Citation
The Barbados advocate

Material Information

Title:
The Barbados advocate
Uniform Title:
Barbados advocate (Bridgetown, Barbados : 1983)
Portion of title:
Sunday advocate
Place of Publication:
Bridgetown Barbados
Bridgetown, Barbados
Publisher:
Advocate Co.
Publication Date:
Frequency:
Daily
regular
Language:
English

Subjects

Subjects / Keywords:
Newspapers -- Bridgetown (Barbados) ( lcsh )
Genre:
newspaper ( sobekcm )
Spatial Coverage:
Barbados -- Bridgetown

Notes

Dates or Sequential Designation:
Apr. 22, 1983-
Numbering Peculiarities:
No issue published for May 3, 1983.
General Note:
On Sunday published as: Sunday advocate.
General Note:
Microfilm produced before 1988 may be substandard.
General Note:
Latest issue consulted: Feb. 28, 2005.

Record Information

Source Institution:
University of Florida
Holding Location:
University of Florida
Rights Management:
Copyright Advocate Co.. Permission granted to University of Florida to digitize and display this item for non-profit research and educational purposes. Any reuse of this item in excess of fair use or other copyright exemptions requires permission of the copyright holder.
Resource Identifier:
17931718 ( OCLC )
sn 88063345 ( LCCN )
Classification:
Newspaper ( lcc )

Related Items

Preceded by:
Advocate-news (Bridgetown, Barbados)

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This item has the following downloads:


Full Text








ESTABLISHED 1895

coe ee

TARY 7, 1982





Advocate

NG LIVE THE QUEEN

THURSDAY, FEBF

’ A

THE KING IS DEAD: LO

BUCKINGHAM PALACE, Feb. 6.
The King died at 10.45 am. today, February 6th, 1952.
The King who retired to rest last night in his usual health |

+
' Business And | ‘
passed peacefully away in his sleep early this morning.
Princess Elizabeth in Nairobi, Kenya, immediately became

on 3 ‘Offices Closed!

It is expected that Princess Elizabeth will fly back to|
London immediately. The King died the same place he
was born on December, 14, 1895. The announcement of
Death came as a stunning surprise to Britain, who thought
that the King was on his way to recovery from his lung
Operation on September 26 and has been well enough to go}
to Sandringham for his favourite sport of hunting.

Queen Elizabeth and Princess Margaret were at Sandring-
ham when the Kingidied. The King had been out in the
countryside yesterday, both morning and afternoon and ap-

PRICE : EF







ee .



High Courts
Adjourned

MEMBERS of the Bench
and Bar of the island assem
bled in the High Court vester-
day morning and paid their
respects to the passing of His
Majesty King George Sixth,
after which His LoXiship the
Chief Justice, Sir Allan Col
lymore, Kt., adjourned the



Local business places and Gov-
ernment offices were closed half-
day in respect of the death of His
Majesty the King. Flags were seen
flying at half-staff and the win-
cows of most stores in Broad
Street showed the portrait of His
Majesty the King draped in
mauve and black colours.
| Early yesterday morning people
went about their work with visi-
ble signs of sorrow and the one

.

tes,
8

4 Court,
ared to be in good health. |} topic—that was the death of Hi - st thei
tis MAJESTY King GEORGE On the announcement of death| Majesty the King. Sineee eis Lordship the Chiet
SIXTH died peacefully in his|jto-day all public functions|, Schools among which aces : ,

were |

Â¥ Jus
Marrison College and Combermere _



is ci 7 ce, accompanied His Lordship
sleep this morning. King George! throughout Britain were immedi-



_——_—







als er lose ¢ ee Mr. Justice Taylor, Acting Puisne

1086, at ae Mune co. Deetenber | aie cancelled, The British Fas inte watt Oe Police | Judge, formally announced tha
brother King Edward Eighth ‘ a. Corporation which} @ourts in the island was adjourn- tae Mare’ ae oH . naa

His Majesty will be succeeded jos . 4 e news at 11.16 G.M.T./ eq until further dates and at tha} Sid souecah” Rk wie a. “aa
by Her Royal Highness Princess closed down for the day except/fhree District “A” Police Courts | aréssion of humble auty, I declare
Elizabeth, Duchess of Edinburgh for news and shipping broadcasts. some ten cases were er Ais Court now adjourned Jud
now on a tour with her husband The announcement concerning the|for further hearing. and Police Magistrate

Second son of His late Majesty period of court mourning was ex-| Some houses in St. Michael flew! accordingly in their discret
King George V. and of Her pected shortly but the order will|the Union Jack at half-staff and | The Cour, is now. adjourned

some of the cinemas were closed |

Majes : ; -ga; 2ave to come from the new Queen.
Jesty Queen Mary. King George! me Court went into caieine for | last night.

was born at York Cottage, Sand-

March 1949 was a lumbar sym-

His Lordship the Chief Justice,
ringham, December 14, 1895. His nine months after the death of} Sir Allan Collymore, Kt., His}
Majesty succeeded to the Throne} ®ing George Fifth. | HALF MAST Lordship Mr. Justice G. L. Taylor,
December 11, 1936, and was The King’s last public appean - All the ships in port flew thei Acting Puisne Judge; His Honour
crowned at Westminster, May 12,]4 ce was his airport farewell last | fags at half mast yesterday as al Mr. Justice H. A, Vaughan, His
1937, having married, April 26,| week to the new Queen, when she| mark of respect to. the death of Honour Mr. Justice A. J. H. Hans ’
1923, the Lady Elizabe salleft for Africa, . ‘ ‘i Tee St Sepers. se. SE. SERS chell; His Honour Mr. H. A.!
» the Lady Elizabeth Angela rica, . Three thousand|the King. The harbour was nor- T ? f
Marguerite, daughter of the 14th} people saw his arrival at the air-|jpally at work with ‘schooners Talma; His Worship Mr. E. A *.
Earl of Strathmore and Kinghorne}field. A reporter who was there | Spey Sy : seeded Pu a -e McLeod His Worship Mr. C. L ie
His Successor ante he looked unusually good.| °™® and_dscharging cargo. Walwyn; His Wor hip Mi c W \
, 3 BLA: TH} It was as if . rad 3 Orsnip Myr. G. i
HLR.H. PRINCESS ELIZABETH | “Tt Ww pags By. sensed, he would! Legislature Meet Today Griffith; Mr, Horace Williams
Alexandra Mary, Duchess of Edin- us daughter again” he a vislat ct > 7
; bate tae = GA wrote, “He s i -| Both houses of the Legislature | Registrar; Mr. W. | Jougla , i
burgh, Lady of the Garter, C.L, Me surprised the crowds will meet at 11 a.m, to-day for Deputy Registrar Mr Ww. I
F.R.S., Grand Gordon of the;>Y standing bareheaded in Ic¥| the purpose of receiving an ad-| Laurie, Clerk of the Court; Hon
Legion of Honour, Heiress Pre-| Wind though his hands were blue} Gress irom His Excellency the C. Wylie, Attorney General; Mi
sumptive to the Throne; Colonel | With cold. “Princess Margaret was| Governor regarding the death of W. W. Reece, K.C., Solicitor Gen
Grenadier Guards, Colonel-in- | rawn with cold and the teeth of | 47 \y King George VI. eral; Miss M. FE. Bourne, Assistan: | va
Chief 16/5 Lancers and Argyl and | SPectators were chattering, but the|" is Excellency will wear uni- Legal Draughtsman; Mr. D. H. L.| Pe Tae” me
Sutherland Highlanders, Regimen, | King stood up well.” ltorm. Lady Savage will not be THE LATE KING GEORGE SIXTH Ward; Mr.J. 5. B. Dear; Mr. D.E.| “Sra "Seaguamer ater tua secon p weve i ax tie
de Chaudiere, 48th Highlanders of Princess Elizabeth will re- | present. _ Malone; Mr. E. W. Barrow; Mr a wath the hew hake sd at es en eee :
Canaga, Royal Durban Light: In-| turn to Britain at the earliest | G. B. Niles; Mr. G. L. Farmet RSTIOG CES O Speers
fantry and Railway and Harbour opportunity; it was learned to- Mr. L. A, Williams; Mr. H, Will-| Poy : [7 4 10
Brigade, South Africa, Senior day. e ams, Chief Deputy Marshal; Mir e ate in eor e
Controller Women’s Royal Army The King had recently felt) L. Smith; Mr, C. Mayers; Mr. F 7
Corps. Commodore Sea Ranger | sufficiently recovered to take up| ueen Doyle; Mr. Cummins, Deputy : us >
Section Girl Guides Association,}some threads of his off social life. | Marshals Mr. E.. M. Shilstone By GEORGE MALCOLM THOMSON
Chief Ranger of the Girl Guides, |Last Wednesday, he paid his first| are ee tue 7 ep Hach successor to the throne of our crowned republic
Dame Grand Cross of the Orderj|visit to the theatre, since his| : : sy HOS, Mr P i by t ‘ y ati : veseiniente
; naaienY 3 . oR G ’ ; faced by » question: What shall be the interpretatior
of St. John of Jerusalem, Presi-joperation and held his last party e .. a tr he n Ot Mk oa 7 a 4 my Seal } - . d led Air d ed I ich
dent of the Royal College of|before his daughter left for Kenya. | usciey Ree. we Ne wee atlas lige ye ta ae i a ana ah re waeoal dest ag.
Music, Grand Master of the Guild|The King was to have returned to | 1, Aue KER TE B.C | have inherited .
of Air Pilots, born at 12, Bruton|London from Sandringham with- | Hutchineoht Mr'D A Banfield Hach finds a different answer to the question, according
Street, London, W.1, 2 in . fortnight. He had planned | , evr. H 0. Ste, ¢ amberbatet: Mr to the needs of the hour and the limitations set him by
gg Bie tng Ac ogy M25 sine Teintds we tenaty eu Queen Elizabeth started theJof Nunyaki as the Queen’s party }naut craft Atlanta W hich 2 at ve Paes Mr. R. S. Nicholls temperament and talent, To none of them can the question
th Duk f Edinburgh, K.G,\precedent is foll d th Ki a long journey home Wednesday to | passed through. 5 present at Mombasa airport, The yiand Mr, N. A. Niles, representin have been harder than it was to King George VI.
eee oe ae ae | awe e 28! mount the throne of the British At the airport itself, only a] Were to have spent the day resting} Mr, D. L. Sargeant To giart with, hig temperament,economic fabric of Britain, the
Lieutenant, R.N. Personal Aide de ‘body may be taken first to a little . ; “i ny! 1 & Boyal Lodge Axticled: (Clerks were lao | 1, his 2 v e fe ain, e
2 . dupe Empire after her husband tender=}small. group, pringipally . police's _* : awe . We Ee ua was quite unsuited to a role which }@ommonwealth and the world was
Camp, to the King,¢born June 10,;private Chapel in the grounds at)jy broke the news to her or the] and military officers were éliowed| The staff for the broken Royal] present, can be agreeable only t » who|}subject to e sus stresses, Wi
1921), : Sandringham, After that it will death of King George Sixth, her | inside. ; tour of the Commonwealth ee cota] Bl 4c od 16 the owhibitie re ce P A Scaieaiss)) Be ate Gir me
Last Goodbye aol oy eas e brought to London | father 7 , The Queen was dressed in .a]promptly arranged for immediatc ee core nia ee obi of the exhibition- ai loome ; In he : eatin!
King George stood bareheaded )and then taken in state to Windsor | “The new Queen at first broke} simple beige dress and white hat.|return to England. Elizabeth and " Cc in Ais Make-Up. j wealth a rapid process of politica
in the bitter wind when he said]—Royal Castle, 25 miles from’) down and Pn when the Duke The Duke stood talking to Lieu-|the Duke had just come back INTER-CHANGE He wa exceptionally shy and}development went on At home,
goodbye to his daughter at a Lon-|London—before the funeral. But | of Edinburgh told her of her}tenant General Sir Alexander|from the fairy tale “Treetops OF TELEGRA mae He had, moreover, a sweeping changes ir the structure
don airport. Born on the 14th/all arrangements must wait on the | father’s death but she bore up|Cameron, the Commanding Gener-|Hotel” from which by artificial GRAMS tht impediment of his speech|of society brought new tensions
December 1895, the second son of] decision of the new Queen. bravely and a member of herfal of Bast Africa, while the lug-|moonlight they looked down on ; q hieh at times could be embar-lof their own into play. {
King George Fifth and of Queen Normally the ec ; staff said later: “She took it like | gage was hurriedly put aboard the |jungle animals in wild surround- Death of His Majesty ing to him He had not re-| George VI's reign was a period
Mary who survives him at the age new saci te *. eee ae of 8/4 Queen.” Only a few hours be-| plane and the flares at the corner | ings. King George VI ived that special training and}; which every institution and
of 84, the late King succeeded to) ®' Srelgn, SOUOWS a year OF) fore, she had come into the forest} cf the field were lit. It was dark The Royal couple came back a ractice In the ceremonial and} almost every principle of lile we
the throne on the 1ith December eighteen months after accession. lodge given to her by the people | Now, the Queen mounted the ramp {happily to the lodge totally un- The following telegrams priv role of the British on alled into question. ‘There wa
1936 after the abdication of his King George was crowned in of Kenya as a wedding present]leading to the door of the plane,|prepared for the blow that was have been interchanged be- ireh hich very properly vee. b time im which. it) we
eldest brother King Edward 8th. Westminster Abbey on May 12,| from a night in the treetop bunga-|turned, and managed a smile for|to fall on them. In an instant all tween the Secretary of State reserved for the Heir lnecessary ‘hat the monarct
Britons remembered the King as{1937 six months after his acces- | jow watching big game come to|those outside before she disap- elaborate plans for their tour feli for the Colonies and His |) py pon whould remain As fixed point
he sounded halting and tired|sion. He became King when his|the jungle water-hole at the foot | peared. to the ground Excellency the Governor. Above all, there were the cir- be a hich @apes ghould’ t6-
when he gave his customary na-|brother now Duke of Windsor | of the tree. In Tears In the midst of sorrow they had (From the Secretary of cumstances, .painfully melodra-|uolve ana ition. kuin e
tionwide broadcast on Christmas}gave up the Throne after full} The 26-year-old Queen, her face] Elizabeth, the new Queen, burst |to prepare their minds for new State for the Colonies). muafiberiae wilish ha utderdok an volye ‘ and. Yeriven ws hopes
Day. Some thought he was speak-}scale political controversy which|showing the strain of the last] into tears when the news of her |responsibilities. The — steamship Profoundly regres, to in- offlee which he certoinly did not|\Siae of & monarchy. Yet. the
ing with great difficulty. Prime followed his decision to marry a|hours, left the hunting lodge,| father’s death was broken to her |Gothie which was to have taken form you that His Majesty vith’ Wile Malay Wrother bad (ioe ee ee 1¢
Minister Winston Churchill was|commoner the American born] where she had been staying for the | at the Rovel Lodge in Nyeri, Then |them to Ceylon lies idle at Mom- King George VI. passed | round ha eel e? ier be |monarchy itself wa inevitably
told of the King’s death at an Mrs, Wallis Warfield Simpson.| last two days and drove with her she immediately decided to fly|basa, her flag at half mast and away last night st : ler: Me omen shaken by the circumstances: ot
early hour and immediately sum- Queen Mary, the late King’s| husband in a closed car eight miles] hack to-day to London—17 flight}her erew disconsolate. {from the Governor) ne «ef aan 2 i orge VI.| brother’s departure from thr
moned a meeting of the Cabinet. |mother now becomes Dowager] to the small airport neay the town | pours B.O.A.C, arranged by telephone Lhe announcement of the wer pe - eh to find them much ne
‘ ? ‘ Queen Mother and Queen Eliza-|of Nunyaki, An Hast Africa Air- The news was first withheld|from London for the same_ plane death of His Majesty King CAS HR SART ER: i } If at the end of hi ign, the
Privy Council beth becomes the Queen Mother.) ways plane took off at 13.57 from her until hard confirmation |Whieh took the couple to Nairobi George VI. has been received Enormous Stresses | Crown had vesumed its ancient
The meeting of the Privy Coun- The question still unresolved is|G.M,T. at Tnetbe Argonaut, was obtained The newspaper}to stand ‘by to fly them back m Barbados with the deep- He became King at a moment ‘
cil — disunguished by political the title to be taken by the new The “Atalanta”, which broughv|East African Standard gave the}|The Atalanta has been restocked est distress and J send on {iwhen the social, political ind! @ On Page 4
the Sover-|Queen’s husband ex. sailor i las ‘ ff at! first news to the staff at the Royal }and will fly via Entebbe (Ugan- behalf of the Government ||
leaders appointed by the ‘ ; 4 her to Africa was to take off a : h . d 2 i 4 ‘ —————
; i Prince Philip, Duke of Edin! h ™ ; 7 take da) EK : “th and people of this Island an
se him on constitu- iP, ie 0 burgh,| spout 18.30 G.M.1 Lodge. Not until a direct radio{da) and El Adem on the North {
eign 10 Savage: Di } ter|Who is thirty, Last time Britain age ‘scheduled to touch down |telephone call had been made to}African coast where it will refuel,! expression of profound grief
tional matters—will be neld wae had a Queen—Victoria (1837 to) It eae rig Fo ne Ean Sack Buckingham Palace and the tragic It will pick up a fresh air crew and heartfelt sympathy with f
to-day. Ferkiament “> yo b: 1901)—her husband Prince Al-| $ Bein ta takva a ‘about 0530 news confirmed from there was|at Fl Adem and thef fly non stop oo Majesty Queen Eliza- | /}
afternoon to hear a statement bY|bert took the title of Prince Con- G.M.T. on Thursday and arrive|the ‘Princess told that the King|to London's airport where _ it is| veth, Her Majesty the Queen } iis
the Prime Minister ern the | sort. in. London at about 16.30 G.M.T.]| was dead and she herself was |expected to arrive at 1900 G.M.T + ag ana — gy ae of } a
tion’ rrow, The King’s lung} It is pected ¢ Bliza oo ; “Tre ; 2 England >rince aries -ep-year-old | e Roya amily in their |
pnt gent September was his}will fly back to Lani fmomedi: Be ae a ot sorrowful We tnd tee Duk a Edinbu: gh a wate eases td oe | sorrow.” |
fifth operation since 1914 when his} ately. The King died the same as ot an veoet lined the ain were understood to be travelling |heir to the throne with his sistet 6th February, 1952.
appendix was removed. : , place he was born Dec. 14 1895.| Street of the small farmer's town ‘by car to Nairobi to join the Argo- @ On Page 5 ileal
His first operation as King in}Announcement of death came as|* one i : "
|



a stunning surprise to Britain





|

pathectomy “with view to im-|Who “ees the or was Gy his |
ove the blood supply to the right}W@Y %o recovery from a lung
foot and to sated this for the |9Peration on September. Queen

future.



Elizabeth and Princess Margaret















Years of
























Those present were







War and Austerity






















. were at Sandringham when the ha Y 4 o ’
A few months alte - in| King died. The exing had been { kak ore
November 1948 vA xine veel out in the countryside yesterday LONDON. Commonwealth in a steady voice, the blood supply from reaching his\| family wanted to be the sailor son ee
note ae aaats ae a both morning and afternoon and In the gruelling war years and He asked hi people “to stand] foot. They ordered a complete}of a sailor So his direct service ! : 3
suffering from obstruction. to appeared to be of good health. |i). aftermath austerity his un-|calm, firm and united in this time { rest and advised the cancellation|to the Stat® began when he wa
circulation in his right leg was the|It was a sense of duty alone | swerving devotion to duty inspired jof trial. The task will be hard of the tour to New Zealand and|14 years old. At Osborne ore
first indication to the puslic of] which carried him through bleak | confidence and trust in his people. There may be dark days ahead] Australia. 7 oe ae he nearly died of pneumonia and
his ill health. December, | . en 7 jland war cati no longer be configed A month later, his six doctors| at Dairtmouth over a period of
He and Queen Elizabeth started}® ar Cé r ; dais that peat! Pa vere ha ted ae ta aaa
5 salve te the battlefield but we can only| @"nounce hat operations for|four years, he learned as an or-
a a slowly: the were themselves. ¢ as a . i Tose a ‘ , atk a
. | v ms eajado right as we see right and lumbar sympa.:hestomy were toldinary cadet what the Navy 1
Just as King George V. conquere: reverently commit our cause to} 2€ performed to improve the blood | quires of its chosen servant
a wave of unpopularity whic God.” upply to his right foot. Doetor: At 18 young Prinee Albert was
‘ surged against him at the outset To that call George VI himself reported normal progress after the |} posted at a midshipman aboard
of his reign so his second son dis- responded with unmatched] 2Peration, but ruled that his en-|H.M.{ Collingwood. He answer: d
persed public fears. The visit of aeention fagement list must be kept to the |ty the name of Mr. Johnston. I
King George and Queen Elizabeth Pe it minimum. was Mr. Johnston who wus on A
to France in 1938 proved to ix er ersonal Loss Complete Rest duty as Sub-lieutenant in the bi to the ( NGOS Captain and (Crew of
a great turning point. The French The King suffered personal loss Later, his doctors ordered gun turret in the mogt hist ASL ’ 7
people took the royal couple toj4uring the war, His _ youngest] period of complete rest as essential naval battle of the first world war
their hearts and this triumph was]>rother, the Duke of Kent, was} to his recovery and he cancelled |at Jutland. He carried hime: If | ‘ . alias
‘contagious. On their return home killed in a flying accident on his| all his public engagements for at {during the action with coolness || & & c vi PRESS
there were scenes of mass loyaity |“ x to one . least four weeks ind courage which earned admir- Ve it Ve 44 bh
| reminis jubi ays © ; the day the war broke out On Tuesday, Sept. 18, a bulletin | stion and Jellicoe’s commendation
eminiscent of the jubilee days of soe ae ‘ uesday, Sey atlor ; i
| King George V 1 to Victory Day—May 8, 1945—the| from Buckingham Palace said that After being operated on for abi | ‘@TLAN ab
| 7 es London Times recorded in its col-| investigations showed “structural | pendicitis he joined H.MS. Malay: '
1 ; i
Roya’ Visits umns no fewer than 4,766 public hanges to have developed in the |and was promoted to full Lieuten-
The nation suddenly awoke to engagements carried out by the] lung, His Majesty has been advised | ant Put pastric trouble became 5 : oe
! the fact they had a friendly King King and Queen either separately|'o stay in London for further | apparent again and the Prine: Vhile in Barbados we invite you to visit our store
who with his srailing wife and two} oy together. treatment.’ invalided four times. The young We are agents for Liberty and Company (Lon-
little daughters had a sincere and When ihe war war over, thé On Sunday Sept. 21, a bulletin}oficer had to abandon } rope to). Ebaiitad
simple humanity and desire to King slipped back into peacetime | “8 issued announcing the necess-}for the seas after another opera don) iam
lead a normal, domestic happy outine by paying, a visit t “an ity for the King to undergo an }ijon " stocki [:
i life. other Dominion. For 65 days, from | operation in the near future’ | P : We are Stockists of:
Since then people have shared) pep 17 to April 24 1946 the King The events of the King’s life Joined R.A.F. ; ; \ ee ‘i 4 . ;
in every family celebration, Prin-|] Queen. Princess Elizabeth and | before his accession to the throne Stine hia ninkcwraeis Ha Lola thal Fine! quality English China including Wedgewoed
cess Elizabeth’s wedding and the } princess Mbrgaret toured South revealed a oe eres Royal Air Force a Captain ; ;
birth of her children were the}Africa, covering nearly 10,000} Hverything he did aaee: Ea raed *Iserving in Fr He t i Coshmere Sweaters and Coats
latest occasions. During their Six{ miles, including 900 miles by air | Of conscientiousness end reve aled iis pilot's licence né ead
week tour of Canada and the|The King was the first British | qualitie which were assurance: nning hi He Wins Deeskin Gloves 43 Argyle Socks
co ei in early a a monarch to set foot in South; that he wo e eee so 8 Commander or rét Jul 192
| hoya couple were acclaimed! Africa howev arauous ; 4 , 0 when his active duty ceased. After oe tad . rN! . + >ECIALTY.
from coast to coast not only as] Though he permitted no slacken-| Undesired, that the country might] ii. war he enterect Trit Col LOCALLY MADE SOUVENIRS A SPEC
worthy sovereigns, but as people!ing in the tremendous heavy pro- all upon him to perform - 9 lowe Cambridge for aed f
f personality and charm His-j gy me of engagements planned The King was born at Yor ee | spec He took cial
tory was made because never be- m those close to the King | ‘4e& Sandringham on Dec 14, t AA Vatuenie: e
fore had a reigning British Mon-| noticed increasing signs of tired 895, while Queen Victoria was y : ;
arch visited the United Stat ne 1 the days following the ex- | cbservi the anniver my zenst a hl a} ) 1
Welcome in the United States was| citement ind emotion of ith of the Prince Consort - a a { \\j SHEPHE 1) & { 0) i (
incomy able ghte eddi and his owz +8 of i es tt F d Vee 4 e
n f : Wedding Wanted to he a Sailor : ; ee d
ni September ze The King physician, Sir Joh s or a —r l ; r 4, He 16. 11. 12 & 13 Broad Street.
1€ o i wer exar! ©d nit ane c eda 4 eo y i AT L n Oy a if
QUEEN ELIZABETH AND PRINCE CHARLES PB pe t The f ent exer f d plenty ol i]
as Sb Ss | @ on Pa r 1 = -







PAGE TWO

t

BARBADOS ADVOCATE

1952







—_—_— THURSDAY, FEBRUARY 7,
muinshinesiiininiaitenlaneanil an i

B.B.C. ORGANIST
IN AUSTRALIA



ad 2 o





TODAY (cast two sxows) 4.45 & 8.30 P.M.

R.K.0. Radio Action Packed Thriiter
WwW nes
RACKET

Robert Lizabeth
ANCE





Ptewn

P
L
A

An Elephant Tries
Escape In Mid-Air

From BERNARD WICKSTEED
KARACHI

Robert

in 6
MiTcHUM ~ scott — rvaN in “The

G sUR « pAt
Also the Local Educational Short. "GIVE YOUF uit

H°s GERALD LASCELLES























































































































HT r
THE five elephants and Wick- born D George he is known for both his a SPECIAL TODAY 1.30 p.m \ TCO} it Zz
short his visit to B steed, who are flying from Bang- Thalben muSical adviser and] casts and +s gra pace records, SWING The WESTERN WAY’ r TAIN Hi i 4a
early Wednesday rning wher kok to London by B.O.A.C. freigh- consultant to the BBC's R« ou d he w SP? Se ee ee cae Shek’ Maks te | IRN BLOW i} J
he left for London T.C.A : ter, arrived at Karachi this eve- « tment went to Australia durin his stay He played at oda RIE ROUND UP” ‘ t | Dia
Canada to attend r€ funeral of ning ind I don’t know who igs con with several other musi- tl concerts, eighteen of ham on _ nite Smiley Burnet; | Gree: k. Vv iH ears
the late King George ea He n exhausted—the elephants or to take part in the Common- ¢ rci ral one os wend r ae Charles Star : a
a nephew of the late ing. Wicksteed ealti Jubilee celebrations at in } urne and Sydney cathe OISTIN = ithe Garde
Mr. Las elles, who owns Be We were due to fly on to a 1e invitation of the Australian dials and made f mare proad- PL Ad a Dial 8404 a» ALE a ¥ ST JAMES
and Mount Estate Barbadc rein, in the Persian Gulf, aftr proadcas ig Commission. casts. The audiences at his n- aS aa Me ts
arrived here on January 2nd c refuelling, but we put our trunks eris included a large number 9f TODAY als aie N WAY .
Other passengers leaving by th together and agrecd that the Tha!ben-Ball, an organist of in- young people who, whilst being SWING THE Passe f :
same plane for Montreal wer seven-hour flight across India’ was ational repute who has spent g e.tly impressed by his inter-, ty > se UNDUP ee ee ‘e .
Miss Mary Calnan, Mr. Dawe enough for one day most of his musical life in Lon- preta'ons of the classics of organ eae a = Gee aS UNDERWORLD, INC.
Wilson, Mr George Cuthbe One of the elephants was so on, succeeded the late Sir Wal- composition, were als keenly in- 1a er I LY DALE
ag a Mie — 7 a .. bored she kept a ten e _ the f { ‘Davies as organist of the terested in the newer works e Fri. & Sat. 4.4 Midnite SAT yo
Heller and Miss Gwen Meas escape hatch with her trunk a ate ~} ci ; e he performed, He also acted as & § 20 p.m SIX GUN MESA p SAT
As they do not make parachu‘es Ter ple c hurch ng ae ae se 5 *key in a couple of radic THE BIG FIGHI Johnny j Sheriff of
Cancelled for elephants, one man had to | ere ee tae a i oe ee, pregresnines and. IP ape pony) Migr strip stand- i” 1941, and then joinec he g.amop , Bre é We ||] Joe Palooka sUN DOWN Bill Biliott &
CYWING to the _death of | His oe er pipe ig Apo BBC staff. Technically he is stiil interviewed at the microphone on FOLLOW THE sd tho PRA case SADDLE PALS
ft Maieey ee Ree, yg hel 1 mitting suicide , _ etganist of the Temple and plays several occasions. Leo GORCEY Tex Ritter Se oe...
tail — nea "eounihare “t' I wondered sometimes as I look- @! _the | cee eae een ~ Tnalben-Ball’s Australian wel-]1!)= PS —_———
ae cabbaliod. ar ed down at Mother India two miles /€!Ds heid pues ne thent ont ‘| come was not confined to mu I
syonshir. jue i below us whether anyone there Ec Aa tice Lad “Purel Hy given recept ~
ar cae jay tor v ‘ phants were passing overhead. entimental measure, a pre a etabeah at elt in the big cities
tay visit. These elephants, destined for -arhme — is eel mat and taken on sightseeing trips to 1OWS 145 & 830 P.M
ibiti Billy Smart's circus, are about Christmas in the ruins of th the places'o terest he couid TO-DAY, LAST 2 SI S — 445 & 8.3 -M.
Three Exhibitions three years old, and so far none Temple, and here Dr. Thalben- ote eer , Hi ‘i ur involved :
OBERT J. MacLEOD who ha of them has been given official Pall and his choristers stand in / ‘six thousand miles of air| PARAMOUNT PICTURES PRESENTS—
lately returned from an pe names, but unofficially I have yndon’s chill night air to sing it accepted ail
ensive sketching tour of St. Lu named all five of them Eve Per- eir carols, a programme ict - Sees, “aks helnaaAaie from - 1a" 7 wr ENG ee
wil hold histannual exhibition rick. because if"you Ro anywhere Js 'neariy alwvaye broadcast by te ,be ivitatlons he received for]. wa NG) EDR
f recent oil paintings of Barba- near them they, try to tread 6n RBC in bo its domestic S still, in both social aren : NNE 'E
a as _ ‘Pletu eater ore JOUR tes 1 habit, XS PaE VERE Bs Gnicat papacite.) Sabteal “OF Starring :—JOSEPH COTTEN—CORINNE GALVERT
nth in the Picture allery of?, They have the playful hal D Ball’s fame had aii aie 4 . BBC EDMUND GWEN
he Barbados Museum. The exhi- , picking up wet sawdust in h¢ to Australia, where being) b ck with the BBC
ae, oy ne trunks and blowing it in your fact : Ss ] me BLAZING ACTION SUSPENSE
, 9th, with a private view forr as you go by ° : = ———
Members and Associates of the ; 1€ don y that | ~ EXTRA
Mr. M cLeod Wei painter of the 4. Bill ”§ “Sheu te 4 Star Blouse
Mr. MacLeod is a ps *r Oo > get to Billy Smar circus Y i “WATER SPEED’—Short
West Indian Scene, both in land- should be no end of success. | . é & OF Short
sani 7" ; or all this! .
scape aid s cape and his work They ought to be. After all thi 4 LATEST NEWS REEL
is well known in this Island and flying —L.E.S. .
appreciated for ite seers and HON, GERALDLASCELLES left Seawell yesterday morning for MORG AN Selteptclcbiceaatibes Z
accurate portraya of the sun- ‘a nea Me yT CO » prese 1 of the late 1 . . pita
: ; London via Canada by T.C.A. to ve present at the funeral o: DD 1 e ey 4 az 1 .
= of the be es i King George VI. Mr. Lascelles ‘vho arrived here early in January, B.B.C. Radio Prodramme OPENING TOMORROW — 2.30 & 8.30 P.M,
pening on le same day a 8 ephew of the late King SHE , WINTERS
the MacLeod Exhibition are an ‘* * D0 THURSDAY, FEBRUARY 7, 1952 FARLEY GRANGER — SHELLY WINTERS
exhibition of Oils and Water- . . i Days 11,15 am. Inia Te Qiata, 11.30 ar
Colours by Golde White and one re roo Fifteen y Crazy People, 12 noon The News, 12.10 aaa
of drawings by Harold Connell ecture Cancelle R. B. R. PARIHAR, a repre- » s Analysis, 4. si eh a ; 3
Resi y HE ANNUAL MEETING ot sentative of the Norfolk Sen.“ oe “BEHAVE YOURSELE”
esident Supervisor the Barbados Museum and gicate (India) Ltd., and other > Dail
M®*® CARLYLE RAMCHARAN, Historical Society which was to anufacturing firms arrived in ,
B-A., Hons. (Durham), Dip. have taken place yesterday ha Barbados yesterday from Trinidad ©,
Ed. (London) newly appointed been postponed and Mr. Geoflre : BWA , I 6 pan R oO Y A L
Resident Supervisor of the Roodal Jellicoe’s lecture cancelled, owin , 1. Seottish ine, 6.4 ; i wos ; wr
Theatves in Barbados arrived to the death of His Majesty th Mr, Parihar will spend 15 days ; noes Pp rere Pare Last 2 Shows, 4.30 & 8.15 p.m.| Friday Only, 4.30 & 8.15 p.m,
here otf Tuesday by B.W.1.A. to King here with the hope of finding 41) Pi, fo all ¢ ep
r : 7 ; : valysis, 7.30 p.m. T : i Joan CRAWFORD
take up dities, market for goods manufactured of a Youngish Writer Columbia Double ; s '
Mr. Ramcharan a Trinidadian, Salvation Army Commander jy the svndi -te 7.45 pom.—-10.30 p.m. M, 48 43m Wendell COREY
is the son-in-law of Mr. Percival UE to arrive ft St. Vin- ¥ ; “Se ARSE Louis HAYWARD
B. Singh, General Manager of the a day ig Col: Willig “There are” good prospect. of pit Be Sew Pecnis, 9.18 ‘na George MacREADY IN
Roodal Theatres in the West In- > «. Torr nao dey 2etting mazkets for my syndicate Diy p45 p.m. Composer of the Wee ’
dies, Mr. Ramcharan takes up I Sansom, qT ee Sees as there is a great deal of business £.00 pr up the Curtain, 10.06 opens at a petide . Sam $ — ea AHEEREE a
residence at ‘“Morecambe’’, offi- w ve a ye s Walon hime in these islands” Mr. Parihar told The nee 10 e t ar ee
cial residence of the Roodals in ™ Pec eaeh, Caen A Tee | Cheeks “I have got good en- “The Genutdlat ce Wie ee © 9
Barbados, ~ ‘oo fhe coe io couragement at Trinidad and ?™. The Last Chronicl te for - EBL ACK CRAIG
a min iin A le amaica is on a to jugh . ‘ ; spitality. ¢ .
_Accompanying Mr Ram haren his. ares ani’ he iaeatready. visit- jud sing f om the hospitalit of T.C.A. Auditor i je and
was Mr. Maurice Jones, Manage wrk + Barbedians and _ the volume of - > e ANC
. ie ec Trinidad, British Guiana and : : Ria R RAYMOND WHITE of
of the Globe Theatre who attend- j Dute) We Indie H business done locally I have every Winnipeg who had been here grerseer on a
ed the funeral of his uncle ihe the utcn ” 1cles, , ne of meeti with go "ess nhipeg who had bee are os GE ; y f
late Mr, Timothy Roodal, Gov- expects to be in Barbadrs for oer «eins aides tts eg Peta de na five day visit left yesterday And “mn ewe Ghul a geek
erning Head of Roodal Theatres. about four days before returning Bermuda by T.C.A. He was ee
* 8 to Jamaica via Trinidad : guest at the Ocean View Hotel. = ERD aD YW SiGhe D giz a ¢ ih 7 9°
. Grenada Visit Talkirg Point Mr. White is a T.C.A. Auditor and Gee @ ANEERS
ME" 2. YOUNG. Assistant Returning Shortly Other passengers leaving for Bet : WITH - staat
rg Public ae — to FTER hor but en abl udge a an by his muda were Mr, Anthony Mason, Dancing : : Starring :
e Comptroller for Development es : 2 ra 3 well as by his friends— Mr Doug’as Ma: ind Mr P
and Welfare, left for Grenada on holiday n Barbados, Mr : . , s Behera Orville aeiteaas . Willard PARKER HENRIED
Tuesday by B.W.1.A. on a special Bee baat = the’ City ser se m _ Y f e ge see
visit. He is expected to returr ouncil *ort-of-Spain, returned our Vv ite offic .
next Tuesday. ; Tees * to Trinidad on Monday night by 4 h OC i l > i oe oO L Y M P i g
. . 3.W.LA. While » he was stay- .
Social Welfare Talks rad aber ante tae Houne” it ne Litt e I Inger blouse, neatly tailored, |} A GALA 3 ie ‘ ‘
ETURNING from Jamaica via gs) Lawre fice, : é ms wie TO-DAY, LAST 2 SHOWS — 4.30 & 8.15 P.M.
Trinidad by B.W.I.A. on This was Mr. O'Neal's first visi! © © easy to wash and iron], ‘ sen Wud: 2 >
Tuesday was Miss Dora Tbberson, to the island during which tim in Oo 1 e 3 4 ne ISE NIGHT RRO SUPER DOUBEE '« «+
Piatection tee outa ~ ne was able to eee anany of hi ‘ ... here in four heavenly | HOWARD HUGHES PRODUCTION
or for evelopme: and relatives among them ‘ing his * . .
Welfare gaia Se, eae rs, (By CHAPMAN PINCHER) colour, at a piggy-bank||!—m °° *mtertein the “HE OUTLAW”
Miss Jbberson went over to Ja- tion Officer. ONCE OR TWICE a year I wake up in the night feel- : PIsey assengers from the
maica for talks with Mr. Chinn, To Ais many friends and rela- ing so co letely paralysed the annot eve re m + ' passenge erat
Social Welfare Adviser to the tives, he begs to say thank Beil 1 HP J BOPatys at I cannot even move n y price ! j — Starring —
Secretary of State for the Col- making his stay such a ple *e ye A c RUSSE “K aT Ee
onies who is making a tour of the one. Because of this strange quirk, a famous brain specialist ON 6.8. EMPRESS REY EISELE SACK BURT,
West saee ond chien will be = Mr O'Neal expects to be back has given me the chance of fulfilling the scientist’s most LY e 6 | ese AND
yis t Barbados later Sarbados shortly : - eaten ,
visiting Barbados later in Barbados short! romantic ambition—to make some new discovery at the ‘a OF SCOTLAND RACE
risk of my life. ' oe E % wake g iad
I have turned down the offer after less than i »'s Vl 3 ;
Why the Doors Are Unhappy hesitation ween nan wrendern, Drete, Ces wie
ye The specialist Wants me to let myself lapse into “sl iE
3 : ‘ st Wants ys aps eep Sh for reservations GEORGE RAFT — WILLIAM BENDIX
—They’re Always Being Opened, Shut and Kicked— paralysis”, a mysterious state of the nervcus system in op : pat SEs
By MAX TRELL

which sudden paralysis of the muscles is followed by deep





“YOU have no idea,” Christophe:
Cricket was saying to Knarf and
Hanid, the shadows, “how unhappy
Front-Door and Back-Door are.”

“Who?” said Hanid, who wasn't
quite sure that she had understood
what Christopher Cricket was say-
ing.

“Front-Door and Back-Door.”

Knarf said: “] never heard of a

Front-Dvor or a Back-Door or any |

other kind of a door being unhappy

What are they unhappy about?”
Late at Night
“They're unhappy,” Christopher
said, “about being doors—just being
doors. Of course, none of the folks
who live in this house knows that

they’re unhappy. But if they listened |
late at night, they’d hear Front- |
Door and Back-Door creaking and |

cracking and complaining.”

Knarf and Hanid both asked why
“Well, | said it was because they |

were doors, and that’s the reason
why. Now just imagine that you
Knarf, and you Hanid were doors

The first thing you'd complain about |

would be that all day long people
were opening and shutting you
You'd wish they'd just fet you alone
But no, hardly are you opened when
you're shut again, and hardly are
you shut again when you're opened

“And it wouldn't only be just be
ing opened and shut, and shut and
opened, that would bother you sc
much as another thing,” Christopher
went on.

“Whatother thing?” asked Knart

“When people opened you,” an
swered Christopher, “they come in
or they go qut. But you just stay
there. You van't go out and you can't
come in. That's whats so bad. You
Wish you could go inside the house
walk up the steps—sit down for a
glass of tea do a million-and-one
things that everyone else in the
house can de. Or you wish \ ou could
go outside in the st take a
stroll down the Ment lie
down in the grass N of the une





Mu &



Doors ket kicked by people who
won't bother to ring the bell.

and-a-million things that everyone
else does. Oh no!”

Knarf and Hanid both sighed.
Chey had never realized before how
miserable they would be if they were
unlucky: enough to be doors.

The Worst Thing

“But | haven't told you the worst
thing of all about being doors, It's
this, All day and all night and all
week and all month, and for years
and years, you stand with half of
you inside the house, warm and cozy,
and the other half outside, getting
rained on, blown on by the wind,

| scorched by the sun, frozen by the



snow, scratched by the cat, jumped
on by the dog, rapped on (or even
kicked) by people who won’t bother
to ring the doorbel!. Yes, that’s-the
very worst of all, You certainly are
glad, when all is said and done, that
you're not the Front-Door and the
Back-Door but just Knarf and
Hanid. You wouldn’t be doors for all
the money in the world,”

Kr and Hanid nodded. They
‘ vouldn’t.
” said Christopher sadly,
rs keep right on being doors,”

arf



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unconsciousness,

He argues that as I am a trained
observer I should make an ideal
“guinea pig” for an experiment
which would tell the doctors more
about this rare condition

But—having experienced the
first terrifying stages of sle ep
paralysis—I cannot accept his as-
surance that the experiment would
not be too dangerous

I had my first “attack” 20 years
ago, This is what happens: —

{ seem to be going to sleep nor-
mally when suddenly I become
aware that although I am fully
awake I am complete ly paralysed.

This is frightening in itself, but
what immediately follows is terri-
fying

As I lie there, helpless, I feel
I am sliding deeper and deeper
into an unconsciousness—from
which there can be no return.

it. seems to be a coma far more
profound than the unconsciousness
induced by an aneesthetic or a




faint
My brain urges ‘me to ac
quickly, and I knc that the

t
only
way back is to get my body Vv
ing somehow
My Mind Panics
I MAKE a tremendous effort to
move, but nothing happens. I try
to shout for help, but my lips and
vocal cords are paral da.
All the time I feel nm if getting
|
'

further and furthet away from
life



With an all-out effort TI try t
nove the whole hand. It work
ind with a violent shudder, I vre-
trieve full control of my body
The whole ordeal seems to la
less tha
If I try
ely afterwards,



a minute
to go to sleep immedi-
the



paralysis}



usually returns, But this time |
ready for it and pu Y vse |
ack before f lose full control

tg }
Nervous Fault |











“The perscn affected by sleep
paralysis always recovers contro]
by a tremendous effort of will,’
States one Standard authority on
neurology,

But what would happen
person deliberately faile.
this effort?

if a
d to make

My specialist frie nd assures me
that if f let myself slide into fulj
unconsciousness while still para-
lysed I should

simply go into a
deep sleep and wake
next morning

; Urge To Live -

HE is probably right. But dur-
ing an “attack” my faith in his
judgment is completely swamped |
by the banic urge to live

Look at it this way: How
people who die in the.r

up normally

many

pe e sleep from
leart failure may really have
failed to rouse themselves from

an attack of sleep paralysi

It may be un 1eroic, but this rid«

°







dle of the nervous system
have to remain unanswered as
am concerned, ;

as I L

|
|
|

at kb



t f letter
surrounded by 100 eyes y

short









DOCTORS know hardly any-| .) You ca rely on getting mu
t sle aralysis beyc from it (4)
POU BLCCD Das alysis nitom | i ft makes a bitter pili. (4)
€ that it is not a sympto | 13. Sk er. (3 14, Qustea ,
lise > li R with L2 makes Olive wild
Orca enamemmmenenmemmmnannianeana, | { 1Â¥. So to a Filn ww
| 20 Japanese sash in the Fleet
22 Being around one morning. (7)
23. Even a little gentleman ma
spy. (5)
24 Porm of phase. (5) '
26, Bloke by the seaside’ (4) |
Down j
oe Sek ae re 1 Nothing yn the ball for fight
eee i au) 2 allies with grease. (6)
the ie. + % Letter from this clue and
i ee tippea perhaps. (3)
j 4. Wriggles in the election meet-
$1.58 & $1.69 1 | 6. we the string around f¢
oe 019 ; guiding. (8)
Pos 555 0) ae } 6. 8, and ¥ Words that make Ray
resume. (3, 3, 3)
», $11.69, 10 Colloquis sneak. (4) 5
14 4 are ¢ iis in ples. «6)
11.96, ee 16 I'm up a coat. in @ small
49c., 51c., 66c 8c., 89e. way of (6)
49c., 51c., 66c., 68c., Pry OF COUTRO. Oyo
ar (5) 18 A broken ange! (
; 20 Speedy tax? (4)
} 21. Or this for a heavenly path (3
' , Acre
i 4 4 c
N I
| eet
| a Down Mi
k . A \
< ‘ N ‘
Aliv Tsar: 19, Tir l
Dial 4606 | b& Ally





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VIRGINIA }



xo RAOUL WALSH

Screen Play by Ivan C



Be

From the Mame! by C. %. Forester



OPENING FRIDAY FEB. 8th

2.30, 4.45 & 8.30 pm. and Continu

DAILY 4.435 & 8.30 p.m.

ROXY

TO-DAY, LAST 2 SHOWS — 4.30 & 8.15 P.M.
REPUBLIC WHOLE SERIAL - - -

GLOBE



TO-DAY LAST SHOWS 5 & 8.30 p.m.
THE RED BADGE OF COURAGE

Opcaing fo-Morrow » & 8.30

MITZI

Gaynor

with Una Merkel
‘aymond Welburn

Produced by

GEORGE JESSEL

DALE

ROBERTSON

- LLOYD BACON - WAL

=
Se
Owrected by % . Screen

From a Story by Albert and Arthur Lewss 204 Low



Day

TER BULLOCY, Ci



m
iB

cf





canton rox









JAMES

ARTON



THURSDAY, FEBRUARY

PIONEER INDUSTRIES BILL PASSED



52

~

Bill Will Get B’dos Little
Further, Says Mapp

DURING THE DISCUSSION of the Bill to amend the
Pioneer [Industries (Encouragement) Act, 1951, which was
passed by the House of Assembly on Tuesday, Mr. R. G.
Mapp (L) said that a Bill of that sort would get Barbados
very little farther on the road to industrialisation.

“The sooner the West Indies get
together and plan industrialisa-
tion on a Regional Basis,” he said,
‘the quicker they would = get
somewhere.”

Mr. E. D. Mottley (E) was of
the opinion, however, that the
argument about industrialisation
on a Regional Basis was all right
for those who wanted to qualify
as West Indian statesmen, but the
first interest should be the liveli-
hood of the people of Barbados.

Mr. R. G. Mapp (L) said that
the Bill was simply an attempt
to extend the provisions of the
principal Bill to those persons
who through no fault of their
own, or of the House, would not
benefit from that Bill. They would
welcome the Bill because they
did not wish, having accepted the
principle of encouraging pioneer

industries, to deny those indus-
trialists whom the Bill would
benefit, any assistanee
Over-Optimism
He would, however, say that

the trend of debate indicated that
there was much airy, over-optim-
ism in some of the speeches on
the Other Side welcoming the
Bill. Mention was made to Puer-
to Rico, but apart from the fact
that that country was very neat
the U.S.A. and there was a capi-
tal investment of millions of U.S.
dollars, that country was also in
the dollar area and enjoyed the
benefits of the dollar market. The
dollar area was supreme in the
world today. United States in-
dustrialists would naturally _in-
vest more quickly in Puerto Rico
or Jamaica, where bauxite would

afford more opportunity for big
capital. :

‘They also had to consider the
fact that the markets of those

bigger countries afforded greate:
inducement. Trinidad’s half mil-
lion population and Jamaica’s mil-
lion and a half were bigger mar-
kets for the sale of goods. Bar-
bados was a small area in com-
parison. He would also point out
that local capitalists were at pres-
ent criticising the Electric Cor-
poration of this island and com-
plaining that they could not get
an efficient supply of current for
their needs. Could they imagine
foreign businessmen being attract-
ed to an island without a proper
supply of even electric power?
“After hearing all that about Bar-
bados, would they be anxious to
come here?” he asked.
Seriousness Welcomed

He said that he welcomed the
seriousness with which the House
debated the matter, There had
been in the past too much pro-
agandising about that matter of
ndustrialisation, They had heard
and read for example before the
elections how the Government
by failing to attract capitalists
through such a Bill, had failed to
industrialise Barbados. Recently,
however, they read that the Brit-
ish Government, by not relieving
industrialists there who wanted
to invest in the colonies of income
tax, were the people whaquwere
hindering industrialisation in the
colonies,

A Bill of that sort would get
Barbados very little farther on the
road to industrialisation, The
sooner the West Indies got to-
gether and planned industrialisa-
tion on a regional basis, the quick-
er they would get somewhere
Those individual efforts _ would
prove futile. It was no use indulg-
ing in such puny efforts. He
hoped the House suw yon =
etting up of industries willy-nilly
Count, lead to. They had fhe Se-
nior Member for St. Philip quite
naturaMy urging protection. With
each Island protecting itself
against the other, there would be
no room for expansion and even-
tually they would kill the very
industries they were encouraging.
Bach colony could not afford to
compete against the other.

Regional Planning

He felt the House should
stress the necessity for regional
planning. The conference in Puer-
to Rico was‘an attempt to get
down to brass-tacks, and he hoped
it would produce some _ proper
planning for industrialisation, It
was not a conference to be taken
lightly for some policy in that
matter could be worked out at it.

He finally drew attention to
the sweated conditions under
which the workers were employ-
ed in the new industries, They
were comparable to the sweated
conditions in England in indus-
tries a century ago. They should

protect the workers while they
were giving the inducements to
capital. They would find that
while protecting the industries,
while barring cheaper products
from coming into Barbados, as

the senior member for St. Philip

had urged, the workers would not
be able to buy the very goods
which they were producing.

Here, Mr. Crawford rose and
said that he had spoken of bar-
ring cheaper goods such as goods
from Japan, things being equal,
there being no difference in price
and quality.

Mr. Mapp said that things be-
ing equal, there would be no ne-
cessity to prevent goods, from
coming in. It was ony if local
products were in danger of being
forced off the market by cheaper
goods from outside that such
protection would be needed. He
hoped that the consumers and
workers would also receive pro-
tection

too Optimistic

Mr. E. D. Mottley (E) said that
the Senior member for St Thomas
seemed to think that some of
them were too optimistic.

“But I would say, he said
“God help all of us if in any of
these schemes we are not optimis-
tic. We are bound to be.”

He said that it had taken a long
time for the Government to im-
plement the suggestion which
really came from that side of the
table. If they would recall, dur-
ing past discussion, it was sug-
gested that opportunity should be
given to industries which had al-
ready been established to allow
them to benefit under the Bill.

In the previous discussion, the
question had been raised about the
then Hat Factory, the West Indiau
Knitting Mill, the Shirt Factory
and other businesses which were

then termed Pioneer Industries.
He wondered at the length ot
time it had taken Government to

send down the Bill ang questioned
whether it was because of the
new Candy Factory which he un-
derstood was being established.

They had argued in and sut
season that that Bill should
enacted in Barbados.

“As to the Senior Member for
St, Thomas who plit stress on this
Regiecnal approach, that seemed
very good argument for those
members of the House who were
attempting to qualify for British
recognition or those who were
qualifying themselves to be West
Indian Statesmen.” he said, “but
I think our first interest should
be for the livelihood of the 200,000
people of this country.”

Whatever Regional Economical
approach one thought shoulu be
made, business of that hature
was not necessarily well regula
by people with University Degrees
or was not followed as the Socialist
theory which given from
books. For an example o/{ the
way it was done, they could con*
sider Jamaica.

He did not think thet they
would get any great benefit from
the Bill then as it stood. In 1944
such legislation shouid have been
enacted when money was flow-
ing about.

of
be





was

American Capital

Most of the indusimies in the
West Indies were run with Ameri-
can capital. Did they expect to
fool themselves about looking te
the sterling area? The idea «bout
looking to the Sterling Area was
toc much bogey. They in the
West Indies would never attract
British Capital as long as they
were British. If all their stuff had
to come from the Sterling Area,
did they expect them to allow
them to bid with the British
working msn.

They had had definite cases of
small American Jews who had
made money, he said,

As to the point that they snould





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be no scandalous wages,
they admitting that the Trade
Unicn was not doing its duty
Members had made reference
to the Gas and Electric Compan-

were

ies, but it was not for him to
suggest how they could get over
that.

His final point was that just as
there were shirt factories ian the
West Indies, the Barbadian pris
Gould be taught to make = shirts
too.

Mr. F. E. Miller
he had no hope or
Bill attracting
island, An individual who was
thinking of establishing a busi-
ness in the West Indies, had first
to consider the question of fuel
Puerto Rico for instance ad
American oil and no one would be
afraid of setting up an industry
there on that score,

(L) said
faith in
capital to

thai
the
this

No Inducement

There had to be inducement for
a Capitalist coming te Barbados
and that Bill gave no inducement
for a man with a snowball cart.

Before one set up an industry,
one had to be sure one could pro-
duce the article at a price that
would pay, The fact that he was
granted tax free exemptions for
five years was not of the greatest



importance as an _ industrialist
would scarcely think cf setting
up an industry if he could not

pav his taxes

The idea was that there should
be foresight on a Regional Basis
or all hope for industrialisation
in the West Indies had to fail.

No Industrialist would set up
a plant without planning for
about the following 30 years.
And what was the case with the
Gas Company? .There was no
certainty whether it would con-
tinue functioning for the next two
years or the next 30.

In 1898, he said, discussion had
taken place concerning provis-
ion of a deep water harbour. At
the time it would have cost
£70,000, but it was not done. Yet
they were then being choked by
the Press because they could not

provide the necessary millions
of pounds it would require
Disagreed

Mr. C. E. Talma (L) said he
disagreed with the views ex-
pressed by the Junior Member
for St. George.

The Senior Member for the

City had made many observations
in clearing up the issues for thei!

benefit and guidance, That mem-
ber had said that they had
missed the bus and that was a

fair statement of fact because he
was in a position to say so. He
had been qa member of the Ex-
ecutive Committee then a it
was within his knowledge that
applications were made by vari-

ous concerns in 1947 and if the
concession for exemption from
income tax had been granted
then Barbados would have en-
couraged industries which even-
tually went to Jamaica and
Trinidad.

On such a big question as in-
dustrialisation from which the
big preblem of unemployment
could be tackled, he would speak

as ah individual “member as_ it
was not a question of party. The
only way unemployment could

be sclved was by industrialisation
or emigration. And since nobody
wanted them, they had to depend
on industrialisation,

If they adopted a defeatist atti-
tude that they could not induce
capital from Canada or America,
they would never get anywhere.
Unless the question of industri-
alisation was looked at and faced
up to, the Labour Governinent,
interested as they were for the
welfare of the people and genuine
as they were, would not be
facing the unemployment prob-
lem.

He said that the conference
which was proposed to take place
in Puerto Rico shortly, was of
great importance to Barbados and
at least two members from that
Assembly and an advisor should
be sent.

He said that if there was trouble
with the Electric Company, that
trouble should be remedied.

He suggested that they should
avoid buying salt fish in bulk
and should can flying fish. He
said, to® that a factory could be
set up to make bags for the sugar
factories. Even if the raw mate-

BARBADOS ADVOCATE



rial was not available in Bar-
bados, it could be got from
Dominica.

Refund of Customs Duties

Mr. A. E, 8S. Lewis (L) pointed
out that the Bill before the House
was one dealing with the refund
of Customs Duties and Exemption
from Income Tax of industries
which were already set up in
Barbados between July 1949 and
August 1951.

He saia what the other side
wanted to biame the Labour
Government for being late as far
as Pioneer Industries were con-

cerned, The Acts of Jamaica
and Trinidad which had encour-
aged industries in those places,

had not saved them one brass far-
thing in taxation such as Income
Tax.

Any industry that came down
here from the United Kingdom or
the United States of America, had
to pay more in Income Tax than
if they haq paid in Barbados
alone, hence honourable members
could erase from their minds the
thought that Government: had
kept back anything.

Une member said that they had
a large labour market which was
perfectly true, but they did not
1ave a large consumers’ market.
It was no good saying that they
must not plan on a regional basis.
Trinidad was sending shirts here
from her faetories and those fac-
tories can only reduce their cost

if they increased their markets
and that was what was happen-
ing.

He hoped that great attention
would be paid to what is taking
place in Puerto Rico instead of
making every attempt to blame
the present Government for what
was happening.

He said that the passing of the
Barbados Act could not affect the
issue of a company doing business
here with their head office in the
United Kingdom. That type of
propaganda could only spring
from those persons who were en-
tirely ignorant of what was tak-
ing place.

Amendment
Mr. E, W. Barrow (L) said that

he did not intend to usurp the
functions of any member of the
Executive Committee present.

This was an amendment to the
Bill which was passed last year
and there were only two real
provisions in the amendment.

The first was that any manu-
facturer or industrialist who had
extended his plant or factory, or
constructed or repaired a particu-
lar factory, such might be deemed
by the Governor-in-Executive
Committee to be a pioneer indus-
try

Secondly, any manufacturer
who set up an industry after 1949
and before this Act had come
into operation, such industry
would be deemed as being a
pioneer industry.

He hoped that

that was clear

to honourable members. If they
dealt with pioneer industries as

a whole, the advantage of being

declared a pioneer industry by
the Executive, had two advan-
tages. Firstly, ‘that any ma-

chinery imported into this colony
would be done so free of normal
customs duties and secondly that
for a period of five years after
commencement of the operation
of a particular industry, no tax
would be paid for that period.

Mr. Barrow then explained in
detail the purpose of the original
Bill after which he referred
briefly to some of the points raised
by honourable members.

