Citation
The Barbados advocate

Material Information

Title:
The Barbados advocate
Uniform Title:
Barbados advocate (Bridgetown, Barbados : 1983)
Portion of title:
Sunday advocate
Place of Publication:
Bridgetown Barbados
Bridgetown, Barbados
Publisher:
Advocate Co.
Publication Date:
Frequency:
Daily
regular
Language:
English

Subjects

Subjects / Keywords:
Newspapers -- Bridgetown (Barbados) ( lcsh )
Genre:
newspaper ( sobekcm )
Spatial Coverage:
Barbados -- Bridgetown

Notes

Dates or Sequential Designation:
Apr. 22, 1983-
Numbering Peculiarities:
No issue published for May 3, 1983.
General Note:
On Sunday published as: Sunday advocate.
General Note:
Microfilm produced before 1988 may be substandard.
General Note:
Latest issue consulted: Feb. 28, 2005.

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Source Institution:
University of Florida
Holding Location:
University of Florida
Rights Management:
Copyright Advocate Co.. Permission granted to University of Florida to digitize and display this item for non-profit research and educational purposes. Any reuse of this item in excess of fair use or other copyright exemptions requires permission of the copyright holder.
Resource Identifier:
17931718 ( OCLC )
sn 88063345 ( LCCN )
Classification:
Newspaper ( lcc )

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Preceded by:
Advocate-news (Bridgetown, Barbados)

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Full Text


ete

ESTABLISHED 1895





U.K. Seeks Direct

Settlement With E

4 Power Discussions

Could Begin Later

(By W. G. LANDREY)
LONDON, Feb. 5.
FOREIGN SECRETARY Anthony Eden said on Tues-
day that he was seeking direct settlement of the Anglo-
Egyptian dispute which would “take inte account the true
and rightful aspirations of Egypt and her people.”
But Mr. Eden said anxious as he was for agreement

with Egypt he would not take any step “which would be a

betrayal of his pledges to the Sudan.” Egypt demanded

British evacuation of the Sudan. Britain favours

determination of the territory.

“There can be no going back on
those pledges which perhaps do
not facilitate my task” Eden said.
wgen, Said he preferred to resume
negotiations on an Anglo-Egyptian
basis after which there cana be
joint discussion of the proposed
Allied Middle Eastern Defence
Command.

Eden told the House details of
the January 26 Cairo riots which
showed “how brutal was the char-
acter and how terrible the scale
of destruction of life and proper-
ty which occurred there ten days
ago. “For centuries there can have
been nothing like this in a civilized
capital during peace.

Reconciliation Possible

“We are prepared to seek ways
and means to this end (meeting
Egypt’s aims) and to pursue them
in a spirit which will give ex-
pression to real friendship be-
tween our two countries and our
Allies. “I am sure our mutual
ends and interests can be recon-
ciled in a way both advantageous
and honourable to both parties.”

Mr. Eden took note of Egyptian
Premier Aly Maher Pasha’s public
assurances that he wished to re-
sume negotiations with Britain.
Eden said he did not underrate the
difficulties involved and trusted
the Commons would realize he
could not be more explicit about
Britain's aims at this time. He
said ‘‘much is at stake in these ne-
gotiations, both for Egypt and our-
selves.” He added he would
“spare no effort to reach a settle-
ment which took account of the
legitimate rights of both parties.”



















































Mr. ANTHONY EDEN

Eden replied he could not speak
for the American Government but
the statements did not “in any
sense” represent the policy of
Britain. “All I can deal with is
what was said to us in our con-
versations, Nothing remotely re-
sembling those two quotations
was divulged to us. All leading
Americans took exactly the oppo-
site view. “I hope history will
prove me right this week. They
want an armistice.

America is Sincere

Eden said there seemed to be
the impression among some circles
in Britain that America is not sin-
cere in the truce negotiations and

Interrupted
Left-wing Labourite leader
Aneurin Bevan interrupted to ask
how the defence of the Canal Zone
was to be approached on the basis

that it is an international question.| some people even thought Ameri-
Mr, Eden sogtied that Britain cans wanted to ext the war.
was in the Canal Zone on the basis |

He said he had heard “no single

of the 1936 treaty. He said:)word in any responsible quarter

“Therefore it would be better to; while in America to lend credit

resume negotiations on an An-|to this belief.”

glo-Egyptian basis. If perfectly This statement was greeted with

ready negotiations could then be/joud Conservative cheers.

brought on the basis of four-| Mr. Eden continued: “I sincere-

power discussion.” ly believe the American Govern-
Eden clashed repeatedly in the;ment and people are as_ deeply

House with Labour members| anxious for peace in the Far East



loudly suspicious of American in-j as we.” .

tentions in the Far East so he —UP.
opened the two day aoe = ‘
fairs debate. Labour Back-bench-

er R. Crossman interrupted Eden’s TARIFF TALKS

defence of American peaceful in-
tentions to ask Eden what he; :
thought about the statement | Tariff talks at Torquay last year
“which had been made in America! at which Britain signed the Black
that in the event of an armistice Pact with Cuba cost £45,377.
not being achieved the war would| It had not been expected to ex-
be carried to the Chinese coast.”|ceed £2,500.

American Interest

In Egypt Mounting

CAIRO, Feb. 5.

KEMIT ROOSEVELT, the State Department’s Con-
sultant on Near Eastern Affairs, started a series of meetings
since his arrival in Cairo on Sunday, with various Egypt-
ian officials,

Roosevelt's arrival coincides with the return from the
Sudan of the United States Embassy counsellor, Gordon
Mattison and Wells Stabler of the Egypt-Sudan desk in the

State Department. Mattison ang Stabler said that
BO tie Mags : they had travelled freely Sudan-

Iran To Close Dow, wide, conferred with Sudanese,

British and Egyptians and said

F a C that the purpose of their trip was
oreign Centres
TEHERAN, Feb. 5.

“to gather information”,
Government decided to close

Roosevelt was a familiar figure

in the Mid-East, where he travel-
down all foreign cultural insti-
tutes outside of Teheran, but

led widely both during and after

World War Il. Recent diplo-

; . a\ matic activity by various Ameri-

official sources explained on Tues- lcans, including the U.S. Ambas-

day that the United States would 'sador, Jefferson Caffery, indicated
not be affected by the move. s .

The decision was taken at a
four-hour Cabinet meeting on|

the mounting American interest
in Egyptian and Near - Eastern

. Affairs, according to observers.
Monday night, ..,|. The U.S., reportedly, still hopes
It means that the 1949 decree i that Egypt will accept and be-
by the Government of ‘the former |come a member of the proposed

LONDON, Feb. 5





Premier, Mohammed Merahei wid-East Pact outlined by Brit-
Saed will now be enforced. ain, France, Turkey, and tne
Foreign countries affected, in-|U-S. However, although some

clude Britain, Russia and India, Egyptians feel that the proposal
Foreign cultural institutes in/Comtains the basis for discussion,
Teheran will not be involved, in-| there are strong groups in Egypt
cluding the one operated by the; °Pposed to this.

US. Strong Opposition
Sources ‘explained that US. in-| The powerful Moslem Brother-
formation servide centers at hoods Chief Guide, Hassas El

Mehed, Tabraz, Insahen also will| Hodebi, saiqd that any occupation
not be affected, because they are) via foreign troops of Islamic soi,
part of the U.S. embassy and not, is against the principles of the
considered as cultural societics.|Koran. Thus, although there are
—U.P. (many promising signs since Prem-

ier Aly Maher Pasha assumed

the reins of Government, there

CONLIFFE APPOINTED |aheaa) “7 ‘us? Problems

| i imary sc -
RECTOR OF ST. GEORGE, started tocday, and “within 10

? |days, all schools and universities
At the meeting of the Board of | are expected to re-open, In order
Appointment held in the Lobby of |i, catch up on lost weeks, the

Be Cenc membly yesterday, | scademfe year will be lengthened

Rector of St. Peter was, on the no- juntil late in July.
mination of the Lord Bishop abe | There are report that the
pointed Rector of St. George in curfew will soon be lifted. Prem-
place of Rev. F. M. Dowlen who| ier Maher agreed to all demands
has resigned and accepted work|0f airlines in order to facilitate
in the diocese of Jamaica. ‘their work.—U.P.



self |

west France today after causing

gypt

Kgypt Ready To
Compromise In
Negotiations

LONDO),,
British officiais sa ey

}benevea that Egypi reaay
now to seek some compromise

web.

aaa

Anglo -Egyptian dispute,
continued to discount optimistic
reports that the negotiations were
likely to star, in a matter of days,



but admitted that the “first steps” |
through diplo-|

had been taken
matic channels in Cairo.

It was obvious from all official
comment, that the British Gov-
ernment was anxious to avoid aly
comment which might prejudice
the Egyptian Government's en-
deavours to restore law and order
and bring about a calmer at-
mosphere in which negotiations
might usefully be started.

There were strong indication
that britain was taking anowe:
look at the proposals made by
iraqi Premier Nuri when he came
to London in November last year.

Thesé proposals, in effect, sup-
port Egypt’s demand for British
evacuation from the Suez Canal
Zone with provision that such
token evacyation be followed by
the enuy of forces of the four-
Power Middle East Command as
well as those of Egypt.

it was apparent also from all |
available comment that the rae
was playing a much more active!
diplomatic role in bringing Britain |
and Egypt together to bury the
hatchet. There is no doubt that
the U.S. is seeing eye to eye with!
Britain on Middle-East policy but
was also pressing Britain to per-
suade Egypt to accept the Four
Power Mid-East Defence pro-
posals, if British policy in the
Sudan can be modified to meet
Egypt’s wishes.

This is the main bone of con-
tention.

The British intention is to give
ppeedy independence to the
Sudanese, so that they can choose
whether they’ wish to be asso-
ciated with Egypt or not. In the
British point of view, the major-
ity of Sudanese do not want to
be associated with Egypt any
more than is necessary frorm the
fact that the two countries are

neighbours.-U.P,

Floods Kill 11
In S.W. France

PARIS, Feb. 5.
Floods rose steadily in south-



the death of 11 people, swamp-
ing hundreds of farms and iso-
lating towns and villages. The
whole of one town Marmande
with a population 12,100 is flood-
ed by 16 inches of water, About|
two thirds of another Agen popu- |
lation 33,500—is inundated and}
parts of the town are without!
drinking water, gas and elec-
tricity.

Heavy rains and melting moun-
tain snow turned the country-
side at the foot of the Pyrenees
into a vast inland lake dotted
with uprooted trees, dead ani-
(mals and tangled telephone
lines. The flood area is roughly
in the shape of a triangle with
the towns of Castelsarain, Mois-
sac and Valence Dagen forming
three points.

The Garonne, France’s third
river today reached a level of
37 feet, the highest since 1875.

Flood waters from the river,
now a raging torrent, are break-
ing in waves against the ancient
ramparts of Marmande, chief
danger point, Hospitals, con-
vents and town halls have open-
ed their doors to shelter the
homeless. —UP.

Trinidad Meat
Decontrolled

(From Our Own Correspondent)
PORT-OF-SPAIN, Feb, 5.

Trinidad Government yester-
day announced the immediate
removal of locally produced meat
price from control. Fish, cow’s
milk and 11 more foodstuff items
will be decontrolled next July
according to the announcement
and egg will be taken off the
control lis. next January.

Also imediately controiled
cattle carcases, swine, beef, mut-
ton, pork, goats and sheep on
hoof, and grape fruit juice pro-
duced in
The decontrol decision, Hon
Albert Gomes, Minister of Labour,
Industry and Commerce, said, is
in accordance with recommenda-
tions of the local Food Production
Committee and aims at encour-
aging local industry to reduce the
colony’s dependence on imported
foodstuffs.





Dea

Death by natural causes was
the verdict returned by a nine-
man jury when the inquest touch-
ing the death of Herbert H. Davis





a Canadian 76 years of age was
concluded at the District “A”
Police Station yesterday after-
noon. The Coroner His

Worship Mr. E. A. McLeod Police
Magistrate of District “A”

Mr. Herbert Davis who was a
retired banker was found dead

fresh negotiations for setuing the |
iney |

Trinidad and Tobago.

|

the Boy Scouts.

a

WEDNESDAY, FEBRUARY 6,





1952





ICE ; FIVE CENTS



eee

U.N. Assembly
Postpone All.
Talk On Korea



PARIS, Feb. 5.
THE SIXTH ANNUAL United Nations Assembly, the
most disappointit ecord, adjourned after postpon-
ing all debate Ke til eith nunjom
negotiators arrive nm arr wers
decide that me milite me re t t
necessar’ The end car eT
e-half hour convene n j f
vember The Counc tays on until
ba
Russia Has |!
ussia Has
Been Put On|):
een Fut On . genie th dead:
1 ‘ eke Panmu rr rotidtors
ee The Defensive! 20 soos. sin osm
w U.N. debate at present simply
SQUADRON LEADER WIL. R. “BILL” RAMSAY (eft) who has just been appointed Ganadian ike Nes ew. ZORK, Fe ould serve tall battlefield
Imperial Headquarters Liaison ‘Commissioner for Barbados presents his credentials to His Excellency The New York Times said the) armistic ilks even further, The
the Governor at Government Ho yesterday. dominant impression of the United] Korean postponement was the
Maj. J.B. Griffith, Island Commissioner looks on. Nations General Assembly session}last item on the Agenda of the
Squadron-Leader Ramsay and His Excellency are exchanging the traditional left-hand shake of | in Paris coming to a close possibly| current Assembly, convened three
today is that Soviet Russian has|months ago, today
in ‘ 4 cae ea : g - : — put even mare on the de- Stinet Del
ensive before world opinion anc stinging e
7 e } C’'dian Scout that free nations abe: acg ie mn we
U.S. Seeks Solution Of Sr intteag sone Sa] Jum bears the Ravens, wat in
oe o |

Franco-German Conflict

(By ARTHUR J. OSLEN)

*
UNITED STATES 0:

to the Franco-German conflict over the Saar and N.A.T.O.
membership which threatens to impose a new delay in the

rearmament of Germany,

Department experts are looking for a formula to abate
the Saar controversy which will permit the Federal Repub-
lic and three Western occupying powers to get back to
negotiations on a “peace” contract and a European Defence

Community.

Crew Members
Of Sheffield
Left Behind

Chief Petty Officer J. Morris
and Leading Seaman Colin Swith,
crew members of the H.MS,
Sheffield who were in the Tere
centenary Ward of the General
Hospital eee nt
Barbados for Trinidad on Thurs-
day night, January 17, are now
staying at the Y.M.C.A. hostel at
Pinfold Street.

Morris and Swift are to report
on board the H.M.S. Devonshire
as soon as she anchors in Carlisle
Bay on Friday morning. It will
then be decided where they will
resume duties next.

Swift told the Advocate yes-
terday that he is all fit for going
to sea again and he expects that
a passage to Jamaica wijl be ar-
ranged for him when the Devon-
shire arrives. He is hoping to join
the Sheffield there and resume
duties.

He said that Morris, who is still
«ailing with his stomach, may join
the Devonshire and go on to
England where he will enter a|
hospital for treatment. Swift
said that they are both com/forta-
ble at the Y.M.C.A.

M.L.C.’s
Walkout On
Kumar

PORT-OF-SPAIN, Feb. 4.
Hon. Ranjit Kumar got a taste
of his own medicine Friday last
when 17 members of the Legisla-
ture walked out of the Chamber
as he was speaking on a food sub-!
sidisation motion.

'



Hon. Albert Gomes, Minister of
Labour Commerce and Industry,
explained to the Speaker “the
Honourable member makes a habit
of expressing his viewpoint and
then walking out.”

Kumar has not been gracious
enough on several occasions to
listen to other members and this
is the expression of our displeas-
ure.

The motion moved by Hon,
Tubal Uriah Buzz Butler called for
sSubsidisation of flour, rice, milk
and other essential foodstuffs be-
cause of the rising cost of living.
He brought the motion as it is
feared that there will be food riots
if prices continue to rise.

The ageing bearded self-styled
“chief servant of the people” shed
tears as he took his seat. During
his speech he made frequent refer-

ences to God and urged the House | ment’s intention to send a cultural
to-abandon its own wisdom for delegation to Cormraut

the Bible’s and collect tithes. The
motion was lost thirteen to nine.
— CP)

th By Natural Causes

jin his. bedroom at the Marine
| Hotel Christ Church about 6.30
p.m. on Friday February 1. His
body was removed to the Burton's
Funeral Parlour, Pinfold Street
where a post mortem was -per-
formed by Dr. A. S. Cato

Giving post miortern evidence
yesterday Dr. Cato said that the
| body of the deceased was iden-
tifled to him by Dr, Jack, Déath








jâ„¢much prestige has already been
, conceded to her ancient rival.

Presents

















































Squadron Leader Ramsay pre-
sented his credentials to His
Excellency and had short discus-
sions on the forthcoming visit of
Lord Rowallan, Chief Scout of the
World who arrives here on Mon-
day, February 11th.

Lord Rowallan arrived in
Jamaica yesterday and leaves
there to-day for Trinidad. His
Excellency is Chief Scout ©
Barbados,

United States officials sa
phatically that issues of estern
security are “infinitely” more
important than the political status
of the little industrial region.

Negotiations at Bonn and Paris
came to a complete halt last week
after Germany reacted sharply to
the appointment of Gilbert Grand-
vill as French diplomatic repre-
sentative to the Saar with
rong of Ambassador. on da

e German representative
Hallstein raised the issue in Paris

’s relationsh
} Atlantic Treaty
~~ Wnfortunate

em-





on major whieh the

small nation
solidly

issues lined up

almo behind the U.S.,









The Times said: “This is most] those same small states went over
e a | forcibly illustrated by the Assem-]io the Russian side to hand the
Credentials bly’s action on the Korean war] U.S tinging defeat on the
on disarmament and on collective} Gues.\ion of the self-determination

Shortly after 3.30 o'clock yes=| Security. ae te “genaeve an} ot Colanias goopres
ms terday afternoon Squadron Leader|@rmistice in Korea and the con Most of the Asiatic, Arab, and
teen! Feb. 5. ‘ William R ‘Bill os ce tinuing of the Korean war u Latin American blocs which had
S are seeking a solution cently appointed Canadian Impe- doubtedly cast a pall over the} broken away from the U.S. lead
rial Headquarters. Liaison Scout ‘whole session and killed some of}ership on several crucial issues at
Commissioner for Barbados ac-| the brighter hopes entertained at] this session—backed the Russian
Informed sources said the State|companied by Maj. J. EB, Griffith, = DeEOINS, meet Soviet man-}text on self-determination, oppos-
Island Scout Commissioner, paid|CCUvres to exploit this situation|ed by thé S., Brita and other

an official call on His Excellency for its own ends soon disillusioned | ( onial Power

the Governor at’ Governnient all free delegates as to Soviet in- rhe Soviet text cared by
raise. tentions with the result that an}36 to 11 with 12 abstentians.

overwhelming majority not only

Arabs and Asiatics turned on the
reiterated support for United Na-

Western Powers yesterday on the
tions forces but also took steps to]same issue when they decided to
cope with any future Koreas else-| bring the Tunisian ec mplaint be-
where. fore the emb! UP.

“Finally, though with only a

small majority vote, the Assembly a ee
went so far as to indict Soviet
Russia for failing to live up to
treaty commitments with China.”
These actions (to which others
might be added) demonstrate that
the Soviet attempt to paralyse the
United Nations by crippling the
Security Council through abuse of
the veto has met with failure.

Counterfeit
Ring Smashed

CHICAGO, Feb.
A multi million dollar interna«
tional counterfeit ring described a$













one of the biggest in the United
States history was smashed Mon-
day by secret sen agents. More

Adenauer Denies





ie than $2,200,000 in bogus $10 and
United States officials regard} holds the Scout's Gold Cord. In x $20 bills were produced by the

the sequence of events as ex-| Canada he is Chairman of a group! Making Threats ring in the last four years said

tremely unfortunate. Their dis-;committee and District Secretary ) larry D. Anheirer, Chief of the

appointment is understood to stem|in a Montreal area, During the’ BONN, Feb, 5 | Secret Servi n Chicag

from hopes that the Anglo-French | war he was a squadron leader pi West German Chancellor ‘

American group could go into an; With the R.C.A.F. He will now act} Konrad Adenauer flatly denied| Five Chicago men were seized

Atlantic Council meeting in Lis-jas a liaison between Canadalhe had threatened to keep West |“! further arrests were expected

bon with the announcement that|headquarters and Barbados head-|Germany out of the European | AUheirer said. He disclosed that

contractual agreements with Ger-| quarters in order to further closér]army and to refuse the Allied|Phony $10 and $20 bills have

many had been completed and a|international relations between the] “peace contract” until German| turned up in cities throughout the

European defence treaty drafted.|two countries. demands for the Saar and _for| United States as well as in London,
There appears to be little ex- Squadron Leader Ramsay membership in the North Atlon- Paris, Rome and in other parts of

Ase ap aie oe, ~~. —s turns to Canada to-day. tic Treaty Organization were} the world, —CP

can achiev in nex anted |

— Gaye. ee a points errno Chancellor was re ported |

vetween rance and Germany, to have made those threats at aj}

the NATO membership question U N Reoceu revi caucus of his Christian PLANE CRASHES

is regarded as not too serious ol Ne py Bemocratic party last night. BRUSSELS. Feb. 5

re : 14 A Government communique} A jelvian Airlines plane with

icials _ said ere is every Ad Pp t issued said the report of his|,.) 00° vag pate ph iy om

reason to believe that a satisfac~ vance os statement “is wrong”, The com- Welsan tenis tenknuie hana

tory relationship between Ger 8TH ARMY, H.Q., Korea, Fob. 5 [Munique added that Adenauer |, nee t a * ntyel + oe id

many and NATO can be worked |") united Nations infantrymen}had reported on the foreign |)? . baer viittle a er ' =

out now leaving the matter of moved out in sub-zero tempera- political situation and referred thers i i e 1ope o seF eo

formal German membership in| ines to re-oceun, an advance)’ «difficulties which have arisen] \!Vors. ae ad: the. plane

. alliance a ee position on the Weehune front lost}in negotiations in the last few rag ews ———, =

the ‘ens Sune, Fo ron gypsies Mionday to an “overwhelming” oon —UP. "jungle near Kikwit,. .

is based on fears that the con- paren Communist attacking ; ’

troversy will be blown up delib- free. A small reconnaissance

patrol advanced slowly on the hill
position north-west of Yonchon at
2 a.m. to find that Red soldiers
had pulled out and returned to
the main line of resistance.

An unidentified plane bombed
and strafed positions held by
the 40th Infantry Division slong
the Kumsong river on the cen-
tral front. It was the second
time in three days these soldiers
had been attacked by unidentified
aircraft.

The plane flying southwest
along the river, strafed a medi-
cal unit compound and dropped
several bombs fired on a supply
road and put several machine-
gun bursts into hillside. There
were no casualties or reports of
damage United Nations antt-
aircraft guns fired unsuccessfule
ly at the marauding: plane.

Three days ago six unidentified
planes attacked 40th Division
— injuring three Korean
abourers. A Chinese Cormmun-
ist squad flushed the Allied unit
from am outpost west-northwest
of Chorwon on the western front
yesterday. Heavy small arms
fire forced Allied infantrymen
back to their main defence line.

The Allied unit made no at-
tempt to re-occupy the. ition.

erately into a fest of strength be-
tween Germany and the French
Government which feels that too

Significantly one responsible
official did not rule out the pos-
sibility that France precipitated
intentionally the latest crisis over
the Saar. He said: “T certainly
hope that is not not so.”——U.P.























India To Draw Up
Treaty With Japan

NEW DELHI, Feb. 5

President Rawenda Prasad wel-
eomed on Tuesday the agreement
under which the United States
offered $50,000,000 for develop-
ment projects in India. Inaugur-
wting the last session of the out-
going Indian Parliament, he said
that India hoped to conclude a
peace treaty with Japan soon and
referred poiniedly to the upsurge
of freedom in Asia and other
countries. He called it the “most
significant feature of the age in
which we live.

“That great upsurge continues
and it is not confined to Asia, but









Reds _ Fighting “War
Of Nerves’ At ‘Talks

PANMUNJOM, Korea, Feb, 5

NEGOTIATORS QUICKLY settled the more minor
details of the Korean armistice but the United Nations
Command warned that the Reds still have not shown “real

willingness for fair peace.”
The “Voice of the U.N
Communist concession so fat
direction, but there’s still
Progress of sorts has been ma
before and each perio
optimism has been in turn follo
ed by weeks of frustration
this is part of the Communist wat
of nerves. Hopes must be raised
and dashed according to schedule

broadcast said that
step in the 1 sht

Command”

had been a‘
i long way to
ti

of

Vrenech Unit Kills
30 Rebels ta Clash






in the hope that sooner or later ¢ HANOI Feb. 5.
the U.N. Command will give in A clash between a French
completely.” Uni momando unit and Com-
Warning against false optim-}!unist el troop: n the Red
ism, the broadcast was by Ger River Delta, last night, resulted
Ridgway’'s official radio, on tt in some 30 rebels being killedj
eve of the first meeting in twolaccording to the French High

months of the full armistice dej-} Command
egations, i ie
5 ney id

that Franco-Viet Nam



















ai ae ( ; aie . biter ae
spreads to other countries, whose| Arctic temperatures limited con- Full-Dress Session indo troops attacked ele
peoples have yet to attain free-|tact on the remainder af the 145] A full-dress session will ments of Communist, | 15 —_
dom.” He specifically mentioned| mile battlefront tq patrol clashes] yene to take up the fifth and fil Seg She aie : ¢
Tunisia and Libya. and one minor Red bing at-litem on the Armistice Agenda Red Ver De 2 They said tha
Prasad announced the Govern~|tack northeast of ‘ bow!" | recommendations to be made to|@fter a short but violent fighting,
in the “Heartbreak Ridge” sec-|helligerent Governments for a|Communist troops were forceal to
ist China,}tor of the eastern front, An at-| final peace settlement withd And that in the Hoa
in return for the Chinese good-|tacking Communist squad was] pevelopments included; The | Binh x and on Colonial High«
will mission whigh visited Indiajrepulsed after a five minute) pychange of Prisoners—the Con : », Six, activities were lim~
recently.—U.P. fight. —U-P. munists agreed that each side |t o normal patrols and ree n=
— es should return prisoners “as rap-|"aisance The rest of the Delta
idly as possible”; agreed that there ea was reported quiet, 3
might be need for another ex —U.P.
change site in addition to Par eh inet
munjom to speed up the excha |
agreed that displaced yersons| ryt * ’ .
might settle in defence areas after| /ruman’s Choice
the truce and agreed to consider ; f
had occurred for about 20 to 24, the deceased to Dr. Cato said he|the U.N. proposal that Red Cross | WASHINGTON, | 5
hours. The apparent age of the§jis.a dental surgeon and is 76} tean isiting the prison cary ‘ F el R ions
deceased was 71 and the body was years old. He knew the deceased|jafter the truce, should comp Tues failed to
w@l developed. for 30 to 40 years and came ove?|nationals of bot}! de fruman’s nomination of
There was no fracture of the} with him on the Lady Rodney to} Fhe Armistice Supe syroade the stant
skull ond no evidence of aJBarbados in the month of Novem-| both i that ) | / Near East-
haemorrhage was present. There} ber 1951 They then stayed at} shoul upervise the truce the ‘ Ss : , i
was fat around the heart and in |the Marine Hotel demilitarized zone betw the} lon nnally said
his opinion death * due to} opposing armies, @ comp! s@ | he t ver te to approve
natural causes namely fatty de- The deceased was always an| between the Red desire f only | Byroade itil the 1 r resigns
generation around the heart. active man and ne r complained|5 teams an the U.N. proposal {his comr ssion as a regular Army,
Dr. A. C. Jack who identified | about being ill. for 15 teams.—U.P. \Colonel.—U.P.





PAGE TW

a





oe

Meoe

‘ i are
of “Her j

f for

Barbadian Dentist In U.S.

D MRS, I I i, AL-
‘ vi ne ay been

j I adc he



p ek gud of Mr.
h \. Clarke of “1LO-e
n Worthin re due to
ret 1 he U.S. via Puerto
Rico on Monc February llth
Dr, Alleyne who is a Barba-
dian left home in 1913. He is a Lady BROOKE — her
Illinois School of Dentistry and brother Lord ESHER is at
graduate the University of rresent holidaying in Bar-
started practising as a dental bados.
surgeon in 1931, Thi s his first a"
visit to Barbados since he first left Brother And Sister
in 1913. Hi s mother who i 86 and ORD ESHER (Oliver Sylvain
his sister also live in the U.S, Baliol Brett) at present
The Ductor’s wit who was Belidaying in Barbados with his

wife is a brother of Lady Brooke,
the Ranee of Sarawak.
Brooke is also in Barbados at the

an active
Maryland she

born in Tennessee is
social worker. In

“

s strial Secretary of the :

Y Won an eee its moment, She arrived here ear-
Board. She is also a member of 1Â¥ in November and wren oA
the Board of the Department of With her a a ee
Welfare and a member of the Col, and oer Dick ae = a
Governor's Commission which ae en ee © “em
looks after problems etc. affect- Parbados z ech aie

ing negroes in Maryland, She is Lord ond OG, a le
the first woman ever to be ap- suests of Sir wan) '

pointed to the grand jury for the of Glitter Bay, St. James,

State of Maryland. Mrs. Al- eit
leyne’s brother works with the Short Visit
Probation Department, Philadel- R. JOSE NUNES, one of the

phia and his wife teaches at the Managing Directors of

Junior high schools. : Messrs, William Fogarty Ltd., and

Among the places of interest ny 4, K. Harrison, a Director of
that they have visited are the 4). <3me company arrived here on
Crane, Bathsheba, and Cherry the same company's a

Monday for a short visit. Mr.
{arrison is accompanied by his
vife' and daughter, and they are
guests at the Rockley Beach Club.
Mr. Nunes is staying at the Marine

Tree Hill.
Trinidad Engagement

FTHE engagement was announc-

ed recently in Trinidad be- Hotel. 2 ’
tween Miss Lucille Gormandy, Mr. Nunes will be leaving on
daughter of Mr Jone Gormandy Friday while Mr. and Mrs. Har-

rison and daughter will be re-
maining on for a few days.

Flight Delayed

ny eae Ane AIRLINES
flight to Barbados scheduled
time of arrival 5.10 a.m. is ap-
proximately 15 hours late and is
not expected to arrive at Seawell
before 9 o’clock tonight.

and the late Mr, Victor Gor-
mandy of Trinidad and Mr. An-
thony Mitchell, son of Mrs, E.
Mitchell of Port-of-Spain and the
late Mr. Mitchell.

Lucille is a niece of Mr, Errol
Gibbons who is in charge of the
Advocate‘s Linotype Department.
She was educated here and is an
Old Queen’s College Girl.

When Two Career Women Meet.

AN AMERICAN CAREER-WOMAN has taken a piere-
ing look at Eva Peron. And she sums up Eva’s career

like this : : .
“She transformed herself from a brunette with burn-
ing ambition to a cynical blonde with unlimited power.

Fleur Cowles, wife of the weaithy publisher of the
American magazines Look and Quick, met Eva on a visit
to the Argentine last year.

Now she has written a book about her, called “Bloody
Precedent”, which is published in America to-day.



sal investments in Sviteestand,
, gy some say the
Diamonds Algiers, _and, some say, in
, United States, — ;
Fleur Cowls on her first meet- “The : Foundation’s money 18
ing with Eva— supposed to be spent entirely on
“Except for her jewels, at first welfare. This is no problem to
glance she looked even modest, Evita, since she construes her
She was dressed as millions of personal welfare to. .be inextric~
American women would like to ably woven into her country’s.
be dressed The only giveaway ee
was the orchid in her lapel.
“No redl flower, but one of
diamonds, larger even than an 6eZY_Sy = 2
orchid, about Sins, acros by 7 war ian
ins. high—a brooch of big, pure
white diamonds that must have ; ,
been worth $250,000 ( £89,000).” de © ee On, OF
Mrs Cowles, who says she used C,UIUOSELLES
“sharpened intuition” when she
was with the Perons, writes that SYDNEY, Aus. Feb. 4
Eva’s “investments” pay off so A mers fashion critic Mon-
well that she casually spend os pal al ers ar
: 5 17 OF day said drainpipe trousers are
more men anor A Pepe) a “dwardian curiosities” whieh
ye rleur Posies ie 1€S. don’t suit Australian individual-
pay Siieccend on the Perons m. Paul Nelson, editor of the
ee eee waite mes sparkled and jnagazine “Tailor and Men's
canta absiver aisen iY ate Huge Wear” commenting on the Lon-
feet ee oar oe nee our don report that the Duke of
Tt ? Per aoe vidyg'® like pillows, Gloucester has begun wearing
De bf coining oe ioe we world of the new drainpipe style — said
ea are Pe. Ler ee tapes- “drainpipe trousers would never
anon athe eer oon am un= gienic and too tight for the Aus-
hg and queen. alian climate.
On Reson’ aii: tas tahediock tralian climate
and manner of a Latin super- One Sydney tailor believed
man, trouser cuffs are getting nar-
“He looks as if Hollywood cast Sau Bina§ a aniine one
him to be van Argentinian Don treme. “He added Australian
Sen a even ae a = men oe call eighteen in¢gh
abl ° > In a pro- cuffs the limit,
fessionally continuous smile. —U.P.

“To a man whose word is law,
there can be no serious inter-
ference from a mere woman, . .
A woman’s help is only another
hand extended. ,

“And so it was with Evita
who knew what she wanted, and
got it with Peron,

“She changed from a girl with



almost nothing to wear to the
woman with the most elaborate
wardrobe in her country. Her
jewels grew from a fake string

of beads to a

2 e potentate’s collec-
tion.’

Whispers
And Fleur Cowles on
“social” activities: “She began
with less than $3,000 (£1,070)
of her own money, but now her

Social Aid Foundation has accu-
mulated uncounted $

Eva's

squirrel find themselves facing a
small frowning figure in a spiky hat.




“No one dare k. 1 “Who are you two?" he says
S ask—al- } : “ . r
though whispers grow louder— oury: aoe have you qum-
as to the source of Evita’s colos- moned me? Please, I did it,

says the squirrel. ‘I’m terribly

BECEIVED....

TROPICAL SUITINGS 56” Grey, Fawn, @

STRIPED FIBRE SUITINGS 54” Beige, Fawn, Grey, @

STRIPED FIBRE SUITINGS 54” Grey @

GARBERDINE 54” Grey, Brown, Fawn, Tan, & Navy @ .......:-

LO BE ER TR EC ae ERE EINE SUE is a
RRA MINE: Dvn. adi s cua cce-v cs calgkanee
MEN'S SHOES “GLOVEPHET” — Black & Tan

IE N’S SOCKS — Cotton & Rayon @



Rupert and the

s Camb (ating

Holiday Over
M* & MRS. ROBT. SELLIER
left for Trinidad yesterday

afte spending five weeks holi-
day n Barbados. They were
staying at “Leaton-on-Sea,” Max-
well During their holiday the
majority of their family came

over but they have already re-
tur ea

Mr. Sellier who is a Solicitor
in Port-of-Spain was a member
of the Trinidad golf team which
recently played against a team
from the Reekley Golf and Coun-
try Club, Me is a brother of Fr.

Joe Sellier SJ., of St. Patrick’s
RL, Chureh, Jemmotts Lane.
Leaving To-day
RS. REX ALLAMBY and
baby daughter who have
been holidaying in Barbados are
due to return to Trinidad to-day.

Mr. Allamby who was also here
on holiday has already returned.
He is with Trinidad Leaseholds
Ltd., in South Trinidad.”

Mrs, Allamby is the former
Sheila Blades, daughter of Mr.
and Mrs. Edward Blades of “Mar-
gate”, Hastings,

Talking Point

How many “coming men” has
one known? Where on earth do
they all go to?—Arthur Pinero.

En Route To Jamaica

R. AARON MATALON,

Jamaica businessman and
Mrs. Matalon who had been holi-
daying in Barbados staying at the
Hotel Royal left on Monday for
Trinidad by B.W.1.A. en route to
Jamaica.

Americans Return To U.S.

UE to leave this morning for

Puerto Rico on their way
home to. the U.S, are Mr. and
Mrs, J. Clifford Dillon who have
been holidaying at the Paradise
Beach Club.

Mr. Dillon who is in the ad~
vertising business is Vice Presi<
dent ex-Fitzgerald-Sam-
ple, Inc., with offices on Madison
Avenue, New York.

Other passenge’s bound for
the U.S. by the same plane are
Mr. Conrad Brant who has been
staying at Four Winds, St. Peter,
Mr. and Mrs. Charles Sparks
who have been holidaying at the
Ocean View Hotel. Later today
Mr. and Mrs. Thomas MacKen-
zie who are from the U.S. will
leave for Trinidad, They have
been guests at the Colony Club,
St. James.

IF IT RAINS, IT POURS
NEW YORK.

Recent rainmaking efforts of
the city of New York have proved
successful .... too successful in
fact. While the city water reser-
voirs have filled up to overflow-
ing from the dangerously low
levels of past seasons, the city
has also been swamped with a
deluge of law suits from neigh-
bouring regions which not only
harbour New York’s reservoir
lakes Nae ate, Sve —_
resorts for swe]
slickers as well, ee
Christmas the city was presented
with a bagful of 117 lawsuits ask-
ing foy a totaf of $1,500,000 in
damages mostly on the grounds
that the rainmakerg caused an
abnormally wet summer se€ason
which rained out both New York
vacationers and hotel owner’s
profits,

COIN SHORTAGE
WASHINGTON.

A serious shortage of metal
coins has induced some American
banks to offer premiums Of as
much as $2.00 per $100 cOins.
The coin pinch became le ss
stringent around Christmas when
millions of Americans dug into
xheir piggy banks. The situation
isn’t expected to change as long
as critical materials imeluding
copper, nickel and bronze re-
main in short supply. Such large
coin users as the “Automats” and
department stores every morning
are having a difficult time obtain-
ing the necessary quantity of coins
from their bank, which itself is
being rationed by the Federal
Reserve Bank. This situation has
jed to an elaborate system Of
coin exchange between banks
themselves. If Bank A is short
of dimes but happens to have
plenty of nickels or quarters it
may trade coins with neighbour
Bank B where the reverse is the
case. In addition, department
stores are asked to refrain from
pricing their merchandise at 98
cents, $2.89 and similar broken
figures.



worried; something aviaily “% is

happening 8 the fo the
acorns are disappea as soon as
they fall and. . sep think
1 don't know that?" exclaims the
other, “* We are more worrie:

you gre, so don’t waste any, moce
of my rime, | must be off,’

@ $11.59, $11.69,
$11.96, $12.09 Pr.
. 49c., 5le., 66c., 68e., SI.

T. R. EVANS & WHITFIELDS

YOUR SHOE STORES

Dial 4220

Dial 4606

j=

BARBADOS ADVOCATE

Best Dressed Willy Found a Strawberry

Politician?
It’s A Plot
—Says DAVID ECCLES

_BRITAIN’S best - dressed poli-
ticlan is Mr. David Eccles, 47-
year-old Minister of Works. And
the Cabinet is the best-dressed
Britain has had for many a year.
So says Cloth and Clothes, tailgrs’

“It’s a plot the tailors to make
me suit.”
ed: “I know why 1 ane
4 I have been
chosen. It’s because _
a cull and have television
“They seen me in the pro-
pores Mo Bows, i was with
_ would

jook like, But now, says the
journal, “the style jackpot is

he did own were of the Sunday
best or Downing-street variety,
umber

: “He’s very
neat really. But if he doesn’t put
his trousers in the press no one
else dots,”

He usually remembers to use a
clothes brush. He is easy on socks.
His shoes get to the repairers in
plenty of time.

Advice
Mr. Eccles gave advice to the

struggling young politician. It

few good suits are better than a

‘lot of cheap ones, That goes for

everything in life.”
And here is what

Clothes said of Mr. Oliver Lyttel-

ton, Colonial Secretary: “A style-

General Lord Ismay, Common-
wealth Relations Secretary: “His
suit shows a soldierly hankering
for the unostentatious”;

Lord Cherwell, Paymaster-Gen-
eral; “His ensemble fairly screams
a business man.”

There was one black mark. It

went to the Chancellor of the
Exchequer, Mr. R. A. Butler. He
had no breastpocket handker-

chief —L.E.S.

Follow The Chef

By HELEN BURKE



Seventeen of London's led@ing

chefs, totalling 500 years of ser-
vice, belong to the Association
Culinaire Francaise.

Under the patronage of the
French Ambassador and_ the
French Consul-General, its pur-
pose is to promote the French art
of cooking, honouring all chefs,
irrespective of nationality.

President of the association is
M. Malet, chef of the Reform Club,
where the famous Alexis Soyer
Was maitre chef 100 years ago.

I have asked some of these fam-
ous London chefs to give us epicu-
rean recipes which housewives can

adapt.
His Way

M. Malet gives the first.

Here is M. Malet’s method for
Duchess Potatoes if you have no
sieve or piping bag: Dry out the
boiled potatoes in the oven. Beat
with a whisk or wooden spoon
until there are no lumps. Add
butter or margarine and the yolk
of an egg and beat well. Form
into balls in the palms of the hands,
make a little depression in the cen-
tre of each and place small potato
balls on top. There you have a
brioche-shaped “Duchess”. Brush
with fat and brown in the oven.
‘These go well with the escalope of
veal. Sliced fillet of beef, leg of

lamb or tenderloin of pork can be}: 2.30, 4.435 & BB.

used in the same way.
‘ —LE.S,



CROSSWORD



) a,
i” ‘ohour. (4)

1) special prince for explosive
beer ? (6)

18 type wi before the Frenci.
i3 20. 4)

3 . Y
uw) Rides over a sea of trouble. (2)
23 Custly for a red, 1
es Aviator ae a (3) :
26 YoU Start At ite appearance. (5
27 Taken any red ensign. (4)
28 Degrees below the beet. #4)
own
1 Moon has returned in it. (8)
2 fas. the eas of smoothing
er. (4)
Indian orange dye stult. (6)
version of

Annie
> ‘ heaps. (6)
) sould BU 3. 43)
& On the end of a seat. (3)
y Money tn my engagements, (3)
il Pins usea for scattering. (4)
14 Ray upset by explosive sur-
rowndings. (8)
io . \ave oniy when 4 am. (5)
ii Star ruler?
ly “early Qpset Wher 100 short of
sredit (5) 4. Cover, (3
24 Found in a leg guard. (3)

4. «tion Of yesterday's puztie.— Across:

?
ixer

Dai. i OUBLE, » Leese;
1! Page: 16, Lempest. 15, Holpie; 16
arts 1s, Any: 19> Sneer; 35 Nostalgia

24 bwok, 25. (Mierrive, 25, (Cleases dy
Down: L Allowance, 9 Lis: 3 a
tnvst 4, 2. ger; 6 Rent. &
San Nowe. ig’ Denote: 14 Mansce
1% Staia: 19 Star: 30 Pik: 1. Fare
te






















flanid.

‘That's the
Willy. “I’m not

“Well,” said

half of it
be able to find it at



—But He Had a Hard Time Eating It—
By MAX TRELL

KMNARF and Hanid, the shadow-
children with the turned - about
names, found their friend Willy
Toad sitting on a toadstool, looking
very dejected. They asked him if
anything was the matter, and after
a moment or two of silence, Willy
replied that there was.

“What happened, Willy?” asked

trouble,”
exactly sure what
. Butvany way, I started

sighed

I’m sup-
left, but L

ping down the road past the straw- | berry.”

berry patch when ail at once I spied
a fine, big, red, juicy, strawberry.
It was perfectly beautiful and my
mouth was beginning to water at
the thought of eating it. Bur just
as | was about to open my mouth
and swallow it, a robin came fly-
ing over to me,”

“What did the robin want ?” asked

Koarf.

“The robin looked ct tie straw-
herry and said it was one ~t the
most beautiful he had ever seen.
Then he asked me, please, to give
him half of it. ‘You'll still have half
of it left, Willy,’ said the robin.
So he tlew off with half of it.
continued Willy, “I
opencd my mouth again and I was
about to swallow the half of the
strawberry
beetle. He jooked at the strawberry
with a great longing, and finally
he asked me to give him half of it.
‘I'm sure you won't mind giving it
he said,
you'll still have half of it left.”

“And did you give him half of
it?” Hanid wanted to know.

Willy nodded, “1 did indeed, But
I was beginning to get worried be-
cause, though I still had half of the
strawberry left, the half seemed to
be getting smaller and smaller.
However, 1 opened my mouth for
the third time and was just about
to swallow it when along cante a
eaterpillar, a snail, a sparrow, and | half left for himself,

B.B.C. Radio Programme

WEDNESDAY, FEBRUARY 6, 1952

“Then,”

to me,

Cockney Cabaret, 12 00 noon The News, 75219, Pi

12.10 p.m. News Analysis. ree ne S138m., 48.43m
Hr — 25.38m., 31 32: ee nr ae

Ere ee 745 pm. Over To You, 815 p.m
400 p.m. The News, 410 pm. The Ragio Revere}, 8.30 p.m. Statement of

Daily Service 4.15 pun, BBC Midland 4ccount 8.45 p.m. Composer of the

Light Orchestia, 5.00 p.m. Composer of Week, 9 00 p.m. Leave Her Johnnie,

the Week, 5.15 p.m. Sandy MacPherson, 1@@ve Her, 10 00 p.m. The News, 10,10

5.30 pm
Fum



when

Willy,’

11.15 a.m. Listéners’ Choice, 11.45 am. 7

Books To Read,
Review, 6.00

Music, 6.46 p.m. Sports Rownd Up and

PLAZA — WARNER

B° TOWN (pia 2310)

exclaimed.

held out his paw.

along came a

eat it now.”

‘because



10 pm

5 45 p.m
pm. Souvenirs of

pm
Mid Week Talk,
and Waltzing

BROS.



Willy saw a big, red strawberry.

a chipmunk. Each of them asked
ive him half of my straw-

Try.
“And did you?” Knarf and Hanid

“Oh yes,” said Willy, “because
each of them told me that if I only
gave him half I would still have
half left for myself. And finally,”
said Willy, “when all of them went
away, I glanced down to look at my
half of the strawberry, and it was
no bigger than the head of a pin!
Here—just look at it!” And Willy

Head of a Pin

Sure enough the piece of straw-
perry was no bigger than the head
‘ of a pin, “Now what I can’t under-
stand,” said Willy, “is how my half
of the strawberry got so small with-
}out my eating it even. But,” he
added brightly the n t
“it still is my half and I think I'l

ext moment,

Willy was just opening his mouth
‘to swallow his half of the straw-
berry when an ant came along.
“Please, Willy,” Knarf and d
jheard the ant saying, “Just give
me half of that fine, big, red, inkey,
strawberry. You'll still have

of it left.” And as Knarf and Hanid
started walking away, they saw
Willy once more slicing the straw-
bervy in half. And they were quite
sure that no matter how small a
piece Willy had, he could still keep
giving ha‘? of it away and still have



Programme Parade, 7.00 p.m. The News,
News Analysis

From The Editorials, 10.16 p.m
1030 pm. Marehing

Twe Hours of Solid Entertainment f

% Fe
AF ;
Mle tas
“ae is
R Es

hed

Warmer Bro

» CAPTAI

PRES
/

Oe
ad

aE Ce Eee

Wh



go 22, RAO IL WA [Sn and Aeneas MacKenge

From (he Mane! by C. S, Forever

OPENING FRIDAY FEB. 8th









By ‘ JEAN BOTHWELL.

A COLLECTION OF
INTRIGUING RECIPES

After introducing the onion and
its cousins (leeks-Chives-garlic)
in a series of delightful and witty
essays, Miss Bothwell presents
some 250 delicious, tested recipes
for the use of onions in soups, in
breads and pastries, with meat,
fish, and fowl, by themselves or
with other vegetables, and in
salads, sandwiches, and _hors-
doeuvre. A number of | these
recipes have not appeared in print
before.

An inexperienced cook will not
need to search elsewhere for in-
structions on the making of the
pastry needed in some of the
onion dishes, since complete
recipes for pie-crusts, dumplings,
etc... are given where they are
‘wanted, Each recipe printed will,
make enough for four people.

Read this bpok and you won't
weep—you'll run straight to the
kitchen to use it.

WE HAVE IT AT
ADVOCATE
STATIONERY

Street and Greystone Shop, Hastings

eo

30 p.m. and Continuing
DAILY 4.43 & 6.30 p

ONIONS
WITHOUT

TEARS

THE












WEDNESDAY, FEBRUARY 6, 1952



Btewn

P
L
A

OPENING FRIDAY 8TH Z
Hoosier Hot Shots a | “CAPTAIN HORATIO || A

“PRAIRIE ROUND UP" | Dial

Charles Starrett — Smiley Burnet; | HORN OWER _mae
PLAZA UN | GABE TW Since
|

|| TODAY 4.45 and 8.30 p.m.
Robert Lizabeth Robert

R.K.Q, Radice Action Packed Thrilicr
mitcHuM - scort - ryan in “The RACKET”

Also the Local Educational Short. ‘GIVE YOUR CHILD A CHANCE’



THURSDAY Special — 1.30 p.m
“SWING The WESTERN WAY"

Dial 8404
Last 2 Shows Today 4.45 & 8.40 p.m LAST SHOW TONITE 8.30 p.m
Republic's Whole Serial | !

“BILL THE UMPIRE”
“FEDERAL AGENT vs.

William BENDIX &
“BETWEEN MIDNITE & DAWN” | UNDERWORLD, INC.”
Kirk ALYN -- James DALE

Mark Stevens — Edmund O’Brien



THURS. (only) 4.45 & 8.30 p.m THURS. \only) &.30 p.m.

SWING THE WESTERN WAY TAHITI HONEY
Simone Simon, Dennis O'Keefe &
PRAIRIE ROUNDUP SONG

|
Hoosier Hotshots & |
OF NEVADA

ers

Charles Starrett & Smiley Burnett Roy Rog



EMPIRE

TO-DAY & TOMORROW — 445 & 8.30
*
PARAMOUNT PICTURES PRESENTS—

“PEKING EXPRESS”

Starring :—JOSEPH COTTEN-—CORINNE CALVERT
EDMUND GWEN

BLAZING ACTION .

. SUSPENSE
EXTRA
“WATER SPEED”—Short
LATEST NEWS REEL



OPENING FRIDAY — 2.30 & 8.30
FARLEY GRANGER — SHELLY WINTERS
ila ean

“BEHAVE YOURSELF”
ROYAL

TO-DAY & TOMORROW — 4.30 & 8.15
COLUMBIA Double - - -
LOUIS HAYWARD :o: GEORGE MacREADY



—in—

“BLACK ARROW”
AND
- BODYHOLD”
— With —
WILLARD PARKER

OLYMPIC

TO-DAY & TOMORROW — 4.30 & 8.15
RKO SUPER DOUBLE - - -



HOWARD HUGHES PRODUCTION
~THE OUTLAW”
— Starring —

JANE RUSSELL — JACK BUETEL
AND

“RACE STREET”
— With —
GEORGE RAFT — WILLIAM BENDIX





ROXY

TO-DAY & TOMORROW — 4.30 & 8.15
REPUBLIC WHOLE SERIAL - - -



GLOBE

TODAY AND TOMORROW — 5 & 8.30

THE RED BADGE OF COURAGE

AUDIE MURPHY (WORLD WAR II HERO)

Opening FRIDAY Feb. 8th 5 & 8.30 p.m.
te + Ou .




DALE DENNIS. #0.
BERTSON & = BARTON

MiT2
Gaynor
so.uma rl GEORGE VESSEL LID RAGIN WALTER BULLOGY, CHARLES O'NEAL. GLADYS LERMAN

Trom 4 Story wy Albert and Arthur Lewis an Eaward Thompson












WEDNESDAY, FEBRUARY

Se SS lL

6, 1952



Over 1,200 Exhibits

At

Grenada Fair

(From Our Own Correspondent)

ST. GEORGE'S, Feb. 2.

GRENADA’S third post-war Agricultural and Indus-

trial Exhibition took place
last with
holiday

thousands availing themselves of the
declared for the opening day to give t

on Wednesday and Thursday
public

the Tanteen

grounds where it was held an impressive fair atmosphere

There were over

1,200 exhibits of

a wide variety with

the general standard good though expert opinion held there
could have been higher quality in some respects.

Besides the Agricultural De-
partment’s own stand, the live-
stock section and the Arts and
Crafts section, three local firms
provided stands one of them
taking the form of a tractor dem-
onstration Another attrective
section was the schools Arts and
Crafts section which in addition

fo jocal work presented exhibits
from Barbados and St. Kitts.
Promised exhibits from Jamaica,
$t. Lucia and Dominica cid not
arrive on time.

Highlight on the first day ‘was
i March Past before His Excel+
ency Sir Robert Arundel] of
drize-winning livestock. In the
ifternoon of the second day, His
§xcellency addressed a large
tumbe; of visitors to the Exhi-
tition after introduction by Mr.
a. A. G. Hanschell, Director of
\griculture. Later Lady Arundell
wesented the Special Awards
ind Dipjomas while Hon. W. E.
‘ulien of the Permanent Exhibi-
fon Committee moved a vote of
hanks.









Mr. Hanschell expressed regret
t the lack of participation of
he large estates and said it was
Gs hope that the Exhibition

Vould in the near future be run
y the Grenada Agricultural As-
Ociation which had a large and
afluential membership.

Less Classes
His Excellency said that a vari-
ty of good things had been pro-
fuced, but he held it would be
fise to reduce sOmewhat the
umber of classes (there were
$8) and concentrate more on the
hings that matter most. By re-
ucing classes they might be
ble to canalise the skill, patience
nd desire to create that was
ganifested, making more beau-
ful and useful things of the kind
hat people wanted to keep in
peir homes. He would also have
tked to have seen more entries
a Grenada’s specialised export
tops. This was the best exhibi-
on so far, but he hoped not nearly
$ good as the next one would be
Following were the special
wards:—
Challenge Cup by the Royal
Sank of Canada for the best
nimafj}i in the show—W. P.
tranch, Dougaldston Estate.

Challenge Bowl by Barclays
sank for the best milch cow—
feorge Nurse, Paddock.

Challenge Cup by Mr. T. E.
loble Smith for the best pure-
red sow—W. P. Branch, Doug-

Idston Estate.

Silver Cup by Mr. D. L. Fer-
uson for best milch goat—Joseph
tarter, Westerhall Government
\gricultural Station.

8-Day Mantie Clock by Geo, F.
fuggins & Co. (Grenada) Ltd.
or best Rhode Island Red trio
Mrs. Lilian King.
8-Day Mantle Clock by Thom-~
on Hankey & Co., Ltd., for cocoa,
ured and polished—George Kent,
it, Patrick’s.

Silver Cup by The Grandy
ittores Ltd. for fresh butter-
tonway Steele, St. George's.

Silver Cup by R. K. Milne &
to. for mixed vegetables but due
>? the unsatisfactory standard in
ais, given for the best exhibitor
a Arts and Crafts—Mrs. Evelyn

‘ilgrim.
Governor’s Special Prize for
fest peasant exhibitor—James

fampbell of Moliniere,
feorge’s, who gained seven
izes, 12 seconds and one
ommended.

St.
first
was

Canada’s C. 0. i.
Index At All Time
High

OTTAWA, Feb. 5.

Led by scattered increases in
ood prices Canada’s cost of living
adex pushed upward two-fifths of
point in December to the highest
wint of all time.

The two-fifths rise compared
vith a November drop of one-
enth of a point the first slide in
8 months. It brought the index

p to a peak of 191.5 at Jan. 2.
—(CP),





World-famous ay food products

White shoes,
in company, must be spot-
less, immaculate. Use [p
Propert’s White Renovato
or Propert’s Shuwhite. No t
surer way of making sure

that white shoes are white!

New Monarch
Comes To
Guana Island

ST. JOHN’S Antigua
Mrs. Rosamond Wright
island queen has
claims to the Island Kingdom
consisting of the historic deer,
forested Guana Island and
other little rocks, reefs and islets,
The new owner of the 354 acr
which make up the kingdom i
Mr. Hamilton Hill of London
The handsome black haired M:
Hamilton Hill arrived in Antigua
two weeks ompanied by
his tall slim son, dark haired like
the father and also two
young farmers.
The party has
Antigua’s Beach
the lantic
snooker.
Yesterday erowds gathered
around an Amphibian Jeep which



a dozen

ago ac

strong

been relaxing At
Hotel, enjoying
breeze and playing










v landed from the S.S. Tribes-
man assi ned to this gentleman
The boat-shaped vehicle is capa-
ble of travelling on land or sea
and besides having four wheels

with tyres, it has a steering rudder
and propviler at the rear. There
is plenty of chatter about seeing
the Amphibian Jeep submerge in
the Narrows and make its maiden



voyage across the 50 yard chan-
nel to Barne Point, Guana with

the party of gentlemen.
A Farmer King

Mr, Hamilton Hill intends to
be a farmer’king on Guana, Land
which a hundred and, fifty years
ago grew sugar cane for the Cod-
rington family and where banks
can still be seen is now going to
be used for cotton cultivation.

A tractor has also arrived and
the three young men will soon be
at work supervising and clearing
Accacia, Cedar, Logwood and
Cinnamon trees, They will live
in the beautiful old house whose
original walls are still standing,
It is a building which has been
added to and now has two modera

wings on either side.

Deer and fat sheep roam the
island abundantly, mongooseés cun-
ningly stand on their hind legs
and watch the new owner as
much as to say “We intend to give
you a jolly good fight before you

established your poultry here.”
Rats of the largest variety will
also have to be met in battle since

for the past months they have
had their freedom in and out of
the ancient mansion.



Guianese Refused
Perniission To
Remain In T’dad

GEORGETOWN, B.G., Feb. 4

British Guiana Trade Union
Council to-day cabled a strong
protest to the Secretary of State
for the Colonies against the
action of the Trinidad Govern-
ment in declaring Mrs. Janet

Jagan a “prohibited immigrant”,

an elected member of the George-
town Town Council and General
Secretary of the Peoples’ P
gressive Party.

Mrs, Jagan deplaned from
Trinidad on Friday last to spend
a short vacation during the
island’s carnival. She i now
due back in B.G. to-day, having
been refused permission ito re-
main,

The T.U.C.A. have informed the
Secretary of State that they con-
sider the practice of restricting
the freedom of movement of
Trade Union and political lead-
ers within colonial territories
“most reprehensible” and have
further called upon all working
class organisations within the
Caribbean area to join in a united
protest against the action of the
Trinidad Government.

Other protests expect to follow.

WL ake












LACKWELL

—the name FAMOUS for Pickles

” generations
Branston Pickle White Onions
Mixed Pickles Cocktail Onions
Gherkins Chow Chow
Piccalilli Walnuts

Local Agents:
Geddes Grant Ltd., Bridgetown.

to pass muster

i
3

} SHUWHITE & WHITE RENOVATOR |

In Cartons with Sponge

tamous
relinquished her



EXHTDITEC

MR. W. P. BRANCH, Manager of
prize for the best animal in the

Hanschell, Director of Agriculture looks on.

of the late Revd. Philip Branch o
in Grenada. In his address, His
father, the late Revd. G. W. Branc'!



IN PRIZE







>
BARBADOS. ADVOCATE PAGE THREE
. ; 4 ; .
Obituary ; GiothFromBananas Gqiry Holds Talks With
[pe =
MR. OTHO WAITHE And I inteapples Factory Management
1e ocetfrred unexpected- NEW YORK
lence Ris er Road or A weaving trade that expire (From Our Own Correspondent)
rni Mi Otho ir he Philippines more than 50 ST. GEORGE'S. Feb. 2
ithe, Linotypist of the Adv years ago has been revived. |: re ’ a ae ee nee &
Co, I He \ 44 makes cloth from both the banan WITH GRINDING OPERATIONS commencing at
Mr Waithe wa pia en plant -_ the for ean Woodlands Sugar Factory on Monday, Hon. E. M. Gairy
of his parents and was brought up experts have just rol ht «thi : > parurnnsintattuae ‘
in a christian atmosphere He at- trade to light again and they pa aay othes 7 eee : Sa aa i at d Mental
tended. Bay Street Boys’ School predict that these unusual cloth orkers Union yesterday held talks with members of the

Dougaldston Estate, receiving his
show from Lady Arundell. Mr.
Mr. Branch is a brother
f Barbados and a leading planter
Excellency made reference to his
h whose small cocoa plantation at

St. Paul’s was outstanding for its heavy yields of high quality.



Manager Announces

C.N.S. Sailings For °52

SPRING, SUMMER AN

MONTREAL, Jan.
D FALL sailings for the 1952

season by Canadian National West Indies Steamships from

Montreal,

Halifax and Boston to Bermuda,

the Leeward

and Windward Islands, and British Guiana were announc-

ed here recently by Captain R

t. A. Clarke, General Manager.

The first spring sailing will be from Montreal late in April

by the C



Seawell

ARRIVALS — BY B.W.1LA
ON MOND. AY
From ST. VINCE
Noreen Hazell
Gibson

From GRENADA




Webb, FE

clid

Basil Lewis, Edmond Gwyn, P. Blades,
Barry Blades, Elma Wilsor
From MARTINIQUE:

Gordon Osgood, James Culpepper
Amelyna Nelson. Robert Curri

From TRINIDAD



W. Grimstead, M. Laurence, M, Ftrg
son, R. Toussaint, V. Anderson, M. Ander
. E. Friffin, M. Griffin, M. Wat



lor, M. Mural, D, Mitchell, E. Giag
A. Sivers, L. David, E. Vogel, D. Lyder,
£. Clarke, H on, Harrison, Harrison,
J. Nunes, Lu I Dyer, H. Dyer, A
Dyer, E. Dyer, Behn, B. Nogueira, C.
Robinson, D. Hugo mn, V. Hugon, C. Tom-
sent, A, Tor ne
DEPARTL RES BY
ON MONDAY
For MARTINIQUE
Guy Massel!
For ST, VINC
Pickford G









BWA

Joseph Seale
ENT
Patrick Murray




Tor GRENADA;
Jene











Millington, Willoughby Sayers,
A Py Darty, Daphne Hutchinson,
F Fe Ince, Mary Frost DaCosta
Lovell, Réy Me Connell, Leota MeConnell,
Fe Bernard Crosby, Rtv. James Boulton,
Rev. Robert MeCullough, Rev. Francis
Lawrence, Rev. Maxwell Thomas, Rev.
George Frost, Arthur Clarke, Julian
M St Clair Weekes Laurie
For TRINIDAD
Wilbert Waleoti, Olivia Fox, Grace
Fox, Ernest Fox, Winston Fox, Grace
x ‘ , Wallace Fo Aaron
» Matalon, Erie The
Colin Inniss, Anthony
Worrell, Albert O'Neal

Marjorie Colley,
Banfield, B

Brandford
ttie Raymond

In Touch With Barbados
Coastal Station

Cable and Wireless (W.1 Lid.,
that they can now communicate with the





advise

following ships through their Barbado:
Coast Station
S. Bonito, s.s. Braga, s.s. Empress of


























Scotland, s,s. Ionian



Leader, $.5. Charitas.





s.s. Tindra, s.s, Fort Townshend, s 5
Rosa, 8.8. Aleoa Ranger, 8.8. F eer Cove,
Marco Polo, s.s. Mauretania, s
Quilmes, s.s. K, Bitten Court Orione,
8.8. Mercator, Southern Counties, s.1
Zelos, s.s. Lady Nelson, s.s. Willem tid,
5 Mormacrio, s.s. Awimen, Rodas,
Ca Poseidon, 8.3
Beatrice done nth
ine M R
Proteu

JOINT Au)
MUSCLE PAINS

May mean kidney trouble

A function of the kidneys is to
eliminate harmful impurities from
the system. If the kidneys grow
sluggish, these impurities accum-
ulate and settle and often become
a cause of pain in joints and
muscles. The way to tackle the
trouble is to help the kidneys.
They should be toned up with
De Witt's Pills—the medicine
made specially for this purp¢
De Witt's Pills have a soothing,
cleansing and antiseptic action on
the kidneys that brings them
back to perform their natural
function properly.¢ This well-
® tried medicine is sold all over
the world and we have many

letters from sufferers telling
of relief gained, after years
of suffering, by taking De
Witt's Piils. Try them

for your trouble. Go to
your chemist and








GUARANTEE —
De Witt’s Pills ; r

manufactured under strictly hygienic
conditions and the ingredients con-
form to rigid standards of purity.

Va Re tbs

for Pernt Pee mere iran



°.N Ss. motor vessel, Canadian Cruiser.

The new schedule is designed
to provide a sailing approximate-
ly e very 10 days with passengers
and freight from Montreal and
Halifax to the Caribbean, The
fleet will comprise the Lady Nel-
son, Lady Rodney and the three
motor vessels Canadian Cruiser,
Canadian Constructor and Cana-
dian Challenger, A 10-day freight
service will be operated also to



Nassau and Jamaica.
Calls at Boston will be made
by the Lady Nelson and tady

Rodney on each of their south and
northbound voyages. Passengers
returning to Canada in the three
motor vessels will disembark at
Saint John, N.B., and the ships
will proceed to Halifax, Québec
and Montreal with freight.

A Seenic Route

Five-day cruises between Mor
treal and Boston over the scenic
St. Lawrence route are fea



in the new schedule. to
cruises in the Lady liners will
offer a five-day sailing in eithe:

direction between Montreal
Boston, with a call at Halifax.

and

Under a sea-air agreement be-
tween Canadian National Steam-

ships and Trans-Canada Air
Lines, alternate routing will be
possible for passengers to Ber-
muda and the West Indies, Pas-

sengers from any point in Can-
ada or the United States
by the two carriers, may travel
to Bermuda, Barbados and Trini-
dad by sea or air and return by
the alternate service,

The Canadian Cruiser, first o!
the C.N.S. fleet to reach Montreal
next spring, will arrive about
April 19. She will be followed
by the Canadian Constructor,
Lady Rodney, Canadian Challen-
ger and Lady Nelson. The first
sailings of these vessels fror:
Montreal have been scheduled fo
April 29, May 9, May 19, May 30
and June 9,

FOR
EXTRA

SAFE!

THE CYCLIST’S

CHOICE

—DOWDING ESTATES & TRADING CO., LTD.

(ECKSTEIN BROS.)

Distributors

> News

served }

y



and was a lifelong member of St

Ambrose Church Choir and











the

will soon be making their mark Factory Management about working conditions during the























$ in the world markets. crop season. subscriptions both sides fell in
‘ootball Club. Later he went to The fibre of the banana plant The talks proceeded in an ami- line with a suggestion by Mr.
Combe mere School and Harrison” ig soft, with a Slight sheen and cable atmosphere, with Mr. S. A DaBreo that the Union should
Coll a but never forsook the , silvery cast. The pineapvic Francis, Managing Directoy of @ppoint Shop Stewards who
hoe of his boyhood days. fibre makes a cloth called pina, the Factory, presiding and La- Should look into that on their
adres 5 een eae at the which is warm and pleasing to bour Officer G. S. DaBreo and ehalt. —
Stock Room of the Advocate Co,, ‘0Uch. Looms and new processes Labour Inspector John DaBreo The closed shop principle did
fed 3 iy teenies yee; vreparing the fibre have been only sitting in as observers ne present great difficulty as
Operat aA reas to be Ghe Of ei developed by the E.C.A. expert Among the M.M.W.U, requests Most of the worker were
ae + allan —B.UP were the fajlowing M.M.W.U. members and the pos-
poe ce sae the feat Harri R 2 sibility of strike action was held
e Was probably the first HM: Secniniteenipbantiiiie a 7 :
sonian become member of A closed shop at the Factory Undesirealije in the event of
the Barbados Workers Union. He BARBADIAN DIES and associated estates for W'thholding the request
was fearless and as a unionist did IN GRENADA members of the Union and ar- RATES OF EXCHANGE
not hesitate to let his views be Chicks’ Gut Own Careiiibatbiiay rangements by the Manage- ‘Valea ee re ee
known, There were occasions ST. GEORGE'S. ment for collection of Union a
when this brought him into con- . a subscriptions, 736/10 Cheques on Bankers n 4/10
flict with others but in the end it , The ‘ death | tao er Yast Compensation for workers Sight or Demand Drafts 712/10
was his nature to retain the Wednesday of Martha Taylor, 85, when due to road conditions 726/19 Cabl
friendship and respect of his op- 10Pmerly of Barbados and moth- trucks become bogged down “*/'° Gurrenes mee
ponents. Fast friendship was part ¢r-in-law of Mr. Fitzgerald Fer- and unloading and ré-loading 56 Silver Sa 4
of his nature and he was highly Tington, well-known local garagé had to take place; also for de- DA
respected not only by his col- Proprietor. The deceased leaves lays in field work due to late ™*"° _ weno
leagues at re Advocate, but by © brother, Hezekiah Brathwaite arrival Pgs Be tee : af 10.65.
wide circle whose presence at ®d two sisters, Mesdames Eliza- An increase of pay for stigar 794/10 Cable :
his funetal on Sunday testified to beth Sealy and Lydia Agard, iD workers bringing ‘them into 79/18 Curren 69 3/10
the est@@m in which they held Barbados, four sons in the United ling with general agricultural so Siiver, =
hi States and a daughter here. The te Sesileaen, at — a cd 20
m. workers. Cane workers under FEBRUARY 1952
He was married to Miss Chloe ‘uneral took place at the St. an agreement prior to the strike NEW YORK
Kippings who now survives him, George’s Methodist Church with of ’ last Fegruary—March are 73.6% pr Sees on Bankers 71.4% pr.
so and other re potrdg| _— a large & thering | attending, _ paid $1.02 per day for men and - a * Seen 71.2% pe
condolence will be extended. resemblance to the late George 95¢. for women, whereas general aaa a 8% pr
Arliss, the actor. His hobbies @griculturay workers (now earn Coupons 69.2% pr.
MR. W. H. ANTROBUS were farming and gardening. $1.20 and $1.00. CANADA
The death occurred on Satur-/ | Surviving are his widow, Mrs. The Factory representatives 4, ,,“Meluding Newfoundiand)
day of Mr. William Hilton An-]| Hallie Doorly; two sons, Martin viewed the representations fa- "**” Demand Dratts 90.88% oe,
trobus, Assistant Master at the| EB. and Brie; a daughter, Mrs. vourably agreeing to discuss Sight Drafts 20.5% pr
Boys’ Foundation School, He was} Charles Lundgren, and two bro- them early with other Directors, 14% pr. Cavie
51. thers, George and Harry Doorly. though in regard to collection of “°° ”* gua oa jn
Mr. Antrobus was one of those : AS
quiet and unassuming members of 2
the teaching profession who in an
unobtrusive way achieved an

amount of work beyond the capac-
ity of their more exuberant col-
leagues. He was the son of a
schoolmaster and teaching was his
natural bent. He was a favourite
with his colleagues and pupils
alike and highly respected, Be-
sides taking part and helping in
the school activities, “Antro” as
he was familiarly known, took a
deep interest in the corporate life



of the school. It was during the
period when text books were
scarce and almost unobtainable

that he began to import from the

publishers and sometimes by
means of re-sale or exchange
could supply the needs of pupils

of other schools.

Besides his popularity in edu-
cational circles he was at one time
Assistant Manager of the Empire
Theatre and here he was as popu-
lar and obliging as in school,

To his bereaved sister and other
relatives deepest sympathy will be
extended



MR. EDWARD DOORLY

Edward Doorly, first editor-
in-chief of Women's Wear Daily,
died in his home at Saugerties,
N.Y.., on January 30th at the
age of 78. Although he retired
ten years ago, he had contribut-
ed to Mairchild publications un-
til his death says the New York

Times. .
Born in “Barbados, B.W.L., he
received a law degree from Har-

rison College there and came to
the United States in 1898, After
working on a farm in Canada for
seven months, he became a street
car motorman in New York for
a brief time, In 1899 he started
with The Daily Trade Record,
the original name of the present
Fairchild publication, The Daily
Record,

An inside editorial worker, Mr
Doorly later served as make-up
editor and head of the copy desk.
Gradually he became right-hand
man to the late E. W. Fairchild,
founder of the papers.

Mr. Doorly edited in The Trade
Record, a page that was devoted
to concentrated daily news of the
women’s wear industries, In 1010
this service had been developed
to such an extent that it became
separate publication, Women’s
Wear Daily.

