Citation
The Barbados advocate

Material Information

Title:
The Barbados advocate
Uniform Title:
Barbados advocate (Bridgetown, Barbados : 1983)
Portion of title:
Sunday advocate
Place of Publication:
Bridgetown Barbados
Bridgetown, Barbados
Publisher:
Advocate Co.
Publication Date:
Frequency:
Daily
regular
Language:
English

Subjects

Subjects / Keywords:
Newspapers -- Bridgetown (Barbados) ( lcsh )
Genre:
newspaper ( sobekcm )
Spatial Coverage:
Barbados -- Bridgetown

Notes

Dates or Sequential Designation:
Apr. 22, 1983-
Numbering Peculiarities:
No issue published for May 3, 1983.
General Note:
On Sunday published as: Sunday advocate.
General Note:
Microfilm produced before 1988 may be substandard.
General Note:
Latest issue consulted: Feb. 28, 2005.

Record Information

Source Institution:
University of Florida
Holding Location:
University of Florida
Rights Management:
Copyright Advocate Co.. Permission granted to University of Florida to digitize and display this item for non-profit research and educational purposes. Any reuse of this item in excess of fair use or other copyright exemptions requires permission of the copyright holder.
Resource Identifier:
17931718 ( OCLC )
sn 88063345 ( LCCN )
Classification:
Newspaper ( lcc )

Related Items

Preceded by:
Advocate-news (Bridgetown, Barbados)

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I it





ESTABLISHED 1895





WEDNESDAY, 3.\NUARY





30, 1952





PRICE : FIVE CENTS



BUTLER TO SACK 10,000 CIVIL SERVANTS

Conservatives announce super-austerity programme

Imports Slashed:
Foodstuffs Cut

PATIENTS MUST PAY
FOR MEDICAL AID

By EDWARD JACKSON.

LONDON, Jan. 29.
‘THE CONSERVATIVE GOVERNMENT
announced a Super-austerity Programme on
Tuesday in a drastic bid to save Britain from bank
ruptcy and keep her in the front line of Western
defence.
~ ‘The Chancellor of the Exchequer, R. A. Butler,
rocked the reconvened House of Commons with the
announcement that he would fire 10,000 civil ser-
vants in the next six months, slash coal imports
from the United States, and reduce the nation’s
already meagre food supplies.

< He warned that the alternative to the sacrifices he out-
lined was “starvation and unemployment for this island, and

| Life In Cairo
_ Returns To

By PETER WEBB

BRITISH H.Q., Suez Canal
Zone, Jan. 29.
} Radio reports received from the

British Embassy in Cairo on
Tuesday said that the “general
tempo of life’’ was slowly return-
ing in riot-swept and the still-
smouldering Egyptian capital,

Reports said that the cars
overturned and burned out by
Saturday’s mobs were still strewn
in some of Cairo’s main _ thor-
oughfares, but many shops re-
opened and the City’s commercial
life started again.

The British Embassy was
reportediy “sealed off” by strong
military guards from the rest of
the city, and only cars with
special passes were being
allowed into the Embassy area
at night,

The Embassy added that at
night when the curfew was in
force, “the normal hum of traffic
subdued, and the city absolutely
quiet.”



|
}

Normal Tempo. Agreement With
Egypt Over Suez

By HAROL{) GUARD

Britain hoped to reach an Qgreement for the adequate de-

fence of the Suez Canal
“Egyptian aspirations”.

Eden told the House efCommons in a special statement
that Britain was still ready to enter negotiations for the re-
vision of the 1936 Anglo-Egyptian Treaty which Egypt had

unked.

e shid: “It is the aim of His
Majesty's Government to reach
agreement on arrangements for
the adequate defence of the Canal
Zone which would meet Egyptian
aspirations. We fully understand
that this is by no means exclu-
sively an Anglo-Egyptian interest.
but one in which we have an inter-
national responsibility.”

|
Foreign Secretary, Anthony Eden, said on Tuesday that |

disaster for other members of the Commonwealth.”

Health Services

Butler invaded the National
Health Service to announce a
charge of one shilling on every
prescription and of one pound
on most dental services.

He said, “Government mean
to carry out as quickly as we
can the defence programme
started by our predecessors.
We cannot do so without a
strong and healthy economy.”

In .a series of shocks for the
nation which has known nothing
but austerity since the outbreak
of World War II, Butler announc-
ed that a saving will be effected
in tobacco imports.

Coal imports from the U.S. will
be slashed to the tune of £2,500,-
000. Supplies of foodstuffs, in-
cluding hams, meats, canned fish,
fruit, vegetables and certain fresh
fruits, will be reduced. The week-
ly meat ration ig -
shilling two penee.

homes, that too- be cut

Reconstruction of blitzed cities | Government.



R. A. BUTLER.

limited by tightened credit re-
gulations, and imports of cloth-
ing, furniture, carpets, shoes,
and toys, will be slashed.

Butler said, “Jt is vital that the

one
t except for} country should understand the sort

of urgency which inspires the
I had not intended

will be delayed. Shops, offices, and|tO open the budget until late in
factories using steel will encount-|April, but I now will do so on
er restrictions. Total deliveries of |March 4th.”

Blame “machinery ‘end velucies | The Briush Commonwealth is |

civil use will be slashed £200,-
000,000 below the 1950 level.

The motor industry will be
asked to release only 60,000 cars
and 60,000 commercial vehicles
for the home market as com-
pared with 110,000 and 100,000
respectively last year. There
will be less cakes and candy in
the shops, due to the reduced
allocation of sugar, oils, and fats.

Direction Of Labour

To achieve this Defence Pro-
gramme and keep Britain’s ex-
port programme in high gear,
Butler took a step toward Govern-
ment direction of labour with the
announcement that employers
could only hire workers thfough
local Government Labour Ex-
changes.

Butler said that he would pre-
sent the budget for the critical
next fiscal year on March 4th, a
month ahead of schedule.

Ten thousands civil servants
will be fired in the next six
months, saving £ 12,000,000, and
Government's Information Ser-
vices will be slashed to a total
£110,000 at home and abroad.
In addition to motor cars, these

items will be limited to about two
thirds of last year’s supplies:
motorcyeles, bicycles, radios, tele-
vision sets, refrigerators, washing
machines, vacuum cleaners, metal
furniture and sports goods,

Instalment buying of motor
vehicles, bicycles, radio and
television sets, and electrical
appliances, will be restricted.
Other instalment buying will be



RIOTS

-

|

|



aiming at baloucing its books by
the end of thi’ year, as the first
step towards treeing the pound
now pegged to $2.80.

—U-P.



‘Moslents To Support
| Egyptiaa Premier

CAIRO, Jan. 29.

The leader of the Moslem
Brotherhood said that his group
expected to support the new Pre-
mier, Aly Maher Pasha, in a
united drive to restore order to
Egypt and oust Britain from the
Suez Canal Zone.

Maher was touring scarred
Cairo to see for himself the dam-
age done in Saturday’s riots, when
the Brotherhood’s Supreme
Guide, Hassan El Hobeiby, called
at the Premier’s residence this
morning.

Hobeiby said that the Brother-
hood was likely to support Maher
in view of the Premier’s declara-
tions that he intends to try to
achieve Egypt's national aspira-
tions. Maher obtained the support
of the majority of the Wafdist
Party and other groups last night

Cairo remained quiet with its
| nattalecete jammed with a seeth-
ing mass of cars and pedestrians
transacting business and seeing
jthe damage for themselves.

—U-P.



IN TEHERAN

Reports reaching British Head-
quarters here, said that the Cairo
riots had been “premeditated over

a long period,” and some of the ;
Britodg who lest. thelr lives had | sat eamer Wael stand on the 1936

been deliberately murdered. Treaty and reject any compromite
An Embassy report said that :
the Anglican Bishop of Cairo _
conducted a memorial service
yesterday for three Britons
killed in the riots.
—UP.

The 1936 Treaty

Eden made it clear,





| U.S. Not Mediating}
In UK—Egypt Issue} — ,

WASHINGTON, Jan. 29.

State Department spokesman,
Michael J. McDermott said on
Tuesday. that the United States

is not mediating or planning to
mediate in the Anglo-Egyptian
dispute “in any formal sense.”

He added that the good offices
of the U.S. were continually
available to both countries.

\ He said, “We are exercising
ouy good offices’ to the extent
that is possible at the present
time. But I emphasize that we
are not mediating in any sense
of that word, But we have been
exercising our good offices by
urging both sides to use modera-

~ ‘ spbcledasinisntenlenesis wr
ANTHONY = EDEN.

Tei until Egypt halts terrorism in

tion. 1Cairo and the Canal Zone.
McDermott said that the one Eden recounted for the House,

reason that he did not believe Britain’s four written and many

the U.S. would be a_ proper) verbal protests against attacks by
mediator in the dispute was that] Egyptian “auxiliary police’ on
it was a party to the proposals| British Tommies:in the Zone.
for the creation of the Middle East He said; “The late Egyptian
Command which the Egyptians,] Government paid no heed to these
had rejected. representations, It is, on the con-
Declaring, “we have not been|trary, only too clear that so. far
asked to mediate yet,” McDer-|from wishing to prevent armed
mott said, “I do not know whose| clashes with British forces, they
is the next move, but it is not] were actively concerned to pro-
ours.” —UP. voke them,

a. “This produced the critical situ-
ation at Ismailia, In view of the
military measures which had to
be taken there, to round up the

. + . terrorists, the British Commander

Resigns Service ‘had no alternative but to disarm

the auxiliary police. The latter

CHICAGO, Jan. 29. /|had explicit instructions from the

The Treasury Agent, who played| then Egyptian Government _to re-

the leading part in sending “Scar-|sist, and consequently, General

face” Al Capone and some of his|Erskine had no option but to use
associates to jail on Tuesday an-| force.”

Top Treasury Agent



nounced his resignation, Eden was cheered when he
He is A. P. Madden, Chief oftadded, “In this and indeed
the Intelligence Unit of the,throughout, he had full authority

and support from His Majesty’s
Government,”

Eden listed casualties as four
Britons killed, and 13 wounded,
with unconfirmed figures of 42

Bureau of Internal Revenue here

He said that for reasons of
own health and that of his wife
he was submitting his resignation.







General Eisenhower's Chief of
Staff General Alfred Gruenther
warned that Allied forces in
Europe would be at a “disadvan-
tage” in the event of a showdown
with Russia in 1952.
| In a radio interview with

Madden refused to give his - ¢ : i in round-the-clock conferences, to keep order in the country
exact age, saying he is shows Tha, however yg: our Down-town Cairo was jammed
60.” cas abili ‘i -| vith thousands of pedestrians

-ldiminish the ability and_ deter-| ‘

Madden was the spark-piug of or ; ; ajesty’s Govern- | Tl i , today, as curious Egyptians—many
‘the long investigation which sent aco great Age rights un- | U.N. ro SEEK RED thrown out of work because of
gang leader Capone to a federal) aa, the Treaty of 1936, until such } 4 closed business houses paraded
penitentiary in the early 1030°s|4:., as a new agreement to re- r W . T through the area of destruction
for federal income tax violations, | Ue. ‘the ‘Treaty "ean be reached]| \ IE SON ALLIED left after Saturday’s costly riot
after state courts, had preven|! . _vUP. | s : Premier Aly Maher Pasha

owerless to penalize him, ~w’ toured the city to inspect the
vi Ms —U.P. BLUEPRIN I damage. Meanwhile, the British
a Ambassador, Sir Ralph Steven-
° t
By ARNOLD DIBBLE or asked for an appointmen
»? $e Allies At A vith the Premier. It will be hb
“ } MUNSAN, Jan. 29 first meeting with Maher since
Di d ta e | United Natiows Staff Officer new Government took office
1sa van £ are to take the pulse Wednesday, Ha n El Hodeiby, Supreme
‘ of Communist views on the Allied) Guide of the Extremist Moslem
| PARIS, Jan, 29. blueprint for safeguarding the) Brotherhood, called at ‘Maher

United Nations correspondents
Gruenther repoited the progress of
12 European members of NATO in
building their forces had been
greater than expected during the
last year.

He said: “I would say at this
time the forces under SHAPE-— if
there were a determined attack
made—would be at a disadvantage.
Although the progress which had
been made is very marked it has

| not reached the stage where it can
guarantee against an act of aggres-
sion”’.—U P.



however, |





LONDON, Jan. 29

Zone which still would meet



| U.S. Bomber
Explodes

| RUSSIA WARNS
During Flight

MID-EAST





























TOKYO, Jan. 29 ,

A United States Airforce 1 29 . S LONDON, Jan, 29
ht Russia warned the Middle East
bomber exploded in fligh O-lorn States Tuesday that Allied
night only seconds after at least eee AY s ¢

f ywer pr sals for e
ll_of the 13 crewmen bailed out ourpower proposals for a Middle



Eastern Command violate p
The burning plane then crashed) United Nations hhiteae uaee
anto the industrial area on th€/them into Western plans for wat
outskirts of Tokyo. The Airforce|»nd would force them to break
Said that all the crewmen were/ off trade with the Easter bloc.

believed to have parachuted to

and Yokosham near a_ primary
school. They were unable to de-
termine immediately if the plane
had struck any buildings or if
any persons on the
been killed or injured
| ott 2 ft

Czech Minister On
Treason Charge

VIENNA, Jan, 29
Rudolf Margolius acting chief
the Czechoslovakia ‘oreign
Trade Ministry has been arrested
ind charged with treason informed
ouree aid Tuesday

ground had

|

| J’CA’S 1ST CEMENT
| FACTORY OPENED

KINGSTON, J’ca. Jan. 28. |“brains” of
Jamaica’s first cement factory|senior deputy, and in charge du-
was opened to-day by the Gov-lring the absence of Minister
ernor, It will start with a 100,000 |Antonin Gregor. Gregor has been
tons yearly output which willjin Moscow for special reasons
fully statisfy the local demand,j}conducting negotiations with the

leaving about 25,000 tons export.|Soviet Government,

—OP.

Police Kill Curfew

Violators In Cairo

CATRO, Jan, 29.
Egyptian officials announced on Tuesday that three
curfew violators had been killed and six injured by the
Police in Cairo on Tuesday night, while Security Chiefs met

Margolius regarded as the

the ministry was









Korean armistice. Meanwhile} home while the Premier was
United Nations negotiators in the; making his tour, but left word
adjoining truce tent throw the/that the powerful organisation
responsibility for breaking’ the| probably would back the new
deadlocked prisoner exchange) Government as long as it worked
talks squarely in the Communists|to oust Britain from the Suez
| lap. ' Canal

Maher already has won _ the

United Nations and Communist

upport of the

“working level officers’ worked wrordict Party whose Governmen

through the fourth page of the) pe replaced

paragraph by paragraph survey |

of the 17-page draft Monday | New Cabinet Ministers

“ ee Pee vil | The new Premier is planning
nesday Sta ate Wi!) | secording to reliable sources, to

face possible disagreement on the; ,»ame four new Cabinet Mini

actual machinery for prevention | ;,, including at least one

of an arms build-up after the) waorq

| truce. The tough Interior Minister

Murtadal

Maraghi



|

Bey was }

amed Censor General by the
Premier in a military order aimed
renting further outbreaks |

| Possible stumbling blocks fac-
| ing staff officers include = an
agreement on points to be inspec-



S.S. ARGENTINA

U.K. Hopes For |

Rea aeon ce 2 nae
- ae
Us eas
ee La
Ye

woeecene



THE 8.8. ARGENTINA will drop anchor in Carlisle Bay at 7
“Argentina” is on a 44 days’ Carnival Cruise to Rio.

Nationalistic



ee we “SS

An outburst of Communist activity coincided with the arrival in Teheran of Mr. Averell Harriman and
culminated in riots and shooting which were quelled with tanks and tear gas.

Many people, including 20 police, were injured and unconfirmed reports say that 12 demonstrators
were killed, as the mob of 10,000 fought with sticks, stones and revolvers.
(Communist) Party “Partisans of Peace” demonstrating against Mr.
plood-sucking imperialists” and the Angio-Iranian Oil Company, ciashed with their bitter enemies, |
the National Front who were running a demonstration on much the same lines. —Express,






ted behind the Communist lines J ey pee aoe
The Allied blueprint suggests one t he A iglo-Egyptian crisis A
ee oe ; Avail Most of Cairo’ business life
or two places in Red territory, Sceed cd normal ister ‘today,
f RI ive vk are located in the ; "* - _ c 7?
ee B.O.A.C, Al INER } eS vara. ote ie ple ste though the bank ; Opt ned only |
‘ CRASH LANDS | field country Chinese nay om poker ae — at
oppose neutral inspection team ee. og ee se
pit TOKYO, Jan. 29. | $0 close to the Manchurian ness houses are jobless as al
' A British Overseas Airways! porder result of damage done to do ge
| Corporation airliner crash-landed| f din a
at Haneda Airport at approxim- On Tuesda oweve Chinese ( nd
| ately 9.00 p.m, last night. No; hinted for the 4
| casualties were reported. Early| plan to wash t . :
Riots broke out when Tudeh | reports said that the ‘plane ran| Korean truce tO
Harriman “Anglo-American | off the runway during its land-* leave North , k in
jing the rth Kor l !
—U.P.



- ee tls

eameen in eee el
i) ogee

4.m. today for a six-hour stay here. The



-———_—_

Leg. Co. Propose Select
Committee On Emigration

SUBJECT to agreement by the House of Assembly
with the proposal by the Legislative Council in their Mes-
sage of 17th July, 1951 a Joint Select Committee of both
Houses of the Legislature is to be set up “to examine thie



question of over-population in Barbados and to make
recommendations for dea with this problem.”
fhe Council yesterday passed
e in Address, notice of which was
1 ,
safety, but only 11 of the men; The warning to the Middle Kast Commun ist |given earlier during the day by
ee or reported per-|came in similar bur unidentical c |Hon. F. C, Hutson, to this effect.
sondlly to the plane’s base at|notes handed to representatives of D | Che Address reads as follows —
3 p! ‘ 2 os
Yokyta, west of Tokyo the United States, Britain, France, @ et amape ( he Legislative Council have
The bomber’s pilot said that}Turkey yesterday in Moscow in he honour to refer to their Mes~
he had checked on the plane’s|reply to their December eighteen BIGHTP ARMY H.Q |sage dated the 17th of July, 1951,
inter-communication system tojnote KOREA, Jan. 29 | regarding the nomination of
learn sere anyone was trap- whe eebaat ka’ Wis the ‘Oita Allied jet pilots said they dam- | members from the Honourable
ped in the pline before he bailed] _ stae : ote note to the nited|sged the first M.LG. 15 in four | House of Assembly to serve with
~~ a ee Sin oe : < Te ee ee days Tuesday after a brief high meres, ae the aoe
f spokesman Saic a 1e | Pe c ied B easter a titude clash between 22 Sabre |the Legislative ‘ouncil on a Jo!
pour eeceeed bomber apparently | Pact to “aggressive” Atlantic pact, jets and fifty Communist jets, (Select Committee “to aes
had caught fire and the pilot wa . . Le® Friday Allied jets claimed |duestion of over-popu ation
abi anal ; ans .| It said at the time while Mid- |)“ oat ‘. | Be ' ie
mace ete teas oar easterners are trying to oust Brit- ae el ee er as aden ook decling with thie
ch : fan pere-)ain that the four powers hoped to {Probably — the. destraction of) sn roul . eful
ychutting, but only a few seconds|), ing in the troops of other West- {another and damaging of. thre¢, |, Problem, and would be grat
elapsed befere the plane ex-|er states os a Then for two days no contact was |' learn at an early date whether
sladed» The bomber plunged to —U.P. |reported: Yesterday jets from|‘he Honoufwble House is in
the ground: in flames. | lnealighahe both sides clashed’ briefly with | #teement with this proposal and,
oe — said ea beni Allied pilots making no claims if so, to receive the nomination
plane crashec setween ‘okyo

of members to serve on the pro-

On the ground a fifteen minute
Joint

fight northeast of Chorwon on the
western front and a five minute
clash south of Kosong on the
eastern front were reported

posed Committee."
Asking the Council to approve
the passing of the AdCress, Hon.
vp |i. C. Hutson recalled that some
seosehep ae) me | ‘ime about the middle of last year
j‘he question was raised and @
. “ WW oR > Viessage was sent to the Other
SMOULDERING FIRP Place on the subject asking them

VANCOUVER, Br, Columbia |if they would agree to the setting
Ke Sais ; a7 = p of a Joint Committee to inves-
rire smouldering for more that litigate the sti rer- =

so heute ah Eibkdiar ta the bold € 1e question of over-popu

lation of the island,
For one reason or another,
nothing had been done about it,

of the Danish freighter Seroabor:
unloading a cargo of cotton and



copra, Seven pieces of fire figh nd he therefore begged to move
ing equipment and «a harbour|ihat the Message be sent to the
fire-boat were called into action.) Other Place.

The damage was not deter- The Hon. Dr, C, H. St. John
mined, but firemen said that 1t)seconded the motion for the pass-
would not be extensive ing of the Address which was

—U.P. igreed to nem con,

————————————————————_——



to the Passengers, Captain and Crew of
8.8. ARGENTINA

While in Barbados we invite you to visit our store.
and Company (Lon-

We are agents for Liberty
don) Limited.
We are Stockists of :

Fine quality English China including Wedgewood
Cashmere Sweaters and Coats,

Doeskin Gloves

Argyle Socks

LOCALLY

MADE SOUVENIRS A SPECIALTY.

CAVE SHEPHERD & Co, Ltd.

, 11, 12 & 13 Broad Street.





ey

cee





SiGe:
od







PAGE TWO

BARBADOS ADVOCATE WEDNESDAY, JANUARY 30, 1952


































































] ' ae
OR NI ADY OLIVER * OnnOW
ESE = wh "ae eee th ° gs | He tells women how drab they are—and makes TODAY : Oo ee
i who < tou y € e . . COLUM eee rr
Caribbean were intransit passeng- Give Your i a fortune doing it | Rita Orson ! WEISSMULLER P
€rs through Barbados on Monday " | HAYWORTH-—WELLS
from Antigua on their way io Child A The Dari Of M Willi LADY FROM SHANGHAI & LOST TRIBE|) 9
Grenada to continue their W.I. ' e aril Tr» l 1s ncin. Suite: @aeen e. Friday 230-448 & 8.30 p.t
holiday ss | j a — aan i continuing daily z
Dinner Party Chance Mee 1's
+ a ~~~ Aly K KET
PD®. AND Mrs. K. M. B. Simon By FREDERICK COOK “ROLLIN’ WESTWARD pebee 5 Robert Z
gave a dinner party at thei: ie a * at ant Auer a " MITCHUM RYAD
residence, St, Leonard’s House, St First Locally NEAT—but : oe aoe er Sat. Special 9.30 am. & 1.29 pi age ry A
eonard’s Avenue, in honour of ie i —but not glamorous. Goo igures—bdu ey PICTURES APTAUN HORATIO Dial
onl Neck Fear li acuet Produced Film hide them. Very a ive—but apparently quite un- To be announced HORNBLOWER (Colon) 2310
mir Nechoumoft. . aware i y in the opinion of a a:
Renee Mem mnente ; ee By PAUL FOSTER aware of it. Those are English women in t p
— . oe Page tepited wave An educational film photo-) daring 43-year-old New Yorker, who thinks he knows all|f PQ AZA oo GAIETY > _—
A. S. Cato, M.L.C., Mt, J. Brome graphed in Barbados — acted,| there is to know about women. . :
Mr. and. Mrs. C. C. Clarke Mrs. produced and directed by Bar- Lawt 2 Shows To-day 4.49 & 8.90 pm Last Show Tonite 8 30°
Av. - ana I Ss. = S " Be 2 ~ 7 . ”
R. M. Chatt Maj. and Mrs badians is to be released at the| In the Bs few years he has Republic's Whole Serial a Tun goppey Roig «| PT
Goldsmith. Mi uk tins beginning of next mofth at the/told 3504 women what is P. 7 re For FEDERAL AGENT vs. . ah ae ateeees
Ince and Miss E.Goldson Plaza Theatre, Bridgetown, In}wrong with them, their general. repa. UNDERWORLD, INC. 9 ae
Lod S “ core fact, the only non-Barbadian|*hapes and their clothes. Not Kirk ALYN=VJames DALE
oage hool Magazine part of the entire production is|Omly as he survived, but he has ii oy fadiete ade Thurs: ony Friday & Sat.
A LL Old Ledge Boys are re- “The Voice” that gives the yom»|™4ade for himself some £44,000 British Fair ae esp pase "et oar pn a
niet are mo morn “7 mentary throughout the film,|* Year in doing it. rAWITY HONEY nidwosh Vattes Glass Menagerie eye
of the Department of Medica r- Nevertheless it is a West Indian : . ; chien Riese Simone Simon i i Jane Wyman & , ais
Vices has odie eh alaietiainn : A Ss : Richard Willis, cleanshaven, * Keefe Bill Elliott & John Carroll &
- ae ar ee thy oo ee voice, an essential factor for a|lsleek, with blue pin-stripe suits akilieradiias! te ee eS es 1 (pals, ieee cliintala tabale bis nat Malas
, ; i Sorincgttan apsete West Indian production, and|(and ‘happily , married even ; Teceia’ Wet. ae Ne ee ; j Gare Cooper Roy Rogers
Record and will distribute it among S asthe di eas ; “fete ih Industries Fair—the 31st—are Rey Rogers | Gene: Autry : eee
; one that most Barbadians}though he chooses all his wife’s * j :
past pupils of the school. In order $ : . already well in hand. The Board
Ses sesh teiccenece at know quite well. The com-/hats and clothes) runs a_ five- of Trade hopes that despite the
tncneet increased cost of printing, mentary is given by Jama-|days-aweek — television _pro- cfroct on British Industry of re- ,
he agazine Committee has ican-horn Erfiest Eytle—at pres-|gramme in New York called - 2 mtr id s wu
ordered many more copies of the ” . 3 PB Z armament and raw material short
Record than usial in the ho; that af ent in Australia with the West|Looking At You, ages, last year’s record figure of .
Old Boys will show their cident Indies team and whose voice has A stream of women trot duti- "¢atly 20,000 foreign visitors will TO-DAY & TO“MORROW, 445, 8.30
in their old sehool by buying a, an ee ee pe we fully before his camera each day be surpassed. COLUMBIA PICTURES PRESENTS —
copy. MR. & MRS. COLIN Ss. Cox half domite tariés of tH sts. fo invite —~ and get — a fran The Fair, always a vatuable y os
' In ad@ition to Mr. Bowen, the’ —-married recent! nan eee aa - ue nae appraisal of their appearance by “shop window” for British goods, ee i y cR g LIE
Lodge Schoo! Magazine Committee} : U. oe ae Pg <= for 20| Mr. Willis. Lots of them have has even greater significance this HER Ww ONDE FU rr
has secured the services, as sub- First Visit aa Re Se visiting Britons. This is

agents of such Old Boys as Arthur!

Streetly in Trinidad Judgie Good- R
7 } »M"

ing at the University of Cambridge
and Bert Reete at the Universit;
College of the West Indies in’
Jamaica,

Staying With Sister

A= two months’ holiday in
4 Barbados, Mrs. E. Patrick is
due to return to New York City
tomorrow via Puerto Rico by
B.W.LA. Mrs. Patrick who is Bar-
bados born is a U.S. citizen having
lived in the U.S, for 32 years

During her stay here she has
been the guest of Mr. and Mrs.
Francis Moore of Bank Hall, St

Michael. Mrs. Patrick and Mrs.
Moore are sisters.

On Honeymicon
A

RRIVING the colony
are



in
recently from British Guiana
Mr. and Mrs. Victor Spencer
who are on their honeymoon. Mr.
Spéncer who attached to the
Civil Service Department in Brit-

h Guian on six months’ vaca-
tion and hopes to stay here for
some time prior to going to St.
Vincent. They are the guests of

Mrs. Angela Bart of “Anneville”,
River Road,

Back To Trinidad
APT. and Mrs. John Halifax
and their daughter Susan
who have been spending a short
holiday here expect to return to
Trinidad today where Capt. Hali-
fax is a B.W.1LA., pilot.



| BY THE WAY eeeee By Beachcomber

EEING a picture of two wef

men, very neatly dressed, and

each in a neat little hat, I coul

not but recall the song which says:" it

Two little men, two little
What wild economy! ren
One hat apiece—oh, what a waste!
Each little wearer stands dis-
graced,
If I could only see
Two little heads in one large hat,
How happy I could be, my love,
How happy I could be.
Refrain:—
Poems are
that,
But only hatters make a hat,
A Challenge
DEFY the aldermen and coun-
cillors of Arundel to appear
naked at the next quarterly meet-
ing. They have decided not to
wear their civic robes, because
“Robes bring no additional wisdom
or inspiration.” Nor do lounge
suits. Nor do clothes of any sort.
The Gamma-bomd
R. KARPAM KOOLRUK was
one of the most trusted foreign
scientists at Bumpton, and possibly
the only man who fully under-
stood what the devil was going on
there. He alone knew the inner
secrets of the Gamma-bomb, and
had succeeded in harnessing elec-
tromagnetic radiations of high
frequency to the powerful exhala-
tions of thin strips of molybdenum

made by fools, like

steeped in sodium chloride. On a
certain Tuesday Dr. Koolruk sat
at his desk with a sheet of paper
before him. He had just decipher-
@d a message traced by a fine



needle dipped in hot lemon-juice.

The application of oxytalie acid
rendered the inyisible writing
visible, The message, smuggled to

him in a tin of Indonesian hash,
informed him that G.241 would
eontact him in a day or two. Hum-
ming contentedly, he returned to
his laboratory, where white-coated





WALTER CARTER, C.B.E,,

and Mrs, Carter who arrived
here recently by the Gelfito expect
to be in Barbados until about mid-
March. Mr. Carter now retired
used to be Manager of the London
head office of Royal Insurance. Mr.
Carter has travelled extensively
and among the countries he has
visited are the U.S., Canada, Aus-
tralia, New Zealand and Japan.
This is however. his first visit to
3arbados.

Mr. Carter was awarded his
C.B.E., in 1943 in recognition for
his work with the Board of Trade
dealing with war damage claims in
London. :

Mr. and Mrs. Carter are guests
at Cacrabank.

Leaving To-day

UE to leave this morning for

Puerto Rico by B.W.1.A. on

his way to the U.S, is Mr. George

Barnes, eldest son of Capt: and

Mrs. Robert C. Barnes of 6th
Avenue Belleville.

George who recently became en-
gaged to Miss Heather Rosemary
Ramsay, daughter of Mr. Hugh O.
Ramsay of Carlisle View, Bay
Street and the iate Mrs. Ramsay is
returning to the U.S. where he is
a Graduate Fellow of Emory Uni-
versity.

concoctions in glass retorts, Pro-
fessor Puppie looked in, “How’s
going, Koolruk?” he asked
cheerfully. “Everything is splen-
did,” replied Koolruk, turning
aside to hide a smile of triumph,
Getting on with it
Y lowering the school entry
age to two, more mothers
could be “released” for factory

JACK TURBOT IS COMING
work, and thus—
Prodnose; Pray,
Jack Turbot coming?
for?
Myself;
business,
—thus education would be con-
tributing to industrial expansion,
and the industrial expansion to
education, Or not,
The Gamma-bomb (IV)
M I. ZERO were convinced
that the Belle of Dung was
after the secret of the deadly
Gamma-bomb, Orders were
therefore sent to Bumpton to
double and triple the secufity
measures, Dr, Koolruk was warned
to be on his guard. The place
became like a besieged fortress.
But Muffet had a master-plan.
“You,” he said to Egham, “must
find this lady, and convince her
that you are the person who
knows most about the bomb. You,
as she knows are not a sqdientist,
but from this moment you are in
charge of Bumpton, Koolruk
will be told thpt we are sending

when is this
And what

Pray, mind your own

you, and why we are sending
you. He will be able to give you
some sort of information that
will sound plausible to Dingi-
Poos. Pass it on to her, and let
her get out of the country with
it. In facet, go to the air-port
with her. We'll see that she

.ssistant’s were peering through meets no difficulty there.” “It’s



bod

is pondering over

heard. ‘If all the
ppéearing it mast be
work,”’ he muses,

s though
wood more
Then a bright







idea strikes him. ‘* Why, of course,
| know who may have taken them,"
he chuckles. Choosing a tree that
is easy to climb he soon discovers
a squirrel, ‘* Hi, have you and your
pals been taking away all
scorns?" he calls. Tle

JUST RECEIVED

SILVER SWALLOW ENAMEL-WARE

PUDDING BASINS—70c. 85c. 91c.
T4c.
$1.22, $1.31, $1.61
60c.
80c, Ile. 99e, $2.32

BOWLS—42c.
JUGS—%6ce.
PIE DISHES—39c.
BASINS—70c.
PAILS with Covers—$2.60

54dc. 56,

48.

T. RB. EVANS & WHIT FIELDS

Dial 4220

PAILS

B0e.

wo

YOUR SHOE STORES



nicroseopes and boiling strange fool-proof!"”



CHAMBERS—8iec. $1.20
ENAMEL PLATES—29¢. 3ic. 40c.
KETTLES—2 pts—$1.32

Since 1917
cer. ROY BROWN, Vice

President and Operations
Vianager of Central Northern Air-
ways Ltd., of Canada is enjoying
his four weeks’ holiday in Barba-
dos. He arrived from Canada last
week by T.C.A, and is a guest at
Cacrabank, He has already made a
motor tour around the island and
thinks it’s a grand spot.

Capt. Brown has been flying
since 1917 when he flew with the
Royal Flying Corps during the
First World Wir.

He was born in Winnipeg and
has his home and headquarters
there. Most of the ’planes his com-
pany operates use pontoons and
vkiis instead of wheels, due to cold
conditions throughout the territory
over which they fly. Capt. Brown
himself is quite accustomed to cold
weather. Shortly before he came
down here he experienced temper-
atures of 52 below.

Talking Point

Thought depends absolutely on
the stomach.

—Voltaire.

Incidental Intelligence
HEN I was young I resolved
not to marry until I found
the ideal woman. Some years later
i met her. But she was looking for
the ideal man,
—French film star Michet Simon.
—-L.E.S.

cried Egham. “It
has to be, with you at work,” said
Muffet bluntly, Two days later
Egham arrived at Bumpton, But

Dingi-Poos was already one more
ahead,

Remember your manners
I LIKE the suggestion that
enough,

kindness to animals is not

and that courtesy is

needed. as well, Anybody can fling
a bit of fish to a cat. Nature’s gen-
Uleman will pass it to the eat on
a plete, Similarly, many a dog's
feelings are hurt (and an inferi-
ority complex set up) when you
forget. to remove your glove be-
fore shaking hands with it. Again,
if you are introduced to an
animal yho is a stranger to you,
it is kind to say, “I think we met
at Mrs. Detmold’s. How’s your
father?” It is little things like this
that oil the wheels of social life,
By the way, if you are sitting next

to a dog at dinner, don’t talk
across it.





CROSSWORD



Across

1. Pear af mistake in the nisi
Tworthirds of the sledge

Ghastly and sensational

» What a beast! (4)

In @ steamer moves 4) 13: On the way out. (3)
ther nests hold tt. (4)

| Deadly pestiience, (6)

Sort of tear. (3)

. A forerunner, (6)

Implement of progress (8)

23. Rely on # letter from the dees

& . (6) 26. Retainers. (7)
wollen. (8)

Dewo

Brings the peo to heel. (y)
It cap be consumed (6)
Gear Edenh made for
deserter, (8)
- A ripe age, (8) d
» A good one is obeyed. (5)
. Phat additiona, seat, (7)
. Bard's idea of a deer} (3)
Part of it is blige (6)
Our King does by love
Roomy with 100
notes, (3)
+ After needy this in ruture es)
She may be a huider, (4)
. This makes the ies heavy

Solution of reste
1 Reindeer, 4

(4
on)

the

oO. Rasea. (ti)

(a)
Drom tseer

Sep Seseanse Shr

‘

eal

Arron,
Ke '

days
Endure
1A Mol

Avenue: 12 Dean 5 Y

16. Roar 1

Heart: 21 Pee 2

24. Tree Down:

loved: 5. {dea 4 '

6 Raves. Ape i n j
14. Settle: 15

20. Rus



WITHOUT COVERS—$2.11

4 pts—$1.80

Dial 4606











featurette before the main pi¢-
ture at the Plaza. It is em
titled “Give Your Child a Chance”
and deals with the subject @
pre-natal care of mothers duri
pregnancy. Under the direction
of Mr. Isaac Carmichael, Acting
Supervisor of Visual Education, it
is a production of the Barbados
Film Unit.

The Film Unit is attached to
the Department of Education and
the scheme hag been made possi*
ble through a West Indian Film

Training project, sponsored by
Colonial Development and Wel-
fare.

If “Give Your Child a Chance”
is just a beginning of what this
department can do then the Film
Unit has already proved its use-
fulness to the commuriity and
will become a permanent part of
our education set-up.

After its run at the Plaza, this
film will be shown by the
Mobile Cinema in the various}
parishes,

16 mm. film is used in its pro-
duction while standard theatre
projectors are 35 mm. The
Plaza are therefore arranging to
temporarily install a 16 mm.
projector in their operating room
and attach their sound equip-
ment to the sound track so as to
enable the film to be showm at
that theatre. In this way it will
be seen by many who would not
see it had it been issueq direct
to the Mobile Cinema.

“Give Your Child a Chance is a
story of an expectant mother
who is uneasy about the future
of her unborn babe due to pre-
vious experience with her first
child who has been sickly from
the time of his birth—all due to
her negligence during pregnan-
ey. Through the advice of a
friend she visits the Maternity
Hospital and benefits by fre-
quent medical attention. As a
result she produces a_ ve
healthy baby and sets the stage
for its usefulness in life. The
story is simply told cleverly
interwoven into the educational
side of the film and the people
in the cast all help to make the
production very convincing.

The film for this first film
was supplied by the Colonial
Film Unit who also conducted

the Training Course in the West
Indies (in Jamaica) for the
British Colonies, and which Mr,
Carmichael attended.

AW investigation, treatment
scripting, commentaries as well
as actual “shooting” are done

locally under the technical guid-
ance of the Colonial Film Unit.
The exposed film is then sent to
England to be processed and
edited. The rough edition is sent
back to Barbados for comments
before finalisation.

The Colonial Film Unit eventu-
filly acts as a clearing house for
the distribution of local material
to other West Indian islands and
vice-versa, This is necessary to
prevent overlapping of subjects.

It is understood that the Bar-
badog Film Unit is now working
on a production for the Social
Welfare Department. Quite a
wealth of subjects yét remain to
be tackled among which are prob-
lems of Road Safety, agriculture,
housing sanitation, development
of the fishing industry, etc., etc.,
—in fact there is no shortage of
material.



CLUB
MORGAN

opens at 3 p.m.

for
Dinner
and
Dancing
Every Night

(Except Sunday)















































how My. Willis comes to be an
authority on British womanhood.

“Too Severe’

“To start with,” he said today,
“their clothes are far too severe,
Who can see a pretty figure in a
suit or coat cut straight up-and-

down? Admittedly they look
neat. And penhaps tidier than
our American women. But how
about a bit more glamour? A
dress that clings, perhaps. A
prettier colour in materials
A touch more make-up, maybe.

Softer hair-styles.” fe

Mr. Willis pulis no punches in
telling his television victims
where they go wrong. If a figure

is in need of minor repairs, or
even a complete overhaul, he is
not backward in saying so.

Excess poundage, he begins to
hink, is the major cause of tihe
lispiritedness he encounters in

|so many women.

At times Mr. Willis introduces
a -touch of psyechdlogy in his
attempt to restore his “patients’ ”
confidence in themselves.



*“T am not,” he told a_ plain,
mousy little woman “trying to
make you look like Hedy
Lamarr. I’m just trying to
improve on what you've got.”
And with a dexterous hand he
restyled her hair, dabbed on some
makesup (he was a Hollywood
make-up man for years) and

rearranged the hang of her suit.

What, apart from some blunt
ddvice, do the women get out of
it?

They get a new £35 suit and
£10 hat, each guaranteed by the
expert Mr. Willis to do all the
things for them that they had
not known enough to do for-
themselves,

Apart from an income that
puts him in the top Broadway
bracket, Mr, Willis collects from
his chosen task a certain sar-
donie satisfaction which cannot
be expressed in dollars and cents.
Me feels that he has made a
career of doing what thousands
of other men have longed to do
and have not dared.

And there is some evidence
among his tremendous fan mail
that he may be right. He shows
with pride for instance, a letter
from a husband in a distant city.

“Please, Mr. Willis,” wrote the
husband, “accept my grateful
thanks for telling my wife in five
minutes what I have been want-
ing to tell her for the last
25 years.”

. WORLD COPYRIGHT RESERVED
—L.E.S.



IRISH LIN

Embroidered Souveni

JANETTA DRESS SHOP

Lower Broad Street

DRESSES—for every occasion
BATHING SUITSin many styles and colours
PURE WOOL TWINSETS—from Scotland

N—Luncheon and Tea Sets

LOCAL HANDCRAFTS—Baskets,

year, The new balance of pay-
ments’ crisis makes it absolutely
Vital to expand British exports,
and the B.I.F. is considered one of
the chief means by which this ex-
pansion can be achieved.

Mr. Peter Thorneycroft, Presi-
dent of the Board of Trade, has
called the Fair ‘“‘a focal point of
our export trade’, Writing in the
Board of Trade Journal he points
out that it not only enables for-
eign buyers to compare British
prices and styles with those of
other countries, but also provides
a meeting place where lasting
business friendships can be
formed.

“It is true, of course,” he g@es
on, “that we have andertdken a
heavy programme of defence pro-
duction and we are determined to
play a full part with our Allies
in the defence of the free world
Inevitably the claims of defence
on our engineering capacity will
not allow us to do all we should
like to promote our export trade
at the present time. There are
also raw material problems to be
overcome as a result of world
shortages.”

“But there are special reasons
why we in Britain should main-
tain our exports while carrying
out our defence programme.
British Isles lack almost all the
raw materials essential to an in-
dustrial country and at the utmost
can provide only a.pare half of the
food needed to keep the popula-
tion fit, So our economy depends
on our being able to pay for vast
essential food and raw material
imports, ,

The 1952 B.1.F. opens simultane-
ously in eee and Birmingham

5th.
on May wiltatua

B.B.C. Radio

Programme

WEDNESDAY, JANUARY 30, 1952
11.15 a.m, Cockney Cabaret, 11.30 a.m.
Listeners’ Choice, 12 — The News,
12.10 p.m. News Analysis
4.07.15 p.m. 25.38M 31.32M





4 p.m. The News, 4.10.p.m. The Daily
Sanviem, 4.15 pm. BBC Midland Light
Orchestra, 5 p.m. Composer of the Week,
5.15 p.m. Sandy MacPherson, 5,30 p.m.
Books to Read, 545 p.m. The Arts,
6 p.m. Elton Hayes, 6.15 p.m. Ulster
Magazine, 6.45 p.m. Sports Roundup and
Programme Parade, 7 p.m The News,
7.10 p.m. News Analysis, 7.15 p.m.
Cricket Report on Final Day’s Play in
Fifth Test and Review of W.1I. tour of
Australia 7.45 p.m, Over to You, 8.15
p.m, Radio Newsreel, 8.30 p.m. European
or Atlantic Union, 8.45 p.m. Composer of
the Week. 9 p.m. Now it can be Told,
1 p.m. The News, 10.10 p.m. From the
Editorials, 10.15 p.m. Mid-week Talk,
10.30 p.m. Marching and Waltzing













Handbags; Hand

rs



_ es

GLOBE

TO-DAY and TO-MORROW 5 & 8.30

Inside §$

traight ”

ARLENE DAHL — BARRY SULLIVAN

OPENING

/, te
0 eg4
(or Ml eles"
Alene



RO bars

Dheeret by siewann 5,



FRIDAY

x





5 & 8.30 P.M.







a yon q
CORERT WAGNER: MARIA ro
neRT ey & UGH ens 20 ;









Starring :
MARTA JAN
EGGERTH KIEPURA
JANIS CARTER

EXTRA SHORT —
“YE OLDE SWAMP

SWOPPER”

OPENING FRIDAY, 2.30 & 8.30

PARAMOUNT PICTURES PRESENTS—

*PEKING EXPRESS”

Starring :—JOSEPH COTTEN-

-~CORINNE CALVERT

EDMUND GWEN

ROYAL

TO-DAY & TO-MORROW, 4.50 & 8.15

PARAMOUNT DOUBLE —
HENRY

WILCOXSON

THE

YO
IN

AND

LORETTA

UNG

CRUSADES”

“DESERT FURY™~

Starring :
BURT
LANCASTER

LIZABETH
SCOTT

FRIDAY ONLY, 4.30 & 8.15

REPUBLIC WHOLE SERIAL —

“GG MEN NEVER FORGET”

CLAYTON MOORE

Starring :

OLYMPIC

TO-DAY ONLY, 4.30 & 8.15

COLUMBIA ACTION DOUBLE —

JON
HALL

NINA
FOCK

IN
“THE MUTINEERS~

AND

“DARK PAST”

Starring :
WILLIAM HOLDEN —

LEO S. COBB

THURSDAY ONLY, 4.30 & 8.15

COLUMBIA DOUBLE

GEORGE FOMBY in —

AND

“GEORGE IN CIVVY ST.”

-BODYHOLD~

With WILLARD PARKER —



Tey ey. A

W042 ae Ta =
A TIDAL WAVE!

LIZABETH SCOTT
JANE GREER
DENNIS O'KEEFE

ROX

LOLA ALBRIGHT

OPENING FRIDAY

Ist. FEBRUARY

R-K-O Super Double :

Shocking Secrets of
“Respectable” People

ee sD} PEG aA

Rk 5
AY BREEN
cen LOWY ar ne snes

oe

sone:

»

LAST TWO SHOWS TO-DAY, 4.50 & 8.15

REPUBLIC DOUBLE —

ADELE MARI

“THE INNER

AND

— WARREN DOUGLAS

in

CIRCLE~

“UNMASKED”

Starring: ROBERT ROCKWELL -

THURSDAY ONLY, 4

REPUBLIC WHOLE SERIAL

“G@ MEN NEVER FORGET™~

CLAYTON MOORE.

With

BARBARA FULLER

30 & 8.15


















WEDNESDAY, JANUARY

30, 1952

Paris Newsletter from SAM WHITE

The Customs Men
Upset Les Girls

PARIS.

L*s GIRLS at the Bal Tabarin cabaret were aghast, the

management spluttered with

indignation and the

French tourist bureau is still wringing its hands in frus-
tration over the fact that at the moment there is no French

Government in existence to w

Cause of all this agitation—a
raid by French Customs inspec-
tors on the largely tourist audi-
ence of the Tabarin in search of
smuggled watches. The raid was
carried out by 20 inspector§ in
mufti who posed as ordinary mem-
bers of the audience. At the inter-
val the inspectors moved down the
aisle examining the watches of
foreigners for Customs stamps.

Result of the raid: 40 sum-
monses and a total of £350 in
fines, A French Customs official
expleined “750,000 watches were
smuggled into France last year.
We had to do something about it.”
Comment by the Tabarin man-
agement and the French tourist
office: “No way to treat our for-
eign guests.”

RED CURTAINS

PARIS “chic”; Bearded Rus-
sian Ambassador in Paris. Mr.
Pavlov, has bought Rennais-
sance furniture for his Embassy.

Alcohoiics Not So Anonymous;
Of 396 American passports lost
in Paris last year, 78 were found
in bars,

POET’S CORNER
MISSING diplomats
A former Lyons publisher re-
veals that in 1945 he published
a slim volume of poems, written
by Guy Burgess in French and
entitled Proustian Garlands.
The publisher went bankrupt,
hawever, before the volumes
could be put on sale, Total print
was 1,200 copies, and these are

latest :

now in a stockroom of a book-
shop in Toulouse.
Profit And Lost
Casino receipts for the past

year show that Enghien Casino,
near Paris, heads the list with an
annual take of £743,000; Deau-
ville comes second with £489,000
and Cannes with £299,000.

Sacha Guitry has opened his
Paris house as a museum, charges
£1 admission,

e

A French drama critic writes
in protest against the French
adoption of the English word

hich it can protest.

“starlet,” says that if it is
adopted as a French word it
should be spelt “Starlette” ag in
“Omelette.”

, De Gaulle Speaks

Charlemagne rides again:
General Charles de Gaulle, sur-
veying with icy disdain the
shambles of yet another political
crisis in Paris, plans a dramatic
gesture — to deliver a speech
extolling Charlemagne in the
ancient city of Aix-la-Chapelle,
where Charlemagne (founder of
the Holy Roman Empire) is
buried.

In the speech de Gaulle will
say that the Vatican policy was
wise in supporting Charlemagne,
in contrast with its present cool-
ness towards de Gaulle’s aspira-
tions. He will also lambast the

concept of a European army and .

the Schuman plan and. make
dramatic offer to the Germans.

The offer: Joint Franco-Ger-
man exploitation of French
Morocco,

a

The Invalid

Actor-dancer Gene Kelly,
starring in his second film after
An American in Paris, held up

location shots last year by going
skiing and straining a _ tendon.
This year he is again holding up
proceedings—he is now in a Paris
hotel with influenza.

Sit. Vac.

Quotes of the week:

Orson Welles in Paris searching
for someone to play the part of
Salome in his next film: “It’s a
eurious and baffling thing. When-
ever I see a likely looking girl
in a bar or a nightclub and ask
her if she would like to go into
films she replies. Run away, I
have heard that one before.’ ”

A fortune-teller, to the Aga
Khan: “Your son, Ali, will not
remarry. He is much happier as
a bachelor.”

After The Dance

Economy measure? The ball-
room of the British Embassy has
been turned into a badminton
court,

BARBADOS, ADVOCATE





£222 Oh, iust a little thing



Former T; rinidad
M.L.C. Shot Dead

PORT-OF-SPAIN, Jan. 28.

Clarence Abidh, a member of
the Trinidad Education Board and
a former member of the Executive
and Legislative Councils was shot
dead through the window of his
home on Friday night. The shot
rang out from the dark patio as
Abidh sat with his wife, two
women visiters, and a small boy



U.S. Boys Will
Find ‘Corner
Drug Store’

In Britain

first

can

all - Ameri-
national
boarding school
opens in Eng-
land this year.
The students
will drawn
from all parts
of the United
Kingdom,” said
an American
officer to-day,
The exact locas
of the
has not
been de-

ve

hon
school
ver
cide
Several
being con-
and if
well,

sites
are
sidered,
we
will be
ned n Sep-
tember.” r
There will be
fees’ at the
school and
children wili
selec
American
between
age of 13 and
ho wishes
attend the
new school may
do aid the
pokesman
atAmerican
H.Q. “We expect
abeut 140 to
enrol.” —L.E.S.

no
new
the
not
Any

child
the
18 w
to

be ted

we ran up for sniping at Mr. Churchill,”
London Express Service

Dope Is Jamaica’s
Answer To Poverty

Scotland, Yard Man —
For Kingston :

THE ILLEGAL drug traffic, which is causing so much

|
|
|
|

Americam Moneka, Sch. At Last, Sch, Franklyn
t D.R., Sch. Gardenia W., Sch. Everdenc,
t ar nrls :
boys and girls oo,’ Marion ‘Belle Wolfe, Sch. United ;
whose fathers Pilgrim S., Sch. Lady Noeleen
are serving in ARRIVALS
ha i . Séhooner Enterprise SS. 44 tons net |
the US. Ai? aoe Mcquilkin, from St Luci |
Force in Britain, “g¢ehooner Adaiina, 50 tons net, Capt.} |
own American: a. DEPARTURE | MOTOR CYCLE TYRES
- Areeripanns DE JRES |
wen American~ Schooner Philip H. Davidson, 87 tons
style CAMPUS net, Capt. Sealy, for British Guiana
and corner drug Mary M. Lewis, 68 tons net, Capt. }y
store complete Marshall, for British Guiana.
with soda foun- SEAWELL “ .
tain, when the

Odle, Jean Coustenoble,

Esher, Lady Antoinette Esher.

