Citation
The Barbados advocate

Material Information

Title:
The Barbados advocate
Uniform Title:
Barbados advocate (Bridgetown, Barbados : 1983)
Portion of title:
Sunday advocate
Place of Publication:
Bridgetown Barbados
Bridgetown, Barbados
Publisher:
Advocate Co.
Publication Date:
Frequency:
Daily
regular
Language:
English

Subjects

Subjects / Keywords:
Newspapers -- Bridgetown (Barbados) ( lcsh )
Genre:
newspaper ( sobekcm )
Spatial Coverage:
Barbados -- Bridgetown

Notes

Dates or Sequential Designation:
Apr. 22, 1983-
Numbering Peculiarities:
No issue published for May 3, 1983.
General Note:
On Sunday published as: Sunday advocate.
General Note:
Microfilm produced before 1988 may be substandard.
General Note:
Latest issue consulted: Feb. 28, 2005.

Record Information

Source Institution:
University of Florida
Holding Location:
University of Florida
Rights Management:
Copyright Advocate Co.. Permission granted to University of Florida to digitize and display this item for non-profit research and educational purposes. Any reuse of this item in excess of fair use or other copyright exemptions requires permission of the copyright holder.
Resource Identifier:
17931718 ( OCLC )
sn 88063345 ( LCCN )
Classification:
Newspaper ( lcc )

Related Items

Preceded by:
Advocate-news (Bridgetown, Barbados)

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This item has the following downloads:


Full Text








ESTABLISHED 1895

ed







Likely Late This Year

LONDON, Feb. 16.

The Coronation oi Queen Elizabeth I, although not
yet officially ahnounced, is likely to take place in late Sep-
tember or early October, according to authority close to

the Royal Family. dit.is said

the new Queen is determined

to carry out the thrice postponed tour of Australia as soon
as possible, but she would want to go as a crowned sov-



ereign and not in the interim period before Coronation. Carlisle Bay yesterday though
After the ordeal of yesterday's —— rough seemed not to give the
ee through London and 9 platitest rock to me oan |
the funeral for King George VI, Pl French touris. liner Liberte, |
Queen Elizabeth was spenable ane Uu airs biggest tourist ship in (
the day quietly at Clarence House wo Id p which arrived in port
while the Queen Mother and O ° oo at Lape via Martinique
Princess Margaret were at Buck- Tr anis S CO ee. eee
ingham Palace. Queen Juliana e So gigantic is the Liberte that
and Prince Bernhard of the her builders _Blohm & Voss o
Netherlands returned to Holland = Hamburg, Germany, did not fi
mae . ;her With an accommodation lad-
to-day, but most of other Royal ee ures Jer for passengers to disembark |
and distinguished visitors were nto atl “aentone ths pasa
staying in England at least over'| The Barbados Light Aeroplane} gers would obviously be exhaus
the week end. Club have organised a_ series of | ted before they got half-way |
i. ‘ -. weekly lectures, the first of whichi}down the ladder. And coming
No Public Appearances takes place at the Y.M.P.C, on{up would be “worse
The new Queen will very; Thursday, February 2ist at 8 p.m,| The Liberte was built for
seldom be seen in public during)This will be in the nature of an! operating alongside piers and}
the mourning period through May/jiintroductory talk which will be, with no deep water harbour at
3st, | given by Wing Comdr. L. A.! 3arbados, the 384-ton French}

moral in Scotland in spring

For lively Princess Margaret
court mourning will mean she’
will forego all her frequent ap-
pearances at theatres, balls and
public restaurants. If Elizabeth is
crowned in autumn it will be the,
first time in 200 years -that a
Coronation has been held in th<
same year of the death of the
previous Sovereign. But Royal
authority said it was more than
likely that the ceremony would
be held in the Fail. Queen Eliza-
beth would want to make the
tour of Australia in what are the
summer months in the Southero
Hemisphere, So if the tour is not;
to be postponed for two years,
the Coronation would have to be
held in 1952. Britain will want 10}
have the Coronation ceremony in|
mild weather here. Secondly but
quite an important comakléeniican|
is the hundreds of thousands of)
tourists it will attract to the Brit-
ish Isles. And very important is
the fact that Queen Elizabeth is
known to want several more chil-
dren,

This Royal obligation in bear-
mg a Ta*geYmily cannot begin
until the : tour is =
cluded,







She is expected to go to “a






Egglesfield, Director General

Civil Aviation in this area, follow-' platform
a resumé and progress re-

ed by

t of the club since its inception
Â¥ Mr, Wood Goddard, chairman
of the Club's Committee of Man-
agement.

The British Council have
at the club’s disposal a series of
six films on the theory of flying.



The edition is entitled “Why an
aeroplane flies’.
Three of these films will be



shown on Tuesday February 26th
at the British Council’s head-
quarters “Wakefield” after which
questions from the audience will
be answered by Mr, Goddard.

On the following Tuesday
(March 4th) the remaining three
films will be shown at the Brit-
ish Council and on this occasion
Mr. Stanton Toppin will answer
questions. Weekly lectures will
then continue every Thursday at
the Y.M.P.C., beginning at 3
o'clock,

C

Airmanship

There will be three lectures on
airmanship by Mr. Dennis Malone,
Mr, Stanton Toppin and Mr.

ane airframes bo Mee "Roa Mase

Kenzie, T.C.A’s Resident Engin-

London seemed peculiarly busi-| cer; compass and intruments, Mr,

ness like to-day after the great
pomp of yesterday’s funeral pro-
cession, At Windsor a large crowd



Castle from early in: the morning

Dennis Malone; two lectures on
navigation given by Mr. E, W.
Barrow, M.C.P.; three on meteor-

the pilot’s point of view) and one

put, s|
; though built to tend the tourist





‘



with buntings the
minded: Barbadians
'Frenc ourist lin

“Liberte”

Arrives

for the
disembark. The

passengers

Ptnta, a



of: motor vessel Pinta was the ideal |

to

smal

BARBA



{ This is how

| “Pinta’s” dock and then

long

freighter, came to Barbados from |

Martinique the day

this: job.

Tied up alongside the port side |

before to do}

of the Liberte, the Pinta was

liner. Her
Liberte's

he

deck
door
passengers

through
came,

reached
wh
A

the
ich

landing |
shoot fitted with rolling pins to|

cun smosethly as she rocked, was

almost
deck.

at right

A wooden platrorm with

angles

with |

ver

ilis

was built from the landing shoot

seading

to the Pinta’s

acco

modation ladder, from which th

passengers

s epped

into

local

faunches that were making regu-

lar trips
Of

ashore.

the 739 passengers,

ovel

400 came ashore and about 200

went
tour.
country rides or
Bridgetown, They
bit of spending.

on

the usual
The others hired taxis for,
in

!

shopped

did quite

organised

a

Painted black and _ bedecked

Liberte

7e-

of the once

er Normandic

which was similarly tended by
the French passenger ship Duc
D’Aumale when she was here in
1939. The Liberte is the biggest .
tourist ship to call at Barbados'| We WESC PER. UE She: reity trere
lined outside the walls of the! ology two by Mr. Barrow (from!sirce the Normandie.

to see the magnificent display of| by Mr. Evelyn Reece, Manager of |Baggage Warehouse

flowers and wreaths sparkling
like inulti-coloured gems on the
green lawns around St. George’:
Chapel where George VI. was bur-
ied yesterds y. The Commons wil!
meet again on Tuesday to arrange
for the continuance of Foreign
Policy deb:

te broken off on Febru- ;
ary 6th, the day Winston Churchill |

Three Houses Factory, St. Philip,

who will talk on local weather
conditions etc.; and two by
Squadron Leader David Hender-

son, Government Airport Mana-
ger, on airport control and_ ait
regulations, These lectures are
expected to last until about June.

Mr. Goddard told the Advocate

was to reply to heated attacks yesterday that the ‘plane for the
from Socialists on how far he |club had been ordered and the
had committed Britain to follow letter of credit forwarded, The

the United States’ line in Far
Eastern Policy. }
Duke Visits Mother |

The Duke of Windsor is stay-

ing with his mother Queen Mary
at Marlborough House, The length
of his stay is indefinite. One of
the matters which must be settled
is his salary. |
had given the

The late King
Duke a regular annual income
reportedly £25,000 but it ended

on the death of George VI. Queen!
Elizabeth will decide on what}
arrangements are to be made for}
the Duke.—U.P. |

|
OIL DISPUTE
DEADLOCKED

LONDON, Feb. 16.
Big Three Foreign . Ministers
Saturday invited Chancellor Kon-
rad Adenauer to join their con-
ference in their hopes of ending
the Franco-German dispute which
threatens to wreck the Western

Europeag. Defence plans.
U.P.



| Jaerques

‘plane it is hoped will arrive in
Barbados about April. Mr. A. R.
Toppin he said, had accepted the
post of Hon. President of the
club and Mr. Jack Skinner (one
of the pioneers of local flying) the
post of Hon. Vice President; both
of them will be attending the
meeting on February 2\st,

Killed In Accident

PARIS, Feb. 15.
For six years a French army
deserter and Nazi collaborator
lived under the assumed name of
Tacnet and eventually
became a deputy known as
Jacques Ducreux in the all pow-
erful National Assembly only to
be unveiled in death. Police said
Ducreux who was a Radical So-
cialist Deputy of the Vosges De-
partment and was killed recently
in an automobile accident has
been sought by all French Police
stations for desertion and collabo-

ration with the Vichy Regime.

P.



WELL DONE

Tourists poured through the|
during the;

jafternoon to get back aboard for
the Liberte to sail later in the
fternoon. She is bound for Rio
via Bahin where her passengers |

|

will spend four days fer Car

From Rio she will
at Port-of-Spain and Narsau be

fore going back to New York +

March 10



make c¢



3,000 Cram St.
John’s Cathedral

ival|

1)
a]

», ended here





|

_ British Bar
Trains

f (By PETER WEBS)
BRITISH HEADQUARTERS,
Suez Canal Zone, Feb. 16
The British barred all Egyptiar
,food and oil trains from passing
‘through the Suez Canal Zone, on
Saturday in retaliation for ne
of British oil trains Friday nig)
(A spokesman for Lieut. ‘George Erskine, British Com-
jmander of the Zone said the bat
{would .continue in force ynt
|Egyptian railway crews cleared

| Port Said - Ismailia line and all
British

been made

treffic delays have

U.P.

rail
up



} GRENADA, Fet
The Administrator n
discuss
| topics including a drat
ing rules and orderg for
{sion to the legislatures
;ment of a public
| sion, Windwards’
scheme, means
} Agricultural and
ment and preparation of st

ervic commi

bro

|
Conference Exids |
|
|



of accelerating



other deve ic

{From Our Cwn Correspondent material both for proposed feder
ANTIGUA, Feb. 16 ition talk: in L as and oth
A representative gathering of purposes,
over 3,000 people crammed St.! At different stage F. G. Ho
John’s Cathedral yesterday at of Nautilus Con pany atter
the commemoration service ' for discuss his scheme for i
his late Majesty King George V1 island shipping service ane 1
His Excellency Mr. K. W. Black- Bahr for recent B..WLA
burne lead the procession of! ments ir connection ;
officials from Government House servicing for Dominic
to the Cathedral, Vi ca

Vincent.



Spartan Beat Carlton 2—1
As Soccer Season Opens

SPARTAN won their first engagement when the B A.F.A

1952 season opened yesterday evening, defeating

Carlton

2—1. The winning goal came a few seconds before the
final whistle when Boyce the outside left converted a fine
centre by Van Ganderen who played on the right wing.



“@udy” Warren, Carlton

custodian
season. Spartan last year’s Cup winners defeated Carlton the runners-up 2—1.

saving, when

Carlton met Spartan in the first game of the B.A.F.A

It was avery ‘auspicious start
for the Association as a crowd of
over 3,000 paid to see the first
game. The field too, was _ pre-
pared, for the time since football
matches were being played. at
Kensington, near the regulation
size.

a

Carlton touched off first, Spar-
tan kicking with the breeze and
defending the southern goal, and
it was immediately apparent that
the players would have to accus-
tom themselves to playing on a
proper-sized field. Both
bundled in the middle,
was some ten minutes
the wingmen realised that
were playing too far inside

The Black Rock team was
first to correct this, and after
they had spread out, they wert
able to use their long passes
advantage, this being evident
their many assaults on their
opponents who had to fight }
to defend their

Spartan tent
0 each

sides
and it
before
they

the

to

goal
till played ‘close
r nd soor Itor
Péynold Hutcet

inson wssed ‘o G Hutchinsor
who tried ; t it custodian
Wood no fail to gather, and
Peppy Hutchinson made no mi

take with h next trs

The interval ¢





me with tt



DOS, FEBR*'ARY 17, 3962

Queen To Tour Austrz!

Crowning Ceremony

SS. LOSE AND P



to Weal

Winter Turned To
Spring In Windsor

Sunday Advocate





TA



the 384-ton motor vessel “Pinta” looked alongside the 51,840-ton French tourist liner
“Liberte” in Carlisle Bay yesterday. Passengers are landing from the port door of the “Liberte” to the

launches. The “Liberte” is 890 feet long and the “Pinta” 207 feet

(By REBECCA WEST) |
WINDSOR, England, Feb, 15 }

® morning of the King’s funeral was gently grey. |

aeie was light fog on the lowlands round Windsor and
whe sky was veiled, The weather has been so bad lately
@hat there are grey seagulls in every field. The great wall]

and round tower 6f Windsor Castle were dark shapes
through mist and indeed they are built of a stone that’s |
coldly grey. But once within the Castle, winter seemed to |
have gone, for there were flowers everywhere.

: Flowers sent to King George |
~\imed the great steps up to St. |
yecrge’s Chapel, They. lay.on the
grass under the walls of
Chapel. They were piled up in
cloisters, They filled the archways
jand arcades. Many of them were
very elaborate, A Mayor and Cor+
poration would send the Coat of

Travelling





Bank Service









}
| Arms of the town they represented

. | worked in flowers, P the ae
> il » } thing as a man or factory staff
ori Ine | wouta send a crown two or three

‘ 2 feet across, j

Th year the Management it| |
the Government Saving Bank Little Flowers }
h fecided reluctantiy not oO ' |
end out the Travelling Office But many of them consisted of |
This decision, Mr, Roberts, Man-| only three or aataean ora bune)

f the Bank said, was reached| of snowdrops falling into a cave-
on account of the resent introduc-| gory that will make some of u: |
tion of a Machine System fo:|always think of King George's |
keeping Depositors’ accounts death as a time of little flowers. |

They gradually made their appear- |

With this new Machine Systen:,| ance (the little flowers) during the
it would mean that the book {\lying-in-state which oddly encugh
wepositors would have to be seat; became a much bigger thing as it
© the Head Ofitce in Bridgetown| went on. Many men and women
or the deposits to be entered by{not given to moving much of thei
Machine, and then returned .0o}routine read in the papers about
he depositors through the pos'.]/}ying-in-state and said to them-

; procedure, the Manager sait,iselves: “it seems thing to

bably not be accepta-|go and pay our ay to our

he most of the depositor King. We will do it too, if other

é : people can wait three, four or five
inconvenience hours; well so can we”

Duris the past three yea So more and more jcined the
a gC ee gar tA ETS, fe Jine . outside Westminster Hall |
P ee ee Ok ae nee uatil it became something prodi- |
a8 Ad provided 7 Travelling gious, vaster than the ordinary |
ffice to it the principal sug phenomena of everyday life It |
factor ies in the island. during t emed as if two rivers were flow- |
reaping of the sugar cane cror ine gids by side, one the Thame. |

THis service was provided on its way to the sea and one lin |
make it eas’ for those who we. -| Of men and women on the way to)
already depositors to save part of| see their King lying in the seat of
their -carnings, as well to e,-| Government. And as this rive: |
courage others to do the same. | 8r@w larger there began to be a

| queer business about flowers.

It is realised that the prese It was not explicitly said that
ecision may cause some incor-| there might be no flowers left
venience to those who previously! inside the colntelaags, tat bg Be
ised the service, as well as to, should be no wreaths left in
those who may have intended) Westminster Hall except thore
doing so, Consequently the Man- | sent by the Royal family. But obvi-

|

by |

ard
|

core 1—0 in favour of Carlton |



had been otherwise dul

on lL thrill

@ On Page 16

agement are taking steps in the; ously it would have to be forbidden
endeavour to provide alternative) if lots of people had started bring.
facilities, and trust that the reason| ing big bunches and sprays and
for discontinuing the service at)wreaths of their own.

present and their subsequent So there was a queer kind of
action will be appreciated. bootlegging of flowers, the peo-
ple brought in little bunches of
flowers, snowdrops and violets
and straight slim staff like tulips
and narecissi hidden under their
coats and dropped them on the
floor as they were passing.



On Other Pages

Page 2° Carib Calling, tour-

ist “Liberte” Well here they were again
yo Cinema, Farm & lying in strength on the ground
Garden, B.B.C. notes and in the cloisters of St.

& Programme, Gar- George's Chapel because people
dening hints for Ama~ loved him. Large and small of-
teurs. ferings made a blaze of golden

4 Bookie, O.S.C. Racing daffodils, scarlet tulips, blue

Gallops, Table Tenni
5 Regatta, Chatson
Swimming, Cycling.

irises, white carnations, red and
white anemones and some
astounding roses very startling








, 6 Mary McLeod; Buda- under a grey sky at the base of
pest listens info Lon- grey walls.
don Voice. And people were going in and
The blonde woman out looking at them; the people
hose name Taboo, who were admitted to the castle
yman who enclosure people who have ties
houlc never have vith the castle ind held = posts
rried, within t or were soldiers or
Editorials, Si.ting on ailors or officials or their kir
the Fence What
wanted, Grave People
9 Funeral of King | They were grave controlled
George VI i people of the type that takes ser-
10 Seout it Caomber- vice under the crown, and the King
1ere Camp _ Fire liked that sort of person. He knew
College their value to England and to him
Golde There i something appropriate
| about eeing them there where the
= k who bore control so weil was}
otr helped by them to live hi fe of
“ l¢ ff il care
i j

@ On Page 9



ia After Coronation

, cutting tracks in more than sixty

TD frosee



PRICE :

SIX CENTS



-,|Korean Truce

May Be Solved
As U.N. Want

By. ARTHUR DIBBLE

PANN IJOM, Feb. 46.
The Allies are close to winning the K<*,of armistice they
wanted for Korea. Only three major isbels must be solved
befere the United Nations’ Supreme Commander Gen. Ridg-
wey, North Korean Kim El Sung and Chinese Gen. Peng Teh
Huai scratch their names oh the armistice daeument in this

unlikely truce village of Panmunjom.
* They are

2 2 } Allied demand for a ban on
Fifth Air rehahilit are ywnd " peconsttustibn
if airfields to minimize the chances

y of

Farce Bomb \’
e .
Bridges

STH ATR FORCE H’'QRS.,

Korea, Feb. 16
A spokesman said fighter-bomb-
ers slashed at North Korean rail
lines bombing two rail bridges and

sneak attacks on South Korea.

repatriation for
war prisoners This Allied de-
mand is designed to give Anti-
Communist prisoners a chance to
escape or return-to life under Red
naster

2. Voluntary

3. Communist d@manas for dis-
cussion at a high level Peace con-
ference following the armistice, of
411 the assorted problems of Asia.

places, F.80 Shooting Stars hit rail] The U.N. insists upon limiting

bridges at Sunchon and nea: discussion to Korean problems

Huichon inflicting “heavy dam- ? at P|

age” in attacks Few Can Tell
Two F.86 Sabrejets exchanged ny at ‘ :
liring passes with two Communi: pry A Baenter 4 dMonstacsetass oc Pipher
MIG 16's over “MIG Alley” this} he U.N. and Communist High
‘afternoon. but no claims were|COmmands could accurately tell
made pending examination of gun | 10W these issues ultimately will be
camera films. Other Sabres flying } settled But the Allies at one
as a screening force for fighter-] “tee of the negotiations indicated
bombers sighted about 75 Red jets hey mighe settle the airfield issue
ith a verbal promise trom the
The Fifth Air Force flew 466]Communists that they would not
effective sorties by 6 p.m. to-day. }build up theiy ‘air capabilities”
Claimed as destroyed or damaged Jduring the armictice Rear Ad-
were two rail bridges, two box}miral R. FE. Libby tole cor-
| cars three vehicles and seven sup- pond revently ihe \llie
rly buildings. would rather have no armistice
“U.P. [than give up ! vol

untary repatriation



Though the numbers of prison-
rs are likely to be large the
principle is considered to he one
of the most important of the en-
tire armistice negotiations.

Reds Are Stalling

not

Siege Of Wonsan
Continues

TOKYO, Feb.. 16,
The longest siege in United
States naval history entered the

second year to-day with warships The U.N. Command brodcast
of the United Nations banging)®*d Red negotiators at Panmun-
steadily away at the most shot-at}jom were stalling while the
| ity in the world—Wonsan-—at the | mremlin tried to aecide

rate of 22 sheils per hour. 1. “Whether to insist on the

sight

buud

in North Korea during

bon,

Day and night warships of nine]. .” pases





nations nave roueee weraen ial the truce
‘ion pounds of exploding steel into : 7 ee

he bax coast ant city. Wonsan 2 Whether to agree to allow
former industrial centre and still {Voluntary repatriation of wat
‘he hub of the rail and road ne! }! 'soners.

hat leads into Communist batile 3. “Whether to insist that sub-
positions was placed under sien: equent governmental settlement
by U.N blockading and escori |must include talks about r
force February 16th, 1951 problems not directly related to

Korea,”

Ships of. all sizes, from battle The b-oadeast said, “when the
ships and carriers to minesweepers | decicion is made in Moscow, the
and frigates have joined in the ‘ymistice will be tesolved with.

ioge, They come from the navie
¢f the United State, Britain, | the
Netheriands, Australia, New Zea-

delay one way or anoth-
is now at the point

out muc
er and Moscoy,





a

land, Canada, Vhailand, the Re- shere it m m ke that much
public of Korea and Colombia postponcd choice
U.P. ostponed ch '"—U.P,

mer ne
——>_—— eee







Hat

5
E

|

RALEIf:

THE ALL-STEEL BICYCLE
A wide variety of models

and |

it
a

— SSS

always on display

ready assembled for you

to take away. See our

cycle Dapartment, first Floor

CAVE SHEPHERD & Co, Ltd.

10, 11, 12 & 13 Bread Street




Sole Distributors

. ,
”
4 PAODUCT OV BaLkigs (NDUSTRI 4 LOOTSD, HOTTINGRAM ENGLAND

FITTED WIT@ STURMEY-AROHER & OR 4-SPEGED GAR
aa 1

rr

SlCr,



PAGE TWO

1952

FEBRUARY 1/7,

SUNDAY ADVOCATE SUNDAY,



e” 4 ° | 2 Ws
‘Soaping dulls hair_ iI “Presidalt of Siaton. Herth
Penns¥ivania ahd i
Halo glorifies it!
+ Zu









h4.G.%4. G1 ORE 70th Century Fox |

Tonite 8.30 p.m. LAST SHOWING OF

1¢ ompany,

ister Miss Sarah McDowell were
;among the cruise passengers who
arrived heré yesterday morning on
the French Liner Liberte. Travel-
ling with them in their party were
Mr. C. B. Lartz, General Manage
of the Sharon Herald and Mrs.
|Lartz and Mr. Henry O. Forker







HALO leaves your
hair wonderfully soft

and easy to manage. | Jnr., Secretary of the Buhl
Foundation and Mrs. Forker.

Mr. MéDowell and Mr. Laftz

HALO makes your | were both in Barbados 14 yéars

permonents take ~ || |ago. They both told Carib that

better — last longer! they had noted mafiy impfove-



|} ments on the island.
| One thing that impressed them
particularly was the cleanliness of
the streets which were well kept
and looked very much like those
back in the U.S.A.

This is about thé seventh visit
to the Caribbeah for Mr. Lartz,
while for Mr. MeDowell it is his
third visit. They said that they
like it down here as the ¢limate
was wonderful and the wediher
good. When they left the U.S.A.
the température was 42° F.

Americans on the Liberte

HALO REVEALS
THE HIDDEN BEAUTY
OF YOUR HAIR





HALO SHAMPOO

isao ¥

r ‘
TOMORROW (MONDAY) and TUESDAY 4.45 & 8.30 p.m.
A DOUBLE YOU'LL JUST LOVE

Ey
A Diary of ee :











MONG thé matty Ameritans
a ry > 4Rmaking the crtiise on the
Under ahr: E M P i R E Liberte are Mr. Perry Rosenberg,
| Advertising Manager, Néw York
TO-DAY 4.45 & 8.30 And Continuing Daily | Journal merican; Mr. Jiilius
enue " wa | ovine, owner of Briss Rail
NG A: © serena 3 ,| Restatirants, New York 4n a
NOW AT POPULAR PRICES |Mre. Levine; Mr. Raymota J
;| Bushey, President Bushey and Seen chatting at the Baggage Warehouse yesterday were, left to right: General Vidmer, Mrs. Ray

| Sons, Drydocks and Shipyards,
= | Brookiyh, N.Y.; Mr. George W.
|| Foy, Néw York States Assembly-
}fian and Mrs, Foy; Mr. Harty L.
Kagan, Presidetit Eagle Paper
Company, Chieago Til; Mr, Ed-
mund Price, President Solar Air-

Manbert and Mr. Gordon B. MacGillivray. : :
om ‘Mr. MacGillivray who is head of the Toronto Real Estate Exthange was intransit through Barbado

yesterday on the French luxury liner “Liberte.” Mrs. Matibért who is holidaying in Barbados also comes
from Toronto.

Exhibition Opens

JOSE J FERRER

Academy Award Winner Married Yesterday

ISS IRMA GILBERT who i

Women In The News





AATISS Kay Austin who has becu

2 «-- because... é yicraft, San Diego, California and This Week 4 Editorial Secretary at the on the staff of B.W.LA. in
when his | Mrs. Price; Mr. Harold Pp. Herman, RS FELA DE KUH’S Annual Barbados Advocate has now been Trinidad was married yesterday
member of Hempstead, L.L., City Exhibitio f her paintings transferred to the Repoftorial afternoon at St. Matthias Church,
sword thrusts home ’ ; * RANOn CF Det painyings t A ni ; : ies inf
. Couneil, Mr. P. J, Dee, President, 244 drawings opens at her home Staff. Hastings to Mr. Reggie da Silva of
---aman dies. . . P| Allience Theatre Corporation, the pavilion,” Hastings on Tues- Kay thus has the Messrs. Y. de Lima and Co., Ltd.,

@ woman thrills! ie | Chicago, fl., and Mrs. Dee and gay February 19 and will con- distinction of be- Trinidad.
.|Mr. Alpha Whiton, Chairman of tinue for about two weeks. Mrs. ing the first “Wo- The ceremony which tock place

man Reporter” in
Barbados

The change will
enable the Advo-
cate to cater more
efficiently to the

the Board of Supervisors of Put-

nam County, New Yo.

: Meeting of Frietids

# M*â„¢ and Mrs. William F. Hof-
i mayer, who arrived in Bar-

shortly after 4.30 o’elock w
formed by Rev, Fred Layne.
The Bride, who was given in
marriage by Mr. Harold Bowen
Manager of the local branch of

de Kuh’s work is well known to per.
Barbados and she has been hold-
ing exhibitions here for over ten

years.







M-G-M presents

the mystery- thritier



jbados on January 23 by T.C.A.,
went on board the Liberte yes-
terday to meet friends from the
U.S.A. Mr. Hofmayer is a retired
Banker from Glenrock, Néw Jer-
\sey.

They were able to show their
friends about the island, some-
thing many tourists would have
keg. Mr. Hofmayer has spent 26

nters in Bermuda. He is staying
it the Rockley Beach Club.

Friend of a Friend
RS. FRIEDA SMITH of Tif-

Coming Event
oan understands that Club

No. 6 of the Girl’s Industrial
Union will be staging a Show at
the Union headquarters on Satur-
jay, 23rd February at 8.30 p.m.
Some of the artists taking part
are Rev. St. C. Tudor and Miss
Nell Hall. Following the Show
will be dancing to Keith Camp-
bell’s Orchestra, the Society Five
and also a Fashion Parade by the
Members of the Club,



need for news of
women, fashions,
children and so-
ciety.

Miss Austin will
cover events deal-
ing with such in-
stitutions as_ the
Miss Kay AustinY. W, C. A., the
Housecraft Centre, the G.1U.,
Baby Leagues and creches and
will be pleased to answer the calls
of Secretaries and other members
of such concerns,

Messrs. Y. de Lima and Co., Ltd.,
wore a gown of white slipper satin
with low cut neckline with lace
insertion. The dress was cut on
Princess lines with full gathered
skirt long tight fitting sleeves and
medium length train. Her head-
dress was made in juliet cap style
with finger-tip veil and she carried
a bouquet of two white orchids
with Queen Anne's Lace.

The Bestman was Mr. Ken
Isaacs and the Bridesmaid was
Miss Tecla Agostini both of whom









Ohio, was one of the wd over from Trinidad for the
Bergerac to arrive i s es- occasion. i
de terday bs ‘he thant tke Tee Miss Agostini wore a strapless
coer on her fifst visit to Barbados. lemon evloured net gown with net
MALA POWERS: aiifttie - aatatisies “=i, |She vee, “ery, iueh lapttened Tae saan wae tang cals ha ae
with Fort de France which she e skirt was lon, ull. Her
s+“ oe LES 7 ea er hae ee ae — ion Saturday. © headdress was a small hat trimmed
5 j Mrs. Smith is véry interested with violets and she carried a
POETRY AND DRAMA COMBINED rm figurines. While she was in the small bouquet of vander orchids.



yesterday she dropped in a
of the stores in search of

Extra: LATEST NEWSREEL

Btewe Joulton ee She is a friend of
E

||| TODAY To TUESDAY 4.45 & 8.30 P.M. a ie aan Mahan “doa
LIGHTNING STRIKES TWICE} g_ - ||: r-Tribune, who was in. Barbas|

tiser-Tribune, who was in Barba-
. ios last winter.

Lachary

SCOTT





After the ceremony, a reception
was held at the home of Mr, and
Mrs. Harold Bowen of Maxwells
and the honeymoon is being spent
at the Crane Hotel.







|







ROODAL THEATRES

Annual Dance
HERE are still. a

Richard Mercedes

TODD

oe McCAMBRIDGE i <= YE) Fak ae sap
B.B.C. Radio

TE eee ae



few more
















































INE pr

SPECIAL MON. $ an | tables around the ballroom of
7 >» x "| SXOW BOUND ; HIDDEN CTTY ! the Marine Hotel for the Women’s
EME ame E | ROXY Robert Long es NEWTON | 3 oan Jungie Ba A i Canadian Club’s dance on Satur-
; anhny Stvetiie anc ‘ q : tzel
iia) - AY ied XN & “DEAR MURDERER | “SUNDOWN ON T TRIE day February 23, Mrs. Teetzel
TO-DAY 4.45 & 8.30 TO-DAY TO TUESDAY peas wusDE SON THE FRA os Il I rogr ammes of the “Pavilion” Hastings is in
and Continuing Daily ns 2 = i SUNDAY, FEBRUARY 17. 195? charge of bookings.
. ca ; OISTIN The Garden| am. The Smalt Geography of a The Women’s Canadian Club's
Jose FERRER Margaret ‘O'BRIEN ts ” : Af A Dial 8464 G Al & Ty ST. JAMES) re ag as Bg annual dance is always one of the
“HER FIRST ROMANCE” T 145 & BM ys j te< sé = : : Pee nae best dances of the season. Includ-
in Stanley Kramer's and “NEVER TRUST Robert MITCHUM i T orrew 83) p= 5 26M 21 SM €d in the evening’s fun will be
A GAMBLER” WEERS B ANGER LIVES” « oe: BLUES susrees aa games of chance, bridge, Palmis-
Production of itd wil ae NE j| i©° GORCEY & The Bowery Bors & i @esd Strange hats and head-ties were the order of the day as tourists try and a flower shop.
taal B Starring ‘ia neers _ _“HEDDEN C3TY | om from the Liberte” landed at the Baggage Warehouse yesterday. The ‘
q Y R A N oO Am i abibthistihtdiblinin cite ie ac j Bomis The Ju~gie Boy | cs y head-tics these two ladies were wearing were no exceptions to the rule. Oil Man
ane C < Tues, & Wet 465 A tw pm | : : ' ot s MONG the ps ki
ae , sae d war Robert METCHL i tp Ps Tr ’ . + the passengers making
de Bergerac Cathy O'DONNELL ovr OF tan Past a i ROCKY” Rotty MeDowsll 4 sand Oi6 Schetors Bains French Art the cruise on the French
} THE se7 UP i = s . oF iERE will be a meeting of th« a Liner Lib hi nt r
— | —___—_——— Bote KYAX Jacke COUPER & decker COOGAN ate asain i” Stedinn tak Gan M- YLADIMIR NECHOUMOFF yesterday Mee ae, “Gear ae
c » : ROY AL ia SSS - - r’s Association at the schoo has Kindly consented to 4 G, Wood of Santa Barbara
OLY Ma i¢ 4 ms SSS : Radio | « I February 19th at e cture to members of the Alliance? California, Mr. Wood is a big
, wen “a ee. 17 rr > agend: des a Francaise at the British Council : iaeuks. °
LAST 2 SHOWS TO-DAY e he ars 'W > erinde ' BP genda include 7 aket a! v P * oil operator in California.
TO-DAY TO TUESDAY 430 & 8.15 a Just Arrired ... | 2090 oe rae ee ee | Se OE eee ee Stee eteus, yim on Wed- it was their first visit to the
Action’ Deutie i ue Ba . ) - ie of the British muncil, recor sabieat Gil’ ippentt island and they spent most of their
4.30 & 8.15 7 7 ' f BysTox music followed by the election o ubjec wi be rench time as guests of Mr. and Mrs.
NEW D) RESSES | ig Deapoodngeyones waa Mar
Gary COOPER | “eee eee ee rothers Hastings.
. 00
aa s |) 20S nan Porwened Porto, iim 32 R. JIM PASTER, merchant of Good Move Back to St. Lucia
Madeleine CARROLL in fi ee ee ~~ wow Swan Street, was at the ATS OFF to the B.A.F.A. who R. BRIGGS WILLIAMS who
THE GENERAL DIED fur 1o ib pm mm. ua wm | Baggage Warehouse yesterday have placed the football field is stationed in St. Lucia with

John © , morning to meet his brother, Mr. in such a position that all of the Barclays Bank is due to return to







a “SANDS OF IWO JDMA 5 . . s {| ae a ae ae cial ai The ; James Paster, a jeweller of Albury, spectators in the Kensington stand that colony today after spending
AT DAWN Cocktails of Weddings ‘ aie. tte SOs -New York who is making a cruise can see the entire game without two weeks’ holiday with his

i f : MON TUESDAY , - i} - the Week, 515 pm. Nights on the Liberte which anchored in having to stand. This was impos- family here.

£15 Ay ¢@ 9m Deniel Defoe. | Carliste Bay early in the morning. sible last season and previous
and Z Double sae ie also e a oe : Pgh aca ri seasons when the field was so Intransit
: 4 John WAYNE in iy yt Analysis, 7.15 p.t French Line Attorney close to the pavilion. Excited ] NTRANSIT through Barbados
CASSINO 10 KOREA | “wan or sur wan ; Or ee nee ae |PRAVELLING on the Liberte fans inte front rors would sana IU Vestenday makin ane tbee
i us CATS and “MOONRISE” {| ; \) $ re ae a anit which called here yesterday up to get a better view of play Carnival Cruise on the French
with { M1) 3 4 pm. Marx gnd his Heir 8.00 p.m. | was Mr. Frank Foley, Lawyer of in the corners of the field nearest Luxury Liner was Mr Gordon B
The First Wartime of } i Think on These Things, 6.18 p.m. Radio | waw york arid Attorney of the the pavilion. This forced every- ; ee

McGillivray, Head of the Toronto

The Fighting Men in Korea Real Estate Exchange.

Gale RUSSELL

French Lines in the U.S.A.

MACLEANS
PEROKUDIE TOOTH PASTE
keeps WEIN Wats Fb

p.m. Composer of the Week, 9.00 p.m one in the stang to stand up
From the Third Programe, 10.00 p.m
The News, 10.10 pm. From the Eadi- |
| torials, 10.15 pom Science Review, 10.30
p.m. Tip Top Tunes

|
RADIO NEWS |)
}

Dane CLARK—
\
\

{pm sreel, £30 p.m. African Survey, &45













A Fine Assortment to






















s select from. The most )) |
THE WOMEN’S Set”
- 1952.

—_——_

Radios and onions! we know ‘em
both! we service all makes of
radios, gratucte servicemen will
put your set in first class condition,
radios, graduate servicemen will
are fepatring yours, we don't
want you to miss o single moment
of rado enjoyment, when we
take your receiver to our shop
for Overhauling and repairs “ete,”
Wwe are equipped with modern in-+
struments for radid testing and
repairs, also A.C. or D.C. Ampli-
fiers made to order, call on us with
confidence

THE ACME RADIO REPAIR SHOP
78 ROEBUCK STREET
Nr. Moravian Church

J.B GULSTON®E,
Radio Tethhician,
Dial 4970

}
Sizes 12—20
In a Variety of Shades
Veivets, Tattetas |

CANADIAN CLUB

a

and healthy Ws,

Shot Taffetas, Sheers
Crepes, Satins

$18.00 = $29.7:

Annual Dance

in aid of
LOCAL CHARITY

Auspices of His Excellency the Governor
and Lady SAVAGE

wt

under the





RY : a} HATS AND BAGS a BARB. 51 IB :
at the to match any Ensemble if | ee eo ees
° ; . 2 hee | GENTLEMEN !
Marine Hotel NYLON STOCKINGS }% gay < cies YOU'LL BE SURE TO LOOKSMART IN THESE
— ON + 51 and 60 guage Hair Tonic RAYON SUITINGS

STRIPES



$3.89 — $3.
SATURDAY EVENING, February 23rd * aol Bom TONIC Pewgeenn . PLAIN SHADES ... . Bae $4.37
hair, Removes and prevents the @| WOOLLEN TROPICALS $6.66, $6.72, $7.00, $7.41

GAMES - further, development of | GENTS “RENOWN” SHIRTS
BRIDGE nna nian Tt leaves the hair soft and silky | WHITE steasenesteeeeeaeereeweeeaneeaneney seeeeeneeeee eens avetvieed $4.50 — $5.23
eer ‘ coe Ses Oe ae NTN bk ahd cedar caegideasiekslasociver $5.20, $5.57, $5.94
PALMISTRY MEN’S BUCKLE SHOES | oojncccccsssssssssoons .. $12.09
FLOWFR SHOP an MODERN DRESS SHOPPE ® JOHN WHITE SHOES IN PPOWN & BLACK $10.64 - $11.19
Ors. os y 4 4 ‘$C. CARLTON BROWNE 3:
|

ADMISSION $1.00



T. R. EVANS & WHITFIELDS

Dial 4220 YOUR SHOE STORES Dial 4606

Wholesale & Retail Druggist
136 Roebuck St. Dial 2813

65¢
POSSE SSS SPOOL OS OOOOOCCO

4 é i i

BROAD STREET.

LLL LLL LLL LLC LE sete

CSF PSOPS







Oe a a ee a ee ee ee ee ee ee a ae a

SUNDAY, FEBRUARY



17, 1952

AT THE CINEMA=Hy G.R.



EDMOND ROSTAND’S romantic drama of the 17th
century “Cyrano de Bergerac” has had many famous actors
play the title role of the gallant soldier-poet with the pre-
posterous nose, but none with mcre assurance and charm
than Jose Ferrer who received an Academy Award for his

ormance,

h from his Broadway suc-
cess in the same role, Mr. Ferrer
makes an ideal Cyrano and his
oe nt is a memorable one.

at the Empire Cyrano de
Bergerac 2 nn eee of a French

poe © is the finest
swordsman in France, wit a mon-
strous nose that over-shadows his
life as it does his face. In love
with his cousin Roxanne, he lacks
the courage to court her—but woos
and wins her for a young inarticu-
late soldier whom she fancies, by
telling him how to declare his
love to the young lady, and writ-
ing his love letters for him. Not
until Cyrano is dying does he re-
veal his devotion to Roxanne, who
only then realizes that it is he who
wrote the love-letters and whom
she has really loved all the years.
_ Cyrano, as played by José Ferrer
is arrogant, tender, fearless and
touching—a hero easily capable of
his extravagant exploits and yet
one who would express himself
naturally with wit and poetry.
The role itself is long and
difficult and at times the action
slows considerably to enable
the hero to get through his
lines, but when they are de-
livered with the inimitable finesse
of Mr. Ferrer one can excuse the
slackening tempo. His interpreta-
tion of the famous “nose” speech
is priceless; the duelling scene at
the commencement ef the film, in
which Cyrano says he will com-
pose an extemporaneous ballad
and kill his opponent on the last
line of the last refrain is a fine
piece of action and the “no thank
you” speech, when he refuses the
offer of Cardinal Richelieu for a
place in his following and to pro-
vide him with funds, reveals the
true character of the Gascon, Mr.
Ferrer’s distinguished realization
of the whole role overshadows the
rest of the cast which is, perhaps,
just as well, as it is Cyrano’s story,
and Ferrer plays it to the hilt.
There’s not much to say for Mala
Powers as Roxanne. She is cer-
tainly lovely to look at, but both
her interpretation and acting are
immature, while William Prince,
as her lover, leaves very little im-
pression on the imagination or
memory. Morris Carnowsky as
Le Bret, Cyrano’s friend, gives Mr.
Ferrer good support.
_ The musical score is outstand
ing and credit for this goes to
Dmitri Tiomkin. Authentic old
French music played on the instru-
ments for which it was composed
enhances the mood of this truly
fine film

Showing at the Plaza, LIGHT-
NING STRIKES TWICE is a mys-
tery story of high voltage melo-
drama, and for a change, we have
a thriller that is practically devoid
of any violence, but in which sus-
pense is built up as a result of
good direction, acting and photo-

aphy. Richard Todd, Ruth

oman and Mercedes McCain-
bridge+three young actors who
are adding to their laure!s in no
uncertain fashion—have the prin-
cipal roles in a plot that concerns
a wealthy young Texan who is
acquitted by a hung jury of the
murder of his wifs. Fared with
the continued suspicion of his
neighbours, he meets an actress en
vacation—who falls in love with
him—and despite his warnings,
determines to clear his name.

The plot thickens with well sus-
tained suspense right up to the
surprise denouncement and is com-
pletely credible, and suspicion is
skilfully pointed at various char-
acters—the hero’s foster mother,
his greatest friend and the crip-
pled brother of the “other woman.”

The principal roles are well
handled with a. special mention
tor Miss McCambridge as the
“other woman.” South Western
settings and locale add to the
reality of this intriguing mystery
entertainment.

Starting on Wednesday, at the
Globe, MEET ME AFTER THE
SHOW is a smoothly produced

When your BACK
ACHES...



of excess acids and Wastes so that pure,
fresh blood flows to every nerve and muscle.
Then you feel better—look better work
better and you are ready to dance with
joy. Ingist on the genuine Dodd's Kidney
Pills im the blue package with the red
bands. Only 3/- at all drug stores: 524

Dodds Kidney Pills



musical comedy starring Betty
Grable. This platinum haired star
and lavish Technicolor sets are
and there are plenty
of both in this picture. As I have
observed before, stories never
amount to much in this type of
film, and this one is no exception,
It concerns a Broadway musical
comedy star whose success would
appear to be entirely due to the
efforts of her producer husband,
who is also a bit of a philanderer.
To prove that she is independently
talented and sought after, she
feigns amnesia and fills a success-
ful engagement in Miami before
her husband finally finds her and
realizes that she was a great star
even before he met her,

From the opening scene where
sie gorgeous venuses draped in
gold draw back the curtain, until
ihe final chose-up, costumes and
decor are consistently lush and
fashionable New York and Miami
night clubs provide a background
for sophisticated production num~-
bers-—among them “Bettin’ On 4
Man” and “No Talent Joe". A
competent cast supports — Miss
Grable in the manner in which she
is accustomed and her songs and
dances are up to her usual stand-

ard.

synonomou:

The Shadow Has
Gone From
A Lovely Face

BEATRIX THOMSON



If on looking in the mirror
one morning you saw a strange
and horrible distortion of your

face, what would you do ?

If, instead of the familiar face,
you saw an_ incredibly swollen,
palioon-like face covered with
disfiguring weals and blemishes.

That was what happened one
day in 1944 to pretty Beatrix

Thomson, the actress.

Mystery Germ

For the next six years she was
to suffer at intervals the same
horror, never knowing from hour
to hour when the transformation
would strike again.

A mysterious agency was at
work in her blood-stream, She
had picked it up in Burma while
entertaining troops,

Now she has been cured after
doctors had said she was incur-
able.

And yesterday, after her com2-
back to the stage, she told the
story of those six terrible years.

“When I looked in my mirror
that first day the reflection was
horrible. My face and throat
were all puffed up.

Always Hoping

“Tt went away, but only to
return again and again. I began
to feel like a leper,

“I was even told that death
might come at time. When
my tour with the troops finished
I couldn't face coming home.

“So I went from place to
place, searching, for a cue and
always hoping. Eventually, in

1946 I did return home and went
to live in seclusion in Surrey.

“Sometimes I ventured out. I
might be sitting in a restaurant
or watching a show with friends.
Then sitidenly my face would
undergo that hideous change as
people watched it,

“Usually I left hurriedly,
utterly humiliated.”

It was by chance that Miss
Thomson found a young
physician who suggested a long
course of vaccine injections.

He diagnosed that she was

suffering from a rare allergy,
urticaria caused through bac-
teria of some noxious substance
in the body.

His treatment was successful,
but the mystery of the cause
of the illness itself remains.

—L.E.S.



ik
ig
8

‘ So





ee TaN. ENN NNN.

(ardening Hints §
Cyrano De Bergerac fy Amateurs :



fy PURE

Se ee a ae ee ae ae ee oe ett ee ee

+ <9"

order, are inclined
to think of it in terms of annuals
only, and to quickly decide that it
would too much trouble to
make one.

A Border composed entirely of
annuals does indeed mean the
labour of replanting the whole bed
each year. Not only that but it
also means an empty bed for half,
the year. But the ideal Her-
baceous Border need not be made
up of annuals alone, but can be a
combination of perennials and an-
aye, with perennials predomin-

When the border consists ete

ee a eee



SUNDAY



THE

ADVOCATE

FARM AND GARDEN

DRY SEASON
FARMING AND GARDENING—in fact any activity
connected with the soil, plants and animals—can never be

dull. The song of earth is never dead, writes the poet, and

this is indeed true whatever the season.

You see, we are

dealing with life—life in the soil, life above the soil and,

in a sense, all around us.
animal, is full of absorbing

On the = other hand, dite,

wherever we meet li, Makes Cvll~
tinuous demands; mos: oO: WMese
can be summed up in tn¢@ euc
word: rOumne. Kouune ig © lle

what oil is to machinery;
essential in ordér to keep the
wheels turning and must be car-
vied out with unfailing regularity.
Farm life in the broadest sense
cannot be vigorously and profit-
ably maintained if routine opera-

>

cipally of perennials it is perma- tions in the field, in the garden

nent, and with the addition each
year of a few annuals to help give
it more colour you have the per-
fect Herbaceous Border,

Now for a border of this type
snecial care must be given to the
preparation of the bed. Once
planted, the perennials will remain
in the same place for years, dur-
ing which time only a surface
forking and an occasional top
dressing of manure will be possi-
ble. Therefore the bed must be
deeply forked and a good ly of
rotted pen manure added. If any
grass cuttings are available they
should also be put in. Finally the
surface must be manured and
fined, with hand fork and rake.

After the bed hag been watered
for a few days, and has settled,
then the plants can be put in.

The plants for the Werhgeeous
Border should be eremnped in large
clumps (not rows) graduated from
the tallest ones at the back down
to the shortest in front. The com-
bination of colours must of course
he the choice and taste of each
gardener, but the general effect
when the border is fully grown
should be one Of massed and
varied colour.

If the bed for the border is a
large wide one there is no reason
why shrubs such as Poinsettia,
Crotons, Hibiscus and Exora
should not be used as a back-
ground.

Other suitable perennials are
Cannas, Buddlea, Tamarisk, Mich-
aelmas-daisy, Gerberas, Coreopsis,
Vincas, Tuberoses and Pentas.

A border such as this would re~
main’ undisturbed for years, need-
ing only to be kept trimmed.

If in addition, g few anmuais are
added each year to give more col-
our a really lovely Herbaceous
Border would be the result.

In adding the annuals it may
be necessary to trim back some
of the regulars to make room, but
this would be a simple job.

Suitable annuals for the Border
are:—

Gladiola, Snapdragon, Yellow
Pea, Petunias, Queen Ann’s Lace,
Pinks, Carnations, in fact almost
any of the annuals,

A Herbaceous Border of this
kind is a very beautiful addition
to any garden, Once established
it would give little trouble, and
yet it would help considerably in
keeping up the colour of the wnole
garden at a steady level.

With a predominance of peren-
nials in the garden the ‘per-
fection” level, which in a garden
fluctuates so, is maintained far
more steadily than when the gar-
den depends on less lasting plants.

It is not everyone however who
has the room or the desire for a
very big Herbaceous Border such
as has just been described.

But a smaller Border can be
planned, and, instead of using the
big shrubs, it could be confined
to the smaller ones with equally
good effect.

Canariersis, Golden Rod, Mic-
haelmas-daisy, Red pinks and the
addition of a few annuals would
make a lovely Border for a smail-
er bed,

In any Border, it is advisable
to stake the taller plants when
they are half grown, to ensure
their keeping a good upright
position. These stakes should be
inconspicuous, and should only be
used when necessary.

He

DRUGS

Aind
ACCURATE

PRESCRIPTION

SERVICE

and in the stock pen are negtected
or undertaken in a cusual, fitful
or perfunctory manner, Further,
routine efficiency will often, entau
some measure of forward plan-
ning against weather and seasonal
changes. And, with these gen-
eral remarks, we pass on to some
seasonal considerations of route
importance at the present tme.

rollowing the copious showers
of December, drougnty conailions
have set in with a rather unusual
suddenness which appears to have
caught many tarmers and garden-
ers unawares. It doubtless has
caused them to pause and think if,
and how they are prepared to

“meet this sharp change. Mature

canes, especially in the low rain-
fall areas, are rapidly drying and
calling for the bill; ground pro-
visions require to be reaped;
growing crops and vegetables to
be freed of weeds and mulched;
fruit trees pruned, sprayed for
scale and blight control, and the

(By AGRICOLA)

ccc aimed teninpeaninnaiagatacetaties
younger ones muiched as well;
while, in addition, a number of
dry weather maintenance odd
jobs intrude themselves.
Among this array of things cail-
ing for action, none is so impori-~-
ant or urgent as the need tor sou





cover as an insurance «against
undue loss of moisture and to
maintain a fairly equable tem-

perature both in the soil itself ana
around growing plants, especiiliy
in the early stages of their exisi-
ence. There will be a tendency
for crops to transpire water more
quickly than they can take it in
the result is wilting and stunting
of growth, notably in plants
whose growth cycle is of relatively
short duration. Thus, garden
vegetables may lose their crisp-
ness, succulence and market value
where water supplies are short or
moisture withheld for any reason
whatever. Any operation, there-
fore, which tends to conserve soil

moisture at this season is of firse
importance, and all pvailable
waste material will be ‘required

for mulches. Here is where a little
routine planning will have been
found to pay handsome dividends.
Have all concerned made a regu-
Jar habit of conserving every
spare blade of grass, hedge and
tree clippings, crop residues and
s0 On and devoted the necessity
attention to composiing—all with
a view to having ample mulching
material to meet sudden and un-
expected needs as the present?
Farmers with sugar-canes to reap
have no doubt reckoned on the re-
sultant trash for mulching their
young crops but the sudden ap-
proach of intensively dry weather
may do a good deal of harm
meantime.

So, a valuable lesson emerges:
never neglect the routine of sav-
ing and conserving everything
except empty cans for dry season
use and whether the weather
change comes early or late, we
should never be caught napping.
Remember a successful cultivator
may be defined as one who can
grow good crops in bad years, and
bad years are those in which there
have been floods or a prolonged
drought.

Those who may have beey
keeping these notes will find the
subject of moisture conservation
and mulches discussed in the



sixth of the series, March 18, 1951. p.m.

All life, be it human, plant or
interest.





B.B.G. Radio
Notes

On Wednesdays in “Calling the
West Indies” from London the
subject of federation is being dis-
cussed in a series of four pro-
grammes with Douglas Hall oj
Jamaica, a graduate of Torontc
University and M.Sc., (London) i:
Economics, interviewing Professor
Kenneth Wheare, Gladstone Pro-
fessor of Governmem at Oxford
University and an acknowledged
authority on the history of tedera-
tion in the British Commonwealth
The series consists of exploratory
analyses of existing federations in
the English speaking world in
which Professor Wheare outlines
and explains the main character-
stics of three outstanding exam
pls of federal government, the
United States of America, Canada
and Australia, We regret that we |
did not have advance informatio:
to advise you of the start of the!
series which began on the 18th
February but in the second pro
gramme on the 20th the case oi
Canada will be discussed and in
the final broadcast Douglas Hall
will ask Professor Wheare to look
at the West indies and see whether
there are any dissimilarities 01
whether the general principles de-
duced from an examination of th«
three examples can apply and if
so, what are the possible develop-
ments from the starting point of
the Rance Committee Report.
Broadcasts are being given on
Wednesdays in the est Indies
half-hour from London. The
programmes with a ten-
minute talk and the last twenty
minutes of the half-hour willbe
taken up with these comments on |
federation, the West Indies being |
examined in the broadcast on the)
5th March. Calling the West |
Indies” begins at 7.15 p.m, in the
31 and 49 metre bands, 9.58 and
6.195 megacycles, |

Another West Indies series of
which we did not have advance
information before it began is
also running in the West Indies
half-hours on Mondays. This is|
on examination of Shakespear's |
‘King Lear, not as a pedantic)
exercise but as an interesting ex- |
periment for those in drama or}
play reading groups who wish to
find out whether a major Shake- |
spearian tragedy is within
compass of a group of enthusiastic |
amateurs who want to read scenes |
or to enact the play. The argu-
ment of the producer is that the
tragedies of Shakespeare, if played
with sincerity and understanding, |
are within the range of players of |
all ages, whether in a sixth form |
at school, or a club or literary |
group. The steps towards con |
structing the play will be taken |
and individual scenes acted but no |
attempt will be made to give the
complete performance In any}
event the play will be broadeast |
in two parts at the end of March
and April in two parts with John
Gielgud taking the leading role
Among the players taking part in
these half-hour broadcasts for the |
West Indies will be Errol John of |
Trinidad, and Pauline Henriques |
and Noel Vaz of Jamaica. Broad-|
casts begin at the usual time of |
W.I. programmes 7.15 p.m.|

This year Carnival in Trinidad |
falls on the 25th February and}
the BBC's “Caribbean Voices” will |
be taking special note of it in pro- |
grammes on the 17th, and 24th.)
inst. On the first of these two th’
half-hour starts with a short story
by Clifford Sealy and an artich
on ‘Calypsoes @f the Olden Time’ |
by Charles Penney of Trinidad.)
On the second date there will be}
two short stories of Carnival but |
we'll remind you of them next |
week. Broadcast begins at 7.15)



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'W.L REGAINING PRESTIGE
IN NEW ZEALAND TESTS
Football Season Off Te Good Start
| By O. S. COPPIN

oe WEST INDIES have chalked up another
good performance to their credit by seoring
the buge total of 546 for six wickets declared im the
first innings of their Second Test with New Zealand.
They have consolidated this early Neo talkenn
considerable extent by dismissing four New
batsmen for 76 runs, so that with six first innings
Wickets in hand they are still 470 runs behind the
We total
match so far has been a triumph for the West
belittling of this achievement on any

en

indies batting
grounds since






before the start of the h that Bert Sutcliffe the New Zealand
captain, having won the t sent the West Indies in to bat.
GOOD BOWLERS

N ADDITION to this. bowlers of the calibre of Burtt, Hayes and
Beard can command respect im any Test company in the world
today, so that good batting performances agaimst them must be re-
garded in the correct perspective.
tollmeyer and Rae’s fine service to the team, in laying the
foundation of what finally proved to be a formidable total justified the
argument firmly hel m these parts that one of the handicaps fram
which the West Indies batting suffered in the Tests with Australia
was the lack of a good start.
The excellence of the individual efforts of Stollmeyer and Ree
will no dewbt earn spontaneous commendation from cricket
A most important feature of the play however is the consistency
uf Worrell’s batting in these Tests. It proved an important turning
point in the First Test which the West Indies won with more travail
then had been expected judging from the run of fortunes during the
course of the game

WORRELL IN
RIPPING FORM

E has come back to score an

even century 2 in associa-

tion with Clyde Walcott helped

to exploit to the full, the favour-

| able circumstances created in the

| ®arly stages of the game by Rae
| and Stollmeyer,








Walcott too has shown a wel-
come return to Test form and his
batting too in this series has pro.

vided one of the principal bul-
werks in the structure of the
West Indies batting machine.

We who look towards future West
Indies cricket must feel more than
gratified that even at this late

| hour when the confidence in West
Indian batting powers has been

} So severely shaken on occasions
curing the Australian tour that
the batting has shown a hand-
ome advance on the road towards
full and complete restoration.



FRANK WORRELL

W.L SHOULD WIN AGAIN :
} XCEPT unfavourable weather conditions curtail play in the two
i remaining days, the West Indies have established a lead that
| Should guarantee them victory for a second time at the expense of

|New Zealend
SHOOTING STRAIGHT
HIS WE 1 want to turn the Spotlight on an old form of sport,
: entertaining but certainly mot as popular in these parts as King
Cric ket and its poorer cousin football and that is SHOOTING.
_ _ Shooting in Barbados is controlled by the Barbados Rifle Asso-
| Clation. It boasts of the small membership of 62 but only between

24 and 32 members turn out regularly for shoots at the Barbados
Government Rifle Range at Gravesend.

POLICE FALLING OUT

recent investigations show that even this percentage of the

attendance of shooting members is falling off, more so among
the Police members. I shall have more to men’ auaue this at a later
date because I assume at once that this could not be for lack of
encouragement because members of any non-military but neverthe-
less disciplined Force such as the Police would receive every encour-
agement to enjoy such a pastime that would have a salutary effect
on their genera] efficiency.

i WE WANT LADIES
HE B.R.A. is not an exclusive Association as some people imagine.
Any persen interested in rifie shooting is invited to join. If he
|} or she has not served in H.M. Forces it will be necessary to join the
| Barbados Small Bore Club first before they are permitted to shoot
ion the Full Bore Range.
| At this stage I must observe that there is no interest displayed
| by members of the fairer sex t is true that we married men would
| have a wholesome respect for wives who can shoot Straight but-in
Trinidad and British Guiana ladies have been taking their full share
of this form of sport. The Barbados ladies are invited to do 50 too.
| Maybe we would not like them to be too proficient at Snap and Rapid
| but Grouping and Application would be great fun. Howéver ladies
; let us see you “get your gun.”

i SEASON OPENS MARCH 15















The shooting season this ar starts on March 15. The first

competition to be shx A be for th ‘rontenac Trophy. There will

i be three .303 Post natohes for the Martinez Cup, the Swettenham
i Cup and the Overseas Postal Match.

The Shoot for the Anchor Cup takes place in Barbados this
yeat and will be shot for, shoulder to shoulder. This produces some
keen sivalry as in the background is the news that the West Indies

| will be ropresented at Bisley in 1953.

SPARTAN WINS AS FOOTBALL SEASON OPENS

j A LARGE CROWD turned out yesterday afternoon to see Spartan,





last year’s cup winners, scored the odd goal in three to win from
| Carlton, last year’s runners-up. :
i Playing on a larger field and one that is pitched farther away
(from the Kensington. Stand, all the spectators are now afforded a
| nod view of the game.
i lt was obvious that the players must now get used to the larger
ground ag there was too much bundling in the play. The pitch how-





ever is in good condition and the players themselves are keener
| than their eatly form would indicate. It does seem as if we will be
getting some good énicriainment for our money this season from
i : € A
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Pepper Wine

Returns Best Time

Harroween On Ice—French Flutter

Hot Favourite
By BOOKIE

on ice.”
ice in a ager 4 however,
Tivals can prepare
themselves.

Lumways was the second to go
off. She did a box to bex in 1.28
but only started to run from the
five which she did in 1.05.

Flying Dragon improves with

ae yg 2-4 all the way in 151,

st box to box im 1.24§.
Mabouya had the half-bred

Rosette for a companion over five.

‘They did it in 1.043, with the half-
bred moving well

full
ngs fin-

jer was not as strong as his

>rother.

Betsam did four in 53. T did not
see much of her

Tiberian Lady looked better by
herself doing a box to box in 1.28
She is fighting age more than any-

Demure did a box to box and
although I did not pay any atten-
tion to her I am told she finished
-ather tired. Her time was 1.214.

Dim View worked but nobody
took her time. Even Mr. Teddy
Jones said he did not know what
it

was.

Pepper Wine went off at a smart
clip over five. She is steadily re-
ducing her time figure for this
distance with each gallop. This
time she cut it down to 1.02. I
learned on returning to the stand
that she had been clocked in 1.072
for the five and a half. This is
the fastest gallop over this dis-
tance before race day that I have
ever heard of.

Jane escaped my atten-
tion. Her time for tive was said to
be 1.11% so she could not have
been doing much.

Yasmeen made stable compan-
ion Topsy look very inferior. They
did a box to box in 1.23}, Yasmeen
having copious pounds in hand at
te spate did a comfortable five in
1.04.

avi

Queen’s
Defeat

By P.A.V.

second round of Ladies
Inter Club Table Tennis matches
was played at the Y.M.C.A. Naval
Hall on Friday night in the
presence of a large crowd. Queen’s
College—Barna match was the
most interesting.

Queen’s College has a group of
orthodox players who make good
use of both back and forehand
smashes. Margaret Wood was in
her usual good form but I was
very much impressed by Neil
Hall’s performance. The men play-
ers who find the new style of
service difficult should watch these
Queen’s College girls.

The College girls defeated Barna
three—two. The first set was be-
tween Ruth Williams of Queen's
College and Dolores Howard.
Howard won 21—23, 21—19 and
21—10 to put Barna one up. Wil-
liams put up a good fight but



Howard, the more experienced
player, won the decisive game
easily.

Nel] Hall won the next set

against Elsie Goodridge to bring
honours even. Hall took an early
lead in the first game and went
on to win 21—17. In the second
game Goodridge had a four point
lead. Hall brought points equal
end the score read 18 all. Good-
ridge got the next two points but
Hall deuced the game. In a fine
finish Hall won 24—22.

Margaret Wood, Queen’s College
met Marian Manning in the third
match. Wood opened with a bar-
rage of forehand smashes some
which found Manning off

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+s

Flieuxce moved easily over ay

Vanguard must have done littl .

dging by his time of 1 dex
Ju iy
the box to box.

Belle Surprise caused a surprise
by leaving Dashing Princess be-
hind at the end of a box to box.
The former's time was 1.224. 1
understood Surprise was

. thought to be short. If so Dashin,
Princess is shorter. .

French Flutter a to be
doing nothing much but neverthe-
less the clock told a different story
when she came back over the box
to box in 1.20%. I took the last five
in 1.05%.

Red Cheeks does not impress as
much on the hard going as she did
in the mud. Five in 1.07 was her
effort yesterday, very much on the

bit.

The ing is another who does
not Am SHE. on the hard
ground. She did five in 1.05#,
pushed along.

Arunda did five in 1.05%, easy.

Doldrum broke from the seven
and did the box to box in 1.22.

Joan’s Star did four finishing
the last three in 41.

Landmark did a comfortable box
to box in 1.21}.

Sweet Rocket did not have much
to spare when she finished a box
to box in 1.213.

Blue Nelly and Magie Gaye
worked well together each looking
strong at the end of five in 1.05%.

Notonite gave Fuss Budget a
good run over five in 1.03. The
former is really in grand form.

Dunquerque, still in the stage of
shaking off a cough, did a box to
box is 1.254, finishing rather com-
fortably.

Colleton did five in 1.078.

Test Match aa Ali worked
five together but Yvonet opened
Mate “anise in nies dake toe

atch fin mn’

in 106} and finishing

Diadem and March Winds did
four in 52%.

Embers did her work with more
relish. With Usher she did the box
to boxin 1.24% and the five in
1.073. I am sure if we had a/mile
and a half race we would see her
at her best.

Slainte did a restrained box to
box, doing the last five in 1.09%.

Rambler Rose who might better
have been named “Morning Glory’
did four in 53$. “

Waterbelle did five in 1.06.

Fille D’Iran did not seem too
much for the three-year-old creole
Seedling who finished a box to box

8 @ On Page 10



College

Barna

guard, mainly employed
the Soubaed toon shot but this
did not worry Wood. Wood won
21—16, 21—17 to put Queen’s Col-
lege in the lead.

It is a pity that Marian Manning
relies so much on that backhand
push shot, Owing to this she has
to get around the table twice as
much as her opponent. If sne
would develop her forehand she
would be more successful,

Joyce Clarke, of Q.C., a very
attractive player who puts a lot
of back spin on the ball, won her
set against Joan Bryant to put
Q.C., two in the lead. Clarke was
always on top and won 21—12,
21—14.

Rosie Howard won the next set
for Barna when she beat Rose-
mary Barrow. Barrow lost many
of her points through inaccurate
smashing. Howard, who never lost
concentration, won 21—13, 21—2.

In the next match Adelphi
scored a four—one defeat over
Lenville, In the first set Maria
Barrow, the Lenville skipper, was
beaten by Heather Deane 21—15,
15—21, 13—21. Barrow is a good
player but was definitely not in
her best form.

Betty Carrington of Lenville de-
feated Angela Perkins 21—1%,
21—18 in the next set to increase
Adelphi’s lead. Perkins gained
many of her points through her
fast service but Carrington was
more steady.

Phylis Chandler, skipper of
Adelphi, had an easy walk over
when she met Caroline Perkins

@ On Page 9











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SUNDAY, FEBRUARY 17, 1952

CROWDED FIELDS
Cavalier and Cardinal Dangerous
To Dunquerque

By BOOKIE

ITH the exception of only one previous meeting,

the forthcoming March meeting has more horses
on the entry list than we have ever seen before in
Barbados. This is a significant fact. To me it is also
a frightening one. ;
Â¥ a gad, s course, to see racing in Barbados
each the stage where we can expect such a variety of
talent. ~I am glad that punters will have more than one or two horses
in any race to chose from. It is a good thing for the B.T-C. to rereive
in sums in entrance fees. But I cannot pretend to be anything
else but alarmed when I see that there is a likelihood of 19 horses
starting in one race on the Garrison Savannah. ‘



I know full well that just because there are 19 hor:

one race on the last day this does not mean that all will mame
start. But what I do feel certain of is that it wil] not be very long
before we see far more than this number entered in one race ona
there is every possibility that we will one day reach the stage where
a field will dwindle to 19 by the time the bugle is sounded for the
event. t E
ois Who ween sere Senet that at a minor m

‘ure we would not only have as many as 75, but th ld
also be a reserve list of about 17 who are in training buen!
It is something which our officials must be aware of but are not in
the mood to do anything about. How long will it last? wg

_ Looking first at the classic on the
Guineas, it is clear that a few of these

eeting like our March

Programme, the Barbados

i will not 1
for the simple reason that some of them ee oat Bs this oe

are i >

class race which immediately precedes it. Those ne wyy bgt Ry
clude: Cavalier, Dunquerque, Seedling, May Day, Apronusk, Colom-
bus and Cardinal. As it is the only stake Tace which these horses are
entered in before the handicaps, thty will have to go in this event to
qual et the remainder of the meeting.

aking these seven as the certainties, what then do we fi
them? First of all Dunquergue is still a firm favourite on i
of last Novem At this meeting she defeated Cavalier decisively
and as he is obviously still the next best on the entry list, there seems
little reason to expect that she cannot deal with him effectively once
again. This is sound reasoning but for two things. Number one is
that Dunquerque has-had a bad cough and has not been seen at
exercise very regularly. Number two is that Cavalier, to all appear-
ances, has developed a good deal since we saw him in November.
Therefore, the question is whether a Dunquerque, who is not one
hundred per cent fit, can beat an improved Cavalier over a distance
of ground over which neither of them has any experience?

: Nor is Cavalier the only one in the picture. There is also a strong
indication that Cardinal has improved. Personally, I think his chances
are as good as Cavalier’s.

The others are still very backward. Columbus and Apronusk
are good lookers but obviously soft, Seedling and May Day will take
a lot more furnishing while the four others are uncertain starters.

Discussing the other races on the first day as they
programme, we shall start with a 7% furlong race for B class which
is packed full of rivalry of a high order. At the present moment it
would be impossible to say which is favourite between Firelady,
Fuss Budget, Red Cheeks, Flying Dragon, Demure and Landmark.
Nor may the four others who make up the field of ten be summarily
dismissed. In the long run it may well turn out to be “who acts best
on hard going wins.”

The Maiden Stakes with 14 on the card is without doubt the big-
gest problem of the day. The best way to pick your winner in this
will be by a process of elimination. Perhaps the track will also help
you im this respect. Right now those going best are Abu Ali, Blue
Nelly, Darham Jane, Castle in the Air and French Flutter. But the
situation is likely to change without notice.

The Chelsea Stakes over 5% furlongs for class F and lower may
be a good thing for the aged mare April Flowers but this will depend
a lot on whether Sunina and Rambler Rose start instead in the
Guineas. Waterbelle and Sunbeam are the dark horses. The others
I do not fancy up to the present.

appear on the

W®* next skip the Guineas and come to the A cla&s bunch who are
carded to run for the Barbados Turf Club Stakes over 9 fur-
longs and 14 yards, It is unlikely that River Sprite and Flying
Dragon will go in this race and that will leave us with Landmark.
Slainte, Gun Site, Embers, Harroween, Pirelady, Rebate and Notonite.
I had thought that after her performances over similar distances in
Trinidad that Harroween would be my favourite for this race. But
I see she is entered also in the Dalkeith Stakes over 5% furlongs and
as she is doing some amazing sprints at exercise it is to be expected
that the short distance will be her bait for the first day. Wig Har-
roween out of the way it will be interesting to see whether Rebate can
recapture her form of last year and if so whether she and Landmark
can give away any substantial amount to Firelady. I am also very
interested in the progress of Embers, who, although painted so black
by those who saw her in Trinidad, is certainly not a bad one on looks.

I am also very impressed with the way Notonite is going at
exercise. To tell the truth he will be favourite in my book if Har-
roween does not go. Incidentally, I am told that he has never had a
dry coat. It was certainly news to me, although I see nothing very
degrading in this ailment which horses from Singapore to Mexico
suffer from as regularly as you and I catch a common cold. If his
trainer thinks that his stable will be the only one never to have suffer-
ers from this ailment in it, then he certainly has a lot more guesses
coming. But being, in his own words, “the only trainer in Barbados”,
I imagine it is incumbent upon me to apologise to anyone who is so
vastly superior to anybody else who, shall we say, supervises the ex-
ercising and feeding of race horses in the island.

The Spring Stakes for C class winners seems to lie between Sweet
Rocket, Lunways, Dashing Princess and Doldrum. I gather that
Watercress is fancied in certain sections but for my part I shall have
to see it first. If she can take on Dashing Princess successfully she
will be a much better mare than I ever imagined her to be.

The racing in G class is very far from falling through due to
lack of numbers. Three races with 11 in each is something to be ex-
pected more from the C class lot. Of those listed quite a few are coim-
plete unknown quantities and one or two from overseas I have not
yet seen. Those with the best chances are the aged Betsam, Gavotte,
Blue Diamond and the newcomer from St. Vincent Rosette. Age
and inexperience are the only things which would prevent me from
making the last named favourite, for it must be realised that she is
racing against seasoned campaigners while she is only just three.

Racing in D class opens with the 714 furlong Castle Grant Stakes.
At present I favour Cross Bow and Usher, but of course Mary Ann
is always there to spring a surprise. Oatcake, poor chap, looks as if
he is fighting age as well as ailments to his legs. Apollo and Van-
guard will, I suppose, give some good opposition here and there.

The big sprint event of the meeting has attracted seven, three of
which starqi out as the fastest fillies we have seen out here for some
time, while the other four are themselves very smart. The three I
fancy are Harroween, Demure and Yasmeen and it remains to be
seen how Pepper Wine, Fuss Budget and Belle Surprise will shape
against them, Rebate, I should imagine will not contest this event
after racing in the Turf Club Stakes.



“For Sprains of the ankles
For Pains in the back
Your quickest relief .....

is FIERY JACK".

On sale at all
DRUG STORES

Frank 8. Armstrong Ltd.
Agents:







SUNDAY, FEBRUARY 17,

1952



Frogs And Swimming

Hy IAN GALE

Men have always admired the a =
frog’s swimming ability, and in- ” )
deed they have copied him for the
kick of the breast stroke is some-
thing like the kick of a frog.

It is interesting to see what a
prominent part the frog plays in
books on swimming. In a book
published in 1858 J. G. Wood says:
“For the leg stroke there is no bet-
ter model than a frog, whose action
in swimming should be copied ex-
actly.” Writing a few years later,
however, in a boy’s magazine, he
repudiates the frog and says: “It
is right and natural for the frog to
throw out his limbs in angles and
bring, therm back in similar lines
of projection, with a sort of front
and back jerk continually re-
peated.” '

Leahy, writing in 1875, says: “I
have heard that man took his first
ory in ae from the frog,

ut since that time swimming has
been vastly improved.

circle, as we ought to work them,
but are kicked straight out to the
cear, and more or less downwards.”

Even as late as 1083 Mr. Wilson
thought it aoe say that it
is a mistaken idea that the kick of f
the breast stroke is obtained from ,.,5!7, Nicholas: Let me rest
the soles of the feet, in imitation little to respire.
of the frog, but that it is from the fl, â„¢
wedge action of the kick as well.

feet ;
of a frog are not work in a ‘ \

across Sir Nicholas learning t
swim on a table.

its motion, by the detention of thi
filum or thread within m:
which makes a ligature al
loins, and though by many sudde:

frog was king. Winmann,

tells his pupil to watch the frogs
swim with their hinder feet, Dig-
by, 1587, says, “his legs he must
pull out and in.” This must have
been accepted as the stroke of the
frog, and in The Virtuoso, a come-
dy published in 1876 by Thomas
Shadwell this scene is given:

ECOUEN JETT NATATICN

SUNDAY ADVOCATE

7 Boats Break Down
In Third Regatta |

(By Our Yachting Correspondent)

IN THE last two R.B.Y.C. regattas helmsmen and crews |
alike were complaining of the light winds. When the Third |
Regatta was sailed yesterday the wind Was strong and
puffy at times. Some said it was too strong: therefore we |
come back to that old saying: “You can’t have everything if
life.”







The boats sailed south about. |

FEB. 17 NO. 211

The Topic
of

Last Week



Cycling

a

So, it is wonder- 7

_no friend, to observe

the agility of this pretty animal

In the old days, however, the which notwithstanding I impede
15:

“« The Track

stops I cause the Ahimal some- r
times to sink or emerge, yet with
indefatigable activity it rises, and
keeps almost its whole body upon
the superfices or surface of this

W.I. Declare
At 546 For 6

AUCKLAND CRICKET

GROUND, N.2Z
Worrell and Waleott carried on
in their brilliant style after lunch
giving the crowd which swelle<
to over 20,000 a great treat. Step-
ping out to Burtt and hitting hin
for a straight four, orrel|
reached 50 in 85 minutes (six
fours). Carrying on with the
y greatest freedom, Worrell ran \
his century in 151 minutes (13
fours. He and Walcott, stepped
the pace up after lunch; Walcott



especially with shots all round
the wicket almost caught hi:
partner in fties.

)

fi "

It took Waleott 86 minutes (4
score half a century (six fours).
They added 100 runs in 75 min-
utes. Like Worrell, Walcott de-

lighted the crowd with powerful
roun all-round stroking: The partner-
7 ship between this pair yielded
. 189 in 1837 minutes. The only
other run registered during the
partnership was a bye, this giving
indicatiofi that the batsrm
were hitting every ball.
reaching the three-figure mark,
Worrell hit out, and Sutcliffe took

By ERLE McLEOD

A cyclist in order to cycle needs

two machines—his cycle and him- @ brilliant running catch in the

; humid element. self, Although both “machines” °utfield.
_ Lady Gimerack: The truth on’t | Longvil:. Have you ever tried are complemen in the of _ Walcott carried on to a century
is, he’s learning to swim. in the water, Sir? cycling, the cyclist’s own is in 155 minutes (13 fours), but
Longvil: Is there any water Sir Nichol No, Sir: but I by far the more important of the was dismissed leg before at 125.
hereabouts, Madam? swim most exquisitely on land. two entities. Ten minutes before tea, God-
Lady Gimerack: He does not Bruce: Do you intend to prac- This is the opinion of Charles dard deelared his innings closed,

learn to swim in the water, Sir. tice in the water, Sir?

Fearnley who was one of the top three minutes before adjournment

Bruce: Not in the Water, Sir Nicholas: Never, Sir; I hate flight track cyclists in the United with the total 546 for 6 wickets.
Madam! How then? the water, I never come upon the Kingdom, earniey has just New Zealand bowlers had a
Lady Gimerack:. .In his Labora- water, Sir.

tory, a spacious room, where all

Some two hundred years later

written a book headed “HEALTH

trying time under ideal batting
AND HANDLEBARS” and this

conditions against such splendid

his instruments and fine knacks we come across another account of book is strictly for the green batsmen.
are. t r swimming on land. Mr, Sam- track rider. Beard was the steadiest, taking
Longvil: How is this possible? bourne, the author, describes how

Lady Gimerack: He has a swim-
ming master come to him.

Bruce: A Swimming Master!
This is beyond all precedent: He
is the most curious coxcomb liv-
ing.

at a

masters.

Lady Gimerack: He has a frog
in a bowl of water, tied with a
packthread by the loins; which
packthread Sir Nicholas holds in
his teeth, lying on his belly on a
table, and as the Frog strikes, he
strikes, and his Swimming Master
stands by, to tell him whether he
does well or ill.

Later on in the scene we come

must

“Peyseverance!” Exclaimed



SSS
GERMAN POSITION for teaching the breast stroke from Auerbach
(ss) 1873.

Golf Match Postponed

The White Horse Trophy and Christ Church yesterday afternoor
President’; Cup for Ladies which has been postponed,
was to have been played at the





<== >. Vey
sei tN
ao => a
ee j
e——— — = 2 tenis sensi,
at me
We When lovely, lively figure-heads like these choose
Jantzen, they certainly prove they havea head for figures! Jantzens
have everything —fit, fabric, volour and style to suit you to
perfection. This year, the Jantren wizards have woven even lovelier spelis,
Look out for seductive shirring removable straps for sun
worshippers, decorative piping, coatrasung uffs, How is it done at such
reasonable prices? That's che zen magic! Go and
capture some of it yourself — quickly
anleeie Attraction in Action
‘
‘ re COvsen

French ore ne
saw an enormously fat man NE cy t this book is somethin
ut through his paces on top of a ot .
x by two bearded swimming
After watching this per-
formance for a quarter of an hour
he remarked to one of the swim-
ming masters that the fat man
have great’ perseverance.
the

swimming master, “He has worked
like this for five years, and he has
not been in the water yet!”

Well, so much for swimming on
land. Next week I will start on
the craw] strokes so get your bath-
ing suit ready.

» and are held in high esteem as

t But let us return to Charles.

> the Publie Libra

7s.

The match will now be playeda Fearnley says “If you are over-
Rockley Golf and Country Club, off in March 1 and March 2.
: 3

I have just finished reading it

2 for 96 off 40 overs. He was
track

unfortunate just before declara+
tion to have to leave the field
due to an ankle injury, suffered
in attempting to save a bonnd-
ary. The New Zealand fielding
was good in patches, but the
severity of the batsmen’s strokes
eaused mishandling at times,
New Zealand’s innings opened
sensationally, Leggatt beings
bowled by Worrell’s second de-

and I can_ assure loeal

out of the ordinary.

Track cycling was really started
in Barbados—I was told by an
eminent cyclist—sometime in the
year 1929 and since then the
sport has gained in popularity,
In Trinidad and British Guiana
track racing is just as ular as
Siege and soma : course
track riding can airly expen- , ry
sive if one finds one’s self in too Re seattt Sur 3 er,
many spills.

a j . off Atkinson for five, The score
names such 28 iyrihe yeung Was then 12 for 2. Suteliffe anc
Ken Farnum who has broken a Scott then added 38 with some
few records in the last Intercolo- bright batting and good running
a) Cysie esse 96 Repenenn Sy Feet alo, Bukclifle seamed
well Enown oytaie of ie an to be well set until at 20 he was
brilliantly caught by Worrell off
Ramadhin. Reid, wito had ample
time to regain the crease in lifting
his back foot to Valentine, was
easily stumped by Guillen. Scott
and Rabone were in when “n
hppeal againsy light was upheld
ten minutes before stumps were
to be drawn. New Zealand was
then 76 for 4.

Bowling honours for the Wes!
Indies team were evenly divided
In his first between Worrell Atkinson, Val-

chapter he introduces the green entine and Ramadhin who all
‘ track rider to his cycle so that bowled steadily.
he can carry out any repairs or
make adjustments to parts which
can make the going rough or
smooth,

SPEED AND CONDITION
In the middie of Chapter two

Fearnley says that the only way
* the green tseek Fyar gen, Sovelee
speed and condition is con~ “On massed starting Fearnley is
tinual practice. Many cyclists be- very thoroukh asa says eer
lieve that the weight of the jo::ed starting is akin to track
dropped handle bar has sot Ziding as in both eases the rider
thing to do with his progress buo fig." himself starting with seas-
this is a false belief as the resist- oned riders who know all the

ance the cyclist offers himself is 4 i01. ; ;
the salient factor. tricks of pocketing and jockeying

regards cycling.

T am gure that theve are cyclists
in the island who could take care
of themselves handsomely in any
Olympic eyeling event but their
quality eannot be aseertained un-
til they are sent out where they
can clash with top ranking cyclists
of the world.

, Fearnley, His book which has
eight chapters can be obtained at



at the opening of a season, then
you will need to sweat awheel
from the first half dozen miles and
that is where Tuning comes in.
Tuning is important and light
clothing should be used. Gloves
also should be used to prevent
soreness on the fingers.”

Ti

E for ition.
mda ita te tn" tpe books «ert, gen dts o cone
The chapter covers no less than wa i a eat ve Tuihione
six sections—six sections of in- S y f

specialists—he must seek his ad-

valuable advice to the tyro on the Ving from men who have been

eyele track, The chapter is itcHed in that company. Some-
ra
ao Somer * Concluding 1 can only urge
(b) Massed Starting, (c) Trae! eyelis tna
Work, ' (d) Massage, (e) Sleep, eave track cyclists to drop in a

Public Library and __ get
“HEALTH AND HANDLEBARS.”
By reading this book I am sure
local cyclists would be encouraged
to ride more intelligently on the
track and thus decreasing the
amount of spits which mark
weight, as many racing men are every Cycle Meeting.

DUNLOP

| .
| MOTOR CYCLE TYRES

(f) General Hygiene, (g) Relaxa-
(h) Position on

ti d finally
ion an a while

the wheel and posture

, walking.
TUNING



DOWDING ESTATES & TRADING CO., LTD.

(ECKSTEIN BROS.)
Distribufors

Around the western mark the sea
was choppy. “D” boat Olive
Blossom overturned. When the
launch towed her towards hef |
mooring she looked more like a
submarine than a yacht. Inter- >
mediate boats Skippy, Dawn and
Clytie B boat Raseal, Tornado,
Comet and Scamp of the C Class ;
ull broke down, Very few people
saw Clytie after she cleared the
western mark in the fitst round.

Racing conditions were good |
for the Tornad and the Sea-
gulls. Invader in the Intermediate |
Class also sailed a beautiful race
and Corkie Roberts in Rainbird |
‘ave one of his best performances. ,
Moyra Blair also found the wind
extremely suitable.

Nine boats started in the B Class.
Hi Ho lead for the first two rounds. |
Moyra Blair took over the lead
and went on to win, She finished |
a minute and 15 seconds ahead of
Mischief which was second. Third |
was Mg A a minute and 10
seconds later. Both Mischief and
Gipsy gave good performances. |

C Class

{

Six boats raced in the C Class
Seagull Gannet, the winner,
took the lead trom the first:
round. She completed this round
40 seconds ahead of Madness,
which was second, Magwin was)
third, about two minutes later.)

Gannet beat Magwin by ane!
minute and 50 seconds. It was a
tough battle between Magwin
and Madness, Madness should
have won, She finished four sec=
onds behind Magwin.

In the Intermediate Class nine!
boats started but only six fin-
ished; At the end of the first)
round Mohawk, the first boai,)
had a lead of about four minutes |
on Dauntless and Invader, How-|
ever Invader took the lead, She!)
finished eight seconds ahead of
Gnat, which was second, Dauni-|
less was third, 15 seconds later
and Coronetta fourth

Rainbird carried off honours
in the D Class, Only four boats
finished, She beat Hurricane by
one minute and 26 seconds, Third
was Van Thorndyke, a minute
and 30 seconds behind Hurricane.

Vamoose won in the Tornado
Class. She kept the lead through-
out the race, She finished two
minutes and 40 seconds ahead of
Thunder which was second, Ed-

ril, third, finished 55 seconds
later,
The results were as follows :
CLASS B
Elapsed Ave Py
7 Moyra Blair 1.48.37 36.12 1
5 Mischief 1.42.00 4.03 2
1 Gypsy 1.42.02 34.01 3
9 Okapi 1.48.12 26.24 4
481 Fantasy 1.55.30 38.30 5
4 Hi Ho 1.55.28 38.29 8
18 ee 1.58.31 39.30 1
6 Fi -. 256.14 38.25 8
10 Wizard 2.06.26 40 08 °
CLASS ©
10 Gannet 1.12.52 36.2% 4
1L Magwin 1.15.39 37.49% 2
3 Madness 1.18.49 39.24% 3
7 Rogue 1.17.17 38.38% 4
1 Miss Behave 1:25.49 42.54% 5
CLASS I
2 bnvader 1.28.28 44.14 1
1 Gnat 1.19.36 39.48 2
9 Dauntless 1.24.48 42.24 3
4 Coronetta 1.20,29 40,14% 4
ll Reen 1.25.12 42.0 5
7 Mohawk 1.37.29 48.42% 6
CLASS D
3 Rainbird 1.28.48 4.24 1
14 Hurricane 1.26.50 43.20% 2
10 Van Thorndyke 1.53.20 46.44%) &
4 Senbird 1.38.47 49.25 4
CLASS K
40 Vamoose 1.08.24 22,44 1
38 Thunder 1.10.47 23.30 2
36 Edril 1.11.50 23.50 3
41 Zephyr 1.25.3 26.21 4



Will Play Softball

(From Our Own Correspondent)
KINGSTON, J’ca, Feb. 14
Thirteen girl players have been
named to represent the Com-
mandos Softball Club in a yas
day tour of British Honduras.
The team captained by Mis.
Edna Miller, will be accofapan-|
ied by a coach, Mr. F, Miller,)
and will leave Jamaica by Plane}
on Sunday, February 17, }
They will play nine matches}
in Belize,





THE

| PRESTCOLD

Lou called Bn Joe last Monday
And said. “Let’s pick this bone
Remember from now onwards
A Queen is on the throne

In our domestic squabbles
I must have my own way
And when I thus command thee
Have not a word to say

So bring honie every penny
Ti give vou vour bus fare
This ship will have one Captain
And I'm the one to steer

Joe bowed and sald, Lou, thahk you
I wes longing for this day

The day when all the women
Would simply lead the way

Joe came home Friday
And said Lou the money here

Girl ty Your best next six days
Now s your time to steer

So Saturday morning early
Lou to the market went
To buy a pound of beef steak
And that cost sixty eight cents
The buteher missed and gave Lo
Three quarter pound of bone,
Lou said TI called for beef steak
Old man I ain't buying stone

lady
A cow has beef and bone

The butcher said ny





Why! I didn't make the schedule
Go leave my meat alone
She went a little further
To another butcher siali
The butehér turned politels
And said my lady call
A pound of pork chops, please Sir

With o sigh of relief
The butcher sated my lady
wm selling pork with beef

Lou went a little further

ying to reach her goal
This time the call was mutton
The butcher saict “that’s sold”

For Lou it was all bad luck
No mutton, pork nor beef
In such a situation
Lou shivered like a leat
| Louw said this thing is awful
We should have « Sunday d’sh
Of beef or pork or mutton
Or evén flying fish
|
| She waited until sunset,
| Hoping for fish to come
And when the last boat came in

| The fisherman said there's none
| Louw woke up Sunday morning
{ To eat beef at any rate

| And one the very butchers

| Gave her bones at sixty-eight
| doe Lou girl you see life
spar,

sad,
We men know how to
1 ean bring the
Plus a bottle of J & RK

sponsored by

J&R BAKERIES
makers of
ENRICHED BREAD

arid the blenders of
J&R RUM

. PAIN

CAN BE
CONQUERED

1 SACROOL

CONQUERS PAIN.



On Sale at

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os



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PAGE FIVE








SCC SSSSCELEE EEL VEEL LAA AAA LAAP ¢
AN OLD FRIEND IN A NEW SPOT &
Just A Few Yards Off Broad Sirect %
in Pr. Wm. Henry Street -
YOUR DRUG STORE ° %
THE COSMOPOLITAN
Please Come in and See .. .

THE NEW GOODS CONSTANTLY ARRIVING
*Phone 4111—2041
P. A. CLARKE, (COSMOPOLITAN PHARMACY

SOOGSSSO GPCL LLL LLL LPL AANA M

a neler een





SATURDAY, 1ST MARCH, 1952
THURSDAY, 6TH MARCH, 1952
SATURDAY, 8TH MARCH, 1952

Twenty Five Events. The First Race on the



PELLETS

a

———
ne re
—

First Day starts at 1.00 p.m, On the Second |

and Third Days at 1.15 p.m.
The 2'- Sweepstake will be officially closed on
THURSDAY, 28th February, 1952, and will be
drawn for on Friday, 7th March, 1952, at the
GRAND STAND at 4.00 P.M. Tickets can be
purchased from Registered Sellers up to 4.00
p.m. of the same day.



The Plan for admission to the Grand Stand will
be opened, as follows :

To SUBSCRIBERS on THURSDAY, 2lst FEBRU-
ARY, 1952. 7

To THE GENERAL PUBLIC on MONDAY, 25th
FEBRUARY, 1952, between the hours of 8.15
a.m. and 3.00 p.m. daily.

All Bookings close and must be paid for by
FRIDAY, 29th FEBRUARY, 1952. by 3.00 p.m.

PRICES OF ADMISSION :

SUBSCRIBERS :—Free and Three (3) Ladies or
Juniors at $2.16 each for the season.

GENERAL PUBLIC :—

Ladies per Day . $1.20
Gents per Day 1,92
Ladies’ Season 3.00
Gents’ Season Bia 5.00
Admission to the Paddock per

person per Day . 1.20

FIELD STAND :—
Per Person per Day 3 -

4 —

a §6—No Passes for re-admittance will be given



POSITIVELY NO BOOKINGS BY TELEPHONE
WILL BE ACCEPTED

G. A. LEWIS
Secretary.



|







PAGE SIX
Doctors Prove

A Lovelier Complexic:: in 14 Days ;










McLeod
erTnost ~ i
the United States.
2 powerful organiza-

Bethune







tion 800,006 women. and
f president of a col-
ege she not oniy has witnessed

gress but has helped make it.
Today, at 76, this woman is loved,

pected, and followed
Bethune is loved and
revered by hundreds of gradu-

of Be.hune-Cockman College
ch she founded in 1904 in the

vy





néern city of Daytona Beach,

da. She is heid in respect by

public officials and private

piorers throughout the nation

wee of her power and per-

i in her fight for equal

For a Brighter, Fresher rights. She is followed by the
Complexion, use Palmolive 200,000 members of the National





Ceuncil of Negro Women, which
ounded in 1935 and which
4s president until her
in 1949. She still iz

McLeod Bethune will
place in history not so
for her personal accom-

Soap as Doctors Advised

Se, de os 36 shin speciaiiem edviseed:
1] Wowk with Palmolive Soap.

2 for 60 seconds, massoge with
Palmalive’s salt, towely kather. Ramen |

Leading skin specialists proved that
Palmolive Soap con improve ‘com-
plexions in many ways. Oily skin looks

ach



2 doy bee 4 hope plishments as for her achieve-
less oily—dull, drab skin wonderfully 3 oe anne [ae asa Negro, in behalf of
brighter. Coarse-looking skin appears the 13,000,000 Negroes in the

United States, and for what she
ha wpired them to do for them-

. T&roughout her full life
she has met adversity and rebuff
with wrath and, more often, with
shrewd humour. “I have no

rity complex,” she asserts.
aking talks before public
: ngs, she writes all her own
speeches and articles as well as
t column which she conducts
in the Chicago Defender, a lead-
ing Negro newspaper in the
econd largest city in the United

finer.





Serv









States. Her prose is picturesque
and poetic when she urges her
people in scords such as these:
“Be a Daniel. Take a vow of
courage. Be miistant. But let the
weapons of determination be
coupled with the armour of jus-
tice and forgiveness.”