Although he helped guide oth-
er Fairchild papers, the develop-
ment and growth of Women’s
Wear Daily took more and more
of his time. He was credited
with ‘ having hired and trained
many of the present executives |
of Fairchild publications,

After his retirement to his}
farm, Mr, Doorly contributed
columns to Women's Wear Daily}
and, under the pen name of Ed-
ward Drayton,
and Footwear

Mr. Doorly

to Retaining Daily
News. |
proud

was of his|






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PAGE FOUR



BARBADOS 9 ADVOGATE

Gee SSS = fase

Printed by the Adverste Co., Lid., Broad St., Bridgetown





Wednesday, February 6, 1952

Fishing Industry

THIS week the Comptroller of Supplies
fixed the price of roast beef at 68 cents
per lb., and stew beef at 58 cents per Ib.
Last week roast beef was sold at 48
cents per lb. and stew beef at 36 cents
per Ib.

Last week Trinidad’s meat prices rose
when brisket was fixed at 74 cents per lb.
instead of 54 and sirloins advanced from
67 cents to 75 cents. In Seychelles the
price of beef which was 65 cents per Ib.
(against 25 cents before the war) has re-
cently been controlled at one rupee per
lb. The price of meat advances almost
everywhere and the only remedy that
governments in Trinidad, Barbados or
Seychelles can counsel is to grow more
livestock and reduce the quantity of im-
ported meat. So long as Barbados is de-
pendent on imported meat, the Govern-
ment can do nothing else except continue
to raise the controlled price of imported
meat to a price which will make it possi-
ble for the importer to continue importing.
The contrast with the Government’s con-
trol of fish prices is striking. Australia and
New Zealand exporters are allowed to
raise the prices of their meat because their
government permits them to do so: but
Barbadian fishermen are not allowed to
put up the prices of fish despite the in-
creased costs of fishing materials and de-
spite periodic shortages of fish. The Bar-
bados government which recently voted
$70,000 to build 40 new fishing boats and
$10,000 to introduce power-driven fishing
boats in the local fleet probably prides it-
self on its active encouragement of the
fishing industry. Is there however much
justification for pride? The controlled
price of flying fish (retail) has recently
risen from 6 cents to 7 eents but the only
immedite benefit seems to be experienced
by hawkers who cheerfully ask and get 8

cents for flying fish bought in bulk from
the fishermen at 6 cents each.

The steep rise in the price of fresh meat
by twenty cents per lb. for roast beef and
22 cents per lb. for stew beef, will force
more people to eat fish. It seems strange
that while the Government of Barbados is
prepared to sanction the increase of prices
to be paid to Australian livestock owners,
it rigidly prevents Barbadian fishermen
from raising the price of local fish during
periods of scarcity, while they are often
compelled to sell at half the controlled
price during periods of glut, The Govern-
ment’s policy for the fishing industry is
overdue for revision, and the recent de-

bate in the House of Assembly proved con- |

clusively how little attention members
seemed to have devoted to study of the
industry and its needs. The removal of
price controls on fish is only the first of a
series of essential steps that have to be

taken if the status of fishermen is to im- }

prove.

Until it does there can be little confi-
dence that the industry will become more
efficient.

If the Investigator can catch $3,700 of
fish in 141 days every fishing boat of Bar-
bados ought to catch between $3,000 and
$4,000 of fish during a 7 months season,

If fishing boats are earning revenues of
this size then there is urgent need for fish-
ermen to save more of their earnings. If
catches of this value are not being made
by each boat investigations ought to be
made to discover why they are not made.
These investigations might prove that
fishermen were not catching full hauls for
a variety of reasons. One reason might be
fear of arriving ashore after a more suc-
cessful and earlier fisherman had already
satisfied local demands: another might be
due to uncertainty as to marketing his
catch if late. Only proper distribution
methods will enable the fisherman to oper-
ate efficiently with certainty that the
whole of his catches will be bought. Al-
ready some Bridgetown groceries with
deep freeze facilities buy surplus catches
and store them but only in Bridgetown.
One pioneer effort to establish a distribut-
ing agency for stored flying fish was killed

recently by the Government’s rigid con- |

trol of fish prices. Another good effort is
likely to be dissipated shortly if the Gov-
ernment continues to compel deep sea
fishermen who clean and preserve on ice
fish caught off the Georgetown banks to
sell their catches at the same price as is
received by a local fisherman when he
sells a complete fish with head, tail and
entrails, In Bermuda no fisherman is
allowed to sell fish which have not been
cleaned. In Barbados control prices make
no allowance for the conditions of fish at
the time of sale.

The Government is aware that fishing is
important to the life of the community:
but it displays little foresight when it
allows people who want to eat meat to
pay whatever prices are made necessary
by rising costs in Australia, and yet will
not encourage its own fishermen to catch
more fish through hope of greater reward.

The only way to modernise the fishing
industry is to make fishing more attractive.
If fishermen want to go on building old
fashioned boats (which have caused some
40 deaths in the past six years) Govern-
ment should give them little encourage-
ment,
$14 million dollars to Barbados today: if

}
re

|
|
|





The fishing industry is worth some |

boats were modernised and fitted with en- |
gines it would be worth at least one mil- |

lion dollars more,

The Government must have an active
forward looking fishing policy if success
is to be achieved: it cannot keep looking |
back to see if all the fishermen are follow- ,

ing: it must lead.

The Commonwealth

BARBADOS. ADVOCATE

}

ai, een

LONDON.

The value of the rubber planta-
tion industry to the British Com-
monwealth has often been stressed
in recent years, but few people
know the story behind the estab-
lishment of this important indus-
try in South East Asia.

Mr. Hugh Latimer, writing in
“History Today”, has managed to
condense it into a single article.
The result is one of the most
readable and informative contri-
butions yet achieved on this sub-

ject.
Much of the early history of
the introduction of the South

American “indiarubber” tree into
Asia has been documented by such
pioneers as Sir Clements Markhurn
and Sir Henry Wickham, and Mr
Latimer has drawn heavily on
their works, But gaps remain, and
at certain points history has be-
come confused with legend.

One of these legends — that
Wickham smuggled the rubber
seeds out of Brazil in defiance of
a local government jealous of its
earnings from the export of natu-
ral rubber — is discounted by Mr.
Latimer. The legend apnvears to
have grown out of Wickham’s own
colourful account of the affair.”

“Read carefully,” says Mr. Lati-
mer, “the narrative makes it plain
that Wickham merely feared this
might be so: the local authorities
at Para, with whom H.M. Consul
Was on good terms, was most. co-
operative in his desire to get the
cargo through quickly.”

Furth onfusion was undoubt-
edly due@ to the interest which
several U.K. Government depart-
ments — notably the Indja Office
— professed in the efforts to intro-
duce the rubber tree into Asia. The
Governments of those days did
not attach such great importance
to colonial development as their
modern successors the huge
sums spent on the East African
groundnuts scheme may be con-
trasted with the niggling attitude
of the nineteenth century authori-
ties when Wickham demanded
£10 per thousand for the’ seeds
that were to grow into today’s
flourishing industry.

“The matter,” Mr. Latimer says,
“moved ponderously through the
proper channels.” ter — much
later — we find the then director
of Kew Gardens writing to Mr.
Joseph Chamberlain in the fol-
lowing terms:

“Sir,

“....Twenty years ago the
Secretary of State for India in
Council invoked the aid of this
establishment to introduce the
species yielding indiarubber
from South America into India.
The operation was successfully
accomplished at considerable
cost. Three species were estab-
lished in Ceylon, where they
have since produced seed which
is available for distribution.
As far as I am aware, no prac-
tical result has followed....”

The efforts to establish the rub-
ber tree in India failed, and part
of the blame for this must be

POCKET CARTOON
by OSBERT LANCASTER

“Well, what a fine lost
Rare ey gees ont
to bel”

.



attached to a misleading report on
the natural habitat and method of
cultivation of the tree prepared by
Mr. Cross, who had been entrust-
ed with the task of collecting the
seeds in South America. Although
his observationg proved hopelessly
wrong, it appears that some of his
plants, received in Singapore in
1877, were destineq to become the
forebears of three-quarters of the
world’s cultivated rubber.

Once these plants had been es+
tablished in Singapore’s botanical
gardens, they were apparently
forgotten, for when Mr. H. N.
Ridley arrived here some years
later to take charge of the gardens



he found them fully-grown and
entirely overgrown by secondary
——

'o Mr. Ridley belongs much of |
the credit for @tscovering a meth- |
Od of tapping which did not kill
the trees. But he found it difficuit
to interest planters ig the tree. Mr.
Latimer describes how Mr. Ridiey
used to press rubber seeds into
the pockets of visitors to his bot-
anical with the injunc-
tion, “Take a few of these home
with you. They will be valuable
some day.”

Mr. Ridley, a remarkable 96-
year-old, who lives near Kew Gar-
dens once told me that some oi
the oldest rubber trees in Malaya
were grown from seeds which he
gave to district residents many
years ago. The seeds were planted
near rest-houses and official resi-
dences, and some of them are still
giving a daily yield of latex.

With the development of the
motor car industry, the rubber
tree became a popular plantation
crop, and the British Common-

wealth’s dollar-earning
industry was on the road to pros-
What th meant to Malaya

is best described by Mr, Latimer:
“A jungle waste was converted
into one of the most productive
agricultural areas under the sun,
and the character of the Malayan
population was transformed. As
well as the South Indian workers
and the Jaffna superintendents,
the best planting blood of the
East was attracted to Malaya: A
Skinner from Indga, a Lushington
from Ceylon, and all the clans of
North Britain, figure among the
names of planters of the early
twentieth century.

“Their capital was enough for
pioneering; not enough for devel-
opment, and many sold their pro-
prietary rights for shares and be-
came managers on their own
estates. The small London invest-
or really made modern Malaya.
But the planters or their succes-
sors stayed. The country which
they personally have done so much
to develop has a strong emotional
hold on the European Malayans
of today and not even the inter-
‘war depression or the humiliation
of the Japanese occupation have
succeeded in shaking it,

“In the present Communist ter-
ror, the rubber planter faces the
biggest odds he has ever faced.
The Commonwealth has reason to
be grateful for his devotion.”

Crime Does Not Pay

I would not like to say that
what has lately passed in our
House of Assembly on the sup-
posedly malign influence of the
modern Cinema is just so much
rubbish, but I think that the nar-
row basis on which it is supposed
to rest is not within the pale of
reason, The quick action of many
today in turning quite helplessly
to this intangible excuse is a
supreme achievement on the part
of modern escapism; and above
all uncovers what is a complete
lack of understanding towards the
fundamental structure of human
society and the habits evident in
the local scene.

Today, an elementary education
is as much the rule as it was lack-
ing years ago. And this is what
many people fail to understand—
the person endowed with even a
little common sense, or that which
may be . artificially engendered
through the means of simple in-
struction, even the reading and
understanding of a few fables or
parables, cannot possibly miss
wihat today’s films are everywhere
based upon, what is the whole
structure that motivates Holly-
wood—the moral that each and
every film has as its eventual
aim. Thus the veneer of the plot
never succeeds in obscuring the
whole meaning of the production.

There it is in the proverbial
nutshell, One hundred per cent. of
these crime movies end with the
criminal pictured in the lowest
state of mental and moral degre-
dation possible, a person for
whom we can entertain not the
slightest feeling of sympathy.
With this fact drilled so constant-
ly in the minds of cinema-goers
everywhere—Crime does not pay,
and never will—we still have an
individual attempting to emulate
the brutal deeds of one who has
been so completely delineated and
made utter disgusting before
their very efes! It’s hard to be-
lieve isn’t it? But the conclusion
most people will arrive at is the



BY A CORRESPONDENT
obvious fact that even in the ab-
sence of an “Encouraging film”
the material for the dirty work
is all there, in the character of a
person with a plainly complicated
and sadistic turn of mind.

Can anyone tell me anything of
the films that incited the black
neeromantic background and mor-
bid inhuman machinations of the
Ritual Murder Case: the utterly
senseless reason for numerous
acid-throwing cases: the many
other events that so dismay and
disgust us, and all with not the
slightest vestige of a precedent to
be discovered on the screen.

The crime wave that has re-
cently struck hitherto compara-
tively staid Barbados has assumed
propersoas the present generation
nas never before witnessed. It is
only natural that this extremely
sad state of affairs should cause
paralleled reverberations among
classes and people in general, and
that as is to be expected the usual
trend of thought would necessarily
be disturbed from its traditional
rut. Nevertheless in spite of these
changes, I see absolutely no need
for the Assembly to be alarmed
about the type of film the public
likes to see.

It is perhaps sufficient to re-
mark that the type of pictures
blamed for the rising trend of
crime are not in any way new to
the screen; they have not, in other
words, been shown for the first
time during 1950. If this was the
case, then maybe there would be
some reason for attributing to
the new-fangled hair-raisers a
faithful. following in Barbados
spurred on to emulate dark deeds
done upon the canvas patch before
their eyes, and a following to all
intents and purposes that has got
off to an experienced and calcul-
atingly cold-blooded start.

Unfortunately, this is not the
case, These pictures have been
showing in Barbados and_ else-
where for years past, and gentle-
men who wish to compliment

Our Readers Say $

Alarming Reading

To The Editor, The Advocate—

SIR,—The remarks made by Mri
Oo. T. Allder in the House of
Assembly last Tuesday on the’ sub-
ject of films: will no doubt make
alarming reading for those who
know little ar nothing of the mo-
tion — business,

To begin with, the theatres can
only show the type of product as
made available to them by the
producers, The Board of Censors
is not appointed to tell the thea-
tre owners what t of picture
they must play. The Censors are
appointed to view films and to
approve of such films which are
moral and »proper; and also dis-
approve such as are sacrilegious,
obscene, indecent or » or
such as tend in the, judgment
of the board, to debase or corrupt
morals,

Mr. Allder states that at least
25% of the pictures shown should
be of an educational nature. Per-
haps Mr. Allder will be g0od
enough as to tell us where these
pictures may be obtained.

With reference to the remarks
made by Mr. F. E. Miller, he no
doubt refers to the “Production
Code” which governs the making

of motion pictures. Motion pic-
tures made in the United States
are, with few exceptions, pro-

duced in accordance with the pro-
visions of a Production Code
The general principals of this
code are :
(1) No picture shall be pro-
duced which will lower the moral
standards of those who see it.
Hence the sympathy of the au-
dience shall never be thrown to

the side of crime, wrong-doing,
evil or sin.

(2) Correct standards of life,
subject only to the uirements
of drama and entertainment shall
be presented,

(3) Law, natural or human,

shall not be ridiculed, nor shall
Syren be created for its viola-
tion, ‘
Under the heading “Particular
Applications” Crimes Against The
Law shall never be presented in
such g way as to throw sympathy
with the crime as against the law
and justice or to inspire others
with a desire for imitation.

With particular reference to
murder, the Production Code
states

(a) The technique of murder
must be presented in a way that
will not inspire imitation.

(b) Brutal killings are not to
be presented in detail.

(ec) Revenge in modern time
shall not be justified,

In these modern~ days the
Cinema is blamed for everything?
Adultery, Rape, Vulgarity, Ob-
ecenity, Profanity — all blamed
on the Cinema, It would be inter-
esting to discover what took the
blame before the era of Motion
Pictures.

Yours faithfully,
R. N. W. Gittens
CARIBBEAN THEATRES LTD.

Fires and Electric Wiring

To The Editor, The Advocate—
SIR,—With reference to your
Leading Article on some precau-
tions to be observed as a pre-
ventive to possible fires occurring
in Barbados, in which you quite

them on engendering this latent
burst of talent must remember
this and ae Besides, if
we are ng to do somet

about these moving movies thes
we cannot stop here, but do the
job of censorship wisely, complete-
ly leaving no horror unbared.
The newspapers must be gagged
of all such grisly news; the num-
erous tongues of Gossip’s malic-
ious hangers-on will have to be
cleansed of all reference to these
degenerate deeds; the penny
dreadfuls (no longer a_ penny,
however) must also go. In other
words, it’s no use doing things by
halves. In fact, we will even
have to put a stop to the mean-
dering motions of the courts,
where murders are relived and
deeds redoné, and even sentences |
of final deaths are summarily pro- |
nounced! }

No, tihese flimsy excuses are too |
weak, too,groundless, The per-
son who believes that the films
exert a lasting influence, whether
good or bad, on this generation of
vipers has yet to learn a _ vast
amount on the wonders and whims
of human nature in the world of |
today. I personally prefer to look)
on the movies as the supreme
means of relaxation, even some-
times remotely of education.
Seldom do the facts remain over-
long in our minds—the picture
has really to be outstanding for
that, and they are few and far
between.

It is a product of threatening |
reality that we face, and we have
to meet this reality with reality
equally stark, One poison will
conteract another, won’t it? But
while one poison is seeping through
our life blood, it’s no use indulging
in senseless ravings fit only for
the maniac. That is only another
of tihe infinite ways of losing pre-|



cious time.
Fear is sometimes an extremely
efficient panacea and dreadful

Savagery never walks abroad
where fear heavily treads.

|

rightly pointed out the dangers
involved jin defective electrical
wiring and circuits, may I be
allowed to offer a suggestion
whereby fires due to electrical
defects could be considereably
minimised?

In British Guiana one must be
certified in electrical wiring be-
fore being allowed to wire any
building. Also after a building
has been wired the Government
Electrical Inspector must inspect
and certify that the job has been
properly done.

I think it would be wise, for
all concerned, to have similar
measures enforced in Barbados
instead of allowing amateurs, to
wire build b ' j

JOSE A. GOMES |
Porey Spring |
St. Thomas.
Stamps
To The Editor, The Advocate—

DEAR Sir, I have been collecting
stamps for quite a. number of
years but have difficulty getting
stamps from some parts of the
British West Indies including
Barbados,

I was wondering if I could im-
pose on your g to secure
a correspondent for me who is
interested in exchanging stamps. I
am 28 years of age but I will
answer every letter and send



KREMLIN LEADERS {paPER SERVIETT

WAGE WAR ON
ALL RELIGIONS

In a new bovk, Gary MacEoin, a distinguished
journalist, presents evidence that Soviet Com-
munist Party leaders purge all religions—
regardless of the fath — in the countries
brought within the imperialist Soviet orbit ,

By WILLIAM HENRY CHAMBERLIN
From “The Wall Street Journal”

SOVIET communism is dedicated to the
annihilation of all religion, and the Kremlin
leaders enforce the Communist Party system
as a way of life requiring absolute accept-
ance of the decisions of the Politburo and the

Central Committee of the Party as unques-
tioned “truth”, Gary MacEoin, a distinguish-
ed journalist, emphasizes in his new book
“The Communist War On Religion” (pub-
lished by the Devin-Adair Company, New
York City).

Organized Soviet communism plays two

roles to-day; it is at the same time mission-
ary and persecutor, the author reports, sup-
porting his statements with accounts of
Communist persecution of religion in numer-
ous countries.
is a constant intensive effort to indoctrinate
the people in countries under Soviet Com-
munist rule and to win converts in the rest
of the world. At the same time, there is a
systematic effort to haress, repress and, so

On the missionary side there

far as possible, utterly destroy religious faith
in the lands where Communist governments
are in power. The tactics employed are
adapted according to each country, its his-
tory, its politics, and its customs. But a
pattern of first concentrating on minority
faiths is almost universally followed.

For Soviet communism, a secular mate-
rialistic faith, is jealous of all rivals. It
recognizes no distinction between what is
due to God and what is due to Caesar (civil
or political leaders), It claims all as Caesar’s
portion.

Especially obnoxious to Communist rulers
in Moscow and in the states which have been
brought within the Soviet orbit is the as-
sumption, common to all the great religious
faiths, that there is a higher moral law, by
which the actions of the most powerful rulers



must be judged. They see in this a danger-

ous challenge to the amoral absolutism of
their regimes. Hence their determination to
deviatalize religion, if they cannot destroy
it, and to tolerate only churches which will

be subservient obedient tools in the hands

o! the State.

The story of Soviet Communist persecu-
t.on of religion in the vast expanse of Euras-
ia, from the Elbe River to the Pacific Ocean
is known in imperfect and fragmentary
form. There is no free, no reliable, news
reporting in this area. Consequently the
systematic campaign to dedtroy some
churches outright and to undermine all
others has proceeded without the spotlight
of publicity.

However, the main facts of this campaign
have been pieced together in this new book
by Mr. MacEoin. He undertakes to tell what
has happened in Soviet Russia itself, in the
satellite states of Eastern Europe and in
China. Much of his material is drawn from
Catholic (both Roman and Greek) sources;
but he clearly recognizes that communism
is equally hostile to all forms of religious
faith and he cites the fate of other religions
—Christian Protestant, Jewish, Moslem,
Buddhist, and others. The names of those
various nationalists who co-operated in
supplying factual information have been
witheld by the author to lessen their per-
sonal danger and for other sound reasons,
but the book includes a list of other sources
that can be checked.

The Orthodox Church in Soviet Russia
has been so ruthlessly purged of all its inde-
pendent leaders that the Moscow regime is
willing to tolerate its formal existence. The
price of this toleration is complete unques-
tioning subservience to the party line in
domestic and international affairs. Atheism,
however, remains a condition of membership
in the ruling Communist Party; and the
whole weight of education and propaganda

is thrown against any spiritual interpreta-
tion of life.

There has been a savage persecution of the
Catholics of the Eastern Rite, mostly Ukrain-
ians who accept the spiritual leadership of
the Pope in Rome. Countless numbers of
these have been arrested, some have died
under suspicious circumstances, and there
have been many arrests and some martyr-
doms among the priests.

The purpose of this religious persecution
by the Moscow party leaders, which has been
extended to Romania, is to force communi-
cants into the Orthodox Church. The motive
of persecution is purely political, as there is
no reason to suppose that Stalin, even
though he was sent to an Orthodox seminary

stamps to anyone who is kind by his pious mother, favours Greek Ortho-
enough to wate to me, |dox theology against Roman Catholic.
a nks, ‘ .
Yaure truly, (BOOKS—Reviews)
Cc. R. MALLOY,

Bank of Montreal,
Main and James, |
Hamilton, Ontario,
Canada. |

This article appeared in the December 6, 1951, i €
of The Wall Street Journal, a daily newspaper pub
lished in the United States, containing articles of
financial and economic interest. The reviewer is a
member of the ‘editorial staff of The Wall Street
‘ournal.

}



WEDNESDAY, FEBRUARY 6, 1952
__ WEDNESDAY, FEBRUARY 6, 195:
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WEDNESDAY, FEBRUARY 6 1952 BARBADOS ADVOCATF PAGE FIVE

Widow Proves She Can Write ee
WILL DISPUTE ear ens vce

BEFORE COURT

for the purpose of extending

knowledge and appreciation

of the British way of life. It

has representatives in most

. ries o > wor and

AN OLD WIDOW, Mary Taylor, wrote to the dictation cae er re dea

Caveator’s counsel, Mr. E. W. Barrow, to prove at the scholarships are granted to
Court of Ordinary yesterday before the Acting Puisne
Judge His Lordship Mr. Justice Taylor, that although she
had signed her marriage certificate with an “X” she could
still read and write and could have identified the will she

claimed was her husband’s to be in his handwriting

students from abroad for post-
Tt not signed by any the dispute over the will arose.















ry »
graduate courses in the United I h e food
Kingdom .
. . .
Toc British Council also has a / * / ly
Students’ Welfare Department at ‘ ol i a mut





ss its London headquarters and this .

hie... ., {nt is disputed by an He admitted that soon after provides excellent cultural and fitness
illesi son of the dead man Mary had taken the will to the ecre.tional facilities for visiting

as n in his handwriting, clicitor, Mary and himself had Students, for it is important for .

The pei ty question in dis- had a fignt.” He said that his them to know about life in Britain Marmite is a good dietary source
pute is h rit can be admit- name was not mentioned in that

ted probate in Common Form will.

of Vitamin B. A little added to
Stews, Soups, Sauces, Gravies
and Savoury dishes gives extra
flavour and nourishment. Chil-
dren love Marmite—especially
in Sandwiches of every variety
and on hot buttered toast.

as a whole in addition to their
studies bach term this depart-
ment draws up a carefully plan-
ned list of lee ures, social events,
week-end and vacation courses
and surveys available to students.
The most recent syllabus includ-

asi ought for by Mr. At the close of this evidence,
O. St. C. Cumberbateh, solicitor Mr. Barrow said that they were
tk widow, Or whether it then asking that the direction of
shou be admitted in Solemn the Court be given that the will
Fo as Mr, E_W. Barrow, in- be proved in Solemn Form by
structed by Mr, Banfield of way of a petition, :

ed weekend visits to Shek« In jars: | oz.,2 oz.,
Messr Hutchinson and Banfield “Lt am submitung,” he said “that Speare’s birthplace, Stratford-on ae te
is urgin the Court is not ca led upon to Avon; to Winchester with it

The e is adjourned unti] the decide the matter at issue at this
14th of this month when it will stage, but only to say

femous public school and cathed-
ral; and to Oxford and Cambridge
© see the college and buildings
and introduce the = students

the mode of life in an English

, whether
be decided whether on the denial] from first appearances there will ol 4
of the illegitimate son alone as be a contest of this will.” ia a }
to the will being his father’s, it It would not be fair upon them, aM * =

Should be admitted in solemn he said, to call upon them to dis- : MEMBERS of the Korean delegation (above) and the United Nations, delegation who are negotiating
form.

MARMITE









University.
To. ‘oetebthits < Ste: tie > ‘i peas wane, then. i a truce at Panmunjon.—_EXPREss. There were also several surveys THE VITAMIN B YEAST EXTRACT
0 establis Ss case for the f umberbatch said that ——— ee series sctures Halts ce.
will being admitted in Common Counsel for the other side had : nan S ‘ ~ peat m= emer — Nn waae4 GIVES COOKING EXTRA GOODNESS AND FLAVOUR
Form, Mr, Cumberbatch for Tay- to bring enough evidence to the St. Joseph Round-up Mr. mit 1 oes Pe nee weth:—Ane
lor called her to give evidence. Court to get such a decision and ——————— — pre Ot these dealt with the BBC ’

; ENGAGEMENT dies GP” ceetianice “eat 4

Awaited Daughter could not merely say that there - T M . \ was of particular interest to

She said that she was the widow “@S a caveator, Tinned Meat RING STOLEN O VIOSCOW students from abroad, for the voice
of Martin Taylor who died May A

S far as they were concerned





ef the BBC is already well known. ,
y Eleven fountain pens, tom . ” Soni to most of the ho listen to tl \
8. sr husbée , , the evidence they had produced y Evening Advocate” Series ™ OF re wand Haten tothe } 4 ;
is an oo ee — at then was sufficient i Save: tne Washed Ashore er ee eee — "eae vay menses General Overseas and other Ser- |
Of j ; 7 : ‘om y. A . f Vices. The students who enrolled. __. saeesantquagntanetanainiengti

her © Wad, Une sheir daughter ineerton el aoe po RESIDENTS of the Ba hsheba toria Stree’, between Sat- On Monday the Evening came from twelve different coun- a
Phidelia arrived from Trinidad custody aan “ mt he tae area who were on the beach last urday and Manday. The Advocate will begin publication tries and in the course of a fort-
and the two of them could get 4 y B soune Te et Binley bad pleasant surprise incident was reported to the of a lively, entertaining series night they absorbed a great deal. /
things settled. She kept the wiil â„¢ind of the testator , * P oats * lice by Mr. Fred Cole of articles. eae y abs da great de: &

til Phidelia oz P Counsel for the other side had When some tinned meat was dis Police by Mr. of articles about the Soviet” of” useful information about the
we "Te came. to upset that and give some form Covered on the sand. A resident the same printery. Union, : BBC and heard lectures on_ its
Sm a ia Aner ie oe Clarence of evidence on which it could be Of St. Elizabeth’s Village who was Louise Brathwaite of Mas- The author of the articles is Third Programme, European and But new treatment does more than
fetes will vh oa ae _ ot held that the will could not be On the beach told the Advocate ae ire an ne named John Smith. He is a man- Overseas Services and Audience ston
father's v ; She said, She carrier admitted in Common Form hat the meat and some onions ported that a gold engage- aging director of Coutts Bank. Research, given by the heads of ease these terrible agonies.
it to the solic itor to get it proved. Mr. Barrow said that the Wil] were washed up from the sea. ment ring, valued $12, ve He speaks and reads Russian, the departmen’s concerned. Mix-
The will was produced in court 124 not been witnessed and the Some youngsters who were also stolen from her house a He has just been to Moscow ed with these and other lectures . : +
and she said it was her husband’s, the Seta a a at on the beach promptly set about Mount Pleasant Plantation, : : epee ern as On policy and ad t f new product, DOLCIN, has been created which not only gives
She had often seen her husband tt pik wine polos Sin kee eating the meat which vy ipostly St. Philip, at about 10.30 not as a fellow eee a ~ Sivttinh -Serwadeation wears cites s ) ompt relief from the pains due to tne symptoms of arthritis and
write and knew it was in his » jo). "0; ? sa ; ; in tomato sauce, Pil- a.m. on Sunday. a member of a conducted dele- s adcasting e Visits to

* which said that a Holograph Will herrings in tomato sz '

handwriting. She then asked that |

+ | Nin + Hous where: th h : hwumatism, but also affects the metabolic processes which constitute
- ation, but as a private touris hn ouse, 1ere ey ear ive v7 art of the rhe tic state’s backgr 4
= ba ; ame 7 : shards ah Sausages ga i e ea , be aes very 1m pe rant part o rheumatic 1 ickground, .
it be admitted to probate anne te ei — rors an OBSTERE bre in good supply He went about Moscow with on youth broadcasts and saw DOLCIN has been thoroughly tested in medical institutions,
M0 . e rr 4! s ORS ¢é 5 . y i ‘ w ¥ str. s of *m: cca
There had been another docu- would come into force ‘as far as the hotels in he Bath- the outlook of an English boli- demonstrations of them; to Picca
ment which her husband had also





rH : OLCIN is being used now with unprecedented success DOLCIN
ahbid atae ate Bahneriad:, i ain. 1 ie Stn day-maker in Paris oy Rome oily studio, where they watched seing prescribed by doctors nou And many sufferers have already
given her m ~ ; a re ge ested ie Abe. Custonis Duties He Talked— nh instalment of a serial play for imed normal living as a result of teking DOLCIN
Cross-examin sd by Mr. Barrow. ae mee ee gone este veaterday “But, he added S He travelled in buses, in taxis, Children’s Hour, complete ‘with ton’t delay Profit by the experience of fellow-victims of these
OSS-€Xa € . » a contest, one was that the hand- cate ) ay. ’ ‘ . 2 ee . ’ . , ious effecte a ae ‘ let DOLCH ay. / , x ci ablets «os
she said that her husband wrote writing of the purported Will was the local housewives cannot get On U. =. Goods on the tube, He ate in restau- pie he ag 3 _ ss and on s. Get DOLCIN or A rottle of 1 ) precious tablets costs
the first will in her presence, She not chat of the testator. . as much as two pounds a week. seq Pants and drank in taverns. H ords: a urd Programm 2/- PER BOTTLE
could read and write. She could His Lordship said that the docu- Reason? The Lobs ers are caught Except in the case of recognisec

strolled in the parks. He Concert given by the London Phil-/ 9 8% BOOKER'S
charitable organisations, persons looked at the churches, He went !@rmoni¢e Orchestra with Moisie-
receiving relief packages from the to the

not see well enough to read the ment produced to him, appeared especially for hotels.
document produced in Court, Tt to be identically the same writing

(BARBADOS) DRUG STORES LTD.

; — B Stree t
theatre and to a night wilsch as soloist; to the Television road Street and Hg





tings (ALPHA PHARMACY)
was not because she could not as the Will. n United States will have once again «).:, He talked to the people he *Udios at Lime Grove, and to the | ..
read it, but merely because her Mr. Barrow said that the y had Cenes, rash Burnt to pay Customs Duties, The article jor Now, in MR. SMITH GOES ‘4 colian Hall, where they saw the | } SN
eyes were bad, She knew her put in a witness to show they of agreement relating to the cOn- TO MOSCOW, he describe: what '°°ording of a Variety show. At the |} ‘
husband’s handwriting and recog- were contesting the Will and that A cane fire at Applewhaite cession wags repealed by a Bill he saw and what he: heard. end of the survey the students | , PC K BOOK DEP ARTME T:
nised it then by the general out- ‘7: handwriting was not that of Plantation, St. Thomas, at about passed by the Legislative Council He describes the shops, the Possessed a very .good workin i\.E UN, y |
line, but could not read it. the testator and it was not for midday on Monday burnt eight yesterday evening. food, the drink,. the clothes, the knowledge of the way in which the |

It was true, she said, that she that Court to enquire whether acres of first crop ripe canes, three r |, women, the houses, the arcades, BBC is run and the miny difficul- | (C.F, HARRISON & CO, — FIRST FLOOR)

had signed her marriage certificate their contention was correct and a half acres of fourth crop The article, which was one of ‘he. Baki and “newspapers he ties and problems with which it
with an “X”, His Lordship asked what would ripe canes and ten acres of trash. i § |

4 ic C erati ree- has to contend
iti j he Economic Co-operation Agree a akin ata 3 as ¢ %
At this stage she was given be the position in the case of any The canes and trash are the prop- the saw. He tells how he queued up
























> the Po . : : > ments between the Governments the. Red Square to look at e
paper and a pen and to test her mischief-maker claimed that a erty of Applewhaite Ltd. They cf the United States of America a. 7 ee ened cords’ (enti | sei mregrivan '
ability to write, Mr. Barrow dic- Will was not a correct Will were insured ond the United Kingdom was ter- Lenin muti yy ye - ~ | { SELECTION OF ....
tated to her, “I Martin Luther Mr. Barrow said that the ques- On Thursday last a fire, also at minated last April, and conse- Be ee nee ae mo ‘ 1! “ot 4, onths I or 7 De ”
? : yan aite g a. he s , " “ue a say). > tells | r ’ ay AM A) i o
Taylor, witness Mr, Cecil Hughen- tion of whether a contestor would Applewhaite, burnt one and a half quently. opportunity was taken to que ue had to s uy) e : te : me | NE Ww and RE EN 7 Vii Zn cs
ville Kn.ght,” and she wrote it. win was not before the Court, but acres of fourth mye, ee naan. _ peal the local.Act by a Bill which ® Visit. to Renin s house, wre :
R wan? - get =* its >; itted in This fir as reported to the Po- repes B L0CE ee } i cle snin’s motorcar B | ‘ ; WPPeNCrUE rg RK
Written In An Hour bbe ol aes ne ae montage rete amends to Customs Tariff Act ltwe-ae nas, Rolls-Royces), ‘ egeme | FROM OUR’ EXTENSIVE STOCK.
She said that her husband took * » case was then adjourned. At Small “Ridge Plantation, dealing, with the exemption of He Watched |
t h to te the will The case wa ) at Ly . aor aig e ateh “g J : | e
about an hour wri 4 Christ Church, three and three- Customs duty, CA ie toh y HMertece Stop going around the bu
He gave it to her a couple of days aacenmteieentemee quarter acres of first crop ripe ' » the man of 28:.who ; to the Stand and being a nuisance t ‘SS IN THE MAKING Lady Wentwort)
after he had made it. He died canes were burnt when a_ fire Under the Bill passed by the cient ainaliatg banking family People. You have been repeated- ; Rs CENTURY , it yi h, Preweneele
pean ‘aan —. cope mt Labourer Gets A occurred there last week. hay § Legislative br men dposregt ae atin al é a enaea ot ¥y warned about going and bed. | Ae ‘ , J iraham Storey
gan on paper, are the property of the Jate G. S. provision was however made to (h é Me ‘ : , : ;
had no other writing on it,
4 John Lindsey
Another fire at Farm Plantation, J. H. Hanschell | " . . s !
9 ; 5 ; Pr hy Ud arn ahmtl acai, va rice fy Fleet Air Arm din order, he“: 2 anschell, Judges of th« i{TI f ; Fr. H. Hinsley
will . ao avert he: ae sie His Worship Mr. G. B, Griffith a eae iron sae Oa ter RVIRyEn aay eal By corr sae ‘to meet some people who Assistant Court of Appeal, tol SASTERN EPIC Compton Mackenzie
tee 10 Shara) 4 the bottom yesterday sentenced 20-year-old * font ay “ond crop ripe canes tay Ube" SO1Ry a b: Mine #3 were not Old Etonians”), Du- 54-year-old James Chandler of ‘HE RIVAL MONSTER Compton Mackenzie
cee te ra - oe her’ 1945 labourer Elmer Lewis of Deane's the lB coge R A H Johnson. LightAeropiane Club} ring the war he served in the Orange Hill, St. James, when they | \ MOUSE IS BORN Anita Loos
altteocan sean Bite said that it was Village, My Lord's, Pat ras inis ware insured. The uniforms and equipment of Mediterranean, the Home Fleet, “€ntenced him yesterday to four MORNING JOURNEY re James Hilton
ss ritten at one period, was that Michael to one mngpths Ac tthe At about 2.40 p.m. on Monday the Church Lads’ and Church the Fast Indies; he did neva! Months’ imprisonment for beg- | HE END OF THE AFFAIR Graham Greene
it must “have been a’ mistake, ment vies ao icon ad. en a fire at Claybury Plantation, St. Gir’ Brigade, as is the case with liaison With the R.A.F. end the &ing alms at the Probyn Street | HE VALLEY OF SONG ; Bisabeth Gocane
Mr. Cumberbatch objected to oe oe or ars “Lally Witbect John was put out before yee the Boy Scouts’ and Girl Guides’ yg Aiy Force. After the war he bus stand, . ee aon ore ; faces 2
searaicaiahe. § ' , ) any great damage urnt only 4 conn, 7. : btn i. seine: teh ts 3 . oad - : t
Mr. Barrow’s asking her what had Ward of Black Rock, St. Michael. any an at ee row Sashes the 5sociations; and went to Oxford and then inte By doing this Their Honour | :
keen her husband's intention with i. fountain pen was valued ten holes of L. Sealy. They -were ph oie sersonal and banking, confirmed the decision of Hir| ‘ore’s Commentary-—History of S.P.G.—Shape ofthe Liturgy
régard someone witnessing the .+°19/. and the penknife at 16/-, property of L. Seal; 7 ne eee eee ners cna aia, MR. SMITH GOES TO Mos- Worship Mr. G. B. Griffith, Act-| | *P0stolic Ministry—Liturgy & Worship—What the C. of E.
will, when Mr, Barrow asked that Cpl Devonish, attached to the insured ppeeeee ef ae cocsaatbed ODAG ia the account of a lisele ing Police eee ae) Pande tas
question, — C.I.D. Central Station, told the ; ak a observant young man with no “A”, Chandler ‘appealed against | few diaries still Available—engagement pads—writing cases
She said that Byron King was court that while searching at the NCN-SUIT to Barbados. ideology to peddle Mr. Grifith’s decision -
a witness to both wills. King was house where the defendant was vlaintif! Gwendolyn Hewitt of — amo Hon. the Colonial Secretary It begins exclusively in the ' eres, VALENTINE CARDS.-GREETING CARDS—EASTER
a witness though he did not sign staying, the et en found Black Rock, St. Michael, accepted pointed out that the Government Evening Advocate, Harbour Police Constable Jam« CARDS !! !
a , was later identified by ward “ee a non-suit when her case against oA istralia had recently ap- ON MONDAY Wilkinson told the court that on|
Phidella and. hevselfedvete-to a We i R. eee “ Ethelbert an ig eet joe pointed a Trade Commissioner to —L.E.S. February 2 he was on duty at the
antes workshop o>? eae . Bank Hall, in which she cla : West Indies with his office in Vrobyn Street bus stand and saw
carry the last will to the solicitor “Tro. sentencing him, Mr. B zen 2 - detention of fur- the West Indies f )
£10 damages for detention



and get raw . The time ‘ aid: “Prisr 5 t really ~ c Trinidad, and the concession y ryt Chandler beg a woman in a bu: !
anda get it arawn up. = 7 two Griffith said: “Prispn is no , my niture came before His Honour serait on: ee SS Water I urned Off for a penny. Me told him he wa |
between the writing c e the place for you. You should be Mr. H. A. Vaughan in the Assist- ther g ie sere a » patibentiein beter arraete is As
wills was about three months. ont'to a place and be treated, but 2 Gourt-of Appeal yesterday. Commissioner on the — ac 'cim. ..Residents in the Brittons Cross “} ds d him an
Teiniden wittl atte ne dat th and { campiet, Sa. arainans. lose in fae Hewitt was also claiming the ciprocity, customs privileg

Trinidad until after his death and y.—)) have a serious case of house-

J » oad area were without their © ;
so i turn of the furniture or the ilar to those extended to United pane supply of water yesterday Station where he was charged
she carried the will to the peeeg breaking and larceny coming up ee ad it which was estimated Kingdom Trade Commissioners in J
tor about a month after the death,

against you.” SR 16/ Australia. morning when both s andposts in Chandler had 12 previoug con |
Mr. Cumberbatch then gave ar ewis sald that at times he was at £25

evidence as to his custody of the unable to check himself from tak-
will for sometime, ing up other people’s things,
Caveator Clarence Taylor, also
called Smith, then gave evidence,
He said that Martin Taylor was

his father, He himself was 56 and Judge Strikes Out

took him to the Bridge Police |

NOTICE

thet area were turned off. Water

victions for beggin alms fron |
was subsequently supplied by Being



tanks sent by the Waterworks People. Chandler told the couri

ee Department that he appealed so that he coulk

T ic Offences Reported e800 psin-vans, jors, Yee £08 money "T Navel Bad ty

ra. tc : : ind other recep acles had to form ‘"¢ 4m unable to work, andl
long queve and await their S@ld.



ry Bing from people,” Their H SHELBOURNE Elizabeth Bowen
Shale he I rov z , Bing from people, “heir onou sSERNARD SPILSBURY Browse and Tullett
i a . ° he payment of cus- the National Provincial) He ’ Si ; BING a i
Her explanation covering the Month For Larce wy ga pays A as ob or begat parts, went to Eton, then into the Mt. H. A. Vaughan and Mr. A WREN. A
} Owing to the Arrival of the “EMPRESS OF



, t ‘ere reporte exceeding the speed limit on . 7 came a Their Honours told Chandle pie " a : " sae
— . was ther WO motorists were reported ae a : ‘ y hanes A (aes arpaee a Decamy sient that apparently he was ill an SCOTLAND” on Thursday, 7th instant, we
Mary Taylor was not his mo : fond The Police ate continuing to place speed traps along] tient had to go as far as Dalkeith 2
He and his father used to live Damages Case pose |. This is done to ensure that motorists do} corner or Culloden Road was indifferently clad and the t-holiday
cn good terms and used to visit various roads of the island ~" Residents in the Ivy district were going to send him to a place will be CLOSING for our weekly Half-holiday
each other, “I know my father's In the Assistant Court ¢ — not break the speed limits 7 also suffered a similar inconve- faa fte See eee
handwriténg,” he said. yesterday Judge {, A. ia nt rience, ooked after. s ArT ay ¢ sad of Thursday.
Handwriting Recognised Peet nao s ruck out a case brought Many other people were reported for other traffic offences; three} mene on SATURDAY, 9th instead o
He said he recognised two docu- py plaintiff Enid Babb of Cocoanut for not parking close enough to the sitle of the road, one for not con-

ments before the court to be in his Walk, Christ Church, age PS forming with read signs, three for parking in restricted areas, one for
father’s handwriting, but the docu- fendant Lester D. Branch o 5 py — ne otor vehicle and leaving the engine running, one for
ment which Mary Taylor — thing, Christ Church, asking for quitting a ss , vehicle around a bend, one for wilfully.intertrupting
vas his will, was not in his hand- £50 damages ae parking a moto ' 7 ce ee J in
te riting Babb claimed that on Novem- 4, passage, one for failing to have a lighted lamp on a ponies Perr’ .
" Cross-examined by Mr, Cumber- per 28, 1951 she eutaintd injeries ind one for réfusitig to move a motor vehicle so as-to prevent
ms ° i accident. se a
batch, He eld Ties Cie “SSE ne wells te An Becident she defends traffic block
“w” of the documents he admit- juries were caused by ine eae
ted to be in his father’s handwrit- ee eK Every day reports come into the Traffic Branch at Central Police
ae St nied ad one eS “Re complaint was filed by St ation In some cases the offenders are warned, but dn others they
vibe ae in, See and Mary Tay- E. D. Rogers, Solicitor of James are charged and appear before Police Magistrates.

lor had been on good terms before Street, on behalf of Enid Babb "
ye 7]
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PAGE SIX





PUBLIC OFFICERS’ HOUSING
LOANS BILL PASSED
BY LEGISLATIVE COUNCIL

MEMBERS of the Legislative Council yesterday hailed
the Public Officers’ Housing Loans Bill as an “admirable”
and “long overdue” measure which would “do much good
for the Civil Servants, but issued a warning to Government

that they should make regulations which would protect
Government itself as well as the Civil Servants.

The Bill which was given
unanimous approval by the Coun-
cil, provides among other thing:
for establishment ef.-a Public
Officers’ Housing Board composed
of a Chairman and wot less than

two members, and the creation of «

a Public Officers’ Housing Fund
over which the Board will have
control and management, and from
which Civil Servants may be given
loans to acquire or construct
homes of their own.

A move by Hon. G. D. L. Pile
and supported by Hon. R. Chal-
lenor to make it binding on the
Governor-in-Bxecutive Committee
to make Regulations was defeated
by eleven votes to two, the Hon.
Mr. Wylie, Atterney General,
pointing out that it was inconceiv-
uble that Government weuld place
large sums of money in the hands
of the Board to be spent as the
Board likes without being con-
trolled by Government

Second Reading

Moving the. seeond reading of the
Bil, Hon. “Mr. R.~ No Turner,
Colonial Seerctary saitl he was
sure that the Bill which was to
set up machigery for the ogivance

of loans to: Public Officers to
construct houses would be gener-
ally welcomed,

Hon. Mri Turner expinived
that the BH had been under
consideration for a2 long tine,
but in the form which it came
before the Council it woula
seen that it was quite a nple
Bill, and he was sure that it
would mer long-fell heed.
The Barbados Civil Service As-
sociation for some yeurs had
been pressing Jor . legislation
along the siine lines, ang in the
event that the Bill was passed,
they would, he was sure, derive
considerable benefit from it,
since they would be abie §)
borrow money to build homes
which wenld be their

to the :



wn
ctual al

vide ndet rill, ir & event
i as paseed, that would a
r Pr for the ; > mA s,

b



snd it would be for the

legisla

1 eu pproy 4iose sums,
First. Contribution
\fter goitig briefly through the
rious clauses of the Bill, the

H the Celonial Secretary told
the Council that it was proposed,
in so far as the establishment of
the fund was concerned, to ‘in~
elude the figst contribution in the
forthcorning 1952-53 Estimates;

Speaking In support of the Bill,
Hon. H. A, Cuke said that he had
for many years advocated meas-
ures along the lines of the present
Bill, and said that the Civil Ser-
vants had always felt that some-
thing should be done to enable
them to acquire homes of their
own.

He however warned that Civil
Servants should not try to raise
money to purchase homes above
their means, and said that he was
‘heartily in favour of the Bill.











money, but it would help a man
icquiring a house.”

That was very dangerous be-
when one started building
one could not even get
n estimate, and even if one did
t an estimate, it often exceeded
the amount, and therefore one got
an entirely wrong conception of
what the house was going to cost.
it was possible that a man might
¢ brought in to give an estimate
without the slightest idea of what
was about,

ause

i house,

he



In moving the adjourn-
ment of the Legislative

Council yesterday evening
until Tuesday, 12 February,

at 3 pm. Hon, Mr. R. N.
Turner, Colonial Secretary,
told honourable members
thai His Excellency the Gov-
ernor proposed to receive the
Repiies to his Speech at the
opening of the Legislature at
3.30 pam, in the Legislative
Council Chamber, on that
date.

Since there were two Reso-
lutions with which he would
ask the Council to deal he
would suggest that they meet
at three o'clock mstead of the
usual hour of 2 p.m.

The Council accordingly
agreed to the adjournment as
suggested .by .the .Coloniai
Secretary.



Mir. Lvelyo warned tnat Govern-
vent, in making regulations, it
snould endeavour to protect itself
as well as the men.

Main Point

Hon. Mr. Cuke said that the
main point which the Government
should see to was that if the
period for repaying the loan was
20 years, the sum which such an
officer is called upon to pay should
be in keeping wiih his salary and
that ne could ailord to pay it.

He said there was no use if a
man charged with a debt over a
period of 20 years could not pos-
vibly mee* it, since it would be
putting that man in trouble, he
having first to meet other com-
mitments, pay his rent and then



the balance he could not live on.
Hon. Mr, Evelyn suggested that
Regulations should be made that
the amount which was loaned,
and which must be repaid over’a
period of years, must not go over
a certain percentage of the salary
of the particular officer,

Hon. Dr. A. S. Cato
seemed to him that the
point to be considered by
Board which was to be set up
was not so much the = actual
value of the house, but the officer's
capacity to repay over a_ period
of time.

said it
main
the

The granting of only a per-
centage as suggested by Hon.
Mr. Evelyn would place the
officer in the position of hav-
ing to find the remainder of
the money, and he therefore
felt that with an officer's
capacity to repay a loan over
a period of time, he should
be given the full value of the
house.

Unpopular Fund

There was another point, and
that was in respect to the princi-
ple generally of loaning money to
Civil Servants for building
houses. There was the Widows
and Orphans Fund which was
found to be very unpopular with
Civil Servants, He himself felt
that if Government found them-
selves in difficulties in raising
money for the houses of Civil
Servants, it should be the Widows
and Orphans Fund added to a
scheme of the nature envisaged
in the Bill.

Replying to the last point raised
by Hon, Dr. A. S. Cato, the Hon,
the Colonial Secretary said that
it had been proposed by the Civil
Service Association that certain
monies which came into the Trea-
sury under Section 15 of the Pen-
sions Act, 1925, should be used
for the purpose of the Fund for
Public Officer’s Housing, but as
Honourable members were aware,
an investigation was going on at
the moment by the United King-
dom Actuary into the Widows
and Orphans Pensions, but it was
felt that until such investigation
was completed, it would be un-
wise to appropriate such funds to
the scheme.

it might be appropriated, to
any fund hereafter to be formed
for the benefit of the Widows and
Orphans. However, as the law
now stood, it could not be appro-



BARBADOS ADVOCATE

priated to ang use, at any rate,
until the investigation was com-
pleted

General Revenue
that the fund for

Loan,

He

the

repeated
Housing



from the

formed by contributions
General Revenut in the usual
way, and it was proposed to enter
a sum under the 1952-53 Esti-
mates

As regards the other points

raised, Hon. Mr. Turner expiained
that the intention was that the
Bill should set out the general
principles, so that it would be on
the Statute Book, and the details
would be set out in the Regula-
tions made under Clause 9 of the
Bill and which would be placed
before the legislature in the
ordinary way.

He had made notes of the points
raised, and it was quite obvious
that the task of drawing up the
Regulations would not be an

easy one,

The Bill was then given its
second reading, and on being
dealt with in Committee, Hon.

Mr. Evelyn drew attention to what
he termed a “danger” in Clause
5 of the Bill. He pointed out
that under that section it seemed
that the whole purchase price of
a house was permissible, and
emphasised that only a certain
percentage of the amount required
should be granted,

Replying the Hon. the Attor-
ney General agreed that the
establishment of a Valuation
Board was necessary, but said it
was impossible to say what per-
centage chould be granted to an
officer, That, he said, seemed to
him entirely a question of policy,
since it might be necessary from
time to time to review the per-
centage granted to a_ particular
officer, according te the value o/
the house

No Debate

The other sections having been
passed without debate. Hon. G.
D. l& Pile sought to insert the
word “shall” for “may” in section
9 which says that the “Governor-
in-Executive Committee may
make regulations for giving effect
to the provisions of the Bill.

Hon, Mr. Pile said he did not
like the original wording of tne
clause, and said he preferred the
word shall. This suggestion was
supported by Hon. Mr. Challenor,
but the Hon. Mr. Wylie and Hon.
Mr. Cuke, thought it was incon-
ceivable that Government would
place large sums of money in
the hands of three men to be
spent as the Board liked.

A motion to give effect to Mr
Pile’s suggestion was defeated by
eleven votes to two, only Hon.
Mr, Pile and Hon. Mr. Challenor
voting in favour,

The remafning sub-sections in
the Clause were passed, and the
Bill read a third time ard passed
in its original form.



Pioneer Industries Bill Passed

AFTER a lengthy debate yesterday,

the House of

Assembly passed a Bill to amend the Pioneer Industries

(Encouragement) Act, 1951.

Some members said that the Bill was long overdue,
and Barbados had lost much because of the delay. Indus-
trialists who would have set up industries in Barbados,

they said, had set them up

in other West Indian islands,

but despite the lateness of the Bill it would still benefit
the island and relieve unemployment.

Other members felt there was
not much room for much optim.
ism because of the passing of the
Bill.









vide for consequential amend-
ments necessary in sections 2 and
9 of the Act,



















the Act had been in force,

Mr. M. E, Cox (L) who intro-
duced the Bill said that he was
sure Members had been looking
forward) for years to a Bill of
that sort which would embrace
every phase of Pioneer Industry
and encourage manufacturers to
come into Barbados and develop
industries taking into considera-
tion the fact that the door of emi-
gration was very slightly opened.

Mr. W. A. Crawford (C) lead
off the lengthy debate on the Bill.





a EEE OEE





in The Legislature Yesterday

COUNCIL
When the Legislative Council
met at Pm. yesterday, the

Henourabie the Colonial Secretary
laid the following documents: —

Statement of Gross Customs and
Itetse Reeeipts for six minth«
«ended %th September, 151.

Biatement of Gross Customs and
Excise Receipts for seven months
ended Met of October, 1951.

Statement of Gross Customs and
Excive Receipts for cight months
ended Mth November, 1951.

The Clerk offered an exeuse
for the absence of Hon, Mr. F. C.
Hutson.

H



G. DL Pile presented pe-
titiens from the Vestries of St.
John, St. James, St. George, St.
Thomas, Christ Church, 5t. Philip,
and St. Joseph to amend the Poor
Relief Acts to allow them to pay
more to their Clerks of the Boards
of Guardians

The Council concurred in the
following =

Resolution to approve of the
Book of Reference and Pians of the
proposed extension of the Water
Works in the Parish of St. Michael.

Resolution te appreve of the
Book of Reference and Plan of the
proposed extension of the Water
Works in the Parish of St,
Michael.







The Council passed the following
Bilis:—

Bill intituled an Act to Authorise
the Goevernor-in-Exeeutive .Com-
mittae to make advances to public
efMficers for the purposes of eon-
structing. altering, repairing, or
purchasing houses.

Bill intituled an Act to amend
the Bills of Exchange Act, 190%.

Bill intituled an Act te amend
the Customs Tariff Act 19%.

The Counetl poseponed a oll in-
tituled am Act to carry out the
Convention relating to Labour
Clauses in Public Contracts,

The Council was adjourned until
on Tuesday 1%h February at %

"HOUSE

When the House of Assembly
met yesterday. Dr. H,. G. Cum-
mins laid the following:—

Statement showing Gross Cus-
toms and Exeise Regeipts for six
months ended 6th September,
1951, Statement showing Gross
Customs and Excise Receipts for
seven months ended Sist October,
i951; Statement showing Gross
Customs and Excise Receipts for
eight months ended 30th Nevem-
ber, 1951;

The
siven:—
Resolution to place the sum of
$8070 at the disposal of the
Gevernor-in-Exeeutive Committee
Ah the Eetimates
Part I, Current, as shows
fn Supplementary Fativmates,
i91—, Ne, 4, which form the
Schedule to the Resolution.
Resolution to place the sum of

following notices were






$3500 at the isposal of the
Governor-in-Executive Committee
to supplement the Estimates

1951—S2, Part I, Capital, to sup-
plement the Estimates [51—j!,
No. 45, which form the Schedule
te the Resolution.

Bill intituled an Act for the
Establishment of a Revenue
Equalisation Fund.

This was later read « just time.

The House passed the following:

A resolution for $1405 for the
replacement of electrical installa
tons at Seawell Airport

A resolution to make it lawful
for the Governor in Executive
Committee to lease to the Vestry
of St. James a portion of tand
at Reid's Bay, in the parish of
St. Jismes and containing by
admeasurement 16.2 perches for
the purpose of erecting bathing
sheds.

A resolution to make it lawfal
for the Vestry of St. Jamen to
lease from the Governor-in-
Executive Committee, a portion of
land at Reid's Bay, situate in the
parish of St, James and containing
by admeasurement 16.2 perches for
the purpose of ‘erecting bathing
sheds.

A resolution to make it lawful
for the Governor-in-Rxecutive
Committee to lease to the Vestry
of St. Michael that parece! of land
forming part of Welches Tenantry
in St. Michael and containing by
admeasurement 158,504 square feet
for the purpose of establishing a
playing field.

A Bill to amend the Pioneer
Act,



Industries
1951.

An address in connection with
the King's visit to Seuth Africa,
# place where there is racial
p@gregation, for his health.

An address in connection with
British

(Encouragement)

the dfimissal from the
Legation in Panama of the British
West Indian Specialist.

An address in reply
Governor's Message No.
dated January 7, relating to the
annual revenue required to finance
the Imperial College of Tropical
Agriculture.

The House adjourned to Tuesday
next at 3.00 p.m.

to the

1/1952



Consideration of Labour
Clauses Bill Postponed

THE LEGISLATIVE COUNCIL yesterday postponed

consideration of the second

Secretary and the Hon. the Attorney General might go
into the Bill, and provide them with further information
regarding any hardships which might be suffered by per-
sons employed by persons to whom public contracts were

awarded.

The Bill, which gives effect to
a Convention passed by a confer-
ence of the International Lab-
our Organisation in June 1949,
and which was later ratified by
the United Kingdom Govern-
ment, provides that persons to
whom public contracts are award-
ed shall pay rates of wages and
observe hours and conditions of
labour not. less favourable than
those established in the trade
or industry in the district where
the work is being carried out.

The Bill provides further that
the original contractor may not
sub-let without the approval of
the competent authority, which
is the Labour Commissioner, ana
that such contractor shall keep
books. showing the rates of wages
and hours of labour of the vari-
cus classes of workmen employed
by him, whether any wages in
respect* of the said work and la-
bour remains in arrears, and








for the various parochial bodies.
Those boss carpenters and masons
were very long at their trades,
and were very good workmen in-
deed. They did not keep big
establishments, and had no clerk
or book-keeper, and _ therefore
would not be able to carry out
the. regulations.
Difficulty

It would give them great diffi-
culty, and they would not be able
to tender for the work which they
now do; that would put many
people out of work, and the con-
tractors would have to go into a
lot of paraphernalia before they
could go into the Treasury for
their money.

Strongest criticism came from
Hon. Mr. Robert Ghallenor who
dubbed the Bill as a “farce”, and
said it was going to upset a large
number of poor people. It was a
waste of time, and paper, Mr.
Challenor said, and he hoped that





reading of the Labour Clauses
{Public Contracts) Bill in order that the Hon. the Colonial





WEDNESDAY, FEBRUARY 6, 1952





cud WIN with

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your handkerchief by day or from your pillow
at night or use the
VAPEXK INHALER
-— handy for daytime
Easily recharged from
standard bottle.

On Sale at KNIGHT'S
DRUG STORES



Made in England by THOMAS KERFOOT & CO. LTD.







For Years We Have Been Striving for
LEGISLATION TO COMBAT THE
STRAY DOG PROBLEM

Please Join the
BARBADOS S.P.C.A.
NOW

and help us to improve conditions for all animals.

Particulars from : The Hon, Secretary. Telephone 3077



















There was one thing which they Peéporence w i 4. se § ide He prefaced his*remarks by say- that all the labour conditions in His Excellency the Governor RS
had to watch, and ther was, us had nana ee the ee ae Se sites ee Gosh apres che ing that there was no use crying the contract are complied with, @ On Pree 7
been the experience in other colo- t rence in Puerto Bice shortl at subsequent to the introduction in- over spilt milk or bemoaning the before he can file his claim for > PPDOOD +S D9 VOVDYDO VOY
nies, a man living in a house and \ nich the question of inatateinn to the House of Assembly on the possible industries they had lost payment. ‘
ent to aceite his cma he wentes WOuld be discussed. Members said Oth nly. Guia ah wean wine, ae To ee Fy ' criti-
something very much bigger. He Siast EeSeraae as TE eS 1949, commenced pioneer indus- ‘The least we can do today,” he cism on the Bill when he point- 5
thought therefore that they should [Ty dies tries, This Bill did not pass the gaid, “is to grant the same assisi- ed out that the requirements of
scrutinize aby ‘regulations Mace, "the ‘Objocté and Reasons of the Hediste before, the prorogation. ‘nce to thore courageous. penple the Bll, when applied 10, con: S a treasure
> i tt “a establis i es betore m
this bill ks t d th commented projects. to set up ee thea he POGUE. "Industries ment bodies, would work great
Bill Overdue aes = : ° smn © pioneer industries. which projects (Encouragement) Bill. enacted hardship on the small contract or
ste Ueuahc sei ‘wan. 1 "io es o h follontee continued after the bill lapsed, (Pncoursertie'’) om thereby to © Whom local government bodies e
. _ + ’ ’ ‘| © . f r *
overdue and he had the oreakea Neate” ae ee oe? eae has i? by Sage aay ie aahne concession which i arded a orgy? nig gen
pleasure in supporting? it. “Hé © Clause 3 seeks to : d a L ci set sed it it sible the existing Act allows for those Dae bites ee ei bere or the mos'
further thought ft was a good. Jin, eee re, SLOG ginal project and it 3k poss ‘yho have established industries pat ss carpenters and masons, ee
heasure whick wah tic Ya, —_ 4 of the Act so as to en- on bac cnotecs, ee ee th CST Wacaria JAW." and therefore did not have the
eo eee «ble a person who has already of his project, i e more sinc e aporers ' facilities for keeping such ac-
o en 4 oe Servants tablished a factory but wishes difficult to establish now that the Those of them who had fought counts ag were required under the
Was wh adnHeabio” tuitl the Dil ts extend it, to be declared a industry concerned is a pioneer in- in that House and elsewhere for provisions of the Bill.
ce rot ene ar a ame amare eee, SUT, aa Cen tan, eet tena et he «ch ee et ame CELE
. Be oriate cases, As the secti tands also lost all subseque sort on the Statu oks odly throw e small con!
whether therg-was to be a Waluen rt present, only a uncon wae, ‘is under the Act. Clause 5 seeks to coloty in spite of very strenuous Del of work, and consequently af- A le e E L E C T RI C
tion Board which would say what Casirous of establishing a pioneer remedy this position by providing jyposition, welcomed any attempt fect the men whom he employed,
proportion of the amount required’ factory can be so declared. It was that, where the circumstances be- 1 pring that legislation in line and in addition the work, having
elt pe tee of the house ),5t intended to exclude from the fore ey eta liecnene ot wee 2 with similar legislation in other to be given to the big contractors,
# io ae a vovisions of the Act persons who project, wou a ® Caribbean colonies, would cost more in view of their
Not only will men build houses | 44 established a factory prior to declaration that the industry was Cc Mr. Craatert then dealt. with’ hating 40 keep books an@ aceounts:
Nant them, hie Evel warned, (.-bassing of the Act and the pro- a pioneer industiy ane titese de. the question of publishing to Hon. V. C. Gale agreed with the
eat ne aioe Cite hana sed amendment will remedy this I worse WaT Ge eke aon places where there were capital- criticism made by Hon. Mr, Ma
@niriv easily - vi state of affulrs of enabling such* claraions ai the full benefit ivts, the circumstance of Barbe» hon, and warned that a lot of the
dairly easily you will find peopl) ; ersons to have the benefit of the the person obtain the full pencil ts on introduced the Pion- small contractors all over _ the
demanding Unreasonable prices Act in the case of alterations etc, of the Act in respect of his Peewee nce Tradustries Bill. He said he aid island would be adversely affect-
HME Neara vould ox Ngeteehegt a eee Oeics, tatane tae ly Ba, eg on y cid sot et tee ore (
oy aluation Board would not jlacements) to existing businesses. tax a ’ . q hardshi th ho did work
only help Government from io:me 3. Clauses 2 and 4 seek to pro- would not have been payable if @ On Fare abi che Notions }
errs as TE r at
‘ 3 te
GEORGE SAHELY & CO., (dos) Ltd. i
doscclen vee either vetadedtss ARE: s nse Bip wea ere ake NE Lae ea _ - . t =
Crepe Back SATIN Old Rose LINEN 4 é
ee x WE AGAIN OFFER @ M114 — Now @ $1.60 i
@ $1.67.-- Now @ $1.50 nition ith
Te 4 FI amend “wl aa YOU Flowered SILK p
owere SPUN @ $1.80 & 2 ite
@ 8c. & 91. a \ x ‘mY | Now @ $1.50 *
@ Me. & $112 — Now | SIWEEPING | *“®
@ 80c, & $1.00 | —~SRoRGETTE__
Peers : GEORGETTE
REDUCTIONS | 4 8 Now @ %
f LE }
ao . SILK
@ 7c. Now @ 60e. ON THE FOLLOWING | @ $1.16 — Now @ $1.00
Pink: SHARKSKIN LINE per een nr ae
an ° Flowered SATIN The refrigerating unit of the G.E.C. refrigerator is so
@ $1.0%.- Now -@ $1.44 ‘\ @ 88c, — Now @ 78e. }
TAFFETTA =e } . finely made that it is hermetically sealed after manufacture
u y ~ an. ——————— :
@ $1 ay Sa an . B. SPECIAL LADIES’ SHOES The flowing beauty of crepe and never needs servicing. This refrigerator will stand up to
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Ladies’ GARARDINE | ‘ ,
h € SATURDAY 9th | Sts — Now @ $4.00 than in Ferguson's luxurious rayons
@ $1.34 — Nor $1.20 | FRIDAY 8&t A th | 4.51 — Now , Bs : ici a ae , + >
1 ¥ cs acl at nul in ariot of lovely colours ome de " NEW STOCKS REC, ENTLY
ores! BELTS OF BORDERED PRINTS | __ 724 — Now @ sozz ft | ARRIVED
\LiL KENDS y ; Those at - - { é
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i2c. Rte. & 3he. enc i Etc., Ete., ) Ete. ' ron cacanena oe ence ee a —~
\ PAYS TO ECONOMIZE!! SO DON’T FORGET !! SHOP AT } sh. Rasa dk THE CITY GARAGE TRADING CO. LTD.
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Represen \. S. Bryden & Sons (f ys) Lid O. Rox 403, Bridgetown,
, i







WEDNESDAY, FEBRUARY 6, 1952 BARBADOS ADVOCATI PAGE SEVEN

* *
MADE BY THE MONKS OF BUCKFAST ABBEY





$1,405 Passed For |













Land At Reid’s Bay To Be Leased









Replacements _

The House of Assembly at their

At Seawell |
}




e i caraetialaai i oa
beaches for the benefit of the ° i" meeting yesterday passed @ reso- |
Bathing Sheds public. Installation , Land To Be Leased inten tor Sia0s tor the replace-
€ Mr. Allder (1) was wondering , 5 ‘ 6 ment of cer.ain electrical instal-
whether Hon, Members were Of Pi For I laying Field tavions at Seawell Airport.
eC e realising that the setting up of es “é 2 ene
oO e r et bathing Sheds was qunag p The House of Assembly yester- took charge of the ene Sere
quite different from the setting A d day } sd q resolution author- that it was necessary o have
THE HOUSE OF ASSEMBLY yesterday passed a reso- © UP ©f playing fields in the vari- pprove ising, the Government-in-Execu- immediately, the replacement. of
; : To . x ous parishes. tive Committee to lease to the “e & OMIT Me Jand-
lution making it lawful for the Vestry of St. James to lease Tt was true, he said; that play- The installation of three stand- Ves of St, Micha, 158,504 198 apron at Seawell, as it was
from the Governor-in-Executive Committee, a portion of ing fields were paid for out of pipes and fire~hydrants at the Bay sq feet of land at Welches found that the runway up there
land at Bay containing 16.2 perches for the purpose the Labour Welfare Fund, but Housing Scheme and six others at ‘Ten. St. Michael, for the Was not all that was required,
: a Caeser . that shovld not prevent the the Pine Housing Area was yeS- purpo-. of establishing a playing It had been discovered that the
' of €x ing sheds. vestries from having their baths terday approved by the Legisla- juid. & a play exis.ing ground system did not “ain,
4 Dr. BH. OG. & mins (L) intro- just as good, if rfot better than and bathing sheds set up in the tive Council when that body con- Mr. Allder (1) said that now give , Ooo Sremecwas aaning : z
‘duced the resolution. He said that that in St. James. So far there parishes. The playing fields were CUtTed in two separate Resolu- 4). Cjyvernment was spending acu being Talelled the Gave Ua
Gts purpose was to sive the Vestry were only two parishes which paid for out of the Labour wel- tions giving effect to the ey of money in the Carrington Village pe Sant Hlectrial eu acho Kad
wor St. Jawres pow hich it did were not bordered by the sea, fare Fund while the other was Reference and plans submitted in 210. °°). hoped that they would Sha" wow ROSS OE
ot at present pi t. nter therefore the other eight exclud- the responsibility of the Sanitary ‘spect of the extension. take the opportunity to repair Visited'the scene and made certain
to a lease with the | “or- ing St. James, should have inter- Commissioners of the parishes In regard to the Bay Housing |}, The tenantry, he said, TCC PMmendations which. repul.ed if you fecl worn out, depressed, or
ase 3 n base ur i 18 vt. é Ss, § / . Pp . Sch th . t lay a roa 1 enantry, he said, in the resolution before the House. , .
-Executive : Committ: the est in the matter. He said that he wanted to com- a agua dit —— - Oo Jay , was 0 r than many of the mem- Tie matter was a very urgent i d |
urpose of acquiring a u of Mr, E. K. Walcott (E) told the mend the parishes which started eoties the coming aceic teh ee bers the House and it w@s one ang he therefore moved that generally run down a glass or two
ae nt Reid Bay 1 recting House that Mr. Wilkinson as a to provide those social amenities Water Works Department in Bec. time that got proper roads it be passed. a day of Buckfast Tonic Wine will

He said he believed it \







member of the House, in and out,

for the people and he was of the

kles Road along and under the

Mr. Bryan (L) said that he was





Mr. F. C, Goddard (EB) said that







i ‘ is some had advocated something which opinion that the Government ,.~ eme’ . Siac to see that something was they had to pass the resolu.ion. quickly restore lost energy and
me in 1950 that a general au- he would like to advocate, It was should use its power and call on =A vate ook eee ore none being done in connection with He however told the House that .
ooaree, eve Rost i he “Sover= in connection with Sandy Lane the cther parishes which have done 4¢ 499 yards and fix thereon three the Welches Playing Field. A lot as a result of a conversation he tone up the whole nervous system.
or-in-Executive ‘omr 2e tie alan 2 echesed me gz ic se é a5 aths . ror , t » . > g nMactricis » dise
ase land to ‘the Vaatry of st. wee vr ao soe tic ro i ¥ saataek — standpipes and fire hydrants. The ae at eae med o a ee Wiel be: electric ian, he dis Giving new vitality it fortifies you
Michael. In 15 Y Of St. by the Government as a public and other vocial amenities cost of this work is estimated av thé uunds inte proper shape. covered that the resolution would
Re emisens | eo oe Act park and bathing site. It was a Special Rate $3,400. he ited to ask the Hon. Junior be coming before the House, bu against fever and exhaustion and
which gave eran inci l a natural beauty spot and shoud He said that 9 special rate of — The other extension in the Pine ‘lember for St. Thomas if he did not know that it was coming
, > « se and

or cer.ain purposes, There was

preserved for the people.



axation could be laid

on the par-



Estate Housing Scheme will pro-



could give any information about

that day.





remember, Buckfast Tonic Wine



. ne + He said that it would not in- ishioners wh» would be enjoying vide 460 yards of four-inch dia- ‘e Friendship Playing Field. Groundings Faulty
0 er r s ar a 7 7 . s , . ; ; ** ‘ > . b
pare. an capine . sisaieey fringe on any person’s rights be- the 2menitics in order to cover meter cast iron pipe on which will Mr. Mapp (L) said that many He said that it was apparent A is especially valuable
ere was now specifi - aisth: rity Cause there was room on‘the left. the expenses and i: the burden be fixed six standpipes and fire of the country areas were getting that the groundings for the the i after ttines's
enable the Stevaeriicky eemet They had undoubtedly got a most were great, the Government hydrants at a cost of approxi- their playing fields but St. planes when they were receiving ay aay a Td i .
tive Committee to lease this desirable pienie spot within easy could then siep in. He was sug- mately $3,800. Thomas was getting none, The fuel were fauliy. They were put = AST TONIS re
mnmiitee +0 lease. this. par~ ac i y 1 jrew ngt henever Gov > Labour Welfare Fund was in ex hi ‘ . sink kee
: cular piece of land to the Vestry reach of Bridgetown. He drew ting that whenever Government . e Fu down when the new apron was —
i St. James. He therefore movea ‘at, to the attention of Govern- was coing to acquire any land. istence sincé 1947 and still nO being erected and apparently
e passing of the resolution. — ment and hoped that they would that land should be of sufficient playing field was established in placed into the concrete, but not

hi te

on

Resolution In Order
Mr. C. E. Talma (L) said that
Bp. Teearded a resolution such as
one before .he House as being
Much in order and added that the
rpose for which it would be
rving was very essential.

