Citation
The Barbados advocate

Material Information

Title:
The Barbados advocate
Uniform Title:
Barbados advocate (Bridgetown, Barbados : 1983)
Portion of title:
Sunday advocate
Place of Publication:
Bridgetown Barbados
Bridgetown, Barbados
Publisher:
Advocate Co.
Publication Date:
Frequency:
Daily
regular
Language:
English

Subjects

Subjects / Keywords:
Newspapers -- Bridgetown (Barbados) ( lcsh )
Genre:
newspaper ( sobekcm )
Spatial Coverage:
Barbados -- Bridgetown

Notes

Dates or Sequential Designation:
Apr. 22, 1983-
Numbering Peculiarities:
No issue published for May 3, 1983.
General Note:
On Sunday published as: Sunday advocate.
General Note:
Microfilm produced before 1988 may be substandard.
General Note:
Latest issue consulted: Feb. 28, 2005.

Record Information

Source Institution:
University of Florida
Holding Location:
University of Florida
Rights Management:
Copyright Advocate Co.. Permission granted to University of Florida to digitize and display this item for non-profit research and educational purposes. Any reuse of this item in excess of fair use or other copyright exemptions requires permission of the copyright holder.
Resource Identifier:
17931718 ( OCLC )
sn 88063345 ( LCCN )
Classification:
Newspaper ( lcc )

Related Items

Preceded by:
Advocate-news (Bridgetown, Barbados)

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This item has the following downloads:


Full Text
——



ESTABLISHED 1895



KING’S FUNERAL Tt

Crowds Totalling

2,000,000

Britons filing by King George VI’s coffin in Westminster
Hall passed the 200,000 mark today and tens of thousands
more waited patiently in the snow sleet rain for their turn.
It was the sorrowing subjects’ last chance to pay tribute to

the King as he lay in state
Houses of Parliament.

Tomorrow the coffin will be
taken in a majestic funeral pro-
cession from Westminster to
Paddington Station for the train
journey to its final resting place
in. St. George’s Chapel at Wind-
~ Castle.

me 10,000 troo a
detectives will line the ction
three and a half mile route through
Central London's Streets to keep
back the crowds expected to total
2.000,000 persons.

Six Sovereigns
Representatives of all the
world’s remaining monarchies will |
take part in the funeral procession,
They include at least six sovereigns
—the greatest collection of Royalty
to assemble anywhere since before |
World War II. An eerie daytime
darkness hung over London when |
the massive wooden doors of
Westminster Hall swung open at
8 am. G.M.T. for the third and
last day of King George the Sixth’s

lying-in-state.

Enveloped in winter clothes
against the 32 degree Fahrenheit
temperatures, and hidden beneath
umbrellas, the mourners stretch.
ing across the misty Thames River
and along the South Bank shuffled
into the cold Hall past the purple
draped coffin, surmounted by the
crown jewels and flanked by yeo-
men, gentlemen of arms and
guardsmen in ancient dress.

Like the 185,092 people who pre-
ceded them during the first two
days the coffin was on view, the
people who entered in one’s and
two's were plain citizens of Britain
who regarded the death of King
George on February the Sixth as
a personal loss. 1

Snow, Rain, Sleet
Weather officials predicted that
the dreary discomforting mixture
of snow, rain and sleet would

continue throughout the day, but |Ports of carcase meat and veal in

it appeared to muke no difference
to tens of thousands still falling
into line along the River Bank.

The doors will remain open until
sometime early tomorrow morn-
ing. By then almost 300,000
persons would have filed past the
catafalgue—a throng equal to the
number who paid final respect to
King George V when he lay in
state for four days in January
1936.

But the total still will be short
of the 500,000 who filed by the
coffin of King Edward VII, son of
Queen Victoria and andfather
. George VI, after his death in
1910,

Visit By Queen Mary

Last night the dowager Queen
Mary, mother of King George VI
and the Duke of Windsor, his
brother and predecessor on the
throne, also visited the catafalque.

The 84-year*old dowager Queen
reluctantly agreed not to take part
in the state funeral tomorrow
owing to her age. The Duke of
Windsor who ruled briefly in 1936
as Edward VIII before abdication
to marry American divorcee
Mrs. Wallace Warfield Simpson
had arrived earlier in the day
from New York City.

Through red-carpeted old train



Expected

LONDON, Feb. 14.

in the vast hall adjoining the

moved K: , Queens, Princes and
Princesses both eastern and
western hemispheres. Guns boom-
ed a royal welcome for them.
Already here or on their way,
were six rulers: Paul of Greece,
Gustav of Sweden, Haakon of
Norway, and Frederik of Denmark,
Queen Juliana of the Netherlands,
and Grand Dutchess Charlotte of
Luxembourg.

Queen Louise of Sweden and,
Queen Ingrid of Denmark accom=
panied their husbands.

Princes And Princesses

Then there were Princes and
Princesses representing at least
seven other ruling houses of
Europe, Africa, Asia, plus Presi-
dent Vincent Auriol of France and
President Ivan Ribar of Yugo-
slavia.

U.S. Secretary of State Dean
Acheson, representing Truman
and at least 17 other foreign
ministers are also here or are
coming. General Eisenhower, Su-
reme Commanéer of the Atlantic!
Pact Armed forces and his wife
were scheduled to arrive
today.

The weather man predicted a
dry cold day for the funeral, but
said there might be showers of;
rain or snow.

’

later

Britons Eat
Less Meat |

LONDON, Feb. 14.
Britons ate in 1951 about 26
percent less meat than in 1950
and 38 per cent, less than before
the war. The main reason for
this was the failure of Britain’s
main foreign meat supplies. Im-



1951 were 53 per cent, less than
in 1950 and much lower than at
any other time in the last 50 years.

hese facts were revealed in the
February issue of the Common-
wealth Economic Committee’s in-
telligence bulletin. It calculated
that Britons ate an average of
54.7 pounds of beef and veal per |
head every year before the war.
In 1951 the average consumption
per head dropped to 35.6 oe

—

TWO W.I. POLICEMEN
IN KING’S FUNERAL
PROCESSION





Support “Bob

has ever had before.”

Before concluding his talk, The
Chief Scout appealed to members
of the Chamber for their support
in making BOB A JOB WEEK, |
(which will be instituted shortly)
a success and during which!
Scouts properly dressed in uni-
forms and carrying a card would
go around asking for jobs which
would help them to earn money
for the Scout Movement.

After a brief welcome by the
President of the Chamber, Mr.
D. G. Leacock Jnr., Lord Row-
allan thanked the President for
his welcome, and said he thought!
very few people realised the in-
fluence of Scouting in the world





(From Our Own Correspondent)
LONDON, Feb. 14
Two West Indian police offic-
ers—Sub-Inspector K. B. Harry-
singh of British Guiana and As-
sistant Superintendent L. Rod.
riguez of Trinidad—will be
among the small contingent of
Colonials representing Colonial
Police Forces in the King’s funeral
procession in London tomorrow,
Seventy Colonial Police Offic-
ers will help ‘line the funeral
route from Westminster to Pad-

terminals and London airports!dington station.
|



Truman Undecided
Over Presidency

WASHINGTON, Feb. 14.
President Truman. told a new conference he cannot say
at this time whether he would run for the Presidency if it
became necessary for the preservation of world peace. He
said the decision was difficult to make and the time has not
come to make any announcement. He said that when the
time comes he will make it directly to news representatives
and not through third persons who come to call on him at
the White House.
Truman asked reporters not to
= him further about his at-

tude on re-election because he
was not ready to discuss it further.

Spanish Minister
je¢t all he is going te do until ‘the
tape comes to aioe ne an- Confers With Edew



ts eal



; because Lor:







nouncement as to his decision. His
comment was provoked by ques-
tions as to whether he had been
quoted correctly by various
callers who saw him this week
and afterwards told
their impression of his attitude.

Foremost among these was re-
presentative Adolph Habath who
on Tuesday said Truman told him
he would run for the Presidency
if it was necessary for world peace
and the welfare of the TWnited
States, although it might shorten
his life to do so.—U.P.

HOGAN TO REPRESENT
ARGENTINA AT

KING’S FUNERAL
LONDON, Feb. 14.

Argentine President Peron has
signed a special decree appoint-
ing Carlos Alberto Hogan Argen-
tine Ambassador in London, to
represent the President and the
Argentine Government at the
funeral of the late King George
the Sixth tomorrow.

Hogan will be received by the
new Queen Elizabeth the Second
along with all other foreign
representatives now in London
to attend the funeral. —U.P.

reporters |

The Spanish Foreign Minister,
Alberto Martin Artajo, conferred
with Foreign Secretary Anthony
Eden at the Foreign Office for
nearly half an hour today, and
officials said that the meeting took
place in a “friendly atmosphere.”

LONDON, Feb. 14.

Also present was the Spanish
Ambassador, Miguel Primo De
Rivera, and the British Ambassa-
dor to Madrid, Sir John Balfour.

Officials described Artajo,s call
as a “courtesy visit.” No details
of the discussions were disclosed
However, it is understood that the
Ministers briefly discussed Anglo-
Spanish relations, but the main
part of the conversation was said
to have bsen confined to non-
political exchanges. It is under-
stood that Artajo recalled Spain’s
readiness to play her part in
western defence. Embassy offi-
eials said that Artajo would stay
in London until Tuesday or
|Thursday of next week, and that
jhe was planning to meet a number
of political personalities for a
general exchange of views.

—UP.

to-day. It was too often regard-
ed from the negative point of
view—from the point of view of
a cure for juvenile deliquency,
rather than the creation of an at-
mosphere in a boy's heart, which

would prevent juvenile delin-
quency from taking its place
there,

The Scout Motto

Referring to the strength of the
Scout Movement, the Chief Seout
said there were some 5% million
scouts in the world, about 1%
million of which were to be
found in the British Common-
wealth and Empire. There were
scouts in, almost every free coun-
try of the world, all of whom
kept essentially the same comes
ise and the same law, al
varying slightly in their wording.
But the spirit behind them was
always the same—duty to God,
as the first part of the, Promise,
Baden-Powell real-
ised that without something to
hold on to above themselves,
there was very little permanent
value in the work.

He said that the movement was
often criticised in the early days
because it was not entirely a
christian movement. They were
criticised because they did not
confine themselves to certain de-
nominations, but Lord Baden-
Powell with his usual insight and
wisdom (because he was a very
wise man) realised that there
was a place and some common
| ground in which boys and young
}men of good will and of all faiths
‘and languages, could meet to-
| gether without compromise to
their own conscience and their
own national way of life.

Lord Rowallan went on to de-
jfine and illustrate the respective
Scout Laws, and commenting on
the positive instructions given in





‘French Frane Drops
\'T'o Lowest Value Yet

1
PARIS, Feb. 14.

The French frane Wednesday
dropped to the lowest free mar-
ket value since it was devalued
jin 1949, Black market operators
here are paying up to 468 francs
tur the dollar against the official
peg of 350 on the Government
controlled exchange. Gold as
well as dollar prices continued
upward as confidence in France
decreased. A temporary halt en-
sued after Government earlier
this month announced an aus-
terity plan on imports and tax
reductions to encourage exports.

Wednesday's weakness follow-
ed the National Assembly’s re-
fusal to begin debate on the fin-
ancial programme Friday design-
ed to balance the budget and halt



inflation.—U.P. { Australian rocket base i

LAST GOOD-.BYE



SHOWING the strain of his recent operation, King George VI is
pictured at the airport in London, as he witnessed the departure of
Princess Elizabeth and her husband, Prince Philip, for Africa.

— (International Photo)

Chief Scout Asks C.C. ‘To Mr Cee ae

LORD ROWALLAN, Chief Scout of the World, who|i®luding the
was guest speaker at the Quarterly General Meeting of
the Barbados Chamber of Commerce yesterday, said that]authority which
“Seouting to-day is stronger than it has ever been in its{local
history, and perhaps a greater appeal for the boys than it] Pâ„¢eved





FRIDAY. *EBRUARY 15, 1952

-_
wy



| Chinn’s Visit
Will Be Of
Great Help

Miss Dora Ibberson, Social

Welfare Adviser to the Comp-
troller for Development and
Welfare who returned from
Jamaica tast week, told the
Advocate yesterday that the

main purpose of her visit was to

meet Mr, W. Chinn, the Secre-
tary of State’s Social Welfare
Adviser at the beginni of his

four of the B.W.1 colonies.

Mr. Chinn has a long personal
record of social work, He was
Chief Probation Officer in Pales-
tine and head of the Social Wel-
fare Department when this was
set up,

Since his appointment in 1947
as Social Welfare Adviser to the
Secretary of State for the Colon-
jes, he has visited the greater
part of the Colonial Empire and
acquired an extensive and un-
usual knowledge of welfare work,
both official and voluntary in
all parts of the world.

Mr. Chinn’s special knowledge
of the problems of organisation
should be. outstandingly useful
to West Indian governments and
the Conference on Social Wel-
fare work which will be held in
Hastings House, Barbados from
March 17 — 21 should enable
‘welfare officers to see their work
as part of a world movement to
rocialize the thinking of admin-
istration,

Since welfare work is
ately associated with
as well as with
agriculture, it is
Messrs, Houghton, Director of
Education and P. M, Sherlock,
Vice-Principal of the University
College of the West Indies who
is responsible for the Department
of Extra Mural Studies, will be
present as well as other distin-
guished guests,

intim-
education
health and
hoped that

spent a very

99 ‘{crowded fortnight in Jamaica
A ob Week ‘where he was impressed by the|party which was lined up about
demand for the further

ation of the Welfare

many
voluntary bodies.
The work of the

is assisted by
“juvenile committees,”

marking as it does, an important

advance in the community's
the Scout Laws, said that the} responsibilit ’
challenge which’ they make “is any. hase” whee Seve -atecee

first founded. Among the
Knowledge Acquired was 2
Scouting, the Chief Scout said,
in addition to teaching lads to
light a fire with one mateh in the
open or cook a meal, taught all
those things which kept them in-
terested, and which widened their
experience and practical ability;
to apply the knowledge that they
acquire, not only through scout-
ing, but in their school; to acquire
all practical experience—some-
thing of wisdom as well as
knowledge. The
He thought that one of the
greatest tragedies of to-day,
in many ways, was the vast
increase in the pool of know-
ledge that had been develop-
ed during the past 50 years,
with the result that nobody
knew or saw knowledge as a
whole, but each one was a
specialist in an ever narrow-
er and narrower groove.
That was particularly so in our
education where there was very

Nations to make a scheme
@ On Page 3 s

ADVISER WILL



GEORGETOWN, Feb. 12,
much travelled, Wilfred

State for the Colonies now on the

three-month tour

Conference here that there is a
general lack of knowledge
social problems,

ment should be the complementary
side to economic development, and
said that he would like to see more



vigorous} with the Brownies who lined up
.. junder the tree about ten
Juvenile! from the saluting base,

to be of great interest, fonartgn. on the

Introducing Lord Rowallan — who
was dressed
shirt with a short

subjects discussed | Commonwealth and Empire should | Pretesting nations
proposal from the United|]@ome at this time and she was

DURING TOUR ures in Canada and since that

British Guiana leg of a scheduled|fve and a half million brother
of the British }#[d three and a half million sis-
Caribbean territories told a Press |ters in the family,

of |five and a half million
‘ would look like but they knew |
He stressed that social develop-|they are quite a lot of them, If
there was a Bible so big that the
Scouts of the World could stand

a4



PRICE FIVE CENTS.
“COLOUR PARTY” AT PAX HILL”







LORD ROWALLAN, Chief Scout of the Commonwealth and Empire shakes hands wth Sea Ranger
Allison Alkins during his inspection of the Guide's “Colour Party” at Pax Hill, Guide Headquarters yes-
terday afternoon, Mrs, E. B. Williams, Island Guide Commissioner, follows behind the Chief Scout,

pore ye Pall
Chief Scout Inspects ee

Guides’ Colour Party — Gurrency

A
FIVE HUNDRED and ten Guides were present at Pax | TEL A VIV,-Beb. 14
Hill, St. Michael, to welcome Lord Rowallan, Chief Scout! ‘The new state of Israél, ridden
of the Commonwealth and Empire, yesterday afternoon jby economic crisis has devalued
The weather was fine and punctually at 4.30 p.m. Lord |it8 eurreney in a drastic bd to
Rowallan, accompanied by Lt. Commdr. Mallinson was met Soe sree Mg whedon 4 a
by Mrs. E. B. Williams, Island Commissioner of the Guides. |° De glint! dae . ¥

: ductivity. Premier David Ben
He then inspected the colour,— - Gurion, speaking in the Knesset

j (Parliament) announced — these
co-ordin-|three yards from the entrance KE; at Offers “halt inflation” changes The
Services| and finally chattea and laughed Syi ee Ee pound “sterling officially valued at

2.80 dollars will be cut to one
dollar per pound for foreign in+
vestments. It will be cut to ene
dollar forty cents for tourists and

To Pay £5m.
Da on F ge for inapets of weet
mages *}com as meat, fish, coffee,

tea and medical supplies.

yards

The Guides sat in a horse-shoe
‘ound before
Jan addressed then.
in kilts and khaki

staff in his Investors will
s 1 ’

no longer have

accepted as keenly to-day by| del; have becom@liand — Mis. Williams said CAIRO, Peb, 14. °|*, tuvm over one dollar at: the

ty inquent, but also those who official rate of exchange for every
boys all over the world as it was] are in need of care or protection,| hat it was unfortunate that the} |The Egyptian Government told) iy oth of capital transfer
jin 1908 when the Movement was] or out of control. "| visit of the Chief Scout of the | Argentina, Brazil and 13 other|‘ 5 pi ,

officially that (U.P.)

it “deplored” last mronth’s bloody



wat Jairo rioti é Yered to pay U.N. DELEGATES ON

for! Sorry that all the Guides in the|Caive rioting and off iy
i sland could not be present at this|"P, t9 5,000,000 in damage TOUR OF MOROCCO
moment, claims, In identical notes atl-| p27, PRENCH MOROCCO,
. dressed to the nations Govern Feb. 14
Brownies Respected ment also said preliminary inves- saat

Lord Rowallan opened his ad- The group of Latin American

tigations showed that the instiga-

man”. Similar incidents accom-
anied the visit of the group to
he town of Mekness near here,

and foreign inhabitants” in the
capital but also for the



, : le . . i Nations
~ dress to the Guides by telling|tors of violence which took more|elegates to the United
‘ * ” , £ : . -
VISIT! B’DOS them of a story of a naughty|than 40 lives wanted to exploit|/OW on an inspection tour of Mo
sai . hes tse -otesting |roeco as guests of the French
Brownie. He said the incident|public demonstrations protesting |" : jay visited th
against the incidents between Brit- navies = ae aes Fer 7 .
neident he had the greatest re-|ish troops and Egyptian police at | "ative quarte “a @ ;

spect for the Brownies. Ismailia in the Canal Zone, It The eT. rl spenedinnely
Lord Rowallan said that he|Said: “The Egyptian Government ree +} 7 “ry as’ “long
Henry Chi t wanted them to realise just how |“eplored these events and the re- shouti ag such tne "wa. Haat

fare A ivi mu C.M.G., Social Wel- big the family to which they be- sultant losses not only because of ive anoon ion liv T
itate for the Calernee tay of long is, He paid that there are|t#e great number of Egyptian|pendence’ and “long live Tru-

entire
Egyptian economy

They could not imagine what |

brothers

















h word tLey would be seven
urban surveys carried out, pe re ;
Chinn presented the “family cause pee on each word in}
structure” as one of the most dim. |t2® whole Bible and there will
cult problems of social welfare in be still some scouts left over.
the West Indies, where a large Everywhere we go we have |
majority of the people do not have} this family with the same law,
a family life, ite had observed in! ®"d the same promise. Should |
Asian Territories a strong tribal | Very Guide and every Brownie!
structure and what has to be pre-|4nd every Scout do her and his|
vented is too rapid a break-down, |duty to the people of the world. |
but he observed that, in the W.1\|there would be five and a half!
there has to be a building up and| million people made happier every |
the “technique is to try to build up|day. Our founder told us to|

little time for boys to acquire
practical experience, having to
fill himself up with knowledge
from books, Wisdom and learn-
ing required quiet and solitude
to think, but the present genera-
tion could not think in quiet. It
was in a quiet atmosphere that
influence had a chance to work
over the boys. Shouting was not
the technique; it was the influ-
ence on the mind of the boy, and
the finer the qualities of the



————$———————
Ss

a



teacher, the better the results in ‘ian through group | make other people happy.”
developing the character of the Chinn has already visited @ On Page 3
boys. Jamaica, British Honduras, and

@ On Page 3 Trinidad. He said that B.G. is



Plane Engine Was
Not Working Just |

unique in the British Colonial Em-
pire in having social welfare and
focal Government so closely link-

Thunderstorms

—

° od, and he d ibed th ifie
Lash U.S. selup as ‘an depaventing ane Before Crash

ATLANTA, Feb. 14
Thunderstorms lashed southeast
of the United States during the
night killing at least two persons,| Gone in the way of social welfare, | pr
injuring 65 others and causing] Ut what is greatly needed is the |w

widespread property damage.|®-ordination of such services,

Freak storms riding ahead of the both voluntary and governmental.

Vea Welfare
Referring to Jamaica, Chinn
said, interesting things are being

ELIZABETH, NEW JERSEY,
Feb. 14.
One engine was not working
id the propeller of the second
as spinning in reverse when the
ational Airlines four engine






Dinner, Luncheon, Birthday, Wedding,
or for your own quiet enjoyment at home—

K. W. V.

can add to that enjoyment, as
K.W.V. Wines
are Quality Wines,
popular throughout Great Britain, Canada,





advancing cold wave, struck rar: He, fell that there should be aw
est in the Lower and Central College of the WI na
Tennessee, northern Arkansas and : as

Middle and Upper Alabama.

A small but vicious tornado
ploughed through Manila Arkan-
sas and five persons were report-
ed hospitalized. Fifteen to twen-
ty homes were demolished by
high winds in the towns of} will be held under the auspices of
Decherd and Winchester killing | Colonial Development and Welfare
one person and injuring others, and at the conclusion he will leave

—U-P. for the United Kingdom.—(Cp)

U.K.’s First Atomic
Explosion Not Far Off

SYDNEY, Feb. 14,

The Sydney Daily Telegraph predicted that the British Common
wealth’s first atomfe explosion will be touched off in the near future
on the central Australian rocket range’ The newspaper said the first
test probably would be a: small bomb suitable for use as an atomic
warhead for guided missiles or rockets

“Observers believe most parts for the assembly of the first British
bomb already have been shipped secretly to Australia. Australia’s
second Canberra jet bomber which has been specifically ordered to
help in guided missile research and for testing new equipment at the
to leave for Australia next Monday.”—U.P.

to Barbados, and then the Wind«
ward and ‘Leeward Islands, He
will return to Barbados to attend
a conference of social welfare and
probation officers, and other inter-
ests in this field. This Conference





—_—————$—$

m B.G., Chinn will proceed) tors.

New Zealand, Sweden and many other
Countries of the World, including the
British West Indies

C 6 passenger plane crashed
Monday with a loss of 32 lives ac-
cording to a report of the Civil
Aeronautics Board of Investiga-



They said: “The malfunction-
ing of two right engines caused
the plane to crash into the Eliza-
beth residential section following
take off from nearby Newark air-
port.”

A spokesman disclosed that
Number four Engine, which had
halted functioning completely
before the crash would have re-
quired @ major overhaul in less

And in these burdensome days of HIGH
COST OF LIVING K.W.V. comes to your
rescue also,

K.W.V. Wines COST much less than
Foreign Wines of France, Spain, and



than 87 more flying hours.—U.P.
' :
p K.W.V. Wines are
BUSTA REJECTS Portugal because
APOLOGY admitted into the Colony under the

From Our Own Correspondent!

KINGSTON, Sica Wels 14, British Preferential Tariff.



In Puerto Rico to-day Busta-
mante rejected the formal apology ;
tendered hirn by the emigration!

authorities there. Bustamante said |

a tebe, deel Matas nal K.W.V. Paarl Tawny, K.W.V. Coronation Wine,
that the apology is equivocal and K.W.V. Sweet Vermouth, K.W.V. Dry Ver-
(hit docerament supporter ie staxt}|| mouth, K.W.V. SPARKLING WHITE WINE,
and will further urge the ao K.W.V. SHERRIES.

Office to obtain a full apology from
Washington. a ee

tanita:





PAGE TWO



IS LORDSHIP Sir Allan Col-
lymore, Chief Justice of Bar-
bados is due to leave,to-day for

British Guiana by B A. to at-
tend a sitting of the lest Indian
Court of Appeal in t colony.
He is expected to away for
approximately one w ;
Back to Antigua

Ms. KENNETH W. BLACK-
BURNE, wife of the Govern-
or of the Leeward Islands accom-
anied by her friend Mrs.
argaret G. Hodgson returned to

Antigua yesterday morning by

B.W.I.A. after spending twelve

days holiday in Barbados.
Cousins

ge. JACK ALLFREY, R.N.
and Mrs. Allfrey who arrived
from England via Trinidad a few
days ago left yesterday by B.G
Airways for Dominica to spend
about two weeks holiday.

During their short stay here they
were _the ~guests of Squadron
Leader David Henderson, Govern-
ment Airpert Manager and Mrs.
Henderson, Mrs. Allfrey and Mr.
Henderson are cousins. This is
Mrs. Allfrey’s first visit to her
homeland for 20 years.

During the war Capt, Allfrey
was on the staff of Admiral Fraser.

En Route to Belgium

M: AL NYREN, former Ameri-
can Viee Consul here and
Mrs. Nyren left yesterday morning
for Puerto Rico by B.W.LA. en
route to the U.S. where they will
spend a short holiday with their
families before leaving for Bel-
gium where Mr Nyren has been
appointed as Second Secretary at
the American Embassy in Brussels.

They were accompanied by their
four “children.

Mr, Nyrer who was appointed to
Barbados in May 1949 arrived
here in August the same year,
Born in Boston, Massachusettes,
November 29, 1919 he was a grad-
uate of Roslindale High School
and took his B.S. at Boston Col-
lege, 1941. He served overseas in
the U.S, Army as Ist Lt., from
1941 to 1945.

Mr. Nyren entered the U.S. For-
eign Service on July 26, 1946 and
has served as Vice Consul at La
Paz, Bolivia and at Belize prior to
coming to Barbados, Mr, Nyren,
has been succeeded by Mr. Philip
Ernst. American Consul who ar-
rived here January 11, accom-
panied by his wife and two daugh-
ters.

Gramophone Concert

HE: next gramophone concert

at the British Council will be

presented by Mr. E, E, Hackett on

Wednesday, 20th February at the

Council’s headquarters ‘Wake-
field,” White Park.

The programme which begins at
8.15 p.m. is as follows:— Trumpet
Voluntary—Purcell, Chanson de
Matin—Elgar, Serenade for Tenor,
Horn and Strings—Britten, Fin-
landia—Sibelius, Symphony No, 5
in C Minor—Beethoven.

There is no charge for admission.

BY THE



HERE have been recently
so’many cases of animals
holding up traffic that C, Suet
Esq., is considering a plan for
animal crossings.
The smaller animals, such as
field mice, might be escorted

across by uniformed animal exe
cutives, Still smaller creatures,
such as spiders, ants, and blue-
bottles too young to fly, would
have to be carried across by
small-game wardens in stiff-
peaked hats, I notice that four
swans on the Windsor road had to
be threatened by bulldozers. But
that is an uneconomical way of
dealing with the problem. More-
over, if bulldozers are going to be
mixed up with the traffic, we
might as well employ gigantic
cranes to lift cars and their occu-
pants over the zebra crossings,
while pedestrians pass under-
neath.

The Gamma-bomb (XII)

GHAM had murmured into
that coral ear, having first
pushed aside a hefty great earring
like an anchor chain, words that
I am not cad enough to chronicle.
Yet, for once, his brain was cold
as the waters of Coumshingaun.
The Belle of Dung waited. Pre-
sently, and ever so casually, the
warrior said, “Oh, by the way I've
brought you that bit ‘of nonsense
you wanted. Koolruk wrote it
down for me.” She had to hide
her face against his waistcoat, lest
he should see the triumph in her



eyes. Very casually she said,
“Oh, than The paper changed
hands. So carefully had Egham

altered figures and letters that she
suspected nothing She recognis-



ed Koolruk’s writing. “And
now,” said Egham, “what does a
good boy get as a reward?” “My
gratitude,” said the tiresome en-
chantress, reclaiming her hand
from his grasp. “Not a kiss?” pur-
sued the avid courtier. “A kiss,”

said she, “is soon over. My grati-
tude will last for ever.” “I doubt
it,” said Egham to himself.

Burmese correspondence

Dear Sir, I keep on writing,
But your discourtesy

Leads me to think I bore you.
Yours truly,

U BAW ME.





BARBADOS ADVOCATE



Mr. and Mrs. Al V. Nyren and family left yesterday for the U.S.

via Puerto Rico by B.W.LA.

Left to right, Johnny, Patricia, Mrs.

Nyren with Sheila and Mr. Nyren with Claire.
Mr. Nyren who was formerly American Vice Consul here has
recently been appointed as Second Secretary at the American Embassy

in Brussels.

Before leaving for Belgium they will spend a short holiday with

their families in the U.S.

Returning Monday

OMMANDER NORMAN HOL-
BROOK, V.C., R.N., (Retir-
ed) flew to St. Vincent yesterday
ona four-day visit. Commander
Holbrook was a Submarine Com-
mander during the first world war.
A regular visitor to Barbados he
arrived here in mid-December last
year with his wife.

With T.L.L.

R. and Mrs. John Dalgliesh
and child are at present holi-
daying in Barbados staying with

Mrs, Dalgliesh’s mother Mrs. L,
King of Navy Gardens.
Mr. Dalgliesh who is on long

leave is with Trinidad Leaseholds
Ltd., in Trinidad.

Leaving To-day

ORD WHARTON who has been
holidaying here since Janu-

ary 27th is expected to leave to-
day by B.W.LA. for Trinidad and

the following day he will fly to
Jamaica,
Lord Wharton's home is in

Bridgwater Somerset,

er
WAY .....

The Gamma-bomb (XIV)

EN minutes after Egham had
left Dingi-Poos, things began
to happen. Orders went out to

watch every” airport, railway-
station, cab-rank and lift in the
British Isles, since it was known
that Dingi-Poos would try to
brazen it out by leaying from
Heathfield. A squad was already

speeding to
Koolruk Meanwhile Dingi-Poos,
disguised as Mime. Mioche, was
on her way to the airport, Kool-
ruk, disguised as Egham, was to
join her there. Koolruk himself
had already slipped out of Bump-
ton, and was putting on his dis-
guise in the powerful car which
had awaited him outside a lonely
dairy. EgharQ\ came out of the
back-entrance of the fried fish
shop with Inspector Blood, and
was being driven to Heathfield,
where detectives were already
hidden in dustbins, behind piles of
rubbish, in hangars:and holes in
the ground, The “pilot” of the
Paris plane (Inspector Hownde)
fingered a pair of handcuffs as
he leaned against the fuselage.
Armed police, disguised as travel-
lers, lounged all over the main
buildings, or lay on the roofs,
“Air-hostesses,” who were really
women police and jiu-jitsu ex-
perts, cowered in doorways, whis-
tles to their lips, Dusk drew
down

Bumpton to arrest











ind Pauline call again and
d search near the waterfall,
rath the squirrel leads the
vem. They look at the

au
y Suspiciously



frowning.

JUST RECEIVED ....

HAPPY TIME
PRINTS B63
PLAIN SPUNS .

FLOWERED SPUNS :
FLOWERED WAFFLE PIQUE

PLAIDS 36” ....
WHITE MUSLIN

T. R. EVANS & WHITFIELDS

YOUR SHOE STORES

Dial 4220

PRINTS

54”





Gulf Officer

RRIVING from Venezuela yes-
terday by Special Flight were
Mr. Willia
of the Gulf Oil Corporation an
Mrs. Whiteford. They were met a
Seawell by Dr. W. PF, Auer, Man-
ager of the Barbados Gulf Oil Co.,
Ltd.

Mr. and Mrs. Whiteford who are
guests at the Colony Club, St.
James are due to return to Ven-
ezuela to-day. ,

President of the Gulf Oil Corpn.,
who originally planned to accom-

Lord Rowallan Gets
Around

a oer ROWALLAN, Chief Scout
of the Empire and Common-
wealth attended a Scout Commis-
sioners Conference at the Island
Commissioner’s home at 2.30 p.m
on Wednesday. Present were Maj.
J. E. Griffith, Island Commissioner,
Mr C. R. C. Springer, Commission-
er for Training, Col, A. H. G
Campbell, Commissioner for the
Midland area, Mr. L. T. Gay, Act-
ing Commissioner for the Northern
Area, Mr. C. D. Spencer, Acting
Commissioner Southern Area, Rev,
L. C, Mallalieu, Commissioner St.
Joseph, Mr. R. S. Jordan, Com-
missioner St. John, Mr. A. G. Jor-
dan, Commissioner St, George, Mr
L. B. Waithe, Commissioner St.
Peter, Mr. G, E. Corbin Commis-
sioner_St. Lucy, Rev. A. I, John-
son, Commissioner Christ Church,
Capt. R. A. Sealy, Commissioner
St. Michael—South and the Hon
Secty. of the Association Mr. Lisle
Harrison.

After the conference they had
tea with the Island Commissioner

Lord Rowallan then went on to
St. James for a meeting of the
local Association of the Northern
Area at St. James Combined
School and at 6.30 o’clock the same
evening he attended a meeting of
the Bethel Troop, Bay Street,

To-morrow evening Lord Row-
allan will attend a camp fire at
Harrison College which begins at
8.30 o'clock. Entrance will be
through the Crumpton Street Gate
and there will be a sfiall admit-
tance fee which will be donated to
the Jamboree Fund.

It is expected that Lord Rowal-
lan will give the “yarn.”

On Holiday
R, ALEX BRATT, a regular
visitor to Barbados is holi-
daying at the Hotel Royal. Alex is
an accountant with a.construction
company in Caracas, Venezuela
Talking Point

Man has his will, but woman has

hiteford, an officer [her way.—Oliver Wendell Holmes,





FRIDAY, FEBRUARY 15, 1952



SWALLOW
TAILS

His Skirts Have
An Extra Inch

From EILEEN ASCROFT PARIS

Unwaisted JACKETS are the
most interesting fashion change
introduced by Jacques Fath. They
ar. two-thirds in length, egg
cut On the lines of a
swallow tail coat with a low belt.

In flecked tweeds, Paisley silks
or grosgrain, they are worn with
slim skirts, which follow the

eneral Paris trend of one inch
longer.

Me

A second suitline is more con-
servative, with set-in sleeves,
skirts either very slim or slightly
flared and nipped waist.

DRESSES in Chiffon jersey,
hantung and sheer organdie show
toth the slim and bell skirt, and
waists are heightened by draped

ey Judo belts.

Sleeves are either very tight
fitting or full above the elbow,
Necklines feature starched
white Billy Bunter collars for
daytime,. and for after six
frocks variations of the horse-
shoe neck.

EVENING DRESSES are i10in
from the ground, very full in
gleaming satin with lavish beads
eng silk embroidery, Wrist-length
satm GLOVES match the evening
gowns,

OVERCOATS are straight with
low belts, sloping shoulders andl
10 collars,

Colours are
than the other
wild lemon





ed je

more springlike!
collections
yellow, passion
rich green, two-tone greys
lots of black and white,
HATS are unflattering, Garbo
cloches and Dickens coachman
Shapes are equally hard to wear
There are also flat wavy shovel
hats, shading the eyes, trimmed
with large roses, Most becoming
models were the big flat cart-
wheels, worn straight on the
head with coarse mesh veils.
—L.E.S.

red,
and





The Shadows Get a Surprise

—Mr. Punch Tells Them His Uncle Was A Knight—

By MAX TRELL

“I WISH I were a knight,” Knarf, |
the shadow-boy with the turned-

pany them over changed his plans] about name, said to his sister Hanid.

at the last moment and has re-

turned to the U.S.

For Carnival
UE to leave to-day to spend
D Carnival in Trinidad is Mr,
Evan Foster who, has been holi-
daying here since Christmas. Mr,
Foster, who is the son of Mr. and
Mrs, Darcy Foster of Belmont
Road, lives in British Guiana
where he works at ‘“Rosehall”
Estate, Berbice. ;
He is on long leave and will
probably be returning to Barba-
dos after Carnival to complete his
holiday.

By Beachcomber

1 rebuff ,
Â¥ HAVE been informed that
my account of the commer-

cial traveller who booked an order
for £10,000,000 worth of large
boilers gives an entirely erron-
eous impression of the way these
things are done, Nevertheless, I
cling to my idea of a young man
thrusting his foot in a door, while
an angry woman tries to shut it

and shouts, “I dont want any

large industrial boilers today!

Please go away!”

Joe Rickthorpe had a long, long
nose

Which reached down almost to
his toes,

And he could wind it round his
waist

To keep his .trousers up. He
placed

Reliance on this startling snout;
Whenever there were crowds
about
He'd use it.asxa long lasso,
be crack itfas*the stockmen do.
One day, alas! he caught a cold, ,
Stooped blew his nose, then lost
his hold, ¢
Tripped over it, fell on his head, |
And lay for hours as good as oe .
Warned by such accidents as —
He wears it curled yeneath his hat, |

|

—_—_

Ogre—28

o\

**Who are you?" ‘*Oh, please,
don't be afraid,’’ says Rupert.
‘Pauline is a friend, and she is
worried about the acorns, too.”

** Then let's get down to business,"’
says the other. “' If we're not going
to lose our forest, we must discover
the Pine Ogre's plans.”’

$1.12

86c., 92¢., $1.09, $1.17

91c., 96e.

$1.59, $1.60

$1.85 |
|
|

87c., $1.47, $1.53
seaheuE Ry abesens $1.20

Dial 4606

“A what?” asked Hanid, who
thought perhaps Knarf meant he
wanted to be a night. Knarf ex-
as peg what he really meant. “A

night-with armor—a knight of
King Arthur’s Round Table, that’s
the kind of knight I wish I could be.”

Hanid shook: her head. “There
aren’t any more knights, not real
ones with armor. So I don’t know
how you can become one.”

At this moment, Mr. Punch who
was sitting in his rocking chair at |
the other end of the room, coughed
loudly. Knarf and Hanid went over
to him |

“1 don’t suppose either of you has |
ever seen a knight of King Arthur >|
Round Table?”

Knart and Hanid said they hadn't

Long Ago

“Well,” said Mr, Punch, “! haven't ,
either but long, long ago, one of my
uncles was a knight of King Ar-. |
thur’s Round Table. His name was
Sir Punchelot.”

Knart and Hanid both exclaimea
‘n astonishment since this was the
first time they had ever heard that
Mr. Punch had an uncle who was a
knight. “Are vou sure,” Hanid saic
a little doubtfally, “that his name |
was Sir Punchelot? One of King
Arthur's knights was named Sir
Lancelot. You aren't getting them |
mixed up, are you?”

“Certainly not,” said Mr. Panch. |
“Sir Lancelot was one knight and
Sir Punchelot was another. They
were great friends, of course, and
they both sat at King Arthur’s table }
when they weren't riding off on some |
brave adventure or other.”

“Did Sir Punchelot have a suit of |
armor?” Knarf asked. |

“Indeed he did! When he was in- |
side it, and sitting on his horse, you
couldn’t see his face at all. He was
covered with armor from head to
toe. And that reminds me,” said Mr.
Punch, “of one of the most curious
adventures in Uncle Sir Punchelot’s
whole history.”

Knarf and Hanid begged Mr.
Punch to tell them about this ad-
venture.

|

|
|
2

“Not far from King Arthur's |

court lived some wicked giants,”

Mr. Punch began. “King Arthur or- |

dered Sir Punchelot to ride off and
fight them. Now it so happened that
on the morning that Sir Punchelot
was to set out, and he was just about



Sir Punchelot was covered with
armor from head to toe.

to get into his armor which stood
ready for him on the front steps, he
suddenly reminded himself that he
tad forgotten his handkerchief and
turried up to his room to get it.
leanwhile his servants, seeing his
suit of armor standing on the front
steps and believing Sir Punchelot to
he in it, lifted the suit of armor on
‘ir Punchelot’s horse and sent the
horse galloping toward the moun-
tain where the giants lived. |

lhe Back Door
“Sir Punchelot,” Mr. Punch con-

| tinued, “saw all this from the win-

dow. He chuckled to himself, then
hurried out through the back door,
chasing after his horse.”

“And what happened?”
cried.

Mr. Punch smiled. “he horse and
the suit of armor reached the giants’
mountain first. The giants came out
in a rage. They drew their swords, |
hacked at the suit of armor, for they
thought Sir Punchelot was inside,
und finally tossed it down a great |

Knart |



precipice, And at that instant, when
they thought for certain that the
great Sir Punchelot was dead, there
before them, his sword in hand and
without a seratch on him, stood Sir
Punchelot ready for battle. The
pwiants were so terrified and so sure
that Sir Punchelot must be the
| strongest and bravest knight in the
world to survive the fall off the
precipice that they fled in terror and
were never seen or heard of again.”
Knarf and Hanid were delighted
with this story of Mr. Punch’s noble
uncle Sir Punchelot. But they were
still puzzled as to whether it was
really true or not.





JANETTA DRESS SHOP

Lower Broa



DRESSES

for every occasion
Lovely Pure Wool Sweat
END OF SEA
of EVENING













———$————s

SPECIAL NOTICE!
As a mark of respect to His Majesty, the late King George VI
there will be no shows at 2.30 and 4.45 p.m. at the Plaza Cinemas
to-day Fri. 15th (Oistin and Bridgetown). However, there will be





B.B.C. RADIO PROGRAMME
FRIDAY, FEBRUARY
5 a.m. N Recor



two evening performances at 6.00 and 8.45 p.m.





Programr





6.15 p.m

P.m. Sports R y 1] Btewn
Parade. 7 p.m. The News

7 15—10.30 p.m $1.3

2M... & 43 M

P












Midnite Special SAT. 16th Two New Action Westerns!

SS
Held over TO-DAY 6.00 and 8.45 P.M.
Gregory PECK — Virginia MAYO ir
CAPTAIN HORATIO HORNBLOWER
———— ~ s he Color by Technicolor t
7.15 per Powe id the State, 7.45} ~ -———-- ———_—_- ——-— a
p.m. Get out those old Records, 9.15 Special Sat. 9.30 2 and 1.30 p.m L
p.m. Radio Newsreel, 9.30 p.m. World “CONQUEST OF CHEYENNE” Wild Bill ELLIOTT and
Altaith, 9.48 p.m: Composer Gt the Weal “ALIAS BULLY THE KID” Sunset CARSON A
10 p.m. Radio Newsreel, 10.30 p.m OO
Recital Opening SAT. 16th. 4.45 & 830 p.m.
LIGHTNING STRIKES TWICE Z
Ruth Richard Zachary Mercedes
CROSSWORD ROMAN TODD SCOTT McCAMBRIDGE |]. A



LAW OF THE WEST’ “RIDING THE CHEROKEE TRAIL” Dia!
Johnny Mack BROWN Starring: Two Gun Tex RITTER one







w- “Om, Ce
wi-& GLOBE ‘erey Fine
FOR HIGH-CLASS MOVIES

Present TO-DAY 6





P.M. and 8.45 P.M. and continuing
to SUNDAY

Across

- Echo. (6)
. This den for the poet. (3)
- Can I be good natured ? (7)
. It couldn't be better. (4)
- Do leave the ordeal. (4)
+ End of a wine producer. (3)
. Annoy. (8)
. Tear from your end. (4)

Re Niger. (5)

WN Wapiaaen a

WHAT YOULARE. ..
Neil
aaa ee

Rule of
Follow.
. Draw in less space, (8)

1, What Iay ahead included her.
(4) 22. Pire controller ? (5)
Down
1. Louis Bromfield chronicled ite

arrival. (4)

Demands immediate action, (9)
The nap on cloth, (4)
Praised in sorrow. (7)
Speed from a weed, (4)
Tree proclaiming its owner ? (8)
Reversed draw, a gift. (5)

The French greeting; welcome
to the soldier. (5)

10. A loud utterance. (5)
13. The need to point out.
14, Near a sports ground ?

Pooh

(6)

: (5)
The mistake of three letters. (3)
End of 20 Across. (3)

Solution of yesterday's nuzzle.—Across:
1, Ca 8. Overall: 9. Negative:
Alarm; 17,
20 Dregs;
Ton. Down:
5, Regulated;
7, Direction:
React: 16.

M-G-M presents



1. Cont
4. Dram:

Inmates

\Bachting!






starring

STEWART PIER

GRANGER - ANGELI

The star of “King Solomon’s
Mines”’ and the beauty of
“Teresa” in a tic, ro-
mance-filled story of an inno-





oo



ee ete cent, young girl-painter who
PL ATA OISTIN copied famous works of art SANDERS
~ Dial 8404 and her scoundrel-sweetheart GEORGE
TODAY 6 & 8.45 p.m i ioe eee her, sold AN M-G-M PICTURE
TOMORROW (SAT.) 4.45 & 8.30 p.m ees
Claudette tose ae Suggested by a Story by Jed Harris and Tom Reed
TREASURE ISLAND Written for the Screen and Directed by RICHARD BROOKS + Produced’ PANDRO S. BERMAN
(Technicolor) 7 Fs
Bobby O'Driscoll & Robert Newton In respect of ‘the Funeral of our Beloved King this

SAT. SPECIAL
SHERIFE OF REDWOOD y ALLEY
Wild Bill Elliot as Red Rider &
‘SADDLE PALS” Gene AUTRY

1.30 p.m

Theatre’s MATINEE TO-DAY will start at 6 P.M.—
EVENING SHOW 8.45 P.M.

GOD SAVE THE QUEEN






MIDNITE SAT_
“Rocky” Lane Double!
SHERIFF OF WICHITA &
SUNDOWN IN SANTA rE

Allan



EMPIRE

Openiug TO-DAY 6,00 and 9.00 p.m. and continuing 4.45 and 8.30

GAIETY

To-day

The Garden

ST. JAMES |/ |

To-morrow 8.30 » |
“THE BIG FIGHT”

Leon ERROL & Joe PALOOKA &

“FOLLOW THE LEADER"
Leo GORCEY and The Bowery

& m

‘ i. ‘ a >
BEN eet ems wre we -

NOW AT POPULAR PRICES

JOSE] FERRER

Academy Award Winner

Gpening Sat. 16th --- because...
when his

4.45 and 6.30 p.m. evond Wirusie heme

and Continuing DAILY es:





MIDNITE SAT
“SIX GUN MESA"
Johnny Mack BROWN &

“SUNDOWN ON THE PRAIRIE”
Tex RITTER

|
|
Boys |
|





See 295



MALA POWERS. sultiftitier « weit,

REP 5 SE eR ig

BON SD a a laa
POETRY AND DRAMA COMBINED
Extra: LATEST NEWSREEL



PRESENTED BY
WARNER BROS.













ALSO STARRING

ROODAL THEATRES











),
|
d Street RICHARD M C MeEActoEs \
—— || TO0D-MeGaMBRIDGE | |
zacnaty KING VIDOR r 5
renowcen oF y
SCOTT vcnaratene |) EMUPIIRE ROXY :
er and Cardigan Sets o> a Ad A Opening To-day 6.00 & 9.00 TO-DAY st 6.6 & $90. PM.
SON SALE 4.45 & 8.30 . es. 4. .
DRESSES f Margaret O’BRIEN in
ee ) BTOWN pia 2310) | Joee FEAREB ‘pn: Sine ponkacate
——— in Stanley Kramer's and “NEVER TRUST
Production of sd an
. ey : i: Starring
) CYRANO
} Dane CLARK
de Bergerac Cathy O'DONNELL
a ‘
OLYMPIC ROYAL
; TO-DAY 6.0; & 9.00 P.M.
TODAY at 6.00 & 900 PM. | 50. HOPE — Lucille BALL
Sat. to Tues. 4.30 & 8.15
in “FANCY PANTS”
Gary COOPER — Color By Technicolor
Madeleine CARROLL in \cintstitiaganiaisinngpensisninidaaiiepmatiieatiariains j
SAT. & SUN. 4.30 & 8.15 é
“THE GENERAL DIED

You need no sand-man to make you sleep when you take

NUTROPHOS

BECAUSE
STEADY NERVES MEAN STEADY SLEEP.

TAKE NUTROPHOS

FOR NERVE DISORDERS.









Action Double

Rod CAMERON

Forrest TUCKER

in “SEA HORNET” q
and JOHN WAYNE in

“SANDS OF IOWA JIMA”

apeetere.
52 ten
om rat

AT DAWN” and
“CASINO TO KOREA”

alt
83

The First Wartime of
The Fighting Men in Korea.

LT

IN RESPONSE TO HER MAJESTY’S REQUEST ROODAL
THEATRES WILL BEGIN THE FRIDAY MATINEES
“AT 6.00 P.M. NIGHT SHOWS AT 9.00 P.M.



"i
j Saat ete
Sess oceamanas br
Oona y
| »
OBE er
: meas |
rs ey “eS
|
'
|





FRIDAY, FEBRUARY 15,

1952



pe

TUEUELDLUUUEPEE TEPER

Air Services In
J’ca Threatened
By Strike

(From Our Own Ci wrdent

KINGSTON, J’ca, Feb. 14

The strike of the airport staff
threatens Jamaica with complete
blackout of air services tonight
tomorrow and tomorrow night

arising out of the dispute between
Jamaica Tele-communications As-
sociation and Goverhment on
salary rates, The union which
represents the technical staff at
Palisadoes and Mobay airport:
issued an ultimatum to Govern-
ment this morning that if Govern-

ment does not revise its salary
increase cffer of last week, a 24-
hour token strike’ would begin

midnight tonight.

Government ‘in a firm stand ha
refused to give promise of an in-
creased offer and warned the staf
that if a strike were called they
would have to stand the conse-
quences of their actions, At
nightfall no change in strike plans

was noticed and if it is called
the result would be that a con-
siderable volume of air traffic

would bypass Jamaica during the
period of the strike involving 12
Pan-American, two Avianca, two
KLM, two B.O.A.C., one B.W.1.A
four Chicago and Southern and
one Caribbean International Air-
ways flight.

IRON ORE FOUND
IN JAMAICA



(From Our Own Co onde eS
KINGSTON, J'ca., Feb. 14,

Geographical Survey Depart-

ment here anounced to-day the



discovery of rich deposits of
iron ore in Jamaica, but pointed
Out the absence of coal deposits is
"a barrier to exploitation, Ore ex-
ists in certain areas of the island
in economic deposits, the depart-
ment said and at some points :
most on the roadside. Quantities
discovered are said to be large
enough and acceptable enough to
repay cost of exportation of ore a
such,

Harbour Log

IN CARLISLE BAY
Sch, Henry D. Wallace, Sch, Enterprise

S., sch. Guraenia, >
Sch. Anita H., Sch. Adalina,
umbia, Sch. Philip H. I
Marea Henrietta, Sch. Luci
Sch. Mary M, Lewis, Sct
Sch. Mandalay H,. Sct
Wonderful Counsellor
Eunicia









ARRIVALS

S.S. KALL.ADA, 4,533 tons net
Christie, from Trinidad

8.S. TRIBESMAN., 4,861 tons
Baker, from Dominica

M.V. CARIBBEE, 100 tons net
Gumbs, from St. Lucia

DEPARTURES

Sch. ROSALINE M., 30 tons net, Capt

McLaurence, for St. Lucia

Capt
net, Capt

Capt



Sch. ENTERPRISE 8S 44 tor
Capt. MeQuilkin, for 5St cia

Sch. CLOUDIA S., 52 r €
Lewis, for British Guiana






ONUUUEODEPUEELEQUED OGLE EEE ER EOL LAEEDCAEUL CED EEL ED COL ED POAT OETA TTT TOTTI,

Lord Beaverbrook sits for
Graham Sutherlan





TO
commissioned Mr.

sittings t
villa, La Capponcina, Ca)
of France, last March. he
on loan to the Tate Gallery,

portrait.

Hitherto fis work, while seldom
passing over into pure abstruc-
tion, hud made very few con-

portraiture there is a strict
limit to the tricks that can be
played with natural
ances,

The subjects of his pictures had

at first
repaying.

sight, far more



C.Cc. Will Diseuss
Clerks’ Embargo

THE CHAMBER OF COMMERCE is to take up with
the Comptroller of Customs the matter of the embargo
placed on Customs Clerks of the respective firms being
able to obtain statistieal information on export cargo.

Case Dismissed

HIS Worship Mr. G. B, Griffith,
Acting Police Magistrate of Dis-
trict “A”, yesterd: dismissed
Without prejudice a case brought
by Herman Skeete of Carrington
Village, St, Michael, against Darn+
ley Maloney, also of Carrington
Village, charging him with assault-
it ind beating him while in the




ecution of his duty.

Herman Skeete called on one
witnes Skeete told the court
hat on December 18 he went to
the defendant’s house to levy on

some furniture as he had authority
from the landlord.

“The defendant said he would
not permit me to come in the
house after I told him I was a
bailiff. When I got to the front
door the defendant took a club
and hit me on the left shoulder
with it’, Skeete told the court.

Samuel Brathwaite said that on
December 14, he went to the de-

fendant’s house with Skeete.
Skeete went to the door and the
defendant asked him what he

wanted. Skeete then told the de-
fendant that he had authority
from his landlord to levy on him
for house rent As Skeete at-
tempted to go into this house the
defendant took a club and hit him
on the left shoulder with it.

To Mr. Griffith. Brathwaite said:
“IT cannot if Skeete told the
defendant he was a bailiff. I only
aw when Skeete was hit with the
club.”

say



Minister Murdered

‘
HAVANA, Cuba, Feb, 13,

The former Interior Minister
Alejo Cossio Del Pino, 45, was
assassinated last night by men in
an automobile, who fired eight
bullets into his body while he was
in a cafe. Two men, his com-
panions were wounded

Cossio Del Pino owns a radio
station in Havana, and is a mem-
ber of the Autentico Political
Party headed by President Carlos
Prio Sog The former Cabinet
Minister marked for death in
1947 by the Union Insurreccional
2evolucionaria, the Revolutionary
Group, which accused him of be-
ng responsible for the battle in
which their leader, Emilio Tro,
was slain
io Del
Minister at the




Pino Interior

time.



was

(CP)

Sa seeaphdceaiinmebeliomennaninnmmencannnllt

Ideal for

intimate

personal

use

94

eo

|
|
|
|

Attention was drawn to this
difficulty by Mr. William Atkin-
son at yesterday's meeting of the
Chamber, when he pointed out



that Customs Clerks of the
various firms had been refused
permission, as was the = case
previously, of looking through

the clearance papers in order to
get certain valuable statistical
information.

Mr. Atkinson expressed the
view that the Chamber, should
in view of the fact that such in-
formation was valuable, maka
representation to the ‘Controller
with a view to re-establishing
the practice, at least in the case
of larger firms.

During the course of the short
discussion on the matter, it was
pointed out that the reason for
the embargo was because objec-
tion had been lodged by certain
firms on the greund that their
business was being made public.
The view was alse expressed
that there was little likelihood of”
the Chamber getting the Comp-
troller to relax the present ar-
rangement,

It was however suggested that
the Comptroller should be ap-
proached and asked to give a
reasonable explanation as to why
the stegistics were no longer
allowed to be taken by the
clerks,-as was the case previous-
ly.

It was pointed out by the
Secreiary that there was inform-
ation that in the enforcement of

fhe present arrangement, the
Comptroller was bringing local
practice into line with that in

other countries and places in the
Caribbean,

The meeting decided that the
Chamber should take the matter
up with the Comptroller after
certain inquiries haye been made
as to what practice obtains in
other islands, in the hope of hav-
ing the decision reconsidered.



In Touch With Barbados
Coastal Station

Cable and Wireless (W.1I.) Ltd. advise
that thay can now communicate with the
following ships through their Barbados

Coast Station
s.s Norse Lady, Helicon, Aljcoa
Patriot, Triton, Stratidore, Attila, Gulf-

pass, Mormactern, Liberte, Brazil, Uru-
guay, Glenbank, Quilmes, Regent Caribou,
Empress of Scotland, Italia, Stella Polaris,
Rodas, Alcoa Poineer, Queen of Bermuad,
lwide Canada, Colombie, Pioneer Isle,
Gerona, Harencaig, Del Mar, Veendam,
Mercator, Highland Prince,

A BIRTHDAY
PORTRAIT

COMMEMORATE Lord Beayerbrook’s
birthday, the executives of his néwspapers
Sapam cetmentens to

int the rirait reproduce ere.
Sit ook piace at Lord Beaverbrook’s
d@’Ail, in the South
rirait is now
illbank, S.W..

cessions to naturalism. And in VERY

appear- n

Lord Beaverbrook



subjects to whom things have of

BARBADOS



The

hard

GRAHAM
and is exhibited in Galler IX. Of the ; :
portrait, OSBERT LANCASTER writes:— SUTHERLAND
A COUPLE of years have OS . r k

passed since the art world | wees are men with loug and
was startled to learn that | ull careers Sehind them
Mr. Graham Sutherland— ™ the portrait of M:. Somerset
certainly one of the most Maugham. recently on view 4!
disti ished, but hardly | the Tate, the author aopears
seperate “in his | #001, withdrawn and shigntly
the most “popular” in > | on the detensive Titteo va +
appeal, of the younger) gn his chair. he sutveys 'h
painters—had produced a world with a slight distasie not

untinged with nervousness

differently
Sutherland

nas Mr
portrayed Lori

Beaverb©ook, whose portrait nas

eplaced Mr

he Tate

Maugham’s at

‘SS nor in the





) ul 3 ;
varied from rocks to driftwood, ae Vane Gere apie,
old tree-roots. and the jagged on larger than ufesize
outlines of the Pom beokesniire one purple-trousered lea
hills. But his treatment . crossed over tho aliter, his
these objects had obviously repose is obviously purely
involved a prolonged investiga- momentary, ’

tion of their aracter, Of His outlook on the world 1s
more profound than that “neither withdrawn nor iloot
accorded by the natural run of At any moment something nay
painters to subjects thet were, cocky. éalling for his persona



intervention.
That one should feel all unis at
once is measure of the painter's

genius.

T was obvious, therefore, that i er mered” exacts
to sit for one’s portrait to Mr. the reverse.