She tells tne story of her life
with self-revelation and self-
rrespect. Mary Jane McLeod.

fifteenth child in a family of 17,
we
on July 10,

Il before the community had a







know will make The



good.”
Jane McLeod.

there’s more foam in

is
?

SUNDAY ADVOCATE

By GENEVIEVE FORBES
HERRICK

From COLLIER’S

=

on the Gospel Choir Team \



toured ine orthwestern

States Wher she left
Institute, she turned

In 1897 she met and

fellow teacher, Albertus

He died in 1919. leaving her or
son, Albert, now on the faculty
of his mother’s sahool

- "
At mention of the school, she
closes her eyes and, in the rhythm

of a spiritual (a religious song),

chants: “I had been dreaming.
all my life, down yonder in the
cotton fields, in the classroom,

dreaming, dreaming.

singing in the Ohicago slums,
of big build-

ings and little children — my
own institution.”
In Florida she found some

“frienaly folks” who directed her

to a piece of land and a house

she

cout rent for almost

nothing. She had a feeling it was

one October







Mary McLeod Bethune:

Outstanding American Woman

i reviewing cae school’s

, founder puts first its
ngible asset—her part-
I God. She says
believe in God, and
e in Mary Bethune.”

Mary Bethune had
place as an educator
was 60 vears old and suffered
ma, but she felt there
job for her to do. She




By 35

Sh






ut nec representatives of
Negro women's o -
Mitlined to them her



a federation. Almost
nded she founded the
Council of Negro Women.







ttle



eTsC he council decided to
concentrate on the problem it
considered the most Zz at
that time. The unem-



loyment ef Negroes which was

problem of the economic
pression during the early
1930's. Mrs. Bethune recalls how
she met with government officials
and testified at U.S. Congressional





hearings, speaking as the leader of |

organized Negro women. She laid
groundwork on which the Fair





the right place, so a ; Fs
day in 1904 she openca her schooi E=PYment Practice Committee
at Daytona Beach She had a... my pe Scicaiineae -
dollar and a half, a few make- nployment diserim:

shift pieces of furniture, and five ~~ Hens.

little girls for pupils. She also had done somethi ean dae

faith and

Daytona Educational

initiative.
With a flourish she founded the

and Indus-

trial Training School, and became
its president. She started a one-
woman campaign for funds, gomg

from door to door. To help out
she often sold fried fish and

sweet-potato

pies. No cook her-

self, she had friends provide the

food, while she furnished one of
her best commodities—salesman-




quickly demanded that
do something for them-
impressing on Negroes the
good relations with
loyers and fellow work-
ers. During World War II,
Couneil worked for the admission
of Negro women into all branches
of the service on the same basis
: women. Subsequently,
ethume became the only
member of the women’s

ves
aced
their e









ship. At the end of a toilsome ttee selected te choose can-
day she would wash out her didates for the first officers’
blouse, cut mew cardboard soles tr school of the Women’s
for her shoes, count her money, - Corps. Since the war the
say her prayers, and go to sleep, council has worked for a broad-
ready for a new day. ened Social Security programme,

‘ _ amd a bill for the establishment

Money came in, but slowly

born on a southern plantation When she invited the industrialist
1875. Her parents had and 7 I
been freed from slavery 10 years Gamble, to visit ar —- he
earlier and had earned five acres entered om ne furnished a
of land as their own. Mary was With a wooden crate and a .

philanthropist, James WN.

“And where is this school of

| schcol for Negro children, a one- which you wish me to be a trus-
room building established by the tee







Board of Missions of the Presby- Gamble demanded.
terian hurch. She walked 10 7 Be ie ee cee os
miles. a. day to attend classes, , “10 my mie ane in. my soul,
and at» might taught her older “4! Bethune rep ied. Se
| brothers and sisters to read and Gamble gave her — nce
j te Finishing the school’s 27d advice and became chairman
limited course, she had no place of the school board for the macs
to go but back to the cotton fields. 20 years until his death. In 1923
Then ome sunny morning as the “¢ former grade en Ie girls
famike worked im the field. her “2S ™erged with the Cookman
former teacher appeared. Another Institute to become Bethune-
rural school teacher had written Cookman College. At the same
the Board of Missions that she me It Degen to receive inan-
had saved enough money to give Cial aid from the moard Bie
m education to a Negro girl Cation for Negroes of the Method
provided you can find one you }8t Episcopal Church. Today the

rj college is fully accredited by the
who had been selected was Mary Southern Association of Colleges
vho hz ’ as ; os
buildings

Schools.
Its

and Secondary
faculty of 100.

It has
97

2:

A few weeks later she boarded are dominated, approximately, by

n had never seen one)

a trair ?

to ride 150 miles to the southern dents

city of Concord, North Carolina, Nigeria who are sons )
where she studied at Scotia chiefs. Sixty-five per cent. of its

eight years. She graduates are teachers. Five per
professions. Most of
skilled labourers,
domestic ser-

Seminary for

t

THE ORIGINAL CREAM SHAMPOO IN A TUBES





Chicago to study cent. are in

Faith Hall. Its 1,000 regular stu-
from

include three boys

of tribal

the others

secretaries,

are
and

in

then went to :
two years at the Moody Bible
re Institute. There her lovely mezzo- se
voice won her a place vice.

| soprano



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vi





of a permanent Fair Employment
Practices Commission

cuces

As director of the Division of
Negro Affairs of the National
Yout Administration, she was

the Only member of her race in
that organization at a top level.
In 1939, typical of the seven
spent with the admin-
she travelled 35,000
address 41 meetings in

dedicated six Youth
and made three com-
ent addresses—all this at
of 64. At the United
Conference in San Fran-
© in 1945 she was associate
consultant to the American dele-
gation. After working hours she
addressed 52 California meetings.

Mrs. Bethune

years she






hab known five
Presidents of the United States.
The walking cane she uses was
given her by Mrs. Eleanor Roose
veit from the possessions of the
late President Franklin bd.
ioosevelt. She first met Roosevelt
when he was Governor of the



State of New York. When she

visited him in later years at the
White House, America’s official
Presidential residence,




her was this: “I am always glad
to see you, Mrs. Bethune, for you
always come asking help for
others—never for yourself.”







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: {6} KLI Mis recommended for infant feeding

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President |
Roosevelt's customary greeting to

SUNDAY, FEBRUARY



1952

17,



Budapest lisiens in

to London voice

IT COMES FROM EXILED WOMAN

‘

|

i very day in Budapest and al! over Hungary hundreds

of people creep into

rooms. or hide under tables to listen in secret to the voice
of 27-year-old Miss Beata Szekely broadcasting news
of free Europe to those behind the [ron Curtain

They listen at the risk
imprisonment or even the
lives, for it is forbidden

sponsored programmes

But
they hear from Miss Szeke
from Radio Free Europe
true: they know her voice
and they remember
during thé war.

From 1943. when Budapes:
Beata

' fell to the Germans,

then a 19-year-old studen

listen to the BBC

Jailed five times

She transcribed

i
Engiish news and ran ner | me in London.” she said
own monitoring service with | to-day.
the help of a few schoo! | Most of her broadcasts are
friends.

“Five times I was put into
prison between 1943 and the
end of the war.” she said.
“But they never found the

radio and I would never te
them who worked with me.
lived alone with my mothe

and they imprisoned her, too,

in an effort to make me talk

When the end of the war

t
te

listen to any but the Russian- |

they Know that what

her

i used to hide in the bath to

the |

“upboards. boxrooms or bath-



came Beata was elected a
municipal councillor of
Budapest. But in 1948 she
was warned by friends that
the Russians contempiated
her ~ disappearance.”

ty | “I got a few indirect hints

is that I was not beloved by the

| Communists,” is the way she
puts it.

She obtained a student’s
visa for Holland, and from
there got to England. Her
mother followed in 1949.

“It seems strange’

“It seems strange to think
that onte I hid in the bath to
listen to London in Buda-
pest, and now many people
do the same thing to listen to

t

madr on a tape recorder and

brog icast to Hungary from

Munich by Radio Free
Europe.

“I get messages from

| ¥arious underground

I channels telling me_ that

people listen, many people.’
she said “I know the risks
they take, and I am proud
that they risk their lives to
hear me tell them the truth.”

London Express Service



What’s Cooking

Pizza Alla Napoletana
Pizza is a very well known
speciality of Neapolitan cooking.
It is a good dish, easy to prepare
| and above all very filling.

|__For 6 people:
| Flour, 1 Ib. Dry Yeast, 1
Salt package
Garlic Olive oil
1 tin whole Cheese, 2 table-
tomatoes spoonsful
Dry Marjoram
Sift the flour on the kitchen

table or pastry board. Make a
hole in the middle and put a pinch
of salt. Put the package of yeast
in a cup of lukewarm water and
let it dissolve. Add the yeast to
the flour and add a tiny bit more
of lukewarm water (it should be
1 glass in all). Work the dough
until perfectly smooth. Put it in
a bow! which has a tiny bit of flour

at the bottom and let it rest in a)

warm place for about 2 hours, By
that time the dough will have
doubled its size. Take the oven
cake tin and put some olive oil at
the bottom. Put the dough and
feven it up with your hand until it
|has covered the whole tin. Put
|}$some more oil on the top and
|spread it with your hands. Cut
the garlic in small pieces, put it
on top of the pizza, then put the
| whole tomatoes, sprinkle some
jsalt, and some dry marjoram.
Put it in a hot oven for about 20
minutes or half an hour. Serve



We sat on the gallery of the
Bungalow out of the sun and
talked. So far as I can recall, it
was the unexpected chugging of
an outboard engine that had first
attracted my attention. After all,
down there on the hot sands with

| the time rising midday and hard-

ly a soul around, the busy chug-
chug of an outboard needed some
explanation.

The owner, I discovered, was
Mr. Baisley P. Elebash of New
York although it seemed that city

; and state was more of a postal
| address than anything else, You
| see,
|came here from St.

Mr. Elebash and his wife
Thomas in
the Virgin Islands quite recently,
and should, by rights, be ending
their Caribbean vacation with
maybe a look-in at St, Thomas
on the way home.

} hot. If you don’t like garlic or
olive oil, you can use lard and in-
st of garlic you can put 2 table-
5 sful of gratéd cheese with
the tomatoes,

Pizzelle Alla Napoletana

For 25 pizzelle:
Flour, 1} Ib. Dry Yeast, 1
| Salt package
Water 1 glass Pepper
Garlic Oil or lard
Marjoram Whole tomatoes
Cheese
Sift the flour on the kitchen

}

table or pastry board. Put the
dry yeast in a teacup of lukewarm
water and let it dissolve. Put the
yeast and a pinch of salt in the
middle of the flour and work the
dough like the other pizza, add-
ing lukewarm water and working
the dough until smooth. Put in a
bowl with flour at the bottom and
leave it for two hours. When
ready cut the dough in small
pieces the size of an egg, even each
| piece with your hands and make
small pizze. Put some oil or lard
in a frying pan and when boiling
hot put the small pizze and let
{them fry until they are golden on
both sides. Prepare a tomato
sauce: Put a tiny bit of olive oil
tin a saucepan, add two pieces of
! garlic and let it fry, take it out
j and add the tin of whole tomatoes
and some salt, let it cook until the
sauce is quite thick and then add
a pinch of marjoram. Pour a
‘ tablespoonful of the sauce on each





This'll Interest You...

By William Forres Stewart

weeks searching for fish. Any kind
of fish. Mr, Elebash is not particu-
lar. Like me, I’m not particular
either but the difference is I don’t
catch ‘em. And after that it’ll be
off to New York ,.., to end you'd
think, a fairly extensive vacation.
Well it does end it, even for Mr.
and Mrs. Elebash, until early
July (we're still in the same
year) when it'll be pack-up time
again and off—like you and I
would go off to the Crane or
somewhere — to San _ Francisco,
That's the start of new travels
From there the President Wilson
will steam the Elebashs to silvery
Hawaii for a brief stop-over before
going on to Tokyo. About now,
you’ll gather, the trip is getting
fairly well under way.

The Elebashs



plan to leave

Well, they're going to look inJapan by way of Kobe en route

boat and spend

| alright, and pick up a charterto China and Hong-Kong and go
afew days Cron to

Manila in the Philippines
es ee



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Sole Agent and Distributor: F. S

Also obtain

LONDON’S 3





MISS SZEKELY
Listeners remember her.



In The Kitchen ?

pizzela and serve them hot,

If you don’t like olive oil or gar-
lic, the sauce can be made with
butter or margarine, tomatoes and
2 tablespoonsful of cheese,

For 6 people:

Flour, 1 Ib. Dry Yeast,

Salt package

— Oil Cheese, Ee
epper spoonsfu

Ham, 3 oz. Lard

Tomato sauce

Work the dough like that for
the pizza and the pizzelle and
leave it in a warm place for about
2 hours,

Grate 2 tablespoonsful of cheese
and cut the ham in very small
pieces. Add a tiny bit of butter,
a pinch of salt, pepper and mix it
all. When dough is ready, put it
on the pastry board or the kitchen
tablq. Roll it with the rolling
pin until it becomes like a disc
with a diameter of 17 inches, and
inch thick. Take a piece of lard
and spread it evenly with your
hand all over the disc; take the
mixture of ham, cheese, butter,
salt and pepper and put it on half
of the disc spreading it evenly.
Close the disc with the other half
and with your hands press the
sides. Put it in the oven for about
20 minutes or half an hour, When
cooked you can serve it with a
tomato sauce seasoned with a bit
of olive oil, salt and pepper.



and from there return to Hawaii
and Honolulu where they'll spend
two or three weeks covering these
beautiful vag et a a ro

rd for the y politic -
aa Mrs, Baisley P, Elebash will
ignore the President Wilson in
favour of the equally luxurious
President Cleveland for their re-
turn to the Pacific Coast and San
Francisco, It’ll be a car after that,
to Los Angeles then home to New
York (remember?) via the stream-
liner Santa Fe Express,

We continued to sip cool drinks
and sit out of the sun, Td got
bogged down somewhere in China
and was slow in boarding that
home-bound Santa Fe Express:
I looked again at Baisley P. Ele-
bash and his charming — wife.
These were delightful people and
it was hard to think of them doing
anything else but just sitting here
with me in Barbados. Unhurried
slow spoken, kind and hospitable
in their little beach house, they'd

been around and about this planet
| more times than I’d have thought
| possible

So it’s a fair compliment to
Barbados when globe spanners of
the Elebash calibre come around
these parts year after year and
never tire of this small isle, its
sunshine and its people. And be-

, fore they leave, somewhere in the

0 . | confusing list of continents and

} : Soaetes comprising the Elebash

\b % travel intinerary for 1953, there'll
pes ‘



be the Caribbean and Barbades.



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Your Horoscope

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is 4 cen*e



ist possess some sort



SUNDAY, FEBRUARY 17,

1952



THE BLONDE WOMAN |
WHOSE NAME IS TABOO |

Eva has the Fear of Death in the
Peron Land of Biuaff

Ready for gelaway if meat ruse fails

By MAC DONALD DALY

—_ has ue returned from a

wo-month tour judging at

South American Sprcoluien
and livestock shows,

President Juan Peron of the
Argentine, who on Friday told
Britain she must pay double last
year’s price for beef in 1952, was
bluffing—bluffing in a big way.
For the Argentine is on her knées.

“Nature and the Government,”
as one cattle-breeder put it,
“have combined to ruin the un-
ruinable.”

He meant that a combination of
Peron and a three-year drought
has defeated even the fertility of
12ft. of good black earth, Corn is
short, grass is short, calves are
short,

To understand the Argentine
you must know that the peopie
will never think in the British
terms of “When a man is down,
help him get up.”

They Whisper . . .

When a man is down in the
Argentine that is the time to kick
him to death.

In the luxurious Jockey Club of
Buenos Aires, where one-time
society now gathers to lick its
wounds and whisper about Peron,
they tell you: “There is only one
thing we subscribe to—and that
is his ruthlessness. If we were
in the same position we would
do the same to him.”

The Perons are ready to duck
out any day now. A vast outflow
of wealth which has crippled the
peso on the exchanges of the world
is secreted in Switzerland in the
names of General and Senora

Peron.

Forbidden
Senora Peron? I almost, by
habit, hesitated to mention her.

For no one does in Buenos Aires.

Hers is the forbidden name.
“The Lady,’ “Mrs. You-Know,”
“Our Blond Bombshell,” they say.
But not ever “Eva” in case the
taxi-driver, the chambermaid, or
the waiter is an informer,

Yet you cannot turn right or
left without seeing her name and
her pictures on walls, shop-win-
dows, houses, and even corporation
dust carts,

“Peron—Eva” appears
murals at the airport.

“Peron—Eva” is repeated on
the posters round the unfinished
housing estates which line the
roads to Buenos Aires.

“Peron—Eva” sang a procession
of white-robed 15-year-olds as
they marched through the centre
of the city.

Above me, as I did my shop-
ping—at the world’s cheapest rate

on the

—down the Argentine’s Bond-
street, the Florida, there flared a
gigantic scaffolding, 50ft, high,
the whole street in length, chron-
icling the virtues of Eva and her
man.

Fear

The Peron bluff is the biggest
since Hitler tried his hand at
power polities, It may be even
bigger if it can fool Britain.

Most of Buenos Aires to-day is
on the pattern of Berlin in 1938.
—helmeted troops, huge flags,
hysterical marching adolescents,
an accent on athletics, and a very
particular~hatre@ of Britain,

Behind it all is the same throb-
bing undercurrent of fear.

At one end are the people who
are afraid to mention Eva. At the
other is Eva herself.

Eva can frighten them easily
A man spoke against her. She
ruined him in five minutes by
lifting her bedside phone and
saying: “The inspector has found
cockroaches in his factory. I will
not tolerate it. The place must}
close.” |

Lonely |

But her own fear, and the!
fear of the clumsy soldier by her
side, ds the fear of death,

Rarely does the city see them |
in public. In their palace they sit
at a lonely table eating food which
has first passed through a corps}
of food-tasters. |

There was a sensation at the!
British Embassy one_ night before |
Fva’s illness when the President
and his.lady insisted on their)
tasters sampling every dish during |
a dinner with the Ambassador, ,

Even Eva’s poodle has a food)
taster.

Over
the Argentine’s fortunes
world’s markets looms the silent,



all the dizzy descent of |
in the|

sinister figure of Juan Duarte, |
Eva’s brother. |
Waiting |

“There is now no black market |
in the Argentine,” said a Brazil-
ian friend. “There is only Juan
Duarte.”

Peron’s ranchers cannot pay
for the bulls they bought at auc-
tion in Seotland last year.

Yesterday I talked to Scottish
breeders who are still waiting for
their money—and are not parting
with their bulls till they get it.

The Argentine banks cannot
release the money béeause they
do not have the sterling,

They scream for sterling as
loudly as they scream for dollars.

And intelligent men in the
Argentine are asking, with greater
insistence: “How long can the
bluff go on?



BLACK!

The Paris Silhouette without a Waist

By SUSAN DEACON

PARIS.

TS first day of the Spring dress

shows opened in Paris with
collections by Jacques Heim,
Bruyere, and Paquin; the mas-
ters Dior and Fath have yet to
show.

And if the first day is anything to
go by, it will be a spring séason
of untrimmed hats, sombre col-
ours, and lots of black—the hats
I show in the pictures are ex-
ceptional.

Low Sleeves

The biggest fashion news so far is
in the hip line and the sleeve.

The HIP LINE is emphasised with
either skin-tight hip draping on
a straight skirt or by all-round
fulness or pléating starting at
the hips.

SLEEVES are often set low in the

shoulder seam. The rounded
shoulder line is _ fashionable
again, Paquin shows enormous

sleeves on loose coats and day
dresses which balloon out in a
winged point.

Heim ignores the waist line. Many
of his suits have loosely belted
boxy jackets,

The skirt length is about one inch
longer, but the neck line is high-
er on day dresses. White school-
boy collars and soft bow ties are

in,

COLOURS are mainly all-black
{with black accessories] — or
white [with black accessories].
Vivid coloured accessories are
worn with shades of grey or
beige,

Still Strapless

I was sorry to see that Paris is

still showing strapless evening |

and cocktail dresses.



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Strapless dresses are finished in
London, They are no longer
smart.

The halter neck or single shoulder
strap has taken their place.

In Paris TULLE and LACE are

still fashionable for evening
dresses which are now finely
pleated, wide-skirted, short or

full length, and fan pleated from
the waistline.

English fabrics are used by many
Paris designers.

“Wintry” Hats

HATS: The pastel-coloured straws
massed with spring flowers have
unhappily almost disappearea,

This year’s straws and felts are
vivid-coloured either untrim-
med or with ribbon or feather
mounts.

They looked wintry.

CARVIN'S collection is the most
interesting and most colourfully
dressed show seen in Paris so
far. The clothes are inspired by
a trip to Mexico.

The trend follows that of the other
shows—with flowerless hats, lots
of sleeve interest, and both wide
and narrow skirts. The hem
‘line in this collection is again
one inch longer.

Fine Prints

Carvin has some of the most beau-
tiful prints seen in either Lon-
don or Paris so far, Cottons are
shadow-printed and have bold
Mexican flowers and animals
bordering the hem line.



P.O. Box 27







A woman who Should

never

» = GRASS IS SINGING. By Doris
Lessing. Michael Joseph. 9s. 6d
756 pages.

rAXHIS novel velongs to the

new generation of
writers which, almost

every month, turns up a

iresh talent clemouring for

notice and judgment.

The Grass is Singing is sincere,
inexpert, powerful and
promising. Its atithor is a
woman, from South Africa, home
of so many iamous women
writers.

Its story is ugly and pitiful,
with its own version of human
dignity preserved somehow im
squalor and defeat.

And its theme, underlying the
story, is that tragic social
dilemma_of our time: the Cold
War of Colour. Here it is, trans-
lated into the calamitous life of
Dick Turner and his wife, Mary,
and played out in the oppressive

ir of the lonely tin shack,
anoas the dust devils of the
veidt.

No villains here and no heroes.
The casual brutalities of white
farmers, like their ually
casual outbreaks of _ kindness,
are too much part of a social
pattern to provoke
condemnation.

As for the natives, they are
cunning. they are stupid and, on
the whole, they are disagreeable.
This novel spins no sentimental
web round them. It is an assault
»n your pity, not on your tear-
ducts,

Mary should, of course, never
have married Dick. Probably she
should not bave married at all.

She was a “good sport,” life
and soul of the tennis club
dances, and rather under-sexed.

Overhearing a malicious con
versation one day (“ How absurd

she looks, @ressed like a gifl in
her ‘teens”) ts the notion of
martiage into her head. Dick

comes into town about that time,
buying stores for his farm.

It is not much of a farm and
Dick not much of a farmer, Mary
is even more feckless, She eannot
endure the heat. the drought, the
deadening loneliness. Above all,
she cannot manage the native
servants.

The Turners are well on their
way down to the “ poor white”
level by the time Moses comes
back to help in the house.

He is a huge black man; once
Mary had struck him with a
whip. But now things are some-
how different between them.
Mary is awate of Moses; soon
she is aware of no one else. At
first, with anger.

“When a white man in Africa

accident looks into the eyes
of a native and sees the human
being, his sense of guilt fumes
up ih resentment and he brings

down tke whip.
Later, Macy (by now hardly



For colours, pinky beige takes the
place of navy blue and grey.
Evening dresses in the Carvin col-
lection are mostly full length

with one bare shoulder.

The ‘Masher’

IN LONDON earlier in the week
the Big Ten concentrated mostly
on tailored suits, dresses, and
matching jackets and top coats.

Lachasse’s “masher” line for suits
is the newest London line, It has
a straight skirt and boxed

. Edwardian jacket with high flat
revers.

| liked the London short evening

dresses with their feminine
fluffy skirts shown by Hartnell
and Hardie Amies. Colours in

London were as sombre as in
Paris.
—LES.





SCANDAL
By R. M. MACCOLL

PRETTY JANET GORDON,
who is on the New York State
Legislature, is sick and tired ot
a _ long-standing seandal—the
State’s divorce laws. She, in
sommon with many other people,
dislikes the “hypocracy” and “no-
torious frauds” attendant on too
many actions, ang the “noncha-
lant perjury” they engender. So
she proposes a Times correspond~-
ent: “Mr. Goldstein’s spectacular
feat in sparing millions of TV
fans further punishment came
when he stopped a _ horrendous
charade called a prize-fight at
Madison Square Garden. Neither

fighter was any the worse for

wear, but Ruby obvious|y had
the setowners in mind. They cer-
tainly were in nc position to de-
fend themselves.”




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PARTIAL BALDNESS
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° The daily application of this Hair
Food results unfailingly in a really
beautiful glossy head of hair.

The B

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= 2

oa this novel.

Im the end he could work for
only three or four minutes at a
time, after which he would lic
aimost blind and with a_ raging
headache. He _ died,
December 30, 1948.

A Voice Through a Cloud is
in fiction, the story of an illness
k ‘s moving and uncomfortably
v , it has the acuteness, with-
out the distortions; of pain. It
is bitter and courageous

Ht states a kind of distrustfu'
integrity in a series of brilliant
pictures of fellow - patients,
nurses, anxious relatives. It is
mature, with disarming flashes
of youthful timidity. It is hardly
a novel at all. But it is a deep
e ience.

elch was a writer born
even physical disaster could
frustrate his angry, sensitive
talemt. Showid we say genius ?



31, on

Not

Should we say genius?
DENTON WELCH Xe

~
”

sane) is haunted in

by the gigantic black re. Twelve Against the Law. By Edward
ey are like two antagon ®. Radin, Heinemann. 10s, 6d.
But he is sure of himself; ont 246 pages.

yagerarne’, Mente by ver TP WAESE excellent crime stories
obsession. : hawe the advantage of being

It ends at the moment where
the book opens—with the srur-
der of Mary and the arrest of

. Radin has not needed to
use his imagination, He has gone

to the newspapers, to the police
Moses ( ws theft). Dick is records (mostly Now Yors
out of his mind. records)

Only Tony, a man not His talent lies in giving fresh
long out from pogen shows an ness those bygone annals of
; rrassing readiness toexplain. iniquity.

Charlie Slatter, Dick's = rich For example, to the Green
neighbour, soon shuts ‘him wp. Parrot murder on Third Avenue,
It is a “bad business. in which the critical evidence

was provided by a parrot which
kept on calling out “ Robber,
robber.” Until one day a detec
tive decided the bird was talking

Under that muttered formula,
White South Africa resolutely
buries the unsavoury affair.

The note never forced ing ft

aura abe Sore wired Ret nated acoede |

pa ie g, tbat A most readable sheaf ot

fannet hed, t 18 wickedness.

imp! it in the peonte, ne,

the climate. might be 4

merely sordid=takes on.a- kind Wate... Oo. | { ma

of pride. ht

Student Body. By> M. R.
* Hodgkin. Gollancr, 9s. 6d. 226
pages.

Scene: an American college.

' By Dea
sg jh a Cloud BY ‘Theme: blackmail and murder

Welch. Lehmann. 10s..6d. 256

Writer: an American woman,
pages. newcomer to rer me
HE most « astoni: & thi gemou worke ou and

», abou! jihis bose isa mot ta amusingly told,
it is written so brillian
a) vis i . Ne Duty on a Corpse. By Max
teat dee wae Weis at all, Murray. Michael Theeph, Bs. 6d.
c . 208 pages.

Denton Welch was born. in
Sharighat in 1917 and brought-up
in China. He was,studying art
ia London when* (aged#18) he
was tee .victim of a, road” acci-

A murder takes place on 4
transatlantic liner called the
» Queen Alexandra, It should have
‘been easy to solve. But it

fron é » appears that many people had
pent 3 ate ere tis eine 4, reason to kill Leonora Buth. Mr
had been broken. Murray brings a light touch to his
The interval was filled with %Mmbre topic.
hospitals, doctors, and London Bapres Service.

pain



righter Sun-— By Samuel Selvon |

os
— Man
| Expressly designed to meet the
jneeds of the tourist is the depart-
'mental store of Cave, Shepherd &
|Co., Ltd., on Broad St. Within
jits féur walls amq@ on all floors
|the rich nature of Cave Shep-
|herd’s imported stock has no
\superior anywhere in the Carib-
bean. Won't you come with me
|for a few minutes and see? Here,
\for instance, are superb silks,
jlinens and cottons bearing the
magie name of Liberty, which
famous name and house, Cave
Shepherd's represent. And ladies’
scarves gnd hankies as well as

Men's neckties and dressing
gowns and attrartive character
|dolls are all of Li manufac-

ture. Let's look at China and the
extraordinary perfection of
| Wedgewood — here at Cave
|Shepherd’s in Dinner Sets and
| Novelty Ashtrays. This selection
fof figurines is in Royal Doulton,
|Now, with thoughts of travelling
| North, we'll just have a breath-
jtaking lpok at the wonderful
; value and quality in these Ladies’
}and Men's Top-coats in Pashm!
| Cloth, Georgian Covert and Doe-
| skin,
{genuine Tartan designs, while’
| English Doeskin Gloves, Ladies’.
jand Men’s Cashmere Sweaters
{and Men's Cashmere Top-coats
land Sports Jackets are right out
jot this world
\value. I know you're excited, but
\wait — I’ve more to show you.
This comfortable looking Man's
|Top-coat is of Genuine Harris
| Tweed and a ne handy thing
|for the ‘plane. ‘ow, to idle yet
awhile on this isle, and I ho;

|gashtel Linen Suits for Men, andj
|Shorts, too, in plain colours,
| They're extremely cool and crease
| resistant.
jfew of the highlights at Cave
| Shepherd's, not forgetting the
big counter of Local Handicrafts
| of fascinating design and crafts-
manship. Everything you could
wish for is here at Cave Shep-
}herd’s on Broad St. — known

‘throughout the West Indies by
those who travel.

| * . .

| Higher Education for your

‘children — like the sound of it?
;You will when you know it’s
|} guaranteed! And to provide so
| very important & guarantee is the
j business of the Manufacturers
| Life Insurance Company through
| their chief representative, Peter
|De Verteville. In his new office
jin the K. R. Hunte Building on
Lower Broad St. (ph. 2845), Peter
| will show you how you can place
the obligation of financing your
children’s education in the event
of your death, squarely on the
|shoulders of a great financial in-
stitution.

in quality and:

LONDON

Samuel Selvon, former “Trini-
dad Guardian” journalist now
living in London has recalled to
the full his exciting memories of
home in his new book “A Bright-
er Sun”.

The story of Tiger, a young In-
dian boy, and his childhood mar~-
riage to Urmilla is developed
against a background of Trinidad
in the late 30’s and the period of
the American ‘occupation’ after
the declaration of war.

Selvon describes graphically the
way of life in Chaguanas a sugar-
cane district halfway down the

More beautiful?

Western coast of the island where
it ves, chinese, and Indians live
for the most part in

together,
harmony. :

The picturesque speech, habits
and morals of the villagers are
accurately reported. But many
English readers may find it tedi-
ous and hard to understand the

local dialect which Selvon uses
with such delight. All West In-
dians, however, will find them-

selves really at home in the pages |

of this book.

Published by Alan Wingate
(Publishers) Ltd,, 12, Beauchamp
Place, London S.W.3. Price 11/6d.



|



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About Jown |

A car that has created a recor i]
in consistency ever since it hit tne?
motoring worla with I[ront-wheei
drive — the Cilmosuy a
beautifully manulacturea auto-
mobile, the new 4-cylinder, §

hp. CITROEN is now in barba-
dos Agencies Ltd. Neable ser-
vice — in fact, absolute dependa-
bility is in every standing and
moving part of it and $4,2/0 is a
low expenditure for such atiri-
butes these days. But talk it over
with the CITROEN engineer
he'll not only tell you things —

he’ll prove them!
. .

Received a Wedding invitation
recently ? Bet you have and
can't make up your mifd on a
suitable gift. Let me heip you...
Stuart Crystal available in com-
plete sets is a gorgeous gift tor
anyone....a plated Silver Tea
Service
Dinner Service for twelve (with
matching Tea and Coffee Sets)
from $72.60....Truly beautiful
Cutlery, loose or in Canteens —
all of this and much more is

Ladies’ Suits are of the Yoffered at Louis L. Bayley’s on
|very finest of English Tweed in:

Bolton Lane.
e

* .

A ‘Jeep’ for Boys only! It’s a
Hercules, the very new Hercules
Cyele now in Barbados Co-op
Cotton Factory Ltd. You'll see
their Ad. on page 3 today. A
really sturdy and well balance
‘machine with lots of fine features
this Hercules is going to be really
popular. The Co-op also have
‘the mew Hercules for Girls,

.Ladies and Men, in 18”; 21” and
you do, you may care to look ath22”
Cave Shepherd's readymade Moy-:'Green and Black

Colours are
and models
range from Sports ‘to Roadster.
But come on in and see them!
In any lang — for any land,

frame sizes.

Well, there you have asthere’s nothing to really compare

with the Massey-Harris Tractor,
That wonderful machine with all
its many attachments including
Grass Mowers, Grass Loaders,
Rakes and Manure Loaders and
Spreaders. This last, incidentally,
is highly suitable for the applica-
tion of Bagasse in the fields. It's
Courtesy Garage for Massey-Har-
vis with Tyres or Steel Wheels or
Half Tracks, whichever you pre-
fer and for Cane Trailers, too.
” ak x

Long, long awaited but here it
is now. At Manning’s Corner
Store, the new KELVINATOR
Electric Refrigerator with 4,18
cu, ft. mett food storage, alumin-
um Ice Trays, Crisper, Chilling
Tray and durable cabinet finish
that will neither crack nor change
colour, is here to display and
prove its food keeping superiority
—with economy! The Kelvinator
really is a buy at $395. Neat, well
built amd space saving.
see it in the Corner Store.

ON SALE AT

Broad St.

a

* EASY TO SEW
* EASY TO WASH
* AND IN SUCH

You'll;

&

from $45 up....China} \...

A KING’S STORY

THE MEMOIRS OF HR.H.
THE DUKE OF WINDSOR, KG.

ADVOCATE STATIONERY

&. Greystone,

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PAGE SEVEN







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ax

PAGE EIGHT

3ARBADOS gi ADVOGATE

eT enw Se PSonaS ae)
Printed by The Adverstec Co.. Ltd. Broad St, Bridsetews

"Sunday, February 17, 1952

LOVTAL FOOD

AMENDMENTS have been made to the
Control of Prices Order 1951 and a num-
ber of items have been decontrolled since
the schedule was printed.

Bags, balanced animal feed, balanced
poultry feed, breadfruit, certain brands ot
butter. eggs, salted fish, pickled herrings,
pickled mackerel, avocado pears, oats,
okras, and pickled salmon, are no longer
controlled. Other items which are still
controlled have increased in price since
the schedule was printed.

These include corned beef, bread, salted
butter, table butter, cement, charcoal,
firewood, fresh fish, flour, lard, margarine,
fresh and frozen meat, condensed milk,
fresh milk, edible oil, rice, tinned salmon,
certain brands of sardines, and soap.

It is likely that there will be further
increases during the year.

The Government employs more than one
method of keeping down rising prices.

Rice which is being sold to the public
for 10 cents per pint will cost the Govern-
ment $3.41 per bag in subsidies when the
equalisation fund which is now being used
to cushion the rise, has been exhausted.
The price of salted pork remains un-
changed because the government is buy-
ing less for the prices paid when the
schedule was printed. The rise in the price
of salted pork is concealed by this method,
but if larger quantities were required the
public would have to pay more.

With regard to biscuits the government
has left the retail price at 2 cents for 7
sunrise and 2 cents for 3 eclipse, but has
reduced the wholesale price from $2.72 per
carton of 24 lbs. (sunrise) to $2.60 per
same carton and from $2.85 per carton of
24 Ibs. (eclipse) to $2.73 per carton.

In- several ways the government is
attempting to keep down the cost of living
by keeping down prices.

Many opinions are expressed upon the
subject of controls and most people are
grateful that the existence of controls pre-
vents all prices from rising at once.

But in one respect controls are having
an effect which was certainly not intend-
ed. In “Labour Marches On” which Mr.
Adams has stated to be the policy of the
party with a majority in the House of
Assembly, the Party promises to inten
sify “the Grow More Food” campaign
which includes the rearing of live-stock
and further assistance to the fishing indus-
try. This is an excellent intention and
everyone hopes that it will be carried out.
Yet how can it be so long as controls are
maintained on the prices of locally pro-
duced food? The only local articles of
diet, which have recently been removed
from the schedule of Control Prices are
breadfruit, eggs, avocado pears, and okras.

Still on the list are yams, sugar, milk,
fresh meat, margarine, lard, bananas,
plantains, Julie mangoes, grapefruit,
oranges, fish, eddoes, coconuts, bread, bis-
cuits, sweet potatoes, and butter.

Not all the best intentions in the world
will encourage people to grow more food
if yams cannot be sold retail for more than
4 cents per lb. potatoes for more than 3
cents per lb., and eddoes for more than 4
cents per lb., while imported rice even at
its artificially controlled price sells for 10
cents per pint.

It is true that by law plantations are
compelled to plant 21 per cent. of the
arable acreage with ground provisions, but
not even the law can encourage anyone to
sell more food when the reward is so
strictly limited.

Less than a year ago during a debate in
the House of Assembly on April 24th, 1951,
Mr. H. A. Dowding said “there are several
plantations today with acres of yams still
in the ground because they have not been
sold.” According to official reports these
conditions do not exist this year, but
although yams may not be surplus it is
common knowledge that locally grown
provisions and green vegetables are un-
naturally expensive because of the control
that hawkers keep over distribution.

If the government is to intensify food
production it must take yams, potatoes
and eddoes off the control list and should
encourage private retailers to distribute
locally grown provisions and vegetables
with the same efficiency that they now dis-
tribute imported provisions and vege-
tables.

Local enterprises will never be attracted
towards the marketing of locally grown
foods unless they are allowed to fix their
own prices. If a guarantee of support
were given by the government, many of
the exorbitant profiteering prices of
locally grown vegetables would disappear,
while the consumption of potatoes, yams
and eddoes would almost certainly in-
crease if reasonable profits could be made
out of their distribution.

It is true that rice is more easily cooked
and therefore needs less fuel and that
sweet potatoes and yams have far greater
water content.

Yet it seems very bad economics to sub-
sidise the price of imported rice, while
yams and potatoes and other ground pro-
visions are surplus as they have been on
several occasions in recent years.

, than $73.50.



SO +k a - : . ae sic
ground provis g will the

ns, $80 lon retail





stores be di rested their distribu-
tion. And if removal of controls failed to
give the necessary incentive then the gov-
ernment might well consider either leav-

ing rice free to find its own market level
or cutting the quantity imported so as to
compe} more people to eat locally grown
The average Barbadian has become
so accustomed to rice that he or she is un-
likely to eat less except when there is no
choice.

The money saved on rice subsidies
might perhaps be better employed to keep
down the price of milk, which is so largely
dependent on the price of imported bal-
anced animal feed over which the local
government has'no control.

foods.

MEAT AND FISH

IF the Government is faced with the
unpleasant burden of subsidising rice
while there is always a possibility of local
ground provisions not being sold, the situ-
ation with regard to livestock rearing and
fishing in Barbados is yet worse.

Not even the recent rise of 20 cents per
Ib, for roast beef or of 22 cents per Ib. for
other cut beef will encourage the raising
of steers. It has been estimated with great
accuracy that it will cost $649.31 to raise a
steer to the age of 3 years. Even with beef
at its present price of 68 cents per lb. for
roast steak, rump, round sirloin and ribs’
and at 58 cents per lb. for all other cuts,
the return to the owner-slaughterer of a
900-lb. steer will hardly exceed $300. For
the owner who has to buy fodder this re-
turn represents a loss of more than $300.
For the owner who can obtain free grazing
on someone’s else plantation the loss will
only be $100. But so long as the prices
of animal feed remain at their present
levels, there will always be a loss unless
controls are removed on locally produced
meat. Even if this were done the cost of
local beef would become prohibitive for
all except a relatively small. number of
people. Yet if the party with a majority
in the House of Assembly is to implement
its promise to intensify the rearing of
livestock, it will only be able to do so by
removing controls on the price of locally
produced beef. The formation of a central
milk depot right assist in reducing the
high cost of beef that would result from
the removal of price controls by increasing
the amount of beef available from cows
which had passed their milking days but
whose beef could be sold for much less
than specially raised steers.

With regard to other livestock the situ-
ation is correspondingly difficult for rear-
ers of pigs and sheep. The estimated cost
of raising a pig to the age of one year is
approximately $85. With pork at 42 cents
per lb. a 225-lb. pig cannot produce more

Nothing but the removal of price con-
trol on pork will encourage people to rear
pigs at their own expense, although the
“swill” system permits many pig-keepers
to make a small profit.

Sheep seem only to be kept profitably
by those who can avail themselves of free
pasturage. Even if a sheep is slaughtered
at the age of 1 year and four months by
an owner who has had to buy its feed from
birth he will have spent $60 to earn $35.

The Government is wisely encouraging
peasants to improve the pedigree of their
sheep, but it is discouraging would-be
owners of sheep from keeping any sheep
at all by controlling mutton at present
prices of x cents per Ib. for legs and loin
chops, 48 chnts per Ib. for shoulders, and
42 cents pet lb. for stew.

There seems little reason why controls
should be retained on locally produced
mutton.

The only rearers of livestock who seem
to make any worthwhile profits at all are
those who butcher calves for veal. With
legs and loin chops at 54 cents per lb. and
stew veal at 40 cents per lb. it is possible
to make a profit on the sale of veal. But
the popularity of veal with livestock rear-
ers reduces the quantity of meat which
could be produced by fully grown ani-
mals. The control of local meat certainly
cannot be said to intensify the rearing of
livestock.

Nor is the control of fish prices the best
method of further assisting the fishing in-
dustry.

The Government has been most gener-
ous in its treatment of fishermen who lost
their boats during the high tides of
December last year. It has encouraged
the fishing industry through its support
of the Fisheries Department and the re-
search work done by the Investigator, will
when fully applied, be very beneficial to
fishermen,

But the industry cannot be expanded,
unless fishermen are given greater incen-
tive than that offered now when fish prices
are controlled.

One result of controls of fish prices is
the flouting of the law by fish hawkers
who profiteer at the expense of the con-
sumer and of the fishermen. The majority
party in the House of Assembly is com-
mitted to a policy of encouraging live-
stock and the fishing industry, but it is
prevented from doing so by the controls
on prices of local meat and fish. There
seems to be only one way out.



;













SUNDAY



‘Sitting On The Fene

The war between walkers and
motorists is almost as bitter and
prirnitive as the war between men
and women.

There are two schools of thought
on the question. One believes that
all motorists are devils and all
walkers are angels.

The other believes that all mo-
‘orists are angels and all walkers
devils. It depends on whether you
are driving a car or dodging one.

I am inclined to the theory that
most of them are neither angels
nor devils, but just plain idiots.

Therefore, when framing new
regulations, the obvious thing is
© invite the aid of a mental s
‘lalist who will certify the lot,
walkers and motorists, and leave
he country safe for sane loafers
vho hate walking and driving and
nerely want to eat, sleep, drink,
nd lounge about.

Stuffing A Colonel

A Colonel (I have forgotten his
1ame) living somewhere in Eng-
‘and has probably made himself
‘xtremely unpopular with animal
overs by stating that stuffed cats
laced in a field scare away crows
etter than anything.

>. *

I suppose I shall be unpopular
with colonel lovers if I. suggest
hat stuffed colonels would be
even better.

In appearance they are muah
nore frightening than ca, es-
necially if you can get hold of
those with lurninous noses,

They are also far less useful
than cats because, although fre-
quently haunted by mice, they
cannot catch them.

They cost more to keep, and
are regarded as pests by almost
everybody.

The cost of stuffing a colonel
is about £10, including caviare
and champagne.

If all the words I write each

On ith October, 1884, the
Barbados Telephone Company

the Tropical American Telephone
Co, Ltd., which is said, in records
f the Company,
‘unctioning for three years before
the sale.

At the time the Company
vossessed 150 instruments of which

his handbook of jos
wotices how up to date Barbados
was in this ani other respects
(even anticipating England in
passing legislation to enable a
man to marry his deceased wife’s
sister).

Not that telephones in those
days were the simple instruments
we know today. The Tropical
American Telephone Co, Ltd. is-
ued a special sheet of instruc-
tions to subscribers. One of these
sheets is on display at the,
Museum. It begins with the -
emptory notice that “subscri
will please read carefully and
observe strictly the following.”

ist: On being called do not
“ing back, but respond as prompt-
'y as possible, by removing the
receiver from the hook and plac-
ing it to the ear with the usual
“what is wanted” in an ordinary
but clear and distinct voice, with
the mouth one foot from the trans-

mitter,

2nd: To call the exchange
press the crank of the call box
inward and turn it = twice

round vigorously. After which
do not wait for the operator to
ring back, but remove the
receiver from the hook and
place it to’ the ear when the

operator will ask what is
wanted. Then make your
wishes known, keeping the
receiver at the ear until the
desired connection has been!
established and the communica~
tion concluded immediately

after which, ring off by hanging

the receiver upon the hook and

turning the crank as above
mentioned.”

How much simpler to lift the
handset, wait for the dialling tone
and then dial, replacing the hand~
set when speech is finished.

The specimen sheet of instruc-
tions issued by the Tropical Am-
erican Telephone Company gives
, total list of subscribers. It is
noteworthy that there were only
three subscribers’ in Hastings of
which one was the Marine Hotel,
There was one subscriber (a
store) in Holetown and the Lines
to Hastings and Speightstown
were known as trunk lines, Most
other subscribers seem to have

ADVOCATE

Dr. ADEKAUER GOES

—$———$———_——$—————————

“What Is Wanted”

urchased for $12,000 the stock of lif



2@

(By NATHANIEL GUBBINS)..

year to the officials of the Inland
Revenue explaining why I
shouldn’t pay something I don’t
owe were collected and printed as
funny articles in newspapers or
magazines, they would not only

be funnier than most funny arti- ©

cles in newspapers and magazines,
but I should also earn twice as
much money and thus increase the
national revenue.
It’s Not Only Ducks That
Waddle
“Women begin to waddle at
the age of 50.”.—Profound ob-. .
servation in Woman's page.
Ever since the child could tod-
dle
She had been inclined to wad-
dle,
Though in deportment
later
Kept her just a little straighter.
Middle-age, the birth of twins
Sent her rocking on her pins.
She wobbled so that folks, of
course,
Nicknamed her “The Rocking
Horse.”
Now, at the age of fifty - three,
She staggers like a ship at sea,
Reeling through the streets at

lessons

night,
A derelict without a light.
its more than one can do, we
feel,
To keep her on an even keel.
Indeed. It’s now our fondest
hope
To fit her with a gyroscope.
Heart To Heart—1
Girls go on writing to me about
their troubles, and I do my best
to give them advice, Below is a
heartbreaking appeal from “PUZ-
ZLED.”
“I have been engaged to a boy
for seven years. In all that time
he has never given me a pres-

By GEORGE HUNTE

been doctors or people in public
e.

When the Comoarty was bought
out by the Barbados Telephone
Company its monthly revenue
was $542.50, Today a_ similar
number of subscribers for the
same period produces only $493.00
for the present com i

Some idea of the cost of tele-
phoning may be obtained from a
notice in the Agricultural Reporter
of October 21, 1884 announcing
the installation of Barbados Rail-
way Telephones.

“Telephones have been erected”
says the notice, “at the railway
stations at Bridgetown, Bulkeley,
Carrington, Bushy Park, Three
Houses, Bath, Bathsheba, and St.
Andrew and messages will be for-
warded at the an rates:

Messages of 12 words or under
—24 cents.

Use of instruments at any two
stations for five minutes—24 cents,
,, Planters ordering or. sending
freight by train — 12 words or
under—12 cents.

Messages will be delivered with-
in 4 mile of stations free; if ex-
ceeding } mile a special delivery
charge will be made.”

The Telephone was used as a
means of spreading fire alarms
and the Tropical American Tele-
phone Company issued instruc-

tions that “an operator will re- expen

main on duty at all hours, nights
and § not excepted to at-

tend to calls.”
An old chart framed in the
office of the present Barbados

Telephone Company recalls the
rogress of telephony in the
land since 1884. There were 230

subscribers in 1886, one thousand

and fifty in 1918 and 1,960 in 1930.
Between 189! and 1892 the

Albert Hall which had, until then,

frequently been used by touring

theatrical companies was bought
for $8,900 and is still used as the
present Company's Headquarters
in 1952. The Company’s capital

was increased to £4,000 in 1885.

In 1902 it went into liquidation

and a new company was formed

on the Ist April with a capital of
£15,000. In 1913 the capital was
increased to £20,000 (Today the
present company’s authorised
capital is £131,250).

In 1914 earth circuits (one wire
and an earth) were replaced by

metallic circuits (two wires), This D.

was a great improvement since
it practically eliminated over-
hearing.

In 1916 telephone service was
extended to St, John and St.
Joseph and in 1917 ownership of
the countfy servicés and govern-
ment lines was transferred to the
Company,



UP i3 TRE Liz









BER-F00M

ent or said a kind word,

“The last time I saw him,
about two years ago, he was
very rude to my mother, and
when I reminded him of his
promise he flew into a violent
rage.

“Since then he has left the
neighbourhood, and only wrote
to me once, asking for a loan
of ten shillings. Do you think
he wants to settle down?”
Possibly, but certainly not with
you, dear.

Heart To Heart—2

For some reason I cannot h
to explain a young woman, signing
herself “WORRIED” has written
the following appeal to me:—

‘I am very anxious to gel
married, and wonder if you
could help me?

“I am only 4ft. 10ins. and a
bit on the dumpy side. My hair
is’ wiry, and my face always
comes out in red patches when
I am excited,

“IT am also double-jointed
and the dentist says my teeth
are loose. My boy says it
would be all right if I didn’t
giggle and laugh so much.”
Well, “Worried,” yours is ¢

rather difficult case. Does your
boy mean that your teeth are
less likely to drop out if you keep
your mouth shut, or what?

Curiously enough, some men
prefer double-jointed women, anc
I should draw his attention as
much as possible to what appears |:
to be your outstanding charm.

Snap your thumbs back at him
occasionally, and when bathing
this summer do a few little tricks
with your toes.

You should certainly try to
avoid this giggling and laughing
After all, you don’t seem to have
much to laugh at, do you dear?



In 1919 a new switchboard was
installed and in 1920 a new ex-
change was built at St. Lawrence

A branch exchange was opened
in St. John in 1924 and in 1931
pen first underground cable was
aid.

By January 1935 the Barbados
Telephone Company was serving
2,113 telephone stations. In that
year the Telephone and Generai
Trust Ltd. of London secured a
controlling interest in the Barba-
dos Telephone Company and made
preparations to instal modern au-
tomatic equipment. During 1936
and 1937 the most modern
Strowger automatic exchange
equipment manufactured by Auto-
matie Telephone and Electric Co.
Ltd. of Liverpool, was installed at
the Albert Hall headquarters in
James Street and at the St. Law-
rence Exchange. The main aerial
wire routes were replaced by
underground cables in the city
and the entire outside plant was
reconstructed.

At the end of December 1951
there were 4,855 subscribers anc
two additional automatic ex-
changes had been erected in St.
John and St. James, Speightstown
is still dependent on a manual ex-
change.

The Barbados Telephone Com-
pany is now planning further ex-
tensions which ~will
diture of about £100,000.
This expansion programme allows
for the ¢e between
town and StLawrence of an
line exchange with an_ ultimate
capacity of 2,000 subscribers, De-
tails of the programme will, it is
expected, be made known before
the end of this month.

The Telephone and General
Trust Ltd. of London is also asso-
ciated with telephone companies
in Trinidad, Jamaica, Portugal
and Caracas. But it has several
Barbadians on the Board of Di-
rectors of the Barbados Telephone
Company. Its Managing Director
is Mr, George de Nobriga,
who is also managing Director of
the Trinidad Telephone Company,
and is a Director of the present
Telephone and General Trust Ltd,
of London, The Chairman of the
Telephone and General Trust Ltd,
Sir Alexander Roger is also a
Director of the Barbados Tele-
phone Company. But all the oth-
er Directors, Mr. G. D. Bynoe, Mr,

. G. Leacock, jnr, Mr. C,
H. Wright and the Chairman, the
Hon. J. D. Chandler, M.L.C., are
Barbadians. }

Off to an early start the Bar-
bados Telephone Company today
can be proud of its achievement
of service to the community, and
of its satisfaction of the public |
demand for “what is wanted.”

involve an

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13,

Winter
To Spring

@ From page 1

They were mindful not to let
their feet strike too sharply on the
stone p:ths. They bent down over
the flowers and read labels but
never in too loud a tone.

But outside, people were stand-
ing in the streets. We had seen
them as we drove to Windsor
queueing for buses making a holi-
day of it. Do not, when you think
of the British mourning their King,
think of them looking like a lot of
Spaniels full of lugubriousness.
One might even say they were
making a sort of pienic of this.
They march along the street with
shopping-bags bursting with sand-
wiches and showing the tops of
theimos flasks, They speak at the

usua! pitch of their voices and
they talk of other things than the
death of the King’s quite often.

Prince Monolulu

Outside the Castle gates was
standing the most famous racing
tipster, Prince Monolulu, a col-
oured gentleman who frequents
our race meetings and speaks in
Hyde Park in a costume as authen-
tically royal as his title, of trailing
white robes and feathers curling
up from his head for a couple of
feet.

A rich race character he is, and
we all knew him and crowds all
saluted him even today, not loudly
but with a smile.

“I knew the King”, he was tell-
ing his neighbours, “personally.
But personally I’m telling you”.

Whatever the extent of that
knowledge might be it is certain
that the King must have known
him for he had an eye for all odd
characters that ‘frequented the
English scene.

So crowds do the dead King no
wrong by smiling at Prince Mono-
lulu as he would have smiled. And
indeed they constantly give proof
that for all they’re making a holi-
day of this they’re grieving deeply.

A window is opened, the voice
of the radio speaks out into the
street. A man in the crowd with
his mouth full of sandwiches says
“he’s coming round by Marble
Arch now”, and from the tone of
his voice you know that he’s gone
every step of the way with his
dead King.

And there are director tributes.
People speak to one suddenly and

tell one stories which have a
queerly twisted, unpredictable
character of truth.

On the way to the chapel fer
the funeral service I asked the
way from a woman who was walk-
ing alone. So that she could tell
me something important that at
that moment she felt she had to
tell someone, she walked towards
the chapel with me though that
wasn’t her way.

Shé@ had a husband it appeared
who sudderily went blind at the
age of 35 when he was a well-paid
executive in an insurance business.
He had been filled with despair,
he had found the first lessons that
were given him in Brail'e pro-
foundly adiscouragine, he had
wanted to die and when his wife
had discovered that there was a
school for adult blind in England’s
West Country where he could be
trained to earn a living in some
new way he had refused to go.

But then one Christmas C_y

he had heard the King make a

broadcast in which the fact that

he was wrestling with a stam-
mer was particularly obvious
and the obvious embarrassment
and effort of the King had made
him decide that he could make
such an effort himself too. And
he hed gone to school in the

West Country and it had been

the beginning of a better time

for both of them.

She left me as soon as she had
told her story and I think it possi-
ble‘she was going around town to
tell it where she could.



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Turned

Always Beauty

In Saint George's Chapel ther:
is aways beauty. It was built by
Henry VI who is considered an in-
effective King but who made here
a strong box into which the ages
have shut some of their beauty
which time has never been able to
devour because it is sealed there
forever. It has its own late Gothic
Lewluty. It lacks simplicity, it is not
purely as beautiful as the thousand
year-old Westminster Hall, it is
too ornamented and too pretty, But
on each’side of the building pillars
rise flush with the walls and break
into the eglaberate vaulting that
covers the roof with the effect of a
fountain stilled forever. And un-
der this roof ai the end of the
Church between the place where
the congregation sits and the altar,
is the choir where Knights of ihe
Garter have their seats. Hore
again is Elizabethan pomp and
glory and edlowr. Each Knight sai
in his own stall which has on the
beck of it 4 gold plate enamelled
with his Coat-of-Arms.

As Knight succeeded Knight
these gold medallions became
many. Each of the stalls is cov-
ered by a canopy of carved wood
which rises-high into the air of

this ‘hi church and on top is
a knight’s helmet draped with
his coloured. scarf and sur-

mounted by his arnmfourial’ bear-
ings, which may be a tree grow-
ing out of a golden pot or a
naked boy holding a shield or
two arms hélding plumes, Above
these “again hang Knights’ ban-
ners of scarlet and gold and all
the brave colours that there are.
These are trappings. of chivalry
as they were worn and one sees
that the film.of Henry V was a
pallid reflection of glowing fact.

Into these stalls. there came
now in dark plain clothing those
who had a right to be close
mourners of thesKing either by
reason of ties of blood or because
they had held high office in his
state or in allied states.

.. Exiles

Those that were akin to the
dead King were some of them
exiles.

In four adjoining stalls sat
King Michael of Romania and
his Queen Anne, Peter of Yugo-
slavia and his Queen Alexandra
The two exiled Queens kissed as
they passed.

Of the high Officers of our
State the greatest was of course
Winston Churchill. Mr, Attlee
was there too, and ‘for all his
excellence he did not make a
strikingly appropriate effect
though he was a man who had
served King George VI _ well.
Because he didn’t fit in with his
surroundings he was good for
this day but he had nothing in
common with Knights of the
Garter and their bearings ana
bannefs. He lacks scarlet and
gold im, his composition. But
when General. Eisenhower came
in he wag of their company all
right. A plain man, he neverthe-
less has richness of banners.

And so of course had Winston
Cours ge he . He wore
the slightly ity look that we
all as Sve eee Old “ate apt to
wear at funerals of those who die
younger than ourselves. He is
growing old as strong men do;
not sure how much he should
restrain the energy which still
wells out of him, He nearly
tripped and fell on the step that
led down to the choir, It could
be seen that he was embarrassed,
it could be guessed that he was
asking himself if he had _ not
done this because he was infirm.
But indeed it happened because
he was striding too youthfully.

A Hush

We sat waiting and after an
hour or so we heard sounds that
told us that the King’s body had
reached. Windsor, Those who
were outside in the streets say
that there was at the moment of
its coming a hush on the Town
which did not lift until the coffin

@ on page 10










Your doctor is captain of

accuracy and care. You,

* THE BARBADOS FOUNDRY LTD.

Whitepark Road

6596603

3
%
R

ro

SUNDAY

ADVOCATE

MEMORIAL SERVICE



The Clergy of the diocese entering St. Michael's Cathedral throuch the West gate on Friday to attend

the Memorial Service for the late King George VI.

We



atched From

The Chimney Tops

By HAZEL MAY

LONDON, Feb. 15.

High up in the grimy heights of
Edgeware Roads, grey and red-
brick buildings, the great com-
pany of His Majesty’s loyal sub-
jects had gathered to see the
funeral processicn wind its solemn
way through the hushed streets
towards Paddington Station today.
With the watchers among the
chimney tops I saw George Sixth
make his last journey.

Every window was packed with
people, every garret with its
patient witnesses. The old were
indoors,. the young on the roofs
perched on parapets clinging to
chimneys, clambering precarious-
ly on treacherous slates.

Fr beneath the mingled colours
of the crowd fringed with khaki
clad troops lined by¢the roadside,
vividly resembled a view of forest
wild flowers which end where the
grey-preen veld begins.

All the way along this straight
ugly street with its cheap tailors
flashy little dress shops and second
hand dealers, people waited
patiently. Many worked there reg-
ularly.

Nine Deep

Now there were lining their
familiar pavements nine deep to
see their greatly loved King pass—
the King who many of them had
never seen in life—‘‘only on news-
reels, dear, never got off work to
see him”.

All the plate-glass windows
which line beth sides of the street
had been boarded up and there
were crash barriers across the
pavements. Yet none of it was
necessary. These crowds so typi-
eally British were perfectly be-
haved. Many of them with their
rugs and thermos flasks had sat up
all night.

Overhead snow-clouds gathered
threateningly.

Then the black herse was seen
coming through the distant Marble
Arch and the solemn surge of the
funeral march drifted mournfully
up to us.

Slowly they moved down that
great straight road. In perfect for-
mation troops marched as one man.
The slow measured tramp of their
feet beet away the minutes.

“Nothing Like It”

An American perched precipi-

tiously on a sloping roof nearby







said briefly in amazement “we
have nothing liké this back home.”

Then the bold yellow splash of
the Royal standard appeared so
gay amongst the grey and black.
And a hush fell on the waiting
crowd which spread up from the
people on the pavements and en.
veloped the chimney pots in a
blanket of stillness.

Afterwards they said up there in
the chimney pots that somehow
they had forgotten to look at all
those foreign Kings that followed
the cortege. But had you noticed
the Duke of Windsor wearing his
naval uniform? A long time since
he had been seen in that! And
young Prince Philip—now there
was a fine young man!—He had a
walk that you could pick out any
where and that funny way of

Sticking out his chin.

A Wren said she felt proud of
the navy all over again when she
saw how good the ratings looked
pulling that gun carriage. every
man in step. and white ropes held
tautly in dead straight lines.

Coaches in their scarlet passed
and then rank upon rang of diplo-
mats, attaches, servicemen and
policemen.

A splendid lookinse. detachment
of East African Askaris swung
proudly by like giants, who seemed
to tower above the troops before
and after them. Further on
freshly whitened helmets shqwed
up starkly against dark blue uni-
forms.

A woman fainted in the. crowd
falling forwards through the troops
to lie face downwards on the tar-
mac. Immediately, miraculously to
tend her Saint John’s men were
there springing from nowhere.

Then the lament of the bagpipes
took over from the brass bands
and the end of the procession came
in sight. Last of all a very old am-

bulance, battered and _ belching
black smoke from its exhaust
passed on its way. Such a long

journey for an ancient engine

A great sigh swept over the
crowd. They waited a moment be-
fore they moved away watching
the great procession winding into
the misty distance, It had taken
forty minutes to pass.









Queen’s
College
Beat Barna

@ from page 4

in the next set. In both games
Perkins failed to get ten points.
Chandler won 21—4, 21—7.

The score was Adelphi three,
Lenville when Cecely Vaughn,
Lenville met Claudette Chandlei
Vaughan scored an easy victory
She returned many
smashes. She

of Chandler's



Rowallan
Attends
Camp Fire

Chief Scout Lord Rowallan sa

h.ough some hours a starry nigh
hilarious group o

with a large

in his honour last night at Har
Co, lege.

rison

RAGE NINE



For relief from

scouters who staged a camp fire A ’ I H M A
—_



The scouters sang with ful -one small tablet acts
gusto seldom equailed, as the ,
sat a.ound the red flames, crack . / *
ing wood and floating sparkle quickly and e ye
Jokes were told and short lud
cious plays acted. HE Ephazone treatment for Asthma is so
Che flames were blazing som«

12 teet high and the wood poppe
loudky
formerly declared the
open, As the fire got going, ih«
various troops of scouts marche:
in singing, . let’s
nearer,”

And while the scouts began t
stir about, the Chief Scout wh«
must have sat around hundred
of camp fires, looked quietly or

When the scouts had sung
few songs, including, “Loch L@
mond,” the Chief Scout rose anc
told them the tale surroundin
some of the words, “...and yop
take the high road and I take the
low Road,” and received a great
applause when he had finished.

The St, Peter's Sea Scouts then
put on a short sketch, “The Don-
key,” in which two scouts dress-
ed as a donkey treated the other
scouts and the fairly large crowd
which had gathered, to some
amusing antics.

For the next item, the Bethel
Troop placed a log on the ground
and imitating their idea of Red

Indians on the kill—the log be-|

ing a man—danced as they sang
a shrill war song and then leaped
in for the kill, sending their
staves onto the log,

Rangers followed this with two
songs
At the end of each ‘item, the

- troops which had not taken part
in it, would give one of the usua}

won 21-—8, 21-14. cheers of appreciations, “B-R-A-
Pauline Smith, another good y.o bravo,” or “Isica-isica!”
player who appears to have got Included. in’ the programme,
over her nervousness, defeated too, were the Soufriere Song
Gloria Ramsay two love to win Under the Spreading Chestnut
the final set for Adelphi, Smith Tree and Ging Gang Goolie. In
especially has a yood forehand the Soufriere Song two Rovers
smash. She lifts the ball from gave a display of humour in
well below the table and it just rhyming and these were fairly
shoots into one of her opponent's well received
co. ners. She also has «a beautiful In the song Ging Gang Goolie-
bacshand cut shot, Umpa, umpa, umpa, all scouts

seemed to enjoy themselves more

sn tne final match Y.W.P.C, de- than ever, particularly when they
feated Y.W.C.A, four-cne, The went off into long “umpaaaaahs”
Y.W.C.A, girls need some ex- Other songs, “Haila — shaila,’
perienced player from the “Buma Lac” were sung with fully
Y.M.C.A. to practice with them. throated loudness and made the
I understand that this method is camp fire very lively
adopted at many of the other Besides, “Sea Scouting Is The

ladies clubs. 1,
have borne fruit,

Aon
player for ¥.W.P.C. She defeated
Elsie Bynoe 14—21, 21—15, 21—14,
In the other sets Jean Humphrey
was beaten by Joyce Jones
(Y.W.C.A.) 21

would appear to

Hoad was the outstanding

10, 21—-9; Rennee

Life For Me” and “Nobody knowsr
the Trouble I See” there was :
scene of morning camp life of the
scout depicted by the Ist Sea
Scouts,

After the Chief Scout told ¢
yarn, scouts sang the closing song
“O Come and Go with Me.”



Glommeau beat Eugene Daniel

(Y.W.C.A,) 21—19, 21—6; Yvonne T e l
Costella beat J. Holder (Â¥.W.C.A Larceny ria
21—18, 21—16 and Patsy Hum-

phrey defeated Weldine Pilgrim T

(Y.W.C.A.) 21—14, 21-18, giving OoOmorrow

Y.W.P.C. a four-one victory.



Book-keeping
Successes

There were three Book-keeping

successes (as against 12 failures)
at a recent Pitman’s Commercial
Examination conducted by M1:
Cc. B. Rock at Combermere.

The list is as follows:—

ELEMENTARY

Gloria Walcott, First-class, (Mr
P. L, Reid).

Lauriston Burnett,
(Mr. L. 8. Richards).

First-class

Mignon Lovell Second-class
(Miss A. Skeene).
ARITHMETIC
Rudolph Gibbs, Intermediate

First-class, (Modern High Sch.





Further evidence in the case
in which the Police have brough,
six charges of larceny, falsifica

tion and fraudulent conversior.
involving amounts of $4,00u anc
$5,000 from the Governmen:

‘treasury against Carlos Smith ¢
Civil Servant of the Auditor
General's office, will be taken by
His Worship Mr. C. L. Walwy:
at Diswrict “A” on Monday a
10 aam,

The charges
offences were
time between
June 8, 1951.
of £50v,

Counsel in

state that the
committed some-
April 1945) anc
Smith is on a bai

the case are Mr
E K, Walcott Q.C., associatec
wih Mr, E. W. Barrow for the
defence while Mr. W. W, Reece
> QC, Solicitor General is appear
) ing for the prosecution.



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PAGE TEN

—..

‘ ‘ T

@ From Pare 9 capacity. Théy were coming to fection of the words. There was 316 F 4 W kt
was taken into the chapel. Peoplereport the funeral and they were no allusion to the dead man’s @ or : Ss
stopped eating sandwiches, they coming to the funeral of someone Kinghood interpolated in the fun-
did not smile any more at Prinee they had seen much of and had — Ne ae a ee oe
Monplulu or at anything else. honoured, A number of them of Arms read his titles and prayec I ” d | t
They were conicmplating the had received decorations from for a blessing on Queen Elizabeth n econ es ;
death of their King whiagh when the King, some for war service. Il. No newspaper correspondent

his coffin appears becomes more
than the death of a King; it be-
comes the death of a salesman, the
death of a soldier, a sailor, a tink-
er, a tailor, it becomes the death of
every man.
every minute to represent every
they
say startled seagulls who genes
the
Castle and circled over the pro-
cession. But we in the
knew none of these things. We
received our

year

from

King

marching, of hoofbeats, or a dirge
played on bagpipes that were
faint, that grew loud, that faded

away, that were loud again.



Winter Turned To Spring Trinidad Hit

A gun was

of his #ffe. And this

the grasslands round

intimation of

‘s coming by sounds

procession was taking the coffin

on its gun-carriage around _ the
town of Windsor by a circuitous
route that brought it sometimes

near,

tle. It was as if a cocoon of nove
o

were

sometimes far frorn the Cas-

being wound round

chapel.

At
and

had taken part in t) yrocession
Queen Juliana of Holand took
her seat in the choir, She is not

a beautiful wernan but she could
stand up to searlet and gold; to
chivalry.
Bishops
Church

down
to the door of the Chapel to meet
the coffin and
range themselves
below
sudden sunshine was now

ri¢hr
Now
and
and

on the golden vessels. Crown;
Sceptre and" Orb suddenly ap-
peared being borne to a_ stanc
covered wilh purple velvet. It
wag the only intimation that those
who were reporting the funeral
for the Press ever received
through the eye that the funeral
was taking place. it must be
noted that the death of this Fing
is a very strange event; it is

constantly turning into a symbol,

Sounds Stepped
last the sounds
stopped,

168s of relics of
Archbishops and

High Dignitaries of

choristers went slow!

slowly
on the
where

the Altar

an allegory.

It was like an allegory of Eng-
lish history that people were not
or wearing too
being snobs,
but in a sane and self-respecting
file by in
thousands through
half where proper relations of the
King of England and his
have been threshed owt through
centuries to
King who had

being hysterical

jong
state

hundreds

care

went

was also an allegory of what hap-
people.
the
his

pens
The

truth about

fami

privacy
hardly. possible for the mass of
ple to know what the King

the

is like except through the medium
: of the

Very. soon
VY came to the Throne the pro:
realised that Great

Av Allegory

faces and not
of mind should
of

pay
taken
himself

to acquaint

on
toe King and his
Press tells the
the King
. This is no
for in

people
and

Press?

lucky in the ruler they had got

and they have taken pleasure in
telling a story of
was always agreeeble.
press got to St. George’s Chanel

Royalty



fired

Chapel

the
of

The

eame near
There entered with
the choir sorne of the people who

returned to
steps
some
shining

people

homage to a
particular
with
what those proper relations were
and how to maintain thern.
in St. George's Chapel

What

invasion of
these days it is

after King George

Britain was

that
When the




saw any member of

in The Chapel
But when they got
George's Chapel they were shown
into a singular enclosure. There
is a passage alongside the choir
which at ~ point mxese a view
of half-a-dozen of choir stalls -
and the entrance to the choir ani it were right.
a sideways glimpse of the Altar.
There is apparently some slovenly
housekeeping at .
Chapel. This passage wads in a
state that no part of a consecrated
building ought ever to be fl
It was littered with bits of cush-
ions, doormats, pots of +: 7 , ,
pieces of carpentry that were cast er ue ea eae
hither and thither on the floor or ne Vaul
were leaning against the walls. At The Vault
There was even, as heaven be my
witness, a table with a sewing of the
machine on it, As a British Catch

mable strength, as if she
We

exquisitely expressive

press who
early ertitions

pondents from other
passing through such a grievously
displaced lumber-room and it was

poor comfort to be able to assure ‘© the vault. His starmmer and °'0 "Guillen dipped his right |

the - t broadcasts became touching and *‘TOKCS. — + \

enureh oF ‘chapel “thal {know infinitely significant. He must Ke° and pulled Wight to the long if oe eee
could such a sight, be seen, Here have know well when he gave 0” ' ee ‘threatened ahd ane COUGHS & COLDS
the Press ranged itself disap- ‘¢ last one that he would soon (O°* “) TSN vids blew away and

pointed at its quarters but with be just there under the Royal “ne i olebrate “thee sun- ;

its mind fixed on the ftmeral, Standard with a wreath of white ao. as ied “tha pew” ae In a Jiffy

But as soon as the procession “°wers upon him about to be Gulr smary Pa

arvived there passed through the
choir a large number of represen-
tatives of military and diplomatic
forces who stood on the Altar
teps at the end of the choir
between the coffin and the press,

Could Not See

No newspaper correspondent ai
the funeral of George VI sa
iny part of the service. They
saw simply a number of official
backs. There followed an awk-
ward struggle. Tt is a newspaper-
man’s duty to turn in copy to his
paper. But he also has a sense
of fitness of things; he may even
have a notion that maybe he has a
soul and that maybe there is a
God. He may even be quite sure
of it. This works out to a: pro-
found disinclination to scramble
about during a funeral service and
climb on chairs and on any pro-
jecting portions of o sacred edifice.

Stood On Cushions

the

and putting them into

machine run as smoothly
it were simple.



@ From Page 4

think he did
five was done in 1,061.

candidate who

standing on a coping of several but I
pew cushions that had been lying they
on the floor nearby. And even
then all I could see was the Lord
Chathbérlain, Lord Clarendon. a five in 1,09.
This too was a symbol. The Royal

Family would have been appalled do
by the thought that a number of the box
people who wished them well had might be
been forced into such an unseemly
predicament. So too would Lord
Clarendon who is an_ intensely
dignified person who would
all things to serve dignity,

did in 1.055,
Caprice did four in 5

to box,
on ice.



the Royal
to st, Family during the service but it
~ was not difficult to guess how the
Queen was looking. At her wed-
ding there came on her a look of
were
resolving to do the hard thing if
wouldn't
have been able to see her face
through her dark veil but it would
have shown in the lines of her
figure.
Add to that the look that is on
the face of any daughter whose
father has just died of a long and
painful illness, and you have the
been

After the service Was over those
had not to
“ walked

betes , . through the choir with the rest of
woman, I blushed ta seein the congregation and looked down
on the King’s coffin as it lay in the
opening in the floor that led down

lowered into darkness. But cer-
tainly from what he said he had
believed fully in the resurrection
and life in a new Heaven and a
new earth. As we left the choir
some men were bending over the
purple velvet stand and taking
Crown and Orb and Sceptre
cases,
t They wouldn't be used again till
w the Coronation, the signing and

sealing of the Queen's consecra-
tion to this life of overwork and
constant effort to make a complex

THE GALLOPS

with her in 1.25, It was his first
gallop over this distance and
it very well. The

Cardinal is eer Guineas
8 go
I was not pleased to find myself He did a box to bes with Guin Site

took only the last five which

Bt.
Clementina was well fsa over

Watercress was not allowed to
much returning only 1.31 for
Another who

There was next a three horse
allop in which the visitors from
ntigua and St. Kitts were seen,
wish Cottage, Vonwise and Condevon,
_ But ag they are named, or Sea Bis-
there were so many people tn be- cuit, Citation and Nonr, as they

SUNDAY ADVOCATE

(From Our Own Correspondent

PORT-of-SPAIN, Feb. 16

Trinidad treated the huge Oval |
crowd today to delightful Satur!
day afternoon batting and by a!
colourful century by Nyron As-
garali scored 316 in 300 minutes
for the loss of four wickets to
end the first day of the second
Trinidad-British Guiana match.
It was Asgarali’s second century
in his career. He and Ken Corbie
making his intercolonial debu
put on 170 for the first wicket
which broke the record for the
ground against British Guiana
scored by the Stolimeyer brothers
since 1944. Sharing the spotlight
with As and Corbie, was
Noel Guillen who played bril-
liantly before he was bowled by

as *



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and Norman Wight for 50 by the |
luncheon interval, When with the
the score at 78 without loss, As-
garali 50 not out, Corbie 25 not
out, Trinidad sent up the 100 in
108 minutes before tea, |

At 133, Corbie with his score
47, cut hard into Leslie Wight’s
chest off his brother’s bowling.
Leslie juggled the ball and drop- |
ped it.

if Asgarali who wag particularly |
severe on Patoir, got 100 when |
he drove the leg spinner to the |
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shied for a single. His century
was scored in 163 minutes.

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Trinidad’s first wicket ee
170, Corbie cutting

Norman Wight’s

fell at
and edging
off spinner into





wicket keeper Mc Watt's safe
gloves, \

Asgarali went at tea when he
cut Wight to the slips where |

Camacho took the catch with the
score 212 in 212 minutes. j

Guillen who batted slowly be-
fore tea, brightened considerably
after the interval and with Legall
and then Chicky Sampath kept
the score abreast of the clock. |
Guillen was bowled in crossing to

Gaskin for 70 and Tangchoon
played out time.
Scores : ¥)










, Trinidad’s First Innings

tween them and the pregs that are called, They did four in 56 T 1
there had been opportunity for Twinkle w: Vt Reeiatatt 6 Canines & Ne Sure ‘ . e | Pp R
ooee. 2 go oe oa gallop with Gavitte tt was a Spo Combe Me Watt b N. Wight. 38 " Yy ain eliever

‘rong. was precisely to kee Gritlen b Gaskin .., . =D s s
things going right in spite of the Wee Vay wea oe ee see ere nn ON. Wien at containing Vitamin B
complexity of the machinery of Apollo did 9 box to box in 1.28 Tanschoon mot out i 1
modern state that the dead King and five in 1.09%, never allowed to ——=Extras aa want fi
had laboured so hard. The day run. cy ma | if ve to get QUICK RELIEF
was of course not lost for us, “First Adria! hid the better of a a Bie | cI EARN, gee Site 3 extoy thy

Resurrection, Life Miss Friendship over a five in 1,05. Fall of wickets: 1 for 170, 2 for 212, | take EAST writ Table.

We stood on our perches and Ractan was the last I saw. He did. 2 for 256, 4 for 311, There’s nothing else lik YEAST.
listened to the words of the burial a box to box in 1.254 ,and the last BOWLING ANALYSI VITB. It o the ONLY in
service whieh spoke of the resur- five in 1.07, Once the proud pos- me o M . wt reliever which ALSO cuataien’ the
rection and the life, of a new sessor of two bowed tendons he Gaskin . 28 7 @ 44 tonic Vitamin B,. Don’t axis
Heaven and earth and proclaimed now displays two of the cleanest Camacho 13 1? aad and get some YEAST-VITE
that the Lord is our Shepherd legs in the paddock without a Peco : 18 1. | Papier now.
therefore can we lack nothing bandage to hide them. Strange eee 7. : . :

they were coming in a double and we were soothed by the per- game this horse racing. Gibbs ee 2» — For ~~
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How the famous
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POSTAL TUITION
P YOU FEEL that you cannot pass the [in wuich OF THESE |

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Opportunities — here's a message of hope foseebre: Ses, fess)
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EAR OUT THE COUPON

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(subject) |

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IN 1908 Prof, C. V. Boys made the following
remarks in his Presidential address to the

Physical Society in London : ;
“The Lubricating property of oil depends 7
on something which is at present un-

no-one knows what oiliness

This blissful state of Coe continued until
March 1920 when Wells and Southcombe pub-
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7
Ps
) SUNDAY, FEBRUARY 17, 1952 SUNDAY ADVOCATE PAGE ELEVEN
> 7: ¥ T ao
5 PAINTINGS OF. |
'
ee ‘DO YOU KNOW] |
i
9
&
-that when you swallow your
F Irs. Golde W 1as fo any By OUR ART. CRITIC first one-man exhibition of Golde ¥ ae . pa oe . 7.
be c to the cause P White’s art. It is to be hoped neers a dimednak as 0 or
a of e We Indi during ceasingly to foster an interest in that others will follow, for in her 40 f et? This ‘trattic “mu t
: i Sritis ; a * the ars, using this word in its work there something for art keep moving constant
- ‘ to the Georgetown widest sense. Her interest in the lover and artist alike. otherwise your digestion
. i ad founded work of children hag never S246 of tho oils on exhibition “Bus~ | BRcetse roc Sabor sens
re: during the them the flame of enthusiasm for bY’s Alley” is a pleasant arrange- tired, irritable
Sar \< Sonsiahs ‘ nilar -all that. is beautiful. men of form and colour, well lit, There’ ‘snothing like spark
Soc . toiled un- At the Museum there is the ®"d the drawing is highly expres- | ling Andrews



sive. In “Red Fish”, a good com-
position, the translucency of the
fish and the hot, clear ligh have
been handled with dexterity
“Joe” is an excellent portrait.
The background is full of interest
and is only marred by the intro-
euction of surf at an unlikely
angle at the top of the painting.
This would be greatly improved
by con inuing the flat treatment
of the beach to the edge of the
canvas.

to revent sluggish
Andrews, the gent)
tive, helps the wonderft
mechanism of your v
to fwnection easily und
regularly. Remember

| Andrews 40?

for
Inner Cleanliness Stop over-forty overstrain!

Headaches, indigestion, lack cfenergy, inability
to concentrate, are often the consequences of
{ the physical and nervous strain caused by over-
© \~ BABY LOVES i work and worry. To restore your digestive and
metabolic tone, strengthen your nerves and j

increase your energy, start taking Phyllosan







“View from Gun Hill” is a
painting that grows on one. The
recession of colour is good and
typical of the island’s scenery.
‘The movement. is well conceived
and the aerial perspective com-
petently executed. “Joe and his
Sheep” depicts a happy arrange-
ment of forms against a back-


















the womfert of Cuticurs
Teleum Powder, It is








; a . emquiaitely perfumed, and { tablets to-day! Just two tablets three
ground that does not protrude. A . Weepe baby's skein cool, | times a day before meals, but if you
strong feeling of sunlight is con-- G@OLDE WHITE'S Manda, one of the many paintings done by her at and tree from chafing 4

veyed by muted tones rather than and _ now on exhibition at the Barbados Museum. Make bp bath
by an excess of brilliant colour ‘ |
too often employed by the unwary exhibited in this medium her por- tunately, it lacks conviction, since |
painter of tropical scenery A trait heads are the best rhe more closely resembles ‘“Toy-

harmonious little picture is “The Big Hat", “Manda reading the own.” The heavy deliniation of

Scotland Districi? composed in Bible” and “Old Manda” — all the railway line has the undesir~

blues and greys which success- heads of women—are full of char- le effect of leading the eye out

fully convey sunlight, shadow and acter and, doubtless, excellent of the picture, instead of towards

distance. “Children examining a likenesses of the sitters, Above the centre of interest,

lustre jug” has the distinction of all the drawing here is good, which { White has been fortunate

a painting by Mary Cassatt—the cannot always be said of her enough to be able to keep in touch

famous pupil of the Impressionist figures in landscape. ‘Doris’, a i: the art movement in Europe
painters Manet and Degas. Al- girl arranging her hair in front of ty periodic visits and by working

though Mrs. White’s painting is a mirror, is a clever piece of fac- in art classes there, Although not
in no sense derivaiive, she has tual representation. “Cannonball herself a “Modern” painter, she I Rl JFORM FI .E X IBLE FOO TWEAR {
achieved the bravura of that Tree” is clean and fresh, and the has been able to distill from mod=

American painter. The juxtapo- true value of watercolour appre- ¢rn art such “tricks of the trade”

sition of blue and yellow against ciated. “Stow-on-the-Wolda” has @S she could usefully employ, It is }
the darker flesh tones gives : eae sitters ‘7 to be greatly regretted that other FOR CHILDREN : : {

take the tablets regularly, the
results willastonish you. °

-PHYLLOSAN

fortifies the over-forties :



® an entirely different set of values

scintillating effect to the centre the less brilliant light of an Eng-, local artists have been unable to f 4 yi
of interest—the lustre jug. lish summer’s day is clearly dis- pursue this course. One a > ni
~erni , : hope that the British Council w {
Of all Mrs. Whiie’s oil paint- cernible. rat seams : ‘ \
ings “The Careenage” is the least : , hola ei eo eh eae ppoBtt \
successful. Here she has altered “Bathsheba in the days of the iolarship iis year ° = os, Ia {
her palette and lost the effect of Railway” should have been an hich has hitherto been left out ar dkenn )
strong sunlight. The picture has historic piece of painting, unfor- in he cold in this respect.







no recession and looks cramped in }
jog frame, owing to insufficient i
THIS is one of Harold Connell’s pencil drawings which are now being *"Kire, White is also a skilful Prize Books For t niversity College »}i
exhibited at the Barbados Museum. water-colour painter. Of the work (DEAL FOR . 3 }
At their recent meeting the the interest used for an annual e \\
|couneil of the University Col- "im Books whichis tbe GROWING FEET ““ t
lege oan rae ge ac hie vr of the University Collene i)
ed with gratituag re ome essay written during the
by the Trustees and forme! vacation on a subject pro- 44
members of the Young Men’s 1 by the a of the Univer MADE BY BRITISH CRAFTSMEN BACKED BY '
G uild of Georgetown, British BP sig sail Pepe w 4
Guiana to give to the Univer. °,0Pen to all undermraduates and | OVER FIFTY YEARS EXPERIENCE
fy Gallons um of $786.00 ¢ . The Cc iT resande | i;
Ret jaa lhe Derensastaer ol ty SUPPLIED BY YOUR LEADING STORES
The money is to be invested anc ft i}
SSS
FBSA AIFS EAE PEG EFS SILES SS SESE SES EEF
t
my }
ROBERT J. MacLEOD is well known for his sea-scapes. This one is among his exhibition at the PA |
Barbados Museum. 1c
Y a
) IF YOUR BUNGALOW IS ONLY
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INSURED AGAINST FIRE.... IT'S
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is PAGE TWELVE SUNDAY ADVOCATE SUNDAY, FEBRUARY 17, 1
a EL TS a ae

comers nem

=
ue
tw







PEN PALS
. . ARNOLD GRAY, Stanley Town
; ar , Village, West Bank, Demerara,
; , Ape British Guiana. Age 21, wants Pen |
b. ae % Te! hi Pals between the ages of 18 and 20 |






























































18—“Apply thine heart unto instrue-

14—Feminine name Ae oh i)
15—Bring to a level
16—Assam silkworm Y
17-—Hindu diety Gri | GF
aeiats Cee
words of knowledge” (Pr. 28: 12) YY
19—Reveded | a GY ny
20—Provided with pedal digits Uy} Y





21—Tear violently %Y Wy"
22—Suare ta ra i i
23—Who stood against Israel and pro-

voked David? (1 Chr. 21:1) sat yr Gl |
25—S pace
26—'‘jymbol for tantalum AA f YY
28- “Can one go upon ——— cvals, Uj)
and his tect not be burned?” (Pe “ee

vie ra rt
29—Y ields } A.
°3—Expressions of surprise
85—What disciple followed Jesus afar
off, when he was taken before the
high priest, Caiaphas? (Mat.
26:58)
387—Go quickly

$8—First born son of Eshek (1 Chr. Ys ee
8:39) rer

40—Kinds
42—“Then shall he speak unto them









in his wrath, and vex them ie 53—Spruce 65—-"——-—. sharpeneth ; soa
his displeasure” (Ps, 2: 4—Of what waters were the [srael- man sharpeneth the countenance
43— City built by Asshur (Gen, 10: it) ites unable to drink because of of his friend” (Pr, 27:17)
45—' a just man, and he will the bitterness? (Ex, 15:23) 66— Portico
increase in learning” (Pr. 9:9) o6—For whom did Jacob serve seven 67—Passageway between rows otf
47—Writing implement years? (Gen, 29:20) pews
48—One of the races among whom the 59—Apple-seed 68—Employed
Israelites dwelt (Judy. 3:5) 60--Heavy cord 69—Animal’s feet
50—The waters of what sea were dried 3. Bitter * %0—“Notwithstanding the Lord-
by the Lord for the Isra lites §4—"God is our refuge and strength, with me, and strengthened me”
fligut from Egypt? (Josh. 2:10) a yery Arsen ——- in trouble” (2° Tim, 4:17)
62—Prefix: of (Ps. 46: 71—Seriés
(Copyrieht, 144 Kinw Features Syndicate, Ine.t



Your Factory is in the
hands of your equipment.

See that your machinery
is fitted with materials
that you can depend on.

~

That is‘why you must use

we ‘





the timbrel, the ples asant
with the psaltery’ (Ps, 81:2)

8—~Those in office

9—Note in the scale

10—What Apostle’s surname was
Thaddaeus? (Mat. 10:3)

1l—To whom iid werent first belong?
(Josh, 21:1

1yCounte vane

18--Commanded

19—A part of Nimrod’s kingdom( Gen
10:10)

22—Footed vase

24—"I watch, und am as a sparrow
Bees: aeeee the house ——

(Ps. 102:7)

poste artery





26—"The things that my soul refused
to ————- are as my sorrowful
meat” (Job 6:7)

27—Who was Zabad's father? (1 Chr
11:41)

29~—-Waxes
0—“Thou crownest the year with thy
oddness; and thy paths

atness” (Ps. 65:11)

31—Wandered

2—Tower of " (Ezek, 29:10)

34—Into what kind of pitas did Lot’s
wife turn? (Gen, 19:26)

86—Indian symbolic pole

39—Who was chosen by lot to be num-
bered with the other eleven
apostles? (Acts, 1:26)

41—Discarded

41—"Thou shalt not oppress «.. ———
servant that is poor and needy”
(Deut, 24:14)

46—Personal pronoun

49—Sesame

5i—Who took over as king when Bel-
shazzar was slain? (Dan, 5:31)







breezy platform?
‘apIsyno yInys OF peYy ay ‘Alem
“FON Woos ous opisuy Bt op / MOLNIOS

erie built by King Solomon (1 Ki

oe The is prepared against
the day of battle: ber sate is of



the Lord” (Pr, 21:3

566—Grate

57—Records of proceedings

58—"The cock shall not. ———,
thou hast denied me thrice” Fiee™ (onn
13:88)

:9—Mexiean dollar

61—Bard

62—“Wisdom is before him that hath
understanding: but the eyes of ¢
fool are in the — of the
earth” (Pr. 17:24)

64—Strike

67—Roman coin

vn)

STapasAaTopols s7sIMy a

IS) SISTINE al st UW Z7y] OF] S}

INL OFS) al al Hg tay Shy

BEDE EME mEIEIE













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PSINIVisISINZAal ieVAalalol 41
1G} 3/918] SA Sleal VAAL ils!
SE 1a SINIVI WAV} 9} I I

Hidal In sloZ 7 Talore)

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THOR GOODYEAR RUBBER BELTING

Sizes 3, 3}', 4’, 43" and 5’

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Rp, 7 i ( \
ees, my preferably females. Hobbies: |
wa os . f . cricket, nee movies, photo- |
sto anh ,
did ne ane c i Ol \ ou } l wth. W. ‘Bailey. C/o Machine |
_ : ’ eae Office, T.L.L.. Pointe-a- |
a Pierre, Trinidad. “Writs pen pals | A
his between ages of 17 and 19. } z
tha Errol i, c/o Machine Shop 7
eae Office, T. Pointe-a-Pierre, >
a rruuees: Y a iw pals between | ;
the ages of 16 and 18, ®
er,
ev YOUR SLIP IS Built-in Headache W1 th
ton SHOWING. SONIA Mii! etting estimates for
iro ERE IT iS! A ri this week for eve r r boy by . dehateuetion work on a new
Ret surprise o ry girl or 00 home. Som -orkmen
ie H ‘eho loves planes, But this s no ordinary plane is i eee ERNEST DUDLEY ju “ee their bids, oath this ye 4
oe a ene Sa ae lying ee ee —_ ee — te The Armchair Detective + r ‘ ensic
c e easi ‘ :
Pet a En yu co vd make a whole ficet out of a week's poeket-money 4a Ganaee ‘ 7 So The painter and paperhanger
a fore,“ Ginen circle O8.6 pléce | jage until the model is balsncet Ey t Creede luxuriously appointed Sonia’s soraia stories of her WN= = will work fur $1,100.
cay _balsa Wood (inch thick), Sa â„¢ ; Sehactiveie flat ae lights were derworld career, The painter and the plumber
Pat Dany point op, the outside TO PLY. Hola the Saucer as Cyioe y low (there was an I was working hand - in = gor $1,700.
. fae arate with ene | You Would for throwing a dart, = © pee! cut). pocket with Manny Skripp, smart- The plumber and the electri-
= ..P iene dotted with tne rose ee | might! i ” inight ee srtheng (another est book-swindler in the game,’ tian for $1,100.
ope oats the seoe out You need a iatee uld e t & af ges : ) as Sonia she continued in her alluring sin- The electrician and carpenter
o8 dotted ine. Glue along | space. The Saurer que uc then eg rom the window overlook- and-fog tones. “I had the novel for £3,300.
nd leave it to set. vane ing the High-street. notion of faking Casanova’s
rol yon need ase ous Sno She straightened her gaze, which memoirs.” The carpenter and mason for
oy ins are giued on top of the i had been bent on the stream of It seems that Sonia had $5,500. } MO ensig
= ea ee fi sleek limousines bearing expen tipped that Parry Graff, se er Ca mo Ci Mery a | Maa Pang
neath (as sho C * yf i
onary a lle—that’s ; sively gowned actresses and their known Welsh antique book-d estimated is fot each kin: Weapaca
chi ene, aoa piece, whl peor, oa ee escorts to the local would pay £10,000 for the orignal of work on Smith’s hew resi- — | p regtAisia
risa wood and giued on. the eo0m aBove night - clubs and gambling casinos. manuscript of the great lovers’ dence? . wgtAco
é 5 ice ny erout Ouse fubtnest “tm through with all that!” life- and loye-story, told in his ‘pod'es ‘tiosnin toqo'ee 2 ed v9 The famous threefold action of PHENSIC agtunane
ou sway trom. che ss cetsiem Sonia cried, a blood-red fingernail own hand. COON a sunuedegs suuTIniOS tablets RELIEVES PAIN, SOOTHES Cheek aad Rane
. along a line about “inch from the flicking the foot-long ash off her ‘For weeks Manny and I worked NERVES, COUNTERACTS DEPRES- coneNza
hat centre. You can test this by hashish cigarette “That aimless, on the job. We both got writer's | ? i Hveng ys
Qu resting your Saucer on a pencil empty glitter of hecti¢ milk-bars cramp, but we did it, We had ja It's Your Move SION. No matter how intense the pain, no TON
; angles to the fuselage oo and East Croydon’s tinselled spattered, travel-stained worm- tter hi how essed hin OME Brey,
a Push two pins into the fuse how aevow a night- -life. T'm through with eaten, cobwebbed, battered old matter how weary your nerves, t H Sect so
me a POPNOF: dteros . volume, which looked the genuine you feel, PHENSIC tablets will bring you
No pti lenimigi iach a : soggled Stina erktgh BT Uele SOR Enver t cover: relief and comfort, quickly and safely. Re-
te Vee an ee “Don't — «“Concocting the story that I’d . > uf
~ s don’t tell ef I asked in surprise, come by it py Ah Th an old member this — PHENSIC tablets neither
to suport and ei he LUNE UGre—ud a caieited junk-shop,” Sonia went on, “I harm the heart nor upset the stomach.
the os ecient ee mndon’s notorious Crime Queen }opped down with the book te Don’t accept substitutes, Keep a suppl of
rar 4 7 eyed herself in the tall wall- parry Graff’s home at Little P . pPp+y
be | mirrror. “Keep my form out of Binding-in-the-Slump. PHENSIC tablets by you!
sui this,” she snapped, : “The old boy fell over his beard
on She drew hef mink-lined bath- j), his excitement... . If only,”
Se robe, with its revealingly plunging and tears trickled down Sonia's TWO TABLETS
pe hem-line closer round her shapely jose and put out her cigarette } aD
co figure. “There’s nothing wrong with a loud fizz, “I hadn't made BRING QUICK
we with it that a good foundation that foolish mistake... i
x won iva adhe mapmen Yo be BUT of course, YOU ‘nave woot Laie a) | RELIEF
' 5 . i l t awa . .
th: Sonia took a deep drag at her if ot at one « aoehey ON’T be misled. That Black
wi cigarette and et ae a glance at the picture gives you saat ee ee 1 is a King |
no cloud of hashish smoke through he cl so @ White 10-7 move may prove c
aa . a i ts ie te ends: tee iad, Gonia’s Slip disastrous. If you look Pgs 4-4 FOR RHEUMATI ae LUMBAGO, NERVE PAINS, -
hat Rupert has remembered is on it. someth al army “An thin it had’ en - rou will find a real stroke tha A
an the piece of bark he pic ked 7s i aeaitiline ‘be Pa The "elt for that silly slip I made—” She ee ae a oe vanihitates the Blacks. HEADACHES, NEUR LG A, FLU, coLDS & CHILLS
the pine forest, and running to his looks at it. Then he turns it over broke off—she was a_ terribly. Snote 2 | t sack he tips out some of the cones. and frowns. “1 don’: know what terribly brittle character. pase, Mer Sate he English in in four moves.—Millard Hop- =
Sure enough the bark is there and, you're talking about,” he grumbles I leaned forward on the edge of a = Ss ta & win in a. = =
picking it up, he hands it to the There's no writing at all on a : j . the mistake Sonia made. per: pe
lis Autumn Elf. “ There's e this!" my chair—the seat was missing. MA OUOM—TE-L cts
be ee Biri La anyway—eager to hear another of —LES. "ETE (LIK WT-OT ‘81-6 “PEST FUOHITIOS E : Y F d
io, njoy Your Foo
bu °
by Hugons Shoper an Entrancing Job
HORIZONTAL Joke R. JONES, janitor of the rai! HAVE NO FEAR OF
1—What is the 29th book of the Old cae, way station, has to clean
estament? ag > i yhich has 37 VOUS
5—From what place did Solomon ob- ie. grandson of Judah (1 Chr, the waiting room w a 3 fin- NER US,
tain gold fox himself and his 4:21) entrances. When his work is fir
temple? (1 Ki. 10:11) . feed Rodd 5—Runs ished, he has passed through each INDIGESTION
10—To what Jewish animal of sacri- = 6—"They are all to him that entrance only once. Is he then
fice was Jesus often likened? Pus WY. AL understundeth, and right to them inside the waiting room where
(John 1:29) that find knowledge” (Pr. 8:9) there’s heat or outside on the
7—“Take a pslam, and bring hither

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————
<< —<——————————— —————_—









SUNDAY, FEBRUARY 17,

1952

\

ee

=
te
SON ASS OY W



FLINT OF THE FLYING SQUAD....



