Citation
The Barbados advocate

Material Information

Title:
The Barbados advocate
Uniform Title:
Barbados advocate (Bridgetown, Barbados : 1983)
Portion of title:
Sunday advocate
Place of Publication:
Bridgetown Barbados
Bridgetown, Barbados
Publisher:
Advocate Co.
Publication Date:
Frequency:
Daily
regular
Language:
English

Subjects

Subjects / Keywords:
Newspapers -- Bridgetown (Barbados) ( lcsh )
Genre:
newspaper ( sobekcm )
Spatial Coverage:
Barbados -- Bridgetown

Notes

Dates or Sequential Designation:
Apr. 22, 1983-
Numbering Peculiarities:
No issue published for May 3, 1983.
General Note:
On Sunday published as: Sunday advocate.
General Note:
Microfilm produced before 1988 may be substandard.
General Note:
Latest issue consulted: Feb. 28, 2005.

Record Information

Source Institution:
University of Florida
Holding Location:
University of Florida
Rights Management:
Copyright Advocate Co.. Permission granted to University of Florida to digitize and display this item for non-profit research and educational purposes. Any reuse of this item in excess of fair use or other copyright exemptions requires permission of the copyright holder.
Resource Identifier:
17931718 ( OCLC )
sn 88063345 ( LCCN )
Classification:
Newspaper ( lcc )

Related Items

Preceded by:
Advocate-news (Bridgetown, Barbados)

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Par bado:



ESTABLISHED 1895





CALM IN TUNISIA

BROKEN AS POLICE ,

DISPERSE GROU

TUNIS, Feb. 4.

THE CALM which reigned over Tunisia for the past
few days was broken today when the police fired into a
group on the outskirts of the city killing one person. The
incident occurred in the suburb of Tunis known as France-
ville, where police patrols ran into a group forming in the
street. The police opened fire and one person was killed.

The group dispersed without
further incident, the authorities
said. This brings the death toll
to 70 killed and more than 200
injured, since rioting broke out
here on Jan. 16,

Authorities said today that the

Nationalist Neo Destour (New
Independence) activities were
on the increase. Nationalist sa-
boteurs in the past two days

launched widespread attacks on
communication lines, telephone
and telegraph and electric pow-
er transformers throughout the
country, and early today at-
tempted to set fire to the Office
of the Ministry of Transport.

ee
ACTION
NEEDED
WASHINGTON, Feb. 4,

Senator Pat McCarran said
action is needed and quickly on
the plans to extend United States
economic and military assistance
to Spain. The Senator has been
in the forefront of Senate moves
for closer collaboration between
the U.S. and Spain.

“There has been too much delay
in getting aid to Spain started” the!
Senator told United Press in an
exclusive interview.

“Prompt action is what is need-
ed.” “I have been advised that the;
Mutual Security Agency will set
up a mission in Spain in a short
time” he added. “I hope it will
but I do not know when that will
happen. It should have been sent
before.”

McCarran said he had no idea
how Spain might figure in the





programme yet to be submitted to}

Congress for United States foreign
aid during the 1952-53 figcal year.

Administration sources said it
still is too early te late on
what might be Spain's share of
the programme of which Truman
told Congress in his budget oe

—(U.P.)

4 Of “Gloria’s’’
Crew Picked Up

NEW ORLEANS, Feb. 4.

The Navy said on Monday a
navy cargo ship had picked up
four crew members in a lifeboat
from the schooner Gloria about 95
miles north of the Caribbean en-
trance to the Panama Canal.

The Eight Naval District Head-
quarters said the rescue was made
by the cargo ship Private John

m as a result of a message
from Captain William Cowan of
Thorson to Captain P. H. Jenkins,
Commanding Officer of the Guif
Subarea Military Sea Transporta-
tion Service who said 18 additional
persons were believed to be on the
schooner. No details on reason
for her distress were immediately
available,

The Navy said the Gloria was
listed as an 87 foot schooner of
Colombian registry. The Com-
mandant of the Fifteenth Naval
District at Balboa has ordered a
sea and air search of the area, The
message from Thorson to the Sea
Transportation Services read:
“Sighted and rescued — four sur-
vivors in a lifeboat from schooner
Gloria bound for Cologne. Eighteen
additional survivors are said to be



on the schooner”, —U.P. 1







U.S. Slashes
Military
Budget

WASHINGTON, Feb. 3

‘rom All Quarters

New Notes
For Old

Luska; In eighteen months an
African, John Issamacai, saved up
his pennies which he changed into
six pound notes at Kalabo, North-
ern Rhodesia, Post Office. He
buried the notes under his hut
floor. The rains came. John dug
up the notes and spread them in
the open to dry. They were eaten
by a _neighbour’s goat. John



Defence Secretary Robert Lo-|killed the goat and recovered the

vett disclosed today that the fis-| shreds
cal 1953 military spending bud-|is claiming six new
slashed \the
$19,000,000,000 below the|bour is demanding £6 from John

by|for the loss of his goat.

get already has been
about
amount originally sought
the joint Chiefs of Staffs.
He warned an economy mind-
ed Congress any further cuts
would not be “prudent”. Lovett
testified before a Senate Appro-
priations Sub-committee consid-
ering Truman’s request for $52,-
000,000,000 for military expens-
es in the
July 1,
Lovett = the semen ge
head on testifying t e
seryices orlginatly sought $71,-
000,000,000 to reach “an accept-
able state of readiness” this year.

| He said his own office trimmed the
total to $55,000,000,000 and Tru-| House.

of} 2,940
sending a/words, and was signed by 31,306

man ordered a further cut
$3,000,000,000 before
budget to Congress.
Lovett explained that
tions were accomplished
by “stretching out the period in
which readiness is to be achieved”
—that is by postponing target
dates for reaching the goals of
143 group Air Force, a 21 Divi-
sion Army, a Navy with 408 ships
and a three Division Marine Corps.
—UP.

reduc-



Bulb Causes
Piane Crash

MONTREAL, Feb. 4.

A seven cent light-bulb that| whale,

fiscal year beginning | seneration,

mainly | new

of the notes. Now John
notes from

Post Office. But the neigh-

Capetown: Mrs. 5S. Joubert
who lives at a home for the aged
at Paarl, near Cape Town, this
week put on her lace bedjacket
and a small lace cap on her head.
It was a special occasion for she
was expecting a visit from a
member of her family’s fifth
Mrs. Joubert is 90
and her grand-daughter’s grand-
daughter is five days old,

Schuylkill County, Pa: The
biggest telegram in the history of
the Western Union Company has
just been delivered at the White
It was 878 feet long, cost
dollars, totalleq 80,000

residents of Schuylkill County,
Pennsylvania, who want ‘to see a
air force base built in their

county instead of the one next
door.
Moorhead, Minnesota : The

temperature was 29 degrees be-
low zero when Ray Gillette’s
creamery lorry broke down, The
heater stopped working, so Ray
crawled into the refrigerator com-
partment, where the temperature
was only at freezing point, and
spent a snug night,

New York: Columnist Robert
Ruark, announcing that he in-

tends to buy whalemeat at 93
cents per lb., while steak stays at
$1.50 a lb, says he quite likes
but does wish his wile

failed was blamed Monday for the/ would stick to “come and get it”

loss of a $4,000 amphibian airplane.| at mealtimes

instead of “Thar

Jean Paul Gauthier and a passen-{ she blows!”

ger were uninjured when the

Madrid: “Grandfather”, a 20-

plane crash-landed in an unfroz-| year-old boar, has been killed. He

en stretch of a river late Satur-| was

one of two hundred wild

day. The plane sank in 40 feet} boars killed in a hunt on an estate

of water.
Gauthier said he
make an emergency

decided to} hundred
landing in|‘Grandfather” was said to have

near San Sebastian, in which two
sportsmen took part.

the river when the pilot light in-| killed 150 dogs in his lifetime.

dicating the wheels were locked
failed to go on.

—(U.P.)







— - eee,

POCKET CARTOON
bs OSBERT LANCASTER









“1 wouldn't be surprised tf
Miss Thorneycrojt were
shortly to abandon her
opposition to lowering the
school-leaving age.”



| the 38th Parallel.

° 4 previously reported

\4 e erman y ffers lof several Allied held islands off
|

Allies $

New York: New York Daily}

TUESDAY, PEB




oe?

THE WEDDING GIFT hunting lodgé on the wooded Slopes of Mount Kenya whore Princess
and the Duke of Edinburgh will spend a few days © their way to Australia
on stone foundations, was given te them by the Kenya Government in 1047, and lies almost on the

Equator.—-EXPRESS.,

First Math
Produced In_ W.1.

THE FIRST WORK of its kind ot be produced and,





RUAR

agorce

published in the West Indies—-A New School Geometry with
frigonometry — in two volumes — 1 & 2 by Andrew G. J.
Camacho, now Mathematical Tutor, Extra-Mural Depart-
ment of the West Indies University College, is being put
into circulation by the Public Library.

Trinidad Ban
Janet Jagan: |

ProtestLodge |

(From Our Own Correspondent)
PORT-OF-SPAIN, Feb. 3,
The question whether Mrs.
Janet Jagan, wife of Hon, Dr,
Cheddi Jagan, a member of the
British Guiana Legislative Council
will be able to holiday in Tobago
to see Carnival in Trimidad as
planned will be decided by the
Executive Council tomorrow,
Mrs. Jagan who ig a member
only of a political party in British
Guiana favours Federation of the
West Indies and a Councillor of }
the Georgetown City Council, |
was refused permission to remain
in Trinidad last Friday. On ar-
rival, she was served with a blue)
slip signed by an official of the
Immigration
that she has been refused permis-
sion to visit Trinidad. |
A delegation of political organi- i







This work, available both in the

Reference Library, and in the
Adult Department, was printed by
the Trinidad Publishing Company,
and has a Foreword by Sir Allan
Collymore, Kt. Chief Justice of
Barbados.
The author, who was formerly a
Master at St, Stanislaus College,
British Guiana, Mathematical
Master, St. Mary's College, Trini-
dad, and later Mathematical Tutor,
Intlustrial Training Class, Port-of-
Spain, presents the subject in a
simple and clear manner without
any saerifice of accuracy, It is a
work suited even to very young
students as well as to those who
havé no previous knowledge of
eometry, since it begins with ‘de-
nitions and simple geometrical
stre whose. truth ee he
re@dily abstracted pei
ence, or evolved from the funda-
mental notions’, and continues to
a logical sequence of theorem,

Six Parts

It is set out in six parts, and
contains all the subject matter re-

Department nee for geometry and trigono-

metry in the mathematics sylla-
bus of the School Certificate of
the Cambridge University local

News columnist John O’Donnell,| sations called on Hon. P, M, Reni- | examinations, and the elementary

commenting on the fact that
Churchill did not ask for money
in America, cracks: “He'll be
back again. Winnie doesn’t put
all his bees in one ask-it.”

Reds Claim
Capture
EIGHTH ARMY HEAD-
QUARTERS, Feb. 4.
Communists claimed today to
have captured a Korean island
south of the 38th Parallel. Radio
Pyongyang said Red troops seized
Yuk To island south of Onjin
peninsula on the west coast of
Korea Sunday. It said the island
had been a refuge for South
Korean troops driven from the
peninsula by Communist troops.
The broadcast marked the first

time Communists have claimed to
have captured an island south of



However, they

the capture

‘the north west coast of North
Korea.

Onjin peninsula which dips

2,.000m.

PARIS, Feb. 4.

WEST GERMANY offered on Monday to make a
$2,500,000,000 contribution to Western European defence
but the United States, Britain, and France demanded 20
per cent. more. The German delegation argued the defence
contribution issue with the Commissioners of Big Three

Western countries, the Allied Occupying Powers.

FISHING
SCHOONER
ON DRY DOCK

The fishing schooner Florence
Emanuel was taken on dry dock

yesterday afternoon for repairs. |

he came in port over the week-
end from Martinique,

After being painted and cleaned
the Florence Emanuel will tie up
alongside the wharf to take a sup-
ply of ice. She will then sail for
the fishing banks to make a catch
of red fish for Martinique.

Another fishing” schooner, the
Lindsyd II, arrived here on Sun-
day from Martinique but she too
brought no fish. Her catch was
sold in Martinique and she has
come to take a supply of ice before
going back to the fishing banks.
is con-

The Florence Emanuel

signed to the Schooner Pool while
the Lindsyd II is consigned to the
Barbados Import & Export Co.



Germans sought to cut the
|amount which the Allies de-
'manded. German delegates Franz
| Bluecher, Vice-Chancellor of the
Bonn Government, Fritz Schaef-
fer, Finance Minister and Lud-
wig Erhard, Minister of Econo-
mics based the offer of 10,500,-
000,000 marks on an estimated
fiscal year national product of
127,000,000,000 marks. But west-
ern delegates estimated German
output at 136,000,000,000 marks.
—UP,

Britain Closing
Canton Consulate

LONDON, Feb, 4.
A Foreign Office communique
said that Britain was closing its
consulate in Canton, China. The
shutdown was ordered because
there was not enough Britons in
the area to justify keeping the
office open. It said that the
Chinese Red Government had
been notified of the decision.
{Britain also has consulates at
\Shanghai and _ Tientsien,
}maintains a consular staff at the

Communist capital of Peking.
' -—UP.





and |

south of the Parallel was the first
| segment of South Korea seized by

Communists in their invasion
June, 1950. They reoccupied it
after the intervention of Allied

armies south of the 38th Parallel
in December, 1950 and January,
1951, and still hold it.

Reds for a time laid claim to
five islands off the peninsula in
armistice negotiations at Pan-
munjom but last week withdrew
their demand.

—UP.

Govt. Officials
Detained

JAKARTA, Feb. 4.
Jakarta



About 50

prominent
officials have been detained by
police over the weekend for

questioning on a “ieeKkage of in-
formation concerning new mon-
etary measures issued by the Gov-
ernment Saturday, Already on
Friday details of imrninent mon-
etary’ measures were known by
most businessmen and according
to judicial authorities they made

use of “information” which was
a State secret.
Authorities are now trying to

find out how the information was
gained. About 15 people are still
under detention. A spokesman in
the Attorney General’s office said
Government officials who gave
the information in question
“should be jailed.”

Most details complicated new
;Measures known already Friday
iFinance Minister Juse Wilbono
said.—U.P.

son, Colonial Secretary, this after-
noon protesting the ban on Mrs.
Jagan and asking that she be |
allowed to remain in the colony
with complete freedom of move-
ment and urging that a serious
blow will be dealt Federation if
permission was not granted

Renison did not disclose the
reason for the ban but told the
delegation that the matter would
be considered by the Executive
Council tomorrow. She will have
to leave the colony on Thursday
if the ban is not unlifted.

U.N. Assembly
Approve @G.0.L.

Incréase

PARIS, Feb. 4
The United Nations General
Assembly, pushing hard for ad-
journment to-day overwhelming-
jy approved a seven and a half
per cent. increase in the cost of
living allowance for United Na-
tions headquarters staff in New
York. The decision, which will
cost United Nations an extra
$1,300,000, was opposed by Rus-
sia, the United States and Brit-
ain, ay
Among other supplementary
budget appropriations the Assem-
bly also approved $17,000 for the
work of the new U.N. Commis-
sion to investigate the possibility
of free elections throughout Ger-
many
The Assembly upheld a resolu-
tion of the U.N. Economic and
Bocial Council to discontinue the
United Nations Heanomic, Em-
ployment and Development Com-
mission. E.C.O.8.0.C. was ask-
ed, however, to reverse its decis-
ion to discontinue until 1955, U.N.
Sub-Commission on the preven-
tion of discrimination and protec-
| tion of minorities had instructed
the Council to call a meeting of
the Sub-Commission in 1952, The
Assembly also asked E.C.O.S.0.C.
jto convene a Commission on the
status of women for one session
each year, thus reversing
E.C.0.S.O.C. decision to cut the
Commission's meetings to once
every two years.—U.P,

BACK TO GRENADA

After spending two weeks’
holiday with his relatives, Mz
Rudolph Knight of the editori: :











staff of the West Indian in St.
George’s, returned to Grenada on
Saturday by B.W.LA.



mathematics syllabus of the Ma-
triculation of London University.

Among other new books which
are now being catalogued and
which will go into circulation at
the Library in the very near fu-
ture, can be found A King's Story,
Memoirs of H.R.H, the Duke Of
Windsor Written with candour
and moving simplicity, the book
depicts the whole dramatic story
of the life of the Duke from early
childhood until the day when he
set sail from Britain in voluntary
exile,

@ On Page 5

Thieves’ Hauls
Total $94:

Three crates of white potatoes
valued $13.86, were stolen from
Reginald Holder’s stall at the
Public Markét on Saturday. They
are his property.

The Standard Pharmacy at
Tweedside Road was broken ate
entered and a quantity of tooth-
paste, tooth brushes and cigar-
ettes, total value $68, stolen. The
Pharmacy is the property of Mrs
E. Franklyn.

In connection with this inci-
dent, Elmer Lewis of My Lord's
Hill, St. Michael, has been charg-
ed by the police with breaking
and entering the same drug store
and stealing the articles.

Mr, C. B. Gill of Mount Pleas-
ant Plantation, St. Philip, report-
ed that 21 holes of cabbage and
ten pounds of carrots, valued
$12.48, were stolen from the lands
ef the same plantation betweer
3.00 am, on Friday and 11.1*
aim. on Saturday. ‘They are his
property.





Big Auction Sale

One of the biggest auction sales,
ever to take place in the District
“A” Court yard, was held yester-
day, People came from all, over
the City to make purchases,

A few auctioneers and specula-
tors mixed with the crowd, ‘The

sale was carried out by Mr.
Darcy Seott and began shortl
after 2 o'clock.

A large number of beds were
among the items sold. Chairs,

dining table
other items

glassware and many
were also sold.



Murder Case Adjourned

The case in which 43-year-ok
Joseph Gibbs, a chauffeur and
lorry owner of Bryan’s, Weichman
Hall, St. Thomas, is charged with
the murder of 35-year-old Duncar
Headley on Friday, January 18
continued before the Police Mag-
istrate at District “D’ yesterday






| Hall, is also charged wit

The case was adjourned until to-
morrow,

Jane Murray: also of Welchmar
the mur-
der of Duncan Headley She
the sister of Gibt and siste f

Headley’s wife

_ aa

ROY Ad. HUNTING LODGE
~ _ )) Ae % » * 3 .









‘Price Of Animal Feed

And Rum Increase

FOLLOWING CLOSELY on the increases announced
over the week-end by the Control Office on the price of
fresh meat, loca) dairymen and pig-keepers wed this morn-

| ing asked to pay 2 cents mere on the price of Ba
Animal Feed which on the 18th of December last moved
from 7 cents per pound to 9 cents per pound.

The advance in the price of this commodity is due to
the increased cost of the ingredients which go to make up
this balanced feed, only recently released from controls,
and which, although they have been covered by exchange
at low rates, have cost more than was anticipated.

. —. The increase of about $1.29 on

he 75-lb. bag which formerly

} Prince Philip ost $6.06, represents a maximum

cetail price of 11 cents per Ib, or

e 1 2 ey cent, advance on the
W ill Play In brice ahead to on tne igth De-
Polo Match

Following the last increase in

| the price of this feed, dairy-keep-
NYERI, KENYA, Feb. 4

Prince Philip, astride a bor-

| ws made successfgl representa-

} jon to the Controlier of @upbpiies

| the price of
rowed pony will play in a_polo|
1atch at the local club on Mon-/|
iy afternoon, Princess Eliza-|

still being

beth will drive to the Nyeri Polo} [erease in the price of poultry
Club with him to watch the mateh, | feed at about the same time also
‘he Royal Pair, making a four- | ‘effected an advance in the prica
onth round-the-world Common-| ol eggs which are now being sojd

j wealth tour, are stopping over} «t ten cents each,
here at their hunting lodge. Discussing the recent § in-
‘ This morning, they explored the} crease in the price of feedstuffs,
| 10-aere estate which surrounds a butcher said: “We are back
} their Lodge, given to them by the | where We were priory te the
| Colony as a wedding present inerease given by Government
(cP) in the price of fresh meat,”
because ‘he thinks that people
who have to pay more for feed
for their stock will want to

; |

~ m |
} Coast Guard Goes sell them at a greater price
than now obtains,
|

tor increases m
milk which is
trolled.

con-

Eges Dearer

Blizabeth
Tho lodge, built of cedar

v
To The Rescue We will therefore either have
to operate with that very slight
Carolina, margin of profit which has been
Feb. 4 the case for many years, or ask
Coast guardsmen battled storm-/| {9% another increase to offset the
jlashed seas today in an attempt! ec responding increase in the
to rescue 26 crewmen of the Pan-| price we have to pay for live-
amanian registered motor-ship | steck.”

r ”
Zenith 44,
|
Days Overdue
| Miget, driven aground by a freak A housewife when told of the
increase in the price of feédstuff,

The 87-ton schooner Zenith is|¢yclonic storm
now 44 days overdue on her voy- wo cutters, a surf boat, and @/ said: “We housewives are being
a asied week after week te pay

age from Barbados to British} >‘ ae the ae spery duet _ to
juiana and local shipping author- | "eh the coastal freighter lying more for almost every essential
ee cd) SHIPPINE GUlHor~ | off shore of the narrow Portsmouth

O'CLAKE, North



ae o ’ ' item of foodstuff us@€d° in the
ber eats becoming doubtful o island on North Carolina's lonely} home, and the result is that we

Pyeng: SM : . outer banks. j; have been forced to make drastic
me pember 19 the Benth, | Che Miget’s crew sent up flares) cuts in these items. We are not
with lives on board, _ Sailec two coast guard planes fleW] able to plan our budget, and
from the Careenage for Spring ver her during the night. Ob-! consequently we are unable ta
lands with a load of stone and servers said the ship apparently | put aside for

the ‘rainy day’ as

up to yesterday, neither the local! was in no immediate danger. |we have been taught to do.

Harbour and Shipping Master nor The master of the ship at first

the Schooner Pool, the schooner’s vodioed the coast guard that he Same Prices

agents, received further informa- \bandoning ship but a later “Imagine the price of local
tion of her whereabouts {message indicated he had changed iresh meat being the same ag

Reports have reached Barbados ;! mind,—U.P, imported meat!” she said, “Eggs
from time to time since the | ) which were once bought 6 for



schooner was reported missing; |'en cents are now 10 cents each,

stating that she was seen off Brit- | , ‘ Goe land there are cases where people
ish Guiana and one, cablegram | Luxury Liner Si Yare demanding e v en higher
stated that She wa

> expected to ly prices.”
reach British Guiana on Decem- ack To West Indies She said it was regrettable

ber 23. that Government decided to de-

The local Hagbour and Shipping : NEW YORK, control and consequently re-
Master hag been keeping in touch! Having just returned from 4] move the subsidy on imported
with other West Indian Islonds'C!vise to the West Indies, the] animal feed at a time when the

Canadian Pacifie’s 26,300-ton liner

price of essential food items
the Empress of Scotland will do

was being increased, but she

and hopes to be promptly inform-
ed if the Zenith o1

her crew are



sighted three more cruises before the! hopes that in the interest of
. ’ wintery is out: these three will be the health of the community,
from New York, Government will do everything

The liner is making a special in their power to encourage the

Kidna
Girl

ling from Southampton to New

/, York via Halifax, in time for her

ound fret cruise which started on] the high cost of meat.
t

bruary Ist for 16 days. ‘The The man in the street will also
ond trip starts on February 20] have to pay about one cent more

keeping of pigs and other small
stock with a view to reducing

FRANKFURT. Feb. 4. if the third on Mareh 8 (14]/for his “snap” of rum because of

cnbiaaie ae deithicin: Sa and 16 days). an advance in the price of this
reported today that "they had| .. The ports of call are: Havana,jcommeédity from yesterday.
found Mamie’ Shelton. the 18-| Kingston, Cristobal, Willemstad, Molasses Dearer

La Guaira, Bridgetown and Char-
lotte Amalia,

(he liner will be back on the
, Liverpool—Quebee and Montreal
ervice in mid-May.

This increase which comes about
at about the same time as a simi-
lar increase last year is due partly
to the fact that the rum refineries
have to pay more for molasses and

year-old daughter of an Army
Sergeant, who was kidnapped on
Sunday by an armed soldier.
Military police headquarter
wnid that they received the report | ‘

from a radio patrol which took} —B.U.P. @ On page 5.
part in a_ widespread search |
hroughout Southwestern Ger-
many. |
The first report did not say}
where the girl was found. The!
kidnapper was not found |
Miss Shelton had been riding}
with two Army Sergeants in a}

car from Frankfurt to Hanau on‘

Sunday, when they stopped to}
pick up a soldier hitehiker. The
soldier reported that he had es-|
caped from Mannheim Prison, |

soon after he held them up, and |
drove off with the girl and the}
car, Army authorities said.

; —UP.



Egyptian Premier |
Meeting Trouble |

CAIRO, Feb. 4

Premier Aly Maher Pasha re-
ported that he was meeting diffi-
eulty today in forming an all

party national front Government
with both Saadist and Liberal
Constitutional Parties demanding
1 full inquiry to establish the re-
sponsibility for the Cairo rioting
vf January 26

The new Premier is attempting
to reconcile party difference and
oring party leaders together in a
common stand,

The Egyptian Press meanwhile
reviewed the Anglo-Egyptian
ituation. The Weeklies Al Gam-
hour, Al Mahry, and Rosal Yous-
sef charged that the British were
responsible for the Cairo riot

—UP





Britain To Protest
To Argentina | More and more
LONDON, Feb. 4.

| people ave saying ~
OMmice pokesman

A Foreign
that the British |

confirmed today



Embassy in Buenos Aires had|{
been instructed to protest to the | o
Argentine Government over the}
incident at Hope Bay, Graham}
Island, in the Antaret in which |
Argentinians allegedly fixed ma- }
chine guns over the heads of a!
Sritish landing parts id then]
forced the British t tur to}
their ship |
Tr ¢ pokesmar sid at r '
tructior were sent on 8S d
mut ne if t kn ‘ € r
t had r elivered UP, ra















ORD and Lady Oliver Esher
are at present in Barbado
on a short visit. They are
a W.I. tour and among the island
they have already visited a:
Jamaica, Grenada and Antigu
Here until Thursday they ar
the guests of Sir Edw>rd Cunar
of “Glitter Bay”, St, James
Lord..Esher who will be 71 i:
March -ig-Chairman of the Gov-
ernors Oftthe Old Vjic. He is also
Presideni and Chairman of a num-
ber of other Theatrical and Cv ic
Societies.and wag a former Trus-
tee of thé London Museum. He
was married im 1912 to Antoin-
ette, daughter of August Heck-
scher of New York. They hav?
one son and three daughters

Visiting Her Sons
ADY LUCIE-SMITH is due to
leave for Trinidad to-day by
B.W.1LA. to spend about three
weeks’ holiday in that colony with
two of her sons Maurice and
Reggie.

Tourists Read About
Barbados

ERE was another bumper
crowd dining and dancing at
Club Morgan on Saturday night,
what with tourists from the Fort
Townshend, T.C.A,, as well as
“winter” visitors from the hotels,
St. James Coast and several of
the regular local visitors,
Barbados and Club Morgan had
some advance. publicity with the
Fort Townshend passengers when
one of them discovered a book in
the ship’s library entitled “The
Man Who Died Twice,” which is
a new detective thriller by
George Harmon Coxe.

on

The plot of this novel is set in
Barbados and mentions among
other people and places — Club
Morgan, Helen and Frank Mor-
gan. This created a lot of inter-
est on the boat and by the time
the ship reached here, every pas-
senger on board had read it and
they all gota “big kick” out of
being in Barbados, seeing Club
Morgan and meeting the Morgans.

George Harmon Coxe, who is
a well known writer of Detec-
tive fiction was here two years
ago when he started on the plot
for “The Man Who Died Twicc*
and a novelette about Barbados
which was _ published in the
November’ issue of the America:
M> azine.

Mr. Coxe is at present in Bar-
bedos on another visit and will
he here until the end of March.
Cerib understands that he is hard
nt work on a new novel.

Tt would seem that our little
islend isattractive to writers as
well °« artists and we are hanp?7
to welcome them here.

Married In Trinidad

ISS ANNE MILNE, daughter

of Mr. and Mrs. T. Mzelcolm
Milne of Trinidad was married on
Saturday in Trinidad to Mr. Ray
Klynott, son of Mr. and Mrs. Mat-
thew Klynott of Wilkes Bane,
Pennsylvania, U.S.A. Mr. Kly-
nett is a radio announcer over
station W.V.D.I., Trinidad.

Mr. and Mrs. Malcolm Milne
were recently in Barbados on a
visit with their daughter Claire,
who made her debut in Trinidad
shortly after the wedding.

Anne has also visited Barbados
on several occasions e@1 has
many friends here,



POCKET CARTOON
by OSBERT LANCASTER

With the compli
ments 0; the season from
the Verbena Steam Laun-
dry —add ‘With much love
and all best wishes jor a
mek Christmas

adudie and Willy.’”

* Delete



Back from U.S. and Canada

ETURNING from Canata aid
the U.S. on Sunday eveains

via Puerto Rico by B.W.1.A. were
Mr. Carlton Browne, Roebuck
Street Druggist and Mrs. Brown
Mrs. Browne had been in Can-
ada since mid September lavt
year, when she went up with he
daughter Toni, who is attendin
Trafalga~ Finishing Seuool, Mon-

treal,
Mr. Browne left Barbados in
December and Mrs. Brywne and

Toni met him in New York, where
they spent the Christmas and New
Year holidays.

They then returned to Canada
to spend a few days and leive
Toni at School in Montreal. On
their way back to Barbados, they
spent a couple of weeks in New
York.

Toni is expected to come down
in June to spend the summer
holidays in Barbados.

To Take Up Appointment
R. KENNETH GRIFFITH,
son of Mr. H. C. Griffith,

Chief Sanitary Inspector of Christ

Church and Mrs, Griffith of

Harts Gap, left for Trinidad

over the week-end by B.W.LA.

on his way to Tobago. He has
gone to take up an appointment
as Mathematical Master of the

Bishop's High School.

Visit to Her Mother
ISS RUBY KENNEDY of
River Road, left on Saturday
evening by B.W.LA. for Trini-
dad on a visit to her mother who
is very ill,

Grenada Tourist Chief

ETURNING to Grenada on

Saturday by B.W.LA. were
Mr, and Mrs, A. Norris Hughes
who had been holidaying here for
the past two weeks at the H«tel
Royal,

While here, they attended the
jintercolonial cricket games be-
tween Barbados and Jamaica at
‘Kensington,

Mr. Hughes is Chairman of the
Grenada Tourist Development
Board and Vice-President of the
Caribbean Tourist Association, He
had recently attended the meet-
ing of the Executive Council of
the Caribbean Tourist Associa-
tion held in St, Thomas, Virgin
Islands.



Carib Calling

Ten Days

RS. Kenneth W. Blackburne,
wife of the Governor of the
Leewarg Islands flew in from An-
tigua on Sunday evening by
B.W.1.A. Accompanying her was

Mrs. Margaret G. Hodgson.
During their ten-day holiday
here they are the guests of Mrs.
Peebles of “Bayleys”, St. Philip.

Back Home

RS. W. McSHINE, the form-
er Evelyn Ward, d°ughter
of Mr. and Mrs. George C. Ward
Warners, Christ Church, is
ick in Rarbados after a virit to
“ngland and the U.S. She return-
ed on Sunday evening via Puerto

Rico by B.W.LA.

lo-morrow—A Lecture
R. GEOFFREY A, JELLICOE
who is due to arrive at Sea-
well to-day by air will be the guest
of Mr. Ronald Tree of “Heron
Bay”, St. James. He will be ac-
companied by Mrs. Jellicoe.

Mr, Jellicoe will give a lecture
at the Barbados Museum to-mor-
row afternoon at 5 o’clock on
‘Landscape in relation to Archi-
tecture and Town Planning.”

Members of the MuSeum
their friends are invited
tend the lecture.

Mr. Jellicoe who designed
‘Heron Bay” is a Fellow of the
Royal Institute of British Archi-
tects and a member of the Town

and
at-

Planning Institute and a_ past
President of the Institute of
Landscape Architects, He has

been responsible for the Lands-
cape Gardens of many English
Country hoyses including San-
dringham — the King’s Norfolk
home, Royal Lodge (Windsor),
Ditehley and Kelmarsh Hall. He
is also an author and has written
books on the Baroque Gardens of
Austria, Gardens of Europe and is
joint author of Italian Gardens
of the Renaissance and Gardens
and Design,

Mr. Jellicoe bas just been mak-
ing a lecture tour through the
U.S. and Canada on various as-
pects of landscape and planning.
He expects to be here for about
one week,

Same ’Plane
M*® AND MRS. William J.
Whiting who were in Bar-
bados recently returned on Sun-
day by B.W.LA. after a short
visit to Trinidad. They are guests
at the Hotel Royal
Mr. Whiting is Manager of Bar-
clays Rank in Dominica.
Arriving by the same plane
were Mr. and Mrs. F. Quested.
Mr. Quested is an English Jockey.
From Wisconsin
R. AND MRS. George P. Frise
of Wisconsin arrived from
Trinidad over the week-end by
.W.LA, to spend a short holiday
in Barbados, Mr, Frise is Presi-
dent of the La Crosse Concrete
Company of Wisconsin.
They are guests at the Paradise
Beach Club,

Alliance Francaise
T the Annual General Meet-
ing of the Alliance Fran-
caise, which will be held at the
British Council, “Wakefield”, at
8.00 p.m. on Thursdey, officers
will be elected to the Executive
Committee for the year, New
members will also be enrolled.
The Reports of the Secretary
and Treasurer for the year 1951

will be presented.



West Indian Table Talk

YEAR BOOK
Just published in London is
the Year Book of the West Indies
and Countries of the Caribbean
1951 edition. This publication





CROSSWORD





v8







i stalagmites and stalactites (v)
7 Veh te to make Lolli mine \W war, Mrs, James was in the Queen
! he | ale ermine (4) lew “n'a flitar re! .
i? Sonask an one nee. 1k) Alt vendra s Military Nursing Serv-
13 Shakespeare's storm. (7) i Reserve,
lope aaftly leaves. (3) ‘
Anagraz rt) r ) aq
18 nie chive tide Wide choice (i) LECTURE DISAPPOINT-
19 Expresses contempt. (5) ~
23 Yearn tor « gain lost. (vy) , MENT
24 At this is good defence, (4) A disappointed man this week
26 My heart when jovial, (3) was Mr. Albert Gomes, leader cf
4 ' . 4 a
26 Over when a" Defence he West Indies delegation to the
t Accept excusing circumstanc B RaECS Ministers Conference, It
to make It (9) was not the official giscussions in
£ own is made when thir London which disappointed him,
4 A jewel for thy mates. (8) Far from it. He was pleased with
+ R Me) from whe rine. (¢) the way the talks worked out,
idde| a. ( > Ga ia
eo words trom parent. But Mr, Gomes had to turn down
(4. 3) en invitation to speak at Cam-
Wears Re aut pons (4) bridge University, on the West
é Theeeten (6) Indies. He did not have time to
‘ gould be a Biot, (6). “ac spare, “I would have loved it,”
ts ram “
45. Seem in a whelk stall? (3) he told me, “but perhaps I shall
21 Found in 9 Down. (4) be able to speak there next time I
o2 Mature (4) come over.”
1 Saturd puzz)e ~
acroass Princiowls "Rustic ao NEW JOURNAL
fe tor id arrive’ at Lose’ gs. bes The British Medical Journal
£8, Musicne | "8s "Stone Tre this week praises the University
Biol 5 A College of the West Indies for the
aah way in which the new West Indian
Far Medical Journal has been produted
SILVER SWALLOW ENAMEL-WARE
=
i PUDDING BASINS—70c. 85c. 91e. PAILS

JUGS—%6e. $1.22, $1.31,
PIE DISHES—39c.

Dial 4220

‘ BOWLS—42c, 54c. 56c. 74c.

48c. 60c. 80c.
BASINS—70c. 80c. 91c. 99c. $2.32
PAILS with Covers—$2.60

By Londoner

whieh is in
tains detailed
different

its 28rd year, con-
information of 27
countries, from Guate-
mala to French Guiana on the
mainland and from Bermuda,
Cuba and the Bahamas to Trini-
aad among the islands. The price
is again 35 shillings and the pub-

lishers are Thomas Skinner and
Co., Ltd., 330 Gresham House,
E.S.2,

MR, CAREY

From Guernsey I have heard
with regret news of the death of
Mr, J. F. Carey, whose daughter
Mrs, J, James, is wife of the
Chief Out Island Commissioner,
Nassau, Mr, Carey, 71 years of
age, was a Jurat of the Royal
Court, Guernsey, until October,
1959 when he retired, During the



$1.61 ENAM

T. R. EVANS & WHITFIELDS

YOUR SHOE STORES

CHAMBERS—85c. $1.20

KETTLES—2 pts—$1.32

despite the trials and tribulations
of the recent hurricane. The
BMJ says that some of the articles
in the West Indian Journal are
useful reviews and that the pro-
duction of the magazine is a fine
indication of the way new medi-
cal schools in the Colonies are
making progress,
AIR PIONEER

Sir Alan Cobham, the air
pioneer, and his wife, have bought
a house on Rose Island in the
Bahamas, But they are not ex-
pecting to visit it as often as they
would wish. Sir Alan is too busy.
When they do go there from Nas-
sau they are likely to use the 27-
knot power boat that Lady Cob-
ham has bought for the journey.
There are only two other houses
on Rose Island.

FAN CLUB

While Winifred Atwell, Trini-
Gadian pianist is enjoying her
holiday-cum-business visit to the
West Indies I hear that her busi-
ness manager in England, Wyn
Carter, is busy forming a fan
club for her, The idea of the
club is to enable her to keep io
touch with all the many young
friends who have followed her
career so closely and loyally,

JAMAICAN VISITOR

Attending a course on life in
rural Wales is Miss Pancilla
McPherson of Jamaica. Together
with 20 other students, from for-
eign countries and the colonies,
Miss MePhergon is staying at Cil-
gwyn, an old mansion house
in Carmarthenshire. The course
is arranged by the British Coun-
cil, Recently a cameraman from
the “Herald” of Wales, a weekly
newspaper, visited the mansion
and took a photograph which was
subsequently published, showing
Miss McPherson reading to a
young Welsh girl

|

WITHOUT COVERS—$2.11

EL PLATES—29c. 3c. 40c.

4 pts—$1,80

, ing
| Eric had been born on

BARBADOS ADVOCATE

Teddy Saw a Picture Book

-—But He Didn’t Know What the Pictures Were—

By MAX TRELL

WHEN Knarf and Hanid, the
shadow-children with the turned-
about names, entered the playroom,
they found Teddy the Stuffed Bear
looking into a very large book. It
was laid out on the floor before him.

“It’s all full of pictures,” said
Teddy; “but they’re the strangest
kinds of pictures, They aren’t@ic-

tures of poms or animals
or houses. I 't know what "Te
pictures of.”

Knarf said: “Let’s see them,
Teddy.” So Knarf and Hanid looked
at the pictures in the big book. The
next instant, Knarf and Haniddoth
exclaimed that they weren’t ordi-
nary ; — at £. “They're
maps Hanid. “It’s a geogra-
phy book!”

“What are maps?” Teddy asked.
“And what’s geography?” ”

Drawings of Land

Hanid explained that maps were
drawings of all the land, and seas,
and rivers and countries and eities
of the whole world. “And when. gou
study about all these things—the
land, the seas, the rivers, the coun-
tries, and the towns—that’s called
geography,” she added, “The chil-
dren all study phy in scheol.”
fi Teddy looked at the maps again.

Why are there so many different
colors?” he asked.

“Those are the different
tries,” said Knarf. “Each of
has a separate color. That’s so you
can tell them apart.”

“Here’s the United States where
we are,” Hanid broke in, poin to
the middle of one of the maps. “You
see it’s colored brownish.”

“And what’s that,” asked Teddy,
“right above it, colored pink?”

“That’s Canada, Teddy. It’s north
of the United States,”

“And what’s that below, colored
green?”

Knarf said: “That’s Mexico, It’s
south of the United States.”

“And what’s that all around the
United States, and Canada, and
Mexico? It’s all colored blue.”





B.B.C. Radio

tra,
News,
4.00—7.15 p.m.

Programme |

TUESDAY
1115 am
ll

FEBRUARY 5, 1952
Southern Serenade Orches- |
30 am Solomon, 12 00 noon The
1210 pm News Analysis. |
25.38m , 31 stm |
}





4.00 pm The News, 410 pm The}

Daily Service, 415 pm Cafe Colette,
5 00 pm Composer of the Week, 5 15
pm. Nights at the Opera, 600 pm

This is Ceylon, 6.30 p.m. Military Band







TUESDAY, FEBRUARY 5, 1952



R.K.0. Radio Action Packed Thrilier
Robert Lizabeth Robert

mitcHum - scorr - rvan in“The RACKET”!

A
Also the Local Educational Short. ‘GIVE YOUR CHILD A-CHANU! =

canersiareiaenteerinat-tenidjecualieiadialichy ay
THURSDAY Special — 1.30 p.m. 1} Z
| A

OPENI.!G FRIDAY 8TH
“CAPTAIN HORATIO
HORNBLOWER

“SWING The WESTERN WAY”
Hoosier Hot Shots &

“PRAIRIE ROUND UP” Dial
Charles Starrett — Smiley Burnet; | _ 2310

|
|



















Music, 6 45 p m. Sports Round-Up, 7.00 P 4 OISTIN The Garder
Bm The News, 710 pm News Analy- | Z / A Dial 8404 G a a E t ST JAMES
7.45—10.30 p.m. — S132m , 48 43m To-day & To-morrow 445 & 8.30 p.m. | To-day & To 20 p.m
“KILL THE UMPIRE” Republic's Whole Secial
745 Cros The Atlantic 7
Single-Handed, £00 pm Cockney Cab- William BENDIX FEDERAL AGENT vs
aret, 815 pm. Radio Newsreel, 8 20 “BETWEEN MIDNITE & DAWN” UNDERWOKLD, INC.”
Pm _ Report From Britain, 845 pm Mark Stevens — Edmund O'@rien Kirk ALYN Ja DAIE
The Royal Tour, 900 pm Meet The - aia
Commonwealth, 930 pm Ray's A THURS. (only) 4.45 & 8.30 p.m THURS. « : p.m
soem, 20 pm She Mews. 1 30 pm SWING THE WESTERN WAY | TAHITI HONEY
cart tists Ren seo fn "thers Hoosier Hotshots é& Simone Simon, Dernis O'Keefe &
‘eddy look t the fun c= : . ce PRAIRIE ROUNDUP SONG OF NEVADA
T “= S mF Te Charles Starrett & Smiley Burnett Roy Rogers
a = es
}
“Those are the seas and oceans,”
said Hanid. “On one side is the
Atlantic Ocean. On the other side is : |
the Pacific. And way up at the top |
is the Arctic Ocean, which goes |
around the Nort! Pole where it’s FL ;
very cold.” YY TO-DAY TO THURSDAY — 445 & 8.30

Great Continents

Knarf and Hanid explained many
more things about maps to Teddy.
They explained about the six great
continents: Asia, Africa, North
America (“Where the United |
States, Canada and Mexico are,” |
said Hanid), South America, Eu-
rope and Australia, They explained |
about the different countries of the
world such as England, France,
Spain and all the other countries.
Then they showed Teddy how al! the
large cities were shown on the map
by dots with their names after them.

“Maps are wonderful!” Teddy (i,
nally said. “You can sit right in
front of one and go traveling all |
over the world, across oceans, and |
continents, and from one city to an- |
other!” :

So Knarf and Hanid nodded ani
said that was right, and walked out,
leaving Teddy sitting in front of tho
maps in the geography book, travel!
ing all over the world.



|
|
|



Doctors Who

Are Warned

THE CONSCIENTIOUS DOC-
TOR who urges his patients to
consult him whenever they feel
unwell may be causing more sick-
ness than he cures.

By telling patients that minor
pains may be the first signs of
serious disease he may frighten
them into real physical illness.

This warning has been issued
to doctors by two highly ex-
perienced medical men — Si)
Heneage Ogilvie, chief surgem
at Guy’s Hospital, and Dr. Wil
liam A, R. Thomson, a_ hear
specialist.

“There is a very real danger
that by driving the public into
our consulting rooms and sur-
geries whenever they feel un-
well’ we may be increasing the
liability to disease,” they write
in an editorial in The Practition-
er. Worry has such an enormous
effect on health that a whole
range of anxiety ailments, called
“psycho - somatic” complaints, is
now recognised. They include
duodenal ulcer, heart disorders,
and asthma as well as mental
troubles,

There is no doubt that doe-
tors who advise their patien‘s
to consult them at the first signs
of disorder save some lives.
“But the question must arise
whether the price we are paying
for health is not too high.” The
Practitioner states,

Dust ‘Colds’

AT is there in house dust

that can give you all the symp-
toms of a heavy cold?

Some doctors believe that at
Jeast half the streaming colds
blamed on germs are really caus-
ed by some powerfu! irritant in
the woolly dust which collects un-
der furniture.

Thousands of people suffer from
constant “hay fever” because they
are super-sensitive to this irri-
fant. It is also known to bring
on asthma attacks.

Dr. Kate Maunsell, of King’s
College Hospital, has isolated the
mysterious irritant. She believes
‘'t is formed by the action of cer-
tein moulds on furniture stuffing
and upholstery.

Britain's damp _ climate
make us unduly susceptible

Mothers
Swop Sons
Aged Six

Monsieur and Madame J——
nodded happily as they caught
sight of their six-year-old twins
Victor and Pierre marching
hand-in-hand in the procession
of Swiss children.

But their happiness gave way
to astonishment when they no-
tced a boy called Erie walking
a few paces behind. His likeness
to Victor was so extraordinary
ae they felt they must meet
him.

When Eric smiled the resem-
blance became even more re-
markable. He had a wide gap
between his lower front teeth.
So had Victor,

It really
co-incidence,
sieur J.

may
to



was a most interest-
thought Mon-
until he learned that
the same
night and in the same maternity
home as hie own children.
After that neither he nor



his

| wife could rid their minds of the

terrifying possibility that Pierre
was somebody else’s child, who
had been accidentally substituted
for Eric by the nurses.
. . J

When they showed, Victor to
Eric’s widowed mother she be-
came desperately anxious, too.

So they reported the case to the
authorities, who ordered an im-
mediate investigation. ¢

Scientists wecorded the | finger-



|

Dial 4606

|
;}ments of the three boys
} Sults

print patterns, eye colours, hair
characters, and teeth arrange-
The re
the belief
were the

all
Victor
twins,
@ On Page 3

supported
that and Eric

real

|

Frighten You

dust “colds,” because it favours
the growth of these moulds.
Pigeon Puzzle

AFTER the most thorough in-
vestigation ever made to explain
the pigeon's ability to find its way
home, Cambridge scientist Dr. G.
V. T. Matthews admits he is still
baffled.

By fitting homing pigeons with
magnetic necklaces he hes dis-*
proved the theory that they navi-
gate by measuring the earth's)
magnetism.

The necklaces neutralised the
earth’s magnetic field, yet the
birds still homed to the loft,

He then transported pigeons a
j tong way over unknown territory
in blacked-out boxes. Again they |
got home, proving they do not}
navigate by known landmarks. |

|



A new possibie expianation has
emerged from _ these studies: |
pigeons may navigate by taking
bearings on the sun, |

Their sense of direction is poor |
on overcast days, Dr. Matthews
reports. But when they can just
fee the sun through the cloud
layer they home almost as surely |
as_in bright sunshine.—L.E.S.

—



EVENING



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Richard DENNING Willard PARKER



OLYMPIC

Last 2 Shows To-day, 4.30 & 8.15
R.K.O. Super Double —

LIZABETH SCOTT Howard Hughes Production
DENNIS O'KEEFE

in ee THE
THE COMPANY! OUTLAW”

Wednesday & Thursday 4.30 &
8.15



SHE KEEPS Starring :
Jane RUSSELL — Jack BUETEL
AND

HUNT THE
MAN DOWN

with

GIG YOUNG —
CARLA BALENDA

* RACE
STREET”

Starring :
GEORGE RAFT —

WILLIAM BENDIX





ROXY
Wednesday & Thursday,
8.15
Republic Whole Serial

UNDERSEA
KINGDOM”

WITH

RAY CRASH CORRIGAN

Opening FRIDAY 8th
Paramount presents —

* 6 r see
“CROSSWINDS’
Starring
JOHN PAYNE

FORREST TUCKER

4.30 &

HERBERT J. YATES
presents







ROD CAMERON» ADELE MARA

ADRIAN BOOTH+CHILL WILLS
A REPUBLIC PRODUCTION},







GLOBE

TODAY TO THURSDAY —5 & 8.30 P.M.

THE RED BADGE OF COURAGE

— With —
AUDIE MURPHY (WORLD WAR II MOST DECORATED G.I.)



Opening FRIDAY Feb. 8th 5 & 8.30 p.m.







4
CENTURY-FOX'S

5 Musical
; A Treat of Treats! / 4
Ai Ad PJ / bof OX



oF jd









TUESDAY, FEBRUARY 5, 1952 BARBADOS. ADVOCATE PAGE THREE
ET

30% Of Trinidad’s ee ere

Revenue From Oil

LONDON.
THE OIL INDUSTRY in Trinidad contributes more
than 30 per cent of the total revenue of the Colony, which
has increased some four times over that of 1939, said Mr.
Malcolm Maclachlan, chairman and joint managing director
of Apex (Trinidad) Oilfields, Ltd., at the company’s annual
general meeting in London.
“The Government of Trinidad,
= a sleeping partner in the oil
usiness: noW takes by means of S ij Ne F
taxation over 60 per cent of the ug ar ews
profits of the industry,” he said.

“The revenue accruing to the Gov- WASHINGTON.
ernment of Trinidad per barrel of | The Philippines are contemplat-
oil produced compares very well -ing fhe sale of 30,000 to 50,000
with that received by owners of tons of sugar to Japan this year
mineral rights in other and far and Cuba is hoping that as a
more prolific oil-bearing countries result her own share of the U.S.

under arrangements which are sugar market will be increased.
more highly publicised. “We understand that the Philip-
“It_is an encouraging feature, pines are interested in develop-
which has not always been the ing wérid markets to absorb her
case, that the general public in surpl when production increas-
Trinidad is gaining an appreciation es,” r, Lawrence Myers, the
of the contribution which, despite U.S. Sugar Director, told B.U.P
its difficulties, an efficient oil in- “We é¢an see that the Filipinos
dustry has made. and I trust will must begin soon to soften their
continue to make, to the welfare way into such non-US. markets if
and prosperity of the Colony. they are to get into them at all.”
“It must be very clear that Cuba is interested because its
the greatly increased revenue own sugar quota in the U.S, mar-
from the oil industry which ket will be smaller -than in any
Trinidad now receives — and year since the war unless the
spends in full — can only be United States raises its 7,700,000-
maintained by the successful ton ceiling on 1952 sugar markei-



jor itsel

Clor®?™ prsed Moe “Ge

Helps to cleanse the system
from blood impurities

seenesenensy

Impurities in the blood may cause rheumatic
aches and pains, stiff and painful joints, F
boils, pimples and common skin disorders. AF
Clarke’s Blood Mixture helps to purify
the blood, cleanses the system and assists
in restoring good health.

SSSCCSSSTAOGEUPSANS



oo . s ‘ ARTHRITIC PAINS

But new treatment does more than
ease these terrible agonies.














A new product, DOLCIN, has been created which not only givéi
prompt relief from the pains due to the symptoms of arthritis and
rheumatism, but also affects the metabolic processes which constitute
a very important part of the rheumatic state’s background,

DOLCI has been thoroughly tested in medica! institutions,
DOLCIN is being used now with unprecedented success, DOLCIN
is being prescribed by doctors now, And many sufferers have already
resumed normal living as a result of taking DOLCIN

Don't delay, Profit by the experience of fellow-victims of these
pains, Get DOLCIN today. A bottle of 100 precious tablets osta

sob BY: BOOKER’S (BARBADOS) DRUG STORES LTD.
A Broad Street and Hastings
(ALPHA PHARMACY)





|

“Drunk in charge of a Zebra Crossing—that's what t am.”



outcome of exploration to de- ing. Under the U.S. Sugar Act, boudon Express Servipe
velop further oil reserves.” Cuba gets 95 per cent. of any
Development unsubscribed portion of the| _—~



Mr. Maclachlan: reported that Philippines quota. Typhoon dam-

— ne +E *
during the year ended September #ge¢ to Philippines cane has ] : | annot Be
WME Seip ea aay pou owe ot BRITISH ARMS DRIVE Kremlin
feet, continuing its programme to 150,000-ton deficit and any world

obtain production and to extend Market sales by the Philippines - y T 9 ®

the tested areas of the Apex prop- Would further increase the Cuban WILL AFFEC 52 B. e e ‘ >

erty. Six wells were npleted se the U.S. market, a en rom nsl e
in the main field and four in the pokesmen for the U.S, sugar NY I

South Quarry area. industry are in favour of iene f LONDON.

Four wells were completed in Asian outlets for Philippine suga BRITAIN’S REARMAMENT DRIVE will cast its influ- (By DONALD GONZALEZ) a .
te Ryneiinal: scniy, He. CURIE, AS 5 TREERD. 08 seliorene. penbesre ence over the 1952 British Industries Fair, to be held at WASHINGTON, Feb. 4.

yas a non~producer, two are on the big Cuban supplies. They t May THE KREMLIN’S CONTROL over the Russian people










































and the fourth, which warn, however, that the Philip- London and Birmingham next Plastics Sect at Olym- annot be seriously challenged from inside the Soviet
came in as a producer, has been pines might endanger their own ~~ - ee The Plastics Section at ber can re i ‘ ie x t
closed in in the interest of gas position in the U.S. market if Mi th Ss pia, in London will be half again Union. A survey of the bes available reports and exper
conservation. Two of the older they fell down too much on their NEO ers wu op Oar tar baba pao price of opinion on Soviet life, throws cold water on any eo Pnat
y ir e same zo ave been quota as a_ res xtensiv © Bhar. Ys icti at the C ; “e states are W or tha
SMeiehtmnr ae Sane Sten” =" Sone Aged Six ata firma sade | Gan eer iatorelt |W |
“In view of developments which “But if they do not overdo it eae . a Sante tart adits The State He J + I tle ines: saivecthieenn eiipheraiaeemeienaianiins / hen pleasures of the table bring on
have taken place in the island,” and can make Asian sales without @ From Page 2 p ‘Tombaseiog this aitect Sik: RtHINRA in aiinloeie of 1981 event discomforts of indigestion —rely on Alka-
. ; t tte teen gr re 2 ; ‘es . cee as Ss 2a analysis o 9 its oa a s
ee ee. ee letting the United States down, 7 ; ae be a central feature, orgatiised behind the Iron Curtain reported p orrhea an Seltzer. A tablet or two in a glass of water
still dee or dtiiing ewkare i they we ia be tak ag aa pase chen phe 4 See by the Ministry of Supply to- recently that “troubles are mount- mpkte a sparkling, pleseunt still deep’ ling re i hey would be taking much risk, the boys and the parents, ub gether with the Royal Aircraft ing” in Russia. edy. See how quickly and effectively Alka
the Synclinal zone in conse- Certainly, with Caribbean crops because the man whom Eric had fetapiishment at Farnborough But authorities said that there Sel 7
quence of these two factors we as big as they are this year, I called father was dead, thes¢ 7; \in) show how plastics are wa i abasta ian Salt ae ae oe 8 tzer acts to settle your stomach and
may expect some reduction from believe judicious marketing ‘in tests could not settle the case }ow not only being used for sistance widesprend "Thev:eate | soothe your headache, Not a laxative, you
the increased production rates of Asia would be a good thing for conclusively. i small articles, but also for heav- that the Gaviat resine. #ull rules | can repeat its use without laxative effect.
recent months, but our Trinidad the Philippines. wv When the problem see in- jer goods which in the past have with oppression, — terror anil Stopped in 24 ours Take Alka-Seltzer whenever you feel that
management estimates that our After all, the Filipinos have soluble one of the scien ists Fe> either been made of metal or Cruelty, ‘The people don't like it i you've had too rich a meal.
total production for the current said they hope soon to be pro- membered that, ale ber involved composite structures in Put the don’t have the guns-| Pj oY
eet approximate to that ducing ayer no ing = sees ao oe ae enn Mtg ean their manufacture. bombs, and other weapons to make | fameus Alka-Seltzer helps millions.
0 VWUe-ol, and some or 1e world marke Ss - .> re ) ‘VOT f eo
well. They have sane to step olit from one person to another, Other Highlights ete aaa min oe | Lot it help you too. | ‘
Increasing Cost and develop those markets. They Stafts are usually possible be- : . : Ff Mother Russi Seoes of 18 tng BO tabiete. —// f

Referring to the continually in- cannot do it overnight.” tween identical twins. | Other ee Has mae Unceast : nek ree nt *
creasing cost of oilfield develop- —B.U.P > : _ the Jewellery Section, here, 1CeasIng Propesanda poling ¥
ment in Trinidad, he Seater: * rs wee So the authorities called in Sir jewellers, silversmiths and watch out the horrors of alleged Western a- e tzer ie ho ge a ad ae
“During the six-year period to Archibald McIndoe, the 50-year- makers have also taken more attack plans on “Mother Russia tw is eRIDGEND,, WALES, "U. «
the end of 1950, some £5,750.000 NORWICH. Norfolk old 3ritish plastic surgeon, space than last year inh “Mil- is the chief instrument used by ‘i = ' .
were expended by the oil industry Every acre of British-grown known to hundreds of badly liondires Row.” .. the Kremlin to stir Russian a
in Trinidad in drilling 53 wells to Sugar beet now yields a full barned R,A.F. men as The Nearby, pretty models will patriotism. oAleeGine ules Snee srap tite. Y syuet
depths in excess of 8,000 feet, of year’s sugar ration for 15 more Maestro” for his brilliant work show swimsuits and underwear. Some 6,000,000 Communist Party rhea ov Trengh Mouth, or some bad dispaio
which only approximately one in people than it did five years ago, in giving them new faces. Alongside will be a group exX- members inside Russia enjoy a {vat viii eventually cause you fala teeth
three were completed as commer- Mr. G. F. N, Battle, executive , This bluff, bespectacled New hibit, perhaps more mundane, standard of living higher than that| before your timo. Bince the great world
cial producers.” director of the British Sugar Cor- Zealander remoyed a small square of printing inks, and a_ record of more than 200,000,000 Ryssians. | Rbubneet froth, cuveneyn. Pave, apeeed

a Pm bat r ski r Jictor’s right arm ber of displays showing the ‘ - . { 7 te.