He said that representation
should be made to the Colonial
Office on the question of doing

something tangible in the way of
aiding the West Indies in starting
an industrial development scheme
as he thought it was time to stop
talking and act.

Irrelevant

Mr. M. E. Cox (L) replying said
that honourable members would
agree that some of the speeches
made were quite irrelevant. The
object of the Bill, he pointed out,
was merely to amend the Pioneer

idustries Act of 1951 in order
that those industries which were
started before the passing of this
Act might be included in the Act
and given pioneer status.

With regard to the remarks by
the junior member for St. Lug
relative to double taxation, he be-
lieved that it was in 1950 that a
Bill was passed by the House



|
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COMMONWEALTH AND
OTHER TRIBUTES

WASHINGTON, Feb. 6.

President Truman on Wednesday
extended deepest sympathy to the
British Royal Family and_ the
British people on the death of King
George. “God bless Queen Eliza-
beth and may she find in the
memory of her brave father the
courage and inspiration that she
will need in the great responsibili-
ties that lie befote her,” Truman
said in a public statement.

Truman also sent private mes-
sages of condolence to the new
Queen, her mother, and her grand-
mother Queen Mary. The House

of Representatives adjourned at
1.25 p.m. out of respect to the
King.

Demoératic whip, Percey Priest
of Tennessee offered a resolution
expressing “profound sorrow” and
“sympathy with his people in the
loss of their beloved sovereign”;
ihe House immediately passed it
and adjourned for the day. The
resolution will be forwarded to the

British Government, —U.P.
- —___.
OTTAWA, Feb. 6
The Canadian Cabinet was

summoned to meet at noon to-day



to authorize an official proclama-
tion on the h of King George
VI and the succession of Princess

Elizabeth as Queen of Canada

Elizabeth will be proclaimed
Queen of Canada before she is
preciaimed Queen of the United
Kingdom

Official proclamation of the ac-
ession of Queen Elizabeth to the
throne was announced here before
Imperial Privy Council in Lon-
gion. Church bells will ring to-
morrow in mourning for the King,
Catholie churches will offel special
prayers for the King and the
Royal Family,

External Affairs Minister Lester
Pearson and the Canadian High
Commissioner in London may both

represent Canada at the funeral
rites for the King. Pearson leaves
Otiawa at 4.30 p.m. for Montreal

to take plane for London at 6.50
p.m en route to the North Atlangic
Treaty organisation meetings m
Lisbon



NEW Feb. 6
Government throughout
India remained closed on Thurs-
day as mark of respect to the
late King George. Flags were flying
halfmast on the building The

DELHI

offices

abandoning that practice. So far

as the United Kingdom Govern-
ment was concerned, they could
not pass any Bill to control them

He said that the question was
raised by the junior member for
St. John relative to the Hat Fac-
tory That question had been

breught up before and it was con-
sidered that ‘the Hat Factory did
not come as near as the Knitting

Mills Co He thought that the
honourable member should re-
member that in 1950, the House

passed a Bill reducing the general
tariff from 20% to 10% in ofder
to assist the Knitting Mills in get-
ting in their machinery here duty
free.



The Hat Factory was allowed
to import their machinery duty
free and the Government even

granted the gentleman in question,
a sufficient number of dollarg to
go up to Canada to study the hat
business

While it was not on all fours
with the Knitting Mills was due
io the fact that the Knitting Mills
got its raw materjals and manu-
factured them into the finished
product, whereas the Hat Factory
only blocked hats and trimmed
them. There was no manufacture
whatsoever

He said that he was not in a
position to say whether the pass-
ing of the Act would include those
persons, but he could only say that
he hoped it would

The question of advertising the
Bill in various parts of the wortd
as raised by: tne senior member
for St. Philip, was quite aptly re-
plied to by the junior member for
the City

Mr. Cox said that all over the
world people knew that as far as
manufacturers were concerned,
there was a Bill in Barbados which
gave similar facilities for Income
Tax concessions ete., as was the





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period of mourning was not yet)
announced, but official functions in |
the capital were cancelled.

With deep regret, Nehru con-|
veyed the news of the King’s!
ceath to Parliament. He said: “As
we all have known, His Majesty
has been yinwell, but recently he|
had recovered, even thinking of |
undertaking a journey to recu-|
perate his health further. The}
news therefore comes as a sur-|
prise and shock.” |

Nehru suggested that the Speak- |
er convey to the Queen a sense of |
ceep sorrow and that Parlia-|
ment do not sit tomorrow in view
of this happening. Members of |
Parliament stood in silence, and
the House adjourned until Friday
morning.—U.P. |

—_

LONDON, Feb, 6.

Queen Elizabeth joins Queen
Juliana of Holland as the only
two women to occupy major

thrones,

The rest of the dwindling list
cf Crown heads belong to men.
In Europe there are King Haakon
of Norway, King Gustav Adolf
of Sweden, King Frederik of
Denmark, King Badouin of Bel-
gium, and King George of Greece.
Greece

Others include King Farouk of

Egypt. Mikado of Japan, thé
Emperor of Ethiopia, the Shah
of Persia, the King of Siam and
various minor monarchs. The
Scandinavian Kings have close
ties with Britain and are

expected to attend the funeral,

Arrangements for the funeral
have not yet been completed, but
it is believed that Queen Juliana
and the Kings of Belgium and
Greece might also be present.

It is considered doubtful
whether Farouk would attend,
although he went to school in
Britain,

The funeral probably will be
held in the week of February 17,

Many Britons worried on Wed-
1esday about Queen Mary, 84,
who is the most beloved member
vf the Royal Family. The ery of
Oh” was wrung from the lips of



he indomitable olq lady when
he was informed of her son's
eath — another in the = many

agedies which marked her long
iife, She is under the care of

iurses.——U.P,
—U-P.



case in Jamaica and Trinidad,

Mr, ©. 'T. Allder (I) said that
‘ince Jamaica and Trinidad had
lready attracted the major in-
Justries which might have assist-
d Barbados, he hardly thought
hat any regional planning would
elp them at this late stage.

He said that the Leader of the
Covernment as well? as other po-
litical leaders in Jamaica ans
‘Twinidad were members of the
Federation Commission at which
industrialisation of the West In-
dies was discussed, Trinidad and
Jamaica went ahead and got a
number of new industries while
Barbados was waiting until a re-
gional set-up was brought about
with the result that they had no
new industry

Some years ago when a big tex-
tile magnate came to this island
for the purpose of erecting a tex-
tile factory, his #roposa were
turned down and now the Govern-
ment members were obliged to ex-
euse themselves,

PRELIMINARY MURDER
HEARING ADJOURNED

His Worship Mr. C. L, Walwyn
yesterday further adjourned until
to-day the case in which 20-year-
old Cyril Lashley a carpenter of
Government Hill, St. ichael is
charged with the murder of El-
mina Hoyte.

The Police has charged that the
offence was committed on January
1k

Mr. W. W. Reece, K.C., Solicitor
Geenral is appearing for the
Crown in the preliminary hearing.

SEVEN LD.'s
There were seven notifications





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month of January,
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PAGE FOUR

BARBADOS a8 ADVOGATE

Gree SE Feces
Printed by the Adverste Ltd., Broad St, | Bri





Thursday, February 7, 1952

‘KING GEORGE



KING vi

BARBADOS, together with the rest of
the British Commonwealth and with the
whole civilized world mourns the loss of a
great King, his late Majesty King’ George
Vi.

After
than

a reign of fifteen years and less
two months, King George passed
peacefully away in his sleep’on the morning
of February 6, 1952. He was fifty-six on
his last birthday December i4, 1951.

Less than six months ago thousands of
Barbadians and millions of people scattered
over the globe heard the late King’s heroic
voice at Christmas time when he reminded
the world that the British are a friendly
people and that the British Commonwealth
is an association of friendly peoples. King
George Vi has borne during his short reign
a burden that no previous British Monarch
has had to bear and his example has earned
the respect and admiration of all peoples.
The King represented to the world as the
French Prime Minister said in Paris yester-
day “dignity, grandeur and devotion to the
public good.”

The late King and his Royai family have
become identified in the minds of all
peoples with the simple virtues of family
life and the King’s private life had its re-
flection in the wider family life of the
Commonwealth, since his position can ad-
mirably be likened to that of a father
exercising discipline and earning love, and
at no time and in no place ruling by fear
or tyranny.

The Commonwealth has lost a father: the «
world has lost a great King and a good man.
King George VI visited Barbados as a cadet
before the last war and planted a tree in
Queen’s Park and among other duties took
charge of a firing party at Gravesend.

He became a Counsellor of State during
his father’s illness in 1928-29. On Decem-
ber 10, 1936 he succeeded to the throne
when his brother King Edward VIII ab-
dicated. His coronation took place at
Westminster Abbey on May 12, 1937.

With Queen Elizabeth, the King visited
Canada, the United States and Newfound-
land in May and June 1939. He was the
first reigning British sovereign to visit the
United States of America. For the first
time in the history of the Commonwealth
he performed Royal functions in a
Dominion when he appeared in the
Canadian Parliament, gave Royal assent to
Bills and r@eeived the United States
Minister to Canada. He also signed the
Canadian-American Treaty of Commerce.
During this seven-Week tour the King
visited President Roosevelt at Washington
and was welcomed by the United States
Congress at the Capitol.

During the second world war he visited
the British Army in France and throughout
the war he shared the perils and sufferings
of the English people. Buckingham
Palace was thrice hit and a de-
layed action bomb which was dropped
on September 11, 1940 blew
dows of Their Majesty‘s apartments.
Later the Royal chapel at Buckingham
Palace was wrecked. Hundreds of Barba-
dians will remember His Majesty on some
of the many occasions when he was easily
seen in London. They may remember a
morning in Kensington Gardens when the
King, the Queen and the Princesses inspect-
ed Barbadians and other servicemen and
chatted informally with several colonials,
They may recall another morning on Vic-
tory Day when the King’s hand remained
in permanent salute for more than an hour
while troops of all nations marched past
along the Hall. Or they may have heard
the King speak with unaffected simplicity
at some function where distinguished
servants of the Colonial peoples received
rewards from their Sovereign.

out win-



spring of
1949 and the operation on the King’s right
leg in 1949 sent a shudder of anxiety
throughout the world. In 1951 the world
watched hourly the results of the serious
operation on the King’s lung which was
performed on September 21. It was cheer-
ed by the news that he was enjoying Christ-
mas at Sandringham and was able to go out
shooting.

Last Thursday, His Majesty carried out
his first public engagement since that
operation when he stood in the cold winds
of a London airport waving goodbye to
Princess Elizabeth who was leaving with
her husband to carry out the long promised
and eagerly awaited visit to Australia and
New Zealand. Who could have foreseen
one week ago that this great and good King,
this father of the Commonwealth should
have died so tragically soon, and plunged
the world in sorrow? In our grief we will



pray for our new gracious Queen on whom

has fallen the great burden borne so hero-
ically, so well by our late lamented Sov-
ereign, His Majesty King George VI, and to
His Majesty’s nephew who left Barbados
last night and the whole Royal Family we
offer on behalf of our readers our con-
dolences. |



Penny Wise

FOR some time now it has been ad-
vocated that the Governments of the West
Indies demand from the schooners regis-
tered in these colonies and catering to inter-
eolonial trade that they should carry radio
equipment so as to be able to receive hur-
ricane warnings or to communicate with
the port service in cases of distress or
danger. This crying need for some safety
measure to save the lives of those compell-
ed to travel by this means has been con-
sistently ignored.

Within the last few weeks another
Schooner, the Zenith, has disappeared with-
out any trace.

The Zenith left Barbados on December
19th for British Guiana with a load of stone
and was last seep off the coast of George-
town on December 22nd. It was known
that she was leaking, but her pumps were

oe



BARBADOS ADVOCATE

=sessseessnsesnsssunensnehsinanspinensteesssvininmnsecedsainiapieindiicersdnpmemsngseesostsmtsans
moro ore Ameo |IE LATE KING GEORGE,
Zealand was cancelled in the

@ From Page 1

held wae the affection and ley-

aities of the nations of the Cem-

monwealth, if at a ume when
every institution was challenged
the institution of the monarehy
remained stable, a chief part of
the credit must be given to
modest and gentle figure who
was the titular political head of
all the British societies. :

It may, indeed, be said that hot
all the credit should go to George
VI. He had faithful servants both
in the Palace and in Whitehall.
A powerful bond of commoa in-

| terest and outlook united him with

with the solid middle portion’ of
the people.

Above all, he enjoyed the sus-
taining help and comfort of the
charming and spirited lady who
was his Queen.

All this is merely to say that
the King had, with the help of
those on whom he had the right
to call, found his own answer to
a delicate question with which his
reign, like every other reign, had
opened,

He had given his own form to
the British conception of a eon-
stitutional kingship, had done so
in a delicate hour and against

}certain personal handicaps. How
, had he done it? On what was this

personal triumph founded?
Basically it was built on the

trespect which the British people

instinctively give to one who is
manfully doing his best in a ‘fob
which he manifestly dislikes. A
people which has never shown
much affection for brillicnce is
always ready to pay its tribute to
one who cannot escape his duty
yet shows an inflexible resolve in
discharging it.

Hard-won Conquest

The King’s hard-won conquest
of his stammer was in itself a de-
monstration of grit that won him
esteem.

It might be argued that his
painful anxiety not to be in the
foreground of the picture was a
positive advantage when it came
to the political side of his task.

But no King, however rigidly
constitutional, has ever been a
success through the mere accumu-
lation of negative virtues. He has,
in the end, to be a leader of his
people. Where was George VI’s
leadership exerted?

He could not be a political fig-
ure, He had neither the desire
nor the gifts for a glittering social
leadership; as time passed the
monarchy was shorn of even the
financial means that this would
involve. His was essentially
moral lead given at a time when
moral standards were shaky. The
public very socn realised that the

working and the captain of the steamer |home life of the Royal Family had
: *, 1 Ad cst vik spat ah an essential happiness and sweet-
which sighted her, was of opinion that she |ness which was neither too old-
would make land in a few hours’ time and pened nor too conventional,
1 his was something that could
that all would be well. not fail to appeal, In Britain the
Several weeks have now passed [question of moral values is rarely
‘ a ee Zeni' more than an intellectual exercise.
and it is to be presumed that the | th If the Royal home reflected
with all aboard has been lost. This is stark the lively and cheerful disposi-
tragedy and one which could have been tion of the Queen, it was also a

avoided.

The Advocate newspaper has pointed out
on more than one occasion that in view of
the difficulties of steamship travel between
the islands many people who would not
otherwise do so have been compelled to
travel by schooner.

It is singularly unfortunate that they
should be condemned to travel by boats,
sometimes in the hands of men without
any knowledge of navigation and always
at the mercy of the wind and the deep.

Besides the danger of having to guess
their way from one island to the next, the
passengers have to travel knowing full well
that if at any time there should be rough
seas or damage to the vessel, they will not
be in communication with land or with any
ship which would come to their rescue.

This loss of life has occurred several
times within the last few years and con-
tinues without any notice being taken by
the Governments who allow people to
build schooners and carry passengers with-
out the necessary and adequate means of
communicating with shore stations. And
it is tragic that these same governments
have contributed to the most elaborate
equipment and stations for warning ships
of approaching storms. When the ships
have been caught in those storms, however
there is no means of calling for help. This
is not merely tragic but borders on the
criminal.



NEW YORK, Jan. 31. cently that



Yesterday was the coldest day
of the current winter season in iner
New York, The temperature dived
to 7 deszrees just before daybreak,
officially but a Long Island resi-
dent assured me that his ther-
mometer revistered only 5 degrees

when he read it. But

annoyed. It should not be 45 de-
grees one day in January, and then
suddenly 10 the next, This is not
good behaviour on the part of the
mercury. Do one thing or the
other, or at least do it gradually
In fact one was so warm (7?) 35
degrees that a friend suggested in-
viting people from sunny Califor-
nia (where there

off from this

Jan,
Boston

36 aboard



freat care has to
taken that the number does a
ase at the present rate,
*mashup that really shook: things
up here occurred on Jan. 3. when
a big plane, an American Ai
Convair came in too low on the
fog sereened- New Jersey airport

lines C.46 plane failed in a take
same field,
return but crashed into the nearby
river with the loss of 56 lives, Dn
14 a Northeast Airliner from
undershot
approach to La Guardia Field, and
plunged into the East River.
were rescued



It was indeed a right royal wel-
come, and the gallant skipper was
persuaded at the last moment to
ride in a car. He had previously
said that he wanted to walk and it
was well that he changed his mind,
He is not a huge man, but looks
every inch a sailor. His square

The

rlings

whichever of Newark. It barely missed the chin, and clean cut jaw revealed

was right, it was much too cold roof of the Battin High School for his determination and he recalled
for a good many people and I was girls, sheared off the top cf one for me some lines of my boyhood
amone that number. building, and crashed into another days:

Up to now the weather has been killing all 23 persons aboard. Five That's the way at sea, my boys!
freakish. We know that it is win- people in the houses smashed also That's the way at sea.
ter but the temperature has been died. This was the second holo- I got a big ‘thrill at seeing
see-sawing for some time now. caust to visit Newark in a short thousands of cheering people
And the real American people are time. On Dec 16, a Miami Air- many of them from fourth up to

tenth and fifteenth floor windows
—showering confetti—they call it
“ticker tape’—down to the street
below

A similar honour was arranged
for Mr, Winston Churchill a few
days later and I was all set for
my first glimpse in the flesh of the
Grand Old Man of British politics

tried to

an instrument
All

by the

was a heavy prompt action of tugs But a cold kept “Winnie” indoors
snow storm) to spend the winter T saw the plane in the river with and I was disappointed, like
in New York. only one wing above the water. many others. And it was as well
However this really cold weath- and it was refloated and towed that he did not brave the weather
er seems to make the majority of away in a day or two, The day proved to be one of the
folk happy, and they hope that Since these hoeppenings there dampest of the winter with oceas-
February will be a much more have been ‘tests of the radar tonal drizzles which would have
normal period than January was equipment at these fields to check done him no good, One newspaper
ce landings during fog columnist opines, however, that
< . the British Prime Minister’ will
I have not got any mail from * soon be in America again. He
Barbados for nearly two weeks I really did have a close up of came to beg, he wrote, and he is
and this is much too long a period. some of the news during the past not the sort of chap to put all his
T suppose, however, that the snow fortnight Apart from the big begs in one ask-it.
which shut down the airfields for p¥ane in the East River at La ® cae e
a couple of days has been respon- Guardia, I saw New York's wel- I was talking to a group of
sible in part for this. There have come to Capt. Kurt Carlsen, hero youngsters a few evenings ago—
been so many plane vrashes re- of the Flying Enterprise episode. all American high school lads—

tribute to the sound and stead-
fast character of the King, his
tolerance, good sense, and sim-
plicity. (All this, however, is
not to say that he had been
denied his share of the heredi-
tary irascibility of the House of

Windsor.)

He was given by the public his
portion of the admiration accorded
to one who sits on one side of a
happy fireside, that supreme ideal
of the British,

Unassuming Virtues

And so by exercise of many un-
assuming virtues, by faithful
obedience to the call of duty, oner-
ous and ultimately exhausting as
it was, by displaying that complex
of qualities most conveniently
described as those of a “gentle-
man,’

King George VI reigned success-
fully over his people for 14 years,
the monarchy adapted itself to ex-
traordinary new conditions with
an apparent ease, and, at the end
it appeared that the man who had
been, Duke of York was not with-
out some of that political sense
which has contributed to make the
British throne so illogical and so
valuable an institution.

He was born at York Cottage,
Fpetinesem. on December 14th
1895.

The ill-health which was so
heavy a burden through his life—
and has had so tragic a conclusion
—miade its first appearance during
the Great War when Prince Al-
bert, as he was called until 1920,
was a midshipman in H.M.S. Col-
lingwood with the First Battle
Squadron, Obstinate gastric trou-
ble was at last diagnosed as duo-
denal ulcer.

This, though it involved an
operation, did ,not prevent him
from serving with the crew of a
12in. gun in the Battle of Jutland,
a fitting climax to a naval educa-

who were very interested to hear
something about a spot where
there was no winter. It was the
third time I haq been inveigled
into this kind ef conversation by
‘nis group, and one of a oldest
finally asked:

“Now that you have seen snow
are you ready to go back to the
West Indies?”

I later found out how difficult
it was for him, although he had
experienced winter, to understand
how anyone could leave all sun-
shine in exchange for cold ,and
snow. None of them had ever been
to Florida or »Miami,; and could
barely picture a land where the
sun shone every day, and where
you did not have to use heavy
coats and rubbers for many
months of the year.

They are all potential visitors to
the West Indies—at least Barba-
dos—when they grow up, make
enough money and are entitléd to
long holidays.

* * ®

For many years New York auto-
mobile drivers have been driving
on their parking lights. This ‘‘anti-
quarian ‘acetylene light’ regula-
tion” as it has been described goes
by the board on Sunday, Feb. 3,
and from Monday a new city law
governing automotive illumination
goes into effect. This is an effort,
according to the Traffic Commis-
sioner, to reduce the appalling
number of night traffic secidents.
Night pedestrian accidents make
up a “staggering percentage of
traffic fatalities and injuries” in

THURSDAY, FEBRUARY 7, 1952



tion which had begun at the Nava!
College Osborne. The man, who
would have a longer experience of
war than any British monarch
since the Middle Ages, was, to his
own great happiness, not denied a
baptism of fire.

His marriage in 1923 to the
Lady Elizabeth Bowes-Lyon,
daughter of the Earl of Strath-
more, whom he had known since
childhood, was, as it turned out,
the most successful single enter-
prise of his life.

The young couple settled at
145, Piccadilly, which was, be-
fore long, the scene of a healthy
nursery which housed first
Princess Elizabeth and four
years later, Princess Margaret
Rose.

These years before his father’s
death in 1936 were passed by the
young couple in the busy cere-
monial life which falls to the
younger son of a Sovereign. If
the Duke of York had little natural
aptitude for it, his consort made
up for this by her vivacity and
charm. But over these events,
tedious as they sometimes were,
there did not yet fall the shadow
of kingly responsibility.

Before the death of his father
this must at times have occurred
us a possibility to one who knew
something of the direction his
elder brother’s affection was tak-
ing. But he must havé hoped that
the crisis would somehow be
averted, It was a hope that faded
during the days of King Edward
VIII's brief and eventful reign.

The Abdication

In the whole business of the
Abdication, the man who became
King George VI shone forth as a
good and loyal brother. The letters
which passed at that time between
‘David" (Edward VIII) and “Ber-
tie’ (George VI) give a pleasant
picture of fraternal affection.

“Bertie” fully understands the
dilemma in which his elder brother

is placed, His sympathy never
falters.
Nobody can read these docu-

inents, so simple and so sincere,
without gaining the impression
that, under the formidable wing
of George V, a pleasant and de-
voted family had grown up. Not
once did the will or ambition of
the heir-presumptive add to the
tension of the hour.

Not once did the King-to-be re-
proach the King-that-was for
leaving so heavy a heritage to
him. And his first act, on acceding,
was to give the ex-King a fitting
title as Duke of Windsor.

But he can scarcely have doubt-
ud that he was undertaking a task
inevitably difficult at a time when
its difficulties were abnormally
cahanced,

One task he imposed on him-
seif. He persisted with the exer-
cises which the Australian spe-
cialist, Sir Lionel Logue, had
prescribed for his hesitation in
speech. The result was that, in
the later part of his reign, he
was able to deliver compara-
tively long addresses at a meas-
ured pace that was not ill-suited
to Royal diction
As his kingly title he chose the

name “George” with probably the
intention of emphasising at that
moment the tone of moral upright-
ness and even severity which his
father had set. Amid the Corona-
tion splendours. with all their
medieval discomforts, he bore
himself with the dignity—and as
much of the ease—that this cere-
mony permits to its leading actor

An early duty, undertaken in
the deepening shadow of war, was
the journey to Canada undertaken
in 1939, His tour of that Common-
wealth country was interrupted
for a four-day visit to Washington
and the United States. It was the
first time that a British Sovereign
had crossed the borders of the
Union lost to the Crown in part at
least by the obstinacy of his dis-
tant ancestor, George III,

The King returned to London in
time for Mr, Neville Chamberlain's
efforts to save the peace of Europe
by the diplomatic negotiations to
which the general name of “Mun-
ich” is given. A year later, George
VI hurried south from his shooting
at Balmoral to hold a Privy Coun-
cil that proved to be the fore-
runner of a graver sort of shooting.

The Dark Days

In his broadcast on the night
war was declared, the King told
his peoples to stand “firm and
united” and warned them that
“dark days” were ahead.

They were, for country and
King, too, No war since George
VI's remoter ancestors had taken
the field with sword and armour
to risk all with their feudal Tevies,
ever came so close to a British
monarch. Buckingham Palace was
bombed on nine occasions, o1 one
of which the King and Queen
through a window of their Lon-\
don house saw the bombs falling
that were to wreck the Chapel
Royal.

The King took the same risks as
his subjects, carrying on with his
work as they did. He would not



A VISITOR IN NEW YORK -_=By BARNEY MILLAR

the city. Analysis of these night
accidents, plus research by ex-
perts in night visibility has led to
the conclusion that night driving
with parking lights only is a prim-
ary factor, Usually, both the vic-
tim and the driver say they hadn’t
seen one another,

The new order requires use of
low beam headlights, but driving
with top brights is prohibited, ex-
cept where the street lights fail to
disclose objects within 350 ft., and
then will be permitted only if
there is no approaching car within
500 ft.

Use of parking lights, will be
continued only on highways where
signs specifically prescribe use of
such lights.

s om 2

Today was also the last day for
affixing the 1952 License Tags to
your automobile. In an effort to
conserve meta] it was decided that
no new state license plate would
be issued in New York this year
So when you paid your fee you
got a metal tag bearing the year
“$2"—and you had to attach this
to the bottom right hand edge of
your number plate.

New Yorkers are like other
people, the world over, so Wednes-
day, the coldest day of the winter
caught long lines of owners in a
final big rush to obtain their auto
tags. “Hundreds shiver in line,”
was the text of a big newspaper
picture of this crowd.

America is stepping up its Uni-
versal Military Trataing pro-

have tolerated any other arrange-
ment.

After the collapse of France,
when a German onslaught was
awaited, plans were drawn up for
the Royal Family to leave for
Canada.

It may be assumed that only in
the direst need, only faced by the
most imperative advice from his
responsible Ministers, would
George VI have left this island.

When Parliament, in the days
following victory, presented him
with its congratulations, he re-|,
plied, speaking to both Houses
in Westminster Hall: “I have
done my best to discharge my
duty as a constitutional Sover-
eign of a free people.”

It was the claim of a singularly
self-effacing man. Yet could any
prouder or bolder assertion have
been made by a man_ glittering
with genius and personality? He
added a few words of acknowledg-
ment to the ceaseless help given
him by the Queen. And it was true
that in war as in peace, he had
been blessed by all that a wife’s
grace and good sense can confer.

Peace brought with it a political
transformation in Britain, the
forerunner of huge and rapid eco-
nomic changes.

A new and untried ruling class
swept into power, which first
heated and then cooled its enthu-
siasms and its ambitions.

In the Commonwealth overseas,
constitutional revolution marched
quickly.

India was divided with arbitrary
haste—an operation over -vhich
the King’s cousin presided as the
last Viceroy of the Passing Empire,

Burma left the Commonwealth.
The new India remained within
its fold, though casting off allegi-
ance to a monarth. Pakistan and
Ceylon became Dominions, as Can-
ada and Britain itself were Domin- |.
ions. South Africa welcomed the
King and Queen one year and in
the next gave political power to
the party that proposed to make
the Union a republic.

Amid such a welter of change,
some of it ill-considered, some
of it needless, many might hawe
seen only the image of decay.
George VI took a less superficial
view, “Come what may,” he said
on ore occasion, “nothing will
ever shake my belief that this
old country is at heart as young
and vigorous as she has ever
been.”

The British monarchy had seen
countless alterations over the years
and the great-grand-son of Victo-
rié, who wags also the descendant
of Charles I, put his faith in the
uture welfare where the wisest
f his forebears had put thes —
in a sturdy belief in the national
character. After all, he was him-
self not a bad embodiment of
the stolider British virtues even
if he lacked the flamboyance o!
his elder brother or the intellec-
tual eminence of his great-grand-
fathtr.

Testing Your

After the testing South Africar
tour of 1947, the King’s health
showed the first real symptoms ot
decline. His appearance bore
signs of fatigue and strain which,
after a time, it was hoped he haa
cast off.

But an affection of the leg post-
poned a projected visit to Austra-
Jia and graver trouble in his lung
at last made this cherished jour-
ney impossible,

This is known to have been,
during the last months of his life,
an anxiety and a sorrow. Having
no particular belief in his own
magnetism, he believed that the
free Commonwealth could best
prosper with a King as the central
human symbol and that the King
must go to visit all his peoples.

During those years, however,
life brought him a new source of
happiness in the marriage of his
elder daughter, Princess Elizabet)
to Philip, Duke of Edinburgh, a
young man of marked ability and
fine presence. King George in
due course found himself the de
lighted grandfather of two per-
sonable children, a prince und
princess in the direct line of suc-
cession to the throne.

The first sign that his health
had taken a sinister turn came
the day after he attended the in-
stallation of Knights of the Bath
in Westminster Abbey. An attack
of influenza persisted too long |o)
his subjects’ peace of mind.

Confirmation of their graver
fears came when the King was
resting at Balmoral. By that time
it was evident that a deepsertec
disorder was taking progressive
toll of his strength. Photogranhr
published in the newspapers pess-
ed their own grave message ‘or
to those who could not read bet-
ween the lines of medical bulie-
tins,

He had greatness thrust upor
“him. But his reign ali too brief
as it was, showed that he had the
moral. courage equal to his high
responsibilities,

gramme, but opinion is divided on
the speed of this speed up. From
the Senate hall down to the street
the matter has been discussed as
the youth of the nation answer the
draft call.

Yesterday two church groups
entered these discussions by voting
opposition to U.M.T., as the mens-
ure is usually called. The two re-
ligious groups are the National
Council of Churches of Christ in
America representing 147,00
Protestant, Eastern Orthodox «nd
Anglican Churches with 31,000.900

members in U.S., and the New
York Board of Rabbis.

The General Board of the Ni-
tional Council at a meeting yos-
terday acknowledged the need fer,
and its support of, adequate de-
fense measures. But the statement
it approved of in an 89 to 8 vote
saic, “we believe it is one thing to
acknowledge the necessity of
drafting men for a limited period
to meet a_ specifice international
emergency,” and “another qui'e
different thing for the churches ‘o
support the conscription of each
succeeding generation of the na-
tion’s youth for a programme of |
universal military traifing. To co
this would be to take a long step
in the direction of a garrisen
state.” |

The Board of Rabbis, independ- |
ently voiced the same feelings an-| |
added, “|. . U.M.T. will be a dis-
ruptive force in family life
in the education ef our youth, ard
will further endanger the basic |
spiritual principles upon
our nation is founded.”


















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THURSDAY,

FEBRUARY 7,

1952



Queen Elizabeth

Reiurning Home
@ From Page 1

18 months old Princess Anne, sec-

ond in line of succession. Both

children are at Sandringham
. they were taken by the

ing and Queen Elizabeth after
aying goodbye to their parents.
*rincess Margaret, also at San-

dringham, is the third in line.
News Telephoned
New f the King’s death

was
mmediately telephoned from
Sandringham to Buckingham
Palace where officials informed
the Prime Minister and Home
Seeretary Sir David Maxwell
Fyfe

Queen Mary was told at her
London home, Marlborough
House She did not plan to
travel to Sandringham. Doctor

James Ansell, surgeon apothec-
ary to the King, was called to
Sandringham early this morning.
rhe exact time of the death was
not announced.

All Court functions were im-
mediately cancelled, theatres and
cinemas throughout the country
closed

Members of the Royal House-

hold who were at Sandringham
were Sir Alan Lascelles, the
King’s private secretary; Sir

Harold Campbell and Lady Hyde,
the Qween’s Lady-in-Waiting.
Further details of the King’s
death were expected to be made
known later. It was learned that
he went out yesterday both dur-
ing the morning and afternoon,

Shocked
The Duke of Windsor,
foundly shocked” by the death of
his brother King George VI, will
sail for England Thursday aboard
the liner Queen Mary, but the
American born Duchess will re-

main in the United States.
The Duke who abdicated the
throne in 1937 announced plans
to return to England for his

‘pro-

brother’s funeral after a _ trans-
atlantic telephone call to Buck-
ingham Palace. The Duke's sec-

retary said his wife, the former
Mrs. Simpson, would not accom-
pany the Duke, but would remain
at the six-room suite in New
York at the Waldorf tower. She
never has been accepted by the
Royal family.

Both the Duke and Duchess are
bearing “up very well indeed”
since learning of the King’s death,
the secretary said.

The Duke of Windsor was
stunned at the news of his broth-
er’s death because he had no hint
that his brother was not recover-
ing, the secretary said

“He has not been in tou with
the Kins recently because there
was no reason for him to be.” No
one had any idea that the King
was ill.”



She said the Duke was as
greatly distressed “as anyone
would be on losing his brother
suddenlv’

—(UY.)

B.G. Toll Bells;
ry °
Fire Minute Gun
(Prem Our Own Carresnondent)
GEORGETOWN, B.G, Feb. 6.
Church belis toiled early this
morning at the receipt of the news
of the King’s death and business
places closed at 11.00 a.m, Flags
were lowered to half mast on all
Government and Municipal build-
ings, and commercial and private
houses The Legislative Council
met in a Special Session at 2 p.m.
to pass a Resolution of Sympathy
to the Royal Family and to the





New Sovereign Loyalty to the
Throne. ;
The Georgetown City Council

also held a Special Meeting at 2.30
p.m. for the same purpose. At
6.00 p.m. a 56-gun salute at one-
minute intervals was fired from
Fort William Frederick and by

evening the ishow cases of | the
leading Water Street business
places were changed to deep

mourning The Daily Chronicle
issued a Special edition at 4.00

p.m



Trinidad Mourns
King’s Death

(From Our Own Correspondent)
PORT-OF-SPAIN, Feb. 6.
The death of the King put a
stop to business and fun as Trini-
dad has plunged its inhabitants
into mourning which will last un-
til the day after the Royal funeral
except for the occasion of the
Frociamation of the accession of
the new Sovereign.
Public offices were closed mid-
day and business houses shortly

afterwards,
The Governor and Ministers
will not attend social functions

during mourning. Carnival and
Intercolonial Cric'’set are not
affected. An Extraordinary Legis-
lative Council meeting is likely
to be held on Friday for formally
passing Resolutions of sympathy
and Proclamation. of the new
Sovereign. A Special Chamber
of Commerce meeting will be held
to pass a vote of condolence io Her
Majesty the Queen and the Royal
Family





en re

WEALL LIKE 17 BEST



s
J&R







#

This group of the late King
and his Family was taken dur.
ing the Royal holiday at Bal-
moral. In the picture are
(l, to r,.) the late King, the
new Queen, the Duke of Edin-
burgh, Prince Charles astride
a pet deer, Princess Margaret
and the Queen Mother.

Headline
Discussed
In House

After meeting with objections
from some member of the House

of Assembly cn Tuesday that he
was no: in order io discuss a
Headline which appeared in the
Beacon newspaper of Feburary 2
“Allder Wants Second Hand Bed-





of yams and potatoes.

+

at 4 cents per pound and 3
now cost a cent more each.





.



MOTOR CAR
OVERTURNS

steads for Policemen,”’ Mr. Allder
postponed his decision to draw to




bats. West of Hothersal

the House’s attention that the blak auOa, Se John and nve
psper had committed a breach of VocUpalts 01 We mower car
privilege of the House. M—I1sS¥, waich sne was
He postponed jhis request for a Ci.ving, Nariowly escapea
ruling of the House that he wa- ‘gully when the car over-

in order to discuss the Headline
until he will have discussed the
matter in private with the Speak-
er of the House, Hon. K. N. R
Husbands.

tu:.ed at College Bottom,
& gOun, at about 6,00 p.m.
on ‘baesday. The car is
owned by Mr, Parkinson of
Buiten & Co., Pinfold St.
‘Tee car was extensively
coma ed but its occupan’s
softfcred from shock only.
Sixty-‘ive-year-old Maude
Ga cith of Palmers, St. John

Mr. Allder in explaining why
be wanted permission to discuss
he Headline, said that the news-
paper shad misrepresented _ the
real debate of the House.









who was walking aloag
‘ e Bcettom was injured
n ‘Se incident, She is de-

vained at the General Hos-
pital.

lt was reported to the
lokee tha the car was
.urn.ng into the entrance of
the College. It struck the
,uard wall and overturned.
it rotled downhill for about
61 feet before it came to a
stop.

Sea Scout Dance
Postponed

Invitees to the First Sea Scou:
Valentine Dance are asked to not
tha. consequent
of His Majesty the
Dance which would have
held on February 9, has
postponed.

upon the death
King, the
been
been







Baby Clinic Opened
At Mount Tabor

OVER 100 BABIES, accompanied by their mothers,
were present at the opening of the St. John’s Baby Welfare
League Clinic at Mount Tabor yesterday evening. This
Clinic is another of Madame Ifill’s contributions to the
parish. About two years ago she opened the first Clinic
in the St. Margaret's area,

The Committee of Management thei;



while she prayed for

ci the Clinic is: Madame Tfill, th: suecess of the Clinic. She
President, Mrs. I G. Pilgrim, then declared it opened.

Vice-President, Mrs, C. Pinder, Rev. Pilgrim praised Madame
Treasurer and Secretary and Mrs. Ifill and said that he hoped the
Vv. Gay, Mrs. M. Greaves, Nurse venture would grow bigger and
D. Clarke, Nurse D, Holder. Miss bigger. He offered a pray for

E. Sealy, Mrs, D. Graham and Queen Elizabeth and
Mrs. E. Bennett. Nurse D. Holder one for the Clinic
will be in charge of the clinic
Madame [Ifill in sher addres
asked the audience to stand for Mt, O. T. Allder, M.C.P., Senior
e@ few minutes in silence out of Member for St. John, said that it
respect to the late King George was a definite opportunity offered
Vi. them to be present to witness the
She said that she was very opening of the institution which
preud to be opening the Clinic would be of invaluable assistance
because she felt it was greatly to mothers of the urea. He said
needed in that district. Mothers thct if there were many more
should be taught to take care of Madame Ifills the poor of Barba-
their children.” che seid. dos would be better off,
Hr hoped that it would be
Competent Nurse more successful than others he
She said that the Committee had seen in the colony. “It can-
was glad to secure a cOmpetent not be such if mothers do not
nurse, in Nurse D. Holder, te look d« all ir their power to make it

afterwards



Great Assistance





after the children, She then so,” Mr. Allder said

asked Mrs. Bruce H. Alleyne A. vote of thanks was moved by

Wile of Dr. Alleyne, to open ti Mr. Claude Ramsy, member tr

Clinic officially th Committee of Managemen:
Mrs. Alleyne said it wus a of the Christ Church Baby Wel-

real thrill to see the large num- fare League

ber of mothers and children. She Ajter the .opening Madame
read her “ten commandments fo, Ifill! distributed powdered milk to
parents” and said that before she mecthers. Next Wednesday moth-
returned to the U.S.A, she would er: will get yeast,, barley, cod



leave a copy of them with | oil and sugar
Madame ‘Ifill. At present there are 27 babies
She suggesied to mothers to or the Clinic’s roll. The insti-

give the Committee the kind of tution, which is carried on in the
cocperation which is needed. She Mcunt Tabor School, is equipped
reac a poem and said it was a with cale for weighing the
message she “wanted them to hibies. towels. a cupboard and
have. She asked them to bow First Aid items.





SSS

Ca

een

Ki QU EY ~ \\\

SaaS SS

The Cost o;

LOCAL HOUSEWIVES, not yet recovered from the
ncws of the 20 cents increase on locally produced beef
11d other stunning increases on mutton and other items,
were asked earlier this week to pay increases on the price

}
|
| Size 2
|
|
|

BARBADOS



Food Prices And



Living

These two items of foodstuff which feature prominently
in local dishes and have for

two years or more been sold
cents per pound respectively,

These increases sent the already
so iring cost of living which during
the week saw increases in the
price of local fresh meat, bread,
animal feed and rum, up another



peg. This year, rice, milk, eggs,
tresh fish and local green vege-
tables have cost more than
during the previous year, and

hcuse-lkeepers are becoming more
and more anxious about what
is to be done to make ends meet.

They claim that the money
which they get for their house-
keeping has been whittled down
by more than 25% of the value
which it had last year, and are
fearful that it will drop further
in value as further price increases
are announced,

To bear this out, one city clerk

whose __ salary is $80.00 per
month said; “I am unable to
save a cent out of my salary;
with rent to pay, electric and
water rates, two children at
scheol and other commitments,

ell of which must come out of
my present income, I have been
forced to cut to a minimum es-
sential items of foodstuff, and as
regards clothing, it is impossible
for me to buy a new suit

Grave Situation

A Civil Servant, recently mar-
ried, said “the present situation
foy me is a grave one.” He also
has rent to pay in addition to a
Life Assurance Policy, electric
and water rates, all on a “small
salary.” “One bill is hoerdly
cleared off before another is not
inevitably incurred,” he said

A domestic whose only income
is $4.50 per week, and who has
a little girl at school said : “meat
or fish I cannot afford, and what’
more, I can only manage one
“rea! meal” a day, and that is at
night when I have gone home
from work. I try to rear some
stock, but the present price of
teed seems ag though it will soon
be impossible.

She asked “who is responsible
for all this. Why can’t the Gov-
ernment do something to keep
prices from going up week after
week? Shop-keepers, she claims,
anticipating price increases on
certain items, keep them hidden,
‘and then you have to do without
them,

She said she had noticed that
breadfruit had been taken off the
contro) list, and she feels that
hawkers will take advantage of
this decision to demand a higher
price for this itern

New Vein In U.K’s
Attitude To Egypt

CAIRO, Feb. 6
The newspaper Al Ahram
commenting on British Foreign
Secretary Anthony Eden's state-



ment on Egypt in the Commons
last night, said the speech mark.
ed a new vein in Britain’s atti-
tude toward the Egyptian ques-
tion. It added that moderation
replaced intransigence in London
when Eden admitted that a set-
tlement could not be reached in
Anglo-Egyptian questions unicss

based on Egypt's rightful aspira-
tions.

Al Ahram stressed Egypt's
stand on Sudan would = not
violate British pledges to the

Sudanese as Cairo proposes a
plebiscite whereby the Sudanese
would determine their own future
status.—U.P,









ADVOCATE

PAGE FIVE



U.N. Tanks

Penetrate
Red Territory

EIGHTH ARMY H.Q.,
Korea, Feb. 6.

MORE than 20 U.N. tanks
infantrymen

supported — by

drove five miles
munist territory
Chorwon and blasted Red
supplies and Assembly areas
with direct tire for three
hours in a surprise armoured
raid. Not one United Nations
tank was lost. Infantrwmen
Jumped off at 4 a.m. to secure
fully in no-man’s-land — sur-
rounding the flat snowcovered

into Com-

Vey through which tanks
drove.

Dirrcily behind the riflemen
moved engineers with demolition

eaquipmen: to blast paths for tanks
across the big drainage ditches and
0 tes. for mines and other obsta-



cles

Allied infantrymen drove Reds
ff the northernmost hill in a sav-
age battle but were thrown off
with intense small arms and mor-
tar fire. They regrouped however
and had almost retaken the posi-
tien before the raid was ended and
they were ordered to withdraw.

Tanks moved out at 7 a.m. ad-
vaneing beyond the dug-in infan-
rymen to the northwest of the
Communist held hill which gave
them a clear shooting view of the
whole valley, The advance of the
tanks was held up by a huge ditch
which only a few of the armour-
clads managed to cross.

From that spot however the en-
tire valley was open to United Na-
tions tank fire. A United Nations
tank Commander described Red
resistance as “relatively light.”

—UP.

Civil Servants
Over All Greece
Move On Strike

ATHENS, Feb. 6

More than 65,000 civil servants
throughout Greece tod y went on
strike for a substantial increase
ii Wage Tae Government is
exuceted today to .ssue° orders
teday calling up all essential em-
ployees,

I'he police were s anding by in
Athens, Piraues and other towns
to-day. Ministries and other ad-
ministrative buiidings were put
under guard,

The Greek Government offered
a 15 per cent. wage increase to
junior civil servants as from Feb-
ruary 1 this year, but this was
rejected by civil servants who
said hat the offer was a “prov-
ocation ciming at disrupting the
unity of civil servants.”

The new Greek constitution,
passed on January 1 this year,
as well as the civil servants code,
does not permit strikes by civil
servants.——U.P. <





MORE NICKEL
WASHINGTON, Feb. 6
General Services Administra-

tion (G.S.A.) said that the Nicaro
Nickel Plant in the Oriente
Province of Cuba is expected to
reach a £30,000,000 per year pro-
duction rate by next June. They
said, “This is equivalent to about
10% of the world’s annual nickel
production in the pre-Korean
year of 1949.” UP,







Avalanches Hiuerl Down Houses, Barr:

A VALANCHES thundered

and houses destroyed.
great.”

were blamed on five fect of snow

the Alpine regions and two fect in the streets of Zurich and ol!

cities.
A repetition of last y
ut Switzerland, Austria, Ite







Hong Kong Will One
Day Be “Free”

HONG KONG,
A Communist
Canton has warned hat “the day

Feb. 6

will eventually come when Hong
from the
barbarous yoke of the imperialist.”
semi-official
attack
yet in the Communist press and

Kong will be liberated

The
organ

newspaper, a

made the strongest

radio propaganda blast again
Hong Kong over the last hree
weeks.

Attacks began after Hong Kong
uthorities had deported a num-
rer of Chinesé to the mainland
for alleged subversive political
activities in the colony.

Claiming that Hong Kong was

originally part of China taken by

he British by force, the news

paper added: “Our people will
hever tolerate it if this territory
is to be used asa base for in-

vasion of the mainland.”

—U.P.





CHILDREN’S

Size 1

$3.39
$3.92

Size 3

$5.05



just



FOOTBALLS

Genuine leather complete with bladder

like the real

from the ages of 10 to about 12

—_—__—



CAVE SHEPHERD & CO. 01D.) |

10, 11, 12 &





north of

down
said one person was killed and an unspecified number of ber
Swiss officials warned that
Three villages near Schwyz were evacuated
A church, school and inn were damaged at Reimenstalden. Sli«

*s avalanches which killed 250 perso
y and France was feared,

newspaper in

thing.

13 Broad Street



Communists Call For Post
Armistice Peace Conference




















- PANMUNJOM, Korea, Feb. 6
4 me: THE COMMUNISTS called fo post armistice peace
00 ourists nference—from which Sor Korea would be excluded
to the Korean conflict and “restore peace in the
Due Today — **** |
o North Korean Lieut.-General Nam Il presented a
The Canadian Pacific line vagueiy worded three int pl mime at the first full-
Empress of Scotland, 26,300 tor Gress truce negoti Ig St held since December 4
v-ill be calling at Barbados to-d: rhe 4 ; ss ‘
cn her 16 day Caribbean crui: aE oe fs \ ; - A 2 Bia mee,
irom New York and she will | oblecss: 3 dations to teeoamee ne
bringing about 400 tourists—mo of all foreig Kore ed He asi oy ; Ppclitienl
of whom will be Americans Secondly, a p nent ; oa tae ae co
Sne is. expected to anchor eo Korean the : ae = pot
tec eae ea : Fi q ; h ignir Kverean truce
Carlisle Bay at about 9 a.m. ai other question peace with five representatives of each
Baibados will be having anoth Korea urtcl UP oe
tourist day The Communist ed the -- on
' 7 eae * eects will expected demand tha uce del 5
»¢ the third tourist liner to arrive egates “recommend pesu ‘? ‘ “d
at Barbados for 1952. She started ithdrawal of foreign troops fror > Re porte . For
this cruise from New York on Kgrea, but they left no doubt that ry’... ef2
treb:uary 1 and has stopped in on iis point would have first prior i ratfie Offeneés
her way down at Havana, King- y at the peace conferen ci
ston, Cristobal, Willemstad Nam's proposal was presented Thirteen people were reported
. . : proy I v
La Guaira, She will be leaving os the starving point for afle offences on Tuesday and
port during the afternoon tor t) on on the fifth and final tten { of these ir re fcr exceeding
Vi. gin Islands e Truce agenda he speed li 2
The liner recently returned * It came as the negotiations. re ihree were reported for driving
New York from a cruise to t uned deadlocked on other

ite ingerous 1 iner me for
West Indies and plans to do t ‘ruce Supervision, and the ex- Parking in a restricted ar

more cruises from New Yor. ange of Prisoners sein combats
before the winter is out..She wA! ee
be back on the Liverpool-Quelx
ind Montreal service in mid-Ma

ea and
hired car in a



park

Vaguely Worded








Vaguely worded, the proposal
Her local agents are Messrs. 1). pparently was designed to for CANES BURNT
Costa & Co., Ltd 1% United States and the Western
llies to give de facto diplomati« Nine ures of first crop ripe
Ne ) ry cognition to Communist China, fanek’ we@e burnt when a fire
Kratice Moves ‘To

illing for direct official negotia- ecurre at I
n with the Governments of Red Christ Church at about 10

vace » i ic hina and North Kore The U.S) on Monday
Kase Re lations gnises neither The canes are the property of

rr. . ‘ N Il opened today’s session Williarg Watson of the same plan-
W ith W est Germar th he reading of the Commu- tatior 1

vere insured
PARIS, Feb. 6

France moved to ease «th
strained relations with We
Germany by proposing to com
promise on the NATO Association
ior tne Bonn Goveinment, |
proposal in a report to the N»
tional Assembly tor the upeomi:
debate on a European army, ad
not mention the Saar but sugge
close ties with the NATO in
European defence commun
with Bonn as an equal mem
in the latter, The report
membership in NATO will be
subject at the NATO Lisbon mx
ing for decision,

Proposals will permit Jo
NATO European army meeti:
Joint policy for the NATO Ei
pean army, Germans at S.H.A.!
with Eisenhower

wthers Plantation,

p.m,







ANIAMTED OPINIONS



Meanwhile apostles will
to-day to prepare the final rep
for Lisbon, The meeting is
pected to last three days unc
the Chairmanship of the tnu.u





security programme head Says Mr. Leo King:
Averell Harriman éttaes nee . roe
—UP YOU CAN RE-LION IT
oe BEING THE SWEETEST TREAT”

Mrs. Jagan Goes e

PORT-of-SPAIN, Feb, ¢
Janet Jagan, American -b« ”
resident of British Guiana \

last Friday was refused perm.
sion to remain in Trinidad leay
tomorrow possibly for Grenac
The Governar’s refusal to ¢
voke the immigration Depa:
ment’s order was conveyed to hy
by letter on Tuesday evening
ter the Executive Council me
ing. The letter told her “ple
kindly leave at the earlies «
portunity and that if she rett
to Trinidad intransit to Pri
Guiana she will not be permit
to leave the airport

Toffee

The Perfection of Confection
MADE IN UK.

WALTERS’ ‘PALM’ TOFFEE LTD.
LONDON, W. 3

PALM’ WORKS.





aa!

ZURICH, Feb, 6

Swiss valleys and first 1

danger is * !

which has fallen since Saturda



UP.

Bush Fires
Under Contro!

Here’s a Food He'll Meaty Ge For/
Dog Chow is made for dogs every - you'll fir

where because all dogs require in your deg's bill o




the same basic forrmula. The © 1}, Dog ¢
only difference is that herd of fresh x f ¢
MELBOURNE, Fe working dogs wan nd neod °0 0
Most bush fires which dey onde ofth Nite ae er 200 de }
tated wide areas in Victoria an ore ne uted the ed e-ier."e3

New South Wales yesterday wer and in palat
reportéd early today to be ter

porarily under cor. rol gut weal
fire fighters were still on the alert

ee ee ee =

SLEPLS att. ths Ail aD

In Victoria where fire h
been deseribed ¢ the most ruil: 9 ’
ous and widespread since 1939, | AYN ATLARLE
was expeeted to be



cooler toda |
ut the Weather Bureau he |
warned that tomorrow will be
“scorcher” and could be ti

{ y .
PURINA
$ ate’s “blackest day yet,” > ‘ 2 + ‘ >
Reports from fire ravaged ce ah 1 aed >
tres in New South Wales tod

\)
said the fires were under cont:
H. JASON JONES &



| ALSO
{

ease

ond that a cool southerly wind ha
trought some relief after yeste:
days one hundred
verature.-U.P,

Co., Ltd.—Distributors

degrees te

For boys



BREATHE... the antiseptic vapour from
your handkerchief by day or from your pillow

at night or use the
I VAPEX INHALER
} — handy for daytime
Easily recharged from

standard bottle
Sale at |
ALL DRUG STORES |



| On

Made in Engiand by THOMAS KERFOOT & CO
A nee ac







PAGE SIX

CLASSIFIED ADS.

TELEPHONE 2508.

FOR §































For Births, Marriage or Engagement
announcements in Carib Ca the
*harge is $3 00 for any number of words
© 30 and 6 cents per word. for each | -—-——-——-——-—- ~
ona) word Tern Phone 2903 | AUTOMOTIVE
A St Death | —_
_ , CAR--One 1947 12 H.P. Vaux -
He ain f i Colour black, good condition $1,000.00
DIED Dial 0108 Alvano, St. James
- ee: 7.2.52—4n
SPRINGER On. Fe ry ———~ — eS
at« her residence, Beimont", Six }
Roads, St. Philip, Lillian Springer CHEVROLET CAR: 1930 model and m
Her funeral leaves the above residence] ¢x¢elient condition. Dial 4616 Courtesy
at 4.15 p.m. today for St. Martin's] Garare 7.2.52 —6n
Chureh io ecard
Joseph Springer (widower), Fran) CAR 1947 Standard @ h.p. Apply:
Bertram, Merton jsons}, Mrs. Abram] G Gill, Burton & Co 5.2.52—3n |
Alleyne, Mrs. Ernest Butcher, Mex. | ————————————————— |
Haskell Eastmnond, Philo Springer] CAR-—O DeLuxe Ford Car 194/
Adaughters te « driven. Tyres new, Apphy
E. McLea ar Hi St, Joseph.
6.2.52—3n |



ANNOU

7 ‘es yr .
4 EMEN rs New Citroens in stock,

CTTROENS







maineteotianannes - ri $3. apply Barbados Agencies, |
REPAIRS AND MAINTENANCE—Bar- } telephone 4208 1.2.52—6n. |
bados Agencies anr co that t Dc
recently been joined by an expert] C¥TROEN—One second hand Citroen
automobile engineer {rom United King- under 5,000 miles, apply Barbados
dom aod are extending. their premises geneles, telephone 4902 1.2.52—6n.

to handle all types of repairs

———$—$——

1.2.52—6n











LLOYD—The car fer cheap motoring,

w to Barbados apply Barbados

FERTILIZER DISTRIBUTORS— manu sencies, telephone 4208. 1.2.52—€n.
factured by Massey‘4iarris. Just in tiny row et a

for the application of your fertilizer CYCLE—Only cne (1) in stock,

young canes or grass ‘ands. Courtess [ ambassador Supreme, Spring-frame, 2

Garage. Dial 4616 7.2.52 p. $905.00. Terms. A BARNES & CO.,

—

GRASS RAKES:

rod. 26.1, 52—t.f.n.



mh

Hea

y duty 12” rak!
6” transport width) Self-lifting. #







































































BARBADOS ADVOCATE

PUBLIC SALES





B.G. Mystified












RATES OF EXCHANGE



THURSDAY, FERRUARY 1952

TAKE NOTICE

LOSING RATES: FEBRUARY 6, 1952/
MAIL NOTICES NEW YORK
scion } 73.6% pr. ao on Bankers 71.4% pr, |
REA ESTA 2 Mails tor S. Lucia, S. Vincent, Gren- ight or demand }
eat | t nnin?’ jada, and Aruba by the M.V. Daerwood Drafts 71.2% pr
AVONDALE is REED STREET, | will be closed at the General Post Office 38% pr peed i i
y % ie ak ant la c .2% pr. rrency 6 pr
Bridgetown. | A ree vee "aah “ek.s 1 ““Parcel. Mail at 12 noon, Registered 69.2" pr. |
cine tit agan |Mail at 2 p.m. Ordinary Mail at 2.30 CANADA
ated thie Satine aiital aie i p.m. on the 8th February, 1952 (Including Newfoundland) }
“RORAIMA". KING STREET, Bridge y Mait. for Pr. Guiana by the Sch. Francis 73.9% pr, Cheques on Bankers 71.3% p
AD . 2 * . ae@r . ,Or= , . > : ®
town, tenanted tiy Mr. and Mrs. Eustace] GEORGETOWN, B.G., Feb. 6 w. nit will be. clone at the Genera! Donen Deohs i 1 he
Gooding, and standing on rented land Political and Labour circl in Od ‘Mail ‘= 12 noon, Registered 73.9% pr. Cable
Rg Maakoee inaere fer c E Rixton British Guiana are ny | at) Mail at 2 p.m., Ordinary Mail at 2.30 72.4% pr. Sa o.8%s pr
srt oa , tenar y r - a ; % r
wnd standing on rented land the drastic action of the Trinidad |>™ on the 8th February, 1952. »
Inspection on application to the respec- | Government in banning Mrs.
tive tenants between 10 a.m. and 6 p.ir }

Janet Jagan from visiting o1
| maining in the island.

It appears that the Trinidad
Government acted on information
or advice received from some

on any day except Sunday re-4
The above properties, belonging to
Estate Alfred T. Phillips, deceased, will be
set up for sale by public competition at
our office, James Street, Bridgetown
Thursday 14th February at 2 p.m.

YEARWOOD & BOYCE |Government (British or Foreign)
aie ns jor through official or diploma‘ic |
channels, but up to the present



£100 Barbados Government De-

no reason or clauses for the ban
benture @ 3% %

has reached the



1 £100 Barbados Government De- public in this |

benture @ 5% country. |

3 2100 Bavbados Government De-| Through the British Guiana

ventures @& a% i .

ahs: abaaee UF.2. euen Saket: a6 | Government, His" Excellency the

441 shares Barbados Fire Insurance |Governor of Trinidad Sir Hubert}

= nace PS T. e: Ltd Rance has formally notified Hon. |

shares i. iscul o. ~ _ i 2 g .