( hesterfield Steedle, Conrad Brant, Walter

PAGE THREE

a a a ro an

Harbour Log |

In Carlisle Bay



(——

— o a
} ¥
Sch. Zita Wonita, Yacht Leander, M.V Pp
a a )

\RRIVALS BY B.W.LA, ON MONDAY
From Guadeloupe Intranait for Grenads
James Fairbanks
Intransit for Trimtdad~Azar Gaovdat
From Martinique-—James Culpel, Leslie
Intransit for Grenada—Lord Oliver
From Puerte Rieo—Carl Trunk, Mada-

laine Trunk, Leonard Levis, Kathleen

levis, Walter B Sehletter, Helen

Echletter, George Grittens, Ceeil A. Paris,

Milton C. Welch, Kenrie QO. Welch,

li. Trant, Isolene Moore, Charles V
Anderson, Elizabeth Anderson, Ermyn-
trude Shilstone
DEPARTUR BY B.W.LA. ON MONDAY
For Trini A, Clayton-Smith, Her
bert Ince, Grace Ince, Keith Atkinson,
Yrrel Bailey, Olive Bailey, Daphne
Willems Albert Steinhardt Leonard
earlman, Frank Evans, Franklyn Hall,
liosario Perez, Marjorie Adams-Mitchell,
Leonard Granum, Anna Bilaneq,’ Paul
ohn Blaneq

For Extra
vw, Maw nonces | Reliability

Antigua, St, Kitts, St. Thomas, V.I. and
New York by the S.8. Fort Townshend
will be closed at the General Post Office
“ under:— +t]
Pareel Mail at 12 noon, Registered Mail
at 2 pm. and Ordinany Mail at 2.30 p.m
TO-DAY, the 30th January, 1952



(ECKSTEIN BROS.)
Distributors

Mails for St. Vincent by the Sch
Mandalay I, will be closed at the General
Post Office as under

Parcel Mail, Registered Mail and
Ordinary Mail at 2.30 p.m. TO-DAY, the
30th January, 1952

Commonwealth of Australia
5%, Bonds due 1955
(Callable Ist July 1952—55)










DOWDING ESTATES & TRADING CO., LTD.



—L.E.S. in his drawing room,—CpP)

Family Week In Antigua

“Home and family Week’ was

concern to Britain’s police at present, can be traced back
directly to Jamaica, according to Harold C hampion, in an
article published in the “Sunday Empire News’, in London.
Mr. Champion, who has just =

returned to Britain from Jamaica

If you are the holder of any of these



.
‘juan Ke k Pleases bonds which may be called for repay-
has stimulated considerable in- according to tidiness : declares that seough marijuane. arou y
yer’ 3S i igue 5 res Ther rere . w S, variety, or granja, as it is known in the
very successful in Antigua last terest. There were two hundred general a searance 4 , R ja, as it is know ,
year and in view of it having and fifty entrants from villages : Ppearance and standard, West Indies—is coming out of

Sudanese Leader
KHARTOUM, Jan, 28

and that the object of the com-
petition was not for the sake of
prizes, but for the promotion of

arrested so much interest in peo-
ple keeping better homes internal-
ly Mrs. Blackburne felt it would

in all parts of the island,

the Caribbean to make big money
Last Wednesday morning there

from addicts in America and the

ment on 15th July 1952, we suggest













yas an interes ; United Kigndom. He doubts whe~- a Bey Khalil, Secretary

ack it woul was an interested gathering on beauty in the island’s villages. ther the Jamaican authorities will poe ees 7 a Sedat

be a good idea to sponsor a gar- the grounds of Government rue Also it was meant to stimulate a succeed in stamping out the sho ‘ z a ee A d ti

den competition to encourage an and His Excellency My, K. : drive f ; oe ; ao ’ , " mma Party welcomec > S- b

external pride. Blackburne in his address ex- Guction ty assist in the wre we ade: missal of Nahas Pasha, to-day that you obtain from us recommendations

In its first year the competition plained that gardens were judged creasing cost of living: The or- “Is it likely that this pover- by saying that Farouk’s action re- ‘

ganizers and himself could give __ ty-stricken, thing pose vealed “wisdom and far sighted-
the inspiration but unless people will turn down a chance, ille- ness. e
did the work on their land and gal or pot io a fv eleoe 4, Abdulla Khalil, also leader of for the re-investment of these funds.
gardens, r > ney?” he asks, “And, be P the Legislative ssembly sajd
in foal. there ey as me, reefer growing in a lush, that he hoped a more reasonable
year there would be a thousand hot-house country like Jamai- 4nq practical attitude toward:
entrants and perhaps a prize for ca is easy money. If you are th, sudan would now prevail, He
the best garden in Antigua where found out, you “ more com= cid, “The last Government made 1
it mi be S r a fortable in gaol than in your ony silly mistakes, but the :
mee Gunn ot adie home, but you are seldom ereaiie’ af thats Wai: thes aera ar a OS Pp
his closing words His Excellency found out.” : © enforce domination over the ® e
quoted Kipling’s words “Gardens He describes how workers im cigian, without reference-to the
are not made by singing. Oh how citrus groves and coffee planta Giginose Government, politic atl
beautiful, and = sitting in the tions plant reefers in secluded parties, or people

shade.” places and hope that it will grow

ad t lly does, In He said that he looked forward
undetected, as it usually ,

to a greater spirit of co-operation

Barbados Correspondents for

Prizes were presented by Mrs the last few months, however, and sympathy to Sudan’s aims,
Blackburne. Some villages re- informers have directed the’ au- from Ah New Prime Minister of
ceived as many as six prizes. thorities to bigger things. Egypt, Ali Maher Pasha.
laberta, Jennings and Willikies “On a sunny plateau they found | we Soi

UP.
received the greatest number of
honours, and it was amazing to
see the number of very elderly

recipients of prizes. Alarm clocks,

thousand reefer plants, }

nearly l i
fortune in the

worth tt the | _
markets of the West,” he reports. |
“Every plant was destroyed, but

a
a small

Royal Securities Corp. Ltd.

































RAnceue
flash lights and glassware were the owner was never arrested. ASTHMA Pea dl! nS
presented. “Several large ee at } g’eX
The gathering were then invited recently found in this way, D ae . inet it
to inspect the beautifully kept far no ‘big’ man ‘has ae a Dissolved First ay
a > 7 ice. ar ever) ‘ king neg " ”
ont Lady Oliver car cas ioe "eniertinete Y yennant Oo ovate 1 rey, cain Yeo oos POSS SPOS LL EEELELLLLLL LLL AO tities
among the guests along with Mr js hauled before a magistrate and Your health and wet ur heart, 1% 3
& Mrs Mortimer Seabury with charged with growing a bush or} (1,/),j th rveirous [gS =
whom they are staying at “Jolly two z lates through the : fee %
Hill”. Mrs Seabury was one of wore the British Government ine the att rh rt day the % :
the judges and was keenly in- wants to put a stop to this — inet reat F tent % :
terested in he; visits to all the rible business it will, in my oe ful slecr ' rkes, no 1S ;
villages. Mrs H. W. Peebles who jon, have to send out a Hy eee x %
ls a guest at Government House perienced men from | ow Mir % $
thought it was a most impressive Yard to assist in the om oe x z
midday function and said she Kingston’s C.1I.D. But eee ME 30 in’ % 2
thought the expressions on faces cure of all would be i mir col- ey ueahiniog in 24 hou ¥ %
generally were much happier wholesome prosperity in ass tow your Asthma in'8 da} 8 %
ain = eturn of emp
OLD LADY from Tennings holds on to her prize and admires — when she was here a year ony of Jamaica. _BuP. Apt our fram npty x y
bed of Bost at Government House. ({Oteesssces1ess0080088 poecnoeneorororrrnT | hemist: The guarantee protects you 1 S
st $ x e
% Pie °
% s x
% ¢
V WORRIED ppoen dy ‘ §
. x .
‘
GALVANIZED :; *| DREAD ‘ .
% ys
%, *. 4
ABOUT 1 oor ‘ FOR ;
% g
%| UNTIL**” , %
x %
PARKING | THE
\ | %
$
s
f | Arms f HOME! &
4 de >
. | He Lest the Pains inhis : :
No wonder tale inte, tocetes x
going to work, fo ama’
THEN SEE THE pains in his arms mente tt tetas x
Atter than ever and work 1s. ENAMEL TABLE TOPS :
| pleasure, as he tella in his letter + ‘
r §
K T i Ps ” ; “I had been suffering from %
I ING ( 4 S| rheumatism very badly and had BOX IRONS x
% | such pains in my os I oqaredty : .
knew how to use them. >
| rae told to try Kraschen Salta SAD IRONS 8
’ | and after using one ee %
‘or 7 . So, of course,
# ae HS 1 HY 2” Beant cn with ti, am now thor: PERFORATED ALUMINUM x
PIPES : 4 “ ! ee 1} yas 3} oughly better and have never felt g
| 20 r venrs:_ used feet FOR LARDERS S
et i but now P
Uni | miserable and sluggish, bu NOW OFFERED x
FITTINGS: Elbows — Tees — Unions 7 Bi » 5a6 sine Or S
Lisa
+ a MPH. with ense | Siete TABLE CORK MATS :
* .P.H. with | : >
* 104 ths. weight only S| ue _pains ana oupmaans ef AT g
. ¥ heumatism are usua x
eeneeteneecenmeactipeenets % by deposite of excess uric octd in ; NER ALUMINUM & SILVER TRAYS *
‘ r >| the muscles and joints. Kru
ECONOMY — ACCESSIBILITY — RELIABILITY =} simulates te kidneys ana other COR ivi ‘bhi $
@ | intestins ee aa L fhe $
t stion so that all N] <
CITY GARAGE : ola | Henley acsion oo tat aes 8 STORE :
. | thrown the, naturel coaains ($ GLASSWARE :
: %, Then that goes, aches < s : >
{ % Fekstein Bros -Bay Street 5} Sue Pee shits ‘vigour 12 A Convenient :
| VICTORIA STREET. s | ie rostored ID ah kine Clantre EARTHENWARE :
General Hardware Supplies—Rickett st. 2) 6x0 we eemsdai™ tas |§ Shopping Cen S
% yn ERC . & ti give Kruschen @ t >
s General Hardware Supp | matin, ize Keaschen & som [8 NORE BET ES
S shemists and Stores, ee OSS 0080S SH SOS SOSO SOOO OOSF SOOSCO SS O8 F598 OOO FFF
i Feeeanmesoosocoeesooeset $65000S00090095000000000" | all r +4 OOOO PPOOCC COST 50OS oo



















f



PAGE FOUR



Printed by the Adverste Co., Ltd., Broad St, Bridgetows
(ae el le te tite tlt He = eitiseatetiy

Wednesday, January 30, “1952

EGYPT

THE change of Government in Egypt
does not mean that all is now right in the
Middle Eastern World. The dismissal of
one Egyptian Prime Minister by King
Farouk on the grounds that he was no
longer capable of maintaining law and
order will not increase Egypt’s affection
for the United Kingdom. And the new
Prime Minister, despite his liking for the
United Kingdom is still committed to a
policy which has for its aim the evacua-
tion of British troops from the Suez Canal
area, and the acquisition of the Sudan for
Egypt.

In 1947 British troops evacuated Alex-
andria and Cairo in implementation of a
British proposal of 7th May, 1946, to with-
draw all British sea, land and air forces
from Egypt.

Under Article 8 of the Anglo-Egyptian
Treaty of Alliance of 1936, Egypt author-
ised, without prejudice to her sovereign
rights, Great Britain to station 10,000
troops and 400 airmen with the necessary
staff in the vicinity of the canal until such
time as the contracting parties agree that
the Egyptian Army can ensure by its own
resources the liberty and entire security
of navigation of the Canal.

By an agreement of March 7, 1949, be-
tween Egypt and the Suez Canal Company
the property of the Company reverts to
the Egyptian Government at the end of
the ninety-nine year concession in 1968.
Meanwhile Egypt takes annually seven
per cent. of the gross profits of the Com-
pany.

The British contention is that the
Egyptian Army is clearly not in a position
to secure by its own resources the liberty
of navigation of the canal agreed to in
Article 8 of the Treaty of Alliance of 1936.
Their contention is supported by the action
of the Egyptian monarch in dismissing a
Prime Minister for failure to maintain law
and order in Egypt itself.

But treaty rights are in themselves weak
bargaining counters against fanatical
nationalism.

British statesmanship in Egypt will have
to find a solution which will satisfy Egyp-
tian honour and maintain the security of
a Canal necessary for the strategic defence
of the free world.

How this solution is to be found at a
time when national sentiments have been
aroused is not clear but the possibilities
of a solution are, if not greater, certainly
not lessened by the accession to power of
a Prime Minister who is not violently anti-
British.





FAR EAST

INFORMED commentators are more
pessimistic today about affairs in the Far
East than they are about Egypt. The news
from the Far East points to a wide spread
Far Eastern War within a month or two.
The Chinese are, according to the evidence,
preparing to attack Indo-China, in the
event of a truce in Korea,

In the United States serious discussions
are taking place with regard te the advisa-
bility of intensifying the war against the
Chinese, if there is no truce.

In addition to urging extension of the
blockade to stop strategic materials, the
bombing of Manchuria and China proper
is epenly advocated.

Uneasiness has been expressed in the
United Kingdom about any commitments
Mr. Churchill may have made during his
recent discussions with President Truman.
Neither the British nor the French nor any
other Western European nation are en-
thusiastic about the prospects of a large
scale conflict with China. The Chinese
themselves appear to view war with
equanimity, probably because they have
been fighting almost continuously for some
thirty years.

The Korean truce talks have given them
a breathing space to strengthen their
forces and they are unlikely to sign an
armistice except on their terms.

On the other hand, Russia cannot want
the Korean war to develop into a global
conflict which would commit Russia even

more deeply than she is already commit-
ted through having to supply the Chinese
with equipment. The Americans want
above everything else to get their troops
home, Unless Russian and American -re-
luctance to engage in large scale war in
China proves stronger than Chinese ambi-
tions, the Korean war may soon flare up
and spread to China. Another period of
crisis in the Far East has arrived.

Confused Combinations

To The Editor, The Advocate—

SIR,—In his criticism of the book;
“Behold The West Indies”, your corre-
spondent tells that the writer, Mrs. Gak-
ley, “drops some bloomers.”

While I agree that the inaccuracies com-
plained of might be referred to as “drop-
ping a buck” or “making a bloomer”, I am
sure no lady would be guilty of the mis-
demeanour Mr. Hunte suggests!

Could it be that they both got confused
with their combinations?

A. G. L.
17th January, 1952.













A, TT TT aT
j LAA SY,
Landed on Smars This merning, Th .

have just he! an Elect Under & syston The ¥ ce
Mockracy, every Ng works by opposites and Th
Polificians do the reverse of whal They p «

The Prime SmariiperT sad ne had
because he hadnt pey
T the job Low and The
explained thaT we wouldnt
thing, for 2 moment on Earth

beer

Sean






Trouble has becn Caused py Jane

ng, attest

»
sland thaT k of

away will 6 RoboT infant and by spying ectvit
ot Senator M*Carthy and Sir Ww. Buther:

BARBADOS ADVOCATE

oe fore
of Carterbu

Russell geting
Ties

LOW’S SPACE-SHIP EXPEDITION — 2

A Book That Will Raise
The Roof



By JOUN GORDON

HOW did Russia, so near to
collapse in the war, come to be so
powerful when it ended that she
could terrify the world?

A book published this week “The
Struggle for Europe”, by Chester
Wilmot, claims to give the answer

Even more important, while
vigorously and rightly upholding a
close British-American alliance as
a fundamental policy for both
nations, the author, with tremen-
dous persuasive power, builds the
case for a stronger degree of Brit-
ish independence within the alli-
ance,

For he shows—from the course
of recent history:—
(1) The danger we face if we per-~
mit our Army and Air Force
to pass out of our control and
become an integrated part of a
European army.
The price we might have to
pay if we accept foreign con-
trol and command for our
Navy.
The folly we commit if we
meekly agree to run our Em-
pire as some other nation,
with less experience and lesy

(2

(3

understanding, thinks we
should run it.
(4) The futility of cherishing

rosy hopes of world peace
coming out of UNO.

“The struggle for Europe” is
probably the most interesting and
vital book on recent history yet
published, It is certainly the most
controversial and provocative. It
will cause a storm in the United
States. But many in Britain will
find it palatable.

It seeks to establish from select-
ed documents and events that the
present perilous plight of Europe
—and the world—would never
have developed if Britain’s advice
had been taken.

It asserts that the emergence of
Russia as the most powerful
nation in Europe was the inevi-
table consequence of political mis-
judgments made by President
Roosevelt in face of strong protests
from the much wiser Churchill.

Political war was lost

It agrees that because of Ameri-
ca’s tremendous strength we could
nétgose the war.

ut it makes the case that
Roosevelt—always our most loyal
and powerful friend through the
years of trial—did not understand
the political problems of Europe.
That he had an utterly erroneous
conception of the British Empire.
And that he misjudged completely
the mind and purposes of Stalin,

Its conclusion is that because we
fought the war in the wrong way,
though we won the military vic-
tory, we lost*he political war upon
which the future depended.

By losing it we left Stalin the
master of Europe.

We gave him control of Eastern
Europe, which he would never
have won by force of arms.

We gave him mastery of the
Balkans.

We put him in a position to pre-
vent the application to half Europe
of the principles of freedom as laid
down in the Atlantic Charter for
which we fought. Our troubles
today, it argues, are he price of
those mistakes.

‘IT IS the author’s view—and he
has powerful British support for it
—that in the late summer of 1944
the Western Powers had it in their
power to ensure that the great
capitals of Eastern Europe, Berlin,
Prague, and Vienna, would be lib-
erated from the West,

There would have been no Rus-
sian threat over Europe today had
that been done.

But the opportunity was cast
away at Yalta by Roosevelt, who
was convinced beyond all argu-
ment that Churchill could offer
that Stalin had beconte his trusting



friend; sharing his ideals, deter-
mined to stand with him in bring-
ing peace to the world and liberty
to all men,

But Stalin, in fact, “took him fot
a ride.”

We might have taken Berlin

There were, the book asserts, a
few critical days in the final weeks
of the war when the tragedy could
have been averted.

Montgomery was in a position to
take Berlin long before the Rus-
sians could get there. Vienna was
wide open to the Americans. So
was Prague.

But the guile of Stalin was pow-
erful to the end.

In keeping with Roosevelt's
promises to him the forces of the
West were checked in order that
Stalin should enter them first.

WHY were these’ mistakes
made’? Mr. Wilmot expresses the
view that they rose out of sus-
picions rooted deep in history.

Roosevelt—in common with mos‘
of his countrymen — had a deep
prejudice against what the Ameri-
cans call “Colonialism,” and when
it relates specifically to the British
Empire, “Imperialism,”

He entered the war, Mr. Wilmot
infers, not only firmly determined
to defeat Germany and Japan, but
equally determined to put an end
to the British Colonial Empire sys-
tem and the Dutch and French
Colonial systems as well,



Definite ideas about Empire

That did not mean that he sought
any weakening of the bonds that
bind Britain and America as in-
separable allics. He merely saw
America as “the enlightened son
seeking to reform the
father,”

The Atlantic Pact, Mr. Wilmot
assumes, wag a deliberate step to
that end.

Cordell Hull, then Secretary of
State, was quite frank about the
President's purpose. He wrote:—

“We had definite ideas with
respect to the future of the Brit-
ish Colonial Empire on which we
differed with the British.”

ROOSEVELT, with his curious
misunderstanding of the British
Empire, developed an ‘equally
curious misunderstanding of Stalin
and Russia.

He regarded the United States
and Russia as the only two great
Powers without “original sin” in
the shape of colonial possessions
and imperialistic aspirations.

Stalin was much more wily

He thought that if he and Stalin
met round a table on a man-to-
man basis thére was no problem
they could not solve, because their
minds were in tune.

He had no doubt whatever that
Stalin would come into a United
Nations Organisation like a lamb,
and defend Roosevelt's ideals of
peace, liberty and democracy like
a lion,

wayward

But Stalin was “a much more
wily dealer than Roosevelt lived
to realise.

For he bought the right to enter
and hold the lands that now lie
bound and helpless behind the
Iron Curtain, with power to controi
eventually Manchuria and China
as well, for the price of joining
UNO. The world rocks to-day, de-
clares Mr. Wilmot, because of that
astonishing diplomatic triumph.
And UNO remains a futility as a
memorial to it.

WHAT of the
the war?

military side of

America, says Mr. Wilmot, a na-
tion of great man-power and in-
comparable |. industrial power,
tights her wars in a method that
suits her best.

Her theory is that a mass of men,
given weapons capablevof deliver-
ing an overwhelming: blow, can
achieve victory with absolute cer-
tainty. And she proved her case,





She believes in the direct frontal
attack as the swiftest way to vic-
tory, and i> the end the most eco-
nomical in lives.

And sne 1egards military victory
as the only thing that matters.
Political issues never cloud the
picture.

Britain, with a man-strength in-
finitesimal compared with Ameri-
ca, fights her wars differently.

Through history she has beaten
enemies much stronger than her-

self by finesse anq stratagem. |

She has always avoided the de-
cisive frontal blow. For she dared
not risk being bled to death or
smashed to pulp.

In the 1914 war she abandoned
her historic strategy. She merged
herself with a land mass on the
Continent, and although she
emerged victorious she
nearly died from the mauling,

In 1939 she began with the same

mistake. At Dunkirk her life hung |

on the slenderest thread, But mir- |
aculously it held. |

The wisdom of the ages

With Hitler the master of
Europe, Churchill restored the
wisdom of the ages, We began to
probe towards “the soft belly.” In
the Western Desert of North Africa
that policy returned a fruitful
dividend,

We persuaded the Americans
ugainst their will to play the same
same further west. Again the divi-
dend was tremendous.

Mussolini had the death rattle
in his throat and Hitler for the
first time saw the red light of
coming disaster.

Italy collapsed. The way was
open into Hitler’s fortress, We had
the foothold, we had the Army,
and at the head of it the greatest
general of the war—Britain’s
Alexander.

So we went to Normandy

~ But, Mr. Wilmot argues, the
Americans did not understand
either the strategy of the long way
round, or the importance of the
political opportunity. So it was
lost,

We went into Normandy instead.

And from Normandy to the end
we moved in a_ solid, relentless
human mass, ignoring opportun-
ities which if taken as Montgom-
ery desires might, as many experts
now believe, have shortened the
war by half a year.

NOW what lessons do
years hold for Britons?

What was lost by political mis-
judgment — if it occurred — has
now to be regained by political
wisdom,

these

If we believe, as we do, that our
own wisdom is our best guide,
then we must retain our inde-
pendence and see that our views
have the influence we think they
should have,

We must never be forced down
paths we hesitate to tread. We
must never commit to others con-
trol of the forces upon which our
liberty and our lives depend.

The protection of our island, the
mastery of the skies above it, and
the keeping of the seas around it,
is their first and’ most vital re-
sponsibility.

Where and how they fight to ful- |,

fil that duty and purpose must al-
ways be our decision,
For our life depends upon it.

THE MAN WHO WROTE THE
BOOK: Chester Wilmot is an
eee and in the war had a
wide experience as a reporter i
the field, ane

He spent six years sifting the
evidence upon which “The Steug-
gle for Europe” was written. It
is published by Collins, price 25s.,
and runs te 350,000 words.

—LE.S.



NEW PANS

Dope running is _ exciting
enough as a subject for a thriller;
but when Trinidad is the scene of
action the interest is _trebled.
Murder in Trinidad by J. W. Van-
dercook is the most exciting book
that Pan has published for some
time. It is full of local colour

The action moves swiftly from
the Queen’s Park to the Caroni
swamps and as far as the Five
Islands, Those who know Trini-
dad will want to read it for
descriptions of an isiand they
know. Those who don't will find
it a murder story which they
can’t easily put down.

The Maltese Faleon by Dashie!
Hammett is a story told in Ameri-

can, It moves like a pistol shot
and the hero is one of those very
very tough guys without a shred
of feeling. The girl is the wick-
edest anybody can imagine.
Everybody wants the Falcon and

nearly everybody gets killed or
gaoled as a result.
ere is something _ sinister

about the Sea Tower by Sir Hugh
Walpole. The story is reminis-
cent of Rebecca, with a_ back-
ground of a large country house
and the sea. It is a tale of a
selfish woman who never wanted
her sons to grow up. The tragic
consequence to one wife provides
the drama and suspense of this
powerful tale.

Amateur theatre clubs
schools will find Pan’s new col-
lections of Seven Short Plays a
useful text book. Noel Coward's
Still Life, and Laurence Hous-
man’s Possession are the two
main attractions. There are five
others.

One of them is concerned with
Dr. Johnson and another with
Bonnie Prince Charlie.

Pan has also recently published
The Provincial Lady by FE. M
Delafield in an abridged edition
and Oppenheim’s The Great Im-
personation. G.H

Pan Books can be bought at the
Advocate Stationery

'
|

pretty |

and|

GoToRussia?

| —Say the shipping men....and the |
Merchant Navy crews answer—

No, Thanks!

chant Navy men who have tried it recently
borrow the Sam Goldwyn phrase and say:
“Includeas out.”

In the Untied States serious discussions

Don’t dub them anti-Communist on that
account; politics has nothing to do with it.

Not all Merchant Navy men would go as
far as CAPTAIN THOMAS DOUGHTY, of
Willerby, Hull, who threw up his command
rather than go back to a North Russian port.
He was without a job for nine months, and
has told an official inquiry :—

“I would go through it all again rather
than go back to Russia. I would not take
another cargo for Russia for all the gold in
the world.” He did not like the treatment
he and his crew received.

The unpopularity of the Russian trip is
more startling because there was no trouble
to man the ships during the war when the
trip around North Norway was through
“Suicide Alley.”

As soon as loading is complete, ships have
been ordered off the quay and have put to
sea before their hatches were battenéd down.

It seems that the brotherhood of the sea
cannot thaw out the cold war.

@ STRIKING JOKE
The clash between the London Electricity
Soard and its striking meter readers has the
distinction of giving birth to a joke—while
it ig still on.
alf the meter readers—who have been
accused of spending too much time in cafes
—are still at work. They go round the
| 10uses with the new supervisors, whose ap-
pointment led to the strike and whose job
it is to see that the readers and collectors
do a fair day’s work. The story goes like this:
“Pity about that supervisor yesterday.
After three hours trudging from house to
|house he gaid to his reader, ‘Hey Joe, when
do we knock off for a snack? I’m hungry,’
So the reader left the supervisor in a cafe

%





|

with instructions where the ‘watch-dogging’
}could be resumed in the afternoon.”

@ FIRST VISIT

How’s this for coincidence? A film exe-
cutive phoned me to say that a prize-win-
ning choir of young miners was coming to
the Twickenham England v. Wales match.
Would I like to meet them? Indeed I would.

None of the lads had been to London be-
fore, and since they had to be back at work
| yesterday they had darefully balloted on
| what to see in 48 hours.

Near the top of the ballot was the organ
cf the Tooting Granada, which they had
heard on the radio.

The coincidence ? It was only when I got
to the cinema that I found they were from
my own village of Abertridwr (pronounce tt
-\bber-trid-oor,. Glam—one of 1,100 town-
ships and villages in Wales.

@ NO SOLDIER’S JOB

If Mr Churchill announces when he comes
home that FIELD-MARSHAL VISCOUNT
ALEXANDER is to be the new Minister of
Defence, the Socialists will oppose — for two
reasons. They will say :— ‘

(1) IT IS UNFAIR to the Chiefs of Staff, | }
who are themselves technical advisers, to
make them report to a chief who is also a
technical adviser, instead of to a political
chief,

(2) DISTINGUISHED soldiers who are
international civil servants, on such organis-
ational jobs as the defence of Europe, want
political guidance, This can come only from
a politician.

These are Mr. Attlee’s personal views.
They will be his party’s views before Parlia-
ment meets.

@ PLEASE DEFINE

Sir Archibald Forbes, one of the busiest
and most influential men in Britain, has been
asked to call a special conference to define
Private Enterprise—so that British people
can support it “with confidence and with
pride.”

JOHN M. RYAN, editor of the business
magazine Scope, makes the plea. He thinks
jit is the last chance to “retrieve the public
mind”. after the long retreat against Social-
ism.

| American-owner Encyclopedia Britannica
|ignores any variation under the heading En-
terprise. The Oxford Dictionary says “enter-
prise” is “undertaking, esp. bold or difficult
/one.”

| CHURCHILL catches that spirit when he
pealls it competitive enterprise.

IT ONLY MEANS...

A CANADIAN magazine has been having
some fun unmasking the verbal’ camouflage
used by Important P»ople. It publishes a
|‘‘What Do They Mean When They Say —?”
| glossary, including :—
| @ CONFERENCE—A_ place where con-

versation is substituted for the dreariness of
| work and. the loneliness of thought.
| @ CONSULTANT or EXPERT—Any or-
;dinary guy more than’50 miles from home. ’
| @ A PROGRAMME — Any assignment
jthat can’t be completed bY one telephone
call.

Would any readers like to add te this glib
‘ glossary ?—L.E.S.

|
|





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WEDNESDAY, JANUARY 30, 1952

NEW BOOKS

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WEDNESDAY, JANUARY 30, 1952

Hearing In St. Lucy

Damages Case Adjourned | F1LM SHOWS PLANNED
FOR BOYS’ CLUBS

A new film projector has been bought for the Police Boys’

Until February 12

In the Assistant Court of al yesterday His Honour
Mr. A. J. H. Hanschell at the rane of Mr. J. ET Brancker,
adjourned further hearing in the case in which Clyde Boyce
of Pie Corner, St. Lucy, claimed £50 damages from the
defendants Christopher Hinds and Mary Hinds, both of
Chandler Hill, St. Lucy, — Tuesday, February 12
iT.

* oe, in _ -_ ae

. E. T. Braneker for the plain- ;
P.M. Exam. Held

Of Infant’s Body

tiff, Boyce, and Mr. J. S. B. Dear

for -the two defendants, In his
case Boyce. claimed that by the
two defendants inflicting bodily
harm on him—for which they

Dr. A. S. Ashby performed &

post mortem examination on the

and claimed damages to the body of three-year-old Joseph

amount of £50. Cumberbatch of ‘Tudor Bridge,

Mr. Brancker in asking for an St. Michael, at the Public Mor-

Clubs. The Clubs also have
used for general transportation.

to renair broken films.

from the
purchase some
Each

were both convicted and fined—
he suffered much inconveniences

ente>

to-day.

adjournment said that it was tuary yesterday afternoon, Street Boys’ Club. This piano will be used in th
important for him to summon Dr. Helena Cumberbatch, mother

Kirton who attended to his of Joseph Cumberbatch, said

client after the fight with the that her son got out of bed early

"Tr thatales ask that this Yes'eâ„¢d@y and had a warm cup] encourage keen competition and will also add 1

of tea. About 7.45 a.m. he fell asm.”



The projectionist for the Boys’ Clubs is P.C
He will give film shows at the Clubs all over the Island,
various types of films will include educational and @ntertain-
ing—some, will come from the Education Department, some
British Council and the Boys’ Clubs are hoping tc

matter be adjourned for medical
evidence from Dr. Kirton,” said
Mr. Brancker.
Knew Defendants

Clyde Boyce told the court that
he knew both defendants Chris-
topher Hinds and Mary Hinds.
On June 27 about 6.30 p.m. he
was standing by Pie Corner near
Christopher Hinds’ place. After
an argument Christopher Hinds
grabbed him by the shirt and
pulled him over the guard wall
near the road. Mary Hinds joined
in the fight and while Christophe

Hinds held the front of his shirt,
ay Hinds tugged him from the
ack.

The shirt he was wearing cost
him $7. Darry Hinds seeing the

fight, brought three sticks and
two of them he handed to the
two defendants Christopher
Hinds and Mary Hinds, With
these sticks the defendants hit
him several times across his
body, head and ears. After the

fight he went to Dr. Kirton who
examined and treated him. The
whole of ‘his body was painful
and swollen.

He paid Dr. Kirton $2.76 for
the examination and the medi-
cine cost him $2.76 while the
hire of a motor car and bus
fares totalled $4.48,

Unable To Work
“T was unable to work due to
the blows which I _ received.
During the time of my illness I
was forced to hire labourers to
work my two and a half acres
of land on which potatoes, yams,
ete., were growing. Each of the
labourers was paid 5/- a day.
In the fight my khaki pants were

ill and before she could get medi-
cal aid he was dead.

She then notifigd the Black
Rock Police Station,



DRIVERS’ BADGES
RENEWED

This mgnth bus drivers and
conductors are getting their cap
badges renewed at the Traffic
Branch at the Central Police Sta-
tion. The drivers and conductors
had until January 15 to get their

badges. However, they will be
getting them throughout the
month,

Up to mid-day yesterday 169

conductors and 202 drivers got
their new cap badges. THe “total
number issued last year were 359
conductor badges and 438 drivers’
badges.

The clerk at the Traffic Branch
told the Advocate that both con-
ductors and drivers should try to
renew their badges as soon as
possible. “It is hoped that every-
one will have theirs by the end
of the month,” he said.

Later in the year drivers and
conductors will be applying for
hadges. As soon as they get their
licences they ask for badges



THEFT AT WALKERS
REPORTED

A quantity of household ar-

torn and these caused me $8 for ticles, valued $13.47 was stolen

the material
Boyce told the court.

Cross-examined, Boyce
that both of the defendants
dragged him

and the making,” from the home of Harold Hunte
at Walkers,
said are his property.

St. Andrew. They

He told the Police that the inci-

along the ground dent occurred between 2.00 p.m.

to their yard and as a result of on Saturday and 12.30 a.m. on

this he had scrawls and bruises
all over his body. He never hit
Christopher Hinds and the motor
car she hired to carry him to the
doctor is the property of a Mr.
Birch, but he did not take a
receipt from him for the car
hire.

He stayed away from his work
for about three weeks and as a,
vesult he had to’ pay labourers
to work for him. During the
fight he wearing a khaki pants
and these were torn, At this
stage the court asked that the
pants and shirt the plaintiff was
wearing be produced to the
court for examination,

Clothing Torn

Next witness called was Maud
Collymore who said that Boyce
was beaten by the two defend-
ants with sticks. She went with
him to Dr. Kirton and his cloth-
ing was torn in the fight. The
plaintiff employed labourers to
work in his land and one of these
was Elise Boyce. She (Colly-
more) worked for the plaintiff
for four days since the fight.

Cross-examined, she said that
the fight was started by the two
defendants who dragged the
plaintiff along the ground to their
house.

ill-treatment Of
Bonkey Costs £4

His Worship Mr, L. Walwyn
yesterday ordered Winter Tull of
Dayrell’s Road, Christ Church, to
pay a fine of £4 for ill treating
a donkey. The offence was com~
mitted on December 18, 1951.

The fine is to be paid in 28
days or there is an alternative of

one month's imprisonment with
hard labour. Tull’s record show-
ed that he had three previous

convictions and on the last con-
viction was fined 25s, by His
Worship Mr. E. A. McLeod.

“FRANKLYN D,R.’’
ON DRY DOCK

After discharging a cargo of
firewood and charcoal from Brit-
ish Guiana, the 87-ton schooner
Franklyn D. R. was dry docked
on Monday evening for repairs.

The Franklyn D. R. will be
coming off dock in about a week
to load cargo for British Guiana.
She is consigned to the Schooner
Pool.







Beauty on the Bed



Sunday.

The Police are carrying out in-

vestigations.



is

"ULL WALL WekaT® fre.
Solp- Glovlb You Nip iF T
JUST Si OUT Hexe ANd k/Slew?



French Official
Escapes Ambush

HANOM, Indo-China, Jan. 29.

It was learned that on Tuesday
that Jean Le Tourneau, the
French Minister of the Associated
States, narrowly escaped a Com-
munist rebel ambush to-day while
visiting the front line.

Accompanied by the French
General, Raoul Salan, Temporary
Commander of the French Union
forces in Indo-China, Le_Tourneau
was inspecting the Choben Front
Line, twenty eight miles south-
west of Hao Binhak, the officiel!
car was nearing the post of
Quang Mang on Colonial High-
way 21, when it was caught in
cross fire.

But the driver accelerated and
the post was safely reeched,
casualties were reported, French
forces returned fire with machine
guns, as Le _Tourneau visited
wounded soldiers in a local first
nid station. The post had already
been attacked prior to the Min-
ister’s errival, —U.P.



EVERWEAR CANDLEWICK BEDSPREADS

Shades of Dusty Rose, Light Blue, Green, Blue, Gold

ER ae hk a hh kde « Ore ds sieee eres aoe ee $22.00
GRECIAN COTTON BEDSPREADS in Blue, Green, Gold,
Pink. 80 ins. x 100 ins. Each................. $15.71

TO te POA ON ir ceet ccs teins $12.15

FOLKWEAVE BEDSPREADS in Rose, Blue, Green,

70 ins. x 100 ins.



CAVE SHEPHERD & CO., LTD.

Each

10, 11, 12 & 13 Broad Street

No ,,







At present 903 local boys
Police Boys’ and Girls’ Clubs.
Belleplaine 62, District
Cliff Cottage 68, Speightstown

Bay Street Boys’ Club 90, Holetown 34. Seawell

BARBADOS. ADVOCATE



a new pick-up which ‘will be
The film projector was ordered

from England. Expected to arrive shortly are the gramophone
unit, projector stand, microphone, rewinding units and splices

261 Chandler
The

Recently the Clubs have been divided into three sections
section will have a Committee of
Clubs Will have a Football League
Advocate that at present the football matches will be only
between the Clubs, but should the standard improve, they will
team; in the B.A.F.A. games next year
Captain Raison and Major Craggs will inspect four pianos
From these they will select one to be used at the Bay

Management The
Major Craggs told the

> giving of

music lessons and will also be of great help to the chi
Major Craggs said: “The boys are taking a kee. interest
in Club life and we feel that their division into sections will

» their enthusi-

and girls are members
District “A” 55 membe

f the
of €

hos

“C” 29, District “D” 28 Four Roads 42

54, Bay Street Girls’ Club 36
Bovy’ and

Girls’ Club 68 girls and 45 bogs, Worthings 29, Cleavers Hill
Boys’ Club 66, Cleavers Hill Girls’ Club 56 and the newly
formed club at St. Cecilia Barracks, Passage Road, 141,





American Column



Hooded Terror Strikes
Again—With Whip

By R. M. MacCOLL

K K.K., the dreaded and detested Ku Klux Klan which
everyone thought was dead and done for, is stirring again

in North Carolina.

local

Around Whiteville G men have been called in to help
authorities investigate a series

of night floggings

carried out by men masked in the traditional bedsheets

with eye-slits.

The ‘‘Times’’
Review

The Advocate acknowledges
with thankg the receipt of a
copy of the first issue of the

Times Weekly Review. This is @
new journal which will carry on
the traditions of the long-estab-
lished Times Weekly Edition.

The Times Weekly Review will
draw on all the resources that
serve the Times of London, by
conenon consent, the foremost
newspaper in the world. The
Review will present tc re ders
all over the world the news and
comment that have been provid-
ed both by the staff of the daily
Times and by its Correspondents
in all parts of the globe.

The purpose of the Times
Weekly Review is to give its
readers a service of news and

comment that should keep them
informed on world affairs and on
current British opinion.

“Special articles and photo-
graphs,” says an editorial in the
first issue of the Review, ‘will
be published to help in giving a
full and fair account of signifi-
cant and interesting events and
trends. The life of men and
women in Britain, their polities,
their economic and _ financial
affairs, their theatre, music, books
and other entertainments and
their social activities will be re-
flected. Sport in Britain will be
described with emphasig on what
is most likely to interest people
in other countries.

“World affairs
veyed each week
patches from the Times Cor-
respondents resident in many
capitals or through critical
articles written in Printing House
Square. A selection of the lead-
ing articles snd letters to the
Editor that have appeared in the
Times will be regularly made
For close on a century and
three-quarters — since 1785 —
the Times has sought to tell the
truth by reporting facts, kept
scrupulously clear of views, and
by offering critical comment
upon them. This double func-
tion of* reporting end interpreting
will be performed in the per-
spective suitable for a weekly
journal, in the new Review.”

will be sur-
through dis-



Dies Suddenly

Seventy-eight-year-old Hestelle
Francis of Trents Tenantry, St.
James, died suddenly in the Pente-
Mission, Porters Road, St.
J mes at about 8 o’clock last night.
Francis was attending a service at
the Mission.

To-day Dr. A. A. Gibbons will
issue a certificate as to the cause
of death.





/











A strange fact about these flog-
gings is that none has involved
Negroes, often the victims of the
K.K.K

The Whiteville area has been
80 terrorised that people hesitate
to call on friends living in isola-
ted homes at night because
many of them are armed—and
very jittery

And the latest victim, a farmer
named Lee Tyson, only summoned
up enough courage to report the
outrage the other day, although
it happened on December 1.

Victims are lured from their
homes by unmasked strangers,
imported from other parts of the
State, with requests for help in
a motor breakdown, and then
attacked by the Klan.

SECRETS IN FIRE

Secret apparatus used in Gov-
ernment cosmic and infra-red ray
experiments was destroyed in a
mysterious fire at Denver Univer-
sity. Dr. Bryan Cohn, in charge
of the work, says the equipment
was built for the hush-hush ex-
periments and is “almost irre-
placeable.”

BUSINESS WENT OFF

An electrical company filed a
bankruptey petition in Brooklyn
and explained that crooked em-
ployees systematically looted it
of an estimated 400,000 dollars’
worth of TV parts in the last few
years, Employees filched the parts
while pretending to be taking
them to “service” faulty TV sets.
Severa| of the employees were
able to set up in business for
themselves on the haul,

THE BAND WEPT

Nearly every one of the quar-
ter-nillion people gathered to
greet Captain Carlsen at his home
town of Woodbridge, New Jersey,
was smiling. Tearful exception:
the High School band which had
been practising incessantly on
“King Christian stood beside the
mast” all the week—and then got
dispersed and lost in the gigantic
shuffle.

PAY RISE PSYCHOLOGY

Hatmakers in New York have
signed a three-year contract in
which they promise not to ask
for a pay rise “for industrial,
financial and psychological reas-

ons.”
GAS IS TOO HOT

In Westchester County, a typi-
cal, prosperous New York suburb,
seven. out of ten housewives say
they dislike the new natural gas
with which they now have to
cook. The general complaint: “It’s
too hot , so we have to learn new
timings for our favourite dishe

The gas collects on top of Tex-
as oil deposits and is piped to
New York.

TRAFFIC COP IN JAM

Mr. Charles Solomon, a New
York magistrate, is an authority
on Freud and his theories on mé
behaviour So when a 50-year-
old accountant, Francis Doyle,
was accused of having “directea
traffic” in Brooklyn for ten min-
utes, Mr. Solomon said : “I sup-
pose all your life you've had a
sub-conscious urge to be a traffic
cop?”

Fine :

v's



five dollars (35s.).











Seamen Leave
For Curacao |

Four A.B, seamen left Barbados yesterday morning by
B.W.LA., via Trinidad for Curacao where they will take up |
employment with the Shell Oil Tanker Fleet.

Last week, one A.B, seaman and ten firemen and greas-
ers left by direct K.L.M. chartered ‘plane for Curacao for
employment with the same company.

Mr,
of the
Messrs.

Vernon Knight, Manager
Petroleum Department of
Da Costa and Co., Ltd,
told the Advocate that it was
gratifying that in view of the

-operation of the Government

Barbados through the auspices

the Barbados Evening Insti-
tute that these firemen and
reasers were trained by Mr.
D. W. Sayers .who is Dean of
Technical Studies for the Insti-
ute,

He said that he had offered the
uggestion that the men would,
ia all probability, find employ-
ment in Curacao with the Shell
Company Tanker Fleet if they
ould be trained as firemen and
greasers, As a consequence of rev-
resentations made to the Gov-
ernment, the development had
taken place and several men had
since found employment in
Curacao,

Trained On Combermere

Mr. Knight said: “The men are
trained on the water boat Lord
Combermere where the workiag
conditions approximate an oil
fired boiler and marine type en-
gines are on the Shell tankers on
which the men are ultimately “en:
ployed,

“Recruiting of Barbadians
service in Curacao, both at the
refinery and in the tanker fleet
has been one of unqualified suc-
cess and has been in operation
for the past eleven years,

for

“The working conditions and
pay offered by the Shel] Oil
Company attract men to seek
eagerly employment with the
company and as a result of the
large number employed, some-

where in the vicinity of $400,000
is remitted here each year eithe:
through Messrs Da Costa and Co.,
Ltd., or the commercial banks te
the relatives of the men serving
in Curacao.’

He s-id that it
to no.e that since the initiation
of he emigration scheme. 1
Curacao that Messrs Da Costa an?’
Co., Ltd., had paid out in the
vicinity of $2,250,000. This lary
amount compared very favourabiy
with the amuont paid out to rela-
tives of labourers who served in
America during and just after the
world war when about 9,000 men
were working in the U.S.A.

No More Schemes

“There has
continuous

was inte estin:



been a steady
operation of
scheme,” he said and added: “It
is to be regretted that although
there is quite an appreciable num.
ber of men serving in Quracao
more schemes of this nature can-
not be developed,”

At the present time he said
that the only men required for
service in Curacao were A.B, sea-
men with at least four years’ ex-
perience on either
motor vessels,

and
the

Steamers of



2nd Marriage
Nullified

ATLANTA, Georgia, Jan, 29,

The second marriage of pretty
Agnes Sasser was nullified Tues-
day in a brief court hearing fol-
lowing official confirmation that
her first husband whom she
thought killed on the Korean bat-
Uefield is alive,

Superior Court Judge, E. BE. An-
drews, who handed down the de-
claratory judgment, sympatheti-
cally questioned Mrs. Sasser about
the details of the case that made
the shy Government worker the
central figure in a modern Enoch
Arden chronicle,

Her plight came to light when
Communists announced that her
first husband, Private Walter 5
Dixon, was a prisoner of war. She
received 4 letter signed by him on
January 2

The Defence Department con-
firnted through comparison of the
handwriting on the letter with
official records that Dixon was the
actual writer Mrs. Sasser mar-
ried Privaty William Sas¢er on
September 7, seven months after
the Defence Department notified
her Dixon was killed*in action

UP.

DANCING BANNED

OTTAWA, Jan



Dancing in all parish hall
threughout the Ottawa arch
diocese was banned from Tues-

day, The directive issued by Mon-

ignor Maxime Tesser, the Aux- ‘

illiary Bishop, remjnded parish
priests that the ban imposed v-
eral years ago haq not been re-
scinded, He said that the order

banned dancing at
events, concerns or
tions in parish halls.

all social

Similar fine






y ESTERBROOK
(i ESTOLAN



Bie. ee |

‘K & JILL COUGH SYRUP iM 1 AY 1 y
|) REE | MEN CHOW |
I} (Scratch Grain)
| || KNIGHTS LTD. ||) H. JASON JONES & Ce., Ltd. — Distributors !
ILLS ER ere FE eet i 4



The 180 ‘ which swept the main island of men with a care that no machine could
the Fijis Group in the South imitate,

ESTERBROOK FOUNTAIN PENS

HAIR CREAM
i ABDEC VITAMIN DROPS
’ HALIVER OIL © VIOSTEROL DROPS



























Colonies

And Food |

Problems |



You can enjoy Britain’:
favourite tobaccos. Sis
blends te choose from—

every one a Balanced
blend of vintage leat

ee



LONDON
The Secretary of State for the}
Colonies, Mr. Oliver Lyttelton,

believes a flow of savings into the |
development of Britain's own soil
and the wealth which lies in the

Colonial territories is of utmost
importance if food production | is
to be increased,

“Wherever you look, that is

what is needed,” he said, address- |
ing the Basingstoke branch of the
National Farmers’ Union. “We
have to bring to our aid every
device of ingenuity and modern
practice and We must also give
the farmer assurances which en-

able capital to look forward to a pt a peta
roper reward if it invested in - - eeeees

agrioukure.” ate a MESSRS. A. S. BRYDEN & SONS (BARBADOS), LTD,
It was necessary to increase > P.O. BOX 403, BRIDGETOWN, BARBADOS

output of many agriculture prod-

ucts in the Colonies and to in-
crease production of the minerals,, _
ecal, copper, and phosphates) }

“

| KEEP YOUR HOME SPIC AND SPAN

' .
I We have a wide range of
to be most carefully planned and |

re tos’! | PAINTS - ENAMELS - VARNISHES
li i 1. HERBERT Ltd.

order we have to be extremely |

‘tender about the amount of capi- |

tal monies which we invest any-| |

where, and what we want to get! 10 and 11, ROEBUCK STREET.
out of agriculture is the maximum | |
output by only making the most |!
essential c a p i t al investment. |
Whenever investment has to be|
cut down, either in industry 01 | ({(
‘agriculture, you are, of course i}
striking a blow at the productiv- Xt

MORE AND MORE MEN
ity o nat industry \
rer, | ARE CHANGING TO ...

te bond, pu the’ SGU 'O, Pe
‘K SHOES vat

“But the return on in-
vestment
Because they have become convinced

which lie beneath the surface of
some of those territories,

“Difficulties are still massive,’
said Mr. Lyttelton, “and they
relate entirely to this matter if
capital investment, which has got, ;



Established
1860

Incorporated
1926













in agriculture now, in
new buildings, in grain driers
and modern milking equipmen
and so forth, yields a returr
which would make the mouth of
the ordinary industrialist water.’

Mr. Lyttelton, added that where

, : .
he had been responsible for the r rit )
investment of trust funds ir of K's Supe 19 Y
agriculture, he had, in quite i e
short time, seem electric results

achieved. “I believe profoundly
\here is no contribution so grea\
nor 8 Valuable to this country
nor to the sterling area than thi
one of growing more food,”

HERE ARE THREE OF THE MANY VERY GOOD
REASONS FOR THAT SUPERIORITY :

(1) ‘K’ SHOKS are made from the finest leathers
obtainable. Both soles and insoles are hand-
tested for flexibility and accurately graded
by skilled craftsmen,

THE UPPEDS of ‘K’ SHOES are selected,



Hurricane Takes
Toll Of. Fiji Island

9
WELLINGTON, Jan, 29, (2)

Seas on Monday, killed an esti-
mated 12 persons and did $2,800,
000 damage, reports from Suvi
said on Tuesday.

Many persons were left home-
less in the flimsily built villages

(3) ‘K’ SHOES are made over the famous ‘K’
PLUS FITTING LASTS with the heel-parts
one fitting narrower than the fore-parts. The
ensures a close fit at the heel and freedom

Suva, the capital, was without for the toes.
clectricity or newspapers, Tele- ee
phone lines were still down and
communication with Wellingtor Why not come in and be fitted with a pair
i ee my —— oe. of these world famous shoes ? We are sure
medic wireless anc radio che » s » “Ww oan RPS tone
bHone.neporta, Latithale “Bar Al you'll say like all the other ‘K’ wearers:
Base was heavily dé . ; ini ; sie ial eae aiel 9
se eT nea ke ULL NEVER WEAR ANOTHER SHOE RUT ‘K’
PRICES $17 $21 >.
. . °° t
‘Rainmakers FROM 00 to 63
.
Decrease Rain i

NEW YORK, Jan, 29,

Man made rain experiments in
cicht Western states were failure
uccording to reports made to th
annual meeting of the American
Meteorological Society in session
here

E. Workman of the New Mexic
nstitute of Mining and Tech-
nology said in a report to. the
cpening session yesterday use o
ilver ljodine failed increas« | 4{
éin in Western experimfats, |

tually decreased precipitatior
Workman said in advocating muc
hiore research into the
bility of rain-making.

HARRISON'S
DIAL 2664

Sole Distributors for ‘K’ SHOES in Barbados,















EQUAL in 7?@
td

ENERGY we

to



0





Doctor Irving Langmuir rair e e 6
oviking experimenter for Generai ~es
bLiectrie Company said Wester: Big Saving un Cost
cxperiments “gave inconclusive »)

ults’” Experiments were aban. |)}
ccned about the end of last yea: }}) Hard to believe? Well, it's true
he said, toa —only 1 Pound oj Purina Dog

—s 7. P,

Chow is equal in food energy
to 3 lbs. of fresh meat. That
means you can feed your dog
well—at a big saving. And your
dog will like Dog Chow, too!

TAKE YOUR DOG A BAG TODAY

i] . .
} ri ; ee eet eae x
EEO as ic



NIBS ALSO AVAILABLE

PURINA

































PAGE SIX

Leg. Co. Pass $1,385 To Repair ‘Investigator’

Defective Parts Of Ship engagement of



Came From U.S.A.