Wiice, in THe
WARDEN'S OFFICE...

THERE'S NO

2 OKAY, GIRUG/ I CAN STILL
yt

USE YOU ..SO YOU WON'T GET
THE SAME TREATMENT AS THE
WARDEN HGRE DID... BUT THIS'LL
KEEP YOU FROM DOIN’ ANYTHING
FOOLISH WHILE I’M BUSY...

f GARCON, TAKE THESE
P BAGS ANP MEET ME 47
WEE DORRIE WOULD RUN OFF THE “ANTON SANITARIUM"
NOW TO GET TICKETS, AND LEAVE
ME HERE HOLDING THE...BAG /
L- eGUPPOSE WEE LAURIE...

tlm

:







aS
Nee/

SUNDAY

ADVOCATE





PAGE THIRTEEN









BY CARL ANDERSON





A
TOAST TO











er i ’ , r
YOUR ~~
HEALTH!! ur WINCARNIS § War
ASSIST YOU TO GUARD IT
BUY A BOTTLE TO-DAY.
BY CHIC YOUNG
mee en |
Rag rs: _ IT PAYS YOU TO DEAL HERE |
SPECIAL offers to all Cash and Credit Customers for Monday 10 Wednesday onl

Se enema een



SPECIAL OFFERS are now © ble at our Hranches Tweedside,
Speightstown and Swan Street



Usually Now Usually NOW
Pkgs. Quaker Corn Flakes 41 .88 #£=Tins Pie Apples 96 DO
Tins Box-All Cleanser 23 .20 6 lb Potatoes 72 4
Tins Cooking Butter (5lb) 4.50 4.30 Boneless Beef 58 50

NOW, LEMME =}
SEE...ONE OF <
THESE DIALS Is



THE COLONRA D GROCERIES









World-wide and Handsome
THE NEw ausvrin A40 SOMERSET



GEORGE WMC.

HELLO-DINTY-THIS IS UGGS!
LISTEN -WHAT FOUR-LETTER
WORD MEANS "LABOR"? I'M
STUCK WITH THIS CROSSWORD
PUZZLE -WHAT ? YOL SAY YER
BARTENDER IS WORKIN’ ON TH’ }
GAME PUZZLE? FING '! ASK |
Mya, HIM = fLL
° 3 \
LH 5 |
2 Aa |
~~ i Hil a
|
BY ALEX RAYMOND |
a senineenipnicaiaiiale ipiialiaas Sains %
|
\

MANUS



De eeecerecetaeeniameneneeenennentaiataiiaataeta tase aerator An oeecteetl

* AUSTIN again makes world





news~with this exciting, hand- rik
some new saloon. The A40 NEW AUSTIN
Somerset has new refinements, A40
peta age new comfort and sepsreNbong §() M f R 5 F T
ORES ano & GUIDE the record-breaking 4-cylinder h 4 4
TO THE AIRPORT! IT'LL
pune Back 3 A O.H.V. A40 engine, with im- WILL WE
proved induction and cylinder ON SHOW
head design for extra to ear
° ' SHORTLY
performance. weba
i AUSTIN=-You can depend on it!
J

| ECKSTEIN BROS — Bay Street.







{“-





PAGE FOURTEEN

CLASSIFIED ADS.

TELEPHONE 2508.

SUNDAY ADVOCATE

|CHRIST CHURCH FOUNDATION BOYS’
| AND GIRLS’ SCHOOLS

SUNDAY,

_—_______ SUNDAY, FEBRUARY 17,1952
PUBLIC SALES §QHUIPPING NOTICES

FEBRUARY 17, 1952



PUMLIC SALES
REAL ESTATE






















































































—— ahiientierentemnisieniiinenidiaiay BEAT IT IF U CAN! TRUTH AND * : . AUCTION | 4
= " : RIGHT MUST PREVAIL! EVIL DES-| segment are invited for the post of Secretary and Treasurer)” GAR Ford Prefect Saloon 1947 model ROYAL NETHERLANDS | 2o.c5ccs0ssssssseesoey
uTS } N 3 ° s Ph. | ie
DIED FOR SALE BELLISHED WITH AND BY TEARS OR | e Governing Body of these Schools. ee ee Te ae Res STEAMSHIP CO. | The M.v. MONEKA will secet %
ae Saree — TARNISHED WITH AND BY REGRETS The post is part time and non-pensionable. The salary is $720.00 to offer this vehicle for sale by auction , E . Cargo and Passengers for Domin- q
; ’n Peorua 16 1952 at How sapeniiioaesh bed is WORTHWHILE ! CONSCIENCE | per annum abl hl " . B at McEnecrney’s Garage on Friday 22nd, SAILING FROM EUROPE i% ica, Antigua, Montserrat, Nevis §
ellis Cross Road. Elvin Austin. Hee THOUGH SILENT AND EXORABLE payable monthly (Cost of Living allowance will not be/#t 2,P.m. John M. Bladon & Company | M.S. BONAIRE, 22nd February, 1952. * and St. Kitts. Sailing Friday 22nd
funerol leaves the above address to AUTOMOTIVE LIKE A PENDULUM SWINGS ON given). Auctioneers 17.2.52—an.| M.S, HERSILIA, Ist March, 1952 inst
4.30 p.m. today for the Brethren Cg Ree ee oe Details S.8, BRATTINGSBORG, 13th March, 1952. ‘Tie MV. “DAERWOOD” wl
Hall, Bank Hall and thenee to the MAIN RD., A Very Suitable Cottage of the work involved can be obtained on application to UNDER THE SILVER OO COREA ee AM accept Cargo and Passengers for
Westbury Cemetery. Friends are 2 Bedrooms (possible 3), Toilet, Bath, |the undersigned. Applicati vi ferenc wt wR. Loris, ts. remem. Spenene
asked to attend perenne, Sees Hees, eed ieee ae ule aoe th re es must be sent to the HAMMER sk wissedde oe be pnd Aruba, Sailing Saturday 23rd
William Austin (Park Constable, B.S.A. MOTORCYCLE—1% h.p. only | 7 Sn » aoe P on airman or ‘ore i the plican’ By recommendati Lioy . WILLEMSTAD, h ruary, 1952 a ”
Husband). PC. Lionel and PLC. [OMe Me Rpring frame, come in ahd see | GecieG” fore years with a dennite | Will be fequired a peor A t | ee wil sell on TUESDAY fh at oar| SAMLANG TO PARAMARINO AND The M.V. CARIBBEE will
Ennond Austin iSons), Ema|it at Redman & Taylor's Garage Ltd. | °Oe ior 8 yeats with a definite to assume duties on the Ist March, 1952. Mart BRITISH GULANA BI cg oy Pky
t . Street cept Cargo and Passengers for
Austin and Olga Ince (Daughters), | Show Room 15.2.52—3n. a _ ue geen a GEORGE B. EVELYN | ¢ tron 3, 6 W.C. Bowls, 37 Coni | M.S. STENTOR, 28th February, 1952 Dominica, ‘Antigua, >
17.2.52 Cee EEE so a as $2. b a . . 27 Stove mneys, 191 Drums One- | 5.5. BRATTINGSBORG, 27th March, 1952 Nev a si =
tt ae 2) Ford Ve Count pe tame) ~ 2) D- 7. Co Soren Chairman, Brome. ‘Cases c tins Paint, 89 | SAILING TO TRINIDAD, PAKAMARIBO Neves and St. nits, Sawing #rt-
FIELDS—Ethelroseden, retired Sarttary oo ag yd General condition, veny 17.2.52—1n Dumfries, pkgs. Quaher Oats, 2 4 Cecoa ra AND BRITISH GUIANA Ste aeeeny
Inspector, St. James. His funeral | 800d. pply: C. Gittens, 5 Roebuck a tteries, Garbage M.S. BONAIRE, 10th March, 1952 NER WNERS’
leaves his late residence Endeavour, | Street. Dial 4353, 16:3. 90—-Oe Pe aa tae eke ee St. Michael. $F Oe eee Sam: |S.8. COTTICA, 1th April, ised. BW SsOGATION (ING)
St. James at 480 p.m. today for the 5 le Abreu. AT BANK HALL MAIN RD., Felt Huts, 18 Cases Lux, 70 pkgs Corn. | SAILING TO TRINIDAD AND CUKACAO Consignee. Tele. No. “047
St. James ‘meter’. No cards, friends . Vauxhall ‘elox 1951 Model im = < e,—Partly Stone 2-Storey, — . « 2 c ‘s * 7
$t. James 68 GAK—Vauxhall V Near Strathelyde,—Partly Stone 2-St 9.2.52—"n 2 Cases Macuroni, Andux Tollet|M.S. HERSILIA, 18th March, 1952.
are invited exéellent condition and only one driver. |3_ Bedrooms, all Conveniences, Very ‘oper ete. Sale 12.30 o'clock. Terms Cash 5. P. MUSBON, SON & CO., mn
Thomas 8. Rock, Hilda Mayers Couttesy Garage. Dial 4616. Large Enclosed Yard, about 8,000 sq. ft., a ’ , Agents.
17.2.52—1n 17,2.52—6n Siigbie Aigo for Business, Going Under NT NOTI ‘ES BRANKER, TROTMAN & CO.
diss saoseasbeenedassiiliipsiciadians i so oiiiadtieeltie f MA HILL, Main Rd., uctioneérs.
NURSE: On February 16, 1962. William CAR—Vauxhall 12 H.P. 1947. Dial 0 . = ee Seeenen Paty eee Grteade, . va e * (Xs .
usiac¢ is funeral will leave his late 16.2.5: . » ‘ondition, le
abdenoe Howreit’s Cr ; , Entrance and Spacious Yard, View of Canadia N t nh i st mshi
Roan to8 st Garhitvas Chapel: CAR—Vauxhall Velox 18 h.p. Saloon, Sea. Stock Pens, Going For $4,000, AT VACANT POST OF VISITING OBSTETRICIAN, n a 10 a ca Ss
ssked wo attend 10-50 Model. Mileage under 25,000 SEMURECE, Gencide-+Abenm Hew Coss . MATERNITY HOSPITAL UNDER THE SILVER
irse (Wife), Gwendolyn, | Courtesy Garage. Dial 4616, : ean sign
James, Ronald tance, ci 17.2.5: n, | Bungalow, all Modern Conveniences, Applicati ; : : xe HAMMER
sentiien:- iChtiaenn) phased: about 11,000 +q ft.. Going Under £2,700 pplications are invited from Registered Medical Practitioners a Thuredar 2ist by order of Mrs.
“ing q. oe : . sei A . H. H. nson UTHBO Sails
Pret yy pr Gakicd elec ba 3 Bedroom 12 teen Store Buraow. al for the Part-time non-pensionable post of Visiting Obstetrician, | Furniture at ‘Scsharbia: Sees) ‘Gettionts ” wr satitas earn Barbages Barbados
4662, Rock. 16 252-9, | Modern Convew'ences, about 12,000 sq. ft., Maternity Hospital, which will become vacant on the 10th of March, | Cross Road, which includes: Very nice | “LADY RODNEY” 13 Feby. 15 Feby, 24 Feby. 25 Feb
rss eer Going Under £3,100. In NELSON ST.,| 1952 Extension Dining Table (seat 10), Pedes- |«Lanpy NELSON” ¥ <3 >* “o7 ad Feb . + wv. nee
THANKS GAR-4 Year old Vaughall 16, gooa|B¥ The Bus Co. 2-Storey Stone] tal Sideboard; Bergere Rockers; ‘Upright | “GANADIAN CRUISER” ". .. 1.1 March 29 Feuy. 3 March S March
BRATHWAITE _W condition, suitable for taxi work, Owner | BUSiness Premises an@ Residence, Con- The salary attached to the post is at the rate of $1,152 per Chairs; Double End Settee, Revolving os ‘ e
Seatene cae ae. to bd our | wants quick sale. Phone 2607 veareeen Good Condition, Ideal for any | annum aoe — Ornament Tables; Morris
ppest gratitude to those who sent ‘5a usiness, Going Under £2,300. IN x rs, ord Cabinet, all in Mahogany:
anor 7 exteo oes ft Brat} +.» ban ST.—Large 2-Storay Stone Busi- The Maternity Hospital is one of twenty beds with a maternal fe oe Chairs; Cherry ere Barbados Barbades Bomton St John Bsittex
us on the death of Daniel Brath- : Z > ness Premises & Residence with a Large | pjinid att: : : : eo a elves, Glass and | ,, ” r
waite wae Pile he alias aoeatlien. S%:| Garage or Workshop, all Conveniences,| cHinié attached. It is primarily a teaching Hospital for Students | China Pit'd Ware; Dinner & Tea Services, “LADY RODNEY” > Pees + match 00 Mere at starch oe merch
The Brathwaite {amily 192.82—1n. | further particulars, Dint 8420, A-1 Condit'@n,, Taal for any Business, |@nd twenty are trained annually. It is served by a Matron, three a ae And Fittings. Electric Table | «LADY NELSON” ""92 Mareh 24 March S April 4 April 7 April
WUSKISSON: “The fomiy "of Whe Tate | aus ee 1 | 23.000" Can Buy 2230.00 pm unde: | graduate furse-midwives and the usual subordinate staff. Mateek Manet chk ioe, taeen | "CAN. CRUISER” 5... Cape TAR 0 MASE AT April
a Vv. uskiss 7 » ~ : - ° : Pnience sai : 2 as im Doub! Bedstead
Recirestation me ente teenen suneite to ng Ford prefect in pertect condition, ee ein aoe ane ae i eee a In addition to the ordinary duties, the Visiting Obstetrician ra bean Ree Mattress: a I ad » For further particulars, apply to—
Sil’ who attended the funeral, sentlartew Bellerig~2n | Below £600. Contact Me for Almost will be required to assist in the training of Midwives and in the] tor. M.T. Washstand, French Press, Towel
Wreaths, cards and letters of sympathy ——— Real Estate. “If 4 Can't— | supervision of the maternal clinic Sere eae, Wis ee. S508
or in any other way rendered assistance | “ CAR—1947 Vauxfall 12. .Good tyres and m1? Call at “Olive Bough, aay Press and Dressing Table, painted Cream;
in thelr bereavement, sagen, | attemy. 97,000 antes. | Owner leaving the Hasti Sh tae ed pe 3.89—In Applitations should be addressed to the Colonial Secretary, Bar- rng wh i Sa Be. ee P coves ; GARDINER AUSTIN & co., LTD,—Agents.
u son, “4 , tha si dwelling- ; ings, ; i
yuskisvon, Arthur Huabiewe.| Band. 91,000.90. Grevenson, io 21 | case Gvariocming "the ese btuale. i bados, so as to reach his office not later than the 29th of February,|4 Burner Valor Oil ‘Stove: iron Ppt
e or R454. 15.2.52=3n
17.2.52—1n Enterprise Road, Christ Church and built | 1952, 17.2.52.—3n.





to thank all those





———————
MARINE ENGINE—Mallard Motor Sail-
er 21 foot Morris Marine Engine full

of 12 inch stone standing on 2 Roods
15 Perches of land containing open











i





Stand; Zine Top Table; Cream Separator,
Churn; Kitchen Cabinet, Coolerator;
Tennis Nets & Poles; Lawn Markers, Fow!



























































































it wreaths, Caras or | equipment $2,000.00 nearest. Telephone verandah, drawing and dining rooms, 2 Coop, Galv. Trap Nest; Teed rs;
in any other way expressed their] 4490 or 3274 17.2.52—2n | bedrooms (with space for a third PART ONE ORDERS Gale. Feed Boxes; Brooding lamp, A MODERN BUNGALOW on 11,000 sq, feet land at Brighton on Sea.
sympathy in our recent bereavement kitchen, try, garage, servant's room, Empire Treadle Machine, Smiths Type- Contai 3 Bed along a ner convenience
which was occasioned though the CARS—1949 Morris Oxford Saloon | “ter and electricity. The above will be Bs writer, Pye Radio and other items. ee Renee EEE ae ler, eee
cone oe og Eta ying : 16,000 miles in excellent condition. ie up = tg a as. oe the Lieut.-Coil. J. CONNELL, O.B.E., E.D. Sale 11,30 o'clock Terms CASH. CECIL JEMMOTT
: May he ace rsa SD under on ‘Thursday ebruary Somme BRANKER, TROTMAN & CO. ss ricsiere BUERETN
Chloe Wailthe and family Weitable “for Mine "yee" Dodge Delite | at 2 0° in the afternoon. Ispection he Barbador Regiment 7 oo 33, BROAD STREET. KNIGHT'S BUILDING
17.2.52—1n | Coupe nas been well cared, Very suitable | @"y day on application to the occupier. Issue No. 7. 15 Feb. 52 Auctioneers, foes. SEV.
for converting to pick-up. 1938 Chrysler HAYNES & GRIFFITH, —————— TST SSS a o¥.2.68—2n
Royal Sedan going cheap, 1956 Morris Solicitors, 12 High Street. 1. COMMAND—CHANGE—OF
FOK RENT Minot 2 Door Saigon 12,000 iniles. 14.2.52—5n Captain SE. Ie Jofinson, assumes egmmand “A” Coy. vice Majer t.. A. Chate
Ju arrivi fortis lords = an ni mon’ ve w.e.f, 1 Peb. 52, .
Minors in assorted colours, We also have Rt Bema. Brand rent ample 3 bedroom |2%. APPOINTMENT i re . We always carry a large assortment of — %
3-10 ewt, Vans at prices prior to January | house, all conveniences, with party- Lieut. P. L. Cc. P i i se -in-e 7 yw 1 LEO 5 CHURCH
HOUSES vil Pe Mage Ro sine oO nuar, sided living soom, epeh verandaly kitchen February, 188, eterkin appointed second-in-command “B' Coy w.e.f. 1st . BEST BRITISH PAINTS tb ENAMELS
me ROYAL GARAGE LTD. and wsiitey routn., Garage, jaundry, 2|%. PARADES=TRAINING ORGANIST CHOIR-MASTER —
“Lil A ermal! self contained un- | Telepho 4504. 13.2.52—7n, | servant rooms and storage room under All rank: i ade ¢ 7 rsday * c i
furnished Vial’ Bréely’ ahd 00) WHA | cennenciee | ON attractive hillside site, Hockley New t.. He. Coy, ih eo weeetllct uehing 100 OE et eat eae ee] Applications to be sent to the in stock
attractive surfoundings, about 2 miles] ONE COMMER LIGHT VAN-New | Road. A, Barnes & Co., Ltd. Dial 4476 A’ Coy-—-Dvill under the CSM "A" Coy, Officers wil visit VPs. “B” | Vicar for the above vacancy caused Send us a trial Order
from city. Available immediately, call] tyres, new battery, in good working 13. 2.52t.f.m Coy—interior Economy—Checking Kit ; through ill-health. Salary $24.00 .
Mayers, | Advocate Advertising Dept.| condition, Dial 0163, 168.9080. | “Se eee at tnd containing 2 Signal Platoon ; plus Fees. A ;
al 25 or full particulars, - LAND—One Spot nd containing Th ‘ . a CENTRA
17.2.52-4n. |" VAN: Foursome Van 1949 model, |r more House spots at Derrick’s St Se ee Tete eee ett On Mon:-17. a0 -Wed. Feb. 58. State experience—names of two | 5 L EMP ORIUM
Dark Green (A-2) Good condi 4 eames. Opposite the Cuffley’s Phone 2707 ; ‘
eaeeresraprpsee nein ame Oe ieee. ie ndition: |5°"V" parker. Station Mill, St. Michael, Band Practices will be hela on Mon. 17, Wed. 20 and Thurs. 21 Feb. 52. ba from whom reer at ‘ Corner Broad & Tudor Streets
and George St.—3 bedrooms with running | Andrew. 12.2,52—4n 17,2.52—1n Recruit: ny f y ; :
water, drawing . Gining rooms —Electric _ 4. REGIMENTAL "SnooTs ee ee eee eee ce
lighting and gas for cooking installed — RIVERTON—River Road, s Ing on The Major G. Hy. St. AM Cup—Rifle, open to marksmen and ist Class
Garage and servant's room. Phone 2902. ELECTRICAL Tr ae ate iia aie ae Shots was won by C.S.M, Carter, G.A. with 103 points, C.S.M. Mandeville
; rooms, = and oor Sa light. In- Weyal Lawenacsnine Cp FOR SAI E . ’ . g
—oee a — | speetion by appointment wone 4019 i 9 %
WANTED Gna EMPFRON CAR RADIO tor sais.|"he'above will’be set up for sale ui Fees, UeSe” iP aaheBlnce "at i400 hours, on Saturday 20\ Feb. Ba. x ° x
Practically new, Can be seen at Lash-| public competition on Friday, the 22nd “i a we Ghace c a AS on R %
ley’s Limited. Sold for $179 * reduced | Gay of February 1852, at 2 p.m. at the} ORDERLY OFFICER AND ORDERLY SERJEFANT FOR WEEK ENDING —_— R J %
daimnte to $100.00. 12.2,52—6n | office of the undersigned. 2NTH PEB. #8. % x
HELE CARRINGTON & SEALY, Orderly Officer Lieut. G. C. Peterkin SWEET FIELD % -
Si ou Ss aan os cu, ft, Made by Lucas Street. sane: erent 409 Sjt. Reid, N. E. conti i vane a %
er perd | guarenteed, eR Next for du ve one House; comprisi
A WILLING HOUSB-BOY- y famous Orderty : hoo. ; Room
it capable references. nai SITE Lieut. T, A. Gittens upstairs three Bedrooms, WILL OUR CUSTOMERS PLEASE NOTE ~
r Bring Ca out hew show room. K. RK Orderty bi v.N 2 .
ing. The Moorings” Martie Gaiden. [P20. “Dial $188, 5027 or 461 The un Wal pftee, 208 pale one 30 Sit A ORMWES-COY., tfc} Totes baiies! tae THAT BLCK WIRE HANGERS AND $
10.2 62—In ; a or rn to public competition at their office M. L. D. SKEWES-CO>., -tsjor Toilets and Baths, one with Tub 4 Q
duinee reek en Fetlae the Win Purtusry 6.0.1.7 - © Adjutant. Bath and hot and cold water, GALVANISED HANGERS _ RETURNED %
CASHIER: Lady for our Retait ADIOS: ‘well - 4 Berchis er ath crema cana Rooms, a a rarer TO TS .
oe rast utes tberiternoetiel kc : The known for ing sites at PART Tl ORDERS 8, Kitchen, and Shower OUR DEPO AND HEAD OFFICE x
person. GW. HUTCHINSON & CO 9-tube sets, only a few left. See these | Maxwell Long Road, Christ Church, This 2 Room. Standing on approximately OUR DEPOTS AND HEAD OFFICE .
LIMPTED ave 17.2 62 =. before buying. Redman & Taylor's Garage | jand has a frontage on the Maxwell Long THE BARBADOS REGIMENT SERIAL No 2% Acres of land about 100 yards n s x
, Ltd, Show Room. 16,.2.52-—-3n. Roed of 128 feet and over 900 feet along 7 anaie ieee a nee ee eh ee from G bbs ae Inspection by s WILL BE PURCHASED BY US AT 3c. os
7 on . nother blic road runfing along its 4 a . N “ 4 appointment iy. ; >
"TRNAGE HOTLER Wart (ave sod] “HEFNIGHRATOR One @ cv, | cntve tngin. Vacant possenson svatsple,| Cb! Springer, M. 0, tn. HQ. Gogg gy manine vasaion jens we § ee ae :
cee in. Apply to ‘Lady Deane, | ee present needs, Phone 8256 between 8 eeniete oF Saree -_ M. L. D SKEWES-COXx, Major See . x
2 a fa bay 3) Om. 80d Sem, Soe pemniesion to view. HUTCHINSON & BANFIELD, $.0.L.F. & Adjutant, A Two Storey Stonewall resi- s
TWO JUNIORS—For our office, one of , i 1. anes Street the, Free era SS with hoe ao gene . %
shoul av ack : ——$—$—_____— TT % : -
Rateete steer serine: fan fe 16,2.52—6n, NOTIOR attached, Large Living and Dining SANITARY LAUNDRY Co, LTD. $
person to A, S. B:yden & Sons (Bar- FURNITURE a ae aie The Mess at Home for Members and Honorary Members which should have Rowin, tloe Galery ren . © Phy sen s
3) LA 4 — — taken pace on Saturday 23 Feb 1s cancelled. instea ere W e e 5 = .
bados) Ltd 14.2,52—t.f.n, | Taken pene on Couey So Soars ahproximately 8,000 equate ountry Road one 3: %

_-

CHAMSER OF COMMERCE

Applications in writing are invited for | Pargains in

the post of fulltime Secretary (male).
Salary approximately $200.00 per month,
acecerding to qualifications Successful
applicant must bssume duties not later
than Ist May, perferably earlier. Further
details may be obtained from the present



Secretary. Applications giving details of
past experience and copies of testimonials
should be sent by 28th February to the



Chamber of Commerce, Bovell & Skeete | poa¢,

Bidg., Lucas Street



16,.2.52—6n
MISCELLANEOUS
BOARDERS—‘‘Private family near

Savannah can accommodate visitors to
Trinidad. Single or double rooms, Write
Mrs. Stone, 80 Dundonald Street, Port-
of-Spain.” 9.2.52—12n.

eo
WANTED TO BUY ANTIQUE GOLD

SEAL. Phone Mrs. Russell, Martine Hotel
b 18.2.52—3n

OLS OLELEEPESLEPDSOOES,
NOTICE

Mr. EB D'ABREU has returned
to the island and is carrying on
his TAILORING as usual at Mar-
hill Street 15.2.52—3n

LCCOPPPOOPOPOE SPFFPOOOEâ„¢
Se | .



The Roebuck Street
Moravian Church
ANNUAL FAIR
% will be held on THURSDAY,
May ist, at 3 p.m.
Interested Friends please
Note !

a |



Special Offer

ELECTRIC
CLOCKS

Table Models with
luminous dials

G. W. HUTCHINSON
4222 & Co. Ltd. Broad St.

$7.52

each

SIEGES

EXHIBITION

BARBADOS
MUSEUM



f
{

WEST INDIAN
PAINTINGS

By ROBERT J. MAC LEOD

and

PENCIL & WATER
COLOUR

Figure Drawings of
West Indian Subjects
By HAROLD CONNELL
OPEN FEB. 9—MARCH 8

10 a.m.—6 p.m. nN
}
(

FURNYTURE—Ralph Beard offers you
Furniture, Mag. Dining
Chairs $2000 pr. Birch Dining Chairs
$16.00 pr. Also numerous other Articles
in furniture at reduced Prices. Call ut
Lower Bay Street. 16.2.52—2n.
——$——$_$___ TT

POULTRY

‘TURKEY COCK AND HEN and a
humber of fowl eggs for sitting. Phone
17.2.52—Zn.



LIVESTOCK

COATS— (3) Alpine-Sanaan Goats
heavy in kid each gives between 10 and
12 pints when fresh. Apply Benjamin
Springer, Belfield Housing Area, ok
Rock. 17.2.82—11

MECHANICAL





“AEROMOTOR In good order.
Por particulars dial 4506. 102.522"

_———
ONE FOUR WHEEL CANE CART with

eS pneumatic tyres and brakes.
eed wi & » never
used, Dial 4616. Courtesy

15, 2,52—6n.



Apply to Marion J
opposite Belmont hureh,



15. 2.52--3n.
ANTHURFUMS—In large and small
drums and s: Prodgers, Smalltown,
4%. John, . 17.2.52—2n
ANTIQUES — of every
Glass, old Jewels, fine Silver
Watercolours, books, Maps, Auto-
graphs ete., at Gorringes Antique Shop
adjoining Royal Yacht Club,
3.2.52—+.f.n.
AIR RIFLE shipment of
these just 22, and 177, call

early at Redman & Taylor's a Ltd.
1 "

ACCESSORIES, for the Car Chamois
Leathers Repair Kits, Car Polishes, French
Chalk, Oil Cans, K.L.G. Spark Plugs,
ete., etc. Redman & Taylor's Garage
Ltd 15.2,52—3n.



BARBADOS ANNUAL REVIEW~--Last
100 copies to close local sales by end of
month, buy now from Advocate
Stationery, Roberts Stationery, Weather-
head’s Drug Store. 17,.2.52—I1n

a Be rental
CUT GLASS— At reduced prices at
Ralph Beard, Lower Bay Street.
16,2.52—2n



designs fast colours 36” wide. Usually

nc ——
COTTON SEERSUCKER:-In ten lovely
iF 12 yard. Reduced for ohe week only

to $1.05 yard Visit KIRPALANI 52
awan St. 17.2.52—1n
eee EEE
BGGS—Barred Plymouth Rock Exgs for
hatehing. 36 cents each, Infertiles. re-
slaced. John Alleyne, Ebworth, St. Peter
Phone 91280 15.2. 52-—3n
GLADIOLI BULBS: Limited number
w Gladioli Bulbs Orders taken for

Dahli & Gladioli Bulbs for next season

Delivery end of November. Dial 3425,
Cottage Gift Shop 13. 2.52—4n
GALVANIZED SHEETS — A_ limited

quantity. 7 ft. $4.80, 8 ft, 96.89, 9 ft. $6 45
Telephone 2696.
2.2.52—t.L.n.

Incuite Auto Tyre Co



MADAM
HELENE

HAIR STYLIST
BEAUTY SALON >
47 Swan Street
Hair Styled after
Apex, Poro or
MADAM WALKER

| Systems



the








“WINDY MILL”, Amity Lodge Estate,
Chriet Church. Modern stone-wall three
bedroom bungalow with running water
fm each room, warage, servants’ rooms,
ete. Excellent construction.

The above property will be oifered
for sale at public competition on Fri-
day the 22nd February, 1952, at 2 p.m
at the offices of the undersigned from
whom full particulars can be obtained.
The ey. is being offered swhject
to a m ate Tesetve and provided the
reserve price is equalled or exceeded it
will be sold to the highest bidder at the

auction,
CARRINGTON & SEALY,
Solicitors.
8,2,52—4n.







MISCELLANEOUS

— eee

WANDCRAFTS consisting of Baskets,
Handbags, Pottery, Children’s Clothes,
Embroidered Linen. Orders taken for
Flowers, Cocktail Savouries and Cakes.
Up-to-date lending Library. Cottgge Gift
Shop. 13,2.52—4n

ee
MEGASS: At a ee Factory,

Apply the Manager. Telephone 2442.
16,2.52—6n

OlL—The wtld’s finest motor oit
Veedol, at all leading Garages and Service
Stations. Your vehicle deserves the best.
VEEDOL “Pound wherever fine cars
17,2.52—t.f.n



PKANO, Broadwood Grand Piano in
good order, $500. Phone 4640 during
oMfce hours. 17.2.52—-1n

PURGRAIN Pigeon Feed — none |
better — 10-Ib, lots and upwards @ 19¢. |
per lb, Phone 2547, 8.2.52—t0 n |

SHIRT FAGTORY—Capable of making |
60 dozen shirts per day For particulars: |
Phone Johnson 4311,
13.2.62—Tn

TORNADO-—International K.41. Beautt- |
ful condition, excellent equipment, good
racing record, Cost $700.00 now $500.00. |
No offers. Hicks. Telephone 3189.

psa OOOO,
& WEAR A TRUSS
and Keep Feeling Fit §







§ IF YOU SUFFER FROM ¥
1% RUPTURE I can supply you |
i with a comfortable fitting %
* m I .

TRUSS. Simply drop a post &

~ card or call on x

| & ETHELBERT SPOONER &
| Edgecliffe, St. John ~
1e i | s
1% i.cpe 2
‘L9SSSSSSSS9S999509999098H XR
















TO-DAY’S HAWK



A
The Annual Sale of ~* _—

The Girls Friendly
Society
will be held at The Hostel

on SATURDAY, April 26th
from 3—6 p.m. Details later.

20.1.52.—4n.

See

R. E. HOLDER

Competent Electronician





No. 4, Tudor Street



“INCH HAVEN”

A new modern Bungalow, 3 furnished
Bedrooms, large Living Rooms, facing Sea fur-
nished, all Cupboards built in, all wood used
in construction Barbados Mahogany, Garage,
Servants Room, its own Lighting Plant, stand-
ing on one acre of land sloping to the sea.
Price £4,000. Apply J. H. O'Dowd Egan,
C/o William Fogarty (B’dos) Ltd.
17.2.52.—2n.

’ -

[topaysnawx || feet of land,
REPAIRS, ETC. | a

1
The Serviceman with one

aim:
To Give You Satisfaction
R. E. HOLDER, Electronician

situate at Navy
Gardens,

BUILDING

Warehouse and Bu‘idings situate
Marhill Street, Bridgetown.
Standing on approximately 10,000
square feet of land, This building
has possibilities for carrying on
any trade that you may require.

LAND .

Approximately 18,000 square feet
of land with one large and one
small stonewall build’ng thereon,
situate at Roebuck Street. Excel-
lent for making into a parking
place or building warehouses,

NEW BUNGALOW

Comprising Three Bedrooms,
Dining and Living Room, Kitchen,
Toilet and Bath. Standing on
approximately 11,000 square
of land. Situate near the famous
Rockley Beach,

PARAGON























Comprsing Four Bedrooms,
Dining and Living Room, Pantry,
Kitchen and a very nice Study.
Standing on 7% acres of land.
Situate Near Seawell Airport.
Price ‘very reasonable. Imspection
by appointment only.

BUNGALOW

Rockley New Road: on approx-
imately 19,000 square feet, of land.
Magnificent view including Golf
Course, three Bedrooms, Drawing
and Dining Room, Kitchen.

Downstairs: Garage, Servants
Room with Bath and Toilet, and
Cr. room for Laundry or
Workshop.



a

REALTORS Limited

REAL ESTATE AGENTS
AUCTIONEERS
VALUERS

BUILDING CONTRACTORS
151/152 Roebuck Street,
Bridgeto

Phone 4900





& Co.

ALF.S, E.V -A.

John M. Bladon

Real Estate Agents, Auctioneers,

THE FirM WITH TEE

REPUTATION





























-

*
6555595555599 GOSS SG9 FOF 9 SOO OF FOOTIE OD POGP FIO



AVING
TROUBLE? |
CHANGE TO) }

" >
x

Ps

+

x

e

.

%

>

3

FOUND WHEREVER FINE CARS TRAVEL

ROBERT THOM LTD,—Agents %
Tel, 2229 %

Pa

Is





Other Popular Shades
at

$2.80, $3.72,
$3.81, $3.97

LASHLEY'’S LIMITED.

Swan & Prince Wm. Henry Sts.









eS eS Se eS a ae ee

SUNDAY, FEBRUARY 17,

Panama Canal May

Be Rebuilt In 1953

g cacy of more thah 20 ¥ears, it is hoped
} e U.S, Congress will appropriate mofiey arid atithor-
ise the pfoper authority to start rebuilding the Patiama
Canal in January 19538, Mr. William L. Fresinger, former
Judge of the Court of Common Pleas and former member
of the U.S. Congress for the State of Ohio, told the Advocate
yesterday
id that unless America
ind herself in a very bad
ion, the rebuilding of the



AAP i E R <

have worked on the canal and
other first class engineers inter-
ested in the matter, would like it



Canal would take a lot of labour, to rettiain as such, but there

including labour from the West is certain agitation in the U.S.A.

Indies at good wages as to whether it should be a sea
Mr. Fresinger was one of the levél canal,

passengers who called at Bafba- Sea Level Canal

dos yesterday on the French ] think it is absolutely im-

Liner Liberté,

practible and impossible to have

a sea level canal”, Mr, Fresinger

He said that his interest in the

rebuilding of the Panama Canal said, ‘‘because it goes over terrain
Started from his services in Con- that is mountainous and practi-
gress with the Rivers and Har- ¢eally ali the engineers have said
bours Committee. that it was impractical and have

“There is and has been an
issue since the French started to
build a canal, as to whether or
not the canal should be a s
lock

advocated that we call it the
rminal Lakes Plan which is the
lock plan preposed by Capt, Miles
ea or DuVal, USN Ret., who was Opera-








‘ ti 1 Naval Officer at Panama
The present canal, he said, is a during World War II.
lock one and many engineers who Mr, Fresinger said that the









Right « on Time ¢

++.
NEW DAWN 30-hour alarm clock in
handsome cream, blue or green case with
lated fittings. 4-inch dial with full
uminous numerals. Also available non-

VICTORY 30-hour alarm clock in cream,
blue or green case with plated fittings.
4-inch dial with luminous spots. Also
Juminous. Superbly British-made by | available non-luminous. British precision-
Smiths English Clocks Ltd madeé— completely reliable.

Svmuith Mauns
Talking of HAIR...

what is happening to YOURS?

OBTAINABLE AT ALL
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When is hair healthy ? The truth is so surprisingly simple that
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hair root by tiny blood vessels in the stalp. Should the supply
of these vital hair foods fail, the hair bécomeés lifeless and
brittle — and finally begins to fall out, This often happens at an
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in a concentrated form which can be massaged into the scalp.
Pure Silvikrin carries on where nature leaves off. If you are '
worried about your hair it would be wise to
start with Silvikrin today.





Besides Pure Silyjkcin for severe dandruff and falling
hair, there is Stivikrin Hair Tonic Lotion—the ideal
daily treatment for less serious cases, and also
Silvikrin, Hair Tonic Lotion with Oil for those
whose hair is on the dry side.

eS

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: ORIENTAL







To-pAv's NEWS FLASH 4

250 copies Special Edition
King’s Funeral will be
reserved for us.

Only 47 left to be booked.

Johnson’s Stationery



|

|
SILKS, CURIOS, ARTS

VENDEMOS, SEDAS,

JOYERIAS ¥ ARTISTIOAS }) |

CURIOBIDADES, TRAIDOS {\\|

DE LA INDIA CHINA e {\\|

EJIPTO

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LOCK YOUR BICYCLE

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ee ee a ee a ee a a



SUNDAY ADVOCATE





building-of the canal would be Of apie. This would be of great ad- |
benefit to the West Indiés in addi- vants to the West Indies be-
tion to all the world for the caus ‘we have shipping in the
reason that the Culebra Cut pacific and will be having more
which connects the Gatum and and more all the time.”

Miraflores Lakes, would be wid- The Terminal Lakes Plan with
ened from 110 to 140 feet to take adequate locks would cost about



eare of more
The country

modern shipping ne



of what it would cost to
there has a greater build a sea level canal which
rainfall than any other like area speak be ehtjrely an experiment
in the world and there are many Mr. Ffesinger whose business
weather conditions which impede now is finance said that he was
navigation in the canal as is the conrected with the Mutiial, Mort+
case at the present time. gage and Investment Company of

The purpose of the Terminal Cleveland, Ohio, He igs also con
Lakes Plan is to extend the lake pected with the People’s Loan
on the Pacific side+Miraflores— gnq Savings Company 6f San-
which covers an area of about 142 dusky, Ohio, and has beeh with
miles to a point where they could those companies for many vears
make it cover an afea of four before he left Congress.

miles so that it could be used as
NAVAL AIRCRAFT

a mooring basis for beats to
FOR CURACAO

await the betterment of weather
condtions which are very danger-
WILLEMSTAD, Curacao,
Jan. 31.

ous at times to navigation.
British-built Fairey

Three Locks
Firefly aircraft, in service with |

The U.S. authorities are pro-
posing, tree locks at Miraflores the Dutch Navy, have been land-+
ed in Curacao from the Dutch

instead of two and éliminating the
he said, Feed bee a ated el bole” aireraft carrier “Karel Doorman”



Fifteen

neck. Ships going in there got to Strengthen the island’s des |
into cross currents and had to fences.

move out into the Culebra Cyt Apart from its vital oil refining |
under dafgérous weather condi- industry, Curacao also has aq
tions, whereas if the Miraflores Strategic importance in the des
Lake were extended, the ships fence of the Caribbean. During |
could be protected until the the last war, the air defence of |
weather conditions were better Curatad was undertaken by the |

and navigation was more favour- U.S. Air Force.—§.U.P.



“NEW RELIEF FOR

ARTHRITIC PAINS

But new treatment does more than
ease these terrible agonies.

prompt relief from the pains due to tie symptoms of arthritis and
rheumatism, but also affects the metabolic processes which constitute
a very important part of the rheumatic state’s backgtound.

DOLCI has n thoroughly tested in medica! institutions,
DOLCIN is being used now with unprecedented suevess, DOLCIN
is being ea by doctors now. nd mafy sufferers have already
resumed normal living as a result of taking DOLCIN.

Don’t delay. Profit by the experience of fellow-victims of these
pains. Get DOLCIN today. A bottle of 100 precious tablets rosts

only 12/- PER BOTTLE
SOLD BY: BOOKER’S (BARBADOS) DRUG STORES LTD.
Broad Street and Hastings (ALPHA PHARMACY)










| itching, Burning and Smarting of

Stopped In
(0 Minutes

| Since the discovery of Nixederm by an

Amerioan physician it is no longer necessary

r ar ne to suffer from ugly, disgusting

ring skin blemishes such as

. Pimples, Rash, Ringwotm, Psorl-

asis, Acne, Blackheads, Scabies and Red

Blotehes. Don’t let a bai skin make you

| feel inferior and cause you to lose your

friends, Clear your skin this new scientific

way, and don’t let a bad skin make people
think you are diseased.

A New Discovery
Nixoderm is an ointment, but different
from any ointment you have ever seen or
felt. It is a new discovery, and is not greasy
but feels almost like a powder when you
|
}



BEFORE

ie a po your skin—the trea'ment to malir
ore attractive, to hele you wi

ae Rinoae has brought. clearer

i iinter skins to thousands: such as M
rR who Writes: ‘1 suffered tram terrib!+

Hebd ing and s ser for
ata evetyth m0")

hea

It. stop; ne ite Sing in i
utes, Could see et, skh clearing
"

pins

apply it. It penetrates replay, into the pores | on the second day. e red disfigurity:
and fights the cause of surface skin blem- itches, snd scaly skin disappéared in ib
ishes. Nixoderm containg 9 ingredients jaye v lends were amaze at the in

which fight skin troubles in these 3 ways.
1, It fights and kills the microbes or para-
sites often responsible for skin disorders,
2. It stops itching, burning and smarting
in 7 to 10 minutes, and
the
lear,

provement in my appearance.”

Satisfaction Guaranteed
Nixoderm costs absolutely nothing unl «

it clears your skin (} your complete sat:
faction, Get Nixoderm from your chem
today. Look in the mirror in the morn!
and you will be amazed at the improvemen
Then just keep on using Nixederm for of
und at the end of that time it mu

r made your skin soft, clear, smoot
and magnetically attractive
the kind of skin that will m
miréd wherever you go, or you
tutn the empty package and your ronc;
will be refunded in fu et Nixoderm fro!
your Chemist today. The guararitee protec

cools and soothes
kin, 3. It helps nature heal the skin
oft and velvety smooth,

Works Fast

ecoust Nixoderm is scientifically com-
pounded to tight akl ‘iS troubles, it works
laster than_anythi i ad seen in your

before. It stops ching, butning and
smarting ih a few minutes,
work immediately, clearing
your skin,





—must give ve
ce you ad
simply 1



hen. starts to
and healing
making it softer, whiter av nd
velvety smooth. In just a day or two ¥
mirror will tell you that here at last 1é the
scientifie *re-tment you have been needing you.





TAYLOR'S SPECIAL BLENDED RUM

|

|

|| Let your next Drink be mixed with ||
|

|

(With the Distinctive Flavoyr)

YOU WILL BE SURE TO LIKE THIS BLEND
Blenders

JOHN D. TAYLOR & SONS Lid.



|
}
|

— =
Saupe Sot Seo

OO PSP SOP COO SOP PPG SOP AT III IIT os

x

Â¥

I
|
]
|
|
*

s

the resumption as from WEDNESDAY, February 20th %
%,

of its %

WEDNESDAY

:

which were suspended owing to the death of His

7.30 pum. to 12 midnight x

%,
C. B. BROWNE'S ORCHESTRA 3
AAA OCSE ELL O ALMA, 2s

Evening Dress

ttt tt tet oD
‘ AAAS CLEA









A new product, DOLCIN, has been created which not only gives 4

THE COLONY CLUB {

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announces Q |

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NIGHT HWOFFET 5
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+
late Majesty King George VI S|
‘
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MADE



29 880% 664














Giving new vitality

Take homea

TONI

BY THE MONKS OF BUCKFAST

and exhaustion and remember,
Wine Is especially valuable after iliness



BUCKEAST

ABBEY

if you feel worn out, der

generally rum down a glass or two a day of
Buckfast Tonic Wine will quix
energy and tone up the whole nervour «ystem.

kly restore lost

it fortifies you ogainse fever

Buckfast Tonic



bottle today








C WINE

Youthful Yao Restored

In 24 Hours

Glands Fortified &
by New Discovery

Are you tired
ith the

sufte

a

iter thor

Do you feel old before your time
Tun-town. worn out, apd unable to
speed and pleasures of modern lif
from loss of memory, rervousne
@ blood? Are you
+ or have an inferior
society of women or






ithout a second
conditions, ther “

and unless your giat ‘ ‘ i
mulated, you can tr tft
igour and animation

Vitalize Your Glands

Portunately for those who suffer from ray ~tte owe
gland action, a physician with 30 ATs "
has perfected a simple, safe, and je ey
tion to stimulate gland act! Bid thu
feeling of inereased enerey
This prescription, eatied Vi-Tabs, is in ‘ten
tasteless, tablet form. All you need to do
is to take two little tablets three time
each day, This prescription starts work
immediately, stimulating the @lantia, |
Vigoureting (he blood, and enlivening your
whole body. As yout glands rapidly beconie
stronger, you Will feel and ser yoursell he
younger, more hhasted t
ith gour werk, but









comin
only ‘able to keep up ©
ealtzing the, Jove A vd me re
more frequently tt for

Doctor Praises Vi-Tabs
Dr, J, Rastelli,, wid known Hurope
physician, recen'ty stoted “Ma
tists are of the Opinion that th
of youthtul Vigour and
giands, if we could keep
tioning properly, we Wor and
years younger § ead} € lotiget it
oh my yénre of experience in stud
practice, i! is My_opituen thot the
mula kno





Vi-Tab

eal. lore



TreCr as
rep 4



youthtul ® :
] tality to the b prit

24-Hour Results ar

Because, Vi-Tobs are | py
clentifically Sesieted t
and prepared to

ieTabs ° Quarante








Women
Admire
Vigeurows
Men

é gland tem, the

nerves,



f 4 eour, there is
& for ‘ Most titer§ re-
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' t ear

he reealt

after time
hich had
ne,

Results Guaranteed

of
is of
1 that new
sat ost
itiaf t Unh-
Vi Teobs at
i tat Ald see
v ing eh
and
ly
a 1 ‘ 1 ur

1 6 {WIL purchase
refunded el Vie Tabs from
tive guarantee pro-

fo Restore
nhood, Vitality

Ct

CALLING ALL HOUSEWIVES.

We have an excellent range of Breakfast,
Soup and Lunch Plates, Tea Cups and

Dinner,
Milk

Saucers

Jugs, Meat and Vegetable Dishes.

There are various designs

from.

N. BRB. MO

Lumber & Hardware

PD 2ODODDD DY D4 D®ODQDVGD VDE OODVDDGIVEY 4,

SEE
PATTERN

and patterns to select

WELL

Bay Street,



OUR BEAUTIFUL
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in Squares and by the

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GENERAL

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ABSA DALE Ee SE POSES SP FPDP OOH DO-GS



PAGE FIFTEEN

-- ~~ ~~
A BEAUTIFUL GARDEN
ENHANCES THE APPEARANCE OF YOUR HOME,

you ean achieve this by keepih# yours in good condi-
tion. We can our comprehensive
range of

GARDEN TOOLS

assist you fron



WE HAVE —
SHEARS, FORKS, HOES, RAKES, EDGING

TOOLS, SPRAYERS, SPRINKLERS.
Here's a special offer for this Week

jin. RUBBER HOSE @

BARBADOS HARDWARE (€0., LTD.

No. 16, Swan St. Phone 2109, 4406, or 3534
sosegeers

l6e. per foot Nett.



ral

Now Acailable—
THE CONCISE OXFORD DICTIONARY
CHAMBERS TWENTIETH CENTURY
And
WEST INDIAN COOK BOOK by Phylis Clarke

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Dial 3301

LALSC ES? ere

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ASK TO SEE

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Plantations Ltd.—4400
| Ward & Spencer Ltd.—2223

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Agents

——— iia einai dl
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y % be

a teow awe 1 aE,

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“\,.to the designers
and engineers goes
the credit for this
brilliant achievement.”

CONSUL

VO v4 ws obey



Drive it once,
Drive it twice
—And

You'll drive it
Always!

|| We have a small number of Consuls
‘| now available — choice of colours,
too!

Charles McEnearney & Co., Ltd.











PAGE SIXTEEN



Visitors Driving Hired Cars _,

Taxi Drivers
Diseuss Problem

A GENERAL MEETING of The Barbados Hackney Car
Owners Association was held at the Headquarters of The
Barbados Progressive League on Friday night, the 15th
inst., when the said Association was revived and reorganised
and the general grievances which are still prevailing both
at the Seawell Airport and at the Pier Head were fully ex-
plained by some of the prominent members of the Associa-
tion.

2
The question of self driven ‘ ‘

cars by visitors to the Island

within the first fortnight of On £5 Bond
their arrival, without any know-

ledge of the Highways Regula- “I have taken into considera-
tions or of the highways and— tion what you have said and
byeways of the Island as @that you are the wife of the
whole. was properly explained complaint but you should not go
and debated from all its legal to the workplace of the com-
aspects and implications by some plaint and make him miser-
of the members of the Associa- able?” His Worship Mr. G. B
tion present together with Messrs Griffith told Violet Butcher of
E. W. Barrow, M.C.P, J. Cameron Dash Gap, St. Michael yesterday
Tudor, M.A., L. A. Williams, as he placed her on a bond for
M.C.P., J. E. T. Brancker, M.C.P. 5)* months in the sum of £5

M.cC.P. The for stealing an iron drill.

point relative to an International | rhe, drill which was valued at
License was fully explained by 9 the property of Oliver
Messrs Barrow and Williams. Butcher, Oliver Butcher told the
Messrs. St. Hill, Green Bayley, court that on February 16 about
Burrowes, Gittens ana other 7-45 .8.m the defendant who is

: : his wife came to the DaCosta
ore ages wn se a cooperage and asked him for
ire 0 we gener:

* money. He told her that he had
namely:

no money to give her and then
For the first 100 miles

turned away from her.

: Edgar Gill said that he saw
eee Pe eee, »s the the defendant come in the coop-
sé aie he, Sai - erage and she had a talk with
a : , * _, Oliver Butcher. Butcher turned

They turther pointed out _ his back on the defendant and as
* might be ADs oe RW he did so the defendant took up
ne average visitor, TI the iron rill.
OF THESE RATES, to make yjolet Butcher said that she
ee, use of ot gs _ oe did not take up the drill but that
they do at present, e - Edgar Gill and her husband
licity Bureau could assist in this were conspiring to put her in
direction, it was ee aa a ne oeene 30 the court and
and also by means of suitable telling lies on her,
PLACARDS OR POSTERS at the “I went to my husts a to get

and C. E. Talma,

is.

rate...

rate is



Seawell Air Port and at the $1.00 from him and he told her
Baggage Warehouse. ‘that he had no money,” Violet
: Butcher told the court.
The following were appointed
Officers of the Association for
the year 1952, namely:

Mr. J. E. T. Brancker, M.C.P.—
President. Mr. Kenneth Forde
Vice President; Mr, C. E.
Talma, M.C.P. General Secre-
tary; Mr. C. BE, St. Hill Treas-
urer,

The revision of the Rules and
the Constitution of the Associa~-
tion is now in the hands of The
Brain Trust and Legal Advisers of
the Association, who are also
making a detailed study of the
grievances suffered and indigni-
ties meted out to small owners: the Governor’s Private Secretary
The General Meeting was then Major Denis Vaughn and Lt.
adjourned by the Chairman, Comdr. E. P. Mallinson, Field
Mr, Brancker, until Friday, be Commissioner for West Riding and
22nd, at 8 p.m. at the Head- yorychire, arrived at Comber-
quarters of the B.P.L., when com~= more School yesterday at 3:0’clock
pletion shall be made in mar- and was met by the Island Scout
.shalling the general grievances Commissioner Major J. E. Griffith
of its members, and in appoint- 5.4 Mr. L. A. Harrison, Secretary
ing the Members of the Com- of the Barbados Boy Scout Asso-

ttee of Management ciation.

The Delegation to prepare the “as soon as the Chief Scout
Petition and to wait on His arrived, the Police Band played
Excellency the Governor will the “General Salute” and the flag
be appointed at the next meeting was broken. Immediately after
of the said Association. this the scouts who were drawn
up in horse-shoe formation around
the flag post, welcomed Lord
Rowallan with a hearty yell. The
Chief Scout inspected the guard
and shook hands with each scout
in turn.

Afterwards Lord Rowallan took
up his position next to the flag for

Lord Rowallan, Chief Scout
and Empire.
Lord Rowallan, accompanied by

Germans Win
Bob Sled Event

OSLO, Feb. 15.

Germany’s number one team ihe salute and each of the twenty-
of world’s champions Andres one troops present marched past.
Ostre and Lorenz Neiberl won preceded by their colour bearers.

the 1952 Olympic Competition in
the bob sled event over 1 500 The’ aftertioon's eritertainmeht
metre course in five minutes 24.54 was highlighted by a cycle dis-

seconds play given by tihe Ist Barbados
Sea Scouts in which sixteen

American number one team of scouts took part, Each cycle was
Stanley Benham and Patrick cecorated with the scout colours

Martin took second place with 5 of red, yellow and green, The
minutes 26.39 seconds. Switzer- colours red and green were very
land’s number one team of Fritz significant and especially per-

Feirabend and Stephen Washer taining to Sea Scouting, since the
finished third with 5 minutes req flag on the left represented
27.71 seconds, UP the Port side and the green flag

represented the starboard side.

In this display which was
rather picturesque, the scouts
rode pass in file and formed two

ntl

WEATHER REPORT

circles, one of which rode clock

- wise and the other anti-clock

YESTERDAY wise. From the concentric cir-

cles they formed two separate

Rainfall from Codrington: circles and then joined again

nil. forming a figure of eight. At

Yotal Rainfall for month to this point they again branched

date; .07 inch. off into four circles and then

Temperature: 72.5 °F. formed the St. George’s Cross
Wind Velocity: 1? miles per and the St. Patrick's Cross.

hour ‘

29.983 A great deal of precision was

tas cn) . a? necessary on the part of the

acess opi scouts who code a this Gisplay.

since they pass angerously

TO-DAY close to each other, and_ the,

Sunrise; 6.16 a.m. crowd became _ rather _ restless

Sunset; 6.08 p.m.

Moon: Full, February 10.
Lighting: 6.30 p.m.

High Tide: 7.46 a.m. 8.32 p.m.
Low Tide; 1.15 a.m. 2.31 p.m.

fearing the possibility of a col-
lision which on many occasions
seemed imminent. Nevertheless
nothing of the kind occurred and
the cyclists received great ap-
plause for their performance,
The rally came to a close with





It Every Tume
NO, PHILO! DON'T TRY_\-
TO STOP MEI TVE STOOD
ENOUGH! T’M TH '
THIS IS THE END!FIN
TELL HER TO GO TO
RENO! I’M WALK!
GOOD



Repistered US Patew ORee






BUT, BUNSON,
) DON'T
BUST UP THE PART
COME ON BACK IN
EVERYTHING'LL BE

SSeS TE a ES









IM SURPRISED







J Wey HAVE




BACK HO!

Vag/é YS

Ox) >—
“aN 1 Sa



THIS IS SERIOUS!

DION'T EAT FIRST
ANDO HAVE THEIR



FIGHTS THAN A WESTERN
MOVIE HE'S ALWAYS

WALKING OUT OS! HER-SUT

HE ALWAYS STAGGESS /

SUNDAY ADVOCATE



Music Al The
Esplanade

The Police Band will resume
their public engagements today
by giving their monthly Sunday
Concert at the Esplanade Band-

stand beginning at 4.45 p.m, under
the conductorship of Band-Sgt
Cc. Archer. The programme wilj
be as under:—

Grand March-Processional—

The Imperial Crown Elgar
Overture — Raymond Thoma
Grand Selection — Cavalleria Rus-

ticana ...... 143 Mascagni
Sursam Corda — Lift up your ;

PRONE OS ies ocd Elgar
Fantdsia — Folks Songs of Scot-

land Sit taee alecb Mydlleton
Nocturne Celebre —

Liebestraumme Lizst .
Sacred Arias — Sheep may safe-

ly Graze ..........+.- .,» Bach

He shall feed His Flock. . Handel
Grand Mareh — The Queen of

Sheba ...... : .7... Gounod

Hymns—Jesus Lover of My Soul
The King of Love my Shepherd
is.

GOD SAVE THE QUEFN

News In Brief

A FIRE at Hanson Plantation,
St. Lucy at about 9.30 p.m. on
Friday burnt four and a_ half
acres of second crop ripe canes
and 200 holes of first crop young
canes, They are the property of
D. E. Webster and were insured.



MAUDE WILLIAMS of Good-
land, St. Michael, reported that
her house was broken and entered
on Friday between 6.45 and 10.45
a.m. and $57 in cash were stolen
from a bureau drawer in a room,

The Police are making investi-
gations.



Scout Rally For
Lord Rowallan

_MEMBERS of twenty-one troops including 10 Commis-
sioners, 27 Scouters and 157 Scouts were present at a Scout
Rally held at Combermere School yesterday in honour of

of the British Commonwealth

a yarn by the Chief Scout who
laid stress on courage and duty.
in his story he told of an old
African who had shown courage
and a great sense of duty in wars
and disputes among the tribes,
and had eventually risen to the
position of Prime Minister of his
State. He thought that this old
African would have made a_ fine
scout had scouting been started in
his day. After the rally had
ended, Lord Rowallan and many
of those who attended were enter-
tained to tea by Major C, E, Noott
Headmaster of Combermere
School,

Football —

@ From Page 1

ton pressing their
an effort to regain
advantage. Ably supported
their defence, the Carlton for-
wards, directed by Lucas at in-
side righ., swept down the field,

opponents in
their lost
by

but when their efforts were not
foiled by Morrison the Spartan
full back, Lucas failed to con-

vert, either kicking wide or over
the cross bar.

Cadogan the Spartan skipper
also raliied his men, and they too

improved their game, but the
vorwards, particularly the wing-
ers, failed to .ake advantage ot

what opportunities were offered
them. hey lacked that
sary last minute effort which 1:
so much required in a game of
this sort. i

The hour for the final whistle
approached, and it appeared that
the game would end in a draw,
but at .he eleventh hour, Griffith
gave Van Genderen a pass for
this player to centre off the line.
Custodian Warren just failed to
gather, and Boyce who was
standing opposite the right post
converted for his team to win
the match,

The teams were as follows:—

Spartan: Wood, Morrison,
Bowen, Medford, Cadogan, Git-
tens, Griffith, Van Genderen,
Wood, Haynes, Boyce.

Carlton; Warren, Hutchinson,
Kennedy, Marshall, Claigmonte,
Cox, Andrews, Lucas, G. Hutch-
inson, Williams, R. Hutchinson.

Referee Mr, Ben Hoyos, Lines-
men Messrs J. Archer, Wilson.


















“11S NOT ALL BIG-
MOUTHS SAULT. WHEN
SHE WASN'T PICKING
ON HIM SHE ‘WAS OUT |
IN THE KITCHEN TELLING |
ME THE ROAST LOOKED |
LIKE HORSESME ATs
t
|




WEY




MORE Wa
| —_s \~
| [ é Xb “i
ie Ka NG



=

| ANy TIME,A
| ANYWHERE: WORD, \
| A LOOK*AND WHA:
| THE WAR IS ON!

YY -



neces- |



CHURCH |
SERVICES

A Requiem will be held in the
St. Michael's Cathedral for the
! rehdeacon Alfred Shank-

d Tuesday morning at 9
o'clock It is hoped that the
eles sy Ol the Diocese will attend

service

Friends of the late
acon are invited.

LE YMORE ROCK A.M. BE. CHURG
YOUTHS DAY .

Archae
et
1) am

Youth's
ervice

. Divine Worship, 3.30 pm.
Service, 2.15 p.m. Evangste ist ¢
A cordial invitation is extended
Minister.-Rev. E. A. Gilkes

METHODIST SERVICES
BFTHEL

Thomas. 7
DALKEIT
pm. Mr. G
PELMONT
Rev
SOUTH
M.A. E
ster
PROVIDENCE 11 am. Mr. &
Srowne. 7 p.m. Mr. J. Clarke
VANXHALL -- 9 a.m. Rev, B. Crosby!
7 p.m. Mr. P. Deane.

STREET
CIRCUIT

1l_ am. Rev. M. A. EB,
pm. Rev. B. Crosby.
H 11 a.m, Rev. B, Crosby
McAllister
11 a.m. Mr. G, Bascombe

M. A. E. Thomas.

DISTPICT 8 a.m
Thomas, 7 p.m. Mr. G

7 pm

Rev
Brew-

JAMES

Pulpit Appointments for To-day
fae STREET 11 a.m. Rev. J. S
uiton; 7 p.m. Rev. F. Lawrene
SPEIGHTSTOWN Harvest Festival, PN
a.m. Rey. F. Lawrence, Services 7 p.m
Mi. F. D. Roach,
PAYNES BAY

am

Harvest Festival, 9.30
Mr. F. Moore, Services 7 p.m. Rev

J. 8S. Boulton.+

WHYTEHALL — 9.30 a.m. Mr. G. Me
Allister, 7 p.m. Mr. G. Harper

GILL, MEMORIAL — 11 a.m. Rev. R
McCullough, 7 p.m. Mr. J. Layne,

HOLETOWN Sacrament, 8.30 a.m
Rev. R. McCullough, 7 p.m. Mr, J. E
Haynes

BANK HALL—@.30 am. Mr. J. T
Oxley, Sacrament, 7 p.m. Rev R. Me
Cullough

THE ST. JAMES NATIONAL BAPTIST
11 a.m. Matins and Sermon, Preacher
Rev. J. B, Grant L.Th., Minister in charge;
7 p.m. Evensong and Sermon, Preacher
Rev. L. Bruce-Clarke. Special prayers
will be said for the late King George VI,
4.30 p.m, Mon., Wed., Fri. training for
youths this will be conducted by the
Rev. L. Bruce-Clarke (Assistant Pastor)
assisted by Mrs, Olga Browne
ST. MATTHEWS ORTHODOX CHURCH
Deighton Road

HARVEST FESTIVAL

9 a.m. Mass Celebrant Rector, 3 p.m.
Marvest Festival regular Cantata including
many popular local Artists and musical
renditions. Chairman Mr McDonald
Symmonds, Churchwarden, Guest Speaker
Mr. C. Tudor M.A 7 p.m. Vespers
Preacher Rev. Barker

MORAVIAN SERVICE

ROEBUCK ST; 11 a.m. Morning Service,
Preacher: Rev. FE, E. New; 7 p.m. Evening
Service, Preacher: Mr. F. Moore

Harvest Festival at Grace Hill

11 a.m. Morning Service; Preacher; Mr,
lL. Oxley; 3.30 p.m. Harvest, Thanksgiving
Service; 7 p.m. Evening Service (fol-
owed by Holy Communion) Preacher:

v. E. E. New.

FULNECK: 11 a.m. Morning Service;
7 p.m. Evening Service; Preacher: Mr
S. Weekes

MONTGOMERY: 7 p.m. Evening Ser-
vice; Preacher: Mr. F. G. Downes

DUNSCOMBE 7 p.m. .Evening Ser-
vice; l'reacher; Mr. D. Culpepper

SHOP HILL: 7 p.m. Evening Service;
Preacher: Mr; F. G. Smith

ST. MARY’S—Sexagesima, 7.30 a.m
Matins and Litany, 8 a.m.’ Low Mags,
9 a.m, Sung Mass and Sermon, 3.30 p.m.
Sunday School, 4 pan, Children’s Vespers,
415 pm Baptism, 7 p.m Solemn
Evensong and Sermon, .

ll aie

CHRISTIAN SCIENCE |

First Church of Christ, Scientist,
Upper Bay Street, Bridgetown
Sundays 11 a.m. and 7 p.m.
Wednesdays 8 p.m A Service which
includes Testimonies of Christian
Science Healing



SUNDAY, FEBRUARY 17, 1952
Subject of Lesson-Sermon: Soul
Golden Text: Psalms 35, 9. My soul

shall be joyful in the Lord it shall re-
jotce in his salvation

The following Citations are included
in the Lesson-Sermon:

The Bible; Happy is he that hath the
God of Jacob for his help, whose hope
is in the Lord his God

Psalm M6: o.
Selence and Health with Key to the
Seriptures, by Mary Baker Eddy.

Soul has infinite resources with which
to bless mankind, and happiness would
be more readily attained and would be





nore secure in our keeping, if sought
in soul
Page 60.
Hello Friends!
Ianthe Gill reminds

you of her

DANCE

On Monday Night the 18th
of February, 1952, at Club
Royal, Silver Sands, Christ
Church.

ADMISSION 2/-
Music by Mr. C. B. Browne's

Mrs.

the major defence measures employed against pollution and disease, |
sterilization by chlorine is one of the most important. Chlorine is a very i
ict
ther substances, from which
of these is common salt in which chlorine is combined with sodium An Island of Holiday Opportunities!
The passing of an electric current through salt splits it into its con-|
stituent elements and releases chlorine in the
yellow gas, which is dried and liquefied and,so made available for

ready transport all over the world.

SPEIGHTSTOWN Jof the salt from which it is obtained. In addition to having many
uses as a sterilising agent, chlorine is an important raw

material
insecticides anesthetics and dry-cleaning fluids all

need chlorine at some stage in their manufacture.





| WILKINSON & HAYNES (0., LTD.

—





Orchestra
Miss this and blame yourself
Lorries leave Empire
Theatre at 8.30 p.m.

AST SS EEE SS ES EEE
= >

}







COTTON DRESS SHIRTS with
attached.

ELITE SEA ISLAND
trubenised Collar

Each

STRIPED PYJAMAS in some nice patterns, sizes 38 to

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FLEECE LINED VESTS, long sleeves for travelling to
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Elastic Waist.

Sizes $2 to 44.

Cold Climates.

TRUNKS.

and fawn.

OTIS VESTS, Ribbed and plain athletic style,
Sizes 26 to 46.

$1.30 & $1.32

OTIS WHITE COTTON BRIEFS, sizes 30 to 44.

sleeves.

Bair

RAYON & COTTON FANCY STRIPED SOCKS.

Sizes 10 to 114. Pair.

S97¢. & SLOS



—_—

—







we
ee

SUNDAY, FEBRUARY 17, 19











if ————————,

}

CHLORINE }
' '
A hundred year igo inj |

Great Britain typhoid vers

and cholera were ommon | |
water-borne diseases To- |

day cholera is unknown and

an outbreak of typhoid

This
publie

makes front page news
improvement
health reflects the
all
‘with water purification.

- —_

in
unremit-

ting care of concerned




i or
‘ FISHING
RIDING

SPECTATOR SPORTS

ive chemical which in nature is found only in combination with}

it must be isolated. “The best known;

So many and varied that clothes may seemingly
sare at scaailabin’ present a problem. There is, in fact, no cloth-
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Bolton Lane, Custom Tailors and Men’s Out-

LCL. fitters, cannot adequately solve—either from

are large manufacturers of chlorine as well as producers
their selective, imported stock, or with a gar-
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C.. B. Rice & Co.

Textiles, petrol, dyestuffs, paper, medicines,

YS





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4 in, thick, 4ft. x 8ft., 9ft., 10ft., 12ft. Long
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STANDARD HARDBOARD SHEETS
The Board of 1,000 Uses.
Â¥ in. thick, 4ft, x 6ft., Bft., 10ft. long
at 18c. pr sq. ft.
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4g in, thick, 4ft. x 6ft. 8ft., 10ft. long
at 30c. per sq. ft.
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3/16 in. thick. 4ft. x 8ft. @ 23e. per sq. ft,
All these Building Boards have been treated to resist the attack
of Wood Ants and other Termites.

| WM. FOGARTY aos LP.

Now's

4

TIME
TO



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SELECT THESE !!
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Full Text

PAGE 1

sl-VDAY. rRRRl'ARV 17. !;.' si HtnVI VIlVfKATE I I HUM. AT THE ri\fc>l \ -.HV .B. Cyrano De Bergerac (iardening Hints g For Amateurs EDMOND ROSTAND'S i ami of the 17th when thinking of j Herbaceous century "Cyrano da Bcrgertc* 1 haa had many famous actors Border, moat peoaie are inclined plav the HUa rola of the gallant BDldier-poat with the preto ..ink of n m term, of annual* poateroua note, but none with mora assurance and charm ?£&"&' t S?'£*.$ c 'g t £g : .;;, than Jose Ferrer u i a hrad an Academy Award lor his m ake one. parfOna 2 UU C ,' 11 J""'aW, *aiTtno P.t> T A Border composed entarsly at FYvsh doni I... Bro.d.,y sueGrabl. Tina platinum kaired atar .ma, doc, indaed mean th,cess In th. tame role. Mr ferrer and lavuh 'fchnlcoksr n .re tabour rf ,„!,„„, lKe „.,,, ^, make, an .d-al Cyrano and bU %  WHTtrfod'I'tiX*? ! faS. *!*" "" N "' % %  >•••> stH it performance i. a memorable one. ' b . U L, ln S.'.'LS ^,i \S£Z a, > mMn an ""<* "^ for "*"t ST? K^. 1 t hei^p.reCyr ; .o2|^-.b5:'.^-..^ r r..^^ 1 But "* •*! Bergerac la the story of a Prsnch It concern a Broadway musical FARM AJSD GARDFA mi nm Bi \M>S i %  connected wiih the soil, plans and amm.ib-can dull. The song of earth il nevtr dead writes the poet, ami t!'is is indeed true whatever the season, V (WfcftJ with life—Me in thetoll, lift above the soil and in ifcr.se. all around us. All life, be it human, plant oi animal, is ('.ill of ubsorbiiij AT 31, HE FELT LIKE an* OLD MAN DM /V.fl.Cu ifrw/io /Votes .i wi P^' Br lu ** en" 1 1 <* to "> atj .i!-w rflort* f her producer husband, I 1 !" .. .* pMlaad. okfier-poel who is th* • face, what would vide him with fundx, revrals (he If. ti. lead of the concerns a if^Mtwayi !" !" combination of perennials and comedy ar whose success woald nuaJt wiUl p^,^ pr.dsnn.nFarm '.nuvtjs dvmanu ran be summed up aO '" no* renune. ftrll"— > „. lie","-'* What >ii is to macninci; H i* amount to much In this type of baceoua Border need not be made essential in order to Heap th* 0 n WednetdfeVs In "CtJlfelg the tllm, and this oot at no exeepuoo. ^ u( aBnuai# m i ua9t but can be n adMalg tunlSta -il aaBs1 lM car-s^l IndaM" (rasa London th. tied out with unlailiug regui ,.f federation u being .tis-ucoaijeBi sense ruased l> maintjlned if routine oper-iJamaica, a 'graduate of Turont. %  ,,'s deitrnricntly "'"lv u pareansall it || pern-.. %  %  „,„. u Utaj Bead, .,. the garden nn .... \-s. (Losidon) i nul witht aliei she "ent, and with the %  ddiuoti each „ n t ,„ t he loeh pen arc negwvted Economics, interv.ewlns; P naX iaW •eiena ar iwata andliillf a success*•" : %  frW • % %  "" %  Is to help give m undertaken in a latual. RtDjI Kenneth Wheare. (Padstone Pio ful engagement in Miairo Irtore iLTS[U^-.r"iuSt!!r **"'" ' : her hun of the bed. Once changes. ,.nd. with ihea* gen' C?uAll!^iii P'^'WO. "* pacsmnieia will remain and remark,, we paaa on to *uw a ^tfL^ij In the same place for vsjars, durseasonal eonsidet ..\onM it>uu.ie 1,1 *"? ma wMah time only sarfa. in->itanc* at the araaeai naaa. A new perfume for YOU..." costuiaaa and lly lush and ** and Miami 'orklna" *"d an cajcasiaausl top rouoaing e .op*ou> %  [5St^iS urovii 1 **^k-Snd -haasing of manure will be pessnol DtLfmbar, dTOUgait) i led prodHctton ntim*• Therefore the bad maaji be have set n witii %  ratner unusual e i-, T ._LnioiiH them "Bettin" " A '" %  '-ply forked and a good Mpply ol suao.nnesj whiU appears to hmf r* a P..T1..1 .-nt .T...,^..a^ ^^.I^J tf ... a-a %  i-aa^S %  aeelaatB ian** and "No Talent Joe'. A rotted pen manure added If am caught many tarmeis ana garflssji omoetcot east supports Miss urasg cutUngs are available they ,. r -, unawares. It doubtlesa has ind lier songs and up to her u.ual itandThe Shadow Ffas Gone From A Lovely Face which she should also be put in. Finally th, JUr ,oU tnetn to pause and tnmk it. surface must be manured and lined, with hand fork and rake After the bed has been watered for a few days, and has settle,), then the plants can be put In. l*ha plants for the Herbaceous Harder should be an anted in targ, and now tney are P^'P"^ | meet, this sharp change, .vsature eanaa, sst|akelall) to th.kstw ramtall areas, an iapiul> dryUI aiul calling for the bill; ground pioviAioiu imuiii' to be reaped; __ growing crops and \es^Wolcs tu clumps (not rows) graduated from be lieed of weeds ana mulched; rrrr_— a_-ra th* tallest ones at the back down I;U H trees pruned, sprayed lor *J !" *?** E^^EZETZZ to me shortest in front The comacaUmm blight control, ana the ystea "_*;**"".*". , bmalion Of colours must of course i >aee exsa^lli can ajisay ana be the choice and taste of each <-V AUsUCOL \ so. what ar* the possib but the general effect % %  when the border Is full* grown >ounger 01 frflgor of Coeernmeni at Oxfui Itj and an acknowledge.' rsn the history of toderai ii in it.i %  The series consists of explorator; s'lalyses of existing fedci .ih speaking world in OBtoaat Wheare outline [plains the mam el ol three OUtStandkns; exam of federal govemnwm. th. huiwa United Statta of America. Cannd.-Australia. We regret thai we dw not have tdtvanea informailoi 1o idvise TOU of the start e| th< • I3.h n the 2uth tt Canada will be dlseussed and Ir the final broadcast l>ugl.i Hal will ask Proftwaor Wheare to look at the West Indies and sea wtoctnei there are any dissimilanfies i Than g 'aund the fm*4f fa raw YOUTHFUL VIGOUR This yoosg man waa being .iri'inaiaraly agr>d by klanay iroubls. H tails In his lattat DOW Kraschen r*>** him baos* • aealth aftar weeka of pain :— • "I saffr>red for waeks from kidi.fi' trouMs anJ fait ilka i ol>l miu al'tu'uiih I am only L If 1 taoaaed to 00 anything I sraa agonv to straightan an again. Sev-ral people *>!vlaal a* to try Knisehaa Salu aa the* bad found tiim wundarful. I tried tlii>m and found thsy | me reli-if fv„ m pain, and I ... i-M'er ta -vsrv wav I shall kas* on with tha dally doe* baeiaoaa 1 c*u now do Bar day'a work and an* %  ">! any '.ha worse Tor It." • -a.trn. I tha kidneys function •sartaln acid wastat, insiuad of being axpeUed, ar* aJlowsd to pollute tha blood tream and preduca troubleaom* onit>la1ata--bacarache. rheumalUtn ami fxoaajfva fatlgaa. Kruachan Is on* of tha finaat %  or kldoay ji>*rl*nU. The in-.ill dally dnae kc^pa tha ; til tu-\.nan.I othnr internal creans "forking smoothly and naturally, tin. blood stream u %  iirltie.1 •> %  vigorous haaJtb • Aak > ni*rrst ChM • a • %  ass rr> fJ*a v-*B a *? J—n -.aST / V %  a^> W ^ The pcii'umc with Uhfl /,-. %  ,Ming rragraon BOURJOIS I'IKII MC (3 %  :.. .11 K.M sl.d Bin I IX 1IKIMSON J cnoicc jn.u IBI %  %  ._n ^^^wj !" -*--^^^ mint, frasa" the Itartsnl ROlBt amllinr face, *>-SM'S* ••-• *-'">' true character of the Gascon. Mr. you taw Ferrer's distinguished realisation bal oon-llke of the whole role overshadows the disfiguring li. ,i rest of the cast which It, perhai: Just as well, as it is Cyrano"ttOtT, and Ferrer plays it lo the hilt. ."here's not much to nay tot Main Power* as Roxannc She Is certainly lovelv io look at, but both her interpretation and acting are r-..T~ immature, while WIlHam Prince. Horror, m as her h> try hub i-itiicr m.:.men„'.ee odd Wednesdays in ns intrun.then halt-hoar fron mcedibly swollen, large wide one there is no reason A "' ""'*;""" 'TST!uT .^f*?Ke**lt n St covered with why shrub* such a. Poinsettia. ">* eta s ,Tnuork %  •*• nlk "^ lh lMt '*"" -i< mvl blemishes Crvtons, Hibiscus and Kxurbe used as backver ivhat happened one sliould day In 1M to pretty Beatrix Thomson, the aetree*. ,My.lcr> Germ For the next bc yeais he waa _: intervuh the anc mul prassion on the imagination or memor>' Morris (arnowsky as Le Bret, Cyrano's friend, gives Mr. Ferrer good support The n.usical score is outstand ing and credit for this goes to Dmitri Tiomkin. Authentic old French music played on the instruments for which it was; enmpowed tc hour when the Iransfoin would stiikc again. A mysterious agency w wink in ho, blood-stream. Site had pi.keil it up i" Burma* while lining troops. Other suitable perennials are mainuiiii .. lairly atyiablt lamCannas, Buddleu. Tamartak. Michjiemluie both in th* s Vincat, Tuberoae* and P-entas. ;n the early stage* irf their exinA border auch a* thl* would reence. There will be a tenoeir > main undisturbed for years, needfor crops to transpire walei more ing only to be kept trimmed. quickly than they can taxe II to If in addition. a few annuals are .„,. r ^ u U i willing ..nd Munling added each year ti> give more col„( (.lowth. notably in pun its our a leally lovely Herbex-eou* whose growth cycle is of reaHittrt. Ilorder would ha> the it-suit. jjuin duration. Thus, gardsu .,._ In adding the annuals it may r ^ llin ft, may LOM „i.-tr CJlgOgj has been cuied after ^ necoDlrror Jf^SZMj^SSrgitti Lam NINO STKIKKS TWKl 1 anr>that tlrtd day the reneetton w •. """".•"''" A ' tery story of hl.h volt raSabarrlHa. My r. and '"'out !'". C^nu'ion' U. fact almost drama. ;iml l %  etianf, c have ,.„,. ,11 „,.,; " "' mlmrtet of the hall-h.ui .M1M. uixurai.ee against mken up with these eon i anuue laas of nun tun IO federation. Ihe Wast Indie* helm; .'\nmlned in the broadcast th March Calling the W<( ntns at 1$ p.m. in the :n and 4 metre band*. a.sg ami (. iS megacycles. Another West Indies series tf natch we did not have advance ran In Ihe West IDI.I on M Tin of Stuikepear King l*-ar,' not aa a pedanli. %  \::;:,::^:, lor.-, aduch landi to on • nmistiiii' at this season is of firs. .,11 aviillablo waste material ..ill ! %  leimired for mulch.il. i. i ,U"ie .. little rouiine piauuin.: an R found li p.y haiwUoine dividends. i n.ad.' ,. icgllbll i blada the tragedy Is wllhln compass of a group of enthuoiasti. ...d acenot %  the pi..y. The argu, meiil ol ihe producer is that Uie | >l Sl.-kes-peare. if pUyed %  With suiei'rily and und*'istanding | urc within tinrange Oft players of cry all ages. Wl I i>" "*> """ gruss, hedge and at school, or a club or literary The >i.|i io wards eon, au-o. '" u '-•'' '" attention to eomp^, )nj{ —oil with -.mi individual scenes acted but no With a predominance of per en;i V1|1VV ,,, n lv ,„ K ,,„..(,. mulching gUwaal a/Oi ba %  nials In the garden the *Pf r material to tost peiionnsnoe In i gaidei xpected needs nantarad aat I %  - %  **waaar. the continued • neighbours he meeU an l vocation--who falls In love nith film—and de>rlte his warnings. vr determines to clear his name. Then ..undenly my face would ** J" been described. meaiitlme. Tne plot thickens w,th well -nundergo that hideous change a But s smaller Border can be So. a valuable le*'on ernarg. talned suspense right op to the ,,,„,,,,. w .dched it. nlanned. mad. insload of using the never m-glecl the routine of savsurprise denouncement and is com'Usually I left pletely credible, nnd suspicion is u u,.,tv humiliated." skilfully pointed at various charIt %J! bY chance thai Miss good effecL use and whether the weathc Micchange comes early or lair. the pu'sent? „-,,.„• Oit alaj Mill i>c iwoadeast ,'. „ %  tha and "i Marca lakii young crop* hut the sudden ap^roong the playar taking part In iiawii helittns In n restaurant hat the room or the desire for %  proach of intensively dry weather lhtffJ# half-hour broadcasts lor the wut^ine a show Jith^hicndt! ve.y big Hertxiceou. Border auch may do a go.d deal of harm K llxtttM W1 n be Errol John ol Then sSdcnW mv face would " %  just been described. meaiUlme. Tim.tl-' and Pauline IlenriQUCs But a smaller Border can be So. a valuable lesson emerge.: „,„ Norl Vat of Jamaica. Broadplanned, and, insload of using th'' never neglect the routine of in ,, .,t tin u ual ttnt Of hurriedly big ahrubs, it could be conttne I ing and conserving everything *v j programme* — 7,15 p.m. to the smaller one* with equally except empty cans for dry .season This year Carnival ii Tr.md:* u-i* hv chance that Miss good effecL use and whether the weather foibi 0 n the 25th Fatal Thtntan found a v o u n C CantriersU, Gulden Rod. Matchange come, early or late, we tj,e BBC's "Csrlbbean V. whT^US*et*d %  long hselmaa-daisy. Bed pinks ami the should never be caught napping, be taking sptcial note of it in p. •., vaccine 'SJirti^ -dd.uon of a few annuals would Item-mber a aucf-wnrful eull.va'.a grammes M the 17th. and ftth oUaant>ied that she was make n lovely Border for a smallmay be defined as one who can |aat i m the hM .-l >I %  ** %  two w tare alleicv er bed. grow good crops in bad years, and half-hour starts --which the|y t'lilt.,rti Seal, and I I prolonged on 'Calypso**a>f ihe Olden T-aeters—-the hero's foster mother, his greatest friend and the crippled brother of the "other woman." The principal roles anwail handled with a nmil mention KnJ! < ^..J.l^" m S2F WMIS urticaria Vauavd" through "b;KIn any Border, it Is advisable bad years ar* those £, !" Z ,n i OP aS"SflloS "-"a f **" ^ox ou,, --Mhatanew to Make the taller plants when have bee,, floods c Startinson Wedncd... at the but the my.lcry of the csuse position Thas. sukes should l>" keeplna these note, Globe MEET ME AFTER THE of the .11 !" -. itself remain.. Inconspicuous, and .hould only or wbjeet of mol.ttir SHOW II a smoothly produced I I I used "hen necessary. and mulches — r~ IHMT iT 7TT mm rna^ 1 Whan your BACK ACHES... taduKtai as aaaidh ,.•. h. I... kUaxs. Th. lualaay! M HV hkad i t*W>. Whm thay fH w.i ol WOK, aaaaaj ., ida and r n —a w ua wa.tta Mat an ll n ilem. Than aarkadat. IwaaVI-, %  %  —m,, %  jajqitii r*t m Ikal lintal at' h itaa, Ta nua. raw kia rn aa vont rraafli and U n*B| Hwin m faad ardV %  at* DaaVs Kaia., Pill. IK-W KiaW, r*BS **kUr nd ta. aw Inirdaaad blaed el nou and, and na.ie. thai hrah bload Aawi to rrrrr net.and %  TTMn IOU (ad badn loaa Kn %  r.ik hH uni IOU IIF rtadv la dam* ailli nil. Inaitt n Irtr ftnanrar IKo-l>l I Kidrvry P.II. in In. Uu. a, k.„ Mli II—I band.. Onl T 1 rjaeVbluaW Pills by Charles Ponney of Trtnidad hgaaaj \ ..nd date there tvlll bl srtj] find the two short stories of Carnival but) 11 ivmind you of them next dlscus*ed U tl" w.-k. Broadcast begins at 7.IS March 18. 19M lo HtaXisyoci. POND'S CRIAM to rleanae and soften > iNIMIINC (RUSf to rarolect your skin by day and to hold your powder matt jfnV rttt^t'Bt*i& '&o&>^4 riiMi i a i I'lirtiini: perfumed, sceinlifically blended, for a clamorously malt complexion. i*4wSli*% I II*** I If K >m^ %  n easily onto your lips; the rach vibrant colour stays on and on and on. Here is a range of beauty products uaed by lovely society women everywhere. Simple and Inexpensive, they art all you need to keep you looking flawlessly lov-ly, feeling your **ry beat at all times You will find them at all the best beauty countara. YOU CANT BEAT IT'S QUALITY! YOU CAN'T BEAT IT'S PRICE JfobmcdoA in i I.U.I II \ roil 4^ eft. Hurt Proof Cthinet Dclux Finish — will not crack, chip or discolour | Hermetically Sealed Unit Automatic Flosdiighi sod Crisper 5-year guarantee Extrt room for tall bottles on both aides. O.M.Y $395.00 .Oil O.V IHSfl.XY l# THE CORNER STORE