43 shares Barbados Telephone Co, Dr. Cheddi Jagan, a member of

(6% Preference) the Legislative Council for the

= mare aes Jee Cs. es Central Demerara constituency,

e above mentioned shares wil e : ‘ facie nd

set up for sale at Public Auction on} that he and his wife have been

Friday the 8th day of February 1952 at}deemed by the Governor in the

2 pm. at Carrington & Sealy, Lucas|Council of Trinidad to be “pro-
Street

#1.3.08 = hibited immigrants”.
EN-DAH-WIN, Pine Hill —Standt Similar information was sent by



on























TAKE NOTICE



That LOEW'S INCORPORATED, a corporation organized and existing unde! | apparatus,
the laws of the State of Delaware, United States of America, whose trade or

business address is 129 South State Street, Dover, State of Delaware, U.S.A.
Manufacturers, has applied for the registration of a trade mark in Part “A” o

Register in respect of films adapted for reproduction and containing recorded
images of pictures and/or recorded sound, motion pictures and motion picture
motion picture |
projecting apparatus, motion picture cameras, and parts, photographic apparatus

photoplays, motion pictures films of all kinds and description,



Tiat LOEW'S INCORPORATED,
the laws of the State of Delaware,
business address is 129 South State Street,
Manufacturers, has applied for the
| Register in respect of films adapted for
images of pictures and/or recorded sound, motion pictures and
photoplays, motion picture films of all kinds and description,
projecting apparatus, motion picture cameras,
and parts, talking picture apparatus, combined
‘and motion picture machines and apparatus parts and accessories,
| synchronized sound reproducing and motion picture projecting machines
parts and accessories, talking machines combined and
| with motion picture apparatus and records and films therefor,
| parts and appurtenances, including radio receiving sets, cabinets,
horns,
| tus of all kinds and description including electric switches and

corporation
United States of America, whose trade or

Dover,

reproduction

t

‘some person shall’in the meantime give ne

registration of a trade mark in Part “A”
and containing recorded
motion picture
motion picture
and parts, photographic apparatus
synchronized sound recording
combined

organized and existing under

State of Delaware U.S.A,
* of

and

synchronized
radio apparatus,
amplifiers,
and combined talking machines and radio receiving sets; television appara-
electric stop mechan-
isms, detector tubes, amplifying tubes, and like goods, and _ will be entitled to
register the same ofter one month from the 7th day of February 1952 unlpss
stice in duplicate to me at my office

and pdrts, talking picture. apparatus, combined synchronized sound recording | of opposition of such registration. The trade mark can be seen on application
and motion picture machines and apparatus, parts and accessories, combined | at my office
synchronized sound reproducing and motion picture projecting machines and | Dated this 23rd day of January, 1952.

@pparatus, parts and accessories,
with motion picture apparatus and records and films therefor,

parts and appurtenances, including radio receiving sets, cabinets,











































talking machines combined and synchronized |
radio apparatus,
amplifiers,
horns, and combined talking machines and radio receiving sets; television apparatus |
ef all kinds and description including electric switches and electric stop mechanisms





H. WILLIAMS,











































Registrar of Trade Marks.
1.2.52—3n









| ¥ x ‘ e
width (9 ~ “ a8 detector tubes, amplifying tubes, and like goods, and will be entitled to register | te . - 8
Courtesy Garage. Dial 4616 ELECTRICAL koe sig ao yer the Trinidad. Governor for Mrs.| the same after one month from the 7th day of Februory 1952 upless some person | Sader . m A. 2 j
1.3.82 ee ee ee nea ay room, livifig room and k aatlenethe with Jagan who plans to fly to Gren-~| shall in the meantime give notice in duplicate to me at my office of oppositios |
ADDING MACHINE: Barrett Electrical | ™ . ra ‘ ' ada to spend dheet faratt of such registration. The trade mark ean be seen on application at my office. |

3, ‘ 1V " ACTOR RAKES: Adding. Machine (U.S.A.) Cost New cupboards. Tiled bath and toilet. Ser- | ace ) spend a snor vacation Dated this 28rd day ef January MONTREAL, AUSTRALIA AND NEW IRE ST

IDE-DELIVERY TRACTOF K = | 1952.

. See a Faas a €295.00 will accept $200.00. At Ra'ph | vants’ room and garage. Inspection on there instead. e ZEALAND L! >.

unsble for wind-rowing f fenrd's 1 fae Street. Phone 5010, | »pplication to Mrs. Bernard Rolfe. Tele- 7 H. WILLIAMS, MAN? 1 The M/V. “CACIQUE DEL
’ assey-Harris product ial rte Beard 's ower a3 4 . a —_ ‘ , ¥ /V.

Gare <0 eee Deere — Pine aoe will be set up for sale at éuerae ene gy 4 wo eye 13500 | Fee das NER Meineke: don. Sossenaeh ‘a — Lucia, “ot.

scatter ciceaiuabdi being hinteciipeclovientelane t ut Ce se ve irst women to be elect@d) aig soniye Liilispaataia | Adelaide February 11th, Melbourne Feb- Passengers for St. a,

7 AAR nee CANDY FLOSS MACHINE: Excellent; Public Auction on Friday the 8th Feb-|, me se : ian pital | a a ; ‘i Vincent, Grenada, and Aruba
walet Prue ~ : Hi a vA Die | Profits having made by Legh ge sa at tg p.m. at the office of the Aha nag nt F ea oe mah TAKE NOTICE | Rese Be Or rear ad rine % Sailing Wy efnae say i. m

; ¢ st New $400.00 will accer 2 for | undersignec > satates-born ; r| sa > The M.V. “D. OOD” w

ei > Available 0 ‘ ' . , + a Ss a
i Leake Iand-wiak, Oe me quick sale. Apply Ralph Beard, CARRINGTON & SEALY, | Janet Jagan is General Secretary ZEROLIT asen ie 8th and Barbados about} © cept Cargo and Passengers for
cae. Dinter 2 "tn | Lower Bay Street. Phone 5910 Pry ae - "v1 152. th Jof the Socialist Peoples’ Progres- Thet THE PERMUTIT COMPANY LIMITED, a British Company, whose trade | 1 addition to general cargo this ves- * St. Lucia, Be ae a

eS } “isive Porty of British Guiana and| Gf ,pusiness address is Permutit’ House, Gunnersbury Avenue, London, W 4, | sel has ample spa.e for chilled and hard | % and Aruba. Salling "y

6 CANE TRAILERS: Immedinte creed ead a cP re oe 4 a ce nglaud, janufacturers, has applied for the istration of a trad k F | frozen cargo * . ny 4 IBB ”

ly available wi or without ‘Tre eth Amenete 5. estas te 10.008 square tout $f ieee Mircea at Chel. with her husband 1s the foremost|“A" of Register in respect of chemical substances being artificially. sureares Cargo “aecepted on through Bills of > Be ou oe ane ioe

Very Heavily con ted afd they mal ae ie a ceriastian 1% years guaranteed sea Gardens, St. Michael, The house among the people in their strug- cy Pounes for the treatment of water and other liquids; plant and installations | Lading for transhipment at Trinidad to| » sects ton Kataoh ee teaerat

es a "7 y Ol Transport prokioms tt ano on Apply Ralph Beard, Lower |contains Drawing Room, Living Room, gle for self - Government and und ‘will De Tentitved tc "Sermuar the mete te aa eG Ge ia Ce yee ie Nevis and St, Mitte ‘Sailing Friday

a B16 *ourte Garage ert Z . z a. & » ister the same after one month from the 7th ay « Islands. > sal ”

’ Bay. Street. Phone S010 6.2.52—2r 6 eine e, Toilet, Bath and! eventual independence. ee 1952 unless some person shail in the meantime give nitibe in auptiate | "For further particulars apply % sot inst,
1.2.52—3n . } { ¢ i ao ;
The above property will be set up for| , In St. Vincent in 1948 she wos sti cc tandiicainn sao ee of such registration. The trade mark can be | ruRNESS, WITHY & Co., Ltd % B.W.1. SCHOONER OWNERS
FOK REN RADIOS—One (i) 9 tube Murphy |sale by Public Competition at our office similarly banned and could not Dated this 23rd day of January, 1952 TRINIDAD > ASSOCIATION (INC.)
Radio almost new. 1 (7) tube HM.V Jame Rares on Friday 8th February.| address public meetings and it is , H. WILLIAMS, B.W.L . Consignee. Tele. No, #47.
a ox celle . Holder Bros. . mM, ateaheds F y ; S . . } 2 *
HOUSES seven st Dial oa 72 82 —toin Inspection on application to Miss Kell- feared in many quarters here Realstrar of Trade Marka | DaCOSEA £ Go. 548 Ft
oe Nhe ees | MN, Oe avone pi that Grenada might take action 7.2,52—3n awit
SEEM ict Marche Bint aN D. A. Bre FURNITURE WOOD & BOYCE, = jalong the lines of Trinidad, and pha Se eee -
Prospect, St. Jame 2 27.1.52.—10n, | St. Vincent. KE °
CHAIRS, Chairs, Chairs and other a The British Guiany Trade Union TA NOTICE ‘
wniture and all sorts of fittings for ANS SOUCI” situated at Kensington | ea nei : ; CAR-PLATE cone e
JANTE (urnitrcme. A. BARNES & Co., 14d.|New Road (near Fontabelle End) St,,council has protester to the , ; |
WA cep 18.1.52—t.£.n. | Michael standing on 6,030 square feet of | Secretary of Stote for the Colon- That S. C. JOHNSON & SON, INC., a corporation organized under the laws | “
— —— | a land ; fee awainet thie, mast. Femros | eying, State of Wisconsin. one of the United States of America, whose trade ot one nc.
so ~ . STEEL FURNITURE: Filing Cabinets, 4 nante ec doy : et 4 er? n ss address is 1525 owe Street, in the City of Racine, State of Wisconsin, |
MISCELLANEOUS Gan ; yi Sas desks "typists PR hg Beige Birla rnin \hensible” action by the Trinidad | USA t Tahiie oe aoe pplied for the registration of a trade mnie on art | :

Ne eee $ ae q - 8, ‘ ah s 2h ce ‘ p c " oO egister in respec’ f polish for metal and surfaces fs . 2 .

iE.-4 irs an > chairs. K, R. HUNTE : y | Government ond the Peonle Pp etn Feapect 85: Bo metal and other surfaces and will be |

pLOOEEEN OND —-Sultabie to be mounted a led a Te Gait or 8027 perder ae cuneee cae ene boomy in mon ial dcbaegia As es f a Saiitlod to register the sare, after one month from the 7th day of February NEW YORK SERVICE

ines z m chards & Son. Me] © © 4 * Fale, * +. | ¢ pe v cahbler nentoe 952 nless some person shall in the meantime giv re . |

. 6.2.52—2n, ae nv e give notice in duplicate t |
Gregor Street. 7.2.52—1n garage and eee tear tae in yard. ithe Trinidad Governmant Seor at my office of opposition of such registration, The trade coaere, on Mia’ ohert A STEAMER sails 25th January—arrives Barbados 5th February, 1952
Pe ne eer every day (except Sundays) | ot tnin far tha Calan on application at my office | A STEAMER sails 15th February—arrives Barbados 26th February, 1982.
WANTED TO RENT 9 between 1 & 5 p.m | o f win Dated this 25th day of January, 1952 ae aos $ 3

HOUSE: English family requires vn LIVESTOCK es ere hb ne : SEP gen | tt > Aum Right Commiisss H. WILLIAMS recs inctinatiieoccetimpait enna
furnished House from April Ist, 6 months sale at public auction on Friday @ 18th |, i 2 s F Regis ‘ “2 i ’ ve ae ¥ . apne cr Re eer
or iondite Gurist Church, Bt. Philip, February at 2 p.m. at the office of the|! the United Notions.—CP) hagiatcar of an ae f NEW ORLEANS SERVICE
s! cha 7 " ; 7 7 Pe , anna || undersigned } Ainsschesuinhitelindinndinitiibe” daislaaide i . A STEAMER sails 16th January—arrives Barbados 31st. January, 1952,
t. Michael preferred Write; Box LL. TWO RIDING HORSES Phone 2668 a ee ee ee winless hiP wa a > :

C/o Adyogate Advia. Dent. 7.2.52—4n CARRINGTON & SEALY } A STEAMER sails 30th January—arrives Barbados 14th February, 1952
abo it Soliettors, | 7 OFFICIAL NOTICE A STEAMER sails 18th February—aerrives Barbados 28th February, 1952.
a em — r Lucas Street Ce ee ee TTT

ANICAL ;.2.62--9
ren Tione (ve seeen eee | RES BE) sansanes CANADIAN SERYIUE
- 2-8 GUY—New passenger chassis recently) ‘“TRANQUILITY’—Standing of 14,110) ° IN THE COURT OF CHANCERY SOUTHBOUND
aacoumabe received, oh view at Barbados Agencies,|square feet of land at Strathclyde. n usterit : P
UEEN’S COLLEGE telephone 4908. 1.2,52—€n. | House contains three bedrooms upstairs 7 IN PURSUANCE of the Chancery Act, 1906, I do hereby give notice to all Name of Ship Sails Halifax Arrives Barbados
- mee ae aD nn and one bedroom and spacious rooms CO ne claiming any estate right or interest or any lien or incumbrance ing ,
A SINGER SEWING } HINES (RE- | downstairs ‘wo baths and toilets, m- | in or affecting the poperty hereinafter mentioned (the property of th , $ ¥ J) ""

Requided ‘tas Suinmer Term: if possible, | CONDITIONED).—Just like new. See | spection anyday by appointment. ‘Phone @ From Page 1 to bring before me an account of their claims with ieie witnbeses Reruns oa 8.8. WALCOA PIONEER enue both Fottunry sth
if not. “September, 1952, a Senior History} them on Display st our Show Rooms, | Mrs, L. Skinner 2657 The above will be | vouchers to be examined by me on any Tuesday or Friday between the hours of 12|s.s. “ALCOA PLANTER" February 12th February 22nd
Mistress to organise and teach the subject] Cash or on easy Payment ‘Terms The} set up for sale at Public Auction on; MOVements to prwrnote welfare in| neon and 3 o'clock in the afternoon at the Registration OMce, Public Buildings, | A STEAMER February 26th March 7th*
throughout-—the Schook including €!xt! rondard Agency (B'dos) Co., 14 Swan | Friday the “sty February at 2 p.m. ot! industry. Bridgetown before the 26th day of March, 1952, in order that such claims may A STEAMER March i4th March Mth
r (Aderrmeed Scholarship St ~ Din) 3620 6:2.92—On | the office of the undersigned | On Jan. 1923. after three years be reported on and ranked according to the nature and priority thereof respectively, A STEAMER March 23rd April 2nd

Scales TD CARPINGTON & ALY, lot close friendat Py : S| otherwise such persons will be precluded from the benefits of any decree and be |
Graduate £295 by £12. 108. to & MISCELLANEOUS | ¢ Lu 5 Street a 2" ye ae he became en- | deprived of all claims on or against the said property, ¥ | These vessels have Mmited passenger accommodation
£15 to £400 } a fm} gaged to Lady Elizabeth Bowes- ‘ 5
Graduatc Ist and ¢ lass } ' - ——-—---——--—- -- —--- vor . " snaktnr Plaintif; ERROL MALCOLM STEELE TH TD. AND GULF SERVICE.
came ty 235 ¢ CLOCKS--Old English and Frerich| |. The undersigned will be set up for sale | a? Oe are SaaS Defendant; HELEN EVELYN GREGLEY acting herein ene OM LTD. — NEW YORE G SERVI
. £4bu b yt is Th wood 1 der. WmD.| SY Public Competition at their office Nos. |) 0° S00 ne r . by GARFIELD DeVILTON HOLDER her ‘
£580 soda de oak ba ae a 151/152 Roebuck Street on Fridaw the 15th | They were married at Westminster constituted attorney on record in this Island. | APPLY:—DA COSTA & CO., LTD.—CANADIAN SERVICE
but to a highly qualified and ¢ 7.2.52—1n| instant at 2 p.m. All that certain two| Abbey on April 26, 1923. Three | PROPERTY: ‘ |

mint uper le post iad Phe ap ego ore 6.16 square | years later, the popular Duchess : a cane, on piece or parcel of land (formerly part of the lands of En-

off by S28 to £800 : ~ a eet of land situate at Bay. Street, and | },,. a . erprise Plantation) situate at Enterprise in the parish of Chris ° MITED

tion, ate hold a T acute ¢ coe Te $5.89. ‘eae adjoining the premises of Messrs, Man | Silene a Aine = ae Island containing by admeasurement 7 sere Tineluave oe a TSasan. ch i weak ROBERT THOM LI

Diploma will € an allowance of % oe r ‘ ning & Co., Limited. The building | é ‘xandra ary, @ | twenty feet wide which intersects the said parcel of land and runs from the Public EE

£45 per hs y a ; oll inquire Auto Tyre Co, Telephone Ot. a recently constructed one, and has a{‘fourth lady in the land.” Road in a northerly to southerly direction) Butting and bounding on lange of the PLANTATIONS BUILDING, LOWER BROAD STREET

Piensa, ot ceding 43m, agnor ez ct |, ON AUK. 21, 1980, a second | Si, Cantar y” B, Gichae or andr wiley oe enw et, & tieae||| Svan Gatnda Ailines, W.O.A.C. and
wi! be ge'nst approp < cners Jay’ Records pnd 78 FR ’ ’ area o i square Rae cate - . of the ni e ‘ r, On lands formerly o' e estate o! . C, Lucas a s

A term's 4 guaran r fi seeens ua we book orders too. A.| ‘ownstairs with the same upstairs, Elec- daughter, Princess Margaret ose but now of Miss Hazel M, Bynoe on the remainder of the said road twenty feet ‘Trans-Canads AGRO B.0.A.C. B.W.1.A.
years’ r none SARNES & Co., Ltd. tric light and power and three water | Was born in the haunted Glamis} wide, on lands of Mr. BE, C. Jackman, on lands of Mr. W. A. Yearwood, and on the ALCOA STEAMSHIP COMPANY

‘lak of ser . 18.1,82—t.f.n, | toilets are installéa in the building. The ;Castle, in Forfarshire, the first| Public Road, together with the messuage or dwellinghouse thereon and all other Telephone No. 4466

‘ eave 1 i ad es uti glass cases and ene and also a eee | Yoval baby born in Scotland for| buildings and erections thereon erected and built standing and being as

o 1 > vut t t as | the e J ¢ \".

Bs ( enninanis. under ene vars Gru one araeuaae. Saabs $SMee | graben bo desuces, ‘ns, beamiae von | ™ORW than Shree, centurtes Adu te anty, | Poorer eee CNT eNO CNS DNE NUN IND ONE IDN OTe nT INN

nde Tear Pension Ac o cont! | 4y'36 to $624. -A BARNES & CO., LTD. | stitute ‘an admirable business site and The King’s serious affliction was| pi ated :— 23rd October, 1951 ; Kee we : f ee °
but rval but the mi ; 24.-1.52-t.f.n | if necessary could easily be converted | a stammer, which he finally mast-| Dated 2#14 January, 1952. % A RICUL TURE FORKS .

tl ng period c 5 ‘ into a. Bond or Warehouse. Inspection} ered with the patient Duchess. 24.1.52—4n | 5 .

punter ee see OSV EN oor aaa ie aes ou e il gene the BIN aca toMr. R.A. After his marriage he took daily - - maar ae ele You had better buy now even if var do not wish

f& und E : oT rer 00 years par > pre es. Z :

init Ac Det peri dnd wm D wicnare & Son, | For further particulars and conditions of | Speech 7 ssons for two years, and any immediately.

* anit on i sally > ‘ 2 .

tppl ” he thr {eGregor Street, 7,2.52—1n | sale apply to R. S. NICHOLLS — CO., | practically learned how to speak Suppliers are now quoting two years delivery

pirmonia he names of tw {ov ees . | Telephone 3925 7 8n | again, pp sé 4 8 .

@ a Medical Cerufieate of fitness should ere ere en any er Radio, boxing, tennis d de ,E
: ; r Aug ely ta a : a 5 xing, tenn an e- MP Mi
Coffes ; se sete Me Mg nr AUCTION tective fiction came first amon CENTRAL E ORIU

i on I Sets, AORN OR, Cita ee ee aT 7 s : a

ee mat { By instructions of the Insurance Com- his hobbies. He also liked cinema Cnr. Broad & Tudor Streets

th Fobruary, 1962 { pany L will sell on SATURDAY $th and had his own camera with

T2seein 12 o'clock at PAYNES BAY Back of which he spent hours “stalking” LLL LLL LLC AED ; %
sneer 7 \ CLUB Parochial Treasurer St; James the fishing |his children. His tastes in litera- {9000490909000 09 0909 OOP OPOOOOO P
nv Le amaged . i

. . 2 ture were Catholic. He read the rs x 1g’ NJ
. " CASH R. Archer Me Kenzie M 4
er ISSCC OO COSI ITS (Members Only) . tl gm latest best-sellers and the heaviest é SELECT THESE CROP-TIME

; oe 1) By instructions received I will sel sociological tracts. His knowledge ¢

>

x INVESTMENT * OPPOR- % \ ix Messrs. Mc Ernearney & Co., Garage on | was wide and his family once 2 SUPPLIES

% TUNITY % Notice FRIDAY, 8th, at 2 p.m. VAUXHALL | calieg him the “Walking Encyclo-

2h : ga cee s } SEDAN CAR 12 H.P. 1947 model in a io” e a s ye 2

number 0} im ive ¥ king order—tvres fair, TERMS CASH, }| Pcdla. ‘

5% sre Shares in. A. X|{} Members are asked to note ARCHER MC KENZIE, Auctioneer i Intellectual $

% BAR? & CO, LTD. Telephone ¥ that the Dance previously 2 Mote. intatinwhinl ' th his s

& Scorsiury, Mr. Vicior Munte, 28°. 31} advertised for Saturday, 9h ff | ———————_____ — 5 Mote. Joatecad |. than. his STEA M

be-ldn. os * ar has been s, he § n 4

} + x retenesy, 4989, UNDER THE IVORY HAMMER ithe golf links and tennis courts ‘“

BEBO FOOLS OIOOE cancelled. Sta wat i i der, shot. and

VLE POET (| By Instructions received from the In- TC Was a gooa rider, ‘

Yrs POTD

HOT WATER ON

















PPE PE SEPP EPSP FPF PSD





herman. A devoted husband and
father, his great love was his

surance Co., ¥ will sell on Friday Feb
Sth at Messrs, Courtesy Garage White-



































s
Sia park: (1) 1947 Austin Car, 8 h.p. and ..jpitdy + a mire Oe
S TAPfor YOUR BATH >» | 3 OUR AGENTS are making £100 ¥] (1) 1941 V-B Ford, 85 h.p.'( Both dam-, |) ae ae 2 y % and more by taking eee aged th nctldents) Sale ot 2 pr [Noes ‘oF 1em no ma
> 1% Pers istmas G 9 . Pas busy
With eve of the lovely White Por- ¥ | ¥ ee ere eT eee: VINCENT GRIFFITH | He founded an annual summer
st * wan or story cane we ave x Eritain’s largest and foremost 6.2.52-—3n Auctioneer, }eamp for 400 boys from 17 to 18
minutes of lighting up. Econ. % Publishers will send a Beautiful Sect | lwo hundred came from public
omically priced and CHEAP to §|% Free Sample Book for 1952 to {schools including Eton, Harrow,
> tun with Natural Gas. A few are x % Genuine Agents Write today. | Rugby, and Winchester. The other
now available at your GAS Highest Commission paid. Jones, " 200 were working boys from in-
i ornay. x Williams & Co,, Dept. 9, Victoria SHE dustrial centres.
LODO OOOO IN I A 3 Works, Preston, England. yp |
t OOOO KNOWS ho 4
SLOPES OSO VOSS OSS OIO. i
LONG BAY NEW TE ALD. k . d
MENT CHURC ; > Hts % ~ In Touch With Barbados
er ipuErr Ws. Educational Notice )
7 rey * , , r Able and Wireless (W.L) Lid, advire
HARY ES | * x that they can now communicate with the
Sw ne . hog gliowing shins wh their Barbado
Ou February lth, 1952 » “PECHNICAL AND VOCA- ¥ Sasi
q ¥ TIONAL TRAINING” 4 3 ¢ Catherine M, Goulan
« . . ; > ty is. ». Hallanger Uso, 8.5 aiam,
| at 3 o'clock p.m. H * A Public Address by % o icolaolt Marin 1 8
, " . xX Major C. E. DARLINGTON, @ Mauretania tude
A Friends are J a : g Sti fetadn. 6
iends are invited * B.Sc., M.LE.I. * stan Ripe ALE Nelson, 6.8.
earn s Principal: Government Technical 4, . ‘i oe) ae ee ’ stn
No Vegetables. * Institute, British Guiana x ; New Haven. ‘ Ampa Ww Megearton. s
ALLAN BANNESTER y on So ee [Ares bee Italia, ss. Rosina Marron, s.s. Rangitane,
. , pea {%§ MONDAY, FEB, Lith, 1952 x Book aa bees Europa, ss. S. Monica, s.s. Gulf
x at 8.30 p.m X\ At Your Gas Showroom, Bay St : Coote! ™ ae Say 7 ar ees, © >
: er oe hac ae > Kaia Knudsen Alcoa Plone 5
PROVISO re Pr eer eerie | COMBERMERE SCHOOL ¥ ESS SSS SSSSSSSSSSSS, | press of Scotland, ss, K. Hadjipateras,
Viy HALL \ Yl Canadian C . &s. Fort Towns-
J » Ly pap ‘ 1, ss. Southern Counties 8
TO-DAY'S NEWS FLASH &)$ > joa permission of to 2] ff ROYAL BARBADOS fi) jo). Froutieton ss Fomor
oasew A \ ea aster and 1e +
BanOrot Y inSE CHEC- x Governing Body % YACHT CLUB
FERS, — | LAR GAMES . seION —_ Bans
ie TL Uta OAM ‘ ADMISSION FREE # ! ASSENGERS
ee eet OU EE ES oily s¢ Dept. of Education, x NO a ICE { P
Se Faget oS» ath Heb, 1062 3 } .
> > Passengers arriving here yesterday by
CHAMPEAS TWENTIETH CEN- we : % MM ne 8.8 7 a
Biny"” nonnny, reas 9 | “eeeenanneeencooneste* I Members are asked 0 note HH on saiktb ad
CUPS. BLUE BAND PLATES = that all entertainments for L. K. Carter and Wife, C. Bartlett
AND DISHES. | His Majesty’s ships “Dev- })}) eo wit ee
A KING'S STORY By H.R. H. § | onshire” and “Enard Bay” 2. Gehring and wife
the Duke of Windsor | FOR s§ Al E have been cancelled. ‘] Prom St. Vincent
sinvber oe ptoteay | 4 4 A. Grant and wife, D. Grant, E
. HARDWARE i T. BRUCE LEWIS, lolder
* EYREVILLE Secretary. i rom BRITISH GUIANA : |
; s W. Savies, E. H. Spinney! R. Pecker,
PESOS I. Kilkenny, §, A. E. Moshette, A
te SS N. Stuart. H A Liverpool, D
LOSSES SPOS OOF GE
EAGLE HALL ROAD i :
One substantially built two- ORIENTAL NOTICE
HOUSE storey house. It has sitting
room up and downstairs, SOT JVENIRS st
HASTINGS BARBADOS gallery, dining room (4) There will be a , Seneral
Under new management bedrooms, toilet and bath SILKS, OURIOS, ARTS meeting of the Barbados

Daily and longterm rates and garage reasonable

N
Inspection by





, quoted on request offer refused
Permanent guests appointment.
welcome.
Dinner and Cocktail D'ARCY A. SCOTT
ties rod
. Middle Stre 2
J. H, BUCKLAND, iddle Street Dial 2645
Proprietor. 6.2.52—-2n.
a a SSS



Hackney Car Owners’ Asso-

VENDEMOS, SEDAS,

ciation at the Progressive



LLLP

JOYERIAS Y ARTISTIOAS League’s Building on Thurs
CURIOSIDADES, TRAIDOS day night, 8th February
DE LA INDIA CHINA e commencing at 8 o'clock
EBIJIPTO when 2 Board of Manage-

ment will be elected.

THANI’S C. ST. HILL,
Pr. Wm. Hry. St., Dial 3466 } Acting Secretary

‘ ’ o¢ S56 665666OGOO9SSS5SSOS” ‘



PPPECE LLLP POSS

|



LASTIKON RESISTS

Cloudbursts, scorching sunshine, exposure to all the winds tha
blow—they make no difference to a roof painted with Lastikon

Lastikon is available in various colours—ask your dealer about it

‘LASTIEON

MADE BY
BERGER PAINTS





FOR SALE
“CARLDIEM”

a two storeyed dwellinghouse standing on 10,770 square feet
of land on the incomparable St, Lawrence Coast.

Excellent sea bathing. Dwellinghouse contains verandah
upstairs and do dining and sitting rooms, 4 bedrooms, pan-
try and kitchen. Electric light, gas and water installed. Garage
and servants rooms.

Purchaser to have option of buying furniture and effects
Inspection by appointment. Dial 8137. (Mrs. K. R. Hunte)

The above will be offered for sale at public competition on
Friday, the 8th February, 1952, at 2 p.m., at the office of the
undersigned from whom further particulars and conditions of
sale can be obtained.





|

PVP E PLLA LE

s COTTLE, CATFORD & CO.,
% Solicitors.
$ 24.1.52—15n



THE WEATHER

For galvanised, asbestos or shingled roofs Lastikon is ideal ; it
never fades, cracks or peels off. Economical and long-lasting









Industrial Plants
GALVANISE PIPES
and Fittings

HOES, CANE BILLS, etc., ete.



t RICKETT STR




EET (Opposite Post Office)

a ee ms
We for Every
Z Pur pore
sh - aa

Anti-Corrosive Gripon Red
Roofing Paint for metal.

er Minerva Red Roofing Paint
SOOSSSSSSSSSS a for shingles. 4

Figaro House Paint in colour.
Oblita Undercoating.
Marine Gloss White.

Also:
Paint Brushes, Turpentine

and all other Paint Materials.

e
Let Us Supply Your





|| PLANTATIONS LTD.

PACKINGS

all types for Factory and

AGRICULTURAL FORKS

ile ere
GENERAL AHA RDWAXRE ssvprties
Th lll aiiieiitiaaiae ee

PHONE 4918










|
|





THURSDAY, FEBRUARY 7, 1952

PAGE SEVEN



BARBADOS ADVOCATE























HEN

1c

A
TOAST TO

YOUR
HEALTH!!

ur WINCARNIS Whe

Se ASSIST YOU TO GUARD IT
BUY A BOTTLE TO-DAY.

s) f = %
\ Pe Me: ded SPS PT Gt)
be oe eccacadiieiee ssf hy





ONDIE BY CHIC YOUNG —

IT PAYS YOU TO DEAL HERE















SPECIAL offers to all Cash and Credit Customers for Thursday to Saturday only



a
SPECIAL OFFERS are now ®@vailable at our Hranches Tweedside,
Speightstown and Swan Street
3 j Usually Now Usually NOW
Tins Heinz Soup: Tins Corned Mutton 68 60

To o—Onion—G P. ‘ ob ep :
sete aura hngeaing 36 Tins Cooking Butter (1lb) 98 95













Pkgs. Bird's T. Jellies .20 AS
Bottles Heineken’s Beer .26 -21 Pkgs. Jacob Cream
: Raisins per lb. 3Oe. Crackers 49 38



A) [1M KIND OF F RIGHT, FLASH/ HH} 4 J
uP’N’ AT ‘EM, Guys! fy)) | ANXIOUS TO an SEE yOu } > Pat \ fh |

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THE COLONNADE GROCERIES.





4 Visitors!
“™ Residents! :

WHERE ARE YOU STAYING ? WHERE DO YOU LIVE ?
If you are staying at any of the hotels in the Hastings or
Worthing district, if you live anywhere in or around these
areas, we would like you to know that we have provided
for vour convenience A BOOK SHOP and STATIONERY
as modern and up-to-date as space would permit, But in
case you have difficulty in finding it we would like to explain
exactly where it is.

JOHNNY HAZARD BY FRANK ROBBINS

YOU'RE THE
ARTIST, DR. ANTON
/
















HMM, T WOULD GAY
THAT OUR WEE LALIRIE
WAG IN A WEE COMA /

AH-H/ 1 WAS RIGHT..
WITH A FEW, AH, MINOR
CHANGES... YOU WILL BE
ALIKE AG TWIN SISTERS! &






BRINGING UP FATHER

ee ee | ee IF YOU ARE STAYING at the Marine Hotel, the Ocean
View Hotel, the Hastings Hotel or the Windsor Hotel, then
you have probably discovered it already because it is in
Greystone Village, near to the above places.



BUT IF YOU ARE STAYING anywhere nearer to town
than the Ocean View Hotel then you will find our shop in
the first gap on the left, off the Hastings main road, with a
sign marked “Entrance to Marine Hotel”,






-¢

a fe P 4 bd at 4
; em >: VP | § he ] va I | y\ I\

90 Vr / 6 fe — j , nem ic. aaa \ IF YOU ARE STAYING anywhere further from town than
L ~ Ba B LY | Poe a 4 i g we , oF — a ioe Vi bh 4 the Ocean View Hotel, you will find our shop in the second

gap on the right with the sign “Entrance to Marine Hotel”.





as
KIRF AE BY ALEX RAYMOND | THIS GAP IS KNOWN AS “BALMORAL GAP” and a few

yards up you will find our shop along with others in a line
of booths opposite Grey Stone Flats. Think of the time you
will save not having to come to town.

THEY WERE BURNING OES... BUT WE MUST
OUR PLANE! THE HAWK / GO ON,..OUR ONLY
STILL MEANS TO CHANCE WITH A DOUBLE-
MURDER US! CROSSER |S TO TRIPLE-
CROSS HIM/



ADVOCATE

STATIONERY
BOOK SHOP

GREYSTONE VILLAGE, BALMORAL GAP, HASTINGS





caiptiinninncaininaia
' ,NO. 3



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TRUST) | EVER MET. SOMETHING STRANGE ~ 4),

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af a~







PAGE EIGHT BARBADOS ADVOCATE

THURSDAY, FEBRUARY 7,

7 Trunk Call Puts
34s. On Bill

FOR two hours last night I wrestled with an invisible op-

1952







SPORTSMAN’S DIARY QUOTES GRIMMETT:

Selector Bradman
Should Resign

McDONALD CAUGHT



WHAT’S ON TODAY

Court of Error: 10.00 a.m.
“ Court of Original Jurisdic-
tien: 10.00 a.m.
Police & Petty Debt Courts:
10.00 a.m.

ponent over the chessboard.

Meeting of the Vestry of

TO-DAY comes the backwash of the “fight for the
world’s cricket championship” — the greatest batsman of



his day attacked by possib

SIR DONALD BRADMAN and his

CLARRIE GRIMMETT.

Little Grimmett — nick-name<

“the Gnome” by C. B. Fry years
that the Australian
chairman is
replaced.

ago—thinks
selectors, whose
Bradman, should be
“They showed lack of imagination
and goi into a rut. A well-bal-
anced representative side could
do a lot to restore cricket pres-
tige.”

NOT ALONE

This after Australia had lost
the third Test match against
West Indies and won the fourth
only by the narrowest of mar-
gins. Bradman is not alone in
Grimmett’s bad books, Other
selectors are JACK RYDER (20
Tests against England) and
“CHAPPIE” DWYER.

Mesnwhile the Australian

States will have to meet a guar-
antee of up to £8,000 to cover the
losses of the tour.

For this blame
in part Australian DOUGLAS
RING, who clinched the rubber
by scoring, wity BILL JOHN-
STON, 38 for the last wicket in
the fourth Test. If they had
failed what fun and funds the

final Test would have supplied
HOW VERY TRUE

To-day the Johannesburg Siar
is advocating again cancellation
of the South African tour of
Australia for cricket and money
reasons. If this happens, it says,
“Australians will neo doubt ex-
press polite protest but will in
fact feel deeply relieved.”

How very true, how vers rue!

JiM TITMUS ILL

In hospital with throat trouble
is Mr. JIM TITMUS, president of
the London Amateur Boxing As-
sociation and former police
heavyweight champion.

I wish him a speedy recovery.
HOCKADAY RETIRES
AFTER 20 YEARS ii senior
soccer, 37-year-old LES HOCKA-
DAY, a pre-war English amateur
international, is retiring, but his
services to the game will not be
lost. He plans to take an FA
eoaching course and to make a

new career for himself

To-day he told me: “I am
definitely giving up this season. I
want to leave the field of my own
accord.”

Hockaday began senior football
with his local team, Bexleyheath
and Welling, in the Kent League.
He has since played for three
Athenian League clubs, Enfield,
Leyton and Sutton United, his
present club.

ONE AMBITION

A member of the first England
amateur team to win in Saptland
(Hampden Park in 1937-38) he
has won four caps. In 1939 he
played as an amateur for Arsenal
at left-half. With Leslie Comp-
ton behind and Denis Compion
in front they formed the Arsenal’s

left gank.

Hockaday leaves the game with
one ambition not fulfilled. He
wanted to play in every Conti-
mentel country. With Middle-
sex Wanderers ands FA XIs he

visited them all except Denmark.

PIANO, PIANO ?

SIGHT not to be missed in
boxing just now is that of BOBBY
GLEASON, American manager,
bobbing up and down at a West
End gymnasium ringside yelling:
“Piano, piano!”

Inside the ring, and trying his

best to follow manager Gleason’s
newly learned Spanish is 21-
year - old JUAN PADILLA,
feather-weight champion of
Mexico.

Padilla speaks not a
English, and Gleason

word of
has had to

start swotting Spanish from
sramophone records.
“The puv can’t even eat unless

T am around to order his meals,”
says Gleason.

PREFERS LONDON

After two fights in Paris in
one of which he put the great
Ray Famechon on the floor, Padilla
has chosen to train in London for
his next engagement in Brussels
—against JAN MACHTERLINCK,
feather-weight champion of Bel-
gium.

The idea, of course, is that
some talent-spotting matchmaker
might drop in when Juan is spar-
ring. He tells me—in Spanish!

—that any feather-weight can be

accommodated.
—L



Ss.



I mean
fellow-Adelaider,

ly the greatest bowler.

Nankeville

Seeks His
‘Revenge’

PETER WILSON

says one of the few who does
not tip Roger Bannister for
the Olympic 1,500 metres is
his British rival, Bill Nanke-
ville, who kept in training all
through the Christmas season
for that day in July when he
hopes to win a world title.

OLYMPIC year, Helsinki only
just over six months away—-and
Great Britain hoping te do better
than ever before in the world’s
greatest quadrennial sports meet-
ing

Among the brightest hopes, of
course, is Roger Bannister, the
ex-Oxford miler, runner of last
year’s two fastest miles (4 mins.







3.3 secs. ilad a; 5, : f I d
(Seem: Regulation Issue

“Jolly Roger” has so captured
the public imagination that almost
everyone you meet is talking about Y: mers are receiving leaf-

7 . A acht owners are receiving leat
the 1,500 metres, the Olympics jets with the new Royal Barbados
owe: race, as being “Bannister’s yacht Club racing instructions. A
senefit.”

* 2 ‘hanges have been made in
There is, however, one impor- 5 el saaittona
tant dissentient from, this point of The first rdle is on Classes.
view, and he is none other than Formerly there were only the
the man from whom Bannister, G D. and Intermediate
ae three A’s title—Bill Nan- Classes. The addition to this is
seville,

the Tornado Class in the R.B.Y.C.
series come under R.B.Y.C., regu-
lations. The Tornadoes have an
Association of their own which
cater to their Sunday races.
There is no change to Rule 2
which states that at the finish of
amrace the first part of ayacht

Nankeville believes that he lost
the mile at the White City through
watching the wrong man—John
Parlett, with whom he has trained
so much that his style is an open
book to the European 800 metres
champion,

aa eee, Oe ee at ae over the line counts even if the
time: “Towards the tape Nanke- bowprit be that part.

Rule three, which states that a
maximum of five minutes from
seratch yacht per round for alt
classes will be allowed in handi-
capping, is also unchanged.

Rule four is that the time limit
for a race will be two hours and
thirty minutes from the start of
the first yacht to the finish of
the first yacht in “B” Class.
Should no “B” Class yacht finish

ville made up a lot of ground,
and at the finish seemed to have
more running left in him than
Bannister had, But that was his
fault.” Bill finished perhaps three-
quarters of a second behind Ban-
nister. =
For the rest of the season
Nankeville entered every athletics
meet where there was the remot-
est possibility of his getting his
“revenge” on Roger, But—-no dice,

They haven't clashed since last ‘
July. y, R. B. Yi, c. Third
Regatta Postponed
An Omen ? egatta Postp
, ‘ On account of the death of
Heightening the intense per-

His Majesty King George
VL, the Third Regatta of
the Royal Barbados Yacht
Club which would have
been held in Carlisle Bay on
Saturday has been post-
poned, This Regatta will
now take place on Saturday,
February 16 at 2.30 p.

sonal rivalry between the two is
the fact that all the publicity has
gone to the forther Oxford blue
while the ex-market gardener,
who is now a sports salesman, has
been relegated to the role of “just
another runner,”

In many ways this recalls the
1936 Olympic Games, in Berlin,
when there was the same sort of
rivalry between Sydney Wooder-
son and the late great Jack Love-
lock

—

in this time the race will be de-
clared off and must be resailed.

Flag N will be flown from the
On that o¢casion Wooderson Committee Box and two guns
had an injured ankle, and was fired,

eliminated in a heat, and a link
with those days is provided by
77-year-old coach Bill Thomas,
who trained Lovelock and is now

An addition has been made to
Rule 5 which formerly stated that
B Class boats will sail three
rounds and other classes will sail

looking after Nankeville, Could two rounds.

that be an omen? To this rule is added that the
Thomas, incidentally, hopes to Tornado Class will sail three

2 =e Tt me a number rounds on the shorter course,

of a es have formed a com- ;

mittee which hopes to raise the Twelve Races

The sixth rule formerly stated
that twelve races would be held
for the series and ten races to
qualify. All yachts to qualify
must start in the last three races
except exempted by the Com-
mittee,

Only the first part of this rule
now stands. That is; Twelve races

£100 necessary to
warrior to Finland

send the old

In the meantime Nankeville has
been, training all through the
Christmas season for that one
day in July when he hopes to
a) win an Olympic title and (b)
veat Bannister, And I’m not sure

n which order he would put those Will be held for the series.

ambitions! A slight change was made to
CRACKER-JACK idea, .., An Rule seven but no change at al

clectrie starter which’ -fres a rules eight and nine, The next

vule outlines the conditions for
carrying the Racing Flag and to
this is
Their racing flag will
inches by five inches,

The other rules are
except for
it quite clear that the starting
line is between the starting Flay
and the Committee Box on the
Aquatic Club pier.

The flags are the same: The 10
minute flag be “B” (Red Swallow
Tail); the 5 minute Flag the Blue
Peter and the Race Off Flag N
(Chequered Flag),

cracker behind each runner may
!ecome standard equipment for
ihe New South Wales A.A, Device
enables starterto stand away from
tield.

Athletics in Australia should go
1ocketing after this!

be eight

the same

—L.E.S.



Tennis Postponed

Due to the death of King
George VI, the Lawn Tennis Fix-
tures at the Belleville Tennis Club
were postponed yesterday after-
noon. They will now take place with many Yacht Clubs all ove
this afternoon instead.





Registered U6 Potent OMe

They'll Do It Every Time By jimmy Hatlo |

Tr WAS ONLY A BIT PART-BUT .« |
_ HORACE.,WHO HASNT WORKED SINCE
ABIES IRISH ROSE’ WAS GLAD 1 GET rm



IS VERY SMALL BUT



So RIGHT AFTER HE SIGNED THE
UNEREAKABLE CONTRACTâ„¢NEED WE
GO FURTHER? You KNOW THE REST!

OKAY OKAY s+

IT'S BETTER THAN GIMME ‘THAT

NOTHIN’: WE PAY
THE MINIMUM»
SIGN HERE }

we Wey,
ee i



added the Tornado Class.|

12 which now makes;|

_ Backache, Kidneys Strained!

The R.B.Y.C. has fallen in line}

the world which have ceased ‘oj;

(By Our Yachting Correspondent)

award the cups on the percentage
basis. This year the Cups will be
awarded on the points system.

According to this new points
system, the winter in the B gets
15 points, in the C ten points and
in the Intermediate, D and
Tornado Classes twelve points
each, Therefore if only five boats
race in the B Class, the last boat
gets ten points, Formerly on the
percentage system, this boat would
only have got one point and the
‘irst boat five points.

Ten Best

At the end of the season the
helmsman will select his ten
best races. He can discard in two
races in which he gave the worst
performances. However, if he is
disqualified in a race, he cannag
discard that race because “you
must be punished for a breach of
the laws.” The disqualification (or
if they are more than one) counts
among the ten best,

A few yacht owners have told
me that something should be done
so as to allow the small boats to
start before the large ones, They
feel that the handicap times could
be fixed about half an hour
earlier so that it would not be
necessary for a “B” boat to start
along with two or three of the
“Dp” Class,

This will mean that the start-
ers, who at present spend about
forty minutes out by the starting
flag will have to remain an addi«
tional thirty minutes. Poor start-
ers !

iwever I do not think this
could be done since, according to
Rule four; “The time limit for
a race will be two hours and 30
minutes from the start of the first
yaeht to the finish of the first
yacht in the “B” Class,

It must be remembered that the
“B” boats sail three rounds, Jf,
for instance, a “D” boat was
allowed to start half an hour
before the first “B”’ boat, surely
many races, which have so often
been completed in light wind,
would have to be declared off and
Lesailed,

The whole idea is to get the
“B” boats off as quickly as pos-
sible. In manoeuvering at the
start, the small boats should give
the big boats room, On some
ceeasions the big boats are the
offenders,

Tae whole idea is not to get the
big boats and small boats jibing
the beagle at the same time. If in
the second or third rounds they
jib the beagle together that is not
the fault of the handicappers.

However, this is only one of the
many attacks made on the handi-
jceppers. Some are made during
| the season, but the majority at
ithe end.

|

}
|

~ Rheumatism

If you're feeling out o’sorts, Get

Up Nights, or suffer from Dizziness,

' Nervousness, Backache, Leg Pains,

i Swollen Ankles, Rheumatism, Burn-

ing Passages, Excess Acidity, om

i Loss of Energy and feel old bef

| your time, Kidney Trouble ts ft
| true cause,

Wrong foods and drinks, worry,

colds or overwork may create an

strain on your kidneys so that they
function poorly and need help ta
properly purify your blood ard main-
tain. health and energy.



doctors have discovered by



ent
practt that a quiek and sure way
to help the kidneys clenn on? o¥-

—

We can supply

| Crittall Steel Windows

various widths and heights with or without Ventilators

| (rittall French Doors

3 ft. 9 ins. x 7 ft, 9 ins. high

|| Crittall Steel Sliding Folding Doors

The Whole Door Slides and Folds te one side
6ft. 2ins. wide x 7ft. 2ins. high

INQUIRIES ARE INYITED.

YOUR










| excess of acids and place a ries

¢ clinical tests and in actual) cle mists and the money bac

!

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| Help Kidneys Doctor's Way:
lan

Phone 4267.

WILKINSON & HAYNES C0., LTD.

McDONALD (52) caught Worrell off Gomez during the Fifth Test at Sydney ericket ground on 25,1. 52.

New Yachting



* ‘TEST MATCH
COMMENTARY

With the assistance of
Messrs Cable and Wireless
Limited, the Barbados Re-
diffusion will make an effort
to give a commentary on
the first Test match between
New Zealand and the. West
Indies tomorrow night at
9.00. p.m.

This service is not orig-
‘mally beamed to the West
Indies.

M.C.C. 224—5
In Final Test

MADRAS, Feb. 6.

A solid undefeated 71 by Jack
Robertson and 66 by Dick Spoon-
er helped the MCC score 224 for
5 wickets on the first day of the
fifth and final Test against India
here,

The MCC made a_ bad star‘
Josing Frank Lowson for only 3
runs but Spooner and Tom Grave-
ney put on 68 for the setond
wicket, This was followed by a
third wicket stand of 60 by
Spooner and Robertson.

The pitch gave no help to the
bowlers but the batsmen found it
difficult to score at a_ fast rate
against an accurate spin attack.
Even so the score might have been
better, for the ball came off the
pitch very slowly and some of the



wickets should not have been
lost.
SCOREBOARD
England — Ist Innings .
Towson b Phadkar ‘ 1
Spooner c Phadkar b Hazare 66

Graveney stpd. Sen, b Mankad 39

Rabertson not out 7
Watkins c Gopenath b Mankad 9
Poole b Mankad 15
Carr not out 12
Exivas 3 i

Tota) (for 5 wickets) 224
—UP,



King’s Death Stops
Stock Exchange

LONDON, Feb. 6.
Trading on the London Stock
Exchange was brought to a stand-
still to-day by the news of the
death of King George VI. The
Council of the Stock Exchange
held a special meeting and de-

cided to close markets at 8.00 a.m. }

Prior to the news trading was
quiet and most sections had shown
no definite trend. Domestic issues
were maintained at overnight
levels, but there was some activ-
ity in foreign bonds, with German
and Japanese loans higher on
moderate support. To-morrow’s
markets are expected to be quiet
and subdued.

Ankles Pi

—U.P.



cess polaons and acids is with «
aclentifically prepared preseription
called Cystex. Hundreds and hun-
dreds of tors’ records prove th’:

No Benefit—No

The very dose of Cyste c
Tright to Seok Neha yor Kianes

remove exc

acids. this
makes

ut feel like new again. And
80 eer are the makers that
Cystex Satisfy you completely
they Sak Yau No try St w ra y
bach, guarantee. You the e.

' mot emtirely satisfied rn return
Ue empty , P
ni¢ Ry - Pacha oF -
Cystex ¢ tthe at
guar

so buy your

is-tex) costs

amtee protects you,
‘went teday

from Stock :a=

fireside; at Tyburn Road, Birmingham, Mr.

I sat near a sotnehane by my
. FIELDEN,
a worker in the plastics industry, did likewise.

St. Michael: 2.00 p.m.
Netball match between

Between us an impartial Post-
master-General kept a trunk line
clear from seven to nine p.m.

We were playing telephone
chess, a new service offered by the
Post Office “when traffic permits,”
at specially reduced rates.

After an initial exchange of
leasantries (during which Mr.
ielden, a member of a_ chess

team, established a clear psycho-
logical ascendancy), the TC sys-
tem was put to its first severe test.
How to deeide the toss for first
move? ‘ .
Solved With Grace

The problem was solved with
grace by Mr. Fielden. He admitted,
unflinchingly, my guess that the
white piece was clutched in his
left hand.

Agreement on sundry scratch-
img noises as a signal between
moves to recall each player to
the phone was the only other pre~
liminary to this trial by telephone.
From then on only occasional

unts of “Queen to Queen’s
Bishop Four” or “Rook to King
Six” troubled the trunkline.

Unrewarding

The cost of the call, from the
time Mr. Fielden lifted the re-
eiver to checkmate was £1. 14s.
x the normal evening rates, it
would have been £3.

As to the game of chess by
telephone—it is curiously unre-
warding to a player who, like me,
founds his clessmanship on an
elaborate repextoire of intimidat-
i facial expressions.
me right, Mr. Fieldea, I am
saving it for the end. You won!

(Cheltenham Flyer ?

CHELTENHAM Rugby Club are

hoping that speedy BRIAN

To Our Friends
From Overseas

KINGSLEY
RESIDENTIAL

CLUB

AT BATHSHEBA

Welcomes you and offers y

LOBSTER
LUNCHEONS

which include our
popular

MERINGUE PIES
in Coconut,



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DIAL 95266

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_ YOU |
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“LADIES BELAS OF | BORDERED PRINTS

BOOBBYER, Oxford Univ

Queen’s College and Ur-
and England three-quarter,

suline Convent at the

play for them, He begins teaching Ursuline Convent: 4.00

at n Close School, Cheltenham, p.m.

=o Mobile Cinems Show at
Mile Ambition Pasture, Christ

Kingsland .
Church: 7.30 p.m.
_ DEFENDING her Kent women’s
individual cross-country title over
a 3% miles Orpington course on
Saturday will be 19-year-old fair-
ae HAZEL NEEDHAM, of
itham.

Training has not been easy for





WEATHER REPORT

Miss Needham, who is at Worces- YESTERDAY
ter Training College studying to Rainfall from Codrington:
become a teacher. Often she has 03 im. 4
done her training runs alone at ‘Total Rainfall for Month to
night on the r near the Col- date: .05 in.
lege, but she has also accom- | Highest Temperature:
panied local men runners on cross- 83.5°F.
country traini spins. Lowest s

Her big ambition is to become 710.5°F.

the first woman in the world to
run a mile in five minutes. Her
best time is 5 min. 23.4 sec., which
she recorded at the White City
last summer, when winning the
British women’s mile .champion-
ship.
Tied For First Place

JULIO MORENO, Chilean
swimmer claims to have broken
a world record by floating on
water with his hands and feet tied
jor two hours 45 minutes, Previous
record was two hours 15 minutes.

—LE.S.

Wind Velocity: 12 miles per
hour

Barometer (9 a.m.) 30.028,
(3 p.m.) 29.936
TODAY
Sunrise: 6.12 a.m.
Sunset: 6.00 p.m.
Moon: First Quarter, Feb. 2
Lighting: 6.30 p.m.
High Tide: 3.32 am. 1.16

p.m.
‘Low Tide: 7.56 am., 8.50
p.m.