OEPORTUNITY was taken by the Colonial Secretary

N. Turner,

when the Legislative Council debated

and passed yesterday a Resolution for $1,385 to effect re-
foes

‘to the Government Experimental

tigator, to

Agents had
are now in poor condition.
Sade charge of the Resolu-
a in the Council, the Hon'ble
+ Turner said he regretted to
have to inform hon’ble members
oe during the course of 1951,
Government Surveyor of
Shipping who carried out a sur-
vey of thé. Experimental Fishing
Boat Inv reported that
an examination had disclosed that
the bronze: propellor, tail shaft,
lag seréws in the outboard
bearing and zines of the pont

Were in a poor condition due to
Serious deterioration and corro-

“dispel the

ion that that condition was due
ectrolysis erg . two major
eZ the boat in
Careenage, and defective con-
sof the electric circuit in
engine room.
ith the fishing calamity at
beginning of December, con-
tion of the Resolution be-
the Council was expedited
the legislature went into
s and nothing could be done
il it was recalled,
e Resolution was sent down
the Other Place, and unfortu-
tely he had noticed reports in
e Press which show that the
ie facts had not been disclosed
bout the origin of the propellor
naft. It had been reported in the
ress that the propellor shaft
came through the Crown Agents,
| and remarks had been made about
the poor quality of British work-
manship and so on.

The propellor shaft, the
hon’ble Colonial Secretary ex-
plained, was purchased from a
firm in the United States, and
it was therefore not a British
article at all, and the Crown
Agents had nothing whatever
to do with the transaction.

He had also seen it mentioned
) the Press that if British work-
manship was poor, it was high
time they went to the United
States. of America He was not
saying for one moment that the
quality of the propeller shaft
was defective when it arrived,
but honourable members might
have wished to know a bit more
of the origin of the various parts
if the boat.

It seemed that when the bont
was being ordered, the .Pishgries

visory Committee wante it
rered as early as pos-
i re mode obout
from whieh the various
suld be obtained, Those
; mpparently showed that
veries from the United King-




jom conle not be expected for
hwo veers or more, and accord-
frely nquiries were made else
where for these parts which could

not be reerived quickly.
Best Availohle

The Hon. the Colonial Secre-
tary gave the name of the firm
in the United States from which
the propellor shaft had been ob-
teined, and said that the engine—
a Caterpiller—had also come
from the United States, and was
considered the best available.
Most of the other fittings were
imported direct from a firm in
Glasgow,

So much for that, He merely
wanted to dispel the untrue re-
port that the Crown Agents had
anything to do with the parts at
all.

With regard to replacements,
the propellor shaft had been ob-
tained from one of the leading
manufacturers of bronze propel-
lors, and he did net know why it
had worn in so short a time. It
seemed, however, that the mud
from thé careenage was ‘partica-
larly acid and also some stec!
piling had -been put into the
careenagé sihce the Investigator
had been in use, apparently
causing electrolysis,

It was.now proposed to replace
the shaft by one made of Mone!
Metal. It seemed that enquiric
were made both in the United
Kingdom and North America in
1948, but it wes not possible to
effect delivery because metal was

in priority for more essential
products, It was now hoped, he
was informed, that the importa-

tion of a propellor made of this
Monel Metal would be possib!>
in the fairly neay future,

He was also informed that it
would not be neeessary to ptt
the Investigator out of action for
a long period and the nfcessary
repairs could be effected within
@ week or so,

Rules Lax

It might be asked why order

were not being placed with th



POOP

GOSVOSES

4 =
AP CPREVTVG

Or

MAGGS

.

.



anything to do with the

PPPS

FOR COMFORT
RIDE A

HOPPER
BICYCLE

Fishing Boat
untrue report” that the Crown
parts of the boat which

Crown Agents more frequently,
end he was having enquiries in-
stituted because it seemed to him
that the rules of procedure were
somewhat lax.

So far as the Resolution under
consideration was concerned, iu
was for the sum of $1,385 for es-
sential replacements for the boa:,
and he aceordingly moved that
the Resolution be concurred in,

Hon, Mr. F. C, Hutson gaid that
the phenomenon of electrolysis
was very well known to engineers,
particularly marine engineers, and
it happened whenever two very’
dissimilar metals like steel and
bronze were exposed in close
proximity for any length of time
in waters that were polluted.

The waters in the inner Careen-
age were very poliuted indeed to
tne affluent from the Constitution
drain, Another cause was fauliy
electrical connections and instai-
lations in the engine room.

Not Consuited

In the addendum, reference was
made to we GOverumenut Sur-
veyor or Snipping, ana ne wouiu
jike tO Menuvn tat tnere was
more Wan one Government in-
specwuor Of Shipping. ‘ne one re-
terred to in the Aadenaum to the
Resolution was Mr. C. G. Craw-
tora, and he wouid like to Say in

fairness to him, tnat he was not
consuited at all regarding the
design or construction of the
investigator. He thought it fair

that honourable members should
know that, beeause again in read-
ing from Press reports, it could
be implied that he was inspecting
his own work, and that was not
50. ‘

He was of course the only ma-
rine engineer and it did seem a
very great pity that he had not
been consulted on the very first
occasion, and possibly the Reso-
Jution might not have come be-
fore the Honoutable Council.

At the last meeting of the Coun-
cil he had asked what type of
engine Was going to be used, and
he wanted now to enquire if ad-~
vice would be sought and who
would be asked to give that ad-
vice., a

Replying the Colonial Secretary
said that there were a few points
which should be helpful to hon-
ourable members, The _ title
slipped into the Addendum to
the Resolution because Mr, Craw-
ford signed himself as Govern-
ment Surveyor of Shipping, but
he had come across the correct
title, and it was Surveyor of
Ships, and there were in fact, as
the Hon. Mr, Hutson had pointed
out, more than one,

The next point was, as he had
already mentioned, when he
spoke about the affair which
happened in 1948 when purchases
could in fact be made in various
parts of the world with the possi-
bility of insufficient forethoughi
or advice before an order was
made. He was looking into that
with a view to seeing what meas-

ures should be taken in the
future.
In addition to the Resolution

before the Honourable Council at
the moment, there was a further
Resolution which sprang from an
unsatisfactory source which he
would be asking permission to
move later that afternoon, and
there was a third one which had
not yet gone down to the Other
Place, and had just passed
through the Executive Committee
stage, and which again showed
defects which possibly might
have been checked at an earlier
stage. Those three cases together
made him note that it was
necessary to go rather closely
into the matter.

As regards the points raised
by Mr. Hutson regarding the
engines, in the fishing vessels, he
regretted that he was not in a
position to add anything more
than what he had sald earlier.
He had made a note of the point,
and he would do his best to see
that the make of the engine was
carefully vetted before orders
were made,



RAINS PREVENT
PLANES LANDING

From Our Own Correspondent

KINGSTON, Jan, 29.

lieavy rains and clouds prevent-

ed aeroplanes from landing at
Palisadoes airport for several

hours today. As a result screen

star Merle Oberon due to arrive

n Kingston today went on to

Montego Bay while another plane

, flew without stopping to Cuba,

PPS



OA SPOPORS

Factory Inspector
Approved

THE Legislative Council yester-
day approved a Resolution author-
ising the Governor to enter into
an agreement with a person to
serve in the Labour Department
as Factory Inspector.

The term of engagemeht of the
Officer selected shall be for a
period of two years in the first in-
stance subject to renewal by
mutual agreement,

The salary will be at the rate
of $4,920 per annum, and reason-
able passage expenses of the per-
son engaged, his wife and chil-
dren not exceeding $1,440 in each
direction may be paid from the
place of engagement to Barbados
on appointment, and from Barba-
dos to the place of engagement
on the termination of the agree-
ment,

The Hon. the Colonial Secre-
tary told the Council that honour-
able members would remember
that during the closing stages of
the last session there was the
passing of the Factories Amend-
ments Bill, 1951, and he made
reference of the difficulty which
was being encountered with the
recruitment of a Factory In-
spector. f

Two-Fold Difficulty

For almost three years Govern-
ment had been endeavouring to
recruit an Inspector, but their
difficulty was two fold. First the
salary provided in the Estimates
of £800 had not been sufficient
to attract a man, and secondly,
that the conditions of service in
employment in the United King-
dom prevented them securing the
services of a serving officer for
more than one year.

As it was felt that they should
have the benefit of a Factory
Inspector for at least two years,
he had informed the Honourable
Council that the Executive Com-
mittee had authorised him to
make an approach to see whether
they could secure the services of
a retired Factory Inspector to
come out for the period,

Information was received that
an Inspector to the Ministry of
Labour, who retired in 1950 as an
Inspector Class 1A, after serving
in the London Area and in Man-
chester and Yorkshire would be
prepared to come at a salary of
$4,920 annum, with passages
to and from Barbados, and accord-
ingly the Resc'ution was pre-
pared for the legislature.

The legislature was in recess at
the time, and it was not possible
to deal with the Resolution
However it had not been passed
by the Other Place and it had
come to the Council.

If it was concurred in, a tele-
gram would be sent to the Secre-
tary of State, and it was hoped
that the Officer would arrive in
the very near future.

The Council also concurred in
a Resolution authorising the Di-
rectors of the Savings Bank to
pay $630 from the funds of the
Savings Bank as a gratuity to
James Lewis, a retired Messenger
of the Bank.

Resolutions were also concur-
red in, giving effect to the Order
oo the Pensions (Pension-
able Officers) (Amendment)
Order, 1951, and sanctioning the
Registration of Deaths (Amend-
ment) Regulations, 1951.

Cuban Lawyers
Cable Truman

HAVANA, Jan, 28.
Nineteen Cuban lawyers on
Saturday cabled President Truman
asking him to commute the death
sentence on Oscar Collazo, the
Puerto Rican nationalist, involved
in an attempt to assassinate him

on November 1, 1950. —(CP)



BARBADOS ADVOCATE



WEDNESDAY, JANUARY 30, 1952
———$————_



Full Report On — Sinanan

Seawell Expected
By End of Month

HON. R. N. TURNER,

Colonial Secretary, told the

Legislative Council during the debate yesterday on a Reso-

lution for $4,000 which
Seawell Runway, that a

was approved for the upkeep of
full report” on the condition of

the runway “is expected about the end of this month.”

_ The $4,000 approved by the
Council is in addition to ‘$7,000
voted in the 1951-52 Estimates,

and will be used in effecting im-
mediate temporary repairs up to
the end of the present Financial
year, in accordance with reeem-
mendations contained in the in-
terim report of the Engineers of
the Ministry of Transport, Canada
and of Trans Canada Airlines,

In asking the Council’s coneur-
rence in the Resolution, the Hon.
the Colonial Secretary said that
honourable members would re-
member that he had reported to
the Legislature sometime in May
or June of last year that the
Superintendent of Construction at
Seawell Runway was on the point
of completing the runway, and had
informed the Government shortly
before his departure that the cost
would exceed the amount of
$1,620,000 which was provided
from Colonial Development and
Welfare Funds by $80,000, and
further that he had reported that
the macadam base concrete had
never fully dried and hardened
because of the moisture condition
resulting in the runway

Such drying and hardening
would normally take place two or
three years after construction,

Great Anxiety

Since then there had been a
great deal of anxiety regarding the
condition of the runway and early
in July a telegram was sent to the
Ministry of Transport, Canada,
because, honourable members
would remember that although the

funds came from C.D. & W. funds,
the work was carried out by a
construction engineer from the

Ministry of Transport, Canada.

That cable was sent some
months ago, and the engineer came
down. He went away again, and
his report was awaited, but it did
not come, Eventually the engin-
eer returned again in September
and took samples, leaving again
towards the end of September.

He eventually sent down an In-
terim Report and replied that the
Superintendent of Construction at
the Ministry of Transport, Canada,
would look at the job himself. He
came down in December, and the
other gentleman, Mr. Connelly,
came back with the other engin-
eer, and they looked at the run-
way again, returning to Canada
just before Christmas.

He had received the Interim Re-
port from Mr. Connelly, and a
more detailed report was expected
about the end of this month,

He anticipated that when the
detailed report came and it was
being considered, it would be ne-
cessary to come down to the legis-
lature for a substantial amount of
money for the reinstatement of the
runway. All he could say at the
moment was taken from the In-
terim Report which he had re-
ceived, and which stated that the
defects in one section of the run-
way were due to the following
main causes—

Causes Of Defects

(1) “heavy unexpected rains
during the construction dissolving
the asphalt before it had reached
the setting stage or point known as
‘breaking point’; ’

(2) “that all clay in the sub-
grade was not removed and re-
placed by coral rock, and

(3) “failure of the macadam
base course by unsuitable material
being used in the preparation of
the base course... .”

SEAWELL DIARY FOR DECEMBER 1951

MOVE

The operative hours of the A

ENTS

irport were 474 hours during the

month (an average of 15.29 hours daily), during which time there



















were 228 aircraft movements composed as follows: — i
o a
n a o
% 8 a I 8
g g ot on be = - a o 3
¢ 3 x a= 8
> 3 oe. Oe fb ee Be
B.W.I.A 138 18 156
T.C.A. 18 18
B,G.A, 26 26
K.L.M, 2 : 2 8
L.A.V. 16 16
MILITARY .. 2 2
PRIVATE ue 2 2
138 18 «(20 4 2 16 x 26 2 228
A total of 3,075 passengers passed through the Airport during the
month in the various airlines as listed below
B.W.LA, .. . 1,160 landed; 160 intransit; 1,095 left
T.C.A. 122 % 66 ’ 33,
B.G.A. 47 ” 3 cy 49 ,,
LAV. 116 + _ 6) 4
K.L.M, 101 ve 42
1,546 229 “1,300,



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is and he hoped that when the



“The detailed report,” the Colo-
nial Secretary continued, “has not
yet been received and I would ask
honourable members to reserve
judgment until it is received and
until the action it necessitates is
considered ‘by the Executive Com-
mittee.’

He said that Mr. Connelly
regards it as “essential that when-
ever shrinkage appears in the sur-
face it is immediately sealed with
an asphaltic compound to prevent
water from entering the base
course in the sub-grade, deterio-
rated by being saturated, whether
it is of coral rock or clay. Realis-
ing that some little time will lapse
before the reinstatement of the
“failed” area, every care. should
be taken to have any cracks which
develop immediately filled as a
temporary measure in order that
water will not get down below the
pavement. .. .”

$7,000 Spent

In the present Estimates there
was $7,000 for the upkeep of the
runway and that amount was be-
ing spent. The Director of High-
ways and Transport was carrying
on the job of sealing all cracks
when they appear, and he antici-
pated that the sum of $4,000 would
be needed before the end of the
present financial year to enable
him to seal up any cracks which
became noticeable,

In view of the urgency and
need of letting the Director get
ahead with plans, he moved that
the Resolution be concurred in.

Hon, V. C. Gale said he had
listened carefully to the speech
made by the honourable the Colo-
nial Secretary on the runway, and
it seemed to him that Barbados
had been very unfortunate indeed
with the disposition of their run-
way.

He supposed that the people
when they bought Seawell
thought that they had a bit of
coral reef and that it was one of
the most exeellent foundations in
Barbados. Now Seawell seemed
to be placed in those pockets of
coral and when the coral was
taken off, from the top, the bal-
ance was actually clay.

Barbados Unfortunate

Barbados had been very unfor-

tunate indeed to have spent a lot

of money on the runway; and
when they had the Canadian
people come down, and they

named Seawell for the new run-
way, it was thought that-Barbados
was Out of the woods.

He wouldn't like to pass judg-
ment on it that day, but it seemed
that they were very far from be-
ing out of the woods, and it looked
as if they would have to spend a
great deal more money on Seawell
runway.

It was a very unfortunate occur-
rence, and there seemed to be
some engineering defect some-
where, There had been excuses
that there was a tremendous lot
of rainy weather. There was, it
was true, a most unprecedented
rainfall when it was done, but
however, the runway had been
constructed with that defect. They
seemed to have run into a tre-
mengious lot of snags with the run-

‘nal report came down, they
vould be able to know exactly
where they stood.

The Resolution was concurred
in,



House Destroyed
By Fire

A house situated near Spooners
Hill belonging to Miriam Herbert
completely destroyed by

was
fire last night.

The Fire Brigade,
moned shortly after
and under .the command
Maior Craggs, Fire Officer, rusher
to the scene of the fire.
was concentrated on
ing houses
trom. spreading,

Mitiam Herbert
chureh at the

was

time

sum-
10 o'clock
of

Water
surround-
to prevent the fire

was attending
of the fire,

Presides

PORT-OF-SPAIN, Jan. 11.
The Hon. Mitra Sinanan, Deputy
Speaker of the Legislative Coun-
cil presided over the meeting of
the Council yesterday, through |
indisposition of Hon. William
Savary. He was the first elected
representative to do so.
Occupying the chair he express-
ed thanks to the Colonial Secre-
tary and members of the House
for the generous sentiments ex-
pressed,

The Hon, Uriah Butler said he
felt a touch of joy to see a Butier-
ite of “yesterday” gracing the
chair,

During the course of the meet-
ing Government proposed to limit
the imports of Irish potatoes when
local starchy crops are at their
peak. This was approved by a
15-one, majority of the House,
with the Hon. Butler dissenting,
although he agreed with the re-
port, Hon. Victor Bryan, Minister
of Agriculture mover of the motion
asked the Legislature to accept in
principle the recommendations
contained as “we were most
fortunate that we were able at
short notice to enlist the support
of a combination of experts on the






The Genuine “4711” Eau de Cologne comes from Cologne on

particular matter which was to being to the famous and secret formula since 1792,

examined.” Mr. Bryan referred to
the question of deactiviation of
U.S. Bases in the Colony for the
grdwing of food, and said: “the
matter is under very active exam-
ination and that there are mes-
sages going back and forth as
between the American and Brit-
ish Government.”

The Hon. Renison,, Colonial

Secretary also told the House that
it was the intention of Govern-
ment to ask the Finance Commit-
tee to agree to an increase in the
establishment of the Minister of
Agriculture in order to give him
one officer who would be entirely
responsible for seeing that ever)
recommendation of the report i
kept moving and kept for the at-
tention of those who were to carry
it out.

Clergyman To
Appeal Against
Sentence

LONDON

A London clergyman, who
spent more than ten years in Ja-
maica and was stated to have
‘done ah enormous amount of
good there, may appeal against
a nine-month prison sentence
passed on him after he was found
guilty on three charges of im-
properly assaulting an 1l-year-
old girl,

The Rev. John Irvin Mitchell,
42, who now has a church in
Plaistow, East London, was con-
victed at the West Ham Quarter
Sessions, He emphatically denied
the allegations and shad elected

to go for trial from a magistrate’s

court. Mr, James Burge, appear-
ing for him, told the edurt that
Mr, Mitchell was married to a
Jamaican woman and there had
never been any suggestion against
him,

Mr. Mitchell said that while in
Jamaica he was on friendly terms
with the resident magistrate and
helped in juvenile court cases.
He had a dormitory attached to
his rectory there for some of them
and his wife helped in the work.
He had studied psychology at a
theological college.

Evidence was taken from the

girl, who alleged that Mr, Mitah- |

ell committed the offence, despite
her protests, when she visited him
in his vestry, A 13-year-old girl,
also giving evidence, said that
she has once stayed with Mr.
Mitchell and his wife and that
several times he had sat on her
bed and behaved improperly.
Mr. Mitchell, in his evidence,
said there was not a word of
truth in the 13-year-old girl's
story. He said that the 1l-year-
old girl had told him a terrible
story of depravity. If that story
were true, he said, she wa§’ in
great moral danger,
—B.U.P.



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WEDNESDAY, JANUARY 30, 1952



$246,000 TO SUPPLEMENT





BARBADOS ADVOCATE



Money Passed For | 1 THE LEGISLATURE

20 Departments

THE House of Assembly yesterday passed a Resolution
for $246,340 to supplement the Estimates 1951—52. The
money was passed to supplement 20 Heads among which
were Colonial Treasurer, Customs, Legal Departments,
Police, Medical Department and Miscellaneous.

A small item which introduced giving the Accountant General
a lengthy debate and on which a travelling allowance would make
division was eventually taken was him encroach on the duties of the
Travelling under Colonial Treas- Auditor or make him feel that he



urer. It was stated that it was could over-rule the Auditor Gen-
necessary for the Accountant Gen- eral who is a colonial, he would
eral in :

the discharge of his duties not vote for the $50.
to do a certain amount of travell-

ing and provision was therefore
required to meet such expenses.

May Create Precedent

Mr E. K. Walcott (E) said that
if the travelling was distinct from
But some members questioned the travelling of the Audit De-
the actual work of the Accountant partment, he did not think they
General and said that his work did should pay it. He pointed out
not necessitate travelling. Some that if one of the senior officers
members asked whether that offi- 1eceiving a salary such as the
cer did not know when he accept- Accountant General felt he want-
ed the work that travelling was ed $50 for travelling allowance,
necessary and provision had not that officer would say that the
been made for it. A division was Accountant General got it and he
taken on a motion by Mr, E. D. Should get it too. If they were
Mottley that it should be deleted, 80ing to pay the Accountant Gen-



but it defeated by a 9—g eral to visit Seawell very ‘occa-
majority sionally, they would be starting
the principle that if every other

Full ‘Notes officer was travelling one yard,

Mr, Adams (L) said that the they would have to pay for travel-

notes to the resolution were as full ling.
as possible and he was going to He

Said that the
say nothing then.

Audit Office

If Honourable Was the Department to check
Members desired further informa- money of the various offices and
tion on any Head, he was prepared check for the irregularities,

to give them. Mr. Adams said that the only

If they examined the resolution reason any one could have for
carefully, he said, they would see suggesting it was not an honest
that the supplementary estimates vote for travelling expenses was

came clown as a result of the in- if he felt that the Accountant
creased cost of goods. Everybody General was trying to get money
was charging impérters the cost for himself in an undeserving
of the goods at delivery and not manner,

the cost of

the goods
placed,

when the

Mr, Walcott said that when he
He moved that

order was was looking afjer Government

the Heads be taken ‘separately. business, one Colonial Secretary
Under Head IIT (New) Cost of tried to establish the principle
Not n which the estimate in-

that they (Colonial Secretaries)
cluded $16,716, Mr. Lewis (L) said should get paid for going up to
that as far as he could remember, Government House,

they had recently passed a con- He said that he considered the
siderable sum of money in con- Accountant General reasonable in
nection with the note issue. He asking for $50. The Accountant
thought it an extraordinary General had asked for 23 cents a
amount of Barbadian notes for mile and he (Mr, Adamsf was in-

them to have ordered seeing that formed that the official rate was
the East Caribbean note issue was a shilling per mile.

soon to come out
not exe

sight a

Somebody had
‘reised the necessary fore- it
i so it was not seen that it

Mr. Taima (L) queried whether
was $50 really in travelling. If
had already been Spent and





the Eastern Caribbean issue would the officer was to be refunded, He
have superseded the Barbadian said that he considered it as an
note issue attempt either by the officer or
He felt it a bad way to do others to place the Accountant
busine He said that when they General in the travelling allow-
received goods, a token estimate ances group,
should be placed on the next At A Disadvantage
estimates for them so that the Mr. E. W. Barro 3 al
House would know something intend thie zeae) Seo

. criticised the item under Colonial
about if. Treasurer in which i s pr
Spesking under the same Head ene bWas pro~

(New) Travelling, in which $50 posed to grant $50 as travelling
was included in the supplementary Siownnee for the Accountant
estimates to meet the expenses ot “Cneral.

the He said that there were cer-
discharge of his duties to do a tain matters which the members
certain amount of travelling, of the Executive were well ac-
Mr. £. D. Mottley (E) said that Quainted with, concerning. which
though he realised that the sum of Other members of the House were
money was small, he wanted the 4t a disadvantage.
introducer of the Bill to tell him “When we look through these
if the money was to be used purely supplementary estimates, we see
in travelling and if there was any a lot of items to which only a
necessity for the Accountant cursory explanation is given,” he
General to travel in the discharge said, “There may be very good
of his duties. reasons for these grants, but un-
It was the principle implied that til we know more about them, we
he was driving at, he said. Some have to look askance at any such
people come to Barbados and feel new item.”
that if they had to go up toGov= There were put there to pass
ernment House, they must have Jegislation for the benefit of tne
travelling allowance, — community, he said, “and every
Dr. Cummits (L) in explana-~ little, supplementary vote whit-
tion, said that the Accountant t1eq downdthe amount they had
ooeree eee peters i ba at their disposal for social ser-
different Government ne vices. If a man’s employment dic
to look into their accounts. e not call for travelling, they should

would have to visit the various oa
police stations and far out Gov- not be asked ‘to grant $50 becaus

the Accountant General in



. he had arrogated to himself,
ernment offices and so the pro- ae ‘in ms . ’
vision of $50 to cover those eee duties beyond his normal

spenses was made z :
veers Faia auiea The Senior Member for St.

Mr. Adams said that the present

have secret information which

scounté yenere had been ‘
wats pee aM nein trying to could not be disclosed to member
stop possible thefts—putting it Of the House, but the other mem-

ntly—in Government Depart- ‘bers could not presume anything
Sie The Accountant General on possible secret information.
has been responsible for the dis- He was against and would always
covery of lapses of grace in the OppOSe any instances of a public
Departments of the Civil Service. officer being given such licence.
He would have to go up to Seawell There was a classic example of it
at sometimes to discharge his in the Police Force in which they
duties. He felt that he asked for had a man who was Lord High
a very low sum and the House this and Lord High that and Social
should congratulate him (the Welfare Officer, who came to the
Accountant General) on his House and got such votes. He
discretion had arrogated to himself fung-

Mr. Lewis (L) said that the Ac- tions which he was not called to
countant General was supposed perform when he took up the job.
to institute a system of book- They had to be very chary when
keeping. It was the Auditor Gen- they approved of estimates of that
eral whose duties were to check nature. The affairs of any Head
the various offices, It seemed to of a Department was as much in
him as if the Accountant General neeq of scrutiny as anybody
was overstepping his mark. ,. else’s in the eommunity.

If the Accommnaess, Gerace Must Trust Somebody
duties were to check t ne accou Mr. G. H. Adams (L) said that
in Government »Offices, he said if h 0 ie Hon

re would be no need of an e were as young as ‘
there wou , . +h cip- Ourable member who had just
Auditor General, Under such cir a inted with
cumstances, it would seem that Spoken and as unacquaint ; ae
the Accountant General would be the constitution of Barbados, he
° duties of tae would probably have said the





encroaching on the

Auditor General same thing he had said, but that
Later in the - debate, he said member could not be more
that he was surprised at the wrong.

ies he ard were those of the It was not that that $50 had
orient theme He contended been spent and the Accountant
that it was the duty of the Ac- General was trying to get it back
countant General to see that the When he went out in a motor car
books that he instituted be usec he went out to do duties he had
to perform by the laws of Barba-
dos The Accountant General
thas eould not get a car and drive any-

and not to visit the various offices
to check accounts.
He

that if he feit

said










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COUNCIL

The Legislative Council met at
2 p.m. yesterday. The Hon'ble the
Colonial Secretany laid the follow-
ing Documents:—

The Civil Establishment (General)
(Amendment) Order, 1952.

The Civil Establishment (General)
(Amendment) No, 2 Order, 1952.

Quarterly Return of Transactions
in Rum to 3ist December, 1951.

Hon, J. A. Mahon presented
Petitions from the Highway Com-
missioners of the parishes of St.
George and St. Thomas, for per-
mission to increase the salaries
pnd travelling allowances of their
Inspectors of Roads.

Hon. F. C. Hutson gave notice
of an Address which was later
passed to the Other Place in con-
nection with the setting up of a
Joint Select Committee of both
Houses “to examine the question
of over-population in Barbatos
and make recommendations
dealing with the problem.”

The Council concurred in the
following :—

Resolution to authorise the Gov-
ernor to enter into an agreement
with a person to serve in the
Labour Department in the post of
Factory Inspector

Resolution to place the sum of
$1,385 at the disposal of the
Governor-in-Executive Committee
to supplement the Estimates, 1951
—52, Part I, Current as shown
in the Supplementary Estimates,
1951—52, No. 39.

Resolution to authorise the Direc-
tors of the Savings Bahk to pay
the sum of six hundred and thirty
dollars from the funds of the
Savings Bank as a gratuity to
James Lewis, retired messenger of
the Bank

Resolution to approve the Order
entitled “The Pensions (?ension-
able Offices) (Amendment) Order,
i951, made by the Governor on the
18th day of October, 1951, under
the provisions of section 2 (1) (a)
of the Pensions Act, 1947

Resolution to sanction the Regis-
tration of Deaths (Amendment)
Regulations, 1951, made by the
Governor-in-Executive Committee
on the 20th December, 1951, under
the provisions of section 32 of the
Registration of Deaths Act, 1924

Resolution to place the sum of
$4,000 at the disposal of the
Governor-in-Executive Committee
to supplement the Estimates 1951—
52, Part [—Current, as shown in
the Supplementary Estimates,
1951-52, No, 40,

The Council passed an Address
in reply to His Excellency the
Governor concurring in the exten-
sion to Barbados of the provisions
of the new notes exchanged
between the Governments of the
United Kingdom and the United
States of America on the subject
of Economic Co-operation.

The Council was adjourned until
Tuesday February 5, 1952, at 2 p.m.

for

HOUSE

When the House of Assembly
met yesterday Mr. Adams Inict
the Post Office Advances for pay-
ment of Money Orders to Mth
November 1951.

notices were
siven:—

Mr. Adams: Resolution to place
the sum of $1,405 at the disposal
of the Governor-in-Executive
Committee to supplement the
Estimates, 1951-52, Part IIl—Cap-
ital, as shown in the Supplemen-
tary Estimates, 1951-52, No. 43,
which form the Schedule to the
Resolution. -

Dr. Cummins; Resolution to
make it lawful for the Governor-
in-Executive Committee to lease
to the Vestry of St. James a
portion of land at Reid’s Bay,
situate in the parish of St.. James
and containing jby admeasure-
ment 16.2 perches for the pur-
poses of erecting bathing sheds

Dr. Cummins Resolution to
make it lawful for the Vestry of
St. James to lease from the
Governor-in-Executive Commit
tee a portion of land at Reid's
Bay situate ‘n the parish of St.
James and containing by admeas
urement 16.2 perches for the pur-
pose of erecting bathing sheds

Dr. Cummins; Resolution to
make it lawful for the Governor
in-Executive Comunittee to lease
to the Vestny of St. Michael that
parcel of land forming part of
Welches Tenantry situate in the
parish of St. Michael and con
taining by admeasurement 158,501
square feet for the purpose of
establi ‘\ og a playing field

Mr. Cox: Bill intituled an Act
to amend the Pioneer Industries
(Encouragement) Act, 1951

The House passed the follow-
ing:-

Resolution to place the sum of
$246,340 at the disposal of the
Governor-in-Executive Committee
to supplement the Est$mates
1951-52, Part 1—Current as shown
in Supplementary Estimates
1951-52, No.41, which form the
Schedule to the Replution

Resolution to place the sum of
$51,618 ‘at the disposal of the
Governor-in-Executive Committee
to supplement the Estimates 1951-
52, Part Il—Capital, as shown in
Supplementary Estimates 1951-
52, No. 42, which form the Sche-
dule to the Resolution

Resolution to approve the Order
entitled “The Civil Establishment
(General) (Amendment) No. 2
Order 1952, made by the Governor
in-Executive Comumittee on the
Seventeenth day of Jamuary 1952,
under the provisions of Section 3

of the Civil Establishment Act
1949.
The House adjourned to Tues

day next at 3 p.m

sto have




'linvolved travelling.

Joseph and his colleagues might !

+ rs — eee

where he felt like driving and the Government funds and a cer-
make a charge for travelling ai- tain amount of travelling allow-
1owance, ance was necessary by virtue of
They had to trust somebody his office. He would not be get-
and it was quite possiple tnat this ting travelling allowance to take
or that officer of the Civil Estab- him to and from his job
lishment, if he had traveling to “I hope Honourable members
do might say he travelled bu Will take this assurance,” he
miles when he kad only travelled Said, “that there is no reason to
40, but nevertheless they haq to SUPPose that this Government is
make regulations when a man was 82g to let any individual mem-
blic ber of the Civil Service play fast
oo co” toniehinn — St, and loose with the tax payers

I money.”
Andrew, say, it would be im- Mr. A. W. Crawford (C) said

perative that he travel by tne that the Senior Member for St.
Shortest possible route, Joseph had claimed that the Gov-

“As far as this item is concern- ernment was not going to allow
ed, I would like to tell the Senior any Civil Servant to make them
Member for St. George that if his play fast and loose with the tax-
facts were right, his comments payers’ money, but it seemed to
would be quite deserving, but his him from what he had just said
facts cannot be more wrong”, Mr. that that was precisely what they
Adams said. were doing.

That $50 had not yet been , The item appeared very small
earned. The Accountant General but it was a very em chan pee
had said that the duties he was een soe ee | San wee toe
called to do might Tieeeet one sasooel their apprehension when
within the present time and March the rads the femark of the thin
31, a travelling allowance of $50.

e of the wedge.
The mere fact of its being done “F Senior Member for St.

showed that one could not incur Joseph had clearly said that the
expenses. in Barbados and then functions of that office called for
ask the House of Assembly to pay travelling and one could only
them. When the estimates came wonaer how that official accepted
oefore the House, there would be the post when he knew he would
n item for travelling for that have to travel and knew that no
department. proven “= made to e =
at members travelling allowance, >
Bp Reng Soins “had to Lew mse! ut some nm
nenk up for te aves and: Wie} ead cake thos play fast and
; loose with the taxpayers’ money,
’ Straying From Point he wanted them to pay for trav-
Mr. Barrow (L) said that in de- ejling.
fending the item, the Senior Mem- The Senior Member for the
ber for St. Joseph had strayed City had emphasised the necessi-
from the point raised by Honour- ty for clearly defining the func-
able Honours! The specific point tions. j
he had been called upon to answer Not Entitled To More
was whether travelling was :@ Obviously, originally the Gov-
duty of the Accountant General ernment did not feel that there
and whether he was an auditor was need for that travelling
or not. After a careful scrutiny, allowance. If the only travelling
he could find no provision which was from the Audit Office to the

ave the Accountant Gen- Treasury where they lost $14,000,
we power to go around and he did not see where the travel-
investigate. ling was in that, If as had been

As the Senior Member for made clear, his work necessitated

travelling, then, when he accept-

ed the work, he must have felt

that the money was enough for
On

\e sober reflection the
oceasion when perhaps money for reo a ae Toten

a car for someone was to be voted, would agree that whatever
Honourable members would be travelling that officer was then
reminded that they had agreed in going, was originally intended
principle to it. that the money they were paying
Allowance Necessary him was enough to do it, He
Mr. Adams observed that he was not entitled to any more. :
had been quict because the Hon- Mfr. E. D. Mottley (E) said on
ourable member was supposed to had thought that the Sen -
be a member of the Labour Member for St. Joseph woulc
Party. He said that there was no have said that in view of certain
travelling that the Accountant recent happenings, they ’ owe
General or any Civil Servant had providing some travelling allow-
to do unless it was laid down by ance for that department, but he
law or regulations. The Account- had not said that. That member
ant General had been responsible had gone on to say that there
for pointing out past leakages in would be an allowance for trav~

——<—<$—$< $$

EYOND
EUPHRATES

Autobiography
1928—1933

FREYA STARK

ON SALE AT

Christ Church had put it, that
might only be putting in the thin
edge of the wedge and on another



| ADVOCATE STATIONERY |



elling for that officer when the
estimates came down. He did
not agree with that.

He said that if that officer was
travelling allowance,
then for that matter, the Colo-
nial Secretary could get.

Motion For Deletion

He would be prepared to say
that the money for travelling
should be voted to the Department
as it was voted to other depart-
ments, but not that it should ho
voted to that officer. He thought
that was the contention of Hon-
ourable members.

Mr. Mottley then moved that
that item, Travelling—$50 be de-
leted. This motion was seconded
by Mr. O. T. Allder (1).

Mr. Allder (I) said that before
fereeing with the motion for
deletion, he had tried to convince
himself that the travelling was
necessary, but had been unable to
do so. He never knew that the
Accountant General had to do
travelling in his job and unless
full details had been given as to
the travelling he had to do, he
could not vote for it.

Mr. A. E. S. Lewis repeated
some of the arguments he had pre-
viously used, He said that he had
been trying all along to get some-
bedy to tell him the actual duties
of the Accountant General. If they
could find out what he had to do,
they would be able to come to a
decision. The Senior Member for
St. Joseph could only say that his

duties entailed travelling, but
members wanted to know what
duties entailed travelling. The

point about an officer having to
take the shortest route was no
point. The question was how many
times he could take these short
routes, how many times in a day
say, he could go to St. Andrew if
he wanted to do so.

The Senior Member for St. Jos-
eph had previously referred to the
Auditor General as a watch dog of
the treasury, were they then hav-
ing two watch dogs?

The motion that the item be
deleted was defeated by a 9—8
majority. The voting was as fol-



lows:— For the deletion Messrs.
Lewis, Crawford, J.C. Mottley,
Allder, Haynes, E. K. Walcott,
E. D. Mottley and Goddard.
Against the deletion:— Messrs.
Miller, Talma, Bryan, Holder,

Adams, Cummins, Cox, Brancker
and Mrs. Bourne.

Court Reporter

When the Head “Legal” came to
be considered, Mr, Brancker (L)
suggested that the two High Courts
should sit simultaneously.

He also said that there was need
for a regular court reporter. Lesse1
courts in the colonies had official
reporters, furthermore a high
court,

He said that at least one set of
officers who deserved their trav-
elling allowance were the Proba-
tion Officers. They did a good job.

Mr. Adams said that it was ne-
cessary to get reporters to take
counsel’s speeches and the Judge's
sum up in important cases, but a
reporter was not needed for every
case.

Mr. E. K. Walcott (E) said what
happened on account of the small
amount voted was that they did
not obtain proper court reports.
There would be need for at least
two reporters as a reporter neces-
sarily got tired after going on for
' long period taking notes. Any
move to get proper reporters to
take down the verbatim notes, he
would readily support,

Mr. Adams said that he would
bring it to the notice of the Execu-
tive Committee. He said that it
was true that the reporters could
£et more money, as in Barbados
they were inadequately paid.

Dilapidated Morgue

When the Head, “Police” came
up for consideration, Mr. Allder
drew it to the House’s attention
that the morgue at District “Cc”
was in a dilapidated condition and
also wanted cleaning. To such an
extent was the dilapidation that
when post mortem examinations
had to be performed, doctors gen-
erally refused to carry out the ex-
éminations there,

One item under “Police” for
which a supplementary amount is |
to be voted is “Forage.” Mr, All-
der said that he had always sug-
gested that formal functions which
cost too much should be done
away with. The number of horses
which were kept should be reduced
or there should be none at all.
Those horses were only kept so
that when His Excellency was go-

ing to the races, they would curvet|

about him.
He said that Government should
see that the police vans were not
run about unnecessarily.
Under the item, “Upkeep
Motor Launches,” he said

of
that

t
by police who kept surveillance
‘
t



FLASH

FACTORY OWNERS

Ranging from

+
%
4
%

| :
5,
*
%,
‘.
%
o
o
$
‘
»

No. 16, Swan Street

>

LPL ,



hese launches were usually tad . KNIGHT'S DRUGSTORES :

ver the yachts which belong to |
ich men, They should be made to $

PLLA LOPS

We are now in a position to supply you

with your Requirements of

GALVANISED PIPE

ALSO
A LARGE ASSORTMENT OF FITTINGS



ge Pay Us a Visit To-day and Get Yours



BARBADOS HARDWARE Co. Ltd.

(THE HOUSE FOR BARGAINS)



}

pay taxes just as fishermen paid.

Mr. Lewis drew attention to the! 5's. ‘Kingsborough. ss.
note on Fodder which said that in| Lady Nelson. SS. Matheos, S.S.Herds
order to effect an economy, edtly |
in the year, the amount of fodder | pajudina
supplied to the horses was reduced; ! Dominicano, 5S K. Bittencourt, $8 r
it was necessary however to re- | Quercy.

store the former ration so as to
preserve the condition of the an-

imals. The price of fodder has also |5 S$. Queen of Bermuda, 8.5

increased considerably.

Mr, Lewis said he wondered at}

the temerity someone had had in
placing such a note before the
House

“I do not see how ou can buy!s.S. Willow Branch, §.S. Alcoa Pilgrim

horses,” he said, “and give the
police department and they, send
and tell you that they deliber-
ately refused to give the horses
the adequate amount because of
economy, and then increase it to
bring them back to their former
state.”
Investigation

They should be able to take

the particular person and treat



| advise that they can now communicate
} with the following ships through the!
Barbados

PAGE SEVEN



‘In Touch With Barbados

ESTIMATES,

Coastal Station

Cable and Wireless (West Undies) Ltd

Pimples Go

Coast Station
ss. 8 “Ss. nods ss} Cause Killed in 3 Day
| ayite, ss. can Woateee SS. Athos ause n a 5

‘The very first
derm begins te
\ agic, Use

plication of Nixe-
ar away pimples
ixoderm tonight

Naviero, 8.8



man, S&S. Aleoa Pointer,

SS. Vikland . S
8.5. Antelope Hills,

5S. Arneta, 5.5
SS Argentina, S.S. Nuevo

1 will soon see your skin be-

. soft. smooth and ¢lear. Nixg-
derm is a new discovery that kills
ml parasites on the skin that
$.S. Genera! Vhoples, Boils, Red Blotches,
Artigas, SS _ Francisco P. Hart, 8.5 locema, Ringworm, and ions.
Rio Atuel, S.S. Alagoas, SS. Italia, $8 tk ave The Gave tate

: . . er. 1 you rem

Cristobal, S.S. Oslofjord, S.S Callipoy the tiny _faweun of” rene ain
Compero Nixoderm from your chemist to-

8.8. Trocas,

}5.S. John Chandris, $.S. Frances, 8.5 oder the positive guarantee that

| Guifglow, S.S. Brazil, S.S. Pygmalion Nixederm wit banish Imples apd”

5.S. Rosario, S.\S. Samana, S.S. Dolores lear your skin soft and smooth or .

{8 S. Nagu, S.S. Romana, S.S. Rav Bt Fez

ranger, SS. Trans Pacific, S.S. Lady ack ©

| Rodney, $8. Inventor, S.S. Sundial, S.S Nixoderm omat ¥

| Mcoa Clipper, S.S. Rosewood, S.8 Delft fer Skin Troubles package..." ~
ay



him worse than the horses were}!

treated. A charge should be
brought against him by the
S.P.C.A. An investigation shouid

be held on the matter,
Mr. J. E. T. Brancker said}
that one could only suggest that|

the horses of the Royal Canadian |

Mounted Police were not kept
in a half starved condition. He!
wondered whether when _ they

were kept in that condition, they

could better play polo,

When one read the note, one
wondered whether one was in
wonderland. Apart from the
question of the animals, the |
person who was in charge of the
Police Department was elected

chairman of the S.P.C.A,

Every week the police prosecu-
ted people for
animals and there it was animals
were being half starved,

Mr. Mottley said that the fact
that the cost of living had gone
up might be put as a reason for
the required additional amounts
He, however, wondered wheth:

members knew that there was a! ¥

grave dissatisfaction inside the
Police Force. Besides things that
should be gone into, there should
be a greater rent allowance, he
said,

The other Heads were passed
after further discussion and the
Resolution finally passed,



Jca Announce
Industrial
Developnient Plans

From Our Own Correspondent
KINGS) UW, Jan,
Jamaica Hauxite Limited
nounced today a _ bigger pro-
gramme of bauxite mining and
aluminium manufacture totalling
£ 30,500,000.
Simultaneously
Government
team of

2.
an-

the Jamaica

announced that a
British Industrialists
were being invited here to con-
sider in detail what schemes tor
industrial development might be
encouraged in Jamaica and what
measures might be taken to at-
tract private capital to finance
them,

At the same time the Govern-
ment is inviting the International
Bank to undertake a general
survey into the economic and
finance position of Jamaica and
make regommendations with an
eye to attracting US. capital.

A bill to set up an industrial
development corporation to
finance government funds is also
before the legislature on similar
lines to the agricultural develop-
ment corporation now being set
up by Government.



ARE
YOU
F SCARED

BY

RHEUMATIC
PAINS?

Here's the sure and certain
way to conquer them, Rub

SACROOL

and it’s penetrating powers
will act quickly and effec-
tively



On Sale at

SOOO



oO 14 AAP LAs



NEWS!

AND CONTRACTORS

%” to 3” Bore

"Phone 2109, 4406, or 3524

Â¥
990060900000"

}

|

ill-treating |

SLOCCSCESSSE SSS SSS SPP ELE LLLP LLL LLL APA



3, ote
=



8.8 Alcoa Puritan, S.S. Bayano, S.S
Agamemon, 5.S. Pacific Unity, Calabar

The Mayonnaise

WITH THE DELICIOUS

Flavowl







x

Local Agents:
T. Geddes Grant Ltd., Bridger own





SOO PPLEL LSE OP PSPSPS PSOE PEPE AAPA POO
MI

s *

x Introducing = =<

+
+
%

S TRUE POSTURE CHAIR

LG

SO

-

PROS,
CLL CPOCOCPE OCLC

4 6%

-



Mili
Advantages embodied in these fine CHAIRS include— &

ws | atu " +

@ Perfect Balance %

@ Adjustable Seat and Back :

@ Seat Anatomically Designed %

@ Beautiful Upholstery

@ Fitted with Casters or Rubber Cushioned
Domes.

See them on display at —

S. P. Musson, Son & Co., Ltd.
Dial 3713

LLL CELL LLLP MO

-

5,
x

POCO OS SPSS

OOP OLE CLOO OS POPOVOEPE LLLP LAPS

Don’t Ruin Your
TIRES!

Putting Wheels in Line

£59000G098



Can Save 5000 Miles g
of Rubber !

If your wheels are just the

slightest bit out of Hine it

ean mean that your tires

will wear unevenly be worn at

out a year ahead of time ,

Let us chuck, toe-in and McEncarneys bY
realign wheels, balance 4 ° %
tires and cross-switeh them Sewice Station %

for you! >



Firestone

The Fyre with Built-in Dependability

— ae

} on’t Risk :
ad Brakes! ;



.
. ,

% We'll Adjust "Em $

.

% Expertly for %

soe -

Summer Driving! %

ac ' Py

€ Don’t take a chance on g

faulty brakes that can g

ar eS mean danger to life and s-

Property Well clean 2g

brakes, repack front wheel %

bearings, lubricate brake

McEnearney | itiw'sist osc

bleed all brake lines and re-
fll brake master cylinder

& Co. Ltd. | â„¢ :
0., ° OFFICE... ..4493 8

SOSSSSSS



8

» ‘4
% WORKSHOP 4203 $
. .
1% PARTS DEPT 4673 8
, “
'S NIGHT 4125 %
y .
od %
Seocesesesesteeeseeeeeeeseseeeseoosososoesoosous!





PAGE EIGHT

CLASSIFIED ADS.

FOK RENT



















@nmnouncements in Carib Calling the
charge is $3.00 for any number of words

TELEPHONE 2508. HOUSES
einen
< BERESFORD’—From ist February,
For Births, Marriage or age FOR SALE the modern bungalow in Maxwell's Road,

fully furnished, all m









| PUA

persons

BARBADOS ADVOCATE

¢ NOTICES

i

NOTICE
Re Estate of
ALLAN FITZHERBERT CLARKE
deceased
NOTICE IS HEREBY GIVEN that all
ing any debts or claim upon



up to 50 and 6 cents per word for each ~~ —-—-s-- — Appe * Goo or effecting the estate of Allan Fitz-
additional word. Terms cash. Phone 2508 - ‘ herbert Clarke late of Kirtons in the
- between 8.30 and 4 p.m., 3113 for Death BUNGALOW t Garrison, 4 bed-| parish of Saint Philip who died in this





























Netices rooms and ali conv erences,
only after 4 p.m $80 60 a month ct W. Wells at
eae ae T. Geddes Grant Ltd. Phone 2861 or

Heme 4025 -3n

BIRTH

0.1.52

CAR—One Prefect Ford m good con-
dition. Phone 4351,



27.1.52—3n.

——_—_——_—___
KORBIN-On danuany 28,

FURNISHED ROOM—O:



















se
1952, at Dr Worthing. Phone 8401 105 sfte: > 2 Me
Bayley’s Clinic, to Lili, nee Matalon, wife] | CAR—Ford V8 in very kood condition cients the Leste Ot ten abate Gubng
of leving Korbin of “Worthy Down”,| (M_ 1763) always owner driven. Apply} LILYVILLE-—9th Avenue, Belleville, 2! the parties entitled thereto having regard
Top Rock, Christ Church, a son. Mother| Redman & Taylor's Garage or contact | bedrooms and usual conveniences. Phone}. the debts and claims onlg of whieh 1
find son are doing well 90 1.52—1n. | N. Niles: Dial 3213. 30.1.52—2n. | 4595 29.1.82—2.} chail then have had notice, and that
a eg oe Pet ees a ae st p ible for assets so dis-
GAR—ibs) Packard Sedan in excellent | MORNING SIDE—Dathaheba, February |i ,qnau,"0t be Me y
SIMMONS Qn January 28th, 1952; to] running condition, 5 good tyres, mileage|to June. Telephone 2481 Mrs ae + aan ee eee
Mr & Mrs. Lisle Hutson Simmons, | 24.000. Dial Mr, Peter King 4001 Chandler 29.1. 86—Sn: | ina une ch aueh AieUan.
“Hillcress,” St. George. A_ son 30. 1.53—4n “And all persons indebted to the said
30 1.52—I1n ONE FURNISHED BUNGALOW—At| cctate are requested to settle their
CAR—Vauxhall 1947 12 H.P. very food | Coral Sands, Worthing, with Silver and] seeounts without delay
IN MEMORIAM pees. See oe 27.1.52—3n. | Linen. Good sea bsthing. For further] Dated ims 30th day of January, 1952.
particulars apply Alma Lashley, No. 6 OTTALES CLARKE,

CAR-—2-seater Ford V-8, accommodates
5 persons comfortably, (De Luxe Coupe

Coral Sands. 30.1.52—t.f.n

DA COSTA—In ever tender memory of







our darling younger son Patrick — | model), General condition excellent. Dial ROOSEVELT Maxwell Coast Road

Lt., 1st Battalion, Irish Guards, killed in | 4353 between 8 a.m. and 4 p.m. dat'y or | Fully furnished, including Frigidaire,

action at Anzio on January 30th 1944 after 4 p.m. Dial 4882. 29.1.52—4n |telephone and r iffusion. Good sea-
R.1I.P. bathing Phone 2224

His ‘ever sorrowing Father and Mother. 'CLE—Only one (1) in stock, 30.1 52—t in



Ambassador Supreme,
h.p. $605.00. Terms.
LTD.

30.152

PERSONAL

1 Spring-frame, 2
A BARNES & CO.,

26.1.52—4.i.n





SEASIDE HOUSE on Lighthouse Road
(Enterprise) Christ Church, Water, light,
garage, safe sea-bathing. Moderate rent



——
MOTORCYCLE—5 HP. B.S.A. Twin





for careful tenant. Apply: Hill House,
(X-812) does 8 m. P.H., effortiessiy, | via Oistin, Lodwe Road 30.1.52—2n.
but too many speed traps. Dene 16,000 _

miles. Well cared and looks new. Too|] TWO LARGE COOL ROOMS—Furnished,









The public are hereby warned against) good for you, but only $600.00. Dial 8354.| running water, with or without meals
giving credit to my wife, RINE BLACK-! Desmond Johnson. 30.1.52—In. | 10 minutes walk to Yacht Club or City
MAN (nee Blackman) as I do not hold Woodside Gardens. Dial 3356
myself responsible for her or anyone else ELECTRICAL 22.1.52-—t.f.0
ee ig Ri aatg or debts in my name oacasessineengeipareenesnane one ee _
unless by a written order signed by me.]| “On Deane ~~ WINSLEY Bathsheba, February to

Signed ERNEST R. D. BLACKMAN, WATER HEATERS—Electric hot water} yune. Telephone 2461, Mrs, W. Chandler,

Bromefield, heaters, 12 gallon capacity, only $105 * 26.1.52—3n
St. Lucy each K. R. Hunte & Co., Ltd. Dial =
29 1.52—2n, | 4611 or 5027, 29.1.52—3n







The public are hereby warned age
giving credit to my wife, VELTINE
ALLEYNE (nee Evelyn) as I do not hold
myself responsible for her on anyone else
contracting any debt or debts in my name
unless by a written order signed by me

Signed LEONARD ALLEYNE,
Clevedale Gap,
St. Miehael.
30,1,.52—2n

WANTED

FURNITURE

CHAIRS, Chairs, Chairs and other
furniture and all sorts of fittings for
your home. A. BARNES & Co., Ltd.