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40ft ESTABLISHED 1895 17, 1952 PRICE MX i Queen To Tour Australia After Coronation Crowning Ceremony Likely Late This Year LONDON. Fl 'I'M.' Coronation g| Queen BUzabttth II. alihoujjh noi yet officially annuuncwl. lo likely to takt place in late September or eariy Octobtt, MBOTdlng lo authority close tu i Family. l\ ,.~ .mi the new Queen u determined to carry nut the thrice postponed tour of Australia as soon as possible, but she vn .-i'\ want to go as ereigfl and not in the interim period before Coronation the ordeal of yesterday*! Afti n throush London the funeral fur King George VI. Queen V. the day quietly at Clan i iotber and !'i r.i %  M.i %  i.„ %  ingham Palace. Queen Juliana and Prince Bernhard of the M otherlan dl returned to Hollai.J to-day, but most .if other Royl ttnauttfesd violtori were staying in England at least over %  k end. Plane Clul) Organises Lectures %  bados Light \. Club hav Mitt of weekly lecture*, the Dm ..f which M.i'c on Liars llsi at 8 p.m % %  % %  iW ilk which will be Wing Comdr. I. A Director General Civil \ "Liberte Arrives ea it %  ugh seemed hot to give the } %  UnSl LUKIV. thud bi, %  which arrived I york via H %  art) during the nmnuni. So giganln H the LIIHII her builders Hluhni A Ve Hambui;. Germany did %  %  dcr for passengers to disembark Mrs. The paseen%  ted before the) got d<>wn the ladder And comm,? up would be worse The Uberte W buftf tot operating .ilom with rut deep watai harbour at Barbados. tnt Me>ton French motor vessel I'tnla ami the ideal S.S. I I;IIII .V.Mf I'l.VIA -^ %  ?.-' £&U ^^^^^ % % % %  esege^tr M, •%  \m* ';. | SA.jSKjfev fc=r No 1'uhlic Appearances Tinnew tjui-en win very seatkan be wen in pubin during nlng period through Mu> 31. She is expected to moral m Scot)-.-. For lively Pi.in • Mi net Civil Aviation in this area, follow-'platform for the i-i court %  HMuniag will mean sho""*' %  '> %  resund and progress re-'dlaombark. The rVi will forego all net frequent ass-jo i Of Ihe Club sin.e its Inception) freigh 01 IfM ' Harbadns from I peannices at theatres, balls and bv Mr. Wood Goddard. rhainnan Martinique the day befon public restaurants. If EI./..1 .-:.. ' %  c 'ommiltee of Manthis job. crowned in autumn il .... -' .'"; ....... .VF [ t \, porX ridc first time In 20Q vean 'hat %  **" %  Brtnah Council have put of the Liberte. tbe Pint, w.i* :.ion has been held In . %  dUwwal a series „r, though built to ten,, the tourist same vear of the death at "' "'' ,ll "" "f fl >">* |,n r cr dwk reached the preTluuTwrciS.. But RoJ! . enn.lcd • W*> ,, Mb***, door thmu. authority said it was more than '" V''!-.'.-"..! thoaa. dim. wUl ... hk.-.y „,,, ce-emonv „ *%„*jeS iti the Fall Queen Eliza11( ,,,. ,.. add want to make jbe quarter Wakeflekr aftnr whktn tour of Australia in what ore the ( UCT uon.. from the au.ii. months in the Soutl.. ,., Iiy j|r. Goddard. Hen pbere, So if the tour is notOn the following Tuesday lo be postponed for two year..; (March 4th) the remaining Mire. %  nation would hnve to t'! illms will be shown at the Brili!52. Britain will want W Irh Counrfl and on thia occasion have the Coronation ceremony tailor, Stnnton Toppin will answer mild weather here. Socormly bi.liquestions. Weekly lectures will quite ,m important consider.. linue every Thin hundred! of thousands ofjthn Y.M.P.C beginning at t tourists it will attract to the Britoclo-a Tall la how the .184 ton motor TM1 "Pint*" looked alongside Ult M.SIO-ion Fro %  Libeite" la C'arbl %  • yestotday. Panaengers are u.iding from tbe port door of tna i tad th-n to sicsl laeSkSeei The "Lllterte" I* H00 fael long and the Ion* i.li touri"t IInet %  Libert*" to the Pint*" 207 feat Korean Truce May Be Solved As TJ.N. Want •) \KTIII I! IHIIHU' 1'ANNONJOM. r '['il.Allin an clinv '. wanted lui KDIPU Onlj Ihi :hf Unitad Nationa'SupramaCommander Cm RI<1Lwrv. North Koraan Kim El Sunn jr.I ChineaeOan Pen T. I Hua: • MIIIIS oft tha uiilik.lv Uuca vill,ik'. %  passengers s epped tote lnunches that were making rcgu I lar trips ashore. Of the 739 passengers. 0..1 400 came -shore and about 2on went on the usual organise. 1 tour. The others hired taxis tor country rides or shopped In! Bridgetown Thev tit of spending. Painted black with buntings ihe Llnerte minded Barbadians of the ,.,..French tourlrl liner Narmaadiiwhich was similarly tended 1 %  the Frcncii passenger ship Dae D'Aumale when she was here 111 1938 The Uberte is the blgge. tnuri1 ship to call „\ Rar'tado~CP "'le Xormsndle. poured through the Winter Turned To Spring In Windsor Mil AMI rOgtCI IfQeti Ron reh it; A spokesman said tlghtrr-bomb%  is slashetl at No'ih Kofi ines bombing two rail bridges and tutting tracks in more th.in sUrt) 1 lares F8u Shooting Stan hit 1 • %  bihtfjei at Bunehon and nes ii.ni hon InfUi 0n| T'e iv) damge* in .ittacks British liar Trains OIL DISPUTE DEADLOCKED LONDON. I> Big Three Foreign aflnlgters Saturday invited Chancellor Roared Adenauor to Join thr;r conrerenco in theli hopes of ending ihe Franco-German dispute which thre,itns to wreck the Wotern Euroima* Defence plans .no N.i/, olluboratar lived under tbe assumed name of 11 .1 deputy known %  ." Jacques Ducreux in iht crful National Assembly only to sm DucrettS who was a Radical Soendtot Deputy or the Vosgea Oepartraent and we* killed recently in an automobile accident been sought by all Frcncii P0DM StoUOM for desertion and collaboration with the Vichy Regime. —W.P. VVM.I. IMM Warehouse during the to get back abtiar.i fo) tOM l.laerte to sail ] H t. 1 'terrioon. She is bound for rt %  <> H Rahiwhere her pa .ill snend tnur dJB) From Rio she will %  • • I-. .. fore eom.^ back to Kew V w • Marrh 10 lt< PI.II II w\ HM BRITISH HEAD %  The British barred a rood and oil train through the s,w> %  .J2;""" I Saturday in retitlmiion I of British oil A spokesman U" I George Erskimv ,. 1 ,1 would eontlnui Egyptian I.HKV.I. crewi elegted the wreefci port Bald %  Ismell 1 ui British %  IP 'oiiferciU'e KHIIS 3,000 Crwrm St. %  fan to the tofdelat m, avbtui' %  sion. Windward! che %  u %  John's Cafhi'flrai A. .., i .„,i ment si mi prop" ANTKUA Feb. I l *PJ p *' ,1, ve gathering of |H .rpoass. John's Cathedral yesterdni >t of Nautilus Compan, 1 i '"'"m-'nMi.,t„,n lervie. ro ahcuas has Khetne to m Ms tote Kejeet) K..., r.,-.^.. vi i. ll)d .!„.,,,., serv.ee „ HI^ExeaUency Mr. K W Ml,, k,,, ir f(1 r „! ^ m'!!i 7 J? ,,ru i rrom Gmernment HOUSe „.rvieing f. VllH' (11% Kf.RHl A WEST) WINDBOB Knglend, rfa 18 irninfi 0( tinKum's funcial rt.is i;i'nll> i whuid) round v lndg< i nnd -\ %  %  veiled The weatliei lias bxt-li so btsd I t' !• ,., %  .ui. ,:, overs f .1 The %  ront WPII ul wind 01 '".t itle ^ re d u k shape i: mist ami iMend thej ere bulll of a atone that-. coldlj .'.rev Bnt once within the Castle, winter seemed t i i there were Bowers every whtB Flowers sent to King George %  kneed the great steps up to fit • Gsurg.--. Chapel. Tb*> lay on thgmsa under the walls of Iba Chapel, The* ere pileil up Ut l kit kM Kiev filled th.%  and %  re a daa fcfau of them were -.idle A Mayor and Corpond ion would send Ihe Coat of teem Ihey i-epresentf-d • i flov-em. the whole .> man or fawH rWfl tWO "I Ibicr ">SS. t Travelling Bank Service Discontinued i | bring passes with l* \ti<; IVI evei Mi. ndtng enamln it amera Unu Othei Babn dying i.s .i -i I veiling I' i %  ,oml.ei* sighted about 75 Red jets The fini Mi Ft ree new * ik w tr o y ed 01 were two rail bridges, two bos tiding r f T' to the Cathedn i rear '.in* Manage ivh i %  .1 ibt M ik said %  "i at -> afa in b I %  %  %  .... %  lorbe < : i the pos; %  H if. oat 'bienre Spartan Beat Curllon 2 —/ As Soccer Seasttn Opvns SPAHTAN won ihtir nrtt enaK*'ment when the H A K A 1952 season opened yesterday < £—1 The winning nal came a few final whistle when Boyce the oul contra by Van Gandemi who played on 11 . It was a us >art roe th. uwodatloi rowd ot game The Held 1 % % %  matches were to %  •'KUlati'Ni 'ui kicking with the breeze and uefending the southern goal, and medletel] apparent that ihe pa %  -, nuM | .,, %  ,. i, ,,... t"m themselves to ptav,. i • %  • | I the middle, nnd H was SO-ne leg minii'ei iK-foi" the wingmcn realised that th. %  i side The Ula.k Rock team was the 'I rat to < %  pisses to) tr:elr many aauults fight hard; the t>>t Urn %  I .... during ir %  %  llu'i [I Ballsed I prei lou I well l.illle Flowers leoj "f Hi i i ..i fee or four tulip* or i. f illlng into dial will raake iomi of u %  think ..f King Oenrge • as a line '•' little .! %  ..'. iheti apps olitue rkwrarel during the lylng-in-.t-le vvliith •> Idly en Ugh Kb bUnP "'ing .. it tni on Many men od not given te movlni i IUI i routine reed In Ihe p ip< lying-in-stale and said t alve IV, ii," |...v < %  % %  %  I %  people i ui wall three %  hours; well mi run ear So n %  %  "' nore i inod th* .',. %  j j*ii it beeaino lomething prodl-| n.ous. vaster than the ordintry lift fl if two rivers a i %  kte me U on its way to the sea ind one tin of men null women 'Mi the way t > 100 ibeir King lying In '' Government. And H tl grew larger there began to h % %  r In. im % % % %  %  %  It w.is not explicitly said thr* Ighl !• no Be Inside the cutafalque. that ihei* be no wreaths left Siege Of Won nan OonHnuen m TOKYO. Fab. ia. The longest siege III united Mates naval history entered the second year to-da> wltil warships of the I'nitvH rfaUon %  -...lllv ;iWllV .It Ihe LTV ity in the eorld Wonsan it 'I 1 ~2 B IICIIB |N'r IIIIIII Day and nlghl warships of nine nations have poun %  Ion |H>UIHIS of npledlng %  %  .'.' %  rustruil eantr* thi nil end into Communist batlle :. %  iiioi, i inder *;$* %  r. IT N I ,r. I F. biu.-ry Ifitb. 1051 t. | nt balllci -ito mini and fi.KMti-s h.ive |OUMd DS Iht • I %  rails Hwa I* \ land. Cat labile of Korea ami ColombJ i %  .. %  ? Volui iius A'h.'ti dead to give Anti. Communii l prtfonei ...(.. % %  | b 3 C -mm %  <*emaavi .11 :.. .1 ...|'..1 i.i-rf.leil The UN", insists upon limiting %  Few Can Toll %  .. i i I High %  %  will be ..I on i, .an Oie Conntunlats thai Ihej %  Mnld up iheli i . i . %  i ould i %  vOl%  : t|y 1 ,• one r unportant ai lie enue jrmi-in neg illation. Rt-th Are Stalling .". Command %  italilng whiht ih (.lemlin U V A I %  %  bases in Nor', 2 "WheUiet te igi> %  %  I "Whether u> aiuent %  i must ii"-lude telh tad en Rnree' esgeast i i decision Is made in M'-^ rmtoUer m %  I,,,., n anoth. L and • %  %  ; o*t|ioti i I I". %  i their action will be appreciated the Bervioi praeant and their subsequent N %  %  may have Inh Biter Hall eaogpl Joing so. Confteq n-l sent by the Royal fam.l. Butobvl.ire takllut steps in tbe, oilsly it would have lo be fefhi"i %  i.>r people had started bringf t that the n Wing big bunches and 'pravs and -f their own Ho there waa a naeer klad | bootlegging of Dower*, the pee pie brought In lilll' hunches o lluwers. snowdrops and vbdH and rdraight slim stuff like lallp %  ml narcissi hidden under their roata and dropped them on th< Hi.... ,Ihey were paaalm Well here they were agabi lying in strength on Ihe ground and In Ihe eialaleni of Oeurga'a fhapel because it* laved him. Large and small ferlngs made a blase of golden daffodil-, scarlet tulip* Irises white carnation*, red and while anemone* and a .astounding rose* ver> %  Urlllng under a grey -hi at the ha*c of grey walla. And pif.ple were going in aiid Ul lo 'king ,i! thei %  nave .. %  die and held pos'j „ were soldier %  I mls" rady" Warren. Oarltoa castodlan saving, when Oarlton mat SpsrUn In tha int game of the B AT A "•MOBOpartan but year's Cap *::::ier* defeated Carlton the mn-ifisns 2 1. %  wiln th' 1 %  % % %  %  %  > On Page IS On Other Pjogtii Page 2*Cdnb ( ailing, tour%  „ 3 cmenu Farm A %  i: c notes n e, Oardeedng bini tot Amal Bool i | %  .. 5 Regatt*. Chat son Swimming, c pest Ustetii Info London Vi To.' | las no women %  never have %  %  .. 8 yFi p/nai Fl n.i of King rg* VI %  i .. ii %  %  „ 13 .. 16 I. Grave People %  arc gravo ,. that lakes er1 ihe King md I" bun. ii %  there vhori the %  I • on Page t RALSSHH THI flU-iTtn ncrcu A wide variety of modols display and ready assembled for you take away. See out cycle Department, first Floor CAVE snail Ato., ui 10. II, 12 & 13 B.cd Sliest





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M Mm i i BBI \\:\ 11 IN] SUNDAY ADVOCATE l'\(.l Ml n.i \ Panama Canal May Be Rebuilt In 1953 : mOffV thin 20 years, ii it hoped %  ">'! I v u nu author%  ri rebuilding the Panamu A liicttn I. FreMnger. former J d i I mmon Pleas and former member w UK I %  st;,v M I nun. told the Arlvncatiunlew America km worhrt an the canal .in<1 MiGutd i!nd heiwtd other first class engineers Inter%  i Use aattd In the matter, would like it Canal would take lor of labour. I" remain at tuch. but there includm*labour from the Wett I* M'l. -because it gw~, oW ter.Tm t^l M .i.^T h n ,etV CC '" f. 0 ,h 1 ,s ""ounUlnous and practl%  reas with the Rivers and Harc *Uv ..II the rnamecr? have said '•P." "' % %  •-" •l it the ItST! "' Mchtotlta %  ... %  Mile* %  B ii |l "-inner said that the %  The lock one and r anal, ha ma! would be of i>dlni in addifor the reason th.it :i.. Miraflores Lakes, would be widened from 110 to 140 feet lo take care of more modern sruppmx The FOUiltr) rhere ha* a greater *n any other like are.i .ire nvm< weather conditions which Impede a m the canal as U the case at the p rWfi H 1 .*.c ol the Terniin.il %  OB the Pacific %  Itle— Mtrafloces• huh .overs an area uf about I 1 %  i-itnt where they could make It cover an area of foui miles so thai it could be used as . mooring basis foe boats to a wail the betterment of weather condtlons which are very dangerous at times to navigation. Three Locks The VS. authorities are proposing three locks at Mirations instead of two and eliminating th one at Pedro Miguel. That lock, l^ad been a sort of bottleneck. Ships going in there go' into cross currents and had t" into Hie Culebra Lji*. BrMthat toniliUona, •nharasu it the MJrafiorai tM ship-. protected until tfti weather conditions were bette, and navigation was more favour.ible This would be of great ad% %  ;;"L in the i M hiving more ill -l-.c time The Terminal Lakes Plan with adequate lucks would ecdt about i %  whgl it would cost to i --a level canal arhlafl would be entirely an experiment f-nger whose bune*> now i finance said that he wn | • %  v., >ears left Congres* Mil/. AIRCRAFT FOR VIRXCAO WILLEMSTAD. Curacao. Jan. 31. Kitten Bnt.*h-built Faircv Firefly aircraft, in aarvsM aTltB the Dutch Navy, have been larui'i i uacao from the Dutch aircraft carrier "Karri Doorman' to strengthen Iha island's de' iBBaaM Apart from its vital oil refining IndmsMf] CllraeM aasD has S mportamca in Iha da* fence of the Caribbean. During the lost war. the air df Curacao was undertaken by the US. Air Foice .-ajUM". TM8 MONKS Of auCKfAST ABBI \ energy you faal worn out. 4p'tisd. e gt-•rally mo down %  |h Burhfui Ion* Wins will a •nerjf and ions up ths a*Mll Giving AS* fiulit* K forttfie. sow tg tnd •>hjuiio and esnwnior ft b (k(ut Tonk Wins h sspccullf vBlwibl* if.BICKFAST TONIC WIXK %  II i^In on Time -Smgifl/c IO0tT (0-hour aUrm tlotk in cream. geaa oast uiih pUied tttkm. i -nh luminous spot*. Also •tailartrn.'iHumin.iut BiilnhpnKMtOOnMd< f ow ig a m i) reinbls. rn/rtJ Talking of HAIK . what is happening to YOURS? When n haii hcaliln Ihc tiuih IttO Wf pr1a1ftg aj Mmple tti.it nun. pacajkh sWHttajk it. to their cost. Hair it health* . Hny Wood \e^^cls in the snilp. Should the surplv or the* vital hair food* fail, the hair becomes HMu hntilc — and linj||> begins K> fallout. Ihisolicn hnpfWW Ittfl cmhurrasingly early age. Direct nouri*hmeni of the hgir roots u then essential Tor recovery, hot this purpose Pure Silvilmii i. iiuhspcnsabk:. Pure SMkrfo conlain* cyslinc. irypiophanc. tvroMiie and all the other naiutal hair-grovsmg siibslanccs — m %  concentrated form which CM be massaged into the scalp. Pure Silvikrin carries on w!iere nature leases off. If you are ftbOtH >•" %  i Iv.n: it would be vviiC lo sun with SIIMKI >J.i>. P all M allH • % %  > ;>< %  *.n.kuff a*l faUtg hatr.tkmtti -iheldral *. .imh wmmm i< *>> %  MS.N< ( esaas; uxdmlm%  \"H' | *itk on f-* th**t %  NEW RELIEF FOR ARTHRITIC PAINS But new treatment dot* more than ease these terrible agonies. A new product. DOLi ON mated *hi.h.n-t onlv |tvej proanpi recM braaa ths i da %  ymptetna I>I arthrii issl rb LI in itseaa, bat aasoaflaeti ths> metabotk pnars^ which coaastttuta ji vi i ;mp.>ri:int purt .ii Iha rheumatic state's lunkgrour-J. IHU.CIN hsi been thormiehlv li--l-d in im-dit .' m-ru n* IXH.CIN La 1-iug u-ed noie will, unprecedented IKII.CIN i* Udng prwriiN-d bv do<-tors nori And Mioay suffcnTn have nlreudv rwum.il norm.l living .1- r.-.ili ..r Inking IKH.s'lN I)..n't del iv Profll i>v Iha egpaetanci ••• tt&m eteilaaa ol \\+ pnin-. (let IHH.CIN i.-!,v. A i-.il k of 100 precinoi.ihl. 1, -,.*( ^Jy, .,. 12/PKR BOTTI.K soto 11. BOOKF.R'R (BARRADOK) DRUG STORKS I.TO. Broad Street and Muslim;* (ALPHA PHARMACY 1 hing, Burning and Smarting Ecie Stopped In 10 Minutes Youthful Vigor Restored In 24 Hours Glands Fortified \ "#/^* l> ) \ ; ii Discover) I %  &/, %  Vitalise Your Glands [tVl Doctor Praises Vl-Tahs Silvikrin TM HA<* NATURAL loi/D %  (•> .nir-t HOT 1 *>f|t. n ".'i".n>i -in Ufsusp*. 1 Mn %  •!-. rUnaBarm e-m.A 1 RlBtkhMia. Bcsllai aol Hd ivmftiM fsan-t las a ka4 Au. %  *!• JM IMI interior and u U TMI lo lor i whim Bihl aim treablei In IHa S •.... 1 11 n,-1.Ussulli OuorsiivUaal 'Tabs • Guavari j %  Beilera ..heed. VllalHr "d iha uin 1 11 bajpa nalura hssl u* aa Work 1 'rait • ,1 „•. 1 %  imatadiatrlT. Crarinc and htali.:. i •• %  %  <* 11 >ofur. whllfr < %  %  %  : da? D ... r0u 111 v. thai liar* at I in n ih> % %  ^ttii rou hat* h" U Ni.-aa.-a II .i... %  i.imlii I flauld ire fir Kin rrfaiinf i on 11 a .eoaii'l Hi. All I' i-.l di-na.i-" %  Mrnaa tad B J %  tin duasswared in idi>< *. frland. arra ar.ia*sT al Urn Ir proemaiit la au> saptaraoe-. SotlsffaKlMHt Guornnteed 11 ,'•', "IT'IIT? ilT".r'.Beap*fa sa lailHM, 0.1 N.Mia liw.l vour rli.i. Iwlai I** in II. ....,1 • r-i ..id al tM ana bl UMU lime II m aim 1... 1 all) 1 %  uras anaraaar IOJ id or aou ilmplr lain IteinpIT pa.kife and ra.t m %  led In I,H %  %  1. ORIENTAL SOUVENIRS SII.KS. CDUIOS. AUTB VENIIEMOB. 8BDA8. JOYEltlAS Y AKTI.sTICAS OUEIOBlDADEt). TKA1D08 DE IJi INDIA CHINA r EJUTO THANl'S I'r is n. |lr St., Dial 34M I TO-DAY'S NEWS FLASH Wi copies Special Edition Kind's runerul will be rescrs'Cd fur us. Only 7 left to b booked. Johnson's Stationery LOCK YOUR BICYXXK ;...,, %  I.I.K From L,: H .. %  DO 1O0 HUM 10 KONOMISE f rlll.V HIV \ . FILLERYS COOKER IT BAVRS TOC OVER 75" KITCHEN niB. COOK I St. TIME It,. Hi. !. Flavours -nd Nulrltlvr IJemrnta of Foods are Kl l \l\IIl In this OMUBSJ Devkr NO DRIDGHKV I MAK1S COOKING KASIER | \\l f• % %  < %  >>>!< %  .SaVfV Of II HI II III I I. # I WTEtWS in CONGOLEUM in Squares and by the Yard %  Shu/t ntnri'nii-nllf/ ul . GINEH AL HARDWARE SUPFLILS BEAl TIFLL CARDED! na Aivr \ i m nchievc this liy v %  •iun W can assist y.ui from our comprehaniivc ratine of 4. All III \ I ours WE HAVE SHEARS. FURKS. HOES. RAKES. EDGING TOOLS. SPRAYERS, SPRINKLERS. llrre's a pecial itlTef lir IhU Wpck | In. Kl I'.r.i I: IIOSI. g lit |K. 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We have a small number of Consuls now available — choice of colours, too! Charles McEnearney & Co.. Ltd.



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SIMMY, KmitlARY 17. 1M2 Sl'\n\\ U- % % %  llrmirha-s I'nrraloidr. S|ti'i^lilsliiL mill Sttan Sf %  --! Osu.illy Now Pkgs. Quaker Corn Flakes .41 .:U Tins Pie Apples Tins Box-All Cleanser .23 .341 6 lb Potatoes Tins Cooking Butter (51b) 4.50 1M Boneless Beet D. V. SCOTT & Co. Ltd. Broad Street I'M \o\> .96 .•HI .72 ..'•I .58 .. O I. O \ A A l <; ii i i. ii 11: s U)oJild-wid& and dianddumn Till: NEW AUSTIN A40 SOMERSE 'AUSTIN again makes world news with this exciting, hand some new saloon. The A40 Somerset has new relinements. new comfort and roominess-plus the record breaking 4 cylinder O.H.V. A40 enaine, with improved induction and cylinder head design for extra top gear performance. rill'; M:W Asvri.v A in SOMERSET Mill. III. 0.\ SHOW' siioitri.Y M Nil. \— Yon t'iin l-|'inl on ill ECKSTEIN BROS — Bay Street.



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St.MlU tt-BBU^V 13. IK-i SUNU l\ \ll\ill ATI Winter Turned To Spring AT >U >loini si lit II i PICI. MM 6j From pjtr 1 They were mindful not to lei 100 oh .irpi>on the sUt.ta p tha. The> beni down over rvad lahel* hm never in too loud a tone. llui uutitde, people were aiunuIng In the street*. We had seen them as we drove to Windsor niMUOtngl (or buses making a houIX. not. when you think i.r the lli itir.lt mourning their King. itu-ik ol them looking like u lot of full •.! lugubtiousne&s. Ighl wen av thov won sort of picn*c of this. They march .tlong the street with -bags bursting with sandDd -homing the tops of Ibnmog flasks. They speak at the usu.it pitch of their voltes and they talk of oUwr things than the death of the King's quite often. Prince Monolulu Outside the Caitk gates was sfndlni ihe most famous racing Prtnco Monolulu. i palOUTOd gentleman who frequen's our race meetings ;.nd speaks in 111 >U Park in a costume as authentically royal as hut title, of trailing white robes and featherGtsfttal up from his head for a couple of Teet. A rich race character he is. ana we all knew htm and crowds all saluted him even today, not loudly but with a smile. 'I knew the King", he was telling his neighbours, "personally. But personally I'm telling you". Whatever the extent of that knowledge might be it is certain that the King must have known him for he had an eye for all odd characters that frequented the Englivh scene. So crowds do the deid King no wrong by smiling at Prince Monolulu as he would have smiled. Ann indeed they constantly give proof that for all they're making a holiday of this they're grieving deeply. A window is opened, the voice 1 of the radio speaks out into the street. A man In the crowd with his mouth full of sandwiches says mtng round by Marble Arch now", and from the tone of < )TOII know that he's gone U p of the way with his deud King. And there are director tributes. r ODM spook to one suddenly and tell one clones which have a queerly twisted, unpredictable character of truth. On the way to the chapel fir the funeral service I asked the i. .i woman who was walking alone So in it she could tell DM something Important that at that moment she felt she had to toll someone, she walked towards the chapel with me though that wasn't her way. Sh.' bad a husband It appeared who suddenly went blind at tillage of 35 when ho was a well-paid executive In an insurance business. He had been tilled with despair, he had found the flrsl lessons that won until Mm in Brall'e profoundly niieouragip" he hud inend Whan his wife had discovered thai there was a %  chool for adult Hind in b ttOl I West Country where he could bo to eiru a living in some new way he had refused to go. Hut tnrn one ( IUIMIIHI he had heard the Kim make a broadcast in which the i.'.t thai he was wrestling with a stammer was particularly obvleu* and the obvious embarrassment and effort of 'he King had made him decide that he could make such an effort himself too. And he h d cone to school In the Wool Country and It had been the beclnnlns; of a better Um* for both of them She left me as soon as *he had told her story and I think it pocsl. ble she was going around town to tell it where she could Always Reaul> In Saint Geo;ge'-. I ;!apel ther .i i •* bOOUtj 11 R*oa built b\ HODI | VI who is considered JH |1 iftcilive King but it strong l> > into al 'he ages havo shut aome of inear ssmu* Which nm. ha* in. bacauao It is soob It has -Is own lotO OOtkh : locka simplicity, it is not pui-lv n beaut,ful U the trinusaiM year-old Westminster Hall, it .. loo urn .incptcd ond U*i | Me r.r the I un ||i rise flush with the wa'U and break into the sSaberNk* emitting thai c vers the roof uh tineileet of .. fountain stilled forever, And under this roof :•: the and of the Church between the pl-ee where the congregation sit* am' is Ihe choir where Knights of the Garter h:.vc their aool again is KlKabethan pomp and ntnli i ., v %  in his own stall which a gold pi with hi> Coot-of-Arms. As Knight succeeded Knight these gold medallions beeomc many Each ..f the stalls Is covered by a canopy of carved wood which rises *il|jh into the air of this high church and on top i* a knightS helmet draped with his coloured scarf and surmounted by his armourial bearings, which may be a tree growing out of a golden pot or a naked t*>y holding a shield or two arms holding plumes. Above ineae again hang Knights' banners of scarlet and gold and all the brave colours 'hat there are. These are trappings of enivalrj •s they were worn .uid one sees thai the film erf Henry V was a pallid reflection of glowing fact. Into these stalls there came now in dark plain elothinaj those who had a right to be close mourner* of the. King either by reason of ties of blood or because they had held high office in his state or in allied stales. Exiles Those ihat were akin to the dead King were some of them exile* In four adjoining stalls sat King Michael of Romania and his Queen Anne. Petet Of Yugoslavia and his Wui'ii Alexand'.i The two OXttOd QtlOOnj kissed as they passed. Of the high Officers of our State the greatest was of course Winston Churchill. Mr. Attlee was tliete loo. ajui for all his excellence he did not make a strikingly appropriate effect though he was a man who had served King George VI wall. Because he didnt lit in with h.v rurrouiulinai he was good for this day but he had nothing In common with Knights of the Garter and their bearings ami banners. He lacks scarlet and gold In his composition But when General Elsenhower came in he wag of their ooh p TIIP Clergy <' tar> **>nion*i far*! • nit-niiK Si Micinri Oatkedial thiii Iste King Oeoraa VI. •A faot on fruity to attend We Watched From The Chimney Tops Queen'* College Beat liufna light. A plain man. he neverthe)..rlt less has richness of banners. AJKI SO of course had Winston hill when he came. He wore we bi dio wear at funerals of those who younger than ourselves. He is growing old as strong men do; %  how much he RMMjd restrain the energy which still wells out of him. He nearly tripped and Tell on the step that led down to the choir It could be seen that he was embarrassed. It could be guessed that he was asking himself if he had not done this because he was Infirm. But Indeed it happened because he waa striding too youthfully. A Huah We aat waiting and after an boui oi .-o we beard sounds that told us that the King** body had reached Windsor. Those who were outside in the %  treets say that there wag ot the moment of its coming a hurh on the Town which did not lift until the coffin *> *• aagr 10 > H \/l l MAY LONDON. Feb. 15. High up in lite giiinj baighti ol Hoods, grey and redbrlok buildingi, the ggOOt DOB* pOBJ of His Majesty'' loyal sublecu h id gaUK'red to see the funeral prnteoilon wind its solemn ough i in' hushed streets towards Paddington Station toaay. Witn tbo watchers .niong the I leoraa Sixth make his last journcv Kn iv window waa pa people, every garret with its patient witnesses. The old were 'lie young on the roofs g parapet* clinging to QnlsTtfloyg, clambering prec.irlously on PTOochirou* glatiM F r btneath the minified coloun A : i, .„.,i aBh khaki clod Iroops luted livil. %  gomblod a v km ol lorai I wild BoWon Which end wliere the eon veld begins. AII the way %  locsfl thl %  10 dress sho| and second hand dealers, people waited %  iked there regNlne Deep Now than were limn* their famtliir pavements nine tgM|) i.. see their greatly tovef Them with thou thermos flasks had sat up all night. %  ad mow-cloud* gathered thrc.iteningly. Then llublack horse was aeen (ximitig through the dlatont Marble Arch and the solemn surge of the funeral march drifted mournfully up lo us. moved down that great straight road. In perfect forH one man i roaoaured trait i !' %  .-t iw.i> the minutes. "Nothing Like It" An American perched praeapi11 a sloping roof nearby -in" hrteilv In .iiu.i/emetit "*w have nothing like thU bai Then the bold yellow *p!.i>h ol the Royal slmdard appeared so Boat the grey and black And ,i hum fell on the waiting crowd which spread up from the people on the pavements and en. veloped the chic blanket of stillness. Afterwards they snid up there in th ehhnnay pots that tomonow the> had forgotten to look at ail those foreign Kings th it foflooiod the eorloaji But bad you noticed the Duke of Wiiuisor t form' A long tune since he had been seen m th.it And young Prime Plnluno* was a tine young man'IIhad %  walk that you could pick out an> where and that funny w |] Ol sticking out his chin A Wriii said -lie fell proud Of the navy all over again when she s.iw how good the ratings lookeo pulling that gui. carriage, ever) mm in step and White rOBOg bOl I tautly in dead straight lines. Qoaehei In their seirlet pasaed and then rank upon rang of diplomats, attaches, M-ivicemen ami policemen. A splendid lookhv detaehtnei of East African Asuaris swuna. proudly by like giants, who secrm-i to tower above the h*00| and after them. Furtlir on freshly whitened helmets Bhoan <\ kl) against dark blue UIIform*. A woman fainted In %  falling forwards through tintroops. |0 Ua f.i"liownwards on the tarmac. Immediately. nUroculDual) i bind bar Balnl John'* man were Uiere springing from DOWasori Then the lament of the bagpipes took over from the brass bands and the end of Iho procession came in sight. I.ast of all a very old ambattmd ai.d boseUni black smoke from its exhaust passed un its way Such %  long rOUrrlO] lor .oi .uieient engiiio A great sigh swept oval crowd. They wailed a moment !-•lore they moved away watd the great procession winding into tin mist.v distance. It had taken lorty ji.jnut. %  • in pass. • from page 4 in the next sat |g t.,U\ games Perkins failed to get ten points. %  WOd 21— 4. 21—7. I A A.ieiphi three, IdfetvUle whan fnglj Vaughn LanvtUe me: Clouoatto ChaMkn Vaugr.au scored an ea*y \ i. toi %  She leturned man> of < II 21 8, 21—14. Pauline S:mUi. another ppOd ho appears to have got over her nervon-m s dOfl OtOd Gloria Ramsay two love to win the final get for Acielphi Smith lorahoimd all lit.Ill ibie ami it lo't one ni it; %  .1 cut h %  .n UM Bnal match Y w PA o> \ v w i A •. .. i %  ph %  VWCA. girls ilayi un UM I ., > \ % % %  ; .. %  i with them |0s] tha' this na InOd W %  I maii> of tie OthM . % %  I would u|ipeai lo hove borne fruit. Ann Hoad Was the outstanding player foi YW.PC the defeat d fa Li Byrsoa M ll t ^i 15. 21—14. In IhO OflkOt Mil Jean UumShrO) was beaten by Joyce loni V W. A || 10. 21—9; Bennee i ... tomi %  i %  < % %  Eugene I > — • %  %  I V WC A i II 1!' It 6; Yvonne J. ii lei i Y.W.C A II || || in end Pol H in Wi idine 1'ilgrim V W( A i ?l 14. 21 18. givlni ^ W PC a foui-one victory Rowallan i ttennis (Jump Firt> >^ ut Loid Kowallan s*i* loxrj okfli With a laige hilarious gi^up o .couteis who staged a vamp tir\-. ins i.o tout loot night at H-i .lege. The scoutei" sang with fu> .loin equalled, as Int. Bd the rod Haii. nii WCKKI and (1 atmg sp-rsi. %  ind ihoft lun i out plays acted. i ho Borneo were bio I || tOOt bUh and the w I I ratasnfb daaurad %  .amp Ai %  open. As the tin got |0U)g, %  various troops of scouts march**' in singing. Ml And while the scouts began tatu about, the Chief Seoul wh must have sat around bundrod Iras, MOkad or \\ on tlw scouts had sung g including. Loch 1 0 naiiiii.' the ChM .oroundin %  OOJM of the words, -...and yea I ha UM high road and 1 lake lh low Hoad." and received a great applause when he had llnlslied The SI M0r> Sea Scouts then put on a abort sketch. The [>>nkry." m which two scouts droaaed as a donkey treated the other stouts and the fairly Luge OTOWd which had gathered, to some Timigrlno antics. IM UM next item, the llelhel Tiuop placed a log on the ground and imitating their Idea of Red Indians on the kill—the log being a man—danced as they sang %  shrill war song and then leaped ui for the kill, sending thrii staves onto the log. Rangers followed thi< with two I oaaj At the end ol each item, thtroops which had not taken part in it. would give one of the usual cheers of appreciations, "B-H-AV-O bravo." or "Isica-isica" Included in the programme too. were (lie Soufriere Song C'idci the Spreading Chestnut Olnj 0on| OooUo. inl ItlO Sotifriere Song tWO ROVOTI ihsplay of humour In illuming ana these weie (.ml well leeelved In the Bflflfl Qtofl Cam 1 I Cnipa. umpa. umpa. all MOUta %  .lined to enjoy themselves more i particularly when thai went off Into long "iiinpaaaaahs" Other songs, "Haila shaila.* "Huma Lac" were sung with f-.illthioated loudrMM anil made tbi camp Are \ei. liv. I\ BOOtdOO, "Sea Scouting Is Thl Life For M(-" and "Nobody know the Trouble I See" there was i %  rane of morning camp life of tin scout depicted by the 1st Sea Seoul s. After the Chief Scout told I varn. scouts sang the closing song "O Come and OO with Me Far relief from ASTHMA oar small tab/ft arts yukkly and e ffectively *TMih kphiwnc treatment for Asthma n so VfS^I'l'V simple, BO qux*, so effective! All you do fl \(^ \ I twallow oat inull tablet, and relief nani almost v^^ *sw tnuneduicly riphaaonc conuuu several healing T*, agents *hi.h sre released on reaching the itomach and ian to dissolre the germ-laden sccumulaUoos srluch congest the bmnchui tubei Thii *,icntifi-sllv balanced preparation brings the boon of easy breathing, and has the additional advantage of safeguarding the mind tnun the dread of those sudden nerve-racking nmLauitiK There n nothing to It ai when l-phaxonc tableti ire 03 fund t There ii nothing to iniect, nothing to inhale l : phaaone has succeeded in esses ol Asthma, Bronchilit and llnxuhul Catarrh wrn.li prai HHisly scenied hoprksi. What U ha. done lot other*. II can .lo ior vou FOR ASTHMft AND BRONCHITIS TAKE 1 usnsD I aj all r|.*lar a ch* If sai siatsiajr, mN U IN OUR LINEN DEPT. WE OFFER F.UK ion i is in GOLD, ill I I RUSE and i .1(1 I \ nun ion F.I. s i in PLAIN WHITK II.S2 to WHO BATH TOWELS tram 12.13 to M.32 in Bl.l'K, PINK, QBBBN nd GOLD from in Kiiily Coloured Desitns $1.59 to 5119 litMtk-keeping SueeesHVH I'here weie tineo iJot l k-kee ( iiiig succaasOO tas against U loihiroo) at a recent Pitman's Coniinen i.n tlOn i ondueled D] Ml i i; Rock at C o rabar n vor. Vl\c lisf is as lollows;— tl IMrNrAkV .(Jloru Walcotl. First-class. (Mr. P U Beid. i-iui.-toi, iiumen. rtrat-cl .li 1S. Richards). Mignoti Lovell Second-clas-(Miss A. Skeenei. Mil 11*11 i Ii Hudolph Uibbs. lot' First-cjass. (Modern High Sch Larceny Trial Toinorrow iititnei avadaaea In U %  in winch Ihe PolMO have hioiigh. ^.x charges of UsrCOrt] ii HI ami fraudii %  in.olvilii, umoUiiU u. >J,UUu ail. J.1.UOU from th.? Oovornmeni Vreaeury against Carlos Smilh • Civil aWvani of UM Auiino. llenrral's olTtce, will be taken b) ll Worahlp Mr. C. IWalwyi Di. net "A"' on Monday •* %  %  .. in. Ihe charge MM UMI 0 offMcM were conanltted somelime U-tweeii April IMS am June 8. lvol. Smith is on a bai of fcSQu. Counsel in the case anMi R K. Walcott QrC ..saociatw wi h Mr. E w. Borrow rot th' lefonce while Mr. w w He... rr bottle 4.60 SICHEL & Fll.s FREHFs ST JULrtN—por l-'lll* 3 43 i\ i-.KF.H— per carton 4.80 lEER—per bottle 20 si.wsEEt.iK srirrr A CW. tML Broad Street Oreyatona HaiUaca



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PAGE TEN M M>\\ MiVlli -1M>U KIRRl'ARV IT. 1$S2 Winter Turned To Spring Trinidad Hit • rrmm Pat* capacity Th*y *tn coming b, was taken into Ihe cha| funeral and Ihr-y w*rr stopped caHnit sandwich**, tht'V coming to the funeral of someoritdid BC. smile an*' more at Prince (hey had seen much of and had Mooolulo ot A. numbar of them Ttty received decontions from death if the-r Ku.g wl Ji u-'.tfn the Kin*. some for war service his coflin appears l-echoes more In The ( haps-l than the death ol King, it be„... whithey to 9*. come* the tlaalh .* sa'crnnan. the (;,„ re< .-, Chapel they were shown de..th of a T l rl ll f .. a-nlor a link..,„, ., „naulat encloaure. Toajre er. a tailor, it became* the dwtb of „ „ p*,*^ .lonf ride the coat •very man A gun was fired whu h „ „,„. ,„,„, a ff OI d, v^every mtouty to rtpmem evvr> rf h ur--lozon of the cho,r MJ.IL. year of hH Jfe. And this khey „ rr1 ttv n(nnff ,„ Ih4 cholr „, say startled m|uU ho wared , ide ways gkmpa* h 1 t>luhed to see rorreapondents from other • %  • %  Chapel. poor comfort to be able to assure Sound*. Mopped them that in no other famous At last lh.*>.inds earnsnear rt, urc h or ehaael that I know and stoop1. Tn^re %  • j, „ right be seen. Here the choir some van the pr-a, ranged Its.'.' had taken par ml .. i u quar-ers but with Queen Juliana of il ......rd. took: fa mlna Bx „| <„, .j^ ^n^n,, her sea* In the chair. She is not nut as soon as lh* profession a bemillnil Wernan hut re 1 ouId wn ;V „| y,„, p.,^ through the stand up to searlc! and goldto ha(r „ irf< numbfr ^ ^^resenrtrhi.e*of n.iHtanand dtptomatlc Now Arrhhlshnps i.nrt Bjshops forces who stood on the Altar •ml Hie • ; thevnii of the choir •nd^rhor •_'-^ twW!f ln ..ofTiTi and the presa. rnttM Vni See to the door n* Uv the eoff.n ind 1^*1* rt'iume.1 u> rarntc laaVmaslVM "n the step* bttoalh* Mtai %  %  .sper corraapondent at sudden nlng •( %  funeral of Ueorge VI saw on the rfouen ,,f the service. BaB Scepltr gad* f 1 1 „ m ,mher of i-mclal peared being hrne t.. a at am barb T! ere fnllo-v.-d an awkcovered w* li pun] r -ard nti-ufjfla. 11 Is a newtpaper' %  to turn In ropy to hi) was the onlv lmim.ii who were repoi'ti.p tl ,. .... ,1 ..*,.„ a ense for II1 IIiay even th-wi.-h he funeral Won that n t* he hn? n was '.!-. noted lhal I %  no jlluaiun to the deed man's Kingnood Interpoiatad In the funeral service-till the Garter Knight of Arm* read his titles and pr.iyed f<.r a blessing on Queen Elizabeth II N<> newspaper corTeapondent • %  any member of the Royal 1-amlly during tinservice but it wae not difficult to guear how the Que<-n waa looking. At her wedJing there i-ame on her a look of mble sticnglh. as if she were irsolving to do toe hard thing if it were right. We wouldn't have been able to see her face through her dark veal but It would h.ive shown in the linen of her exquisitely expressive figure. Add to that the look that is on the face of any daughter whose f;iher has just died of a long and painful illness, and you have the sum of what would have been under her veil At The Vault After the service wua over ahoae of the pre* who had not to catch early editions walked through the choir nth trie rest ..r i he con gr %  < gat ion and looked down on the King*, coffin as it lay in the opening In the Boor that led down to the vault His .'immcr nml broadcasts became touching and infinitely stfaiflcani. He must have know well when he gave the last one thnt he would soon be juai there under the Royal Standard with a wreati flowers upon him about to be lowered Into darkness. But cer• ,lnh'i-ffl whnt he said he had believed fully in the reaurrection and life in a new Heaven and • '1 As we left the choir some men were bending N-T the purple velvet stand a ( >d taking the Crown and Orb und Sceptre and putting them Into cases. They wouldn't I* used acaln till 'he Coronation, the signing and sealing of the Qiieen'e consecration to this life of overwork and constant effort to make a romplox machine run 11 amOOtl I] it were ainutle. :U6For4\Ykt8 In Second Tent •rtsss Oar awn I'ORT-of-SPAlN. Feb. 16 Trinidad treated the huge Oval ' %  %  ' I J wuld see was the l*>rd hundreds of thousands through -haial>c leln. ixrd Clarendon half wherpropn rel Itlons ••' the This loo WHS a symbol. The Rovnl K'n* of Englnnd and his people rtoilly would have b.-cn itppolled have been IhfTssllM -a' Utrotlf^ h v 'he thought that a number of een'uries to pe" floin.'BP t KUif who had ip^^n care to aequalnl h what tr><> % %  '. ">ns we-v and how to matn'nin them. What went on In Si. George's Charsel '' 'hinrs to was alo an allegory of what hap,n ished them well had urh an unarsjmU Wit. So too would lord Clarendon who is in Intensely !ljtnifl"d person who would wish ierve dignity. But man) reopl' n ber->n* 10 r V'*" nrd his peopk. twean them and the press, th.t T! %  Prest 'ells th people aSe **" bad been opportunltv for truth abom the King nnd Ml •' %  to go thus grievously %  wrong. It was precisely to keep 'hir*'. Holng right in spite of the family. This Is no Invasion of K vacv foin these iaya It I rdly possible for the Ui~ peopk kno-.i. I of the maohlner\of Is like excap*. throuKh the of 'he rTeas. Verv soon after King nv>rpp VI came to the Thro,.,, the prealised thai Great Prltaln as lucky In the ruler thai and they hnve taken pleasure 1 lern state that the dead King: btarei .0 hari. The da'v was of course not 1ml for us. Resurrection, Life We stood on our prrehea and %  MM words of the, burial % %  rviee which spoke <>f ihe reaurn itnd the life, of a new telling a story of Royalty that Heaven nnd earth and proclaimed was always ft<-rccr*h!e When the that hhe Lord press get lo St George's Ihey were coming In n ._ Is our Shepherd %  H therefore can we lnrk nothing double '"d we were soothed by the perTHE GALLOPS' # From Page 4 with her in I fa. | t was his first gallop over this distance and I think he did it very well. The rive WHS done in 1.06',. Cardinal is another Guineas candidate who is going; verv well. He did a box lo box with Otm Blti hut I took only the last f\ve which they did In 1 05> Caprice did four in M|. Clementina wa* well Md over %  %  in 1.09. Watercress was not allowed to do much returning only 131 for the box to box. Another arho might be on ice There was next a threw horsr I lfJop in which the visitors from ntlgua and St Kilts were seen Collage. Vonwlse and Condevon, aa they are named, or Sea Biscuit, Citation and No^r. as they ;irrailed. They did four In 56. Twinkle was promoted to do P gallop with Gavotte. |was a good boa to box in 1 24 and the last five In 1.061. Very good for Twinkle. Apollo did a bog to box in 136 and five In 1 09|. never allowed to Krai Admiral had Ihe better of Mis* Friendship over n five in 1 Dfl Rnctnn was the l.-i.| I paw He did a box to box in 1 U| .aid the l,it live in 1 07. Once the proud possessor of two bowed tendons he now displays two of the cleanest legs In the paddock without a bandage to hide them. Strange Knme this horse raring. he drove the leg spinner to the' covers and Le lie Wight overshied for a ifnele II %  waa scored In I6S minutes Trinidad's first wicket fell at IT", Corbie cutting and edging Norman Wight's on* spinner into wicket keeper Me Wntt's safe gloves. A garall went at tea when he CUt Wight lo the slips where Cimacho took the catch with the score 212 m J12 minutes. Guillen who batted slowly before lea. brightened cm after the Interval and with Leg,ill nnd then Chlcky Sumpath kepi the score abreasi of the clock. (iulllen was bowled in nosing lo Claskin for 70 and Tangehrvm li time. Scores %  f 1 i%  ..i ,.| Flr.1 Inniacs • -tmrai. r CaaMSasi b N Wight %  Mi Wall b N Wlghl Lrfjull r Csmarhn b S Wlalit Sunpalh not ou> TanacHooB "< out i — i T. 1 >i %  1 %  1 .i'i. rll of uirMfU 1 for IM. 1 for 111, 1 I .. Ill "*ll": AN4I.VBSS Oukin . St T SI I'-nwho |) 1 44 Ttu !" .....,. %  t at TT t H w 1 S we the men and women working for the Reliance Shirt Factory are proud of the fact that every one of the .'MM! shirts we produce daily is of guaranteed fit and workmanship Reliance Shirt* are available in all leading stores O I II I flying Uirck-8 CROP-TIME SALE gi ~ .**-> Seagulls is Hier.XGi.xv #/// ##-:vo/ > W£SI*O.V5EiT Tnese and other thousands know that the prices Reductions in this Sale is no Sham Genuine Big Reductions are the order of the day TO-DAY and EVERYDAY at Til AM BROS. Pr. Wm. Henry & Swan St.. — Dial 3466. All Wall Plaques in P00LE POTTERY Select Your Favourite Set Early AT Louis L. Bay ley %  .%W.VSSS,VSSSSSX**.-.-.-.-.V. WMW .WSSMVSSSSSS. Bolto.i La.ie Phone 19(19 Aqunlir Club Gill Sliop Phone 4897 It'll ttaffli'fi's fur llttui' I hina. A BLESSING TO MOTHERS! JACK and JILL COUGH SYRUP With Vitamin C STOPS KIDDIES COUGHS & COLDS rcara juting** H* Arstb%  %  K imt pn.i.u %  an fit fatara attacks. For matanr*. Mr. ;rrtunrt olst tda* an-i %  -U TOII %  !••!> rnl*bi and 1 m %  Mendaoo K"-' •"> : £ In a Jiffy AND TASTES SO GOOD THEY BEG FOR MORE I .mwn Mam Q tiaaa •* i_. —tmm 1h rtas-ana* (tj|l a^S >t4> >a' hans i daaaarraa, n aili f ai iiA .IACIC .--• JIM. tt.-"iai-i Li ..:.. aassH asai tm m M kalleisi p* %  > Aai %  aaaaaal umo* JACK and /nx. ITS NfW. DIFFERENT SAFE JACK and JIU. inaw but lh,.ioi^l>l> triird ill tnauaand> 0( Cue* %  nd u ciuramerd to relieve *id.l*. r uh> and rnld. la.irr than uni bara evar triad, and HMHI imptrt.int f T| JACK and JIM. I. B*rt fr thr tmlaM toddler Another famous Buckley Product "** %  %  "•<• Burkl-, • Mixture. Canada %  lir.t arlllnf co u h and esM rss—dy. and n a< laai and aahrtiva for kiddls*' rnkl> a* Bucak i and havr II handy How ii>c iamous Bennett College can help your career through personal POSTAL TUITION ttu I >• h V..II iiaJs or ptofcaiioii. il %  in OUT carset h% ofpoiiuniucs aatC'1 and cncouraaenicrii Qaarairlsee tattian i ntii \ Iltjl . When you enrol with lla: Beanrl I %  i -ill ba coached onnl th Ctavcraoraf the CoUcge .h.i I %  .>-tcm of I'rmiK luisr UJIIIIIHI way you have ihtIvnctv ol I luKmn, bul you ssark a •* %  <*\to more ihar, m taaatins VIHI will (Justify* Aod 0"al*catfOT> m^itf personal hrltcrnsaat. Fatal chocae youi Mthjact— than aaad (wilh-mt obliplioni lor The sett Coleav : I I IN MM OF TrlfSI LIfS YOUR rtlfatr % %  ....-.u-,I., -^-*ta ..„.-. U (ai — %  .*! IIMIU l.wt.tllH—<1 C' larlH-.U al c t—- %  • -, %al>ama>th.a i-...; .*i f WM. tMxK-M •fn-iam • Sha>i siaca Shetfl l.lK-.U Sufc WSS.a rrtit — ll"l' I ujtu. — '" %  ^laXNNETT COLLEGE Z^SE Daps. 1 SB. Iko anuia MCaUaMr(Wd 1 *fs>ld Itka %  '">' •"* % %  • Wiwcs Ifyasmoi to tet QUICK REI.IIiF Iroas FAIK. anl also to enjoy the benefits nf Vitamin H. you miat tafce YEAST VITE Tsb, There'* aothituj die like YEA VITB. It i> the ONLY r rebever which ALSO contains i tonic Vitamin B t Don't wait fp and let some YEAST-VI' Tableta noa. ftr HEADACHES BEBVE PAINS COLDS, CHILLS, RHEUMATIC PAINS UUCVU YOU* PAIN M MAOS 100 Wl MEU IYEASTVITEI The Only Pain Reliever containing Vitamin B, YEAST-VITE s S K 1 Ol Al MA (B'dos) Ltd. &Co. M\ !! \i-:\vs!! IVEWtli \V'iHave JuM Rocuvcd a New Shipment ot . LADOM' PLASTIC HAND BAGS—Assorted Colours ^,^ **"* %  S4M **" %  *'• EKh > %  %  ?•.%  • t • -.,.... u _... .^1.-4; SMALL LADIES' HAND BAGS—(or Evenins'llse W M.87 only CIIII.DKKNS PLASTIC HAND BAGS In Black. White and Red S 1 $1.83 Each ALSO KLITK. PIIOTO.PBJNT SPORT SHIRTS @ W.75 aah MKN S B.V.D-I @ $1.M per Pair SOCKS $1.43 and 53c. per Pair a .japIt Pays to I %  mi And Ihe miy way You can do so — li by ShoppinK at . GfOKGE SAHELY & CO., (Bdos.) LTD. 19. SWAN STREKT FOR BKST VALUBI AND EFFICIENT SERVICE Joyance' is probably the most famous children's sandal in the world today. It is simply and sturdily made from strong, supple leather, and thick plantation creperubber. K] design and shape was the result of a scientifr n-ey of hundred: of children's feet. It's a lovely ^andal. SANDALS MADE Br C. ft J. CLARK LIMITED. ^T^EfT. SOMERSET. ENGIANO LOCAL ACtNTS -0 BAAflADOS % IN 190tt Prof. C. V. Boys made Ihe following remarks in his Presidential address to the Physical Society in London : "The Lubricating property of oil depends on something which is at present unknown n o-one knows what ollirtcas This blissful state of ignorance continued until March 1920 when Wells and Southcombe pubUsheXa ^ paper showing conclusively that the "oiliness" of a mineral oil could be substantially improved by additives. Oils made on ihe Wells Southcombe process became marketed ini-ouch-nit the World as GERM OIL These Oils are available to you to-day In Bar bad 11through the "GERM" AgalNR. (BTRAI. FOUNDRY LTD.



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_! PAGE Will SUNDAY ADVOCATE M\||\\ rr.Blil \H\ 17 l3L' ,*//.•/ it 1\ inj> Sancrr-for > on MYSTERY CLUB I jERfc IT 18! A aurpris* mil -%  II wno tovts DlariM Bu! this is no ordinars P*§ne_ I%  Sjtoh-I Club Firing Baucrr i m*ftt u Oraw >%nrn cirri* on a piece tnl.n wosl i ."I' 'MeJtl ttr > inrstMirr llncii Inwam Lwww a .inc p*rai wlU) Ui Taj 4 •**•• dulia-J .,• >t*idL H->s 5d [n piaca oui•,ac the fluum nnc oiua •• %  i' ..-.e snfl iwwe it to eel .. uu need >r< cut Irotn %  uaaa Sa.-s wood T p oi m* t!ie otnet .toe-HI fWD nc from aar " &f D man* a wools' fWi out ol a %  *-•• %  : r> • YOUR SLIP IS SHOWING SONIA fRNEST DUDLIY rawchal. D*I*CCl*w < .rrertir. TO PLY rio.i • snor*. • t>u JUid tor -in ur r-m P "-wart llie ear ir.row c*""* %  •pace i wait, rmm ml fiii'| %  Mil eantr*. raat.na rout Iba %  %  v> I if fUMRupert and the /. -..v Whll Kupei; lui IllgOllllllll H lht pasd ol turk he put IBM (>-iloi*(. and running to h uck he up* om wimc ol ihc IOIIII. Suit enough the hark it there ind. P OUAj %  up. tie hinHi |. I EH. Trirre*. > TMoigr iMfinhlin." he ispi. mr an .ook. || it. Fhrn V nm irul troariv "I rton'i Ran ->• %  Tou'rv iilkmg abcul," hf giumMr* "There'. . amtina ,i -II •> -Opotnl*>l East Croydon fl.l UM httiu werv M'di.iiiwiy low (there wax an electricity cut). Midnight was striking (another higher wages dispute) as Sonla turned from the window overlooking tho High-street. She straightened her guze, which had been bent on the stream ol IsMh limousines bearing expen-* sivrly gowned actresses and their millionaire escorts to the local night clubs and gambling castnos. ''! in through with all that f Sorua cried, a blood-red nngernail flicking the foot-long *sh off her hashish rLgarette *That tlu^lle^.. empty flitier of hrciic miAt-teri and East Croydon's tinselled nighl-life I'm through with It "• I goggled at her—I'd Just arrive! by motor-bike. "Dont dont tell me," I asked In surprisp. 'you'n reformed?" [>indon's notorious Crime Queen eyad herself in the tall wallmi rrror. "Keep my form out if this," she snapped. She drevr her mtnk-llnrd balhrooi with Its rcvcalingly plunging heni-lme closer round her shapely figure "There'i nothing wrong with it that a good foundution won't fix I lust happen to be broke, that's all." Sonla took a deep drag at hn ligiirotte and dexterously puffed a cloud of hashish 'moke through her left ear. And to think if II hadn't be< for that slUy slip 1 m terribly brittle eharactei I leaned forward on the edgr of my chair—the sent was mlssinc anyway—eager to he.r another of Sonia'i sordKi stones of her uitt:rr world eareei. "I waw'king hand in pockc* with Manny Skripp, smart* est book-swindler in the game.'' she continued in her alluring sinand-fog tones. "I had the novel notion of faking Casanova's memoirs." It seems that Sonla had been lipped that Parry Graff, the wellknown Welsh antique book-dealer, .' ould pay £ 10.000 for the original manuscript of the great lovers' lifeand love-story, told In bis wn hand 'For weeks Manny and 1 worked on the )ob. We both got writer' %  fell over his beard n> his excitement. If only." /ltd tears trickled down Soniw's nose and put out her cigarette with a loud fiu, 1 hadn't made that foolish mistake. . "' BUT. of cosirse, YOU havr spotfed Soria's rillp slip right auau If \i"u haren'r ,ir'. another pl0"ce of the picfare pires VOti nut r*L \PNOI.O C.H*.Y 41 V.llage. Wfl Bank. Oe.nei.rt. Bl itih Guiana Age II, wanu Pen I'iks between the ages of IB and 2n preferal.1v females Hubble* %  ruket. d-ncing. movies plu>tosysusfcj mid reading High W Bailey. C/o Machine Shop Office. T.UL Pointe-aI'iprre. Trinidad. Wants pen pals l-etween the age* of IT and IB. Ert>l Ah. e/e Machine Sh..i Ofrke-. T.LIPn nte-a-Pierre. Trinidad. Wants pen p-f-. between the ages of !• and 1* Bi't'f' fn Headache CMi Ugsj eaUraates for O censtrui lion ork on a new fcome. ^om* el the v-iriimen are kimptnff their Mda. with this re suit The pooler and aaprrkan#er u M teirk ,'^r fr.100 the pniiiN-r N.—Caaaiseve. was born in Venice. He wrote in French, and not a word ml his personal memoirs In English the mistake Sonla made 1 I v * aTegsw Sftsfsi HORI/X>NTAL 1—Wliat %  tha L'iitli bou^ ol idOM TeataSM&tT — From wtiai place did Molomor. .btain gold U„ himxll I temple? It K 19:11) 10—To what J.ih aalawl of aaerlnc# wa* Jesva w't*n i.ktuadT (John l:S9) 14—Feminine name 16—Bring to a level la—Aiaam ailkwonn 17— Hindu ditty 1*—"Apply thine heart unto Imftm trf, and thir* t tk. wordof knovledg." (Pr. M:1I it— Hmtt.itt 20— Provided with pedal digit* Xl—Tesi elakwtty %  % % % %  a w %  71 i t<-*| uraumt 1-ri.i'l itfidpiv voked Uavidr Uktn before the hiirh iirieal, Caiaphai: (Hat. M;M> 37—Uo quickly as— FITt born lor. ol Eahek (I Chr. jlM) if Jin h t£— -Then ahall he apoak unto them In hie wrath, and tea uwal In hit dlipleaiore'* (Pa. 2:5) a—City built by Anhtir tCen. 10:1H *6—" a /art van. and ha srlfl Increaaa in learning" ll'r. :) 47—Writing Implement 48—One of ihe racea among whom t'-e laraalltea drlt (Jud J:i> 60—Th. -atrr. i>f whit by ihe %  ill laraa tl.t. t fromF^ypl! (Jesh-lllt) 1 !-Medle —p*iriea 4--A crandx.. Oilll of Judah (1 Chr ( Spruce i ol *hat wiUr. were the laraelBBabla to drink Wi.i'jtt ol I bg--e| whom .hi J.i...b Sam te>ei> yeT || 11 •—Taoao in ofhra %  in the wale 10—What Aposlle'i aurnsmo *>i Th...l.laoeaT (Mat. I0:>> II— To -h .md.d llefciim 111 %  I be lor. a T Qbah.tltll) It—Ceanl.-nanco lit—Commanded 19—Apart %  f Vlmi l'i kli li> in. W-Foote.lv..e il—"I eratrh, and am a n sparrow alone upon tha h.ni.ie — ——" IF: Ilii7) Bl—Large artery W—"The thinirx thai my soul refused • %  17— Who was/.-. —I. lair... I QtU Mill) M pa] cmwnr.i the year with thy ([uddnc and Ihy pat ha % %  Fain.. I:: I-Wandered ..J--Tower ol iF-rea. 3t:H .4— Into hat kind of pillar did Lot'a %  rife Inrel (n'en. IPrXO) "il— Indian nvmbolic pole :; JWho wa. ghiaia by lot to be numbered with the other eleeen apo.tte.? (Acts. 1:M> 41 —IHirarded .; "1 he.u shalt nnio|.pnii... -^^~ servant that n poor and needy' .1'. .it. 84:141 in—Personal pronoun 11-Sesame .-Who took o*er a* slnj ohao BotD ONT be misled That Black counter on aquare l la a Kinr ,o a White 10-7 move ma\ (iiaaatroul If ynu kK* deeper you Will Bod a real stroke that annihilates the Blacks While rheckvr* %  < n win In four moves — Mlllaril Hopper. ItM 11HM -It I tt t •4-ifii-i '•tat ft- ''%  %  "'• %  i— Entrancing Job M R. JONES. Janitor cf tta rail way station, has to clean lh waiting room which tins n? t-ntrances. When hla work is finished, he has passed through each entrance only once. Is he then inside the waiting room where there's heat or asjMda on the breexy platform" -tSM ea*M'*ul eonot'ei en aiil-e H iltby King >oU-mn (I Kl 11:-T sa_-The — Is prepaiod aga.nal the day of battle: but -afety la ol tha Urd" (PR lltfl) If—lirsu .'7— Rseordsol |iroreedlact t.1:BS) %  dollar ••I — Bard r,2—"WlMlawi Is befnie him thai hath undorstan.ling: but the eyes of i lew are in Ihe of th. earth 1 (IV ITlM) Cl — Sir ike I I] l!t-. PIKE*!-! SFir'-TTEClP mi'M! ni mb


PAGE 1

rvr.r FOURTEEN BONDA1 IDVOt ITS -i MI\\ riniu \itv IT, n:.-' CLASSIFIED ADS. TtLEPMONI 1101. HIED %  Hall. II— i %  ,. %  Hoahend'. PI lew-1 and PC Kt.nond Awettr. Sorav td \ . :1 i .v.. ir. KtlHFi-. %  —eV. ...r^W ••%-%  ,i.r in 0M Thm.i. R IWR. Hilda M*>M, rctvuary is ittt w .1 w*r !•,,!. %  n ri K.1 Bernabaa C •.. attend I % %  aM %  P THANKS HAtlWUn Wa MH lo ofter *wf Satpa al gtatltudjr ID Ihoee who %  *^ed Iheir %  -mpathy DM BrathTH Stall :las*> In Ml -i.i Tl. I apt ret ution grata al' -no atlende card* an %  g With dCcpe' r-lurn thanXe I funeral, aei r "i tymp-thy .-".. Arthur lli L . dl^. J TO M All ill w r be* gympatro ir. awh mm death of OIK Oloe Wallh* aft* taxHr* thank nil than* ..|,f.W: AUTOMOTIVE I A MOTo MA. a %  f HBtmaa Ford V-a Ceupe Da Luxe %  I condition ven. UJJ t.ittrn*. 1 Hoevuck Dial OU. 14 I IMM. Miter Den—al era-Rent entidllim rln 1SI Model i< .,i tttvaj I.I *tl IT t !*-•** BAR--Oamoapi car. Q-a-nar dri tefl Uead in (nod warning organJi •V R.-k Ml Si—an Tl*J|-| rear old VausRaU I*, •%  d '_.l>le lot l. II -* iu-n*imT^ >v \r nwK HAU.CROM i BMBMBM BMMMI i twain ii.ii. li(hU ...-al Condition, Hpxloui Yard I •, Can Remain on IMT. U dcalred fur • fee*, -tin %  definite i-.i-rhawe land Yield. * ei D m Going a* l a* H.Moaa Dial 1111. D P da Ab.u IT Jiit-lo BARGAIN %  RKKCKSDul Jill D F da Abrtu AT RANK HAI4. VAIN KD Nrti SlreUt. I ne J-atore*. 1 Bedroom. all Coi • ei i.-.-. Vert l-arge Eneloaed Yard, about Soto an) ft Suitable alao for Hum !" Going Wider Cl.am AT MAtWCU. HIIX Main Rd ^naM aVImaTu Fait St.. %  <-M.. .'I ominrw. dJoaa rondaion. Widrnlrance and Hpartoua Yard, View at a. ttoth (Vn. OolnK F..r H ra. AT BJUaHTON. Nmiidr. Almnd New Con' irrt1 Bedrmm Amerlcati DevH'i Riincalow. all Modern Convenience*. iihn.il M.0a>< >q ft ((-.inK Under (l.TAu PACaNG NAVY OAM1JCSI AlrefM Mew 1 fledraon II aWV f, ,,n-B*.. -U \-i. %  -€. VHeir,v alKn.t Il.taww) It. (. OkaMI > •I '>.i..'. .: pa TeaBug Ca I ~'-*e\ Mi I PnemeAx l'rnm*aa oral Rr CHRIST CHURCH FOUNDATION BOYS' AND GIRLS SCHOOLS Applications are invited lor the port of Secretary and Treasurer o( the Governing Body of these Vheols. TIMJ |Mt 1. part time and non.penslonable. The teiary Is $Tt 00 aiRMam pe.va.Mv monthly (Coat of living allowance will not be I>eteaea of the work Involved .an be obtained on application w the urvdereigii.j Apphc-etlons with refeweaere* must be sent to the (. hatrmaa on or before the 20th inatant and take successful appllcRnt \'lll be required to assume dutie. .m the 1st March, 1B62. GEORGE B EVELYN Cra-trman. Dumfrtee, St. ltUchaejL 9.2 51—? n ri HI II s\a i \ CAR' One KeU-r Sui nlinder Car. New Tvraa le. a-e*cl condition Koe a DtBi •* IIINtn i. Cot i. .u i i'" IV. t: AUCTION >d Pirierl Saloon 1ST model .> aaRlH %  ^ %  v. l^— % %  BJ [ ^W" r-- Uuif> on Knaay Ond. John M kudos %  Cormaana SHIPPING NOTICES UNDER I Hi SILVER HAMMER aU reromnai' "ir ••• of Lki'Oi AJII-.A. %  I on TL1SDAY fHh .it iiai Mart Hln tSTeet ataani. a W C M*t: IT Coal m Ckunnava, IR Dimna OneGOVERNMENT NOTICES |..m,4* a-artiewlara TUDOR ST -Ir*e> Rtoeal) neaa Pranuaea Reatdenee with a Una.' Qaraa* u r *">Mf all C A-l ( -.1 tlt an, lr.l frm i • av. B e %  %  > P n-r* ; %  ., %  %  • ;*H hi D A. Pnete Andrew. 'AR-IMT V.u.^U i •7 .DWI rruasa. sat •i.oubM at. ^od t\ rea aatd • mi healing the k,!,. iihone *-i Whe> Will' ti. .ti'*' Bmmu VLAHJNE ENOINE-MaiUrd Motor Bailee tl foot M..rrla Marine Enalne lull iquioment U'WM neareal Telrphoiia •WO or ITU IT 2 5 *n Momi rARS <* ia.000 mllea in Ifrfcl Hudaan Sadai. .. rarubla Tot hire ItSI Dodi Coupe baa been Oalord *aloon illanl condiuon " enja mltable converting lo pick-up 1S3S Chryakei Roral Sedan aMn| cheap ISM Mom, Minot S Da.* RakMn 12.000 mile*. lxn\ mrlvad Mmi wiorai and Umoi In aaaortad eotoura. Wa alao have in rwt Vana at price* prior lo January %  PORT ROYA1. UARACC LTD. Taba-ben* i>M iSSSS-Tn. t S mile* inj t>en HUM VwaTTIRCOrTAiJr hater, dravlnc d.< VAN' Paaii Dark Green a Andrew. u'.vvricii liELr A WIliJNO WCrt-wr ROV i-wm aalax Cat moen•Thf /*rtnr" M..ww> OffaWSaV i-AMiiRR IMI. tor nv* Rrti.it DeaA I %  HRON A CO l.lMrTT.Il IT 2 St Jn %  TearemaMt rprrlable, n uApiiiv ii i_idv Danne. Blac ffWO J' MUMPbr I U -I I n (HAMI.IR Or OMMIRC* ApRUcali^na In wrtllna are invited M .1 fiilltime Secrrtar-y male! faalar' approxlmalalr SS^" SO per monlh %  %  ih.n I at M IT aw*t %  "!" %  *-taiai MS effpanence and eaiea ol teeaimoMaia ahiiuld u.aanl W> SRh Pen,.>an i ••mei>•• %  •*. SJoeU St l< I aMISCELLANEOUS liOAHm:HS—"Ptivaie laahUy Raviinnan can angnmadiU vtaltota to Trinidad "llitala or double room a Wilt' Kra. Stone. SO Dundonald Htreat. PtaTI•l-Spaln •• %  ••—IP* ONE COMMJPt UUMT VAN—New Tea, new baiter), in lood working LiidlUon. Dial eiSB. IS t SI In ..•me Van IMS model, Good aondluas. Newton. RelaeWaiit IS. M -f Uiid conlainlng 2 Rttast M->ti -t Datratki - riJWZiaoi-eS eu. ft Made b* rlTa-Ww, iwwramwTawV and l < aM|ll %  artwa %  r IMnoua F>ISdalre Meter-Mlart Al ,nr—n K II Ron*. A Co ltd Dial SIR IB 1 M R* TW WWH known Mwra*. only a few Ml ^ee theaa %  H*dinan*y T.i>lcir Garaaa Phone SIM between it lor penmaalon lo viet FURNITURE rXaWaTVriX Halph %  .tvm. lb Pur. 1 lluaM.g DR*la r-.h-. SSSWI TR*rcn DWiiMtf Cbaar. V pr. Alan nuntaroua olher Article, uroilura at rodmed PikeCall U rr Hay Strert It 2 W In " loll IHhing POULTRY AND IISM ..i..I l r> pR tRltni IT 1 M—Jrt LIVESTOCK .-i i i H|-M.)r. r < .. W|,., Ml n. about 3.i0 MJ Conlart Me lor Almo.1 Real Fit.tle II I CaU -.1 OMvw rUxigha. IT 1 M lit H-, that dctiraMa dwelling;merprlifi Road. Chrl.t Chun*, and built ,( II inch .tone Handing on 2 Rooda J Perehea of Und conlainlng open erandah. drawing and dining rooma. 2 ledrooma iwllh apace lor a third Hat-hen. pantrj. garage, aetvant. mom. I nler atio etertrrrR' The ahnee will be et up for aale at the other ol the iiderngned on Tliuradny M'i %  7 e^rw^k in Thai arrnmnem Tnopwrtlon gly day on app'tration to the ocruplei HAYNCs A uKirrmi. Solicitor* 12 High ttraeVACANT POST OF VISITING OBSTETRICIAN MATERNITY HOSPITAL Applications are invited from Registered Metlical Practitionei> for Uv,. LHrMeaN iim.-pensionaihlc |n*t of Vbtiting Obstetrician. Maternity Hospital, which will become vacant on the lOUi of March, IMS. The salary nttached to IM ihe vale of 11.152 per ..muiin The Mateti. >"• t twenty beds with miwrnal lini .1 Uai lung Hoapital for Student* and twenty am tiaincd annually. It it served by a Matron, three giadunte riui^e-m.tlwives and the usual suboidtnatf staff. In addiUon to the ordinary . IVdeUl H.deboard llergere Hia-km. Upright i h.,. ii, .'. %  i:.,d ttttm K.-.-u.. i l)rn..mei.l Table,. Mom. Choltw. Ikecord Cabinet, all in Mahogany Baa gram Rocker, and Chain; Charrv Tree Cheer*. aWok Shelve*. Gtaea and China Plid Ware. Ihnner Tea Service. Mur* Carpet and rutinga. riectrlc Table limp* and nYiad,, window Cuahlona. 1-i.iwre*. aVamtiful ...d Mahog: Uarn r Sleep Matl.e Shaving Ml.. rot. M T WWakaUnd. Piench Pre**. Towel rail*. Chltd"* Cradle with Drop nea* and Dr***!ng Table, painted Cream R'Kking Mom. Co Carta A Mig>, Clxai srn Blende Pilling*. Jaeoual* Screen. I Burner Valor Oil Rlov.. iron Part M mt /.i.rf T. | T.II. Cvtsga BWaaaadasv Chuaw; KRahia C-a+net. Coa4erator: TanauaNewiaPola.. Lawn Marfeara. Pow : Caaa>. Qat*. Ttaf) Neat: Teed Hope-.. Gale Feed Boar*. Brooding lamp. Empire Tread!* Machine, Smith* Typewriter. P>e Radio and olher llama Sale 11 30 o'clock Tertna t A-SII BRANKRB. TROTMAN a% CO. AarM*a*rr. iTit.n Tr SOLTRBOLND T.ADV RODNETl-AHY NTlilON'CANAUIAN CKCuntJr 1 Salla Sail* Ralifaa B-.Ua ..12 Pear. IS P*w|>. .... %  11 .'pH II Man*. — M Pebr tS Feby B March IS March U March M March NORTMttUl Ml Arrraaa SI!-•> %  Baiifaa M Pens'. I March tl March I* Mann Aped I April 1 AprU II April %  A CoV v Ualtr L A ChoSa -tV Coi ntgMAMi—CRAwat-ur CaSBkSlna %  l. J.aViaon, awnime. c.n gi.,uteri a ,..,nthlewve v. %  f 1 P.I vriois IMI M UBtTl P L C Peierkm apnoinled | Pehmary, tall r A a A ii r a— TWAIN sxr. All ninh. will parade >.i Itegl IIQ ..* IT'* houi* on Thuraday_lla> b 13 HI. Coy will do apeciali.t iiwHni.g iSignal PTatOcm wIt visn \ Pa A' Coy -whrlll under tha C S M -"A' CQ Owteata wSil .T-t V I-. RT Cor Ir.tntoi I*-oii..:n.--Checking Kll Signal IM.1....11 The aagaiala Court* will b* hold net Mow H aSdl Bred SB Pa* at n ret. st Practice* wil i Moa>. IT. Wed •> and Thin. (ton IT and Wed B) P**b p.araiii* fae Iral Rl'.IMSSTAI, 4BOOT* The Majnr O II 'A NU1 Cup -Rifle, open to n.ar .. an .. by c %  M Can.-. €1 A w.th ici pom waa aeeond with 101 as*Brl a. 1.1 ini..r.ni, rap The -head, brtwwan the OtSrwrt ottd the WO. A Serjennt""'"'' I*lce*lennlr* Cup w.il Rtkn al*.. al l*0t hour* on Aaiurday a l-t> oan.aiV OPFKIR ANattUIBI t StBJtANT loa WEtK a,BTN(l -.Sf. IHINAIID.S CHURCH OROANIST CHOIR-MAflTKR Applications to be sent to thr Vicar for the above vacancy caused through Ill-health. Salary ?4.00 plus Fees, Mat* experience—names of two utsaapi fniii whom references may be M ay a id 15XM.—3aA'//.V. .VW/A'/nV.V,V. V We alaray* carry a large astoitmont of — BEST MUTISH PAINTS lb ENAMELS in stock Send un a trial Order. IIMKVI EMPOKHM Corner Broad It Tudor Streets :trM rra at. Olderiv Officer Orderly SeM'm.t N.. far gat, l-aerli OnWi PAR I %  nir itARnAnrts myiiMENT &f as an Lieut C. G P.teikln Reld. N F. i v taaaass Robinaon. V N. misr'/W/W/.'.'/A L^**',^'eOO*-**%*e***e'e4^tT>*>0',. The Itotituck Street ^ Moravian H'hBrch X \ ANNUAL FAIR S J will be held on THURSDAY. 4 May 1st. Jl :i P.m. 3; t Interested Ertrnds please ^ Note! e*. :',•*'.*.*.*,**'•'<''***•** Ott0>00 ^ M „int when lreh Apply *p..ngr. Relheld Houaing Are*. ntss-i Ma-* .i %  a. BlBtl MECHANICAL "WINDY MUX %  Amity Lodge fcatate ChruS Church Modern alonv-wa.l ihr.bednvn bungalow wlUi running watr In each ^*om, garttga. aarvwrnt i.netia c Ecallnl conatiuclloci. The above paoparty will be i..t"nd tor aale at public aaSagRRW day tha Bnd Pebruary. ISM. at J p.m at Ihe officea ol the undenlgnad Iron, whom full partlculara can be obtained The pmparty la being off-rc! avbtaci In a modarale rceerve and ,T..ilead the ni'"" nrtce la eajualHrd sr rxiiaded it will lie -old lo the hlghrat bidder at Ihr inaction CARH1NGTON S SEALY. Solicitor lt.1 ta The Meaa at Ho !" for Mamlaara aRd I Ua-a pace on Saturday 23 Peb ta ca-u• |.,Hng al 2D1S 1 RWER-COX. Major S n 1. f Ad|.ii.int. Tha Bartaadoa R*gimrnl mrv Membert which ahould have Inalead Uiere will be Ihe uaual FOR SALE -til I i 111 I Lovrty I lb onBedm LaraRoom. Dining Tollela and Hatha. one with Tun Utith and hcA and cold water. Oataary Down-taira* 3 ,p Rooma. KUChri and Rlwiwer nnonv Baidlttl on approxlnuilely ft. Acre* ..f land ahead IBD vard* from O bb* Reach leaipertlon by Bisolntnwnl otdy. Al Rt'BN BALI %  Stonewall .-.*---. AV.'/-'.V, ;',;;'.','S.',-,','* •.V.'.V.W*VMV''/rW.'** v i NOTICE. WILL OUR CUSTOMKHS IM.EARE NOTE THAT BI-CK WIRE HANCERS AND GALVANISED HANGERS RETURNED TO OUR DEPOTS AM) HEAD OFFICE OUR DEPOTS AND HEAD OFFICE WILL BE PURCHASED BY US AT 3c. AND 4c. RESPECTIYJ LY IV. .1FOCII WMFEI. CANE CART with nv pfieumalN Inand brake* Hlghwejva a Tratiapoct. never Oarag* 11 I U An MACrtDJB On* Singer tewing MerhlnTeadlei rt little uaed Caangd-te with %  ftM Cut Waa* and EmbraiderT \ t .pl tn Marion Jon** My l-Uda Hill. o,no.h> srbant, C^arth U||M MISCELLANEOUS VNTHIRH'MS "mi and pota John tBSBT I M 2n >/..•• I Ott+r riFATRH CUrCIS S7.52 faMa Models wl lumlnoas dlaK G \\ IUTilllNMN Air. A to. Ltd. Broad St. EXHIBITION BARBADOS MUSEUM WEST INDIAN PAINTINGS By KOrtr.rtl J. MAC I.EOU .<-uo.il a — ot evary *aaartjiBoa lass, Otln* nld Jewel*, frno aiiyer Mercotaur* EBHy hooka. M-i... Autolapna etc, at Oorrlnge* Antique aaaa> lli.inihg Boyal Yacht Club. S t M1 n illl : PKJJ ahlpmenl ol ed. IB. and IH, call A Taylari Oarage Ltd It 2 H-3n C^r poliahea. Franc I* 1 I. O Spark Plug*. Tavlofa Garagn IS S M-Sr ii Utl UKM .'.-•ilh. NNt'AI. RaTVDW G. F. S. The Annual Sale of The liirls Fritiidly Sorlfly will be held at The Hostel .II SATURDAY. April 261h IM ... 3 Ii pin. IVtatb. lat TO-DAY'SHAWK Foe FADIO KK1A1KS. KTC. R. E. HOLDER Competent Fleetronlelsn TluPMtilritaTini with one To Olve You Satlsfaetlon R. E. HOLDER. Electronic Ian No. 4. Tavaor Streel Near Tabernacle A Tw*> "4a* dence <*thpru*n nttaetaad. L*rg> IJvlng and DHnlng Roenv IUCO Gallery r-nnlng thenllte length of the hou** atandBioMtma'elv g.oS* eq.i.rtw luata at N.VT ra*M OB apgno: 1 Ian. SAMTTARY LAUNDRY Couiitrv K..ul CO., LTD. Phone 35M I II nisi. JVST Poll TRTB ttghl Snlah ITS CiA* lor rooklna • t*ed BOOK .our cooke. today al your Oaa Show mom. Bar at FOR WALE MISCEU.ANTOVS FOIt SALE buy noa> rroa* Advocau •rv, Roberta Btallotttrv. Wealhcr. Drvag Btore IT 2 at-In BBAl reduced pncee at laan P-y Street IS 1 St-Sn PrTt*N RBTIWUCKER IB le.; 'av-lv le-ign* %  %  eatoatiT M* ide Uaually II II yard Redi.eed Inr nhe week onlv ., tioy u>NI S2 tfgtaft Barred PT i 1'I.M II A U \ I I roLori: I Figure Drawloga of West Indian Sul ; % %  iB) II \KOLD COeWELL l H. 9-MARC113 10 a.m.—6 p.m. GALVANIZED SHEETS A awaollt* 1 ft MM. S It BYtt. t Ii^TJlr* Atitu Tyre Co Telepr MANDcnAFTS HaiidbagK rwBSSl F.i'iliiold.-ic.l |jn rtowaaa, c* n m o-dale t-awlii.u -IVtll IIAVEX" A new modern Bungalow, '.i furnisluil Bedrooms, lavrgfj Living Rooms, facing Sea furnished, all Cupboards built In, all wood used in construction Barbadus Mahogany. Garage. Servants Room, its own Lighting Plant, standing on one acre of land sloping to the sea. Price i: 4.000 Apply J. H. O'Dowd Egan. C/o William Fqgariy (P'dos) Ltd. 17.252—2n. W.irrhnuae and Billdinga nt-ate at Marhlll Street. Bridgetown Standing on approatmatelv lo.OOO %  quare feet of Und Thla building ha* poaalbllltla* foe carrying on „,. • trade IhM yo.i may require. I.ANB Appyoitmabrlr It.nat aqua'c fert of land w.th ana large and one email rtonewail b.aid ng U.ereon. rltuale at Una-buck "JtreetEgeallnt lot nwdllng ltd* a parting place or building warehouee* NW BINOAIMOW C.'4irii(.g Three Bedroom'. Dining and IJvlng Boom. Kitchen. Toilet and B-!h Standing on appro*lmat.-lv II.C00 aquaro faat Hockley Beach. I-ABAGON Campf alng Four Bedrooma. ng Room. l'-"t" Study rll'ST.llOW Rocklev New H.wd on npprotim.it... 19.0110 -quanr feet, ol land Magnificent view Including Gulf Courac. Ihree BrtBta-*ana, DT-wlng nd lining Rawwn. RBBBMB DuwimUIra^ Garage. Servant* %  loom with Bath and Toilet, and for Laundry or enough Wetwaa. REALTORS limited REAL ERTATB AOntTS AUCTION EERa VALt-ERJi HAVING TROUBLE? CHANGE TO VEELL1L FOUND WHEREVER FINE CARS TRAVEL ROBERT THOM LTD.—Agents Tel. 2229 ///,^V//,V/,V////////////^V///////-V''' Oil. The Veedol at a I wild'nneM mata* o i, „i„ <;.,. ...a %  iaTeli „r vehicle deearvoa the baa %  Ttnuvd wnnaeevw SB** cat Orand Piano in we* atto duHng U 2 M—In REAL ESTATE 1URORAIN Ptge I.UT 10 lh lo" a i*.r lb. Phone 5tT. siMPT FACTORY MI .b.icn ahlrta per d. IIUHI* J.ieinao* 4311. TimNAOO Inlern-llo I K II Baautl limited N1 coaaRttwn. ad*la*Ha*wlB*n^Laood mj rwcmg raeard Coat fT*at nowJaBM '" gllr,. lllck*. Telephone 2IB. GENTS FELT HATS H*IV//A'/WVAWW. WtAK I IRISS J and krrp Fttlinj; Fil : ^ IF YOU SUFFER FROM I bit nlttnit nUS8 yuaapl" drop a pott can) OT Call 'Mi I I HI I IIUtT srtKINFR John //,w/*v/.v/.v//.v/.v.v: Jo hn M. Bl adon 1 f& Co. A.F.!*>. r.V.A. •I. .i i sl;il..\|| rnl. Auelioneera, nn: fraawM mm TITSC Bi:i*l T.ITIOX The Sportsman WHITE FELT at 84.04 Other Popular Shades n $2.80, $3.72. $3.81. $3.97 LASHLEYS LIMITED. Swn & Prince Urn. Henry Su.