Glassware

from Czechoslovakia

Champagne Glasses, Ea....7lc. & $1.26
Sherry, Each 44c. & 80c.
Port, Each —_—44c. & 80c.
Cocktail, Each 49c. & 92c.
Liqueur, Each__..___§_§__36c. & 66c.
Tumblers, 80z., Each___36c. & 57e.
Tumblers, 5az., Each______38c. & 52c.
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PAGE FIGHT >/•'./, %  />>,• i \ SMAM1 QVOTU t.KIV'li I I Selector Bradman Should Resign TO-DAY comes the baclcwaoh of the "fight ior the World'* .Ticket championship" the ,Ti\iN-st batsman of his day attacked bv possibly the K r "test bowler. I mean S1K IMJNAM) ItKAIi.MAN and his fellow-Adelalder, I I. iltlilr. c;KI.I.MKTT nick-named InuaaO" bv C B Fr\ years %  go—thinks that the A m • aVadman. should be %  %  %  anrcd representative !..... do a lot fa* MIT Al-ONE This after Australia had lost the third Ten match again*! W< only l.y IDC narrowest of marnlone In Grimmett's bad be-" %  re JACK KYIHTR (20 Tests i.,l) and -tHAi'i-n mrm • h.Australian states will have to m Bt a antre of up to E8.000 b kfii of the tour. For this blame IMH .l \s gl\. mil ICHIN. shiest hopes, of STOM. 38 for the last wick.i. Roger Bannister, the the fourth TOO*. If they had ex Oxford mls-r, ronner f l.iM failed what fun nnd funds the year's two fastest miles (4 ntfu*. final Tool would hum I MCB. at Philadelphia; 4 mini. 7.8 sees. In the A A A. thawpaenADVOCATE THURSDAY FEBRUARY 7, IW2 MIHI> \l II i \l 1.1| | Pfcmi c l illf i Seeks His 'Revenge' 1*1 1 r K WII-SON says one of the few who does not tip ICIIIM i Bannister for the Olvmpir metre* is bio Itritish rhrsit Hill Nanke\illr. who kepi in lruining all ll.rouuh the Christum*, seusen fur that day in July when he %  i" to win a world tille. OLYMPIC >ear. IfeUuiki only %  Ix months nv QroOl Urit.tan hopim. la do bsttcr in tno teoracn baft quadrennial sports meetMi-DOKALO (SB) caught WorroJI off Ueracs dtuini the Fifth Ts-t at Sydney cricket fjouna on 38 1 HOW VI IE, Tltfl .Inhimiekburi SU Is advoi-atuui Oajtin < of ttaa Bouth Afrkan toui of Austral in for erirket aj reasons. If this happ I hips at the Whit. Cat) I lloger" has so raptured lb* ptthatc imaginiiUon that almost i %  iking about the 1.500 metres, the Olympics !.. %  -. r* a. %  l"U,i: ll.M.m-tcr I BamenL" -rets po' %  %  JIM TUMI'S M I ""•" '*• howover. one im^r\\^ u ,„, thla pattn of and he Is none other than tho IT. an from when took the three A's title Mill Naniu'ville. Nankevillr believes thut he lost "7, "' the mile at the White City throuuh ',.,,„;,. i. the wrong man—Jehn '[ I Mrtl with whom lie has txalMd *"*" l -' 11 it rhampton. Q much ha h „ s|jrlr ,„ hn ,,,„ „ to tba %  uropOU 800 metres • hamplon. He certainly I ->e..r-old UM IIIKRA,ace for. as I reported at the ., PAT, .. Kngllah amateur time: "Towards the tape NankcW* .P*.j^ jg 1, 'I i retiring, but hiMile made up a lot of ground. BU / o<4 ,. (.nit, nWX! iioipiiii' with nmxii trouble i Hr. JIM III Ml B, New Yachting Regulation Issued (By Our Yai-litini. ( orre-ooi'denl) Yacht owners are rocoi "il the euus on the percentaaja lets with IhO new Royal Barbados bans) LhO Cups will he yaeht O %  • A .awarded .in the points %  ii AawoffOlRI 10 iln> new points system, the winter in the It gets isl rfllo in on ClaSM 18 Psslnta, In the C ten points and .nlv UtO in the IniiTmemate. D and B.i C. . and Intermediate Tornado Classes twelve pottlll Oai kUtson to this i each. Ttsorarforo I! only five boats the Tornado Class in the ItUY.C. race In the II Cla> the last boat nerle* come under Klivc, roajuteta ten polnta. Formerly on the lations. The Tornadoes have an |H>rceiitage system, ihis boat would lusawlatkiii of Ihali own arhleji only have hot one inunt and the ater to their Sunday races. nst boat live points. There is no change to llule ? J rn Best TEST MATCH COMMENTARY With the aaatstance or M..-v.s Cable and WlrHeas Limited, the Barbados B>dlfTusion will make an effort to rive a commentary on Ibe first Test match between New Zealand and the West Indies tomorrow nlaht at 9.00 i"i Thh> aarvlce la net mn Inally beamed to the West Indies. Trunk Call Puts 34s. On Bill FOR two hours last night I wrestled with an invisible opponent over the chessboard. 1 sat near a telephone by my fireside, at Tyburn Road. Birmingham. Mr. J. KIKLDKN, a worker in the plastics industry, did likewise Between us an impartial POMItOOHHYER. Orford UntverwUy H.epl a trunk line and England three-quarter, iHU %  *rven to nine p.m. play tor them. He brffint Icachinu We *erc playing telephone at Dean Cloar School. CTielfcnham. ehess, jnrvi tervtee offered by the toon. Post Office "when traffic permits" at specially reduced rate* Mile Ambition After an initial exchanse of „___., _, „ pleasantries (during which Mr. DEFENDING her Kent women's Fielden. a member of a chess Individual cross-country title over team, established a clear payrhoa 3H miles Orpington course on logical ascendancy), the TC ays* Saturday will be lS-year-old fairtern was put to its first severe test, haired HAZEL NCEDHAM. of How to decide the ton for first Eltharn. move 1 Training has not been easy for snlwl VYitk Grace Mln Needham. who is at Worcestrace b>Mt rielden. He admllMd. J !" ?"JJf !"&* %  t '"' V h 't unniru-Kin.lv m, |uit> lh.1 Uie *f, hr tralnln. rum alone ? I rlulchcd In n.s !" "t • U^K-i near the College, bul ah* has also eccomsundtv icratchpanied local men runners on crosssunal between country lrainin.pina. lach player to H W* ambilioo la to become . uu ihe i-ilv other ore,hc flrat woman In the world to K^S3 B!Js%Asi?B grunU of Queen to **" Ilishop Four" or "Rook to King Sis" troubled the trunkline Unrewarding The coat of the call, from the time Mr rielden lifted the receiver to checkmate was £1. 14s. At the normal evening rates, it would have been £3. As to the game of chess by telephone— it in curiously unrewarding to a playeT who, like me. founds his ch*vsmanship on an elaborate repertoire of Intlmidat||| ml facial expressions All right. Mr Fieldca. I am saving it for the end You won' Cheltenham Flyer ? CHELTENHAM Ri.cbu Club ar. hopitf ll-at speedu BRIAN WHATS ON TODAY (can oi Error, le.a* a-sa. Caort of Otslnal Jurladtette*j: 10.SO a.aa. FoUee A Petty Uefct c..unlatO am. MUsaalaar ac the Vestry of St Michael: 3.00 p m Ni iii-it aaateh ketwren Qaean's Celtese aod I'ritBdtDe ( -invent at Use L'raullne Convent L00 Mobilr Cinema. Show si KUUrsland Paatare, I lirirt Chun ti ?.SO i> m lUiujly. white piece was left bond Agreement on ing noises as i imwes to recall she recorded at the White Citylast summer, whan winning the r.iit; ri women's mile championTied For First Place JULIO MORXNO. Chilean claim* to have broken a world record by floatinu on uuiiT with his hands and feet lied for !uo hours 45 mlnules. Previous record tea* Itro hours IS mlnules. WEATHER REPORT YESTERDAY Kainfall from t-adrlaston: •Sat.. Tatal Rainfall for Month to state: .M la. Hlghaat TaawaeratMre: IWF. Lowest TeniJBermture: MJ*aT. Wind Velocity: 12 mUea per hour Barometer • a.m.) :10.:K. IS pin i zssse TODAY Sunrlae: C.U asm. Sunset: •.(ID p-m. Mooo: First Quarter, Feb. 2 Llthllng: 0.30 p.m. High Tide: AM am. Ill BUSS, Lew Tide: 7.50 a.m.. 0.50 M.C.C. 224—5 In Final Test HOCK MI.W KKTIKKS Arrrit 2" VE<\US II> %  %  — %  nrace the tlrat part ll-judcd oycr hc „ M ,.„„„,, which stales lhat at the iliiish ol At the end of the aeaaon the MADRAS Fcb 6 yacht helmamn will attecl his tea A aolld undefeated 71 by Jack If the beat races He run disurd in two Kobertson and 66 by Dick Spoon.— .^.. '*? '" w Uc,, ."!• *""' ,h ? wor f nelped the MCC score 234 for llule thr-•. whi.-h \ : % %  However, If he ia 5 wickets on the first da, of the •ervico to Ihe (Una will not laand at the nnish seemed To have ">"""" "' f" %  *" ,""7! '"J"" "'f? ,n "^U 1 "%** """ '•* ""' Test analnst India for only 3 Si>ooner and Tom Graverey put on 118 for the second wicket. Thla was followed by :. third wicket stand of 60 by Spooner and Robertson. [09] thai UN handicap times could !" vl ^ h "" no ht ''P lo he .1 u?„ __ u b owlers bul the bal-men found it OOOO hl ng course and to make a Bannister had. Or for himself told mo 1 definitely f.vini; up !h warn lo leave the field of mj t Hmust r^punUhed for . i%H!^t ^L LI |o€ln < Prar ( l*m*m I e than one) counts luni bul d T oecord.' 1 'i foo'bsll with hi< local h and Welling, In the Kent V B hi 1 Leyton and his 1 lllll AMR \\lltClln\ lenlng the bMOSsN I"'" A memlM'r of the Ural Bnglend Uio foci thai all the publicity ha: imnteur |i im lo win \ '" '" thl r,,,rt r Oxford blm 1 rk In 1M7-S8. ' uU "" ox-market gardener hl 1 i n |930 he who la now-a sports salesmim. ha' plavcl .is .in %  It left-half. With La ton behind ami Drills CompElD In front they formed the Arsenal's left Honk. Hockadsy loavoa tho .tame with one .untiltlon not fulfilled. He fc o ntod la ploy in on penl I country. With Middlesex W %  1 PA XI* h lasses will be allowed In h m lapping. Is also unchanged. the l.iw" Th> thirty minutes from Ihe start of A feu ..dn ownon have told the first yacht to the finish or me lhat somelhMig should be done Ihe Hist yacht in "B" Class. *o as U> allow the small boats to Should no -Ii" Class yacht finish -dart bett.re the large ones. They For ihe rest of the season Nankeville entered every athletic. meet whenthere was too remotest possibility of his getting his %  II Roger. But—no dice. Tins li.ivcn't clashed atoM |l An Omen raaOaWtad to the role of "Juat iiother -unner." In many ways this recalls the !W3 -Hympic fianu-s, in Berlin, when there was the same sort nf ivalry DOtWOOD Syeen held in Carlisle Bay on Saturday has been polponed. Thu KegatU will now lake place m Sauarda>. Fehruar) 1 Oi al !. p,m Infixed alMml half an hour earisST so that it would not las' necessary for n "B" boat to start a ainst along with t' \y CLsso, vislletl them PIANO, SKJI1T not ti boxing just now t.l l WON. Am bobbing up ami End >• %  r. %  1 1 lano!" %  entnark PIANO ? tii.it down .c 1 im .hie missed Of !. %  1 IT.. %  'i 1 yelltnc difficult to score at a fast rate te spin attack. three of the EvPn * *"* cor might have been better, for the ball came off the Thla will mean that the startP tw V X slowly and ome of the tea, who nt present spend about ' lc kets nhould net have been lint* minutes out by the starting J^"' flag will have to remain an addiai-ossavnasn tional thirty mlnules Poor starsrMu.r-i" "MI... Cr %  >• %  >.. b Ptiarthur 1 R Moor I do not think this Jftf*" 1 £r"'n.. b u if'\ ^ 2 coul i be done since, accordlns; to -'.X-lii. Si ,!3 ,, "'" Rule four; "The time limit for wsttdes c Oop n> ih >. M...I" l-o.it was 1 1 %  allowed to start half an houi __ # ( tinfirst II' ho.it. Mirety K i |*ir a llftrtll Stnikd which have so ollon IY "*& B *" OTI1 ^OpB boon completed In light wind Wif— rt | f — -i' % %  would have lo be declnred o and -.•lOX'K ^Xi'IiaiklXt' %  I.M ^ niO whOlo idea is to gel that __^ LONDON, Feb. 6 II" boats oft as quickly as pos,.Jf Bdln on ,ne London Stock I ble in manoeuverlng at the ^ x 1 t 1 h n l' w brought to a standIhO unall boats should give '.to-day by the news of the xth rule formerly .stated the big boals room. On some •asions Ihe big boat* gnj the Tola! 1 1 aaaanm time the race will I BOD and thO lOtO tied .lack Lovedared oft* and musl be :• leek Flag N will he flown from Ihe On that occasion Wooderson Committee Box and two |UQ1 bod On lnjiiro.1 ankle, anil WM llnd Olhnlnotod In 0 heat, and a link An addition has been made lo with those days Is provided b> R u l c 3 which formerly stated thol '.' "" ''"' '" ( '' 77-vear-o.d C.-.C1J Bill Thomas.,, C la. boats will' toll .hr.. KLf Staltuai^1 ^ vno uTOJned lovelock and o* now ruunds and other classes will sail looking altar Nankeville Could W|( rounds. that be an omen? To this rule Is added that UtO Thomas, incidentally, hopes la Tornado Class will sail thrCvWc ,, 00 at ihe raOMO) and a number rounds on the shorter course of athletes have formed a comTauiaauia u—.... Jen hopes to raise tne T inside Ihe ring, and trying his ^ !" T*s^J2 """ ''"' "' *•! tWOiVo rSC* iraold bo he best lo follow in in Bar C.leason'a warrif '" "ninno lltr lh) ..,. ni> illl() lcn racC6 ,, newly %  '1 121|„ the meantime Nankeville hot u "" fy A W chl I" V I I \ v rtlHIJ.A. 1 ,, ,, haming all through the muM s, rt '" ,hr '"*' -hf00 rOOOi big boofg and small boats Jibing 1 '" or ^ thc feilhei-welght champion of Christmas •easor |of that abO ****** exempted by the Com-he beagle at the same lime. If In Ql1 Mexico. .:, Juh when hs] hopes to '""tee. 1 th:nt rounds thoy %  peak., nol n trord Of ( i urln on Oljmpk R&O and (in Only the first part of this nitO |lb Ihe leagle together that is not has had to ,H>ot Bannister And I'm not sure *>o* stands That Is; Twelve met IhO fotlll <>t the handicapped To Our Friend* From Overseas nPMwn III;SIIM;MI\I (Mil AT BATHRBRBA Welcoasea ran sad aassrs r LOBSTER LUNCHEONS which include our popular MERINGUE PIES in Coconut, Lemon or Orange DIAL 15*00 11.1.53—4n. Glassware from Czechoslovakia Champagne Glasses, Ea.. Sharry, Each Each Port, Cocktail, Each. Liqueur, Each. 71c. & $1.26 _44c. & 80c. _44c. 8c 80c. _49c. & 92c. Tumblers, Saz., EachTumblers, 5cu., Each Plain & Decorated 36c. & 66c. _36c. & 57c. _33c.8c52c. CAVE SHEPHERD & CO., ITD. 10-13 Broad Stre**t Crepe Back SATIN @ $1.7 — Now (a $1,511 %  ords. says 01* <\ imles* I mcsls.*" PREFERS LONDON nlch order ho would nut UMOO WI b '' n, u f,,t ,hc erle ' rnbltlono! „ A li M change was made to ( KACKEH-JACK Idea. ... An Ru ,•*•? ''"' "" 'hame at Oil barter which fires a * rules eisht and nine The next taiker l-ehind each ruaner may J,,lr standard equipment ecome standard equipment foi Bouth Wales A.A. Device tnables startei to stand away from Athletics in Australia should gu %  -ketini; after this! —L.E.S After two unlit111 PaTh. n one of which he put the great Ray Famrehon on thl Boot*. Padilla 1 11 lo train in London for hiin (I 1 ragemeni in Urussei1 \N .1 \. lllltUMK •srelghl champion of Belgium. The Idea, of course, u that •onto la OOkOI l>ue lo ihe death -. mmht drop in when Juan i> 1 vi. the Lawn Tannat fitl' p ter and the Race Off Flag N ami turw ot the BOIIOVUSB Tonnlg Club (Chequered Flai). — Il1.1t an} feather-WOIght can be were postponed yesterday afterThe R.B.Y.C. has fallen In line noon. They will now t.ikc psOflO with many Yacht Clubs all over %  ill ;i %  -nernoon instead. the world which have .e.,^,1 r~ Tt nnis Posl|rom k d Kinn rrytiig the Racanj Flag and h> this Is added the Tornado Cla*t Their racing flait will be atgltl Bve inches. The other rules arc the sum" except fo. 12 which now moke* It quite clear that the starting uae Is between the starting Flu.: and the Committee Ilox on the Auuatie Club pier The flags are the same: The M minute flag be "H" (Red Swallow T-.il). the S minute Mrithe Blue death of Kime George VI The Council of the Slock Exchange field a special meeting ano de... K ei the r "W ' ckM markets at 8.00 a.m. Prior to the news trading was quiet and most section* had she no definite trend Domestic Isi wi re maintained at uvernight level*, but there was some activity in foreign bonds, with German onoofthO ami Japanese loan* higher on itUaaka made on the handlmoderate support To-morrow's 1. ppers. Some anmade during markets are expected to be quiet die season, but the majority at and subdued the end. —it.p. Rheumatism. Ankles Puffy Backache, Kidneys Strained! Flawrrrd SPUN 9Kc. & SI.12 — Now • MH A SI." Ishtt .r •alf.rrmm liii.inraa.1 -... I... I Pslas.!,r. A..ki. 1:1,. 1, .1 .... Ilur.-I' ... \. I.III. aaa irf Kasray .nd taal old ' ill-1 C SlIIOZE 73c. — N ow (a *0c. Pink SHARKSKIN (o. 1A — Now la tl .44 TAFFETTA 11 tl.44 — Now Ii tl.18 Ladies' GABARDINE (ffi tlJ4 — Now tl.2H LADIES' KELTS OF ALL KINDS Q 12c.—24c. i 30c. each "c.l woI. : rirtB,, I drlnka. 1 lhcy'11 Do It Every Time IT VUS CS-> A SIT iwrr-BUT CS..WM3 HASHT WORk-ra SlriCE ABtS IRtSH fSE" WAS OL/'iD O 6ET iTIS VE& SMAL&SLT ITS BETT3? -WAU By jimmy Hatlo SO RIGHT AFTER HE Sl£.r4ED THE UNeREAICABLE CONTRACT-NEED VJE GO FURTWER? you KNOW THE REST! '4ve I GOT >O0 ,V SOMETHING ( THE .iAO r. -HE V0SICA-AV"_cTT aj ^SOONr A SRAS=> pen •EEX-. No lanajftf—No oy Th. TTI BTM .1. n. or emu a" •" i. w.a* k. l| H i.a ....r hi.n.. •i"> —id* gwkaii.. tau %  .' %  >tia kal HI., iiaw afain. A .ruM .. ia. BaXani ii. -. -asiaa wdl aatufv >ai cuaii.Ui i\ ,.,! ..... m i„ )T n u „d.. r lmiM ,. > .nraaiM V.^ W lUa aau' l"t MKUr. l-f..d MM ...,.,. Help Kidov. OKtor't Wey [ :,TaV ,rtM J ri ** ..'-. ilbM.i.al carts -. v..,iiiiawai i^ ll'. ran -.ii II /ii H Iromt Slmrk:m I riliall Steel Windows and hrlllMa v.llh (riliall French Doors J ft. I loa. < 1 It. la., bilk (riliall Steel Sliding folding Doors The Whole Hi.ur Slides and Folds to on* sj| 0ft. ?.B. wide s Hi Slna. Ugh VOli: INQUIRIES ARE INVITED Phanr !!•: & HAVNES CO. SAHELY & CO.. (B-do.) WE AGAIN OFFER YOU siiifi'itr. HEDUt TIOXS ON THE FOLLOWING LINES. .V. m. SPECIAL I" "/DAY (Id S SArirtDAY 91* BORDERED PRINTS at 84c. per Yd. OW Rose LINEN fill 11.74 — Now (B -ID" Flowered SILK <&> Sl.KCI & S|.Ill Now (3 tl.S0 & tl.00 GEORGETTE II ILM — New @ Mc SILK @ (Lit — Now @ SI."" Flowered SATIN (§i 88c. — Now @ 78c. LADIES' SHOES OF ALL KINDS Those al M.S1 — Now (ffi t4.M Thoae at 17.84 — Now @ tt.72 Those at 18.32 — Now @ $7.50 Etc.. Etc.. Etc. ECONOMIZE ! SO DONT FORGET ! SHOP AT GEORGE SAHELY & CO., 19 Swan Street. (B'dos) Ltd. VALUES AND EFFICIENT SERVICE YOUR REQUIREMENTS FOR THE FOLLOWING USEFUL ITEMS Sun vigors < anti danle | Cigarette Llshters it II vlta) Reverse I.imp-. Rear view Mirrors— can/tmrhs Cttaw aala Lrathers %  hast <-Uths Ueeiiee Plate Jewels Hoed Omameato Traable Lanaa. Feeler Gauges lKHiii.ui Testers Bstter j Hydrometers Mr Si Hater Uosss Pallahea Wases /,O^V^/'.V r AV-'/.V/,V-'... UeaUet Files Cle. Ft* Fender Tape and a larre sapalr Off • • e I ltimlM'lli>hi-r. lirnni. SLFDGE HAMHFR.S :ih ;* ptated and lila canaolete with ;J aaaOaasBa, Steerlni-wheel Cavers .^1




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TllfRSnW. FrMHVRY T I9.12 BARBADOS ADVOCATE PAGE TIISFT PIONEER INDUSTRIES BILL PASSED BOYRIL Bill Will Get B'dos Little Further, Says Mapp > scandalous %  o the Gas and F.lntiu CotnpMl* ie*. but il era*) ni'i for him |*> mggest how UM th.ll. Hiftn..| point wm '" %  DURING THE DIS • th. B.ll to ..mend .ho g Pioneer Industries (Encouraemeni Act. 1951. which was could be taught to n pawed by the House of Assembly On Tuesday. Mr. K G. hM Mapp r verv little farther on Uw road lo wit iiTLST '" 'The* sooner th*Wnt Indie, net 1Hfm.llv divw attention lo H •'"**'"V* c ] '*"!'" together and plan Industrhilissth.sweated conditions under ['^ Ar ) md \ ,du t' wh tion on t i Regional Basis." he Hid. which th.woriun war* employu,,nk n ,'" ,S ; "the mucker they would gel IM fees r • %  "' lomewlu-f uw sweated '" OOlW* I oi fuel Mr. E. D. Mottlrv (F.i w..s of conditions In England in IndusPnertc RIO the d|" lea .1 century ago. The>should American oil and no one w argument almut InduftrtaUaation kers while thejr a*rald of setting up n on a Regional Basis was all ugh: an n Living the Inducement* to there OB th.it score for those who wanted to qualify capital. They would nnd th.: as West Indian statesmen, (ml the while .noterting the nsdu >e linlis. im ni first interest should l-e the llveliwhile Kming cheaper products There had to be inducement for Capitalist tr* rial wit not available in i. uadoa. >t could be got Doaali Bar. Refund of (UMom, IHities Mr. A. t. S. IU (Li peamttd out that tinBill bafttr* the llou-i was one dealing with the refund "f Custom* Unties and Exemption from Income Tax ol industries which were already Barbados between Jul August ll COMMONWEALTH AND OTHER TRIBUTES WASHING President Trumai \ tended deepest > >t up in British Ben IMS and British poop!. 1 MM thi* n QuaHa Sam -ri*L the other %  pmjg she nml fa the wanted to bUme the Lsfaoi.t ^ father the put foi N-m* IJ'I |||on that she had recovered. aa Pioneer Industries were conwill -.tutertafcing a i> renal sj mourning was not yet out otttf-ial functions in %  .. 1 pita] were cancelWd. With L-p regret Nehru cuni-.ed the news of the I ejth to Parliament. He r nil hare known. Ills MaiesU been *inwell. but recently he en thinking oi rtiey gives your meals the goodness of real BEEF canted. The A. t fYuman [.rate his health further. The and Tnnidd which had tncout.vaid m %  public itatement. fttwi therefore ...mes % %  • sur.igrd industries in thosr places. Truman also rant prlvan matI <> and shock." had not saved them one brass far. nan* Nehru suggested that the Speak thing in taxation such as Income Q nvej lo the Wueen a sense of %  in thai >; % % % %  **n sorrow and that Parlla.djourncd at ownt do not sit tomorrow in VIC-A here *rom the United Kingdom or |J5 pjn out I 'hi* happrning. Members oi the United States oi America, had Ki I .irl lament slond in -1 to p;i> more in Income T;.x thagt Denweratte whip. \ me House adjourned until Fitili.\ it thry had paid in Barbados ot Tennesaee offered a irsolution -nornlm.—U.P. alone, hence honouraht. ^ Iff the ii Good cooki know the value of loerfl, I rich flsvi'iir BMBB1 the vimplot mcjltaity and appcti.uig. IU beefy goodnest make* more nutnuous. Bovril is the goodnoi of reef. aaasasBBn ts food 1 ^j aafA 1 from well did nut pnncipli Inaii %  beneftl, hood of the people of Barbados. from coming into Barbados, as Mr. K <>. Mapp Mid that the sonior member for St. Philip and that Bill nave no inducement could er, the Bill was simply an attempt had uigod. the workers would not for a man with a snowball carl thought that t. n to extend the provisions of the be ;he very good" llt-fore on* set up an indn trv kept back anything principal Bill lo 'hos* person* which they were producing ,.„,. had b) I"' aUM DM COuU | roUna nMBlhSH said that they had n Who through no fault of UN CTa wtOHl rOH and duee thg urUcJg .1 ,1 price that a large labour market which was (( >1 uU _„. „ (lt ,„. %  own. r.r Of the House, would no' raid that he had spoken Of barjrouM pay The fact that he wa* perfectly true, but the> did ii"i ]; t p benefit from that Bill. They would ring cheaper goods such as goods -, lU1 t,.,| u\ fi„< xcrnntlonj foi >•'* %  large consumers' market V Ihe Bill because they (ram Japan, things being equal, 5 VC , ., ,u: %  **'"> %  • '* %  l nyrng thai the. OTTAWA, I -I the there being no difference in price impo > lancc p „ must not plan on a regional basis The 1 met w a %  i.f ewHiiaginn pioneer ladqUfU s-nulll seareali think ul 1 w "* "ending Rtint henMIIIJIH Mapp said tlu.tth.ngs be• %  ** ^T.'* Vf he cssauS ,loln h '-'^",d "" rhon ihe BUI would tagequal, fhen w.mkl Is? i>na2 W !" "•"**' „„. ,,, i] 1 lam ill 1 ntvenl goods from ^i_^ lri "" n lhl) ,,.,.. ,....,,, H Om W e r a as id Umr inarkeu v\ Be srotdd. how.-.. maricet ta cnaapat or • \ ** n Hr huprd lhat gnml aU eruion CKI. v """ "' Japun> ,h# had to Wl .a,, b^ .aid 1 '" "' K """'"-""' Sh h awhelry.over. %  d H, No I. I up 32? £ fSSto iffleatteldcd IS ihK...g of si...,, and Ism in acne of U fiaugOMl and %  plain without plannmg (Or gStfT aJSTatUnS* tobSl5 l 1-m.t. !" of th 1 monarcha The the Other Side weWomlna. it, I '*,.. (ollowini ^(i wm ff!^ M |^,irY!SSt f 11 K Bill. M.-ntion wag made t.. %  %  And v • .,, nc he pr^nt Omcrnrnent foi what r^aion of Queen Eliwbcth to the t, C s with Britain .....l %  I.ONDON. Feb. gnceo Kluabeth join, t^ueen [ f Holland as the only two women to occup\ major' >ii..lie*. Us* >lwindling list heads belong t.i mm hSara at* King lia.ikoo t f Norway. King Gustnv Adolf Sweden, King Frederik King Badoum of Bel%  slum, and King Qeorgi to Rico, but apart from the fact that that country was very neai the USA and there was a caplti.l HIM --tment of millions of U.S. dollars; Uurl oouhtn %  roi ala %  • the dollar arN and eiii"yed the Of the dollar miiikct. The 100 Oiilimi.lii Mr t |i. M.tll.* (B) sj that <"l""ty w He '.11,1 that the passing of the throne was nnnouiicct I 1 %  Hut iber tar st Th • think ti %  %  ild say." he said llarbados Act could not affect the ,j,„, ( 1, Id help all of us if in anv ..f ... iheM.KbtMi rt .,1,. DO! opUmlalie We ale Nmnd lo U d< 11.. world today UnUad dustrinlid*: would naturally ,, vest IUOI.' qutckda In Ptl Bk .d taken a long or Jamaica srbart bauxlt* anwh) '" l lmIfford mon oppommlij (01 ":: i 1 ""' ,:| iotlori which capital Irom that side of the U It iliey wnuld leiall. .torfact that the I past discussion, it was sugbigger countries affonta rtUBll] riMUtd b< indinei 1 lialf mil| lion populanoo and Jamaica's milr lion and a hnlf were biggt 1 I tlnuc fumt.onmc for he rtfOl two ()f c nv do(n DU5ineM ~-r . n her* with Us-arhMd orSce in II In IBM. he said, disc,.".-., had ,.„ ||( KJSJHB That bn> "fflL^Tt: i> land, could orJ, 'PUI.K '/ £***} from th.*,,-w.n. f m mi i -I P i\ > I would ha hokad b) th> Press because they could not 1. million. disagreed with the to Indi. %  id *\pressed by the Junk 1 idy been established lo allow ( s: (ieorgc %  Hdl -. ignorant of what was tak,, ing place. Aiueiidnienl od the I H in London may poln epteseni 1 Ih* funeral .itc("i Ih* K Mt t H narrow Hi he did not intend to UMTp the .,. ..,(.. |:i ... ,. ., fiini-liuns of any membci of the , „, ... h N h AUsnJli Executive Committee present. Treatt organ 1 itlon rrweUnn in This was an amendmeni to BM 1 | Bill which was passed last year and there vrara OQ|> two real Th. Senioi Membei t0| Uk* provisions in the amendment i. ., kets for the aulc of goods BarIn the previous discus 1 nan) Ufa**r*tlong Th ,lr,t w """ ;,n > nianuIndia rents bados was a small area in eo 1 l( t been raised about the i n clearing up Uwli faeturer or industrialist who had daj rt to th* parison. He wotlM ih point OUl Hat Factory, the Waal MfU and guidance That memextended his plant or factory, 01 1 t. King that Ineal ca pUa l tat W*r* at pn KnlttUU MUL the shirt Ficti bet had < onstrueled or repaired a particupsJuna on Ih) buUdu S other buslrwfaea whfc buj and thai was %  factory, such might ta deemed poraUon Of Un* island and com, ln ^^ ,, r by the C..iverno.-in-Exeeuti%. position lo Mi HO "lotniltee to be a pioneer UMUaConwifttofl UW fondly. any manufacture. ,,. fl^i who set up an industry alter HMD lo attend Uw funeral. Um:.., in, inn. 1 II ring t>I iv* o"t y*t bean COHMMlioL hid Ihe Kin t I U'hrved that Wueen Jiilifeti.i the Kings ,4 Itelaium and ayers for the King and the Graoct might also be present. It 1. ronsidcred doubtful I 1 sflolra Mb Lea* \ itnuh wrpuld ..tt.iui BOVRI PUTS 8BEF INTO YOU Every spoonful g'ves yo more ** went Ii"..l r Mondcrcd at the length Ol wa '" Cor1 land and complainmi: lhat th. > could not get an efficient -uppiy of currenl tot their needs Could U* ""V ,' ,v ' 1 foreign bufunc I without a proper whether it was because of the supply of oven aloctrk ptrwirl ew Candy Factory which he 1 The funeral pnibahly will h* %  eld 111 III.vseek • %  Vi l-lu.M, 17 Many Brttona worried on WrsiQu*ar. Mary, H4. %  ii oat POloVOd membri •i the Royal Family. The rry ol Oh" WHS wrung from the lips or he Indomitable old lad. when Informed Ol her sons %  ealh — another in the mam ,h %  li inaiked her loni: %  l iunder the care i i r. —V.P. Ivsr^ spoont^i o. m,,.,.. ,„„ ,o u t rKR u^pi of %  itamint A and D Thaw vKtatuH ant aasasVl wodr aioragai ISBurkM ii'Sltl* nil fr -adorn from Mrn. woman, clud-^n l( ihoul I SMH ai fc iBgnsty 'Kaahr n-ear KEPLER rlthln knowh made by van1047 and if th. and before this Act had into operation. bados, would they be anxious to They had argued in and Bom* herer* 1 rat as* of seawm thot that liill SerimiMiess Welcomed I He said that lie welcomed the "As to the Senior Member for seriousness with which Uk BOU who pUl Strom on |hlg debated the mafter. There had BOffMnal approach, that been In the i I '""'v good arguniem *j O andising about that matter of members of the Ho uatrial ...fv for mm %  n and read for example before the recognition rho were .."vernment qua i llying thcm( ,, by raUlni to attract fP"l"J* m through such a Bill had failed to sh ih Ciovrrn.nent. by not industn-l.sts there who U Ou-llle-' i. it necessarily well i by people with Un A Bill of thai sort would gM Of nBt I followed M th' Barbados verv little farther on the UMtol which road to Industriahsatlon. cample o| the sooner the West Indie-, got I %  ether and planned mdustrlnllsnalder Jamaica. tion t.n n regional basis, the oi'' %  not think th t er thev would gel Those individual effoMwo„M .),,. ,. lM .,„.„ '^ ,, sU „„) [ prove futile It waBO ue indulgfll( h lrci ji nlion should havi Ing In such puny effonhooed Ihe House *.w what the ^ setting up of Industries wtllv-nilly American Cnpital %  neome tax had been granted P*£f*[ ,nd l u l r >', ,. hados would have enH* hopes! that that couraged industries which evenMiaiiv went t" Janu %  -. r.n i. %  i.i B %  ihai Ua a* such industry St J Ih* Ha) t H | toj i I b*4 i ... honour.,We members If they „,,,„,, lhitl ln ,, dealt with pioneer industries as ,,,, Kn.tn.u: -hole, the ndvantage of being Mlllt r „ ,,,. ,!„,„,,„ hil xh teing d cU !* rt •. f 1 """' fdufnrj by honourable ihe Eaw our. hail t iv a n ted i in\est in the colonies of income ,x. WOT* the people | ._ %  hmdenni; uidustrlollsatlon in the On such a big question Wsation from which the nt—n, OH prohh aploymant *""' ,""">•„, "Si '"/ .. enuU he faeklad h, would n i*i would lie paid for that perii.it Mr Barrow then tori detad th* purpose n( thg original \>\ honOUrabt* members. i-e in Jamaica and Trinidad. M, 0 T Allder ill said i l imai* .i md Ti inldad hail duneied tin major I huh might have a si ih.s. he haroly thought %  %  ..I %  % %  i"i .il planninv w i %  h) them at thi He saui that the Leader of the lovgrnranal as wellas %  Um aa Ucal k idi i in Jamaica [Vuudad we*memliers <* the i < '-"I unfa I'o at which II ..tion of the West indies was disc-usseil Trinidad and • lo KM In ordej .., sranl abend nnd got a Knltti % %  : Mil. In f*tlumbar of new Industries while 100 lIVER OIL WITH MALI (XIBACT a kuaao UCHS WIUCOMI a PkODUC T J3 ;v//,vrtww>v/AV/#yv^v.v.'.v,v.-/. -----. bet that m mMi. the Hob* !" *.~ f*y*l a HIN reducing 'in general %  ial Eeonon 1 night si" as 1. ifarxaUon And nrtce nobody wanti %  Ihent, Haas had I on industnalisatii.i If they adopted a defenlist attiit they cc capital from Canada %  i never get anywhcn Unless the cnies'ion "( industn%  ind (MOd Office on the up to, the Laboii; Q n nli -rested fd UstJ were for the I were, would not '•• from facing the unemployment prot*1W4 lem. been He I od that the coi llnwwhich was proposed to take pi in PLJgreat Important) n Hail ., i. 'I id lhat repn :hould Inn id. lo th) I i|iusii,ii of doing : <,t ,1, ting in iheir free. Tic Hat Fait.ii' to import then m th* i".-.\ aranted tth %  While it was with the Knitting Mills was dm th. (act thai tin Knitting Mill li.il bados wa waiting until i:ional set-up was brought aliout frith the result th.t UM r had M %  111 Sniiie ve.us ,igo when a big texllon, ill* magnate came t" this island i.f dollar., to tor Ihe pun. %  > %  ( ei.. Una; a tonStud! UM hnt i,ie factory, his pTo|iosab were urned down and now the GovernlOlland %  • uppfoo A..allowed runen ihrtj an roun %  Iv %  nd ma troubli. should %  He suggested that they should avoid buying salt Bgh in hiHk and "hould ran Hying Hh He %  %  thai i bu ha set up lo moke bags for |h> ti| U KM II d the raw p mate.. %  ding the v. ta In starting an industrial development scheme as hi thought it was time to stop talking and art Irrelevant Mr. M. E. Cox (L) replying gall 1 ( lhat BOnounbte members would Ih* %  peach* Tiade wen quh* linlmni The American Cnpilal • object of the Hill, he pointed out nlor Member for St Ihilip uuij. ^^ M ill'lMM; KFMIKI; TAPB ikii.niiili SHEETS COHK SHEETS KI.F.Xllil.K HADIATOH HOSE %  .I'NS oil, CANS HEAil VIEW MUtltOUS HATIKHV CABLES a HATTKHY HYI>lt()METERS UA'ITKiiv CHABOBB BULBS HKill PKESSUHE AMI HOSE '' Km rvn MIS AM) VCUANIZINt; KITS BUI I H IN VALVE QB1NDEBS ENtHNR VALVK-S -All Models UECAHIKiNIZlNC GASKETS BETS \.l M GEM'.HAHUi ARMATURES All M LODaC SPARK I'l i i VAIAK CKINIilNC COMPOUND CASK! i (ioo f i Sealing Joints • HOLTS Atjl'A-TH"i" foi water piooflng Ignition W itriii-.iMi COMPOUND SIMON I/. KI.EENEH AND WAX HOI.TS WUNIIAK WAX CHAMOIS AND POLISHINQ < mills I U KN8B DIGITS ANU IM.ATES ALL TYPES MB IIAN1CS' TOOIS MIA. TOO, OUl IW tOR }OIK RIVUREwsrrs, writ SUMMLI UAVM IV ECKSTEIN Dial 4269 linos. Bay Street British „ ...Arid produer some proper planning for Industrialisation It was not a conference 10 l>e 'aken lightly for some policy in that matter could be worked out at it. They had had definite cases ol V in Jews who had nude money, he said. |h point that they snould WHITE HORSE Scotch Whisky The purptv-e of signs U to tell without words. Here is a symbol that tell., plainer than any words, of whisky at its fined . lovinglv blended, long matured, until it is as noble a Scotch as ever came out of Scotland. AHM-THO : Sntull fJawsffveysMesj it„„l. I of Harhutlitx and Ihv II '•*' I—I if* I Inhi,ul. vriTfi Srhnml ilnlil \lmiilil im II IV ll AhVOIATE STATIONERY S^^IAIW •A<.--^*,*^'V^ %  v^^^*-^^^V'-vv'-^'**,^^^*---^^^*.r.c^^^^^'-*.'-'--. Shirts for Men 8i Boys Elite Print SPORTS SHIRTS l.im.; Sleeves Re|{. Mi.mi S5.25 Khaki Shids LtMHj Sleeves ami s pec in II | priretl Only $3.65 Short Sleeves Ml \s SPORT SHIRTS a wondoerlul buy r, S2.95 THE Boy's Print tith SI'OHTS SIIIKTS Shorl bm beb $2.25 Floral Prints .i \. ulr i lioire shnrl Sl.-rvi-s lor Mr i.li.ur • nd pri.l $2.45 American Sanlorized I ml. r.li.irK . mbovr — $|.20 >. II |Mt %  MBJ SlIIIV U Our HUM H'.s. Ulll St>liifd C M Tail rrd mil Ui.Hv Md.Clolhrs. PHONE 4785 LONDON SHOP U w Hnmd Si .11 prrmiscs lorimrk orriipiril k) BATA SIIOF. STORK clra? .'/ rr*-ri'fr#/ your hiiiltlint/s? GALVANIZED IIOOII\4. And IIOI I KOOI IM. ;II-\ailalil


PAGE 1

PACK TWO n MM Anns Anvor\Tr. THURSDAY. IT 111: I '* %  f Qahib QaUinq An Elephant Trits ftcttpt In \HilAir H OM urn \u %  %  i i \ %  i attrnd the funanl •[ Vie late Kir./ Q .1 iiej.ru KIHK. Mr. L n* Billarbadt • arrived hetv mi Janu.tiv 2nd Other passengers leaving by il MM plane fnr Montreal wgg-s U iry Olnan. M ,< Mr. Alexander < nd Mi** G*fn Measher S,i?.C. ORGANIST IN AUSTRALIA o rYaaa HII:N \kl> Mil h-lll i THE flvp elephants and Wick/. .Italian bom wti for both his broadre n>mg from Bangnuilban-BalL muateal aYdvlatY and casts and I O.AC frei|ih. consultant lO Lb | !' %  r-r. arrived at Kararhi UU ant to A Hi flayed at ling, and i several other mu exhaii 4w "" ' "* uasiins Coauni N We were due to i the Peru* Cancelled WING lo the death of Majesty the King, the Co il l\.riv which area to be I i board H.M.S. D %  lied. IIMS i %  .re 1* due I %  i Three Exhibitions R OBERT J M..-1.KOI) *h %  enslve skeu-htnit low .11 bald hla annual exhibit re. rut .ni p HI aw si. i.iu-i:i djurlni I nth In the Plrlure Gallerv I Barb., [tie aahlton opci.i .>n Satui'l.. %  rlUi 11 pnn'.< 'rember* and A i tomorrow. Mr. MarU-od is a paint.-, of IB. %  arape and sea-srape PI is well known In tail Island ano %  -I for its colourful and accurate port my al ei I shine of the Tn Opening on the same day lithe MacLeod Exhilut--. exhibition nf OlU and W.itvi v Oosdo White and one of drawings by H Resident Superviior TVf" CAMLHtM RAMCHARAN |( • tr~ nA Hoi Dip ',..v, i,.k<'ii ..ci.ni" ii.. Ed. (London) newly appouiUd Supervisor of the R.x-dai Jcllleoe' %  in Barbados arrived lo lis here on Tueaday bj B.WJ A • duties, u Tnn.dnd..,,, Salvation ArmvComnvmdcr I) | but we put o •ogither and iv flight across India was for one day. • It.< of U %  ICPl .irr's was to open the ith h< i trunk As QMS arachu'e* foa h phants. one man had to spend almost the entire trip standing by the hutch i*tup her i Uige number >f %  -Ball, jn o gai l repute sent '•'•>' impn>ed b> bis Inter-, moat of his musical life in Lonpreta on.of the (lassies rM -ceded the late Si r WatrompoanJon, were aLsu k" '' %  lei as organist ol : % %  ka that Church in 1923 M %  Hi . trunks and blowing n In as you go by. ben they flnalV should be no end "t %  fter aM tht i i Fifteen Days ML Pen erf Mi II. Singh Qflnei'al Man tea i of the KO<-II theatn in tin %  dies. Mr. Ramcharnn %  eial roMdcnre 1( f the Roodals in Harbadov Accoiiipanvmg Mr Itamchiinin was Mr. Maurice lanes — "MM ls MB. -MJB a.as. si as %  %  I ttri-URli I U .-.i-vft" ind Tnnldad R lies. H.' i | ; haul Pout daj ; Returnir.f Shortly A i special A "e'"> O'Neal of the Clll %  : B W i \ WhUfl here he lug at "Mayville Guest "it. Lawrence. This wa B Mr. <> pa Is mi of hi itnong tliein | COUsJn. Mr Fred O'Neal. PrOba* Miss lblN>rson went over to .' inalci for t.ilks with Mi Chuui. To hj'> mans rrsanda md Mia .w,., w,,,,, ; A.K,... to ge %  ,.. ,.. ES -.. ..; ifiStaS, ScreUry uf Suic for llir coles who i* in;ikiric .. loui ol Ihl W,l In.lioMr Chinn will M viMlinn Barbail, ..,!.,1 II,. 1 ,-( T.C.4. Auditor i ope i bj B.W.I.A Visit, lie is expe--l. : next TlM Social Welfare Talks R ETURNING from Jamaica via Trinidad by B.W.I.A. on Tuesday was Mis." rw>ra Ibbet on Si>citil Wi ran i to tin. Comptroller for Develop Wei fa Why the Doors Are Unhanoy —They're Always Being Opened. Shut By MAX I iti'Li. "TOU have no idea." Christophn Crkket was saying to Roarf and Hariid. tha shadows, "how nnhapi>\ Pront-Uoor and Back.Door ara." "Who?" said Hanld. who wasn't nmie sura that she had understood wnat tTiristophor Cricket was saying. *rront.Door and Bacs-Door %  Knarf ssid: ~l ncvar heard of s rronl-O^ar or a Back-Door or any other Kin.i of a door being unhappy W 1,1,1 ra they unhappy about T" Lala at Night "They'ra unhappy." Christopher %  aid. "about being doors—)uit being daart, Uf course, none of iha folks *ho live tn this house knows that they're unhappy But If they listened late at nirht, they'd hear FrontDoor and back-Boor creaking and cracking and complaining.'* Knarf and Hanld both asked why "Well. I said it was because they were doors, and that's the reason why. Now lust imagine that you Knarf. and you Hanld were doors The first thing you'd complain about would be that all day long people were opening and shutting you You'J *i,i they'd fust let vou alone But no hard'v ara yon opened sihrr you're .hoi again, and hardly arc you *hni again when you're opened -And M wouldn't only be )ust IT ing I'li-ned and shut, and shut %  nd opened. Ihnl would bother you %, muhan,.otncr thing."Chrtstophei went on "ft'lm ol her thing VaskrdKnart "When people opeaad ju." an sweied thn mphsT, "thaj IOBM NI or ih.y go QUI Bui te i bad Mail there Vouean l geoiM .1 soa can i come in That I Wl t SO bad foi wuh you could go I,I -r, I? the house walk up the Maps—all down for a glass of tea do a million gad-awl things that iveryaac else ' the house rai do. 0 go out-ids in tn* %  i.ishu.c take a •troll down tin %  down In'.he grass Jo all meeting with good uicew x Winnipeg who had m a five day vuut left yi b mu PC A -, .. a Hoii-I. Ifllhirg Point i | \n iv Ing I B Mi Anthony Ma*..i, fri ea da— Mi nd I Conr ad. OrvilbMlH With One Little Finger 1 Cling To Life (By CHAPMAN PINCIIKK) i.M'K OH TV.'ICK „ >,..„ I „.. lk ,. „,, ,„ ch n h ,,, inM> completely pualjrtrd thai I cannui <-vi n m .1, n 1 eyell Becuin "I Ihli itrang* quirk, %  fanoui brain ipcciali.' Iv mt the chance ol lulfllllng the icleritut'i ml 1 la make me m w dl 1 I %  lue. I have turned down the offer efta • minute 1 tatton let vianu mo to lat inyaaU lapta Into "alaen |k ;'" v ~ ,s %  " > • Of the ncrvius system in which sudden paralysis of the muscles is followed by dc lllU'iUIJCKIUSIlCSs ^ M nconaciou 1 argue, that as I am a irainril ; ".hoTild-maV; an-idNl ~' Cd b "" %  always recovers control —-ndous efloet of wil. "guinea pig" tor an experiment which would tell the doct %  DOUt this rare condition Bui—having My sDectallM Hand that if 1 and a-million things that oTeryone etaa does. Oh no!" Knarf and Hanld both sighed. I hey had never readied before how mnerable they would be if they were unlucky enough to be doors. I he Worst Thing "Htit I havrn't told you the worst %  ill I'fins doors. It's this. All dnv and all night and all ueek and all utonth, and for years %  nd years, you stand with half of vou Inside tat hOMM, ann andcoiy, nd tha other half outside, gelling rained on. blown 00 by the wind. %  e ata a a d i.y the sun. frosen by the %  now. scratched by the cat, lumped oti by the dog. rapped on (or even kickedl bjr people who won't bother lo ring the doorbell Ye-, that's the 1 of all. You certainly ara Kind, w hen at) is said and done, that you're not the Front-Door and tha Hack IWt but Just Knarf and llanid. Vou wouldn't he doors for all "the world." Knarf and ilanid nodded. ThcT Pertalnl* wouldn't, tad iMJI I riilophcr sadly. Moon keep light on being doors.*' s more states one standard neurology. innot an) would igerous. 1 had inv iirti "attack" 20 > Ids ia what happens' — lo U going tn i ••lien suddenly i becoms that although I am fully ikr l n i complatttj paralvsed. rrightanii | In i.edialcly follow • "'ra'i waVh^u As 1 lie there, helpless. I feel bv 'he panic ur,;I am sliding deeper and deeper ;Look *.' tin into an unconsciousness—'ro j'hlrh there can he HO %  ~irnpl. .; ralta up nonnai) ii I In I i I .: %  '.'...ii iii. uneon i by an anaesthetic or .i %  ni' to act quickly, and I know thai tin only %  %  Ms ItlsMl Panic* I MAKI .: nothing happens I I" tn shout f"i help, hut mj lipand Ultta 1 feel in>R further and tUTtl i t effort I t II and srltfa .! riostnl thud % %  %  H nf my bodj fh si searni t" lai LqUte If I iry io go to %  %  Bui ' %  %  Neevatu Fault %  %  %  %  • %  "a at it tin.paopts Who TROPICAL Sl'ITINCs :,., l. r ,v. Kawn. 'it MJ7 BTRIPEDFIBRJ SUITINGSM Babja,Fawn,Gray, • STRIPED FIBR1 Sl'ITINGS M" Grej 3.3a GAf.PRl Irowa Fawn, Tan, at Naivt @ M.IK KII VKI rl SI.SK & Sl.fi! I'-ll I IX MM $i.as SHOES "':i "\ i PHET Black e. Tan B *11.39. $lt.fi9. SI 1.1M. SI2.09 I'r Mi • s S0( KS — Cation & Rayon B ., tSc.. 51c. 66c. 68c. 89c .urrjut.iiej b) lUv inea 1W1 I feu i % % %  (i.tter pill ii ii (Mete i inase> pun I til .. Japanese aah ... Being around onr> rrn fc.ni %  IIHM gaaU Porrii oi phaais> aiosc by the %  union i JII me ban lor mn(. ra.na> wlih sreaae <• iroan tnu due sat %  %  T. R. EVANS & WHITFIELDS ,, ...roi.d.iii Oi.l 4220 fOVR SHOE STORES Dial 460 I i'ck wilh UKBBC 4 Star Blouse SPECIALS favourite office neatly tailored, easy to wash and iron ...here in four heavcnly i oJours. al a piggy-bank ONLY $3.36 ^Modern ZDress Shop <>|ia'.,s til 7 ji.iii. for i ItilllUT null Ititmilll/ A I. Al. V IIIIISI: MI.IIT fo enterf.nn iKo S.S. I >liltl SS l MOM \\l Dial 4000 rOH.Ii (i_AST T*0 'KII %  .L. II.C. %  OALg %  : > %  %  %  it i; TODAY. LAST 2 SHOWS — 1.13 I I'M PARAMOUNT PICTURES PRE-SI I'lhiM, i; \i>ii. ss SlarrinK .—JOSEPH COTTt.". EDMUND Of HI^ZING ACTION EXTRA "tVATKH S1MLI)Short LATEST SEWS UB OI'KMNfi TO.MOKROW — 2.JII & S.J0 P.M. i \ i \ v ;KII SHI ; i rWINTERS — In — -III HOI lOMIIMII" II O V A I. .ast 2 Shows. 4.30 & 8.13 | m <'olumbla Doable Louis HAYWARD Ckorge MicREADY %  IN •III 4.CR \RBie And %  • EEOD1 lll II WITH I Wlllard PARKER Friday Oaljr, & sir, |,.,„. W.iuk-ll COREY -II4IIIIII I f II 411." And -LAS1 Ol Sill. litl 4NEEBS** S'.iiring: lltlNHIKIJ O L Y M P I I TO-I>AY. LAST 2 SHOWS — 1M & 8.15 P.M. RKO BURR DOUBLE HOWARD IIUGIII-1S PRODUCTION •• %  I II Oil 11 AW* — Starring — JANE HUSSELl. — JACK Bl AND "II4CI 411(11 | — With — GEORGE RAFT WILLIAM 11KND1X JA.M-I'TA I.(IMP DRESS SIIOI Brimd Slrert daap iiaae lll(1 ni'XI MKiimndj Una To Lin... P' ol >alJl> liihl Butdu,. %  n an "attackmy fo.tl, in 1,.. I ,'"'T".:'.:• %  ""<*> '•>> swamped l'l'.\ I .MU. (i u I LOCK TO.Ii.W IBl ssafl lor all 01 MKWV IIASKKTS AND IIKACII HATS in various destffns and colours BATHING SLITS in -,„,„ ;.,„; ( %  „;,„„. atanji Styles and Low %  i %  in; IRISII LINKN Uinch. .MMii.i.is mm airs , ,u nd II O \ V TO-DAY. LAST 2 SHOWS — l.:ill & Ml KM REPUBLIC WHOLE SEHIAI. UNDERSEA -TIMODftaM ORRICAN r; Raj PRISONERS of ATLANTIS .PLAZA -ntRNtii rums DIAL 2310) IIHOS. nl S.iiiil %  .il.-. Cnianr.l ? AYENTURE THAT STORMS THE SEAS OP THE WORLD! U/artte r 7?ro> i. I O U I TO-DAY LAST SHOWS 5 4 8.30 p.m. %  Ill RED II4IM.E Ol f OIIH4GL Oprnini I ..-...... S O H. tO t %  •*s '" CAPTAIN .HORATIO HORNBLOmER jgv ,. RA0y.LWALS_^ ##•;. v#.v ntinw int. nth 9.30. 1.1.; A H..IO,,..... u.„l1„nlinuin„ niii.v I.I.I A it. in ,,.,,,. GAYNOR ROBERTSON (T^DAY BARTON aSS'ik -mm w'uaim OSBIWI amum