Mr. Maclachlan reported that poration, told members of the of skin from Vic number of displays § & But this inequality has a long Liots say that four out of every five people

the company’s revenue during the Norfolk’ Farmers’ Union ata and replaced it with a similar latest Office Machinery and Ap- jradition in Russian society, .An are pubborere soener Oh lara Pome i
year totalled £1,635,000 of which meeting in Norwich. He describ- skin graft taken from Erie. Then pliancds.

, 7 official -said, “You would think| too late, hopaune tieey often cause not only
£1,595,000 was oil revenue. The ed the result as “a great achieve- he covered the slight wound left The total space occupied by the Joss of teeth, but also chronic rheuma-
£ 1,595, as , : as “a great ¢





G ; ere 4 J that people in Moscow would gjet tim and heart trouble.
, tic! . in Erie’s arm with the square the Fair in London is a little ,,, c 1 .
net profit for the year was £530,000, ment by British agriculture. in Se “a Sea tetaiin w Pres Saree , " . nad when Kremlin officials drive :
After transfers for the general “On 400,000 acres of beet it of skin taken from Victor, less than that during the 1951 Gown the streets at 70 miles ai New Discovery Saves Teeth

imilar crossaigre are on Poaetive Fa ace rairhh alee u h . Amoson, the discovery of an American
reserve fund and a balance to be means a full yeat’s domestic ra- Similar cross-gr afts mee then Festival Year, Nevertheless, 400. jour in limousines. But they love! — aclentint. fights these troubles in a. new
aaina tasuracd * » said. “the tion for 6,000,000 more people made between Victor and Pierre 000 square feet at Olympia and and quick way, It penetrates r hit wine
ee oe dine sites A ne h ie than five years ago,’ ; tant and between Pierre and Eric. Earls Court have been booked root nf the trouble, stops Rey ea ends
owners of the business, who haye than live years ago, ne =6Sald. rhe results satisfied the authori- py, 1,250 manufacturers, while
provided the capital and bear the “Every ton of sugar we can pro- i

Russian’ living, ing thé very gat day, qui a baned the
. ' : ied as generally soreness out o! our mouth, and soon
: 7 ; ad 1 ties that a terrible mistake had at Birmingham, in the heavy ded as g ull) |
risk, will draw in dividends the duce at home means a ton less

The aver
standard is re




ge

tightens the teeth. The following letter












been made, engineering section, more_ than Higher. than pro-Wwat cea aki Amosan ise! aah: taut i frou ‘rene
. | © * Y sec . : e i ry ue ge "T suffere rr
sum of £220,000. to be bought in dollars. The * * % 1.100 manufacturers have already “t@, Virtually non-existent, food Mouth and Prorshon for tap sears,
“At the same time, the Govern- 1950—51 campaign yielded 700,- The skin transplanted from tee TOhe 485,000 rg foot is reported adequate although it) puma were note en ovata ne ad
ment of Trinidad will draw over 0900 tons and to have bought that yjctor to Eric and vice versa at Castle Broomwich. consists mainly of vegetables and were getting looser all the Line tele
£886,000 in royalties and direct quantity in the dollar market grafted on rapidly without scar- grains with little meat and fats,\ muny things and then heard o A; ile néw
taxations and in addition the would have cost at least $80,000,- ying, It retained its texture and — — Clething and housing also fall far, Riepreey Amora ip 3 Reghed biked
United Kingdom Government take 000. hair growth, The other attempt- nn ‘ 2 short of Western standards, ers Tinton soa found tbat
a further £330,000. Thus for every “If we had been allowed to sell eq grafts would not knit togeth- 8 British King s —(U.P.) | my loose teeth were much tight mand
£1 drawn by the owners of the our products—sugar, pulp and er at all. The transplanted skin eT ae Gu ponnteed
business, approximately £5 10s. 6d, molasses—at their full value shrivelled and died. 5 ‘“ BY ® °° var
is taken by the two governments,” there would have been no sugar The Swiss authorities there- Scouts To Atte nd 7 L ADY VELSON 5 ern teres pe Pus ao pat oy
—B.UP. beet subsidy needed for the past fore ordered Eric and Pierre to y ie EXPECTED TOMORROW from ble atin, énd sore mouth dit nm
—_—_—_—_— several years,” he added. be exghanged irompadiately. i. db W. Indian Jamboree Tis RLS. Lady Net ne ioe wack’ Fea ot empey .
4 Was a terr re ae RL.M.LS. Lady elson wi ye Don't take a chance on losing your r
Bermuda To Protest —B.U.P. the three parents. And it was LONDON. | arriving here to-morrow from auftering, the, festante Amosen cons
especially hard on a. a Eight British King’s Scouts|emerara, Trinicod, Grenada and| chemist today unde this Irorie a6 AOareD-
* DUBLIN. suddenly found himse ather- ave been chosen to represent the | St. Vincent. Oc the
About Centeteries The Irish Sugar Company has less. i disee Lnited Kingdom's 474.000 scouts | Fi She eee to sail on on Amosani::':: ee >a
built a special harvester, based But the boys thave adapted 9+ ih. first Caribbean ‘ .«|day for Bermuda, Boston and St 5 ‘
y nirvar ’ é " ‘a a jamboree :
HAMILTON. on the specifications of a U.S, themselves surprisingly well to 5. yamaiea from ‘arch § to 13. John, NB. For Pyorrhea--Trench Mouth

The Bermuda Government is
expected to make representation
to the British Government about
the state of military cemeteries



expert, designed to overcome the this strange family switch-round
peculiar difficulties in the me- Sir Archibald reports in his just-
chanical harvesting of sugar beet published medical record of the





Here are the names as an- {
nounced by the Boy Scouts’ As-
-oclation fn London:—

; ‘ : in Ireland, case, Geoffrey li-J 23 (16), Ips-
on the island if nothing is done phe US expert, Mr. Austin BLINDS UP tee cheumen ‘Richard Denby |
ie. Beasbve them in the near Armer, of the Spreckels Sugar Co., = (17), Purley office junior; Derek

’ ; visited Ireland under an E.C.A. For all ear-wagglers, eye- 1), 6 ee
Members of the Legislatue scheme to investigate Irish diffi- rollers, double-jointed thumb- ee Wiis 'Maxtio Ph ties:
pointed out to B.U.P. that it iS culties in the mecnanical harvest- Ssters, and others who get peren= ot a oy. erence O'Reilly |
the War Office which is respon ing of beet—rainfall, stony condt- nial party fun out of their mus- (16) Cardiff avbrentice ‘itter ana |
sible for the upkeep and condl- tions in small fields and the hilly cular abnormalities, I bring in- turner; John Parker (16) Reigate
tion of the cemeteries and not pjantations teresting news: a is ‘oo Saeattans Joke T Rimell et
the Bermuda Government Manila ‘ hile _ Scotsman who, by contorting his © Me , |

Me C. Co Gilbert, member for ina ante biuld Wa odidiod face muscles, can turn his eye- Wie) Ralewia and John Stoneman |

x ‘ 4 5 é ids inside z r u P .

Sandrys Parish, ee eee to harvest beet under all the con- tee ot out ‘and. roll them, up The party will be led by Mr.)
the eae “ ri re 3 ditions of climate found in Ire- ““pye performance is so as- P. B. Nevill from the Boy ‘Scout
pa 2" Nias patie 5 Gay eA land, it should be possible to start tounding that Aberdeen eye ex- Association H.Q. and Mr. C. G.|









n ' . from scratch and design a ma- ert Dr. William Souter has Roberts, Troop Scoutmaster of | T
ee Te leat asasnk aire specally to meet these con- y ade a coloured film of its the 15th. Firichley tie 7 ;
= C 1 Ss. call }
yard near H.M. dockyard he ssid: tug at ah ES, UP. |
“J don’t suppOse you would see B.U.P. |
that in any otner gene of we 4 . i
world. It belongs to the War | ‘
Otiee and iis going trom baa Down For Sessions » C. L. Gibbs & Co. Ltd
= | . ° ° e
to worse. B.U.P.

yaar Twenty-two year-old Rudojph
5 : . Howell of Nurse. Land, Carring-
No Representation For ton Village, St. Michael, and 19-

B.G. At Trade Meeting year-old Oswald Small of Ven-}

ture, St John, charged with

GEORGETOWN, Feb. 4. stealing brass and lead between
British Guiana will not be send- 19th and 23rd of October last;
ing a representative to the confer- were yesterday committed!
ence on industrial relations to be ind their trial at the Court of
held in Puerto Rico this month. Grand Sessions by His Worship |
The Government has so replied to Mr. A. W. Harper, Acting Police

® P.O. Box 56 ° ; .
, BRIDGETOWN . Dial 2402

PPLE LLL LLL LAB LEE






Therte’s a baby to gladden a
mother’s heart!—firm

e
little body and strong white A re you re-rooting WHEN “COGNAC” IS

ds ik Sth dint eo ta your buildings? | MENTIONED

SevenSeaS—the pure cod liver




PE

Ke

the Trade Union Council and has Magistrate of District “C.” |
also informed the Caribbean Com- The brass and lead were the

.















STOKES & BYNOE Ltd.



:
mission under whose auspices the property of Mr. DeC. O'Neil of | oil so rich in natural fats ~” | THE NAME HENNESSYS LEAPS >
Conference is being held. —©? Cliff P¥antation, St. John. | and protective vitamins, | ELALVANIZED 3 TO THE MIND--BECAUSE HEN- %

i R NESSYS IS THE BRANDY THAT &
” | | << ” >
Po wuss viâ„¢ teeth ? c | ROOFING % MADE COGNAC FAMOUS: %
%
ravine | evenSeaS | And : :
—— 4 aveuae | HENNESSYS :
SEA-FRESH VITAMIN FOOD |) ROLL ROOFING >
+ x
i are Available S * THREE STAR
| i} % >
| IK ee 8 ¢ V.S.O.P. (over 20 years) %
“eee F iiediol. see aide i | BCCE | * x
Mother to stag Tine Gon a ae | LIQUID in bortles of 6, % or 16 fluéd } an faa | % ° a. ©), LIQUEUR *
ive you sete, 2 Oe et ot eae: SAPEDERY tt hilt Hisillnd } ih : ‘
‘ASHTON & PARSONS eee I; Barbados j (over 40 years)
} i$ .

Â¥

¢

:

+

&



Ty
0 } Co-op Cc , r |
’ | Co-op Cotton Factory Ltd. | :
INFANTS POWDERS Ngevite H »p Cotton acto + i pith ak :





~

© Seer ePre ween

see eee

PAGE FOUR

BARBADOS co) ADVOCATE



[oer t= =e



Printed by the Adverste Co., Lid, Broad St. Bridgetown



Tuesday, February 5, 1952

HOUSE HOURS

LAST Tuesday the House of, Assembly
did not meet until 5 p.m. Normally the
House meets at 3 p.m. In point of fact
prayers are never read until 3.15 p.m. Be-

fore the tea interval there are approx-
imately two hours available for debate on
motions, resolutions or bills before the
House. After tea the House has another
two hours available until dinner, and

sometimes another two hours are spent in
discussion after dinner. Six hours and
never more than seven are spent by the
House of Assembly once a week, when the
House is sitting, to discuss measures that
come before it.

Presumably if six hours only are neces-
sary each week for the House of Assembly
to deal with the affairs of the island, the
selection of those six hours and (rarely
seven) is a matter of some importance.
Visitors to the House of Assembly are
sometimes impressed when they see mem-
bers lying back in their chairs, as if rest-
ing. Such positions may be conducive to
clear thought or may be necessary because
the member has begun his working day at
6.30, a.m. and is literally worn out by 3 p.m.
After dinner on a tiring day would not
seem to be the best period to conduct
normal business, but apparently the House
is making a habit of after-dinner sittings.

The House is of course at liberty to con-
duct its business at times suitable to the
convenience of the House, and is unlikely
to make any changes out of respect for
public opinion. Yet public opinion can-
not be ignored since the members of the
House are responsible to electors whose
views collectively form and influence pub-
lic opinion.

This month the House will debate the
Estimates for 1952-53. On this occasion
every member of the House of Assembly
will endeavour to justify himself to the
constituents who returned him to the
Assembly.

The debate on the Estimates will last
for more than six or seven hours. What
will happen? Will the House deal with
expenditure under so many heads once a
week and will the debate drag on into
March? ‘The electors hope not. Many if
not the majority would like to see the
Estimates discussed in the House daily
until approval is reached. There seems
little reason why the House should
not make provision for daily meetings
until the Estimates are passed.

And what occasion would be more suit-
able than this to introduce new hours of
sitting?

In Westminster, three p.m. is a suitable
time for the House of Commons to open
daily (except Saturdays and Sundays).
Most members of Parliament arrive in their
business offices at 10 a.m. daily and keep
office hours until 12 or 12.30, They have
finished lunch by 1.30 or 2 p.m. and usual-
ly spend the intervening hour in cor-
respondence or talking to constituents or
others who visit them in the House of
Commons. In London where distances are
great 3 p.m. is a reasonable time for the
House of Commons to meet. »

In Barbados where six hours are
normally devoted now to legislative dis-
cussion in the House of Assembly, each
week during a session of the House, the
selection of hours seems vital, Is three
p.m. the best selection for opening ? The
traditional Barbadian breakfast hour is 11
a.m, to 12. Most members of the House
probably eat breakfast during that period.
Could the House of Assembly not meet
therefore at 1 p.m. On normai days the
House could finish its business by seven
o'clock allowing its members the oppor-
tunity to return home for dinner. Tea,
instead of being a reason for adjourn-
ment of the House, could be served from
four to five and members would leave the
House at intervals during that period, as
they do now during debates.

The smallness of Barbados makes it
possible for members to be at their places
of business by 8.30 daily and between 8.30
and 11 a.m. as much work can be accom-
plished as between 10 and 12.30.

Only during major debates would the
House need to sit for more than one day
per week, and there seems little to be
gained by debates conducted after dinner,
although dinner might be served at 7 p.m.
for members who desire it. An important
advantage that would be obtained as a re-
sult of earlier sitting is the availabilty of
civil servants responsible for departments.
Ministerial status is impossible unless
“ministers” are well briefed and civil
servants cannot burn the candle at both
ends, since they are more slaves of the
clock than are politicians.









BARBADOS. ADVOCATE



TUESDAY, FEBRUARY 5, 1952



The: American Novel
Through 20 Wears:

Thomas Wolfe

There may have been some
uncertainty among critics at vari-
ous times as to which novelists
of this century should find a
permanent place in American
literature, but before the century
had run one -fourth of its course
one nomination, at least, had been
made and the candidate chosen

by acclaim,

Not all agree on what Thomas
Wolfe ag capable of doing
There is} however, the minimum

accord exacted by the evidence.
The latter consists of two lengthy

novels, “Look Homeward, An-
gel” (1929) and “Of Time and
The River” (1939), two more
earved posthumously from the

mountain of manuscript turned
over to his literary editor before
his death in 1938, “The Web and
the Rock” (1939) and “You
Can’t Go Home Again” (1940),
and a fragmentary third member
(although chronologically first)
of what might have been a tri-
logy, given the title “The Hills
Beyond” (1941). Besides this
skeletal trilogy there was pub-
lished in 1936 an honest piece
of literary self-examination, “The
Story of a Novel,” and in 1935 a
collection of short pieces and in-
cidents entitled “From Death to
Morning.” The catalog ends with
“The Face of a Nation,” , com-
pilation of some of Wolfe’s more
lyrical passages, an arrangement
of his prose in verse form called
“A Leaf, A Stone, A Deer,” and
a thick volume of letters to his
mother, Julia Elizabeth Wolfe.

Autobiography Only

It is important to note early
that Thomas Wolfe consistently
showed himself incapable of any
type of writing save autobiog-
raphy. He wrote millions of
words, not one of them unrelated
to the sensations he had experi-
enced, the people he had known,
the aspirations he had conceived.
While it is a canon of sound
writing to tell of what one
knows, avoiding all that one is
ignorant Of, the point to be made
about Wolfe is that he seems
never to have created a charac-
ter or contrived a plot,.God made
the people and things happened
to them, Wolfe recorded them,
first in his mind and then with
his pen, The way in which he did
it comprises his art.

This is not to say that Wolfe
underwent no process of matu-
ration. There is in his work a
clearly observable movement to-
ward spiritual adulthood, though
not many would care to say un-
equivocally that he had achieved
it by the time of his death at the
age of 37. He remained always
incurably boyish in certain aspects
of his thinking. “I suppose I am a
greater surprise to myself than to
anyone under the sun,” the 17-
year-old could write. “I am
changing so rapidly that I find
myself an ever-growing source
of interest. Sounds egotistical,
does it not?”

How is One to set down the in-
fluences that had a bearing on
the peculiar genius of Thomas
Wolfe? He found the thing hard
to do in five volumes, wherefore
five paragraphs may be expected
to accomplish nothing at all. The
beginning will serve as a con-
venient starting place.

Dutch Antecedents

On October 3, 1900, a boy was
born of William Oliver and Julia
Elizabeth Wolfe in Asheville, in
the Atlantic Coast State of North
Carolina, The father’s antece-
dents were Dutch, who had set-
tiled in the eastern State of Penn-
Sylvania, the mother of pioneer
Scottish-Irish ancestry. He was
the youngest child, four brethers
and two sisters comprising the
family that survived beyond
childhood. The father was a stone-
cutter, a huge fellow with a pen-
chant for lengthy recitations of
the works of the literary masters,
If the boyhood of Eugene Gant

Thomas Wolfe has received the acco-
lade of an outstanding American
novelist’ despite the fact that he
“seems never to have created a
character or contrived a plot”: his
works are considered autobiographical
By GERARD F. SLOYAN
From AMERICA

(as intimately described in “Look,
Homeward, Angel”), is a trust-
worthy autobiographical source,
young Thomas’ home life must
haVe been a wretched experience.
Wolfe’s early success and sub-
sequent career demand some
iurther insight into the threefold
matrix of his life in which every
idea and passion was conceived.
The first consideration might be
of his relation to his family, the
second to society, and the third
to his own genius, which shall
be temporarily equated with his
peculiar mental endowment.

“Ugly Duckling”

Wolfe thought himself an ugly
duckling from the start, and was
maddened that the rest of the
brood should be blind to the cyg-
net in their midst. “You little
freak,” Helen Gant jeers at Eu-
gene in “Look Homeward, An-
gel,” “wandering around witb
your queer dopey face . . . Every-
body’s laughing at you. Don't
you know that?” He knew it and
was resolved to throw the laugh-
ter back in their teeth. The one
great bond of his life was with
his mother, yet one would hesi-
tate to describe it as love.




POCKET CARTOON
by QSBERT LANCASTER

Ce

om.

“My dear,
dove than I am—nust a fellow

she’s nu more

travelling. pigeon with «an
artificial olive-branch.’



Brothers and sisters all came in
for his scorn at various times,
which makes it particularly re-
freshing to see him
mildly upon occasion after their
well-being. His letters often end

in words and inquiries indicating ramified, none but the patient

affection, yet an awareness of
his. jealousies and incredible
rudenesses that tore them apart
was never absent from his mind,

In view of this burning and
irsaticnal resentment, which con-
timues uninterrupted through all
Wolfe’s novels, it is challenging
to try t defermine if there was
love in the man’s life. It does
not seem so, nor any depth of
charity in his writings. One must
go slowly here. Passion there
is in plenty, absorption in indi-
viduals, fellow feeling With nis
mother’ above all. Any of these
might be the concomitant of
love, but love is not to be iden-
tified with any one of them.
The whole Gantian epoch is
interpreted by Wolfe as he
search for a fatherhood that
Eugene had never known. Eliza
Gant could not supply it, neither
a multitude of others, nor the
learning of a thousand books,
The quest gives every appearance
of going unsatisfied,



As an epic of devotedness to
purpose, the story of Thomas |
Wolfe’s life is not easily rivalled. |
The price he paid was bitter lone-
liness. Sq men are voluntary
exiles in Paris or Rome; to have
left Old Catawba was ‘expatria-
tion enough for Thomas Wolfe.
Old Catawba, the home State of
Eugene Gant in “Look Home-|
ward, Angel” (said to be Wolfe’s|
home State of North Carolina),|
was just right. Its p8ople were
humble people, not going to set
the world on fire, nor intending
to, It had no cosmopolitan city,
no empty pretense, no look o
fear, no cruelty in its people's
eyes. Yet in a state of revolt and
siege against a society he
fessed to love, Wolfe lived his
adult days.

Self-Esteem

The novelist’s conception of his
own genius coloured his work
more than family or _ society
could ever do, for through this
glass all else was seen. A searcher
always, the labyrinth of self
entranced him,

How good is Wolfe? It is not,
easy to answer. The matter is
complicat entirely by the fact
that thefJage of which Wolfe
writes h lost faith. Philosophi- |
cal stature he has none. He has
heard a faint echo of all the
gravest questions asked by men
of every time. Posing them,
unanswered, in anguish of spirit
and with groanings unutterable,
he is a raging prophet of the bit-
ter hope that things may somehow
mot be as bad as they seem. If 50
years see man as a being resem-
bling man, oblivion has its niche
prepared for Thomas Wolfe.
Come deeper darkness, then
Wolfe’s star is one of those that
will enjoy a further ascendancy.

Bore

Wolfe is pseudo-Joycean in
that he uses the “stream of
consciousness” technique; he is
Ecclesiastes uninspired, Off with
his head! But cisewhere he fan-
cies himself to be thinking as

’ presen pally upon life as has ever

one, and because he is
eee he must perish. Again, in
other passages, he is a mighty!
Tubalcain ammering out the
lordly brass and iron of a descrip-
tive or a_ self-fathoming prose.
The material resists; sparks fly
Has ever language been asked to)
do so much as this? Yes, but|

there is so much language with | tj

which to do it! And Wolfe, the
unrelenting smith, achieves again
and again what few have cared
or dared attempt, he comes close
to setting down the wild diver-
sity of things. Torrential, repeti-|
tive, wearing, disgusting, indis-)
criminate, annoying, needless
inexact, prodigal—one may cal!
his spate all that, But in doing
so one comes closer to the truth
that a succinct and clever phrase
would not have half described

inquire Words are the signs of ideas, anc | the colonies.” It is the housing shortage, not

when the ideas are huge, some-
times disordered and endlessly

craftsman who cares naught for
space or time will cateh their
meaning.

Wolfe’s finest passages are
found bedded deep in heaps of
slag that tire the mind and dis-
gust the soul; filthy, word-poor
vituperation; blasphemies uncon-
scious of whom they smirch,

caricatures of creatures given a

transfused and temporary interest
by the laboured limning of their

few idiosyncrasies, It is hemmed

in on all sides by a false-mystic

chant that strains to endow itself

with significance.

Once in a while, though, the
‘man is caught out in love—with
words for ideas’ sake; with God's
world; with men, those twisted
images of God that never cease
lovable somehow — and
then the is worth one’s while to
read, this tortured Colossus who
up in the things

to be

never quite
a man should long for; who never
— knew what things to hunger
after,

desperately to play the man.



News From Britain

LONDON,

A fitting answer has been given,
by the Times, to some rather un-
dignified criticism of “the King’s
advisers” who, it was said, should
not have allowechim to accept the
invitation of Dr. Malan, the Pre-
mier of South Africa,

After the announcement that
the King would spend his con-

valescence at the Natal country
villa of the South African Prime
Minister certain elements of the
press took the line that the King's
choice implied support for the
policies of Dr. Malan’s Nationalist
Party.

The King is the Constitutional
head of seven countries. He has to
employ the fiction that he sup-
ports the policies amd views of
whatsoever Government, in every
Dominion, that is chosen by its
Parliament to take office. That
was the gist of the argument made
by the Times, It is inferred that
the Prime Minister was the South
African who could most suitably
invite the King to South Africa.
Some suggestions had been made
that the King should stay with the
Governor-General, or with the
British High Commissioner, The
Times disposed of these remarks
by pointing out that the Governor-
General's residences are. either
unrestfully amidst the hubbub of
city life or out on the High Veldt
at an altitude that would be de-
barred by: the King’s doctors. As
for slaying with the British High
Commissioner; that would be fla-
grantly identifying himself with
his Government in the United
Kingdom, and be a rudeness to his
elected Government in South
Africa.

A Talking Point

Whether the King should have
decided to go to Natal as Dr
Malan’s guest has beco.ne quite a
talking point. The objectors take
a frankly political attitude and
say that the King will in fact give
great encouragement to Dr. Malan.
They argue that the King must
stay above politics by avoiding
tricky political situations where
the very presence of Royalty
might be exploited. ‘The reason
for all this strong feeling in Brit-

By DAVID TEMPLE ROBERTS

ain is because of the great distaste
felt here for the avowed Nation-
alist policy of separating the
races,

Those who have met the criti-
cism point out that the King hal to
choose one of his Dominions;
both Australia and New Zealand
are too far, They assert the truth
that Dr. Malan’s invitation was
sent with kindness and considera-
tion. They point out that the
King was eagerly received in such
Nationalist and avowedly “Re-
publican” centres as Bloemfontein,

The Times, in its dignified and
conclusive editorial defending the
King’s choice goes out of its way
to commend e merits of the
West Indies—and their future
claims for a Royal visit.

The King will go to the beauti-
ful and secluded villa in Natal.
We can only wish him a_ happy
and rapid recovery in those sur-
roundings—and forget the politi-
cal controversy.

“The Gale Rages

In distant seas they are called
hurricanes or typhoons; round the
coasts of Britain they are merely
gales. But the word hardly does
justice to what hit the isolated,
low-lying, islands of the Orkneys
off the extreme North Coast of
Scotland, You may think of these
islands as peaceful, remote, and
little known, In fact they are
flourishing; they include some of
the best agricultural land in Scot-
land, I remember in my wartime
R.A.F, experience, how we would
like to land on the aerodromes
round the naval harbour of Scape
Flow. There, on the islands, eggs
were always to be bought. The
prizes were flown south to the
tightly rationed mainland. Now
a 120 mile an hour gale has
swept away chickens and hen-
coops, torn up the very few small
trees of that Northern climate, and
left the countryside desolate. The
Orkney Islands are in the track
of the great Atlantic westerly
winds. Fortunately a relief fund
has been formed to put the islands
back in shape,

Russian in the Navy

One of the odder public an-
this

nouncements was _ released
week. The Royal Navy will ac-
cept any National Service
who, during their period of con.
scription, are willing to
Russian. What should the Navv
want with Russian, you will ask,
They cannot contemplate

viewing many prisoners in
future war,
enemy codes to be broken. With-
out giving away information I can

any

tell you that the Royal Navy takes
a great pave in - bs vet its oppos-

Red Fleet are
doing. At he Aaeninity there is

ite number

one man employed to read the
Soviet journal, “Red Fleet” in
search of indiscretions. But that

hardly accounts for a desire to

attract more Russian speaking
men to the Navy—or men willing
to learn Russian,

Powerful

Graham Sutherland is the most
remarkable painter in Britain,
So it caused a sensation when he
suddenly announced that he would
paint a portrait of Somerset
Maugham. For, previously, he
was famous for his abstract works
and “still-life” The portrait was
an astonishing success, Now its
place is taken by. another, of
Lord Beaverbrook. The paintiny
now hangs in the Tate Gallery. It
is a strange work. As the Man-
chester Guardian remarks, “No
one is likely to call it a pleasant
picture; powerful is the word.”

Graham Sutherland paints these
portraits under a peculiar
rangement with the sitter. If his
subject—and it must take some
courage to submit oneself as
subject for Graham Sutherland —
objects to the painting; or if
Graham Sutherland objects to it,
then it is destroyed. This seems
to be an admirable arrangement
between portrait-painter and sit-
ter. It enables a really origina!
artist to paint a bold picture with-
out being afraid of ar offended
subject,

I hear the Queen will be the
next sitter to Graham Sutherland,

are

‘| nificant move.

pro- |

; taboos of life in lodgings.”

this boy who tried so

men

learn

inter-

Of course there are









| PAPER SERVIETTES
| In Plain White
| $1.00 per hundred

COLONIAL STUDENTS
‘DIFFICULTIES IN U.K.

LONDON, Jan.
|

| ECONOMIC and temperamental differ-
ences that could apply to any overseas visit-
or are the root of the difficulties confronting
the colonial student in this country. This is
the view taken by an “Economist” corres-
| pondent. He thinks of a better explanation
than the usual one—colour prejudice.



ADVOCATE STATIONERY

Broad Street & Greystone, Hastings i

a



We stock this 2-ply .

| Representation of various colonial stu- Rubber Hose in

|dents’ unions on the new consultative com-
mittee, set up last August, is seen as a sig-
Students “should now learn
how much, or how little truth there is in the
stories of colour prejudice and there should
| be much less exaggerated repetition of them
‘in the colonies themselves,” the “Econom-
‘ist” article continues.

three sizes

x 5
There are also —
BORDER FORKS
\GRIGULTURAL FORKS
1KES
{GRICULTURAL HOES
SPRAYERS



“Most Tools for your
garden are to be found
at Pitcher’s!”

| Difficulties demanding immediate solution,
it is pointed out, fall into two categories—the
psychological and the material. An import-
ant psychological factor is the student’s at-
| titude of mind when he arrives in Britain.
Frequently he has a preconceived idea of the
feelings of the people here through stories
heard from some others who have been here;
he may arrive expecting the worst.

Phone 4472

Cc. S. Pitcher
& Co.

COUPLINGS
PRUNING SHEARS
MENDERS

from which to choose.

One of the main causes of trouble is a “dif-
ference of background and temperament
which calls for a great deal of toleration on
both sides. This is particularly necessary be-









| tween landlady and ‘tenant. Landladies have

a certain rigid code of behaviour and morals
to which the tenant is expected to conform;
|not many are prepared to tolerate deviations
| from this code, and not unnaturally, colo-
is nial students and others used to a less
| inhibited atmosphere and different customs
| find it difficult to conform.”

a| Something more than this toleration by
|landladies and families is deemed necessary.

The visitor must make an effort to acquaint
himself with the “unofficial regulations and



iy

by “TOOTAL”

| The material factor giving rise to difficul-
es is the housing shortage. “Few of the
coloured people one meets,” the “Econom-
ist” correspondent goes on, “seem to realise
| that finding anywhere to live is a i gga
for thousands of English people to-day.

‘is difficult for the university authorities io
| find accommodation for the greatly increased
|numbers of English university students, let
alone the continuing stream of students from

Lystav Tootal Fabrics
are Crease Resistant!
Plain or Patterned —
we have a wonderful

selection - 36° wide,$1.86 |
Da Costa & Co., Ltd. ,
i
|
|

colour prejudice, which brings so many stu-
dents face to face with the “no room at the
inn” notice,

The two organisations most helpful in find-
ing accommodation are the British Council
and the East and West Friendship Council.
Both make every effort to find suitable hostel
or private accémmodation. But they are fac-
ing tremendous odds. They can do little to
improve the position unless more hostels are
built—immediately. “The long-term answer,”
the correspondent adds, ‘“‘would appear to be
not hostels specially provided for colonial
students but more hostels housing all sorts of
university students. When colonial students
obtain this type of accommodation, they are
usually perfectly satisfied because they are
being treated the same as everyone else.”











JUST RECEIVED

The “DALE”
MEASURING TAP





IT POURS A DRINK, STOPS |
If more hostels of this type could be pro- |} AND POURS AGAIN }
vided, many graduates who now return to {
their own countries in a thoroughly dis:
gruntled frame of mind, would go back far
better friends of Great Britain.









BAR AnD CLUB

visitors encounter because they come to Eng
land independently, without having assured
themselves a place at any university, or be-
cause they have been lured ‘here by the
thought of higher wages and better working
conditions.

i
Indispensable in the



Saas tain DIAL a5a9

Emphasis is placed on difficulties which |





DA COSTA & CO., LTD. |
cael







A Delightful Tea Party...











Bananas Scarce For
Three Years

r
E

For

Liverpool fruit importers believe it will be
three years before there are enough bananas
in British shops to meet all demands.



“T have no doubt at all tat but for the hur- | })
ricane which created so much havoc in
Jamaica last year we would now be import. |
ing a far greater amount of bananas”, saic | |

one importer. “As it is our weekly imports
into Liverpool have shown little change for ||
some years. It will take three years for the |







Carr’s Crackers
Kraft Cheese
Dutch Cheese
J & R Bread
Anchor Butter

Jack Straws
Cheese Biscuits
Meltis Dates
Meltis Figs

EAT meee:
FISH

new banana plants to produce saleable fruit \ Sia — ARE YOUR FINEST BUYS.
” ea z
for export. Lipton Tea TASTY HITS
) ei ose T
An official of Elders and Fyffes said : i Cube a Antiplusto
“Production in Jamaica and the British |! Castor Sugar vom
Cameroons, from which we import the fruit, | Carr's Sweet Biscuits eae Boe es

is nothing like it was before the war, It is IK
difficult to say why, but undoubtedly the | })
hurricane last year has affected production
tremendously. At the moment there is little
belief that it will improve.”







CABBAGE sb. b

ORDER your .
GOLD BRAID RUM





| permit them to sell a pound of bananas to | |;
only one customer in three. There is a great | |))
deal of dissatisfaction among customers, but

Salmon
Cod Fillets
Mackerel in tins



EEE EEE
=
= ee
———

the shopkeepers point out that they are |! adel nae
powerless. Some have even suggested that RYE WHISKY Salt Mackerel



;
}
}
Shopkeepers say their banana allocations |}
}
}
)
)

jan unofficial rationing scheme should be in- Today
}troduced, to stop people who go from one | jj}
| shop to another buying bananas in each. ti

—B.U.P. Tecan tii ait aaa

Salt Herrings

Its GODDARD'S for Good Foods |





ee



TUESDAY, FEBRUARY 5, 1952

BARBADOS ADVOCATE

Chancery Suit
Adjourned



PAGE FIVE

FOR THE BEST



HOUSE AFIRE —



oS ae



fuarv:

Mr. 0. O. Walcott |







The death occurred last week
Oliver Oscar Walcott
Head teacher of St ,
THE CHANCERY SUIT Rowland C. Taylor, appellant . 08 el — Fa of St. i} 4 BEASTIFULA
Alfied De C, Boyee and Aubrey C. Kirton, respondent, yy). ‘ Walcon ainesadia -dhs tasy-TO-CLEAS
eonverning which His Lordship Sir Allan Collymore said Samuel Thorne at the St. Jos- FLOOR COVERING
yesterday when heering began that he did not know on eph’s Church School in 1912
what grounds the matter was before him by way of a case et cea eats anion ne .
stated, was adjourned sine di¢ partly because Mr. Grantley cultural activities of the dis- Si LVER STAR
Adams, counsel for Rowland C. Taylor was indisposed trict.
© vase which arose from a completed or removed from the He was among the pioneers i:
viijute over land, is an appeal cause list of the Court of Chan- several other fields. The St CON
from the Assistant Court of cery Joseph Boys’ School Band stage
Appeal in its Original Jurisdiction Not Agreed many successful Band Concert
before His Honour Mr. J. W. ! (7) 1 did not agree with the Qveen’s Park during the °30:
Chenery contention of Appellant's Counsel, = Was its founder and conduc
Mr. B. K. Walcott, K.C., associ- j,i, }lonour Mr. J. W. B. Chenery 72° and many of the present Po
ated with Mr, J. B. T. Brancker, ciated, holding that this suit waa )S¢ Band started their trainin
iced by Messrs Yearwood & properly before the Court ant With him
Jayee are counsel for A. De C. that there was nothing to preclude ., His birthplace was Orange Hill |
\. C. Kirton Mr. him proceeding with it. I ageord- S&S James, where he returned as
’ instructed by Messrs ingly refused an application from Sshoclmaster of the St Silas
Hutchinson & Banfield this decision. R. C. Taylor tas Boys. on the retirement of Mr.
ata certain stage in the pror appealed J. M. Crick in 1942, There he
ceedings in the Avsistant Court of “It seemed amazing that the feunded the St. Silas Men's Co-
Appeal, Mr. Adams submitted that appellant should file a claim to be Operative.
it was not competent for that heard by the Court and then pro- , His: interest in education was|
Court to take notice of the matter ceed to argue that it was improper fostered by his great desire, of-|
im yiew of cer.ain proceedings for the Court to hear the claim,’ ten at great sacrifice, bed render |
t were in the Court of Chan- he stated. his service for the benefit of his
ry. The Court ruled that it was His Lordship before adjourning district He was a keen and kind
“mpetent to take cognizance of the suit, said that he did not know ‘eacher in day and Sunday
the matter and Mr. Adams gavé on what grounds the matter was School, a Joving father and a}
notice of appeal. The proceedings before him then by way of the “cere friend. His passing was | Tor ’
- were then terminated. case stated. . mourned by a large circle, | INSIS1 ON
Roof Burnt

Plaintiff's Evidence
Evidence had been previously
Liven by plaintiff R. C. Taylor,
©. A. Pilarim, land surveyor, and

‘“‘Success Or Failure
Depends On The Self

members of the teaching profes- |
sion and close friends, He was}
laid to rest at the St. James|
Cemetery on Sunday, January 27

The jurisdiction of that Court
m matters of appeal surely was
oth in law and in fact, Section
78—~79 of the Assistant Court of

The roof of a boarded and
shingled Fouse at Beckwith
Street was damaged when a



SILVER STAR



















7 : z r ae : To his sorrowing _ relatives
fire broke out at the house Horatio Williams, Registrar-in- Appeal Act made no mention of deepest sympathy will be ex
ns. eee (ope p se | :tovlly after? oclock yester: | Chancery. 0" sug BOE One MARR sign OO. SOLD AT ALL THE LEADING STORES
hiseipline Of The British?’ | Scitseeeiees | Re Ceeaes t in, am SET EONG gore ing vas OE
L i» front of the house and the which came before the Court yes- judge’s having any authority to wi
Fire Brigade used water a eee ma it bs gy ie 9 se — a id tt buss tad P ust Maths Book
1 Tt 7 . “itis *onserv: 1e@ from this to stated for the Court of Chancery said that as he expecte, 1G e ia aianielig lis aL
: MR. RONALD TREE, former British Conservative ae put out the by virtue of the Assistant Court Learned Trial Judge to return at In We tI die i PSs PISS
M.P., who is spending two months’ holiday at his seaside of Appeal Act, Section 79, His the end of this month and he him- es ndies if 9
residence, “Heron Bay”, St. James, told the Advocate yes- The house is occupied by Honour Mr. J. W. B. Chenery one would, be absent from the From Page 1 | HARRISON S BROAD ST
erdav at the ne , » oo far ce » f a, ye a tin-smith, know si- stated. colony during next week at the ‘ .
terday that the next year as far as the future economy of | Gents as “Waerrlok’ “ates 1) On July 22, 1949, the re- West Indian Court of Appeal in _,Thére Is also Dr. Ryder’s Psy-
sritain is concerned b highly de ao arrick.” At the (1) 1» July 22, 1949, the re i Appea hol 4 :
Britain is concerned, must be a highly dangerous one. time of the fire he was not | spondent A. De C. Boyce, as mort- British Guiana, it would be re- very Unbsutal took au est h — <<
apace shy at home. gagee of certain properties situ- summoned, The re-summoning Very technic or one which JUST A FEW OF THE MANY ITEMS WE HAVE
eri ant a boy oe aces ated in St. Philip, filed an action for a date on emphasises this or that viewpoint

notification of the

Calizing the gravity of the situa-

1 although to-day, Mr. Attlee
is attempting to water it down.

Once again, success or failure
depends on the self discipline of
the tish people and othe suc-
the very drastic measures
that are being taken of which the

st instalment were presented last

k by Mr. R. A. Butler, Chan-

of the Exchequer; and the
will be in the Budget of
1 4, significantly two months
of the normal budget date.
Relationships

his reasons why Mr.
Churchill had recently
the United States of
America, Mr. Tree said that the
Prime Minister was very worried
when he came into power in Oc-
find that the relationships
which he had built up between the
U.S. and Britain during the war
such as very close collaboration
between the Chiefs of Staffs had
greatly deteriorated

His object in going to America
in January, was-to attempt to re-
establish those relationships, and
it was for that reason that he took
with him, his closest friends in the









Winston”

visited

ober to



Cabinet, such as Lord Ismay, the
Secretary of State for Common-
wealth Felations, Lord Cherwell



who had all matters of atomic
science in his hands in the Cabi-

net and the Chief of Staff, Army,

Navy and Air Force to Washing-
ton
it was Mr, Churchill's hope to

re-establish the same kind of re-
lationship that existed during the
war, not only in London and
Washington, but also at various
headquarter staffs where the two





countries worked together as one
team and there were nm secrets
one from the other

PM. In Good Spirits

Mr. Tree said that he saw the
Prime Minister just before he left
for England. He was in very good
spirits although he had a heavy
cold and he felt that he had suc-
ceeded to a very large extent as
far as his visit was concerned.

One other thing the Prime Min-
ister wished to"'do, was to obtain
adequate supplies of steel in order
that the British Rearmament Pro-





mme should not come to a
standstill, causing serious unem-
ployment. In this, Mr. Tree said
that he was also successful and
had obtained the promise of
600,000 tons of steel in return for
rubber and tin in which the
Americans were in short supply

for their Rearmament Programme,
The reactions in Washington of







Mr. RONALD TREE.

September 9,
Their Honours confirmed the de-

Rudder,



——

BODIL’ HARM COSTS 30/-

_ Their Honours Mr H A,
Vaughan and Mr. A. J. H. Han-
schell, Judges of the Assistant

Court of Appeal, yesterday fined
Beversley White Chancery
Lane, Christ Church 30/- and 3/-
cosis to be paid in seven days or



in default one anonth’s imprison-
ment with hard labour

for inflict-

ing bodily harm on Vivian Jones
with a stick
The offence was committed on

1951. By doing this

cision of His Worship Mr, C

olice

Ww.
Magistrate of Dis-



told the court that on

September 9 he was at a dance
at Silver

Sands, Christ Church,
ind had a row with the defendant,
In the row the defendant hit him
with a stick on the head Dr.

Ward attended him.



Harlem Seethes Over

B.W.L. Quota—Cut Plan

By JOHN TWITTY

WEST INDIAN LEADERS in the Harlem area are up
in arms over a proposal to impose a quota on the number

of Islanders allowed to enter the U.S. each year.

quota exists at present.

No such

Introduced two weeks ago by

Senator Patrick A. McCarran, (D-Nevada) the Bill would
limit immigration to 100 persons a year from each of the
British colonies in the Caribbean area.

John D. Silvera, Harie:n public-
ist who acts in a liaison capacity
for Congressman Jacob K. Javits
(Rep.-N, Y.), said that a number
of West Indian leaders are in the
process of forming a committee to

take positive action against the
Bill.

Javits, who stated that he is
“vigorously opposed to the Bill”

is of the opinion that although it
is difficult at this time to assess
the attitude of members of Con-
gress, especially the Southern bloc
and feels that opposition to the
measure will be stronger than
would be the case if civil rights
were involved.

“No Question”
“There is no question as to the
unfairness of the Bill,” he said,



25/- For Bodily
Harm With Store

Their Honours Mr, H, A.
Vaughan and Mr, A, J, H. Han-
schell Judges of the Assistant
Court of Appeal, yesterday order-



ed Carmen Blades of Deacons
Road, St. Michael, to pay a fine
cf - for inflicting bodily harm

on Mazie Leacock with a stone on
February 4, 1950.

By doing this Their Honours
confirmed the decision of His
Worship Mr, E. A. McLeod, Police
Magistrate of District “A.” Coun-
sel in the case was Mr, D, H. L.
Ward for Mazie Leacock,

Mazie Leacock said that on

in the Assistant Court of Appeal
against the respondent A. C.
Kirton, claiming payment of the
@mount secured by the mortgage
of the foreclosure properties or
in default sale or foreclosure.
Among these properties was one
particularly described as contain-

ing 1 acre, 2 roods, 2 perches.
(2) On July 22, 1949, the re-
spondent A. C. Kirton accepted

service of the action and summons
in the suit, admitted the truth of
the allegation it contained and
submitted to judgment.

(3) The order of the Court de-
creed the sale of the properties
described in the particulars of the
action to take place on October 7,
1949 and called for claims affect-
ing the properties to be made be-
fore October 5, 1949,

Claim Filed

(4) On September 27, 1949, the
appellant R. C. Taylor, filed a
claim for two roods, 21 perches of
land, part of a portion of 1 acre,
2 roods, 2 perches of land describ-
ed in the action. The ground of
the claim was that the 2 roods
21 perches of land formed part of
the property called “Harrismith”,
purchased by him (R. C. Taylor)
from the Registrar-in-Chancery
in the suit of Taylor v, Taylor on
October 18, 1946.

(5) On the hearing of claims in
this action, R. C. Taylor’s Counsel
raised an objection in limine of
the Court’s proceeding with the
hearing of a claim affecting the
land referred to in (4), on the
ground that the title of the iand
formed inter alia the subject mat-
ter of the suit in the Court of
Chancery entitled Taylor v. Tay-
lor, Counsel urged that under the
circumstances, the issue to be de-
cided being the same in the Courts
of Chancery and Assistant Court
of Appeal, viz; the ownership of
the portion of land claimed by

R. C. Taylor, the action in the
Assistant Court of Appeal, the
Court of inferior jurisdiction,

should be stayed pending a decis-
ion in the Court of Chancery, a
Court of Superior jurisdiction
Counsel further submitted that
it was open to the respondent,
Kirton to file the claim in the
suit, Taylor v. Taylor still pend-
ing in the Court of Chancery in
respect of the portion of land.
(6) In support of this conten-
tion, the appellant, R. C. Taylor,
in evidence swore that the portion
of land claimed by him formed
part of “Harrismith”, a property
sold to him by the Registrar-in-
Chencery in 1946 in the suit Taylor



Solicitors of both parties during
the first or second week of the
March Assizes when the Acting
Puisne Judge His Lordshin Mr
Justice G. L. Tavlor would be
presiding at that Court

Shopkeeper
Fined 30/-

In the Assistant Court of Appeal
yesterday Their Honours Mr, H, A,
Vaughan and Mr, A. J. H. Han-
chell contirmed a decision of His
Worship Mr. H, A. Talma who
imposed a fine of 30/- and 2/-
costs to be paid in 14 days or
in default one month’s imprison-
ment with hard labour on Her-
vert Grant of Howells Cross Road,
St, Michael for keeping his liquor
shop open on Sunday, August 19,
1951, for the purpose of selling

Mr. E, W. Barrow appeared in
the court on behalf of Grant,
while Sgt. Murrell attached to
the Central Station, prosecuted
from information received,

Cpl. Shepherd told the court that
on August 19 about 10.15 a.m. he
was on duty on Howell's Cross
Road, St, Michael, and saw the

coor of a shop opened, He entered

and the defendant was behind the
counter and in front of the coun-
ler were a man and woman, The
man was drinking rum from a
Lottle which was on the counter,

He then asked the defendant if
he was the proprietor of the shop
and he said “yes,”

Police Constable 139 Warner
who was in the company of Cpl.
Shepherd corroborated Cpl. Shep-
herd’s evidence, Mr. Barrow in his
address said that the ition
had failed to prove that the door
cf the shop was open for business,
He said that it was evident that
both of the witnesses for the
prosecution Cpl, Shepherd and
Police Constable Warner—went
into the shop and saw a com-
pletely different state of affairs.

Before confirming the decision,
Their Honours said that the evi-
dence was substantiated and what

the two policemén saw in the
Shop they had come into court
nd said,

Both said that there was a man
and a woman in the shop and the
man was drinking from a bottle
cn the counter,





but an objectively and clearly
written study of the subject, ex

plaining it in a manner which wil!

prove valuable to the layman or
the student,
Interesting Novels

Two other interesting novels
Children Of The Archbishop b
Norman Collins, author of London
Belongs To Me, and Margaret Ken
nedy’s Lucy Carmichael—add va
riety to the subject matter fron
which borrowers might wish t
choose In the first volume, th
story told by Mr, Collins centre
around the life of two missin
children from that well-know:
London Orphanage The Arch
bishop Bodkin Hospital, Putney
and vividly deseribes those mo-
mentous years between 1920 and
1938, which saw the Hospita
thrown into confusion by bur-
glary, fire and temporary disap
pearance of one of its inmates
and the hue and cry for the tw«
missing children, the Press cam
paign and the eventual Home
Office inquiry.

The second volume, Lucy Car
michael adds another portrait t
that gallery of young girls which
is perhaps Miss Kennedy's princi-
pal achievement, Both these novels
are Book Society Choices

Sports writers will welcome th:
addition of Wisden 1951 to the Re
ference Library, as well as J. H
Fingleton’s Brown And Company
in which the author of “Cricke!
Crisis” and “Brightly Fades The
Don” provides an extraordinaril)
interesting and revealing accoun
of the 1950 M.C.C. Tour to Aus
tralia Mr. Fingileton's latest
work includes not only an accu
ate and detailed account of each
of the Tests, but also comes to sig
nificant conclusions about the tour
as a Whole, and about the state of
Australian and English Cricket

Those interested in
will find Rackham
Washington Carver of
interest, while Movie Parade,
to 1949 will provide very valuable
information for local film critics

These proposed additions &
well as the 2,000 or more books
added during the latter half of
1951, provide a wealth of literary
material for the ever increasing
number of borrowers who make
use of the facilities offered by the
Barbados Public Library

Banker’s Inquest







immense

To Be Held To-day,

















p
L>=
+>



biography 1}
Holt’s George ||

1888 |



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Fet 4. 1950 at at t 10 " Tayl that } k k . The inquest concermmng - deatt R 4 ADY TO
7 7 sjnce there is no quota on coun- ebruary 4, 19: at abou a.m, v. Taylor; that he had been put of 76-year-old Herbert avis, /

Mr. Churchil]’s visit were good. trie: in Central or South America, while passing in front of a Mrs. into possession of the property HARBOUR EMPTY Ci nadian banker, will be held to -
They appreciated his statement “ Gongressman Javits said that Hail’s House, the defendant sud- but that no conveyance had as yet lay at the District “A” Poli HELP YOU
that if war started in Korea again, 1. will be able to discuss the Bill Genly rushed out of that house and heen exeented by the Registrar Car,isle Bay was empty yester- Court when the Coroner will | i 4
that Britain would be at their at greater length when the House threw a stone at her which cut and that the suit had, not been day, Since the year began, it has 4 \9 Worship Mr. E. A. McLeo
ee m j. 8} penaeerthe version has been completed It her in the head. eee had a few empty days. But win Herbert Davis Whe. vd so

Mr ree saic i neihah le fer ‘ 2 T= theo started ¢ say to ‘0 > Marine otel, iri

cas heen . will probably differ in some r s s i ‘te . . he crop started and sugar at the
people in America were all Seek ypects from the Senate version, _ She went to the General Hon i: Price Of Animal shipped to the U.K. and Canada, Chureh, was found dead in i ts 3 mee
eae ene : me « United States he said Emanual Celler (D-N.Y.) t#! where he was treate a di the harbour, it is expected, will bedroom on Friday February YOUR DOCTOR (ty
CEO Ee ee aan e to ask for a is Chairman of the House Judici- Copeland who said she exai oe Feed oon be always busy with ships 1952 about 6.30 p.m A post mor i
1id he did not com ask ary Committee which is expected Leacock and found that she ae calling to discharge and load tem examination was performe: you DRUGGIST a
large peti: at the only serious to take action on the me © 4“ cut on the left side of the head @ From Page 1 cargo by Dr. A. S. Cato. PUA a€nl (2) hi
ey gpd igo the Prime in the next few week which could have been caused by partly because some of their opera- —— \

point of critici m anon gps oth ome blunt instrument. tional costs are slightly higher In case of sudden sickne cident yu {{

ape id be sent from the Meanwhile, James i. Lawson Blades told the court that she — Since the merchants who deal can call on your doctor at any hou f the i
es ae Turkey ind France, president of the United African was at home and heard Leacock jy the rum trade have to obtain day or night for aid. And-—~at any how }
chy et it intaining law and Nationalist Movement, called the tugging at the front of the house. the rum for their vats have to li ne ) oa or iB
; a th esi Cc inal But in MeCarran Bill unfair and asked Before she could reach the front purchase from the refineries, they the day or night—we and ready p t
Ter aas like many other simi- for a proportionate reduction of coor Leacock was inside. her jn turn have had to-work out cor- your doctor in an emergency wit! it
ee states neritheee the Prime Min- European immigraticn quota f house and there she was given 4 responding increases, and now 4 medicines, first aid materials, prescription {
vers in the past, it would look the Bill becomes law. “Thy Car- cood beating. She never threw a dozen pint bottles of rum which Allied od gubect dbarioleak ‘comnts \
o me mites as if he was merely ibbéan is in our economic, social. stone at Leacock. a formerly we ee i will ged an > i }
ve b ini F ica i é ; Worshi r, E McLe be sold for $4.64. is represents : voi. ; , a \

Sa ublic opinion, and that folitical and military orbit, and His Worship Mr. E, A, ) : oe; ap ada eal Se sa ai
ee, compromise along those pesides, the people of that area imposed a fine of 5/- to be paid an increase of 34 cents per dozen, Fer Accurate Prescription Service, Call at i
lines might well be worked out are of the same ethnic group as in seven days or seven days’ im- or roughly 3 cents on the bottle {
vith the new Egyptian Govern- j,jllions of Negroes on the Ameri prisonment on Mazie Leacock for which is about an 8 per cent. in- x
ment shortly can mainland,” he said. @ On Page 6. crease on the retail price. "4
1 |

SAVE ON THESE

For
Originally This Wéek i

Swank Swim — Suits



ti

ROBERTSON’'S RED CURRANT, BLACK



i
! ho public of CURRANT, APRICOT & RASPBERRY i
's In order to convince the public of sine 5 a
| the superior quality of our } ‘ a ce : 7
RIPLY TAFFETA SWIM SUITS in ENRICHED BREAD i Or ieee eee ‘i sag
red, rf » g s ore Pen i * : otnl REE a sDEN & 7 I ‘ 3 .
ed royal blue and emerald green in will be offering FREE OF { ROBERTSON’S STRAWBERRY JAM ah 87
one piece only, loaf to the first 200

62

31

re, e ; 9 > 5
EVERLASTIK SATIN SWIM SUITS, persons who ’Phone us at 4758.
in black, royal blue and gold, one
piece only, strapless.