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PAGE SIXTEEN' SUNDAY ADVOCATE si vim 11 itiii \r.\ n IMJ Visitors Driving Hired Cars 7a.r# Drivers Discuss Problem Miuic At The LspUliKiilr CHURCH SERVICES A GENERAL MEETING of The Barbados I %  % %  *> "" Association was held at the Hcadquarli %  I Thr JJ n ,. c*__l if. I bv KIVI'I*. l.'ieij ilk'*'' Hi. • BvbMkM IVogresaive Leau.on PrtsJaa Dlfht, the 15th cin ^„ -l Ul , iisi wii.-n i he wild Association was revived and reorganised BUIIW I ( „ i Alfred Shank* ill II l H'l*rt thai iho .11 hl*-rvl 1 '' Of the IMIC%  are Invited. %  %  t v .| , M h „ , „, VOI THMl and the gtnm] cuevaiuo \. %  ft IMJ ..t the PiM Hd were fully IffC A-n.. The programme will pUined hv snme of the prominent me-mi"'Ijtlll lonal— The invcr, ^ _, — Tt "' lm '"' tin Island aO— ^.T R^nsi S***" %  ^""Sfi „ ^-T* th* first rortnigM o. Ull jfc-> DOtlil arrival, without -ny knowtirana .... Maac-ani ways Regula|Sim < orda — u U P vour the highway* and— t . have said and -"f*/ 1 •*_!._ EUC ;h Island as a t) %  the %  rlfa ol UM rantJkia Folk* Son*of Scotwholc WM lU i" i no l nd ........ Mydllemn and debated :, haaal to UM srarkpUi Nocturne Celebre — aspecta and imp.uat.onA by aonw plaint -'•d maaa him mlscroi th, UM AsMda..hi. Hi Worship .-.--ent lofeUiei with Mesars Ciifmi. lolfl Woir-4 ... m, ItCP X Ilehael --Merday M A L A Williams, as (* placed her on a M.C.P.. .' E i Brancsaar, H.C.1*. and C. K Talma. M.C P The point relative to nn lntcrnalim. Il *£*• V-.vc7T.utch.er toiTtha Meatra Barrow and William*. i IB about Merars. SI HU Green, Bag wh(J „ tied th P rates or ( ., M(pcraj ai ,d aaked him for Hire lo the Kenernl body, mo[wy He o|)j namely. ,,. nonca h and then (roan bar. -:i naosHi -i rvaoM Th nan ol MI Iron drill %  d rill diich H, ; |. Llebcstraummc Sacred Arias — Sh I Graze I shall feed Hi: £S Grand March — Sheba Usst j nnj i if*. Bach r I Thr Queen of Oounod O.M.KITTH II am K*v M A E m l ii c ! %  . II in li#v h ('..->., <. IricAlli.ln T ii .... Mi , n, nN MAS Th,.,,.,, I Hymns—Jems Iver of M The Kim of Love mv Bin COD SAVF TI1K QUBPN News In Brief CIT<.\ HUM kawna i pm i \ ANXIIA1J. Ivlitar i lard comf in U Scout Rally For Lord Rowallan MEMBERS ol tWBflty-OM troops including 10 Commisuontrs, 27 Scoutttn and lf7 Scouts wi IIpreaeni at a Scout Rally held at Combermi-re School yesterday in honour of lrd Kowallan. Chief Scout 'if the British Commonwealth und Empire. Lord RnwAlinn. accompanied by a yiirn by the Chief Scout who Private fUueUlJ •'• alresa on courage and duty. L Li. In his story he told of an old •mil B, P, MallinBon. Field African who had ohown courage ''*' ComintaaMtWi rot W<--t Kidtniiand •"<• •' ureal w>n*e of duty in war* the Heady ,. .,, Cofnot umoiig the trlbei S %  (,,.. eh Bnd haa •yentually_.rtaen to tn r-iDM \pm.,Mmrn%i.r T.J.. JAMBS HTmr-T n ,. i (r j Iteu.lon. -• i II. ) l^.tvnf. -PriGHTSTOWN ||... .-.I rMlval. II j in Brv r l**ienrr Xrr'tcr* 1 pi., 4. r D Roach. PAVNtMhiV II.!,. \ rr.lun BUI .., vii r M.-..nk w l %  •>•• illim • WM.iniAU. > am. Mr O Mt : pn. Mr O llarprr t.na. MmiiiuAi II ., MCi >•*. >pm Mr. J L*ynr. ramwil. BSt am. 1 pm Mi 1 K HANK IIAIJ, M ant Mr J T Oxlr>, llMf.m. .1 1 p.m II.-.. It Mc Cuii'^ah rnr. T JAMHB NATIOMAI. n\rn>i I., I II Ornnl I.Tli MMUHai m rhaia* Ba i. Hrnr^-Clarh. apr.i*l p...... Mill b* Ml (ot llw ltr Klnf Or-xfVI. 4.3 o m. Moo Wd.. fil Inunlna lor ..mill, mi* will i%  an SIM MS UtM Hv I. nruc*-Clarfcr AuitUrtl Partqn •nl.tpd by Mr* IM|4 Hrtiwnr f.„ lb it KMI mile rfM 30 cents per BlU*UM dafandanl COM in the eoopA PIRI at Hanun Plantation, .„ For • I -'"' S %  talk -.iti. si. Ltan at about 9.30 p.m. on -f" |K "! J M.arf Oliver Hutchcr lluufur lurMd Friday burnt four and a half They further pointed out that |m , iK „ dnd „ ^^ of 6W(md ^ can-f it might be mere eco^nmnlcal for ,„. ,,„, M( Ui) ,,^,.,,,1..,., „..,„ tl iiri)t J01 h ,, lc> (1 f ,- cn p voung „ . b | IK Ml. KNEW .,„. ,.„„ tl „ 1(1( hl Sopart* of *£*£ Of THB8I RATES, to mf* Vn.l.-, Butcher said that sh.D I WebSl ...id were insured. e of hired cars than i(M „,., ,. lk( nu h( .irill but that Ihe* d ,it present. The PubtOgm OUI and her husband HAUUF WILLIAMS of Goodlicity Bun-.iu could aaaist in th'*,-., | •<> put hei In land. St Michael, repoi il win pointed out. ji.il l.y mming lo lheOUri nd >u r house wi< broken and entered and also by mean* of suitable telling lies on her. on Friday between 6 4S and 10.45 PLACARDS OH POSTERS at th'I weal to my hu*r->;1 to %  • Scswell An Port and at tinsi mon important. C'hl.i mc i found onl) III from Ahieh ,t musl be kaolal known i >.iii in which chlorine n ceanntoed with sodiun %  urrent thi %  tituent elements and releases chlorine in the form of a ari yello made availai l< : l produce) Ii drtad aad liojeafied and. %  tMsori ail over the world. manufactiners of ehlnnne m* iMU of the salt from which it is obtained. In addition to having uses as a itariRsUl| avant, chlorine is an important i .iper. medicines, |M iiia-stheii. gnd iirv-vleanini; t I HI KIM HABVEBT rranv XOBAMAV l\lll IHMJI % % %  the vhen pletlon 'hall be made in roarand w „ mc b ^ sland j^ t position of Prime Minister of his sheluWf ihe general grievances ccmmlsskmer M nor J. E. Griffith ^i'"' ,lr 'height that ihi s old of it. members, and ID appointStrata*! African would have made a fine The Delegation to prepare th" Af SQO nail on His ROEBUCK AT 11 a i I'irarhrr: Hcv. t E. N n I'IW.WI: Mi r Moore Barnu r*u*ai *i O*M MIII II a m M, riuiLK Service J'rracHML Mi. t'-jukiviii I %  %  ... I % %  I.. I t N. %  K II... : p ii. L>rnma Hrr • WMk| %  U HTOCatnR %  %  n ttm < iMiir We offer the following lf:ii.\IHr:-PI{OI)FBUII.IHN(;.\iAftRIAI.S |\IT1\ IN81 L iiN(. \s vl.l.miAKIi SMU-TS in thick. 4ft x 8fl ft 10f.., 12ft Long .. l!l .. per H.|. r. WALLBOAKI) MOULDING for covering joints %  i aa. per fl STANDARD HAKDBOAKI) SHfcKTS The Board of 1.000 Uses. i. m. thi-k, 4ft x 6ft.. 8ft.. lOfL long at 18c. pr sq. ft. II MI'IKLI) IIAKDliOAKD SIIKKIS ', in thick, 4ft x 8ft 8ft.. 10ft. long at 30c. per sa. ft. SURINAM PLYWOOD SHEETS 'i in. thick, tit, x 8ft>" 4e. per *q. It 3 18 in. thick. 4ft. x 8ft. In 29e. A 32e per sq. fl. TURNALL ASBESTOS WOOD S1IKKTS 3 lfi m. thitik, 4fl x KM P Z3e. per aq. fl. All these Ruildini Hoards hav.been Irealed to Nettf Ihe allark of Wood Ants and other Termites. Phone 4267. WILKINSON & HAYNES CO., LTD. ii\\i. I INIIIM. BaaaasBl HIIIIM. M"M IVIOII span is An Island ul lluhdav Ouoortu: So many and vartad that ci mmgly present u problem. There is. In fact, no clothing problem which the House ol C. B. Rice i.I Bolton Lane, Custom Tailors and Men's Outfitters cannot adaquately solve I-HIMT from their selective, imported stock, or with a garment tailored to individual needs. I. B. nWa>tV€a>. WM. FOCARTY CN-I LTD. his day. After the rail] Petition Excellency the Governor will be appointed at the next mceiin4 nf the sud Association Gt'rniaiis \\ in Bob Sled Evert OSLO. Feb. IS Germany's number one team id WOridF champions AnUrei* , %  Neiberl th.it*.** Olvmple Compi I .i,.. boh sk i event "ver i ended Lord Rowallan and many ... ^.i" n" . U t of those who attended ware arrived, ihe Police lland played lal to „„ by MaJor c y N ,^, I... %  .......! Salute" .m.l ll„ ,. KeadmastW Of Cnmbenne.f WBl broken. fmmemutely after aK|Mil this the scouts who W %  up in horse-shoe formalion around the flag post. BfalcotMd Lord ROM II.ill With I heartyell. Thr Chief Scout inspected the guard and shook rlandl *ilh each scout in turn. After wards lrd Ilowallan took up his peaKson next m thi fl i| fn %  i %  ne iTOOni present niarchvd past. b) then .-ol.. HI ii.ueis Football Fair the metre wcoad ton pressing their Opponent III ..II i iloii lo ii-Rain their 1*1 AN) supported D) thau defence, the Canton hw Llraetad %  % %  Lw i I la The afternoon's entertainment sl,l ' nAgh swept down lb. tkl.i urse in five mmute 24 M v „, highlighted by a cycle dis' ul wnv ""'" •'" t„. |ag Haruadoa oll *' d ny Morrison the Sparti— in wldch sixteen AmerUan numlei one %  %  nils look part. Each cycle wa StanlC) Henham und Patrick QsKorated with the scout colours %  lB .k second place with -I39 avcnndi Switse land's number one team .d_ r. Feir %  t--rid and Stephen WiWn i third with ^ minute27.71 second.. % f MABVS—aaat>aima. 1 S a n .nd I.II.HJ. I a m I.,M>| SIIHK M..-. and Sermon. .' |> n .Srh.-. 1 P in i-nildrcn-n Veapn .... Ifeapllam. I p ., R ...1 aWnnon. *• ii.. slrtrl. H...1..I..-.. nundsTi n %  %  ".xi P '" i.irludn Taalli'M rtcaiwa roAT, rannvAKV IT. isu Sablr.1 -f U> WE.. iaMi Tarn* .hall t-P i: llir as. Lore i la i MS rilaUan. lull la] u to Sea Scou red flag on the left rapi the Port side and the areei fail i 'I'ed the stiirhoard i WEATHER REPORT llalnfall from I'odrlnrion %  ill. %  th lolal Rainfall for dale: .07 Inch. Tempera I ore: '.1.5 "P. Wind Veloidty: I? mile* per ho"' _, lUromeier (9 BdsS.1 '! %  * (II a.m.| 2B.92 TO-DAY Sunrise 6.16 a.m Sunaet: 6.0H p.m. Moon: Full. Februr> 10 I i-liii.i. 630 p.m. Ililh Tide: 7.46 a.m. S.32 p.m. Low Tide: 1.15 a.m. 2.31 p.m. L.iU-d Ui t> n%  thai giektni %  Ida o cross bar. .— and grt-en Thi „ n i and green were verv Cadogan the Spartan skippci i and especial!* per%  !* rained his men. and tney 100 %  outing, since the improved the., game, but lbs particularly s. failed to ake advantage ol n.it opnortunltlei wen offered ihein. liny lacked thai In thi* display which was sary last minute ciTort which rattan picturesque. the scout* * muc n required in a game "i nxle \yi>i. in llle and formed Iwo 'his sort. r envies, one of which rode clock ., sntl-osoca '''" "" "" "" ""*' •pff* h, thi ...luentric clToppro.ubed. and it appeared that lies they formed two aepai..'.. '"uKI end in a draw, od Itaan jmned again but at he eleventh hour, ..nm.1. forming n figure of eight. Al kavc Van Gemleu-i. .| %  .. %  for tins point they ..gain branched this player to centre oil the line iff Into four circles and tho t usiodi.m Warren Just (ailed b. the 8L George's Cross galtui. and Boy f. and i'1 SI Patrick's Cros*. etandlng opposlU the light post converted for hi team to win the match. A great deal of precision was necessary on the part of tho seouls who rode in this display lines they passed dangerously Men other, and the crowd became rattan restless fearing the possibility of a collision which on many occasions imminent. Nevertheless al the kind occurred and Cox. Andrews, Lue Ihe earns were as follow — Spartan: Wood, Morrison, BOwen, Medford. Cadogan, Gitlens. Griffith, Van Genderen. Wood. Haynes. Boyce. Carllon: Warren. H I Marshall, Clairrnuntc. "llutehlists received great apIriaoh, Williams. It. Hutoasnain. auso for their performance. Keferee Mr. lien Hoyo.. Lines. The rally came to a cloae with men Me?.srs J Archer. Wilson They'll 1>* If Every I imc |J\ |imniv Hatlo ?30T SysSpv OL (x>-&t£ X^ 9U6T L>P>CRWT>c COVE >J &C CVERVT-40'LL 6£ CX-> -.tSEf % %  rO.PWiLO.'fXJfrT TRy V' TM'S 'S SeffOLSB? TO STOP MEIIM: 5TOOO 1/ IV SoPPRiSCO T-5> EKXJOi! TM THreOUfiH' / TrtlS iS tME EW.Flhll.' A • TZUHER TO OO TO 'A'\ 'JPNO! I'M WALKING y OUT FOR (soooiy— Oir>-T EAT RST AHP K4VE T-Je^ BATTLE LATER' / m5 NO T A'-u t*6MOUTHS JMUL*. vvWCM Sh€ W45K'CICrirWj J-. HIM 3< V*S OtTT I N TV** CS TBLL s a ; F3OAST ^ov=; K3R£E^ L IT— th> r.ii.i. Happi '. Ii* nuti i>alh ili# C.-1 ul Jacob li'r hi. twlp. noae hoploM M. God l-aalffi its i -.!- *-4 He.US -Ilk *>T *• Ul" ..,,,.,,.-. i. Ho. Rakr l-iv *oal ha* tnftntl* r-.o. nn which •a bk manklrH ami happlncaa aroukl I ^Ill atl-lned and ouW b* %  rcptrif il uuahl Hello Frtanla 1 Mn I in the Gill reminds you of her DANCE On Monday Nlfht the LBth .if 1'ebruary, P)52, at Club rtoral, Silver Sands. Christ Church. AliMlSSION 2 Music b> Mr. 0. B. Browne's llrrhestra MlH this and blame yourself Lnrrlrs leave Kmplre Theatre al S.30 p.m. Guarantee A Perfect to every SHAPE. We have done it in the PAST. We can do it all the TIME. P. C. S. MAFFEI & CO., LTD. Top Scorers in Tailoring Prince William Henry Street vows \1// TBE TO SELECT THESE ! OUR HARDWARE AND ELECTRICAL DEPARTMENT Have JUHI Openad the Mail Useful Selection ol MIYMY PAMKY and other HOUSEHOLD HUMS. THE BEST VALUES IN GLASSES 1 Pi. Tub Shaped Glasses 1 each lugs—with Plastic jkont, ^EM) ... U rill h,DRESS sum is ELITE SEA ISLAM) COTTON DRESS SHIIITS will. trubom^l ColUl niuclwcl. SUM 14—111 ms SH.W tlulK'TI Each ALSO STRIPED I'YJAMAS in "!" %  mopattemi, si7cs :i8 to 44 ms Pti -.,"1 ... aJaTiSfaf FLEECE LINED VESTS. Ien| •hnvea for iravellms to CoW Cllmau Sunk M ** Each Xl.lHi to *#. /•# JANZTEN WOVEN BOXER SHORT BATHINIi TRUNKS Blaitk WSISt I" Shadal "( Sax.Blur and fawn Sim Si tc 14 Pair 9ft.-J!i OTIS VESTS, Ribb.l and VM SUM 2'i %  ... 46 plain athletic stv Triers, each 9I.XO A SI..V2 OTIS WHITE COTTOM BMEF8 S8M 30 to 44 Pair SI..Hi RAYON & 0OTTON FANCY STRIPED SiK'KS Pa*... .. SH7,. A SI.O.1 CAVE SHEPHERD & Co., Ltd. 10-13 Broad St. CIS] -in three sizes Dispensers Egq Slicers ENAMEL WARE Bowls in all sizes Pie Dishes Oval Roastct-s Enamel Colanders S? 13. S1.65 & $147 S1.17 Each 8Zc. Each .... 41c. — 53c. .. 34c. — 56c. 10 — S3.70 ....98c. & $1.06 Enamel Muqs & Cups .... 66c. Black Enamel Saucepans 5 Sizes $1.68 — S2.53 n Cream and Green Enamel Basins 60c—$1.12 ech. ELECTRIC KETTLES (3 Styles)

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i'w:i TWO SURDAV ADVOCATE sl'ND.U ll.itlHAio IT, I9.-.J M.I.W. l.l OKI Tortile M :;u p.m, LAST SHOWING OI M GM's Drama Packed Romance! "Soaping dlulls 'halr_ Ilalo glorifies it! TOMOKKOU (MONDAY) and Tl ES.).\Y M.*> & s :|4> p.m. A DOUBLE YOU'LL JUST LOVE HALO leovti your hair wonderfully tofl and OOty lo monagi HALO makei your pormononfs take belror — lair longer' 15*0 'I i; i p i it K TO-DAY 4.45 & 8.30 And Continuing Daily A MONO the fa. making the M R W A 1 T r !i..el| ...d Mr. Lart7 wenl->th in BuMdn' If yfgra fj both told Ctftrtb that they had noted many Improvements on the island. Ono thing tht impressed them i irficularly wu the < lean 1 mess of the streets which were well kep* and looked very much like those the USA. This %  about th* -evenih visit •o Uw Caribbean for Mr LaVtz. while for Mr. McDowell It (j hit, They !ri that they like it down here as the climate -rful nd the wea.her %  hod. When they left the US. A nperature was *!' f Americana on the Libert*? rwny Ameriran* nn the Ibeete aft Mr Pert* Hotenbei.: ti Mansger. New York low ma I Aaaartt— i Mr aSlUua i Irvine. owner of Br" I Riurii!.. New York i n n Mr*. Levine. Mr. Raymond J Bnhey, President Ruhey ami Sons. Dry dor k *nd Shlp?ar Brooklyn. NY Mr (leorgr W F-n Ne Yor* MatM AssembK man nnd Mr*, toy. Mr Harry I. [Kaftan. I reil^ent F.a|le Paper I Company, ChketfB III; Mr. tdnund Price, President Solar Air1 craft. San Diego. California an.: Mr?. Prlee: Mr. Harold P %  "ember of Hemp*tead. Ut., Ci"> Council. Mr. P J Dee, "resident MHanee Thestre Corporation. Chir.ii, III, nnd Mm Dee and Mr. Mphn Whiton Chairman of %  he fli-ard of Supervisor* "f Putnam Counts-. New Yotjk. %*' %  < (mp of FrirnrJ* M R. and Mrs. William F. Hofmayer. who arrived in Barbados on January 23 by T C A %  ml aa board the Libert* yesi wrskey %• awn friends from the S A. Mr Ho| a retired -•i % %  Ulenrock. N* Thr> were able to show lh< IrHMI •• m the I'iind, some%  ouit' have %  l Hofmayer has spent 2* % % %  • he Rocfcley Beach Club Friend of a Friend M RS. FRIEDA SMITH of TifBn, Ohio, was one of the tourists to arrive in the island yesterday by the Uberte. She saon her first vim to Barbados Sh wa* very much impressed • de France which ahe visited on Saturday. • Mrs Smith is veT\ Interested While she was in the .rsteiday she dropped in a '--.. of the stores in search of D as ah afj pieces. She Is a friend of Mr E Tappan Rodgers. Preaient-Travel Editor of thi | • ser-Tnbune, who was in Barba.ot lalt winter. B.B.C. Radio Programmes QaJtib QaUinq tn chattmi at the Bs. ibeii and Mr Gordon B. Macoilllvray. Mr. MacOilliviay who u head of the Toronto Real C-t^te Eirbjuae wu. intraiuut uroutih BailuO ye. Mia. de Kuh's. work is *ell known n Barbados and aba ma exhibitions here for over ten years. Coming Event C ARIB understands that Club No. 6 of the OH'i Industrial itilng a Show at :he Union headquarters on Satut >lay. 23rd Frbru.iiy a! 8-30 p.m. Some of the artists taking part St. C Tudor and Mits Nell Hall. Following the Show Li be Mr Manbert who i-. holtd*ytn in Barbados alM Women In The Ne*s HarKsd.w. Adtartle btM BO# M insfened lo thi* -HI be danc.ru to Keith CampB^ Uaiues and rM> Orchestra the Soeiety tWc Sm^Kd to answer the calls 1%L*£L\r u ? lt 'Zl f arBde by ,hC "' Secretaries nnd other member* Member* of the Club. of uch concerns Married Yeaterday M ISS MIMA OILBaTHT „ Hai of Ii\\ n-as married afternoon at St. Matthias Church. Hastings to Mr. Reggie da Silvu of V de Lima and Co., Ltd.. Tl .nuiad. lo funned by Rev. Fred %  The Bride, who was given in maruage by Mr. Harold Bowen Manager of the local branch of Messrs. Y. de Lima and Co., Ltd. wore a gown of white slipper satin with low cut neckline with laco insertion. The dress was cut on Miss Austin will P" 1 "*** lines with full gather*,! mta dealk>rt long tight lilting sleeves ami %  such inmedium length train. Her headstilutions as the dress was nude In julict cap style Y W C A., the with finger-tip veil and she carried c bouquet of two white orchids v. Ah Queen Anne's Luce. The Bestman waa Mi. Ken Isancx and the Bridesmaid was Miss Tecla AgOatl:ii both or whom flgnjf ovei froir Trinidad for the i i 4 ing the man Reporter" in BaAadoi Th, i-hange will aaabaa ifte Aftveeate to cater more efficiently to the need for women, fashions, children and sonety Centre, the O.I.U., %  %  Unga haU sod haa4-tit weic lie order of the day aa tourists from V-* Liberia' landed at tee Baggage Warehouse yesterday. The c*ad ti-* thane two ladiat ware wearing were no exceptions to the rule. OU ScboUrt' Mettini ryH'.F.KE. will be a meeting of im M. Modern High School Ola Scttoiar'i Association at the school on Tuesda;. February lftth a'. : he agenda includes a aim show, through thof the Bi.ijfi Cojnu! music followed by the election officers Brothers M M JIM PASTER, merchant of Swan Street, was at the Baggage Warehouse yeterda> lo meet his brother Mr. % %  ••r. a jt-weller of Albury. New York who la making a cruise l Uberte .vhich anchored in Carlis'e Bay early in the morning French Line Attorney T RAVELLING on the Uberte which called here yesterday was Mr. Frank Foley. Lawyer of New York and Attorney of the French Lines in the U.S.A. French Art V| VLADIMIR NKClioi KOFI 1*1 ha* kindly COOSsmtad t" lecture to a t M l nJlitHK i Francaise -*t th.! BrtUah CoUM I, Wakefield, at 8 15 p.m. on WcdF'bruar> 27. The sublect will be Trenc', Ait," Good Move H ATS OFF to th,B A • have placed the football field in such a position that all of the spectators in the Kensir..;can e*> the entire gamhaving to stand. Thi %  aeasons when the lield was so close to the pavilion fans in the front rowi would stand Up to get a better view of play aM nearest n %  one m tail, %  a ' up. Miss A^ustlni wore a strapless lemon euloured net gown with net stole over a princess eut bodice The kii: tng long and'full. Her headdress was a small hat trimmed \> ith violets and she carried a -mail bouquet of vander orchids. After the ceremony, a reception was held at the home of Mr. and Mrs. Harold Bowen of Maxwells and the honeymoon is being spent in the Crane Hotel. Annual Dance T lktai :,M%  till | f, tables aiound tintalks* the Marine Hotel for the Women'! "-'anaUian ClUaVl claim* on Satuiday February 23. Mrs. 11 of the "Pavilion" Hatting* li in of bookings. The Women's Canadian Clubannual dance is alwnys one cf the : %  ..Naaon, Inetud• d in the evening's fun will be names of chance, bridge. Palmisfry and a flower shop. Oil Man A MONO the passengers makina the cruise on the French Liner Uberte which called here %  %  i. %  :.!.,, were Mi nnd Mrs. A. G. Wood of Santa Barbara. California. Mi. Wood is a big nil operator In California. "lion tirst visit to the isltnd and they ;.pent most of their time is guests of Mr. and Mrs. Venn.,, Knight of (Listing*. Back to St. Lucia M R HRIGGS WILLIAMS uho ts stationed In St. Lucia with Barclays Bank Is due to return kD that colony today after spendm*: two weeks' holldav wi'h IS family here Intranait NTRANSIT through Barbado -• vesterday makmc the Rio Carnival Cruise on the French Luxury Uner was Mr. Gordon B. McGlUivny, Head cf the Toronto MACLEANS u?d9d^vLj)d^££)^ TOOTH PASTE keeps iriSlSlflfil WJdJ'J'il and healthy BARB 51 II GEIVTLE3MEJVI rfl.l. #• SI HP TO I.IHWSUIHI I.V THESt RAYON SiriTINC.S STRIPES PLAIN SHADES WOOLLEN TROPICALS UENTS "RENOWN" SHIRTS WHITE COLOURED MEN'S BUCKLE SHOES JOHN WHITE SHOES IS P"OWN .• BLACK $.1 39 — $3.72 M 18-14.37 M5. $872. S7 00. $7.41 $450 K33 $5 20. $557. .4 $12.0* $1084 $11.19 T. R. EVANS & WHITFIELDS Dial 4220 fOdR SHOE STORES Dial 4606



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PACil UI.U1 M M"\ IKMH tit M NUUt, H-UKl Kk ALACMrVTE 1 — %  UKBADOS Nund.j. Ichruar> IT. 1SS2 LOCAL FOOD \:>MENTS have been madC—III! oi PrtMt Ordei 1951 and a number ol items have been decontrolled since ihe schedule was printed. Bags, balanced animal feed, balanced poultry feed, breadfruit, cerUin bran butter, eggs, salted fish, picKlea nemngs, pukied mscswrsi avocado pears, oats, oJtras, and pickled salmon, art controlled Other items which are still iled have increased in price since the schedule was printedThese include corned beef, bread, salted butter, uble butter, cement, charcoal, firewood, fresh fish, flour, lard, margarine, freah and frozen meat, condensed milk, fresh milk, edible oil. rice, tinned salmon, certain brands of sardine-, and soap. It is likely that there will be further increases during the ye.ir The Government employs more than one method of keeping down rising prices. Rice which is being sold to the public for 10 cents per pint will cost the Government $3.41 per bag m subsidies when the equalisation fund which is now being used to cushion the rise, has been exhausted. The price of salted pork remains unchanged because the government is buying less for the prices paid when the schedule was printed The rise in the price of salted pork is concealed by this method, out if larger quantities were required the public would have to pay more. With regard to biscuits the government has left the retail price at 2 cents for 7 sunrise and 2 cents for 3 eclipse, but has reduced the wholesale price from $272 per carton of 24 lbs (sunrise) to $2.80 per same carton and from $285 per carton of 24 lbs. (eclipse) to $273 per carton. In several ways the government is attempting to keep down the cost of living by keeping down prices Many opinions are expressed upon the subject of controls and moat people are grateful that the existence of controls prevent* all prices from rising at once. But in one respect controls are having an effect which was certainly not intended. In "Labour Marches On* which Mr. Adams has stated to be the policy of the party with a majority in the House of Assembly, the Party promises to inten sify ""the Grow More Food" campaign which includes the rearing of live-stock and further assistance to the fishing industry. This is an excellent intention and everyone hopes that it will be carried out Yet how can it be so long as controls are maintained on the prices of locally produced food ? The only local articles of diet, which have recently been removed from the schedule of Control Prices are breadfruit, eggs, avocado pears, and okras. Still on the list are yams, sugar, milk, fresh meat, margarine, lard, bananas, plantains. Julie mangoes, grapefruit, oranges, fish, eddoes, coconuts, bread, biscuits, sweet potatoes, and butter. Not all the best intentions in the world will encourage people to grow more food if yams cannot be sold retail for more than 4 cents per lb. potatoes for more than 3 cents per lb., and eddoes for more than 4 cent; per lb., while imported rice even at its artificially controlled price sells for 10 cents per pint It is true that by law plantations are compelled to plant 21 per cent of the arable acreage with ground provisions, but not even the law can encourage anyone to sell more food when the reward is so strictly limited. Less than a year ago during a debate in the House of Assembly on April 24th. 1951, Mr. H. A. Dowdmg said "there are several plantations today with acres of yams still in the ground because they have not been sold." According to official reports these conditions do not exist this yesr, but although yams may not be surplus it is common knowledge that locally grown provisions and green vegetables are unnaturally expensive because of the control that hawkers keep over distribution If the government is to intensify food production it must take yams, potatoes and eddoes off the control list snd should encourage private retailers to distribute locally grown provisions and vegetables with the same efflctfney that they now distribute imported provisions and vegetables Local enterprises will never be attracted towards the marketing of locally grown foods unless they are allowed to fix their own prlOM If a guarantee of support tMTt flvsxi by the government, many of the exorbitant profiteering prices of locally grown vegetables would disappear, while the consumption of potatoes, yams and eddoes would almost certainly Increase if reasonable profits could be made out of their distribution. It is true that rice is more easily cooked and therefore needs less fuel and that sweet potatoes and yams have far greater water content Yet it seems very bad economics to subsidise the price of Imported, rice, while yams and potatoes and other ground provisions are surplus as they have been on several occasions in recent years. So !%  .iiair.Uir.ed on %  he retail ted in their tion. And A n failed ta give the need I vh* goternmer;er leavI free to rind its own market level of tutting the quantity imported so as to compel more people to eat locally grown foods. The average Barbadian has become so accustomed to rice that he or she is uneat less except when there is no c holes. The money saved on rice subsidies • rhaps be better employed to keep down the price of milk, which is so largely dependent on the price of imported balanced animal feed over which the local government has no control MEAT A.MI FISH IK the Government is faced with the unpleasant burden of subsidising rice while there is always a possibility of local ground provisions not being sold, the situation with regard to livestock rearing and fishing in Barbados is yet worse. Not even the recent rise of 2b cents per lb. for roast beef or of 22 cents per lb. for other cut beef will encourage the raising of steers It has been estimated with great accuracy that it will cost $649.31 to raise a steer to the age of 3 years. Even with beef at its present price of 68 cents per lb. for roast steak, rump, round sirloin an>l ribs and at 58 cents per lb. for all ott the return to the owner-slaughterer ol a 900-lb. steer will hardly exceed $300 For the owner who has to buy fodder this return represents a loss of more than $300. For the owner who can obtain free grazing on someone's else plantation the loss will only be $100. But so long as the prices of animal feed remain at their present levels, there will always be a loss unless controls are removed on locally produced meat. Even if this were done the cost of local beef would become prohibitive for all except a relatively small number of people. Yet if the party with a majority in the House of Assembly is to implement mas* to intensify the rearing of livestock, it will only be able to do so by removing controls on the price of locally produced beef. The formation of a central milk depot might assist in reducing the high cost of beef that would result from the removal of price controls by increasing the amount of beef available from cows which had passed their milkiM6 whose beef could be sold for much less than specially raised steers With regard to other livestock the situation is correspondingly difficult for rearers of pigs and sheep The estini.it' d • %  >' of raising a pig to the age of one year is approximately $85. With pork at 42 cents per Jb. a 225-lb. pig cannot produce more than $73.50. Nothing but the removal of price control on pork will encourage people to rear pigs at their own expense, although the "swill" system permits many pig-keepers to make a small profit. Sheep seem only to be kept profitably by those who can avail themselves of free pasturage. Even if a sheep is slaughtered at the age of 1 year and four months by an owner who has had to buy its feed from birth he will have spent $60 to earn $35. The Government is wisely encouraging peasants to improve the pedigree of their sheep, but it is discouraging would-be owners of sheep from keeping any sheep at all by controlling mutton at present prices of rfl cents per lb. for legs and loin chops, 48 e*nts per lb. for shoulders, and 42 cents pe;' lb. for stew. There seems little reason why controls should be retained on locally produced mutton. The only rearers ot livestock who seem to make any worthwhile profits at all are those who butcher calves for veal. With legs and loin chops at 54 cents per lb. and stew veal at 40 cents per lb. it is possible to make a profit on the sale of veal. But the popularity of veal with livestock rearers reduces the quantity of meat which could be produced by fully grown animals The control of local meat certainly i noM 1M ja;j to intensify the reevtnfl of livestock. Nor is the control of fish prices the best method of further assisting the fishing industry. The Government has been most generous in its treatment of fishermen who lost iheu boats during the high tides of o.-r last year. It has encouraged the fishing industry through its support of the Fisheries Department and the research work done by the Investigator, will WhtO fully applied, be very beneficial to Bihernv Hut .fie industry cannot be expanded, unless fishermen are given urcaler incentive than that offered now when tish prices are controlled. One result of controls of ffjfc prices is the flouting of the law by fish hawkers who profiteer at the expense of the consumer and of the fishermen. The majority party In the House of Assembly is committed to a policy of encouraging livestock and the fishing industry, but it is ted from doing so by the controls np pries* of local meat and fish. There seems to be only one way out. Or. ADLKAJGR G0F.S l P ".O TKE L'J./.&:n FOOM Silling On the Fence %  *•: %  *n walkers and re frightening than cafV usi an get hold of hose with luminous noses. They are also far lea* useful nan cats because, although freluentlv haunted by mice, they annot eaten them. *t more to keep, and ire regarded as pests by almost %  '"'' The cost of stuffing a colonel t about £10. including caviar. md champagne If all the words I write each %  n walkers and (By NATHAN!M C.tBBINSi year to the ufrk ..... of the Inland Revenue explaining why I shouldn't pay something I dont owe were collected and printed as funny articles in newspapers or r-.agazincs, they would not only '%  funnier than mot funny article* in newspaper; .nd magazines, but I should al.o earn twice as much money and lhus increase the national revenui Its Not Only Duck* That Waddle "Women bet in to waddle at the age of 50.'—Profound ob. ion in Woman's page. Ever since the uhild could toddle She had been inclined to waddle. Though lessonin deportment later Kept her Just a little straighter Middle-age, the birth at twins Sent her rockir.g on her pin* She wobbled s • that folks, of course. Nicknamed h-i Th* Rocking Horse." N'ow. at the age of fifty three. She staggers like a ship at sea, Rn-ling through the streets at night, A derelict without a light. than one can do, wo feel. To keep her on an even keel. Indeed. It's nt w our fondest hope To fit her with a gyroscope. Heart To Heart—1 Girls go on wilting to me about their troubles, god I do my beat to give them advice. Below Is a heartbreaking appeal from "PUZZLED." "1 have been >-ngaged to a boy for seven yearIn all that time he has never given me a preskind word. "The last time I saw him. about two years ago, he was very' rude to my mother, and when 1 reminded him of his promise he flew into a violent rage. -Since then he hot left Ihe neighbourhood, and only wrote to me once, asking for a loan hillings. Do you think he wants to settle down?" Possibly, but certainly not with you. dear. Heart To Heart—2 For some reason I cannot hope to explain a young woman, signing %  all WOHRIED" has wnttei the following appeal to me: — "I am very anxious to gel married, and wonder If you could help me? "I am only 4ft. 101ns. and a bit on the dumpy side. My hair I v, and my face always comes out in red patches when I am excited "I am also double-jointed ,.nd the dentist says my teeth are loose. My boy says I' would be all right if I didn't giggle and l.iugh so much." Well. -Worried." yours is rather difficult case. Does your boy mean that your teeth arc less likely to drop out if you keep your moult) .shut, or what? Curiously enough, some mcr prefer double-jointed women, ant I should draw his attention at much as possible to what appear? to be your outstanding charm. Snap your thumbs back at hirr occaslonally. and when h,dhinc this summer do a few little tricks with your toes. You should certainly try to avoid this giggling and laughing After all. you don't seem to have much to laugh at, do you dear? L.E S ••What 1* Wauled" On 11th October, 1884, the Barbados Telephone Company urehased for 112.000 the tocfc ol the Tropical American Telephone ;o Ltd.. which U said, in recordi f the Company, to have been motioning for three yeas before the sale At the time the Company assessed 130 Instruments of which tl wese in use. Bell had only patented his lephone In 1878 ant Slnckler to hU handbook of Parbados llces how up to Hate Barbados peg in thl ant o'rer espacts even anticipating togjand to assing legislation to enabis a ian to marry his deceased wife's I telephones in those %  he simple instruments re know todav The Tropical American Telephone Co. Ltd. |sued a special sheet of instruelons to subscribers. One of these on dlsplav at the. Museum It begins with the perotorv notice that "suh-eribers will please read carefullv and -bserve strictlv the following. 1st: On l--lng called do not -inir back, but respond as prompt> as possible by removing the eeeiver fmrn the hook and plac.nlot Telephone Company Its monthly revenue was S542.50. Today a similar number of subscribers for the same period pmdurcs only S4M.00 for the present company. Some idea of the cost of telephoning may be obtained from a notice in the Atfr.rtiltarol Reporter uf October 21, 1884 announcing the installation of Barbados "Railway Telephones "Telephones bar* been erected" says the notice, "at the railway stations at Bridgetown, Bulkeley, Carrlngton. Bushy Park, Three Houses, Bath. B-ithsheba, and St. Andrew and messages will be foiwanted at the following rates: Messages of 12 words or under M I BBStl Use of Instruments at any two stations for five minutes—24 cents. Planters ordering or sending freight by train — 12 words or under—12 cents Me* lephony In the Island s.nce 1884 There were 230 subscribers in 1K46. one thousand •tvi t.f'.y in 1918 ,nd 1.9*0 in 1930 Between 1B: and 1892 the Albert Hall which had. until then frequent)v been used by touring theatrical compai les was bought for 98.900 and li still used at the Oempany'l Headquarters In 1942. The company's capital was Increased to £4.000 In 1883. In 1902 it went into liquidation and a new company was formed on the 1st April with a capital of £15.000. In 1913 the capital was Increased to £20.000 (Today the present company's authorised .£131,230). In 1914 earth circuits (one wire and an earth) were i.'placed by metallic circuits (two wires). This was a great Improvement since •..ally eliminated overhen ring In 1916 telephone service was extended to St. John and St. Joseph and In 1917 ownership of the country sen-ices and government lines was transferred to the Company. In 1919 a new switchboard wa? installed and In 1920 a new exchange was built at St. Lawrence A branch exchange was opened in St. John in 1924 and in 1931 the first underground cable was laid. By January 1933 the Barbados Telephone Company was serving; 2.113 ulrphonc stationIn that year the Telephone and Clencrai Trust Ltd of London secured a controlling Interest in the Barbados Telephone Company and made preparations to tnstal modem automatic equipment. During 1938 and 1937 the most moderr Strowger automatic rxchangt equipment manufactured by Auton-ntie Telephone and Electric Co. Ltd. of Liverpool, was installed a* the Albert Hall headquarters in James Street and at the St. Lawrence Exchange The main aerial wire routes were replaced by underground cables In the city and the entire outside plant was reconstructed At the end of December 1951 there were 4.835 subscribers am two additional automatic exchanges had been erected in St John and St. James. Spelghtstown Is still dependent on a manual change. The Barbados Telephone Company Is now planning further extensions which vlll Involve an expenditure of about £100.000 This expansion programme allow* for the erection between Bridgetown and St.•Lawrence of an 800 line exchange with an ultimate capacity of 2.0OO subscribers. Details of the programme will. It is expected, be made known before the end of this month. The Telephone and Ceneral Trust Ltd of London Is also associated with telephone companies in Trinidad. Jamaica. Portugal and Caracas. But It ha* several Barbadians on the Board of Directors of the Barbados Telephone %  %  i'H n Managing; Dinette Is Mr. George de Nnbrlga. who Is also managing Director of the Trinidad Telephone Company, and Is a Director of the present Telephone and General Trust Ltd of London. The Chairman of the Telephone and General Trust Ltd. Sir Alexander Roger is also DirscUM of the Barbados Tele•npaay But nil the other Directors. Mr. G. D. Bynoe. Mr. D G Leaeock. Jnr., Mr. C. H Wright and the Chairman, the Hnn J n Chandler. M.LC. arc Barbadians. Off to an early start the Barbados Telephone Company today can !>•' proud of Its achievement %  to the community, nnd of Its satisfaction of the public demand for "what is wanted." PAPER SERVIETTES In Plain White SI.OO per humlr.'il ADVOCATE STATIONERY Broad Street £ Groitonc, Halting %  ,1M ImiTirim PrfMMitrm f'ovkvr To rook 4-nri/lhinn I/M aSkSP ihi.nifhl ot — in a Irartion ol Ihf linn: Imi '. So •>/ tO /MTBil' unit no i-ronimiiral — I'ilrhi-r's hat it. €.S. PITCHER iVTO. a YIPPEE" Children's Elastic Topped COWBOY SHORTS AND COWBOY LONGEES Fawn Blue Green Brown Da losta & Co., Ltd. Enjoy cr DOMINICA CIGAR Qr Sale at Your Druggist DA COSTA & Co., Ltd.— Agents You can'l ht'lp drinking Goddard'w (.old Braid Hum if you love good ram.



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SUNDAY, PtBRl'.lBY 17, 19a! si M>\\ \II\IH \TI I-M.I I II VI \ PAINTINGS Of. GOLDE WHITE /ly III K Mil t RITW Mi an interest in •his word m its U interest in Unit Of chQdn n has nfw flagged ad she ha* tried to hand on to 1 enthusiasm for utiful. %  d miAt the Museum there > the %  'nan exhibition ol Gold"White's art. It is to be hoped that otners will follow. lor in her work UMM I something for art Of the oib on exhib.n is .t pleasant arrangci well 111. and lb* ilriwrng is hiKhly exprws. sive. In "Bed fish", a good eompaxition. me hot. clear liah have been handled with "Joe" Is an excellent portrait. The i ckarou t la full of interest %  nd Is onlv nwd by the nitmF surf at at anile at the tp of the painting. %  NcreatK by eon paMpeot %  Manlt) exACUtM Joe and his %  boo] happy arrangei.'itns agBinat a background thai des not protrude. A l Una "I Minllght Is conKy* | | %  > muled tone* rather than MOM of brilliant colour too often employed by the unwary painter of traMOal aflgCMrj ft bannooloua uuie picture at "TIM Scotland Dislric.*' composed in blues and greys which successfully convey sunlight, shadow and distance. "Children examining .• lustre jug" has the distinction of a painting by Mary Cassatl—the famous pupil of the Impressionist paintets Monet and Degas. Although Mrs. White's painting is in DO HOlc denva Ivc, she has *ii. (ooil it start* on a )< %  %  Keep %  bOOOBAOO diaom., L I'll'T; I sen BII rthli i Uto hint .' %  i tfUl %  : : to %  • %  i Andrews for Inner Cleanliness rrrr; lays itOLDE WHITE'S Manda. on* of tiia many painting* don* by her M\A iiow on xhlWU l the Barbados atuitum. ixhiblted m thai P. I %  %  %  Big liar. Unsj UM Bible" and "Old Manda" — all heads of women—are full i %  , excellent %  all the dra* cannot always be said o| h< I figures In landscape I girl arranging her hair In (roM of a mirror. Is a cl\ i tual represcnta kBl Troo" is clean and froth, and lh irue ralno ol vretereotout .ipprecialed. "Stow-on-the-U an entirely different set Ol votUOi the less brilliant light or an English summer'da) CM nij Ok %  tamfbto, "Bathsheba in the days of the Railway 1 lustonr piece of painting, unfur... k conviction since Town." Tl 4 !-'nation of raj nne ho* the undesir%  • tdinsj I Mt 004 of towards 1 %  i Whits baa been fortunate e iblo ii> Ki-i'p in touch tm nv i,t"m Suiopo i, visits and by w rkmg sea there. Although not M,.don p ntei she 0 .iistill from modern art u. h 'it I 1 i..i uaofully onplo) ll %  %  aj l ia tl Od lhat other rtlsti have been unable to BOUIM Ono can only %  UM HI Ltasn Council will %  .id at least one art p this jroor to Barbados. Iti ana boon BBaTi .'in n Ingold In 'hi. respect (uticura X- TALCUM ** Stop over-forty overs lie ol.uhP8.lnrllKPr>rlun i.-k -fonervv. tnahlllty -H-ontrato. are i i.Ht- itiPtabollc tone. Mrootrttaen vour m-tvi ,\i\(\ increase your enonry. rtorl taking I'liullcian tablets to-day 1 Jual two tablets throe times a day before meala. but if you lake tho talfloia roffBilarlv, tho ^. roaaltswlllu;'onisbyou -^ PHYUOSAN fortifies the over>forties TRUFORM TM FLEXIBLE FOOTWEAR FOR CHILDREN BBVBBW''*' %gi Prizv Itooks For I n'uvrsity Collegv At their rcconl tat < % %  Council nf ih. I I i lce of the Wcol Indii led with RraTtltude the olw by the Truatajw and members uf the YOMI Quild %  HUE the J£2 LDEAL FOR GROWING FEET MADE BY BRITISH CRAFTSMEN BACKED BY OVER FIFTY YEARS EXPERIENCE SUPPLIED BY YOUR LEADING STORES i 4 2 2 Z ii t i $ 2 $ Z 2 Z 2 2 2 i ii 9 2 Z 2 t Z & 9 $ f$$ 9 9 9 2 $ ti9 HALF WAY INSURANCE DOES NOT PAY! IF YOUR BUNGALOW IS ONLY INSURED AGAINST FIRE .. ITS SIMPLY HALF WAY INSURED ANTIGUA... 30.80 ^ I $ SAN JUAN. 93.00 S £ KINGSTON 200.00 § V INSURE ITS SURFACE NOW AGAINST THE EFFECTS OF BLAZING SUN, SOAKING RAINS AND MILDEW with ... Lower Brond Street Phone 4585 L Supplied in the 1 popular Shi'i<^ Wrii!.-. (tram Pink. Silver, firry. ,ri.n Blur. MOT and Terra-Col la. • On Sale at all I.llml,. r and Hardware Slnrrs SIVOWCEM 2l>ll\l WATERPROOF COATCfl SlfOWCEM a Provides o Hard, Durable and Walerprool : urlaco • Does nol Brush. Peel or Flake ofi • Easy lo apply by Brush or Spray Can be used on Concrete. Cement Rendorinri. Roughcast and Pebbledash Asbestos . Cement, Stone. Wall and Fibre Boards suitable Trick work. B S y gBgBtysajt^ il2ZZ4Z***?£$&£$9&99Zi 199 4**19*9 9 f^f&Z



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wm <^m wmm mmmmmmm MMiU rhBRl ARY 17. 1*M M'NUW \DVOC\Tf rAor nv* Frogs And Swimming Kj I.W | .1 I Men have always admired the frogs swimming ability, and ladeed they have copied him fur the Kick of the breast stroke is somethin* like the kick of a frog. It In Interesting to seewhat i i-iominent part the frog playi In books on swimming; |n 9 book published In IMS J C Wood says 'Tor the leg stroke there is no batter model than a frog, whose action in swimming should be copied exactly." Writing a few years later. however, in a boy* magarine. he repudiates the frog and sayr "It %  a right and natural for the frog t. throw out hiit limbs in angle* aim bring, them back in High by many suddet. pull out and in." This must have *' lo P*' ruse the Animal some been accepted as the stroke of the ,,m * ' *'"* r emerge, yet wllli frog, and in The Virtuoso. 3 comeindefatigable activity it rises, ami dy published in 1876 bv Thomakeeps almost its whole body upon Shadwell this scene is given' Lady Gfmceacfc The truth on't he's learning to swim Lonfreil: Is there any water hereabouts. Madam"" Lfldj; Ginirrack; He does not learn to swim in the water. Sir BruceNot in the Water, Madam' How then Lad|i Gioicrarlc In his Laboratory, a spacious room, where all his instruments and fine krtnrk are. Lonowil: How is thr Lady Gimmick He h..s •, shimming master come to him flmre: A Swimming Master' This is beyond all precedentHe hi the mot nmOUl roxenmb living. Lady Gimcrack He has a trog in A bowl of water, tied with a packthread bl the loins; which packthread Sir Nicholas holds in his teeth, lying on his belly on a table, and M the Frog strikes. Li strikes, anil his Swimming Master stands by. to tell him whether he does well or ill. Later on in the scent MOM the luperflce: humid element. Lcmy r 1 1 • Have 111 the watei.Sir? Sir JVicftoUa: No, Cycling Around The Track By ERLE MeLEOD A cyclmt in order to cycle needs irface of this two machines-his cycle and himself. Although both "machines u ever tried .11 complementary in the act of eyclini, the cyclist's own body U Sir: but I by far one more important of the .0 entities. This is the opinion 7 Boats Break Down In Third Regatta (By Our Yachting Correspondentt IN THE last two R.B.Y C regattas helmsmen and crews | alilN artre CfrTnatlltlififj ol ire hi'.hi winds When the Third Regatta was wiled yesteidjy the wind was strong and puffy t times Some said 11 was too strong: therefore we com* back to that old saying; "You cant have everythtmin Ufa." .1 The boats sailed south .itXHit Around the western mark the sea W els l/Ct-IOI %  Blossom overturned. When the __ wards her A f ^A+\ | J-\I* 4TI mooring hc looked morv like a rXl tf1*J 1 f.11 1" wbrnarine thaaa ***M Inter,.-. Dawn and CIvti< B bout Rascal d Scamp of the C Class ill broke down Very few people |W t l>tie after .he cleated the vaatara mark in the arrt retanaV R ring condition* were good for Bay Tornadoes and the Seagulls Invader in the Intermediate 1 beautiful race and Corkie Roberts in Ratnblrd hit t-t UCII.H in-nccs Moyra ltl.nr aasO found extremely sultaMa. hi tiara 1 'i 11 tan I Hi HO lead for the art*, two rounds. I Hantook over the lead She finished FEB. 17 — NO. 211 The Topic I Of / OH — \ Last Week ii VUUNCSS 1 All KLAND lltK'KKT CROUND. N.7 Wi*rell and Walcott ea.Hed o m their brilluim Ryle itter lunch giving the crowd which iwaUi to ^ver 20.000 a great treat Stt| ping out to Burn and hiring liter a straight four. Worn, leached 50 in 85 minutes t*i fours) Carrying on with th graataal freedon. Worrell ran i his century in 151 mumta* I. fours He %  ad Waleott, steppe-the |in> up after lunch. W'l< %  espcclaU> with shots all roun. the wicket almost caugh* %  • partner in Hie fifties It took Waleott 86 minut-s :i assd went score half a century <* foursi •* minute and IS second* ahead of They added 100 runs i„ 15 minMisehlef which wa> second. Third utes Lake Worrell, Waleott dewas Gtp>j i minute and 10 lighted the crowd with powerful second* later Both Mischief and ull-round Poking The partnerulp ggvaj H*-HI performance.-hip between this pair yielded IBB m IS7 m.nutes The < 'h C Clasr>ther run regWtered during ihe piirtnerahip was a bye. thU giving Six boats raced In the C Cl| an lii.ticatroh tliat the baUtnen Seagull Ganovi, the winner. were hitting ever> ball Qfi took ine lead from the fir it teaching th. three-ilgurr mark umiut She coinpltted this round Worrell hit out, and Sutcliffe took 40 second> ahead of Madne-i. .i brilliant running catch in the which was second. Magwm w si utfleld third, about two minute* latei. WalftOtl earned on lo a centur* (iunnet beul Hafl* In B| gfltg 155 minutes (13 fours), bu' irunute and 60 seconds. It was a Cbark* was duunissed leg before at 136 Ten minutes before tea, Ooddard declared his innings closed lough battle between Mu*m and Madness. Madne -s should She nnlahed fuur se;i nds behind Magwin In the Intermediate Class nine' boats started but only six tlnAt the end of UU Hi It Mohawk, the tir>i % %  had a Lead of about four mlnul." %  Dauntless and Invader. HowInvader twk the lead. She BWbn most exquisitely on land Bruce. Do you intend to practice in the water. Sir? Fcarnlev who was one of the top three minutes before adiouinmet' Sir Nicholas Never. Sir; I hate flight hack cyclists in the United with the total M6 for S wickets the w uter. 1 never rome upon tin Kingdorn. Fearnley has just New Zealand bowlers had a water. Sir. written a book headed "HEALTH trying lime under ideal battinK l( hyd Some two hundred years later AND HANDLEBARS" and thl* conditions against such splendid l0 „ lu i we come aero** another account of book is strictly for the green batsmen swimming on land Mr. Samimck rtder. Beard was th aieadie-t. takn bourne the author, describes how i haw Ju>t tlnmhcd reading it 2 for W off 40 overs. He m %  French swimming bath he and | ca „ „!„. local track unfortunate |uM before deelaia-"-WM "w-hi "ZZ*Z*m -hri"Vf in enormously 1st man being cyclists that this book is something llon to hilV e lo leave the field fwh f „n ^Id n i hmugh his paces on top of a UUI 0 f the ore""-•" -' %  •— — %  '—' %  — —*••* %  by two bearded swimming Track cycli in Barbados—I was told by an -f y~*Ths> New "Zeaim eminent cyclist—sometime in the WB Bood „, ^ithes. but the year IMit and since then the savgrtu of the batsmen's Htrok'sport has gained in popularit> ,. lu9e d* n (,handling at times. In Trinidar and BrlUsh Guiana Hpw Ze f(l n dV innings ope: i Hack iscing is Juit at popular as j^ngationaUy Le BB att bflni: rickot and fo-Hball. Of course ,„ iwlcd by Worrelfs second deig_can be falily^cfltpen, lvpr> f0| g (luck aiKl a^e-,. lteina caught behind the srlekcl off Atkinson lor live The M" >a* then 12 tor 2 Sulcliffe K t through hU paces on top of a oul 0 f the ordinarv g by two bearded swimming masters After watching this performance for a quarter of an hour he remarked to one of the swimmine musterthat the fat man must have great perseverance "Pevseveraiice"' Exclaimed the swImmliiK master "He has worked like this for five years, and he has not been in the water yet'" Well, b much for swimming on land. Next week I will start on the crawl strokes *o get your bathInc autt I sfl] MM T-> nMi*i bull Thr .1rMr tun Ann uld m> lag Illllr l.nlhr, r inn lo mrh ^^• t—il UN call w. mtiiMt Th* B-llrh*< ulil lhal • utlit .-% HI i.ut ktra Ha inullnci. pn* !" %  ""' Inirh %  llii*limi iversri ii"' < AN* OLD FRIKNI) IN A \l *-l'(H S Jml A Few Vaigfl OfT gsfMt] Street In Pr. Wm Henry Sin i YOUR Ml'O STOKI • THK ( OSMoroill vs Pit is.( <>i 111in .mil See . THK NKW S I'ONSTAMI v VKKIVINC. 'Plume IMI— 21! 11 F. A-. CLAilKE, iUMlOrOLii IN F1AIMAC1 ; i k rid niMf DBM inan> spills. Niiiin-s such .1 I) l>ouglai>. K N I *h ^;:!''wh'h7'b^*,TJ s !" £'' %  Ken ram urn who ho* ut"KVn a i...., n -...a 1t .^| ruI .iv (ew leeords in the last Intercoio^i^ ^ 8 ^'kel! Tl N ,., ,i r,,-i„ Meet ..I Krn.iuiiton are. between uie wickets Ts* V m s^SJWtfBa aSJs^ :.i..l Cyclu l)n!lmnlly c.uiO.1 b Worrell f die vvvU^ Rnrihin. Reld. who had mnpU> in Iht li.li.id who could l.ko M Om, rwlii 'ho or. !" In I.II .. .< ihnlv handm.ol> In tw hu nack fool I.. Vkline. .. Olymin, c )c lin evenl bul lh.fr ".ll lujni>ed by Omllon b.-..ll I.IKMAV roamoN ll 1113. Golf Match Postponed The White HOIMTrophy ajui Chi ii t iuirch yestei.i..> afttrm President's Cup for Ladies wlweli has l*en postponed, wtl to have been played -t the The match will now be plaj Rockley <;..lf and Country flub off -n Maich 1 a-. -' ud are ricld in high legards cycling I am sure that theie in the inland who could of themsclve Olympic ir"i %  quality cannot be ascertained unnn.i Rabone *..• ." *"'' %  .. til they are sent out where they appeal again*. 1 Imbt was upheld can clash with top ranking cyclists ten minutes before stumps weee uf the world. to be drawn New /.valand %  But let us letum to Uharles. then TO for 4. Feamky. His book which has BowUng honours tor the Wrv eiglit chapters can he obtained at Indies team were evenly divided the Public Library. In hla first between Worrell Atkinson. Vlehapter he introduces the green inline and Bamadhtn who all I nick rider to his cycle so that buwled -.teadily. ho can carry out any rupairs of • ^rarjs.'^a.rs -VasTtf •—--' • ""o !" irun, iho llmt h*U dam, mile, on.i •* Sl**'e7i I W i'll\HITI(l\ ,1 "*' ' where Tunlnn ..Bnea In I" ""' "' "' CluipWr l*o i,,,,^, hnA ll i,. M alovl Feainliy WI.IW Ihe only vy ll!a rtlou | d ^ uw ta ptevein the arcnl.aok rider c.n develop „„„„, „, u,, llnffri %  • upecd and condition is by cw0 massed itartina reiirnU^ r tinual pr-.eU.-e Mjn > '•"' f* fc v '''> Uh" !" *" and .) Ihal linre *al llje weight of the m J t>i ^'^ „ .„,„ ,„ lr ck dropiieil hiuiclle bar has sona." r|(1|n( „, |n h^j, rt-e ,, K Il( i, : I IhlMI t.i d,. with hl> P-Of"" J ilnds lumaell .tanii.K vUt MSIIUs b a lalse taller a. the relitm rt „,,,.„ v/(lu klwn „,, „,„ era the ryrim offers hlmaeir i I|cks „, „„ k( lul md J( ,hy,„, the s.ihent fnctor ,, T M.i,„,, 1 think Chapter Five is the iffVprnB ride, p, most important one in the t-ook. u lUl ^^^ specialists—for thev The chapter covers no less than liio -,„!,:* and very ruihle> six eeeetioos—eix *f5" 0 "V i ' in ; specialists-he must seek got advaluable advice to the tyro on Use V|) .„ tnm men who htw ttocu i cycle track. The chapter i* .,,,,„„,, in hal company. SomcreaHy -It explanatory ,,„,„ „,. „ „ in book %  Ih, %  sections ore la) funlng.. ,„„ 1:ii l| , .,,, „ Ll .. Kainbird carried off honours In the D BlBjgf. Only four bSMtl iiiushcd. She beut Hurricane by one minute and 26 seconds. Thi'-l was Van Thorndyke. a minute i.nd 30 steonds lielund Ihintc <• Vamoose won in Ihe Tornado %  kept the lead throughout the race She finished two %  Him.', .md 40 seconds ahead of TaUassar which was second. Kitil. thud tint-lied M second law. i Lit "ere .is toUoW IXASS a n >,i ..id Ihit UIIKK I *, BM at aaei i Oktpl ( %  I ria>> 4 III Ho ".§r Id Wifurrl % ..,.-.. *• 1 • If 1 U %  *> M n 1 1 M 1 1 • 11 45, 1 U *i i SB aa JS St 1 s .* 1 M B i i ii. 31 M 1 %  ias 44 u i i sa 4* I 4 4M %  .' 1 Jrt SO 4B 14-, i a.ia an I T) %  • %  sponsored by J & R BAKERIES makers of ENRICHED BREAD and the blenders of J & R RUM V **0*>OS>0000*VOOOV.**'.' PAIN 3 llo..0>.r.l ,n %  %  I) V'l Ttl.rll.l.b.f I SWilu/d 1 I. i .a st n •' i io *I u %  Will Play Softball Oenenil Hygiene. (g> Relaxs turn and finally (*i> Posillon on the wheel and posture while '-..Ll.JM. // \I\<. m Fearnley says "If you are overyejght M m.in> racinn men %  !'• lo th* HEALTH AND HANDLEBARS.' By reading this book I am ure local cyclists would he encouraged 10 ride Bon intelligently on the track and thus decreasing the amount of spills which mark aven Cycle Meeting. •Procn Out >-* Vanmpfmtdm' • KINGSTON J'ca. Feb. 14 Thirteen gni playata have bei named to represent the Con urge mandos Softball Club il track cyclists to drop in at dav tour of British llondur.i Public Library __ and get ThP team captained by Mi-., Edna Miller, will be KooApanled by a coach. Mr. F. Millci. and will leave Jamaica by pla.i i 'in Sunday, February 17 They will play nine mater*'* | m Bellse, ElCaye and Cl SACROOL CONQUERS PAIN KNIGHTS LTD. J** takes a borf DUNLOP MOTOR CYCLE TYRES for extra Performance WtMwasM %  hM %  ' lo,L '"' g^w^ in... Looi.otto'se.... Iktrt ( .i".i.'ii'.w'i"- assiaaa I.atr..mtss> < teatm. ess-teta* .-i.iiiliipiwei' Tlii'i mi r i '< *' „BI... .or-..' l atl[2&ft Attraction In Action DOWDING ESTATES & TRADING CO., LTD. (ECKSTEIN BUCK.) Distributor! TO SEE fS TO BUY THE NEW PIIISKOIU REFRIGERATOR GR^J^Tr:R IN sPACti CREATKR IN GRACE II SPANGLED WITH A GALAXY OF NEW FEATURES Seven cubic feet capacity In tmall floor 'pace Tnggei*ype door latch. Exti.i large Frosen Foo<: Locker <26 lb capacity! Automatic Interior Ligh' T0 raSW deugn Ice Tr-.v [ QaKk-Basaaaa cuheAdjustable feel for levelling cabinet. Fold-down top ahabt A'i%  helt Cnspaior %  %  By Compariion You'll Buy PRRSTCOLD Wm. FOGARTY (Barbados) Ltd. Agents. BARBADOS llilll CLUB - %  %  RACES SATURDAY, 1ST MARCH. 1952 THURSDAY. TH MARCH, 1952 SATURDAY. BTH MARCH, 1952 Twenty Five Events. The First Race on the Fiml Day siarln at 1 OT p.m. On Ihe Second and Third Days at 1.15 p.m. The 2 Sweepstako will be oHicially closed on THURSDAY. 28th February. 1952. and will be drawn lor on Friday, '/Ih March. 1952. al Ihe GRAND STAND al 4.0C P.M Ticlcets can be purchased Irom Registered Sellers up lo 400 p.m. ol the same day. The Plan for admission lo the Grand Stand will be opened, as lollov/s : To SUBSCRIBERS on THURSDAY, 21-st FEBRUARY. 1952 To THE GENERAL PUBLIC on MONDAY. 25th FEBRUARY. 1952. between the hours ol 8.15 a.m. and 3 00 p.m. daily. All Bookings close and must be paid lor by FRIDAY, 29lh FEBRUARY. 1952 by 3.00 p.m. PRICES OF ADMISSION: SUBSCRIBERS :Free and Three 13) Ladies or luniors al S2.16 each lor Ihe season. GENERAL PUBLIC :-Ladies per Day Gents per Day Ladies' Season Gents' Season Admission to Iho Paddock por person per Day FIELD STAND:— Per Person per Day 3 • $120 1.92 300 500 120 St* No Passes lor re-admittance will be giver. POSITIVELY NO BOOKINGS BY TELEPHONE WILL BE ACCEPTED G. A LEWIS Secretary.



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SUNDAY. HHHI'im 17 IM1 SI'NDAY M.MM m r\(.i SKVBM THE BLONDE WOMAN WHOSE mm:is TABOO l..i hs the I ••;• %  • <•! lli-.iili in IllsI'rriMi Land of Hlnfl Ready for gvluuniy if until rune fails u> Books by George Malcolm Thorny MAC IMIN \l ii KM > it* ho hog just returned jfroi -d*n :he Argentine's Bond%  %  .• flared l clgantic scaffolding. 50ft high. %  -iifrt in length, chronvlrtuee of Eva and hoi tuwinomh to*r judgino at South American agricultural aid lit'caiuck shous. President Juan htun of the m n Argentine, who on Friday told r ',r Britain she must pay double las'. The Peron bluff Is the biggcs* year's price for beef" in 1B52. was Mnc Hl "" ,,ied "" h nn "' bluffing—bluffing In a big way. i'-" r P""'"-'* "may to even For the ArgenMnc la on her kntei. • fool Britain. %  Nature and the Oownunmi." %  **f "ueno* Altn M one cattle-breeder pu' K, <"' th *' P"'"> "• """n '" >• -hart combine.! to ruin the un" "' lr ~Ph ^ •_ %  *.• ruinablr." s Li nlstnttgaj i I Dl i %  help him get up." They WhUper When a man K down in the Argatitlne that is the time to k.IUS novel melons* to the 1 new generation of wrilera which, almost every monlli. turn* up a '.ilent clamouring for notiot and judgment. • %  %  11 Singing > %  alnceir. po* rrI u I and ..oinng IU author la a omu. from South Africa, home Si -m ugly of 1*. illfll!. He meant that . Peron and a three-year drought nartictilar'h.-itrfal of Britain. 1MB defeated even the fertility of Behind it all H the same throb12ft of good black earth. Com la bm & undenrurreiishort, grass is ahort. calve* in l one £?* snort r-afraid %  nentton Eva. At the To understand the Argentine other Is Eva herself you mug) know that the peop* %  %  can i/'Snten will never think In the British A nun -pofc. again* her She term* of "When %  ...an |g down, "*£•?, a"" iLl? !" ul ** .^ lifting her bedside phone and saying: "The Iwpe ct CC h ^ s found .... factory. 1 will r.ot tolerate ft. The place must, chase." 1 .oriel v Buenos At rat, whore "ont-Ume But Ml OWB tear and t*e society now gathe.s to lick its < %  / of th.clumsy wUHer by her %  Bfld whisper about Peron, "'* %  "" W * .' ,e th they toil yotti There is only one %  f*g ^S-**B thing we subacr.be to—nd tha; ta publ.c to ^^J^^ fl "g 1 is hU ruthtaaaneg. If we ware a* lo^'v table eating food which f in the same position we would has first passed through a corps cio the same to him" of food-tasters. Thg Pan ..tMdy to duck There was a flens a t..m at the rut any day now. A vast outflow British EmbusJjy one ni£ht befca. Of wealth which ha. crippled the aWl UaM "hen the ^Jtot peso on the exchanges of the world and his |an> insisted OD l he.r is secreted in Switzerland ii. the ta lei impling oeery dish dyrfn g .i.imcof Qeoenl and Seno,:i dinner with t ^ Am ^ a, ~*[v H [.,.,„ Even Iva's poodle has a food „_ Forbidden ^^r all the diuy descent of For no one does m BUMfeM Aires. ££ %  m "' kwl V^ m ^ bc n X''V Hers is the fcrtlMm ,:"-:. il" 1 ?' 1 £ ' Juan ^""^ The Lady." "Mrs. Tou-Knou.." Evj • Dro "*' "Our Blond Bombshell they say. \\ nn. %  But not eve. •Eva" In case the rh ,..,. u nuw no b|ork marht .. I taxi-driver, the chambermaid, or ,„ y,,, Arfeil Une," said a Braztlthc natter U an informer an / ri p nd -There is only Juan Yet you cannot turn rl*'ht ir Uunrte" left without seeing her name and „„,„ %  ran chers cannot pay her pictures on walls, shop-winf m lnc buUs tney nou-ht at tuc dows. houses, and even corporation iio„ ^ Scotland last year. dug cart hy I talked to Scottish P.-ron—Era'' appears on I geg who are still waiting for murals at the airport. their money and are not partlmt %  •Peron—Era" is .epeated bull) till they get it. the posters lOu'id 'he unfinished The AJrfentlne banks cannot housing estates which line tM clease the money because they roadi to BuatM Alrea [have the rerltng • Peron—Era" sang a processm i r f.,, gtgeUna ;, 01 white-robed 15-ve.,r-old* as i,.udly a^ they scream lor dollars. they marched through the cenli" \ ii gnl men in the if the citv i.int. Wllh ftM'.cr Above me. as l did my shopinsistence: 'Hoto lone can the pinf—at the world's cheapest rate bluff po on* II LACK The Paris SUhouvtl<> without a Waist riteae. IU story >is osm preserved KHI-'IIM tit junior and defeat. And Its theme, underlying the story. Is that tragic social dilemma of our time j the Col* WJII of Colour. Here It .. trans:-u-d into the calamitous life of 1'iok Turner and his wife. Mary. % %  ft played out In the oporr*ve | tie lonely Un shaok. ni-ng the dust devils of ta*\ eldL No villain* here and no heroe* The casual brutalities or white f.irmera, like Ihcir equally casual outbreaks of fcMidn*.. are too much part nf a social %  | e r n ta provoke tar -if "mi I MNTON WtLCM As for 'inning, they are — • he Whole, they are dUBrre..hie mil not i pirn no lanUmental eb round them It is an nuault p 'our ijily. not on your tearduds. Mary should of course never have married Dick. Probably she %  ttiuilri not bnvf married at all. She was .. "good .porl.' life und saul of the tennm club dances, and lalher unlOverhearing a nullcioUk con versatIon one day ("Mow aturi %  he looks. eeeMvf iik..-> girl In rifr 'teens"! puU the rndkai "' %  nrrlase tnkher head. Ih. k comas iota town about that tune, buying stores for his farm. It is not much o1 .t I Dick net much of a farmer Mary ) %  gvea more (eekle She ennnot endure the heat the drought, the dc.idenlng lei ebneas. Abu\.all. she cannot manage the nattee %  eivants The Turner" ,ire elt en Ihetr argj down to the -poor hlte level bv the time Mows eorm-s back to help In Ihe houae. II,|i a huge Mack man ; once Mary had struck him wilb a whip. But now thing* are siudifferent between ihem. Mr Is aware of Mo*c>: soon %  •/are of no uee else. At first with anger -When g whit..r..,n In Afrlra 3 den' look" lnt.> %  a native and arei thihuman I>I'1IM his H-nse of guilt 'dines up ff< resenlmcnt and h< gosrn f>e whip" Mat, u(h Africa resolutely buneg the uniavouiy aifalr. The note Lp never forced throughout. ljg jorg ta ruled — mm Ml> geaet —lilliraii wa Mi Qoiib U>U novel In the end he c-u only uwet or foei i nme. efter ehich he '.ing and with %  rjim IU died 31. on !>ccen ber . IfHS A V.os Through a Cknaf h %  o neUA. UM ator* of an It kt moving and m vivid, it has the acuteness. wllhut th i itortiuns nf piin ll la bittc.and courageous li • t. a kind of ditrustfu' Inlegn.y u a wrtes of b pletutei of fellow i nurse, anxious relative, it „ mature. *lth ill-ami nc of youthful timidity. It is haidlr %  novel at all. Bui It i> j fl.-.-p rspeiii-nw. Welth was %  % % % % %  eeen physkel dl fruati.ahis angn-. sensitive Ulewt Should we say genius I %  -V faafce a^w.,1 (a. l„ g, (rf B#f0. **.,* Hi i aieiai. fOi e> 246 pages. '%y 11 excellent enme -*. hat the BdvanUgc .if brir.g Mr. Radio has not needed to war hii l<"agination. He has gone to Me n*spnpers. so the record, (mostly Hen Mi. t.i al Ik m |tl kuj fresh neaa to Uiose bygone annal. of Iniquity Fi-r example, to the (,.-.! Parrot murder on Third Avenue. In which the critical evidence %  Nig pmvidcd by a parrot which kept on calling out "Robber. i.>ub< i I'otH one d u deiective decided the bird was talking Trench snrl went looking fur a own named Robert. A moat rrad.iW# sheaf m man Oboul Jown K\pi, ->l. it< tiuA ai I the toUThrt iv the departin vtoti Bf Cav,Shepherd molotuig worn Wltn iiont-wneei on Bmac" St WM "* v-iiivvvs-v -* wAlls and en all floors beautifully manui-ctuivu auloi nature of Cave Shcpmobile, the new i nerd's unporled slock has no "pt iTKOt.N %  vhere in thCaribuos Agencies Ltd. Kciauw srl^-an. Wont you come with me vice — in lact. absolute l A minutes end see t Here. UsUly as in every stand*** ami %  re superb silks. lUBWBH and cottons bearing the magic iiaiiH' ut Liberty, which t.imons name and house Cave %  cor e scut. And ladies M-arve* end bartsuee an well as Men's neckties and dressing BOVBa end allraellve character dolls ere all of Liberty manulacture. Let's look at Chuia and the xtiaordlnary perfection of ig part of it aim g-i low eapenditure lor such aliru Uutea Uieav dayi. Hut taiK it ovei with the CiritUiJ. he Ii nui only tell you ihii.g:. — ne 11 prove them I 'he eHrr i: irt takes on kind %  %  imniia Studeod Hod* A Vaice rhreeen a CloawMsV fkWMa Wrkfc falbateaa 10s. W. JU I WIK moal ,Naaeaniskkae.' -I ihi. bo-ik ia'aot ifiat ilTton brilUanlly out a at alt. wrt %  hat it %  *-• l*rmder. Dentoo Welch was boni In |hai in 1*17 and brought up Ha -a,sludyuig art *> lamdon when* (agedsll) lie was Ibe.vlMlm M a. road aerldaol, Itsun the afSeeti of which | it years later. His aptne li.d bi*en biuken. The In'erv,.! w., ftlled with hoipltaU, dr>rlor, paki *'n< Theme' blackmail ,md mi Writer: an American m ne*cime'. to •' %  • %  -cti.ir gviuouaiy worked ul ,m inrdv laid. A murder takes place on a Iran v., Han tk 1 liner called the (Jureii At"(*iidra It should have been e...v b> Salve. Bui U appei's 1'iat many people had rea.v.r, to Mill I eonor.i Itlirh M. Mm'-* tmng* a light touch Ui bis sombir topic. Heceived a WeUdn..: toVtustteal eenUj llet you have uuJ n't make up your mil Wedgewood —' here at Cave suitable gift Lei me help you. snepherd'h m Unmet Sets and Stuart LiysUI available ga ceanNovelty Ashtrays. This %  ekeetlon plete sets Is a gorgeous gift loi of figurines is in Royal Doulton. -nyone. ..a platcu Bafeai !•Now. with thoughts of travelling ".civue from S4a up. China Nora, we*U just have a breathUiunc r Service i i taking look at Ihe wonderful matcbum Tea and Coffee Setst value and quallly in ihese Ladiea' Iron. $72-60 Truly beaulitul mil Men's Tup-coal* u. Pashm v-ullei>. h% %  ' %  %  ( loth, Ceorgiatt Coverl and Doe.ill of Lh.s and much moto H in Ladles' Suits are of theiofteted at Louis L. Bayley's on .r> taaeSl tf Kngludi Tweed in>klolto,i Lane. lemiiiie Tartan nagjenj, whiie^ • • %  Knglish Doeskin Cloves, Ladies'. and Men's Caahmere Sweateis A Jeep loi Boya onlj! In and MenCaatutuui Top-ooaU Hercules, Ihe very new Hercules .rut S|!,is Jackets are right out < real faWf in Ha.bados Co-op l thM world In quality andCotton ractory Ltd 1 %  v.i.,, lkm. r ..u tv excited, but "' %  A 1 "' l'-'' ; ';,''?, wait — I've more to show you. really sturdy and well balance r.n cmninrtable looking Man's insithlne wiUi lou of line leaturys r.pH?oat u of Genuine Hams ">'* Hcivutea u t"J to be really Tweed and a mighty handy thing populai. The Co-op also have lor ihe plane. Now, to Idle yet the new Hercules for Oirla, %  rhllt on this .sJe, and 1 hope-Ladies and Men. in 18", 21" and sou do. you may care to look all,5 ,ramc '"** Colours are rave Shepherd's readymade Mov-\tliren and Black and uiudeU ^ashel Linen Suila tor Men, andi]-"in f 'u'" ^P""-W HoadeWr. tiM>, in plain colours.'llhil enme on In and see them. riw) >r oKtremelv co.,i and eteaae '" ,r, >' l n *l '"' "y land n ditanl Well, there, you have aetharea nothing to really compare icw of the highlighU ul Cave with the Massey-Huirui Tractor. Shepherd not forgetting UMThat wonderful machine with all bbj counte. of l.ocal HaiidicrafU it-, many atlailmi.nts including %  I fascmaltng design and ciafl-% %  M<' ( "' '" lr rianship. Evcrvthlng you could Kakea and Manuiv Loaders and v.ah for is hare at Cow? ShepSpreaders. ThU last. inciduntaUy. I herds on Broad St. known la highly mlUbk* for th* %  pplica throughout the Wol Indies by I*"" *'f Bagasse In the fields. Us l-hnse who travel. -urtesy Uarago for Mauey-llai • • .is with Tyres or Sled Wheels or Higliet Education for your Half Tracks, whichever you prehUdrfa — like tle sound of H' fet and for Cane Traders, too. r.ui will when you know it's luaranteed 1 And to provide so !->*. <"ng awaited but here it /tr3 important a Kuarantee is the kl now. At MaiuutiH'.s C.unei regain gag of the Msnuractureis Store, the new KCLVINAlOKi lafe Insuiancc Cnmiieiiy thrmifh Rlecti uHefrigerub.i with 4.18 hen chief repre cnUtivo. Peter cu It. nett food storage, nluminie Veilcville In Ins new oIlUc um Ice Trayg, t'livper. Chilling I n the K H Hunte nuildlng un Tray and durable cabinet finish 1 : DM llioad St iph t84). feter that will neither ci.uk nor change I -ill ghowi you how you can place colour, u heie to dUplaj and: he obligation of financing your prove Its food keeping superiority | liildren's education in ihp event w.Ui economy! The Kelvinalor, '^r your death, suuarcly on the really is a buy at $3115. Neat, well You'll | msidenj/brm* All'wllc FranVly f^egutilol curves... superb lift. ..Molta figure trrnilualion -thii* ih'e l-"iuu of wesrinii Maidcntorm'* All*>clte" brat Try All., ettVou'Usay Ba ll-' gseeal leata?] your figure geel had! In youi favorite c.ilot" an.I UsM (.enutne Maidci.turiii brassieres are made N By SUSAN DEACON iStnenlega dregsrs are finished Ik London. Thf|i ore no lonpcr PARIS. SSkeTt T HE first day of the Spring dress The hallcneck or miule sfioulder shows opened in Paris with strap Has laken Ihelr place. collections by Jacques Heim. In Paris TULLE and LACE are Bruyere, and Paquin; the mas*"" fnshlonable for %  *! 0U| ters Dior and Fath have vet to dresses which are now finely ghow. pleated, w.di-skirted. short or \nd If the first day Is anything ;o full ssfeith, and fan pleated from go by. It will be a spring reason the wajgf of untrlmmed hats, sombre colEnglish fabrics are used by many our*, and lots of black—the hatB Perls designers. Dtef of the island when Samuel Selvot. [ormci wa, chtnagg. gad Indians live dad Guardian now lhar, fur the moat part In living in London has recalled to harmony. „t the full tui exciting memories of The ptctureequa a|ie>.h. habtfa, "• hjonuj II, h. new book "A Brightand moiaU -f Hie villagers an-, ,. r s, m ne, i.lately leporuHL Hut minj The storv ..f Tiger, a voung InEngllah readers n dia.. boy. andI h-s"childhood marOk. fend tand te laichaasv-a "mash.-r" line for galls rt.ge to Urmllla U developed l"ra| JlaMwbkh tal^J" >g the R.-n.eet London line. It h\[\ T !" ovea wHl niidTricrna slrotghl iklrt ond boxed In the late 90s and the period of ilians. however will lliui %  nemSd-curtiin jacket ullhhiph flat the Ameri...n '.a-cupatn-i' ,V .t home ta tint ntftal rwrrn the dcclarnlion of war. %  UU DOOB de-crlbes graphkally the Published ti) Man wiiigahuv ut lif.. in Chaguanas a sugrn Iful II. Braurhainii %  district halfway down the PI... :i Price ll'J The 'Masher' IN LONDON earlier in ihe Ihe Hiti Ten ronrentrafed inosflu on latlored suit.-, dresses, and mair'itnp jackels and top coals I liked the London ahort efenlno d'csics u'lth their feminine ItUf/y sklrfg shoun bu Ifertneli and ffardle Amies. Colours in London u-ere os sombre as In Parts. / show In repfional. Ihe pictures are expleating starting at They looked trtntrg. CAKVIN3 colleclhin Low Sleeves The higgest fashion news so far is in the hip line and the sleeve. The HIP LINE [g emphasised with either skin-tight hip draping on a straight skirt or by all-round fulness the hips. SLEEVES nre often set low in The shoulder seam The rounded shoulder line is fashionable again Paquin shows enormous sleeves on loose coats and day dre ss e s which balloon out In a winged point. Ifetm fpnoreg the moist liri<". Jlfonp of hu suits hove lootel" belted boxy jackets. The skirt lenofh is about OM *nrl longer, bui Hie neck line is hioher on dap dresses. While schoolboy collars and soft bow tics arc If. COLOURS are mnlnly aJl-hla-{with black accessories | — or white [with black accessories] Vivid coloured accessories are worn with shades of grey or beige. Still st .-;.,)!< %  %  f teas sorry fo see that Paris is grill shou-infl strapless ecentna; and cocktail dresses "Wintry" Hats HATS: The pastil-coloured straws magged with spring flowers have unhappily almost dlggpj This year's straws and fell* SCANDAL By R. M. MACCtHX PRETTY JANET GORDON.' vivid-coloured either uiitrim " !" *' %  *"'" "i med or with ribbon or feather Legislature, is sick and tired oi mounts a taag-gtandlng acand-i Ike Slate's divorce laws. She. Ut the most roaomon with many other people, Una, and most colourfully dislikes the "hypocraey" and "nodrcssed show seen In Paris so lorious frauds" attendant on t'oo far. The clothes are Inspired by many action*, anj the "nonchaa tup t<> Mexico^ ^^ perjury" they engender So The trend follows that of the other ^ hf nropoecs a Times coiresp-ndone inch longer. Fine Prints hen lie stopped a hocreadou* charade called %  prise-figh* mo of Ihe rao.l be.u""•" S ^ l re "M "S'S don oTPartt to t.r Collon. .tr w~r. but Ruby obviou.|y hd shadow-primed and have bold ll> ralownw. In mind. TMr i flowers and animals tainly were In no |>o*lt!on lo debordetln, Ihe hem Une. fend themselves." GET IT INTO YOUR HEAD! 1 FREE YOURSELF from the BONDS OF CONSTIPAT.ON with "MORSES SPILLS i ^***i iTftfi-. y *' M **-~' i i •'£H".r^-.""~ "~ i| // 4 "'(ij • sss^rs*—•—-j! FU •*--;.T.;g;r-"•••— %  !i '^ • mtns mxior i I ro OVEB 50 run ; '"BYWAREO'FWORMSI Local IMslrlrmtnr: (,l Ml I'. \1. A'.l M V ( O lUrludos) Lid Lanalol ,7,, 10 III .001 „ %  AND YOU CANT 60 WHONB! The regular UM of lanalol Hair Food h> i" action on roots ami -air. h every hair gland and ajaamraac richer grolih U ptovMha nournhmeat to the scalp and ban roots aad corrocts iuch troubha as DANDRUFF PARTIAL BALMCSS THIN A FALLING HAIR I he dally application of tula Hair I'<>od results unfailingly In a really beautiful glossy bead of hair. LANALOL Ne. I W.O. oil (Ygftew Ubell for dry ** l LANALOL Ne. 2 W.ihoet oil ( libel) for htir that >i naturally oily — ingeni and cooling NALOL CHEAM a-AaieajM OLIDIFIED IgakeUta bos). An


PAGE 1

PACE six SUNDAY ADVOCATK SUNDAY. Fl-BSXAHY 17. IttS Doctors Prove • S/oulooMayW'* A Lovelier Complexici In 74 Days //*• *d>2 "* Mary McLeod Bethune: Outstanding American Woman B-: *. i,t\HUM MMtM %  ''•-: ir the L'ruU : of pOwerf.il orgaruxa400.000 .omen. and ".oorr MM p tea u dagst of %  colege srie nut oniy hu ^itn fnu i •grass but baa helped mate it. ." % %  day. M T. this woman M lovM • per wl. ana followed :r.t • %  %  pel Cfcssw r. lVlhut.< tt loved and fcuurtr. Ar turned V nurtdreds of BTraduIn igg/. |bt mff wd Of l>nur.*-C*kmn Colk* feUo* u-acher. Alberiu .-.•-.ngib,e afan-ncT pei-l'Jod. She uvi : ^Mv* hi Ood. and hi Mary Bathun*Uary ltaasisu had .are a* an educator .". • a— aaa. but aha fait there her to do. She :*"""" %  na ro ad J %  Budapest listens to London voice IT COMES FROM EXILED WOMAN £ r Hungary hundred.* of people creep inio upboardv uoxrooau or bathrooms, or hidunder laoir i to listen in secret to the voice ar-old Miss Beat* Szekeiy Broadcasting news of free Europe co those b. hind the Iron Cun*m %  11 in lh* For J BrieWer. Freshet Compteiion. use Palmoliie Sup as Doctors tdviseil '.Hrfilf SB!" .pe..!l.H ec..ea tHi W ... I f.i-.u.. it; mm !>••• < %  • ]T*Jp* „, planer., (n many way. 0ly tain looel ••..— %  ie .j T -d. *•• >•! w*rf-iiy 1 *• %  •• %  •' biraMei Cor.e-loo*ir-fl Uin aieee.. .^r^arJTthe'SSS % %  ^.M, of the school, ah. ^1 Council c* !ro Women c har power and pericar bo* eyes and, tn the rhythm Wnj, L -tat -icarse* and llai.tta.il for equal of a aptrrtual la relupoua song*, per* had bean dreaxnuui. eoa*entra> us .enet tn her ifhu. She i* foliawad by %  H ctsfgak. iOuOOO mambara of the Natioraal all my life. Council of Negro Women, which cotton Meld*. sea tn IttS and which afauflnc I Matla* the rlain the considered the — rlajsrooan, 'hat ume we sssrvJ as p ra ah Se n i unUl bar dreaming still IMS %  %  and a plaee m history much for | .. I.:.BBj •a m Negro, m behalf lacs and little children Florida she r *\ imsM at Negroes ^tatt n ou "=i i^..-. of the puril iinamnlrii>*7 Ktit problem of the Tnnnnyr *£**" %  > during the earl; I In Flond. ate found so il?.!.^, %  • "?"'., T IL0W.0M -lUcm. UttU She haa • helm.; u 2SS?or>T? TSff S^ IW haa inaptrad thean to do far thMBday m IW4 she upenea her trnoo i _..,._, ,. n _ _-. h ._, >._ _. ..ivelTThxouSSu-. £^ri5. Dayton. fcSy hi > ^^ r J J^_ Pho i : shc ha* aal adVararty and rahaaV dollar and a half, a f-w maha£££-,-5 a^rtniinaiKiQ in .:n and. more often, with ahlft psecea of furnJiure. and 0Y '-"i"~ ahnrad hstsnour. "I have no htUe girls for pupils She also had 11*%.-^ don* orr*Uuiu| I infcrordy complex.'' mtt aaacrta. faiin *nd .:. neoat* she auicfclv iltrnandcd that talks before public With a flourish she founded the th— ^ r^-nnri | n t fir Tbaro • rites all bar own Daytona aUucauonal and Indus„ res. .mpressBn* on Necroaa the i And articles aa well aa trial Trauuna* School, and bee*.-: -a^ retaUooa with aluaui which she conducta Na pr asad en t. She started a onetkeir err.ployera and fellow wurr>"hiraow Oe/nder. a lead* wonun campaum for fund ^.at ers iX.-:r, World War II. the %  %  rrt> -.* -paper in the froan door to door. To help out Courefl worked for the admission iarreat city in the United she often sola fnea fish and of N>cro women into all hranchaa Her prose is ptcturaa q ue iweet-potato pses No cook herof '*he •vrvice on the aame basis and poeUr whan she urgaa her self, she had fnenda provide that as other women. SabatquenUy. ,-.<.!* in %-crds such as thaac food, while she furnisned on* of Hr* Bcthuac became The only Be a Daniel Take a vow of her beat conwood.-i M sal a a m i n S*t \> *r*mbar of the women's count*. Be muiunl. Bui let the ship. At iha end of a tcasaoc nacoRvnlttee selected to chouee canweapons of determination be day she would waah out har dtda:** for the first omcera* r..uplerl with the armour of .usblouse, cut new cardboard solas trainm* school of the Women's tie* and forrjvenesa." for her shoaa. count her mooay. Arsmy Corps, Since the war the She tell* ine rtory r/ ner life ** bar pra>ers. and (o to sleep, council has worked for a broad• if-irvelatlon and aeif::ad for a new day. cned Social Security programme. reaper;. Mary Jane McLeod and a bill for the establishment riileanlh child la a family of IT. Money came in, but slowly & a permanent Fair Employment ws hf-m on a southern plantation Whan she invited the industrialist Practices Commission, on July 10. ltT5 Her parents had and aniUnttropuB. James N. been freed from slavery 10 years Garnb**. to vbat the school, her As director of the Division of earlier and had earned ve acres entered an office furnished only .\eejnj Affairs of the National of land a* ihetr own Mary was *>" wooden cra-e and a oh:ntr*Uon. she was 1! before the community had a "And where is trus school of th only member of her race in Kbnol for I**s*ro children, a onewh ** yo * %  me to be a trustha. oraanuauon at a top level, room building established by the tec" in 1938. typical of the seven MisaKrf^ of the Presby0*mb* dernawlad. years she spent with the adminlenan ChurchShe walked 10 _, .... ^^. Iha travelled 35.000 T.pr %  aaaaeii ,: Y .. n the Mssiansponsored nroajrarrim<-< But they know that what they hear from Miss Ssektj from Radio rree JEurope l. "rie* know her voice and they remember ner -<• war. r*rom 1M3 when Budip-.' tba German*. Beats tftjaaj s 19 year-";n tuden! used to h:de m the bath to M t^r BBC She transcr .o news and ran ner -wn monitoring service with the help of a few achoo. times I was p pr-.son tw-twrrn 1943 and thr 4 the war." the said. 'But they never found the radio and I would never tell them who workd with me I .;ved alone with my motfcrr and they imprLsoned her. too. :n an effort to make me talk. When the end of th<> ajar Beata was elected a paJ counc.ior Bu'tapcst But in iMd she was warned o friends that jKswssuai contemp.af-^j h-r disappearance '" I got a few indirect hints *a not beloved by the mists." is the way she She obtained a studeot visa for Holland, and frorr rnere got to England HT mother followed IP IM9 If saasws (triage "It seems strange to think that onte I hid In the bath to listen to London In peat, and now many prop.. do the same thing to listen to me in London." she said to-day. Most of her broadcasts are mad' on a tape recorder and bras least to Hungary from Mun :h by Radio Free Europe. -I get massages from various underground channel., telling me that people listen, many people she said M I know the riskthey take, and I am proud that they risk their lives to hear me tell them the truth." LMS01 rrc, H S*-r* What's Cooking In The Kitchen ? 50 beautJfufljr easy. . so easily beautiful mileearn dav to attend classes. Ir. n.;. :r.irjt. -:..: nuic rain aa* 10 iiinn IIIBO. ,, .Iht her older ""g g? "I^>1 r >oui.%  flai *1 • ^*2 W "Y^y T"iS e Center. address 41 meetings In K dedicated *i Youth — e-enter.. and made three comFlniahlna the arhool'l •"". • dvl y !" *'* m "•"" %  addreoei—all this at mane, .he had no place !" <*• *" 0 ', b f* rt '" !" "IS he an of M. At the United u. en urn bark to the eoatae. fSeld. f n """' J" "*"• '" >*** Nation. Conference In San Franmornmj as the %  forrnar iro> •choil for erU ,,„„ ,„ 1M5 lhe wu her *'*J„ InCT !" "C tri "" tff man •on.ulunt to the Airam f'.rmet iwcher apfeared AnoMier lnatil"te J" ""T. Bnunekauon After wortdn* hours she fal KhaU llal br rad written Cookman OJlem At the lam* addressed 52 California meetings. r. thai *.#• time it began to receive finanthe Board of Mlasari •. M gtM n..„h to He. "-I !* j'~rjh' 2-s £f-!S: iJll.fr^"^^ Negro girl five for Negroes of the MethodiTesidenU of the United Suites. 'rrt one vou w •^Iscopal Church Todsy the, The \* diking cane she use* was here's more foam in BRYLFOAM THE Ot.OINAL CIEAH SHAMPOO IN A fUM know will make good." The girl who had been wlected was Mary fully accredited by the given her by Mrs. Eleanor RooscSouthern AawOraaAloa of Collegaa ve.t fconi the possessions of the and Secondary Schools. It has a late Pre s ident Franklin D. faculty of 100. Its 27 building* itoa>vctl. She rttst met Kuoaevelt later she boarded are dominateci. apvinximalely. b> v han it* *** Governor of the as] never wen on*> F^.th Roll. Its 1.0O0 regular atuSale of New York. When she to nde 140 miles lo She southern dents Include tnree < %  .c-l him in later years at the city of Concord. North Carolina. Nigeria who are sons of tribal Whit* House. America's official where she studied at Scotia chiefs. Sixty-five per cent, of it* I'i->iour hand until it I has covered thi, some more oil on the top and 'spread It with your hands. Cut [the garlic in small |Hf> put it Ion top of the piiza. then put Iht [ whole tomatoes, sprinkle some salt, and some dry marjoram Put it in a hot oven for about 20 minutes or half an hour Serve won her afjaw He* .%  r for yourself' hot. If you don't like garlic or* olive oil. you can use 'ard and ln%  •tggkl of garlic you can put 2 tableipoonsful of grated cheese with] Pizzelle Alia Napolelana For 25 pizzelle Flour. 1) lb. Dry Yeast, I "It package Water 1 glass Pepper Garlic Oil or lard Marjoram Whole tomatoes Cheese Sift the flour on the kitchen table or pastry board. Put the dry yeast In a teacup of lukewarm water and let it dissolve. Put the yeast and a pinch of salt in the middle of the flour and work the dough like the other pizza, adding lukewarm water and working the dough until smooth Put In a bowl with flour at the bottom and leave it for two hours. When ready cut the dough In small %  ue of an egg, even each piece with your hands and make smull pi//c Put some oil or lard Lag pan and when boiling hot put the small piz/e .nid let them fry* until they are golden on both sides Prepare a tomato sauce Put a liny bit of olive oil in a saucepan, add two pieces of garlic and let It fry. take it out and add the tin of whole tomatoes and some salt, let it cook until the sauce Is quite thick and then add a pinch of marjoram Pour a .ful of the sauce on each plzzela and serve them hoi. If you dont like olive oil or garlic, the sauce can be made wltn butter or margarine, tomatoes and 2 tablespoonsful of cheese. For 0 people: Flour. 1 lb. Dry Yeast. J Sail package OUve OU Cheese. 4 tablePepper spoonsful Ham. 3 oz. Lard Tomato sauce Work the dough like that for lh* pizza and the pizzelle and leave It in a warm place for about 2 hours. Grate 2 tablcspoonsf ul of cheese and cul the ham in very small pieces. Add a tiny bit of butter, a pinch of salt, pepper and mix it all. When dough u ready, put it on the pastry board or the kitchen tablg. Roil it with the rolling pin until It becomes like a dlse with a diameter of 17 inches, and 1 inch thick. Take a piece of lard and spread it evenly with your nand all over the disc; take the mixture of ham. cheese, butter, salt and pepper and nut it on half of the disc spreading It evenly. Close the disc with the other half and with your hands press the sides. Put It in the oven for about 20 minutes or half an hour. When cooked >ou can serve ii with .i lomalo sauce seasoned with a bit of olive oil. salt and pepper. For any age—a I any time . tli.. nil alw I be Tours, '.uaraiit.-.-,' I .il.n. that h pasfact fag the occaxinu. Notbinr ran tu. Ii il.venalflr. Isajadweannje tat.., (of irrit sQkd biaM) „i . xt-ir. UUra -ir. ,.l..vbapp) ,,, rrjdfA I aswaga, l.e.auT ihcy as* a prMtatd %  tbsrj .r. oretlv . TOHK iLCO, I •• a bssflfwi lew a! Bss4*aaW tatsafkasea, h <..M..a.i. ...r again. lr.,,j llf ,t. (,. .|. aaakSSw. fOSUUlCO BOsen | m tM at *a. ...|„..r. ami 'I'lisliir.il |.MI,I. — all ,r.,.,.,K | .,,i-..,,.,,KOII1 \. ii... rtsji % %  !.i •ajkaaaftaH i leJsaawassi at nir>i I la> ..II tl. flag* H pi i -t-r. I* |..r(. lion In %  djartr...,,. I, .-V3 • TDK T.HITA1. II VlllNII t All good, pall kj ir.I saSfSSS] nJ brariai ih-> %  aglelataa isaaa mark natag %  >• ifce w-eJ i a TOC.f.l ra..m t rr ( n.rulrl by llIgapii y ami an.arranlrgl I.. B*vt .*n-fa.|. M s i I'l aiasi latsssafe ssn 4 (%  I i .1 ail laaaass it .* ipfued id' BBBM aaa aai las BBM laaaiaid m mal. ag-ui*. TOOTAL^^".-" pu/v, scfemffk KI IM issuneri >r. h t -luycim'smilk,produced under avkfosji vinit.r. onditiony. >cs, and the spctialls-packcd tin p< -./. M IM so lhac you £Ct milk ,s fine a-, rh. I(JV it left the farm. Buy KLIM-nulk ilui yosj taq alwavy depend upon for its •*hiKinKiiess ggaj ptlricyl ^VKLIM IS PURE, SAFE MILK |2J KLIM heaps w.tl o .' retriqerorion |3f KLIMquolity isolwayt uniform [T] KLIM li eicallcn* for growing children £§] KLIMaddtnour-.-mmf te cooked d,*h*t r*j tnihii % % %  iiwhigsjfiiifgiw>i| [7[ KLIM is sofa in the tpocially-pockadtia |tj KLIM is produced under strictest control if \ •^ Toke cure wolar. odd KUM, it.. \ f\ ond you have pjre, tofe milk KLIM ear* safe MILK This'll Interest You... By B illium torn'* Stvwtirl We sat on the g.i. • bang for llsh. Any kind P'SS l0 v P" 1 ^ " *un and of ti,h Mr. Elebash is not puiticutalked. So far as I can recall, it l*r. Like me. I'm not particular was the unexpected chugging of either but the difference is I don't I an outboard engine that had first catch "em. And after that it'll be attracted my attention. After aU. off lo New York to end you'J 1 down there on the hot sands witn think, a fairly extensive vacation, the time rising midday and hardWell it does end it, even for Mr ly a soul around, the busy chugand Mrs. Elebash, until early chug of an outboard needed som. July (we're still in the same t e *Pl*na"nyear) when it'll be pack-up time v^^S ey s. P 1 E baS ^ 2* N **' wuuld n • '"• franc or York although it seemed lhat city semewhere to San FrancUco. i and state was more of a postal j i af new iravc's ddress than anything else. You Fr ..., : ,„. [il( P W lto#n see. Mr. Elebash and his wife will steam the Rlebaihs to silvery ame here from St. Thomas in Hawaii for %  brief stop-over before 'he Virgin Islands quite recently. g„,nr on to Tokyo. About now. ai-d should, by rights, be endlni; you'll Rather, the trip is getting iheir Caribbean vacation wit.'i i,i| r |y well under way. maybe %  look-in ut St. Thomas • on the way home. Th.Elvbastu plan to leave Well, they're going to look injapan by way of Kobe en route alright, and pick up a charter to China and Hong-Kong and go and spend .',: '. dMJr| rnn to Manila In the Philippn GALA OF LONDON'S mwm [pi/iiKi! and from there teturn to Hawaii and Honolulu where they'll spend two or three weeks covering these beautiful islands. With a line disregard for the body nolilic Mr and Mrs. Baisley P. Elebash will ignore the President Wilson In favour of the equally luxurious President Cleveland for their return to tho Pacific Coast and San Francisco. It'll be a car after that, to Los Angeles then home to NewYork (remember?) via the streamliner Santa Fa Express. We continued to sip cool drinks and sit out of the sun. I'd got bogged 'town ganktWnCtw in China and was slow in boarding thnt home-iH.i.iui Santa Fy I looked again at Balaley P. H'i-a-r, and hl charming wife. Thrse were delightful people ana it was hard to think of them doing anvthiiut else but Just sitting hc\with me In Barbados. Unhurried slow spoken, kind and hospitable tn their little beach house, they'd been around and about this planet more times than I'd have thought pnaaJhll So it's a fair compliment to Barbados when globe spanners of the Elebash calibre come around these parts year after year and never tire of this small isle, its sunshine and its people. And before they leave, somewhere in the confusing list of continents and peoples comprising the El-bash navel ,:.tlnerary for 1953. there'll b the Caribbean and Barlwdcs. 'IRS? IN PKrffliNCI THI WORLD OVII fce&klThr T,,,, Truth •„ Give your skin a new tint -. change your complexion tone at will with Gala Face Colour.' GalaTinted Foundations are made to suit every type of skin, each has Its "vitehine Powder. Follow the Gala Colour Plan to tie f.t.hion right. Key lips to dothei with Gad Lipstick or Lip 1 ine. Mitch nails to lips Wtth Gala's jewel-bright Nail Colours, and see that you • i .* a perfect skin by using Gila Face Creams. GALA OF LONDON Sot* *fe/.i an4 0 ttrrftuior; F. S. NICHOLLS, P.O.SOX 2*1 Your Horoscope Would trni Ilk* lo know what 11.r Stan indicate for you* Would yea ..*.• to taai tttr iha aVklil o( Pundit Tabor r India's mo* tamou* • %  *-m-#— •> %  hi t anclenl mrmi uaaful i hat built •"".Me I UonTha To poDuUrue hn lyssorr. Tbor %  end uur AMtal Imnpi'i-lion If you forward him lour lull namr 'klr. Mrs or kins addrww and dais ->' birth all ilosrty • nilaa by yunlr. Ha rtumay wantad BW Aitrnlodlcal Wotk. nwusv rv.. but *nd 1 IP Srrti.t. Portal Order for •UrU€ary. tasOsssraSsis and other InUTe-tms BSnast Se amaied at Iha rrnurkabl* acruiao of hi* lUlfinmt. about you and yoar aiTalrr; Write now > %  Oils orTrr njv r %  ba mad* asain rtu: FWDIT TAnc-HX. iDept 111-D Upprr Forirv. SDMI Boitbay %t. kndla. Posuur* to I"di. it cc- f>










ESTABLISHED 1895

ed







Likely Late This Year

LONDON, Feb. 16.