PAGE 1

PACK *IX IIVRIHOOS ADVOCATE Tin-RROAY FFRRl \RY \r,2 CLASSIFIED ADS. %  >i HI it BALES riLfPHOHt J50§ REAL ESTATE tm Birth* M-lat* M •mf >• J ci to tie %  ton SALE u rOMOTlVK mi n ,oa*r \+<&>w*** 1 A.\.\I\H;MI:\I> i r>%. Ian* On* iMl II HP HIII-AIMA KIN1 **THI %  ltd on inM UMM tvitjMT. COT i KAPM \s anucrr .1 to U C KUMat *U Court*** %  an ft Co S SB-a*. .in* %  MM ae4.. -i %  %  I tail a.a.iaS*t *.p.m* %  pin-. %  |WU T.im. A BAB.NLS CO M I SS-t In i: IKt I %  '. U-i 1 k MS ..-' IS— %  %  %  -• MIH ns:vr 111)1 sis gLECTMCAL The above pi opei tie* be longing FHI A.lrrdT ItnUIBWlei %  %  0* to pubi't % %  t..T.r. *"r.l ll-ri*ln*n ,i Trmraday lath FMrruary at I TlARWiXlD A IV IYI 1 SolKIM"IIIH-j I IW l*A>M Ot.nu M Wl D*bnlura i. I 41 iMiti BiTbiio* Tncpnona Co, loronMi •hair* Batbadoa |M C. Th* abov* mentioned *n%  I up tor ulf at Public A iid-. Ih* Sth day of reor.i.o IM3 al I p m al 1 irrrl %  riom MAI HIM: I Mta Apply Ralph r.N -UAH-WIN. Pin* Htll Stti.itinl I ON **,.""* 1**1 of land MM buncal I'titaimnV Ihiw brdinnm*. breakl rjpboanl* Tiled I Ml MV.i.i and garig* l"***eti"ii n in Mr*. H*ratd Halle Ti l,linnr> Kill Th* "< %  %  >iii 11Ml M rMai tiaxii r n t t pm. al the rat** <•' Heard. I irw ln*i" %  MttfajM i M ri iKiitmr -1 ,. Muiiai %  ..I.: 111'. UVMKII PURNITUIII %  MISQ-|.I. \NMH S •TAh.rit IO MNT %  April l • %  l Si. Nuhv.l |iiLet. Hath and u.ual fnnl*"f* Th* aun.e prvwrt* WlD I* -l i.p IM %  al* by Public CMnpailllan al mil i.fTrt .mr •lit**) on Pildav lih rwbtuaiv. 01, al > pm In-prrllon on appliuf up In TI no reason or clauM* Irjff tinhas rearlird the publu m rcjuiitrThrouth the Urili.h Guinnai I Government. Hl> Excrl!Governor m Trlnl Ranee has fnrmallv notlfli r l tfjaa, .. iMmbn Council tor iho • Demerara eonilituenev. rid Oil wife have been deemed uv 'h(lnvrmir in thr Council of Trlnidail |0 be "profliiilti-il inun.LI ' Similar infnrnvillnn wai sent by Ihe Trinldnd Governor In Mi Jagan who plins >o Mv to Grenada lo spend a short I end Kirsl Women Member T woman t. b i :\ menilM'i of thi' CicorRCowii .I.IIK-t Ii I with her I •inionK Iho MBpIt HI ti %  Ble fl Ma S Vi. %  %  %  do. and Arubo by Ih* M.v Da*r>od wtB bo chawd at Iho 0*n*.al Foal Olflr* hml Mail al M aaan. rlr. g Mall M t pm. OnaMaary Moil at I. .. b< Ih* l*b Fiari. KXCUA \t,t; M'l a IMI TAKE OMMH CAMABA la< lalifia *ltr*0>dlaaa I i on iHkri. II 1 I Drofl. II I i Pr." TI .. al II noon. Roanat TAKE NOTICE I:.,I..I-.IL oraan.ud and OVKtlna und'r.< fatr of An^raro. whoa* Irado < %  il. Dovar. *tai* of D*la*ar* U.I.A Utm of a Uodc mark in Pan A %  Mroduciion and coniainuid l eeototd d mnlinn ptrliir*. and motion parturo ii-rriptior. motion pwlui* rraa. and n*M %  k!..)loaITa*n appaial.* ..f-.miirrt -yn.lironii*d wund roapart of ninu anoa — %  •f pRt-ira. anC 'or ro*o*atad — iihoii>vl*i>. inotkm piiiurn Rlma of all I ; IMW'IHI apparaiu*. mwlm ptrtur* ramoi and u'rta. lalkina pxtur* apparaiu*. !" i and motion picture machlnra and appari nrhmnlaod aoiaaat nrprndi pparatua parta and ith motion pirliir* iiaru and appurtoni — %  f a W *d mark in Pan "A" ol II pifturra and moHcn pi-tm* nda and daaenpuon. mollon p*rluro • and pana, photnaraphU' apporaiui blind lymhronlud HJIIIMI rtmrdind u*. partar.il anmarln. nmibln*d pirliir* |. ortoa, talk inal tnachinaa lua and nrrord* and Alma Uvrafor. rnd: inclwdink radio ra-crtvina **1>. rablnoli oiarhlnr* and radio rotoKlna Patt aataArM ind ayncl I TLai in* la*. a>.L.inr-* ad-l-r.la l fkHllh SUM K>aart*-r in n anir l of Alma adopl*-l imaajra of picluiro* and or f**i.r.lrd *^ pkoaaatlay*. molion pir'.ir.i-i-in-uiia opparaliai. molU>-• ---—j and a*"-, talklna pirtur* app-ratuv ...masnod *yn.r.ronii*a aound "**5f^ ,r. and apparaiu* parta and ow—ortoa. iwiO***o %  Michroniaad aound nrprodiiclnB ami motiun pictur* pmjocilna ." %  oh*g _* > apparatua. parta and arcna^ari*.. ..Ik.na nuH-hlnr* comblnad *^ •> nch !" **'**f •W motkio ptrtur* apparaiu. ami .......l. and nlm. tlarrWor. ;-* %  •'": %  paru and app.irlona-ar*-. inrludina iod r***lvln arta. rablnota aaaaaaata. 'urn*, and cumbinnl "alkirul mochinr* and radio roeoivina aoia. loarviaion acpirol,ol all kind, and d*-*nplion ifKliKllna rkdrl. ...Ith*. a lk d aaacUK^'W "Tj*"* 4 Ilk* iood*. and will b* *nlltt*d to one H*T ona manUi Irom th* 1th day of Fwiruary laM unay-t m -hall in Ih* m^ntim* I", m.iic* in duphcala to ma at my tdko • Mirk mitatratlon. Th* Irad* mark can b* man on appnraUbd Dai*d Ihi. M-i dav of January. IM) raa M H. rt*i*.i. implilWra. apparaiu* all kind* and drarnption incliidlnk *l**ln. •-it.P** and rlnlii n..p mrrhanum* ampllfylna tub**, and Ilk* aooda. nnd will b* *n1llh-l la i**i.i,i on* month from Ih* flk da* nl F-bnii>ri IMC unl*oa aom* p*T*m aaaahana MM no~ii on uppliiotion at my nrnr* ]3rd .la. of Januat". IV II W1I.IIAM Iti-ai-irar of Trad* Marka. VOJUAMI |t*auirar of Trad* Mark*. i j M an SHIFI*"* NOTICES TAKE NOTICE ZEROLIT • '-SI I I M Al 111 ZBAI ANtl I. TIKOA ia arm • ,..,.. ,1: ). %  | ... |H ftahfy M'.i I %  II. ...I That TIIF. PFBMtTIT COWPANI M tiualnoaa a dd f laa la Pocmulil Ilouao. ounna Inti.i.il Mj.iiifaiti.rrr-. k.— applird lor th* roMi A" of H**mtrr in raa p art of ihtmkal *ula*tai roroiiuunda for the treatment of •m I..-MI-. c nnaallaf. ^.iliplvii-t and od -ill b* rntltkr.1 to raarkat ** aMJ IMt unlaaa mom* prtaon aha in* I me al iny oftlc* of opfraaitmii "' •'-*' rraUII %  >*n on aaaalH-alion at mr ol*. e about April 1Mb Hi .u.n Coranani wbnv Inada I" addition to fenoral carfD thit r*l.bury A.enu !" l^odoiT VY 4. ••I * %  •*• r for rhillad and hard ialum of a irad* mark in V re. bein. .nil.,-in p.epa.rn | Carko a***pled I HH id. plant and ln*Ullallo > li'tilbL-tnn water, und r.ltei '. L '*illlah (avnann, aanrarano %  ... ,i i l.landa antlmr %  **•> I '" It'RMVSS miY t U. LH TRINIDAD %  .-:,,. ItMlv II.UAUH I Ti...i. M..I-. : I.I Th* U V "CACIQUi: Dl CAHIBF/' -HI .ift-*pt Canto and I P.iu*ii(*r< lor SI Lucia. Vincent. Grenada, and Araha kWii ma Wednoaday Mh Inat Th* M V -DACltWOOn" will i accept Cairo nnd Iaaa*na* n '" r %  I. Lucia. St. Vin**nt. Oronada and Arab* Sailing Friday Mb %  nut Th* U V -rARlSBEr -I" 1 accept Carlo and Paaarngara lot Dnmi "I**. AnlUlna. MoaMrm. I r>*M. nnd It Kilt* S-lllna ndn> [ D W 1 BCHOONF.H UWKaUta A8SUCIATION iDIC i Comigne* T*l* No. OMI. TAKE NOTICE CAR-PLATE Thai s i ifaaaMMii oraa. <.r in* it*"' Italaa of AIH> t'li'i'addrr^. U IMI How* Sirrei. in the Cllv of Darin* I' %  A laaaMtAartUraffa, h-. irain-d I..I .... i,.ui.iii,..n al I .1 Hrai.tri in i* M trct of polidi ti.i metal and ..tlu I t" r*a|i*l*T in* *am*> after one inotilh trim in. I IKS ^nlea. aoan* amnn *h.,lt lit' HtMl ai omce of oppo'ttmn an application al my r.rhr* Dated the nth dav .,i ii.j mil... %  tata of w trade mai k n I'jit 1 : -,II ba I it -f February %  mark c-n be aeen NEW VIIKK SEKVICB %  | 1-, MA to %  %  %  %  8 INV, TMJM I'IM.R>1 | ream I i --• ; i IIFAIH I A I...i. OAS ;: HOT WATER ON : ; TAP for YOUR BATH J; %  Ml :. WhrtaPot;, i ..i can havl S mn.Mt— .-f liititiul l ..'..liable al y_o t ^* ' UK HAY TTItUT l (>M, BA1 KID il l \ vii M t in I;I il in (.tin BAA VEST Oil I .I.i nil iii'l. |i | t .ni. Friend' Ut taVrtHd %  %  • )la I Ma af-^ \|1<( I I.I.AMDIIS •pactHin Any am\ hy appoinlmrnl "Phoo* kin I skum*! MST Th* absvi %  I I Frhtav the M*l >hrvary at I r m , II.offlrol th' I M" %  Years Of War And Austerity OFFICIAL NOTICE \ •...1 %  •! %  A %  RAUn A STIAMCH ul NEW UK! 1 ASS RCKVICE i !Hin Januarv-arrtv*a Rarbadoa Hit January. IfaW i 30th Januar. irMVM lliibadoMlb Fabruar.. IBM ilv** Barbado* nth February. ItU CANADIAN HEyHJB .".K-H oil Krtdllah and %  . .-.( order. ...id. A Son Mr Grodor 81 IMI.VANIUD kMRTTA Umllad n H*i. %  It §sm %  II M a|uanl Aiilo T>i Co Telepli.mr MM and RPM 1-71 MH IN and I m lo MM Valtata. aitarh* caaoa %  i...ibl* locka. A DAHNE* A CO. LTD I '. V u 1'l.TtXHV Spooni • %  m.od will h| <*l UP lor aal* nipelilioo at Iheir offlc* Not III :H Ro*t..ick Strert on Frldaw th* Istli inalanl at p m A I .in.II c-i a *l aquart ten of land adjofnlng tbe premi*** oi V mil* A Co. Umlivd ri. %  onatriMtad one and ha* %  I :*. of T l*et -" I %  •id Boot aPN of t*W -aaare let daWtaMkhT ilh the *am* uintatr* Brr irl* light and pot %  HU i. ... (Mil i, i.i %  I M r/andwiia* In* pprlaallori \o M i i I... i. ,iti,. v i" '"' %  'i % %  %  %  ' l*anpl> M It 1IS it. n A RAKRADOS AQUATIC CLUB iMemberk Only) Entire M'mli'K are aslied Ul note ma Ihe l>ane*> prevlou-.lv %  .. 11 -il for -.iiini.*.. "ii : %  i...ii. 1952. haa been raneelled. A (11'R AGFKTR i %  lak i i ordan fog I I..-. I fhridmaa Or**ting Carda ;* Un loquaal. , ... .1 and foromoal >J aaod > Beaut. Ul X Ft** Saoipl* Dook lor 1BU 10 v %  Ig today , .-.ion paid Jonaa. >J .. DaM %  I ;, i ...ti.ii. England ^ -',-,'*,--',','.*.--'.'-*-*-'e*******-'e*^ *>;*.;::;:'.:-.::: '.:::•. fihinilioiial NiHirc AUCTION %  Y iMlnatllona of th* liuuruiK* Com.. I Ii -ell on SATLKItAV Wth at I oclork M amrhlal Trraauror St Jam*i Ih* Dahma %  ..i "il'UANA AMI n A, ;iu in IN PURkLANCE of th laon. havlna m cUliniuR or .fleetI.ii; the popoily bin a hefor* m* an acroi 0 ur.'.note v.Induitrv. On Jan. 1923, after tlVM yeirt uf close ii... un.' it%  if) .1 | %  M*i of the Kirrl ;ti.it Countess Strut hmore. Wi-tmlnstet Abbey on April "Jii 1B*23 Three i UM populH DwbMi .. dauilhtc'i tin I'rtncr'i EllnteU Ainandri Miir.. th<| "fourth lady In the land." Uut 21. 1930. second mhu i i'i .i.i! %  %  \. II i % %  u %  in tinhaunUfJ Giamis 1 %  %  : : the first ib] born hi Scotland for M Mnturhw. Jlie Klng'g serious afflirtimi a slammer, which he Anally manli the patient DuehtW After his marriage he took dally for two year*, and k.irnctl bow to spc.ik Radio, boxinji, laWnto, and de'iii came first among hli KobbieN. He also liked cinema • d b.il his own CaVnera wllh birh he spent hours big (.hildrcn. Hi* t.,-t., ..i ii-. I. litread the Ddthi I.--...-HI HI knowledge I.-, and his fannK ODi • called him the "Walking Encyclo. ;i wiu Mil on piidai i band and love Ml hi in IMI Aaatm Car. a k p i| ,i,i always -pare a in acetdeVt* "'.'. houghl f.n UMm M mailer how in annual summer i 17 to 1 i rwo btinilred came front publkt %  Tttigbv. and Winchestir The other '.'no won working boys from in•ntrdjg -IP MM • II i Chanrort Acl IMd. I d., hr.et.v K ,„ MO* I M onv lion or Irani In.i tinned iihe property of the d*fend.intr^nmt of Inrir Claim, with th*i. *,t.,.I by mr on any Tiataday or Fllo.iv nn-een tn* hour, of 11 Ihe alter noon M th* Keai.irjtran ofne*. p.ibl.. M4h day Of Marrh. IBM. I., o.d. i Thai MBh rl laj IKiordlnl lo the Ik "ini'il ie-u*rli. rl> will I.* precluded from Ihe in .. in. and I* n or ngaintt Ih* aaid property PI.I..II* llUtOI. MALCOIJW STEEI.F llrlrinlaat MR1FN R^'FLVN UHF4JIJ-.V art Ink herein by flARFIRI.n D*V1LTN HOI J>m hr conatiiuttd attom*v on record in thi* Uland rttopFjm' At L THAT c. %  ,-i .,1 |,„d .formerI. pait ol th* land, of Enl*rprla* Plantation' Htuala at Enlrrpnae In Ih* pariah Of Chrlat Church In thka %  i. MM parrel of l.nd and rui.a from UM PWMH Koad m a northrrly lo aouthorly dlrrctloni nulling and bounding on land* of the Mi. Mnf— F l-ucaa drcaoard. on landa of Jam** A Tudor, on land* -< i" Mnnotirabt* •* Cr.ejndl*r. on landa formally of tb* r.tnte of T C I.uca. ol Mt-> Harrl M ttvno* on th* r*analnd*r of th* aald road tar*nl> fed landa of Mi E. C Jackman. on land* of Mr. W. A. V*or*vood. and on th. nod. Iug*lh*r with th* mrwunu* or d rllhiBhoi.t* th*r*Mi and ,ill olh-i Ini(litIra* and eraciiim. iheroon *r*c1*d and built .tniidina and i-im II WIIJ.IAMS. Raaistr Mill died tJrd Octob** IM II.led Vul fanuary 1M3 sot in noi MI X.rne al Sk.p 'ALCOA PVtHTAN AITOA PIONETPA J'lAMlH A STRAMEB A trrm-AMEH A 9TEAMRH Thri* rMMM hi..* limited HOBHII TUUH LTD. APPLY:—PA COSTA Arrlrr* Rarhada. Januarv Mth >.' N %  • H Februar.MUi March Hih March Mth v. ... t MM NftH TOt AND OULT bUVICB. 4% CO. LTD—CANADIAN MRVIll IIOIM III TIIOIH LIHfllTCD PLANTATIONS Bt'lLDLNU. LOWaM BKt>AD >i I-I.I I I'.i.M'ii.'i S;tlra AECDU for: li.ini .u Airlinra. B.O.A.C. and B.W.I.A. ALCOA STEAMSHIP COMPANY THrphonr No. 4I At.ltM I III III: IOIIKS You had hrtl"r buy now even if you do not wish any ImmedaatWy. Supplii'i quoting two years delivery. MM UAI EMPORIUM Cnr. Broad & Tudor Streets ,!... %  • Ml 1 HIHAY ath. nl 1 p.m m>AN CAR II II P IS47 mod-* lo/kang u-der f i• f* r: UNDER THE IVORY HAMMER VINCP-NT ciHlHITlt SHE KNOWS TO DAYS SW> FLASH ( I • ji I OH •ipyv i: 1 thhall, thai la*l Ik* ..*,. %  CHA I 4 TWINTI1TU CtW rtlRY •f-ltONF.PY PfATtR I AIIGE TJW i Ii .NI> PIATRn A--n ntviiyv \ um i sitiHi HI H i* H lb' MM aj Hl.ia.ar -V^.*-C •V-e*.*r*** * and 1'mirter-n ralM % %  On rrajuest pTwriuuient guet'-a welcome. %  l II pi'CKIAND. II I II.MCAI. AND VOCATIONAL THAIMNfJ \ Public \ildrrv. b> MdjfN > I-. DARaalNOTON, i MllMi \\ I III llllt lujj ^' roMiti r.Mi HI: SCHOOL ^ IIA LI, id pMmUsion of tinv Hi-.iiiMi.tstt r .ind tinN Oovcnttni nn-iv J IDMINKION Eltll \ : Education. I N %  Touch With Barbados e*>'-*-*-*A*.*-*.'.*,','.V,*-*,V. I fill SAI I EYREVILLE HALL ROAD .IIMIIV built twill nag silting room u, 1 and tlownstalrs. nlu f-H.in H, '-txli-oorn*. toilet nnd bath Mid Range N<> rea*onable i r %  1-ispecUon b> in eni I) ARTY A SCOTT Mni.lle str*ei m Dial 2S45 ] ROVAI. BARBAIMIS YACHT CLUB AOTItK Member* are asked to nnlr thai all ul. i: .ii.m.i for Ilia Majesty s ships !>* DBshlre" and "rJtard Bat' due been eanrcllrd BBI'l 1 ORIENTAL SOUVENIRS SII.Krt (ItiBIOS ABTP VF.Vnr.MOP. BFDAB. JOYEKIA8 Y ABTI8TICAS CUKIOSIDADES. TRAIDOB DE LA INDIA CHINA BJIPTO THANl'S Pr. Ha Hry. St. Dial MM | , %  %  %  *r Aramtna. %  %  i %  %  Abiqua. • 11. %  . M 1 1 % %  K Akw i i . FUrl Ttawn*, %  i Ml 1 UM i PASSENGERS i luudbursts, scorching sunshine, exposure to all the winds UMtf hlow—they make no difference to .1 roof paiited with I^istikori For galvanised, asbestos ur shinulrd roofs Lastikon is ideal ; it never fades, crack* or peels oft t^onomical and long-lasting: I jutikon is available in various eoliUH—ask your dealer about it LASTIKON %  MUI ay BERCER PAINTS 1 oil SALE ------•--'-'••, |lM Barliados %  l-tMUur'* Bulldlm '"I Thui'.. %  % %  rttaruan • .omniencing at B o'clock a C ST HTLL, ; Acting Seer| < Alllllll M %  two 5toreyed dwellinghouse tandlnc on 10.170 square feet of land on the incomparable Si. Lawrence Coast. Excellent sea bathing. Dwelling-house contains varandah upstairs and down, dining nnd Fitting rooms. 4 bedrooms, pantry and kitchen Electrl lift* gas and water Installed. Garage and servants rooms. Purchaser to have option of buying furniture and effects Ir.tpectlon by appointment. Dial B137. (Mrs K. R Hunte) The above will be offered for sale at public compeUUon on Friday, the 8th February. IMI. at 2 pm. at the Dee of too undersigned from whom further particulars and conditions of %  be obtained. COTTLE. CATFORD a. CO. Solicitors. M.1.52— 15n fat Se*9 I '.MW///.W? Anti-Corrosive Gripon Red Hoofinc Paint for metal. Minerva Red Roofing Paint for shinnies. FiKnrn llmisc Painl in colon (M'lii.1 I'ndercoating. Marine (iloss White. AlsoPainl Brushes. Turpentine .ind all other Painl Materials. Let Us Supply Your Requirements. PLANTATIONS LTD.



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I HI RSOAV, i i i:iti \H\ : tM| BARBADOS ADVOTATF P\C.V I !\ I Queen Elimbmih Returning Home HO a \l I \>MM I. 'I IVltr 1 This group of the Ui Km* and bin Family i ukcu dut ins u> Royal Hobday ai Bal moral la the picture are (1. to r.| tha Uie King, tea new Queen, Uie DuX* ol Edin burgh. Fnnce CharUs aatrldo a pet deer. Prince— Margaret and Hi. Quean Mother %  I .a %  .in. Hold astradrtnghan %  Queen Elizabeth after OOdfafrs to then patent,, at San third in Itaf I. leplu.iird I i B tkmgham i n t or me. ( nd Hong s.i David Maxwi ii M at hei home. Marlboruugh Nk Bad not plan to Sjiidnngham. Dot-tni irgeon apothec.-ailed to no early 'Inmomma. I HUM of the death was *JTt functions were itn. I) rancelled. UM I throughout the countrv Members of the Royal HouseI .rulringhnm were Sir Alan Loscellcs. the King's .-lary: Sir Harold Campbell and Ladv Hyde. the Queen's Lady-in-Waitm* Fuitlier details of the King'death were expected to be made known later It was learned that l">th dining the morning and afternoon. Shocked The Duke of Windsor. profoundly shocked" by the death of bis brother King George VI. will sail fni England Thursday aboard the liner Quern Mary, but the I in born Duchess will rein.United Hates The Duke who abdicated the tin -tie in 1937 announce*! plans Altar to return to F.nglanii (Ol his tr m same man tx I brother's funeral after a Iran-Of As* I that In atlantic telephone call to Buck*" ; " '" OTdai inghain Palace. The Duke's secHeadline Which appealed in ths laid hts wife, the former "' ol Feburory : MiSimpson, would not acconiA'ldei *."ils s Duke hut would remain *V** r,i| *' ,,l "< ..I the Mx-room suite | n New I'M'/"'! Viik at the Waldorf towar. Boa never has bean accept.-1 bj the %  \ !" '' '" lch "' privihMM el UM l! Both the Duke and DucheM are He postponed hi bearing "up very well indeed' inline: of the h r..rninR of the King's death. In order to dJgcu the secret lry said. ] m 11 |, i DvJn ol Wu %  K W R ,th because he had nn hint "-.abend*, that his brother was not recovering, the secretary said %  wantsd psrraia %  i! The advance <>i ih.Md earlier thi> wmtk to pn IncnaJal OH the EH B *** %  %  %  hu r ditch ind potatoes. W* nl > %  *" %  "' lhv armou. EtORTH ARMY lly Korea. Feb. 6 MORE than 20 UN tanks UppOTtaXl h\ inlatitivnu-n drove fiva mltee Into Conv '""'ii' '.'It iton north of and Matted R ( -*l and Assemhr. Ire UM throe • urprtae •rtrwurod : i! Wi • %  ne i %  lie i Natton* tank onto loot Infantrymen Uitnpe.i Dfl ii 4 .i n. ..sir Bay at ii nO'llsaJllB'land suiBaibedai will be having anoth i % % % %  '.' %  veraj • %  %  r.si " . l Brbad< la l nitenm tAb .mi*. iLim Ni Ytnk Ma, r.l. „.„, I .,,.,1 !,.„ -l„,,|.,, „ I nlu IH, „.„ .,.„,. .,. A """" "ndotlwr Ob* si„. >,,, •IT in. nonh.Ti.imi hill m u lav•. % %  .! ,„. b Ih„.v.„ „n N,.,, v' Ik m ill, IMIM .mall miu JIKI n.orZ.-Z, I3JL V3 , lt flrr Tht) ......ui,.,l l„,u,,., *ind had Mlimwt rrMkcn Ihc uom, ' ."'" s ...id w.i .nded and .. h r *J h ".','"' 1 ' '' sl "' v ,ilidr.. r l ': l : k ."" !'"' l.""l--l-". 400 Tourists Dut* Today Tha OenadU BBsesraai f %  aaeasaal, M in be ca n hat it; day Caribbean ,iui i in New York ,md she wilt I brauting about *•*• sourt will be AsHBOnasaM ana i* expected to anehoi about 9 nr %  aaoaaai *i leaiiMi recently returned %  ii* in da i New V. PAN THE COMMI %  i in the %  [I presented a Ural fullmbor 4 ih %  %  id Ifentn i H;*r loc.il I % % %  Ltd valley %  ins tank tlr nk C.i • %  — (IMM li.G. Toll Reli*: Fire Minute Gun Si a Seoui Dance Postponed Invitee? to tinl : D tha consequent upon .-i ihMajest) the Dance which would havg bean POhniary 9. has been postponed. % % % %  . %  till (AH 0\l IMI ||\S m %  Waai ol lloturr-al i Hal %  mi. ->i iimii ajag live I i %  i 141 i, antieh gag W-H . .II.* aanawt] aaoapaa wiieii ii.car overIII. r.| gj atsagO llniium. .in. %  -^ abaOl • p.m. Oil 1. rd*>. Ihe ear t* o^nrd by Mr. I'arkinMin ul Baj lu A In. I'lllluld st l.e i *r H A' r\tenai el> i in i r J but Its oerusian %  B Ktl ir aid Maude t.i .ii.t t paJgaan, si John .. ho •:. It Mega Man injured mrIdeal, she i* de.Jined athe (irn-ral llospit.1 1. ma rrpoitej lu the ol... Me 1 liege. It -.truck the MMfd If lotl.'d dm.i.liiM fr about 61 fee >Uip. ih. en. open to Unltod Nl A Unit, d rtbed Red Ugdit —I'.l". 1'iaiice UohVUs I Eoat€ iulah.M, WilliUesKiniLar Civil Serivimts Over All Greeer Move Oft Strike n .,,1 strained (ienuany pnimiae oPARIS, Pah t %  rotations with w.by pioposing to coin the NATO Aatuciatio. Bonn which only a f. of the These two .tone ol foodstuff which feature prominently l ^mS!iTLS how col diatHM and hove for two raora 01 more been sold per pound and 3 cents poi pound reopecUvoly, 1 enl initeach. sant the already ek Tinyear, rtoa, milk eg*!-*. '. Md local green wegOtaMoi have teat more loan lurtni the previous \..,. i usekeepers are becom re anxious about whal i i. be dona to i ,.., n I They claim thai the nUM) which tin I wrhnUad down the vahi" All...ii had last learful that it will diop further l i. M uistiie Tobear this out. .me .H> .1. %  %  M< (liwhllr salary is MIVIMI T K .I. .....M %  "on-" "*l i anabU to i .. greek Oovernmei ..-,.,; '^JZJT 3 *'* '" lave a *nt out Of Bay salary. %  15 per cent t to pay. electric and | U n* ; ,, Kti*-ater %  '''' '>>" oniadree -'t Miary I this year, but this was %  (li.ol and other commilrrei.ts. rejected by %  ivil %  ervanbj who all of which must eokne out at ltd hat i "provmj present income. I have | forced to cut to a minimum esganOal itema of fe-Histuir. .md .-egards clothing. It Is Impossible for me lo bu v a new suit ..ii torebj eondl) i i K %  %  Korea i*\l the %  Kyii-a. but they 1. i. poi.,1 woulii .it Ir., I'loposal was presented %  km on the ilfth and Itnal imed leadlockt ogtan \*ai;urly W'<.rded propoj %  %  i ,t. i i. la to Communi %  hlne and N.irth K i %  %  to (.. %  %  %  Hi lent %  Off. I Reported rr I reoatic OffecMM isfeaa reporteil i t jiii lea i parking in a restricted area and i hired car in a CANES BURNT %  i • n a Arc ..ooui 10 55 um. %  party of %  Uoveanawni to the N tionai Aaatrnbl) lot tinupcum dabata on %  i>iranean in.i menu. >II the Baai I o % %  Uaa .Mid iba NATO i ti "s I• i ^""I'ean defence corornui ': • '• "" nuntonhu ,„ NATO >" %  „ %  P „.,. Una l J ""' ""'""' '" '"" NV! lncn.-. -.. ,,....,. %  •" %  ;:"" %  %  s II A .... oth ad' %  "" mra pi.i ANIAMTED OPINIONS B.0 l"'i I b< U i • earl) tins %  t tha receipt ol tth %  > %  the K glei_llll gnd w.it.-r ratea. all on a "small %  alary." "Ont imi is hardly i leared ..if hafora gnotha %  .,. aald A domestic whose OTIK inconta IS S4 50 per week, ami I a little girl at school said t)VKR 100 BAH1KS. accompanied b> \Uvn mothoi were present at the upenmis of the St John's Boby Welfare "'fjjf "J %  CtlnlC %  Mount Tabor yesterday evening This IUBnl JKn j £„ gone hum.. Clinic II anOthei Ol Ma.iamo [flU'l OOntribUtiOlll U) the from work I lry tc. i parish. About two yeon ago oho opened the Rrat CUnk '•edk, but the present prio ol in the St. Margaret's ai ,eed ,,eOTU, "-' ,, "" ,K,l The Comn itet i % %  na | imenl he d %  hlle i %  tha Clink b Madan. I of tha Clink She President. Mrs. 1 G PtlgTlri red it opened i Idem atn t Plndei Pllerun praised Madame Hung at dtarupUng the h il rvants" The naa Oraak ooi I %  tassel mi January 1 ti is well ,.s ih.civil servants .ode doea not permit itrlkei t>v civil servants If. Baby Clinic Opened At Mount Tabor ..nl thai the Ni. Trinidad Mourns King's Death %  I SPAIN FBI The dcaih of the King put a stop to business and fun %  Trinidad has plunged il mhab.lanlinto motfcning which will last unUl the day after the Royal funrral ,.,,,,,. for the occasion of the D( Ian Pubtk day an ( | DUSUli leed be imposslb .ho Is reapomibla f.ir all this Win oaol %  It <*n! do something t ,.i that be hoped the '""r. *'?,"' K "" liI u|> ** %  anticipating | I IlKTOlMej on earbilq Itanu keep them hidden. and then you have to do without then.. So, i Ban i Elil' %  link pre] (oi .ii*". .. grdt this item and Si. ret Itill and Special cdllfon .< 00 Mrs K %  will be In charne of Ulc Orml AsM-lali... ,. I.. H I Ml HI Allilri. MCI-.. Senior l,rc !" ', pu j' n M "T"' '*" %  •" '.' ", r lew mlnii w ol Mmbti In si John, Md ihai u "">' ""•„,""", %  "• re.pscl lo Ih,line King llrors. opporlunil) r.rirrnl 55 wl "3 wlU lakr ndvanlaor of VI H. %  %  %  '" '" %  "< %  "' %  •"""" hi Ins oi the institution which •* \ opanbUJ th> <"l would he of Invaluable sssl bocauai she MI H mu teadj lo rnothant of tinuea. ". if there were many more tM tannlit to t..l lulls the poor of Barbaiheir children %  •. dos would IKbetter off. Hi ho arould be (cinpelent Nurse lul than others he She said that ihe < can in the oolony. it tanUaani do not n Nurse D. Holder. ;,. I .k d I to mike it Sd t % %  'after the children. Shi r. Mi AlUU-r said houses shor'.h 1 h H Ml lril( H s i wi., of Dr AIL tie Mi Cllnb 'h Committee nl Hi AUeync I It Bab] %  '• %  real rhrlU %  %  %  nun(ire I ber of mothei childn the opening %  %  %  fj&SZ parent-' • %  Wednesday moth' leturncd to lh ISA i uie.-tint; pa : .. urtts presjrsi i AM e'l M.n i i Nickel Plant f Cuba ... I, ., CM.OOOjMO pst % %  SayS Mr I H Kbit : "VH CAN III INC III! U.UON IT iwn run RBAT Toffee The Perfection ol Confection MADE IN U.K WALTERS PALM'TOFfECLTO. PAIMWORKS LONDON. W 3 •i thai r |Uca. A M |till .I.INI h' wit/, il.iinl. Aii.lrla, Italy and FruiKV whlth hilli-il 2 .II p. .s rarad I r Ne Veto In LI.K's Attitude To Egypt HobgKongK ill One On Be "Free" CAIU'i I %  The newspaper AI Alii commenting on llnli.h FOM *n k. ffcL Secretary Anthoi i -ri„' mom "" Bforpt "> UM Co nu noni HOtfG K.iN<;. i-.i. a A i omroumsl n< wg| Canton ha* warned hat 'the di ill Kong oq i The Oorsrnot rlU not ring mourning. %  social : Carnival snd III Cru'rel are not %  I ' %  ... be i eld on Friday for formally lMV# passing Raaolutksns of %  ympathy Madom* Shg wu$m %  Chambei k ,v, ,hc Comnutti ld locperalion amtOl "'1 < to pass vote Ctfcono Tea? g poem and said I thItoyal mesoag. *hc wanted them to f SVt She a*kel thai h> • H anil be Hban led froot U i oua yoke of thtImp i j. %  %  t,-.',.. i at) ... mu l DP the 1 %  i the 1 %  [OIL nd sugar II babies r .11 The insti.. i arrted on In n %  Sf*JLa8S*c ssSm"^ c.i I. in i. lud. toward Ih. I UOB li ..-i'i. %  < thai %  ""' n '"" %  .11 ... i .-,•.., ifln Horu when Bden .iii.i!i..ri lhal ... Ilemenl coulil IM I , i I Anmi,-Eypli,.n |„ ,||..„.,| nbvmlv. ; I buad on Eavpl. nnil ,.,„„, '"':',. „ I I ti.InK trial Hnnr K.mg wan AI Ahram treat I ... ...... tan lhal IT at km-j Jogs want maiaaf il ItatepO Rul I ond In J lOOOde,-. I %I.SO \\ \ll \lll.l I'I III\ A llf.l<\ CHOW H. JASON JONi.S .; lu., Lid.-Dl.lrlbulon CHILDREN'S FOOTBALLS Size 1 $339 Size 2 $3.92 Size 3 $5.05 Genuine leather complete with bladder just like the real thing. For boys (rom the ages of 10 to about 12 CAVE SHEPHERD & CO.. LTD. 10. II. 12 & 13 Broad Street TAPEX INHALANT i BREATHE . (he anMeptic vapour (rom yoi.r hondkerc^.O* by day or from your p-llow at night or use the VAPEX INHALE* — handy 'or daytime Easily recharged from standard bottle. On Suitat ALL DEUG STORI S



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THE KING IS DEAD: LONG LIVE THE QUEEN Business And Offices Closed i-i% %  ill < KIM,II \\l I'M.A* I 1.1. li The Kiu died ut 10.1.1 a.m. today, February 6th. 1952. The Kint: who retired to rest List night in his usual health pasted peacefully away in his sleep early this morning. Princess Elizabeth in Nairobi. Kenya, immediately became Queen. It is expected that Princess Elizabeth will fly back to London immediately. The Km^ died the same place he was born on December. 14. 1895. The announcement of day m reeaaet <>( tbe death <>f EDI Death came as a stunning surprise to Britain, who thought i*3?** !*£ 5\3 that the King was on his way to recovery from h,s lun U &w? J l^ffES operation on September 26* and has been well enough to go Street show.,, the portrait of H to Sandnngham for his favourite sport of hunting Majesty the King draped ir Queen Elizabeth and Princess Margaret were at Sandring"fiX.TJilS? Z^S* .,.e ham when the Kin*.died. The Km* had been out m the J &*3£ country si da yesterday, both morning and afternoon and apble rjgns of sorrow and the one peared to be in good health. HIS MAJESTY King GEORGE On the announcement of death| M *£*>thc K,llK of HiSIXTH died peacefully in hi* %  to-day all public functions sleep this morning. King George< throughout Britain were immedi% % %  cended the throne on UetemtM.'-.mely cancelled. The British 1936, at the abuicaliun of brother King Edward Eighth. His Majesty will be fuciceoed by Her Royal Hu.hn,&* princess Elizabeth, Duches* of Edinburgh now on a tour with her husband. Second Mm of His late Majesty King George V. and of Hu' MajeMy Queen Maiy. King George vnU born at York Cottage. Sandrlngham. December 14. 1884. Hu Majeity succeeded lo the Throiu December 11. 1936. and w.is crowned at westDunstar. May 13, 1937, havlnif married, April 2. 1923. tlf .ID Angela Marguem.-. daughtei "i the Hth Earl of Strain mo re and Kiiigtvn nc His Successor II.R.H. r-HlNCLiS EUZAliETH Alexandra Mary. DUCIH burgh, Lad> Q| UM Qartar, CX, F.Hi, Grand Oordon oi toe Legion of Honour, Heiress Presumplivt lo the 'throne; Colonel Grenadier Guards. Colonci-iuChief 10/5 Lancers mid Argyl and Sutherland Highlanders. Bagbneni dc Chaudiere, 48th Highlanders ol Canada. Hoy.il Duro.ui l.igni Infantry and RaUway and Haiooui Brigade. South Allies, Senior Controller Women's Ruy.d AimCorps. Commodore Sea Ranger Section Girl Guides Association, Chief Ranger of the Girl OuldOS, Dame Grand Cross of the Ordci of St. John of Jerusalem, Pivsident of the Royal College <>1 Music. Grand Master of the Guild of Air Pilots, burn at 12, bruion Street. London. W.l. April 21, 1926. married November 20. 1X4.*, at Westminster Abbey to HH 11. the Duke of Edinburgh, K.C; Lieutenant, H.N. 1'crsrmst Ante de Cemf.l.i the Km (born June 10, 1921). La*l Goodbye King George Mood baiMlllMll In ihe bitte. srtnd when be saW goodbye to his daughter at a London airport. Bom QO the 14Ui December 189"). the second son or King George Fifth and of Queen Mary who survives him at the age of 84. the late King succeedcu to the throne on the 11th December 1936 ;iftcr the ubdieation of his eldest brother King Edward Bin. Britons remcniberrd tbe King as he sounded halting SBd urcd when he gave his customary nationwide broadcast on Christmas Day. Son"" ihouaht he was speakin*:" with pca% diltVulty. Pun* Minister Winston Chiirchill told of the Kings death I early hour and immediately summoned a meeting of the Cabinet Privy Council The meeting of Uio Privy Cour cli — disunguisoed by political luwierb appointed by the So 1 vian to advise him on eoosuiuUonsi matters—wdl be ntld later to-day. Parliament will meet this afternoon to hear a statement by toe Prune Minister expressing tin nation'ssorrow. The King's lung resecuon last September was his fifth operation since 1914 when his appendix was removed. His Hist operation as King in March 1949 was a lumbar sympstheclomy with view to Improve the blood supply to the right foot and to safeguard this for the future A few months before this in November 1948 an official announcement that die King was suffering from obstruction to the circulation In his right leg -vas the first indication to the pu jlic of his HI health. Broadcasting Corporation which flashed the news at 11 16 GMT. closed down for the day except for news and shipping broadcasts. The announcement concerning the period of court mourning pected shortly but the order will|'h nave to come from the new Queen. The Court went Into mourning for nine months after the death of King George Fifth. The King's list puhlir IBMB1 w;i* his mi-port farewell last Schools uMBfi wfcaah were Harrison College and Combcrmerc dga wen !. -i-.i lmlf-•. hi. arrival l the hold. mally T.K" """* I," """f iM"i"8 m looked unusually good. Mid he if he sensed, he would itevei see his daughter again" he He stirnrMed the crowd* by standing barebeaded in Icy wind Ihouch hi* hand, wore blue with cold. "Princess Margaret was irawn with cold and the teeth of %  peetators were chattering, but the King stood up well." Princes* Elizabeth will return lo Britain si Ihe esrllest opportunity; II na learned today. The King had recently felt | ifflciemly recovered to take up BOOM threads of his opd social life. Last Wednesday, he paid his first. vi.it lo ihe theatre. since his operation and held hi* last party before his daughter left for Kenya. The King was to have returned to j London from Sandriiigham within a fortnight. He had planned to hold an Investiture to presentI (.late awards on February 17. If I itoUowe*. the King's body may be taken first to a liille : prtvaa Chapel in the ground* at S-mdringham. AfU--r that It willprobably be brought to London nd then taken in state to Windsor -Royjl CasUc. 2S miles froea j London—before the funeral. But I i rangements must wait on the aeeision of the new Queen. Normally the coronation of a ew Sovereign follows a year or ighteen months after accession. King George was crowned in Westminster Abbey on May 12. 1937 six months after his accession. He became King when his brother now Duke of Windsor gave up the Throne after full *cile political controversy which followed his decision to marry a • ominonei the American born Mrs. Wallis Warfield Simpson. Queen Mary, the late King'.mother now becomes Dowager Queen Mother and Queen Eliza. oeth becomes the Queen Mother The question still unresolved u the title to be taken by the ne Quearrt t. us band ex sailo.I'nnce Philip. Duke Of Edinburgh, who la thirty. Last tim. Britain had a Quean—Victoria (1837 to 1901)—her husband Prince Albert look the title of Prince ConThe harbour < at work with schoon and diwhnrKiti. t re-isl .lur • Meet Today Both houseof the Legislature will meet at II %  m. to-day for! the puipose of receiving an ad-[ dress from His Excel! %  %  Governoiregarding the death of H.M Kinu G mormiiK twd p* nvpect* in UM I ; alter whli Hi I v (.'hief Jlymore. Kt adjoin Court. riit pgeasrnaj >t>-ii to uieu I %  %  %  %  i %  Judges and Pol i will ." I Tliii**' pgl I Kl., Htl ,1 II \ \ i II Hans -.11. ; %  4 i! A |l V, I \ I. Hi •' I Walwvt HiW. mm.1.1 it. v. r MI c B irlltli. M. llors Willlsi Mi W R Deputy W '1 %  art; Horn "' wsi„ Mi W W Reec. K Boll E II. l--g.il Draughtsman: Mr li H. 1 aTai I; Mi I 8 B 1> Mi i> I M..lone. \|i IQueen Elizabeth Returning Home It is expected to*; Elizabeth will U.v back to London taruuediatcly. The King died the same Place dc was born Dec. 14 IMS. Announcement of death came as a stunning surprise to Britain who thought ihe King was on his way u> recovery from a lung operation on September. Queen Elizabeth and Princess Margaret Were at S.m.lrmgham when the King died. The King had been %  ui m ihe countryside yesterday both morning and afternoon and appeared lo be of good health It was a sense of duty alone which carried him through bleak December. Queen Elizabeth Matted ItM 11 mount the UirOflM of the Hi'tiih aaaptre after bat r J, r K P'*tf tendara ly brokr the news to i %  death ->f Kim: at the Royal Air Force Base of El Adcm in Libya at about 0530 G M.T on Thursday and arrive |truin London at about 16 30 G M.T to-morro" Crowds of silent of all races lined the *•! of thr .small farmer's l Queen's party passed tsWHUfti At thf airport itself, aol) u l and military off %  | M The Queen Was dressed in a Irnple beige dresa and w! P I The iii;ki need talklrt icnant General Sir Alexander %  al of &-' Air., i Wbfh the luggage was hurriediv (ll ii .-.board the plane and the baJTM %  < the cornei .1 Ihe field were lit li %  N". the Queen Mounted the i imp leading to the door of the plane, turned, and managed I tmlU [Ol he disapgeaMd In Tears Elizabeth, the new Queen, burnt Into l*ers When Us* new of hei father's death was broken to her awl Lodge in N-.. i deckled to n> baeh to-daj i" Lo n do n —It flight hours. The news was first withheld %  riapptb to the i.kige loielly unprepared >oi Die now thai wwi to tall on ihem In an btstanl all alabonte plans foi then lo ihe ground %  %  prepaie then n Indl M The le.tinaliip Oeaali whtel n have taken .it Mombasa, her M.i^ at half | I i • disconsolate. ,i ihe couple to Nairobi stand fag Ul B) theOl I The Atalanta has ln-en icfn-keu Hid will fly via Entebbe (fjganla) and El Adem on the North African const where It will refuel It will pick up n Jjcsh air crew at El AdenBJM ML.* My non stop i.. London*! airport where it a assarted to arrive si IBOO O.M.T Prtaea Qhajrlei nurr-year-mid on -.1 Hi. %  Quei heli lo 'tie ihrona wl hi g> OH Page 5 I lepu Mi I M Shilstone, Mi A DaC Boyce Mi Mi M Hi L E K <;iii Mi \i. w M i Armstrong \n Hutehlnaoi M KB Mr II (I B*.C I w i Qrtmth, Mi R i i %  ONIVt. i %  • alee INTER-CHANGE OF TELEGRAMS Death of His Ma|eal KiniQgajfgg VI 'Itie fullowlnc Ub'xrjni" bava hern inlerehangrd be* tweea Ibe Bee r atari <>i Si its t.t III r (III I .Hid IIIi i • tlir (iovern I Mi NUI III. .ill.in. I ef M lo inform >u that He. Majel> him. Geoijcr VI. pawned away last nlshl •' il-'rnni Ihe Oavei I tir IIIK-i liwill of tile d^jlh ut Ills M ,,., ho... Geerge vi. ha* ben. resolved lt.nl.>d< with Ihe deep %  -I ib-lr.-— .nd I -vrml mi behalf ul in. (.IIUMUMII-III •iui priiair ef the. laatad w iM r. --um ..I in.I ul 11. i and hiMHi>ll svmpalhv with Ber Hajeatj uurrn Bttaaath, llrr MlJaafu Hie GEOBGE MAl.toi.M THOMSON I public quaatioti \ hall be the interorejtitsoi. .. i. I myttari .m-\ :ll-ileiineil .illiee which I ll.IVMm to Ihg rjuaaUon, .iicudin.: iMwdf 'i the haul nlid 'he llfnlustloni gel him by Lemparmmenl .mil telenl To %  id ol them can the que li wit to hsuuj George VI. u fc UH *ili %  %  commnnwenllh n u-n i nunonre lib a raj Mvelouuient went on, A of then* own Into play. ( %  i -.'-re wa %  'hat the % % %  i.a h rhange ggOUld %  %  Ide of %  %  1 I • mi Page t %  > b Ult witi %  llfd lo .. role wliler %  He had %  which al %  Hi I d DO! ii'knlng and • %  iii. ibere wen %  • "-ik NO %  h Hal eldei brothi %  1 iiighlu inti let > %  %  eawan I tl Kin, ,i ., %  till Oil, Crbrn.. Years of War and Austerity LOMDOtl | %  m e stead) %  < %  hing hi* In the gruelling war years .mdl He asked % % %  Mand|foo1 The> ordered •• ion.pi. ih Mftoiiiv.il. lusicriw hiun-!'-Im. ih in and united in th. j advised lh. .. swerving devotionh III herd I of list tour to Ntw Ze.lam. gnd ,i,t ,n hi. pcmle The k day. j.he-d| AstrsliHe and yueen Elisabeth MjiUdland war can no longer oe r-mrif. u UOWrjj l hey were themsi'iv • efletd i"" ight i God !" To that i aapeoded %  doru.t< Um brother, the Duke of Kii.t. w.e %  idem on hK lUng'Oeorga V a wave of unpopularity whici surged against him at of his reign so his secend son deLcrsed public fear*. The visit of King George and Queen Elisaix'h lo France in 183H prow .i great turning point The Frrr.-1 l eople look the royal couple to their heart* and this iriumph wa. %  outasiouOn Iheir return boarH there were %  OOPQI of mass loy.dtv remlnicent of th) King Oeorge V Royal VWel The nation suddenl> aweiu le the fsct they had .. friendly King ..ho with hisnulbig *if' little daughter, had a incere and %  itnple humanity arui desire lo 'irm-il. domestic happy 1 Since then people h..• I.I.I..UOM Prbv |he King and trftieer. %  When the war w-over, th Ii i*d buck into pi outine by paying a vi %  i%  i reb IT to April 24. IMS. thKing Queen. Princes Klizaheth and Princess %f*j h *. %  Africa 10.00*) lies by al %  Africa .iteil no slackening in the tremcr,' of engngementi planned those close t" IR the exil vedding and his Silver Wedding log*! physician B Klled in in the north Inter, his Six doc to lumbar sympa hcstomy were parforrned 11. tmnroveiht blood %  hu riKhi fiH.t Deeaoi wrsonted tut ruled thai bis enk< I't to thr i n,n. in Cmnplete Ke%| I ii<-i his doctor; or-li n<: nniod of i Ee his recovery all his publu engagement" for m\ least foui %  from Buckinih.iri Palace said that investigations Showed lunges to fd In Ihi Hleil %  lav in Ixndon for further neay Sept 21. r-d announcing the neees"!I) N,I ihe Kinc lo undergo an in the near future' | K.e.Miiri to Ihe thron. troflg characici %  ., ng bore 'he mark isnese and revealed quslil.es which were :< %  rduous, unexi %  i all up>>< was born at York Cot!age Sandrinuh..n I" %  '< -. n Vi.tona WH 'bserving the anniver*.n -• Aluert Wanted lo he a Sailor He and his brother..rmal Englih b fr tutor %  %  1 . I pgl .ii d <>< poeun> at Daetm'niTii I,VI ,i period Of %  %  ned dinary DM Nnvy re%  p. |u i Lie .. At !H youn* Prloea A1*-I1 wai -' a midshipman aboard HJf! Colling nu ol Mi .i • M i %  gun turret In %  %  %  it Jutland He carried durhiK Irk) %  %  I .... | M .nt Bvl %  i I officer bad %  s. s. L.>IIIII-:SS or srouwh While In Barbados ,-iin\ It) \".u le \ i-H BUI -l"i.* I iliert> eiul (nmpiitty (LonJoined R \ I Dvery hi Royal All •TviriK 111 %  %  s|H-oiai rtudy He took i %  The he -i %  %  es M rage e I OL \\r en SI.MIMSS el: qMbUt) I m;li>l> liinn iniliulini; WHl eu-ed ( .ishmere Swealers mid < Mtl :,, O Wge g \n;vle Beefa UM M IV HADB sol vi NIKS \ gm I \I.TV. • CAVE SIIEFIIEKI) & Co.. Ltd. Ill II. | \ I : Bl '' >irtel.



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Tin-Rsnw n r.m \itv : iw n.\i:n.\nos ADVOCATE PACE SEVEN BY CARL ANDERSON 'LINT OF THE FLYING SQUAD V -BY ALAN STRANKS ft GEORGE DAVIES V Ml Mag \ OOMMt DMM* * O %  "" %  %  \-f*^';J 5V ONDIE ?LASH GORDON BY DAN BARRY l.'iHNNY HAZARD BY FRANK ROBBINS AH-M.' I w* PitwT WITU A I .A AU Vi VV CUANC£<;_.' W.U BE ALKE AS TWIN 0*TfaK %  uiNr.|NG UP FATHER BY GEORGE MC. MANUS A TOAST TO YOUR HEALTH!! LET WINCARNIS TONIC WINE ASSIST YOU TO GUARD IT BUY A BOTTLE TO-DAY. BY CHIC YOUNG IT PAYS YOU TO DEAL HERE SPECIAL offers to all Cash and Credit Customers for Thursday to Saturday only M'M I \l OI'r'KHS nrr mm iivailuhlr ill our Hrimrhr* TneetKidr, S|i-iyliisi* II mid Snuu Sim i Usually Now VtmOy NOW Tins Corned Mutton 68 60 Tins Cooking Butter (III.) 98 Tins Heinz Soup: Tomato—< )nion—Circpn Pen Pkgs. Bird's T. Jellies Bottles Heineken's Beer Raisins per lb. .20 .m .26 .21 Pkgs. Jacob Cream :illr. Crackers 49 N Ml til) Til I SCOTT Ci. t*8te riAi8 COLO .\ A AOL ( %  II <> I I It I I S Visitors! Will KK ABI OU STAYING T WIIF.RK IK> YOU LIVE ? If v %  -i rc sluyini; ul liny of the hotels in the lliistlnys or Worthing district, if you live iinvwhere in or nround lhfc areas, wr would like >mi to know thnt < %  have provided for \iiur convenience A HOOK SHOP mid STATIONERY M 'ii...I. in ..M.I up in il.ih n% spiwe would permit. Hul in case you luive difficulty in finding it wr would like to rxpluln cxmtlv where it is. IK YOU' Mil STAYING ut Ihr Miirine Hotel the Oeeun View Hotel, the II.. .to. Hotel nr the Windsor Hotel, then vou have probably discovered it already because H I* in Gritstone Village, nnr to the above placet. BUT IF YOU ARK STAYING anywhere nearer to town 'I. HI the Ocean View Hotel then you will find our shop in the firM gap on the left, off the llasl : i K s main mud. with u -iijn niiirkrd "Entrance to Marine Hotel". IF YOU M;i STAYING anywhere further from town than the Ocean View Hotel, you will find our shop in the second pp on the riyht uith the si K n "Entrance to Marine Hotel' THIS GAP IS KNOWN AS "BALMORAL CAP" and a few yards up you will liud our shop iiloni; with others in a line of booths opposite Grey Stone Flats. Think of the time you will save not having to coin* to town. ADVOCATE STATIONERY HOOK SHOP SREYSTONE VILLAGE, BALMORAl GAP, HASTINGS /.



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I'M. i FI.I a HAKIIAUOS ADVOCATE IIHK-.I>U IIBKIIRY :. i*s BARBADOS &# AlMXtfTL |r. 1 f .1 Thn.-.l..I •fcraV) 7. INI Kl.\. 4.1 OIM.I VI ar with ihc rest of %  i monweolth and with the Whole IT lOMof A %  VI. Afui .tars and less Iban tui. geontha, Kinf George pasted Doming of February <>. Utt, He ana lift;. hta lust birtMag O ec ern be g i4. 1951. than m months ai;o thousands of Barbadians ami millions ol people scattered voice at Christmas Um i minded the world that the* llnti.sh in a friendly people and that the British Commonwealth is an assoeiain n of (rtsadly peopled King George 1 a burden thai no prevloug B hits had to bear and ins example has earned the resp< itration ofl all peoples. The Kinn rapt—sintll t<> the world as the French I't J -: %  %  Mir tej said in Paris yesteru .md devotion to the public The lata KIT lllsnHflsMJ HI the minds of all peoples with the tlin| I irmly life and the Kind's private life had flection in tha wider family life ol the Comm'mwe.ilih. since his position can admirably be Lib i (athat axarcisini <; % %  Ipllna and aarnlng love, tad at no tlma and in no place ruling I' '• %  or tyranny. Thai !ommonwoaltl] hai teal i father: theII Kim: aM I good man. I visited Barbados as a cadet i Q M Park and amunK other duties] look 1 and la during his lather's lllnasa In 1938-39 On December 10. Lfl ad %  throne is brothai Kmg Edward VI11 ah. T ii.ii took p o U, -minMei Abbej m, May 1?. It With Quaan EUiabeth, tha King vfgtted I wfound land in May and June 19.*19. He v Brat reigning British nvaraign to vietl tha United States ol Anu-nci For the llrsl time in the hiatorj oi thi Conunonwaalth he performed Royal funeUona in a Dominion when he ap|>cared in the Canadian Parliament, gave Hoyal assent to BlUi and ;• % % %  . the Ift ttad states Mimsi. i i.. Canada Ha also %  i Canadian-Anieiiean Tu'aiv oi Commerce. Dunni; this nvon-Waah tour the King visin-ii ; %  a.it ;it Washington and was welcomed by ihe United Stales l Dunni; tha aocond world wai he visited the british Army in France and throughout the war he shared the perils and sufferings of tha Bnglish people. Uuckinnham Palace was t h r I e • hit and a delayed action bomb which was dropped on September 11. 1940blew out windows of Then Majesty's ai ,: i.ati a tinRoyaJ chapel at Buckingham Palace was wieeked llu. lied;, ol llaiha...... of tha many occastoni whan he was easily seen in London. Th.y m.i> ramambOff I mormni; n K.i -u tin QjwdaOl when the King, tha Quaan and thaPrincawai aapeetpfl Barbadians and other seivn chatted InformaJl) with leweraJ Tliey maj rai all ai othar morning on Yutorv Day wham tht King 1 hand remained In perm Ebi more? than an hour while troops of all I i hed past tha II.i 1 ci the Kin" speak With unatfected simplicity ma function whendial servants of the Colonial i n wards I rum lhair Sovereign. \'. 'iaha and New I ung of I the operation on the Kim .huddei ul throughout the rlu In L9BJ th* world lesjlts of the serious operation on the King's lung which was mad on September 21. It was cheered by the news that he was enjoying Christmas at Sandnn^ham and was able to go out tlaf, riiin^day. His Majesty carried out his first public engagement since that %  when he stood in the cold winds of a London airport waving goodbye to Princess Elizabeth who was leaving with band to carry out the long promised rwfldtad efeM lfl Australia and ;., .v /...land Who could have foreseen onawaah ago that this great and good King. | this father of the Commonwealth should I III I All KIM. .i om.i %  > Kt-wi Pair 1 %  i the ne>ii<>ii -it! oi the nation* ul ti dilution was %  L'tamuasuai. the nutuulion ol the monarchy remained liable, a chH Da* credit muH 0* given *o ttu modest and gentle t., was the titular political na*** tt .ill the British wcielies. It may, indeed, be Bald all the credit should go to (.••mi VI. He bad faithful servants both in the Palace and in Whitehall. I il bond of com tercet and outlook usttcd him wim with the solid middle portion of the people. Above .ill. Bs enjoved the au*uirariK help and comfort nf tin charming and spirited lady who hit Queen .'i begun at the Naval nd iyCollege Oabornt The man, who ment otba %  aslid have a longer experience of After the collapse of France, war than any British monarch when a German onslaught was since the Middle Ages, wai, to his awaited, plant were drawn up (or own great happiness, noi denied a the Royal Family lo leave lor : .L|iiiMn i>: lire Canada. II.marriage in 1923 to the It may be assumed that only in Lady Elizabeth Bowaa-Lyon. the direst need, only faced by the da ugh tar of the Earl of Strathmost imperative advice from his more, whom he had known since responsible Ministers. would childhood was. as turned out, C*eorf VI have left this Island. the moat successful single enterprise of hp life. The young couple settled WX US. Piccadilly, which was. before long, the scene of a healthy nursery which housed first Princess Elizabeth and four years later, Princess Margaret Rose. These years before his father'th in 11*38 were passed by thi When Parliament, in the dan I i0o* tag v ii aoff] pre** %  with its congratulations, he replied, speaking to both Houses in Westminster Hall: "1 have done my best to discharge my duty as a constitutional Sovereign if a f.-ee people" It was the claim of a singularly self-erTacing rrwin Yet could any irouder or bolder assertion have -de by a man glittering proud i been opened He had i:lven his own form t< •he Rritish conception of a Son the King had, with the help of lose on whom he had the right i call, found his own answer to delicate question with whim hi> have died so tragically soon and plunged reign, like every other refgn. hi the world in IQfTOWT In our grief we will r our new gracious Queen on whom has fallen the great burden borne so heroically, so well by our late lamented Sovereign, His Majesty King George VI. and to Mis Majesty's nephew who left Barbados Isjht and the whole Royal Family we olTVr on behalf of our readers our condolences il*a.h"i. % % % %  % %  Ut M hii >oung couple in the busy cerewith genius and personality '. !" ^.n.-i \ ltr wh.ch fjlb to the added a few words o( acknowledg*he British eoncrpiion >f a son.L ,,__i„ --^'.IWUM. M dn. -,. "££ UPSETS-„,, ,.„,, this must at times have occurred ounger son of a Sovereign. If ment to the ceaseless help given ihe Duke of York had little natural him by the Queen. And il was true aptitude for it. his consort made 'hat In war as in peace, he had up for this by her vivacity god b *"" blessed by all that a wife* tharm. But over these events, •"£ nd good sense c-r tedious as they sometimes were, >'*' bought with il a POUUeal there did not yet fall the shadow !" ** n i * m '" Bnlaln th Ptmmy WIMB FOR some time now it has been advocated that the Governments of the Waal Indies demand from the schooni tered in these colonies and catering to lnlor> aotonial trade that they should cnrr\' radio equipment BO as to be able to receive hurricane warnings or to communicate with the port service In cases of distress or danger. This crying need for some safety maasnra to save the lives of those compelled lo travel by this means has been con%  :\\ ignores] V\ ithin Ihe last few weeks another Schooner, Ihe Zenith, has disappeared withoul any trace The Zenith left Barbados on December Itttb foi British Guiana with a load of stone and was last seep off Ihe const of Georgetown OH December 22nd. !' was known that she was leaking, but her pumps were worklnt] and tha captain of the steamer which sighted her. was of opinion that she would make land in a few hours' time and that all would be well. Several weeks have now passed and U is to be presumed that the Zenith with all aboard has been lost. This is stark tragedy and one which could have been avoided The Advocate newspaper has pointed out on more than one occasion that in view of the difficulties of steamship travel between tha i.sl.mds many people who would not otherwise do so have been COBII travel by scbouin'i It is singularly unfortunate that they should be condemned to travel by boats. sometimes in the hands of men without any knowledge of navigation and always at the mercy of the wind and the deep. Baaldai the danger of having to guess iiu'ii araj From one bland lo the next, the en have to travel knowing full well thai II at any time there should be rough seas or damage to the vessel, they will not be in .ommuiucation with land or with any %  bin winch would come to their rescue. This loss of life has occurred several times within the last few years and continues without any notice being taken by ihe Governmenta who allow people to build schooners and carr\ passengers without the necessary and adequate means of communicating with shore stations. And it is tragic thai these same governments have contributed to the most elaborate " nf Kln Mward haste -an operation over -hich VUTt krlef and eventful reign the King's cousin presided as l The Abdication .-ady to pay lt tribute to .J2JSL *o?i'* 5?*2H ^' f *? one wh. cinnot^cape hi* duty Sm^^ ret show. Ml mflex.blc resolve m go^ and loVal brother -ThV letter dehc itc hour and against %  ertain pertonal handicaps. How Ud be 'icmif On what was this per-onal triumph founded? iv it was built on the respect which the British people ln*lmi-tivrlv give tn me who %  Opli nvch 'hich ha show II brilli no The new India remained withi: Its fold, though casting ofT allegiance to ,i i.istan and !.HKI and loyal brother The letters 7."" ,„. mTnomtnlMW n Can-iischarelnc il lliird-won ji> %  %  -1 o, n .u w„ ,„ mm %  ,^,,?. 7:n"'," n dSSi lh !-: ?" understands the which his elder brother i mpalhy never monstration of urn that won him dilemma esteem. .. ,. ].„,,. might be argued tha.' his falters painful anxiety not to be in the Nobody can read these docuforcground of the picture was %  merits, so simple and so sincere, positive advantage when it came without gaining the Impression to the political side ol hi* 'ask lf,M '' under the formidable wing But no King, however ngldlv o1 George V. a pleasant and deonsUtutlonal, has ever been .< voted .'"."V.'> lu "\ "*n_up. Not success through the mere accuniU' ion of negative virtue* He hai lership exerted? Ict vlril( ,. ,. lU ut 1(1 Ic could not be a political nghim. And hai Bl act, M Mcadlna. Hfl had neilher the desire W a to give tlj. ex-Klnu nor the gifts for a glittering social title as Duke <>• Windsor did the 11 or ambition of iptive add to the p :i time passed monarchy was shorn of even thi* BMBCW means that this irould Involve. His was essentially moral lead given at a time when moral standards were shaky. The %  iv soon realised tha* ihe home life of the Royal Family had essentnl hippinc-s and sweeta which wa netthei loo otdfashioned nor too conventional. This was something that could not fall to appeal. In Britain the question of moral value* Is rarely more than an Intellectual exercise. If the Royal home reflected the lively and cheerful disposiUOB Of the Queen, it was also a tribute to the sound and steadfast character of the King, his tolerance, good sense, and sim. 'fiumtoTm 5 arty thnt proposed to make nlon republic Amid such .' woitei tfebaitt* %  red, BOBM of u needless, many might hawseen only the image of decay George VI took %  tees siipcrllcial view "Corne erhsl mas be said on ore ncciislnll, 'nothing will ever shake mv belief that this mtrj '-it hoarl ,gue. had '"i;! eminence of his | (AM ihl*. however. .ask n se.f M which tl clalist. Sir Uonal Loguc. prescribed foi his hesitation in speech The result was that. ii. Tiall.a Iteaas the Uur part of his relan. he .. t Tp ? l ,K \ U f, ., •MSbta toMteer compara*? • *"£* *5 'iv. H long a nc 1 ured pace that was not ill-suited *"*>*ed Use OnM real -••> n.toms oi I diction decluic His appearance boo. As his kinglv title he chose the MS"* of fatigue and strain wln-h name ""Ooorsje* ith probably the after a time, it was hopca he hni intention of emphasising at that cast off. moment the tone >f moral uprightBut an affection of the leg postand even severity which his poned %  projected vi-n to Austra\mld the Coronaj| n and jynver trouble m his hunt at last made this cherished Journey impossible. This i* known to have, been, plicily. (AH im nowever. ,s Uuu sp | r ndours with all their not to say that he had been medieval disco-iforts, he bore denied his share of the heredlhimself with the dignity—and as Thu He ".gWafl bv the public his An eVrly duty, undertaken in %  " n ^ I a d ll i •5*^* K.^'"* portion of the ndmlratlon acrorded the deepening shadow of war. was no P*ri"U'-r "ff' ln nu, ow Ofl one side of the Journey to Canada undertaken magnetism, he believed that •! happv fireside, that supreme ideal in 1" His tour of that Common'"* Commonwealth could of the British t iijssuininu Virtues And so by exercise of many unassuming virtues. bv faithful obedience to the call of duty, onerous and ultimately exhausting as It was, by displaying that complex of mialttics most conveniently described as those of a "gentlecalth country was Interrupted prosper with a King as the central for a four-day visit lo Washington human symbol and that the Kuui and th.United States. It was the must go to visit all his iieopl"*. first lime that %  British Sovereign During those years, howc-i had crossed UM borders of the life brought him a new source ul Union lost to the Crown in part at happiness in the marrluge of hit least l>> the oi unary of Ins dls, ; ... daughter, fill I ISM BbBsDOth taut .ineeMoi. .. it g< III ,„ ,.[,„ Dukl 0 f Kin : ITSfe ld at Balmoral to hold a Privy Councession to the throne cil that proved to be the foreThe first sign that hi* heili! 1 runner of a graver sort of shooting had taken a sinister turn cam-.' The Dark Days the day after he attended the inIn his broadcast on the night •tallation of Knights of the Bad war was declined, the King told "> Westminster Abbey. An %  Hack his peoples lo stand "firm nnd of influenza pemsted too long lo> united 11 and warned them thai his subjects' peace of mind. "dark days'' wen ahead. Confirmation of their irovn The) were, for country and fears came when the King \v M King. too. No war since George resting at Balmoral. Bv thai tune cstc-rs had taken ,i wa s evident that .ireiw, tc ord and armour dlw ,rder was taking it appeared that the man who had be< n Duke Of York was not without some of lhat political sense which has contributed to make the British throne so Illogical and so valuable an institution. He was born at York Cottage. Sandlingham, on December 14th 1895 The lll-henlth which was so heavy a burden through his life— and has had so tragic a conclusion VI's remoter made Its first appearance during the field ulln swan IKI unwu disorder was iIhc Great War when Prince AIlo risk all with their feudalities. Io „ of h( slr ,. nR n Phoiogr ^, bert. as he was called until 1920. ever came so close to a British ,,.,|,_,— rt u. thp naiiianaTaVf % % %  was a midshipman in H M S Colmonarch. Buck.ngham Palace was K ( SuT ^„ !" ^!E!I!-w llngwond with the First Battle bombed on nine occasions, on one rd ,' n, r own r !" ? •"*** Squadron Obstinate gastric trounf which the King and Queen ^' h '? p *h >uld no read betble was at last diagnosed as duothrough a window of their Lon-*£ n ,hc l,nw of mr "'" i bui denal ulcer. don house saw the bombs falling n %  This, though it Involved an that were to wreck the Chapel c had greatness thrust upor o|ieratton. dM not prevent him Royal. him. But his reign :n| too ) %  .' from serving with the BPaSl oi a The King t--'. the same risks as ai It was. showed that he had the 12ln. gun in ihe Ballk of Jutltnd, his MbJncU, carrytnj on with his moral courage equal t a fitting climax to a naval edurawork as thc\ did He would not responsibilities \ VIS! | OH |\ NEW YORK -By HAIIM V MILLAR HEW YORK, Jan. Si. %  of the eui -eason In %  was riKht. it wi i \< ind l wa* i %  %  %  eratui %  gsnored I flrees one day 111 suddenly i" the ROOd Del: n rt Of Ihl mercury Do i other, oi In fact one wag Slung l>yle from sum a heavy •now storm I to spend 11 in New York. %  ke tba m Jot itj oi folk I.i 4 normal pi iiarv was .' rreat car*) has to be taken the) the numinn !t.-v not the presai m rate Taa i oh. Ihlnsji %  urred on Jar American Airlinra line in too low on the i i %  i ,' \Yv. .1, *,., .ni|or! %  It bareu n roof of the llattin High School for I'.ilK she;.i, d < %  !! the lofl I "tie nd crashed Inl kllllni .,ii 13 parsone eboard Plve i In Us housi i imadied als %  trig was the second holocauat tu vlsJi Newark in .. shorl tune On Dec 16. a Miami Airlaiied in a i..kc gme Held. Incd to return hut crashed Into the noorfaj river with the leei ofl H Ihree tin Jan :i ., Northesal AJrUoei (nan Boston undenhol an instrument approach to La Guardln t jliiii(:c ,il welloine. and the gallant skipper way 11-1 iuaded il Hn lit...mi -it % %  ride in a car He had pel \ %  Bid that he WUtad to walk and il was well that he changed his mind He is not a huge man. but loobl every Inch a sailor. His square chin, and clear, cut Jaw revealed %  .nation and he recalled fin rnc some line* of my boyhood daw: Thai's the ti-au at •* %  Thai's Ihi u-aw at ra 1 got a big thrill at easing II.. i. ifld I I heeling people many of them fimn fourth UD t(. lentil . to go beet b Lhe W.--I Indies '" I later found out how diilteult II wse ' %  him. although he had experienced "inter, to undenaanH how anyoi %  .11 suniime in exchanaa tor cold and mo* None of them had ever been lO l"loride or Miami, and could barel] picture a land where the sun -hone every day. and where you did not have to use heavy coats and rubbers for many month* of the year. Thev are all ootential visitors to ihe West Indies at least Barbados when the> grow up. make enough money and are entitled to long holld For many years New York automobile driver* have been driving on their parking lights This "antiquarian 'acetylene light' regulation" a* il has been described goes by Ihc board on Sunday. Pec 3. and *!"" %  Honda %  over ning imlnatton goes into effect This is an effort, according to the sioner, to reduce the appattlna number ol night trsiTv '^cldents Night pedeshMfl .".idem* make up a "iteggeglng perceateaa of traffic fatalities and injuries" ln the city Analysis of these night accidents, plus research by experts m night visibility has led to the conclution thai night driving with parking lights only Is a primary factor. Uniolty, holh the victim and the driver say they hadn't seen one another. The new order requires use of low beam headlights, but driving with top bright) |g prohibited, except whinthe street lights fall lo disclose Objects within .IDO ft .md then will be permitted odj if ihere Is no apt n aching car within 500 ft. 1 1 4 oarking lights, will be continued ool) on Mipw signs %  pectncatly prescrllte use of Mich Iighlv Today was :,)*.) the last day for affixing Ihe 1952 License Tags to your automobile In an effort to conserve metal it was decided lhat no new stat. Ucenai plate would i,'" \ Bo wiiin you paid your fee you got a mrtal tag bearing the you "51"—and you had lo attach this to the bottom right hand edge of your number plate Nee Yorkers arc like other people, the world over, so Wednesday the coldest day of the winter caught long line* of owners In R Baa] big rush to obtain their auto %  in line" was the text of a big M picture of this c-owd pfdng u >* ha UniMih'.ary Trailing programme, but opinion Ii divided the speed of this speed up. PVi tc hall down u. %  UM nutter has U-en discussed as of thi nation at. draft call Veeterda entered these dlaruashmi 1 opposition to U.M.T.. OS urc is uaueUy called Thi ligious group* are Ihe Council of Church) 1 ol America representing 14",' 1 0 Protestant. Eaatern Ortti Anglican Church*? wtU in U.S.. and the N.v York Boaid of Rabbis The General BOWt tinnal Council at a mc terday acknowledged th. -nd its support of, adequate da* fense measures Hut th. it approved of In an SB to 8 v its •an 1 we believe it i* one thim *.n acknowledge the ncdrafting mm fM a limited per ."rt to meet a spcdflce Inli emergencv.'* and "SflOtl thing for the churche0 support the COfUKTlptloa succeedn^. I the nerouth for a programme if universal military traffting. To o this would be to take a long atgn In Ihe dll The Board of Rabbis. IndOpendentlv VOIced the %  I added. ". U M.T will be a dlsI %  %  will further endanger II spiritual principles upon wtllcL our nation la founded." PAPER SERVIETTES In Plain White SLOW |M-II111n1lr.il ADVOCATE STATIONERY Broad Street & Greystone. Haitingt JhsAs uic Mitch needed Hems f&i the home — we have ihein £1 Sml Iran* TSaS, t A!' 7 fan* beau Van. 1; ; 7 7 1 l IU,nl /*../. (II") /in VryiagPomi nr. //". 12* ''j c.s.pircHER&ca rii..,1. %  un BRUSHED ALL-WOOL BLANKETS $11.17 each These Lightweight Blankets, (only 2.] lbs) have warmth withoul weight. The Full colour range is most attractive and includes plain White. DA COSTA & CO., LID. Jisr MECKEVEB The "DALE" MEASURING TAP IT POURS A DRINK, STOPS AND POURS AGAIN MnilisprnNubli' in Ihv HAM! l.v # %  #.# DA COSTA & CO., LTD. BROAD STREET DIAL 4689










ESTABLISHED 1895

coe ee

TARY 7, 1982





Advocate

NG LIVE THE QUEEN

THURSDAY, FEBF

’ A

THE KING IS DEAD: LO

BUCKINGHAM PALACE, Feb. 6.
The King died at 10.45 am. today, February 6th, 1952.
The King who retired to rest last night in his usual health |

+
' Business And | ‘
passed peacefully away in his sleep early this morning.
Princess Elizabeth in Nairobi, Kenya, immediately became

on 3 ‘Offices Closed!