He reminded the introducer of
the resolution that not only the
one in St. James should be

commodated or granted priority

far as sea bathing facilities

Te concerned, but those in other

rishes, particularly Christ

urch with its bathing facilities.
addition to being one of the
ief resorts in the island it had
een handed and _ accepted
Bouquets from visitors from all
rts of the world

He thought that Christ Church

t and foremost, should have

nm granted priority in a matter

this nature. He hoped that in

e not too distant future—and

‘hat he meant weeks and not
Months or years—that the _Gov-
@fnor-in-Executive Committee, if

y did not happen to own land

Christ Church, would at least

keep it before their mind.

Money Resolutions

Now that the Government was
in the happy position of being
able to bring down money reso-
lutions without opposition, this
would be an opportunity which
should not be missed again other-
wise they woulda find some
wealthy person erecting build-
ings on this last remaining beauty
spot which if Government then
made up its mind to purchase,
would have to pay many times
the value for which they could
obtain it to-day.

Mr, E, D. Mottley (E) support-
ed the passing of the resolution.
Referring to the land at Sandy
Lane, he said that he understood
that some of it had been sold
already.. Here in Barbados, apart
from Queen’s Park and in later
years King George Fifth Memo-
rial Park, there were no other
amusement centres.

He advocated that not only
Sandy Lane woods, but the entire
54 acres should be bought for the
benefit of the people to go on

size to accommodate large sections
of the community.

Mr. Cox (L) replying to the
Hon. Junior Member for Christ
Church, said that the Hon. Member
knew that 10/- per ton was allo-
cated to the Labour Welfare Fund
for the purpose of providing social
amenities for those who work in
the sugar industry.

That money was not only for the
purpose of establishing playing
fields and bathing cubicles, ha
said, but for repairing houses.
The fund has been going en for
over two years and advances had
been made to only about 2,000
people.

Mr, Lewis (L)
onus was on the v
for the sites and get their alloca-
tions for such necessary social
amenities. But he was surprised
to learn that the money was com-
ing out of the Labour Welfare
Fund, He was maintaining that
as long as the money was coming
out of the Labour Welfare Fund,
some mention should be made of
it in the resolution. The time
would come when somebody would

said that the
tries to search



Two Detained
in Hospital

Sixty-five-year-old Maude
Griffith of Palmers Land, St.
Philip, was struck by a motor car
after it had overturned on Col-
lege Bottom last night.

She was taken to the General
Hospital where she was treated
and detained, for injuries to both
her feet. At the time of the ac-
cident, the car was being driven
by Mr. West of Hothersal, St. John,

e * *

Norman King, a
Powder Road, Station Hill, feil
from a ‘bus while on his way
home on Monday, and struck his
head.

King remained
the remainder of that day, but
after experiencing nose-bleed,
went to the General Hospital yes-
terday evening, and was detained
for treatment.

barber of

home during



Consideration

St. Thomas
No Priority

Mr. Talma (L) said that playing
fields should not be given prior-
ity. The Government should pay
attention to first things first. They
should give priority to the setting
up of baths and latrines island
wide.

Mr. Smith
many playing
couraging idlers
Government could

(L) said that too
fields were en-
He felt that the
stop thinking



about playing fields for the time®from the equipment

being and allocate the money to
housing.

Mr. Mottley said that he
wanted to assure the Hon Ju-
nioy Member for St. Michael that
the St. Michael’s Vestry was
clways eager to do something

In 1949, he said, the Vestry
sought the advice of people out-
side—people- like schoolmasters
and teachers—to make recom-
mendations of suitable sites for
playing fields. After some 16 or
18 people had worked in the in-
terest of the people at the Vestry's
request who was the Social Wel-

(E)

far enough into the ground.

Many of the groundings were
now not making contact and for
that reason, the whole system
had to be condemned. Had. they
been properly inspected at the
beginning, they would not be
faced with the resolution which
was before them.

As he understood it, when the
planes were being ré€fuelled, they
had to have electrical equipment
grounded otherwise there waild
be the likelihood of some spark
igniting the
gases of the fuel which would
even iually set the plane in flames

He said that the groundings
should be connected one to the
other so that even if one was not
making proper contact with the
ear h, the others would still be
able to do their work, ,

The resolution was then passed,

Eczemalich
Killed in 7 Minutes

picnics’ and other forms of out- fo.) that the money was spent ‘ fare Officer to say that the piece pha f niftiton tiny
Bprchase Sone under the Compul- door amusement. from the treasury and not the Of Labour of land was too small? he asked. i fe !
Powers Act whereby bath- One saw dozens of buses com- The Government should not allow '

ry
Se sheds could be erected for the
Use ef the public.
_He welcomed the _ resolution
@md hoped that many such more
ld come down frequently as
@y would mee’ with the gen-
e 1 approval of the House.

Government Thanked
Mr. E. St. A. Holder (1) UWank-
i the Government for the kind
avour of allowing St, James to
have this opportunity for erecting

ing from all over the island with
people who had to go and ask
permission to cross people’s land
to get to the beaches. Because
other people could afford to pur-
chase such places at high prices,
it was a crying shame that they
should sit there and allow every
spot to be taken up.

Permission Asked

Further down at Heywoods, he

Labour Welfare Fund. The reso-

lution. was then passed.

Pioneer Industries
Bill Passed

From Page 6.
not think that sufficient effort
was being made to advertise the
provisions of the Bill abroad.
He said that when Puerto Rico,

@ From Page 6
would take note of what was said
before he gave his assent to it,

Hon. Mr. Challenor continuing
his trenchant criticism, said “it is
a most unsuitable Bill, and it will
be like many others which are
honoured in the breach.”

After the Hon. the Colcnial
Secretary had explained the origin
of the Bill, and the ratification of
the Convention by His Majesty's



one person to turn them around
There would be always trouble
with playing flelds as long as the
Government refuse to remove the
Social Welfare Officer from hav-
ing anything to do with them. The
resolution was then passed.

eee eeeeancenanaeatcettaistasiaeeae
poned in order that further in-

formation might be obtained on
the benefits to be derived from the







inhe forall
temnporar

kill the germ couse
’ Nixoderm, kill
nutes and te guar
“ vit lear
in one weels, or tienes
of empty package
Nixodarin (rom vour

Kixogerm © : ; '

Pur Skin Troubles vahiv





hen













T
_ CRPOOOOEOD?





KE HOME

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@ REFRIGERATOR ICE CUBES
@ REFRIGERATOR JARS
@ EGG TRAYS and CUPS
COASTERS
@ NAPKIN HOLDERS
@ TOWEL RAILS
@ CANNISTER SETS



BUCKFAST
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A BOTTLE TODAY
LELELLPOLOOLE ALA

Something New!





(Flour, Sugar, Tea, Etc.)
@ TUMBLERS

(in all sizes for the




; ie ie eras Tei nics : r - Bill, and the hardships suffered 9 Septet me eae eo Kids and Adults)
vo 18 said that people again had to ask Jamaica, and Trinidad had intro- Government, Hon, Mr, Gale mov- Bill, a Ll
dl gets ad pe however permission to be able to use those duced such a Bill, they wisely ed, conceter by - go a by Erie and ftutber 2 @ TRAYS
Pn d Say like the honour- woods whenever they went on a advertised it in Canada, the, onial Secretary w oe ee a Se ee A RE ts. nesend, wemde ur 0 .
able senior member for Christ pienic, He felt that the time had United Kingdom and the United’ ed with the Hon. the ee Ee ne aoct a to suffer %
Church 4hat his parish snuuld come for the Government to say States in order to attract indus- General, that the Bill be post- ing was po:tponed. salt eling kan vorerins thame Ps x
have priority. He reminded the that while they did not intend to trialists. The Governor of Trini- — since the discovery of Mytex (formerly ,
i honourable member that St. rob anyone of his land, yet they dad had even sent an Economic | Rae ee enero e a ser oats pote ;
» games was the place where the felt that the majority of the Adviser at the Head of a small| the pain but also takes out the awell- % .
st settlers landed. .All the other people should have it. delegation overseas to publics | ing, stops bleeding and combats nerve |
at arishes had priority and St. He was of the opinion that the the provision of the legislation s irritation theveby curbing other trou~ | 55 &
} . stri alia bles caused vy Piles such as Headache, | gS e °
3 ames had been left behind, but time had come for the members and explain re. nae au Nervousness, Backache, Constipation %
ey were now coming out. of the Government to cease being concessions which were afforded, los of enorgy, debility, and Irritable | ¥ dabidetbiiet *
’ He did not think the honour- small-mindeq and if something * addition to oy IR pienso Gramcte’ \naay’ ‘under the’ positive % (THE HOUSE FOR BARGAINS)
able member had an reason Was suggested by the slightest advertising space had been taken 4, : ' , so Mytex muat atop your pile | 5s : ,
to be. jeaaaas, “The take was opponent, they should see it im- in leading journals in various cause you like ‘em Sof fainn aad troubles or money back on 14s No, 16, Swan Street ’Phone 2109, 4406, or 3534 &
+ purchased very many years ago plemented. countries in order that the great- return of empty package %
4 . . ea ee wy ying ‘ Ss blicity should be given to 44,4,4666604 44 CALLAO LILO
and nothing “had been done. Dr. Cummins, replying, said est pu i ; PEALE SEPP PALL LLLP LLLP AD
* There brs no Sathing shade that he wanted to remind Hon, the provisions of the Bill and ihe @ Toasted fresh and sweet ~
no latrines nor playing fields Members on his extreme left that euen he ee ere aianeana i on eee Kellog; font
‘ =,’ the present Government was a ‘hat from those steps | AG, Flakes e
therefore the people in St. Croisier ads tae and ie vercitsii Jamaica and Puerto Rico ‘had > ast as we ma ont
7; a — er eg grate- implement any measure that benefited foain
ul for thi: rtunity . ea ness.
: He Rowe Fg er ah ike good sought after the good and welfare Competition
of the community, more bathing °f,the People. He said that as an additional
shade would be erected oa te He said that a bilk to amend measure to encouraging new
* coast of St Jamie so that sah the Vestries Act was passed in ‘ndustries, they should not be MOTHE

people from the city and other

pr ; er to maintain playing flelds and ness by foreign competition. In wee
parishes came to the parish, other things for public recreation. saying that, he was referring
they would not be congested They (the Hon. Members) would especially to the fact that Japan

at one centre.
_ Mr. W. A. Crawford (C) said
gt the resolution sought to give
e Governor-in-Executive Com-
Mittee the necessary authority to
ase a portion of land at Reid’s
ay to the Vestry of St. Jaines.
e wanted to know if it was the
overnor - in-Executive Commit-
fee or the Vestry who had moved
in this riatter

Free Access
If the land was to be leased
ff the Vestry he would also like
© know if the public would have
free access to the sheds or if they
Would have to pay rent as the
Matter appeared to be breaking

New ground, ,
He felt that full details should
be given the House so. that if

1948 giving the Vestries the pow-

see therefore that the Govern-
ment was willing to do its part.
The Vestries should go ahead and
select those things, he said, and
the Government would do its best
to implement them.

Dr. Cummins said that they all
felt that Vestries would soon be
abolished, but they would still
have a local form of Government
which could go ahead and make
recommendations of the nature to
Government.

Labour Fund

Mr. Goddard (E) said that he
wanted to remind the Hon. Jn.
Member for St. Thomas that the
money was being spent out of the
Labour Welfare Fund, In Christ
Church, they had money allocated
to them from the fund that would
give them two playing fields. One

allowed to be driven out of busi-

was then seeking to get back
into the West Indian market.
Providing that the locally manu-
factured materials were of the
same quality and price, then
there was every reason for pro-
tecting the local industry,

Mr. Crawford said that only
last week the Japanese Trade
Commissioner visited Trinidad,
and he had no doubt he would
soon be coming to Barbados,

He said he had _ repeatedly
suggested to the Government that
they should take some steps to
find out what new industries
might prove economical to Bar-
bados and Government might
well consider the question of
embarking on such a scheme, if
only for the simple reason that
the profits would remain in the
state and should be used for



Can your family
‘say this?

“We SLEEP well -
LOOK well -
and FEEL well /”









other Vestries were granted the was finished but the Christ expanding social services,
me facilities they would be able Church Vestry was wondering Mr. J. C. Mottley (C) sup-
appreciate the position. whether to spend the remaining ported Mr. Crawford’s suggestions
He hoped that the Government part of the allocation on the pro- and said that Pioneer Industries
Would take action in other par- posed other playing field or Would be of great help in reliev-
fshes in which the bathing was whether to spend it on bathing ,ing the widespread unemploy-
A @ On Page 8 ‘ATURAL, restful sleep is the high

N road to radiant healch and fitness. .
and countless thousands of m.n, women
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If you have reason to believe that your
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an

Pains in Back
| Nervous, Rheumatic:

Wrong foods and drinks, worry,
overwork and frequent colds often put
a strain on the Kidneys and Kidney
and Bladder Troubles are the true



5 e cause of Excess Acidity, Getting Up for it is prepared from Natures best
° Nights. Burning Passages, Li .
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kles, Rheumatism, Puffy Eyelids, and
f old re your time Help your
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tex. The very first dose starts helping
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ta ‘an reach. | a LEEPEEELOEL SLES, a a . Pitas.
i Ht) 5s : A. a 1% , ¢ Pee Meee ete conveniently and at the cheapest first class fare.
} ; Hi HI | | ‘Herpic’ is safe to use in ~~ '\% ¢ TO-DAY'S NEWS FLASH ° ; 4e
: | all lavatories, including ,) ot {3 Quality has made e 1 flight ‘’t desitnaté li a
1 Wn : . * MONOPOLY CHINESE CHEC- cwevera ig Sa wee your es 0
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4gen A. 5S. BRY i 1 -
& | PLPC FP > POSS O





PAGE FIGHT BARBADOS ADVOCATE WEDNESDAY, FEBRUARY 6, 1952
SSeS,

CLASSIFIED ADS, PUmte sates | EpucamienaL, | NOTICE CHR H0Tick | PERSONAL













































































suayeaiasincee:tatiptehiotimreiciciteigei ti initia
TELEPHONE 2508. REAL ESTATE | HARRISON COLLEGE | It is notified for general infor-{ ‘ne public are hereby warned agains
ei) e | ——$ TS | ; y wite SYBSL HARD
| AIRY COT—Brighton, St. Michael, all FOUNDATION SCHOLARSHIP — | PARISH OF ST. ANDREW _ — one Coane. wane ee ee te me nie SEEN. RARD.
For Births, Marriage or Engagement! FOR SALE jâ„¢modern. conveniences, house contains) At ieast one vacancy will be available GENERAL ELECTION 1951 : - i@ Buildings yard) nivecif responsible fer her or anyone
announ ts in Carib Calling the! c . | Open and Closed Verandahs, Drawing and | for a Foundation Scholar at Marrison In aceordanee. with, the. Representation: of the People Act, 1951,| Will be closed for repaigs from | tise contrasting any debt or debts in im:
charge 0 for ang number of words | Dining Rooms, 2 Bedrooms, Bath, Toilet | couage tember, 1852. Pp . * | WEDNESDAY, order =
j . exe in. Sep : ; : Ss , the 6th of Febru- unless by a written order signed
tap 90 80 and. 4 cents Gall tenet dee ona ito ——————————-_ | and Kitchen, Garage and Servant’s Room | An Examination will be held at the | Section 43, Para. 7% I hereby publish the following Summary of ary, 1952, until further notice by ma.
tional word. Terr cash, P' in va Standimg on over 17, > . z , * iy
Givin an enka ook ae AUTOMOTIVE | ana all enclosed with barbed ‘wie fence. | once! “porn of application can te {Election Expenditure, and also give notice that the Returns (Form|” 4) vehiculap traffie must enter a aaceiaab a al
Natices only after 4 p.m CAR; 107 Standanl © tap. Apply: | Saity catens' dumtert Liana ae obtained at the Headmaster's Offtce, Har-| No, 14) and thein supporting documents can be inspected at my office,}and leave the yard by the north- Fairfield Land
DIED G. Gill, Burton & @o., §.2.52—39¢ p.m, Purther pertioulars. Dial 2640 | Ucn. Wines Bicth as Buptiomel Costin. / at Turnerhall, St. An@rew, on Mondays between the hours of 3 p.m.|ern gate during thie \ { Se.
: CAR—One Deluxe Ford Car 1944 3.2/5 40. | cate on ar before the 29th of February,|and 5 p.m. during the month, of February, 1942. .2.52—2n. '5.9.59-2n
———— . é ; ee
s ) rer | mode wine yen, y s abe 1962 MRS. . BOURN
a a neat anh E “eitbean. Suse ie ee Seen : ls ved eee on Ament De-/ “Candidates must be 5.2.52 mw - BE % : POPC OOPT FOSS.
Se ie 3 will take Se 62.8230 1 ene Memnae a = me (1) The children of parishioners of Petty Expenses .. “E i 3 $ 2.75 ‘ah S -
t 4.45 this evening at the West: | ———--_-—-_eeeesneneeee— venture @ 8% 7 as eden een Te Printing i 3 2 ne 32.70 AGRICULTURE FORKS
Cemetery where friends are asked pan =. bers . HP. 1947 3 2100 Barbados Government De-| g0 6 os 412 Advertisi 2.10 “
d Saloon, excellent condition, mew tyres. bent 84% . . be oe oe o- . ‘ :
ian Bascom 02,8210. | recentiy, painted, | Offers So. Dpnald | 291 ree Pee wetnany As inclusive on the Sist of March fae etiets Mating | 2.40 You had better buy a . you do not wish
a hill until 4 p.m, and 3878 a: 441 shares Barbados Pire Insurance any i i x
BENSKIN—On February 5, 1952, at her|4 p.m $.2.58-t.t.n.| 45) shares BS, # T. Co, Ltd They can be members of Harrison Col- Canvassing 3 2 és a 100,00 Suppli y immediately . x4
residence Beckles Road, St. Michacl, | eeeeeeeeeeeneceeneeeatineen 40) shores W.1 ua lege or of other Schools. Members of 00 ppliers are now quoting two years delivery
Mrs. Elien Moore Benskin, late] CITROENS—New Citroens im stock,| 45, shares Gasbades Telephone Co, Harrison College should state this clear- Clerks and Messengers .. ae vy 45. .
Sor, hehinauthases turns | pie, sg, sony Baradon, gagins| © “MES preteen! a tl re cacca, Postage and Miseeliameous =, =. 128.00 CENTRAL EMPORIUM N
Age 91, Her funeral leaves the above | telephone 4908, 1.2.52--On. 33| shares Barbados Ice Co. oo 5
Fesidence Gt 4 PAM, £Or St PRUs | TTT The above mentioned shares will be : .
Church and then to. the Westbury C¥TROEN—One second hand Citroen | set up for sale at Public Auction on Gennes ¥ $312.95 Cnr. Broad & Tudor Streets
Cemetery. . done under 5, miles, apply Barbados | Friday the ath eR, SET intone mei ee ee Boe eel. OM 9 A ERE og Sty a fe, ge eal beer
William Moore (son), Mrs. Clara Moore} Agencies, telephone 4908, 1.2.52-—6n. | 9 is. a es & Senty, Lucas| Harrison eae SOC oS IGSS96966599S090 c 3S
(daughter-in-law), Prank, Moore, a ee 91.1.52—4n are . F. A. INGRAHM, J.P. SSS ¢ SS
Elsie Holder, Mrs. Violet Mapp. Mrs.[ LIGYD—~Ehe. cap S50 GBeeD Mente L <..cemmaceenmetinibenienneten " ;
Alice Phillips, Miss Dalton Moore, Mrs.|new to Barbados, apply Barbados | ~gN-DAH-WIN, Pine Till Standing on 6.2.59--Sn Returning Officer, Parish of St. Andrew. Announeing the arrival of:—
Ruby Perkins, Mt. Aubrey Perkins,| Agencies, telephone 4908, 1.2.52—4n. | g,000 square feet of land, Stone bungalow .
Clyde Benskin and Oliver Phillips? .— break:





containing three h fast

(grandchildren?, 6.2.52—-In MOTORCYCLE-—Only one (i) in stock, oom, living and. kitel t itt Public

ee LAmbnener Ragen frame, 2/ cupboards. Tiled bath and toilet. Ser- N
IN MEMORIAM hp. $005.00, ‘Terms. “A BARNES & Co.,|Cubrgands, “llad path and toilet Ser.

LTD. 26.1.52—t.f.n. | application to Mrs. Bernard Rolfe. Tele- NOTICE

BRYAN—In loving memory of our dear phone 4817. }

Mother ida Bryan who departed this ELECTRICAL The above will be set up for sale at Re Estate of

(Terrazzo) MARBLE CHIPS

in 5 colours


























life on 6th Fi 1 Publie Auction on Friday the @th. Feb- ALLAN FITZHERBERT CLARKE
A dear fa ; FRIG: American @ cu, ft Frig, tav-|Tuary at 230 pam. at the office of tha) decene@ The M/V. “CACIQUE DEL For Verandahs and Floors
A dear ing & large freezing compartment in | undersigned. | }TON meat debts or. claim * will accept Cargo and
and life departs, excellent condition 1% years guaranteed CARRINGTON & SEALY, persons having any ts or upon F an tee ae ee ae
1 our hearts. | left $400.00, Apply Ralph Beard, Lower Lucas Street. [or effecting the estate of Allan Fitz~« vio bettie, ann a T. HE
Ever to be reme re ~—Cpl. Harold | Bay Street, Phone S010. ; 91,1.52—Hn | herbert Clarke late of Kirtons. in the Saiting Wednesday’ 6th se * . Lb
Bryan and family. 6.2.52—1n 62.5230 | ——— | parish of Saint Philip who died in The MV. “DAERWOOD" will





— Dwelling house called ieee, with | island on me day « ie 1951, are

DPAVIS—In tribute to the memory of the} RADIO: One Second-Hand American~ | 10,803 square feet of land situate at Chel-} hereby requii to send in
late Herbert H. Davis, of Montreal, a] gosch g-tube Radio. Apply to H. DB, |8¢a Gardens, St. Michacl. The house; of their claims duly attested to the un-
contains Drawing Room, Living Room,/ dersigned, in care of D. Lee Serjeant,

accept Cargo and Passengers for
St. Lucia, St. Vincent, Grenada
and Aruba, Sailing Friday 8th



















Service conducted by the Rev. M. E. ok H inst.

Ce eee Oe Eton Funeral |P0Ck's Drug Store, Todor Street oan |4 bedrooms, Garage, Toilet, Bath and} Solicitor, 12 James Street, Bridgetown, The M/V. “CARIBBEE” will

Parlour at 4.30 pam. on Monday after- ae usual conveniences. on or before the 10th day of April 195: accept Cargo and Passengers for

noor The above property will be set up for] after which date IT shall proceed to Dominica, Antigua, Montserrat,
Dr. and Mrs. C. Jack from Montreal, FURNITURE sale by Public Sena at our office | distribute the assets of the estate ameng Nevis.and St. Kitts. Sailing Friday
Mrs. G. Soper, Mr. Gordon Fleck from | eens nena apres jo on iday 8th February, Se Pettien sate thereto Davin, Seve sad EAIDAD 15th inst, ’
Ottawa, Mrs. L. Irving from Victoria CHAIRS, Chairs, Chairs....and other » a p.m, to the debts and claims onl RAMARIBO, BRIT
Mr. S. Wookey from Toronto, Mrs. F. W.| furniture and all sorts of fittings for| Inspection on application to Miss Kell-/ shail then have had notice, and os s,s. Mth Feb. 1952. Se
Hearle from Newport, Vermont, Mr. G.jyour home, A. BARNES & Co., LAd, {| man, Lodge. Dial a L shail not be liable for assets so M.S. BON. 10th March, 1952.
Zumft from New York, Mrs. D, Perkins 18.1,52—t.i.n. YEARWOOD & BOYCE, tributed to any person of whose debt | SAILING TO TRINIDAD AND CURACAO ee f oe
Mi. H. Frisch, Mr. R. Martin from| ——— —— ——— ——_____—_ Oe tae ste or claim I shall not have had notice at}M Ss, HERSILIA, 17th March 1952. ' 3
Barbados were amongst those who paid| STEEL FURNITURE; Filing Cabinets, 27.1.52.—-10N. | the time of such distribution, &. P. MUSSUN, SON & CO.
their last respects 6.2.52—1n | stationery supbosties a 4 ists “SAND BOUGE’ aiated at Kenaingion sont all ee =e = Agents ‘

ee | Chairs and office chairs. a : es are i

RICE: ever loving memory of Emma|& CO., LTD, Dial 4611 or 5037. New Road (near Fontabelle End) St. | jccounts without delay agle Hall Road. A two storied dwelling house standing on



about 2% acres of land. Garage and out-buildings. ° Water
and Electric Light installed. Offers will be received by Mr.



Away from all sorrow and pain, Estate of Allan Fitzherbert Clarke,



ruary 6, 1951, J .
Asleep in God’s beautiful garden, MECHANICAL a ae a ‘open eeenee, 6a Qualified Administratrix,
‘ —



















Some day when life's journey is Sula Aghia, ne . | Bedrooms (with Gielen Same in on oes: iibidadibieaseer — oe » Carter & Co., Ltd., High Street, up to Feb. 15th.
‘aed— os ng ‘ Fee mlecttical | breakfast room, : ‘ nspection by appointment with Miss Edna Carter, Dial 2329.
We shall, meet ‘You, (Mother) ‘again aie ee. Gin Cost By garage and servants Cutan Eg y OUTWARD FROM THE UNITED KINGDOM ; +
Claretta and famil 6.2.52—1n I Beard’s Lower Bay Street. Phone 5010. ce Py hg y LIQUOR LICENSE Ni ai of
mt Gan. | ae, bot Drapery ibe sot, tr] The, auplention of, Stapler Lavell |
i ‘ x day the 15th | Oistins Hill, Ch, se Due
ANNOUNCEMENTS | | canny Fi0ss MACHING: Excellent | Februny at 2 bm. at the oes af the }to sell Spirits, Malt Liquors, &ec., ab 8 Vessel From Leaves Barbades
hott re aa Profits having made by this Machine, ‘undersigned. board and shingled shop attached to
REPAIRS AND MAINTENANCE —Bar-| OM New $0000 will, scespt $200.08 tor CARRINGTON & SEALY peniaonss. 40 eee Bes Fe as. “TRIBESMAN” - London llth Jan, 6th Feb,
. = that they hh ile. Solicitors, with) : S, i “ . 5
recentiy been Joined by." an. expere| Lower Bay Street, “Phone, SOW0,, tacas ‘street, | Dated le, ti doy Gt Tetruary: WE Se. TACOMA STAR” “Tine " neh Bb Feb.
automobile engimner FEO, United King- 3.42—3n 6.2,52—9n To Shinde Magistrate, SS. “WAYFARER” ve Liv i 4th Feb. 16th Feb, ;
» exte he remi; oo reriakteee Te ee | ata Magistrat ae erpoo. reb. °
to handle ail types of repairs. | .GUY=New passenger chassis recently | ~FRanQuigTy—Standiog, of iail0 District “BY ey wove. {|9S. “DEFENDER” . . Liverpool &
y 1.2.52—6n, | Teeeived, on view at Barbados Agencies, square feet of land at Strathclyde, . eatin . Glasgow 12th Feb, 27th Feb.
telephone 4908, 1.2.52—6n. House contains three bedrooms upstairs pi etit pe eek 5 > °
SINGER SEWING MACHINES (RE-| 2nd one bedroom and spacious rooms | N:B—-Thia ape Court to we held. nt —————— We are instructed to offer a section of a 2 i
FOu RENT CONDITIONED) —Just lke “new. | See | Spection any day by appointment. "Phone | Police Court, District “B", on Monda HOMEWARD FOR THE UNITED pprox. 2 acres in






y
them on Display at our Show Rooms, | SPeCupP Any wey oas7 The above will be|the 16th day of February, 198%, at 12 one of the most desirable and private parts of this fashionable


















Cash or on easy Pagment Terma The lander ‘ekven coast at the low figure of 25c. per sq. ft. in order to obtain a
HOUSES Standara ‘Agency (Bion) Co. le Swan | Bgl? act Gu wbeuary att pam afc. w. BUDO Lge pe Voueel aa ene Eetete quick sale.
“MEDERANZA™ Fan To Wael | ee G2.52—6n | the office of je, anderstaned “oe Police Magistrate, Dist <3", i 5 a we. can thenouahly recommend this land which is one of
cra ew giles i CARR, . e a Priced coa: sections to be offered for a
fully furnished, water, light, refrigidaire, ELLANEO = " further Information he
meaNeae esnventioncet On the sea coast— MISC. US Lucas Street For r apply to




31.1.52—8n



considerable period.

St. James Sea-Coast. Phone 91-33.






















































’ on ANTIQUES — of every deseriptien | ———_—_—_—_——_- ANTED a a
ni Glass, Aiea, old Jewels, fine iver By Publie Auction ar cue ome sane Ww — DA COSTA & co., LTD.—Agents
SR, Opa rm ee ce, | gee wee ra HELE JOHN M. BLADON & CO.
Worthing. Gentlemen preferred. Phone pray B. a Sh Y ne Ct - que op 1 She dwelling house known as v
eeei. 03-58-80 bags i = 3.2,.52—t.f.n. “Edgecliff”, with forty six acres of land SALESMAN: Driver must have ex- ‘3 ° he e AFS., F.V.A.

RUSHDEN—George St, BelleviL0. | ———— ere | in the parish of St. John, of which twenty | perience. Apply in person Caribbean Canadian National Steams Ss srs Beal Estate Agents, Auctioneers, Building Surveyors
From Ist March, Diol 0121 D. A. Brown|' BULL RINGS-—Self Piercing, 3” Cop- do igh es tnowthiy sad. Wepitly temnptn.” | ooCee EERO La, We Me ete PHONE 4640, a8 Plantations Building
eo sees $2.0 Bi ene ted enn Ot Oe, et | ae 1400 equare. feet cf land at. the : f :

r s ’ ee y
> Ney and Marhill Street OGRAPHER & TYPIST for our

TREVILLE—Deacon’s Road, Drawing | | corner of Amen A STEN! SOUTHBOUND Sails Arrives Sails
an Duan sens werongs et |, BARBADOS AWE REVIEW onto | win are shereo, an dhe, Sature| fice ply by yell tna ih paren Oe. th St. ote
and bath, Dial 4017. ee Buy at once 3/- each at Advocate Station- eee the Grug, business ert Rt £8 CARA, CRIES r ee. 15 Feby 2 Feby, 25 Feby, FOR 8/ ALLE

WHATHIERHEAD'S DRUG STORE. me For further particulars and conditions MISCELLANEOUS a i 8 i Feby. 29 Feby. 9 March 10 March
3.2.52—Gn | of sale to; & BANFIELD. CRUISER” .. ad +. 24 March, -- 23 March 24 March os
HEETS 30,1.62—5n. MEN'S GOLF BAG—rmust be fair con-
| rg Py ee a | I sabre gition id, “riee ressonable, | Phone ee ee ae eS e6
Inquire Auto Tyre Co. ‘Weephone oe AUCTION pif r 8134, saiiedniiell + @ Feby “ 8 Feby 16 Feby. £ Feby. ee 4
.2.52-—tin, +20 Feb; Feby. - Feby. arc! ~

i i pea OER ERY = forte rotor RR eh Barat tee b 1/3} March “9 March, 20 Maren 21 March 24 March a two storeyed. dwellinghouse standing on 10,770 square feet

issoive TEST DAY | ait “Temperature ‘Thermometers, | UNDER THE IVORY HAMMER Sgt ecaaéstede trcela euaaeciee + semen ‘2% March 24 March 3 April, 4 April 7 April of land on the incomparable St, Lawrence Coast.

Choking, gasping, whoezing | Teistering up to 360° Centigrade. Only or longer, @hrist Church, St. Philip, + @ April TAprilL = — 14 April 17 April Excellent sea bathing. Dwellinghouse contains verandah
Asthma and Bronchitis poison ;4 Umited supply to hand, get yours now.| By tetructions received from the In- St. Michael preferred. Write: Box LiL, upstairs and down, and sitting rooms, 4 bedrooms, pan-
your system, sap your energy, ruin | Knights Ltd, 6.25210 bsurance Co., * will sell on Friday Feb. C/o Advoeate Advtg. Dept, For further particulars, apply: to~ tr: d kit " Le
your health and weaken. your heart. 8th at Messrs, Courtesy Garage White-| C/o . 5.2.52->3n 'y and kitchen, Electric gas and water installed. Garage
in’ 3 minutes MENDACO—the pre- | Long Playing Records and 78 RPM) parc: (1) 1947 Austin Car, 8 h.p, and and servants rooms,







soriplen al, famnanie doctor—eireu- | Records and we book orders too A.) (1) 1941 v-8 Ford, 65 h.p, ( Both dam-)
ates through the bloc t







Purchaser to have option of buying furniture and effects.









































































There will be a_ general



aged i idents) Sale at 2 p.m. . 56 on
atrangting ‘mucus Terms Cash. w {PF SOSGSSTTS0R GARDINER AUSTIN & CO., LTD.—Agents. Inspection by appointment. Dial 8137. (Mrs. K, R. Hunte).
civing free, eany One Baby's Pram, perfect condition can eR eee 2 OUR AGENTS are making £100 %° ee == = The above will be offered for sale at public competition on
ul sleep, No dop be seen at “Somerly’ Worthing. Apply: | ¢ 9 59 gn % ond more by taking orders, fom Friday, the 8th February, 1952, at 2 p.m., at the office of the
fons MUBNDACO tabletn'nt ate and (et bile Thomas, Phone: ae Mie Sle cat be Okinised, ee nen a conaNtCN OF g
be entirely freo from Asthma and | — cat "| LOST & FOUND | $ anc. caienaere. Y sale can be obtained, x
#ronehitis In next to no time, even SUITCASES — Valises, attache cases, % Britain's largest and: foremost 15) { , COTTLE, CATFORD & CO Y
Phowgh you uy, have sultered for) sturdy and lightweight, double locks, % Publishers wil ama 3 Senos sh % Solicitors
Phare, MENDACO ts so successful | $3.96 to $6.24,.A BARNES & CO., LTD. % Free Sample rv jo } é ‘ade
say btetihing ature nd i a Te uV\e, : ai.de—1o0
completely s r Asthma in 8 days ADO—Int tt Beautt. DOG: ‘errie! AS Commission h cone
pa mon Get n DA wen ot one ful condition canelent ee good | White, ‘with ‘bck ears. Answers’ to. Ure ‘s on Se. be Vietoria @ i ;
pmackage, Ge NDACO from vou : f Jack, Please contact Dona’ » Works. . ind. >
Chemist, The guarantee protects you, | Taeing record. Cost $700.00 now $500.00, | name of be A { ste s -——} PVOLECPVTIOES,
er — Weil. bie ttn shone 2729. + Oe a aee—in’ 8 1 1E SATLANTIQUE )
OFS PROD 9 SOOO SOO OSOO FS \} C G“T RAN i; i Do » . i :
INVESTMENT OPPOR- PUBLIC NOTICES {| Sailings from Southampton to Guadeloupe, Martinique, Barba- fH} § n’t Ruin Your ;
TUNITY, . GENERAL ELECTION 1951 dos, Trinidad, LaGuaira, Curacao, Cartagena and Jamaica. | & T IRE Ss I g
- wore ae Cumulative ka ROMPADOS Cores —_ ) . g
Te Preference ares 1 A. ¢ . .
BARNES & CO, LTD. Telephone B| guovs Asmeiatioe will be meld ta the PARISH OF ST. THOMAS From. Southampton Arrives Barbados = }/% Putting Wheels in Line =
Secretary, Mr. Victor Hunte, 3359. Harrison College Hall on Saturday, 23rd ! soe Tth Feb, oe a a oe a = is z
: Feb » 1952, at 1.30 p, Summ Expenses «.- 20th March, 1952. ...._.... ni pri, N} | [
se Esler, Serene, ts : Ce *"DEGRASSH.... 4th April, 1952 | Gth May, 1952 f}% Cam Save 5000 Miles
oO » ‘ )
—OSSSISOS are L. A. HALL, (As required by Section 43 of Sub-section 7 of the Representation of |}} *Not calling at Guadeloupe. 1% of Rubber!
HOT W. bs Genera So) aaa. the People (Miscellaneous Provisions) Act 1951) SAILING FROM BARBADOS TO EUROPE HI spss
| ——— H. G, Cummins, J W. Hewitt, R.G, Mapp, } ) If your wheels are. just the
TH % ADOS CHORAL SOCIETY From Barbados Arrives Southampton }})| %
TAP for YOUR BA | Or Annan Conemal Mewing. wit ba Eaq., M.D. Bee. Esq. |i} “COLOMBIE”... 2nd March, 1952... ... 14th March, 1952 a wutihete ow wt tie's :
With one of the lovely White Por- 4 | held at the Cathedral Church House on Personal Expenses — 48.00 — » “COLOMBIE”.... 13th April, 1952 .... . 25th April, 1952 | &
celain Gas Geysers-——You can have % Tuesday 12th Bebruary, 1963 at 8 D.™. | Printing .. ee +e 25,00 9.50 25.0 *“GE GRASSE”.... 19th May. 1952... ... 29th May, 1952 can mean thet your tires
a warm or hot bath within 8 & Members are requested to bring with oe . ; “
minutes of lighting up, Econ- X%|them the music whieh was issued for | Advertising “ 2.00 9.00 2.00) *Sailing Direct to Southampton. ) will wear unevenly be worn at
eget 8 aoe, = —_ to the last Mid-Year Season ehimeks Expenditure on Adver- ‘ put a year ahead of time
run wi a Ss. w are 42. ' .. ) .
now available at your GAS tising Material ... 15.00 ~ 15.00 } K. M. JONES & €@., LTD.—Agents. }}); WMcEnoarneys
WORKS, BAY STREET. NOTICE Expenditure on Canvass- } ‘ Let us check, toe-in, and
POSSESSES EEP OOD. . ess % e 103.00 105.00 103.00}'= : SSS SSS — realign wheels, balance
yrcocooscooscosesosooso; | THE BARBADOS MUTUAL | anowance to Speakers .. e 15.00 _ =sS PS Te adel Pra Sewice Station
Â¥ NOTICE 3] XERAORDINARY GENERAL Miscellaneous Expenses 101.25 290.00 101.281) Swe eee
x % NOTICE is hereby given that an Ex- )) CALEING *
+
%
x

qualified Poli¢yholders of the above
office



meeting of the Barbados named Society will be held at

: traordinary General Meeting of the $246.25 $476.00 $246 . 25 |
% —
% ; |
3 Hackney Car Owners’ Asso- g of the Society, Beckwith Place, we- Notice is hereby given that these Returns and the Documents in
%

town, at 2 o'clock p.m. on Friday, 15th



LLL ELL LPP PP OOOS



S$ ciation at the Progressive 9} February 1952, for the purpose of con- }SUPPort thereof can be inspected jat my office “Belvedere”, St. Thom: )
& League's Building on Thurs- ¥ | sidering ond passing with or without! on Monday, 11th February, 1952, between the hours of 9.00 a.m. anil
$ day night, 8th February }|“NESOCvED tna elntes Soe ee Deed | NOON

%, re ples SOL a Jase o! .

x commencing at 8 o’clock, % of Settlement be deleted and the fol- D. A, M. HAYNES, }
S when a Board of Manage- \ }lowing Clause substituted therefor:— i
8 ment will be elected 8 5. No assurance or Seurenere gnats Returning Officer, )

. be accepted and no policy or policies

s Cc. ST. HILL, @ [shall be issued on any one life for a ~ Parish of St. Thomas, :
= Acting Secretary. |sum exceeding unless the} ———~ RE aA oe he rec Reena
% % J amount in. exeess of $25,000.00. is imme- (

g:





$$9566666259666500656GO% |dintely reassured with some other Gane ,
ing, and the Society thereby relieved of : as.
any direct liability in respect of such

ORIENTAL }fisuvszs.

Provided al that in arrivi:
the same asareaate sum of $25,000.00 = NOTICE
SILKS, CURIOS, ARTS
VENDEMOS, SEDAS,

account shall be taken of existing or
JOYERIAS Y ARTISTIOAS

Srusvactive. “Rerevianan Tae: Alle Applications are invited by the Water Commission, Jamaica, for
CURIOSIDADES, TRAIDOS
DE LA INDIA CHINA e

Cc, K, BROWNE, a post of Temporary Civil Engineer.
, BJIPTO

THANI’S
Pr. Wm. Hry. St., Dial 3466



ALL : . :
mm || pirestone



TO THE

CROP-TIME |
SALE |

NOW IN FULL SWING

at THANI BROS.



see |
n't Risk $
ad Brakes!

e’ll Adjust "Em
‘Expertly for
‘Summer Driving!

-

The post is temporary and non-pensionable, and carries a salary"
seale of £798 by £25 to £920 per annum. Point of entry into the
. scale will be determined by experience and qualification. Hold
FOR Ss ALE may be required to keep a motor vehicle for the performance of his

duties in which case he will be eligible for a. travelling allowance in
KYREVULLE accordance with the Commission’s rates.

OOS

oO OOS

Don't take a chance on















soaesSooaeooas Appointment will be on probation for one year at the end of i er ee eee e
which period it may be extended at the Commission’s discretion. Pr. Wm, Henry & Swan Sts. a dee ees,

SRA VIEW GURST EAGLE HALL ROAD Applicants should be between 30 and 45 years of age, and must|}} brakes, repack front wheel $
One substantially built two- (t} Mave had satisfactory experience in Water Works. Engineering, includ+ } HAS EVERYTHING YOU DESIRE. { bearings, tubricate brake

HOUSE { storey house. It has antng ing the construction of small dams and intake works, tunnelling, the } ¢ carey mechanism, adjust brakes, %

room up and downstains, {laying of me! 1 and cast iron mains and reservoir con-|{f OWEST PRICES: } Bised all brake limessadize. =

ae BARBADOS fellery, "ining room (4) eaten. a saan of land surveying and general bulide i L ON RECORDI! | fill brake master cylinder $
bale eieiainers rates a ee ae ee ing work, including quantity surveying and estimating also essential, i YOU WILL AT ONCE SAY | 3 es . $
quoted on request offer refused. Inspection by as well as administrative experience. ) 0., 5 OFFICE . .. .. 4493 x
oo eer Applications, accompanied by references from firms or depart- <7FHIS IS THE SALE FOR ME” (aR: WORKSHOP 4203 >
Dinner and Cocktail { D'ARCY A, SCOTT ments in which experience has been gained should be submitted to } , PARTS DEPT 4673 &
parties arranged. Middle Sireet ::: Dial 2645 the Chief Engineer, Waterworks Department, Barbados by the 16th $100,000 00 Merchandise offered at § s

J. HW, BUCKLAND, | r ay of February, 1952, clearly marked ‘Application for post of Civil Engin- , rien ° NIGHT 4125 %
Proprietor. 6.2.52—2n. eer, Water Commission, Jamaica.’ Rediculous Low Prices. 1% 4

SSE. | as 5 BN sees 2D OD An, | NR ER ESAS SSS SIS SSS SS SSS SSSSS 34.6650656566556066556555 00550595 SSS SSSSSESTS SLE





—_.



ee
&
&

at

iat OAM a Ahh

190





WEDNESDAY, FEBRUARY 6, 1952





HENRY

BY CARL ANDERSON



FLINT OF THE FLYING SQUAD .

f MPORMATION ROOM |
CALLING FB. TEN.

HOW THE DICKENS COULD
WHERE IS FLINT ?.. SHE GET AWAY SO FAR-
WE WONT ANSWER

y AND $O FAST 2

BY ALAN STRANKS & GEORGE DAVIES



NO SIGN OF FLAME !







MY AMBULANCE!
SOMEBODY'S
PINCHED IT !..



BY CHIC YOUNG

I GAVE THEM 2 so. Se er DADDY DIDN'T
E POPPER

oe r 0 TS nn
Wh “ a 9s < PUT TI D
aes ap = KING = A © OER) |
» JUST T - <& ) ou ae Ae wh, ‘ ee ° e

KNOW WHAT
a TO DO ONA

o> < of 2 Rh a, OSS NY DAY my
< >

THAT'S RIGHT! THE
OSMO-RAY DISPLACES CLEAR! THIS iS DuwiT We RE
THE MOLECULES OF GREAT — MEY GOING TO THE
SOLID MATTER! IT YOIDS THAT AIN'T THE WAY
THE ELECTRO-ALARM : TO THE LAUNCHING ,
SYSTEM AT THE SAME CHAMBER / o
TIME / FOLLOW ME...

SAY, KENT, THIS GADGET iS
OKAY! Y'MEAN T’SAY WE
CAN JUST WALK QUTA
HERE THROUGH THAT
HOLE —AS EASY

AS THAT ?/

ae ialaateets
f THE CORRIDOR 4S OF COURSE NOT, \

PRISON LAB/ Jy

_¢ GOING TO WALK
OnTO THAT
ROCKET...

a. @ Siren Sy Rae: PRE
Gadeetae

JOHNNY HAZARD

FUNNY PLACE,..1O,..
GET...MAL DE /ER..
ON BOARD A
TRAIN /

FINALLY / IT'S WORKING...
FOR A MOMENT I THOUGHT
YOU MIGHT HAVE GOTTEN
THE WRONG DEMITASSE,

p
NEVER FEAR, MY
DEAR MISS WISP.. I’

AN OLP HAND AT
DETECTING DeUuGS/

me /
{ GOOP SHE WASN'T /
oe, NOW...TO WORK /
OH, LET ME HELP... ~ ne: f
YOU...SPILLER., MY, THAT'S

ODP... ALL OF A SUDDEN.,

CaM 900 piezy / ee bs



WIGGS-DAW-LING/T WANT YOU TO
MEET ME AT THE SOLASEE MLISIC
SHOP-MY BROTHER BIMMY WILL
BE THERE TOO-

(M DRIVING THE

I WISH MAGGIE FOR GOODNESS’ 6AKE!/
THERE'S MAGGIE’S
BROTHER LYIN’ IN THE

GUTTER -I WONDER IF
HE WAS RUN OVER-



‘6 MY PLANE! THERE \¥

GOES OUR LAST MEANS
THE KINGDOM BEFORE ESCAPE!

€lL KAZAR MARRIES
‘ ER!



DONT WORRYS WELLY N A BABE IN THE WOODS#1D BETTER 'D BETTER+<10

HANDLE HiM. BUT, GO ALONG + AND MAKESURE SHE MAKE SURE YOU

you INTHE J B\ PLEASE «PROFECSOR, DOESN'T LEARN TOO MUCH ABOUT COME ee
Een )SIVE UP THE TRIP.

you DOWN? Y THE PHANTOM 7

LEGENDS
, LJ

a al i a a an i il ite aii ae





BARBADOS ADVOCATE

PAGE NINI

Glands Made Youn
—Vigour Renewe
Without Operation

If you feel old before your time or





Sensational New Make-up!



2 -ealenees, you will fd os ysical

rei ess, a will find new happiness

Foundation we E,you will find new h medics
which restores youthfa!

and Powder rt vitality quicker than glanr

erations, It is a simple home Speat- -
—_ in tablet form, discovered br an
Doctor. Absolutely harm!
' a easy to take, but the newest and
st powerfu) invigaurator known to
j iene. It gel pens on E>: nds,
uy and organs, s new
| 2 blood, and and works so fast that you
an see feel new wer ar
fea er to 48 hours. Because of
action on glands and

} e your brain power, emer and
} aa often improve amazing’
| A amazin, nee ae am

im one!



TA
ruaranteed. I been tested 2 1d
vroved by thousands and is now ava!!-

| bie at all ere. Get

| ABS from your chemist today. P:
{ itto Naat. Soe the Ul improvement
} ina babe the full bottle, which
| ists ts under the positive
| uarantee that it must make you ful!
i oy , energy and and vitality and fee!

0 to 20 years younger or money back
on 1 reteep of empty package.
TABS costs eras and the guar-

antee protects
j Vi-Tabs **:



Resteres Manhood and Vitality

it é a CSS .

g . ~ ae fcr ; %

TT Bese ey x
a cAN BES

$ CONQUERED %

New Not a cake make-up, not a greasy foundation! \

“Angel Face” is foundation and powder all in one
no greasy fingertips, “Angel Face" goes on easil
its own white puff. Gives you a soft, velvety cor

Ne wet sponge,
and smoothly with
. n instantly,



New! Stays on longer than powder!

The special “cling” ingredient fused into “Angel fF
stay on much longer than ordinary powder, And it
never greasy

New | Can’t Spill!

* makes it
ever drying.

SACROOL



x
You'll say Pond's “Angel Face" is the most convenient e-up you've CONQUERS PAIN.
ever used it can't spill over handbag or clothes, It perfect to use
anytime, anywhere
Choose from five angelic shades: Blonde Angel, Ty Angel, Pink On Sale at
Angel, Tawny Angel, Bronze Angel. At all the best ty counters

KNIGHT'S LTD.

SOOO



-





IT PAYS YOU TO DEAL HERE

—————————————
SPECIAL offers to all Cash and Credit Custe mers ners for Monday to Wednesday only

<—_ Soil eee
| SPECIAL OFFERS are now ®¥: ‘ilable at our Hranches Tweedside,
Speightstown ind Swan Street

Usually Now
Tins Anch, Powd. Milk (24) 2.24 2.00 Tins Batchelor Peas 89 36

Bots. Maula Olives 12 oz. 125 1.20 > Tins Tomato Juice 3330
Pkgs. Dates 18 16

>. Ltd. Broad Street










ee

Usually NOW

Tins Armours Soups Aspargus-Tomato 28 26

D. V. SCOTT’ & C

THE



GROCERIES

COLONNADE







Residents!
webs wy AA se iaSaest a Sa

At spa

aati
- eee: git"

Ger:
5 Ge
. Visitors!

WHERE ARE YOU STAYING? WHERE DO YOU LIVE ?
If vou are staying at any of the hotels in the Hastings or
Worthing district, if you live anywhere in or around these
areas, we would like » ou to know that we have provided
for vour convenience .} BOOK SHOP and STATIONERY
as modern and up-to-date as space would permit. But in

case you have difficulty in finding it we would like to explain
exactly where it is.



Ik YOU ARE STAYING at the Marine Hotel, the Ocean
View Hotel, the Hastinzs Hotel or the Windsor Hotel, then
you have probably discovered it already because it is in
Greystone Village, néar to the above places.

O° RRR

STAYING anywhere nearer to town
than the Ocean View fttotel then you will find our shop in
the first gap on the left, off the Hastings main road, with a
sign marked “Entrance to Marine Hotel”.

BUT IF YOU ARE

IF YOU ARE STAYING anywhere further from town than
the Ocean View Hotel, you will find our shop in the second
gap on the right with the sign “Entrance to Marine Hotel”

THIS GAP IS KNOW™ AS “BALMORAL GAP” and a few
yards up you will find our shop along with others in a line
of booths opposite Grey Stone Flats. Think of the time you
will save not having to come to town.

DVOCATE

STATIONERY
BOOK SHOP

GREYSTONE VILLAGE, BALMORAL GAP, HASTINGS





PAGE TEN



TABLE TENNIS:

How To
A Cha

(By P.

JOHNNY LEACH; officially ranked the best Table

Tennis player in the world i

his suceess in his work, “Table Tennis For All.”
like many other champions,

assist the beg

knows all a
“Table Ter
wardly digeste
most like



vill
vi

ihe first Englishman ever to win the World
fable Tennis Championship twice.

H \\ national chamy

: \y eighteen illusti

hh ts author

. title in 1949 an

Among the many other titles’
won by Johnny Leach are the
Single Championship of the

US.A., France, Belgium, Wales and
lrelanu; Men’s Doubles Champ-
ionship of England and France
ana the Men’s Doubles and Mixed
Doubles Championship of the
U.S.A., France, Belgium, Ireland
and Wales.



Now, in “Table Tennis For All,”
he gives readers the benefit of the
many hours of careful study
which he has put into the perfec-

methods which have enabled him,!
in the last five years, to record)
victories over every player of
note in the Table Tennis world.

Of Johnny Leach, A. K. Vint,}
Hon. Treasurer of the
Table Tennis Assoc§tion and In-

ternational Table Tennis eee? players and spectators alike.
ore~

tion, who contributed the 9
word, states: “The name Johnny
Leach is known not only to all,

Table Tennis players and officialss

in the English Table Tennis Asso->
ciation but through the Table;
Tennis playing world as a great!
sportsman and a first class expo-
nent of the game.

of a_ typical Bagishsan, , His Jersey Joe Scores par al aa Stee ae
i iness 2 z : sty - - ; ) s
friendliness and natural modes partnerships. They hold the

make him one of
players of today !

An Author
“It is now with somy interest

we jind him the author of a book.
Yypically Johnny is ready to teach

ine beginner giving advige not
onty on how to play—strokes,
joowwork, and ihe other techni-
calities of the game—but what
dress to wear and the playing
equipment to use.”

Vint writes; “With the rapid

development of the game in the
last few years—in 1938 there were
3,700 “clubs wich 65,000 players
and today there are nearly 7,000
clubs with 120,000 players—it is
very necessary that there should
be good reading material avail-
able to assist the thousands of
new players coming into the game



for the first time. In addition
ihis book gives some valuable
background knowledge for the

would-be aspirant for team hon-
ours, either League, County or
National. The author quite clearly
wants to help the player whether
he is a new-comer or has been
playing the game for years.”

Chapter 1 of the book deals
with “What Table Tennis offers
and what it demands.” In this
Leach tells how among his player
friends he knew one, who at the
age of eighty-three, still worries
about the weakness of his back-
hand.

This should be a good example
to those local players, who al-
though still in their twenties, feel
that their Table Tennis days are
over. Why’? Because they are
either alcoholics or smoke and a
few claim they are short winded.
But Leach says: “It is not only
those who are completely fit who
can enjoy this game. Table Tennis
seems to provide a much-needed
and interesting recreation to many
who suffer from various disabili-
(ies. There are many players who
manage to do quite well despite
the loss of an arm or even a leg.
I know of one player who has lost
both hands and even one para-
lysed from the waist down wh
enjoys his game from a wheel-
chair,”

His other chapters, making up
Part One of the Book, which is
mainly for the beginner, deals
with Dress, Playing Equipment,
The Grip, The Sideways Stance,
Spin and The Follow-Through.

Parts two, three and four are
written for the benefit of the
player who has already passed

the beginner's stage.

In the introduction Leach states:
“I regard the doubles game as
something whch differs in many
respects so widely from singles as
to need separate study. A special
section has therefore been devoted
to this subject.”

Part five deals with Points
worth Knowing and_ includes
Table Manners and Umpiring,

two points which are really worth

knowing by local players
Johnny Leach dedicates his

book to his father without whose

mprove the sté

yin dealing with the problems of
tion of his game, and reveals the). Jearner.”’

Johnny Leach’.
to many of us is the personification.

the best liked Outside The Ring





HASSETT CAt

oF




Become
mpion

A. V.)

n 1950, discloses the secrets of
Leach,
is trying to
inner and also sets about to
indard of the player who feels
bout the game.

inis For All”, if read and in-
d by some of our local players
ely bring them up to inter-
xionship standard. It contains
‘ations.

von the World Men's Singles
d again in 1951, thus becoming

help his Table Tennis cireer

would not have been possibk
Good Reading

“Know The Game Table Ten-
nis” also provides interesting
reading for the Table Tennis en
thusiast and player alike. It is in
booklet form and prepared in
collaboration with the English
Table Tennis Association. It
written by Jack Carrington whom
A. K. Vint and Ivor Mon agu
state: “Has had great exper.ence

is



“The book not
new-come! to under
technique of the various
but explains the laws and tact
of the game in an attractive way,”

the

only helps

tand

strokes,
Ss



EnglishMthey write

Vint and Montagu commend it



(“Table Tennis For All” Johnny
Leach, published by Nicholas
Kaye Ltd. “Know The Game
Table Tennis”, Jack Carring-
ton, published by Educational
Productions Ltd. — Both books
can now be obteined at the
Advocate Stationery

4

4

4



FRANK SEDGMAN Ken

and

championships of Wimbledon,
" 2 U.S.A., France and Australia, but
PHILADELPHIA, Feb. 5 ow on the eve of the last stages

Jersey Joe Walcott won another of the Davis Cup series it seems

Ca

inspect the

BARBADOS ADVOCATE

iGHT HY W.L.



Preliminary Canter

DOWN from Oxford to-day to
7%-mile cross-coun-
try course at Roehampton was the
University

team which
mbridge on Saturday.

me

Secretary John Haddock; from
Wadham, told me that the Oxford





KEEPER FOR 2 OFF GOMEZ

HASSETT caught by Guillen, West Indies wicket-keeper for 2 off Gomez during the Fifth Test at Sydney cricket ground on 25.1.52.

Tennis Tactics

To Beat U.S.

Mr.
special emphasis for the need of a
careful study of the indusirialisa-
tion of Puerto Rico during the last
decade. He said he had studied
that country
that it was a country with social
eae almost identical to Bar-

ados,

ets



WEDNESDAY, FEBRUARY 6, 1053









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PIONEER INDUSTRIES
BILL PASSED

@ From Page 7
B. Vaughan

give encouragement to local capi-
talists. He thought that with the
necessary encouragement to local
people, most of the money would
be kevt in Barbados.

Mr. L. A. Williams (L) said
that he did not think that the de-
lay of the Bill was the reason for
industrialists setting up indus.

Vv. (D) laid

and had observed

point in his struggle to by-pass that the Australian selectors have team were running over the He spoke of the help it w tries in Trinidad ang Jamaica and
sotdenis Wet keane ee doubts about their invincibility. course this afternoon. They are be in removing some iy Rogge not in Barbados. He said that
aii aid ‘cr Tuesday that ae ula In the current Victorian cham- confident of revenging last season’s employment problem, which he when reference was made to
recognize Walcott je world oe pionship Sedgman is partnered by defeat which gave Cambridge said was a harder problem to Puerto Rico, it had to be remem-
weight champion until he loses oe ween and ee by their only post-war success in the tackle than low wages. poor age, = nt ae pews
his title in the ring or retires. atbavearis eng ot eae eae ro oe ake wis i > the , He referred to two men who America and America’s foresight.
Thus, Pennsylvania revealed in Ghulieerais round in whieh Aus- ee marae Seon, wit be Lc had had the courage to start a hat Mr. R. G. Mapp (L) said he
roundabout fashion that it would tralia meet the winners of the Wtd, and last University match making industry despite the lack thought a Bill of that sort then
refuse to strip Walcott of the inter-zone final between Sweder for the Oxford captain, 30-year- of the provision of the Pioneer would get Barbados little further.
title if he repudiates the contract | ; ihe TSA. petween sweden old Cyril Black, He is engaged Industries and said he hoped that Except on a Regional basis, a Bill
to fight Charles, : ae +) No 10 be married and leaves Oxford they would be assisted in some like that could help very little.
Walcott prefers to fight Harry What lies behind this spli d No soon to become a teacher of agri- way. ment with which the colony was
Matthews or Rocky Marciano, be- official reason has been given, but cultural economy at Edinburgh The main thing, he felt, was to faced
cause it would be moré money an are two possible explana- University,—LE.8.
However, Wale as a contract “ODS. ‘ —
to.” box ree P Brea One is that the Australians do light

agreed that Walcott not want the U.S. doubles pairing
obligation to meet Charles but of Schroeder shg Trabert to gain
cecided to take refuge behind the further experience against Sedg-
technicality that the contract 2" and McGregor.
never was filed officially with the _ The other is that the move wa
Commission, made to give Rose practice in case
Thus the Commission will ignore 2°ther pairing is necessary
the contract too if Walcott does, through injury either to Sedgman |

has a moral

|



—U.p, oY McGregor. Miss Mavis King beat Mrs. D.
a I favour the first version, In;Worme 6—3, 6—2.
the recent New South Wales MEN’S DOUBLES
1 Be tournament Sedgman and Mce- U. N, Roach and G. Watson
U.S. Funds For Gregor beat the United States pair beat A. J. Jemmott and W. H.

6—8, 6—4, 4—6, 6—2,,10—8

’

Europe Australia’s chief hope of retain-

ing the Cup and continuing to

WASHINGTON, Feb. 5. break the U.S.A.’s monopoly in

: Truman informed Congress on world tennis depends on winning

Tuesday that he will transfer the doubles. When it comes to

$478,160,000 Mutual Security ap- tactics the Australiang have litt'e

propriations from military to to learn,
economic funds for France, Greece,

‘

KL

Turkey, the (United Bingdom, This Award Was Fair ve P. K. Roach and E. A, Benja-
anc ugoslavia, This dncludes Nieves : " min,

$300,000,000 which the Mutual PR. PETER COOPER, fast be- hu ;

Security Agency indicated will be Coming one of the best rugby| MIXED DOUBLES HANDICAP
extended as economic aid to Teferees, and appointed to the] wy, , al saa s
Britain, The President sent iden- University match next week, gave ee one Sire. FD. Sree ee

tical letters to the Chairmen of One decision in the first England | pam,
the Foreign and Armed Services trial for which no one present Mrs. S. J. Patterson and J. B. D.
Committees of the Senate and the could recall a precedent, Robinson vs. Mrs. H. A. O'N.

House of Representatives inform- Afterwards he said, with a
ing them of his decision to con- smile, that’ he would mention it
tribute “more of military strength at a meeting of the London
in Europe than if same funds were Referees’ Society. He was not
to be used to procure military end too certain of chapter and verse
for items for delivery to coun- which gave him authority {or
tries concerned.” Truman said what he did, but he was quite
$100,000,000 will go to France and sure the incident was against the



the remaining $78,160,000 to spirit of the game.
Greece, Turkey and Yugoslavia,
—U.P All Agreed
And the old internationals,

Rugby Union committee men and
selectors who were at Leicester al)
seemed to agree that it was a per-
fectly fair award.
: Ny D, F. White, the old England
i eure 2 here cap and captain of the Possibles,
ave given British-born Captain was penalised for obstruction fot
Maurice Ray Mussons and. his gojporate > aOR

are . 4 br deliberately getting in the way of
British-Guiana born wife Vivian ", M. PB: Hardy when he al
one month’s notice to leave {“,.* 2 a me Nee
Trinidad, taking a drop-out.

If they fail to comply with the The incident was reminiscent of
order, steps will be taken to have that which ended a Hutton innings

Must Leave Trinida

(Prom Our Own Correspondent:

PORT-OF-SPAIN, Feb, 5.

them removed. last summer, when he took a

The Mussons have a case pro- Second stroke at a ball which he
ceding in the Supreme Court thought was going to hit his
against the local Emigration wicket, and was given out for
Officer for wrongful arrest and preventing a fielder from catc hing |
false imprisonment. it. lui

BLUEBERRIES SO 7 USED
, SOLU
ALL PRIMED RAISINS INSTEAD »AND-UH
Pee oe oy TURN UREDE DoMaS
GO I LEFT IT RIGHT SIDE UP.
YOUR MOTHER SAID SHE
SERVED IT HOTZ THINK
ITS NCEK COLD“I DIDN'T
HAVE ANY FRUIT SALAD 1
PUT ON IT“BUT THE HARD-

So you Ger

BOILED EGG AND OLIVES
AND STUFF ARE REALLY

BELLEVILLE TENNIS
CLUB RESULTS

Results of Yesterday’s
Matches

LADIES SINGLES—Ftnals

Allan 6—1, 6—1,

Today’s Fixtures
MEN’S DOUBLES
C. B. Lawless and D. E. Wor

re. P, Edghill and J. H. C. Edg-
hill,

E. P. Taylor and C. G. Mann’

Miss M. King and J. D. Triming-

Skinner & J. W. McKinstry.