18,1,52—t.i.n,

CHEVAL MIRROR—Solid Mahogany
frame, tm good condition, inquire: Mrs.
Cc. R. Cowan, Marine Hotel,

PUBLIC SALES



REAL ESTATE

Aerated Seda
guaranteed con









AS a going concern (1)
Water Factory in
with all Fittings.
3,000 dozen Patent Bottles with cases
Monthly sales of Business can be known
to any would-be purchaser

For further information Dial 5075.

29,1.52—3n



30.1. 52-

MECHANICAL

2n.


































—_— -_—_—_—— BICYCLES, a shipment of yell perenne ney teenie aera
known B S.A eheiee to heh” Meet. The undersigned offers for sale ALL

HELF Gents various sizes and models. Redman| THAT certain messuage or dwellinghouse
& Taylor's Garage Ltd 30.1.52—4n, | Called “Greendykes” together with the/

__._____. | 8,800 square feet of land thereto belonging

ee eee situate at Amity Lodge Terrace, Christ
COUNTER GIRL WANTED — Apply: I Church. Building contains three bed-
Caribbean Studios at Cave Shepherd & MISCELLANEOUS rooms with running water In each, gar-

month,
30.1.52—In

Co. Twenty-five dollars per age, servants’ rooms, and all conveniences

Electric and telephone services at
For all further particulars and inspec-

— Of every description






meet ANT QUES
NURSE—A







reliable nurse for taking] Glass, China, oid Jewels, fine Silver] tion apply to W. NORMAN ALLEYNE,
care of two small children. Mrs. J. E.| Watercolours, Early books, Maps, Auto-] “Fairways”, Worthings, Dial 6164
Marson, ‘Las. Palmas", Marine Gardens.|] graphs etc., at Gorringes Antique Shop 30.1.52—Hn
30.1.52—4n. | adjoining Royal Yacht Club. candied Staite eat
SALE NOTICE



Lene nnn EEEEEEeENEE 3.10.51—+,f.0
STENOGRAPHER & TYPIST for our — wares
Office, apply by letter and in person-—

T. Geddes Grant Ltd.

The undersigned will offer for sale at
their office, No, 17, High Street, Bridge-
town, on Friday, the Ist February, 1952 at
1.30 p.m. the newly erected stone wall

AUTO POLI
ment of the pop
23,1.52—t f.n.| ER AND POLISH just arrived-—Old Cars



dition } instead of ‘Gaskin
Motor Van and about | all times thereafte

stand or
ereby

the 24th day of April 1951, are
equired to send in particulars

of their claims duly attested to the un

in care of D. Lee Sarjeant, |
12 James Street, Bridgetown.)
on or before the 10th day of April 1952,

dersigned,
Solicitor,

Qualified Administratrix,
Estate of Allan Fitzherbert Clarke,
ceased,

I SELWYN WINFIELD BLADES here-
tofore sometimes called and known by the
natne of Selwyn Winfield Gaskin of
Marley Vale in the parish of Saint Philip
in this Island, Assistant Schoolteacher
hereby give public notice that on the
26th day of January 1952 I formally and
absolutely renounced and relinquished
and abandoned the use of my said sur-
name “GASKIN" and then assumed and
adopted and determined thenceforth on
all oceasions whatsoever to use and sub-
scribe the surname of “Blades’’ instead
of the said surname of “Gaskin”

And I give further notice that by, a
Deed Poll dated the 26th day of January
1952 duiy executed and attested fand
recorded in the Kegistration Office of
this Island on the 26th day of January
1952 & formally and absolutely renounced
and abandoned the said surname of
“Gaskin” and declare that I had as-
sumed and adopted and intended thence-
forth upon all occasions whatsoever to
use and subscribe name of “Blades”
and so as to be at
r called known and

name of “Blades”







described by the
exclusively :
Dated the 26th day of January 1952,
SELWYN WINFIELD BLADES,
late SELWYN WINFIELD oe

_——$———L
THE BARBADOS MUTUAL
LIFE ASSURANCE SOCIETY
EXTRAORDINARY GENERAL
MEETING
NOTICE is hereby given that an Ex-
traordinary General Meeting of the
qualified Polievholders of the above
named Society will be heid at the office
of the Society, Beckwith Place, Bridge-
town, at 2 o'clock p.m. on Friday, 15th
February 1952, for the purpose of con-













WEDNESDAY, JANUARY 30, 1952



GOVERNMENT NOTICE

DEPARTMENT OF HIGHWAYS & TRANSPORT—VACANCY
FOR FOREMAN MECHANIC
Applications are invited for the post of Foreman Mechanic High-
ways & Transport Department.

The post is pensionable with salary on the scale $1,920 x 120—
2,520 per annum. In addition a non-pensionable cost of living allow-
ance is payable in accordance with approved rates. Point of entry
into scale will be determined on the basis of experience and qualifica-
tions. Contributions at the rate of 4% of salary will be required
under the Widows and Orphans Pension Act 1928. No quarters are
provided,

Appointment will be on probation for two years and will be made
subject to the selected candidate being passed as medically fit for
employment in the Public Service.

Candidates should not be less that thirty (30) years of age and
should preferably be practising mechanics employed in a supervisory
capacity with at least ten (10) years’ experience in Motor Mechanics
and Workshop practice. They should have a theoretical knowledge
of Internal Combustion Engines and will be required to keep the
Labour and Distribution Rolls.

Applications should be submitted to the Director, Department of
Highways and Transport, Bridgetown, to reach him not later than
noon on Saturday, 9th February, 1952,

30.1.52—2n.

OFFICIAL NOTICE

BARBADOS. IN Th COURT OF CHANCERY
IN PURSUANCE of the Chancery Act, 1906, I do hereby give notice to all

persons having or claiming any estate, right or interest or any lien or ine ce
in or affeeting the property hereinafter mentioned (the property of the defendant)
to bring before me an account of their claims with their witnesses, documents
and vouchers to be examined by me on any Tuesday or Friday between the
hours of 12 noon and 3 o'clock in the afternoon at the Registration Office, Public
Buildings, Bridgetown, before the 22nd* day of December 1961, in order that such
claims may be reported on and ranked according to the nature and priority thereef
respectively, otherwise such persons will be precluded from the benefits of any
egcree and be deprived of all claims on or against the said property

Plaintiff; PETER NIGEL HUAN JOHNSON

Defendant: DORCAS WILLIAMS

PROPERTY: ALL THAT certain piece or parcel of land situate in Upper Collymore
Rock in the parish of Saint Michael and Island of Barbados containing by
admeasurement one rood be the same more or less butting and bounding on
lands now or late of James H,. Wiles, of Catherine Wiles, of Clement Lucas,
of James Ford and of Miss Louisa Mallet, and on the Public Road or however
else the same may butt and bound Together with the messuage or Dwelling-
house called “AVEDON” and all and singular other the houses and outhouses
both freehold and chattel on the said land erected and built standing and
being with the appurtenances

Bill filed 12th October, 1951.

Dated 19th October, 1951.

|

H, WILLLAMS,
Registrar-in-Chanceny.

OFFICIAL NOTICE

BARBADOS. IN THE COURT OF OHANCERY

In pursuance of the Chancery Act 1906, I do hereby give notice to all persons
having or claiming any estate right or interest to any lien or encumbrances in or
affecting the property hereinafter mentioned (the property of the defendant) to
bring before me an account of their claims with their witnesses documents and
veuchers to be examined by me on any Tuesday or Friday between the hours of
12 noon and 3 o'clock in the afternoon at the Registration Office, Public Buildings,
Bridgetown, before the 4th day of March 1952, in order that such claims
may be reported on and ranked according to the nature and priority thereot
respectively otherwise such persons will be precluded from the benefits of any
decree and be deprived of all claims on or against the said property,

sidering and a Pes ba) = without | Plaintif; ENA MAY GALE
amendment the following Resolution: .
RESOLVED that Clause 5 of the Deed Defendant; CLARA ALSOP GALS
ot Settlement be deleted and the fol- PROPERTY: FSRSTLY ALL THAT certain messuage or dwellinghouse called
lowing Clause substituted therefor;— PARADE VIEW" with the land whereon the same stands and thereto belonging
6. No assurance or assurances shail| situate at St. Anns, The Garrison in the parish of Christ Church in this nd








ceieninte tates idan iareieiscmtenanrtreetinie
Traffie Clerks for our Office, All appli-

cants must apply in writing, with refer-| Garage.

ences and photo hs, to BRITISH
WEST INDIAN A AYS LTD., Lower
Broad Street, Bridgetown.



REDS INVITE U.S,

ENVOY TO DEBATE

COPENHAGEN, Jan, 29.
Danish Communists on Mon-
day night invited the American
ambassadress,

derson to a meeting to discuss the ;, BARNES & Co., Ltd.

negro problem in the United
States. The Ambassadress how-
ever, had to refuse the invitation
because she was giving a dinner

party for the well-known Ameri-| LTD.

can negro lawyer, Mys. Edith
Sampson, guest at the Ambassa-

dor’s residence during her stay} $3.36 to $6.24, A

in Denmark.—U.P,



OUR AGENTS are making £100
and more by taking orders fow
Personal Christmas Greeting Cards

and Calenders, On
Britain’s largest and
Publishers will send a
Free Sample Book for 1953 to
Genuine Agents Write today.
Highest Commission paid. Jones,
Williams & Co., Dept. 9, Victoria
Works, Preston, England.

request,
foremost
Beautiful





T0-DAY'S NEWS FLASH

WHITAKER'S ALMANAC
Unabridged Edition

BROWN’S NAUTICAL ALMANAC
1952

DAILY MAW. YEAR BOOK 1952
PLASTIC SCHOOL RULERS

VIOLIN BOWS & BOW HAIR
PIANO INSULATORS
SUNSHADES FOR DOLLS

SEPARATOR OIL by the Pint.
— at —



1952

JOHNSON'S STATIONERY
& HARDWARE



ORIENTAL
SOUVENIRS

SILKS, CURIOS, ARTS
VENDEMOS, SEDAS,
JOYERIAS YÂ¥ ARTISTICAS
CURIOSIDADES, TRAIDOS
DE LA INDIA CHINA e

EJIPTO

THANI’S
Pr, Wm. Hry. St., Dial 3466



Our many BARGAINS inelude
ATTRACTIVE

LUNCH TINS

Strong metal
with durable
finish in 3 col- (.



ous.
(. W. Hutchinson
& CO, LTD.
Broad St. — Dial 4222



IMPROVE YOUR
SPEECH

Speak and Write correctly
and with style.
Join the Society for Fluent
English .

Call ate .
Miss JULIET SHEPHERD,
“Indhurst,” Westbury Road,

For particulars of Enrol-
ment Fees for Written Lec-
amount to $2.00 per month.
First Payment on Enrolment.
Enrolment from 4.30 p.m.—
6.00 p.m, Monday-Saturday .




27.1,52. | 300 copies left to be sold out immediate





look like new after using LARWAX—
really marvellous! Dial 4391, Courtesy
25.1.52.—6.

BARBADOS ANNUAL REVIEW





Last

A real delight to Barbadians abroad.
Buy now and post early. 3/- each at
Advocate Stationery, Roberts High Street,
Weatherhead Drug Store. 29.1 ,52--3n

EGGS—-Pure

bred Barred Plymouth













bungalow called “MIDGET” standing on
8,700 sq. feet of land at Welches New





Road, St. Michael. The dwellinghouse

verandah, sitting and dining
rooms, 2 bedrooms, kitchenette, toilet
and bath, electric Ji#ht and running;
water, Garage and servant’s room in
yard. Approximately half of the land |

is enclosed.
Inspection any day
Miss Cozier next door
For further particulars

1

on application to

and condi-



Rock eggs for hatching, 6c h.] tions of sale apply:—

Infertiles replaced John Alleyne, COTTLE, CArFORD & Coa.,

Ebworth St. Peter, Phone 91-20 .. Solicitors.

12.1.52—3n 20.1.52—9n

i ‘Long Playing Records and 78 RPM SALE NOTICE

Mrs, Eugeni An-| Records and we book orders too. A.§ The undersigned will offer for sale
at their office, No, 17, High Street,
18.1.52—t.f.n, Bridgetown, on Thursday the 3ist day



MAKE-U-WELL HERBS—Nature's Cure
for constipation, Rheumatism, Indigestion,
Kidney and Bladder Diseases, and Slusg-

KNIGHT'S
30.1, 52

gish Liver. Price 2/- box.
-3n

ee —_
SUITCASES — Valises, attache cases,
sturdy and lightweight, double lock:

BARNES & CO., LTD.









24.1.52—t.f.n.

STOVES...PLORENCE OI STOVES in
2 and 3 Burner Models. GREEN ARROW
Stoves in 2 Burner Models only.—Laurie
Dash & Co., Tudor Street, Phone 5061
25.
TORNADO—International K.41, Beauti~
ful condition, excellent equipment, good
racing record. Cost $700.00 now $500.00.
No offers. Hicks. Telephone 3189.
18.11. 51--t.f.n

WATER TAFFETA—Moire
lovely quality for your lovely
modern shades 36” wide $1
get from Kirpalani, Swan St

finish,
dress,
yard.
ret
30,1

an





52—1n

icine may be just what
you need. Go to your
chemist and obtain a
supply of De Witt's
Pills right
now.






















De Witt’s Pills are — £
manufactured under strictly hygienic
conditions and the ingredients con-
form to rigid standards of purity.

GLEN Camel) Co!

Phone 4640























DESO SOOOCOOOL.

THE FIRM WITH THE



of January, 1952, at 2 p.m. the desirable
building lot of land containing 17,964
square feet or thereabouts situate on
top of Rendezvous Hill lying to the east
of and adjacent to the lands of Cloud
Walk the residence of Sir Dudley Lea-
cock, The site is in within easy reach
of the Golf Chib and commands a
beautiful view.

For further particulars and conditions
of sale apply to:—

COTTLE, CATFORD & Co.,

Solicitors,
20.1.52—10n.



The undersigned will offer for sale at
their office, No, 17, High Street, Bridge-
town, on Friday the Ist February, 1952,
at 130 p.m. the dwellinghouse called
“ELLERSLIE” with the land thereto
containing 1 rood, 3 perehes or there-
abouts adjoining Dr. Bancroft's _resi-
dence at Lower Fontabelle, The house
contains downstairs, drawing and dining
rooms, breakfast room, two bedrooms,
toilet and bath and upstairs 3 bed-
rooms. Electric light, company's water
and gas turned tn,

Inspection any day between the hours
of 1 p.m. and 3 p.m. on application on
the premises

For further particulars and conditions
of sale apply to:—

COTTLE, CATFORD



\

& Co. |

Solicitors

20.1.62—1in. |
j



AUCTION

By Public Auction
Street, on Friday



t our office, James
the 8th February 1952

at 2 p.m.
1, The dweiling house known as
“Edgeclifl’, with forty six acres of land

in the parish of St
six acres are arable
is let to monthiy and weekly tenants
2. 1,450 square feet of land at. the
corner of Amen Alley and Marhill Street
with the store thereon and the fixtures
and fittings therein, and the entire stock-
in-trade of the drug business known as
“Olympia Pharma ,
For further particulars and conditions
of sale apply to
HUTCHINSON

John, of which twenty
The entire property





& BANFIELD
30,1.52-—5n

UNDER THE SILVER
HAMMER

MILK AND PEPPERMINTS

On FRIDAY the 1ST February we will
sell at our Mart 17 High Street 40 cz
Condensed Milk, 240 Tins Peppermin












containing by admeasurement 6502'4 Square feet or thereabouts butting and bouna~
ing on a place called or known as Sea View Hotel, on lands formerly of Mary Ann
Cooper, but now or late of Frank Craig, and on the public road or however else
amount in excess of $25,000.00 is imme-| the same may butt and bound SECONDLY ALL THAT certain messuage dwelling-
diately reassured with zome other Com-| house or store situate in High Street in the City of Bridgetown in this Island
pany or Society of unques{ionable stand-| aud numbered 15 in the said Street together with the land whereon the same
ing, and the Society thereby reli¢ved of| stands and thereto belonging containing by admeasurement 1116 square feet or

be accepted and no policy or policies
shall be issued on any one life for a
sum exceeding $25,000.00 unless the



any direct lability in respect of such | thereabouts butting and bounding on the premises known as Number 156 Roebuck
reassured amount, Street aud 14 High Street and on the premises known 4s No. 16 High Street and on
Provided always that in arriv‘og at) High Street aforesaid or however else the same may butt and bound AND







the same aggregate sum of $25,000.09 no| THIRDLY AL, THAT certain piece or parcel of land with the dwellinghouse

account shall be taken of existing or| thereon called “BARTICA” containing by admeasurement 9016 square feet oF
prospective Reversionary Bonus Addi-| thereabouts (formerly part of two acres and thirty one perches) and also 840
tion. | square feet of the public road situate in or near the district called the Cocaaput
C. K, BROWNE, | Walk beyond the district called Hustings in the said paris of Christ Church in

Secretary. | {his Island butting and bounding on iands now or late of one Mrs, Inniss, on the

27.1.52—6n, Sea, on lands now or late of Marcus Grannum et al, and on the Public Road or





and bound Togegher with the messuages or
all other the erections and buildings on the
nd built standing and being with theit

however else the same may butt
dwelling houses and buildings and
said respective parcels of land erected a
| appurtenances.

Bill filed; 3rd December, 1951,
Dated: Sist December, 1951

Income Tax Notice



H, WILLIAMS,

NOTICE 1S HEREBY GIVEN that Registrar-in-Chancery.
1,3.

Income Tax returns are required from
every married man whose income is
.00 per annum or over, from every
ether person whose income is $720.00 per
annum or over and from companies
whether incorporated or unincorporated,
societies, persons engaged in any trade
or profession, and owners of land or
property whether a taxable income has
accrued during the past year or not,

Forms of Return may be obtained from
the Income Tax Department AFTER THE
1ST DAY OF JANUARY, 1952, and the
forms duly filled in must be delivered
to me on or before the following
respective dates;

1. Returns of persons whose books
were closed on the 3ist day of
December, 1961, on or before the
Sist day of Mareh, 1952,

Returns of persons whose principal
place of business is not situate in
the island on or before the 30th
day of June, 1962.

Returns of all other persons, on or
before the S3ist day of January,

1952.
N. D. OSBORNE,
Commissioner of

Income Tax and Death Duties (Ag.)
Note:—-Any person failing to make his
return within the due date will

be liable to a fine not exceeding

£100 and not less than £2 and

will be prosecuted



HOUSE & LAND

ENJOY SECURITY “ON ONE ACRE OF GOOD EARTH!”
A Comfortahge Home with ‘all Modern Conveniences, ‘in-
cluding Telephone, standing on_one acre of Good Land, suitable
for Kitéhen Garden; near town.

CECIL JEMMOTT, sit
Upstairs Knight’s Building,
33, Broad Street.
Phone 4563.

Consult:

to

We will wepicon your Orders
or...

Tins Koo Grapes—Varlo Peaches—Varlo Pears—Carlton Pears

ry
satisfactory reason is ea :
10.1,52—7n. | —Bendigo Apricots—Birds Cherries—Heinz Vegetable Salads



Revitalise Your

KIDNEYS

And You'll Feel Young—Look Young



—Velop Whole Tomatoes—Sawyers Whole Tomatoes—Smed-
leys Garden Peas—Farrows Processed Peas,
AND ALL OTHER 1ST CLASS GROCERY ITEMS.





Nothing ages men er woman more
than aches caused through bad kidney
retion. ‘This makes you suffer from = ae
Seeing an eee Burni Nesting
Passagds, Nerves, Dizzin Rheu- +
matism, Backache, Leg Pa Circles ¥ q N td
under Eyes, Swelien Ankl Loss of JONUN D. TA YLOR & 8$O! s L °



Appetite, Energy, etc., be se kid-
neys which should filter blood fail to
dhvow off acids and poisons, now creep-
tng to joints and muscles, tn 24 hours
Cystex kills kidney germs, strength-
eons kidneys and expels acids and poi-
sons, Get Cystex from any Chemist en
‘yarantee to put you right or money
back, Aet Now! In 24 hours you will
feel better and be completely well in

one week,
oe Cystex ji, Si:

antee pro.

5 OOS TOS O TOPO F OOTP SIDES TOP POP PNG

FOR SALE
-CARLDIEM”



Sale 12.90 o'clock Terms Cash For Kidneys, Kheumatiom, Bladder tects vou.
BRANKER, TROTMAN & CO-| .66.65656690000000600000",
Auctioneers. a x 3 a two storeyed dwellinghouse standing on 10,770 square feet
20.1.58—2n % NOTI x of land on the incomparable St, Lawrence Coast.
UNDER THE SILVER is CE Ss Excellent sea bathing. Dwellinghouse contains verandah
HAMMER 'Â¥ > upstairs and down, dining and sitting rooms, 4 bedrooms, pan-
SALE. TO DA , % en x try and kitchen, Electric light, gas and water installed, Garage
' eee ; ‘ and servants rooms.
The Household Effects of Ca (es , ;
Reed at No. ry Omicers uniter’ ces ab BLOCK STONE x Purchaser to have option of buying furniture and effects.
vitop inchuding good Alpine Gas Stove x Inspection by appointment. Dial 8137. (Mrs, K, R. Hunte).
NEKR, TROTMAN ¢ 12 FO! x The above will be offered for sale at public competition on
= Agaloneen. alana x R SALE 3 Friday, the 9th February, 1952, at 2 pm,, at the office of the
30 1,.62—1n. 1% x undersigned from whom further particulars and conditions of
So —— | , uild- <> sale can be obtained,
S209 D PDD 9 PO SPV OOSISSSE |B ‘oo uanitty = % COTTLE, CATFORD & CO.,
; =r. % Solicitors.
HOT WATER ON 38 ue eee $ 24.1.52—15n
S TAPfor YOUR BATH 3|% cm delivered immedl- 3) osscunsiserstootseortooossOoossoosooosso0os
With one of the lovely White Por- x y
celain Gas Geysers—You can have x Dial 2656. x %,
pares oe sak bat = x % >
nutes ©) up. < >
omically prised sh CHEAP to KEITH RAYSIDE, 8 %,
run with Natural Gas. A few are Manager . ‘ v
now available at your GAS % :
WORKS, BAY STREET. 3 3 Lodge Stone Works Co s
y
4

REAL ESTATE

JOHN M. BLADON & CO.
F.V.A.
BEPUTATION.

A.F.S.



e

Due to a change in schedule effective February,
Ist, 1952, will all passengers holding reserva-
tions with us on or after this date, please check

with our Office.



BRITISH WEST INDIAN
AIRWAYS LTD.

Lower Broad Street. Phone 2789, 4585

SELLS LOGEC PLOY

4
>

x

%
3

V66695

$6666
ee

SSOSSS SS SSO LOS SSS SSS SSS OSS SPSS

\

POSS






SHIPPING NOTICES

M.V. parenoce =

Carge Passengers for
St Teeets. St. Vincent, Grenada
and Aruba. Sailing Wednesday
28rd inst.

The M.VÂ¥. CARIBBEE wil)

Cargo and Passengers for

Besntinice a, Montserrat,

levis and . Kitts Sailing
Friday ist February 1952.

The MV. MONEKA will
aceept Cargo and Passengers for
Dominica, Antigua, Montserrat,
Nevis and St. Kitts. Sailing, Date
to be notified.







SCHOONER OWNERS’



rr |

Canadian National Steamships



Sails Arrives Sails
Boston Barbados Barbados
- 6 Feby. 7 Feby.

15 Feby. 24 Feby. 25 Feby





29 Feby. 9 March 10 March
- 23 Mareh 24 March
Arrives Arrives Arrives
Barbados Barbados Boston St. John Halifax
“LADY fe o by, 7 ¥Feby. 16 Feby. 17 Feby. 20 Feby
“CAN. * Soe 21 roy, _ 28 Feby. 1 March
“LADY wd . 8 March 9 March 20 March 21 March 24 March
“LADY a nee 22 March 24 March 3 April 4 April 7 April
“CAN. 2 29 .. 4 April 7 April a 14 April 17 April

For further particulars, apply to—



GARDINER AUSTIN & CO,, LTD,—Agents.

. HARRISON LINE

OUTWARD FROM THRE UNITED KINGDOM



Due
Vessel From Leaves Barbados
ss. “4 ye . New &
perennial le = ee oh gon. eg a
SS. “ i . Mbrougn a 1l an, st Jan.
SS. “I Piss . Liverpool 13th Jan. 27th Jan.
S.S. “PR " .-Lendon 25th Jan. 7th Feb.







HOMEWARD FOR THE UNITED KINGDOM

Closes in Barbados
6th Feb.

Vessel For
S.S. “HERDSMAN” .. London

For further Information apply 4 .. -

DA COSTA & co., LTD.—Agents







S$. S. “GOLFITO”







OUTWARD HOMEWARD
Arrive & Sail |Arrive & Sail) Arrive
Southington Barbados Barbados | Southampton
February 18th |February 27t! | March 9th March 29th
March 29th April 7th April 18th April 27th



cinemas Menuneen oteieaitentiahanervaeatea tage
Will all passengers for above sailings please note,
WILKINSON &

HAYNES CO., LTD,





CG" TRANSATL

Sailings from Southampton to Guadeloupe, Martinique, Barba-
dos, Trinidad, LaGuaira, Curacao, Cartagena and Jamaica.



From Southampton Arrives Barbados



“COLOMBIE”........ 7th Feb., 1952 20th Feb., 1952
“COLOMBIE”.... 20th Mareh, 1952 2nd April, 1952
*“DE GRASSE”.... 24th April, 1952 __.... 6th May, 1952

*Not calling at Guadeloupe,
SAILING FROM BARBADOS TO EUROPE

From Barbados Arrives Southampton
“COLOMBIE”.... 2nd March, 1952 14th March, 1952
“COLOMBIE”.,.. 13th April, 1952 25th April, 1952
*“GE GRASSE”.... 19th May, 1952 29th May, 1952

*Sailing Direct to Southampton.

K. M. JONES & CO., LTD.—Agents.





TX

SOSSSOSOOOS BODO OOOO OPI GS SSS GGG GIOIA SO TE
g
DO YOU REQUIRE PORCELAIN =
KITCHEN SINKS ? x
>
WE CAN SUPPLY %
- >
CENTRAL EMPORIUM x
Corner Broad & Tudor Streets, 3
os

Cable Address
“ Realtors "

REAL ESTATE AGENTS,

AUCTIONEERS,
VALUERS,

BUILDING CONTRACTORS.

151 & 152 Roebuck Street,
Telephone No. 4900.







WEDNESDAY, JANUARY 30, 1952 BARBADOS, ADVOCATE PAGE NINE

HENRY

SSS

[POND |
coh cacam |
rd

1 vena? } It’s easy to keep
oe = the lavatory clean!
—— Shake some ‘ Harpic’ into the bow!
leave overnight — then flush
That's all. No brush ts needed.
‘Harpic’s’ thorough action cleans,

ee disinfects aud deodorises the whole
°
POND’S COLD CREAA4 to cleanse and soften

pan—even where no brush can reach















BY ALAN STRANKS







your skin. , and leaves the air refreshed.
(OUMP THAT AMBULANCE, LINK, WHILE - "FLAME?! THIS :
/ SEE THIS rote aaa tha Fed WHAT'S GOT INTO - ’ 4 s bye POND’S VANISHING CREAN Harpic’ is safe to use in all lavatories,
4 WANT TO HEAR.... HER 2 SHE LOOKS ; y THE} |

including those connected to septic tanks.
SHINER ..1 MARRIED VOv. j

to protect your skin b Vv é
ven ARN, p 3 kin by day and to bold your

1
£ ore } ®
‘ paw" YOU KILLED TiVO MEN... powder matt. ; ;
| SOMEBODY CAUGHT YOU
MORE THAN ‘ \ ANO VOU WERE SENT THO SAFE LAVATORY CLEANSER
WaALe Pane AND THAT'S WHAT 0 DARTMOOR

» a1
GIVEN HER A + GOING TO GET~ 7 was... FLINT #
MAN-S/ZED THE TRUTH! | m

/, OKAY, SHINER # SURE! FLINT'S
1 GUESS WE FOXED NOBODY'S
FLINT ~ BRINGING | / FOOL!

FLAME HERE iN c

THAT THING...



ee ate a sn as





ae

otter these Beauty fod uct: s

|

Gland Discover
Restores Youi
in 24 Hours

ers from loss of vigour, nery-
. Weak body, impure blood,
and who are old and
heir time will be de-
a new gland diseov-
ry by an American doctor,

This new discovery makes it pos-
i . ible to quickly and easily restore vi-
| —_ | rour to your glande and body, to build
° ‘ ‘ . 4 rich, pure bloed, to strengthen your
POND’S FACE POWDER: clinging, EZ | inna Rnd momory and feet like a new
i a me | man in only 8 days. In fact, this dis-

perfumed, sceintifically blended, for ¢o

ery which is a home medicine in

a glamorously matt complexion. ms “ | p Asant, easy-to take tablet form,

does « , ule yperation#s and

POND’S LIPSTICK $ smooths being to bulld new Vigour and energy

80 easily onto your lips; the | lug! Ged'matral fm potions ame

i ribrs . ave ‘he sucee of this amas dis-

rich vibrant colour stays on | core eet VI-TAES. haw Diane

and on and on, | gr ig distributed

ull chemists here ur ra guarantee

fi of complete satisfmetion or money

Here is a range of beauty products used by lovely suciety women everv- back. Int other words, Vj-TABS snes

‘ . - ‘ : . make you fee igo c
where. Simple and inexpensive, they ar¢ all you need to keep you looking PS

flawlessly lovely, feeling your very best at all times

at all the best beauty counters.



“Tp tears
A LOT OF
NONSENSE

({ MONEY ONLY SPOILS
7 PEOPLE WHO ARE
{ SPOILED TO BEGIN WITH





S THATS WHY I TOLO ALVIN
I WAS GOING RIGHT AHEAD.
~ A AND ASK YOU FOR
] at =A FIFTY-CENT
« \>> RAISE IN MY
“ £72) ALLOWANCE
wf Ne

—-<\







2 irs young
wv + ‘ ‘or verely ptt the emply
You will find them | pe : vr oy baer,

Vi-T

Restores Manhood and Vitality

IT PAYS YOU TO DEAL HERE

B MEANWHILE, In THE space | WMAT'SA MATTER, LITTLE eer =
PRISON LABORATORY — | MAN ¥ YA BEEN JUMPY AS
AN OL HEN SINCE THAT
ROCKET LANDED!
HATCHIN’ ANY IDBAS®



B / THANKS, WARDEN! LOOKS

a LIKE YOU'LL HAVE TO PUT

{IMs US UP _IN PRISON UNTIL

| THIS T WE GET OUR ROCKET COME, I'LL SHOW YOU
| WE'LL DO ALL WE REPAIRED ’ AROUND THE PRISON

| CAN TO HELP you! y — WHILE YOU'RE WAITING /

SPECIAL offers to all Cash and Credit Customers for Monday to Wednesday only
SPECIAL OFFERS are now @vailable at our Hranechnes “Tweedside,
Speightstown and Swan Street

Usually NOW Usually Now
Tins Peaches 81 72 Pkgs. P. F. Sweet Biscuits — 36

Tins Corned Mutton 66 60 Tins Four Cows Milk 33 OSI
Pkgs. Quaker Oats 30 27 Tins Smedley Peas 49 45

D. V. SCOTT & Co. Ltd. Broad: Street

THE COLONNADE GROCERIES

NY PEOPLE EVER
TO SEE THis
“As spectators! }*



Ca SS I ee CES a as a ee
JOHNNY HAZARD BY FRANK ROBBINS

WHICH IS TO GET INTO

THE MIDPLE EAST ANP
COLLECT DATA ON ALLIED

AIR BASES / WHERE DOES
h SHE FIT IN? =4























AFTER BEING MARRIED IN
PARIS SHE RETURNS TO THE
MIDDLE EAST WITH HER HUS
BAND! WHAT BETTER WAY TO
MOVE AROUND FREELY, THAN
AS THE WIFE OF A REPUTABLE
EMPLOYEE OF A MIPDLE-EAST
r OIL FIRM





DR. ANTON / YOU Paay PLAN |S BETTER
GPEAK IN CIRCLES | THAN THAT, MY DEAR.
WHAT DOI DO? | YOU ARE GOING TO

HIDE IN HER MARRY WEE












| ABOUT THAT LAURIE
| GIRL... GHE SHOULD FIT
IN WELL WITH YOUR
|NEXT ASSIGNMENT /









BY GEORGE MC. MANUS

ar

Wa, Ms
| YES-MRS. JIGGS-THIG WAS, }
| FORMERLY PROFESSOR Nf
DRUMMOND FIFES suiTe- (fr)
WE WAS A GREAT ere ee

my

4 OHH
i Cc



(



LL MCVE TOA
K- I'LL MISS MY
GING LESSONS /”— |

We take pleasure in announcing the operting of another





uptodate Book Shep and Stationery situated in the tranquil






atmosphere of Greystone Village, Balmoral Gap. This gap runs
off the Hastings main road immediately opposite the Ocean View

Hotel.

Here, for the convenience of visitors to the island and resi

RIP KIRBY

dents of the surrounding district, will be found al! the latest in

ae Wk. a
a em \





~ Books and English Magazines that there is to be read, Soon, we

(I DON'T UNDERS C

\. BUT THE TONE O SL
VOICE SOUNDED LIKE

TROUBLE

LET ME_ADMIT TO YOU,
LEMEN, THAT I 4
U RSTAND ENGLISH
PERFECTLY/ YOUR c
FEARS ARE

WELL POUNDED!





also hope to stock the most popular American Magazines.



In the line of stationery we will have everything possible

while local souvenirs will also be in stock, The “Parbados Advo

\ cate” will be on sale here every day except on Sundays
|

{
y












A FASCINATING LEGEND. SOME SAY
HES AS TALL AS ATREE, STRONG AS
TEN TIGERS os oe penn
= a aR HE CAN+~

«BE A DOZEN PLACES AT ONCE <~
HAS LIVED FOR 400 YEARS AND
CANNOT DIE? SOMETIMES KNOWN

ASTHEGHOST
NHO WALKS? J





INTERESTING. DOESNT
IT, FELLA?



HMM+ITS
POSSIBLE:

BOOK SHOP
STATIONERY

GREYSTONE VILLAGE, BALMORAL GAP, HASTINGS,





a i PLAT MANNA EAR, ERNE ORRIN WARE NE 2 DOA BS a oe







PAGE TEN



The first major Club
day when the Belleville
Tournament

Tournament fer 1952
Tennis

opens to-
Club will stage its annual

The number of entries is not as large as usual and this is

somewhat surprising in view of the “Herculean”

efforts the

Barbados Lawn Tennis Association have been making in the
last few months to encourage public interest in the game.

Notable absentees ‘in the

Taylor, Peter Patterson, Geoffrey Manning and Dr.

ning, who up to the end of
well have been dubbed ‘

Turk Defeats
Swede At Wrestling

STOCKHOLM, Jan. 29.
Turkey's flyweight Ali Yucel
Gained the first victory of the
Swedo Turkish wrestling meet
here to-day. The free-style Yucel
threw the Swedish veteran Malte

Moeller in two minutes fifty three
seconds, locking the Swede’s legs

in Turkish fashion and applying
the back-hammer.
The Turk took the initiative

from the beginning and had the
Swede in several difficult situa-
tions, The capacity crowd saw the
opening night of the two day meet
devoted to free style.

The team of Turkish wrestlers
who are engaged in the first match
of the Swedish Tour are in the
peak of form Manager Akifoglu
said. The snow covered Stock-
holm has a temperature of ten
degrees below zero centigrade,
but the Turkish visitors claim
they enjoy it. “All the boys are
in good form” said the manager.”
They have been flourishing here
in Sweden although the food is
heaviey than they are used to,

—U-P.

Sehagen Knocks
Out McGowan

LONDON, Jan. 2§

Willie Schagen . of Soilend
weighing 167% pounds knocked
cut Johnny McGowan of Wakefield
167% pounds in the third round of
a scheduled ten-rounder at the
Albert Hall.

A right to the chin in the third
round put McGowan down on his
face, He attempted to rise and ap-
peared just to beat the count, but
referee Archie Sexaton ruled a
knockout.—U.P.

‘The Big Four”

men’s singles are Messrs. Eric
Man-
last year’s tournaments could
of local tennis.
However, the standard of play
should not be jeopardised as in the
last year, players such as Dennis
Worme, David Lawless, Louis St

Hill and the ever steady Darrel!
Trimingham have improved to
uch an extent that most tennis
fans were looking forward to see-
ing them clash with last year’s
champions

It is also heartenifig to see no
less than four promising teen-
gers are among the male entries
nd one would suggest that they
try and acquire as much Tourna-
n.ent experience and tempera-
ment as possible, as it will serve
them in good stead in the future
The ‘old brigade” are well
represented in the persons of
Messrs. Donald Barnes, John Mc-
Kinstry, Bobby Edgehill, and Mr.
K. D. “Tommy” Edwards, a one
time champion who has teamed up
with H. L. Toppin in the men’:
doubles

The Ladies entries have been

very poor, the singles having only
six entrants, here the only conso
lation is that four of the six are all

young and _ promising players,
Among the latter, Miss Charmaine
Goddard, a niece of the W.I.
cricket Captain, although very

young shows much promise and
providing she sticks_at the game
should have a very bright future.

Fixtures of each day’s play will
appear in the daily paper along
with the results of the preceding
cay’s matches.

Today's fixtures are as follows:—

MEN'S SINGLES

W. H.C. Knowles vs. H. L. Top-
pin

D, E. Worme vs. D, E. V Cuke

V. Roach vs. J. L, St. Hill.

S. P. Edgehill vs. D. I .Lawless.

J.D. Trimingham vs. C. B. Law-
less.

G Hunte vs. M. G. Worme

BIG DIPPER CAN BOOST
BLOODSTOCK SALES

RICHARD BAERLEIN)
(Racing Reporter
THE eyes of the _ bloodstock
world will be upon the Irish-bred
Windy City and Big Dipper, when
they race in the Santa Anita
Derby and Santa Anita Handicap,
respectively, for they can provide

by the champion American jockey,
kddie Arcaro, who is also going
to ride him in his preliminary
work to save him some of the
unnecessary rigours of an Ameri-
can preparation,

Prendergast Advises

His former trainer, Irishman

the greatest American advertise- padqy Prendergast, has been out

ment British bloodstock has yet there this winter and discussed

achieved. ; » # the colt fully with his trainer and
Three years ago I suggested yider,

that the British Government His advice was most helpful,

should sponsor a scheme and this headstrong colt should

for
sending their National Stud me

outelass the opposition, @ven if

lings and others, if necessary, he is not an out and out stayer.
to America, where they would" ‘This time last year Big Dipper
advertise our horses in front olg\was favourite for the Derby. He
the Americans and so increase}then went wrong and never ran as
our dollar exports, a three-year-old in this country.

Though this scheme has not being sent to America quite early
been auoptea by tne WWavriona! in the season. His trouble was

Stud or auy ower stud in bngiana,
il 1s sull not lwo late lo atlempt i.
Last year two. famous irish
studs sent thelr yearlings to Un
Saratoga Sales aud obtaine.
tremenaous prices for them.
They will repeat the perform-
ance this year and other Irish
studs are to follow suit. 1 under-
stand that t..e Aga Khan is one of
those who will be sending some
Irish-bred yearlings to Saratoga
this year.
The Irish have
business to attack

made
the

it their
American

market and they are being justly
rewarded But Big Dipper and
Windy City can boost their sales
considerably.

These two colts headed the
English Two-Year-Old Free

Handicap in successive years, and
it is a sign of the times to find
them both competing in America.

Both are expected to succeed.
Windy City, a “flying
machine” in Europe last season,
has lost about 6st. in weight

and harsh measures had to be
adopted to get him to go into
the American starting gate
They were finally successful

He is to be ridden in this Derby

| They'll ll Do It Every



located, treated and has yielded to
treatment,

The colt is in strong work again
and his home form has given his
connections the utmost confidence
wh his abilitv to win this big
handicap.—X..E.8,



WHAT’S ON TODAY

Police Courts and Court of
Original Jurisdiction 10.00

a.m,

Court of Common Pleas 16.36
a.m.

Police Band Concert at

Chalky Mount district 3.00
p.m,
Police Band plays at Mount
Hillaby district 4.00 p.m.
Concert by the Police Band

at Welchman Hall district
5.00 p.m,

A.C.S.B. Committee Meeting
at the British Council,
Wakefield.

Mobile Cinema Show at
Locust Hall Plantation

yard, 7.45 p.m.



Time






lakes ais ase By _Jimmy Haclo



Be 2

LINDWALL

RAY







BARBADOS ADVOCATE

Belleville Tennis T ourney Opens Today |

First 1952 Major
Tournament

By THE SPORTS EDITOR

JEFF STOLLMEYER



Make The
Batsman Hit
That Ball

(By JOHN MACADAM)

THE
again

reformers are at work
-not the ponderous pontiffs

who sit in the high places; but
the jolly lesser ones who sit in

such low places as houses of pub-

lic refreshment or medium-high
ones like the privacy of their own
drawing-rooms

You recall H. t&. Pawle, who
suggested that current concentra-
tion on points for first innings
lead in county cricket was ruining
the overall aspect of the match?

Back comes Mr. Pawle with
the additional suggestion that
cricket would be brightened con-
siderably if no points were allot-
ted for a draw

So far, so good but listen
to Walter Th. Curiger, of London,
W.2, a visitor to this country who
watched both county and public
school games last season

His observation is that batsmen
woud be encouraged to hit the
ball more if for every maiden
over the fielding side should be
credited with six runs—a_ pretty
stringent incentive, but big-time
cricket can do with some such
shots in the arm,

E. F, Levitt takes the bull firm-
ly by the horns by suggesting 20
points for an outright win and
only a meagre couple for that
baneful first-innings lead Again
the idea is to make them play to

win—as if that should be neces-
sary in this day and age. But it
is
Soccer, Too

Soccer doesn’t escape the at-
tention of the curers-of-ills.
Here is John G. Sumner, of
Brixton, London, expressing in-
tense irritation at the prolonged

Club of Controversy, He appears
to over-simplify a little, but his
suggestion is worth some study.

He would have the F.A
League finance and run
own Soccer club, with its own
ground, manager, trainers, and a
playing staff of around 75 players

The F.A.-League Club would be
run in four teams tagged I, II,
III (N.), and III (S.), with the
first team in the First Division,
and the others as they are tagged

He would have these players
start in one of the IIT (N.) or Ul
(S.) teams, and graduate as far
as their ability could take them,
(We can say from our own ex-
perience that Scandinavian and
Dutch teams have such a_ policy,
and it appears to work with
them.)



and the
their

ane players would be paid by
the F.A-League and would get
benefits and bonuses just as any
other players do; but they would
belong to England—and not to
any one club, so that the Club
or Country question need never
arise.

Revolutionary...but there does
look here like the nucleus of the
fully integrated national side we
have been looking for since the
Continental challenge became
strong.

They lay dear old Arnold Wil-
son to rest at Golders Green. this
morning and so sever one more
link with the great Corinthian
days before boxing got ‘“wide’’.

We knew the Major well in our
own early days along what we
were pleased to call The Alley
gentleman of any school, who
met his promotional Waterloo
with his greatest fight.

So many people ballyhooed his
Bloomt.eld-Gibbons open-air
scrap that the public, scared of a
stampede, stayed away in thous-
ands. Rest him well

50














WE DON'T NEED

COME IN EARLY
AND SHE WONT



4 GERTY WAS
7 JUST COMPLAIN-








7 NO AIR-RAID SIREN »- GIVE YOU A RUMBLE* | ING ABOUT A
YOU CAN HEAR GERTY I THINK SHE SORE THROAT |
EIGHT BLOCKS AWAY ! ANO BIGDOME ID HATE TO |
BUT ONLY WHEN YOU GOT SIGNALS ){ HEAR HER WHEN
SASHAY IN LATE» SHE WAS FEELING
; 00D",

@N, | ANNOUNCERS IN

AW: EVERY OFFICE*

at THANK To KALPH H.STEARNS, |
yy 26/9 BROWNELL BLVG, |



TRY AND GET
HER TO OKAY AN



Tree's ONE_OF |
THESE LADY TRAIN |
|
|
i



FLINT, MICH.
ciohinsibandainnsshaiatsinssel

Racecourses

Should Run
Own Totes

By RICHARD BAERLEIN

Mr. Stanley Wootton, chairman
of K em pton Park racecourse,
sends q circular to all members
in which he states that to record
further progress the club must be
allowed “to operate their own
totalisator, as is done at grey-
hound meetings and all race meet-
ings abroad.”

Mr. Wootton has been an
owner-trainer in this country for
as long as the present generation
of rac@goers can remember and
has a vast experience of
throughout the world,

He is a member of the council
of the Racehorse Owners’ Associa-
tion and his efforts are almost
entirely directed these days to
improving the state of racing in
this country.

The totalisator abroad is alone
responsible for the healthy state
of racing in every country in
which it is employed. In many
eases it is the only reason that
racing can be carried on at all.
Visitors to America are loud in

its praise and it’ helps to put up
some of the enormous prize money.
It has also entirely eliminated
credit betting in America and this
is a decided advantage.

Big Benefit

In the Malay States prize money
has gone up from about £100 per
race to £1,000 all because they
run their own totalisators.

Yet in England, the greatest
racing country in the world, the
tote is almost a parasite. It has

ploughed back some of the
profits into racing, but the
benefits are far too small in

comparison to the turnover, The
running expenses are t0o high,

Stanley Wootton rightly wants
all racecourses to run their own
totes, and the profits can then be
used for raising the stake moneys
and improving the course for the
benefit of the public.

But before we arrive in this
position the Government must
accept the recommendations of the
Betting and Lotteries Commission,
whose report was published about
fm year ago.

No Help

Then we can go even further in
our efforts to benefit this great
racing sport and industry, There
are about 200,000 starting-price
bookmakers up and down the
country whose turnover does not
help racing at all,

Why not? Why should not
off-the-course >etting contri-
bute something to the sport
which keeps it give?

A tax of 2% per cent on win-
ning and losing bets would be of
enormous assistance to racing. The
ideal would be for the tote to
perate In every town and village
n the land, so that racing would
receive its percentage,

The totalisator is the only hope
‘f raising stake money in this
country to-day and, unless stake
money ig raised, owners are not
going to be able to carry on,

LES.



WEATHER REPORT
YESTERDAY.
Rainfali from Codrington:

nil.
Total Rainfall for Month to
date: .43 in,
Highest Temperature: 84.5°F
Lowest Temperature: 67.0°F.
Wind Velocity: 7 miles per

hour.
Barometer (9 a.m.) 29.989;
(3 p.m.) 29.902,

TO-DAY
Sunrise: 6.12 a.m.
Sunset: 5.55 p.m.
Moon: New, January 26.
Lighting : 6.30 p.m.
High Tide: 6.40 a.m., 6.53





Pm
Low Tide: 12.1 a.m., 12.39
p.m.
OA POSSO SO POTE,

DANCE

THE BARBADOS AQUATIC
CLUB

SOLSLESSSIS SSE,
x

= %

| %

: 3

:

% CLocal and Visiting Members
% Only)

+.

N on

. SATURDAY, February 2nd

x

% centile

S Music by Mr. ©, Curwen’s

x Orchestra

Pa

s Sides

%

%& Members are cordially invited ¢
¢

x (Free Admission to Ballroom) §
666

POOOSOOSOS SSS OSG.

POSSESS

racing



iW. I. Lost, But Were The!
More Brilliant Team

From HAROLD DALE

29.

SYDNEY, Jan, 2

Australia won the Fifth Test at Sydney yesterday by

202 runs. Looking back on it all, it is clear that the more
brilliant team of cricketers was the West Indian team, but
the more efficient—the Australians. And I would say as a

', last word—the fewer cricketers the West Indies allow to slip
«away to the Lancashire League, the better cricket there
will be in the islands. League methods can only harm

first class cricketers.

Prompt Disaster

Disaster hit the West Indies
promptly and shockingly directly
after lunch, Stollmeyer was
beaten by Miller’s first ball, but
the wicket remained intact, and
he took two to leg off the next
Then he played a return short to
Benaud at mid-on. Worrell came
halfway down the wicket to back
up, but was sent back. Worrell
turned and went back, but Ben-
dud’s threw hit the wicket and
Worrell was still a yard out.
Worrell, run out 18. Four for 191

From Lindwall’s next over
Stollmeyer was I.b.w. for 104, The
new ball had taken instant toll,
and at five for 192, the West In-
dies chances once at least fair,
were now written off.

If there were any doubts re-
maining, Miller—it’s always Miller
—settled it. He bowled Gomez
on the off stump, after he had
scored two. Six for 194,

Three wickets had fallen for
three runs, and the West Indies
effort was finishing with brittle
collapse.

The Last Hours

It was more or less appropriate,
I suppose, although rather sad,
that the last hours of the tour
should emphasise the lack of sta-
bility that has characterised the
islanders throughout their Austra-
lian crusade.

They had the talent, but not the

solid basis of unremitting deter-
mination, and they allowed them-
selves to be beaten by the weak-
est team Australia has fielded for
25 years.
‘I think that a lot of their lack
in this respect can be put down
to the fact that they had no play-
ers in the side who had previously
played Australia, They came as
strangers and met a series of
shocks for which experience on
the part of some of the members
would have prepared them.

Christiani was next out, after
scoring four. when he_ turned
Lindwall into Johnston’s hands at
square leg. Truly, the curtain was
descending fast. Seven for 200.

Atkinson and Guillen still faced
Miller and Lindwall, but not for
long, Atkinson made a very fine
square drive off Lindwall for four,
but in so doing, removed the off
bail from the wicket with his bat.
Atkinson out for two, Eight for
205,

Guillen’s Life Saved

Guillen and Ramadhin now



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dashed through for a short run.
Hassett threw a head high return
with immense force, and Lang-
ley’s dive into the air to hold it
probably saved Guillen’s life—it
looked as if the return would have
hit Guillen square on the head, but
for Langley’s intervention.

Now Lindwall, deadly with the
new ball against _ tail-enders,
knocked back Guillen’s off stump
after the wicketkeeper had scored
six. Nine for 212.

Now, Hassett put on young
Richie Benaud, to give him his
first Test wicket. He bowled Val-
entine for 0, Ramadhin, not out
three. Extras 16. Total 213.

An Anti-Climax

It had all ended in an
climax, but still there will be
notable memories of the tour, and
for Stollmeyer, the experiente that
Goddard has endured all through
—star players letting him down in
moments of crisis.

anti-

BOWLING ANALYSIS
fe} M. R Ww.
Lindwall 21 4 52 5
Johnston 10 2 30 0
Miller 19 2 57 2
Ring 13 1 44 1
Benaud 43 0 14 1



T’dad Cricket
Team Chosen

PORT-OF-SPAIN, Jan. 28.
Opening batsman Noel Guillen
brother of West Indies wicket
keeper Simpson now playing the
fifth Test at Sydney is one of the
players selected to represent Trini-
dad against British Guiana in the

intercolonial tournament opening
February 9.
Other new players were fast

medium bowlers McD. Forde and
Oliver Demming.

Guillen practically played him-
self into the team during the
weekend, scoring an undefeated
hundred and one retired for Tang
Choon’s team in the last. trial
match,

The full team comprises Rupert

Tang Choon (Captain), Guillen
Nyron Asgarali, D. Fitzpatrick
Ralph Legall, Clarence Skecfe
Chiki Sampath, Forde, Bunny

Butler, S. Jackbir, Demming and

Ken Corbie twelfth man,
—(C.P.)