Sutherland involved a certain ' :

degree of moral courage, © e ry

One thing, however, links the ae Z

subjects of Mr, Sutherland's Ww ITH Sutherland, no such

two portraits to date with the doubts can arise. Ali W!

rocks and driftwood of his see this portrait wil) hav

earlier period, They are very shrewd idea of the tm

man Lord Beaverbroo:

happened. And so will posterity tor
Just as the painter has obviously can be little doubt that th

felt intensely the storms and one of the verv few canvas

ravages and action of the Pfoduced in the last quarie)

elements on his natural objects a century that will inev
and made us feel it too—so find its place in the lon

in the portraits one is made of great English ovortra

immediately aware that the London Exores



. ° . .
Chinn’s Visit
From page 1
writing up the history of rural
community work done by Jame
aica Welfare Ltd., (now succeed-
ed by the Jamaica Social Welfare
Commission). This may be car-
ried out by a Canadian research
worker with local assistance,
The question of training was
prominent and it is evident that
a continuing scheme centred on
a gmall residential centre is
needed. It was ge agreed,
however, that the six months’
courses financed from C. D. and
W., funds during the years 1043

—1948, made a_ successful and
lasting contribution and that
efforts should made to pro-

vide a similar course in the firs
kix months of 1953. The question
of ways and means remained to
be considered. Certain sugar
estates have expressed willing-
ness to pay for the training of
their private welfare officers and
it is possible that the Jamaica
Sugar Industry Labour Welfare
Board may make a contribution
in respect of the training Welfare
Officers paid from the Labour
Welfare Fund,

Now In B.G,

Mr. Chinn left Jamaica after a
fortnight to visit British Hondu-
ras where he had much ado to
survey the colony’s vigorous
social welfare work and develop-
ing handicrafts in one_ short
week. He then proceeded to
Trinidad and is now in British
Guiana. He will spend the nights
of February 21 and 22 in Barba-
dog as a guest of the Governor
and Lady Savage, proceeding
thence to the Windward and
Leeward Islands and returning
to Barbados on March 14.

While in Jamaica, Miss Ibber-
son was able to pursue the
question of a regional homa
meking and nutrition training
centre. The Comptroller and she
visited the suggested site on the
beautiful estate of Shortwood
Women's Training College, some
five miles from Kingston looking
out over the distant harbour.
The scheme has firm friends in
the Jamaica educational world
and there is good hope that a
plan for an institute of 30 places
will be accepted.

ihe = visited the devastated
region of St. Thomas where
many people whose houses were
demolished by the hurricane,
are still living in tents. Plans
for rehousing are being rushed
forward and it was suggested
that a Committee of experienced

women should be formed to
assist with the domestic side of
resettlement,

The experince of the Land
Settlement and Welfare Com-
misson staffs in practical hore

improvement, should be called
upon to furnish a model unit in
each area and build and uip
® model kitchen with smokeless
cooking arrangements such as
might be copied by the humblest
tenants for their own resources.



in Great Britain alone



5

a GET

n ¥
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ARM YOURSELF
AGAINST PAIN
‘ANACIN’ TODAY!

ADVOCATE





' Freight Rates

Protested

The protests from tne various
local firms to their Principals on
the continent against increased
freight rates have not had any
effect, Mr. D. G. Leacock, Presi-
dent of the Chamber of Com-
merce told the Quarterly General
pi eeting of that body yesterday.
- The Council of the Chamber
had asked members to write to
their Principals on the Continent
to protest against the increase in
freight rates. Many of the firms
did so, but since then, news of
other’ increases was made avail-
able locally.

The President of the Chamber
of Commerce, in reporting to the
Quarterly General Meeting on the
question of the enforcement of
the rule for the removal of goods
from warehouses in ten days, said
that the rule was working very
much to the benefit of everybody.

Concern over this matter was
expressed at the last Quarterly
General Meeting, and on the mat-
ter being discussed by the Coun.
cil, a Committee was appointed
to interview the Comptroller of
{Customs with a view to pointing
out the views expressed by mem-
| bers of the Chamber,

When the Committee inter.
viewed the Controller, he pointed
out that while he was not pre.
pared to relax the rule, he would
view sympathetically any charges
made when delay in the removal
of goods was beyond the control
of the merchants,

The President told yesterday's
| meeting that in his view, the rule
worked very much to the benefit
of the community as a whole,
goods were cleared easily, and
more quickly. This was also con-
firmed by other members

Chief Scout
Inspects Guides

From Page 1

Lord Rowallan then went on to
tell of a story of a Lady Guide in
Holland, He said that the Guide
was Nel Lind who soon rose from
a Guice to higher rank,

When the war broke out Nel
Lind used to help men who were
shot down over Holland, She did
such dangerous work that = she
never slept two nights in the
same house, At last she was be
trayed by a friend and was
arrested and sentenced to death.
The first time she was saved from
that sentence by the bombing of
the camp in which she was.

She was able to get out for a
short time but shortly was re-
arrested and sentenced to death
again, On the second time = sh:
was saved by the arrival of the
allies, but all the time she neve)
gave up hope,

When we think of Nel Lind we
think of a girl who was a Brownie
She took the same promise like
you and promised to keep it, On
her twenty-first birthday she gave

inessage over the radio and per-
aps some of you heard that mes-
sage, The words were: “Now
dedicate the remainder of my life
whother it be short or long to the
service of our people.”

After his address Lord Rowallan
gave the Guides a little history of
the kilt and said that twice he
heard it referred to as a skirt, Ife





said that each clan in Scotland
thas its different kilt so that in
battle they would not mistake

their clan members,

He was wearing the kilt because
he was ordered by the late King
George VI to wear it whenever
he attends these functions, After
the address Mrs. Williams thank-
ed Lord Rowallan on behalf of
the Guides for coming, The
Rally then ended with the sing-
ing of the National Anthem,

| DECREE ABSOLUTE

In the Court for Divorce and
Matrimonial Causes yesterday,
The Acting Puisne Judge His
Lordship Mr, Justice G, L. Taylor
| yesterday pronounced decree
absolute in the suit of A, M. Webb
petitioner and A, I, K. Webb,
respondent,





lf you suffer
from acid |
indigestion..

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RESTORES DIGESTION

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muscular antagonism when the strong
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PAGE THREE



Chief Scout Asks
C.C. To Support
“Bob A Job” Week

@ From Page 1
idea of what a Jam-
like, and telling of
what a wonderful experience it
was to attend a big one, Lord
Rowallan said that there was an
atmosphere about the camp at a
Jamboree which was not found
elsewhere. The scouts who at-
tended jamborees did not look the
same or think the same, or live in
the same way, but they came to
the camp to bring their own tra-
ditions, their own ways of life
and culture and so make their
contribution to the common good
They had never seen each other
before, but at once they were at
home in the atmosphere of their
camps.

The World Chief Scout told of
some of his many and varied éx-




Giving
boree was

periences in scouting, and the
part the training received by
scouts had played in moulding

men of character, teaching them
to shoulder responsibility, and to
be leaders; of the formation
of, and the part the B.P Guild of
Old Scouts was presently playing
in keeping alive the spirit of
scouting: and of the encourage-
ment he had received from whet
he had seen of local scouting and
scouting in St. Vincent.

Public Support

He said “Scouting is stronger

than it has ever been in its his-
tory; it has, perhaps a greater
appeal for the boys thgn it has
ever had before; it has in many
places greater ublic suppert
than it has ever had before, be-
cause people recognise the diffi-
cult times through which youths
are passing in these days, when
so many of the old standards
have been discarded and nothing
has been put there to take the
place of those old standards.
_ “Too many of the boys to-day
just drift through life without
any clear idea of where they are
#oing until they reach the rocks
and are shipwrecked, They have
ho anchor to‘help them when the
storm blows, Seouting however,
does provide that anchor.”

It was not the job of the Scout
Leaders to make little angels or
goed little boys. Their job was
to make men who would not only
set standards for themselves, but:
would help to raise the standards
of others, Men who did not ac-
cept every bit of rubbish pushed
down their throats, but who
thought for themselves and made
decisions for themselves, and
once they made those decisions,
would have the courage to stand
by them, Moral courage was
rather lacking to-day, and they
believed that scouting did help to
develop moral courage in the

nays.

e said that one of the great-
est proofs that they were achiey-
ing much more than they thought
they were, was that in every to-
talitarian regime, the cout
Movement was the first of three
institutions to be suppressed be.
cause scouting was one of their
biggest enemies and _ biggest
hindrances to the achievement of
their aims,

The B.P. Guild

Lord Rowallan expressed
hope that there would soon
velop in this island a really
strong branch of the B.P. Guild
of Old Scouts to help in the work
which they were trying to do for
the young people of Barbados.

The Chief Scout then issued an
appeal for members to support
scouting by helping scouts to
earn money for the movement
when Bob a Job week is institut-
ed, after which the President
thanked Lord Rowallan on _ be-
half of members for an “extreme-
ly interesting and informative
talk on the activities of scouting
of the present day,”

The President went on to
assure the Chief Scout that busi-

the
de-










most to encourage scouts to learn
to earn money by giving them
jobs when Bob a Job Week was
established in Barbados, after
which the Chief Scout retired.

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PAGE FOUR





Friday, February 15, 1952

tieth century.

These days the whole world has heard in
many tongues and read in many languages
the remarkable news of the sorrow and be-
reavement that the whole Commonwealth
arid Empire feels because a King has died.

The existence of monarchy as an institu-
tion, seemingly anachronistic in an age of
equality and of the brotherhood of man
proves the impossibility of theorising about
men and women as if they were nothing but
statistics or units of this or that.

Great Britain party-divided as it is in its
allegiance to one or other of the two great
political bodies of the country is united and
unanimous in the genuine love and affec-
tion that the people show and feel for their
sovereign. The Dominions of the British
Commonwealth all of which protested in
their formative years against subordin-
ation to the British Parliament and Crown
today, despite their being free and autono-
mous communities, look to the British
Crown as the magic link which binds the
Queen’s realms together. In all the ancient
and loyal British colonies of which Bar-
bados is the most shining example people of
different races and with several loyalties
find in their sovereign a common factor of

unity.

How can this loyalty, this affection, this
love of monarchy be explained in an era
of the common man? There was nothing
common about King George VI. He stood
head and shoulders above the common

_ Man: a giant of a man: a world figure whose
untimely demise has released for a brief
period a gleam of the vision of what man
might become if his life were modelled on
such as the King at whose funeral the

whole world grieves today.

if men were indeed equal: if only oppor-
tunity was necessary to reveal hidden
talents: if there were no diversity of tal-
ents: yet man would surpass man in quali-
ties of physical and spiritual courage. The
memory that the most humble of mankind
will retain of this heroic King is the mem-
ory of his great personal courage, King
George VI succeeded to the throne not in
the normal line of succession at a time when
the prestige of monarchy had suffered be-

cause of abdication.

The shining example of his lite, his
happy family life, his untiring devotion to
auty, his personification of all the qualities
that nave tor centuries been associated with
a Christian gentleman have raised the pres-
lige of the British Crown to a peak that no
one would have believed possible 15 years
ago. The British monarchy it has been said _
during these past ten sorrowful days had

become fused with democracy.

. It is not too easy to define exactly what is
meant by this expression since the idea of
fusion between monarchy and democracy
cannot be comprehended by finite minds.
Yet it is permissible to suggest that what
the expression tends to convey is the fact
that monarchy can exist side by side with

democracy and be complementary and not
repugnant to it. Such seems

the achievement of the British monarchy.
In no country of the world can democracy
be said to have reached further stages of
development than in the United States: yet
would anyone suggest that the British way
of life under constitutional monarchy is
one whit less democratic? And could any-
one be found anywhere to say that British
monarchy with its tradition, its ceremo-
nials, its pageantry, its mediaeval ancestry
is republican? British monarchy exists
today to remind the people who live in the
20th century that men and women are not
merely units of population responding to
\aws propounded by men and women like
themselves. Besides their visible bodies the
souls of millions of human beings refuse to
conform to speculations and forecasts of
those who prophesied that monarchy would
decrease in popularity as men and women
became more rational and free from emo-
tion. Sorrow and bereavement for the King
has not been felt alone by the simple and
lowly ones of the earth, though these ,in
their millions have shared the general grief.

Those whom their fellowmen and women
would term wise above their generation
have not escaped its weight. Liberty, equal-
ity of opportunity, the brotherhood of man
seem to flourish as brilliantly in the realms
of the great Queen proclaimed a week ago
last Friday to reign over us and over the
rest of her realm and territories, as in any
other democratic Commonwealth where

there is no monarch,



IN MEMORIAM

TODAY will always be remembered with
sorrow as the day of King George VI's
funeral. Barbados will remember
late Majesty by a two minute’s silence
island-wide at 11 a.m. and by a memorial
service in St. Michael’s Cathedral. The ten
days which have passed between His late
Majesty’s death and his funeral have been
memorable days in the lives of the people
now living in the second half of this twen-



BARBADOS ADVOCATE



FRIDAY, FEBRUARY 15,



ANOeTE] Miistakes We'll Most

Printed by the Adverste Co., Lid., Broad 8t.. Bridgetown

Regret By 1960

SEFTON DELMER now look
eight or ten years ahead—to
assess the dangers that may
follow some of the sweeping
decisions Britain is taking or
is on the brink of taking in
foreign affairs

EVER since Stalin launched his
first attacks on the West after the
war I have been watching the con-
duct of our defence

Have we learned from our war-
time errors? Or are we making
the same mistakes again?

In my view, we are making the
same mistakes. And for the same
general reasons. These are:—

(a) AMERICAN suspicion of
British Imperialism. The same old
fear of “spending American lives
and American dollars to pull Brit-
ish chestnuts out of the fire” is at
work again today.

During the war it caused Ameri-
eans to suspect Churchill’s plans

for a Mediterranean attack on

Nazi Germany’s Balkan under-
telly. Today it inspires American
fear of becoming involved in our
Persian quarrel.

(b) THE TENDENCY of the
Western planners to rush forward
blindly to smash the immediate
danger, only to find that in doing
so they have created another.

Take for instance the rearma-
ment of Germany.

1. ARMS FOR THE

GERMANS

Nothing, I fear, will stop this
now from becoming an accom-
plished fact. The Atlantic Council
is meeting at Lisbon in a fort-
night’s time

Everything is set for it to invite
Germany to contribute a West
German contingent to the West
European Defence Force.

In Germany politicians and gen-
erals have been working out the
details—even to the point that the
goose-step is to be verboten,

On the face of it the creation of
a German Army certainly seems
one logical way to meet Europe's
shortage of soldiers and redress the
balance of power destroyed by the
elimination of Germany in 1945.
But I believe that this is a move
we may be looking back on with
regret by 1960, ‘

The fighting value of a German
Army recruited in the moral
climate of Germany as it is today
will be much lower than that of
German armies in the two world
wars. It may well prove to be a
liability rather than an asset.

‘Without Us’

On each of my recent visits to
Germany I have sounded out both
young Germans and ex-soldiers on
how they feel about joining up in
a European defence force.

“Ohne uns,” they said. “Without
179

The average West German fears
and hates the Russians, But he de~
rides and despises our political
switch to remilitarisation from the
“re-education” law. which made
criminals and outlaws of all Ger-
man professional officers and
N.C.0O.s ; i

The German dread is that in
the avent of war West Germany
will oecome the battlefield, a new
Korea to be “Morgenthaued”* in-
to, non-existence as armies of lib-
erators from East and West suc-
cessively roll over it

Blackmail

If Stalin permits the creation of
a new German Army to go un-
challenged, then even the most
careful screening of the officers

us

Cane Fires

To the Editor, The Advocate

SIR,—Reterring to your Leader
Article of Sunday, 10th February,
‘there are a few points which de-
serve comment and = emphasi..
First of all it is well that this
matter has been brought to the
attention of the public, as it con-
cerns the Sugar Industry, on whicn
our economy depends.

It is inevitable that a certain
number of cane fires should occur;
the causes being careless smokers,
children playing with matches,
and even the back-firing of lor-
ries when in the field. These
fires become serious, however,
when they dre not controlled in
the early stages and are allowed
to burn large acreages of canes.

In order. to prevent this it is
essential that the fire is fought as
soon as possible after it has
started. It is suggested that this
could be effectively done by the
planters instituting a system of
fire watchers on their plantations,
whereby a few reliable labourers
could be employed at a_ fixed
salary, say $2.00 a week extra,
with the understanding that
whenever a fire occurred on their
plantation they would be ayail-
able at once to help to put it ou‘,
This, of course, would not inter-
fere with their regular duties, It
is estimated that if three or four
men are employed it will cost the
nlantation around $100.00 a crop.
If it is found difficult to get work-
ers to take this job on for a
whole crop, it may be that a sys-
tem of rotation could be adopted.

Another, way to help the pre-
vention of cane fires is to instruct
labourers as to the losses that
these fires involve, These are as
follows:—

1. Loss of trash and grass which

are essential for to-day's

method of cultivation.

. Loss of humus when a field of

canes is burnt.

3. Loss of Sugar output if canes
are not reaped and ground im-
mediately after the fire.

4. The growth of young canes i
retarded, and this affects the
following year’s crop.

All these factors tend to re-
duce the Sugar Output of the In-
dustry and this directly affecis
the wages of the labourers, *s
under the present arrangements
the labourers share in the profits
of the Industry by way of the
Production Bonus

One paragraph in your Article

te

states that at present 1d. a ton is
deducted from the price paid by
factories for burnt canes. Th's

however, is not so. The fact is
that the planter pays the labo
ers 2 cents per ton less for cut-
ting burnt canes. It is well know
that workers can reap larger t
nages of surnt canes per day



OUR READERS SAY:

and men recruited to it cannot pre-
vent one inevitable consequence.

The mere process of rearmament
must once more call to the fore-
front in Germany those same ele-
ments whose ambition and ruth-
lessness have twice plunged Brit-
ain into the ruinous waste of war,

Their guiding motive will be
recovery for Germany not only
its former unity but the restoratiory
to Germany of the frorgiers Hitler
won at Munich in 1938.

As their strength grows these
Germans wiJl seek to blackmail
the Americans, the French, and
ourselves into sUpport of their
cause.

But you may be sure that if ever
it should suit their book—or the
men in power should think it does
—the Germans will sell out the
West without a qualm ,

By 1960 (assuming that no war
breaks out in the meantime) re-
armed Germany will have become
a new anxiety for the West.

And—just to keep us all feeling
cheerful—let me add rearmed

POCKET CARTOON
by OSBERT LANCASTER

“ Forgive my mentioning it
1 peeroae tout it looks as
though 1 shall shortly have
to raise with you the
rather delicate question of
redundant personnel !”’



Japan may easily become another.

ow dangerous continued Amer-
ican suspicion of British motives
can be is demonstrated by my
second choice for a blunder that
will make us blush in 1960. This
is:—

2. DOLLARS FOR THE OIL
GRABBERS

President Truman’s ill-advised
decision to grant a _ 23,000,000-
dollar (£8,214,285) subsidy to
Persian oil thief Mossadeg.

The subsidy has been granted
because American diplomats re-
ported that Persia was about to go
bankrupt for lack of the revenues
it used to draw from the British
oil company. If it did so, they
warned, it would at the same time
go Communist,

So it was decided to keep the
wolf trom the old robber’s door
with driblets of dollar aid. This
is a disastrous plan.

And a most disappointing one.
For it proves that although the
State Department has wisely re-
called its unwise ambassador
Henry Gredy from Teheran, it has

than unburnt canes, The reason
is obvious, because they do no
have to spend as much time e-
moving trash from the canes, ‘his
means that their wages for that
particular week are much higher
than they would have’ been if
there had not been a fire. In order
te overcome this difficulty it is
suggested that there should be
a greater. difference between the
price for cutting burnt canes and
canes that have not been burnt.
Your suggestion that this should
be in the vicinity of 20 cents,
which could be paid in to the
Labour Housing Fund, is a good
fone and should meet with the
approval of the Labour Leaders.
It is felt that Planters would
readily agree to this.

You mention that because fac-
tories insist on having canes de-
livered free from trash that this
tends to make labourers regard
fires as lesser evils than they are.
While this is so, it is known that
factories have also refused aones
which have been burnt becatpe
the trash had not been properly

removed.
It is Roped that these suxg-
gestions will be brought to the

attention of those persons who
have it in their power to put them
into effect, and that a concerte?

effort will be made in dealing
with this important motter of the
prevention of cane fires in the
Tsland.

Yours faithfully.
FIRE WATCHER.

Pridvetown
12th February, 1952

Thanks

SIR,—I have been asked by the
Committee to thank those persons
who subscribed to our fund to help
the poor in the Dayrell’s Road dis-
trict,

The total ar t. collected was
$23.12. The rather turkeys total-
led $15.12; J. A. T. $8.00; Mr. M. D.
Symmonds $2.00; Mr. M. Jones
$1.00;

The $23.12 was divided between
11 persons and we are still in-
debted for grogeries to the extent
of $15.00. We tise say thanks te,
Messrs. Stuatt & Samipson grocer-
ies, and we sincerely hope that a
few more kind friends will see fit
to help us, when we start our big
drive to establish a home for poor
elderly women

B. C. BYNOE.
PS. The turkey was won by No, 48
Mr, C. D, Gittens of Cullo-
den Road, who is asked to
take delivery as soon as pos-
sible
17.1.52.
Taxi Drivers And Places

Of Interest
To the Editor, The Advocate
SIR,—Many criticisms have been
made against the local taxi drivers
as to their behaviour and manner



hot yet understood the reasons for
his failure there,

When I was in Teheran Mr.
Grady talked to and other re-

porters quite f of his inter-
views with Dr, He de-
scribed what he the Persian

Premier's “utter unreasonable-

Ness and muddletheaded a, | Although 61,000,000 Americans have jobs,
there is “spotty” localised unemployment
(affecting about 1,700,000 people) in various
parts of the country.

The worst places are in New England, New
York City—200,000—the mining section of
East Pennsylvania, and Detroit, the car city.

And people are doing just what was done
in the depression of the '30s to meet emer-

sigence.” And then he added for |
publication—“My advice to the
British Ambassador is that Britain
should sweeten the doctor with
some concessions. Let him have
some of the withheld royalties.
That will make him friendlier.”
Needless to say, such advice was
music in the ear of Mossadeg. For

it suggested to him that he would)
be able to count on American sup- |

port against Britain.

In his view Truman’s new gift;

is bound to confirm this. -

Apart from that it is disastrous
because; —

(a) IT rewards and encourages
robbery and contract breaking:

(b) IT permits Mossadeg to go
on stalling, prolongs a situation
which is bound to lead to the
triumph of Communism in Persia:

(c) IT demonstrates to the
whole of the East a weakness and
lack of solidarity in the Anglo-
American alliance:

(d) IT causes Asiatics to look
to the Soviet Union as the only
strong and determined Power in
the area,

First results are already making
themselves felt: —

1. FROM Ibn Saud to the Sheikh
f Kuwait, Arab rulers in the
Middle East are repudiating re-
cently concluded pil contracts with
American and ‘British companies
and are making fresh demands.

2. ARAB LEAGUE countries are

Thus, in Fall River, Massachusetts, shop-
keepers are offering books of coupons good
for 25 dollars for as little as two dollars and

There are sharply contrasting situations of
boom and bust, depending on whether trade
is geared to military or civilian economy.

Connecticut, its metal industries in high
gear because of the arms rush, cannot find
enough men for the jobs.

But next door Rhode Island has 35,000 un-
employed out of 791,000 people.

Foodnote: The first soup kitchen since the
depression has opened in Detroit. It is not for
unemployed factory workers, but to help
refugees from Europe until they find jobs.

‘GOOD SALESMAN’



deliberately opening their markets
to imports from the Soviet Union
and Iron Curtain States. In Iraq,
for instance, world firms like
Philips and Philco are being boy-
cotted on the ground that they
have factories or assembly plants
in Israel.

3. ATOMS FOR THE
GOVERNMENT

Blunder No, 3 on my list is the
decision of the British Socialist
Government to confine atomic re-
search in this country to the
Whitehall scientists of the Minis-
try of Supply and to ban Britain’s
big industrial firms from any par-
ticipation,

Unless Mr. Churehill’s Govern- |

ment reverses this decision soon—
and despite pressure from Lord
Cherwell, it has not done so yet—
we and the whole British Com-
monwealth will look back on this
as a catasthrophic error capable of
affecting generations of Britons in
their standard of living.

In the United States atomic re-
search and atomic production are
in the hands of private firms. Big
firms such as Du Pont, General
Electric, and Union Carbide have
built vast atomic plaats.

Atomie power plants which,
once erected and set working, can
continue to provide ener; inde-
pendent of any fuel supplies will
in the not distant future solve the
production
world’s under-developed areas.

OIL is poured on troubled waters by the
|New York Times as it comments editorially
;on Churchill’s parliamentary explanation of
| what he agreed to in Washington. “He gave a
ood demonstration of how to say the same
!thing in two different ways. Like a good
salesman with different customers, he dis-
played his wares to their best advantage, first
in Washington and then in London.”

RAISE YOUR GLASSES

EDDIE CANTOR, celebrating his 60th {
birthday this week, signs a lifetime contract
with a wine importing firm. Says the firm,
possibly a shade pompously, “The entertainer
will spearhead our company’s advertising and
promotional plains.” Many happy returns of
the spearhead, Eddie.



Russia is most certainly work-
ing on this project, In America
they have already made vast ad-

THE BOOM
- DEPENDS
ON THE JOB

By R. M. MacCOLL .

WASHINGTON.

GLITTER-STREET

NEW YORK’S Justice James MeNally
wound up and “said a mouthful,” as he order-
ed an insurance company to pay a pretty girl
2,500 dollars (£890) for a mink coat and dia-
mond ring that were stolen. Said the justice,
summarising: “Now boy wants girl, and girl
wants diamonds, jewellery, furs and motor-
cars, and consequently larceny, embezzle-
ment, forgery and romance walk hand-in-
problems of the| hand along Fifty-first-street.”

TRUMAN SAYS NO
GOVERNOR Sherman Adams, of New

vances, Only in Britain are we Hampshire, where the first of those palpitat-

lagging behind.
*Morgenthau, Roosevelt's Treasury man

advocated turning the Ruhr into a potato |
field.

|ing primary elections takes place on March
11, likes General Eisenhower.

He says in a broadcast: “The hope for the
| Republican Party with Dwight Eisenhower is

bright and buoyant.”

of dress. I do not propose to add
to the list except in a general way |
and to suggest to them a means of |
improving the service which they |
now render,

Occasionally tourists come to

President Truman withdrew his name from
the primary recently, but said this did not
preclude him seeking re-election.

A primary shows the man that each party

the island strangers from the | in the State would like te see President.

United States especially, and we
find them stopping cars and ask-
ing people what are the points of
interest they could visit.

It would be good if these taxi
drivers could find themselves well
informed so as to be able to sug-
gest to strangers places of inter-
est, historical and otherwise,
where they could visit and take
pictures so as to have mementos
of their visit to Barbados,

As soon as one leaves the Bag-
gage Warehouse and crosses the
Chamberlain Bridge there is the
Legislative Halls where stained
glass windows and paintings re-
veal some of the history of the
figures who made public life in
Barbados what it is today. There
is Harrison College, one of the
outstanding public schools in the
Colonial Empire, there is Queen’s
Park where the late King George
VI planted a tree, there is Graves
End with its cemetery where King
George VI took part in a ceremony
when he visited Barbados, along
the same route there is the old
Military Hospital when the old
B.W.1. Regiment was stationed in
Barbados before vane for Ja-
maica, and further on still there is
the quaint Oistin’s Town founded
by a swashbuckler gentleman and
there is Christ Church Cemetery
where the coffins of a particular
family seem to enter early torment
and stand on their heads,

On the West side there is
Freshwater Bay (aback of the
Paradise Club) with the only fresh
water springs coming up in thé
sea, there is Holetown more his-
torical than many other places be-
eause the first settlers to this
island landed there and where
there is still a monument with the
inseription to “James King of
England,” further along the route
there is Speightstown, (Little
Bristol) where the bulk of ship-
ping one came in; and off the
tr is St. Nicholas Abbey and
Farley Hill House, monuments to

_early.architecture. There is the

‘Animal Flower Cave with its sea
anemonies (animal flowers which
defy capture).

The list could be expanded for
a long time but it is this little
service which adds to the spice of
the drive and even if they are not
desirous of going out of the City,
there are several places which
they could visit with benefit to
themselves. One place where none
of them ever think of carrying
visitors and which would provide |
more history than all the others]
and that is the Museum. There |
could be great improvement in!
this direction

Yours,
BARBADIAN,

THE HUMAN TOUCH
CRITICISING the new “Airedale” hair-do
for girls which consists of virtually shaving
the scalp, columnist Robert Ruark says the
girls need only a few sabre scars and a stiff
neck to be a stand-in for Erich von Stroheim
got up in his aunt’s old clothes.

A “SNEAK FLOOD” from the Ohio River
drove 2,000 people at Empire, Ohio, from their
homes and drowned four. Dinner was left
uneaten on scores of tables, so rapid was
the rush of water.

THE war against race intolerance goes for-
ward, Recently a meeting of the New York
County Medical Society considered a resolu-
tion condemning the segregation of Negro
doctors into “a few hospitals,” and urging all
hospitals to throw open staff appointments
to Negroes.

CAVIAR FOR ONE?

“GONE TO LUNCH”, said the neat little
notice at the window of a Brooklyn bank
teller, Martin Olsen. But the lunch interval
stretched on and on, and when the bosses
started checking up they found that 37-year-
old Martin had apparently thought his lunch
would cost $38,224 and 6 cents (£13,651 4s.
11d.). In any case, that was the amount miss-
ing from the funds. Tonight an alarm is out
for Martin.

THE GAY DIVORCE

HY GARDNER, New York Herald-Tribune
columnist visiting Hollywood, reports that
some filmster couples “are so happy when
they decide to break up that they practically
elope to get divorced.”

FLYNN FUN

AND in Hollywood impish Errol (Burma
Conquerer) Flynn is creating havoc with a
loud-speaker installed in his car, through
which he bellows the names of his friends as
he whisks past their front doors. By the time
the startled friends have emerged, Flynn has

SNEAK

WANTED

THE G MEN have put German-born Ger-
hard Puff on their ten-most-wanted-men list.
Gerry is wanted for a series of daring bank
hold-ups. No powder puff, he.





;

1952







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OTHER SPECIALS

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FRIDAY, FEBRUARY 15, 1952 BARBADOS ADVOCATE



_—_

Latrine And Bath Opened At Rose Hill

First In Its Area

A COMMUNAL latrine and bath at Rose Hill, St. Peter,
was Officially opened yesterday afternoon in the presence
of nearby residents by Mr. T. L. Harris, Road Engineer. It
is the second such public sanit convenience in the parish

. Pi : P
—the first being at Sand Street, Speightstown.

The toilet and bath, situated on
a@ most suitable site, was erected
at a cost of £500 to the St. Peter’s
Vestry. The construction was done

Queen Returns by Orlando Cumberbatch under

= epee eapeons “« ee. Ss SE
Chandler, Chairman of the Com-
Thanks missioners of Health, and Mr. C

The Comptroller for De- = ae Sanitary Inspector of
velopment and Welfare has parish.
received the following tele- Over 400 residents of Rose Hill
gram from the Secrecary ot | 224 Mile and Quarter are to bene-
State for the Colonies in tit by the erection of the toilet and
reply tom message of bath. A resident told the Advocate
pathy tiie death 3 Ring at. the Cominiasioners of Health

. ;
George VI., sent from Hast! commeAded for their



PAGE FIVE







DRINK
News In Brief } CLAYTON’S

Thirteen film shows have “sna
|
}

BATH OPENED

arranged for the local Boys’ and
Girls’ Clubs during the monus. | }
A show was given at the aa



Hill Clubs on Wednesday night | |
ind one at District “A” Club room
last night. On Tuesday the unit
vas at the Charnocks Village
Boys’ and Girls’ Club which is
near Seawell Airport.

rhe current programme of the
Club’s Film unit ircludes “The
House of Windsor,’ This film
shows scenes from the life of the
Royal Family, It shows the Cor-
onation of the late King George
VI, the early childhood of the
present Queen Elizabeth and end’
with the marriage of Queen Eliza-



beth to the Duke of Edinburgh
initiative Also being shown is an instruc- o*
ings House:— This So was the teuiape Gt tie tional film on Road Safety which
S -patt cobatnaatnbl a Reid in his short speech when he — with eet oe code, a
Pia Qiléen to ontvean te sie said that Rose Hill always weened another instructional ¢lm on Div-
and all the members of ine ed the most typhoid cases in the re Tat’? }
Organisation Her Majes- | Parish because of the lack of pub- Sond of the Weat” is especially
ty’s grateful thanks for lic sanitary conveniences.

‘ s . The toilet and bath is about 30
Se oe sy ee feet long, 12 feet wide and 10 feet
OF ‘the ‘Rovel members high. The roof is of galvanized iron

© Royal Family on and is protected by a parapet with
the death of His Late Maj- plinths. A portico of wall with
esty ,King George the | three-square B.R.C. fabric wire
Sixth. gives..a simple facade to the
building

loved by the boys. It is an Ameri-
can cowboy musical film |

The Boys’ Club Film Unit is
operated by Police Constable |
Cuthbert Chandler.

The Football Season of the Bar- |
bados Boys’ Club has begun. Al- |
ready a few games have been
played and the boys are hoping t |
Sanitary Arrangements MR. T. L. HARRIS, Road Engineer, turns the key of the Rose Hill toilet and bath yesterday after. PY in the B.A.F.A. tournament}
Qn 6 Months’ Bond It has two pans and one urinal

ne » |
noon at the opening function. . air Al basin saath | KO | A } ON IC
io... maes...and two. gens-for “See The Boys’ Clubs Footbali
Fi ' . females while there is a bath for
or Wounding males and one for females. There

B k di e League has three divisions, City,
lac Pp C | ‘« I Peace g | B Country and Leeward, |
* a tap and sink for males and . ever ing e ® raimnee mpr SSE ( y There has been very little rain

“er : similar convenience for females . this month. Some of the heaviesi | OC OOE”™,
na a am going to place you on Of wall construction, the toilet Casts 40/- Enelish Bo s’ Clubs Methods showers for the month were re~ | \ “#SOGSOSISGOS9999SS999SO 9S 99S 9990 POFFO FF FOF

nd for Six months in the sum and bath*is the only of its design S ys x ©

eee eee must try hard to go in the island. It took about three ,, THEIR Honours Mr. H. A,













>
>

oF
corded on Tuesday up to. six
Yelock on Wednesday morning
Ou have pleaded guilty months to be built. Vaughan and Mr. A. J. H. Han- pel at i ok aca? . Je? Seine dite . am in 66) Asean
of wounding this woman with a To open the-.function, Mr, Schell, Judges of the Assistant THE voluntary services and the friendship at the Boys’ During that period ten parts were
Stone and this is a serious offence”, Chandler welcomed Mr. Harris, Court of Appeal, yesterday ordered

Club organisations in Great Britain have impressed P.C, recorded at St, John and nine part:
His Worship Mr. G. B. Griffith, who after a word of praise to the Nathaniel Seale of Hunte

Nath: Street. Harold Wickham very much. P.C. Wickham returned to “ an st. | Pidlin’ wes
i 7 effort of. the Commissioners of St Michael, to pay a fine of 40/-in the island on Sunday after attending courses in “Boys’ Club again fortunate on Wealn “sday
Acting Police Magistrate of Dis- Health, declared the toilet. and seven days or in default one Administration” and “Physical Training” in the United 2% rae Ty ar . .
trict “A”, told Elaine Griffith of bath open. month's imprisonment with hard \dminis ration” an iysica ral g ) night. During this period St
Bedford Lane, City, after she Other. speakers were Mr. BE. L. labour wnen they found him guilty Kingdom, George got a light shower, Thy
pleaded guilty of wounding Irene Bannister, Mr. G. C. Parris (Com- of blackguarding on Baxter’s Road He returns for that night were; St
Scantlebury. missioner of Healthy; Mr, Eric on January 12, George four parts, St, John om
Challenor (Road Inspector), and By imposing this fine on Seale, with the running of Boys’ Clubs pert and St. Philip nine parts
Mr. C. Reid who moved a vote of Their Honours varied the decision and it is not surprising to gee a Bus drivers and conductors ha
thanks to Mr, and Mrs. Harris. of His Worship Mr, G. B, Griffith, doctor or any other professional the month of January to renew
court that the defendant hit her The function ended with resi- Acting Police Magistrate of Dis- man serving drinks ‘in a Club their badges. The period has gon
on the head with a stone. She wes dents “Christening” the toilet and jrict “A”, who sentenced Seale to canteen,” but they go into the Traffic
cut. bath, undergo a term of 14 days’ im- P.C. Wickham left Barbados by Branch at Central Station at ai
prisonment with hard labour for the S,S. Bonaire on May 29. His average of two a day to get thei

e e e the offence. lirst engagement was with the badges renewed.
mission Of ] O Seale appealed against Mr. Grif- National Association of Boys’ Clubs

I Up to mid-day yesterday 24
fitn’s decision. The evidence was Training Centre at

THE ( i)

FINEST IN eo
BARBADOS \ “”

BY ALL THE WORLD
FAMOUS PERFUMERS. oe

- - At oe
OLE EEE?

CORAL OPE OLE OOO OEL OOO L OT



aid: “Nearly everyone in the
United Kingdon: is willing to help



The offence was committed on
January 15. Scantlebury told the

a



Cheapstow,







drivers and 216 conductors hac HOUBIGANT—"C ly" ete “Amour Amour’
that on J nuary 12 while on Monmouthshire where he spent renewed their badges MARCEL ROCHAS “Femme” and “peetae nee abetting”
e Baxter’s Road, Seale abused his four weeks on a course in Volun- The Police are checking up oi cAnbne’ Chui Pe a “Ohanet Ne & ;
ro ate ot ecl e wits Edna Seale oa, such a bad tary Leadership. He was the only motorists and drivers of othe Fleurs de Roeaille’ GUERLAIN “Heure Bleu”
manner on Baxter's Road, St. colonial student, but there were
Michael, that the matter was re.

students from Germany, Persia and

vehicles who fail to have = th
various countries.

required — lights at night Fiv

“Nuit de Noel’
‘Narcisse Noir’

AA GO OA OOD ee,

AFTER hearing Mr. EF. W. Barrow, Caveator’s and Heir at pcried to ihe Police.

“Miterouko” “Shalimar” Ete
Law's counsel urge several reasons why a will of Martin ., P47 Seale told the court that

OT—Crepe de Chine





PPO A RRP MPL PLL PLIST







{6 « Tabac Blond N—My Sin Aepege ete, ete.
motorists were reported tor no 3 naniheeaeen Piquet Vigny
i \ having lighted lamps on the rear!‘ JEAN PATOU, “Joy” Jacques Fath Corday
rlor s i she spoke to the defendant many Camping Centre 7. Bees ;
Taylor who died on May 14, 1948, should not be admitted times but he still continued in his He then went to Nash Court, - Wiel, veniclen anid two for no KNIGHT'S PHOENIX PHARMACY.
to probate in Common Form, but in Solemn Form, the own way. Shropshire, where the N.A.B.C. ons te Wanaeeaaye as F
nd? * . : %. ; al an el aiid . ' é § ¢ a “sday .
ce Puisne Judge His Lordship Mr. Justice Taylor yes- Comping Centre is situated, ee t | Of the 19 traMfic offences pecord= * $0086S69695666660600600606006006460606460690506G8.
terday postponed his decision as to the admission-to pro- “nt nates Bekie! E sf d the Police Report:
( i : : r Uppingham Corby Boys’ Club of . jie ed on the Police Reports yester a.
ba one re mas ees Priday. DEATH WAS DUE TO Nottingham. This Club had among P.C. HAROLD WICKHAM ony ey two ~~ ists were re | | 7
rt Vi 1s a holograph wil Intention of the testator was its voluntary leaders Colonel Dal- \, ln ieee | heave ri portec or exceeding the speec - ied : : ,
which Was begun to be written paramount. If the testator only HEART FAILURE ton and Mr. Collier. “Chairman of the NLAB.C, Coun. Umit. Two were reported for " STANSFELD, SCOTT & Co., Ltd.
in 1943 and was finished in 1945 intended the document to be a aie ear ie kr = hs” a re ees was to the N.A.B.C. oj] ig Lord Aberdare end Mr Basil parking hired ears in private car |}
oe es rane Said that the draft, it did not stand that the a tone by aeons causes waS Headquarters at Bedford Square, Henriques is Vice-Chairman, The Park’, one for parking in a re Broad Street
Court had to decide which part of draft would go as a will.” e verdict returned by a nineé-man pondon, where , he nt three t , 0 ‘vee
it should be admitted to cubase The Jodge reminded Mr, Bar- jury when the inquest concerning hens Het ee ee seh

Greystone Hastings

4 t ; ) movement is about 60 years old en rg — oe “ et ri
weeks 1aViInEg discussions with j . e > ear to be hired without a )h « knee: |
because a part was revoked in row that the widow had given in the death of Gwendolyn Hall, a Training Secretaries before leav- ain at a tt ! o Seon 800 licence. )
1945, by another wiil which was evidence that her husband had mauby vendor of Land's End, ‘St. ing for Berwick, N.A.B.C. Senior (ube affiliated to it The rai Two hundred and eleht suse |)
written four days before the 1943 intended the document to be his Miehael, was concluded at District Boys’ Training Centre Clubs affiliated to | sone ate =
will was completed, will and the going to the solici- “A” yesterday afternoon, The

Mr, Barrow is instrucied by tor was not to get it made as a Co‘. oy was Mr. G. b. Griffith,



ROBERESON’S JAMS &














are sesttered all over Great bags, valued $83.20, were stole |t}
After a week in Berwick, PC. Britain from the bond of Messrs, 8S, 1 n -
fs ickham went to Canterbury, Muss Sons & Co {. duty } hd ‘
Messrs. Hutchinson & Banfield, will Hall was admitted and detained coe ease he ¢amped with Insurance Scheme Pen ce me Ite al t {{ ARMALADE
Solicitors, Mary Taylor. widow ’ ‘ a4 at the General Hospital on Cadets of the St. John Ambu ¥ of Martin, who is petitioning that Widow’s Opinion February 6. 4 oo — nex! lance Brigade, under the command B oP aes a : pe Lg ae x the Nuataur? aie athe \ j
the will be admitted to probate in Mr. Barrow’ submitted that day Dr. A. S. Ashby, who per- aio» Ni The camp last- Oys > organisations, has a big " ; Pug (nee , »»
Common Form, is vepriaentad by that was only the opinion of the formed the post mortem examina-~ s ete “a ae insurance cheme for club mem- Mr Weatherhead, Manager of the CONDENSED oMILK
Mr. H. O. St. C. Cumberbatch, widow and could not be used in tion at the General Hospital “A tour of the Clubs in North 2e& Because of this, other or- firm . . ; {
Solicitor of the firm of Haynes & a Court of Law. Mertuary on ree, 7 said a and South Wales with the N.A.B.t gani reas aaiate, in order to one dhe Village } AS BEFORE
Griffith He said that it had been given the appirent age of the deceased ile Trai . ng lasted three “enetit from this scheme tf. James, reported that a quanti vi)

The heir at Law is Allan Taylor in evidence that there had been woe 44. The chest was congested ete wp a one Soton types of ,,/ London there is the London ty of articles valued $14.41 werr i eee : WN
and the caveator Clarence Taylor, two wills, one in October 1943 with the heart extremely enlarged. Clubs, those organised by private Federated Boys’ Clubs which is stolen from her home between 8.0/ ")

The case began on February 6 which’ was purported. to have Jy the stomach there was @ jiaividuals, churches, the Police @bout 66 years old. Mr. Cornock p.m, on Tuesday and 7.45 a.m \{ DENMOR DANISH HAMS—2% lbs. Tins $3.76
and then it wis adiourned until been completed on December qysntity of food. In his opinion ani Santon: Taylor, M.A , is its General Secre- on Wednesday i) DENMOR DANISH HAMS~—-4 lbs Tins . s $5.65
yesterday when it was to be de- 29, 1945, and the other which qeath was due to natural causes, “ ; tary. About 600 clubs are affiliated Nine acres of second crop ript ) IMPERIAL CORNED BRISKET BEEF—4 lb. ‘Tin: $4.20
cided whether on the denial of an Was made on December 25 o, namely cardiacal filure ae Practical Work to pe an B.C SEN s «the £2nes were burnt when » fire 4 ( SWIFTS LUNCHEON BEEF with CEREAL,--12-o07. ‘Tins 69c.
illegitimate son alone as to the The will on _ Lbecember 25 Mervin Greaves snid that the Fe returriad.t4.Gondon and dia d nother organisa ion 38 i eurred at Maynarde Plontatio (( SWIFTS CHEESE—12-0z. Ting . #4) g 99e.
will being his father’s, it should which was done in toto on that qecensed was his mother, He last practical Club work for four aonsl! aae0s Seen a eee St. Peter, about 10.80 pm. ¢ | SWIFTS VIENNA SAUSAGE 12-02, tins i 99e.
be admitted in Solemn Form. date, had ‘in a revoking clause saw her alive on February “a weeks. Two weeks were spent at om oa eed n " Its ‘ ace Wednesday, They are the prover- | (i) IMPERIAL VIENNA SAUSAGES—4-oz. tins bs he)

Will In Common Form which revoked all previous wee when she was taken to the vena the Brunswick Boys’ Club and (oon ee ie Mise Selwyn. sty of F. BE. Corbin of the sam: |\\\ CHIVERS APRICOT JAM--2-lb. tin ....,.. tease Cane

His Lordship said that his at- So there was then the Scena Hospital fter she fell mM : oat two at Stow Boys’ Club ‘ bya Seno ra ie enti plantation and were ‘sured ) PERLSTEIN BEER—per bottle ‘ ‘ ydis ‘ 20¢.
tention had been drawn to rule Position of stating whic h part of jome On February 7 he ae The Brunswick Club wis opened |, Phere T Ke "Fede ted Binge PERLSTEIN BEER —per Carton J alk 4.50
seven and he gathered from that Me, Will which was begun in that she was dead and went to the by the Duke of Edinburgh and has Welsh and Irish Federatec M ‘A Sacer
rule thet a holograph will was a 1943 and purported to have been piyjic Mortuary where he identi- its own premises. It is supported Clubs Mr. Tom ¢ hi Nte ide are -plaves who was in Barbados fe See
* , erap +4, finished in 1945 was revoked body to Dr. Ashby who ! pb , At is the General Secretary of the 1 in Barbados for =
poculiar Kind of will, but despite “twas logical to assume tha: “ed her body + mortem exam- by grants and voluntary subscrip- Wik Club, ‘This has about 300 @ short time last year before re-
that, it could be admitted in Com- 4.6 finishing date of the wil] PeTformed a post m tions. It has about 90 members Uh tiated to it, the majority turning home. =
mon Form which was begun in 1943 was at ination. and its vocational training | ts of which are also affiliated to the P.C, Wickham told the Advocate "SIS LLELLELLLLLLGSLLLSS LO

least written in 1945, but the carpentry. ; N.A.B.C. that the Clubs in Great Britain are

Mr. Barrow had drawn to _ his uestion was,. what other part The activities are table tennis P.T. Course financed ninety per cent. by
attention that the rule stated that te wiitten then MORE REQUESTS THAN opitliards. and snooker ne Cus om. voluntary subscriptions
sich a will could be admitted in “‘some part, or the major part has its own library and gym-

Common Form where it was not 7





i;
and by the it
P.C. Wickham also took a six- @ducational authorities This | \
of the will of 1943 was revoked. TICKETS FOR SERVICE nasium. ; week Assistant Instructors’ Course money goes towards the salaries | })} ‘
contested; but that was the case The revocation was at the be- Stow Club also has_ its pwn n Physical Training at Aldershot of leaders and in some cases the \
vith all kinds of wills. An or- ginning of the will which began OWING to the limited seating premises, but this Club was }
-dinary will which wis contested

; . 0 He completed this course on rent of premises. : H
in 1943. and there was no such accommodation available at the organised by a body of School December 13 and the following dy While he was in England he | })} WwW

haa cota aoa teak te clause at the bottom. where it Cathedral for The Memorial Teachers,’ It has areu a fla eB 1e was in London again witnessed the Boys’ Clubs Week i)

“The Court to my mind,” he was purported to have ended in Service at 11 a.m. on Friday the bers, The activities are similar ; He visited Mr. W. H. Chinn, which was opened on October 27 i
sid, “ has to consider whether 1945, 15th February, it is regretted that those of Brunswick, but the nea Sécial Welfare Adviser to the Representatives of various clut ))
‘there is indeed a contest. The Finishing Date it has not been possible to meet are taught painting and pupPs : Golonfat Office, and Mr. Basil Hen @ On Page »
mere fact that a oe is ae g ell the requests for tickets. making. This Club also has ¢
does not necessarily mean that.---Heosaid that somebody. could
eee is cae ee ar oe have disapproved of the will on

© say whether there is s sub-

December 25, 1945 and put the
siance in the matter raised. finishing date of the 1943 will as
“If there is no substance, the on December 29, 1945. Before,
will can be proved in Common the Court admitted the all ip |
Form,” Common Form, it had to decide | ¥ .
The caveator had sworn that whether it was going to accept | In tribute to the memory of His
two documents produced - = the contradictory evidence of an}
Court were in the handwriting of old woman who could not see ‘ <
the testator, but the will for which well and who had a vested in- Majesty the late King George VI
permission. was being Ae terest in the will. ini a4
it be admitted in Common Form Solicitor for the idow, Mr ‘
was not in the handwriting of the Cumberbatch, said that the date! this store will be closed to-day
testator. at the end of the will was the

“When I compare these,” he date that counted.

in GOLD, BLUE, ROSE and GREEN



| FACE TOWELS

BATH TOWELS

from....... $1.82 to $6.80
in PLAIN WHITE

BATH TOWELS

MINN iis bsiti an cinsvipinsiao edn tssiyrd ibaa $2.13 to $4.32
in BLUE, PINK, GREEN and GOLD

y y ir ‘ih *
suid, “to my mind, they are He said that counsel for the between the hours of 10.30 a.m, BEACH TOWELS
identically the same. other side had said or iaad Pci wtistebite thai: vi dhiensasaihas $1.59 to $4.19
" i vocation clause in the 1945 will!
“Lda oe claton 10 be antexpert, revoked ‘part of the 1943 will, and 12.30 p,m.

hut I think any jury, locking at but up to that moment, the caer
thea writings, would come to the BC, ners or Mate “Tite Sots
conclusion that they are all a ment counsel for the other side |
iat oF ee Pee ad could Was referring to when speaking of
a ‘ r its y i ause, roulc
antyecome to the conclusion that as ts Bet one i ed in eee
there was no substance, though the Jome;it cite be taken,
contest might be bons. fide. Here Mr. Barrow said _ that
Mr. Barrow said that it had not .

both wills were properly before
heen the intention of the testator 1. Court as both had been filed
that the document should be a yer" Cumberbatch went on to

in gaily Coloured Designs

LAVATORY TOWELS

volpigeh esti tialifiaigaes this @ 62¢. and 65c.
, BLUE and WHITE

BATMW MATS



in GREE}



ees
SSSI FSFE

lll

i he .@ $3.06 %
Ne in BLUE and GREE?

holegeaph wit 5 ES - say that the inet that a witness ; { BED HEE

That was quite i was present di not necessary : Ss. Ss

re Eee hh aeiaae Megat, tnt that be gam ses
> that the testz surp~ sign it. ' ¢ FS iodapietdvendah erst ahiniia saan iaieovs 45

moned certain persons to witness Showld sign it, } in BLUE, GREEN, PEACH, LEMON PROSE

the will, and provision had been : i} ™ re ee ’ -

made in the corner of the will for Shi Adrift ny

the witnesses’ signature. ip 1 } x 80” x 100”’—WHITE @ $10.37

her there was her ¢v } ” ” > «

ae eaten had told her tO cpanptp washington, Feb. 14 Hy) . 90” x 108 do. @ $10.13

take the will to the ty eer The British motor ship Hendon- \

a eee Pe nae’ have it hall radioed Thursdsy that che|

Aad so that s

i PILLOW CASES

traightened out had suffered a complete on | 1
ee Neoite ; i eses failure and was drifting, helplessly |

act that witnesses S13
h 2 ee al cruas and one did 48 miles off the Oregon Coast, US



“COTTON 20” x 30” - $1.67
Q
i} —LINEN 18” x 28” 2.48
) ANE? 7
. no 1ess’s name had Cost Guard Headquarters report- i
aed a ee a i i ed The. message said the ves el i
ewPheretore” he said, “our sub- “is in ne eee a Y 10, 11. 12 and 13 Broad Street i
sion is at the testator drew unidentified tanker was standings .
male ee ates nt which by and, the coast guard cutter} y Dial 2664.
aS had intended to go as a Balam was sent from Astoria,|
testamentary deposition of his Oregon.

ae —UP. |
property





?
i
i
)

4)

—— |







PAGE SIX |



BARBADOS ADVOCATE FRIDAY, FEBRUARY 15, 1952

| PUMLIC SALES | GOVERNMENT NOTICES |PARADE ORDERS FOR THE FUNERAL
CLASSIFIED ADS. z SHIPPING NOTICES











LeemONE. 2806. REAL ESTATE EARLY ARRIVAL 3
ant iatan, ipl eeninslaicseecacipiaieatindee HOUSE: Brand new, ample 3 ASKED FOR SERVICE

Fetter . _ ROYAL NETHERLANDS |
house, all conveniences, with party Tickets tor the Memorial Ser-| HIS LATE MAJESTY, KING GEORGE VI. } STE 4 MSHIP co.
vice for is Majesty he late)

a . « 7 sized living room, open verandah, kitche:
FOR SALE a a eanaty, 8
King George VI. which will be} ONAL, zon Febrasy i |












For Births, Marriage or Engagement!
*mnouncements in Carib Calling the
charge is $3.90 for any number of words)

to 50 and 6 cents per word for each $$$. $$$

Garage sundry, 2
servant rooms and storage room under





MV. “CLARA” will accept













M.S. BONAIRE. 22nd Feb 1952 Cargo and Passengers for aos
On attractive hflisid it y Neo ; neta “ 7! ‘sf *® Ea oe. ‘a” ‘ ME 2 >, 22nd February 52 Bahamas, Sailing on the it!
‘ional word. Terms cash. Phone 2508 Road a wieeite held in St. Michael's Cathedral | GENERAL INSTRIt q TIONS. MS. HERSILIA, Ist March, 1952 instant. :
between $50 and 4 p.m., 3113 for Death AUTOMOTIVE aetna ihinniiniesnsaralinies __ | at 11 a.m. today Friday 15th Feo- 8S. ERATE NGRDORG. ith Merch, 1952,
Notices only after 4 p.m BHARE ar have been issued. i |$.$. CoTT . dist Mareh. M.V. “CARIBBEE” will accept
208 ighedes Find trevrande Ce ™ Pa Pes sene have been |EQLONEL R. T. MICHELIN, ‘Commandant, Local Forces | SAEING 5O FLYMPUTE AND Cargo and Passengers for Domin-
61 Barbados Ice Company Ltd . tea cs their a ss _| Headquarters Office 14 Feb., 1952 Ref. No. TBR/G 121/52 | ns. we STAD, seen February: 10d ica, Antigua, Montserrat, Nevis
IN MEMORIAM 7 163 West India Rum Refinery Ltd requested to be in their seats DY|, COMPOSITION OF PARADE | M.S. WELEMSTAD, 3h February. St. Kitts. Sailing 15th instant.
‘eg ane Er aes he a nts | 280 Barbados Shipping & Trading Co.| 10.45 a.m. at the very latest but The Parade will consist of: SAMINGRITISN GUIANA M.V. “DAERWOOD” will accept
. ne it at Redman & Taylors Garage Lid. ‘go in order to avoid congestion a The Barbados Regiment 1 Officer and 36 other ranks |M.S, STENTOR, 28th February, 1952. ‘
che Room ay 1s 2 tao ane above will be set up for sale by

i cargo and Passengers for St. Lucia,
the last moment, it would be ap-| The Barbados Police Force 1 Inspector and 30 other ranks §.S. BRATTINGSBORG, 27th March, 195% St. Vinnents : ‘
preciated if they would do their!: The Barbados Cadet Corps © Cadets fram each Compan: | SAILING TO TRINIDAD, PARAMARIBO

| | sar
utmost to arrive nearer to 10.30 DRESS | AND BRITISH GUIANA

. iblic competition at Offic:

ALLEYNE: In loving memory of our “saan Te mn our ice, James
beloved Son, Jeffrey Alleyne who de- CAR=1947 Vauxhall 12. -Good tyres and va at oping on Friday 15th Feb-
parted this life on the 15th February] batten; 37,000 miles. Owner Jeaving the ‘





Grenada & Aruba.
Date of departure to be notified.











1947. isi YEARWOOD & BOYCE a.nt. (a) Barbados Regiment Shirts, Shorts,) Boots, Hosetops, Berets, |M 5 BONAIRE, 10th March, °1952. B.W.I._ SCHOONER OWNERS
s isiand. $1,000.00. Stevenson, phone 4067 Solicito: Belt: dd Sidea: ‘Ank! iter: White | 5.5 COTTICA, Tth April, 1982. ASSOCIATION (INC.)
Five years have passed since that] or 8454 18.2.52—3n.}13.22—2n - . His oe the Governor | belts and Frogs will be issued. st the Cen. | SAILING TO TRINIDAD AND CURACAO Consignee, Tele. No. 4047.
sad day, _—_—_——OO will wear unjform. | |M.S. HERSILIA, 18th March, 1952
When one we loved was galled away | GARS—199 Morris Oxford Saloon| “RIVERTON TVG heer tee : pie dia Magee 8. P. MUSSON, SON & CO., Be.
The blow was hard, the shock severe} 16,000 miles in excellent condition. | 7.71 Sea tent tem ne a | (b) Barbados Police Force As ordered Agents.
We never knew that death was near] 1$@ Hudson Sedan 14,000 miles very | ¢& rn ‘i “ PR 5 |
diy tp te veowmnbered by-- Mielyn| snitabie for Sire. 1886 Wedae Dehine Saree yas Mua 5 so two bed- 2 MINUTES, SILENCE ‘c! Barbados Cadet Corps .. ++ Shirts, Shorts, Black shoes, Stockings, |
leyne (Mother), Clarendon Alleyne] Coupe nas bes well cared. Very suitable . electric light. In- > .