WEATHER REPORT

YESTERDAY
Rainfall from Codrington:
Nil
Total rainfall for Month to
date: .02 in.
Highest Temperature:
84.5°F.
Lowest Temperature:
72.0°F,
Wind Velocity: 12 miles per
hour
Barometer: (9 a.m.) 30.016,
(3 p.m.) 29,931
TODAY
Sunrise: 6.10 a.m.
Sunset: 5.58 p.m.
Moon: First Quarter, Feb. 2
Lighting 6.30 p.m.
High Tide: 3.25 a.m., 12.33

Tide: 7.14 a.m, 8.25



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Full Text

PAGE 1

WEDNESDAY, FEBRUARY & 1M2 BARBADOS ADVnr\TT Widow Proves She Can Write WILL DISPUTE PAC.F FTVF KOKi:.l.\ MI.OIIMOIIS BEFORE COURT > WIDOW. M.ry Taylor, wrote lo the di.tat,,,,, % %  '" %  M' E W Barrow, to prov. al tht ": '%  .:v yesterday before the Acting Puisne Hta LordAfp Mr. Justice Taylor, that althm, ; I nnaue cerfficate with an "X" ~h,.,,,,1,1 •H and write .nd could have IdentUUd .!„ %  will she mm l„-r husband's t„ be in his hand,,,,!,,.,.lMpul* over the wUI m> sa, not mvntionrd in that I that had the M. Jwi'fih Kuunit' u/t Tinned Hart II united Ashore RESIDENTS IKadmit, m %  '"sir ,n Common Form will. ; ; %  %  < t b) M, At the clo. ot this evlaence, %  ""''" it B *?' ,w ""' ,h *' """J were whtihe, ,t hen a.k,n, that the a.rec'i.on „f -..lam,, he Court be Una that the will V £SS ,n '' pr VM ln **">> form bv li> Mr. BanAeld o( way al a petition Hutching, a „d Bantleld %  ,„. j ,„.,...r „ ihe Court ll|() ( M is adjourned until the decide the man. %  I US" mo !? ln wnen ll *w % %  M3 whether • K* on the denial fro. „ ,,. then ,il legitimate son alone „ be I contest 5 Lb* v.i.r % %  '.-; "-!" ", ,r w %  ,, ; %  %  : < %  BUWd la rokmo be nld. lo can upon thi To establish his case for the Mr Cn.ni,e, I, ,irh ^dd £ .; %  %  h foTayto bring enough i "i to give evidence. Court lo Aw ailed llmiKhter ^ i '•• Who died MM * '•<• as they Ml niH,.miall 14, 1948. Mcr husband gave her ff" his will before his death and told lnen w * sufficient to have the her to Wtil until their daughter Wl admitted m Common Form Phidelia arrived from Trinidad Handwriting had been proved RESIDENTS oi the Band t!-two of them could get <""*dy and a sound frame of ar ** who ww on ,h h*ech last She kepi the will """d of the testator Sund.v tud a pleasant surprise until Ilildelta came. Cmm*el lot the other side had whe •OfBt tinned meat was disAn IlltfitliiwU -on Clarence '" "f^* 1 ,nnl and rive some form n**i*d 0" ,n sand. A resident was not his of v 'deiice on whi.h it could be of 3l Elizabeth's Village who was r.ilrier\ will, she said. She carried ,1,ld ,haI ,h *' %  '! rould not be on *"* b *" h '"'d the Advocate It to thi : ,-t n proveti i" ,n "llod in Common Form. nal '"e meat and some onion*: The will was produced in couii r Blrro *' ""Id that the Will '* er,v washed up from the se*. • %  %  '! it w hor hUffaaBdrf "*" no1 be n witnessed and thr B' TOUngOtOfl Who . %  i She had often MOO her hushaml """' l "d" 1 hav.nu put forward that n the beach promptly *et alx.ut write and kne* 11 %  ... h u 1? un a hoinirapii Win Bectlon %  %  11 "" iwad which *nu atootb hondwrlUnf SI.,then asked that ,* ( h ^ h **" 1 ,h 1 H "oraph Will hn..gs in tomato iauc. I'.lit b,;i. n .i K M„ n,^-_ Av '" ,,,lr fK*indl (->! m.ikin ; IdMI "f thi ( -ii'.i T"ll ilnAdvariiStdJSS her taJhin^ST. ••' ,,m,M ,.,,,he I, rate ,,..„-r,l.,, But. I„.-aided. then !" vlilll, M r ,SJe„r^S. '' v "" ; ^ ,, l"i-ifd w,ll.,. U> -i hoWMeltm ,-.„w,„l U e, -...la ., Her prejence. She ,„,, h at ot the leslolo, as much two pound* a week So, iJ tiif f, "li*. Sh0 5S! d "'" Lordship said thai the doruUeaami" The Lob. an .re ,auhr 2.. !" „^^ Lr^f h , ^ ,Md " "" %  '" produced I" him. .„ ,1 -.,-ument produced In Court. It to be identical!, the same I lecausc -lacould not as Ih, Will „ read it. but merely because bar Mr Harrow isid Ilia! UM) ha I-1;.- I rtl>'"*• acre, ot IB.! crop ripe cine.. Hirehad stifni-1 lu-r mairliiKe certlfleatc '.hiir conuiilion was correct. with an X". His lordship asked wh.t would At this stage she was given be the position In the ca.iat in) paper and a pen and to teat her mischief-maker claimed that a ability to -Mile. Mr. Barrow dieWill was not a correct Will tated to he.-, "I Martin Luther Mr. Harrow -aid that tinquMTaylor. witness Mr. Cecil Huihen'ion of whether a ce nt —tar would ENGAGEMENT RING STOLEN I I' I'll I "II III.I HI l> : *alued S63.3*. were .t*len from Cole'* t'rUUer*. Vlelori* Slree between Saturii.i and Mt.mi.i Tha> ii.< iili-m was reported to tinPolice i" Mr. Fred Coir *f thi* tvaane aetBUry. Loutae Hi iiin. ..itof Maa%  i id Htreet, SI. John, rei Ti.ii thai a iold eniuemrnl rlni. valued fit, was Hlolrn from her houae at Mount I'lr.njni 1'l.tn.allon. si I'hlllp. Al il-.i.i 11)311 Britj.sii Council AndlheB.B.C. The Btiiish Council exists "Of |h puipOM ot extending h;e and apprcciatl'm o* the Br.tisti way of lift It has represent at iws countrw Tld and eath yoar levtraJ nted to tudenls fmm abroad (or pottn (luitecmrsesin tht Kuij(ii | rttuh rnuntil il Welfare Dep-I'.nicri! ..• Ill London headquarters and this ,.(-. Mti.-s excellent cult,;' ll f.ii latttag % %  (Of il ihWBOfftOM for Ihem to know about life in Britain I M .1 whola in nMllloii t.i tfeatf I I ll|l ,. i.ll< (nil. i,| ill 'I 1.1. . and vacation courses and Nrroyi avallal la t., Tinintivt rocanl urllabui tnclud. • speare's btrthplac Avon; to Wtnchoatei artth it f. II, ..us public achool ..titi ftthed %  I heford and Cambrtdt* o S4w the college and binldms* and introduce the students na nu-io of Ith l i.r-cily. There an tvoral -urveys I leetuxM and voted t,... porticular euhji MM cf UIOH oooll with th. BBC 5 "•* "' pnrtktitai it u in abroad, foi the voter I I Ihc HIU 10 naM of them who lltti : Cticriil Overseas and QtaV I ii oi The students who • eem from twelve different eountrtai and la the ct>uxte of a forti ight ihey absorbed a great deal "t ueeful information i-bou[ the Fine and heard lecture* on Id Third. ITogriumnr Km one m named John Smith He is a manOveMM Service,„ii A Hesi-jrih. given b) the hi The food for family fitness Wrm,t i, *|ood V'II .vloiidiiy the Evening Advfseato \ill begin publication oi j livcl. cntartaining series oi articles about the Soviet* MARMITE THf VITAMIN %  IIAsr IXtlACT GIVES COOKING EXTRA GOODNESS AND FLAVOUR The author of iriaelea CIISIOIIIS Duties On L. 4 Goods i the case of recognlaed \ charitable organisations, person* lecelving relief packag.-i; from thv irnited States will have once iigam ( lo pay Cuatonu Duties. The article p of agreement relatinu to 6 cession was repealed by n BUI passed by the Legislative Council vesterday evening acmg director of COUtll Bank. He %  (K-.ik* and rends Russian ,i-i been to Moscow— not ., ., fclliiw-li.iu'lltt. Dttt H u mernt'i'i | eondueted dclcto art i i ghoul Hie OUtlOOk 'i, Irsartn in Peri -. Ri m lie Talked— He irevetled I II the 1 II %  Cd Mi* i.t aria uteee end % %  '! % % %  lecturei %  I pobc> end admlniatu Hi lush bmadi ggtini wen vliita i II. in when the. hforrl i : i, boui roulh broa I Kngliah holtdemonatratlona of ihem; |o Pb billy studio, whenthey watched n liuuimenl ..r ;. tarlal pbu n NOUI i.Nnpli-le with eoptoua iAtota on the M>"t end <". lecords: lo a Third ProgrammNEW RELIEF FOR ARTHRITIC PAINS But new treatment does more than ease these terribie agonies. -c. peo.1,,.1. IMII., IN I,,, ,. ,., ,, ,„„ „„, ^ %  ", %  lJ i -. %  !.. I "" '• %  "' "I lei ' .1,1,1 ate it part or the i ,. ,..,„.„,i 'Wfi !" /"' |V %  %  tilutlon. i. me i .. DOLC1N III...I l. % tt.H |..r. „u, %  i\\nvr..IT. t.lv oil of ii king l>i il.cis f I lira* ihe parks, lie f"rr1 irveri t>\ the London Phil. • ked at the churches He went '"'""nir iTih.-ti. grlUl Motot*ihe theatre end to a night Wiach ea aaloiet, to the Tetevli He talked lo the people he ""I'os *: UIM dove, ami to the HR. SMI I II I.ill-. HaJI. where Hi, -ig pre-. iil Ulicil lliirni .1 h. my i, %  la t deU) i-...r,t tmrn. "A PKK IK H III HOOKKIC-K flt\Klt\fHlS) |>|(I<; STORFS LTD. Mrund Street und ll.is.inir (ALPHA I'UXKMAIV) . ............. | M a t defan ProJl bi 'i %  of f, i iioi.f'iN o-i.iv. \ botUa ot HHI prw %  fill. Kn ght." and she wrote it. Written In An Hour She said that tier husband took Sn Ji ,ni Form id a half acres of fourth crop ripe canes and ten acres of trash The canes and trash erty of Applewhalti were insuico On Tnuradju leal ., inc. also at Applewhalt'*, bin ill one Jlltl .i h.tlf tin WM not befon the Court, bul acres of fourth crop ripe canes, hether it should be admitted in This nie .is reported to the IVThe article, which was one of the Economic Co-oper it ion AgreeLtd Thev nwnts between the QovtrnmenU about an hour to write the will. He gave It to her a couple of days after he had made It He died -bout three years after. When he began to write on the paper had no other writing on it H<' expl.in.itin the wnting of the will Mated that he began it in 1 iit*3 and at the b than written Decembe: The case was then ud)ourned. I.ubourrr (iHs V f Ihc United States of America Mid the United Kingdom Wl let minuted last April, and com.'— QUendy opportuiul> w,e l.kin %  %  .lie local Act by a Hill whsCh In00 Mnntlny to Customs Tarlll Act At Small Itidge Plantation, uualing with thr exemption .( Chrisl Church. Ihree and thrreCustoms duty quarter acre* of first crop ripe iiuint when a fire Umiri the hill passed by the TO MOSCOW, he d< he iw and what he heard. id' dcstiibe* the shops, the Irlnk, the elothee, the the houses, Ihe arcades, tliv looks and newspapers ii. tella how ha queued up in ihe Bed Square to look ai Lenin 1 mununued corpse (and what the people n, i>! %  euoue had to aa] > He u II visit t Lenin's home, wre-. he insperte.l 1^ (tWO 40 h.p. Holla-Roycea). Me Uatthed Who is John Smith' He Is 28 who bchaig* l \ netv ihow At UK %  eg ihe .luvi-. the aturtenii i eeeeeed ,. v.-r> ,•-! w..rkim ol the waj In which th ,1fil run .mil the manj dh1letil< >,. ' i '"I i' m with which ii %  *contend. Months FOT Begging incurred then last week They Logalletrw Council ver.tiida>. banU mil%  an ri i are Uto prnperty ol the late a S ,... hot '' %  | ih.mm ^n covering the flOlltll t Or Lai*f* l lT\ y %  ',' „ ,_ m ,. exempt from th* aoymenl Ml Provincial) u %  Ferw i i.int..ii..n. tomeduti m %  • %  pare part ant to Iton, tb> [is Worship Mr C, B finffllh W Of***? about l no pin on avhiUon spirit* and li in lUdk Fleet An Arm | Usrday aentenced 20-year-old Monday burnt two and a quarter for usv s )|p|4 l>v ,,,,. n.,,1,...W ^bnum Bmeg I^to oi tji^ ; oMjty itptjum, Lle>t Aenplane aub; w* not old Etot Lord's althouKh she had said that it was V 1 "?**; •it one period, was that Michael to i: must have been a miftake. menl wu h Mr Cumberbatch objected to lrcen>-of. Mr. Barrow's asking her what had "" Ituabinifg intention with leelni the will, when Mr. Barrow asked that •*,/* ,", -, SSJlV^ "SIKBSS K5 Zll ~rt that while ..arching at tht ,'L U U "ifias^f ^ house h*re the .lefendant was a wttneea though he did not sign sUvln|[i ihe pen waa found and was later Identified by Ward who said that it was stolen from his workshop in Frhiu.irv 1951 Before sentcncine. him. Mr C.r*ffllh s;dd: "Prison is not really %  tor you. You abouM be sent to a place and be treated, but %  Hill. St. ""• property of H A H Johnson ...„.ith's imprisonThey were hard Llboui for the Al abeul HO p fountahTpen and pena lire at Claybury PlentaUon. St proprrtv of Wilbert 'ohn was put out before it caused Ward of Black hock. St Micha. I %  "" W* damage It burnt only The fountain pen WM valued 1, l)hl ll, '^'T\ nup n ^ e ''r!. nd the ,-nkn.I. at Ifi I %  : %  >t I S. ,1> They W*ee Cpl, Devonlsh. attache.1 to the niMired C.I.DCentral Station, told the ring thr The uniform; and equipment ot Mrd) .. on Monday n . church Lads' brigade, as Is the iii,i Church Slop going around the bu to Ihc i,4 ,u u d being .i RUlBal fa.u l-"l'l" You have i,,,,. ,,.,, ; ,., i> ewmeg, about (otni and i i Hi %  "'• %  '""" Pon* tneii llo ItH "' %  A. V.HIKIMI, „ii,| M, ,.\ h .i n Haneccteu, Judges ol tht who Assistant Court of An iu5 <-. v ei-ui(i Jajnei Cnandiai .,i 11 .-iv i ,M. Orongej Hill. at. J i the Hern. Heel '"I'-need him yesterday to fOUl ntlir imprisonment for begthe Boy Scouts' and Girl 0 Aworiallons. and The baggage, pgggnaal l UM bold effects nf the \ TredM CommUsiotier aeamcUtad tti Barbados. ..^ i .. ...^, h ,.*im a^.—.*..... ** at'. in ^ *£,**• %  hn,s n Hl h ,hc UAF "' M t,l, • lma Bt the Probyn Lttreel /" •'"• "' The Hen. the Colonial %  eeratar) it begins *xr} U ;:,, !.e, "aseTga'IrS *"> out thai the Uvnooat, I .i and herself were to carry the last win to the aoUdtor bnwn UB. The lime bet w een the writing of the two WtUa WBJ about three monthA PbldeUa did not return from ~-j^ Q \ da anvthing Ion ("i roil Ti lidded until after his death and ^JJ hav( ( s ,. ltoill( C01C o( noul ,. she carried the will to the solid, ir ,..u m „ and larceny coming up tor About a month after the death. 3-.^,,,,, V ou Mr. Cumberbatch then gave" 1.,.," SH id lhat at times he was evidence as to his custody of the ui&w* i 0 check himself from takv .11 fi r sometime. ._„ up 0 t|, ei people's things 1 eetor Clarence Taylor, also ctalled Smilh. then gave evidence ~— He said that Ma'tln Taylor was %  •! f\ Ins father He himself was 56 and Jl/(ij?0 tjtttnOH HOT %  l 1 mi-ther. Damage* Case NONSUIT I <3wi tidolyn H< Itlark E U.elb-;T^*urX*7f C ffi.TS ' Australia had recently .„£ 10 damages for detention of fur£• Wj* todlto with I nilurc came before Ills Honour Trinidad. and the Mr 11 A Vaughan in the Assistihcicfore gi.nte.t to ,,1', Court l Appi'al vesterday. Commissionei on UV beal HewtU wag BUM .laimlng the Ciprocity. customs privilege return of the furniture or the liar to those value of il which was estimated Kingdoi at stfA IB/-. U.S. Air Force A" ^ent tiii' banking. MPt SMITH r.or.M TO MOK. < Ot\ Ihe account of .. hvelv observant young man with no lltilugy In p-llllle exclusively in the ON Mii\h,v I 1 -. bug stand. liv lining this Then Hoi | ronrinned the deei.,,,., ,,i 11 WorahJp Mi (, H ;nmth. Act. in* lattice Maglstrale of Dlslrict A" Chandler appealed against Mr Griffith's decision. Harbour Police Cm. table JgOM WilkliunHi told Ihe courl that rebruary 2 he w on duly at the by 11 Street bus stand anil saw bu S.P.C.K. BOOK DEPARTMENT" (C F. HARRISON & CO. FIRST FLOOR) 1 sf;u:t:no\ or Vivii „./ mBCEJVT nuts mam OIK RXTBWVB STOCE 1 IN TH| M \KIN(i 1 rruRY III'' 'MCI 'KIINAHIi SPILSB1 KV HIS 1.1 Kr \Mi IIMl. 51 R \ I'l'i.V .81 BRN I PIC 1 HE RIVAL Mi iM \ MOUSE IS IHUtN J< H RNEY KK END Of THI AFFAIR 11 LOW; IIK VAI.I.RY OF SONI; IK HMtK MOMENT I (.'rnnai'i %  %  I' II lltntlcy 1 I LOM (.'ro'inor -. Howard Ctewes %  •l Undue CommenUrj Hurtor) ol si-<; Bhepe ofthe l.nuigy irgy Wui*hip-.Wh.it the 1 -f I stands for. few diariea Mill %  LlBgj eases VAUtNTINI CARDS GREETING CARDS EASTER CARDS \..-'i,ilia Uater Turned Off ii. iderda Ln ihe Btittona Croaa '.' i" c m *n •>' arrested him ^tended to United ,t "-" 1 %  • %  w *'"" wllhowl that Trade Commissioners in "•"*'. "upply of watei '""k him BI itl'in whei %  Traffic Offences Reported 1 Mondea %  P* exiee-ling tin speed limit on :iuing to place speed traps along done lo ensure that motorists do II is father used to live I and used to vigil NCh Other "I ttaum my father's Assistant Court of Aphandwrilmg. he said. y(5terdBy Judge I! A M.iniiurilini; Kecnmiised Vuughan s ruck out a case brtMlghl l two docu|, v plaintiff Enid Babb of Cocoanut the irt to be In his v/aik. Christ Church, a. lather's handwriting, but the docufondant Leatei i> Brencn Ol WOT' ftoi claimed thing. Chris) Church, aaklnfl RM v.li not in his hand£S0 clan,age vriting Babb claimed thai Ol Cross-ex a mined by Mr. CumberIKT 28, 1931 she sustained Injuries ;. uh. l* said that the "C" end the -while In an etc-dent Theea In%  W" of the documents he admitJuries were caused bl the defendtraffic blwk ted to be in hla father's handwritant and she claimed the sum of _„„,.,, Dd the "Cs-' and "Wa" of £50. Every day reports come Into the Tragic Branch at Central I aUi the one he denied, did not seem The complaint was filed by s .., |(lI i n some cases the offenderare warned, but In OH I like to him He and Mary TayE D. Rogers. Solicitor of J Mrbeg] been on good terms before Street, on behalf of Enid Ha tin Many other people wire reported In other traffic offences. U iajB In the side of the road, on* I .vith roaii dgni three lot peridot Ui leetiltted areaoni 1, and leaving thr engine nmiiinr. one for parking %  motor vehicle OrOUnd a bend, one for wilful ,..ge. one for tailing to have a lighted lamp on %  toOtoi 10 move u motor vehicle so as to prevent a charged and appear before Police Magistrate ing when both s and] thi t .in „ wore turned oil w it< 1 wOg subsequentl.* -uppln-d by ml i>> thWet Depurtn 1 People '•"! •' roeep ncles had to form ill their 1 l who became Impi . 1 .-. . irontly he %  Rood MB ently d Vi re going to send bin mUai inoonvi where be would bi d after. the BjrhSpg Polie. he was eharg.| Chandler had 12 pre | vi.tions for begging al., people, Chandler told the COUI thai he appealed so thai he cOUl beg for mercy. "| have • nd am unable to work Their Honoun told CHILDREN'S FOOTBALLS Size 1 $3.39 Size 2 $3.92 Size 3 $5-05 Genuine leather complete with bladder just like the real thing. For boys from the ages of 10 to about 12 CAVE SIIEPIIKIM) & CO.. LTD. 10. II. 12 & 13 Broad Street KlallYI \sPURt, SAFE MILK rftft KLIM % %  sW MILK h lsaes Iks Woila 0... NOTICE Owlaf I" thr Arrivil i,( llu"BfPBBBS Of SCOTLAND" "ii TIIIIIMIII, 7lh iiisli.nl. we mil I.,< LOSING f.,r MI BTMU] Hull hH*) HI, SMI l(l)\\ llil! „i ,1 Ttnir.il.i, KMI.II1S LTB. PHOENIX %  • % %  ARMAt Y Httt't %  Fotd He'll '-{cato, $o $W IW ifc mndt |o> doq a vs y. Where becauBs oil dogs leanilM %  basic formula. Tl aronee •• baol hard| Jogs want und i—< mno|; !'• tops nulniior.a'.l-/ : rtflMsl*, Buy nmi /.oil f,nd DoaCliew i, I ram dog a b.u of raaal ofDeoChow•I•J3II3:• %  f""* naaea in par | C 'JMJ dog. he N i %  • < feeding s .hob ..J rj| D TtKTfc nrrnvr. ALSO WMI.AHI.i: I'l IIIW I'll.l o\ 1 now H. JASON JONES & Co Ltd.—Distributor. FOR COMFORT RIDE A HOPPER BICYCLE THE BARBADOS lOl.NDRV LTD. Whitepark Road 8



PAGE 1

WEbM-n.w li.llltl \H\ ... 1932 BAimUM' Ui\ .11 PXGI srvrv Land At Reid's Bay To Be Leased Bathing Sheds To Be Erected THh HOUSE OF A.SSKMBLY i %  icing it lawful for tha from tbr ^vc-rnor-in-Executive Committee. %  portion of land at Bay containing lfi2 perches for the purpose of (i 'ling sheds. Dr. II G. <. oa (L) Introjut as good, if ifot barb jduced the reeol that dial In Bt toaVeetry aiere %  b two ijacrlshes which St Jau bs pot .irli •he an in the ma.ter. „ of Mr. r K. Wair.u he %  thai Mr WUMnaaa of the House, In am! out, be i r< The Installation of three flam: pipes and Are-hydrants at the Bag ll nous | .- beane and six ottaan ia.il -haald not prevent the lh **" Housing Area was yesvrstrlr* from luvlm their twin, l^day approved by the LegUi-aad bathing sheds an up In the tt louncil when that body eOUparishe-i. The pUtlnr. HrhK were '"'red m two separate KewHupakl for aal -f the Labour .el£" %  ' ••* to the liook* of fare lund while tfce s*h*r was H -fprpn ' nd plans submitted In CBBBafaratam i the nrathes. In r *frd to ,hc Buv Hou m £ .,...te^uTTe^^Sh dtaEa^J\rin^ .,.„. {aur-iiieh dialer cart Iron pipe social amrmur, i^/S^rS., m m ** "iw M cf '.he %  'SsrJS k iSs^srLz a Si %  s anus kles Road lontj wag %  lease land lo H.. si Wichaei In IM| 'hmendmcM lo tl O/hich i. 1 for cer al %  pwari no iraruai fdven to an) at) %  Bnere was now xpcciAc authority IP enable th, G..\.> or-in-Execufve Commute.to lease thai i "'" i,'".,"" ." pM1 tfteular ptoot of land U) the Vertr,wh ' Bridgetown •f St. James. Ha therefore mov *d something thai the Government *'" ££ Aourtn. Schemed nrl,. Mnu t.l i^ u ri..t. It ., H l.i uw il^ rower arvt .nil nti "*'> "l !" nOUHn* Scheme %  pnld i an lo advocata. it araa ahould use it. i>ower and call on along and under Ua HouHng Scheme's pri'.' i am a A*IM. nice ting yesterday passed a raao* | %  .<*ll Airport, in. II. t.. i % %  •> who I ,„i Aasentblj ycater'•'-" chargi ol lha raaetanon said ii was necessary to have : ,. aw %  italj UM rapl in i %  .... ... % %  %  %  %  % %  %  -ii.t act Ion against ... i ,• ... aircraft inj lefuellcd. The Oovoa cartala %  %  in the tier .iv t u-h urgcn'. Houae and II wa one and hr Ull M (ll „ m(rtrd h ., got proper rinds „ ^ nimd Mr. r. C tlo44ard lEl said tli.it .i playing \IM*r (It "-nd that now %  %  e oppO' I rl* The b il e ttner ;.arisiuof 480 yardt. . %  tin >.inis ana IIK IINI^TI (ii'r> : "rtandntM and tire hvdranb. Th.cost of Mils work is rrtm Saeeial Kale s3 400 ratt of The o;her extension m the Pine %  the patEstale H<.islng Schonie *ill praraaa vide 460 '• nh olaI r lo cover meter eas: irwi pipe on which will ., the burden be llxed six irid[H|->,ind lln' 1-..'venitneni h>di... % %  at ran af pi d ... 1. .I'l amani By land. -rtBoo. Ith Bandy 1 in woods which should b> bv the Government I park 'Hi'l bathing -it. I nulural beautr BDOt and tor tha iaople. l that it woul fringe on any paj 1 eaUM there was room (MIUM tofl They had undout •• pot of Bridgetown Bi that to the ato arnment and hopeLnurch smid th.ii the Hon. Member Sixly-llve-ycar-old Mau rauch in order and added that the ''"' 1 without opposition, th.s knew th it 10/pel Ion wa alloGriffith of Palmers Land. Krocae for' which 'it would he would be an opportunity whu l labour Welfare Fund Philip, was struck by a motor mr\ -., sliould not be missed again otherfa the purpose of providing social 0 ner il had overturned B nralndad lha iniroduccr uf •*• ,m v would And ronM ananlUaa for those who work hi icge Bottom last night %  0 re*olulion that not only tl>0 w "lthy person erecting buildUeiUgar III She was taken to the General %  Midenu ir, St. James thouM lx'ng,s <" %  ihis last remaining beauty Thai aOI 'M B 4 I) for thHospital where she was treated dated Or (rant which if Government than purpose of establishing playing und detained, for injuries to both %  passing of the resolution RcMilulion In Order Mr. C F.. Talma nBd w ^ m xhf n*lu.u. ie roads and land for a distance '" , L W1 ,h Hhowever lold tl" House that la and ftx them-n three gald. A lot ao a result of ., eoni i a a l witi bo was to lo don,, r. put timi with an eUvtn.ian. ha dhr." %  aaapa coserad that the resolution arouM %  Bh the lion Junior t,. ,,, HouaO, btl for St Thomas 'f hei ,( W Kll j^..^. ,),.,, information alwut that day. Mr VJapp \U said that man „,.., l>i( r.f ihr (.litur, % %  nx lhnl lhr -jouOdiruBl I-, tho iieids but si. puna, „ h ,.„ thlv „,,,. ,, ws getting none The ,„,., llin ,,,; 1V wcre „,,! labour Welfare Fund nan when the new -pi on ara i^lenre -inc 1M7 and NUII no beu,,, rrectrd an ,t npprentl Aatd sraa arnuwanad hi pi t nta ihi -. • %  bui not tough Into lha n v -— *•* v ,,f l,,p aTOundlngi wan No 1 rioru> lulw not mB ki>. t Mr. Talma (L) said lhal play no: thai reason, he whota old not b.' given tuiorhad t.. M oondanwiad Had tnej L sjbould pay bean proparb inspected .it ti attention to first 1 lungs find Tni ihej would nol 1 Cull Mawld give priority to the setting fa,-,-) w ,tii lha resolution whii-li up 111 nines 11 hind %  ., la-fore them wide \ h, .11 ;.'.>,i |t, when ihe Mi Smith il. said ihpl *oo plane* were being iVfuellen thaj many pbudni ItoM asan enhad to have electrical equipment couraging Idlen B n-lt thai the mounded other*i-f the laf resorts m tbt %  e e n handed and accepted %  puquets from visitor.from Arts of the a ^ H e thought thai Chrtat Chui gst and foremost, should have Been granted priority in a matter fff this nature. Be hnixxl Ihnl in •he not too distant rutltra ami m 'hat he nteanl weeks and not hOUMIIg Mr Mettle] ( %  ) aranted lo Baaure lha lhal linn JuM)u bOhi„ K %  up its mind to purchase. : M, ha ,,e r feet. At the tune of the •jere coiieerned. but lho<*. m oth'-r Would have to pay many limes said, but lot repai r i n g houses, ,-jdent, the ca r was being driven S rishc*. partlcularlv Christ 'he value for which they could Tinfund ha* U-cn gOttlg on for )V Mr. West of Holhersal. SI John urch with its balhii;g facilities obtain it to-day. • • S addition to being one or the __ ,. .. ._ ._. _„ l -'", """"• '" OBfly al->ut 2.000 Norman King, a barbci uf ief resorts in the islr.nd it had Mr : "' ' ot f n i?" n ***$* %  . Powder Road. Station Hill. fv,l ed the passing of ihi le-olution Mr l.e., il.i SJUI lliat Ue ( „^ .^ i-.i. ^ K, ., f --Lam, ha tut that h, undaolo .,„. ,..,, ,i„ „ rfio !" ;'^T n %  >"" %  >'• • %  ""** "" ,K. SI ( If. Iq lhl .nmc of It had lcn TOM loo for >ucti inann WXUI Km. ..m.,,l h !" , .luih,. '" ll in Barbadoa. ap..' ,„„ „,..,.. .urpmed ih?^JaJindiJ at 11T day taii '" i9 ' v ''"'' from Quaan'B Park and In lalai ,,, k ,. „ ,,.., ..... ..„..,,, „ as com. £ "niaindor of lhal day. but ,, .,,, _.,, ,, ,„. ye, !" Kin. Q. Flflh M,moS*S| *? £ L u ooS, W WauSc ^S ^STSS^S ^SffSt ^-<^?W Ilk. rial Park, there were no oth.-r K ,„„| ,,,. m ,„.,„„.,„„„,, lhj i amuement centrea. M in,,„ ,. ctfnlnr, ,„ is >••-,"-K K BJS, rz?ZL?& s JS ""• %  ''"-""-' • %  •--%  n-Excniti.-e Committi-e. "' lid IKmad. ~. •ey did no, happen bV own land g^fS!* ^'^ '"' """ til Christ Church, would . least picnics and other to pnrchnse some under the Compuldoor amusement IBry Pow Act whereby bathOne saw dozens of bUM U tag 'hed-! rould be erected fur the ing from all over the island willi tJBe of the public. people who had to i'o and ash He welcomed Ihe resolution permission to cross peopfc %  rid hoped that many such more to get to the beaches. Because •rould come dOWB freonenM ;,• OOMt people rould afford In pvir#ie>would meo with the genchase such places at high prire*. %  would "* %  :, 1 th ii ihe n i and noi the 1 he rescConsideration Of Labour it was a crying shame that they should sit there and allow r-very %  l>e taken up. Pioneor Induntriea Hill Passed f lrom Page 8. thai lufflctenl l*erniii.ion Asked -ron was being made ui advertise the .. %  It'll ibioad. Secrelai> had explained the origin pm .f the Bill, and the i jtiliialion of I Bfdsej lhal furthei miglit i...lit uncd on Purtbei down .n riaywooda, ha He nTPUnrtO Rico, the Convenl.on by llu. MaJestyV the %  .leilived r.mthj %  aid that peopie again bad to ask Jam I d 1, lUdad bad inlroGovenunenl. lion M. GaleimovBill,, and permi>MOii to be able to use those ducod such a Hill, they wisely >. se^Hided by the HOD. the tolwoodi whenever they went on a advertised H in Caiiada, lha •**** Secretary who had coi.suUpierdO. ifi fell that the lime had United Kingdom and ihe United e' with the Hon. the Atlonie* el approval or the Houst Government Thanked Hr. t. HI. A. Holder (L) lOankffd the Goveniirient lor ine kind favour of allowing bt, Jaanaa i nave thia opportumiy fpj the baining aneus. He however would nol say like tnc honouiaMe K DIM an m i I Church anal his par! i. I ,„„. f,„ the Government to %  oRMj to allraet indusGeneral, have priority. He reminded tha that while they did not intend to IxlaJlata. The Governor of Trtnihonour. oie n um ber that Bt. rob anyone of his land, yel they dad had even sent an Economic fames was the plan i,.it that the majority of the Adviser el lha Head of %  small B^rst settlers lano.u. .All the other people should have It. overseas to publicise t arUhes had prionlv and St. He was of the opinion thit lln lha legislation imc s had been left behind, bul time had come toff the tnemU-i tiistrialirta the they were now .onun; of the Government to cease being mm wi re Btfoided. He did not think Ih< honouismall-minded and if something II able member had any reason was suggested by the slightest sdverttaJna; space hod been taken to be jealous Tlic IJIUI was opponent, they should see it tan. '" '"'" various purchased very many yean ago plemented. and nothing had bee. There were no bathing -heds, no latrines nor playing balds, therefore the people in St. James were more th..n grateful for this opportunity. He hoped thai for the good of the community, mor sheds would be erected OB lb coast of St. James so thai when %  people from the .. lin p i ta mi[ fields' a nd ness by ... parishes came lo the PSiruB, other things for public rOaraa tl ng that. i,on mendatioiis of .ultable sites for playtnl ftoldi Alter some 18 M 18 people had WOfffcad In the interest ot the people at the Vestry's I | BO I il wel fare Officer to say that the pie-re ,,| l.mil ii too small" hi ask.d lin 0o\i rnmant should not allow Fratn Page 6 OB* POI oil t., turn them BTOUnd would laaa note of what was said There would be' %  l*V >"'" J ]•• before he gave his assent lo it. with pi ami fields as long as he Bon Mr Chaiieno, continuing |; '"';,,.;;'^^i'"'^" h Iv his trenchant criticism, soul "it %  ",'' 7 mrtT ff m h V a most unsuitable Hill, and it wil. "" M IDhl many others which are resolut honoured in the breach." After the H.n th.('..iciiial Uy set the | Ii Ra i thai the groundlna. %  hould t* i.. lo lha thai eve,, ii an contact with lha KBT h. the otherwould still IN 1 lO 'hen work. The resolution Eczema Itch Killed in 7 Minutes H you lc I *orn out. deprened. or j|enerall/ run down a (last or two a day o' Buckfatt Tome Wine will quickly restore lost energy and tone up he whole nervous system. Glvm( new vitality it fertile* you against 'ever and exhaustion and remember. Buckfast Tome Wine especially valuable Ft Of -Mr BUCKFAST TO\K WINE TAKE HOME IOTTLE TODAY hem The ; then passed. be posli turlb • IF., .mil reud.ned. Ir, Cammlm, ieph.i>: -aid given to that he wanted to remind H : ''"' "ill and fte I | on his extreme lelt -hat tl _* M y'" the preaeni Qevai ment socialist Government and it would implement any measure that sought after the good and welfare of the people. He said that a bill to amend the Vestries Act was passed In 1 giving lha Vestries the pow(C) I they would not I at one centre. Mr. W. A. Crawford mat the resolution -ought to glv #ie (iovernor-m-F.xeeutive ComBtttea toe aaea toase a portion of lind at Reld's Bay lo the Vestry of St. JaaWM Me wanted to know If It WA< the thoa Trinidad ii .; % %  '! 1. i-i % %  ( oni|M-|ilii>n ,i> an additional raging they should not be iji t., tit drtvea oui f busi. nii|i. tr.nni. I was referring 'Muse ion HU 'em so! m Toasted fresh and -weet — for folka eat Kelloga'a Corn Klakeafaataawemake" )K-t ViOCiM' r -r SJ.in Tlt.ua:. CurbYpurPiles Snmi'th i"fi AVese f II si \vii\r row IIAVK aasM eanaie !" R A New Rtnfa id PLASTIC WARE • REFRIGERATOR UK CUBES • HEERIIIERATOR JAI1^ • BOO TRAYS and CUPS COASTERS • NAPKIN HOLDERS • TOWEL RAILS • CANNISTER SETS i I'l.mi'. Sugar. Ten, Ele.l • TUMBLERS (In all Rim fur the Kld> and Adults) • TRAYS BARBADOS HARDWARE Co. Ltd. (Till-: HOI SK I M|; KAR(.AINS) 16. Swan Slncl Thorn21119, 44(16. or 3531 be congested They (the Hon. Members) would espei fact that Japan see therefore that the Qovi i Una to get back ment was willing to do its part. Into the West Indian market. The Vestries should go ahead and Providing that the locally m select those things, he said, and f... tured were of the the Government would do its best same quality and price, then 0 implement them. then was every reason for prollr. Cummin* said that they all tilting the local Industry. .. felt that Vestries would soon be Mr. Crawford said that on]] %  ovemorin-Executive CommitB b ol a s n Od, but they would still last wOte, the Japanese Trade • the Vestry who had moved hliv s local form of Government Commissioner visited Trinidad, L Ihis natter which could go ahead and make I %  bad Be doubt he would recommendations of Ihe nature t" "-m L* i enlng hi H. il-ados Free Access Government. He said he had ie|>eateiliy J If the land was to be leased . ... t > a Govi ant tlial %. the Vestry he would also like „ „ Labour fund hould take some step* to |o know if the public would l ( .v>Mr 0n ** r d < %  said that he find out what new industries free access to the sheds or if they want d Io remind the lion Jn. might piove economical to Bart uuld have to uav tent a.the Member for St. Thomas that the bnd- and Government might M*as> ,1MI. J L.,!. niowy was being spcnl out of the w. II consider Ihe question of !1^1HU?^ breaking Ubour Welfare Fm>a |n Cnr|J twb4irkln g on uch B mehm9i if if t ground. Ha fait that full dcl.il. .hould £^2 53B*. MMthM b. IM Uic House so thai n „,„ lhem two ,„ alk 1 TMS.1 itsat k.iAVAtthnfajl 4I.A _ ul,l ihe profits would remain In the .,,._,,...^ fields. One 1 *' •"" hould be used for fther Vestries were granted the wia finished but the I rvlces. ame facilities they would be abb' ( v br) was WOflderini Mr. J C. MeUle* (C) upi appreciate the posiUon. wheth. the remaining : uggestlons P to n eai industries rould \x"f tiioai neJ] He hoped that the Oovarnmenf part of the auocati fc'ould take action In other parpored other playing Held Shes in which the bathing was whether lo spend it on I .. tor lliji/ii'iir •• %  .* ABC lo Leer'he >3vjiory ipoi%  kie some 'Harptc' hao il* bowl and •es** overnight —then flush 11 J ihe S bend where no bru'h c i •H—plc* k *ofc io u*c ia II .%  % %  i .In! %  •:: these eonnrclrd to septic haaha. HARP1G THE SAFE LAVAlORV ClBANIIR WJJWJwr. %  Pains in Back. Nervous, Rheumatic!



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BARBADOS ADVOCATE WEDNESDAY, itBKt.VKV . MM Qahib faUuui w %  %  MM %%  Barbadian Dentist In U.S. .u.%  foe the %  %  LI l'luilu ,i UarbaI] | li. j i %  i •£ a* • %  denial %  I . >. tba U.S. M" Holiday Over li MRS. ROOT. SELLIEC let: for Trinidad yesterday • %  eks hullI They m • Leaton-on-S. | ••• %  IT holiday ;ho tgssu* family cama they hava ;t!ready reBest Dfesaed Politician ? It's A Plot —Say. DAVID rXCI.KS sir. aoiua r who u a Saiiciuj* I IW'-of-Spain wo* a nmnlr %  Mad a"l( twuii which .* hOBM la Andover. He said. It's • plot by UM tailors to make ma buy another suit." Hthought awhile Then adoad: "I know why I nav v been c h osen, it's because most tailors ara wealthy and haw television and Baffc. bgt>y daughter who hava "t**j( have aaan sae in toe proi iavmg • Barbada. ra fET?! '^** ** ew "-' WM "*> • turn to Trinidad (o-day. %  **" %  *•*Anyone would Mi Allamby who wu also hart k ok wall-draaaad beside Foot. Ho or. nohdj>v has already returned. J 0 1 •" *•** ""* doUiaa, you H. hi with Trinidad Leasehilas "£*. n> %  % %  %  ***•" Ltd.. in South Trinidad. Mr Anlhony Eden h* Mrs. Allamby is the former f***'""" * n**** 1 * She He Blade*, daughter of Mr. *• "„* lr,M d P" l li 1 %  nd Mrs. Edward Blades of "Mar** !" But now, says the *". Hastings. fr-Wll "*"• Wa\ jackpot M aeflrutely hit by Mr. Ecciaa." Talking Point Bay CorsWroy Mr. Ecciaa looked at the .wonHow many "romtntf mea" ha* roy froistssni be wac wearing £S E-Ro-UToJ^c. fe~* ^ :;:^Hd* M^an^^e !" ^ £^ ^ T5S .'^cUnSdS thlch JSj-gjr. -.G3; to ^ " 'M-UUun whohng baao hob'S? *, w~ able to aay that luuka ..Her nioblerns I D ""* n V' JM £ti.r r. tha, dayln ,n B" 6 "** %  %  >'" •* * he dldnt own many. The suit. nTnogroe. in Maryland. She u ^ l d '^.."S' ;"'J"? l Royal H£ on Monday for he did own were J ^ S(md ttie flrrt woman ever to be up UB "u.t?l5 If*. !" Trinidad by B-W.I.A. en route to best or Downing-,irt variety* pointed to UM grand jury for the !" uaaaw o*y. *• — Jamaica. country aulU. aod a number M *^; £"" SL„,, w:.:. . t — lie "which arc really loo old. even for M work* with the anon i Americans Return loU.b. u*v country" He wore one .rf The Doctor* ayhjp gfgg Brother And Sister L OBD KSHKB ioiiv,i SgrtvaiB BaUoJ Bratt) M prcaent Itoiidaying in UatLudoii with Ina gk Willy Found a Strawberry —Bar H Had a Hard Time faringIt— Br MAX 11(1.1 I. KNv\RF and Haaid, the al.adoa children with the turned. about names, found their friend Willy T<>ad sitting on a tcaditool, looking cry dejected. Th-y asked him if inythina; waa the aiatter, and after a moment or two of lilence. Willy i. plied that there was. What happened, Willy?" asked \U %  1. "That'e taa treaaia." aigbed Willy. "I'm a*t esactly aure what did happen Bat-any way. I started out wkn soo.etinng aod 1'sa supposed to aa*e half of it krft, but 1 doe't •eeea U ha aUe to find ll at This all %  Banded so mysterious that knmrf and Haaid %  eg*cd Willy to tell thsuu the whole etory. Isawa the Bead "Well," antd Wul>, "1 waa hoppink down the road peat tna etrawbwii y patch wiMn ail at once I ipied a ('me, big. *•*, luwy. strawberry. It waa perfectly U—tiful and my awkidi waa basxiMiua*. U water at tbr Uiewgat of eatiag U. Bot mst as I waa about to open my aiuth and swallow it, a robin cnou flying over to ate." What a>d the lobiti want ?" aked Knarf. "The robin looked at U straw. Viy aed said it ww >•> • *i tba most beautiful he had ever seen. Then be asked me, please, to give • : ,t -YuulUtiH have half of t left. Willy.' said the robin. ,.. <,ff with half at U ied Willy "I i-h-o \ I.U ,....! a.:io p.i. Willy i a big. a chipmunk. Each of them asked me to give him half of my strawberry." And did you V Knarf and Hanid exclaimed. yea," said Willy, -beesose each of them told mo that if I only gave him half I would still ha half left for myself. And finally," •aid Willy, "when all of them went away. I glanced down to look at my naif of the strawbery, and it was no bigger than the bead of a pin! Here—Just look at it!" And Willy held out his paw. Head ef a Pta Sure enough the piece ef straw% %  .-I v was no bigger than the head of a pin. "Now what I can't under*tar.rl." said Willy. "Is how my half d my numUi -iciun and" I was 1 of t hi strawberry got so small withapout U* JIU>* tkc naif f the out my eating it even. But, ha %  iH a>aw S a n aa e... aocsn bsaaath MITCHUPJ SCOTT RYAN 1 AIM thr Lor.: Eeucethw*! %  -Op/I I'Oll t MILD J ia The RACKET .WINO Tli. SMIUM OfENING FRIDAY 8TH | -CAPTAIN HORATIO Ln-, HORNBLOWER P L A Z A HLAZA "TEi CAaa-TVS'SSS I B*.. !• %  • AST SHOW TiNtrr. i Mimi \i.isr % %  I MtiaWORLD. LNC K.ik ALVN Jams* DALI TIIUFOI •atlHpm -wtKu rn> wstariSN wst Ttnart n.v f *i %  \>III BOMIT Simon. Dennis CKrefr •ONC. OS NEVADA He Roeern 'I\MH JOSK .NUN %  i*l iiagiug D lugh i Ajnoni the places of bava •Mtad Tree Hill. Mi W.ill.UN llS] -Hi;. l.''l this i U 1 ^ Mr. HK. Haritoon. ly i.ui. a **" ttw MDIV company arrived here c Mmri*. for a abort visit M ipjincd by , those recently. lorn.ng for g^,, ,,„. g^^ Rico on tawar way net really. But If he doesn of huriM' to tinUS. an* Mr. and D UE tc Puerto H.' Mo n day iftfa) Mrs J Clifford Dillon who hava been holidaying al the I'aradlsc Beaefa Club. Mr. Dillon wbn v.ry put bis trousers in the press no one else dot*.'* He nasally remembers to use a u d. Mother brush. Ha is easy on sock 1 to the repairers in Trmid.d Engagement v.rf d SwsWg. * SSSwSS 8 vo"^S: HU *m m Cd rwciilly in Trinidad beIIntel. Avenue New York aswsswgaj ,.,nu.nd,. Mr. Miinw wdl be iMvUig wi al ^ p.cn u .. bound to.., •Mr-&cle,. .dv.ee to 11 rjonundjl Friday while Mr. and Mr. rttr, hl U-Sj by ^. ^ n „. pUM m Mruggilng young poutloan. II .:„.,lM,n and daughter wlU bv ntMr ConrK | Brant wno has bten ••: '• to Ike bMt uulnr. A u.andy ,.( Trmiilad and Mr. Anmalnlng on for • tew day*. laying at* Four Wlnda, St. Pater. '•* good au.u* arc better than a t Fligrht Delayed Mr. and Mr.. CharUa Spartu. lot ol: cheap on That aoa. tor %  Si.ain and tfce ^ who have bvarn holidaying at the everything in life ,„ n ,. u rntANS-CANADA A1BUNES Ocean View Hold. Ijter todny And here la what Cloth and Mr. K-rrol 1 night to B.rbadc, schedule Mr. and Mr. Thorn.. Iblnv CtoU— „lg of Mr. Oliver IgnulClbbon. %  • %  "I U.c t.mc „t i.my.,1 I M %  ." t. anao why ar. from the US. wUl ton. Colonial Secretary 'A atyle,,,,,„ lS :,.,rlmcnt. unixiniMely 15 hours lale and Is 'avo tor Trinidad. They Jbwe conaclou, iruno"; S .. ut iSi o.icted to arrive at Senw.ll been gueau at tor Colony Club. Gene,.] u^d Ismay, Common.11,1 Ou.ci, CUIICM I before o'clock tonight. St. Jam... wealth Helallon. Secietary: "His IF IT RAINS. IT POUSS u "•""• "" dle y h nk ""' B NEW YORK. Hi i tut i.iutm.iking efforts of the city of New York have proved MKxcssful .... loo successful In Cast. While tb city water reservoirs have filled up to overflowP „_ h lug from the dansjertnujy low HP"gfl ***, R '. A : Butler levels of past seasons, the city had 110 breastpocket chief, gg.a..a,, iwberry when aiaaf came a i., n. .. .i si UM -'I swbarrj! with a gieat lonsrinK. and timslly h< t >'hed me to givo him half f it. addi*d brifhtl> the neat moment, "It vtlll Is ray half and 1 think I'll eat it now." V. illy a/ai rast opening his mouth tire you won't mind giving it to swsWW his half of the atrew,(, me, Willv,' he snld. 'heeasse ber y then an ant rame along. y.ull stiH hae half ..f it left.'" | "Pli-ase, Willy." Knarf and Hanid "And did you irive him half of .hes.J the ant saying. "Just give It*" Hanid wantrd to know. ; me lialX ef that fine, big. red. juicy. WUlv nodded. "1 did .rul.-.l But -.tr.wl.erry. Yot.ll stiU have half 1 was Ugii-nina to Ret worried be.of n baft. 1 And aa knarf and Hanid u.e*, though 1 -nil had half ef thelsUited walking away, they saw MnwbatTf ''ft. the half fiwuml to Wil'y once more slicing the strawhe getting smaller and amaller. ben y In half. And they were quite EMPIRE TO-DAY A TOMORROW — 4.45 A I.U PARAMOUNT PICTURES PRESENTS— I'lklM, EXPRESS" SUrring —JOSEPH COTTEN--CORINNE CAX.VERT EDMUND GWEN HI-AZING ACTION . SUSPENSE EXTRA "WATER SPEED"—Short LATEST NEWS REEL However. 1 opened my aaeub f the third time and was just about l<> swallow it when along came a caterpillar, a snail, a sparrow, and ... that DO matter how small Willy had. he could still keep iiiv n hsvtfca it away and still have halt left (dt himself. When Two Career Women Meet AN AMERICAN CAREER-WOMAN" has taken a pierc: Kv.i Peron And she sums up Eva's career Utoth ...' ..T* from u brunette with burn.. %  i i_l.~...1.^ ..i;>li mili.mfn) ikiui Marcnuvs WaltaUng ;,„lnn'dV"wjlhu,,,,n,.te,l power." JJMJSj. -^ -Jh,. b ol the wealthy publish, r ..I tile b^inK region, which not only l.nuk ailtl Quick, met Eva on n visit harbour New Yorlf. reeervolr *o/|(>fe TltC Chef *u.,,. B ,„oa y feV^rSS -—-. publinhed in An.mi.i l"-il..\ ,., .,.;.,..,., ih e rlty was presented Seventeen of Jjondon's leaning ,1 n< •ir.tiM IM Swit/eriaiia, w |* n „ i^gfui of 117 lawsuits askchefs, totalling 500 years of fstrl.i.m.Mit.ls **"* ay in '"* fo >a ,oU ' *'.o 0 0 n vice, belong to the AasoeUtlon damages mostly on the grounds tuHnalre Frenralse. K.nii.i.iti.n ntonay nliii'ly •upposed to be spent enUraly on ;at > n or-maally wet welfare. This hi no problem to wM ^ Jfo uu her i.i:s inp trf .. EKL Uarc it ran of than an dCB i-f big. pure -88.0001." .' %  %  %  I %  %  %  %  that the rainmaker, caused an Uliac , IK patronage of IT sfssoti yrencn Ambassador and uu-d DM bcaA_New_Yctrk F mich Coiuul-Ganct-I. %  ..ll.ll.llllCTs profits. and hotel owner's •as Mst DSJgPLAZA — WARNER 1'TajWNiDuu.Mid BRSJ*. I •• !•-%  ul Sa>lia Inlr.l.iamrnl S^OfEMTWETHKr STORMS THE SEAS Of THE mmiDf pose is to promote the French art of cooking, honouring all chefs, irrespective of nationality. President of the asswciation k "Edwardum Curiosit'ivs •• COIN SHOUTACK lou. *orJ?, H e' N ." T ^.etal '•J'"";. -n.-f of tne Kriorm Club, where Use fumous Alexis Suyer gsag aaaatre essef 100 years ana. I have asked some of these famous London clu-rs tu give us eplcupas which housewives can coins has induced >omp American banks to offer premiums of as much as $2.00 per HOO coins. The Coin pinch bat I 1 • a %  irlngent around Christmawhet SYDNEY, Aus. Feb. 4 4i critic Monti.* Way I 11.1.1 UL * %  VW..W V. -- **rwt^ ^..—. iialli.m. of Amarican.'i du,: into ad P' their uiggy bunks. The a&AlnUcai isn't oaiKx-ted to change ^t long us critical materials iBcluding M "-^Jv^**"** . %  di i M .11 Lrouarrs a*, coppar, njckal and bmnic re""•' >"> M. Malet s method Tor >ueb main In short supply Such large "ueneas PaUlaaa if .vou have no Vustranan individual,.„„ tlhsn ; , the "Automatr" and MCVIor piping bag; Dry out the l '"' '•" uu i NeJaon, adit f 'h..i^artment stores every morning boiled potatoes in the oven. Beat „nd Men's having a difhcull lim*. obtainwith a whisk or wooden spoon on the Lotsir.v the necessary nuaiiuu of ...in.', until there are no lumps. Add £^ r ', d 1 ,a, ' *• of from their bank, which Itself is butter or margarmo and the yolk JE 2 u,u ,,k • CT' has begun wei.nag brX i^lioned by the Federal uf .ui egg ..nd beat wcU. Form I world of Ihe ne W drainpi[Rstyle saW K -terve Bank. This situation hn. intnbalb .n the palms uf the luinds. louse.s would new-, „ c l uborB ,e -yMem o, make a little depreK.MO.1 m the cen,. %  •*" %  coin Mte le l-twce,, hanks U, ,.f each and pLue small putatn .;'.,,';, k 'i "" URm '" hP AU Ih-mselves. If Bank A kl short ball, on top. There you have a !" Perm?* "ll,' Im? the luak "" '"" cUmife < ** %  '>"' happens to have Uioche-shaped —-— Bnwji I upca, Q*H SvdDsrj utUgv batetnM plartT of nickels B^C jgtjWfr gtt with fat and brown in the oven. man itetting naimay trade colnti with neighbour rheaa go well with the escalope of i... ,.„u*J IJ.ink ll wher,Ihc reverMis tho %on woukl call ".nghtevn itifh pricing their merchandise at H8 _l f s — dashingly whala n .. pgOlll( i.. th. linn:. ccnU, $2.89 and similar broken ^ —CT. tlgures. "To a man whose um there can be no ifgBOUg inter• ference tna %  P go %  "-niWi . A woman's help is only another hand eat* •And ao n u.im, EvlU who knew what she wanted, and got It ui'h IVTI.H %  She lunged from .1 wri will] almost nothing Id wear to the woman with the moat elaborate wardrobe m her cour n a fake string • -f 1 1 %  | tion." Whispers And Fleur Cowles on tea's • %  social" aclivitic. "She began with less than SS.000 (£1,070) of her "wnmwify, but now her Social Aid Foundation hag aceumulau-d uneou darta to nsk—alliaidi-r gfl ID tl ...... „f Kvilaa eolosRupert and the Pine Ogre—24 CROSSWORD Swincukf rawed. K ape IT jnd iha iquinel lied ihaaualves iaong a %  Ml lronina; ti|[ure tna *p>l hat. Who art you two ? he up shitply. "Why h*ve you summoned me?" "Pkssr. 1 uyi iha M|uirrel. I si tunhlv -onltd, aoniMhaOf iwhsl •pr-cgnpi io the ioKM. AM the mrai in tlisipprjong as saon at hey fall and . ."^D'you ihink I don't know irur?" esclnaw the • %  a"We are more woi-.fd tliao >ou t\r. so don'r waste aav inor,t Bay urne. I res.t b> ^.' T-TT-rj p r--ji; f U 'l 1 rl"^ l V* i a Wl y r ~T\Z r*l aaaasg i. Darts idea of tne UM -> the saeadt |SI rt in m loviai *r> of Iruii loviai partiea %  %  of u^._lf->_ u *J m in in TKIH'll AL SIITINC.S :.li On*. Fawn. <§> STR1PU1 FIBRE SIITINC.S M" Beige. Fawn. Qterj, %  STRIPEII KIIIRK SIITINC.S M" Grey Cai <; MM ItlllNi: 51" lire, Brown. Finn. Tan. & Nay ( Ml \KI a III.I I III MM • II •. Mid. l.l n\ I l-IIFT" — Black 4 Tan @ S11.5t. ill 1I1.N, *I2.0 Pr. -It.... S K.,.,,ii & 4 *c.. 51c. He.. (Re.. o*c. *4-n nn ns Ml" tli* oi $lSt SI.M T. R. EVANS & WHITFIELDS Dial 4220 fOUR SHOE STORES Dial 4606 __—.aiaon' i Si n'Tnuled. Si Ham io a de er a* uaukii. 13. Cuhjur i> i aptiUilc lor esaios.ve the Preaeo. ao. Hauat .> i %  I •UK %  'J£ rSsu trnsn am id 4wangii. i rtewreea Delow use best, el iKiteO Ut M. Hi b> Lntllsn oraiiac l %  j-*iicy veraloii ot wtiaS AOUli a* f hi •am saiaar pw'>aa. iS! Hi .a * eturfia, iS> >n the awfl ol a •eat iimi tor eratterlnr. <*• i %  tee tjuaro %  .uuc i 1'fMaua* %  Duiaa — ttnm H5*S( r^^^j^/i OPENING FRIDAY — t.3 A gM FARLEY GRANGER SHELLY WINTERS BEHAVE .OIIIIMIl 11 V A I. TO-DAY TOMORROW — 4.M A t.lg COLUMBIA Double LOUIS HAYWARD :o: CEORCF MacREADY — In — •• BLACK t It HOW ** AND -iioimioin — With — WILUAKD HARKER OLYMPIC TO-DAY a TOMORROW — 4.30 A g.tS RKO SUPER DOUBLE HOWARD HUGHES PRODUCTION •-im ountn — Starring — JANE RUSSELL — JACK BUETEL AND "KM I Mill I I w.m — OEORCE RAFT WILLIAM BEND1X em mwu v m rHio.tr nm. nth •J..IO. LISA It. Ill,, ,., „„,U„,,ii,i„i,.,f mil t I.I.I A u.:io ,,.,,,. O.MO.XS Minim i TEARS By JEAN BOTHWELL. A COLLECTION OF INTRIGUING RKCIPES After introducing the onion and Its cousins (leeks-Chives-garlic i in a series of delightful and witty essays. Miss Both well presents some 25(i dcliciou*. tested recipes for the use of onions in soups. In breads and pastries, with meat. ggb, : %  11il fowl, by themselves or with other vegi'tiibles, and in salads, sandwiches, mid horsd'oeuvre. A number of thawrecipes have not appeared in print before*. An inexperienced cook will not need to search elsewhere for inMruetio-in on the tu.tk.ng of the pastry needed in some of the union dishes, since complete recipes for pie-crusts, dumplings. age g given where they are wanted. Eneh recipe printed will make enough for (our people. Read this bfsok .nd you won't weep—vou'll run <'ra.ght to the kitchen tt. use it WE ll.lt i: IT AT THE ADVOCATE STATIOXEHV Broad Street and Greyslone Shop, Hastings It O \ i TO-DAY A TOMOftKOW — 4.N a B.lft REPUBLIC WHOLE SERIAL UNDERSE IGDOI ^AM.UBOC BSaak J7IIAY CMS A rORRICAN PRISONERS f ATLANTIS GLOBE TODAY AND TOMORROW — 5 & 8.3* %  HI HLB IlilM.I Ol COIIHM.I AUDIE MURPHY (WORLD WAR II HERO) afl N '"' era, "*" GAYNOR ROBERTSON urn m m m : mwum.mue*H am am



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1'AC.K nr.irr HAKBADOS ADVOCATF CLASSIFIED ADS. rv mM SALES % %  " — WEDNKSDAY, FEBRUARY . 1JK NOTICE TtlEPhONE ISO* REAL ESTATE HARRISON COLLEGE • SJ M far any nmlft of a-onla I anil • mil per laird >t Bch • ra.h Phone |M S and p.m.. 11U lor INU I>11 It %  %  %  place at 4 tS thai xmln| at the We-rl bury C*m**M> whore fneMa Ms aahrc !i.rtruni. BB.BS-in M BaBUS. i*M. al hn IMldMKV f*"i > %  *>) -i %  natal, lair K^n. o( SI afjrhaaU Indifnii. ACT B1 lli lur'ial pan resident* at BUB. I..I SI. Paul William Moor* nom. Mra. Clara Moore (aWUShtat-IB-law,), Prank Moarr. ML %  tote Holder. Mi. vw.tei Mapp Hn Aln philllpa, Mlaa DalUm Mooie. Hn m A11W rVrhuu. Phillip. litre". -IIP—. In IN MLMOKIAM %  VAN-In loving mammy The r Mr •— lo Baia daa. an A *•**!•. I MOTOMCYCLdV-Oftlr n %  1 • In %  locB. i""" Buprearn, Hodnf frame, 1 p MM M Ttrtni A IMRNM ft CO. IJ.KirKttAL and Li*. RL, ill ... ast BBMPB hM~ € pm Piillher a.rttairi.r. n.a I SB 4a %  %  >. < % %  .* nwisl br ii.n^-a 1 aether *ith a BtHM ar T £Ua> Marttadoa Oov.rnmrTil De henture •• %  ,"* ti< II i* notified for general information that the southern main %  a*e to the Public BuOdiiiu yard will be rloae< fr r-aaaiMi Sim WIDNKSDAY. MM *pTof •abruary. 12. unUl further notice All vehicular tranV must enter and leave the yard V the northern g&tf during; thi+ period S.2.52—2n IMI il--'. •al up loc aalr a| Publ Friday tha tth day of Frbn ramnfton ft Peatv. %  %  SI.Jl EN-IIAIf WIN Pi.Mill M.ndliiR o-> *Mo aquar* laal ( room, mind tanan and haaftaoaMp wflh euphoaida Ttlad tutti and kiw aorvaHUnaw anal pxalf. Inaparlwn on apptlMUaa la Hra Barnard Rol'r Talaa i am Tha ab*va w.ll torn aal up lor aala at Pubil* Aucl^n on rldi.v l an P ruary al tM pro. al tha ainaa ti Ma OrVULNlaVi MT1C1 PEHS4IKAL riigatd Lpthi %  \i\* mn- at tha I part H Danta, of Montraa/ Vriiff (ond.xtrd by tha IWv. M. waa ncld al r-ailo-i % %  IM p.n> ah Monday af Dr m a Mia C J-tk from Montr MatV. Mr Oordon FVck ft 'r. L IrrUiB from Victoria Mr. X. Wooftar rrom Tormiln Mra F %  %  %  Ml II mtk Mr M*itui I BptaadM -i'. maaaM MPM pha r .id IIMII MM n .1*11 Pit I i %  i..vnm nvcmorr of Bmn HHII.I I rap un Fk f. i*r.l. Aalaap in Coda brauliful aar> Aan. %  Ho"# -uia la W* aluil l't Hoad 3 badlia Dili Wing Tl.. Toll*am ASTHMA Mucus Dissolved First Day .11 a. Iiuli %  ul a fan aa %  %  i in mi II... •• INVESTMENT OPPOKII MTV. udm of CumuUtiva HI ITVI.I.I ,, aaiiiM %  A. IIAKNKH ACO LTD Trlrphoaa x.. raMrj M ^ -i... IL. %  ua I I M-lln HOT WATER ON TAP for YOUR BATH | WIU. on. of lha lov.ly Wblla rarMlaM Oaa Ory-rra -You can bat a •! %  or hot bain within a mn.Klaa of Uhlln| up Economically pi K r.l and (-HEAP I Ota N f.-> Oaaa73tS %  aaaaaafT OAa NOIICE | There will (x.I p incetuiif of (ho Barbados Huckncv Car OWIHTS' Association .il I he Progrtdaivc league's lluildinn on Thursday night, 8th February tig at H o'clock when a Board ol Manaaftmeiil wil iST HILL. Aclini{ Sccrrurt. '•'////.'.'/.• %  '.W/AW/,'/,', ORIENTAL SOUVENIRS SILKS. CUBIOS, AKT8 VENDEMOH, ttUUAH, JUYBRIAR Y ART1BTI0AB CURI0S1DADEH, TRA1DOB DE LA INDIA C11INA BJIPTO THANI'S Pr. Was. M iM Dial 34M • •*>. fa Applv Ralph Beard. Lawn MraM raaaM %  -•it in* a. ItARIO: Ona Hrcondlland Am k.h S-luaa Radio Apply to —-aa Drua Mara. Taaar ateaal ri KM n KI i %  horn* A BARNES STEn. FVRNSTURK atlonarv •upt-uaida. ihalr* and olTlcr thalr* CO LTD Dial Mil and othar I mnirfa fm ft Co, Ud. IIIII-II .Una CabtaaU rlaaka. lynl.lK n. HlWTE Ii-allind lui— .allad "OR.TAN" wllh 10JM U Ma P i Mot oi kaad mualr at ChalBM Cardana, at. Mlaharl Tha Ihiuaa ci.iain. Drawlna Boom, Mima Room. • b-droom.. Oaraa*. Taltot, ~ Frldar lib Fabruary. MKCIIAMCAL AIMiING MAOIIVr. iv.rr.ti Elaclriril Addina Macblna 1UHA.1 ''..-I Nrw •BM.0U -ill araapl MOO hp, Al Ralph Baard'a loan Bai Mrrrl Phone S010. •SAl-ln %  AM>V ru**i MAI-IIINR evrrllrn India ha vlna ruada by U it N-w PPM 00 will araM i"-" ^Apply Ralph OI.V -Wrw paaaaiwr-r .Itaaala lataallv avaivcd. on rkaw M I IBM HtNCEIt WWINIi BAUMfMl in %  iN-niTW)Nrj>. J ,-i I.*,lira Baa ham on Dualav ,,( paj Show HoonLa Ujenty iB'doii Co It Baan Lit.. JBJb. UN an MISIKLI.AMOLS VMI.JI S niaia. China, a Walrrralouri EB %  vary deaartptieri BI*I.I. nmam ai r Pia irr HifUf. a b-ICBln (main'i.M nAiiiiAiios / (aw copiaa laft I'AI. lirVIKW r KDIIKHTS llih siirrf IKATHKRHKAIa DHUO BTORT. 11 %  v.n il.VANIZFIl lir.n< A Ilmllad ItttF. 1 It. Mac. t II MM. • ft M S ira Auto Tyra Co. Tataplion* BB)~ if til IdM Plavrna Bacardi aa4 IB BPM ii-iaidi and at book ordara tap. A. IARNES ft Co. Ltd. IB. ai i.f ii. .i-w. al 'Somaily' Worthln*. Apply: Mia. UalThi.mai Phona S1TT B 1 SB—3n "A'm-AMMI Vallara. atUcha raa.. immv and Ibttitariahl. ikmiilr lik, I1X lo BBM. A BARNES A CO ITT) iaidiUon. I racord. Coat 17*0 iBara. nu-k. Talaphoi il K il BrauUllanl aqulpmrnt. aood Mr B BBB J B. SIM I'llBII MIIIUS %  I HAKIIAIIOH LIVU. SkBVII'l AHkOtBAIIOM •a Annual Oanaral Mm n.a ol It aboia AaaodalMn will ba hald in U Marriaon Cullroa Hall nn Saturday. Dill rrbn. %  Ill IIM. at 116 pm. lha oWaraar aaa a lha Aaaectallon L. A. II M.I Oanrral Baarrlaiy. U\Krl\lM)S < MORAL M" II I V al Genera RMBBMl uih f BMBkPM NOTICE THE BARBAIMJ8 MVTl'AL I II I XSSI RAM . SOCIETY ' i ..I.ISM 1 i.l MUM MtBTIM. MOTK1C iiLrtabv aiven that an ttla.iiUM-v Oaaarpl Mratina ot tha I ..liiWI l',.UcyhaM*i*d BatUaaaaat ba dalalad and tha lat %  ina Clauaa autaaUtuted thpralar;— I No auuianca ot auurann* than 1 airrptrd and no policy or poltcMa all i* loam-d ap any ona lilr lor a tn asceadiiLtBM PMJ H uaOraa Uir i...uni in IM ot fb> *M4kl la Unnar %  Mtr laaaaurrd tdlh aoMa othar Can. inv nr Burlaty of unquaaUonabtr alandB, and lha Boclaty tharaby laliatad of i> duacl liability in laapa.t of such am vina -I alwaya thai roapacllvr Baiamonary Bonua Add. SEA VIEW GUEST HOUSE HASTINGS HAlinADOS Under new managetnant. Daily and longtcrm rates quoted on request Permanent guesta welcome Dinner and <"ocktail parties arranged. J. H BUCKLAND. PRBprlttor I oil sAl I EYREVILLE EAGLE HALL ROAD One substantially built ClrO%  tnray house, it has sitting iiyoni vi]i ,iiu) Lili>, gallery, dining room (4.) bedroorns. toilet and bath and garage. No reasonable i OCm refusetl. lntpectlon by ipp-iintment. 1KARCY A. SCOTT Middle Street gfl Dial JMi \ 6,2.52—2n. aal* by Publli Jiv> Bjcaat in al i IT Inaprrllon on applKauon la Mtaa KaDraa'i, Hrdrnrd lodaa Dial MM vtARWono a noYcr. a-nmin,. OA-VB BOiril Nrw Raad inaa BtMBB : iii:.cn.. Urul Tha h aluabad in>Mia Slfcia %  iiila anil nw inl'-lanad ( ABJUNOTrtN A -dtALV BaBjMllaiB. TRANQUTLrrvUlandiiui Ol ta.110 quara foot of Und at •.u-tlwl.il. louaa contatna thraa brdrooma upatalra ind ana bad room and •pariona inomt downaulia. Two b-iho and totlrta. hv > abova will' ba Friday 'be Bth Fwhruarr at I p.m. at ihioffira of lha a-daiaianad CARBIt.'llTON A SEALY. 1 ... Straat 31.1 an lly l^ihlie Auction at our otlca. J Btraat on Friday thr nth Frbruarv 1 at S am. I. Tha dwalllna houaa known aa r.dajriiir\ "Ith forty aix actaa of land If) tha paruh of St. John, of which twenl NfyTTCE DJ HEREBY GIVEN Ih. uut anv dcbia m claim iapa i hcTl-n Cbarba late ol Ktrtara in Ma pariah ol Saaat Philip who atad la BBM %  aland CM tha Btth .lay tl April I _. hatabv rtqulratl l aid in PatSMwBlta •a dulv atla-iad lo Ma undaratpunl. in ml* ot D. Laa Bat i aa til Jamaa Stroat, B H aajl l jora. an op batoav lha Mth day of April IBIS. aSBBP taattt of tha ratal* lb* partla* raitlUcd inrrrto having |o tha debt" and clajaao oaaiai ol which have had notice, and I thall not ha liablr lor aaaat. ao iribuU. I aball not Hava bad nntici thr tin'rt auch dlatnbilton And all pa-iwana la dabtad to IBa ^. watla than JOU, day of Jam IHTAIXB (lARlU i^ialifWd Adimrhtratna. Allan Piliharbr.1 ClarBt Daraaaad Ml I %J—t.. LiqiOR LICENSE NOTICE Tha .pplk-ailon of HiaolnLavali at to Ball Spirit. Mall I iq board anal -hinalrd i" raatdraca al OlaUna BBM a. within Diatrlcl "W" Itatrd thltth day of Fabruarv To I' RtfOOEK, Baa Pl.lKa M. li wTANI.rv LOVBaaa Appll N I) -Ttna applicatio n WIU ba arad al a UcatkUnf Conn to aa held Pollra Court. DlatrtM "L the Mth ii t NaSWMBBN 1MB. at oclorh. a.m. C. W IlL'DDEJt. Police MapTKlraie Dltt HARRISON LINE OUTWARD FROM THE UNITED KINGDOM WANTUI HKI.r. r' i ,-T, werkly trnanta I. l.tM aquara feat of land at lha rormr of Amen Alley and Mai hill Straat v-ith Ihr •Xi-rr ihrnon and tha flat urea ..i..l Mtliiaa therein, and the nillro alnckiii-trade of the dru. b..u„'n known ai olympm Iliarmacy." For further partlculara and rondllHyna |njTCiriNSr>N a RANTir-1 J> BB.i.aja—aa i.fnllonara Co Ltd 1 STKNOORAPIIEK ft TYPIST tor Office, apply bv letter and In perap T O-dda. Orant Lid „ lM t AUCTION MISCELLANEOUS MEM-H GOLF 1! ditto i. and prM lleeprr BlM. UNDER THE IVORY HAMMER Tl. I I II..InwUI aril on Friday Feb. Oourtaav Uaraar WluuBBrkB and •41 V-B Ford. H h p I Both rt.i.i in accident! > Sale al 1 p m WANTEP TO BMU r BntHah famllv i 1 Mmiae from A I Michael pratair 0 n-aV'ta i< Philip, Ba> Up LOST •* FOUND LOST nOG: Win. hair To* Terrier Doe. i'lilte, With black ear. Arwera to the .alnr of Jack Pleaae contact Doo-.ld WUaa. -Caaa Lama Pine Hill Tclrie STM. i IBS -In GENERAL ELECTION 1951 PARISH OF ST THOMAS %  unary of Elaitlon Expenaaa (As rtKiulrcd by Section 43 of Suh-teition t of the Rrnresenlatloii of the People (Miscellaneous Provisions) Act 1961) ff. C. Camniina, J W. Heu-tir. R.C.Mapp, Personal Expenaas Printing Advertiaing EK pcnditurti on Advertising Material Expenditure on Canvassing Allowance to Speakers .. Miscellniieous Expenses Esq., M.D. 2S. 00 2.00 Ext4*00 0.50 B.00 105.00 13.00 2M.00 r-q. 25.00 2 Ot Notice ts hereby given that these Hetuvns and the Docunianta in support thereof can be inspected at my office "Belvedere". St. Thomas, Monday, Ilth February. |52, hetween the hours ot 9.00 am. ami D A. M. HAYNKS, Returning Ofncer. Parish of St. Thomas. GOVERNMENT NOTICE NOTICE Applications are invited by the Water Commisaion, Jamaica, for a post of. Temporary Civil Engineer Tha post ii temporary and non-pensionable, and carnct a salary scale of *7t9 by £25 to £920 per annum. Point of entry into the scale win be determined by experitneo and qualification Holder may be required to keep a motor vehicle for the performance of his duties In which ease he will be elinible fur a travelling allowance in accordance with the Commission's rates. Appointment will ba on probation for one year at the end of hlch period it may ba extended at the CaMaMMMBBB'l dincretlon Applicants should be be t wrae u 30 and 45 years of age. and must have had satisfactory exparlanca in Water Wurka Engineering, including the construction of small dams ami Intake works, tunnelling, ttu laying of large diamrtor atawl and cast iron main* and reservoir conBtruetion Working knowledge of land surveying and general building work, Including quantity surveying and estimating also essential, well a< administrative experience Applications, accompanied by references from firms or departmenu in which experience has been gained should be submitted to the Chief Engineer. Watarrrvorfcs Department. Barbados by the 16th of February. 1952, clearly marked 'Application for po-t of Civil Engm. Water Commission. Jamaica.' —2.2 52—4n Vessel SS. TRIBESMAN SS. "PROfsPECTOR SS "TACOMA STAR"' SS "WAYFARER' SS "DIFENDER" London London . Liverpool Liverpool .. Llvarpool A Glasgow Leaves Ilth Jan, 25th Jan. 26th Jan. 4th Fel> 6th Feb. 8th Feb. 10th Feb. Ifxh 1-ab, 12th Feb. 27th Feb. %  OlfFWAID FOB THE ONTT1D UNODOM Vessel as. HERDSMAN Closes in Borbodos 6th fab. London For further larBrautiaM aaplr la . DA COSTA & CO., LTD.—Ageate Canadian [National Steamships — • Paby. T Patj 11 raby. M Faby. M >b M Faby. %  Marah id Mai — B3 March M Mat "LADY NB^i.' "CAN. CRtnjUtB IADV BODMrVIADV NSSLHON %  CAN. CWJ1VK" • Pewy It Paby. Arrloao Arrtoaa BL Inks Nallfaa IT Faby. M Faby t Aarll T Apni JO March II March B April 4 April — It AprU M March 7 April 17 April For further partlculara, apply ta— GARDINER AUSTIN A CO.. LTD.—AfaoU. u\e C ,E G U T RANSATLANTIQUE Sailings from Southampton to Giudrleape. Martinlqae. Harbadaa, Triaklad. LaOaaira. Caraeaa, Cartagena and Jatnalra ArrlTos awraadaa 20th Feb.. 1992 2nd Apr.l. 1052 tth May. 1952 Frets, SoalMiaMaii COLOMBIFr Tth Feb., 1952 "COLOMRIE".. 20th March, 1952 —DE GRASSat" 24th Aorai, 19o2 "Nbt calling at Guadeloupe > Ml is.; FROM BARBADOS TO I i KIIIT. r'rom Barbada* '-COLOMHIK--.. 2nd March. 1959 'CCAAMfBIar 13th April. 1962 *"GE GRASSIT.... 19th May. 1S52 •tailing Diract to Southainpton H. M. SmMBS a. COk. I Tl. Aktt ills. Arrln '4th March. 1952 25th April. 1952 ... 29th Mai. 1952 CALLING ALL THRim FOLKS! TO THE CHOP-TIME SALE .VOW IX II IISM 1X1. AT I || \\| BROS. PV. Win. Henry 8 Swan St. HAS EVEBYTHING YOU DESIRE. i.otvicsT fmtfES ox Hi.iiHiua YOU WILL AT ONCE SAY •'THi.s is ran gtautdf run aaaT" $100,000,00 Merchandise offered at Rediculous Low Prices. •^LIIVDEIV GROVE" Eagle frail Road. A two storied dwelling house standing on about 24 acre* of land. Garaga and out-buuding*. Water and Electric Light installed Offers will be received by Mr. Percy Cartar. Carter Co.. Ud. High Street, up to Feb. 15lh. Inspection by appointment with Miss Edna Carter, Dial 2S29. FOB SALE C0ASTLAND, ST. JAMES „ n Z".S" 'SfHSf .!? ""^ " K "" ot '••"" 2 acre. In . .T ," ar b lo nd pnvMr parts ot llils (ashloiaLUJJJJti*" low fl ure "' ^ "" "1 in order lo oblaln a Ws can 1horouhly recommend this land which is one of a *Sf* aweeUfelj. priced coastal sectloiu lo be offered for a considerable period. JOHN M. HI \IM>\ A IO. A.F.S.. K.V A Kaal Eataia Aa-aais. AaoUoat^rs. Bui I dine Surveyors 1-llONE 49W. BJi FlantaUoBB, Buildioit 9C0C00a)OOO0 >O a f>'e'O'e^*, FOR SALE 'i VIII IMI >l a two BBVBJBSBBSJ dwellinghouse standing on 10,770 square feet uf land on the incomparable St. Lawrence Coast Excellent sea bathing. Dwellinghouse contains verandah upstairs and down, dining and sitting rooms, 4 bedrooms, pantry and kitchen. Electric light gas and water installed. Garuge and MTV an is rooms. Purchase! to have option of buying furniture and effects. Inspection by appointment. Dial 8137. (Mrs. K. R. Hunle) The above will be offered for sale at public competition on Friday, the 81h February. 1932. at 2 p.m.. at the office of the undersigned from whom further particulars and conditions of sale can be obtained. COTTLB, CATFORD It CO., Solicitors. 24.1.52— 15n 0*''-''^*-'-*rV.^,**-e-^^^ Mtl Don't Ruin Your TIRES! Putting Wheels in Line Can Save 5000 Mile* of Rubber! If ra-r -aala . jaa i>t BUaBSaal bB aal af line II aap apaaa iaat year Urea Lat aa <.•. (aa>M a.,t reallao wBaala. balaaaa lira, aaa M .-It'll IBaai al Suffice Station ^retptotte JJu Jif/m wilh dhiili-in (Depstidabiiiiif %  Dor n*t Risk Bad Brakes! We'll Adjust 'Em 'Expertly for Summer Driving! Charles McEnearney & Co., Ltd. i.aii. brafera ibat upSBMBBBJ Wrll rl-an araaaa. rtpa.k fraal b.*i V hearlara. labrlealr brahr *> %  ••"'-. atjo.1 brake. J, bleed all BBSBB liar. Baag ,,. I BH brake BMBNB r.llntrr \ OfFICE 4493 WORKSHOP 4?03 I •ARTS DEPT 4673 I NIGHT 4125 •//AV.V.V.W/.V^^V,VAV//.V-V//.VvtsWAV/W