The Coronation oi Queen Elizabeth I, although not
yet officially ahnounced, is likely to take place in late Sep-
tember or early October, according to authority close to

the Royal Family. dit.is said

the new Queen is determined

to carry out the thrice postponed tour of Australia as soon
as possible, but she would want to go as a crowned sov-



ereign and not in the interim period before Coronation. Carlisle Bay yesterday though
After the ordeal of yesterday's —— rough seemed not to give the
ee through London and 9 platitest rock to me oan |
the funeral for King George VI, Pl French touris. liner Liberte, |
Queen Elizabeth was spenable ane Uu airs biggest tourist ship in (
the day quietly at Clarence House wo Id p which arrived in port
while the Queen Mother and O ° oo at Lape via Martinique
Princess Margaret were at Buck- Tr anis S CO ee. eee
ingham Palace. Queen Juliana e So gigantic is the Liberte that
and Prince Bernhard of the her builders _Blohm & Voss o
Netherlands returned to Holland = Hamburg, Germany, did not fi
mae . ;her With an accommodation lad-
to-day, but most of other Royal ee ures Jer for passengers to disembark |
and distinguished visitors were nto atl “aentone ths pasa
staying in England at least over'| The Barbados Light Aeroplane} gers would obviously be exhaus
the week end. Club have organised a_ series of | ted before they got half-way |
i. ‘ -. weekly lectures, the first of whichi}down the ladder. And coming
No Public Appearances takes place at the Y.M.P.C, on{up would be “worse
The new Queen will very; Thursday, February 2ist at 8 p.m,| The Liberte was built for
seldom be seen in public during)This will be in the nature of an! operating alongside piers and}
the mourning period through May/jiintroductory talk which will be, with no deep water harbour at
3st, | given by Wing Comdr. L. A.! 3arbados, the 384-ton French}

moral in Scotland in spring

For lively Princess Margaret
court mourning will mean she’
will forego all her frequent ap-
pearances at theatres, balls and
public restaurants. If Elizabeth is
crowned in autumn it will be the,
first time in 200 years -that a
Coronation has been held in th<
same year of the death of the
previous Sovereign. But Royal
authority said it was more than
likely that the ceremony would
be held in the Fail. Queen Eliza-
beth would want to make the
tour of Australia in what are the
summer months in the Southero
Hemisphere, So if the tour is not;
to be postponed for two years,
the Coronation would have to be
held in 1952. Britain will want 10}
have the Coronation ceremony in|
mild weather here. Secondly but
quite an important comakléeniican|
is the hundreds of thousands of)
tourists it will attract to the Brit-
ish Isles. And very important is
the fact that Queen Elizabeth is
known to want several more chil-
dren,

This Royal obligation in bear-
mg a Ta*geYmily cannot begin
until the : tour is =
cluded,







She is expected to go to “a






Egglesfield, Director General

Civil Aviation in this area, follow-' platform
a resumé and progress re-

ed by

t of the club since its inception
Â¥ Mr, Wood Goddard, chairman
of the Club's Committee of Man-
agement.

The British Council have
at the club’s disposal a series of
six films on the theory of flying.



The edition is entitled “Why an
aeroplane flies’.
Three of these films will be



shown on Tuesday February 26th
at the British Council’s head-
quarters “Wakefield” after which
questions from the audience will
be answered by Mr, Goddard.

On the following Tuesday
(March 4th) the remaining three
films will be shown at the Brit-
ish Council and on this occasion
Mr. Stanton Toppin will answer
questions. Weekly lectures will
then continue every Thursday at
the Y.M.P.C., beginning at 3
o'clock,

C

Airmanship

There will be three lectures on
airmanship by Mr. Dennis Malone,
Mr, Stanton Toppin and Mr.

ane airframes bo Mee "Roa Mase

Kenzie, T.C.A’s Resident Engin-

London seemed peculiarly busi-| cer; compass and intruments, Mr,

ness like to-day after the great
pomp of yesterday’s funeral pro-
cession, At Windsor a large crowd



Castle from early in: the morning

Dennis Malone; two lectures on
navigation given by Mr. E, W.
Barrow, M.C.P.; three on meteor-

the pilot’s point of view) and one

put, s|
; though built to tend the tourist





‘



with buntings the
minded: Barbadians
'Frenc ourist lin

“Liberte”

Arrives

for the
disembark. The

passengers

Ptnta, a



of: motor vessel Pinta was the ideal |

to

smal

BARBA



{ This is how

| “Pinta’s” dock and then

long

freighter, came to Barbados from |

Martinique the day

this: job.

Tied up alongside the port side |

before to do}

of the Liberte, the Pinta was

liner. Her
Liberte's

he

deck
door
passengers

through
came,

reached
wh
A

the
ich

landing |
shoot fitted with rolling pins to|

cun smosethly as she rocked, was

almost
deck.

at right

A wooden platrorm with

angles

with |

ver

ilis

was built from the landing shoot

seading

to the Pinta’s

acco

modation ladder, from which th

passengers

s epped

into

local

faunches that were making regu-

lar trips
Of

ashore.

the 739 passengers,

ovel

400 came ashore and about 200

went
tour.
country rides or
Bridgetown, They
bit of spending.

on

the usual
The others hired taxis for,
in

!

shopped

did quite

organised

a

Painted black and _ bedecked

Liberte

7e-

of the once

er Normandic

which was similarly tended by
the French passenger ship Duc
D’Aumale when she was here in
1939. The Liberte is the biggest .
tourist ship to call at Barbados'| We WESC PER. UE She: reity trere
lined outside the walls of the! ology two by Mr. Barrow (from!sirce the Normandie.

to see the magnificent display of| by Mr. Evelyn Reece, Manager of |Baggage Warehouse

flowers and wreaths sparkling
like inulti-coloured gems on the
green lawns around St. George’:
Chapel where George VI. was bur-
ied yesterds y. The Commons wil!
meet again on Tuesday to arrange
for the continuance of Foreign
Policy deb:

te broken off on Febru- ;
ary 6th, the day Winston Churchill |

Three Houses Factory, St. Philip,

who will talk on local weather
conditions etc.; and two by
Squadron Leader David Hender-

son, Government Airport Mana-
ger, on airport control and_ ait
regulations, These lectures are
expected to last until about June.

Mr. Goddard told the Advocate

was to reply to heated attacks yesterday that the ‘plane for the
from Socialists on how far he |club had been ordered and the
had committed Britain to follow letter of credit forwarded, The

the United States’ line in Far
Eastern Policy. }
Duke Visits Mother |

The Duke of Windsor is stay-

ing with his mother Queen Mary
at Marlborough House, The length
of his stay is indefinite. One of
the matters which must be settled
is his salary. |
had given the

The late King
Duke a regular annual income
reportedly £25,000 but it ended

on the death of George VI. Queen!
Elizabeth will decide on what}
arrangements are to be made for}
the Duke.—U.P. |

|
OIL DISPUTE
DEADLOCKED

LONDON, Feb. 16.
Big Three Foreign . Ministers
Saturday invited Chancellor Kon-
rad Adenauer to join their con-
ference in their hopes of ending
the Franco-German dispute which
threatens to wreck the Western

Europeag. Defence plans.
U.P.



| Jaerques

‘plane it is hoped will arrive in
Barbados about April. Mr. A. R.
Toppin he said, had accepted the
post of Hon. President of the
club and Mr. Jack Skinner (one
of the pioneers of local flying) the
post of Hon. Vice President; both
of them will be attending the
meeting on February 2\st,

Killed In Accident

PARIS, Feb. 15.
For six years a French army
deserter and Nazi collaborator
lived under the assumed name of
Tacnet and eventually
became a deputy known as
Jacques Ducreux in the all pow-
erful National Assembly only to
be unveiled in death. Police said
Ducreux who was a Radical So-
cialist Deputy of the Vosges De-
partment and was killed recently
in an automobile accident has
been sought by all French Police
stations for desertion and collabo-

ration with the Vichy Regime.

P.



WELL DONE

Tourists poured through the|
during the;

jafternoon to get back aboard for
the Liberte to sail later in the
fternoon. She is bound for Rio
via Bahin where her passengers |

|

will spend four days fer Car

From Rio she will
at Port-of-Spain and Narsau be

fore going back to New York +

March 10



make c¢



3,000 Cram St.
John’s Cathedral

ival|

1)
a]

», ended here





|

_ British Bar
Trains

f (By PETER WEBS)
BRITISH HEADQUARTERS,
Suez Canal Zone, Feb. 16
The British barred all Egyptiar
,food and oil trains from passing
‘through the Suez Canal Zone, on
Saturday in retaliation for ne
of British oil trains Friday nig)
(A spokesman for Lieut. ‘George Erskine, British Com-
jmander of the Zone said the bat
{would .continue in force ynt
|Egyptian railway crews cleared

| Port Said - Ismailia line and all
British

been made

treffic delays have

U.P.

rail
up



} GRENADA, Fet
The Administrator n
discuss
| topics including a drat
ing rules and orderg for
{sion to the legislatures
;ment of a public
| sion, Windwards’
scheme, means
} Agricultural and
ment and preparation of st

ervic commi

bro

|
Conference Exids |
|
|



of accelerating



other deve ic

{From Our Cwn Correspondent material both for proposed feder
ANTIGUA, Feb. 16 ition talk: in L as and oth
A representative gathering of purposes,
over 3,000 people crammed St.! At different stage F. G. Ho
John’s Cathedral yesterday at of Nautilus Con pany atter
the commemoration service ' for discuss his scheme for i
his late Majesty King George V1 island shipping service ane 1
His Excellency Mr. K. W. Black- Bahr for recent B..WLA
burne lead the procession of! ments ir connection ;
officials from Government House servicing for Dominic
to the Cathedral, Vi ca

Vincent.



Spartan Beat Carlton 2—1
As Soccer Season Opens

SPARTAN won their first engagement when the B A.F.A

1952 season opened yesterday evening, defeating

Carlton

2—1. The winning goal came a few seconds before the
final whistle when Boyce the outside left converted a fine
centre by Van Ganderen who played on the right wing.



“@udy” Warren, Carlton

custodian
season. Spartan last year’s Cup winners defeated Carlton the runners-up 2—1.

saving, when

Carlton met Spartan in the first game of the B.A.F.A

It was avery ‘auspicious start
for the Association as a crowd of
over 3,000 paid to see the first
game. The field too, was _ pre-
pared, for the time since football
matches were being played. at
Kensington, near the regulation
size.

a

Carlton touched off first, Spar-
tan kicking with the breeze and
defending the southern goal, and
it was immediately apparent that
the players would have to accus-
tom themselves to playing on a
proper-sized field. Both
bundled in the middle,
was some ten minutes
the wingmen realised that
were playing too far inside

The Black Rock team was
first to correct this, and after
they had spread out, they wert
able to use their long passes
advantage, this being evident
their many assaults on their
opponents who had to fight }
to defend their

Spartan tent
0 each

sides
and it
before
they

the

to

goal
till played ‘close
r nd soor Itor
Péynold Hutcet

inson wssed ‘o G Hutchinsor
who tried ; t it custodian
Wood no fail to gather, and
Peppy Hutchinson made no mi

take with h next trs

The interval ¢





me with tt



DOS, FEBR*'ARY 17, 3962

Queen To Tour Austrz!

Crowning Ceremony

SS. LOSE AND P



to Weal

Winter Turned To
Spring In Windsor

Sunday Advocate





TA



the 384-ton motor vessel “Pinta” looked alongside the 51,840-ton French tourist liner
“Liberte” in Carlisle Bay yesterday. Passengers are landing from the port door of the “Liberte” to the

launches. The “Liberte” is 890 feet long and the “Pinta” 207 feet

(By REBECCA WEST) |
WINDSOR, England, Feb, 15 }

® morning of the King’s funeral was gently grey. |

aeie was light fog on the lowlands round Windsor and
whe sky was veiled, The weather has been so bad lately
@hat there are grey seagulls in every field. The great wall]

and round tower 6f Windsor Castle were dark shapes
through mist and indeed they are built of a stone that’s |
coldly grey. But once within the Castle, winter seemed to |
have gone, for there were flowers everywhere.

: Flowers sent to King George |
~\imed the great steps up to St. |
yecrge’s Chapel, They. lay.on the
grass under the walls of
Chapel. They were piled up in
cloisters, They filled the archways
jand arcades. Many of them were
very elaborate, A Mayor and Cor+
poration would send the Coat of

Travelling





Bank Service









}
| Arms of the town they represented

. | worked in flowers, P the ae
> il » } thing as a man or factory staff
ori Ine | wouta send a crown two or three

‘ 2 feet across, j

Th year the Management it| |
the Government Saving Bank Little Flowers }
h fecided reluctantiy not oO ' |
end out the Travelling Office But many of them consisted of |
This decision, Mr, Roberts, Man-| only three or aataean ora bune)

f the Bank said, was reached| of snowdrops falling into a cave-
on account of the resent introduc-| gory that will make some of u: |
tion of a Machine System fo:|always think of King George's |
keeping Depositors’ accounts death as a time of little flowers. |

They gradually made their appear- |

With this new Machine Systen:,| ance (the little flowers) during the
it would mean that the book {\lying-in-state which oddly encugh
wepositors would have to be seat; became a much bigger thing as it
© the Head Ofitce in Bridgetown| went on. Many men and women
or the deposits to be entered by{not given to moving much of thei
Machine, and then returned .0o}routine read in the papers about
he depositors through the pos'.]/}ying-in-state and said to them-

; procedure, the Manager sait,iselves: “it seems thing to

bably not be accepta-|go and pay our ay to our

he most of the depositor King. We will do it too, if other

é : people can wait three, four or five
inconvenience hours; well so can we”

Duris the past three yea So more and more jcined the
a gC ee gar tA ETS, fe Jine . outside Westminster Hall |
P ee ee Ok ae nee uatil it became something prodi- |
a8 Ad provided 7 Travelling gious, vaster than the ordinary |
ffice to it the principal sug phenomena of everyday life It |
factor ies in the island. during t emed as if two rivers were flow- |
reaping of the sugar cane cror ine gids by side, one the Thame. |

THis service was provided on its way to the sea and one lin |
make it eas’ for those who we. -| Of men and women on the way to)
already depositors to save part of| see their King lying in the seat of
their -carnings, as well to e,-| Government. And as this rive: |
courage others to do the same. | 8r@w larger there began to be a

| queer business about flowers.

It is realised that the prese It was not explicitly said that
ecision may cause some incor-| there might be no flowers left
venience to those who previously! inside the colntelaags, tat bg Be
ised the service, as well as to, should be no wreaths left in
those who may have intended) Westminster Hall except thore
doing so, Consequently the Man- | sent by the Royal family. But obvi-

|

by |

ard
|

core 1—0 in favour of Carlton |



had been otherwise dul

on lL thrill

@ On Page 16

agement are taking steps in the; ously it would have to be forbidden
endeavour to provide alternative) if lots of people had started bring.
facilities, and trust that the reason| ing big bunches and sprays and
for discontinuing the service at)wreaths of their own.

present and their subsequent So there was a queer kind of
action will be appreciated. bootlegging of flowers, the peo-
ple brought in little bunches of
flowers, snowdrops and violets
and straight slim staff like tulips
and narecissi hidden under their
coats and dropped them on the
floor as they were passing.



On Other Pages

Page 2° Carib Calling, tour-

ist “Liberte” Well here they were again
yo Cinema, Farm & lying in strength on the ground
Garden, B.B.C. notes and in the cloisters of St.

& Programme, Gar- George's Chapel because people
dening hints for Ama~ loved him. Large and small of-
teurs. ferings made a blaze of golden

4 Bookie, O.S.C. Racing daffodils, scarlet tulips, blue

Gallops, Table Tenni
5 Regatta, Chatson
Swimming, Cycling.

irises, white carnations, red and
white anemones and some
astounding roses very startling








, 6 Mary McLeod; Buda- under a grey sky at the base of
pest listens info Lon- grey walls.
don Voice. And people were going in and
The blonde woman out looking at them; the people
hose name Taboo, who were admitted to the castle
yman who enclosure people who have ties
houlc never have vith the castle ind held = posts
rried, within t or were soldiers or
Editorials, Si.ting on ailors or officials or their kir
the Fence What
wanted, Grave People
9 Funeral of King | They were grave controlled
George VI i people of the type that takes ser-
10 Seout it Caomber- vice under the crown, and the King
1ere Camp _ Fire liked that sort of person. He knew
College their value to England and to him
Golde There i something appropriate
| about eeing them there where the
= k who bore control so weil was}
otr helped by them to live hi fe of
“ l¢ ff il care
i j

@ On Page 9



ia After Coronation

, cutting tracks in more than sixty

TD frosee



PRICE :

SIX CENTS



-,|Korean Truce

May Be Solved
As U.N. Want

By. ARTHUR DIBBLE

PANN IJOM, Feb. 46.
The Allies are close to winning the K<*,of armistice they
wanted for Korea. Only three major isbels must be solved
befere the United Nations’ Supreme Commander Gen. Ridg-
wey, North Korean Kim El Sung and Chinese Gen. Peng Teh
Huai scratch their names oh the armistice daeument in this

unlikely truce village of Panmunjom.
* They are

2 2 } Allied demand for a ban on
Fifth Air rehahilit are ywnd " peconsttustibn
if airfields to minimize the chances

y of

Farce Bomb \’
e .
Bridges

STH ATR FORCE H’'QRS.,

Korea, Feb. 16
A spokesman said fighter-bomb-
ers slashed at North Korean rail
lines bombing two rail bridges and

sneak attacks on South Korea.

repatriation for
war prisoners This Allied de-
mand is designed to give Anti-
Communist prisoners a chance to
escape or return-to life under Red
naster

2. Voluntary

3. Communist d@manas for dis-
cussion at a high level Peace con-
ference following the armistice, of
411 the assorted problems of Asia.

places, F.80 Shooting Stars hit rail] The U.N. insists upon limiting

bridges at Sunchon and nea: discussion to Korean problems

Huichon inflicting “heavy dam- ? at P|

age” in attacks Few Can Tell
Two F.86 Sabrejets exchanged ny at ‘ :
liring passes with two Communi: pry A Baenter 4 dMonstacsetass oc Pipher
MIG 16's over “MIG Alley” this} he U.N. and Communist High
‘afternoon. but no claims were|COmmands could accurately tell
made pending examination of gun | 10W these issues ultimately will be
camera films. Other Sabres flying } settled But the Allies at one
as a screening force for fighter-] “tee of the negotiations indicated
bombers sighted about 75 Red jets hey mighe settle the airfield issue
ith a verbal promise trom the
The Fifth Air Force flew 466]Communists that they would not
effective sorties by 6 p.m. to-day. }build up theiy ‘air capabilities”
Claimed as destroyed or damaged Jduring the armictice Rear Ad-
were two rail bridges, two box}miral R. FE. Libby tole cor-
| cars three vehicles and seven sup- pond revently ihe \llie
rly buildings. would rather have no armistice
“U.P. [than give up ! vol

untary repatriation



Though the numbers of prison-
rs are likely to be large the
principle is considered to he one
of the most important of the en-
tire armistice negotiations.

Reds Are Stalling

not

Siege Of Wonsan
Continues

TOKYO, Feb.. 16,
The longest siege in United
States naval history entered the

second year to-day with warships The U.N. Command brodcast
of the United Nations banging)®*d Red negotiators at Panmun-
steadily away at the most shot-at}jom were stalling while the
| ity in the world—Wonsan-—at the | mremlin tried to aecide

rate of 22 sheils per hour. 1. “Whether to insist on the

sight

buud

in North Korea during

bon,

Day and night warships of nine]. .” pases





nations nave roueee weraen ial the truce
‘ion pounds of exploding steel into : 7 ee

he bax coast ant city. Wonsan 2 Whether to agree to allow
former industrial centre and still {Voluntary repatriation of wat
‘he hub of the rail and road ne! }! 'soners.

hat leads into Communist batile 3. “Whether to insist that sub-
positions was placed under sien: equent governmental settlement
by U.N blockading and escori |must include talks about r
force February 16th, 1951 problems not directly related to

Korea,”

Ships of. all sizes, from battle The b-oadeast said, “when the
ships and carriers to minesweepers | decicion is made in Moscow, the
and frigates have joined in the ‘ymistice will be tesolved with.

ioge, They come from the navie
¢f the United State, Britain, | the
Netheriands, Australia, New Zea-

delay one way or anoth-
is now at the point

out muc
er and Moscoy,





a

land, Canada, Vhailand, the Re- shere it m m ke that much
public of Korea and Colombia postponcd choice
U.P. ostponed ch '"—U.P,

mer ne
——>_—— eee







Hat

5
E

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THE ALL-STEEL BICYCLE
A wide variety of models

and |

it
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ready assembled for you

to take away. See our

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CAVE SHEPHERD & Co, Ltd.

10, 11, 12 & 13 Bread Street




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4 PAODUCT OV BaLkigs (NDUSTRI 4 LOOTSD, HOTTINGRAM ENGLAND

FITTED WIT@ STURMEY-AROHER & OR 4-SPEGED GAR
aa 1

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SlCr,
PAGE TWO

1952

FEBRUARY 1/7,

SUNDAY ADVOCATE SUNDAY,



e” 4 ° | 2 Ws
‘Soaping dulls hair_ iI “Presidalt of Siaton. Herth
Penns¥ivania ahd i
Halo glorifies it!
+ Zu









h4.G.%4. G1 ORE 70th Century Fox |

Tonite 8.30 p.m. LAST SHOWING OF

1¢ ompany,

ister Miss Sarah McDowell were
;among the cruise passengers who
arrived heré yesterday morning on
the French Liner Liberte. Travel-
ling with them in their party were
Mr. C. B. Lartz, General Manage
of the Sharon Herald and Mrs.
|Lartz and Mr. Henry O. Forker







HALO leaves your
hair wonderfully soft

and easy to manage. | Jnr., Secretary of the Buhl
Foundation and Mrs. Forker.

Mr. MéDowell and Mr. Laftz

HALO makes your | were both in Barbados 14 yéars

permonents take ~ || |ago. They both told Carib that

better — last longer! they had noted mafiy impfove-



|} ments on the island.
| One thing that impressed them
particularly was the cleanliness of
the streets which were well kept
and looked very much like those
back in the U.S.A.

This is about thé seventh visit
to the Caribbeah for Mr. Lartz,
while for Mr. MeDowell it is his
third visit. They said that they
like it down here as the ¢limate
was wonderful and the wediher
good. When they left the U.S.A.
the température was 42° F.

Americans on the Liberte

HALO REVEALS
THE HIDDEN BEAUTY
OF YOUR HAIR





HALO SHAMPOO

isao ¥

r ‘
TOMORROW (MONDAY) and TUESDAY 4.45 & 8.30 p.m.
A DOUBLE YOU'LL JUST LOVE

Ey
A Diary of ee :











MONG thé matty Ameritans
a ry > 4Rmaking the crtiise on the
Under ahr: E M P i R E Liberte are Mr. Perry Rosenberg,
| Advertising Manager, Néw York
TO-DAY 4.45 & 8.30 And Continuing Daily | Journal merican; Mr. Jiilius
enue " wa | ovine, owner of Briss Rail
NG A: © serena 3 ,| Restatirants, New York 4n a
NOW AT POPULAR PRICES |Mre. Levine; Mr. Raymota J
;| Bushey, President Bushey and Seen chatting at the Baggage Warehouse yesterday were, left to right: General Vidmer, Mrs. Ray

| Sons, Drydocks and Shipyards,
= | Brookiyh, N.Y.; Mr. George W.
|| Foy, Néw York States Assembly-
}fian and Mrs, Foy; Mr. Harty L.
Kagan, Presidetit Eagle Paper
Company, Chieago Til; Mr, Ed-
mund Price, President Solar Air-

Manbert and Mr. Gordon B. MacGillivray. : :
om ‘Mr. MacGillivray who is head of the Toronto Real Estate Exthange was intransit through Barbado

yesterday on the French luxury liner “Liberte.” Mrs. Matibért who is holidaying in Barbados also comes
from Toronto.

Exhibition Opens

JOSE J FERRER

Academy Award Winner Married Yesterday

ISS IRMA GILBERT who i

Women In The News





AATISS Kay Austin who has becu

2 «-- because... é yicraft, San Diego, California and This Week 4 Editorial Secretary at the on the staff of B.W.LA. in
when his | Mrs. Price; Mr. Harold Pp. Herman, RS FELA DE KUH’S Annual Barbados Advocate has now been Trinidad was married yesterday
member of Hempstead, L.L., City Exhibitio f her paintings transferred to the Repoftorial afternoon at St. Matthias Church,
sword thrusts home ’ ; * RANOn CF Det painyings t A ni ; : ies inf
. Couneil, Mr. P. J, Dee, President, 244 drawings opens at her home Staff. Hastings to Mr. Reggie da Silva of
---aman dies. . . P| Allience Theatre Corporation, the pavilion,” Hastings on Tues- Kay thus has the Messrs. Y. de Lima and Co., Ltd.,

@ woman thrills! ie | Chicago, fl., and Mrs. Dee and gay February 19 and will con- distinction of be- Trinidad.
.|Mr. Alpha Whiton, Chairman of tinue for about two weeks. Mrs. ing the first “Wo- The ceremony which tock place

man Reporter” in
Barbados

The change will
enable the Advo-
cate to cater more
efficiently to the

the Board of Supervisors of Put-

nam County, New Yo.

: Meeting of Frietids

# M*â„¢ and Mrs. William F. Hof-
i mayer, who arrived in Bar-

shortly after 4.30 o’elock w
formed by Rev, Fred Layne.
The Bride, who was given in
marriage by Mr. Harold Bowen
Manager of the local branch of

de Kuh’s work is well known to per.
Barbados and she has been hold-
ing exhibitions here for over ten

years.







M-G-M presents

the mystery- thritier



jbados on January 23 by T.C.A.,
went on board the Liberte yes-
terday to meet friends from the
U.S.A. Mr. Hofmayer is a retired
Banker from Glenrock, Néw Jer-
\sey.

They were able to show their
friends about the island, some-
thing many tourists would have
keg. Mr. Hofmayer has spent 26

nters in Bermuda. He is staying
it the Rockley Beach Club.

Friend of a Friend
RS. FRIEDA SMITH of Tif-

Coming Event
oan understands that Club

No. 6 of the Girl’s Industrial
Union will be staging a Show at
the Union headquarters on Satur-
jay, 23rd February at 8.30 p.m.
Some of the artists taking part
are Rev. St. C. Tudor and Miss
Nell Hall. Following the Show
will be dancing to Keith Camp-
bell’s Orchestra, the Society Five
and also a Fashion Parade by the
Members of the Club,



need for news of
women, fashions,
children and so-
ciety.

Miss Austin will
cover events deal-
ing with such in-
stitutions as_ the
Miss Kay AustinY. W, C. A., the
Housecraft Centre, the G.1U.,
Baby Leagues and creches and
will be pleased to answer the calls
of Secretaries and other members
of such concerns,

Messrs. Y. de Lima and Co., Ltd.,
wore a gown of white slipper satin
with low cut neckline with lace
insertion. The dress was cut on
Princess lines with full gathered
skirt long tight fitting sleeves and
medium length train. Her head-
dress was made in juliet cap style
with finger-tip veil and she carried
a bouquet of two white orchids
with Queen Anne's Lace.

The Bestman was Mr. Ken
Isaacs and the Bridesmaid was
Miss Tecla Agostini both of whom









Ohio, was one of the wd over from Trinidad for the
Bergerac to arrive i s es- occasion. i
de terday bs ‘he thant tke Tee Miss Agostini wore a strapless
coer on her fifst visit to Barbados. lemon evloured net gown with net
MALA POWERS: aiifttie - aatatisies “=i, |She vee, “ery, iueh lapttened Tae saan wae tang cals ha ae
with Fort de France which she e skirt was lon, ull. Her
s+“ oe LES 7 ea er hae ee ae — ion Saturday. © headdress was a small hat trimmed
5 j Mrs. Smith is véry interested with violets and she carried a
POETRY AND DRAMA COMBINED rm figurines. While she was in the small bouquet of vander orchids.



yesterday she dropped in a
of the stores in search of

Extra: LATEST NEWSREEL

Btewe Joulton ee She is a friend of
E

||| TODAY To TUESDAY 4.45 & 8.30 P.M. a ie aan Mahan “doa
LIGHTNING STRIKES TWICE} g_ - ||: r-Tribune, who was in. Barbas|

tiser-Tribune, who was in Barba-
. ios last winter.

Lachary

SCOTT





After the ceremony, a reception
was held at the home of Mr, and
Mrs. Harold Bowen of Maxwells
and the honeymoon is being spent
at the Crane Hotel.







|







ROODAL THEATRES

Annual Dance
HERE are still. a

Richard Mercedes

TODD

oe McCAMBRIDGE i <= YE) Fak ae sap
B.B.C. Radio

TE eee ae



few more
















































INE pr

SPECIAL MON. $ an | tables around the ballroom of
7 >» x "| SXOW BOUND ; HIDDEN CTTY ! the Marine Hotel for the Women’s
EME ame E | ROXY Robert Long es NEWTON | 3 oan Jungie Ba A i Canadian Club’s dance on Satur-
; anhny Stvetiie anc ‘ q : tzel
iia) - AY ied XN & “DEAR MURDERER | “SUNDOWN ON T TRIE day February 23, Mrs. Teetzel
TO-DAY 4.45 & 8.30 TO-DAY TO TUESDAY peas wusDE SON THE FRA os Il I rogr ammes of the “Pavilion” Hastings is in
and Continuing Daily ns 2 = i SUNDAY, FEBRUARY 17. 195? charge of bookings.
. ca ; OISTIN The Garden| am. The Smalt Geography of a The Women’s Canadian Club's
Jose FERRER Margaret ‘O'BRIEN ts ” : Af A Dial 8464 G Al & Ty ST. JAMES) re ag as Bg annual dance is always one of the
“HER FIRST ROMANCE” T 145 & BM ys j te< sé = : : Pee nae best dances of the season. Includ-
in Stanley Kramer's and “NEVER TRUST Robert MITCHUM i T orrew 83) p= 5 26M 21 SM €d in the evening’s fun will be
A GAMBLER” WEERS B ANGER LIVES” « oe: BLUES susrees aa games of chance, bridge, Palmis-
Production of itd wil ae NE j| i©° GORCEY & The Bowery Bors & i @esd Strange hats and head-ties were the order of the day as tourists try and a flower shop.
taal B Starring ‘ia neers _ _“HEDDEN C3TY | om from the Liberte” landed at the Baggage Warehouse yesterday. The ‘
q Y R A N oO Am i abibthistihtdiblinin cite ie ac j Bomis The Ju~gie Boy | cs y head-tics these two ladies were wearing were no exceptions to the rule. Oil Man
ane C < Tues, & Wet 465 A tw pm | : : ' ot s MONG the ps ki
ae , sae d war Robert METCHL i tp Ps Tr ’ . + the passengers making
de Bergerac Cathy O'DONNELL ovr OF tan Past a i ROCKY” Rotty MeDowsll 4 sand Oi6 Schetors Bains French Art the cruise on the French
} THE se7 UP i = s . oF iERE will be a meeting of th« a Liner Lib hi nt r
— | —___—_——— Bote KYAX Jacke COUPER & decker COOGAN ate asain i” Stedinn tak Gan M- YLADIMIR NECHOUMOFF yesterday Mee ae, “Gear ae
c » : ROY AL ia SSS - - r’s Association at the schoo has Kindly consented to 4 G, Wood of Santa Barbara
OLY Ma i¢ 4 ms SSS : Radio | « I February 19th at e cture to members of the Alliance? California, Mr. Wood is a big
, wen “a ee. 17 rr > agend: des a Francaise at the British Council : iaeuks. °
LAST 2 SHOWS TO-DAY e he ars 'W > erinde ' BP genda include 7 aket a! v P * oil operator in California.
TO-DAY TO TUESDAY 430 & 8.15 a Just Arrired ... | 2090 oe rae ee ee | Se OE eee ee Stee eteus, yim on Wed- it was their first visit to the
Action’ Deutie i ue Ba . ) - ie of the British muncil, recor sabieat Gil’ ippentt island and they spent most of their
4.30 & 8.15 7 7 ' f BysTox music followed by the election o ubjec wi be rench time as guests of Mr. and Mrs.
NEW D) RESSES | ig Deapoodngeyones waa Mar
Gary COOPER | “eee eee ee rothers Hastings.
. 00
aa s |) 20S nan Porwened Porto, iim 32 R. JIM PASTER, merchant of Good Move Back to St. Lucia
Madeleine CARROLL in fi ee ee ~~ wow Swan Street, was at the ATS OFF to the B.A.F.A. who R. BRIGGS WILLIAMS who
THE GENERAL DIED fur 1o ib pm mm. ua wm | Baggage Warehouse yesterday have placed the football field is stationed in St. Lucia with

John © , morning to meet his brother, Mr. in such a position that all of the Barclays Bank is due to return to







a “SANDS OF IWO JDMA 5 . . s {| ae a ae ae cial ai The ; James Paster, a jeweller of Albury, spectators in the Kensington stand that colony today after spending
AT DAWN Cocktails of Weddings ‘ aie. tte SOs -New York who is making a cruise can see the entire game without two weeks’ holiday with his

i f : MON TUESDAY , - i} - the Week, 515 pm. Nights on the Liberte which anchored in having to stand. This was impos- family here.

£15 Ay ¢@ 9m Deniel Defoe. | Carliste Bay early in the morning. sible last season and previous
and Z Double sae ie also e a oe : Pgh aca ri seasons when the field was so Intransit
: 4 John WAYNE in iy yt Analysis, 7.15 p.t French Line Attorney close to the pavilion. Excited ] NTRANSIT through Barbados
CASSINO 10 KOREA | “wan or sur wan ; Or ee nee ae |PRAVELLING on the Liberte fans inte front rors would sana IU Vestenday makin ane tbee
i us CATS and “MOONRISE” {| ; \) $ re ae a anit which called here yesterday up to get a better view of play Carnival Cruise on the French
with { M1) 3 4 pm. Marx gnd his Heir 8.00 p.m. | was Mr. Frank Foley, Lawyer of in the corners of the field nearest Luxury Liner was Mr Gordon B
The First Wartime of } i Think on These Things, 6.18 p.m. Radio | waw york arid Attorney of the the pavilion. This forced every- ; ee

McGillivray, Head of the Toronto

The Fighting Men in Korea Real Estate Exchange.

Gale RUSSELL

French Lines in the U.S.A.

MACLEANS
PEROKUDIE TOOTH PASTE
keeps WEIN Wats Fb

p.m. Composer of the Week, 9.00 p.m one in the stang to stand up
From the Third Programe, 10.00 p.m
The News, 10.10 pm. From the Eadi- |
| torials, 10.15 pom Science Review, 10.30
p.m. Tip Top Tunes

|
RADIO NEWS |)
}

Dane CLARK—
\
\

{pm sreel, £30 p.m. African Survey, &45













A Fine Assortment to






















s select from. The most )) |
THE WOMEN’S Set”
- 1952.

—_——_

Radios and onions! we know ‘em
both! we service all makes of
radios, gratucte servicemen will
put your set in first class condition,
radios, graduate servicemen will
are fepatring yours, we don't
want you to miss o single moment
of rado enjoyment, when we
take your receiver to our shop
for Overhauling and repairs “ete,”
Wwe are equipped with modern in-+
struments for radid testing and
repairs, also A.C. or D.C. Ampli-
fiers made to order, call on us with
confidence

THE ACME RADIO REPAIR SHOP
78 ROEBUCK STREET
Nr. Moravian Church

J.B GULSTON®E,
Radio Tethhician,
Dial 4970

}
Sizes 12—20
In a Variety of Shades
Veivets, Tattetas |

CANADIAN CLUB

a

and healthy Ws,

Shot Taffetas, Sheers
Crepes, Satins

$18.00 = $29.7:

Annual Dance

in aid of
LOCAL CHARITY

Auspices of His Excellency the Governor
and Lady SAVAGE

wt

under the





RY : a} HATS AND BAGS a BARB. 51 IB :
at the to match any Ensemble if | ee eo ees
° ; . 2 hee | GENTLEMEN !
Marine Hotel NYLON STOCKINGS }% gay < cies YOU'LL BE SURE TO LOOKSMART IN THESE
— ON + 51 and 60 guage Hair Tonic RAYON SUITINGS

STRIPES



$3.89 — $3.
SATURDAY EVENING, February 23rd * aol Bom TONIC Pewgeenn . PLAIN SHADES ... . Bae $4.37
hair, Removes and prevents the @| WOOLLEN TROPICALS $6.66, $6.72, $7.00, $7.41

GAMES - further, development of | GENTS “RENOWN” SHIRTS
BRIDGE nna nian Tt leaves the hair soft and silky | WHITE steasenesteeeeeaeereeweeeaneeaneney seeeeeneeeee eens avetvieed $4.50 — $5.23
eer ‘ coe Ses Oe ae NTN bk ahd cedar caegideasiekslasociver $5.20, $5.57, $5.94
PALMISTRY MEN’S BUCKLE SHOES | oojncccccsssssssssoons .. $12.09
FLOWFR SHOP an MODERN DRESS SHOPPE ® JOHN WHITE SHOES IN PPOWN & BLACK $10.64 - $11.19
Ors. os y 4 4 ‘$C. CARLTON BROWNE 3:
|

ADMISSION $1.00



T. R. EVANS & WHITFIELDS

Dial 4220 YOUR SHOE STORES Dial 4606

Wholesale & Retail Druggist
136 Roebuck St. Dial 2813

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Oe a a ee a ee ee ee ee ee ee a ae a

SUNDAY, FEBRUARY



17, 1952

AT THE CINEMA=Hy G.R.



EDMOND ROSTAND’S romantic drama of the 17th
century “Cyrano de Bergerac” has had many famous actors
play the title role of the gallant soldier-poet with the pre-
posterous nose, but none with mcre assurance and charm
than Jose Ferrer who received an Academy Award for his

ormance,

h from his Broadway suc-
cess in the same role, Mr. Ferrer
makes an ideal Cyrano and his
oe nt is a memorable one.

at the Empire Cyrano de
Bergerac 2 nn eee of a French

poe © is the finest
swordsman in France, wit a mon-
strous nose that over-shadows his
life as it does his face. In love
with his cousin Roxanne, he lacks
the courage to court her—but woos
and wins her for a young inarticu-
late soldier whom she fancies, by
telling him how to declare his
love to the young lady, and writ-
ing his love letters for him. Not
until Cyrano is dying does he re-
veal his devotion to Roxanne, who
only then realizes that it is he who
wrote the love-letters and whom
she has really loved all the years.
_ Cyrano, as played by José Ferrer
is arrogant, tender, fearless and
touching—a hero easily capable of
his extravagant exploits and yet
one who would express himself
naturally with wit and poetry.
The role itself is long and
difficult and at times the action
slows considerably to enable
the hero to get through his
lines, but when they are de-
livered with the inimitable finesse
of Mr. Ferrer one can excuse the
slackening tempo. His interpreta-
tion of the famous “nose” speech
is priceless; the duelling scene at
the commencement ef the film, in
which Cyrano says he will com-
pose an extemporaneous ballad
and kill his opponent on the last
line of the last refrain is a fine
piece of action and the “no thank
you” speech, when he refuses the
offer of Cardinal Richelieu for a
place in his following and to pro-
vide him with funds, reveals the
true character of the Gascon, Mr.
Ferrer’s distinguished realization
of the whole role overshadows the
rest of the cast which is, perhaps,
just as well, as it is Cyrano’s story,
and Ferrer plays it to the hilt.
There’s not much to say for Mala
Powers as Roxanne. She is cer-
tainly lovely to look at, but both
her interpretation and acting are
immature, while William Prince,
as her lover, leaves very little im-
pression on the imagination or
memory. Morris Carnowsky as
Le Bret, Cyrano’s friend, gives Mr.
Ferrer good support.
_ The musical score is outstand
ing and credit for this goes to
Dmitri Tiomkin. Authentic old
French music played on the instru-
ments for which it was composed
enhances the mood of this truly
fine film

Showing at the Plaza, LIGHT-
NING STRIKES TWICE is a mys-
tery story of high voltage melo-
drama, and for a change, we have
a thriller that is practically devoid
of any violence, but in which sus-
pense is built up as a result of
good direction, acting and photo-

aphy. Richard Todd, Ruth

oman and Mercedes McCain-
bridge+three young actors who
are adding to their laure!s in no
uncertain fashion—have the prin-
cipal roles in a plot that concerns
a wealthy young Texan who is
acquitted by a hung jury of the
murder of his wifs. Fared with
the continued suspicion of his
neighbours, he meets an actress en
vacation—who falls in love with
him—and despite his warnings,
determines to clear his name.

The plot thickens with well sus-
tained suspense right up to the
surprise denouncement and is com-
pletely credible, and suspicion is
skilfully pointed at various char-
acters—the hero’s foster mother,
his greatest friend and the crip-
pled brother of the “other woman.”

The principal roles are well
handled with a. special mention
tor Miss McCambridge as the
“other woman.” South Western
settings and locale add to the
reality of this intriguing mystery
entertainment.

Starting on Wednesday, at the
Globe, MEET ME AFTER THE
SHOW is a smoothly produced

When your BACK
ACHES...



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fresh blood flows to every nerve and muscle.
Then you feel better—look better work
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Dodds Kidney Pills



musical comedy starring Betty
Grable. This platinum haired star
and lavish Technicolor sets are
and there are plenty
of both in this picture. As I have
observed before, stories never
amount to much in this type of
film, and this one is no exception,
It concerns a Broadway musical
comedy star whose success would
appear to be entirely due to the
efforts of her producer husband,
who is also a bit of a philanderer.
To prove that she is independently
talented and sought after, she
feigns amnesia and fills a success-
ful engagement in Miami before
her husband finally finds her and
realizes that she was a great star
even before he met her,

From the opening scene where
sie gorgeous venuses draped in
gold draw back the curtain, until
ihe final chose-up, costumes and
decor are consistently lush and
fashionable New York and Miami
night clubs provide a background
for sophisticated production num~-
bers-—among them “Bettin’ On 4
Man” and “No Talent Joe". A
competent cast supports — Miss
Grable in the manner in which she
is accustomed and her songs and
dances are up to her usual stand-

ard.

synonomou:

The Shadow Has
Gone From
A Lovely Face

BEATRIX THOMSON



If on looking in the mirror
one morning you saw a strange
and horrible distortion of your

face, what would you do ?

If, instead of the familiar face,
you saw an_ incredibly swollen,
palioon-like face covered with
disfiguring weals and blemishes.

That was what happened one
day in 1944 to pretty Beatrix

Thomson, the actress.

Mystery Germ

For the next six years she was
to suffer at intervals the same
horror, never knowing from hour
to hour when the transformation
would strike again.

A mysterious agency was at
work in her blood-stream, She
had picked it up in Burma while
entertaining troops,

Now she has been cured after
doctors had said she was incur-
able.

And yesterday, after her com2-
back to the stage, she told the
story of those six terrible years.

“When I looked in my mirror
that first day the reflection was
horrible. My face and throat
were all puffed up.

Always Hoping

“Tt went away, but only to
return again and again. I began
to feel like a leper,

“I was even told that death
might come at time. When
my tour with the troops finished
I couldn't face coming home.

“So I went from place to
place, searching, for a cue and
always hoping. Eventually, in

1946 I did return home and went
to live in seclusion in Surrey.

“Sometimes I ventured out. I
might be sitting in a restaurant
or watching a show with friends.
Then sitidenly my face would
undergo that hideous change as
people watched it,

“Usually I left hurriedly,
utterly humiliated.”

It was by chance that Miss
Thomson found a young
physician who suggested a long
course of vaccine injections.

He diagnosed that she was

suffering from a rare allergy,
urticaria caused through bac-
teria of some noxious substance
in the body.

His treatment was successful,
but the mystery of the cause
of the illness itself remains.

—L.E.S.



ik
ig
8

‘ So





ee TaN. ENN NNN.

(ardening Hints §
Cyrano De Bergerac fy Amateurs :



fy PURE

Se ee a ae ee ae ae ee oe ett ee ee

+ <9"

order, are inclined
to think of it in terms of annuals
only, and to quickly decide that it
would too much trouble to
make one.

A Border composed entirely of
annuals does indeed mean the
labour of replanting the whole bed
each year. Not only that but it
also means an empty bed for half,
the year. But the ideal Her-
baceous Border need not be made
up of annuals alone, but can be a
combination of perennials and an-
aye, with perennials predomin-

When the border consists ete

ee a eee



SUNDAY



THE

ADVOCATE

FARM AND GARDEN

DRY SEASON
FARMING AND GARDENING—in fact any activity
connected with the soil, plants and animals—can never be

dull. The song of earth is never dead, writes the poet, and

this is indeed true whatever the season.

You see, we are

dealing with life—life in the soil, life above the soil and,

in a sense, all around us.
animal, is full of absorbing

On the = other hand, dite,

wherever we meet li, Makes Cvll~
tinuous demands; mos: oO: WMese
can be summed up in tn¢@ euc
word: rOumne. Kouune ig © lle

what oil is to machinery;
essential in ordér to keep the
wheels turning and must be car-
vied out with unfailing regularity.
Farm life in the broadest sense
cannot be vigorously and profit-
ably maintained if routine opera-

>

cipally of perennials it is perma- tions in the field, in the garden

nent, and with the addition each
year of a few annuals to help give
it more colour you have the per-
fect Herbaceous Border,

Now for a border of this type
snecial care must be given to the
preparation of the bed. Once
planted, the perennials will remain
in the same place for years, dur-
ing which time only a surface
forking and an occasional top
dressing of manure will be possi-
ble. Therefore the bed must be
deeply forked and a good ly of
rotted pen manure added. If any
grass cuttings are available they
should also be put in. Finally the
surface must be manured and
fined, with hand fork and rake.

After the bed hag been watered
for a few days, and has settled,
then the plants can be put in.

The plants for the Werhgeeous
Border should be eremnped in large
clumps (not rows) graduated from
the tallest ones at the back down
to the shortest in front. The com-
bination of colours must of course
he the choice and taste of each
gardener, but the general effect
when the border is fully grown
should be one Of massed and
varied colour.

If the bed for the border is a
large wide one there is no reason
why shrubs such as Poinsettia,
Crotons, Hibiscus and Exora
should not be used as a back-
ground.

Other suitable perennials are
Cannas, Buddlea, Tamarisk, Mich-
aelmas-daisy, Gerberas, Coreopsis,
Vincas, Tuberoses and Pentas.

A border such as this would re~
main’ undisturbed for years, need-
ing only to be kept trimmed.

If in addition, g few anmuais are
added each year to give more col-
our a really lovely Herbaceous
Border would be the result.

In adding the annuals it may
be necessary to trim back some
of the regulars to make room, but
this would be a simple job.

Suitable annuals for the Border
are:—

Gladiola, Snapdragon, Yellow
Pea, Petunias, Queen Ann’s Lace,
Pinks, Carnations, in fact almost
any of the annuals,

A Herbaceous Border of this
kind is a very beautiful addition
to any garden, Once established
it would give little trouble, and
yet it would help considerably in
keeping up the colour of the wnole
garden at a steady level.

With a predominance of peren-
nials in the garden the ‘per-
fection” level, which in a garden
fluctuates so, is maintained far
more steadily than when the gar-
den depends on less lasting plants.

It is not everyone however who
has the room or the desire for a
very big Herbaceous Border such
as has just been described.

But a smaller Border can be
planned, and, instead of using the
big shrubs, it could be confined
to the smaller ones with equally
good effect.

Canariersis, Golden Rod, Mic-
haelmas-daisy, Red pinks and the
addition of a few annuals would
make a lovely Border for a smail-
er bed,

In any Border, it is advisable
to stake the taller plants when
they are half grown, to ensure
their keeping a good upright
position. These stakes should be
inconspicuous, and should only be
used when necessary.

He

DRUGS

Aind
ACCURATE

PRESCRIPTION

SERVICE

and in the stock pen are negtected
or undertaken in a cusual, fitful
or perfunctory manner, Further,
routine efficiency will often, entau
some measure of forward plan-
ning against weather and seasonal
changes. And, with these gen-
eral remarks, we pass on to some
seasonal considerations of route
importance at the present tme.

rollowing the copious showers
of December, drougnty conailions
have set in with a rather unusual
suddenness which appears to have
caught many tarmers and garden-
ers unawares. It doubtless has
caused them to pause and think if,
and how they are prepared to

“meet this sharp change. Mature

canes, especially in the low rain-
fall areas, are rapidly drying and
calling for the bill; ground pro-
visions require to be reaped;
growing crops and vegetables to
be freed of weeds and mulched;
fruit trees pruned, sprayed for
scale and blight control, and the

(By AGRICOLA)

ccc aimed teninpeaninnaiagatacetaties
younger ones muiched as well;
while, in addition, a number of
dry weather maintenance odd
jobs intrude themselves.
Among this array of things cail-
ing for action, none is so impori-~-
ant or urgent as the need tor sou





cover as an insurance «against
undue loss of moisture and to
maintain a fairly equable tem-

perature both in the soil itself ana
around growing plants, especiiliy
in the early stages of their exisi-
ence. There will be a tendency
for crops to transpire water more
quickly than they can take it in
the result is wilting and stunting
of growth, notably in plants
whose growth cycle is of relatively
short duration. Thus, garden
vegetables may lose their crisp-
ness, succulence and market value
where water supplies are short or
moisture withheld for any reason
whatever. Any operation, there-
fore, which tends to conserve soil

moisture at this season is of firse
importance, and all pvailable
waste material will be ‘required

for mulches. Here is where a little
routine planning will have been
found to pay handsome dividends.
Have all concerned made a regu-
Jar habit of conserving every
spare blade of grass, hedge and
tree clippings, crop residues and
s0 On and devoted the necessity
attention to composiing—all with
a view to having ample mulching
material to meet sudden and un-
expected needs as the present?
Farmers with sugar-canes to reap
have no doubt reckoned on the re-
sultant trash for mulching their
young crops but the sudden ap-
proach of intensively dry weather
may do a good deal of harm
meantime.

So, a valuable lesson emerges:
never neglect the routine of sav-
ing and conserving everything
except empty cans for dry season
use and whether the weather
change comes early or late, we
should never be caught napping.
Remember a successful cultivator
may be defined as one who can
grow good crops in bad years, and
bad years are those in which there
have been floods or a prolonged
drought.

Those who may have beey
keeping these notes will find the
subject of moisture conservation
and mulches discussed in the



sixth of the series, March 18, 1951. p.m.

All life, be it human, plant or
interest.





B.B.G. Radio
Notes

On Wednesdays in “Calling the
West Indies” from London the
subject of federation is being dis-
cussed in a series of four pro-
grammes with Douglas Hall oj
Jamaica, a graduate of Torontc
University and M.Sc., (London) i:
Economics, interviewing Professor
Kenneth Wheare, Gladstone Pro-
fessor of Governmem at Oxford
University and an acknowledged
authority on the history of tedera-
tion in the British Commonwealth
The series consists of exploratory
analyses of existing federations in
the English speaking world in
which Professor Wheare outlines
and explains the main character-
stics of three outstanding exam
pls of federal government, the
United States of America, Canada
and Australia, We regret that we |
did not have advance informatio:
to advise you of the start of the!
series which began on the 18th
February but in the second pro
gramme on the 20th the case oi
Canada will be discussed and in
the final broadcast Douglas Hall
will ask Professor Wheare to look
at the West indies and see whether
there are any dissimilarities 01
whether the general principles de-
duced from an examination of th«
three examples can apply and if
so, what are the possible develop-
ments from the starting point of
the Rance Committee Report.
Broadcasts are being given on
Wednesdays in the est Indies
half-hour from London. The
programmes with a ten-
minute talk and the last twenty
minutes of the half-hour willbe
taken up with these comments on |
federation, the West Indies being |
examined in the broadcast on the)
5th March. Calling the West |
Indies” begins at 7.15 p.m, in the
31 and 49 metre bands, 9.58 and
6.195 megacycles, |

Another West Indies series of
which we did not have advance
information before it began is
also running in the West Indies
half-hours on Mondays. This is|
on examination of Shakespear's |
‘King Lear, not as a pedantic)
exercise but as an interesting ex- |
periment for those in drama or}
play reading groups who wish to
find out whether a major Shake- |
spearian tragedy is within
compass of a group of enthusiastic |
amateurs who want to read scenes |
or to enact the play. The argu-
ment of the producer is that the
tragedies of Shakespeare, if played
with sincerity and understanding, |
are within the range of players of |
all ages, whether in a sixth form |
at school, or a club or literary |
group. The steps towards con |
structing the play will be taken |
and individual scenes acted but no |
attempt will be made to give the
complete performance In any}
event the play will be broadeast |
in two parts at the end of March
and April in two parts with John
Gielgud taking the leading role
Among the players taking part in
these half-hour broadcasts for the |
West Indies will be Errol John of |
Trinidad, and Pauline Henriques |
and Noel Vaz of Jamaica. Broad-|
casts begin at the usual time of |
W.I. programmes 7.15 p.m.|

This year Carnival in Trinidad |
falls on the 25th February and}
the BBC's “Caribbean Voices” will |
be taking special note of it in pro- |
grammes on the 17th, and 24th.)
inst. On the first of these two th’
half-hour starts with a short story
by Clifford Sealy and an artich
on ‘Calypsoes @f the Olden Time’ |
by Charles Penney of Trinidad.)
On the second date there will be}
two short stories of Carnival but |
we'll remind you of them next |
week. Broadcast begins at 7.15)



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tism and oxcessive fatigue.
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PAGE THREE



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SUNDAY ADVOCATE



'W.L REGAINING PRESTIGE
IN NEW ZEALAND TESTS
Football Season Off Te Good Start
| By O. S. COPPIN

oe WEST INDIES have chalked up another
good performance to their credit by seoring
the buge total of 546 for six wickets declared im the
first innings of their Second Test with New Zealand.
They have consolidated this early Neo talkenn
considerable extent by dismissing four New
batsmen for 76 runs, so that with six first innings
Wickets in hand they are still 470 runs behind the
We total
match so far has been a triumph for the West
belittling of this achievement on any

en

indies batting
grounds since






before the start of the h that Bert Sutcliffe the New Zealand
captain, having won the t sent the West Indies in to bat.
GOOD BOWLERS

N ADDITION to this. bowlers of the calibre of Burtt, Hayes and
Beard can command respect im any Test company in the world
today, so that good batting performances agaimst them must be re-
garded in the correct perspective.
tollmeyer and Rae’s fine service to the team, in laying the
foundation of what finally proved to be a formidable total justified the
argument firmly hel m these parts that one of the handicaps fram
which the West Indies batting suffered in the Tests with Australia
was the lack of a good start.
The excellence of the individual efforts of Stollmeyer and Ree
will no dewbt earn spontaneous commendation from cricket
A most important feature of the play however is the consistency
uf Worrell’s batting in these Tests. It proved an important turning
point in the First Test which the West Indies won with more travail
then had been expected judging from the run of fortunes during the
course of the game

WORRELL IN
RIPPING FORM

E has come back to score an

even century 2 in associa-

tion with Clyde Walcott helped

to exploit to the full, the favour-

| able circumstances created in the

| ®arly stages of the game by Rae
| and Stollmeyer,








Walcott too has shown a wel-
come return to Test form and his
batting too in this series has pro.

vided one of the principal bul-
werks in the structure of the
West Indies batting machine.

We who look towards future West
Indies cricket must feel more than
gratified that even at this late

| hour when the confidence in West
Indian batting powers has been

} So severely shaken on occasions
curing the Australian tour that
the batting has shown a hand-
ome advance on the road towards
full and complete restoration.



FRANK WORRELL

W.L SHOULD WIN AGAIN :
} XCEPT unfavourable weather conditions curtail play in the two
i remaining days, the West Indies have established a lead that
| Should guarantee them victory for a second time at the expense of

|New Zealend
SHOOTING STRAIGHT
HIS WE 1 want to turn the Spotlight on an old form of sport,
: entertaining but certainly mot as popular in these parts as King
Cric ket and its poorer cousin football and that is SHOOTING.
_ _ Shooting in Barbados is controlled by the Barbados Rifle Asso-
| Clation. It boasts of the small membership of 62 but only between

24 and 32 members turn out regularly for shoots at the Barbados
Government Rifle Range at Gravesend.

POLICE FALLING OUT

recent investigations show that even this percentage of the

attendance of shooting members is falling off, more so among
the Police members. I shall have more to men’ auaue this at a later
date because I assume at once that this could not be for lack of
encouragement because members of any non-military but neverthe-
less disciplined Force such as the Police would receive every encour-
agement to enjoy such a pastime that would have a salutary effect
on their genera] efficiency.

i WE WANT LADIES
HE B.R.A. is not an exclusive Association as some people imagine.
Any persen interested in rifie shooting is invited to join. If he
|} or she has not served in H.M. Forces it will be necessary to join the
| Barbados Small Bore Club first before they are permitted to shoot
ion the Full Bore Range.
| At this stage I must observe that there is no interest displayed
| by members of the fairer sex t is true that we married men would
| have a wholesome respect for wives who can shoot Straight but-in
Trinidad and British Guiana ladies have been taking their full share
of this form of sport. The Barbados ladies are invited to do 50 too.
| Maybe we would not like them to be too proficient at Snap and Rapid
| but Grouping and Application would be great fun. Howéver ladies
; let us see you “get your gun.”

i SEASON OPENS MARCH 15















The shooting season this ar starts on March 15. The first

competition to be shx A be for th ‘rontenac Trophy. There will

i be three .303 Post natohes for the Martinez Cup, the Swettenham
i Cup and the Overseas Postal Match.

The Shoot for the Anchor Cup takes place in Barbados this
yeat and will be shot for, shoulder to shoulder. This produces some
keen sivalry as in the background is the news that the West Indies

| will be ropresented at Bisley in 1953.

SPARTAN WINS AS FOOTBALL SEASON OPENS

j A LARGE CROWD turned out yesterday afternoon to see Spartan,





last year’s cup winners, scored the odd goal in three to win from
| Carlton, last year’s runners-up. :
i Playing on a larger field and one that is pitched farther away
(from the Kensington. Stand, all the spectators are now afforded a
| nod view of the game.
i lt was obvious that the players must now get used to the larger
ground ag there was too much bundling in the play. The pitch how-





ever is in good condition and the players themselves are keener
| than their eatly form would indicate. It does seem as if we will be
getting some good énicriainment for our money this season from
i : € A
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Pepper Wine

Returns Best Time

Harroween On Ice—French Flutter

Hot Favourite
By BOOKIE

on ice.”
ice in a ager 4 however,
Tivals can prepare
themselves.

Lumways was the second to go
off. She did a box to bex in 1.28
but only started to run from the
five which she did in 1.05.

Flying Dragon improves with

ae yg 2-4 all the way in 151,

st box to box im 1.24§.
Mabouya had the half-bred

Rosette for a companion over five.

‘They did it in 1.043, with the half-
bred moving well

full
ngs fin-

jer was not as strong as his

>rother.

Betsam did four in 53. T did not
see much of her

Tiberian Lady looked better by
herself doing a box to box in 1.28
She is fighting age more than any-

Demure did a box to box and
although I did not pay any atten-
tion to her I am told she finished
-ather tired. Her time was 1.214.

Dim View worked but nobody
took her time. Even Mr. Teddy
Jones said he did not know what
it

was.

Pepper Wine went off at a smart
clip over five. She is steadily re-
ducing her time figure for this
distance with each gallop. This
time she cut it down to 1.02. I
learned on returning to the stand
that she had been clocked in 1.072
for the five and a half. This is
the fastest gallop over this dis-
tance before race day that I have
ever heard of.

Jane escaped my atten-
tion. Her time for tive was said to
be 1.11% so she could not have
been doing much.

Yasmeen made stable compan-
ion Topsy look very inferior. They
did a box to box in 1.23}, Yasmeen
having copious pounds in hand at
te spate did a comfortable five in
1.04.

avi

Queen’s
Defeat

By P.A.V.

second round of Ladies
Inter Club Table Tennis matches
was played at the Y.M.C.A. Naval
Hall on Friday night in the
presence of a large crowd. Queen’s
College—Barna match was the
most interesting.

Queen’s College has a group of
orthodox players who make good
use of both back and forehand
smashes. Margaret Wood was in
her usual good form but I was
very much impressed by Neil
Hall’s performance. The men play-
ers who find the new style of
service difficult should watch these
Queen’s College girls.

The College girls defeated Barna
three—two. The first set was be-
tween Ruth Williams of Queen's
College and Dolores Howard.
Howard won 21—23, 21—19 and
21—10 to put Barna one up. Wil-
liams put up a good fight but



Howard, the more experienced
player, won the decisive game
easily.

Nel] Hall won the next set

against Elsie Goodridge to bring
honours even. Hall took an early
lead in the first game and went
on to win 21—17. In the second
game Goodridge had a four point
lead. Hall brought points equal
end the score read 18 all. Good-
ridge got the next two points but
Hall deuced the game. In a fine
finish Hall won 24—22.

Margaret Wood, Queen’s College
met Marian Manning in the third
match. Wood opened with a bar-
rage of forehand smashes some
which found Manning off

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to bri back to a ha

State ealth . PHOSF is

grand restorative when reserves run low.

THE GREATEST

+s

Flieuxce moved easily over ay

Vanguard must have done littl .

dging by his time of 1 dex
Ju iy
the box to box.

Belle Surprise caused a surprise
by leaving Dashing Princess be-
hind at the end of a box to box.
The former's time was 1.224. 1
understood Surprise was

. thought to be short. If so Dashin,
Princess is shorter. .

French Flutter a to be
doing nothing much but neverthe-
less the clock told a different story
when she came back over the box
to box in 1.20%. I took the last five
in 1.05%.

Red Cheeks does not impress as
much on the hard going as she did
in the mud. Five in 1.07 was her
effort yesterday, very much on the

bit.

The ing is another who does
not Am SHE. on the hard
ground. She did five in 1.05#,
pushed along.

Arunda did five in 1.05%, easy.

Doldrum broke from the seven
and did the box to box in 1.22.

Joan’s Star did four finishing
the last three in 41.

Landmark did a comfortable box
to box in 1.21}.

Sweet Rocket did not have much
to spare when she finished a box
to box in 1.213.

Blue Nelly and Magie Gaye
worked well together each looking
strong at the end of five in 1.05%.

Notonite gave Fuss Budget a
good run over five in 1.03. The
former is really in grand form.

Dunquerque, still in the stage of
shaking off a cough, did a box to
box is 1.254, finishing rather com-
fortably.

Colleton did five in 1.078.

Test Match aa Ali worked
five together but Yvonet opened
Mate “anise in nies dake toe

atch fin mn’

in 106} and finishing

Diadem and March Winds did
four in 52%.

Embers did her work with more
relish. With Usher she did the box
to boxin 1.24% and the five in
1.073. I am sure if we had a/mile
and a half race we would see her
at her best.

Slainte did a restrained box to
box, doing the last five in 1.09%.

Rambler Rose who might better
have been named “Morning Glory’
did four in 53$. “

Waterbelle did five in 1.06.

Fille D’Iran did not seem too
much for the three-year-old creole
Seedling who finished a box to box

8 @ On Page 10



College

Barna

guard, mainly employed
the Soubaed toon shot but this
did not worry Wood. Wood won
21—16, 21—17 to put Queen’s Col-
lege in the lead.

It is a pity that Marian Manning
relies so much on that backhand
push shot, Owing to this she has
to get around the table twice as
much as her opponent. If sne
would develop her forehand she
would be more successful,

Joyce Clarke, of Q.C., a very
attractive player who puts a lot
of back spin on the ball, won her
set against Joan Bryant to put
Q.C., two in the lead. Clarke was
always on top and won 21—12,
21—14.

Rosie Howard won the next set
for Barna when she beat Rose-
mary Barrow. Barrow lost many
of her points through inaccurate
smashing. Howard, who never lost
concentration, won 21—13, 21—2.

In the next match Adelphi
scored a four—one defeat over
Lenville, In the first set Maria
Barrow, the Lenville skipper, was
beaten by Heather Deane 21—15,
15—21, 13—21. Barrow is a good
player but was definitely not in
her best form.

Betty Carrington of Lenville de-
feated Angela Perkins 21—1%,
21—18 in the next set to increase
Adelphi’s lead. Perkins gained
many of her points through her
fast service but Carrington was
more steady.

Phylis Chandler, skipper of
Adelphi, had an easy walk over
when she met Caroline Perkins

@ On Page 9











\>



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2 tablets of PHOSFERINE equal
10 drops. r

OF ALL TONICS

for Depression, Debility, Indigestion, Sleeplessness, and
a ofter Influenza,







SUNDAY, FEBRUARY 17, 1952

CROWDED FIELDS
Cavalier and Cardinal Dangerous
To Dunquerque

By BOOKIE

ITH the exception of only one previous meeting,

the forthcoming March meeting has more horses
on the entry list than we have ever seen before in
Barbados. This is a significant fact. To me it is also
a frightening one. ;
Â¥ a gad, s course, to see racing in Barbados
each the stage where we can expect such a variety of
talent. ~I am glad that punters will have more than one or two horses
in any race to chose from. It is a good thing for the B.T-C. to rereive
in sums in entrance fees. But I cannot pretend to be anything
else but alarmed when I see that there is a likelihood of 19 horses
starting in one race on the Garrison Savannah. ‘



I know full well that just because there are 19 hor:

one race on the last day this does not mean that all will mame
start. But what I do feel certain of is that it wil] not be very long
before we see far more than this number entered in one race ona
there is every possibility that we will one day reach the stage where
a field will dwindle to 19 by the time the bugle is sounded for the
event. t E
ois Who ween sere Senet that at a minor m

‘ure we would not only have as many as 75, but th ld
also be a reserve list of about 17 who are in training buen!
It is something which our officials must be aware of but are not in
the mood to do anything about. How long will it last? wg

_ Looking first at the classic on the
Guineas, it is clear that a few of these

eeting like our March

Programme, the Barbados

i will not 1
for the simple reason that some of them ee oat Bs this oe

are i >

class race which immediately precedes it. Those ne wyy bgt Ry
clude: Cavalier, Dunquerque, Seedling, May Day, Apronusk, Colom-
bus and Cardinal. As it is the only stake Tace which these horses are
entered in before the handicaps, thty will have to go in this event to
qual et the remainder of the meeting.

aking these seven as the certainties, what then do we fi
them? First of all Dunquergue is still a firm favourite on i
of last Novem At this meeting she defeated Cavalier decisively
and as he is obviously still the next best on the entry list, there seems
little reason to expect that she cannot deal with him effectively once
again. This is sound reasoning but for two things. Number one is
that Dunquerque has-had a bad cough and has not been seen at
exercise very regularly. Number two is that Cavalier, to all appear-
ances, has developed a good deal since we saw him in November.
Therefore, the question is whether a Dunquerque, who is not one
hundred per cent fit, can beat an improved Cavalier over a distance
of ground over which neither of them has any experience?

: Nor is Cavalier the only one in the picture. There is also a strong
indication that Cardinal has improved. Personally, I think his chances
are as good as Cavalier’s.

The others are still very backward. Columbus and Apronusk
are good lookers but obviously soft, Seedling and May Day will take
a lot more furnishing while the four others are uncertain starters.

Discussing the other races on the first day as they
programme, we shall start with a 7% furlong race for B class which
is packed full of rivalry of a high order. At the present moment it
would be impossible to say which is favourite between Firelady,
Fuss Budget, Red Cheeks, Flying Dragon, Demure and Landmark.
Nor may the four others who make up the field of ten be summarily
dismissed. In the long run it may well turn out to be “who acts best
on hard going wins.”

The Maiden Stakes with 14 on the card is without doubt the big-
gest problem of the day. The best way to pick your winner in this
will be by a process of elimination. Perhaps the track will also help
you im this respect. Right now those going best are Abu Ali, Blue
Nelly, Darham Jane, Castle in the Air and French Flutter. But the
situation is likely to change without notice.

The Chelsea Stakes over 5% furlongs for class F and lower may
be a good thing for the aged mare April Flowers but this will depend
a lot on whether Sunina and Rambler Rose start instead in the
Guineas. Waterbelle and Sunbeam are the dark horses. The others
I do not fancy up to the present.

appear on the

W®* next skip the Guineas and come to the A cla&s bunch who are
carded to run for the Barbados Turf Club Stakes over 9 fur-
longs and 14 yards, It is unlikely that River Sprite and Flying
Dragon will go in this race and that will leave us with Landmark.
Slainte, Gun Site, Embers, Harroween, Pirelady, Rebate and Notonite.
I had thought that after her performances over similar distances in
Trinidad that Harroween would be my favourite for this race. But
I see she is entered also in the Dalkeith Stakes over 5% furlongs and
as she is doing some amazing sprints at exercise it is to be expected
that the short distance will be her bait for the first day. Wig Har-
roween out of the way it will be interesting to see whether Rebate can
recapture her form of last year and if so whether she and Landmark
can give away any substantial amount to Firelady. I am also very
interested in the progress of Embers, who, although painted so black
by those who saw her in Trinidad, is certainly not a bad one on looks.

I am also very impressed with the way Notonite is going at
exercise. To tell the truth he will be favourite in my book if Har-
roween does not go. Incidentally, I am told that he has never had a
dry coat. It was certainly news to me, although I see nothing very
degrading in this ailment which horses from Singapore to Mexico
suffer from as regularly as you and I catch a common cold. If his
trainer thinks that his stable will be the only one never to have suffer-
ers from this ailment in it, then he certainly has a lot more guesses
coming. But being, in his own words, “the only trainer in Barbados”,
I imagine it is incumbent upon me to apologise to anyone who is so
vastly superior to anybody else who, shall we say, supervises the ex-
ercising and feeding of race horses in the island.

The Spring Stakes for C class winners seems to lie between Sweet
Rocket, Lunways, Dashing Princess and Doldrum. I gather that
Watercress is fancied in certain sections but for my part I shall have
to see it first. If she can take on Dashing Princess successfully she
will be a much better mare than I ever imagined her to be.

The racing in G class is very far from falling through due to
lack of numbers. Three races with 11 in each is something to be ex-
pected more from the C class lot. Of those listed quite a few are coim-
plete unknown quantities and one or two from overseas I have not
yet seen. Those with the best chances are the aged Betsam, Gavotte,
Blue Diamond and the newcomer from St. Vincent Rosette. Age
and inexperience are the only things which would prevent me from
making the last named favourite, for it must be realised that she is
racing against seasoned campaigners while she is only just three.

Racing in D class opens with the 714 furlong Castle Grant Stakes.
At present I favour Cross Bow and Usher, but of course Mary Ann
is always there to spring a surprise. Oatcake, poor chap, looks as if
he is fighting age as well as ailments to his legs. Apollo and Van-
guard will, I suppose, give some good opposition here and there.

The big sprint event of the meeting has attracted seven, three of
which starqi out as the fastest fillies we have seen out here for some
time, while the other four are themselves very smart. The three I
fancy are Harroween, Demure and Yasmeen and it remains to be
seen how Pepper Wine, Fuss Budget and Belle Surprise will shape
against them, Rebate, I should imagine will not contest this event
after racing in the Turf Club Stakes.



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For Pains in the back
Your quickest relief .....

is FIERY JACK".

On sale at all
DRUG STORES

Frank 8. Armstrong Ltd.
Agents:




SUNDAY, FEBRUARY 17,

1952



Frogs And Swimming

Hy IAN GALE

Men have always admired the a =
frog’s swimming ability, and in- ” )
deed they have copied him for the
kick of the breast stroke is some-
thing like the kick of a frog.

It is interesting to see what a
prominent part the frog plays in
books on swimming. In a book
published in 1858 J. G. Wood says:
“For the leg stroke there is no bet-
ter model than a frog, whose action
in swimming should be copied ex-
actly.” Writing a few years later,
however, in a boy’s magazine, he
repudiates the frog and says: “It
is right and natural for the frog to
throw out his limbs in angles and
bring, therm back in similar lines
of projection, with a sort of front
and back jerk continually re-
peated.” '

Leahy, writing in 1875, says: “I
have heard that man took his first
ory in ae from the frog,

ut since that time swimming has
been vastly improved.

circle, as we ought to work them,
but are kicked straight out to the
cear, and more or less downwards.”

Even as late as 1083 Mr. Wilson
thought it aoe say that it
is a mistaken idea that the kick of f
the breast stroke is obtained from ,.,5!7, Nicholas: Let me rest
the soles of the feet, in imitation little to respire.
of the frog, but that it is from the fl, â„¢
wedge action of the kick as well.

feet ;
of a frog are not work in a ‘ \

across Sir Nicholas learning t
swim on a table.

its motion, by the detention of thi
filum or thread within m:
which makes a ligature al
loins, and though by many sudde:

frog was king. Winmann,

tells his pupil to watch the frogs
swim with their hinder feet, Dig-
by, 1587, says, “his legs he must
pull out and in.” This must have
been accepted as the stroke of the
frog, and in The Virtuoso, a come-
dy published in 1876 by Thomas
Shadwell this scene is given:

ECOUEN JETT NATATICN

SUNDAY ADVOCATE

7 Boats Break Down
In Third Regatta |

(By Our Yachting Correspondent)

IN THE last two R.B.Y.C. regattas helmsmen and crews |
alike were complaining of the light winds. When the Third |
Regatta was sailed yesterday the wind Was strong and
puffy at times. Some said it was too strong: therefore we |
come back to that old saying: “You can’t have everything if
life.”







The boats sailed south about. |

FEB. 17 NO. 211

The Topic
of

Last Week



Cycling

a

So, it is wonder- 7

_no friend, to observe

the agility of this pretty animal

In the old days, however, the which notwithstanding I impede
15:

“« The Track

stops I cause the Ahimal some- r
times to sink or emerge, yet with
indefatigable activity it rises, and
keeps almost its whole body upon
the superfices or surface of this

W.I. Declare
At 546 For 6

AUCKLAND CRICKET

GROUND, N.2Z
Worrell and Waleott carried on
in their brilliant style after lunch
giving the crowd which swelle<
to over 20,000 a great treat. Step-
ping out to Burtt and hitting hin
for a straight four, orrel|
reached 50 in 85 minutes (six
fours). Carrying on with the
y greatest freedom, Worrell ran \
his century in 151 minutes (13
fours. He and Walcott, stepped
the pace up after lunch; Walcott



especially with shots all round
the wicket almost caught hi:
partner in fties.

)

fi "

It took Waleott 86 minutes (4
score half a century (six fours).
They added 100 runs in 75 min-
utes. Like Worrell, Walcott de-

lighted the crowd with powerful
roun all-round stroking: The partner-
7 ship between this pair yielded
. 189 in 1837 minutes. The only
other run registered during the
partnership was a bye, this giving
indicatiofi that the batsrm
were hitting every ball.
reaching the three-figure mark,
Worrell hit out, and Sutcliffe took

By ERLE McLEOD

A cyclist in order to cycle needs

two machines—his cycle and him- @ brilliant running catch in the

; humid element. self, Although both “machines” °utfield.
_ Lady Gimerack: The truth on’t | Longvil:. Have you ever tried are complemen in the of _ Walcott carried on to a century
is, he’s learning to swim. in the water, Sir? cycling, the cyclist’s own is in 155 minutes (13 fours), but
Longvil: Is there any water Sir Nichol No, Sir: but I by far the more important of the was dismissed leg before at 125.
hereabouts, Madam? swim most exquisitely on land. two entities. Ten minutes before tea, God-
Lady Gimerack: He does not Bruce: Do you intend to prac- This is the opinion of Charles dard deelared his innings closed,

learn to swim in the water, Sir. tice in the water, Sir?

Fearnley who was one of the top three minutes before adjournment

Bruce: Not in the Water, Sir Nicholas: Never, Sir; I hate flight track cyclists in the United with the total 546 for 6 wickets.
Madam! How then? the water, I never come upon the Kingdom, earniey has just New Zealand bowlers had a
Lady Gimerack:. .In his Labora- water, Sir.

tory, a spacious room, where all

Some two hundred years later

written a book headed “HEALTH

trying time under ideal batting
AND HANDLEBARS” and this

conditions against such splendid

his instruments and fine knacks we come across another account of book is strictly for the green batsmen.
are. t r swimming on land. Mr, Sam- track rider. Beard was the steadiest, taking
Longvil: How is this possible? bourne, the author, describes how

Lady Gimerack: He has a swim-
ming master come to him.

Bruce: A Swimming Master!
This is beyond all precedent: He
is the most curious coxcomb liv-
ing.

at a

masters.

Lady Gimerack: He has a frog
in a bowl of water, tied with a
packthread by the loins; which
packthread Sir Nicholas holds in
his teeth, lying on his belly on a
table, and as the Frog strikes, he
strikes, and his Swimming Master
stands by, to tell him whether he
does well or ill.

Later on in the scene we come

must

“Peyseverance!” Exclaimed



SSS
GERMAN POSITION for teaching the breast stroke from Auerbach
(ss) 1873.

Golf Match Postponed

The White Horse Trophy and Christ Church yesterday afternoor
President’; Cup for Ladies which has been postponed,
was to have been played at the





<== >. Vey
sei tN
ao => a
ee j
e——— — = 2 tenis sensi,
at me
We When lovely, lively figure-heads like these choose
Jantzen, they certainly prove they havea head for figures! Jantzens
have everything —fit, fabric, volour and style to suit you to
perfection. This year, the Jantren wizards have woven even lovelier spelis,
Look out for seductive shirring removable straps for sun
worshippers, decorative piping, coatrasung uffs, How is it done at such
reasonable prices? That's che zen magic! Go and
capture some of it yourself — quickly
anleeie Attraction in Action
‘
‘ re COvsen

French ore ne
saw an enormously fat man NE cy t this book is somethin
ut through his paces on top of a ot .
x by two bearded swimming
After watching this per-
formance for a quarter of an hour
he remarked to one of the swim-
ming masters that the fat man
have great’ perseverance.
the

swimming master, “He has worked
like this for five years, and he has
not been in the water yet!”

Well, so much for swimming on
land. Next week I will start on
the craw] strokes so get your bath-
ing suit ready.

» and are held in high esteem as

t But let us return to Charles.

> the Publie Libra

7s.

The match will now be playeda Fearnley says “If you are over-
Rockley Golf and Country Club, off in March 1 and March 2.
: 3

I have just finished reading it

2 for 96 off 40 overs. He was
track

unfortunate just before declara+
tion to have to leave the field
due to an ankle injury, suffered
in attempting to save a bonnd-
ary. The New Zealand fielding
was good in patches, but the
severity of the batsmen’s strokes
eaused mishandling at times,
New Zealand’s innings opened
sensationally, Leggatt beings
bowled by Worrell’s second de-

and I can_ assure loeal

out of the ordinary.

Track cycling was really started
in Barbados—I was told by an
eminent cyclist—sometime in the
year 1929 and since then the
sport has gained in popularity,
In Trinidad and British Guiana
track racing is just as ular as
Siege and soma : course
track riding can airly expen- , ry
sive if one finds one’s self in too Re seattt Sur 3 er,
many spills.

a j . off Atkinson for five, The score
names such 28 iyrihe yeung Was then 12 for 2. Suteliffe anc
Ken Farnum who has broken a Scott then added 38 with some
few records in the last Intercolo- bright batting and good running
a) Cysie esse 96 Repenenn Sy Feet alo, Bukclifle seamed
well Enown oytaie of ie an to be well set until at 20 he was
brilliantly caught by Worrell off
Ramadhin. Reid, wito had ample
time to regain the crease in lifting
his back foot to Valentine, was
easily stumped by Guillen. Scott
and Rabone were in when “n
hppeal againsy light was upheld
ten minutes before stumps were
to be drawn. New Zealand was
then 76 for 4.

Bowling honours for the Wes!
Indies team were evenly divided
In his first between Worrell Atkinson, Val-

chapter he introduces the green entine and Ramadhin who all
‘ track rider to his cycle so that bowled steadily.
he can carry out any repairs or
make adjustments to parts which
can make the going rough or
smooth,

SPEED AND CONDITION
In the middie of Chapter two

Fearnley says that the only way
* the green tseek Fyar gen, Sovelee
speed and condition is con~ “On massed starting Fearnley is
tinual practice. Many cyclists be- very thoroukh asa says eer
lieve that the weight of the jo::ed starting is akin to track
dropped handle bar has sot Ziding as in both eases the rider
thing to do with his progress buo fig." himself starting with seas-
this is a false belief as the resist- oned riders who know all the

ance the cyclist offers himself is 4 i01. ; ;
the salient factor. tricks of pocketing and jockeying

regards cycling.

T am gure that theve are cyclists
in the island who could take care
of themselves handsomely in any
Olympic eyeling event but their
quality eannot be aseertained un-
til they are sent out where they
can clash with top ranking cyclists
of the world.

, Fearnley, His book which has
eight chapters can be obtained at



at the opening of a season, then
you will need to sweat awheel
from the first half dozen miles and
that is where Tuning comes in.
Tuning is important and light
clothing should be used. Gloves
also should be used to prevent
soreness on the fingers.”

Ti

E for ition.
mda ita te tn" tpe books «ert, gen dts o cone
The chapter covers no less than wa i a eat ve Tuihione
six sections—six sections of in- S y f

specialists—he must seek his ad-

valuable advice to the tyro on the Ving from men who have been

eyele track, The chapter is itcHed in that company. Some-
ra
ao Somer * Concluding 1 can only urge
(b) Massed Starting, (c) Trae! eyelis tna
Work, ' (d) Massage, (e) Sleep, eave track cyclists to drop in a

Public Library and __ get
“HEALTH AND HANDLEBARS.”
By reading this book I am sure
local cyclists would be encouraged
to ride more intelligently on the
track and thus decreasing the
amount of spits which mark
weight, as many racing men are every Cycle Meeting.

DUNLOP

| .
| MOTOR CYCLE TYRES

(f) General Hygiene, (g) Relaxa-
(h) Position on

ti d finally
ion an a while

the wheel and posture

, walking.
TUNING



DOWDING ESTATES & TRADING CO., LTD.

(ECKSTEIN BROS.)
Distribufors

Around the western mark the sea
was choppy. “D” boat Olive
Blossom overturned. When the
launch towed her towards hef |
mooring she looked more like a
submarine than a yacht. Inter- >
mediate boats Skippy, Dawn and
Clytie B boat Raseal, Tornado,
Comet and Scamp of the C Class ;
ull broke down, Very few people
saw Clytie after she cleared the
western mark in the fitst round.

Racing conditions were good |
for the Tornad and the Sea-
gulls. Invader in the Intermediate |
Class also sailed a beautiful race
and Corkie Roberts in Rainbird |
‘ave one of his best performances. ,
Moyra Blair also found the wind
extremely suitable.

Nine boats started in the B Class.
Hi Ho lead for the first two rounds. |
Moyra Blair took over the lead
and went on to win, She finished |
a minute and 15 seconds ahead of
Mischief which was second. Third |
was Mg A a minute and 10
seconds later. Both Mischief and
Gipsy gave good performances. |

C Class

{

Six boats raced in the C Class
Seagull Gannet, the winner,
took the lead trom the first:
round. She completed this round
40 seconds ahead of Madness,
which was second, Magwin was)
third, about two minutes later.)

Gannet beat Magwin by ane!
minute and 50 seconds. It was a
tough battle between Magwin
and Madness, Madness should
have won, She finished four sec=
onds behind Magwin.

In the Intermediate Class nine!
boats started but only six fin-
ished; At the end of the first)
round Mohawk, the first boai,)
had a lead of about four minutes |
on Dauntless and Invader, How-|
ever Invader took the lead, She!)
finished eight seconds ahead of
Gnat, which was second, Dauni-|
less was third, 15 seconds later
and Coronetta fourth

Rainbird carried off honours
in the D Class, Only four boats
finished, She beat Hurricane by
one minute and 26 seconds, Third
was Van Thorndyke, a minute
and 30 seconds behind Hurricane.

Vamoose won in the Tornado
Class. She kept the lead through-
out the race, She finished two
minutes and 40 seconds ahead of
Thunder which was second, Ed-

ril, third, finished 55 seconds
later,
The results were as follows :
CLASS B
Elapsed Ave Py
7 Moyra Blair 1.48.37 36.12 1
5 Mischief 1.42.00 4.03 2
1 Gypsy 1.42.02 34.01 3
9 Okapi 1.48.12 26.24 4
481 Fantasy 1.55.30 38.30 5
4 Hi Ho 1.55.28 38.29 8
18 ee 1.58.31 39.30 1
6 Fi -. 256.14 38.25 8
10 Wizard 2.06.26 40 08 °
CLASS ©
10 Gannet 1.12.52 36.2% 4
1L Magwin 1.15.39 37.49% 2
3 Madness 1.18.49 39.24% 3
7 Rogue 1.17.17 38.38% 4
1 Miss Behave 1:25.49 42.54% 5
CLASS I
2 bnvader 1.28.28 44.14 1
1 Gnat 1.19.36 39.48 2
9 Dauntless 1.24.48 42.24 3
4 Coronetta 1.20,29 40,14% 4
ll Reen 1.25.12 42.0 5
7 Mohawk 1.37.29 48.42% 6
CLASS D
3 Rainbird 1.28.48 4.24 1
14 Hurricane 1.26.50 43.20% 2
10 Van Thorndyke 1.53.20 46.44%) &
4 Senbird 1.38.47 49.25 4
CLASS K
40 Vamoose 1.08.24 22,44 1
38 Thunder 1.10.47 23.30 2
36 Edril 1.11.50 23.50 3
41 Zephyr 1.25.3 26.21 4



Will Play Softball

(From Our Own Correspondent)
KINGSTON, J’ca, Feb. 14
Thirteen girl players have been
named to represent the Com-
mandos Softball Club in a yas
day tour of British Honduras.
The team captained by Mis.
Edna Miller, will be accofapan-|
ied by a coach, Mr. F, Miller,)
and will leave Jamaica by Plane}
on Sunday, February 17, }
They will play nine matches}
in Belize,





THE

| PRESTCOLD

Lou called Bn Joe last Monday
And said. “Let’s pick this bone
Remember from now onwards
A Queen is on the throne

In our domestic squabbles
I must have my own way
And when I thus command thee
Have not a word to say

So bring honie every penny
Ti give vou vour bus fare
This ship will have one Captain
And I'm the one to steer

Joe bowed and sald, Lou, thahk you
I wes longing for this day

The day when all the women
Would simply lead the way

Joe came home Friday
And said Lou the money here

Girl ty Your best next six days
Now s your time to steer

So Saturday morning early
Lou to the market went
To buy a pound of beef steak
And that cost sixty eight cents
The buteher missed and gave Lo
Three quarter pound of bone,
Lou said TI called for beef steak
Old man I ain't buying stone

lady
A cow has beef and bone

The butcher said ny





Why! I didn't make the schedule
Go leave my meat alone
She went a little further
To another butcher siali
The butehér turned politels
And said my lady call
A pound of pork chops, please Sir

With o sigh of relief
The butcher sated my lady
wm selling pork with beef

Lou went a little further

ying to reach her goal
This time the call was mutton
The butcher saict “that’s sold”

For Lou it was all bad luck
No mutton, pork nor beef
In such a situation
Lou shivered like a leat
| Louw said this thing is awful
We should have « Sunday d’sh
Of beef or pork or mutton
Or evén flying fish
|
| She waited until sunset,
| Hoping for fish to come
And when the last boat came in

| The fisherman said there's none
| Louw woke up Sunday morning
{ To eat beef at any rate

| And one the very butchers

| Gave her bones at sixty-eight
| doe Lou girl you see life
spar,

sad,
We men know how to
1 ean bring the
Plus a bottle of J & RK

sponsored by

J&R BAKERIES
makers of
ENRICHED BREAD

arid the blenders of
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PAGE FIVE








SCC SSSSCELEE EEL VEEL LAA AAA LAAP ¢
AN OLD FRIEND IN A NEW SPOT &
Just A Few Yards Off Broad Sirect %
in Pr. Wm. Henry Street -
YOUR DRUG STORE ° %
THE COSMOPOLITAN
Please Come in and See .. .

THE NEW GOODS CONSTANTLY ARRIVING
*Phone 4111—2041
P. A. CLARKE, (COSMOPOLITAN PHARMACY

SOOGSSSO GPCL LLL LLL LPL AANA M

a neler een





SATURDAY, 1ST MARCH, 1952
THURSDAY, 6TH MARCH, 1952
SATURDAY, 8TH MARCH, 1952

Twenty Five Events. The First Race on the



PELLETS

a

———
ne re
—

First Day starts at 1.00 p.m, On the Second |

and Third Days at 1.15 p.m.
The 2'- Sweepstake will be officially closed on
THURSDAY, 28th February, 1952, and will be
drawn for on Friday, 7th March, 1952, at the
GRAND STAND at 4.00 P.M. Tickets can be
purchased from Registered Sellers up to 4.00
p.m. of the same day.



The Plan for admission to the Grand Stand will
be opened, as follows :

To SUBSCRIBERS on THURSDAY, 2lst FEBRU-
ARY, 1952. 7

To THE GENERAL PUBLIC on MONDAY, 25th
FEBRUARY, 1952, between the hours of 8.15
a.m. and 3.00 p.m. daily.

All Bookings close and must be paid for by
FRIDAY, 29th FEBRUARY, 1952. by 3.00 p.m.

PRICES OF ADMISSION :

SUBSCRIBERS :—Free and Three (3) Ladies or
Juniors at $2.16 each for the season.

GENERAL PUBLIC :—

Ladies per Day . $1.20
Gents per Day 1,92
Ladies’ Season 3.00
Gents’ Season Bia 5.00
Admission to the Paddock per

person per Day . 1.20

FIELD STAND :—
Per Person per Day 3 -

4 —

a §6—No Passes for re-admittance will be given



POSITIVELY NO BOOKINGS BY TELEPHONE
WILL BE ACCEPTED

G. A. LEWIS
Secretary.



|




PAGE SIX
Doctors Prove

A Lovelier Complexic:: in 14 Days ;










McLeod
erTnost ~ i
the United States.
2 powerful organiza-

Bethune







tion 800,006 women. and
f president of a col-
ege she not oniy has witnessed

gress but has helped make it.
Today, at 76, this woman is loved,

pected, and followed
Bethune is loved and
revered by hundreds of gradu-

of Be.hune-Cockman College
ch she founded in 1904 in the

vy





néern city of Daytona Beach,

da. She is heid in respect by

public officials and private

piorers throughout the nation

wee of her power and per-

i in her fight for equal

For a Brighter, Fresher rights. She is followed by the
Complexion, use Palmolive 200,000 members of the National





Ceuncil of Negro Women, which
ounded in 1935 and which
4s president until her
in 1949. She still iz

McLeod Bethune will
place in history not so
for her personal accom-

Soap as Doctors Advised

Se, de os 36 shin speciaiiem edviseed:
1] Wowk with Palmolive Soap.

2 for 60 seconds, massoge with
Palmalive’s salt, towely kather. Ramen |

Leading skin specialists proved that
Palmolive Soap con improve ‘com-
plexions in many ways. Oily skin looks

ach



2 doy bee 4 hope plishments as for her achieve-
less oily—dull, drab skin wonderfully 3 oe anne [ae asa Negro, in behalf of
brighter. Coarse-looking skin appears the 13,000,000 Negroes in the

United States, and for what she
ha wpired them to do for them-

. T&roughout her full life
she has met adversity and rebuff
with wrath and, more often, with
shrewd humour. “I have no

rity complex,” she asserts.
aking talks before public
: ngs, she writes all her own
speeches and articles as well as
t column which she conducts
in the Chicago Defender, a lead-
ing Negro newspaper in the
econd largest city in the United

finer.





Serv









States. Her prose is picturesque
and poetic when she urges her
people in scords such as these:
“Be a Daniel. Take a vow of
courage. Be miistant. But let the
weapons of determination be
coupled with the armour of jus-
tice and forgiveness.”

She tells tne story of her life
with self-revelation and self-
rrespect. Mary Jane McLeod.

fifteenth child in a family of 17,
we
on July 10,

Il before the community had a







know will make The



good.”
Jane McLeod.

there’s more foam in

is
?

SUNDAY ADVOCATE

By GENEVIEVE FORBES
HERRICK

From COLLIER’S

=

on the Gospel Choir Team \



toured ine orthwestern

States Wher she left
Institute, she turned

In 1897 she met and

fellow teacher, Albertus

He died in 1919. leaving her or
son, Albert, now on the faculty
of his mother’s sahool

- "
At mention of the school, she
closes her eyes and, in the rhythm

of a spiritual (a religious song),

chants: “I had been dreaming.
all my life, down yonder in the
cotton fields, in the classroom,

dreaming, dreaming.

singing in the Ohicago slums,
of big build-

ings and little children — my
own institution.”
In Florida she found some

“frienaly folks” who directed her

to a piece of land and a house

she

cout rent for almost

nothing. She had a feeling it was

one October







Mary McLeod Bethune:

Outstanding American Woman

i reviewing cae school’s

, founder puts first its
ngible asset—her part-
I God. She says
believe in God, and
e in Mary Bethune.”