: Hosetops, Berets and Belts |
WILL BE OBSERVED |# FORMING UP PLACE

e s s
Fiat tns neeersnaere dane Sowe'ees’ Canadian National Steamships
The Service in St. Michael’s Station Parade Grounds and will then march to the Cathedral in the follow-




{Father}, Daphne Blackinan (Aunt). ano | for converting to pick-up, 1088 Chrysler | tye on BY wibpointment ‘phone 4919
ira Hewitt (Great-grand-Mother) Royal Sedan going cheap. 1956 Morris! public competiti te, for sale at

15.2. 52-10 | Minor 2 Door Saloon 12,000 miles. Gay of Paecy teen z lay, the 22nd
Just arrived Morris Oxfords and : » at 2 p.m, at the



































Noo |
————— = “ office o: Cathedral in memory of His late ing order under the Senior Sener Dresent: |
; : E ba : 10) Ww. t f the undersigned 7 . Barbados Regiment
HOPE-—in ee neers of a a “sp a in ee be se cove have CARRINGTON & SEALY Majesty King George VI will Barbados Police Force |
Pee ae tee ee de ee Lacse ‘Sires, [commence at 11 am, | today Barbados Cadet Corps Let
To live in the hearts of those we loved |" FORT ROYAL GARAGE LTD., “SRANS SOUGHT DIKLN Cr Ree | she... 18th, of February with a] Seine sesomnaihaacet tae Seeeee wal Eis ae eee cee ete SOUTHBOUND Sails Sails Arrives —_ Sails
Is not to die. j Telephone 4504. 13.2.52—1. | New Road (ear Pautepelie maar ae silence of two minutes. able’ opera. . | _ Galifax Boston _ Barbados Barbados
Mabel Hope, son and daughters, iis ————~ | Michael standing on 6,030 square feet o¢| -%€ Signal of the commence-|, Rovure “LADY RODNEY" . ++ ee = 4 AB Feby. 15 Feby. me Feby. a a.
é enslgelioers ELECTRICAL ee. ment and the cessation of the| ‘The route will be from Centtal Polico StationMagazine Lane-Reebucx’ |.GADY NELSON, 2, -- ++ 12t Evby, 29 Feby. 6 March Oy March
4, as eee contains open verandahs on| Silence will be given by rockets Street—Spry Street and back the same way after the Service is enaed ce
WANTED Te oa “ink p Veena ee ane dining rooms, 2/ fired from the Harbour Police|; ‘TIME TABLE a
c One EMITRON CAR RADIO for Sale. | breakfast room, mel Galton aay meh) | Barracks. | ‘Units will parade on Friday 18th February, 1952 under their own Commander: | NORTHBOUND ‘Arrives Sails Arrives Arrives Arrives
Sa ; Practically new. Can be seen at Lash-|@arage and servants rooms in yard. | The Governor trusts that alt| at the Central Police Station Parate Ground at 1015 hours. Units will tise ar Poe we 9 = ie ‘
ley’s Limited. Sold for $179.00, reduced Inspection “lasses oO i | march off a yu as seated n ater than urs ¢ | “CAN. ‘ad o* ‘eby. 21 Feby. _— Feby. arch
— ee” reheat [teen ee een’ |oercons throughout the “Ialand|, Sereteh [EABY Neeson cab arch ot Mach °S Mora! 4 Aor" "f Aora’
The above property will b: ‘ ‘A GOOD COOK--Appiy: Mrs. Lacy | HOME FREEZBRS—0'% cu, ft, Made by |aale at public auction on Friday the 10,4 Will unite in observing the occas- Barbados Regiment will arrange transport for the Contingent from No. 2| “CAN, CRUISER" +0 ee @ April TApril = — 14 April 17 April
Hutson “First Attempt” Brittons ‘an Frigidaire, guaranteed, and equipped with | February at 2 p.m. at the office of the|i0M by a complete cessation of Coy. ‘Transport will arrive at Lodge Sehooi not later than 0915 hours. Ps ™ ican .
15.2.52—In. |the famous Frigidaire Meter-Miser. At| undersigned. ‘all nOrmatl business, work|; concausion OF PARADE ‘or further particulars, apply to—
"any with khowlsdas of Seeing. [oon Far ie ns ane CARRINGTON & SEALY and locomotion for two minuies At the conclusion of the Parade, Units will be dismissed by their respective
. —with kno: Ke ard Ltd. Dial 5136, 5027 or 4611, Solicitors, ‘ha biat ae 7 Sins ck Ribeaahe will io alt cy
pply between 9 a and 5) pom 15, 2, 52—3n. Lucas Street, at the hour named. Commanders, Ankle-gaiters, me aks Reaunent
Hutson, Bracebridge, 5th Ave. FE eville tive 1 6,3.53—On ° arrangements to be made Wy the Quarter Master of the Barbados
14.2, 53-—2 RADIOS; The well known Murphy | —





reenter
- §-tube sets, only a few left. See these

TWO JUNIORS ‘or Our office, one of before buying, Redman & Taylor's Garage AUCTION

When should have had some previous|rtq Show Room. 15.2.52—Gn, | 1 will sell at my MART, Victoria st. |

| GARDINER AUSTIN & CO., LTD.—Agents.

M. kL, D. SKEWES-COX, Major.
Staff Officer Local Forces, Barbados



experience. Apply by letter and in| teens | ON FRIDAY 15th from 12 noon tA
— to A. S. Bryden & Sons (Bar-| REFRIGERATOR—One 6 cu. ft. 1949] Pieces Crepe 50 yds each, Assorted
jos) Ltd. 14.2.52—-t.f.n. lp pe Collars, 50 doz.

id in good condition but surplus to b z Sport Print Shirts, 20) OFFICIAL NOTICE
: present needs. Phone 6255 between 9|90%€S .containing 24) Moirs Chocolate That PEPSODENT LIMITED,

a.m. and 4 p.m. for permission to view. are {containing24) Pineapple Choc-| trade or business address Is St Britrons | BARBADOS. IN THE COURT OF CHANCERY

MISCELLANEOUS 19,2,02—3n, | Gales J sede Pees and Body Pow-| House, Bridewell Place, London, E ca In pursuance of the Chancery Act 1906, I do hereby give notice to all persons
; Sah ncaa | England, Manufacturers, has applied tor | having or claiming any estate right or interest to any lien or encumbrances in or

dillciiaetivn MECHANICAL . cK 218 the registration of a trade mark in Part | affecting the property hereinafter mentioned (the property of the defendant) 10)

BOARDERS—“Private family near 13.2.52—3n|“A" of Register in respect of toilet bring before me an account of their claims with their witnesses documents and

ww ee | ari i a

Savannah can accommodate yisitors to} ONE FOUR WHEEL CANE CART with | preparations for cleaning artificial teeth | vouchers to be examined by me on any Tuesday or Friday between the hours of

Trinidad, Single or double rooms. Write | yiatform, pneumatic tyres and brakes. UNDER THE IVORY HAM and natural teeth, and will be entitied | 12 noon and 3 o'clock in the afternoon at the Registration Office, Public Buildings,

Mra. Stone, 80 Dundonald Street, Port-| Passed Highways & Transport, never MER | t, register the some after one month | Bridgetown, before the 4th day of March 1952, in order that such claims

of-Spain,” 9.2.52—-12" | used. Dial 4616. Courtesy Garage. By instructions received fron from the 13th day of February 1952|may be reported on and ranked according to the nature and prtorits thereor

Shgperebereher mens manrmneenmatnn sam , 15,2.52—6n. | surance Co... 3 will ten et eit the In-| unless some person shall in the meantime respectively otherwise such persons will be precluded from the nefits of any

WANTED TO BUY ANTIQUE GOLD}. | ary 16, at Mears General oc | five notice in duplicate .to me at my | decree and be deprived of all claims on or against the sald property,
Be ee tee Ma me. MACHINE--One Singer Sewing Machine | Garage,'Nelson St., (1) 1949 A-70 Austin | The weak Tanee den be ros on seaieian Pigintifs ENA MAY GALE

(Treadie) very little used, Complete with |Car (Damaged in accident). Terms Cash, | at my offies Pr eens S Defendant: CLARA ALSOP GALE
vr
PERSONAL

parts for Cut Work and Embroidery | Sale ot 2

Abply to Marion Jones, My Lords Hill, VINCENT GRIFFITH | Dated this 30th day of January 1952, PROPERTY: FIRSTLY ALL THAT certain messuage or dwellinghouse called

opposite Belmont Church Auctigneer . H. WILLIAMS “PARADE VIEW" with the land whereon the same stands and thereto belongings
is.waece Registvar of Trade Marks. situate at St. Anns, The Garrison in the parish of Christ Chureh in this Island

pirating ner sane aeconstaeninilchiasatire ere

Phe public are hereby warned against

givirty* credit to my wife, CLANESYSs

|
containing by admeasurement 6502% Square feet or thereabouts butting and bouna-
MISCELLANEOUS ant
SCANTLEBURY (nee Depeiza), as I do TAKE NOTICE

ing on a place called or known as Sea View Hotel, on lands formerly of Mary Ann
fot hold myself responsible for her or

14 February, 1952.



























Sereetebe = Bi et : ms : ee
CG“ TRANSATLANTIQUE
Sailings from Southampton to Guadeloupe, Martinique, Barba-
dos, Trinidad, LaGuaira, Curacao, Cartagena and Jamaica.
J °







ae

15.2,52—-3n, | 12,2.52—4n

















From Southampton
“COLOMBIE”

Arrives Barbados
20th Feb., 1952
2nd April, 1952
6th May, 1952



Cooper, but now or late of Frank Craig, and on the public road or however else
the same may butt and bound SECONDLY ALL THAT certain messuage dwelling-
———
fmyone else contracting any debtor debts ATR RIFLE PELLETS-A shipment of
in my name unless by a written order |these just received, .22, and .177, call

house or store situate in High Street in the City of Bridgetown in this Island
and numbered 15 in the said Street together with the land whereon the same |
stands and thereto belonging containing by admeasurement 1116 square feet or |
signed by me carly at Redman & Taylor's Garage Lid | thereabouts butting and bounding on the premises known as Number 156 Roebuck
Signed RIDLEY SCANTLEBURY, r 15.2.52—3n
— Thorpes Land
Jame ACCESSORIES, for the Car Chamois

.. Ith Feb., 1952...
“COLOMBIE”.... 20th March, 1952
*“DE GRASSE”..., 24th April, 1992

“Not calling at Guadeloupe.





| Street and 14 High Street and on the premises known as No. 16 High Street and on |
| High Street aforesaid or however else the same may butt and bound AND |
| THIRDLY ALL THAT certain piece or parcel of land with the dwellinghouse






SAILING FROM BARBADOS TO EUROPE









. ‘ Y | ther called “BARTICA" containing by admeasurement 9016 square feet o:
21. | Leathers Repair Kits, Car Polishes, French That WHITEHALL PHARMACAL Co) ‘. | ner eOn nae (formerly part of two acres and thirty one perches) and als Fron Batbados Aisites Ceahinnien
. hi tk, ae Cabins K aig appar oe isting under the laws of the State ‘of Hlinole Ui ene organized and ex-| square feet of the public road situate in or near the district called the Cocos u “COLOMBIE”,.., 2nd March, 1952 ,.. ... 14th March, 1952
ete, ote ediman aylors Garage! trade or business uadvens Sta Hlinois, ‘ited States of America, whose | Walk bevond the district called Hustings in the said parish 0 rist ni : 4 , 1 2
TAKE NOTICE Ltd 15.2,52—3n. Sees; has applied for te tenn Street, New York, New York, U.S.A.,| this Island butting and bounding on lands now or late of one Mrs. Inniss, on. the COLOMBIE”.,.. 13th April, 1952 .... .... 36th April, 1952
exister in respe :



“ ation of a trade mark in Part “A” of P y late of Marcus Gratinum et al, and on the Public Road or}
FGGS— Barred Plymouth Rock Begs for | atter one tncnth form the teen gn ne | however else. the. same i

W register the *“GE GRASSE”.... 19th May. 1962...
KOL YNOS 2 he meantime aaa, tea ee iste: me yever else e si y d bound Together with the messuages
: rn 5 % sa howev else the same may butt an un
hatching, 36 cents each, Infertiles re-] ¢ ¥ February, 1952 unie “ne perso buildings and all other the erections and buildings on the
placed. John Alleyne, Bbworth, St, Peter, anes Bive notice in duplicate to me at my office ome pr n shall in| dwelling houses and jdt i

*Sailing Direct to Southampton.

a. =20th ay, 1952

, o ; , : ing 4 sing with their
Phone 9120 16.2. 5a—3n registration. The tradé mark can be seen on application at “8 y ee of such | said respective parcels of land erected’ and built standing and being wi
- Dated this Ist day of February 1952 if my office.



appurtenances ;
Bill filed: 3rd December, 1951,

“GALVANIZED SHERTS — A_ limited

HK. M. JONES & CO.. LTD.—Agents.





it, WILLIAMS °
quantity, 7 ft, $4.80, 8 ft. $5.89, 9 ft $6 45] 19 » 52-3 Registrar of Trade Marka Dated: Mist December, 1951 : dl li earner
That WHITEHALL. PHARMACAL| Inquire Auto Tyre Co. Telephone 2696. |: 2:52—3n
GOMPANY, a corporation organized 2.2.52—t.f£.n.







and existing under the
of Tilindis United 8 of America PURGRAIN Pigeon Feed - none
)

Whose trade or business address better — 10-Ib. lots and upwards @ 19c. OFFICIAL NOTICE

Kast 40th Street, New York per Ib. Phone 2547, §.2.52-t£n | RARRADOS. j RAT

US.A,, Manufacturers, has applied ——— ‘ 3 if IN THE COURT OF OHANC
the registration of a trade mark in Por SHIRT FACTORY —Capable of making hae hone eof the Chancery Act 1906, 1 do |

aws of the State
















OF EXCHANGE















rt * veby ive notice to all ay Oe, eS ea Coupons 69 2/10
"A" of Register in respect of tooth pest *, | 60 dozen shirts per day. Por particulars: Afeeting ihe conten Fe ae Heht or ms mi to any Hen ot eheuritiranaue in or aw 50% Silver 20%
footh powder, tooth brushes, shaving | Phone Johnson 4411, Preinafter mentioned (tt operty " defends c 19 6 nec 4

acc Mttecreave ‘ation, Antiseptic soli WONG eee 13.2.59—4n ene before me an account of their clairns with theft Neotaaces domain? nd ae CEN ee 5 71 4/10 78 7/10 babaves on

tion and germicidal disinfectant, and will 2 dennewoninanrstenenentipneasraagpenares — ten ers to be examined by me on any Tuesday or Friday. between the fetes of Sight or Be mee v \ Bankers 171 2/10
he entitled to register the same after | SHIRTING UNLIMITED — Mercerised hoon and 3 o'dloek in the afternoon at the Registration OMcc, Publie Bulldi Tae 2 2/ Demand

one month from the 1 day of Febr- | Cotton cut-piece gents pyjama and shirt- Bridgetown, before the 4th day of March 1952, in order that such claims 4 addy ited : f Drafts. 71 05
ary, 1982 Unless some 5 in ihe ling in fancy designs, different lengths,| ™4¥ be reported on and ranked according to the nature and priority theveot 2 oe eee ‘ee e7io Sight Drafts 70 9/10
meantime give notice in duplttate to me|come and choose at KIRPALANT, 62| S@8Pectively otherwise such persons will be precluded trom the benefits of + Oe re “937/10 Cable cgcgpsvae
at my-offiee of opposition of such resis: | Swan Street, 15.2. 52- “in, decree and be deprived of all claims on or against the said property Bote ae 72 2/10 Currency 69 7/10
tratio; je trade mark can be seen on |. Plaintift: HUGH OWEN SAINT CL. uU e ‘ .. Coupons 60
Ppliciton at my Office. AIR CUMBERBATCH 50% Silver 20%



Baia aor ol More | PULAC NOTICES Perea Raa reente, “aaa |

aoe REECE PATTERSON |

‘ IRTY

Reaistras ot APAHe Marke, OPERTY: FIRSTLY ALI, THAT certain piece or parcel of 1. rmerly

ae... = part of the lands of Kirtons Plantation) known as “Robin Hood" ne i Ge
a ROYAL BARBADOS YACHT parish of Saint Philip and Island aforesaid containing by

* CLUB 3 roods twenty and two fifths perches or thereabouts Riek tha helaine he
SE- LEONARD'S CHURCH NOTICE :

at
the east on lands now or late of J. A. Gittens on the ae ae epee, Oo
ORGANIST CHOIR-MASTER







BOILS

Get rid of unsightly

PIMPLES See fast! 44
them a spee: treatment wit

medicated, antiseptic Dr. Chase's

Ointment. Soothes as it heals. 69c.

Large size, 6 times as much, $2.23.

| DR. CHASE’S -
| Antiseptic OINTMENT

South on a public read o
the west on another public road and on the North on another fabiia road we
however else the same may abut and bound SECONDLY ALL THAT certain
Members are asked to note that] Piece or parcel of land situate at Six Cross Roads in the said parish of Saint

the Club House will be closed on Philip and island aforesaid containing by admeasurement onc

rood thirty eight

. 1 . perches or thereabouts abutting and bounding ca jands of The Grove Plantat
Friday 15th inst. until 12.30 p.m.] on lands of Thurban Plantation on lands now or late of one Holder and on the
T. BRUCE LEWIS, public road or however else the same may abut and bound THIRDLY ALL THAT
Secretary. | certain piece or parcel of land (part of a larger area of land known os Johnny

— | Ward containing Eight acres one rood ten perches which was formerly part of the \ iS cough!
lands of Kirtons Plantation) situate in the said parish of Saint Philip and Island Oh
aforesaid containing by admeasurement Four acres two roods or thereabouts abut- | = What can | do?

Applications to be sent to the
Vicar for the above vacancy caused
through ill-health. Salary $24.00
pius Fees.

State experience—names of two
péople from whom references may







TAKE NOTICE









































































































be fequtred. ion Sa an tana Sma ay gt Sapmanas ct ef on nds now oc | yout sre wth cough cugh, |ROPPEODOOOROESDOOOOOE |
_—_—_________— | the same may abut and bound FOURTHLY ALL THAT certain piece or parce) cough, all the time... INVESTMENT OPPOR- TIME
a SS SSS ¥ of land (part of a larger area of land known as Tank Fleld which was formerly TUNITY.
| N Cl N oe pd Sie nee 3 ne menratipn) situate in the said parish of Saint Philip | 5
| an land aforesaid containing by admeasurement two roods one and seven-tenthe A limited number of Cumulative
perch: th bouts abutti d bounding on le » or late aide .
ORIENTAL }} ANA Eferke'on lands now ot ive of one Mr. Brathtalte wn ands voter oie ye | -— AT =
of G. Cla > y of the said Walter Francis Reece and Selma Cathiee » %|
SOUVENIRS _That WHITEHALL PHARMACAL | Reece Seterion. acd iat A eoat iene ae iwover Gan" ae sane Ra annt SRSPR es Mt See ee.
| COR ON. Ra eupameTle ee ate ahd bound FIFTHLY ALL THAT certain piece or parcel of land known as “Gad | |
SILKS, CURIOS, ARTS ‘at Miinole, United Mates of America. | o/*Saint Philip and Island nforssaia containing. by admensicoment Toon mren rae | BROS
VENDEMOS, SEDAS, whose trade or business address is 221 to9as twenty perches or thereabouts abutting and bounding on lands now or late 5 x e
JOYRBIAS Y ARTISTICAS Kast 40th Street, New York, New York, | ¢ phoebe E. Clarke on two sides on lands now or late of Kirtons Plantation on % x ’
‘OURIOSIDADES, TRATDOS ogee stort Ng gigs er pl api x other lands of the said Walter Francis Reece and Selma Cathleen Rage’ Patterson %
OU , : yer el © same may a , i | . ays
Di LA INDIA CHINA © IH) A’ Of Kexister in respect of a medicinal | rary ALL THAT certain piece or pareel of land situate at Mavehfivld in the 3 Prince William Henry and Swan Streets ;
EIrPTo or De ade an a itl said parish of Saint Patty and alan afovesaid containing hy adieaturement ong | i a . * j
lho uth A t " the same after acre or thereabouts a! dobby ng an bounding ots Aang nee or late oe March: Reale 1 Gy y e
THANI'S one mont trem the itty dng of me | Slane om es Beige pio‘ newever le Whe Sey Ne ith nk Sewice % || Losses? Prices on Record!
Pr. Wm. Hry. S8t., “ fay, 1952 unless some person shall in the hong * s ~
meantime give notice in duplicate to me Bill filed: 16th October, 1951. f . -
se | yt my office of opposition of such regis- Dated: Sist December, 1001 | What a difference! $1} SHARKSKIN 36” $1.98
SSE Bey At Sy, othne Ge cRu oe an Se ee een Bo : Bs , GEE RIE, | fae hail ies eden saat % ] biabih a Cah t es aS GLB cana sndboss coeeienseonvcias /
‘ . *. on
{| application at my office. Registrar-in-Chancers | ‘i ‘ \g Best if Town
{ day of Feb * 1962. * my throat in no time! : .
7; CRE AM ree > ie WILLIAMS tt alae : LT A8—an | B65 606000009099900% I} CREPE DE CHINE 36 coccccccssscccsecsnmunann 98
i egistrar ©: ade 8. = SS |
ea |. GOVERNMENT NOTICES A nell ea
) ; OOOO FSO SGOPOSPPPPPSSODR: ‘ | FOR § ALE JERSY 48” (Plai 12
5 *. . ain) DUPUAE\ Hh on aiynsecneced cose tecsedoscesedeveduvocse 1.
PARLOUR : ice 3
; % Memorial Service Pe R.A VARGA c SIE sae tid cose os eran ee Pn si bette Gas 1
: ‘ \ For the late KING GEORGE V1 S$ most members of the secretariat Ste oP Saas } REce SHANT-UNG (Popular Shades) .....0.cccccccc0 = LM
: FOR SALE x tire Gan AO Heres tats duties in connection with the Memorial Service for His Majesty the | One Cow tveah in mille. 00 (Pop )
ay "Jewish Religious Committee. late King George VI on Friday, 15th February, the Secretariat will | C 0 U G Hi young Leghorn hens three i PRINTS 36” wide .€2
coe ¢ | not open for public business on the morning of that day. It will open Soabiabete 5 prs, White King |i} CALICO 26” wide ... id
the. 300, rae Fiabe ELE EPO GO at 12.30 p.m. li Pigeons,’ 3 ‘Flemish Giant LINENS 36” wide 67
as ari ual PPLE OOS. | , PO WONG iris cies iy Mecenesdbasbescsesoessoseseeesisncees ‘
at Baxter's Noad sa git S NOTICE POLICE TRAFFIC NOTICE LOZENG ES | sete A eens te eon, | BRAPIN 90" Wille: i ccecul hat Buscdvdaksisitadiistovielnssiisie ae
* concern, Ii is properly equip- oP 4 1 “Med- })}| Mae ous
: * be Made by Sunday 8.00 to 12.00 “M Hi BROCADE 367 Wide vocc.cccscccscccsscssccsoscsssssesssosenssrscseee Ti
ete oe. is N Me. EB TD ABREU has returned .| the makers of the famous Zubes Cough Mixture } my m,”” Pine Hill. h ? ORGANDY 36” i 69
judd in, Good opportunity for }}|% to the island and iy ‘carving on ¥]MEMORIAL SERVICE AT ST. MICHAEL'S CATHEDRAL, FRIDAY | 5 Reese hi MBO. 5 calcisscssisiice voriicanee =e
san enterprising man or Ronin a e wy saan 16k FEDRUAB SE: 1098 is ee, |
“woman, Apply at Middle 1% ae aE On Friday, 15th February, between the hours of 10 a.m. and 12 noon yooes os | HATS BAGS SHOES
—, cee A CSR POS < pOOSSSSSSSE | : ears conveyi ‘sons > service > |
ee Furniture Depot. eonbeion aceon Seatobeae 1, The drivers of all cars conveying papers to the service| * We always carry a large assortment of — y| Rock Bats Pri
» Dia! , 5 ral vay, of Trafalgar Street. 12 — 0 rices
: I? A UNITED METHODIST hall approach the Cathedral y way - are gar ea) ig BEST BRITISH PAINTS tb ENAMELS ¥ | m
> MEMORIAL SERVICE 2. Chauffeur driven cars shall set down their occupants at the} ¥ a FOR ONE DOLLAR ONLY
SSS west ee RAsgaey ° South Gate to the Cathedral and then park on Constitution Road in| § in stock % | 3
The Late KING GEORGE VI the vicinity of Queen’s College R dina oi % et eed. $ | 3 Pairs SOCKS or 2 VESTS or 4 HANKIES or
: EXHIBITION Le Soinetade tiuastoer ees Sette ane 2. -Ounibe driven ears shat turn into Spry Btryet, set down thet ‘ 5 | 2 PANTIES or 4 GOLD BELTS or 2 CHANGE
February, commencing at 11 a.m, passengers at the North Gategapel park as directed by the Police. ie
} : i$ Drama. make, @ special 4, Spry Street shall bee way from St. Michael’s Row. $ CoNTHAL EMPORIUM % | PURSES
AT Secoosseoosesesossooooe’ ‘ ee roe shall be = , from loa a % orner, Broad & Tudor Streets ca MEER is YANKEE TYPE SHADES, WALLETS. $1.75
1 “SSOS5SSSSSS9SSSS9999998S: ade under Rule 22 of the Bridgetown and Speightstown SSOBCOO
. BARBADOS ii {| crvamey (Amendment) Rogilations 1048. | SE | FANCY SILK SHIRTS (Barbados View) ......._3.98
- ~ ? ; R. T. MICHELIN, 1) ALL-WOOL TWEED PINSTRIPED 56” wide... 9.50
si FURNISH TO-DAY : Commissioner ot Police. |] |
» MUSEUM % . ee eS Commigghanien. b¢ Police. FOR SALE | j} SILVER GREY FLANNEL 56” wide 0.00 339
‘ olice Headquarters, | di |
“ | " nant 5 | eal rt
WEST INDIAN 3) * The Money Saving Way Bridgetown, ‘ : | oe | DUNGAREE Heavy Quality occu 1.07
ee ; FULL-PANELLED Mab 18th’ February, 1962. 14.2.52.—2n, | \)) KHAKI — Popular Shade ................. 2, ies cei: ee
abe wll ahogany
oR PANELLED _ Manowany =———~| LYNCHBURG
PAINTINGS B sinels and Double Beasteada: some |} BEDROOM RUGS — All Wool — from... 3.58
a with Various Mirrors--Wardrobes i = i
“By ROBERT J. MAC LEOD and. Dresstr-robe . Announcing the arrival of:— | 5 * |} VEGETABLE DISHES (with Covers) ............ 1.27
«My th Avenue, = Belleville
. ees 2 |
\ and MAHOGANY, Bireh and Deat § Sains
ore et Tables for Dining, Cocktail, Radio, Terrazzo) MARBLE CHIPS An attractive and well proportioned 2 storey house situated |||} BLANKETS — £r0m ......0-recwpercnnsnnnnnennnn 298
PENCIL & WATER Sewing. Kitehen in several shapes § | on a corner site of 12,050 sq. feet. Contains 3 galleries (1 1/}} TORCHLIGHTS o.com — 139
COLOUR for China, Kitchen and Bedroom. | enclosed), large drawing room, dining room, study, modern LUNCH BAGS 4.59
Fi ectrnuid Gb | SUITES ind Separate Drawing © in 5 colours | kitchen, 3 ‘coms, garage, etc. Sbdilonds wees sand**be socsdtttbpovevancon tebspiosesess s*¥ereepsese ie
“— 7 }% kere cand. Rush, and Many "eunee z Low figure accepted for quick sale, owner going abroad. CURTAIN NETS. .......2....0..+ thaiciilswess apmaabied, yes 39
Went Indian Subjecte 1 Nice Things NEW AND RENEWED Per Vegenmene ons Freon LADON & CO CRETTONES. 48” wide .....:.ccce:ssssinseneennnte 1.46
By HAROLD CONNELL | T as Ez B EK R T 4 T q JOHN M. ab A = PINNING Con con dcl riches socal bvacds tid cdecetinpabchcaieransrecraashvasyoat 57
i} OPEN FEB. 9—MARCH 8 L. S. WILSON ° R S 4 d. neal eesaTe Asenr OILCLOTH ............ felts aoe
FAL EST? » AGENTS
i 10 a.m.—6 p.m. \$ SPRY STREET. DIAL 409 8 §©6 Magazine Lane, t+: Dial: 4367 | Phone 4640. Plantations Building. HEADKERCHIEFS .78 i
Vencecoos :







FRIDAY, FEBRUARY 15, 1952 BARBADOS ADVOCATE







BY CARL ANDERSON

FLAME'S INITIALS -FLAME'S PERFUME? ))\\NINT i 1}
WHERE DID VOU FIND THIS, DUSTY? 4f 1 i
> s

y

i
RIGHT WHERE ! | i
YOURE STANDING:

STILL ON THE LOOSE ,
\
Ni
if


















SNAP OUT OF IT, KENT!
YOUR SNIVELING WON'T
HELP US SAVE DALE NOW! HOW CAN
WE WARN WARDEN MILES THAT BIG MOE'S
HEADED FOR HIS OFFICE?— AND YOU'D

YES... BUT SOUNDING AN
ALARM MIGHT THROW BIG
MOE INTO A PANIC! HE

WOULDN'T HESITATE TO KILL
CALE... IF WE COULD FIND
THE INTER-COM SYSTEM IN
ONE OF THESE ROOMS, WE
< MIGHT BE ABLE TO WARN THE









WARDEN MILES BUSILY DIRECTS THE *
PREPARATIONS FOR THE ROCKET-
LAUNCHING... .







S) Gre Lee
Unaware OF THE TROUBLE TD ay
SPRUNG UP IN THE CREW QUARTERS, /p i ®:

sa
[hh





MM ...NEVER NOTICING
Ray THE MENACING
WW FIGURE WHO HAS
i GAINED ENTRANCE
TO His OFFICE
WITH KENT'S
Fi OSMO-RAY*GUN |. }
/









HONESTLY=I-I DON'T KNOW!
THIS QUARTER OF THE ;
SPACE-PRISON WAS
ALWAYS OFF-LIMITS

TO PRISONERS /

7



AGE THRU SOUD
GE PENETRATED HE



MATTER, SO THAT THEY



BUT HERE COMES NON, M'SIEU
i Y TH’ TRRAIN CARRYIN’ | FIRST BUY
/ YOUR QUA! TEECKET, MY BELOVED...OUT'F | ZE TEECKET
M'SIEU / YOU MUS’ AVE MY WAY, LITTLE OVER ZERE /
7 QUAI TEECKET...OR
NO ENTRANCE /







NESS / HOLD THIS, JOHNNY,
I'LL GET TH’ CONFOUNDED...
*KAY" TICKETS / WATCH FIR







poo



BRINGING UP FATHER

| -
WHY DON'T MAGGIE
LIVE ON THE FIRST

Nie a



|| HE'S COMIN’ IN -
T RECOGNIZE
HIS STAGGERIN'
FOOTSTEPS -









GET OUT /HE
MUSTN'T
SEE us / |









IN ANOTHER PART OF THE PALACE: } ;

THOU TRAITRESS / ‘ S% STOP! I'LL KILL
ry \ ’ YS MYSELF BEFORE &
OF AN IMPOSTOR! . 3 NY 4 @ TLL SURRENDER!
WHAT FOOL . Ah,

OF THIS SACRED

~<
ee ? OF




WITH THAT (
PIGSTICKER, MISS

et
ft en

=
ae

NOT HEADHUNTERS. SENGA BANDI
AFTER OUR EQUIPMENT. .
SHH +-DEVILs~ -





COSCO?

ENJOY FINE FOODS DAILY





AL AD PRELOMEAS IE NEENASN SORS ERAE AR
!



We can’t catch up





with it!

The call for “Black & White” continues to grow
all over the world, for connoisseurs agree that it
is a Scotch in a class all its own.

Blended in the special “Black & White” way it
is a splendid drink at all times and for all
occasions,

‘BLACK: WHITE’

SCOTCH WHISKY
Wie Secrct ts tn the Blending

By Appointment



Scorch Whisky Distillers

to H.M. King George VI James Buchanan & Co. Led.



4AMES BUCHANAN & CO. LTD., GLASGOW, SCOTLAND







IT PAYS YOU TO DEAL HERE _

i = —————



oe SSS es Ss ee ae —

SPECIAL offers to all Cash and Credit Customers for Thursday



Speightstown and Swan Street
Usually Now

Tins Lobster 74 68 Beer





THE COLONNADE GR

PPG LE LCL LLLP LLL ELLE LE LAAAD VCP LLL LEELA PE LLALPLPLAPAPE

YEARRIAGE

A BROOK FOR THE MARRIED
AND ABOUT TO BE MARKIED

x r x 1e
KENNETH WALKER, F.R.C.S.
, aod

This book has been written for those who are about to
marry and who find that they are in need of information and
advice on the subject. Its aim is to provide the necessary
knowledge and the practical guidance which will help a couple
to build a successful marriage and avoid the pitfalls which lead
either to the divorcee court or to a frustrated and unhappy

married life

~ + a?
wary

WE HAVE IT AT THE

ADVOCATE STATIONERY





—_— eee oe eee —
SPECIAL OFFERS are now available at our Hranches Tweedside,

Boneless Beef (per lb) 58 .50 Pkgs. H. & P. Assorted
Pkgs. Rice (2+ lbs) .60 34 Cream Biscuits 56 00
Split Peas (per lb) 15 .12~ Bottles Heineken’s

D. V. SCOTT & Co. Ltd. Broad Street

PAGE SEVEN
ree
PLLLSOCCCLE SESS ISSTST

40 YEARS A FAVOURITE

S. & S. RUM

Because of its

MELLOW FLAVOUR

AND

COOL DRINK

Blended and Bottled
by

STUART & SAMPSON
(1938) LTD.

Headquarters for Best Rum.

PLA EALSSSSSSSSSE ICS
& ALE SSESSSCSE SOS,

HURRY! HURRY!
AND

SELECT THESE
NOW

1-Ib & 2-Ib
Tins Mortons Oatmeal

Tins Corned Mutton
Tins Breakfast Roll
Tins Lamb Tongue
Tins Veal Loaf

(Imperial Vienna Sausages)
Large & Small

Tins Hamberger Steak

Gelatine in Packs
Tins Fruit Cocktail
Tins Fruit Salad

$< PESOS 9S SSDI OOSPDPD PPPS SSSI OG GOES

CESS

INCE & CO.

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PAGE EIGHT

BARBADOS ADVOCATE



Second






By O. §. COPPIN

The We Indic egi their
Second Test with Ne Zealand
today rher a we
doubt as to the suy ity of the
West Indies team i ; Test but

conversely, vhile
a convincing vict

expected
was only



the tenacity of John Goddard and
Guillen in® the closing stages of
the innings and the batsmanship
of Worreii in the second innings
that clinched matters our way
on each however.

Chose Thirteen

Godiuard has declared that his
team will be chosen from the
following thirteen players: J. Bi
Goddard (Capt), D, Atkinson, W.
Fergusson, S, Guillen, R. Mar-
shall, S. Ramadhin, K. Rickards,
J. Stolimeyer, A. Valentine, C.
Walcott, E, Weekes, F. Worrell
and A, Rae.

It is definite that he will go
into battle for the second time
without the assistance of his
pacers, Jones and Trim. He
would seem justified in this since
the wickets seem to favour the
spinning of Ramadhin and Val-

entine more than it would pacers

Gomez Out
For the first time Gerry Gomez
ig out of a Test team and regard-
less of the extent to which we
might be superior to New Zeal-
and, yet one cannot help feeling
a pang of uneasiness that Gomez,
admittedly the best all rounder
of the tour, on performance, will
be absent from the ranks of the

West Indies Test team.
Goddard must have very good
reasons for not including him 19



RABONE

(Wellington)

G.



West Indies Scor

In Second

B. SUTCLIFFE

the thirteen

(Auckland)

players from whom

he will eventually chose his team
presume to

and. we would not
criticise from this distance.

Atkinson’s Chance

It would seem as if this means
be

that Denis Atkinson will
brought in to share the new ball
with Worrell.

Skipper Goddard will have to
fecide whether he will open with
Rae or Roy Marshall as a part-
ner for Stollmeyer. Some schools
of thought subscribe to the view
that Jeff might be given a rest
but I would not take the chance
of dropping both Gomez



Vv. J. SCOTT

(Auckland)





J. A. HAYES (Auckland)

Stollmeyer, seasoned veterans as
they are, from the same West
Indies Test team,

Speculation

Further speculation is whether
Ken Rickards will be given 4&4
chance in place of Weekes who
has not been able to get over a
very bad patch. This would be in
the nature of an experiment as
well but no one could criticise
Goddard if he gave young Rick-
ards a chance in the circum-
stances,

Let us meet some of the New
Zealand players whom the West

and Indies are most likely to meet.



J. REID (Wellington)



N.Z. Test

NEW ZEALAND, Feb. 15.

IN 45 MINUTES’ BATTING before lunch the West
Indies scored 34 without loss in the second cricket Test
Match against New Zealand at Eden Park. Stollmeyer was

then 21, Rae 7.

The weather was threatening when New

Zealand which won the toss, took the field, Sutcliffe, New
Zealand’s captain, being of the opinion that the pitch would

take spin.

Football Season
Opens To-morrow

The 1952 Football season opens
at Kensington Oval on Saturday,
February 16 With a First Division

fixture between Spartan, last
year’s cup winners and Carlton,
runners-up,

The Council of the B.A.F.A, at
their meeting on Wednesday
graded the teams for the 1952
competition as follows:

FIRST DIVISION
Spartan, Carlton, Empire, Ever-
ton, Notre Dame and Harrison
College.

SECOND DIVISION
Empire, Carlton, Spartan, Notre
Dame, Everton, Pickwick-Rovers

THIRD DIVISION
Wanderers, Cable and Wireless,
Foundation School, Foundation
Old Boys, Y.M.P.C. “A”, Y.M.P.C.
“B”, Empire, College, Comber-
mere School, Combermere Old
Boys, Carlton, Lodge School
Y.M.C.A., Pickwick-Rovers, Bar-
bados Regiment, Notre Dame,

Everton, Police, Rangers,

KNOCKOUT COMPETITION

Spartan, Carlton, Empire, Notre
Dame, College, Everton and Bar-
bados Friendly Football Associa-
tion,

The Council appointed the fol-

lowing sub-committees to serve
during the season.
Fixture and Match:— Messrs.

Cc. A. Smith and L. F. Harris,
Selection: — Major A, R. Foster

O, S. Coppin and G, Wilkes.
Consultative: —Messrs, D, H, L

' They'll Do It Every Time"



Doctors’ cASe-800K, TYPE
NO.3,426-~THE BIG HE-MAN
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STRAIGHT» DON'T PULL
ANY PUNCHES»: TELL

ME THE TRUTH

Acter 15 minutes’ play heavy
rain drove the players from the
field tor 35 minutes.

Stollmeyer appealed to a crowd
of about 2,500 by the grace and
ease with which he made his shots.
Both he and his partner however
were subdued in the early stages.
Sutcliffe used only fast bowlers
Hayes, Beard and Reid until giv-
ing the spinners Burtt and Moir
an over each before lunch.

W.1. FIRST INNINGS
Rae b Burtt 99
Stollmeyer not out 135
Marshall b Beard 9
Weekes not out MM
Extras 18
total (for 2 wkts) 288
Fall of wickets:— 1 for 198, 2 for 203.



Aussies Unable To

Organize Gantes

OSLO, Feb. 12,
learned officially that
intends to waive the
honour of organizing the 1956
Olympic games, and Argentina
appeared as a likely candidate to
pick up the honour,
tabs 2. —U.P.

It was
Australia





Ward, S. O'C. Gittens, L. F. Har-
ris.



Finance: Messrs. D. H. Le
Ward, V. T. McComie, O. S.
Coppin. t
Disciplinary:— Major A. R.

Foster, Messrs. D. H. L. Ward, S.
o’c. Gittens, F. L. Walcott, L. F.
Harris, W. Hoyos, V. T, McComie,
J. M. Kidney.

Referees:— Messrs. J. H, Wal-
cott, J. Spencer and L. F. Harris

e 288-2 Devonshire

Regiment

A team from H.M.S. Devonshire
defeated one from the Barbados
Regiment at Rifle Shooting on
Wednesday morning on the Goy-
ernment ‘Rifle ge. The
Devonshire scored 469 points
as against 433 by the Regiment.

The shoot comprised application
at 200 and 300 yards respectively
and snap and rapid at 300 yards.

Instructor Lt. Des Clayes from
the Devonshire scored the high-
est points 91 with a_ possible at
200 yards, while the best shot for
the Regiment was Capt, C. E.
Neblett with a total of 81.

Following are the scores:

H.M.S. Devonshire

Points
Instructor Lt. Des Clayes 91 :
Marine Jones ... . 88
Marine Gillard .. 76
Sat. Turper iiis....- 74
Commander. Crawford 72
Surgeon . Wilson 68

469

Barbados Regiment

Capt.. Neblett, C. E. .... 8a
Major Walcott, O. F.C. 80

Set. Edwards, F. E. ....
R.S.M, Marshall, H. B. G, 7

Major Warren. A. S. .... 60
C.S.M. Carfer, G. A. .... 59
433

P. C. TRAINEE
IMPRESSED

@ From Page 5



lined up on the Horse Guards
Parade Ground in front of the
Duke of Edinburgh. The Duke
deelared the Clubs Week opened
and Arthur Wint, Jamaican run-
ner, delivered the first message.
Afterwards representatives ran off
to their various clubs to deliver
the message.

“It was a very interesting pro-

cession and I shall never forget |










F. B. SMITH (Canterbury)

Regatta

Handicaps
The Handicap times for the
Third Regatta which will be sailed
in Carlis.e Bay To-morrow, Febs

ruary 16, are as follows: —
t



























Class No. Start at Flag
:
B 4 Hi Ho
B 10 Wizard
B 1% Ranger 2.30 R
B 481 Fantasy es
B 482 Circe “
:
D 4 Seabird
Bb & Peter Pan 2.32 Yellow
———
B 7 Moyra Blair 2.33 Red
B 6 Flirt
B 8 Rascal 2.34 Yellow
|
B 3 War Cloud
B @& Okapi 2.35 Red
D 12 Rainbow
D 10 Van Thorndyke 2.36 Yellow
D 3 Rainbird 2.38 Red.
———+ |
B . Resolute
D 1 Buceaneer 2.39 Yellow
dD 9 Olive Blossom
B 5 Mischiet Sata
D 2 Imp 2.41 Red
D i4 Hurricane
B 1 Gipsy Ges, tae,
D 7 Sinbad 242 Yellow
ee
c 68 Peggy Nan 2.43 Red
——————
I 2 Invader
L 6 Eagle 244 Yellow
—————
K Tornadoes 2.45 Red
——_—
I 7 Mohawk
I 8 Skippy 2.46 Yellov
—— ..
c 9 Folly 247 Red
—_—
a 1 Miss Behave
Cc 3 Madness
I 9 Dauntless 2.48 Yellow
1 12 Dawn
c 2 Scamp 2.50 Red
C 11 Magwin
I 11 =Reen 2.51 Yellow
Cc 10 Gannet 2.52 Red
c 7 Rogue : me
I 4 Gnat
I 4 Coronetta 253 Yellow
I 18 Clytie
H. BLAIR BANNISTER,
Starter



Winter
Olympics

(By A Special Correspondent)

LONDON.

The Winter Olympic Games of
1952 will begin today in Oslo.

The official opening, inaugurate
ed by King Haakon on February
15th will set the seal on five years
extensive preparation. For,
since the International Olympic
Committee, in 1947, chose Oslo as
the scene, Norway has been get-
ting ready for the arrival of the
world’s top-flight snow and ice
athletes, §

Teams are coming from over 30
countries, including Great Britai
'Canada, Australia, New Zealan
| Portugal Japan, Argentine, a
j Italy—the latter subsidised by a
| State-run football pool.
| The problem of housing the
| 1,200—1,300 competitors has been
‘solved by the erection, in Oslo’s
‘suburbs, of three new ~ villages,
which will afterwards accommo=
date students and the staff.of a
| hospital.
|. Events in this year’s programme
include ice-hockey, speed and
| igure-skating, skiing, bob-sleigh-
|ing and the Nordic winter sport of
| bandy,
| _ Bandy is little known
; Scandinavia, where it is often
| called ‘winter-football’. The rules
are similar to those of soccer, Fast
and apectaculac, there are eleven-
aside; players use a “bat”, shaped
like a hockey stick, eS drive a
| heavy ball.

outside



| that day's a ity”
t ay ctivity”, P.C. Wi
ee P.C. Wickham
| _ P.C. Wickham has now resumed
| duties with the Barbados Boy:
jand Girls’ Club organisation.

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FRIDAY, FEBRUARY 15,

1952



W.L—-N. Zealand Test ‘To-day



*
T. B. BURTT (Canterbury)

F. L. MOONEY (Wellington)



Get-Together

Buxton Defeated
In Disappointing
Bout With Turpin

(From Our Own Correspondent)
LONDON, Feb. 13

By GEORGE WHITING In his first fight since his sen-|

At last, after years of uneasy ‘ational, defeat at the hands of|
truce thinly veiled by polite lip- Sugar Ray Robinson last Septem- |
service, the controllers of amateur ber British middleweight cham-
and professional boxing in this pion Randolph Turpin beat Alex
together i uxton in an overweight match

affairs of oF ie eae ” at Harringay arena tonight. Bux-
This bright and m ton retired at the end of the
news comes to-day in a short, seventh round with a badly dam-

formal announcement by the “8&d eye.

ABA. It reeds: Before the evening’s boxing
. “At an informal meeting of began, the 10,000 spectators stood
the Amateur Boxing Association in silence in memory of a belov-
and the British Board of 2 King and fellow sportsman.
Control it was that Then as the arc lamps of the
resentatives of two bodies vast arena were dimmed until

the only light was from the two
spot lights and the red exit signs,
they joined in singing the ‘Na-
tional Anthem,

should meet from time to time to
ciscuss matters of mutual interest.’

This announcement drawn up
after the two groups had lunehed

together, is the culmination of As a token of memory for the
much excellent spade work by dead King veferees and seconds
the respective secretaries, Mr wore black arm bands over their

hite shirts.

Unfortunately the Turpin-Bux-
ton affair brought credit neither
to the two boxers concerned nor
to British boxing generally.

The prefight ballyhoo heralded
this as a “needle match’’—large-
ly on account of some indiscreet
remarks dropped by Buxton to
the effect that having finally
caught up with Turpin he intend-

J. O. McIntosh, of the ABA, and
Mr, E, J. Waltham,

They began it many months ago
when, at my invitation, they dis-
cussed the mutual recognition of
amateur-pro’ interests with me at
lunch,

Lance-corporal Basil Williams
(REME), Welsh international and
cane een tin champion, will

e the ABA | light-welterweight oq “to despatch him in double
against Ireland next month, He quick time. But it was not to be.
will box T. Milligan in Dub-

iin on February 8, and W. Reddy Both Were Warned

at Cork two days later. Of the fight itself little can be

_Williams comes into the ABA said. Hardly a single clean blow
side in place of the Repton light- was



4 landed. The referee had
welter, Reg Murray, who is in- cgontinually to warn both men
jured. against holding and the crowd

frequently broke into slow clap-
ping to demonstrate their disap-
pointment with the performance.
Turpin opened a cut over Bux-
ton’s left eye in the first round
and it grew steadily worse as the
fight progressed, In the seventh
round Turpin managed to break
uy, leose from the embracing clutch



Results Of Belleville
Tennis Tournament
THURSDAY’S RESULTS

Men’s Doubles (Semi-Finals)
‘iP, MeG, Patterson & G.

‘ i ¢ . .. aq of his opponent and dealt out
Be Woes bo “evens hs more punishment than he had
6—3._ se “ done all through the fight.

y Though he was unable to re-

E. P, Taylor & Dr. C, Manning
beat J. L. St. Hill and J, D, Trim-
ingham 6—3, 5—7, 9—7, 6—2. ek a Turnin’s .

. , , glorious spell, Turpin’s left hooks
in — Te as to the body showed all their old
. ° fire.
—'%z 15 beat Mrs, P, McG. Pat- On the whole however this was

terson & J, D. Robinson Scr, 6—4+ g most disappointing fight, It’s a
6—4. sad commentary on the perform-
There will be no tennis on Fri- ance of both boxers that the
day and no tournament on Sat- crowds whieh had given Turpin
urday, a terrific welcome back to the
MONDAY’S FIXTURES British ring greeted the final de-
Men’s Doubles (Finals) cision in almost complete silence.

P, McG, Patterson & G. H, Pompey Wins Again
Manning vs B, P. Taylor & C.G. Yolande Pompey, the Trinidad-
Manning. ian wonder man who recently
Mixed Doubles (Handicap) = gave a surprising but convincing
Mr. & Mrs, D. E. Worme vs Miss win over Australia’s Dave Sands
-M, King & J. D. Trimingham. Miss yepeated that performance te
E. Worme & M. Worme vs Mrs, night by defeating Dutch light

produce the form that made him
world champion for a brief but

A. S, Warren & V. M,. Roach, heavyweight champion Willie
Owing to the fact that Friday, Schagen. ;
February the 15th. 1952, has been The referee stopped the fight

cecla’ a National Day of half a minute before the end of
Mourning for the late King the tenth and final round to pre-
George the Sixth, there will be vent the Dutchman from receiv-
no Tennis, Tournament, or other- ing ae peeps: “

i Right from the outse’ ompey
nore See had difficulty in breaking through
Schagen’s superb defence. Most
of the punches—and it seemed he



WEATHER REPORT

never stopped throwing them—

YESTERDAY landed harmlessly on the Dutch-
Rainfall from Codrington: man’s arms and shoulders. But
nil gradually the West Indian’s ag-
Total rainfall for month to gressive tactics wore down his
date: .07 inch opponent and it was sheer guts

and fighting spirit that prevented
the Dutch champion going down
in the final stage of the fight.

Highest Temperature:
84.

Lowest Temperature;
71.0 °F.
Wind Velocity 12 miles per
i

5 °F



hour
Barometer (9 a.m.) 29.993
(3 p.m.) 29.909
TO-DAY
Sunrise: 6.15 a.m.
Sunset: 6.07 p.m.
Moon: Full February 10,

WHAT'S ON TODAY

Memorial Service for King
George VI at St. Michael's
Oathedral 11.00 a.m.

Court of Appeal 1.00 p.m.



Lighting 6.30 p.m. Police and Petty Debts
High Tide: 641 a.m., 6.56 Courts 1,00 p.m.

p.m, Mobile Cinema show at
Lew Tide: Warner's Plantation Yard,

12.18 a.m. 12.49 p.m. Christ Church 7.30 pan.