EVERLASTIC SATIN SWIM SUITS -

we
CHARGE a
CONDENSED MILK 33
\

DENMOR BONELESS HAMS
EWINGS CANADIAN

All
PUDDINGS

sizes

pee Only ‘Phone Calls will be

acknowledged in this offer





)
t
‘
{
t
}
ROBERTSON'S GINGER MARMALADE 68

BUTTERSCOTCH







, aap eRe CARAMEL, CHOCOLATE—per pkt.—25c.
in multicolour and plain designs, one PRICES and we will DELIVER. No |} EWINGS PURE ALMOND ESSENCE—per bottle 42
. i i ; personal calls, ty} DANISH SALAMI SAUSAGE—per 1b 1.31
ee eT $10.75 to $17.25 mn : 7 ) DANISH SLICED HAM—per Ib 1.82
| Phis offer holds good cog Sheeday \ SOUTH AFRICAN ROCK LOBSTER-—per tin .69

| 5th and Wednesday 6th February. i TOWER JELLIES—per pkt 16

CAVE SHEPHERD & Cx. Laem i COCKADE RUM, MARTELL BRANDY, BALLANTINES

‘ , 1 {i} WHISKY

10, 11, 12 & 13 Broad Street

BARBADOS BAKERIES LTD.

BR aggre || STANSFELD, SCOTT & Co., Ltd.



















PAGE SIX BARBADOS. ADVOCATE TUESDAY, FEBRUARY 5, 1952

CLASSIFIED ADS. | POStte SALES | MacGillivray Made |Toronto Doctor Dies | Me omnes | SAIPPIRG NOTICES
























































































































































































































































































































































pF - | Blades, but yesterday Their Hon-
: de Malay ++ Heart Attac : PT ee
TELEPHONE 2508. | REAL ESTATE } i puty lo alay at Afte H rt At . k ours yatied the decision and ordet- SoNTReat, AUSTRALIA AND NEW puppy s2 > SU SSUOIOOOO,
1 $$$ | “att HOUSE 8 x 12, pine frame anal j4% Y ae ed Leacock to pay a fine of 20/-| ZEALAND LINE UTD. if , Dai
| foor, fir sides, jron roof, easil ‘ilich Conimissioneér ‘ORONTO. Fel or to undergo one month’s impris- | MANZ LINE |S he M/V, “CACIQUE, DEL
For Births, Marriage or Engagement | FOR SALE cabled anes oving eight bolts, | 5 TORON eb. 4. | nment @ith Hard labour. | §.S. TEKOA is scheduled to sail from CARIBE” will accept Cargo and
@mnouncements in Carfh Calling the} weeks ong i Somme. | Our Own Cortespéndent) Prank O'Leary, 61, died sudden- i: H id that i g| Adeluide February 11th, Melbourne Feb- Passengets for St. Lucia, ts
Sherge 93.00 for any gumber of words Dial 254 H | LONDON, Feb. 4 ly, early on Sunday, after a heart| Tet Honours sai at it was Vary vind, Sydney February 28th, Bris- Vincent. Grenada, se
Up to 50 and 6 cents per word for each . . oo 4 sas! ea eigen oo) seizure. He was one of Toronto's |@uite Clear that there was a cet- bane March sth arriving at Trinidad |% Salling Wednesday Gth ing.
additional word, Terms cash. Phoue 2503 AUTOMOTIVE | . Mr. Donald MacGillivray, form- | S©i2U aa e ‘ltain amount of fighting going on sbout April sth and Barbados about The M.V. “DAERWOOD 4
between 8.30 and 4 p.mi.j 3113 for Death | _ : Colonial Se ry of Jamaica} best known medical men, ; 3 April Lith accept Cargo and Passengers
: ; | 1 £100 Barbados Government De-| ©! lonial - and both parties were seen by 4» ~. St. Vincent, Grenada
Notices only after 4 o.™ CARs 1947 Standard & h.p. Apply: | benture @ 3° and w deputy to the High Cor F . ti ho id they had bruises _™ addition to general cargo this ves- St. Luct pe ts Piaad eth
a G Burton & Co 5.2.52—3n | : 100 Balentics Government De-| main vane rs Dr, O'Leary was born in Orillia, | Goctors W su y sel has ample space for ehilled and hard and A . Sailing
— } benture @ 5° |missioner for Malaya, way at the) and after attending Orillia Colleg-|and abrasions on their skims. | frozen cargo 7 inst. ev, “CARIBBEE” will
” - | } ; ‘ r | .
"ger svarreres | CAR-—One (1) Morris 8 HP. 1947) 3 £100 Barbados Government De-|Colonial Office to-day. With him] jate, came to Toronto and was : | Cargo accepted on themeigg —_ “A BF aces and Passengers for
ANNOL q EMEN T'S | saioon, excetient condition, 5 new tyres, | Lanusies @ Ok% |was his new boss, General Sir| praguated from the University of ee }Lading for transhipment at Trinidad to accep ‘Antigua, Montserrat,
“| recently pajnted. Offers to D§pnald| 95 ; um Mefinery Ltd. |eo-cia Teamnler T Ce graguated trom ) RATES OF EXCHANGE | British Guiana, Leeward and Windward Dominica, Gatling Friday
231 shares W.I, Rum Refinery 1 Gerald Templer, They exchanged| To Phi a. eae d Nevis and St. Kitts. Sail
"3 Faghill 2229 until 4 p.m. and 3378 after| 44; shares Barbados Fise Insurance i upler, They an Toronto in Pharmacy. He entered | Fuavakt 4 68 Islands, ae ng
REPAIRS AND MAINTENANC 4 bm 5.2.52—ttn.| 95 shares B.S. & T. Co, Ltd views with Mr, Oliver Lyttelton] a medical course but was inter-| NEW YORK -| For further particulars apply— 15th inst.
bados Agencies announce that they have] "“—"ooeNs new Cliroens in stock, £ — we. state Sahel co. [2 the situation they will face} rupted and he went overseas with | 73.6% pr. Chequés on Bankers 71.4% pr. | FURNESS. WITHY & O., Ltd. pwit SCHOONER | OWNERS
ecently S| . : " aN SS ° shares arbados e one o, 5 : - - Am j mand "‘RINIDAD. ASSOCIA %
. to! nobil ae ner trégn Gated Kine: price $3,275, apply Barbados Agencies, (6% Preference) when ‘they Sy to Malaya to-mot-| We: Gat s3eKd pulance in 1915. — “Grate 71.2% pr. | AW Consignee. Tele. No. win
Soe ord ase “extending their ptemiges| telephone 4008. 1.2.52—€n. | 33 shares Barbados Ice Co. row. ; He became Staff Sergeant, was | 45 60, pr. cable Ci re DaCOSTA & Co... Ltd. -
to handle all types of repairs. | _ The adove mentioned shares will be} MacGillivray’s appointment was| awarded the Military Medal, and | 72.2 pr. Currency 69.8% pr. BARBADOS. pbs tpt PLL LISLE
: 1.2.52—6n. C¥PROEN—One second hand Citroen | so for sale at Public Auction on| . . pare 2% | a0 oom" :
: “| done under 5,000 miles, apply Barbados | priga® the 8th day of February 1952 at |* well kept secret. When he ar-| lost his leg below the knee as a Coupons 69.2% pr. fo bey semana
Agencies, telephone 4908. 1.2.52—6n.| "pm at Carrington & Sealy, Lucas|rived from Jamaica ten days| result of being wounded at Pas- cian eeitiilteay |
ee ee ae 31.1.52-—-4n |ago, even officials at the Colonial| schendaele in 1917. 73.3% pr. Cheques on Bankers 70.76 pr.
Loy ve car for cheap moto x — : » 4 —
FOK mR Tt ew to Barbados, apply Barbados “EN_DAILWIN, Pine Hill Standing on Hill Standing on|Q!lice did not know why he had seh ts shite Wa tatat elie | Uaeeee.. renee 70.98% pr. |
Agencies, telephone 4908. 1.2.52—6n. | 6 600 square feet of land, Stone bungalow | been summoned. The first indi- oe Archet af ae Trini los. 306 ge aa 3 } co
-—__-_——__-__-- containing three bedrooms, breakfast |cation they had wag an official an-| the former Archel Daly of Trini- | “2% pt. Currency 69.2% pr.
LORRY-—1 Austin 3-ton lorry in perfect | -oom, living room and kitchenette with eae ana dad, and a small son, Peter. } 5 68.5%
TU , SAMPSON : : ‘ nouncement put out on Sunday Coupons 5% pr.
HOUSES working order. STUART & “S = N| cupboards. Tiled bath and toilet. Ser- nA heeent aver the. wirel —(UP.)
TD 29.1.52- | vants’ room and garage. Inspection on | &Nc yroadcast ove he wireless | Y
- nnn ——~ | application to Mrs. Bernard Rolfe. Tele-|this morning. :
ee oS Sane cL James | . MOTORCYCLE—Only one (1) in stock, whore 4817. MacGilliveay ts well suited to
FU RNISHED BUNGALOW an St See Ambassador Supreme, Spring-frame, 2 The above will be set up for sale at MacGu ay is : ad | NEW YORK SERVICE
ee 3 bedr ee tele an Stihine, b.p. $605.00. Terms. A ae fee ~ Public Auction on Friday the 8th Feb- his new job, for previously he | nites -
modern conveniences, goo ea bathing, | iy pp 26.1,52—t.f.n > t the at Palestine nearly te ane } s 5th A 7
ay t 247 ruary at 2,30 p.m, at the office o' been in Palestine nearly nm years | 2tt .. arrives Barbados
=—e Senn RS 1.3 a. oe undersigned. TON & SEALY where he learned plenty about . ° - Fen foe 15th #iibeats arrives Barbados 26th February, 1952.
ee ELECTRICAL CARRING' i a. eniae Selaiaeae.
MOORLANDS — Comfortably farnishe | rn a “ “ $1.4.52—8n} But reports from Singapote to- imat
Awelling house at St. James, on the sea-}| RADIO: One Second-Hand American- 31,1.52—4: P ports singap }. ane
sine: dkvegs and Telephone. Dial 3589 Bosch 8-tube Radio apy to H. D TAIT VINCENT. BWL night suggest that his task is not NOT ICE | NEW ORLEANS SERVICE Ha jute 1902
4.2.52—2n } Rock's s 1 Street ALN NT, B.W. - ensy. T my ; een $ ary, :
42.52% | Rock's Drug Store, Tudor Street. sn | PROPERTY—Attractive senside property |g0ing to be easy. The Daily Ex-| AtipMedtions invited By thé. Water Commission, Jamaica, for| . * STEAMER sails 10th January arrives Bepados 14th February, 1952
; Deacon's Road. Drawing adjoining Villa Beach, 3 acres with| press correspondent on the spot} PpHestions are invited By the. Water nission, eee, A STEAMER sails 30th January: arrives Fetrbades 28th February, 1982.
caer ee 3 ‘bedrooms, massive stone eee * og 4 sa. feet.) pays Malayan politicians of all! 1 post of Temporary Civil Engineer. | | A STEAMER sails 13th February— @ ee aemgeeneantl
nd bath. Dial 4017 . Fl TU Particulars from Errol Rooks, Dour © "sn. |Shades of opinion and _ colour! ; | been iteneenatirneesnenenarntnemeeraa — roe
Teli enaniaiiebiat RNITURE Ppgne S20 os lore atgry that fe hie been} The post is temporary and non-pensionable, and carries a salary | CANADIAN SERV
ANT Dwelling house called “GILVAN” with|anpointed as Templer’s députy.| sQile of £795 by #25 to £920 per annum. Point of entry into the SOUTHBOUND
7 CHAIRS, Chairs, Chairs and other fi f land situate at Chel . 2 i. foun F 4 ‘ ‘ ”
oa Mise |, CHAIES:, Chsirs, Chairs... and othe 19,008 squbre | eae Of Band af at Boose (Tne anger was because of two) scale will be determined by experience and qualification. Holder isso Sails Halifax Arrives Barbados
HELF sur home. A. BARNES & Co., Ltd.|contains Drawing Room, Living Room,|facts: firstly, because Malayan} may be required to keep a motor vehicle for the performance of his — ry 24th
_— oOo 18.1,52—t.f.n.!4 bedrooms, Garage, Toilet, Bath and | epiincillors ade it clear in the} . ‘ . wah ont 4 PURITAN” . January Mth January rts
STENOGRAPH®R & TYPIST for ouy usual conveniences for) debate last week that they want- duties in which case he will be eligible for a travelling allowance in | s : ae Eee rere January 29th rary es
T. Geddes Gt t Lid. Pe ET LIVESTOCK sale by Public Competition at our office ed either an Asian or European| accordance with the Commission’s rates. ss, “ALCOA PLANTER” . Sa 26th March 7th
— i -!"Doa: Wire hair Fox. Terrier Dog,|James Street on Friday 8th February, | with Malayan experience to get ‘ a - i A pk eae a et ao a March 14th oe
white, with Biock ears. Answers to the | 1952, at 2 p.m. fention'to Miss Kenl-|{h© job, and secondly, _ because Appointment will be on probation for one year at the end of A STEAMER (||. March 23rd Apri
- ~ i. we ' 7 ss Kell- 113 ; . : . : bods ia ;
MISCELLANEOUS ume of Jack, Please contact Donald i EE rare oa gg 58. MacGillivray is an ex-Palestine| which period it may be extended at the Commission’s discretion. ; aia aac
NiED TO RENT le Gh gl amall ata iene ts * ““YEARWOOD & BOYCE, Administrator—and men from) Applicants should be between 30 and 45 years of age, and must These vésscls Have limited passenget < senate
d eh ne 272 s i 5. >, setine ¢ “ ‘ * 3 le
satin WANTE ee ek , | Sofleltors eld ee eae Co ica asin w | have had satisfactory experience in Water Works Engineering, includ- ROBERT THOM LTD. — NEW YORK AND GULF
sa House from Ar Ist ? | 1 “ibaa teal ices soli . : " r . ne z,
furnished House tom Arih ist too MECHANICAL “.TRANQUILITY—Standing of 14110|N. Gray, a former Palestine po-|*98 the construction of small dams and intake ee eee the | APPLY:—DA COSTA & CO., UTD. CANADIAN SERVICE
St. Michacl.nswferred Write: Lox LL. |“GOSTNow passenger chamis recently |square feet of land at Strathclyde,|lice chief, many Palestineans| laying of large diameter steel and cast iron mains and reservoir con- r
C/o Advoentenddvise. “Dept | ceived, on view at Barbados Agencies, | House contains three bedrooms upstalrs lin key jobs when he came to Ma-) struction. Working knowledge of land surveying and general build- | a i eieheeelinanieniantalanlenialeinle nian NT
P . f rious room awe + ‘ »2 ™ o te : ; 3 j e is
ns Me 4 }islephone 4908 1,2.83—En, SE eee batts snd toilets, Sn- lexan in waited eee these ap-! ing work, including quantity surveying and estimating also essential, pas .
ena EES . ae ea ments prov o be unsucces- D
. ti day by appointment. ‘Phone | POIN a” | ae oe “e, i
MISCELLANEOUS Man L, Skinner 2687 he above will be | ful as well as admististrative experience UENAY TE
—_———— ————— t up for sale at Public Auction on Mrs. MacGillivray who return- ee r not ra —_— — S
, GALVANIZED SHEETS A limited| Friday the Sth February at 2 p.m. at| oq desl: CHEE bea will sail to Applications, accompanied by references from firms or depart — a, I
, ) GunHtsty. 7 £t. 96.00, 9 £. 90.98, 9 St 96 45) tig office Gh Wa. wetensaned, join her husband next month ments in which experience has been gained should be submitted to | *~ come es
lunquire Auto Tyre Co. Telephone 2696. CARRINGTON & SEALY, y b he 16th ! 4 N SERVICE
There is ncnebd For us to tell you of the 2.2.52—t.£.n. Lucas Street — ——— the Chief Engineer, Waterworks Department, Barbados by the } CANADIA i ca ag
iat vied ; le eile oath ahinedgtnialanoe $1.1.62—8r ‘ i for post of Civil Engin- | bei oa
torture covaed ky pils ereuble, . We seb | niGra, Nazing, Records ‘snd 70, RPM “ Seawell Vii epee From St. John and Halifax, N.S.
re cau: » ) Records and we book orders too. A. > } , |eer, Water Commission, Jamaica, | ceeenngeccmmnaenapetars
i nl using Man Zap | BAPNES & Co., Ltd. GOVERNMEN; NOTICE ARRIVALS — a —2.2.52—4n. | . Expected Arrival
> = Rape y ae aeaihae pain, 18.1.52—t.f.n. i | 1 Se st Spat aoe . ee war | St John Halifax Deteg, Brlageyown,
. y Fre TRINID/ t bados
soothe and completely heal blind orbleeding | = MEN'S GOLF BAG-—must be fair con- , ee hee ye athe | male } aero 33S: 28 Jan. 14 February
piles. Read just these two from a host | dition ~ and price reasonable. Phone+ qt ig notified torr general infor=| quested, F. Odie, M. Henry, C. Haines..R. | ~ pe By at ; 14 Feb 16 Feb. 5 March
of letters eee | mation that the southern main | Gilbert, W Whiting..C, Whiting, Ht. Prise, | | 5.8. “SUNDIAL’ 25 Feb 29 Feb. oo
aa : ie, » Li * | « r Ma 5 Mare
| Mrs. Mc a. A, NoneatenAiibeaiM Fok over'| One Child's Play Pen & Mattress,) gate to the Public Buildings yard)», 4m porrTo RICO: ee a7 IRG? SI gen bp ear pea. See ie cage hk em Tea a ple kl adc lpee
@ year I suffered with terrible burning piles. | one Tabs» Pram, perfert condition, ean | win) be closed for repairs from| ‘Cari Mayden, Henry Lord, Mary Lire, | R@ €98 : i ; eecce —_——___—_——- ICE
Fomentations and ointments Rave me only tem- She tine PROnae Pulse ait rer WED SDAY, the 6th of Febru- eens Sarieant, Stuart eet UNITED KINGDOM SERV Cc
porary i. A me i : Josep’ 3. G. Morgan, Fi -is , Morgan,
Se Sita tec piso Gattne tne) | 6.2.00-n ary, 108%, until further notice. | | innie Aereiton, mith J. owen, rere is evervthine you want | FRM SWANSEA, LIVERPOOL AND GLORGON. 0
am completely cured of this dreadful complaint.” “SUITCABES <2 Valings. attache Galea. All vehicular traffic must enter) Bertha Green, Stuart Sarjeant, Evelyn | i Cre 5 @ P : g V t | oxpec rr
; + s, attache cases, rth- | Williams, Fred D, Mathers, Gladys C / : + Dates Bridgetown,
Mrs. J T., Penrith, anys :—"' Itching and bleed- | sturdy and lightweight, double locks,|and leave the yard by the north M thetic c iotin Cc 5 Seainali Myrd Cc e Swansea Liverpool Glasgow Barbados
ing piles worried_me for over two years, and 1) $3.36 to $6.24. A BARNES & CO., LTD.|ern gate during this period. Laurel Browne, Evelyn McShine cake Seieeiaaaal i” ahs! | Dae 15 February
could not Obtain ahy relief, I was recommended 24.1.52—t.f.n 5§,2.52—2n. ON SATURDAY oo aren gyome ty $8 Os ROGER : Se ah to Fen: 14 March
soa Zan, at. 1 found relief, From TRINIDAD: way sats Py - —
ow I am quite free of the terrible agony.” A. Lewis, G. Field, A, Cazabon, J :
Don’t suffer longer the nerve-destroying, | PURLIC NOTICES PERSONAL Stora/, J. King, M. Brubtt, B. Raymond, UNITED KINGDOM AND CONTINENTAL SERVICE
. 4 TTTTTTTTTMOCCM==— 1 > alley, &. Donovan, J. Merry, G vader,

P ee clk anager
weakening misery of pile trouble. a The public are hereby warned against | E. Menjamin, B. ‘Thorn, R. Warner, Hi. | — Expected Arrival
Zan will most surely give you instant relief. giving credit to my_ wife CLEMINT: Warner, J, Hess, J. Hess, | Bridgetown

ye vk NOTICE QUINTYNE (nee MC COLLINS) as I do] From ST. KIM N Antwerp Rotterdam London Dates, Bridgetown,
Sold in easy, clean-to-use bye wi PARISH OF ST, JAMES not hold myself responsible for ber or | Lance Villaneuva, Colin Bdghill, Aiis- eici ; Be ea is pepeary
special noz applicator, from chemists, i hereby publish the summary of - | anyone else contracting any debt or debts e Payne sar (4 BR é iS Jan. on = March
- tlon Expenses for Mr. E. St. A. Hol id my name unless by a written order| prom ANTIGUA: ss, “SUNAVIS 14 Feb. 11 Feb, 21 Feb. 8 Mar
for election to the General Assembly for | signed by me i =“ Albert ~hwarting —_—
the Seasion 1931-04 WILBERT QUINTYNE, From MARTINIQUR: |
Belts Expenses .. ¢ 38.00 College Bottom, | | "Raymond Logue Agents: PLANTATIONS LIMITED — Phone 4703
Printing : 39.00 } wi FgEo., From GRENADA = ete rt
Distribution of Ad- 3,2,.52—2n Lord Oliver Esher, Lady A Rati asiy ——— ov |
vertising Material 10.08 wenn | THirbarn Cabral, Rolland Cabral, BP
ILE REMEDY Newspaper Adver- The publie are hereby warned agains! | williams, Joon ‘Reece, Marjorie Hum. | ROBERT HOM LIMITED
tising » iving credit to my wife SYBRL ~ | phrey, Charlés Humphrey,
: : : Canvassing 190,00 ING ince WORRELL) ax L do not hold DEPARTURES — BY B.W.LA. ) PLANTATIONS BUILDING, LOWER BROAD STREET
. Clerks and myself responsible for her or anyone ON SUNDAY ' hel: Pinas
Messengfers 4 28 00 else contracting any debt or debts in MY] por 87. LUCIA; Passenger Sales Agen ‘or: LA
Savion €} Postage, Stationery name unless by a written order signed} Norinyn Marshall, Arthur Duboula Trans-Canada Airlines, B.O.A.C. and B.W.1.
0) D ‘WS i} ASH > fnd = Miscellaneous by me Potet Hotter. ALCOA STEAMSHIP COMPANY
ig u uy * Expenses 290 84 «$525.42 CLEMENT N, HARDING, For ANTIGUA: Telephone No. 4466
mi’, eeetnr centers Fairfield send nap tea eeu ren. Se kt nek acta a tee ere aac laiceeeceeee
HRC. »} This Return can be inspected at my Tudor Bridge, For PU 0 RICO: io eee ee
QUBRS POPULAR GAMES % | omice at Sandy Lane Factory from 9.00— St, Michael Ethel Mullin, Arthur Collins, Harry ; LEPC EE EOE LLL LLL AAP AEAD AA AAP APA,
” FOR ALL AGES | 11.00 a.m, on Wednesday Sth February | 5 9 52—2n Collins, Ben Golde, Arthur Gerber *
“SPENCER OUKTON TENNIS },| 1952. a) | George Rager, Lee Shaul, Este}le Farrell, e Have you Learnt to Use the
is that last the &¢ J, H, C, THORNE, Cuspert Forde, George Ashworth, Martan. ‘
on * Roe eo x Returning Officer. MAIL NOTICES Ashworth, Martha Ashworth, John San- " * G IL L NE T
CHAMBERS TWENTIETH CE : 5.2.52—1n Mails for St. Lu¢ia, Dominica, Montser- son, Matilda Sanderson, Virit Weather- | A car that keeps ahead of the queue in town travel. ¥ * a LL l
TURY DICTIONEPY, PEARS § rat, Antigua, St. Kitts, Bermuda Boston | ead, Minerva Gill : Sek: / % , te enis Meiiiiy of
CYCLOPABEA. LARGE TEA +1 ,1QUOR LICENSE NOTICE| St. Jobn N.B. by the R. M. 5. Lady | for TRINIDAD; On the open road, a car that Japs the miles in safety and = . You can now obtain your PP
: : j res | & Q - nd y losed at the General eter Hy. larry Ritchie, Victor % os vee : < U
CUPS. BLUE RAND PLATES § “ Nelson will be ¢ a Peter Hyro: Harry Ritchie, oria " 5A, 2 A = ‘ = “ NETTING and CORKS. from s
A AND DISHES RL im ais By ger phe Sa Murray Lam-| Post Office as under:— Registered | Titchie, Essa Sabga, Charley Epalish comfort. Seating for five in comfort. 70 horse power six- = *
ae . ‘ The spplicatio: y ay - one 2 " sgistere: se} ; : . é = .
A RING'S STORS, Bite ip | g ritt of Fortescue Land, St. John the pur- Mere eth Qlakihy Matt at 200 | te nanen i hamperena, @. Hnatper: | cylinder engine that runs as smooth as silk, Steering x CENTRAL EMPORIUM
haser of Liquor License No, 1089 of |” . 7 bruany, 1952 ; avity Re raad, Gertrude Headley, b 5 . ‘ -
nig “STATIONERY S| ist granted to Harold Proverbs & Co.,|?™ on the 7B win Bee eiaiata Loule Bovartenit; Patios column gear shift. Torsion-bar indépendent front wheel % Corner Broad & Tudor Streets.
atl yr ty E % | td. in respect of a board and shingled | pp 6 ggneee3e969G69SGS00O%, | Machido, Grazielia Machado, Doroth | ; ts h t as, to cntiedies °
L x ap at jut reeticreaitiaee.” and to use % _ “a % | Bailey, Sally’ Ritchie. | suspension smooths out the roug) hest roads, cubic 6 6,6555566,665655606 Kt tt, 6654, stot OOOO
AOOGOoO- at said described premises . : FFERE § j Rg” sh a oA oto" CLEATS ~ ;
LLLP II re + °' | Dated this ist day of February, 1962. | % ars Bi Sh © os wae leee nee: of luggave space. Special rust-proofing rerfders ‘* Mono- 893995090809 FSS CSSOSSS SOS FOOOPOSSPOGIS 9.
= wae , p o hg Tree lance eo ’ a ‘ - ra t \ a i
i til Ag: Selig Mariscatae % man—Arehitecture OG ee eatoh x eiyiy Shee igi meee bee Rg construction ” body and chassis resistafit to rust. Every feature 3
i we ». Ability to produce sketch & | Krox, Timothy Allayne, Sylvia Sami = ‘ 4 FOR SALE
_ Er lk R. LAMPITT % piahs. layouts, perspectives ane % gh, Vincent Lewis, ; Milly stew | that appeals to car proud owners will be found in %
r sar % prepare working drawings, Assist- % | Wendy Lewis, Roger Lewis, sabe te | , " *
7 ay Applicant y prep ; ing, & » Heng: oe ra Rameheran, : >
ATEFEN TION N.B.—Thiy application will be. consid | % ance in Estimating, and Building. § | Monroe, Henry Manros, Dota Ramcheran, | this masterpiece Morris. oe % ee
- : ed at A - icensing ae te et % advertising Boards, Signs, Show- ¥ ficing, Mary Pruitt, Raymond Legge, June | ° ee CARI DIEM
MOGLORISTS He fied va ied see, Caine District * cards undertaken. Phone 4705 % | Sialay Ruby Kennedy. x ‘
a x . ee P ., %,
c OOO ALA CEEOL OOO . | -
* , A.W, HARPER, SOOO OO PP TO, | in Touch With Barbados | $ a two storeyed dwellinghouse standing on 10,770 square feet
” Ag. Police Magierate, DUS. si tps S$ 1 | % of land on the incomparable St, Lawrence Coast.
At last you can have your 5.2.52—1n | ¢ saved but seeking Coastal Station % of land on the p ;
na —— —__———— |¥ if tio ers write for ¢ Cable and Wireless (WB) Ltd. advise | zt Excellent sea bathing. Dwellinghouse contains verandah
Car looking like new by ||| (@S00ese00s0ss9000000"99 |X ree PDE Docent fang yeba irate sag Ni upstairs and down, dining and sitting rocms, 4 bedsooms, —
’ x $- OUR AGENTS are making 2100 ¥ % FREE HOOK © | Coast Station . meres try and kitchen, Electric light, gas and water installed. Garag
the use of - - - { and more by taking orders fom 3 x | S. America, m.c. Bonito, s.s, Braga, and servants rooms.
— | uilmes, # Tern 5 :
R Peed Sages Seen Soe : beng oem s | \ ee ‘ or Rotterdaxn vee Ss E E i AT Purchaser to have option of buying furniture and effects.
and Calenders. On requess x /yD’ OF S| hosa, ss, Seabird, #2. Cavoplatanos, s,s Et Inspection by appointment. Dial 8137. (Mrs. K, R, Hunte).
JOHNSON’ Britain's largest and foremost x GOD’S WAY & Fmpress of Scotiand, 8.8. Mauretania, s.s The above will be offered for sale at public competition e
\ Publishers will send a Beauttful % % | Rangitata, s.8. Gulfgiow, s,s, Marco Polo, FO T ROY A I GARAGE LTD Friday. the 8th February, 1952, at 2 p.m., at the office of the
Free Sample Book for 1952 to * Aleoa Corsair, 8.8. Sapulpa Victory ° > y, o> *
Genitha “Agecié Writs today % SALVATION % American Sun, 8.8. Silver Stary 8.5 Distrib p 45 unemenen one Shows further particulars and conditions of
ned * : r nadia Conqueror, s.8. Gillerest, s.s ho 04 n be obtained,
pees Highest Commission paid, Jones, ” ry &l idian Conquer oF s. . Galle Phone 2385 Sole stri utors ne sale ca
oes a Bee et tS vant ae PLAIN Be eee oe er See ee COTTLE, CATFORD & CO.,
% Works, Preston, England % S. Roberts, Gospel g | Krato Tindra, #8. Esso Reading, Solicitors.
% Book & Tract Service, 30 | Alcon Puritan, 8%, Heliec ‘ 24.1.52—15n
See % Central Ave., Bangor, N.I- 1 Me ver ng 2 Virginia, ’ “2 Ale PPLE - PESOS POLED AISA, EOC OOOO OSS SS
, ‘ ‘ Mesaverde, 8.8 a, 33. E ‘ POLO PESO SO 8 es bt st ste0y 26595
a * z PA AOA ALLL LLL. | i El Silver Ocenn, s,s, Esso | 5 4
n * “INVESTMENT OPPOR- % a 1 Salte 51 ‘Camp | # 7 Y B hk ‘
CAR-PLATE TONEY, fF Moma". nasi < Small Geography Book \
‘ y ‘ ss 2
+ Ot Preference Shares in A. & FLASH LASH V1 ty \ 3 of Barbados and the West Indies
. Cae a \ BARNES &€O. LTD. Telephone & ) & HOT WATER ON %| - *
at no trouvie to your t Seeremry, Mr. Victor Hunte, 3359. S When thinking in terms of Radio } * ey R
ated ; 2. 52- 4
selves. } 125-11 cepairs contact— | = TAPfor YOUR BATH » » The book every School child 3 |
LOCC RSSSSC SS GESSSOS OSS ares ‘ i aa « % i
YES—Your favourite RE HOLDER \\| With one of the lovely White Por- Sis ' ¥ >
= = : | Sf celain Gas Geysers—You can have s should Own )
- » LY . s .
‘| a warm or hot bath within 8 @| ¥ - —
1% minutes of lighting up. Econ- ~ - rx
» QUALIFIED ELECTRICIAN }|%& omically priced and CHEAP to t * ! y 3} i
' The serviceman with a single <> run with Natural Gas, A few are X ld? at ADVOCAT 1 y
; “ . now available at your GAS
tt The ; SOUVENIRS Thought | “Te Give Sattetection. HH % Wonks, BAY STARUT. gx >|
t. HOLDER, Electronician . % | ’
ie | 5 Seca ans avs ama aaa 85$6%659606906660660000" Yeooseee S9SSSSSSSSSESOOSOOOOS !
WY i at gp ar Bx SILKS, CURIOS, ARTS ;
ek VENDEMOS, SEDAS, | oC
JOVERIAS ¥Y ARTISTICAS

CURLOSIDADES, TRAIDOS
DE LA INMTA OHINA eé

OF RY ACE
STATION

has opened a Polishing

| TO THE

| CROP-TIME
SALE
|

EJIPTO
THANI’S

(ecems|| IF YOUR NERVES ARE
EXHIBITION A WRECK

AT

|
cchoud |
)

rr. Wm. Hry. St., Dial 3466

a ORIENTAL
|
|
| ’





; . : SPL OOOE ES FOEFOF SO take
serv ice for your cast. % BARBADOS ¥ r wy wer 7
is 7 : Sulina | FURNISH : MUSEUM N LITROPHOS NOW IN FULL SWING
\ ind Trucks.







ar THANI BROS.

Pr «Wm. Henry &~ Swan Sts.

NOW and SAVE } |) WEST INDIAN },

: eae AND RELAX
i= & renewed Bedsteats, 3\f} PAINTINGS

&

;

YOU EAT WELL

Cal? today, for particulars

FRORMPT ?

{
\
‘
\



Deep Coil and Flat Springs, Laths, § |

{
i
v Dressing Tables $14 up. - 9 By ROBERT J. MAC LEOD \\



sbes, Washstands, Night- %&



HAS EVERYTHING YOU DESIRE.

|
$5 ‘up—Racks for Towels, % |
|













is ¥ ~ vee yang . and yt SLEEP WELL Se ‘ x
Meectent stor tae ed Poaemat Sif} an ics LOWEST PRICES ON RECORD! |

Fancy us Trolleys, Side-~ % | {\\ panes _ v by * o 3 :
and S ieee: a S| | _— — - FEEL YOU WILL AT ONCE SAY

1 Teeny Ge in Morris, © | Figure Drawings 0 j ? ~— ——- ki ee

; t Ohevel and. & ) -_ ~~ - = when you take J a . 1a ‘ ’
COURTEOUS Zoo meaciitne 7, x 16-- : } West Indian Subjects i} ~~ — Reet “ “<7HIS IS THE SALE FOR ME” i
‘ r ‘_e % GRAND PRAM ; ae - SONNY si S 5 5 ‘
SERVICE x %| ee oe $100,000.00 Merchandise offered at {i
Sa) 3 L.S. WILSON 3)]) open ras. o—wanci # Rediculous Low Prices.
PHONE: 4599 % Y arian. uLkr bbe, Si 10 a.m.—6 p.m } , i
== ee a STOKES & BYNOE LTD. ee
























TUESDAY,



HENRY





IN DEATHLESS SILENCE, THE BLEAK



JOHNNY HAZARD

| 2, ANTON, TO INVITE ME
| TO JOIN YOU TWO..
| SHA'N'T BE LONELY MUCH
| LONGER / WeA\y, THIS



FEBRUARY 5, 1952



BY CARL ANDERSON



BY ALAN _STRANKS

@O0D!.. YOURE DRIVING US TO

STRAWS WHARE-POOL OF

4ONDOM +44 GOTTA GUY

STRAIGHTENED OUT THERE...

WELL aa iS 4 NE LITTLE
°






& GEORGE DAVIES
FA



7” OUTSIDE ...1 WAS |

JUST DRIVING OFF WHEN
( 1 HEARD VOUR SHOT...









1 CAME Back AND FOUND ¥

LL HOLD HIM, ELMER,
WHILE YOU RUN OFF-
AND WELL MAKE HIM
CATCH YOU FAIRLY

DAGWOOD -- YOU TOLD
ELMER A FALSEHOOD --
THAT WASN'T FAIR

ae)

I_HAD TO RESORT
TO TRICKERY TO
CATCH HIM FOR

HIS BATH

ae nee)
PLEASE st)

BY DAN BARRY

~.. THE HO {

E HOPE OF “ESCAPE. Mf }

\/ READY? —IM
IT¢ HING/! LET'S

Bur, WITHIN It
HER STEEL 4:50 AM
. rt READY
Big moe? )
READYING
THE ROCKET,

ononaee
OWMEER ,
AN i
EARLY DAWN
LAUNCHING!

© For, WHEN
4] FLASH GORDON
Ea ANC HIS CREW WERE
FORCED TO LAND
HERE FOR EMERGENCY
I REPAIRS, A BURNING
HOPE SPRANG UP
IN THE HEART OF
EVERY CAGED
SOUL ON THIS
FLOATING “DEVIL'S
ISLAND *..

PRISON IN SPACE HANGS IN THE
COLD, BLACK VACUUM ABOVE eee
EARTH LIKE A SLEEPING SIAR...

BY FRANK ROBBINS













MY DEAR MISS LAURIE /

Tree 2 te ‘

— are | ¢ SEE... IT uy ei “AGE, MIGS veo F

2 THE COFFEE CAN’T BE RECEIVED THIS CABLE Ress fei jew SE VORRIE WILL BE AS tine ee”
| (T WAS SWEET OF YOU, TOO STRONG FOR ME, FROM MY BETROTHED, ~~ S| | DEPOT WAITING FOR ME WHEN .

WEE DORRIE / ALL WE REACH PARIS /

-BUT T





"LL TAKE THAT~I
HAVEN'T ANY MONEY
AND I MUST GO TO
THE MARKET-

<1) ARE YOU CRAZY? EVEN

iF I WERE MADLY IN ae ae

WITH YOu, I ae ae T
PLANS FOR OUR WEDDING} BE QUEEN OF A KINGDOM
+s; THE CEREMONY WILL / WHERE I MIGHT GET SHOT
Mas! fy Ee ei NOON / OR POISONIZD ANY MINUTE!

MY DEAR, IN THE KINGDOM ol KAZAR
THE MAN DOES NOT PROPOSE
MARRIAGE, HE

OMMANDS

THANKS, SHEIK... 019

SIR T rmeae ae KIND

(GOIN’ TO Th’. JUNGLE, ARE YOu,
| BABY? WELL +1 LL GE THERE, TOO!
GUNNIN’ FOR Yous,
* ne AW
\A we AaA\
ear) \*



BARBADOS



















Al









IVOCATE PAGE SEVEN







APO AI tt ete Aha
LLL LIE OF

356004
Make Your Party A Suctess

with -
Bots. Cocktail Onions
Angostura Bitters

FOR LASTING

Tins

Peanuts
. Cocktail Biscuits
° Sausages
ALITY & SHADES “os Swen
. Coffee
Pkgs. Icing Sugar
y » Blancurauge
Puddmes
Tins Custard Powder
‘ G. F. Juice
INSIST ON : Oa G F sulce ,
. . O, Jule
% Prunes per Ib.
Ss Roisons per Ib
Re Ec % % Peanut: per Ib
GISTER \ % Bacon per Ib

‘trom



: STUART & SAMPSON
: (1938) LTD.

g Headquarters for Best Rum.

Se CLL AAG
A. FEPSSOSSFSOIOOIG

We have just

Received
e

‘lum Pudding

— eas Biscuits
Cream Crackers
Pea Nuts ,
Pears, Peaches, Grapes %
and Pineapples
Soups

SSPE EL LSPS SPSS LSPS

Coffee
Shell Almonds (Retail)
Pkgs. Mixed Fruit
Raisins, — Prunes &
Mixed Pee!
Table Malice, Jams, Table

'

READY MIXED

PAINTS

AN I. C. 1 PRODUCT
A. S. BRYDEN & SONS (os) Lip.

AGENTS

Tins Orange, Grapefruit,

O. & G. PF. Juices ‘
Luncheon Beef, Roast Beef §
Tea (pkg. Lipton’s Horni-

man’s Typhoo, Red Rose)
Cocoa (Fry's Peter’s Round

Trees)

< INCE & + Co. Ltd.

S 8 & 9, ROEBUCK ST.
$

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PAGE EIGHT



PETER WILSON SAYS

.

Let Ss
‘Amateur’

VERY



Abolish

The Word

At Next Olympics

SOON the Winter Olympics will start at Oslo

ind later this year the XVth Olympiad begins in
Helsin
At the opening ceremony for both the Winter and
Summer Games a famous athlete from each competing
nation will mount the rostrum and take the following
Olympie Oath :—
s This is what I would like to
* We swear that we will take see happen in these next Games
part in the Olympic Games in _the realism which prompts the
loyal competition, respecting the often despised table tennis to
regulations which govern them

and desirous of participating in
them in the true spirit of sports-
manship for the honour of our

country and for the glory of sport.”

Furthermore, no doubt, in a
prominent place, will be displayed
the ideal of Baron Pierre de Cou-

bertin, who revived the Olympic
Games in 1896, which reads
“The important thing in the

Olympic Games is not winning but
taking part. The essential thing

in life is not conquering but fight-
ing well.” 4
High sounding words; Fine sen-

timents! Noble, lofty aspirations!
And alas, so much hooey!
Much as I regret to say this I

believe the time has come to abol-
ish the very word “amateur”
Lost Its Meaning

It has Jost all its original mean-
ing, and I do not believe that on
athlete in ten from some of the
Continental countries—and I sus-
pect from Russia—could put their
hands on their hearts and swear
that they were deriving no finan-
cial benefit from their status
Olympic stars.

Jreat Britain on the whole will
probably be the most purely
amateur nation in the Olympiad,
and that is at least one reason
why our successes in the recent
Games have been so infrequent.

As someone who takes a lively
interest in this problem put it
to me the other day: “Conditions
have so changed throughout the
world that amateurism is in most
cases impossible and in all cases
improbable.”

n the Winter Games our ath-
letes—for the most part restricted

as

to those few people wealthy
enough to afford brief winter
sporting holidays abroad—will

have to.compete against the top
professionals from countries where
ski-ing and similar activities are
virtually national games, The for-
eigners will be known as “sii
teachers.”

In we Soccer, which is part of
the Summer Olympics, we shall

send a team of pure (more or
less) amateurs, whereas it has
already been suggested that the

draw no finicking distinctions be-
tween amateur and professional,
but to call everyone “players”
and let each competitor more or
less decide his own status.
—L.E.S.

W. Indies In Good
Position Against
Otago

DUNEDIN, Feb. 5.

On the third and last day
of the match here, at lunch
time Otago was dismissed
by the West Indies in their
second innings for 176. The
West Indies needed 159 to
win with 225 minutes left for
play.

In the first innings the
West Indies had had a lead



of 18 runs, having scored
249 for 9 declared in reply
to Otago’s 224.



ty Wealth vs. St. James

Match Ends In
Exciting Draw

An exciting



one-day cricket
match between Commonwealth
Sports Club (St. Miohael) and St.
James Sports Club ended in a
draw at Merlyn grounds yester-
day.

Batting first, Commonwealth
scored 108 runs and skittled out
St. James Sports Club for 58 in
their first innings. Common-
wealth S. C. took the chance of
sending back St. James S.C. with-
out their (Commonwealth’s) tak-
ing a second

innings, and ina
very thrilling finish, St. James
S.C. lost their last wicket at 50

runs—the amount needed to wipe
off the deficit,

E. Breton, 28, D. Elcock, 22,
and J. O, Tudor, 10 not out, were

Austrian team which drew with the best scorers for Common-
the full professional might of wealth in their only innings.
England may represent their “Pappy” Walcott of St. James
country, S.C. took 6 for 20 in a fine bowl-
Tennis Lead ing performance and V. Todd 2

s = ae

Recently the lawn tennis gave for 29.
the lead in the war on “shama- “Pappy” Walcott, making 18 in
teurism’—that unlovely word the St. James S.C. first innings,
which was largely coined in con- ang §, Lewis 20 runs in the

nection with the tennis racket.

Viscount Templewood, the pres
ident of the Lawn Tennis Asso-
ciation, announced that a special
committee has been appointed by
the Lawn Tennis Association to
see how far help can be given to
really promising young players to
continue to play first-class tennis,

This is straight subsidisation
and, of course, has nothing to do
with amateurism. And I am very
glad to see it.

The day of the amateur, apart
from friendly garden party or vil-
lage green sport, is over.

Big-time international sport is
now so much a matter of national
prestige that outstanding athletes
are now ambassadors-at-large.

We cannot afford to have our
ambassadors failing from continent
to continent through lack of funds,
which have hampered them in
obtaining facilities and, indeed, in
getting even the necessary time



. to prepare themselves properly for

events like the Olympics.

In the words of Viscount
Templewood: ‘In these difficult
days, no one has the time, the

leisure, or the money to devote a
life to any game.”

All The Best

And as we Uiympic Games are?
in iact, world cuampionsoips for
a great many sporti, 1 want
see the best ainietes, whether
amateur or professional, repre-
senung their respective coun-
tries.

I know that the idea
pure amateur is an admirable
one, but unless every national
truly abides by it the Olympics
become sordid affairs in which
those nations who try to keep to
the spirit are humbled by coun-
tries who have decided that “The
important thing in the Olympic
Games is winning.”

Oddly enough the Games
by no means always

of the

have
been ama-

teur, for long before the original
ones were suppressed by the
Roman Emperor Theodosius in
A.D, 393, they had become pro-
fessional, with the greatest ath-
letes of the then known world
CAPES.

second, were the only two bats-
men of that team to reach double
figures during the match,

Keith Bowen turned in the best
bowling performance for
Commonwealth S.C. He captur-
ed 2 for 14 in the first innings and
6 for 22 in the second innings.
Other good bowling perform-
anees were those of J, Graham

and C, C, Clarke of Common-
wealth S.C, who took 3 for 8 and
8 for 7 prepectvery in the first

innings of St. James S.C., and D.
Eleock who took 3 for 6 in the St.
James S.C, second innings.

The wicket considerably help-
ed the spinners, especially during
the later hours of the evening.



Ellis Achong To Go
Back To Trinidad

LONDON,

Aftey 18 seasons as a profes-
sional in League cricket in Lan-
cashire League, Ellis Achong, at
present with Walsden in the
Central Lancashire League, is to
return to Trinidad before next
stason,

He has taken over 2,000 League
wickets 1,650 of them in the
Central Lancashire League, where
he has been for 13 seasons

—B.U.P.



WHAT'S ON TODAY

Court of Ordinary: 10.00
a.m.
Court of Appeal: 10.00 a.m.
Police and Petty Debt
Courts: 10.00 a.m.
Inquest into the death of

Herbert Davis at District
‘A’ Police Courts: 1.00 p.m.

Meeting of the Legislative
Council; 2.00 p.m.

Meeting of the House of
Assembly; 3.00 p.m.

Mobile Cinema Show at St.
George's Almshouse: 17.30
p.m,



“SAY AL~I HEAR OL LADY
GARGOYLE'S PLACE IS FoR

SALE*WHATS SHE

NOT THAT IM INTERESTED. |
JUST CURIOUS« IS IT

INSULATED ? WH:

ASKIN'2/

AT

KIND OF HEATING

PLANT ? €Tc,,





BLANKETS, OR A REAL.
ESTATE MAN FROM

BARBADOS ADVOCATE



THOMS FIELDED HY WEEKES





THOMS (5) fielded by Weekes off Gomez during the Fifth Test at Sydney cricket ground on January 25 last.

Police Gain
Lead Over
Boys’ Club

In the Police-Combined Boys’ London usually has only
Club one day cricket match at Opportunity each year to see a
Queen’s Park on Saturday, the Rugby League match. The occa-
Police gained a first innings lead sion is the League Cup Final

on the Boys’ Club. Batting first,

the Boys’ Club XI scored 87 runs,

A. Best topseoring with 35 and
G. Sobers 28. E. Sealy took four
for 17.

Bowling for Police I. Springer
and O. Marshall took two wicket
each,

A breezy 42 retired by E.
Denny was perhaps the feature
cf the Police first innings who had
scored 119 runs for the loss of

seven wickets when stumps were

arawn.

Three of the Police wickets were
taken by A Best and he conceded
Sealy took

25 runs in doing so, T.
two for 25 and K. Barker
for 42.

Football At

; o.

Garrison
There will be
this afternoon
Savannah
Plantations
from Messrs.

and Co.,
o'clock.



the
a team

and a
Musson,

at
between
Ltd.,

ie

The teams are:—

Plantationg Ltd: G.
C, H, Kinch, E, A, Deane,
Patterson, L, Warren,

J.
A, Hazell,

K, Jordan, S. Smith, D, Allamby,
R, Greenidge, (Capt.);
ney.

S. P. Musson: A. Moore (Capt)

R. B. Noel, D, Medford, H. Roett,
A. D. Hutchinson, M. Stoute, H,
Ingram, M. Spence, E,. L, Rogers,
Jnr. E, Lb. Rogers, Snr, A.
Ingram,



WEATHER REPORT

YESTERDAY
Rainfall from Codrington:
Nil
Total Rainfall for Month to
date; .02 in.
Highest Temperature:
84.5°F
Lowest Temperature:
67.0°F
Wind Velocity: 8 miles per
hour
Barometer (9 a.m.) 29.994,
(3 p.m.) 29,928
TODAY
Sunrise: 6.10 a.m.
Sunset; 5.58 p.m.
Moon; First Quarter, Feb. 2
Lighting: 6.00 p.m.
High Tide: 1.24 a.m. 11.42
p.m,
Lew Tide: 5.40 a.m., 7.34
p.m,





SEE HOW
f ITLL TAKE TO
GIVE ALL OF US
PNEUMO)

Every Business HAS
THEMâ„¢THE PROSPEC
WHO WON'T COME IN

one

a football matcn
Garrison
from
team
Son
Ltd. Play begins at 5



a

which is now played

in

this match are
Treassive
as a

dof before they returned to New
Zealand
so this game was arranged. From
an attendance point of view it was
a flop.
week game but even
this,
was
week soccer
play
to
ind
higher.

watehed the Rugby Union Inter-
Marshall, national

‘
ti

jong
atmosphere has a great deal to do
with every

———— +








SEES.

S. Wales at Twickenham on the pre-
vious

N.McCon- mere handful.
Stamford
looked lost.



_—Consolidated Press Photo. _

Rugby League Comes To
London—But Not To Stay

at Wembley
figures for
good; it fills the
Empire Stadium which
capacity of 99,000, The crowd

April. Attendance

later in the week, and

Admittedly it was a mid-
allowing for
the crowd of just over 6,000
extremely poor. For a mid-
match Chelsea, who
at Stamford Bridge, reckon
attract a crowd of about 30,0006
frequently the figure is

Small Crowd
Compared with the 73,000 who

between England and
Saturday,
the New

the crowd whoa
Zealanders was a
And in the vast
Bridge Stadium they
This may have beet
» reason that the game took so
to warm up. Undoubtedly

w
to

this
OSE ODODSOSSR SOFEY PPSFOOOS:

* CHECK

match and on

League
also
movements

fed by
two.

son,
Ward, wen



one occasion\it was lacking.
Londoners took a long while to
get used to the play-the-ball rule
which is such a highly advertised
feature of League rugby. As soon
as a player is grounded with the
ball the referee blows his whistle
and play comes to a
halt.

The tackled player

is drawn mostly from those who the ball between his legs and
s take advantage of the cheap-day heels it back to one of his own
‘rain excursions to travel down side who then either bullocks his
from the North, way through the opposition or
But what chance has Rugby else starts up a passing move-
League football of gaining per- ment.
manent popularity in the south- The British Empire XIII con-
ern stronghold of Rugby union taining two great wingers in
und soccer. The answer, if one Bevan and Cooper, the Australian
is to judge from the match on captain, showed how rapid mov-
Wednesday between the New ing of the ball can result in tries.
Zealand touring team and the But it was noticeable that fre-
British Empire XIII at Stamford quently the ball passed through
Bridge is next to none. four or five pairs of hands before
The Rugby League tourists any player began to move at
wanted to play one game in Lon- gpeed. This is undoubtedly one

of the big draw-backs of Rugby
the forwards

with
part

for

taking in

The New Zealand

the longest

expose this weakness,

Joy to Watch

Some of these second half pass-
ing movements
watch.

were a
There

temporary
drops

the passing
it is often a case of
too many cooks spoiling the broth.

At half-time the Empire XIIT
six points (two tries) ta
score
came from a penalty goal kicked
by full-back White from fully 45
yards—surely
ever scored at Stamford Bridge.
Shortly after the interval, John-
the New Zealand prop-for-
t off with a shoulder
injury and then the British Empire
side really showed their power.
The absence of Johnson meant
that there was frequently a man
over and, flinging the ball around
the
Empire players added four tries,
each of which Ernest Ward goaled.

goal

joy to
is no doubt that,

when it comes to handling, the
League players. can show one or
two tricks to most followers of
Rugby Union. And I am sure
that England Rugby Union selec-
tors would be delighted if they
could call upon the services of a
winger such as Bevan, who side-
stepped the opposition with the
grace of a ballet dancer before
setting off at Olympic speed to
score his try.

But tradition dies hard. For
the present, I cannot see League
Rugby making any real progress
in the amateur south, at least not
until it has undergone one or two
changes, particularly as regards
the play-the-ball rule.

Many of the spectators at Stam~
ford Bridge found it hard to un-
derstand why the player tackled
in possession should be allowed
to retain the ball for his side.
Their view, and I agree with
them, is that instead of openfng
up the game the play-the-ball
rule tends to close it up.

League Game Would Benefit

I feel sure that the League
game would benefit if the sida
tackled with the ball were to lose
possession, This ruling would
result in more passing and would
also cause players to utilise the
thort kick ahead which is) se
popular in thp Union game.

Rugby Union would probably
be a much better spectacle if the
wing forwards were eliminated
and each side played only 13 men.
Passing movements would then
be given more chance to develop
and we would not have the some-
times boring spectacle of a harass-
ed serum-half continually kicking
the ball into touch.

Die-hard supporters of Rugby
League may not admit that the
Union game has anything to offer,
and vice-versa. But the common-
sense view is that they can and

—PO°SESOSSOE SSS SOS ESEPE OSES

YOUR REQUIREMENTS

FOR THE FOLLOWING
USEFUL ITEMS

COURTESY
GARAGE

Robert Thom Lid.
White Park Rd.
‘Dial 4391

56 GCCCOSSSO4

——.

LLL OLEOCCCEE LOSES

Sun visors (anti-dazzle)
Cigarette Lighters (6 & 12

volts)
Reverse Lamps
Rear view Mirrors—
ears/trucks
Chamois Leathers
Dust Cloths
Contact Files
Fender Tape
Rimbellishers—chrome
plated

Steering-wheel Covers



PODOSSSSY

Licence Plate Jewels

Hood Ornaments

Trouble Lamps

Feeler Gauges

Ignition Testers

Battery Hydrometers

Air & Water Hoses

Polishes & Waxes

Etc. Etc.,

and a large supply of .
SLEDGE HAMMERS 7Ib

and 16Ib complete with
handles.

LAP LAPS SD



3



EVERY SLICE

Is

EXTRA NICE



WE DON’T BAKE
ALL THE BREAD
WE ONLY BAKE

THE BEST

On sale a: a

J & R BAKERIES

and GODDARD'S





TUESDAY, FEBRUARY 5, 1952
C.S.0.B.A. MEETING



should learn from each other. Then
maybe the time will come when



we shall see one Rugty code Members of the Combermere
played throughout the world with! School Old Boys’ Association who
professionals and amateurs play-| are interested in football will
| ing together. meet the Honorary Secretary of

the Association at Combermera

NETBALL MATCH
POSTPONED

Due to the death of Mr. William
Antrobus, an assistant master at
Foundation Boys’ School, the
netball match whie was sched-
uled to have been played yester-
day between Foundation Girls
arid Queen's College was postpon-
ed until February 15 when it will
be played at Queen’s College.

School this afternoon at 5.00 p.m.

WATER POLO
and DANCE

AT THE

Barbados Aquatic Club

(Local & Visiting Members)
ON



To Our Friends
From Overseas

KINGSLEY
RESIDENTIAL
cLUB

AT BATHSHEBA

SAT. 9th FEBRUARY, 1952
Water Polo
Ladies vs.

Gents vs. “Devonshire”
Dance 6 p.m. to 8 p.m.
ADMISSION
to Water Polo & Dance 1/6
(Proceeds for Water Polo
Association)



ROYAL BARBADOS
YACHT CLUB.
NOTICE

A DANCE

in honour of
The Commanding Officers,
Officers and Cadets of Bis

Welcomes you and offers ¥

LOBSTER
LUNCHEONS

which include our

— ATURDAY Oth Feb
8. eby,
MERINGUE PIES 1952.
Dancing from 8.00 p.m. to

in Coconut, 12.00

midnight.
ADMISSION will be $1.00

Lemon or oe person a
For Members and their
Orange Friends.
By order of,
The COMMITTEE OF
DIAL 95266 MANAGEMENT,
T. BRUCE LEWIS,
12,1.52—4n. Manager & Secretary.