Mary Bethune had
place as an educator
was 60 vears old and suffered
ma, but she felt there
job for her to do. She




By 35

Sh






ut nec representatives of
Negro women's o -
Mitlined to them her



a federation. Almost
nded she founded the
Council of Negro Women.







ttle



eTsC he council decided to
concentrate on the problem it
considered the most Zz at
that time. The unem-



loyment ef Negroes which was

problem of the economic
pression during the early
1930's. Mrs. Bethune recalls how
she met with government officials
and testified at U.S. Congressional





hearings, speaking as the leader of |

organized Negro women. She laid
groundwork on which the Fair





the right place, so a ; Fs
day in 1904 she openca her schooi E=PYment Practice Committee
at Daytona Beach She had a... my pe Scicaiineae -
dollar and a half, a few make- nployment diserim:

shift pieces of furniture, and five ~~ Hens.

little girls for pupils. She also had done somethi ean dae

faith and

Daytona Educational

initiative.
With a flourish she founded the

and Indus-

trial Training School, and became
its president. She started a one-
woman campaign for funds, gomg

from door to door. To help out
she often sold fried fish and

sweet-potato

pies. No cook her-

self, she had friends provide the

food, while she furnished one of
her best commodities—salesman-




quickly demanded that
do something for them-
impressing on Negroes the
good relations with
loyers and fellow work-
ers. During World War II,
Couneil worked for the admission
of Negro women into all branches
of the service on the same basis
: women. Subsequently,
ethume became the only
member of the women’s

ves
aced
their e









ship. At the end of a toilsome ttee selected te choose can-
day she would wash out her didates for the first officers’
blouse, cut mew cardboard soles tr school of the Women’s
for her shoes, count her money, - Corps. Since the war the
say her prayers, and go to sleep, council has worked for a broad-
ready for a new day. ened Social Security programme,

‘ _ amd a bill for the establishment

Money came in, but slowly

born on a southern plantation When she invited the industrialist
1875. Her parents had and 7 I
been freed from slavery 10 years Gamble, to visit ar —- he
earlier and had earned five acres entered om ne furnished a
of land as their own. Mary was With a wooden crate and a .

philanthropist, James WN.

“And where is this school of

| schcol for Negro children, a one- which you wish me to be a trus-
room building established by the tee







Board of Missions of the Presby- Gamble demanded.
terian hurch. She walked 10 7 Be ie ee cee os
miles. a. day to attend classes, , “10 my mie ane in. my soul,
and at» might taught her older “4! Bethune rep ied. Se
| brothers and sisters to read and Gamble gave her — nce
j te Finishing the school’s 27d advice and became chairman
limited course, she had no place of the school board for the macs
to go but back to the cotton fields. 20 years until his death. In 1923
Then ome sunny morning as the “¢ former grade en Ie girls
famike worked im the field. her “2S ™erged with the Cookman
former teacher appeared. Another Institute to become Bethune-
rural school teacher had written Cookman College. At the same
the Board of Missions that she me It Degen to receive inan-
had saved enough money to give Cial aid from the moard Bie
m education to a Negro girl Cation for Negroes of the Method
provided you can find one you }8t Episcopal Church. Today the

rj college is fully accredited by the
who had been selected was Mary Southern Association of Colleges
vho hz ’ as ; os
buildings

Schools.
Its

and Secondary
faculty of 100.

It has
97

2:

A few weeks later she boarded are dominated, approximately, by

n had never seen one)

a trair ?

to ride 150 miles to the southern dents

city of Concord, North Carolina, Nigeria who are sons )
where she studied at Scotia chiefs. Sixty-five per cent. of its

eight years. She graduates are teachers. Five per
professions. Most of
skilled labourers,
domestic ser-

Seminary for

t

THE ORIGINAL CREAM SHAMPOO IN A TUBES





Chicago to study cent. are in

Faith Hall. Its 1,000 regular stu-
from

include three boys

of tribal

the others

secretaries,

are
and

in

then went to :
two years at the Moody Bible
re Institute. There her lovely mezzo- se
voice won her a place vice.

| soprano



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vi





of a permanent Fair Employment
Practices Commission

cuces

As director of the Division of
Negro Affairs of the National
Yout Administration, she was

the Only member of her race in
that organization at a top level.
In 1939, typical of the seven
spent with the admin-
she travelled 35,000
address 41 meetings in

dedicated six Youth
and made three com-
ent addresses—all this at
of 64. At the United
Conference in San Fran-
© in 1945 she was associate
consultant to the American dele-
gation. After working hours she
addressed 52 California meetings.

Mrs. Bethune

years she






hab known five
Presidents of the United States.
The walking cane she uses was
given her by Mrs. Eleanor Roose
veit from the possessions of the
late President Franklin bd.
ioosevelt. She first met Roosevelt
when he was Governor of the



State of New York. When she

visited him in later years at the
White House, America’s official
Presidential residence,




her was this: “I am always glad
to see you, Mrs. Bethune, for you
always come asking help for
others—never for yourself.”







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: {6} KLI Mis recommended for infant feeding

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‘of the general unemploy- |



President |
Roosevelt's customary greeting to

SUNDAY, FEBRUARY



1952

17,



Budapest lisiens in

to London voice

IT COMES FROM EXILED WOMAN

‘

|

i very day in Budapest and al! over Hungary hundreds

of people creep into

rooms. or hide under tables to listen in secret to the voice
of 27-year-old Miss Beata Szekely broadcasting news
of free Europe to those behind the [ron Curtain

They listen at the risk
imprisonment or even the
lives, for it is forbidden

sponsored programmes

But
they hear from Miss Szeke
from Radio Free Europe
true: they know her voice
and they remember
during thé war.

From 1943. when Budapes:
Beata

' fell to the Germans,

then a 19-year-old studen

listen to the BBC

Jailed five times

She transcribed

i
Engiish news and ran ner | me in London.” she said
own monitoring service with | to-day.
the help of a few schoo! | Most of her broadcasts are
friends.

“Five times I was put into
prison between 1943 and the
end of the war.” she said.
“But they never found the

radio and I would never te
them who worked with me.
lived alone with my mothe

and they imprisoned her, too,

in an effort to make me talk

When the end of the war

t
te

listen to any but the Russian- |

they Know that what

her

i used to hide in the bath to

the |

“upboards. boxrooms or bath-



came Beata was elected a
municipal councillor of
Budapest. But in 1948 she
was warned by friends that
the Russians contempiated
her ~ disappearance.”

ty | “I got a few indirect hints

is that I was not beloved by the

| Communists,” is the way she
puts it.

She obtained a student’s
visa for Holland, and from
there got to England. Her
mother followed in 1949.

“It seems strange’

“It seems strange to think
that onte I hid in the bath to
listen to London in Buda-
pest, and now many people
do the same thing to listen to

t

madr on a tape recorder and

brog icast to Hungary from

Munich by Radio Free
Europe.

“I get messages from

| ¥arious underground

I channels telling me_ that

people listen, many people.’
she said “I know the risks
they take, and I am proud
that they risk their lives to
hear me tell them the truth.”

London Express Service



What’s Cooking

Pizza Alla Napoletana
Pizza is a very well known
speciality of Neapolitan cooking.
It is a good dish, easy to prepare
| and above all very filling.

|__For 6 people:
| Flour, 1 Ib. Dry Yeast, 1
Salt package
Garlic Olive oil
1 tin whole Cheese, 2 table-
tomatoes spoonsful
Dry Marjoram
Sift the flour on the kitchen

table or pastry board. Make a
hole in the middle and put a pinch
of salt. Put the package of yeast
in a cup of lukewarm water and
let it dissolve. Add the yeast to
the flour and add a tiny bit more
of lukewarm water (it should be
1 glass in all). Work the dough
until perfectly smooth. Put it in
a bow! which has a tiny bit of flour

at the bottom and let it rest in a)

warm place for about 2 hours, By
that time the dough will have
doubled its size. Take the oven
cake tin and put some olive oil at
the bottom. Put the dough and
feven it up with your hand until it
|has covered the whole tin. Put
|}$some more oil on the top and
|spread it with your hands. Cut
the garlic in small pieces, put it
on top of the pizza, then put the
| whole tomatoes, sprinkle some
jsalt, and some dry marjoram.
Put it in a hot oven for about 20
minutes or half an hour. Serve



We sat on the gallery of the
Bungalow out of the sun and
talked. So far as I can recall, it
was the unexpected chugging of
an outboard engine that had first
attracted my attention. After all,
down there on the hot sands with

| the time rising midday and hard-

ly a soul around, the busy chug-
chug of an outboard needed some
explanation.

The owner, I discovered, was
Mr. Baisley P. Elebash of New
York although it seemed that city

; and state was more of a postal
| address than anything else, You
| see,
|came here from St.

Mr. Elebash and his wife
Thomas in
the Virgin Islands quite recently,
and should, by rights, be ending
their Caribbean vacation with
maybe a look-in at St, Thomas
on the way home.

} hot. If you don’t like garlic or
olive oil, you can use lard and in-
st of garlic you can put 2 table-
5 sful of gratéd cheese with
the tomatoes,

Pizzelle Alla Napoletana

For 25 pizzelle:
Flour, 1} Ib. Dry Yeast, 1
| Salt package
Water 1 glass Pepper
Garlic Oil or lard
Marjoram Whole tomatoes
Cheese
Sift the flour on the kitchen

}

table or pastry board. Put the
dry yeast in a teacup of lukewarm
water and let it dissolve. Put the
yeast and a pinch of salt in the
middle of the flour and work the
dough like the other pizza, add-
ing lukewarm water and working
the dough until smooth. Put in a
bowl with flour at the bottom and
leave it for two hours. When
ready cut the dough in small
pieces the size of an egg, even each
| piece with your hands and make
small pizze. Put some oil or lard
in a frying pan and when boiling
hot put the small pizze and let
{them fry until they are golden on
both sides. Prepare a tomato
sauce: Put a tiny bit of olive oil
tin a saucepan, add two pieces of
! garlic and let it fry, take it out
j and add the tin of whole tomatoes
and some salt, let it cook until the
sauce is quite thick and then add
a pinch of marjoram. Pour a
‘ tablespoonful of the sauce on each





This'll Interest You...

By William Forres Stewart

weeks searching for fish. Any kind
of fish. Mr, Elebash is not particu-
lar. Like me, I’m not particular
either but the difference is I don’t
catch ‘em. And after that it’ll be
off to New York ,.., to end you'd
think, a fairly extensive vacation.
Well it does end it, even for Mr.
and Mrs. Elebash, until early
July (we're still in the same
year) when it'll be pack-up time
again and off—like you and I
would go off to the Crane or
somewhere — to San _ Francisco,
That's the start of new travels
From there the President Wilson
will steam the Elebashs to silvery
Hawaii for a brief stop-over before
going on to Tokyo. About now,
you’ll gather, the trip is getting
fairly well under way.

The Elebashs



plan to leave

Well, they're going to look inJapan by way of Kobe en route

boat and spend

| alright, and pick up a charterto China and Hong-Kong and go
afew days Cron to

Manila in the Philippines
es ee



GALA OF

f



GALA OF

Sole Agent and Distributor: F. S

Also obtain

LONDON’S 3





MISS SZEKELY
Listeners remember her.



In The Kitchen ?

pizzela and serve them hot,

If you don’t like olive oil or gar-
lic, the sauce can be made with
butter or margarine, tomatoes and
2 tablespoonsful of cheese,

For 6 people:

Flour, 1 Ib. Dry Yeast,

Salt package

— Oil Cheese, Ee
epper spoonsfu

Ham, 3 oz. Lard

Tomato sauce

Work the dough like that for
the pizza and the pizzelle and
leave it in a warm place for about
2 hours,

Grate 2 tablespoonsful of cheese
and cut the ham in very small
pieces. Add a tiny bit of butter,
a pinch of salt, pepper and mix it
all. When dough is ready, put it
on the pastry board or the kitchen
tablq. Roll it with the rolling
pin until it becomes like a disc
with a diameter of 17 inches, and
inch thick. Take a piece of lard
and spread it evenly with your
hand all over the disc; take the
mixture of ham, cheese, butter,
salt and pepper and put it on half
of the disc spreading it evenly.
Close the disc with the other half
and with your hands press the
sides. Put it in the oven for about
20 minutes or half an hour, When
cooked you can serve it with a
tomato sauce seasoned with a bit
of olive oil, salt and pepper.



and from there return to Hawaii
and Honolulu where they'll spend
two or three weeks covering these
beautiful vag et a a ro

rd for the y politic -
aa Mrs, Baisley P, Elebash will
ignore the President Wilson in
favour of the equally luxurious
President Cleveland for their re-
turn to the Pacific Coast and San
Francisco, It’ll be a car after that,
to Los Angeles then home to New
York (remember?) via the stream-
liner Santa Fe Express,

We continued to sip cool drinks
and sit out of the sun, Td got
bogged down somewhere in China
and was slow in boarding that
home-bound Santa Fe Express:
I looked again at Baisley P. Ele-
bash and his charming — wife.
These were delightful people and
it was hard to think of them doing
anything else but just sitting here
with me in Barbados. Unhurried
slow spoken, kind and hospitable
in their little beach house, they'd

been around and about this planet
| more times than I’d have thought
| possible

So it’s a fair compliment to
Barbados when globe spanners of
the Elebash calibre come around
these parts year after year and
never tire of this small isle, its
sunshine and its people. And be-

, fore they leave, somewhere in the

0 . | confusing list of continents and

} : Soaetes comprising the Elebash

\b % travel intinerary for 1953, there'll
pes ‘



be the Caribbean and Barbades.



Face Colo, tov |The Truth in

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tone at will with Gala ‘ Face
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Gala Face Creams.

LONDON

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able ‘rom all the leading Scores,

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Your Horoscope

—_———

Would you like to know what the
Stars indicate for you ? Would you like
to test free the skill of Pundit Tabore,
India’s most famous Astrologer. who by
applying the
ancient science to
useful purposes
has built up an
enviable reputa-
tion? The ac-
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predictions and
the sound practi-
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Horoscopes on
Business, Specu-
‘ation, Finances,
Love affairs,
Friends, Enemies,
Lotteries, ete.,
bave astounded
educated people
the world over.
George Mackey
of New York be-
lieves that Tabore rm
of second-sight. i

To popularise his syster. Tabore will!
send you FREE your Astral Interpreta-
tion if you forward him your full name
(Mr, Mrs. or Miss), address and date of
birth all clearly written by yourself. No
money wanted for Astrological Work,
Postage etc., but send 1/- in British
Postal Order for stationery, testimonials
and other interesting literature. You will
be amazed at the remarkable accuracy
of his statements about oe and your
affairs. Write now as this offer may pot
eat mate again. Address: PUNDIT
TABORE, (Dept. 213-D), Upper Forjett
Street, Bombay 26, India, Postage to India
is 4 cen*e



ist possess some sort
SUNDAY, FEBRUARY 17,

1952



THE BLONDE WOMAN |
WHOSE NAME IS TABOO |

Eva has the Fear of Death in the
Peron Land of Biuaff

Ready for gelaway if meat ruse fails

By MAC DONALD DALY

—_ has ue returned from a

wo-month tour judging at

South American Sprcoluien
and livestock shows,

President Juan Peron of the
Argentine, who on Friday told
Britain she must pay double last
year’s price for beef in 1952, was
bluffing—bluffing in a big way.
For the Argentine is on her knées.

“Nature and the Government,”
as one cattle-breeder put it,
“have combined to ruin the un-
ruinable.”

He meant that a combination of
Peron and a three-year drought
has defeated even the fertility of
12ft. of good black earth, Corn is
short, grass is short, calves are
short,

To understand the Argentine
you must know that the peopie
will never think in the British
terms of “When a man is down,
help him get up.”

They Whisper . . .

When a man is down in the
Argentine that is the time to kick
him to death.

In the luxurious Jockey Club of
Buenos Aires, where one-time
society now gathers to lick its
wounds and whisper about Peron,
they tell you: “There is only one
thing we subscribe to—and that
is his ruthlessness. If we were
in the same position we would
do the same to him.”

The Perons are ready to duck
out any day now. A vast outflow
of wealth which has crippled the
peso on the exchanges of the world
is secreted in Switzerland in the
names of General and Senora

Peron.

Forbidden
Senora Peron? I almost, by
habit, hesitated to mention her.

For no one does in Buenos Aires.

Hers is the forbidden name.
“The Lady,’ “Mrs. You-Know,”
“Our Blond Bombshell,” they say.
But not ever “Eva” in case the
taxi-driver, the chambermaid, or
the waiter is an informer,

Yet you cannot turn right or
left without seeing her name and
her pictures on walls, shop-win-
dows, houses, and even corporation
dust carts,

“Peron—Eva” appears
murals at the airport.

“Peron—Eva” is repeated on
the posters round the unfinished
housing estates which line the
roads to Buenos Aires.

“Peron—Eva” sang a procession
of white-robed 15-year-olds as
they marched through the centre
of the city.

Above me, as I did my shop-
ping—at the world’s cheapest rate

on the

—down the Argentine’s Bond-
street, the Florida, there flared a
gigantic scaffolding, 50ft, high,
the whole street in length, chron-
icling the virtues of Eva and her
man.

Fear

The Peron bluff is the biggest
since Hitler tried his hand at
power polities, It may be even
bigger if it can fool Britain.

Most of Buenos Aires to-day is
on the pattern of Berlin in 1938.
—helmeted troops, huge flags,
hysterical marching adolescents,
an accent on athletics, and a very
particular~hatre@ of Britain,

Behind it all is the same throb-
bing undercurrent of fear.

At one end are the people who
are afraid to mention Eva. At the
other is Eva herself.

Eva can frighten them easily
A man spoke against her. She
ruined him in five minutes by
lifting her bedside phone and
saying: “The inspector has found
cockroaches in his factory. I will
not tolerate it. The place must}
close.” |

Lonely |

But her own fear, and the!
fear of the clumsy soldier by her
side, ds the fear of death,

Rarely does the city see them |
in public. In their palace they sit
at a lonely table eating food which
has first passed through a corps}
of food-tasters. |

There was a sensation at the!
British Embassy one_ night before |
Fva’s illness when the President
and his.lady insisted on their)
tasters sampling every dish during |
a dinner with the Ambassador, ,

Even Eva’s poodle has a food)
taster.

Over
the Argentine’s fortunes
world’s markets looms the silent,



all the dizzy descent of |
in the|

sinister figure of Juan Duarte, |
Eva’s brother. |
Waiting |

“There is now no black market |
in the Argentine,” said a Brazil-
ian friend. “There is only Juan
Duarte.”

Peron’s ranchers cannot pay
for the bulls they bought at auc-
tion in Seotland last year.

Yesterday I talked to Scottish
breeders who are still waiting for
their money—and are not parting
with their bulls till they get it.

The Argentine banks cannot
release the money béeause they
do not have the sterling,

They scream for sterling as
loudly as they scream for dollars.

And intelligent men in the
Argentine are asking, with greater
insistence: “How long can the
bluff go on?



BLACK!

The Paris Silhouette without a Waist

By SUSAN DEACON

PARIS.

TS first day of the Spring dress

shows opened in Paris with
collections by Jacques Heim,
Bruyere, and Paquin; the mas-
ters Dior and Fath have yet to
show.

And if the first day is anything to
go by, it will be a spring séason
of untrimmed hats, sombre col-
ours, and lots of black—the hats
I show in the pictures are ex-
ceptional.

Low Sleeves

The biggest fashion news so far is
in the hip line and the sleeve.

The HIP LINE is emphasised with
either skin-tight hip draping on
a straight skirt or by all-round
fulness or pléating starting at
the hips.

SLEEVES are often set low in the

shoulder seam. The rounded
shoulder line is _ fashionable
again, Paquin shows enormous

sleeves on loose coats and day
dresses which balloon out in a
winged point.

Heim ignores the waist line. Many
of his suits have loosely belted
boxy jackets,

The skirt length is about one inch
longer, but the neck line is high-
er on day dresses. White school-
boy collars and soft bow ties are

in,

COLOURS are mainly all-black
{with black accessories] — or
white [with black accessories].
Vivid coloured accessories are
worn with shades of grey or
beige,

Still Strapless

I was sorry to see that Paris is

still showing strapless evening |

and cocktail dresses.



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CeneictitiltiieearencantiinninienianannseeilD

Strapless dresses are finished in
London, They are no longer
smart.

The halter neck or single shoulder
strap has taken their place.

In Paris TULLE and LACE are

still fashionable for evening
dresses which are now finely
pleated, wide-skirted, short or

full length, and fan pleated from
the waistline.

English fabrics are used by many
Paris designers.

“Wintry” Hats

HATS: The pastel-coloured straws
massed with spring flowers have
unhappily almost disappearea,

This year’s straws and felts are
vivid-coloured either untrim-
med or with ribbon or feather
mounts.

They looked wintry.

CARVIN'S collection is the most
interesting and most colourfully
dressed show seen in Paris so
far. The clothes are inspired by
a trip to Mexico.

The trend follows that of the other
shows—with flowerless hats, lots
of sleeve interest, and both wide
and narrow skirts. The hem
‘line in this collection is again
one inch longer.

Fine Prints

Carvin has some of the most beau-
tiful prints seen in either Lon-
don or Paris so far, Cottons are
shadow-printed and have bold
Mexican flowers and animals
bordering the hem line.



P.O. Box 27







A woman who Should

never

» = GRASS IS SINGING. By Doris
Lessing. Michael Joseph. 9s. 6d
756 pages.

rAXHIS novel velongs to the

new generation of
writers which, almost

every month, turns up a

iresh talent clemouring for

notice and judgment.

The Grass is Singing is sincere,
inexpert, powerful and
promising. Its atithor is a
woman, from South Africa, home
of so many iamous women
writers.

Its story is ugly and pitiful,
with its own version of human
dignity preserved somehow im
squalor and defeat.

And its theme, underlying the
story, is that tragic social
dilemma_of our time: the Cold
War of Colour. Here it is, trans-
lated into the calamitous life of
Dick Turner and his wife, Mary,
and played out in the oppressive

ir of the lonely tin shack,
anoas the dust devils of the
veidt.

No villains here and no heroes.
The casual brutalities of white
farmers, like their ually
casual outbreaks of _ kindness,
are too much part of a social
pattern to provoke
condemnation.

As for the natives, they are
cunning. they are stupid and, on
the whole, they are disagreeable.
This novel spins no sentimental
web round them. It is an assault
»n your pity, not on your tear-
ducts,

Mary should, of course, never
have married Dick. Probably she
should not bave married at all.

She was a “good sport,” life
and soul of the tennis club
dances, and rather under-sexed.

Overhearing a malicious con
versation one day (“ How absurd

she looks, @ressed like a gifl in
her ‘teens”) ts the notion of
martiage into her head. Dick

comes into town about that time,
buying stores for his farm.

It is not much of a farm and
Dick not much of a farmer, Mary
is even more feckless, She eannot
endure the heat. the drought, the
deadening loneliness. Above all,
she cannot manage the native
servants.

The Turners are well on their
way down to the “ poor white”
level by the time Moses comes
back to help in the house.

He is a huge black man; once
Mary had struck him with a
whip. But now things are some-
how different between them.
Mary is awate of Moses; soon
she is aware of no one else. At
first, with anger.

“When a white man in Africa

accident looks into the eyes
of a native and sees the human
being, his sense of guilt fumes
up ih resentment and he brings

down tke whip.
Later, Macy (by now hardly



For colours, pinky beige takes the
place of navy blue and grey.
Evening dresses in the Carvin col-
lection are mostly full length

with one bare shoulder.

The ‘Masher’

IN LONDON earlier in the week
the Big Ten concentrated mostly
on tailored suits, dresses, and
matching jackets and top coats.

Lachasse’s “masher” line for suits
is the newest London line, It has
a straight skirt and boxed

. Edwardian jacket with high flat
revers.

| liked the London short evening

dresses with their feminine
fluffy skirts shown by Hartnell
and Hardie Amies. Colours in

London were as sombre as in
Paris.
—LES.





SCANDAL
By R. M. MACCOLL

PRETTY JANET GORDON,
who is on the New York State
Legislature, is sick and tired ot
a _ long-standing seandal—the
State’s divorce laws. She, in
sommon with many other people,
dislikes the “hypocracy” and “no-
torious frauds” attendant on too
many actions, ang the “noncha-
lant perjury” they engender. So
she proposes a Times correspond~-
ent: “Mr. Goldstein’s spectacular
feat in sparing millions of TV
fans further punishment came
when he stopped a _ horrendous
charade called a prize-fight at
Madison Square Garden. Neither

fighter was any the worse for

wear, but Ruby obvious|y had
the setowners in mind. They cer-
tainly were in nc position to de-
fend themselves.”




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= 2

oa this novel.

Im the end he could work for
only three or four minutes at a
time, after which he would lic
aimost blind and with a_ raging
headache. He _ died,
December 30, 1948.

A Voice Through a Cloud is
in fiction, the story of an illness
k ‘s moving and uncomfortably
v , it has the acuteness, with-
out the distortions; of pain. It
is bitter and courageous

Ht states a kind of distrustfu'
integrity in a series of brilliant
pictures of fellow - patients,
nurses, anxious relatives. It is
mature, with disarming flashes
of youthful timidity. It is hardly
a novel at all. But it is a deep
e ience.

elch was a writer born
even physical disaster could
frustrate his angry, sensitive
talemt. Showid we say genius ?



31, on

Not

Should we say genius?
DENTON WELCH Xe

~
”

sane) is haunted in

by the gigantic black re. Twelve Against the Law. By Edward
ey are like two antagon ®. Radin, Heinemann. 10s, 6d.
But he is sure of himself; ont 246 pages.

yagerarne’, Mente by ver TP WAESE excellent crime stories
obsession. : hawe the advantage of being

It ends at the moment where
the book opens—with the srur-
der of Mary and the arrest of

. Radin has not needed to
use his imagination, He has gone

to the newspapers, to the police
Moses ( ws theft). Dick is records (mostly Now Yors
out of his mind. records)

Only Tony, a man not His talent lies in giving fresh
long out from pogen shows an ness those bygone annals of
; rrassing readiness toexplain. iniquity.

Charlie Slatter, Dick's = rich For example, to the Green
neighbour, soon shuts ‘him wp. Parrot murder on Third Avenue,
It is a “bad business. in which the critical evidence

was provided by a parrot which
kept on calling out “ Robber,
robber.” Until one day a detec
tive decided the bird was talking

Under that muttered formula,
White South Africa resolutely
buries the unsavoury affair.

The note never forced ing ft

aura abe Sore wired Ret nated acoede |

pa ie g, tbat A most readable sheaf ot

fannet hed, t 18 wickedness.

imp! it in the peonte, ne,

the climate. might be 4

merely sordid=takes on.a- kind Wate... Oo. | { ma

of pride. ht

Student Body. By> M. R.
* Hodgkin. Gollancr, 9s. 6d. 226
pages.

Scene: an American college.

' By Dea
sg jh a Cloud BY ‘Theme: blackmail and murder

Welch. Lehmann. 10s..6d. 256

Writer: an American woman,
pages. newcomer to rer me
HE most « astoni: & thi gemou worke ou and

», abou! jihis bose isa mot ta amusingly told,
it is written so brillian
a) vis i . Ne Duty on a Corpse. By Max
teat dee wae Weis at all, Murray. Michael Theeph, Bs. 6d.
c . 208 pages.

Denton Welch was born. in
Sharighat in 1917 and brought-up
in China. He was,studying art
ia London when* (aged#18) he
was tee .victim of a, road” acci-

A murder takes place on 4
transatlantic liner called the
» Queen Alexandra, It should have
‘been easy to solve. But it

fron é » appears that many people had
pent 3 ate ere tis eine 4, reason to kill Leonora Buth. Mr
had been broken. Murray brings a light touch to his
The interval was filled with %Mmbre topic.
hospitals, doctors, and London Bapres Service.

pain



righter Sun-— By Samuel Selvon |

os
— Man
| Expressly designed to meet the
jneeds of the tourist is the depart-
'mental store of Cave, Shepherd &
|Co., Ltd., on Broad St. Within
jits féur walls amq@ on all floors
|the rich nature of Cave Shep-
|herd’s imported stock has no
\superior anywhere in the Carib-
bean. Won't you come with me
|for a few minutes and see? Here,
\for instance, are superb silks,
jlinens and cottons bearing the
magie name of Liberty, which
famous name and house, Cave
Shepherd's represent. And ladies’
scarves gnd hankies as well as

Men's neckties and dressing
gowns and attrartive character
|dolls are all of Li manufac-

ture. Let's look at China and the
extraordinary perfection of
| Wedgewood — here at Cave
|Shepherd’s in Dinner Sets and
| Novelty Ashtrays. This selection
fof figurines is in Royal Doulton,
|Now, with thoughts of travelling
| North, we'll just have a breath-
jtaking lpok at the wonderful
; value and quality in these Ladies’
}and Men's Top-coats in Pashm!
| Cloth, Georgian Covert and Doe-
| skin,
{genuine Tartan designs, while’
| English Doeskin Gloves, Ladies’.
jand Men’s Cashmere Sweaters
{and Men's Cashmere Top-coats
land Sports Jackets are right out
jot this world
\value. I know you're excited, but
\wait — I’ve more to show you.
This comfortable looking Man's
|Top-coat is of Genuine Harris
| Tweed and a ne handy thing
|for the ‘plane. ‘ow, to idle yet
awhile on this isle, and I ho;

|gashtel Linen Suits for Men, andj
|Shorts, too, in plain colours,
| They're extremely cool and crease
| resistant.
jfew of the highlights at Cave
| Shepherd's, not forgetting the
big counter of Local Handicrafts
| of fascinating design and crafts-
manship. Everything you could
wish for is here at Cave Shep-
}herd’s on Broad St. — known

‘throughout the West Indies by
those who travel.

| * . .

| Higher Education for your

‘children — like the sound of it?
;You will when you know it’s
|} guaranteed! And to provide so
| very important & guarantee is the
j business of the Manufacturers
| Life Insurance Company through
| their chief representative, Peter
|De Verteville. In his new office
jin the K. R. Hunte Building on
Lower Broad St. (ph. 2845), Peter
| will show you how you can place
the obligation of financing your
children’s education in the event
of your death, squarely on the
|shoulders of a great financial in-
stitution.

in quality and:

LONDON

Samuel Selvon, former “Trini-
dad Guardian” journalist now
living in London has recalled to
the full his exciting memories of
home in his new book “A Bright-
er Sun”.

The story of Tiger, a young In-
dian boy, and his childhood mar~-
riage to Urmilla is developed
against a background of Trinidad
in the late 30’s and the period of
the American ‘occupation’ after
the declaration of war.

Selvon describes graphically the
way of life in Chaguanas a sugar-
cane district halfway down the

More beautiful?

Western coast of the island where
it ves, chinese, and Indians live
for the most part in

together,
harmony. :

The picturesque speech, habits
and morals of the villagers are
accurately reported. But many
English readers may find it tedi-
ous and hard to understand the

local dialect which Selvon uses
with such delight. All West In-
dians, however, will find them-

selves really at home in the pages |

of this book.

Published by Alan Wingate
(Publishers) Ltd,, 12, Beauchamp
Place, London S.W.3. Price 11/6d.



|



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jer







About Jown |

A car that has created a recor i]
in consistency ever since it hit tne?
motoring worla with I[ront-wheei
drive — the Cilmosuy a
beautifully manulacturea auto-
mobile, the new 4-cylinder, §

hp. CITROEN is now in barba-
dos Agencies Ltd. Neable ser-
vice — in fact, absolute dependa-
bility is in every standing and
moving part of it and $4,2/0 is a
low expenditure for such atiri-
butes these days. But talk it over
with the CITROEN engineer
he'll not only tell you things —

he’ll prove them!
. .

Received a Wedding invitation
recently ? Bet you have and
can't make up your mifd on a
suitable gift. Let me heip you...
Stuart Crystal available in com-
plete sets is a gorgeous gift tor
anyone....a plated Silver Tea
Service
Dinner Service for twelve (with
matching Tea and Coffee Sets)
from $72.60....Truly beautiful
Cutlery, loose or in Canteens —
all of this and much more is

Ladies’ Suits are of the Yoffered at Louis L. Bayley’s on
|very finest of English Tweed in:

Bolton Lane.
e

* .

A ‘Jeep’ for Boys only! It’s a
Hercules, the very new Hercules
Cyele now in Barbados Co-op
Cotton Factory Ltd. You'll see
their Ad. on page 3 today. A
really sturdy and well balance
‘machine with lots of fine features
this Hercules is going to be really
popular. The Co-op also have
‘the mew Hercules for Girls,

.Ladies and Men, in 18”; 21” and
you do, you may care to look ath22”
Cave Shepherd's readymade Moy-:'Green and Black

Colours are
and models
range from Sports ‘to Roadster.
But come on in and see them!
In any lang — for any land,

frame sizes.

Well, there you have asthere’s nothing to really compare

with the Massey-Harris Tractor,
That wonderful machine with all
its many attachments including
Grass Mowers, Grass Loaders,
Rakes and Manure Loaders and
Spreaders. This last, incidentally,
is highly suitable for the applica-
tion of Bagasse in the fields. It's
Courtesy Garage for Massey-Har-
vis with Tyres or Steel Wheels or
Half Tracks, whichever you pre-
fer and for Cane Trailers, too.
” ak x

Long, long awaited but here it
is now. At Manning’s Corner
Store, the new KELVINATOR
Electric Refrigerator with 4,18
cu, ft. mett food storage, alumin-
um Ice Trays, Crisper, Chilling
Tray and durable cabinet finish
that will neither crack nor change
colour, is here to display and
prove its food keeping superiority
—with economy! The Kelvinator
really is a buy at $395. Neat, well
built amd space saving.
see it in the Corner Store.

ON SALE AT

Broad St.

a

* EASY TO SEW
* EASY TO WASH
* AND IN SUCH

You'll;

&

from $45 up....China} \...

A KING’S STORY

THE MEMOIRS OF HR.H.
THE DUKE OF WINDSOR, KG.

ADVOCATE STATIONERY

&. Greystone,

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PAGE EIGHT

3ARBADOS gi ADVOGATE

eT enw Se PSonaS ae)
Printed by The Adverstec Co.. Ltd. Broad St, Bridsetews

"Sunday, February 17, 1952

LOVTAL FOOD

AMENDMENTS have been made to the
Control of Prices Order 1951 and a num-
ber of items have been decontrolled since
the schedule was printed.

Bags, balanced animal feed, balanced
poultry feed, breadfruit, certain brands ot
butter. eggs, salted fish, pickled herrings,
pickled mackerel, avocado pears, oats,
okras, and pickled salmon, are no longer
controlled. Other items which are still
controlled have increased in price since
the schedule was printed.

These include corned beef, bread, salted
butter, table butter, cement, charcoal,
firewood, fresh fish, flour, lard, margarine,
fresh and frozen meat, condensed milk,
fresh milk, edible oil, rice, tinned salmon,
certain brands of sardines, and soap.

It is likely that there will be further
increases during the year.

The Government employs more than one
method of keeping down rising prices.

Rice which is being sold to the public
for 10 cents per pint will cost the Govern-
ment $3.41 per bag in subsidies when the
equalisation fund which is now being used
to cushion the rise, has been exhausted.
The price of salted pork remains un-
changed because the government is buy-
ing less for the prices paid when the
schedule was printed. The rise in the price
of salted pork is concealed by this method,
but if larger quantities were required the
public would have to pay more.

With regard to biscuits the government
has left the retail price at 2 cents for 7
sunrise and 2 cents for 3 eclipse, but has
reduced the wholesale price from $2.72 per
carton of 24 lbs. (sunrise) to $2.60 per
same carton and from $2.85 per carton of
24 Ibs. (eclipse) to $2.73 per carton.

In- several ways the government is
attempting to keep down the cost of living
by keeping down prices.

Many opinions are expressed upon the
subject of controls and most people are
grateful that the existence of controls pre-
vents all prices from rising at once.

But in one respect controls are having
an effect which was certainly not intend-
ed. In “Labour Marches On” which Mr.
Adams has stated to be the policy of the
party with a majority in the House of
Assembly, the Party promises to inten
sify “the Grow More Food” campaign
which includes the rearing of live-stock
and further assistance to the fishing indus-
try. This is an excellent intention and
everyone hopes that it will be carried out.
Yet how can it be so long as controls are
maintained on the prices of locally pro-
duced food? The only local articles of
diet, which have recently been removed
from the schedule of Control Prices are
breadfruit, eggs, avocado pears, and okras.

Still on the list are yams, sugar, milk,
fresh meat, margarine, lard, bananas,
plantains, Julie mangoes, grapefruit,
oranges, fish, eddoes, coconuts, bread, bis-
cuits, sweet potatoes, and butter.

Not all the best intentions in the world
will encourage people to grow more food
if yams cannot be sold retail for more than
4 cents per lb. potatoes for more than 3
cents per lb., and eddoes for more than 4
cents per lb., while imported rice even at
its artificially controlled price sells for 10
cents per pint.

It is true that by law plantations are
compelled to plant 21 per cent. of the
arable acreage with ground provisions, but
not even the law can encourage anyone to
sell more food when the reward is so
strictly limited.

Less than a year ago during a debate in
the House of Assembly on April 24th, 1951,
Mr. H. A. Dowding said “there are several
plantations today with acres of yams still
in the ground because they have not been
sold.” According to official reports these
conditions do not exist this year, but
although yams may not be surplus it is
common knowledge that locally grown
provisions and green vegetables are un-
naturally expensive because of the control
that hawkers keep over distribution.

If the government is to intensify food
production it must take yams, potatoes
and eddoes off the control list and should
encourage private retailers to distribute
locally grown provisions and vegetables
with the same efficiency that they now dis-
tribute imported provisions and vege-
tables.

Local enterprises will never be attracted
towards the marketing of locally grown
foods unless they are allowed to fix their
own prices. If a guarantee of support
were given by the government, many of
the exorbitant profiteering prices of
locally grown vegetables would disappear,
while the consumption of potatoes, yams
and eddoes would almost certainly in-
crease if reasonable profits could be made
out of their distribution.

It is true that rice is more easily cooked
and therefore needs less fuel and that
sweet potatoes and yams have far greater
water content.

Yet it seems very bad economics to sub-
sidise the price of imported rice, while
yams and potatoes and other ground pro-
visions are surplus as they have been on
several occasions in recent years.

, than $73.50.



SO +k a - : . ae sic
ground provis g will the

ns, $80 lon retail





stores be di rested their distribu-
tion. And if removal of controls failed to
give the necessary incentive then the gov-
ernment might well consider either leav-

ing rice free to find its own market level
or cutting the quantity imported so as to
compe} more people to eat locally grown
The average Barbadian has become
so accustomed to rice that he or she is un-
likely to eat less except when there is no
choice.

The money saved on rice subsidies
might perhaps be better employed to keep
down the price of milk, which is so largely
dependent on the price of imported bal-
anced animal feed over which the local
government has'no control.

foods.

MEAT AND FISH

IF the Government is faced with the
unpleasant burden of subsidising rice
while there is always a possibility of local
ground provisions not being sold, the situ-
ation with regard to livestock rearing and
fishing in Barbados is yet worse.

Not even the recent rise of 20 cents per
Ib, for roast beef or of 22 cents per Ib. for
other cut beef will encourage the raising
of steers. It has been estimated with great
accuracy that it will cost $649.31 to raise a
steer to the age of 3 years. Even with beef
at its present price of 68 cents per lb. for
roast steak, rump, round sirloin and ribs’
and at 58 cents per lb. for all other cuts,
the return to the owner-slaughterer of a
900-lb. steer will hardly exceed $300. For
the owner who has to buy fodder this re-
turn represents a loss of more than $300.
For the owner who can obtain free grazing
on someone’s else plantation the loss will
only be $100. But so long as the prices
of animal feed remain at their present
levels, there will always be a loss unless
controls are removed on locally produced
meat. Even if this were done the cost of
local beef would become prohibitive for
all except a relatively small. number of
people. Yet if the party with a majority
in the House of Assembly is to implement
its promise to intensify the rearing of
livestock, it will only be able to do so by
removing controls on the price of locally
produced beef. The formation of a central
milk depot right assist in reducing the
high cost of beef that would result from
the removal of price controls by increasing
the amount of beef available from cows
which had passed their milking days but
whose beef could be sold for much less
than specially raised steers.

With regard to other livestock the situ-
ation is correspondingly difficult for rear-
ers of pigs and sheep. The estimated cost
of raising a pig to the age of one year is
approximately $85. With pork at 42 cents
per lb. a 225-lb. pig cannot produce more

Nothing but the removal of price con-
trol on pork will encourage people to rear
pigs at their own expense, although the
“swill” system permits many pig-keepers
to make a small profit.

Sheep seem only to be kept profitably
by those who can avail themselves of free
pasturage. Even if a sheep is slaughtered
at the age of 1 year and four months by
an owner who has had to buy its feed from
birth he will have spent $60 to earn $35.

The Government is wisely encouraging
peasants to improve the pedigree of their
sheep, but it is discouraging would-be
owners of sheep from keeping any sheep
at all by controlling mutton at present
prices of x cents per Ib. for legs and loin
chops, 48 chnts per Ib. for shoulders, and
42 cents pet lb. for stew.

There seems little reason why controls
should be retained on locally produced
mutton.

The only rearers of livestock who seem
to make any worthwhile profits at all are
those who butcher calves for veal. With
legs and loin chops at 54 cents per lb. and
stew veal at 40 cents per lb. it is possible
to make a profit on the sale of veal. But
the popularity of veal with livestock rear-
ers reduces the quantity of meat which
could be produced by fully grown ani-
mals. The control of local meat certainly
cannot be said to intensify the rearing of
livestock.

Nor is the control of fish prices the best
method of further assisting the fishing in-
dustry.

The Government has been most gener-
ous in its treatment of fishermen who lost
their boats during the high tides of
December last year. It has encouraged
the fishing industry through its support
of the Fisheries Department and the re-
search work done by the Investigator, will
when fully applied, be very beneficial to
fishermen,

But the industry cannot be expanded,
unless fishermen are given greater incen-
tive than that offered now when fish prices
are controlled.

One result of controls of fish prices is
the flouting of the law by fish hawkers
who profiteer at the expense of the con-
sumer and of the fishermen. The majority
party in the House of Assembly is com-
mitted to a policy of encouraging live-
stock and the fishing industry, but it is
prevented from doing so by the controls
on prices of local meat and fish. There
seems to be only one way out.



;













SUNDAY



‘Sitting On The Fene

The war between walkers and
motorists is almost as bitter and
prirnitive as the war between men
and women.

There are two schools of thought
on the question. One believes that
all motorists are devils and all
walkers are angels.

The other believes that all mo-
‘orists are angels and all walkers
devils. It depends on whether you
are driving a car or dodging one.

I am inclined to the theory that
most of them are neither angels
nor devils, but just plain idiots.

Therefore, when framing new
regulations, the obvious thing is
© invite the aid of a mental s
‘lalist who will certify the lot,
walkers and motorists, and leave
he country safe for sane loafers
vho hate walking and driving and
nerely want to eat, sleep, drink,
nd lounge about.

Stuffing A Colonel

A Colonel (I have forgotten his
1ame) living somewhere in Eng-
‘and has probably made himself
‘xtremely unpopular with animal
overs by stating that stuffed cats
laced in a field scare away crows
etter than anything.

>. *

I suppose I shall be unpopular
with colonel lovers if I. suggest
hat stuffed colonels would be
even better.

In appearance they are muah
nore frightening than ca, es-
necially if you can get hold of
those with lurninous noses,

They are also far less useful
than cats because, although fre-
quently haunted by mice, they
cannot catch them.

They cost more to keep, and
are regarded as pests by almost
everybody.

The cost of stuffing a colonel
is about £10, including caviare
and champagne.

If all the words I write each

On ith October, 1884, the
Barbados Telephone Company

the Tropical American Telephone
Co, Ltd., which is said, in records
f the Company,
‘unctioning for three years before
the sale.

At the time the Company
vossessed 150 instruments of which

his handbook of jos
wotices how up to date Barbados
was in this ani other respects
(even anticipating England in
passing legislation to enable a
man to marry his deceased wife’s
sister).

Not that telephones in those
days were the simple instruments
we know today. The Tropical
American Telephone Co, Ltd. is-
ued a special sheet of instruc-
tions to subscribers. One of these
sheets is on display at the,
Museum. It begins with the -
emptory notice that “subscri
will please read carefully and
observe strictly the following.”

ist: On being called do not
“ing back, but respond as prompt-
'y as possible, by removing the
receiver from the hook and plac-
ing it to the ear with the usual
“what is wanted” in an ordinary
but clear and distinct voice, with
the mouth one foot from the trans-

mitter,

2nd: To call the exchange
press the crank of the call box
inward and turn it = twice

round vigorously. After which
do not wait for the operator to
ring back, but remove the
receiver from the hook and
place it to’ the ear when the

operator will ask what is
wanted. Then make your
wishes known, keeping the
receiver at the ear until the
desired connection has been!
established and the communica~
tion concluded immediately

after which, ring off by hanging

the receiver upon the hook and

turning the crank as above
mentioned.”

How much simpler to lift the
handset, wait for the dialling tone
and then dial, replacing the hand~
set when speech is finished.

The specimen sheet of instruc-
tions issued by the Tropical Am-
erican Telephone Company gives
, total list of subscribers. It is
noteworthy that there were only
three subscribers’ in Hastings of
which one was the Marine Hotel,
There was one subscriber (a
store) in Holetown and the Lines
to Hastings and Speightstown
were known as trunk lines, Most
other subscribers seem to have

ADVOCATE

Dr. ADEKAUER GOES

—$———$———_——$—————————

“What Is Wanted”

urchased for $12,000 the stock of lif



2@

(By NATHANIEL GUBBINS)..

year to the officials of the Inland
Revenue explaining why I
shouldn’t pay something I don’t
owe were collected and printed as
funny articles in newspapers or
magazines, they would not only

be funnier than most funny arti- ©

cles in newspapers and magazines,
but I should also earn twice as
much money and thus increase the
national revenue.
It’s Not Only Ducks That
Waddle
“Women begin to waddle at
the age of 50.”.—Profound ob-. .
servation in Woman's page.
Ever since the child could tod-
dle
She had been inclined to wad-
dle,
Though in deportment
later
Kept her just a little straighter.
Middle-age, the birth of twins
Sent her rocking on her pins.
She wobbled so that folks, of
course,
Nicknamed her “The Rocking
Horse.”
Now, at the age of fifty - three,
She staggers like a ship at sea,
Reeling through the streets at

lessons

night,
A derelict without a light.
its more than one can do, we
feel,
To keep her on an even keel.
Indeed. It’s now our fondest
hope
To fit her with a gyroscope.
Heart To Heart—1
Girls go on writing to me about
their troubles, and I do my best
to give them advice, Below is a
heartbreaking appeal from “PUZ-
ZLED.”
“I have been engaged to a boy
for seven years. In all that time
he has never given me a pres-

By GEORGE HUNTE

been doctors or people in public
e.

When the Comoarty was bought
out by the Barbados Telephone
Company its monthly revenue
was $542.50, Today a_ similar
number of subscribers for the
same period produces only $493.00
for the present com i

Some idea of the cost of tele-
phoning may be obtained from a
notice in the Agricultural Reporter
of October 21, 1884 announcing
the installation of Barbados Rail-
way Telephones.

“Telephones have been erected”
says the notice, “at the railway
stations at Bridgetown, Bulkeley,
Carrington, Bushy Park, Three
Houses, Bath, Bathsheba, and St.
Andrew and messages will be for-
warded at the an rates:

Messages of 12 words or under
—24 cents.

Use of instruments at any two
stations for five minutes—24 cents,
,, Planters ordering or. sending
freight by train — 12 words or
under—12 cents.

Messages will be delivered with-
in 4 mile of stations free; if ex-
ceeding } mile a special delivery
charge will be made.”

The Telephone was used as a
means of spreading fire alarms
and the Tropical American Tele-
phone Company issued instruc-

tions that “an operator will re- expen

main on duty at all hours, nights
and § not excepted to at-

tend to calls.”
An old chart framed in the
office of the present Barbados

Telephone Company recalls the
rogress of telephony in the
land since 1884. There were 230

subscribers in 1886, one thousand

and fifty in 1918 and 1,960 in 1930.
Between 189! and 1892 the

Albert Hall which had, until then,

frequently been used by touring

theatrical companies was bought
for $8,900 and is still used as the
present Company's Headquarters
in 1952. The Company’s capital

was increased to £4,000 in 1885.

In 1902 it went into liquidation

and a new company was formed

on the Ist April with a capital of
£15,000. In 1913 the capital was
increased to £20,000 (Today the
present company’s authorised
capital is £131,250).

In 1914 earth circuits (one wire
and an earth) were replaced by

metallic circuits (two wires), This D.

was a great improvement since
it practically eliminated over-
hearing.

In 1916 telephone service was
extended to St, John and St.
Joseph and in 1917 ownership of
the countfy servicés and govern-
ment lines was transferred to the
Company,



UP i3 TRE Liz









BER-F00M

ent or said a kind word,

“The last time I saw him,
about two years ago, he was
very rude to my mother, and
when I reminded him of his
promise he flew into a violent
rage.

“Since then he has left the
neighbourhood, and only wrote
to me once, asking for a loan
of ten shillings. Do you think
he wants to settle down?”
Possibly, but certainly not with
you, dear.

Heart To Heart—2

For some reason I cannot h
to explain a young woman, signing
herself “WORRIED” has written
the following appeal to me:—

‘I am very anxious to gel
married, and wonder if you
could help me?

“I am only 4ft. 10ins. and a
bit on the dumpy side. My hair
is’ wiry, and my face always
comes out in red patches when
I am excited,

“IT am also double-jointed
and the dentist says my teeth
are loose. My boy says it
would be all right if I didn’t
giggle and laugh so much.”
Well, “Worried,” yours is ¢

rather difficult case. Does your
boy mean that your teeth are
less likely to drop out if you keep
your mouth shut, or what?

Curiously enough, some men
prefer double-jointed women, anc
I should draw his attention as
much as possible to what appears |:
to be your outstanding charm.

Snap your thumbs back at him
occasionally, and when bathing
this summer do a few little tricks
with your toes.

You should certainly try to
avoid this giggling and laughing
After all, you don’t seem to have
much to laugh at, do you dear?



In 1919 a new switchboard was
installed and in 1920 a new ex-
change was built at St. Lawrence

A branch exchange was opened
in St. John in 1924 and in 1931
pen first underground cable was
aid.

By January 1935 the Barbados
Telephone Company was serving
2,113 telephone stations. In that
year the Telephone and Generai
Trust Ltd. of London secured a
controlling interest in the Barba-
dos Telephone Company and made
preparations to instal modern au-
tomatic equipment. During 1936
and 1937 the most modern
Strowger automatic exchange
equipment manufactured by Auto-
matie Telephone and Electric Co.
Ltd. of Liverpool, was installed at
the Albert Hall headquarters in
James Street and at the St. Law-
rence Exchange. The main aerial
wire routes were replaced by
underground cables in the city
and the entire outside plant was
reconstructed.

At the end of December 1951
there were 4,855 subscribers anc
two additional automatic ex-
changes had been erected in St.
John and St. James, Speightstown
is still dependent on a manual ex-
change.

The Barbados Telephone Com-
pany is now planning further ex-
tensions which ~will
diture of about £100,000.
This expansion programme allows
for the ¢e between
town and StLawrence of an
line exchange with an_ ultimate
capacity of 2,000 subscribers, De-
tails of the programme will, it is
expected, be made known before
the end of this month.

The Telephone and General
Trust Ltd. of London is also asso-
ciated with telephone companies
in Trinidad, Jamaica, Portugal
and Caracas. But it has several
Barbadians on the Board of Di-
rectors of the Barbados Telephone
Company. Its Managing Director
is Mr, George de Nobriga,
who is also managing Director of
the Trinidad Telephone Company,
and is a Director of the present
Telephone and General Trust Ltd,
of London, The Chairman of the
Telephone and General Trust Ltd,
Sir Alexander Roger is also a
Director of the Barbados Tele-
phone Company. But all the oth-
er Directors, Mr. G. D. Bynoe, Mr,

. G. Leacock, jnr, Mr. C,
H. Wright and the Chairman, the
Hon. J. D. Chandler, M.L.C., are
Barbadians. }

Off to an early start the Bar-
bados Telephone Company today
can be proud of its achievement
of service to the community, and
of its satisfaction of the public |
demand for “what is wanted.”

involve an

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13,

Winter
To Spring

@ From page 1

They were mindful not to let
their feet strike too sharply on the
stone p:ths. They bent down over
the flowers and read labels but
never in too loud a tone.

But outside, people were stand-
ing in the streets. We had seen
them as we drove to Windsor
queueing for buses making a holi-
day of it. Do not, when you think
of the British mourning their King,
think of them looking like a lot of
Spaniels full of lugubriousness.
One might even say they were
making a sort of pienic of this.
They march along the street with
shopping-bags bursting with sand-
wiches and showing the tops of
theimos flasks, They speak at the

usua! pitch of their voices and
they talk of other things than the
death of the King’s quite often.

Prince Monolulu

Outside the Castle gates was
standing the most famous racing
tipster, Prince Monolulu, a col-
oured gentleman who frequents
our race meetings and speaks in
Hyde Park in a costume as authen-
tically royal as his title, of trailing
white robes and feathers curling
up from his head for a couple of
feet.

A rich race character he is, and
we all knew him and crowds all
saluted him even today, not loudly
but with a smile.

“I knew the King”, he was tell-
ing his neighbours, “personally.
But personally I’m telling you”.

Whatever the extent of that
knowledge might be it is certain
that the King must have known
him for he had an eye for all odd
characters that ‘frequented the
English scene.

So crowds do the dead King no
wrong by smiling at Prince Mono-
lulu as he would have smiled. And
indeed they constantly give proof
that for all they’re making a holi-
day of this they’re grieving deeply.

A window is opened, the voice
of the radio speaks out into the
street. A man in the crowd with
his mouth full of sandwiches says
“he’s coming round by Marble
Arch now”, and from the tone of
his voice you know that he’s gone
every step of the way with his
dead King.

And there are director tributes.
People speak to one suddenly and

tell one stories which have a
queerly twisted, unpredictable
character of truth.

On the way to the chapel fer
the funeral service I asked the
way from a woman who was walk-
ing alone. So that she could tell
me something important that at
that moment she felt she had to
tell someone, she walked towards
the chapel with me though that
wasn’t her way.

Shé@ had a husband it appeared
who sudderily went blind at the
age of 35 when he was a well-paid
executive in an insurance business.
He had been filled with despair,
he had found the first lessons that
were given him in Brail'e pro-
foundly adiscouragine, he had
wanted to die and when his wife
had discovered that there was a
school for adult blind in England’s
West Country where he could be
trained to earn a living in some
new way he had refused to go.

But then one Christmas C_y

he had heard the King make a

broadcast in which the fact that

he was wrestling with a stam-
mer was particularly obvious
and the obvious embarrassment
and effort of the King had made
him decide that he could make
such an effort himself too. And
he hed gone to school in the

West Country and it had been

the beginning of a better time

for both of them.

She left me as soon as she had
told her story and I think it possi-
ble‘she was going around town to
tell it where she could.



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Turned

Always Beauty

In Saint George's Chapel ther:
is aways beauty. It was built by
Henry VI who is considered an in-
effective King but who made here
a strong box into which the ages
have shut some of their beauty
which time has never been able to
devour because it is sealed there
forever. It has its own late Gothic
Lewluty. It lacks simplicity, it is not
purely as beautiful as the thousand
year-old Westminster Hall, it is
too ornamented and too pretty, But
on each’side of the building pillars
rise flush with the walls and break
into the eglaberate vaulting that
covers the roof with the effect of a
fountain stilled forever. And un-
der this roof ai the end of the
Church between the place where
the congregation sits and the altar,
is the choir where Knights of ihe
Garter have their seats. Hore
again is Elizabethan pomp and
glory and edlowr. Each Knight sai
in his own stall which has on the
beck of it 4 gold plate enamelled
with his Coat-of-Arms.

As Knight succeeded Knight
these gold medallions became
many. Each of the stalls is cov-
ered by a canopy of carved wood
which rises-high into the air of

this ‘hi church and on top is
a knight’s helmet draped with
his coloured. scarf and sur-

mounted by his arnmfourial’ bear-
ings, which may be a tree grow-
ing out of a golden pot or a
naked boy holding a shield or
two arms hélding plumes, Above
these “again hang Knights’ ban-
ners of scarlet and gold and all
the brave colours that there are.
These are trappings. of chivalry
as they were worn and one sees
that the film.of Henry V was a
pallid reflection of glowing fact.

Into these stalls. there came
now in dark plain clothing those
who had a right to be close
mourners of thesKing either by
reason of ties of blood or because
they had held high office in his
state or in allied states.

.. Exiles

Those that were akin to the
dead King were some of them
exiles.

In four adjoining stalls sat
King Michael of Romania and
his Queen Anne, Peter of Yugo-
slavia and his Queen Alexandra
The two exiled Queens kissed as
they passed.

Of the high Officers of our
State the greatest was of course
Winston Churchill. Mr, Attlee
was there too, and ‘for all his
excellence he did not make a
strikingly appropriate effect
though he was a man who had
served King George VI _ well.
Because he didn’t fit in with his
surroundings he was good for
this day but he had nothing in
common with Knights of the
Garter and their bearings ana
bannefs. He lacks scarlet and
gold im, his composition. But
when General. Eisenhower came
in he wag of their company all
right. A plain man, he neverthe-
less has richness of banners.

And so of course had Winston
Cours ge he . He wore
the slightly ity look that we
all as Sve eee Old “ate apt to
wear at funerals of those who die
younger than ourselves. He is
growing old as strong men do;
not sure how much he should
restrain the energy which still
wells out of him, He nearly
tripped and fell on the step that
led down to the choir, It could
be seen that he was embarrassed,
it could be guessed that he was
asking himself if he had _ not
done this because he was infirm.
But indeed it happened because
he was striding too youthfully.

A Hush

We sat waiting and after an
hour or so we heard sounds that
told us that the King’s body had
reached. Windsor, Those who
were outside in the streets say
that there was at the moment of
its coming a hush on the Town
which did not lift until the coffin

@ on page 10










Your doctor is captain of

accuracy and care. You,

* THE BARBADOS FOUNDRY LTD.

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SUNDAY

ADVOCATE

MEMORIAL SERVICE



The Clergy of the diocese entering St. Michael's Cathedral throuch the West gate on Friday to attend

the Memorial Service for the late King George VI.

We



atched From

The Chimney Tops

By HAZEL MAY

LONDON, Feb. 15.

High up in the grimy heights of
Edgeware Roads, grey and red-
brick buildings, the great com-
pany of His Majesty’s loyal sub-
jects had gathered to see the
funeral processicn wind its solemn
way through the hushed streets
towards Paddington Station today.
With the watchers among the
chimney tops I saw George Sixth
make his last journey.

Every window was packed with
people, every garret with its
patient witnesses. The old were
indoors,. the young on the roofs
perched on parapets clinging to
chimneys, clambering precarious-
ly on treacherous slates.

Fr beneath the mingled colours
of the crowd fringed with khaki
clad troops lined by¢the roadside,
vividly resembled a view of forest
wild flowers which end where the
grey-preen veld begins.

All the way along this straight
ugly street with its cheap tailors
flashy little dress shops and second
hand dealers, people waited
patiently. Many worked there reg-
ularly.

Nine Deep

Now there were lining their
familiar pavements nine deep to
see their greatly loved King pass—
the King who many of them had
never seen in life—‘‘only on news-
reels, dear, never got off work to
see him”.

All the plate-glass windows
which line beth sides of the street
had been boarded up and there
were crash barriers across the
pavements. Yet none of it was
necessary. These crowds so typi-
eally British were perfectly be-
haved. Many of them with their
rugs and thermos flasks had sat up
all night.

Overhead snow-clouds gathered
threateningly.

Then the black herse was seen
coming through the distant Marble
Arch and the solemn surge of the
funeral march drifted mournfully
up to us.

Slowly they moved down that
great straight road. In perfect for-
mation troops marched as one man.
The slow measured tramp of their
feet beet away the minutes.

“Nothing Like It”

An American perched precipi-

tiously on a sloping roof nearby







said briefly in amazement “we
have nothing liké this back home.”

Then the bold yellow splash of
the Royal standard appeared so
gay amongst the grey and black.
And a hush fell on the waiting
crowd which spread up from the
people on the pavements and en.
veloped the chimney pots in a
blanket of stillness.

Afterwards they said up there in
the chimney pots that somehow
they had forgotten to look at all
those foreign Kings that followed
the cortege. But had you noticed
the Duke of Windsor wearing his
naval uniform? A long time since
he had been seen in that! And
young Prince Philip—now there
was a fine young man!—He had a
walk that you could pick out any
where and that funny way of

Sticking out his chin.

A Wren said she felt proud of
the navy all over again when she
saw how good the ratings looked
pulling that gun carriage. every
man in step. and white ropes held
tautly in dead straight lines.

Coaches in their scarlet passed
and then rank upon rang of diplo-
mats, attaches, servicemen and
policemen.

A splendid lookinse. detachment
of East African Askaris swung
proudly by like giants, who seemed
to tower above the troops before
and after them. Further on
freshly whitened helmets shqwed
up starkly against dark blue uni-
forms.

A woman fainted in the. crowd
falling forwards through the troops
to lie face downwards on the tar-
mac. Immediately, miraculously to
tend her Saint John’s men were
there springing from nowhere.

Then the lament of the bagpipes
took over from the brass bands
and the end of the procession came
in sight. Last of all a very old am-

bulance, battered and _ belching
black smoke from its exhaust
passed on its way. Such a long

journey for an ancient engine

A great sigh swept over the
crowd. They waited a moment be-
fore they moved away watching
the great procession winding into
the misty distance, It had taken
forty minutes to pass.









Queen’s
College
Beat Barna

@ from page 4

in the next set. In both games
Perkins failed to get ten points.
Chandler won 21—4, 21—7.

The score was Adelphi three,
Lenville when Cecely Vaughn,
Lenville met Claudette Chandlei
Vaughan scored an easy victory
She returned many
smashes. She

of Chandler's



Rowallan
Attends
Camp Fire

Chief Scout Lord Rowallan sa

h.ough some hours a starry nigh
hilarious group o

with a large

in his honour last night at Har
Co, lege.

rison

RAGE NINE



For relief from

scouters who staged a camp fire A ’ I H M A
—_



The scouters sang with ful -one small tablet acts
gusto seldom equailed, as the ,
sat a.ound the red flames, crack . / *
ing wood and floating sparkle quickly and e ye
Jokes were told and short lud
cious plays acted. HE Ephazone treatment for Asthma is so
Che flames were blazing som«

12 teet high and the wood poppe
loudky
formerly declared the
open, As the fire got going, ih«
various troops of scouts marche:
in singing, . let’s
nearer,”

And while the scouts began t
stir about, the Chief Scout wh«
must have sat around hundred
of camp fires, looked quietly or

When the scouts had sung
few songs, including, “Loch L@
mond,” the Chief Scout rose anc
told them the tale surroundin
some of the words, “...and yop
take the high road and I take the
low Road,” and received a great
applause when he had finished.

The St, Peter's Sea Scouts then
put on a short sketch, “The Don-
key,” in which two scouts dress-
ed as a donkey treated the other
scouts and the fairly large crowd
which had gathered, to some
amusing antics.

For the next item, the Bethel
Troop placed a log on the ground
and imitating their idea of Red

Indians on the kill—the log be-|

ing a man—danced as they sang
a shrill war song and then leaped
in for the kill, sending their
staves onto the log,

Rangers followed this with two
songs
At the end of each ‘item, the

- troops which had not taken part
in it, would give one of the usua}

won 21-—8, 21-14. cheers of appreciations, “B-R-A-
Pauline Smith, another good y.o bravo,” or “Isica-isica!”
player who appears to have got Included. in’ the programme,
over her nervousness, defeated too, were the Soufriere Song
Gloria Ramsay two love to win Under the Spreading Chestnut
the final set for Adelphi, Smith Tree and Ging Gang Goolie. In
especially has a yood forehand the Soufriere Song two Rovers
smash. She lifts the ball from gave a display of humour in
well below the table and it just rhyming and these were fairly
shoots into one of her opponent's well received
co. ners. She also has «a beautiful In the song Ging Gang Goolie-
bacshand cut shot, Umpa, umpa, umpa, all scouts

seemed to enjoy themselves more

sn tne final match Y.W.P.C, de- than ever, particularly when they
feated Y.W.C.A, four-cne, The went off into long “umpaaaaahs”
Y.W.C.A, girls need some ex- Other songs, “Haila — shaila,’
perienced player from the “Buma Lac” were sung with fully
Y.M.C.A. to practice with them. throated loudness and made the
I understand that this method is camp fire very lively
adopted at many of the other Besides, “Sea Scouting Is The

ladies clubs. 1,
have borne fruit,

Aon
player for ¥.W.P.C. She defeated
Elsie Bynoe 14—21, 21—15, 21—14,
In the other sets Jean Humphrey
was beaten by Joyce Jones
(Y.W.C.A.) 21

would appear to

Hoad was the outstanding

10, 21—-9; Rennee

Life For Me” and “Nobody knowsr
the Trouble I See” there was :
scene of morning camp life of the
scout depicted by the Ist Sea
Scouts,

After the Chief Scout told ¢
yarn, scouts sang the closing song
“O Come and Go with Me.”



Glommeau beat Eugene Daniel

(Y.W.C.A,) 21—19, 21—6; Yvonne T e l
Costella beat J. Holder (Â¥.W.C.A Larceny ria
21—18, 21—16 and Patsy Hum-

phrey defeated Weldine Pilgrim T

(Y.W.C.A.) 21—14, 21-18, giving OoOmorrow

Y.W.P.C. a four-one victory.



Book-keeping
Successes

There were three Book-keeping

successes (as against 12 failures)
at a recent Pitman’s Commercial
Examination conducted by M1:
Cc. B. Rock at Combermere.

The list is as follows:—

ELEMENTARY

Gloria Walcott, First-class, (Mr
P. L, Reid).

Lauriston Burnett,
(Mr. L. 8. Richards).

First-class

Mignon Lovell Second-class
(Miss A. Skeene).
ARITHMETIC
Rudolph Gibbs, Intermediate

First-class, (Modern High Sch.





Further evidence in the case
in which the Police have brough,
six charges of larceny, falsifica

tion and fraudulent conversior.
involving amounts of $4,00u anc
$5,000 from the Governmen:

‘treasury against Carlos Smith ¢
Civil Servant of the Auditor
General's office, will be taken by
His Worship Mr. C. L. Walwy:
at Diswrict “A” on Monday a
10 aam,

The charges
offences were
time between
June 8, 1951.
of £50v,

Counsel in

state that the
committed some-
April 1945) anc
Smith is on a bai

the case are Mr
E K, Walcott Q.C., associatec
wih Mr, E. W. Barrow for the
defence while Mr. W. W, Reece
> QC, Solicitor General is appear
) ing for the prosecution.



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i






PAGE TEN

—..

‘ ‘ T

@ From Pare 9 capacity. Théy were coming to fection of the words. There was 316 F 4 W kt
was taken into the chapel. Peoplereport the funeral and they were no allusion to the dead man’s @ or : Ss
stopped eating sandwiches, they coming to the funeral of someone Kinghood interpolated in the fun-
did not smile any more at Prinee they had seen much of and had — Ne ae a ee oe
Monplulu or at anything else. honoured, A number of them of Arms read his titles and prayec I ” d | t
They were conicmplating the had received decorations from for a blessing on Queen Elizabeth n econ es ;
death of their King whiagh when the King, some for war service. Il. No newspaper correspondent

his coffin appears becomes more
than the death of a King; it be-
comes the death of a salesman, the
death of a soldier, a sailor, a tink-
er, a tailor, it becomes the death of
every man.
every minute to represent every
they
say startled seagulls who genes
the
Castle and circled over the pro-
cession. But we in the
knew none of these things. We
received our

year

from

King

marching, of hoofbeats, or a dirge
played on bagpipes that were
faint, that grew loud, that faded

away, that were loud again.



Winter Turned To Spring Trinidad Hit

A gun was

of his #ffe. And this

the grasslands round

intimation of

‘s coming by sounds

procession was taking the coffin

on its gun-carriage around _ the
town of Windsor by a circuitous
route that brought it sometimes

near,

tle. It was as if a cocoon of nove
o

were

sometimes far frorn the Cas-

being wound round

chapel.

At
and

had taken part in t) yrocession
Queen Juliana of Holand took
her seat in the choir, She is not

a beautiful wernan but she could
stand up to searlet and gold; to
chivalry.
Bishops
Church

down
to the door of the Chapel to meet
the coffin and
range themselves
below
sudden sunshine was now

ri¢hr
Now
and
and

on the golden vessels. Crown;
Sceptre and" Orb suddenly ap-
peared being borne to a_ stanc
covered wilh purple velvet. It
wag the only intimation that those
who were reporting the funeral
for the Press ever received
through the eye that the funeral
was taking place. it must be
noted that the death of this Fing
is a very strange event; it is

constantly turning into a symbol,

Sounds Stepped
last the sounds
stopped,

168s of relics of
Archbishops and

High Dignitaries of

choristers went slow!

slowly
on the
where

the Altar

an allegory.

It was like an allegory of Eng-
lish history that people were not
or wearing too
being snobs,
but in a sane and self-respecting
file by in
thousands through
half where proper relations of the
King of England and his
have been threshed owt through
centuries to
King who had

being hysterical

jong
state

hundreds

care

went

was also an allegory of what hap-
people.
the
his

pens
The

truth about

fami

privacy
hardly. possible for the mass of
ple to know what the King

the

is like except through the medium
: of the

Very. soon
VY came to the Throne the pro:
realised that Great

Av Allegory

faces and not
of mind should
of

pay
taken
himself

to acquaint

on
toe King and his
Press tells the
the King
. This is no
for in

people
and

Press?

lucky in the ruler they had got

and they have taken pleasure in
telling a story of
was always agreeeble.
press got to St. George’s Chanel

Royalty



fired

Chapel

the
of

The

eame near
There entered with
the choir sorne of the people who

returned to
steps
some
shining

people

homage to a
particular
with
what those proper relations were
and how to maintain thern.
in St. George's Chapel

What

invasion of
these days it is

after King George

Britain was

that
When the




saw any member of

in The Chapel
But when they got
George's Chapel they were shown
into a singular enclosure. There
is a passage alongside the choir
which at ~ point mxese a view
of half-a-dozen of choir stalls -
and the entrance to the choir ani it were right.
a sideways glimpse of the Altar.
There is apparently some slovenly
housekeeping at .
Chapel. This passage wads in a
state that no part of a consecrated
building ought ever to be fl
It was littered with bits of cush-
ions, doormats, pots of +: 7 , ,
pieces of carpentry that were cast er ue ea eae
hither and thither on the floor or ne Vaul
were leaning against the walls. At The Vault
There was even, as heaven be my
witness, a table with a sewing of the
machine on it, As a British Catch

mable strength, as if she
We

exquisitely expressive

press who
early ertitions

pondents from other
passing through such a grievously
displaced lumber-room and it was

poor comfort to be able to assure ‘© the vault. His starmmer and °'0 "Guillen dipped his right |

the - t broadcasts became touching and *‘TOKCS. — + \

enureh oF ‘chapel “thal {know infinitely significant. He must Ke° and pulled Wight to the long if oe eee
could such a sight, be seen, Here have know well when he gave 0” ' ee ‘threatened ahd ane COUGHS & COLDS
the Press ranged itself disap- ‘¢ last one that he would soon (O°* “) TSN vids blew away and

pointed at its quarters but with be just there under the Royal “ne i olebrate “thee sun- ;

its mind fixed on the ftmeral, Standard with a wreath of white ao. as ied “tha pew” ae In a Jiffy

But as soon as the procession “°wers upon him about to be Gulr smary Pa

arvived there passed through the
choir a large number of represen-
tatives of military and diplomatic
forces who stood on the Altar
teps at the end of the choir
between the coffin and the press,

Could Not See

No newspaper correspondent ai
the funeral of George VI sa
iny part of the service. They
saw simply a number of official
backs. There followed an awk-
ward struggle. Tt is a newspaper-
man’s duty to turn in copy to his
paper. But he also has a sense
of fitness of things; he may even
have a notion that maybe he has a
soul and that maybe there is a
God. He may even be quite sure
of it. This works out to a: pro-
found disinclination to scramble
about during a funeral service and
climb on chairs and on any pro-
jecting portions of o sacred edifice.

Stood On Cushions

the

and putting them into

machine run as smoothly
it were simple.



@ From Page 4

think he did
five was done in 1,061.

candidate who

standing on a coping of several but I
pew cushions that had been lying they
on the floor nearby. And even
then all I could see was the Lord
Chathbérlain, Lord Clarendon. a five in 1,09.
This too was a symbol. The Royal

Family would have been appalled do
by the thought that a number of the box
people who wished them well had might be
been forced into such an unseemly
predicament. So too would Lord
Clarendon who is an_ intensely
dignified person who would
all things to serve dignity,

did in 1.055,
Caprice did four in 5

to box,
on ice.



the Royal
to st, Family during the service but it
~ was not difficult to guess how the
Queen was looking. At her wed-
ding there came on her a look of
were
resolving to do the hard thing if
wouldn't
have been able to see her face
through her dark veil but it would
have shown in the lines of her
figure.
Add to that the look that is on
the face of any daughter whose
father has just died of a long and
painful illness, and you have the
been

After the service Was over those
had not to
“ walked

betes , . through the choir with the rest of
woman, I blushed ta seein the congregation and looked down
on the King’s coffin as it lay in the
opening in the floor that led down

lowered into darkness. But cer-
tainly from what he said he had
believed fully in the resurrection
and life in a new Heaven and a
new earth. As we left the choir
some men were bending over the
purple velvet stand and taking
Crown and Orb and Sceptre
cases,
t They wouldn't be used again till
w the Coronation, the signing and

sealing of the Queen's consecra-
tion to this life of overwork and
constant effort to make a complex

THE GALLOPS

with her in 1.25, It was his first
gallop over this distance and
it very well. The

Cardinal is eer Guineas
8 go
I was not pleased to find myself He did a box to bes with Guin Site

took only the last five which

Bt.
Clementina was well fsa over

Watercress was not allowed to
much returning only 1.31 for
Another who

There was next a three horse
allop in which the visitors from
ntigua and St. Kitts were seen,
wish Cottage, Vonwise and Condevon,
_ But ag they are named, or Sea Bis-
there were so many people tn be- cuit, Citation and Nonr, as they

SUNDAY ADVOCATE

(From Our Own Correspondent

PORT-of-SPAIN, Feb. 16

Trinidad treated the huge Oval |
crowd today to delightful Satur!
day afternoon batting and by a!
colourful century by Nyron As-
garali scored 316 in 300 minutes
for the loss of four wickets to
end the first day of the second
Trinidad-British Guiana match.
It was Asgarali’s second century
in his career. He and Ken Corbie
making his intercolonial debu
put on 170 for the first wicket
which broke the record for the
ground against British Guiana
scored by the Stolimeyer brothers
since 1944. Sharing the spotlight
with As and Corbie, was
Noel Guillen who played bril-
liantly before he was bowled by

as *



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Guillen was particularly a
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the score at 78 without loss, As-
garali 50 not out, Corbie 25 not
out, Trinidad sent up the 100 in
108 minutes before tea, |

At 133, Corbie with his score
47, cut hard into Leslie Wight’s
chest off his brother’s bowling.
Leslie juggled the ball and drop- |
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if Asgarali who wag particularly |
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dangerous complications. With JACK and JILL these nasty, sniffy
colds and bad coughs go faster than you would believe possible. And
how they love the pleasant taste of JACK and JILL.

IT'S NEW, DIFFERENT SAFE

JACK and JILL is new but thoroughly tested in thousands of cases
and is guaranteed to relieve kiddies’ coughs and colds faster than
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Another famous Buckley Product

JACK and JILL is a product of the famous Buckley Laboratories
that gave you Buckley's Mixture, Canada’s largest selling cough and
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Mixture ‘s for your own. Get a bottle of JACK and Jia. TODAY
Trinidad’s first wicket ee
170, Corbie cutting

Norman Wight’s

fell at
and edging
off spinner into





wicket keeper Mc Watt's safe
gloves, \

Asgarali went at tea when he
cut Wight to the slips where |

Camacho took the catch with the
score 212 in 212 minutes. j

Guillen who batted slowly be-
fore tea, brightened considerably
after the interval and with Legall
and then Chicky Sampath kept
the score abreast of the clock. |
Guillen was bowled in crossing to

Gaskin for 70 and Tangchoon
played out time.
Scores : ¥)










, Trinidad’s First Innings

tween them and the pregs that are called, They did four in 56 T 1
there had been opportunity for Twinkle w: Vt Reeiatatt 6 Canines & Ne Sure ‘ . e | Pp R
ooee. 2 go oe oa gallop with Gavitte tt was a Spo Combe Me Watt b N. Wight. 38 " Yy ain eliever

‘rong. was precisely to kee Gritlen b Gaskin .., . =D s s
things going right in spite of the Wee Vay wea oe ee see ere nn ON. Wien at containing Vitamin B
complexity of the machinery of Apollo did 9 box to box in 1.28 Tanschoon mot out i 1
modern state that the dead King and five in 1.09%, never allowed to ——=Extras aa want fi
had laboured so hard. The day run. cy ma | if ve to get QUICK RELIEF
was of course not lost for us, “First Adria! hid the better of a a Bie | cI EARN, gee Site 3 extoy thy

Resurrection, Life Miss Friendship over a five in 1,05. Fall of wickets: 1 for 170, 2 for 212, | take EAST writ Table.

We stood on our perches and Ractan was the last I saw. He did. 2 for 256, 4 for 311, There’s nothing else lik YEAST.
listened to the words of the burial a box to box in 1.254 ,and the last BOWLING ANALYSI VITB. It o the ONLY in
service whieh spoke of the resur- five in 1.07, Once the proud pos- me o M . wt reliever which ALSO cuataien’ the
rection and the life, of a new sessor of two bowed tendons he Gaskin . 28 7 @ 44 tonic Vitamin B,. Don’t axis
Heaven and earth and proclaimed now displays two of the cleanest Camacho 13 1? aad and get some YEAST-VITE
that the Lord is our Shepherd legs in the paddock without a Peco : 18 1. | Papier now.
therefore can we lack nothing bandage to hide them. Strange eee 7. : . :

they were coming in a double and we were soothed by the per- game this horse racing. Gibbs ee 2» — For ~~
HEADACHES



CE.

> OCS LLL PLSLLL CLP LL PEASE

eee

aa

my
s
x
*
$

e
R
j %
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%

%
-

we the men and women = working for the Relianee

Shirt Factory = are proud of the fact that every one

of the $00 shirts we produce daily is of guaranteed ,

fit and workmanship

CROP-TIME SALE

iS BRINGING

RESPONSE

>



These and oiher thousands know that
the prices Reductions in this Sale is
Genuine Big Reductions
of the day TO-DAY
and EVERYDAY at

THANI BROS.

Wm. Henry & Swan Sts.

no Sham
are the order

Pr,

6 AL CEOCOSOCOEOSS

LEPC PPLE ALLELES EOOCOOSOO SOP ICOOP

Reliance Shirts dre available in

all leading stores

$



TREMENDOUS

| om
|

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Phone 3909



a DD
Flying Ducks !

Blue Birds !

Wall

POOLE POTTERY

Select Your Favourite Set Early

Louis L. Bayley

and

it’s Bayley’s for Bone China.












NERVE PAINS
COLDS, CHILLS,
RHEUMATIC PAINS





sy

VEAST-VITE

Vv
A
L
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t
|

S QUALITY E
(B’dos) Ltd.



|| NEWS !! NEWS !!

NEWS !!

We Have Just Received a New Shipment of .. .
LADIES’ PLASTIC HAND BAGS—Assorted Colours

-06, $4.08, $4.27, $1.45 Ea
Seagulls ! pasar ss: a” a " Sera nap rats 8)
SMALL LADIES’ HAND BAGS—for Evening Use
@ $4.87 only

Plaques in

CHILDREN’S PLASTIC HAND BAGS
In Black, White and Red @ $1,83 Each

ALSO

r

ELITE, PHOTO-PRINT SPORT SHIRTS
e @ $6.75 Each

MEN’S B.V.D’s @ $1.20 per Pair

AT | » SOCKS @ $1.43 and 53c. per Pair

=

It Pays to Economise ! !
| Ch

And the ony way

3 ger 4

Shopping at...

: (TEORGE SAHELY & CO., (Bos. LTD.

You can do so! — Is by

of

4897

Phone
19, SWAN STREET

{

Aquatic Club Gift Shop
| FOR BEST VALUES AND EFFICIENT SERVICE
(













|
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|
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Bronchitis Curbed in.




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fo that 3
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MADE BY C. & J. CLARK LIMITED, STREET, SOMERSET, ENGLAND

SUNDAY, FEBRUARY 17, 1952

"coughing, Strangling Asthma,

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td stra

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fA uma
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ack funrantpe
ge. If you den't feei
ke a new person, and

eet to vanish like
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r blood aid









av
er taking M



aiding natu satisfied aft
a oon kaa es aus | DACO just return the empty pack
prom«te free easy breathing | ace and the full purchase price will

u soon feel yeats younger | your Chemist today and see how
well you sleep tonight and how much
better you will feel tomorrow. Th

ound sleep the first night | be refunded. Get MENDACO from
guarantee

ing but Duilds up the system to ward
off future attac

. For instance, Mr, | Ends Asthma % Bronchitis we Hay Fe



How the famous
Bennett College can help your
career through personal
POSTAL TUITION
P YOU FEEL that you cannot pass the [in wuich OF THESE |

exams which will qualify you in your
trade or profession, if you are handicapped ~— LE5 YOUR FUTURE >
in your career by missed educational .
Opportunities — here's a message of hope foseebre: Ses, fess)
and encouragement, Book -keeping ‘
Guaranteed tuition until successtul... Cu Scpmmencyal Sebiects
Deaughtsmanship ‘

When you enrol with The Bennett Cofege

you will be coached until you QUALIVY. — GasgigelGnsinecring |
This assurance is given by the Governor of Education Exam.
the College who has /uith in his system of ee

Private Tutor training —by pest. This — sechanical Engineering
way you have the benef; of College Mover

tuition, but you work wu \our own fie -

at your pace! No extras are charged. All goad Maki
dooks are free to students. Sanitation =
Your latent cleverness . . _ Secrecarial |

Your own Tutor will help you, will bring
out the cleverness in you. And there is
often more than you imagine. You will
Qualify! And Qualification means personal
betterment. First choose your subject —
then send (without obligation) for The
Bennett. College book on your subject.
EAR OUT THE COUPON

NOW

|The BENNETT COLLEGE To the Governor, |

Dept. 188, The Rennett College, Sheffield, England. 1 would like to have (at no cost) I
(subject) |

‘itman
Short Story Writing

rveying
Telecommuhications
ireurere

Public Speaking

English Language

Short Technical Subjects
Workshop Practice

AND MANY OTHERS









AGE (if under 21).



Sw a ail





‘JOYANCE?



‘Joyance' is probably the most
famous children's sandal in the world

today. It is simply and sturdily made from

strong, supple leather, and thick plantation crepe-
rubber, Its design and shape was the result of a
scientific survey of hundreds of children’s feet. It's a
lovely sandal.











VMAS
SANDALS




LOCAL AGENTS: ALEC RUSSELL & CO., BARBADOS



IN 1908 Prof, C. V. Boys made the following
remarks in his Presidential address to the

Physical Society in London : ;
“The Lubricating property of oil depends 7
on something which is at present un-

no-one knows what oiliness

This blissful state of Coe continued until
March 1920 when Wells and Southcombe pub-
lished a paper showing conclusively that the
“oiliness” of a mineral oil could be substan-
tially improved by additives. Oils made on
the Wells Southcombe process became market-
ed throughout the World as

GERM OIL

These Oils are available to you to-day in
Barbados through the “GERM” Agents.

CENTRAL FOUNDRY LTD.



|


























7
Ps
) SUNDAY, FEBRUARY 17, 1952 SUNDAY ADVOCATE PAGE ELEVEN
> 7: ¥ T ao
5 PAINTINGS OF. |
'
ee ‘DO YOU KNOW] |
i
9
&
-that when you swallow your
F Irs. Golde W 1as fo any By OUR ART. CRITIC first one-man exhibition of Golde ¥ ae . pa oe . 7.
be c to the cause P White’s art. It is to be hoped neers a dimednak as 0 or
a of e We Indi during ceasingly to foster an interest in that others will follow, for in her 40 f et? This ‘trattic “mu t
: i Sritis ; a * the ars, using this word in its work there something for art keep moving constant
- ‘ to the Georgetown widest sense. Her interest in the lover and artist alike. otherwise your digestion
. i ad founded work of children hag never S246 of tho oils on exhibition “Bus~ | BRcetse roc Sabor sens
re: during the them the flame of enthusiasm for bY’s Alley” is a pleasant arrange- tired, irritable
Sar \< Sonsiahs ‘ nilar -all that. is beautiful. men of form and colour, well lit, There’ ‘snothing like spark
Soc . toiled un- At the Museum there is the ®"d the drawing is highly expres- | ling Andrews



sive. In “Red Fish”, a good com-
position, the translucency of the
fish and the hot, clear ligh have
been handled with dexterity
“Joe” is an excellent portrait.
The background is full of interest
and is only marred by the intro-
euction of surf at an unlikely
angle at the top of the painting.
This would be greatly improved
by con inuing the flat treatment
of the beach to the edge of the
canvas.

to revent sluggish
Andrews, the gent)
tive, helps the wonderft
mechanism of your v
to fwnection easily und
regularly. Remember

| Andrews 40?

for
Inner Cleanliness Stop over-forty overstrain!

Headaches, indigestion, lack cfenergy, inability
to concentrate, are often the consequences of
{ the physical and nervous strain caused by over-
© \~ BABY LOVES i work and worry. To restore your digestive and
metabolic tone, strengthen your nerves and j

increase your energy, start taking Phyllosan







“View from Gun Hill” is a
painting that grows on one. The
recession of colour is good and
typical of the island’s scenery.
‘The movement. is well conceived
and the aerial perspective com-
petently executed. “Joe and his
Sheep” depicts a happy arrange-
ment of forms against a back-


















the womfert of Cuticurs
Teleum Powder, It is








; a . emquiaitely perfumed, and { tablets to-day! Just two tablets three
ground that does not protrude. A . Weepe baby's skein cool, | times a day before meals, but if you
strong feeling of sunlight is con-- G@OLDE WHITE'S Manda, one of the many paintings done by her at and tree from chafing 4

veyed by muted tones rather than and _ now on exhibition at the Barbados Museum. Make bp bath
by an excess of brilliant colour ‘ |
too often employed by the unwary exhibited in this medium her por- tunately, it lacks conviction, since |
painter of tropical scenery A trait heads are the best rhe more closely resembles ‘“Toy-

harmonious little picture is “The Big Hat", “Manda reading the own.” The heavy deliniation of

Scotland Districi? composed in Bible” and “Old Manda” — all the railway line has the undesir~

blues and greys which success- heads of women—are full of char- le effect of leading the eye out

fully convey sunlight, shadow and acter and, doubtless, excellent of the picture, instead of towards

distance. “Children examining a likenesses of the sitters, Above the centre of interest,

lustre jug” has the distinction of all the drawing here is good, which { White has been fortunate

a painting by Mary Cassatt—the cannot always be said of her enough to be able to keep in touch

famous pupil of the Impressionist figures in landscape. ‘Doris’, a i: the art movement in Europe
painters Manet and Degas. Al- girl arranging her hair in front of ty periodic visits and by working

though Mrs. White’s painting is a mirror, is a clever piece of fac- in art classes there, Although not
in no sense derivaiive, she has tual representation. “Cannonball herself a “Modern” painter, she I Rl JFORM FI .E X IBLE FOO TWEAR {
achieved the bravura of that Tree” is clean and fresh, and the has been able to distill from mod=

American painter. The juxtapo- true value of watercolour appre- ¢rn art such “tricks of the trade”

sition of blue and yellow against ciated. “Stow-on-the-Wolda” has @S she could usefully employ, It is }
the darker flesh tones gives : eae sitters ‘7 to be greatly regretted that other FOR CHILDREN : : {

take the tablets regularly, the
results willastonish you. °

-PHYLLOSAN

fortifies the over-forties :



® an entirely different set of values

scintillating effect to the centre the less brilliant light of an Eng-, local artists have been unable to f 4 yi
of interest—the lustre jug. lish summer’s day is clearly dis- pursue this course. One a > ni
~erni , : hope that the British Council w {
Of all Mrs. Whiie’s oil paint- cernible. rat seams : ‘ \
ings “The Careenage” is the least : , hola ei eo eh eae ppoBtt \
successful. Here she has altered “Bathsheba in the days of the iolarship iis year ° = os, Ia {
her palette and lost the effect of Railway” should have been an hich has hitherto been left out ar dkenn )
strong sunlight. The picture has historic piece of painting, unfor- in he cold in this respect.







no recession and looks cramped in }
jog frame, owing to insufficient i
THIS is one of Harold Connell’s pencil drawings which are now being *"Kire, White is also a skilful Prize Books For t niversity College »}i
exhibited at the Barbados Museum. water-colour painter. Of the work (DEAL FOR . 3 }
At their recent meeting the the interest used for an annual e \\
|couneil of the University Col- "im Books whichis tbe GROWING FEET ““ t
lege oan rae ge ac hie vr of the University Collene i)
ed with gratituag re ome essay written during the
by the Trustees and forme! vacation on a subject pro- 44
members of the Young Men’s 1 by the a of the Univer MADE BY BRITISH CRAFTSMEN BACKED BY '
G uild of Georgetown, British BP sig sail Pepe w 4
Guiana to give to the Univer. °,0Pen to all undermraduates and | OVER FIFTY YEARS EXPERIENCE
fy Gallons um of $786.00 ¢ . The Cc iT resande | i;
Ret jaa lhe Derensastaer ol ty SUPPLIED BY YOUR LEADING STORES
The money is to be invested anc ft i}
SSS
FBSA AIFS EAE PEG EFS SILES SS SESE SES EEF
t
my }
ROBERT J. MacLEOD is well known for his sea-scapes. This one is among his exhibition at the PA |
Barbados Museum. 1c
Y a
) IF YOUR BUNGALOW IS ONLY
ol
INSURED AGAINST FIRE.... IT'S
’ e.
SIMPLY HALF WAY INSURED



eo




TOBAGO-_-_------ $ 37.00
GRENADA------. 29.00

TRINIDAD_---..-_ 37.00



MARTINIQUE..-.-- 34.00



GEORGETOWN.... 74.00





CARACAS......-..-- 101.00

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Lower Broad Street ‘Phone 4585 t oe BGEBGLGSEGSGOGDOD9DGGGDGDGGGGG%¢GDGL2LGLLQ
ower roa re


is PAGE TWELVE SUNDAY ADVOCATE SUNDAY, FEBRUARY 17, 1
a EL TS a ae

comers nem

=
ue
tw







PEN PALS
. . ARNOLD GRAY, Stanley Town
; ar , Village, West Bank, Demerara,
; , Ape British Guiana. Age 21, wants Pen |
b. ae % Te! hi Pals between the ages of 18 and 20 |






























































18—“Apply thine heart unto instrue-

14—Feminine name Ae oh i)
15—Bring to a level
16—Assam silkworm Y
17-—Hindu diety Gri | GF
aeiats Cee
words of knowledge” (Pr. 28: 12) YY
19—Reveded | a GY ny
20—Provided with pedal digits Uy} Y





21—Tear violently %Y Wy"
22—Suare ta ra i i
23—Who stood against Israel and pro-

voked David? (1 Chr. 21:1) sat yr Gl |
25—S pace
26—'‘jymbol for tantalum AA f YY
28- “Can one go upon ——— cvals, Uj)
and his tect not be burned?” (Pe “ee

vie ra rt
29—Y ields } A.
°3—Expressions of surprise
85—What disciple followed Jesus afar
off, when he was taken before the
high priest, Caiaphas? (Mat.
26:58)
387—Go quickly

$8—First born son of Eshek (1 Chr. Ys ee
8:39) rer

40—Kinds
42—“Then shall he speak unto them









in his wrath, and vex them ie 53—Spruce 65—-"——-—. sharpeneth ; soa
his displeasure” (Ps, 2: 4—Of what waters were the [srael- man sharpeneth the countenance
43— City built by Asshur (Gen, 10: it) ites unable to drink because of of his friend” (Pr, 27:17)
45—' a just man, and he will the bitterness? (Ex, 15:23) 66— Portico
increase in learning” (Pr. 9:9) o6—For whom did Jacob serve seven 67—Passageway between rows otf
47—Writing implement years? (Gen, 29:20) pews
48—One of the races among whom the 59—Apple-seed 68—Employed
Israelites dwelt (Judy. 3:5) 60--Heavy cord 69—Animal’s feet
50—The waters of what sea were dried 3. Bitter * %0—“Notwithstanding the Lord-
by the Lord for the Isra lites §4—"God is our refuge and strength, with me, and strengthened me”
fligut from Egypt? (Josh. 2:10) a yery Arsen ——- in trouble” (2° Tim, 4:17)
62—Prefix: of (Ps. 46: 71—Seriés
(Copyrieht, 144 Kinw Features Syndicate, Ine.t



Your Factory is in the
hands of your equipment.

See that your machinery
is fitted with materials
that you can depend on.