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PAGE 1

PACK FOIK ll\KII.\l><)S ADVOCATE FRIDAY. FKBRl'ARY 13, IK2 BARBADOS AmfcGlTF ~ %  f — -i rrtal4 • *W A***-*** Oft. LM InM S. awt***-*-**. Friday. Felruar> 15. 19S2 istokes We'll Most %  egret Y I960 l\ >ll AIOHI \ .1 TODAY will always be remembered with sorrow as UM day "I King George V'I's funeral. Barbados will remember His late Majesty by a Iwo minute's silence island-wide at 11 a.m. and by a memorial -.MI., in St Michael's Cathedral. The ten days which have passed between His late Majesty's death and his funeral have been memorable days in the lives of the people now living in the second half of this twentieth century. These days the whole world has iieaid in many tongues and read in many languages the remarkable news of the sorrow and bereavement that the whole Commonwealth and Empire feels because a King has died. The existence of monarchy as an institution, seemingly anachronistic in an age of equality and of the brotherhood of man proves the impossibility of theorising about men and women as if they wen' nothing but statistics or units of this or that Great Britain party-divided as it i in iU allegiance to one or other uf the two great political bodies ui the country is unitca and unanimous in the genuine love and affection that the people show and feel for their sovereign. The Dominions of the British Commonwealth all of which protested ui their formative years against subordination to the British Parliament and Crown today, despite then being free and autonomous communities, look to the British Crown as the magic link which binds the Queen's realms together. In all the ancient and loyal British colonies of which Barbados is the most shining example people of different races and with several loyalties find in their sovereign a common factor of unity. fc fc How can this loyalty, this ailection, this love of monarchy be explained in an era oi tne common man? There was nothing common about King George VI. He stood head and shouiaers above the common man: a giant of a man: a world figure whose untimely demise has released for a bnel period a gleam of the vision of what man might become u" his life were modelled on I such as the Kuig at whose funeral the i whole world gncves today. II men were indeed equal: if only opportunity was necessary to reveal hidden talents: if there were no diversity of talents: yet man would surpass man in qualities of physical and spiritual courage. The memory that the most humble of mankind will retain of this heroic King is the memory of his great personal courage. King George VI succeeded to the throne not in the normal line of succession at a time when the prestige of monarchy had suffered because of abdication. The sinning example o| his lile, Ins happy lumily life, ins untiring devotion to uuiy, ms personification of all the qualities thai nave lor centuries been associated with a Cnrisuan gentleman nave raiseu the prestige ol the British Crown to a peak that no one would have behoved possible 15 years ago. The British monarchy it has been said during these past ten sorrowful days had become fused with democracy. It is not too easy to define exactly what is meant by this expression since the idea of fusion between monarchy and democracy cannot be comprehended by finite minds. Yet it is permissible to suggest that what the expression tends to convey is the fact that monarchy can exist side by side with democracy and be complementary and not repugnant to itSuch seems to be the achievement of the British monarchy In no country of the world can democracy be said to have reached further stages of development than in the United States: yet would anyone suggest that the British way of life under constitutional monarchy is one whit less democratic? And could anyone be found anywhere to say that British monarchy with its tradition, its ceremonials, its pageantry, its mediaeval ancestry is republican? British monarchy exists today to remind the people who live in the 20th century that men and women are not merely units of population responding t "aws propounded by men and women like themselves. Besides their visible bodies the souls of millions of human beings refuse to conform to speculations and forecasts of those who prophesied that monarchy would decrease in popularity as men and women became more rational and free from emotion. Sorrow and bereavement for the King lias not been felt alone by the simple and lowly ones of the earth, though these in their millions have shared the general grief. Those whom their fellowmen and women would term wise above their generation have not escaped its weight. Libel I Ity of opportunity, the brotherhood of man seem to flourish as brilliantly in the realms Of the great Queen proclaimed a week ago last Friday to reign over us and over the rest of her realm and territories, as in nny other democratic Commonwealth where there Is no monarch. right T To. U--PT, ah assets th* dangrrt that infl(/ •• %  ejiiHi* diTifto'ia H'iMin i' d' 1 II on !*• brisk "1 taking in loritian affai*' EVER ri M-hcd hi* first attack* on the West after the and men recruited ii> It %  icratood the reasons for '.' i-Ued to ate and other refror.t In Germans tho*e tame elixirtcrs quite freshof hit interment* whose ambUii and ruthstows with Dr asossadea; He dele-mess have twin :-ifet only sl*nc* Andithen M added for there is "spotty" localised unemployment Is hut the restoration publication—"Mr advice to the ..-„„„, Havr we learned I the froi-fiers Hitler British Ambassador is that Britain (affecting about 1,.00 000 people) in various time errors* Or are wc making won at Munuh m JH3K should sweeten the doctor with .uirt of !rw rnnntrv the same mistakes aaln As their strength grows these some concessions. Let him have l IT In CO UnU '' „ . In my view, we are making thr Oei-BMfki will seek to blackmail some of the withheld royalties The Worst places are in New England, New same mist.ik.-. And for the same the Americans, the French, and That will make him friendlier." York Pitv— MOOOn— th*. minine u-.linn nf general reasons. Theseare.— ourselves Into support of their Needless to say. such advice was| ^ork City—^UO.WO—the mining section Ol (a) AMERICAN suspicion of cause. muskin the ear of Mossadeg. For East Pennsylvania, and Detroit, the car city. British Imperialism The same old But you may be lure that if ever u suggested to him that he would An d n**nnlp ar rininu inst what wa* asassa fear of "spending American lives it. should suit their l-iok—or the he able to count on American sup' Uia P^P 1 at a "' n K Just what was UOIie and American dollars to pull Britmen in power should think it does port against Britain n the depression of the '30s to meet emcrlsh chestnuts out of the fire" is at —the Germans will sell out the In his view Truman's new flft West without a qualm i, bound to confirm this. M (assuming that no war breaks nut in the meantime) reApart from that it is disastrous S(L.m wtU ETC bacoau because.keepers are offering books of coupons good ft the West. tf) IT rewards and encourage*! for 25 dollars for as little as two dollars and And— just to keep us all feeling robbery and contract breaking. lei me add rearmed tb) IT permits Mossadsg to go !" cents, on s'allmg, prolongs a situation _. which is bound to lead to the There arc sharply contrasting situations of triumph of Communism in Persia |. ((om anc i DUsti depending cm whether trade tc) IT demonstrates to the . *^ ... whole of the East a weakness and | U geared to military or civilian economy. lack of solidarity In the AngloConnecticut, its metal industries in high Aiirasrtosa alatsssp ,, , (df IT causes Asiatic* to look t.ear because of the arms rush, cannot rind to ihe Soviet Ummas the onl> onoUR h men for the jobs. strong and dctciriincd Power I" „ „. „ . II i um I But next door Rhode Island has 35.000 unFlrst results are already making I employed out of 791,000 people. jas '*H %  -Foodnote: The first soup kitchen since the 1. FROM IbnSaud to the Sheikh , i\ i. t^ ( Kuwait, Arab rulers in the ne.irr-ssion has opened in uetroit. It is not for Middle East are repudiating re-' unemployed factory workers, but to help ently coiu-ludi'd pit contracts with American sad British companies .HHI .ire making fresh demands. 2. ARAB LEAGUE countries art deliberately opening their market'.o imports from the Soviet Union irtd lion Curtain Slates, in Iraq. fur instance, world firms like Philips and Phllco are being boycotted on the ground that the) have factories PAPER SERVIETTES In Plain White SI.OH p.-r li.ni.lrr.l ADVOCATE STATIONERY Broad Street A Greystone, Hastings work again toda> During the wur It tjused Americana to susj'iect Churchill for a Mediterram an Nsr4 Germany'! Balkai. belly. Today It inspires A Bssn of bet i b %  Ived In our Persian qu (bl THE TENDENCY of the Western plannen I blindlv to smash the immediate Assssjar ooly to find that In doing so they have created as* I merit Of Germany. eencies. Thus, in Fall River, Massachusetts, shop|POCKET CARTOON uMIIKi LANCASTER 1. ARMS FOR THK <;KRMANS Nothing. I fear, will now from becoming an accomplished fact. The Atlanii I | at Usbnn in u fortnight'' frerythlni i k sst t" T |l to IwriU Germany to i-ontiibute a West i tut to the West European D POfO In Gen'!. %  ind it nerals have been working out the details—even to the point thnt the gooae—ni' -i otstj On the fact of it the < 11 a German Army certainly seems one logical w.i. to meet Europe's rdorUgy of soldiers and redress the h ilnnre o' ; elimination of Germany In IMA But I believe th.it tins is a move I rid haik 00 wild egret faff 1 !••' The fighting ii ci uiti .1 .Fliefrr* I Mr ,i. %  • i.',* rhoMgh 1 ihull ihortly he to raise tMlh *** %  > < rather SsSttoSM queiflon r'liiimf.irit tu-T'Onnfl &verrf*' i W lT.i.1 fighting value of a German Army recruited in the moral feasts of Germany as It is today will be much lower than that of German armies in the two world j apt %  '.ui'' ' IIQ liability rather than an asset. j^.,,, •WitheutUs' :h of my recent visits in srU) I have sounded out l>oth is young Germani and ex-soldlcrs on how they feel sl-.ut joining up In 2. IH1LLARS FOR THE OIL n Eiinnx'iin defence force "Ohnr uns." they said. "Without refugees from Europe until they find jobs. GOOD SALESMAN' OIL is poured on troubled waters by the New York Times as it comments editorially n Churchill's parliamentary explanation of what he agreed to in Washington. "He gave a assembly plantK(tod demonstration of how to say the same thing in two different ways. Like a good ATOMS FOR THE .desman with different customers, he dis(iOVERNMENT | played his wares to their best advantage, first n Washington and then in London." RAISE YOUR GLASSES EDDIE CANTOR, celebrating his 60th f the Minisbirthday this week, signs a lifetime contract mporting firm Says the firm. hlunder No. 3 on my list Is trw decision of the British Socialist Government to confine atomic research In this country to the Whitehall scientists taiay easily become another. i, v of Supply and to ban Britain'* wjlh „ wmp dangeroui continued Amerhie inrluntrial firms from anv psr,ne uspicion „r British motives udpattoo possibly a shade pompously. "The entertainer is demonstrated b> my Unless Mr. Churchill's Govern— >..—. *"_ . Id i rot i iiunderthat mem reverses this decision soon >'l spearhead our company s advertising and lake us bluvh m *.60. This a nd -lesDlte pressure from Lord | promotional plains." Manv happv returns of Chcrwell. It has not done so yet : ., (nAB -h an( | ejj (o w nd the whole British Com-' ,hc spearhead, Eddie monwenlth will look back on this as a catasthrophic error capable of affecting generations of Britons In _ their Htnndard of living lent munan'a Ill-WtVlSSd | n the United States atomic reid hates the Russians. But he ded< |rut a 23.000,000Marc h and atomic production are iles and despises our political dollar (1.8.211.285) subsidy to m the hands of private firms. Big i>ltch to remilitarisation from the Persian oil thief Mossadeg. flrm „ ^pj, M rvg p onti General -education law which made The subsidy lu. been granted Electric, and Union Carbide have On GKAHHEKS p built vast atomic plaats. criminals and outlaws of all Oerbecause American diplomats man prnfesslnnnl officers and pr rted that Persia was about to go N C-O.s bankiui'i toi IScg uf the revenues Th Qermsri dreed la that in i use.) t., dnm from lbs nrttish v tksj '>vcnt of win Went Germany nil ron>pnnv If it did *. they |Wnr |ent of an GLITTER-STREET NEW YORK'S Justice James McNally wound up and "said a mouthful." as he orderI ed an insurance company to pay a pretty girl 2.500 dollars (£890) for a mink co„t and diamond ring that were stolen. Said the justice, stimmarisinR: "Now boy wants nir\, and Kirl i, oseonu the Mrttlaislri, new warned II a/nuM it ihssamstin Kuiva to be "MoiRenthimeil"* ing G Comn.ir. tn non-existence us mmies at 111 I |sjd lo keep the erators from East and West suewo |f from the uld robb. I cesslvely roll Of** H Tn is a disastrous plan Hlackmail And %  most disappointing ona If Stallii permits the cie ,iion ..( ItM li prOVSS lhal aiUiough the v 1B1 H n a hehind %  new German Army to K" unBUta Department has wisely re.?,„„„,„,.„ ^ .'hallenacd then even the most called Its unwise ambassadt the rftieers Henry Orady ltom Tshsren, It hi Atomic power plants which. led and set working, can i wants diamonds, jewellery, furs and motorntlntir to provide energy indel.lles Will f.iel ... the not distant future sol' iiMiiintion problems of the world's under-developed areas Russia Is most certainly working on this project. In Anurlea I] b ise already made vast advances Only in Britain are we advocated tuintnc t Ol II III AIMUS SAs CHM / itm To the Editor, /'inAdvoosls Sin. Kotstraig to > I nrs. and consequently larceny, emrxvzlcthe i Tient, forgery and romance walk hand-ml iand along Fifty-flrst-street." TRUMAN SAYS NO CiOVERNOR Sherman Adams, of New Hampshire, where the first of those palpitating primary elections takes place on March M. likes General Eisenhower. He says in a broadcast: "The hope for the Kepublican Party with Dwight Eisenhower is bright and buoyant.' President Truman withdrew his name from but said this did not than unburnl csoai RM res on -f dress. I do not propose to add la obvious, becau i to ttis list except in a general way the primary recently li„ve to spend a\ much time Sand to suggest lo them a means of , "' ,'m. .1,^1, u ,'.' "' "'•" '""• %  •• %  •• lor m.'i ""X "'„ ,. I A pnmary shows the man that each party art jncg%^i^t&WJ!mSw0tamumwMuJr r.t.i ol UI it u WUl that 111 i '" 1 jf*y,-„?gH* J*. !" .r!?,,;! Unllnl Sl.lr. Mperlalljr. and m-. maiur haa been broughl lo IU y ,erc ,""i"* ^T" "."Tf". " !" ", Bnd Ihcm stopping car, and arta.lenuu,, i U-Mbl I. con|?.^2r-^ K**SS:..? H '"I eerrjg the sug.ir iiuiutiv on vrn onomy do|tends. ihete ars %  ara i serve comment Plftt ,.i ..II it U %  rssopM It Is inevitable that a number <>f cane Urea should the causes being < obJl£en playing with .mil even tinbuck-BrlBg of lor|SSS when In the in I fires bevormiriou however, whan thsjy its rsM louiruiied in (lie eailv slane-. ail,| .lie allow, i |0 bum large iicreuges ol CSfS In nhar to prevent thia It li . thai ins Bra hi fought u soon as poMible after il bai •i uled It Is iintfesifd that d>i K .vwhat are Ihe point*of ggested that there should % %  ,.,..,, u „. y lfllll( vltlt a greaterdifference between tbo -, WO uld be good if these taxi price for cutting burnt canci and drivers could Und themselves well canes that have not been burnt, informed so as to be able to sugYour suggestion that this shouii gest to strangers places of Intermatrhel' * ln ^le vicinity uf 20 cants, est. historical and otherwise, which could be {Mild m to tlM where they could visit and take labour Housing Fund, Is a go-nl pictures so as to have mementos one and should meet with fh* appro*, il nf tlu' Labour Leaden; It Is felt that Planters would i IM.IIU ..!<. %  :i. tinYou mention that because facf agjilalnf fortes Insl-t on having canes delivered free from trash that thi* tends to make labourers regaid Ores as leaser evils than they of their visit to Barbados. ,\ %  mi .! % %  one leave* Ihe Raj* gage Warehouse and crosses thi Chamberlain Bridge there is the Hull*, where stained ,ld be effectively dime by the ^^ ^ b ( „' kmiun thai igtclien mi their plantation sfherebs I %  labourers could be i I at a Used salary, say $2.00 %  week exir with the uiulerstandiug thai %  tire occurred on thsii psUtailon thej wo r 1 %  N tO help t,. DU1 il 0U Tbi'. ot uMir'i'. would not Intorrers wUh thenreg^itgu 1, estimaleil th.,t if tinmen are employed it will cost the -tantalum aroijnd SlOOOO a crop. li tl found difficult to gl wora> rrto take this Job on fa .i whole crop. It may lie th;it a > %  (era "f ralatloa ooald bi Another way to help the prevention of rune fires Is to instruct InlHiurers as to the losses llvit then* tires involve. These are ;.s follows— 1 I.oa* of trash and grass whirs) are essential for to-day's. inethi-d of culQval factories have also refused %  isurM beeatj i t'nn.i-li had not bei'ii i removed. It Is hoped lh.it tli. gestions will lie brought to the iltenllun of Ihosa i ham it in their power i<. put them nnd in it rf-.E-t ,li bs it with tins Important matter of ths v of cane tui Dland. Your*, falthfulrr. FIHE WATCH FT' 1 town 12th February. I9U Klass windows and painting! v..il some of the history of the figures who made public life in H.irl'.idos what It Is today. There is Harrison College, one of the outstanding public schools in the Colonial Empire, there is thiccn'*. Park where the late King George VI planted a tree, there Is Graves F.ndwith its cemetery where King i H VI took part in a ceremony heii he visited Barbados, along i route there is the old Military Hospital when the old B.W.I. Regiment was stationed in Barbados before leaving for Jamaica, and further on still there Is quaint Oistln's Town founded CAVIAR FOR ONE" "GONE TO LUNCH", said the neat little notice at the window of a Brooklyn bank teller. Martin Olsen. But the lunch interval stretched on and on. and when the bosses >tarted checking up they found that 37-yearM Martin had apparently thought his lunch would cost $38,224 and 6 cents (£13,651 4s 1 Id.). In any case, that was the amount missillg from the funds. ToniRht an alarm is out for Martin. THE GAY DIVORCE HY GARDNER. New York Herald-Tribune columnist visiting Hollywood, reports that MrBas fllmster couples "are so happy when they decide to break up that they practically elopo to get divorced." FLYNN FUN AND in Hollywood impish F.rrol (Burma Conquerer) Flynn is creating havoc with a loud-speaker installed in his car. through which he bellows the names of his friends as the quaint uistins town lounaeai, ... bv a swashbuckler gentleman and he whisks past their front doors. By the time X,,'",,V^iST. 1 SSJ23S l h ,artIod fricnds h v """'• "y" h family seem to enter early tormen* laded. THE HUMAN On the West side there is Ihiink* Freshwater Bay (aback of thr SIR.—I have been asked bv the Paradise Club) with the only fresh Committee lo th.mk Ithoss "ersons water srjrlngs coming up in the VtoMbseribedtoots fund to help •*•• *•" % %  ""I'town more hlsKr. Road anjjrtaai than nus u*i. pii^. be. I Kir i 8 need onJv fl few Sflbre scars and a stifl .r*.**,, % %  -..... inland landed there and where neck to be a stand-in for Erich von Stroheim i .'!. V '! *_V there II still a monument with the TOUCH CRITICISING the new "Airedale" hair-dc for girls which consists of virtually shaving histhe scalp, columnist Robert Ruark says the '.i ii t The tut a I SM.I-'. The %  %  %  i %  iw-*"' in"-' 5 '-o-M^ti^KSr&iM ,. nds s2o,, : Mr M Jones ,„— „ Soeietitstown (Uttle 3 I^s of Sug,r output If can,, r*o B^ol. whenTSe bulk of ship! ...d ground imThr S23.12 was divided bet*... pU, ( ,iie came in; and off t lull persons and w% arc still int,act U St Nicholas Abbey and 4. The growth rrf young gsnea l debtor! foi gi cede* to the extoot Fnrlev Mill House, monument* to retarded, and this affectn (1 f gtSOn We Sla* say thanks % k jAfV-0'r hi lecture There Is the foqosrlAf year's cfop •; >. Baflfpson groce-Animal Flower Cave with Its sea AH theie factors ten.I hope that a anemonles (animal flowerti which dues the Sugar Output of the Infew Ddi will we at defy capture). dmtrv and this directly sjflseti lo help are not —Mr. C I) Oitteus of Cullodc-Mrous of going out of the City. den Road, who is asked to there are several places wblch take delivery an soon as posthey could visit with benefit to themselves One place where none 17 1.52 f them ever Ihink of carrying Taxi tMn-r* \ml Ptacn vlsltora and which would provide 1 ,., , more history than all th. "/ inlrryitl an j that lS ihe Museum. There ii'ocote could be great Impri vi* been this direction made against the local taxi driver* Your*, of the of the Industry ba i hat Bentsi One paniRraph i r.-sent Id a ton is deducted from the price paid bv for burnt Cine*. TVhi not so. The fad ithat the planter pay* the labc er 2 cents per lot ttnif burnt cane-. It I* wreD kn m that worker" ran reap larger I nagei of burnt canes not up in his aunt's old clothes. SNEAK A "SNEAK FLOOD" from the Ohio River drove 2.000 people at Empire, Ohio, from their homes and drowned four. Dinner was left uneaten on scores of tables, so rapid was ihe rush of water. THE war against race intolerance noes for• ward. Recently a meeting of the New York County Medical Society considered a resolution condemning the segregation of Negro! doctors into "a few hospitals." and urging all < hospitals to throw open staff appointments to Negroes. WANTED THE Q MEN have put German-born Ger-1 ement"*n | h3r( Pt'ff on their ten-most-wanted-men list. | ) Gerry is wanted for a series of daring bank %  Pitch Pine White Pine Fir PORTLAND CEMENT C. S. PITCHER & CO. Ph. 4413 JVST HECMVED The "DALE" MEASURING TAP IT POURS A DRINK. STOPS AND POURS AGAIN Inilis/ivmiuhlf in Ihf BAR iv 11.1 It DA COSTA & CO., LTD. BROAD STREET DIAL 4689 Da Costa & Co.. Ltd. BARBADIAN. %  hold-ups. No powder puff, he. COCKTAIL pasj in.i.H.nii 11 i-omr.Mi.s COCKTAIL ONIONS—Red. White, Yellow. Green. Red CHEESE. KRAFT CHEESE. ANCHOVIES. PEANUT BUTTER. CHEESE BISCUITS. OLIVES Green. OLIVES Black. GOLD BRAID RUM. SANDWICH BREAD Ja$t arrived from France DUBONNETT. LIEBFRAUMILCH STILII.IEBFRAL'MILCH SPARKLING. BEHNCASTLE WHITE. VIELl.E CURE OTHER tiLWMOAMS CABBAGE 30c per lb., CARROTS 2tc. per lb BEET ROOT 24c per lb. EMBASSY CIGARETTES In tins iff S5c — 48c each. 1)1' MAURIER 20s 41c. each. DU MAURIER MJs. $1.04 each. 2-lb tin HAMS $430 each PHONE G0DDARDS WE DELIVER S P E c I A L S



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FRIDAY. FF.RRI-ARY 13. 1952 BARBADOS ADVOCATE PACE SEVEN HFNRV BY CARL ANDERSON fLINT Of THE FLYING SQUAD BY ALAN STRANKS ft GEORGE DAVIFS FLASH GORDON BY DAN BARRY Mtf CUT C* it •*<"• >Ov **.ML* WO*T %  .* _S -l* f 1*6 HOW' HCW CAI fi *AEH *-*•>* U4 THAT PtfaO.* van..; I -eAoeo *oa: * owtcefo >cu P "UtHS V TT£ £ CM TI LEVEL.'. H-TYS**-. AM MAIM SKTtM TO / oe *rro A *>C A.fiT t-1 \ KOAiTWT -f*'*'c TQ...1 AiA*0 TO I PM„. -t KVLO *•; %  A mCl ** •£* %  „*>*Tf * %  *XAftf ONI -'"f*^ %  TOO"'-. E JOHNNY HA2A; CY FRANK ROBBINS We can', caich up with it! The call for Black & While continues to grow all over the world, tor connoisseurs agree th* 1 %  it a Scotch in %  class all its own. Blended in the spcvul %  Hl.wk A White" way it a a splendid drink at all limes and for all occasion*. BLACKs WHITE SCOTCH WHISKY O/le Sectcfii in t/if Blatt/ituj WMlb W-. DWIIM /AMES IUCHANAN 4 CO. LTD.. GLASGOW. SCOTLAND •* VKAJtS A FAVOt-'RITE S. & S. RUM Htsrauar r lu MELLOW FLAVOUR AM) COOL DRINK lllendrd iad BW STUART & SAMPSON (MM) LTD. W-..Z. HURRY! HURRY! AND SELECT THESE NOW i-h> *-r Tin* Morton* Oatmeal Tin" I'orned Mutton Tin-. Hrrakfwt Roll Tin* I .nub 1'OIIIIH* Tin* Vral Loaf ImprrUI Vienna Sanaa* !" ) I*> %  • 1Small BM II unh.ri.-r Steak I .rtaUn* In Pack* Tin* Fruit Cocktail Tina Krult Salad INCE & CA). %  a i. .omi < K ST IT PAYS YOU TO DEAL HERE SPECIAL offers to all Cash and Credit Customers for Thursday to Saturday only M'M'I.%1. OH-'KIW arc mm aijiilalilr "I " % %  •" llrnnrtarM I << -il%il S|M ii4lllsl>> ii and Sunn Sln-i-l Usually Now Uni.ll> NOW Boneless Beef (per lb) .58 ..S Pkgs. H. & P. Assorted Pkgs. Rice (2 lbs) .60 S4 Cream Biscuits .56 .SO Split Peas (per lb) .15 M Bottles Heineken's Tins Lobster .74 . Beer .28 M D. V. SCOTT & Co. Ltd. Broad Street i II i o i o \ \ \ i i i. it < < i: II i i s ',;;*,*,',',*,',;;', %  \ Vsi Allltl AI.I: A ItOOK Milt mi w UUIII :n AMI AIMII I Ml IH .IVHIIilLII if KI vvi in Hiikiii r.H.r.v Thw book ha* been wrtttatl f tnoM who are about to marry and who ilnd thai they arin IMIMI of inform.iti tha wbjad Ita aim m to provide the iiwem-i: knowledge and the practical guidance which will Iwlp a .-..uplc 10 build a %  uecaaafUl marrlag* and IVOtd the pitlall, whirh lead n..rUnirm court • %  %  i Druitrawfl ud unhappy %  I WUWF. HAVF. IT AT THF. '\i>oi VII si t MOM in Grrv.l.i Haslingi %  ^..^.^^•.%  •.•.••--'••-' %  '•' %  •-' %  '•'•'•••••'•••••'•' %  '••-'•''"'' '-• %  '•--••'-'-'% % % % % % % % %  % % %  % % % %  -.•.-.%  -•---.•.-.•.•---•.••• %  •.•.• %  -.--• %  -• % %  • %  •--.-.%  %  -.%  -.%  •.-.•,•.-.%  -.-. ENJOY FINE FOODS DAILY CHOICE w..\|s Slu ill Hum ~rr it nr Whoh lin^ Salisblirv I i.ruril Million „ Rrimlv ll'iii-l BITI S.i 11 Hill |HT lb. nin Slabi III I SI N Kmcii rrnci'.x <'hrw I2-01. Ilnr. Nan /ciluinl i i>. (id.. i •... per lb. I iiiiiidiuti Chrddiir ( hri-w per lb. ALLEYNE ARTHUR & CO., LTD. soi it .HOII:IIS mi. II STIII:I %  DEMERARA RICE in 2\ lb. pkgs. I III M ill IM.S Tin* %  -... i Cocktail in l' A Zt'> St r IU Ipcrni in l's & 2's CwltltM in 2'a i'i I.. in l's & 2ft's Apricot* In !' %  & 2\\ Pears in l's 4c ::U. VAwuKwnm Pkaa. rumpiu-r> %  LMIMI Havourtsd) Irlna Suiai .. RrtaaJ M.K Sucar trialn) .. Tale Ll> C"ub* Suar ,. T*V I > I.Caatnr Surr Tin* Tomato l*aat* tin si in i TIIFSI; Sail llrrrinits I 111. kill-Is



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PACE TWO n\RB.\nos AnvoriTE FRIDAY, FEBRUARY 15. 1S52 Cahib Calling BLACKH IS LORDSHIP Sir Allan Coin-more. Chief Justice of Barbados m due lo leave_lo-day for British Guiana i>> BWA i land a sitting of the Seat IMM Court of Appeal in UiM He is expected to fl approximately on I V Back to Antfgua M RS KENNETH BI'HNE. a ,fo of ih, or of the Leeward Islands K nied by her friend Mrs irgaret C. Ilbdgson returned lo Antisua yesterday morning by B.WI.A. after spending twelve days holiday In Barbados. Coming C APT JACK ALLFREY R N and Mrs. Allfrey who arrived from England via Trinidad a few days ago left yesterday by BG Airways for DomluU-.. to spend about two week* holiday. During tneir short Slav here lhe% were the guesu of Squadr<>i Leader David Henderson. Covert men! Airport Manager and Mr* HSMl rtOB Mr All'i.-, tod Mi Henderson arc cousins This is Mrs. Allfrey'i first visit to hei homeland for 20 years. During Ihe war Capt Allfrr-v was on the staff of Admiral Frasei fa Route to Belgium M R. AL NYREN, former American Viee Consul here and Mrs Nyren left yesterday morninv for Puerto Rlro by BVV.IA en route to the US where they will spend a short holiday with their famiuss before leaving f.pr Bel*yn whore Mr Nyren has been appointed a* Second Secretary at the Amerlran Embassy in Brussels Thay wore accompanied by Iheir four i hlliln ii Mr. Nyren who was appointed to Barbados In May 1049 arrived here In August the same rear. Born in Boston, Massachusettet, November 29. 1919 he wag a grid uate of Rosllndale High and took his B.S ii !: %  .-• %  ,n c lege. 1941. lie served overseas In tl:. U S Army as 1st Lt., from 1941 to 1945. Mr. Nyren entered the US Foreign Service on July 28. 1940 and has served as Vice Consul at La Par. Bolivia and at Beli/i prior to coming to Barbados Mr Nyren has been succeeded by Mr Philip Ernst. American Consul rived ln'i-.Januan II, accoiT panied Ly his wif, ten Lord Rowallan Geti Around ORD ROWALLAN. Chief Scout a-* of the Empire and Commonwealth attended a Seoul CommisI inference at Uv Commissioner's home at 2 30 BUM %  >n Wednesday Present I r. (infflih. Island Con.r Mi C R C Springer. Coc M for Training. Col Campbell, Commissioner for the Midland area. Mr L T Gay, Act''"> Rirts. which follow tho ing Commissioner for the Northern cneral Parts trend of one inch Area, Mr. C D. Spencer, Acting longer. Commissioner Southern Area, Rev A second suit line is n I. C Mallalicu. Oocnmissionei with set-in Joacph, Mr R S. Jordan. ComSkirt* either very slim t mlKloner St. John, Mr A G Jortlurc.l and nipped waist dan, Commiasloner St George. Mr DRESSES ln Chiffon (era*,, Waithe, Commissioner St. b.mtung and sheer organdie show Corbm Commisi oth the slim and bell skirt, and lieigiitened by draped SWALLOW TAILS His Skirts Havu An Extra Inch ma nuiN Atcaorr PAEIS &•'* Lnwai I .IMKii. .„,tn* "•-• bv r. change ~^TT" introduced by Jacques F..th. They -thirds in length, egg •a) ui on ih* \M %  "il coat with a low belt. RSS] tweeds, PahuV irosiraia, they are worn with iini i.'\inni>mM,R\\nn: I M T>* N SPEC /. t r mm Tic E : As a ourk of r—aac t U His Majsetr. ta* Utt King Oaorga VI there will be no shows at 2 M and 4 46 p in at IK* Plaaa Clnuaaa lo-dav Fri 15tto (Ol-Uu aad Bridgetown). However, there Will be two evening perforawacos at 6 00 and I 45 . %  I'.Hjr.mma 4-IIH on % %  %  -...-v. .slightly Peter, Mr. G. sioncr St. Lucy. Rev. A 1. Johnson. Commissioner Christ Church. Capt R. A. Scaly. ^Commissioner St Michael—South and the Hon Sv1> 91 Uw Asset UBtlCH MI U |g After ihe eon/eronco Ihaj had tea with the Island Comi Lord Rowallan Ihtn gfi St. James for u meeting of the kN il A oi i..-i..i. oil 'I.. R rtkn %  tl jersey Judo belts %  are either VST) tfnftjj %  tho elbow. Hilly Bunler collars fo; muiattoni oi tin shoe ... KVENfNO URINES arc 10m Mr. and Mn> Al V Nyren and f %  tally left yesterday for the U.8. via Puerto Rlro by BWI.A Left lo right. Johnny. Patricia. MrNyien with SIi.il* and Mr. Nyren with Claire Mr. Nyren who waa formerly American Vice Consul hare haa raeantly been appointed as Second SecrUry at the American Embassy in BrtisaelsBefore leaving for Belgium they will upend a diort holiday with their famlliein the U.S. Returning Monday Gulf Officer Gramophone Concert T"5 'cSKii /COMMANDER NORMAN HOIA RRIV1NG from Venezuela yes„P^ 1 V> BROOK. V.C, R.N., (RetlrA terda> by Special Flight were •d] aW*J i" Si Vinrenl yesterday Mr Wllllnm Whlleford, an officer DO g four-day VtaU Commander >f the tiulf Oil Corporation and Holbrook *as a Submarine ComMix Wliilcford Thev were met al mander during the first world war. Seawol] bv Dr W F Auer, ManA regular visitor to Barbados he auer of the Barbados Gulf Oil Co., arrived here in mid -December last Ltd. vear with bl Mr. and Mrs Whitcford who are guest', at IbS < 'lunv Club, St With T.L.L. James arc due to return to Venezuela to-day. M R. and Mrs John Dalglicsh President of the Gulf OH Corpn. and child are al present holiwho originally planned to aeco a-ymg in Barbados staying with pany them over changed his pli Mrs. Dalglicsh* mother Mrs. L. al the last moment and has King of Navy Gardens. turned lo the U.S. Area at St. James • School and at 630 o'clock the same Steaming aatln with lavlsfl evenlng he attended a meetinK %  • V Wrlst-lenglh Ihe Bethel Troop. Bay Street. •* GLOVES match the To-morrow evening Lord Rowgowns. all.,n will attend a camp fire at o\KKng, Garbo M yn Mohdny iv% and Dickens coachman R ALEX lilt ATT. .. revuhv shapes are equally hard t. visilor to Barbados is holiThere are also flat wavy shovel daylng at the Hotel Royal. Alex is hats, shading the avoo, trimmod i accountant with a coastruction with Isrsfe) roaes. Mr*; • % % %  • %  "iv n, ( ; were Ihe big Sal Cfl Talking Point M heels, worn straight on Man has his will, but wiman has r-.ead wllh coarse mesh veils. ier wan --Oliver Wendell Holmes I W\ tin j., nboras Fund. It i>X[tected that Lor.l Rowallan *lll r: ml fron> Mr. E. E. Hacketi on rdnesday, 20th February at the Council's headquarters •'WakefleW.'' White Park. Tho programme which begins at B. 15 p.m Is as follows:— Trumpet Mi. UalgUesh who i on long leave is with Trinidad Leasehold' HULL, 1 Leaving To-day D For Carnival \I"K to leave to-dav to spei Carnival in Trinidad Is h Evan Foster who. has b dayint; hST* Sines Christmas. Mi ORD WIIAKTON who has been K^bSrcy "rUS !" **? BeUont - holidaying here since Janun 0i ,d. lives in Britain VoluntaryPurccll Chanson de '">' 27,n '" '""I'^'^l '<• l* Vf 'where he works at "Rooshall" Matin Elgar. Sereni.de for Tenor, day by B.W I.A. f..i T.u.iil. 1 .i i.n-1 e ,,,,„ BsrfaiM Horn and Strings Britten. Fin" '""owing day he will fly lo Hc ,„ ,,„ u. n g |SS landia—Silx-lius. Symphony No. S i.im.iu'ii m IgUMM IWeilioveii !-". an have to l>r curried across bv f*.""""h .mull-game warden, m stiff* • M'"^he waa pe.ikl hats. | notice that fOUl '" ..on-rt Koolawans on the Windsor road had to ,uk £ be threatened by bulldozers. But >J that is an uneconomical way of HAVE been informed that m> account of the commer(.il travaUef Who booked an order ih i.f ISTfa gives an *-ntlrely erronimprwalon of the way these *„^ Ihmsa are done. Nevertheless. I "' -Oiruj to IOV idea of a young man !" i rVl...,.J tl '' 1 fi'vell-r who t.-*c lastlnsj nu fool I i door, while i ^u^l;r^ woman tries to shut It M-n^DUg-PW* Sa'ffiSj I the WS) IVS brought you IhSl lut of Ti'ed Koolruk wrote it down for me" she ha I In. f.n ilil.-t 111-, u.,1' t.cvtl l,-:-t i see the triun-pii In bier Vsrj %  i ill) ihe said. %  Oh Ihsnkl Tho paper changed hands. So eatoridly hud Eoham • !!III.I t run-, and letters that she %  Bapseted nothing She rseognaSed ITjaStnik*! S Itinf "Ami DSW .1 ii %  r il] gratitude" said the tiresome en' or hand from his N urtler \ ki-' ssid she "i* %o-n over • \ doubt It," said Egham to himself. HrMSM iiirrvx/HnnlriiriDear Sir. / fcggp on uTirii;u. Buf |,oiir ditcaurteiv Leads me [,> ihinlc I bar,' ym*. Y '" luchien m dustbins, behind HI hangars and the ground. The "pUol ot UM Paris plane (Ins|tector HOWTIOOl i..in ,,f handcuffs as leaned ugatnst the fuselage uld irind it nmnd hi. i this slartH'10 stiotil. IhSfS n'cre cTOlPd: i do. fteHaitre w btnsve %  I I *.. H M( sss if -* i BO '"•"• PDI disguised H H'vel '' crack i^aj'.the *•*"*" . ged.llovei lbs main One d". slasf he CtfJurkl %  eeW. bulsdlrunv or laj > the roofa, Stan d bieto his nose. \r bnatossea," who were really u '<•'"'• women i-.lue and ]iu-)ltau exTnpia-d orer , "* peris, oowwred in doorways, whm.ind law 1 on the morriiriK that Sir Punch*let | was lo set out. and he was lust about hla head.| The Shadows Get a Surprise — Mr. Punch Tells Them His Uncle Was A Knight— By MAX lit l l.l "1 WISH 1 ware a knight." Knarf. tha shadow-boy with tha tornedabout mmi, said to his sister Hanid "A what?" asked HanM who thought perhapi Knarf mean) h*' wanted to bo a night Knarf *S> [ lained what he really meant "A night with armor a knight of Klnr Arthur's Round Table, that's the kind of knight I wish 1 eouM he %  Hanld shook her head "There aren't any more knights, not real ones with irmoi So I don't know how yon can become one %  At this moment. Mr Punch *h< was sitting; in hi* rocking chnlr st the other end of the room, coughed 1 loudly Knarf and Hanld went ovor to him "1 dont ftur.eose either ot von h..evei seen a knight of Kine ftrtl Round Table?" Knarf an* Ban it MsM I %  >4ing Ago %  Well. Bald Ml Punch. *'! hartnl either but long, long ago. one of my uncles was a knight tf King Ar thur's Round Table Hi -,-me waSir Pimchelot Knarl and Hanid both i ooi Sir Punchelot.' Mr Punch enn'irmed, "saw all this from the Sfh> %  iraj II* chuckled to himself, then li'itried out through the back door. husing after his horse.*' And what happened?* Knarf 0 m Power and Ue BUU-. T V % % %  a* p m Worlo • ** p m Comoaprr f^ the •*. n> Ratio NraiiNl. I* *t r n, CROSSWORD T-T-, • 1 .' ir i, i r % %  n • 11 r Held over TO DAY G.00 and B.4.'< P.M, CAPTAIN HORATIO HORN1LOWER Spaeial Sai • w %  m sss_ . 'oMjii-f ot imvi\M WHO BUI tiiMTTT j AIJAa N'lXT THI HIBBun OpvaSaf AT 1Mb U a S SB p.m. LIOHTMTWO STKIKEI TWICE Ruth Richard Zachary M— i i. IIOMAS' Toim crrrr McCAMiutrtxjp i. Reno. i, . Ttii" ,dn foe the poet. (31 T. Can 1 be good nalut*d f !7| io. it eouidn l be belter. (4i 11. Do lM*e the ordeal. <4l if. Rii o( a wine pnylucer. *> I OR III4.H.CI 4%% MOVIIa Pntsaal TO-DAV U P.M. and 8.45 P.M. und tontinuin^ to SIMIAY i u> point out. (Si Il WAaffatsw" ; -' ound 4. Otata. S Sat: %  > iv*l '. 5tr*cUa; %  • | 4* IIMIN lai v-i -i i.i \ M (Twhril, RAT spga -l HIM ... i. ,.,..,„„ UJ|J tAIEIV--lilt RIO in.in Joe I'AIXHIKA \ Hl !•<" mi I Mil R ORtRY -i.a Thr Ri ..,., | Th* star of "King 8awaWOB* Mines" and tha beauty of "Taraaa" In a dramatic, ron). !" *-fiLI*d •lory oi an innocent, young girl-paintar who i jii—l famoua w.>lui of art and her ai-oundrel awaalhaa r t 1M. unknown to har, aold i Item a* ociginale. SrtWART PIER GRANGER-ANGELI (HOME SANDERS as *-•%  rictust lagaewl f, %  %  *> H I al Harm ml IMB aw* axsm W B Scnm am ftnrM n BICNARD WOORS • Pneawi PAMDRO S ottWAR dead'i !" urt lived icked giant-. "'Ti^h'^iffiS 1 .""^ .Ln.' n ried. Mr. Punch smiled. "The horse and he auit of armor reached the giants %  munlaln first. The giants came out a a rage. They drew their sworda iiched at the suit or armor, for they i .Might Sir Punchelot was insid*. id linallv tossed it down a srrcat '. %  cinice. And at that Instant, when I..- thought for certain that the fMgtl Sir Punchelot wa dead, there Ofors them, his sword In hand and Mthout a scratch on him. stood Sir 'unchelot ready for battle. The %  ianta were so terrified and so sure lint Sir Punchelot must he the iransast snd hraveit knight in the MM Id to aurvivo the fall off the .reciplco that they fled In terror arrt *sra novor seen or heard of again." Knarf and Hanld were delighted %  'h this story nf Mr Punch's nohle %  nets Sir Punchelot. But they were till puiiled as to whether It was ieally true or o"*. tlprninil Sal. llilli I.4J ufi a.:io |>.m. and Continuing DAILY RUTH ROMAN IS ALL WOMAN In r--.pctt ,if Ihe Funeral of our Beloved Km;: (his Theatre's MAT1NEK TO-DAY will start at 6 P.M.— EVENING SHOW 8,45 P.M. GOD V4VI llll QUIEN I >l I' I II I 0|SatBa*| TO-DAY 6 00 and S.00 p.m. and continuing 4.45 and B.38 NOW J,T POP JLR PRICES JOS^FERRER \cadrm M Arnrnrd Wtnmrr whon hi* tword mruiii homo ... o man dies .. a woman thrills! Rupert and the l*ine Ogre — 28 JlMIll DRESS *IIOI %  itvor Kin..,: Street DRESSES i.. every oc< HMa lively Pure Wool Sweater .ind Cariigan Sets ENII OF Sl:\SON SAI.F ol EVENING DRESSES M i %  K< K. J"d Mj'ih tic, llM ,.! ,.,oi,iou,ty. I'm %  • miwll Sf clt. iro.n "Who ., you?" "Oh. pi don't I.liai.l." 11*1 IttiMrr. P.utin, i. i ln.nd. and Jw ;, wornod jboor thr Menu, too." I II W: • KI .ton to buun.it." utfi ih. h*r. It 'r no, §OMI •o lot* Out to". *, mu,l dj^os>Toe MALA POWERS!" ^ MII II:. AND DRAMA MIMIIIMH Kxtra: LATEST NFWSREKl. R00DAL THEATRES EMPIRE HOW Op. nine Tn-dn fi.Qfl Sj B.oo and ( ..Mini.i. MI; 4.45 K .L.I Jnar FERRER In sunlcy Kramer's Production af TI>-DAV al 8.00 9.00 P.M. Sat. to Tun. 4.30 A 1,15 Margaret O'BRIKN m HER FIRST ROMANii: and "NEVER TRI'ST A GAMBLER" C V ll.l.MI df Bcrg*ra< Starring Dane CLARK Cathy ODONNH.L OLYMPIC KOYAL TO-DAV si i. on aV 9.S0 P.M. Sal. ta Tu. 4.3S 4. S.1S Gary COOPER Madeleine CARROLL In TO-DAY .0J J. 9.00 PM. Bob HOPE — Lucille BALL in "FANCY PANTS" Color By Technicolor "THE f.ENERAL DIED AT D.WVN' and "CASINO TO KOItt \ The Firsl Wartime of The rtanUnj Man in Korea. RAT. SUN. 4.3S ft 1.15 Action Double Rod CAMERON Forrest TUCKER in "SEA HORNET and JOHN WAYNE in 'SANDS OF IOWA JIM A' IS ll-rONSF TO HEX MAJESTY S REQl'F.ST ROODAL llll Mills Hill. BFC.IN THI. II'IIIX. MlllMIs ~ "AT .0 P.M. NIGHT SHOWS AT 9.00 P.M.



PAGE 1

FRIDAY. FEBRI AKY It, IK! BARBADOS ADVOCATE Ivi.i nun i •MiiiiiinniniimiiiiiiimiiiiiiiiniiniiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiininHiiinmiminminii I Lord Beaverbrook sits for I Graham Sutherland TS 1 ^^r^ .*aa^Bifc j 1 K /JH tt^Cibi '^ %  rt_4 Id ( inniniDKVII. Lord Hea*erhrrii llrniihi'Mk' villa. La < apponcina. Otl d Ail in lh* South ol Frame, l*l March The portrait I* nni on loan l Ihe I.I' l.allrr, Millh-nk s \\ and irUiibiled in i..iiri> XIX oi the portrait. OftBERT IAN<*S1HI -rite* : — A COUPLE "I years hve passed line* the art world was atartled 10 1. am that Mr. Oraham Sutherland certainly on.ol the most distinguished, but hardly the most "popular" In nu appeal, ol tV y^unar painters-had produced a pi rtr.tM :i | mOTK ll > passing over into pur* abatni'lion, had made very le cicessions to naturalism And tn C raiturr 'here n a st/ic: i to the tness that can be plaved with natural appeal .in,.-.. The subjects ol his picture* tint raned from rocks to drill old tree-roo: and the |BM"1 outlines ol the pembrubeshirv But his treatment ol the*object* had obvKMSlv neorraq prolong, d investigation of their character. Car more profound than thai accorded in the natural run of PMiuiem to subjects 'hat ere il ui vh< !" %  > %  '.... .at %  u> si: lor on.s portrait tsnt||.>ri.uid involved a crtam degree n| moral courage. Oiuthing, however, links the subjects ol Mr. eutheruuid'.. two portraits to date with UM roc*s and dnfiwood ol bis O.T.H). I He V -Ti •object. In srtiom Hi Bg tiuppriW Just u the painter has Owl fell intently the storms and ravage* and action ol the Mem.-nu im hw nntural and mude u. (eel il too so tn too portraits one is made immed.ately aware thai the ..era are men *iih ic:.a anfl . a the porr.t \laugha;ii rcernlh ih det< iai nu cha.r intintln*ed • Mr ._ Ion Ii. i. I ihe Tate 1-ord Bravcrnrom Crouched IO nu rhair le. •vith one purple-mam i %  repose la obvioual. nOawMUn 1 Kok on the I I *::hdr*:i DM i occur call:im I inufYeoupn Trial one shmld fe-i all tint ii MaH < %  M Uk lenru. .' 0tt.ll .....dil.... iiin'N Im.uhievod exactly the revene. see (hi* iHinrai* srUj nm \,-r\ slm d Idea o o( man urd Hej.rrnti And so ftll %  car be little d.m" tisi D one ol Hi" ti r: i a centum iba' rind |i i u ol %  H u %  Loll urn > %  Air Services in J'c4i Threatened lly Strike. KING The Mrike of I %  p %  .. blackout ni Ionian.,, and %  rising out %  cl bf|(in nndiiiKhi i (jovernment In a linn refuse*! I" five I ero —ed offer and warned (hi I I C.C. Will Discuss Clerks' Embargo Chinn's Visit Freight Hales Chie f ^o"' ^*" Proiested ^**5C* llobAJob Week The proteits fiotn trie v-rloii' pels on # i ,..,,, rmte I intent against increased G g ... idea of *hat a J"> ve not had aaa beraa J like, and tailina t "reelwhat a wondeiinl ap—,. dent of the Chamber of Com to attend a big one, Lui merer laid the %  raUaa said that trivr* was I ; Meeting of that body yesterday, atmosphci* about the camp at 1 The Cou nc il Ol the Chain I which was n 'had agkl The acouU who a their Principals on the Contmenl u-iuled iamboree< did not look 1" ataal the increase in same or think the BMBB, 01 h*e fieighl rales Many of tinBTBM lite saate way, but they came i did go. l>ui since then, news of the camp to bring their own ti i. was made availditions, tfteir own ways of llfi abU locally. and culture and so make their The PresMenl of the Chamhe iqiuhuiion to the comm> rv had never swan aach nthei (tfiiartciiy Oaneral Maa Mn i on thiwfore. but a| once thev weir ,; S en! ri hum,m the atmosphere of th.ii e rule for the removal of jooo* camps, from warehouses m fen deft, aH ( Id. World Chief S.-out told of that the rule was working vrr. s.-me of his many and varied e\ ,. the henent ol eveiyho. i>eriance* in meaning, and Concern over this matter was part the training receiwl expraascd at the la>t Quarterly scouts had pU%ed in mouldir.' K General Meeting and on Ihe matmen of character, teaching them %  ed by the Coun. t,. shoulder responsibility, and Io 1 '' bt leaden; ,,f the formation aaprrolstr o| of end the pait the B.P Guild tf with .. view to point im: Old Scouts was present! v plavmi; II HM views expressed by memi kaaping altva th spirit at Deri of the Chamliei. s.-.iuting and of the •ncourageWhe n the Committee Inletment he hn.| ie*tvd from wh\u lewe.1 DM ControDor, he pointed he had seen of local scouting and OUt thai while he was not pre•cuiiting in St. Vincent pared to relax the rule, he would view sympathetically any charges Public Support iade when delay m Ihe removal He said "Scouting is slrongei of good* was beyond ihe control than it ha*, evei been in itg his( ihi Mii'i.li.ui' tory, it has, perhaps a great<-i The Prealdenl told yesterday's appeel for the ban thn It hus meeliiiR tnul in lug MOW, the rule ever had itofore. it has in man worked vary much Io Ihe benetit places grotei public nippoi i 'in i whole, than it h;is avej had before, be goon* were clorrd easily, and cause people recognise Ihe difficult times through which youth; are passing i n these days, when •ti man) of the old standan have Item discarded and nothu h,is been put thento take the pl.ice of those old standards. "TOO m-iny of Ihe boys f JO] lusl linfl Unough life wltlioul any clear idea of where thev aie going unlil they reach the rock^ and are shipwrecked. They hn\. no anchor io help ihem when thl storm blowScouting howevei dOM provide that anchor' It was nut the Job of Ihe Seoul %  •eaders to make little angels or ROBINSONS •PATENT' BARMY irvskea ssgfc nveea gigasOW* lor bafte •PATENT' GROATS mekM **aalng a riappy t'me far tU i rmben Chief Soul IIIS|MV1S Jain-1 Wt r„nM.I. (now ,i bj UM Jamak i Social Welfare Cofnjnlorion) Tiili rnaj tie ear-. I..-I--HI leaearcli worker with 1IK.I| assUtance. THE CHAMBER OK COMMERCE is to takt up with The question of training was Ller ol Cjiitoni th, matter ol th* mb-xgo f^gjg^^^g^ a _^j i > ri 11 ii-Miiential centre is iieeded It was genornlu .•gieed, however, th.ii the MX MIOHUU' AtMntloj wai drown to thu ,,„„-,u i from C i). and iirtUiiltv liy Mi William Atkinw fmOt during th, years ltU "ii "' yeitenl.iv'.. me.-l.iig of Uui V4B made a successful and Chamber, when he pointed put IssrUng GOntrtbutli and th it that Customs Clerks of tho t>fTi>rtv -hould tnadl various firms had been refuse.! V |d ( a umitur .,i , permission, a* was the cnao „ x mo mhs oi .;...( Phe ottaauon previously, f looking through 0 f wnv s A nd means remained to i in Custorm CIrkg ol the respective firms IK m. | .i,h-iiial information on t'xport cara Cas<* Dismissed ins Wo .-hot down over ftoUand HM did %  ;"** J IIUt %  > %  !" ,r h wai such daiiKeii.us WOrh lhai she '" %  ''"' """ *"0 WOUld Hot OUlj % %  leW two '.tidHs Hi ,.. l-'ioiaids I..1 themselves, but x I:| .. ,„. WBB ,. %  Id help I., rats* the Ha I U-ayed i. .i friend and w. i othei Men whoidid not cgrrestad ami aentenced to cseath ''''' ,A, '|_> bl1 rubbish pushed The llrst time she was saved fro*.. ? own 1 .. lh ,r .. throois. hut who that sentence bv the homliing "l "• %  >" r themselves mid made the camp lit which "he was. decisions for themselves. „ n d She WIIK gbla to get OUt for i "*e ihey made lhosdecisions, short turn but ahortb was rewould have the courage lo stand I and %  entaneed to death -T, 'hem. Moiai enurage ws BYNIN AMARA %  %  a* if ALU I I 1*1 HIM 110.. ION DO BfBU On l-i.nd tn \ed by UM giTtval n. uiimth, %  ile ir privnte welfare ofTlrers and thai the Chamber. BhOUld „ | ,,. •>,>,{ tl„. .lamaii. Ihi laet lh:.t Mich InRugar %  i w.-n.n USB >fnlilaKli> iitiibl* n _. "_1__ _>_ %  • .i '" ontrlbutlon ng Wellsre Laboi period of the brlhe Lnvort Pan-American, two A'. KLM. two B.O.A.C. one BW! \ four Chicago and South' One Caribbean I Hicht. IRON ORE FOUND IN JAMAICA in view of OB was valuable, makei Board may niiihrepreaeul.it.ni! to the Controller „, ,,-spcrt \.\ the Ira ;"rt with a View to re-establishing officers paid from i v \n ^.P*** al u,asl ln tho "• WeMere rMnd. 11 if larger firms. During the course of the short i i ..u dl""toB on the matter, it was Mr Chmn left Jamaica after a "W poiiitvd out Uial the reason for fortnlalil u vlall Brlusfa Hou.it.i old KT'I %  I ,h •J Bbt 5 0 Wi 1 l c,u,lc objC ''"" he had much ado to .,,! Ien lodged by certain u rvey the colony's vtgDTOUl linns OB the grf.und that their „*,,! welfare work and tlevelopbuslnets was bviug made public. i ng handicrafts m one I it The view was alsc expressed ut'ek He then nroceeilol to "T, 0 .?"? ih "' '""" * • lhel.h.d of-T^W and is oow ,n wnual Bn.thwa.tc said that on ni chamber getting the Comp( iU1 .na He will spend the "lgh ix the present orD f rebruarv 21 and 22 in Barbs1 hut all the "me >|>e When we think Of N.I Und think of a girl who was a |n>wn c Sh.tiM.k the ama | >dse Uki vou and promised lo gaep II I her t*intv-rii't birthdea I nicasagi'over the i.niioand per. %  iios some (*T v dgeayJofj moral courage In ihe K I d thut .me of the grenlc-o, pr t,' 0 )| IT Skeett. %  ..'.i.i-l.n-nl Ijecml fetidant'o bouse KINGSTON JV:. Pa I liinl hat he Oeoernphira! ment hen the fendant that he had uthorlt} nf rteh %  %  I to levj on '"m \he Iron ore in Jamaica *J Sk.it.' atallowed" to l>e taken by the ,ut the Ibeet ' ' ,"'"' leri was the case previousa barrici b I Ists In earl • said to be large enough and acceptable enoueh to dog aa a guest of the Covert— hm-.v-i suggestr.1 that and Uidy Savage, proceeding the Comptroller shoold be npthonc,. to the Windward and proached and asked to give a Leeward Islands and returning reasonaDle explanation as to why ln i) ;ir(l , M r (i %  ( HilUtics were no longer While m Japiaiea. affa ion was able lo pursue the question of a regional h The B.P. (.mid Lord rWWallan expressed !< %  hojHthat there would soon develop |n th ( Uluiid a really %  tfong branch of the ii v Oufld f Old BeOUU to help in thr wotk Which they were hying U> do for UM youiitf people of Barbados. The Chief Scout then issued an appeal fur members U> support b) helping scouts to emu money for thr mOTemeill when Hob a Job week i. mslilui. I. iiftei which the President nke.1 l^rd Itowallan on behalf of members for an "extremely interesting and informative talk on ihe activities of scouting UM i OUr! (Of Divorce and f '[•* pr *** n t * v -" M.iinmonial Causes yesterday. %  %  residant went on to The Acting Puisne Judge Hi %  • %  the Chief Scout that busiI^srdslup Mr. Justice G. L. Tayhin M houses would do their utinonouneed deere.n,0 %  to eneourage scou it ,f.\ M Webb "• L "" money by giving them V I K Webb l'bs when Bob a Job Week wa< said that rini Hi tUnVrenl kill battle Ihey wrsil.l their cl.ui Miinib. i He win wearing the kilt because he was ordered M tlM Hto Wng flenrge VI to wear it whenever lie .ittends these functions. Aftei V. ad Lord RowaUan on behalf ol the Guidw for coming. The Kally then eri.h.l with t*ie sing„, ing of the Nali.mal Anthem. DECREE ABSOLUTE for tation Ore exdefendant u>ok a club and hit him |mrkms and nutrifion traln.m/ grftl MwMer with It '„ was lnuv nuX b ,„,. m nd n ;j^ 0 K r Ind 'he In eeonoml OrtfBth "' h a ;'r "'/*; Secre.ary that there was informvisited the suggested site on the ment aaid and ai S > "75*' ''' "K ^ ,on ,h *' l ""• >' !" neni of beautiful estate of Shortw-xl most on the road i.dant he was a baiiin. i oniy fn c present arrangement. the Women'ti Traiiung College some discovered are sa >e large U ihe comptroller was bringing local a*j miles from Kingston looking practice into line with that In .,ut over the distant harbour. iceporidcut repay coet of uch. .xpnrtation nf Harbour Log IN CARLISLE BAY Minister Murdered certain In Touch With Barbsdoa Coastal Station \RRI< US a -i KAIJ \w< • • ChTIdom Trlnidl s !S THIBESMAK .sei i i Oia#r. from Onmlntt* M V CADI I !" nirAari ai I ach nOSUUKE M. SCi U McUirn f"i %  C.pl ateQiulkli.. lor 84. Lucia. sVh CUOUOIA i.bi l*w1. Issnrit.sH CiianHAVARA. Cube, Feb 13. n Minister n Alejo • Pino, 40! was assassinated last night by men In An automobile, who liicd eight bullets into his body while he was 0 men. his companions were wounded. I>s 1 Pino owns a radio d la a memii i Political rbU and 1 i President Carlos ttut Uta % %  PrtoSogr-rrn. The former Cabinet Ml ia %  %  > %  **! Mlnltte? % %  inarbad for death In c at-ue. .. Union Insurrectional „ tlap%t lonarta, the Revolutionary patriot. Tnta Group. for the battle in which Iheh leader. Emlllo Tro. Cosslo Del V.: 'CPi other countries and places in the The scheme has firm friends Ir.. Caribbean. the Jamaica educational world I The meetuig decided that the llM | there is good hope that a I Chamber should take the matter plan for an Institute of 30 places I ilh the Comptroller after -*ji be accepted. isited have been mode "^h practice obtains m region .. other Islands. | n the hope of havmany people ing the decision reconsidered W I i U* aMvti* I I (! %  DUffTl .! %  ,,, A..A" PBM. Mwmaciatit. Ul>il, •*... baas o im*. nrt'r.i raniKii. each area i,. |H d u(H(i. n . I..H-. ata-iiiiPai.ru „ model kltrhen with smokel-< M oS^cSj^MmSyL i to l W'angement. such n< Oio..... HsrasHBis. Del Mar. Vtendain might be copied by the humblest s.pn.ibr. Until.nd Prince. tenants for their own resources the devastated Thomas win re hoae houses weroi demolished by the hurricane, are still living in tents. Pinna %  for rehousing are being rushed [ forward and it was suggested that a Committee of expci ien< ed i women should be formed to I assist with the domestic side of .nt. The experi. nee Of the Land Settlement and H '.. miBOti staffs In practical hern" i improvement, should be eallvo upon to furnish a model unit in id build and equip If you suffer from acid re k Ideal for intimate personal use 'DETTOL'IH! HO" r 1 SEPT IC 1 PAIN CAN BE CONQUERED! m&srzr" to... FOOkTHinirsdlsnt' ThsQulalaa ifkallr Naneed e*tk three -•ll-praa n %  ed,:,n (•t*r,,n. Cafleina ing Acatylsalleriie And), sa that UM medkmai tegathsr in %  fseffntital'*. Thsi it why 'Anaem e**t pain lut, and reiiortt rear stnss of wsll-bemg. gag DetM lb) ocutrslUnftlaieseai AM II>C CJOK Ol ihe ii..i'"k lhha r* sonihlnf setuMoai BM rakdM ill of ihe stomawh ali Dolsa KilOIKI 0IUISII01 ||S*S!*/ rsMaCfaT? llwalco n *d by Doctori 1 O.a* 12.000 d lope—anough to b.-'.f gu-tk relief a bout of pain. Or inahane>20-ts*let boOr In s W-t*bi-t bettla (for I0WUSS) ARM YOURSELF AGAINST PAIH GET AHACIN 1 TODAY! ssatawMi ant as %  •**•* II... .1 !. I | ",.,... KI and •lofn**S aunt **1 up % ssasBf -• %  l • %  r. ...rt Mml (.—1 1.. 1 ,.., i
.— 4 I- Cet %  • +•*' <• %  HI kres •< .•'•<•• KCKSTEIN BROS. Diatributora YOU CAN'T BEAT IT'S QUALI T Y m YOU CAN'T BEAT IT'S PRICE J(sdvinah)k III I 1(14.1 It \ I tut Vs tit. Rust Proof Cabinet Uelus Finish — will not crack, chip or discolour \ llermetirally Sealed Unit Automatir Floodlight (ri-per 5-year guarantee Extra room for tall bottle on both sides. IM V $395.00 imw ox oispt.tr AT THE CORNER STORE