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Full Text

PAGE 1

PACE SIX IIAleHU.oll>\(H.'ATF. WEDNESDAY, JAM7ABX . IM Leg. Co. Pass $1,385 To Repair Investigator' Defective Parts Of Ship Came From U.S.A. r Engagement Of Factory Inspector Approved debated THE Legislative Council yeiterFull Report On Sea we 11 Expected Hm, H P R !" NIT V was ..ken bv the Colonial Secret.,) and D. J!i l U 'l""i "'"•'" "" %  '--K"' !" Counc.l debat.xl C and pawed yesterday a Resolution (or $1,385 u, effect red. : .pprcd R-oliiUon .ml..., D. I7 I „ /• M/T mW ~,„_ .£. hC Oovc ">nicnl Experimental K.sh,n. Boat >ni the Go..mor to enter %  >'' % %  -TJ \" fjtlfl fit VI V.I1 ## Th .„„„ are novTE •Zr"Zi?,?^ W h "* ""^ "' ,h U "" "** "^t^'SfSS^u-n %  * !" RNEK. Colonial Secretary, told the £& nicer nltctad Sad be Sinanan Presides %  I mrrit.-di"! Taking ^ ^^^ Mr. Turner seid~n.' i^WM ,< have to inform hon'ble member. during; ihe course of i5i. soanewhal i- " %  (..'•veynnwnt Surveyor ol •nipping who curried out a survey or the-aTjirx-rimenlal Fishuiif Boat Invesgigater repot " examination h;ul dtn i me bron/,. propellor. i %  Mft UK screw* In the •waring and ;inc. of th. bnnl "*• "' Pw oamliHori due t< ~T1OUB deterioration ltlll | ,,„,. "of the metal the Surveyor hud expressed the n that tiiit randftkn .. I %  %  pr a mooring of the boat in [Careenage .md (WctiV eonOf the electric rueuit ill l^-ng Ireroom. pih the flshine. fal.iiures* which show tnai the sfXscwr M Snipping, LH OM ra ^uc fact s h.i nut men disclosed lam | la In UM Auuenuum 10 £ uuut the origin of tne propellor riCMJiuliun was wr, c t. < i I* ti l .JVf*" M 1 ui ime to sa> that the propellor abaft lajrilOSS „, mi(K 1IM1 lie %  •^Jl^T 0 ^1 Crown Agent.. <„ liJ>U iiad at all regarding th id remark* n..r roiuurucuou ul in ha poor qujlilo 0| BHUsh prark, nv e.tia;ater. He thought *'..inship and on lh honou.able Th e propellor -Oiaft, 'PORT-OF-SPA1N, Jan. 11. i. Mitra Sinanan. Depot* the LvgUlatlve Couii, cu presided over the meeting ol r Mialolluia rmnirll iln^liIT'.V-rj 7' **" f *" r >. loia tilt, he Council vtatcrdav. thiough uJtirln J.r tinnX IS V C lhc dl ^ te ?Wlerdy un a Reso.nd-powtion of Hon. WtUiam luilon for $4,000 which was approved for the upkeep of SavarV He was the rtr-t elected heawell Runway, that a "full report" on the condition of representative to do so. -J-tf*' r U .'J^, ay ,s cx P ted a^ut the end of this month Occupying the chair he express4.000 approve by the "The detailed report the Colo*** thanlu to th Colonial Secreto $7,000 nlal Secretary continued "has not ""> &n,i rn "' mber of ,h( H( u yet been received and 1 would ask ,or ,h '' fMrnu sentiment-, -x^ ..... iMmouriible member^ to reserve pres^d. w-.-iUteiuport.rv repairup ... |udgm.nl until ( t ii i.,eivedarl tj %  dlrtjatan may be paid t. %  • incUl und lh acHoa It nrrewltates . T "' ll "" "";''' % ,1, irred in. place of engagement to ti „ ,,.), Xou .,, .. Buli'TH .i U r. C. Hutaoat gttd lha appmntment. and from Barb, ri ,ie, -. live torn •verterday'gl Hi. phen place of engagement u. M, %  „ o( He ^ t|uil Mr Connelly chair. v. M van well toown to wgiw i on the tarmination ol the agree.dn .cgards It as "aaaanUal that whenDuring the course of the i NiHuu.il/ marine engineer, and !" aoi. iL I.J_„. t J A rllnea. *ned whenever twov.iv The Hon. the Colonial Sec.eJ '^'ZX^ ['T >l „ dlsannibir nxrtab like steel nn i| tary told the Council that honoui !" ** £ rtht rtesolu bronaa anrre exposed m c \." bto mtmU-rs would rimrinl.. y for anTSngth of time U* "uru.g Ihe dosing M-g-M ol |! n 5 r _? b !* in waters thut were oolluted Uand Chll1^ a/ill led In agjactlnfl lmhonou pi 'lien n<'( exceeding $1,440 %  ' poh. ngln Nul ( ,,,,-,111, .1 the Laxdalstura NsmaUme In May ments'Biil, r51, and he Bade g._fj g?._*?._l >* g*" r f the :ng that ,ho dSeuit, h ,ch ^ l :; i j;;" P ; :; ; b^ :uid had h takei vpector. orient hhortlv dava* Tw For almost ment hail been endeavour in.: .,',.„( >n ^ iccru.t an lnspeeloi. Iul then Weir.ii. Fund by $8(1000. and difficulty was two fold. First the further that he hail reported thai %  alarv provided in the HtJBMtei Ihe m:uadam base com • of £800 had not been %  OttHMAI tSffVOT lullv dried to attracl n man. und secondly, i,.-, ;iUM ( that Ihe conditions of service in ,, uitlng In UM employment in the United Kings, i dryaag dom prevented them securing the would normally lake p|a Hirer yean after eonstroction ever shrinkage appears In the suring Government proposed to limi. %  "Y" %  •*' "i* immediately seeled with the imports of Irish potatoes hei. ,',,;. ^^ "Phalt.c compound to prevent ]ocat starchy crop-i are at their at nater from entering the baae _„„. ThU ww UW .oume in the nib-grade, detrrioVT",' IZuWte. ,,r rated b9 l>-n,g saturated, whether i^'wX R...1 it Is of coral rock or clay. ReaUsTSLS? ""•_!!." .. '.'%  ii. Ajiother causewas fauuy waa being,• no ^ mto 7i l w r l \* e of completing the runway. Heetrleal cOfinocUana and in-tn.recruitment of a Factory In)rif „ rnir(| „„. (;,, V( [rimonl imost three years Gove.n$i.a,.0u0 which was provided oVvrn'"" This was approved by Ihe House illhough he agreed with the rereTnaTatenient "of"the P 011 Hon vic,or Bryan, Mlnistei ra. every are should X Agriculture mover of •!. %  have any cracks which asked the Legislature to accept in mm.-diately filled as a pr-nclple the recommendations orrter that contained as ""we were most below the fortunate that we were abl> .short notice to enlist Ihe support S7.ll*! Spent of a combination or experts on the In Ihe present FrtlnuLtltere particular matter which was to be an wa *~' 00( ' or ,hp upkeep of the examined." Mr. Bryan referred to hardened '""wav and that amount was bethe question of deactivlatlon of COI^IUOK Oir.rtor of HighI VS. liases in the Colony for the 'id [ransport waa carrying growing of food, and said: "the f sealing all cracks mattei is under very acUvo oxam % %  %  " %  %  ''; %  •;" %  an-.H-ibutton nd Owl maw nn OM pated thai Ihe sum of $4,000 would MgM going back and forth a le needed before the end of the between the American and Britt.real Alixletv present financial year to enable ,h r.nvcrnment Since then there had been a film to seal up any cracks which •"Government *t*leal..r...i* 1 ,H regarding the Iccamnoticeable The Hon. Ronuon.. Colonial In view of the urgency and secretory olso told the House that li-'lellirr services of a serving officer lot more than one year. Aa It was felt that they should have Ihe benefit of a Factory Inspector for at least iwo year*' Know U ,..,,*„u ,„ ,„ I..0StS." hid authorued h.n, tt> KSE hJo'iST' m^'fl", X&ZSSj&JlLSSX&r* '"'"< ' "* "" "" %  • c !" "",'lee u. agree tu an iiun.: establishment of tho Minister of IvwaVEAUDE COLOGNE ntflrt *. Intend crefullv to the speech f Ins own work, and that wa> not a retired Factory Inspector to ,,.,. ,, b> a mn(|r bv h( honourable the ColoAgriculture in order to give h R0. come out for the period. construction engineer from the nlal Secretary on the runway and one officer who Would he cntirct> Ho was of course the only maInformation waa raceived that Ministry of Transport. Canada. it seemed to him lhat Barbados responsible for seeing that .v. i r.ne engineer and it did seem .i an Inspector to the Ministry of That cable was sent some had been very unfortunate Indeed recommendation of the report ll vury great pity that he had not Labour, who retired in -"Was an months ago. and the engineer came with the disposition of their runkepi moving and kept for the atbeen consulted on the very first Inspector Class IA, after serving down Ho went away again, and way. tention of those who *ere to carry caslon. and possibly the Reviln the London Area and in !";>hll report was awaited, but it did He %  upposcd thai the people It out. Eventual!) ina anaanwhen they bough! na-iw—n ''!.?'." '" S *? u mU r thought that they had At the last meeting of the Counwoa therelore not a Krillah •vrtlcle at all. and the fruwn \genta had nothing whatever U do with the trinsactiun. He had also seen II mentioned {^ comulU'd on "the"verv' lint Inspector"cUai IA, after serving down ihe Press thai ii Britain work,„....„,„„ „„,, .inaallilT the ii !" In the London Area and in Man| they wen t to the Unite.) far .h. H nr m ,fr, h ir^mTil prepared to come Slates, of America Ha wa< not \i ^Z^Z^i nftfiTciuin *' M0 P^ %  m wlth P'" 1 ""'" id l-.k samples, leaving again coral reef and that it B-iying for one moment thnt Ihe ,.,, h*n ikl *hii tm of to and from Barbados, and accord urwai Of s.-i.iember. the Bnoat excellent foundations In I he had asked what type of qualPy of the n ifi ,.„_._„ -,--....„., i. „.d und '"*" """ R c utlon S£5" TOSS rfrio'en^uTlr 'ad'P-^^JH^Z bul l-orourable members nugh' iH^, ZZJA h* .,10 ht „.,,. ^.h.. The legislature was in prelle eventually .stnl down an InBarbados Now Seawell seemed md repUod thjt Ina u, be placed in those pockets of. mr i*gi>iuie * ... recess at Superintendent or Construction at CO ral and when the coral was ...e would b c sought and who h d ,, wu no| po^ibi.. the Mim.try of Transport. Canada, uk,,, ,# from th* top. the balto deal with the Resolution hiraeaU. He anc* was actually cUy — However It had not been passed • imc down in December, and the .^i >1 n ?w lh colonial secretary ^ g Qlhet PUc# .„d it rutd thai rentier Mr Connelly, t h n th* bo I ml that there wen. a few points "*_ 7 ,_„ C nunc\l came beck with th.other mglnrdered the LeWata srnkn .hould be helpful to hon*WtAwmSSEni m %  triei and they looked ai the runwautej II ourabla owmben. The title '^d V* ient to the Set-re' K again, returning ary of State, and it was honed luat h. for.. Christmas. able members nugh '' ild t>c asked to glvo that adui part.vice. .——. ha boat. ..>i. •']' The title is po*•itpp.ti into the Addendum Till *" neeolution because Mr. Craw,r .iT.vii^.. !" .IJ — Hr the Order momtn wa , akrix f rnm trl e | n DOUld In fact be made in varloua entitled the Pensions fPenslon. R P port which he had r. uarts of the world with the wosslable Ofncers) (Amendment) ',,.., ,,:., ,,. mr h stated thit the ,m engineering detect somelhe aC gatlons and eiad elected Colonial1 Secre{gg VbJSStStSSSS^ Order. 1951. and sanctioning th, ''SiiSrf therun^T^^T^ir^^'^x ' .<" U..1 from a magiatrate's name of the Ann rr JldvIre Mmr „„ ordc| *„, RegUtratlOn "' %  n wnlcn „ 1>r u, H.. WD* lookina intn ihui ment) Reffuiaii mnln cauaaa i.n. Of Defect!! .alnfaU whan it was" done, but ,. | 1 > heavy unexpected rains however, the runway had been !" c n "^" JL^iS^lE? during the construcUon dissolving constructed with that defect. They """ bcen Bn y sugBt'on against the asphalt before it had i cached seemed lo have run into a trehim. the setting stage or point known as merdous lot of snags with the run. Ml \ MiwneH said that while HAVANA. .1 .in 2 -breaking point'; ft ., n d he hoped that when the £•* %  he was on friendly terms Nineteen Cuban lawyers 0fl (2, "that all clay in the suh-l'nal report came down, they ,?J ro *" ,onl magistrate and Saturday cabled President Truman jrade was not removed and re-l.'ould be able to know exactly "'I !" asking h.m to commute the death placid by coral ruck, and where they stood. sentence on Oscar Coluuo, tho (3> : %  macadam i The Resolution was concurred m f m * P w J h cl (V h *5 Puerto Rican nationoliat. Involved )> ow noraa b> unsuitable material m. an attempt to assassinate him being UMd io Iba preparation of —^—^——— N,.\.nib.i I. 1B50. — <*> the b.i-c Cuban Lawyers Cable Truman ,rrel. ..dvire before an order wnHeglslratlon nf Deatl in the United ..atea from which lliarte He was looking into that ment) Regulations. 1951 the protsallor ihail had l.ecn obwlln a vi should be taken in lhe g L -rpiller—had also tome ; u tuu-. rrom *he United States, and was | n addition to Hie Resolution co:iuld lie asking permission to nova later 'hat afternoon, and here was not yet gone down to she other I'lace. nnd had just passed 'hrough the KvctlttUo Committee i which attain showed which piis-il.lv might ..in' basin checked ai an aarfior %  tag**. Those thies* caaov together inade him note that it was '-eceasnry to go rather closely into tho matter. .ids the points raised '^"ai*^." by Mr. Hutson reRardlng th Km -"'• mucneu was marnw If you feel worn out, depressed, or generally run down a gla.. or two i day of Buckfau Tome W.ne will quickly restore lost energy and tone up the whole nervous system. Giving new vitality it fortifies you against fever and exhaustion and remember. Buckfast Tonic Wine is especially valuable after illness. r.iasgow. So much for thnt. He wpnte-l 'o dispel the untrue reporl that the Crown Agents had an. thin* to do with the parts nt aU. With regard to r. placement'-. the pronel'nr shatl had been obtained from one -! the lemlln %  nie pvoiH-1'o s. and he did not know why it had worn In 0 short %  asjasskgd, bowevei thai I i from the partieo%  ome ateel piling had been pul Into "' laiawngi dboa tho InvestigateSEAWELL DIARY FOR DECEMBER 1951 MO vi MI: vis House Destroyed By Fire The operative hours of Ihe A ge of IS.M horn raft movements conj port were 474 hours during the luring which time there aad ai follows: — had been in Ufb, appan ,,. n(ld anything more eautlng t .. bn ., ^i,.,i h had sa ld earlier. II wanow proiMtMd In it-plate i;,. had made a note of the point. the shaft by OM made ..t Mom 1 .,„> |„. would do his best lo see Metal It %  aSstned that enqulril t : ,i the make or lhe engine was %  rn made both in Ihe t nil. t.-rully vetted liefure orders Kingdom and North America In ,. ere made. 1948, but ll wi>s not possible to .ffect delivery because metal in pr.oFlty for more tenet proasseta, n an itow hoped, ii was Inforimfl. that the lion of a pro|>elloi made Of tin \;..nel Metal SfOUl i* srOttU "Ol be naoossaty to p 1 Heavy rain:, ami iloudo pr.-.i i the bievetlgator out if action foi • %  eropssm iu.m landing at .. long period and the I LsaasOM airport for several repalra could !> % %  effected irlthln ln.urs today. As a result %  rrOM RAINS PREVENT PLANES LANDING o 1 •j %  1 F I > i H s i'%  a B SB H 11 W 1 A i3a 1H 15fl T.C.A. 1H 18 II. G. A •; 26 Kl M. 2 4 2 • L.A.V. If! If MILITARY a PWVATK 2 2 138 ... 20 4 % %  %  H; '•, 1 Hi A total of S.075 paw ago. month in the various airlines i the An pot i during ihe Rules IJIX It might be a-kc.l why moe. we.e not being placed with tin r Merle Obcron due lo arrive n Klngaton today went on lo Bay while nnothci plane oW rtirppfng to Cuba. II.W l.A. TCA BOA. I A.V KLM. i LM i rnd> 122 lift 101 dj 3 court cases. He had a dormitory attached to his rectory' there for some of them and his wife helped in the work. He had studied psychology at a theological college Evidence was taken (rum the girl. win. alleged that Mr. Milohcll committed the olfeiue, di^inte her protesLs. when she visited him In his vestry. A 13-year-old girl. ui iw.?n-1 M Miri !" u^EJl BUO %  lv,Bi "vldence. said that Hill belonging to Miriam Herbert ^ *£, ^^ ^ ^ w| h Mr was completely denroyed by Mllchel Bnd hift wirc find ^ me last: night. several times he had sat on her The Fire Brigade, was sumbed aml behaved Improperly. oned shortly aHer 10 o'clock Mr Mitchell, in hi* evidence. ltd under the command or M ,d there was not a word of Craggs, Fire Officer, rusher' truth in the 13-Venr-old girl's lo tlie scene nf thr Are. Water -tory. He said that the ll-yearcotieentrated on surroundold girt had told him a terrible in* houses to prevent the lire atory of depravity. If lhat storv Irosn --preading. were true, he said, she wall in Miriam Herbert was nttendini: great moral danger. hurcb at Ihe lime Of the fire —B.U.P. BUCKFAST TONIC WINE TAKE HOME A BOTTLE TODAY SHOP WINDOW TO THE WORLD '.-.•> %  *V#**V*'-.*-.W'.*.-.#'**-**'.'. '-•-'.'.*.-.'. '-V*V>V>i FOR COMFORT RIDE A HOPPER BICYCLE THE BAMADOS FOINDM LTD. Whi.i-park Road .•.•^^^.1. KUM •>•**. ..I. milk 2. KLIM h**,l with... r*r..q.r,llM 3. KLIM,..MI, I..I..,. o.ll.r. 4. KLIM I, ......, h> swtaf iHHM 5. KLIM neds nouri,a*at to coalite atiasi %  % % % %  sssssja*iWanXsT KLIM is recommended for iiiiunt feeding H bah) MIM areas fc > AI *VS fssM Ml) asxatsaV U*e %  >!.) an ISM a**i ii %  • r* araHrred h\ mother*. 7. KLIM li *<• la the *Mia<'v-Mk<^ *• %  8, KLIM ii aradacsd aaeer i'rittil caatrol KLIM Z: MILK F,*Sr IN PRIVIRINCI TMI WORLD OVtR c uimmw a IMP 11 Tirecr Nerves make life a Burden 'V-.i Britain ifl May Tor tfca RMst lamoui of all ivmonal trailc No %  %  %  nt* .'roducis de aig ned I •orW bv a BRITISH INDUSTRIES FA!r 1AY 5-16 • LONDON • BIRMINGHAM IATION SRBSSSr f %  %  T-FNM starves . thai make you irriiahl. h\ Jax sssd dastUCB -our -leep >t night . .ire starved Bssreaa. Vourevrr\Js\ mcal< mav nor have proiJed -nth. irnl %  >! tn* ds tvlucn bed and % % %  Main UM) aen I fats III. I or thli nxtion rou ill find •ftisllsssl' %  n idi*: ..ippltiinri BO KOUl .' %  rai\ I'reparrd ir.m NiNure's beat 'OvaMne' peovtdateaaantlal %  i,inr. knri-itiflntTlraninifi i^lrhhaia lOBtlUue n-iu v.rmrl. .ui.l MMtnv IheiiToi • % %  in dir assaissnH 'Ovaluae' Ulmro Rant, I laiin vai.i.d la ssstve^eatorssg [wopmlai Krdtime I) Is i'"n-l. reatftsl %  he IIKnssstssfl aid ui drrp Mlu. anrvai *< turn %  .ioutMac i. %  -:t Ovasaane Ii i bassanaaBBOMtagnawrt usedia llnsnUali .11,1 \iirmK HOOKf tiri>ii||l><t v M tilss w Drink delicious UMD ,-..i Mai) A l4 UfSfl MBS|a| I -.N %  ..*• Ii %  ,,' iiaikKs .'Ifcf. lull li f .-I,.. -..I takes %  i • % 


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Wl DNI SDAi n\| UH -M, KS2 UAJtllAlM> ADVOCATE ; %  K.I HJ HENRY BY CARL ANDERSON FLINT BLONDIE BY CHIC YOUNG %  ..MY i HVOALVN %  .1 *" %  *> *SK VOU FOB / V -.,—I A ClCTv-CenT i,iJ ".tCMNCI FLASH GORDON BY DAN BARRY \ m 1 PIKQsj B 1 "^ fe BRINGING MANUS Tt-IB R AND Wl .L SC PA so >*vn P ilAfJO AND SA: RIP KIRRY BY ALEX RAYMOND THF PHANTOM BY LEE FALK a RAY MOORES HWE -iCU MR HE4SP WES ABCUTTHrS MIPJESJPEB01IIWTHE munoM?^,/— -TTJTMC09&1&E. lo JN lir%IUK smooth. •n easily onto your lips; the rich vibrant colour stays on and on and on. Here If a range ol l>o.iuty products used bv |of %  !• %  %  - n where. Simple and I nu paint 111, they ar* all vou Mad to keep WQ tooloag tliiwliwtly lively, rMUng your very best at all times You will find them at all the best beauty counters. ii'm MMBj #• f.-e#f %  ihr Ittrntmr* clrmnt %  :• 'Hji-pic'into theh*wl e 1 — IMVC own.hi — ihfn ltd** % Na fruUi it nwicJ %  £ thrpuv it*-"*..* KiiM ctotw* % | wo-"' %  •(" %  •> *"* '•*•(* % i HWM* Naknw >•> %  u-*M.. a" ~HARP.C' i [ THI * tAVATOKV •4UNB1 f) ,fV.VWW.Va.W. Gland Discovery Restores Youih In 24 Hours ,::.v: -it.. *••*-!( ,. uull< > .'I l.tirn. y-t U i1. •1 in *< I 1 %  : Vl-TAII%  Ire #.I..n ... Vi-Tabs .".>MI o-J Vim Illy IT PAYS YOU TO DEAL HERE SPEC IAL offers to all Cash and Credit Customers for Monday to Wednesday only M'M'l.tl. OI'FI'IIS artman .imiliiblr it) our llr;>iirlis I <• ilsid.-. S|X'it|lilsla> ii .mil Vmill Siren Umially NOW Usually Now Tins Peaches 81 Ti Pkgs. P. F. Sweet Biscuits 36 Tins Corned Mutton 66 M Tins Four Cows Milk 33 :.l Pkgs. Quaker Oats 30 27 Tins Smedley Peas 49 1.1 D. V. SCOTT & Co. Ltd. Broad Street I II I I O I. O \ N A II I 4. II O i: II I I s u ly^hvrtfyuwGoru) Wa lake pleasure In announclnq Ihe opeitlnq o( another up-uydate Book Shop and Stationary alluated In Ihe tranquil ulmoaphere ol Oieylone Vlllaqe. Balmoral Gap. Thia qap run. oH lha Haillinja mo .. road lmmadialaly oppoalla Ika Ocaan Vlaw Hotel. Hara. lor lha convenience ol vtaitora lo lha ialand and real Jenta ol tha aurroundinq dUtriel. will be lound all 'ho lataal in Hooka and Enqllsh MnqailnM lhal lhara la lo be raad. Soon, we alao hop* lo atock Ihe moat popular American Maqailnee. In the Wnm ol xla'lonary wa will have verythmq poaeibla %  /hlla local aouveniiwill alao ba In alock. Tha Forbade* Advo MaV will ba on aol hora avary day except on Sunday". ADVOCATE BOOK SHOP STATIONi"K H V OREYSTOHE VILLAGi:. BALMORAL GAP HASTINGS.



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WEDNESDAY. JANX'AET 30. 1M2 R\RB\DO ADVOCATE PA OF TTVT, Hearing In St. Lucy Damages Case Adjourned Until February 12 v I" }*?. A f iW n Co "" ot Appeal yesterday His Honour \ J H. Hanschell at the request ol Mr J.E T. Brancker, adjourned further hearing in the case in which Clvde Bovcti J Corner Sx LtXQ yclaimed CM) damages" from the defendants Christopher Hmds and Marv Hinds, both of Chandler Hill. St Lucy, until Tuesdav. February 12 Ml in the case are Mr J r. I Brancker for th* plain•'. and Mr. J. S B [*••• <:-ndantR. In hi case Boyce claimed thai by the %  WhMtl inflicting Uidll> • -n him—for which the* were butt • onvu'ted and lined— Or. A. S. Ashby iwrformed %  • nnrd much inconvenience* Pas* imwtam examination on ihu i nmed damages to the body of three-year-old Joseph at £50 Cumber batch of Tudor Bridge Mr. Brancker in asking for an St. Michael, at the Public Mor.MljiHinunent wild that it wi> tuary yesterday afternoon important for him to summon Dr Helena Cum herb* ten, mothir 522" fT^K' ,U ^ d ft .1 U of Jo, pK Cumberbatch. said client an*T the light with the that her defendants. P.M. Exam. Held Of Infant's Body %  on got out of bed early yesterday and had a warm cup of tea About 7 45 a m he fell ill and before she could get medical aid he ami dead. She then noting! the Black Bock Police Station. DRIVERS' BADGES RENEWED month "I therefore ask that this matter be adjourned for medical evidence from Dr Kirton." said Air. Brancker. Knew Defendants Clyde Boyce told the court that he knew both defendants Christopher Hinds and Mary Hinds On June 27 about 6.30 p.m. he ndtng by Pie Corner near bar Hind*' place. After an argument Christopher Hind.s : nun by the shirt and pulled him over the guard wall conductors ire getting their ?". ,x^ ^ "?, V n d ?Jil n .* d bad cs !" ewed U* Traffic in the rtght and while Chrtstophei Branch at the Central Police St.HjBda held the front of his shirt. t Th( lld timdtivlol < Mu> Hind, tugged him from the had unl)1 Januarv .5 to ^ ,„,.,,. The .nirt he was wcartna cost bads "*" %  *•*! ihey will be him $7 Darr? rllnd.*^! 1 S %  * %  *""" '"roughou. the fight, brought three flicks and mon,n , M two of them he handed to the U f * midday yesterday 16 two defendants Christopher conductor! and 202 driven got Hindand Mary Hinds. With ln01r ••* d"P badge* The total ikka the defendants hit "umber issued last year were S5 him several times across hir conductor badges and 438 drivers" body, head and ears After the badges. tight he went to Dr. Kirton who The clerk ji the Triiffic Branch examined and treated him. The told the AaVeeale thnt both con%  f his body wn painful due tors and drivers should try to •Men renew Jhelr badge* M soon as He paid DT Kirton $2.76 for possible "II is hoped that everytha examination tmd tinmedi,„„. ni \\ have theirs by the end Ml him $2 7fl while the tt lm m0 Mh." he .aid "', H-J^IS Ca Bnd bU I -*'"' r ' '"• vear drivers and '" B R U Sl! 1 aS . conductors will he applvin. for I nahle To Work Nidges A soon n thev get their "I was unable to work due to 1,,-ence: thev a* for bade* the hinws which I received Dunna the time of my I lines* I %  was forced to hire labourers to work my two and a half acres OB which potatoes, yams, %  n growing. Each of the l.dxiurers was paid 5'a day. In the tight my khaki pants were FILM SHOWS PLANNED FOR BOYS' CLUBS A new Him projector gaa been bought for the Pol Clubs. The Clubs also have a new pick-up which will "tused for general transportation The film projector w u from England. Expected to arrive shortly are i ,'ector stand, nserophoM, i CM Milling units and splices broken Alms The orojecilonist foi the Boys' Clubs Is P C :'fll I gtva tllm ghnarg at the Cluhs all ovm the Islan I Dims will mclude education.,; i'im the Education I>; %  i BMd in* Boys Cluban honta) b I • K*eentl> (ha Clubs have been divided mi Each section will have a Committee ol Management rhi a II have a Football league Maji>t Cram told tha \ I H Dbstrict 'D' II I i hrT CoHag* 68. Slteightstown | eel Boys' Club 80. Holelown 34 S> Girls' Club 68 girls and 45 bogs. Worthing! 2*. Cleavers Hill Baya Sub 6 Cleavers Hill Girls' Club 56 and the reformed club at St Cecilia Barracks. Passage Road HI Seamen Leave For Curacao Four A B scitnMi loft Barbados. ragtanLty monun, B W I A via Trinidad for Curacao where thev will take U| rmplnyment with the Shell Oil Tanket llMrl M A.B. seaman and len firemen and yrea*\ K L.M. chartered 'plane fur Curacao for emplovment with the same company. Vtinon Kniabi manager Colonies And Food Problems %  %  •.< and (v Lb \.lv*rilr Uul ii u^ i.tatifyiiu; that in view of th%  %  i tavanamani tlgb the ausplcei' I id... K.einnj lnstitulg th H iien and % %  v M D J laa %  arba i Daaa i %  %  had oftered thf find emp|i>.(,,| "" i,s I believei % .-• if UMv I us mada lo II c-nment. the dctclupment had men hM -nue f..und ampinjaimg >> n> Xiii.-riiuii Cntumn Hooded Terror Strikes Again—With Whip Trained On Couik-rmrrr Ttm niei %  nan whara Iba tad boilti arhkb the i %  %  aid in.irtinlypa ani the Shall %  ien .ne ultin I ONDON BaecatH | I Mr Olive, |.y-.lt..| tin.,.t ia in g i asto UM Dpmanl "( Britain*! and tV wealth which lies i M the Ci lonial territorial i> ..r utmorl tuctton M t ba incrrased ' ravi s II toast, that b what is Daadad," ba saU. addresamg th,. •aamgatoba braaeta al the National Farmers' Union w> bava t> brmg to oiw al I avar davtca or ingenuity ami modarn pi.ntice and w,. must alia grea fa/me r assurances which en: lie capital to II-.K 'oi i I irii|>er reward if It Barbadians for ao, ixith lit the and in the tankei licet baa baiap ona % %  u I and has been in M i K K K the dreaded and detested Ku Klux Klan whieh .... VPHr ,, BY It. tf. MuvCOI.L culture" It was necessary '" increase output of many agncult., IM U in the COHM %  crease production of the ntUstrall, << .1. caajaar, and phosphates "Inch lie beneath th. suit.... %  thoaa tanftorHM MBSSRS. A. S BRVI'I-"S \ SONS BARBADOS), LTD., ) P.O BOX 401. BKllK.fclOWN. BARBADOS lUtllciillie* %  till in North Carulina. i'.iv oObrad by Around Wrdt*vill Q men have been called in lo he. .V'liti, locaj authoritlaa 1nvtgtlgg|g a sines of nlghl rKgllhefl aaull U caxriad oul b) man masked in the traditional bedshwis lDr "* ""'-' "nployrd With t-VO-slltS The "Times" Review %  In UM w, miiy ,,i $400,000 ; %  < -' *. . ISStt Th,Whiteville iM h.i. Ix-.n '",',,"';",;', „,.,, ,. THEFT AT WALKERS REPORTED A quantity of household ori l Ibaaa caused me IS for tides, valued $13.4* was stolen the material and the making.' from the home of Harold Hunte i told the court. al Walkers. St Andrew Thev Cross-examined. Boyce said are his property. that l*>lh of too defendants He told the Police that Iba ui.lmm along the ground (l€n occurred between 1! 00 p m t.. Mien yard ami as a result of on Saturday and 12 SO a.m. on this he had scrawls and bruises fi un d a id! over his body. He never hit Th Police are rarrvin* oul in%  phat Hinds and the motor V J.,* JJJi-* '• r n r,n • "'* ...i ba blrad to carry him to the v ""*"" on doctor is the property of a Mr I he am not take a receipt from him for the car hire -it away from his work for about three weeks and as a H-MIII In had to' pay labourerto work for him. During the in lit I unmailwd „ruuger draw on all ttw n-sourcethat importe*! from other parts of the Times i.t London. b> state, with requests for help In common conaant, the rarornoal ., motot hreak.iown. and thei. newspaper in the world. The attacked by the Klan Kriir* ,il present u i BECECTS IN FIRK all over tha world the news anu s,,.^ „pp* r atui( used i c mmani thai have been providernment cosmic and infra-red i iioth by tr thai Shell Oil iclale entiiel> to tins matter II ipMal iMVe-tnii-iit. which has got t.. i>,. rnoat cucfuiiv plMinad aad %  pant I., put on, %  torUng houaa in o .ii i m bava u. bg tain n letidi-i about the amount i.il iiiiinir. which w,. Ittt Whara, and what we wain ... :t. %  oul ol %  gfftetiltura la Um maalmunt output b v mily making the moti -enttal C a p i t a I mv. tmaW KEEP YOUR HOME SPIC AND SPAN We have t wide range of PAINTS-ENAMELS VARNISHES 1" i. UERBEKT Lid. "'"-" 10 and II KOI HI I K sIKCKT inknltl %  Whenever Investment has %  i CUt down, either m industr. B •ii ..l'-.ii.-. you aie. of course had i i.i oul In i • tnking a blow at the productive • S2.2SO.IMJO. Thai larga, u> ot that aim uni ,ibiy with the aiiLUont [..i.l oul lo reiaWe |ual r.umot h.lp ih.iL' lives of labourei.< who ganatl In '"' "hi ,,, '' l '' fa*uni 'n In> America dining and |Ukt aftei UM v> tnMPI in agi nultuie now. in 1 i al> ui U.UIIO man Raw buDdlnga, in grain driers % %  king in the USA I irwdani mllhlng equlpman No More Schemes '" ,h 1 1 "' 1 1 %  V 1 1 "" which would niafc,. the mOUUl Ol %  %  .idinaiv imtUtttiaUal water' "l^'":'"' I U scheme/' he mid and sddad •Mad tnat allhougti %  her of men serving in t^uraa Mr Lyttelton. H dd'Pr^'"lin|t t" ! %  liking trends. The life ol men and £ !" ''' V" t V"' EX 1 FV "" N Omai n. Britain, iheir nolUlaa W W, I r "' '" their econornii I .i.. war* A.H sen uii .t km*) %  the, %  loabta t" Uiis country n< i lo the steilma HWI lhae tin growing man '" 0 "'" •Is. 2nd Marriage Nullified Hurricane lukts I oil Of I iji Ishmd arhlla ihem i.. Savarai of th Ji?!a able lo at) .„ NHBMI haul THE BAND WEPT *idni *~4u WemBF tea. Soo>uoUn too /vup m r 7u& S/TourMuv *a> t/&*> affairs, their theatre, music. lx-.ks .uid ther entertainments and their social activities will ba fleeted. Sport in BritiIn will be described with emphssi, on wh .* WELLINGTOrf, J 150-mile hour huirlcam ATLANTA. Oaorgja. J.m M, which -.wept the nmiii island of oond marrlaga % %  praU) "" %  y 'i' s Oroup m tha loutJ i on Monday, killed an estldaj in %  brlel BOUD hi *d 12 persons and did 2.noo. lowing oflklal ronllim.it that '""" dainiiR''. ntportl frotl 1 *.i she Mid on Tuesday Nearly every "one of"th*T ouarIftSSfi? 1 k '","' "" ""' K, ,1 "> *""" "' 1*" aOBga. MHAIU. ^U — ,JL -i .„ Uelleld is alive. ler-milUon greet Capta paopla gathered Carlaan at his home m other rnunlrlev ill-treatment Of Donkey Costs £4 Mi Worship Mr. L Walwv.i 0d Winter Tull of Dayrcll's Road. Christ Church, to pay a line of £4 for ill treating j, donkey. The offence was committed on December IS. 19M. The fine is to be paid in 28 ". % %  -ii alternative of ona monUl'l imprisonment with hard labour Tull's record show%  ho had three previous %  M and '-i> Iba last cones lined 25s by Hi* Mr E A McLeod. %  FRANKLYN D.ft.'* ON DRY DOCK Alter ci .-n.-iging a cargo of firewood and charcoal from Brltj-i! Quiana, tha 87-ton schooner trsnkl>n D. It. was dry docked !.,v evening for repairs The I r. I,I.IM. D. I*. Will b •T cliH-k in about a week i.i load targM (or British Guiana. MMancd to the Schooner Pool. exceptii... the High SCIKKII hand which had been practising incessantly op King Christian stood I.. maal' all tha amah—and than got dispersed ano t wag safely ie ched. No casualties were reported. French forces returned lire with n n 'nn guns, as Le Tourneau visited wounded soldiers In a local first aid station. The post had alraadj been attacked prior to the Mb> rrival — i\r. 'World affalr^ veyed each week through dispatches from the Times Correspondents resident In many artlctaa wrmeI,^nVrinlmg"l'ouHe PAY RISE NVCHOLOOY Square. A selection ot the leadHatmalters In New yorb havo mg articles nd letters to the "K"^ u three-year OOBtrael M K-in..r that have appeared m the *""<* thev agon H B0| to ask Times will be regularly made i" r p "v ." %  • '' %  iitrlal. PM ekag on I cantury -nd Jj""^ 1 " ,d W^Qg*j the Times has sought to tell the GAS IS TOO HOT truth bv reporting fact', kepi ''-i scrupulously clear of views, and CL 'orosperoua New York suburb. %  I n ad) i n.-rit worhar lha oantral ngura m %  modarn Inoeh % %  %  %  onloM Hi I pUgbl caine to llgbf IV | CommunMi smnounoad thai hai lirsl hu:l trol • hoi' on .| muai | '.' rated throi mn ol In. haadwriUng on UM ItOag wiin oiiici.,1 racordi thai Diai s., , i taacr on by offering critical comment ff n J 0 V? t 0, .^ n houi,wlVM *' y September 7. seven menths after upon them Thi 5 dI> KDAStlNS FOB THAT MI-IKIOKITY I iklllod .'.lit imti (ill TIIK riM'KDS .d -K' SIIOKS .nr wlecUd, liaiui-iut mill matched by oxpgi Ignoad craftaineii with u earg thai no machlng could imitate. ci) 'K' SIKI-;S in made over tha famoug 'K' PLUS H'lTlNt; LASTS with the lut-l-parls ona Btttng i %  Tho I'nsurcs a clos.Ill al tha hatl BIN Irt-edom for the toes. Why not cam in inn! lt> lilted uilli a pair ( thi-Mwurlil f.Mtioiis SIHM'S ? We lire Mire ymill any like all (I lln-r K* nearer*.:— 1 ll.l. NEVER WEAR AMITIII R SHOE BIW K' S17.00 to $21.63 PRICES FROM HARRISONS DIAL 2664 Sol,Distributors lor K SHOES in is.. I.... I I STERIIROOK FOUNTAIN PEN! I VM KIIIIDIIK VIIIS ISTIII.AN HAIR (REAM MIDEI VITAMIN DROPS HAI.IVER Oil. I \ IOSTEROI. DROPS PETROL HAHN I \< K \ Jill. ( OlfOfl SYRLP I.I DENS COUGH DROPS UBDOMAL (lor II EQUAL in POOD ENERGY uru Big Saving in 1 Hard lo Uliave? Woll U'i true --only 1 Pound oi PIT IO Chow ia equal In focd energy lo 3 lbs. of fresh meat. Thai mtani you can feed your doq woll -al a biq saving. And your doq will like Doq Chow, too! PI 'lll.\ A III \ HOW (Scratch Grain) H. JASON JONES & Cc, Ltd. Distributor.


I it





ESTABLISHED 1895





WEDNESDAY, 3.\NUARY





30, 1952





PRICE : FIVE CENTS



BUTLER TO SACK 10,000 CIVIL SERVANTS

Conservatives announce super-austerity programme

Imports Slashed:
Foodstuffs Cut

PATIENTS MUST PAY
FOR MEDICAL AID

By EDWARD JACKSON.

LONDON, Jan. 29.
‘THE CONSERVATIVE GOVERNMENT
announced a Super-austerity Programme on
Tuesday in a drastic bid to save Britain from bank
ruptcy and keep her in the front line of Western
defence.
~ ‘The Chancellor of the Exchequer, R. A. Butler,
rocked the reconvened House of Commons with the
announcement that he would fire 10,000 civil ser-
vants in the next six months, slash coal imports
from the United States, and reduce the nation’s
already meagre food supplies.

< He warned that the alternative to the sacrifices he out-
lined was “starvation and unemployment for this island, and

| Life In Cairo
_ Returns To

By PETER WEBB

BRITISH H.Q., Suez Canal
Zone, Jan. 29.
} Radio reports received from the

British Embassy in Cairo on
Tuesday said that the “general
tempo of life’’ was slowly return-
ing in riot-swept and the still-
smouldering Egyptian capital,

Reports said that the cars
overturned and burned out by
Saturday’s mobs were still strewn
in some of Cairo’s main _ thor-
oughfares, but many shops re-
opened and the City’s commercial
life started again.

The British Embassy was
reportediy “sealed off” by strong
military guards from the rest of
the city, and only cars with
special passes were being
allowed into the Embassy area
at night,

The Embassy added that at
night when the curfew was in
force, “the normal hum of traffic
subdued, and the city absolutely
quiet.”



|
}

Normal Tempo. Agreement With
Egypt Over Suez

By HAROL{) GUARD

Britain hoped to reach an Qgreement for the adequate de-

fence of the Suez Canal
“Egyptian aspirations”.

Eden told the House efCommons in a special statement
that Britain was still ready to enter negotiations for the re-
vision of the 1936 Anglo-Egyptian Treaty which Egypt had

unked.

e shid: “It is the aim of His
Majesty's Government to reach
agreement on arrangements for
the adequate defence of the Canal
Zone which would meet Egyptian
aspirations. We fully understand
that this is by no means exclu-
sively an Anglo-Egyptian interest.
but one in which we have an inter-
national responsibility.”

|
Foreign Secretary, Anthony Eden, said on Tuesday that |

disaster for other members of the Commonwealth.”

Health Services

Butler invaded the National
Health Service to announce a
charge of one shilling on every
prescription and of one pound
on most dental services.

He said, “Government mean
to carry out as quickly as we
can the defence programme
started by our predecessors.
We cannot do so without a
strong and healthy economy.”

In .a series of shocks for the
nation which has known nothing
but austerity since the outbreak
of World War II, Butler announc-
ed that a saving will be effected
in tobacco imports.

Coal imports from the U.S. will
be slashed to the tune of £2,500,-
000. Supplies of foodstuffs, in-
cluding hams, meats, canned fish,
fruit, vegetables and certain fresh
fruits, will be reduced. The week-
ly meat ration ig -
shilling two penee.

homes, that too- be cut

Reconstruction of blitzed cities | Government.



R. A. BUTLER.

limited by tightened credit re-
gulations, and imports of cloth-
ing, furniture, carpets, shoes,
and toys, will be slashed.

Butler said, “Jt is vital that the

one
t except for} country should understand the sort

of urgency which inspires the
I had not intended

will be delayed. Shops, offices, and|tO open the budget until late in
factories using steel will encount-|April, but I now will do so on
er restrictions. Total deliveries of |March 4th.”

Blame “machinery ‘end velucies | The Briush Commonwealth is |

civil use will be slashed £200,-
000,000 below the 1950 level.

The motor industry will be
asked to release only 60,000 cars
and 60,000 commercial vehicles
for the home market as com-
pared with 110,000 and 100,000
respectively last year. There
will be less cakes and candy in
the shops, due to the reduced
allocation of sugar, oils, and fats.

Direction Of Labour

To achieve this Defence Pro-
gramme and keep Britain’s ex-
port programme in high gear,
Butler took a step toward Govern-
ment direction of labour with the
announcement that employers
could only hire workers thfough
local Government Labour Ex-
changes.

Butler said that he would pre-
sent the budget for the critical
next fiscal year on March 4th, a
month ahead of schedule.

Ten thousands civil servants
will be fired in the next six
months, saving £ 12,000,000, and
Government's Information Ser-
vices will be slashed to a total
£110,000 at home and abroad.
In addition to motor cars, these

items will be limited to about two
thirds of last year’s supplies:
motorcyeles, bicycles, radios, tele-
vision sets, refrigerators, washing
machines, vacuum cleaners, metal
furniture and sports goods,

Instalment buying of motor
vehicles, bicycles, radio and
television sets, and electrical
appliances, will be restricted.
Other instalment buying will be



RIOTS

-

|

|



aiming at baloucing its books by
the end of thi’ year, as the first
step towards treeing the pound
now pegged to $2.80.

—U-P.



‘Moslents To Support
| Egyptiaa Premier

CAIRO, Jan. 29.

The leader of the Moslem
Brotherhood said that his group
expected to support the new Pre-
mier, Aly Maher Pasha, in a
united drive to restore order to
Egypt and oust Britain from the
Suez Canal Zone.

Maher was touring scarred
Cairo to see for himself the dam-
age done in Saturday’s riots, when
the Brotherhood’s Supreme
Guide, Hassan El Hobeiby, called
at the Premier’s residence this
morning.

Hobeiby said that the Brother-
hood was likely to support Maher
in view of the Premier’s declara-
tions that he intends to try to
achieve Egypt's national aspira-
tions. Maher obtained the support
of the majority of the Wafdist
Party and other groups last night

Cairo remained quiet with its
| nattalecete jammed with a seeth-
ing mass of cars and pedestrians
transacting business and seeing
jthe damage for themselves.

—U-P.



IN TEHERAN

Reports reaching British Head-
quarters here, said that the Cairo
riots had been “premeditated over

a long period,” and some of the ;
Britodg who lest. thelr lives had | sat eamer Wael stand on the 1936

been deliberately murdered. Treaty and reject any compromite
An Embassy report said that :
the Anglican Bishop of Cairo _
conducted a memorial service
yesterday for three Britons
killed in the riots.
—UP.

The 1936 Treaty

Eden made it clear,





| U.S. Not Mediating}
In UK—Egypt Issue} — ,

WASHINGTON, Jan. 29.

State Department spokesman,
Michael J. McDermott said on
Tuesday. that the United States

is not mediating or planning to
mediate in the Anglo-Egyptian
dispute “in any formal sense.”

He added that the good offices
of the U.S. were continually
available to both countries.

\ He said, “We are exercising
ouy good offices’ to the extent
that is possible at the present
time. But I emphasize that we
are not mediating in any sense
of that word, But we have been
exercising our good offices by
urging both sides to use modera-

~ ‘ spbcledasinisntenlenesis wr
ANTHONY = EDEN.

Tei until Egypt halts terrorism in

tion. 1Cairo and the Canal Zone.
McDermott said that the one Eden recounted for the House,

reason that he did not believe Britain’s four written and many

the U.S. would be a_ proper) verbal protests against attacks by
mediator in the dispute was that] Egyptian “auxiliary police’ on
it was a party to the proposals| British Tommies:in the Zone.
for the creation of the Middle East He said; “The late Egyptian
Command which the Egyptians,] Government paid no heed to these
had rejected. representations, It is, on the con-
Declaring, “we have not been|trary, only too clear that so. far
asked to mediate yet,” McDer-|from wishing to prevent armed
mott said, “I do not know whose| clashes with British forces, they
is the next move, but it is not] were actively concerned to pro-
ours.” —UP. voke them,

a. “This produced the critical situ-
ation at Ismailia, In view of the
military measures which had to
be taken there, to round up the

. + . terrorists, the British Commander

Resigns Service ‘had no alternative but to disarm

the auxiliary police. The latter

CHICAGO, Jan. 29. /|had explicit instructions from the

The Treasury Agent, who played| then Egyptian Government _to re-

the leading part in sending “Scar-|sist, and consequently, General

face” Al Capone and some of his|Erskine had no option but to use
associates to jail on Tuesday an-| force.”

Top Treasury Agent



nounced his resignation, Eden was cheered when he
He is A. P. Madden, Chief oftadded, “In this and indeed
the Intelligence Unit of the,throughout, he had full authority

and support from His Majesty’s
Government,”

Eden listed casualties as four
Britons killed, and 13 wounded,
with unconfirmed figures of 42

Bureau of Internal Revenue here

He said that for reasons of
own health and that of his wife
he was submitting his resignation.







General Eisenhower's Chief of
Staff General Alfred Gruenther
warned that Allied forces in
Europe would be at a “disadvan-
tage” in the event of a showdown
with Russia in 1952.
| In a radio interview with

Madden refused to give his - ¢ : i in round-the-clock conferences, to keep order in the country
exact age, saying he is shows Tha, however yg: our Down-town Cairo was jammed
60.” cas abili ‘i -| vith thousands of pedestrians

-ldiminish the ability and_ deter-| ‘

Madden was the spark-piug of or ; ; ajesty’s Govern- | Tl i , today, as curious Egyptians—many
‘the long investigation which sent aco great Age rights un- | U.N. ro SEEK RED thrown out of work because of
gang leader Capone to a federal) aa, the Treaty of 1936, until such } 4 closed business houses paraded
penitentiary in the early 1030°s|4:., as a new agreement to re- r W . T through the area of destruction
for federal income tax violations, | Ue. ‘the ‘Treaty "ean be reached]| \ IE SON ALLIED left after Saturday’s costly riot
after state courts, had preven|! . _vUP. | s : Premier Aly Maher Pasha

owerless to penalize him, ~w’ toured the city to inspect the
vi Ms —U.P. BLUEPRIN I damage. Meanwhile, the British
a Ambassador, Sir Ralph Steven-
° t
By ARNOLD DIBBLE or asked for an appointmen
»? $e Allies At A vith the Premier. It will be hb
“ } MUNSAN, Jan. 29 first meeting with Maher since
Di d ta e | United Natiows Staff Officer new Government took office
1sa van £ are to take the pulse Wednesday, Ha n El Hodeiby, Supreme
‘ of Communist views on the Allied) Guide of the Extremist Moslem
| PARIS, Jan, 29. blueprint for safeguarding the) Brotherhood, called at ‘Maher

United Nations correspondents
Gruenther repoited the progress of
12 European members of NATO in
building their forces had been
greater than expected during the
last year.

He said: “I would say at this
time the forces under SHAPE-— if
there were a determined attack
made—would be at a disadvantage.
Although the progress which had
been made is very marked it has

| not reached the stage where it can
guarantee against an act of aggres-
sion”’.—U P.



however, |





LONDON, Jan. 29

Zone which still would meet



| U.S. Bomber
Explodes

| RUSSIA WARNS
During Flight

MID-EAST





























TOKYO, Jan. 29 ,

A United States Airforce 1 29 . S LONDON, Jan, 29
ht Russia warned the Middle East
bomber exploded in fligh O-lorn States Tuesday that Allied
night only seconds after at least eee AY s ¢

f ywer pr sals for e
ll_of the 13 crewmen bailed out ourpower proposals for a Middle



Eastern Command violate p
The burning plane then crashed) United Nations hhiteae uaee
anto the industrial area on th€/them into Western plans for wat
outskirts of Tokyo. The Airforce|»nd would force them to break
Said that all the crewmen were/ off trade with the Easter bloc.

believed to have parachuted to

and Yokosham near a_ primary
school. They were unable to de-
termine immediately if the plane
had struck any buildings or if
any persons on the
been killed or injured
| ott 2 ft

Czech Minister On
Treason Charge

VIENNA, Jan, 29
Rudolf Margolius acting chief
the Czechoslovakia ‘oreign
Trade Ministry has been arrested
ind charged with treason informed
ouree aid Tuesday

ground had

|

| J’CA’S 1ST CEMENT
| FACTORY OPENED

KINGSTON, J’ca. Jan. 28. |“brains” of
Jamaica’s first cement factory|senior deputy, and in charge du-
was opened to-day by the Gov-lring the absence of Minister
ernor, It will start with a 100,000 |Antonin Gregor. Gregor has been
tons yearly output which willjin Moscow for special reasons
fully statisfy the local demand,j}conducting negotiations with the

leaving about 25,000 tons export.|Soviet Government,

—OP.