It is expected that Princess Elizabeth will fly back to|
London immediately. The King died the same place he
was born on December, 14, 1895. The announcement of
Death came as a stunning surprise to Britain, who thought
that the King was on his way to recovery from his lung
Operation on September 26 and has been well enough to go}
to Sandringham for his favourite sport of hunting.

Queen Elizabeth and Princess Margaret were at Sandring-
ham when the Kingidied. The King had been out in the
countryside yesterday, both morning and afternoon and ap-

PRICE : EF







ee .



High Courts
Adjourned

MEMBERS of the Bench
and Bar of the island assem
bled in the High Court vester-
day morning and paid their
respects to the passing of His
Majesty King George Sixth,
after which His LoXiship the
Chief Justice, Sir Allan Col
lymore, Kt., adjourned the



Local business places and Gov-
ernment offices were closed half-
day in respect of the death of His
Majesty the King. Flags were seen
flying at half-staff and the win-
cows of most stores in Broad
Street showed the portrait of His
Majesty the King draped in
mauve and black colours.
| Early yesterday morning people
went about their work with visi-
ble signs of sorrow and the one

.

tes,
8

4 Court,
ared to be in good health. |} topic—that was the death of Hi - st thei
tis MAJESTY King GEORGE On the announcement of death| Majesty the King. Sineee eis Lordship the Chiet
SIXTH died peacefully in his|jto-day all public functions|, Schools among which aces : ,

were |

Â¥ Jus
Marrison College and Combermere _



is ci 7 ce, accompanied His Lordship
sleep this morning. King George! throughout Britain were immedi-



_——_—







als er lose ¢ ee Mr. Justice Taylor, Acting Puisne

1086, at ae Mune co. Deetenber | aie cancelled, The British Fas inte watt Oe Police | Judge, formally announced tha
brother King Edward Eighth ‘ a. Corporation which} @ourts in the island was adjourn- tae Mare’ ae oH . naa

His Majesty will be succeeded jos . 4 e news at 11.16 G.M.T./ eq until further dates and at tha} Sid souecah” Rk wie a. “aa
by Her Royal Highness Princess closed down for the day except/fhree District “A” Police Courts | aréssion of humble auty, I declare
Elizabeth, Duchess of Edinburgh for news and shipping broadcasts. some ten cases were er Ais Court now adjourned Jud
now on a tour with her husband The announcement concerning the|for further hearing. and Police Magistrate

Second son of His late Majesty period of court mourning was ex-| Some houses in St. Michael flew! accordingly in their discret
King George V. and of Her pected shortly but the order will|the Union Jack at half-staff and | The Cour, is now. adjourned

some of the cinemas were closed |

Majes : ; -ga; 2ave to come from the new Queen.
Jesty Queen Mary. King George! me Court went into caieine for | last night.

was born at York Cottage, Sand-

March 1949 was a lumbar sym-

His Lordship the Chief Justice,
ringham, December 14, 1895. His nine months after the death of} Sir Allan Collymore, Kt., His}
Majesty succeeded to the Throne} ®ing George Fifth. | HALF MAST Lordship Mr. Justice G. L. Taylor,
December 11, 1936, and was The King’s last public appean - All the ships in port flew thei Acting Puisne Judge; His Honour
crowned at Westminster, May 12,]4 ce was his airport farewell last | fags at half mast yesterday as al Mr. Justice H. A, Vaughan, His
1937, having married, April 26,| week to the new Queen, when she| mark of respect to. the death of Honour Mr. Justice A. J. H. Hans ’
1923, the Lady Elizabe salleft for Africa, . ‘ ‘i Tee St Sepers. se. SE. SERS chell; His Honour Mr. H. A.!
» the Lady Elizabeth Angela rica, . Three thousand|the King. The harbour was nor- T ? f
Marguerite, daughter of the 14th} people saw his arrival at the air-|jpally at work with ‘schooners Talma; His Worship Mr. E. A *.
Earl of Strathmore and Kinghorne}field. A reporter who was there | Spey Sy : seeded Pu a -e McLeod His Worship Mr. C. L ie
His Successor ante he looked unusually good.| °™® and_dscharging cargo. Walwyn; His Wor hip Mi c W \
, 3 BLA: TH} It was as if . rad 3 Orsnip Myr. G. i
HLR.H. PRINCESS ELIZABETH | “Tt Ww pags By. sensed, he would! Legislature Meet Today Griffith; Mr, Horace Williams
Alexandra Mary, Duchess of Edin- us daughter again” he a vislat ct > 7
; bate tae = GA wrote, “He s i -| Both houses of the Legislature | Registrar; Mr. W. | Jougla , i
burgh, Lady of the Garter, C.L, Me surprised the crowds will meet at 11 a.m, to-day for Deputy Registrar Mr Ww. I
F.R.S., Grand Gordon of the;>Y standing bareheaded in Ic¥| the purpose of receiving an ad-| Laurie, Clerk of the Court; Hon
Legion of Honour, Heiress Pre-| Wind though his hands were blue} Gress irom His Excellency the C. Wylie, Attorney General; Mi
sumptive to the Throne; Colonel | With cold. “Princess Margaret was| Governor regarding the death of W. W. Reece, K.C., Solicitor Gen
Grenadier Guards, Colonel-in- | rawn with cold and the teeth of | 47 \y King George VI. eral; Miss M. FE. Bourne, Assistan: | va
Chief 16/5 Lancers and Argyl and | SPectators were chattering, but the|" is Excellency will wear uni- Legal Draughtsman; Mr. D. H. L.| Pe Tae” me
Sutherland Highlanders, Regimen, | King stood up well.” ltorm. Lady Savage will not be THE LATE KING GEORGE SIXTH Ward; Mr.J. 5. B. Dear; Mr. D.E.| “Sra "Seaguamer ater tua secon p weve i ax tie
de Chaudiere, 48th Highlanders of Princess Elizabeth will re- | present. _ Malone; Mr. E. W. Barrow; Mr a wath the hew hake sd at es en eee :
Canaga, Royal Durban Light: In-| turn to Britain at the earliest | G. B. Niles; Mr. G. L. Farmet RSTIOG CES O Speers
fantry and Railway and Harbour opportunity; it was learned to- Mr. L. A, Williams; Mr. H, Will-| Poy : [7 4 10
Brigade, South Africa, Senior day. e ams, Chief Deputy Marshal; Mir e ate in eor e
Controller Women’s Royal Army The King had recently felt) L. Smith; Mr, C. Mayers; Mr. F 7
Corps. Commodore Sea Ranger | sufficiently recovered to take up| ueen Doyle; Mr. Cummins, Deputy : us >
Section Girl Guides Association,}some threads of his off social life. | Marshals Mr. E.. M. Shilstone By GEORGE MALCOLM THOMSON
Chief Ranger of the Girl Guides, |Last Wednesday, he paid his first| are ee tue 7 ep Hach successor to the throne of our crowned republic
Dame Grand Cross of the Orderj|visit to the theatre, since his| : : sy HOS, Mr P i by t ‘ y ati : veseiniente
; naaienY 3 . oR G ’ ; faced by » question: What shall be the interpretatior
of St. John of Jerusalem, Presi-joperation and held his last party e .. a tr he n Ot Mk oa 7 a 4 my Seal } - . d led Air d ed I ich
dent of the Royal College of|before his daughter left for Kenya. | usciey Ree. we Ne wee atlas lige ye ta ae i a ana ah re waeoal dest ag.
Music, Grand Master of the Guild|The King was to have returned to | 1, Aue KER TE B.C | have inherited .
of Air Pilots, born at 12, Bruton|London from Sandringham with- | Hutchineoht Mr'D A Banfield Hach finds a different answer to the question, according
Street, London, W.1, 2 in . fortnight. He had planned | , evr. H 0. Ste, ¢ amberbatet: Mr to the needs of the hour and the limitations set him by
gg Bie tng Ac ogy M25 sine Teintds we tenaty eu Queen Elizabeth started theJof Nunyaki as the Queen’s party }naut craft Atlanta W hich 2 at ve Paes Mr. R. S. Nicholls temperament and talent, To none of them can the question
th Duk f Edinburgh, K.G,\precedent is foll d th Ki a long journey home Wednesday to | passed through. 5 present at Mombasa airport, The yiand Mr, N. A. Niles, representin have been harder than it was to King George VI.
eee oe ae ae | awe e 28! mount the throne of the British At the airport itself, only a] Were to have spent the day resting} Mr, D. L. Sargeant To giart with, hig temperament,economic fabric of Britain, the
Lieutenant, R.N. Personal Aide de ‘body may be taken first to a little . ; “i ny! 1 & Boyal Lodge Axticled: (Clerks were lao | 1, his 2 v e fe ain, e
2 . dupe Empire after her husband tender=}small. group, pringipally . police's _* : awe . We Ee ua was quite unsuited to a role which }@ommonwealth and the world was
Camp, to the King,¢born June 10,;private Chapel in the grounds at)jy broke the news to her or the] and military officers were éliowed| The staff for the broken Royal] present, can be agreeable only t » who|}subject to e sus stresses, Wi
1921), : Sandringham, After that it will death of King George Sixth, her | inside. ; tour of the Commonwealth ee cota] Bl 4c od 16 the owhibitie re ce P A Scaieaiss)) Be ate Gir me
Last Goodbye aol oy eas e brought to London | father 7 , The Queen was dressed in .a]promptly arranged for immediatc ee core nia ee obi of the exhibition- ai loome ; In he : eatin!
King George stood bareheaded )and then taken in state to Windsor | “The new Queen at first broke} simple beige dress and white hat.|return to England. Elizabeth and " Cc in Ais Make-Up. j wealth a rapid process of politica
in the bitter wind when he said]—Royal Castle, 25 miles from’) down and Pn when the Duke The Duke stood talking to Lieu-|the Duke had just come back INTER-CHANGE He wa exceptionally shy and}development went on At home,
goodbye to his daughter at a Lon-|London—before the funeral. But | of Edinburgh told her of her}tenant General Sir Alexander|from the fairy tale “Treetops OF TELEGRA mae He had, moreover, a sweeping changes ir the structure
don airport. Born on the 14th/all arrangements must wait on the | father’s death but she bore up|Cameron, the Commanding Gener-|Hotel” from which by artificial GRAMS tht impediment of his speech|of society brought new tensions
December 1895, the second son of] decision of the new Queen. bravely and a member of herfal of Bast Africa, while the lug-|moonlight they looked down on ; q hieh at times could be embar-lof their own into play. {
King George Fifth and of Queen Normally the ec ; staff said later: “She took it like | gage was hurriedly put aboard the |jungle animals in wild surround- Death of His Majesty ing to him He had not re-| George VI's reign was a period
Mary who survives him at the age new saci te *. eee ae of 8/4 Queen.” Only a few hours be-| plane and the flares at the corner | ings. King George VI ived that special training and}; which every institution and
of 84, the late King succeeded to) ®' Srelgn, SOUOWS a year OF) fore, she had come into the forest} cf the field were lit. It was dark The Royal couple came back a ractice In the ceremonial and} almost every principle of lile we
the throne on the 1ith December eighteen months after accession. lodge given to her by the people | Now, the Queen mounted the ramp {happily to the lodge totally un- The following telegrams priv role of the British on alled into question. ‘There wa
1936 after the abdication of his King George was crowned in of Kenya as a wedding present]leading to the door of the plane,|prepared for the blow that was have been interchanged be- ireh hich very properly vee. b time im which. it) we
eldest brother King Edward 8th. Westminster Abbey on May 12,| from a night in the treetop bunga-|turned, and managed a smile for|to fall on them. In an instant all tween the Secretary of State reserved for the Heir lnecessary ‘hat the monarct
Britons remembered the King as{1937 six months after his acces- | jow watching big game come to|those outside before she disap- elaborate plans for their tour feli for the Colonies and His |) py pon whould remain As fixed point
he sounded halting and tired|sion. He became King when his|the jungle water-hole at the foot | peared. to the ground Excellency the Governor. Above all, there were the cir- be a hich @apes ghould’ t6-
when he gave his customary na-|brother now Duke of Windsor | of the tree. In Tears In the midst of sorrow they had (From the Secretary of cumstances, .painfully melodra-|uolve ana ition. kuin e
tionwide broadcast on Christmas}gave up the Throne after full} The 26-year-old Queen, her face] Elizabeth, the new Queen, burst |to prepare their minds for new State for the Colonies). muafiberiae wilish ha utderdok an volye ‘ and. Yeriven ws hopes
Day. Some thought he was speak-}scale political controversy which|showing the strain of the last] into tears when the news of her |responsibilities. The — steamship Profoundly regres, to in- offlee which he certoinly did not|\Siae of & monarchy. Yet. the
ing with great difficulty. Prime followed his decision to marry a|hours, left the hunting lodge,| father’s death was broken to her |Gothie which was to have taken form you that His Majesty vith’ Wile Malay Wrother bad (ioe ee ee 1¢
Minister Winston Churchill was|commoner the American born] where she had been staying for the | at the Rovel Lodge in Nyeri, Then |them to Ceylon lies idle at Mom- King George VI. passed | round ha eel e? ier be |monarchy itself wa inevitably
told of the King’s death at an Mrs, Wallis Warfield Simpson.| last two days and drove with her she immediately decided to fly|basa, her flag at half mast and away last night st : ler: Me omen shaken by the circumstances: ot
early hour and immediately sum- Queen Mary, the late King’s| husband in a closed car eight miles] hack to-day to London—17 flight}her erew disconsolate. {from the Governor) ne «ef aan 2 i orge VI.| brother’s departure from thr
moned a meeting of the Cabinet. |mother now becomes Dowager] to the small airport neay the town | pours B.O.A.C, arranged by telephone Lhe announcement of the wer pe - eh to find them much ne
‘ ? ‘ Queen Mother and Queen Eliza-|of Nunyaki, An Hast Africa Air- The news was first withheld|from London for the same_ plane death of His Majesty King CAS HR SART ER: i } If at the end of hi ign, the
Privy Council beth becomes the Queen Mother.) ways plane took off at 13.57 from her until hard confirmation |Whieh took the couple to Nairobi George VI. has been received Enormous Stresses | Crown had vesumed its ancient
The meeting of the Privy Coun- The question still unresolved is|G.M,T. at Tnetbe Argonaut, was obtained The newspaper}to stand ‘by to fly them back m Barbados with the deep- He became King at a moment ‘
cil — disunguished by political the title to be taken by the new The “Atalanta”, which broughv|East African Standard gave the}|The Atalanta has been restocked est distress and J send on {iwhen the social, political ind! @ On Page 4
the Sover-|Queen’s husband ex. sailor i las ‘ ff at! first news to the staff at the Royal }and will fly via Entebbe (Ugan- behalf of the Government ||
leaders appointed by the ‘ ; 4 her to Africa was to take off a : h . d 2 i 4 ‘ —————
; i Prince Philip, Duke of Edin! h ™ ; 7 take da) EK : “th and people of this Island an
se him on constitu- iP, ie 0 burgh,| spout 18.30 G.M.1 Lodge. Not until a direct radio{da) and El Adem on the North {
eign 10 Savage: Di } ter|Who is thirty, Last time Britain age ‘scheduled to touch down |telephone call had been made to}African coast where it will refuel,! expression of profound grief
tional matters—will be neld wae had a Queen—Victoria (1837 to) It eae rig Fo ne Ean Sack Buckingham Palace and the tragic It will pick up a fresh air crew and heartfelt sympathy with f
to-day. Ferkiament “> yo b: 1901)—her husband Prince Al-| $ Bein ta takva a ‘about 0530 news confirmed from there was|at Fl Adem and thef fly non stop oo Majesty Queen Eliza- | /}
afternoon to hear a statement bY|bert took the title of Prince Con- G.M.T. on Thursday and arrive|the ‘Princess told that the King|to London's airport where _ it is| veth, Her Majesty the Queen } iis
the Prime Minister ern the | sort. in. London at about 16.30 G.M.T.]| was dead and she herself was |expected to arrive at 1900 G.M.T + ag ana — gy ae of } a
tion’ rrow, The King’s lung} It is pected ¢ Bliza oo ; “Tre ; 2 England >rince aries -ep-year-old | e Roya amily in their |
pnt gent September was his}will fly back to Lani fmomedi: Be ae a ot sorrowful We tnd tee Duk a Edinbu: gh a wate eases td oe | sorrow.” |
fifth operation since 1914 when his} ately. The King died the same as ot an veoet lined the ain were understood to be travelling |heir to the throne with his sistet 6th February, 1952.
appendix was removed. : , place he was born Dec. 14 1895.| Street of the small farmer's town ‘by car to Nairobi to join the Argo- @ On Page 5 ileal
His first operation as King in}Announcement of death came as|* one i : "
|



a stunning surprise to Britain





|

pathectomy “with view to im-|Who “ees the or was Gy his |
ove the blood supply to the right}W@Y %o recovery from a lung
foot and to sated this for the |9Peration on September. Queen

future.



Elizabeth and Princess Margaret















Years of
























Those present were







War and Austerity






















. were at Sandringham when the ha Y 4 o ’
A few months alte - in| King died. The exing had been { kak ore
November 1948 vA xine veel out in the countryside yesterday LONDON. Commonwealth in a steady voice, the blood supply from reaching his\| family wanted to be the sailor son ee
note ae aaats ae a both morning and afternoon and In the gruelling war years and He asked hi people “to stand] foot. They ordered a complete}of a sailor So his direct service ! : 3
suffering from obstruction. to appeared to be of good health. |i). aftermath austerity his un-|calm, firm and united in this time { rest and advised the cancellation|to the Stat® began when he wa
circulation in his right leg was the|It was a sense of duty alone | swerving devotion to duty inspired jof trial. The task will be hard of the tour to New Zealand and|14 years old. At Osborne ore
first indication to the puslic of] which carried him through bleak | confidence and trust in his people. There may be dark days ahead] Australia. 7 oe ae he nearly died of pneumonia and
his ill health. December, | . en 7 jland war cati no longer be configed A month later, his six doctors| at Dairtmouth over a period of
He and Queen Elizabeth started}® ar Cé r ; dais that peat! Pa vere ha ted ae ta aaa
5 salve te the battlefield but we can only| @"nounce hat operations for|four years, he learned as an or-
a a slowly: the were themselves. ¢ as a . i Tose a ‘ , atk a
. | v ms eajado right as we see right and lumbar sympa.:hestomy were toldinary cadet what the Navy 1
Just as King George V. conquere: reverently commit our cause to} 2€ performed to improve the blood | quires of its chosen servant
a wave of unpopularity whic God.” upply to his right foot. Doetor: At 18 young Prinee Albert was
‘ surged against him at the outset To that call George VI himself reported normal progress after the |} posted at a midshipman aboard
of his reign so his second son dis- responded with unmatched] 2Peration, but ruled that his en-|H.M.{ Collingwood. He answer: d
persed public fears. The visit of aeention fagement list must be kept to the |ty the name of Mr. Johnston. I
King George and Queen Elizabeth Pe it minimum. was Mr. Johnston who wus on A
to France in 1938 proved to ix er ersonal Loss Complete Rest duty as Sub-lieutenant in the bi to the ( NGOS Captain and (Crew of
a great turning point. The French The King suffered personal loss Later, his doctors ordered gun turret in the mogt hist ASL ’ 7
people took the royal couple toj4uring the war, His _ youngest] period of complete rest as essential naval battle of the first world war
their hearts and this triumph was]>rother, the Duke of Kent, was} to his recovery and he cancelled |at Jutland. He carried hime: If | ‘ . alias
‘contagious. On their return home killed in a flying accident on his| all his public engagements for at {during the action with coolness || & & c vi PRESS
there were scenes of mass loyaity |“ x to one . least four weeks ind courage which earned admir- Ve it Ve 44 bh
| reminis jubi ays © ; the day the war broke out On Tuesday, Sept. 18, a bulletin | stion and Jellicoe’s commendation
eminiscent of the jubilee days of soe ae ‘ uesday, Sey atlor ; i
| King George V 1 to Victory Day—May 8, 1945—the| from Buckingham Palace said that After being operated on for abi | ‘@TLAN ab
| 7 es London Times recorded in its col-| investigations showed “structural | pendicitis he joined H.MS. Malay: '
1 ; i
Roya’ Visits umns no fewer than 4,766 public hanges to have developed in the |and was promoted to full Lieuten-
The nation suddenly awoke to engagements carried out by the] lung, His Majesty has been advised | ant Put pastric trouble became 5 : oe
! the fact they had a friendly King King and Queen either separately|'o stay in London for further | apparent again and the Prine: Vhile in Barbados we invite you to visit our store
who with his srailing wife and two} oy together. treatment.’ invalided four times. The young We are agents for Liberty and Company (Lon-
little daughters had a sincere and When ihe war war over, thé On Sunday Sept. 21, a bulletin}oficer had to abandon } rope to). Ebaiitad
simple humanity and desire to King slipped back into peacetime | “8 issued announcing the necess-}for the seas after another opera don) iam
lead a normal, domestic happy outine by paying, a visit t “an ity for the King to undergo an }ijon " stocki [:
i life. other Dominion. For 65 days, from | operation in the near future’ | P : We are Stockists of:
Since then people have shared) pep 17 to April 24 1946 the King The events of the King’s life Joined R.A.F. ; ; \ ee ‘i 4 . ;
in every family celebration, Prin-|] Queen. Princess Elizabeth and | before his accession to the throne Stine hia ninkcwraeis Ha Lola thal Fine! quality English China including Wedgewoed
cess Elizabeth’s wedding and the } princess Mbrgaret toured South revealed a oe eres Royal Air Force a Captain ; ;
birth of her children were the}Africa, covering nearly 10,000} Hverything he did aaee: Ea raed *Iserving in Fr He t i Coshmere Sweaters and Coats
latest occasions. During their Six{ miles, including 900 miles by air | Of conscientiousness end reve aled iis pilot's licence né ead
week tour of Canada and the|The King was the first British | qualitie which were assurance: nning hi He Wins Deeskin Gloves 43 Argyle Socks
co ei in early a a monarch to set foot in South; that he wo e eee so 8 Commander or rét Jul 192
| hoya couple were acclaimed! Africa howev arauous ; 4 , 0 when his active duty ceased. After oe tad . rN! . + >ECIALTY.
from coast to coast not only as] Though he permitted no slacken-| Undesired, that the country might] ii. war he enterect Trit Col LOCALLY MADE SOUVENIRS A SPEC
worthy sovereigns, but as people!ing in the tremendous heavy pro- all upon him to perform - 9 lowe Cambridge for aed f
f personality and charm His-j gy me of engagements planned The King was born at Yor ee | spec He took cial
tory was made because never be- m those close to the King | ‘4e& Sandringham on Dec 14, t AA Vatuenie: e
fore had a reigning British Mon-| noticed increasing signs of tired 895, while Queen Victoria was y : ;
arch visited the United Stat ne 1 the days following the ex- | cbservi the anniver my zenst a hl a} ) 1
Welcome in the United States was| citement ind emotion of ith of the Prince Consort - a a { \\j SHEPHE 1) & { 0) i (
incomy able ghte eddi and his owz +8 of i es tt F d Vee 4 e
n f : Wedding Wanted to he a Sailor : ; ee d
ni September ze The King physician, Sir Joh s or a —r l ; r 4, He 16. 11. 12 & 13 Broad Street.
1€ o i wer exar! ©d nit ane c eda 4 eo y i AT L n Oy a if
QUEEN ELIZABETH AND PRINCE CHARLES PB pe t The f ent exer f d plenty ol i]
as Sb Ss | @ on Pa r 1 = -




PAGE TWO

t

BARBADOS ADVOCATE

1952







—_—_— THURSDAY, FEBRUARY 7,
muinshinesiiininiaitenlaneanil an i

B.B.C. ORGANIST
IN AUSTRALIA



ad 2 o





TODAY (cast two sxows) 4.45 & 8.30 P.M.

R.K.0. Radio Action Packed Thriiter
WwW nes
RACKET

Robert Lizabeth
ANCE





Ptewn

P
L
A

An Elephant Tries
Escape In Mid-Air

From BERNARD WICKSTEED
KARACHI

Robert

in 6
MiTcHUM ~ scott — rvaN in “The

G sUR « pAt
Also the Local Educational Short. "GIVE YOUF uit

H°s GERALD LASCELLES























































































































HT r
THE five elephants and Wick- born D George he is known for both his a SPECIAL TODAY 1.30 p.m \ TCO} it Zz
short his visit to B steed, who are flying from Bang- Thalben muSical adviser and] casts and +s gra pace records, SWING The WESTERN WAY’ r TAIN Hi i 4a
early Wednesday rning wher kok to London by B.O.A.C. freigh- consultant to the BBC's R« ou d he w SP? Se ee ee cae Shek’ Maks te | IRN BLOW i} J
he left for London T.C.A : ter, arrived at Karachi this eve- « tment went to Australia durin his stay He played at oda RIE ROUND UP” ‘ t | Dia
Canada to attend r€ funeral of ning ind I don’t know who igs con with several other musi- tl concerts, eighteen of ham on _ nite Smiley Burnet; | Gree: k. Vv iH ears
the late King George ea He n exhausted—the elephants or to take part in the Common- ¢ rci ral one os wend r ae Charles Star : a
a nephew of the late ing. Wicksteed ealti Jubilee celebrations at in } urne and Sydney cathe OISTIN = ithe Garde
Mr. Las elles, who owns Be We were due to fly on to a 1e invitation of the Australian dials and made f mare proad- PL Ad a Dial 8404 a» ALE a ¥ ST JAMES
and Mount Estate Barbadc rein, in the Persian Gulf, aftr proadcas ig Commission. casts. The audiences at his n- aS aa Me ts
arrived here on January 2nd c refuelling, but we put our trunks eris included a large number 9f TODAY als aie N WAY .
Other passengers leaving by th together and agrecd that the Tha!ben-Ball, an organist of in- young people who, whilst being SWING THE Passe f :
same plane for Montreal wer seven-hour flight across India’ was ational repute who has spent g e.tly impressed by his inter-, ty > se UNDUP ee ee ‘e .
Miss Mary Calnan, Mr. Dawe enough for one day most of his musical life in Lon- preta'ons of the classics of organ eae a = Gee aS UNDERWORLD, INC.
Wilson, Mr George Cuthbe One of the elephants was so on, succeeded the late Sir Wal- composition, were als keenly in- 1a er I LY DALE
ag a Mie — 7 a .. bored she kept a ten e _ the f { ‘Davies as organist of the terested in the newer works e Fri. & Sat. 4.4 Midnite SAT yo
Heller and Miss Gwen Meas escape hatch with her trunk a ate ~} ci ; e he performed, He also acted as & § 20 p.m SIX GUN MESA p SAT
As they do not make parachu‘es Ter ple c hurch ng ae ae se 5 *key in a couple of radic THE BIG FIGHI Johnny j Sheriff of
Cancelled for elephants, one man had to | ere ee tae a i oe ee, pregresnines and. IP ape pony) Migr strip stand- i” 1941, and then joinec he g.amop , Bre é We ||] Joe Palooka sUN DOWN Bill Biliott &
CYWING to the _death of | His oe er pipe ig Apo BBC staff. Technically he is stiil interviewed at the microphone on FOLLOW THE sd tho PRA case SADDLE PALS
ft Maieey ee Ree, yg hel 1 mitting suicide , _ etganist of the Temple and plays several occasions. Leo GORCEY Tex Ritter Se oe...
tail — nea "eounihare “t' I wondered sometimes as I look- @! _the | cee eae een ~ Tnalben-Ball’s Australian wel-]1!)= PS —_———
ae cabbaliod. ar ed down at Mother India two miles /€!Ds heid pues ne thent ont ‘| come was not confined to mu I
syonshir. jue i below us whether anyone there Ec Aa tice Lad “Purel Hy given recept ~
ar cae jay tor v ‘ phants were passing overhead. entimental measure, a pre a etabeah at elt in the big cities
tay visit. These elephants, destined for -arhme — is eel mat and taken on sightseeing trips to 1OWS 145 & 830 P.M
ibiti Billy Smart's circus, are about Christmas in the ruins of th the places'o terest he couid TO-DAY, LAST 2 SI S — 445 & 8.3 -M.
Three Exhibitions three years old, and so far none Temple, and here Dr. Thalben- ote eer , Hi ‘i ur involved :
OBERT J. MacLEOD who ha of them has been given official Pall and his choristers stand in / ‘six thousand miles of air| PARAMOUNT PICTURES PRESENTS—
lately returned from an pe names, but unofficially I have yndon’s chill night air to sing it accepted ail
ensive sketching tour of St. Lu named all five of them Eve Per- eir carols, a programme ict - Sees, “aks helnaaAaie from - 1a" 7 wr ENG ee
wil hold histannual exhibition rick. because if"you Ro anywhere Js 'neariy alwvaye broadcast by te ,be ivitatlons he received for]. wa NG) EDR
f recent oil paintings of Barba- near them they, try to tread 6n RBC in bo its domestic S still, in both social aren : NNE 'E
a as _ ‘Pletu eater ore JOUR tes 1 habit, XS PaE VERE Bs Gnicat papacite.) Sabteal “OF Starring :—JOSEPH COTTEN—CORINNE GALVERT
nth in the Picture allery of?, They have the playful hal D Ball’s fame had aii aie 4 . BBC EDMUND GWEN
he Barbados Museum. The exhi- , picking up wet sawdust in h¢ to Australia, where being) b ck with the BBC
ae, oy ne trunks and blowing it in your fact : Ss ] me BLAZING ACTION SUSPENSE
, 9th, with a private view forr as you go by ° : = ———
Members and Associates of the ; 1€ don y that | ~ EXTRA
Mr. M cLeod Wei painter of the 4. Bill ”§ “Sheu te 4 Star Blouse
Mr. MacLeod is a ps *r Oo > get to Billy Smar circus Y i “WATER SPEED’—Short
West Indian Scene, both in land- should be no end of success. | . é & OF Short
sani 7" ; or all this! .
scape aid s cape and his work They ought to be. After all thi 4 LATEST NEWS REEL
is well known in this Island and flying —L.E.S. .
appreciated for ite seers and HON, GERALDLASCELLES left Seawell yesterday morning for MORG AN Selteptclcbiceaatibes Z
accurate portraya of the sun- ‘a nea Me yT CO » prese 1 of the late 1 . . pita
: ; London via Canada by T.C.A. to ve present at the funeral o: DD 1 e ey 4 az 1 .
= of the be es i King George VI. Mr. Lascelles ‘vho arrived here early in January, B.B.C. Radio Prodramme OPENING TOMORROW — 2.30 & 8.30 P.M,
pening on le same day a 8 ephew of the late King SHE , WINTERS
the MacLeod Exhibition are an ‘* * D0 THURSDAY, FEBRUARY 7, 1952 FARLEY GRANGER — SHELLY WINTERS
exhibition of Oils and Water- . . i Days 11,15 am. Inia Te Qiata, 11.30 ar
Colours by Golde White and one re roo Fifteen y Crazy People, 12 noon The News, 12.10 aaa
of drawings by Harold Connell ecture Cancelle R. B. R. PARIHAR, a repre- » s Analysis, 4. si eh a ; 3
Resi y HE ANNUAL MEETING ot sentative of the Norfolk Sen.“ oe “BEHAVE YOURSELE”
esident Supervisor the Barbados Museum and gicate (India) Ltd., and other > Dail
M®*® CARLYLE RAMCHARAN, Historical Society which was to anufacturing firms arrived in ,
B-A., Hons. (Durham), Dip. have taken place yesterday ha Barbados yesterday from Trinidad ©,
Ed. (London) newly appointed been postponed and Mr. Geoflre : BWA , I 6 pan R oO Y A L
Resident Supervisor of the Roodal Jellicoe’s lecture cancelled, owin , 1. Seottish ine, 6.4 ; i wos ; wr
Theatves in Barbados arrived to the death of His Majesty th Mr, Parihar will spend 15 days ; noes Pp rere Pare Last 2 Shows, 4.30 & 8.15 p.m.| Friday Only, 4.30 & 8.15 p.m,
here otf Tuesday by B.W.1.A. to King here with the hope of finding 41) Pi, fo all ¢ ep
r : 7 ; : valysis, 7.30 p.m. T : i Joan CRAWFORD
take up dities, market for goods manufactured of a Youngish Writer Columbia Double ; s '
Mr. Ramcharan a Trinidadian, Salvation Army Commander jy the svndi -te 7.45 pom.—-10.30 p.m. M, 48 43m Wendell COREY
is the son-in-law of Mr. Percival UE to arrive ft St. Vin- ¥ ; “Se ARSE Louis HAYWARD
B. Singh, General Manager of the a day ig Col: Willig “There are” good prospect. of pit Be Sew Pecnis, 9.18 ‘na George MacREADY IN
Roodal Theatres in the West In- > «. Torr nao dey 2etting mazkets for my syndicate Diy p45 p.m. Composer of the Wee ’
dies, Mr. Ramcharan takes up I Sansom, qT ee Sees as there is a great deal of business £.00 pr up the Curtain, 10.06 opens at a petide . Sam $ — ea AHEEREE a
residence at ‘“Morecambe’’, offi- w ve a ye s Walon hime in these islands” Mr. Parihar told The nee 10 e t ar ee
cial residence of the Roodals in ™ Pec eaeh, Caen A Tee | Cheeks “I have got good en- “The Genutdlat ce Wie ee © 9
Barbados, ~ ‘oo fhe coe io couragement at Trinidad and ?™. The Last Chronicl te for - EBL ACK CRAIG
a min iin A le amaica is on a to jugh . ‘ ; spitality. ¢ .
_Accompanying Mr Ram haren his. ares ani’ he iaeatready. visit- jud sing f om the hospitalit of T.C.A. Auditor i je and
was Mr. Maurice Jones, Manage wrk + Barbedians and _ the volume of - > e ANC
. ie ec Trinidad, British Guiana and : : Ria R RAYMOND WHITE of
of the Globe Theatre who attend- j Dute) We Indie H business done locally I have every Winnipeg who had been here grerseer on a
ed the funeral of his uncle ihe the utcn ” 1cles, , ne of meeti with go "ess nhipeg who had bee are os GE ; y f
late Mr, Timothy Roodal, Gov- expects to be in Barbadrs for oer «eins aides tts eg Peta de na five day visit left yesterday And “mn ewe Ghul a geek
erning Head of Roodal Theatres. about four days before returning Bermuda by T.C.A. He was ee
* 8 to Jamaica via Trinidad : guest at the Ocean View Hotel. = ERD aD YW SiGhe D giz a ¢ ih 7 9°
. Grenada Visit Talkirg Point Mr. White is a T.C.A. Auditor and Gee @ ANEERS
ME" 2. YOUNG. Assistant Returning Shortly Other passengers leaving for Bet : WITH - staat
rg Public ae — to FTER hor but en abl udge a an by his muda were Mr, Anthony Mason, Dancing : : Starring :
e Comptroller for Development es : 2 ra 3 well as by his friends— Mr Doug’as Ma: ind Mr P
and Welfare, left for Grenada on holiday n Barbados, Mr : . , s Behera Orville aeiteaas . Willard PARKER HENRIED
Tuesday by B.W.1.A. on a special Bee baat = the’ City ser se m _ Y f e ge see
visit. He is expected to returr ouncil *ort-of-Spain, returned our Vv ite offic .
next Tuesday. ; Tees * to Trinidad on Monday night by 4 h OC i l > i oe oO L Y M P i g
. . 3.W.LA. While » he was stay- .
Social Welfare Talks rad aber ante tae Houne” it ne Litt e I Inger blouse, neatly tailored, |} A GALA 3 ie ‘ ‘
ETURNING from Jamaica via gs) Lawre fice, : é ms wie TO-DAY, LAST 2 SHOWS — 4.30 & 8.15 P.M.
Trinidad by B.W.I.A. on This was Mr. O'Neal's first visi! © © easy to wash and iron], ‘ sen Wud: 2 >
Tuesday was Miss Dora Tbberson, to the island during which tim in Oo 1 e 3 4 ne ISE NIGHT RRO SUPER DOUBEE '« «+
Piatection tee outa ~ ne was able to eee anany of hi ‘ ... here in four heavenly | HOWARD HUGHES PRODUCTION
or for evelopme: and relatives among them ‘ing his * . .
Welfare gaia Se, eae rs, (By CHAPMAN PINCHER) colour, at a piggy-bank||!—m °° *mtertein the “HE OUTLAW”
Miss Jbberson went over to Ja- tion Officer. ONCE OR TWICE a year I wake up in the night feel- : PIsey assengers from the
maica for talks with Mr. Chinn, To Ais many friends and rela- ing so co letely paralysed the annot eve re m + ' passenge erat
Social Welfare Adviser to the tives, he begs to say thank Beil 1 HP J BOPatys at I cannot even move n y price ! j — Starring —
Secretary of State for the Col- making his stay such a ple *e ye A c RUSSE “K aT Ee
onies who is making a tour of the one. Because of this strange quirk, a famous brain specialist ON 6.8. EMPRESS REY EISELE SACK BURT,
West saee ond chien will be = Mr O'Neal expects to be back has given me the chance of fulfilling the scientist’s most LY e 6 | ese AND
yis t Barbados later Sarbados shortly : - eaten ,
visiting Barbados later in Barbados short! romantic ambition—to make some new discovery at the ‘a OF SCOTLAND RACE
risk of my life. ' oe E % wake g iad
I have turned down the offer after less than i »'s Vl 3 ;
Why the Doors Are Unhappy hesitation ween nan wrendern, Drete, Ces wie
ye The specialist Wants me to let myself lapse into “sl iE
3 : ‘ st Wants ys aps eep Sh for reservations GEORGE RAFT — WILLIAM BENDIX
—They’re Always Being Opened, Shut and Kicked— paralysis”, a mysterious state of the nervcus system in op : pat SEs
By MAX TRELL

which sudden paralysis of the muscles is followed by deep





“YOU have no idea,” Christophe:
Cricket was saying to Knarf and
Hanid, the shadows, “how unhappy
Front-Door and Back-Door are.”

“Who?” said Hanid, who wasn't
quite sure that she had understood
what Christopher Cricket was say-
ing.

“Front-Door and Back-Door.”

Knarf said: “] never heard of a

Front-Dvor or a Back-Door or any |

other kind of a door being unhappy

What are they unhappy about?”
Late at Night
“They're unhappy,” Christopher
said, “about being doors—just being
doors. Of course, none of the folks
who live in this house knows that

they’re unhappy. But if they listened |
late at night, they’d hear Front- |
Door and Back-Door creaking and |

cracking and complaining.”

Knarf and Hanid both asked why
“Well, | said it was because they |

were doors, and that’s the reason
why. Now just imagine that you
Knarf, and you Hanid were doors

The first thing you'd complain about |

would be that all day long people
were opening and shutting you
You'd wish they'd just fet you alone
But no, hardly are you opened when
you're shut again, and hardly are
you shut again when you're opened

“And it wouldn't only be just be
ing opened and shut, and shut and
opened, that would bother you sc
much as another thing,” Christopher
went on.

“Whatother thing?” asked Knart

“When people opened you,” an
swered Christopher, “they come in
or they go qut. But you just stay
there. You van't go out and you can't
come in. That's whats so bad. You
Wish you could go inside the house
walk up the steps—sit down for a
glass of tea do a million-and-one
things that everyone else in the
house can de. Or you wish \ ou could
go outside in the st take a
stroll down the Ment lie
down in the grass N of the une





Mu &



Doors ket kicked by people who
won't bother to ring the bell.

and-a-million things that everyone
else does. Oh no!”

Knarf and Hanid both sighed.
Chey had never realized before how
miserable they would be if they were
unlucky: enough to be doors.

The Worst Thing

“But | haven't told you the worst
thing of all about being doors, It's
this, All day and all night and all
week and all month, and for years
and years, you stand with half of
you inside the house, warm and cozy,
and the other half outside, getting
rained on, blown on by the wind,

| scorched by the sun, frozen by the



snow, scratched by the cat, jumped
on by the dog, rapped on (or even
kicked) by people who won’t bother
to ring the doorbel!. Yes, that’s-the
very worst of all, You certainly are
glad, when all is said and done, that
you're not the Front-Door and the
Back-Door but just Knarf and
Hanid. You wouldn’t be doors for all
the money in the world,”

Kr and Hanid nodded. They
‘ vouldn’t.
” said Christopher sadly,
rs keep right on being doors,”

arf



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unconsciousness,

He argues that as I am a trained
observer I should make an ideal
“guinea pig” for an experiment
which would tell the doctors more
about this rare condition

But—having experienced the
first terrifying stages of sle ep
paralysis—I cannot accept his as-
surance that the experiment would
not be too dangerous

I had my first “attack” 20 years
ago, This is what happens: —

{ seem to be going to sleep nor-
mally when suddenly I become
aware that although I am fully
awake I am complete ly paralysed.

This is frightening in itself, but
what immediately follows is terri-
fying

As I lie there, helpless, I feel
I am sliding deeper and deeper
into an unconsciousness—from
which there can be no return.

it. seems to be a coma far more
profound than the unconsciousness
induced by an aneesthetic or a




faint
My brain urges ‘me to ac
quickly, and I knc that the

t
only
way back is to get my body Vv
ing somehow
My Mind Panics
I MAKE a tremendous effort to
move, but nothing happens. I try
to shout for help, but my lips and
vocal cords are paral da.
All the time I feel nm if getting
|
'

further and furthet away from
life



With an all-out effort TI try t
nove the whole hand. It work
ind with a violent shudder, I vre-
trieve full control of my body
The whole ordeal seems to la
less tha
If I try
ely afterwards,



a minute
to go to sleep immedi-
the



paralysis}



usually returns, But this time |
ready for it and pu Y vse |
ack before f lose full control

tg }
Nervous Fault |











“The perscn affected by sleep
paralysis always recovers contro]
by a tremendous effort of will,’
States one Standard authority on
neurology,

But what would happen
person deliberately faile.
this effort?

if a
d to make

My specialist frie nd assures me
that if f let myself slide into fulj
unconsciousness while still para-
lysed I should

simply go into a
deep sleep and wake
next morning

; Urge To Live -

HE is probably right. But dur-
ing an “attack” my faith in his
judgment is completely swamped |
by the banic urge to live

Look at it this way: How
people who die in the.r

up normally

many

pe e sleep from
leart failure may really have
failed to rouse themselves from

an attack of sleep paralysi

It may be un 1eroic, but this rid«

°







dle of the nervous system
have to remain unanswered as
am concerned, ;

as I L

|
|
|

at kb



t f letter
surrounded by 100 eyes y

short









DOCTORS know hardly any-| .) You ca rely on getting mu
t sle aralysis beyc from it (4)
POU BLCCD Das alysis nitom | i ft makes a bitter pili. (4)
€ that it is not a sympto | 13. Sk er. (3 14, Qustea ,
lise > li R with L2 makes Olive wild
Orca enamemmmenenmemmmnannianeana, | { 1Â¥. So to a Filn ww
| 20 Japanese sash in the Fleet
22 Being around one morning. (7)
23. Even a little gentleman ma
spy. (5)
24 Porm of phase. (5) '
26, Bloke by the seaside’ (4) |
Down j
oe Sek ae re 1 Nothing yn the ball for fight
eee i au) 2 allies with grease. (6)
the ie. + % Letter from this clue and
i ee tippea perhaps. (3)
j 4. Wriggles in the election meet-
$1.58 & $1.69 1 | 6. we the string around f¢
oe 019 ; guiding. (8)
Pos 555 0) ae } 6. 8, and ¥ Words that make Ray
resume. (3, 3, 3)
», $11.69, 10 Colloquis sneak. (4) 5
14 4 are ¢ iis in ples. «6)
11.96, ee 16 I'm up a coat. in @ small
49c., 51c., 66c 8c., 89e. way of (6)
49c., 51c., 66c., 68c., Pry OF COUTRO. Oyo
ar (5) 18 A broken ange! (
; 20 Speedy tax? (4)
} 21. Or this for a heavenly path (3
' , Acre
i 4 4 c
N I
| eet
| a Down Mi
k . A \
< ‘ N ‘
Aliv Tsar: 19, Tir l
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Screen Play by Ivan C



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From the Mame! by C. %. Forester



OPENING FRIDAY FEB. 8th

2.30, 4.45 & 8.30 pm. and Continu

DAILY 4.435 & 8.30 p.m.

ROXY

TO-DAY, LAST 2 SHOWS — 4.30 & 8.15 P.M.
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‘aymond Welburn

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From a Story by Albert and Arthur Lewss 204 Low



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JAMES

ARTON
THURSDAY, FEBRUARY

PIONEER INDUSTRIES BILL PASSED



52

~

Bill Will Get B’dos Little
Further, Says Mapp

DURING THE DISCUSSION of the Bill to amend the
Pioneer [Industries (Encouragement) Act, 1951, which was
passed by the House of Assembly on Tuesday, Mr. R. G.
Mapp (L) said that a Bill of that sort would get Barbados
very little farther on the road to industrialisation.

“The sooner the West Indies get
together and plan industrialisa-
tion on a Regional Basis,” he said,
‘the quicker they would = get
somewhere.”

Mr. E. D. Mottley (E) was of
the opinion, however, that the
argument about industrialisation
on a Regional Basis was all right
for those who wanted to qualify
as West Indian statesmen, but the
first interest should be the liveli-
hood of the people of Barbados.

Mr. R. G. Mapp (L) said that
the Bill was simply an attempt
to extend the provisions of the
principal Bill to those persons
who through no fault of their
own, or of the House, would not
benefit from that Bill. They would
welcome the Bill because they
did not wish, having accepted the
principle of encouraging pioneer

industries, to deny those indus-
trialists whom the Bill would
benefit, any assistanee
Over-Optimism
He would, however, say that

the trend of debate indicated that
there was much airy, over-optim-
ism in some of the speeches on
the Other Side welcoming the
Bill. Mention was made to Puer-
to Rico, but apart from the fact
that that country was very neat
the U.S.A. and there was a capi-
tal investment of millions of U.S.
dollars, that country was also in
the dollar area and enjoyed the
benefits of the dollar market. The
dollar area was supreme in the
world today. United States in-
dustrialists would naturally _in-
vest more quickly in Puerto Rico
or Jamaica, where bauxite would

afford more opportunity for big
capital. :

‘They also had to consider the
fact that the markets of those

bigger countries afforded greate:
inducement. Trinidad’s half mil-
lion population and Jamaica’s mil-
lion and a half were bigger mar-
kets for the sale of goods. Bar-
bados was a small area in com-
parison. He would also point out
that local capitalists were at pres-
ent criticising the Electric Cor-
poration of this island and com-
plaining that they could not get
an efficient supply of current for
their needs. Could they imagine
foreign businessmen being attract-
ed to an island without a proper
supply of even electric power?
“After hearing all that about Bar-
bados, would they be anxious to
come here?” he asked.
Seriousness Welcomed

He said that he welcomed the
seriousness with which the House
debated the matter, There had
been in the past too much pro-
agandising about that matter of
ndustrialisation, They had heard
and read for example before the
elections how the Government
by failing to attract capitalists
through such a Bill, had failed to
industrialise Barbados. Recently,
however, they read that the Brit-
ish Government, by not relieving
industrialists there who wanted
to invest in the colonies of income
tax, were the people whaquwere
hindering industrialisation in the
colonies,

A Bill of that sort would get
Barbados very little farther on the
road to industrialisation, The
sooner the West Indies got to-
gether and planned industrialisa-
tion on a regional basis, the quick-
er they would get somewhere
Those individual efforts _ would
prove futile. It was no use indulg-
ing in such puny efforts. He
hoped the House suw yon =
etting up of industries willy-nilly
Count, lead to. They had fhe Se-
nior Member for St. Philip quite
naturaMy urging protection. With
each Island protecting itself
against the other, there would be
no room for expansion and even-
tually they would kill the very
industries they were encouraging.
Bach colony could not afford to
compete against the other.

Regional Planning

He felt the House should
stress the necessity for regional
planning. The conference in Puer-
to Rico was‘an attempt to get
down to brass-tacks, and he hoped
it would produce some _ proper
planning for industrialisation, It
was not a conference to be taken
lightly for some policy in that
matter could be worked out at it.

He finally drew attention to
the sweated conditions under
which the workers were employ-
ed in the new industries, They
were comparable to the sweated
conditions in England in indus-
tries a century ago. They should

protect the workers while they
were giving the inducements to
capital. They would find that
while protecting the industries,
while barring cheaper products
from coming into Barbados, as

the senior member for St. Philip

had urged, the workers would not
be able to buy the very goods
which they were producing.

Here, Mr. Crawford rose and
said that he had spoken of bar-
ring cheaper goods such as goods
from Japan, things being equal,
there being no difference in price
and quality.

Mr. Mapp said that things be-
ing equal, there would be no ne-
cessity to prevent goods, from
coming in. It was ony if local
products were in danger of being
forced off the market by cheaper
goods from outside that such
protection would be needed. He
hoped that the consumers and
workers would also receive pro-
tection

too Optimistic

Mr. E. D. Mottley (E) said that
the Senior member for St Thomas
seemed to think that some of
them were too optimistic.

“But I would say, he said
“God help all of us if in any of
these schemes we are not optimis-
tic. We are bound to be.”

He said that it had taken a long
time for the Government to im-
plement the suggestion which
really came from that side of the
table. If they would recall, dur-
ing past discussion, it was sug-
gested that opportunity should be
given to industries which had al-
ready been established to allow
them to benefit under the Bill.

In the previous discussion, the
question had been raised about the
then Hat Factory, the West Indiau
Knitting Mill, the Shirt Factory
and other businesses which were

then termed Pioneer Industries.
He wondered at the length ot
time it had taken Government to

send down the Bill ang questioned
whether it was because of the
new Candy Factory which he un-
derstood was being established.

They had argued in and sut
season that that Bill should
enacted in Barbados.

“As to the Senior Member for
St, Thomas who plit stress on this
Regiecnal approach, that seemed
very good argument for those
members of the House who were
attempting to qualify for British
recognition or those who were
qualifying themselves to be West
Indian Statesmen.” he said, “but
I think our first interest should
be for the livelihood of the 200,000
people of this country.”