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ESTABLISHED 1895 FRIDAY KBKUARY 15, lS2 PRICE FIVE CENTS KING'S FUNERAL TO-DAY Crowds Totalling 2,000,000 Expected -I OI.OI It IVtHTV' AT PAY Hill i AST i.iMMi.im: _, LONDON, Feb. 14. Britons niing by Kins; George VI's coffin in Westminster Hall passed the 200,000 mark today and tens of thousands more waited patiently in the snow sleet rain for their turn lr was the sorrowing subjects' last chance to pay tribute to the King as he lay in state in the vast hall adioinine the Houses of Parliament. Tomorrow the coffin will bo Taken in a majestic funeral procession from Westminster Hall lo Paddlngton Station for the train journey to Its ilnal resting place ior CaitS***" 1 ChaP01 d Some 10,000 troop* and 1.4* detectives will line Ihe circuited Uuw and a half mile route through Central London's Streets to keep bark the crowds expected to total ? 000.000 persons. Six Sovereigns Representatives of all the world's remaining monarchies wUl %  ake part moved King*, tjueens. Princes and Princesses from both eastern tind western hemispheres. Guns boomed s royal welcome for them. Already here or on their wa>. were six rulers: Paul of Greece. Gustav of Sweden. Haakon of Norway, and Frederlk of Denmark. Queen Juliana of the Nctherlundf. and Orand Dutchess Charlotte of Luxembourg. Queen Louise of Sweden and Queen Ingrld of Denmark necom-| panted their husbands. Princes And Princesses Then the ion, I Pr ">a Princes •ntlng at lens .. -i the funeral p.-^, i riey include at least six sovereigns "*vcn other ruling houses of the greatest collection of Royalty Europe, Africa. Asia, plus Presito assemble anywhere since before i dent Vincent Auriol of France and World War II. An eerie daytime %  President Ivan Rlbar of Yugortnrkness hung over London "when | al'"" the massive wooden doors Westminster Hall swung open at 8 a.m. G.M.T. for the third and last day of King George the Sixth s Iving-ln-state. Enveloped in winter clothes against the 32 degree Fahrenheit temperature*, and hidden beneath umbrellas, the mourners stretching across the misty Thames River and along the South Bank shuffled into the cold Hall past the purple draped coffin, surmounted by the crown jewels rmd flanked by yeomen, gentlemen of arms and guardsmen In ancient drou. Like the 183,002 people who prereded them during the first two days the coffin was on view, the people who entered in one's and two's were plain citizens of Britain who regarded the death of King George on February the Sixth as a personal loss. U.S. Beeretary of State Dean Acheron, rrprescnUng Truman and at least 17 other foreign minister* are also here or are coming. General Elsenhower. SuK *me Commander of the Atlantic ct Armed forces and his wife were scheduled to arrlvr later I..,!.,. The weather man predicted .> i dry *'old day for the funeral, but | said there might be showers of rain or snow. —r.p Britorfs Eat Less Meat LONDON, Feb. 14. Britons ate in 1951 about 26 percent less meat than in 1950 Snow, Rain, Sleet and 3* per cent, lees than before Weather officials predicted that (the war. The main reason for the dreary discomforting mixture ithls was the failure of Britain'!* of snow, rain and sleet would "uun foreign meat supplies. Imontinue throughout the day. but PrU of rarcase meat and differ, to tens of thousands still falling into line along the River Bank. The doors will remain open until sometime early tomorrow morning. By then almost JOO.OOO persons would have 11 led past the catafalque—a throng equal to the number who paid final respect to King George V when he lay in state for four days in January 1936. But the total still will be short of the 500,000 who filed by the coffin of King Edward VII. son of Queen Victoria and grandfather of George VI. after his death in 1910. Visit By Quern Mary List night the dowager Queen Mary, mother of King George VI and the Duke of Windsor, his brother and predecessor on the throne, also visited the catafalque. The 84-year-old dowager Queen reluctantly agreed not to take pan in the state funeral tomorrow owing to her age The Duke of Windsor who ruled briefly in 1930 as Edward VIII before abdication t" marry American divorcee Mrs. Wallace Warfleld Simpson hnd arrived earlier in the day from New York City. Through red-carpeted old train terminals and London airports SHOWING th* strain of his recent operation. King George VI it. pictured at the airport in London, as he witnessed the departure of Princess Elisabeth and her husband. Prince Philip, for Africa. — (International Phote) Chief Scout Asks C.C To Support "Boh A Job" Week LORD ROWALLAN, Chief Scout of the World, who was guest gpeaker at the Quarterly General Meeting ol the Barbados Chamber of Commerce yesterday, said that "Scouting to-day is stronger than it has ever been in its history, nnd perhaps a greater appeal for the boys than *i has ever had before." Before concluding hitalk. The!the Scout Laws, said that the Chief Scout appealed lo member*'challenge which they make "is of the Chamber for their support' accepted as keenly to-day by in making BOB A JOB WEEK, bovs all over the world as it was telligence bulletin. It calculated, (which will be instituted shortly), in 1908 when the Movement was that Britons ate an average of., success and during which tlr-t founded 54.7 pounds of beef and veal periscouu properly areased in um-1 Knowledge Acquired forms nnd carrying a card would 1 Scouting, the Chief s Idition to leaching lads lo with one match In Hat cook a meal, taught nil ngs which kepi them interested, and which iraasssBd (bail '(experience and piarlieal ability, ~,to apply the knowledge that they igh scouthead every year before teie In 1951 the average consumptlor jier head dropped t. eard go around asking for jobs Mi | Seoul Movement TWO W.I. POLICEMEN IN KING'S FUNERAL PROCESSION .6 pounds. woll | d | lt i p Ihl m l0 -••* %  .for theSco.it Movcmi After a brief welcome.by the lhoM u,,.,^ wnlcll kppl „ President of the Chamber. Mr It-rested, and which i.h II, money|| iah , open G. Leacock Jni an thanked -hi i welcome, and tty few peopl Lord Hi President nd he thought allsed the fluence of Scouting in the wuilu to-day. It was too often rcgard.pieaa. Oa r o Chfaeaaaastaali !ed from the negative point of LONDON. Feb. 14 view from the point of view of Two Weal Indian police offlc-la cure for Juvenile deliquency, era—Bub-Inspector K. B. Harry| rather than the creation of an tsingh of British Guiana ond_Artmsphere in a boy's heart, which prevent juvenile delinfrom taking it-, pi sistant Superintendent L. Rodriguez of Trinidad—will br among the small contingent ol Colonials representing Colonial Police Forces in the King's funeral! unerring to the strength of the procession in London tomorrow. Scout Movement, the Chief Scout Seventy Colonial Police orficMld u^err W ere some 5Mr million ere will help line the funeral K outs in the world SHSOUI I route from Westminster lo Paddlngton station would quency there. The Scout Motto Referring to the strength Truman Undecided Over Presidency WASHINGTON. Feb 14 President Truman told a new conference he cannot say at this time whether he would run for the Presidency if it became necessary for the preservation of world peace. He said the decision was difficult to make and the time has not come to make any announcement. He said that when the time comes he will make it directly to news representatives and not through third persons who come to call on htm at the White House | nil 1 lion of which 1 found in the British Commonwealth and Empire. There were 'scouts in. almost every free counItry of the world, all of whom I kept essentially the same promise and the same law, although 1 varying sligfiily in their wording. 1 But the spirit behind them was always the same—duty to Ood. '% the flrat part of the Promise, because Lord Baden-Powell realised that without something <*> Truman asked reporters not to S liest Ion him further about hit allude on re-election because he was not ready lo discuss It further He explained, he said, on this eubject all he Is going to do until the time comes to make some announcement as to his decision. His comment was provoked bv question* a> to whether he had been quoted correctly by various callers who saw him this week and afterwards told reporter-: I Fd their impression of his attitude. Foremost among these was representative Adolph Habath who on Tuesday said Truman told him he would run for the Presidency if It was necessary for world peace and the welfare of the United States, although it might shorten his life to do so. -CP hsM mseli permanent there was very little value in the work. He said that Ihe movement often criticised in the eaily days because it was not entirely Christian movement. They were criticised because they did not confine themselves to certain denominations, but Lord BadenPowell with his usual insight and wisdom (because he was a vary wise man) realised that there was a place and some commor ground in which boys and vounr 'men of good will and of all faith^ and languages, could meet (Jhinn's Visit Will Be Qf Great Help Miss Dora Ibbersoii. Social Welfare Adviser to the Compiii f i development and Welfarv who letumed from "*. Mid the Wveeal* yesterday that the %  nain purpose of her visit was ..-•Mi W rhino, the So. tar> of Mast's Social Welfare i at the beginning of hi "our M the H W I colonies. Mr. Ch.nn ha* a long personal record of social work. He was Chief Probation Officer In Pales• and head Of the Social Wel> IVpnrtme.it when this was set up Since hia appointment in 1947 Welfare Adviser to the Of State for the Colon>. tn lias visited the greater he Colonial Empire ami axle* and unusual knowledge of welfare work. OSta "ttW'tul and voluntary in all parts of Ihe world. Mi Chinn's special knowledge f the problems of organise! should be. outstandingly useful :ci Weil Indian governments nni Ihu Conference on Social Wcl fare work which will ba held (I Hosting.* House, Barbados from March IT — II should cnabli welfare officers to see their work as part of a worts! movement to socialize ih,. thinking of adminbstrsuan. MAM welfare work .Isfttn lly associated WIUI edo.ation > well i.. with iH'allh gn.ullure. it u hoped 1 ML-UTS Houghton. Director of n and P. M. aVierioek, \ice-l-ilncipal of thr Universitv Uasb] of 'he West Indies „ ho responsible for the Depailim.it of Extra Mural Studies, will be pre-en; as well sfl i)thei diil.n!uishe.| guests Crowded Kortniyht Mr Chinn spent >-.iv rowded fortnight In Jamaica '.din.he was Impressed by I ho •mand for the rurther ro-nrdlnlon of the Welfare Servli eluding the nuiny vigorous limitary bodies. The worst of the Juveiiilej authority which it assisted by local '-juvenile committee*"proved to be of greet interest, marking — i. does, en %  mpnrtaiil advance in (he rommunltv-r refponiiUllly for children not %  nly thosewho have become delinou*nt. hut also those who Md Of cars Off proterllon. out of control Among Ihe subject, discussed was a proposal from ihe United Nation* to make a scheme for a> On rag 3 Spanish Mini-t. r flfknfl'P*; With lTrlrtiw !gather without compromise to WMI1 % %  WIII1 liaOiT |* h(>ll own conKience and their own national way of life. LONDON. Feb. 14 1 Lord Rowallan went on to deThe Spanish Foreign Minister,[fine and illustrate the respective Alberto Martin Artajo. conferred .Scout Laws, and commenting on th Foreign Secretary Anthony the positive instruction* given in ken at the Foreign Office for ^— ^—^~ nearly half an hour today, and n %  a-s r* e meellng took; rTt'IlCls r rttlH' lifOpS HOCAN TO REPRESENT ARGENTINA AT KING'S FUNERAL LONDON, Feb 14 Argentine President Peron ha^ signed a special decree appointing Carlos Alberto Hogan Argentine Ambassador in London, to represent 'he Preskieo' and the Argentine On.ernmcrM at the of the late King George the Sixth tomorrow place i -friendly atmosphere." Also present waa the Spanish Ambassador. Miguel Primo De River., and the British Ambassador to Madrid, Sir John Balfour To Lovw'M V iilue VH PARIS, rfg) 14 The French franc Wednesd dropped to the lowest free m> Offlclsls described Artajo., call Ike* value since it was devalued i a "courtesy visit.' No details, m 1949, Black market operators of trie discussion* were disclosed here are paying up to 4os franca However, it i* understood that the f r *he dollar against th. acquire, no| only Ihu tu, but in then aehool; to all practical experience ^something of wisdom a well .is knowledge. He thought that one of t; %  creatent tragedle* of to-da). In many ways, waa the vaat InrrraAT In the pool of knowledge that had been developed during the past 50 ean. will, the rrs,,li that noho-h knew or saw knowledge sa a whole, but earh eae waa a laerlallnt In an ever er and narrower groove. That was particularly so lucation where there \ little time for boy* to acquit' practical experience, having io I himself up with knowledge '.". hooks Wisdom and leamg required quiet and solitude think, but the present generam could not think in quiet II as in a quiet atmosphere that fluence had a chance to work over the hoys. Shouting was not the technique, it was the Influnce on the mind of the hoy, am the finer the qualities of th. teacher, the belter Ihe results In leveloping the rharnrtei of th a> On Page 3 Th iiiitht slitrms Lash U.S. ATLANTA. Feb. 14 Thunderstorms lashed southesrtl of the United States during the light killing at least two persons, njuring 83 others and causing Widespread property damage. Freak storms riding ahead of the advancing cold wave, .sir the Lower and Central Tennessee, northern Arkansas and Middle and Upper Alabama. A small but vicious tornado ploughed through Manila Aikanand five persons were reporthospitaln>ed. Fifteen to twenhomes were demolished by high winds in the towns Decherd and Winchester kilo one person and injuring other s. —xr. Ministers briefly discussed Anglo Spanish relations, but the main part of the conversation waa said to have h"en confined to nonl-ditical exchanges. It la understood that Artajo recalled Spain's roadinwSk in play her part In western defence Embassy offleCsla said that Arta)o would atay London until Tuesday or Hogan will lie received by the|Thursday of next week, and that i ew Queen Elizabeth the Second,he was planning to meet a number olong with oil other foreign of political personal it lefor a representativee now in London [general exchange of views to attend the funeral. —U.P. —I'T peg of Sao on the Government I exchange. Gobi well as dollar prices continued upward as confidence In Franco decreased A temporary hall ensued afler Government earlier this month announced an austerity plan on imports arid tax i.lo encourage export* Wednesday's waaknasa followed the National Asecn < fusel to begin deb anclal programme Friday daw ed to balance the budget and halt inflation.—U.P. ( • J I NW .ay • .. 1 WQBBBSV VsBBsntliaam \ Idat' / ftafi 4 *•' M) SelHH skk: i* Bsl %  BP*^^^^ Isf '^BBW^ld fe ^ J VfasP4r\ ssssk v'""en JL^B ^^aaeL *4JBBB! !" "fin LORD BOWALLAN. Chief H.- Alli-on Alkln* during Inm-or.ti if of thr (Minmniiwulth .ml P.mpii.-lik.h>iol. vtb Sea Ranger of the Oufge* Celeiu Party*' M Pas Hill. Unite Headquarter-yesMm. E B William*. Inland Omde Comim ajsMMI Chief Seoul Inspects Guides' Colour Party flVK HI'NIIHKII .III.I l.-i. (iuuli-N U.Mill .il I'.s Hill. St Michael. M wtlooma Lord Kuwullun, Chief Seoul 0J Ihe Cummunwealth ami Kinpire. yesterday alter Tin' wi'Mlhrr wan tlluand puiu'tiially at 4.30 pm. Loi I Howallan. nccumpanied hy I.I. Commdr Malln. m • %  < D %  by Un K B. Williams, bland Commiaaioner of the Ciuldi.. IhCl HV.lM-.Nd UM mini i Kgypl Offers To Pay KSllL Damages ADVISER WILL \ISII!BT)OS WRING TXMJR 'iKORarrowN. rn, n „ ^i 1 '' h nv ". wnftCj lleno'Chlnn. CMC. s., i„l w.|. f..r,Advi.,., |„ ,hr Secretary of v. ., lo, il,.. r„l, m ,„ „„ w un „„. Buli.li C.IHOOJ |,„ „, |,^ U | H Ihroe-monlli lour ol Ih, llrll, I, CarlliOertit Uruu.iie, (old a Pre, <„„l,,,i,o hare that there l> lack ol k„owlede '"• %  al probUma. He stroaaod that social divelopnieiit should be lhi<-oni]>lementai U to econoinii' development, ai id that he would like to see mo urban Mrfeys. carried out. Chlnn preneiited the "family strudurv" as one of the most dllTltult problems of social wclfu. i ihe West Indies, where a large in.-ij-.rltv of the people do not have ii ramllv life ife had observed In Aalan Territories a strong tribal Ktructure and what has to be prevented Is too rapid a break-down, but he observed thatIn the W I there has to be a building up and atqiM is lud. from the anbraoci slid finally chatted and laughed wiUi lbs HrownlcK who lined up under Ihe tree about 1.1 from tinsaluting base. The Guide* sal in s horse-shoi formation on the nuui.u before Lord Ttowallan addressed trU'tn Iiitrcdiiitrig Lord Rowallan — who waa dressed in kilts and khaki ahlrl with a short staff in h|l hand — Mrs Wlllh. that it waa unfortunate that the Visit of the Chief Scout of th. Common wealth and Empire should eotne at tha time and slie wna sorry that all Unt;indes in the Island could not he present al this I' 111 """ Respected d Rowallan oi>ei.ed his address lo the Guides b) ttlUD| them of a story of a nnughly Brownie. He said Ihe Incwttll Becurred in Canada ,ind aince that incident he had Ihe grenleM n spect for the Browning, Lord Rowallan said th.tl hg mntna them to leallv Just how big the family to which the> IT long is He said that there arc and a half Million brottsM and three and a half million all tera In the family. They could not Imagine sMSgl five and a haU inllUon brottinn ould look like but they knew they are quite a lot of them, [f waa a Ulblr so big that th-' Scouts of the World could stand each word .Ley would be seven scouts standing on each word in thr whole Bible and there arfll be still some scouts left ovei "Everywhere we go we have this family with the same lav ;*nd the asm* prcinlso SnouM vi i v fJolos) and everv BeOWnla ind every Scout do htT and b duty to Ihe people Of the world there would he live BM lllon people) made hapottf \ Our fotirwI.T ti.|,t UlSl PJRfejgln hapny • On Page ^ CAIRO. Tet> H 1'tnIgFPUM Oovfjmnagnl uld Argentina, Hut, d and 13 other nations ofllelnlly thai it "deplored*' last imeith'bliNtdy Cairo liaUm si d offl ied lo pay .ip to O.iMW'HW In damage lai'ii. In ntlosl not) iieeseii io the nnttoiu Oovornmeiit ul'i said |iiellnilt: 11..W.-1 thai I-. ora of vloteiiiiwhich tin.k inor.halt 41) lives wanled tO exploi' iiiblie demonstration* proteallng against the incidents between lint i-h tronis and Egyptian imbee .' ismiiilni m the Canal Bonn 11 aid %  ihe Uyptlas 00 %  deplore*I these event* ami the nMilUnit losaee not only because "f |' th gJsaOl %  %  "i< Kne.i an inanoeUofi batii of Ho* roeeo as guests of the Ki i i b to-d.iv visited the native quarter of Fer Th." group was immediately 1 by Ar.il yOtlUH houttag aueri ilogana w -long freedom" "long live inde%  n.. %  nnd "long live Trulilar Incidenta aceomvlsit of the group to ... near here. —fD.P.l ILK.'s First Atomic Explosion Not Far Off in the I man". Sin %  entire!* /he town ol —U.P. f everv PUtm* tinginv Wan Not Working Jut Before Crash ELIZABETH. NEW JERSEY Feb 14 One engine was not workinu hltd the propeller of the second waa spinning in reverse when tag National Airlines four engine DC fl passenger planMonday with a loss of 32 lives aclo.dmg t.. a report of the Civil Aeionautirs Hoard of Invoattgg. thni ;ud "The malfunctioning of two right engmes caused the plane to crash into the Elizalentia) %  notion take off from nearby Newark airport A spokesman disclosed that ffumber four Engine whirl, bad halted functioning completely hrf-ire the rra.h would have reIIUIMHI p major overhaul The Sydney Daily Telcgriph pn wealth's first otomft explosion will be touched SYDNEY, Feb 14, edieted that the British Common be touehed off in the near futuratttrnj Australian rocket range The newspaper said the frrt i ably would >>e a small oornb suitable for use as in warhead for guided missile* >>r rockets "Observers believe most parts for the aaeembly of Ihe first rintL*h bomb already have been shipped seeretlv t.i Auv'ralla A second Canberra Jet bomber which haa been specifically ordered to help in guided missile research and for testing new equipment At the t Mor.day."—U.F. Australian rocket baae is to leave for Austialia n-xt ttni n i alia I ihari n flying hoi — li.P, BUSTA REJECTS 4POLOCY KIN(;s'l'-N I: reb 14. nrto Hico to-day Busta.1 ilpnlogv • .11 for the rejaetion was aHnology is equivocal and S alifled end it is Mpei it government supports his stand and will further urge lbs Office to obta)n a full apology from Washington (jJkonSLVGJl you CUxMmqs d flaJdu Dinner. Luncneon, Birthday, Wedding, or for your own quiet enjoyment at home— K. W. V. can add to that enjoyment, as K.W.V. Wines are Quality Wines, popular throughout Oreat Britain, Canada, New Zealand, Sweden and many other Countries of the World, including the British West Indies And in these burdensome days of HIGH COST OF LIVING K.W.V comes to your rescue also. K.W.V Wines COST much less than Foreign Wines of France, Spain, and Portugal because K.W.V. Wines are admitted into the Colony under the British Preferential Tariff K.W.V. Paarl Tawny, K.W.V Coronation Wine, K.W.V Sweet Vermouth, K.W.V. Dry Ver mouth, K.W.V. SPARKLING WHITE WINE, KW.V SHERRIES.





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PACF K1CHT BARBADOS ADVOCATE FRIDAY IKBRLARY li. 1M2 Second W.I -N. Zealand Test To-day llv o. > rtn>n\ I The UV%  wi only liird an 1 the inmugi •>•• 'he batsman mu.) lid Inning* • ur WKf Choee IfchHw leclared tliut h> ie. m uill (-> I 11.--> %  i Mlsovrtnsj thirteen piarora:— J. D. Capo, L> A 1 ... n S Out Urn. If M.Tshall. S Ranvi'l' %  >er, A. Vali l walcott, r. WNM, I BM It u deuuilc thai he will go Into battle for the second (MM without the al*Unce of h.a pacers, Jone* and Tllga. He the thirteen players from whom StMlmeyer. seasuned veterans awould seam tuatUatd In thii %  he will eventually chow hU team they are. from the same West the crickets stem to favour the and we would not presume to [ndhes Test team. spinning of rtamadhln and Valcriticise frotn this distance cntinr more than it would pacci*. Speculation (ionic/ Out Further speeul.it.on is whether For thr first lime Gerry Oomcz It would seem as If this means Ken Hirk.irrls will be given %  s out of l Teat team and regardthat Den I. Atkinson wfll be (hlon Handolph Turpin beat Alex country are to let totether U> ""i"" ,n n overweight mulch -ITaln of mutual ooncern ' Harringaj arena tonight. BuxThis brtlhl and momentous 10 ""red at the end of the U)NUON.~b. 13 first ftahl MI.to-day In a short, try the u G RABONE 1WelllnitoiO W., I I Okapl lUi-bo* . news comes formal 1 v-now ABA. It ~T~ "At an lratorma 1 meeting of . the **nt*^T Bfr**"g Association and ihe British Boxing Board of Y.ues Control it tu agreed mat rapleaegvtatlvaa of reveiuh round with a badly damBefore the evening's boxing ix-gari. the 10.000 spectators stood in silence in memory of a belovi-n King and fellow sport' Than as the arc lamps of the vast aren.i were dimmed until Re-d MS* HS tn ume Z iisTw he ."p 1 *."<*!.r,."JS n, -l?t-L. spot lights and the red exit signs. they joined in singing the 'National Anthem As 1 token of memory for Ih dead King referees and second: V. J. SCOTT < Auckland) J. Kill) lV.lliri.l4.il 1 Devonshire Defeats Regiment A team from H.M.S. Dei-oruMer %  iscuss mutton of mutual interest' This announcement diawn up .iftrr Uw two group* bad lunched together. u the culmination of much excellent spade work by the reaps-> uvr J. O. Mcfntosh. of the ABA, an I Mr. E. J. Walthiun. They began it many months ago when, at my invitation, they discussed the mutual recognition of amateur-pro' Interest* with me it lunch. Laince-corporal Basil Williams :RE*IE). Welsh intern..honal and Army light-weight champion, will be the ABA Hght-welterweiRht against Ireland next month. He will box T. Mllllgan in D11I iin on February 0, and W. Redtlv .it Cork two days later. bandi theii MANNING & CO. LTD. Agents NOTICE. WILL OUR CUSTOMERS PLEASE NOTE THAT BLCK WIRE HANGERS AND GALVANISED HANGERS RETURNED TO OUR DEPOTS AND HEAD OFFICE OUR DEPOTS AND HEAD OFFICE WILL BE PURCHASED BY US AT 3c. AND 4*. RESPECTIVELY. wewe black white shirt*. Unfortunately the Turpin-Huxton affair brought credit neithe. ti> the two boxers concerned nui 1 tUta boxing generally. The preflght ballyhoo heraldii this as a "needle match"—largely on account of some indiscreet remarks dropped by Buxton to the effect that having finally caught up with Turpin he intended to despatch him in double murk time. But 11 was not to be. Both Were Wnmed Of the fight itself little I. West Indies Score 288-2 In Second N.Z. Test NEW ZEALAND. Feb. 15. IN 46 MINUTES' BATT.NU before lunch the Wwt Indies scored M without loss in the second cricket Teal Match against New Z.-algnd al Eden Park Stollmeyer was fj !" \''*' !" "^^LJBMS :,. Rac 7. The weallur was Jhru.tenl.ig when New SS/^Sl"^ !" Zealand which won the loam took the field, SutcllffV Nw ernmem Rifle Vinge. the Zealand's captain. bcin' ol the opinion that the pitch would OewmaMr lake spin, Foolbull ^ra-iHI Opeaa To-morrow Oi>at Cor !" ,. Ctytta H Bl_Alh UAs^wmu. /\'.'xr 15 minutes' Held The IBM Fi-rtball season otjen* ngton Oval on Saturday Pttbruarj Ifi MUi a Flr^: Mini lietween S|tartan. last year's cup winncni and Carllon. uiinieis-up. The CouneO of the B.A.F.A. at their meetinR on Wednesday gradiMl the teams for the 11*32 competition as follows FIRST MVIKION Spartan, Cnrlton. Empire, Evci ton, Notre Dame and Harrison College HECOND NnnoN a i".niton. Spurtan. Notre Dame, Everton, I'ickwUk-Hover* Til inn DIVISION Wanderers. CabUand Wu.-le Koundatiun School. Fo.indatiot. Old Bov-. V M l'f "A". YM.I'.t "B". Empire. College, Combermere School, Combermere Old Bovs, Carlton, Lodge School YJ^.C.A.. Hckwlck-Itovcn.. Barbados Regiment. Notre Dam*\ Everton. Police. Rangers. Btolkneyg. i; to %  crowd of about 2.5M0 by the grace and ease with which lie mule hi:.hots. Both be and Ma partner howavei were subdued in the earlv stage*. NuUlifTe used only hurt bowlers inttl saving, the -pinner. Hurt: and aton i e ith before Inn-h w I rsasr NlAWH ... I. |->.rll StDllnMVrr not ul >** 4H pocnb 433 by the Regiment. shoot comprised applie.it imi nl lu'-iv. %  %  ^^ *""' 3 vards respectivelv -ipld at 300 yanta IVs C'l.yes fnim the |).MKishire scored tlie highest point> 91 with a possible al 200 yards, while the host ahot foi thr Regiment was Cant. C. E. Neblett with a total of 81. Following are the scores: drove Ihr playrra from ll' •""' !" P, !" !" >,.,• 35 niim.l.-.. '"^' !" '•' Winter Olympics Williams comes into the ABA ia(< j. Hardly a single clean bl_.. side In place of the Reptnn lightWM landed The referee had ueller. Reg Murray, who Is Incontinually to warn both men Jured. against holding and the crow; frequently broke into slow clapping to demonstrate their disappointment with the performance Turpin opened a cut over fluxion's left eye in the first round and 11 grew steadily worse as lh< light progressed. In thr IMHII round Turpin managed to break I loose from the embracing clutch | of hi* opponanl and dealt out more punishment lhan he had done all through the fight Though he was unable to re' that made him for a brief but glorious spell. Turpln's left hooks to the body showed all their old Results Of Belleville Tennis Tournament THURSDAY'!* RESULTS .. Bl. Hill and J.D.Trhiiw(jrld .-hampion -?• *—• •" 1. ^-T 2 glorious spell. Tui O.I1 M.rliU b BMBsl tntii dm "i" rail ol WStsMM I l"< I IS II.M.S. Ii.-v.-n-lnr. Point) Instiuctor I-t Dee Clayea 91 Mai lag Jones .88 ('..Hard 76 Sgt. Turner 14 Comman der Crawford Surge-on TJiT Wilson 68 469 Vussies Unablo To nrjiani/r Gairtea OSLO, Feb. 12, It was learned officially that Australia intends to waive the honour of organlring the 195o Olympic games, and Argentina appeared u a likely eandHtti * ink up the honour. ..... -•• RarhadiM Racbnenl Cap!.. Neblett, C. E. Majoi Walcott. O. F. C, Sgt. Edwards, F. E. H.S.M Marshall. H. B Q, Major Warren. A. 8. CS.M Cerhrr, G. A. iBy A Bpeclal Coni-pondon'i LONDON. The Winter Olympic Games of 1952 will begin today In Oslo. • The offteial opening, inaugurat•d by Kin*! Haakon on February Manning 15th will set the seal on five years Manning xtensive preparation. "For, at hi vies. P. C. TRAINEE IMPRESSED aj Free* rage 5 KNOCKOUT (OMM.T1I10N Spartan. Carlton, Empire. Notre Ward. S O'C Gittens. If. HnrOame. College. Everton and Barrts. •i.id'" Prtgaau rnocbal] Aaaocta* Fistawei steam i> M U :,„,, %  | M.i-omie. O. Thr Council appointed the fol(\>ppm. lowing sub-committees to serve Disciplinary.-Major A. during the season. t-'.fSer. Measrs. I> M IWard, b. ner. delivered the first Fixture nad Match:— Messrs. O'C. Gltten 1 F. l.__WaleoJt._l*. F. Afterward'* representatives ran off ling, skiing, bob-sleighe Nordic winter sport of utaMi C. A. Smith and L. F. Ham. Selection: Major A. R. Foster O. S. Oopptn and D, Wllkea. Consullafui — Mcati *. D. II. I r Hoyos, V 1 McComie, J. M. Ki Rlfataaa: Messrs. J. H. Wulcott. J. Speneer and L. F Harris rtgure-skatii at and un lined up on the Horse Guards b *5 dv \ U Parade Ground In front of the Bi,ndv * hle know S. Ihike of Edinburgh. The Duke ^"'ndin-via. where it , doclared the Clubs Week opened i ''•"l !" 'wintei-football'. The rules It. aid Arthur Wint. Jamaiean run,-'nmilar to those of succor. Fast •pfitacular. there are elevenaatda-; pwara use a "bat", shaped Men's Doubles . the TrinidadIan wonder man who recently aetslee (Handicap! g aV e a surprising but cnnvinclns toea tin Enleraationa] Olympic Mr. ft Mrs. D. E. Worme vs Miss win ovcr Australia's Dave Sands ComnntUe. in 1947. chose Oslo as .M. King ft J I>. Tnmlngham. Mi repeated that performance to (he t.-inNorwaj has Ix-en getE. Worme ft M. Worme vs Mrs. night by d'-leating Dutch light ting ready for the arrival of theA. S. Warren ft V. M Roach. Heavyweight champion Willie top-limb, snow and tea Owing to the fact that Friday. Schagen. February the 19th. 1952. has been The referee Mopped the light > ('eclaren e National Day tf hnlf a minute before the end of M5*<£S SSiff *-. V,„";„ < % %  >g S tCanada, Australia. New Zealand. wge the Sixth, thenwill bt Portugal Japan. Argentine, and '* Tennis, Tournament — Italy—the latter subsidised by a *""> on ,p dav state-run football pool. ________ The problem of housing the 1,200—1.300 eompetitors has been solved by the erection, in Oslo's 'suburbs, of three new vlHagea, which will afterwards accommodate students and the staff of a ho-.pit.il Event* in tails year's programms) nclude ice-hockey, speed and SANITARY LAUNDRY CO., LTD. Country Road Phone 3592 FOR COMFORT RIDE A I HOPPER BICYCLE THE BARBADOS FOUNDRY LTD. Whitepark Road ',*,''*'-**4'***'->'J'-*-*.*.'-**'.*'C*-**'-'.'-'-'.*.'-*-*-*.^*>. V'-**'-V--,'.*.*,1'**,to their various clubs to del the message. "It was a very interesting procession and I shall never for as I like a hocksg meh heavy ball. to drive They'll Do "it Every Tune ~_"1~U By Jimmy" Hado EtecTORS C~: ^40.3,426 —THE 9H HE-WAH WHO S*rs (AND wett EcscswPiNa)--. %  a* THEN NEEPLESS ro s*y; CUT COLO WHEN HE SETi MUT HE ASKED R3R — I mtd '• *' •" 6S6 Ma. Ls-a* Tide: lt.lt a.m. !?. p.m. Dutchmnn from reeel' otherIIIR further punuhmenl. Right from the OUtaet Pompej had difllculty m breaknui through Schagen's superb defence. Most of the punches—and it seemed h. i>ped throwing them— landed harmlessly on the Dutchman'! arms and shoulders. Bui gradually the West Indian's aggressive tactic* sYOfa down his opponent and It was sheer guts md lighting spirit that prevented the Dutch champion going down in the Anal state of the fight WHAT'S ON TODAY M. n .i service for King Ceorae VI at St. Michaels (Uthedral ll.e* a.m. inert <>i Appeal I.Ot p-m. Pellre 4nd Pelt> Debts Courts l.M pm. Mnr.Ur( Inema shov. at Warnerplantation Yard. Christ Church 7.30 p.m. s'-',-MEN WHO ARE AGREED ON TOP QUALITY TAILORING INSIST ON HAVING THEIR CLOTHES MADE BY P. C. S. MAFFEI & CO. LTD. Top Scorers in Tailoring Princd Win. Hnry Street '.W.WV.W//,V-W -. Mll.l SUiMYII.M. iHivri.M. % % %  %  %  1WH IIIIHV4. SI'II I \ I Oil SPOII IS An Island of Holidav ODDortunities! So many and varied that clothes may seemingly present a problem. There is, in fact, no clothing problem which the House of C B. Rice of Bolton Lane, Custom Tailors and Men's Outfitters, cannot adequately solve—eilher from their selective, imported stock, or with a garment tailored to individual needs. €. B. Rice If Co. USE SISCOLIN DISTEMPER Bring harmony, the harmony of colour, into the home by decorating with Siscolin the ideal treatment for Wall:and Ceilings. Siarolin—-covers in one coat. Siscolin—is lower in coat.' Siscolin—is simply mixed with clean water. Siscolin—can be easily applied over any surface— Plaster. Wallboard, Distemper. Oil Paint. Sisrolin—will not flake or rub off. Sis.olin—dries rapidly and hard. Supplied in White, Cream, Grren. Buff. Peach. Sunshine, Blue. !. lb. S< :.J lb. packages


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PACE SIX BARBADOS ADVOCATE FRIDAY. FEBRUABY 13. 1952 CLASSIFIED ADS. ft\.tPttOHt MOB. PITWLir SALE* REAL ESTATE 9m Birth*, Mamas* or biMMMil 5ii l m l I ru l per aord Srir • %  • h IOS**V IkMiM n -in lor *.*M IN Ml MOKIAM r Vho ton •M llH Warn or* *e Inv .1 %  eallerl awv Ttir blow •>• hard, in* aback VKI. WP ROWS* Inp%  %  m In l<* rrnumt-r-^l > aji-> !" jMoiasr i ciM>i >to AM*.-.. iFavh-r I' a*a- iii--."(.. %  on Wi lovrur IMMII *I Norman FluGerald Hrpe FsBruar. ISO. ISO* To livin Ih* ..ri of *w *•> lvf.M*Bet Hop*, MM and daugfitrr* U flJaVli ** %vi>.n i on SAI.I: %  UTUMOTIVK • hi;..!*.Li. I A MOTc Hfdmari & T as lor %  Oa-ner i tonaon. phone iOal l> 1 St—In OAlM It .*4* i' .-. %  < £ ,. Uxf.ird Saloon .rilml .nnom-.n H %  M DMI..DtflUM I H p.. -u|> IBOS ChiiUri Itv. Morru Minor 1 Dm* Hotnotl 11,000 mil*. Jmt arrived Mom* (XlonU a no %  MM "i %  •'-' "1 1-10 ..I Vaiu al prieas %  %  *" lo J.n^ir 1*1. S*. ..,..aura %  ltMMI> >."" : i'i I'..;.. i:->4 11 s ss-Ta. KI.ECTIIICAL HEI.I OOOD CK>K Aw. Mr.. l*c: ton "F r< I* 1 53 If. %  I Qtrtn m .n^ kaatj I MISCELLANEOUS aoAKnuttt-'-PTK Beearru.li on a> y.ln .. .1 % % %  I MY. Slone. Ml ANTIQl'F. <)! Ill I* B* On* EMimOH CAP BAIM'i PrOrtteaiJ} r.rw Can M >rn %  <1 Bold lot SITU II 111* 00 II 1 U—• MUIU fl Bart-do* It, SHipelng At Tradl'i,* CO no KMHON FKO kuu *T Barbed*, It* Compan, lid 1 Wr*< I. .i .Tho above wiU bo **t twbli. mnpHiUot a( ap>oinUnr.> The abnvr *UI bo let up for talf jriaMrr rampr-UUon on TI~I of WAruari itol. at 1 | r 4 IIOMK rf-F.R7.Bit4 4HOI fl Made br-..iUlio. luaroMlex). ...L.| oUaM)0 wMB l"mu> f-Tlaidairr Mrtor-Mlofl .' K It Hunt, at C Dial 3I3 MM < %  Mil. 11.1 Tho I.KMIIAI coLOoni K T M.ntrjiv HxtMtuarlori OOBe* 14 Fob Itol i (onrotinoN or PABABI T>e Fa>*a> -.ill toruWt r.( The Baebadoa Brglmcn The na.l-'ivI Barbados Polwo rnre lUrbado* Cade! Corp. GEORGE VI. i\vrni < Tioxs. ROYAL NF.lMtRLANDS STEAMSHIP CO. %  omr %  srorl'. Bool. Ifnaotopi. I Boil, and UdMim*. AnK'ti'-rn holla and Fiot will M laaued at Ibi nil Pol.,. Aordered %  %  AllIM, TO IISII. M. 4MB < %  Banamaa Ballina HI IbO 1MB I MtlnftFT" will ae.-cpl Caiao and Pi iimm fa* DoonmSIKMU %  allina 1Mb initanl M V %  DAK" WOOD %  will oeeofA %  Uranoda Arwba. %  narliirv to be nolUlld. B.W.I. tCHOAJNUt OWNaaU' ABBOCIATloN IDC > Conain.. Tela. No 0M7. Ban %  M l l.U an. ItSPTUOOtATOR One f cu fl IB4S B C in good condition but mrplm la ireaonl needi. Phone BH % %  M ilan • .. %  -I 4 ( %  in for prmilMion 10 view ta.p.pB BB. MECHANICAL ONI; roun wurtx CANK CABT w.ih "m and l.r.ikr-. I'aoM-d MiKhw--. at Tranaporl. nevei i.d Dial 40111 Coiirleav a>r.|. If. 1 M• I'WWIMI. or..nlnarr Sewln* M.hlf.r Treadir' very llltle uaed. Cnmale*r UK part* for Cl Work und Kmbroidery %  %  The 1. IcMrnjBnnn M boM imyif rlMrontr. -lie .I.' I Do in 111. l ,1 > %  anv deb) ftCned <>• %  TAKE NOTICE K0LYN05 AUCTION '"*" Cropc 50 >d* •,!> Ateorled •liar*. M dor f(^.,i Prlal sni.i.. r our. .ronialnmg Mi Moln (Mi Ma.-, Far* ind H-. PH.. %  U. Boao* Trenrf and other ii*n., H ABCrtRR MrKFA/IF. Cattafldrm] in momory of His Ifttc UatdBt? KIIIK <;.re VI will i fommence al II a.m. today hv IMh of Fehruary with %  • tWO mimitfv The siicnal at the lommencemenl and the CBStaUon nf lhBaatncdj will be Riven by rockvts fired from the Harbour PwM Bu i.u ka povdjrnor trust* that all I the rommuntty and all persons throughout the IiUnd will unit* :n ohoervln-, ;he occaaIon b* I complete coMitlon of nil normal burdne*.. woik| and locomotion for two mlnui %  •• .il ihe hour named. TAKE NOTICE CHLORODENT I .i I BatBKJMB-f ind Bell (oat.isi. tp n.o Tho Parade will form .in under their unll Con^nandrn nl li Italian Parade Grounda and will ihen rnarch to ih. t.thnir. m* order nader Ihe BanMr Orlkrr prlaii*n-Mailn#. Canadian National Slanishi|is n will k %  w %  MI (hi arrival then, aaii BOITt Th. rouw will be frara Catural PM.-. !" *tPbsrv Mreet and bacB Ihe tame TIMI TABU I'nlM will paiaOa on Friday IMh rotoruarv, !BM C.i.lral Piillce Bui. >n P.i. I. flround LADY RODNEY" LADr NBLBONCANADIAS cmjisra%  allfai •all* •oiUa Arrival oall* BarbaOoi Bafbadai .. II Peby ..It Fry II Mar* li F*b. n Foby. M Pebf. U Feb> t March 10 March n March M March march • Cathedral TBAMarOBT Bdrbarioa raatBnenl will arrange iranepon lor n Ch* Tri aaiBH will arrlvo at Lada* BelUK.1 no* tONIUMBH OF PABADI At th. eoticluaton of the Parade Umi. ardl i-d> .Vniii —nd*r* and Ankle-fallen, bell, and Btdai be mode b;* ihe waiter Matter M Pindar their own (wiwrn at IOI j aami laler lhan !• hour* in M>> I II 111 It Ml CAW. CRU1RXRLADY RODNEY l-ADY NBLBON" CAN. CRUISER" Ar.l.r. tall* Arrl*ea ArtK.i Aral*** %  arbadaa Rarbad** BoMoa m. loka Balira* 10 Feb. II Ftby — M PMrp. 1 March • March • March M March li March M March M March M March 1 April 4 April T April .4 April T Ascil 14 April IT AprU For further pirllciilarr. apply ti B by Iheir i i f itt will be caUeeted I BartMdot Realrr.1 GARDINER AUSTIN A CO.. LTD.—Agent.. %  IMITED. whnar m ii -tt Brida.ii lndnn OFFICIAL NOTICE %  "i UNDER THE IVORY HAMMER ipp || at Met. < %  -..., %  N. |>. Cat -ii „,. ppg ii ln.a| M.,i ISM -i-eldeni i MISCELLANEOUS oment ul -I %  IT! tnll %  -t li. "-. HI AT. Or" • (!.. %  ., % % %  lad i | %  B %  ApurK Pin*, ilor*. Oain.. I9IU -Sn. %  I i.\LVANI7JU> Hill Kin A limit..! i ft II ao. i II is • %  on H *'< boalilta Al Tyo Cn. TOteakooe MM I151 Ifn liiiAiN riin lb lot. and Im.tri | Ipllmi. nut %  epl I dUinferUnt, and w.H I'I I *l 'l-'l %  %  I 1 Ifgl £M 4111. %  I..bl.nf RBBMI Pa) aa^HrulM 1.1 1 W -1. * • Un<. M i-l-.nlim arliflcial trell, eth. and Wttl I >' %  ii.. .ii VMeuan IMI taon -hnll In thrmranUnir i diiplieate to n.r at my I reaMnttei HARHADOS In puriuanec ^.f 'he Chancery Af applied fm bavlng or clalmtna any oalale rlghl C ..rTr.ttns the proprnv hereinafter m before rBT OF CIlANtrar VINC-ENTi. -I J.. MBJ TAKE NOTICE BiSoDoL aBMffl II norm j MatatM • eaaimned bv m* o id 3 o'clock In the afterr a, laefore the 4th day eporied on and ranked iv otherwise a | b. deprived IV nil COI M I do haesby Five noUc* to all I tereil lo any lien or .nctiniLrancei >ned Hhe property <>r I imi with th*lr wllnHIM dacurnei Tueada> r Friday b.t-"- tM '•' tb. B .lUlr..lioti OnVc. PuMW> Bu larch ttea. In order thai ueh rdirui lo Ihe %  **?* nr,d C. 1 *!! 1 propert y. preaana uill be pretliidr-l fi-.t PlalallB: ENA MAY OALE Drfridanl: CLARA AlJtOP C.A1E PROPFHT^ FIRSTLY AU. THAT certain MSB PARADE %  iii.*I* at at. riintalnlng by ml on a plan I -ho IBgS or dv.ilm.iih iland. and Ir-eretn belDiialiv -uti.t Church in thl. I.l.iui .. _. reabouU bultinfl and be-iinnor known >• Baa View Hotel, on li.i.di formally of Mary Ann % %  aw %  lat* of Prtnk Crt|. and on the public ro*d or hoocv r sas ,* butt and bound SECOND1.Y AIX THAT reri.ii. rnalMB dweUlnl .tore (IWate in Hiffh Street in the City ••< BridsHo.n In le.ii ibered I' W the —"< Btieei i.>aeihcr with •>., n.1 thoeto belonalng eonlalnina bv admeanrneiit Ills •*>" %  •" it. b.uilf Bad brmndli.K Ml Ihe premi^a known * Numb., iv* l d 14 H.*h mreet and un Ih. aiMnBM hnowe. a. Ho. IS HUfl. SI i l.lniWHITtllAU. I'HARAIAl-AI !" ier th. lawa of the Rtett. r. butinaa* addre*. ,v *, ga M lurre.. ha. aapbed for Iho rogUtroi .maaT^a,V.V 1 h d-" %  ;:. %  srTCu5-t In .Frt,rM MM "1'n.rM and r%  %  %  Mow York. Ul A Part \ to*l>t.r the an' -* aervon .hall in %  Hill. Slrct afon-uld ... miHDLY AU. THAT .'Haiti alM-e or parcel ol Und tniMH.ri r.ll.'i -RARTICA %  ronUiinlhii b> ihrreabout. (foemerlv pan -t — uare loeUd the 1...LI.' i.'.'l -".'. M w-.k beyahd tnc rii.ttict ..il*d It.-tma. in the oaid par lhl> l.liui.l t)! isg ..,.l -K,.. aaeaoatokal Bj | | %  %  ..ii MB K at my otto* of oppoaltiu ir*ti. f. Tt moi v aprMkllUB ot h.V Owlee jy-t*. H.K it4 day -A I • -I IFl.llMIIKI.S SI.LEONARDO uuiaGU OXOANIBT CHOIR MASTER Applications |o lxieni to Nil %  ilii.Ai.n lU-tMhsIu., Sulury 914410 %  %  fn •). whom rcfereiicfB nmy lw required. i'i 2 52.—3n ORIENTAL SOUVENIRS BILKS. Ct'RIOR ARTS TPWT TM08 SPDAS. —IAS T AKTIMTICAH | OORItMlDADEfl. Tl ATD0S I I.A INDIA C11INA • F..' n-TO ROYAL KAKBAIH>S VAiJIT CUB NO I II I MlMllil'l i.1 ..< %  I '. %  .'.< tll.it the Club House will be closed on ii.t until 12.30 p.m. I HHUCE LEWIS, Sttii'taiy. TAKE NOTICE ANACIN "h.t WlimniAI.I. PHARMACA iNU'ANY. corporation orginir. -ndar the Lawi of Ihe Stair llllnol* United Slain of Amen DM Had* or bualn**s oddreai la %  an. ar...t. N*w York. New York, facluteri. ho* applied for rrgKliation of a Irade mark in Fort .1 hritiiter in rmpect of a medicinal %  ft llr.1 In irgl.t-l Hi* Mil* 01" nrh from the llth day Of Febm ..m ihall in %  ICE CRIAM li.l.'.il.i Kill M.\IJ: Th. I Cn I'itrluur known ..s The CUtb sttUBW at llaxtei* lload It %  propefl) equipK voih Urfrlurratois and p Kiei're*. and tM W in. Gootl npi>orlunlty lor n jir.tinR man or ippfa %  Middle Street Kurniluie Depot. Dl.il 2fM5. EXHIBITION AT BARBADOS MUSEUM :w3BST INDIAN I'MNTINi; 1 -' By ROBERT J. MAC lEOI .ind IINl II A UMI i: COLOIK I irriire Drsuingo of Ml BBaMBB Sabjret* By llAROIIt ( uaBafl I OPafJH faVfi. 0— MARCH R 10 a.m.—6 p.m. y office. lit day of Fetoruar ISU II H.l.kAM> negWtiar ol Tr.de Maih. ..-,,-,*,',',',*,',*,V'*'e-e--We--*-*-*-,:; Mrmtirial fcn'fct * i las ralo BjMt) uaonur. "'"J i i\im %  e an an-num ,.( |pj ,, . i ... o'eirwfc i„ ih. BSlOBStsaii, before llic 4ln u.. al may be refiortrd ui. -nd ranked an respectively sa wroH Ptaia llrlri %  4F.IAIA i Mllll.lA MKECK |-ATTrH8oN PHoraarrv FIKSTLY ALL THAT ...t„,„.,,, .-_, ,,, ri of Ihe Umi..IK ,. %  rtsh of Saii.i I^mp aim laland atari , %  %  ". -d 'part Ward ronUining Eight acre* one rood ten perrhc wh rt lands of Klrtona Plantatlor.i .lln-.l. ifiuni.ld con.tali.iiig b> adineaiurirmriit I'm" ting and bounding on land. ..f Slrphanai CUrho On th. i.f Ihe elate ol T. LAllamby oVceaard .ind on the p.._. Uie Mm* raa, abut and bound FOURTHLY ALL THAT Cert ol land ipart of a larger area of IsfM ,-art of the land! of Elrlnn. HUnt.ni..,. Mtuale in Ihr ..ml pa lal i and Uland %  lorcaald conuinlng b, •Snaiunmiriik two rood* o. %  par ah 0* or thereabout* auuttu.i BM .< Adeinklr t ",' %  Z, !" ""w %  ^• " w T ^ W "• V" Mr '" •""%  "'•• <> %  l'"metly of th* e*t*t. "P CUrbe deeoaard rit now nf ih. .aid Wallet Ft..n.l. Hetcr and fMlma and bound FIFTHLY AU. THAT certain piece or parcel ot land kjUwn"*** "Oao Field"' iform-rl> part ol the land. %  •( Kin-.ii. PlaalathMJ sNwatO lit the and parun ol saint Philip nnd Uland alorvauld coiuainnm h. Adineuiirernenl Too roodi iwenly p*rche* or thereabout, abuluiig and l-nnidliui on land! now or lato ..( rhoehe E Clarke on two Moss on landa now or latv M Klitoni Pl.tM %  *tn*r Und* of the laid Walur rrancii Recce and Selm* Calhleen Reoce Patter...„ Drafi Right IM..tt, UNO . . ii a.-m I Tl OS BOILS Ohl tW COUo"' lid ol unsightly hlemi-iiei last I dive ipeedv treatment BUI Meditated, ontiiepi" in t haw'. Qtotmrnt Sowhrimii MBM H Large im-. '• tiiin-sat much, ti.lt. DR. CHASE'S AntlMplic OINTMENT What oaf rt torewiih ifi-ito coufh. all fhe Kmr i '.,i | .i .... Si Joaeph llownr bound Rill flledDoted THAT icitain iiirc ami Philip and l.lai abutting %  i .I . (he pubii" at Maichflcld In Ihe l.v admeaiirer-ent OH* k i brad* SOW or Int. ,.| i* MISS mi, nbul ard II WIU.IAMB. Ilegiatmr-lit thinrrrMM ,*.'.- V/W//// INVESTMENT TTJNITT. *,-.*.*-*-V*'-;. OPPORli A limited number of CurouiaUv* tj St Prefernce Share* in A. V RARNES CO., LTD Telrphnri. \ Secretary. Mr. Victor Hunt*. MS". I 1 Jlln X ssaaaaaaM CALLING ALL THRIFTY FOLKS! %  Ill m. these lu*>e'GOVERNMENT NOTICES As moil member* 0a Uu %  "UK n t, duties in i-Diiiie.-liiut ith UM i.e lor His Maj' % % %  : late King George VI OR Pi Ah I not open for publn' h.• oaf AdMBBtsf I POLICE. I It XI 114 \oiin: COUGH LOZENGES MEMORIAL SEKYIt I \l ^1 M ICIIAII S C \TIIFIR\I IMh (IHKI'ARY. 195? IRIIMV young Leghorn bsna, tlirei %  oc-keieis r. paa wnlta K,Plgvons, 3 Flcmun Giant rabbits, 1 pr. white turkeys Sec Saturday 1.00 to 6.00. Sunday 8.00 to 12.00 %  'Medmenham," Pine Hill SHARKSKIN 36" Best iii Town (RF.Pr DE CHINE 36 A Real Beamy >1.98 JERSY 48' (Plain) 1.12 (Striped) 1.27 9HANT-ONG (Popular Shades) 1.12 PRINTS M' wide CALICO 06" Brisk ( I .1 \S :ili wide SATIN St.' wide BROCADE :!6" wide fj; hi ORGANDY 36" wide .57 .67 .19 .71 .69 On l-n.i .. I .ih Februsrv. Wtv 1 The drivers of all r.i hall approach the Cathedral I 2. Chauffeur driven cars koutti Gala u> tl %  CRtbi lha vi.-iinly of QucvnV CtJlBf) 3. Owner driven ears >h.t' pawengem at Ihe Ninth CJai 4. Spry Sin-. 3. Church Slivt-t -IKIII M.nto under Hule .ii the RdMgaa of III IA Jnd I? nom lonveying nersim^ I" tintdsri o/aj ..f TraralRai I %  BRJ Ihenoccupnnls al Ihe N nu Ciiii'tttutnui K.i.i.l ,ti '**>'*'*'.'***'.*.*.'*<.*,n ... %  uu Into Spiv Slreel. sel down ilunr iMik as rUnettd b) lha Police. Bray tron si Bflebaal'g How. oiH' way from Chuuh Square. BrMffBtOWTI Jinl S|>eighlst.i..ii \mendlBent) BnguLiiinns 1043. II T MICHEI.IN. CommiaBaWlrW Headtiu I Ifndgetown. 13lh Febniiii>. IH3Z. Announcing Ihe arrival of:— (Terrazzo) MARBLE CHIPS We always crry a large a.H.-orln,ent of — BEST BRITISH IMIVTS II ENAMKLS la MM% 1*0 .. a trUl Drier. II.MHAI KMPOHIITM .*.*.*.*.*.*.'.*.'-*.*.*,*.*,'Kot in 5 colours Verandahs and Flo Hi KIM It I .M.H..I/U1, Lane, I. Til. Dial: 4367 Corner Broad & Tudor StTcett FOR SAI i; I V\< II III 114, "ili AvfRur. M. K. II. % ill. iateJ An Bttracthnl and well proportioned 2 stoiey house s i corner lite of 12.060 SQ. feet. Contain3 gallei encloaad), large drawing room, dining room, study, modern %  fa, t bedroom*, garage, etc. l-.w flgBPe serrated for quirk sale, owner gains abroad. JOHN M. BLADON A. O. A IS F V A REAL I v|.11 K.IMiii.. II..fiio. ri.,u..ii..ii. Umi., II II IIVI.S SHBIS — RiK-k Bollum frier. HII! (INK HOLLAR ONLY n Pnirs SOCKS or 2 VESTS or 4 HANKIES or 2 PANTIES or 4 COLD BELTS or 2 CHANGE PURSES YANKEE TYPE SHADES. WALLETS FANCY SILK SHIRTS (Barbados View) J1.7S 3.18 ALL-WOOL TWEED PINSTRIPED 5" wide SII.VKR OBEY FLANNEL 56" wide 9.50 3.39 IIIINGABBB — Heavy Quality LSI KHAKI — Popula r Simile 1.17 BEDROOM RUGS — All Wool — from 3.58 VEGETABLE DISHES (with Coven) 1.27 BLANKETS — Irom 1(.K( III K.IITS II M II MM.CURTAIN NETS CRERONM IH" wide TOWELS DILI -LOTH III AIIKI lit. lilt I %  2.91 1.39 4.59 .39 111 .17 1.39 .78


——



ESTABLISHED 1895



KING’S FUNERAL Tt

Crowds Totalling

2,000,000

Britons filing by King George VI’s coffin in Westminster
Hall passed the 200,000 mark today and tens of thousands
more waited patiently in the snow sleet rain for their turn.
It was the sorrowing subjects’ last chance to pay tribute to

the King as he lay in state
Houses of Parliament.

Tomorrow the coffin will be
taken in a majestic funeral pro-
cession from Westminster to
Paddington Station for the train
journey to its final resting place
in. St. George’s Chapel at Wind-
~ Castle.

me 10,000 troo a
detectives will line the ction
three and a half mile route through
Central London's Streets to keep
back the crowds expected to total
2.000,000 persons.

Six Sovereigns
Representatives of all the
world’s remaining monarchies will |
take part in the funeral procession,
They include at least six sovereigns
—the greatest collection of Royalty
to assemble anywhere since before |
World War II. An eerie daytime
darkness hung over London when |
the massive wooden doors of
Westminster Hall swung open at
8 am. G.M.T. for the third and
last day of King George the Sixth’s

lying-in-state.

Enveloped in winter clothes
against the 32 degree Fahrenheit
temperatures, and hidden beneath
umbrellas, the mourners stretch.
ing across the misty Thames River
and along the South Bank shuffled
into the cold Hall past the purple
draped coffin, surmounted by the
crown jewels and flanked by yeo-
men, gentlemen of arms and
guardsmen in ancient dress.

Like the 185,092 people who pre-
ceded them during the first two
days the coffin was on view, the
people who entered in one’s and
two's were plain citizens of Britain
who regarded the death of King
George on February the Sixth as
a personal loss. 1

Snow, Rain, Sleet
Weather officials predicted that
the dreary discomforting mixture
of snow, rain and sleet would

continue throughout the day, but |Ports of carcase meat and veal in

it appeared to muke no difference
to tens of thousands still falling
into line along the River Bank.

The doors will remain open until
sometime early tomorrow morn-
ing. By then almost 300,000
persons would have filed past the
catafalgue—a throng equal to the
number who paid final respect to
King George V when he lay in
state for four days in January
1936.

But the total still will be short
of the 500,000 who filed by the
coffin of King Edward VII, son of
Queen Victoria and andfather
. George VI, after his death in
1910,

Visit By Queen Mary

Last night the dowager Queen
Mary, mother of King George VI
and the Duke of Windsor, his
brother and predecessor on the
throne, also visited the catafalque.

The 84-year*old dowager Queen
reluctantly agreed not to take part
in the state funeral tomorrow
owing to her age. The Duke of
Windsor who ruled briefly in 1936
as Edward VIII before abdication
to marry American divorcee
Mrs. Wallace Warfield Simpson
had arrived earlier in the day
from New York City.

Through red-carpeted old train



Expected

LONDON, Feb. 14.

in the vast hall adjoining the

moved K: , Queens, Princes and
Princesses both eastern and
western hemispheres. Guns boom-
ed a royal welcome for them.
Already here or on their way,
were six rulers: Paul of Greece,
Gustav of Sweden, Haakon of
Norway, and Frederik of Denmark,
Queen Juliana of the Netherlands,
and Grand Dutchess Charlotte of
Luxembourg.

Queen Louise of Sweden and,
Queen Ingrid of Denmark accom=
panied their husbands.

Princes And Princesses

Then there were Princes and
Princesses representing at least
seven other ruling houses of
Europe, Africa, Asia, plus Presi-
dent Vincent Auriol of France and
President Ivan Ribar of Yugo-
slavia.

U.S. Secretary of State Dean
Acheson, representing Truman
and at least 17 other foreign
ministers are also here or are
coming. General Eisenhower, Su-
reme Commanéer of the Atlantic!
Pact Armed forces and his wife
were scheduled to arrive
today.

The weather man predicted a
dry cold day for the funeral, but
said there might be showers of;
rain or snow.

’

later

Britons Eat
Less Meat |

LONDON, Feb. 14.
Britons ate in 1951 about 26
percent less meat than in 1950
and 38 per cent, less than before
the war. The main reason for
this was the failure of Britain’s
main foreign meat supplies. Im-



1951 were 53 per cent, less than
in 1950 and much lower than at
any other time in the last 50 years.

hese facts were revealed in the
February issue of the Common-
wealth Economic Committee’s in-
telligence bulletin. It calculated
that Britons ate an average of
54.7 pounds of beef and veal per |
head every year before the war.
In 1951 the average consumption
per head dropped to 35.6 oe

—

TWO W.I. POLICEMEN
IN KING’S FUNERAL
PROCESSION





Support “Bob

has ever had before.”

Before concluding his talk, The
Chief Scout appealed to members
of the Chamber for their support
in making BOB A JOB WEEK, |
(which will be instituted shortly)
a success and during which!
Scouts properly dressed in uni-
forms and carrying a card would
go around asking for jobs which
would help them to earn money
for the Scout Movement.

After a brief welcome by the
President of the Chamber, Mr.
D. G. Leacock Jnr., Lord Row-
allan thanked the President for
his welcome, and said he thought!
very few people realised the in-
fluence of Scouting in the world





(From Our Own Correspondent)
LONDON, Feb. 14
Two West Indian police offic-
ers—Sub-Inspector K. B. Harry-
singh of British Guiana and As-
sistant Superintendent L. Rod.
riguez of Trinidad—will be
among the small contingent of
Colonials representing Colonial
Police Forces in the King’s funeral
procession in London tomorrow,
Seventy Colonial Police Offic-
ers will help ‘line the funeral
route from Westminster to Pad-

terminals and London airports!dington station.
|



Truman Undecided
Over Presidency

WASHINGTON, Feb. 14.
President Truman. told a new conference he cannot say
at this time whether he would run for the Presidency if it
became necessary for the preservation of world peace. He
said the decision was difficult to make and the time has not
come to make any announcement. He said that when the
time comes he will make it directly to news representatives
and not through third persons who come to call on him at
the White House.
Truman asked reporters not to
= him further about his at-

tude on re-election because he
was not ready to discuss it further.

Spanish Minister
je¢t all he is going te do until ‘the
tape comes to aioe ne an- Confers With Edew



ts eal



; because Lor:







nouncement as to his decision. His
comment was provoked by ques-
tions as to whether he had been
quoted correctly by various
callers who saw him this week
and afterwards told
their impression of his attitude.

Foremost among these was re-
presentative Adolph Habath who
on Tuesday said Truman told him
he would run for the Presidency
if it was necessary for world peace
and the welfare of the TWnited
States, although it might shorten
his life to do so.—U.P.

HOGAN TO REPRESENT
ARGENTINA AT

KING’S FUNERAL
LONDON, Feb. 14.

Argentine President Peron has
signed a special decree appoint-
ing Carlos Alberto Hogan Argen-
tine Ambassador in London, to
represent the President and the
Argentine Government at the
funeral of the late King George
the Sixth tomorrow.

Hogan will be received by the
new Queen Elizabeth the Second
along with all other foreign
representatives now in London
to attend the funeral. —U.P.

reporters |

The Spanish Foreign Minister,
Alberto Martin Artajo, conferred
with Foreign Secretary Anthony
Eden at the Foreign Office for
nearly half an hour today, and
officials said that the meeting took
place in a “friendly atmosphere.”

LONDON, Feb. 14.

Also present was the Spanish
Ambassador, Miguel Primo De
Rivera, and the British Ambassa-
dor to Madrid, Sir John Balfour.

Officials described Artajo,s call
as a “courtesy visit.” No details
of the discussions were disclosed
However, it is understood that the
Ministers briefly discussed Anglo-
Spanish relations, but the main
part of the conversation was said
to have bsen confined to non-
political exchanges. It is under-
stood that Artajo recalled Spain’s
readiness to play her part in
western defence. Embassy offi-
eials said that Artajo would stay
in London until Tuesday or
|Thursday of next week, and that
jhe was planning to meet a number
of political personalities for a
general exchange of views.

—UP.

to-day. It was too often regard-
ed from the negative point of
view—from the point of view of
a cure for juvenile deliquency,
rather than the creation of an at-
mosphere in a boy's heart, which

would prevent juvenile delin-
quency from taking its place
there,

The Scout Motto

Referring to the strength of the
Scout Movement, the Chief Seout
said there were some 5% million
scouts in the world, about 1%
million of which were to be
found in the British Common-
wealth and Empire. There were
scouts in, almost every free coun-
try of the world, all of whom
kept essentially the same comes
ise and the same law, al
varying slightly in their wording.
But the spirit behind them was
always the same—duty to God,
as the first part of the, Promise,
Baden-Powell real-
ised that without something to
hold on to above themselves,
there was very little permanent
value in the work.