——————



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Full Text

PAGE 1

c TUESDAY, HBRfARV 5. U52 BARBADOS ADVOCATE PAOI FIVE M Vlllll rflMl .-. v^dl -rf Vs. *VMi .^P^S^'r** •>" |B IMP* | HI .lie SJI ^LT — J ^^^M St^st^ H ^ %  ^H B II F"^"^ JHU ** nraa 7 J %  **ii > i D i v^|n . AukC 7^*tfv HgMduBB B ^-MB 1 Chancery Suit Adjourned Mr. O. O. W air.HI RRY st'lT I'. ml C T .-! N.I Agreed i did i>"' t %  i Mi J v> H Ihat Ihei % %  %  Thr Head ppellam Joaeph %  crtekc prove I In the dto %  %  ra ong i*ic pioneers lr -i-v-ei-l other Meld*. The Si J,.*eph Boys' School Band stage* %  %  %  •' the present IV Md th.i. ti..mir. with him Mi birthplace v.. Ouiie HI 8 .'.it v here in, %  ..r Ih. St Silas Rvyi an the retiree i \\ o. Mi %  M Crtca in HMI than "Success Or Failure Depends On The Self 'discipline Of The British' VH RONALD TREE, former Britisl. I who is rptnding two months' holiday ai hli i Bay 1 SI junta, told UM Advocate yesthe next year as far as the future geonomy of "(•rned. must be a highly abn gg ro uj one. the Socialist Oov%  %  nt went out of office well 'Wtv of the situai .igh to-day. Mr Altlee : ting to water it down. .•in. success or failure < H discipline of I he British people and otf the guc.i %  %  n| tak< n of which the V ere presented list Mi B A H .tit i Chancellor of the Exchequer; and the i i be in tinEiudizci of %  the not Kclal io.lv hi|>s • laona why Mr Churchill hud recently lha United States of Mi Traa Bald ihat the MlnUter was van a/erried when he came into power in Oci i had built up between the U S and Britain durinK the war l v.i rioaa collaboration between the Chiefs of Staffs had uited. Ills object In going; to America in January, was tn attempt to rasa retail iships. and v that reason thai he took Bet fi 'iids in the %  such us Lord Ismay. the of State for CommonI %  lations. l.ord Cherwell ho had all matters of atomic science li hit hands in the CablI trw Chief <>f Staff. AIM... Ul iwea tn WnshmR%  %  Ml luiichills hope to IRK kind of rcip that existed during the only in I-ondon and also al various ifTl where the two team am m secrets %  Hoof Burnt The roof uf a hoirdrd BMi shiiiiilcd I ouw at H-rkwitu Mrt-et • dam.ijeil when a lire kiuke out si the house i* .ftft 3 or lock vesleri \ g i IILI,.IIMU .iiuat.-d i front ol the house and the '" Briiiade uxed ualer horn thk | pU l out the Idi /i I i nousr l occupied h> %  Ua-anleh, known io real* denu . tlanirk." Al the time of the lire he was not Waleoii teacher of St an also of St • I I Aubic> C K&rtOn, rl Jj" WakotT succeeded Mr i .m;i\. which H 3u Allan CoHymun laid Saouiel Thome at it %  rsU-i (.. avhen l %  that he did lUrl know on Pah's Church School ui 1! v hut grounds the in.-Uer wa> b< f"ii-hmi iy way of a raso J7 1 ?* iii BJM die j (Mr Gi anlles roaa from a leaaatHae or removed from Ihe .li appeal cause Uel al the COWf M ham th> up uf mt Appe.il in it Original Jul Ml .i W Mr. fe. k Wakott K atad with Mi .' I i Branc ke r, ... i K rtoi \ii a> i i I H—ifteld the i roi %  iinAsasstanl Court ->t j, ,,,,... ., ., ,,. ,. ,,, founded Ihe M BUM Men'0 I it was not cimipeieiii for ih. no-rd i„ h ( .,,,. ins Intereal In edtieaUon was Court to lake notice of the H codings '' .linf stated i *• benaoi "f hi llu Loidsliulefctc .dmmn.n "' "' *' %  %  •' kw '" un,i km,t ne of the su.1. sa,d that he o,d .... > *"<"'•' the matter and Mr Adam* M on wha, grounds lha matter wag f ho 1 '*' "* notice o. appeal l he pi rfore I %  ( Ihe *""' c,v M ternimiiled. case slated '" l WW* clichriainliff's KwaYnce The jurUdieiion of that Courl %  '•"' u ''; Evidence had been previouslv an matters of apical survlv anu ,',',' 'V *. iricn,i *, ,I v *' t last .ml ii fact Wllnn "' H ' "''' l ll ' Sl Jailii%  •-?• of "he A .I! ''.'"• %  "" *"<<*> %  • fcnuary 27 ^ppea^ Act ma [ • M> sorrowing r. I I <* %  '' p.itnv will I. luerlad IN trta '''"^ |feflga/l '-.viiii; | n> BOthorlt] tQ state a case He said th.it is hi ,\| been preeiol\ an piaintiiT R. C. Thylefj loti 1 1 A Tim UM. land -in %  %  i %  ,\ i .. %  % % %  .. %  %  The back gtoui ul >.( whieh can befon tha i that H lati for ih. Court oi *. hancenj M thi \ Mant I i' I'irned Trial Judge to return of Appeal Act BecUon 79. Hi* Ihe end of Ihia lagmth and he himHonour Mr .' W B ChMonj llf *"uld Uabsent from the %  UMd. colon) during next w-eek nt ihe (1) On July 22. 1B*. the ITWeal Indian four! of Appeal spoiiaent A i)e (.* Boyee u mortOuiana, it gagee of certain properties situ%  Ununoned, The re-aummoning ,iled in St. Phiiip. rtled an aclion for a date on notification In the Awi5U.nl Court of Appeal Solicitors of both parties during „.-.. nnnmn K*tns\ the respondent A. C. 'be ilt-i ... second BMak of the HAUDBT CUDJa .'IO/' Kirton. claiming payment of Ihe Marth A-si/c^ whan Ihe Art.nc mount secured bv Ihe mortgaga P|ll*ne Jud* Hi* lx-I II. A. of the_ foreclosure properties or Juatle* Q Li r ^ lor would le •tishan and Mi A J H~~Ha&In deCauli atla or" foroci^ MU, Jlldajf Blatant Among Ihese properties was ono i>urt of Api t,,,,,! parUcularl) described at contain' v*W3 mcij >r MM aervMe e %  %  wtloi ind lununon nt with bard laboui f..i inttetIn IIHuit. admltled lha imth of bodily ham VlVfan Jones the allegation i! contained and submitted to judgment (3) The order of (Vie Courl rJos '"""'"""'"" creed the sale of the D l J l describe.1 in the particular! of the residing, at that Court Shopkeeper Fined 30/%  I Mil H iii the A i > esterday Their Horn aughan and Mi A Filnl Maths Kook In W t -I hull. • gj ...tn l'ar I Tl.ce ialv. Ih H>de. /'would 1re'""'OOV ^"d Vou. This is not a ling v, r> t'^hn'cal work noi OM win. t )hP emphasises this or that viewpoint but nn obtectivelv u written study of the subject, ex plaining it in a manner which will pi W \ithiable to the layman oi .he student. I %  nn Novels Two other interesting novel) CMMrea Of The Areh6ish..f b Norman Colttna, author ol Loade HOonu* To Me,and Margaret K. i nedy's Liicp Cat. n.t> I., the suhieet matt.-i ( whui. borrower might ci.iH.se in the nm volume, lit %  tor] told i" Mi <">IILIIS eaotri lha life >r two nns-.r hildren from lht weU-knOWl FOR THE BEST .I.ITF.l %  III ll-ILI.I riiWI COVKR1NC SILVER STAR" CONGOLEUM INSIST ON SILVER STAR SOLD AT ALL THE LEADING STORES in ul Appc.1 urn Ml. K. A. J II HiU^TTo V^d i„ M/ !; %  ^.^ "''.''-''"'".'•" %  '"''-'"'^ "-%  i. default one month's Imprison>ient wilh hard labour on Heri,t Magistrate of-Di.V ^Ve'properTle.Vbe'^d^.i%  I th, court that on '• Ortober 5 19 B he was at n dance Halm riled at Silver Sands. Christ Church. <> " S*pt"nher 27. 194M. ihe and had a row with the defendant. PPlnt R. C. Taylor. flle.i a ... ll.e defendant hit him c '"' m ,or two roods. 21 pal CrossHoad. .„.„....,.• .t ng h" 'RONAI.II Iltl.l stick on the head Ward attended him. In Harlem Seethes Over B.W.I. Quota—Cut Plan land, part of a portion of I 2 roods. 2 perches of land described in the action. The ground of %  laim was thai the it Grant if I! ...til St. Michael fot kec| i".|. open on Sunday, August n i95i. fix the purpose of Balling Mi | w ii.ii row appear* i in the court nn behalf of ('.rant thrown glarv. tire vhirh the Heal Hi confusion by pur ,i tempor al one of It-s t and the hue and nv for lb) In luldici,, the Prt^j. C..IU paign and the eventual HOfJIi IMWee liiipin > .. ood roluma i uej (! the property called "Hurrismith purchased by him (R. C. Taylor) from Ihe Registrar-in-Chancery in the suit of Taylor v. Taylor on October IS. 1946. (ft) On the hearing of claims in this action. R. C T. lot \ Court* I raised an objection | n llml w of WEST INDIAN LEADERS in the Harlem area are up ">e Court's proceeding with Ihe in arms over a proposal to impose a quota on the number !"!" "*, u ',''"'" !l '''"""' > Of forming %  eoi I he f It that he had sue( i.irnde, IHftf 11 til | provide vei / vi n,foMn..t.<.ii f..i I %  wrll as the 2.WM1 oi more Un.Kadded during lha Urtbw half ol IBM, provide a wealth oi Uterai material for the ever increauiis number of borrower* who mag. %  tlea offered i HARRISONS BKOAD SI JC.ST A KKW OF THE MAN\ ITEMS WE HAVE KKl'KVlI.Y KKCKIVKl) %  AiinvFiiiii inmi s< \ns t oinplelc uilh N IV Weights ]<•/. to lo/s. Well linisli. il. ilrooglj consirticled and 'T -v^^ ucciu.ilc I si'tnl in |InHome No oflire J J^-0>' should be u.ll.oiil one. u\i\ 8H. II %  AMI 1^=* DRAIN (I F.ANINI. OUTFITS Sel g oaap rla ag III K.MK eiich .'I feel, with aolid BnaM I'.id IH I AcUasf connections, complete uilh all neressary liiini.:$32.38 i'i:ii si;i lillll) CAGES ^I^* In severul sizes and shapes jft—$r \„| ( mu reinarkal-lv low price* which beat all roiiipelilinu. I rom 9 | fo Stt. 72 riirh l.\IV,\.MSFI)liAIII{A(iFBIi\S Slrouuh made and heavily K&lvuniicd. Due to Control Restrictions in (.real llnLiin this l.i'J.l, pioleclixe linish is %  ml likely lo he n\nilrble again for an iiidelinile period. i::^ III V A lll\ Tl) D.W : II III |SM Mi-ill. 1MB. Ilia. $10.11 I .nil Mill Al.l. KINI1S (II I1I1MI sill II \KllH on: — TIIV — HARRISON'S BROAD ST TEL 2364 lo. Public l.ii.i ta of DUIrlct "A." Counlo llio Want t .r Maiir Ix-ucock • ilrl to hin Hankcr'x ImqUBti To IUIli-M To-day i.iinie— t| Uui Hill." he said. Mazie l>a.ock said that on c;hincery m 114B in the ult Tavlor i hi is no quota on OOUnFebruary 4. IB50 at about 10 a. IT. V Taylor: thai he ha.i lues in Central or South A INISSIHR II. front of a Mrs. Into poaaaaaioi <>f UM propertt H M UM defendant sudbut that n i u*hed out of lhat house and li.o esjeejltad b 'h.' ItCfliitrar HARBOUK EMPTY i length when %  li.n been completed. will probably din%  stone at her which cut the head md Mud tr* BDH bad %  I ., %  le D ,, • till lare loan =5SE .' %  %  :>ie Prim. .t thai tokei %  enMtea wbfa i tn take action on il in the next fe i i u >* .€> from the Sfloanwhlle JafB) B n othci amilor ;. prop ol iii Prime Minluit^ean imm : |Uola s 1' the past. H would look the Bill becoines las ,l he was merely ibbtbn is In our economic -ihead of public opinion and that rolltical and military orbit, and I compromise along those be,ides. the people of that area lines imRbi well be worked out MP of [h<. samt ,hnic %  • With the new Egyptian Govern,. ( ,llions of Negroe • %  "•** % %  *• >* k and found that she had M the left side of the head Mild have been caused by ,, ; rt |. rone blunt in-trument. t that sho Sim. Od heard Leacoek in nsg I the I %  lha bouag, |ha rui Before aha i I icb ihe front unrcha .'oor Leacoek and the Price Of Animal Feed From Pate 1 because some ol Ihi llgbtly highe. i. \m deal %  i Ln their vail A fion. 'J inside her fo turn have had to woi k Ml she was given -i nupondinii inco-ases. mainland.' he MI I itlng She never threw a dozen pint bottles of mm which fi.imerlv sold for 94.30, w.ll now His Worship Mr E. A. HcLeod t>e sold for $4 64. This r> | I DfM of .' %  to be paid an increase of M cent In seven davs or leven days' 1mor roughly 3 cents on 'he bottb rumt on Mazle Leacoek tor which is ulwut an B p<-i eerd Ingj On i'*r C crease on Ihe retail prlOl i an pi) days. Bui ind lugai shipped i" 'i %  • U K and Ca the harbour II %  t apei led, t'.ii !%  . :ij himand cmeriild green in one piece only. EVEBJ ASTIK SATIN BU m SI ITS. in black, royal blue and gold, one piece only, strap less KVEBLASTIC SATIN SWIM SUITS in multicolour and plain designs, one or two piece with straps. PRICES MI0.7. lo 917.2.1 CAVE SHEPHERD & CO., LTD. 10, 11, 12 & 13 Broad Street Phone A It's FREE! In order lo convince tl i Ihe superior quality ol OUT t:\KH III. i> IIKI \i> KK OF I HAIUJE :i loaf to the Al I l>ersons who ThOfM li II 1758. Only Phone Call* will h< acknowledged in this <>lfcr and we will DELIVER. N<> iiersnnal culls. i.lfer holda I>(MKI f< Ofh and Wednesday fiili F-bruarv BARBADOS BAKERIES LTD. MMBB STKKKT UIIK IMM Hill 01 • oi it mu I.I.ISI c_'i In ... %  Pi ni night foi .' i tin' .lav or night jroui oootoi in %  %  i 1-. i %  .ii mattu ul i" %  ftlli-'l and D3tpoi i phgrn.ii il 11 il I'cr Areurale I'resei iplinn Servi..-. ( I'.I il KVM.IIIS IIIIII. SIOIIIS SAVE ON THESE Oiialnslly ROftr.RTHON'H BFD CURRANT KLACK CURRANT. APRICOT 4 r.ASIHIiKRV JAM M HOOTCH ORANdK. SII.VKH .HIIKl'.U ooLDr.N mm MAKMAI.AIH: I %  KOBERTHONH KTRAWRKKRV JAM *.| ROBERTHON'H (UNORR MARMALADC %  UONDENAED MILK Si For Thi' Wk N DENMUK BONKI.KHH 1IAMH A BWINUB CANADIAN PUDUINI1H BUTTERSCOTCH CARAMEL. CHOCOLATE—p pkt.—36c. EWINOB PURE ALMOND EHSENCE per bottle 13 DAN1HH BALAMI SAUBAOE pr lb. 1 31 DANISH BLICED HAM I 18 BO'JTII AFRICAN ROCK LOBSTER )?ex tin . TOWER JELLIES pal pkt. .16 COCKADE RUM. MARTELI. BRANDY. BALLANTINES WHISKY 8TANSFEMJ9. SCOTT 4% #.#-•#.



PAGE 1

Mtwni CALM IN TUNISIA BROKEN AS POLICE DISPERSE GROUP TUNIS. Feb. 4. THE CALM which reigned over Tunisia for the past few days was broken today when the police fired mm ., KToup on the outskirts of the city killing one person. Trie %  ncident occurred m the suburb of Tunis known as Francevillp. where police patrols ran into a group fi>: street The police opened fire and one ptrton wus killed The group dispersed without further incident, the nuthnrtticsaw. Thli brings the death toll to 70 killed and more than 200 injured. since rioting; broke out here on Jan. 16. Authorities said today lhal ihe Nationalist Nrn I**tour re." McCarran said he had no idea how Spain nwgiil ilgunm (he K Htramme yet to be submitted to ogress for United States foreign aid during the Ha-ft3 Itacal year. A dim nut ration sources said it still is too early to aMOUiate >> 1%-. Qi,.i->* .,_ total to $55.000 000.000 and Truman ordered a further cut of M.000.0O0.0O0 before sending a budget to Congress. Lovett sfcplalned that reductions were accomplished mainly by "stretching out the period in which readiness is to be achieved" —that is by postponing target dates for reaching the goals of 143 group Air Force. %  l!l Division Army, a Navy with 408 ships and .i three Division Marine Corps. —U.P. ituib Causes Plane Crash 1/7 Ou.irlr New Notes For Old Liukj; in UghftSgn African, John I**amcai, saved up his pennies which he changed into '• pound not* it Kalabo. N nih. em Rhodesia, Post Office He buried the note* undei Boor. The rains came. John dug up the notes and spread them in the open to dry. by a neighbour's goat. John killed ihe goat and rteovt shreds of the notes. Now Joint is claiming six new notes from tba !' %  • Office. But the neighbour H demanding £6 from John for the loss of his goat. Capetown: Mrs. S. Joubert who lives at a home for the aged at Paarl. near Cape Town, this week put on her lace bedjucket and a small lace cap on her head. It was a special occasion was expecting a visit from a member of her family's fifth generation Mrs. Joubert is 90 and her grand-daughter's granddaughter is iKv days old. Price Of AnimaTFeed And Rum Increase IN CLOSELY on the mcreasi s m-ounced by tin Control Office nn the prk* of -'.IIMM.1 rial i piii-keept^is weajV this m'irnmo, asked to pay 2 cenls mere on the prica f Balanced Animal Feed which fin Ihe lath of December last moved i centi pat pound to 9 tents per pound. Tin* .mi i ec HI the price "f this commodity is due Co t d coal of the ingradianta which uo to make up ihii balanced taad, only recently ralaaaod iron controls, lid 1 h .; I though thev have been covered by exchange i tore than was anticip • The mcraast of about 11 *• on %  | | Till: WCDDIKU .HIT liunUag 1. if* • and the Daks of Edinburgh *m petni on i>tou feiudsUoa*. WAS ilven te thna by Uu Uruy Oaveinm -,,\ %  i .it,. His woeded UOBe* of Mount Kenya whn I'nneei* BUsabath fw days aa their way to An U lUa Ti. %  kslgg baill ul cedar iid iir4laii>*t on tba First Maths Produced In what might be Spain's -hare of 11M of MONTREAL. Feb. m cent light-bulb t failed was blamed Monday for the the programme of which Truman told Congress in his budget speed — (I'.P.) 4 Of "Gloria's" Crew Picked Up NEW ORLEANS. Feb. 4. The Navy said on Monday a navy cargo ship had picked up four crew members in a lifeboat from the schooner Gloria about 95 miles north of Ihe Carii-: trance to the Panama Canal. The Eight Naval DIM quarters said the rescue was mad* by the cargo ship Private John TTserson as a result of a message from Captain William Cowan of TfcT s —i to Captain I'. II. Jenkins. Coanmanding Officer of the Gulf Subarea Military Sea Transportation Service who said 18 additional persons were believed to be on the schooner. No details on reason for her distress were immediately ..v.iiUble. The Navy said the Gloria waa listed as an 87 foot schooner of Colombian registry. The Commandant of the Fifteenth Naval District at Balboa has ordered ken and air search of the area. The message from Thereon to the Transportation Services re "Sighted and rescued — four vivors in a lifeboat from school Gloria bound for Cologne. Eight* additional survivors are said to be on the schooner". —U-P. $4 000 amphibian airplane. Jean Paul Guulhier and a passenger were uninjured when the plane crash-landed in an unfrozen stretch of a river late Saturday. The plane sank in 40 feet of water. ithier said he decided to make an emergency landing in the river when the pilot light indicating the wheels were locked failed to fo on. —(I'.P.) Srkujlklll t'ounly. i, Th< biggest telegram in the history of the Western Union Company has just been delivered at the White House. It was 878 feet long, cil 2,940 dollars. totalled 80.000 words, and waa signed by 31,300 residents of Schuylkill County, Pennsylvania, who want •- see ., new air force base built in then county instead of the one next door. Moor head. Minnesota : The temperatuie was 3V degire. I-low zero when Ituy GUtettes creamery lorry broke down. The heater stopped working, so Kay crawled into the refrigerator ami. partment, where the tempeiatunwas only at ffaaalng point, ami spent a Mfug night. New York I Columnist Robert l'rilith Quiai Itu.irk. announcing that he in"rill tends to buy wh llamai I g| 93 cenls per lb., while steak stays at SI.50 a lb, says he quits likes whale, but does wish his wife would slick to 'come and get It" nt mealtimes instead i>f "Thar she blows'" Madrid: 'OandiauV H yeur-nld boar, has been killed. He was one of two hundred wild boatl killed in a hunt on near San Sebastian. In which two hundred spoilsmen took part. 'Grandfather'* was said to have killed ISO dogs in his lifetime. New York : New York Dsill News columnist John O'lknnnell oinn.i nting on the Tact that Churchill did not ask for monev m America, rraek* -He'll be back again. Winnie doesn't put all his bee* m one ask-it THE FIHST WORK of its kind ot be produced and. in the West Indie.-.-A \t School Geometry with Trigonometty tin two volumes — 1 AV 2 by Andrew (J. J Camacho. now Mathematical Tutor. Extra-Mural Department of the West Indies University Collega, is bcinn put into ciroulatton by thr Public library. Th work, available both in the %  Ubraiy, and in Hie partment, was printed by tlie rinidad Publishing ( oin|*in, and has a Forewi.nl b) Stl All..-, K' Chiel .1 \tm Barbados. rtsj IUUW i r-merl> ,. ll St. Stanislaus College. Hr.i|h Guiana. Man MB % % %  r. St. Mary's College. Trlniihaanatlcal Tutor, I'ollT-Or-M'AIN Fell l l "itrial Tiainhm Class. Port-ofQMlscUDa whether M, I'" nU the subject In Janet J*gan. wile of Hon. lit < lu-.iiu Jagsn, .> BBsBBbi i I*.. in Tubago IViiiidad Bun Jan<>l Jagan: IVotestLonly of a politic! iih to BHttBb Guiana favours PaasTaUon ol the West IndaSS mid a COUIHIIIOI .if Ihe QaSMtPtSSra (->' %  Council. was refused permission to remain | Si\ Tarts in Trinidad last Friday. On ar-I rival, she wus served with a bluo it bj ,I lj .PIH .,1*1 Ihp |.l*ll ,, ill ., 1 I W. Germany Offers Allies $2,500m. PARia Feb. 4. WEST CFRMANY offered on Monday tn make ;. S2>00,fJO0.000 contribution to Western European defence but the United States. Britain, and France demanded 20 per cent. more. The German delegation argued the defence contribution issue with the Commissioners of Bit: Three countries, the Allied Occupying Powers. — Germans sought to cut the amount which the Allies demanded. German delegates Franz Bluecher, Vice-Chancellor of the Bonn Government. Fritz Schaeffer. Finance Minister and Ludwig Erhard, Minister of Economics based the offer of 10.M0. 000,000 marks on an estimated fiscal vear national product of 127.000.000,000 mark.*. But westFISHING SCHOONER ON DRY DOCK Reds Claim Capture/ Of Island lUGHTH ARMY HEADQUARTERS, Feb. 4 Communists clulmed today to have captured a Korean island south of the 38th Parallel. Radio Pyongyang said Red troops seised Yuk To island south of On)in peninsula on the west coast of Korea Sunday, It said the island had been a refuge for South Korean troops driven from the peninsula by Communist troop*. The broadcast marked the ni-t time Communists have claimed to have captured an island south of the 38tli ParalW. However, they previously reported the capture of several Allied held islands off the north west coast of North Korea j Onjin peninsula which dips 1 SOIlUl of the Patallel was the first egment of South Korea seised by Communist!. in their invasion June, 1950. They reoccupied it fter the intervention of Allied railes south of the 38th Parallel i December. I9M and January 11*1, and still h Reds for a lime laid < laim U live inlands off the peninsula it 'legoliation.' nt Paniiunjom but last week wlthdre their demand —vr. Hid oa Hon. P, M. Hem examli ihls after.matl i noon prote-ting tba ban on Mrs ,""" ,! > Jagan and x^klng that ba bi allowed to remain in (he dttlOBJ wiUi complete freedom of movement and urging that a serious blow will be dealt Federation if not granted %  %  reason for tba u< siting back to the fl-hing banks. Britain Closing Canton Consulate GovL Officials Detained •in i in w books | ulallon at %  1 I M it ll the Dk of Wnllen with landoui %  in liook I %  blldhood until the day when he et sail from Itntain in voluntary JAKARTA. Fob 4 About 50 prominent Jakarta official. 1 have been detained by poUce over the weekend for questioning II %  ieekage oi .•.formation concerning I etary measures issued by the Go v. emmenl Saturday. Already on Friday details of immn I etary measures were known by most businessmen and according l.ey made use of "Information" which *'n* a State secret. Authorities are now trying to ordered because t.nd on' how the information was nough Britons In famed AluIS paoplo are still detention. A spok> LONDON. Feb. A Foreign Office communique said that Britain was closing its consulate in Canton. China. The shutdown was there was not the area to justify keeping Uv office open. It said that the th Attorney General's office said Chinese Red Government bad 'Government officials who gave been notified of the deeiMor the ; nformalion in question Britain nUo has consulates at "-.houM be Jailed ... Shanghai and TienUien, and ; Most details complicated ncv signed to the Schooner Pool while 'maintains a consular staff at the .measures known already Fridiy. the f.frtdiwd ff is consigned to the Communist capital of Peking. I Finance Minister JuM Barbados Import ft Export Co. t -— fj.r. said.— Vf. L'.N. AstM-uibK Vpprove C.O.L. Iiu'rt'a^' CM: is. M The Unite.! Assembly, pushing bard ni w loumment to-day overwhelimnKly approved a seven and a half Ml pant increase in the cost of living allowance for United Nations headquarters start in New York. Tb %  .'mil will cost Unite, i N.iti $1.3u0,iJUU. wss oppoeM until 1055. U.N. inUauon on tl tion of discriminaUon and protection of minorities had instructol die Council to call a meeting of tc Sun-< ommlaskm in 1052 Tr. Assembly also IS) to convene a Commiaiion on the .'utufc of women for one session each year, thus reversing EC.O.S.O.C. decision to cut ths C'lnimissiorr, meetings to orw* %  %  U II* BACK TO GRENADA After 'penrtinr two weeks' *llh his relat K bo Weat Indian in St. George's, return* Saturday I li W.I A (Hi On Page "i Book W.I. Zenith 44 Days Overdue Prince Philip \\ ill Play In Polo Match KENYA, Feb. astride a borrowed pon> will play In a polo ,; i lu i he'h will drive 10 the Nverl Pnl.. %  i i making, i fourioiith round-tii' < iini loaaaas over Ul I I. 'v. II. I, tJ 1 • in, ii aanuuiidi ,:•. given to tban i>> lha i Coisslt < Piiiifil 6i mastoi of the ship st first lie Sehi->ne. I' Inning hip but i late* ,,l-.,|! ... LAKE North ( it Feb 4 .. %  piai i % % %  %  i battlad WOTBIb> rescue 18 rrewmen of the Pani tglgBSrod inotor-shiiMtMi dltvan %  groiind b% i freak •• %  INI [Siro -utters. %  surf boat, and a i, icn %  i ..< i -iilj -"unlit ti %  eoait.il freighter lyinr • ill shore of the narrow port-mouth i ui,i on North c.irolinns lonel> %  Mi,*-r. ..,! .. |... • guard pianos flew her during the night Ob%  MM It ..-! $8.06, represents a m : 11 i-enU i>i'r lb. ol II per eenl advance on Ue .,. lha 18 th De' . %  %  II i iince of mi'k wlneh kg rtlU h.ing conESgi l>rarer iioultry I the same "me ilso advam,in tn r prka ..t eggs which IM now beb>g su>;d t ten eenl Discussing th,. recent in%  '• -i %  the |.i .. %  ':. ii butrhcr said; "We are bars Bfban %  >• wene prio, tc the %  given by Government in Die price of fresh meat." • lie think* that people who have to pay more for feed for their stock will want to •HI them .it a greater price than now oM \\ rill therefore either have with thai verv slight profit whlrh ha." been for many years, or ask 1 %  resiKindmg increase in the M ea mi have to pay foe hve%  %  k %  A housewife when tnlrt Oj the tin Prase In the prlee of feedstuff 1 w. re being %  '• %  e.1 week after week w< psn %  I % %  ibnest every SSStfttlSI it. m of foodatuhT used In the home, .mil the result Is that we have bean forced to make drasthi iiiese items. We are not ii .' i<> plan oar budget, and %  • l1 lv we are unable In 1 put Aside f<>. Ihe rainy day' as have been taught lo 00 %  Hi-pin t fmii. MOM I sl.itmg tli-i binw* tab t.uiou and on* tfablonrani atated tl ih (iu ber 23. The 1". I Hat %  with oth< %  W I i ni'i bops t" i.>pi "mi 'i. i'.l IT the y.rnllti iKhted. id i r Luxun Lin*r (rtU'ri Thieves' Hauls Total $94 Three crates of wiuivolued tlS.U. were Mtfl BjM Heginnld Holder's stall at th Public Miirket 00 Saturday. I h are hh property. The Standard Pharmacy Twedsldo Road was bgokon entered and a quuntity "f toothpaste, tootb brushes and UKHI,i value $•. stolen Tin Pharmacy Is the property of Mi B. franklyii. In connection with this Incident. Eur.er Lewis of My Lord's Michael, has i*en rhargrd by the p.ilne with breaklns go entering the same druu rtorc and itealiiiK the .irtleles \W ( B Oil! jit ptaatal e.i that II "t'Jge and li u pou: I % %  valued |i.4g. Wen stolen from tin kaad of the same plantatton lilO a.m. on Fridav and 111* am. on Saturday They re hi property. Kidnajt/H'd Girl Found FHANKFI'IIT. Feb. A. United todaj that U %  %  i ATII.> %  S .mlii\ t Mill tarj Iquarter: <:iid that they recrivr*! tl :' n, .i radio patfol which took I ui ii udstaiaeani 'hroughout Sot.' not say hart Mi. i i; wus found. The kidnapper wan not found. lii'lton lind been ndinr with two Army Sergeants In a |. II Ki.inkfurt to llannii on i %  i >' I I %  iti hiker. The loMkti repori caped from ICannheim J*i ba hebi than li-ivi' of! with IH Ar 'i>\ iiithoiittn *jid. —UP. NKW YORK. Hiving inn returned from n H %  I lies, tha i ladian PBcifle*i MJOtKton IbMfl B^Banaa of NeaUanri will do II i bat uti %  U %  will he V..ik. I ( %  l> BBS to New i UL .n bow for her M. %  anSleh started on : % %  .. in mi trip Marti on Fn tint.I ,.ii March 8 (14 %  days). dt are 1 Havana. %  i Wool, WlUeraatad, Bridgetown and i hai lotto Amalla. rha liner wdl be l>ack on Ue '. bag and Montreal n mid-May. —B.l'.P Siuiie Prices uns ,M 4 laaal sab nieat lieing tbe same aa %  iii-i meat!" she said "fcgss luh were once UoUklil h* gai. i • %  LO aaafj aai t\ iii.i. arg BBaas where people ... inding i . %  n lugher prices." She -.1,1 ll BfOJ reirelUble i'i ii Govemnirnl drrlded lo de%  onirol and eonaeouenUr rtinnve Ihe %ubsld> on imported animal reed at s tlmr when the prlee of r*enllal food Items >i it* brim inerpjsed. hut nhe II.IIM*. that In Ihe Intereal or (he health of ih. rmmunlt>. l.uirrnmrnt will do everyUiIni In id. II powrr U> enraurase Ihe i i.in ul ,,, %  :and nther "mil • lock Brha view to redu.it. ihe blah ni ol meal. %  AIII .-ils.. I r.-• lo | nt more H .|i" m mm becauie of an adviinre in the price of thli — 'fium yestcrdav MoloAse* Dearer I hi* tnrrense whlrh eomes nbour .it .drnut Hh . simi•' latl year u due portly % %  '.I.. | %  hnv.to piv more r She rontinued .\\tT nt Glbbs and sister istrate at District "D" yesterday. Ileadlev < 4 I.. %  %  The nr %  i ttempunf bring party leaders togetl 'immon tand The Bgyptlan Pra i eviewed the Anglo-Egyptian Al



Par bado:



ESTABLISHED 1895





CALM IN TUNISIA

BROKEN AS POLICE ,

DISPERSE GROU

TUNIS, Feb. 4.

THE CALM which reigned over Tunisia for the past
few days was broken today when the police fired into a
group on the outskirts of the city killing one person. The
incident occurred in the suburb of Tunis known as France-
ville, where police patrols ran into a group forming in the
street. The police opened fire and one person was killed.

The group dispersed without
further incident, the authorities
said. This brings the death toll
to 70 killed and more than 200
injured, since rioting broke out
here on Jan. 16,

Authorities said today that the

Nationalist Neo Destour (New
Independence) activities were
on the increase. Nationalist sa-
boteurs in the past two days

launched widespread attacks on
communication lines, telephone
and telegraph and electric pow-
er transformers throughout the
country, and early today at-
tempted to set fire to the Office
of the Ministry of Transport.

ee
ACTION
NEEDED
WASHINGTON, Feb. 4,

Senator Pat McCarran said
action is needed and quickly on
the plans to extend United States
economic and military assistance
to Spain. The Senator has been
in the forefront of Senate moves
for closer collaboration between
the U.S. and Spain.

“There has been too much delay
in getting aid to Spain started” the!
Senator told United Press in an
exclusive interview.

“Prompt action is what is need-
ed.” “I have been advised that the;
Mutual Security Agency will set
up a mission in Spain in a short
time” he added. “I hope it will
but I do not know when that will
happen. It should have been sent
before.”

McCarran said he had no idea
how Spain might figure in the





programme yet to be submitted to}

Congress for United States foreign
aid during the 1952-53 figcal year.

Administration sources said it
still is too early te late on
what might be Spain's share of
the programme of which Truman
told Congress in his budget oe

—(U.P.)

4 Of “Gloria’s’’
Crew Picked Up

NEW ORLEANS, Feb. 4.

The Navy said on Monday a
navy cargo ship had picked up
four crew members in a lifeboat
from the schooner Gloria about 95
miles north of the Caribbean en-
trance to the Panama Canal.

The Eight Naval District Head-
quarters said the rescue was made
by the cargo ship Private John

m as a result of a message
from Captain William Cowan of
Thorson to Captain P. H. Jenkins,
Commanding Officer of the Guif
Subarea Military Sea Transporta-
tion Service who said 18 additional
persons were believed to be on the
schooner. No details on reason
for her distress were immediately
available,

The Navy said the Gloria was
listed as an 87 foot schooner of
Colombian registry. The Com-
mandant of the Fifteenth Naval
District at Balboa has ordered a
sea and air search of the area, The
message from Thorson to the Sea
Transportation Services read:
“Sighted and rescued — four sur-
vivors in a lifeboat from schooner
Gloria bound for Cologne. Eighteen
additional survivors are said to be



on the schooner”, —U.P. 1







U.S. Slashes
Military
Budget

WASHINGTON, Feb. 3

‘rom All Quarters

New Notes
For Old

Luska; In eighteen months an
African, John Issamacai, saved up
his pennies which he changed into
six pound notes at Kalabo, North-
ern Rhodesia, Post Office. He
buried the notes under his hut
floor. The rains came. John dug
up the notes and spread them in
the open to dry. They were eaten
by a _neighbour’s goat. John



Defence Secretary Robert Lo-|killed the goat and recovered the

vett disclosed today that the fis-| shreds
cal 1953 military spending bud-|is claiming six new
slashed \the
$19,000,000,000 below the|bour is demanding £6 from John

by|for the loss of his goat.

get already has been
about
amount originally sought
the joint Chiefs of Staffs.
He warned an economy mind-
ed Congress any further cuts
would not be “prudent”. Lovett
testified before a Senate Appro-
priations Sub-committee consid-
ering Truman’s request for $52,-
000,000,000 for military expens-
es in the
July 1,
Lovett = the semen ge
head on testifying t e
seryices orlginatly sought $71,-
000,000,000 to reach “an accept-
able state of readiness” this year.

| He said his own office trimmed the
total to $55,000,000,000 and Tru-| House.

of} 2,940
sending a/words, and was signed by 31,306

man ordered a further cut
$3,000,000,000 before
budget to Congress.
Lovett explained that
tions were accomplished
by “stretching out the period in
which readiness is to be achieved”
—that is by postponing target
dates for reaching the goals of
143 group Air Force, a 21 Divi-
sion Army, a Navy with 408 ships
and a three Division Marine Corps.
—UP.

reduc-



Bulb Causes
Piane Crash

MONTREAL, Feb. 4.

A seven cent light-bulb that| whale,

fiscal year beginning | seneration,

mainly | new

of the notes. Now John
notes from

Post Office. But the neigh-

Capetown: Mrs. 5S. Joubert
who lives at a home for the aged
at Paarl, near Cape Town, this
week put on her lace bedjacket
and a small lace cap on her head.
It was a special occasion for she
was expecting a visit from a
member of her family’s fifth
Mrs. Joubert is 90
and her grand-daughter’s grand-
daughter is five days old,

Schuylkill County, Pa: The
biggest telegram in the history of
the Western Union Company has
just been delivered at the White
It was 878 feet long, cost
dollars, totalleq 80,000

residents of Schuylkill County,
Pennsylvania, who want ‘to see a
air force base built in their

county instead of the one next
door.
Moorhead, Minnesota : The

temperature was 29 degrees be-
low zero when Ray Gillette’s
creamery lorry broke down, The
heater stopped working, so Ray
crawled into the refrigerator com-
partment, where the temperature
was only at freezing point, and
spent a snug night,

New York: Columnist Robert
Ruark, announcing that he in-

tends to buy whalemeat at 93
cents per lb., while steak stays at
$1.50 a lb, says he quite likes
but does wish his wile

failed was blamed Monday for the/ would stick to “come and get it”

loss of a $4,000 amphibian airplane.| at mealtimes

instead of “Thar

Jean Paul Gauthier and a passen-{ she blows!”

ger were uninjured when the

Madrid: “Grandfather”, a 20-

plane crash-landed in an unfroz-| year-old boar, has been killed. He

en stretch of a river late Satur-| was

one of two hundred wild

day. The plane sank in 40 feet} boars killed in a hunt on an estate

of water.
Gauthier said he
make an emergency

decided to} hundred
landing in|‘Grandfather” was said to have

near San Sebastian, in which two
sportsmen took part.

the river when the pilot light in-| killed 150 dogs in his lifetime.

dicating the wheels were locked
failed to go on.

—(U.P.)







— - eee,

POCKET CARTOON
bs OSBERT LANCASTER









“1 wouldn't be surprised tf
Miss Thorneycrojt were
shortly to abandon her
opposition to lowering the
school-leaving age.”



| the 38th Parallel.

° 4 previously reported

\4 e erman y ffers lof several Allied held islands off
|

Allies $

New York: New York Daily}

TUESDAY, PEB




oe?

THE WEDDING GIFT hunting lodgé on the wooded Slopes of Mount Kenya whore Princess
and the Duke of Edinburgh will spend a few days © their way to Australia
on stone foundations, was given te them by the Kenya Government in 1047, and lies almost on the

Equator.—-EXPRESS.,

First Math
Produced In_ W.1.

THE FIRST WORK of its kind ot be produced and,





RUAR

agorce

published in the West Indies—-A New School Geometry with
frigonometry — in two volumes — 1 & 2 by Andrew G. J.
Camacho, now Mathematical Tutor, Extra-Mural Depart-
ment of the West Indies University College, is being put
into circulation by the Public Library.

Trinidad Ban
Janet Jagan: |

ProtestLodge |

(From Our Own Correspondent)
PORT-OF-SPAIN, Feb. 3,
The question whether Mrs.
Janet Jagan, wife of Hon, Dr,
Cheddi Jagan, a member of the
British Guiana Legislative Council
will be able to holiday in Tobago
to see Carnival in Trimidad as
planned will be decided by the
Executive Council tomorrow,
Mrs. Jagan who ig a member
only of a political party in British
Guiana favours Federation of the
West Indies and a Councillor of }
the Georgetown City Council, |
was refused permission to remain
in Trinidad last Friday. On ar-
rival, she was served with a blue)
slip signed by an official of the
Immigration
that she has been refused permis-
sion to visit Trinidad. |
A delegation of political organi- i







This work, available both in the

Reference Library, and in the
Adult Department, was printed by
the Trinidad Publishing Company,
and has a Foreword by Sir Allan
Collymore, Kt. Chief Justice of
Barbados.
The author, who was formerly a
Master at St, Stanislaus College,
British Guiana, Mathematical
Master, St. Mary's College, Trini-
dad, and later Mathematical Tutor,
Intlustrial Training Class, Port-of-
Spain, presents the subject in a
simple and clear manner without
any saerifice of accuracy, It is a
work suited even to very young
students as well as to those who
havé no previous knowledge of
eometry, since it begins with ‘de-
nitions and simple geometrical
stre whose. truth ee he
re@dily abstracted pei
ence, or evolved from the funda-
mental notions’, and continues to
a logical sequence of theorem,

Six Parts

It is set out in six parts, and
contains all the subject matter re-

Department nee for geometry and trigono-

metry in the mathematics sylla-
bus of the School Certificate of
the Cambridge University local

News columnist John O’Donnell,| sations called on Hon. P, M, Reni- | examinations, and the elementary

commenting on the fact that
Churchill did not ask for money
in America, cracks: “He'll be
back again. Winnie doesn’t put
all his bees in one ask-it.”

Reds Claim
Capture
EIGHTH ARMY HEAD-
QUARTERS, Feb. 4.
Communists claimed today to
have captured a Korean island
south of the 38th Parallel. Radio
Pyongyang said Red troops seized
Yuk To island south of Onjin
peninsula on the west coast of
Korea Sunday. It said the island
had been a refuge for South
Korean troops driven from the
peninsula by Communist troops.
The broadcast marked the first

time Communists have claimed to
have captured an island south of



However, they

the capture

‘the north west coast of North
Korea.

Onjin peninsula which dips

2,.000m.

PARIS, Feb. 4.

WEST GERMANY offered on Monday to make a
$2,500,000,000 contribution to Western European defence
but the United States, Britain, and France demanded 20
per cent. more. The German delegation argued the defence
contribution issue with the Commissioners of Big Three

Western countries, the Allied Occupying Powers.

FISHING
SCHOONER
ON DRY DOCK

The fishing schooner Florence
Emanuel was taken on dry dock

yesterday afternoon for repairs. |

he came in port over the week-
end from Martinique,

After being painted and cleaned
the Florence Emanuel will tie up
alongside the wharf to take a sup-
ply of ice. She will then sail for
the fishing banks to make a catch
of red fish for Martinique.

Another fishing” schooner, the
Lindsyd II, arrived here on Sun-
day from Martinique but she too
brought no fish. Her catch was
sold in Martinique and she has
come to take a supply of ice before
going back to the fishing banks.
is con-

The Florence Emanuel

signed to the Schooner Pool while
the Lindsyd II is consigned to the
Barbados Import & Export Co.



Germans sought to cut the
|amount which the Allies de-
'manded. German delegates Franz
| Bluecher, Vice-Chancellor of the
Bonn Government, Fritz Schaef-
fer, Finance Minister and Lud-
wig Erhard, Minister of Econo-
mics based the offer of 10,500,-
000,000 marks on an estimated
fiscal year national product of
127,000,000,000 marks. But west-
ern delegates estimated German
output at 136,000,000,000 marks.
—UP,

Britain Closing
Canton Consulate

LONDON, Feb, 4.
A Foreign Office communique
said that Britain was closing its
consulate in Canton, China. The
shutdown was ordered because
there was not enough Britons in
the area to justify keeping the
office open. It said that the
Chinese Red Government had
been notified of the decision.
{Britain also has consulates at
\Shanghai and _ Tientsien,
}maintains a consular staff at the

Communist capital of Peking.
' -—UP.





and |

south of the Parallel was the first
| segment of South Korea seized by

Communists in their invasion
June, 1950. They reoccupied it
after the intervention of Allied

armies south of the 38th Parallel
in December, 1950 and January,
1951, and still hold it.

Reds for a time laid claim to
five islands off the peninsula in
armistice negotiations at Pan-
munjom but last week withdrew
their demand.

—UP.

Govt. Officials
Detained

JAKARTA, Feb. 4.
Jakarta



About 50

prominent
officials have been detained by
police over the weekend for

questioning on a “ieeKkage of in-
formation concerning new mon-
etary measures issued by the Gov-
ernment Saturday, Already on
Friday details of imrninent mon-
etary’ measures were known by
most businessmen and according
to judicial authorities they made

use of “information” which was
a State secret.
Authorities are now trying to

find out how the information was
gained. About 15 people are still
under detention. A spokesman in
the Attorney General’s office said
Government officials who gave
the information in question
“should be jailed.”

Most details complicated new
;Measures known already Friday
iFinance Minister Juse Wilbono
said.—U.P.

son, Colonial Secretary, this after-
noon protesting the ban on Mrs.
Jagan and asking that she be |
allowed to remain in the colony
with complete freedom of move-
ment and urging that a serious
blow will be dealt Federation if
permission was not granted

Renison did not disclose the
reason for the ban but told the
delegation that the matter would
be considered by the Executive
Council tomorrow. She will have
to leave the colony on Thursday
if the ban is not unlifted.

U.N. Assembly
Approve @G.0.L.

Incréase

PARIS, Feb. 4
The United Nations General
Assembly, pushing hard for ad-
journment to-day overwhelming-
jy approved a seven and a half
per cent. increase in the cost of
living allowance for United Na-
tions headquarters staff in New
York. The decision, which will
cost United Nations an extra
$1,300,000, was opposed by Rus-
sia, the United States and Brit-
ain, ay
Among other supplementary
budget appropriations the Assem-
bly also approved $17,000 for the
work of the new U.N. Commis-
sion to investigate the possibility
of free elections throughout Ger-
many
The Assembly upheld a resolu-
tion of the U.N. Economic and
Bocial Council to discontinue the
United Nations Heanomic, Em-
ployment and Development Com-
mission. E.C.O.8.0.C. was ask-
ed, however, to reverse its decis-
ion to discontinue until 1955, U.N.
Sub-Commission on the preven-
tion of discrimination and protec-
| tion of minorities had instructed
the Council to call a meeting of
the Sub-Commission in 1952, The
Assembly also asked E.C.O.S.0.C.
jto convene a Commission on the
status of women for one session
each year, thus reversing
E.C.0.S.O.C. decision to cut the
Commission's meetings to once
every two years.—U.P,

BACK TO GRENADA

After spending two weeks’
holiday with his relatives, Mz
Rudolph Knight of the editori: :











staff of the West Indian in St.
George’s, returned to Grenada on
Saturday by B.W.LA.



mathematics syllabus of the Ma-
triculation of London University.

Among other new books which
are now being catalogued and
which will go into circulation at
the Library in the very near fu-
ture, can be found A King's Story,
Memoirs of H.R.H, the Duke Of
Windsor Written with candour
and moving simplicity, the book
depicts the whole dramatic story
of the life of the Duke from early
childhood until the day when he
set sail from Britain in voluntary
exile,

@ On Page 5

Thieves’ Hauls
Total $94:

Three crates of white potatoes
valued $13.86, were stolen from
Reginald Holder’s stall at the
Public Markét on Saturday. They
are his property.

The Standard Pharmacy at
Tweedside Road was broken ate
entered and a quantity of tooth-
paste, tooth brushes and cigar-
ettes, total value $68, stolen. The
Pharmacy is the property of Mrs
E. Franklyn.

In connection with this inci-
dent, Elmer Lewis of My Lord's
Hill, St. Michael, has been charg-
ed by the police with breaking
and entering the same drug store
and stealing the articles.

Mr, C. B. Gill of Mount Pleas-
ant Plantation, St. Philip, report-
ed that 21 holes of cabbage and
ten pounds of carrots, valued
$12.48, were stolen from the lands
ef the same plantation betweer
3.00 am, on Friday and 11.1*
aim. on Saturday. ‘They are his
property.





Big Auction Sale

One of the biggest auction sales,
ever to take place in the District
“A” Court yard, was held yester-
day, People came from all, over
the City to make purchases,

A few auctioneers and specula-
tors mixed with the crowd, ‘The

sale was carried out by Mr.
Darcy Seott and began shortl
after 2 o'clock.

A large number of beds were
among the items sold. Chairs,

dining table
other items

glassware and many
were also sold.



Murder Case Adjourned

The case in which 43-year-ok
Joseph Gibbs, a chauffeur and
lorry owner of Bryan’s, Weichman
Hall, St. Thomas, is charged with
the murder of 35-year-old Duncar
Headley on Friday, January 18
continued before the Police Mag-
istrate at District “D’ yesterday






| Hall, is also charged wit

The case was adjourned until to-
morrow,

Jane Murray: also of Welchmar
the mur-
der of Duncan Headley She
the sister of Gibt and siste f

Headley’s wife

_ aa

ROY Ad. HUNTING LODGE
~ _ )) Ae % » * 3 .









‘Price Of Animal Feed

And Rum Increase

FOLLOWING CLOSELY on the increases announced
over the week-end by the Control Office on the price of
fresh meat, loca) dairymen and pig-keepers wed this morn-

| ing asked to pay 2 cents mere on the price of Ba
Animal Feed which on the 18th of December last moved
from 7 cents per pound to 9 cents per pound.

The advance in the price of this commodity is due to
the increased cost of the ingredients which go to make up
this balanced feed, only recently released from controls,
and which, although they have been covered by exchange
at low rates, have cost more than was anticipated.

. —. The increase of about $1.29 on

he 75-lb. bag which formerly

} Prince Philip ost $6.06, represents a maximum

cetail price of 11 cents per Ib, or

e 1 2 ey cent, advance on the
W ill Play In brice ahead to on tne igth De-
Polo Match

Following the last increase in

| the price of this feed, dairy-keep-
NYERI, KENYA, Feb. 4

Prince Philip, astride a bor-

| ws made successfgl representa-

} jon to the Controlier of @upbpiies

| the price of
rowed pony will play in a_polo|
1atch at the local club on Mon-/|
iy afternoon, Princess Eliza-|

still being

beth will drive to the Nyeri Polo} [erease in the price of poultry
Club with him to watch the mateh, | feed at about the same time also
‘he Royal Pair, making a four- | ‘effected an advance in the prica
onth round-the-world Common-| ol eggs which are now being sojd

j wealth tour, are stopping over} «t ten cents each,
here at their hunting lodge. Discussing the recent § in-
‘ This morning, they explored the} crease in the price of feedstuffs,
| 10-aere estate which surrounds a butcher said: “We are back
} their Lodge, given to them by the | where We were priory te the
| Colony as a wedding present inerease given by Government
(cP) in the price of fresh meat,”
because ‘he thinks that people
who have to pay more for feed
for their stock will want to

; |

~ m |
} Coast Guard Goes sell them at a greater price
than now obtains,
|

tor increases m
milk which is
trolled.

con-

Eges Dearer

Blizabeth
Tho lodge, built of cedar

v
To The Rescue We will therefore either have
to operate with that very slight
Carolina, margin of profit which has been
Feb. 4 the case for many years, or ask
Coast guardsmen battled storm-/| {9% another increase to offset the
jlashed seas today in an attempt! ec responding increase in the
to rescue 26 crewmen of the Pan-| price we have to pay for live-
amanian registered motor-ship | steck.”

r ”
Zenith 44,
|
Days Overdue
| Miget, driven aground by a freak A housewife when told of the
increase in the price of feédstuff,

The 87-ton schooner Zenith is|¢yclonic storm
now 44 days overdue on her voy- wo cutters, a surf boat, and @/ said: “We housewives are being
a asied week after week te pay

age from Barbados to British} >‘ ae the ae spery duet _ to
juiana and local shipping author- | "eh the coastal freighter lying more for almost every essential
ee cd) SHIPPINE GUlHor~ | off shore of the narrow Portsmouth

O'CLAKE, North



ae o ’ ' item of foodstuff us@€d° in the
ber eats becoming doubtful o island on North Carolina's lonely} home, and the result is that we

Pyeng: SM : . outer banks. j; have been forced to make drastic
me pember 19 the Benth, | Che Miget’s crew sent up flares) cuts in these items. We are not
with lives on board, _ Sailec two coast guard planes fleW] able to plan our budget, and
from the Careenage for Spring ver her during the night. Ob-! consequently we are unable ta
lands with a load of stone and servers said the ship apparently | put aside for

the ‘rainy day’ as

up to yesterday, neither the local! was in no immediate danger. |we have been taught to do.

Harbour and Shipping Master nor The master of the ship at first

the Schooner Pool, the schooner’s vodioed the coast guard that he Same Prices

agents, received further informa- \bandoning ship but a later “Imagine the price of local
tion of her whereabouts {message indicated he had changed iresh meat being the same ag

Reports have reached Barbados ;! mind,—U.P, imported meat!” she said, “Eggs
from time to time since the | ) which were once bought 6 for



schooner was reported missing; |'en cents are now 10 cents each,

stating that she was seen off Brit- | , ‘ Goe land there are cases where people
ish Guiana and one, cablegram | Luxury Liner Si Yare demanding e v en higher
stated that She wa

> expected to ly prices.”
reach British Guiana on Decem- ack To West Indies She said it was regrettable

ber 23. that Government decided to de-

The local Hagbour and Shipping : NEW YORK, control and consequently re-
Master hag been keeping in touch! Having just returned from 4] move the subsidy on imported
with other West Indian Islonds'C!vise to the West Indies, the] animal feed at a time when the

Canadian Pacifie’s 26,300-ton liner

price of essential food items
the Empress of Scotland will do

was being increased, but she

and hopes to be promptly inform-
ed if the Zenith o1

her crew are



sighted three more cruises before the! hopes that in the interest of
. ’ wintery is out: these three will be the health of the community,
from New York, Government will do everything

The liner is making a special in their power to encourage the

Kidna
Girl

ling from Southampton to New

/, York via Halifax, in time for her

ound fret cruise which started on] the high cost of meat.
t

bruary Ist for 16 days. ‘The The man in the street will also
ond trip starts on February 20] have to pay about one cent more

keeping of pigs and other small
stock with a view to reducing

FRANKFURT. Feb. 4. if the third on Mareh 8 (14]/for his “snap” of rum because of

cnbiaaie ae deithicin: Sa and 16 days). an advance in the price of this
reported today that "they had| .. The ports of call are: Havana,jcommeédity from yesterday.
found Mamie’ Shelton. the 18-| Kingston, Cristobal, Willemstad, Molasses Dearer

La Guaira, Bridgetown and Char-
lotte Amalia,

(he liner will be back on the
, Liverpool—Quebee and Montreal
ervice in mid-May.

This increase which comes about
at about the same time as a simi-
lar increase last year is due partly
to the fact that the rum refineries
have to pay more for molasses and

year-old daughter of an Army
Sergeant, who was kidnapped on
Sunday by an armed soldier.
Military police headquarter
wnid that they received the report | ‘

from a radio patrol which took} —B.U.P. @ On page 5.
part in a_ widespread search |
hroughout Southwestern Ger-
many. |
The first report did not say}
where the girl was found. The!
kidnapper was not found |
Miss Shelton had been riding}
with two Army Sergeants in a}

car from Frankfurt to Hanau on‘

Sunday, when they stopped to}
pick up a soldier hitehiker. The
soldier reported that he had es-|
caped from Mannheim Prison, |

soon after he held them up, and |
drove off with the girl and the}
car, Army authorities said.

; —UP.