Whatever Regional Economical
approach one thought shoulu be
made, business of that hature
was not necessarily well regula
by people with University Degrees
or was not followed as the Socialist
theory which given from
books. For an example o/{ the
way it was done, they could con*
sider Jamaica.

He did not think thet they
would get any great benefit from
the Bill then as it stood. In 1944
such legislation shouid have been
enacted when money was flow-
ing about.

of
be





was

American Capital

Most of the indusimies in the
West Indies were run with Ameri-
can capital. Did they expect to
fool themselves about looking te
the sterling area? The idea «bout
looking to the Sterling Area was
toc much bogey. They in the
West Indies would never attract
British Capital as long as they
were British. If all their stuff had
to come from the Sterling Area,
did they expect them to allow
them to bid with the British
working msn.

They had had definite cases of
small American Jews who had
made money, he said,

As to the point that they snould





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be no scandalous wages,
they admitting that the Trade
Unicn was not doing its duty
Members had made reference
to the Gas and Electric Compan-

were

ies, but it was not for him to
suggest how they could get over
that.

His final point was that just as
there were shirt factories ian the
West Indies, the Barbadian pris
Gould be taught to make = shirts
too.

Mr. F. E. Miller
he had no hope or
Bill attracting
island, An individual who was
thinking of establishing a busi-
ness in the West Indies, had first
to consider the question of fuel
Puerto Rico for instance ad
American oil and no one would be
afraid of setting up an industry
there on that score,

(L) said
faith in
capital to

thai
the
this

No Inducement

There had to be inducement for
a Capitalist coming te Barbados
and that Bill gave no inducement
for a man with a snowball cart.

Before one set up an industry,
one had to be sure one could pro-
duce the article at a price that
would pay, The fact that he was
granted tax free exemptions for
five years was not of the greatest



importance as an _ industrialist
would scarcely think cf setting
up an industry if he could not

pav his taxes

The idea was that there should
be foresight on a Regional Basis
or all hope for industrialisation
in the West Indies had to fail.

No Industrialist would set up
a plant without planning for
about the following 30 years.
And what was the case with the
Gas Company? .There was no
certainty whether it would con-
tinue functioning for the next two
years or the next 30.

In 1898, he said, discussion had
taken place concerning provis-
ion of a deep water harbour. At
the time it would have cost
£70,000, but it was not done. Yet
they were then being choked by
the Press because they could not

provide the necessary millions
of pounds it would require
Disagreed

Mr. C. E. Talma (L) said he
disagreed with the views ex-
pressed by the Junior Member
for St. George.

The Senior Member for the

City had made many observations
in clearing up the issues for thei!

benefit and guidance, That mem-
ber had said that they had
missed the bus and that was a

fair statement of fact because he
was in a position to say so. He
had been qa member of the Ex-
ecutive Committee then a it
was within his knowledge that
applications were made by vari-

ous concerns in 1947 and if the
concession for exemption from
income tax had been granted
then Barbados would have en-
couraged industries which even-
tually went to Jamaica and
Trinidad.

On such a big question as in-
dustrialisation from which the
big preblem of unemployment
could be tackled, he would speak

as ah individual “member as_ it
was not a question of party. The
only way unemployment could

be sclved was by industrialisation
or emigration. And since nobody
wanted them, they had to depend
on industrialisation,

If they adopted a defeatist atti-
tude that they could not induce
capital from Canada or America,
they would never get anywhere.
Unless the question of industri-
alisation was looked at and faced
up to, the Labour Governinent,
interested as they were for the
welfare of the people and genuine
as they were, would not be
facing the unemployment prob-
lem.

He said that the conference
which was proposed to take place
in Puerto Rico shortly, was of
great importance to Barbados and
at least two members from that
Assembly and an advisor should
be sent.

He said that if there was trouble
with the Electric Company, that
trouble should be remedied.

He suggested that they should
avoid buying salt fish in bulk
and should can flying fish. He
said, to® that a factory could be
set up to make bags for the sugar
factories. Even if the raw mate-

BARBADOS ADVOCATE



rial was not available in Bar-
bados, it could be got from
Dominica.

Refund of Customs Duties

Mr. A. E, 8S. Lewis (L) pointed
out that the Bill before the House
was one dealing with the refund
of Customs Duties and Exemption
from Income Tax of industries
which were already set up in
Barbados between July 1949 and
August 1951.

He saia what the other side
wanted to biame the Labour
Government for being late as far
as Pioneer Industries were con-

cerned, The Acts of Jamaica
and Trinidad which had encour-
aged industries in those places,

had not saved them one brass far-
thing in taxation such as Income
Tax.

Any industry that came down
here from the United Kingdom or
the United States of America, had
to pay more in Income Tax than
if they haq paid in Barbados
alone, hence honourable members
could erase from their minds the
thought that Government: had
kept back anything.

Une member said that they had
a large labour market which was
perfectly true, but they did not
1ave a large consumers’ market.
It was no good saying that they
must not plan on a regional basis.
Trinidad was sending shirts here
from her faetories and those fac-
tories can only reduce their cost

if they increased their markets
and that was what was happen-
ing.

He hoped that great attention
would be paid to what is taking
place in Puerto Rico instead of
making every attempt to blame
the present Government for what
was happening.

He said that the passing of the
Barbados Act could not affect the
issue of a company doing business
here with their head office in the
United Kingdom. That type of
propaganda could only spring
from those persons who were en-
tirely ignorant of what was tak-
ing place.

Amendment
Mr. E, W. Barrow (L) said that

he did not intend to usurp the
functions of any member of the
Executive Committee present.

This was an amendment to the
Bill which was passed last year
and there were only two real
provisions in the amendment.

The first was that any manu-
facturer or industrialist who had
extended his plant or factory, or
constructed or repaired a particu-
lar factory, such might be deemed
by the Governor-in-Executive
Committee to be a pioneer indus-
try

Secondly, any manufacturer
who set up an industry after 1949
and before this Act had come
into operation, such industry
would be deemed as being a
pioneer industry.

He hoped that

that was clear

to honourable members. If they
dealt with pioneer industries as

a whole, the advantage of being

declared a pioneer industry by
the Executive, had two advan-
tages. Firstly, ‘that any ma-

chinery imported into this colony
would be done so free of normal
customs duties and secondly that
for a period of five years after
commencement of the operation
of a particular industry, no tax
would be paid for that period.

Mr. Barrow then explained in
detail the purpose of the original
Bill after which he referred
briefly to some of the points raised
by honourable members.

He said that representation
should be made to the Colonial
Office on the question of doing

something tangible in the way of
aiding the West Indies in starting
an industrial development scheme
as he thought it was time to stop
talking and act.

Irrelevant

Mr. M. E. Cox (L) replying said
that honourable members would
agree that some of the speeches
made were quite irrelevant. The
object of the Bill, he pointed out,
was merely to amend the Pioneer

idustries Act of 1951 in order
that those industries which were
started before the passing of this
Act might be included in the Act
and given pioneer status.

With regard to the remarks by
the junior member for St. Lug
relative to double taxation, he be-
lieved that it was in 1950 that a
Bill was passed by the House



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COMMONWEALTH AND
OTHER TRIBUTES

WASHINGTON, Feb. 6.

President Truman on Wednesday
extended deepest sympathy to the
British Royal Family and_ the
British people on the death of King
George. “God bless Queen Eliza-
beth and may she find in the
memory of her brave father the
courage and inspiration that she
will need in the great responsibili-
ties that lie befote her,” Truman
said in a public statement.

Truman also sent private mes-
sages of condolence to the new
Queen, her mother, and her grand-
mother Queen Mary. The House

of Representatives adjourned at
1.25 p.m. out of respect to the
King.

Demoératic whip, Percey Priest
of Tennessee offered a resolution
expressing “profound sorrow” and
“sympathy with his people in the
loss of their beloved sovereign”;
ihe House immediately passed it
and adjourned for the day. The
resolution will be forwarded to the

British Government, —U.P.
- —___.
OTTAWA, Feb. 6
The Canadian Cabinet was

summoned to meet at noon to-day



to authorize an official proclama-
tion on the h of King George
VI and the succession of Princess

Elizabeth as Queen of Canada

Elizabeth will be proclaimed
Queen of Canada before she is
preciaimed Queen of the United
Kingdom

Official proclamation of the ac-
ession of Queen Elizabeth to the
throne was announced here before
Imperial Privy Council in Lon-
gion. Church bells will ring to-
morrow in mourning for the King,
Catholie churches will offel special
prayers for the King and the
Royal Family,

External Affairs Minister Lester
Pearson and the Canadian High
Commissioner in London may both

represent Canada at the funeral
rites for the King. Pearson leaves
Otiawa at 4.30 p.m. for Montreal

to take plane for London at 6.50
p.m en route to the North Atlangic
Treaty organisation meetings m
Lisbon



NEW Feb. 6
Government throughout
India remained closed on Thurs-
day as mark of respect to the
late King George. Flags were flying
halfmast on the building The

DELHI

offices

abandoning that practice. So far

as the United Kingdom Govern-
ment was concerned, they could
not pass any Bill to control them

He said that the question was
raised by the junior member for
St. John relative to the Hat Fac-
tory That question had been

breught up before and it was con-
sidered that ‘the Hat Factory did
not come as near as the Knitting

Mills Co He thought that the
honourable member should re-
member that in 1950, the House

passed a Bill reducing the general
tariff from 20% to 10% in ofder
to assist the Knitting Mills in get-
ting in their machinery here duty
free.



The Hat Factory was allowed
to import their machinery duty
free and the Government even

granted the gentleman in question,
a sufficient number of dollarg to
go up to Canada to study the hat
business

While it was not on all fours
with the Knitting Mills was due
io the fact that the Knitting Mills
got its raw materjals and manu-
factured them into the finished
product, whereas the Hat Factory
only blocked hats and trimmed
them. There was no manufacture
whatsoever

He said that he was not in a
position to say whether the pass-
ing of the Act would include those
persons, but he could only say that
he hoped it would

The question of advertising the
Bill in various parts of the wortd
as raised by: tne senior member
for St. Philip, was quite aptly re-
plied to by the junior member for
the City

Mr. Cox said that all over the
world people knew that as far as
manufacturers were concerned,
there was a Bill in Barbados which
gave similar facilities for Income
Tax concessions ete., as was the





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period of mourning was not yet)
announced, but official functions in |
the capital were cancelled.

With deep regret, Nehru con-|
veyed the news of the King’s!
ceath to Parliament. He said: “As
we all have known, His Majesty
has been yinwell, but recently he|
had recovered, even thinking of |
undertaking a journey to recu-|
perate his health further. The}
news therefore comes as a sur-|
prise and shock.” |

Nehru suggested that the Speak- |
er convey to the Queen a sense of |
ceep sorrow and that Parlia-|
ment do not sit tomorrow in view
of this happening. Members of |
Parliament stood in silence, and
the House adjourned until Friday
morning.—U.P. |

—_

LONDON, Feb, 6.

Queen Elizabeth joins Queen
Juliana of Holland as the only
two women to occupy major

thrones,

The rest of the dwindling list
cf Crown heads belong to men.
In Europe there are King Haakon
of Norway, King Gustav Adolf
of Sweden, King Frederik of
Denmark, King Badouin of Bel-
gium, and King George of Greece.
Greece

Others include King Farouk of

Egypt. Mikado of Japan, thé
Emperor of Ethiopia, the Shah
of Persia, the King of Siam and
various minor monarchs. The
Scandinavian Kings have close
ties with Britain and are

expected to attend the funeral,

Arrangements for the funeral
have not yet been completed, but
it is believed that Queen Juliana
and the Kings of Belgium and
Greece might also be present.

It is considered doubtful
whether Farouk would attend,
although he went to school in
Britain,

The funeral probably will be
held in the week of February 17,

Many Britons worried on Wed-
1esday about Queen Mary, 84,
who is the most beloved member
vf the Royal Family. The ery of
Oh” was wrung from the lips of



he indomitable olq lady when
he was informed of her son's
eath — another in the = many

agedies which marked her long
iife, She is under the care of

iurses.——U.P,
—U-P.



case in Jamaica and Trinidad,

Mr, ©. 'T. Allder (I) said that
‘ince Jamaica and Trinidad had
lready attracted the major in-
Justries which might have assist-
d Barbados, he hardly thought
hat any regional planning would
elp them at this late stage.

He said that the Leader of the
Covernment as well? as other po-
litical leaders in Jamaica ans
‘Twinidad were members of the
Federation Commission at which
industrialisation of the West In-
dies was discussed, Trinidad and
Jamaica went ahead and got a
number of new industries while
Barbados was waiting until a re-
gional set-up was brought about
with the result that they had no
new industry

Some years ago when a big tex-
tile magnate came to this island
for the purpose of erecting a tex-
tile factory, his #roposa were
turned down and now the Govern-
ment members were obliged to ex-
euse themselves,

PRELIMINARY MURDER
HEARING ADJOURNED

His Worship Mr. C. L, Walwyn
yesterday further adjourned until
to-day the case in which 20-year-
old Cyril Lashley a carpenter of
Government Hill, St. ichael is
charged with the murder of El-
mina Hoyte.

The Police has charged that the
offence was committed on January
1k

Mr. W. W. Reece, K.C., Solicitor
Geenral is appearing for the
Crown in the preliminary hearing.

SEVEN LD.'s
There were seven notifications





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month of January,
Diphtheria 1; Enteric Fever 3;

Tuberculosis 3,



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PAGE THREE

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PAGE FOUR

BARBADOS a8 ADVOGATE

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Thursday, February 7, 1952

‘KING GEORGE



KING vi

BARBADOS, together with the rest of
the British Commonwealth and with the
whole civilized world mourns the loss of a
great King, his late Majesty King’ George
Vi.

After
than

a reign of fifteen years and less
two months, King George passed
peacefully away in his sleep’on the morning
of February 6, 1952. He was fifty-six on
his last birthday December i4, 1951.

Less than six months ago thousands of
Barbadians and millions of people scattered
over the globe heard the late King’s heroic
voice at Christmas time when he reminded
the world that the British are a friendly
people and that the British Commonwealth
is an association of friendly peoples. King
George Vi has borne during his short reign
a burden that no previous British Monarch
has had to bear and his example has earned
the respect and admiration of all peoples.
The King represented to the world as the
French Prime Minister said in Paris yester-
day “dignity, grandeur and devotion to the
public good.”

The late King and his Royai family have
become identified in the minds of all
peoples with the simple virtues of family
life and the King’s private life had its re-
flection in the wider family life of the
Commonwealth, since his position can ad-
mirably be likened to that of a father
exercising discipline and earning love, and
at no time and in no place ruling by fear
or tyranny.

The Commonwealth has lost a father: the «
world has lost a great King and a good man.
King George VI visited Barbados as a cadet
before the last war and planted a tree in
Queen’s Park and among other duties took
charge of a firing party at Gravesend.

He became a Counsellor of State during
his father’s illness in 1928-29. On Decem-
ber 10, 1936 he succeeded to the throne
when his brother King Edward VIII ab-
dicated. His coronation took place at
Westminster Abbey on May 12, 1937.

With Queen Elizabeth, the King visited
Canada, the United States and Newfound-
land in May and June 1939. He was the
first reigning British sovereign to visit the
United States of America. For the first
time in the history of the Commonwealth
he performed Royal functions in a
Dominion when he appeared in the
Canadian Parliament, gave Royal assent to
Bills and r@eeived the United States
Minister to Canada. He also signed the
Canadian-American Treaty of Commerce.
During this seven-Week tour the King
visited President Roosevelt at Washington
and was welcomed by the United States
Congress at the Capitol.

During the second world war he visited
the British Army in France and throughout
the war he shared the perils and sufferings
of the English people. Buckingham
Palace was thrice hit and a de-
layed action bomb which was dropped
on September 11, 1940 blew
dows of Their Majesty‘s apartments.
Later the Royal chapel at Buckingham
Palace was wrecked. Hundreds of Barba-
dians will remember His Majesty on some
of the many occasions when he was easily
seen in London. They may remember a
morning in Kensington Gardens when the
King, the Queen and the Princesses inspect-
ed Barbadians and other servicemen and
chatted informally with several colonials,
They may recall another morning on Vic-
tory Day when the King’s hand remained
in permanent salute for more than an hour
while troops of all nations marched past
along the Hall. Or they may have heard
the King speak with unaffected simplicity
at some function where distinguished
servants of the Colonial peoples received
rewards from their Sovereign.

out win-



spring of
1949 and the operation on the King’s right
leg in 1949 sent a shudder of anxiety
throughout the world. In 1951 the world
watched hourly the results of the serious
operation on the King’s lung which was
performed on September 21. It was cheer-
ed by the news that he was enjoying Christ-
mas at Sandringham and was able to go out
shooting.

Last Thursday, His Majesty carried out
his first public engagement since that
operation when he stood in the cold winds
of a London airport waving goodbye to
Princess Elizabeth who was leaving with
her husband to carry out the long promised
and eagerly awaited visit to Australia and
New Zealand. Who could have foreseen
one week ago that this great and good King,
this father of the Commonwealth should
have died so tragically soon, and plunged
the world in sorrow? In our grief we will



pray for our new gracious Queen on whom

has fallen the great burden borne so hero-
ically, so well by our late lamented Sov-
ereign, His Majesty King George VI, and to
His Majesty’s nephew who left Barbados
last night and the whole Royal Family we
offer on behalf of our readers our con-
dolences. |



Penny Wise

FOR some time now it has been ad-
vocated that the Governments of the West
Indies demand from the schooners regis-
tered in these colonies and catering to inter-
eolonial trade that they should carry radio
equipment so as to be able to receive hur-
ricane warnings or to communicate with
the port service in cases of distress or
danger. This crying need for some safety
measure to save the lives of those compell-
ed to travel by this means has been con-
sistently ignored.

Within the last few weeks another
Schooner, the Zenith, has disappeared with-
out any trace.

The Zenith left Barbados on December
19th for British Guiana with a load of stone
and was last seep off the coast of George-
town on December 22nd. It was known
that she was leaking, but her pumps were

oe



BARBADOS ADVOCATE

=sessseessnsesnsssunensnehsinanspinensteesssvininmnsecedsainiapieindiicersdnpmemsngseesostsmtsans
moro ore Ameo |IE LATE KING GEORGE,
Zealand was cancelled in the

@ From Page 1

held wae the affection and ley-

aities of the nations of the Cem-

monwealth, if at a ume when
every institution was challenged
the institution of the monarehy
remained stable, a chief part of
the credit must be given to
modest and gentle figure who
was the titular political head of
all the British societies. :

It may, indeed, be said that hot
all the credit should go to George
VI. He had faithful servants both
in the Palace and in Whitehall.
A powerful bond of commoa in-

| terest and outlook united him with

with the solid middle portion’ of
the people.

Above all, he enjoyed the sus-
taining help and comfort of the
charming and spirited lady who
was his Queen.

All this is merely to say that
the King had, with the help of
those on whom he had the right
to call, found his own answer to
a delicate question with which his
reign, like every other reign, had
opened,

He had given his own form to
the British conception of a eon-
stitutional kingship, had done so
in a delicate hour and against

}certain personal handicaps. How
, had he done it? On what was this

personal triumph founded?
Basically it was built on the

trespect which the British people

instinctively give to one who is
manfully doing his best in a ‘fob
which he manifestly dislikes. A
people which has never shown
much affection for brillicnce is
always ready to pay its tribute to
one who cannot escape his duty
yet shows an inflexible resolve in
discharging it.

Hard-won Conquest

The King’s hard-won conquest
of his stammer was in itself a de-
monstration of grit that won him
esteem.

It might be argued that his
painful anxiety not to be in the
foreground of the picture was a
positive advantage when it came
to the political side of his task.

But no King, however rigidly
constitutional, has ever been a
success through the mere accumu-
lation of negative virtues. He has,
in the end, to be a leader of his
people. Where was George VI’s
leadership exerted?

He could not be a political fig-
ure, He had neither the desire
nor the gifts for a glittering social
leadership; as time passed the
monarchy was shorn of even the
financial means that this would
involve. His was essentially
moral lead given at a time when
moral standards were shaky. The
public very socn realised that the

working and the captain of the steamer |home life of the Royal Family had
: *, 1 Ad cst vik spat ah an essential happiness and sweet-
which sighted her, was of opinion that she |ness which was neither too old-
would make land in a few hours’ time and pened nor too conventional,
1 his was something that could
that all would be well. not fail to appeal, In Britain the
Several weeks have now passed [question of moral values is rarely
‘ a ee Zeni' more than an intellectual exercise.
and it is to be presumed that the | th If the Royal home reflected
with all aboard has been lost. This is stark the lively and cheerful disposi-
tragedy and one which could have been tion of the Queen, it was also a

avoided.

The Advocate newspaper has pointed out
on more than one occasion that in view of
the difficulties of steamship travel between
the islands many people who would not
otherwise do so have been compelled to
travel by schooner.

It is singularly unfortunate that they
should be condemned to travel by boats,
sometimes in the hands of men without
any knowledge of navigation and always
at the mercy of the wind and the deep.

Besides the danger of having to guess
their way from one island to the next, the
passengers have to travel knowing full well
that if at any time there should be rough
seas or damage to the vessel, they will not
be in communication with land or with any
ship which would come to their rescue.

This loss of life has occurred several
times within the last few years and con-
tinues without any notice being taken by
the Governments who allow people to
build schooners and carry passengers with-
out the necessary and adequate means of
communicating with shore stations. And
it is tragic that these same governments
have contributed to the most elaborate
equipment and stations for warning ships
of approaching storms. When the ships
have been caught in those storms, however
there is no means of calling for help. This
is not merely tragic but borders on the
criminal.



NEW YORK, Jan. 31. cently that



Yesterday was the coldest day
of the current winter season in iner
New York, The temperature dived
to 7 deszrees just before daybreak,
officially but a Long Island resi-
dent assured me that his ther-
mometer revistered only 5 degrees

when he read it. But

annoyed. It should not be 45 de-
grees one day in January, and then
suddenly 10 the next, This is not
good behaviour on the part of the
mercury. Do one thing or the
other, or at least do it gradually
In fact one was so warm (7?) 35
degrees that a friend suggested in-
viting people from sunny Califor-
nia (where there

off from this

Jan,
Boston

36 aboard



freat care has to
taken that the number does a
ase at the present rate,
*mashup that really shook: things
up here occurred on Jan. 3. when
a big plane, an American Ai
Convair came in too low on the
fog sereened- New Jersey airport

lines C.46 plane failed in a take
same field,
return but crashed into the nearby
river with the loss of 56 lives, Dn
14 a Northeast Airliner from
undershot
approach to La Guardia Field, and
plunged into the East River.
were rescued



It was indeed a right royal wel-
come, and the gallant skipper was
persuaded at the last moment to
ride in a car. He had previously
said that he wanted to walk and it
was well that he changed his mind,
He is not a huge man, but looks
every inch a sailor. His square

The

rlings

whichever of Newark. It barely missed the chin, and clean cut jaw revealed

was right, it was much too cold roof of the Battin High School for his determination and he recalled
for a good many people and I was girls, sheared off the top cf one for me some lines of my boyhood
amone that number. building, and crashed into another days:

Up to now the weather has been killing all 23 persons aboard. Five That's the way at sea, my boys!
freakish. We know that it is win- people in the houses smashed also That's the way at sea.
ter but the temperature has been died. This was the second holo- I got a big ‘thrill at seeing
see-sawing for some time now. caust to visit Newark in a short thousands of cheering people
And the real American people are time. On Dec 16, a Miami Air- many of them from fourth up to

tenth and fifteenth floor windows
—showering confetti—they call it
“ticker tape’—down to the street
below

A similar honour was arranged
for Mr, Winston Churchill a few
days later and I was all set for
my first glimpse in the flesh of the
Grand Old Man of British politics

tried to

an instrument
All

by the

was a heavy prompt action of tugs But a cold kept “Winnie” indoors
snow storm) to spend the winter T saw the plane in the river with and I was disappointed, like
in New York. only one wing above the water. many others. And it was as well
However this really cold weath- and it was refloated and towed that he did not brave the weather
er seems to make the majority of away in a day or two, The day proved to be one of the
folk happy, and they hope that Since these hoeppenings there dampest of the winter with oceas-
February will be a much more have been ‘tests of the radar tonal drizzles which would have
normal period than January was equipment at these fields to check done him no good, One newspaper
ce landings during fog columnist opines, however, that
< . the British Prime Minister’ will
I have not got any mail from * soon be in America again. He
Barbados for nearly two weeks I really did have a close up of came to beg, he wrote, and he is
and this is much too long a period. some of the news during the past not the sort of chap to put all his
T suppose, however, that the snow fortnight Apart from the big begs in one ask-it.
which shut down the airfields for p¥ane in the East River at La ® cae e
a couple of days has been respon- Guardia, I saw New York's wel- I was talking to a group of
sible in part for this. There have come to Capt. Kurt Carlsen, hero youngsters a few evenings ago—
been so many plane vrashes re- of the Flying Enterprise episode. all American high school lads—

tribute to the sound and stead-
fast character of the King, his
tolerance, good sense, and sim-
plicity. (All this, however, is
not to say that he had been
denied his share of the heredi-
tary irascibility of the House of

Windsor.)

He was given by the public his
portion of the admiration accorded
to one who sits on one side of a
happy fireside, that supreme ideal
of the British,

Unassuming Virtues

And so by exercise of many un-
assuming virtues, by faithful
obedience to the call of duty, oner-
ous and ultimately exhausting as
it was, by displaying that complex
of qualities most conveniently
described as those of a “gentle-
man,’

King George VI reigned success-
fully over his people for 14 years,
the monarchy adapted itself to ex-
traordinary new conditions with
an apparent ease, and, at the end
it appeared that the man who had
been, Duke of York was not with-
out some of that political sense
which has contributed to make the
British throne so illogical and so
valuable an institution.

He was born at York Cottage,
Fpetinesem. on December 14th
1895.

The ill-health which was so
heavy a burden through his life—
and has had so tragic a conclusion
—miade its first appearance during
the Great War when Prince Al-
bert, as he was called until 1920,
was a midshipman in H.M.S. Col-
lingwood with the First Battle
Squadron, Obstinate gastric trou-
ble was at last diagnosed as duo-
denal ulcer.

This, though it involved an
operation, did ,not prevent him
from serving with the crew of a
12in. gun in the Battle of Jutland,
a fitting climax to a naval educa-

who were very interested to hear
something about a spot where
there was no winter. It was the
third time I haq been inveigled
into this kind ef conversation by
‘nis group, and one of a oldest
finally asked:

“Now that you have seen snow
are you ready to go back to the
West Indies?”

I later found out how difficult
it was for him, although he had
experienced winter, to understand
how anyone could leave all sun-
shine in exchange for cold ,and
snow. None of them had ever been
to Florida or »Miami,; and could
barely picture a land where the
sun shone every day, and where
you did not have to use heavy
coats and rubbers for many
months of the year.

They are all potential visitors to
the West Indies—at least Barba-
dos—when they grow up, make
enough money and are entitléd to
long holidays.

* * ®

For many years New York auto-
mobile drivers have been driving
on their parking lights. This ‘‘anti-
quarian ‘acetylene light’ regula-
tion” as it has been described goes
by the board on Sunday, Feb. 3,
and from Monday a new city law
governing automotive illumination
goes into effect. This is an effort,
according to the Traffic Commis-
sioner, to reduce the appalling
number of night traffic secidents.
Night pedestrian accidents make
up a “staggering percentage of
traffic fatalities and injuries” in

THURSDAY, FEBRUARY 7, 1952



tion which had begun at the Nava!
College Osborne. The man, who
would have a longer experience of
war than any British monarch
since the Middle Ages, was, to his
own great happiness, not denied a
baptism of fire.

His marriage in 1923 to the
Lady Elizabeth Bowes-Lyon,
daughter of the Earl of Strath-
more, whom he had known since
childhood, was, as it turned out,
the most successful single enter-
prise of his life.

The young couple settled at
145, Piccadilly, which was, be-
fore long, the scene of a healthy
nursery which housed first
Princess Elizabeth and four
years later, Princess Margaret
Rose.

These years before his father’s
death in 1936 were passed by the
young couple in the busy cere-
monial life which falls to the
younger son of a Sovereign. If
the Duke of York had little natural
aptitude for it, his consort made
up for this by her vivacity and
charm. But over these events,
tedious as they sometimes were,
there did not yet fall the shadow
of kingly responsibility.

Before the death of his father
this must at times have occurred
us a possibility to one who knew
something of the direction his
elder brother’s affection was tak-
ing. But he must havé hoped that
the crisis would somehow be
averted, It was a hope that faded
during the days of King Edward
VIII's brief and eventful reign.

The Abdication

In the whole business of the
Abdication, the man who became
King George VI shone forth as a
good and loyal brother. The letters
which passed at that time between
‘David" (Edward VIII) and “Ber-
tie’ (George VI) give a pleasant
picture of fraternal affection.

“Bertie” fully understands the
dilemma in which his elder brother

is placed, His sympathy never
falters.
Nobody can read these docu-

inents, so simple and so sincere,
without gaining the impression
that, under the formidable wing
of George V, a pleasant and de-
voted family had grown up. Not
once did the will or ambition of
the heir-presumptive add to the
tension of the hour.

Not once did the King-to-be re-
proach the King-that-was for
leaving so heavy a heritage to
him. And his first act, on acceding,
was to give the ex-King a fitting
title as Duke of Windsor.

But he can scarcely have doubt-
ud that he was undertaking a task
inevitably difficult at a time when
its difficulties were abnormally
cahanced,

One task he imposed on him-
seif. He persisted with the exer-
cises which the Australian spe-
cialist, Sir Lionel Logue, had
prescribed for his hesitation in
speech. The result was that, in
the later part of his reign, he
was able to deliver compara-
tively long addresses at a meas-
ured pace that was not ill-suited
to Royal diction
As his kingly title he chose the

name “George” with probably the
intention of emphasising at that
moment the tone of moral upright-
ness and even severity which his
father had set. Amid the Corona-
tion splendours. with all their
medieval discomforts, he bore
himself with the dignity—and as
much of the ease—that this cere-
mony permits to its leading actor

An early duty, undertaken in
the deepening shadow of war, was
the journey to Canada undertaken
in 1939, His tour of that Common-
wealth country was interrupted
for a four-day visit to Washington
and the United States. It was the
first time that a British Sovereign
had crossed the borders of the
Union lost to the Crown in part at
least by the obstinacy of his dis-
tant ancestor, George III,

The King returned to London in
time for Mr, Neville Chamberlain's
efforts to save the peace of Europe
by the diplomatic negotiations to
which the general name of “Mun-
ich” is given. A year later, George
VI hurried south from his shooting
at Balmoral to hold a Privy Coun-
cil that proved to be the fore-
runner of a graver sort of shooting.

The Dark Days

In his broadcast on the night
war was declared, the King told
his peoples to stand “firm and
united” and warned them that
“dark days” were ahead.

They were, for country and
King, too, No war since George
VI's remoter ancestors had taken
the field with sword and armour
to risk all with their feudal Tevies,
ever came so close to a British
monarch. Buckingham Palace was
bombed on nine occasions, o1 one
of which the King and Queen
through a window of their Lon-\
don house saw the bombs falling
that were to wreck the Chapel
Royal.

The King took the same risks as
his subjects, carrying on with his
work as they did. He would not



A VISITOR IN NEW YORK -_=By BARNEY MILLAR

the city. Analysis of these night
accidents, plus research by ex-
perts in night visibility has led to
the conclusion that night driving
with parking lights only is a prim-
ary factor, Usually, both the vic-
tim and the driver say they hadn’t
seen one another,

The new order requires use of
low beam headlights, but driving
with top brights is prohibited, ex-
cept where the street lights fail to
disclose objects within 350 ft., and
then will be permitted only if
there is no approaching car within
500 ft.

Use of parking lights, will be
continued only on highways where
signs specifically prescribe use of
such lights.

s om 2

Today was also the last day for
affixing the 1952 License Tags to
your automobile. In an effort to
conserve meta] it was decided that
no new state license plate would
be issued in New York this year
So when you paid your fee you
got a metal tag bearing the year
“$2"—and you had to attach this
to the bottom right hand edge of
your number plate.

New Yorkers are like other
people, the world over, so Wednes-
day, the coldest day of the winter
caught long lines of owners in a
final big rush to obtain their auto
tags. “Hundreds shiver in line,”
was the text of a big newspaper
picture of this crowd.

America is stepping up its Uni-
versal Military Trataing pro-

have tolerated any other arrange-
ment.

After the collapse of France,
when a German onslaught was
awaited, plans were drawn up for
the Royal Family to leave for
Canada.

It may be assumed that only in
the direst need, only faced by the
most imperative advice from his
responsible Ministers, would
George VI have left this island.

When Parliament, in the days
following victory, presented him
with its congratulations, he re-|,
plied, speaking to both Houses
in Westminster Hall: “I have
done my best to discharge my
duty as a constitutional Sover-
eign of a free people.”

It was the claim of a singularly
self-effacing man. Yet could any
prouder or bolder assertion have
been made by a man_ glittering
with genius and personality? He
added a few words of acknowledg-
ment to the ceaseless help given
him by the Queen. And it was true
that in war as in peace, he had
been blessed by all that a wife’s
grace and good sense can confer.

Peace brought with it a political
transformation in Britain, the
forerunner of huge and rapid eco-
nomic changes.

A new and untried ruling class
swept into power, which first
heated and then cooled its enthu-
siasms and its ambitions.

In the Commonwealth overseas,
constitutional revolution marched
quickly.

India was divided with arbitrary
haste—an operation over -vhich
the King’s cousin presided as the
last Viceroy of the Passing Empire,

Burma left the Commonwealth.
The new India remained within
its fold, though casting off allegi-
ance to a monarth. Pakistan and
Ceylon became Dominions, as Can-
ada and Britain itself were Domin- |.
ions. South Africa welcomed the
King and Queen one year and in
the next gave political power to
the party that proposed to make
the Union a republic.

Amid such a welter of change,
some of it ill-considered, some
of it needless, many might hawe
seen only the image of decay.
George VI took a less superficial
view, “Come what may,” he said
on ore occasion, “nothing will
ever shake my belief that this
old country is at heart as young
and vigorous as she has ever
been.”

The British monarchy had seen
countless alterations over the years
and the great-grand-son of Victo-
rié, who wags also the descendant
of Charles I, put his faith in the
uture welfare where the wisest
f his forebears had put thes —
in a sturdy belief in the national
character. After all, he was him-
self not a bad embodiment of
the stolider British virtues even
if he lacked the flamboyance o!
his elder brother or the intellec-
tual eminence of his great-grand-
fathtr.

Testing Your

After the testing South Africar
tour of 1947, the King’s health
showed the first real symptoms ot
decline. His appearance bore
signs of fatigue and strain which,
after a time, it was hoped he haa
cast off.

But an affection of the leg post-
poned a projected visit to Austra-
Jia and graver trouble in his lung
at last made this cherished jour-
ney impossible,

This is known to have been,
during the last months of his life,
an anxiety and a sorrow. Having
no particular belief in his own
magnetism, he believed that the
free Commonwealth could best
prosper with a King as the central
human symbol and that the King
must go to visit all his peoples.

During those years, however,
life brought him a new source of
happiness in the marriage of his
elder daughter, Princess Elizabet)
to Philip, Duke of Edinburgh, a
young man of marked ability and
fine presence. King George in
due course found himself the de
lighted grandfather of two per-
sonable children, a prince und
princess in the direct line of suc-
cession to the throne.

The first sign that his health
had taken a sinister turn came
the day after he attended the in-
stallation of Knights of the Bath
in Westminster Abbey. An attack
of influenza persisted too long |o)
his subjects’ peace of mind.

Confirmation of their graver
fears came when the King was
resting at Balmoral. By that time
it was evident that a deepsertec
disorder was taking progressive
toll of his strength. Photogranhr
published in the newspapers pess-
ed their own grave message ‘or
to those who could not read bet-
ween the lines of medical bulie-
tins,

He had greatness thrust upor
“him. But his reign ali too brief
as it was, showed that he had the
moral. courage equal to his high
responsibilities,

gramme, but opinion is divided on
the speed of this speed up. From
the Senate hall down to the street
the matter has been discussed as
the youth of the nation answer the
draft call.

Yesterday two church groups
entered these discussions by voting
opposition to U.M.T., as the mens-
ure is usually called. The two re-
ligious groups are the National
Council of Churches of Christ in
America representing 147,00
Protestant, Eastern Orthodox «nd
Anglican Churches with 31,000.900

members in U.S., and the New
York Board of Rabbis.

The General Board of the Ni-
tional Council at a meeting yos-
terday acknowledged the need fer,
and its support of, adequate de-
fense measures. But the statement
it approved of in an 89 to 8 vote
saic, “we believe it is one thing to
acknowledge the necessity of
drafting men for a limited period
to meet a_ specifice international
emergency,” and “another qui'e
different thing for the churches ‘o
support the conscription of each
succeeding generation of the na-
tion’s youth for a programme of |
universal military traifing. To co
this would be to take a long step
in the direction of a garrisen
state.” |

The Board of Rabbis, independ- |
ently voiced the same feelings an-| |
added, “|. . U.M.T. will be a dis-
ruptive force in family life
in the education ef our youth, ard
will further endanger the basic |
spiritual principles upon
our nation is founded.”


















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THURSDAY,

FEBRUARY 7,

1952



Queen Elizabeth

Reiurning Home
@ From Page 1

18 months old Princess Anne, sec-

ond in line of succession. Both

children are at Sandringham
. they were taken by the

ing and Queen Elizabeth after
aying goodbye to their parents.
*rincess Margaret, also at San-

dringham, is the third in line.
News Telephoned
New f the King’s death

was
mmediately telephoned from
Sandringham to Buckingham
Palace where officials informed
the Prime Minister and Home
Seeretary Sir David Maxwell
Fyfe

Queen Mary was told at her
London home, Marlborough
House She did not plan to
travel to Sandringham. Doctor

James Ansell, surgeon apothec-
ary to the King, was called to
Sandringham early this morning.
rhe exact time of the death was
not announced.

All Court functions were im-
mediately cancelled, theatres and
cinemas throughout the country
closed

Members of the Royal House-

hold who were at Sandringham
were Sir Alan Lascelles, the
King’s private secretary; Sir

Harold Campbell and Lady Hyde,
the Qween’s Lady-in-Waiting.
Further details of the King’s
death were expected to be made
known later. It was learned that
he went out yesterday both dur-
ing the morning and afternoon,

Shocked
The Duke of Windsor,
foundly shocked” by the death of
his brother King George VI, will
sail for England Thursday aboard
the liner Queen Mary, but the
American born Duchess will re-

main in the United States.
The Duke who abdicated the
throne in 1937 announced plans
to return to England for his

‘pro-

brother’s funeral after a _ trans-
atlantic telephone call to Buck-
ingham Palace. The Duke's sec-

retary said his wife, the former
Mrs. Simpson, would not accom-
pany the Duke, but would remain
at the six-room suite in New
York at the Waldorf tower. She
never has been accepted by the
Royal family.

Both the Duke and Duchess are
bearing “up very well indeed”
since learning of the King’s death,
the secretary said.

The Duke of Windsor was
stunned at the news of his broth-
er’s death because he had no hint
that his brother was not recover-
ing, the secretary said

“He has not been in tou with
the Kins recently because there
was no reason for him to be.” No
one had any idea that the King
was ill.”



She said the Duke was as
greatly distressed “as anyone
would be on losing his brother
suddenlv’

—(UY.)

B.G. Toll Bells;
ry °
Fire Minute Gun
(Prem Our Own Carresnondent)
GEORGETOWN, B.G, Feb. 6.
Church belis toiled early this
morning at the receipt of the news
of the King’s death and business
places closed at 11.00 a.m, Flags
were lowered to half mast on all
Government and Municipal build-
ings, and commercial and private
houses The Legislative Council
met in a Special Session at 2 p.m.
to pass a Resolution of Sympathy
to the Royal Family and to the





New Sovereign Loyalty to the
Throne. ;
The Georgetown City Council

also held a Special Meeting at 2.30
p.m. for the same purpose. At
6.00 p.m. a 56-gun salute at one-
minute intervals was fired from
Fort William Frederick and by

evening the ishow cases of | the
leading Water Street business
places were changed to deep

mourning The Daily Chronicle
issued a Special edition at 4.00

p.m



Trinidad Mourns
King’s Death

(From Our Own Correspondent)
PORT-OF-SPAIN, Feb. 6.
The death of the King put a
stop to business and fun as Trini-
dad has plunged its inhabitants
into mourning which will last un-
til the day after the Royal funeral
except for the occasion of the
Frociamation of the accession of
the new Sovereign.
Public offices were closed mid-
day and business houses shortly

afterwards,
The Governor and Ministers
will not attend social functions

during mourning. Carnival and
Intercolonial Cric'’set are not
affected. An Extraordinary Legis-
lative Council meeting is likely
to be held on Friday for formally
passing Resolutions of sympathy
and Proclamation. of the new
Sovereign. A Special Chamber
of Commerce meeting will be held
to pass a vote of condolence io Her
Majesty the Queen and the Royal
Family





en re

WEALL LIKE 17 BEST



s
J&R







#

This group of the late King
and his Family was taken dur.
ing the Royal holiday at Bal-
moral. In the picture are
(l, to r,.) the late King, the
new Queen, the Duke of Edin-
burgh, Prince Charles astride
a pet deer, Princess Margaret
and the Queen Mother.

Headline
Discussed
In House

After meeting with objections
from some member of the House

of Assembly cn Tuesday that he
was no: in order io discuss a
Headline which appeared in the
Beacon newspaper of Feburary 2
“Allder Wants Second Hand Bed-





of yams and potatoes.

+

at 4 cents per pound and 3
now cost a cent more each.





.



MOTOR CAR
OVERTURNS

steads for Policemen,”’ Mr. Allder
postponed his decision to draw to




bats. West of Hothersal

the House’s attention that the blak auOa, Se John and nve
psper had committed a breach of VocUpalts 01 We mower car
privilege of the House. M—I1sS¥, waich sne was
He postponed jhis request for a Ci.ving, Nariowly escapea
ruling of the House that he wa- ‘gully when the car over-

in order to discuss the Headline
until he will have discussed the
matter in private with the Speak-
er of the House, Hon. K. N. R
Husbands.

tu:.ed at College Bottom,
& gOun, at about 6,00 p.m.
on ‘baesday. The car is
owned by Mr, Parkinson of
Buiten & Co., Pinfold St.
‘Tee car was extensively
coma ed but its occupan’s
softfcred from shock only.
Sixty-‘ive-year-old Maude
Ga cith of Palmers, St. John

Mr. Allder in explaining why
be wanted permission to discuss
he Headline, said that the news-
paper shad misrepresented _ the
real debate of the House.









who was walking aloag
‘ e Bcettom was injured
n ‘Se incident, She is de-

vained at the General Hos-
pital.

lt was reported to the
lokee tha the car was
.urn.ng into the entrance of
the College. It struck the
,uard wall and overturned.
it rotled downhill for about
61 feet before it came to a
stop.

Sea Scout Dance
Postponed

Invitees to the First Sea Scou:
Valentine Dance are asked to not
tha. consequent
of His Majesty the
Dance which would have
held on February 9, has
postponed.

upon the death
King, the
been
been







Baby Clinic Opened
At Mount Tabor

OVER 100 BABIES, accompanied by their mothers,
were present at the opening of the St. John’s Baby Welfare
League Clinic at Mount Tabor yesterday evening. This
Clinic is another of Madame Ifill’s contributions to the
parish. About two years ago she opened the first Clinic
in the St. Margaret's area,

The Committee of Management thei;



while she prayed for

ci the Clinic is: Madame Tfill, th: suecess of the Clinic. She
President, Mrs. I G. Pilgrim, then declared it opened.

Vice-President, Mrs, C. Pinder, Rev. Pilgrim praised Madame
Treasurer and Secretary and Mrs. Ifill and said that he hoped the
Vv. Gay, Mrs. M. Greaves, Nurse venture would grow bigger and
D. Clarke, Nurse D, Holder. Miss bigger. He offered a pray for

E. Sealy, Mrs, D. Graham and Queen Elizabeth and
Mrs. E. Bennett. Nurse D. Holder one for the Clinic
will be in charge of the clinic
Madame [Ifill in sher addres
asked the audience to stand for Mt, O. T. Allder, M.C.P., Senior
e@ few minutes in silence out of Member for St. John, said that it
respect to the late King George was a definite opportunity offered
Vi. them to be present to witness the
She said that she was very opening of the institution which
preud to be opening the Clinic would be of invaluable assistance
because she felt it was greatly to mothers of the urea. He said
needed in that district. Mothers thct if there were many more
should be taught to take care of Madame Ifills the poor of Barba-
their children.” che seid. dos would be better off,
Hr hoped that it would be
Competent Nurse more successful than others he
She said that the Committee had seen in the colony. “It can-
was glad to secure a cOmpetent not be such if mothers do not
nurse, in Nurse D. Holder, te look d« all ir their power to make it

afterwards



Great Assistance





after the children, She then so,” Mr. Allder said

asked Mrs. Bruce H. Alleyne A. vote of thanks was moved by

Wile of Dr. Alleyne, to open ti Mr. Claude Ramsy, member tr

Clinic officially th Committee of Managemen:
Mrs. Alleyne said it wus a of the Christ Church Baby Wel-

real thrill to see the large num- fare League

ber of mothers and children. She Ajter the .opening Madame
read her “ten commandments fo, Ifill! distributed powdered milk to
parents” and said that before she mecthers. Next Wednesday moth-
returned to the U.S.A, she would er: will get yeast,, barley, cod



leave a copy of them with | oil and sugar
Madame ‘Ifill. At present there are 27 babies
She suggesied to mothers to or the Clinic’s roll. The insti-

give the Committee the kind of tution, which is carried on in the
cocperation which is needed. She Mcunt Tabor School, is equipped
reac a poem and said it was a with cale for weighing the
message she “wanted them to hibies. towels. a cupboard and
have. She asked them to bow First Aid items.





SSS

Ca

een

Ki QU EY ~ \\\

SaaS SS

The Cost o;

LOCAL HOUSEWIVES, not yet recovered from the
ncws of the 20 cents increase on locally produced beef
11d other stunning increases on mutton and other items,
were asked earlier this week to pay increases on the price

}
|
| Size 2
|
|
|

BARBADOS



Food Prices And



Living

These two items of foodstuff which feature prominently
in local dishes and have for

two years or more been sold
cents per pound respectively,

These increases sent the already
so iring cost of living which during
the week saw increases in the
price of local fresh meat, bread,
animal feed and rum, up another



peg. This year, rice, milk, eggs,
tresh fish and local green vege-
tables have cost more than
during the previous year, and

hcuse-lkeepers are becoming more
and more anxious about what
is to be done to make ends meet.

They claim that the money
which they get for their house-
keeping has been whittled down
by more than 25% of the value
which it had last year, and are
fearful that it will drop further
in value as further price increases
are announced,

To bear this out, one city clerk

whose __ salary is $80.00 per
month said; “I am unable to
save a cent out of my salary;
with rent to pay, electric and
water rates, two children at
scheol and other commitments,

ell of which must come out of
my present income, I have been
forced to cut to a minimum es-
sential items of foodstuff, and as
regards clothing, it is impossible
for me to buy a new suit

Grave Situation

A Civil Servant, recently mar-
ried, said “the present situation
foy me is a grave one.” He also
has rent to pay in addition to a
Life Assurance Policy, electric
and water rates, all on a “small
salary.” “One bill is hoerdly
cleared off before another is not
inevitably incurred,” he said

A domestic whose only income
is $4.50 per week, and who has
a little girl at school said : “meat
or fish I cannot afford, and what’
more, I can only manage one
“rea! meal” a day, and that is at
night when I have gone home
from work. I try to rear some
stock, but the present price of
teed seems ag though it will soon
be impossible.

She asked “who is responsible
for all this. Why can’t the Gov-
ernment do something to keep
prices from going up week after
week? Shop-keepers, she claims,
anticipating price increases on
certain items, keep them hidden,
‘and then you have to do without
them,

She said she had noticed that
breadfruit had been taken off the
contro) list, and she feels that
hawkers will take advantage of
this decision to demand a higher
price for this itern

New Vein In U.K’s
Attitude To Egypt

CAIRO, Feb. 6
The newspaper Al Ahram
commenting on British Foreign
Secretary Anthony Eden's state-



ment on Egypt in the Commons
last night, said the speech mark.
ed a new vein in Britain’s atti-
tude toward the Egyptian ques-
tion. It added that moderation
replaced intransigence in London
when Eden admitted that a set-
tlement could not be reached in
Anglo-Egyptian questions unicss

based on Egypt's rightful aspira-
tions.

Al Ahram stressed Egypt's
stand on Sudan would = not
violate British pledges to the

Sudanese as Cairo proposes a
plebiscite whereby the Sudanese
would determine their own future
status.—U.P,









ADVOCATE

PAGE FIVE



U.N. Tanks

Penetrate
Red Territory

EIGHTH ARMY H.Q.,
Korea, Feb. 6.

MORE than 20 U.N. tanks
infantrymen

supported — by

drove five miles
munist territory
Chorwon and blasted Red
supplies and Assembly areas
with direct tire for three
hours in a surprise armoured
raid. Not one United Nations
tank was lost. Infantrwmen
Jumped off at 4 a.m. to secure
fully in no-man’s-land — sur-
rounding the flat snowcovered

into Com-

Vey through which tanks
drove.

Dirrcily behind the riflemen
moved engineers with demolition

eaquipmen: to blast paths for tanks
across the big drainage ditches and
0 tes. for mines and other obsta-



cles

Allied infantrymen drove Reds
ff the northernmost hill in a sav-
age battle but were thrown off
with intense small arms and mor-
tar fire. They regrouped however
and had almost retaken the posi-
tien before the raid was ended and
they were ordered to withdraw.

Tanks moved out at 7 a.m. ad-
vaneing beyond the dug-in infan-
rymen to the northwest of the
Communist held hill which gave
them a clear shooting view of the
whole valley, The advance of the
tanks was held up by a huge ditch
which only a few of the armour-
clads managed to cross.

From that spot however the en-
tire valley was open to United Na-
tions tank fire. A United Nations
tank Commander described Red
resistance as “relatively light.”

—UP.

Civil Servants
Over All Greece
Move On Strike

ATHENS, Feb. 6

More than 65,000 civil servants
throughout Greece tod y went on
strike for a substantial increase
ii Wage Tae Government is
exuceted today to .ssue° orders
teday calling up all essential em-
ployees,

I'he police were s anding by in
Athens, Piraues and other towns
to-day. Ministries and other ad-
ministrative buiidings were put
under guard,

The Greek Government offered
a 15 per cent. wage increase to
junior civil servants as from Feb-
ruary 1 this year, but this was
rejected by civil servants who
said hat the offer was a “prov-
ocation ciming at disrupting the
unity of civil servants.”

The new Greek constitution,
passed on January 1 this year,
as well as the civil servants code,
does not permit strikes by civil
servants.——U.P. <





MORE NICKEL
WASHINGTON, Feb. 6
General Services Administra-

tion (G.S.A.) said that the Nicaro
Nickel Plant in the Oriente
Province of Cuba is expected to
reach a £30,000,000 per year pro-
duction rate by next June. They
said, “This is equivalent to about
10% of the world’s annual nickel
production in the pre-Korean
year of 1949.” UP,







Avalanches Hiuerl Down Houses, Barr:

A VALANCHES thundered

and houses destroyed.
great.”

were blamed on five fect of snow

the Alpine regions and two fect in the streets of Zurich and ol!

cities.
A repetition of last y
ut Switzerland, Austria, Ite







Hong Kong Will One
Day Be “Free”

HONG KONG,
A Communist
Canton has warned hat “the day

Feb. 6

will eventually come when Hong
from the
barbarous yoke of the imperialist.”
semi-official
attack
yet in the Communist press and

Kong will be liberated

The
organ

newspaper, a

made the strongest

radio propaganda blast again
Hong Kong over the last hree
weeks.

Attacks began after Hong Kong
uthorities had deported a num-
rer of Chinesé to the mainland
for alleged subversive political
activities in the colony.

Claiming that Hong Kong was

originally part of China taken by

he British by force, the news

paper added: “Our people will
hever tolerate it if this territory
is to be used asa base for in-

vasion of the mainland.”

—U.P.





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north of

down
said one person was killed and an unspecified number of ber
Swiss officials warned that
Three villages near Schwyz were evacuated
A church, school and inn were damaged at Reimenstalden. Sli«

*s avalanches which killed 250 perso
y and France was feared,

newspaper in

thing.

13 Broad Street



Communists Call For Post
Armistice Peace Conference




















- PANMUNJOM, Korea, Feb. 6
4 me: THE COMMUNISTS called fo post armistice peace
00 ourists nference—from which Sor Korea would be excluded
to the Korean conflict and “restore peace in the
Due Today — **** |
o North Korean Lieut.-General Nam Il presented a
The Canadian Pacific line vagueiy worded three int pl mime at the first full-
Empress of Scotland, 26,300 tor Gress truce negoti Ig St held since December 4
v-ill be calling at Barbados to-d: rhe 4 ; ss ‘
cn her 16 day Caribbean crui: aE oe fs \ ; - A 2 Bia mee,
irom New York and she will | oblecss: 3 dations to teeoamee ne
bringing about 400 tourists—mo of all foreig Kore ed He asi oy ; Ppclitienl
of whom will be Americans Secondly, a p nent ; oa tae ae co
Sne is. expected to anchor eo Korean the : ae = pot
tec eae ea : Fi q ; h ignir Kverean truce
Carlisle Bay at about 9 a.m. ai other question peace with five representatives of each
Baibados will be having anoth Korea urtcl UP oe
tourist day The Communist ed the -- on
' 7 eae * eects will expected demand tha uce del 5
»¢ the third tourist liner to arrive egates “recommend pesu ‘? ‘ “d
at Barbados for 1952. She started ithdrawal of foreign troops fror > Re porte . For
this cruise from New York on Kgrea, but they left no doubt that ry’... ef2
treb:uary 1 and has stopped in on iis point would have first prior i ratfie Offeneés
her way down at Havana, King- y at the peace conferen ci
ston, Cristobal, Willemstad Nam's proposal was presented Thirteen people were reported
. . : proy I v
La Guaira, She will be leaving os the starving point for afle offences on Tuesday and
port during the afternoon tor t) on on the fifth and final tten { of these ir re fcr exceeding
Vi. gin Islands e Truce agenda he speed li 2
The liner recently returned * It came as the negotiations. re ihree were reported for driving
New York from a cruise to t uned deadlocked on other

ite ingerous 1 iner me for
West Indies and plans to do t ‘ruce Supervision, and the ex- Parking in a restricted ar

more cruises from New Yor. ange of Prisoners sein combats
before the winter is out..She wA! ee
be back on the Liverpool-Quelx
ind Montreal service in mid-Ma

ea and
hired car in a



park

Vaguely Worded








Vaguely worded, the proposal
Her local agents are Messrs. 1). pparently was designed to for CANES BURNT
Costa & Co., Ltd 1% United States and the Western
llies to give de facto diplomati« Nine ures of first crop ripe
Ne ) ry cognition to Communist China, fanek’ we@e burnt when a fire
Kratice Moves ‘To

illing for direct official negotia- ecurre at I
n with the Governments of Red Christ Church at about 10

vace » i ic hina and North Kore The U.S) on Monday
Kase Re lations gnises neither The canes are the property of

rr. . ‘ N Il opened today’s session Williarg Watson of the same plan-
W ith W est Germar th he reading of the Commu- tatior 1

vere insured
PARIS, Feb. 6

France moved to ease «th
strained relations with We
Germany by proposing to com
promise on the NATO Association
ior tne Bonn Goveinment, |
proposal in a report to the N»
tional Assembly tor the upeomi:
debate on a European army, ad
not mention the Saar but sugge
close ties with the NATO in
European defence commun
with Bonn as an equal mem
in the latter, The report
membership in NATO will be
subject at the NATO Lisbon mx
ing for decision,

Proposals will permit Jo
NATO European army meeti:
Joint policy for the NATO Ei
pean army, Germans at S.H.A.!
with Eisenhower

wthers Plantation,

p.m,







ANIAMTED OPINIONS



Meanwhile apostles will
to-day to prepare the final rep
for Lisbon, The meeting is
pected to last three days unc
the Chairmanship of the tnu.u





security programme head Says Mr. Leo King:
Averell Harriman éttaes nee . roe
—UP YOU CAN RE-LION IT
oe BEING THE SWEETEST TREAT”

Mrs. Jagan Goes e

PORT-of-SPAIN, Feb, ¢
Janet Jagan, American -b« ”
resident of British Guiana \

last Friday was refused perm.
sion to remain in Trinidad leay
tomorrow possibly for Grenac
The Governar’s refusal to ¢
voke the immigration Depa:
ment’s order was conveyed to hy
by letter on Tuesday evening
ter the Executive Council me
ing. The letter told her “ple
kindly leave at the earlies «
portunity and that if she rett
to Trinidad intransit to Pri
Guiana she will not be permit
to leave the airport

Toffee

The Perfection of Confection
MADE IN UK.

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LONDON, W. 3

PALM’ WORKS.





aa!

ZURICH, Feb, 6

Swiss valleys and first 1

danger is * !

which has fallen since Saturda



UP.

Bush Fires
Under Contro!