He said that the movement was
often criticised in the early days
because it was not entirely a
christian movement. They were
criticised because they did not
confine themselves to certain de-
nominations, but Lord Baden-
Powell with his usual insight and
wisdom (because he was a very
wise man) realised that there
was a place and some common
| ground in which boys and young
}men of good will and of all faiths
‘and languages, could meet to-
| gether without compromise to
their own conscience and their
own national way of life.

Lord Rowallan went on to de-
jfine and illustrate the respective
Scout Laws, and commenting on
the positive instructions given in





‘French Frane Drops
\'T'o Lowest Value Yet

1
PARIS, Feb. 14.

The French frane Wednesday
dropped to the lowest free mar-
ket value since it was devalued
jin 1949, Black market operators
here are paying up to 468 francs
tur the dollar against the official
peg of 350 on the Government
controlled exchange. Gold as
well as dollar prices continued
upward as confidence in France
decreased. A temporary halt en-
sued after Government earlier
this month announced an aus-
terity plan on imports and tax
reductions to encourage exports.

Wednesday's weakness follow-
ed the National Assembly’s re-
fusal to begin debate on the fin-
ancial programme Friday design-
ed to balance the budget and halt



inflation.—U.P. { Australian rocket base i

LAST GOOD-.BYE



SHOWING the strain of his recent operation, King George VI is
pictured at the airport in London, as he witnessed the departure of
Princess Elizabeth and her husband, Prince Philip, for Africa.

— (International Photo)

Chief Scout Asks C.C. ‘To Mr Cee ae

LORD ROWALLAN, Chief Scout of the World, who|i®luding the
was guest speaker at the Quarterly General Meeting of
the Barbados Chamber of Commerce yesterday, said that]authority which
“Seouting to-day is stronger than it has ever been in its{local
history, and perhaps a greater appeal for the boys than it] Pâ„¢eved





FRIDAY. *EBRUARY 15, 1952

-_
wy



| Chinn’s Visit
Will Be Of
Great Help

Miss Dora Ibberson, Social

Welfare Adviser to the Comp-
troller for Development and
Welfare who returned from
Jamaica tast week, told the
Advocate yesterday that the

main purpose of her visit was to

meet Mr, W. Chinn, the Secre-
tary of State’s Social Welfare
Adviser at the beginni of his

four of the B.W.1 colonies.

Mr. Chinn has a long personal
record of social work, He was
Chief Probation Officer in Pales-
tine and head of the Social Wel-
fare Department when this was
set up,

Since his appointment in 1947
as Social Welfare Adviser to the
Secretary of State for the Colon-
jes, he has visited the greater
part of the Colonial Empire and
acquired an extensive and un-
usual knowledge of welfare work,
both official and voluntary in
all parts of the world.

Mr. Chinn’s special knowledge
of the problems of organisation
should be. outstandingly useful
to West Indian governments and
the Conference on Social Wel-
fare work which will be held in
Hastings House, Barbados from
March 17 — 21 should enable
‘welfare officers to see their work
as part of a world movement to
rocialize the thinking of admin-
istration,

Since welfare work is
ately associated with
as well as with
agriculture, it is
Messrs, Houghton, Director of
Education and P. M, Sherlock,
Vice-Principal of the University
College of the West Indies who
is responsible for the Department
of Extra Mural Studies, will be
present as well as other distin-
guished guests,

intim-
education
health and
hoped that

spent a very

99 ‘{crowded fortnight in Jamaica
A ob Week ‘where he was impressed by the|party which was lined up about
demand for the further

ation of the Welfare

many
voluntary bodies.
The work of the

is assisted by
“juvenile committees,”

marking as it does, an important

advance in the community's
the Scout Laws, said that the} responsibilit ’
challenge which’ they make “is any. hase” whee Seve -atecee

first founded. Among the
Knowledge Acquired was 2
Scouting, the Chief Scout said,
in addition to teaching lads to
light a fire with one mateh in the
open or cook a meal, taught all
those things which kept them in-
terested, and which widened their
experience and practical ability;
to apply the knowledge that they
acquire, not only through scout-
ing, but in their school; to acquire
all practical experience—some-
thing of wisdom as well as
knowledge. The
He thought that one of the
greatest tragedies of to-day,
in many ways, was the vast
increase in the pool of know-
ledge that had been develop-
ed during the past 50 years,
with the result that nobody
knew or saw knowledge as a
whole, but each one was a
specialist in an ever narrow-
er and narrower groove.
That was particularly so in our
education where there was very

Nations to make a scheme
@ On Page 3 s

ADVISER WILL



GEORGETOWN, Feb. 12,
much travelled, Wilfred

State for the Colonies now on the

three-month tour

Conference here that there is a
general lack of knowledge
social problems,

ment should be the complementary
side to economic development, and
said that he would like to see more



vigorous} with the Brownies who lined up
.. junder the tree about ten
Juvenile! from the saluting base,

to be of great interest, fonartgn. on the

Introducing Lord Rowallan — who
was dressed
shirt with a short

subjects discussed | Commonwealth and Empire should | Pretesting nations
proposal from the United|]@ome at this time and she was

DURING TOUR ures in Canada and since that

British Guiana leg of a scheduled|fve and a half million brother
of the British }#[d three and a half million sis-
Caribbean territories told a Press |ters in the family,

of |five and a half million
‘ would look like but they knew |
He stressed that social develop-|they are quite a lot of them, If
there was a Bible so big that the
Scouts of the World could stand

a4



PRICE FIVE CENTS.
“COLOUR PARTY” AT PAX HILL”







LORD ROWALLAN, Chief Scout of the Commonwealth and Empire shakes hands wth Sea Ranger
Allison Alkins during his inspection of the Guide's “Colour Party” at Pax Hill, Guide Headquarters yes-
terday afternoon, Mrs, E. B. Williams, Island Guide Commissioner, follows behind the Chief Scout,

pore ye Pall
Chief Scout Inspects ee

Guides’ Colour Party — Gurrency

A
FIVE HUNDRED and ten Guides were present at Pax | TEL A VIV,-Beb. 14
Hill, St. Michael, to welcome Lord Rowallan, Chief Scout! ‘The new state of Israél, ridden
of the Commonwealth and Empire, yesterday afternoon jby economic crisis has devalued
The weather was fine and punctually at 4.30 p.m. Lord |it8 eurreney in a drastic bd to
Rowallan, accompanied by Lt. Commdr. Mallinson was met Soe sree Mg whedon 4 a
by Mrs. E. B. Williams, Island Commissioner of the Guides. |° De glint! dae . ¥

: ductivity. Premier David Ben
He then inspected the colour,— - Gurion, speaking in the Knesset

j (Parliament) announced — these
co-ordin-|three yards from the entrance KE; at Offers “halt inflation” changes The
Services| and finally chattea and laughed Syi ee Ee pound “sterling officially valued at

2.80 dollars will be cut to one
dollar per pound for foreign in+
vestments. It will be cut to ene
dollar forty cents for tourists and

To Pay £5m.
Da on F ge for inapets of weet
mages *}com as meat, fish, coffee,

tea and medical supplies.

yards

The Guides sat in a horse-shoe
‘ound before
Jan addressed then.
in kilts and khaki

staff in his Investors will
s 1 ’

no longer have

accepted as keenly to-day by| del; have becom@liand — Mis. Williams said CAIRO, Peb, 14. °|*, tuvm over one dollar at: the

ty inquent, but also those who official rate of exchange for every
boys all over the world as it was] are in need of care or protection,| hat it was unfortunate that the} |The Egyptian Government told) iy oth of capital transfer
jin 1908 when the Movement was] or out of control. "| visit of the Chief Scout of the | Argentina, Brazil and 13 other|‘ 5 pi ,

officially that (U.P.)

it “deplored” last mronth’s bloody



wat Jairo rioti é Yered to pay U.N. DELEGATES ON

for! Sorry that all the Guides in the|Caive rioting and off iy
i sland could not be present at this|"P, t9 5,000,000 in damage TOUR OF MOROCCO
moment, claims, In identical notes atl-| p27, PRENCH MOROCCO,
. dressed to the nations Govern Feb. 14
Brownies Respected ment also said preliminary inves- saat

Lord Rowallan opened his ad- The group of Latin American

tigations showed that the instiga-

man”. Similar incidents accom-
anied the visit of the group to
he town of Mekness near here,

and foreign inhabitants” in the
capital but also for the



, : le . . i Nations
~ dress to the Guides by telling|tors of violence which took more|elegates to the United
‘ * ” , £ : . -
VISIT! B’DOS them of a story of a naughty|than 40 lives wanted to exploit|/OW on an inspection tour of Mo
sai . hes tse -otesting |roeco as guests of the French
Brownie. He said the incident|public demonstrations protesting |" : jay visited th
against the incidents between Brit- navies = ae aes Fer 7 .
neident he had the greatest re-|ish troops and Egyptian police at | "ative quarte “a @ ;

spect for the Brownies. Ismailia in the Canal Zone, It The eT. rl spenedinnely
Lord Rowallan said that he|Said: “The Egyptian Government ree +} 7 “ry as’ “long
Henry Chi t wanted them to realise just how |“eplored these events and the re- shouti ag such tne "wa. Haat

fare A ivi mu C.M.G., Social Wel- big the family to which they be- sultant losses not only because of ive anoon ion liv T
itate for the Calernee tay of long is, He paid that there are|t#e great number of Egyptian|pendence’ and “long live Tru-

entire
Egyptian economy

They could not imagine what |

brothers

















h word tLey would be seven
urban surveys carried out, pe re ;
Chinn presented the “family cause pee on each word in}
structure” as one of the most dim. |t2® whole Bible and there will
cult problems of social welfare in be still some scouts left over.
the West Indies, where a large Everywhere we go we have |
majority of the people do not have} this family with the same law,
a family life, ite had observed in! ®"d the same promise. Should |
Asian Territories a strong tribal | Very Guide and every Brownie!
structure and what has to be pre-|4nd every Scout do her and his|
vented is too rapid a break-down, |duty to the people of the world. |
but he observed that, in the W.1\|there would be five and a half!
there has to be a building up and| million people made happier every |
the “technique is to try to build up|day. Our founder told us to|

little time for boys to acquire
practical experience, having to
fill himself up with knowledge
from books, Wisdom and learn-
ing required quiet and solitude
to think, but the present genera-
tion could not think in quiet. It
was in a quiet atmosphere that
influence had a chance to work
over the boys. Shouting was not
the technique; it was the influ-
ence on the mind of the boy, and
the finer the qualities of the



————$———————
Ss

a



teacher, the better the results in ‘ian through group | make other people happy.”
developing the character of the Chinn has already visited @ On Page 3
boys. Jamaica, British Honduras, and

@ On Page 3 Trinidad. He said that B.G. is



Plane Engine Was
Not Working Just |

unique in the British Colonial Em-
pire in having social welfare and
focal Government so closely link-

Thunderstorms

—

° od, and he d ibed th ifie
Lash U.S. selup as ‘an depaventing ane Before Crash

ATLANTA, Feb. 14
Thunderstorms lashed southeast
of the United States during the
night killing at least two persons,| Gone in the way of social welfare, | pr
injuring 65 others and causing] Ut what is greatly needed is the |w

widespread property damage.|®-ordination of such services,

Freak storms riding ahead of the both voluntary and governmental.

Vea Welfare
Referring to Jamaica, Chinn
said, interesting things are being

ELIZABETH, NEW JERSEY,
Feb. 14.
One engine was not working
id the propeller of the second
as spinning in reverse when the
ational Airlines four engine






Dinner, Luncheon, Birthday, Wedding,
or for your own quiet enjoyment at home—

K. W. V.

can add to that enjoyment, as
K.W.V. Wines
are Quality Wines,
popular throughout Great Britain, Canada,





advancing cold wave, struck rar: He, fell that there should be aw
est in the Lower and Central College of the WI na
Tennessee, northern Arkansas and : as

Middle and Upper Alabama.

A small but vicious tornado
ploughed through Manila Arkan-
sas and five persons were report-
ed hospitalized. Fifteen to twen-
ty homes were demolished by
high winds in the towns of} will be held under the auspices of
Decherd and Winchester killing | Colonial Development and Welfare
one person and injuring others, and at the conclusion he will leave

—U-P. for the United Kingdom.—(Cp)

U.K.’s First Atomic
Explosion Not Far Off

SYDNEY, Feb. 14,

The Sydney Daily Telegraph predicted that the British Common
wealth’s first atomfe explosion will be touched off in the near future
on the central Australian rocket range’ The newspaper said the first
test probably would be a: small bomb suitable for use as an atomic
warhead for guided missiles or rockets

“Observers believe most parts for the assembly of the first British
bomb already have been shipped secretly to Australia. Australia’s
second Canberra jet bomber which has been specifically ordered to
help in guided missile research and for testing new equipment at the
to leave for Australia next Monday.”—U.P.

to Barbados, and then the Wind«
ward and ‘Leeward Islands, He
will return to Barbados to attend
a conference of social welfare and
probation officers, and other inter-
ests in this field. This Conference





—_—————$—$

m B.G., Chinn will proceed) tors.

New Zealand, Sweden and many other
Countries of the World, including the
British West Indies

C 6 passenger plane crashed
Monday with a loss of 32 lives ac-
cording to a report of the Civil
Aeronautics Board of Investiga-



They said: “The malfunction-
ing of two right engines caused
the plane to crash into the Eliza-
beth residential section following
take off from nearby Newark air-
port.”

A spokesman disclosed that
Number four Engine, which had
halted functioning completely
before the crash would have re-
quired @ major overhaul in less

And in these burdensome days of HIGH
COST OF LIVING K.W.V. comes to your
rescue also,

K.W.V. Wines COST much less than
Foreign Wines of France, Spain, and



than 87 more flying hours.—U.P.
' :
p K.W.V. Wines are
BUSTA REJECTS Portugal because
APOLOGY admitted into the Colony under the

From Our Own Correspondent!

KINGSTON, Sica Wels 14, British Preferential Tariff.



In Puerto Rico to-day Busta-
mante rejected the formal apology ;
tendered hirn by the emigration!

authorities there. Bustamante said |

a tebe, deel Matas nal K.W.V. Paarl Tawny, K.W.V. Coronation Wine,
that the apology is equivocal and K.W.V. Sweet Vermouth, K.W.V. Dry Ver-
(hit docerament supporter ie staxt}|| mouth, K.W.V. SPARKLING WHITE WINE,
and will further urge the ao K.W.V. SHERRIES.

Office to obtain a full apology from
Washington. a ee

tanita:


PAGE TWO



IS LORDSHIP Sir Allan Col-
lymore, Chief Justice of Bar-
bados is due to leave,to-day for

British Guiana by B A. to at-
tend a sitting of the lest Indian
Court of Appeal in t colony.
He is expected to away for
approximately one w ;
Back to Antigua

Ms. KENNETH W. BLACK-
BURNE, wife of the Govern-
or of the Leeward Islands accom-
anied by her friend Mrs.
argaret G. Hodgson returned to

Antigua yesterday morning by

B.W.I.A. after spending twelve

days holiday in Barbados.
Cousins

ge. JACK ALLFREY, R.N.
and Mrs. Allfrey who arrived
from England via Trinidad a few
days ago left yesterday by B.G
Airways for Dominica to spend
about two weeks holiday.

During their short stay here they
were _the ~guests of Squadron
Leader David Henderson, Govern-
ment Airpert Manager and Mrs.
Henderson, Mrs. Allfrey and Mr.
Henderson are cousins. This is
Mrs. Allfrey’s first visit to her
homeland for 20 years.

During the war Capt, Allfrey
was on the staff of Admiral Fraser.

En Route to Belgium

M: AL NYREN, former Ameri-
can Viee Consul here and
Mrs. Nyren left yesterday morning
for Puerto Rico by B.W.LA. en
route to the U.S. where they will
spend a short holiday with their
families before leaving for Bel-
gium where Mr Nyren has been
appointed as Second Secretary at
the American Embassy in Brussels.

They were accompanied by their
four “children.

Mr, Nyrer who was appointed to
Barbados in May 1949 arrived
here in August the same year,
Born in Boston, Massachusettes,
November 29, 1919 he was a grad-
uate of Roslindale High School
and took his B.S. at Boston Col-
lege, 1941. He served overseas in
the U.S, Army as Ist Lt., from
1941 to 1945.

Mr. Nyren entered the U.S. For-
eign Service on July 26, 1946 and
has served as Vice Consul at La
Paz, Bolivia and at Belize prior to
coming to Barbados, Mr, Nyren,
has been succeeded by Mr. Philip
Ernst. American Consul who ar-
rived here January 11, accom-
panied by his wife and two daugh-
ters.

Gramophone Concert

HE: next gramophone concert

at the British Council will be

presented by Mr. E, E, Hackett on

Wednesday, 20th February at the

Council’s headquarters ‘Wake-
field,” White Park.

The programme which begins at
8.15 p.m. is as follows:— Trumpet
Voluntary—Purcell, Chanson de
Matin—Elgar, Serenade for Tenor,
Horn and Strings—Britten, Fin-
landia—Sibelius, Symphony No, 5
in C Minor—Beethoven.

There is no charge for admission.

BY THE



HERE have been recently
so’many cases of animals
holding up traffic that C, Suet
Esq., is considering a plan for
animal crossings.
The smaller animals, such as
field mice, might be escorted

across by uniformed animal exe
cutives, Still smaller creatures,
such as spiders, ants, and blue-
bottles too young to fly, would
have to be carried across by
small-game wardens in stiff-
peaked hats, I notice that four
swans on the Windsor road had to
be threatened by bulldozers. But
that is an uneconomical way of
dealing with the problem. More-
over, if bulldozers are going to be
mixed up with the traffic, we
might as well employ gigantic
cranes to lift cars and their occu-
pants over the zebra crossings,
while pedestrians pass under-
neath.

The Gamma-bomb (XII)

GHAM had murmured into
that coral ear, having first
pushed aside a hefty great earring
like an anchor chain, words that
I am not cad enough to chronicle.
Yet, for once, his brain was cold
as the waters of Coumshingaun.
The Belle of Dung waited. Pre-
sently, and ever so casually, the
warrior said, “Oh, by the way I've
brought you that bit ‘of nonsense
you wanted. Koolruk wrote it
down for me.” She had to hide
her face against his waistcoat, lest
he should see the triumph in her



eyes. Very casually she said,
“Oh, than The paper changed
hands. So carefully had Egham

altered figures and letters that she
suspected nothing She recognis-



ed Koolruk’s writing. “And
now,” said Egham, “what does a
good boy get as a reward?” “My
gratitude,” said the tiresome en-
chantress, reclaiming her hand
from his grasp. “Not a kiss?” pur-
sued the avid courtier. “A kiss,”

said she, “is soon over. My grati-
tude will last for ever.” “I doubt
it,” said Egham to himself.

Burmese correspondence

Dear Sir, I keep on writing,
But your discourtesy

Leads me to think I bore you.
Yours truly,

U BAW ME.





BARBADOS ADVOCATE



Mr. and Mrs. Al V. Nyren and family left yesterday for the U.S.

via Puerto Rico by B.W.LA.

Left to right, Johnny, Patricia, Mrs.

Nyren with Sheila and Mr. Nyren with Claire.
Mr. Nyren who was formerly American Vice Consul here has
recently been appointed as Second Secretary at the American Embassy

in Brussels.

Before leaving for Belgium they will spend a short holiday with

their families in the U.S.

Returning Monday

OMMANDER NORMAN HOL-
BROOK, V.C., R.N., (Retir-
ed) flew to St. Vincent yesterday
ona four-day visit. Commander
Holbrook was a Submarine Com-
mander during the first world war.
A regular visitor to Barbados he
arrived here in mid-December last
year with his wife.

With T.L.L.

R. and Mrs. John Dalgliesh
and child are at present holi-
daying in Barbados staying with

Mrs, Dalgliesh’s mother Mrs. L,
King of Navy Gardens.
Mr. Dalgliesh who is on long

leave is with Trinidad Leaseholds
Ltd., in Trinidad.

Leaving To-day

ORD WHARTON who has been
holidaying here since Janu-

ary 27th is expected to leave to-
day by B.W.LA. for Trinidad and

the following day he will fly to
Jamaica,
Lord Wharton's home is in

Bridgwater Somerset,

er
WAY .....

The Gamma-bomb (XIV)

EN minutes after Egham had
left Dingi-Poos, things began
to happen. Orders went out to

watch every” airport, railway-
station, cab-rank and lift in the
British Isles, since it was known
that Dingi-Poos would try to
brazen it out by leaying from
Heathfield. A squad was already

speeding to
Koolruk Meanwhile Dingi-Poos,
disguised as Mime. Mioche, was
on her way to the airport, Kool-
ruk, disguised as Egham, was to
join her there. Koolruk himself
had already slipped out of Bump-
ton, and was putting on his dis-
guise in the powerful car which
had awaited him outside a lonely
dairy. EgharQ\ came out of the
back-entrance of the fried fish
shop with Inspector Blood, and
was being driven to Heathfield,
where detectives were already
hidden in dustbins, behind piles of
rubbish, in hangars:and holes in
the ground, The “pilot” of the
Paris plane (Inspector Hownde)
fingered a pair of handcuffs as
he leaned against the fuselage.
Armed police, disguised as travel-
lers, lounged all over the main
buildings, or lay on the roofs,
“Air-hostesses,” who were really
women police and jiu-jitsu ex-
perts, cowered in doorways, whis-
tles to their lips, Dusk drew
down

Bumpton to arrest











ind Pauline call again and
d search near the waterfall,
rath the squirrel leads the
vem. They look at the

au
y Suspiciously



frowning.

JUST RECEIVED ....

HAPPY TIME
PRINTS B63
PLAIN SPUNS .

FLOWERED SPUNS :
FLOWERED WAFFLE PIQUE

PLAIDS 36” ....
WHITE MUSLIN

T. R. EVANS & WHITFIELDS

YOUR SHOE STORES

Dial 4220

PRINTS

54”





Gulf Officer

RRIVING from Venezuela yes-
terday by Special Flight were
Mr. Willia
of the Gulf Oil Corporation an
Mrs. Whiteford. They were met a
Seawell by Dr. W. PF, Auer, Man-
ager of the Barbados Gulf Oil Co.,
Ltd.

Mr. and Mrs. Whiteford who are
guests at the Colony Club, St.
James are due to return to Ven-
ezuela to-day. ,

President of the Gulf Oil Corpn.,
who originally planned to accom-

Lord Rowallan Gets
Around

a oer ROWALLAN, Chief Scout
of the Empire and Common-
wealth attended a Scout Commis-
sioners Conference at the Island
Commissioner’s home at 2.30 p.m
on Wednesday. Present were Maj.
J. E. Griffith, Island Commissioner,
Mr C. R. C. Springer, Commission-
er for Training, Col, A. H. G
Campbell, Commissioner for the
Midland area, Mr. L. T. Gay, Act-
ing Commissioner for the Northern
Area, Mr. C. D. Spencer, Acting
Commissioner Southern Area, Rev,
L. C, Mallalieu, Commissioner St.
Joseph, Mr. R. S. Jordan, Com-
missioner St. John, Mr. A. G. Jor-
dan, Commissioner St, George, Mr
L. B. Waithe, Commissioner St.
Peter, Mr. G, E. Corbin Commis-
sioner_St. Lucy, Rev. A. I, John-
son, Commissioner Christ Church,
Capt. R. A. Sealy, Commissioner
St. Michael—South and the Hon
Secty. of the Association Mr. Lisle
Harrison.

After the conference they had
tea with the Island Commissioner

Lord Rowallan then went on to
St. James for a meeting of the
local Association of the Northern
Area at St. James Combined
School and at 6.30 o’clock the same
evening he attended a meeting of
the Bethel Troop, Bay Street,

To-morrow evening Lord Row-
allan will attend a camp fire at
Harrison College which begins at
8.30 o'clock. Entrance will be
through the Crumpton Street Gate
and there will be a sfiall admit-
tance fee which will be donated to
the Jamboree Fund.

It is expected that Lord Rowal-
lan will give the “yarn.”

On Holiday
R, ALEX BRATT, a regular
visitor to Barbados is holi-
daying at the Hotel Royal. Alex is
an accountant with a.construction
company in Caracas, Venezuela
Talking Point

Man has his will, but woman has

hiteford, an officer [her way.—Oliver Wendell Holmes,





FRIDAY, FEBRUARY 15, 1952



SWALLOW
TAILS

His Skirts Have
An Extra Inch

From EILEEN ASCROFT PARIS

Unwaisted JACKETS are the
most interesting fashion change
introduced by Jacques Fath. They
ar. two-thirds in length, egg
cut On the lines of a
swallow tail coat with a low belt.

In flecked tweeds, Paisley silks
or grosgrain, they are worn with
slim skirts, which follow the

eneral Paris trend of one inch
longer.

Me

A second suitline is more con-
servative, with set-in sleeves,
skirts either very slim or slightly
flared and nipped waist.

DRESSES in Chiffon jersey,
hantung and sheer organdie show
toth the slim and bell skirt, and
waists are heightened by draped

ey Judo belts.

Sleeves are either very tight
fitting or full above the elbow,
Necklines feature starched
white Billy Bunter collars for
daytime,. and for after six
frocks variations of the horse-
shoe neck.

EVENING DRESSES are i10in
from the ground, very full in
gleaming satin with lavish beads
eng silk embroidery, Wrist-length
satm GLOVES match the evening
gowns,

OVERCOATS are straight with
low belts, sloping shoulders andl
10 collars,

Colours are
than the other
wild lemon





ed je

more springlike!
collections
yellow, passion
rich green, two-tone greys
lots of black and white,
HATS are unflattering, Garbo
cloches and Dickens coachman
Shapes are equally hard to wear
There are also flat wavy shovel
hats, shading the eyes, trimmed
with large roses, Most becoming
models were the big flat cart-
wheels, worn straight on the
head with coarse mesh veils.
—L.E.S.

red,
and





The Shadows Get a Surprise

—Mr. Punch Tells Them His Uncle Was A Knight—

By MAX TRELL

“I WISH I were a knight,” Knarf, |
the shadow-boy with the turned-

pany them over changed his plans] about name, said to his sister Hanid.

at the last moment and has re-

turned to the U.S.

For Carnival
UE to leave to-day to spend
D Carnival in Trinidad is Mr,
Evan Foster who, has been holi-
daying here since Christmas. Mr,
Foster, who is the son of Mr. and
Mrs, Darcy Foster of Belmont
Road, lives in British Guiana
where he works at ‘“Rosehall”
Estate, Berbice. ;
He is on long leave and will
probably be returning to Barba-
dos after Carnival to complete his
holiday.

By Beachcomber

1 rebuff ,
Â¥ HAVE been informed that
my account of the commer-

cial traveller who booked an order
for £10,000,000 worth of large
boilers gives an entirely erron-
eous impression of the way these
things are done, Nevertheless, I
cling to my idea of a young man
thrusting his foot in a door, while
an angry woman tries to shut it

and shouts, “I dont want any

large industrial boilers today!

Please go away!”

Joe Rickthorpe had a long, long
nose

Which reached down almost to
his toes,

And he could wind it round his
waist

To keep his .trousers up. He
placed

Reliance on this startling snout;
Whenever there were crowds
about
He'd use it.asxa long lasso,
be crack itfas*the stockmen do.
One day, alas! he caught a cold, ,
Stooped blew his nose, then lost
his hold, ¢
Tripped over it, fell on his head, |
And lay for hours as good as oe .
Warned by such accidents as —
He wears it curled yeneath his hat, |

|

—_—_

Ogre—28

o\

**Who are you?" ‘*Oh, please,
don't be afraid,’’ says Rupert.
‘Pauline is a friend, and she is
worried about the acorns, too.”

** Then let's get down to business,"’
says the other. “' If we're not going
to lose our forest, we must discover
the Pine Ogre's plans.”’

$1.12

86c., 92¢., $1.09, $1.17

91c., 96e.

$1.59, $1.60

$1.85 |
|
|

87c., $1.47, $1.53
seaheuE Ry abesens $1.20

Dial 4606

“A what?” asked Hanid, who
thought perhaps Knarf meant he
wanted to be a night. Knarf ex-
as peg what he really meant. “A

night-with armor—a knight of
King Arthur’s Round Table, that’s
the kind of knight I wish I could be.”

Hanid shook: her head. “There
aren’t any more knights, not real
ones with armor. So I don’t know
how you can become one.”

At this moment, Mr. Punch who
was sitting in his rocking chair at |
the other end of the room, coughed
loudly. Knarf and Hanid went over
to him |

“1 don’t suppose either of you has |
ever seen a knight of King Arthur >|
Round Table?”

Knart and Hanid said they hadn't

Long Ago

“Well,” said Mr, Punch, “! haven't ,
either but long, long ago, one of my
uncles was a knight of King Ar-. |
thur’s Round Table. His name was
Sir Punchelot.”

Knart and Hanid both exclaimea
‘n astonishment since this was the
first time they had ever heard that
Mr. Punch had an uncle who was a
knight. “Are vou sure,” Hanid saic
a little doubtfally, “that his name |
was Sir Punchelot? One of King
Arthur's knights was named Sir
Lancelot. You aren't getting them |
mixed up, are you?”

“Certainly not,” said Mr. Panch. |
“Sir Lancelot was one knight and
Sir Punchelot was another. They
were great friends, of course, and
they both sat at King Arthur’s table }
when they weren't riding off on some |
brave adventure or other.”

“Did Sir Punchelot have a suit of |
armor?” Knarf asked. |

“Indeed he did! When he was in- |
side it, and sitting on his horse, you
couldn’t see his face at all. He was
covered with armor from head to
toe. And that reminds me,” said Mr.
Punch, “of one of the most curious
adventures in Uncle Sir Punchelot’s
whole history.”

Knarf and Hanid begged Mr.
Punch to tell them about this ad-
venture.

|

|
|
2

“Not far from King Arthur's |

court lived some wicked giants,”

Mr. Punch began. “King Arthur or- |

dered Sir Punchelot to ride off and
fight them. Now it so happened that
on the morning that Sir Punchelot
was to set out, and he was just about



Sir Punchelot was covered with
armor from head to toe.

to get into his armor which stood
ready for him on the front steps, he
suddenly reminded himself that he
tad forgotten his handkerchief and
turried up to his room to get it.
leanwhile his servants, seeing his
suit of armor standing on the front
steps and believing Sir Punchelot to
he in it, lifted the suit of armor on
‘ir Punchelot’s horse and sent the
horse galloping toward the moun-
tain where the giants lived. |

lhe Back Door
“Sir Punchelot,” Mr. Punch con-

| tinued, “saw all this from the win-

dow. He chuckled to himself, then
hurried out through the back door,
chasing after his horse.”

“And what happened?”
cried.

Mr. Punch smiled. “he horse and
the suit of armor reached the giants’
mountain first. The giants came out
in a rage. They drew their swords, |
hacked at the suit of armor, for they
thought Sir Punchelot was inside,
und finally tossed it down a great |

Knart |



precipice, And at that instant, when
they thought for certain that the
great Sir Punchelot was dead, there
before them, his sword in hand and
without a seratch on him, stood Sir
Punchelot ready for battle. The
pwiants were so terrified and so sure
that Sir Punchelot must be the
| strongest and bravest knight in the
world to survive the fall off the
precipice that they fled in terror and
were never seen or heard of again.”
Knarf and Hanid were delighted
with this story of Mr. Punch’s noble
uncle Sir Punchelot. But they were
still puzzled as to whether it was
really true or not.





JANETTA DRESS SHOP

Lower Broa



DRESSES

for every occasion
Lovely Pure Wool Sweat
END OF SEA
of EVENING













———$————s

SPECIAL NOTICE!
As a mark of respect to His Majesty, the late King George VI
there will be no shows at 2.30 and 4.45 p.m. at the Plaza Cinemas
to-day Fri. 15th (Oistin and Bridgetown). However, there will be





B.B.C. RADIO PROGRAMME
FRIDAY, FEBRUARY
5 a.m. N Recor



two evening performances at 6.00 and 8.45 p.m.





Programr





6.15 p.m

P.m. Sports R y 1] Btewn
Parade. 7 p.m. The News

7 15—10.30 p.m $1.3

2M... & 43 M

P












Midnite Special SAT. 16th Two New Action Westerns!

SS
Held over TO-DAY 6.00 and 8.45 P.M.
Gregory PECK — Virginia MAYO ir
CAPTAIN HORATIO HORNBLOWER
———— ~ s he Color by Technicolor t
7.15 per Powe id the State, 7.45} ~ -———-- ———_—_- ——-— a
p.m. Get out those old Records, 9.15 Special Sat. 9.30 2 and 1.30 p.m L
p.m. Radio Newsreel, 9.30 p.m. World “CONQUEST OF CHEYENNE” Wild Bill ELLIOTT and
Altaith, 9.48 p.m: Composer Gt the Weal “ALIAS BULLY THE KID” Sunset CARSON A
10 p.m. Radio Newsreel, 10.30 p.m OO
Recital Opening SAT. 16th. 4.45 & 830 p.m.
LIGHTNING STRIKES TWICE Z
Ruth Richard Zachary Mercedes
CROSSWORD ROMAN TODD SCOTT McCAMBRIDGE |]. A



LAW OF THE WEST’ “RIDING THE CHEROKEE TRAIL” Dia!
Johnny Mack BROWN Starring: Two Gun Tex RITTER one







w- “Om, Ce
wi-& GLOBE ‘erey Fine
FOR HIGH-CLASS MOVIES

Present TO-DAY 6





P.M. and 8.45 P.M. and continuing
to SUNDAY

Across

- Echo. (6)
. This den for the poet. (3)
- Can I be good natured ? (7)
. It couldn't be better. (4)
- Do leave the ordeal. (4)
+ End of a wine producer. (3)
. Annoy. (8)
. Tear from your end. (4)

Re Niger. (5)

WN Wapiaaen a

WHAT YOULARE. ..
Neil
aaa ee

Rule of
Follow.
. Draw in less space, (8)

1, What Iay ahead included her.
(4) 22. Pire controller ? (5)
Down
1. Louis Bromfield chronicled ite

arrival. (4)

Demands immediate action, (9)
The nap on cloth, (4)
Praised in sorrow. (7)
Speed from a weed, (4)
Tree proclaiming its owner ? (8)
Reversed draw, a gift. (5)

The French greeting; welcome
to the soldier. (5)

10. A loud utterance. (5)
13. The need to point out.
14, Near a sports ground ?

Pooh

(6)

: (5)
The mistake of three letters. (3)
End of 20 Across. (3)

Solution of yesterday's nuzzle.—Across:
1, Ca 8. Overall: 9. Negative:
Alarm; 17,
20 Dregs;
Ton. Down:
5, Regulated;
7, Direction:
React: 16.

M-G-M presents



1. Cont
4. Dram:

Inmates

\Bachting!






starring

STEWART PIER

GRANGER - ANGELI

The star of “King Solomon’s
Mines”’ and the beauty of
“Teresa” in a tic, ro-
mance-filled story of an inno-





oo



ee ete cent, young girl-painter who
PL ATA OISTIN copied famous works of art SANDERS
~ Dial 8404 and her scoundrel-sweetheart GEORGE
TODAY 6 & 8.45 p.m i ioe eee her, sold AN M-G-M PICTURE
TOMORROW (SAT.) 4.45 & 8.30 p.m ees
Claudette tose ae Suggested by a Story by Jed Harris and Tom Reed
TREASURE ISLAND Written for the Screen and Directed by RICHARD BROOKS + Produced’ PANDRO S. BERMAN
(Technicolor) 7 Fs
Bobby O'Driscoll & Robert Newton In respect of ‘the Funeral of our Beloved King this

SAT. SPECIAL
SHERIFE OF REDWOOD y ALLEY
Wild Bill Elliot as Red Rider &
‘SADDLE PALS” Gene AUTRY

1.30 p.m

Theatre’s MATINEE TO-DAY will start at 6 P.M.—
EVENING SHOW 8.45 P.M.

GOD SAVE THE QUEEN






MIDNITE SAT_
“Rocky” Lane Double!
SHERIFF OF WICHITA &
SUNDOWN IN SANTA rE

Allan



EMPIRE

Openiug TO-DAY 6,00 and 9.00 p.m. and continuing 4.45 and 8.30

GAIETY

To-day

The Garden

ST. JAMES |/ |

To-morrow 8.30 » |
“THE BIG FIGHT”

Leon ERROL & Joe PALOOKA &

“FOLLOW THE LEADER"
Leo GORCEY and The Bowery

& m

‘ i. ‘ a >
BEN eet ems wre we -

NOW AT POPULAR PRICES

JOSE] FERRER

Academy Award Winner

Gpening Sat. 16th --- because...
when his

4.45 and 6.30 p.m. evond Wirusie heme

and Continuing DAILY es:





MIDNITE SAT
“SIX GUN MESA"
Johnny Mack BROWN &

“SUNDOWN ON THE PRAIRIE”
Tex RITTER

|
|
Boys |
|





See 295



MALA POWERS. sultiftitier « weit,

REP 5 SE eR ig

BON SD a a laa
POETRY AND DRAMA COMBINED
Extra: LATEST NEWSREEL



PRESENTED BY
WARNER BROS.













ALSO STARRING

ROODAL THEATRES











),
|
d Street RICHARD M C MeEActoEs \
—— || TO0D-MeGaMBRIDGE | |
zacnaty KING VIDOR r 5
renowcen oF y
SCOTT vcnaratene |) EMUPIIRE ROXY :
er and Cardigan Sets o> a Ad A Opening To-day 6.00 & 9.00 TO-DAY st 6.6 & $90. PM.
SON SALE 4.45 & 8.30 . es. 4. .
DRESSES f Margaret O’BRIEN in
ee ) BTOWN pia 2310) | Joee FEAREB ‘pn: Sine ponkacate
——— in Stanley Kramer's and “NEVER TRUST
Production of sd an
. ey : i: Starring
) CYRANO
} Dane CLARK
de Bergerac Cathy O'DONNELL
a ‘
OLYMPIC ROYAL
; TO-DAY 6.0; & 9.00 P.M.
TODAY at 6.00 & 900 PM. | 50. HOPE — Lucille BALL
Sat. to Tues. 4.30 & 8.15
in “FANCY PANTS”
Gary COOPER — Color By Technicolor
Madeleine CARROLL in \cintstitiaganiaisinngpensisninidaaiiepmatiieatiariains j
SAT. & SUN. 4.30 & 8.15 é
“THE GENERAL DIED

You need no sand-man to make you sleep when you take

NUTROPHOS

BECAUSE
STEADY NERVES MEAN STEADY SLEEP.

TAKE NUTROPHOS

FOR NERVE DISORDERS.









Action Double

Rod CAMERON

Forrest TUCKER

in “SEA HORNET” q
and JOHN WAYNE in

“SANDS OF IOWA JIMA”

apeetere.
52 ten
om rat

AT DAWN” and
“CASINO TO KOREA”

alt
83

The First Wartime of
The Fighting Men in Korea.

LT

IN RESPONSE TO HER MAJESTY’S REQUEST ROODAL
THEATRES WILL BEGIN THE FRIDAY MATINEES
“AT 6.00 P.M. NIGHT SHOWS AT 9.00 P.M.



"i
j Saat ete
Sess oceamanas br
Oona y
| »
OBE er
: meas |
rs ey “eS
|
'
|


FRIDAY, FEBRUARY 15,

1952



pe

TUEUELDLUUUEPEE TEPER

Air Services In
J’ca Threatened
By Strike

(From Our Own Ci wrdent

KINGSTON, J’ca, Feb. 14

The strike of the airport staff
threatens Jamaica with complete
blackout of air services tonight
tomorrow and tomorrow night

arising out of the dispute between
Jamaica Tele-communications As-
sociation and Goverhment on
salary rates, The union which
represents the technical staff at
Palisadoes and Mobay airport:
issued an ultimatum to Govern-
ment this morning that if Govern-

ment does not revise its salary
increase cffer of last week, a 24-
hour token strike’ would begin

midnight tonight.

Government ‘in a firm stand ha
refused to give promise of an in-
creased offer and warned the staf
that if a strike were called they
would have to stand the conse-
quences of their actions, At
nightfall no change in strike plans

was noticed and if it is called
the result would be that a con-
siderable volume of air traffic

would bypass Jamaica during the
period of the strike involving 12
Pan-American, two Avianca, two
KLM, two B.O.A.C., one B.W.1.A
four Chicago and Southern and
one Caribbean International Air-
ways flight.

IRON ORE FOUND
IN JAMAICA



(From Our Own Co onde eS
KINGSTON, J'ca., Feb. 14,

Geographical Survey Depart-

ment here anounced to-day the



discovery of rich deposits of
iron ore in Jamaica, but pointed
Out the absence of coal deposits is
"a barrier to exploitation, Ore ex-
ists in certain areas of the island
in economic deposits, the depart-
ment said and at some points :
most on the roadside. Quantities
discovered are said to be large
enough and acceptable enough to
repay cost of exportation of ore a
such,

Harbour Log

IN CARLISLE BAY
Sch, Henry D. Wallace, Sch, Enterprise

S., sch. Guraenia, >
Sch. Anita H., Sch. Adalina,
umbia, Sch. Philip H. I
Marea Henrietta, Sch. Luci
Sch. Mary M, Lewis, Sct
Sch. Mandalay H,. Sct
Wonderful Counsellor
Eunicia









ARRIVALS

S.S. KALL.ADA, 4,533 tons net
Christie, from Trinidad

8.S. TRIBESMAN., 4,861 tons
Baker, from Dominica

M.V. CARIBBEE, 100 tons net
Gumbs, from St. Lucia

DEPARTURES

Sch. ROSALINE M., 30 tons net, Capt

McLaurence, for St. Lucia

Capt
net, Capt

Capt



Sch. ENTERPRISE 8S 44 tor
Capt. MeQuilkin, for 5St cia

Sch. CLOUDIA S., 52 r €
Lewis, for British Guiana






ONUUUEODEPUEELEQUED OGLE EEE ER EOL LAEEDCAEUL CED EEL ED COL ED POAT OETA TTT TOTTI,

Lord Beaverbrook sits for
Graham Sutherlan





TO
commissioned Mr.

sittings t
villa, La Capponcina, Ca)
of France, last March. he
on loan to the Tate Gallery,

portrait.

Hitherto fis work, while seldom
passing over into pure abstruc-
tion, hud made very few con-

portraiture there is a strict
limit to the tricks that can be
played with natural
ances,

The subjects of his pictures had

at first
repaying.

sight, far more



C.Cc. Will Diseuss
Clerks’ Embargo

THE CHAMBER OF COMMERCE is to take up with
the Comptroller of Customs the matter of the embargo
placed on Customs Clerks of the respective firms being
able to obtain statistieal information on export cargo.

Case Dismissed

HIS Worship Mr. G. B, Griffith,
Acting Police Magistrate of Dis-
trict “A”, yesterd: dismissed
Without prejudice a case brought
by Herman Skeete of Carrington
Village, St, Michael, against Darn+
ley Maloney, also of Carrington
Village, charging him with assault-
it ind beating him while in the




ecution of his duty.

Herman Skeete called on one
witnes Skeete told the court
hat on December 18 he went to
the defendant’s house to levy on

some furniture as he had authority
from the landlord.

“The defendant said he would
not permit me to come in the
house after I told him I was a
bailiff. When I got to the front
door the defendant took a club
and hit me on the left shoulder
with it’, Skeete told the court.

Samuel Brathwaite said that on
December 14, he went to the de-

fendant’s house with Skeete.
Skeete went to the door and the
defendant asked him what he

wanted. Skeete then told the de-
fendant that he had authority
from his landlord to levy on him
for house rent As Skeete at-
tempted to go into this house the
defendant took a club and hit him
on the left shoulder with it.

To Mr. Griffith. Brathwaite said:
“IT cannot if Skeete told the
defendant he was a bailiff. I only
aw when Skeete was hit with the
club.”

say



Minister Murdered

‘
HAVANA, Cuba, Feb, 13,

The former Interior Minister
Alejo Cossio Del Pino, 45, was
assassinated last night by men in
an automobile, who fired eight
bullets into his body while he was
in a cafe. Two men, his com-
panions were wounded

Cossio Del Pino owns a radio
station in Havana, and is a mem-
ber of the Autentico Political
Party headed by President Carlos
Prio Sog The former Cabinet
Minister marked for death in
1947 by the Union Insurreccional
2evolucionaria, the Revolutionary
Group, which accused him of be-
ng responsible for the battle in
which their leader, Emilio Tro,
was slain
io Del
Minister at the




Pino Interior

time.



was

(CP)

Sa seeaphdceaiinmebeliomennaninnmmencannnllt

Ideal for

intimate

personal

use

94

eo

|
|
|
|

Attention was drawn to this
difficulty by Mr. William Atkin-
son at yesterday's meeting of the
Chamber, when he pointed out



that Customs Clerks of the
various firms had been refused
permission, as was the = case
previously, of looking through

the clearance papers in order to
get certain valuable statistical
information.

Mr. Atkinson expressed the
view that the Chamber, should
in view of the fact that such in-
formation was valuable, maka
representation to the ‘Controller
with a view to re-establishing
the practice, at least in the case
of larger firms.

During the course of the short
discussion on the matter, it was
pointed out that the reason for
the embargo was because objec-
tion had been lodged by certain
firms on the greund that their
business was being made public.
The view was alse expressed
that there was little likelihood of”
the Chamber getting the Comp-
troller to relax the present ar-
rangement,

It was however suggested that
the Comptroller should be ap-
proached and asked to give a
reasonable explanation as to why
the stegistics were no longer
allowed to be taken by the
clerks,-as was the case previous-
ly.

It was pointed out by the
Secreiary that there was inform-
ation that in the enforcement of

fhe present arrangement, the
Comptroller was bringing local
practice into line with that in

other countries and places in the
Caribbean,

The meeting decided that the
Chamber should take the matter
up with the Comptroller after
certain inquiries haye been made
as to what practice obtains in
other islands, in the hope of hav-
ing the decision reconsidered.



In Touch With Barbados
Coastal Station

Cable and Wireless (W.1I.) Ltd. advise
that thay can now communicate with the
following ships through their Barbados

Coast Station
s.s Norse Lady, Helicon, Aljcoa
Patriot, Triton, Stratidore, Attila, Gulf-

pass, Mormactern, Liberte, Brazil, Uru-
guay, Glenbank, Quilmes, Regent Caribou,
Empress of Scotland, Italia, Stella Polaris,
Rodas, Alcoa Poineer, Queen of Bermuad,
lwide Canada, Colombie, Pioneer Isle,
Gerona, Harencaig, Del Mar, Veendam,
Mercator, Highland Prince,

A BIRTHDAY
PORTRAIT

COMMEMORATE Lord Beayerbrook’s
birthday, the executives of his néwspapers
Sapam cetmentens to

int the rirait reproduce ere.
Sit ook piace at Lord Beaverbrook’s
d@’Ail, in the South
rirait is now
illbank, S.W..

cessions to naturalism. And in VERY

appear- n

Lord Beaverbrook



subjects to whom things have of

BARBADOS



The

hard

GRAHAM
and is exhibited in Galler IX. Of the ; :
portrait, OSBERT LANCASTER writes:— SUTHERLAND
A COUPLE of years have OS . r k

passed since the art world | wees are men with loug and
was startled to learn that | ull careers Sehind them
Mr. Graham Sutherland— ™ the portrait of M:. Somerset
certainly one of the most Maugham. recently on view 4!
disti ished, but hardly | the Tate, the author aopears
seperate “in his | #001, withdrawn and shigntly
the most “popular” in > | on the detensive Titteo va +
appeal, of the younger) gn his chair. he sutveys 'h
painters—had produced a world with a slight distasie not

untinged with nervousness

differently
Sutherland

nas Mr
portrayed Lori

Beaverb©ook, whose portrait nas

eplaced Mr

he Tate

Maugham’s at

‘SS nor in the





) ul 3 ;
varied from rocks to driftwood, ae Vane Gere apie,
old tree-roots. and the jagged on larger than ufesize
outlines of the Pom beokesniire one purple-trousered lea
hills. But his treatment . crossed over tho aliter, his
these objects had obviously repose is obviously purely
involved a prolonged investiga- momentary, ’

tion of their aracter, Of His outlook on the world 1s
more profound than that “neither withdrawn nor iloot
accorded by the natural run of At any moment something nay
painters to subjects thet were, cocky. éalling for his persona



intervention.
That one should feel all unis at
once is measure of the painter's

genius.

T was obvious, therefore, that i er mered” exacts
to sit for one’s portrait to Mr. the reverse.

Sutherland involved a certain ' :

degree of moral courage, © e ry

One thing, however, links the ae Z

subjects of Mr, Sutherland's Ww ITH Sutherland, no such

two portraits to date with the doubts can arise. Ali W!

rocks and driftwood of his see this portrait wil) hav

earlier period, They are very shrewd idea of the tm

man Lord Beaverbroo:

happened. And so will posterity tor
Just as the painter has obviously can be little doubt that th

felt intensely the storms and one of the verv few canvas

ravages and action of the Pfoduced in the last quarie)

elements on his natural objects a century that will inev
and made us feel it too—so find its place in the lon

in the portraits one is made of great English ovortra

immediately aware that the London Exores



. ° . .
Chinn’s Visit
From page 1
writing up the history of rural
community work done by Jame
aica Welfare Ltd., (now succeed-
ed by the Jamaica Social Welfare
Commission). This may be car-
ried out by a Canadian research
worker with local assistance,
The question of training was
prominent and it is evident that
a continuing scheme centred on
a gmall residential centre is
needed. It was ge agreed,
however, that the six months’
courses financed from C. D. and
W., funds during the years 1043

—1948, made a_ successful and
lasting contribution and that
efforts should made to pro-

vide a similar course in the firs
kix months of 1953. The question
of ways and means remained to
be considered. Certain sugar
estates have expressed willing-
ness to pay for the training of
their private welfare officers and
it is possible that the Jamaica
Sugar Industry Labour Welfare
Board may make a contribution
in respect of the training Welfare
Officers paid from the Labour
Welfare Fund,

Now In B.G,

Mr. Chinn left Jamaica after a
fortnight to visit British Hondu-
ras where he had much ado to
survey the colony’s vigorous
social welfare work and develop-
ing handicrafts in one_ short
week. He then proceeded to
Trinidad and is now in British
Guiana. He will spend the nights
of February 21 and 22 in Barba-
dog as a guest of the Governor
and Lady Savage, proceeding
thence to the Windward and
Leeward Islands and returning
to Barbados on March 14.

While in Jamaica, Miss Ibber-
son was able to pursue the
question of a regional homa
meking and nutrition training
centre. The Comptroller and she
visited the suggested site on the
beautiful estate of Shortwood
Women's Training College, some
five miles from Kingston looking
out over the distant harbour.
The scheme has firm friends in
the Jamaica educational world
and there is good hope that a
plan for an institute of 30 places
will be accepted.

ihe = visited the devastated
region of St. Thomas where
many people whose houses were
demolished by the hurricane,
are still living in tents. Plans
for rehousing are being rushed
forward and it was suggested
that a Committee of experienced

women should be formed to
assist with the domestic side of
resettlement,

The experince of the Land
Settlement and Welfare Com-
misson staffs in practical hore

improvement, should be called
upon to furnish a model unit in
each area and build and uip
® model kitchen with smokeless
cooking arrangements such as
might be copied by the humblest
tenants for their own resources.



in Great Britain alone



5

a GET

n ¥
‘An AGIn’ is sold throughout Great Britain and South Africa undue the name ‘ANADIN’

PAIN GAN BE
CONQUERED!

contains QUININE as its FOURTH ingredient! The Quinine
has been scientifically

blended with three well-proven

medicines (Phenacetin, Caffeine and Acetyisalicylic Acid), so that the
four medicines together act synergistically. That is why ‘Anacin’
relieves pain fast, and restores your sense of well-being.

is welcomed by Doctors! Over 12,000 doctors and dentists

use it in their surgeries! Fevers,

colds, headaches, toothache, rheumatism, neuralgia — this wonderful
new specific brings you amazingly quick relief from all of them !
TANACIN, costs little. You can buy it in a two-tablet
envelope—enough to bring quick relief
frdm a bout of pain.
box.
home use).

Or ina handy 20-tablet
Or in a 50-tablet bottle (for

ARM YOURSELF
AGAINST PAIN
‘ANACIN’ TODAY!

ADVOCATE





' Freight Rates

Protested

The protests from tne various
local firms to their Principals on
the continent against increased
freight rates have not had any
effect, Mr. D. G. Leacock, Presi-
dent of the Chamber of Com-
merce told the Quarterly General
pi eeting of that body yesterday.
- The Council of the Chamber
had asked members to write to
their Principals on the Continent
to protest against the increase in
freight rates. Many of the firms
did so, but since then, news of
other’ increases was made avail-
able locally.

The President of the Chamber
of Commerce, in reporting to the
Quarterly General Meeting on the
question of the enforcement of
the rule for the removal of goods
from warehouses in ten days, said
that the rule was working very
much to the benefit of everybody.

Concern over this matter was
expressed at the last Quarterly
General Meeting, and on the mat-
ter being discussed by the Coun.
cil, a Committee was appointed
to interview the Comptroller of
{Customs with a view to pointing
out the views expressed by mem-
| bers of the Chamber,

When the Committee inter.
viewed the Controller, he pointed
out that while he was not pre.
pared to relax the rule, he would
view sympathetically any charges
made when delay in the removal
of goods was beyond the control
of the merchants,

The President told yesterday's
| meeting that in his view, the rule
worked very much to the benefit
of the community as a whole,
goods were cleared easily, and
more quickly. This was also con-
firmed by other members

Chief Scout
Inspects Guides

From Page 1

Lord Rowallan then went on to
tell of a story of a Lady Guide in
Holland, He said that the Guide
was Nel Lind who soon rose from
a Guice to higher rank,

When the war broke out Nel
Lind used to help men who were
shot down over Holland, She did
such dangerous work that = she
never slept two nights in the
same house, At last she was be
trayed by a friend and was
arrested and sentenced to death.
The first time she was saved from
that sentence by the bombing of
the camp in which she was.

She was able to get out for a
short time but shortly was re-
arrested and sentenced to death
again, On the second time = sh:
was saved by the arrival of the
allies, but all the time she neve)
gave up hope,

When we think of Nel Lind we
think of a girl who was a Brownie
She took the same promise like
you and promised to keep it, On
her twenty-first birthday she gave

inessage over the radio and per-
aps some of you heard that mes-
sage, The words were: “Now
dedicate the remainder of my life
whother it be short or long to the
service of our people.”

After his address Lord Rowallan
gave the Guides a little history of
the kilt and said that twice he
heard it referred to as a skirt, Ife





said that each clan in Scotland
thas its different kilt so that in
battle they would not mistake

their clan members,

He was wearing the kilt because
he was ordered by the late King
George VI to wear it whenever
he attends these functions, After
the address Mrs. Williams thank-
ed Lord Rowallan on behalf of
the Guides for coming, The
Rally then ended with the sing-
ing of the National Anthem,

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PAGE THREE



Chief Scout Asks
C.C. To Support
“Bob A Job” Week

@ From Page 1
idea of what a Jam-
like, and telling of
what a wonderful experience it
was to attend a big one, Lord
Rowallan said that there was an
atmosphere about the camp at a
Jamboree which was not found
elsewhere. The scouts who at-
tended jamborees did not look the
same or think the same, or live in
the same way, but they came to
the camp to bring their own tra-
ditions, their own ways of life
and culture and so make their
contribution to the common good
They had never seen each other
before, but at once they were at
home in the atmosphere of their
camps.

The World Chief Scout told of
some of his many and varied éx-




Giving
boree was

periences in scouting, and the
part the training received by
scouts had played in moulding

men of character, teaching them
to shoulder responsibility, and to
be leaders; of the formation
of, and the part the B.P Guild of
Old Scouts was presently playing
in keeping alive the spirit of
scouting: and of the encourage-
ment he had received from whet
he had seen of local scouting and
scouting in St. Vincent.

Public Support

He said “Scouting is stronger

than it has ever been in its his-
tory; it has, perhaps a greater
appeal for the boys thgn it has
ever had before; it has in many
places greater ublic suppert
than it has ever had before, be-
cause people recognise the diffi-
cult times through which youths
are passing in these days, when
so many of the old standards
have been discarded and nothing
has been put there to take the
place of those old standards.
_ “Too many of the boys to-day
just drift through life without
any clear idea of where they are
#oing until they reach the rocks
and are shipwrecked, They have
ho anchor to‘help them when the
storm blows, Seouting however,
does provide that anchor.”

It was not the job of the Scout
Leaders to make little angels or
goed little boys. Their job was
to make men who would not only
set standards for themselves, but:
would help to raise the standards
of others, Men who did not ac-
cept every bit of rubbish pushed
down their throats, but who
thought for themselves and made
decisions for themselves, and
once they made those decisions,
would have the courage to stand
by them, Moral courage was
rather lacking to-day, and they
believed that scouting did help to
develop moral courage in the

nays.

e said that one of the great-
est proofs that they were achiey-
ing much more than they thought
they were, was that in every to-
talitarian regime, the cout
Movement was the first of three
institutions to be suppressed be.
cause scouting was one of their
biggest enemies and _ biggest
hindrances to the achievement of
their aims,

The B.P. Guild

Lord Rowallan expressed
hope that there would soon
velop in this island a really
strong branch of the B.P. Guild
of Old Scouts to help in the work
which they were trying to do for
the young people of Barbados.

The Chief Scout then issued an
appeal for members to support
scouting by helping scouts to
earn money for the movement
when Bob a Job week is institut-
ed, after which the President
thanked Lord Rowallan on _ be-
half of members for an “extreme-
ly interesting and informative
talk on the activities of scouting
of the present day,”

The President went on to
assure the Chief Scout that busi-

the
de-










most to encourage scouts to learn
to earn money by giving them
jobs when Bob a Job Week was
established in Barbados, after
which the Chief Scout retired.

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PAGE FOUR





Friday, February 15, 1952

tieth century.

These days the whole world has heard in
many tongues and read in many languages
the remarkable news of the sorrow and be-
reavement that the whole Commonwealth
arid Empire feels because a King has died.

The existence of monarchy as an institu-
tion, seemingly anachronistic in an age of
equality and of the brotherhood of man
proves the impossibility of theorising about
men and women as if they were nothing but
statistics or units of this or that.

Great Britain party-divided as it is in its
allegiance to one or other of the two great
political bodies of the country is united and
unanimous in the genuine love and affec-
tion that the people show and feel for their
sovereign. The Dominions of the British
Commonwealth all of which protested in
their formative years against subordin-
ation to the British Parliament and Crown
today, despite their being free and autono-
mous communities, look to the British
Crown as the magic link which binds the
Queen’s realms together. In all the ancient
and loyal British colonies of which Bar-
bados is the most shining example people of
different races and with several loyalties
find in their sovereign a common factor of

unity.