Egyptian Premier |
Meeting Trouble |

CAIRO, Feb. 4

Premier Aly Maher Pasha re-
ported that he was meeting diffi-
eulty today in forming an all

party national front Government
with both Saadist and Liberal
Constitutional Parties demanding
1 full inquiry to establish the re-
sponsibility for the Cairo rioting
vf January 26

The new Premier is attempting
to reconcile party difference and
oring party leaders together in a
common stand,

The Egyptian Press meanwhile
reviewed the Anglo-Egyptian
ituation. The Weeklies Al Gam-
hour, Al Mahry, and Rosal Yous-
sef charged that the British were
responsible for the Cairo riot

—UP





Britain To Protest
To Argentina | More and more
LONDON, Feb. 4.

| people ave saying ~
OMmice pokesman

A Foreign
that the British |

confirmed today



Embassy in Buenos Aires had|{
been instructed to protest to the | o
Argentine Government over the}
incident at Hope Bay, Graham}
Island, in the Antaret in which |
Argentinians allegedly fixed ma- }
chine guns over the heads of a!
Sritish landing parts id then]
forced the British t tur to}
their ship |
Tr ¢ pokesmar sid at r '
tructior were sent on 8S d
mut ne if t kn ‘ € r
t had r elivered UP, ra












ORD and Lady Oliver Esher
are at present in Barbado
on a short visit. They are
a W.I. tour and among the island
they have already visited a:
Jamaica, Grenada and Antigu
Here until Thursday they ar
the guests of Sir Edw>rd Cunar
of “Glitter Bay”, St, James
Lord..Esher who will be 71 i:
March -ig-Chairman of the Gov-
ernors Oftthe Old Vjic. He is also
Presideni and Chairman of a num-
ber of other Theatrical and Cv ic
Societies.and wag a former Trus-
tee of thé London Museum. He
was married im 1912 to Antoin-
ette, daughter of August Heck-
scher of New York. They hav?
one son and three daughters

Visiting Her Sons
ADY LUCIE-SMITH is due to
leave for Trinidad to-day by
B.W.1LA. to spend about three
weeks’ holiday in that colony with
two of her sons Maurice and
Reggie.

Tourists Read About
Barbados

ERE was another bumper
crowd dining and dancing at
Club Morgan on Saturday night,
what with tourists from the Fort
Townshend, T.C.A,, as well as
“winter” visitors from the hotels,
St. James Coast and several of
the regular local visitors,
Barbados and Club Morgan had
some advance. publicity with the
Fort Townshend passengers when
one of them discovered a book in
the ship’s library entitled “The
Man Who Died Twice,” which is
a new detective thriller by
George Harmon Coxe.

on

The plot of this novel is set in
Barbados and mentions among
other people and places — Club
Morgan, Helen and Frank Mor-
gan. This created a lot of inter-
est on the boat and by the time
the ship reached here, every pas-
senger on board had read it and
they all gota “big kick” out of
being in Barbados, seeing Club
Morgan and meeting the Morgans.

George Harmon Coxe, who is
a well known writer of Detec-
tive fiction was here two years
ago when he started on the plot
for “The Man Who Died Twicc*
and a novelette about Barbados
which was _ published in the
November’ issue of the America:
M> azine.

Mr. Coxe is at present in Bar-
bedos on another visit and will
he here until the end of March.
Cerib understands that he is hard
nt work on a new novel.

Tt would seem that our little
islend isattractive to writers as
well °« artists and we are hanp?7
to welcome them here.

Married In Trinidad

ISS ANNE MILNE, daughter

of Mr. and Mrs. T. Mzelcolm
Milne of Trinidad was married on
Saturday in Trinidad to Mr. Ray
Klynott, son of Mr. and Mrs. Mat-
thew Klynott of Wilkes Bane,
Pennsylvania, U.S.A. Mr. Kly-
nett is a radio announcer over
station W.V.D.I., Trinidad.

Mr. and Mrs. Malcolm Milne
were recently in Barbados on a
visit with their daughter Claire,
who made her debut in Trinidad
shortly after the wedding.

Anne has also visited Barbados
on several occasions e@1 has
many friends here,



POCKET CARTOON
by OSBERT LANCASTER

With the compli
ments 0; the season from
the Verbena Steam Laun-
dry —add ‘With much love
and all best wishes jor a
mek Christmas

adudie and Willy.’”

* Delete



Back from U.S. and Canada

ETURNING from Canata aid
the U.S. on Sunday eveains

via Puerto Rico by B.W.1.A. were
Mr. Carlton Browne, Roebuck
Street Druggist and Mrs. Brown
Mrs. Browne had been in Can-
ada since mid September lavt
year, when she went up with he
daughter Toni, who is attendin
Trafalga~ Finishing Seuool, Mon-

treal,
Mr. Browne left Barbados in
December and Mrs. Brywne and

Toni met him in New York, where
they spent the Christmas and New
Year holidays.

They then returned to Canada
to spend a few days and leive
Toni at School in Montreal. On
their way back to Barbados, they
spent a couple of weeks in New
York.

Toni is expected to come down
in June to spend the summer
holidays in Barbados.

To Take Up Appointment
R. KENNETH GRIFFITH,
son of Mr. H. C. Griffith,

Chief Sanitary Inspector of Christ

Church and Mrs, Griffith of

Harts Gap, left for Trinidad

over the week-end by B.W.LA.

on his way to Tobago. He has
gone to take up an appointment
as Mathematical Master of the

Bishop's High School.

Visit to Her Mother
ISS RUBY KENNEDY of
River Road, left on Saturday
evening by B.W.LA. for Trini-
dad on a visit to her mother who
is very ill,

Grenada Tourist Chief

ETURNING to Grenada on

Saturday by B.W.LA. were
Mr, and Mrs, A. Norris Hughes
who had been holidaying here for
the past two weeks at the H«tel
Royal,

While here, they attended the
jintercolonial cricket games be-
tween Barbados and Jamaica at
‘Kensington,

Mr. Hughes is Chairman of the
Grenada Tourist Development
Board and Vice-President of the
Caribbean Tourist Association, He
had recently attended the meet-
ing of the Executive Council of
the Caribbean Tourist Associa-
tion held in St, Thomas, Virgin
Islands.



Carib Calling

Ten Days

RS. Kenneth W. Blackburne,
wife of the Governor of the
Leewarg Islands flew in from An-
tigua on Sunday evening by
B.W.1.A. Accompanying her was

Mrs. Margaret G. Hodgson.
During their ten-day holiday
here they are the guests of Mrs.
Peebles of “Bayleys”, St. Philip.

Back Home

RS. W. McSHINE, the form-
er Evelyn Ward, d°ughter
of Mr. and Mrs. George C. Ward
Warners, Christ Church, is
ick in Rarbados after a virit to
“ngland and the U.S. She return-
ed on Sunday evening via Puerto

Rico by B.W.LA.

lo-morrow—A Lecture
R. GEOFFREY A, JELLICOE
who is due to arrive at Sea-
well to-day by air will be the guest
of Mr. Ronald Tree of “Heron
Bay”, St. James. He will be ac-
companied by Mrs. Jellicoe.

Mr, Jellicoe will give a lecture
at the Barbados Museum to-mor-
row afternoon at 5 o’clock on
‘Landscape in relation to Archi-
tecture and Town Planning.”

Members of the MuSeum
their friends are invited
tend the lecture.

Mr. Jellicoe who designed
‘Heron Bay” is a Fellow of the
Royal Institute of British Archi-
tects and a member of the Town

and
at-

Planning Institute and a_ past
President of the Institute of
Landscape Architects, He has

been responsible for the Lands-
cape Gardens of many English
Country hoyses including San-
dringham — the King’s Norfolk
home, Royal Lodge (Windsor),
Ditehley and Kelmarsh Hall. He
is also an author and has written
books on the Baroque Gardens of
Austria, Gardens of Europe and is
joint author of Italian Gardens
of the Renaissance and Gardens
and Design,

Mr. Jellicoe bas just been mak-
ing a lecture tour through the
U.S. and Canada on various as-
pects of landscape and planning.
He expects to be here for about
one week,

Same ’Plane
M*® AND MRS. William J.
Whiting who were in Bar-
bados recently returned on Sun-
day by B.W.LA. after a short
visit to Trinidad. They are guests
at the Hotel Royal
Mr. Whiting is Manager of Bar-
clays Rank in Dominica.
Arriving by the same plane
were Mr. and Mrs. F. Quested.
Mr. Quested is an English Jockey.
From Wisconsin
R. AND MRS. George P. Frise
of Wisconsin arrived from
Trinidad over the week-end by
.W.LA, to spend a short holiday
in Barbados, Mr, Frise is Presi-
dent of the La Crosse Concrete
Company of Wisconsin.
They are guests at the Paradise
Beach Club,

Alliance Francaise
T the Annual General Meet-
ing of the Alliance Fran-
caise, which will be held at the
British Council, “Wakefield”, at
8.00 p.m. on Thursdey, officers
will be elected to the Executive
Committee for the year, New
members will also be enrolled.
The Reports of the Secretary
and Treasurer for the year 1951

will be presented.



West Indian Table Talk

YEAR BOOK
Just published in London is
the Year Book of the West Indies
and Countries of the Caribbean
1951 edition. This publication





CROSSWORD





v8







i stalagmites and stalactites (v)
7 Veh te to make Lolli mine \W war, Mrs, James was in the Queen
! he | ale ermine (4) lew “n'a flitar re! .
i? Sonask an one nee. 1k) Alt vendra s Military Nursing Serv-
13 Shakespeare's storm. (7) i Reserve,
lope aaftly leaves. (3) ‘
Anagraz rt) r ) aq
18 nie chive tide Wide choice (i) LECTURE DISAPPOINT-
19 Expresses contempt. (5) ~
23 Yearn tor « gain lost. (vy) , MENT
24 At this is good defence, (4) A disappointed man this week
26 My heart when jovial, (3) was Mr. Albert Gomes, leader cf
4 ' . 4 a
26 Over when a" Defence he West Indies delegation to the
t Accept excusing circumstanc B RaECS Ministers Conference, It
to make It (9) was not the official giscussions in
£ own is made when thir London which disappointed him,
4 A jewel for thy mates. (8) Far from it. He was pleased with
+ R Me) from whe rine. (¢) the way the talks worked out,
idde| a. ( > Ga ia
eo words trom parent. But Mr, Gomes had to turn down
(4. 3) en invitation to speak at Cam-
Wears Re aut pons (4) bridge University, on the West
é Theeeten (6) Indies. He did not have time to
‘ gould be a Biot, (6). “ac spare, “I would have loved it,”
ts ram “
45. Seem in a whelk stall? (3) he told me, “but perhaps I shall
21 Found in 9 Down. (4) be able to speak there next time I
o2 Mature (4) come over.”
1 Saturd puzz)e ~
acroass Princiowls "Rustic ao NEW JOURNAL
fe tor id arrive’ at Lose’ gs. bes The British Medical Journal
£8, Musicne | "8s "Stone Tre this week praises the University
Biol 5 A College of the West Indies for the
aah way in which the new West Indian
Far Medical Journal has been produted
SILVER SWALLOW ENAMEL-WARE
=
i PUDDING BASINS—70c. 85c. 91e. PAILS

JUGS—%6e. $1.22, $1.31,
PIE DISHES—39c.

Dial 4220

‘ BOWLS—42c, 54c. 56c. 74c.

48c. 60c. 80c.
BASINS—70c. 80c. 91c. 99c. $2.32
PAILS with Covers—$2.60

By Londoner

whieh is in
tains detailed
different

its 28rd year, con-
information of 27
countries, from Guate-
mala to French Guiana on the
mainland and from Bermuda,
Cuba and the Bahamas to Trini-
aad among the islands. The price
is again 35 shillings and the pub-

lishers are Thomas Skinner and
Co., Ltd., 330 Gresham House,
E.S.2,

MR, CAREY

From Guernsey I have heard
with regret news of the death of
Mr, J. F. Carey, whose daughter
Mrs, J, James, is wife of the
Chief Out Island Commissioner,
Nassau, Mr, Carey, 71 years of
age, was a Jurat of the Royal
Court, Guernsey, until October,
1959 when he retired, During the



$1.61 ENAM

T. R. EVANS & WHITFIELDS

YOUR SHOE STORES

CHAMBERS—85c. $1.20

KETTLES—2 pts—$1.32

despite the trials and tribulations
of the recent hurricane. The
BMJ says that some of the articles
in the West Indian Journal are
useful reviews and that the pro-
duction of the magazine is a fine
indication of the way new medi-
cal schools in the Colonies are
making progress,
AIR PIONEER

Sir Alan Cobham, the air
pioneer, and his wife, have bought
a house on Rose Island in the
Bahamas, But they are not ex-
pecting to visit it as often as they
would wish. Sir Alan is too busy.
When they do go there from Nas-
sau they are likely to use the 27-
knot power boat that Lady Cob-
ham has bought for the journey.
There are only two other houses
on Rose Island.

FAN CLUB

While Winifred Atwell, Trini-
Gadian pianist is enjoying her
holiday-cum-business visit to the
West Indies I hear that her busi-
ness manager in England, Wyn
Carter, is busy forming a fan
club for her, The idea of the
club is to enable her to keep io
touch with all the many young
friends who have followed her
career so closely and loyally,

JAMAICAN VISITOR

Attending a course on life in
rural Wales is Miss Pancilla
McPherson of Jamaica. Together
with 20 other students, from for-
eign countries and the colonies,
Miss MePhergon is staying at Cil-
gwyn, an old mansion house
in Carmarthenshire. The course
is arranged by the British Coun-
cil, Recently a cameraman from
the “Herald” of Wales, a weekly
newspaper, visited the mansion
and took a photograph which was
subsequently published, showing
Miss McPherson reading to a
young Welsh girl

|

WITHOUT COVERS—$2.11

EL PLATES—29c. 3c. 40c.

4 pts—$1,80

, ing
| Eric had been born on

BARBADOS ADVOCATE

Teddy Saw a Picture Book

-—But He Didn’t Know What the Pictures Were—

By MAX TRELL

WHEN Knarf and Hanid, the
shadow-children with the turned-
about names, entered the playroom,
they found Teddy the Stuffed Bear
looking into a very large book. It
was laid out on the floor before him.

“It’s all full of pictures,” said
Teddy; “but they’re the strangest
kinds of pictures, They aren’t@ic-

tures of poms or animals
or houses. I 't know what "Te
pictures of.”

Knarf said: “Let’s see them,
Teddy.” So Knarf and Hanid looked
at the pictures in the big book. The
next instant, Knarf and Haniddoth
exclaimed that they weren’t ordi-
nary ; — at £. “They're
maps Hanid. “It’s a geogra-
phy book!”

“What are maps?” Teddy asked.
“And what’s geography?” ”

Drawings of Land

Hanid explained that maps were
drawings of all the land, and seas,
and rivers and countries and eities
of the whole world. “And when. gou
study about all these things—the
land, the seas, the rivers, the coun-
tries, and the towns—that’s called
geography,” she added, “The chil-
dren all study phy in scheol.”
fi Teddy looked at the maps again.

Why are there so many different
colors?” he asked.

“Those are the different
tries,” said Knarf. “Each of
has a separate color. That’s so you
can tell them apart.”

“Here’s the United States where
we are,” Hanid broke in, poin to
the middle of one of the maps. “You
see it’s colored brownish.”

“And what’s that,” asked Teddy,
“right above it, colored pink?”

“That’s Canada, Teddy. It’s north
of the United States,”

“And what’s that below, colored
green?”

Knarf said: “That’s Mexico, It’s
south of the United States.”

“And what’s that all around the
United States, and Canada, and
Mexico? It’s all colored blue.”





B.B.C. Radio

tra,
News,
4.00—7.15 p.m.

Programme |

TUESDAY
1115 am
ll

FEBRUARY 5, 1952
Southern Serenade Orches- |
30 am Solomon, 12 00 noon The
1210 pm News Analysis. |
25.38m , 31 stm |
}





4.00 pm The News, 410 pm The}

Daily Service, 415 pm Cafe Colette,
5 00 pm Composer of the Week, 5 15
pm. Nights at the Opera, 600 pm

This is Ceylon, 6.30 p.m. Military Band







TUESDAY, FEBRUARY 5, 1952



R.K.0. Radio Action Packed Thrilier
Robert Lizabeth Robert

mitcHum - scorr - rvan in“The RACKET”!

A
Also the Local Educational Short. ‘GIVE YOUR CHILD A-CHANU! =

canersiareiaenteerinat-tenidjecualieiadialichy ay
THURSDAY Special — 1.30 p.m. 1} Z
| A

OPENI.!G FRIDAY 8TH
“CAPTAIN HORATIO
HORNBLOWER

“SWING The WESTERN WAY”
Hoosier Hot Shots &

“PRAIRIE ROUND UP” Dial
Charles Starrett — Smiley Burnet; | _ 2310

|
|



















Music, 6 45 p m. Sports Round-Up, 7.00 P 4 OISTIN The Garder
Bm The News, 710 pm News Analy- | Z / A Dial 8404 G a a E t ST JAMES
7.45—10.30 p.m. — S132m , 48 43m To-day & To-morrow 445 & 8.30 p.m. | To-day & To 20 p.m
“KILL THE UMPIRE” Republic's Whole Secial
745 Cros The Atlantic 7
Single-Handed, £00 pm Cockney Cab- William BENDIX FEDERAL AGENT vs
aret, 815 pm. Radio Newsreel, 8 20 “BETWEEN MIDNITE & DAWN” UNDERWOKLD, INC.”
Pm _ Report From Britain, 845 pm Mark Stevens — Edmund O'@rien Kirk ALYN Ja DAIE
The Royal Tour, 900 pm Meet The - aia
Commonwealth, 930 pm Ray's A THURS. (only) 4.45 & 8.30 p.m THURS. « : p.m
soem, 20 pm She Mews. 1 30 pm SWING THE WESTERN WAY | TAHITI HONEY
cart tists Ren seo fn "thers Hoosier Hotshots é& Simone Simon, Dernis O'Keefe &
‘eddy look t the fun c= : . ce PRAIRIE ROUNDUP SONG OF NEVADA
T “= S mF Te Charles Starrett & Smiley Burnett Roy Rogers
a = es
}
“Those are the seas and oceans,”
said Hanid. “On one side is the
Atlantic Ocean. On the other side is : |
the Pacific. And way up at the top |
is the Arctic Ocean, which goes |
around the Nort! Pole where it’s FL ;
very cold.” YY TO-DAY TO THURSDAY — 445 & 8.30

Great Continents

Knarf and Hanid explained many
more things about maps to Teddy.
They explained about the six great
continents: Asia, Africa, North
America (“Where the United |
States, Canada and Mexico are,” |
said Hanid), South America, Eu-
rope and Australia, They explained |
about the different countries of the
world such as England, France,
Spain and all the other countries.
Then they showed Teddy how al! the
large cities were shown on the map
by dots with their names after them.

“Maps are wonderful!” Teddy (i,
nally said. “You can sit right in
front of one and go traveling all |
over the world, across oceans, and |
continents, and from one city to an- |
other!” :

So Knarf and Hanid nodded ani
said that was right, and walked out,
leaving Teddy sitting in front of tho
maps in the geography book, travel!
ing all over the world.



|
|
|



Doctors Who

Are Warned

THE CONSCIENTIOUS DOC-
TOR who urges his patients to
consult him whenever they feel
unwell may be causing more sick-
ness than he cures.

By telling patients that minor
pains may be the first signs of
serious disease he may frighten
them into real physical illness.

This warning has been issued
to doctors by two highly ex-
perienced medical men — Si)
Heneage Ogilvie, chief surgem
at Guy’s Hospital, and Dr. Wil
liam A, R. Thomson, a_ hear
specialist.

“There is a very real danger
that by driving the public into
our consulting rooms and sur-
geries whenever they feel un-
well’ we may be increasing the
liability to disease,” they write
in an editorial in The Practition-
er. Worry has such an enormous
effect on health that a whole
range of anxiety ailments, called
“psycho - somatic” complaints, is
now recognised. They include
duodenal ulcer, heart disorders,
and asthma as well as mental
troubles,

There is no doubt that doe-
tors who advise their patien‘s
to consult them at the first signs
of disorder save some lives.
“But the question must arise
whether the price we are paying
for health is not too high.” The
Practitioner states,

Dust ‘Colds’

AT is there in house dust

that can give you all the symp-
toms of a heavy cold?

Some doctors believe that at
Jeast half the streaming colds
blamed on germs are really caus-
ed by some powerfu! irritant in
the woolly dust which collects un-
der furniture.

Thousands of people suffer from
constant “hay fever” because they
are super-sensitive to this irri-
fant. It is also known to bring
on asthma attacks.

Dr. Kate Maunsell, of King’s
College Hospital, has isolated the
mysterious irritant. She believes
‘'t is formed by the action of cer-
tein moulds on furniture stuffing
and upholstery.

Britain's damp _ climate
make us unduly susceptible

Mothers
Swop Sons
Aged Six

Monsieur and Madame J——
nodded happily as they caught
sight of their six-year-old twins
Victor and Pierre marching
hand-in-hand in the procession
of Swiss children.

But their happiness gave way
to astonishment when they no-
tced a boy called Erie walking
a few paces behind. His likeness
to Victor was so extraordinary
ae they felt they must meet
him.

When Eric smiled the resem-
blance became even more re-
markable. He had a wide gap
between his lower front teeth.
So had Victor,

It really
co-incidence,
sieur J.

may
to



was a most interest-
thought Mon-
until he learned that
the same
night and in the same maternity
home as hie own children.
After that neither he nor



his

| wife could rid their minds of the

terrifying possibility that Pierre
was somebody else’s child, who
had been accidentally substituted
for Eric by the nurses.
. . J

When they showed, Victor to
Eric’s widowed mother she be-
came desperately anxious, too.

So they reported the case to the
authorities, who ordered an im-
mediate investigation. ¢

Scientists wecorded the | finger-



|

Dial 4606

|
;}ments of the three boys
} Sults

print patterns, eye colours, hair
characters, and teeth arrange-
The re
the belief
were the

all
Victor
twins,
@ On Page 3

supported
that and Eric

real

|

Frighten You

dust “colds,” because it favours
the growth of these moulds.
Pigeon Puzzle

AFTER the most thorough in-
vestigation ever made to explain
the pigeon's ability to find its way
home, Cambridge scientist Dr. G.
V. T. Matthews admits he is still
baffled.

By fitting homing pigeons with
magnetic necklaces he hes dis-*
proved the theory that they navi-
gate by measuring the earth's)
magnetism.

The necklaces neutralised the
earth’s magnetic field, yet the
birds still homed to the loft,

He then transported pigeons a
j tong way over unknown territory
in blacked-out boxes. Again they |
got home, proving they do not}
navigate by known landmarks. |

|



A new possibie expianation has
emerged from _ these studies: |
pigeons may navigate by taking
bearings on the sun, |

Their sense of direction is poor |
on overcast days, Dr. Matthews
reports. But when they can just
fee the sun through the cloud
layer they home almost as surely |
as_in bright sunshine.—L.E.S.

—



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TUESDAY, FEBRUARY 5, 1952 BARBADOS. ADVOCATE PAGE THREE
ET

30% Of Trinidad’s ee ere

Revenue From Oil

LONDON.
THE OIL INDUSTRY in Trinidad contributes more
than 30 per cent of the total revenue of the Colony, which
has increased some four times over that of 1939, said Mr.
Malcolm Maclachlan, chairman and joint managing director
of Apex (Trinidad) Oilfields, Ltd., at the company’s annual
general meeting in London.
“The Government of Trinidad,
= a sleeping partner in the oil
usiness: noW takes by means of S ij Ne F
taxation over 60 per cent of the ug ar ews
profits of the industry,” he said.

“The revenue accruing to the Gov- WASHINGTON.
ernment of Trinidad per barrel of | The Philippines are contemplat-
oil produced compares very well -ing fhe sale of 30,000 to 50,000
with that received by owners of tons of sugar to Japan this year
mineral rights in other and far and Cuba is hoping that as a
more prolific oil-bearing countries result her own share of the U.S.

under arrangements which are sugar market will be increased.
more highly publicised. “We understand that the Philip-
“It_is an encouraging feature, pines are interested in develop-
which has not always been the ing wérid markets to absorb her
case, that the general public in surpl when production increas-
Trinidad is gaining an appreciation es,” r, Lawrence Myers, the
of the contribution which, despite U.S. Sugar Director, told B.U.P
its difficulties, an efficient oil in- “We é¢an see that the Filipinos
dustry has made. and I trust will must begin soon to soften their
continue to make, to the welfare way into such non-US. markets if
and prosperity of the Colony. they are to get into them at all.”
“It must be very clear that Cuba is interested because its
the greatly increased revenue own sugar quota in the U.S, mar-
from the oil industry which ket will be smaller -than in any
Trinidad now receives — and year since the war unless the
spends in full — can only be United States raises its 7,700,000-
maintained by the successful ton ceiling on 1952 sugar markei-



jor itsel

Clor®?™ prsed Moe “Ge

Helps to cleanse the system
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seenesenensy

Impurities in the blood may cause rheumatic
aches and pains, stiff and painful joints, F
boils, pimples and common skin disorders. AF
Clarke’s Blood Mixture helps to purify
the blood, cleanses the system and assists
in restoring good health.

SSSCCSSSTAOGEUPSANS



oo . s ‘ ARTHRITIC PAINS

But new treatment does more than
ease these terrible agonies.














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prompt relief from the pains due to the symptoms of arthritis and
rheumatism, but also affects the metabolic processes which constitute
a very important part of the rheumatic state’s background,

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DOLCIN is being used now with unprecedented success, DOLCIN
is being prescribed by doctors now, And many sufferers have already
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Don't delay, Profit by the experience of fellow-victims of these
pains, Get DOLCIN today. A bottle of 100 precious tablets osta

sob BY: BOOKER’S (BARBADOS) DRUG STORES LTD.
A Broad Street and Hastings
(ALPHA PHARMACY)





|

“Drunk in charge of a Zebra Crossing—that's what t am.”



outcome of exploration to de- ing. Under the U.S. Sugar Act, boudon Express Servipe
velop further oil reserves.” Cuba gets 95 per cent. of any
Development unsubscribed portion of the| _—~



Mr. Maclachlan: reported that Philippines quota. Typhoon dam-

— ne +E *
during the year ended September #ge¢ to Philippines cane has ] : | annot Be
WME Seip ea aay pou owe ot BRITISH ARMS DRIVE Kremlin
feet, continuing its programme to 150,000-ton deficit and any world

obtain production and to extend Market sales by the Philippines - y T 9 ®

the tested areas of the Apex prop- Would further increase the Cuban WILL AFFEC 52 B. e e ‘ >

erty. Six wells were npleted se the U.S. market, a en rom nsl e
in the main field and four in the pokesmen for the U.S, sugar NY I

South Quarry area. industry are in favour of iene f LONDON.

Four wells were completed in Asian outlets for Philippine suga BRITAIN’S REARMAMENT DRIVE will cast its influ- (By DONALD GONZALEZ) a .
te Ryneiinal: scniy, He. CURIE, AS 5 TREERD. 08 seliorene. penbesre ence over the 1952 British Industries Fair, to be held at WASHINGTON, Feb. 4.

yas a non~producer, two are on the big Cuban supplies. They t May THE KREMLIN’S CONTROL over the Russian people










































and the fourth, which warn, however, that the Philip- London and Birmingham next Plastics Sect at Olym- annot be seriously challenged from inside the Soviet
came in as a producer, has been pines might endanger their own ~~ - ee The Plastics Section at ber can re i ‘ ie x t
closed in in the interest of gas position in the U.S. market if Mi th Ss pia, in London will be half again Union. A survey of the bes available reports and exper
conservation. Two of the older they fell down too much on their NEO ers wu op Oar tar baba pao price of opinion on Soviet life, throws cold water on any eo Pnat
y ir e same zo ave been quota as a_ res xtensiv © Bhar. Ys icti at the C ; “e states are W or tha
SMeiehtmnr ae Sane Sten” =" Sone Aged Six ata firma sade | Gan eer iatorelt |W |
“In view of developments which “But if they do not overdo it eae . a Sante tart adits The State He J + I tle ines: saivecthieenn eiipheraiaeemeienaianiins / hen pleasures of the table bring on
have taken place in the island,” and can make Asian sales without @ From Page 2 p ‘Tombaseiog this aitect Sik: RtHINRA in aiinloeie of 1981 event discomforts of indigestion —rely on Alka-
. ; t tte teen gr re 2 ; ‘es . cee as Ss 2a analysis o 9 its oa a s
ee ee. ee letting the United States down, 7 ; ae be a central feature, orgatiised behind the Iron Curtain reported p orrhea an Seltzer. A tablet or two in a glass of water
still dee or dtiiing ewkare i they we ia be tak ag aa pase chen phe 4 See by the Ministry of Supply to- recently that “troubles are mount- mpkte a sparkling, pleseunt still deep’ ling re i hey would be taking much risk, the boys and the parents, ub gether with the Royal Aircraft ing” in Russia. edy. See how quickly and effectively Alka
the Synclinal zone in conse- Certainly, with Caribbean crops because the man whom Eric had fetapiishment at Farnborough But authorities said that there Sel 7
quence of these two factors we as big as they are this year, I called father was dead, thes¢ 7; \in) show how plastics are wa i abasta ian Salt ae ae oe 8 tzer acts to settle your stomach and
may expect some reduction from believe judicious marketing ‘in tests could not settle the case }ow not only being used for sistance widesprend "Thev:eate | soothe your headache, Not a laxative, you
the increased production rates of Asia would be a good thing for conclusively. i small articles, but also for heav- that the Gaviat resine. #ull rules | can repeat its use without laxative effect.
recent months, but our Trinidad the Philippines. wv When the problem see in- jer goods which in the past have with oppression, — terror anil Stopped in 24 ours Take Alka-Seltzer whenever you feel that
management estimates that our After all, the Filipinos have soluble one of the scien ists Fe> either been made of metal or Cruelty, ‘The people don't like it i you've had too rich a meal.
total production for the current said they hope soon to be pro- membered that, ale ber involved composite structures in Put the don’t have the guns-| Pj oY
eet approximate to that ducing ayer no ing = sees ao oe ae enn Mtg ean their manufacture. bombs, and other weapons to make | fameus Alka-Seltzer helps millions.
0 VWUe-ol, and some or 1e world marke Ss - .> re ) ‘VOT f eo
well. They have sane to step olit from one person to another, Other Highlights ete aaa min oe | Lot it help you too. | ‘
Increasing Cost and develop those markets. They Stafts are usually possible be- : . : Ff Mother Russi Seoes of 18 tng BO tabiete. —// f

Referring to the continually in- cannot do it overnight.” tween identical twins. | Other ee Has mae Unceast : nek ree nt *
creasing cost of oilfield develop- —B.U.P > : _ the Jewellery Section, here, 1CeasIng Propesanda poling ¥
ment in Trinidad, he Seater: * rs wee So the authorities called in Sir jewellers, silversmiths and watch out the horrors of alleged Western a- e tzer ie ho ge a ad ae
“During the six-year period to Archibald McIndoe, the 50-year- makers have also taken more attack plans on “Mother Russia tw is eRIDGEND,, WALES, "U. «
the end of 1950, some £5,750.000 NORWICH. Norfolk old 3ritish plastic surgeon, space than last year inh “Mil- is the chief instrument used by ‘i = ' .
were expended by the oil industry Every acre of British-grown known to hundreds of badly liondires Row.” .. the Kremlin to stir Russian a
in Trinidad in drilling 53 wells to Sugar beet now yields a full barned R,A.F. men as The Nearby, pretty models will patriotism. oAleeGine ules Snee srap tite. Y syuet
depths in excess of 8,000 feet, of year’s sugar ration for 15 more Maestro” for his brilliant work show swimsuits and underwear. Some 6,000,000 Communist Party rhea ov Trengh Mouth, or some bad dispaio
which only approximately one in people than it did five years ago, in giving them new faces. Alongside will be a group exX- members inside Russia enjoy a {vat viii eventually cause you fala teeth
three were completed as commer- Mr. G. F. N, Battle, executive , This bluff, bespectacled New hibit, perhaps more mundane, standard of living higher than that| before your timo. Bince the great world
cial producers.” director of the British Sugar Cor- Zealander remoyed a small square of printing inks, and a_ record of more than 200,000,000 Ryssians. | Rbubneet froth, cuveneyn. Pave, apeeed

a Pm bat r ski r Jictor’s right arm ber of displays showing the ‘ - . { 7 te.

Mr. Maclachlan reported that poration, told members of the of skin from Vic number of displays § & But this inequality has a long Liots say that four out of every five people

the company’s revenue during the Norfolk’ Farmers’ Union ata and replaced it with a similar latest Office Machinery and Ap- jradition in Russian society, .An are pubborere soener Oh lara Pome i
year totalled £1,635,000 of which meeting in Norwich. He describ- skin graft taken from Erie. Then pliancds.

, 7 official -said, “You would think| too late, hopaune tieey often cause not only
£1,595,000 was oil revenue. The ed the result as “a great achieve- he covered the slight wound left The total space occupied by the Joss of teeth, but also chronic rheuma-
£ 1,595, as , : as “a great ¢





G ; ere 4 J that people in Moscow would gjet tim and heart trouble.
, tic! . in Erie’s arm with the square the Fair in London is a little ,,, c 1 .
net profit for the year was £530,000, ment by British agriculture. in Se “a Sea tetaiin w Pres Saree , " . nad when Kremlin officials drive :
After transfers for the general “On 400,000 acres of beet it of skin taken from Victor, less than that during the 1951 Gown the streets at 70 miles ai New Discovery Saves Teeth

imilar crossaigre are on Poaetive Fa ace rairhh alee u h . Amoson, the discovery of an American
reserve fund and a balance to be means a full yeat’s domestic ra- Similar cross-gr afts mee then Festival Year, Nevertheless, 400. jour in limousines. But they love! — aclentint. fights these troubles in a. new
aaina tasuracd * » said. “the tion for 6,000,000 more people made between Victor and Pierre 000 square feet at Olympia and and quick way, It penetrates r hit wine
ee oe dine sites A ne h ie than five years ago,’ ; tant and between Pierre and Eric. Earls Court have been booked root nf the trouble, stops Rey ea ends
owners of the business, who haye than live years ago, ne =6Sald. rhe results satisfied the authori- py, 1,250 manufacturers, while
provided the capital and bear the “Every ton of sugar we can pro- i

Russian’ living, ing thé very gat day, qui a baned the
. ' : ied as generally soreness out o! our mouth, and soon
: 7 ; ad 1 ties that a terrible mistake had at Birmingham, in the heavy ded as g ull) |
risk, will draw in dividends the duce at home means a ton less

The aver
standard is re




ge

tightens the teeth. The following letter












been made, engineering section, more_ than Higher. than pro-Wwat cea aki Amosan ise! aah: taut i frou ‘rene
. | © * Y sec . : e i ry ue ge "T suffere rr
sum of £220,000. to be bought in dollars. The * * % 1.100 manufacturers have already “t@, Virtually non-existent, food Mouth and Prorshon for tap sears,
“At the same time, the Govern- 1950—51 campaign yielded 700,- The skin transplanted from tee TOhe 485,000 rg foot is reported adequate although it) puma were note en ovata ne ad
ment of Trinidad will draw over 0900 tons and to have bought that yjctor to Eric and vice versa at Castle Broomwich. consists mainly of vegetables and were getting looser all the Line tele
£886,000 in royalties and direct quantity in the dollar market grafted on rapidly without scar- grains with little meat and fats,\ muny things and then heard o A; ile néw
taxations and in addition the would have cost at least $80,000,- ying, It retained its texture and — — Clething and housing also fall far, Riepreey Amora ip 3 Reghed biked
United Kingdom Government take 000. hair growth, The other attempt- nn ‘ 2 short of Western standards, ers Tinton soa found tbat
a further £330,000. Thus for every “If we had been allowed to sell eq grafts would not knit togeth- 8 British King s —(U.P.) | my loose teeth were much tight mand
£1 drawn by the owners of the our products—sugar, pulp and er at all. The transplanted skin eT ae Gu ponnteed
business, approximately £5 10s. 6d, molasses—at their full value shrivelled and died. 5 ‘“ BY ® °° var
is taken by the two governments,” there would have been no sugar The Swiss authorities there- Scouts To Atte nd 7 L ADY VELSON 5 ern teres pe Pus ao pat oy
—B.UP. beet subsidy needed for the past fore ordered Eric and Pierre to y ie EXPECTED TOMORROW from ble atin, énd sore mouth dit nm
—_—_—_—_— several years,” he added. be exghanged irompadiately. i. db W. Indian Jamboree Tis RLS. Lady Net ne ioe wack’ Fea ot empey .
4 Was a terr re ae RL.M.LS. Lady elson wi ye Don't take a chance on losing your r
Bermuda To Protest —B.U.P. the three parents. And it was LONDON. | arriving here to-morrow from auftering, the, festante Amosen cons
especially hard on a. a Eight British King’s Scouts|emerara, Trinicod, Grenada and| chemist today unde this Irorie a6 AOareD-
* DUBLIN. suddenly found himse ather- ave been chosen to represent the | St. Vincent. Oc the
About Centeteries The Irish Sugar Company has less. i disee Lnited Kingdom's 474.000 scouts | Fi She eee to sail on on Amosani::':: ee >a
built a special harvester, based But the boys thave adapted 9+ ih. first Caribbean ‘ .«|day for Bermuda, Boston and St 5 ‘
y nirvar ’ é " ‘a a jamboree :
HAMILTON. on the specifications of a U.S, themselves surprisingly well to 5. yamaiea from ‘arch § to 13. John, NB. For Pyorrhea--Trench Mouth

The Bermuda Government is
expected to make representation
to the British Government about
the state of military cemeteries



expert, designed to overcome the this strange family switch-round
peculiar difficulties in the me- Sir Archibald reports in his just-
chanical harvesting of sugar beet published medical record of the





Here are the names as an- {
nounced by the Boy Scouts’ As-
-oclation fn London:—

; ‘ : in Ireland, case, Geoffrey li-J 23 (16), Ips-
on the island if nothing is done phe US expert, Mr. Austin BLINDS UP tee cheumen ‘Richard Denby |
ie. Beasbve them in the near Armer, of the Spreckels Sugar Co., = (17), Purley office junior; Derek

’ ; visited Ireland under an E.C.A. For all ear-wagglers, eye- 1), 6 ee
Members of the Legislatue scheme to investigate Irish diffi- rollers, double-jointed thumb- ee Wiis 'Maxtio Ph ties:
pointed out to B.U.P. that it iS culties in the mecnanical harvest- Ssters, and others who get peren= ot a oy. erence O'Reilly |
the War Office which is respon ing of beet—rainfall, stony condt- nial party fun out of their mus- (16) Cardiff avbrentice ‘itter ana |
sible for the upkeep and condl- tions in small fields and the hilly cular abnormalities, I bring in- turner; John Parker (16) Reigate
tion of the cemeteries and not pjantations teresting news: a is ‘oo Saeattans Joke T Rimell et
the Bermuda Government Manila ‘ hile _ Scotsman who, by contorting his © Me , |

Me C. Co Gilbert, member for ina ante biuld Wa odidiod face muscles, can turn his eye- Wie) Ralewia and John Stoneman |

x ‘ 4 5 é ids inside z r u P .

Sandrys Parish, ee eee to harvest beet under all the con- tee ot out ‘and. roll them, up The party will be led by Mr.)
the eae “ ri re 3 ditions of climate found in Ire- ““pye performance is so as- P. B. Nevill from the Boy ‘Scout
pa 2" Nias patie 5 Gay eA land, it should be possible to start tounding that Aberdeen eye ex- Association H.Q. and Mr. C. G.|









n ' . from scratch and design a ma- ert Dr. William Souter has Roberts, Troop Scoutmaster of | T
ee Te leat asasnk aire specally to meet these con- y ade a coloured film of its the 15th. Firichley tie 7 ;
= C 1 Ss. call }
yard near H.M. dockyard he ssid: tug at ah ES, UP. |
“J don’t suppOse you would see B.U.P. |
that in any otner gene of we 4 . i
world. It belongs to the War | ‘
Otiee and iis going trom baa Down For Sessions » C. L. Gibbs & Co. Ltd
= | . ° ° e
to worse. B.U.P.

yaar Twenty-two year-old Rudojph
5 : . Howell of Nurse. Land, Carring-
No Representation For ton Village, St. Michael, and 19-

B.G. At Trade Meeting year-old Oswald Small of Ven-}

ture, St John, charged with

GEORGETOWN, Feb. 4. stealing brass and lead between
British Guiana will not be send- 19th and 23rd of October last;
ing a representative to the confer- were yesterday committed!
ence on industrial relations to be ind their trial at the Court of
held in Puerto Rico this month. Grand Sessions by His Worship |
The Government has so replied to Mr. A. W. Harper, Acting Police

® P.O. Box 56 ° ; .
, BRIDGETOWN . Dial 2402

PPLE LLL LLL LAB LEE






Therte’s a baby to gladden a
mother’s heart!—firm

e
little body and strong white A re you re-rooting WHEN “COGNAC” IS

ds ik Sth dint eo ta your buildings? | MENTIONED

SevenSeaS—the pure cod liver




PE

Ke

the Trade Union Council and has Magistrate of District “C.” |
also informed the Caribbean Com- The brass and lead were the

.















STOKES & BYNOE Ltd.



:
mission under whose auspices the property of Mr. DeC. O'Neil of | oil so rich in natural fats ~” | THE NAME HENNESSYS LEAPS >
Conference is being held. —©? Cliff P¥antation, St. John. | and protective vitamins, | ELALVANIZED 3 TO THE MIND--BECAUSE HEN- %

i R NESSYS IS THE BRANDY THAT &
” | | << ” >
Po wuss viâ„¢ teeth ? c | ROOFING % MADE COGNAC FAMOUS: %
%
ravine | evenSeaS | And : :
—— 4 aveuae | HENNESSYS :
SEA-FRESH VITAMIN FOOD |) ROLL ROOFING >
+ x
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ive you sete, 2 Oe et ot eae: SAPEDERY tt hilt Hisillnd } ih : ‘
‘ASHTON & PARSONS eee I; Barbados j (over 40 years)
} i$ .

Â¥

¢

:

+

&



Ty
0 } Co-op Cc , r |
’ | Co-op Cotton Factory Ltd. | :
INFANTS POWDERS Ngevite H »p Cotton acto + i pith ak :


~

© Seer ePre ween

see eee

PAGE FOUR

BARBADOS co) ADVOCATE



[oer t= =e



Printed by the Adverste Co., Lid, Broad St. Bridgetown



Tuesday, February 5, 1952

HOUSE HOURS

LAST Tuesday the House of, Assembly
did not meet until 5 p.m. Normally the
House meets at 3 p.m. In point of fact
prayers are never read until 3.15 p.m. Be-

fore the tea interval there are approx-
imately two hours available for debate on
motions, resolutions or bills before the
House. After tea the House has another
two hours available until dinner, and

sometimes another two hours are spent in
discussion after dinner. Six hours and
never more than seven are spent by the
House of Assembly once a week, when the
House is sitting, to discuss measures that
come before it.

Presumably if six hours only are neces-
sary each week for the House of Assembly
to deal with the affairs of the island, the
selection of those six hours and (rarely
seven) is a matter of some importance.
Visitors to the House of Assembly are
sometimes impressed when they see mem-
bers lying back in their chairs, as if rest-
ing. Such positions may be conducive to
clear thought or may be necessary because
the member has begun his working day at
6.30, a.m. and is literally worn out by 3 p.m.
After dinner on a tiring day would not
seem to be the best period to conduct
normal business, but apparently the House
is making a habit of after-dinner sittings.

The House is of course at liberty to con-
duct its business at times suitable to the
convenience of the House, and is unlikely
to make any changes out of respect for
public opinion. Yet public opinion can-
not be ignored since the members of the
House are responsible to electors whose
views collectively form and influence pub-
lic opinion.

This month the House will debate the
Estimates for 1952-53. On this occasion
every member of the House of Assembly
will endeavour to justify himself to the
constituents who returned him to the
Assembly.

The debate on the Estimates will last
for more than six or seven hours. What
will happen? Will the House deal with
expenditure under so many heads once a
week and will the debate drag on into
March? ‘The electors hope not. Many if
not the majority would like to see the
Estimates discussed in the House daily
until approval is reached. There seems
little reason why the House should
not make provision for daily meetings
until the Estimates are passed.

And what occasion would be more suit-
able than this to introduce new hours of
sitting?

In Westminster, three p.m. is a suitable
time for the House of Commons to open
daily (except Saturdays and Sundays).
Most members of Parliament arrive in their
business offices at 10 a.m. daily and keep
office hours until 12 or 12.30, They have
finished lunch by 1.30 or 2 p.m. and usual-
ly spend the intervening hour in cor-
respondence or talking to constituents or
others who visit them in the House of
Commons. In London where distances are
great 3 p.m. is a reasonable time for the
House of Commons to meet. »

In Barbados where six hours are
normally devoted now to legislative dis-
cussion in the House of Assembly, each
week during a session of the House, the
selection of hours seems vital, Is three
p.m. the best selection for opening ? The
traditional Barbadian breakfast hour is 11
a.m, to 12. Most members of the House
probably eat breakfast during that period.
Could the House of Assembly not meet
therefore at 1 p.m. On normai days the
House could finish its business by seven
o'clock allowing its members the oppor-
tunity to return home for dinner. Tea,
instead of being a reason for adjourn-
ment of the House, could be served from
four to five and members would leave the
House at intervals during that period, as
they do now during debates.

The smallness of Barbados makes it
possible for members to be at their places
of business by 8.30 daily and between 8.30
and 11 a.m. as much work can be accom-
plished as between 10 and 12.30.

Only during major debates would the
House need to sit for more than one day
per week, and there seems little to be
gained by debates conducted after dinner,
although dinner might be served at 7 p.m.
for members who desire it. An important
advantage that would be obtained as a re-
sult of earlier sitting is the availabilty of
civil servants responsible for departments.
Ministerial status is impossible unless
“ministers” are well briefed and civil
servants cannot burn the candle at both
ends, since they are more slaves of the
clock than are politicians.









BARBADOS. ADVOCATE



TUESDAY, FEBRUARY 5, 1952



The: American Novel
Through 20 Wears:

Thomas Wolfe

There may have been some
uncertainty among critics at vari-
ous times as to which novelists
of this century should find a
permanent place in American
literature, but before the century
had run one -fourth of its course
one nomination, at least, had been
made and the candidate chosen

by acclaim,

Not all agree on what Thomas
Wolfe ag capable of doing
There is} however, the minimum

accord exacted by the evidence.
The latter consists of two lengthy

novels, “Look Homeward, An-
gel” (1929) and “Of Time and
The River” (1939), two more
earved posthumously from the

mountain of manuscript turned
over to his literary editor before
his death in 1938, “The Web and
the Rock” (1939) and “You
Can’t Go Home Again” (1940),
and a fragmentary third member
(although chronologically first)
of what might have been a tri-
logy, given the title “The Hills
Beyond” (1941). Besides this
skeletal trilogy there was pub-
lished in 1936 an honest piece
of literary self-examination, “The
Story of a Novel,” and in 1935 a
collection of short pieces and in-
cidents entitled “From Death to
Morning.” The catalog ends with
“The Face of a Nation,” , com-
pilation of some of Wolfe’s more
lyrical passages, an arrangement
of his prose in verse form called
“A Leaf, A Stone, A Deer,” and
a thick volume of letters to his
mother, Julia Elizabeth Wolfe.

Autobiography Only

It is important to note early
that Thomas Wolfe consistently
showed himself incapable of any
type of writing save autobiog-
raphy. He wrote millions of
words, not one of them unrelated
to the sensations he had experi-
enced, the people he had known,
the aspirations he had conceived.
While it is a canon of sound
writing to tell of what one
knows, avoiding all that one is
ignorant Of, the point to be made
about Wolfe is that he seems
never to have created a charac-
ter or contrived a plot,.God made
the people and things happened
to them, Wolfe recorded them,
first in his mind and then with
his pen, The way in which he did
it comprises his art.

This is not to say that Wolfe
underwent no process of matu-
ration. There is in his work a
clearly observable movement to-
ward spiritual adulthood, though
not many would care to say un-
equivocally that he had achieved
it by the time of his death at the
age of 37. He remained always
incurably boyish in certain aspects
of his thinking. “I suppose I am a
greater surprise to myself than to
anyone under the sun,” the 17-
year-old could write. “I am
changing so rapidly that I find
myself an ever-growing source
of interest. Sounds egotistical,
does it not?”

How is One to set down the in-
fluences that had a bearing on
the peculiar genius of Thomas
Wolfe? He found the thing hard
to do in five volumes, wherefore
five paragraphs may be expected
to accomplish nothing at all. The
beginning will serve as a con-
venient starting place.

Dutch Antecedents

On October 3, 1900, a boy was
born of William Oliver and Julia
Elizabeth Wolfe in Asheville, in
the Atlantic Coast State of North
Carolina, The father’s antece-
dents were Dutch, who had set-
tiled in the eastern State of Penn-
Sylvania, the mother of pioneer
Scottish-Irish ancestry. He was
the youngest child, four brethers
and two sisters comprising the
family that survived beyond
childhood. The father was a stone-
cutter, a huge fellow with a pen-
chant for lengthy recitations of
the works of the literary masters,
If the boyhood of Eugene Gant

Thomas Wolfe has received the acco-
lade of an outstanding American
novelist’ despite the fact that he
“seems never to have created a
character or contrived a plot”: his
works are considered autobiographical
By GERARD F. SLOYAN
From AMERICA

(as intimately described in “Look,
Homeward, Angel”), is a trust-
worthy autobiographical source,
young Thomas’ home life must
haVe been a wretched experience.
Wolfe’s early success and sub-
sequent career demand some
iurther insight into the threefold
matrix of his life in which every
idea and passion was conceived.
The first consideration might be
of his relation to his family, the
second to society, and the third
to his own genius, which shall
be temporarily equated with his
peculiar mental endowment.

“Ugly Duckling”

Wolfe thought himself an ugly
duckling from the start, and was
maddened that the rest of the
brood should be blind to the cyg-
net in their midst. “You little
freak,” Helen Gant jeers at Eu-
gene in “Look Homeward, An-
gel,” “wandering around witb
your queer dopey face . . . Every-
body’s laughing at you. Don't
you know that?” He knew it and
was resolved to throw the laugh-
ter back in their teeth. The one
great bond of his life was with
his mother, yet one would hesi-
tate to describe it as love.




POCKET CARTOON
by QSBERT LANCASTER

Ce

om.

“My dear,
dove than I am—nust a fellow

she’s nu more

travelling. pigeon with «an
artificial olive-branch.’



Brothers and sisters all came in
for his scorn at various times,
which makes it particularly re-
freshing to see him
mildly upon occasion after their
well-being. His letters often end

in words and inquiries indicating ramified, none but the patient

affection, yet an awareness of
his. jealousies and incredible
rudenesses that tore them apart
was never absent from his mind,

In view of this burning and
irsaticnal resentment, which con-
timues uninterrupted through all
Wolfe’s novels, it is challenging
to try t defermine if there was
love in the man’s life. It does
not seem so, nor any depth of
charity in his writings. One must
go slowly here. Passion there
is in plenty, absorption in indi-
viduals, fellow feeling With nis
mother’ above all. Any of these
might be the concomitant of
love, but love is not to be iden-
tified with any one of them.
The whole Gantian epoch is
interpreted by Wolfe as he
search for a fatherhood that
Eugene had never known. Eliza
Gant could not supply it, neither
a multitude of others, nor the
learning of a thousand books,
The quest gives every appearance
of going unsatisfied,



As an epic of devotedness to
purpose, the story of Thomas |
Wolfe’s life is not easily rivalled. |
The price he paid was bitter lone-
liness. Sq men are voluntary
exiles in Paris or Rome; to have
left Old Catawba was ‘expatria-
tion enough for Thomas Wolfe.
Old Catawba, the home State of
Eugene Gant in “Look Home-|
ward, Angel” (said to be Wolfe’s|
home State of North Carolina),|
was just right. Its p8ople were
humble people, not going to set
the world on fire, nor intending
to, It had no cosmopolitan city,
no empty pretense, no look o
fear, no cruelty in its people's
eyes. Yet in a state of revolt and
siege against a society he
fessed to love, Wolfe lived his
adult days.

Self-Esteem

The novelist’s conception of his
own genius coloured his work
more than family or _ society
could ever do, for through this
glass all else was seen. A searcher
always, the labyrinth of self
entranced him,

How good is Wolfe? It is not,
easy to answer. The matter is
complicat entirely by the fact
that thefJage of which Wolfe
writes h lost faith. Philosophi- |
cal stature he has none. He has
heard a faint echo of all the
gravest questions asked by men
of every time. Posing them,
unanswered, in anguish of spirit
and with groanings unutterable,
he is a raging prophet of the bit-
ter hope that things may somehow
mot be as bad as they seem. If 50
years see man as a being resem-
bling man, oblivion has its niche
prepared for Thomas Wolfe.
Come deeper darkness, then
Wolfe’s star is one of those that
will enjoy a further ascendancy.

Bore

Wolfe is pseudo-Joycean in
that he uses the “stream of
consciousness” technique; he is
Ecclesiastes uninspired, Off with
his head! But cisewhere he fan-
cies himself to be thinking as

’ presen pally upon life as has ever

one, and because he is
eee he must perish. Again, in
other passages, he is a mighty!
Tubalcain ammering out the
lordly brass and iron of a descrip-
tive or a_ self-fathoming prose.
The material resists; sparks fly
Has ever language been asked to)
do so much as this? Yes, but|

there is so much language with | tj

which to do it! And Wolfe, the
unrelenting smith, achieves again
and again what few have cared
or dared attempt, he comes close
to setting down the wild diver-
sity of things. Torrential, repeti-|
tive, wearing, disgusting, indis-)
criminate, annoying, needless
inexact, prodigal—one may cal!
his spate all that, But in doing
so one comes closer to the truth
that a succinct and clever phrase
would not have half described

inquire Words are the signs of ideas, anc | the colonies.” It is the housing shortage, not

when the ideas are huge, some-
times disordered and endlessly

craftsman who cares naught for
space or time will cateh their
meaning.

Wolfe’s finest passages are
found bedded deep in heaps of
slag that tire the mind and dis-
gust the soul; filthy, word-poor
vituperation; blasphemies uncon-
scious of whom they smirch,

caricatures of creatures given a

transfused and temporary interest
by the laboured limning of their

few idiosyncrasies, It is hemmed

in on all sides by a false-mystic

chant that strains to endow itself

with significance.

Once in a while, though, the
‘man is caught out in love—with
words for ideas’ sake; with God's
world; with men, those twisted
images of God that never cease
lovable somehow — and
then the is worth one’s while to
read, this tortured Colossus who
up in the things

to be

never quite
a man should long for; who never
— knew what things to hunger
after,

desperately to play the man.



News From Britain

LONDON,

A fitting answer has been given,
by the Times, to some rather un-
dignified criticism of “the King’s
advisers” who, it was said, should
not have allowechim to accept the
invitation of Dr. Malan, the Pre-
mier of South Africa,

After the announcement that
the King would spend his con-

valescence at the Natal country
villa of the South African Prime
Minister certain elements of the
press took the line that the King's
choice implied support for the
policies of Dr. Malan’s Nationalist
Party.

The King is the Constitutional
head of seven countries. He has to
employ the fiction that he sup-
ports the policies amd views of
whatsoever Government, in every
Dominion, that is chosen by its
Parliament to take office. That
was the gist of the argument made
by the Times, It is inferred that
the Prime Minister was the South
African who could most suitably
invite the King to South Africa.
Some suggestions had been made
that the King should stay with the
Governor-General, or with the
British High Commissioner, The
Times disposed of these remarks
by pointing out that the Governor-
General's residences are. either
unrestfully amidst the hubbub of
city life or out on the High Veldt
at an altitude that would be de-
barred by: the King’s doctors. As
for slaying with the British High
Commissioner; that would be fla-
grantly identifying himself with
his Government in the United
Kingdom, and be a rudeness to his
elected Government in South
Africa.

A Talking Point

Whether the King should have
decided to go to Natal as Dr
Malan’s guest has beco.ne quite a
talking point. The objectors take
a frankly political attitude and
say that the King will in fact give
great encouragement to Dr. Malan.
They argue that the King must
stay above politics by avoiding
tricky political situations where
the very presence of Royalty
might be exploited. ‘The reason
for all this strong feeling in Brit-

By DAVID TEMPLE ROBERTS

ain is because of the great distaste
felt here for the avowed Nation-
alist policy of separating the
races,

Those who have met the criti-
cism point out that the King hal to
choose one of his Dominions;
both Australia and New Zealand
are too far, They assert the truth
that Dr. Malan’s invitation was
sent with kindness and considera-
tion. They point out that the
King was eagerly received in such
Nationalist and avowedly “Re-
publican” centres as Bloemfontein,

The Times, in its dignified and
conclusive editorial defending the
King’s choice goes out of its way
to commend e merits of the
West Indies—and their future
claims for a Royal visit.