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ILK. Seeks Direct Settlement With Egypt 4 Power Discussions 9CW1-S MUtl^VIIAl S Could Begin Later < lt> tt. i Hie negotiations wvie likely to sLiri in | gag but admitted that the i had been taken through dlptumatic channeU in Cairo. It was obvious from all oflVu. comment, that the British Government was anxious to ... comment which might prcjii.li. the Egyptian Government'todeavours to restore law and order and bring about a calmei „;losphere In which negotiation*, ight usefully be started. .m-i •were strong Uiai uiitaui was laaiug aiMHSn look at llie piopuaal* maUe o> Iraqi j'reimei" rturi when he canu to London w November last year Tncse proposals, in effect, support Egypt's demand lor tiritiah evacuation from the Bw Zone with provision Uial such token evacuation be followed b> entry of forces of IsM InMf" Power Middle East COB %  %  H as those of Egypt. it was apparent also nun, available comment Uial the U.S. was playing a much more active diplomaiic rule in bringing Britain md Egypt together to bury the hatchet. There is no doubt tiiat the U.S. is seeing eye lu eye with Britain on Middle-East policy but was also pressing uritam '< parsuade Egypt to accept the Four Power Mid-East Defence proposals, if British policy in the Sudan can be modified to meet Egypt's wishes. This kl the mam bone of .ontention. The British intention is to give Speedy independence to the Sudanese, o that thry can choose whether they wish to be associated with Egypt or not. In the British point of view, the major ity of Sudanese do not want i be associated with Egypt an more than is necessary from the fact that the lv neighbour*. -I'.r. glo-Egyptian basis. If perfect] ready negotiations could then be brought on the basis of fourpower discussion." Eden flashed repeatedly in the House with Labour members loudly suspicious of American intentions in the Far East so be opened the two day Foreign Affairs debate Labour Back-bencher R. Crossman interrupted Eden's defence of American peaceful intentions to ask Eden what he LONDON. Feb. thought about the statement l Tariff talks at Torquay last y "which had been made in America at which Britain signed the BUM h that In the event of an armlsUce Pact with Cuba cost £45.37 not being achieved the war would 1 It had not been expected t< be carried to the Chinese coast." I ceed £2.500. This statement was greeted loud Conservative cheers. Mr. Eden continued: "1 sincerely believe the American Gs ment and people are as deeply i*.i. r la the lei EM — CP. TARIFF TALKS U.N. Assembly Postpone AllTalk On Korea PAH THE SIXTH I ..n join negoti il %  i i %  ppmntod Cmaili.ii < t Hi* Bicallancy SQUADKON LEADER W1LL1A* R BILL' RAMSAY il-tn eh. b. Imperial Hrd<|iiarUr* Ll alarm Cnmnii— lonei for Barbados presents ma ex the Governor at (Hvsrnntaiit Housa yesterday. M*| J. 8 Onatth Island Seoul OoaunlssMaai looks on. Squadron Leader aUm.sy ana His Bieolloncy *r asclisuging Uie uiidltloiial left hand Shake of tiia Soy Scouts Floods Kill 11 In S.W. France U.S. Seeks Solution Of Franco-German Conflict i ItWUIHK J. tlSLI.N i r WASHINGTON, Feb. 5. N1TKD STATES OFFICIALS H rt> seeking a solution to the Kianco-tJerman conflict over the Saai and NATO. memhership which threatens to impose a new delay in ttw rearmament of Germany frilorm<*terday that he is all lit for going to saa again and h expects t'.-n a passage to Jamaica wi|l be arranged for him when the Deveashire arrives. H e is hoping to )sac and Valence Dagen forming three points. The Garonne. France's third river today reached a U'vel of 37 fee*, the highest since 1875 Flood watw* from the river. now a raging torrent, are breaking in waves against the ancient ramparts of Marmande. chief danger point Hospitals, convents and town halls have openixi 'Jim OOOn to shelter the homeless. —U-P. vho i. I M iling with his stornacli, uiv )o,n the I>evatis*lre and go OB 1 F-ngland where he will tnltf I hospital for treatment Swift said that they are both eon'*ortable at the Y MCA lfallsteln raised the issue In Paris %  % % %  Sor#i Atlantic Traaty iff by the Government of the former' Premier. Mohammed 1 Saed will now be enforce TEHERAN, tvu. Government decided to dose down all foreign cultural institutes outside of Teheran, but official sources explained on Tuesday that the United State s would not be affected by the move. The decision was Liken at a four-hour Cabinet meeting on I ^fl, lr 7 p according to observer: i The US., reportedly, -till hooes that Egypt will accept and become a member of the proposed Mid-Ea n n. n n In Cairo, primary schools reRECTOR OF ST. GEORGE startsyd to-day. and wtthta 10 ., , ^'days, all schools and universities At the nicvtmg ..f the Board of : lir ,. ,. xp( a ed to r*-opcai In order Appointment held in hr I^bby of' th ,„ k hr atfta-w WEsffsftiis 1 ongthcn,d Beetorof* P^t. r ..-.. on the nol un i" lal m Ju, y minstlon ol the Lord Bishop *p-' *"'" arc '.part' lhai the pointed Rector of St George in ^urfew will soon be lifted Premnlace of Rev T M. Dowlen who ler Maher agreed to all demands has resigned and accepted work I "f airlines in order to facllltat ID the diocese of Jamaica. their work.—CP. Trinidad Meat Decontrolled PORT-OF-SPA1N, Feb. 5. Trinidad Government yesterday announced the immediate' removal of locally produced meat price from control. Pish, cow's milk and II. more foodstuff Items be decontrolled next July according to the announcement end egg will be taken off the mtrol Its. next Jn Also i mediately controlled cattle carcases, swine, beef, mutton, pork. goat, and sheep on hoof, and grape fruit Juice pi duced in Trinidad and Tobago. The decontrol decision, Hon Albert Gomel, Minister of Labour. Industry and Commerce, said, is 1'' in accordance with recommends-('' tions of the local Food ProducUon CONLIFFE APPOINTED M.L.C.S Walkout On Kumar PORT-OF-SPAIN. Fob 4 Hon. Ibmjtt Kumar got a taste if his own medicine Friday last vhcn |7 members of the Legislaure walked out of the Chamber iir he was speaking on a food subsat ion motion. [OD Albeit domes, Minister of '.nmu-rce and Industry, explained to the Speak-i ii. Honourable in'-mbi-i makes a habit >0tnt .md then walking out." Kumar has not been gracious enough on several occasions listen to other member." and thai it the expression of our displeasure. The motion moved by Hon. Tuba) Uriah Buzz Butler called for subsl.ii sal ion o/ flour. n.< milk r essential foodstuffs because of the rising cost of livi He brought the motion as It f.-.oi-i that Dsars srO bf.<.-i i loll Jf prices continue to rise UnfortunaU Statos officials regard IUSBM of events aa reinely unfortunate. Their disrp-ontmrnt is understood to stem from hopes that the Anglo rrSMB American group could go Into an Atlantic Council mssrlng in Lisbon ith "" %  announcement that %  nli—tu.l agreements with Germany had been completed and a Kuropewn defence treaty drafted. There appears to be little smpsctawn now that these goals be achieved in the next twelve days. Of two sore points between France and Gennanv, Die NATO membership question Is regarded as not to here. Oflleiuls said there is every % %  lielteve that a • atl-factoey mationship between Ger mai "I NATO can be worked leiiving the matter of formal Gernuin ineinln r^hip bi. tbs aUfanea for uter discussion. \\ | !" ^ Thsr. il less optimism the Saar Issue. OfB< i co .-( %  %  f.'.H 'll..l 11,. %  < i .1 .i aftl'l lli"i|l Si|U iln 11 I. .ItllT WUusm U -MillItamsa), imitsidsa being n King's Scout holds the Seoul's Gold Cord. Canada he is Chairman of a group conuiutl.-e and District Sec rotary In a Montreal area. During UM ii he was a squadron leader pile* th the R C A> He will now act a liaison between Camels la nlqil.ll t< I anil I'.i l.a.l. la-ldquarters lu order to further i loser international relations between the two i uunlries. Squadron Leader Ramsny re-l turns to Canada to-day Kussia Has Been Pal Qn The Defeiuuve Th. \e w \,nk lime. ilonu t imprsss %  \ in Pans coming to %  rlosi today b that lovM ];,, been put sesn asm an ii da> fenai\e before trorld •-, that free nations arc % % % %  •. The Tisnea Mid forcibly Uhattrafc biys action on tbs Kon si on disarm imiiit secui.i.N Fail in Unuing Of the Kofi doubted I > ess) a pall .>. Whob' %  inn ami kill.',I "in ..r the bhghti-i hops th. beginning Bui s..oeuvres to expl.. for its own ends soon di Si] m i tu'legau-s % %  lo -. t.ntiiiwith tle ratUl n ily ranar issd supiKirt f..r rtions forces but also took I | lo cope wlUi any future K %  whore "Finally, thoujj. srlUi small rnji.ii il. VOSS, Ul. A went so far as to n..|,. RIISSI.' tor failing tn live troaly commitments wi'l, These actions (to win | Ight ho add>N|) drn.o n-'i %  %  i dead%  • .Agen.Ia of th. irronl Assembly, coneened three onth ag<> ^linuini: Ih-fe.il lined up o the i(.i llM j Uiw on too %  Most of the Asiatic, Arab, and : 1 ershln sue a .it tins lies.-...i Kusslan text on sell oppos-.itwi by :i I.. It with 12 .1*1 %  %  i • .!-int hel r the %  xidei Haaasay who Hid ted Nations hy rrlpplii • igator srlth TransS<^iir.i v OottneU Un U.N. Reoccupy Advance Po8t BTH ARMY. H.Q., Korea rob. I mted Nation,, Infanlrymen moved out in sub-zero temporn%  -o^enpj an advance the wftlern front lost Mfemday to an "overwhelming" Chinese CommunM attacking I l^'nii'wn im^dsMt J" 1 "'A small ioco n nauwanos er.tely into e,| ,* st.erlg.h sZl >**g %  need slowly.on the htll Germany and th. Government which feelmuch prestige lias already been •*>nccded to he. anetont rival. Signillcantly one responsible official did not out the posibilitv II ,Fr..n.. precipitated ntentionallv the latest crisis over the Saar He said: "1 certainly hope that is not not Committee and aims at eneourU> a band o aging loal industry to reduce the " colony's dependence on imported motpjn wa foodstuffs :ng beirded BSU-Stylsd hief servant of ttw [*•-%  i % %  %  ars as he took hu seat Dunn s speech he made freqn< to God and urged the Hous .-sr Imliii I'n Draw Up Trt'al) V> itli Jupun it %  ill im DSLHJ iresident Hawenda 1'r.isad W.Ii'ui-..l.i> '.Inagreement under which lb. Unile-i StaU* offered o0.000,oou for development projects in India. Inaugurating the last session of tho outKng Indian Psrlisfasot, he said t India hoped to conclude a pence treaty with Japan soon and referred pounedly U> the upsurge of freedom In Alia and oth .untrics He (idled it th. most "ignlfic .ml feature of the age kn 'hich we Use, "That great upsurge continue* and it is not confined to Asia, but spread-, lo other • ountrles, whose pSOpIl hiVS yet to attain freedom." Mr sperincally m'-t>tinned Tunisia and Libya. Prasad unnoufued the Goveniment's intention to send %  cultural .i.lcgntion to '••' CMna, in return for the Chinese goodwill mission which visited India) repulsed recently.—D.P. fight find that Red solliurs had pulled out and roturii. I lo the mam lino of resistance An unidentified plane tor ibod r<-d i-.siti.ms held by >* 40th Infantry Division nlong the Kumsong rivei on t•"iiI front. It was the -ccond Haas HI Ihm days these soldiers had been Slacked by unidentified re raft. The plane (lying southwest along the river, strafed a medical unit compound and dropped several bombs fired on a .iupply road and put several machinegun hursts int., Iiillstde. Then ties or reports of damagiCnit.^l Nations anti[UJU ftrv.1 misuc. %  •fatal the marauding plane met win, failure Vii.ihuirr Dalai Making 'lliroals noNN, Pab. .'. Wc-i (i e i m a ii Chiiiicellor onra.1 AiliniiTi. : } had threaten) ii to HSSf W %  • Onl of IbS Knii.]" in mid to refuse! tbs onlract" until '. demand for the Saar and for rehlp in the North At i %  Organisation m re granted Tin• hanuallnt was nspottad to bSTS made those threats al a e viiijueus of his noeraUa party last night. A (,.rvi'imii)-nt ui'! Issued said the statei..-i.t "is wr.mg*' l'l..com mum |ii> added that \ bad i • %  ported on UM fo Hgn poUtii .i situation and re* rrsd ilttaa which hiiv)irisen In negotiations In the last law wcok —r.r. Coiuilorfeil Iting SIIUIHIICCI rill. M.. i %  % %  biggest in instates history was smashed Mool SL'II biiu nsara prod u es I ring in the last four years said Karrj i> Anhsfrsr, CbM "f too and further arrest, were 1 .n-sas wells* lp 1 Paris, Rome and rM *r> PLANE CRASHES RRUSSEI^. Feb. 5 v I lane with .:, '. %  1 ago ..sterday. Reports lo all traflai eootrol here said any sur(MVOIB. It. i HM plane parrying this, crewmen and %  .. %  ,.,pH Bggf f..vh'-.l \i irUkwtt. Three days ago six unidentified planes attacked 40th Division B sitiOfu injuring three Korean liourers. A Chinese Communist squad flushed the Allied unit from an outpost west-northv of Choi won on th"western front Heal sii.all u ins fire foiced Allied lnfantrvmen back to their main defence line. iv.. Allied unit mads no tempt to re-occupy tbs p<*itl! iim Kon ."i -ui i '... i .%  t'niiim.iiiii wurmil that it % %  willingness for fair peace." Tbg "Viinc ui 'In i .least said that Communist concession MI far had been Death by natural causes waijln his bedroom at the Marine had occurred for about 20 to 24 B ih, iiei eased to Dr. the verdict returned by %  nine: Hotel Chri't Church about 6.50 [hours. The apparent age ot man jury when the inquest touchj p.m. o n Friday February 1. His deeeased was 'I and the bodv i| Ing the death or Herbert H Devla tx-ly was removed |o the Burton'* waM developed s Canadian Id year* of *ge was Funeral I'ari WU!t no fracture, f tb* OCaX fcl dsd at the Dudrict "A" i where SM nMrtesa arai p--rskull .->nd no cvtdss Police Station yesterday afterI formed b„ Dr A I haemorrhage was present There TruCoronei H Worship Mr. E. A UcLeod police Giving post mortem evidoncc Hsgistrate of District "A" 'yesterday Dr Cato laid that the Mr Herbert Davis who was a i body of th. deceased was idenrctired banker wa* found dead tifled to him by Dr. Jack. Death said h. Is a dental lorgeon and Is 76 years old He knew the deceased for 3H to 40 years and came over with him on the Lad? Rodney to Barbados in the month of Novrmi>er 1951 They then tayed at Hotel. was fat around the heart and in his opinion death 'was due The rleceased was shears generation around the heart. active man and never complain*! Dr. A C Jack who identified about being Ul. ftion, but theres still _reas of sorti baa b< i iand %  %  op'imnn, i .>f frustration part uf UM I'niiriii 1 of ring %  M i i I ii hops that sooner | the UN. Command will grtni m completely.** Warning againut Mai ism. the broadcast w,i Ridgway's of!\ii..i e\i' t %  | true % %  opposing armies, s compror desire fonlr 5 team; for 15 taei -I'.F. Unix wn> Preach Unit Kills 30 RdMh In Gkah HANOI Feb 5. between a Frencn nando unit and Comops on tb. Bad tii. ia.it night, resulted i. killed.. Frtaaeb High Command. Viet Nam %  iiii-ii' of O inniuiu u, 15 miles on the -..iid that '.:;.%  :. ithdraw. And that in Coli ol i nigh. %  naiance. The rest .[ulet. —U.P. Iranian's (Jhoice Feb. S Jlj* satd %  %  Colonel-I P.



PAGE 1

PAC.r BIX BARBADOS ADV0CA1T. IIIUMMIW. FFBRl \RY . 1S! PUBLIC OFFICERS' HOUSING LOANS KILL PASSED B\ LEGISLATIVE COUNCIL MEMBERS of ihv I..ri Uliv(.'..un.il vesl. uiay hailed l,u balai.ee he ouls \ iegard the "i.i' ri*d. Hon Mr. Tunic, expUlned hnt the intention was th< ,: %  %  mild he on iM Book, and the details Id be aet out in the Begulaa certain percentage of the" M^ry ,,on made under Clause 9 of the BUI and which would be placed —uld help a man of the particular officer, urrng a house' Hon Dr. A. 8. cato taid II ...t m very dangerous beseemsd to him that the main Imj point to be conaidered by the .1.1 not MM I Hoard which was to be avail if CM did waj not v much the actual '.1 Time, it often exceeded value of the hnue. but the nfnV<-i' i '•ciefore one got capacity to repay over a HI miltel> wrong conception erf of time hit Uw house was going to cost .. wo* possible thai n man m.fhi give .in estimate the lUaJhtaM idea of what re KKI about, lovtoi ihc aet Bill. Hm. far. aunt that the I'l of lorn* to Pi construct boafaa ffegtld i.v generaily weicwuitt I'un. Mr; Turner aval *d that She RBI had hern u J r eastataVrallaai for a lone si..ir. Du' In the form which ll cumr brlorr Uu i uu. i H WOHIU seen thai u . %  .Ha %  .ir BIN, Mid hi* m gi H. ii .. M lie Barbados ( Ivil Ser A.a f-r ".mr l .' %  1. -i I .i .. alette .r llr.es, jny .n the e.t-ni II %  mil His ru***-*. lh> .hi H. .. %  rv Its build hi"n.^ I %  the. In movuis the jdtournmun of Ibe Lnlalatlve I'uunrll •rslerda* evening until lueadak. 12 r>bruar>, al 3 p.m.. Hun. Mr. l; N. Ttmaar. Colonial SeereUry. told honeurable mrmiHi... II I .. llr.M 111. I,"V %  tiiuf proposrd to reeelve the K. unrto m. Ksweeh al Ihc opening of Uie LrsUlkture al I J<> p.m. In Ute LcilalaUve toui" II I number, on thai aate. %  feaaa Ihrr* upfe two Keaoluiiui.* with whlrh he would aa the Coanrll to deal be > %  iil.l -i Hi ,t they uu %  [ al mi %  %  o'clock inaleMl of Ibe II-II 11 hour of %  '. v ni The Council aeeordlnsl* >.:tet d lo iltr .adjournment Uu.Colonial -ierrelar*. the leflslature in tht ordinary way )l> M^id made note* of the pomtc (I. and It v/a The task of drawing up the u would not be rm %  The Bill was Ihen BJ readlna. nnd on being deall with ir CnmmiMee. Hen V.i l.\elyti drew attention to what | % %  u-rmed a "danger" In Clause ol the Bill. He lyiinted out thai mder that *ectlnn It seemed • • IM Tvhote purchase price nf hodPI was permlaslhfe .~nd n .'. iitwd thai onlv n certain i. i '.tage of the amnom required i he granted, nvi'lyhig the Hon. the Attorney General agreed that the I 111H.1.11I..1Fund ealsiblhuaweai of a Valuation There wTffirrV".. T'lm^ -MTU? SV wL^'ner" ihai M m rwpect lo the pnncl"f Impowible to Say what peTple geheraUy of loaning money to cenuwe hould be tranled to Civil STranta for building !" f -r j houses. There wa r the Widow and OrphanB Fund which was found tn be very unpopular with Civil Servants. He himself felt that if Gf vernnn I solves In difficulties in ratsinu money for the houses of Civil Servants, It should be the WMowi and Orphans Fund added lo The grunting t only IN couUge us suggested b] I Mr. Evelyn would ptaci officer in the position oi having to find the remainder •.' the money, und be Ihs l felt thai with an unVei" capacity to repay a loan ovei :i period uf time, he be given the full value of 1h>hog I In Tlw Logislalurt' COUNCIL %  *• %  ) psti'rtlay %  •• %  IK.i:-' ... %  e,.t %  0H—He. iHi MSM a-iai!• %  •• %  —- U.K G D L ell. r-wm.4 M ii.-,. <- Ik* 1..1.I-. .\ HI ).!SI. I."-SI. !.".*\ rhamii (H < k*r.h i rsili* .na .. !.... %  i. U...4 ih. r... rt.lt.l V.i. HI.Ih.i" I* SOI •- -I Nrlririirr BBS Flai r*Ba4 %  (• % % %  • %  at Ih* Hark* In Ik* 1-nrl.h i %  i i V1JM al Ik* 4i.—.l I* % % % %  lam-ai ihI. ran n >iw %  l**a*nl Ik* immi", If*. IS. *hMk larm Ik* U Ik* K...I.II." mil laUUUdi an > %  ,•* aiivdl Ik* l-llnni-, l*m— a earUai anlalnlnf t. I ,...,.. t. >llB| lulhli. lie M1. teemed to him entirely n qiiestion of pnHcy. slnco It might )>e iireessarv from time to lime to review the percentage granted to ;i onHng < % %  the rabw o< the hon I-1'irst Cniitrlbtitlon I i iig brtvflj iiirough tho u cttggea of 'he Bill, the %  GaaOoial Bm ietwy told cil ihat it was proposeu, aj.il 'i, \i w. conceii edi to ingluda Uon in thu r.i 1952-53 Rs'.imatea, > % %  : I'. ., It H A Cuke said thai he had %  urci along Ike linea ol the nwin Bin. and saU i ihe Civil Barid always fell thai something 'hould be done lo enable them BOQUln r own. He i. mat Civil Servanu should not try to money to pun!. Inoir nu.. I I There was oive thing which they had tu watdk "i d o..t. been tfn, %  | %  other colo: .ii a house and reasotiably happy, Innin ; went to ti quire li". uvris, he wnnleit (.oiiwihiii.: vci y much bigger. Hi No l>cWalr The other section* naving been l tot*. Hon. G. of the nature envisaged 1>1* Pu> sought to loaosi tfca in the Bill. word • %  hall" (MI may" in section Replying to the ln*t point raised • wh,ch '-> lhat lhc tiovernorby Hon. Dr. A. S. Cato. the Hon. m-Lxecutive CommitWe may the Colonial Secretary said thai m.kc icgulaliona for giving elfcu It had been proposed by the Civil to Ihe provisions of the Bill. MI. fcveiyu wuiieovuujigovernj^rvic,. Association that certain Hon. Mr. Pile said he did not ant. ui makang regulallons, it n o niM which camo Into the TreaUkl the original wording of UM o protert ileatl Rury undpr s,^,^ s of Ihl T .,. ri clause, and said he preferred th ga ute nun slftnAct ^ IM8i „„„„,(, ^ uf#< | word shall. This suggestion am Main Foinl -,, r h( purpose of the Ftin.i f. r 'upporied by HOQ 111 I Hun. Mr. Cuke said that the Public Officer's Housing but as "Ut Ihe Hon. Mi. Wyluand Hon. onnurable memberwer.ware. W f^llDS.thought II was incon.. inveatlgation was cnm on at ci-iv.ible Hull Clov.i nineni woul. 1 repaying the loan oral ln e moment by hhe United Klnnplace large sums of money ir. 20 jeers, the sum which ui.i an dom Actuary Into Ihe Wldnu me hands of three men to be .. called upon lo pay ahou^J ;i nd Orphans Pensions, bul It rM spent as the Board liked. '^ ii. Keeping e/iiA lug aaUiy and felt that until such Inveatlp;!*-.-..! A motion lo give effect to Mr that a* %  jJld -.lord to pay It, W(1 completed. It would be unPile's suggestion was defeated b> %  < %  ••• u f %  wi-e to opnropriBte such funds to eleven votes to Iwo. only Hon ". i i.tid w.ui a deut over a the scheme. Mr. Pile and Hon. Mr Cli.illein* (or the Period of 2b years could not posit might be appropriated, to voting In favour. ..in Mbly mec* It, since it would be any fund hereafter lo be formed The remaining sub-sections in Qg thai man in trouble, he tor the benefit of the Widow-. ..inIke Clause were passed, and the .•giving ilrst to meet other comOrphans. However, as the lav milments. pay his rent and then now stood. It could not be appromill..la task* *•)•• %  li.fllni allaflac aairhaMB* >• %  <• %  Mil lulltal.a an %  a* SVUU al L.-aa) Bill l.lll.l.a an IB* I •IUIBI Tail* TW i -u i i II ... p na."" CkI. B.kll. HOUSE i* ttaa.* al A.^mbl. MBH ana BMlM *•* t.ti.fe al SI Jam*> mm* >.M ki MBMIVWX lal aa.,1 •tnrlilr-ainl I lar Ik* a.ra.... Blatlnt -•!',":..'C'lrr.mi'^T^:, \ l'..I I % %  ... K*lBI. a*t*a l. nu. i. "Hl ISSkSBM Ik* l-.B-.UI ill( vl Trapl.il Ta. Boaa)a>ra I TickttfiGtCM t^ VAPI;X S IN HALANT ... — . a BREATHE ... the antiseptic vapour from your handkerchief by day or from your pthow at night or uie the VAPEX INHALE* — handy for daytime Easily recharged from standard bottle. On Sale at KNIGHT'S IIKl'G Sit mi s %  %  """ DBff ih. .ii wm |M-kee. Hlrtl y ri CuK B4ud lnill u^p JrT.lt^TrrirM niain point which the Gov.rr.meni Honou rE t.-ua' h.:*-J. •'" Kl '"' rtpuying the loan w.v ihe m 'll' ii.iMii' did not keep big ted Kingdom Governr-tlahliahmcnu. and had no clerk book-keeper, and therefore mild not be able to carry out e regulation*. Difficulty ll would give them greiu diffl.Jlty, and they would not be abl" the district where to tender for the work which they being carried out. now do; that would pul many ihe ment, provides that persons to whom public contracts are awarded shall pay rates of wages and 'herve hours and conditions ol labour not less favourable than Ihoae established in the trade or indu-' tinwork i'l" Hill provides furtner that pe^pie"out"of~wc7rk7 !" nd"th k „ the ortfin.il contractor may not tractor, would have to go Into a sub-let without the approve of |„ t of paraphernalia before they ihc competent authority, which could go inio the Treasury for %  the Labour Commissioner, arm their money. V, h0 L ,uch contractor "hall keep strongest criticism came from id develop m.ka showing the rales of wages Hon. Mr Robert Chnllenor who •rosideraand hours of labour of the varidubbed the Rill as a •farce", and us classes of workmen employed said it was going to upset a large him. whether any wage-, in numlier of poor people. It was n irk and lawaste of time, nnd p;iper. Mr. ud tin* lengthy debate en ihe n.u boui lecoasna fa area 4 Clause 5 seeks lo previ. "" Il "" ihr ,UDDur ronditlons In H •tlress for those person* who, '"K "-* Ihr, a %  %  crying 'he contract are complied with. il-seuucnt to the Introduction Inover MtU milk or bemouning the Ivfore he can file his claim for > Ihe House of Assembly on thr poeafbie industries they had lo-t pavrrient > .uld be discussed Members aatd 5ln Jul >'l 49 ' W" 1 P'oneer Inthrough not having passed that Criticism I>d Off .llnaTeo3ir^ I Encouragement) B|. uill before INI. Hon. J, A. Me^nn led off criU%  Uno un, M ,l| e West 1S49 '•"'""'cnced pioneer IndusThe least we can do today. ho CUBB on the Bill when he polntns p * WCB1 tries. This Bill did not pas* the M „ t n, t 0 gran t the same assisled out that the requirements of Tirutinue any regulations marie The0 bjocU and Btaaon., of II rends :— lictei.iRv am made during ihe t"imn, to Ihe proposed conrenee in Puerto Rico shorUy at in h the question of Industrie?* and Cliallenor said, and he" hoped that Excellency the Govei'i • On Hue? &f eoe-eeeeee*e under the Bill -"levi rnauuiaciurer m approuu-ni, mr o.aij ...ct.i..t a-. v.-^.r. ... fc .. ...-.. —• * aNMng rr. II '!' %  v mate cases. As the section stands "Iw l""l all subsequent beneilt ..„ n m the Statute books of th present, only a person who is under the Act. Clause 5 seeks to eeioOy in Iptta of very strenuou Bill Overdue He thought tin* HU1 .is lone overdoe and he had m* n j pleasure in sup '.iig Ii He further ll n ^Ssod measure which' would do much good ft>r the Cli I %  -' % %  Hon. G. B. Evelj was an .n.urv, but thl-If whether tin r# va* lo I %  pruporti' lor the uiUlsIHon ,f the hou '• al)'uld (%  i*r*il %  %  ... leyond the nllRyiac for %  Inch th<" want ti., n werm-t ll be fouivi %  demnndii. n unieasotiable prln for then "A Valuaikm Hoard would o i ffua hill seeks to amend the ii'-i'i Industrie* (Encouragenil Act. 1951, in Ihe following BsKtl (inuse 3, seeks lo .imcnd %  l*wi 4 ol ihe Acl w .. lo m. i>le a person who has already la b i b b ed a factory but wishes "xtvnd It. to be declared h Legislature before the prorogation _,— ,„ (hose courageous people the Bill, when applied to conIt is known that some persom j industries betor "acts awarded by local govern.ommenced projects to set up h llu ..,„„,.,., i^i,,..,,,. -.nt bodies, would work great "" i.ii.iui.e I.KIIIL t-lni i. II:>I •>.ni~-1 ... I, ,ril.tin. HII lut ima nmtraM A* oneer manufacturer in approdustry. pioneer Industries, which projiv: %  unUnu.il after the bill lapsed l l V,' ,,„',,....,. iw^i&*m%< ssssrsu \tTjSm HT? {? Soaslble i ; %  > % %  -A;i %  ;'';;' ih..t, because of the establishment of his protect, it might be n< i' 1 1 '"'"W '"*' illfflcult to establish now that the Those of ihem who had fu ndustry concerned is a pio: He may therefoi ..f establishing a pioneer remedy this position by providing %  toiy can be so declared. It was that, where the circumstances beit intended to exclude from tho tore the establishment of such a ivlsloos of Uic Act persons who project, would have warranted established a factory prior to lol l hardship on the small contract or to whom local government bodies 'heir contracts, since those men who were for the most t-iirpentei; nnd masons, and therefore did not have the '< (or keeping such occounts a*i were required under the rrinin that House and elsewhere t." provisions of the have yan to get_ legislation of^thol g uch hardships would undoubtedly ihrow the small contractor out of work, and consequently af< %  passing of the Act and the profit .un.:unieiit ili remedy thu %  Suits "f enabling such ihe benefit of the %  el in the ease of alteraUons etc. i if ">Tis (but not rc: :>) to existing businesses ,-claration that the Industry %  pioneer Industry and the perion ,i pioneer manufacturer, these declarations may still be made and the person obtain the full Item Hi of the Act in reapfC. of his project including J refund of any package lax niHl customs duty paid, which PlWksitioii. welcomed S0> attempt ( ,, t t | )( mrm whom he employod, in I.ring that legislation m line with similar leglilation in other Caribbean colonies. Mr. Crawford then deall with Ihe question of publishing to %  in iiiii-t.ni.i%  having Introduced ih? Phan ... Industries Bill III C uses 2 and 4 seek to prowouki not have been payable^ • tin rage 1 iid In addition the work, having I be given to the big contractors, ould cost more in view of their vine to keep books and accounts. n.u, V C. Gale agreed with the ItMsrfl nuide by Hon. Mr. Mai, .mil aranasd thnl a lot of the .ill i ontractom all over the land would be adversely affect1, since it would creute a great irdship on those who did work GEORGE SAHELY & CO.. (Bdos) Ltd. Crep,. Rack SATIN 'u $1.1.7 S „ I J1.50 H.iwer .1 SIM \ @ 9*c. ft $1.11 Nan* ijj! atlc. i. IUM WE AGAIN OFFER YOU gmou Viw (a sty. Pinl. RI! '.RKSKIN m l' ,w Nea IL44 i I ttTA 11.44 \„is i i IBUUHNI ... uf i. KINDS 1c. I 3H... . SWEEMNQ rtEuucnoNs ON THE FOLLOWING LINES. V. . SPEti.M. I* '..c.'.v t,li t saruMMV 9ih RORDFRED PRINTS at 84c. pr Yd. Old Rose I.1NKN -u) 1.14 — Now <^_W.0 Flowered SILK a slim & si.io Now 5 aua *i<*> (IKUKOETTE -I -JS — Now @ 96c. SILK W 41.16 — Now @ tl.0 Flowered SATIN | Bac. — Now (. i.-lrphone Mfl n>e— %  It's a treasure in every home &4a.C ELECTRIC l-O.BWs0.lrlSBBW-B. SfHasV The refrigerating unit of the G.E.C. refrigerator is so finely made lhat it is hcrmetictlly sealed after manufacture and never needs servicing. This refrigerator will stand up to any extreme of climate—and it's lovely to look at, too! .VsfVH SVMKS MHEXTLY THE CITY GARAGE TRADING CO. LTD. BRIDGETOWN. BARBADOS % 



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PAGE TIN BARBADOS ADVOCATE WFTJNE5DAY, PFBRUAJtT 8, HO TXBI.H TEWISi How To Become A Champion (By P. A. V.) Kill^V LEACH, officially ranked the best Table Tennis player In the world in 1950, discloses the secrets of uceeai In his Brock. "Table Tennis pot Ail." Ltncbi like many other champions, is II.M %  .:)iicr and also sets about to i player who feels It the qame. tauiti fw AII ii reed end In%  .1 playci s will mosi likely bun:' Uu MI up to Inter pioi st lard Ltttuti .itions title hi M n ever to win thi A I i mptonship to. i %  in 1 would not h,i\i I %  • "1 ""' Good Reading Belgium, Wales and "TCnow Th. -i. DoubiM Champnta ft |, 0 yrnvluc* inti lonsnip td Franee „, ad nit r 1( the Tab* IN .nd Mlxeo n,,, lt ta | n %  %  %  Belgium. Ireland collaboration with lha SI d Table Ten. It %  rOf All. wrttti ','" A. K Vmt and I I n-ful study ly post-war success his title in the ring or retires. Thus. Pennsvl'. unl %  "" .[r,p w,":.;". rt a -*.-cwSd ^puin;-so: s ; a v.!,„,'," '"";-'"" %  •'•" %  "" %  %  ..1.1 Cyril BUck. Ho >. m.cd % %  flirlil Charlei. JCIWJ JO^ \S.lIltl won .I1II.II]..I, ', „Tii,c a.',..;'o< L?bS£ es.'", -i", '" u< : 1 *' o b pa8 * *• 5S sylvanla State AtbleU I t^. Tuesday recognife Walcott n* McQra Ingua in the Saturday's race will be round In which .V.third nd last University match a.*iliia miutt lha* i*t iniit.i-. ..f thu #^^ t— — the Joliimy is ready to teach innci living adviab not %  E) on now to play— strokes. iK. and ill. 11 thi tame i>ui i sQUiptnant to nse." vmt write. w.ui uu rapid dsssalopasent ol the % %  " %  >" %  ** %  %  S.7IHJ "clubs wi.h Oa.lRIU players jiKi lodas Ihan clubs with 180,000 players—It bt very necessary that then be Kim-i ^;:: J ,:;r,:.„r:: ET^S? K Z backgrnuud knowledge for the UMhnieaUty llial Kne ,. would-be aspirant for team honr.eve r was Hied officially with in ours, either League. County OP Commission. Ni.tiiMinl. The author nuite clearly Thus the Commission to be married and leaves Oxford Walcott prefers to fight Har.y ^W h ? r ''" b *L h U ,h pI F* soon to "ceom* a teacher of agrlv Maiciano u,* am ul re on ha b '' r cultural ifMomy at Edinburgh WOuld be more DWnO) ['"'"' H lwo P 01 ""* 1 •*P*OnHiaiiln Ml Howaver, WakoU has %  eonti %  DOS Charles. Pennsylvania VIA B RKSir.TS • Prom Page 7 Mr. V. B. Vaughan laid special emphasis for the need of a .-.ireful study of the industrialisation of Puerto Rico during the las decade. He said he had studied that country and had observed that it was a country with social problems almost identical to Barbados. He spoke of the help it would ba in removing some of the unemployment problem, which he ami a harder problem to tackle than low wages. He referred to two men who had had the courage to start a hat making industry despite the lack of the provision of the Pioneer IndUSMaa and said he hoped that they would be assisted in some way The main thing, he felt, was to give encouragement to local capitalists. He thought that with the necessary encouragement to local people, most of the money would be keut in Barbados. Mr. L. A. WUllasns (L) said that he did not think that the lay of the Bill was the reason for industrialists setting up Industries In Trinidad and Jamaica and not in Barbados. He said that when reference was made Puerto Rico, It had to be remembered that that country had been backed up by 834,000.000 from America and America's foresight. Mr. R. G. Mapp said he thought a Bill of that sort then would get Barbados little further. Except on a Regional basis, a Bill like that could help very little ment with which the colony faced LraUans do lha oantraet too if walcott does —I'.P. KS. Funds For Furo/M' wants to help the player whether riicr i li.i~ been playinw tha game for years." Chaptci i of the book deau> wiiii R wi il tabta ii'itu oftai and what it demands." In this Laach tells how among his player Stands ha knew one. who at the age Of eighty-three, still a about the weakness of his Iiatkhand. Toil -.iiould be a good example |p lha %  i i i %  • rs, who sill ough in. h U %  i twenues, real th.it than Table Tennis days are over, Wh>" esOcosMa, tbej ire cllhei alcoholics or sun < ES eisr^ -n enjoy tins game. Table TOD The other i:. thai th< made to givr ROSS prsictlos in OaSS vill ignore another palril I'II in|ur> eithSS I" Srdgman i farvoui ma Aral rarston, in the recent New South Wales H Dl St-.lgn.an and McQregor beat lha i 0—. 8— 4, 4—8. 0— 2. .10—a. Aiisli.ilin' ihlef hi %  lug the Cup an I break the I! S.A *s mono i C world tennis depends on winning lit?'. WASHINGTON. Feb. 5. 0 ad Congress i will tranaaar th.> double-, when H7B,|W,000 Mutual Security npturtles the \ from military to | Q h itn ill Pundj f"i I-'I ince, Qreaos Turkey, the United KlnjdOTn. This Award Was Fair gm.000,000 .. 'Sm!!^ DijLPfnW CUOPetR, coming one of the bcM rugby ra nsr eaa, and sgasolnb I to lha ,,. i .,,,. UnlvaraUj match nexl an i eel Liters to the Chairmen of "•"' dwision la tb %  ,;ii and Armed Services trial for which no one present < i ounltUM* t>f tha Benata ami |ha could retell a precedent. House of Represenlatives informAfterwards he said, with a Ing. them of his decision to consmile, that ba "i>iln Dkt isvting of tinUoedori Kurope than if same funds were Bef ara os' %  was nol %  larj end too certain of i-tiuptei .. t DS for daUverj to eounwhich gave him authi quite seems to provide a much-needed and interesting recreation to many who suffer tron various disabllt:ics. There are nuuny plan manage to do quitr -M U i; ,: %  :.. %  v."'.:-,?....::both handi and e\-en one paralysed from the waist d< enjoys his game from * Irlca conccrn^l.Truman said what ha did. but In Kb olhai i n| up ''"O.OOO-OWI will go to France and sure the incident Pail One Of Iho Book, which is ,nr lemaining $78,160,000 to su r(t „f ,h 0 game. mainly for the beginner, doob. Oreaoa, Turkey ami Yugoslaviu. srltfa Dieas, Playing Eciuipmcnt, —I r All Aureed The Grip. The Sidruax; S' —— Aim lha old UteTtaVatiOfUUSJ, The PoUow-Torougtt fc ., ,., . . Ruiiby Union ooauuttoa %  Musi Lt*4\' lriiiulad i .II arrltten m iho in-nefit of the ssaaaed to agree tha plav %  : rho bai already psssed , icctly lair award. POHT-OF-SPAIN. Feb. ft, D K wlllI „„. 1(|li En fc ld Emigration auohorilies here cma alld aaBlaln „f ,|„. i^^ioles. for deliberately getting in %  E. M. P. Hardy when he .* taking u drop-oul. Kesulls of Yesterday's .Matches L tints SINOLts— FfnaU I Miss Mavis King bent Mrs. D. Wiinn. ti 3. 8—2. MEN'S DOini.KK U. N. Roach and C. Watson beat A. J Jemmofl and W. H. Allan 0—1. 6—1. Today's Fixture*. MEN S DOUBLES l. Lawless and D. E. Wormo rs. S. P. Kdghill and .1. 11. C. Edghill. ft I' Taylor and C. Q, Manning vs. P. K. Rou.cn and K A. BenjaMl.\tl> DOIBLES HANDICAF Mr, and Mrs. P. 1). Barnes vs. Miss M. King and J. D. Ti Igoingj" ban Mrs. S. J. Patterson and J. B. D. Robinson vs. Mrs. H. A. O'N. Skinn.-i A J. W. McKmstry. i l i POBT-OP-8PAIN, Feb. 5. in tha ititioouciion La ach >tat-v i rt-gard the doubles game as have given British-bom Captain .* nanallseil for ,. •omrthing whMi dlfrari in many Maurice Hoy Musaons and his *. "1 Ii,i„ L,uL M respects so wiJely from linglea M Hrili-li-Gm.tna born wife VW— to mi.I sepaiate stuilv. A -pecial one month's notice section I .ted Trinidad. iiai to this subject" r^reil to oaaaar/ with the h '>' I" 1 "'" Purl Bvo deals with |\.inls order, steps will be taken to have ''*'' **w> ,,! "'' d %  worth Knowing and includes them ivmoved. • %  ** summer, whei Table Marrnen and Umptrmg, The Musson*. have a case prosecon rsro pointi sddoh sn i aduig In the Supreme Court thought area going to Kttovrtng by local playi the local Emigration wicket, and Snal Johnn> l,< ... Office] lot wrongful arrest and preventing I I'tliine bootc 'o his father without whose false ititprison T nent it. Tlieyll Do It Every Time XXI1 /1SKED XXIR lOMR WHAT XXJK 5*egrre DISH WS.AI.0 SUE CjJVE ME HER nan RXsuees \MAJ-TA So VOO GET ALL PRIMeD rOR IT-/WP WHAT K> >OU aeT?MEA\ErJ OILy kWOIVSI D.DMT WAVE ANY BLUCBERIMS, SO I 0SEP l?alSIMS INSTEAD ^SI0UH~ I WASNT SUffE HOW TO TLa?N IT URSIOE OOV,\, SO I LEFT IT R&HT &-5e Uf— lOLK KOTBER SA;D SHE SERVED IT HOT-I n, tin ir ~._uR COLD-I DIWT HAVE ANY FRUIT SMAO ID PUT ON IT-BUT THE MAR5•OIIEO ESS AND ouv ES AS:J sfijm ese NV--llCOOS—• _By_Ji mum Hatk WEATHER REPORT 1LSTthOAV Rainfall from (odringtoii: NU IvUl rainfall for Month to date: 08 In. Hlgheal Temperaturr; B4.5*F. Lseraat Temperaturr: Ttet**. l\ln.l Nrlocity: Ii mileo per asgsj lt.w,.meter: ill *.m ) J0.B18. (I p.m.) 29.831 TODAY. >unrise: 6.10 ..in Sunset: 5.51. p.m. Moon: Flnt quarh-r. Feb. I I.Uhttng 6.30 p m Huh Tide: 3.85 a.i : II 12.83 8.25 To Our Friends Frnm Oversea* %  %  WlaWFV %  nwlNllAg] e'l.lll AT I. V Ill-Ill u \ ** %  !......... ..... .ad ofler. LOBSTER LUNCHEONS which include our popular MKRIMU'F PIFA in Coconut, 1 .ennui or Orange DIAL 52 18.1 52-an WILLIAM FOGARTY % %  % %  RECORD PLAYERS PORTCGRAM" Slow and Standard Speeds in Roll Top Cabinets. — AlaSO — The "GOBLIN" Clothes: Washer 5! lb. Capacity, for use on AC DC Current. Wm. FOGARTY (BarM. s) LTD. • % %  "••• %  • % %  • •'-•••— fo/iimQeH,iiHc\m DE COLOGNE ''///;* ^ "* COLOGNE ON BHINl I 'AMOI1S BUIF K..OI.;> IABE1. H • emm supply from Stock im (rillall Steel Windows v.rhua. o-ldtha ..no h.uluwill, or wlthoat VenUlalar. (rillall French Doors 3 ft. 9 inx : n %  Ins. high CritUII Steel Sliding Folding Doors The Whole Doer Slides and Folds to one side tfL 81ns. wide x 7ft. 21ns. high YOUR INQUIRIES ARE INVITED Phene 4367. WILKINSON & BAYNES CO., LTD. P. C. S. MAFFEI & CO., LTD. Top Scorers in Tailoring Prince Wm. Henry Street On landing In the Tropics, Clothes are uppermost in mind! The House of C. B. Rice on Bolton Lane, have made It their business over a long number of yrars, to tailor to the requirements of the Barbados visitor and resident alike. The superb quality of Imported materials. English Worsteds, Tropicals, Gabardines and Linens—to mention a fsw, are a section of Rice's wardrobe of Meoswear for work and play. A wardrobe of quality, value and pleasurable wearing. I K. Rico 4V Co. Merchant Tailor*



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WEDNESDAY, FFBrUARY 0. \*:,1 BARBADOS ADVOCATE I'M. I THREE Over 1,200 Exhibits Al Grenada Fair ( Krom Out OWM 'i'< i>nil.-nl) ST ( GRENADA'S ihud pwt-wi trial txhibilion took place on V. last with thousands availing thenuclvt-* of UM public boltdaj grounds where it was held an imprwsive fair atmosr There were over 1,200 ajchl i h e/HJi tfu) pjtotrtJ standard K'^d though <\> • i • | %  bon hew tlierr could have been higher qualitv b Besides the Agrlcultu I Mllllll IO> 1*111/1. New Monarch Comes To (i uana Island SI' JOHNS V ft island qu>" Jghtd In %  I %  Department'-, own stand. hack train section, tnree h i grnul %  Anothei lection waa th. schools Aits ana Crafts aft to '.ocal work p r e e ontod from Barbados and St Kit'Promised exhibits from Jamaic i. it LUCI.I and Domini. Irrtira on Highlight I.TI %  i attack Paat Sir Robert Arlind*!: %  • %  -wli rune ,.-., took. In tho Tin C HI* whiih make in) the kiimd "' . j %  I ' Antigua f %  ll M V "• ,' %  pirectoi < ; i two week. Unco''irad Itk" fad DiponiM wh.i c Hon. W, K roun| -. t Vihcn of the Permanent Exh.bin Ommitle* moved a vote of ajmgua's beach Hotel •T %  .. the A Mr. Hanaebcu • M" %  %  t the lack of participation of Yneterdn, erowda gather,-1 be Urge estate and said It M fc.i^ Pe .*. U,al ,h J* Cxhibi ,,,,„. ffuuld In the naal tUUirO DO run mi|| cntleman the Grenada Agncultural A on which had a large .. %  atluent.al membership. ond ^i^ hjvlng four Less < hastes W itn lyraa, it has a steering rurtd.; ihs Kxctlkmcy aakj that ., i..,.. .,. Tfaara (y of good things had been proIN | ..t gaalna; Bead, but he held it would bo the Ainpluiii.m Jeep jubmeigc in fie to reduce somewhat the the Narrow, and m.ikr H B mber of classes (there an tha 10 yard ehanI) and concentratr morr •> the „el to iiarne Point. Ouana wil!i kings that matter most By rethe partv of gentlemen Unrig classes they might be OliilMjara : Ml! OTItO \ \H (II %  ..th n>-(*rind imi %  River Road on %  It. M i night up I In %  aasaasV* i i and Uie Harrison can g. i •ook th.* %  rat of tho i %  i %  Hi probabli II %  Brat Hun esa and as an: %  %  %  . hi him into con[he end II nature to pi I I I his coli barf i" the esSSj i n .n whi. h I him. %  > ives him i Jot h From Bonomis \nd Pineapples NF.V. YORK t trr.de th.it \n %  -i has been revived I' tnaki %  doth from both the* In plant and the \A\ eupptr l % %  xperts hare lust hmuatit th. trade t< tight ag.un and 1he> naM these unusual cloth will soon be making their ma: l in tha world market* The fibre of the banana plan! -ith %  alight sheen md ,. *ilv*> caat. Th r plreapo'i iibnmakes a cloth caU>d plnn. which i> warm tad pleasing to Touch Looms and new pro( th* Factory Mana*ement about working conditions during the (TOD season. rebeerlption* both side, fell in The btlk* proceeded IB .<" an l ""' Wl,h uaMUon by Mi. i-aWe atmosphere, with Mr s A PKn*t> %  ,,i *he Union should Prnncia. Mansging [. "' Sn 'T Stewards wha he fneaarr, presiding ano 1 k l, lhat n 'heir presiding and Lai*oue Oflirer Q. 8. DaPreo and I-ibour Inspector John DaBreo only titling m n ob*-i n Among the KJI.WII. requ* -wre th.i BJtoanssl bahall .pie did iifTU-ullv aa at tna BARBADIAN DIES IN GRENADA ^r oBbRora The death took place last Wednesday of Martha Taylor. "V kofanoriy of Barbados arid molhif Mi Fitrgerahl Fe, rington. ell-kiioWn |i>ral g.irag' Th,. de. eased leav i brottu-s. Hetetoah Hubwinte nod tv-.. nsti-as, Vli'Mlimr. Kli7>n'th Real> and L>du Anaid. m lUrbadv,, four *ott* m 1hr Unite-l ^.tate* and n d.mgliter here. The lyasaral took place al Hag si lieorge't MethodsM t hurch witn .I.irge aathcring atieintii'x \l \1 W 1 i tie poaasaa haH • i II. -vent 4 wthholdin g Ihe request. K %TK8 Of EKCUA VGM runtUAhv v isH roaa 11 • IS Ch..| %  -i :. ** r DMIMNM Dtafc nvfj %  %  %  I A Farmer KaVf Mr. Hamilton Hill Intai Ua farmer king on Guana. Land %  %  %  igton family at>d where banks ii still be seen is now g"ing lo be used foi cotton tulu A tractor has also am will soon be .-nig and rlenrliu' UM .or. Ib ^o,., ^-, n ^; Sra K3 In tl-e l>eautitul Old onginal walls an still standuw. 11 is a building which ioded to and now has tv o wing-: on either ltd*. : f.n i heap roam tha island abutul.mtl>. mongoose* tuntheir hind loga i the new nwni'i gl Wi %  i %  you n jolly good fight befoi.wou i yoar poult iv heie." Ruts of tho largest variety will ble to cannliM the skill, paliem pd desire to create mat was %  antfasted, making m Vul and useful Ihlngl "f the kind hat people wanted to keep in keir hornet. He would also have ked to hav seen more entries 1 Grenada's specialised export t thg best exhlbl.. on so far. but he hoped not nearly !" wo ^ Ser?| • good as the next one would be. vi wards %  Challenge Cup by the Royal lank of Canada for the best n i m a 1 in the show—W. P. (ranch. Dougitldatou Estate. Challenge Bowl by Barclays lank for the best milch cow— leorge Num\ Paddock. MR. W. P BRAVCn. Manager of DougaldMon Estste. receiving hlprlsr for the bBt animal in Uie show from Lady Anuidsll. Mr nucctor of Agnculture look, on Mr. Branch Is a brother of the 1st* Rcvd. Philip Branch of Barbado* and s leading planter in Grenada. In bis address, Ills Excslleiicy msde rsferance to hi* father, the late Revd O W. Branch whow amall cocoa plantation at St. Panl'n WSH outsunduig for IU heavy yiald> of high quality. Manager Announces C.N.S. Sailings For 52 MONTREAL. Jan. SPRING, SUMMER AND FAI.I. sailing for the 1952 seaiun by Canadian National RM Indies BHumblpa final Hontnal, Halifax and B.*ton lo Bermuda. Ihe Lmwm I and Windward Islands, and British Guiana were announced here recently by Captain R. A CUl In, Cl.mi.il ManaRrr The first spring Mdling will be from Montreal late in April by the C N.S. nioloi ves*el. Canadian Cruiser. Chillcne Cup b, Mr T T.. "ii"!..:! !" 1 lobl Smith for the best pure-cd aow—W. P Branch, Dougldston Estate Silver Clip by Mr. D. L FerUson for best milch goal—Joseph wan i. n* >. OX WIIMUl • '•• n*-\\i.\ Baall Uwn. Bdi-^Hd Owrn. r Blr>o>< "" %  StAXIINMII ( <€o->0. Jamea CuipapvvT. !'• %  IRIMIi \|i MK V. II \N IKOIH S The der-th occ u rre d mi Bat HUten Annt the He n. Mr. Aiiirobuv . t s oata Ol than Miivet and iinaaaiimlM ineanbars of tha lea.'iiiu, pro f aaaio n wno In %  iiiiubtrusiviv..i. .,> lueM-J -n amount of wotk bay ond U ity of thlaaguas Ha %  %  natural bent. He was a favourite with hi coUesi'.ue* nnd pupils alike and highly tespeeted. Bolides taking part and helping In the school nctlvitirv Antm" nhe waf:uiiiiiiiv known, took u deep interest in the corporate life of the sabsjal ii %  aurlng tha ban bod b* %  scarce n.| aim that he tx-gaei la itnp" publl.sber. and s>metinn> p| moans 01 r. %  tic ot oould ninpij "" '" 1 of atiplai uf other Besides his DO c.itlonal rclai n< waa at one time %  r .| .lar and < %  apbflgl. To hi D< Mive-ill ba Id. M I-iir-,.. M I I.. Igrlcultural Stution la tinoiist months H %  larter. Westarhall Government a " £"' tw J* mct .,i n b i ule *' n '' Ml i. M Oitrtin. n %  %  J. Nur. i t Dya oy*r, a i. Msawatn, c. m. f> H ,. The new schedule is designed tu provide a sailing upproxim.it* ly g very 10 daya with passengers and freight from Montreal umi Halifax to Iht The fii-ct will comprise the Lady Nel— %  tm. Lady Bedme* and the three motor vessels Canadian trasses MK EDWABDIMMHUA (anadlan Cenatruetor gggl Canadian Challenger. A lU-day freight '\ ill IH* operated also to Nassau and Jamaica. 8-Day Manr Clock by Ge„ r luggins & Co ( Ltd or best llhotle Island Red Ulo Ars Lilian King. 8-Day ManUe Clock bv ThomOn Hankey .V Co.. Ltd.. for cocon ured nnd polished—George Kent, It Patrick's. Silver Cup by The Grandy ^ Ltd. for fresh butter-ly Steele. St George'-. Sdver Cup by R. K. Mil... a for mixed vegetables but duo lent mansion. GlaaaUMM HofuWil %  • Tini-ina Bo Ktiiiuiii In iM.nl i..'. British Guiana !>.. > the unsatisfactory standard in Council to-day cabled Us. given for lh c best exhibn... l>'-iet lo the Bacn ) Arts ond Crafts—Mrs. Evelyn tv n p Colonies against the llgrim. action of the Trinidad 11 Governor's Special Prize for ment in declaring Mi Janel •fit peasant exhibitor—James Jagan n "prohibited mi:: t Tipbell of M o 1 i n i e r e, St. an elected member of the George%¡ rge's, who Sained seven fir-t town Town Council and •> I rizes, 12 seconds and one was Secretary I emmended. gressive Party. Mrs. Jagan deplaned I r o m Trinidad on Frli.ij : vacation during the idond's cimlval. Bhl due back to u<;. to-dan %  main. The T.l'.C-A. have mformad the Secretary of State that they consider the practice of restricting the freedom of movcrm r>od prices Canada s cost of livin,; Trade Union and politico! kadadex pushed upward '. within colonml t. i point In December to the high' oint of all lime. further called upon nil a The two-iifth i %  ned class organisation), tvltb ith a Nm-ember drop Of DtiaCaribbean area to Join In .i united tnth of a point the tint sltt W pnpM IpllaM UM action <>f the 8 months. It brought the Index Trinidad (.ovcrnnur.t |) to a peak of 191 %  • nl Jan. 2 Other' protests •BpOct U) fulk-w i'i % %  IKM l' -i i t OS NIIMill I M UETISfaVI • i I.. -I V IM I I Ptckford oni panic*, v. I -r i.ass w\ % %  i FK..I. UaCuMa aas Bauiion, Rm ane>.rt MfTullnuih. Hav. franela Masn Oroer PrnS. Anh %  %  Canada'* C.O.L. Index At All Time Higl. OTTAWA, Feb 5. Led by scats I ..i miMinii wiitK-f. a I.,., orser %  1 In Touch With Barbadoa Coastal Station tK.ii tha) < I w..:. I rase -itn tin *ir TinFt^o.i .hl|) V tn.il> ... 1 1 ill. ai tliiinaai o( I I laniai, Lr i i .. I Toawhrna. *• S F.-a. % %  Alf nangav.ss I. .. Ma^. K %  i %  atdaa, %  t. %  %  %  Calls at Boston will be made bl Lha l-ady Nrlaon and Lady Kodney on each of their south and northbound voyage*. Passenger* returning to Canada to lha mrae motor vessels will disembark at Saint John, N B will prooaod to n ilifaj i nnd Montreal with freight. A Scenic Kotite treal and Boston over the scenic St. Lawrence route at< in the n i w cruises In the Lady liners will offer a live-day sailing In eitln direction between IfOfttlt lio'tw, with a call at Halifax. Under n sea-air ngrect 1 nadian N.itioin ahlps and Trans-Canada Aii Lines, alternate routing will 1 possible for pnnseiigers tt> n>,-. muda and Ihe West Indies. Passengers from any point rdn or tho United States served by the two curriers. ma v travel to Bermuda. Barbadoa and Trinidad by aaa or air and return by the alternate service. The Canadian Cruiser. ILm ol tha IN'.S fleet lo reach HODtraal (! %  yt -prmg. will .irrive about Apnl IB. She will be followed by the Canadian Cww-trsHta*. Lady Ksxlney. Canadian ChaHcnpBfl .ml IJUIV Nel-on. The tir-t % %  IHnp of these vaaaat Montreal have baan Mhaduiad fo April 2f. May 9. May 19. May 30 ind June 9. M-seinblame tu 'h.' I..Ulle-i.* Arlias, the actor. His hobble were farming and gardening. Surviving are In widow. Mi Hallie Doorlytiro her*. Geotg.nut ibirrv Poojty Edwaru IXiurly. i.i-t editori Women's Wear Daily, died in hut homiat Saugcltlea M.V i\ January 30Hl at the age of ;B Aiten yeats ago, he hud contributed lo aauri-luht publications until his death *a.vs the Aiase Vor* Times Hon. In Uarbadm. IIW I lit raeaaV d %  law dagras from Harrison Coll' i .une to INI Aftei "iiiiin* oa %  (arm to c.mada for mm n onab N< %  Vork lot II b lef Uma In l"*" 1 ha stnrted with The Daily Trad* Iteeord. lln> oiisinal name ..f tl Pull hil.i |>iit.li..iii..o. The Iillj | .<. Mr. Dootly wa proud of his A close*! hop at the Fuciori and asasociated . s t a t e a for members of the Union and arrangements by theM.mag. ment for collection of UateOn > abst riptions CompenaaUon for workers when due to road conditions J trucks become bogged doent .uid unloading end re-loadtn-> I hod to take place; also for delayr in Held work due -o lat.i of trucks. An Increase of pay an workers bringing them into lino with general agricultural %  '.in,, v.. i kits undi %  n agreement prior to tin%  Mini "i last Fegruary—March ana paid *t 02 per day fo t men and „ 9Se for women, whcrvai general IJt* ;i T* W agricultural workers now earn ,Tl^w* *1 W and $100 laNASi Thp Factory reprtsu'iiialivi. i l aaisaia aHr 2ZZL a l *g^** tl0 ^ f "' "' ^ad Or\f? VOID ably agreeing lo discuas Samt Urn ihem early with other Direetois though In regard to collection TSStfl 10SS BBBBBBBBaBf *. 'J sm mm S*ii i-i Ran^n II *•. a. aw 1 IM m i DiaO Kdlandi Hata Vt\ pr for \ QUALITY \ \ and \ ECONOMY \ RED ROSE TEA is good tea! gRMSSE & .ItACKWELL lissC 34 ^§^fT-^ name FAMOUS for Pickles for generations iiinuon Plclil, *VhiU Onion, Mi.^P.tHe. Cocfct,,:Oo Oairt u w ChO* Cw P.cci'. Wl u <, local Af IM G.ddM Cf,ni ua ir.iJe*!**" For all a-hin> shots While shoe*, to pav\ muster in company, must be spot* less, immaculate. Use ''rti,.,' Propert's While Rcocnai. or Propert's Shuwhitc No surer way of making sure that white shoes arc wafts ^^ PROPERT'S smriiirt a WHITE RENOVATOR IM Crntiam aM* 5po*/# JOINT AND MUSCLE PAINS May mean kldnny trouble A fuoction of the kidneys is to ehminatr harmftil impmitlew from the syatem. If the kidneya grow slaggiah, th-r imairitifsi %  !< % % %  nUle and sanl' and often berotSM a oaaas of paui in -uuits and BMBCh-s. The wa; to tackle the traubk u to help UV kidneys. The* should be toned up with Dc W" Pill* the riiediCUW made socially for this purpose. Ds Wit* Pii.-, haw a lAothuig. cleansing and :OMIKS*II actionou the kidneys that brings then bach to perform their natural J unction properly.* This welltried i-neotrine n sold ail over ai the wo'ld and wr have many -afl n telling ^ss of ralwf gained, after years A of auffermg. by takmg De Witts Pills. Try then (or your troable. Co to n aad %  apafp today. OUR GUARANTEE Dt Witt i 'lybygiaauc tooditi'.rs and tea iigredbenta coaforrn tv rigid %  uuida-ds of punty. DE WITT'S PILLS THE CYCLIST'S CHOICE DUNLOP m ROADSTER DOWDING ESTATES & TRADING (0.. LTD. (ccKsreiN BRQS.J Distributor* SAVE ON FOODS TO-OAY BY SELECTING A NEW ENGLISH JiJilvmcdvA HI: i nil.i:it \ i oil Vk caTt. Ruit Proof Cabinet Oeiux Finish — will not crnck, chip or discolour Hermetically Sealed Unit Automatic Floodlight and CrHper ft-year guarantee jm for tall bottlss i both sides. torit JLttvr MafMlnfloMflM # AT A I # #11 §9KAS40\.tBLt-: sWrVBII For rnquirirs rail .> HgVNMIlW A to. IrH L W HUM. or Pkonr I •-?!! =.-1



PAGE 1

HI IISI-.D \\ i i BEI \u\ i, 1912 U.\lillllM>S ADMHAII HENRV BY CARL ANDERSON BLONDIE BY CHIC YOUNG FLASH GORDON BY DAN BARRY BRINGING UP FATHER MANUS jaO^-PNWH-MS'I WAkiT MXI TO WEST ME AT Tk£ 60t>SEE MUftt SMOP-MV eoonce sav*/ wu BETKffe TOOIM DQMMA Tfti I C*C OCWN -, FCC COOPNEStf&A"*' BffOT>*C LVUSi' IN TK OJTTEC-I MXWffff M£\MA<> PI^J O/EPRIP KIRRV BY ALEX RAYMOND THF PHANTOM BY LEE FALK & RAY MOORES %  KHf MlM>? (If MAKE SUMJ Sensational New Make-up! Foumtlmlioi* mntl PtttrtU-r NeW Not %  cuke aitkc-up, not %  grmy f o jndition! ADCri IW. Ori -II in PIS : n i>rl ivonc*. no Ktaaay II if.rlip. Amrl I c %  o. on ...n. .1 I .mnulhlv llh U* own Mlo 1.IT Oltn >ou .4 m.iaiilli NeW! St.). on longer than powder! New! Can't Spill! You'll -r IN>id an-yUma. aiuwliri Glands Made Youna -Vigour Renewed Without Operation '.' m faal aid Mfon wr (It 1 -' ""T fr-irri n-r-n I I American aWfl-' I % %  — 1 wttlck iWrti y "thf J' w MM* vitality milrb.r than fi.i -ratta-M. It la a, atja.pl* Iv-m. tr- nt hi tabiat form. alarm Mail br ,.%  liaaji norlnr AhaolutalT Iwrml'*1 MM la la*., but tha B at Hm CI Inilfttaraioi •Ma. It act* r-oUv Ml f. r • • aaa til faal a*r a--l> po*ar .. lour to M to tl boun iWaita" '• MMral %  rttotl M 1anda and irala-v %  BaH todt I ^.r-rKKffl'K.'S"."''a alcfct 4a>>, uM'r lb MMlti" ""• thai It >OKat aukyi I vlMaT, laMfT *nd utaiity *• '"' 1 lo~ yaara yoo**r or irivn M* MI nm of ampiT pui-k'K* VLTAM Mta llttl*. aiJ ihI—' Vl-Toba"" 1 %  -.-.. Ma.koo.-a 1 VIl.I.I. PAIN CAN BE CONQUERED '•: SACROOL C iNQUERS PAIN. On Slf •• KNIGHTS LTD. fc IT PAYS YOU TO DEAL HERE SPECIAL offers to all Cash and Credit Cuslc mers for Monday to Wednesday only ^Pi^LUrVrrEHS^ri-~iIliVri 35B! • "• Branclie.. TwrrdWr. S|>. lyliisl.... % %  mid Swan Slrl %  "• Dually Now %  * NOW Tins Anch. Powd Milk (2t) 224 S.M Tins Batchelor Peas 39 • Bots. Maula Olives 12 oz. 1.25 1.2 Tins Tomato Juice 33 3 imi Armours Soups Aipjrgui-tomato 28 M Pkgs. Dates 18 ' D. V. SCOTT & Cb. Ltd. Broad Street T ii i: c o L t WN Ail a H o < i II i i: s %  I Visitors! %  n Residents! I .. -.-,^ %  al li 9 **< WIIIIM AHI \>l SI iVIMi? Will Kl lid Mil I \\ If yon at* vl.i'M.i ;.i ,iv nt ihe httlt-K in lltr lluiiiu-> or Worthing tlistrirl, if n livt.'uivuhiTf in or around lhr*tiirt-.iv u, uoultl likmil to kntiM thul wtlittvr pro* idwl IMI VOW '"iiMni | HOOK SHOP mid STATIONARY % %  looihrn .mil up In .!.• s suiu-f would piTinil. Bui in 'ii M.M II.IMtlitlii nil in lindinu it we would lik.to cxpl.iio lA.lllll M'll.'M* il IS. IF YOl AUK SIAVIM; M ll..< Marine Hotel, the Ocean \ |MI Mud I. DoII. .MI, Huli-I or the Windsor Hotel, then \on MMW |irohiilil> •li-divrred il iilrrudy beeaune il i. in GnjritoM VHIage, MM to MM uhove placoa. III I II MM \i:i si \M\(, mitvthere ne..r.-i lo low n IIIMII lite Oreitn View Hotel then you will lind our shop in Hi.Iirsi -.ip on ill.P. It. ,,fl the llualiriKs main ro.id wild u -iyii marked "Knlram lo Murine HoU'l". II Mil \KI M '\V|\<. iU i> where further from I ..wo than lh CtetH Vnw Holtl M.U will find our hop in the second (p on ihf ti^hl wilh trie sijju "llntrmiee lo Man inHotel" I His i.W l> KNOW I \S "HAI.MOUAl. GAP mid I fow Mini up MIII will lint* our <4Hip alonu with others in a line of boolln. opposite


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ete

ESTABLISHED 1895





U.K. Seeks Direct

Settlement With E

4 Power Discussions

Could Begin Later

(By W. G. LANDREY)
LONDON, Feb. 5.
FOREIGN SECRETARY Anthony Eden said on Tues-
day that he was seeking direct settlement of the Anglo-
Egyptian dispute which would “take inte account the true
and rightful aspirations of Egypt and her people.”
But Mr. Eden said anxious as he was for agreement

with Egypt he would not take any step “which would be a

betrayal of his pledges to the Sudan.” Egypt demanded

British evacuation of the Sudan. Britain favours

determination of the territory.

“There can be no going back on
those pledges which perhaps do
not facilitate my task” Eden said.
wgen, Said he preferred to resume
negotiations on an Anglo-Egyptian
basis after which there cana be
joint discussion of the proposed
Allied Middle Eastern Defence
Command.

Eden told the House details of
the January 26 Cairo riots which
showed “how brutal was the char-
acter and how terrible the scale
of destruction of life and proper-
ty which occurred there ten days
ago. “For centuries there can have
been nothing like this in a civilized
capital during peace.

Reconciliation Possible

“We are prepared to seek ways
and means to this end (meeting
Egypt’s aims) and to pursue them
in a spirit which will give ex-
pression to real friendship be-
tween our two countries and our
Allies. “I am sure our mutual
ends and interests can be recon-
ciled in a way both advantageous
and honourable to both parties.”

Mr. Eden took note of Egyptian
Premier Aly Maher Pasha’s public
assurances that he wished to re-
sume negotiations with Britain.
Eden said he did not underrate the
difficulties involved and trusted
the Commons would realize he
could not be more explicit about
Britain's aims at this time. He
said ‘‘much is at stake in these ne-
gotiations, both for Egypt and our-
selves.” He added he would
“spare no effort to reach a settle-
ment which took account of the
legitimate rights of both parties.”



















































Mr. ANTHONY EDEN

Eden replied he could not speak
for the American Government but
the statements did not “in any
sense” represent the policy of
Britain. “All I can deal with is
what was said to us in our con-
versations, Nothing remotely re-
sembling those two quotations
was divulged to us. All leading
Americans took exactly the oppo-
site view. “I hope history will
prove me right this week. They
want an armistice.

America is Sincere

Eden said there seemed to be
the impression among some circles
in Britain that America is not sin-
cere in the truce negotiations and

Interrupted
Left-wing Labourite leader
Aneurin Bevan interrupted to ask
how the defence of the Canal Zone
was to be approached on the basis

that it is an international question.| some people even thought Ameri-
Mr, Eden sogtied that Britain cans wanted to ext the war.
was in the Canal Zone on the basis |

He said he had heard “no single

of the 1936 treaty. He said:)word in any responsible quarter

“Therefore it would be better to; while in America to lend credit

resume negotiations on an An-|to this belief.”

glo-Egyptian basis. If perfectly This statement was greeted with

ready negotiations could then be/joud Conservative cheers.

brought on the basis of four-| Mr. Eden continued: “I sincere-

power discussion.” ly believe the American Govern-
Eden clashed repeatedly in the;ment and people are as_ deeply

House with Labour members| anxious for peace in the Far East



loudly suspicious of American in-j as we.” .

tentions in the Far East so he —UP.
opened the two day aoe = ‘
fairs debate. Labour Back-bench-

er R. Crossman interrupted Eden’s TARIFF TALKS

defence of American peaceful in-
tentions to ask Eden what he; :
thought about the statement | Tariff talks at Torquay last year
“which had been made in America! at which Britain signed the Black
that in the event of an armistice Pact with Cuba cost £45,377.
not being achieved the war would| It had not been expected to ex-
be carried to the Chinese coast.”|ceed £2,500.

American Interest

In Egypt Mounting

CAIRO, Feb. 5.