How can this loyalty, this affection, this
love of monarchy be explained in an era
of the common man? There was nothing
common about King George VI. He stood
head and shoulders above the common

_ Man: a giant of a man: a world figure whose
untimely demise has released for a brief
period a gleam of the vision of what man
might become if his life were modelled on
such as the King at whose funeral the

whole world grieves today.

if men were indeed equal: if only oppor-
tunity was necessary to reveal hidden
talents: if there were no diversity of tal-
ents: yet man would surpass man in quali-
ties of physical and spiritual courage. The
memory that the most humble of mankind
will retain of this heroic King is the mem-
ory of his great personal courage, King
George VI succeeded to the throne not in
the normal line of succession at a time when
the prestige of monarchy had suffered be-

cause of abdication.

The shining example of his lite, his
happy family life, his untiring devotion to
auty, his personification of all the qualities
that nave tor centuries been associated with
a Christian gentleman have raised the pres-
lige of the British Crown to a peak that no
one would have believed possible 15 years
ago. The British monarchy it has been said _
during these past ten sorrowful days had

become fused with democracy.

. It is not too easy to define exactly what is
meant by this expression since the idea of
fusion between monarchy and democracy
cannot be comprehended by finite minds.
Yet it is permissible to suggest that what
the expression tends to convey is the fact
that monarchy can exist side by side with

democracy and be complementary and not
repugnant to it. Such seems

the achievement of the British monarchy.
In no country of the world can democracy
be said to have reached further stages of
development than in the United States: yet
would anyone suggest that the British way
of life under constitutional monarchy is
one whit less democratic? And could any-
one be found anywhere to say that British
monarchy with its tradition, its ceremo-
nials, its pageantry, its mediaeval ancestry
is republican? British monarchy exists
today to remind the people who live in the
20th century that men and women are not
merely units of population responding to
\aws propounded by men and women like
themselves. Besides their visible bodies the
souls of millions of human beings refuse to
conform to speculations and forecasts of
those who prophesied that monarchy would
decrease in popularity as men and women
became more rational and free from emo-
tion. Sorrow and bereavement for the King
has not been felt alone by the simple and
lowly ones of the earth, though these ,in
their millions have shared the general grief.

Those whom their fellowmen and women
would term wise above their generation
have not escaped its weight. Liberty, equal-
ity of opportunity, the brotherhood of man
seem to flourish as brilliantly in the realms
of the great Queen proclaimed a week ago
last Friday to reign over us and over the
rest of her realm and territories, as in any
other democratic Commonwealth where

there is no monarch,



IN MEMORIAM

TODAY will always be remembered with
sorrow as the day of King George VI's
funeral. Barbados will remember
late Majesty by a two minute’s silence
island-wide at 11 a.m. and by a memorial
service in St. Michael’s Cathedral. The ten
days which have passed between His late
Majesty’s death and his funeral have been
memorable days in the lives of the people
now living in the second half of this twen-



BARBADOS ADVOCATE



FRIDAY, FEBRUARY 15,



ANOeTE] Miistakes We'll Most

Printed by the Adverste Co., Lid., Broad 8t.. Bridgetown

Regret By 1960

SEFTON DELMER now look
eight or ten years ahead—to
assess the dangers that may
follow some of the sweeping
decisions Britain is taking or
is on the brink of taking in
foreign affairs

EVER since Stalin launched his
first attacks on the West after the
war I have been watching the con-
duct of our defence

Have we learned from our war-
time errors? Or are we making
the same mistakes again?

In my view, we are making the
same mistakes. And for the same
general reasons. These are:—

(a) AMERICAN suspicion of
British Imperialism. The same old
fear of “spending American lives
and American dollars to pull Brit-
ish chestnuts out of the fire” is at
work again today.

During the war it caused Ameri-
eans to suspect Churchill’s plans

for a Mediterranean attack on

Nazi Germany’s Balkan under-
telly. Today it inspires American
fear of becoming involved in our
Persian quarrel.

(b) THE TENDENCY of the
Western planners to rush forward
blindly to smash the immediate
danger, only to find that in doing
so they have created another.

Take for instance the rearma-
ment of Germany.

1. ARMS FOR THE

GERMANS

Nothing, I fear, will stop this
now from becoming an accom-
plished fact. The Atlantic Council
is meeting at Lisbon in a fort-
night’s time

Everything is set for it to invite
Germany to contribute a West
German contingent to the West
European Defence Force.

In Germany politicians and gen-
erals have been working out the
details—even to the point that the
goose-step is to be verboten,

On the face of it the creation of
a German Army certainly seems
one logical way to meet Europe's
shortage of soldiers and redress the
balance of power destroyed by the
elimination of Germany in 1945.
But I believe that this is a move
we may be looking back on with
regret by 1960, ‘

The fighting value of a German
Army recruited in the moral
climate of Germany as it is today
will be much lower than that of
German armies in the two world
wars. It may well prove to be a
liability rather than an asset.

‘Without Us’

On each of my recent visits to
Germany I have sounded out both
young Germans and ex-soldiers on
how they feel about joining up in
a European defence force.

“Ohne uns,” they said. “Without
179

The average West German fears
and hates the Russians, But he de~
rides and despises our political
switch to remilitarisation from the
“re-education” law. which made
criminals and outlaws of all Ger-
man professional officers and
N.C.0O.s ; i

The German dread is that in
the avent of war West Germany
will oecome the battlefield, a new
Korea to be “Morgenthaued”* in-
to, non-existence as armies of lib-
erators from East and West suc-
cessively roll over it

Blackmail

If Stalin permits the creation of
a new German Army to go un-
challenged, then even the most
careful screening of the officers

us

Cane Fires

To the Editor, The Advocate

SIR,—Reterring to your Leader
Article of Sunday, 10th February,
‘there are a few points which de-
serve comment and = emphasi..
First of all it is well that this
matter has been brought to the
attention of the public, as it con-
cerns the Sugar Industry, on whicn
our economy depends.

It is inevitable that a certain
number of cane fires should occur;
the causes being careless smokers,
children playing with matches,
and even the back-firing of lor-
ries when in the field. These
fires become serious, however,
when they dre not controlled in
the early stages and are allowed
to burn large acreages of canes.

In order. to prevent this it is
essential that the fire is fought as
soon as possible after it has
started. It is suggested that this
could be effectively done by the
planters instituting a system of
fire watchers on their plantations,
whereby a few reliable labourers
could be employed at a_ fixed
salary, say $2.00 a week extra,
with the understanding that
whenever a fire occurred on their
plantation they would be ayail-
able at once to help to put it ou‘,
This, of course, would not inter-
fere with their regular duties, It
is estimated that if three or four
men are employed it will cost the
nlantation around $100.00 a crop.
If it is found difficult to get work-
ers to take this job on for a
whole crop, it may be that a sys-
tem of rotation could be adopted.

Another, way to help the pre-
vention of cane fires is to instruct
labourers as to the losses that
these fires involve, These are as
follows:—

1. Loss of trash and grass which

are essential for to-day's

method of cultivation.

. Loss of humus when a field of

canes is burnt.

3. Loss of Sugar output if canes
are not reaped and ground im-
mediately after the fire.

4. The growth of young canes i
retarded, and this affects the
following year’s crop.

All these factors tend to re-
duce the Sugar Output of the In-
dustry and this directly affecis
the wages of the labourers, *s
under the present arrangements
the labourers share in the profits
of the Industry by way of the
Production Bonus

One paragraph in your Article

te

states that at present 1d. a ton is
deducted from the price paid by
factories for burnt canes. Th's

however, is not so. The fact is
that the planter pays the labo
ers 2 cents per ton less for cut-
ting burnt canes. It is well know
that workers can reap larger t
nages of surnt canes per day



OUR READERS SAY:

and men recruited to it cannot pre-
vent one inevitable consequence.

The mere process of rearmament
must once more call to the fore-
front in Germany those same ele-
ments whose ambition and ruth-
lessness have twice plunged Brit-
ain into the ruinous waste of war,

Their guiding motive will be
recovery for Germany not only
its former unity but the restoratiory
to Germany of the frorgiers Hitler
won at Munich in 1938.

As their strength grows these
Germans wiJl seek to blackmail
the Americans, the French, and
ourselves into sUpport of their
cause.

But you may be sure that if ever
it should suit their book—or the
men in power should think it does
—the Germans will sell out the
West without a qualm ,

By 1960 (assuming that no war
breaks out in the meantime) re-
armed Germany will have become
a new anxiety for the West.

And—just to keep us all feeling
cheerful—let me add rearmed

POCKET CARTOON
by OSBERT LANCASTER

“ Forgive my mentioning it
1 peeroae tout it looks as
though 1 shall shortly have
to raise with you the
rather delicate question of
redundant personnel !”’



Japan may easily become another.

ow dangerous continued Amer-
ican suspicion of British motives
can be is demonstrated by my
second choice for a blunder that
will make us blush in 1960. This
is:—

2. DOLLARS FOR THE OIL
GRABBERS

President Truman’s ill-advised
decision to grant a _ 23,000,000-
dollar (£8,214,285) subsidy to
Persian oil thief Mossadeg.

The subsidy has been granted
because American diplomats re-
ported that Persia was about to go
bankrupt for lack of the revenues
it used to draw from the British
oil company. If it did so, they
warned, it would at the same time
go Communist,

So it was decided to keep the
wolf trom the old robber’s door
with driblets of dollar aid. This
is a disastrous plan.

And a most disappointing one.
For it proves that although the
State Department has wisely re-
called its unwise ambassador
Henry Gredy from Teheran, it has

than unburnt canes, The reason
is obvious, because they do no
have to spend as much time e-
moving trash from the canes, ‘his
means that their wages for that
particular week are much higher
than they would have’ been if
there had not been a fire. In order
te overcome this difficulty it is
suggested that there should be
a greater. difference between the
price for cutting burnt canes and
canes that have not been burnt.
Your suggestion that this should
be in the vicinity of 20 cents,
which could be paid in to the
Labour Housing Fund, is a good
fone and should meet with the
approval of the Labour Leaders.
It is felt that Planters would
readily agree to this.

You mention that because fac-
tories insist on having canes de-
livered free from trash that this
tends to make labourers regard
fires as lesser evils than they are.
While this is so, it is known that
factories have also refused aones
which have been burnt becatpe
the trash had not been properly

removed.
It is Roped that these suxg-
gestions will be brought to the

attention of those persons who
have it in their power to put them
into effect, and that a concerte?

effort will be made in dealing
with this important motter of the
prevention of cane fires in the
Tsland.

Yours faithfully.
FIRE WATCHER.

Pridvetown
12th February, 1952

Thanks

SIR,—I have been asked by the
Committee to thank those persons
who subscribed to our fund to help
the poor in the Dayrell’s Road dis-
trict,

The total ar t. collected was
$23.12. The rather turkeys total-
led $15.12; J. A. T. $8.00; Mr. M. D.
Symmonds $2.00; Mr. M. Jones
$1.00;

The $23.12 was divided between
11 persons and we are still in-
debted for grogeries to the extent
of $15.00. We tise say thanks te,
Messrs. Stuatt & Samipson grocer-
ies, and we sincerely hope that a
few more kind friends will see fit
to help us, when we start our big
drive to establish a home for poor
elderly women

B. C. BYNOE.
PS. The turkey was won by No, 48
Mr, C. D, Gittens of Cullo-
den Road, who is asked to
take delivery as soon as pos-
sible
17.1.52.
Taxi Drivers And Places

Of Interest
To the Editor, The Advocate
SIR,—Many criticisms have been
made against the local taxi drivers
as to their behaviour and manner



hot yet understood the reasons for
his failure there,

When I was in Teheran Mr.
Grady talked to and other re-

porters quite f of his inter-
views with Dr, He de-
scribed what he the Persian

Premier's “utter unreasonable-

Ness and muddletheaded a, | Although 61,000,000 Americans have jobs,
there is “spotty” localised unemployment
(affecting about 1,700,000 people) in various
parts of the country.

The worst places are in New England, New
York City—200,000—the mining section of
East Pennsylvania, and Detroit, the car city.

And people are doing just what was done
in the depression of the '30s to meet emer-

sigence.” And then he added for |
publication—“My advice to the
British Ambassador is that Britain
should sweeten the doctor with
some concessions. Let him have
some of the withheld royalties.
That will make him friendlier.”
Needless to say, such advice was
music in the ear of Mossadeg. For

it suggested to him that he would)
be able to count on American sup- |

port against Britain.

In his view Truman’s new gift;

is bound to confirm this. -

Apart from that it is disastrous
because; —

(a) IT rewards and encourages
robbery and contract breaking:

(b) IT permits Mossadeg to go
on stalling, prolongs a situation
which is bound to lead to the
triumph of Communism in Persia:

(c) IT demonstrates to the
whole of the East a weakness and
lack of solidarity in the Anglo-
American alliance:

(d) IT causes Asiatics to look
to the Soviet Union as the only
strong and determined Power in
the area,

First results are already making
themselves felt: —

1. FROM Ibn Saud to the Sheikh
f Kuwait, Arab rulers in the
Middle East are repudiating re-
cently concluded pil contracts with
American and ‘British companies
and are making fresh demands.

2. ARAB LEAGUE countries are

Thus, in Fall River, Massachusetts, shop-
keepers are offering books of coupons good
for 25 dollars for as little as two dollars and

There are sharply contrasting situations of
boom and bust, depending on whether trade
is geared to military or civilian economy.

Connecticut, its metal industries in high
gear because of the arms rush, cannot find
enough men for the jobs.

But next door Rhode Island has 35,000 un-
employed out of 791,000 people.

Foodnote: The first soup kitchen since the
depression has opened in Detroit. It is not for
unemployed factory workers, but to help
refugees from Europe until they find jobs.

‘GOOD SALESMAN’



deliberately opening their markets
to imports from the Soviet Union
and Iron Curtain States. In Iraq,
for instance, world firms like
Philips and Philco are being boy-
cotted on the ground that they
have factories or assembly plants
in Israel.

3. ATOMS FOR THE
GOVERNMENT

Blunder No, 3 on my list is the
decision of the British Socialist
Government to confine atomic re-
search in this country to the
Whitehall scientists of the Minis-
try of Supply and to ban Britain’s
big industrial firms from any par-
ticipation,

Unless Mr. Churehill’s Govern- |

ment reverses this decision soon—
and despite pressure from Lord
Cherwell, it has not done so yet—
we and the whole British Com-
monwealth will look back on this
as a catasthrophic error capable of
affecting generations of Britons in
their standard of living.

In the United States atomic re-
search and atomic production are
in the hands of private firms. Big
firms such as Du Pont, General
Electric, and Union Carbide have
built vast atomic plaats.

Atomie power plants which,
once erected and set working, can
continue to provide ener; inde-
pendent of any fuel supplies will
in the not distant future solve the
production
world’s under-developed areas.

OIL is poured on troubled waters by the
|New York Times as it comments editorially
;on Churchill’s parliamentary explanation of
| what he agreed to in Washington. “He gave a
ood demonstration of how to say the same
!thing in two different ways. Like a good
salesman with different customers, he dis-
played his wares to their best advantage, first
in Washington and then in London.”

RAISE YOUR GLASSES

EDDIE CANTOR, celebrating his 60th {
birthday this week, signs a lifetime contract
with a wine importing firm. Says the firm,
possibly a shade pompously, “The entertainer
will spearhead our company’s advertising and
promotional plains.” Many happy returns of
the spearhead, Eddie.



Russia is most certainly work-
ing on this project, In America
they have already made vast ad-

THE BOOM
- DEPENDS
ON THE JOB

By R. M. MacCOLL .

WASHINGTON.

GLITTER-STREET

NEW YORK’S Justice James MeNally
wound up and “said a mouthful,” as he order-
ed an insurance company to pay a pretty girl
2,500 dollars (£890) for a mink coat and dia-
mond ring that were stolen. Said the justice,
summarising: “Now boy wants girl, and girl
wants diamonds, jewellery, furs and motor-
cars, and consequently larceny, embezzle-
ment, forgery and romance walk hand-in-
problems of the| hand along Fifty-first-street.”

TRUMAN SAYS NO
GOVERNOR Sherman Adams, of New

vances, Only in Britain are we Hampshire, where the first of those palpitat-

lagging behind.
*Morgenthau, Roosevelt's Treasury man

advocated turning the Ruhr into a potato |
field.

|ing primary elections takes place on March
11, likes General Eisenhower.

He says in a broadcast: “The hope for the
| Republican Party with Dwight Eisenhower is

bright and buoyant.”

of dress. I do not propose to add
to the list except in a general way |
and to suggest to them a means of |
improving the service which they |
now render,

Occasionally tourists come to

President Truman withdrew his name from
the primary recently, but said this did not
preclude him seeking re-election.

A primary shows the man that each party

the island strangers from the | in the State would like te see President.

United States especially, and we
find them stopping cars and ask-
ing people what are the points of
interest they could visit.

It would be good if these taxi
drivers could find themselves well
informed so as to be able to sug-
gest to strangers places of inter-
est, historical and otherwise,
where they could visit and take
pictures so as to have mementos
of their visit to Barbados,

As soon as one leaves the Bag-
gage Warehouse and crosses the
Chamberlain Bridge there is the
Legislative Halls where stained
glass windows and paintings re-
veal some of the history of the
figures who made public life in
Barbados what it is today. There
is Harrison College, one of the
outstanding public schools in the
Colonial Empire, there is Queen’s
Park where the late King George
VI planted a tree, there is Graves
End with its cemetery where King
George VI took part in a ceremony
when he visited Barbados, along
the same route there is the old
Military Hospital when the old
B.W.1. Regiment was stationed in
Barbados before vane for Ja-
maica, and further on still there is
the quaint Oistin’s Town founded
by a swashbuckler gentleman and
there is Christ Church Cemetery
where the coffins of a particular
family seem to enter early torment
and stand on their heads,

On the West side there is
Freshwater Bay (aback of the
Paradise Club) with the only fresh
water springs coming up in thé
sea, there is Holetown more his-
torical than many other places be-
eause the first settlers to this
island landed there and where
there is still a monument with the
inseription to “James King of
England,” further along the route
there is Speightstown, (Little
Bristol) where the bulk of ship-
ping one came in; and off the
tr is St. Nicholas Abbey and
Farley Hill House, monuments to

_early.architecture. There is the

‘Animal Flower Cave with its sea
anemonies (animal flowers which
defy capture).

The list could be expanded for
a long time but it is this little
service which adds to the spice of
the drive and even if they are not
desirous of going out of the City,
there are several places which
they could visit with benefit to
themselves. One place where none
of them ever think of carrying
visitors and which would provide |
more history than all the others]
and that is the Museum. There |
could be great improvement in!
this direction

Yours,
BARBADIAN,

THE HUMAN TOUCH
CRITICISING the new “Airedale” hair-do
for girls which consists of virtually shaving
the scalp, columnist Robert Ruark says the
girls need only a few sabre scars and a stiff
neck to be a stand-in for Erich von Stroheim
got up in his aunt’s old clothes.

A “SNEAK FLOOD” from the Ohio River
drove 2,000 people at Empire, Ohio, from their
homes and drowned four. Dinner was left
uneaten on scores of tables, so rapid was
the rush of water.

THE war against race intolerance goes for-
ward, Recently a meeting of the New York
County Medical Society considered a resolu-
tion condemning the segregation of Negro
doctors into “a few hospitals,” and urging all
hospitals to throw open staff appointments
to Negroes.

CAVIAR FOR ONE?

“GONE TO LUNCH”, said the neat little
notice at the window of a Brooklyn bank
teller, Martin Olsen. But the lunch interval
stretched on and on, and when the bosses
started checking up they found that 37-year-
old Martin had apparently thought his lunch
would cost $38,224 and 6 cents (£13,651 4s.
11d.). In any case, that was the amount miss-
ing from the funds. Tonight an alarm is out
for Martin.

THE GAY DIVORCE

HY GARDNER, New York Herald-Tribune
columnist visiting Hollywood, reports that
some filmster couples “are so happy when
they decide to break up that they practically
elope to get divorced.”

FLYNN FUN

AND in Hollywood impish Errol (Burma
Conquerer) Flynn is creating havoc with a
loud-speaker installed in his car, through
which he bellows the names of his friends as
he whisks past their front doors. By the time
the startled friends have emerged, Flynn has

SNEAK

WANTED

THE G MEN have put German-born Ger-
hard Puff on their ten-most-wanted-men list.
Gerry is wanted for a series of daring bank
hold-ups. No powder puff, he.





;

1952







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Green, Red CHEESE, KRAFT CHEESE,
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BISCUITS, OLIVES Green, OLIVES Black,
GOLD BRAID RUM, SANDWICH BREAD

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OTHER SPECIALS

CABBAGE 30c. per lb., CARROTS 24c. per lb.,
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$1.04 each, 2-lb. tin HAMS $4.30 each.

PHONE

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=

eae


FRIDAY, FEBRUARY 15, 1952 BARBADOS ADVOCATE



_—_

Latrine And Bath Opened At Rose Hill

First In Its Area

A COMMUNAL latrine and bath at Rose Hill, St. Peter,
was Officially opened yesterday afternoon in the presence
of nearby residents by Mr. T. L. Harris, Road Engineer. It
is the second such public sanit convenience in the parish

. Pi : P
—the first being at Sand Street, Speightstown.

The toilet and bath, situated on
a@ most suitable site, was erected
at a cost of £500 to the St. Peter’s
Vestry. The construction was done

Queen Returns by Orlando Cumberbatch under

= epee eapeons “« ee. Ss SE
Chandler, Chairman of the Com-
Thanks missioners of Health, and Mr. C

The Comptroller for De- = ae Sanitary Inspector of
velopment and Welfare has parish.
received the following tele- Over 400 residents of Rose Hill
gram from the Secrecary ot | 224 Mile and Quarter are to bene-
State for the Colonies in tit by the erection of the toilet and
reply tom message of bath. A resident told the Advocate
pathy tiie death 3 Ring at. the Cominiasioners of Health

. ;
George VI., sent from Hast! commeAded for their



PAGE FIVE







DRINK
News In Brief } CLAYTON’S

Thirteen film shows have “sna
|
}

BATH OPENED

arranged for the local Boys’ and
Girls’ Clubs during the monus. | }
A show was given at the aa



Hill Clubs on Wednesday night | |
ind one at District “A” Club room
last night. On Tuesday the unit
vas at the Charnocks Village
Boys’ and Girls’ Club which is
near Seawell Airport.

rhe current programme of the
Club’s Film unit ircludes “The
House of Windsor,’ This film
shows scenes from the life of the
Royal Family, It shows the Cor-
onation of the late King George
VI, the early childhood of the
present Queen Elizabeth and end’
with the marriage of Queen Eliza-



beth to the Duke of Edinburgh
initiative Also being shown is an instruc- o*
ings House:— This So was the teuiape Gt tie tional film on Road Safety which
S -patt cobatnaatnbl a Reid in his short speech when he — with eet oe code, a
Pia Qiléen to ontvean te sie said that Rose Hill always weened another instructional ¢lm on Div-
and all the members of ine ed the most typhoid cases in the re Tat’? }
Organisation Her Majes- | Parish because of the lack of pub- Sond of the Weat” is especially
ty’s grateful thanks for lic sanitary conveniences.

‘ s . The toilet and bath is about 30
Se oe sy ee feet long, 12 feet wide and 10 feet
OF ‘the ‘Rovel members high. The roof is of galvanized iron

© Royal Family on and is protected by a parapet with
the death of His Late Maj- plinths. A portico of wall with
esty ,King George the | three-square B.R.C. fabric wire
Sixth. gives..a simple facade to the
building

loved by the boys. It is an Ameri-
can cowboy musical film |

The Boys’ Club Film Unit is
operated by Police Constable |
Cuthbert Chandler.

The Football Season of the Bar- |
bados Boys’ Club has begun. Al- |
ready a few games have been
played and the boys are hoping t |
Sanitary Arrangements MR. T. L. HARRIS, Road Engineer, turns the key of the Rose Hill toilet and bath yesterday after. PY in the B.A.F.A. tournament}
Qn 6 Months’ Bond It has two pans and one urinal

ne » |
noon at the opening function. . air Al basin saath | KO | A } ON IC
io... maes...and two. gens-for “See The Boys’ Clubs Footbali
Fi ' . females while there is a bath for
or Wounding males and one for females. There

B k di e League has three divisions, City,
lac Pp C | ‘« I Peace g | B Country and Leeward, |
* a tap and sink for males and . ever ing e ® raimnee mpr SSE ( y There has been very little rain

“er : similar convenience for females . this month. Some of the heaviesi | OC OOE”™,
na a am going to place you on Of wall construction, the toilet Casts 40/- Enelish Bo s’ Clubs Methods showers for the month were re~ | \ “#SOGSOSISGOS9999SS999SO 9S 99S 9990 POFFO FF FOF

nd for Six months in the sum and bath*is the only of its design S ys x ©

eee eee must try hard to go in the island. It took about three ,, THEIR Honours Mr. H. A,













>
>

oF
corded on Tuesday up to. six
Yelock on Wednesday morning
Ou have pleaded guilty months to be built. Vaughan and Mr. A. J. H. Han- pel at i ok aca? . Je? Seine dite . am in 66) Asean
of wounding this woman with a To open the-.function, Mr, Schell, Judges of the Assistant THE voluntary services and the friendship at the Boys’ During that period ten parts were
Stone and this is a serious offence”, Chandler welcomed Mr. Harris, Court of Appeal, yesterday ordered

Club organisations in Great Britain have impressed P.C, recorded at St, John and nine part:
His Worship Mr. G. B. Griffith, who after a word of praise to the Nathaniel Seale of Hunte

Nath: Street. Harold Wickham very much. P.C. Wickham returned to “ an st. | Pidlin’ wes
i 7 effort of. the Commissioners of St Michael, to pay a fine of 40/-in the island on Sunday after attending courses in “Boys’ Club again fortunate on Wealn “sday
Acting Police Magistrate of Dis- Health, declared the toilet. and seven days or in default one Administration” and “Physical Training” in the United 2% rae Ty ar . .
trict “A”, told Elaine Griffith of bath open. month's imprisonment with hard \dminis ration” an iysica ral g ) night. During this period St
Bedford Lane, City, after she Other. speakers were Mr. BE. L. labour wnen they found him guilty Kingdom, George got a light shower, Thy
pleaded guilty of wounding Irene Bannister, Mr. G. C. Parris (Com- of blackguarding on Baxter’s Road He returns for that night were; St
Scantlebury. missioner of Healthy; Mr, Eric on January 12, George four parts, St, John om
Challenor (Road Inspector), and By imposing this fine on Seale, with the running of Boys’ Clubs pert and St. Philip nine parts
Mr. C. Reid who moved a vote of Their Honours varied the decision and it is not surprising to gee a Bus drivers and conductors ha
thanks to Mr, and Mrs. Harris. of His Worship Mr, G. B, Griffith, doctor or any other professional the month of January to renew
court that the defendant hit her The function ended with resi- Acting Police Magistrate of Dis- man serving drinks ‘in a Club their badges. The period has gon
on the head with a stone. She wes dents “Christening” the toilet and jrict “A”, who sentenced Seale to canteen,” but they go into the Traffic
cut. bath, undergo a term of 14 days’ im- P.C. Wickham left Barbados by Branch at Central Station at ai
prisonment with hard labour for the S,S. Bonaire on May 29. His average of two a day to get thei

e e e the offence. lirst engagement was with the badges renewed.
mission Of ] O Seale appealed against Mr. Grif- National Association of Boys’ Clubs

I Up to mid-day yesterday 24
fitn’s decision. The evidence was Training Centre at

THE ( i)

FINEST IN eo
BARBADOS \ “”

BY ALL THE WORLD
FAMOUS PERFUMERS. oe

- - At oe
OLE EEE?

CORAL OPE OLE OOO OEL OOO L OT



aid: “Nearly everyone in the
United Kingdon: is willing to help



The offence was committed on
January 15. Scantlebury told the

a



Cheapstow,







drivers and 216 conductors hac HOUBIGANT—"C ly" ete “Amour Amour’
that on J nuary 12 while on Monmouthshire where he spent renewed their badges MARCEL ROCHAS “Femme” and “peetae nee abetting”
e Baxter’s Road, Seale abused his four weeks on a course in Volun- The Police are checking up oi cAnbne’ Chui Pe a “Ohanet Ne & ;
ro ate ot ecl e wits Edna Seale oa, such a bad tary Leadership. He was the only motorists and drivers of othe Fleurs de Roeaille’ GUERLAIN “Heure Bleu”
manner on Baxter's Road, St. colonial student, but there were
Michael, that the matter was re.

students from Germany, Persia and

vehicles who fail to have = th
various countries.

required — lights at night Fiv

“Nuit de Noel’
‘Narcisse Noir’

AA GO OA OOD ee,

AFTER hearing Mr. EF. W. Barrow, Caveator’s and Heir at pcried to ihe Police.

“Miterouko” “Shalimar” Ete
Law's counsel urge several reasons why a will of Martin ., P47 Seale told the court that

OT—Crepe de Chine





PPO A RRP MPL PLL PLIST







{6 « Tabac Blond N—My Sin Aepege ete, ete.
motorists were reported tor no 3 naniheeaeen Piquet Vigny
i \ having lighted lamps on the rear!‘ JEAN PATOU, “Joy” Jacques Fath Corday
rlor s i she spoke to the defendant many Camping Centre 7. Bees ;
Taylor who died on May 14, 1948, should not be admitted times but he still continued in his He then went to Nash Court, - Wiel, veniclen anid two for no KNIGHT'S PHOENIX PHARMACY.
to probate in Common Form, but in Solemn Form, the own way. Shropshire, where the N.A.B.C. ons te Wanaeeaaye as F
nd? * . : %. ; al an el aiid . ' é § ¢ a “sday .
ce Puisne Judge His Lordship Mr. Justice Taylor yes- Comping Centre is situated, ee t | Of the 19 traMfic offences pecord= * $0086S69695666660600600606006006460606460690506G8.
terday postponed his decision as to the admission-to pro- “nt nates Bekie! E sf d the Police Report:
( i : : r Uppingham Corby Boys’ Club of . jie ed on the Police Reports yester a.
ba one re mas ees Priday. DEATH WAS DUE TO Nottingham. This Club had among P.C. HAROLD WICKHAM ony ey two ~~ ists were re | | 7
rt Vi 1s a holograph wil Intention of the testator was its voluntary leaders Colonel Dal- \, ln ieee | heave ri portec or exceeding the speec - ied : : ,
which Was begun to be written paramount. If the testator only HEART FAILURE ton and Mr. Collier. “Chairman of the NLAB.C, Coun. Umit. Two were reported for " STANSFELD, SCOTT & Co., Ltd.
in 1943 and was finished in 1945 intended the document to be a aie ear ie kr = hs” a re ees was to the N.A.B.C. oj] ig Lord Aberdare end Mr Basil parking hired ears in private car |}
oe es rane Said that the draft, it did not stand that the a tone by aeons causes waS Headquarters at Bedford Square, Henriques is Vice-Chairman, The Park’, one for parking in a re Broad Street
Court had to decide which part of draft would go as a will.” e verdict returned by a nineé-man pondon, where , he nt three t , 0 ‘vee
it should be admitted to cubase The Jodge reminded Mr, Bar- jury when the inquest concerning hens Het ee ee seh

Greystone Hastings

4 t ; ) movement is about 60 years old en rg — oe “ et ri
weeks 1aViInEg discussions with j . e > ear to be hired without a )h « knee: |
because a part was revoked in row that the widow had given in the death of Gwendolyn Hall, a Training Secretaries before leav- ain at a tt ! o Seon 800 licence. )
1945, by another wiil which was evidence that her husband had mauby vendor of Land's End, ‘St. ing for Berwick, N.A.B.C. Senior (ube affiliated to it The rai Two hundred and eleht suse |)
written four days before the 1943 intended the document to be his Miehael, was concluded at District Boys’ Training Centre Clubs affiliated to | sone ate =
will was completed, will and the going to the solici- “A” yesterday afternoon, The

Mr, Barrow is instrucied by tor was not to get it made as a Co‘. oy was Mr. G. b. Griffith,



ROBERESON’S JAMS &














are sesttered all over Great bags, valued $83.20, were stole |t}
After a week in Berwick, PC. Britain from the bond of Messrs, 8S, 1 n -
fs ickham went to Canterbury, Muss Sons & Co {. duty } hd ‘
Messrs. Hutchinson & Banfield, will Hall was admitted and detained coe ease he ¢amped with Insurance Scheme Pen ce me Ite al t {{ ARMALADE
Solicitors, Mary Taylor. widow ’ ‘ a4 at the General Hospital on Cadets of the St. John Ambu ¥ of Martin, who is petitioning that Widow’s Opinion February 6. 4 oo — nex! lance Brigade, under the command B oP aes a : pe Lg ae x the Nuataur? aie athe \ j
the will be admitted to probate in Mr. Barrow’ submitted that day Dr. A. S. Ashby, who per- aio» Ni The camp last- Oys > organisations, has a big " ; Pug (nee , »»
Common Form, is vepriaentad by that was only the opinion of the formed the post mortem examina-~ s ete “a ae insurance cheme for club mem- Mr Weatherhead, Manager of the CONDENSED oMILK
Mr. H. O. St. C. Cumberbatch, widow and could not be used in tion at the General Hospital “A tour of the Clubs in North 2e& Because of this, other or- firm . . ; {
Solicitor of the firm of Haynes & a Court of Law. Mertuary on ree, 7 said a and South Wales with the N.A.B.t gani reas aaiate, in order to one dhe Village } AS BEFORE
Griffith He said that it had been given the appirent age of the deceased ile Trai . ng lasted three “enetit from this scheme tf. James, reported that a quanti vi)

The heir at Law is Allan Taylor in evidence that there had been woe 44. The chest was congested ete wp a one Soton types of ,,/ London there is the London ty of articles valued $14.41 werr i eee : WN
and the caveator Clarence Taylor, two wills, one in October 1943 with the heart extremely enlarged. Clubs, those organised by private Federated Boys’ Clubs which is stolen from her home between 8.0/ ")

The case began on February 6 which’ was purported. to have Jy the stomach there was @ jiaividuals, churches, the Police @bout 66 years old. Mr. Cornock p.m, on Tuesday and 7.45 a.m \{ DENMOR DANISH HAMS—2% lbs. Tins $3.76
and then it wis adiourned until been completed on December qysntity of food. In his opinion ani Santon: Taylor, M.A , is its General Secre- on Wednesday i) DENMOR DANISH HAMS~—-4 lbs Tins . s $5.65
yesterday when it was to be de- 29, 1945, and the other which qeath was due to natural causes, “ ; tary. About 600 clubs are affiliated Nine acres of second crop ript ) IMPERIAL CORNED BRISKET BEEF—4 lb. ‘Tin: $4.20
cided whether on the denial of an Was made on December 25 o, namely cardiacal filure ae Practical Work to pe an B.C SEN s «the £2nes were burnt when » fire 4 ( SWIFTS LUNCHEON BEEF with CEREAL,--12-o07. ‘Tins 69c.
illegitimate son alone as to the The will on _ Lbecember 25 Mervin Greaves snid that the Fe returriad.t4.Gondon and dia d nother organisa ion 38 i eurred at Maynarde Plontatio (( SWIFTS CHEESE—12-0z. Ting . #4) g 99e.
will being his father’s, it should which was done in toto on that qecensed was his mother, He last practical Club work for four aonsl! aae0s Seen a eee St. Peter, about 10.80 pm. ¢ | SWIFTS VIENNA SAUSAGE 12-02, tins i 99e.
be admitted in Solemn Form. date, had ‘in a revoking clause saw her alive on February “a weeks. Two weeks were spent at om oa eed n " Its ‘ ace Wednesday, They are the prover- | (i) IMPERIAL VIENNA SAUSAGES—4-oz. tins bs he)

Will In Common Form which revoked all previous wee when she was taken to the vena the Brunswick Boys’ Club and (oon ee ie Mise Selwyn. sty of F. BE. Corbin of the sam: |\\\ CHIVERS APRICOT JAM--2-lb. tin ....,.. tease Cane

His Lordship said that his at- So there was then the Scena Hospital fter she fell mM : oat two at Stow Boys’ Club ‘ bya Seno ra ie enti plantation and were ‘sured ) PERLSTEIN BEER—per bottle ‘ ‘ ydis ‘ 20¢.
tention had been drawn to rule Position of stating whic h part of jome On February 7 he ae The Brunswick Club wis opened |, Phere T Ke "Fede ted Binge PERLSTEIN BEER —per Carton J alk 4.50
seven and he gathered from that Me, Will which was begun in that she was dead and went to the by the Duke of Edinburgh and has Welsh and Irish Federatec M ‘A Sacer
rule thet a holograph will was a 1943 and purported to have been piyjic Mortuary where he identi- its own premises. It is supported Clubs Mr. Tom ¢ hi Nte ide are -plaves who was in Barbados fe See
* , erap +4, finished in 1945 was revoked body to Dr. Ashby who ! pb , At is the General Secretary of the 1 in Barbados for =
poculiar Kind of will, but despite “twas logical to assume tha: “ed her body + mortem exam- by grants and voluntary subscrip- Wik Club, ‘This has about 300 @ short time last year before re-
that, it could be admitted in Com- 4.6 finishing date of the wil] PeTformed a post m tions. It has about 90 members Uh tiated to it, the majority turning home. =
mon Form which was begun in 1943 was at ination. and its vocational training | ts of which are also affiliated to the P.C, Wickham told the Advocate "SIS LLELLELLLLLLGSLLLSS LO

least written in 1945, but the carpentry. ; N.A.B.C. that the Clubs in Great Britain are

Mr. Barrow had drawn to _ his uestion was,. what other part The activities are table tennis P.T. Course financed ninety per cent. by
attention that the rule stated that te wiitten then MORE REQUESTS THAN opitliards. and snooker ne Cus om. voluntary subscriptions
sich a will could be admitted in “‘some part, or the major part has its own library and gym-

Common Form where it was not 7





i;
and by the it
P.C. Wickham also took a six- @ducational authorities This | \
of the will of 1943 was revoked. TICKETS FOR SERVICE nasium. ; week Assistant Instructors’ Course money goes towards the salaries | })} ‘
contested; but that was the case The revocation was at the be- Stow Club also has_ its pwn n Physical Training at Aldershot of leaders and in some cases the \
vith all kinds of wills. An or- ginning of the will which began OWING to the limited seating premises, but this Club was }
-dinary will which wis contested

; . 0 He completed this course on rent of premises. : H
in 1943. and there was no such accommodation available at the organised by a body of School December 13 and the following dy While he was in England he | })} WwW

haa cota aoa teak te clause at the bottom. where it Cathedral for The Memorial Teachers,’ It has areu a fla eB 1e was in London again witnessed the Boys’ Clubs Week i)

“The Court to my mind,” he was purported to have ended in Service at 11 a.m. on Friday the bers, The activities are similar ; He visited Mr. W. H. Chinn, which was opened on October 27 i
sid, “ has to consider whether 1945, 15th February, it is regretted that those of Brunswick, but the nea Sécial Welfare Adviser to the Representatives of various clut ))
‘there is indeed a contest. The Finishing Date it has not been possible to meet are taught painting and pupPs : Golonfat Office, and Mr. Basil Hen @ On Page »
mere fact that a oe is ae g ell the requests for tickets. making. This Club also has ¢
does not necessarily mean that.---Heosaid that somebody. could
eee is cae ee ar oe have disapproved of the will on

© say whether there is s sub-

December 25, 1945 and put the
siance in the matter raised. finishing date of the 1943 will as
“If there is no substance, the on December 29, 1945. Before,
will can be proved in Common the Court admitted the all ip |
Form,” Common Form, it had to decide | ¥ .
The caveator had sworn that whether it was going to accept | In tribute to the memory of His
two documents produced - = the contradictory evidence of an}
Court were in the handwriting of old woman who could not see ‘ <
the testator, but the will for which well and who had a vested in- Majesty the late King George VI
permission. was being Ae terest in the will. ini a4
it be admitted in Common Form Solicitor for the idow, Mr ‘
was not in the handwriting of the Cumberbatch, said that the date! this store will be closed to-day
testator. at the end of the will was the

“When I compare these,” he date that counted.

in GOLD, BLUE, ROSE and GREEN



| FACE TOWELS

BATH TOWELS

from....... $1.82 to $6.80
in PLAIN WHITE

BATH TOWELS

MINN iis bsiti an cinsvipinsiao edn tssiyrd ibaa $2.13 to $4.32
in BLUE, PINK, GREEN and GOLD

y y ir ‘ih *
suid, “to my mind, they are He said that counsel for the between the hours of 10.30 a.m, BEACH TOWELS
identically the same. other side had said or iaad Pci wtistebite thai: vi dhiensasaihas $1.59 to $4.19
" i vocation clause in the 1945 will!
“Lda oe claton 10 be antexpert, revoked ‘part of the 1943 will, and 12.30 p,m.

hut I think any jury, locking at but up to that moment, the caer
thea writings, would come to the BC, ners or Mate “Tite Sots
conclusion that they are all a ment counsel for the other side |
iat oF ee Pee ad could Was referring to when speaking of
a ‘ r its y i ause, roulc
antyecome to the conclusion that as ts Bet one i ed in eee
there was no substance, though the Jome;it cite be taken,
contest might be bons. fide. Here Mr. Barrow said _ that
Mr. Barrow said that it had not .

both wills were properly before
heen the intention of the testator 1. Court as both had been filed
that the document should be a yer" Cumberbatch went on to

in gaily Coloured Designs

LAVATORY TOWELS

volpigeh esti tialifiaigaes this @ 62¢. and 65c.
, BLUE and WHITE

BATMW MATS



in GREE}



ees
SSSI FSFE

lll

i he .@ $3.06 %
Ne in BLUE and GREE?

holegeaph wit 5 ES - say that the inet that a witness ; { BED HEE

That was quite i was present di not necessary : Ss. Ss

re Eee hh aeiaae Megat, tnt that be gam ses
> that the testz surp~ sign it. ' ¢ FS iodapietdvendah erst ahiniia saan iaieovs 45

moned certain persons to witness Showld sign it, } in BLUE, GREEN, PEACH, LEMON PROSE

the will, and provision had been : i} ™ re ee ’ -

made in the corner of the will for Shi Adrift ny

the witnesses’ signature. ip 1 } x 80” x 100”’—WHITE @ $10.37

her there was her ¢v } ” ” > «

ae eaten had told her tO cpanptp washington, Feb. 14 Hy) . 90” x 108 do. @ $10.13

take the will to the ty eer The British motor ship Hendon- \

a eee Pe nae’ have it hall radioed Thursdsy that che|

Aad so that s

i PILLOW CASES

traightened out had suffered a complete on | 1
ee Neoite ; i eses failure and was drifting, helplessly |

act that witnesses S13
h 2 ee al cruas and one did 48 miles off the Oregon Coast, US



“COTTON 20” x 30” - $1.67
Q
i} —LINEN 18” x 28” 2.48
) ANE? 7
. no 1ess’s name had Cost Guard Headquarters report- i
aed a ee a i i ed The. message said the ves el i
ewPheretore” he said, “our sub- “is in ne eee a Y 10, 11. 12 and 13 Broad Street i
sion is at the testator drew unidentified tanker was standings .
male ee ates nt which by and, the coast guard cutter} y Dial 2664.
aS had intended to go as a Balam was sent from Astoria,|
testamentary deposition of his Oregon.

ae —UP. |
property





?
i
i
)

4)

—— |




PAGE SIX |



BARBADOS ADVOCATE FRIDAY, FEBRUARY 15, 1952

| PUMLIC SALES | GOVERNMENT NOTICES |PARADE ORDERS FOR THE FUNERAL
CLASSIFIED ADS. z SHIPPING NOTICES











LeemONE. 2806. REAL ESTATE EARLY ARRIVAL 3
ant iatan, ipl eeninslaicseecacipiaieatindee HOUSE: Brand new, ample 3 ASKED FOR SERVICE

Fetter . _ ROYAL NETHERLANDS |
house, all conveniences, with party Tickets tor the Memorial Ser-| HIS LATE MAJESTY, KING GEORGE VI. } STE 4 MSHIP co.
vice for is Majesty he late)

a . « 7 sized living room, open verandah, kitche:
FOR SALE a a eanaty, 8
King George VI. which will be} ONAL, zon Febrasy i |












For Births, Marriage or Engagement!
*mnouncements in Carib Calling the
charge is $3.90 for any number of words)

to 50 and 6 cents per word for each $$$. $$$

Garage sundry, 2
servant rooms and storage room under





MV. “CLARA” will accept













M.S. BONAIRE. 22nd Feb 1952 Cargo and Passengers for aos
On attractive hflisid it y Neo ; neta “ 7! ‘sf *® Ea oe. ‘a” ‘ ME 2 >, 22nd February 52 Bahamas, Sailing on the it!
‘ional word. Terms cash. Phone 2508 Road a wieeite held in St. Michael's Cathedral | GENERAL INSTRIt q TIONS. MS. HERSILIA, Ist March, 1952 instant. :
between $50 and 4 p.m., 3113 for Death AUTOMOTIVE aetna ihinniiniesnsaralinies __ | at 11 a.m. today Friday 15th Feo- 8S. ERATE NGRDORG. ith Merch, 1952,
Notices only after 4 p.m BHARE ar have been issued. i |$.$. CoTT . dist Mareh. M.V. “CARIBBEE” will accept
208 ighedes Find trevrande Ce ™ Pa Pes sene have been |EQLONEL R. T. MICHELIN, ‘Commandant, Local Forces | SAEING 5O FLYMPUTE AND Cargo and Passengers for Domin-
61 Barbados Ice Company Ltd . tea cs their a ss _| Headquarters Office 14 Feb., 1952 Ref. No. TBR/G 121/52 | ns. we STAD, seen February: 10d ica, Antigua, Montserrat, Nevis
IN MEMORIAM 7 163 West India Rum Refinery Ltd requested to be in their seats DY|, COMPOSITION OF PARADE | M.S. WELEMSTAD, 3h February. St. Kitts. Sailing 15th instant.
‘eg ane Er aes he a nts | 280 Barbados Shipping & Trading Co.| 10.45 a.m. at the very latest but The Parade will consist of: SAMINGRITISN GUIANA M.V. “DAERWOOD” will accept
. ne it at Redman & Taylors Garage Lid. ‘go in order to avoid congestion a The Barbados Regiment 1 Officer and 36 other ranks |M.S, STENTOR, 28th February, 1952. ‘
che Room ay 1s 2 tao ane above will be set up for sale by

i cargo and Passengers for St. Lucia,
the last moment, it would be ap-| The Barbados Police Force 1 Inspector and 30 other ranks §.S. BRATTINGSBORG, 27th March, 195% St. Vinnents : ‘
preciated if they would do their!: The Barbados Cadet Corps © Cadets fram each Compan: | SAILING TO TRINIDAD, PARAMARIBO

| | sar
utmost to arrive nearer to 10.30 DRESS | AND BRITISH GUIANA

. iblic competition at Offic:

ALLEYNE: In loving memory of our “saan Te mn our ice, James
beloved Son, Jeffrey Alleyne who de- CAR=1947 Vauxhall 12. -Good tyres and va at oping on Friday 15th Feb-
parted this life on the 15th February] batten; 37,000 miles. Owner Jeaving the ‘





Grenada & Aruba.
Date of departure to be notified.











1947. isi YEARWOOD & BOYCE a.nt. (a) Barbados Regiment Shirts, Shorts,) Boots, Hosetops, Berets, |M 5 BONAIRE, 10th March, °1952. B.W.I._ SCHOONER OWNERS
s isiand. $1,000.00. Stevenson, phone 4067 Solicito: Belt: dd Sidea: ‘Ank! iter: White | 5.5 COTTICA, Tth April, 1982. ASSOCIATION (INC.)
Five years have passed since that] or 8454 18.2.52—3n.}13.22—2n - . His oe the Governor | belts and Frogs will be issued. st the Cen. | SAILING TO TRINIDAD AND CURACAO Consignee, Tele. No. 4047.
sad day, _—_—_——OO will wear unjform. | |M.S. HERSILIA, 18th March, 1952
When one we loved was galled away | GARS—199 Morris Oxford Saloon| “RIVERTON TVG heer tee : pie dia Magee 8. P. MUSSON, SON & CO., Be.
The blow was hard, the shock severe} 16,000 miles in excellent condition. | 7.71 Sea tent tem ne a | (b) Barbados Police Force As ordered Agents.
We never knew that death was near] 1$@ Hudson Sedan 14,000 miles very | ¢& rn ‘i “ PR 5 |
diy tp te veowmnbered by-- Mielyn| snitabie for Sire. 1886 Wedae Dehine Saree yas Mua 5 so two bed- 2 MINUTES, SILENCE ‘c! Barbados Cadet Corps .. ++ Shirts, Shorts, Black shoes, Stockings, |
leyne (Mother), Clarendon Alleyne] Coupe nas bes well cared. Very suitable . electric light. In- > .

: Hosetops, Berets and Belts |
WILL BE OBSERVED |# FORMING UP PLACE

e s s
Fiat tns neeersnaere dane Sowe'ees’ Canadian National Steamships
The Service in St. Michael’s Station Parade Grounds and will then march to the Cathedral in the follow-




{Father}, Daphne Blackinan (Aunt). ano | for converting to pick-up, 1088 Chrysler | tye on BY wibpointment ‘phone 4919
ira Hewitt (Great-grand-Mother) Royal Sedan going cheap. 1956 Morris! public competiti te, for sale at

15.2. 52-10 | Minor 2 Door Saloon 12,000 miles. Gay of Paecy teen z lay, the 22nd
Just arrived Morris Oxfords and : » at 2 p.m, at the



































Noo |
————— = “ office o: Cathedral in memory of His late ing order under the Senior Sener Dresent: |
; : E ba : 10) Ww. t f the undersigned 7 . Barbados Regiment
HOPE-—in ee neers of a a “sp a in ee be se cove have CARRINGTON & SEALY Majesty King George VI will Barbados Police Force |
Pee ae tee ee de ee Lacse ‘Sires, [commence at 11 am, | today Barbados Cadet Corps Let
To live in the hearts of those we loved |" FORT ROYAL GARAGE LTD., “SRANS SOUGHT DIKLN Cr Ree | she... 18th, of February with a] Seine sesomnaihaacet tae Seeeee wal Eis ae eee cee ete SOUTHBOUND Sails Sails Arrives —_ Sails
Is not to die. j Telephone 4504. 13.2.52—1. | New Road (ear Pautepelie maar ae silence of two minutes. able’ opera. . | _ Galifax Boston _ Barbados Barbados
Mabel Hope, son and daughters, iis ————~ | Michael standing on 6,030 square feet o¢| -%€ Signal of the commence-|, Rovure “LADY RODNEY" . ++ ee = 4 AB Feby. 15 Feby. me Feby. a a.
é enslgelioers ELECTRICAL ee. ment and the cessation of the| ‘The route will be from Centtal Polico StationMagazine Lane-Reebucx’ |.GADY NELSON, 2, -- ++ 12t Evby, 29 Feby. 6 March Oy March
4, as eee contains open verandahs on| Silence will be given by rockets Street—Spry Street and back the same way after the Service is enaed ce
WANTED Te oa “ink p Veena ee ane dining rooms, 2/ fired from the Harbour Police|; ‘TIME TABLE a
c One EMITRON CAR RADIO for Sale. | breakfast room, mel Galton aay meh) | Barracks. | ‘Units will parade on Friday 18th February, 1952 under their own Commander: | NORTHBOUND ‘Arrives Sails Arrives Arrives Arrives
Sa ; Practically new. Can be seen at Lash-|@arage and servants rooms in yard. | The Governor trusts that alt| at the Central Police Station Parate Ground at 1015 hours. Units will tise ar Poe we 9 = ie ‘
ley’s Limited. Sold for $179.00, reduced Inspection “lasses oO i | march off a yu as seated n ater than urs ¢ | “CAN. ‘ad o* ‘eby. 21 Feby. _— Feby. arch
— ee” reheat [teen ee een’ |oercons throughout the “Ialand|, Sereteh [EABY Neeson cab arch ot Mach °S Mora! 4 Aor" "f Aora’
The above property will b: ‘ ‘A GOOD COOK--Appiy: Mrs. Lacy | HOME FREEZBRS—0'% cu, ft, Made by |aale at public auction on Friday the 10,4 Will unite in observing the occas- Barbados Regiment will arrange transport for the Contingent from No. 2| “CAN, CRUISER" +0 ee @ April TApril = — 14 April 17 April
Hutson “First Attempt” Brittons ‘an Frigidaire, guaranteed, and equipped with | February at 2 p.m. at the office of the|i0M by a complete cessation of Coy. ‘Transport will arrive at Lodge Sehooi not later than 0915 hours. Ps ™ ican .
15.2.52—In. |the famous Frigidaire Meter-Miser. At| undersigned. ‘all nOrmatl business, work|; concausion OF PARADE ‘or further particulars, apply to—
"any with khowlsdas of Seeing. [oon Far ie ns ane CARRINGTON & SEALY and locomotion for two minuies At the conclusion of the Parade, Units will be dismissed by their respective
. —with kno: Ke ard Ltd. Dial 5136, 5027 or 4611, Solicitors, ‘ha biat ae 7 Sins ck Ribeaahe will io alt cy
pply between 9 a and 5) pom 15, 2, 52—3n. Lucas Street, at the hour named. Commanders, Ankle-gaiters, me aks Reaunent
Hutson, Bracebridge, 5th Ave. FE eville tive 1 6,3.53—On ° arrangements to be made Wy the Quarter Master of the Barbados
14.2, 53-—2 RADIOS; The well known Murphy | —





reenter
- §-tube sets, only a few left. See these

TWO JUNIORS ‘or Our office, one of before buying, Redman & Taylor's Garage AUCTION

When should have had some previous|rtq Show Room. 15.2.52—Gn, | 1 will sell at my MART, Victoria st. |

| GARDINER AUSTIN & CO., LTD.—Agents.