The King will go to the beauti-
ful and secluded villa in Natal.
We can only wish him a_ happy
and rapid recovery in those sur-
roundings—and forget the politi-
cal controversy.

“The Gale Rages

In distant seas they are called
hurricanes or typhoons; round the
coasts of Britain they are merely
gales. But the word hardly does
justice to what hit the isolated,
low-lying, islands of the Orkneys
off the extreme North Coast of
Scotland, You may think of these
islands as peaceful, remote, and
little known, In fact they are
flourishing; they include some of
the best agricultural land in Scot-
land, I remember in my wartime
R.A.F, experience, how we would
like to land on the aerodromes
round the naval harbour of Scape
Flow. There, on the islands, eggs
were always to be bought. The
prizes were flown south to the
tightly rationed mainland. Now
a 120 mile an hour gale has
swept away chickens and hen-
coops, torn up the very few small
trees of that Northern climate, and
left the countryside desolate. The
Orkney Islands are in the track
of the great Atlantic westerly
winds. Fortunately a relief fund
has been formed to put the islands
back in shape,

Russian in the Navy

One of the odder public an-
this

nouncements was _ released
week. The Royal Navy will ac-
cept any National Service
who, during their period of con.
scription, are willing to
Russian. What should the Navv
want with Russian, you will ask,
They cannot contemplate

viewing many prisoners in
future war,
enemy codes to be broken. With-
out giving away information I can

any

tell you that the Royal Navy takes
a great pave in - bs vet its oppos-

Red Fleet are
doing. At he Aaeninity there is

ite number

one man employed to read the
Soviet journal, “Red Fleet” in
search of indiscretions. But that

hardly accounts for a desire to

attract more Russian speaking
men to the Navy—or men willing
to learn Russian,

Powerful

Graham Sutherland is the most
remarkable painter in Britain,
So it caused a sensation when he
suddenly announced that he would
paint a portrait of Somerset
Maugham. For, previously, he
was famous for his abstract works
and “still-life” The portrait was
an astonishing success, Now its
place is taken by. another, of
Lord Beaverbrook. The paintiny
now hangs in the Tate Gallery. It
is a strange work. As the Man-
chester Guardian remarks, “No
one is likely to call it a pleasant
picture; powerful is the word.”

Graham Sutherland paints these
portraits under a peculiar
rangement with the sitter. If his
subject—and it must take some
courage to submit oneself as
subject for Graham Sutherland —
objects to the painting; or if
Graham Sutherland objects to it,
then it is destroyed. This seems
to be an admirable arrangement
between portrait-painter and sit-
ter. It enables a really origina!
artist to paint a bold picture with-
out being afraid of ar offended
subject,

I hear the Queen will be the
next sitter to Graham Sutherland,

are

‘| nificant move.

pro- |

; taboos of life in lodgings.”

this boy who tried so

men

learn

inter-

Of course there are









| PAPER SERVIETTES
| In Plain White
| $1.00 per hundred

COLONIAL STUDENTS
‘DIFFICULTIES IN U.K.

LONDON, Jan.
|

| ECONOMIC and temperamental differ-
ences that could apply to any overseas visit-
or are the root of the difficulties confronting
the colonial student in this country. This is
the view taken by an “Economist” corres-
| pondent. He thinks of a better explanation
than the usual one—colour prejudice.



ADVOCATE STATIONERY

Broad Street & Greystone, Hastings i

a



We stock this 2-ply .

| Representation of various colonial stu- Rubber Hose in

|dents’ unions on the new consultative com-
mittee, set up last August, is seen as a sig-
Students “should now learn
how much, or how little truth there is in the
stories of colour prejudice and there should
| be much less exaggerated repetition of them
‘in the colonies themselves,” the “Econom-
‘ist” article continues.

three sizes

x 5
There are also —
BORDER FORKS
\GRIGULTURAL FORKS
1KES
{GRICULTURAL HOES
SPRAYERS



“Most Tools for your
garden are to be found
at Pitcher’s!”

| Difficulties demanding immediate solution,
it is pointed out, fall into two categories—the
psychological and the material. An import-
ant psychological factor is the student’s at-
| titude of mind when he arrives in Britain.
Frequently he has a preconceived idea of the
feelings of the people here through stories
heard from some others who have been here;
he may arrive expecting the worst.

Phone 4472

Cc. S. Pitcher
& Co.

COUPLINGS
PRUNING SHEARS
MENDERS

from which to choose.

One of the main causes of trouble is a “dif-
ference of background and temperament
which calls for a great deal of toleration on
both sides. This is particularly necessary be-









| tween landlady and ‘tenant. Landladies have

a certain rigid code of behaviour and morals
to which the tenant is expected to conform;
|not many are prepared to tolerate deviations
| from this code, and not unnaturally, colo-
is nial students and others used to a less
| inhibited atmosphere and different customs
| find it difficult to conform.”

a| Something more than this toleration by
|landladies and families is deemed necessary.

The visitor must make an effort to acquaint
himself with the “unofficial regulations and



iy

by “TOOTAL”

| The material factor giving rise to difficul-
es is the housing shortage. “Few of the
coloured people one meets,” the “Econom-
ist” correspondent goes on, “seem to realise
| that finding anywhere to live is a i gga
for thousands of English people to-day.

‘is difficult for the university authorities io
| find accommodation for the greatly increased
|numbers of English university students, let
alone the continuing stream of students from

Lystav Tootal Fabrics
are Crease Resistant!
Plain or Patterned —
we have a wonderful

selection - 36° wide,$1.86 |
Da Costa & Co., Ltd. ,
i
|
|

colour prejudice, which brings so many stu-
dents face to face with the “no room at the
inn” notice,

The two organisations most helpful in find-
ing accommodation are the British Council
and the East and West Friendship Council.
Both make every effort to find suitable hostel
or private accémmodation. But they are fac-
ing tremendous odds. They can do little to
improve the position unless more hostels are
built—immediately. “The long-term answer,”
the correspondent adds, ‘“‘would appear to be
not hostels specially provided for colonial
students but more hostels housing all sorts of
university students. When colonial students
obtain this type of accommodation, they are
usually perfectly satisfied because they are
being treated the same as everyone else.”











JUST RECEIVED

The “DALE”
MEASURING TAP





IT POURS A DRINK, STOPS |
If more hostels of this type could be pro- |} AND POURS AGAIN }
vided, many graduates who now return to {
their own countries in a thoroughly dis:
gruntled frame of mind, would go back far
better friends of Great Britain.









BAR AnD CLUB

visitors encounter because they come to Eng
land independently, without having assured
themselves a place at any university, or be-
cause they have been lured ‘here by the
thought of higher wages and better working
conditions.

i
Indispensable in the



Saas tain DIAL a5a9

Emphasis is placed on difficulties which |





DA COSTA & CO., LTD. |
cael







A Delightful Tea Party...











Bananas Scarce For
Three Years

r
E

For

Liverpool fruit importers believe it will be
three years before there are enough bananas
in British shops to meet all demands.



“T have no doubt at all tat but for the hur- | })
ricane which created so much havoc in
Jamaica last year we would now be import. |
ing a far greater amount of bananas”, saic | |

one importer. “As it is our weekly imports
into Liverpool have shown little change for ||
some years. It will take three years for the |







Carr’s Crackers
Kraft Cheese
Dutch Cheese
J & R Bread
Anchor Butter

Jack Straws
Cheese Biscuits
Meltis Dates
Meltis Figs

EAT meee:
FISH

new banana plants to produce saleable fruit \ Sia — ARE YOUR FINEST BUYS.
” ea z
for export. Lipton Tea TASTY HITS
) ei ose T
An official of Elders and Fyffes said : i Cube a Antiplusto
“Production in Jamaica and the British |! Castor Sugar vom
Cameroons, from which we import the fruit, | Carr's Sweet Biscuits eae Boe es

is nothing like it was before the war, It is IK
difficult to say why, but undoubtedly the | })
hurricane last year has affected production
tremendously. At the moment there is little
belief that it will improve.”







CABBAGE sb. b

ORDER your .
GOLD BRAID RUM





| permit them to sell a pound of bananas to | |;
only one customer in three. There is a great | |))
deal of dissatisfaction among customers, but

Salmon
Cod Fillets
Mackerel in tins



EEE EEE
=
= ee
———

the shopkeepers point out that they are |! adel nae
powerless. Some have even suggested that RYE WHISKY Salt Mackerel



;
}
}
Shopkeepers say their banana allocations |}
}
}
)
)

jan unofficial rationing scheme should be in- Today
}troduced, to stop people who go from one | jj}
| shop to another buying bananas in each. ti

—B.U.P. Tecan tii ait aaa

Salt Herrings

Its GODDARD'S for Good Foods |





ee
TUESDAY, FEBRUARY 5, 1952

BARBADOS ADVOCATE

Chancery Suit
Adjourned



PAGE FIVE

FOR THE BEST



HOUSE AFIRE —



oS ae



fuarv:

Mr. 0. O. Walcott |







The death occurred last week
Oliver Oscar Walcott
Head teacher of St ,
THE CHANCERY SUIT Rowland C. Taylor, appellant . 08 el — Fa of St. i} 4 BEASTIFULA
Alfied De C, Boyee and Aubrey C. Kirton, respondent, yy). ‘ Walcon ainesadia -dhs tasy-TO-CLEAS
eonverning which His Lordship Sir Allan Collymore said Samuel Thorne at the St. Jos- FLOOR COVERING
yesterday when heering began that he did not know on eph’s Church School in 1912
what grounds the matter was before him by way of a case et cea eats anion ne .
stated, was adjourned sine di¢ partly because Mr. Grantley cultural activities of the dis- Si LVER STAR
Adams, counsel for Rowland C. Taylor was indisposed trict.
© vase which arose from a completed or removed from the He was among the pioneers i:
viijute over land, is an appeal cause list of the Court of Chan- several other fields. The St CON
from the Assistant Court of cery Joseph Boys’ School Band stage
Appeal in its Original Jurisdiction Not Agreed many successful Band Concert
before His Honour Mr. J. W. ! (7) 1 did not agree with the Qveen’s Park during the °30:
Chenery contention of Appellant's Counsel, = Was its founder and conduc
Mr. B. K. Walcott, K.C., associ- j,i, }lonour Mr. J. W. B. Chenery 72° and many of the present Po
ated with Mr, J. B. T. Brancker, ciated, holding that this suit waa )S¢ Band started their trainin
iced by Messrs Yearwood & properly before the Court ant With him
Jayee are counsel for A. De C. that there was nothing to preclude ., His birthplace was Orange Hill |
\. C. Kirton Mr. him proceeding with it. I ageord- S&S James, where he returned as
’ instructed by Messrs ingly refused an application from Sshoclmaster of the St Silas
Hutchinson & Banfield this decision. R. C. Taylor tas Boys. on the retirement of Mr.
ata certain stage in the pror appealed J. M. Crick in 1942, There he
ceedings in the Avsistant Court of “It seemed amazing that the feunded the St. Silas Men's Co-
Appeal, Mr. Adams submitted that appellant should file a claim to be Operative.
it was not competent for that heard by the Court and then pro- , His: interest in education was|
Court to take notice of the matter ceed to argue that it was improper fostered by his great desire, of-|
im yiew of cer.ain proceedings for the Court to hear the claim,’ ten at great sacrifice, bed render |
t were in the Court of Chan- he stated. his service for the benefit of his
ry. The Court ruled that it was His Lordship before adjourning district He was a keen and kind
“mpetent to take cognizance of the suit, said that he did not know ‘eacher in day and Sunday
the matter and Mr. Adams gavé on what grounds the matter was School, a Joving father and a}
notice of appeal. The proceedings before him then by way of the “cere friend. His passing was | Tor ’
- were then terminated. case stated. . mourned by a large circle, | INSIS1 ON
Roof Burnt

Plaintiff's Evidence
Evidence had been previously
Liven by plaintiff R. C. Taylor,
©. A. Pilarim, land surveyor, and

‘“‘Success Or Failure
Depends On The Self

members of the teaching profes- |
sion and close friends, He was}
laid to rest at the St. James|
Cemetery on Sunday, January 27

The jurisdiction of that Court
m matters of appeal surely was
oth in law and in fact, Section
78—~79 of the Assistant Court of

The roof of a boarded and
shingled Fouse at Beckwith
Street was damaged when a



SILVER STAR



















7 : z r ae : To his sorrowing _ relatives
fire broke out at the house Horatio Williams, Registrar-in- Appeal Act made no mention of deepest sympathy will be ex
ns. eee (ope p se | :tovlly after? oclock yester: | Chancery. 0" sug BOE One MARR sign OO. SOLD AT ALL THE LEADING STORES
hiseipline Of The British?’ | Scitseeeiees | Re Ceeaes t in, am SET EONG gore ing vas OE
L i» front of the house and the which came before the Court yes- judge’s having any authority to wi
Fire Brigade used water a eee ma it bs gy ie 9 se — a id tt buss tad P ust Maths Book
1 Tt 7 . “itis *onserv: 1e@ from this to stated for the Court of Chancery said that as he expecte, 1G e ia aianielig lis aL
: MR. RONALD TREE, former British Conservative ae put out the by virtue of the Assistant Court Learned Trial Judge to return at In We tI die i PSs PISS
M.P., who is spending two months’ holiday at his seaside of Appeal Act, Section 79, His the end of this month and he him- es ndies if 9
residence, “Heron Bay”, St. James, told the Advocate yes- The house is occupied by Honour Mr. J. W. B. Chenery one would, be absent from the From Page 1 | HARRISON S BROAD ST
erdav at the ne , » oo far ce » f a, ye a tin-smith, know si- stated. colony during next week at the ‘ .
terday that the next year as far as the future economy of | Gents as “Waerrlok’ “ates 1) On July 22, 1949, the re- West Indian Court of Appeal in _,Thére Is also Dr. Ryder’s Psy-
sritain is concerned b highly de ao arrick.” At the (1) 1» July 22, 1949, the re i Appea hol 4 :
Britain is concerned, must be a highly dangerous one. time of the fire he was not | spondent A. De C. Boyce, as mort- British Guiana, it would be re- very Unbsutal took au est h — <<
apace shy at home. gagee of certain properties situ- summoned, The re-summoning Very technic or one which JUST A FEW OF THE MANY ITEMS WE HAVE
eri ant a boy oe aces ated in St. Philip, filed an action for a date on emphasises this or that viewpoint

notification of the

Calizing the gravity of the situa-

1 although to-day, Mr. Attlee
is attempting to water it down.

Once again, success or failure
depends on the self discipline of
the tish people and othe suc-
the very drastic measures
that are being taken of which the

st instalment were presented last

k by Mr. R. A. Butler, Chan-

of the Exchequer; and the
will be in the Budget of
1 4, significantly two months
of the normal budget date.
Relationships

his reasons why Mr.
Churchill had recently
the United States of
America, Mr. Tree said that the
Prime Minister was very worried
when he came into power in Oc-
find that the relationships
which he had built up between the
U.S. and Britain during the war
such as very close collaboration
between the Chiefs of Staffs had
greatly deteriorated

His object in going to America
in January, was-to attempt to re-
establish those relationships, and
it was for that reason that he took
with him, his closest friends in the









Winston”

visited

ober to



Cabinet, such as Lord Ismay, the
Secretary of State for Common-
wealth Felations, Lord Cherwell



who had all matters of atomic
science in his hands in the Cabi-

net and the Chief of Staff, Army,

Navy and Air Force to Washing-
ton
it was Mr, Churchill's hope to

re-establish the same kind of re-
lationship that existed during the
war, not only in London and
Washington, but also at various
headquarter staffs where the two





countries worked together as one
team and there were nm secrets
one from the other

PM. In Good Spirits

Mr. Tree said that he saw the
Prime Minister just before he left
for England. He was in very good
spirits although he had a heavy
cold and he felt that he had suc-
ceeded to a very large extent as
far as his visit was concerned.

One other thing the Prime Min-
ister wished to"'do, was to obtain
adequate supplies of steel in order
that the British Rearmament Pro-





mme should not come to a
standstill, causing serious unem-
ployment. In this, Mr. Tree said
that he was also successful and
had obtained the promise of
600,000 tons of steel in return for
rubber and tin in which the
Americans were in short supply

for their Rearmament Programme,
The reactions in Washington of







Mr. RONALD TREE.

September 9,
Their Honours confirmed the de-

Rudder,



——

BODIL’ HARM COSTS 30/-

_ Their Honours Mr H A,
Vaughan and Mr. A. J. H. Han-
schell, Judges of the Assistant

Court of Appeal, yesterday fined
Beversley White Chancery
Lane, Christ Church 30/- and 3/-
cosis to be paid in seven days or



in default one anonth’s imprison-
ment with hard labour

for inflict-

ing bodily harm on Vivian Jones
with a stick
The offence was committed on

1951. By doing this

cision of His Worship Mr, C

olice

Ww.
Magistrate of Dis-



told the court that on

September 9 he was at a dance
at Silver

Sands, Christ Church,
ind had a row with the defendant,
In the row the defendant hit him
with a stick on the head Dr.

Ward attended him.



Harlem Seethes Over

B.W.L. Quota—Cut Plan

By JOHN TWITTY

WEST INDIAN LEADERS in the Harlem area are up
in arms over a proposal to impose a quota on the number

of Islanders allowed to enter the U.S. each year.

quota exists at present.

No such

Introduced two weeks ago by

Senator Patrick A. McCarran, (D-Nevada) the Bill would
limit immigration to 100 persons a year from each of the
British colonies in the Caribbean area.

John D. Silvera, Harie:n public-
ist who acts in a liaison capacity
for Congressman Jacob K. Javits
(Rep.-N, Y.), said that a number
of West Indian leaders are in the
process of forming a committee to

take positive action against the
Bill.

Javits, who stated that he is
“vigorously opposed to the Bill”

is of the opinion that although it
is difficult at this time to assess
the attitude of members of Con-
gress, especially the Southern bloc
and feels that opposition to the
measure will be stronger than
would be the case if civil rights
were involved.

“No Question”
“There is no question as to the
unfairness of the Bill,” he said,



25/- For Bodily
Harm With Store

Their Honours Mr, H, A.
Vaughan and Mr, A, J, H. Han-
schell Judges of the Assistant
Court of Appeal, yesterday order-



ed Carmen Blades of Deacons
Road, St. Michael, to pay a fine
cf - for inflicting bodily harm

on Mazie Leacock with a stone on
February 4, 1950.

By doing this Their Honours
confirmed the decision of His
Worship Mr, E. A. McLeod, Police
Magistrate of District “A.” Coun-
sel in the case was Mr, D, H. L.
Ward for Mazie Leacock,

Mazie Leacock said that on

in the Assistant Court of Appeal
against the respondent A. C.
Kirton, claiming payment of the
@mount secured by the mortgage
of the foreclosure properties or
in default sale or foreclosure.
Among these properties was one
particularly described as contain-

ing 1 acre, 2 roods, 2 perches.
(2) On July 22, 1949, the re-
spondent A. C. Kirton accepted

service of the action and summons
in the suit, admitted the truth of
the allegation it contained and
submitted to judgment.

(3) The order of the Court de-
creed the sale of the properties
described in the particulars of the
action to take place on October 7,
1949 and called for claims affect-
ing the properties to be made be-
fore October 5, 1949,

Claim Filed

(4) On September 27, 1949, the
appellant R. C. Taylor, filed a
claim for two roods, 21 perches of
land, part of a portion of 1 acre,
2 roods, 2 perches of land describ-
ed in the action. The ground of
the claim was that the 2 roods
21 perches of land formed part of
the property called “Harrismith”,
purchased by him (R. C. Taylor)
from the Registrar-in-Chancery
in the suit of Taylor v, Taylor on
October 18, 1946.

(5) On the hearing of claims in
this action, R. C. Taylor’s Counsel
raised an objection in limine of
the Court’s proceeding with the
hearing of a claim affecting the
land referred to in (4), on the
ground that the title of the iand
formed inter alia the subject mat-
ter of the suit in the Court of
Chancery entitled Taylor v. Tay-
lor, Counsel urged that under the
circumstances, the issue to be de-
cided being the same in the Courts
of Chancery and Assistant Court
of Appeal, viz; the ownership of
the portion of land claimed by

R. C. Taylor, the action in the
Assistant Court of Appeal, the
Court of inferior jurisdiction,

should be stayed pending a decis-
ion in the Court of Chancery, a
Court of Superior jurisdiction
Counsel further submitted that
it was open to the respondent,
Kirton to file the claim in the
suit, Taylor v. Taylor still pend-
ing in the Court of Chancery in
respect of the portion of land.
(6) In support of this conten-
tion, the appellant, R. C. Taylor,
in evidence swore that the portion
of land claimed by him formed
part of “Harrismith”, a property
sold to him by the Registrar-in-
Chencery in 1946 in the suit Taylor



Solicitors of both parties during
the first or second week of the
March Assizes when the Acting
Puisne Judge His Lordshin Mr
Justice G. L. Tavlor would be
presiding at that Court

Shopkeeper
Fined 30/-

In the Assistant Court of Appeal
yesterday Their Honours Mr, H, A,
Vaughan and Mr, A. J. H. Han-
chell contirmed a decision of His
Worship Mr. H, A. Talma who
imposed a fine of 30/- and 2/-
costs to be paid in 14 days or
in default one month’s imprison-
ment with hard labour on Her-
vert Grant of Howells Cross Road,
St, Michael for keeping his liquor
shop open on Sunday, August 19,
1951, for the purpose of selling

Mr. E, W. Barrow appeared in
the court on behalf of Grant,
while Sgt. Murrell attached to
the Central Station, prosecuted
from information received,

Cpl. Shepherd told the court that
on August 19 about 10.15 a.m. he
was on duty on Howell's Cross
Road, St, Michael, and saw the

coor of a shop opened, He entered

and the defendant was behind the
counter and in front of the coun-
ler were a man and woman, The
man was drinking rum from a
Lottle which was on the counter,

He then asked the defendant if
he was the proprietor of the shop
and he said “yes,”

Police Constable 139 Warner
who was in the company of Cpl.
Shepherd corroborated Cpl. Shep-
herd’s evidence, Mr. Barrow in his
address said that the ition
had failed to prove that the door
cf the shop was open for business,
He said that it was evident that
both of the witnesses for the
prosecution Cpl, Shepherd and
Police Constable Warner—went
into the shop and saw a com-
pletely different state of affairs.

Before confirming the decision,
Their Honours said that the evi-
dence was substantiated and what

the two policemén saw in the
Shop they had come into court
nd said,

Both said that there was a man
and a woman in the shop and the
man was drinking from a bottle
cn the counter,





but an objectively and clearly
written study of the subject, ex

plaining it in a manner which wil!

prove valuable to the layman or
the student,
Interesting Novels

Two other interesting novels
Children Of The Archbishop b
Norman Collins, author of London
Belongs To Me, and Margaret Ken
nedy’s Lucy Carmichael—add va
riety to the subject matter fron
which borrowers might wish t
choose In the first volume, th
story told by Mr, Collins centre
around the life of two missin
children from that well-know:
London Orphanage The Arch
bishop Bodkin Hospital, Putney
and vividly deseribes those mo-
mentous years between 1920 and
1938, which saw the Hospita
thrown into confusion by bur-
glary, fire and temporary disap
pearance of one of its inmates
and the hue and cry for the tw«
missing children, the Press cam
paign and the eventual Home
Office inquiry.

The second volume, Lucy Car
michael adds another portrait t
that gallery of young girls which
is perhaps Miss Kennedy's princi-
pal achievement, Both these novels
are Book Society Choices

Sports writers will welcome th:
addition of Wisden 1951 to the Re
ference Library, as well as J. H
Fingleton’s Brown And Company
in which the author of “Cricke!
Crisis” and “Brightly Fades The
Don” provides an extraordinaril)
interesting and revealing accoun
of the 1950 M.C.C. Tour to Aus
tralia Mr. Fingileton's latest
work includes not only an accu
ate and detailed account of each
of the Tests, but also comes to sig
nificant conclusions about the tour
as a Whole, and about the state of
Australian and English Cricket

Those interested in
will find Rackham
Washington Carver of
interest, while Movie Parade,
to 1949 will provide very valuable
information for local film critics

These proposed additions &
well as the 2,000 or more books
added during the latter half of
1951, provide a wealth of literary
material for the ever increasing
number of borrowers who make
use of the facilities offered by the
Barbados Public Library

Banker’s Inquest







immense

To Be Held To-day,

















p
L>=
+>



biography 1}
Holt’s George ||

1888 |



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Fet 4. 1950 at at t 10 " Tayl that } k k . The inquest concermmng - deatt R 4 ADY TO
7 7 sjnce there is no quota on coun- ebruary 4, 19: at abou a.m, v. Taylor; that he had been put of 76-year-old Herbert avis, /

Mr. Churchil]’s visit were good. trie: in Central or South America, while passing in front of a Mrs. into possession of the property HARBOUR EMPTY Ci nadian banker, will be held to -
They appreciated his statement “ Gongressman Javits said that Hail’s House, the defendant sud- but that no conveyance had as yet lay at the District “A” Poli HELP YOU
that if war started in Korea again, 1. will be able to discuss the Bill Genly rushed out of that house and heen exeented by the Registrar Car,isle Bay was empty yester- Court when the Coroner will | i 4
that Britain would be at their at greater length when the House threw a stone at her which cut and that the suit had, not been day, Since the year began, it has 4 \9 Worship Mr. E. A. McLeo
ee m j. 8} penaeerthe version has been completed It her in the head. eee had a few empty days. But win Herbert Davis Whe. vd so

Mr ree saic i neihah le fer ‘ 2 T= theo started ¢ say to ‘0 > Marine otel, iri

cas heen . will probably differ in some r s s i ‘te . . he crop started and sugar at the
people in America were all Seek ypects from the Senate version, _ She went to the General Hon i: Price Of Animal shipped to the U.K. and Canada, Chureh, was found dead in i ts 3 mee
eae ene : me « United States he said Emanual Celler (D-N.Y.) t#! where he was treate a di the harbour, it is expected, will bedroom on Friday February YOUR DOCTOR (ty
CEO Ee ee aan e to ask for a is Chairman of the House Judici- Copeland who said she exai oe Feed oon be always busy with ships 1952 about 6.30 p.m A post mor i
1id he did not com ask ary Committee which is expected Leacock and found that she ae calling to discharge and load tem examination was performe: you DRUGGIST a
large peti: at the only serious to take action on the me © 4“ cut on the left side of the head @ From Page 1 cargo by Dr. A. S. Cato. PUA a€nl (2) hi
ey gpd igo the Prime in the next few week which could have been caused by partly because some of their opera- —— \

point of critici m anon gps oth ome blunt instrument. tional costs are slightly higher In case of sudden sickne cident yu {{

ape id be sent from the Meanwhile, James i. Lawson Blades told the court that she — Since the merchants who deal can call on your doctor at any hou f the i
es ae Turkey ind France, president of the United African was at home and heard Leacock jy the rum trade have to obtain day or night for aid. And-—~at any how }
chy et it intaining law and Nationalist Movement, called the tugging at the front of the house. the rum for their vats have to li ne ) oa or iB
; a th esi Cc inal But in MeCarran Bill unfair and asked Before she could reach the front purchase from the refineries, they the day or night—we and ready p t
Ter aas like many other simi- for a proportionate reduction of coor Leacock was inside. her jn turn have had to-work out cor- your doctor in an emergency wit! it
ee states neritheee the Prime Min- European immigraticn quota f house and there she was given 4 responding increases, and now 4 medicines, first aid materials, prescription {
vers in the past, it would look the Bill becomes law. “Thy Car- cood beating. She never threw a dozen pint bottles of rum which Allied od gubect dbarioleak ‘comnts \
o me mites as if he was merely ibbéan is in our economic, social. stone at Leacock. a formerly we ee i will ged an > i }
ve b ini F ica i é ; Worshi r, E McLe be sold for $4.64. is represents : voi. ; , a \

Sa ublic opinion, and that folitical and military orbit, and His Worship Mr. E, A, ) : oe; ap ada eal Se sa ai
ee, compromise along those pesides, the people of that area imposed a fine of 5/- to be paid an increase of 34 cents per dozen, Fer Accurate Prescription Service, Call at i
lines might well be worked out are of the same ethnic group as in seven days or seven days’ im- or roughly 3 cents on the bottle {
vith the new Egyptian Govern- j,jllions of Negroes on the Ameri prisonment on Mazie Leacock for which is about an 8 per cent. in- x
ment shortly can mainland,” he said. @ On Page 6. crease on the retail price. "4
1 |

SAVE ON THESE

For
Originally This Wéek i

Swank Swim — Suits



ti

ROBERTSON’'S RED CURRANT, BLACK



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PAGE SIX BARBADOS. ADVOCATE TUESDAY, FEBRUARY 5, 1952

CLASSIFIED ADS. | POStte SALES | MacGillivray Made |Toronto Doctor Dies | Me omnes | SAIPPIRG NOTICES
























































































































































































































































































































































pF - | Blades, but yesterday Their Hon-
: de Malay ++ Heart Attac : PT ee
TELEPHONE 2508. | REAL ESTATE } i puty lo alay at Afte H rt At . k ours yatied the decision and ordet- SoNTReat, AUSTRALIA AND NEW puppy s2 > SU SSUOIOOOO,
1 $$$ | “att HOUSE 8 x 12, pine frame anal j4% Y ae ed Leacock to pay a fine of 20/-| ZEALAND LINE UTD. if , Dai
| foor, fir sides, jron roof, easil ‘ilich Conimissioneér ‘ORONTO. Fel or to undergo one month’s impris- | MANZ LINE |S he M/V, “CACIQUE, DEL
For Births, Marriage or Engagement | FOR SALE cabled anes oving eight bolts, | 5 TORON eb. 4. | nment @ith Hard labour. | §.S. TEKOA is scheduled to sail from CARIBE” will accept Cargo and
@mnouncements in Carfh Calling the} weeks ong i Somme. | Our Own Cortespéndent) Prank O'Leary, 61, died sudden- i: H id that i g| Adeluide February 11th, Melbourne Feb- Passengets for St. Lucia, ts
Sherge 93.00 for any gumber of words Dial 254 H | LONDON, Feb. 4 ly, early on Sunday, after a heart| Tet Honours sai at it was Vary vind, Sydney February 28th, Bris- Vincent. Grenada, se
Up to 50 and 6 cents per word for each . . oo 4 sas! ea eigen oo) seizure. He was one of Toronto's |@uite Clear that there was a cet- bane March sth arriving at Trinidad |% Salling Wednesday Gth ing.
additional word, Terms cash. Phoue 2503 AUTOMOTIVE | . Mr. Donald MacGillivray, form- | S©i2U aa e ‘ltain amount of fighting going on sbout April sth and Barbados about The M.V. “DAERWOOD 4
between 8.30 and 4 p.mi.j 3113 for Death | _ : Colonial Se ry of Jamaica} best known medical men, ; 3 April Lith accept Cargo and Passengers
: ; | 1 £100 Barbados Government De-| ©! lonial - and both parties were seen by 4» ~. St. Vincent, Grenada
Notices only after 4 o.™ CARs 1947 Standard & h.p. Apply: | benture @ 3° and w deputy to the High Cor F . ti ho id they had bruises _™ addition to general cargo this ves- St. Luct pe ts Piaad eth
a G Burton & Co 5.2.52—3n | : 100 Balentics Government De-| main vane rs Dr, O'Leary was born in Orillia, | Goctors W su y sel has ample space for ehilled and hard and A . Sailing
— } benture @ 5° |missioner for Malaya, way at the) and after attending Orillia Colleg-|and abrasions on their skims. | frozen cargo 7 inst. ev, “CARIBBEE” will
” - | } ; ‘ r | .
"ger svarreres | CAR-—One (1) Morris 8 HP. 1947) 3 £100 Barbados Government De-|Colonial Office to-day. With him] jate, came to Toronto and was : | Cargo accepted on themeigg —_ “A BF aces and Passengers for
ANNOL q EMEN T'S | saioon, excetient condition, 5 new tyres, | Lanusies @ Ok% |was his new boss, General Sir| praguated from the University of ee }Lading for transhipment at Trinidad to accep ‘Antigua, Montserrat,
“| recently pajnted. Offers to D§pnald| 95 ; um Mefinery Ltd. |eo-cia Teamnler T Ce graguated trom ) RATES OF EXCHANGE | British Guiana, Leeward and Windward Dominica, Gatling Friday
231 shares W.I, Rum Refinery 1 Gerald Templer, They exchanged| To Phi a. eae d Nevis and St. Kitts. Sail
"3 Faghill 2229 until 4 p.m. and 3378 after| 44; shares Barbados Fise Insurance i upler, They an Toronto in Pharmacy. He entered | Fuavakt 4 68 Islands, ae ng
REPAIRS AND MAINTENANC 4 bm 5.2.52—ttn.| 95 shares B.S. & T. Co, Ltd views with Mr, Oliver Lyttelton] a medical course but was inter-| NEW YORK -| For further particulars apply— 15th inst.
bados Agencies announce that they have] "“—"ooeNs new Cliroens in stock, £ — we. state Sahel co. [2 the situation they will face} rupted and he went overseas with | 73.6% pr. Chequés on Bankers 71.4% pr. | FURNESS. WITHY & O., Ltd. pwit SCHOONER | OWNERS
ecently S| . : " aN SS ° shares arbados e one o, 5 : - - Am j mand "‘RINIDAD. ASSOCIA %
. to! nobil ae ner trégn Gated Kine: price $3,275, apply Barbados Agencies, (6% Preference) when ‘they Sy to Malaya to-mot-| We: Gat s3eKd pulance in 1915. — “Grate 71.2% pr. | AW Consignee. Tele. No. win
Soe ord ase “extending their ptemiges| telephone 4008. 1.2.52—€n. | 33 shares Barbados Ice Co. row. ; He became Staff Sergeant, was | 45 60, pr. cable Ci re DaCOSTA & Co... Ltd. -
to handle all types of repairs. | _ The adove mentioned shares will be} MacGillivray’s appointment was| awarded the Military Medal, and | 72.2 pr. Currency 69.8% pr. BARBADOS. pbs tpt PLL LISLE
: 1.2.52—6n. C¥PROEN—One second hand Citroen | so for sale at Public Auction on| . . pare 2% | a0 oom" :
: “| done under 5,000 miles, apply Barbados | priga® the 8th day of February 1952 at |* well kept secret. When he ar-| lost his leg below the knee as a Coupons 69.2% pr. fo bey semana
Agencies, telephone 4908. 1.2.52—6n.| "pm at Carrington & Sealy, Lucas|rived from Jamaica ten days| result of being wounded at Pas- cian eeitiilteay |
ee ee ae 31.1.52-—-4n |ago, even officials at the Colonial| schendaele in 1917. 73.3% pr. Cheques on Bankers 70.76 pr.
Loy ve car for cheap moto x — : » 4 —
FOK mR Tt ew to Barbados, apply Barbados “EN_DAILWIN, Pine Hill Standing on Hill Standing on|Q!lice did not know why he had seh ts shite Wa tatat elie | Uaeeee.. renee 70.98% pr. |
Agencies, telephone 4908. 1.2.52—6n. | 6 600 square feet of land, Stone bungalow | been summoned. The first indi- oe Archet af ae Trini los. 306 ge aa 3 } co
-—__-_——__-__-- containing three bedrooms, breakfast |cation they had wag an official an-| the former Archel Daly of Trini- | “2% pt. Currency 69.2% pr.
LORRY-—1 Austin 3-ton lorry in perfect | -oom, living room and kitchenette with eae ana dad, and a small son, Peter. } 5 68.5%
TU , SAMPSON : : ‘ nouncement put out on Sunday Coupons 5% pr.
HOUSES working order. STUART & “S = N| cupboards. Tiled bath and toilet. Ser- nA heeent aver the. wirel —(UP.)
TD 29.1.52- | vants’ room and garage. Inspection on | &Nc yroadcast ove he wireless | Y
- nnn ——~ | application to Mrs. Bernard Rolfe. Tele-|this morning. :
ee oS Sane cL James | . MOTORCYCLE—Only one (1) in stock, whore 4817. MacGilliveay ts well suited to
FU RNISHED BUNGALOW an St See Ambassador Supreme, Spring-frame, 2 The above will be set up for sale at MacGu ay is : ad | NEW YORK SERVICE
ee 3 bedr ee tele an Stihine, b.p. $605.00. Terms. A ae fee ~ Public Auction on Friday the 8th Feb- his new job, for previously he | nites -
modern conveniences, goo ea bathing, | iy pp 26.1,52—t.f.n > t the at Palestine nearly te ane } s 5th A 7
ay t 247 ruary at 2,30 p.m, at the office o' been in Palestine nearly nm years | 2tt .. arrives Barbados
=—e Senn RS 1.3 a. oe undersigned. TON & SEALY where he learned plenty about . ° - Fen foe 15th #iibeats arrives Barbados 26th February, 1952.
ee ELECTRICAL CARRING' i a. eniae Selaiaeae.
MOORLANDS — Comfortably farnishe | rn a “ “ $1.4.52—8n} But reports from Singapote to- imat
Awelling house at St. James, on the sea-}| RADIO: One Second-Hand American- 31,1.52—4: P ports singap }. ane
sine: dkvegs and Telephone. Dial 3589 Bosch 8-tube Radio apy to H. D TAIT VINCENT. BWL night suggest that his task is not NOT ICE | NEW ORLEANS SERVICE Ha jute 1902
4.2.52—2n } Rock's s 1 Street ALN NT, B.W. - ensy. T my ; een $ ary, :
42.52% | Rock's Drug Store, Tudor Street. sn | PROPERTY—Attractive senside property |g0ing to be easy. The Daily Ex-| AtipMedtions invited By thé. Water Commission, Jamaica, for| . * STEAMER sails 10th January arrives Bepados 14th February, 1952
; Deacon's Road. Drawing adjoining Villa Beach, 3 acres with| press correspondent on the spot} PpHestions are invited By the. Water nission, eee, A STEAMER sails 30th January: arrives Fetrbades 28th February, 1982.
caer ee 3 ‘bedrooms, massive stone eee * og 4 sa. feet.) pays Malayan politicians of all! 1 post of Temporary Civil Engineer. | | A STEAMER sails 13th February— @ ee aemgeeneantl
nd bath. Dial 4017 . Fl TU Particulars from Errol Rooks, Dour © "sn. |Shades of opinion and _ colour! ; | been iteneenatirneesnenenarntnemeeraa — roe
Teli enaniaiiebiat RNITURE Ppgne S20 os lore atgry that fe hie been} The post is temporary and non-pensionable, and carries a salary | CANADIAN SERV
ANT Dwelling house called “GILVAN” with|anpointed as Templer’s députy.| sQile of £795 by #25 to £920 per annum. Point of entry into the SOUTHBOUND
7 CHAIRS, Chairs, Chairs and other fi f land situate at Chel . 2 i. foun F 4 ‘ ‘ ”
oa Mise |, CHAIES:, Chsirs, Chairs... and othe 19,008 squbre | eae Of Band af at Boose (Tne anger was because of two) scale will be determined by experience and qualification. Holder isso Sails Halifax Arrives Barbados
HELF sur home. A. BARNES & Co., Ltd.|contains Drawing Room, Living Room,|facts: firstly, because Malayan} may be required to keep a motor vehicle for the performance of his — ry 24th
_— oOo 18.1,52—t.f.n.!4 bedrooms, Garage, Toilet, Bath and | epiincillors ade it clear in the} . ‘ . wah ont 4 PURITAN” . January Mth January rts
STENOGRAPH®R & TYPIST for ouy usual conveniences for) debate last week that they want- duties in which case he will be eligible for a travelling allowance in | s : ae Eee rere January 29th rary es
T. Geddes Gt t Lid. Pe ET LIVESTOCK sale by Public Competition at our office ed either an Asian or European| accordance with the Commission’s rates. ss, “ALCOA PLANTER” . Sa 26th March 7th
— i -!"Doa: Wire hair Fox. Terrier Dog,|James Street on Friday 8th February, | with Malayan experience to get ‘ a - i A pk eae a et ao a March 14th oe
white, with Biock ears. Answers to the | 1952, at 2 p.m. fention'to Miss Kenl-|{h© job, and secondly, _ because Appointment will be on probation for one year at the end of A STEAMER (||. March 23rd Apri
- ~ i. we ' 7 ss Kell- 113 ; . : . : bods ia ;
MISCELLANEOUS ume of Jack, Please contact Donald i EE rare oa gg 58. MacGillivray is an ex-Palestine| which period it may be extended at the Commission’s discretion. ; aia aac
NiED TO RENT le Gh gl amall ata iene ts * ““YEARWOOD & BOYCE, Administrator—and men from) Applicants should be between 30 and 45 years of age, and must These vésscls Have limited passenget < senate
d eh ne 272 s i 5. >, setine ¢ “ ‘ * 3 le
satin WANTE ee ek , | Sofleltors eld ee eae Co ica asin w | have had satisfactory experience in Water Works Engineering, includ- ROBERT THOM LTD. — NEW YORK AND GULF
sa House from Ar Ist ? | 1 “ibaa teal ices soli . : " r . ne z,
furnished House tom Arih ist too MECHANICAL “.TRANQUILITY—Standing of 14110|N. Gray, a former Palestine po-|*98 the construction of small dams and intake ee eee the | APPLY:—DA COSTA & CO., UTD. CANADIAN SERVICE
St. Michacl.nswferred Write: Lox LL. |“GOSTNow passenger chamis recently |square feet of land at Strathclyde,|lice chief, many Palestineans| laying of large diameter steel and cast iron mains and reservoir con- r
C/o Advoentenddvise. “Dept | ceived, on view at Barbados Agencies, | House contains three bedrooms upstalrs lin key jobs when he came to Ma-) struction. Working knowledge of land surveying and general build- | a i eieheeelinanieniantalanlenialeinle nian NT
P . f rious room awe + ‘ »2 ™ o te : ; 3 j e is
ns Me 4 }islephone 4908 1,2.83—En, SE eee batts snd toilets, Sn- lexan in waited eee these ap-! ing work, including quantity surveying and estimating also essential, pas .
ena EES . ae ea ments prov o be unsucces- D
. ti day by appointment. ‘Phone | POIN a” | ae oe “e, i
MISCELLANEOUS Man L, Skinner 2687 he above will be | ful as well as admististrative experience UENAY TE
—_———— ————— t up for sale at Public Auction on Mrs. MacGillivray who return- ee r not ra —_— — S
, GALVANIZED SHEETS A limited| Friday the Sth February at 2 p.m. at| oq desl: CHEE bea will sail to Applications, accompanied by references from firms or depart — a, I
, ) GunHtsty. 7 £t. 96.00, 9 £. 90.98, 9 St 96 45) tig office Gh Wa. wetensaned, join her husband next month ments in which experience has been gained should be submitted to | *~ come es
lunquire Auto Tyre Co. Telephone 2696. CARRINGTON & SEALY, y b he 16th ! 4 N SERVICE
There is ncnebd For us to tell you of the 2.2.52—t.£.n. Lucas Street — ——— the Chief Engineer, Waterworks Department, Barbados by the } CANADIA i ca ag
iat vied ; le eile oath ahinedgtnialanoe $1.1.62—8r ‘ i for post of Civil Engin- | bei oa
torture covaed ky pils ereuble, . We seb | niGra, Nazing, Records ‘snd 70, RPM “ Seawell Vii epee From St. John and Halifax, N.S.
re cau: » ) Records and we book orders too. A. > } , |eer, Water Commission, Jamaica, | ceeenngeccmmnaenapetars
i nl using Man Zap | BAPNES & Co., Ltd. GOVERNMEN; NOTICE ARRIVALS — a —2.2.52—4n. | . Expected Arrival
> = Rape y ae aeaihae pain, 18.1.52—t.f.n. i | 1 Se st Spat aoe . ee war | St John Halifax Deteg, Brlageyown,
. y Fre TRINID/ t bados
soothe and completely heal blind orbleeding | = MEN'S GOLF BAG-—must be fair con- , ee hee ye athe | male } aero 33S: 28 Jan. 14 February
piles. Read just these two from a host | dition ~ and price reasonable. Phone+ qt ig notified torr general infor=| quested, F. Odie, M. Henry, C. Haines..R. | ~ pe By at ; 14 Feb 16 Feb. 5 March
of letters eee | mation that the southern main | Gilbert, W Whiting..C, Whiting, Ht. Prise, | | 5.8. “SUNDIAL’ 25 Feb 29 Feb. oo
aa : ie, » Li * | « r Ma 5 Mare
| Mrs. Mc a. A, NoneatenAiibeaiM Fok over'| One Child's Play Pen & Mattress,) gate to the Public Buildings yard)», 4m porrTo RICO: ee a7 IRG? SI gen bp ear pea. See ie cage hk em Tea a ple kl adc lpee
@ year I suffered with terrible burning piles. | one Tabs» Pram, perfert condition, ean | win) be closed for repairs from| ‘Cari Mayden, Henry Lord, Mary Lire, | R@ €98 : i ; eecce —_——___—_——- ICE
Fomentations and ointments Rave me only tem- She tine PROnae Pulse ait rer WED SDAY, the 6th of Febru- eens Sarieant, Stuart eet UNITED KINGDOM SERV Cc
porary i. A me i : Josep’ 3. G. Morgan, Fi -is , Morgan,
Se Sita tec piso Gattne tne) | 6.2.00-n ary, 108%, until further notice. | | innie Aereiton, mith J. owen, rere is evervthine you want | FRM SWANSEA, LIVERPOOL AND GLORGON. 0
am completely cured of this dreadful complaint.” “SUITCABES <2 Valings. attache Galea. All vehicular traffic must enter) Bertha Green, Stuart Sarjeant, Evelyn | i Cre 5 @ P : g V t | oxpec rr
; + s, attache cases, rth- | Williams, Fred D, Mathers, Gladys C / : + Dates Bridgetown,
Mrs. J T., Penrith, anys :—"' Itching and bleed- | sturdy and lightweight, double locks,|and leave the yard by the north M thetic c iotin Cc 5 Seainali Myrd Cc e Swansea Liverpool Glasgow Barbados
ing piles worried_me for over two years, and 1) $3.36 to $6.24. A BARNES & CO., LTD.|ern gate during this period. Laurel Browne, Evelyn McShine cake Seieeiaaaal i” ahs! | Dae 15 February
could not Obtain ahy relief, I was recommended 24.1.52—t.f.n 5§,2.52—2n. ON SATURDAY oo aren gyome ty $8 Os ROGER : Se ah to Fen: 14 March
soa Zan, at. 1 found relief, From TRINIDAD: way sats Py - —
ow I am quite free of the terrible agony.” A. Lewis, G. Field, A, Cazabon, J :
Don’t suffer longer the nerve-destroying, | PURLIC NOTICES PERSONAL Stora/, J. King, M. Brubtt, B. Raymond, UNITED KINGDOM AND CONTINENTAL SERVICE
. 4 TTTTTTTTTMOCCM==— 1 > alley, &. Donovan, J. Merry, G vader,

P ee clk anager
weakening misery of pile trouble. a The public are hereby warned against | E. Menjamin, B. ‘Thorn, R. Warner, Hi. | — Expected Arrival
Zan will most surely give you instant relief. giving credit to my_ wife CLEMINT: Warner, J, Hess, J. Hess, | Bridgetown

ye vk NOTICE QUINTYNE (nee MC COLLINS) as I do] From ST. KIM N Antwerp Rotterdam London Dates, Bridgetown,
Sold in easy, clean-to-use bye wi PARISH OF ST, JAMES not hold myself responsible for ber or | Lance Villaneuva, Colin Bdghill, Aiis- eici ; Be ea is pepeary
special noz applicator, from chemists, i hereby publish the summary of - | anyone else contracting any debt or debts e Payne sar (4 BR é iS Jan. on = March
- tlon Expenses for Mr. E. St. A. Hol id my name unless by a written order| prom ANTIGUA: ss, “SUNAVIS 14 Feb. 11 Feb, 21 Feb. 8 Mar
for election to the General Assembly for | signed by me i =“ Albert ~hwarting —_—
the Seasion 1931-04 WILBERT QUINTYNE, From MARTINIQUR: |
Belts Expenses .. ¢ 38.00 College Bottom, | | "Raymond Logue Agents: PLANTATIONS LIMITED — Phone 4703
Printing : 39.00 } wi FgEo., From GRENADA = ete rt
Distribution of Ad- 3,2,.52—2n Lord Oliver Esher, Lady A Rati asiy ——— ov |
vertising Material 10.08 wenn | THirbarn Cabral, Rolland Cabral, BP
ILE REMEDY Newspaper Adver- The publie are hereby warned agains! | williams, Joon ‘Reece, Marjorie Hum. | ROBERT HOM LIMITED
tising » iving credit to my wife SYBRL ~ | phrey, Charlés Humphrey,
: : : Canvassing 190,00 ING ince WORRELL) ax L do not hold DEPARTURES — BY B.W.LA. ) PLANTATIONS BUILDING, LOWER BROAD STREET
. Clerks and myself responsible for her or anyone ON SUNDAY ' hel: Pinas
Messengfers 4 28 00 else contracting any debt or debts in MY] por 87. LUCIA; Passenger Sales Agen ‘or: LA
Savion €} Postage, Stationery name unless by a written order signed} Norinyn Marshall, Arthur Duboula Trans-Canada Airlines, B.O.A.C. and B.W.1.
0) D ‘WS i} ASH > fnd = Miscellaneous by me Potet Hotter. ALCOA STEAMSHIP COMPANY
ig u uy * Expenses 290 84 «$525.42 CLEMENT N, HARDING, For ANTIGUA: Telephone No. 4466
mi’, eeetnr centers Fairfield send nap tea eeu ren. Se kt nek acta a tee ere aac laiceeeceeee
HRC. »} This Return can be inspected at my Tudor Bridge, For PU 0 RICO: io eee ee
QUBRS POPULAR GAMES % | omice at Sandy Lane Factory from 9.00— St, Michael Ethel Mullin, Arthur Collins, Harry ; LEPC EE EOE LLL LLL AAP AEAD AA AAP APA,
” FOR ALL AGES | 11.00 a.m, on Wednesday Sth February | 5 9 52—2n Collins, Ben Golde, Arthur Gerber *
“SPENCER OUKTON TENNIS },| 1952. a) | George Rager, Lee Shaul, Este}le Farrell, e Have you Learnt to Use the
is that last the &¢ J, H, C, THORNE, Cuspert Forde, George Ashworth, Martan. ‘
on * Roe eo x Returning Officer. MAIL NOTICES Ashworth, Martha Ashworth, John San- " * G IL L NE T
CHAMBERS TWENTIETH CE : 5.2.52—1n Mails for St. Lu¢ia, Dominica, Montser- son, Matilda Sanderson, Virit Weather- | A car that keeps ahead of the queue in town travel. ¥ * a LL l
TURY DICTIONEPY, PEARS § rat, Antigua, St. Kitts, Bermuda Boston | ead, Minerva Gill : Sek: / % , te enis Meiiiiy of
CYCLOPABEA. LARGE TEA +1 ,1QUOR LICENSE NOTICE| St. Jobn N.B. by the R. M. 5. Lady | for TRINIDAD; On the open road, a car that Japs the miles in safety and = . You can now obtain your PP
: : j res | & Q - nd y losed at the General eter Hy. larry Ritchie, Victor % os vee : < U
CUPS. BLUE RAND PLATES § “ Nelson will be ¢ a Peter Hyro: Harry Ritchie, oria " 5A, 2 A = ‘ = “ NETTING and CORKS. from s
A AND DISHES RL im ais By ger phe Sa Murray Lam-| Post Office as under:— Registered | Titchie, Essa Sabga, Charley Epalish comfort. Seating for five in comfort. 70 horse power six- = *
ae . ‘ The spplicatio: y ay - one 2 " sgistere: se} ; : . é = .
A RING'S STORS, Bite ip | g ritt of Fortescue Land, St. John the pur- Mere eth Qlakihy Matt at 200 | te nanen i hamperena, @. Hnatper: | cylinder engine that runs as smooth as silk, Steering x CENTRAL EMPORIUM
haser of Liquor License No, 1089 of |” . 7 bruany, 1952 ; avity Re raad, Gertrude Headley, b 5 . ‘ -
nig “STATIONERY S| ist granted to Harold Proverbs & Co.,|?™ on the 7B win Bee eiaiata Loule Bovartenit; Patios column gear shift. Torsion-bar indépendent front wheel % Corner Broad & Tudor Streets.
atl yr ty E % | td. in respect of a board and shingled | pp 6 ggneee3e969G69SGS00O%, | Machido, Grazielia Machado, Doroth | ; ts h t as, to cntiedies °
L x ap at jut reeticreaitiaee.” and to use % _ “a % | Bailey, Sally’ Ritchie. | suspension smooths out the roug) hest roads, cubic 6 6,6555566,665655606 Kt tt, 6654, stot OOOO
AOOGOoO- at said described premises . : FFERE § j Rg” sh a oA oto" CLEATS ~ ;
LLLP II re + °' | Dated this ist day of February, 1962. | % ars Bi Sh © os wae leee nee: of luggave space. Special rust-proofing rerfders ‘* Mono- 893995090809 FSS CSSOSSS SOS FOOOPOSSPOGIS 9.
= wae , p o hg Tree lance eo ’ a ‘ - ra t \ a i
i til Ag: Selig Mariscatae % man—Arehitecture OG ee eatoh x eiyiy Shee igi meee bee Rg construction ” body and chassis resistafit to rust. Every feature 3
i we ». Ability to produce sketch & | Krox, Timothy Allayne, Sylvia Sami = ‘ 4 FOR SALE
_ Er lk R. LAMPITT % piahs. layouts, perspectives ane % gh, Vincent Lewis, ; Milly stew | that appeals to car proud owners will be found in %
r sar % prepare working drawings, Assist- % | Wendy Lewis, Roger Lewis, sabe te | , " *
7 ay Applicant y prep ; ing, & » Heng: oe ra Rameheran, : >
ATEFEN TION N.B.—Thiy application will be. consid | % ance in Estimating, and Building. § | Monroe, Henry Manros, Dota Ramcheran, | this masterpiece Morris. oe % ee
- : ed at A - icensing ae te et % advertising Boards, Signs, Show- ¥ ficing, Mary Pruitt, Raymond Legge, June | ° ee CARI DIEM
MOGLORISTS He fied va ied see, Caine District * cards undertaken. Phone 4705 % | Sialay Ruby Kennedy. x ‘
a x . ee P ., %,
c OOO ALA CEEOL OOO . | -
* , A.W, HARPER, SOOO OO PP TO, | in Touch With Barbados | $ a two storeyed dwellinghouse standing on 10,770 square feet
” Ag. Police Magierate, DUS. si tps S$ 1 | % of land on the incomparable St, Lawrence Coast.
At last you can have your 5.2.52—1n | ¢ saved but seeking Coastal Station % of land on the p ;
na —— —__———— |¥ if tio ers write for ¢ Cable and Wireless (WB) Ltd. advise | zt Excellent sea bathing. Dwellinghouse contains verandah
Car looking like new by ||| (@S00ese00s0ss9000000"99 |X ree PDE Docent fang yeba irate sag Ni upstairs and down, dining and sitting rocms, 4 bedsooms, —
’ x $- OUR AGENTS are making 2100 ¥ % FREE HOOK © | Coast Station . meres try and kitchen, Electric light, gas and water installed. Garag
the use of - - - { and more by taking orders fom 3 x | S. America, m.c. Bonito, s.s, Braga, and servants rooms.
— | uilmes, # Tern 5 :
R Peed Sages Seen Soe : beng oem s | \ ee ‘ or Rotterdaxn vee Ss E E i AT Purchaser to have option of buying furniture and effects.
and Calenders. On requess x /yD’ OF S| hosa, ss, Seabird, #2. Cavoplatanos, s,s Et Inspection by appointment. Dial 8137. (Mrs. K, R, Hunte).
JOHNSON’ Britain's largest and foremost x GOD’S WAY & Fmpress of Scotiand, 8.8. Mauretania, s.s The above will be offered for sale at public competition e
\ Publishers will send a Beauttful % % | Rangitata, s.8. Gulfgiow, s,s, Marco Polo, FO T ROY A I GARAGE LTD Friday. the 8th February, 1952, at 2 p.m., at the office of the
Free Sample Book for 1952 to * Aleoa Corsair, 8.8. Sapulpa Victory ° > y, o> *
Genitha “Agecié Writs today % SALVATION % American Sun, 8.8. Silver Stary 8.5 Distrib p 45 unemenen one Shows further particulars and conditions of
ned * : r nadia Conqueror, s.8. Gillerest, s.s ho 04 n be obtained,
pees Highest Commission paid, Jones, ” ry &l idian Conquer oF s. . Galle Phone 2385 Sole stri utors ne sale ca
oes a Bee et tS vant ae PLAIN Be eee oe er See ee COTTLE, CATFORD & CO.,
% Works, Preston, England % S. Roberts, Gospel g | Krato Tindra, #8. Esso Reading, Solicitors.
% Book & Tract Service, 30 | Alcon Puritan, 8%, Heliec ‘ 24.1.52—15n
See % Central Ave., Bangor, N.I- 1 Me ver ng 2 Virginia, ’ “2 Ale PPLE - PESOS POLED AISA, EOC OOOO OSS SS
, ‘ ‘ Mesaverde, 8.8 a, 33. E ‘ POLO PESO SO 8 es bt st ste0y 26595
a * z PA AOA ALLL LLL. | i El Silver Ocenn, s,s, Esso | 5 4
n * “INVESTMENT OPPOR- % a 1 Salte 51 ‘Camp | # 7 Y B hk ‘
CAR-PLATE TONEY, fF Moma". nasi < Small Geography Book \
‘ y ‘ ss 2
+ Ot Preference Shares in A. & FLASH LASH V1 ty \ 3 of Barbados and the West Indies
. Cae a \ BARNES &€O. LTD. Telephone & ) & HOT WATER ON %| - *
at no trouvie to your t Seeremry, Mr. Victor Hunte, 3359. S When thinking in terms of Radio } * ey R
ated ; 2. 52- 4
selves. } 125-11 cepairs contact— | = TAPfor YOUR BATH » » The book every School child 3 |
LOCC RSSSSC SS GESSSOS OSS ares ‘ i aa « % i
YES—Your favourite RE HOLDER \\| With one of the lovely White Por- Sis ' ¥ >
= = : | Sf celain Gas Geysers—You can have s should Own )
- » LY . s .
‘| a warm or hot bath within 8 @| ¥ - —
1% minutes of lighting up. Econ- ~ - rx
» QUALIFIED ELECTRICIAN }|%& omically priced and CHEAP to t * ! y 3} i
' The serviceman with a single <> run with Natural Gas, A few are X ld? at ADVOCAT 1 y
; “ . now available at your GAS
tt The ; SOUVENIRS Thought | “Te Give Sattetection. HH % Wonks, BAY STARUT. gx >|
t. HOLDER, Electronician . % | ’
ie | 5 Seca ans avs ama aaa 85$6%659606906660660000" Yeooseee S9SSSSSSSSSESOOSOOOOS !
WY i at gp ar Bx SILKS, CURIOS, ARTS ;
ek VENDEMOS, SEDAS, | oC
JOVERIAS ¥Y ARTISTICAS

CURLOSIDADES, TRAIDOS
DE LA INMTA OHINA eé

OF RY ACE
STATION

has opened a Polishing

| TO THE

| CROP-TIME
SALE
|

EJIPTO
THANI’S

(ecems|| IF YOUR NERVES ARE
EXHIBITION A WRECK

AT

|
cchoud |
)

rr. Wm. Hry. St., Dial 3466

a ORIENTAL
|
|
| ’





; . : SPL OOOE ES FOEFOF SO take
serv ice for your cast. % BARBADOS ¥ r wy wer 7
is 7 : Sulina | FURNISH : MUSEUM N LITROPHOS NOW IN FULL SWING
\ ind Trucks.







ar THANI BROS.