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MELBOURNE, Fe working dogs wan nd neod °0 0
Most bush fires which dey onde ofth Nite ae er 200 de }
tated wide areas in Victoria an ore ne uted the ed e-ier."e3

New South Wales yesterday wer and in palat
reportéd early today to be ter

porarily under cor. rol gut weal
fire fighters were still on the alert

ee ee ee =

SLEPLS att. ths Ail aD

In Victoria where fire h
been deseribed ¢ the most ruil: 9 ’
ous and widespread since 1939, | AYN ATLARLE
was expeeted to be



cooler toda |
ut the Weather Bureau he |
warned that tomorrow will be
“scorcher” and could be ti

{ y .
PURINA
$ ate’s “blackest day yet,” > ‘ 2 + ‘ >
Reports from fire ravaged ce ah 1 aed >
tres in New South Wales tod

\)
said the fires were under cont:
H. JASON JONES &



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PAGE SIX

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for the application of your fertilizer CYCLE—Only cne (1) in stock,

young canes or grass ‘ands. Courtess [ ambassador Supreme, Spring-frame, 2

Garage. Dial 4616 7.2.52 p. $905.00. Terms. A BARNES & CO.,

—

GRASS RAKES:

rod. 26.1, 52—t.f.n.



mh

Hea

y duty 12” rak!
6” transport width) Self-lifting. #







































































BARBADOS ADVOCATE

PUBLIC SALES





B.G. Mystified












RATES OF EXCHANGE



THURSDAY, FERRUARY 1952

TAKE NOTICE

LOSING RATES: FEBRUARY 6, 1952/
MAIL NOTICES NEW YORK
scion } 73.6% pr. ao on Bankers 71.4% pr, |
REA ESTA 2 Mails tor S. Lucia, S. Vincent, Gren- ight or demand }
eat | t nnin?’ jada, and Aruba by the M.V. Daerwood Drafts 71.2% pr
AVONDALE is REED STREET, | will be closed at the General Post Office 38% pr peed i i
y % ie ak ant la c .2% pr. rrency 6 pr
Bridgetown. | A ree vee "aah “ek.s 1 ““Parcel. Mail at 12 noon, Registered 69.2" pr. |
cine tit agan |Mail at 2 p.m. Ordinary Mail at 2.30 CANADA
ated thie Satine aiital aie i p.m. on the 8th February, 1952 (Including Newfoundland) }
“RORAIMA". KING STREET, Bridge y Mait. for Pr. Guiana by the Sch. Francis 73.9% pr, Cheques on Bankers 71.3% p
AD . 2 * . ae@r . ,Or= , . > : ®
town, tenanted tiy Mr. and Mrs. Eustace] GEORGETOWN, B.G., Feb. 6 w. nit will be. clone at the Genera! Donen Deohs i 1 he
Gooding, and standing on rented land Political and Labour circl in Od ‘Mail ‘= 12 noon, Registered 73.9% pr. Cable
Rg Maakoee inaere fer c E Rixton British Guiana are ny | at) Mail at 2 p.m., Ordinary Mail at 2.30 72.4% pr. Sa o.8%s pr
srt oa , tenar y r - a ; % r
wnd standing on rented land the drastic action of the Trinidad |>™ on the 8th February, 1952. »
Inspection on application to the respec- | Government in banning Mrs.
tive tenants between 10 a.m. and 6 p.ir }

Janet Jagan from visiting o1
| maining in the island.

It appears that the Trinidad
Government acted on information
or advice received from some

on any day except Sunday re-4
The above properties, belonging to
Estate Alfred T. Phillips, deceased, will be
set up for sale by public competition at
our office, James Street, Bridgetown
Thursday 14th February at 2 p.m.

YEARWOOD & BOYCE |Government (British or Foreign)
aie ns jor through official or diploma‘ic |
channels, but up to the present



£100 Barbados Government De-

no reason or clauses for the ban
benture @ 3% %

has reached the



1 £100 Barbados Government De- public in this |

benture @ 5% country. |

3 2100 Bavbados Government De-| Through the British Guiana

ventures @& a% i .

ahs: abaaee UF.2. euen Saket: a6 | Government, His" Excellency the

441 shares Barbados Fire Insurance |Governor of Trinidad Sir Hubert}

= nace PS T. e: Ltd Rance has formally notified Hon. |

shares i. iscul o. ~ _ i 2 g .

43 shares Barbados Telephone Co, Dr. Cheddi Jagan, a member of

(6% Preference) the Legislative Council for the

= mare aes Jee Cs. es Central Demerara constituency,

e above mentioned shares wil e : ‘ facie nd

set up for sale at Public Auction on} that he and his wife have been

Friday the 8th day of February 1952 at}deemed by the Governor in the

2 pm. at Carrington & Sealy, Lucas|Council of Trinidad to be “pro-
Street

#1.3.08 = hibited immigrants”.
EN-DAH-WIN, Pine Hill —Standt Similar information was sent by



on























TAKE NOTICE



That LOEW'S INCORPORATED, a corporation organized and existing unde! | apparatus,
the laws of the State of Delaware, United States of America, whose trade or

business address is 129 South State Street, Dover, State of Delaware, U.S.A.
Manufacturers, has applied for the registration of a trade mark in Part “A” o

Register in respect of films adapted for reproduction and containing recorded
images of pictures and/or recorded sound, motion pictures and motion picture
motion picture |
projecting apparatus, motion picture cameras, and parts, photographic apparatus

photoplays, motion pictures films of all kinds and description,



Tiat LOEW'S INCORPORATED,
the laws of the State of Delaware,
business address is 129 South State Street,
Manufacturers, has applied for the
| Register in respect of films adapted for
images of pictures and/or recorded sound, motion pictures and
photoplays, motion picture films of all kinds and description,
projecting apparatus, motion picture cameras,
and parts, talking picture apparatus, combined
‘and motion picture machines and apparatus parts and accessories,
| synchronized sound reproducing and motion picture projecting machines
parts and accessories, talking machines combined and
| with motion picture apparatus and records and films therefor,
| parts and appurtenances, including radio receiving sets, cabinets,
horns,
| tus of all kinds and description including electric switches and

corporation
United States of America, whose trade or

Dover,

reproduction

t

‘some person shall’in the meantime give ne

registration of a trade mark in Part “A”
and containing recorded
motion picture
motion picture
and parts, photographic apparatus
synchronized sound recording
combined

organized and existing under

State of Delaware U.S.A,
* of

and

synchronized
radio apparatus,
amplifiers,
and combined talking machines and radio receiving sets; television appara-
electric stop mechan-
isms, detector tubes, amplifying tubes, and like goods, and _ will be entitled to
register the same ofter one month from the 7th day of February 1952 unlpss
stice in duplicate to me at my office

and pdrts, talking picture. apparatus, combined synchronized sound recording | of opposition of such registration. The trade mark can be seen on application
and motion picture machines and apparatus, parts and accessories, combined | at my office
synchronized sound reproducing and motion picture projecting machines and | Dated this 23rd day of January, 1952.

@pparatus, parts and accessories,
with motion picture apparatus and records and films therefor,

parts and appurtenances, including radio receiving sets, cabinets,











































talking machines combined and synchronized |
radio apparatus,
amplifiers,
horns, and combined talking machines and radio receiving sets; television apparatus |
ef all kinds and description including electric switches and electric stop mechanisms





H. WILLIAMS,











































Registrar of Trade Marks.
1.2.52—3n









| ¥ x ‘ e
width (9 ~ “ a8 detector tubes, amplifying tubes, and like goods, and will be entitled to register | te . - 8
Courtesy Garage. Dial 4616 ELECTRICAL koe sig ao yer the Trinidad. Governor for Mrs.| the same after one month from the 7th day of Februory 1952 upless some person | Sader . m A. 2 j
1.3.82 ee ee ee nea ay room, livifig room and k aatlenethe with Jagan who plans to fly to Gren-~| shall in the meantime give notice in duplicate to me at my office of oppositios |
ADDING MACHINE: Barrett Electrical | ™ . ra ‘ ' ada to spend dheet faratt of such registration. The trade mark ean be seen on application at my office. |

3, ‘ 1V " ACTOR RAKES: Adding. Machine (U.S.A.) Cost New cupboards. Tiled bath and toilet. Ser- | ace ) spend a snor vacation Dated this 28rd day ef January MONTREAL, AUSTRALIA AND NEW IRE ST

IDE-DELIVERY TRACTOF K = | 1952.

. See a Faas a €295.00 will accept $200.00. At Ra'ph | vants’ room and garage. Inspection on there instead. e ZEALAND L! >.

unsble for wind-rowing f fenrd's 1 fae Street. Phone 5010, | »pplication to Mrs. Bernard Rolfe. Tele- 7 H. WILLIAMS, MAN? 1 The M/V. “CACIQUE DEL
’ assey-Harris product ial rte Beard 's ower a3 4 . a —_ ‘ , ¥ /V.

Gare <0 eee Deere — Pine aoe will be set up for sale at éuerae ene gy 4 wo eye 13500 | Fee das NER Meineke: don. Sossenaeh ‘a — Lucia, “ot.

scatter ciceaiuabdi being hinteciipeclovientelane t ut Ce se ve irst women to be elect@d) aig soniye Liilispaataia | Adelaide February 11th, Melbourne Feb- Passengers for St. a,

7 AAR nee CANDY FLOSS MACHINE: Excellent; Public Auction on Friday the 8th Feb-|, me se : ian pital | a a ; ‘i Vincent, Grenada, and Aruba
walet Prue ~ : Hi a vA Die | Profits having made by Legh ge sa at tg p.m. at the office of the Aha nag nt F ea oe mah TAKE NOTICE | Rese Be Or rear ad rine % Sailing Wy efnae say i. m

; ¢ st New $400.00 will accer 2 for | undersignec > satates-born ; r| sa > The M.V. “D. OOD” w

ei > Available 0 ‘ ' . , + a Ss a
i Leake Iand-wiak, Oe me quick sale. Apply Ralph Beard, CARRINGTON & SEALY, | Janet Jagan is General Secretary ZEROLIT asen ie 8th and Barbados about} © cept Cargo and Passengers for
cae. Dinter 2 "tn | Lower Bay Street. Phone 5910 Pry ae - "v1 152. th Jof the Socialist Peoples’ Progres- Thet THE PERMUTIT COMPANY LIMITED, a British Company, whose trade | 1 addition to general cargo this ves- * St. Lucia, Be ae a

eS } “isive Porty of British Guiana and| Gf ,pusiness address is Permutit’ House, Gunnersbury Avenue, London, W 4, | sel has ample spa.e for chilled and hard | % and Aruba. Salling "y

6 CANE TRAILERS: Immedinte creed ead a cP re oe 4 a ce nglaud, janufacturers, has applied for the istration of a trad k F | frozen cargo * . ny 4 IBB ”

ly available wi or without ‘Tre eth Amenete 5. estas te 10.008 square tout $f ieee Mircea at Chel. with her husband 1s the foremost|“A" of Register in respect of chemical substances being artificially. sureares Cargo “aecepted on through Bills of > Be ou oe ane ioe

Very Heavily con ted afd they mal ae ie a ceriastian 1% years guaranteed sea Gardens, St. Michael, The house among the people in their strug- cy Pounes for the treatment of water and other liquids; plant and installations | Lading for transhipment at Trinidad to| » sects ton Kataoh ee teaerat

es a "7 y Ol Transport prokioms tt ano on Apply Ralph Beard, Lower |contains Drawing Room, Living Room, gle for self - Government and und ‘will De Tentitved tc "Sermuar the mete te aa eG Ge ia Ce yee ie Nevis and St, Mitte ‘Sailing Friday

a B16 *ourte Garage ert Z . z a. & » ister the same after one month from the 7th ay « Islands. > sal ”

’ Bay. Street. Phone S010 6.2.52—2r 6 eine e, Toilet, Bath and! eventual independence. ee 1952 unless some person shail in the meantime give nitibe in auptiate | "For further particulars apply % sot inst,
1.2.52—3n . } { ¢ i ao ;
The above property will be set up for| , In St. Vincent in 1948 she wos sti cc tandiicainn sao ee of such registration. The trade mark can be | ruRNESS, WITHY & Co., Ltd % B.W.1. SCHOONER OWNERS
FOK REN RADIOS—One (i) 9 tube Murphy |sale by Public Competition at our office similarly banned and could not Dated this 23rd day of January, 1952 TRINIDAD > ASSOCIATION (INC.)
Radio almost new. 1 (7) tube HM.V Jame Rares on Friday 8th February.| address public meetings and it is , H. WILLIAMS, B.W.L . Consignee. Tele. No, #47.
a ox celle . Holder Bros. . mM, ateaheds F y ; S . . } 2 *
HOUSES seven st Dial oa 72 82 —toin Inspection on application to Miss Kell- feared in many quarters here Realstrar of Trade Marka | DaCOSEA £ Go. 548 Ft
oe Nhe ees | MN, Oe avone pi that Grenada might take action 7.2,52—3n awit
SEEM ict Marche Bint aN D. A. Bre FURNITURE WOOD & BOYCE, = jalong the lines of Trinidad, and pha Se eee -
Prospect, St. Jame 2 27.1.52.—10n, | St. Vincent. KE °
CHAIRS, Chairs, Chairs and other a The British Guiany Trade Union TA NOTICE ‘
wniture and all sorts of fittings for ANS SOUCI” situated at Kensington | ea nei : ; CAR-PLATE cone e
JANTE (urnitrcme. A. BARNES & Co., 14d.|New Road (near Fontabelle End) St,,council has protester to the , ; |
WA cep 18.1.52—t.£.n. | Michael standing on 6,030 square feet of | Secretary of Stote for the Colon- That S. C. JOHNSON & SON, INC., a corporation organized under the laws | “
— —— | a land ; fee awainet thie, mast. Femros | eying, State of Wisconsin. one of the United States of America, whose trade ot one nc.
so ~ . STEEL FURNITURE: Filing Cabinets, 4 nante ec doy : et 4 er? n ss address is 1525 owe Street, in the City of Racine, State of Wisconsin, |
MISCELLANEOUS Gan ; yi Sas desks "typists PR hg Beige Birla rnin \hensible” action by the Trinidad | USA t Tahiie oe aoe pplied for the registration of a trade mnie on art | :

Ne eee $ ae q - 8, ‘ ah s 2h ce ‘ p c " oO egister in respec’ f polish for metal and surfaces fs . 2 .

iE.-4 irs an > chairs. K, R. HUNTE : y | Government ond the Peonle Pp etn Feapect 85: Bo metal and other surfaces and will be |

pLOOEEEN OND —-Sultabie to be mounted a led a Te Gait or 8027 perder ae cuneee cae ene boomy in mon ial dcbaegia As es f a Saiitlod to register the sare, after one month from the 7th day of February NEW YORK SERVICE

ines z m chards & Son. Me] © © 4 * Fale, * +. | ¢ pe v cahbler nentoe 952 nless some person shall in the meantime giv re . |

. 6.2.52—2n, ae nv e give notice in duplicate t |
Gregor Street. 7.2.52—1n garage and eee tear tae in yard. ithe Trinidad Governmant Seor at my office of opposition of such registration, The trade coaere, on Mia’ ohert A STEAMER sails 25th January—arrives Barbados 5th February, 1952
Pe ne eer every day (except Sundays) | ot tnin far tha Calan on application at my office | A STEAMER sails 15th February—arrives Barbados 26th February, 1982.
WANTED TO RENT 9 between 1 & 5 p.m | o f win Dated this 25th day of January, 1952 ae aos $ 3

HOUSE: English family requires vn LIVESTOCK es ere hb ne : SEP gen | tt > Aum Right Commiisss H. WILLIAMS recs inctinatiieoccetimpait enna
furnished House from April Ist, 6 months sale at public auction on Friday @ 18th |, i 2 s F Regis ‘ “2 i ’ ve ae ¥ . apne cr Re eer
or iondite Gurist Church, Bt. Philip, February at 2 p.m. at the office of the|! the United Notions.—CP) hagiatcar of an ae f NEW ORLEANS SERVICE
s! cha 7 " ; 7 7 Pe , anna || undersigned } Ainsschesuinhitelindinndinitiibe” daislaaide i . A STEAMER sails 16th January—arrives Barbados 31st. January, 1952,
t. Michael preferred Write; Box LL. TWO RIDING HORSES Phone 2668 a ee ee ee winless hiP wa a > :

C/o Adyogate Advia. Dent. 7.2.52—4n CARRINGTON & SEALY } A STEAMER sails 30th January—arrives Barbados 14th February, 1952
abo it Soliettors, | 7 OFFICIAL NOTICE A STEAMER sails 18th February—aerrives Barbados 28th February, 1952.
a em — r Lucas Street Ce ee ee TTT

ANICAL ;.2.62--9
ren Tione (ve seeen eee | RES BE) sansanes CANADIAN SERYIUE
- 2-8 GUY—New passenger chassis recently) ‘“TRANQUILITY’—Standing of 14,110) ° IN THE COURT OF CHANCERY SOUTHBOUND
aacoumabe received, oh view at Barbados Agencies,|square feet of land at Strathclyde. n usterit : P
UEEN’S COLLEGE telephone 4908. 1.2,52—€n. | House contains three bedrooms upstairs 7 IN PURSUANCE of the Chancery Act, 1906, I do hereby give notice to all Name of Ship Sails Halifax Arrives Barbados
- mee ae aD nn and one bedroom and spacious rooms CO ne claiming any estate right or interest or any lien or incumbrance ing ,
A SINGER SEWING } HINES (RE- | downstairs ‘wo baths and toilets, m- | in or affecting the poperty hereinafter mentioned (the property of th , $ ¥ J) ""

Requided ‘tas Suinmer Term: if possible, | CONDITIONED).—Just like new. See | spection anyday by appointment. ‘Phone @ From Page 1 to bring before me an account of their claims with ieie witnbeses Reruns oa 8.8. WALCOA PIONEER enue both Fottunry sth
if not. “September, 1952, a Senior History} them on Display st our Show Rooms, | Mrs, L. Skinner 2657 The above will be | vouchers to be examined by me on any Tuesday or Friday between the hours of 12|s.s. “ALCOA PLANTER" February 12th February 22nd
Mistress to organise and teach the subject] Cash or on easy Payment ‘Terms The} set up for sale at Public Auction on; MOVements to prwrnote welfare in| neon and 3 o'clock in the afternoon at the Registration OMce, Public Buildings, | A STEAMER February 26th March 7th*
throughout-—the Schook including €!xt! rondard Agency (B'dos) Co., 14 Swan | Friday the “sty February at 2 p.m. ot! industry. Bridgetown before the 26th day of March, 1952, in order that such claims may A STEAMER March i4th March Mth
r (Aderrmeed Scholarship St ~ Din) 3620 6:2.92—On | the office of the undersigned | On Jan. 1923. after three years be reported on and ranked according to the nature and priority thereof respectively, A STEAMER March 23rd April 2nd

Scales TD CARPINGTON & ALY, lot close friendat Py : S| otherwise such persons will be precluded from the benefits of any decree and be |
Graduate £295 by £12. 108. to & MISCELLANEOUS | ¢ Lu 5 Street a 2" ye ae he became en- | deprived of all claims on or against the said property, ¥ | These vessels have Mmited passenger accommodation
£15 to £400 } a fm} gaged to Lady Elizabeth Bowes- ‘ 5
Graduatc Ist and ¢ lass } ' - ——-—---——--—- -- —--- vor . " snaktnr Plaintif; ERROL MALCOLM STEELE TH TD. AND GULF SERVICE.
came ty 235 ¢ CLOCKS--Old English and Frerich| |. The undersigned will be set up for sale | a? Oe are SaaS Defendant; HELEN EVELYN GREGLEY acting herein ene OM LTD. — NEW YORE G SERVI
. £4bu b yt is Th wood 1 der. WmD.| SY Public Competition at their office Nos. |) 0° S00 ne r . by GARFIELD DeVILTON HOLDER her ‘
£580 soda de oak ba ae a 151/152 Roebuck Street on Fridaw the 15th | They were married at Westminster constituted attorney on record in this Island. | APPLY:—DA COSTA & CO., LTD.—CANADIAN SERVICE
but to a highly qualified and ¢ 7.2.52—1n| instant at 2 p.m. All that certain two| Abbey on April 26, 1923. Three | PROPERTY: ‘ |

mint uper le post iad Phe ap ego ore 6.16 square | years later, the popular Duchess : a cane, on piece or parcel of land (formerly part of the lands of En-

off by S28 to £800 : ~ a eet of land situate at Bay. Street, and | },,. a . erprise Plantation) situate at Enterprise in the parish of Chris ° MITED

tion, ate hold a T acute ¢ coe Te $5.89. ‘eae adjoining the premises of Messrs, Man | Silene a Aine = ae Island containing by admeasurement 7 sere Tineluave oe a TSasan. ch i weak ROBERT THOM LI

Diploma will € an allowance of % oe r ‘ ning & Co., Limited. The building | é ‘xandra ary, @ | twenty feet wide which intersects the said parcel of land and runs from the Public EE

£45 per hs y a ; oll inquire Auto Tyre Co, Telephone Ot. a recently constructed one, and has a{‘fourth lady in the land.” Road in a northerly to southerly direction) Butting and bounding on lange of the PLANTATIONS BUILDING, LOWER BROAD STREET

Piensa, ot ceding 43m, agnor ez ct |, ON AUK. 21, 1980, a second | Si, Cantar y” B, Gichae or andr wiley oe enw et, & tieae||| Svan Gatnda Ailines, W.O.A.C. and
wi! be ge'nst approp < cners Jay’ Records pnd 78 FR ’ ’ area o i square Rae cate - . of the ni e ‘ r, On lands formerly o' e estate o! . C, Lucas a s

A term's 4 guaran r fi seeens ua we book orders too. A.| ‘ownstairs with the same upstairs, Elec- daughter, Princess Margaret ose but now of Miss Hazel M, Bynoe on the remainder of the said road twenty feet ‘Trans-Canads AGRO B.0.A.C. B.W.1.A.
years’ r none SARNES & Co., Ltd. tric light and power and three water | Was born in the haunted Glamis} wide, on lands of Mr. BE, C. Jackman, on lands of Mr. W. A. Yearwood, and on the ALCOA STEAMSHIP COMPANY

‘lak of ser . 18.1,82—t.f.n, | toilets are installéa in the building. The ;Castle, in Forfarshire, the first| Public Road, together with the messuage or dwellinghouse thereon and all other Telephone No. 4466

‘ eave 1 i ad es uti glass cases and ene and also a eee | Yoval baby born in Scotland for| buildings and erections thereon erected and built standing and being as

o 1 > vut t t as | the e J ¢ \".

Bs ( enninanis. under ene vars Gru one araeuaae. Saabs $SMee | graben bo desuces, ‘ns, beamiae von | ™ORW than Shree, centurtes Adu te anty, | Poorer eee CNT eNO CNS DNE NUN IND ONE IDN OTe nT INN

nde Tear Pension Ac o cont! | 4y'36 to $624. -A BARNES & CO., LTD. | stitute ‘an admirable business site and The King’s serious affliction was| pi ated :— 23rd October, 1951 ; Kee we : f ee °
but rval but the mi ; 24.-1.52-t.f.n | if necessary could easily be converted | a stammer, which he finally mast-| Dated 2#14 January, 1952. % A RICUL TURE FORKS .

tl ng period c 5 ‘ into a. Bond or Warehouse. Inspection} ered with the patient Duchess. 24.1.52—4n | 5 .

punter ee see OSV EN oor aaa ie aes ou e il gene the BIN aca toMr. R.A. After his marriage he took daily - - maar ae ele You had better buy now even if var do not wish

f& und E : oT rer 00 years par > pre es. Z :

init Ac Det peri dnd wm D wicnare & Son, | For further particulars and conditions of | Speech 7 ssons for two years, and any immediately.

* anit on i sally > ‘ 2 .

tppl ” he thr {eGregor Street, 7,2.52—1n | sale apply to R. S. NICHOLLS — CO., | practically learned how to speak Suppliers are now quoting two years delivery

pirmonia he names of tw {ov ees . | Telephone 3925 7 8n | again, pp sé 4 8 .

@ a Medical Cerufieate of fitness should ere ere en any er Radio, boxing, tennis d de ,E
: ; r Aug ely ta a : a 5 xing, tenn an e- MP Mi
Coffes ; se sete Me Mg nr AUCTION tective fiction came first amon CENTRAL E ORIU

i on I Sets, AORN OR, Cita ee ee aT 7 s : a

ee mat { By instructions of the Insurance Com- his hobbies. He also liked cinema Cnr. Broad & Tudor Streets

th Fobruary, 1962 { pany L will sell on SATURDAY $th and had his own camera with

T2seein 12 o'clock at PAYNES BAY Back of which he spent hours “stalking” LLL LLL LLC AED ; %
sneer 7 \ CLUB Parochial Treasurer St; James the fishing |his children. His tastes in litera- {9000490909000 09 0909 OOP OPOOOOO P
nv Le amaged . i

. . 2 ture were Catholic. He read the rs x 1g’ NJ
. " CASH R. Archer Me Kenzie M 4
er ISSCC OO COSI ITS (Members Only) . tl gm latest best-sellers and the heaviest é SELECT THESE CROP-TIME

; oe 1) By instructions received I will sel sociological tracts. His knowledge ¢

>

x INVESTMENT * OPPOR- % \ ix Messrs. Mc Ernearney & Co., Garage on | was wide and his family once 2 SUPPLIES

% TUNITY % Notice FRIDAY, 8th, at 2 p.m. VAUXHALL | calieg him the “Walking Encyclo-

2h : ga cee s } SEDAN CAR 12 H.P. 1947 model in a io” e a s ye 2

number 0} im ive ¥ king order—tvres fair, TERMS CASH, }| Pcdla. ‘

5% sre Shares in. A. X|{} Members are asked to note ARCHER MC KENZIE, Auctioneer i Intellectual $

% BAR? & CO, LTD. Telephone ¥ that the Dance previously 2 Mote. intatinwhinl ' th his s

& Scorsiury, Mr. Vicior Munte, 28°. 31} advertised for Saturday, 9h ff | ———————_____ — 5 Mote. Joatecad |. than. his STEA M

be-ldn. os * ar has been s, he § n 4

} + x retenesy, 4989, UNDER THE IVORY HAMMER ithe golf links and tennis courts ‘“

BEBO FOOLS OIOOE cancelled. Sta wat i i der, shot. and

VLE POET (| By Instructions received from the In- TC Was a gooa rider, ‘

Yrs POTD

HOT WATER ON

















PPE PE SEPP EPSP FPF PSD





herman. A devoted husband and
father, his great love was his

surance Co., ¥ will sell on Friday Feb
Sth at Messrs, Courtesy Garage White-



































s
Sia park: (1) 1947 Austin Car, 8 h.p. and ..jpitdy + a mire Oe
S TAPfor YOUR BATH >» | 3 OUR AGENTS are making £100 ¥] (1) 1941 V-B Ford, 85 h.p.'( Both dam-, |) ae ae 2 y % and more by taking eee aged th nctldents) Sale ot 2 pr [Noes ‘oF 1em no ma
> 1% Pers istmas G 9 . Pas busy
With eve of the lovely White Por- ¥ | ¥ ee ere eT eee: VINCENT GRIFFITH | He founded an annual summer
st * wan or story cane we ave x Eritain’s largest and foremost 6.2.52-—3n Auctioneer, }eamp for 400 boys from 17 to 18
minutes of lighting up. Econ. % Publishers will send a Beautiful Sect | lwo hundred came from public
omically priced and CHEAP to §|% Free Sample Book for 1952 to {schools including Eton, Harrow,
> tun with Natural Gas. A few are x % Genuine Agents Write today. | Rugby, and Winchester. The other
now available at your GAS Highest Commission paid. Jones, " 200 were working boys from in-
i ornay. x Williams & Co,, Dept. 9, Victoria SHE dustrial centres.
LODO OOOO IN I A 3 Works, Preston, England. yp |
t OOOO KNOWS ho 4
SLOPES OSO VOSS OSS OIO. i
LONG BAY NEW TE ALD. k . d
MENT CHURC ; > Hts % ~ In Touch With Barbados
er ipuErr Ws. Educational Notice )
7 rey * , , r Able and Wireless (W.L) Lid, advire
HARY ES | * x that they can now communicate with the
Sw ne . hog gliowing shins wh their Barbado
Ou February lth, 1952 » “PECHNICAL AND VOCA- ¥ Sasi
q ¥ TIONAL TRAINING” 4 3 ¢ Catherine M, Goulan
« . . ; > ty is. ». Hallanger Uso, 8.5 aiam,
| at 3 o'clock p.m. H * A Public Address by % o icolaolt Marin 1 8
, " . xX Major C. E. DARLINGTON, @ Mauretania tude
A Friends are J a : g Sti fetadn. 6
iends are invited * B.Sc., M.LE.I. * stan Ripe ALE Nelson, 6.8.
earn s Principal: Government Technical 4, . ‘i oe) ae ee ’ stn
No Vegetables. * Institute, British Guiana x ; New Haven. ‘ Ampa Ww Megearton. s
ALLAN BANNESTER y on So ee [Ares bee Italia, ss. Rosina Marron, s.s. Rangitane,
. , pea {%§ MONDAY, FEB, Lith, 1952 x Book aa bees Europa, ss. S. Monica, s.s. Gulf
x at 8.30 p.m X\ At Your Gas Showroom, Bay St : Coote! ™ ae Say 7 ar ees, © >
: er oe hac ae > Kaia Knudsen Alcoa Plone 5
PROVISO re Pr eer eerie | COMBERMERE SCHOOL ¥ ESS SSS SSSSSSSSSSSS, | press of Scotland, ss, K. Hadjipateras,
Viy HALL \ Yl Canadian C . &s. Fort Towns-
J » Ly pap ‘ 1, ss. Southern Counties 8
TO-DAY'S NEWS FLASH &)$ > joa permission of to 2] ff ROYAL BARBADOS fi) jo). Froutieton ss Fomor
oasew A \ ea aster and 1e +
BanOrot Y inSE CHEC- x Governing Body % YACHT CLUB
FERS, — | LAR GAMES . seION —_ Bans
ie TL Uta OAM ‘ ADMISSION FREE # ! ASSENGERS
ee eet OU EE ES oily s¢ Dept. of Education, x NO a ICE { P
Se Faget oS» ath Heb, 1062 3 } .
> > Passengers arriving here yesterday by
CHAMPEAS TWENTIETH CEN- we : % MM ne 8.8 7 a
Biny"” nonnny, reas 9 | “eeeenanneeencooneste* I Members are asked 0 note HH on saiktb ad
CUPS. BLUE BAND PLATES = that all entertainments for L. K. Carter and Wife, C. Bartlett
AND DISHES. | His Majesty’s ships “Dev- })}) eo wit ee
A KING'S STORY By H.R. H. § | onshire” and “Enard Bay” 2. Gehring and wife
the Duke of Windsor | FOR s§ Al E have been cancelled. ‘] Prom St. Vincent
sinvber oe ptoteay | 4 4 A. Grant and wife, D. Grant, E
. HARDWARE i T. BRUCE LEWIS, lolder
* EYREVILLE Secretary. i rom BRITISH GUIANA : |
; s W. Savies, E. H. Spinney! R. Pecker,
PESOS I. Kilkenny, §, A. E. Moshette, A
te SS N. Stuart. H A Liverpool, D
LOSSES SPOS OOF GE
EAGLE HALL ROAD i :
One substantially built two- ORIENTAL NOTICE
HOUSE storey house. It has sitting
room up and downstairs, SOT JVENIRS st
HASTINGS BARBADOS gallery, dining room (4) There will be a , Seneral
Under new management bedrooms, toilet and bath SILKS, OURIOS, ARTS meeting of the Barbados

Daily and longterm rates and garage reasonable

N
Inspection by





, quoted on request offer refused
Permanent guests appointment.
welcome.
Dinner and Cocktail D'ARCY A. SCOTT
ties rod
. Middle Stre 2
J. H, BUCKLAND, iddle Street Dial 2645
Proprietor. 6.2.52—-2n.
a a SSS



Hackney Car Owners’ Asso-

VENDEMOS, SEDAS,

ciation at the Progressive



LLLP

JOYERIAS Y ARTISTIOAS League’s Building on Thurs
CURIOSIDADES, TRAIDOS day night, 8th February
DE LA INDIA CHINA e commencing at 8 o'clock
EBIJIPTO when 2 Board of Manage-

ment will be elected.

THANI’S C. ST. HILL,
Pr. Wm. Hry. St., Dial 3466 } Acting Secretary

‘ ’ o¢ S56 665666OGOO9SSS5SSOS” ‘



PPPECE LLLP POSS

|



LASTIKON RESISTS

Cloudbursts, scorching sunshine, exposure to all the winds tha
blow—they make no difference to a roof painted with Lastikon

Lastikon is available in various colours—ask your dealer about it

‘LASTIEON

MADE BY
BERGER PAINTS





FOR SALE
“CARLDIEM”

a two storeyed dwellinghouse standing on 10,770 square feet
of land on the incomparable St, Lawrence Coast.

Excellent sea bathing. Dwellinghouse contains verandah
upstairs and do dining and sitting rooms, 4 bedrooms, pan-
try and kitchen. Electric light, gas and water installed. Garage
and servants rooms.

Purchaser to have option of buying furniture and effects
Inspection by appointment. Dial 8137. (Mrs. K. R. Hunte)

The above will be offered for sale at public competition on
Friday, the 8th February, 1952, at 2 p.m., at the office of the
undersigned from whom further particulars and conditions of
sale can be obtained.





|

PVP E PLLA LE

s COTTLE, CATFORD & CO.,
% Solicitors.
$ 24.1.52—15n



THE WEATHER

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Industrial Plants
GALVANISE PIPES
and Fittings

HOES, CANE BILLS, etc., ete.



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er Minerva Red Roofing Paint
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|
|


THURSDAY, FEBRUARY 7, 1952

PAGE SEVEN



BARBADOS ADVOCATE























HEN

1c

A
TOAST TO

YOUR
HEALTH!!

ur WINCARNIS Whe

Se ASSIST YOU TO GUARD IT
BUY A BOTTLE TO-DAY.

s) f = %
\ Pe Me: ded SPS PT Gt)
be oe eccacadiieiee ssf hy





ONDIE BY CHIC YOUNG —

IT PAYS YOU TO DEAL HERE















SPECIAL offers to all Cash and Credit Customers for Thursday to Saturday only



a
SPECIAL OFFERS are now ®@vailable at our Hranches Tweedside,
Speightstown and Swan Street
3 j Usually Now Usually NOW
Tins Heinz Soup: Tins Corned Mutton 68 60

To o—Onion—G P. ‘ ob ep :
sete aura hngeaing 36 Tins Cooking Butter (1lb) 98 95













Pkgs. Bird's T. Jellies .20 AS
Bottles Heineken’s Beer .26 -21 Pkgs. Jacob Cream
: Raisins per lb. 3Oe. Crackers 49 38



A) [1M KIND OF F RIGHT, FLASH/ HH} 4 J
uP’N’ AT ‘EM, Guys! fy)) | ANXIOUS TO an SEE yOu } > Pat \ fh |

| dag =

ite
THE SHIP'S WAIT TO GETOFF “all || TAKE OFF, TOO! 7S ABOARD! \ eM |
Ree MEVEE YOu J THIS ROCK! WE BUT IF WE ge : Y q pa Bs |
COULDN'T StEER SO— %3]\ HAVEN'T HAD - 7 } Ne ie om, |

ANY TROUBLE . = |

HERE WE ARE! ALL SET—<¢
$ ACCELERATION SUITS \i/ UP TO NOW,
as } I OON'T THINK, : i
WE WILL! ['LL ‘ ‘ > ¢ 4 |
ROUND UP THE } 7 A giaN = a






THE COLONNADE GROCERIES.





4 Visitors!
“™ Residents! :

WHERE ARE YOU STAYING ? WHERE DO YOU LIVE ?
If you are staying at any of the hotels in the Hastings or
Worthing district, if you live anywhere in or around these
areas, we would like you to know that we have provided
for vour convenience A BOOK SHOP and STATIONERY
as modern and up-to-date as space would permit, But in
case you have difficulty in finding it we would like to explain
exactly where it is.

JOHNNY HAZARD BY FRANK ROBBINS

YOU'RE THE
ARTIST, DR. ANTON
/
















HMM, T WOULD GAY
THAT OUR WEE LALIRIE
WAG IN A WEE COMA /

AH-H/ 1 WAS RIGHT..
WITH A FEW, AH, MINOR
CHANGES... YOU WILL BE
ALIKE AG TWIN SISTERS! &






BRINGING UP FATHER

ee ee | ee IF YOU ARE STAYING at the Marine Hotel, the Ocean
View Hotel, the Hastings Hotel or the Windsor Hotel, then
you have probably discovered it already because it is in
Greystone Village, near to the above places.



BUT IF YOU ARE STAYING anywhere nearer to town
than the Ocean View Hotel then you will find our shop in
the first gap on the left, off the Hastings main road, with a
sign marked “Entrance to Marine Hotel”,






-¢

a fe P 4 bd at 4
; em >: VP | § he ] va I | y\ I\

90 Vr / 6 fe — j , nem ic. aaa \ IF YOU ARE STAYING anywhere further from town than
L ~ Ba B LY | Poe a 4 i g we , oF — a ioe Vi bh 4 the Ocean View Hotel, you will find our shop in the second

gap on the right with the sign “Entrance to Marine Hotel”.





as
KIRF AE BY ALEX RAYMOND | THIS GAP IS KNOWN AS “BALMORAL GAP” and a few

yards up you will find our shop along with others in a line
of booths opposite Grey Stone Flats. Think of the time you
will save not having to come to town.

THEY WERE BURNING OES... BUT WE MUST
OUR PLANE! THE HAWK / GO ON,..OUR ONLY
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MURDER US! CROSSER |S TO TRIPLE-
CROSS HIM/



ADVOCATE

STATIONERY
BOOK SHOP

GREYSTONE VILLAGE, BALMORAL GAP, HASTINGS





caiptiinninncaininaia
' ,NO. 3



100 YOU% HES LIKE NOOTHER MIAN IVE )

TRUST) | EVER MET. SOMETHING STRANGE ~ 4),

TAINS { | UNUSUALS —————— (Kwonvks '
“\\2 = = beavers -

af a~




PAGE EIGHT BARBADOS ADVOCATE

THURSDAY, FEBRUARY 7,

7 Trunk Call Puts
34s. On Bill

FOR two hours last night I wrestled with an invisible op-

1952







SPORTSMAN’S DIARY QUOTES GRIMMETT:

Selector Bradman
Should Resign

McDONALD CAUGHT



WHAT’S ON TODAY

Court of Error: 10.00 a.m.
“ Court of Original Jurisdic-
tien: 10.00 a.m.
Police & Petty Debt Courts:
10.00 a.m.

ponent over the chessboard.

Meeting of the Vestry of

TO-DAY comes the backwash of the “fight for the
world’s cricket championship” — the greatest batsman of



his day attacked by possib

SIR DONALD BRADMAN and his

CLARRIE GRIMMETT.

Little Grimmett — nick-name<

“the Gnome” by C. B. Fry years
that the Australian
chairman is
replaced.

ago—thinks
selectors, whose
Bradman, should be
“They showed lack of imagination
and goi into a rut. A well-bal-
anced representative side could
do a lot to restore cricket pres-
tige.”

NOT ALONE

This after Australia had lost
the third Test match against
West Indies and won the fourth
only by the narrowest of mar-
gins. Bradman is not alone in
Grimmett’s bad books, Other
selectors are JACK RYDER (20
Tests against England) and
“CHAPPIE” DWYER.

Mesnwhile the Australian

States will have to meet a guar-
antee of up to £8,000 to cover the
losses of the tour.

For this blame
in part Australian DOUGLAS
RING, who clinched the rubber
by scoring, wity BILL JOHN-
STON, 38 for the last wicket in
the fourth Test. If they had
failed what fun and funds the

final Test would have supplied
HOW VERY TRUE

To-day the Johannesburg Siar
is advocating again cancellation
of the South African tour of
Australia for cricket and money
reasons. If this happens, it says,
“Australians will neo doubt ex-
press polite protest but will in
fact feel deeply relieved.”

How very true, how vers rue!

JiM TITMUS ILL

In hospital with throat trouble
is Mr. JIM TITMUS, president of
the London Amateur Boxing As-
sociation and former police
heavyweight champion.

I wish him a speedy recovery.
HOCKADAY RETIRES
AFTER 20 YEARS ii senior
soccer, 37-year-old LES HOCKA-
DAY, a pre-war English amateur
international, is retiring, but his
services to the game will not be
lost. He plans to take an FA
eoaching course and to make a

new career for himself

To-day he told me: “I am
definitely giving up this season. I
want to leave the field of my own
accord.”

Hockaday began senior football
with his local team, Bexleyheath
and Welling, in the Kent League.
He has since played for three
Athenian League clubs, Enfield,
Leyton and Sutton United, his
present club.

ONE AMBITION

A member of the first England
amateur team to win in Saptland
(Hampden Park in 1937-38) he
has won four caps. In 1939 he
played as an amateur for Arsenal
at left-half. With Leslie Comp-
ton behind and Denis Compion
in front they formed the Arsenal’s

left gank.

Hockaday leaves the game with
one ambition not fulfilled. He
wanted to play in every Conti-
mentel country. With Middle-
sex Wanderers ands FA XIs he

visited them all except Denmark.

PIANO, PIANO ?

SIGHT not to be missed in
boxing just now is that of BOBBY
GLEASON, American manager,
bobbing up and down at a West
End gymnasium ringside yelling:
“Piano, piano!”

Inside the ring, and trying his

best to follow manager Gleason’s
newly learned Spanish is 21-
year - old JUAN PADILLA,
feather-weight champion of
Mexico.

Padilla speaks not a
English, and Gleason

word of
has had to

start swotting Spanish from
sramophone records.
“The puv can’t even eat unless

T am around to order his meals,”
says Gleason.

PREFERS LONDON

After two fights in Paris in
one of which he put the great
Ray Famechon on the floor, Padilla
has chosen to train in London for
his next engagement in Brussels
—against JAN MACHTERLINCK,
feather-weight champion of Bel-
gium.

The idea, of course, is that
some talent-spotting matchmaker
might drop in when Juan is spar-
ring. He tells me—in Spanish!

—that any feather-weight can be

accommodated.
—L



Ss.



I mean
fellow-Adelaider,

ly the greatest bowler.

Nankeville

Seeks His
‘Revenge’

PETER WILSON

says one of the few who does
not tip Roger Bannister for
the Olympic 1,500 metres is
his British rival, Bill Nanke-
ville, who kept in training all
through the Christmas season
for that day in July when he
hopes to win a world title.

OLYMPIC year, Helsinki only
just over six months away—-and
Great Britain hoping te do better
than ever before in the world’s
greatest quadrennial sports meet-
ing

Among the brightest hopes, of
course, is Roger Bannister, the
ex-Oxford miler, runner of last
year’s two fastest miles (4 mins.







3.3 secs. ilad a; 5, : f I d
(Seem: Regulation Issue

“Jolly Roger” has so captured
the public imagination that almost
everyone you meet is talking about Y: mers are receiving leaf-

7 . A acht owners are receiving leat
the 1,500 metres, the Olympics jets with the new Royal Barbados
owe: race, as being “Bannister’s yacht Club racing instructions. A
senefit.”

* 2 ‘hanges have been made in
There is, however, one impor- 5 el saaittona
tant dissentient from, this point of The first rdle is on Classes.
view, and he is none other than Formerly there were only the
the man from whom Bannister, G D. and Intermediate
ae three A’s title—Bill Nan- Classes. The addition to this is
seville,

the Tornado Class in the R.B.Y.C.
series come under R.B.Y.C., regu-
lations. The Tornadoes have an
Association of their own which
cater to their Sunday races.
There is no change to Rule 2
which states that at the finish of
amrace the first part of ayacht

Nankeville believes that he lost
the mile at the White City through
watching the wrong man—John
Parlett, with whom he has trained
so much that his style is an open
book to the European 800 metres
champion,

aa eee, Oe ee at ae over the line counts even if the
time: “Towards the tape Nanke- bowprit be that part.

Rule three, which states that a
maximum of five minutes from
seratch yacht per round for alt
classes will be allowed in handi-
capping, is also unchanged.

Rule four is that the time limit
for a race will be two hours and
thirty minutes from the start of
the first yacht to the finish of
the first yacht in “B” Class.
Should no “B” Class yacht finish

ville made up a lot of ground,
and at the finish seemed to have
more running left in him than
Bannister had, But that was his
fault.” Bill finished perhaps three-
quarters of a second behind Ban-
nister. =
For the rest of the season
Nankeville entered every athletics
meet where there was the remot-
est possibility of his getting his
“revenge” on Roger, But—-no dice,

They haven't clashed since last ‘
July. y, R. B. Yi, c. Third
Regatta Postponed
An Omen ? egatta Postp
, ‘ On account of the death of
Heightening the intense per-

His Majesty King George
VL, the Third Regatta of
the Royal Barbados Yacht
Club which would have
been held in Carlisle Bay on
Saturday has been post-
poned, This Regatta will
now take place on Saturday,
February 16 at 2.30 p.

sonal rivalry between the two is
the fact that all the publicity has
gone to the forther Oxford blue
while the ex-market gardener,
who is now a sports salesman, has
been relegated to the role of “just
another runner,”

In many ways this recalls the
1936 Olympic Games, in Berlin,
when there was the same sort of
rivalry between Sydney Wooder-
son and the late great Jack Love-
lock

—

in this time the race will be de-
clared off and must be resailed.

Flag N will be flown from the
On that o¢casion Wooderson Committee Box and two guns
had an injured ankle, and was fired,

eliminated in a heat, and a link
with those days is provided by
77-year-old coach Bill Thomas,
who trained Lovelock and is now

An addition has been made to
Rule 5 which formerly stated that
B Class boats will sail three
rounds and other classes will sail

looking after Nankeville, Could two rounds.

that be an omen? To this rule is added that the
Thomas, incidentally, hopes to Tornado Class will sail three

2 =e Tt me a number rounds on the shorter course,

of a es have formed a com- ;

mittee which hopes to raise the Twelve Races

The sixth rule formerly stated
that twelve races would be held
for the series and ten races to
qualify. All yachts to qualify
must start in the last three races
except exempted by the Com-
mittee,

Only the first part of this rule
now stands. That is; Twelve races

£100 necessary to
warrior to Finland

send the old

In the meantime Nankeville has
been, training all through the
Christmas season for that one
day in July when he hopes to
a) win an Olympic title and (b)
veat Bannister, And I’m not sure

n which order he would put those Will be held for the series.

ambitions! A slight change was made to
CRACKER-JACK idea, .., An Rule seven but no change at al

clectrie starter which’ -fres a rules eight and nine, The next

vule outlines the conditions for
carrying the Racing Flag and to
this is
Their racing flag will
inches by five inches,

The other rules are
except for
it quite clear that the starting
line is between the starting Flay
and the Committee Box on the
Aquatic Club pier.

The flags are the same: The 10
minute flag be “B” (Red Swallow
Tail); the 5 minute Flag the Blue
Peter and the Race Off Flag N
(Chequered Flag),

cracker behind each runner may
!ecome standard equipment for
ihe New South Wales A.A, Device
enables starterto stand away from
tield.

Athletics in Australia should go
1ocketing after this!

be eight

the same

—L.E.S.



Tennis Postponed

Due to the death of King
George VI, the Lawn Tennis Fix-
tures at the Belleville Tennis Club
were postponed yesterday after-
noon. They will now take place with many Yacht Clubs all ove
this afternoon instead.





Registered U6 Potent OMe

They'll Do It Every Time By jimmy Hatlo |

Tr WAS ONLY A BIT PART-BUT .« |
_ HORACE.,WHO HASNT WORKED SINCE
ABIES IRISH ROSE’ WAS GLAD 1 GET rm



IS VERY SMALL BUT



So RIGHT AFTER HE SIGNED THE
UNEREAKABLE CONTRACTâ„¢NEED WE
GO FURTHER? You KNOW THE REST!

OKAY OKAY s+

IT'S BETTER THAN GIMME ‘THAT

NOTHIN’: WE PAY
THE MINIMUM»
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we Wey,
ee i



added the Tornado Class.|

12 which now makes;|

_ Backache, Kidneys Strained!

The R.B.Y.C. has fallen in line}

the world which have ceased ‘oj;

(By Our Yachting Correspondent)

award the cups on the percentage
basis. This year the Cups will be
awarded on the points system.

According to this new points
system, the winter in the B gets
15 points, in the C ten points and
in the Intermediate, D and
Tornado Classes twelve points
each, Therefore if only five boats
race in the B Class, the last boat
gets ten points, Formerly on the
percentage system, this boat would
only have got one point and the
‘irst boat five points.

Ten Best

At the end of the season the
helmsman will select his ten
best races. He can discard in two
races in which he gave the worst
performances. However, if he is
disqualified in a race, he cannag
discard that race because “you
must be punished for a breach of
the laws.” The disqualification (or
if they are more than one) counts
among the ten best,

A few yacht owners have told
me that something should be done
so as to allow the small boats to
start before the large ones, They
feel that the handicap times could
be fixed about half an hour
earlier so that it would not be
necessary for a “B” boat to start
along with two or three of the
“Dp” Class,

This will mean that the start-
ers, who at present spend about
forty minutes out by the starting
flag will have to remain an addi«
tional thirty minutes. Poor start-
ers !

iwever I do not think this
could be done since, according to
Rule four; “The time limit for
a race will be two hours and 30
minutes from the start of the first
yaeht to the finish of the first
yacht in the “B” Class,

It must be remembered that the
“B” boats sail three rounds, Jf,
for instance, a “D” boat was
allowed to start half an hour
before the first “B”’ boat, surely
many races, which have so often
been completed in light wind,
would have to be declared off and
Lesailed,

The whole idea is to get the
“B” boats off as quickly as pos-
sible. In manoeuvering at the
start, the small boats should give
the big boats room, On some
ceeasions the big boats are the
offenders,

Tae whole idea is not to get the
big boats and small boats jibing
the beagle at the same time. If in
the second or third rounds they
jib the beagle together that is not
the fault of the handicappers.

However, this is only one of the
many attacks made on the handi-
jceppers. Some are made during
| the season, but the majority at
ithe end.

|

}
|

~ Rheumatism

If you're feeling out o’sorts, Get

Up Nights, or suffer from Dizziness,

' Nervousness, Backache, Leg Pains,

i Swollen Ankles, Rheumatism, Burn-

ing Passages, Excess Acidity, om

i Loss of Energy and feel old bef

| your time, Kidney Trouble ts ft
| true cause,

Wrong foods and drinks, worry,

colds or overwork may create an

strain on your kidneys so that they
function poorly and need help ta
properly purify your blood ard main-
tain. health and energy.



doctors have discovered by



ent
practt that a quiek and sure way
to help the kidneys clenn on? o¥-

—

We can supply

| Crittall Steel Windows

various widths and heights with or without Ventilators

| (rittall French Doors

3 ft. 9 ins. x 7 ft, 9 ins. high

|| Crittall Steel Sliding Folding Doors

The Whole Door Slides and Folds te one side
6ft. 2ins. wide x 7ft. 2ins. high

INQUIRIES ARE INYITED.

YOUR










| excess of acids and place a ries

¢ clinical tests and in actual) cle mists and the money bac

!

|

| Help Kidneys Doctor's Way:
lan

Phone 4267.

WILKINSON & HAYNES C0., LTD.

McDONALD (52) caught Worrell off Gomez during the Fifth Test at Sydney ericket ground on 25,1. 52.

New Yachting



* ‘TEST MATCH
COMMENTARY

With the assistance of
Messrs Cable and Wireless
Limited, the Barbados Re-
diffusion will make an effort
to give a commentary on
the first Test match between
New Zealand and the. West
Indies tomorrow night at
9.00. p.m.

This service is not orig-
‘mally beamed to the West
Indies.

M.C.C. 224—5
In Final Test

MADRAS, Feb. 6.

A solid undefeated 71 by Jack
Robertson and 66 by Dick Spoon-
er helped the MCC score 224 for
5 wickets on the first day of the
fifth and final Test against India
here,

The MCC made a_ bad star‘
Josing Frank Lowson for only 3
runs but Spooner and Tom Grave-
ney put on 68 for the setond
wicket, This was followed by a
third wicket stand of 60 by
Spooner and Robertson.

The pitch gave no help to the
bowlers but the batsmen found it
difficult to score at a_ fast rate
against an accurate spin attack.
Even so the score might have been
better, for the ball came off the
pitch very slowly and some of the



wickets should not have been
lost.
SCOREBOARD
England — Ist Innings .
Towson b Phadkar ‘ 1
Spooner c Phadkar b Hazare 66

Graveney stpd. Sen, b Mankad 39

Rabertson not out 7
Watkins c Gopenath b Mankad 9
Poole b Mankad 15
Carr not out 12
Exivas 3 i

Tota) (for 5 wickets) 224
—UP,



King’s Death Stops
Stock Exchange

LONDON, Feb. 6.
Trading on the London Stock
Exchange was brought to a stand-
still to-day by the news of the
death of King George VI. The
Council of the Stock Exchange
held a special meeting and de-

cided to close markets at 8.00 a.m. }

Prior to the news trading was
quiet and most sections had shown
no definite trend. Domestic issues
were maintained at overnight
levels, but there was some activ-
ity in foreign bonds, with German
and Japanese loans higher on
moderate support. To-morrow’s
markets are expected to be quiet
and subdued.

Ankles Pi

—U.P.



cess polaons and acids is with «
aclentifically prepared preseription
called Cystex. Hundreds and hun-
dreds of tors’ records prove th’:

No Benefit—No

The very dose of Cyste c
Tright to Seok Neha yor Kianes

remove exc

acids. this
makes

ut feel like new again. And
80 eer are the makers that
Cystex Satisfy you completely
they Sak Yau No try St w ra y
bach, guarantee. You the e.

' mot emtirely satisfied rn return
Ue empty , P
ni¢ Ry - Pacha oF -
Cystex ¢ tthe at
guar

so buy your

is-tex) costs

amtee protects you,
‘went teday

from Stock :a=

fireside; at Tyburn Road, Birmingham, Mr.

I sat near a sotnehane by my
. FIELDEN,
a worker in the plastics industry, did likewise.

St. Michael: 2.00 p.m.
Netball match between

Between us an impartial Post-
master-General kept a trunk line
clear from seven to nine p.m.

We were playing telephone
chess, a new service offered by the
Post Office “when traffic permits,”
at specially reduced rates.

After an initial exchange of
leasantries (during which Mr.
ielden, a member of a_ chess

team, established a clear psycho-
logical ascendancy), the TC sys-
tem was put to its first severe test.
How to deeide the toss for first
move? ‘ .
Solved With Grace

The problem was solved with
grace by Mr. Fielden. He admitted,
unflinchingly, my guess that the
white piece was clutched in his
left hand.

Agreement on sundry scratch-
img noises as a signal between
moves to recall each player to
the phone was the only other pre~
liminary to this trial by telephone.
From then on only occasional

unts of “Queen to Queen’s
Bishop Four” or “Rook to King
Six” troubled the trunkline.

Unrewarding

The cost of the call, from the
time Mr. Fielden lifted the re-
eiver to checkmate was £1. 14s.
x the normal evening rates, it
would have been £3.

As to the game of chess by
telephone—it is curiously unre-
warding to a player who, like me,
founds his clessmanship on an
elaborate repextoire of intimidat-
i facial expressions.
me right, Mr. Fieldea, I am
saving it for the end. You won!

(Cheltenham Flyer ?

CHELTENHAM Rugby Club are

hoping that speedy BRIAN

To Our Friends
From Overseas

KINGSLEY
RESIDENTIAL

CLUB

AT BATHSHEBA

Welcomes you and offers y

LOBSTER
LUNCHEONS

which include our
popular

MERINGUE PIES
in Coconut,



Lemon or
Orange

DIAL 95266

12.1.62—4n.





GEORGE SAHELY & CO, (dos) Ltd.



Crepe Back SATIN |
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Flowered SPUN
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SHIOZE
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Pink SHARKSKIN



TAFFETTA
@ $1.44 — Now @ $1.18

Ladies’ GABARDINE
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_ YOU |
|

|

“LADIES BELAS OF | BORDERED PRINTS

BOOBBYER, Oxford Univ

Queen’s College and Ur-
and England three-quarter,

suline Convent at the

play for them, He begins teaching Ursuline Convent: 4.00

at n Close School, Cheltenham, p.m.

=o Mobile Cinems Show at
Mile Ambition Pasture, Christ

Kingsland .
Church: 7.30 p.m.
_ DEFENDING her Kent women’s
individual cross-country title over
a 3% miles Orpington course on
Saturday will be 19-year-old fair-
ae HAZEL NEEDHAM, of
itham.

Training has not been easy for





WEATHER REPORT

Miss Needham, who is at Worces- YESTERDAY
ter Training College studying to Rainfall from Codrington:
become a teacher. Often she has 03 im. 4
done her training runs alone at ‘Total Rainfall for Month to
night on the r near the Col- date: .05 in.
lege, but she has also accom- | Highest Temperature:
panied local men runners on cross- 83.5°F.
country traini spins. Lowest s

Her big ambition is to become 710.5°F.

the first woman in the world to
run a mile in five minutes. Her
best time is 5 min. 23.4 sec., which
she recorded at the White City
last summer, when winning the
British women’s mile .champion-
ship.
Tied For First Place

JULIO MORENO, Chilean
swimmer claims to have broken
a world record by floating on
water with his hands and feet tied
jor two hours 45 minutes, Previous
record was two hours 15 minutes.

—LE.S.

Wind Velocity: 12 miles per
hour

Barometer (9 a.m.) 30.028,
(3 p.m.) 29.936
TODAY
Sunrise: 6.12 a.m.
Sunset: 6.00 p.m.
Moon: First Quarter, Feb. 2
Lighting: 6.30 p.m.
High Tide: 3.32 am. 1.16

p.m.
‘Low Tide: 7.56 am., 8.50
p.m.



Glassware

from Czechoslovakia

Champagne Glasses, Ea....7lc. & $1.26
Sherry, Each 44c. & 80c.
Port, Each —_—44c. & 80c.
Cocktail, Each 49c. & 92c.
Liqueur, Each__..___§_§__36c. & 66c.
Tumblers, 80z., Each___36c. & 57e.
Tumblers, 5az., Each______38c. & 52c.
Plain & Decorated







CAVE SHEPHERD

& C0. LTD.

10—13 Broad Street









| Old Rose LINEN
WE AGAIN OFFER @ $1.74 — Now @ $1.60



Flowered SILK
@ $1.80 & $1.10
Now @ $1.50 & $1.00

SWEEPING



REDUCTIONS |, 85° E" 6c
ON THE FOLLOWING SILK



2 $1.16 — Now @ $1.00
LINES. Flowered SATIN
' @ 88. — Now @ 78c.





N. B. LADIES’ SHOES

‘OF ALL KINDS

Those at - -

$4.51 — Now @ $4.00
Those at - -

$7.84 — Now @ $6.72

SPECIAL |
|
for

FRIDAY 8th & SATURDAY 9th

ALL KINDS Those at - -
at 84c. per Yd. $8.32 — Now @ $7.50
Ete., Etce., ' Ete. i



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COURTESY
GARAGE

White Park Rd.

Dial 4391
$

st

IT PAYS TO ECONOMIZE !!

GEORGE SAHELY & CO, (dos) Ltd.

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Rehert Thom Lid,

y
SSSSSSSCS SSS SSSSSGEOSTIOIOSOVSSS SSO SSG IGE FOS SS SSS SISOS GSS FOSS FIGS SS



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FOR BEST VALUES AND EFFICIENT SER’ h.

®:Q:~-->oflmlfl aE



YOUR REQUIREMENTS
FOR THE FOLLOWING {
USEFUL ITEMS :

=

Sun visors (anti-dazzle} Licence Plate Jewels %
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ON. “Bie teens

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ee Pe and a large supply of . . . >
ey ene SLEDGE HAMMERS 1b }
a and 16% complete with

Steering-wheel Covers handles, t



a lai cememeneiinamaiaae