M. kL, D. SKEWES-COX, Major.
Staff Officer Local Forces, Barbados



experience. Apply by letter and in| teens | ON FRIDAY 15th from 12 noon tA
— to A. S. Bryden & Sons (Bar-| REFRIGERATOR—One 6 cu. ft. 1949] Pieces Crepe 50 yds each, Assorted
jos) Ltd. 14.2.52—-t.f.n. lp pe Collars, 50 doz.

id in good condition but surplus to b z Sport Print Shirts, 20) OFFICIAL NOTICE
: present needs. Phone 6255 between 9|90%€S .containing 24) Moirs Chocolate That PEPSODENT LIMITED,

a.m. and 4 p.m. for permission to view. are {containing24) Pineapple Choc-| trade or business address Is St Britrons | BARBADOS. IN THE COURT OF CHANCERY

MISCELLANEOUS 19,2,02—3n, | Gales J sede Pees and Body Pow-| House, Bridewell Place, London, E ca In pursuance of the Chancery Act 1906, I do hereby give notice to all persons
; Sah ncaa | England, Manufacturers, has applied tor | having or claiming any estate right or interest to any lien or encumbrances in or

dillciiaetivn MECHANICAL . cK 218 the registration of a trade mark in Part | affecting the property hereinafter mentioned (the property of the defendant) 10)

BOARDERS—“Private family near 13.2.52—3n|“A" of Register in respect of toilet bring before me an account of their claims with their witnesses documents and

ww ee | ari i a

Savannah can accommodate yisitors to} ONE FOUR WHEEL CANE CART with | preparations for cleaning artificial teeth | vouchers to be examined by me on any Tuesday or Friday between the hours of

Trinidad, Single or double rooms. Write | yiatform, pneumatic tyres and brakes. UNDER THE IVORY HAM and natural teeth, and will be entitied | 12 noon and 3 o'clock in the afternoon at the Registration Office, Public Buildings,

Mra. Stone, 80 Dundonald Street, Port-| Passed Highways & Transport, never MER | t, register the some after one month | Bridgetown, before the 4th day of March 1952, in order that such claims

of-Spain,” 9.2.52—-12" | used. Dial 4616. Courtesy Garage. By instructions received fron from the 13th day of February 1952|may be reported on and ranked according to the nature and prtorits thereor

Shgperebereher mens manrmneenmatnn sam , 15,2.52—6n. | surance Co... 3 will ten et eit the In-| unless some person shall in the meantime respectively otherwise such persons will be precluded from the nefits of any

WANTED TO BUY ANTIQUE GOLD}. | ary 16, at Mears General oc | five notice in duplicate .to me at my | decree and be deprived of all claims on or against the sald property,
Be ee tee Ma me. MACHINE--One Singer Sewing Machine | Garage,'Nelson St., (1) 1949 A-70 Austin | The weak Tanee den be ros on seaieian Pigintifs ENA MAY GALE

(Treadie) very little used, Complete with |Car (Damaged in accident). Terms Cash, | at my offies Pr eens S Defendant: CLARA ALSOP GALE
vr
PERSONAL

parts for Cut Work and Embroidery | Sale ot 2

Abply to Marion Jones, My Lords Hill, VINCENT GRIFFITH | Dated this 30th day of January 1952, PROPERTY: FIRSTLY ALL THAT certain messuage or dwellinghouse called

opposite Belmont Church Auctigneer . H. WILLIAMS “PARADE VIEW" with the land whereon the same stands and thereto belongings
is.waece Registvar of Trade Marks. situate at St. Anns, The Garrison in the parish of Christ Chureh in this Island

pirating ner sane aeconstaeninilchiasatire ere

Phe public are hereby warned against

givirty* credit to my wife, CLANESYSs

|
containing by admeasurement 6502% Square feet or thereabouts butting and bouna-
MISCELLANEOUS ant
SCANTLEBURY (nee Depeiza), as I do TAKE NOTICE

ing on a place called or known as Sea View Hotel, on lands formerly of Mary Ann
fot hold myself responsible for her or

14 February, 1952.



























Sereetebe = Bi et : ms : ee
CG“ TRANSATLANTIQUE
Sailings from Southampton to Guadeloupe, Martinique, Barba-
dos, Trinidad, LaGuaira, Curacao, Cartagena and Jamaica.
J °







ae

15.2,52—-3n, | 12,2.52—4n

















From Southampton
“COLOMBIE”

Arrives Barbados
20th Feb., 1952
2nd April, 1952
6th May, 1952



Cooper, but now or late of Frank Craig, and on the public road or however else
the same may butt and bound SECONDLY ALL THAT certain messuage dwelling-
———
fmyone else contracting any debtor debts ATR RIFLE PELLETS-A shipment of
in my name unless by a written order |these just received, .22, and .177, call

house or store situate in High Street in the City of Bridgetown in this Island
and numbered 15 in the said Street together with the land whereon the same |
stands and thereto belonging containing by admeasurement 1116 square feet or |
signed by me carly at Redman & Taylor's Garage Lid | thereabouts butting and bounding on the premises known as Number 156 Roebuck
Signed RIDLEY SCANTLEBURY, r 15.2.52—3n
— Thorpes Land
Jame ACCESSORIES, for the Car Chamois

.. Ith Feb., 1952...
“COLOMBIE”.... 20th March, 1952
*“DE GRASSE”..., 24th April, 1992

“Not calling at Guadeloupe.





| Street and 14 High Street and on the premises known as No. 16 High Street and on |
| High Street aforesaid or however else the same may butt and bound AND |
| THIRDLY ALL THAT certain piece or parcel of land with the dwellinghouse






SAILING FROM BARBADOS TO EUROPE









. ‘ Y | ther called “BARTICA" containing by admeasurement 9016 square feet o:
21. | Leathers Repair Kits, Car Polishes, French That WHITEHALL PHARMACAL Co) ‘. | ner eOn nae (formerly part of two acres and thirty one perches) and als Fron Batbados Aisites Ceahinnien
. hi tk, ae Cabins K aig appar oe isting under the laws of the State ‘of Hlinole Ui ene organized and ex-| square feet of the public road situate in or near the district called the Cocos u “COLOMBIE”,.., 2nd March, 1952 ,.. ... 14th March, 1952
ete, ote ediman aylors Garage! trade or business uadvens Sta Hlinois, ‘ited States of America, whose | Walk bevond the district called Hustings in the said parish 0 rist ni : 4 , 1 2
TAKE NOTICE Ltd 15.2,52—3n. Sees; has applied for te tenn Street, New York, New York, U.S.A.,| this Island butting and bounding on lands now or late of one Mrs. Inniss, on. the COLOMBIE”.,.. 13th April, 1952 .... .... 36th April, 1952
exister in respe :



“ ation of a trade mark in Part “A” of P y late of Marcus Gratinum et al, and on the Public Road or}
FGGS— Barred Plymouth Rock Begs for | atter one tncnth form the teen gn ne | however else. the. same i

W register the *“GE GRASSE”.... 19th May. 1962...
KOL YNOS 2 he meantime aaa, tea ee iste: me yever else e si y d bound Together with the messuages
: rn 5 % sa howev else the same may butt an un
hatching, 36 cents each, Infertiles re-] ¢ ¥ February, 1952 unie “ne perso buildings and all other the erections and buildings on the
placed. John Alleyne, Bbworth, St, Peter, anes Bive notice in duplicate to me at my office ome pr n shall in| dwelling houses and jdt i

*Sailing Direct to Southampton.

a. =20th ay, 1952

, o ; , : ing 4 sing with their
Phone 9120 16.2. 5a—3n registration. The tradé mark can be seen on application at “8 y ee of such | said respective parcels of land erected’ and built standing and being wi
- Dated this Ist day of February 1952 if my office.



appurtenances ;
Bill filed: 3rd December, 1951,

“GALVANIZED SHERTS — A_ limited

HK. M. JONES & CO.. LTD.—Agents.





it, WILLIAMS °
quantity, 7 ft, $4.80, 8 ft. $5.89, 9 ft $6 45] 19 » 52-3 Registrar of Trade Marka Dated: Mist December, 1951 : dl li earner
That WHITEHALL. PHARMACAL| Inquire Auto Tyre Co. Telephone 2696. |: 2:52—3n
GOMPANY, a corporation organized 2.2.52—t.f£.n.







and existing under the
of Tilindis United 8 of America PURGRAIN Pigeon Feed - none
)

Whose trade or business address better — 10-Ib. lots and upwards @ 19c. OFFICIAL NOTICE

Kast 40th Street, New York per Ib. Phone 2547, §.2.52-t£n | RARRADOS. j RAT

US.A,, Manufacturers, has applied ——— ‘ 3 if IN THE COURT OF OHANC
the registration of a trade mark in Por SHIRT FACTORY —Capable of making hae hone eof the Chancery Act 1906, 1 do |

aws of the State
















OF EXCHANGE















rt * veby ive notice to all ay Oe, eS ea Coupons 69 2/10
"A" of Register in respect of tooth pest *, | 60 dozen shirts per day. Por particulars: Afeeting ihe conten Fe ae Heht or ms mi to any Hen ot eheuritiranaue in or aw 50% Silver 20%
footh powder, tooth brushes, shaving | Phone Johnson 4411, Preinafter mentioned (tt operty " defends c 19 6 nec 4

acc Mttecreave ‘ation, Antiseptic soli WONG eee 13.2.59—4n ene before me an account of their clairns with theft Neotaaces domain? nd ae CEN ee 5 71 4/10 78 7/10 babaves on

tion and germicidal disinfectant, and will 2 dennewoninanrstenenentipneasraagpenares — ten ers to be examined by me on any Tuesday or Friday. between the fetes of Sight or Be mee v \ Bankers 171 2/10
he entitled to register the same after | SHIRTING UNLIMITED — Mercerised hoon and 3 o'dloek in the afternoon at the Registration OMcc, Publie Bulldi Tae 2 2/ Demand

one month from the 1 day of Febr- | Cotton cut-piece gents pyjama and shirt- Bridgetown, before the 4th day of March 1952, in order that such claims 4 addy ited : f Drafts. 71 05
ary, 1982 Unless some 5 in ihe ling in fancy designs, different lengths,| ™4¥ be reported on and ranked according to the nature and priority theveot 2 oe eee ‘ee e7io Sight Drafts 70 9/10
meantime give notice in duplttate to me|come and choose at KIRPALANT, 62| S@8Pectively otherwise such persons will be precluded trom the benefits of + Oe re “937/10 Cable cgcgpsvae
at my-offiee of opposition of such resis: | Swan Street, 15.2. 52- “in, decree and be deprived of all claims on or against the said property Bote ae 72 2/10 Currency 69 7/10
tratio; je trade mark can be seen on |. Plaintift: HUGH OWEN SAINT CL. uU e ‘ .. Coupons 60
Ppliciton at my Office. AIR CUMBERBATCH 50% Silver 20%



Baia aor ol More | PULAC NOTICES Perea Raa reente, “aaa |

aoe REECE PATTERSON |

‘ IRTY

Reaistras ot APAHe Marke, OPERTY: FIRSTLY ALI, THAT certain piece or parcel of 1. rmerly

ae... = part of the lands of Kirtons Plantation) known as “Robin Hood" ne i Ge
a ROYAL BARBADOS YACHT parish of Saint Philip and Island aforesaid containing by

* CLUB 3 roods twenty and two fifths perches or thereabouts Riek tha helaine he
SE- LEONARD'S CHURCH NOTICE :

at
the east on lands now or late of J. A. Gittens on the ae ae epee, Oo
ORGANIST CHOIR-MASTER







BOILS

Get rid of unsightly

PIMPLES See fast! 44
them a spee: treatment wit

medicated, antiseptic Dr. Chase's

Ointment. Soothes as it heals. 69c.

Large size, 6 times as much, $2.23.

| DR. CHASE’S -
| Antiseptic OINTMENT

South on a public read o
the west on another public road and on the North on another fabiia road we
however else the same may abut and bound SECONDLY ALL THAT certain
Members are asked to note that] Piece or parcel of land situate at Six Cross Roads in the said parish of Saint

the Club House will be closed on Philip and island aforesaid containing by admeasurement onc

rood thirty eight

. 1 . perches or thereabouts abutting and bounding ca jands of The Grove Plantat
Friday 15th inst. until 12.30 p.m.] on lands of Thurban Plantation on lands now or late of one Holder and on the
T. BRUCE LEWIS, public road or however else the same may abut and bound THIRDLY ALL THAT
Secretary. | certain piece or parcel of land (part of a larger area of land known os Johnny

— | Ward containing Eight acres one rood ten perches which was formerly part of the \ iS cough!
lands of Kirtons Plantation) situate in the said parish of Saint Philip and Island Oh
aforesaid containing by admeasurement Four acres two roods or thereabouts abut- | = What can | do?

Applications to be sent to the
Vicar for the above vacancy caused
through ill-health. Salary $24.00
pius Fees.

State experience—names of two
péople from whom references may







TAKE NOTICE









































































































be fequtred. ion Sa an tana Sma ay gt Sapmanas ct ef on nds now oc | yout sre wth cough cugh, |ROPPEODOOOROESDOOOOOE |
_—_—_________— | the same may abut and bound FOURTHLY ALL THAT certain piece or parce) cough, all the time... INVESTMENT OPPOR- TIME
a SS SSS ¥ of land (part of a larger area of land known as Tank Fleld which was formerly TUNITY.
| N Cl N oe pd Sie nee 3 ne menratipn) situate in the said parish of Saint Philip | 5
| an land aforesaid containing by admeasurement two roods one and seven-tenthe A limited number of Cumulative
perch: th bouts abutti d bounding on le » or late aide .
ORIENTAL }} ANA Eferke'on lands now ot ive of one Mr. Brathtalte wn ands voter oie ye | -— AT =
of G. Cla > y of the said Walter Francis Reece and Selma Cathiee » %|
SOUVENIRS _That WHITEHALL PHARMACAL | Reece Seterion. acd iat A eoat iene ae iwover Gan" ae sane Ra annt SRSPR es Mt See ee.
| COR ON. Ra eupameTle ee ate ahd bound FIFTHLY ALL THAT certain piece or parcel of land known as “Gad | |
SILKS, CURIOS, ARTS ‘at Miinole, United Mates of America. | o/*Saint Philip and Island nforssaia containing. by admensicoment Toon mren rae | BROS
VENDEMOS, SEDAS, whose trade or business address is 221 to9as twenty perches or thereabouts abutting and bounding on lands now or late 5 x e
JOYRBIAS Y ARTISTICAS Kast 40th Street, New York, New York, | ¢ phoebe E. Clarke on two sides on lands now or late of Kirtons Plantation on % x ’
‘OURIOSIDADES, TRATDOS ogee stort Ng gigs er pl api x other lands of the said Walter Francis Reece and Selma Cathleen Rage’ Patterson %
OU , : yer el © same may a , i | . ays
Di LA INDIA CHINA © IH) A’ Of Kexister in respect of a medicinal | rary ALL THAT certain piece or pareel of land situate at Mavehfivld in the 3 Prince William Henry and Swan Streets ;
EIrPTo or De ade an a itl said parish of Saint Patty and alan afovesaid containing hy adieaturement ong | i a . * j
lho uth A t " the same after acre or thereabouts a! dobby ng an bounding ots Aang nee or late oe March: Reale 1 Gy y e
THANI'S one mont trem the itty dng of me | Slane om es Beige pio‘ newever le Whe Sey Ne ith nk Sewice % || Losses? Prices on Record!
Pr. Wm. Hry. S8t., “ fay, 1952 unless some person shall in the hong * s ~
meantime give notice in duplicate to me Bill filed: 16th October, 1951. f . -
se | yt my office of opposition of such regis- Dated: Sist December, 1001 | What a difference! $1} SHARKSKIN 36” $1.98
SSE Bey At Sy, othne Ge cRu oe an Se ee een Bo : Bs , GEE RIE, | fae hail ies eden saat % ] biabih a Cah t es aS GLB cana sndboss coeeienseonvcias /
‘ . *. on
{| application at my office. Registrar-in-Chancers | ‘i ‘ \g Best if Town
{ day of Feb * 1962. * my throat in no time! : .
7; CRE AM ree > ie WILLIAMS tt alae : LT A8—an | B65 606000009099900% I} CREPE DE CHINE 36 coccccccssscccsecsnmunann 98
i egistrar ©: ade 8. = SS |
ea |. GOVERNMENT NOTICES A nell ea
) ; OOOO FSO SGOPOSPPPPPSSODR: ‘ | FOR § ALE JERSY 48” (Plai 12
5 *. . ain) DUPUAE\ Hh on aiynsecneced cose tecsedoscesedeveduvocse 1.
PARLOUR : ice 3
; % Memorial Service Pe R.A VARGA c SIE sae tid cose os eran ee Pn si bette Gas 1
: ‘ \ For the late KING GEORGE V1 S$ most members of the secretariat Ste oP Saas } REce SHANT-UNG (Popular Shades) .....0.cccccccc0 = LM
: FOR SALE x tire Gan AO Heres tats duties in connection with the Memorial Service for His Majesty the | One Cow tveah in mille. 00 (Pop )
ay "Jewish Religious Committee. late King George VI on Friday, 15th February, the Secretariat will | C 0 U G Hi young Leghorn hens three i PRINTS 36” wide .€2
coe ¢ | not open for public business on the morning of that day. It will open Soabiabete 5 prs, White King |i} CALICO 26” wide ... id
the. 300, rae Fiabe ELE EPO GO at 12.30 p.m. li Pigeons,’ 3 ‘Flemish Giant LINENS 36” wide 67
as ari ual PPLE OOS. | , PO WONG iris cies iy Mecenesdbasbescsesoessoseseeesisncees ‘
at Baxter's Noad sa git S NOTICE POLICE TRAFFIC NOTICE LOZENG ES | sete A eens te eon, | BRAPIN 90" Wille: i ccecul hat Buscdvdaksisitadiistovielnssiisie ae
* concern, Ii is properly equip- oP 4 1 “Med- })}| Mae ous
: * be Made by Sunday 8.00 to 12.00 “M Hi BROCADE 367 Wide vocc.cccscccscccsscssccsoscsssssesssosenssrscseee Ti
ete oe. is N Me. EB TD ABREU has returned .| the makers of the famous Zubes Cough Mixture } my m,”” Pine Hill. h ? ORGANDY 36” i 69
judd in, Good opportunity for }}|% to the island and iy ‘carving on ¥]MEMORIAL SERVICE AT ST. MICHAEL'S CATHEDRAL, FRIDAY | 5 Reese hi MBO. 5 calcisscssisiice voriicanee =e
san enterprising man or Ronin a e wy saan 16k FEDRUAB SE: 1098 is ee, |
“woman, Apply at Middle 1% ae aE On Friday, 15th February, between the hours of 10 a.m. and 12 noon yooes os | HATS BAGS SHOES
—, cee A CSR POS < pOOSSSSSSSE | : ears conveyi ‘sons > service > |
ee Furniture Depot. eonbeion aceon Seatobeae 1, The drivers of all cars conveying papers to the service| * We always carry a large assortment of — y| Rock Bats Pri
» Dia! , 5 ral vay, of Trafalgar Street. 12 — 0 rices
: I? A UNITED METHODIST hall approach the Cathedral y way - are gar ea) ig BEST BRITISH PAINTS tb ENAMELS ¥ | m
> MEMORIAL SERVICE 2. Chauffeur driven cars shall set down their occupants at the} ¥ a FOR ONE DOLLAR ONLY
SSS west ee RAsgaey ° South Gate to the Cathedral and then park on Constitution Road in| § in stock % | 3
The Late KING GEORGE VI the vicinity of Queen’s College R dina oi % et eed. $ | 3 Pairs SOCKS or 2 VESTS or 4 HANKIES or
: EXHIBITION Le Soinetade tiuastoer ees Sette ane 2. -Ounibe driven ears shat turn into Spry Btryet, set down thet ‘ 5 | 2 PANTIES or 4 GOLD BELTS or 2 CHANGE
February, commencing at 11 a.m, passengers at the North Gategapel park as directed by the Police. ie
} : i$ Drama. make, @ special 4, Spry Street shall bee way from St. Michael’s Row. $ CoNTHAL EMPORIUM % | PURSES
AT Secoosseoosesesossooooe’ ‘ ee roe shall be = , from loa a % orner, Broad & Tudor Streets ca MEER is YANKEE TYPE SHADES, WALLETS. $1.75
1 “SSOS5SSSSSS9SSSS9999998S: ade under Rule 22 of the Bridgetown and Speightstown SSOBCOO
. BARBADOS ii {| crvamey (Amendment) Rogilations 1048. | SE | FANCY SILK SHIRTS (Barbados View) ......._3.98
- ~ ? ; R. T. MICHELIN, 1) ALL-WOOL TWEED PINSTRIPED 56” wide... 9.50
si FURNISH TO-DAY : Commissioner ot Police. |] |
» MUSEUM % . ee eS Commigghanien. b¢ Police. FOR SALE | j} SILVER GREY FLANNEL 56” wide 0.00 339
‘ olice Headquarters, | di |
“ | " nant 5 | eal rt
WEST INDIAN 3) * The Money Saving Way Bridgetown, ‘ : | oe | DUNGAREE Heavy Quality occu 1.07
ee ; FULL-PANELLED Mab 18th’ February, 1962. 14.2.52.—2n, | \)) KHAKI — Popular Shade ................. 2, ies cei: ee
abe wll ahogany
oR PANELLED _ Manowany =———~| LYNCHBURG
PAINTINGS B sinels and Double Beasteada: some |} BEDROOM RUGS — All Wool — from... 3.58
a with Various Mirrors--Wardrobes i = i
“By ROBERT J. MAC LEOD and. Dresstr-robe . Announcing the arrival of:— | 5 * |} VEGETABLE DISHES (with Covers) ............ 1.27
«My th Avenue, = Belleville
. ees 2 |
\ and MAHOGANY, Bireh and Deat § Sains
ore et Tables for Dining, Cocktail, Radio, Terrazzo) MARBLE CHIPS An attractive and well proportioned 2 storey house situated |||} BLANKETS — £r0m ......0-recwpercnnsnnnnnennnn 298
PENCIL & WATER Sewing. Kitehen in several shapes § | on a corner site of 12,050 sq. feet. Contains 3 galleries (1 1/}} TORCHLIGHTS o.com — 139
COLOUR for China, Kitchen and Bedroom. | enclosed), large drawing room, dining room, study, modern LUNCH BAGS 4.59
Fi ectrnuid Gb | SUITES ind Separate Drawing © in 5 colours | kitchen, 3 ‘coms, garage, etc. Sbdilonds wees sand**be socsdtttbpovevancon tebspiosesess s*¥ereepsese ie
“— 7 }% kere cand. Rush, and Many "eunee z Low figure accepted for quick sale, owner going abroad. CURTAIN NETS. .......2....0..+ thaiciilswess apmaabied, yes 39
Went Indian Subjecte 1 Nice Things NEW AND RENEWED Per Vegenmene ons Freon LADON & CO CRETTONES. 48” wide .....:.ccce:ssssinseneennnte 1.46
By HAROLD CONNELL | T as Ez B EK R T 4 T q JOHN M. ab A = PINNING Con con dcl riches socal bvacds tid cdecetinpabchcaieransrecraashvasyoat 57
i} OPEN FEB. 9—MARCH 8 L. S. WILSON ° R S 4 d. neal eesaTe Asenr OILCLOTH ............ felts aoe
FAL EST? » AGENTS
i 10 a.m.—6 p.m. \$ SPRY STREET. DIAL 409 8 §©6 Magazine Lane, t+: Dial: 4367 | Phone 4640. Plantations Building. HEADKERCHIEFS .78 i
Vencecoos :




FRIDAY, FEBRUARY 15, 1952 BARBADOS ADVOCATE







BY CARL ANDERSON

FLAME'S INITIALS -FLAME'S PERFUME? ))\\NINT i 1}
WHERE DID VOU FIND THIS, DUSTY? 4f 1 i
> s

y

i
RIGHT WHERE ! | i
YOURE STANDING:

STILL ON THE LOOSE ,
\
Ni
if


















SNAP OUT OF IT, KENT!
YOUR SNIVELING WON'T
HELP US SAVE DALE NOW! HOW CAN
WE WARN WARDEN MILES THAT BIG MOE'S
HEADED FOR HIS OFFICE?— AND YOU'D

YES... BUT SOUNDING AN
ALARM MIGHT THROW BIG
MOE INTO A PANIC! HE

WOULDN'T HESITATE TO KILL
CALE... IF WE COULD FIND
THE INTER-COM SYSTEM IN
ONE OF THESE ROOMS, WE
< MIGHT BE ABLE TO WARN THE









WARDEN MILES BUSILY DIRECTS THE *
PREPARATIONS FOR THE ROCKET-
LAUNCHING... .







S) Gre Lee
Unaware OF THE TROUBLE TD ay
SPRUNG UP IN THE CREW QUARTERS, /p i ®:

sa
[hh





MM ...NEVER NOTICING
Ray THE MENACING
WW FIGURE WHO HAS
i GAINED ENTRANCE
TO His OFFICE
WITH KENT'S
Fi OSMO-RAY*GUN |. }
/









HONESTLY=I-I DON'T KNOW!
THIS QUARTER OF THE ;
SPACE-PRISON WAS
ALWAYS OFF-LIMITS

TO PRISONERS /

7



AGE THRU SOUD
GE PENETRATED HE



MATTER, SO THAT THEY



BUT HERE COMES NON, M'SIEU
i Y TH’ TRRAIN CARRYIN’ | FIRST BUY
/ YOUR QUA! TEECKET, MY BELOVED...OUT'F | ZE TEECKET
M'SIEU / YOU MUS’ AVE MY WAY, LITTLE OVER ZERE /
7 QUAI TEECKET...OR
NO ENTRANCE /







NESS / HOLD THIS, JOHNNY,
I'LL GET TH’ CONFOUNDED...
*KAY" TICKETS / WATCH FIR







poo



BRINGING UP FATHER

| -
WHY DON'T MAGGIE
LIVE ON THE FIRST

Nie a



|| HE'S COMIN’ IN -
T RECOGNIZE
HIS STAGGERIN'
FOOTSTEPS -









GET OUT /HE
MUSTN'T
SEE us / |









IN ANOTHER PART OF THE PALACE: } ;

THOU TRAITRESS / ‘ S% STOP! I'LL KILL
ry \ ’ YS MYSELF BEFORE &
OF AN IMPOSTOR! . 3 NY 4 @ TLL SURRENDER!
WHAT FOOL . Ah,

OF THIS SACRED

~<
ee ? OF




WITH THAT (
PIGSTICKER, MISS

et
ft en

=
ae

NOT HEADHUNTERS. SENGA BANDI
AFTER OUR EQUIPMENT. .
SHH +-DEVILs~ -





COSCO?

ENJOY FINE FOODS DAILY





AL AD PRELOMEAS IE NEENASN SORS ERAE AR
!



We can’t catch up





with it!

The call for “Black & White” continues to grow
all over the world, for connoisseurs agree that it
is a Scotch in a class all its own.

Blended in the special “Black & White” way it
is a splendid drink at all times and for all
occasions,

‘BLACK: WHITE’

SCOTCH WHISKY
Wie Secrct ts tn the Blending

By Appointment



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to H.M. King George VI James Buchanan & Co. Led.



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SPECIAL offers to all Cash and Credit Customers for Thursday



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PPG LE LCL LLLP LLL ELLE LE LAAAD VCP LLL LEELA PE LLALPLPLAPAPE

YEARRIAGE

A BROOK FOR THE MARRIED
AND ABOUT TO BE MARKIED

x r x 1e
KENNETH WALKER, F.R.C.S.
, aod

This book has been written for those who are about to
marry and who find that they are in need of information and
advice on the subject. Its aim is to provide the necessary
knowledge and the practical guidance which will help a couple
to build a successful marriage and avoid the pitfalls which lead
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~ + a?
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WE HAVE IT AT THE

ADVOCATE STATIONERY





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Boneless Beef (per lb) 58 .50 Pkgs. H. & P. Assorted
Pkgs. Rice (2+ lbs) .60 34 Cream Biscuits 56 00
Split Peas (per lb) 15 .12~ Bottles Heineken’s

D. V. SCOTT & Co. Ltd. Broad Street

PAGE SEVEN
ree
PLLLSOCCCLE SESS ISSTST

40 YEARS A FAVOURITE

S. & S. RUM

Because of its

MELLOW FLAVOUR

AND

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2 ain , a ee
pat \y \) Yu TY Sliced Ham per Ib. or

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Tins Salisbury Corned
Mutton

Bronte Roast Beet

Salt Beef per Ib.
nice Slabs



CHEESES
: ligt
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12-02. tins

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Canadian Cheddar
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FRUIT in tins
Tins Fruit Cocktail in
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Strawberries in
1’s & 2’s
Cherries in 2’s
» Peaches in L’s & 24's
» Apricots in
1’s & 2}’s
» Pears in 1’s & 24s.

VARIETIES
Pkgs. Pumphrey’'s (Tinted &
Flavoured) Icing Suga:
» Bridal Icing Sugar .
(Plainy
. Tate & Lyle Cube Sugar
» Tate & Lyle Castor
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Tins Tomato Paste 4oz.

SS a

SERVE THESE
Salé Werrings

and Mackerels




PAGE EIGHT

BARBADOS ADVOCATE



Second






By O. §. COPPIN

The We Indic egi their
Second Test with Ne Zealand
today rher a we
doubt as to the suy ity of the
West Indies team i ; Test but

conversely, vhile
a convincing vict

expected
was only



the tenacity of John Goddard and
Guillen in® the closing stages of
the innings and the batsmanship
of Worreii in the second innings
that clinched matters our way
on each however.

Chose Thirteen

Godiuard has declared that his
team will be chosen from the
following thirteen players: J. Bi
Goddard (Capt), D, Atkinson, W.
Fergusson, S, Guillen, R. Mar-
shall, S. Ramadhin, K. Rickards,
J. Stolimeyer, A. Valentine, C.
Walcott, E, Weekes, F. Worrell
and A, Rae.

It is definite that he will go
into battle for the second time
without the assistance of his
pacers, Jones and Trim. He
would seem justified in this since
the wickets seem to favour the
spinning of Ramadhin and Val-

entine more than it would pacers

Gomez Out
For the first time Gerry Gomez
ig out of a Test team and regard-
less of the extent to which we
might be superior to New Zeal-
and, yet one cannot help feeling
a pang of uneasiness that Gomez,
admittedly the best all rounder
of the tour, on performance, will
be absent from the ranks of the

West Indies Test team.
Goddard must have very good
reasons for not including him 19



RABONE

(Wellington)

G.



West Indies Scor

In Second

B. SUTCLIFFE

the thirteen

(Auckland)

players from whom

he will eventually chose his team
presume to

and. we would not
criticise from this distance.

Atkinson’s Chance

It would seem as if this means
be

that Denis Atkinson will
brought in to share the new ball
with Worrell.

Skipper Goddard will have to
fecide whether he will open with
Rae or Roy Marshall as a part-
ner for Stollmeyer. Some schools
of thought subscribe to the view
that Jeff might be given a rest
but I would not take the chance
of dropping both Gomez



Vv. J. SCOTT

(Auckland)





J. A. HAYES (Auckland)

Stollmeyer, seasoned veterans as
they are, from the same West
Indies Test team,

Speculation

Further speculation is whether
Ken Rickards will be given 4&4
chance in place of Weekes who
has not been able to get over a
very bad patch. This would be in
the nature of an experiment as
well but no one could criticise
Goddard if he gave young Rick-
ards a chance in the circum-
stances,

Let us meet some of the New
Zealand players whom the West

and Indies are most likely to meet.



J. REID (Wellington)



N.Z. Test

NEW ZEALAND, Feb. 15.

IN 45 MINUTES’ BATTING before lunch the West
Indies scored 34 without loss in the second cricket Test
Match against New Zealand at Eden Park. Stollmeyer was

then 21, Rae 7.

The weather was threatening when New

Zealand which won the toss, took the field, Sutcliffe, New
Zealand’s captain, being of the opinion that the pitch would

take spin.

Football Season
Opens To-morrow

The 1952 Football season opens
at Kensington Oval on Saturday,
February 16 With a First Division

fixture between Spartan, last
year’s cup winners and Carlton,
runners-up,

The Council of the B.A.F.A, at
their meeting on Wednesday
graded the teams for the 1952
competition as follows:

FIRST DIVISION
Spartan, Carlton, Empire, Ever-
ton, Notre Dame and Harrison
College.

SECOND DIVISION
Empire, Carlton, Spartan, Notre
Dame, Everton, Pickwick-Rovers

THIRD DIVISION
Wanderers, Cable and Wireless,
Foundation School, Foundation
Old Boys, Y.M.P.C. “A”, Y.M.P.C.
“B”, Empire, College, Comber-
mere School, Combermere Old
Boys, Carlton, Lodge School
Y.M.C.A., Pickwick-Rovers, Bar-
bados Regiment, Notre Dame,

Everton, Police, Rangers,

KNOCKOUT COMPETITION

Spartan, Carlton, Empire, Notre
Dame, College, Everton and Bar-
bados Friendly Football Associa-
tion,

The Council appointed the fol-

lowing sub-committees to serve
during the season.
Fixture and Match:— Messrs.

Cc. A. Smith and L. F. Harris,
Selection: — Major A, R. Foster

O, S. Coppin and G, Wilkes.
Consultative: —Messrs, D, H, L

' They'll Do It Every Time"



Doctors’ cASe-800K, TYPE
NO.3,426-~THE BIG HE-MAN
SAvS (AND WERE EASSocorPING r

LOOK, DOCâ„¢I WANT
YOU TO GIVE IT TO ME
STRAIGHT» DON'T PULL
ANY PUNCHES»: TELL

ME THE TRUTH

Acter 15 minutes’ play heavy
rain drove the players from the
field tor 35 minutes.

Stollmeyer appealed to a crowd
of about 2,500 by the grace and
ease with which he made his shots.
Both he and his partner however
were subdued in the early stages.
Sutcliffe used only fast bowlers
Hayes, Beard and Reid until giv-
ing the spinners Burtt and Moir
an over each before lunch.

W.1. FIRST INNINGS
Rae b Burtt 99
Stollmeyer not out 135
Marshall b Beard 9
Weekes not out MM
Extras 18
total (for 2 wkts) 288
Fall of wickets:— 1 for 198, 2 for 203.



Aussies Unable To

Organize Gantes

OSLO, Feb. 12,
learned officially that
intends to waive the
honour of organizing the 1956
Olympic games, and Argentina
appeared as a likely candidate to
pick up the honour,
tabs 2. —U.P.

It was
Australia





Ward, S. O'C. Gittens, L. F. Har-
ris.



Finance: Messrs. D. H. Le
Ward, V. T. McComie, O. S.
Coppin. t
Disciplinary:— Major A. R.

Foster, Messrs. D. H. L. Ward, S.
o’c. Gittens, F. L. Walcott, L. F.
Harris, W. Hoyos, V. T, McComie,
J. M. Kidney.

Referees:— Messrs. J. H, Wal-
cott, J. Spencer and L. F. Harris

e 288-2 Devonshire

Regiment

A team from H.M.S. Devonshire
defeated one from the Barbados
Regiment at Rifle Shooting on
Wednesday morning on the Goy-
ernment ‘Rifle ge. The
Devonshire scored 469 points
as against 433 by the Regiment.

The shoot comprised application
at 200 and 300 yards respectively
and snap and rapid at 300 yards.

Instructor Lt. Des Clayes from
the Devonshire scored the high-
est points 91 with a_ possible at
200 yards, while the best shot for
the Regiment was Capt, C. E.
Neblett with a total of 81.

Following are the scores:

H.M.S. Devonshire

Points
Instructor Lt. Des Clayes 91 :
Marine Jones ... . 88
Marine Gillard .. 76
Sat. Turper iiis....- 74
Commander. Crawford 72
Surgeon . Wilson 68

469

Barbados Regiment

Capt.. Neblett, C. E. .... 8a
Major Walcott, O. F.C. 80

Set. Edwards, F. E. ....
R.S.M, Marshall, H. B. G, 7

Major Warren. A. S. .... 60
C.S.M. Carfer, G. A. .... 59
433

P. C. TRAINEE
IMPRESSED

@ From Page 5



lined up on the Horse Guards
Parade Ground in front of the
Duke of Edinburgh. The Duke
deelared the Clubs Week opened
and Arthur Wint, Jamaican run-
ner, delivered the first message.
Afterwards representatives ran off
to their various clubs to deliver
the message.

“It was a very interesting pro-

cession and I shall never forget |










F. B. SMITH (Canterbury)

Regatta

Handicaps
The Handicap times for the
Third Regatta which will be sailed
in Carlis.e Bay To-morrow, Febs

ruary 16, are as follows: —
t



























Class No. Start at Flag
:
B 4 Hi Ho
B 10 Wizard
B 1% Ranger 2.30 R
B 481 Fantasy es
B 482 Circe “
:
D 4 Seabird
Bb & Peter Pan 2.32 Yellow
———
B 7 Moyra Blair 2.33 Red
B 6 Flirt
B 8 Rascal 2.34 Yellow
|
B 3 War Cloud
B @& Okapi 2.35 Red
D 12 Rainbow
D 10 Van Thorndyke 2.36 Yellow
D 3 Rainbird 2.38 Red.
———+ |
B . Resolute
D 1 Buceaneer 2.39 Yellow
dD 9 Olive Blossom
B 5 Mischiet Sata
D 2 Imp 2.41 Red
D i4 Hurricane
B 1 Gipsy Ges, tae,
D 7 Sinbad 242 Yellow
ee
c 68 Peggy Nan 2.43 Red
——————
I 2 Invader
L 6 Eagle 244 Yellow
—————
K Tornadoes 2.45 Red
——_—
I 7 Mohawk
I 8 Skippy 2.46 Yellov
—— ..
c 9 Folly 247 Red
—_—
a 1 Miss Behave
Cc 3 Madness
I 9 Dauntless 2.48 Yellow
1 12 Dawn
c 2 Scamp 2.50 Red
C 11 Magwin
I 11 =Reen 2.51 Yellow
Cc 10 Gannet 2.52 Red
c 7 Rogue : me
I 4 Gnat
I 4 Coronetta 253 Yellow
I 18 Clytie
H. BLAIR BANNISTER,
Starter



Winter
Olympics

(By A Special Correspondent)

LONDON.

The Winter Olympic Games of
1952 will begin today in Oslo.

The official opening, inaugurate
ed by King Haakon on February
15th will set the seal on five years
extensive preparation. For,
since the International Olympic
Committee, in 1947, chose Oslo as
the scene, Norway has been get-
ting ready for the arrival of the
world’s top-flight snow and ice
athletes, §

Teams are coming from over 30
countries, including Great Britai
'Canada, Australia, New Zealan
| Portugal Japan, Argentine, a
j Italy—the latter subsidised by a
| State-run football pool.
| The problem of housing the
| 1,200—1,300 competitors has been
‘solved by the erection, in Oslo’s
‘suburbs, of three new ~ villages,
which will afterwards accommo=
date students and the staff.of a
| hospital.
|. Events in this year’s programme
include ice-hockey, speed and
| igure-skating, skiing, bob-sleigh-
|ing and the Nordic winter sport of
| bandy,
| _ Bandy is little known
; Scandinavia, where it is often
| called ‘winter-football’. The rules
are similar to those of soccer, Fast
and apectaculac, there are eleven-
aside; players use a “bat”, shaped
like a hockey stick, eS drive a
| heavy ball.

outside



| that day's a ity”
t ay ctivity”, P.C. Wi
ee P.C. Wickham
| _ P.C. Wickham has now resumed
| duties with the Barbados Boy:
jand Girls’ Club organisation.

TAILORING
ON HAVING

CLOTHES MADE BY

P.C. S. MAFFE! & CO., LTD.

Top Scorers



WHO..ARE AGREED
ON TOP QUALITY

Prince Wm. Henry Street

%
. sooooosoooooeooosooesooo secoooscoooooosovosssosooooooooooooosooopooocce%

FRIDAY, FEBRUARY 15,

1952



W.L—-N. Zealand Test ‘To-day



*
T. B. BURTT (Canterbury)

F. L. MOONEY (Wellington)



Get-Together

Buxton Defeated
In Disappointing
Bout With Turpin

(From Our Own Correspondent)
LONDON, Feb. 13

By GEORGE WHITING In his first fight since his sen-|

At last, after years of uneasy ‘ational, defeat at the hands of|
truce thinly veiled by polite lip- Sugar Ray Robinson last Septem- |
service, the controllers of amateur ber British middleweight cham-
and professional boxing in this pion Randolph Turpin beat Alex
together i uxton in an overweight match

affairs of oF ie eae ” at Harringay arena tonight. Bux-
This bright and m ton retired at the end of the
news comes to-day in a short, seventh round with a badly dam-

formal announcement by the “8&d eye.

ABA. It reeds: Before the evening’s boxing
. “At an informal meeting of began, the 10,000 spectators stood
the Amateur Boxing Association in silence in memory of a belov-
and the British Board of 2 King and fellow sportsman.
Control it was that Then as the arc lamps of the
resentatives of two bodies vast arena were dimmed until

the only light was from the two
spot lights and the red exit signs,
they joined in singing the ‘Na-
tional Anthem,

should meet from time to time to
ciscuss matters of mutual interest.’

This announcement drawn up
after the two groups had lunehed

together, is the culmination of As a token of memory for the
much excellent spade work by dead King veferees and seconds
the respective secretaries, Mr wore black arm bands over their

hite shirts.

Unfortunately the Turpin-Bux-
ton affair brought credit neither
to the two boxers concerned nor
to British boxing generally.

The prefight ballyhoo heralded
this as a “needle match’’—large-
ly on account of some indiscreet
remarks dropped by Buxton to
the effect that having finally
caught up with Turpin he intend-

J. O. McIntosh, of the ABA, and
Mr, E, J. Waltham,

They began it many months ago
when, at my invitation, they dis-
cussed the mutual recognition of
amateur-pro’ interests with me at
lunch,

Lance-corporal Basil Williams
(REME), Welsh international and
cane een tin champion, will

e the ABA | light-welterweight oq “to despatch him in double
against Ireland next month, He quick time. But it was not to be.
will box T. Milligan in Dub-

iin on February 8, and W. Reddy Both Were Warned

at Cork two days later. Of the fight itself little can be

_Williams comes into the ABA said. Hardly a single clean blow
side in place of the Repton light- was



4 landed. The referee had
welter, Reg Murray, who is in- cgontinually to warn both men
jured. against holding and the crowd

frequently broke into slow clap-
ping to demonstrate their disap-
pointment with the performance.
Turpin opened a cut over Bux-
ton’s left eye in the first round
and it grew steadily worse as the
fight progressed, In the seventh
round Turpin managed to break
uy, leose from the embracing clutch



Results Of Belleville
Tennis Tournament
THURSDAY’S RESULTS

Men’s Doubles (Semi-Finals)
‘iP, MeG, Patterson & G.

‘ i ¢ . .. aq of his opponent and dealt out
Be Woes bo “evens hs more punishment than he had
6—3._ se “ done all through the fight.

y Though he was unable to re-

E. P, Taylor & Dr. C, Manning
beat J. L. St. Hill and J, D, Trim-
ingham 6—3, 5—7, 9—7, 6—2. ek a Turnin’s .

. , , glorious spell, Turpin’s left hooks
in — Te as to the body showed all their old
. ° fire.
—'%z 15 beat Mrs, P, McG. Pat- On the whole however this was

terson & J, D. Robinson Scr, 6—4+ g most disappointing fight, It’s a
6—4. sad commentary on the perform-
There will be no tennis on Fri- ance of both boxers that the
day and no tournament on Sat- crowds whieh had given Turpin
urday, a terrific welcome back to the
MONDAY’S FIXTURES British ring greeted the final de-
Men’s Doubles (Finals) cision in almost complete silence.

P, McG, Patterson & G. H, Pompey Wins Again
Manning vs B, P. Taylor & C.G. Yolande Pompey, the Trinidad-
Manning. ian wonder man who recently
Mixed Doubles (Handicap) = gave a surprising but convincing
Mr. & Mrs, D. E. Worme vs Miss win over Australia’s Dave Sands
-M, King & J. D. Trimingham. Miss yepeated that performance te
E. Worme & M. Worme vs Mrs, night by defeating Dutch light

produce the form that made him
world champion for a brief but

A. S, Warren & V. M,. Roach, heavyweight champion Willie
Owing to the fact that Friday, Schagen. ;
February the 15th. 1952, has been The referee stopped the fight

cecla’ a National Day of half a minute before the end of
Mourning for the late King the tenth and final round to pre-
George the Sixth, there will be vent the Dutchman from receiv-
no Tennis, Tournament, or other- ing ae peeps: “

i Right from the outse’ ompey
nore See had difficulty in breaking through
Schagen’s superb defence. Most
of the punches—and it seemed he



WEATHER REPORT

never stopped throwing them—

YESTERDAY landed harmlessly on the Dutch-
Rainfall from Codrington: man’s arms and shoulders. But
nil gradually the West Indian’s ag-
Total rainfall for month to gressive tactics wore down his
date: .07 inch opponent and it was sheer guts

and fighting spirit that prevented
the Dutch champion going down
in the final stage of the fight.

Highest Temperature:
84.

Lowest Temperature;
71.0 °F.
Wind Velocity 12 miles per
i

5 °F



hour
Barometer (9 a.m.) 29.993
(3 p.m.) 29.909
TO-DAY
Sunrise: 6.15 a.m.
Sunset: 6.07 p.m.
Moon: Full February 10,

WHAT'S ON TODAY

Memorial Service for King
George VI at St. Michael's
Oathedral 11.00 a.m.

Court of Appeal 1.00 p.m.



Lighting 6.30 p.m. Police and Petty Debts
High Tide: 641 a.m., 6.56 Courts 1,00 p.m.

p.m, Mobile Cinema show at
Lew Tide: Warner's Plantation Yard,

12.18 a.m. 12.49 p.m. Christ Church 7.30 pan.







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SIE




PAGE 1

FBUMY. KEBBLABY IS. US! IIAKIIAlMis MiViH'ATE PAGE FIVE Latrine And Bath Opened At Rose Hill First In Its Area IfcAIII OI'IMII A COMMUNAL latrine and bath at Rose Hill. St. Peter. was officially opened yesterday afternoon in the presence of nearby residents by Mr. T. L. Harris. Road Engineer It is the second such public sanitary convenience in the parish the first being at Sand Street, Speightstown ———— The toilet and bath situated on a most suitable ttU at a coat of £500 to the S vcati-j. The MnatvuctaM wai done by Orlando Cumber butch unriei the supervision of Mi r | Chandler. Chairman or the Commis-toners of Health, and Mr C Held. Chief Samt,r% Inspector Of the parish. Over 400 Fesldenta of Roar Hill and Mile and Quarter are to benefit by the erection of the toilet ux bath. A resident told the Advnau that the Commissioner* of Health should be commanded for their initiative. This too was the remark ol Mr Held in his short speech when he said that Row Hill always recorded the mot Uphold ca.s. pariah because of the lurk of | ublic sanitary conveniences. The toilet and bath Is about 30 feet long. 12 feet wide and 10 fee' high The roof i of galvanized i and is protected by a parapet wtQ plinths. A portico of wall am three-square BRC fabric wire lives a simple facade to the huildint? Sanitary Arrangements It has two pam tad one urinal for males and two pans for females while there is a bath for mules and one for females. There is a lap and link (or males and slmllai convenlenet for females Ol wall construction, the toilet aiul Italh'is the only of Its design in the island. It took about three months to be built To open the (unction. Chandler welcomed Mr On. . llVi.irits TIlHIlk* Tne Comptroller for Development and Welfaie has received the following telegr-m from the Secrv.-o of %  or the Colonies in reply to a message ol sympathy on Uie death o( King ueorge VI.. sent from Hasting* cVasMt— "I am commanded by the Queen to convey to you and all the memoers ol me Organisation Her Majesty's grateful thanks for your message of symp_lhv to herself and member, of the Royal Family on the death of His Late Majesty King George the Sixth." 1£2 vT LBBBBBBBBBBBBW VflaWaa • Li • J DRINK News In Brief j CLAYTON'S Thirteen Mm shows tor the local Boys' and' Guts' Clubs during tha MMui A atlOW was gl\e: hill Clubs on WcdneMi-. night I District A I last mght. On Tuesday Hie unit Village I Oil fa ( lab whkn i* near Sekwcll A The CW I Chiavs Kiim unit Ircluaai Ra House of Windsor. Tola illni shows scenes from tne i Royal FanuU M oii.ilton of the bite King Georgi VI. the earl> childhood of the with the inarn.ifc. r-linburgh Also being nhoi anal Urn on Ra %  als with the highway tfwtn* I which On 6 Months' IU>m k For Wounding MR T L HARRIS. Road EnglnMi. II; st the opening function turnthe key of the Rose Hill toilet and bath yesterday after "I _.. bond for you -ix months in the sum •liaighl. You have pleaded guilty or wounding this wom.n with a His Worship Mr. ~ HUtvkguartling Costs t0/Acting MlM Magistrate of DisHealth, declared o J. to,d KJa,t "' "nfflth of hath open ttPdlord Lane. City, after she Othar speakers pleaded guilty of wounding Ireni ~ Sc*irtlebury. THEIR Honours Mr. H. A. Vaugh-n and Mr. A. J. H. Han„ schell, Judges of the Assistant .. Harris. Court of Appeal yesterday ordered Griffith, who after a word of praise to the Nathaniel Scale of Hun) (Tort of the CQtnmtssionci of S: lUctUML to p,i> ,, tine of 40 in the toilet and MVen dayi 04 m default one ''I t.:Uil <• Ul him uuilty of btackguardiiig on Baxtei Ri m Jtinuaiy 12. The offence was commit ted Of Januarj 15. Scamiebuiv told tin court thai the defendant hit be un the head with a stone. She w.> out ere Mr F. Parrta (O missroner of Health t. Ml I Challenor (Road Iratpaetor), and U 'i Mr. c Reni who moved %  vote Ol Th< i' thanks to Mr anil lira Hani r The function ende probate The Judge reminded Mr liarjury when the InqUM that the widow had gl Id Ne.iiU evei (TOM in Hie K arillmi to help imposing ii i | ale, wllh tin' rmnsnj ol Bo -' Claba Honow it surprlsii t i iVM-abiD Mr. Q it. t.umtii. doctor m Acting 1*011(1* Magistrate of Di-nun aarvaajj drtnl i'ict "A*, who aaataaead Bwli Io t ate en undergo a tiim of U dVS' miIT waflkl b*d I %  nl with hard labour for the S.S Haaalre on Maj the offence. %  rtffawraani i ifith Tin seale ..i, i Mr. OrifNational Araodal i rlalon. The %  wkaenea sra iralnlni Centre at cii. that n .. eoai .• in VotUTs. Ed BoaU H bad tary laaaidanhlp Hi wai the only lit Road, St. colonial student but then tog, Bo %  %  Wi \ i DBWaOf musual liliu Tho Boys' Cwb Film jnil hi nporatad bj r> W • < on labb lath bail Chaiidlei. The Faelball Season ol the |t.n bada Boyi I :.. at) '• %  .• .. %  : f plaj in tha it A r A i i % %  -1 reai i' %  • %  B Football %  %  I City, ( %  uiilrv .ml 1 i There has baan wry Irtle ran' this month Son showers for the nontfa i Tuesday up to six __._ . o'clock on Wedncsda> rnOnUllI TllE voluntary services and the fiieiuiship al ltBoya i*unng that period ten part H wer* Club organisations in Great Britain haw Inaprnoaari H.C. recorded ..i si i Hantld VVickham veiy much. P.C Wukham rftumed '<• Bl -? r 'hiupIhe i-ilanrl on Sunday after attending courses in "Boys' Club Administration" and "Physical Training" .l DEATH WAS DUE TO HEART FAILURE oked ith "f OwerMSolyn Hall, a evidence that her husband had mauby nndor Of Land' intended the document to he his will and the going to the solicitor was not to M It al will. Mi Widow* Opinion Barrow submitted eluded M Dbtrlet E* ,\' i tarda) afternoon Trie -. fi a i! Orlttth. Hall wa> idmUtad inn daialnad -t t ii iGeneral HoapHaJ on ft TV n 8 She dud the | I "•' ' A s A -<•< %  •>• %  •; %  formed th I--;n.-.. .. [, %  „ % %  iV:i 1943. by another wn written four days before the IB43 \M][ \..,nimpleted. %  %  ; %  ma i instructed to Messrs. Uutchlltaoa ^ ll„nn.l,|. Boltcltors. Mary Taykn a/ldow if Martin, who is petitioning th it the will b admilted to probate in Common Form, is represented by that was only the opinion of tK Mr. M. O. St. C Cumberb^dch. widow and could not be used in tf• n Solicitor of the firm of Haynes it a Court of Law. M, rtu Griluh He said that it had leen |JVi : a*. Law is Allnn Tavlor In evidence that there had been an Jthe caveatoi Clarence Taylor, two wills, one in October 18-43 with the heart eyt: The case began on February which was purported to have I(l Uhfl Then It w.s adjourned until 'ten completed on Dcccml>cr ,, u .Titiiv of lood In his opinion lav when it was to be de29. 1945. and the other wl, (tm ,,, „,„, rhelhei on uio denial of an WOJ made on Detemoer Z5. nrri\ ird teal fillure Ultaitlmate aon .done as t„ o„The will mi l*ecember v.U batni his fnlhei's. it should which was done m lofo "" Uial . ., n be admitted In Solemn furm ^..-e. had m .. revoking clause 1JW ,„., .,,„,, „„ Februarj B Will In Oinmnn r'orm rt '" lh 'evoked ail previous wlllf wh „„ lhl „ ls u>k .„ i,.-he (ioneral *^' Hoapn i "" Centre He then went n. Nl I Shropshire, wheie llie N.A.B.C, Camping Centra is iiiuatad H was there for a wiik wUh tinL'ppingiiam Corby Boys' Club al Nottingham. This Club I. . its voluntary leaders COaOn*) Dalton and Mr. Collier. ..,,.„. H,a np 1 vl " wa!i %  ""* N.A B-C i !" Headquarters at Ik-dfo.d s. ^ n ?:"?*" I^ndon. where he aaftnl Ih.e." %  M--k.. havliiK dlscussiens with Tunning SeereCorifti before a?av ins fur Barwlok, NA.it c Ti ilnlni Centre, \f., teat in Bet WieMuini went to CaJntftrbury. Kent, where he bunpcd with Cadets of (he St John Ambitlanei Mi %  I The %  U) North nd South W-lev ilh the N A It IIMtlll II un Kit VM I ring. %  t ..i Coun. %  Mi Ba i Viee-Ch ilrman, rne . a ind nt aided I i %  ited to it Thi %  i lul %  i %  .!. %  i ver Great Brllaln st John and st Phil liala fortunate on tt night During this ,., Oaorsja g"t i light Bhowi i 11 RM tii.it night Civorge four parts, si joha on" ,. it and Bt i*hiiip nlna parti Bus arlvers and condu Hie month of .l.n, i t, ,, ui their badges The partod has gom luii thaj io Into tha TraflV Branch at Cantral Btai at %  rawed up li IHI.I .i.,reatarda) Hi id 111 rand i i .i newed Uoali ba i The Pallre ore checking up oi .i atha vho I.I.I to required lights M ,,,„,„ y lv I lOI ll.l having Ufhtad Ian %  >' iheli vahh lea and 1 1 having iightiHi taropi in u Of ihe iu traftV offanci rat % %  I Polk %  Bt pot I.iv i.nl, two %  '. %  limit. Two we.e r. i in pa .> .t.cat parking in a re< illowin eai % %  bt bind aith >ui llcanea Two hundred ang tight : tad IBS 10, were lola from Hie bond o Measi I Musson. Sons A < o | i, ., Tues,la> nigh I I I THE FINEST IN BARBADOS BY ALL THE WORLD FAMOUS PERFUMERS. M .I.II Hot %  fa a• SU I Vifr KNIGHT'S PHOENIX PHARMACY. STAJVSnMM, MOlTc. GPba MMU Biosd Btiaet HI % % %  hip laid that his nl_ I there i •hen i pol meiiem exnminsthe General Hospital ..id that The eh^wiHr r^esEd M< ll "" '^.Iw araal "• altad Clubs, those organ: individuals, ehun I and "chnol*. I'ractiral WcVK turned tr> London and did Club '."'I'. '"I '"'II Two araata w I I ll I %  ( lufa InsuraiBen BCJMBM %  %  i-t unlifci ihe Mha i" M v ,,f tha mn %  1 -. has a big The Incident wns rejHn i nfr. Waalhtt .i %  %  ihai oi flrn • % %  i dn,t "... fr..m that i ii. tn .. holograph will was o I> etlUar kind of will, but despite tl at, it could be admitted in Comn in Form. f-ll PI t her £• Itegun IMS and purported to have been ftnlsned In 1945 was ravo fc ad It was logical t,i assume tl:. the llnishlng date of the will which was begun in !43 arat al least written in 1945. but th. question was. what othei par argg written then. Souie part, or the major part Of the will Of 1943 was rOVOkl I Th.ii vocation was at v,. IHKlnnina: of ihe will arhh 1U43 and there pan of i... ruary 1 he baard Btoa Boy*' Club 1-ml went ihr The Brunswick ri ifl hate '" Ion ''" i t luiis which is ild Mi Cornock Tayloi M A , '..ti,. Lf Eti it tha % %  >' %  %  tail Chiba .nut Miaod l lub aihwh u %  Daaratary is Mha Si etush Walsh an I paj f in.'-' piortem examb > tranU and volunt-.r. Mib-.i ip%  and it" vocational .iipcntry. The activities are tab* billlardi ami %  nookat The Clul has IU oam Illinium. Stow Club alBO ba* it/ own OWING to thr limited se-ting pumises but this Clul aecommodiitioii available it Iht fd I body of Benool clause at the bottom where it Cathedral for The Memolal Teachers. —-. %  lulla t:dward> or Kills Village 'moreportad thai H i || i n ... ttOlan from her homo l-elween In p at an Tnaaday and Tail gjn ai Wi'dneMl*y Nfhai a.res of %  %  I %  I rOp ir. I %  .1 MM ,' %)...., %  st Pater, about injn Wa d aaaday Thai v of F B Cortotn of I i"lantntlon and were 1945. pur|orted to hat Finishing Data He said that wmebody Lou id Mr. Barrow had drawn to his a ten'ion that the rule stated thai i icfa i will could be adgalttg I hi C >mmon Form where it was no! C ntesled: but that was the case v ith all kinds of wills. An ur%  il nary will which til oonleetftl Ii id to be proved in Solemn Form. "The Court to mv mind." he s Id. •' has to consider whether there is indeed a contest. Thi mere fact that a Caveat Is entered .t.n-s not reeessarilv mean thai thara Is a contest. The Court has n „ vc rtlsappm 1. sav whether there Is some subDetember 25. 1945 and put the Bttee in the matter rilsed. finishing date of the 1943 ar|ll U that unce. the on December 29. 1945 will cat, be proved in Common hh c Court admitted the will in F"rm." Common Form it had to decide The t aveator had sworn that whether ii wag g"vng to at I MM two document* produced to the (he contradl. %  turv ividenea of an t >un were m the handwriting of old woman who could run s the testator but the \%ill for which well and who had a vostad blpennlssion was being sought thil terest in the will it be admitted in Common Form Solicitor for the Wm was not in the handwriting of the Cumberbateh. said that | tistator. at the end of the will v. •When I compare these." he date that counted s..ld. "to my mind, they are ||e said that counsel foi Ihe iilentlcallv the tame. other side had said that the reSame Handwriiinif vocation clause in the 1945 will "Id^t claim uTbVrexpert. revoked part of the 1943 wiU. lut I think any lury, locking at but a^MMlll Othar citings, would come to the S.iS. "Si KlA conclusion that they are all WTII:he same person." Thai l etng the case he said, he coald <>nlv come to Ihe conclusion that there was no substance, though the contest might be beaw hoc. Mr. Barrow said that it had not I -en thr intention of the testator •hat the document should be a holograph will or a will at all. That wai quite clear from the evidence 'given by the widow M „lt WM intended that herself that the testator h'd turn-w-iW .,„ moned certain persons to witness ihe will, and provision had been the corner of the will for Ihwitnesses' signature. Further there was her evidence thit the ltalm had told her to cr*TTI t Washington Feb 14 SSr^KaaMs: "liS, \ i* ?la -ht wltMM %  .I.'--''"*." had hen "ummoned anrt one did miles MT ,he Ore.on OM I s •\?m^T STwmSft nme hid Cost Gu.rd lle.du.,rlcr. repntl-1 lien .ut-erih, u < Th. me W M -fop?" he -.11^. ">r ub"is ir. -.• ,mr e-h ,f dM mMton U lhl Ihe lestalnr dt unidenllfied lank. no %  kind of drpfl documml Wra b and the eoart guard .ulicr, inlended to fo al 3 Balam was sent from Astoria. | MORE REQUESTS THAN TICKETS FOR SERVICE .Service at 11 a.m on Friday the her', tha aetlvKiai llth Fchru.nv. it is regretted that those of llrunswick. bul U il has not been possible to meet are taught paint,' ,1 thai requests for tickets. making. This I I the • •• nei %  ; Baerei irj of *l M^ThM %  '" "" Thin ha: about S00 % % %  *• uf wmch ., %  afflliaf N.A.UC. r.T. CtMust j ' I n PI M ..l Tl "HiiK at Alders-hot oV's-n'ooi H mphrted Unit has iibout 14" memir was ii London again. W ll 1 %  nqucs who was In n.irlMido* for A short time last .. .u i. ,, l urn log home. P.C Wi.kh.uii laid lha Adva*ai.that the Clul !" m (in it llntain are %  i in .i %  mn i, per cent. h> dw aUonal guthorttlas, Thiv monay *•*"• bMrard U .i i rent of DP %  While hi n I ngland Iu %  %  %  %  i -dull was api -."I on %  i • %  g) On Vut H %  toil! KI %ON'% 3AK4S MAKMAI AMI C OSIll SSI D Mil K AS in i oni IIKNMOII IIANIS1I MAMS 2<, || n DENMOB IIANISII HAMS lb. Tim I IMI'KHIAI. (.1IIINEII IIIIISKI I I1KKK 4 Ii SWim I.UNI III. IN IIEKF v-ilh (T.IIEAI I SWIFTS CHUSI ll-o. Tin. SWirrs VIENNA SAUSAQC& i.'../ Un IMI'KHIAI. VIENNA SAI'S.V IB I I • CHIVEM APRICOT JAM l-lb ,i„ PEJI I'KIII.STKIN BUD I-, Carton IN OUR LINEN DEPT. WE OFFER document for probate. The document counsel for the | was referring to when speaking %  Its revocation clause. would bava to l>e put in as I fore It could 1 be taken. Here Mr. Barrow said that both will* were properly baton Ihe Court BF both had bat Mr. Cumberbateh went on to lay that the fact that a witi.eswas present did not necessary should sign it. Ship Adrift In tribute to the memory of His Majesty the late King George VI. this store will be closed today between the hours of 10.30 a.m. and 12.30 p.m. he never tptamenL: t ry property. deposition of his Oregon. —t*r. CAVE SHEPHERD & COMPANY LIMITED 10. 11. 12 and 13 Broad Street FACE nut I.I \ In 00U>, BUm, BOSS iiml OBKBM $1,112 In SUM nWKES fn.m in PLAIN WlilTl. %  Afar ion vis I'Oln $J.|;l |„ SI.32 in tUm, PINK. OBEBN and GOtD ui:\in rottii\ trim SI.S9 In $4.1$ in null.. ( iilnun-4 Ih -.:;..#.. 11 •. i rim v TO II XLS in OBKEN, BLDI and WIIITK illiii MATS ii 2c ,n.l 85f. in BI.I.-K mid I.KKKN | |Mt #/#; SMXBTS 70" x M" (S) M.45 in BUnt, QBBBNl I'KACH, 1 I Mi i -. nnd BOSK 80" x IIN>"—WIIITK O $10.37 90" x 108" do. -a $10.13 I-II nut CASES —COTTON — I.INKN 20" x 30" 18" x 28" $1.7 2.48 HARRISON'S Dial 2664.