Police Kill Curfew

Violators In Cairo

CATRO, Jan, 29.
Egyptian officials announced on Tuesday that three
curfew violators had been killed and six injured by the
Police in Cairo on Tuesday night, while Security Chiefs met

Margolius regarded as the

the ministry was









Korean armistice. Meanwhile} home while the Premier was
United Nations negotiators in the; making his tour, but left word
adjoining truce tent throw the/that the powerful organisation
responsibility for breaking’ the| probably would back the new
deadlocked prisoner exchange) Government as long as it worked
talks squarely in the Communists|to oust Britain from the Suez
| lap. ' Canal

Maher already has won _ the

United Nations and Communist

upport of the

“working level officers’ worked wrordict Party whose Governmen

through the fourth page of the) pe replaced

paragraph by paragraph survey |

of the 17-page draft Monday | New Cabinet Ministers

“ ee Pee vil | The new Premier is planning
nesday Sta ate Wi!) | secording to reliable sources, to

face possible disagreement on the; ,»ame four new Cabinet Mini

actual machinery for prevention | ;,, including at least one

of an arms build-up after the) waorq

| truce. The tough Interior Minister

Murtadal

Maraghi



|

Bey was }

amed Censor General by the
Premier in a military order aimed
renting further outbreaks |

| Possible stumbling blocks fac-
| ing staff officers include = an
agreement on points to be inspec-



S.S. ARGENTINA

U.K. Hopes For |

Rea aeon ce 2 nae
- ae
Us eas
ee La
Ye

woeecene



THE 8.8. ARGENTINA will drop anchor in Carlisle Bay at 7
“Argentina” is on a 44 days’ Carnival Cruise to Rio.

Nationalistic



ee we “SS

An outburst of Communist activity coincided with the arrival in Teheran of Mr. Averell Harriman and
culminated in riots and shooting which were quelled with tanks and tear gas.

Many people, including 20 police, were injured and unconfirmed reports say that 12 demonstrators
were killed, as the mob of 10,000 fought with sticks, stones and revolvers.
(Communist) Party “Partisans of Peace” demonstrating against Mr.
plood-sucking imperialists” and the Angio-Iranian Oil Company, ciashed with their bitter enemies, |
the National Front who were running a demonstration on much the same lines. —Express,






ted behind the Communist lines J ey pee aoe
The Allied blueprint suggests one t he A iglo-Egyptian crisis A
ee oe ; Avail Most of Cairo’ business life
or two places in Red territory, Sceed cd normal ister ‘today,
f RI ive vk are located in the ; "* - _ c 7?
ee B.O.A.C, Al INER } eS vara. ote ie ple ste though the bank ; Opt ned only |
‘ CRASH LANDS | field country Chinese nay om poker ae — at
oppose neutral inspection team ee. og ee se
pit TOKYO, Jan. 29. | $0 close to the Manchurian ness houses are jobless as al
' A British Overseas Airways! porder result of damage done to do ge
| Corporation airliner crash-landed| f din a
at Haneda Airport at approxim- On Tuesda oweve Chinese ( nd
| ately 9.00 p.m, last night. No; hinted for the 4
| casualties were reported. Early| plan to wash t . :
Riots broke out when Tudeh | reports said that the ‘plane ran| Korean truce tO
Harriman “Anglo-American | off the runway during its land-* leave North , k in
jing the rth Kor l !
—U.P.



- ee tls

eameen in eee el
i) ogee

4.m. today for a six-hour stay here. The



-———_—_

Leg. Co. Propose Select
Committee On Emigration

SUBJECT to agreement by the House of Assembly
with the proposal by the Legislative Council in their Mes-
sage of 17th July, 1951 a Joint Select Committee of both
Houses of the Legislature is to be set up “to examine thie



question of over-population in Barbados and to make
recommendations for dea with this problem.”
fhe Council yesterday passed
e in Address, notice of which was
1 ,
safety, but only 11 of the men; The warning to the Middle Kast Commun ist |given earlier during the day by
ee or reported per-|came in similar bur unidentical c |Hon. F. C, Hutson, to this effect.
sondlly to the plane’s base at|notes handed to representatives of D | Che Address reads as follows —
3 p! ‘ 2 os
Yokyta, west of Tokyo the United States, Britain, France, @ et amape ( he Legislative Council have
The bomber’s pilot said that}Turkey yesterday in Moscow in he honour to refer to their Mes~
he had checked on the plane’s|reply to their December eighteen BIGHTP ARMY H.Q |sage dated the 17th of July, 1951,
inter-communication system tojnote KOREA, Jan. 29 | regarding the nomination of
learn sere anyone was trap- whe eebaat ka’ Wis the ‘Oita Allied jet pilots said they dam- | members from the Honourable
ped in the pline before he bailed] _ stae : ote note to the nited|sged the first M.LG. 15 in four | House of Assembly to serve with
~~ a ee Sin oe : < Te ee ee days Tuesday after a brief high meres, ae the aoe
f spokesman Saic a 1e | Pe c ied B easter a titude clash between 22 Sabre |the Legislative ‘ouncil on a Jo!
pour eeceeed bomber apparently | Pact to “aggressive” Atlantic pact, jets and fifty Communist jets, (Select Committee “to aes
had caught fire and the pilot wa . . Le® Friday Allied jets claimed |duestion of over-popu ation
abi anal ; ans .| It said at the time while Mid- |)“ oat ‘. | Be ' ie
mace ete teas oar easterners are trying to oust Brit- ae el ee er as aden ook decling with thie
ch : fan pere-)ain that the four powers hoped to {Probably — the. destraction of) sn roul . eful
ychutting, but only a few seconds|), ing in the troops of other West- {another and damaging of. thre¢, |, Problem, and would be grat
elapsed befere the plane ex-|er states os a Then for two days no contact was |' learn at an early date whether
sladed» The bomber plunged to —U.P. |reported: Yesterday jets from|‘he Honoufwble House is in
the ground: in flames. | lnealighahe both sides clashed’ briefly with | #teement with this proposal and,
oe — said ea beni Allied pilots making no claims if so, to receive the nomination
plane crashec setween ‘okyo

of members to serve on the pro-

On the ground a fifteen minute
Joint

fight northeast of Chorwon on the
western front and a five minute
clash south of Kosong on the
eastern front were reported

posed Committee."
Asking the Council to approve
the passing of the AdCress, Hon.
vp |i. C. Hutson recalled that some
seosehep ae) me | ‘ime about the middle of last year
j‘he question was raised and @
. “ WW oR > Viessage was sent to the Other
SMOULDERING FIRP Place on the subject asking them

VANCOUVER, Br, Columbia |if they would agree to the setting
Ke Sais ; a7 = p of a Joint Committee to inves-
rire smouldering for more that litigate the sti rer- =

so heute ah Eibkdiar ta the bold € 1e question of over-popu

lation of the island,
For one reason or another,
nothing had been done about it,

of the Danish freighter Seroabor:
unloading a cargo of cotton and



copra, Seven pieces of fire figh nd he therefore begged to move
ing equipment and «a harbour|ihat the Message be sent to the
fire-boat were called into action.) Other Place.

The damage was not deter- The Hon. Dr, C, H. St. John
mined, but firemen said that 1t)seconded the motion for the pass-
would not be extensive ing of the Address which was

—U.P. igreed to nem con,

————————————————————_——



to the Passengers, Captain and Crew of
8.8. ARGENTINA

While in Barbados we invite you to visit our store.
and Company (Lon-

We are agents for Liberty
don) Limited.
We are Stockists of :

Fine quality English China including Wedgewood
Cashmere Sweaters and Coats,

Doeskin Gloves

Argyle Socks

LOCALLY

MADE SOUVENIRS A SPECIALTY.

CAVE SHEPHERD & Co, Ltd.

, 11, 12 & 13 Broad Street.





ey

cee





SiGe:
od




PAGE TWO

BARBADOS ADVOCATE WEDNESDAY, JANUARY 30, 1952


































































] ' ae
OR NI ADY OLIVER * OnnOW
ESE = wh "ae eee th ° gs | He tells women how drab they are—and makes TODAY : Oo ee
i who < tou y € e . . COLUM eee rr
Caribbean were intransit passeng- Give Your i a fortune doing it | Rita Orson ! WEISSMULLER P
€rs through Barbados on Monday " | HAYWORTH-—WELLS
from Antigua on their way io Child A The Dari Of M Willi LADY FROM SHANGHAI & LOST TRIBE|) 9
Grenada to continue their W.I. ' e aril Tr» l 1s ncin. Suite: @aeen e. Friday 230-448 & 8.30 p.t
holiday ss | j a — aan i continuing daily z
Dinner Party Chance Mee 1's
+ a ~~~ Aly K KET
PD®. AND Mrs. K. M. B. Simon By FREDERICK COOK “ROLLIN’ WESTWARD pebee 5 Robert Z
gave a dinner party at thei: ie a * at ant Auer a " MITCHUM RYAD
residence, St, Leonard’s House, St First Locally NEAT—but : oe aoe er Sat. Special 9.30 am. & 1.29 pi age ry A
eonard’s Avenue, in honour of ie i —but not glamorous. Goo igures—bdu ey PICTURES APTAUN HORATIO Dial
onl Neck Fear li acuet Produced Film hide them. Very a ive—but apparently quite un- To be announced HORNBLOWER (Colon) 2310
mir Nechoumoft. . aware i y in the opinion of a a:
Renee Mem mnente ; ee By PAUL FOSTER aware of it. Those are English women in t p
— . oe Page tepited wave An educational film photo-) daring 43-year-old New Yorker, who thinks he knows all|f PQ AZA oo GAIETY > _—
A. S. Cato, M.L.C., Mt, J. Brome graphed in Barbados — acted,| there is to know about women. . :
Mr. and. Mrs. C. C. Clarke Mrs. produced and directed by Bar- Lawt 2 Shows To-day 4.49 & 8.90 pm Last Show Tonite 8 30°
Av. - ana I Ss. = S " Be 2 ~ 7 . ”
R. M. Chatt Maj. and Mrs badians is to be released at the| In the Bs few years he has Republic's Whole Serial a Tun goppey Roig «| PT
Goldsmith. Mi uk tins beginning of next mofth at the/told 3504 women what is P. 7 re For FEDERAL AGENT vs. . ah ae ateeees
Ince and Miss E.Goldson Plaza Theatre, Bridgetown, In}wrong with them, their general. repa. UNDERWORLD, INC. 9 ae
Lod S “ core fact, the only non-Barbadian|*hapes and their clothes. Not Kirk ALYN=VJames DALE
oage hool Magazine part of the entire production is|Omly as he survived, but he has ii oy fadiete ade Thurs: ony Friday & Sat.
A LL Old Ledge Boys are re- “The Voice” that gives the yom»|™4ade for himself some £44,000 British Fair ae esp pase "et oar pn a
niet are mo morn “7 mentary throughout the film,|* Year in doing it. rAWITY HONEY nidwosh Vattes Glass Menagerie eye
of the Department of Medica r- Nevertheless it is a West Indian : . ; chien Riese Simone Simon i i Jane Wyman & , ais
Vices has odie eh alaietiainn : A Ss : Richard Willis, cleanshaven, * Keefe Bill Elliott & John Carroll &
- ae ar ee thy oo ee voice, an essential factor for a|lsleek, with blue pin-stripe suits akilieradiias! te ee eS es 1 (pals, ieee cliintala tabale bis nat Malas
, ; i Sorincgttan apsete West Indian production, and|(and ‘happily , married even ; Teceia’ Wet. ae Ne ee ; j Gare Cooper Roy Rogers
Record and will distribute it among S asthe di eas ; “fete ih Industries Fair—the 31st—are Rey Rogers | Gene: Autry : eee
; one that most Barbadians}though he chooses all his wife’s * j :
past pupils of the school. In order $ : . already well in hand. The Board
Ses sesh teiccenece at know quite well. The com-/hats and clothes) runs a_ five- of Trade hopes that despite the
tncneet increased cost of printing, mentary is given by Jama-|days-aweek — television _pro- cfroct on British Industry of re- ,
he agazine Committee has ican-horn Erfiest Eytle—at pres-|gramme in New York called - 2 mtr id s wu
ordered many more copies of the ” . 3 PB Z armament and raw material short
Record than usial in the ho; that af ent in Australia with the West|Looking At You, ages, last year’s record figure of .
Old Boys will show their cident Indies team and whose voice has A stream of women trot duti- "¢atly 20,000 foreign visitors will TO-DAY & TO“MORROW, 445, 8.30
in their old sehool by buying a, an ee ee pe we fully before his camera each day be surpassed. COLUMBIA PICTURES PRESENTS —
copy. MR. & MRS. COLIN Ss. Cox half domite tariés of tH sts. fo invite —~ and get — a fran The Fair, always a vatuable y os
' In ad@ition to Mr. Bowen, the’ —-married recent! nan eee aa - ue nae appraisal of their appearance by “shop window” for British goods, ee i y cR g LIE
Lodge Schoo! Magazine Committee} : U. oe ae Pg <= for 20| Mr. Willis. Lots of them have has even greater significance this HER Ww ONDE FU rr
has secured the services, as sub- First Visit aa Re Se visiting Britons. This is

agents of such Old Boys as Arthur!

Streetly in Trinidad Judgie Good- R
7 } »M"

ing at the University of Cambridge
and Bert Reete at the Universit;
College of the West Indies in’
Jamaica,

Staying With Sister

A= two months’ holiday in
4 Barbados, Mrs. E. Patrick is
due to return to New York City
tomorrow via Puerto Rico by
B.W.LA. Mrs. Patrick who is Bar-
bados born is a U.S. citizen having
lived in the U.S, for 32 years

During her stay here she has
been the guest of Mr. and Mrs.
Francis Moore of Bank Hall, St

Michael. Mrs. Patrick and Mrs.
Moore are sisters.

On Honeymicon
A

RRIVING the colony
are



in
recently from British Guiana
Mr. and Mrs. Victor Spencer
who are on their honeymoon. Mr.
Spéncer who attached to the
Civil Service Department in Brit-

h Guian on six months’ vaca-
tion and hopes to stay here for
some time prior to going to St.
Vincent. They are the guests of

Mrs. Angela Bart of “Anneville”,
River Road,

Back To Trinidad
APT. and Mrs. John Halifax
and their daughter Susan
who have been spending a short
holiday here expect to return to
Trinidad today where Capt. Hali-
fax is a B.W.1LA., pilot.



| BY THE WAY eeeee By Beachcomber

EEING a picture of two wef

men, very neatly dressed, and

each in a neat little hat, I coul

not but recall the song which says:" it

Two little men, two little
What wild economy! ren
One hat apiece—oh, what a waste!
Each little wearer stands dis-
graced,
If I could only see
Two little heads in one large hat,
How happy I could be, my love,
How happy I could be.
Refrain:—
Poems are
that,
But only hatters make a hat,
A Challenge
DEFY the aldermen and coun-
cillors of Arundel to appear
naked at the next quarterly meet-
ing. They have decided not to
wear their civic robes, because
“Robes bring no additional wisdom
or inspiration.” Nor do lounge
suits. Nor do clothes of any sort.
The Gamma-bomd
R. KARPAM KOOLRUK was
one of the most trusted foreign
scientists at Bumpton, and possibly
the only man who fully under-
stood what the devil was going on
there. He alone knew the inner
secrets of the Gamma-bomb, and
had succeeded in harnessing elec-
tromagnetic radiations of high
frequency to the powerful exhala-
tions of thin strips of molybdenum

made by fools, like

steeped in sodium chloride. On a
certain Tuesday Dr. Koolruk sat
at his desk with a sheet of paper
before him. He had just decipher-
@d a message traced by a fine



needle dipped in hot lemon-juice.

The application of oxytalie acid
rendered the inyisible writing
visible, The message, smuggled to

him in a tin of Indonesian hash,
informed him that G.241 would
eontact him in a day or two. Hum-
ming contentedly, he returned to
his laboratory, where white-coated





WALTER CARTER, C.B.E,,

and Mrs, Carter who arrived
here recently by the Gelfito expect
to be in Barbados until about mid-
March. Mr. Carter now retired
used to be Manager of the London
head office of Royal Insurance. Mr.
Carter has travelled extensively
and among the countries he has
visited are the U.S., Canada, Aus-
tralia, New Zealand and Japan.
This is however. his first visit to
3arbados.

Mr. Carter was awarded his
C.B.E., in 1943 in recognition for
his work with the Board of Trade
dealing with war damage claims in
London. :

Mr. and Mrs. Carter are guests
at Cacrabank.

Leaving To-day

UE to leave this morning for

Puerto Rico by B.W.1.A. on

his way to the U.S, is Mr. George

Barnes, eldest son of Capt: and

Mrs. Robert C. Barnes of 6th
Avenue Belleville.

George who recently became en-
gaged to Miss Heather Rosemary
Ramsay, daughter of Mr. Hugh O.
Ramsay of Carlisle View, Bay
Street and the iate Mrs. Ramsay is
returning to the U.S. where he is
a Graduate Fellow of Emory Uni-
versity.

concoctions in glass retorts, Pro-
fessor Puppie looked in, “How’s
going, Koolruk?” he asked
cheerfully. “Everything is splen-
did,” replied Koolruk, turning
aside to hide a smile of triumph,
Getting on with it
Y lowering the school entry
age to two, more mothers
could be “released” for factory

JACK TURBOT IS COMING
work, and thus—
Prodnose; Pray,
Jack Turbot coming?
for?
Myself;
business,
—thus education would be con-
tributing to industrial expansion,
and the industrial expansion to
education, Or not,
The Gamma-bomb (IV)
M I. ZERO were convinced
that the Belle of Dung was
after the secret of the deadly
Gamma-bomb, Orders were
therefore sent to Bumpton to
double and triple the secufity
measures, Dr, Koolruk was warned
to be on his guard. The place
became like a besieged fortress.
But Muffet had a master-plan.
“You,” he said to Egham, “must
find this lady, and convince her
that you are the person who
knows most about the bomb. You,
as she knows are not a sqdientist,
but from this moment you are in
charge of Bumpton, Koolruk
will be told thpt we are sending

when is this
And what

Pray, mind your own

you, and why we are sending
you. He will be able to give you
some sort of information that
will sound plausible to Dingi-
Poos. Pass it on to her, and let
her get out of the country with
it. In facet, go to the air-port
with her. We'll see that she

.ssistant’s were peering through meets no difficulty there.” “It’s



bod

is pondering over

heard. ‘If all the
ppéearing it mast be
work,”’ he muses,

s though
wood more
Then a bright







idea strikes him. ‘* Why, of course,
| know who may have taken them,"
he chuckles. Choosing a tree that
is easy to climb he soon discovers
a squirrel, ‘* Hi, have you and your
pals been taking away all
scorns?" he calls. Tle

JUST RECEIVED

SILVER SWALLOW ENAMEL-WARE

PUDDING BASINS—70c. 85c. 91c.
T4c.
$1.22, $1.31, $1.61
60c.
80c, Ile. 99e, $2.32

BOWLS—42c.
JUGS—%6ce.
PIE DISHES—39c.
BASINS—70c.
PAILS with Covers—$2.60

54dc. 56,

48.

T. RB. EVANS & WHIT FIELDS

Dial 4220

PAILS

B0e.

wo

YOUR SHOE STORES



nicroseopes and boiling strange fool-proof!"”



CHAMBERS—8iec. $1.20
ENAMEL PLATES—29¢. 3ic. 40c.
KETTLES—2 pts—$1.32

Since 1917
cer. ROY BROWN, Vice

President and Operations
Vianager of Central Northern Air-
ways Ltd., of Canada is enjoying
his four weeks’ holiday in Barba-
dos. He arrived from Canada last
week by T.C.A, and is a guest at
Cacrabank, He has already made a
motor tour around the island and
thinks it’s a grand spot.

Capt. Brown has been flying
since 1917 when he flew with the
Royal Flying Corps during the
First World Wir.

He was born in Winnipeg and
has his home and headquarters
there. Most of the ’planes his com-
pany operates use pontoons and
vkiis instead of wheels, due to cold
conditions throughout the territory
over which they fly. Capt. Brown
himself is quite accustomed to cold
weather. Shortly before he came
down here he experienced temper-
atures of 52 below.

Talking Point

Thought depends absolutely on
the stomach.

—Voltaire.

Incidental Intelligence
HEN I was young I resolved
not to marry until I found
the ideal woman. Some years later
i met her. But she was looking for
the ideal man,
—French film star Michet Simon.
—-L.E.S.

cried Egham. “It
has to be, with you at work,” said
Muffet bluntly, Two days later
Egham arrived at Bumpton, But

Dingi-Poos was already one more
ahead,

Remember your manners
I LIKE the suggestion that
enough,

kindness to animals is not

and that courtesy is

needed. as well, Anybody can fling
a bit of fish to a cat. Nature’s gen-
Uleman will pass it to the eat on
a plete, Similarly, many a dog's
feelings are hurt (and an inferi-
ority complex set up) when you
forget. to remove your glove be-
fore shaking hands with it. Again,
if you are introduced to an
animal yho is a stranger to you,
it is kind to say, “I think we met
at Mrs. Detmold’s. How’s your
father?” It is little things like this
that oil the wheels of social life,
By the way, if you are sitting next

to a dog at dinner, don’t talk
across it.





CROSSWORD



Across

1. Pear af mistake in the nisi
Tworthirds of the sledge

Ghastly and sensational

» What a beast! (4)

In @ steamer moves 4) 13: On the way out. (3)
ther nests hold tt. (4)

| Deadly pestiience, (6)

Sort of tear. (3)

. A forerunner, (6)

Implement of progress (8)

23. Rely on # letter from the dees

& . (6) 26. Retainers. (7)
wollen. (8)

Dewo

Brings the peo to heel. (y)
It cap be consumed (6)
Gear Edenh made for
deserter, (8)
- A ripe age, (8) d
» A good one is obeyed. (5)
. Phat additiona, seat, (7)
. Bard's idea of a deer} (3)
Part of it is blige (6)
Our King does by love
Roomy with 100
notes, (3)
+ After needy this in ruture es)
She may be a huider, (4)
. This makes the ies heavy

Solution of reste
1 Reindeer, 4

(4
on)

the

oO. Rasea. (ti)

(a)
Drom tseer

Sep Seseanse Shr

‘

eal

Arron,
Ke '

days
Endure
1A Mol

Avenue: 12 Dean 5 Y

16. Roar 1

Heart: 21 Pee 2

24. Tree Down:

loved: 5. {dea 4 '

6 Raves. Ape i n j
14. Settle: 15

20. Rus



WITHOUT COVERS—$2.11

4 pts—$1.80

Dial 4606











featurette before the main pi¢-
ture at the Plaza. It is em
titled “Give Your Child a Chance”
and deals with the subject @
pre-natal care of mothers duri
pregnancy. Under the direction
of Mr. Isaac Carmichael, Acting
Supervisor of Visual Education, it
is a production of the Barbados
Film Unit.

The Film Unit is attached to
the Department of Education and
the scheme hag been made possi*
ble through a West Indian Film

Training project, sponsored by
Colonial Development and Wel-
fare.

If “Give Your Child a Chance”
is just a beginning of what this
department can do then the Film
Unit has already proved its use-
fulness to the commuriity and
will become a permanent part of
our education set-up.

After its run at the Plaza, this
film will be shown by the
Mobile Cinema in the various}
parishes,

16 mm. film is used in its pro-
duction while standard theatre
projectors are 35 mm. The
Plaza are therefore arranging to
temporarily install a 16 mm.
projector in their operating room
and attach their sound equip-
ment to the sound track so as to
enable the film to be showm at
that theatre. In this way it will
be seen by many who would not
see it had it been issueq direct
to the Mobile Cinema.

“Give Your Child a Chance is a
story of an expectant mother
who is uneasy about the future
of her unborn babe due to pre-
vious experience with her first
child who has been sickly from
the time of his birth—all due to
her negligence during pregnan-
ey. Through the advice of a
friend she visits the Maternity
Hospital and benefits by fre-
quent medical attention. As a
result she produces a_ ve
healthy baby and sets the stage
for its usefulness in life. The
story is simply told cleverly
interwoven into the educational
side of the film and the people
in the cast all help to make the
production very convincing.

The film for this first film
was supplied by the Colonial
Film Unit who also conducted

the Training Course in the West
Indies (in Jamaica) for the
British Colonies, and which Mr,
Carmichael attended.

AW investigation, treatment
scripting, commentaries as well
as actual “shooting” are done

locally under the technical guid-
ance of the Colonial Film Unit.
The exposed film is then sent to
England to be processed and
edited. The rough edition is sent
back to Barbados for comments
before finalisation.

The Colonial Film Unit eventu-
filly acts as a clearing house for
the distribution of local material
to other West Indian islands and
vice-versa, This is necessary to
prevent overlapping of subjects.

It is understood that the Bar-
badog Film Unit is now working
on a production for the Social
Welfare Department. Quite a
wealth of subjects yét remain to
be tackled among which are prob-
lems of Road Safety, agriculture,
housing sanitation, development
of the fishing industry, etc., etc.,
—in fact there is no shortage of
material.



CLUB
MORGAN

opens at 3 p.m.

for
Dinner
and
Dancing
Every Night

(Except Sunday)















































how My. Willis comes to be an
authority on British womanhood.

“Too Severe’

“To start with,” he said today,
“their clothes are far too severe,
Who can see a pretty figure in a
suit or coat cut straight up-and-

down? Admittedly they look
neat. And penhaps tidier than
our American women. But how
about a bit more glamour? A
dress that clings, perhaps. A
prettier colour in materials
A touch more make-up, maybe.

Softer hair-styles.” fe

Mr. Willis pulis no punches in
telling his television victims
where they go wrong. If a figure

is in need of minor repairs, or
even a complete overhaul, he is
not backward in saying so.

Excess poundage, he begins to
hink, is the major cause of tihe
lispiritedness he encounters in

|so many women.

At times Mr. Willis introduces
a -touch of psyechdlogy in his
attempt to restore his “patients’ ”
confidence in themselves.



*“T am not,” he told a_ plain,
mousy little woman “trying to
make you look like Hedy
Lamarr. I’m just trying to
improve on what you've got.”
And with a dexterous hand he
restyled her hair, dabbed on some
makesup (he was a Hollywood
make-up man for years) and

rearranged the hang of her suit.

What, apart from some blunt
ddvice, do the women get out of
it?

They get a new £35 suit and
£10 hat, each guaranteed by the
expert Mr. Willis to do all the
things for them that they had
not known enough to do for-
themselves,

Apart from an income that
puts him in the top Broadway
bracket, Mr, Willis collects from
his chosen task a certain sar-
donie satisfaction which cannot
be expressed in dollars and cents.
Me feels that he has made a
career of doing what thousands
of other men have longed to do
and have not dared.

And there is some evidence
among his tremendous fan mail
that he may be right. He shows
with pride for instance, a letter
from a husband in a distant city.

“Please, Mr. Willis,” wrote the
husband, “accept my grateful
thanks for telling my wife in five
minutes what I have been want-
ing to tell her for the last
25 years.”

. WORLD COPYRIGHT RESERVED
—L.E.S.



IRISH LIN

Embroidered Souveni

JANETTA DRESS SHOP

Lower Broad Street

DRESSES—for every occasion
BATHING SUITSin many styles and colours
PURE WOOL TWINSETS—from Scotland

N—Luncheon and Tea Sets

LOCAL HANDCRAFTS—Baskets,

year, The new balance of pay-
ments’ crisis makes it absolutely
Vital to expand British exports,
and the B.I.F. is considered one of
the chief means by which this ex-
pansion can be achieved.

Mr. Peter Thorneycroft, Presi-
dent of the Board of Trade, has
called the Fair ‘“‘a focal point of
our export trade’, Writing in the
Board of Trade Journal he points
out that it not only enables for-
eign buyers to compare British
prices and styles with those of
other countries, but also provides
a meeting place where lasting
business friendships can be
formed.

“It is true, of course,” he g@es
on, “that we have andertdken a
heavy programme of defence pro-
duction and we are determined to
play a full part with our Allies
in the defence of the free world
Inevitably the claims of defence
on our engineering capacity will
not allow us to do all we should
like to promote our export trade
at the present time. There are
also raw material problems to be
overcome as a result of world
shortages.”

“But there are special reasons
why we in Britain should main-
tain our exports while carrying
out our defence programme.
British Isles lack almost all the
raw materials essential to an in-
dustrial country and at the utmost
can provide only a.pare half of the
food needed to keep the popula-
tion fit, So our economy depends
on our being able to pay for vast
essential food and raw material
imports, ,

The 1952 B.1.F. opens simultane-
ously in eee and Birmingham

5th.
on May wiltatua

B.B.C. Radio

Programme

WEDNESDAY, JANUARY 30, 1952
11.15 a.m, Cockney Cabaret, 11.30 a.m.
Listeners’ Choice, 12 — The News,
12.10 p.m. News Analysis
4.07.15 p.m. 25.38M 31.32M





4 p.m. The News, 4.10.p.m. The Daily
Sanviem, 4.15 pm. BBC Midland Light
Orchestra, 5 p.m. Composer of the Week,
5.15 p.m. Sandy MacPherson, 5,30 p.m.
Books to Read, 545 p.m. The Arts,
6 p.m. Elton Hayes, 6.15 p.m. Ulster
Magazine, 6.45 p.m. Sports Roundup and
Programme Parade, 7 p.m The News,
7.10 p.m. News Analysis, 7.15 p.m.
Cricket Report on Final Day’s Play in
Fifth Test and Review of W.1I. tour of
Australia 7.45 p.m, Over to You, 8.15
p.m, Radio Newsreel, 8.30 p.m. European
or Atlantic Union, 8.45 p.m. Composer of
the Week. 9 p.m. Now it can be Told,
1 p.m. The News, 10.10 p.m. From the
Editorials, 10.15 p.m. Mid-week Talk,
10.30 p.m. Marching and Waltzing













Handbags; Hand

rs



_ es

GLOBE

TO-DAY and TO-MORROW 5 & 8.30

Inside §$

traight ”

ARLENE DAHL — BARRY SULLIVAN

OPENING

/, te
0 eg4
(or Ml eles"
Alene



RO bars

Dheeret by siewann 5,



FRIDAY

x





5 & 8.30 P.M.







a yon q
CORERT WAGNER: MARIA ro
neRT ey & UGH ens 20 ;









Starring :
MARTA JAN
EGGERTH KIEPURA
JANIS CARTER

EXTRA SHORT —
“YE OLDE SWAMP

SWOPPER”

OPENING FRIDAY, 2.30 & 8.30

PARAMOUNT PICTURES PRESENTS—

*PEKING EXPRESS”

Starring :—JOSEPH COTTEN-

-~CORINNE CALVERT

EDMUND GWEN

ROYAL

TO-DAY & TO-MORROW, 4.50 & 8.15

PARAMOUNT DOUBLE —
HENRY

WILCOXSON

THE

YO
IN

AND

LORETTA

UNG

CRUSADES”

“DESERT FURY™~

Starring :
BURT
LANCASTER

LIZABETH
SCOTT

FRIDAY ONLY, 4.30 & 8.15

REPUBLIC WHOLE SERIAL —

“GG MEN NEVER FORGET”

CLAYTON MOORE

Starring :

OLYMPIC

TO-DAY ONLY, 4.30 & 8.15

COLUMBIA ACTION DOUBLE —

JON
HALL

NINA
FOCK

IN
“THE MUTINEERS~

AND

“DARK PAST”

Starring :
WILLIAM HOLDEN —

LEO S. COBB

THURSDAY ONLY, 4.30 & 8.15

COLUMBIA DOUBLE

GEORGE FOMBY in —

AND

“GEORGE IN CIVVY ST.”

-BODYHOLD~

With WILLARD PARKER —



Tey ey. A

W042 ae Ta =
A TIDAL WAVE!

LIZABETH SCOTT
JANE GREER
DENNIS O'KEEFE

ROX

LOLA ALBRIGHT

OPENING FRIDAY

Ist. FEBRUARY

R-K-O Super Double :

Shocking Secrets of
“Respectable” People

ee sD} PEG aA

Rk 5
AY BREEN
cen LOWY ar ne snes

oe

sone:

»

LAST TWO SHOWS TO-DAY, 4.50 & 8.15

REPUBLIC DOUBLE —

ADELE MARI

“THE INNER

AND

— WARREN DOUGLAS

in

CIRCLE~

“UNMASKED”

Starring: ROBERT ROCKWELL -

THURSDAY ONLY, 4

REPUBLIC WHOLE SERIAL

“G@ MEN NEVER FORGET™~

CLAYTON MOORE.

With

BARBARA FULLER

30 & 8.15















WEDNESDAY, JANUARY

30, 1952

Paris Newsletter from SAM WHITE

The Customs Men
Upset Les Girls

PARIS.

L*s GIRLS at the Bal Tabarin cabaret were aghast, the

management spluttered with

indignation and the

French tourist bureau is still wringing its hands in frus-
tration over the fact that at the moment there is no French

Government in existence to w

Cause of all this agitation—a
raid by French Customs inspec-
tors on the largely tourist audi-
ence of the Tabarin in search of
smuggled watches. The raid was
carried out by 20 inspector§ in
mufti who posed as ordinary mem-
bers of the audience. At the inter-
val the inspectors moved down the
aisle examining the watches of
foreigners for Customs stamps.

Result of the raid: 40 sum-
monses and a total of £350 in
fines, A French Customs official
expleined “750,000 watches were
smuggled into France last year.
We had to do something about it.”
Comment by the Tabarin man-
agement and the French tourist
office: “No way to treat our for-
eign guests.”

RED CURTAINS

PARIS “chic”; Bearded Rus-
sian Ambassador in Paris. Mr.
Pavlov, has bought Rennais-
sance furniture for his Embassy.

Alcohoiics Not So Anonymous;
Of 396 American passports lost
in Paris last year, 78 were found
in bars,

POET’S CORNER
MISSING diplomats
A former Lyons publisher re-
veals that in 1945 he published
a slim volume of poems, written
by Guy Burgess in French and
entitled Proustian Garlands.
The publisher went bankrupt,
hawever, before the volumes
could be put on sale, Total print
was 1,200 copies, and these are

latest :

now in a stockroom of a book-
shop in Toulouse.
Profit And Lost
Casino receipts for the past

year show that Enghien Casino,
near Paris, heads the list with an
annual take of £743,000; Deau-
ville comes second with £489,000
and Cannes with £299,000.

Sacha Guitry has opened his
Paris house as a museum, charges
£1 admission,

e

A French drama critic writes
in protest against the French
adoption of the English word

hich it can protest.

“starlet,” says that if it is
adopted as a French word it
should be spelt “Starlette” ag in
“Omelette.”

, De Gaulle Speaks

Charlemagne rides again:
General Charles de Gaulle, sur-
veying with icy disdain the
shambles of yet another political
crisis in Paris, plans a dramatic
gesture — to deliver a speech
extolling Charlemagne in the
ancient city of Aix-la-Chapelle,
where Charlemagne (founder of
the Holy Roman Empire) is
buried.

In the speech de Gaulle will
say that the Vatican policy was
wise in supporting Charlemagne,
in contrast with its present cool-
ness towards de Gaulle’s aspira-
tions. He will also lambast the

concept of a European army and .

the Schuman plan and. make
dramatic offer to the Germans.

The offer: Joint Franco-Ger-
man exploitation of French
Morocco,

a

The Invalid

Actor-dancer Gene Kelly,
starring in his second film after
An American in Paris, held up

location shots last year by going
skiing and straining a _ tendon.
This year he is again holding up
proceedings—he is now in a Paris
hotel with influenza.

Sit. Vac.

Quotes of the week:

Orson Welles in Paris searching
for someone to play the part of
Salome in his next film: “It’s a
eurious and baffling thing. When-
ever I see a likely looking girl
in a bar or a nightclub and ask
her if she would like to go into
films she replies. Run away, I
have heard that one before.’ ”

A fortune-teller, to the Aga
Khan: “Your son, Ali, will not
remarry. He is much happier as
a bachelor.”

After The Dance

Economy measure? The ball-
room of the British Embassy has
been turned into a badminton
court,

BARBADOS, ADVOCATE





£222 Oh, iust a little thing



Former T; rinidad
M.L.C. Shot Dead

PORT-OF-SPAIN, Jan. 28.

Clarence Abidh, a member of
the Trinidad Education Board and
a former member of the Executive
and Legislative Councils was shot
dead through the window of his
home on Friday night. The shot
rang out from the dark patio as
Abidh sat with his wife, two
women visiters, and a small boy



U.S. Boys Will
Find ‘Corner
Drug Store’

In Britain

first

can

all - Ameri-
national
boarding school
opens in Eng-
land this year.
The students
will drawn
from all parts
of the United
Kingdom,” said
an American
officer to-day,
The exact locas
of the
has not
been de-

ve

hon
school
ver
cide
Several
being con-
and if
well,

sites
are
sidered,
we
will be
ned n Sep-
tember.” r
There will be
fees’ at the
school and
children wili
selec
American
between
age of 13 and
ho wishes
attend the
new school may
do aid the
pokesman
atAmerican
H.Q. “We expect
abeut 140 to
enrol.” —L.E.S.

no
new
the
not
Any

child
the
18 w
to

be ted

we ran up for sniping at Mr. Churchill,”
London Express Service

Dope Is Jamaica’s
Answer To Poverty

Scotland, Yard Man —
For Kingston :

THE ILLEGAL drug traffic, which is causing so much

|
|
|
|

Americam Moneka, Sch. At Last, Sch, Franklyn
t D.R., Sch. Gardenia W., Sch. Everdenc,
t ar nrls :
boys and girls oo,’ Marion ‘Belle Wolfe, Sch. United ;
whose fathers Pilgrim S., Sch. Lady Noeleen
are serving in ARRIVALS
ha i . Séhooner Enterprise SS. 44 tons net |
the US. Ai? aoe Mcquilkin, from St Luci |
Force in Britain, “g¢ehooner Adaiina, 50 tons net, Capt.} |
own American: a. DEPARTURE | MOTOR CYCLE TYRES
- Areeripanns DE JRES |
wen American~ Schooner Philip H. Davidson, 87 tons
style CAMPUS net, Capt. Sealy, for British Guiana
and corner drug Mary M. Lewis, 68 tons net, Capt. }y
store complete Marshall, for British Guiana.
with soda foun- SEAWELL “ .
tain, when the

Odle, Jean Coustenoble,

Esher, Lady Antoinette Esher.

( hesterfield Steedle, Conrad Brant, Walter

PAGE THREE

a a a ro an

Harbour Log |

In Carlisle Bay



(——

— o a
} ¥
Sch. Zita Wonita, Yacht Leander, M.V Pp
a a )

\RRIVALS BY B.W.LA, ON MONDAY
From Guadeloupe Intranait for Grenads
James Fairbanks
Intransit for Trimtdad~Azar Gaovdat
From Martinique-—James Culpel, Leslie
Intransit for Grenada—Lord Oliver
From Puerte Rieo—Carl Trunk, Mada-

laine Trunk, Leonard Levis, Kathleen

levis, Walter B Sehletter, Helen

Echletter, George Grittens, Ceeil A. Paris,

Milton C. Welch, Kenrie QO. Welch,

li. Trant, Isolene Moore, Charles V
Anderson, Elizabeth Anderson, Ermyn-
trude Shilstone
DEPARTUR BY B.W.LA. ON MONDAY
For Trini A, Clayton-Smith, Her
bert Ince, Grace Ince, Keith Atkinson,
Yrrel Bailey, Olive Bailey, Daphne
Willems Albert Steinhardt Leonard
earlman, Frank Evans, Franklyn Hall,
liosario Perez, Marjorie Adams-Mitchell,
Leonard Granum, Anna Bilaneq,’ Paul
ohn Blaneq

For Extra
vw, Maw nonces | Reliability

Antigua, St, Kitts, St. Thomas, V.I. and
New York by the S.8. Fort Townshend
will be closed at the General Post Office
“ under:— +t]
Pareel Mail at 12 noon, Registered Mail
at 2 pm. and Ordinany Mail at 2.30 p.m
TO-DAY, the 30th January, 1952



(ECKSTEIN BROS.)
Distributors

Mails for St. Vincent by the Sch
Mandalay I, will be closed at the General
Post Office as under

Parcel Mail, Registered Mail and
Ordinary Mail at 2.30 p.m. TO-DAY, the
30th January, 1952

Commonwealth of Australia
5%, Bonds due 1955
(Callable Ist July 1952—55)










DOWDING ESTATES & TRADING CO., LTD.



—L.E.S. in his drawing room,—CpP)

Family Week In Antigua

“Home and family Week’ was

concern to Britain’s police at present, can be traced back
directly to Jamaica, according to Harold C hampion, in an
article published in the “Sunday Empire News’, in London.
Mr. Champion, who has just =

returned to Britain from Jamaica

If you are the holder of any of these



.
‘juan Ke k Pleases bonds which may be called for repay-
has stimulated considerable in- according to tidiness : declares that seough marijuane. arou y
yer’ 3S i igue 5 res Ther rere . w S, variety, or granja, as it is known in the
very successful in Antigua last terest. There were two hundred general a searance 4 , R ja, as it is know ,
year and in view of it having and fifty entrants from villages : Ppearance and standard, West Indies—is coming out of

Sudanese Leader
KHARTOUM, Jan, 28

and that the object of the com-
petition was not for the sake of
prizes, but for the promotion of

arrested so much interest in peo-
ple keeping better homes internal-
ly Mrs. Blackburne felt it would

in all parts of the island,

the Caribbean to make big money
Last Wednesday morning there

from addicts in America and the

ment on 15th July 1952, we suggest













yas an interes ; United Kigndom. He doubts whe~- a Bey Khalil, Secretary

ack it woul was an interested gathering on beauty in the island’s villages. ther the Jamaican authorities will poe ees 7 a Sedat

be a good idea to sponsor a gar- the grounds of Government rue Also it was meant to stimulate a succeed in stamping out the sho ‘ z a ee A d ti

den competition to encourage an and His Excellency My, K. : drive f ; oe ; ao ’ , " mma Party welcomec > S- b

external pride. Blackburne in his address ex- Guction ty assist in the wre we ade: missal of Nahas Pasha, to-day that you obtain from us recommendations

In its first year the competition plained that gardens were judged creasing cost of living: The or- “Is it likely that this pover- by saying that Farouk’s action re- ‘

ganizers and himself could give __ ty-stricken, thing pose vealed “wisdom and far sighted-
the inspiration but unless people will turn down a chance, ille- ness. e
did the work on their land and gal or pot io a fv eleoe 4, Abdulla Khalil, also leader of for the re-investment of these funds.
gardens, r > ney?” he asks, “And, be P the Legislative ssembly sajd
in foal. there ey as me, reefer growing in a lush, that he hoped a more reasonable
year there would be a thousand hot-house country like Jamai- 4nq practical attitude toward:
entrants and perhaps a prize for ca is easy money. If you are th, sudan would now prevail, He
the best garden in Antigua where found out, you “ more com= cid, “The last Government made 1
it mi be S r a fortable in gaol than in your ony silly mistakes, but the :
mee Gunn ot adie home, but you are seldom ereaiie’ af thats Wai: thes aera ar a OS Pp
his closing words His Excellency found out.” : © enforce domination over the ® e
quoted Kipling’s words “Gardens He describes how workers im cigian, without reference-to the
are not made by singing. Oh how citrus groves and coffee planta Giginose Government, politic atl
beautiful, and = sitting in the tions plant reefers in secluded parties, or people

shade.” places and hope that it will grow

ad t lly does, In He said that he looked forward
undetected, as it usually ,

to a greater spirit of co-operation

Barbados Correspondents for

Prizes were presented by Mrs the last few months, however, and sympathy to Sudan’s aims,
Blackburne. Some villages re- informers have directed the’ au- from Ah New Prime Minister of
ceived as many as six prizes. thorities to bigger things. Egypt, Ali Maher Pasha.
laberta, Jennings and Willikies “On a sunny plateau they found | we Soi

UP.
received the greatest number of
honours, and it was amazing to
see the number of very elderly

recipients of prizes. Alarm clocks,

thousand reefer plants, }

nearly l i
fortune in the

worth tt the | _
markets of the West,” he reports. |
“Every plant was destroyed, but

a
a small

Royal Securities Corp. Ltd.

































RAnceue
flash lights and glassware were the owner was never arrested. ASTHMA Pea dl! nS
presented. “Several large ee at } g’eX
The gathering were then invited recently found in this way, D ae . inet it
to inspect the beautifully kept far no ‘big’ man ‘has ae a Dissolved First ay
a > 7 ice. ar ever) ‘ king neg " ”
ont Lady Oliver car cas ioe "eniertinete Y yennant Oo ovate 1 rey, cain Yeo oos POSS SPOS LL EEELELLLLLL LLL AO tities
among the guests along with Mr js hauled before a magistrate and Your health and wet ur heart, 1% 3
& Mrs Mortimer Seabury with charged with growing a bush or} (1,/),j th rveirous [gS =
whom they are staying at “Jolly two z lates through the : fee %
Hill”. Mrs Seabury was one of wore the British Government ine the att rh rt day the % :
the judges and was keenly in- wants to put a stop to this — inet reat F tent % :
terested in he; visits to all the rible business it will, in my oe ful slecr ' rkes, no 1S ;
villages. Mrs H. W. Peebles who jon, have to send out a Hy eee x %
ls a guest at Government House perienced men from | ow Mir % $
thought it was a most impressive Yard to assist in the om oe x z
midday function and said she Kingston’s C.1I.D. But eee ME 30 in’ % 2
thought the expressions on faces cure of all would be i mir col- ey ueahiniog in 24 hou ¥ %
generally were much happier wholesome prosperity in ass tow your Asthma in'8 da} 8 %
ain = eturn of emp
OLD LADY from Tennings holds on to her prize and admires — when she was here a year ony of Jamaica. _BuP. Apt our fram npty x y
bed of Bost at Government House. ({Oteesssces1ess0080088 poecnoeneorororrrnT | hemist: The guarantee protects you 1 S
st $ x e
% Pie °
% s x
% ¢
V WORRIED ppoen dy ‘ §
. x .
‘
GALVANIZED :; *| DREAD ‘ .
% ys
%, *. 4
ABOUT 1 oor ‘ FOR ;
% g
%| UNTIL**” , %
x %
PARKING | THE
\ | %
$
s
f | Arms f HOME! &
4 de >
. | He Lest the Pains inhis : :
No wonder tale inte, tocetes x
going to work, fo ama’
THEN SEE THE pains in his arms mente tt tetas x
Atter than ever and work 1s. ENAMEL TABLE TOPS :
| pleasure, as he tella in his letter + ‘
r §
K T i Ps ” ; “I had been suffering from %
I ING ( 4 S| rheumatism very badly and had BOX IRONS x
% | such pains in my os I oqaredty : .
knew how to use them. >
| rae told to try Kraschen Salta SAD IRONS 8
’ | and after using one ee %
‘or 7 . So, of course,
# ae HS 1 HY 2” Beant cn with ti, am now thor: PERFORATED ALUMINUM x
PIPES : 4 “ ! ee 1} yas 3} oughly better and have never felt g
| 20 r venrs:_ used feet FOR LARDERS S
et i but now P
Uni | miserable and sluggish, bu NOW OFFERED x
FITTINGS: Elbows — Tees — Unions 7 Bi » 5a6 sine Or S
Lisa
+ a MPH. with ense | Siete TABLE CORK MATS :
* .P.H. with | : >
* 104 ths. weight only S| ue _pains ana oupmaans ef AT g
. ¥ heumatism are usua x
eeneeteneecenmeactipeenets % by deposite of excess uric octd in ; NER ALUMINUM & SILVER TRAYS *
‘ r >| the muscles and joints. Kru
ECONOMY — ACCESSIBILITY — RELIABILITY =} simulates te kidneys ana other COR ivi ‘bhi $
@ | intestins ee aa L fhe $
t stion so that all N] <
CITY GARAGE : ola | Henley acsion oo tat aes 8 STORE :
. | thrown the, naturel coaains ($ GLASSWARE :
: %, Then that goes, aches < s : >
{ % Fekstein Bros -Bay Street 5} Sue Pee shits ‘vigour 12 A Convenient :
| VICTORIA STREET. s | ie rostored ID ah kine Clantre EARTHENWARE :
General Hardware Supplies—Rickett st. 2) 6x0 we eemsdai™ tas |§ Shopping Cen S
% yn ERC . & ti give Kruschen @ t >
s General Hardware Supp | matin, ize Keaschen & som [8 NORE BET ES
S shemists and Stores, ee OSS 0080S SH SOS SOSO SOOO OOSF SOOSCO SS O8 F598 OOO FFF
i Feeeanmesoosocoeesooeset $65000S00090095000000000" | all r +4 OOOO PPOOCC COST 50OS oo
















f



PAGE FOUR



Printed by the Adverste Co., Ltd., Broad St, Bridgetows
(ae el le te tite tlt He = eitiseatetiy

Wednesday, January 30, “1952

EGYPT

THE change of Government in Egypt
does not mean that all is now right in the
Middle Eastern World. The dismissal of
one Egyptian Prime Minister by King
Farouk on the grounds that he was no
longer capable of maintaining law and
order will not increase Egypt’s affection
for the United Kingdom. And the new
Prime Minister, despite his liking for the
United Kingdom is still committed to a
policy which has for its aim the evacua-
tion of British troops from the Suez Canal
area, and the acquisition of the Sudan for
Egypt.

In 1947 British troops evacuated Alex-
andria and Cairo in implementation of a
British proposal of 7th May, 1946, to with-
draw all British sea, land and air forces
from Egypt.

Under Article 8 of the Anglo-Egyptian
Treaty of Alliance of 1936, Egypt author-
ised, without prejudice to her sovereign
rights, Great Britain to station 10,000
troops and 400 airmen with the necessary
staff in the vicinity of the canal until such
time as the contracting parties agree that
the Egyptian Army can ensure by its own
resources the liberty and entire security
of navigation of the Canal.

By an agreement of March 7, 1949, be-
tween Egypt and the Suez Canal Company
the property of the Company reverts to
the Egyptian Government at the end of
the ninety-nine year concession in 1968.
Meanwhile Egypt takes annually seven
per cent. of the gross profits of the Com-
pany.

The British contention is that the
Egyptian Army is clearly not in a position
to secure by its own resources the liberty
of navigation of the canal agreed to in
Article 8 of the Treaty of Alliance of 1936.
Their contention is supported by the action
of the Egyptian monarch in dismissing a
Prime Minister for failure to maintain law
and order in Egypt itself.

But treaty rights are in themselves weak
bargaining counters against fanatical
nationalism.

British statesmanship in Egypt will have
to find a solution which will satisfy Egyp-
tian honour and maintain the security of
a Canal necessary for the strategic defence
of the free world.

How this solution is to be found at a
time when national sentiments have been
aroused is not clear but the possibilities
of a solution are, if not greater, certainly
not lessened by the accession to power of
a Prime Minister who is not violently anti-
British.





FAR EAST

INFORMED commentators are more
pessimistic today about affairs in the Far
East than they are about Egypt. The news
from the Far East points to a wide spread
Far Eastern War within a month or two.
The Chinese are, according to the evidence,
preparing to attack Indo-China, in the
event of a truce in Korea,

In the United States serious discussions
are taking place with regard te the advisa-
bility of intensifying the war against the
Chinese, if there is no truce.

In addition to urging extension of the
blockade to stop strategic materials, the
bombing of Manchuria and China proper
is epenly advocated.

Uneasiness has been expressed in the
United Kingdom about any commitments
Mr. Churchill may have made during his
recent discussions with President Truman.
Neither the British nor the French nor any
other Western European nation are en-
thusiastic about the prospects of a large
scale conflict with China. The Chinese
themselves appear to view war with
equanimity, probably because they have
been fighting almost continuously for some
thirty years.

The Korean truce talks have given them
a breathing space to strengthen their
forces and they are unlikely to sign an
armistice except on their terms.

On the other hand, Russia cannot want
the Korean war to develop into a global
conflict which would commit Russia even

more deeply than she is already commit-
ted through having to supply the Chinese
with equipment. The Americans want
above everything else to get their troops
home, Unless Russian and American -re-
luctance to engage in large scale war in
China proves stronger than Chinese ambi-
tions, the Korean war may soon flare up
and spread to China. Another period of
crisis in the Far East has arrived.

Confused Combinations

To The Editor, The Advocate—

SIR,—In his criticism of the book;
“Behold The West Indies”, your corre-
spondent tells that the writer, Mrs. Gak-
ley, “drops some bloomers.”

While I agree that the inaccuracies com-
plained of might be referred to as “drop-
ping a buck” or “making a bloomer”, I am
sure no lady would be guilty of the mis-
demeanour Mr. Hunte suggests!

Could it be that they both got confused
with their combinations?