KEMIT ROOSEVELT, the State Department’s Con-
sultant on Near Eastern Affairs, started a series of meetings
since his arrival in Cairo on Sunday, with various Egypt-
ian officials,

Roosevelt's arrival coincides with the return from the
Sudan of the United States Embassy counsellor, Gordon
Mattison and Wells Stabler of the Egypt-Sudan desk in the

State Department. Mattison ang Stabler said that
BO tie Mags : they had travelled freely Sudan-

Iran To Close Dow, wide, conferred with Sudanese,

British and Egyptians and said

F a C that the purpose of their trip was
oreign Centres
TEHERAN, Feb. 5.

“to gather information”,
Government decided to close

Roosevelt was a familiar figure

in the Mid-East, where he travel-
down all foreign cultural insti-
tutes outside of Teheran, but

led widely both during and after

World War Il. Recent diplo-

; . a\ matic activity by various Ameri-

official sources explained on Tues- lcans, including the U.S. Ambas-

day that the United States would 'sador, Jefferson Caffery, indicated
not be affected by the move. s .

The decision was taken at a
four-hour Cabinet meeting on|

the mounting American interest
in Egyptian and Near - Eastern

. Affairs, according to observers.
Monday night, ..,|. The U.S., reportedly, still hopes
It means that the 1949 decree i that Egypt will accept and be-
by the Government of ‘the former |come a member of the proposed

LONDON, Feb. 5





Premier, Mohammed Merahei wid-East Pact outlined by Brit-
Saed will now be enforced. ain, France, Turkey, and tne
Foreign countries affected, in-|U-S. However, although some

clude Britain, Russia and India, Egyptians feel that the proposal
Foreign cultural institutes in/Comtains the basis for discussion,
Teheran will not be involved, in-| there are strong groups in Egypt
cluding the one operated by the; °Pposed to this.

US. Strong Opposition
Sources ‘explained that US. in-| The powerful Moslem Brother-
formation servide centers at hoods Chief Guide, Hassas El

Mehed, Tabraz, Insahen also will| Hodebi, saiqd that any occupation
not be affected, because they are) via foreign troops of Islamic soi,
part of the U.S. embassy and not, is against the principles of the
considered as cultural societics.|Koran. Thus, although there are
—U.P. (many promising signs since Prem-

ier Aly Maher Pasha assumed

the reins of Government, there

CONLIFFE APPOINTED |aheaa) “7 ‘us? Problems

| i imary sc -
RECTOR OF ST. GEORGE, started tocday, and “within 10

? |days, all schools and universities
At the meeting of the Board of | are expected to re-open, In order
Appointment held in the Lobby of |i, catch up on lost weeks, the

Be Cenc membly yesterday, | scademfe year will be lengthened

Rector of St. Peter was, on the no- juntil late in July.
mination of the Lord Bishop abe | There are report that the
pointed Rector of St. George in curfew will soon be lifted. Prem-
place of Rev. F. M. Dowlen who| ier Maher agreed to all demands
has resigned and accepted work|0f airlines in order to facilitate
in the diocese of Jamaica. ‘their work.—U.P.



self |

west France today after causing

gypt

Kgypt Ready To
Compromise In
Negotiations

LONDO),,
British officiais sa ey

}benevea that Egypi reaay
now to seek some compromise

web.

aaa

Anglo -Egyptian dispute,
continued to discount optimistic
reports that the negotiations were
likely to star, in a matter of days,



but admitted that the “first steps” |
through diplo-|

had been taken
matic channels in Cairo.

It was obvious from all official
comment, that the British Gov-
ernment was anxious to avoid aly
comment which might prejudice
the Egyptian Government's en-
deavours to restore law and order
and bring about a calmer at-
mosphere in which negotiations
might usefully be started.

There were strong indication
that britain was taking anowe:
look at the proposals made by
iraqi Premier Nuri when he came
to London in November last year.

Thesé proposals, in effect, sup-
port Egypt’s demand for British
evacuation from the Suez Canal
Zone with provision that such
token evacyation be followed by
the enuy of forces of the four-
Power Middle East Command as
well as those of Egypt.

it was apparent also from all |
available comment that the rae
was playing a much more active!
diplomatic role in bringing Britain |
and Egypt together to bury the
hatchet. There is no doubt that
the U.S. is seeing eye to eye with!
Britain on Middle-East policy but
was also pressing Britain to per-
suade Egypt to accept the Four
Power Mid-East Defence pro-
posals, if British policy in the
Sudan can be modified to meet
Egypt’s wishes.

This is the main bone of con-
tention.

The British intention is to give
ppeedy independence to the
Sudanese, so that they can choose
whether they’ wish to be asso-
ciated with Egypt or not. In the
British point of view, the major-
ity of Sudanese do not want to
be associated with Egypt any
more than is necessary frorm the
fact that the two countries are

neighbours.-U.P,

Floods Kill 11
In S.W. France

PARIS, Feb. 5.
Floods rose steadily in south-



the death of 11 people, swamp-
ing hundreds of farms and iso-
lating towns and villages. The
whole of one town Marmande
with a population 12,100 is flood-
ed by 16 inches of water, About|
two thirds of another Agen popu- |
lation 33,500—is inundated and}
parts of the town are without!
drinking water, gas and elec-
tricity.

Heavy rains and melting moun-
tain snow turned the country-
side at the foot of the Pyrenees
into a vast inland lake dotted
with uprooted trees, dead ani-
(mals and tangled telephone
lines. The flood area is roughly
in the shape of a triangle with
the towns of Castelsarain, Mois-
sac and Valence Dagen forming
three points.

The Garonne, France’s third
river today reached a level of
37 feet, the highest since 1875.

Flood waters from the river,
now a raging torrent, are break-
ing in waves against the ancient
ramparts of Marmande, chief
danger point, Hospitals, con-
vents and town halls have open-
ed their doors to shelter the
homeless. —UP.

Trinidad Meat
Decontrolled

(From Our Own Correspondent)
PORT-OF-SPAIN, Feb, 5.

Trinidad Government yester-
day announced the immediate
removal of locally produced meat
price from control. Fish, cow’s
milk and 11 more foodstuff items
will be decontrolled next July
according to the announcement
and egg will be taken off the
control lis. next January.

Also imediately controiled
cattle carcases, swine, beef, mut-
ton, pork, goats and sheep on
hoof, and grape fruit juice pro-
duced in
The decontrol decision, Hon
Albert Gomes, Minister of Labour,
Industry and Commerce, said, is
in accordance with recommenda-
tions of the local Food Production
Committee and aims at encour-
aging local industry to reduce the
colony’s dependence on imported
foodstuffs.





Dea

Death by natural causes was
the verdict returned by a nine-
man jury when the inquest touch-
ing the death of Herbert H. Davis





a Canadian 76 years of age was
concluded at the District “A”
Police Station yesterday after-
noon. The Coroner His

Worship Mr. E. A. McLeod Police
Magistrate of District “A”

Mr. Herbert Davis who was a
retired banker was found dead

fresh negotiations for setuing the |
iney |

Trinidad and Tobago.

|

the Boy Scouts.

a

WEDNESDAY, FEBRUARY 6,





1952





ICE ; FIVE CENTS



eee

U.N. Assembly
Postpone All.
Talk On Korea



PARIS, Feb. 5.
THE SIXTH ANNUAL United Nations Assembly, the
most disappointit ecord, adjourned after postpon-
ing all debate Ke til eith nunjom
negotiators arrive nm arr wers
decide that me milite me re t t
necessar’ The end car eT
e-half hour convene n j f
vember The Counc tays on until
ba
Russia Has |!
ussia Has
Been Put On|):
een Fut On . genie th dead:
1 ‘ eke Panmu rr rotidtors
ee The Defensive! 20 soos. sin osm
w U.N. debate at present simply
SQUADRON LEADER WIL. R. “BILL” RAMSAY (eft) who has just been appointed Ganadian ike Nes ew. ZORK, Fe ould serve tall battlefield
Imperial Headquarters Liaison ‘Commissioner for Barbados presents his credentials to His Excellency The New York Times said the) armistic ilks even further, The
the Governor at Government Ho yesterday. dominant impression of the United] Korean postponement was the
Maj. J.B. Griffith, Island Commissioner looks on. Nations General Assembly session}last item on the Agenda of the
Squadron-Leader Ramsay and His Excellency are exchanging the traditional left-hand shake of | in Paris coming to a close possibly| current Assembly, convened three
today is that Soviet Russian has|months ago, today
in ‘ 4 cae ea : g - : — put even mare on the de- Stinet Del
ensive before world opinion anc stinging e
7 e } C’'dian Scout that free nations abe: acg ie mn we
U.S. Seeks Solution Of Sr intteag sone Sa] Jum bears the Ravens, wat in
oe o |

Franco-German Conflict

(By ARTHUR J. OSLEN)

*
UNITED STATES 0:

to the Franco-German conflict over the Saar and N.A.T.O.
membership which threatens to impose a new delay in the

rearmament of Germany,

Department experts are looking for a formula to abate
the Saar controversy which will permit the Federal Repub-
lic and three Western occupying powers to get back to
negotiations on a “peace” contract and a European Defence

Community.

Crew Members
Of Sheffield
Left Behind

Chief Petty Officer J. Morris
and Leading Seaman Colin Swith,
crew members of the H.MS,
Sheffield who were in the Tere
centenary Ward of the General
Hospital eee nt
Barbados for Trinidad on Thurs-
day night, January 17, are now
staying at the Y.M.C.A. hostel at
Pinfold Street.

Morris and Swift are to report
on board the H.M.S. Devonshire
as soon as she anchors in Carlisle
Bay on Friday morning. It will
then be decided where they will
resume duties next.

Swift told the Advocate yes-
terday that he is all fit for going
to sea again and he expects that
a passage to Jamaica wijl be ar-
ranged for him when the Devon-
shire arrives. He is hoping to join
the Sheffield there and resume
duties.

He said that Morris, who is still
«ailing with his stomach, may join
the Devonshire and go on to
England where he will enter a|
hospital for treatment. Swift
said that they are both com/forta-
ble at the Y.M.C.A.

M.L.C.’s
Walkout On
Kumar

PORT-OF-SPAIN, Feb. 4.
Hon. Ranjit Kumar got a taste
of his own medicine Friday last
when 17 members of the Legisla-
ture walked out of the Chamber
as he was speaking on a food sub-!
sidisation motion.

'



Hon. Albert Gomes, Minister of
Labour Commerce and Industry,
explained to the Speaker “the
Honourable member makes a habit
of expressing his viewpoint and
then walking out.”

Kumar has not been gracious
enough on several occasions to
listen to other members and this
is the expression of our displeas-
ure.

The motion moved by Hon,
Tubal Uriah Buzz Butler called for
sSubsidisation of flour, rice, milk
and other essential foodstuffs be-
cause of the rising cost of living.
He brought the motion as it is
feared that there will be food riots
if prices continue to rise.

The ageing bearded self-styled
“chief servant of the people” shed
tears as he took his seat. During
his speech he made frequent refer-

ences to God and urged the House | ment’s intention to send a cultural
to-abandon its own wisdom for delegation to Cormraut

the Bible’s and collect tithes. The
motion was lost thirteen to nine.
— CP)

th By Natural Causes

jin his. bedroom at the Marine
| Hotel Christ Church about 6.30
p.m. on Friday February 1. His
body was removed to the Burton's
Funeral Parlour, Pinfold Street
where a post mortem was -per-
formed by Dr. A. S. Cato

Giving post miortern evidence
yesterday Dr. Cato said that the
| body of the deceased was iden-
tifled to him by Dr, Jack, Déath








jâ„¢much prestige has already been
, conceded to her ancient rival.

Presents

















































Squadron Leader Ramsay pre-
sented his credentials to His
Excellency and had short discus-
sions on the forthcoming visit of
Lord Rowallan, Chief Scout of the
World who arrives here on Mon-
day, February 11th.

Lord Rowallan arrived in
Jamaica yesterday and leaves
there to-day for Trinidad. His
Excellency is Chief Scout ©
Barbados,

United States officials sa
phatically that issues of estern
security are “infinitely” more
important than the political status
of the little industrial region.

Negotiations at Bonn and Paris
came to a complete halt last week
after Germany reacted sharply to
the appointment of Gilbert Grand-
vill as French diplomatic repre-
sentative to the Saar with
rong of Ambassador. on da

e German representative
Hallstein raised the issue in Paris

’s relationsh
} Atlantic Treaty
~~ Wnfortunate

em-





on major whieh the

small nation
solidly

issues lined up

almo behind the U.S.,









The Times said: “This is most] those same small states went over
e a | forcibly illustrated by the Assem-]io the Russian side to hand the
Credentials bly’s action on the Korean war] U.S tinging defeat on the
on disarmament and on collective} Gues.\ion of the self-determination

Shortly after 3.30 o'clock yes=| Security. ae te “genaeve an} ot Colanias goopres
ms terday afternoon Squadron Leader|@rmistice in Korea and the con Most of the Asiatic, Arab, and
teen! Feb. 5. ‘ William R ‘Bill os ce tinuing of the Korean war u Latin American blocs which had
S are seeking a solution cently appointed Canadian Impe- doubtedly cast a pall over the} broken away from the U.S. lead
rial Headquarters. Liaison Scout ‘whole session and killed some of}ership on several crucial issues at
Commissioner for Barbados ac-| the brighter hopes entertained at] this session—backed the Russian
Informed sources said the State|companied by Maj. J. EB, Griffith, = DeEOINS, meet Soviet man-}text on self-determination, oppos-
Island Scout Commissioner, paid|CCUvres to exploit this situation|ed by thé S., Brita and other

an official call on His Excellency for its own ends soon disillusioned | ( onial Power

the Governor at’ Governnient all free delegates as to Soviet in- rhe Soviet text cared by
raise. tentions with the result that an}36 to 11 with 12 abstentians.

overwhelming majority not only

Arabs and Asiatics turned on the
reiterated support for United Na-

Western Powers yesterday on the
tions forces but also took steps to]same issue when they decided to
cope with any future Koreas else-| bring the Tunisian ec mplaint be-
where. fore the emb! UP.

“Finally, though with only a

small majority vote, the Assembly a ee
went so far as to indict Soviet
Russia for failing to live up to
treaty commitments with China.”
These actions (to which others
might be added) demonstrate that
the Soviet attempt to paralyse the
United Nations by crippling the
Security Council through abuse of
the veto has met with failure.

Counterfeit
Ring Smashed

CHICAGO, Feb.
A multi million dollar interna«
tional counterfeit ring described a$













one of the biggest in the United
States history was smashed Mon-
day by secret sen agents. More

Adenauer Denies





ie than $2,200,000 in bogus $10 and
United States officials regard} holds the Scout's Gold Cord. In x $20 bills were produced by the

the sequence of events as ex-| Canada he is Chairman of a group! Making Threats ring in the last four years said

tremely unfortunate. Their dis-;committee and District Secretary ) larry D. Anheirer, Chief of the

appointment is understood to stem|in a Montreal area, During the’ BONN, Feb, 5 | Secret Servi n Chicag

from hopes that the Anglo-French | war he was a squadron leader pi West German Chancellor ‘

American group could go into an; With the R.C.A.F. He will now act} Konrad Adenauer flatly denied| Five Chicago men were seized

Atlantic Council meeting in Lis-jas a liaison between Canadalhe had threatened to keep West |“! further arrests were expected

bon with the announcement that|headquarters and Barbados head-|Germany out of the European | AUheirer said. He disclosed that

contractual agreements with Ger-| quarters in order to further closér]army and to refuse the Allied|Phony $10 and $20 bills have

many had been completed and a|international relations between the] “peace contract” until German| turned up in cities throughout the

European defence treaty drafted.|two countries. demands for the Saar and _for| United States as well as in London,
There appears to be little ex- Squadron Leader Ramsay membership in the North Atlon- Paris, Rome and in other parts of

Ase ap aie oe, ~~. —s turns to Canada to-day. tic Treaty Organization were} the world, —CP

can achiev in nex anted |

— Gaye. ee a points errno Chancellor was re ported |

vetween rance and Germany, to have made those threats at aj}

the NATO membership question U N Reoceu revi caucus of his Christian PLANE CRASHES

is regarded as not too serious ol Ne py Bemocratic party last night. BRUSSELS. Feb. 5

re : 14 A Government communique} A jelvian Airlines plane with

icials _ said ere is every Ad Pp t issued said the report of his|,.) 00° vag pate ph iy om

reason to believe that a satisfac~ vance os statement “is wrong”, The com- Welsan tenis tenknuie hana

tory relationship between Ger 8TH ARMY, H.Q., Korea, Fob. 5 [Munique added that Adenauer |, nee t a * ntyel + oe id

many and NATO can be worked |") united Nations infantrymen}had reported on the foreign |)? . baer viittle a er ' =

out now leaving the matter of moved out in sub-zero tempera- political situation and referred thers i i e 1ope o seF eo

formal German membership in| ines to re-oceun, an advance)’ «difficulties which have arisen] \!Vors. ae ad: the. plane

. alliance a ee position on the Weehune front lost}in negotiations in the last few rag ews ———, =

the ‘ens Sune, Fo ron gypsies Mionday to an “overwhelming” oon —UP. "jungle near Kikwit,. .

is based on fears that the con- paren Communist attacking ; ’

troversy will be blown up delib- free. A small reconnaissance

patrol advanced slowly on the hill
position north-west of Yonchon at
2 a.m. to find that Red soldiers
had pulled out and returned to
the main line of resistance.

An unidentified plane bombed
and strafed positions held by
the 40th Infantry Division slong
the Kumsong river on the cen-
tral front. It was the second
time in three days these soldiers
had been attacked by unidentified
aircraft.

The plane flying southwest
along the river, strafed a medi-
cal unit compound and dropped
several bombs fired on a supply
road and put several machine-
gun bursts into hillside. There
were no casualties or reports of
damage United Nations antt-
aircraft guns fired unsuccessfule
ly at the marauding: plane.

Three days ago six unidentified
planes attacked 40th Division
— injuring three Korean
abourers. A Chinese Cormmun-
ist squad flushed the Allied unit
from am outpost west-northwest
of Chorwon on the western front
yesterday. Heavy small arms
fire forced Allied infantrymen
back to their main defence line.

The Allied unit made no at-
tempt to re-occupy the. ition.

erately into a fest of strength be-
tween Germany and the French
Government which feels that too

Significantly one responsible
official did not rule out the pos-
sibility that France precipitated
intentionally the latest crisis over
the Saar. He said: “T certainly
hope that is not not so.”——U.P.























India To Draw Up
Treaty With Japan

NEW DELHI, Feb. 5

President Rawenda Prasad wel-
eomed on Tuesday the agreement
under which the United States
offered $50,000,000 for develop-
ment projects in India. Inaugur-
wting the last session of the out-
going Indian Parliament, he said
that India hoped to conclude a
peace treaty with Japan soon and
referred poiniedly to the upsurge
of freedom in Asia and other
countries. He called it the “most
significant feature of the age in
which we live.

“That great upsurge continues
and it is not confined to Asia, but









Reds _ Fighting “War
Of Nerves’ At ‘Talks

PANMUNJOM, Korea, Feb, 5

NEGOTIATORS QUICKLY settled the more minor
details of the Korean armistice but the United Nations
Command warned that the Reds still have not shown “real

willingness for fair peace.”
The “Voice of the U.N
Communist concession so fat
direction, but there’s still
Progress of sorts has been ma
before and each perio
optimism has been in turn follo
ed by weeks of frustration
this is part of the Communist wat
of nerves. Hopes must be raised
and dashed according to schedule

broadcast said that
step in the 1 sht

Command”

had been a‘
i long way to
ti

of

Vrenech Unit Kills
30 Rebels ta Clash






in the hope that sooner or later ¢ HANOI Feb. 5.
the U.N. Command will give in A clash between a French
completely.” Uni momando unit and Com-
Warning against false optim-}!unist el troop: n the Red
ism, the broadcast was by Ger River Delta, last night, resulted
Ridgway’'s official radio, on tt in some 30 rebels being killedj
eve of the first meeting in twolaccording to the French High

months of the full armistice dej-} Command
egations, i ie
5 ney id

that Franco-Viet Nam



















ai ae ( ; aie . biter ae
spreads to other countries, whose| Arctic temperatures limited con- Full-Dress Session indo troops attacked ele
peoples have yet to attain free-|tact on the remainder af the 145] A full-dress session will ments of Communist, | 15 —_
dom.” He specifically mentioned| mile battlefront tq patrol clashes] yene to take up the fifth and fil Seg She aie : ¢
Tunisia and Libya. and one minor Red bing at-litem on the Armistice Agenda Red Ver De 2 They said tha
Prasad announced the Govern~|tack northeast of ‘ bow!" | recommendations to be made to|@fter a short but violent fighting,
in the “Heartbreak Ridge” sec-|helligerent Governments for a|Communist troops were forceal to
ist China,}tor of the eastern front, An at-| final peace settlement withd And that in the Hoa
in return for the Chinese good-|tacking Communist squad was] pevelopments included; The | Binh x and on Colonial High«
will mission whigh visited Indiajrepulsed after a five minute) pychange of Prisoners—the Con : », Six, activities were lim~
recently.—U.P. fight. —U-P. munists agreed that each side |t o normal patrols and ree n=
— es should return prisoners “as rap-|"aisance The rest of the Delta
idly as possible”; agreed that there ea was reported quiet, 3
might be need for another ex —U.P.
change site in addition to Par eh inet
munjom to speed up the excha |
agreed that displaced yersons| ryt * ’ .
might settle in defence areas after| /ruman’s Choice
the truce and agreed to consider ; f
had occurred for about 20 to 24, the deceased to Dr. Cato said he|the U.N. proposal that Red Cross | WASHINGTON, | 5
hours. The apparent age of the§jis.a dental surgeon and is 76} tean isiting the prison cary ‘ F el R ions
deceased was 71 and the body was years old. He knew the deceased|jafter the truce, should comp Tues failed to
w@l developed. for 30 to 40 years and came ove?|nationals of bot}! de fruman’s nomination of
There was no fracture of the} with him on the Lady Rodney to} Fhe Armistice Supe syroade the stant
skull ond no evidence of aJBarbados in the month of Novem-| both i that ) | / Near East-
haemorrhage was present. There} ber 1951 They then stayed at} shoul upervise the truce the ‘ Ss : , i
was fat around the heart and in |the Marine Hotel demilitarized zone betw the} lon nnally said
his opinion death * due to} opposing armies, @ comp! s@ | he t ver te to approve
natural causes namely fatty de- The deceased was always an| between the Red desire f only | Byroade itil the 1 r resigns
generation around the heart. active man and ne r complained|5 teams an the U.N. proposal {his comr ssion as a regular Army,
Dr. A. C. Jack who identified | about being ill. for 15 teams.—U.P. \Colonel.—U.P.


PAGE TW

a





oe

Meoe

‘ i are
of “Her j

f for

Barbadian Dentist In U.S.

D MRS, I I i, AL-
‘ vi ne ay been

j I adc he



p ek gud of Mr.
h \. Clarke of “1LO-e
n Worthin re due to
ret 1 he U.S. via Puerto
Rico on Monc February llth
Dr, Alleyne who is a Barba-
dian left home in 1913. He is a Lady BROOKE — her
Illinois School of Dentistry and brother Lord ESHER is at
graduate the University of rresent holidaying in Bar-
started practising as a dental bados.
surgeon in 1931, Thi s his first a"
visit to Barbados since he first left Brother And Sister
in 1913. Hi s mother who i 86 and ORD ESHER (Oliver Sylvain
his sister also live in the U.S, Baliol Brett) at present
The Ductor’s wit who was Belidaying in Barbados with his

wife is a brother of Lady Brooke,
the Ranee of Sarawak.
Brooke is also in Barbados at the

an active
Maryland she

born in Tennessee is
social worker. In

“

s strial Secretary of the :

Y Won an eee its moment, She arrived here ear-
Board. She is also a member of 1Â¥ in November and wren oA
the Board of the Department of With her a a ee
Welfare and a member of the Col, and oer Dick ae = a
Governor's Commission which ae en ee © “em
looks after problems etc. affect- Parbados z ech aie

ing negroes in Maryland, She is Lord ond OG, a le
the first woman ever to be ap- suests of Sir wan) '

pointed to the grand jury for the of Glitter Bay, St. James,

State of Maryland. Mrs. Al- eit
leyne’s brother works with the Short Visit
Probation Department, Philadel- R. JOSE NUNES, one of the

phia and his wife teaches at the Managing Directors of

Junior high schools. : Messrs, William Fogarty Ltd., and

Among the places of interest ny 4, K. Harrison, a Director of
that they have visited are the 4). <3me company arrived here on
Crane, Bathsheba, and Cherry the same company's a

Monday for a short visit. Mr.
{arrison is accompanied by his
vife' and daughter, and they are
guests at the Rockley Beach Club.
Mr. Nunes is staying at the Marine

Tree Hill.
Trinidad Engagement

FTHE engagement was announc-

ed recently in Trinidad be- Hotel. 2 ’
tween Miss Lucille Gormandy, Mr. Nunes will be leaving on
daughter of Mr Jone Gormandy Friday while Mr. and Mrs. Har-

rison and daughter will be re-
maining on for a few days.

Flight Delayed

ny eae Ane AIRLINES
flight to Barbados scheduled
time of arrival 5.10 a.m. is ap-
proximately 15 hours late and is
not expected to arrive at Seawell
before 9 o’clock tonight.

and the late Mr, Victor Gor-
mandy of Trinidad and Mr. An-
thony Mitchell, son of Mrs, E.
Mitchell of Port-of-Spain and the
late Mr. Mitchell.

Lucille is a niece of Mr, Errol
Gibbons who is in charge of the
Advocate‘s Linotype Department.
She was educated here and is an
Old Queen’s College Girl.

When Two Career Women Meet.

AN AMERICAN CAREER-WOMAN has taken a piere-
ing look at Eva Peron. And she sums up Eva’s career

like this : : .
“She transformed herself from a brunette with burn-
ing ambition to a cynical blonde with unlimited power.

Fleur Cowles, wife of the weaithy publisher of the
American magazines Look and Quick, met Eva on a visit
to the Argentine last year.

Now she has written a book about her, called “Bloody
Precedent”, which is published in America to-day.



sal investments in Sviteestand,
, gy some say the
Diamonds Algiers, _and, some say, in
, United States, — ;
Fleur Cowls on her first meet- “The : Foundation’s money 18
ing with Eva— supposed to be spent entirely on
“Except for her jewels, at first welfare. This is no problem to
glance she looked even modest, Evita, since she construes her
She was dressed as millions of personal welfare to. .be inextric~
American women would like to ably woven into her country’s.
be dressed The only giveaway ee
was the orchid in her lapel.
“No redl flower, but one of
diamonds, larger even than an 6eZY_Sy = 2
orchid, about Sins, acros by 7 war ian
ins. high—a brooch of big, pure
white diamonds that must have ; ,
been worth $250,000 ( £89,000).” de © ee On, OF
Mrs Cowles, who says she used C,UIUOSELLES
“sharpened intuition” when she
was with the Perons, writes that SYDNEY, Aus. Feb. 4
Eva’s “investments” pay off so A mers fashion critic Mon-
well that she casually spend os pal al ers ar
: 5 17 OF day said drainpipe trousers are
more men anor A Pepe) a “dwardian curiosities” whieh
ye rleur Posies ie 1€S. don’t suit Australian individual-
pay Siieccend on the Perons m. Paul Nelson, editor of the
ee eee waite mes sparkled and jnagazine “Tailor and Men's
canta absiver aisen iY ate Huge Wear” commenting on the Lon-
feet ee oar oe nee our don report that the Duke of
Tt ? Per aoe vidyg'® like pillows, Gloucester has begun wearing
De bf coining oe ioe we world of the new drainpipe style — said
ea are Pe. Ler ee tapes- “drainpipe trousers would never
anon athe eer oon am un= gienic and too tight for the Aus-
hg and queen. alian climate.
On Reson’ aii: tas tahediock tralian climate
and manner of a Latin super- One Sydney tailor believed
man, trouser cuffs are getting nar-
“He looks as if Hollywood cast Sau Bina§ a aniine one
him to be van Argentinian Don treme. “He added Australian
Sen a even ae a = men oe call eighteen in¢gh
abl ° > In a pro- cuffs the limit,
fessionally continuous smile. —U.P.

“To a man whose word is law,
there can be no serious inter-
ference from a mere woman, . .
A woman’s help is only another
hand extended. ,

“And so it was with Evita
who knew what she wanted, and
got it with Peron,

“She changed from a girl with



almost nothing to wear to the
woman with the most elaborate
wardrobe in her country. Her
jewels grew from a fake string

of beads to a

2 e potentate’s collec-
tion.’

Whispers
And Fleur Cowles on
“social” activities: “She began
with less than $3,000 (£1,070)
of her own money, but now her

Social Aid Foundation has accu-
mulated uncounted $

Eva's

squirrel find themselves facing a
small frowning figure in a spiky hat.




“No one dare k. 1 “Who are you two?" he says
S ask—al- } : “ . r
though whispers grow louder— oury: aoe have you qum-
as to the source of Evita’s colos- moned me? Please, I did it,

says the squirrel. ‘I’m terribly

BECEIVED....

TROPICAL SUITINGS 56” Grey, Fawn, @

STRIPED FIBRE SUITINGS 54” Beige, Fawn, Grey, @

STRIPED FIBRE SUITINGS 54” Grey @

GARBERDINE 54” Grey, Brown, Fawn, Tan, & Navy @ .......:-

LO BE ER TR EC ae ERE EINE SUE is a
RRA MINE: Dvn. adi s cua cce-v cs calgkanee
MEN'S SHOES “GLOVEPHET” — Black & Tan

IE N’S SOCKS — Cotton & Rayon @



Rupert and the

s Camb (ating

Holiday Over
M* & MRS. ROBT. SELLIER
left for Trinidad yesterday

afte spending five weeks holi-
day n Barbados. They were
staying at “Leaton-on-Sea,” Max-
well During their holiday the
majority of their family came

over but they have already re-
tur ea

Mr. Sellier who is a Solicitor
in Port-of-Spain was a member
of the Trinidad golf team which
recently played against a team
from the Reekley Golf and Coun-
try Club, Me is a brother of Fr.

Joe Sellier SJ., of St. Patrick’s
RL, Chureh, Jemmotts Lane.
Leaving To-day
RS. REX ALLAMBY and
baby daughter who have
been holidaying in Barbados are
due to return to Trinidad to-day.

Mr. Allamby who was also here
on holiday has already returned.
He is with Trinidad Leaseholds
Ltd., in South Trinidad.”

Mrs, Allamby is the former
Sheila Blades, daughter of Mr.
and Mrs. Edward Blades of “Mar-
gate”, Hastings,

Talking Point

How many “coming men” has
one known? Where on earth do
they all go to?—Arthur Pinero.

En Route To Jamaica

R. AARON MATALON,

Jamaica businessman and
Mrs. Matalon who had been holi-
daying in Barbados staying at the
Hotel Royal left on Monday for
Trinidad by B.W.1.A. en route to
Jamaica.

Americans Return To U.S.

UE to leave this morning for

Puerto Rico on their way
home to. the U.S, are Mr. and
Mrs, J. Clifford Dillon who have
been holidaying at the Paradise
Beach Club.

Mr. Dillon who is in the ad~
vertising business is Vice Presi<
dent ex-Fitzgerald-Sam-
ple, Inc., with offices on Madison
Avenue, New York.

Other passenge’s bound for
the U.S. by the same plane are
Mr. Conrad Brant who has been
staying at Four Winds, St. Peter,
Mr. and Mrs. Charles Sparks
who have been holidaying at the
Ocean View Hotel. Later today
Mr. and Mrs. Thomas MacKen-
zie who are from the U.S. will
leave for Trinidad, They have
been guests at the Colony Club,
St. James.

IF IT RAINS, IT POURS
NEW YORK.

Recent rainmaking efforts of
the city of New York have proved
successful .... too successful in
fact. While the city water reser-
voirs have filled up to overflow-
ing from the dangerously low
levels of past seasons, the city
has also been swamped with a
deluge of law suits from neigh-
bouring regions which not only
harbour New York’s reservoir
lakes Nae ate, Sve —_
resorts for swe]
slickers as well, ee
Christmas the city was presented
with a bagful of 117 lawsuits ask-
ing foy a totaf of $1,500,000 in
damages mostly on the grounds
that the rainmakerg caused an
abnormally wet summer se€ason
which rained out both New York
vacationers and hotel owner’s
profits,

COIN SHORTAGE
WASHINGTON.

A serious shortage of metal
coins has induced some American
banks to offer premiums Of as
much as $2.00 per $100 cOins.
The coin pinch became le ss
stringent around Christmas when
millions of Americans dug into
xheir piggy banks. The situation
isn’t expected to change as long
as critical materials imeluding
copper, nickel and bronze re-
main in short supply. Such large
coin users as the “Automats” and
department stores every morning
are having a difficult time obtain-
ing the necessary quantity of coins
from their bank, which itself is
being rationed by the Federal
Reserve Bank. This situation has
jed to an elaborate system Of
coin exchange between banks
themselves. If Bank A is short
of dimes but happens to have
plenty of nickels or quarters it
may trade coins with neighbour
Bank B where the reverse is the
case. In addition, department
stores are asked to refrain from
pricing their merchandise at 98
cents, $2.89 and similar broken
figures.



worried; something aviaily “% is

happening 8 the fo the
acorns are disappea as soon as
they fall and. . sep think
1 don't know that?" exclaims the
other, “* We are more worrie:

you gre, so don’t waste any, moce
of my rime, | must be off,’

@ $11.59, $11.69,
$11.96, $12.09 Pr.
. 49c., 5le., 66c., 68e., SI.

T. R. EVANS & WHITFIELDS

YOUR SHOE STORES

Dial 4220

Dial 4606

j=

BARBADOS ADVOCATE

Best Dressed Willy Found a Strawberry

Politician?
It’s A Plot
—Says DAVID ECCLES

_BRITAIN’S best - dressed poli-
ticlan is Mr. David Eccles, 47-
year-old Minister of Works. And
the Cabinet is the best-dressed
Britain has had for many a year.
So says Cloth and Clothes, tailgrs’

“It’s a plot the tailors to make
me suit.”
ed: “I know why 1 ane
4 I have been
chosen. It’s because _
a cull and have television
“They seen me in the pro-
pores Mo Bows, i was with
_ would

jook like, But now, says the
journal, “the style jackpot is

he did own were of the Sunday
best or Downing-street variety,
umber

: “He’s very
neat really. But if he doesn’t put
his trousers in the press no one
else dots,”

He usually remembers to use a
clothes brush. He is easy on socks.
His shoes get to the repairers in
plenty of time.

Advice
Mr. Eccles gave advice to the

struggling young politician. It

few good suits are better than a

‘lot of cheap ones, That goes for

everything in life.”
And here is what

Clothes said of Mr. Oliver Lyttel-

ton, Colonial Secretary: “A style-

General Lord Ismay, Common-
wealth Relations Secretary: “His
suit shows a soldierly hankering
for the unostentatious”;

Lord Cherwell, Paymaster-Gen-
eral; “His ensemble fairly screams
a business man.”

There was one black mark. It

went to the Chancellor of the
Exchequer, Mr. R. A. Butler. He
had no breastpocket handker-

chief —L.E.S.

Follow The Chef

By HELEN BURKE



Seventeen of London's led@ing

chefs, totalling 500 years of ser-
vice, belong to the Association
Culinaire Francaise.

Under the patronage of the
French Ambassador and_ the
French Consul-General, its pur-
pose is to promote the French art
of cooking, honouring all chefs,
irrespective of nationality.

President of the association is
M. Malet, chef of the Reform Club,
where the famous Alexis Soyer
Was maitre chef 100 years ago.

I have asked some of these fam-
ous London chefs to give us epicu-
rean recipes which housewives can

adapt.
His Way

M. Malet gives the first.

Here is M. Malet’s method for
Duchess Potatoes if you have no
sieve or piping bag: Dry out the
boiled potatoes in the oven. Beat
with a whisk or wooden spoon
until there are no lumps. Add
butter or margarine and the yolk
of an egg and beat well. Form
into balls in the palms of the hands,
make a little depression in the cen-
tre of each and place small potato
balls on top. There you have a
brioche-shaped “Duchess”. Brush
with fat and brown in the oven.
‘These go well with the escalope of
veal. Sliced fillet of beef, leg of

lamb or tenderloin of pork can be}: 2.30, 4.435 & BB.

used in the same way.
‘ —LE.S,



CROSSWORD



) a,
i” ‘ohour. (4)

1) special prince for explosive
beer ? (6)

18 type wi before the Frenci.
i3 20. 4)

3 . Y
uw) Rides over a sea of trouble. (2)
23 Custly for a red, 1
es Aviator ae a (3) :
26 YoU Start At ite appearance. (5
27 Taken any red ensign. (4)
28 Degrees below the beet. #4)
own
1 Moon has returned in it. (8)
2 fas. the eas of smoothing
er. (4)
Indian orange dye stult. (6)
version of

Annie
> ‘ heaps. (6)
) sould BU 3. 43)
& On the end of a seat. (3)
y Money tn my engagements, (3)
il Pins usea for scattering. (4)
14 Ray upset by explosive sur-
rowndings. (8)
io . \ave oniy when 4 am. (5)
ii Star ruler?
ly “early Qpset Wher 100 short of
sredit (5) 4. Cover, (3
24 Found in a leg guard. (3)

4. «tion Of yesterday's puztie.— Across:

?
ixer

Dai. i OUBLE, » Leese;
1! Page: 16, Lempest. 15, Holpie; 16
arts 1s, Any: 19> Sneer; 35 Nostalgia

24 bwok, 25. (Mierrive, 25, (Cleases dy
Down: L Allowance, 9 Lis: 3 a
tnvst 4, 2. ger; 6 Rent. &
San Nowe. ig’ Denote: 14 Mansce
1% Staia: 19 Star: 30 Pik: 1. Fare
te






















flanid.

‘That's the
Willy. “I’m not

“Well,” said

half of it
be able to find it at



—But He Had a Hard Time Eating It—
By MAX TRELL

KMNARF and Hanid, the shadow-
children with the turned - about
names, found their friend Willy
Toad sitting on a toadstool, looking
very dejected. They asked him if
anything was the matter, and after
a moment or two of silence, Willy
replied that there was.

“What happened, Willy?” asked

trouble,”
exactly sure what
. Butvany way, I started

sighed

I’m sup-
left, but L

ping down the road past the straw- | berry.”

berry patch when ail at once I spied
a fine, big, red, juicy, strawberry.
It was perfectly beautiful and my
mouth was beginning to water at
the thought of eating it. Bur just
as | was about to open my mouth
and swallow it, a robin came fly-
ing over to me,”

“What did the robin want ?” asked

Koarf.

“The robin looked ct tie straw-
herry and said it was one ~t the
most beautiful he had ever seen.
Then he asked me, please, to give
him half of it. ‘You'll still have half
of it left, Willy,’ said the robin.
So he tlew off with half of it.
continued Willy, “I
opencd my mouth again and I was
about to swallow the half of the
strawberry
beetle. He jooked at the strawberry
with a great longing, and finally
he asked me to give him half of it.
‘I'm sure you won't mind giving it
he said,
you'll still have half of it left.”

“And did you give him half of
it?” Hanid wanted to know.

Willy nodded, “1 did indeed, But
I was beginning to get worried be-
cause, though I still had half of the
strawberry left, the half seemed to
be getting smaller and smaller.
However, 1 opened my mouth for
the third time and was just about
to swallow it when along cante a
eaterpillar, a snail, a sparrow, and | half left for himself,

B.B.C. Radio Programme

WEDNESDAY, FEBRUARY 6, 1952

“Then,”

to me,

Cockney Cabaret, 12 00 noon The News, 75219, Pi

12.10 p.m. News Analysis. ree ne S138m., 48.43m
Hr — 25.38m., 31 32: ee nr ae

Ere ee 745 pm. Over To You, 815 p.m
400 p.m. The News, 410 pm. The Ragio Revere}, 8.30 p.m. Statement of

Daily Service 4.15 pun, BBC Midland 4ccount 8.45 p.m. Composer of the

Light Orchestia, 5.00 p.m. Composer of Week, 9 00 p.m. Leave Her Johnnie,

the Week, 5.15 p.m. Sandy MacPherson, 1@@ve Her, 10 00 p.m. The News, 10,10

5.30 pm
Fum



when

Willy,’

11.15 a.m. Listéners’ Choice, 11.45 am. 7

Books To Read,
Review, 6.00

Music, 6.46 p.m. Sports Rownd Up and

PLAZA — WARNER

B° TOWN (pia 2310)

exclaimed.

held out his paw.

along came a

eat it now.”

‘because



10 pm

5 45 p.m
pm. Souvenirs of

pm
Mid Week Talk,
and Waltzing

BROS.



Willy saw a big, red strawberry.

a chipmunk. Each of them asked
ive him half of my straw-

Try.
“And did you?” Knarf and Hanid

“Oh yes,” said Willy, “because
each of them told me that if I only
gave him half I would still have
half left for myself. And finally,”
said Willy, “when all of them went
away, I glanced down to look at my
half of the strawberry, and it was
no bigger than the head of a pin!
Here—just look at it!” And Willy

Head of a Pin

Sure enough the piece of straw-
perry was no bigger than the head
‘ of a pin, “Now what I can’t under-
stand,” said Willy, “is how my half
of the strawberry got so small with-
}out my eating it even. But,” he
added brightly the n t
“it still is my half and I think I'l

ext moment,

Willy was just opening his mouth
‘to swallow his half of the straw-
berry when an ant came along.
“Please, Willy,” Knarf and d
jheard the ant saying, “Just give
me half of that fine, big, red, inkey,
strawberry. You'll still have

of it left.” And as Knarf and Hanid
started walking away, they saw
Willy once more slicing the straw-
bervy in half. And they were quite
sure that no matter how small a
piece Willy had, he could still keep
giving ha‘? of it away and still have



Programme Parade, 7.00 p.m. The News,
News Analysis

From The Editorials, 10.16 p.m
1030 pm. Marehing

Twe Hours of Solid Entertainment f

% Fe
AF ;
Mle tas
“ae is
R Es

hed

Warmer Bro

» CAPTAI

PRES
/

Oe
ad

aE Ce Eee

Wh



go 22, RAO IL WA [Sn and Aeneas MacKenge

From (he Mane! by C. S, Forever

OPENING FRIDAY FEB. 8th









By ‘ JEAN BOTHWELL.

A COLLECTION OF
INTRIGUING RECIPES

After introducing the onion and
its cousins (leeks-Chives-garlic)
in a series of delightful and witty
essays, Miss Bothwell presents
some 250 delicious, tested recipes
for the use of onions in soups, in
breads and pastries, with meat,
fish, and fowl, by themselves or
with other vegetables, and in
salads, sandwiches, and _hors-
doeuvre. A number of | these
recipes have not appeared in print
before.

An inexperienced cook will not
need to search elsewhere for in-
structions on the making of the
pastry needed in some of the
onion dishes, since complete
recipes for pie-crusts, dumplings,
etc... are given where they are
‘wanted, Each recipe printed will,
make enough for four people.

Read this bpok and you won't
weep—you'll run straight to the
kitchen to use it.

WE HAVE IT AT
ADVOCATE
STATIONERY

Street and Greystone Shop, Hastings

eo

30 p.m. and Continuing
DAILY 4.43 & 6.30 p

ONIONS
WITHOUT

TEARS

THE












WEDNESDAY, FEBRUARY 6, 1952



Btewn

P
L
A

OPENING FRIDAY 8TH Z
Hoosier Hot Shots a | “CAPTAIN HORATIO || A

“PRAIRIE ROUND UP" | Dial

Charles Starrett — Smiley Burnet; | HORN OWER _mae
PLAZA UN | GABE TW Since
|

|| TODAY 4.45 and 8.30 p.m.
Robert Lizabeth Robert

R.K.Q, Radice Action Packed Thrilicr
mitcHuM - scort - ryan in “The RACKET”

Also the Local Educational Short. ‘GIVE YOUR CHILD A CHANCE’



THURSDAY Special — 1.30 p.m
“SWING The WESTERN WAY"

Dial 8404
Last 2 Shows Today 4.45 & 8.40 p.m LAST SHOW TONITE 8.30 p.m
Republic's Whole Serial | !

“BILL THE UMPIRE”
“FEDERAL AGENT vs.

William BENDIX &
“BETWEEN MIDNITE & DAWN” | UNDERWORLD, INC.”
Kirk ALYN -- James DALE

Mark Stevens — Edmund O’Brien



THURS. (only) 4.45 & 8.30 p.m THURS. \only) &.30 p.m.

SWING THE WESTERN WAY TAHITI HONEY
Simone Simon, Dennis O'Keefe &
PRAIRIE ROUNDUP SONG

|
Hoosier Hotshots & |
OF NEVADA

ers

Charles Starrett & Smiley Burnett Roy Rog



EMPIRE

TO-DAY & TOMORROW — 445 & 8.30
*
PARAMOUNT PICTURES PRESENTS—

“PEKING EXPRESS”

Starring :—JOSEPH COTTEN-—CORINNE CALVERT
EDMUND GWEN

BLAZING ACTION .

. SUSPENSE
EXTRA
“WATER SPEED”—Short
LATEST NEWS REEL



OPENING FRIDAY — 2.30 & 8.30
FARLEY GRANGER — SHELLY WINTERS
ila ean

“BEHAVE YOURSELF”
ROYAL

TO-DAY & TOMORROW — 4.30 & 8.15
COLUMBIA Double - - -
LOUIS HAYWARD :o: GEORGE MacREADY



—in—

“BLACK ARROW”
AND
- BODYHOLD”
— With —
WILLARD PARKER

OLYMPIC

TO-DAY & TOMORROW — 4.30 & 8.15
RKO SUPER DOUBLE - - -



HOWARD HUGHES PRODUCTION
~THE OUTLAW”
— Starring —

JANE RUSSELL — JACK BUETEL
AND

“RACE STREET”
— With —
GEORGE RAFT — WILLIAM BENDIX





ROXY

TO-DAY & TOMORROW — 4.30 & 8.15
REPUBLIC WHOLE SERIAL - - -



GLOBE

TODAY AND TOMORROW — 5 & 8.30

THE RED BADGE OF COURAGE

AUDIE MURPHY (WORLD WAR II HERO)

Opening FRIDAY Feb. 8th 5 & 8.30 p.m.
te + Ou .




DALE DENNIS. #0.
BERTSON & = BARTON

MiT2
Gaynor
so.uma rl GEORGE VESSEL LID RAGIN WALTER BULLOGY, CHARLES O'NEAL. GLADYS LERMAN

Trom 4 Story wy Albert and Arthur Lewis an Eaward Thompson









WEDNESDAY, FEBRUARY

Se SS lL

6, 1952



Over 1,200 Exhibits

At

Grenada Fair

(From Our Own Correspondent)

ST. GEORGE'S, Feb. 2.

GRENADA’S third post-war Agricultural and Indus-

trial Exhibition took place
last with
holiday

thousands availing themselves of the
declared for the opening day to give t

on Wednesday and Thursday
public

the Tanteen

grounds where it was held an impressive fair atmosphere

There were over

1,200 exhibits of

a wide variety with

the general standard good though expert opinion held there
could have been higher quality in some respects.

Besides the Agricultural De-
partment’s own stand, the live-
stock section and the Arts and
Crafts section, three local firms
provided stands one of them
taking the form of a tractor dem-
onstration Another attrective
section was the schools Arts and
Crafts section which in addition

fo jocal work presented exhibits
from Barbados and St. Kitts.
Promised exhibits from Jamaica,
$t. Lucia and Dominica cid not
arrive on time.

Highlight on the first day ‘was
i March Past before His Excel+
ency Sir Robert Arundel] of
drize-winning livestock. In the
ifternoon of the second day, His
§xcellency addressed a large
tumbe; of visitors to the Exhi-
tition after introduction by Mr.
a. A. G. Hanschell, Director of
\griculture. Later Lady Arundell
wesented the Special Awards
ind Dipjomas while Hon. W. E.
‘ulien of the Permanent Exhibi-
fon Committee moved a vote of
hanks.









Mr. Hanschell expressed regret
t the lack of participation of
he large estates and said it was
Gs hope that the Exhibition

Vould in the near future be run
y the Grenada Agricultural As-
Ociation which had a large and
afluential membership.

Less Classes
His Excellency said that a vari-
ty of good things had been pro-
fuced, but he held it would be
fise to reduce sOmewhat the
umber of classes (there were
$8) and concentrate more on the
hings that matter most. By re-
ucing classes they might be
ble to canalise the skill, patience
nd desire to create that was
ganifested, making more beau-
ful and useful things of the kind
hat people wanted to keep in
peir homes. He would also have
tked to have seen more entries
a Grenada’s specialised export
tops. This was the best exhibi-
on so far, but he hoped not nearly
$ good as the next one would be
Following were the special
wards:—
Challenge Cup by the Royal
Sank of Canada for the best
nimafj}i in the show—W. P.
tranch, Dougaldston Estate.

Challenge Bowl by Barclays
sank for the best milch cow—
feorge Nurse, Paddock.

Challenge Cup by Mr. T. E.
loble Smith for the best pure-
red sow—W. P. Branch, Doug-

Idston Estate.

Silver Cup by Mr. D. L. Fer-
uson for best milch goat—Joseph
tarter, Westerhall Government
\gricultural Station.

8-Day Mantie Clock by Geo, F.
fuggins & Co. (Grenada) Ltd.
or best Rhode Island Red trio
Mrs. Lilian King.
8-Day Mantle Clock by Thom-~
on Hankey & Co., Ltd., for cocoa,
ured and polished—George Kent,
it, Patrick’s.

Silver Cup by The Grandy
ittores Ltd. for fresh butter-
tonway Steele, St. George's.

Silver Cup by R. K. Milne &
to. for mixed vegetables but due
>? the unsatisfactory standard in
ais, given for the best exhibitor
a Arts and Crafts—Mrs. Evelyn

‘ilgrim.
Governor’s Special Prize for
fest peasant exhibitor—James

fampbell of Moliniere,
feorge’s, who gained seven
izes, 12 seconds and one
ommended.

St.
first
was

Canada’s C. 0. i.
Index At All Time
High

OTTAWA, Feb. 5.

Led by scattered increases in
ood prices Canada’s cost of living
adex pushed upward two-fifths of
point in December to the highest
wint of all time.

The two-fifths rise compared
vith a November drop of one-
enth of a point the first slide in
8 months. It brought the index

p to a peak of 191.5 at Jan. 2.
—(CP),





World-famous ay food products

White shoes,
in company, must be spot-
less, immaculate. Use [p
Propert’s White Renovato
or Propert’s Shuwhite. No t
surer way of making sure

that white shoes are white!

New Monarch
Comes To
Guana Island

ST. JOHN’S Antigua
Mrs. Rosamond Wright
island queen has
claims to the Island Kingdom
consisting of the historic deer,
forested Guana Island and
other little rocks, reefs and islets,
The new owner of the 354 acr
which make up the kingdom i
Mr. Hamilton Hill of London
The handsome black haired M:
Hamilton Hill arrived in Antigua
two weeks ompanied by
his tall slim son, dark haired like
the father and also two
young farmers.
The party has
Antigua’s Beach
the lantic
snooker.
Yesterday erowds gathered
around an Amphibian Jeep which



a dozen

ago ac

strong

been relaxing At
Hotel, enjoying
breeze and playing










v landed from the S.S. Tribes-
man assi ned to this gentleman
The boat-shaped vehicle is capa-
ble of travelling on land or sea
and besides having four wheels

with tyres, it has a steering rudder
and propviler at the rear. There
is plenty of chatter about seeing
the Amphibian Jeep submerge in
the Narrows and make its maiden



voyage across the 50 yard chan-
nel to Barne Point, Guana with

the party of gentlemen.
A Farmer King

Mr, Hamilton Hill intends to
be a farmer’king on Guana, Land
which a hundred and, fifty years
ago grew sugar cane for the Cod-
rington family and where banks
can still be seen is now going to
be used for cotton cultivation.

A tractor has also arrived and
the three young men will soon be
at work supervising and clearing
Accacia, Cedar, Logwood and
Cinnamon trees, They will live
in the beautiful old house whose
original walls are still standing,
It is a building which has been
added to and now has two modera

wings on either side.

Deer and fat sheep roam the
island abundantly, mongooseés cun-
ningly stand on their hind legs
and watch the new owner as
much as to say “We intend to give
you a jolly good fight before you

established your poultry here.”
Rats of the largest variety will
also have to be met in battle since

for the past months they have
had their freedom in and out of
the ancient mansion.



Guianese Refused
Perniission To
Remain In T’dad

GEORGETOWN, B.G., Feb. 4

British Guiana Trade Union
Council to-day cabled a strong
protest to the Secretary of State
for the Colonies against the
action of the Trinidad Govern-
ment in declaring Mrs. Janet

Jagan a “prohibited immigrant”,

an elected member of the George-
town Town Council and General
Secretary of the Peoples’ P
gressive Party.

Mrs, Jagan deplaned from
Trinidad on Friday last to spend
a short vacation during the
island’s carnival. She i now
due back in B.G. to-day, having
been refused permission ito re-
main,

The T.U.C.A. have informed the
Secretary of State that they con-
sider the practice of restricting
the freedom of movement of
Trade Union and political lead-
ers within colonial territories
“most reprehensible” and have
further called upon all working
class organisations within the
Caribbean area to join in a united
protest against the action of the
Trinidad Government.

Other protests expect to follow.

WL ake












LACKWELL

—the name FAMOUS for Pickles

” generations
Branston Pickle White Onions
Mixed Pickles Cocktail Onions
Gherkins Chow Chow
Piccalilli Walnuts

Local Agents:
Geddes Grant Ltd., Bridgetown.

to pass muster

i
3

} SHUWHITE & WHITE RENOVATOR |

In Cartons with Sponge

tamous
relinquished her



EXHTDITEC

MR. W. P. BRANCH, Manager of
prize for the best animal in the

Hanschell, Director of Agriculture looks on.

of the late Revd. Philip Branch o
in Grenada. In his address, His
father, the late Revd. G. W. Branc'!



IN PRIZE







>
BARBADOS. ADVOCATE PAGE THREE
. ; 4 ; .
Obituary ; GiothFromBananas Gqiry Holds Talks With
[pe =
MR. OTHO WAITHE And I inteapples Factory Management
1e ocetfrred unexpected- NEW YORK
lence Ris er Road or A weaving trade that expire (From Our Own Correspondent)
rni Mi Otho ir he Philippines more than 50 ST. GEORGE'S. Feb. 2
ithe, Linotypist of the Adv years ago has been revived. |: re ’ a ae ee nee &
Co, I He \ 44 makes cloth from both the banan WITH GRINDING OPERATIONS commencing at
Mr Waithe wa pia en plant -_ the for ean Woodlands Sugar Factory on Monday, Hon. E. M. Gairy
of his parents and was brought up experts have just rol ht «thi : > parurnnsintattuae ‘
in a christian atmosphere He at- trade to light again and they pa aay othes 7 eee : Sa aa i at d Mental
tended. Bay Street Boys’ School predict that these unusual cloth orkers Union yesterday held talks with members of the

Dougaldston Estate, receiving his
show from Lady Arundell. Mr.
Mr. Branch is a brother
f Barbados and a leading planter
Excellency made reference to his
h whose small cocoa plantation at

St. Paul’s was outstanding for its heavy yields of high quality.



Manager Announces

C.N.S. Sailings For °52

SPRING, SUMMER AN

MONTREAL, Jan.
D FALL sailings for the 1952

season by Canadian National West Indies Steamships from

Montreal,

Halifax and Boston to Bermuda,

the Leeward

and Windward Islands, and British Guiana were announc-

ed here recently by Captain R

t. A. Clarke, General Manager.

The first spring sailing will be from Montreal late in April

by the C



Seawell

ARRIVALS — BY B.W.1LA
ON MOND. AY
From ST. VINCE
Noreen Hazell
Gibson

From GRENADA




Webb, FE

clid

Basil Lewis, Edmond Gwyn, P. Blades,
Barry Blades, Elma Wilsor
From MARTINIQUE:

Gordon Osgood, James Culpepper
Amelyna Nelson. Robert Curri

From TRINIDAD



W. Grimstead, M. Laurence, M, Ftrg
son, R. Toussaint, V. Anderson, M. Ander
. E. Friffin, M. Griffin, M. Wat



lor, M. Mural, D, Mitchell, E. Giag
A. Sivers, L. David, E. Vogel, D. Lyder,
£. Clarke, H on, Harrison, Harrison,
J. Nunes, Lu I Dyer, H. Dyer, A
Dyer, E. Dyer, Behn, B. Nogueira, C.
Robinson, D. Hugo mn, V. Hugon, C. Tom-
sent, A, Tor ne
DEPARTL RES BY
ON MONDAY
For MARTINIQUE
Guy Massel!
For ST, VINC
Pickford G









BWA

Joseph Seale
ENT
Patrick Murray




Tor GRENADA;
Jene











Millington, Willoughby Sayers,
A Py Darty, Daphne Hutchinson,
F Fe Ince, Mary Frost DaCosta
Lovell, Réy Me Connell, Leota MeConnell,
Fe Bernard Crosby, Rtv. James Boulton,
Rev. Robert MeCullough, Rev. Francis
Lawrence, Rev. Maxwell Thomas, Rev.
George Frost, Arthur Clarke, Julian
M St Clair Weekes Laurie
For TRINIDAD
Wilbert Waleoti, Olivia Fox, Grace
Fox, Ernest Fox, Winston Fox, Grace
x ‘ , Wallace Fo Aaron
» Matalon, Erie The
Colin Inniss, Anthony
Worrell, Albert O'Neal

Marjorie Colley,
Banfield, B

Brandford
ttie Raymond

In Touch With Barbados
Coastal Station

Cable and Wireless (W.1 Lid.,
that they can now communicate with the





advise

following ships through their Barbado:
Coast Station
S. Bonito, s.s. Braga, s.s. Empress of


























Scotland, s,s. Ionian



Leader, $.5. Charitas.





s.s. Tindra, s.s, Fort Townshend, s 5
Rosa, 8.8. Aleoa Ranger, 8.8. F eer Cove,
Marco Polo, s.s. Mauretania, s
Quilmes, s.s. K, Bitten Court Orione,
8.8. Mercator, Southern Counties, s.1
Zelos, s.s. Lady Nelson, s.s. Willem tid,
5 Mormacrio, s.s. Awimen, Rodas,
Ca Poseidon, 8.3
Beatrice done nth
ine M R
Proteu

JOINT Au)
MUSCLE PAINS

May mean kidney trouble

A function of the kidneys is to
eliminate harmful impurities from
the system. If the kidneys grow
sluggish, these impurities accum-
ulate and settle and often become
a cause of pain in joints and
muscles. The way to tackle the
trouble is to help the kidneys.
They should be toned up with
De Witt's Pills—the medicine
made specially for this purp¢
De Witt's Pills have a soothing,
cleansing and antiseptic action on
the kidneys that brings them
back to perform their natural
function properly.¢ This well-
® tried medicine is sold all over
the world and we have many

letters from sufferers telling
of relief gained, after years
of suffering, by taking De
Witt's Piils. Try them

for your trouble. Go to
your chemist and








GUARANTEE —
De Witt’s Pills ; r

manufactured under strictly hygienic
conditions and the ingredients con-
form to rigid standards of purity.

Va Re tbs

for Pernt Pee mere iran



°.N Ss. motor vessel, Canadian Cruiser.

The new schedule is designed
to provide a sailing approximate-
ly e very 10 days with passengers
and freight from Montreal and
Halifax to the Caribbean, The
fleet will comprise the Lady Nel-
son, Lady Rodney and the three
motor vessels Canadian Cruiser,
Canadian Constructor and Cana-
dian Challenger, A 10-day freight
service will be operated also to



Nassau and Jamaica.
Calls at Boston will be made
by the Lady Nelson and tady

Rodney on each of their south and
northbound voyages. Passengers
returning to Canada in the three
motor vessels will disembark at
Saint John, N.B., and the ships
will proceed to Halifax, Québec
and Montreal with freight.

A Seenic Route

Five-day cruises between Mor
treal and Boston over the scenic
St. Lawrence route are fea



in the new schedule. to
cruises in the Lady liners will
offer a five-day sailing in eithe:

direction between Montreal
Boston, with a call at Halifax.

and

Under a sea-air agreement be-
tween Canadian National Steam-

ships and Trans-Canada Air
Lines, alternate routing will be
possible for passengers to Ber-
muda and the West Indies, Pas-

sengers from any point in Can-
ada or the United States
by the two carriers, may travel
to Bermuda, Barbados and Trini-
dad by sea or air and return by
the alternate service,

The Canadian Cruiser, first o!
the C.N.S. fleet to reach Montreal
next spring, will arrive about
April 19. She will be followed
by the Canadian Constructor,
Lady Rodney, Canadian Challen-
ger and Lady Nelson. The first
sailings of these vessels fror:
Montreal have been scheduled fo
April 29, May 9, May 19, May 30
and June 9,

FOR
EXTRA

SAFE!

THE CYCLIST’S

CHOICE

—DOWDING ESTATES & TRADING CO., LTD.

(ECKSTEIN BROS.)

Distributors

> News

served }

y



and was a lifelong member of St

Ambrose Church Choir and











the

will soon be making their mark Factory Management about working conditions during the























$ in the world markets. crop season. subscriptions both sides fell in
‘ootball Club. Later he went to The fibre of the banana plant The talks proceeded in an ami- line with a suggestion by Mr.
Combe mere School and Harrison” ig soft, with a Slight sheen and cable atmosphere, with Mr. S. A DaBreo that the Union should
Coll a but never forsook the , silvery cast. The pineapvic Francis, Managing Directoy of @ppoint Shop Stewards who
hoe of his boyhood days. fibre makes a cloth called pina, the Factory, presiding and La- Should look into that on their
adres 5 een eae at the which is warm and pleasing to bour Officer G. S. DaBreo and ehalt. —
Stock Room of the Advocate Co,, ‘0Uch. Looms and new processes Labour Inspector John DaBreo The closed shop principle did
fed 3 iy teenies yee; vreparing the fibre have been only sitting in as observers ne present great difficulty as
Operat aA reas to be Ghe Of ei developed by the E.C.A. expert Among the M.M.W.U, requests Most of the worker were
ae + allan —B.UP were the fajlowing M.M.W.U. members and the pos-
poe ce sae the feat Harri R 2 sibility of strike action was held
e Was probably the first HM: Secniniteenipbantiiiie a 7 :
sonian become member of A closed shop at the Factory Undesirealije in the event of
the Barbados Workers Union. He BARBADIAN DIES and associated estates for W'thholding the request
was fearless and as a unionist did IN GRENADA members of the Union and ar- RATES OF EXCHANGE
not hesitate to let his views be Chicks’ Gut Own Careiiibatbiiay rangements by the Manage- ‘Valea ee re ee
known, There were occasions ST. GEORGE'S. ment for collection of Union a
when this brought him into con- . a subscriptions, 736/10 Cheques on Bankers n 4/10
flict with others but in the end it , The ‘ death | tao er Yast Compensation for workers Sight or Demand Drafts 712/10
was his nature to retain the Wednesday of Martha Taylor, 85, when due to road conditions 726/19 Cabl
friendship and respect of his op- 10Pmerly of Barbados and moth- trucks become bogged down “*/'° Gurrenes mee
ponents. Fast friendship was part ¢r-in-law of Mr. Fitzgerald Fer- and unloading and ré-loading 56 Silver Sa 4
of his nature and he was highly Tington, well-known local garagé had to take place; also for de- DA
respected not only by his col- Proprietor. The deceased leaves lays in field work due to late ™*"° _ weno
leagues at re Advocate, but by © brother, Hezekiah Brathwaite arrival Pgs Be tee : af 10.65.
wide circle whose presence at ®d two sisters, Mesdames Eliza- An increase of pay for stigar 794/10 Cable :
his funetal on Sunday testified to beth Sealy and Lydia Agard, iD workers bringing ‘them into 79/18 Curren 69 3/10
the est@@m in which they held Barbados, four sons in the United ling with general agricultural so Siiver, =
hi States and a daughter here. The te Sesileaen, at — a cd 20
m. workers. Cane workers under FEBRUARY 1952
He was married to Miss Chloe ‘uneral took place at the St. an agreement prior to the strike NEW YORK
Kippings who now survives him, George’s Methodist Church with of ’ last Fegruary—March are 73.6% pr Sees on Bankers 71.4% pr.
so and other re potrdg| _— a large & thering | attending, _ paid $1.02 per day for men and - a * Seen 71.2% pe
condolence will be extended. resemblance to the late George 95¢. for women, whereas general aaa a 8% pr
Arliss, the actor. His hobbies @griculturay workers (now earn Coupons 69.2% pr.
MR. W. H. ANTROBUS were farming and gardening. $1.20 and $1.00. CANADA
The death occurred on Satur-/ | Surviving are his widow, Mrs. The Factory representatives 4, ,,“Meluding Newfoundiand)
day of Mr. William Hilton An-]| Hallie Doorly; two sons, Martin viewed the representations fa- "**” Demand Dratts 90.88% oe,
trobus, Assistant Master at the| EB. and Brie; a daughter, Mrs. vourably agreeing to discuss Sight Drafts 20.5% pr
Boys’ Foundation School, He was} Charles Lundgren, and two bro- them early with other Directors, 14% pr. Cavie
51. thers, George and Harry Doorly. though in regard to collection of “°° ”* gua oa jn
Mr. Antrobus was one of those : AS
quiet and unassuming members of 2
the teaching profession who in an
unobtrusive way achieved an

amount of work beyond the capac-
ity of their more exuberant col-
leagues. He was the son of a
schoolmaster and teaching was his
natural bent. He was a favourite
with his colleagues and pupils
alike and highly respected, Be-
sides taking part and helping in
the school activities, “Antro” as
he was familiarly known, took a
deep interest in the corporate life



of the school. It was during the
period when text books were
scarce and almost unobtainable

that he began to import from the

publishers and sometimes by
means of re-sale or exchange
could supply the needs of pupils

of other schools.

Besides his popularity in edu-
cational circles he was at one time
Assistant Manager of the Empire
Theatre and here he was as popu-
lar and obliging as in school,

To his bereaved sister and other
relatives deepest sympathy will be
extended



MR. EDWARD DOORLY

Edward Doorly, first editor-
in-chief of Women's Wear Daily,
died in his home at Saugerties,
N.Y.., on January 30th at the
age of 78. Although he retired
ten years ago, he had contribut-
ed to Mairchild publications un-
til his death says the New York

Times. .
Born in “Barbados, B.W.L., he
received a law degree from Har-

rison College there and came to
the United States in 1898, After
working on a farm in Canada for
seven months, he became a street
car motorman in New York for
a brief time, In 1899 he started
with The Daily Trade Record,
the original name of the present
Fairchild publication, The Daily
Record,

An inside editorial worker, Mr
Doorly later served as make-up
editor and head of the copy desk.
Gradually he became right-hand
man to the late E. W. Fairchild,
founder of the papers.

Mr. Doorly edited in The Trade
Record, a page that was devoted
to concentrated daily news of the
women’s wear industries, In 1010
this service had been developed
to such an extent that it became
separate publication, Women’s
Wear Daily.

Although he helped guide oth-
er Fairchild papers, the develop-
ment and growth of Women’s
Wear Daily took more and more
of his time. He was credited
with ‘ having hired and trained
many of the present executives |
of Fairchild publications,

After his retirement to his}
farm, Mr, Doorly contributed
columns to Women's Wear Daily}
and, under the pen name of Ed-
ward Drayton,
and Footwear

Mr. Doorly

to Retaining Daily
News. |
proud

was of his|






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For enquiries call at










PAGE FOUR



BARBADOS 9 ADVOGATE

Gee SSS = fase

Printed by the Adverste Co., Lid., Broad St., Bridgetown





Wednesday, February 6, 1952

Fishing Industry

THIS week the Comptroller of Supplies
fixed the price of roast beef at 68 cents
per lb., and stew beef at 58 cents per Ib.
Last week roast beef was sold at 48
cents per lb. and stew beef at 36 cents
per Ib.

Last week Trinidad’s meat prices rose
when brisket was fixed at 74 cents per lb.
instead of 54 and sirloins advanced from
67 cents to 75 cents. In Seychelles the
price of beef which was 65 cents per Ib.
(against 25 cents before the war) has re-
cently been controlled at one rupee per
lb. The price of meat advances almost
everywhere and the only remedy that
governments in Trinidad, Barbados or
Seychelles can counsel is to grow more
livestock and reduce the quantity of im-
ported meat. So long as Barbados is de-
pendent on imported meat, the Govern-
ment can do nothing else except continue
to raise the controlled price of imported
meat to a price which will make it possi-
ble for the importer to continue importing.
The contrast with the Government’s con-
trol of fish prices is striking. Australia and
New Zealand exporters are allowed to
raise the prices of their meat because their
government permits them to do so: but
Barbadian fishermen are not allowed to
put up the prices of fish despite the in-
creased costs of fishing materials and de-
spite periodic shortages of fish. The Bar-
bados government which recently voted
$70,000 to build 40 new fishing boats and
$10,000 to introduce power-driven fishing
boats in the local fleet probably prides it-
self on its active encouragement of the
fishing industry. Is there however much
justification for pride? The controlled
price of flying fish (retail) has recently
risen from 6 cents to 7 eents but the only
immedite benefit seems to be experienced
by hawkers who cheerfully ask and get 8

cents for flying fish bought in bulk from
the fishermen at 6 cents each.

The steep rise in the price of fresh meat
by twenty cents per lb. for roast beef and
22 cents per lb. for stew beef, will force
more people to eat fish. It seems strange
that while the Government of Barbados is
prepared to sanction the increase of prices
to be paid to Australian livestock owners,
it rigidly prevents Barbadian fishermen
from raising the price of local fish during
periods of scarcity, while they are often
compelled to sell at half the controlled
price during periods of glut, The Govern-
ment’s policy for the fishing industry is
overdue for revision, and the recent de-

bate in the House of Assembly proved con- |

clusively how little attention members
seemed to have devoted to study of the
industry and its needs. The removal of
price controls on fish is only the first of a
series of essential steps that have to be

taken if the status of fishermen is to im- }

prove.

Until it does there can be little confi-
dence that the industry will become more
efficient.

If the Investigator can catch $3,700 of
fish in 141 days every fishing boat of Bar-
bados ought to catch between $3,000 and
$4,000 of fish during a 7 months season,

If fishing boats are earning revenues of
this size then there is urgent need for fish-
ermen to save more of their earnings. If
catches of this value are not being made
by each boat investigations ought to be
made to discover why they are not made.
These investigations might prove that
fishermen were not catching full hauls for
a variety of reasons. One reason might be
fear of arriving ashore after a more suc-
cessful and earlier fisherman had already
satisfied local demands: another might be
due to uncertainty as to marketing his
catch if late. Only proper distribution
methods will enable the fisherman to oper-
ate efficiently with certainty that the
whole of his catches will be bought. Al-
ready some Bridgetown groceries with
deep freeze facilities buy surplus catches
and store them but only in Bridgetown.
One pioneer effort to establish a distribut-
ing agency for stored flying fish was killed

recently by the Government’s rigid con- |

trol of fish prices. Another good effort is
likely to be dissipated shortly if the Gov-
ernment continues to compel deep sea
fishermen who clean and preserve on ice
fish caught off the Georgetown banks to
sell their catches at the same price as is
received by a local fisherman when he
sells a complete fish with head, tail and
entrails, In Bermuda no fisherman is
allowed to sell fish which have not been
cleaned. In Barbados control prices make
no allowance for the conditions of fish at
the time of sale.

The Government is aware that fishing is
important to the life of the community:
but it displays little foresight when it
allows people who want to eat meat to
pay whatever prices are made necessary
by rising costs in Australia, and yet will
not encourage its own fishermen to catch
more fish through hope of greater reward.

The only way to modernise the fishing
industry is to make fishing more attractive.
If fishermen want to go on building old
fashioned boats (which have caused some
40 deaths in the past six years) Govern-
ment should give them little encourage-
ment,
$14 million dollars to Barbados today: if

}
re

|
|
|





The fishing industry is worth some |

boats were modernised and fitted with en- |
gines it would be worth at least one mil- |

lion dollars more,

The Government must have an active
forward looking fishing policy if success
is to be achieved: it cannot keep looking |
back to see if all the fishermen are follow- ,

ing: it must lead.

The Commonwealth

BARBADOS. ADVOCATE

}

ai, een

LONDON.

The value of the rubber planta-
tion industry to the British Com-
monwealth has often been stressed
in recent years, but few people
know the story behind the estab-
lishment of this important indus-
try in South East Asia.