Pr «Wm. Henry &~ Swan Sts.

NOW and SAVE } |) WEST INDIAN },

: eae AND RELAX
i= & renewed Bedsteats, 3\f} PAINTINGS

&

;

YOU EAT WELL

Cal? today, for particulars

FRORMPT ?

{
\
‘
\



Deep Coil and Flat Springs, Laths, § |

{
i
v Dressing Tables $14 up. - 9 By ROBERT J. MAC LEOD \\



sbes, Washstands, Night- %&



HAS EVERYTHING YOU DESIRE.

|
$5 ‘up—Racks for Towels, % |
|













is ¥ ~ vee yang . and yt SLEEP WELL Se ‘ x
Meectent stor tae ed Poaemat Sif} an ics LOWEST PRICES ON RECORD! |

Fancy us Trolleys, Side-~ % | {\\ panes _ v by * o 3 :
and S ieee: a S| | _— — - FEEL YOU WILL AT ONCE SAY

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; t Ohevel and. & ) -_ ~~ - = when you take J a . 1a ‘ ’
COURTEOUS Zoo meaciitne 7, x 16-- : } West Indian Subjects i} ~~ — Reet “ “<7HIS IS THE SALE FOR ME” i
‘ r ‘_e % GRAND PRAM ; ae - SONNY si S 5 5 ‘
SERVICE x %| ee oe $100,000.00 Merchandise offered at {i
Sa) 3 L.S. WILSON 3)]) open ras. o—wanci # Rediculous Low Prices.
PHONE: 4599 % Y arian. uLkr bbe, Si 10 a.m.—6 p.m } , i
== ee a STOKES & BYNOE LTD. ee





















TUESDAY,



HENRY





IN DEATHLESS SILENCE, THE BLEAK



JOHNNY HAZARD

| 2, ANTON, TO INVITE ME
| TO JOIN YOU TWO..
| SHA'N'T BE LONELY MUCH
| LONGER / WeA\y, THIS



FEBRUARY 5, 1952



BY CARL ANDERSON



BY ALAN _STRANKS

@O0D!.. YOURE DRIVING US TO

STRAWS WHARE-POOL OF

4ONDOM +44 GOTTA GUY

STRAIGHTENED OUT THERE...

WELL aa iS 4 NE LITTLE
°






& GEORGE DAVIES
FA



7” OUTSIDE ...1 WAS |

JUST DRIVING OFF WHEN
( 1 HEARD VOUR SHOT...









1 CAME Back AND FOUND ¥

LL HOLD HIM, ELMER,
WHILE YOU RUN OFF-
AND WELL MAKE HIM
CATCH YOU FAIRLY

DAGWOOD -- YOU TOLD
ELMER A FALSEHOOD --
THAT WASN'T FAIR

ae)

I_HAD TO RESORT
TO TRICKERY TO
CATCH HIM FOR

HIS BATH

ae nee)
PLEASE st)

BY DAN BARRY

~.. THE HO {

E HOPE OF “ESCAPE. Mf }

\/ READY? —IM
IT¢ HING/! LET'S

Bur, WITHIN It
HER STEEL 4:50 AM
. rt READY
Big moe? )
READYING
THE ROCKET,

ononaee
OWMEER ,
AN i
EARLY DAWN
LAUNCHING!

© For, WHEN
4] FLASH GORDON
Ea ANC HIS CREW WERE
FORCED TO LAND
HERE FOR EMERGENCY
I REPAIRS, A BURNING
HOPE SPRANG UP
IN THE HEART OF
EVERY CAGED
SOUL ON THIS
FLOATING “DEVIL'S
ISLAND *..

PRISON IN SPACE HANGS IN THE
COLD, BLACK VACUUM ABOVE eee
EARTH LIKE A SLEEPING SIAR...

BY FRANK ROBBINS













MY DEAR MISS LAURIE /

Tree 2 te ‘

— are | ¢ SEE... IT uy ei “AGE, MIGS veo F

2 THE COFFEE CAN’T BE RECEIVED THIS CABLE Ress fei jew SE VORRIE WILL BE AS tine ee”
| (T WAS SWEET OF YOU, TOO STRONG FOR ME, FROM MY BETROTHED, ~~ S| | DEPOT WAITING FOR ME WHEN .

WEE DORRIE / ALL WE REACH PARIS /

-BUT T





"LL TAKE THAT~I
HAVEN'T ANY MONEY
AND I MUST GO TO
THE MARKET-

<1) ARE YOU CRAZY? EVEN

iF I WERE MADLY IN ae ae

WITH YOu, I ae ae T
PLANS FOR OUR WEDDING} BE QUEEN OF A KINGDOM
+s; THE CEREMONY WILL / WHERE I MIGHT GET SHOT
Mas! fy Ee ei NOON / OR POISONIZD ANY MINUTE!

MY DEAR, IN THE KINGDOM ol KAZAR
THE MAN DOES NOT PROPOSE
MARRIAGE, HE

OMMANDS

THANKS, SHEIK... 019

SIR T rmeae ae KIND

(GOIN’ TO Th’. JUNGLE, ARE YOu,
| BABY? WELL +1 LL GE THERE, TOO!
GUNNIN’ FOR Yous,
* ne AW
\A we AaA\
ear) \*



BARBADOS



















Al









IVOCATE PAGE SEVEN







APO AI tt ete Aha
LLL LIE OF

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‘trom



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SPECIAL offers to all Cash on and Credit Custhoiers for Monday to , Wednesday only








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SOOO OFOOS


PAGE EIGHT



PETER WILSON SAYS

.

Let Ss
‘Amateur’

VERY



Abolish

The Word

At Next Olympics

SOON the Winter Olympics will start at Oslo

ind later this year the XVth Olympiad begins in
Helsin
At the opening ceremony for both the Winter and
Summer Games a famous athlete from each competing
nation will mount the rostrum and take the following
Olympie Oath :—
s This is what I would like to
* We swear that we will take see happen in these next Games
part in the Olympic Games in _the realism which prompts the
loyal competition, respecting the often despised table tennis to
regulations which govern them

and desirous of participating in
them in the true spirit of sports-
manship for the honour of our

country and for the glory of sport.”

Furthermore, no doubt, in a
prominent place, will be displayed
the ideal of Baron Pierre de Cou-

bertin, who revived the Olympic
Games in 1896, which reads
“The important thing in the

Olympic Games is not winning but
taking part. The essential thing

in life is not conquering but fight-
ing well.” 4
High sounding words; Fine sen-

timents! Noble, lofty aspirations!
And alas, so much hooey!
Much as I regret to say this I

believe the time has come to abol-
ish the very word “amateur”
Lost Its Meaning

It has Jost all its original mean-
ing, and I do not believe that on
athlete in ten from some of the
Continental countries—and I sus-
pect from Russia—could put their
hands on their hearts and swear
that they were deriving no finan-
cial benefit from their status
Olympic stars.

Jreat Britain on the whole will
probably be the most purely
amateur nation in the Olympiad,
and that is at least one reason
why our successes in the recent
Games have been so infrequent.

As someone who takes a lively
interest in this problem put it
to me the other day: “Conditions
have so changed throughout the
world that amateurism is in most
cases impossible and in all cases
improbable.”

n the Winter Games our ath-
letes—for the most part restricted

as

to those few people wealthy
enough to afford brief winter
sporting holidays abroad—will

have to.compete against the top
professionals from countries where
ski-ing and similar activities are
virtually national games, The for-
eigners will be known as “sii
teachers.”

In we Soccer, which is part of
the Summer Olympics, we shall

send a team of pure (more or
less) amateurs, whereas it has
already been suggested that the

draw no finicking distinctions be-
tween amateur and professional,
but to call everyone “players”
and let each competitor more or
less decide his own status.
—L.E.S.

W. Indies In Good
Position Against
Otago

DUNEDIN, Feb. 5.

On the third and last day
of the match here, at lunch
time Otago was dismissed
by the West Indies in their
second innings for 176. The
West Indies needed 159 to
win with 225 minutes left for
play.

In the first innings the
West Indies had had a lead



of 18 runs, having scored
249 for 9 declared in reply
to Otago’s 224.



ty Wealth vs. St. James

Match Ends In
Exciting Draw

An exciting



one-day cricket
match between Commonwealth
Sports Club (St. Miohael) and St.
James Sports Club ended in a
draw at Merlyn grounds yester-
day.

Batting first, Commonwealth
scored 108 runs and skittled out
St. James Sports Club for 58 in
their first innings. Common-
wealth S. C. took the chance of
sending back St. James S.C. with-
out their (Commonwealth’s) tak-
ing a second

innings, and ina
very thrilling finish, St. James
S.C. lost their last wicket at 50

runs—the amount needed to wipe
off the deficit,

E. Breton, 28, D. Elcock, 22,
and J. O, Tudor, 10 not out, were

Austrian team which drew with the best scorers for Common-
the full professional might of wealth in their only innings.
England may represent their “Pappy” Walcott of St. James
country, S.C. took 6 for 20 in a fine bowl-
Tennis Lead ing performance and V. Todd 2

s = ae

Recently the lawn tennis gave for 29.
the lead in the war on “shama- “Pappy” Walcott, making 18 in
teurism’—that unlovely word the St. James S.C. first innings,
which was largely coined in con- ang §, Lewis 20 runs in the

nection with the tennis racket.

Viscount Templewood, the pres
ident of the Lawn Tennis Asso-
ciation, announced that a special
committee has been appointed by
the Lawn Tennis Association to
see how far help can be given to
really promising young players to
continue to play first-class tennis,

This is straight subsidisation
and, of course, has nothing to do
with amateurism. And I am very
glad to see it.

The day of the amateur, apart
from friendly garden party or vil-
lage green sport, is over.

Big-time international sport is
now so much a matter of national
prestige that outstanding athletes
are now ambassadors-at-large.

We cannot afford to have our
ambassadors failing from continent
to continent through lack of funds,
which have hampered them in
obtaining facilities and, indeed, in
getting even the necessary time



. to prepare themselves properly for

events like the Olympics.

In the words of Viscount
Templewood: ‘In these difficult
days, no one has the time, the

leisure, or the money to devote a
life to any game.”

All The Best

And as we Uiympic Games are?
in iact, world cuampionsoips for
a great many sporti, 1 want
see the best ainietes, whether
amateur or professional, repre-
senung their respective coun-
tries.

I know that the idea
pure amateur is an admirable
one, but unless every national
truly abides by it the Olympics
become sordid affairs in which
those nations who try to keep to
the spirit are humbled by coun-
tries who have decided that “The
important thing in the Olympic
Games is winning.”

Oddly enough the Games
by no means always

of the

have
been ama-

teur, for long before the original
ones were suppressed by the
Roman Emperor Theodosius in
A.D, 393, they had become pro-
fessional, with the greatest ath-
letes of the then known world
CAPES.

second, were the only two bats-
men of that team to reach double
figures during the match,

Keith Bowen turned in the best
bowling performance for
Commonwealth S.C. He captur-
ed 2 for 14 in the first innings and
6 for 22 in the second innings.
Other good bowling perform-
anees were those of J, Graham

and C, C, Clarke of Common-
wealth S.C, who took 3 for 8 and
8 for 7 prepectvery in the first

innings of St. James S.C., and D.
Eleock who took 3 for 6 in the St.
James S.C, second innings.

The wicket considerably help-
ed the spinners, especially during
the later hours of the evening.



Ellis Achong To Go
Back To Trinidad

LONDON,

Aftey 18 seasons as a profes-
sional in League cricket in Lan-
cashire League, Ellis Achong, at
present with Walsden in the
Central Lancashire League, is to
return to Trinidad before next
stason,

He has taken over 2,000 League
wickets 1,650 of them in the
Central Lancashire League, where
he has been for 13 seasons

—B.U.P.



WHAT'S ON TODAY

Court of Ordinary: 10.00
a.m.
Court of Appeal: 10.00 a.m.
Police and Petty Debt
Courts: 10.00 a.m.
Inquest into the death of

Herbert Davis at District
‘A’ Police Courts: 1.00 p.m.

Meeting of the Legislative
Council; 2.00 p.m.

Meeting of the House of
Assembly; 3.00 p.m.

Mobile Cinema Show at St.
George's Almshouse: 17.30
p.m,



“SAY AL~I HEAR OL LADY
GARGOYLE'S PLACE IS FoR

SALE*WHATS SHE

NOT THAT IM INTERESTED. |
JUST CURIOUS« IS IT

INSULATED ? WH:

ASKIN'2/

AT

KIND OF HEATING

PLANT ? €Tc,,





BLANKETS, OR A REAL.
ESTATE MAN FROM

BARBADOS ADVOCATE



THOMS FIELDED HY WEEKES





THOMS (5) fielded by Weekes off Gomez during the Fifth Test at Sydney cricket ground on January 25 last.

Police Gain
Lead Over
Boys’ Club

In the Police-Combined Boys’ London usually has only
Club one day cricket match at Opportunity each year to see a
Queen’s Park on Saturday, the Rugby League match. The occa-
Police gained a first innings lead sion is the League Cup Final

on the Boys’ Club. Batting first,

the Boys’ Club XI scored 87 runs,

A. Best topseoring with 35 and
G. Sobers 28. E. Sealy took four
for 17.

Bowling for Police I. Springer
and O. Marshall took two wicket
each,

A breezy 42 retired by E.
Denny was perhaps the feature
cf the Police first innings who had
scored 119 runs for the loss of

seven wickets when stumps were

arawn.

Three of the Police wickets were
taken by A Best and he conceded
Sealy took

25 runs in doing so, T.
two for 25 and K. Barker
for 42.

Football At

; o.

Garrison
There will be
this afternoon
Savannah
Plantations
from Messrs.

and Co.,
o'clock.



the
a team

and a
Musson,

at
between
Ltd.,

ie

The teams are:—

Plantationg Ltd: G.
C, H, Kinch, E, A, Deane,
Patterson, L, Warren,

J.
A, Hazell,

K, Jordan, S. Smith, D, Allamby,
R, Greenidge, (Capt.);
ney.

S. P. Musson: A. Moore (Capt)

R. B. Noel, D, Medford, H. Roett,
A. D. Hutchinson, M. Stoute, H,
Ingram, M. Spence, E,. L, Rogers,
Jnr. E, Lb. Rogers, Snr, A.
Ingram,



WEATHER REPORT

YESTERDAY
Rainfall from Codrington:
Nil
Total Rainfall for Month to
date; .02 in.
Highest Temperature:
84.5°F
Lowest Temperature:
67.0°F
Wind Velocity: 8 miles per
hour
Barometer (9 a.m.) 29.994,
(3 p.m.) 29,928
TODAY
Sunrise: 6.10 a.m.
Sunset; 5.58 p.m.
Moon; First Quarter, Feb. 2
Lighting: 6.00 p.m.
High Tide: 1.24 a.m. 11.42
p.m,
Lew Tide: 5.40 a.m., 7.34
p.m,





SEE HOW
f ITLL TAKE TO
GIVE ALL OF US
PNEUMO)

Every Business HAS
THEMâ„¢THE PROSPEC
WHO WON'T COME IN

one

a football matcn
Garrison
from
team
Son
Ltd. Play begins at 5



a

which is now played

in

this match are
Treassive
as a

dof before they returned to New
Zealand
so this game was arranged. From
an attendance point of view it was
a flop.
week game but even
this,
was
week soccer
play
to
ind
higher.

watehed the Rugby Union Inter-
Marshall, national

‘
ti

jong
atmosphere has a great deal to do
with every

———— +








SEES.

S. Wales at Twickenham on the pre-
vious

N.McCon- mere handful.
Stamford
looked lost.



_—Consolidated Press Photo. _

Rugby League Comes To
London—But Not To Stay

at Wembley
figures for
good; it fills the
Empire Stadium which
capacity of 99,000, The crowd

April. Attendance

later in the week, and

Admittedly it was a mid-
allowing for
the crowd of just over 6,000
extremely poor. For a mid-
match Chelsea, who
at Stamford Bridge, reckon
attract a crowd of about 30,0006
frequently the figure is

Small Crowd
Compared with the 73,000 who

between England and
Saturday,
the New

the crowd whoa
Zealanders was a
And in the vast
Bridge Stadium they
This may have beet
» reason that the game took so
to warm up. Undoubtedly

w
to

this
OSE ODODSOSSR SOFEY PPSFOOOS:

* CHECK

match and on

League
also
movements

fed by
two.

son,
Ward, wen



one occasion\it was lacking.
Londoners took a long while to
get used to the play-the-ball rule
which is such a highly advertised
feature of League rugby. As soon
as a player is grounded with the
ball the referee blows his whistle
and play comes to a
halt.

The tackled player

is drawn mostly from those who the ball between his legs and
s take advantage of the cheap-day heels it back to one of his own
‘rain excursions to travel down side who then either bullocks his
from the North, way through the opposition or
But what chance has Rugby else starts up a passing move-
League football of gaining per- ment.
manent popularity in the south- The British Empire XIII con-
ern stronghold of Rugby union taining two great wingers in
und soccer. The answer, if one Bevan and Cooper, the Australian
is to judge from the match on captain, showed how rapid mov-
Wednesday between the New ing of the ball can result in tries.
Zealand touring team and the But it was noticeable that fre-
British Empire XIII at Stamford quently the ball passed through
Bridge is next to none. four or five pairs of hands before
The Rugby League tourists any player began to move at
wanted to play one game in Lon- gpeed. This is undoubtedly one

of the big draw-backs of Rugby
the forwards

with
part

for

taking in

The New Zealand

the longest

expose this weakness,

Joy to Watch

Some of these second half pass-
ing movements
watch.

were a
There

temporary
drops

the passing
it is often a case of
too many cooks spoiling the broth.

At half-time the Empire XIIT
six points (two tries) ta
score
came from a penalty goal kicked
by full-back White from fully 45
yards—surely
ever scored at Stamford Bridge.
Shortly after the interval, John-
the New Zealand prop-for-
t off with a shoulder
injury and then the British Empire
side really showed their power.
The absence of Johnson meant
that there was frequently a man
over and, flinging the ball around
the
Empire players added four tries,
each of which Ernest Ward goaled.

goal

joy to
is no doubt that,

when it comes to handling, the
League players. can show one or
two tricks to most followers of
Rugby Union. And I am sure
that England Rugby Union selec-
tors would be delighted if they
could call upon the services of a
winger such as Bevan, who side-
stepped the opposition with the
grace of a ballet dancer before
setting off at Olympic speed to
score his try.

But tradition dies hard. For
the present, I cannot see League
Rugby making any real progress
in the amateur south, at least not
until it has undergone one or two
changes, particularly as regards
the play-the-ball rule.

Many of the spectators at Stam~
ford Bridge found it hard to un-
derstand why the player tackled
in possession should be allowed
to retain the ball for his side.
Their view, and I agree with
them, is that instead of openfng
up the game the play-the-ball
rule tends to close it up.

League Game Would Benefit

I feel sure that the League
game would benefit if the sida
tackled with the ball were to lose
possession, This ruling would
result in more passing and would
also cause players to utilise the
thort kick ahead which is) se
popular in thp Union game.

Rugby Union would probably
be a much better spectacle if the
wing forwards were eliminated
and each side played only 13 men.
Passing movements would then
be given more chance to develop
and we would not have the some-
times boring spectacle of a harass-
ed serum-half continually kicking
the ball into touch.

Die-hard supporters of Rugby
League may not admit that the
Union game has anything to offer,
and vice-versa. But the common-
sense view is that they can and

—PO°SESOSSOE SSS SOS ESEPE OSES

YOUR REQUIREMENTS

FOR THE FOLLOWING
USEFUL ITEMS

COURTESY
GARAGE

Robert Thom Lid.
White Park Rd.
‘Dial 4391

56 GCCCOSSSO4

——.

LLL OLEOCCCEE LOSES

Sun visors (anti-dazzle)
Cigarette Lighters (6 & 12

volts)
Reverse Lamps
Rear view Mirrors—
ears/trucks
Chamois Leathers
Dust Cloths
Contact Files
Fender Tape
Rimbellishers—chrome
plated

Steering-wheel Covers



PODOSSSSY

Licence Plate Jewels

Hood Ornaments

Trouble Lamps

Feeler Gauges

Ignition Testers

Battery Hydrometers

Air & Water Hoses

Polishes & Waxes

Etc. Etc.,

and a large supply of .
SLEDGE HAMMERS 7Ib

and 16Ib complete with
handles.

LAP LAPS SD



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J & R BAKERIES

and GODDARD'S





TUESDAY, FEBRUARY 5, 1952
C.S.0.B.A. MEETING



should learn from each other. Then
maybe the time will come when



we shall see one Rugty code Members of the Combermere
played throughout the world with! School Old Boys’ Association who
professionals and amateurs play-| are interested in football will
| ing together. meet the Honorary Secretary of

the Association at Combermera

NETBALL MATCH
POSTPONED

Due to the death of Mr. William
Antrobus, an assistant master at
Foundation Boys’ School, the
netball match whie was sched-
uled to have been played yester-
day between Foundation Girls
arid Queen's College was postpon-
ed until February 15 when it will
be played at Queen’s College.

School this afternoon at 5.00 p.m.

WATER POLO
and DANCE

AT THE

Barbados Aquatic Club

(Local & Visiting Members)
ON



To Our Friends
From Overseas

KINGSLEY
RESIDENTIAL
cLUB

AT BATHSHEBA

SAT. 9th FEBRUARY, 1952
Water Polo
Ladies vs.

Gents vs. “Devonshire”
Dance 6 p.m. to 8 p.m.
ADMISSION
to Water Polo & Dance 1/6
(Proceeds for Water Polo
Association)



ROYAL BARBADOS
YACHT CLUB.
NOTICE

A DANCE

in honour of
The Commanding Officers,
Officers and Cadets of Bis

Welcomes you and offers ¥

LOBSTER
LUNCHEONS

which include our

— ATURDAY Oth Feb
8. eby,
MERINGUE PIES 1952.
Dancing from 8.00 p.m. to

in Coconut, 12.00

midnight.
ADMISSION will be $1.00

Lemon or oe person a
For Members and their
Orange Friends.
By order of,
The COMMITTEE OF
DIAL 95266 MANAGEMENT,
T. BRUCE LEWIS,
12,1.52—4n. Manager & Secretary.

——————



“a skirt like
this with
materials

like these”

PLAIN MOYGASHELL

LINEN in Turquoise,

Saxe, Gold, Pink, Green,

Blue & Tangerine 36” Yd.
$1.84

In Black, Grey, Emerald,
Green, Beige, Navy, Dark
Brown, Blue, Pink, Tur-
quoise 36”, per yard $1.91

In Emerald, Green, Beige
& Black. 36”. Yd. $2.57
ve

GREY GABERDINE

36”, per vd. ............ $1.53
MIAMI LINEN in Gold,
Beige, Navy, Dark Green,
Turquoise & Light Green. CAVE
{| 36%. Per Yard ........ $1.40 SHEPHERD

& CO., LTD.
10—13 Broad Street







POPPPOSPFSO

BACK TO SCHOOL
I ee

Bates suots












GIRLS’ and
BOYS’ SHOES



—White, Brown or Black
Sizes: 10— 2....



Crittall Steel Windows

various widths and heights with or without Ventilators

(rittall French Doors

3 ft. 9 ins. x 7 ft. 9 ins. high

Crittall Steel Stiding Folding Doors

The Whole Door Slides and Folds to one side
6ft. 2ins. wide x 7ft. Zins. high

YOUR INQUIRIES ARE INVITED.





Phone 4267.

WILKINSON & HAYNES CO, LTD.








PAGE 1

PACE Klf.llT BARBADOS ADVOCATE TUESDAY. FEBRUARY 5. Ml ft /•/ ,, ;,• II ;/ w<\ SAYS Let 9 Abolish The Word 'Amateur' At Next Olympic! Olympus will stnrt at Oslo . Olympiad bofms in y for Ixith the Winter and Sur.i Ul athlete ln.ni Itch ci.mpetinn mount the root rum and take the following Olympic Oath :— This is what I wool % %  01 lake llf happen in these D> Games In _, ho realism which prompts Uw despised table tennis to draw no finicking distinct. %  tween amateur and prefesstonnl. but to call everyone "players" %  Ad I't • more 01 liw-i deelde his own status. —l.i:.s THOMS IIIHMII lO HUMS pan in 1 regulations wtnrh g<>\participating them In manship for the honour of t oun'iy and f I Forth* t, no doubt, la s nawninI %  bertin, arno revived DM "The Important thing in the i Games la not Ii taking i ut fightHigh so-1 rme senh bnoi %  M •. i urtK come In abolish the v,i. word "aaa** l,o*t It* MraninK n %  Ing. an*' : iilhlrU i Continental countrlea l pact front Kusaw—coul.. hands on their heart* and swea" that the* I no llnaii%  whole Will prolmblv lail amateur nation In lhe 11 is at least one reasn i 'ucceaaoa ip the recei 11 A Ln this problem put it to me the other day; "Conditions have so chanced throughout the world that amateurism I in moat An exciting one daj cricket cases ImooMlble and in all caaeo '""tch ><>twe*n Cwnmunwwilth toSaSKir? SP"rts Cluh (St. Mlol.ael) and St. Xn the Wuti* g* Clufc e Ictes—for the meet pan restricted < !" %  '"'^" ground, yeaterto those row POOpk wealth*' '\ ugh to afford bnel w4B4jj £ %  ''. ///> //t Good Position Against (Hugo III NEUIN. Feb. i. On the third and last day ul Ilir match Itcrr. al lunch lame Ouio waa dbmioaed %  I the Hnt Indlea In their % %  •. ••mi Inninefor l*s. The ffffeai I...Ii.. needed 159 to "in with *•:, minute* left for plot, In the iir.l innings the Wool lii.li" had had a lead i) I k r in .. h.i\ HI; -i IT. il 141 lev '• teaairod In reply to OLago* ML C* Wealth vs. St. James Match hud* In Exciting Draw hould learn from eacn other. Then' naybe the time will come when last—Co i "lidtilcd Press Photo. Common wealth i and skittled out Sporu Club for M In first Innings. Commonwealth S. C took the chance of Police Gain Lead Over Boys' Club .spOrlilll! llimuuj. uuiuwu—•.• %  g, bav* Ui cwnprlf i.gain.t the lup ; h(l)r l„„r, mnala from cuu II I,,,., tooklhcrhi .-of In llic Pollre-Cembined Bo %  '"WJS SS, ,"' in: i~"k SI. June. S.C. withClub one il.y ei leket mal "..ul their ((Mminonwciillh'i) InkQuwi'f Park on Saturday, the Rugby League Comes To London—But Not To Stay To Oar Friend* From Oversea* KI.M.SI.IIV III.SIIH;VT(.\I. n.ni AT It M IISIIMIA Welramea >a aad aHera r LOBSTER LUNCHEONS which include our popular MERINGUE PIES in Coconut, Lemon or Orange DIAL 961H 11.1.82—4n, o-oooooaooaoos WATER POLO anil DANCE AT THE Harb.rJis \iyaln fluk (Local & Viautbm Mendieri) ON SAT. th FEBRlAItY. I9i1 Water Pea* S |A Ladle* vs. "Devonahlre" CadetGents vs. '•Devonshire" Dance 6 p.m. U g p.m. ADMISSION I.. Water Pale A Daaee l/ (Proceeds for Water Polo Association) ROYAL BARBADOS YACHT CLt'B NOTICE \ ii AM i: in honour Of rhr < ommandusg OIBtfr.. Omcera and CadeU ef Ula MaJealy'!. shlpa "Deven*hlrt.~ and "Enard Bay" will be held on SATURDAY 9th Feby. ISM. Dancinc from • 00 p.m. to 12.00 midnight ADMISSION wUI be si no per person For Members and their Friends. By order of. The COMMITTEK OF MANAGEMENT, T BRUCE LEWIS, Manager At Secretary. I'ppoi lunr.j •10 leech-is ." In 1 lie known %  i only on* occasionMt waa luckuig. when it cornea to handling, thu BO JfgOJ OO >( LoiKlOatOfl to>k a long wbill to League playciN can show one ttn' I The occo> get used to the play-the-ball rulo (wo tricks to most followers of mg n second Innings, and in a Police gained n first inning* lead lion II Ihi LeagU) v.hich is such o highly advertised Kugby Union. And I am sura soon that England Hugby Union selecrerj tl.iLilii" linmh. St. James „n the Boys' Club. Batting first, which i S( i**i their last wicket at 50 tna Boys' Club XI scored 87 runs, "' April. .1 Wembley feature of League rugby. As Hgurea lor as a player is grounded with tho tors uld be delighted if they taw Summer Olympics, we slut 11 n, nt _ihe amount needrd to wipe A Best topacoring with ISanu %  '•• good; ii'nsla the ball the "referee blows his whistle could call upon the services of a .•end a team of pure tinm. ..licit. G sobers 28. E. ScaU l.-.k fom liun whieB and play comes to n temporary winger such as Bevan, who sldelOOa) amateurs, whereas it has %  ;_ BretonA 28, D. Elcock. 22. f or 17 has a (*p.int> of 99.000. The crowd h„lt. The tackled player drops stepped the opposition with the 1 been suggested that Uw Mild J O. Tudor, 10 not out. were Bowling for Police I. Springer %  drawn in-I 1 gadl Utw.en his legs and grace of u ballet dancer before Austr.an team which drew with the best scorer* for Common, ind Q Marshall took Iwo • ; ''">' ticcb it back to one of his own setting oft at Olympic speed toe fall professional might ol wealth in Wmr only innings. ,. r( traTOl down side who then either bullock, his icure his try. England may represent their "Papp>" Walcott of St. James bict'zy 42 retired if lluough the opposition or But tradition dies hard. For country. ^''WO* fl for 20 in a tine bowl.,...„ wai perhaps the fealui" I c a ' "tart* up a passing movethe present, I cannot see League Tenniv Lead ing performance and V. Todd 2 ,# the Police first lrintngs who hod L*" a *uc footl Lgdng perment. Rugby making anj real progress i;. am Vnnis gave *r • ^oorco n „,„, f l(r lh e lost Jf ''-""'' I'opulai.ty In the southThe British Empire XIII cor,in the amateur south, at least not the le.. 00 •shama..p. 1 )pv Wulcotl making 18 in seven wickets when stumps we.. [ "' l, "* h > '"^ talning two great wingers m until II has undergone one or two ord %  ... ^ c<,1, .-.-*? na.ni. u "'"' flcv.i 11 and Cooper, the Australian ohaaitpg, particularly which wat .U3 in con!£ 3 1 ,^' SS T \ii Thre. of the Police wlokata wen *d how rapid movthe play-the-ball rute ciiaiion. ..1,11..ui,.,.1 i...i i-,1,1 K-rh Bowen turned In the beat [or 42. Ft>otballAt Garrison comn tod by bowling pcrf' na Association to commonweoWh S.C He caplurse how CU help m he given to mi>ing young players to 6 f„ r 22 ln hl vcotu \ i nn ing^. continue to play ilrst-clasa teninv oih.-r >, %  took :t (or H and glad to see it. 3 for 7 respectively In the iirsi The day ..f Iho amoUur, apart Inruftgl i<1 St. Jainm S.C. and D. froind. i-.i.-K wbo bnk 1 te • u the 81 3.C. sectMHl Innings. Hlg-tnm mtC Uon.il i-nt is TlM W lcket con.sidernblv helpPlantations Ltd, much a mattei i-f naUonal ,-,i the %  ; ,i during fiom Messr* 8 P. prestige thai outstanding athlete: ..„. I.,,,-I hoiim of the %  We cannot afford to have out -^-^^^^—^^~ %  mbassadors failing fiom continent : i.t ii,ii-ugh Lei k ot rundi. which have hamjaorod Ihoin In cbtaiiiiT-. getting %  i airy lime to prepare ihemaelvi •vents like the Oiym| LONDON In the Mtt, 18 seasons as a profchdlfncuU -t"ti,i' m league cricket in Lantteyi i %  the r*ahlro Laguo Bl Achong, .it X' "|, "H II; ",-I',II %  ...,. M sti.ute. n MtOUre, or Onm IJ Ul dOVOto progoM with Walsden in the j arr|rn ^ sivme E t. Rogei Ontml iJineashire league, is t-> i(| i i !. SI.I \ AM 1 lie Ut-t ::'".: '" Trtnldad befDro nexi Ingram. And .'UM UaympM iiame* EsUeaTJ /V'llOIXg TO v>v>vy. ilim i ll l l ll ll|y ^iow/.v/ 0t£foH,$*#4- i:. Qn ney. % %  • skirl like this with %  iiiiK'i'iuls likr ilii-se" PLAIN MOYGASHELL LINEN in Turquoise. Saxe. Gold, Pink, Greet), Blur A Tangerine 3d" Yd. *1.M In Black, Grey, Emerald. Green, BelKe, Navy, Dark Brawn, Blue, Pink. Turquoise 36". per yard S1.S1 In Emerald. Green, Beige & Black. :ili' Yd. $2.57 GREY GABERDINE 3S". per *d J1.S3 MIAMI LINEN in Gold. BeiKe, Navy, Dark Green, Turquoise & Light Green. 3". Per Yard SI.40 CAVE SHEPHERD at CO., LTD. 10—13 Broad Street BACK TO SCHOOLI He has taken over 2.000 League wictoataj 1.650 of them in the I'entral Lancashire league, when' ) r haa been for IS seasons -nt r low that the ui* .1 ul tin pure amateur is an admirable one, but unless every national truly abides by It the Oi>mpn.-s %  idid atlalis in which those nations who U> to the spirit are humbled by counli-i. uixi UUt The important thing in the Olympic Games ta winning." Oddly enough the 0 by no im.i.. %  • tour, for long bofon the i.nginal by the Roman Emperor Tlicoduaiua in AJJ. 383. i onto professional, with the grratcit gth* letes of the then kBDf competing. WHAT'S ON TODAY < "Hit of .Itiini.ir. 10.00 I ..in i of Appeal: 10.00 a.m. : % %  i n %  and Petty Debt (Uurta: 10.00 a.m. Ingurot Into the draUi of Herbert Davla at lllslrlrl "A" Police Courta: lOtl p.m. Vb.tinn nt the Lenlslallve i iaiiiii.il: 3.00 p.ni. Mi.in., al the Uoiue of \HM-mh1>. 2.00 p.m. Mwbtlr 4 I item 4 Show at HI. OeorgeMnuhousr: 7.10 p.m. WEATHER REPORT lUtllDAl Kalnfall rrom (odrimtoiK Nil loUl Kamfall for Month tu dale: .02 In. Ilnjii-: Temperature: Mj*r l .,•.. -i Temperature. UafF M.n.i \ i I g miles per hour Barometer <0 a-m.l 2S.H94. i3 p.in. i ;4H;H TODAY BOaWftsM .I0 a.m. >llii-.l .H pill. Moon: Kin.1 tjuartrr, r'eb. 2 l.lghllm: i. on p.m. High I uiUM a.m., 1142 p.m. l.ow Tide: S.40 a.m.. 1.M p.m. I CHECK VVO VVV'-'yV',','..', V* V>*** %  >-*'.*,*,',* ; %  % %  SHOES YOUR REQUIREMENTS FOR THE FOLLOWING USEFUL ITEMS They'll Do It Every T inn. -.' HAT !" B\ Jimmv ll.illo SAY Al -1 HEAR .1E RED y N^IA I FlAUNSLS-y/ COURTESY <;AKAI;I; IC.I.. Thou. I Id WI.W, lark IM it.i I;II Cigarette Llgnters (g II vslts) sseverse LampRear view Mirrorcar'trrk 1 ll.ltllilI r,tlu-rfentaet lllri KimhellL-hrra—rhrori Sieerliui v. heel Cove Licence Plate Jewrl-* Hood Orsuunents fn.iii.ir Lamps Feeler fiaHgea Ignition Teller* Hatlrry Hydrometer^ Air A Water Hoses Palis*?* ft Waxes and a I !' %  • -upplv of SLEDGE HAMMERS lib f.lKI *i..fl BOYS* %IIUI % llniw.. Blaak ar While -lie.: 7—It 1J.J5 ll_lt SJ TS €WM -White, Brawn or Blaelt i-omplrte with •,'.'.','*'*'SS.'''''''-'-'''''-'''''''''--'*'*'.'.' r '.' r '.','.','.'.'.'^^ mm %  Mil CM Britit your Children in lor an expert nttuiBI .v <•* •<_!


PAGE 1

MBS! TWO HARB.MlOS ADVOCATE ii i SDAT 11 III.X un QaJiib Qailinq Teddy Saw a Picture Book B.B.C. Radio L ORD and Lady Oliver Eshci are at present in Hamad"on a short visit. T>• W.I tour and amotui I they have already visited iu Jamaica, Grenada and Antnu > Henuntil l*huri das I of Glitter Bay". St. James Utr who uill l* .1 i March ia Chairman o( %  Presiden. and Chnlrmsn of a nui" her ot •sher Theatrical and C Societies and wa a former Trtrttee cf the London Mnwiim Ht we" married lp 1912 lo Antoinette, daughter of August Herksrher of New York. They ha* one son and three daughter* VUitinf Her Son. L ADY LUCIE-SMITIt I leave for Trinidad to-day b> BW.IA. to *pend abut thi. nHl %  ,ni.t> in tli.it VOlOnj Brttti two of her sons Ma u Reggie. Tourists Read About Barbados 'lUU was another bumpci A crowd dining and dancing Bl Club Morgan on Saturday night, what with tourist* from the Fart Townahend. T.C.A.. as well .is "winter'" visitors from the hotel v St. James Coait and several of the regular local visitor'. Barbados and Club Morgan had some advance publicity with the Fert Tewnaataad passengers when one of them discovered o booh In the ship's libra rv entitled 'The Man Who Died Twice." which U a new detective thriller by George Harmon Coxe. POCKET CARTOON hy mm K i LANCASTER .. Will, it,r co/aa/i -aenU oi iHe HUU?! iron # Carbeaa Mean UM dr -add Wiri mMcA .*,< **" all beit -iM/t tor a %  rauu mm Back from U.S. and C*nad R ETURNING : Uu I via i-ueiti. H ic-.i \fj B W i ft wan Mr. Carltun Bl ,. %  ada since mid Bapti year, when she went up ith he daughter Tom. %  Traf-lga Finishing S, ireal The plol of this novel is set in Barbados and mentions among other people and places — Club Morgan. Helen nnd Frank Morgan. This created a lot of interest on the boat and by the ntnr the ship reached here, avarj BBs> senger on board had read It and they all got a "big kick" out of being in Barbados, seeing Club Morgan and meeting the Morgans. George Hnrmnn Coxe wli> i a well known writer of Detective Action was here lira % %  0 ago when he started on the plot for "The Man Who Died Twirt* and a novelette about Bard ttfja which WHS published In th< November issue of the Amertrj., %  fgMfcll Mr. Coxe Is at present in II.rrcdos on another visit and will >her until th" en.I of M a h r-Hb understandthat j %  % %  I %  OrH -HI ;i new n-ivi-l ft would seem "hit n,ir Uttla Hind is attractive to writers n* "• %  •'I artls's nnd wr are hi>np ma them here. Married In Trinidad M ISS ANNE MILNE, daughter of Mr. and Mm T. M Icolffi Milne of Trimddd Sfal married on Saturday in Trinidad to Ml Rg] Klynotl. son of Mi unecember and Me BntwlM pnd N they spent the Christmas and New Year holidays. They then returned I to spend a few days and l| tva Tom at School in Monti.-..I On nii in iy back to Barl> I %  pent l couple of weeks in Sfll York. T..ni iaggjMk U rj '< %  in June to spend the summer holidays In Barbados. To Take Up Appointment M R. KENNETH GRIFFITH. mm l Mi II t\ Grifllth. Chief Sanitary Inspector of t'hn.; Church and Mrs. Grifllth of Haru Gap, left f o I Trinidad over the week-end by HW.LA. on his way to Tobago. He has gone to take up an appointment as Mathematical Mu*ter of the BUsOp*! High School Visit to Her Mother M ISS RUBY KENNEDY 01 River Road, left on BatHKUk) evening by H W.I A for Trinidad on a visit to her mother srho ivary ]ii Grenada Tourist Chief R ETURNING to Urenad.. OD Saturday by B.W.I.A. .vire Mr. and Mrs. A. Norm Hughes who had been holidaying her,' for the past two week s at the II 1.1 Royal. While here, they attended Ihe i.il cricket games between Barbados and Jam n Kensington. Mr. Hughes Is Chairman of the Grenada Tourist Development Board nnd Vice-President of the Caribbean Tourist Association. He had recently attended the meeting of the Executive COUDOU Of the Caribbean Tourist Association held in St. Thomas. Virgin Islunds Ten Day* M RS KannatB W. Blackburnc, wife of the Governor of the Leeward Islands flew in from Antigua on Sunday evening by li.W I A Accompanying hci mi Mrs. Margaret G. Hodgson. During their ten-day holiday are the guests of Mr f -Bavleys". s Back Home M RS W McSHINE. "he former Evelyn Ward, d ughter 1 Mrs. Georre C Ward %  re, Christ Church. Is irk in Barbados ifter a vi-it to nflamd and the U.S. She return"I on Sundav evening via Puerto 11 W 1 A I o-sr.orrow—A Lecture M R GEOFFREY A JELLICOE who is due to arrive at Seawell to-day by an will be the guest of Mr Ronald Tree of "Hci .n Jamas, lie will be acMrs Jelllcoc. Mi JaUieea snu give a lecture at the Barbados Museum to-mor. row afternoon at 5 o'clock on i %  i to Architecture and Town Planning" %  -urn and nds are invited M! fct•<'ii'i thlecture. Mr. Jelllcoc who designed Heron Bay 1 >* Fellow el tka Hoya) uMMuta of BflUan ArehiI ir.. rtiln-r of ihe Town i'tanning Institute and a past of the Institute of landscape AithH—tg, Hi rsM jxinxible for the Landscapa ;..rdens of many English Country houses including Ssn•Iringham — Ihe King'Norfolk iiome. Royal Ijxlge (Windsor). Ditchley and Kelmarsh Hall. He is also an author and has written bonks on the Baroque Gardens ol Austria, Gardens or Europe and is loint author of Italian Qftrdgnj of the Renaissance and Qai an and Design. Mr. Jelllcoe bai just been making a lecture lour through the U.S. and Canada on various aspect* of landscape and planning. He experts to be here for about one week. Same 'Plane VfR. AND MRS. William J. ^Y* Whiting who *rr ( in Barbados recently returned on Sunday by B.W.I.A. after a short visit to Trinidad. They are guests at the Hotel Royal Mr Whiting Is Manager of Bart-lays Bank In Dominica. Arriving by the same p'nne s#ra Mr and Mrv. F Mr. Queued Is an Engli (rum vv i scons in M R. AND MILS. George P. Frise of Wisconsin arrived from Trinidad over the week-end by H.W.l.A. to spend a short holiday in Barbados. Mr. Frise is President of the I-a Crosse Concrete Company of Wisconsin. They are guests at the Paradiie 1 leach Club Alliance Francaite A T the Annual General Meeting of the Alliance MB culse, which will be held at the British Council, "Wakefleld", at BOO p.m. on Thursday, officers will be elected to the bacirttva Commlltee for the year. New members will also be enrolled. The Reports of the Secretary and Treasurer for the year IBM will be presented. —Bat He Didn't Know What the Pictures We By HAX nil I l WHEN Knarf and Hanfd. the shadow-children with the turnedabout names, sntered the playroora, they found Tsddy the Staffed Bear looking into a sary larga baa*. It was laid oat on ths floor before him "It's sll full of pletoraa," said Teddy: "bat they're the atraagest kinds of pictures. They aren'lajie lures of people or snimals <*£•.or hoases. I dont know what basy're pictures of." Knarf said: "Let's see lhm leddy." So Knarf and Hanld lookad at the pictures la the big book. The -fit instant, Knarf and Hanid* tt eiclaimed that they weren't ordinary pietaraa at all. "They're maps!" said Hanld. "It's a gaogra phy book I" "What are mapsT" Teddy ssked And what's geography T" Teddy looked at the fuaay pirtaiea. Draw lags of Land Hanld explained that maps were Irawingi of all the hud, and ssss, and livers and countries and astir* of the whole world. "And wh M sou itudy about all th. land, the seas. the. r tries, and the town*—that's sailed eeography %  she added. "Ths children all study geography In school." Teddy looked at the maps again. W hy are there so many different colors?" he asked. "Those are the different tries." said Knarf. "Each of 1 has a separata color. That*a so you can tell them apart" "Here's the United States where we are," Hanid broke in, pointing to rhe middle of ons of ths maps. "You es it's colored brownish." "And what's that," asked Teddy, "right above It, colored pinkT" "That's Canada, Teddy. It's north of the United Statee." "And what's that below, colored green I" Knarf said: That's Mexico. It's south of the United Statea." "And what's that all around the United States, and Canada, and Mexico! It's ail colored blue." 1 "Those are the seaa and oceans." -aid Hsnid. "On one side is the AUsntic Ocean. On the other side Is the Pacific And way op at the ip is the Arctic Ocean, which goes around the Nort' Pole where it's Great CeaUaenla Knarf and Hanid explained many more things about maps to Tedd). They explained about the six {real continents: Asin, Africa, Noilh America ("Where the Lnilcu States. Canada and Mexico are." said Hanld), South America. Eu rope and Australm. They tap about ths different countries ol lh world such ss England. Franre, Spain and all the other eaaatrisa. Then they showed Tsddy how all in.. Isrgs cities were shown on the map bydotswith their nsmessftrr tti m, "Hsps are wonderful'" T naUy said. "You can sit right in 'root of one snd go traveling all over ths world, across oecsns. ar..t continents, and from one eily to another I" So Knarf and Hnnld nodded an.| aid that was right, and n U^ving Teddy sitting in f. maps in the geogrsnhy bl I mg all over the woild. Progra mine TtEkDAY HBKIASV i. ISM II II %  m S-.uUwtp 9atmn*t Or>h*. %  ua. II SS a m SotMran. IS SS noon TtM New.. 12 io t ' % %  Ni AnaJystk. ••— i is am fsJOM si sha Th# "i l i Thp m mania •< in< Opr. a SS p m This la Cvylor. %  Si pm Multarr Band MuaW. SU p m 8port> Round-Up. 100 p m Tha Niw-. Illpm Nawi Anal) l.SS—ISSS pm -Una SS 4BBB 1 U p m Croa.Lr,( TtW Allan! .aineta-Handaa. SOB pm Tochnn Cabaret. S IS p m Radio Ktwaiaal B Jo p m aapatt mm Britain S 41 p n Tha Itaol Tour. S M p m Meal The %  -IU1, fl p m Fa* A Laiuan ION pm The Nrwa IS IS pm from Tha Editorial. IS 1 r. p m Her ben Mania* Talk.fif 10 SO p in Spider. THVRSDAV apaeisl — ISO pm "IN<. r-Kills • *1 own Hat Bheta m raAtais mi MI ir TtS-llAV 1.1.1 and 8..'IO p.m. O aadla tiUaa Paeked Thni.'r .*., iu* •*%  I) | ITT" MirCHUM SCOTT -RYAN III I Hf li.ll l\f I 1^1 .'.. r... OPEN! N FRIDAY 8TH "CAPT.. 'N H HOrtNBLOWER L A I A PLAZA srs, Ta-d* m To-morrow 4S Si BSS pm. j BULL TBS i stprat" I BENDIX a limits xinsiti a DAWNSI.... SI.-.UI Idmund OBitan (sill la SWl>ubli. Whola x. run \i wi >i •' I. ALVN J. .)A'E TIIITIS ioril> 4 4S a B SO p m -.MlStl TBS WK-tTSBN WAT %  -u PRAtaiL aOLMDI P Charlaa SUrretl a Smile) Burnall I MUM II.ISI s Krafr A -*>V M \ III! KT Vk lp i..,„ Ilix II.HI, Mk round tiip I.K l". (nun SII Doctors Who Frighten You Are Warned West Indian Table Talk YEAR BOOK Just published in London %  the Year Book of the West Indies i-nd Countries of the Caribbean 1WI edition. This publication CROSSWORD 1 l ^ r "7~1 %  i ... ii I • %  %  '* i... i> ir. DUBS %  an iti %  9 %  %  sain loa'. ill. |0O0 delcnci* i*. %  Pit Defence •asra Accept sisnslng Bireunuiai I IXisrn la made enen inu •rtiiie (Si A law,.] tor iln male*. file. Hi K'.dden from Riga. iSl .it 1 *. •rorda lr.m Dare t fl run rind SI 1*1*11 i' point .tut i isi rnrvaimi ill •jiiid Or a Dim. ill > viagi.m of IS Aeroaa (•< eiiais Ull 7 tSi round in Ioan (41 Mature it. Pruwiael T H.HIC 1 %  %  *• it A %  -.. %  i 0 .i i;. II u I-" I IIIMIOIIII which La in its 23id year, conlalM deUlltd information of 27 tlifferent I milllllag from liday-cum-bustneas visit to th" West Indies I hear that her business manager In England, Wjfn Cuter is bu•> %  f irnlng a fan club for her. The Idea of the club is to enable her to keep ..i t uch with all the many youn,: fi landa who have followed heicareer so closely and loyally. JAMAICAN VISITOR Attending a course on life In rural Wales Is Miss Pancilli MiPherson of Jamaica. Togethcr with 20 other students, from foreign countries and the colon le i'liersoii is staying at CD%  Wyn, an old mansion house in Carmsrthcnshlre. The course is ;irranged by the British Council. Recently a cameraman from the -Herald" of Wales, a wacttly newspaper, visited tho mansion ;md took a photograph which waj Mibsoquently published, showini; Miss McPherson reading to u young Web.h girl JUST RECEIVED SILVER SWALLOW ENAMEL-WARE PUDMNC. BASINS—70c. 85c. 91c. BOWLS—41c 51c. 56c. 74c. Jl'dS—Mr. (1.22. (1.31, (l.GI PIK niSIIKS—3(r. 4Sc. 60c. 80c. B/WilNS—7llc 8(lc. 91c. 9c. (2J2 P4I1.S HI. Carcn—(2.60 I'MIS WITHOUT COVERS—(2.11 CIIAMHKRS—85c. (1.20 ENAMEL PLATES—2tc. 31c. 40c. KETTLES—2 in. -i • 4 pU—ll.8t T. R. EVANS & WHIT FIELDS Dial 4220 YOUR SHOE STORES Dial 4606 THE (<>NS< it.vrmi S IMM TOal who urges hu padaantl ID consult him whenever they feel unwell may be eauslns %  ., new. than he cures. By telling patient.' that minor pains may be the hr.it signs of serious disease he mav frighten them into real physical illness. This warning has bei i to doctors by two highly a pariaacad medical men Mi Heaeage Ogllvie. chief surgeni at Guy's Hospital, and Dr. Wll %  lam A. R. Thomson, m-ir specialist. "There io g vi-ry real dJngar that by driving the public i our consulting rooms ..n In an editorial in The Practlliuner. Worry has surh IB BBaattnuaB effect on health th.it a whole range of nnxicty .nlments. called "psycho somatic" complaint* now recognised. They inih duodenal ulcer, heart dlaordi nnd asthma as well us ment.il troubles. There is no doubt that doctors who ndvisc their path to consult them ut the first >igns of disorder save some U*a "But the iiuestion must i •vhether the price we are paying 'or health Is not too h i ha ITaclittoner st^teDtat. 'Colds' WHAT is 1here in house c that enn give you all tha sygaj toms of u heavy cold? Some doctors believe that lea-t hah* the streaming colds blantt i.ii ;: %  -! %  ii.-.iiiv i.in ed by somer-sensitivi' to this Irri%  anl. It is nl-o known to hnn. on asthma attacks. Ihr. Kale Mannsell. Of King'5 college Hospital, has isolated the %  -NIL. us irritant. She believe t tji formed by the action of "'i•in moulds on furniture stufflnr %  rul upholstery. Prltaln'i damp climate m .v Ttaka in unduly susceptible t" Mothers Swop Sons Aged Six Monsieur and Madame J— iKidded happily as they caught itfht i.f Ihsnr six-year-old twins Vnti.i nnd Pierre inarchii.g hand-in-hand In the procession of Swiss children. But their happiness gave wn> to astonishment when UksB HO" Iced a boy cnltr.l Brk SaVlatns] .. few pare* IKVUIHI. His liketn-.-. to Victor wag so extruordinaiy I felt they must meet h in When Eric smiled the resenib!nnce became even more niiirknblc. He had a wide g..p bltwsian his lower front teet S^ had Victoe It re.illy was .1 mo>-. ing (itincidence, thought M. sieur J UMU; he lea-ried thai Fric had been bom on rhe sti niflht and tn th,same mfltcrmtn 8| hi ot.-., cliildrcn. A.fter thjit neither he nor his ife COUld terrifying posalbiUty that Ileire !'s child, who hid been aeeidentallv sulistitu'ed for Eriii>y tba Whan tbaj Etie"s wUio\.'it eaoM dosperately anxious, too Si they reported she. case lo tho authorities, who ordered an immediate I nveet (gallon. Scientists %  recorded the fingerprint patterns, eye colours, hair characters. and teeth arrangements of the three bo> suits sll supported the belief .. ere the aj) On Tags 3 dust "colds," because it favour Ihe growth of these moulds. Pigeon Puzzle Aatlaal the most thorough 111vsMiCataOn i-vii made lo exp'ain the pigeon's ability to find its way home, Cambridge scientist Dr. fi. V. T. Mat t hews <>dmit> he is itfll biiffled. By fitting honiin{ pigeons with magnetic necklaces he Iu daV 'novod the theory that they navi-. agt* hy measuring the earth's -nagnelism. The necklaces neutralised the earth's magnetic Held, yet thei birds still homed to the loft. He then transported pigeons a long way over unknown territory in blacked-out boxes. Again tha* not home, proving they do not' nivlgiite by known landmio k A iit'W po&aiuie expuination ha* emerged from these studies pigeons may navigate by taking borings on tho -un. Their sense of direction is poor on overcast days. Dr. Itotthaw reports But when they can Jusl lee the sun through Iht layer they home almost In bright sunshine.—L.E.N. *PAA Enjoy the hospitality, comfort ond thoughtful service which have made PAA "first choice" of veteran travelers the world e>v*r YORK 1 1 Mh. MIAMI n.ulv fl.gl.i. %  .1 v Mrvteftni s.i, I..... S.-M.I r. n.v lt.,.11.1 TripErnlooh-.r.ii.. n.,..! ST. caoix ST. THOMAS t-'irpe dipper-. CM I BIIBI BBpal ture timet Von can n.. "ll) I'AA" t. El'HOPK, S1HTH AMHKICA. \Htli'A. MKXICO. the FAB I AM in (.ut. iuiiiuli'li-ly around tha world. For 22 years the leading international oirlino—PAA was first to link the Americas by air, first to fly lo all six continents. For rrimationi. are SSMSr TratW Agrnt ot EMPIIIE TO-DAY TO TIII'RSIIAV — 445 A H.3a PARAMOUNT PICTURES PRESENTS— •• I'IKIM. i: V l>lt I SS Starring —JOSEPH COTTENCOItlNNE 1 EDMUND OWEN BI-AZING ACTION . SrSI'ENSK EXTRA "WATi:K SPKI-:!)" -Short LATEST N.'VS REEL II O Y A I. lasts J Shows To-day: 4.34 A g.U I Columbia Double j Wayne MORRIS — Preston FOSTER in — I III I OIK. Ill It 11111 ns.i — .nd — "FLAME OF ITAMBOUL — with — Bichird DENNING Wei. X Thur. — l.M X %  13 i I. i Double %  > Lvuls 11AYWAKO III At K \ltltO — and — itm> %  m il it— with — Willard PARKER PAN AMERICAN II %  Mill HUM If. Baooar a oo* LTI>Hr..nd Slrrrt — Btldrto" Advertbe in the "Advocate" O LTN P II I.a.1 2 Show* To-d). 4.30 X B.15 K K o Super Double — I.IZABETlt SCOTT DENNIS OKEErr. III! COMPANY YHE KI I !•% AND IIIISI Mil MAN DOWN Wednesday AThursday 4 30 A 8.15 How.ird Hughes Production %  III: OH I LAW* Starling : Jane KUSSELl. — Jack BUETEL AND "II ACL YIHEEI Starring: GEORGE RAFT — WILLIAM BENDIX