A. G. L.
17th January, 1952.













A, TT TT aT
j LAA SY,
Landed on Smars This merning, Th .

have just he! an Elect Under & syston The ¥ ce
Mockracy, every Ng works by opposites and Th
Polificians do the reverse of whal They p «

The Prime SmariiperT sad ne had
because he hadnt pey
T the job Low and The
explained thaT we wouldnt
thing, for 2 moment on Earth

beer

Sean






Trouble has becn Caused py Jane

ng, attest

»
sland thaT k of

away will 6 RoboT infant and by spying ectvit
ot Senator M*Carthy and Sir Ww. Buther:

BARBADOS ADVOCATE

oe fore
of Carterbu

Russell geting
Ties

LOW’S SPACE-SHIP EXPEDITION — 2

A Book That Will Raise
The Roof



By JOUN GORDON

HOW did Russia, so near to
collapse in the war, come to be so
powerful when it ended that she
could terrify the world?

A book published this week “The
Struggle for Europe”, by Chester
Wilmot, claims to give the answer

Even more important, while
vigorously and rightly upholding a
close British-American alliance as
a fundamental policy for both
nations, the author, with tremen-
dous persuasive power, builds the
case for a stronger degree of Brit-
ish independence within the alli-
ance,

For he shows—from the course
of recent history:—
(1) The danger we face if we per-~
mit our Army and Air Force
to pass out of our control and
become an integrated part of a
European army.
The price we might have to
pay if we accept foreign con-
trol and command for our
Navy.
The folly we commit if we
meekly agree to run our Em-
pire as some other nation,
with less experience and lesy

(2

(3

understanding, thinks we
should run it.
(4) The futility of cherishing

rosy hopes of world peace
coming out of UNO.

“The struggle for Europe” is
probably the most interesting and
vital book on recent history yet
published, It is certainly the most
controversial and provocative. It
will cause a storm in the United
States. But many in Britain will
find it palatable.

It seeks to establish from select-
ed documents and events that the
present perilous plight of Europe
—and the world—would never
have developed if Britain’s advice
had been taken.

It asserts that the emergence of
Russia as the most powerful
nation in Europe was the inevi-
table consequence of political mis-
judgments made by President
Roosevelt in face of strong protests
from the much wiser Churchill.

Political war was lost

It agrees that because of Ameri-
ca’s tremendous strength we could
nétgose the war.

ut it makes the case that
Roosevelt—always our most loyal
and powerful friend through the
years of trial—did not understand
the political problems of Europe.
That he had an utterly erroneous
conception of the British Empire.
And that he misjudged completely
the mind and purposes of Stalin,

Its conclusion is that because we
fought the war in the wrong way,
though we won the military vic-
tory, we lost*he political war upon
which the future depended.

By losing it we left Stalin the
master of Europe.

We gave him control of Eastern
Europe, which he would never
have won by force of arms.

We gave him mastery of the
Balkans.

We put him in a position to pre-
vent the application to half Europe
of the principles of freedom as laid
down in the Atlantic Charter for
which we fought. Our troubles
today, it argues, are he price of
those mistakes.

‘IT IS the author’s view—and he
has powerful British support for it
—that in the late summer of 1944
the Western Powers had it in their
power to ensure that the great
capitals of Eastern Europe, Berlin,
Prague, and Vienna, would be lib-
erated from the West,

There would have been no Rus-
sian threat over Europe today had
that been done.

But the opportunity was cast
away at Yalta by Roosevelt, who
was convinced beyond all argu-
ment that Churchill could offer
that Stalin had beconte his trusting



friend; sharing his ideals, deter-
mined to stand with him in bring-
ing peace to the world and liberty
to all men,

But Stalin, in fact, “took him fot
a ride.”

We might have taken Berlin

There were, the book asserts, a
few critical days in the final weeks
of the war when the tragedy could
have been averted.

Montgomery was in a position to
take Berlin long before the Rus-
sians could get there. Vienna was
wide open to the Americans. So
was Prague.

But the guile of Stalin was pow-
erful to the end.

In keeping with Roosevelt's
promises to him the forces of the
West were checked in order that
Stalin should enter them first.

WHY were these’ mistakes
made’? Mr. Wilmot expresses the
view that they rose out of sus-
picions rooted deep in history.

Roosevelt—in common with mos‘
of his countrymen — had a deep
prejudice against what the Ameri-
cans call “Colonialism,” and when
it relates specifically to the British
Empire, “Imperialism,”

He entered the war, Mr. Wilmot
infers, not only firmly determined
to defeat Germany and Japan, but
equally determined to put an end
to the British Colonial Empire sys-
tem and the Dutch and French
Colonial systems as well,



Definite ideas about Empire

That did not mean that he sought
any weakening of the bonds that
bind Britain and America as in-
separable allics. He merely saw
America as “the enlightened son
seeking to reform the
father,”

The Atlantic Pact, Mr. Wilmot
assumes, wag a deliberate step to
that end.

Cordell Hull, then Secretary of
State, was quite frank about the
President's purpose. He wrote:—

“We had definite ideas with
respect to the future of the Brit-
ish Colonial Empire on which we
differed with the British.”

ROOSEVELT, with his curious
misunderstanding of the British
Empire, developed an ‘equally
curious misunderstanding of Stalin
and Russia.

He regarded the United States
and Russia as the only two great
Powers without “original sin” in
the shape of colonial possessions
and imperialistic aspirations.

Stalin was much more wily

He thought that if he and Stalin
met round a table on a man-to-
man basis thére was no problem
they could not solve, because their
minds were in tune.

He had no doubt whatever that
Stalin would come into a United
Nations Organisation like a lamb,
and defend Roosevelt's ideals of
peace, liberty and democracy like
a lion,

wayward

But Stalin was “a much more
wily dealer than Roosevelt lived
to realise.

For he bought the right to enter
and hold the lands that now lie
bound and helpless behind the
Iron Curtain, with power to controi
eventually Manchuria and China
as well, for the price of joining
UNO. The world rocks to-day, de-
clares Mr. Wilmot, because of that
astonishing diplomatic triumph.
And UNO remains a futility as a
memorial to it.

WHAT of the
the war?

military side of

America, says Mr. Wilmot, a na-
tion of great man-power and in-
comparable |. industrial power,
tights her wars in a method that
suits her best.

Her theory is that a mass of men,
given weapons capablevof deliver-
ing an overwhelming: blow, can
achieve victory with absolute cer-
tainty. And she proved her case,





She believes in the direct frontal
attack as the swiftest way to vic-
tory, and i> the end the most eco-
nomical in lives.

And sne 1egards military victory
as the only thing that matters.
Political issues never cloud the
picture.

Britain, with a man-strength in-
finitesimal compared with Ameri-
ca, fights her wars differently.

Through history she has beaten
enemies much stronger than her-

self by finesse anq stratagem. |

She has always avoided the de-
cisive frontal blow. For she dared
not risk being bled to death or
smashed to pulp.

In the 1914 war she abandoned
her historic strategy. She merged
herself with a land mass on the
Continent, and although she
emerged victorious she
nearly died from the mauling,

In 1939 she began with the same

mistake. At Dunkirk her life hung |

on the slenderest thread, But mir- |
aculously it held. |

The wisdom of the ages

With Hitler the master of
Europe, Churchill restored the
wisdom of the ages, We began to
probe towards “the soft belly.” In
the Western Desert of North Africa
that policy returned a fruitful
dividend,

We persuaded the Americans
ugainst their will to play the same
same further west. Again the divi-
dend was tremendous.

Mussolini had the death rattle
in his throat and Hitler for the
first time saw the red light of
coming disaster.

Italy collapsed. The way was
open into Hitler’s fortress, We had
the foothold, we had the Army,
and at the head of it the greatest
general of the war—Britain’s
Alexander.

So we went to Normandy

~ But, Mr. Wilmot argues, the
Americans did not understand
either the strategy of the long way
round, or the importance of the
political opportunity. So it was
lost,

We went into Normandy instead.

And from Normandy to the end
we moved in a_ solid, relentless
human mass, ignoring opportun-
ities which if taken as Montgom-
ery desires might, as many experts
now believe, have shortened the
war by half a year.

NOW what lessons do
years hold for Britons?

What was lost by political mis-
judgment — if it occurred — has
now to be regained by political
wisdom,

these

If we believe, as we do, that our
own wisdom is our best guide,
then we must retain our inde-
pendence and see that our views
have the influence we think they
should have,

We must never be forced down
paths we hesitate to tread. We
must never commit to others con-
trol of the forces upon which our
liberty and our lives depend.

The protection of our island, the
mastery of the skies above it, and
the keeping of the seas around it,
is their first and’ most vital re-
sponsibility.

Where and how they fight to ful- |,

fil that duty and purpose must al-
ways be our decision,
For our life depends upon it.

THE MAN WHO WROTE THE
BOOK: Chester Wilmot is an
eee and in the war had a
wide experience as a reporter i
the field, ane

He spent six years sifting the
evidence upon which “The Steug-
gle for Europe” was written. It
is published by Collins, price 25s.,
and runs te 350,000 words.

—LE.S.



NEW PANS

Dope running is _ exciting
enough as a subject for a thriller;
but when Trinidad is the scene of
action the interest is _trebled.
Murder in Trinidad by J. W. Van-
dercook is the most exciting book
that Pan has published for some
time. It is full of local colour

The action moves swiftly from
the Queen’s Park to the Caroni
swamps and as far as the Five
Islands, Those who know Trini-
dad will want to read it for
descriptions of an isiand they
know. Those who don't will find
it a murder story which they
can’t easily put down.

The Maltese Faleon by Dashie!
Hammett is a story told in Ameri-

can, It moves like a pistol shot
and the hero is one of those very
very tough guys without a shred
of feeling. The girl is the wick-
edest anybody can imagine.
Everybody wants the Falcon and

nearly everybody gets killed or
gaoled as a result.
ere is something _ sinister

about the Sea Tower by Sir Hugh
Walpole. The story is reminis-
cent of Rebecca, with a_ back-
ground of a large country house
and the sea. It is a tale of a
selfish woman who never wanted
her sons to grow up. The tragic
consequence to one wife provides
the drama and suspense of this
powerful tale.

Amateur theatre clubs
schools will find Pan’s new col-
lections of Seven Short Plays a
useful text book. Noel Coward's
Still Life, and Laurence Hous-
man’s Possession are the two
main attractions. There are five
others.

One of them is concerned with
Dr. Johnson and another with
Bonnie Prince Charlie.

Pan has also recently published
The Provincial Lady by FE. M
Delafield in an abridged edition
and Oppenheim’s The Great Im-
personation. G.H

Pan Books can be bought at the
Advocate Stationery

'
|

pretty |

and|

GoToRussia?

| —Say the shipping men....and the |
Merchant Navy crews answer—

No, Thanks!

chant Navy men who have tried it recently
borrow the Sam Goldwyn phrase and say:
“Includeas out.”

In the Untied States serious discussions

Don’t dub them anti-Communist on that
account; politics has nothing to do with it.

Not all Merchant Navy men would go as
far as CAPTAIN THOMAS DOUGHTY, of
Willerby, Hull, who threw up his command
rather than go back to a North Russian port.
He was without a job for nine months, and
has told an official inquiry :—

“I would go through it all again rather
than go back to Russia. I would not take
another cargo for Russia for all the gold in
the world.” He did not like the treatment
he and his crew received.

The unpopularity of the Russian trip is
more startling because there was no trouble
to man the ships during the war when the
trip around North Norway was through
“Suicide Alley.”

As soon as loading is complete, ships have
been ordered off the quay and have put to
sea before their hatches were battenéd down.

It seems that the brotherhood of the sea
cannot thaw out the cold war.

@ STRIKING JOKE
The clash between the London Electricity
Soard and its striking meter readers has the
distinction of giving birth to a joke—while
it ig still on.
alf the meter readers—who have been
accused of spending too much time in cafes
—are still at work. They go round the
| 10uses with the new supervisors, whose ap-
pointment led to the strike and whose job
it is to see that the readers and collectors
do a fair day’s work. The story goes like this:
“Pity about that supervisor yesterday.
After three hours trudging from house to
|house he gaid to his reader, ‘Hey Joe, when
do we knock off for a snack? I’m hungry,’
So the reader left the supervisor in a cafe

%





|

with instructions where the ‘watch-dogging’
}could be resumed in the afternoon.”

@ FIRST VISIT

How’s this for coincidence? A film exe-
cutive phoned me to say that a prize-win-
ning choir of young miners was coming to
the Twickenham England v. Wales match.
Would I like to meet them? Indeed I would.

None of the lads had been to London be-
fore, and since they had to be back at work
| yesterday they had darefully balloted on
| what to see in 48 hours.

Near the top of the ballot was the organ
cf the Tooting Granada, which they had
heard on the radio.

The coincidence ? It was only when I got
to the cinema that I found they were from
my own village of Abertridwr (pronounce tt
-\bber-trid-oor,. Glam—one of 1,100 town-
ships and villages in Wales.

@ NO SOLDIER’S JOB

If Mr Churchill announces when he comes
home that FIELD-MARSHAL VISCOUNT
ALEXANDER is to be the new Minister of
Defence, the Socialists will oppose — for two
reasons. They will say :— ‘

(1) IT IS UNFAIR to the Chiefs of Staff, | }
who are themselves technical advisers, to
make them report to a chief who is also a
technical adviser, instead of to a political
chief,

(2) DISTINGUISHED soldiers who are
international civil servants, on such organis-
ational jobs as the defence of Europe, want
political guidance, This can come only from
a politician.

These are Mr. Attlee’s personal views.
They will be his party’s views before Parlia-
ment meets.

@ PLEASE DEFINE

Sir Archibald Forbes, one of the busiest
and most influential men in Britain, has been
asked to call a special conference to define
Private Enterprise—so that British people
can support it “with confidence and with
pride.”

JOHN M. RYAN, editor of the business
magazine Scope, makes the plea. He thinks
jit is the last chance to “retrieve the public
mind”. after the long retreat against Social-
ism.

| American-owner Encyclopedia Britannica
|ignores any variation under the heading En-
terprise. The Oxford Dictionary says “enter-
prise” is “undertaking, esp. bold or difficult
/one.”

| CHURCHILL catches that spirit when he
pealls it competitive enterprise.

IT ONLY MEANS...

A CANADIAN magazine has been having
some fun unmasking the verbal’ camouflage
used by Important P»ople. It publishes a
|‘‘What Do They Mean When They Say —?”
| glossary, including :—
| @ CONFERENCE—A_ place where con-

versation is substituted for the dreariness of
| work and. the loneliness of thought.
| @ CONSULTANT or EXPERT—Any or-
;dinary guy more than’50 miles from home. ’
| @ A PROGRAMME — Any assignment
jthat can’t be completed bY one telephone
call.

Would any readers like to add te this glib
‘ glossary ?—L.E.S.

|
|





55439, SSSSS800900







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WEDNESDAY, JANUARY 30, 1952

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WEDNESDAY, JANUARY 30, 1952

Hearing In St. Lucy

Damages Case Adjourned | F1LM SHOWS PLANNED
FOR BOYS’ CLUBS

A new film projector has been bought for the Police Boys’

Until February 12

In the Assistant Court of al yesterday His Honour
Mr. A. J. H. Hanschell at the rane of Mr. J. ET Brancker,
adjourned further hearing in the case in which Clyde Boyce
of Pie Corner, St. Lucy, claimed £50 damages from the
defendants Christopher Hinds and Mary Hinds, both of
Chandler Hill, St. Lucy, — Tuesday, February 12
iT.

* oe, in _ -_ ae

. E. T. Braneker for the plain- ;
P.M. Exam. Held

Of Infant’s Body

tiff, Boyce, and Mr. J. S. B. Dear

for -the two defendants, In his
case Boyce. claimed that by the
two defendants inflicting bodily
harm on him—for which they

Dr. A. S. Ashby performed &

post mortem examination on the

and claimed damages to the body of three-year-old Joseph

amount of £50. Cumberbatch of ‘Tudor Bridge,

Mr. Brancker in asking for an St. Michael, at the Public Mor-

Clubs. The Clubs also have
used for general transportation.

to renair broken films.

from the
purchase some
Each

were both convicted and fined—
he suffered much inconveniences

ente>

to-day.

adjournment said that it was tuary yesterday afternoon, Street Boys’ Club. This piano will be used in th
important for him to summon Dr. Helena Cumberbatch, mother

Kirton who attended to his of Joseph Cumberbatch, said

client after the fight with the that her son got out of bed early

"Tr thatales ask that this Yes'eâ„¢d@y and had a warm cup] encourage keen competition and will also add 1

of tea. About 7.45 a.m. he fell asm.”



The projectionist for the Boys’ Clubs is P.C
He will give film shows at the Clubs all over the Island,
various types of films will include educational and @ntertain-
ing—some, will come from the Education Department, some
British Council and the Boys’ Clubs are hoping tc

matter be adjourned for medical
evidence from Dr. Kirton,” said
Mr. Brancker.
Knew Defendants

Clyde Boyce told the court that
he knew both defendants Chris-
topher Hinds and Mary Hinds.
On June 27 about 6.30 p.m. he
was standing by Pie Corner near
Christopher Hinds’ place. After
an argument Christopher Hinds
grabbed him by the shirt and
pulled him over the guard wall
near the road. Mary Hinds joined
in the fight and while Christophe

Hinds held the front of his shirt,
ay Hinds tugged him from the
ack.

The shirt he was wearing cost
him $7. Darry Hinds seeing the

fight, brought three sticks and
two of them he handed to the
two defendants Christopher
Hinds and Mary Hinds, With
these sticks the defendants hit
him several times across his
body, head and ears. After the

fight he went to Dr. Kirton who
examined and treated him. The
whole of ‘his body was painful
and swollen.

He paid Dr. Kirton $2.76 for
the examination and the medi-
cine cost him $2.76 while the
hire of a motor car and bus
fares totalled $4.48,

Unable To Work
“T was unable to work due to
the blows which I _ received.
During the time of my illness I
was forced to hire labourers to
work my two and a half acres
of land on which potatoes, yams,
ete., were growing. Each of the
labourers was paid 5/- a day.
In the fight my khaki pants were

ill and before she could get medi-
cal aid he was dead.

She then notifigd the Black
Rock Police Station,



DRIVERS’ BADGES
RENEWED

This mgnth bus drivers and
conductors are getting their cap
badges renewed at the Traffic
Branch at the Central Police Sta-
tion. The drivers and conductors
had until January 15 to get their

badges. However, they will be
getting them throughout the
month,

Up to mid-day yesterday 169

conductors and 202 drivers got
their new cap badges. THe “total
number issued last year were 359
conductor badges and 438 drivers’
badges.

The clerk at the Traffic Branch
told the Advocate that both con-
ductors and drivers should try to
renew their badges as soon as
possible. “It is hoped that every-
one will have theirs by the end
of the month,” he said.

Later in the year drivers and
conductors will be applying for
hadges. As soon as they get their
licences they ask for badges



THEFT AT WALKERS
REPORTED

A quantity of household ar-

torn and these caused me $8 for ticles, valued $13.47 was stolen

the material
Boyce told the court.

Cross-examined, Boyce
that both of the defendants
dragged him

and the making,” from the home of Harold Hunte
at Walkers,
said are his property.

St. Andrew. They

He told the Police that the inci-

along the ground dent occurred between 2.00 p.m.

to their yard and as a result of on Saturday and 12.30 a.m. on

this he had scrawls and bruises
all over his body. He never hit
Christopher Hinds and the motor
car she hired to carry him to the
doctor is the property of a Mr.
Birch, but he did not take a
receipt from him for the car
hire.

He stayed away from his work
for about three weeks and as a,
vesult he had to’ pay labourers
to work for him. During the
fight he wearing a khaki pants
and these were torn, At this
stage the court asked that the
pants and shirt the plaintiff was
wearing be produced to the
court for examination,

Clothing Torn

Next witness called was Maud
Collymore who said that Boyce
was beaten by the two defend-
ants with sticks. She went with
him to Dr. Kirton and his cloth-
ing was torn in the fight. The
plaintiff employed labourers to
work in his land and one of these
was Elise Boyce. She (Colly-
more) worked for the plaintiff
for four days since the fight.

Cross-examined, she said that
the fight was started by the two
defendants who dragged the
plaintiff along the ground to their
house.

ill-treatment Of
Bonkey Costs £4

His Worship Mr, L. Walwyn
yesterday ordered Winter Tull of
Dayrell’s Road, Christ Church, to
pay a fine of £4 for ill treating
a donkey. The offence was com~
mitted on December 18, 1951.

The fine is to be paid in 28
days or there is an alternative of

one month's imprisonment with
hard labour. Tull’s record show-
ed that he had three previous

convictions and on the last con-
viction was fined 25s, by His
Worship Mr. E. A. McLeod.

“FRANKLYN D,R.’’
ON DRY DOCK

After discharging a cargo of
firewood and charcoal from Brit-
ish Guiana, the 87-ton schooner
Franklyn D. R. was dry docked
on Monday evening for repairs.

The Franklyn D. R. will be
coming off dock in about a week
to load cargo for British Guiana.
She is consigned to the Schooner
Pool.







Beauty on the Bed



Sunday.

The Police are carrying out in-

vestigations.



is

"ULL WALL WekaT® fre.
Solp- Glovlb You Nip iF T
JUST Si OUT Hexe ANd k/Slew?



French Official
Escapes Ambush

HANOM, Indo-China, Jan. 29.

It was learned that on Tuesday
that Jean Le Tourneau, the
French Minister of the Associated
States, narrowly escaped a Com-
munist rebel ambush to-day while
visiting the front line.

Accompanied by the French
General, Raoul Salan, Temporary
Commander of the French Union
forces in Indo-China, Le_Tourneau
was inspecting the Choben Front
Line, twenty eight miles south-
west of Hao Binhak, the officiel!
car was nearing the post of
Quang Mang on Colonial High-
way 21, when it was caught in
cross fire.

But the driver accelerated and
the post was safely reeched,
casualties were reported, French
forces returned fire with machine
guns, as Le _Tourneau visited
wounded soldiers in a local first
nid station. The post had already
been attacked prior to the Min-
ister’s errival, —U.P.



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Shades of Dusty Rose, Light Blue, Green, Blue, Gold

ER ae hk a hh kde « Ore ds sieee eres aoe ee $22.00
GRECIAN COTTON BEDSPREADS in Blue, Green, Gold,
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TO te POA ON ir ceet ccs teins $12.15

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CAVE SHEPHERD & CO., LTD.

Each

10, 11, 12 & 13 Broad Street

No ,,







At present 903 local boys
Police Boys’ and Girls’ Clubs.
Belleplaine 62, District
Cliff Cottage 68, Speightstown

Bay Street Boys’ Club 90, Holetown 34. Seawell

BARBADOS. ADVOCATE



a new pick-up which ‘will be
The film projector was ordered

from England. Expected to arrive shortly are the gramophone
unit, projector stand, microphone, rewinding units and splices

261 Chandler
The

Recently the Clubs have been divided into three sections
section will have a Committee of
Clubs Will have a Football League
Advocate that at present the football matches will be only
between the Clubs, but should the standard improve, they will
team; in the B.A.F.A. games next year
Captain Raison and Major Craggs will inspect four pianos
From these they will select one to be used at the Bay

Management The
Major Craggs told the

> giving of

music lessons and will also be of great help to the chi
Major Craggs said: “The boys are taking a kee. interest
in Club life and we feel that their division into sections will

» their enthusi-

and girls are members
District “A” 55 membe

f the
of €

hos

“C” 29, District “D” 28 Four Roads 42

54, Bay Street Girls’ Club 36
Bovy’ and

Girls’ Club 68 girls and 45 bogs, Worthings 29, Cleavers Hill
Boys’ Club 66, Cleavers Hill Girls’ Club 56 and the newly
formed club at St. Cecilia Barracks, Passage Road, 141,





American Column



Hooded Terror Strikes
Again—With Whip

By R. M. MacCOLL

K K.K., the dreaded and detested Ku Klux Klan which
everyone thought was dead and done for, is stirring again

in North Carolina.

local

Around Whiteville G men have been called in to help
authorities investigate a series

of night floggings

carried out by men masked in the traditional bedsheets

with eye-slits.

The ‘‘Times’’
Review

The Advocate acknowledges
with thankg the receipt of a
copy of the first issue of the

Times Weekly Review. This is @
new journal which will carry on
the traditions of the long-estab-
lished Times Weekly Edition.

The Times Weekly Review will
draw on all the resources that
serve the Times of London, by
conenon consent, the foremost
newspaper in the world. The
Review will present tc re ders
all over the world the news and
comment that have been provid-
ed both by the staff of the daily
Times and by its Correspondents
in all parts of the globe.

The purpose of the Times
Weekly Review is to give its
readers a service of news and

comment that should keep them
informed on world affairs and on
current British opinion.

“Special articles and photo-
graphs,” says an editorial in the
first issue of the Review, ‘will
be published to help in giving a
full and fair account of signifi-
cant and interesting events and
trends. The life of men and
women in Britain, their polities,
their economic and _ financial
affairs, their theatre, music, books
and other entertainments and
their social activities will be re-
flected. Sport in Britain will be
described with emphasig on what
is most likely to interest people
in other countries.

“World affairs
veyed each week
patches from the Times Cor-
respondents resident in many
capitals or through critical
articles written in Printing House
Square. A selection of the lead-
ing articles snd letters to the
Editor that have appeared in the
Times will be regularly made
For close on a century and
three-quarters — since 1785 —
the Times has sought to tell the
truth by reporting facts, kept
scrupulously clear of views, and
by offering critical comment
upon them. This double func-
tion of* reporting end interpreting
will be performed in the per-
spective suitable for a weekly
journal, in the new Review.”

will be sur-
through dis-



Dies Suddenly

Seventy-eight-year-old Hestelle
Francis of Trents Tenantry, St.
James, died suddenly in the Pente-
Mission, Porters Road, St.
J mes at about 8 o’clock last night.
Francis was attending a service at
the Mission.

To-day Dr. A. A. Gibbons will
issue a certificate as to the cause
of death.





/











A strange fact about these flog-
gings is that none has involved
Negroes, often the victims of the
K.K.K

The Whiteville area has been
80 terrorised that people hesitate
to call on friends living in isola-
ted homes at night because
many of them are armed—and
very jittery

And the latest victim, a farmer
named Lee Tyson, only summoned
up enough courage to report the
outrage the other day, although
it happened on December 1.

Victims are lured from their
homes by unmasked strangers,
imported from other parts of the
State, with requests for help in
a motor breakdown, and then
attacked by the Klan.

SECRETS IN FIRE

Secret apparatus used in Gov-
ernment cosmic and infra-red ray
experiments was destroyed in a
mysterious fire at Denver Univer-
sity. Dr. Bryan Cohn, in charge
of the work, says the equipment
was built for the hush-hush ex-
periments and is “almost irre-
placeable.”

BUSINESS WENT OFF

An electrical company filed a
bankruptey petition in Brooklyn
and explained that crooked em-
ployees systematically looted it
of an estimated 400,000 dollars’
worth of TV parts in the last few
years, Employees filched the parts
while pretending to be taking
them to “service” faulty TV sets.
Severa| of the employees were
able to set up in business for
themselves on the haul,

THE BAND WEPT

Nearly every one of the quar-
ter-nillion people gathered to
greet Captain Carlsen at his home
town of Woodbridge, New Jersey,
was smiling. Tearful exception:
the High School band which had
been practising incessantly on
“King Christian stood beside the
mast” all the week—and then got
dispersed and lost in the gigantic
shuffle.

PAY RISE PSYCHOLOGY

Hatmakers in New York have
signed a three-year contract in
which they promise not to ask
for a pay rise “for industrial,
financial and psychological reas-

ons.”
GAS IS TOO HOT

In Westchester County, a typi-
cal, prosperous New York suburb,
seven. out of ten housewives say
they dislike the new natural gas
with which they now have to
cook. The general complaint: “It’s
too hot , so we have to learn new
timings for our favourite dishe

The gas collects on top of Tex-
as oil deposits and is piped to
New York.

TRAFFIC COP IN JAM

Mr. Charles Solomon, a New
York magistrate, is an authority
on Freud and his theories on mé
behaviour So when a 50-year-
old accountant, Francis Doyle,
was accused of having “directea
traffic” in Brooklyn for ten min-
utes, Mr. Solomon said : “I sup-
pose all your life you've had a
sub-conscious urge to be a traffic
cop?”

Fine :

v's



five dollars (35s.).











Seamen Leave
For Curacao |

Four A.B, seamen left Barbados yesterday morning by
B.W.LA., via Trinidad for Curacao where they will take up |
employment with the Shell Oil Tanker Fleet.

Last week, one A.B, seaman and ten firemen and greas-
ers left by direct K.L.M. chartered ‘plane for Curacao for
employment with the same company.

Mr,
of the
Messrs.

Vernon Knight, Manager
Petroleum Department of
Da Costa and Co., Ltd,
told the Advocate that it was
gratifying that in view of the

-operation of the Government

Barbados through the auspices

the Barbados Evening Insti-
tute that these firemen and
reasers were trained by Mr.
D. W. Sayers .who is Dean of
Technical Studies for the Insti-
ute,

He said that he had offered the
uggestion that the men would,
ia all probability, find employ-
ment in Curacao with the Shell
Company Tanker Fleet if they
ould be trained as firemen and
greasers, As a consequence of rev-
resentations made to the Gov-
ernment, the development had
taken place and several men had
since found employment in
Curacao,

Trained On Combermere

Mr. Knight said: “The men are
trained on the water boat Lord
Combermere where the workiag
conditions approximate an oil
fired boiler and marine type en-
gines are on the Shell tankers on
which the men are ultimately “en:
ployed,

“Recruiting of Barbadians
service in Curacao, both at the
refinery and in the tanker fleet
has been one of unqualified suc-
cess and has been in operation
for the past eleven years,

for

“The working conditions and
pay offered by the Shel] Oil
Company attract men to seek
eagerly employment with the
company and as a result of the
large number employed, some-

where in the vicinity of $400,000
is remitted here each year eithe:
through Messrs Da Costa and Co.,
Ltd., or the commercial banks te
the relatives of the men serving
in Curacao.’

He s-id that it
to no.e that since the initiation
of he emigration scheme. 1
Curacao that Messrs Da Costa an?’
Co., Ltd., had paid out in the
vicinity of $2,250,000. This lary
amount compared very favourabiy
with the amuont paid out to rela-
tives of labourers who served in
America during and just after the
world war when about 9,000 men
were working in the U.S.A.

No More Schemes

“There has
continuous

was inte estin:



been a steady
operation of
scheme,” he said and added: “It
is to be regretted that although
there is quite an appreciable num.
ber of men serving in Quracao
more schemes of this nature can-
not be developed,”

At the present time he said
that the only men required for
service in Curacao were A.B, sea-
men with at least four years’ ex-
perience on either
motor vessels,

and
the

Steamers of



2nd Marriage
Nullified

ATLANTA, Georgia, Jan, 29,

The second marriage of pretty
Agnes Sasser was nullified Tues-
day in a brief court hearing fol-
lowing official confirmation that
her first husband whom she
thought killed on the Korean bat-
Uefield is alive,

Superior Court Judge, E. BE. An-
drews, who handed down the de-
claratory judgment, sympatheti-
cally questioned Mrs. Sasser about
the details of the case that made
the shy Government worker the
central figure in a modern Enoch
Arden chronicle,

Her plight came to light when
Communists announced that her
first husband, Private Walter 5
Dixon, was a prisoner of war. She
received 4 letter signed by him on
January 2

The Defence Department con-
firnted through comparison of the
handwriting on the letter with
official records that Dixon was the
actual writer Mrs. Sasser mar-
ried Privaty William Sas¢er on
September 7, seven months after
the Defence Department notified
her Dixon was killed*in action

UP.

DANCING BANNED

OTTAWA, Jan



Dancing in all parish hall
threughout the Ottawa arch
diocese was banned from Tues-

day, The directive issued by Mon-

ignor Maxime Tesser, the Aux- ‘

illiary Bishop, remjnded parish
priests that the ban imposed v-
eral years ago haq not been re-
scinded, He said that the order

banned dancing at
events, concerns or
tions in parish halls.

all social

Similar fine






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I} (Scratch Grain)
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ILLS ER ere FE eet i 4



The 180 ‘ which swept the main island of men with a care that no machine could
the Fijis Group in the South imitate,

ESTERBROOK FOUNTAIN PENS

HAIR CREAM
i ABDEC VITAMIN DROPS
’ HALIVER OIL © VIOSTEROL DROPS



























Colonies

And Food |

Problems |



You can enjoy Britain’:
favourite tobaccos. Sis
blends te choose from—

every one a Balanced
blend of vintage leat

ee



LONDON
The Secretary of State for the}
Colonies, Mr. Oliver Lyttelton,

believes a flow of savings into the |
development of Britain's own soil
and the wealth which lies in the

Colonial territories is of utmost
importance if food production | is
to be increased,

“Wherever you look, that is

what is needed,” he said, address- |
ing the Basingstoke branch of the
National Farmers’ Union. “We
have to bring to our aid every
device of ingenuity and modern
practice and We must also give
the farmer assurances which en-

able capital to look forward to a pt a peta
roper reward if it invested in - - eeeees

agrioukure.” ate a MESSRS. A. S. BRYDEN & SONS (BARBADOS), LTD,
It was necessary to increase > P.O. BOX 403, BRIDGETOWN, BARBADOS

output of many agriculture prod-

ucts in the Colonies and to in-
crease production of the minerals,, _
ecal, copper, and phosphates) }

“

| KEEP YOUR HOME SPIC AND SPAN

' .
I We have a wide range of
to be most carefully planned and |

re tos’! | PAINTS - ENAMELS - VARNISHES
li i 1. HERBERT Ltd.

order we have to be extremely |

‘tender about the amount of capi- |

tal monies which we invest any-| |

where, and what we want to get! 10 and 11, ROEBUCK STREET.
out of agriculture is the maximum | |
output by only making the most |!
essential c a p i t al investment. |
Whenever investment has to be|
cut down, either in industry 01 | ({(
‘agriculture, you are, of course i}
striking a blow at the productiv- Xt

MORE AND MORE MEN
ity o nat industry \
rer, | ARE CHANGING TO ...

te bond, pu the’ SGU 'O, Pe
‘K SHOES vat

“But the return on in-
vestment
Because they have become convinced

which lie beneath the surface of
some of those territories,

“Difficulties are still massive,’
said Mr. Lyttelton, “and they
relate entirely to this matter if
capital investment, which has got, ;



Established
1860

Incorporated
1926













in agriculture now, in
new buildings, in grain driers
and modern milking equipmen
and so forth, yields a returr
which would make the mouth of
the ordinary industrialist water.’

Mr. Lyttelton, added that where

, : .
he had been responsible for the r rit )
investment of trust funds ir of K's Supe 19 Y
agriculture, he had, in quite i e
short time, seem electric results

achieved. “I believe profoundly
\here is no contribution so grea\
nor 8 Valuable to this country
nor to the sterling area than thi
one of growing more food,”

HERE ARE THREE OF THE MANY VERY GOOD
REASONS FOR THAT SUPERIORITY :

(1) ‘K’ SHOKS are made from the finest leathers
obtainable. Both soles and insoles are hand-
tested for flexibility and accurately graded
by skilled craftsmen,

THE UPPEDS of ‘K’ SHOES are selected,



Hurricane Takes
Toll Of. Fiji Island

9
WELLINGTON, Jan, 29, (2)

Seas on Monday, killed an esti-
mated 12 persons and did $2,800,
000 damage, reports from Suvi
said on Tuesday.

Many persons were left home-
less in the flimsily built villages

(3) ‘K’ SHOES are made over the famous ‘K’
PLUS FITTING LASTS with the heel-parts
one fitting narrower than the fore-parts. The
ensures a close fit at the heel and freedom

Suva, the capital, was without for the toes.
clectricity or newspapers, Tele- ee
phone lines were still down and
communication with Wellingtor Why not come in and be fitted with a pair
i ee my —— oe. of these world famous shoes ? We are sure
medic wireless anc radio che » s » “Ww oan RPS tone
bHone.neporta, Latithale “Bar Al you'll say like all the other ‘K’ wearers:
Base was heavily dé . ; ini ; sie ial eae aiel 9
se eT nea ke ULL NEVER WEAR ANOTHER SHOE RUT ‘K’
PRICES $17 $21 >.
. . °° t
‘Rainmakers FROM 00 to 63
.
Decrease Rain i

NEW YORK, Jan, 29,

Man made rain experiments in
cicht Western states were failure
uccording to reports made to th
annual meeting of the American
Meteorological Society in session
here

E. Workman of the New Mexic
nstitute of Mining and Tech-
nology said in a report to. the
cpening session yesterday use o
ilver ljodine failed increas« | 4{
éin in Western experimfats, |

tually decreased precipitatior
Workman said in advocating muc
hiore research into the
bility of rain-making.

HARRISON'S
DIAL 2664

Sole Distributors for ‘K’ SHOES in Barbados,















EQUAL in 7?@
td

ENERGY we

to



0





Doctor Irving Langmuir rair e e 6
oviking experimenter for Generai ~es
bLiectrie Company said Wester: Big Saving un Cost
cxperiments “gave inconclusive »)

ults’” Experiments were aban. |)}
ccned about the end of last yea: }}) Hard to believe? Well, it's true
he said, toa —only 1 Pound oj Purina Dog

—s 7. P,

Chow is equal in food energy
to 3 lbs. of fresh meat. That
means you can feed your dog
well—at a big saving. And your
dog will like Dog Chow, too!

TAKE YOUR DOG A BAG TODAY

i] . .
} ri ; ee eet eae x
EEO as ic



NIBS ALSO AVAILABLE

PURINA






























PAGE SIX

Leg. Co. Pass $1,385 To Repair ‘Investigator’

Defective Parts Of Ship engagement of



Came From U.S.A.

OEPORTUNITY was taken by the Colonial Secretary

N. Turner,

when the Legislative Council debated

and passed yesterday a Resolution for $1,385 to effect re-
foes

‘to the Government Experimental

tigator, to

Agents had
are now in poor condition.
Sade charge of the Resolu-
a in the Council, the Hon'ble
+ Turner said he regretted to
have to inform hon’ble members
oe during the course of 1951,
Government Surveyor of
Shipping who carried out a sur-
vey of thé. Experimental Fishing
Boat Inv reported that
an examination had disclosed that
the bronze: propellor, tail shaft,
lag seréws in the outboard
bearing and zines of the pont

Were in a poor condition due to
Serious deterioration and corro-

“dispel the

ion that that condition was due
ectrolysis erg . two major
eZ the boat in
Careenage, and defective con-
sof the electric circuit in
engine room.
ith the fishing calamity at
beginning of December, con-
tion of the Resolution be-
the Council was expedited
the legislature went into
s and nothing could be done
il it was recalled,
e Resolution was sent down
the Other Place, and unfortu-
tely he had noticed reports in
e Press which show that the
ie facts had not been disclosed
bout the origin of the propellor
naft. It had been reported in the
ress that the propellor shaft
came through the Crown Agents,
| and remarks had been made about
the poor quality of British work-
manship and so on.

The propellor shaft, the
hon’ble Colonial Secretary ex-
plained, was purchased from a
firm in the United States, and
it was therefore not a British
article at all, and the Crown
Agents had nothing whatever
to do with the transaction.

He had also seen it mentioned
) the Press that if British work-
manship was poor, it was high
time they went to the United
States. of America He was not
saying for one moment that the
quality of the propeller shaft
was defective when it arrived,
but honourable members might
have wished to know a bit more
of the origin of the various parts
if the boat.

It seemed that when the bont
was being ordered, the .Pishgries

visory Committee wante it
rered as early as pos-
i re mode obout
from whieh the various
suld be obtained, Those
; mpparently showed that
veries from the United King-




jom conle not be expected for
hwo veers or more, and accord-
frely nquiries were made else
where for these parts which could

not be reerived quickly.
Best Availohle

The Hon. the Colonial Secre-
tary gave the name of the firm
in the United States from which
the propellor shaft had been ob-
teined, and said that the engine—
a Caterpiller—had also come
from the United States, and was
considered the best available.
Most of the other fittings were
imported direct from a firm in
Glasgow,

So much for that, He merely
wanted to dispel the untrue re-
port that the Crown Agents had
anything to do with the parts at
all.

With regard to replacements,
the propellor shaft had been ob-
tained from one of the leading
manufacturers of bronze propel-
lors, and he did net know why it
had worn in so short a time. It
seemed, however, that the mud
from thé careenage was ‘partica-
larly acid and also some stec!
piling had -been put into the
careenagé sihce the Investigator
had been in use, apparently
causing electrolysis,

It was.now proposed to replace
the shaft by one made of Mone!
Metal. It seemed that enquiric
were made both in the United
Kingdom and North America in
1948, but it wes not possible to
effect delivery because metal was

in priority for more essential
products, It was now hoped, he
was informed, that the importa-

tion of a propellor made of this
Monel Metal would be possib!>
in the fairly neay future,

He was also informed that it
would not be neeessary to ptt
the Investigator out of action for
a long period and the nfcessary
repairs could be effected within
@ week or so,

Rules Lax

It might be asked why order

were not being placed with th



POOP

GOSVOSES

4 =
AP CPREVTVG

Or

MAGGS

.

.



anything to do with the

PPPS

FOR COMFORT
RIDE A

HOPPER
BICYCLE

Fishing Boat
untrue report” that the Crown
parts of the boat which

Crown Agents more frequently,
end he was having enquiries in-
stituted because it seemed to him
that the rules of procedure were
somewhat lax.

So far as the Resolution under
consideration was concerned, iu
was for the sum of $1,385 for es-
sential replacements for the boa:,
and he aceordingly moved that
the Resolution be concurred in,

Hon, Mr. F. C, Hutson gaid that
the phenomenon of electrolysis
was very well known to engineers,
particularly marine engineers, and
it happened whenever two very’
dissimilar metals like steel and
bronze were exposed in close
proximity for any length of time
in waters that were polluted.

The waters in the inner Careen-
age were very poliuted indeed to
tne affluent from the Constitution
drain, Another cause was fauliy
electrical connections and instai-
lations in the engine room.

Not Consuited

In the addendum, reference was
made to we GOverumenut Sur-
veyor or Snipping, ana ne wouiu
jike tO Menuvn tat tnere was
more Wan one Government in-
specwuor Of Shipping. ‘ne one re-
terred to in the Aadenaum to the
Resolution was Mr. C. G. Craw-
tora, and he wouid like to Say in

fairness to him, tnat he was not
consuited at all regarding the
design or construction of the
investigator. He thought it fair

that honourable members should
know that, beeause again in read-
ing from Press reports, it could
be implied that he was inspecting
his own work, and that was not
50. ‘

He was of course the only ma-
rine engineer and it did seem a
very great pity that he had not
been consulted on the very first
occasion, and possibly the Reso-
Jution might not have come be-
fore the Honoutable Council.

At the last meeting of the Coun-
cil he had asked what type of
engine Was going to be used, and
he wanted now to enquire if ad-~
vice would be sought and who
would be asked to give that ad-
vice., a

Replying the Colonial Secretary
said that there were a few points
which should be helpful to hon-
ourable members, The _ title
slipped into the Addendum to
the Resolution because Mr, Craw-
ford signed himself as Govern-
ment Surveyor of Shipping, but
he had come across the correct
title, and it was Surveyor of
Ships, and there were in fact, as
the Hon. Mr, Hutson had pointed
out, more than one,

The next point was, as he had
already mentioned, when he
spoke about the affair which
happened in 1948 when purchases
could in fact be made in various
parts of the world with the possi-
bility of insufficient forethoughi
or advice before an order was
made. He was looking into that
with a view to seeing what meas-

ures should be taken in the
future.
In addition to the Resolution

before the Honourable Council at
the moment, there was a further
Resolution which sprang from an
unsatisfactory source which he
would be asking permission to
move later that afternoon, and
there was a third one which had
not yet gone down to the Other
Place, and had just passed
through the Executive Committee
stage, and which again showed
defects which possibly might
have been checked at an earlier
stage. Those three cases together
made him note that it was
necessary to go rather closely
into the matter.

As regards the points raised
by Mr. Hutson regarding the
engines, in the fishing vessels, he
regretted that he was not in a
position to add anything more
than what he had sald earlier.
He had made a note of the point,
and he would do his best to see
that the make of the engine was
carefully vetted before orders
were made,



RAINS PREVENT
PLANES LANDING

From Our Own Correspondent

KINGSTON, Jan, 29.

lieavy rains and clouds prevent-

ed aeroplanes from landing at
Palisadoes airport for several

hours today. As a result screen

star Merle Oberon due to arrive

n Kingston today went on to

Montego Bay while another plane

, flew without stopping to Cuba,

PPS



OA SPOPORS

Factory Inspector
Approved

THE Legislative Council yester-
day approved a Resolution author-
ising the Governor to enter into
an agreement with a person to
serve in the Labour Department
as Factory Inspector.

The term of engagemeht of the
Officer selected shall be for a
period of two years in the first in-
stance subject to renewal by
mutual agreement,

The salary will be at the rate
of $4,920 per annum, and reason-
able passage expenses of the per-
son engaged, his wife and chil-
dren not exceeding $1,440 in each
direction may be paid from the
place of engagement to Barbados
on appointment, and from Barba-
dos to the place of engagement
on the termination of the agree-
ment,

The Hon. the Colonial Secre-
tary told the Council that honour-
able members would remember
that during the closing stages of
the last session there was the
passing of the Factories Amend-
ments Bill, 1951, and he made
reference of the difficulty which
was being encountered with the
recruitment of a Factory In-
spector. f

Two-Fold Difficulty

For almost three years Govern-
ment had been endeavouring to
recruit an Inspector, but their
difficulty was two fold. First the
salary provided in the Estimates
of £800 had not been sufficient
to attract a man, and secondly,
that the conditions of service in
employment in the United King-
dom prevented them securing the
services of a serving officer for
more than one year.

As it was felt that they should
have the benefit of a Factory
Inspector for at least two years,
he had informed the Honourable
Council that the Executive Com-
mittee had authorised him to
make an approach to see whether
they could secure the services of
a retired Factory Inspector to
come out for the period,

Information was received that
an Inspector to the Ministry of
Labour, who retired in 1950 as an
Inspector Class 1A, after serving
in the London Area and in Man-
chester and Yorkshire would be
prepared to come at a salary of
$4,920 annum, with passages
to and from Barbados, and accord-
ingly the Resc'ution was pre-
pared for the legislature.

The legislature was in recess at
the time, and it was not possible
to deal with the Resolution
However it had not been passed
by the Other Place and it had
come to the Council.

If it was concurred in, a tele-
gram would be sent to the Secre-
tary of State, and it was hoped
that the Officer would arrive in
the very near future.

The Council also concurred in
a Resolution authorising the Di-
rectors of the Savings Bank to
pay $630 from the funds of the
Savings Bank as a gratuity to
James Lewis, a retired Messenger
of the Bank.

Resolutions were also concur-
red in, giving effect to the Order
oo the Pensions (Pension-
able Officers) (Amendment)
Order, 1951, and sanctioning the
Registration of Deaths (Amend-
ment) Regulations, 1951.

Cuban Lawyers
Cable Truman

HAVANA, Jan, 28.
Nineteen Cuban lawyers on
Saturday cabled President Truman
asking him to commute the death
sentence on Oscar Collazo, the
Puerto Rican nationalist, involved
in an attempt to assassinate him

on November 1, 1950. —(CP)



BARBADOS ADVOCATE



WEDNESDAY, JANUARY 30, 1952
———$————_



Full Report On — Sinanan

Seawell Expected
By End of Month

HON. R. N. TURNER,

Colonial Secretary, told the

Legislative Council during the debate yesterday on a Reso-

lution for $4,000 which
Seawell Runway, that a

was approved for the upkeep of
full report” on the condition of

the runway “is expected about the end of this month.”

_ The $4,000 approved by the
Council is in addition to ‘$7,000
voted in the 1951-52 Estimates,

and will be used in effecting im-
mediate temporary repairs up to
the end of the present Financial
year, in accordance with reeem-
mendations contained in the in-
terim report of the Engineers of
the Ministry of Transport, Canada
and of Trans Canada Airlines,

In asking the Council’s coneur-
rence in the Resolution, the Hon.
the Colonial Secretary said that
honourable members would re-
member that he had reported to
the Legislature sometime in May
or June of last year that the
Superintendent of Construction at
Seawell Runway was on the point
of completing the runway, and had
informed the Government shortly
before his departure that the cost
would exceed the amount of
$1,620,000 which was provided
from Colonial Development and
Welfare Funds by $80,000, and
further that he had reported that
the macadam base concrete had
never fully dried and hardened
because of the moisture condition
resulting in the runway

Such drying and hardening
would normally take place two or
three years after construction,

Great Anxiety

Since then there had been a
great deal of anxiety regarding the
condition of the runway and early
in July a telegram was sent to the
Ministry of Transport, Canada,
because, honourable members
would remember that although the

funds came from C.D. & W. funds,
the work was carried out by a
construction engineer from the

Ministry of Transport, Canada.

That cable was sent some
months ago, and the engineer came
down. He went away again, and
his report was awaited, but it did
not come, Eventually the engin-
eer returned again in September
and took samples, leaving again
towards the end of September.

He eventually sent down an In-
terim Report and replied that the
Superintendent of Construction at
the Ministry of Transport, Canada,
would look at the job himself. He
came down in December, and the
other gentleman, Mr. Connelly,
came back with the other engin-
eer, and they looked at the run-
way again, returning to Canada
just before Christmas.

He had received the Interim Re-
port from Mr. Connelly, and a
more detailed report was expected
about the end of this month,

He anticipated that when the
detailed report came and it was
being considered, it would be ne-
cessary to come down to the legis-
lature for a substantial amount of
money for the reinstatement of the
runway. All he could say at the
moment was taken from the In-
terim Report which he had re-
ceived, and which stated that the
defects in one section of the run-
way were due to the following
main causes—

Causes Of Defects

(1) “heavy unexpected rains
during the construction dissolving
the asphalt before it had reached
the setting stage or point known as
‘breaking point’; ’

(2) “that all clay in the sub-
grade was not removed and re-
placed by coral rock, and

(3) “failure of the macadam
base course by unsuitable material
being used in the preparation of
the base course... .”

SEAWELL DIARY FOR DECEMBER 1951

MOVE

The operative hours of the A

ENTS

irport were 474 hours during the

month (an average of 15.29 hours daily), during which time there



















were 228 aircraft movements composed as follows: — i
o a
n a o
% 8 a I 8
g g ot on be = - a o 3
¢ 3 x a= 8
> 3 oe. Oe fb ee Be
B.W.I.A 138 18 156
T.C.A. 18 18
B,G.A, 26 26
K.L.M, 2 : 2 8
L.A.V. 16 16
MILITARY .. 2 2
PRIVATE ue 2 2
138 18 «(20 4 2 16 x 26 2 228
A total of 3,075 passengers passed through the Airport during the
month in the various airlines as listed below
B.W.LA, .. . 1,160 landed; 160 intransit; 1,095 left
T.C.A. 122 % 66 ’ 33,
B.G.A. 47 ” 3 cy 49 ,,
LAV. 116 + _ 6) 4
K.L.M, 101 ve 42
1,546 229 “1,300,



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is and he hoped that when the



“The detailed report,” the Colo-
nial Secretary continued, “has not
yet been received and I would ask
honourable members to reserve
judgment until it is received and
until the action it necessitates is
considered ‘by the Executive Com-
mittee.’

He said that Mr. Connelly
regards it as “essential that when-
ever shrinkage appears in the sur-
face it is immediately sealed with
an asphaltic compound to prevent
water from entering the base
course in the sub-grade, deterio-
rated by being saturated, whether
it is of coral rock or clay. Realis-
ing that some little time will lapse
before the reinstatement of the
“failed” area, every care. should
be taken to have any cracks which
develop immediately filled as a
temporary measure in order that
water will not get down below the
pavement. .. .”

$7,000 Spent

In the present Estimates there
was $7,000 for the upkeep of the
runway and that amount was be-
ing spent. The Director of High-
ways and Transport was carrying
on the job of sealing all cracks
when they appear, and he antici-
pated that the sum of $4,000 would
be needed before the end of the
present financial year to enable
him to seal up any cracks which
became noticeable,

In view of the urgency and
need of letting the Director get
ahead with plans, he moved that
the Resolution be concurred in.

Hon, V. C. Gale said he had
listened carefully to the speech
made by the honourable the Colo-
nial Secretary on the runway, and
it seemed to him that Barbados
had been very unfortunate indeed
with the disposition of their run-
way.

He supposed that the people
when they bought Seawell
thought that they had a bit of
coral reef and that it was one of
the most exeellent foundations in
Barbados. Now Seawell seemed
to be placed in those pockets of
coral and when the coral was
taken off, from the top, the bal-
ance was actually clay.