Mr. Hugh Latimer, writing in
“History Today”, has managed to
condense it into a single article.
The result is one of the most
readable and informative contri-
butions yet achieved on this sub-

ject.
Much of the early history of
the introduction of the South

American “indiarubber” tree into
Asia has been documented by such
pioneers as Sir Clements Markhurn
and Sir Henry Wickham, and Mr
Latimer has drawn heavily on
their works, But gaps remain, and
at certain points history has be-
come confused with legend.

One of these legends — that
Wickham smuggled the rubber
seeds out of Brazil in defiance of
a local government jealous of its
earnings from the export of natu-
ral rubber — is discounted by Mr.
Latimer. The legend apnvears to
have grown out of Wickham’s own
colourful account of the affair.”

“Read carefully,” says Mr. Lati-
mer, “the narrative makes it plain
that Wickham merely feared this
might be so: the local authorities
at Para, with whom H.M. Consul
Was on good terms, was most. co-
operative in his desire to get the
cargo through quickly.”

Furth onfusion was undoubt-
edly due@ to the interest which
several U.K. Government depart-
ments — notably the Indja Office
— professed in the efforts to intro-
duce the rubber tree into Asia. The
Governments of those days did
not attach such great importance
to colonial development as their
modern successors the huge
sums spent on the East African
groundnuts scheme may be con-
trasted with the niggling attitude
of the nineteenth century authori-
ties when Wickham demanded
£10 per thousand for the’ seeds
that were to grow into today’s
flourishing industry.

“The matter,” Mr. Latimer says,
“moved ponderously through the
proper channels.” ter — much
later — we find the then director
of Kew Gardens writing to Mr.
Joseph Chamberlain in the fol-
lowing terms:

“Sir,

“....Twenty years ago the
Secretary of State for India in
Council invoked the aid of this
establishment to introduce the
species yielding indiarubber
from South America into India.
The operation was successfully
accomplished at considerable
cost. Three species were estab-
lished in Ceylon, where they
have since produced seed which
is available for distribution.
As far as I am aware, no prac-
tical result has followed....”

The efforts to establish the rub-
ber tree in India failed, and part
of the blame for this must be

POCKET CARTOON
by OSBERT LANCASTER

“Well, what a fine lost
Rare ey gees ont
to bel”

.



attached to a misleading report on
the natural habitat and method of
cultivation of the tree prepared by
Mr. Cross, who had been entrust-
ed with the task of collecting the
seeds in South America. Although
his observationg proved hopelessly
wrong, it appears that some of his
plants, received in Singapore in
1877, were destineq to become the
forebears of three-quarters of the
world’s cultivated rubber.

Once these plants had been es+
tablished in Singapore’s botanical
gardens, they were apparently
forgotten, for when Mr. H. N.
Ridley arrived here some years
later to take charge of the gardens



he found them fully-grown and
entirely overgrown by secondary
——

'o Mr. Ridley belongs much of |
the credit for @tscovering a meth- |
Od of tapping which did not kill
the trees. But he found it difficuit
to interest planters ig the tree. Mr.
Latimer describes how Mr. Ridiey
used to press rubber seeds into
the pockets of visitors to his bot-
anical with the injunc-
tion, “Take a few of these home
with you. They will be valuable
some day.”

Mr. Ridley, a remarkable 96-
year-old, who lives near Kew Gar-
dens once told me that some oi
the oldest rubber trees in Malaya
were grown from seeds which he
gave to district residents many
years ago. The seeds were planted
near rest-houses and official resi-
dences, and some of them are still
giving a daily yield of latex.

With the development of the
motor car industry, the rubber
tree became a popular plantation
crop, and the British Common-

wealth’s dollar-earning
industry was on the road to pros-
What th meant to Malaya

is best described by Mr, Latimer:
“A jungle waste was converted
into one of the most productive
agricultural areas under the sun,
and the character of the Malayan
population was transformed. As
well as the South Indian workers
and the Jaffna superintendents,
the best planting blood of the
East was attracted to Malaya: A
Skinner from Indga, a Lushington
from Ceylon, and all the clans of
North Britain, figure among the
names of planters of the early
twentieth century.

“Their capital was enough for
pioneering; not enough for devel-
opment, and many sold their pro-
prietary rights for shares and be-
came managers on their own
estates. The small London invest-
or really made modern Malaya.
But the planters or their succes-
sors stayed. The country which
they personally have done so much
to develop has a strong emotional
hold on the European Malayans
of today and not even the inter-
‘war depression or the humiliation
of the Japanese occupation have
succeeded in shaking it,

“In the present Communist ter-
ror, the rubber planter faces the
biggest odds he has ever faced.
The Commonwealth has reason to
be grateful for his devotion.”

Crime Does Not Pay

I would not like to say that
what has lately passed in our
House of Assembly on the sup-
posedly malign influence of the
modern Cinema is just so much
rubbish, but I think that the nar-
row basis on which it is supposed
to rest is not within the pale of
reason, The quick action of many
today in turning quite helplessly
to this intangible excuse is a
supreme achievement on the part
of modern escapism; and above
all uncovers what is a complete
lack of understanding towards the
fundamental structure of human
society and the habits evident in
the local scene.

Today, an elementary education
is as much the rule as it was lack-
ing years ago. And this is what
many people fail to understand—
the person endowed with even a
little common sense, or that which
may be . artificially engendered
through the means of simple in-
struction, even the reading and
understanding of a few fables or
parables, cannot possibly miss
wihat today’s films are everywhere
based upon, what is the whole
structure that motivates Holly-
wood—the moral that each and
every film has as its eventual
aim. Thus the veneer of the plot
never succeeds in obscuring the
whole meaning of the production.

There it is in the proverbial
nutshell, One hundred per cent. of
these crime movies end with the
criminal pictured in the lowest
state of mental and moral degre-
dation possible, a person for
whom we can entertain not the
slightest feeling of sympathy.
With this fact drilled so constant-
ly in the minds of cinema-goers
everywhere—Crime does not pay,
and never will—we still have an
individual attempting to emulate
the brutal deeds of one who has
been so completely delineated and
made utter disgusting before
their very efes! It’s hard to be-
lieve isn’t it? But the conclusion
most people will arrive at is the



BY A CORRESPONDENT
obvious fact that even in the ab-
sence of an “Encouraging film”
the material for the dirty work
is all there, in the character of a
person with a plainly complicated
and sadistic turn of mind.

Can anyone tell me anything of
the films that incited the black
neeromantic background and mor-
bid inhuman machinations of the
Ritual Murder Case: the utterly
senseless reason for numerous
acid-throwing cases: the many
other events that so dismay and
disgust us, and all with not the
slightest vestige of a precedent to
be discovered on the screen.

The crime wave that has re-
cently struck hitherto compara-
tively staid Barbados has assumed
propersoas the present generation
nas never before witnessed. It is
only natural that this extremely
sad state of affairs should cause
paralleled reverberations among
classes and people in general, and
that as is to be expected the usual
trend of thought would necessarily
be disturbed from its traditional
rut. Nevertheless in spite of these
changes, I see absolutely no need
for the Assembly to be alarmed
about the type of film the public
likes to see.

It is perhaps sufficient to re-
mark that the type of pictures
blamed for the rising trend of
crime are not in any way new to
the screen; they have not, in other
words, been shown for the first
time during 1950. If this was the
case, then maybe there would be
some reason for attributing to
the new-fangled hair-raisers a
faithful. following in Barbados
spurred on to emulate dark deeds
done upon the canvas patch before
their eyes, and a following to all
intents and purposes that has got
off to an experienced and calcul-
atingly cold-blooded start.

Unfortunately, this is not the
case, These pictures have been
showing in Barbados and_ else-
where for years past, and gentle-
men who wish to compliment

Our Readers Say $

Alarming Reading

To The Editor, The Advocate—

SIR,—The remarks made by Mri
Oo. T. Allder in the House of
Assembly last Tuesday on the’ sub-
ject of films: will no doubt make
alarming reading for those who
know little ar nothing of the mo-
tion — business,

To begin with, the theatres can
only show the type of product as
made available to them by the
producers, The Board of Censors
is not appointed to tell the thea-
tre owners what t of picture
they must play. The Censors are
appointed to view films and to
approve of such films which are
moral and »proper; and also dis-
approve such as are sacrilegious,
obscene, indecent or » or
such as tend in the, judgment
of the board, to debase or corrupt
morals,

Mr. Allder states that at least
25% of the pictures shown should
be of an educational nature. Per-
haps Mr. Allder will be g0od
enough as to tell us where these
pictures may be obtained.

With reference to the remarks
made by Mr. F. E. Miller, he no
doubt refers to the “Production
Code” which governs the making

of motion pictures. Motion pic-
tures made in the United States
are, with few exceptions, pro-

duced in accordance with the pro-
visions of a Production Code
The general principals of this
code are :
(1) No picture shall be pro-
duced which will lower the moral
standards of those who see it.
Hence the sympathy of the au-
dience shall never be thrown to

the side of crime, wrong-doing,
evil or sin.

(2) Correct standards of life,
subject only to the uirements
of drama and entertainment shall
be presented,

(3) Law, natural or human,

shall not be ridiculed, nor shall
Syren be created for its viola-
tion, ‘
Under the heading “Particular
Applications” Crimes Against The
Law shall never be presented in
such g way as to throw sympathy
with the crime as against the law
and justice or to inspire others
with a desire for imitation.

With particular reference to
murder, the Production Code
states

(a) The technique of murder
must be presented in a way that
will not inspire imitation.

(b) Brutal killings are not to
be presented in detail.

(ec) Revenge in modern time
shall not be justified,

In these modern~ days the
Cinema is blamed for everything?
Adultery, Rape, Vulgarity, Ob-
ecenity, Profanity — all blamed
on the Cinema, It would be inter-
esting to discover what took the
blame before the era of Motion
Pictures.

Yours faithfully,
R. N. W. Gittens
CARIBBEAN THEATRES LTD.

Fires and Electric Wiring

To The Editor, The Advocate—
SIR,—With reference to your
Leading Article on some precau-
tions to be observed as a pre-
ventive to possible fires occurring
in Barbados, in which you quite

them on engendering this latent
burst of talent must remember
this and ae Besides, if
we are ng to do somet

about these moving movies thes
we cannot stop here, but do the
job of censorship wisely, complete-
ly leaving no horror unbared.
The newspapers must be gagged
of all such grisly news; the num-
erous tongues of Gossip’s malic-
ious hangers-on will have to be
cleansed of all reference to these
degenerate deeds; the penny
dreadfuls (no longer a_ penny,
however) must also go. In other
words, it’s no use doing things by
halves. In fact, we will even
have to put a stop to the mean-
dering motions of the courts,
where murders are relived and
deeds redoné, and even sentences |
of final deaths are summarily pro- |
nounced! }

No, tihese flimsy excuses are too |
weak, too,groundless, The per-
son who believes that the films
exert a lasting influence, whether
good or bad, on this generation of
vipers has yet to learn a _ vast
amount on the wonders and whims
of human nature in the world of |
today. I personally prefer to look)
on the movies as the supreme
means of relaxation, even some-
times remotely of education.
Seldom do the facts remain over-
long in our minds—the picture
has really to be outstanding for
that, and they are few and far
between.

It is a product of threatening |
reality that we face, and we have
to meet this reality with reality
equally stark, One poison will
conteract another, won’t it? But
while one poison is seeping through
our life blood, it’s no use indulging
in senseless ravings fit only for
the maniac. That is only another
of tihe infinite ways of losing pre-|



cious time.
Fear is sometimes an extremely
efficient panacea and dreadful

Savagery never walks abroad
where fear heavily treads.

|

rightly pointed out the dangers
involved jin defective electrical
wiring and circuits, may I be
allowed to offer a suggestion
whereby fires due to electrical
defects could be considereably
minimised?

In British Guiana one must be
certified in electrical wiring be-
fore being allowed to wire any
building. Also after a building
has been wired the Government
Electrical Inspector must inspect
and certify that the job has been
properly done.

I think it would be wise, for
all concerned, to have similar
measures enforced in Barbados
instead of allowing amateurs, to
wire build b ' j

JOSE A. GOMES |
Porey Spring |
St. Thomas.
Stamps
To The Editor, The Advocate—

DEAR Sir, I have been collecting
stamps for quite a. number of
years but have difficulty getting
stamps from some parts of the
British West Indies including
Barbados,

I was wondering if I could im-
pose on your g to secure
a correspondent for me who is
interested in exchanging stamps. I
am 28 years of age but I will
answer every letter and send



KREMLIN LEADERS {paPER SERVIETT

WAGE WAR ON
ALL RELIGIONS

In a new bovk, Gary MacEoin, a distinguished
journalist, presents evidence that Soviet Com-
munist Party leaders purge all religions—
regardless of the fath — in the countries
brought within the imperialist Soviet orbit ,

By WILLIAM HENRY CHAMBERLIN
From “The Wall Street Journal”

SOVIET communism is dedicated to the
annihilation of all religion, and the Kremlin
leaders enforce the Communist Party system
as a way of life requiring absolute accept-
ance of the decisions of the Politburo and the

Central Committee of the Party as unques-
tioned “truth”, Gary MacEoin, a distinguish-
ed journalist, emphasizes in his new book
“The Communist War On Religion” (pub-
lished by the Devin-Adair Company, New
York City).

Organized Soviet communism plays two

roles to-day; it is at the same time mission-
ary and persecutor, the author reports, sup-
porting his statements with accounts of
Communist persecution of religion in numer-
ous countries.
is a constant intensive effort to indoctrinate
the people in countries under Soviet Com-
munist rule and to win converts in the rest
of the world. At the same time, there is a
systematic effort to haress, repress and, so

On the missionary side there

far as possible, utterly destroy religious faith
in the lands where Communist governments
are in power. The tactics employed are
adapted according to each country, its his-
tory, its politics, and its customs. But a
pattern of first concentrating on minority
faiths is almost universally followed.

For Soviet communism, a secular mate-
rialistic faith, is jealous of all rivals. It
recognizes no distinction between what is
due to God and what is due to Caesar (civil
or political leaders), It claims all as Caesar’s
portion.

Especially obnoxious to Communist rulers
in Moscow and in the states which have been
brought within the Soviet orbit is the as-
sumption, common to all the great religious
faiths, that there is a higher moral law, by
which the actions of the most powerful rulers



must be judged. They see in this a danger-

ous challenge to the amoral absolutism of
their regimes. Hence their determination to
deviatalize religion, if they cannot destroy
it, and to tolerate only churches which will

be subservient obedient tools in the hands

o! the State.

The story of Soviet Communist persecu-
t.on of religion in the vast expanse of Euras-
ia, from the Elbe River to the Pacific Ocean
is known in imperfect and fragmentary
form. There is no free, no reliable, news
reporting in this area. Consequently the
systematic campaign to dedtroy some
churches outright and to undermine all
others has proceeded without the spotlight
of publicity.

However, the main facts of this campaign
have been pieced together in this new book
by Mr. MacEoin. He undertakes to tell what
has happened in Soviet Russia itself, in the
satellite states of Eastern Europe and in
China. Much of his material is drawn from
Catholic (both Roman and Greek) sources;
but he clearly recognizes that communism
is equally hostile to all forms of religious
faith and he cites the fate of other religions
—Christian Protestant, Jewish, Moslem,
Buddhist, and others. The names of those
various nationalists who co-operated in
supplying factual information have been
witheld by the author to lessen their per-
sonal danger and for other sound reasons,
but the book includes a list of other sources
that can be checked.

The Orthodox Church in Soviet Russia
has been so ruthlessly purged of all its inde-
pendent leaders that the Moscow regime is
willing to tolerate its formal existence. The
price of this toleration is complete unques-
tioning subservience to the party line in
domestic and international affairs. Atheism,
however, remains a condition of membership
in the ruling Communist Party; and the
whole weight of education and propaganda

is thrown against any spiritual interpreta-
tion of life.

There has been a savage persecution of the
Catholics of the Eastern Rite, mostly Ukrain-
ians who accept the spiritual leadership of
the Pope in Rome. Countless numbers of
these have been arrested, some have died
under suspicious circumstances, and there
have been many arrests and some martyr-
doms among the priests.

The purpose of this religious persecution
by the Moscow party leaders, which has been
extended to Romania, is to force communi-
cants into the Orthodox Church. The motive
of persecution is purely political, as there is
no reason to suppose that Stalin, even
though he was sent to an Orthodox seminary

stamps to anyone who is kind by his pious mother, favours Greek Ortho-
enough to wate to me, |dox theology against Roman Catholic.
a nks, ‘ .
Yaure truly, (BOOKS—Reviews)
Cc. R. MALLOY,

Bank of Montreal,
Main and James, |
Hamilton, Ontario,
Canada. |

This article appeared in the December 6, 1951, i €
of The Wall Street Journal, a daily newspaper pub
lished in the United States, containing articles of
financial and economic interest. The reviewer is a
member of the ‘editorial staff of The Wall Street
‘ournal.

}



WEDNESDAY, FEBRUARY 6, 1952
__ WEDNESDAY, FEBRUARY 6, 195:
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WEDNESDAY, FEBRUARY 6 1952 BARBADOS ADVOCATF PAGE FIVE

Widow Proves She Can Write ee
WILL DISPUTE ear ens vce

BEFORE COURT

for the purpose of extending

knowledge and appreciation

of the British way of life. It

has representatives in most

. ries o > wor and

AN OLD WIDOW, Mary Taylor, wrote to the dictation cae er re dea

Caveator’s counsel, Mr. E. W. Barrow, to prove at the scholarships are granted to
Court of Ordinary yesterday before the Acting Puisne
Judge His Lordship Mr. Justice Taylor, that although she
had signed her marriage certificate with an “X” she could
still read and write and could have identified the will she

claimed was her husband’s to be in his handwriting

students from abroad for post-
Tt not signed by any the dispute over the will arose.















ry »
graduate courses in the United I h e food
Kingdom .
. . .
Toc British Council also has a / * / ly
Students’ Welfare Department at ‘ ol i a mut





ss its London headquarters and this .

hie... ., {nt is disputed by an He admitted that soon after provides excellent cultural and fitness
illesi son of the dead man Mary had taken the will to the ecre.tional facilities for visiting

as n in his handwriting, clicitor, Mary and himself had Students, for it is important for .

The pei ty question in dis- had a fignt.” He said that his them to know about life in Britain Marmite is a good dietary source
pute is h rit can be admit- name was not mentioned in that

ted probate in Common Form will.

of Vitamin B. A little added to
Stews, Soups, Sauces, Gravies
and Savoury dishes gives extra
flavour and nourishment. Chil-
dren love Marmite—especially
in Sandwiches of every variety
and on hot buttered toast.

as a whole in addition to their
studies bach term this depart-
ment draws up a carefully plan-
ned list of lee ures, social events,
week-end and vacation courses
and surveys available to students.
The most recent syllabus includ-

asi ought for by Mr. At the close of this evidence,
O. St. C. Cumberbateh, solicitor Mr. Barrow said that they were
tk widow, Or whether it then asking that the direction of
shou be admitted in Solemn the Court be given that the will
Fo as Mr, E_W. Barrow, in- be proved in Solemn Form by
structed by Mr, Banfield of way of a petition, :

ed weekend visits to Shek« In jars: | oz.,2 oz.,
Messr Hutchinson and Banfield “Lt am submitung,” he said “that Speare’s birthplace, Stratford-on ae te
is urgin the Court is not ca led upon to Avon; to Winchester with it

The e is adjourned unti] the decide the matter at issue at this
14th of this month when it will stage, but only to say

femous public school and cathed-
ral; and to Oxford and Cambridge
© see the college and buildings
and introduce the = students

the mode of life in an English

, whether
be decided whether on the denial] from first appearances there will ol 4
of the illegitimate son alone as be a contest of this will.” ia a }
to the will being his father’s, it It would not be fair upon them, aM * =

Should be admitted in solemn he said, to call upon them to dis- : MEMBERS of the Korean delegation (above) and the United Nations, delegation who are negotiating
form.

MARMITE









University.
To. ‘oetebthits < Ste: tie > ‘i peas wane, then. i a truce at Panmunjon.—_EXPREss. There were also several surveys THE VITAMIN B YEAST EXTRACT
0 establis Ss case for the f umberbatch said that ——— ee series sctures Halts ce.
will being admitted in Common Counsel for the other side had : nan S ‘ ~ peat m= emer — Nn waae4 GIVES COOKING EXTRA GOODNESS AND FLAVOUR
Form, Mr, Cumberbatch for Tay- to bring enough evidence to the St. Joseph Round-up Mr. mit 1 oes Pe nee weth:—Ane
lor called her to give evidence. Court to get such a decision and ——————— — pre Ot these dealt with the BBC ’

; ENGAGEMENT dies GP” ceetianice “eat 4

Awaited Daughter could not merely say that there - T M . \ was of particular interest to

She said that she was the widow “@S a caveator, Tinned Meat RING STOLEN O VIOSCOW students from abroad, for the voice
of Martin Taylor who died May A

S far as they were concerned





ef the BBC is already well known. ,
y Eleven fountain pens, tom . ” Soni to most of the ho listen to tl \
8. sr husbée , , the evidence they had produced y Evening Advocate” Series ™ OF re wand Haten tothe } 4 ;
is an oo ee — at then was sufficient i Save: tne Washed Ashore er ee eee — "eae vay menses General Overseas and other Ser- |
Of j ; 7 : ‘om y. A . f Vices. The students who enrolled. __. saeesantquagntanetanainiengti

her © Wad, Une sheir daughter ineerton el aoe po RESIDENTS of the Ba hsheba toria Stree’, between Sat- On Monday the Evening came from twelve different coun- a
Phidelia arrived from Trinidad custody aan “ mt he tae area who were on the beach last urday and Manday. The Advocate will begin publication tries and in the course of a fort-
and the two of them could get 4 y B soune Te et Binley bad pleasant surprise incident was reported to the of a lively, entertaining series night they absorbed a great deal. /
things settled. She kept the wiil â„¢ind of the testator , * P oats * lice by Mr. Fred Cole of articles. eae y abs da great de: &

til Phidelia oz P Counsel for the other side had When some tinned meat was dis Police by Mr. of articles about the Soviet” of” useful information about the
we "Te came. to upset that and give some form Covered on the sand. A resident the same printery. Union, : BBC and heard lectures on_ its
Sm a ia Aner ie oe Clarence of evidence on which it could be Of St. Elizabeth’s Village who was Louise Brathwaite of Mas- The author of the articles is Third Programme, European and But new treatment does more than
fetes will vh oa ae _ ot held that the will could not be On the beach told the Advocate ae ire an ne named John Smith. He is a man- Overseas Services and Audience ston
father's v ; She said, She carrier admitted in Common Form hat the meat and some onions ported that a gold engage- aging director of Coutts Bank. Research, given by the heads of ease these terrible agonies.
it to the solic itor to get it proved. Mr. Barrow said that the Wil] were washed up from the sea. ment ring, valued $12, ve He speaks and reads Russian, the departmen’s concerned. Mix-
The will was produced in court 124 not been witnessed and the Some youngsters who were also stolen from her house a He has just been to Moscow ed with these and other lectures . : +
and she said it was her husband’s, the Seta a a at on the beach promptly set about Mount Pleasant Plantation, : : epee ern as On policy and ad t f new product, DOLCIN, has been created which not only gives
She had often seen her husband tt pik wine polos Sin kee eating the meat which vy ipostly St. Philip, at about 10.30 not as a fellow eee a ~ Sivttinh -Serwadeation wears cites s ) ompt relief from the pains due to tne symptoms of arthritis and
write and knew it was in his » jo). "0; ? sa ; ; in tomato sauce, Pil- a.m. on Sunday. a member of a conducted dele- s adcasting e Visits to

* which said that a Holograph Will herrings in tomato sz '

handwriting. She then asked that |

+ | Nin + Hous where: th h : hwumatism, but also affects the metabolic processes which constitute
- ation, but as a private touris hn ouse, 1ere ey ear ive v7 art of the rhe tic state’s backgr 4
= ba ; ame 7 : shards ah Sausages ga i e ea , be aes very 1m pe rant part o rheumatic 1 ickground, .
it be admitted to probate anne te ei — rors an OBSTERE bre in good supply He went about Moscow with on youth broadcasts and saw DOLCIN has been thoroughly tested in medical institutions,
M0 . e rr 4! s ORS ¢é 5 . y i ‘ w ¥ str. s of *m: cca
There had been another docu- would come into force ‘as far as the hotels in he Bath- the outlook of an English boli- demonstrations of them; to Picca
ment which her husband had also





rH : OLCIN is being used now with unprecedented success DOLCIN
ahbid atae ate Bahneriad:, i ain. 1 ie Stn day-maker in Paris oy Rome oily studio, where they watched seing prescribed by doctors nou And many sufferers have already
given her m ~ ; a re ge ested ie Abe. Custonis Duties He Talked— nh instalment of a serial play for imed normal living as a result of teking DOLCIN
Cross-examin sd by Mr. Barrow. ae mee ee gone este veaterday “But, he added S He travelled in buses, in taxis, Children’s Hour, complete ‘with ton’t delay Profit by the experience of fellow-victims of these
OSS-€Xa € . » a contest, one was that the hand- cate ) ay. ’ ‘ . 2 ee . ’ . , ious effecte a ae ‘ let DOLCH ay. / , x ci ablets «os
she said that her husband wrote writing of the purported Will was the local housewives cannot get On U. =. Goods on the tube, He ate in restau- pie he ag 3 _ ss and on s. Get DOLCIN or A rottle of 1 ) precious tablets costs
the first will in her presence, She not chat of the testator. . as much as two pounds a week. seq Pants and drank in taverns. H ords: a urd Programm 2/- PER BOTTLE
could read and write. She could His Lordship said that the docu- Reason? The Lobs ers are caught Except in the case of recognisec

strolled in the parks. He Concert given by the London Phil-/ 9 8% BOOKER'S
charitable organisations, persons looked at the churches, He went !@rmoni¢e Orchestra with Moisie-
receiving relief packages from the to the

not see well enough to read the ment produced to him, appeared especially for hotels.
document produced in Court, Tt to be identically the same writing

(BARBADOS) DRUG STORES LTD.

; — B Stree t
theatre and to a night wilsch as soloist; to the Television road Street and Hg





tings (ALPHA PHARMACY)
was not because she could not as the Will. n United States will have once again «).:, He talked to the people he *Udios at Lime Grove, and to the | ..
read it, but merely because her Mr. Barrow said that the y had Cenes, rash Burnt to pay Customs Duties, The article jor Now, in MR. SMITH GOES ‘4 colian Hall, where they saw the | } SN
eyes were bad, She knew her put in a witness to show they of agreement relating to the cOn- TO MOSCOW, he describe: what '°°ording of a Variety show. At the |} ‘
husband’s handwriting and recog- were contesting the Will and that A cane fire at Applewhaite cession wags repealed by a Bill he saw and what he: heard. end of the survey the students | , PC K BOOK DEP ARTME T:
nised it then by the general out- ‘7: handwriting was not that of Plantation, St. Thomas, at about passed by the Legislative Council He describes the shops, the Possessed a very .good workin i\.E UN, y |
line, but could not read it. the testator and it was not for midday on Monday burnt eight yesterday evening. food, the drink,. the clothes, the knowledge of the way in which the |

It was true, she said, that she that Court to enquire whether acres of first crop ripe canes, three r |, women, the houses, the arcades, BBC is run and the miny difficul- | (C.F, HARRISON & CO, — FIRST FLOOR)

had signed her marriage certificate their contention was correct and a half acres of fourth crop The article, which was one of ‘he. Baki and “newspapers he ties and problems with which it
with an “X”, His Lordship asked what would ripe canes and ten acres of trash. i § |

4 ic C erati ree- has to contend
iti j he Economic Co-operation Agree a akin ata 3 as ¢ %
At this stage she was given be the position in the case of any The canes and trash are the prop- the saw. He tells how he queued up
























> the Po . : : > ments between the Governments the. Red Square to look at e
paper and a pen and to test her mischief-maker claimed that a erty of Applewhaite Ltd. They cf the United States of America a. 7 ee ened cords’ (enti | sei mregrivan '
ability to write, Mr. Barrow dic- Will was not a correct Will were insured ond the United Kingdom was ter- Lenin muti yy ye - ~ | { SELECTION OF ....
tated to her, “I Martin Luther Mr. Barrow said that the ques- On Thursday last a fire, also at minated last April, and conse- Be ee nee ae mo ‘ 1! “ot 4, onths I or 7 De ”
? : yan aite g a. he s , " “ue a say). > tells | r ’ ay AM A) i o
Taylor, witness Mr, Cecil Hughen- tion of whether a contestor would Applewhaite, burnt one and a half quently. opportunity was taken to que ue had to s uy) e : te : me | NE Ww and RE EN 7 Vii Zn cs
ville Kn.ght,” and she wrote it. win was not before the Court, but acres of fourth mye, ee naan. _ peal the local.Act by a Bill which ® Visit. to Renin s house, wre :
R wan? - get =* its >; itted in This fir as reported to the Po- repes B L0CE ee } i cle snin’s motorcar B | ‘ ; WPPeNCrUE rg RK
Written In An Hour bbe ol aes ne ae montage rete amends to Customs Tariff Act ltwe-ae nas, Rolls-Royces), ‘ egeme | FROM OUR’ EXTENSIVE STOCK.
She said that her husband took * » case was then adjourned. At Small “Ridge Plantation, dealing, with the exemption of He Watched |
t h to te the will The case wa ) at Ly . aor aig e ateh “g J : | e
about an hour wri 4 Christ Church, three and three- Customs duty, CA ie toh y HMertece Stop going around the bu
He gave it to her a couple of days aacenmteieentemee quarter acres of first crop ripe ' » the man of 28:.who ; to the Stand and being a nuisance t ‘SS IN THE MAKING Lady Wentwort)
after he had made it. He died canes were burnt when a_ fire Under the Bill passed by the cient ainaliatg banking family People. You have been repeated- ; Rs CENTURY , it yi h, Preweneele
pean ‘aan —. cope mt Labourer Gets A occurred there last week. hay § Legislative br men dposregt ae atin al é a enaea ot ¥y warned about going and bed. | Ae ‘ , J iraham Storey
gan on paper, are the property of the Jate G. S. provision was however made to (h é Me ‘ : , : ;
had no other writing on it,
4 John Lindsey
Another fire at Farm Plantation, J. H. Hanschell | " . . s !
9 ; 5 ; Pr hy Ud arn ahmtl acai, va rice fy Fleet Air Arm din order, he“: 2 anschell, Judges of th« i{TI f ; Fr. H. Hinsley
will . ao avert he: ae sie His Worship Mr. G. B, Griffith a eae iron sae Oa ter RVIRyEn aay eal By corr sae ‘to meet some people who Assistant Court of Appeal, tol SASTERN EPIC Compton Mackenzie
tee 10 Shara) 4 the bottom yesterday sentenced 20-year-old * font ay “ond crop ripe canes tay Ube" SO1Ry a b: Mine #3 were not Old Etonians”), Du- 54-year-old James Chandler of ‘HE RIVAL MONSTER Compton Mackenzie
cee te ra - oe her’ 1945 labourer Elmer Lewis of Deane's the lB coge R A H Johnson. LightAeropiane Club} ring the war he served in the Orange Hill, St. James, when they | \ MOUSE IS BORN Anita Loos
altteocan sean Bite said that it was Village, My Lord's, Pat ras inis ware insured. The uniforms and equipment of Mediterranean, the Home Fleet, “€ntenced him yesterday to four MORNING JOURNEY re James Hilton
ss ritten at one period, was that Michael to one mngpths Ac tthe At about 2.40 p.m. on Monday the Church Lads’ and Church the Fast Indies; he did neva! Months’ imprisonment for beg- | HE END OF THE AFFAIR Graham Greene
it must “have been a’ mistake, ment vies ao icon ad. en a fire at Claybury Plantation, St. Gir’ Brigade, as is the case with liaison With the R.A.F. end the &ing alms at the Probyn Street | HE VALLEY OF SONG ; Bisabeth Gocane
Mr. Cumberbatch objected to oe oe or ars “Lally Witbect John was put out before yee the Boy Scouts’ and Girl Guides’ yg Aiy Force. After the war he bus stand, . ee aon ore ; faces 2
searaicaiahe. § ' , ) any great damage urnt only 4 conn, 7. : btn i. seine: teh ts 3 . oad - : t
Mr. Barrow’s asking her what had Ward of Black Rock, St. Michael. any an at ee row Sashes the 5sociations; and went to Oxford and then inte By doing this Their Honour | :
keen her husband's intention with i. fountain pen was valued ten holes of L. Sealy. They -were ph oie sersonal and banking, confirmed the decision of Hir| ‘ore’s Commentary-—History of S.P.G.—Shape ofthe Liturgy
régard someone witnessing the .+°19/. and the penknife at 16/-, property of L. Seal; 7 ne eee eee ners cna aia, MR. SMITH GOES TO Mos- Worship Mr. G. B. Griffith, Act-| | *P0stolic Ministry—Liturgy & Worship—What the C. of E.
will, when Mr, Barrow asked that Cpl Devonish, attached to the insured ppeeeee ef ae cocsaatbed ODAG ia the account of a lisele ing Police eee ae) Pande tas
question, — C.I.D. Central Station, told the ; ak a observant young man with no “A”, Chandler ‘appealed against | few diaries still Available—engagement pads—writing cases
She said that Byron King was court that while searching at the NCN-SUIT to Barbados. ideology to peddle Mr. Grifith’s decision -
a witness to both wills. King was house where the defendant was vlaintif! Gwendolyn Hewitt of — amo Hon. the Colonial Secretary It begins exclusively in the ' eres, VALENTINE CARDS.-GREETING CARDS—EASTER
a witness though he did not sign staying, the et en found Black Rock, St. Michael, accepted pointed out that the Government Evening Advocate, Harbour Police Constable Jam« CARDS !! !
a , was later identified by ward “ee a non-suit when her case against oA istralia had recently ap- ON MONDAY Wilkinson told the court that on|
Phidella and. hevselfedvete-to a We i R. eee “ Ethelbert an ig eet joe pointed a Trade Commissioner to —L.E.S. February 2 he was on duty at the
antes workshop o>? eae . Bank Hall, in which she cla : West Indies with his office in Vrobyn Street bus stand and saw
carry the last will to the solicitor “Tro. sentencing him, Mr. B zen 2 - detention of fur- the West Indies f )
£10 damages for detention



and get raw . The time ‘ aid: “Prisr 5 t really ~ c Trinidad, and the concession y ryt Chandler beg a woman in a bu: !
anda get it arawn up. = 7 two Griffith said: “Prispn is no , my niture came before His Honour serait on: ee SS Water I urned Off for a penny. Me told him he wa |
between the writing c e the place for you. You should be Mr. H. A. Vaughan in the Assist- ther g ie sere a » patibentiein beter arraete is As
wills was about three months. ont'to a place and be treated, but 2 Gourt-of Appeal yesterday. Commissioner on the — ac 'cim. ..Residents in the Brittons Cross “} ds d him an
Teiniden wittl atte ne dat th and { campiet, Sa. arainans. lose in fae Hewitt was also claiming the ciprocity, customs privileg

Trinidad until after his death and y.—)) have a serious case of house-

J » oad area were without their © ;
so i turn of the furniture or the ilar to those extended to United pane supply of water yesterday Station where he was charged
she carried the will to the peeeg breaking and larceny coming up ee ad it which was estimated Kingdom Trade Commissioners in J
tor about a month after the death,

against you.” SR 16/ Australia. morning when both s andposts in Chandler had 12 previoug con |
Mr. Cumberbatch then gave ar ewis sald that at times he was at £25

evidence as to his custody of the unable to check himself from tak-
will for sometime, ing up other people’s things,
Caveator Clarence Taylor, also
called Smith, then gave evidence,
He said that Martin Taylor was

his father, He himself was 56 and Judge Strikes Out

took him to the Bridge Police |

NOTICE

thet area were turned off. Water

victions for beggin alms fron |
was subsequently supplied by Being



tanks sent by the Waterworks People. Chandler told the couri

ee Department that he appealed so that he coulk

T ic Offences Reported e800 psin-vans, jors, Yee £08 money "T Navel Bad ty

ra. tc : : ind other recep acles had to form ‘"¢ 4m unable to work, andl
long queve and await their S@ld.



ry Bing from people,” Their H SHELBOURNE Elizabeth Bowen
Shale he I rov z , Bing from people, “heir onou sSERNARD SPILSBURY Browse and Tullett
i a . ° he payment of cus- the National Provincial) He ’ Si ; BING a i
Her explanation covering the Month For Larce wy ga pays A as ob or begat parts, went to Eton, then into the Mt. H. A. Vaughan and Mr. A WREN. A
} Owing to the Arrival of the “EMPRESS OF



, t ‘ere reporte exceeding the speed limit on . 7 came a Their Honours told Chandle pie " a : " sae
— . was ther WO motorists were reported ae a : ‘ y hanes A (aes arpaee a Decamy sient that apparently he was ill an SCOTLAND” on Thursday, 7th instant, we
Mary Taylor was not his mo : fond The Police ate continuing to place speed traps along] tient had to go as far as Dalkeith 2
He and his father used to live Damages Case pose |. This is done to ensure that motorists do} corner or Culloden Road was indifferently clad and the t-holiday
cn good terms and used to visit various roads of the island ~" Residents in the Ivy district were going to send him to a place will be CLOSING for our weekly Half-holiday
each other, “I know my father's In the Assistant Court ¢ — not break the speed limits 7 also suffered a similar inconve- faa fte See eee
handwriténg,” he said. yesterday Judge {, A. ia nt rience, ooked after. s ArT ay ¢ sad of Thursday.
Handwriting Recognised Peet nao s ruck out a case brought Many other people were reported for other traffic offences; three} mene on SATURDAY, 9th instead o
He said he recognised two docu- py plaintiff Enid Babb of Cocoanut for not parking close enough to the sitle of the road, one for not con-

ments before the court to be in his Walk, Christ Church, age PS forming with read signs, three for parking in restricted areas, one for
father’s handwriting, but the docu- fendant Lester D. Branch o 5 py — ne otor vehicle and leaving the engine running, one for
ment which Mary Taylor — thing, Christ Church, asking for quitting a ss , vehicle around a bend, one for wilfully.intertrupting
vas his will, was not in his hand- £50 damages ae parking a moto ' 7 ce ee J in
te riting Babb claimed that on Novem- 4, passage, one for failing to have a lighted lamp on a ponies Perr’ .
" Cross-examined by Mr, Cumber- per 28, 1951 she eutaintd injeries ind one for réfusitig to move a motor vehicle so as-to prevent
ms ° i accident. se a
batch, He eld Ties Cie “SSE ne wells te An Becident she defends traffic block
“w” of the documents he admit- juries were caused by ine eae
ted to be in his father’s handwrit- ee eK Every day reports come into the Traffic Branch at Central Police
ae St nied ad one eS “Re complaint was filed by St ation In some cases the offenders are warned, but dn others they
vibe ae in, See and Mary Tay- E. D. Rogers, Solicitor of James are charged and appear before Police Magistrates.

lor had been on good terms before Street, on behalf of Enid Babb "
ye 7]
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PAGE SIX





PUBLIC OFFICERS’ HOUSING
LOANS BILL PASSED
BY LEGISLATIVE COUNCIL

MEMBERS of the Legislative Council yesterday hailed
the Public Officers’ Housing Loans Bill as an “admirable”
and “long overdue” measure which would “do much good
for the Civil Servants, but issued a warning to Government

that they should make regulations which would protect
Government itself as well as the Civil Servants.

The Bill which was given
unanimous approval by the Coun-
cil, provides among other thing:
for establishment ef.-a Public
Officers’ Housing Board composed
of a Chairman and wot less than

two members, and the creation of «

a Public Officers’ Housing Fund
over which the Board will have
control and management, and from
which Civil Servants may be given
loans to acquire or construct
homes of their own.

A move by Hon. G. D. L. Pile
and supported by Hon. R. Chal-
lenor to make it binding on the
Governor-in-Bxecutive Committee
to make Regulations was defeated
by eleven votes to two, the Hon.
Mr. Wylie, Atterney General,
pointing out that it was inconceiv-
uble that Government weuld place
large sums of money in the hands
of the Board to be spent as the
Board likes without being con-
trolled by Government

Second Reading

Moving the. seeond reading of the
Bil, Hon. “Mr. R.~ No Turner,
Colonial Seerctary saitl he was
sure that the Bill which was to
set up machigery for the ogivance

of loans to: Public Officers to
construct houses would be gener-
ally welcomed,

Hon. Mri Turner expinived
that the BH had been under
consideration for a2 long tine,
but in the form which it came
before the Council it woula
seen that it was quite a nple
Bill, and he was sure that it
would mer long-fell heed.
The Barbados Civil Service As-
sociation for some yeurs had
been pressing Jor . legislation
along the siine lines, ang in the
event that the Bill was passed,
they would, he was sure, derive
considerable benefit from it,
since they would be abie §)
borrow money to build homes
which wenld be their

to the :



wn
ctual al

vide ndet rill, ir & event
i as paseed, that would a
r Pr for the ; > mA s,

b



snd it would be for the

legisla

1 eu pproy 4iose sums,
First. Contribution
\fter goitig briefly through the
rious clauses of the Bill, the

H the Celonial Secretary told
the Council that it was proposed,
in so far as the establishment of
the fund was concerned, to ‘in~
elude the figst contribution in the
forthcorning 1952-53 Estimates;

Speaking In support of the Bill,
Hon. H. A, Cuke said that he had
for many years advocated meas-
ures along the lines of the present
Bill, and said that the Civil Ser-
vants had always felt that some-
thing should be done to enable
them to acquire homes of their
own.

He however warned that Civil
Servants should not try to raise
money to purchase homes above
their means, and said that he was
‘heartily in favour of the Bill.











money, but it would help a man
icquiring a house.”

That was very dangerous be-
when one started building
one could not even get
n estimate, and even if one did
t an estimate, it often exceeded
the amount, and therefore one got
an entirely wrong conception of
what the house was going to cost.
it was possible that a man might
¢ brought in to give an estimate
without the slightest idea of what
was about,

ause

i house,

he



In moving the adjourn-
ment of the Legislative

Council yesterday evening
until Tuesday, 12 February,

at 3 pm. Hon, Mr. R. N.
Turner, Colonial Secretary,
told honourable members
thai His Excellency the Gov-
ernor proposed to receive the
Repiies to his Speech at the
opening of the Legislature at
3.30 pam, in the Legislative
Council Chamber, on that
date.

Since there were two Reso-
lutions with which he would
ask the Council to deal he
would suggest that they meet
at three o'clock mstead of the
usual hour of 2 p.m.

The Council accordingly
agreed to the adjournment as
suggested .by .the .Coloniai
Secretary.



Mir. Lvelyo warned tnat Govern-
vent, in making regulations, it
snould endeavour to protect itself
as well as the men.

Main Point

Hon. Mr. Cuke said that the
main point which the Government
should see to was that if the
period for repaying the loan was
20 years, the sum which such an
officer is called upon to pay should
be in keeping wiih his salary and
that ne could ailord to pay it.

He said there was no use if a
man charged with a debt over a
period of 20 years could not pos-
vibly mee* it, since it would be
putting that man in trouble, he
having first to meet other com-
mitments, pay his rent and then



the balance he could not live on.
Hon. Mr, Evelyn suggested that
Regulations should be made that
the amount which was loaned,
and which must be repaid over’a
period of years, must not go over
a certain percentage of the salary
of the particular officer,

Hon. Dr. A. S. Cato
seemed to him that the
point to be considered by
Board which was to be set up
was not so much the = actual
value of the house, but the officer's
capacity to repay over a_ period
of time.

said it
main
the

The granting of only a per-
centage as suggested by Hon.
Mr. Evelyn would place the
officer in the position of hav-
ing to find the remainder of
the money, and he therefore
felt that with an officer's
capacity to repay a loan over
a period of time, he should
be given the full value of the
house.

Unpopular Fund

There was another point, and
that was in respect to the princi-
ple generally of loaning money to
Civil Servants for building
houses. There was the Widows
and Orphans Fund which was
found to be very unpopular with
Civil Servants, He himself felt
that if Government found them-
selves in difficulties in raising
money for the houses of Civil
Servants, it should be the Widows
and Orphans Fund added to a
scheme of the nature envisaged
in the Bill.

Replying to the last point raised
by Hon, Dr. A. S. Cato, the Hon,
the Colonial Secretary said that
it had been proposed by the Civil
Service Association that certain
monies which came into the Trea-
sury under Section 15 of the Pen-
sions Act, 1925, should be used
for the purpose of the Fund for
Public Officer’s Housing, but as
Honourable members were aware,
an investigation was going on at
the moment by the United King-
dom Actuary into the Widows
and Orphans Pensions, but it was
felt that until such investigation
was completed, it would be un-
wise to appropriate such funds to
the scheme.

it might be appropriated, to
any fund hereafter to be formed
for the benefit of the Widows and
Orphans. However, as the law
now stood, it could not be appro-



BARBADOS ADVOCATE

priated to ang use, at any rate,
until the investigation was com-
pleted

General Revenue
that the fund for

Loan,

He

the

repeated
Housing



from the

formed by contributions
General Revenut in the usual
way, and it was proposed to enter
a sum under the 1952-53 Esti-
mates

As regards the other points

raised, Hon. Mr. Turner expiained
that the intention was that the
Bill should set out the general
principles, so that it would be on
the Statute Book, and the details
would be set out in the Regula-
tions made under Clause 9 of the
Bill and which would be placed
before the legislature in the
ordinary way.

He had made notes of the points
raised, and it was quite obvious
that the task of drawing up the
Regulations would not be an

easy one,

The Bill was then given its
second reading, and on being
dealt with in Committee, Hon.

Mr. Evelyn drew attention to what
he termed a “danger” in Clause
5 of the Bill. He pointed out
that under that section it seemed
that the whole purchase price of
a house was permissible, and
emphasised that only a certain
percentage of the amount required
should be granted,

Replying the Hon. the Attor-
ney General agreed that the
establishment of a Valuation
Board was necessary, but said it
was impossible to say what per-
centage chould be granted to an
officer, That, he said, seemed to
him entirely a question of policy,
since it might be necessary from
time to time to review the per-
centage granted to a_ particular
officer, according te the value o/
the house

No Debate

The other sections having been
passed without debate. Hon. G.
D. l& Pile sought to insert the
word “shall” for “may” in section
9 which says that the “Governor-
in-Executive Committee may
make regulations for giving effect
to the provisions of the Bill.

Hon, Mr. Pile said he did not
like the original wording of tne
clause, and said he preferred the
word shall. This suggestion was
supported by Hon. Mr. Challenor,
but the Hon. Mr. Wylie and Hon.
Mr. Cuke, thought it was incon-
ceivable that Government would
place large sums of money in
the hands of three men to be
spent as the Board liked.

A motion to give effect to Mr
Pile’s suggestion was defeated by
eleven votes to two, only Hon.
Mr, Pile and Hon. Mr. Challenor
voting in favour,

The remafning sub-sections in
the Clause were passed, and the
Bill read a third time ard passed
in its original form.



Pioneer Industries Bill Passed

AFTER a lengthy debate yesterday,

the House of

Assembly passed a Bill to amend the Pioneer Industries

(Encouragement) Act, 1951.

Some members said that the Bill was long overdue,
and Barbados had lost much because of the delay. Indus-
trialists who would have set up industries in Barbados,

they said, had set them up

in other West Indian islands,

but despite the lateness of the Bill it would still benefit
the island and relieve unemployment.

Other members felt there was
not much room for much optim.
ism because of the passing of the
Bill.









vide for consequential amend-
ments necessary in sections 2 and
9 of the Act,



















the Act had been in force,

Mr. M. E, Cox (L) who intro-
duced the Bill said that he was
sure Members had been looking
forward) for years to a Bill of
that sort which would embrace
every phase of Pioneer Industry
and encourage manufacturers to
come into Barbados and develop
industries taking into considera-
tion the fact that the door of emi-
gration was very slightly opened.

Mr. W. A. Crawford (C) lead
off the lengthy debate on the Bill.





a EEE OEE





in The Legislature Yesterday

COUNCIL
When the Legislative Council
met at Pm. yesterday, the

Henourabie the Colonial Secretary
laid the following documents: —

Statement of Gross Customs and
Itetse Reeeipts for six minth«
«ended %th September, 151.

Biatement of Gross Customs and
Excise Receipts for seven months
ended Met of October, 1951.

Statement of Gross Customs and
Excive Receipts for cight months
ended Mth November, 1951.

The Clerk offered an exeuse
for the absence of Hon, Mr. F. C.
Hutson.

H



G. DL Pile presented pe-
titiens from the Vestries of St.
John, St. James, St. George, St.
Thomas, Christ Church, 5t. Philip,
and St. Joseph to amend the Poor
Relief Acts to allow them to pay
more to their Clerks of the Boards
of Guardians

The Council concurred in the
following =

Resolution to approve of the
Book of Reference and Pians of the
proposed extension of the Water
Works in the Parish of St. Michael.

Resolution te appreve of the
Book of Reference and Plan of the
proposed extension of the Water
Works in the Parish of St,
Michael.







The Council passed the following
Bilis:—

Bill intituled an Act to Authorise
the Goevernor-in-Exeeutive .Com-
mittae to make advances to public
efMficers for the purposes of eon-
structing. altering, repairing, or
purchasing houses.

Bill intituled an Act to amend
the Bills of Exchange Act, 190%.

Bill intituled an Act te amend
the Customs Tariff Act 19%.

The Counetl poseponed a oll in-
tituled am Act to carry out the
Convention relating to Labour
Clauses in Public Contracts,

The Council was adjourned until
on Tuesday 1%h February at %

"HOUSE

When the House of Assembly
met yesterday. Dr. H,. G. Cum-
mins laid the following:—

Statement showing Gross Cus-
toms and Exeise Regeipts for six
months ended 6th September,
1951, Statement showing Gross
Customs and Excise Receipts for
seven months ended Sist October,
i951; Statement showing Gross
Customs and Excise Receipts for
eight months ended 30th Nevem-
ber, 1951;

The
siven:—
Resolution to place the sum of
$8070 at the disposal of the
Gevernor-in-Exeeutive Committee
Ah the Eetimates
Part I, Current, as shows
fn Supplementary Fativmates,
i91—, Ne, 4, which form the
Schedule to the Resolution.
Resolution to place the sum of

following notices were






$3500 at the isposal of the
Governor-in-Executive Committee
to supplement the Estimates

1951—S2, Part I, Capital, to sup-
plement the Estimates [51—j!,
No. 45, which form the Schedule
te the Resolution.

Bill intituled an Act for the
Establishment of a Revenue
Equalisation Fund.

This was later read « just time.

The House passed the following:

A resolution for $1405 for the
replacement of electrical installa
tons at Seawell Airport

A resolution to make it lawful
for the Governor in Executive
Committee to lease to the Vestry
of St. James a portion of tand
at Reid's Bay, in the parish of
St. Jismes and containing by
admeasurement 16.2 perches for
the purpose of erecting bathing
sheds.

A resolution to make it lawfal
for the Vestry of St. Jamen to
lease from the Governor-in-
Executive Committee, a portion of
land at Reid's Bay, situate in the
parish of St, James and containing
by admeasurement 16.2 perches for
the purpose of ‘erecting bathing
sheds.

A resolution to make it lawful
for the Governor-in-Rxecutive
Committee to lease to the Vestry
of St. Michael that parece! of land
forming part of Welches Tenantry
in St. Michael and containing by
admeasurement 158,504 square feet
for the purpose of establishing a
playing field.

A Bill to amend the Pioneer
Act,



Industries
1951.

An address in connection with
the King's visit to Seuth Africa,
# place where there is racial
p@gregation, for his health.

An address in connection with
British

(Encouragement)

the dfimissal from the
Legation in Panama of the British
West Indian Specialist.

An address in reply
Governor's Message No.
dated January 7, relating to the
annual revenue required to finance
the Imperial College of Tropical
Agriculture.

The House adjourned to Tuesday
next at 3.00 p.m.

to the

1/1952



Consideration of Labour
Clauses Bill Postponed

THE LEGISLATIVE COUNCIL yesterday postponed

consideration of the second

Secretary and the Hon. the Attorney General might go
into the Bill, and provide them with further information
regarding any hardships which might be suffered by per-
sons employed by persons to whom public contracts were

awarded.

The Bill, which gives effect to
a Convention passed by a confer-
ence of the International Lab-
our Organisation in June 1949,
and which was later ratified by
the United Kingdom Govern-
ment, provides that persons to
whom public contracts are award-
ed shall pay rates of wages and
observe hours and conditions of
labour not. less favourable than
those established in the trade
or industry in the district where
the work is being carried out.

The Bill provides further that
the original contractor may not
sub-let without the approval of
the competent authority, which
is the Labour Commissioner, ana
that such contractor shall keep
books. showing the rates of wages
and hours of labour of the vari-
cus classes of workmen employed
by him, whether any wages in
respect* of the said work and la-
bour remains in arrears, and








for the various parochial bodies.
Those boss carpenters and masons
were very long at their trades,
and were very good workmen in-
deed. They did not keep big
establishments, and had no clerk
or book-keeper, and _ therefore
would not be able to carry out
the. regulations.
Difficulty

It would give them great diffi-
culty, and they would not be able
to tender for the work which they
now do; that would put many
people out of work, and the con-
tractors would have to go into a
lot of paraphernalia before they
could go into the Treasury for
their money.

Strongest criticism came from
Hon. Mr. Robert Ghallenor who
dubbed the Bill as a “farce”, and
said it was going to upset a large
number of poor people. It was a
waste of time, and paper, Mr.
Challenor said, and he hoped that





reading of the Labour Clauses
{Public Contracts) Bill in order that the Hon. the Colonial





WEDNESDAY, FEBRUARY 6, 1952





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There was one thing which they Peéporence w i 4. se § ide He prefaced his*remarks by say- that all the labour conditions in His Excellency the Governor RS
had to watch, and ther was, us had nana ee the ee ae Se sites ee Gosh apres che ing that there was no use crying the contract are complied with, @ On Pree 7
been the experience in other colo- t rence in Puerto Bice shortl at subsequent to the introduction in- over spilt milk or bemoaning the before he can file his claim for > PPDOOD +S D9 VOVDYDO VOY
nies, a man living in a house and \ nich the question of inatateinn to the House of Assembly on the possible industries they had lost payment. ‘
ent to aceite his cma he wentes WOuld be discussed. Members said Oth nly. Guia ah wean wine, ae To ee Fy ' criti-
something very much bigger. He Siast EeSeraae as TE eS 1949, commenced pioneer indus- ‘The least we can do today,” he cism on the Bill when he point- 5
thought therefore that they should [Ty dies tries, This Bill did not pass the gaid, “is to grant the same assisi- ed out that the requirements of
scrutinize aby ‘regulations Mace, "the ‘Objocté and Reasons of the Hediste before, the prorogation. ‘nce to thore courageous. penple the Bll, when applied 10, con: S a treasure
> i tt “a establis i es betore m
this bill ks t d th commented projects. to set up ee thea he POGUE. "Industries ment bodies, would work great
Bill Overdue aes = : ° smn © pioneer industries. which projects (Encouragement) Bill. enacted hardship on the small contract or
ste Ueuahc sei ‘wan. 1 "io es o h follontee continued after the bill lapsed, (Pncoursertie'’) om thereby to © Whom local government bodies e
. _ + ’ ’ ‘| © . f r *
overdue and he had the oreakea Neate” ae ee oe? eae has i? by Sage aay ie aahne concession which i arded a orgy? nig gen
pleasure in supporting? it. “Hé © Clause 3 seeks to : d a L ci set sed it it sible the existing Act allows for those Dae bites ee ei bere or the mos'
further thought ft was a good. Jin, eee re, SLOG ginal project and it 3k poss ‘yho have established industries pat ss carpenters and masons, ee
heasure whick wah tic Ya, —_ 4 of the Act so as to en- on bac cnotecs, ee ee th CST Wacaria JAW." and therefore did not have the
eo eee «ble a person who has already of his project, i e more sinc e aporers ' facilities for keeping such ac-
o en 4 oe Servants tablished a factory but wishes difficult to establish now that the Those of them who had fought counts ag were required under the
Was wh adnHeabio” tuitl the Dil ts extend it, to be declared a industry concerned is a pioneer in- in that House and elsewhere for provisions of the Bill.
ce rot ene ar a ame amare eee, SUT, aa Cen tan, eet tena et he «ch ee et ame CELE
. Be oriate cases, As the secti tands also lost all subseque sort on the Statu oks odly throw e small con!
whether therg-was to be a Waluen rt present, only a uncon wae, ‘is under the Act. Clause 5 seeks to coloty in spite of very strenuous Del of work, and consequently af- A le e E L E C T RI C
tion Board which would say what Casirous of establishing a pioneer remedy this position by providing jyposition, welcomed any attempt fect the men whom he employed,
proportion of the amount required’ factory can be so declared. It was that, where the circumstances be- 1 pring that legislation in line and in addition the work, having
elt pe tee of the house ),5t intended to exclude from the fore ey eta liecnene ot wee 2 with similar legislation in other to be given to the big contractors,
# io ae a vovisions of the Act persons who project, wou a ® Caribbean colonies, would cost more in view of their
Not only will men build houses | 44 established a factory prior to declaration that the industry was Cc Mr. Craatert then dealt. with’ hating 40 keep books an@ aceounts:
Nant them, hie Evel warned, (.-bassing of the Act and the pro- a pioneer industiy ane titese de. the question of publishing to Hon. V. C. Gale agreed with the
eat ne aioe Cite hana sed amendment will remedy this I worse WaT Ge eke aon places where there were capital- criticism made by Hon. Mr, Ma
@niriv easily - vi state of affulrs of enabling such* claraions ai the full benefit ivts, the circumstance of Barbe» hon, and warned that a lot of the
dairly easily you will find peopl) ; ersons to have the benefit of the the person obtain the full pencil ts on introduced the Pion- small contractors all over _ the
demanding Unreasonable prices Act in the case of alterations etc, of the Act in respect of his Peewee nce Tradustries Bill. He said he aid island would be adversely affect-
HME Neara vould ox Ngeteehegt a eee Oeics, tatane tae ly Ba, eg on y cid sot et tee ore (
oy aluation Board would not jlacements) to existing businesses. tax a ’ . q hardshi th ho did work
only help Government from io:me 3. Clauses 2 and 4 seek to pro- would not have been payable if @ On Fare abi che Notions }
errs as TE r at
‘ 3 te
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doscclen vee either vetadedtss ARE: s nse Bip wea ere ake NE Lae ea _ - . t =
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Peers : GEORGETTE
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u y ~ an. ——————— :
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h € SATURDAY 9th | Sts — Now @ $4.00 than in Ferguson's luxurious rayons
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, i




WEDNESDAY, FEBRUARY 6, 1952 BARBADOS ADVOCATI PAGE SEVEN

* *
MADE BY THE MONKS OF BUCKFAST ABBEY





$1,405 Passed For |













Land At Reid’s Bay To Be Leased









Replacements _

The House of Assembly at their

At Seawell |
}




e i caraetialaai i oa
beaches for the benefit of the ° i" meeting yesterday passed @ reso- |
Bathing Sheds public. Installation , Land To Be Leased inten tor Sia0s tor the replace-
€ Mr. Allder (1) was wondering , 5 ‘ 6 ment of cer.ain electrical instal-
whether Hon, Members were Of Pi For I laying Field tavions at Seawell Airport.
eC e realising that the setting up of es “é 2 ene
oO e r et bathing Sheds was qunag p The House of Assembly yester- took charge of the ene Sere
quite different from the setting A d day } sd q resolution author- that it was necessary o have
THE HOUSE OF ASSEMBLY yesterday passed a reso- © UP ©f playing fields in the vari- pprove ising, the Government-in-Execu- immediately, the replacement. of
; : To . x ous parishes. tive Committee to lease to the “e & OMIT Me Jand-
lution making it lawful for the Vestry of St. James to lease Tt was true, he said; that play- The installation of three stand- Ves of St, Micha, 158,504 198 apron at Seawell, as it was
from the Governor-in-Executive Committee, a portion of ing fields were paid for out of pipes and fire~hydrants at the Bay sq feet of land at Welches found that the runway up there
land at Bay containing 16.2 perches for the purpose the Labour Welfare Fund, but Housing Scheme and six others at ‘Ten. St. Michael, for the Was not all that was required,
: a Caeser . that shovld not prevent the the Pine Housing Area was yeS- purpo-. of establishing a playing It had been discovered that the
' of €x ing sheds. vestries from having their baths terday approved by the Legisla- juid. & a play exis.ing ground system did not “ain,
4 Dr. BH. OG. & mins (L) intro- just as good, if rfot better than and bathing sheds set up in the tive Council when that body con- Mr. Allder (1) said that now give , Ooo Sremecwas aaning : z
‘duced the resolution. He said that that in St. James. So far there parishes. The playing fields were CUtTed in two separate Resolu- 4). Cjyvernment was spending acu being Talelled the Gave Ua
Gts purpose was to sive the Vestry were only two parishes which paid for out of the Labour wel- tions giving effect to the ey of money in the Carrington Village pe Sant Hlectrial eu acho Kad
wor St. Jawres pow hich it did were not bordered by the sea, fare Fund while the other was Reference and plans submitted in 210. °°). hoped that they would Sha" wow ROSS OE
ot at present pi t. nter therefore the other eight exclud- the responsibility of the Sanitary ‘spect of the extension. take the opportunity to repair Visited'the scene and made certain
to a lease with the | “or- ing St. James, should have inter- Commissioners of the parishes In regard to the Bay Housing |}, The tenantry, he said, TCC PMmendations which. repul.ed if you fecl worn out, depressed, or
ase 3 n base ur i 18 vt. é Ss, § / . Pp . Sch th . t lay a roa 1 enantry, he said, in the resolution before the House. , .
-Executive : Committ: the est in the matter. He said that he wanted to com- a agua dit —— - Oo Jay , was 0 r than many of the mem- Tie matter was a very urgent i d |
urpose of acquiring a u of Mr, E. K. Walcott (E) told the mend the parishes which started eoties the coming aceic teh ee bers the House and it w@s one ang he therefore moved that generally run down a glass or two
ae nt Reid Bay 1 recting House that Mr. Wilkinson as a to provide those social amenities Water Works Department in Bec. time that got proper roads it be passed. a day of Buckfast Tonic Wine will

He said he believed it \







member of the House, in and out,

for the people and he was of the

kles Road along and under the

Mr. Bryan (L) said that he was





Mr. F. C, Goddard (EB) said that







i ‘ is some had advocated something which opinion that the Government ,.~ eme’ . Siac to see that something was they had to pass the resolu.ion. quickly restore lost energy and
me in 1950 that a general au- he would like to advocate, It was should use its power and call on =A vate ook eee ore none being done in connection with He however told the House that .
ooaree, eve Rost i he “Sover= in connection with Sandy Lane the cther parishes which have done 4¢ 499 yards and fix thereon three the Welches Playing Field. A lot as a result of a conversation he tone up the whole nervous system.
or-in-Executive ‘omr 2e tie alan 2 echesed me gz ic se é a5 aths . ror , t » . > g nMactricis » dise
ase land to ‘the Vaatry of st. wee vr ao soe tic ro i ¥ saataek — standpipes and fire hydrants. The ae at eae med o a ee Wiel be: electric ian, he dis Giving new vitality it fortifies you
Michael. In 15 Y Of St. by the Government as a public and other vocial amenities cost of this work is estimated av thé uunds inte proper shape. covered that the resolution would
Re emisens | eo oe Act park and bathing site. It was a Special Rate $3,400. he ited to ask the Hon. Junior be coming before the House, bu against fever and exhaustion and
which gave eran inci l a natural beauty spot and shoud He said that 9 special rate of — The other extension in the Pine ‘lember for St. Thomas if he did not know that it was coming
, > « se and

or cer.ain purposes, There was

preserved for the people.



axation could be laid

on the par-



Estate Housing Scheme will pro-



could give any information about

that day.





remember, Buckfast Tonic Wine



. ne + He said that it would not in- ishioners wh» would be enjoying vide 460 yards of four-inch dia- ‘e Friendship Playing Field. Groundings Faulty
0 er r s ar a 7 7 . s , . ; ; ** ‘ > . b
pare. an capine . sisaieey fringe on any person’s rights be- the 2menitics in order to cover meter cast iron pipe on which will Mr. Mapp (L) said that many He said that it was apparent A is especially valuable
ere was now specifi - aisth: rity Cause there was room on‘the left. the expenses and i: the burden be fixed six standpipes and fire of the country areas were getting that the groundings for the the i after ttines's
enable the Stevaeriicky eemet They had undoubtedly got a most were great, the Government hydrants at a cost of approxi- their playing fields but St. planes when they were receiving ay aay a Td i .
tive Committee to lease this desirable pienie spot within easy could then siep in. He was sug- mately $3,800. Thomas was getting none, The fuel were fauliy. They were put = AST TONIS re
mnmiitee +0 lease. this. par~ ac i y 1 jrew ngt henever Gov > Labour Welfare Fund was in ex hi ‘ . sink kee
: cular piece of land to the Vestry reach of Bridgetown. He drew ting that whenever Government . e Fu down when the new apron was —
i St. James. He therefore movea ‘at, to the attention of Govern- was coing to acquire any land. istence sincé 1947 and still nO being erected and apparently
e passing of the resolution. — ment and hoped that they would that land should be of sufficient playing field was established in placed into the concrete, but not

hi te

on

Resolution In Order
Mr. C. E. Talma (L) said that
Bp. Teearded a resolution such as
one before .he House as being
Much in order and added that the
rpose for which it would be
rving was very essential.

He reminded the introducer of
the resolution that not only the
one in St. James should be

commodated or granted priority

far as sea bathing facilities

Te concerned, but those in other

rishes, particularly Christ

urch with its bathing facilities.
addition to being one of the
ief resorts in the island it had
een handed and _ accepted
Bouquets from visitors from all
rts of the world

He thought that Christ Church

t and foremost, should have

nm granted priority in a matter

this nature. He hoped that in

e not too distant future—and

‘hat he meant weeks and not
Months or years—that the _Gov-
@fnor-in-Executive Committee, if

y did not happen to own land

Christ Church, would at least

keep it before their mind.

Money Resolutions

Now that the Government was
in the happy position of being
able to bring down money reso-
lutions without opposition, this
would be an opportunity which
should not be missed again other-
wise they woulda find some
wealthy person erecting build-
ings on this last remaining beauty
spot which if Government then
made up its mind to purchase,
would have to pay many times
the value for which they could
obtain it to-day.

Mr, E, D. Mottley (E) support-
ed the passing of the resolution.
Referring to the land at Sandy
Lane, he said that he understood
that some of it had been sold
already.. Here in Barbados, apart
from Queen’s Park and in later
years King George Fifth Memo-
rial Park, there were no other
amusement centres.

He advocated that not only
Sandy Lane woods, but the entire
54 acres should be bought for the
benefit of the people to go on

size to accommodate large sections
of the community.

Mr. Cox (L) replying to the
Hon. Junior Member for Christ
Church, said that the Hon. Member
knew that 10/- per ton was allo-
cated to the Labour Welfare Fund
for the purpose of providing social
amenities for those who work in
the sugar industry.

That money was not only for the
purpose of establishing playing
fields and bathing cubicles, ha
said, but for repairing houses.
The fund has been going en for
over two years and advances had
been made to only about 2,000
people.

Mr, Lewis (L)
onus was on the v
for the sites and get their alloca-
tions for such necessary social
amenities. But he was surprised
to learn that the money was com-
ing out of the Labour Welfare
Fund, He was maintaining that
as long as the money was coming
out of the Labour Welfare Fund,
some mention should be made of
it in the resolution. The time
would come when somebody would

said that the
tries to search



Two Detained
in Hospital

Sixty-five-year-old Maude
Griffith of Palmers Land, St.
Philip, was struck by a motor car
after it had overturned on Col-
lege Bottom last night.

She was taken to the General
Hospital where she was treated
and detained, for injuries to both
her feet. At the time of the ac-
cident, the car was being driven
by Mr. West of Hothersal, St. John,

e * *

Norman King, a
Powder Road, Station Hill, feil
from a ‘bus while on his way
home on Monday, and struck his
head.

King remained
the remainder of that day, but
after experiencing nose-bleed,
went to the General Hospital yes-
terday evening, and was detained
for treatment.

barber of

home during



Consideration

St. Thomas
No Priority

Mr. Talma (L) said that playing
fields should not be given prior-
ity. The Government should pay
attention to first things first. They
should give priority to the setting
up of baths and latrines island
wide.

Mr. Smith
many playing
couraging idlers
Government could

(L) said that too
fields were en-
He felt that the
stop thinking



about playing fields for the time®from the equipment

being and allocate the money to
housing.

Mr. Mottley said that he
wanted to assure the Hon Ju-
nioy Member for St. Michael that
the St. Michael’s Vestry was
clways eager to do something

In 1949, he said, the Vestry
sought the advice of people out-
side—people- like schoolmasters
and teachers—to make recom-
mendations of suitable sites for
playing fields. After some 16 or
18 people had worked in the in-
terest of the people at the Vestry's
request who was the Social Wel-

(E)

far enough into the ground.

Many of the groundings were
now not making contact and for
that reason, the whole system
had to be condemned. Had. they
been properly inspected at the
beginning, they would not be
faced with the resolution which
was before them.

As he understood it, when the
planes were being ré€fuelled, they
had to have electrical equipment
grounded otherwise there waild
be the likelihood of some spark
igniting the
gases of the fuel which would
even iually set the plane in flames

He said that the groundings
should be connected one to the
other so that even if one was not
making proper contact with the
ear h, the others would still be
able to do their work, ,

The resolution was then passed,

Eczemalich
Killed in 7 Minutes

picnics’ and other forms of out- fo.) that the money was spent ‘ fare Officer to say that the piece pha f niftiton tiny
Bprchase Sone under the Compul- door amusement. from the treasury and not the Of Labour of land was too small? he asked. i fe !
Powers Act whereby bath- One saw dozens of buses com- The Government should not allow '

ry
Se sheds could be erected for the
Use ef the public.
_He welcomed the _ resolution
@md hoped that many such more
ld come down frequently as
@y would mee’ with the gen-
e 1 approval of the House.

Government Thanked
Mr. E. St. A. Holder (1) UWank-
i the Government for the kind
avour of allowing St, James to
have this opportunity for erecting

ing from all over the island with
people who had to go and ask
permission to cross people’s land
to get to the beaches. Because
other people could afford to pur-
chase such places at high prices,
it was a crying shame that they
should sit there and allow every
spot to be taken up.

Permission Asked

Further down at Heywoods, he

Labour Welfare Fund. The reso-

lution. was then passed.

Pioneer Industries
Bill Passed

From Page 6.
not think that sufficient effort
was being made to advertise the
provisions of the Bill abroad.
He said that when Puerto Rico,

@ From Page 6
would take note of what was said
before he gave his assent to it,

Hon. Mr. Challenor continuing
his trenchant criticism, said “it is
a most unsuitable Bill, and it will
be like many others which are
honoured in the breach.”