PAGE 1

TCRSDAY IIIIKI \tl P. XKRAUOf ADVOCATE PACK TURKU 30% Of Trinidads Revenue From Oil TON. THE oil. INDUSTRY In Trinidad mniributes more taaUl f the total revenue of the C has increased some foul 'iat of 19J9. said Mr Malcolm Maclachlan. chairman and joint mana^ini; director of Apex (Trinidad) Oilfields. Ltd.. at the company's annual general meetin,-; in London. fT^ U, Th*Uovcmmeni' of Trinidad. as a sleeping partner in the < ii businessnoli uke* bv | taxation over 60 per cent of the profits of the Industry." he said. "The revenue accruing bo of Trinidad pa Sugar iXvws WASHINGTON Philippines are contetnpLv.IBt of SO.000 lo M).0tO tgaa* to Japan il mineral right.la %  hoping thai us %  more piown Ml Ofl the US. : ..nkil will be Increasod. more highly pub:-Wo understand that the Phflip%  ll is an encouraging feature, pine* are Interest winch has not always been the ing w*rld market lo ah case, that the general public m Mrpha vrhan production mcreae Tnniti.id H gaining .-in appreciation es." Mr. Lawrence M>eis, th> of the COOtribuU ptte U.S. Sugar Director, told B.U P w, fan ., thai Ltae nUoino H and 1 IruM will mufl begin soon to '.often tear -ontinucto irake. to the lie Colo m "It IDU>I be ver* ilear thai the greatly Increaard revenue from the ml iiidu*lrt width Trinidad now rei-ri\r-< Jm l spends in full — can itnly be maintained ht Ui<-to .<•• ml iiultwnituf rvplitrjiion d> fa> vrlop lurther %  11 re*er\r." I development Mr Maclachld during the utto SUCh mm-US market* Into them at all interested because I' quota in the U.S. market will i < i in air. year since the war unless the ;.7uo.ot>olon ceJUnj marketing Undn th,US Sugar Act. Ml 115 per cent, of any i. ^subscribed portion ported that hillpplncs quota Typhoon dainto Philippi nes cane ha* o -tC^a"£— Drunk in chaige o( a Zebra Crossingthai s what I am &*>**,* %  fram Mo /(lIUx tfl* ill inifiuririi* ^.-... ; HRITISII \RMS DRIVE Kremlin Cannot Be WILL AFFECT '52 B.LF. shaken From Inside LONtX IN BRITAIN'S REARMAMENT DRIVE will CaWl It! in flu r the 1952 British industries Fair, to London and Birmingham next pin The be held II Irondy brought the prospect of it iramme lo 150(>uo-ton dertci: and anj world obtain product i I %  > %  kai a.is by Ihe Philippines p. would further increase the Cuban %  i %  uf UM u.s m •<\ ihc niiim field and tour In tinSpokesmen for the U.S. sugar South Quarry um indue Four an b Phi .; i ihe Syni I tad. ns •• mean* of relieving 1 pressure OH ami %  non-produo r, two an producers and the fourth, which warn, however, that the Philip— % %  —• — a-— ~~'m£Z W—.... n„....„ n i vl ,. came In as a producer, has be> n !" Phi""' ~ ,', ,;' ; *, closed III 1 S market if Mntltir*l S'flYf/ "e.r ., they fell down too much on their lUOUtPrs OlVOp i wells in the same zone have been quota tenatvi 0 J t?" _L"|, ,tverti>d lo arnu. has led %  .r the same reason. SOtlH AgtHi !>tX mam indl^tnos to ^institute the RllflF.ai) peupli -in view -.' .i.-M' .,.inii-. which -Hut u the, do not ov. plastics for peace-tti> %  pfodll have UUDM otto nth. in sabM wlthoul 9 I rom PlK EmdhasbillW thiJ' aspect will pullelii tontinuod Mr. Maclachlan "we letUnj ihe United State:, down." j ;il feature organl>ed behind are diverting one drtlung CTO* %  \|*rl. "| do not think Then it,,-v ,, MllUstrj nl SupHJ Mill dO*p> '.king much risk, the boyand ihe parents. Hut -jsp— W nh tM Roal Aircraft nig" n Ru the b>ncUi tuse ihe man whom EMc had fstabllshmenl Farnboi I 1 quince of lhef> I caHad father was dead, these | ( win „ nOW j^,,^ plastic* aie wf may expect wmr redutl marketing in testa could not settle the eao |low n0 oll | v beinj ued toi it tunit %  .-. ilmin for conclujiivel>'. small arti for heat recent monlhs. but our Trinidad the Philippinos. w h rn tm pmbt'' !" p f m .* d !" ier goods whlcti 1 and lmpuritk> in UM I'IIMHI mj' caaa acbr* and pain*. -"II nd pamlul itnm bailv pimplr* mil camtni>n >kin dUnrdrr^ 1 asshsrs 11 ,1 Mtan MM ^ %  i r UM blood, ataanaaa the SpaHei and oaalaii ht rraionng KKMI ht.ilih. laaaaaooaaaaaaaaaasmeaaaaaaBaaoBai NEW RELIEF FOR ARTHRITIC PAINS But new treatment does more than ease these terrible agonies. A new produ.t. I nil aH'-aa Dffoaapt n'litf froea IIH t-invduo to ihe lyraptonM •>' artl rhiunmtit.ni. lull "U.> SMI Is th* imiiill |" i • bBM %  a verv important par! uf lha rheiunati IKil.CIN has M tested ir POII'IN U l-ing nsed RMS* with nn| 1 l>'>! '"l^ i* l--ing pp— %  il-'d I" d 1. %  -%  • -nfT.nr, hnviMiimln.iinnl Hvina m < raautl HX'IN It.inl drl.v fr.it, t Ihesa pnin. Oa DOLCIN to K\ atila. IHMtKI Ks (HAItHMMIs) DRUG 8TOBE8 LTD. • 0l ,r Brand Street and Hasllni — 1 \i I'll \ I'M IBM \t v i ,iu IMN \1 n GONZALEZ) WASIllNtnXlN. Feb. 4. THE KREMLIN 8 O IWTROI orei the Rim] N i v ehalli %  ed from Inatde U1 U e beat M dial li reporti end expeti throw: cold water on rmj 1 1 an wwn be that to revolt mandnenv nt ihot total produetiofi .id approxitii of 1950-51." ;:. the Filipinos bav. ol the %  c* nU been mad said lhe> hope soon to be prornenibcred that, although hu, nv0 | v# d eompostt skin diners so mursi mat I „. H cannot nurmally be PdWI *eU. T, %  U another. and develop tbOM markets. They Kfts cannot do II overnight ,,t %  %  identical tWBU bcruunifaciun Other IliuMichls IncreasiiiK Cost Iteterring to ihe continually Inretop— n.i'.i* ment in Trn .led: • • 'Uuriug the six-year period t The end nl IfSO SOHIi (1,750-000 NORWICH. Norfolk were expended by the oil mdusii> Kv ''" ""' "' BrfUah-grOwn known 1 ft h nrtiea w In Trtnldad In drilling 53 wells to *"*"" beet now yields a full btfrnrd HA f. depths In excess of 9,000 fe. I whieh only sppnwlmati <' %  " v. m JE!y ln J !l, 0:n ,^l cw M .iSiu" eonunerMr Q. r. V • ncutm t1.1l producer.." director ol |hi British S -r—r?" "V.T", "•' i 1. if Shi. the company's revenue dm a si %  %  ' ' '':;" .,.. j %ear lotalKM C 1.085,000 of which moatini In Norwich H. .. [ wo nd Vt •£1.599.1.00 was oil u. T 1 1 "•."' v'^uJ-F U,-t profit fur the year, .. aM .0lH, *ent byJrUUh U uu.tu.e ; ^ ^ ^ After transfers tor. the general <>n 400,000 acre, of b.H.1 ,. 1 . irl.,1 01 ., Bill in. i.Ulllll'. i the revo %  Other hifhliKhts. will Include Mother Russia .1, sntUw %  Bed .1. n %  Muting So the nuthorltie., called in Sir ,. ,p.,1 watch out Ihi liorroi 1 Arcliil>ald Mclnrioe. the S0-year„ akeis have l,> taken more aM.irk | irai ,,|d Bl i'i last vear In "Mil Pyorrhea and Trench Mouth Slopped in 24 Hours -The Nearby pretty modelwill work show swimsutta and i %  Alongside will l>e a group exThls I4uff, beaPaCtsMlBfl New hlbtt, i>erhnps more mundane, "CQV" ZM luarc ,,f printing mks. end n ', .1 Mi] ' 'iRhl arm numUi of di;j.la' ind n th a rtmllai i,,t,. %  • omce Machinery and Apreaaeve fund and ;t h cerried forward, he Mad t. %  %  fMJOO.OOO o wner s of ihe business, who have than five years ego," hi provide the capital and bear the F.V< :. ton M sugar wi can pro,, s that a terribli risk, will draw in dividends the duos Bl home DaatttB S ton leal ,,„,... nuAt .sum cf £220,000. to __be_ bought hi dollars. The made ti I The the Ki-mlin to sin Russian • i %  t Iradltl a. In Rui i I down I"'Innir in llm I DOO square feet st Olympui i I aria t'mirt have l>oeii booked (led the author!\,\. j.2Mi Inghsm, In Ih, liiginrwriuR 1.100 man living %  -At the same time, the GovernliSO—Bl ranqMni yielded 700.The KIn transplanted Iran taken over 40,000 ment of Trinidad will draw over 000 tons and to have Uiught that victor to Eric and vic<" versa u\ Castle Broomwlch. 1886.000 in royalties In the dollar market grnfted on rapldlv without gearDa anl in addition the would have cost at least $80,000,fag It retained its texture and Unite.) Klngdorn ( fa 000. han gruwiii The other attempta further t33o.iioo. Tin. foi ,-^ if we had been allowed to sell ,,i grafti would not knit togeth£1 drawn by the owners of ln<~ .ur products—sugar, pulp and sg at all. The InnspUmtad skin [i 10a Bdt molasses—at their full value | died, ii taken bv the two p there would have been DO sugar Th.Sl i"" 1 thei*—B.1.I'. beet subsidy needed for the past frre ordered Eric and Pierre several years," he • • it srai a terrible —B.U.P. the three parents. And it SnM %  g arbo niJlllJN. Middenh tOOBd himself father < ..i-i an. II.I I. %  • (iarveer. based lint the I %  lsptel m the speelflcidlonj of a UJ %  >• *•"; "" tlv „ ?' e ".ij in Janiaica from M... to overcome tn 'his strange family switch-roun'i M(i|(i (|l( Illim ,. s ts m l*culiar dJnVulttea In the meSir Archibald leports In his Juitliarvestlllg ol sugar beet publi-hed medical record of Use in Ireland. %  %  The V S expert. Mr. Austin I the Spreckels Sugar O %  lit rniudu l\> IVolosl VIMM.I Ct'ilU'trrMs HA.Mil I %  '. The Bermuda Oeeeri expected imaki to the Bri1i*h Government about the state of mill on the .-land if nothing It. done future. to improve* them i Member! of Unpointed out to B.II.P. that d I the War Office which n c %  nole for Ihe upkeep and eotM, B Kriiish Kiag*$ Scouts l>> Allt'itil >\ Indian .|aiiilMnM LOfttrpM Blghl British Kiiut's Scout n chosen to repri i i,ned Klogd 09 acuti it the first C^i II i consists nniiiiK Bfl %  /. I/O \t l>f/\ / M'li TED TWHNtKO% The It.MS f.adv Net %  inei nt. She la %  • %  day for Bermu John. N.B. n will !" %  nada and Now Discovery Saves Tseth •KM' ll" duo.rr ml • %  Amman Tvnn Ihrv mitl-i In m r* ..nl imf. if-uii...• IM mnmtm "i tour nmuHi. I %  %  ilnf, TI,. fulloali %  ixirr timm Mr W W. a J— Ih* .rwlt. InM *-"....-! I "-!. 1 OrtWlTrHlBlt fl ifii ,.,r. It| |* 1.1'• % %  inS I i.aS IIMI, lotir UI.I. hiU f.roih.r i.^u. |.~MT all It.' Ha**, I uttd %  A**MH II. .'I llf.UK III.-I ! %  —• it., SUMS i.*d •K.st-'d UajnC imiiuu in BIT namri Sitaa> ttn .i i-m 1 pun, fun out rtlh.lr.nu, ...H ,k KIII. c-ulur .bnormalilic. I brine In'"' %  ~r if i in ir"nnilii iii E.C.A' f" """ %  chcmc lo Invalvnlc liish dim> ul: t.11 Ihe llUJ of b.i-1 niuil.ll. !" lion ol Ihe cemtterm und not r | a „„| lol „. ^ terelln new,: Th' the Bermuda Governmenl^ Hl U ctid c d Ihul uhiknu exut. Mr. C G. Gilbert member lm %  nwchmerj. could M ud.pt.-d [• m "" %  %  „ "". Sandry, PurKh. wh.-. 1: nn I,,K ,.d ,.ut ....,! •"""'* .iim.t.I „ '^'"TI,, MrtormKnc. U S..UI.-I Scotsman who. b> cont -lea, can turn his .yell them up I I u I tuuMd1 m .., m,. •• c.i.d .i I.' cn j n ...... con. Raftrrlu to lha mUn ...id near H.M doekv .: —B T I' I don't suppose you that In any other part ol the 10 it had Dowi For Se$man§ .-two year-old Rudorpli -.f Nurse Land, Carruigton VUlnge. Sl Michael, and 19year-old Oswald SmaC of Vei L^ed with rail" njoured Itbn Of li. I.ES b) the Boy Scfiuls' •lelalion In I^mdon: — r;.-olTre\ I1..11-.I vicb, achooiixiy; Richard Denbj ii"). Pur ley office funloi Derri humh. ''amblln flS). Bristol, p William Martin (11 diiT. apprentli • young 'ornei. John P.irke, (II !; %  %  .! (tl lunlor clerk: and John I • 1*.i Kiigate. The party will Inled by Mr B MOVllI from the Boy Seoul Association IIQ .'iiil M Imastet ol • hfl 11th Plnrhlev —B.r.r Office and it to wome —nvu.r. No Representation For B G. At Trade Meeting GEOHGF/K-WN Feb.4. British Guiana will not be SOI >ng a represent. 'mmltteo n industrial relations to be t.. I In Puerto 1 and Sessions p The Government haa no repiie %  Harper. Acting Pvdici the Trade Union Council and has Mai also Informed the Caribbean ComThe brass and lead %  muugon under whose auspices i Conference Is being hehi. — < Cliff Ptantation. St. John. There'i s baby lo gladden a BSOthcr'i heart!—iirm little body and strong white teeth corning . Tbetc the MtKing*. thai come from •enSesS—the pure cod liver Oil *> rkh in natural fit! and pr irecrive vitamin.. ScvenSeaS NATUKtL SEA-FRESH VITAMIN FOOD /* %  • :-;lr% %  :..,-•Askua'a P.r* n Inf-at.' ro* Hv Alk.i Seltrer acls lo settle y xlomneh and sOOlhe y oafs repc.-i' Ha use artthout laaat Tnka Aika-s^ii/.i aihanasai ^ you've had too rkfe a meal Farests Alha-Stlliir Miss arlltm Lit It self TM IM fSS-rflltnd HI...'. Al ka S eltzer vusessa II MILK STOUT (S) C. L. Gibbs fi Co. Ltd., • P. O. Box 56 BRI DGETOWN Dial 2402 WHEN 'COGNAC" is MENTIONED TH! NAME IIKSNKSSYS LEAPS TO THK MINI) BaKAUSB HKNMssVS IS TIIK I1HANDY THAT I IB COGNAC FAMOUS. HENNESSYS • THREE STAR • V. S. O. P. (over 20 years) • X. O. LIQUEUR (over 40 years) HOKTS a BVNOe LTD-aGCNtS


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II E8DAY, H BRIAR Y 5. 1*52 II Mil! MmMIVdfVTK PAGE SEVEN HENH* BY CARL ANDERSON FOR LASTING QUALITY & SHADES INSIST ON %  ^fClSTERtO BRAND READY MIXED PAINTS AN I. C. I. PRODUCT A. S. BRVDEN & SONS (VMS) LTD. MJ,. Your Jarty A SucCMI with Boa OKkUII OnMna %  %  %  SMIrt. Tin. O^iS r>Ur .or JUR* „ o a r. J U M <> JtMc. I. %  -. HI t %  . pr lb hMM BM Ik Bae .* Ik from RBUI & SAMPSON (19381 LTD. nnHi nii-i tor Beat Rum. .'.-,-*', AGENTS We have just Received Tin* I'lum Pudding \ -...r l. >1 BWeult* t rrui Craeaem rn Nub ., Pearv Feaehea, Grapeand IMPI ., ttovpa „ UMIM ,. Coffer shell Alaaoaeta iKeUU) Ik,. MIMII I fu'l I;.i-iiiCurrant*. Prunea Mlv.,1 ITrl Table Jelllea, Jama, Table Butter TinOrange. Grapefruit. O G. F. Juiee* IUM.IM'IIII Keef. KoaM Beef Tra rr' Harnlnun'i Typhoo. Red Rw" (ifM 'Fry < NUn Round Treeal | INC.E & Co. Ltd. | f. ROEBUCK ST SPECIAL offers to all Cash and Credit Customers for Monday to Wednesday only SI'MIAI OI-'FKIIK iire yon naiiiible ft our Hrnnrhr* TwrVdaiiuY. S|i. inliislm. % %  .in.l Sunn * NOW Tins Anch. Powd. Milk (2j) 224 "i.OO Tins Batchelor Peas 39 36 Bols. Maula Olives 12 oz. 125 1.20 Tins Tomato Juice 33 30 in i Armours Soups Aipargui-ionwio 28 'i* Pkgs. Dates 18 IO V. SCOTT & Co. Ltd. Broad Street i II i i o i i% .\ A i; . H o i; nils NOT AFRAID ioSENDorSTOOPi Backache, Rheumatic Pain Relieved Jardcnwgt pawling, odd jobe round the bouie >an be a pleeture .gun when you are free Irora backache, rheumatic palne, iifl, aching muKlca and |oinii, lumn ur inaiy (rouble* due to Impuritlea in the blood. Why not get happy relief by taking Doan'a Backache Kidney Pilla. They help the kidney* to rid the blood of exeat uric add and other impurities which otberwtae might coUect in the >yMem and nu* diitma HAW A CHNTURYaf dm to MaRftfRM *i./#y u.iii-1 II iA prtmd rt..-.l of Duafi Putt. Grtuful • nan / all ayer aw avid rtcomt m mvi ihti iffuitni dmntic and urinary iieplK to ikrir frumdi and mngkboun. D.OANS !/ &f J/i in; i;\ OF THE AFFAIR MEN and WOMEN 40, 50 AND OLDER.' here's how. you can be strong and active fi U s < fret tun dn era <** II t .,!!. I I.If ,i t oU lh'.uld be, md iiildt %  ig on. t"u may %  red i Aal> VUaatlaa. Try iueoiiilt. good tailing Icon*! rmuliioa. Take n '' regularly all real roved. Viuniint ar~l tnergi building oit ll li.lpi build i HIGH ENERGY FOOD TONIC 5 GRAHAM UUUI This is a love story. Tchckov OHM Btid that a writer could express moonlight by itl reflect ion in %  broker bottle at a nver'b edge. Bo Mr. Graham Greene ii... Inecl to express ;i UB of lovfj obllqiMly through chau %  %  '.ehevca that he feels Only hate Tinaction is confinr'l t< J a hanilful of < and today. Ul II \\ I IT AT Till-: \n\or\ii VI \IIO\IIIY Broad Street and Greysfone Shop, Hastings Jl ST TO MBfTTOA I MW ITEMS.\OW OPl'M\C FKNDEII TAPE ci.l.l.i:i.')U> SHEETS CUHK SMEK1S FLEXIIll.K RADIATOR HOSE ORJEASI iJUNS Oil. CANS REAR VIEW MIRRORS BATTERV CABLES HATTEHV HYDROMETERS BATTERV CHAItOKIt BULBS HI'ill PRESSURE AIR HOSE k|' PATCHES AND VULCANIZING KITS BUCTION VAI.VE GRINDERS ENGINE VALVES-All Models UK* AIUIONI/ING GASKETS SKTS—All Models I Bl ERATOR ARMATURES—All ModeU t.olM.K si'ARK PLUGS VALVE GRINDING tOMl'OIND GASKET GOO t-.i Scfllinn Jointt HOI Wirei RUBBING < i IMP! IUND M/ Kl hi NER AND WAX HOLTS WONDAII WAX CHAMOIS AND lOl.ISHINC. CLOTHS \M) PLATES ALL rVPEfl MECHANICS' TOOLS %  \s11>; ram, ///. IM rot )<>i/t UPQUBOI / 77, 8VMEL\ HAVS IT" Ml \; ECKSTEIN Dial 4269 — II II OS. Bay Street 'W///////',^^^0V.'//%V^*/.^0<.W/'///,WM'/.V.'/.',',-.



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I'M.i inn; BARBADOS ADVOCATE KI-.IIW. FEIIIH'IKI *). fiAKRWos^AmmATi; %  ( . **..-...i TucKd->. rebruat) :.. ltS2 The American \ou I Through 50 Years: I homas Wolf** 'COLONIAL STUDENTS' DIFFICULTIES IN U.K. LONDON, Jan IIOIM IIOI IIS LAST TiMKfagr tt*a BM did not Hid' until 5 pm. Normally the It 3 p.m. [| prayer* are never read until 3.15 p.m. Before the tea interval there are approx!wo hours available for dtbs.1 After lea ttu House has another t until dinner, ami es another two hours are spent in %  -. r dinner. Si\ hours and than seven are spent by the i Assembly once a week, when the measures that come be! boun only an h week for the House ul Assembly to deal with I of MM island, the selection erf tfaOM ix hOU OH impoihuntin the House of Assembly are sometimes impressed whei bers lying back in then el ing Such positions may be conducive to clear thought or may be necessary because the men un his working day at 6.30 am. and i> literally worn out by 3 p.m. After dinner on a tiring day would not j seem t< be the best period to conduct normal business, but apparently the B is making a habit of after-dinner sittings The House U of course at liberty to conduct its business at tunes suitable to the convenience ul the 11 unlikely to make any changes out of respect for public opinion. Yet public opinion cannot be ignored since the members of the House are responsible to electors whose %  illectively form and influence public opinion. month the H-use will debate the Estimates for 1952-53. On this occasion evciy member of the House of Assembly will endeavour to justify himself to the constituents who returned him to the Assembly. The debate on the Estimates will last for more than six or seven hours. What will happen'' Will the House deal with expcndituic under so many heads once a week and will the debate drag on into March'' The electors hope not. Many U not the majority would like to see the Estimates discussed in the House dally until approval is reached. There seems little reason why the House should not make provision for daily meetings until the Estimates are passed. And what occasion would be more suitable than this to introduce new hours of sitting? Ill Westminster, three p.m. is a suitable time for the HOUM ofl Commons to open daily (oxoopt Saturdays and Sundays). Most members of Parliament arrive in their bii Hi -i TII daily ,.nd keep office horns until 12 or 12.30. They have finished lunch by 130 or 2 p.m. and usually spend the Intervening hour jn correspondence or talking to constituents or others who visit them in the House of Commons In London where distances arc great 3 p.m. is | reasonable time for the House of Commons to meet. In Barbados where six hours are normally devoted now to legislative discussion in the House of Assembly, each week during a MnUon ol tni HOUM, UM selection of hours seems vital Is three p.in action lor opening The traditional Barbadian breakfast hour is II a.m. to 12. Most members of the House probably eat bntktul during that period Could the House of Assembly not meet therefore at I p.m. On normal days the House c.uld finish Us business by seven o'clock %  ilowni ;' numbers the opportunity to return home for dinner. Tea, instead of being a reason for adjournment of the House, could be served from four to five and members would leave the House at intervals during that period, as they do now during debates. The smallncss of Barbados makes it possible for members to be at their places of business by 8.30 daily and between 8.30 and 11 a.m. as much work can be accomi d as between 10 and 1130 Only during major debates would the House need to sit for more than one day per week, and there seems Uttk named by debates conduotod after dinner, although dinner might be served at 7 p.m. for members who desire it An Important advantage that would be obtained as a result ol thfl availabilly of civil servants responsible for departments. Ministerial status is impossible unless "ministers" are well briefed and civil %  bj cannot burn the candle at both ends, since they are non clock than are politicians. d—ptw Uw fact Ukal n* *v to haw cfMlad a m ranimad a atot": h— ipkl A. .n Mc do*f this century should rind a permanent place in American literature, but before the century had run one -fourth of iu course left Old ('alawba was espatrla.innately described in Look. t.on enoujfh for Thomas Wolie pondent He thinks ol a better explanation mad* and the candidate chosen Homeward. Ansel"). is a trustold Catawba, the home Slate of h .L U8Ua i one colour Dreiudice. worthy autoblosraphlcal source Euitene Gant in "Lou* Home'"*" UiV u Ui '" t ^r > %  II agree On whal Thomas young Thomas' home life must ward, Angel" (said to be Wolfe's . Wnlfe %  capable of doing hav> been a wretched experience, h-mie Slat.of North Carolina). Representation of various colonial stuThere Isfri minimum Wolfe s early success and subwas just right. Iu people wtere J--.-* un i on s on the new consultative cornre. aequenl career demand some humble people, not going to set „..:The | aMri ght Into the thrnrfow Uw worM %  Bn am intendingmittee. set u*p last August, is seen as a sig. i Anmatrix :\ hi> Ufa ai which every u peculiar mental endowment. Self-r-sleem %  — %  -•--H. me Again'' (140). The novelist's eoncepUon of hi >&* article continues. ..nd a fragmenury third membe*"Usjly Ihicklini:" own genius coloured his work; mithough chronologically first* Wolfe thought himself Jn ugly mo "' ,ha '* m,1 y m society Difficulties demandmR immediate solution. 1 %  £ "SS IS* "um" ""'Wing from tne sun, and was SSS^m^JZ^A^tSS ll '* pointed out. fall into two categories—the 'EioS^X^ Animport1,1.1.,] ml KJ Uure win pubM ,., lhclr mldl ,. You mUe c "J, r !" c 'l_5,' m ,. w „„. „ .. „„, anl psychological factor is the student's atStar, of • Novel.and in IMS .. J,., w ,„dtnn t around witb ^t ihJT^ ol hfch VIM. Frequently he has a preconceived idea of the "iK^*ri^h'1„ >"nr'i""-r'i'i' v '"' %  B5'write. hS lost f.iith. Philow^hl(celinos of the people here through stories anOUad Proni Death t*> body'i l,mliin at you. Don't flflturr h. h ,, s none He has L L I. Morning." Kir* Ha knaw It aod gj,3 i.,mi ,,-ho "j nil thheard from some others who have been here; N i"uX.'tr. ; ^ ''' !" "!' — '" """*.theUiuth, r vo .i nu^uon, urt d bj men he may arrive expecting the worst. Of some of WoUWa ii" tbatl leelh. The one „, „,„ Umc Poslru! then, lynral paes. an arrangement ,„„ ,,,,,,1 „r l„. tile WM with unanswered, in anguish of spirit I „, h „ _.,_ „_.,„„ n( rn „hl t a "rlif. „r hi. praein verse form called „„ mother, yet one wnld hesi,„d with gi.iamngs unutterable nc o[ ,he main causes of trouble is a dlfA Leal. A Stone. A Deer, and ,„ c ,„ deserlbe it as love, he Is a raging prophet ol Hie bitTerence of background and temperament !r/,rJ h £dTlneTieeT'i.To which calls for a great deal of toleration on a being resemboth sides. This is particularly necessary bebling man. oblivion ha, iu ..niche MjJ1 ^ A—>.~t Landladies have PAPER SERVIETTES In Plain While SI.OO i" %  I. % % %  • %  Irnl ADVOCATE STATIONERY Broad Street 4: Greystone, Hastings thick volume of letters to his mother. Juh:. Elizabeth Wolfe Aiilohincniphy Only It is Important to note tarly that Thomas Wolfe consi'tently -h -wed himself incapable of any type of writing save autobiography lie wrote millions of words, not one of them unrt'1-ted tn the laBaatsOni he had c xperl> %  people he had known. the aspirations he had conceivta While It Is a canon of sound A ritlag to tell of what ono knows, avoiding „ll that one is itfr.or.uu of. the point to be made %  bout Wolfe is that he seems never la have created a character or contrived a plot. God made the people and things happened la them Wolfe recorded them, ilrst in his mind and then with his pen The way in which he did It comprises hli art. This is not to say that Wolfe underwent no process of matui..Uon. There is in hi* work a clearly observable movement toward spiritual adulthood, though not many would car,, to say uni >|itiv( :ilU that hi had m tin %  it II by tha Bna 0l his death at the %  Hie of 37. He remained always Incurably boyish in certain aspects of his thinking "I suppose I oblivion has Its nicht-, prepared for Thomas Wolfe 'ween landlady and tenant Come deeper darkness, thet. ; certain riifid code of behaviour and murals Wolfe's star is one of those that, ., , , will enjoy a further ascendancy W which the tenant is expected to conform. A Bore not manv are prepared to tolerate deviations ,k Wol t.* ^CJ^K*"^,! !" 'rom this code, and not unnaturally, colothat he use* the "stream of ,, i consciousness" technique; he i,iial students and others used to a leas nT. C, n S e. a d'.' ,, Ba J ," i eTse P !. r n1re < ?e SS """"^ fPh. and different customs :t.seif to t>e thinking %  ind it dimcult to conform. p^oondly upon life as has eve, Something more than this toleration by been done, and because he Is n , hnre he must perish. Again, h; landladies and families is deemed necessary. TubTlcaT^^mrSerln, "ouT*^he The Viait r mUfll makc an cff rt t0 ac q Uam lordlv brass and iron of a deacriphimself with the "unofficial regulations and ne s^r^arsw"*. boos u[ '"*• %  i d inss Has ever language been asked lol _. ,.— do so much as this? Yea. but ( The material factor giving rise to dimcul"•Se'h'.o^oTf'Vr^oife".'!.'.' ,s ,s ""' h us n K shorUge. "Few of the unrelenting smith, arhleves agai. foluured people one meets," the "Econom..nd again tiat few have cared, lst correspondent Boes on, "seem to realise ur dared attempt, he conies clos. r ... .,_ t.. setting down the wild diverthat finding anywhere to live is a nightmare ily of things. Torre n ti„l. repetl,,„. thousands of English people to-day. It live, wearing, dlsgustuiK. indii.„.. %  .. dimcult for the university authorities to ".Wo../ Tout* fur xmir in tli n or.' fu '*•• fount! ul Pilihrr'i!" Hum* u~2 C. S. Pitcher & Co. Hi ./...* (nis l'/./i HttUttr II .'.i Iht. i .,.-,.. Thtrtan ate — llilKM.lt FOUS MKK;I 1. 11 ii \i. roua UCES \I.KII I III Kil. IIIIKS IPK l) BBS oi HJNGB Hit WNf. Sill IU Hawnsas /r*./ii ii'hifh it, aWtaji minute. annoying, tind accommodation for the greatly increased numbers of English university students, let alone the continuing stream of students from .. % % %  .. . -.^.% % % %  I. I.H|U.. words are tne aigna of ideas. an<: i the colonies." It is the housing shortage, not 2SS $!$UE\£'ElS!.'5£. a & 5£S 5Lrd e^' r ;nd'" e n dSsi;| !" lour P re ud,ce which brin s ma "y s ,u in words and inquiries indicating ramified, none but toe patient dents face to face with the "no room at the i. yet an awareneas of rraft.man who cares naught jm | i nn notice. The two organisations most helpful in finding accommodation are the British Counc 1 and the East and West Friendship Council. his spate %  V^IHii't lii IlilVr II. lit III-J i Hi see him inquire Words are the signs of ideas, j tirmwill catch then needle*: '. prodlgnl—one may call n ..fate all that. But In doing greater wrprh^ t„ myaelftMn to Po^bS'^ ^^AousTimM *? on rom clu T fi lhp ^ n "' %  > m. under the sun," the 17w hich makel tt oart.cuUrlv relhat ,! VSV nn l ^Tff SfiSS rnar-asVi cuuld write "I am ,t mfl ? w ll P'"cularly rewuu |d Ilo[ h avo half dewnbe.) >nt oia itan went. i -m fr.jshina to see him Inaulrc -„_J K_ -I__ u _.. .-hiiiigiiig s my-elf .in of Interest. Sounds egotistical, id"'^ it not?" How I. one to set dw n the Inh ts Jealousies and incredible ,.. fluences thai had a bearing on | U deness lhat lore them apart meanniB t ,o',. l ^ C o e "^ k i T" was liever abs nI ,lom h, m,nd Wolfe? He found the thing ham Wolfe's finest pasaages ai to do in five volumes, wherefore In view of this burning and found bedded deep In heaps i live p.i.,,%  ..i'Nmay ,-• anpagtod I km a ntneat a ion eondaa thai tin Uu Bund and dl to accomplish nothing at all. The tmues uninterrupted through all gu*t the soul; filthy, word-pooi | „ ,, _ .. . , beginning will serve as j conWolfe's noveU, it is challenging vituperation; blasphemies unconHotil make every eflort to nnd suitable hostel venient starting place. to Uy to determine if there was scious of whom they smirch. r private accdrnmodation. But they are fac.... love in the man's life It does caricatures of creatures given %  _j-_ -_., „_ T* ,.,,. Diifrh Antecedents llo t seem so. nor any depth of transfused and temporary interev in K tremendous odds. They can do little t On October 3. 1900. a boy was charity In his writings. One must h >' ,n '* laboured limning of then improve the position unless more hostels are born "f William Oliver and Julia B() slowly henI'JUIOU there tvw idiosyncraales. It is hemmc; | Dlsabeth Wolfe i n Aahevllle. In Ts i n plenty absorption in indin I Malan's Nallonnllsi Parta The King Is the ComUtution.d %  von t-uiiitrtes He has to employ tba netiou that he supports the polii'iei and views of whatsoever Governmont. In every l>ominion. thiit is chosen by ili Parliament to take office Th.it was the gi*t of the argument made b> the flmea, li is Inferred that thi Prime Ifinister was the South African who could most suitably invite the Hunt << South Africa Sunn suggestions had been made that the King should stay with the %  i -General, or with the llntisli High t'ommiku.>iK-i I i' Tit-res disposed of these remarks pousttoi out thai the OoeernorGcncraTs residence* are eithei iinrestfully amidst the hubbub ol cttj life or out "ii ihe High Veldt at an altitude that would be debarred by the King's doctors. A> ..i sUyuuj i.i> ihe ssnu.-ii HlgJ lonor: thai would be fla%  rantl) kdantlfytng himself with his Government in the United Kingdom, ami l>e .1 rudeness to his -, 1 .. %  %  1 %  mont In South Africa \ Talking Point Dr % %  .|tl]!t .1 talking point. The objectors lake rf franklv political attitude and say thai the King "ill in fact jnve great encouragement to Dr Malai.. They argue that the King must stay above politics by avoiding tricky political situations where the very presence of Royalty might be exploited. The reason for all this strong feeling In BritBy DAVID TEMPLE ROBERTS .iln 1 becosSN Of (he great distaste felt fiere for the avowed Nationalist policy of separating the races. Those who have met the iiitlcism point out that the King hal to choose one of his Dominions; both Australia and New Zealand are too far. They assert the truth that Dr. Malan's invitation was sent arltf) kindness and onisulci.itlon. They point out that Ihe King wait gogtfl) received in such Nationalist and avowedly "Republican"' centres ;is HIiM'infotUoiu. The Times, in Its dignified and conclusive editorial defending the King's choice goes out of Its way lo commend the merits of the West Indies—and their future claims for a Royal vfaH The King will go to the ILMUIIful and secluded villa In Natal. We can only wish him u happy and rapid recovery in those surroundings—and forget the political controversy The (isle Rages In distant seas they are called hurricanes or typhoons; round the coasts of Hntam the> are merely gales. Bui Ihe word hardly does lustlee to what hii the isolated. low-lying, islands of the Orkney* off the extreme North Coast of Scotland You ma> think of Utec islands as peaceful, remole. ami little kimwn. In fact they are iloiirlkhing, they include some of the best agricultural land In Scotland. I remember in my wartime It.A.F i-xpeiieiue. how • WOuld like to land on the aerodrome* round the naval harbour of Scape Kil" riuiton Uw isi-iui.-. agjgs ware slwayi to M i-Aight. The prlSSM wenMown south to tho tightly rationed mainland Now a 120 mile an hour gale has swept away chickens and hencoops, lorn up the very few small that Northern climate, and left the ciHintrystde desolate. The Orkney Islands are In the track Of the great A'lannc erosterly winds. Fortuivately a relief fund has been formed to put the Island* d Rase Tea tube &u*xr Castor Hoiar fair's Sweet Bi-.uiU Cirr Craekerm Kraft f'bees* llMlch rheete I \ K Itr.'.id Anrhor Hull. 1 iot k WEST III Y8. TASTY HIT?* CfttlMf Mc. lb. tlKIHK your GOLD RKAIIt Rl'M and KVI WIII^KV Today Aiititilustu \m hoi les \ lenna Sjn*.ier Cos] Roes 1 1 h '•irsu* ••hi*w BlsealU hMUi l>ale- MaHai Fits 1 \r MOIII: 1 ISII salmon


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PAOE SIX IIXKHADOS ADVOCATE il I -l, \Y FFHRIAKV S. I5l CLASSIFIED ADS. n\nt ton /mini) II\KM \lu ludtFuronloDiM'tor I>i<> m *" '' TCLEPHONC ISO*. 1M ••Ml SALES REAL KSTATK WfJIUlv T \fulu\Ulf \f|l • Iliairt MlU^'k For Bulhi. Hinun or ln|i|"Mnl %  — —Mrr r-l. tr. .-* I ebarfr N S3 "' <• •' iv-mber Of woxla St BT.J I HW it win* Sal apt a. •Bd. %  -.-.. Mrt !• %  : %  N I. i'l 1* I toa-twere • . H4 • pal.; SI \>MH Xi IMKVI> maw**) i • eaieaarna; tnetr p nai >ii 1 *rp* vf repair*. i on itt:.vr HUISES lOOKUNW Mill SAU AUTOMOTIVE ii %  .. MM UTS Ippll luMOM -..-H.IF.NOi i ooo m.la. phon* PI app:> D>iM4o UYD The <.i f. %  • %  --i %  ll AKT MMBWN MimiHHIl OnlT One *•• I mk.~ia>r s.,(((!• %  Apnna 1 i> fH05l till A HAMM-* %  LBCmiUUi TREs... c .i Dn 1,0.1 INK 1-,One IMCUKI ii.n.1 AaMrt %  %  BHM i *M MPMI : 1 ;I *, \* AM I II Ml I I %  : MISC^il I Wl Ol S ,. %  <:, TO UNI %  rURNRUM 1 ClSS Barbadua <;<.srtnir# DeI f 1<" I *S I I *l*a hitwi...iea Barbedoa tip IH ariar.. II B T C I4d 40 Wtrw Wl. BaeeuH Co 41 Air* B-il.-dae Trlephane C %  •"* Preterrneei a %  hares Barbados Ira Cu Tbe above mentioned Aim will I Tidal iri lih day i p m at Carrmsm High laOii.mi&io4\ IMT. Ilvinr r-n*. cupl-an*. Tiled bnll. and w.ila-1. Brr.enl. aaom ana] tfaraa*. Ii apawtwrn on la Mr. Bernard I: %  Bane 4S1T Tti* above -III Be l D l"> "I< 1-VbUr Action SB Fllda) Iha Slh February •* tM pr*. a*. We oee oi uw underaienea. CARRTNfTI I M I 4AINT ..-( 1 SI W 1 PWirMtTi M'I-. II.nVIII Pl.a, J etTea e rtene IQM >q laat il,i. Ii Rrrol Rook. Fo'n bm •140 ..i ...( .if BAJsMasI i MM Uaraena. ! Mlcha-I MUM Diawina Roum. I ajrdroomt, Qaraaw. Toiki UVBSTOCH *Ot J. I I imUcl LNmald MKtllANlCAL PILES Than Is mOvtdJoc ua to i-ll jou oi fl I %  uddcaing urimtloB, ibe 1U7 and niKhi torture r* U s-d • %  > pdw trouble. We M •011 that if you only suit UMOg Mao Z ... : %  t once it vriil Hop the tettibte pain, soothe and eotnpleirt j beaj blind or bleeding pile* Read jw tfacM two (to* a hot* ; Of letter* Hrrlr MISCrl! \MOrS i.MVAM/rn Mirr.Ts A limit-. -t.ut. 1 n t*m. • n urn in Ml CO Tclcpnonr MM %  tat 111 i.~r 11 I'1. vine Hfoid* ana -1.11H and • %  booh onhui .'%  • Mil not r MO mi M t* ticon. •MMfi >n a pfta* 1—a^>* rho !" limp.-' DM :• MJ b hIM I %  I '•aanaely Worlkkna. Apply: Th..niat Phone nlTl %  a u—Sn Mr*. H A A.. NTia-alo4rr||ar-"Fiit..a. a rear I aoMa-ad Hb unMa barotaa ail, I 'r/' Pomamitkon. and oialaiaala %  •mnalr 'i porai* ftatf. TbM I baud •( Man Zaa. aad | dxlda-llauvIL Now,lnl.4ilhall>iea*.0| aajeoaplttalrearadBiUiidtaaaialiunaiaMit.' | ^inrrAJUaB VaBaea, alt* alia. ] T..Pa*ritfc. ta Iirtuna and Ha** lurd) and lialitweiaht.' doal %  Ml pHea worried mm tm -ear t raara. and I 11a f.. M J, A BAMNBJI a) CO.. LTD. cpald ael Obtain an, nae(. 1 an.i '•rumaaaadaal le (rr Mta Zan. .ad iaaoMdUiH. I loud label. New I a aoNe lite at Iba tar data mmoar Don't tofler lonjer the nerre-deatrorina;. woaheniag nuaery of piw tumble. Man Zan wJI moat wifely giee yoo inatant relief. Sold in eaiy. clean-to-uae tube*, with I \ pperialooiflf applitatof, from all chemiats. % % %  vuc Nances %  The ebo piopeMy will be aet Ul %  ale bj PubMc Coeawaliuan at our elBe* %  trwrt on rr.dar *lh l'ebruai> lalpilHlnn on appl leal inn to Hiu Kelt •n. pedfmd Lodao. Dial MM. YtAltWOOn BOYCt •oflrliori tl 1 *l law •at nl land al "Mratlnl. rtr. laiM th.rr nedmomi upttalrt aedroom nnd .parlo... room. dawnMalr* Two balh. id linlrlt. an 1 .. %  %  % %  I %  r„r J-S7 Tie ab M %  it M %  || "lh Febeiiarr al I pm ** 0AI'Pl::.iT<>N A. SRA1.V. L\"31 1 b %  Colonial 1 :iew boas, fiGcrald TempliT. T1;y rxch„r .*ru on the ritlltlrTm tbwy will face when they fly to Malaya to-morMacClllivraj'a appointment wm well kept aecret. When he " ved from Jamaica ten day* M the Colo11l.1l 1 %  fjon Dai -. I % %  n 1 nine. s IU-W lob, f">r prwvioual] %  on in p-iiI leirnc-d pMl %  But reporla from SIIIK-M-'" liiKht sunijr-st Ull il'iiiiL' tO !-• I'.i-v. Thrllailt W.%prr*ai .<-rn-*poiident i*n the apo' r ,N. of nil j-hadc-. or opinion and arc a n 1 r y thjt he* haa been rttnpler'a iJcput The nnper f,n %  !#(Tfatl! MM %  • Malayan Bath and N-k th.it thev wantMultiral .rul oewtlnj: Carmen P.iadcw, but yeaterday Their HOD..: %  varied the Hce.;io ;i .nd order%  — -.1 Leocock U. pay 0 Ane of 20/<>r to undergo one month's ImprU• I>M %  %  rmlr Hnrjour. ,aio IKK II %  utr clr.r lh.il Ihm WM a "•: uln .moonl .,f llhlin iuln> "i % %  '-' '%  "^ D. O-LMTT • IJO !" I" OrUUa. %  • *" "•'•! 7 h~l brulm flag, aad abrwIarH Ml their sfclns. I la. wi7:s f cioina' • aHIPFlNG NOTICES %  J medical courao but was iniermpied and he went overaeaa with the 3th Field Ambulance in 1915. He became SUfl Sergeantwas ..warded the Military Medal, and lost his leg below the knee as J result of being wounded at PaM-hendaa-Iain 1917. 10 w.11 (roan bmur-arr*>. MIL BrfaV awaasrai carpa iMa vaa. %  S ahillai -nd hard Wrouflh Balls 'a*} .deal t M. Archel Dai) M n ..u a — a'.r.i rr.BRUAitr 4. its* •-i" roan 1 Bar Kara TI.4V* ae. :i I-. pr •a a-, pr v;vC i ia jai CANADA ilnrradiaa Baa* Damand s ,1.. I) Cable 71 S'l pr Cuer-nc, ..„.... a,.. B'TTHV La LM1. TBIOTOAII paCOBTA a Cj. L ui r.\ciqct DL cep' Canto aaal "'- rtkla "^Th. MTT. CATUaTBCTV U| %  ^**^*.- P "^^ -" OnrnlnKi. Aalttfi Nevbi and Bl fDna B t soiooNtnt owsiBot ABBOCIATION Conaignee Tela ...,..i: r-i-v UK *•" V..l.aaSU~a> __ 1 -GOVERNMENT NOTICE Nn vou SEICI "" £T.blo. M Ft !" .". IMi NOTICE Application-, are invited by the Wan r 1 post ft Temporary Civil Engineer Commission. J:>': A STtA' A STEAMXK hill NIW ORL.ANS TICr ._, „ nvaa Barbado. 14Hi FaPruar: ISM L^dowin rmiui". ***" 10th Mh ^ 1 l' IVbi GOVHXMVTi NOTICE The port is temporary and nun-pensionable, and carries a salary £M> of f 795 by A26 to EWO per annum. Point of entry into the rale will be determined by experience and qualification. Holder may be required to keep a motor vehicle for the performance of hi* duties in which case he will be eligible for a trnveUinn allowance in n or European, ricordance with the Commission's rates. I t-rnnio to get . I Hj hgMljBrf Appointment will IMon probation for one year at the end oi i x-Pale tine which period it may lie extended at the Commission's discretion, and men frm Applicants should be between 30 and 45 yearn of age, and must r iBnei w : hlve n d %  Wciory experience in Water Works Engineering, includ..,„. Jo! ing the construction of small dams and Intake works, tunnelling U> llrMMDJ l.iyiiit of large diameter steel and cast iron mains and reservor key Joba w*ien ho came to Mastruction Working knowledge of land surveying and goncr-.l M ,hMe P-,ing work, including quantity surveying and estimating also < Dolntments proved to be unsuccea-l wcl) a& ,|,„ 1 .B > i„r| rr „periene. Applications, accompanied by references from Arms or departments in which experience haNTI* A STEAMBB A STTAMXR A BTBAHKIt >lta M.ll'at January lit" Arrl* Betbae*. t'ebiuanr ""> ratrtuarv nnd Match :\y March awn April nd %  .,1111.1 IUUH LID NEW roar, AND OUU ^avica. CO.. IIO -CANADIAN 1.V1C rri.Ti— DA COSTA a .-III sail lu'h'vl nrt mnmh 5ACUFNAY TCBMINALS Svutvoll (ANAD1AN SERVICE From Si. John and lUlllax. N.S. I.V SI. .1 It IB notified #or generm 1 imation that the houthern main gate to the Public |i..lldi< :: > 1 will lie closed for repairs from \VEI)NESDAY. the 6th of Febni,rv. 1952, until further notice. All vehicular traffic mil arid leave the yard by DM noiihern gate during this period. 52,52—2n. NOTICE MtlH OF ST IAMIH PERSONAL ItManZan rfPILE REMEDY % TO-DiCTNrW S Fl \Sn : 5 • %  1. .'...v %  i 1 cn • j S QW ltt '| l iit MJ I %  BB1 iNCgV gtrn UT'iei 1 INM-,• |C bail. .. I lamr.l C -; %  %  1 i epe...-. i.„ HI %  .. Baaaton ial-a4 %  .nar. is r. < %  ..I Ad. 1 la* till fl-" . FAUSTINA UI'INTVM: .nee MC COTJ r il h'.ld in>il •i ( ya,U ipon.ili'e CIJnntNT N. IIARDINO. %  MeM 1net, T"d nndsc M Mlch..i I S3-In MAIL NOTICES VI %  1 fl 1. fla.Do.lnn 11 a* u.e B M k l-di Nrlmn will be clawed al the Qenera Prat Ofne* aa under:— Ipll al II noon. BetBatere-1 stall M 1 pm.. Ottllnaiv Hall al ISO 1 la* Hh Fcbmanr. IBM UNIDAB 1 u .-larf. M I O'*-i r 1. %  ". l.uall. %  >-, II IBTO III-) I %  Oalhrrma Bariaanl, 9*luai( Ii Marian, Franc.. Mnrfan I VJInnle Aeren.'.n it,, in j I. I '. .1 aiadvt C Hnuti %  %  I o\ -\ri ..n \^ : .am TBINIBAP A laana . Old. \ Ca.abon. J KUUt, M llrutitt, ll ll.i-nuHwl %  1 fl %  rn. II Wnmer. II 1 ..m at. KH ix s Frees IM % %  ^ „ N w ilMul t %  aaysnond I %  IB . %  I'.iiiral. E lens Hum%  ni.viiH %  -.. RIIWU OH 'I NDAT lar ar. tl I l %  %  rat ANtMM 1 1 Ulna, I'. ir Qerb.T. <;.->rge Hatawr. laBhJtH. Rt* ic FaiTr-ll. C. -pc" F'dr. Itmilr A. .1 iRIMBAD: %  \6. Ilnrrv RitcluJia OfsB gjfjMf'a* car.,... Iicrc is CUM) t hing vou wanl • a aWa^ea* Jan 14 Feh Rapa.lad AlH.al UaUa, I, 1> Fabruary AufnU: PLANTATIONS LIMITED — Phone 4703 WrW sFItVIl M "in Rl D rree Ian 1 'I' 1 "" J ms Atnlia 10 p odnea .wn.i. J 1 plait' la.'"it", parapretivee " %* prepare workuie; Braw ma* 1 I)..raid Oa.ie. Jnaeph Bl-ublc Ira JuBan K..iriperaad. C. ~ 1. I aavny Bam. 11 1 %  .%  1 %  os -.VIIRB4V nUNIBAD %  I I'. %  If not aaTeg hot aerkins I ^ Salvallnn. please write lor J, : run HOOK Which Wakes J COD'S WAY OF SALVATION In Touch With Barbados Coastal Station .1 tar thai seers ahead of ihe 1 Rotteidam. %  • 1 ., .,.. daj %  %  aaWh sum man %  %  • %  tjk. u pro. .. A' 1 %  %  u> your^*ES—Youi lavounle StliVICKNTaK II,.! 6i .asfw •iS B'ltE SI AIIOS 1 1 u conveni%  %  V Vi; of Cars, : Trucks .i\ lor j, 11 'it. ul..1 l PttOMIi>T> BfTtttBAFT II ml <0H am. "s SB&VMCE PHOM vm hahi qu.lme-. MiUirnd, 1 Gulls! %  ML Skni. 1 HOT WA1LR ON TAP for YOUR BATH Wiui one oC the lovrl wmie Por.1-l.nii (i. Oexera—You can have o, not b..th within I at llchtlna up Beanj priced and CHEAP to < wllh Nalural Caa A lew are i avallahlr al w.u OAS • RKS. BAV I— .1 >ar ihH •!" ahead of Ihc queue in tuanlra*ef On Hie open road, a car IBM lap* ^ rniks in f ct> and % ipfoft fc.iii.iI.M aVr* la OBaAft. TO horae roaer *\ 1 urns j. snuM.ili a silk StcerinR iiulepcivknt front wheel , ,„>trmHii the roughest roads. Imiha-leei al lu -... -i ... S| \ il 1 nt-proofing rcti k-i Mel l loii-inK'nn" rsidyandiha**is rtsrsUdH tOfUat, I 1 thai apt-cjK 10 car proud *> %  Mien will be f.HinJ 1 t us masterpiece Morris. MORRIS 5^ SEE l( AT FORT ROYAL GARAGE LTD. Pbonr 2385 Sole Di.tribulor. Phone 4504 HOtBKHT TIIO.U LIMITED ruurtAtlONa BIIIDINC. I.OWF.R BROAD SBBaS I,.— II... Slr. ,|,i,l lor: I,.,.,-( ,i. ..I Alrllnrs. II O.A.C. .nd B W 1 A ALCOA STEAMSHIP COMPANY I.I. 1.1 %  -' No 4466 llnvr y.ni Lrarnl lo Use Ihe GtE,L NET You tm MOW otUll \;v# I>IIH i:s o.v #" YOU WILL AT ONCE SAY "Tills IS TIM S.M.K FOB MK" S100.000.00 Merchandise offered at Rediculous Low Prices. %  I