~

That is‘why you must use

we ‘





the timbrel, the ples asant
with the psaltery’ (Ps, 81:2)

8—~Those in office

9—Note in the scale

10—What Apostle’s surname was
Thaddaeus? (Mat. 10:3)

1l—To whom iid werent first belong?
(Josh, 21:1

1yCounte vane

18--Commanded

19—A part of Nimrod’s kingdom( Gen
10:10)

22—Footed vase

24—"I watch, und am as a sparrow
Bees: aeeee the house ——

(Ps. 102:7)

poste artery





26—"The things that my soul refused
to ————- are as my sorrowful
meat” (Job 6:7)

27—Who was Zabad's father? (1 Chr
11:41)

29~—-Waxes
0—“Thou crownest the year with thy
oddness; and thy paths

atness” (Ps. 65:11)

31—Wandered

2—Tower of " (Ezek, 29:10)

34—Into what kind of pitas did Lot’s
wife turn? (Gen, 19:26)

86—Indian symbolic pole

39—Who was chosen by lot to be num-
bered with the other eleven
apostles? (Acts, 1:26)

41—Discarded

41—"Thou shalt not oppress «.. ———
servant that is poor and needy”
(Deut, 24:14)

46—Personal pronoun

49—Sesame

5i—Who took over as king when Bel-
shazzar was slain? (Dan, 5:31)







breezy platform?
‘apIsyno yInys OF peYy ay ‘Alem
“FON Woos ous opisuy Bt op / MOLNIOS

erie built by King Solomon (1 Ki

oe The is prepared against
the day of battle: ber sate is of



the Lord” (Pr, 21:3

566—Grate

57—Records of proceedings

58—"The cock shall not. ———,
thou hast denied me thrice” Fiee™ (onn
13:88)

:9—Mexiean dollar

61—Bard

62—“Wisdom is before him that hath
understanding: but the eyes of ¢
fool are in the — of the
earth” (Pr. 17:24)

64—Strike

67—Roman coin

vn)

STapasAaTopols s7sIMy a

IS) SISTINE al st UW Z7y] OF] S}

INL OFS) al al Hg tay Shy

BEDE EME mEIEIE













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PSINIVisISINZAal ieVAalalol 41
1G} 3/918] SA Sleal VAAL ils!
SE 1a SINIVI WAV} 9} I I

Hidal In sloZ 7 Talore)

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THOR GOODYEAR RUBBER BELTING

Sizes 3, 3}', 4’, 43" and 5’

STEAM ASBESTOS SHEET JOINTING — RUBBER SHEET JOINTING



Rp, 7 i ( \
ees, my preferably females. Hobbies: |
wa os . f . cricket, nee movies, photo- |
sto anh ,
did ne ane c i Ol \ ou } l wth. W. ‘Bailey. C/o Machine |
_ : ’ eae Office, T.L.L.. Pointe-a- |
a Pierre, Trinidad. “Writs pen pals | A
his between ages of 17 and 19. } z
tha Errol i, c/o Machine Shop 7
eae Office, T. Pointe-a-Pierre, >
a rruuees: Y a iw pals between | ;
the ages of 16 and 18, ®
er,
ev YOUR SLIP IS Built-in Headache W1 th
ton SHOWING. SONIA Mii! etting estimates for
iro ERE IT iS! A ri this week for eve r r boy by . dehateuetion work on a new
Ret surprise o ry girl or 00 home. Som -orkmen
ie H ‘eho loves planes, But this s no ordinary plane is i eee ERNEST DUDLEY ju “ee their bids, oath this ye 4
oe a ene Sa ae lying ee ee —_ ee — te The Armchair Detective + r ‘ ensic
c e easi ‘ :
Pet a En yu co vd make a whole ficet out of a week's poeket-money 4a Ganaee ‘ 7 So The painter and paperhanger
a fore,“ Ginen circle O8.6 pléce | jage until the model is balsncet Ey t Creede luxuriously appointed Sonia’s soraia stories of her WN= = will work fur $1,100.
cay _balsa Wood (inch thick), Sa â„¢ ; Sehactiveie flat ae lights were derworld career, The painter and the plumber
Pat Dany point op, the outside TO PLY. Hola the Saucer as Cyioe y low (there was an I was working hand - in = gor $1,700.
. fae arate with ene | You Would for throwing a dart, = © pee! cut). pocket with Manny Skripp, smart- The plumber and the electri-
= ..P iene dotted with tne rose ee | might! i ” inight ee srtheng (another est book-swindler in the game,’ tian for $1,100.
ope oats the seoe out You need a iatee uld e t & af ges : ) as Sonia she continued in her alluring sin- The electrician and carpenter
o8 dotted ine. Glue along | space. The Saurer que uc then eg rom the window overlook- and-fog tones. “I had the novel for £3,300.
nd leave it to set. vane ing the High-street. notion of faking Casanova’s
rol yon need ase ous Sno She straightened her gaze, which memoirs.” The carpenter and mason for
oy ins are giued on top of the i had been bent on the stream of It seems that Sonia had $5,500. } MO ensig
= ea ee fi sleek limousines bearing expen tipped that Parry Graff, se er Ca mo Ci Mery a | Maa Pang
neath (as sho C * yf i
onary a lle—that’s ; sively gowned actresses and their known Welsh antique book-d estimated is fot each kin: Weapaca
chi ene, aoa piece, whl peor, oa ee escorts to the local would pay £10,000 for the orignal of work on Smith’s hew resi- — | p regtAisia
risa wood and giued on. the eo0m aBove night - clubs and gambling casinos. manuscript of the great lovers’ dence? . wgtAco
é 5 ice ny erout Ouse fubtnest “tm through with all that!” life- and loye-story, told in his ‘pod'es ‘tiosnin toqo'ee 2 ed v9 The famous threefold action of PHENSIC agtunane
ou sway trom. che ss cetsiem Sonia cried, a blood-red fingernail own hand. COON a sunuedegs suuTIniOS tablets RELIEVES PAIN, SOOTHES Cheek aad Rane
. along a line about “inch from the flicking the foot-long ash off her ‘For weeks Manny and I worked NERVES, COUNTERACTS DEPRES- coneNza
hat centre. You can test this by hashish cigarette “That aimless, on the job. We both got writer's | ? i Hveng ys
Qu resting your Saucer on a pencil empty glitter of hecti¢ milk-bars cramp, but we did it, We had ja It's Your Move SION. No matter how intense the pain, no TON
; angles to the fuselage oo and East Croydon’s tinselled spattered, travel-stained worm- tter hi how essed hin OME Brey,
a Push two pins into the fuse how aevow a night- -life. T'm through with eaten, cobwebbed, battered old matter how weary your nerves, t H Sect so
me a POPNOF: dteros . volume, which looked the genuine you feel, PHENSIC tablets will bring you
No pti lenimigi iach a : soggled Stina erktgh BT Uele SOR Enver t cover: relief and comfort, quickly and safely. Re-
te Vee an ee “Don't — «“Concocting the story that I’d . > uf
~ s don’t tell ef I asked in surprise, come by it py Ah Th an old member this — PHENSIC tablets neither
to suport and ei he LUNE UGre—ud a caieited junk-shop,” Sonia went on, “I harm the heart nor upset the stomach.
the os ecient ee mndon’s notorious Crime Queen }opped down with the book te Don’t accept substitutes, Keep a suppl of
rar 4 7 eyed herself in the tall wall- parry Graff’s home at Little P . pPp+y
be | mirrror. “Keep my form out of Binding-in-the-Slump. PHENSIC tablets by you!
sui this,” she snapped, : “The old boy fell over his beard
on She drew hef mink-lined bath- j), his excitement... . If only,”
Se robe, with its revealingly plunging and tears trickled down Sonia's TWO TABLETS
pe hem-line closer round her shapely jose and put out her cigarette } aD
co figure. “There’s nothing wrong with a loud fizz, “I hadn't made BRING QUICK
we with it that a good foundation that foolish mistake... i
x won iva adhe mapmen Yo be BUT of course, YOU ‘nave woot Laie a) | RELIEF
' 5 . i l t awa . .
th: Sonia took a deep drag at her if ot at one « aoehey ON’T be misled. That Black
wi cigarette and et ae a glance at the picture gives you saat ee ee 1 is a King |
no cloud of hashish smoke through he cl so @ White 10-7 move may prove c
aa . a i ts ie te ends: tee iad, Gonia’s Slip disastrous. If you look Pgs 4-4 FOR RHEUMATI ae LUMBAGO, NERVE PAINS, -
hat Rupert has remembered is on it. someth al army “An thin it had’ en - rou will find a real stroke tha A
an the piece of bark he pic ked 7s i aeaitiline ‘be Pa The "elt for that silly slip I made—” She ee ae a oe vanihitates the Blacks. HEADACHES, NEUR LG A, FLU, coLDS & CHILLS
the pine forest, and running to his looks at it. Then he turns it over broke off—she was a_ terribly. Snote 2 | t sack he tips out some of the cones. and frowns. “1 don’: know what terribly brittle character. pase, Mer Sate he English in in four moves.—Millard Hop- =
Sure enough the bark is there and, you're talking about,” he grumbles I leaned forward on the edge of a = Ss ta & win in a. = =
picking it up, he hands it to the There's no writing at all on a : j . the mistake Sonia made. per: pe
lis Autumn Elf. “ There's e this!" my chair—the seat was missing. MA OUOM—TE-L cts
be ee Biri La anyway—eager to hear another of —LES. "ETE (LIK WT-OT ‘81-6 “PEST FUOHITIOS E : Y F d
io, njoy Your Foo
bu °
by Hugons Shoper an Entrancing Job
HORIZONTAL Joke R. JONES, janitor of the rai! HAVE NO FEAR OF
1—What is the 29th book of the Old cae, way station, has to clean
estament? ag > i yhich has 37 VOUS
5—From what place did Solomon ob- ie. grandson of Judah (1 Chr, the waiting room w a 3 fin- NER US,
tain gold fox himself and his 4:21) entrances. When his work is fir
temple? (1 Ki. 10:11) . feed Rodd 5—Runs ished, he has passed through each INDIGESTION
10—To what Jewish animal of sacri- = 6—"They are all to him that entrance only once. Is he then
fice was Jesus often likened? Pus WY. AL understundeth, and right to them inside the waiting room where
(John 1:29) that find knowledge” (Pr. 8:9) there’s heat or outside on the
7—“Take a pslam, and bring hither

NUTROPHOS

A Compound Elixir of
Thiamine Chloride and
\ Phosphorus.



ee

NUTROPHOS is often prescribed by the Medical Profession
for cases of Nerve Strain, Brain Fag, Loss of Appetite and
other Nervous Ailments.



ge You Eat Well, Sleep Well, Feel Well
When You Take NUTROPHOS.







>> less Handling » Lower fisitrance |

IGHT

>> lighter Packing - {nereased Markets

BY BOAC





'
{ GREAT BRITAIN. USA.

, | BERMUDA. CANADA. NASSAU »
ve ree CITY GARAGE | racy. swrrzentano |
For complete inféFmation Write to your 1 SPAIN. PORTUGAL. MIDDLE EAST |
GALVANIZED local BOA. Foi ig Agent or | WEST AFRICA. EAST AFRICA i

B.W.1LA, Lower Broad Street. | SOUTH AFRICA. PAKISTAN
WATER TRADING CO. LTD. scam | cr mma
PIPES NEW ZEALAND. FAR : EAST _ JAPAN |
i 1 R SH JERS f tay s g RAT N
Victoria Street BRITISE OVERSEAS AIRWAYS CORPORATIO



ese sats taste setst atl oO NCCC OOA OV ALSLSE HE LDELIGE EY DLAC PEA TOTI AT

:





en
SSS
—



————
<< —<——————————— —————_—






SUNDAY, FEBRUARY 17,

1952

\

ee

=
te
SON ASS OY W



FLINT OF THE FLYING SQUAD....



Wiice, in THe
WARDEN'S OFFICE...

THERE'S NO

2 OKAY, GIRUG/ I CAN STILL
yt

USE YOU ..SO YOU WON'T GET
THE SAME TREATMENT AS THE
WARDEN HGRE DID... BUT THIS'LL
KEEP YOU FROM DOIN’ ANYTHING
FOOLISH WHILE I’M BUSY...

f GARCON, TAKE THESE
P BAGS ANP MEET ME 47
WEE DORRIE WOULD RUN OFF THE “ANTON SANITARIUM"
NOW TO GET TICKETS, AND LEAVE
ME HERE HOLDING THE...BAG /
L- eGUPPOSE WEE LAURIE...

tlm

:







aS
Nee/

SUNDAY

ADVOCATE





PAGE THIRTEEN









BY CARL ANDERSON





A
TOAST TO











er i ’ , r
YOUR ~~
HEALTH!! ur WINCARNIS § War
ASSIST YOU TO GUARD IT
BUY A BOTTLE TO-DAY.
BY CHIC YOUNG
mee en |
Rag rs: _ IT PAYS YOU TO DEAL HERE |
SPECIAL offers to all Cash and Credit Customers for Monday 10 Wednesday onl

Se enema een



SPECIAL OFFERS are now © ble at our Hranches Tweedside,
Speightstown and Swan Street



Usually Now Usually NOW
Pkgs. Quaker Corn Flakes 41 .88 #£=Tins Pie Apples 96 DO
Tins Box-All Cleanser 23 .20 6 lb Potatoes 72 4
Tins Cooking Butter (5lb) 4.50 4.30 Boneless Beef 58 50

NOW, LEMME =}
SEE...ONE OF <
THESE DIALS Is



THE COLONRA D GROCERIES









World-wide and Handsome
THE NEw ausvrin A40 SOMERSET



GEORGE WMC.

HELLO-DINTY-THIS IS UGGS!
LISTEN -WHAT FOUR-LETTER
WORD MEANS "LABOR"? I'M
STUCK WITH THIS CROSSWORD
PUZZLE -WHAT ? YOL SAY YER
BARTENDER IS WORKIN’ ON TH’ }
GAME PUZZLE? FING '! ASK |
Mya, HIM = fLL
° 3 \
LH 5 |
2 Aa |
~~ i Hil a
|
BY ALEX RAYMOND |
a senineenipnicaiaiiale ipiialiaas Sains %
|
\

MANUS



De eeecerecetaeeniameneneeenennentaiataiiaataeta tase aerator An oeecteetl

* AUSTIN again makes world





news~with this exciting, hand- rik
some new saloon. The A40 NEW AUSTIN
Somerset has new refinements, A40
peta age new comfort and sepsreNbong §() M f R 5 F T
ORES ano & GUIDE the record-breaking 4-cylinder h 4 4
TO THE AIRPORT! IT'LL
pune Back 3 A O.H.V. A40 engine, with im- WILL WE
proved induction and cylinder ON SHOW
head design for extra to ear
° ' SHORTLY
performance. weba
i AUSTIN=-You can depend on it!
J

| ECKSTEIN BROS — Bay Street.







{“-


PAGE FOURTEEN

CLASSIFIED ADS.

TELEPHONE 2508.

SUNDAY ADVOCATE

|CHRIST CHURCH FOUNDATION BOYS’
| AND GIRLS’ SCHOOLS

SUNDAY,

_—_______ SUNDAY, FEBRUARY 17,1952
PUBLIC SALES §QHUIPPING NOTICES

FEBRUARY 17, 1952



PUMLIC SALES
REAL ESTATE






















































































—— ahiientierentemnisieniiinenidiaiay BEAT IT IF U CAN! TRUTH AND * : . AUCTION | 4
= " : RIGHT MUST PREVAIL! EVIL DES-| segment are invited for the post of Secretary and Treasurer)” GAR Ford Prefect Saloon 1947 model ROYAL NETHERLANDS | 2o.c5ccs0ssssssseesoey
uTS } N 3 ° s Ph. | ie
DIED FOR SALE BELLISHED WITH AND BY TEARS OR | e Governing Body of these Schools. ee ee Te ae Res STEAMSHIP CO. | The M.v. MONEKA will secet %
ae Saree — TARNISHED WITH AND BY REGRETS The post is part time and non-pensionable. The salary is $720.00 to offer this vehicle for sale by auction , E . Cargo and Passengers for Domin- q
; ’n Peorua 16 1952 at How sapeniiioaesh bed is WORTHWHILE ! CONSCIENCE | per annum abl hl " . B at McEnecrney’s Garage on Friday 22nd, SAILING FROM EUROPE i% ica, Antigua, Montserrat, Nevis §
ellis Cross Road. Elvin Austin. Hee THOUGH SILENT AND EXORABLE payable monthly (Cost of Living allowance will not be/#t 2,P.m. John M. Bladon & Company | M.S. BONAIRE, 22nd February, 1952. * and St. Kitts. Sailing Friday 22nd
funerol leaves the above address to AUTOMOTIVE LIKE A PENDULUM SWINGS ON given). Auctioneers 17.2.52—an.| M.S, HERSILIA, Ist March, 1952 inst
4.30 p.m. today for the Brethren Cg Ree ee oe Details S.8, BRATTINGSBORG, 13th March, 1952. ‘Tie MV. “DAERWOOD” wl
Hall, Bank Hall and thenee to the MAIN RD., A Very Suitable Cottage of the work involved can be obtained on application to UNDER THE SILVER OO COREA ee AM accept Cargo and Passengers for
Westbury Cemetery. Friends are 2 Bedrooms (possible 3), Toilet, Bath, |the undersigned. Applicati vi ferenc wt wR. Loris, ts. remem. Spenene
asked to attend perenne, Sees Hees, eed ieee ae ule aoe th re es must be sent to the HAMMER sk wissedde oe be pnd Aruba, Sailing Saturday 23rd
William Austin (Park Constable, B.S.A. MOTORCYCLE—1% h.p. only | 7 Sn » aoe P on airman or ‘ore i the plican’ By recommendati Lioy . WILLEMSTAD, h ruary, 1952 a ”
Husband). PC. Lionel and PLC. [OMe Me Rpring frame, come in ahd see | GecieG” fore years with a dennite | Will be fequired a peor A t | ee wil sell on TUESDAY fh at oar| SAMLANG TO PARAMARINO AND The M.V. CARIBBEE will
Ennond Austin iSons), Ema|it at Redman & Taylor's Garage Ltd. | °Oe ior 8 yeats with a definite to assume duties on the Ist March, 1952. Mart BRITISH GULANA BI cg oy Pky
t . Street cept Cargo and Passengers for
Austin and Olga Ince (Daughters), | Show Room 15.2.52—3n. a _ ue geen a GEORGE B. EVELYN | ¢ tron 3, 6 W.C. Bowls, 37 Coni | M.S. STENTOR, 28th February, 1952 Dominica, ‘Antigua, >
17.2.52 Cee EEE so a as $2. b a . . 27 Stove mneys, 191 Drums One- | 5.5. BRATTINGSBORG, 27th March, 1952 Nev a si =
tt ae 2) Ford Ve Count pe tame) ~ 2) D- 7. Co Soren Chairman, Brome. ‘Cases c tins Paint, 89 | SAILING TO TRINIDAD, PAKAMARIBO Neves and St. nits, Sawing #rt-
FIELDS—Ethelroseden, retired Sarttary oo ag yd General condition, veny 17.2.52—1n Dumfries, pkgs. Quaher Oats, 2 4 Cecoa ra AND BRITISH GUIANA Ste aeeeny
Inspector, St. James. His funeral | 800d. pply: C. Gittens, 5 Roebuck a tteries, Garbage M.S. BONAIRE, 10th March, 1952 NER WNERS’
leaves his late residence Endeavour, | Street. Dial 4353, 16:3. 90—-Oe Pe aa tae eke ee St. Michael. $F Oe eee Sam: |S.8. COTTICA, 1th April, ised. BW SsOGATION (ING)
St. James at 480 p.m. today for the 5 le Abreu. AT BANK HALL MAIN RD., Felt Huts, 18 Cases Lux, 70 pkgs Corn. | SAILING TO TRINIDAD AND CUKACAO Consignee. Tele. No. “047
St. James ‘meter’. No cards, friends . Vauxhall ‘elox 1951 Model im = < e,—Partly Stone 2-Storey, — . « 2 c ‘s * 7
$t. James 68 GAK—Vauxhall V Near Strathelyde,—Partly Stone 2-St 9.2.52—"n 2 Cases Macuroni, Andux Tollet|M.S. HERSILIA, 18th March, 1952.
are invited exéellent condition and only one driver. |3_ Bedrooms, all Conveniences, Very ‘oper ete. Sale 12.30 o'clock. Terms Cash 5. P. MUSBON, SON & CO., mn
Thomas 8. Rock, Hilda Mayers Couttesy Garage. Dial 4616. Large Enclosed Yard, about 8,000 sq. ft., a ’ , Agents.
17.2.52—1n 17,2.52—6n Siigbie Aigo for Business, Going Under NT NOTI ‘ES BRANKER, TROTMAN & CO.
diss saoseasbeenedassiiliipsiciadians i so oiiiadtieeltie f MA HILL, Main Rd., uctioneérs.
NURSE: On February 16, 1962. William CAR—Vauxhall 12 H.P. 1947. Dial 0 . = ee Seeenen Paty eee Grteade, . va e * (Xs .
usiac¢ is funeral will leave his late 16.2.5: . » ‘ondition, le
abdenoe Howreit’s Cr ; , Entrance and Spacious Yard, View of Canadia N t nh i st mshi
Roan to8 st Garhitvas Chapel: CAR—Vauxhall Velox 18 h.p. Saloon, Sea. Stock Pens, Going For $4,000, AT VACANT POST OF VISITING OBSTETRICIAN, n a 10 a ca Ss
ssked wo attend 10-50 Model. Mileage under 25,000 SEMURECE, Gencide-+Abenm Hew Coss . MATERNITY HOSPITAL UNDER THE SILVER
irse (Wife), Gwendolyn, | Courtesy Garage. Dial 4616, : ean sign
James, Ronald tance, ci 17.2.5: n, | Bungalow, all Modern Conveniences, Applicati ; : : xe HAMMER
sentiien:- iChtiaenn) phased: about 11,000 +q ft.. Going Under £2,700 pplications are invited from Registered Medical Practitioners a Thuredar 2ist by order of Mrs.
“ing q. oe : . sei A . H. H. nson UTHBO Sails
Pret yy pr Gakicd elec ba 3 Bedroom 12 teen Store Buraow. al for the Part-time non-pensionable post of Visiting Obstetrician, | Furniture at ‘Scsharbia: Sees) ‘Gettionts ” wr satitas earn Barbages Barbados
4662, Rock. 16 252-9, | Modern Convew'ences, about 12,000 sq. ft., Maternity Hospital, which will become vacant on the 10th of March, | Cross Road, which includes: Very nice | “LADY RODNEY” 13 Feby. 15 Feby, 24 Feby. 25 Feb
rss eer Going Under £3,100. In NELSON ST.,| 1952 Extension Dining Table (seat 10), Pedes- |«Lanpy NELSON” ¥ <3 >* “o7 ad Feb . + wv. nee
THANKS GAR-4 Year old Vaughall 16, gooa|B¥ The Bus Co. 2-Storey Stone] tal Sideboard; Bergere Rockers; ‘Upright | “GANADIAN CRUISER” ". .. 1.1 March 29 Feuy. 3 March S March
BRATHWAITE _W condition, suitable for taxi work, Owner | BUSiness Premises an@ Residence, Con- The salary attached to the post is at the rate of $1,152 per Chairs; Double End Settee, Revolving os ‘ e
Seatene cae ae. to bd our | wants quick sale. Phone 2607 veareeen Good Condition, Ideal for any | annum aoe — Ornament Tables; Morris
ppest gratitude to those who sent ‘5a usiness, Going Under £2,300. IN x rs, ord Cabinet, all in Mahogany:
anor 7 exteo oes ft Brat} +.» ban ST.—Large 2-Storay Stone Busi- The Maternity Hospital is one of twenty beds with a maternal fe oe Chairs; Cherry ere Barbados Barbades Bomton St John Bsittex
us on the death of Daniel Brath- : Z > ness Premises & Residence with a Large | pjinid att: : : : eo a elves, Glass and | ,, ” r
waite wae Pile he alias aoeatlien. S%:| Garage or Workshop, all Conveniences,| cHinié attached. It is primarily a teaching Hospital for Students | China Pit'd Ware; Dinner & Tea Services, “LADY RODNEY” > Pees + match 00 Mere at starch oe merch
The Brathwaite {amily 192.82—1n. | further particulars, Dint 8420, A-1 Condit'@n,, Taal for any Business, |@nd twenty are trained annually. It is served by a Matron, three a ae And Fittings. Electric Table | «LADY NELSON” ""92 Mareh 24 March S April 4 April 7 April
WUSKISSON: “The fomiy "of Whe Tate | aus ee 1 | 23.000" Can Buy 2230.00 pm unde: | graduate furse-midwives and the usual subordinate staff. Mateek Manet chk ioe, taeen | "CAN. CRUISER” 5... Cape TAR 0 MASE AT April
a Vv. uskiss 7 » ~ : - ° : Pnience sai : 2 as im Doub! Bedstead
Recirestation me ente teenen suneite to ng Ford prefect in pertect condition, ee ein aoe ane ae i eee a In addition to the ordinary duties, the Visiting Obstetrician ra bean Ree Mattress: a I ad » For further particulars, apply to—
Sil’ who attended the funeral, sentlartew Bellerig~2n | Below £600. Contact Me for Almost will be required to assist in the training of Midwives and in the] tor. M.T. Washstand, French Press, Towel
Wreaths, cards and letters of sympathy ——— Real Estate. “If 4 Can't— | supervision of the maternal clinic Sere eae, Wis ee. S508
or in any other way rendered assistance | “ CAR—1947 Vauxfall 12. .Good tyres and m1? Call at “Olive Bough, aay Press and Dressing Table, painted Cream;
in thelr bereavement, sagen, | attemy. 97,000 antes. | Owner leaving the Hasti Sh tae ed pe 3.89—In Applitations should be addressed to the Colonial Secretary, Bar- rng wh i Sa Be. ee P coves ; GARDINER AUSTIN & co., LTD,—Agents.
u son, “4 , tha si dwelling- ; ings, ; i
yuskisvon, Arthur Huabiewe.| Band. 91,000.90. Grevenson, io 21 | case Gvariocming "the ese btuale. i bados, so as to reach his office not later than the 29th of February,|4 Burner Valor Oil ‘Stove: iron Ppt
e or R454. 15.2.52=3n
17.2.52—1n Enterprise Road, Christ Church and built | 1952, 17.2.52.—3n.





to thank all those





———————
MARINE ENGINE—Mallard Motor Sail-
er 21 foot Morris Marine Engine full

of 12 inch stone standing on 2 Roods
15 Perches of land containing open











i





Stand; Zine Top Table; Cream Separator,
Churn; Kitchen Cabinet, Coolerator;
Tennis Nets & Poles; Lawn Markers, Fow!



























































































it wreaths, Caras or | equipment $2,000.00 nearest. Telephone verandah, drawing and dining rooms, 2 Coop, Galv. Trap Nest; Teed rs;
in any other way expressed their] 4490 or 3274 17.2.52—2n | bedrooms (with space for a third PART ONE ORDERS Gale. Feed Boxes; Brooding lamp, A MODERN BUNGALOW on 11,000 sq, feet land at Brighton on Sea.
sympathy in our recent bereavement kitchen, try, garage, servant's room, Empire Treadle Machine, Smiths Type- Contai 3 Bed along a ner convenience
which was occasioned though the CARS—1949 Morris Oxford Saloon | “ter and electricity. The above will be Bs writer, Pye Radio and other items. ee Renee EEE ae ler, eee
cone oe og Eta ying : 16,000 miles in excellent condition. ie up = tg a as. oe the Lieut.-Coil. J. CONNELL, O.B.E., E.D. Sale 11,30 o'clock Terms CASH. CECIL JEMMOTT
: May he ace rsa SD under on ‘Thursday ebruary Somme BRANKER, TROTMAN & CO. ss ricsiere BUERETN
Chloe Wailthe and family Weitable “for Mine "yee" Dodge Delite | at 2 0° in the afternoon. Ispection he Barbador Regiment 7 oo 33, BROAD STREET. KNIGHT'S BUILDING
17.2.52—1n | Coupe nas been well cared, Very suitable | @"y day on application to the occupier. Issue No. 7. 15 Feb. 52 Auctioneers, foes. SEV.
for converting to pick-up. 1938 Chrysler HAYNES & GRIFFITH, —————— TST SSS a o¥.2.68—2n
Royal Sedan going cheap, 1956 Morris Solicitors, 12 High Street. 1. COMMAND—CHANGE—OF
FOK RENT Minot 2 Door Saigon 12,000 iniles. 14.2.52—5n Captain SE. Ie Jofinson, assumes egmmand “A” Coy. vice Majer t.. A. Chate
Ju arrivi fortis lords = an ni mon’ ve w.e.f, 1 Peb. 52, .
Minors in assorted colours, We also have Rt Bema. Brand rent ample 3 bedroom |2%. APPOINTMENT i re . We always carry a large assortment of — %
3-10 ewt, Vans at prices prior to January | house, all conveniences, with party- Lieut. P. L. Cc. P i i se -in-e 7 yw 1 LEO 5 CHURCH
HOUSES vil Pe Mage Ro sine oO nuar, sided living soom, epeh verandaly kitchen February, 188, eterkin appointed second-in-command “B' Coy w.e.f. 1st . BEST BRITISH PAINTS tb ENAMELS
me ROYAL GARAGE LTD. and wsiitey routn., Garage, jaundry, 2|%. PARADES=TRAINING ORGANIST CHOIR-MASTER —
“Lil A ermal! self contained un- | Telepho 4504. 13.2.52—7n, | servant rooms and storage room under All rank: i ade ¢ 7 rsday * c i
furnished Vial’ Bréely’ ahd 00) WHA | cennenciee | ON attractive hillside site, Hockley New t.. He. Coy, ih eo weeetllct uehing 100 OE et eat eae ee] Applications to be sent to the in stock
attractive surfoundings, about 2 miles] ONE COMMER LIGHT VAN-New | Road. A, Barnes & Co., Ltd. Dial 4476 A’ Coy-—-Dvill under the CSM "A" Coy, Officers wil visit VPs. “B” | Vicar for the above vacancy caused Send us a trial Order
from city. Available immediately, call] tyres, new battery, in good working 13. 2.52t.f.m Coy—interior Economy—Checking Kit ; through ill-health. Salary $24.00 .
Mayers, | Advocate Advertising Dept.| condition, Dial 0163, 168.9080. | “Se eee at tnd containing 2 Signal Platoon ; plus Fees. A ;
al 25 or full particulars, - LAND—One Spot nd containing Th ‘ . a CENTRA
17.2.52-4n. |" VAN: Foursome Van 1949 model, |r more House spots at Derrick’s St Se ee Tete eee ett On Mon:-17. a0 -Wed. Feb. 58. State experience—names of two | 5 L EMP ORIUM
Dark Green (A-2) Good condi 4 eames. Opposite the Cuffley’s Phone 2707 ; ‘
eaeeresraprpsee nein ame Oe ieee. ie ndition: |5°"V" parker. Station Mill, St. Michael, Band Practices will be hela on Mon. 17, Wed. 20 and Thurs. 21 Feb. 52. ba from whom reer at ‘ Corner Broad & Tudor Streets
and George St.—3 bedrooms with running | Andrew. 12.2,52—4n 17,2.52—1n Recruit: ny f y ; :
water, drawing . Gining rooms —Electric _ 4. REGIMENTAL "SnooTs ee ee eee eee ce
lighting and gas for cooking installed — RIVERTON—River Road, s Ing on The Major G. Hy. St. AM Cup—Rifle, open to marksmen and ist Class
Garage and servant's room. Phone 2902. ELECTRICAL Tr ae ate iia aie ae Shots was won by C.S.M, Carter, G.A. with 103 points, C.S.M. Mandeville
; rooms, = and oor Sa light. In- Weyal Lawenacsnine Cp FOR SAI E . ’ . g
—oee a — | speetion by appointment wone 4019 i 9 %
WANTED Gna EMPFRON CAR RADIO tor sais.|"he'above will’be set up for sale ui Fees, UeSe” iP aaheBlnce "at i400 hours, on Saturday 20\ Feb. Ba. x ° x
Practically new, Can be seen at Lash-| public competition on Friday, the 22nd “i a we Ghace c a AS on R %
ley’s Limited. Sold for $179 * reduced | Gay of February 1852, at 2 p.m. at the} ORDERLY OFFICER AND ORDERLY SERJEFANT FOR WEEK ENDING —_— R J %
daimnte to $100.00. 12.2,52—6n | office of the undersigned. 2NTH PEB. #8. % x
HELE CARRINGTON & SEALY, Orderly Officer Lieut. G. C. Peterkin SWEET FIELD % -
Si ou Ss aan os cu, ft, Made by Lucas Street. sane: erent 409 Sjt. Reid, N. E. conti i vane a %
er perd | guarenteed, eR Next for du ve one House; comprisi
A WILLING HOUSB-BOY- y famous Orderty : hoo. ; Room
it capable references. nai SITE Lieut. T, A. Gittens upstairs three Bedrooms, WILL OUR CUSTOMERS PLEASE NOTE ~
r Bring Ca out hew show room. K. RK Orderty bi v.N 2 .
ing. The Moorings” Martie Gaiden. [P20. “Dial $188, 5027 or 461 The un Wal pftee, 208 pale one 30 Sit A ORMWES-COY., tfc} Totes baiies! tae THAT BLCK WIRE HANGERS AND $
10.2 62—In ; a or rn to public competition at their office M. L. D. SKEWES-CO>., -tsjor Toilets and Baths, one with Tub 4 Q
duinee reek en Fetlae the Win Purtusry 6.0.1.7 - © Adjutant. Bath and hot and cold water, GALVANISED HANGERS _ RETURNED %
CASHIER: Lady for our Retait ADIOS: ‘well - 4 Berchis er ath crema cana Rooms, a a rarer TO TS .
oe rast utes tberiternoetiel kc : The known for ing sites at PART Tl ORDERS 8, Kitchen, and Shower OUR DEPO AND HEAD OFFICE x
person. GW. HUTCHINSON & CO 9-tube sets, only a few left. See these | Maxwell Long Road, Christ Church, This 2 Room. Standing on approximately OUR DEPOTS AND HEAD OFFICE .
LIMPTED ave 17.2 62 =. before buying. Redman & Taylor's Garage | jand has a frontage on the Maxwell Long THE BARBADOS REGIMENT SERIAL No 2% Acres of land about 100 yards n s x
, Ltd, Show Room. 16,.2.52-—-3n. Roed of 128 feet and over 900 feet along 7 anaie ieee a nee ee eh ee from G bbs ae Inspection by s WILL BE PURCHASED BY US AT 3c. os
7 on . nother blic road runfing along its 4 a . N “ 4 appointment iy. ; >
"TRNAGE HOTLER Wart (ave sod] “HEFNIGHRATOR One @ cv, | cntve tngin. Vacant possenson svatsple,| Cb! Springer, M. 0, tn. HQ. Gogg gy manine vasaion jens we § ee ae :
cee in. Apply to ‘Lady Deane, | ee present needs, Phone 8256 between 8 eeniete oF Saree -_ M. L. D SKEWES-COXx, Major See . x
2 a fa bay 3) Om. 80d Sem, Soe pemniesion to view. HUTCHINSON & BANFIELD, $.0.L.F. & Adjutant, A Two Storey Stonewall resi- s
TWO JUNIORS—For our office, one of , i 1. anes Street the, Free era SS with hoe ao gene . %
shoul av ack : ——$—$—_____— TT % : -
Rateete steer serine: fan fe 16,2.52—6n, NOTIOR attached, Large Living and Dining SANITARY LAUNDRY Co, LTD. $
person to A, S. B:yden & Sons (Bar- FURNITURE a ae aie The Mess at Home for Members and Honorary Members which should have Rowin, tloe Galery ren . © Phy sen s
3) LA 4 — — taken pace on Saturday 23 Feb 1s cancelled. instea ere W e e 5 = .
bados) Ltd 14.2,52—t.f.n, | Taken pene on Couey So Soars ahproximately 8,000 equate ountry Road one 3: %

_-

CHAMSER OF COMMERCE

Applications in writing are invited for | Pargains in

the post of fulltime Secretary (male).
Salary approximately $200.00 per month,
acecerding to qualifications Successful
applicant must bssume duties not later
than Ist May, perferably earlier. Further
details may be obtained from the present



Secretary. Applications giving details of
past experience and copies of testimonials
should be sent by 28th February to the



Chamber of Commerce, Bovell & Skeete | poa¢,

Bidg., Lucas Street



16,.2.52—6n
MISCELLANEOUS
BOARDERS—‘‘Private family near

Savannah can accommodate visitors to
Trinidad. Single or double rooms, Write
Mrs. Stone, 80 Dundonald Street, Port-
of-Spain.” 9.2.52—12n.

eo
WANTED TO BUY ANTIQUE GOLD

SEAL. Phone Mrs. Russell, Martine Hotel
b 18.2.52—3n

OLS OLELEEPESLEPDSOOES,
NOTICE

Mr. EB D'ABREU has returned
to the island and is carrying on
his TAILORING as usual at Mar-
hill Street 15.2.52—3n

LCCOPPPOOPOPOE SPFFPOOOEâ„¢
Se | .



The Roebuck Street
Moravian Church
ANNUAL FAIR
% will be held on THURSDAY,
May ist, at 3 p.m.
Interested Friends please
Note !

a |



Special Offer

ELECTRIC
CLOCKS

Table Models with
luminous dials

G. W. HUTCHINSON
4222 & Co. Ltd. Broad St.

$7.52

each

SIEGES

EXHIBITION

BARBADOS
MUSEUM



f
{

WEST INDIAN
PAINTINGS

By ROBERT J. MAC LEOD

and

PENCIL & WATER
COLOUR

Figure Drawings of
West Indian Subjects
By HAROLD CONNELL
OPEN FEB. 9—MARCH 8

10 a.m.—6 p.m. nN
}
(

FURNYTURE—Ralph Beard offers you
Furniture, Mag. Dining
Chairs $2000 pr. Birch Dining Chairs
$16.00 pr. Also numerous other Articles
in furniture at reduced Prices. Call ut
Lower Bay Street. 16.2.52—2n.
——$——$_$___ TT

POULTRY

‘TURKEY COCK AND HEN and a
humber of fowl eggs for sitting. Phone
17.2.52—Zn.



LIVESTOCK

COATS— (3) Alpine-Sanaan Goats
heavy in kid each gives between 10 and
12 pints when fresh. Apply Benjamin
Springer, Belfield Housing Area, ok
Rock. 17.2.82—11

MECHANICAL





“AEROMOTOR In good order.
Por particulars dial 4506. 102.522"

_———
ONE FOUR WHEEL CANE CART with

eS pneumatic tyres and brakes.
eed wi & » never
used, Dial 4616. Courtesy

15, 2,52—6n.



Apply to Marion J
opposite Belmont hureh,



15. 2.52--3n.
ANTHURFUMS—In large and small
drums and s: Prodgers, Smalltown,
4%. John, . 17.2.52—2n
ANTIQUES — of every
Glass, old Jewels, fine Silver
Watercolours, books, Maps, Auto-
graphs ete., at Gorringes Antique Shop
adjoining Royal Yacht Club,
3.2.52—+.f.n.
AIR RIFLE shipment of
these just 22, and 177, call

early at Redman & Taylor's a Ltd.
1 "

ACCESSORIES, for the Car Chamois
Leathers Repair Kits, Car Polishes, French
Chalk, Oil Cans, K.L.G. Spark Plugs,
ete., etc. Redman & Taylor's Garage
Ltd 15.2,52—3n.



BARBADOS ANNUAL REVIEW~--Last
100 copies to close local sales by end of
month, buy now from Advocate
Stationery, Roberts Stationery, Weather-
head’s Drug Store. 17,.2.52—I1n

a Be rental
CUT GLASS— At reduced prices at
Ralph Beard, Lower Bay Street.
16,2.52—2n



designs fast colours 36” wide. Usually

nc ——
COTTON SEERSUCKER:-In ten lovely
iF 12 yard. Reduced for ohe week only

to $1.05 yard Visit KIRPALANI 52
awan St. 17.2.52—1n
eee EEE
BGGS—Barred Plymouth Rock Exgs for
hatehing. 36 cents each, Infertiles. re-
slaced. John Alleyne, Ebworth, St. Peter
Phone 91280 15.2. 52-—3n
GLADIOLI BULBS: Limited number
w Gladioli Bulbs Orders taken for

Dahli & Gladioli Bulbs for next season

Delivery end of November. Dial 3425,
Cottage Gift Shop 13. 2.52—4n
GALVANIZED SHEETS — A_ limited

quantity. 7 ft. $4.80, 8 ft, 96.89, 9 ft. $6 45
Telephone 2696.
2.2.52—t.L.n.

Incuite Auto Tyre Co



MADAM
HELENE

HAIR STYLIST
BEAUTY SALON >
47 Swan Street
Hair Styled after
Apex, Poro or
MADAM WALKER

| Systems



the








“WINDY MILL”, Amity Lodge Estate,
Chriet Church. Modern stone-wall three
bedroom bungalow with running water
fm each room, warage, servants’ rooms,
ete. Excellent construction.

The above property will be oifered
for sale at public competition on Fri-
day the 22nd February, 1952, at 2 p.m
at the offices of the undersigned from
whom full particulars can be obtained.
The ey. is being offered swhject
to a m ate Tesetve and provided the
reserve price is equalled or exceeded it
will be sold to the highest bidder at the

auction,
CARRINGTON & SEALY,
Solicitors.
8,2,52—4n.







MISCELLANEOUS

— eee

WANDCRAFTS consisting of Baskets,
Handbags, Pottery, Children’s Clothes,
Embroidered Linen. Orders taken for
Flowers, Cocktail Savouries and Cakes.
Up-to-date lending Library. Cottgge Gift
Shop. 13,2.52—4n

ee
MEGASS: At a ee Factory,

Apply the Manager. Telephone 2442.
16,2.52—6n

OlL—The wtld’s finest motor oit
Veedol, at all leading Garages and Service
Stations. Your vehicle deserves the best.
VEEDOL “Pound wherever fine cars
17,2.52—t.f.n



PKANO, Broadwood Grand Piano in
good order, $500. Phone 4640 during
oMfce hours. 17.2.52—-1n

PURGRAIN Pigeon Feed — none |
better — 10-Ib, lots and upwards @ 19¢. |
per lb, Phone 2547, 8.2.52—t0 n |

SHIRT FAGTORY—Capable of making |
60 dozen shirts per day For particulars: |
Phone Johnson 4311,
13.2.62—Tn

TORNADO-—International K.41. Beautt- |
ful condition, excellent equipment, good
racing record, Cost $700.00 now $500.00. |
No offers. Hicks. Telephone 3189.

psa OOOO,
& WEAR A TRUSS
and Keep Feeling Fit §







§ IF YOU SUFFER FROM ¥
1% RUPTURE I can supply you |
i with a comfortable fitting %
* m I .

TRUSS. Simply drop a post &

~ card or call on x

| & ETHELBERT SPOONER &
| Edgecliffe, St. John ~
1e i | s
1% i.cpe 2
‘L9SSSSSSSS9S999509999098H XR
















TO-DAY’S HAWK



A
The Annual Sale of ~* _—

The Girls Friendly
Society
will be held at The Hostel

on SATURDAY, April 26th
from 3—6 p.m. Details later.

20.1.52.—4n.

See

R. E. HOLDER

Competent Electronician





No. 4, Tudor Street



“INCH HAVEN”

A new modern Bungalow, 3 furnished
Bedrooms, large Living Rooms, facing Sea fur-
nished, all Cupboards built in, all wood used
in construction Barbados Mahogany, Garage,
Servants Room, its own Lighting Plant, stand-
ing on one acre of land sloping to the sea.
Price £4,000. Apply J. H. O'Dowd Egan,
C/o William Fogarty (B’dos) Ltd.
17.2.52.—2n.

’ -

[topaysnawx || feet of land,
REPAIRS, ETC. | a

1
The Serviceman with one

aim:
To Give You Satisfaction
R. E. HOLDER, Electronician

situate at Navy
Gardens,

BUILDING

Warehouse and Bu‘idings situate
Marhill Street, Bridgetown.
Standing on approximately 10,000
square feet of land, This building
has possibilities for carrying on
any trade that you may require.

LAND .

Approximately 18,000 square feet
of land with one large and one
small stonewall build’ng thereon,
situate at Roebuck Street. Excel-
lent for making into a parking
place or building warehouses,

NEW BUNGALOW

Comprising Three Bedrooms,
Dining and Living Room, Kitchen,
Toilet and Bath. Standing on
approximately 11,000 square
of land. Situate near the famous
Rockley Beach,

PARAGON























Comprsing Four Bedrooms,
Dining and Living Room, Pantry,
Kitchen and a very nice Study.
Standing on 7% acres of land.
Situate Near Seawell Airport.
Price ‘very reasonable. Imspection
by appointment only.

BUNGALOW

Rockley New Road: on approx-
imately 19,000 square feet, of land.
Magnificent view including Golf
Course, three Bedrooms, Drawing
and Dining Room, Kitchen.

Downstairs: Garage, Servants
Room with Bath and Toilet, and
Cr. room for Laundry or
Workshop.



a

REALTORS Limited

REAL ESTATE AGENTS
AUCTIONEERS
VALUERS

BUILDING CONTRACTORS
151/152 Roebuck Street,
Bridgeto

Phone 4900





& Co.

ALF.S, E.V -A.

John M. Bladon

Real Estate Agents, Auctioneers,

THE FirM WITH TEE

REPUTATION





























-

*
6555595555599 GOSS SG9 FOF 9 SOO OF FOOTIE OD POGP FIO



AVING
TROUBLE? |
CHANGE TO) }

" >
x

Ps

+

x

e

.

%

>

3

FOUND WHEREVER FINE CARS TRAVEL

ROBERT THOM LTD,—Agents %
Tel, 2229 %

Pa

Is





Other Popular Shades
at

$2.80, $3.72,
$3.81, $3.97

LASHLEY'’S LIMITED.

Swan & Prince Wm. Henry Sts.






eS eS Se eS a ae ee

SUNDAY, FEBRUARY 17,

Panama Canal May

Be Rebuilt In 1953

g cacy of more thah 20 ¥ears, it is hoped
} e U.S, Congress will appropriate mofiey arid atithor-
ise the pfoper authority to start rebuilding the Patiama
Canal in January 19538, Mr. William L. Fresinger, former
Judge of the Court of Common Pleas and former member
of the U.S. Congress for the State of Ohio, told the Advocate
yesterday
id that unless America
ind herself in a very bad
ion, the rebuilding of the



AAP i E R <

have worked on the canal and
other first class engineers inter-
ested in the matter, would like it



Canal would take a lot of labour, to rettiain as such, but there

including labour from the West is certain agitation in the U.S.A.

Indies at good wages as to whether it should be a sea
Mr. Fresinger was one of the levél canal,

passengers who called at Bafba- Sea Level Canal

dos yesterday on the French ] think it is absolutely im-

Liner Liberté,

practible and impossible to have

a sea level canal”, Mr, Fresinger

He said that his interest in the

rebuilding of the Panama Canal said, ‘‘because it goes over terrain
Started from his services in Con- that is mountainous and practi-
gress with the Rivers and Har- ¢eally ali the engineers have said
bours Committee. that it was impractical and have

“There is and has been an
issue since the French started to
build a canal, as to whether or
not the canal should be a s
lock

advocated that we call it the
rminal Lakes Plan which is the
lock plan preposed by Capt, Miles
ea or DuVal, USN Ret., who was Opera-








‘ ti 1 Naval Officer at Panama
The present canal, he said, is a during World War II.
lock one and many engineers who Mr, Fresinger said that the









Right « on Time ¢

++.
NEW DAWN 30-hour alarm clock in
handsome cream, blue or green case with
lated fittings. 4-inch dial with full
uminous numerals. Also available non-

VICTORY 30-hour alarm clock in cream,
blue or green case with plated fittings.
4-inch dial with luminous spots. Also
Juminous. Superbly British-made by | available non-luminous. British precision-
Smiths English Clocks Ltd madeé— completely reliable.

Svmuith Mauns
Talking of HAIR...

what is happening to YOURS?

OBTAINABLE AT ALL
LEADING JEWELLERS





When is hair healthy ? The truth is so surprisingly simple that
many people overlook it, to their cost. Hair is healthy when it
is properly nourished. Every hair on your head needs a constant
supply of no less than 14 organic substances, carried to the
hair root by tiny blood vessels in the stalp. Should the supply
of these vital hair foods fail, the hair bécomeés lifeless and
brittle — and finally begins to fall out, This often happens at an
embarrassingly eafly age. Direct nourishment of the hair roots
is then essential for recovery. For this purpose Pure Silviktin
is indispeftsable. Pure Silvikrin contains cystine, tryptophane,
tyrosine and a// the other natural hair-growing substances —
in a concentrated form which can be massaged into the scalp.
Pure Silvikrin carries on where nature leaves off. If you are '
worried about your hair it would be wise to
start with Silvikrin today.





Besides Pure Silyjkcin for severe dandruff and falling
hair, there is Stivikrin Hair Tonic Lotion—the ideal
daily treatment for less serious cases, and also
Silvikrin, Hair Tonic Lotion with Oil for those
whose hair is on the dry side.

eS

i
,





: ORIENTAL







To-pAv's NEWS FLASH 4

250 copies Special Edition
King’s Funeral will be
reserved for us.

Only 47 left to be booked.

Johnson’s Stationery



|

|
SILKS, CURIOS, ARTS

VENDEMOS, SEDAS,

JOYERIAS ¥ ARTISTIOAS }) |

CURIOBIDADES, TRAIDOS {\\|

DE LA INDIA CHINA e {\\|

EJIPTO

|



LOCK YOUR BICYCLE

|



L





THA NI’S 1 with a Bicyele Lock
Pr. Wm. Hry. St, Dial 3466 \\ | % From
; : » Johnson’s Hardware
s

PLLIOFLLLSSSEE LEELA A











DO YOU WISH
THEN BUY A - - -

F ILLERYS COOKER

IT



TO ECONOMISE ?









SAVES YOU OVER 75°‘

KITCHEN FUEL & COOKING TIME

|
A aaa



The Rich Flavours and Nutritive Elements of Foods are
RETAINED in this Cooking Device

NO DRUDGERY ! MAKES COOKING EASIER !

SAVES YOU MONEY! BUY YOURS TOMORROW!

From:—Messrs. PLANTATIONS LTD., DaCOSTA & Co. Ltd.

©. F. HARRISON & Co. Litd,, GENERAL HARDWARE
SUPPLIES, CARTER & Co., C. 8. PITCHER & Co.






















ee ee a ee a ee a a



SUNDAY ADVOCATE





building-of the canal would be Of apie. This would be of great ad- |
benefit to the West Indiés in addi- vants to the West Indies be-
tion to all the world for the caus ‘we have shipping in the
reason that the Culebra Cut pacific and will be having more
which connects the Gatum and and more all the time.”

Miraflores Lakes, would be wid- The Terminal Lakes Plan with
ened from 110 to 140 feet to take adequate locks would cost about



eare of more
The country

modern shipping ne



of what it would cost to
there has a greater build a sea level canal which
rainfall than any other like area speak be ehtjrely an experiment
in the world and there are many Mr. Ffesinger whose business
weather conditions which impede now is finance said that he was
navigation in the canal as is the conrected with the Mutiial, Mort+
case at the present time. gage and Investment Company of

The purpose of the Terminal Cleveland, Ohio, He igs also con
Lakes Plan is to extend the lake pected with the People’s Loan
on the Pacific side+Miraflores— gnq Savings Company 6f San-
which covers an area of about 142 dusky, Ohio, and has beeh with
miles to a point where they could those companies for many vears
make it cover an afea of four before he left Congress.

miles so that it could be used as
NAVAL AIRCRAFT

a mooring basis for beats to
FOR CURACAO

await the betterment of weather
condtions which are very danger-
WILLEMSTAD, Curacao,
Jan. 31.

ous at times to navigation.
British-built Fairey

Three Locks
Firefly aircraft, in service with |

The U.S. authorities are pro-
posing, tree locks at Miraflores the Dutch Navy, have been land-+
ed in Curacao from the Dutch

instead of two and éliminating the
he said, Feed bee a ated el bole” aireraft carrier “Karel Doorman”



Fifteen

neck. Ships going in there got to Strengthen the island’s des |
into cross currents and had to fences.

move out into the Culebra Cyt Apart from its vital oil refining |
under dafgérous weather condi- industry, Curacao also has aq
tions, whereas if the Miraflores Strategic importance in the des
Lake were extended, the ships fence of the Caribbean. During |
could be protected until the the last war, the air defence of |
weather conditions were better Curatad was undertaken by the |

and navigation was more favour- U.S. Air Force.—§.U.P.



“NEW RELIEF FOR

ARTHRITIC PAINS

But new treatment does more than
ease these terrible agonies.

prompt relief from the pains due to tie symptoms of arthritis and
rheumatism, but also affects the metabolic processes which constitute
a very important part of the rheumatic state’s backgtound.

DOLCI has n thoroughly tested in medica! institutions,
DOLCIN is being used now with unprecedented suevess, DOLCIN
is being ea by doctors now. nd mafy sufferers have already
resumed normal living as a result of taking DOLCIN.

Don’t delay. Profit by the experience of fellow-victims of these
pains. Get DOLCIN today. A bottle of 100 precious tablets rosts

only 12/- PER BOTTLE
SOLD BY: BOOKER’S (BARBADOS) DRUG STORES LTD.
Broad Street and Hastings (ALPHA PHARMACY)










| itching, Burning and Smarting of

Stopped In
(0 Minutes

| Since the discovery of Nixederm by an

Amerioan physician it is no longer necessary

r ar ne to suffer from ugly, disgusting

ring skin blemishes such as

. Pimples, Rash, Ringwotm, Psorl-

asis, Acne, Blackheads, Scabies and Red

Blotehes. Don’t let a bai skin make you

| feel inferior and cause you to lose your

friends, Clear your skin this new scientific

way, and don’t let a bad skin make people
think you are diseased.

A New Discovery
Nixoderm is an ointment, but different
from any ointment you have ever seen or
felt. It is a new discovery, and is not greasy
but feels almost like a powder when you
|
}



BEFORE

ie a po your skin—the trea'ment to malir
ore attractive, to hele you wi

ae Rinoae has brought. clearer

i iinter skins to thousands: such as M
rR who Writes: ‘1 suffered tram terrib!+

Hebd ing and s ser for
ata evetyth m0")

hea

It. stop; ne ite Sing in i
utes, Could see et, skh clearing
"

pins

apply it. It penetrates replay, into the pores | on the second day. e red disfigurity:
and fights the cause of surface skin blem- itches, snd scaly skin disappéared in ib
ishes. Nixoderm containg 9 ingredients jaye v lends were amaze at the in

which fight skin troubles in these 3 ways.
1, It fights and kills the microbes or para-
sites often responsible for skin disorders,
2. It stops itching, burning and smarting
in 7 to 10 minutes, and
the
lear,

provement in my appearance.”

Satisfaction Guaranteed
Nixoderm costs absolutely nothing unl «

it clears your skin (} your complete sat:
faction, Get Nixoderm from your chem
today. Look in the mirror in the morn!
and you will be amazed at the improvemen
Then just keep on using Nixederm for of
und at the end of that time it mu

r made your skin soft, clear, smoot
and magnetically attractive
the kind of skin that will m
miréd wherever you go, or you
tutn the empty package and your ronc;
will be refunded in fu et Nixoderm fro!
your Chemist today. The guararitee protec

cools and soothes
kin, 3. It helps nature heal the skin
oft and velvety smooth,

Works Fast

ecoust Nixoderm is scientifically com-
pounded to tight akl ‘iS troubles, it works
laster than_anythi i ad seen in your

before. It stops ching, butning and
smarting ih a few minutes,
work immediately, clearing
your skin,





—must give ve
ce you ad
simply 1



hen. starts to
and healing
making it softer, whiter av nd
velvety smooth. In just a day or two ¥
mirror will tell you that here at last 1é the
scientifie *re-tment you have been needing you.





TAYLOR'S SPECIAL BLENDED RUM

|

|

|| Let your next Drink be mixed with ||
|

|

(With the Distinctive Flavoyr)

YOU WILL BE SURE TO LIKE THIS BLEND
Blenders

JOHN D. TAYLOR & SONS Lid.



|
}
|

— =
Saupe Sot Seo

OO PSP SOP COO SOP PPG SOP AT III IIT os

x

Â¥

I
|
]
|
|
*

s

the resumption as from WEDNESDAY, February 20th %
%,

of its %

WEDNESDAY

:

which were suspended owing to the death of His

7.30 pum. to 12 midnight x

%,
C. B. BROWNE'S ORCHESTRA 3
AAA OCSE ELL O ALMA, 2s

Evening Dress

ttt tt tet oD
‘ AAAS CLEA









A new product, DOLCIN, has been created which not only gives 4

THE COLONY CLUB {

+

%,
announces Q |

+

NIGHT HWOFFET 5
“
a DANCES %

-
+
late Majesty King George VI S|
‘
&









MADE



29 880% 664














Giving new vitality

Take homea

TONI

BY THE MONKS OF BUCKFAST

and exhaustion and remember,
Wine Is especially valuable after iliness



BUCKEAST

ABBEY

if you feel worn out, der

generally rum down a glass or two a day of
Buckfast Tonic Wine will quix
energy and tone up the whole nervour «ystem.

kly restore lost

it fortifies you ogainse fever

Buckfast Tonic



bottle today








C WINE

Youthful Yao Restored

In 24 Hours

Glands Fortified &
by New Discovery

Are you tired
ith the

sufte

a

iter thor

Do you feel old before your time
Tun-town. worn out, apd unable to
speed and pleasures of modern lif
from loss of memory, rervousne
@ blood? Are you
+ or have an inferior
society of women or






ithout a second
conditions, ther “

and unless your giat ‘ ‘ i
mulated, you can tr tft
igour and animation

Vitalize Your Glands

Portunately for those who suffer from ray ~tte owe
gland action, a physician with 30 ATs "
has perfected a simple, safe, and je ey
tion to stimulate gland act! Bid thu
feeling of inereased enerey
This prescription, eatied Vi-Tabs, is in ‘ten
tasteless, tablet form. All you need to do
is to take two little tablets three time
each day, This prescription starts work
immediately, stimulating the @lantia, |
Vigoureting (he blood, and enlivening your
whole body. As yout glands rapidly beconie
stronger, you Will feel and ser yoursell he
younger, more hhasted t
ith gour werk, but









comin
only ‘able to keep up ©
ealtzing the, Jove A vd me re
more frequently tt for

Doctor Praises Vi-Tabs
Dr, J, Rastelli,, wid known Hurope
physician, recen'ty stoted “Ma
tists are of the Opinion that th
of youthtul Vigour and
giands, if we could keep
tioning properly, we Wor and
years younger § ead} € lotiget it
oh my yénre of experience in stud
practice, i! is My_opituen thot the
mula kno





Vi-Tab

eal. lore



TreCr as
rep 4



youthtul ® :
] tality to the b prit

24-Hour Results ar

Because, Vi-Tobs are | py
clentifically Sesieted t
and prepared to

ieTabs ° Quarante








Women
Admire
Vigeurows
Men

é gland tem, the

nerves,



f 4 eour, there is
& for ‘ Most titer§ re-
ne i vement within

' t ear

he reealt

after time
hich had
ne,

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PAGE FIFTEEN

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PAGE SIXTEEN



Visitors Driving Hired Cars _,

Taxi Drivers
Diseuss Problem

A GENERAL MEETING of The Barbados Hackney Car
Owners Association was held at the Headquarters of The
Barbados Progressive League on Friday night, the 15th
inst., when the said Association was revived and reorganised
and the general grievances which are still prevailing both
at the Seawell Airport and at the Pier Head were fully ex-
plained by some of the prominent members of the Associa-
tion.

2
The question of self driven ‘ ‘

cars by visitors to the Island

within the first fortnight of On £5 Bond
their arrival, without any know-

ledge of the Highways Regula- “I have taken into considera-
tions or of the highways and— tion what you have said and
byeways of the Island as @that you are the wife of the
whole. was properly explained complaint but you should not go
and debated from all its legal to the workplace of the com-
aspects and implications by some plaint and make him miser-
of the members of the Associa- able?” His Worship Mr. G. B
tion present together with Messrs Griffith told Violet Butcher of
E. W. Barrow, M.C.P, J. Cameron Dash Gap, St. Michael yesterday
Tudor, M.A., L. A. Williams, as he placed her on a bond for
M.C.P., J. E. T. Brancker, M.C.P. 5)* months in the sum of £5

M.cC.P. The for stealing an iron drill.

point relative to an International | rhe, drill which was valued at
License was fully explained by 9 the property of Oliver
Messrs Barrow and Williams. Butcher, Oliver Butcher told the
Messrs. St. Hill, Green Bayley, court that on February 16 about
Burrowes, Gittens ana other 7-45 .8.m the defendant who is

: : his wife came to the DaCosta
ore ages wn se a cooperage and asked him for
ire 0 we gener:

* money. He told her that he had
namely:

no money to give her and then
For the first 100 miles

turned away from her.

: Edgar Gill said that he saw
eee Pe eee, »s the the defendant come in the coop-
sé aie he, Sai - erage and she had a talk with
a : , * _, Oliver Butcher. Butcher turned

They turther pointed out _ his back on the defendant and as
* might be ADs oe RW he did so the defendant took up
ne average visitor, TI the iron rill.
OF THESE RATES, to make yjolet Butcher said that she
ee, use of ot gs _ oe did not take up the drill but that
they do at present, e - Edgar Gill and her husband
licity Bureau could assist in this were conspiring to put her in
direction, it was ee aa a ne oeene 30 the court and
and also by means of suitable telling lies on her,
PLACARDS OR POSTERS at the “I went to my husts a to get

and C. E. Talma,

is.

rate...

rate is



Seawell Air Port and at the $1.00 from him and he told her
Baggage Warehouse. ‘that he had no money,” Violet
: Butcher told the court.
The following were appointed
Officers of the Association for
the year 1952, namely:

Mr. J. E. T. Brancker, M.C.P.—
President. Mr. Kenneth Forde
Vice President; Mr, C. E.
Talma, M.C.P. General Secre-
tary; Mr. C. BE, St. Hill Treas-
urer,

The revision of the Rules and
the Constitution of the Associa~-
tion is now in the hands of The
Brain Trust and Legal Advisers of
the Association, who are also
making a detailed study of the
grievances suffered and indigni-
ties meted out to small owners: the Governor’s Private Secretary
The General Meeting was then Major Denis Vaughn and Lt.
adjourned by the Chairman, Comdr. E. P. Mallinson, Field
Mr, Brancker, until Friday, be Commissioner for West Riding and
22nd, at 8 p.m. at the Head- yorychire, arrived at Comber-
quarters of the B.P.L., when com~= more School yesterday at 3:0’clock
pletion shall be made in mar- and was met by the Island Scout
.shalling the general grievances Commissioner Major J. E. Griffith
of its members, and in appoint- 5.4 Mr. L. A. Harrison, Secretary
ing the Members of the Com- of the Barbados Boy Scout Asso-

ttee of Management ciation.

The Delegation to prepare the “as soon as the Chief Scout
Petition and to wait on His arrived, the Police Band played
Excellency the Governor will the “General Salute” and the flag
be appointed at the next meeting was broken. Immediately after
of the said Association. this the scouts who were drawn
up in horse-shoe formation around
the flag post, welcomed Lord
Rowallan with a hearty yell. The
Chief Scout inspected the guard
and shook hands with each scout
in turn.

Afterwards Lord Rowallan took
up his position next to the flag for

Lord Rowallan, Chief Scout
and Empire.
Lord Rowallan, accompanied by

Germans Win
Bob Sled Event

OSLO, Feb. 15.

Germany’s number one team ihe salute and each of the twenty-
of world’s champions Andres one troops present marched past.
Ostre and Lorenz Neiberl won preceded by their colour bearers.

the 1952 Olympic Competition in
the bob sled event over 1 500 The’ aftertioon's eritertainmeht
metre course in five minutes 24.54 was highlighted by a cycle dis-

seconds play given by tihe Ist Barbados
Sea Scouts in which sixteen

American number one team of scouts took part, Each cycle was
Stanley Benham and Patrick cecorated with the scout colours

Martin took second place with 5 of red, yellow and green, The
minutes 26.39 seconds. Switzer- colours red and green were very
land’s number one team of Fritz significant and especially per-

Feirabend and Stephen Washer taining to Sea Scouting, since the
finished third with 5 minutes req flag on the left represented
27.71 seconds, UP the Port side and the green flag

represented the starboard side.

In this display which was
rather picturesque, the scouts
rode pass in file and formed two

ntl

WEATHER REPORT

circles, one of which rode clock

- wise and the other anti-clock

YESTERDAY wise. From the concentric cir-

cles they formed two separate

Rainfall from Codrington: circles and then joined again

nil. forming a figure of eight. At

Yotal Rainfall for month to this point they again branched

date; .07 inch. off into four circles and then

Temperature: 72.5 °F. formed the St. George’s Cross
Wind Velocity: 1? miles per and the St. Patrick's Cross.

hour ‘

29.983 A great deal of precision was

tas cn) . a? necessary on the part of the

acess opi scouts who code a this Gisplay.

since they pass angerously

TO-DAY close to each other, and_ the,

Sunrise; 6.16 a.m. crowd became _ rather _ restless

Sunset; 6.08 p.m.

Moon: Full, February 10.
Lighting: 6.30 p.m.

High Tide: 7.46 a.m. 8.32 p.m.
Low Tide; 1.15 a.m. 2.31 p.m.

fearing the possibility of a col-
lision which on many occasions
seemed imminent. Nevertheless
nothing of the kind occurred and
the cyclists received great ap-
plause for their performance,
The rally came to a close with





It Every Tume
NO, PHILO! DON'T TRY_\-
TO STOP MEI TVE STOOD
ENOUGH! T’M TH '
THIS IS THE END!FIN
TELL HER TO GO TO
RENO! I’M WALK!
GOOD



Repistered US Patew ORee






BUT, BUNSON,
) DON'T
BUST UP THE PART
COME ON BACK IN
EVERYTHING'LL BE

SSeS TE a ES









IM SURPRISED







J Wey HAVE




BACK HO!

Vag/é YS

Ox) >—
“aN 1 Sa



THIS IS SERIOUS!

DION'T EAT FIRST
ANDO HAVE THEIR



FIGHTS THAN A WESTERN
MOVIE HE'S ALWAYS

WALKING OUT OS! HER-SUT

HE ALWAYS STAGGESS /

SUNDAY ADVOCATE



Music Al The
Esplanade

The Police Band will resume
their public engagements today
by giving their monthly Sunday
Concert at the Esplanade Band-

stand beginning at 4.45 p.m, under
the conductorship of Band-Sgt
Cc. Archer. The programme wilj
be as under:—

Grand March-Processional—

The Imperial Crown Elgar
Overture — Raymond Thoma
Grand Selection — Cavalleria Rus-

ticana ...... 143 Mascagni
Sursam Corda — Lift up your ;

PRONE OS ies ocd Elgar
Fantdsia — Folks Songs of Scot-

land Sit taee alecb Mydlleton
Nocturne Celebre —

Liebestraumme Lizst .
Sacred Arias — Sheep may safe-

ly Graze ..........+.- .,» Bach

He shall feed His Flock. . Handel
Grand Mareh — The Queen of

Sheba ...... : .7... Gounod

Hymns—Jesus Lover of My Soul
The King of Love my Shepherd
is.

GOD SAVE THE QUEFN

News In Brief

A FIRE at Hanson Plantation,
St. Lucy at about 9.30 p.m. on
Friday burnt four and a_ half
acres of second crop ripe canes
and 200 holes of first crop young
canes, They are the property of
D. E. Webster and were insured.



MAUDE WILLIAMS of Good-
land, St. Michael, reported that
her house was broken and entered
on Friday between 6.45 and 10.45
a.m. and $57 in cash were stolen
from a bureau drawer in a room,

The Police are making investi-
gations.



Scout Rally For
Lord Rowallan

_MEMBERS of twenty-one troops including 10 Commis-
sioners, 27 Scouters and 157 Scouts were present at a Scout
Rally held at Combermere School yesterday in honour of

of the British Commonwealth

a yarn by the Chief Scout who
laid stress on courage and duty.
in his story he told of an old
African who had shown courage
and a great sense of duty in wars
and disputes among the tribes,
and had eventually risen to the
position of Prime Minister of his
State. He thought that this old
African would have made a_ fine
scout had scouting been started in
his day. After the rally had
ended, Lord Rowallan and many
of those who attended were enter-
tained to tea by Major C, E, Noott
Headmaster of Combermere
School,

Football —

@ From Page 1

ton pressing their
an effort to regain
advantage. Ably supported
their defence, the Carlton for-
wards, directed by Lucas at in-
side righ., swept down the field,

opponents in
their lost
by

but when their efforts were not
foiled by Morrison the Spartan
full back, Lucas failed to con-

vert, either kicking wide or over
the cross bar.

Cadogan the Spartan skipper
also raliied his men, and they too

improved their game, but the
vorwards, particularly the wing-
ers, failed to .ake advantage ot

what opportunities were offered
them. hey lacked that
sary last minute effort which 1:
so much required in a game of
this sort. i

The hour for the final whistle
approached, and it appeared that
the game would end in a draw,
but at .he eleventh hour, Griffith
gave Van Genderen a pass for
this player to centre off the line.
Custodian Warren just failed to
gather, and Boyce who was
standing opposite the right post
converted for his team to win
the match,

The teams were as follows:—

Spartan: Wood, Morrison,
Bowen, Medford, Cadogan, Git-
tens, Griffith, Van Genderen,
Wood, Haynes, Boyce.

Carlton; Warren, Hutchinson,
Kennedy, Marshall, Claigmonte,
Cox, Andrews, Lucas, G. Hutch-
inson, Williams, R. Hutchinson.

Referee Mr, Ben Hoyos, Lines-
men Messrs J. Archer, Wilson.


















“11S NOT ALL BIG-
MOUTHS SAULT. WHEN
SHE WASN'T PICKING
ON HIM SHE ‘WAS OUT |
IN THE KITCHEN TELLING |
ME THE ROAST LOOKED |
LIKE HORSESME ATs
t
|




WEY




MORE Wa
| —_s \~
| [ é Xb “i
ie Ka NG



=

| ANy TIME,A
| ANYWHERE: WORD, \
| A LOOK*AND WHA:
| THE WAR IS ON!

YY -



neces- |



CHURCH |
SERVICES

A Requiem will be held in the
St. Michael's Cathedral for the
! rehdeacon Alfred Shank-

d Tuesday morning at 9
o'clock It is hoped that the
eles sy Ol the Diocese will attend

service

Friends of the late
acon are invited.

LE YMORE ROCK A.M. BE. CHURG
YOUTHS DAY .

Archae
et
1) am

Youth's
ervice

. Divine Worship, 3.30 pm.
Service, 2.15 p.m. Evangste ist ¢
A cordial invitation is extended
Minister.-Rev. E. A. Gilkes

METHODIST SERVICES
BFTHEL

Thomas. 7
DALKEIT
pm. Mr. G
PELMONT
Rev
SOUTH
M.A. E
ster
PROVIDENCE 11 am. Mr. &
Srowne. 7 p.m. Mr. J. Clarke
VANXHALL -- 9 a.m. Rev, B. Crosby!
7 p.m. Mr. P. Deane.

STREET
CIRCUIT

1l_ am. Rev. M. A. EB,
pm. Rev. B. Crosby.
H 11 a.m, Rev. B, Crosby
McAllister
11 a.m. Mr. G, Bascombe

M. A. E. Thomas.

DISTPICT 8 a.m
Thomas, 7 p.m. Mr. G

7 pm

Rev
Brew-

JAMES

Pulpit Appointments for To-day
fae STREET 11 a.m. Rev. J. S
uiton; 7 p.m. Rev. F. Lawrene
SPEIGHTSTOWN Harvest Festival, PN
a.m. Rey. F. Lawrence, Services 7 p.m
Mi. F. D. Roach,
PAYNES BAY

am

Harvest Festival, 9.30
Mr. F. Moore, Services 7 p.m. Rev

J. 8S. Boulton.+

WHYTEHALL — 9.30 a.m. Mr. G. Me
Allister, 7 p.m. Mr. G. Harper

GILL, MEMORIAL — 11 a.m. Rev. R
McCullough, 7 p.m. Mr. J. Layne,

HOLETOWN Sacrament, 8.30 a.m
Rev. R. McCullough, 7 p.m. Mr, J. E
Haynes

BANK HALL—@.30 am. Mr. J. T
Oxley, Sacrament, 7 p.m. Rev R. Me
Cullough

THE ST. JAMES NATIONAL BAPTIST
11 a.m. Matins and Sermon, Preacher
Rev. J. B, Grant L.Th., Minister in charge;
7 p.m. Evensong and Sermon, Preacher
Rev. L. Bruce-Clarke. Special prayers
will be said for the late King George VI,
4.30 p.m, Mon., Wed., Fri. training for
youths this will be conducted by the
Rev. L. Bruce-Clarke (Assistant Pastor)
assisted by Mrs, Olga Browne
ST. MATTHEWS ORTHODOX CHURCH
Deighton Road

HARVEST FESTIVAL

9 a.m. Mass Celebrant Rector, 3 p.m.
Marvest Festival regular Cantata including
many popular local Artists and musical
renditions. Chairman Mr McDonald
Symmonds, Churchwarden, Guest Speaker
Mr. C. Tudor M.A 7 p.m. Vespers
Preacher Rev. Barker

MORAVIAN SERVICE

ROEBUCK ST; 11 a.m. Morning Service,
Preacher: Rev. FE, E. New; 7 p.m. Evening
Service, Preacher: Mr. F. Moore

Harvest Festival at Grace Hill

11 a.m. Morning Service; Preacher; Mr,
lL. Oxley; 3.30 p.m. Harvest, Thanksgiving
Service; 7 p.m. Evening Service (fol-
owed by Holy Communion) Preacher:

v. E. E. New.

FULNECK: 11 a.m. Morning Service;
7 p.m. Evening Service; Preacher: Mr
S. Weekes

MONTGOMERY: 7 p.m. Evening Ser-
vice; Preacher: Mr. F. G. Downes

DUNSCOMBE 7 p.m. .Evening Ser-
vice; l'reacher; Mr. D. Culpepper

SHOP HILL: 7 p.m. Evening Service;
Preacher: Mr; F. G. Smith

ST. MARY’S—Sexagesima, 7.30 a.m
Matins and Litany, 8 a.m.’ Low Mags,
9 a.m, Sung Mass and Sermon, 3.30 p.m.
Sunday School, 4 pan, Children’s Vespers,
415 pm Baptism, 7 p.m Solemn
Evensong and Sermon, .

ll aie

CHRISTIAN SCIENCE |

First Church of Christ, Scientist,
Upper Bay Street, Bridgetown
Sundays 11 a.m. and 7 p.m.
Wednesdays 8 p.m A Service which
includes Testimonies of Christian
Science Healing



SUNDAY, FEBRUARY 17, 1952
Subject of Lesson-Sermon: Soul
Golden Text: Psalms 35, 9. My soul

shall be joyful in the Lord it shall re-
jotce in his salvation

The following Citations are included
in the Lesson-Sermon:

The Bible; Happy is he that hath the
God of Jacob for his help, whose hope
is in the Lord his God

Psalm M6: o.
Selence and Health with Key to the
Seriptures, by Mary Baker Eddy.

Soul has infinite resources with which
to bless mankind, and happiness would
be more readily attained and would be





nore secure in our keeping, if sought
in soul
Page 60.
Hello Friends!
Ianthe Gill reminds

you of her

DANCE

On Monday Night the 18th
of February, 1952, at Club
Royal, Silver Sands, Christ
Church.

ADMISSION 2/-
Music by Mr. C. B. Browne's

Mrs.

the major defence measures employed against pollution and disease, |
sterilization by chlorine is one of the most important. Chlorine is a very i
ict
ther substances, from which
of these is common salt in which chlorine is combined with sodium An Island of Holiday Opportunities!
The passing of an electric current through salt splits it into its con-|
stituent elements and releases chlorine in the
yellow gas, which is dried and liquefied and,so made available for

ready transport all over the world.

SPEIGHTSTOWN Jof the salt from which it is obtained. In addition to having many
uses as a sterilising agent, chlorine is an important raw

material
insecticides anesthetics and dry-cleaning fluids all

need chlorine at some stage in their manufacture.





| WILKINSON & HAYNES (0., LTD.

—





Orchestra
Miss this and blame yourself
Lorries leave Empire
Theatre at 8.30 p.m.

AST SS EEE SS ES EEE
= >

}







COTTON DRESS SHIRTS with
attached.

ELITE SEA ISLAND
trubenised Collar

Each

STRIPED PYJAMAS in some nice patterns, sizes 38 to

44 ins. Per suit

FLEECE LINED VESTS, long sleeves for travelling to
Sizes 40 to 44.

$41.96 to $3.43

JANZTEN WOVEN BOXER SHORT BATHING
Elastic Waist.

Sizes $2 to 44.

Cold Climates.

TRUNKS.

and fawn.

OTIS VESTS, Ribbed and plain athletic style,
Sizes 26 to 46.

$1.30 & $1.32

OTIS WHITE COTTON BRIEFS, sizes 30 to 44.

sleeves.

Bair

RAYON & COTTON FANCY STRIPED SOCKS.

Sizes 10 to 114. Pair.

S97¢. & SLOS



—_—

—







we
ee

SUNDAY, FEBRUARY 17, 19











if ————————,

}

CHLORINE }
' '
A hundred year igo inj |

Great Britain typhoid vers

and cholera were ommon | |
water-borne diseases To- |

day cholera is unknown and

an outbreak of typhoid

This
publie

makes front page news
improvement
health reflects the
all
‘with water purification.

- —_

in
unremit-

ting care of concerned




i or
‘ FISHING
RIDING

SPECTATOR SPORTS

ive chemical which in nature is found only in combination with}

it must be isolated. “The best known;

So many and varied that clothes may seemingly
sare at scaailabin’ present a problem. There is, in fact, no cloth-
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Bolton Lane, Custom Tailors and Men’s Out-

LCL. fitters, cannot adequately solve—either from

are large manufacturers of chlorine as well as producers
their selective, imported stock, or with a gar-
ment tailored to individual needs.

C.. B. Rice & Co.

Textiles, petrol, dyestuffs, paper, medicines,

YS





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|

We offer the following

TERMITE-PROOF BUILDING MATERIALS.

UNITEX INSULATING WALLBOARD SHEETS
4 in, thick, 4ft. x 8ft., 9ft., 10ft., 12ft. Long
@ 194c. per sq. fi
WALLBOARD MOULDING
for covering joints
@ 5e. per ft.
STANDARD HARDBOARD SHEETS
The Board of 1,000 Uses.
Â¥ in. thick, 4ft, x 6ft., Bft., 10ft. long
at 18c. pr sq. ft.
TEMPERED HARDBOARD SHEETS
4g in, thick, 4ft. x 6ft. 8ft., 10ft. long
at 30c. per sq. ft.
SURINAM PLYWOOD SHEETS
14 in, thick, 4ft. x 8ft. @ 40c, per sq. ft.
3/16 in. thick, 4ft. x Bit. @ 29e. & 32e. per sa. ft.
TURNALL ASBESTOS WOOD SHEETS
3/16 in. thick. 4ft. x 8ft. @ 23e. per sq. ft,
All these Building Boards have been treated to resist the attack
of Wood Ants and other Termites.

| WM. FOGARTY aos LP.

Now's

4

TIME
TO



See eee

SELECT THESE !!
QUR HARDWARE AND
ELECTRICAL =DEPARTMENT

Have Just Opened the Most
Useful Selection of .......

KITCHEN, PANTRY and other
| HOUSEHOLD ITEMS.
|

SA

Phone 4267.

=>







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WE...

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f
|





e e
We have THE BEST VALUES IN GLASSES
done it in | | ' Pt. Tub Shaped Glasses 1 - each

Milk Jugs—with Plastic

the Mip—i
C.ip—in three sizes

PAST. $2.13, $1.65 &
$1.17

$1.17 Each
82c. Each

We can
do it all
the TIME.

o
a

uger Dispensers

Egg Slicers

ENAMEL WARE
Bowls in all sizes ....
Pie Dishes

Oval Roasters

4lc. — 58c.
34c. — 56c.
$2.40 — $3.70

.. $c. & $1.06
66c.

oR
$1.68 — $2.53

P. C. S. MAFFEI & CO. LTD.

Top Scorers in Tailoring
Prince William Henry Street

Enamel Colanders

—











Enamel Mugs & Cups





Black Enamel Saucepans
5 Sizes ie
also in Cream and Green

~-=-- it will be DRESS
SHIRTS

Enamel Basins 60c—$1.12 ech.

*
Sizes 14—174 ins.

ELECTRIC KETTLES (3 Styles)
$8.16 ve

Ideal Food Savers

$12.92, $19.54,
& $19.72

CHINA WARE
6 piece Washstand Sets ..

$6.22 $18.90 & $20.92

Each e

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Pair 89. oz



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Prices, each

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I'll.l Sl-VDAT ADVOCATE BCNDAY. rFBRIXRV It, 1MJ I'm all for Eno's \\ .1. REGAINING PRESTIGE IN NKW ZEALAND TESTS football Season Off To Good Start . it. g corns y ....! w uuU •a-, l^rfurmanc* u, Ihm ill ... *tf .aortaa; ..f S tot •> ww.ru dwrUrad la *r %  M at IMr Second TM wHI> Hr Zealand fcej ha cooaowawlad ta aarl. advm %  %  Ml I'antaa* to in InlMHur NewZaSual I •• ... %  .,lataaa an Ml t-.v ronj bakind ta* baa Men a triumph for Tne Waal -. brtmunc of tali acMrvamenl on afaaaaal aa ttM M ..* %  : -* .-..,%  aaU and M p miJ to uapmlKUBla thai Ban l iil rHIT aa. Itnr Zealand It keeps *". regular If voy'rt out of ton., take a glass of ENO*S %  Fnaa Sale k the evsrang. END'S -!! keep vou regular—far if it a gentle laxative and mild an no d. food lor the few and serthag to (be mm**.h Thus ESO*S Fran Sab %  dean away Bawiaaia. that make TOO fed dull and heavy Take your %  Frail Seal ai %  • %  %  Eno's Fruit Salt' %  > IIIILU4I ACTION. tact HLU.* teruay and the aaoraungs work bemore than three quarter par*u#. eviy Firesady did a bos to judging by bis time of 1 Ml far box at a strong pace to set the ball the box to box. JoDhM; Bar tune was 131 and she Belle Surprise caused a surprise fiMh*d tBtrty comfartaUy. by leaving Dashing prince** be-Sy 1 ^*T_''P*^" m ihe htod at the end of a box to box. r "w biaskar Harroween gallopThe formers time was l.Jtt I \m acaln but Mr Mayer, U her und-rstood Bella Surprb* -, do ofUysJow work on the Inside thought to be short If so Dashing The word soon went round the P r kn e as is shorter, paddock 'Harrowcan's on ice French Flutter appeared to be %  -e in a bucket however, doing nothing much but neverthea o her riv als can still prepare leas the clock told a difTereni story toenaaalTM. when she came back over the box Luawayi was the seconc to go to box in l.JO|. I took the last five DC. She did a box W tax in I K in ] 05| but only started to run from the Red Cheeks doM not imprest as '• %  rh aha did to I D5 much on the h-rd gatng aa she did nytatg Dragon improves with u the mud Five in 1.07 was her e.*r. aallop and from the way he effort yesterday, very much on the U betng worked he might yet to bitin the A class nine He did a mile The Thing u another who doe* puObsg all the *sy In 1.51. the not look happy on the hard last boat ta box m i 24| ground. She did five In 1.051 Msbo-jya had the half-bred pushed along. Koartsa for s companion over five. Arunda did flva in 1.051, easy They did it in 1MJ. with the halfDoldrum broke from the seven bred moving we'.l and did the box to box in 1 3H Cavalier and Croat Bow. full Joan's Star did four finishing brothers, did seven furlongs finthe last thrae in 41 CROWDED FIELDS Cavalier and Cardinal Dangerous Ta Dunquerque iVv litHtkll. W 1 !" •''• %  Landmark did a comfortable box lo box in 1.21,. Sweet Rocket did not have much to spare when she finished s box to box in 1.11ft. Blue Nelly and Magic Gave worked well together each looking strong at the end of five in 1.05*. Nototute gave Fuss Budget tshlng the last box to box to ID| fivaher was not as strong as hi* brother Betsam did four in 53 T -lid not see much of her Tlbarian Lady looked better by herself 4atng a box to box In I 28 She it fighting age more than anyMag sjgg Demure did a box to box and good run over five in 1 03 The although I did not pay any attenformer is reJly in grand form, tion to her I am told she finished Dunqoerquc. still In the stage of %  ather tired Her lime was 1.211. shaking off a cough, did a box to Dun View worked but nobody box is 1.251. flnishing rather corntook her time. Even Mr. Teddy fortably. Janes said he did not know what CoUeton did five in 1.07|. It was. Teat Match and Abu Alt worked Wine went off at a smart five togvther but Yvcnet appeared "~ !" to be holding back Abu All. Test clip enrar five. She is steadil. during her time figure (or this distance with each gallop This time aha cut it down to 1 02 I learned on returning to the stand that she had been clocked in 1 07| for the five and a half This is the fastest gallop over this dlsMatch finished In front doing the distance In 1 Of ft and finishing Diadem and March Winds did four in 52*. Embers did her work with more Ittsb. With Usher she did the box I before race day that I have lo box to 1.24ft and the five In miNi HoitrtFLi. Good morn&igs tegfc yitti Gffldtfe li> iiMde fgror dttigntd by CUartte.^ 5 Blades 30c Wbe men tarn grttcfufly to Blue Gillette BUdet, sharpest ever boned. Special toagbening makes Blue Gillette Blade, U* longer and save money. To gel the best out of a Blue Gillette Blade use ft in a Gillette razor because razor and blade arc made for each other. Blue Gillette Blades 1KAUI l NOOMUffJ 10| T> &BDDb UBAM! LlHjrtO E !" „ W %  %  SIIWLI1 "W AGAIN JCCEn unt.v.au.bla w..tar coadilKau curtail plat %  tnr iwc raainin< ar ti Wm Indm haaa eatabUabad > lead that %  IWZaaltM""' V rt0 ' "* mKU ,,m "" %  >""' 1 BHOOUNG STRAIGHT T*" S ,um •*• apatUaW on .n old form at apart, %  popular In Ihna pan. aa Kins -rr couan (oolb.ll .nd !ht u SHOQTINO r,..,S !" "iV L"L B *C b *?* U """1 bjr Uia Barbado. Hllla Aaa_ _, I'OIKl lAUJNCOl'T rwenl invautctlon. ahaw that area into peiccnlaa. o( UM i£^oSr-^Thi^'ril^,'?""*" U m — " """" %  ""•* uia FWIca mrinbara. 1 hU havr more to My about Uua at a lUar data barauar 1 atauma m: in. thai thu could nut bi[or lackor jncoujajanwnl barau-. number, of My non-mdiUry but nrv^hH Len !" r.T amct^y P '"' 1 !" ""' "^ "*" ""^ *•" %  „ WB WANT LAMB |' I "*it li R-A is not an exclusive Association as some people imagine i Any peraan inu-rested in rtlle shooting i* invited to loin If he 1 o 55L h c n0( .. Be JZr 1 nacaasary'to join Uv Barbados Small Bore Club liiM rWora (he. are permitted to athMC I on the Full Bore Range. At this stage I must observe that there is no interest displayed i by member* of the fairer sex It t true that we married men would } have a_*jsaomc respect for wive, v, can shoot straight but In '' %  '' %  %  | %  .. • %  %  %  %  ^ ,v %  • .;; al sja of this form of sport. The Barbados ladies are invited to do M too Maybe we would not like ihem to be loo proftcient at Snap and Rapid but Grouping and Api let us see you "get >our gun." ^1 iflON Of! \S MAKt II li The BiaootuiE March 15 The first for the Frontenac Trophy. There wfca. '''-' ' IK Ma Swetienham '. % % %  aa Fw—i ;.: %  es place in Barbados thul >ea* nnd wi.i bi ...i.-r to shoulder. This produces some %  -J.u M the news that Me West, Indies will be i."•presented •*> Hlsicy in 11153. mun \ x eettm \^ foonALLttxAgOH tmam A 1^'tOE CHOWI) Itarnad Mat yesterday afternoon to sac Sp-run. %  ** last >e r*§ cup isMIMra, sti'red the odd goal In three to win from i sag on a larger held and one th.tt i. pitched farther away from the Kensington SUnd all the spectators are now afforded a %  name it \%... oirrious tTi %  players must now get used to the larger ground %  there was too mu<*. play. TV pitch howgag; th*rmselvr-t are keener dots seem as if we w ill Le %  -it for our money this sea son from %  I Kcruangton. e-.-er heard of Darham Jane escaped m> atten• Her Time for five was said to be 1 111 so she could not have been doing much. Tasmeen made stable companion Topay look very inferior They did a box to box la 1 23( Yasmeen ^ four m 5S having copious pounds in hand at Waterbelle did ft the finish 104 Flieuxce moved box to box In 1 24ft lortabs* ton 1.07ft. 1 am sura if we had a-mile and a half race we would see he* at her best. Slainte did a restrained box to DOX. doing the last five in 1.09ft Rambler Rose who might belter have been named "Morning Glory' 1.06. Fille D'Iran did not seem too much for ihe ihree-ycar-old creole Seedling who finished a box to box Queen's College Defeat Barna %  V P. A.V. The second round of Ladies Inter Club Table Tennis matches wsa played at the YM.CA Naval Hall on Friday night in the presence of a larre crowd. Queen'.. College— Barna match was the most interesting Queen* College has a group of orthodox players who nuke good use of both U.ck and forehand smashes aUrgnret Wood wa in her usual good form but I was very much unpresaed by Nell Hall's performance The man playen who and the new style of service difRcull should watch these Queen's College girls. The College girls defeated Barna three—two The first set was be*.ween Ruth Williams of Queen'.. College and Dolores Howard. Howird won 21—H. 21—19 and 21—10 to put Barna one up. Williams put up a good fight but Howard, the nv.ro ..; M the decisive game easily. Sell Hall v.<-i the next set against Elsie Goodridge to bring honours even. Hull took an early lead in the first game and wen: on to win 21 — 17. in the second game 'inodndge had a four point lead. Hall brought points equal rod the *corc read 18 all. Goodridge got the nexi two point* but Hall deuced the tame. In a fine finish Hall won 24—22. Margaret Wood. Queen's Colletmet Marian Manning In the Ihird natch Wood opened with a barrage of forehand smashes some of which founa Manning oil guard. Manning mainly employed the backhand push shot but thi did not worry Wood. Wood won 21—18, 21 — 17 to put Queen's College in the lead. It is a pity that Marian Manning i elies so much on that backhand push shot. Owing to this she has to get around the table twice as much as her opponent. If sne would develop her forehand she would be more successful. Joyce Clarke, of Q.C.. a very attractive player who puts a lot of back spin on the ball, won bar set against Joan Bryant to put Q.C.. two in the lead. Clarke m always on top and won 21—12. 21—14. Rosie Howard won the next set for Barna when she beat Rosemary Barrow. Barrow lost many of her points through inaccurate smashing. Howard, who never lo>* concentration, won 21—13. 21—2. In the next match Adclphl scored a four—one defeat over LenviUc. In the first set Maria Barrow, the LenviUc skipper. wM beaten bv Heather Deanc 21—15. 15—21. 13—21. Barrow Is a goo-1 player but was definitely nut la %  form. Belly Carrington of LenviUc defeated Angela Perkins 21—11, 21 — 18 In the next set to Increaslead. Perkins gained many of her points through he. • Carrington \va< more steady. Phylis Chandler, skipper of Adelphi. had an easy walk ovet when she met Caroline Perkins • On Page t %  %  ... r : %  %  % %  %  I am glad, of course, to see raring in Barbados ,a_, __ ^/"•Jl* !nr *!* %  where we can expect such a VI • talent I am glad that punters will nave more than one ..-w. I taer2tid C Lm C! ?' Li r0m ? Bwd th,n '^"C 7XrE?£ZU? *"f f* But I cannot pretend to be i *e but alarmed when I see that there is a likelihood of J9hSr^ 'tarting in one race on the Garrison Savannah nor*** I know full well that just because there are IB hnrw &Sia3f?B ~-*T&a-a ^ Bald -Ul dTta*, to . by the Urni & t^STS HZSt,^* Who would have thought that al a minor meetin. Ilk. .„ a..t nature we would not only have .. many a. 75. bvMhit ihS , h %  too be a reatrve ho ** your f-*-J, reeling nervy or run-down, it may be thai .'ilOSi l.KlN'l: it rust vahat you need j> hring you b*.> w %  tippy normal sutc of health. I'HOSI ERINE i crand icsfnratii-t -men rcsrrves run km. | Vbcn the appetite fails, the vital reso ur ces of the body fall lo be replaced. Mental and physic*. energy tag. Resilience weak?.** The cheerful rebound lo lifer difli.uliKS deserts you. It u wnrur. ihc power o( PHOSFER1NE 10 ir-crsc thu pnr.eu — %  hy irvtviog the appetite It create* new energy and viuirty. You feel a new Intercii in life. Try this grand tonic today. In liquid or tablet lot 2 tablet, of PHOSFERINE equal io drop*. r THE GREATEST OF ALL TONICS lVI i. Oti'ily. Indif.llion i'.////.V///.v/,v,'.VAW///.V,W//.'/.V/.V//.'.*-'' For Sprains of the ankles For Pains in the back Your quickest relief is FIERY JACK'. On sale at all D