After the Hon. the Colcnial
Secretary had explained the origin
of the Bill, and the ratification of
the Convention by His Majesty's



one person to turn them around
There would be always trouble
with playing flelds as long as the
Government refuse to remove the
Social Welfare Officer from hav-
ing anything to do with them. The
resolution was then passed.

eee eeeeancenanaeatcettaistasiaeeae
poned in order that further in-

formation might be obtained on
the benefits to be derived from the







inhe forall
temnporar

kill the germ couse
’ Nixoderm, kill
nutes and te guar
“ vit lear
in one weels, or tienes
of empty package
Nixodarin (rom vour

Kixogerm © : ; '

Pur Skin Troubles vahiv





hen













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; ie ie eras Tei nics : r - Bill, and the hardships suffered 9 Septet me eae eo Kids and Adults)
vo 18 said that people again had to ask Jamaica, and Trinidad had intro- Government, Hon, Mr, Gale mov- Bill, a Ll
dl gets ad pe however permission to be able to use those duced such a Bill, they wisely ed, conceter by - go a by Erie and ftutber 2 @ TRAYS
Pn d Say like the honour- woods whenever they went on a advertised it in Canada, the, onial Secretary w oe ee a Se ee A RE ts. nesend, wemde ur 0 .
able senior member for Christ pienic, He felt that the time had United Kingdom and the United’ ed with the Hon. the ee Ee ne aoct a to suffer %
Church 4hat his parish snuuld come for the Government to say States in order to attract indus- General, that the Bill be post- ing was po:tponed. salt eling kan vorerins thame Ps x
have priority. He reminded the that while they did not intend to trialists. The Governor of Trini- — since the discovery of Mytex (formerly ,
i honourable member that St. rob anyone of his land, yet they dad had even sent an Economic | Rae ee enero e a ser oats pote ;
» games was the place where the felt that the majority of the Adviser at the Head of a small| the pain but also takes out the awell- % .
st settlers landed. .All the other people should have it. delegation overseas to publics | ing, stops bleeding and combats nerve |
at arishes had priority and St. He was of the opinion that the the provision of the legislation s irritation theveby curbing other trou~ | 55 &
} . stri alia bles caused vy Piles such as Headache, | gS e °
3 ames had been left behind, but time had come for the members and explain re. nae au Nervousness, Backache, Constipation %
ey were now coming out. of the Government to cease being concessions which were afforded, los of enorgy, debility, and Irritable | ¥ dabidetbiiet *
’ He did not think the honour- small-mindeq and if something * addition to oy IR pienso Gramcte’ \naay’ ‘under the’ positive % (THE HOUSE FOR BARGAINS)
able member had an reason Was suggested by the slightest advertising space had been taken 4, : ' , so Mytex muat atop your pile | 5s : ,
to be. jeaaaas, “The take was opponent, they should see it im- in leading journals in various cause you like ‘em Sof fainn aad troubles or money back on 14s No, 16, Swan Street ’Phone 2109, 4406, or 3534 &
+ purchased very many years ago plemented. countries in order that the great- return of empty package %
4 . . ea ee wy ying ‘ Ss blicity should be given to 44,4,4666604 44 CALLAO LILO
and nothing “had been done. Dr. Cummins, replying, said est pu i ; PEALE SEPP PALL LLLP LLLP AD
* There brs no Sathing shade that he wanted to remind Hon, the provisions of the Bill and ihe @ Toasted fresh and sweet ~
no latrines nor playing fields Members on his extreme left that euen he ee ere aianeana i on eee Kellog; font
‘ =,’ the present Government was a ‘hat from those steps | AG, Flakes e
therefore the people in St. Croisier ads tae and ie vercitsii Jamaica and Puerto Rico ‘had > ast as we ma ont
7; a — er eg grate- implement any measure that benefited foain
ul for thi: rtunity . ea ness.
: He Rowe Fg er ah ike good sought after the good and welfare Competition
of the community, more bathing °f,the People. He said that as an additional
shade would be erected oa te He said that a bilk to amend measure to encouraging new
* coast of St Jamie so that sah the Vestries Act was passed in ‘ndustries, they should not be MOTHE

people from the city and other

pr ; er to maintain playing flelds and ness by foreign competition. In wee
parishes came to the parish, other things for public recreation. saying that, he was referring
they would not be congested They (the Hon. Members) would especially to the fact that Japan

at one centre.
_ Mr. W. A. Crawford (C) said
gt the resolution sought to give
e Governor-in-Executive Com-
Mittee the necessary authority to
ase a portion of land at Reid’s
ay to the Vestry of St. Jaines.
e wanted to know if it was the
overnor - in-Executive Commit-
fee or the Vestry who had moved
in this riatter

Free Access
If the land was to be leased
ff the Vestry he would also like
© know if the public would have
free access to the sheds or if they
Would have to pay rent as the
Matter appeared to be breaking

New ground, ,
He felt that full details should
be given the House so. that if

1948 giving the Vestries the pow-

see therefore that the Govern-
ment was willing to do its part.
The Vestries should go ahead and
select those things, he said, and
the Government would do its best
to implement them.

Dr. Cummins said that they all
felt that Vestries would soon be
abolished, but they would still
have a local form of Government
which could go ahead and make
recommendations of the nature to
Government.

Labour Fund

Mr. Goddard (E) said that he
wanted to remind the Hon. Jn.
Member for St. Thomas that the
money was being spent out of the
Labour Welfare Fund, In Christ
Church, they had money allocated
to them from the fund that would
give them two playing fields. One

allowed to be driven out of busi-

was then seeking to get back
into the West Indian market.
Providing that the locally manu-
factured materials were of the
same quality and price, then
there was every reason for pro-
tecting the local industry,

Mr. Crawford said that only
last week the Japanese Trade
Commissioner visited Trinidad,
and he had no doubt he would
soon be coming to Barbados,

He said he had _ repeatedly
suggested to the Government that
they should take some steps to
find out what new industries
might prove economical to Bar-
bados and Government might
well consider the question of
embarking on such a scheme, if
only for the simple reason that
the profits would remain in the
state and should be used for



Can your family
‘say this?

“We SLEEP well -
LOOK well -
and FEEL well /”









other Vestries were granted the was finished but the Christ expanding social services,
me facilities they would be able Church Vestry was wondering Mr. J. C. Mottley (C) sup-
appreciate the position. whether to spend the remaining ported Mr. Crawford’s suggestions
He hoped that the Government part of the allocation on the pro- and said that Pioneer Industries
Would take action in other par- posed other playing field or Would be of great help in reliev-
fshes in which the bathing was whether to spend it on bathing ,ing the widespread unemploy-
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PAGE FIGHT BARBADOS ADVOCATE WEDNESDAY, FEBRUARY 6, 1952
SSeS,

CLASSIFIED ADS, PUmte sates | EpucamienaL, | NOTICE CHR H0Tick | PERSONAL













































































suayeaiasincee:tatiptehiotimreiciciteigei ti initia
TELEPHONE 2508. REAL ESTATE | HARRISON COLLEGE | It is notified for general infor-{ ‘ne public are hereby warned agains
ei) e | ——$ TS | ; y wite SYBSL HARD
| AIRY COT—Brighton, St. Michael, all FOUNDATION SCHOLARSHIP — | PARISH OF ST. ANDREW _ — one Coane. wane ee ee te me nie SEEN. RARD.
For Births, Marriage or Engagement! FOR SALE jâ„¢modern. conveniences, house contains) At ieast one vacancy will be available GENERAL ELECTION 1951 : - i@ Buildings yard) nivecif responsible fer her or anyone
announ ts in Carib Calling the! c . | Open and Closed Verandahs, Drawing and | for a Foundation Scholar at Marrison In aceordanee. with, the. Representation: of the People Act, 1951,| Will be closed for repaigs from | tise contrasting any debt or debts in im:
charge 0 for ang number of words | Dining Rooms, 2 Bedrooms, Bath, Toilet | couage tember, 1852. Pp . * | WEDNESDAY, order =
j . exe in. Sep : ; : Ss , the 6th of Febru- unless by a written order signed
tap 90 80 and. 4 cents Gall tenet dee ona ito ——————————-_ | and Kitchen, Garage and Servant’s Room | An Examination will be held at the | Section 43, Para. 7% I hereby publish the following Summary of ary, 1952, until further notice by ma.
tional word. Terr cash, P' in va Standimg on over 17, > . z , * iy
Givin an enka ook ae AUTOMOTIVE | ana all enclosed with barbed ‘wie fence. | once! “porn of application can te {Election Expenditure, and also give notice that the Returns (Form|” 4) vehiculap traffie must enter a aaceiaab a al
Natices only after 4 p.m CAR; 107 Standanl © tap. Apply: | Saity catens' dumtert Liana ae obtained at the Headmaster's Offtce, Har-| No, 14) and thein supporting documents can be inspected at my office,}and leave the yard by the north- Fairfield Land
DIED G. Gill, Burton & @o., §.2.52—39¢ p.m, Purther pertioulars. Dial 2640 | Ucn. Wines Bicth as Buptiomel Costin. / at Turnerhall, St. An@rew, on Mondays between the hours of 3 p.m.|ern gate during thie \ { Se.
: CAR—One Deluxe Ford Car 1944 3.2/5 40. | cate on ar before the 29th of February,|and 5 p.m. during the month, of February, 1942. .2.52—2n. '5.9.59-2n
———— . é ; ee
s ) rer | mode wine yen, y s abe 1962 MRS. . BOURN
a a neat anh E “eitbean. Suse ie ee Seen : ls ved eee on Ament De-/ “Candidates must be 5.2.52 mw - BE % : POPC OOPT FOSS.
Se ie 3 will take Se 62.8230 1 ene Memnae a = me (1) The children of parishioners of Petty Expenses .. “E i 3 $ 2.75 ‘ah S -
t 4.45 this evening at the West: | ———--_-—-_eeeesneneeee— venture @ 8% 7 as eden een Te Printing i 3 2 ne 32.70 AGRICULTURE FORKS
Cemetery where friends are asked pan =. bers . HP. 1947 3 2100 Barbados Government De-| g0 6 os 412 Advertisi 2.10 “
d Saloon, excellent condition, mew tyres. bent 84% . . be oe oe o- . ‘ :
ian Bascom 02,8210. | recentiy, painted, | Offers So. Dpnald | 291 ree Pee wetnany As inclusive on the Sist of March fae etiets Mating | 2.40 You had better buy a . you do not wish
a hill until 4 p.m, and 3878 a: 441 shares Barbados Pire Insurance any i i x
BENSKIN—On February 5, 1952, at her|4 p.m $.2.58-t.t.n.| 45) shares BS, # T. Co, Ltd They can be members of Harrison Col- Canvassing 3 2 és a 100,00 Suppli y immediately . x4
residence Beckles Road, St. Michacl, | eeeeeeeeeeeneceeneeeatineen 40) shores W.1 ua lege or of other Schools. Members of 00 ppliers are now quoting two years delivery
Mrs. Elien Moore Benskin, late] CITROENS—New Citroens im stock,| 45, shares Gasbades Telephone Co, Harrison College should state this clear- Clerks and Messengers .. ae vy 45. .
Sor, hehinauthases turns | pie, sg, sony Baradon, gagins| © “MES preteen! a tl re cacca, Postage and Miseeliameous =, =. 128.00 CENTRAL EMPORIUM N
Age 91, Her funeral leaves the above | telephone 4908, 1.2.52--On. 33| shares Barbados Ice Co. oo 5
Fesidence Gt 4 PAM, £Or St PRUs | TTT The above mentioned shares will be : .
Church and then to. the Westbury C¥TROEN—One second hand Citroen | set up for sale at Public Auction on Gennes ¥ $312.95 Cnr. Broad & Tudor Streets
Cemetery. . done under 5, miles, apply Barbados | Friday the ath eR, SET intone mei ee ee Boe eel. OM 9 A ERE og Sty a fe, ge eal beer
William Moore (son), Mrs. Clara Moore} Agencies, telephone 4908, 1.2.52-—6n. | 9 is. a es & Senty, Lucas| Harrison eae SOC oS IGSS96966599S090 c 3S
(daughter-in-law), Prank, Moore, a ee 91.1.52—4n are . F. A. INGRAHM, J.P. SSS ¢ SS
Elsie Holder, Mrs. Violet Mapp. Mrs.[ LIGYD—~Ehe. cap S50 GBeeD Mente L <..cemmaceenmetinibenienneten " ;
Alice Phillips, Miss Dalton Moore, Mrs.|new to Barbados, apply Barbados | ~gN-DAH-WIN, Pine Till Standing on 6.2.59--Sn Returning Officer, Parish of St. Andrew. Announeing the arrival of:—
Ruby Perkins, Mt. Aubrey Perkins,| Agencies, telephone 4908, 1.2.52—4n. | g,000 square feet of land, Stone bungalow .
Clyde Benskin and Oliver Phillips? .— break:





containing three h fast

(grandchildren?, 6.2.52—-In MOTORCYCLE-—Only one (i) in stock, oom, living and. kitel t itt Public

ee LAmbnener Ragen frame, 2/ cupboards. Tiled bath and toilet. Ser- N
IN MEMORIAM hp. $005.00, ‘Terms. “A BARNES & Co.,|Cubrgands, “llad path and toilet Ser.

LTD. 26.1.52—t.f.n. | application to Mrs. Bernard Rolfe. Tele- NOTICE

BRYAN—In loving memory of our dear phone 4817. }

Mother ida Bryan who departed this ELECTRICAL The above will be set up for sale at Re Estate of

(Terrazzo) MARBLE CHIPS

in 5 colours


























life on 6th Fi 1 Publie Auction on Friday the @th. Feb- ALLAN FITZHERBERT CLARKE
A dear fa ; FRIG: American @ cu, ft Frig, tav-|Tuary at 230 pam. at the office of tha) decene@ The M/V. “CACIQUE DEL For Verandahs and Floors
A dear ing & large freezing compartment in | undersigned. | }TON meat debts or. claim * will accept Cargo and
and life departs, excellent condition 1% years guaranteed CARRINGTON & SEALY, persons having any ts or upon F an tee ae ee ae
1 our hearts. | left $400.00, Apply Ralph Beard, Lower Lucas Street. [or effecting the estate of Allan Fitz~« vio bettie, ann a T. HE
Ever to be reme re ~—Cpl. Harold | Bay Street, Phone S010. ; 91,1.52—Hn | herbert Clarke late of Kirtons. in the Saiting Wednesday’ 6th se * . Lb
Bryan and family. 6.2.52—1n 62.5230 | ——— | parish of Saint Philip who died in The MV. “DAERWOOD" will





— Dwelling house called ieee, with | island on me day « ie 1951, are

DPAVIS—In tribute to the memory of the} RADIO: One Second-Hand American~ | 10,803 square feet of land situate at Chel-} hereby requii to send in
late Herbert H. Davis, of Montreal, a] gosch g-tube Radio. Apply to H. DB, |8¢a Gardens, St. Michacl. The house; of their claims duly attested to the un-
contains Drawing Room, Living Room,/ dersigned, in care of D. Lee Serjeant,

accept Cargo and Passengers for
St. Lucia, St. Vincent, Grenada
and Aruba, Sailing Friday 8th



















Service conducted by the Rev. M. E. ok H inst.

Ce eee Oe Eton Funeral |P0Ck's Drug Store, Todor Street oan |4 bedrooms, Garage, Toilet, Bath and} Solicitor, 12 James Street, Bridgetown, The M/V. “CARIBBEE” will

Parlour at 4.30 pam. on Monday after- ae usual conveniences. on or before the 10th day of April 195: accept Cargo and Passengers for

noor The above property will be set up for] after which date IT shall proceed to Dominica, Antigua, Montserrat,
Dr. and Mrs. C. Jack from Montreal, FURNITURE sale by Public Sena at our office | distribute the assets of the estate ameng Nevis.and St. Kitts. Sailing Friday
Mrs. G. Soper, Mr. Gordon Fleck from | eens nena apres jo on iday 8th February, Se Pettien sate thereto Davin, Seve sad EAIDAD 15th inst, ’
Ottawa, Mrs. L. Irving from Victoria CHAIRS, Chairs, Chairs....and other » a p.m, to the debts and claims onl RAMARIBO, BRIT
Mr. S. Wookey from Toronto, Mrs. F. W.| furniture and all sorts of fittings for| Inspection on application to Miss Kell-/ shail then have had notice, and os s,s. Mth Feb. 1952. Se
Hearle from Newport, Vermont, Mr. G.jyour home, A. BARNES & Co., LAd, {| man, Lodge. Dial a L shail not be liable for assets so M.S. BON. 10th March, 1952.
Zumft from New York, Mrs. D, Perkins 18.1,52—t.i.n. YEARWOOD & BOYCE, tributed to any person of whose debt | SAILING TO TRINIDAD AND CURACAO ee f oe
Mi. H. Frisch, Mr. R. Martin from| ——— —— ——— ——_____—_ Oe tae ste or claim I shall not have had notice at}M Ss, HERSILIA, 17th March 1952. ' 3
Barbados were amongst those who paid| STEEL FURNITURE; Filing Cabinets, 27.1.52.—-10N. | the time of such distribution, &. P. MUSSUN, SON & CO.
their last respects 6.2.52—1n | stationery supbosties a 4 ists “SAND BOUGE’ aiated at Kenaingion sont all ee =e = Agents ‘

ee | Chairs and office chairs. a : es are i

RICE: ever loving memory of Emma|& CO., LTD, Dial 4611 or 5037. New Road (near Fontabelle End) St. | jccounts without delay agle Hall Road. A two storied dwelling house standing on



about 2% acres of land. Garage and out-buildings. ° Water
and Electric Light installed. Offers will be received by Mr.



Away from all sorrow and pain, Estate of Allan Fitzherbert Clarke,



ruary 6, 1951, J .
Asleep in God’s beautiful garden, MECHANICAL a ae a ‘open eeenee, 6a Qualified Administratrix,
‘ —



















Some day when life's journey is Sula Aghia, ne . | Bedrooms (with Gielen Same in on oes: iibidadibieaseer — oe » Carter & Co., Ltd., High Street, up to Feb. 15th.
‘aed— os ng ‘ Fee mlecttical | breakfast room, : ‘ nspection by appointment with Miss Edna Carter, Dial 2329.
We shall, meet ‘You, (Mother) ‘again aie ee. Gin Cost By garage and servants Cutan Eg y OUTWARD FROM THE UNITED KINGDOM ; +
Claretta and famil 6.2.52—1n I Beard’s Lower Bay Street. Phone 5010. ce Py hg y LIQUOR LICENSE Ni ai of
mt Gan. | ae, bot Drapery ibe sot, tr] The, auplention of, Stapler Lavell |
i ‘ x day the 15th | Oistins Hill, Ch, se Due
ANNOUNCEMENTS | | canny Fi0ss MACHING: Excellent | Februny at 2 bm. at the oes af the }to sell Spirits, Malt Liquors, &ec., ab 8 Vessel From Leaves Barbades
hott re aa Profits having made by this Machine, ‘undersigned. board and shingled shop attached to
REPAIRS AND MAINTENANCE —Bar-| OM New $0000 will, scespt $200.08 tor CARRINGTON & SEALY peniaonss. 40 eee Bes Fe as. “TRIBESMAN” - London llth Jan, 6th Feb,
. = that they hh ile. Solicitors, with) : S, i “ . 5
recentiy been Joined by." an. expere| Lower Bay Street, “Phone, SOW0,, tacas ‘street, | Dated le, ti doy Gt Tetruary: WE Se. TACOMA STAR” “Tine " neh Bb Feb.
automobile engimner FEO, United King- 3.42—3n 6.2,52—9n To Shinde Magistrate, SS. “WAYFARER” ve Liv i 4th Feb. 16th Feb, ;
» exte he remi; oo reriakteee Te ee | ata Magistrat ae erpoo. reb. °
to handle ail types of repairs. | .GUY=New passenger chassis recently | ~FRanQuigTy—Standiog, of iail0 District “BY ey wove. {|9S. “DEFENDER” . . Liverpool &
y 1.2.52—6n, | Teeeived, on view at Barbados Agencies, square feet of land at Strathclyde, . eatin . Glasgow 12th Feb, 27th Feb.
telephone 4908, 1.2.52—6n. House contains three bedrooms upstairs pi etit pe eek 5 > °
SINGER SEWING MACHINES (RE-| 2nd one bedroom and spacious rooms | N:B—-Thia ape Court to we held. nt —————— We are instructed to offer a section of a 2 i
FOu RENT CONDITIONED) —Just lke “new. | See | Spection any day by appointment. "Phone | Police Court, District “B", on Monda HOMEWARD FOR THE UNITED pprox. 2 acres in






y
them on Display at our Show Rooms, | SPeCupP Any wey oas7 The above will be|the 16th day of February, 198%, at 12 one of the most desirable and private parts of this fashionable


















Cash or on easy Pagment Terma The lander ‘ekven coast at the low figure of 25c. per sq. ft. in order to obtain a
HOUSES Standara ‘Agency (Bion) Co. le Swan | Bgl? act Gu wbeuary att pam afc. w. BUDO Lge pe Voueel aa ene Eetete quick sale.
“MEDERANZA™ Fan To Wael | ee G2.52—6n | the office of je, anderstaned “oe Police Magistrate, Dist <3", i 5 a we. can thenouahly recommend this land which is one of
cra ew giles i CARR, . e a Priced coa: sections to be offered for a
fully furnished, water, light, refrigidaire, ELLANEO = " further Information he
meaNeae esnventioncet On the sea coast— MISC. US Lucas Street For r apply to




31.1.52—8n



considerable period.

St. James Sea-Coast. Phone 91-33.






















































’ on ANTIQUES — of every deseriptien | ———_—_—_—_——_- ANTED a a
ni Glass, Aiea, old Jewels, fine iver By Publie Auction ar cue ome sane Ww — DA COSTA & co., LTD.—Agents
SR, Opa rm ee ce, | gee wee ra HELE JOHN M. BLADON & CO.
Worthing. Gentlemen preferred. Phone pray B. a Sh Y ne Ct - que op 1 She dwelling house known as v
eeei. 03-58-80 bags i = 3.2,.52—t.f.n. “Edgecliff”, with forty six acres of land SALESMAN: Driver must have ex- ‘3 ° he e AFS., F.V.A.

RUSHDEN—George St, BelleviL0. | ———— ere | in the parish of St. John, of which twenty | perience. Apply in person Caribbean Canadian National Steams Ss srs Beal Estate Agents, Auctioneers, Building Surveyors
From Ist March, Diol 0121 D. A. Brown|' BULL RINGS-—Self Piercing, 3” Cop- do igh es tnowthiy sad. Wepitly temnptn.” | ooCee EERO La, We Me ete PHONE 4640, a8 Plantations Building
eo sees $2.0 Bi ene ted enn Ot Oe, et | ae 1400 equare. feet cf land at. the : f :

r s ’ ee y
> Ney and Marhill Street OGRAPHER & TYPIST for our

TREVILLE—Deacon’s Road, Drawing | | corner of Amen A STEN! SOUTHBOUND Sails Arrives Sails
an Duan sens werongs et |, BARBADOS AWE REVIEW onto | win are shereo, an dhe, Sature| fice ply by yell tna ih paren Oe. th St. ote
and bath, Dial 4017. ee Buy at once 3/- each at Advocate Station- eee the Grug, business ert Rt £8 CARA, CRIES r ee. 15 Feby 2 Feby, 25 Feby, FOR 8/ ALLE

WHATHIERHEAD'S DRUG STORE. me For further particulars and conditions MISCELLANEOUS a i 8 i Feby. 29 Feby. 9 March 10 March
3.2.52—Gn | of sale to; & BANFIELD. CRUISER” .. ad +. 24 March, -- 23 March 24 March os
HEETS 30,1.62—5n. MEN'S GOLF BAG—rmust be fair con-
| rg Py ee a | I sabre gition id, “riee ressonable, | Phone ee ee ae eS e6
Inquire Auto Tyre Co. ‘Weephone oe AUCTION pif r 8134, saiiedniiell + @ Feby “ 8 Feby 16 Feby. £ Feby. ee 4
.2.52-—tin, +20 Feb; Feby. - Feby. arc! ~

i i pea OER ERY = forte rotor RR eh Barat tee b 1/3} March “9 March, 20 Maren 21 March 24 March a two storeyed. dwellinghouse standing on 10,770 square feet

issoive TEST DAY | ait “Temperature ‘Thermometers, | UNDER THE IVORY HAMMER Sgt ecaaéstede trcela euaaeciee + semen ‘2% March 24 March 3 April, 4 April 7 April of land on the incomparable St, Lawrence Coast.

Choking, gasping, whoezing | Teistering up to 360° Centigrade. Only or longer, @hrist Church, St. Philip, + @ April TAprilL = — 14 April 17 April Excellent sea bathing. Dwellinghouse contains verandah
Asthma and Bronchitis poison ;4 Umited supply to hand, get yours now.| By tetructions received from the In- St. Michael preferred. Write: Box LiL, upstairs and down, and sitting rooms, 4 bedrooms, pan-
your system, sap your energy, ruin | Knights Ltd, 6.25210 bsurance Co., * will sell on Friday Feb. C/o Advoeate Advtg. Dept, For further particulars, apply: to~ tr: d kit " Le
your health and weaken. your heart. 8th at Messrs, Courtesy Garage White-| C/o . 5.2.52->3n 'y and kitchen, Electric gas and water installed. Garage
in’ 3 minutes MENDACO—the pre- | Long Playing Records and 78 RPM) parc: (1) 1947 Austin Car, 8 h.p, and and servants rooms,







soriplen al, famnanie doctor—eireu- | Records and we book orders too A.) (1) 1941 v-8 Ford, 65 h.p, ( Both dam-)
ates through the bloc t







Purchaser to have option of buying furniture and effects.









































































There will be a_ general



aged i idents) Sale at 2 p.m. . 56 on
atrangting ‘mucus Terms Cash. w {PF SOSGSSTTS0R GARDINER AUSTIN & CO., LTD.—Agents. Inspection by appointment. Dial 8137. (Mrs. K, R. Hunte).
civing free, eany One Baby's Pram, perfect condition can eR eee 2 OUR AGENTS are making £100 %° ee == = The above will be offered for sale at public competition on
ul sleep, No dop be seen at “Somerly’ Worthing. Apply: | ¢ 9 59 gn % ond more by taking orders, fom Friday, the 8th February, 1952, at 2 p.m., at the office of the
fons MUBNDACO tabletn'nt ate and (et bile Thomas, Phone: ae Mie Sle cat be Okinised, ee nen a conaNtCN OF g
be entirely freo from Asthma and | — cat "| LOST & FOUND | $ anc. caienaere. Y sale can be obtained, x
#ronehitis In next to no time, even SUITCASES — Valises, attache cases, % Britain's largest and: foremost 15) { , COTTLE, CATFORD & CO Y
Phowgh you uy, have sultered for) sturdy and lightweight, double locks, % Publishers wil ama 3 Senos sh % Solicitors
Phare, MENDACO ts so successful | $3.96 to $6.24,.A BARNES & CO., LTD. % Free Sample rv jo } é ‘ade
say btetihing ature nd i a Te uV\e, : ai.de—1o0
completely s r Asthma in 8 days ADO—Int tt Beautt. DOG: ‘errie! AS Commission h cone
pa mon Get n DA wen ot one ful condition canelent ee good | White, ‘with ‘bck ears. Answers’ to. Ure ‘s on Se. be Vietoria @ i ;
pmackage, Ge NDACO from vou : f Jack, Please contact Dona’ » Works. . ind. >
Chemist, The guarantee protects you, | Taeing record. Cost $700.00 now $500.00, | name of be A { ste s -——} PVOLECPVTIOES,
er — Weil. bie ttn shone 2729. + Oe a aee—in’ 8 1 1E SATLANTIQUE )
OFS PROD 9 SOOO SOO OSOO FS \} C G“T RAN i; i Do » . i :
INVESTMENT OPPOR- PUBLIC NOTICES {| Sailings from Southampton to Guadeloupe, Martinique, Barba- fH} § n’t Ruin Your ;
TUNITY, . GENERAL ELECTION 1951 dos, Trinidad, LaGuaira, Curacao, Cartagena and Jamaica. | & T IRE Ss I g
- wore ae Cumulative ka ROMPADOS Cores —_ ) . g
Te Preference ares 1 A. ¢ . .
BARNES & CO, LTD. Telephone B| guovs Asmeiatioe will be meld ta the PARISH OF ST. THOMAS From. Southampton Arrives Barbados = }/% Putting Wheels in Line =
Secretary, Mr. Victor Hunte, 3359. Harrison College Hall on Saturday, 23rd ! soe Tth Feb, oe a a oe a = is z
: Feb » 1952, at 1.30 p, Summ Expenses «.- 20th March, 1952. ...._.... ni pri, N} | [
se Esler, Serene, ts : Ce *"DEGRASSH.... 4th April, 1952 | Gth May, 1952 f}% Cam Save 5000 Miles
oO » ‘ )
—OSSSISOS are L. A. HALL, (As required by Section 43 of Sub-section 7 of the Representation of |}} *Not calling at Guadeloupe. 1% of Rubber!
HOT W. bs Genera So) aaa. the People (Miscellaneous Provisions) Act 1951) SAILING FROM BARBADOS TO EUROPE HI spss
| ——— H. G, Cummins, J W. Hewitt, R.G, Mapp, } ) If your wheels are. just the
TH % ADOS CHORAL SOCIETY From Barbados Arrives Southampton }})| %
TAP for YOUR BA | Or Annan Conemal Mewing. wit ba Eaq., M.D. Bee. Esq. |i} “COLOMBIE”... 2nd March, 1952... ... 14th March, 1952 a wutihete ow wt tie's :
With one of the lovely White Por- 4 | held at the Cathedral Church House on Personal Expenses — 48.00 — » “COLOMBIE”.... 13th April, 1952 .... . 25th April, 1952 | &
celain Gas Geysers-——You can have % Tuesday 12th Bebruary, 1963 at 8 D.™. | Printing .. ee +e 25,00 9.50 25.0 *“GE GRASSE”.... 19th May. 1952... ... 29th May, 1952 can mean thet your tires
a warm or hot bath within 8 & Members are requested to bring with oe . ; “
minutes of lighting up, Econ- X%|them the music whieh was issued for | Advertising “ 2.00 9.00 2.00) *Sailing Direct to Southampton. ) will wear unevenly be worn at
eget 8 aoe, = —_ to the last Mid-Year Season ehimeks Expenditure on Adver- ‘ put a year ahead of time
run wi a Ss. w are 42. ' .. ) .
now available at your GAS tising Material ... 15.00 ~ 15.00 } K. M. JONES & €@., LTD.—Agents. }}); WMcEnoarneys
WORKS, BAY STREET. NOTICE Expenditure on Canvass- } ‘ Let us check, toe-in, and
POSSESSES EEP OOD. . ess % e 103.00 105.00 103.00}'= : SSS SSS — realign wheels, balance
yrcocooscooscosesosooso; | THE BARBADOS MUTUAL | anowance to Speakers .. e 15.00 _ =sS PS Te adel Pra Sewice Station
Â¥ NOTICE 3] XERAORDINARY GENERAL Miscellaneous Expenses 101.25 290.00 101.281) Swe eee
x % NOTICE is hereby given that an Ex- )) CALEING *
+
%
x

qualified Poli¢yholders of the above
office



meeting of the Barbados named Society will be held at

: traordinary General Meeting of the $246.25 $476.00 $246 . 25 |
% —
% ; |
3 Hackney Car Owners’ Asso- g of the Society, Beckwith Place, we- Notice is hereby given that these Returns and the Documents in
%

town, at 2 o'clock p.m. on Friday, 15th



LLL ELL LPP PP OOOS



S$ ciation at the Progressive 9} February 1952, for the purpose of con- }SUPPort thereof can be inspected jat my office “Belvedere”, St. Thom: )
& League's Building on Thurs- ¥ | sidering ond passing with or without! on Monday, 11th February, 1952, between the hours of 9.00 a.m. anil
$ day night, 8th February }|“NESOCvED tna elntes Soe ee Deed | NOON

%, re ples SOL a Jase o! .

x commencing at 8 o’clock, % of Settlement be deleted and the fol- D. A, M. HAYNES, }
S when a Board of Manage- \ }lowing Clause substituted therefor:— i
8 ment will be elected 8 5. No assurance or Seurenere gnats Returning Officer, )

. be accepted and no policy or policies

s Cc. ST. HILL, @ [shall be issued on any one life for a ~ Parish of St. Thomas, :
= Acting Secretary. |sum exceeding unless the} ———~ RE aA oe he rec Reena
% % J amount in. exeess of $25,000.00. is imme- (

g:





$$9566666259666500656GO% |dintely reassured with some other Gane ,
ing, and the Society thereby relieved of : as.
any direct liability in respect of such

ORIENTAL }fisuvszs.

Provided al that in arrivi:
the same asareaate sum of $25,000.00 = NOTICE
SILKS, CURIOS, ARTS
VENDEMOS, SEDAS,

account shall be taken of existing or
JOYERIAS Y ARTISTIOAS

Srusvactive. “Rerevianan Tae: Alle Applications are invited by the Water Commission, Jamaica, for
CURIOSIDADES, TRAIDOS
DE LA INDIA CHINA e

Cc, K, BROWNE, a post of Temporary Civil Engineer.
, BJIPTO

THANI’S
Pr. Wm. Hry. St., Dial 3466



ALL : . :
mm || pirestone



TO THE

CROP-TIME |
SALE |

NOW IN FULL SWING

at THANI BROS.



see |
n't Risk $
ad Brakes!

e’ll Adjust "Em
‘Expertly for
‘Summer Driving!

-

The post is temporary and non-pensionable, and carries a salary"
seale of £798 by £25 to £920 per annum. Point of entry into the
. scale will be determined by experience and qualification. Hold
FOR Ss ALE may be required to keep a motor vehicle for the performance of his

duties in which case he will be eligible for a. travelling allowance in
KYREVULLE accordance with the Commission’s rates.

OOS

oO OOS

Don't take a chance on















soaesSooaeooas Appointment will be on probation for one year at the end of i er ee eee e
which period it may be extended at the Commission’s discretion. Pr. Wm, Henry & Swan Sts. a dee ees,

SRA VIEW GURST EAGLE HALL ROAD Applicants should be between 30 and 45 years of age, and must|}} brakes, repack front wheel $
One substantially built two- (t} Mave had satisfactory experience in Water Works. Engineering, includ+ } HAS EVERYTHING YOU DESIRE. { bearings, tubricate brake

HOUSE { storey house. It has antng ing the construction of small dams and intake works, tunnelling, the } ¢ carey mechanism, adjust brakes, %

room up and downstains, {laying of me! 1 and cast iron mains and reservoir con-|{f OWEST PRICES: } Bised all brake limessadize. =

ae BARBADOS fellery, "ining room (4) eaten. a saan of land surveying and general bulide i L ON RECORDI! | fill brake master cylinder $
bale eieiainers rates a ee ae ee ing work, including quantity surveying and estimating also essential, i YOU WILL AT ONCE SAY | 3 es . $
quoted on request offer refused. Inspection by as well as administrative experience. ) 0., 5 OFFICE . .. .. 4493 x
oo eer Applications, accompanied by references from firms or depart- <7FHIS IS THE SALE FOR ME” (aR: WORKSHOP 4203 >
Dinner and Cocktail { D'ARCY A, SCOTT ments in which experience has been gained should be submitted to } , PARTS DEPT 4673 &
parties arranged. Middle Sireet ::: Dial 2645 the Chief Engineer, Waterworks Department, Barbados by the 16th $100,000 00 Merchandise offered at § s

J. HW, BUCKLAND, | r ay of February, 1952, clearly marked ‘Application for post of Civil Engin- , rien ° NIGHT 4125 %
Proprietor. 6.2.52—2n. eer, Water Commission, Jamaica.’ Rediculous Low Prices. 1% 4

SSE. | as 5 BN sees 2D OD An, | NR ER ESAS SSS SIS SSS SS SSS SSSSS 34.6650656566556066556555 00550595 SSS SSSSSESTS SLE


—_.



ee
&
&

at

iat OAM a Ahh

190





WEDNESDAY, FEBRUARY 6, 1952





HENRY

BY CARL ANDERSON



FLINT OF THE FLYING SQUAD .

f MPORMATION ROOM |
CALLING FB. TEN.

HOW THE DICKENS COULD
WHERE IS FLINT ?.. SHE GET AWAY SO FAR-
WE WONT ANSWER

y AND $O FAST 2

BY ALAN STRANKS & GEORGE DAVIES



NO SIGN OF FLAME !







MY AMBULANCE!
SOMEBODY'S
PINCHED IT !..



BY CHIC YOUNG

I GAVE THEM 2 so. Se er DADDY DIDN'T
E POPPER

oe r 0 TS nn
Wh “ a 9s < PUT TI D
aes ap = KING = A © OER) |
» JUST T - <& ) ou ae Ae wh, ‘ ee ° e

KNOW WHAT
a TO DO ONA

o> < of 2 Rh a, OSS NY DAY my
< >

THAT'S RIGHT! THE
OSMO-RAY DISPLACES CLEAR! THIS iS DuwiT We RE
THE MOLECULES OF GREAT — MEY GOING TO THE
SOLID MATTER! IT YOIDS THAT AIN'T THE WAY
THE ELECTRO-ALARM : TO THE LAUNCHING ,
SYSTEM AT THE SAME CHAMBER / o
TIME / FOLLOW ME...

SAY, KENT, THIS GADGET iS
OKAY! Y'MEAN T’SAY WE
CAN JUST WALK QUTA
HERE THROUGH THAT
HOLE —AS EASY

AS THAT ?/

ae ialaateets
f THE CORRIDOR 4S OF COURSE NOT, \

PRISON LAB/ Jy

_¢ GOING TO WALK
OnTO THAT
ROCKET...

a. @ Siren Sy Rae: PRE
Gadeetae

JOHNNY HAZARD

FUNNY PLACE,..1O,..
GET...MAL DE /ER..
ON BOARD A
TRAIN /

FINALLY / IT'S WORKING...
FOR A MOMENT I THOUGHT
YOU MIGHT HAVE GOTTEN
THE WRONG DEMITASSE,

p
NEVER FEAR, MY
DEAR MISS WISP.. I’

AN OLP HAND AT
DETECTING DeUuGS/

me /
{ GOOP SHE WASN'T /
oe, NOW...TO WORK /
OH, LET ME HELP... ~ ne: f
YOU...SPILLER., MY, THAT'S

ODP... ALL OF A SUDDEN.,

CaM 900 piezy / ee bs



WIGGS-DAW-LING/T WANT YOU TO
MEET ME AT THE SOLASEE MLISIC
SHOP-MY BROTHER BIMMY WILL
BE THERE TOO-

(M DRIVING THE

I WISH MAGGIE FOR GOODNESS’ 6AKE!/
THERE'S MAGGIE’S
BROTHER LYIN’ IN THE

GUTTER -I WONDER IF
HE WAS RUN OVER-



‘6 MY PLANE! THERE \¥

GOES OUR LAST MEANS
THE KINGDOM BEFORE ESCAPE!

€lL KAZAR MARRIES
‘ ER!



DONT WORRYS WELLY N A BABE IN THE WOODS#1D BETTER 'D BETTER+<10

HANDLE HiM. BUT, GO ALONG + AND MAKESURE SHE MAKE SURE YOU

you INTHE J B\ PLEASE «PROFECSOR, DOESN'T LEARN TOO MUCH ABOUT COME ee
Een )SIVE UP THE TRIP.

you DOWN? Y THE PHANTOM 7

LEGENDS
, LJ

a al i a a an i il ite aii ae





BARBADOS ADVOCATE

PAGE NINI

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SPECIAL offers to all Cash and Credit Custe mers ners for Monday to Wednesday only

<—_ Soil eee
| SPECIAL OFFERS are now ®¥: ‘ilable at our Hranches Tweedside,
Speightstown ind Swan Street

Usually Now
Tins Anch, Powd. Milk (24) 2.24 2.00 Tins Batchelor Peas 89 36

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D. V. SCOTT’ & C

THE



GROCERIES

COLONNADE







Residents!
webs wy AA se iaSaest a Sa

At spa

aati
- eee: git"

Ger:
5 Ge
. Visitors!

WHERE ARE YOU STAYING? WHERE DO YOU LIVE ?
If vou are staying at any of the hotels in the Hastings or
Worthing district, if you live anywhere in or around these
areas, we would like » ou to know that we have provided
for vour convenience .} BOOK SHOP and STATIONERY
as modern and up-to-date as space would permit. But in

case you have difficulty in finding it we would like to explain
exactly where it is.



Ik YOU ARE STAYING at the Marine Hotel, the Ocean
View Hotel, the Hastinzs Hotel or the Windsor Hotel, then
you have probably discovered it already because it is in
Greystone Village, néar to the above places.

O° RRR

STAYING anywhere nearer to town
than the Ocean View fttotel then you will find our shop in
the first gap on the left, off the Hastings main road, with a
sign marked “Entrance to Marine Hotel”.

BUT IF YOU ARE

IF YOU ARE STAYING anywhere further from town than
the Ocean View Hotel, you will find our shop in the second
gap on the right with the sign “Entrance to Marine Hotel”

THIS GAP IS KNOW™ AS “BALMORAL GAP” and a few
yards up you will find our shop along with others in a line
of booths opposite Grey Stone Flats. Think of the time you
will save not having to come to town.

DVOCATE

STATIONERY
BOOK SHOP

GREYSTONE VILLAGE, BALMORAL GAP, HASTINGS


PAGE TEN



TABLE TENNIS:

How To
A Cha

(By P.

JOHNNY LEACH; officially ranked the best Table

Tennis player in the world i

his suceess in his work, “Table Tennis For All.”
like many other champions,

assist the beg

knows all a
“Table Ter
wardly digeste
most like



vill
vi

ihe first Englishman ever to win the World
fable Tennis Championship twice.

H \\ national chamy

: \y eighteen illusti

hh ts author

. title in 1949 an

Among the many other titles’
won by Johnny Leach are the
Single Championship of the

US.A., France, Belgium, Wales and
lrelanu; Men’s Doubles Champ-
ionship of England and France
ana the Men’s Doubles and Mixed
Doubles Championship of the
U.S.A., France, Belgium, Ireland
and Wales.



Now, in “Table Tennis For All,”
he gives readers the benefit of the
many hours of careful study
which he has put into the perfec-

methods which have enabled him,!
in the last five years, to record)
victories over every player of
note in the Table Tennis world.

Of Johnny Leach, A. K. Vint,}
Hon. Treasurer of the
Table Tennis Assoc§tion and In-

ternational Table Tennis eee? players and spectators alike.
ore~

tion, who contributed the 9
word, states: “The name Johnny
Leach is known not only to all,

Table Tennis players and officialss

in the English Table Tennis Asso->
ciation but through the Table;
Tennis playing world as a great!
sportsman and a first class expo-
nent of the game.

of a_ typical Bagishsan, , His Jersey Joe Scores par al aa Stee ae
i iness 2 z : sty - - ; ) s
friendliness and natural modes partnerships. They hold the

make him one of
players of today !

An Author
“It is now with somy interest

we jind him the author of a book.
Yypically Johnny is ready to teach

ine beginner giving advige not
onty on how to play—strokes,
joowwork, and ihe other techni-
calities of the game—but what
dress to wear and the playing
equipment to use.”

Vint writes; “With the rapid

development of the game in the
last few years—in 1938 there were
3,700 “clubs wich 65,000 players
and today there are nearly 7,000
clubs with 120,000 players—it is
very necessary that there should
be good reading material avail-
able to assist the thousands of
new players coming into the game



for the first time. In addition
ihis book gives some valuable
background knowledge for the

would-be aspirant for team hon-
ours, either League, County or
National. The author quite clearly
wants to help the player whether
he is a new-comer or has been
playing the game for years.”

Chapter 1 of the book deals
with “What Table Tennis offers
and what it demands.” In this
Leach tells how among his player
friends he knew one, who at the
age of eighty-three, still worries
about the weakness of his back-
hand.

This should be a good example
to those local players, who al-
though still in their twenties, feel
that their Table Tennis days are
over. Why’? Because they are
either alcoholics or smoke and a
few claim they are short winded.
But Leach says: “It is not only
those who are completely fit who
can enjoy this game. Table Tennis
seems to provide a much-needed
and interesting recreation to many
who suffer from various disabili-
(ies. There are many players who
manage to do quite well despite
the loss of an arm or even a leg.
I know of one player who has lost
both hands and even one para-
lysed from the waist down wh
enjoys his game from a wheel-
chair,”

His other chapters, making up
Part One of the Book, which is
mainly for the beginner, deals
with Dress, Playing Equipment,
The Grip, The Sideways Stance,
Spin and The Follow-Through.

Parts two, three and four are
written for the benefit of the
player who has already passed

the beginner's stage.

In the introduction Leach states:
“I regard the doubles game as
something whch differs in many
respects so widely from singles as
to need separate study. A special
section has therefore been devoted
to this subject.”

Part five deals with Points
worth Knowing and_ includes
Table Manners and Umpiring,

two points which are really worth

knowing by local players
Johnny Leach dedicates his

book to his father without whose

mprove the sté

yin dealing with the problems of
tion of his game, and reveals the). Jearner.”’

Johnny Leach’.
to many of us is the personification.

the best liked Outside The Ring





HASSETT CAt

oF




Become
mpion

A. V.)

n 1950, discloses the secrets of
Leach,
is trying to
inner and also sets about to
indard of the player who feels
bout the game.

inis For All”, if read and in-
d by some of our local players
ely bring them up to inter-
xionship standard. It contains
‘ations.

von the World Men's Singles
d again in 1951, thus becoming

help his Table Tennis cireer

would not have been possibk
Good Reading

“Know The Game Table Ten-
nis” also provides interesting
reading for the Table Tennis en
thusiast and player alike. It is in
booklet form and prepared in
collaboration with the English
Table Tennis Association. It
written by Jack Carrington whom
A. K. Vint and Ivor Mon agu
state: “Has had great exper.ence

is



“The book not
new-come! to under
technique of the various
but explains the laws and tact
of the game in an attractive way,”

the

only helps

tand

strokes,
Ss



EnglishMthey write

Vint and Montagu commend it



(“Table Tennis For All” Johnny
Leach, published by Nicholas
Kaye Ltd. “Know The Game
Table Tennis”, Jack Carring-
ton, published by Educational
Productions Ltd. — Both books
can now be obteined at the
Advocate Stationery

4

4

4



FRANK SEDGMAN Ken

and

championships of Wimbledon,
" 2 U.S.A., France and Australia, but
PHILADELPHIA, Feb. 5 ow on the eve of the last stages

Jersey Joe Walcott won another of the Davis Cup series it seems

Ca

inspect the

BARBADOS ADVOCATE

iGHT HY W.L.



Preliminary Canter

DOWN from Oxford to-day to
7%-mile cross-coun-
try course at Roehampton was the
University

team which
mbridge on Saturday.

me

Secretary John Haddock; from
Wadham, told me that the Oxford





KEEPER FOR 2 OFF GOMEZ

HASSETT caught by Guillen, West Indies wicket-keeper for 2 off Gomez during the Fifth Test at Sydney cricket ground on 25.1.52.

Tennis Tactics

To Beat U.S.

Mr.
special emphasis for the need of a
careful study of the indusirialisa-
tion of Puerto Rico during the last
decade. He said he had studied
that country
that it was a country with social
eae almost identical to Bar-

ados,

ets



WEDNESDAY, FEBRUARY 6, 1053









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Port, Each
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PIONEER INDUSTRIES
BILL PASSED

@ From Page 7
B. Vaughan

give encouragement to local capi-
talists. He thought that with the
necessary encouragement to local
people, most of the money would
be kevt in Barbados.

Mr. L. A. Williams (L) said
that he did not think that the de-
lay of the Bill was the reason for
industrialists setting up indus.

Vv. (D) laid

and had observed

point in his struggle to by-pass that the Australian selectors have team were running over the He spoke of the help it w tries in Trinidad ang Jamaica and
sotdenis Wet keane ee doubts about their invincibility. course this afternoon. They are be in removing some iy Rogge not in Barbados. He said that
aii aid ‘cr Tuesday that ae ula In the current Victorian cham- confident of revenging last season’s employment problem, which he when reference was made to
recognize Walcott je world oe pionship Sedgman is partnered by defeat which gave Cambridge said was a harder problem to Puerto Rico, it had to be remem-
weight champion until he loses oe ween and ee by their only post-war success in the tackle than low wages. poor age, = nt ae pews
his title in the ring or retires. atbavearis eng ot eae eae ro oe ake wis i > the , He referred to two men who America and America’s foresight.
Thus, Pennsylvania revealed in Ghulieerais round in whieh Aus- ee marae Seon, wit be Lc had had the courage to start a hat Mr. R. G. Mapp (L) said he
roundabout fashion that it would tralia meet the winners of the Wtd, and last University match making industry despite the lack thought a Bill of that sort then
refuse to strip Walcott of the inter-zone final between Sweder for the Oxford captain, 30-year- of the provision of the Pioneer would get Barbados little further.
title if he repudiates the contract | ; ihe TSA. petween sweden old Cyril Black, He is engaged Industries and said he hoped that Except on a Regional basis, a Bill
to fight Charles, : ae +) No 10 be married and leaves Oxford they would be assisted in some like that could help very little.
Walcott prefers to fight Harry What lies behind this spli d No soon to become a teacher of agri- way. ment with which the colony was
Matthews or Rocky Marciano, be- official reason has been given, but cultural economy at Edinburgh The main thing, he felt, was to faced
cause it would be moré money an are two possible explana- University,—LE.8.
However, Wale as a contract “ODS. ‘ —
to.” box ree P Brea One is that the Australians do light

agreed that Walcott not want the U.S. doubles pairing
obligation to meet Charles but of Schroeder shg Trabert to gain
cecided to take refuge behind the further experience against Sedg-
technicality that the contract 2" and McGregor.
never was filed officially with the _ The other is that the move wa
Commission, made to give Rose practice in case
Thus the Commission will ignore 2°ther pairing is necessary
the contract too if Walcott does, through injury either to Sedgman |

has a moral

|



—U.p, oY McGregor. Miss Mavis King beat Mrs. D.
a I favour the first version, In;Worme 6—3, 6—2.
the recent New South Wales MEN’S DOUBLES
1 Be tournament Sedgman and Mce- U. N, Roach and G. Watson
U.S. Funds For Gregor beat the United States pair beat A. J. Jemmott and W. H.

6—8, 6—4, 4—6, 6—2,,10—8

’

Europe Australia’s chief hope of retain-

ing the Cup and continuing to

WASHINGTON, Feb. 5. break the U.S.A.’s monopoly in

: Truman informed Congress on world tennis depends on winning

Tuesday that he will transfer the doubles. When it comes to

$478,160,000 Mutual Security ap- tactics the Australiang have litt'e

propriations from military to to learn,
economic funds for France, Greece,

‘

KL

Turkey, the (United Bingdom, This Award Was Fair ve P. K. Roach and E. A, Benja-
anc ugoslavia, This dncludes Nieves : " min,

$300,000,000 which the Mutual PR. PETER COOPER, fast be- hu ;

Security Agency indicated will be Coming one of the best rugby| MIXED DOUBLES HANDICAP
extended as economic aid to Teferees, and appointed to the] wy, , al saa s
Britain, The President sent iden- University match next week, gave ee one Sire. FD. Sree ee

tical letters to the Chairmen of One decision in the first England | pam,
the Foreign and Armed Services trial for which no one present Mrs. S. J. Patterson and J. B. D.
Committees of the Senate and the could recall a precedent, Robinson vs. Mrs. H. A. O'N.

House of Representatives inform- Afterwards he said, with a
ing them of his decision to con- smile, that’ he would mention it
tribute “more of military strength at a meeting of the London
in Europe than if same funds were Referees’ Society. He was not
to be used to procure military end too certain of chapter and verse
for items for delivery to coun- which gave him authority {or
tries concerned.” Truman said what he did, but he was quite
$100,000,000 will go to France and sure the incident was against the



the remaining $78,160,000 to spirit of the game.
Greece, Turkey and Yugoslavia,
—U.P All Agreed
And the old internationals,

Rugby Union committee men and
selectors who were at Leicester al)
seemed to agree that it was a per-
fectly fair award.
: Ny D, F. White, the old England
i eure 2 here cap and captain of the Possibles,
ave given British-born Captain was penalised for obstruction fot
Maurice Ray Mussons and. his gojporate > aOR

are . 4 br deliberately getting in the way of
British-Guiana born wife Vivian ", M. PB: Hardy when he al
one month’s notice to leave {“,.* 2 a me Nee
Trinidad, taking a drop-out.

If they fail to comply with the The incident was reminiscent of
order, steps will be taken to have that which ended a Hutton innings

Must Leave Trinida

(Prom Our Own Correspondent:

PORT-OF-SPAIN, Feb, 5.

them removed. last summer, when he took a

The Mussons have a case pro- Second stroke at a ball which he
ceding in the Supreme Court thought was going to hit his
against the local Emigration wicket, and was given out for
Officer for wrongful arrest and preventing a fielder from catc hing |
false imprisonment. it. lui

BLUEBERRIES SO 7 USED
, SOLU
ALL PRIMED RAISINS INSTEAD »AND-UH
Pee oe oy TURN UREDE DoMaS
GO I LEFT IT RIGHT SIDE UP.
YOUR MOTHER SAID SHE
SERVED IT HOTZ THINK
ITS NCEK COLD“I DIDN'T
HAVE ANY FRUIT SALAD 1
PUT ON IT“BUT THE HARD-

So you Ger

BOILED EGG AND OLIVES
AND STUFF ARE REALLY

BELLEVILLE TENNIS
CLUB RESULTS

Results of Yesterday’s
Matches

LADIES SINGLES—Ftnals

Allan 6—1, 6—1,

Today’s Fixtures
MEN’S DOUBLES
C. B. Lawless and D. E. Wor

re. P, Edghill and J. H. C. Edg-
hill,

E. P. Taylor and C. G. Mann’

Miss M. King and J. D. Triming-

Skinner & J. W. McKinstry.



WEATHER REPORT

YESTERDAY
Rainfall from Codrington:
Nil
Total rainfall for Month to
date: .02 in.
Highest Temperature:
84.5°F.
Lowest Temperature:
72.0°F,
Wind Velocity: 12 miles per
hour
Barometer: (9 a.m.) 30.016,
(3 p.m.) 29,931
TODAY
Sunrise: 6.10 a.m.
Sunset: 5.58 p.m.
Moon: First Quarter, Feb. 2
Lighting 6.30 p.m.
High Tide: 3.25 a.m., 12.33

Tide: 7.14 a.m, 8.25



To Our Friends

From Overseas

KINGSLEY
RESIDENTIAL
CLUY

AT BATHSHEBA

Welcomes you and offers 5

LOBSTER
LUNCHEONS

which include our
popular

MERINGUE PIES —
in Coconut, ;
Lemon or

Orange

DIAL 95266

12.1.52—4n.








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PAGE 1

PACF FOIR BARBADOS ADVOCATE WEDNESDAY. FEBRUARY G. IM BARBADOS ADVOCATE -•—f— .1 Wednesday. Icbni.ry B. 1S52 The Com mon %* ea 11 h And Rubber I isiiini: liiilnsli > THIS week the Comptroller of Supplies fixed the prutof roust beef at I per lb., .mil strw hi %  per lb. Last week roast beef was sold at 48 cents per lb. and it M cenU per lb Last w-..k IMaldad meel puces rose when brisket was lixed at 74 cents per lb. instead ui 54 and sirloins advanced from 67 cents to 75 cents. In Seychelles the price ol beef which was 65 cents per lb. (Sgainst 25 cents before the war) has recently been controlled at one rupee per lb. Tinpries of meal advances almost everywhere and the only remedy that government, in Trinidad, Barbados or Seychelles can counsel is to grow more livestock and reduce the quantity of Imported meat. So long as Barbados is dependent on imported meal, the Government can do nothing else except continue : ih." controlled pries nf bnpcctsd meat t<> .i prios .'.huh will make it possible Eos thi Imports! to conttnUs Inkporttng. The contrast with tinQovsrsmsot*S control ol lish pi k I Australia end New 2* i'r allowed to raise Ihe prices "I their meat because their goveriuin-m pi | m do so; but Barbadian lishermcn are not allowed to put up tin' prices ii for pride? The controlled %  tish (retail) has risen from t> cents to 7 cents but the only Immcdite benefit seems to be experienced by hawkers who cheerfully ask and get 8 cents f"i flying flsfa bought in bulk from the MheiTiM n sBCh The Steep rlSB In the puce of fresh meat by tWSJOtg unls per lb. for roast bi-ul and .Mil [one more people to eel tish. It seems strange that while the Govermneat of Barbados is prepared to sane-lion the increase ol prices to be paid to Australian livestock owners, it rigidly prevents Barbadian fishermen %  • %  iii local fish during LONDON. %  Mtvy i** iiu* Hntish ComIB has often been Wim a %  years, but few people knu w the story bemud the establishment of this important indusiiy in South Eut Asia. %  Miner, writing Hi Today"', hai managed to condense it into a single article. T^e result i* one of the most readable and inform., ti v.contributions yet achieved on this JU I>;ect. ..Twenty years ago the he found them fully-grown and Secretary of State lor India KB entirely overgrown by secondary Council Invoked the aid of this jungle. establishment to introduce the To Mr. Ridley belongs much ol species yielding Indiarubber the credit for ertscover.ng a raethfnirn South America into India, od of tapping which did not kill The operation was successfully the trees. But he found it dnllcL.it accomplished at considerable to Interest planters is the tree. Mr. cost. Thre* species were establ-.Un.er describe* bow Mr. flldlc) llahed in Ceylon, where they used to press rubber PS) have since produced -eed which the pockets of visitors to bis botst available for distribution, amc.il gardssw, with the inj.jr.cA> far as I am aware, no praetton, "Take a few of these botne ttcjl result has followed with you. They will be valuable %  &"a remarkable Stove* near Kew GarThe Much of the early history ol ber tree in India failed, and part —**.; Ridley, *hi> 1M POCKET CARTOON by OSBFRT LANCASTER "Wall, whet flue Jon heriiVN |h(i fttms-st out the Introduction American mdi-iubber" tiee into Asia has been documented by such pioneers as Sir Clement* Markh.in. tnd Sit Henry Wukhjm. and Mr l-itimer ha.* di.i their work*. But gaps remain, and has '*• come confused with legend. One Of these l eg e n ds — that Wickhnm smuggled the rubber seeds out Of Brazil in d) i leesl sossrssssni leeloffi of itearnings from the BXpOti ral rubber -Is discounted by 111 Latimcr. The tSj have grown out of Wlckham's own colourful account of the affair *' "Kend carefully," ays Mr. Uilin.irriitive mnk> I might be so: the local S UtD OC tJ— at Para, with wb wa s on good terms, was most coin his desire to get ihe .u-kly." Furthssjfconfusion was undoubtrlly ilup t> the interest which | U.K. Government departments — notably the Indja Office hertts* ih( turn**, out names of planters of the early -professed in the efforts to fcatsot* ba '." twentieth century ducc the rubber tree into Asia. The m ———^^ M Their capital was enough for Governments of BMS S d.rys did pioneering; not enougli for develnot attach such great Importnnce a tUched to u misleading report on opment, and many sold their pro1o colonial development as their Uu Mun i habUal and method of prietary rights for shares and bemodem successors — the huge cultivation of the tree prepared by came managers on their own sums spent on the East JUrlCBB Mr Cromlforgotten, for when Mr. I! N. biggest odds he has ever faced lowing terms: Ridley arrived here s.-me year The Commonwealth has reason ( %  Sn. laifr to take charge of thi gardsng be grateful for his devotion KREMLIN LEADERS WAGE WAR ON ALL RELIGIONS In a new bouk. Gar* Mac£c4a. a dssUnsussbcd iMrnaltirt. prra-ntevidence that Soviet CemMMsruat Fartr leadrr. purse all rellglesa— recnUeva of the faf^ta — In the roantrles brwuht within the Imperialist Soviet erhll By WILLIAM HENRY ( ll \ Mill i:i l\ From "The Wall Street Journal*' SOVIET commuiusm is dedicated to the, annihilation of all religion, and the Kremlin 1 leaders enforce the Communist Party system as a way uf life requiring absolute acceptance of the decisions of the Politburo and the Central Committee of the Party as unquestioned "truth", Gary MacEoin, a distinguished journalist, emphasizes in his new book "The Communist War On Religion" (publlshsd by the Devin-Adair Company, New Yi i k City). Organized Soviet communism plays two roles to-day; it is at the same time missionary and persecutor, the author reports, supporting his statements with accounts of Communist persecution of religion in numerous countries. On the missionary side there is a constant intensive effort to indoctrinate SmpH"f SiiT* to Ma w? a A >• people in countries under Soviet Com-^ Skinner from Inri-, %  Lushmglur ... from Ceylon, and all the clans of nmnist rule and to win converts in the rest North Britain, figure ssSjsn g t>s [pf, the world. At the same time, there is a systematic effort to haress, repress and, so fur as possible, utterly destroy religious faith in the lands where Communist governments are In power. The tactics employed arc adapted according to each country, its history, Its politics, and its customs. But a pattern of first concentrating on minority faiths is almost universally followed. PAPER SERVIETTES In Plain While SI.OO p'-r himih i.l ADVOCATE STATIONERY Broad Street & Greystone, Hastingg blame for this must be dem ^ lo|l the oldest rubber trees In MdUywere grown from seeds which n? gave to district residents many years ago. In* seeds were BtSBtod near rest-houses and official residences, and some of them arc periods of rcarcity, while th v v are often nibblsh. but 1 think that the narBftd .adiftic turn of mind. jo b of censnrah c uiwiv oimJeucompell^l to sell at half the .ontrolh.i %  -^"'h h -•—-" "=* — --—— reiison. The quick nclion of many urcromaittir beckgniiind lind today In "imniH aulla holplesily hid inhuman machinations of lh lo thi* IntimglMe excuse la a ftilual Munlei CaMUH utlcilv "" % % %  .' Il1 "' "' } H 'l g "' %  '"' ""' HOMd "i .ii rtftnn.V•.'. OH of modem escaplini. and above acld-lhrowliiK canes: the many degenerate deed.-' the nennv all uncover* whal I* a complete ..ihei e\ent* that so dismay and dreadful, (no lon'oer .U !" l.„k ..I IlIKtantudbV toward, the disgust ,,.. and all with not the K5SS .1, S K KfSSi rundaownUI rtructur. „f human ,i„... i ., ,., .. .,, „ .„ '" "^" '. "'" : "-''• % %  " '" "' h s.-,..t> .,,.,1 the hal.,1* evident In he dl.cered on the Veen. J^ in^,"," 3, !" w,M even '"rcT,'. rSementary education JS5 %  ^"fi^K' X^ %£f SSt^Z^tS' SS& %  |--c|ilc f.ni tit understand :hiIH-I-SOII enduwed ith even a only natural that this extremely n ) , I l!!!l|' nimon sense, or that which sad slate of affairs should cause nouncm may be iirtlArlally engendered paralleled reverberations among No. these flimsy excuses are too through the means of simple incla-aes end people in general, and weak, too .groundless. The peratruction, even the reading and that as Is to be expected the usual %  %  >" who believes that the films undersuitiding of n few fables or trend of thought would necessarily exert u lasting Influence, whether parables, cannot possibly mlae be disturbed from Its traditional Kod or bad. on this generation of wthat today's films are everywhere rut. Nevertheless in spile of theae vipers has yet to learn a vast based upon, what la the whole changes, I see absolutely no need amount on the wonders and whims motivate* Hollyfor ihe Assembly to be alarmed ofhuman nature in the world of For Soviet communism, a secular materialistic faith, is jealous of all rivals. It recognizes no distinction between what is due to God and what is due to Caesar (civil or political leaders). It claims all as Caesar's portion. (-.specially obnoxious to Communist rulers in Moscow and in the states which have been brought within the Soviet orbit is the assumption, common to all the great religious I nths, that there is a higher moral law, by which the actions of the most powerful rulers must be judged. They see in this a dangerous challenge to the amoral absolutism of their regimes. Hence their determination to di'viatalize religion, if they cannot destroy it. and to tolerate only churches which will be subservient obedient tools in the hands oi the State %  t/s( ItxfM f"r yi'iir -unli'ii art' I" Infmintt ul Wfr/l.r'c..'" MOM tt?2 C. S. Pitcher & Co. Be tlock thit 2-iily Rubin i //* %  in Ihrff fizeM &f Thmoff aha — udHin.K races Aetna /./( %  /. i/. rows A UQK K;H,I:I I.II KM. BOSS tHUVBU i in niHGS lin was SOSAMS tn. OMBfl frtim u hi* h la rlma.'i: The story of Soviet Communist persecut.on of religion in the vast expanse of Kurasla. from the Elbe River to the Pacific Ocean Iknown in imperfect and fragmentary form. There is no free, no reliable, news i i..; v !" yau"n """" !" "-"' !" where murders are relived and : %  5uS? %?^&£?&S3r8% H^tA^iSSJ^ r 7'" ,imtlnK in ,h,s area ^^^''y „ __... _„i.„. ,i._. .*.!_ oi miai deaths are summarily pro. „ stemsjtic campaign to desUroy some a by "TOOTAL" Lystav Tootal Fabrics are Crease Resistant! Plain or Patterned — we have a wonderful selection 36"wide,$ 1.86 Da Costa & Co., Ltd. "ti.ri-h.'s outright and to undermine all Dthers has proceeded without the spotlight >f publicity. However, the main facts of this campaign been pieced together in this new book structure that wood—the moral lhat each and %  bout the type of film Ihe public today. I personally prefer to look; | (V Mr MacEoin He undertakes to tell what every film has as It* eventual likes to see. on the movies as the supreme , „ — .. aim. Thu. the venwr of ihe plol it is perhaps sufficient to remeans of relaxation, even some-1 has happened in Soviet Russia itself, in the neds In obscuring the mark 'hnt the lype of picture* times remotely of education, i sjlelliti* states of Eastern Kuroiw iinri in whole meaning of the produeUon blamed for ihe rlstns trend of Seldom do the farts remain overr;^" 1 eastern Europe ana in There II is in Uie proverbial crime are not in any way new to long in our minds—Mie picture K-hina. Much of his material is drawn from mitthell. One hundred per cent, of Ihe screen; they have not. in other ha really to be outstanding for! C"athlic ihoth Roman nnri r,ri*oWl %  aiiilM these crime movie-, end with the words, t-ecn shown for the first that, and they ..re few and far'*" C (D * n Koman Qnd ^reek) sources, erlmimil pictured in the lowest time during 1950 If this was the between. I but he clearly recognizes that communism .slate of mcnt,.l and moral degrecase, then maybe there would be It! %  a product of threatening ,s exiuallv hostile to all forma nt roliffimis ,1,-inn p-.li.;,.. i iieison for some reason for attributing to reality that we face, and we have ^ ^ aii y" torrns oi religious whom we can entertain not the the new-fangled hair-raisers a to meet ihjis reality with reality faith and he Cites the fate of other religions slightest feeling of sympathy, faithful following in Barbados equally stark. One poison will Christian Protostant It-wish M !" *!, !" With this fuel drilled ao constantspurred on to emulate dark deeds contemn another, won't It? But „ "" 5 u m. Moslem, \\ in the minds of cinema-goers done upon Ihe canvas patch before while one poison Is seeping through Huddhist, and others. The names of those ev. ivhere -Crime dot-, not pay. their eyes, and a followinR lo all our life blood, it's no use Indulging various nationalist*; wh. ,„ ( ,I B „V,.-I in and never will—we still have an Intents and purposes thit has got in senseless ravings fit only for. . nationalist* wno co-operated in individual attempting t<> emulate .>ff to an experienced and calculIhe maniac. That Is only another' supplying factual information have been the brutal deeds of one who has atingly cold-blooded start. of ahe Infinite ways of losing previthold hv th* aulh^e t„ li„ IO tK 0 ; r nor ..„nplr..-l.v delineated anrt Unfortunately, this i< not the clous Ume. ^ t. lineiQ Dy We author tO lessen their peril... tie ulterlv MSSMtrlng before rasS. These pictures nave been Fear Is sometimes an extremely Si>nal danger and for other sound reasons, M. i MI. efesr It's hard to beshowing in Barbados and elseefficient panacea and dreadful 1 1,,.. ,u„ honk include -. Il>( „f oihor c..e.^ !,.,, la t it! But the conclusion where for years past, and gentlesavagery never walks abroad e TO0K inciUtles a ,lsl ' ot her sources MI,-' people will arrive at Is the men who wish to compliment where fear heavUy treads. | that can be checked. The Orthodox Church in Soviet Russia has been so ruthlessly purged of all its Independent leaders that the Moscow regime is willing to tolerate its formal existence. The Out H;MIIS Say : %  • Iii. iVdiror, The Adrocate— Silt The remarks made by Mr, Allder in the House Assembly last Tuesday on the subi,,. (nesented led of tilms will no doubt make Law. natural o ung reading for those who „i,aU no t be ridiculed. the tide of trime, wrotu:-doing. evil or Bill. Correct staudar-li sub)ect only to the re>i f drama and entertainment shall whereby flret due to lightly pointed out the dangerinvolved in defective electrical, of Ufa, wiring and circuits, mav I belP rice ol this toleration is complete unquesi to offer a suggestion | tioning subsemence to the party line aCessets could human, minimised? shall In British Guiana electrical be considcrenbly domestic and international affairs. Atheism. however, remains a condition of membership the ruling Communist Party; and the >f education and propaganda _._.......„ .^__..._ —. ...^—^ __ .vii.ni nui tninin.uiru. no. bn<.ii in Mriiish Ciuiana one must he km. %  Iitllr i iiolhinf of Ute moaympathr hr rrpjled fo. Its viola.crllflM in electrical wirlni bi, '" lhe rul '"g ( I! py£ r .u rr %;Jjjajj. ..parfloola, &u^ ,$?$ JS^ ** * ...dy show the type of product as ApplicaUons" Crimea Against Tho has been wired the Government '* ,nr w against any spiritual interpreUll.^r;;^' TS i^-J'e? oL^Z Li 'l hM WV *. r r? P'" ,Ied '" Elocirical Inspector must inspect, tton of life. pruducers. Th 0 Board of ttruoK such way is to throw sympathy ;i|1 d certify that the ioh h^s been Ii no) appointed to tell the theew ,th the crime as against the law mS done T . I here has been a savage persecution of the tr e owners what type of piet they must play The Censors ire appointed to view dims and to approve of such tllnis which US moral and pro|>er; and also di>Bpprova such as are sacrilegious, t'bscene. iiidacent or irnrooral. or such as tend in the judgment of the board, to debase or cOTTupt morali Mi Allder states that at least ind hist Ice or to Inspire others rltB %  desirp fo r Imitation With iwrticular reference to nurder. the Production Code ates roperly I think it would be wise, for, oncerned. to haw similar 1 ( atnol.cs of the Eastern Rite, mostly Ukrain(s) Th ( technique of murder nust be presented in n way that vill not inspire imitation. Ibl Brutal killings are not to e presented in detail. (r) Revenge in modern tima JOSFPII A GOMES 1'orey Spring St Thoaias. Stamps The Editor, The Adoocafe— 2SV, nf the pictures stiown should .|,.dl not be justified HEAR Sir. I have been collecting be of an educaUoual nature. Perf n these modern days the m P' for n ihiUAH i v 111 It DA COSTA & CO., LTD BROAD STREET DIAL 4689 For A Delightful Tea Party... Fin* anil Ehvtric Wirin/i pictures Motion plc:iccordance with the provisions of a Production Code The Keneral principals of this code are :— To Tnc Editor. The Adpocole— m Ni Mature shall be preSIR With reference to your Inch will lower the moral Leading Article on soroo peecaustandnrd* ol those who see H tions to be observed as a preHenee the sympathy of tho auventlve to possible fires occurring dlence shall never be thrown to m Barbados. In which you quite correspondent for me who it errs ted In exchanging stamps I 28 yean of age but I will d kind ery letter ami stamps to anyone who is i write to me. With thanks. Yours truly. C. R. MALLOY. Bank of Mon: Main and James. Hamilton. Ontario, Canada. ihe Pope in Rome. Countless numbers ofl these have been arrested, some have died, under suspicious circumstances, and there have been many arrests and some martyr-1 dODM among the priests. The purpose of this religious persecution by the Moscow party leaders, which has been extended to Romania, is to force communicants into the Orthodox Church. The motive ol persecution is purely political, as there Lfl 00 reason to suppose that Stalin, even though he was sent to an Orthodox seminary by his pious mother, favours Greek Orthodox theology against Roman Catholic (BOOKS-Reviews! TBSSB \RI; )<>/ K nsisr M>ra Tea I i plan Tea Red Rose Tea t ube Sugar 4 .-.tor 8ugar Cares sweei m*ruiw *rr %  Crackers Kraft Cheese Dutch Cheese %  I A R Bread snrhnr Rullrr i_srtwl* iMMrtd in in* i>ml*r I WSII Sinn JaBfBBl. „ (Uilv -*>psiM-r pub m II.t'inl*d Staitx iMfiir.ni niliclr. n' I and rvonoiiu. mlrrni Th* ..-. %  memln-T ol th *4llvl>Bl itsfj o( Jl, Will Ittf'l '•UTMl. SwS CAttaftl Ut Ik. omiEK rmr .. T.OLD in: MI, I:I M and RVt WHISKY Today IlltS. r.wrv HVi \nliplutu Anchavfes Menna >iu.ji I d Roes Jack Straws Cheese Bisnnl, Meltb lisle* Mellk Figs EAT MOIII FISH Sjlmen Cod Fillets M.i.krrel in tins Haddock Kippers •-.ill Mackerel '.It H.rrlni-, US f.onitMins tar Smrnd F.....I*