Barbados Unfortunate

Barbados had been very unfor-

tunate indeed to have spent a lot

of money on the runway; and
when they had the Canadian
people come down, and they

named Seawell for the new run-
way, it was thought that-Barbados
was Out of the woods.

He wouldn't like to pass judg-
ment on it that day, but it seemed
that they were very far from be-
ing out of the woods, and it looked
as if they would have to spend a
great deal more money on Seawell
runway.

It was a very unfortunate occur-
rence, and there seemed to be
some engineering defect some-
where, There had been excuses
that there was a tremendous lot
of rainy weather. There was, it
was true, a most unprecedented
rainfall when it was done, but
however, the runway had been
constructed with that defect. They
seemed to have run into a tre-
mengious lot of snags with the run-

‘nal report came down, they
vould be able to know exactly
where they stood.

The Resolution was concurred
in,



House Destroyed
By Fire

A house situated near Spooners
Hill belonging to Miriam Herbert
completely destroyed by

was
fire last night.

The Fire Brigade,
moned shortly after
and under .the command
Maior Craggs, Fire Officer, rusher
to the scene of the fire.
was concentrated on
ing houses
trom. spreading,

Mitiam Herbert
chureh at the

was

time

sum-
10 o'clock
of

Water
surround-
to prevent the fire

was attending
of the fire,

Presides

PORT-OF-SPAIN, Jan. 11.
The Hon. Mitra Sinanan, Deputy
Speaker of the Legislative Coun-
cil presided over the meeting of
the Council yesterday, through |
indisposition of Hon. William
Savary. He was the first elected
representative to do so.
Occupying the chair he express-
ed thanks to the Colonial Secre-
tary and members of the House
for the generous sentiments ex-
pressed,

The Hon, Uriah Butler said he
felt a touch of joy to see a Butier-
ite of “yesterday” gracing the
chair,

During the course of the meet-
ing Government proposed to limit
the imports of Irish potatoes when
local starchy crops are at their
peak. This was approved by a
15-one, majority of the House,
with the Hon. Butler dissenting,
although he agreed with the re-
port, Hon. Victor Bryan, Minister
of Agriculture mover of the motion
asked the Legislature to accept in
principle the recommendations
contained as “we were most
fortunate that we were able at
short notice to enlist the support
of a combination of experts on the






The Genuine “4711” Eau de Cologne comes from Cologne on

particular matter which was to being to the famous and secret formula since 1792,

examined.” Mr. Bryan referred to
the question of deactiviation of
U.S. Bases in the Colony for the
grdwing of food, and said: “the
matter is under very active exam-
ination and that there are mes-
sages going back and forth as
between the American and Brit-
ish Government.”

The Hon. Renison,, Colonial

Secretary also told the House that
it was the intention of Govern-
ment to ask the Finance Commit-
tee to agree to an increase in the
establishment of the Minister of
Agriculture in order to give him
one officer who would be entirely
responsible for seeing that ever)
recommendation of the report i
kept moving and kept for the at-
tention of those who were to carry
it out.

Clergyman To
Appeal Against
Sentence

LONDON

A London clergyman, who
spent more than ten years in Ja-
maica and was stated to have
‘done ah enormous amount of
good there, may appeal against
a nine-month prison sentence
passed on him after he was found
guilty on three charges of im-
properly assaulting an 1l-year-
old girl,

The Rev. John Irvin Mitchell,
42, who now has a church in
Plaistow, East London, was con-
victed at the West Ham Quarter
Sessions, He emphatically denied
the allegations and shad elected

to go for trial from a magistrate’s

court. Mr, James Burge, appear-
ing for him, told the edurt that
Mr, Mitchell was married to a
Jamaican woman and there had
never been any suggestion against
him,

Mr. Mitchell said that while in
Jamaica he was on friendly terms
with the resident magistrate and
helped in juvenile court cases.
He had a dormitory attached to
his rectory there for some of them
and his wife helped in the work.
He had studied psychology at a
theological college.

Evidence was taken from the

girl, who alleged that Mr, Mitah- |

ell committed the offence, despite
her protests, when she visited him
in his vestry, A 13-year-old girl,
also giving evidence, said that
she has once stayed with Mr.
Mitchell and his wife and that
several times he had sat on her
bed and behaved improperly.
Mr. Mitchell, in his evidence,
said there was not a word of
truth in the 13-year-old girl's
story. He said that the 1l-year-
old girl had told him a terrible
story of depravity. If that story
were true, he said, she wa§’ in
great moral danger,
—B.U.P.



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WEDNESDAY, JANUARY 30, 1952



$246,000 TO SUPPLEMENT





BARBADOS ADVOCATE



Money Passed For | 1 THE LEGISLATURE

20 Departments

THE House of Assembly yesterday passed a Resolution
for $246,340 to supplement the Estimates 1951—52. The
money was passed to supplement 20 Heads among which
were Colonial Treasurer, Customs, Legal Departments,
Police, Medical Department and Miscellaneous.

A small item which introduced giving the Accountant General
a lengthy debate and on which a travelling allowance would make
division was eventually taken was him encroach on the duties of the
Travelling under Colonial Treas- Auditor or make him feel that he



urer. It was stated that it was could over-rule the Auditor Gen-
necessary for the Accountant Gen- eral who is a colonial, he would
eral in :

the discharge of his duties not vote for the $50.
to do a certain amount of travell-

ing and provision was therefore
required to meet such expenses.

May Create Precedent

Mr E. K. Walcott (E) said that
if the travelling was distinct from
But some members questioned the travelling of the Audit De-
the actual work of the Accountant partment, he did not think they
General and said that his work did should pay it. He pointed out
not necessitate travelling. Some that if one of the senior officers
members asked whether that offi- 1eceiving a salary such as the
cer did not know when he accept- Accountant General felt he want-
ed the work that travelling was ed $50 for travelling allowance,
necessary and provision had not that officer would say that the
been made for it. A division was Accountant General got it and he
taken on a motion by Mr, E. D. Should get it too. If they were
Mottley that it should be deleted, 80ing to pay the Accountant Gen-



but it defeated by a 9—g eral to visit Seawell very ‘occa-
majority sionally, they would be starting
the principle that if every other

Full ‘Notes officer was travelling one yard,

Mr, Adams (L) said that the they would have to pay for travel-

notes to the resolution were as full ling.
as possible and he was going to He

Said that the
say nothing then.

Audit Office

If Honourable Was the Department to check
Members desired further informa- money of the various offices and
tion on any Head, he was prepared check for the irregularities,

to give them. Mr. Adams said that the only

If they examined the resolution reason any one could have for
carefully, he said, they would see suggesting it was not an honest
that the supplementary estimates vote for travelling expenses was

came clown as a result of the in- if he felt that the Accountant
creased cost of goods. Everybody General was trying to get money
was charging impérters the cost for himself in an undeserving
of the goods at delivery and not manner,

the cost of

the goods
placed,

when the

Mr, Walcott said that when he
He moved that

order was was looking afjer Government

the Heads be taken ‘separately. business, one Colonial Secretary
Under Head IIT (New) Cost of tried to establish the principle
Not n which the estimate in-

that they (Colonial Secretaries)
cluded $16,716, Mr. Lewis (L) said should get paid for going up to
that as far as he could remember, Government House,

they had recently passed a con- He said that he considered the
siderable sum of money in con- Accountant General reasonable in
nection with the note issue. He asking for $50. The Accountant
thought it an extraordinary General had asked for 23 cents a
amount of Barbadian notes for mile and he (Mr, Adamsf was in-

them to have ordered seeing that formed that the official rate was
the East Caribbean note issue was a shilling per mile.

soon to come out
not exe

sight a

Somebody had
‘reised the necessary fore- it
i so it was not seen that it

Mr. Taima (L) queried whether
was $50 really in travelling. If
had already been Spent and





the Eastern Caribbean issue would the officer was to be refunded, He
have superseded the Barbadian said that he considered it as an
note issue attempt either by the officer or
He felt it a bad way to do others to place the Accountant
busine He said that when they General in the travelling allow-
received goods, a token estimate ances group,
should be placed on the next At A Disadvantage
estimates for them so that the Mr. E. W. Barro 3 al
House would know something intend thie zeae) Seo

. criticised the item under Colonial
about if. Treasurer in which i s pr
Spesking under the same Head ene bWas pro~

(New) Travelling, in which $50 posed to grant $50 as travelling
was included in the supplementary Siownnee for the Accountant
estimates to meet the expenses ot “Cneral.

the He said that there were cer-
discharge of his duties to do a tain matters which the members
certain amount of travelling, of the Executive were well ac-
Mr. £. D. Mottley (E) said that Quainted with, concerning. which
though he realised that the sum of Other members of the House were
money was small, he wanted the 4t a disadvantage.
introducer of the Bill to tell him “When we look through these
if the money was to be used purely supplementary estimates, we see
in travelling and if there was any a lot of items to which only a
necessity for the Accountant cursory explanation is given,” he
General to travel in the discharge said, “There may be very good
of his duties. reasons for these grants, but un-
It was the principle implied that til we know more about them, we
he was driving at, he said. Some have to look askance at any such
people come to Barbados and feel new item.”
that if they had to go up toGov= There were put there to pass
ernment House, they must have Jegislation for the benefit of tne
travelling allowance, — community, he said, “and every
Dr. Cummits (L) in explana-~ little, supplementary vote whit-
tion, said that the Accountant t1eq downdthe amount they had
ooeree eee peters i ba at their disposal for social ser-
different Government ne vices. If a man’s employment dic
to look into their accounts. e not call for travelling, they should

would have to visit the various oa
police stations and far out Gov- not be asked ‘to grant $50 becaus

the Accountant General in



. he had arrogated to himself,
ernment offices and so the pro- ae ‘in ms . ’
vision of $50 to cover those eee duties beyond his normal

spenses was made z :
veers Faia auiea The Senior Member for St.

Mr. Adams said that the present

have secret information which

scounté yenere had been ‘
wats pee aM nein trying to could not be disclosed to member
stop possible thefts—putting it Of the House, but the other mem-

ntly—in Government Depart- ‘bers could not presume anything
Sie The Accountant General on possible secret information.
has been responsible for the dis- He was against and would always
covery of lapses of grace in the OppOSe any instances of a public
Departments of the Civil Service. officer being given such licence.
He would have to go up to Seawell There was a classic example of it
at sometimes to discharge his in the Police Force in which they
duties. He felt that he asked for had a man who was Lord High
a very low sum and the House this and Lord High that and Social
should congratulate him (the Welfare Officer, who came to the
Accountant General) on his House and got such votes. He
discretion had arrogated to himself fung-

Mr. Lewis (L) said that the Ac- tions which he was not called to
countant General was supposed perform when he took up the job.
to institute a system of book- They had to be very chary when
keeping. It was the Auditor Gen- they approved of estimates of that
eral whose duties were to check nature. The affairs of any Head
the various offices, It seemed to of a Department was as much in
him as if the Accountant General neeq of scrutiny as anybody
was overstepping his mark. ,. else’s in the eommunity.

If the Accommnaess, Gerace Must Trust Somebody
duties were to check t ne accou Mr. G. H. Adams (L) said that
in Government »Offices, he said if h 0 ie Hon

re would be no need of an e were as young as ‘
there wou , . +h cip- Ourable member who had just
Auditor General, Under such cir a inted with
cumstances, it would seem that Spoken and as unacquaint ; ae
the Accountant General would be the constitution of Barbados, he
° duties of tae would probably have said the





encroaching on the

Auditor General same thing he had said, but that
Later in the - debate, he said member could not be more
that he was surprised at the wrong.

ies he ard were those of the It was not that that $50 had
orient theme He contended been spent and the Accountant
that it was the duty of the Ac- General was trying to get it back
countant General to see that the When he went out in a motor car
books that he instituted be usec he went out to do duties he had
to perform by the laws of Barba-
dos The Accountant General
thas eould not get a car and drive any-

and not to visit the various offices
to check accounts.
He

that if he feit

said










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COUNCIL

The Legislative Council met at
2 p.m. yesterday. The Hon'ble the
Colonial Secretany laid the follow-
ing Documents:—

The Civil Establishment (General)
(Amendment) Order, 1952.

The Civil Establishment (General)
(Amendment) No, 2 Order, 1952.

Quarterly Return of Transactions
in Rum to 3ist December, 1951.

Hon, J. A. Mahon presented
Petitions from the Highway Com-
missioners of the parishes of St.
George and St. Thomas, for per-
mission to increase the salaries
pnd travelling allowances of their
Inspectors of Roads.

Hon. F. C. Hutson gave notice
of an Address which was later
passed to the Other Place in con-
nection with the setting up of a
Joint Select Committee of both
Houses “to examine the question
of over-population in Barbatos
and make recommendations
dealing with the problem.”

The Council concurred in the
following :—

Resolution to authorise the Gov-
ernor to enter into an agreement
with a person to serve in the
Labour Department in the post of
Factory Inspector

Resolution to place the sum of
$1,385 at the disposal of the
Governor-in-Executive Committee
to supplement the Estimates, 1951
—52, Part I, Current as shown
in the Supplementary Estimates,
1951—52, No. 39.

Resolution to authorise the Direc-
tors of the Savings Bahk to pay
the sum of six hundred and thirty
dollars from the funds of the
Savings Bank as a gratuity to
James Lewis, retired messenger of
the Bank

Resolution to approve the Order
entitled “The Pensions (?ension-
able Offices) (Amendment) Order,
i951, made by the Governor on the
18th day of October, 1951, under
the provisions of section 2 (1) (a)
of the Pensions Act, 1947

Resolution to sanction the Regis-
tration of Deaths (Amendment)
Regulations, 1951, made by the
Governor-in-Executive Committee
on the 20th December, 1951, under
the provisions of section 32 of the
Registration of Deaths Act, 1924

Resolution to place the sum of
$4,000 at the disposal of the
Governor-in-Executive Committee
to supplement the Estimates 1951—
52, Part [—Current, as shown in
the Supplementary Estimates,
1951-52, No, 40,

The Council passed an Address
in reply to His Excellency the
Governor concurring in the exten-
sion to Barbados of the provisions
of the new notes exchanged
between the Governments of the
United Kingdom and the United
States of America on the subject
of Economic Co-operation.

The Council was adjourned until
Tuesday February 5, 1952, at 2 p.m.

for

HOUSE

When the House of Assembly
met yesterday Mr. Adams Inict
the Post Office Advances for pay-
ment of Money Orders to Mth
November 1951.

notices were
siven:—

Mr. Adams: Resolution to place
the sum of $1,405 at the disposal
of the Governor-in-Executive
Committee to supplement the
Estimates, 1951-52, Part IIl—Cap-
ital, as shown in the Supplemen-
tary Estimates, 1951-52, No. 43,
which form the Schedule to the
Resolution. -

Dr. Cummins; Resolution to
make it lawful for the Governor-
in-Executive Committee to lease
to the Vestry of St. James a
portion of land at Reid’s Bay,
situate in the parish of St.. James
and containing jby admeasure-
ment 16.2 perches for the pur-
poses of erecting bathing sheds

Dr. Cummins Resolution to
make it lawful for the Vestry of
St. James to lease from the
Governor-in-Executive Commit
tee a portion of land at Reid's
Bay situate ‘n the parish of St.
James and containing by admeas
urement 16.2 perches for the pur-
pose of erecting bathing sheds

Dr. Cummins; Resolution to
make it lawful for the Governor
in-Executive Comunittee to lease
to the Vestny of St. Michael that
parcel of land forming part of
Welches Tenantry situate in the
parish of St. Michael and con
taining by admeasurement 158,501
square feet for the purpose of
establi ‘\ og a playing field

Mr. Cox: Bill intituled an Act
to amend the Pioneer Industries
(Encouragement) Act, 1951

The House passed the follow-
ing:-

Resolution to place the sum of
$246,340 at the disposal of the
Governor-in-Executive Committee
to supplement the Est$mates
1951-52, Part 1—Current as shown
in Supplementary Estimates
1951-52, No.41, which form the
Schedule to the Replution

Resolution to place the sum of
$51,618 ‘at the disposal of the
Governor-in-Executive Committee
to supplement the Estimates 1951-
52, Part Il—Capital, as shown in
Supplementary Estimates 1951-
52, No. 42, which form the Sche-
dule to the Resolution

Resolution to approve the Order
entitled “The Civil Establishment
(General) (Amendment) No. 2
Order 1952, made by the Governor
in-Executive Comumittee on the
Seventeenth day of Jamuary 1952,
under the provisions of Section 3

of the Civil Establishment Act
1949.
The House adjourned to Tues

day next at 3 p.m

sto have




'linvolved travelling.

Joseph and his colleagues might !

+ rs — eee

where he felt like driving and the Government funds and a cer-
make a charge for travelling ai- tain amount of travelling allow-
1owance, ance was necessary by virtue of
They had to trust somebody his office. He would not be get-
and it was quite possiple tnat this ting travelling allowance to take
or that officer of the Civil Estab- him to and from his job
lishment, if he had traveling to “I hope Honourable members
do might say he travelled bu Will take this assurance,” he
miles when he kad only travelled Said, “that there is no reason to
40, but nevertheless they haq to SUPPose that this Government is
make regulations when a man was 82g to let any individual mem-
blic ber of the Civil Service play fast
oo co” toniehinn — St, and loose with the tax payers

I money.”
Andrew, say, it would be im- Mr. A. W. Crawford (C) said

perative that he travel by tne that the Senior Member for St.
Shortest possible route, Joseph had claimed that the Gov-

“As far as this item is concern- ernment was not going to allow
ed, I would like to tell the Senior any Civil Servant to make them
Member for St. George that if his play fast and loose with the tax-
facts were right, his comments payers’ money, but it seemed to
would be quite deserving, but his him from what he had just said
facts cannot be more wrong”, Mr. that that was precisely what they
Adams said. were doing.

That $50 had not yet been , The item appeared very small
earned. The Accountant General but it was a very em chan pee
had said that the duties he was een soe ee | San wee toe
called to do might Tieeeet one sasooel their apprehension when
within the present time and March the rads the femark of the thin
31, a travelling allowance of $50.

e of the wedge.
The mere fact of its being done “F Senior Member for St.

showed that one could not incur Joseph had clearly said that the
expenses. in Barbados and then functions of that office called for
ask the House of Assembly to pay travelling and one could only
them. When the estimates came wonaer how that official accepted
oefore the House, there would be the post when he knew he would
n item for travelling for that have to travel and knew that no
department. proven “= made to e =
at members travelling allowance, >
Bp Reng Soins “had to Lew mse! ut some nm
nenk up for te aves and: Wie} ead cake thos play fast and
; loose with the taxpayers’ money,
’ Straying From Point he wanted them to pay for trav-
Mr. Barrow (L) said that in de- ejling.
fending the item, the Senior Mem- The Senior Member for the
ber for St. Joseph had strayed City had emphasised the necessi-
from the point raised by Honour- ty for clearly defining the func-
able Honours! The specific point tions. j
he had been called upon to answer Not Entitled To More
was whether travelling was :@ Obviously, originally the Gov-
duty of the Accountant General ernment did not feel that there
and whether he was an auditor was need for that travelling
or not. After a careful scrutiny, allowance. If the only travelling
he could find no provision which was from the Audit Office to the

ave the Accountant Gen- Treasury where they lost $14,000,
we power to go around and he did not see where the travel-
investigate. ling was in that, If as had been

As the Senior Member for made clear, his work necessitated

travelling, then, when he accept-

ed the work, he must have felt

that the money was enough for
On

\e sober reflection the
oceasion when perhaps money for reo a ae Toten

a car for someone was to be voted, would agree that whatever
Honourable members would be travelling that officer was then
reminded that they had agreed in going, was originally intended
principle to it. that the money they were paying
Allowance Necessary him was enough to do it, He
Mr. Adams observed that he was not entitled to any more. :
had been quict because the Hon- Mfr. E. D. Mottley (E) said on
ourable member was supposed to had thought that the Sen -
be a member of the Labour Member for St. Joseph woulc
Party. He said that there was no have said that in view of certain
travelling that the Accountant recent happenings, they ’ owe
General or any Civil Servant had providing some travelling allow-
to do unless it was laid down by ance for that department, but he
law or regulations. The Account- had not said that. That member
ant General had been responsible had gone on to say that there
for pointing out past leakages in would be an allowance for trav~

——<—<$—$< $$

EYOND
EUPHRATES

Autobiography
1928—1933

FREYA STARK

ON SALE AT

Christ Church had put it, that
might only be putting in the thin
edge of the wedge and on another



| ADVOCATE STATIONERY |



elling for that officer when the
estimates came down. He did
not agree with that.

He said that if that officer was
travelling allowance,
then for that matter, the Colo-
nial Secretary could get.

Motion For Deletion

He would be prepared to say
that the money for travelling
should be voted to the Department
as it was voted to other depart-
ments, but not that it should ho
voted to that officer. He thought
that was the contention of Hon-
ourable members.

Mr. Mottley then moved that
that item, Travelling—$50 be de-
leted. This motion was seconded
by Mr. O. T. Allder (1).

Mr. Allder (I) said that before
fereeing with the motion for
deletion, he had tried to convince
himself that the travelling was
necessary, but had been unable to
do so. He never knew that the
Accountant General had to do
travelling in his job and unless
full details had been given as to
the travelling he had to do, he
could not vote for it.

Mr. A. E. S. Lewis repeated
some of the arguments he had pre-
viously used, He said that he had
been trying all along to get some-
bedy to tell him the actual duties
of the Accountant General. If they
could find out what he had to do,
they would be able to come to a
decision. The Senior Member for
St. Joseph could only say that his

duties entailed travelling, but
members wanted to know what
duties entailed travelling. The

point about an officer having to
take the shortest route was no
point. The question was how many
times he could take these short
routes, how many times in a day
say, he could go to St. Andrew if
he wanted to do so.

The Senior Member for St. Jos-
eph had previously referred to the
Auditor General as a watch dog of
the treasury, were they then hav-
ing two watch dogs?

The motion that the item be
deleted was defeated by a 9—8
majority. The voting was as fol-



lows:— For the deletion Messrs.
Lewis, Crawford, J.C. Mottley,
Allder, Haynes, E. K. Walcott,
E. D. Mottley and Goddard.
Against the deletion:— Messrs.
Miller, Talma, Bryan, Holder,

Adams, Cummins, Cox, Brancker
and Mrs. Bourne.

Court Reporter

When the Head “Legal” came to
be considered, Mr, Brancker (L)
suggested that the two High Courts
should sit simultaneously.

He also said that there was need
for a regular court reporter. Lesse1
courts in the colonies had official
reporters, furthermore a high
court,

He said that at least one set of
officers who deserved their trav-
elling allowance were the Proba-
tion Officers. They did a good job.

Mr. Adams said that it was ne-
cessary to get reporters to take
counsel’s speeches and the Judge's
sum up in important cases, but a
reporter was not needed for every
case.

Mr. E. K. Walcott (E) said what
happened on account of the small
amount voted was that they did
not obtain proper court reports.
There would be need for at least
two reporters as a reporter neces-
sarily got tired after going on for
' long period taking notes. Any
move to get proper reporters to
take down the verbatim notes, he
would readily support,

Mr. Adams said that he would
bring it to the notice of the Execu-
tive Committee. He said that it
was true that the reporters could
£et more money, as in Barbados
they were inadequately paid.

Dilapidated Morgue

When the Head, “Police” came
up for consideration, Mr. Allder
drew it to the House’s attention
that the morgue at District “Cc”
was in a dilapidated condition and
also wanted cleaning. To such an
extent was the dilapidation that
when post mortem examinations
had to be performed, doctors gen-
erally refused to carry out the ex-
éminations there,

One item under “Police” for
which a supplementary amount is |
to be voted is “Forage.” Mr, All-
der said that he had always sug-
gested that formal functions which
cost too much should be done
away with. The number of horses
which were kept should be reduced
or there should be none at all.
Those horses were only kept so
that when His Excellency was go-

ing to the races, they would curvet|

about him.
He said that Government should
see that the police vans were not
run about unnecessarily.
Under the item, “Upkeep
Motor Launches,” he said

of
that

t
by police who kept surveillance
‘
t



FLASH

FACTORY OWNERS

Ranging from

+
%
4
%

| :
5,
*
%,
‘.
%
o
o
$
‘
»

No. 16, Swan Street

>

LPL ,



hese launches were usually tad . KNIGHT'S DRUGSTORES :

ver the yachts which belong to |
ich men, They should be made to $

PLLA LOPS

We are now in a position to supply you

with your Requirements of

GALVANISED PIPE

ALSO
A LARGE ASSORTMENT OF FITTINGS



ge Pay Us a Visit To-day and Get Yours



BARBADOS HARDWARE Co. Ltd.

(THE HOUSE FOR BARGAINS)



}

pay taxes just as fishermen paid.

Mr. Lewis drew attention to the! 5's. ‘Kingsborough. ss.
note on Fodder which said that in| Lady Nelson. SS. Matheos, S.S.Herds
order to effect an economy, edtly |
in the year, the amount of fodder | pajudina
supplied to the horses was reduced; ! Dominicano, 5S K. Bittencourt, $8 r
it was necessary however to re- | Quercy.

store the former ration so as to
preserve the condition of the an-

imals. The price of fodder has also |5 S$. Queen of Bermuda, 8.5

increased considerably.

Mr, Lewis said he wondered at}

the temerity someone had had in
placing such a note before the
House

“I do not see how ou can buy!s.S. Willow Branch, §.S. Alcoa Pilgrim

horses,” he said, “and give the
police department and they, send
and tell you that they deliber-
ately refused to give the horses
the adequate amount because of
economy, and then increase it to
bring them back to their former
state.”
Investigation

They should be able to take

the particular person and treat



| advise that they can now communicate
} with the following ships through the!
Barbados

PAGE SEVEN



‘In Touch With Barbados

ESTIMATES,

Coastal Station

Cable and Wireless (West Undies) Ltd

Pimples Go

Coast Station
ss. 8 “Ss. nods ss} Cause Killed in 3 Day
| ayite, ss. can Woateee SS. Athos ause n a 5

‘The very first
derm begins te
\ agic, Use

plication of Nixe-
ar away pimples
ixoderm tonight

Naviero, 8.8



man, S&S. Aleoa Pointer,

SS. Vikland . S
8.5. Antelope Hills,

5S. Arneta, 5.5
SS Argentina, S.S. Nuevo

1 will soon see your skin be-

. soft. smooth and ¢lear. Nixg-
derm is a new discovery that kills
ml parasites on the skin that
$.S. Genera! Vhoples, Boils, Red Blotches,
Artigas, SS _ Francisco P. Hart, 8.5 locema, Ringworm, and ions.
Rio Atuel, S.S. Alagoas, SS. Italia, $8 tk ave The Gave tate

: . . er. 1 you rem

Cristobal, S.S. Oslofjord, S.S Callipoy the tiny _faweun of” rene ain
Compero Nixoderm from your chemist to-

8.8. Trocas,

}5.S. John Chandris, $.S. Frances, 8.5 oder the positive guarantee that

| Guifglow, S.S. Brazil, S.S. Pygmalion Nixederm wit banish Imples apd”

5.S. Rosario, S.\S. Samana, S.S. Dolores lear your skin soft and smooth or .

{8 S. Nagu, S.S. Romana, S.S. Rav Bt Fez

ranger, SS. Trans Pacific, S.S. Lady ack ©

| Rodney, $8. Inventor, S.S. Sundial, S.S Nixoderm omat ¥

| Mcoa Clipper, S.S. Rosewood, S.8 Delft fer Skin Troubles package..." ~
ay



him worse than the horses were}!

treated. A charge should be
brought against him by the
S.P.C.A. An investigation shouid

be held on the matter,
Mr. J. E. T. Brancker said}
that one could only suggest that|

the horses of the Royal Canadian |

Mounted Police were not kept
in a half starved condition. He!
wondered whether when _ they

were kept in that condition, they

could better play polo,

When one read the note, one
wondered whether one was in
wonderland. Apart from the
question of the animals, the |
person who was in charge of the
Police Department was elected

chairman of the S.P.C.A,

Every week the police prosecu-
ted people for
animals and there it was animals
were being half starved,

Mr. Mottley said that the fact
that the cost of living had gone
up might be put as a reason for
the required additional amounts
He, however, wondered wheth:

members knew that there was a! ¥

grave dissatisfaction inside the
Police Force. Besides things that
should be gone into, there should
be a greater rent allowance, he
said,

The other Heads were passed
after further discussion and the
Resolution finally passed,



Jca Announce
Industrial
Developnient Plans

From Our Own Correspondent
KINGS) UW, Jan,
Jamaica Hauxite Limited
nounced today a _ bigger pro-
gramme of bauxite mining and
aluminium manufacture totalling
£ 30,500,000.
Simultaneously
Government
team of

2.
an-

the Jamaica

announced that a
British Industrialists
were being invited here to con-
sider in detail what schemes tor
industrial development might be
encouraged in Jamaica and what
measures might be taken to at-
tract private capital to finance
them,

At the same time the Govern-
ment is inviting the International
Bank to undertake a general
survey into the economic and
finance position of Jamaica and
make regommendations with an
eye to attracting US. capital.

A bill to set up an industrial
development corporation to
finance government funds is also
before the legislature on similar
lines to the agricultural develop-
ment corporation now being set
up by Government.



ARE
YOU
F SCARED

BY

RHEUMATIC
PAINS?

Here's the sure and certain
way to conquer them, Rub

SACROOL

and it’s penetrating powers
will act quickly and effec-
tively



On Sale at

SOOO



oO 14 AAP LAs



NEWS!

AND CONTRACTORS

%” to 3” Bore

"Phone 2109, 4406, or 3524

Â¥
990060900000"

}

|

ill-treating |

SLOCCSCESSSE SSS SSS SPP ELE LLLP LLL LLL APA



3, ote
=



8.8 Alcoa Puritan, S.S. Bayano, S.S
Agamemon, 5.S. Pacific Unity, Calabar

The Mayonnaise

WITH THE DELICIOUS

Flavowl







x

Local Agents:
T. Geddes Grant Ltd., Bridger own





SOO PPLEL LSE OP PSPSPS PSOE PEPE AAPA POO
MI

s *

x Introducing = =<

+
+
%

S TRUE POSTURE CHAIR

LG

SO

-

PROS,
CLL CPOCOCPE OCLC

4 6%

-



Mili
Advantages embodied in these fine CHAIRS include— &

ws | atu " +

@ Perfect Balance %

@ Adjustable Seat and Back :

@ Seat Anatomically Designed %

@ Beautiful Upholstery

@ Fitted with Casters or Rubber Cushioned
Domes.

See them on display at —

S. P. Musson, Son & Co., Ltd.
Dial 3713

LLL CELL LLLP MO

-

5,
x

POCO OS SPSS

OOP OLE CLOO OS POPOVOEPE LLLP LAPS

Don’t Ruin Your
TIRES!

Putting Wheels in Line

£59000G098



Can Save 5000 Miles g
of Rubber !

If your wheels are just the

slightest bit out of Hine it

ean mean that your tires

will wear unevenly be worn at

out a year ahead of time ,

Let us chuck, toe-in and McEncarneys bY
realign wheels, balance 4 ° %
tires and cross-switeh them Sewice Station %

for you! >



Firestone

The Fyre with Built-in Dependability

— ae

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ad Brakes! ;



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% We'll Adjust "Em $

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% Expertly for %

soe -

Summer Driving! %

ac ' Py

€ Don’t take a chance on g

faulty brakes that can g

ar eS mean danger to life and s-

Property Well clean 2g

brakes, repack front wheel %

bearings, lubricate brake

McEnearney | itiw'sist osc

bleed all brake lines and re-
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& Co. Ltd. | â„¢ :
0., ° OFFICE... ..4493 8

SOSSSSSS



8

» ‘4
% WORKSHOP 4203 $
. .
1% PARTS DEPT 4673 8
, “
'S NIGHT 4125 %
y .
od %
Seocesesesesteeeseeeeeeeseseeeseoosososoesoosous!


PAGE EIGHT

CLASSIFIED ADS.

FOK RENT



















@nmnouncements in Carib Calling the
charge is $3.00 for any number of words

TELEPHONE 2508. HOUSES
einen
< BERESFORD’—From ist February,
For Births, Marriage or age FOR SALE the modern bungalow in Maxwell's Road,

fully furnished, all m









| PUA

persons

BARBADOS ADVOCATE

¢ NOTICES

i

NOTICE
Re Estate of
ALLAN FITZHERBERT CLARKE
deceased
NOTICE IS HEREBY GIVEN that all
ing any debts or claim upon



up to 50 and 6 cents per word for each ~~ —-—-s-- — Appe * Goo or effecting the estate of Allan Fitz-
additional word. Terms cash. Phone 2508 - ‘ herbert Clarke late of Kirtons in the
- between 8.30 and 4 p.m., 3113 for Death BUNGALOW t Garrison, 4 bed-| parish of Saint Philip who died in this





























Netices rooms and ali conv erences,
only after 4 p.m $80 60 a month ct W. Wells at
eae ae T. Geddes Grant Ltd. Phone 2861 or

Heme 4025 -3n

BIRTH

0.1.52

CAR—One Prefect Ford m good con-
dition. Phone 4351,



27.1.52—3n.

——_—_——_—___
KORBIN-On danuany 28,

FURNISHED ROOM—O:



















se
1952, at Dr Worthing. Phone 8401 105 sfte: > 2 Me
Bayley’s Clinic, to Lili, nee Matalon, wife] | CAR—Ford V8 in very kood condition cients the Leste Ot ten abate Gubng
of leving Korbin of “Worthy Down”,| (M_ 1763) always owner driven. Apply} LILYVILLE-—9th Avenue, Belleville, 2! the parties entitled thereto having regard
Top Rock, Christ Church, a son. Mother| Redman & Taylor's Garage or contact | bedrooms and usual conveniences. Phone}. the debts and claims onlg of whieh 1
find son are doing well 90 1.52—1n. | N. Niles: Dial 3213. 30.1.52—2n. | 4595 29.1.82—2.} chail then have had notice, and that
a eg oe Pet ees a ae st p ible for assets so dis-
GAR—ibs) Packard Sedan in excellent | MORNING SIDE—Dathaheba, February |i ,qnau,"0t be Me y
SIMMONS Qn January 28th, 1952; to] running condition, 5 good tyres, mileage|to June. Telephone 2481 Mrs ae + aan ee eee
Mr & Mrs. Lisle Hutson Simmons, | 24.000. Dial Mr, Peter King 4001 Chandler 29.1. 86—Sn: | ina une ch aueh AieUan.
“Hillcress,” St. George. A_ son 30. 1.53—4n “And all persons indebted to the said
30 1.52—I1n ONE FURNISHED BUNGALOW—At| cctate are requested to settle their
CAR—Vauxhall 1947 12 H.P. very food | Coral Sands, Worthing, with Silver and] seeounts without delay
IN MEMORIAM pees. See oe 27.1.52—3n. | Linen. Good sea bsthing. For further] Dated ims 30th day of January, 1952.
particulars apply Alma Lashley, No. 6 OTTALES CLARKE,

CAR-—2-seater Ford V-8, accommodates
5 persons comfortably, (De Luxe Coupe

Coral Sands. 30.1.52—t.f.n

DA COSTA—In ever tender memory of







our darling younger son Patrick — | model), General condition excellent. Dial ROOSEVELT Maxwell Coast Road

Lt., 1st Battalion, Irish Guards, killed in | 4353 between 8 a.m. and 4 p.m. dat'y or | Fully furnished, including Frigidaire,

action at Anzio on January 30th 1944 after 4 p.m. Dial 4882. 29.1.52—4n |telephone and r iffusion. Good sea-
R.1I.P. bathing Phone 2224

His ‘ever sorrowing Father and Mother. 'CLE—Only one (1) in stock, 30.1 52—t in



Ambassador Supreme,
h.p. $605.00. Terms.
LTD.

30.152

PERSONAL

1 Spring-frame, 2
A BARNES & CO.,

26.1.52—4.i.n





SEASIDE HOUSE on Lighthouse Road
(Enterprise) Christ Church, Water, light,
garage, safe sea-bathing. Moderate rent



——
MOTORCYCLE—5 HP. B.S.A. Twin





for careful tenant. Apply: Hill House,
(X-812) does 8 m. P.H., effortiessiy, | via Oistin, Lodwe Road 30.1.52—2n.
but too many speed traps. Dene 16,000 _

miles. Well cared and looks new. Too|] TWO LARGE COOL ROOMS—Furnished,









The public are hereby warned against) good for you, but only $600.00. Dial 8354.| running water, with or without meals
giving credit to my wife, RINE BLACK-! Desmond Johnson. 30.1.52—In. | 10 minutes walk to Yacht Club or City
MAN (nee Blackman) as I do not hold Woodside Gardens. Dial 3356
myself responsible for her or anyone else ELECTRICAL 22.1.52-—t.f.0
ee ig Ri aatg or debts in my name oacasessineengeipareenesnane one ee _
unless by a written order signed by me.]| “On Deane ~~ WINSLEY Bathsheba, February to

Signed ERNEST R. D. BLACKMAN, WATER HEATERS—Electric hot water} yune. Telephone 2461, Mrs, W. Chandler,

Bromefield, heaters, 12 gallon capacity, only $105 * 26.1.52—3n
St. Lucy each K. R. Hunte & Co., Ltd. Dial =
29 1.52—2n, | 4611 or 5027, 29.1.52—3n







The public are hereby warned age
giving credit to my wife, VELTINE
ALLEYNE (nee Evelyn) as I do not hold
myself responsible for her on anyone else
contracting any debt or debts in my name
unless by a written order signed by me

Signed LEONARD ALLEYNE,
Clevedale Gap,
St. Miehael.
30,1,.52—2n

WANTED

FURNITURE

CHAIRS, Chairs, Chairs and other
furniture and all sorts of fittings for
your home. A. BARNES & Co., Ltd.

18,1,52—t.i.n,

CHEVAL MIRROR—Solid Mahogany
frame, tm good condition, inquire: Mrs.
Cc. R. Cowan, Marine Hotel,

PUBLIC SALES



REAL ESTATE

Aerated Seda
guaranteed con









AS a going concern (1)
Water Factory in
with all Fittings.
3,000 dozen Patent Bottles with cases
Monthly sales of Business can be known
to any would-be purchaser

For further information Dial 5075.

29,1.52—3n



30.1. 52-

MECHANICAL

2n.


































—_— -_—_—_—— BICYCLES, a shipment of yell perenne ney teenie aera
known B S.A eheiee to heh” Meet. The undersigned offers for sale ALL

HELF Gents various sizes and models. Redman| THAT certain messuage or dwellinghouse
& Taylor's Garage Ltd 30.1.52—4n, | Called “Greendykes” together with the/

__._____. | 8,800 square feet of land thereto belonging

ee eee situate at Amity Lodge Terrace, Christ
COUNTER GIRL WANTED — Apply: I Church. Building contains three bed-
Caribbean Studios at Cave Shepherd & MISCELLANEOUS rooms with running water In each, gar-

month,
30.1.52—In

Co. Twenty-five dollars per age, servants’ rooms, and all conveniences

Electric and telephone services at
For all further particulars and inspec-

— Of every description






meet ANT QUES
NURSE—A







reliable nurse for taking] Glass, China, oid Jewels, fine Silver] tion apply to W. NORMAN ALLEYNE,
care of two small children. Mrs. J. E.| Watercolours, Early books, Maps, Auto-] “Fairways”, Worthings, Dial 6164
Marson, ‘Las. Palmas", Marine Gardens.|] graphs etc., at Gorringes Antique Shop 30.1.52—Hn
30.1.52—4n. | adjoining Royal Yacht Club. candied Staite eat
SALE NOTICE



Lene nnn EEEEEEeENEE 3.10.51—+,f.0
STENOGRAPHER & TYPIST for our — wares
Office, apply by letter and in person-—

T. Geddes Grant Ltd.

The undersigned will offer for sale at
their office, No, 17, High Street, Bridge-
town, on Friday, the Ist February, 1952 at
1.30 p.m. the newly erected stone wall

AUTO POLI
ment of the pop
23,1.52—t f.n.| ER AND POLISH just arrived-—Old Cars



dition } instead of ‘Gaskin
Motor Van and about | all times thereafte

stand or
ereby

the 24th day of April 1951, are
equired to send in particulars

of their claims duly attested to the un

in care of D. Lee Sarjeant, |
12 James Street, Bridgetown.)
on or before the 10th day of April 1952,

dersigned,
Solicitor,

Qualified Administratrix,
Estate of Allan Fitzherbert Clarke,
ceased,

I SELWYN WINFIELD BLADES here-
tofore sometimes called and known by the
natne of Selwyn Winfield Gaskin of
Marley Vale in the parish of Saint Philip
in this Island, Assistant Schoolteacher
hereby give public notice that on the
26th day of January 1952 I formally and
absolutely renounced and relinquished
and abandoned the use of my said sur-
name “GASKIN" and then assumed and
adopted and determined thenceforth on
all oceasions whatsoever to use and sub-
scribe the surname of “Blades’’ instead
of the said surname of “Gaskin”

And I give further notice that by, a
Deed Poll dated the 26th day of January
1952 duiy executed and attested fand
recorded in the Kegistration Office of
this Island on the 26th day of January
1952 & formally and absolutely renounced
and abandoned the said surname of
“Gaskin” and declare that I had as-
sumed and adopted and intended thence-
forth upon all occasions whatsoever to
use and subscribe name of “Blades”
and so as to be at
r called known and

name of “Blades”







described by the
exclusively :
Dated the 26th day of January 1952,
SELWYN WINFIELD BLADES,
late SELWYN WINFIELD oe

_——$———L
THE BARBADOS MUTUAL
LIFE ASSURANCE SOCIETY
EXTRAORDINARY GENERAL
MEETING
NOTICE is hereby given that an Ex-
traordinary General Meeting of the
qualified Polievholders of the above
named Society will be heid at the office
of the Society, Beckwith Place, Bridge-
town, at 2 o'clock p.m. on Friday, 15th
February 1952, for the purpose of con-













WEDNESDAY, JANUARY 30, 1952



GOVERNMENT NOTICE

DEPARTMENT OF HIGHWAYS & TRANSPORT—VACANCY
FOR FOREMAN MECHANIC
Applications are invited for the post of Foreman Mechanic High-
ways & Transport Department.

The post is pensionable with salary on the scale $1,920 x 120—
2,520 per annum. In addition a non-pensionable cost of living allow-
ance is payable in accordance with approved rates. Point of entry
into scale will be determined on the basis of experience and qualifica-
tions. Contributions at the rate of 4% of salary will be required
under the Widows and Orphans Pension Act 1928. No quarters are
provided,

Appointment will be on probation for two years and will be made
subject to the selected candidate being passed as medically fit for
employment in the Public Service.

Candidates should not be less that thirty (30) years of age and
should preferably be practising mechanics employed in a supervisory
capacity with at least ten (10) years’ experience in Motor Mechanics
and Workshop practice. They should have a theoretical knowledge
of Internal Combustion Engines and will be required to keep the
Labour and Distribution Rolls.

Applications should be submitted to the Director, Department of
Highways and Transport, Bridgetown, to reach him not later than
noon on Saturday, 9th February, 1952,

30.1.52—2n.

OFFICIAL NOTICE

BARBADOS. IN Th COURT OF CHANCERY
IN PURSUANCE of the Chancery Act, 1906, I do hereby give notice to all

persons having or claiming any estate, right or interest or any lien or ine ce
in or affeeting the property hereinafter mentioned (the property of the defendant)
to bring before me an account of their claims with their witnesses, documents
and vouchers to be examined by me on any Tuesday or Friday between the
hours of 12 noon and 3 o'clock in the afternoon at the Registration Office, Public
Buildings, Bridgetown, before the 22nd* day of December 1961, in order that such
claims may be reported on and ranked according to the nature and priority thereef
respectively, otherwise such persons will be precluded from the benefits of any
egcree and be deprived of all claims on or against the said property

Plaintiff; PETER NIGEL HUAN JOHNSON

Defendant: DORCAS WILLIAMS

PROPERTY: ALL THAT certain piece or parcel of land situate in Upper Collymore
Rock in the parish of Saint Michael and Island of Barbados containing by
admeasurement one rood be the same more or less butting and bounding on
lands now or late of James H,. Wiles, of Catherine Wiles, of Clement Lucas,
of James Ford and of Miss Louisa Mallet, and on the Public Road or however
else the same may butt and bound Together with the messuage or Dwelling-
house called “AVEDON” and all and singular other the houses and outhouses
both freehold and chattel on the said land erected and built standing and
being with the appurtenances

Bill filed 12th October, 1951.

Dated 19th October, 1951.

|

H, WILLLAMS,
Registrar-in-Chanceny.

OFFICIAL NOTICE

BARBADOS. IN THE COURT OF OHANCERY

In pursuance of the Chancery Act 1906, I do hereby give notice to all persons
having or claiming any estate right or interest to any lien or encumbrances in or
affecting the property hereinafter mentioned (the property of the defendant) to
bring before me an account of their claims with their witnesses documents and
veuchers to be examined by me on any Tuesday or Friday between the hours of
12 noon and 3 o'clock in the afternoon at the Registration Office, Public Buildings,
Bridgetown, before the 4th day of March 1952, in order that such claims
may be reported on and ranked according to the nature and priority thereot
respectively otherwise such persons will be precluded from the benefits of any
decree and be deprived of all claims on or against the said property,

sidering and a Pes ba) = without | Plaintif; ENA MAY GALE
amendment the following Resolution: .
RESOLVED that Clause 5 of the Deed Defendant; CLARA ALSOP GALS
ot Settlement be deleted and the fol- PROPERTY: FSRSTLY ALL THAT certain messuage or dwellinghouse called
lowing Clause substituted therefor;— PARADE VIEW" with the land whereon the same stands and thereto belonging
6. No assurance or assurances shail| situate at St. Anns, The Garrison in the parish of Christ Church in this nd








ceieninte tates idan iareieiscmtenanrtreetinie
Traffie Clerks for our Office, All appli-

cants must apply in writing, with refer-| Garage.

ences and photo hs, to BRITISH
WEST INDIAN A AYS LTD., Lower
Broad Street, Bridgetown.



REDS INVITE U.S,

ENVOY TO DEBATE

COPENHAGEN, Jan, 29.
Danish Communists on Mon-
day night invited the American
ambassadress,

derson to a meeting to discuss the ;, BARNES & Co., Ltd.

negro problem in the United
States. The Ambassadress how-
ever, had to refuse the invitation
because she was giving a dinner

party for the well-known Ameri-| LTD.

can negro lawyer, Mys. Edith
Sampson, guest at the Ambassa-

dor’s residence during her stay} $3.36 to $6.24, A

in Denmark.—U.P,



OUR AGENTS are making £100
and more by taking orders fow
Personal Christmas Greeting Cards

and Calenders, On
Britain’s largest and
Publishers will send a
Free Sample Book for 1953 to
Genuine Agents Write today.
Highest Commission paid. Jones,
Williams & Co., Dept. 9, Victoria
Works, Preston, England.

request,
foremost
Beautiful





T0-DAY'S NEWS FLASH

WHITAKER'S ALMANAC
Unabridged Edition

BROWN’S NAUTICAL ALMANAC
1952

DAILY MAW. YEAR BOOK 1952
PLASTIC SCHOOL RULERS

VIOLIN BOWS & BOW HAIR
PIANO INSULATORS
SUNSHADES FOR DOLLS

SEPARATOR OIL by the Pint.
— at —



1952

JOHNSON'S STATIONERY
& HARDWARE



ORIENTAL
SOUVENIRS

SILKS, CURIOS, ARTS
VENDEMOS, SEDAS,
JOYERIAS YÂ¥ ARTISTICAS
CURIOSIDADES, TRAIDOS
DE LA INDIA CHINA e

EJIPTO

THANI’S
Pr, Wm. Hry. St., Dial 3466



Our many BARGAINS inelude
ATTRACTIVE

LUNCH TINS

Strong metal
with durable
finish in 3 col- (.



ous.
(. W. Hutchinson
& CO, LTD.
Broad St. — Dial 4222



IMPROVE YOUR
SPEECH

Speak and Write correctly
and with style.
Join the Society for Fluent
English .

Call ate .
Miss JULIET SHEPHERD,
“Indhurst,” Westbury Road,

For particulars of Enrol-
ment Fees for Written Lec-
amount to $2.00 per month.
First Payment on Enrolment.
Enrolment from 4.30 p.m.—
6.00 p.m, Monday-Saturday .




27.1,52. | 300 copies left to be sold out immediate





look like new after using LARWAX—
really marvellous! Dial 4391, Courtesy
25.1.52.—6.

BARBADOS ANNUAL REVIEW





Last

A real delight to Barbadians abroad.
Buy now and post early. 3/- each at
Advocate Stationery, Roberts High Street,
Weatherhead Drug Store. 29.1 ,52--3n

EGGS—-Pure

bred Barred Plymouth













bungalow called “MIDGET” standing on
8,700 sq. feet of land at Welches New





Road, St. Michael. The dwellinghouse

verandah, sitting and dining
rooms, 2 bedrooms, kitchenette, toilet
and bath, electric Ji#ht and running;
water, Garage and servant’s room in
yard. Approximately half of the land |

is enclosed.
Inspection any day
Miss Cozier next door
For further particulars

1

on application to

and condi-



Rock eggs for hatching, 6c h.] tions of sale apply:—

Infertiles replaced John Alleyne, COTTLE, CArFORD & Coa.,

Ebworth St. Peter, Phone 91-20 .. Solicitors.

12.1.52—3n 20.1.52—9n

i ‘Long Playing Records and 78 RPM SALE NOTICE

Mrs, Eugeni An-| Records and we book orders too. A.§ The undersigned will offer for sale
at their office, No, 17, High Street,
18.1.52—t.f.n, Bridgetown, on Thursday the 3ist day



MAKE-U-WELL HERBS—Nature's Cure
for constipation, Rheumatism, Indigestion,
Kidney and Bladder Diseases, and Slusg-

KNIGHT'S
30.1, 52

gish Liver. Price 2/- box.
-3n

ee —_
SUITCASES — Valises, attache cases,
sturdy and lightweight, double lock:

BARNES & CO., LTD.









24.1.52—t.f.n.

STOVES...PLORENCE OI STOVES in
2 and 3 Burner Models. GREEN ARROW
Stoves in 2 Burner Models only.—Laurie
Dash & Co., Tudor Street, Phone 5061
25.
TORNADO—International K.41, Beauti~
ful condition, excellent equipment, good
racing record. Cost $700.00 now $500.00.
No offers. Hicks. Telephone 3189.
18.11. 51--t.f.n

WATER TAFFETA—Moire
lovely quality for your lovely
modern shades 36” wide $1
get from Kirpalani, Swan St

finish,
dress,
yard.
ret
30,1

an





52—1n

icine may be just what
you need. Go to your
chemist and obtain a
supply of De Witt's
Pills right
now.






















De Witt’s Pills are — £
manufactured under strictly hygienic
conditions and the ingredients con-
form to rigid standards of purity.

GLEN Camel) Co!

Phone 4640























DESO SOOOCOOOL.

THE FIRM WITH THE



of January, 1952, at 2 p.m. the desirable
building lot of land containing 17,964
square feet or thereabouts situate on
top of Rendezvous Hill lying to the east
of and adjacent to the lands of Cloud
Walk the residence of Sir Dudley Lea-
cock, The site is in within easy reach
of the Golf Chib and commands a
beautiful view.

For further particulars and conditions
of sale apply to:—

COTTLE, CATFORD & Co.,

Solicitors,
20.1.52—10n.



The undersigned will offer for sale at
their office, No, 17, High Street, Bridge-
town, on Friday the Ist February, 1952,
at 130 p.m. the dwellinghouse called
“ELLERSLIE” with the land thereto
containing 1 rood, 3 perehes or there-
abouts adjoining Dr. Bancroft's _resi-
dence at Lower Fontabelle, The house
contains downstairs, drawing and dining
rooms, breakfast room, two bedrooms,
toilet and bath and upstairs 3 bed-
rooms. Electric light, company's water
and gas turned tn,

Inspection any day between the hours
of 1 p.m. and 3 p.m. on application on
the premises

For further particulars and conditions
of sale apply to:—

COTTLE, CATFORD



\

& Co. |

Solicitors

20.1.62—1in. |
j



AUCTION

By Public Auction
Street, on Friday



t our office, James
the 8th February 1952

at 2 p.m.
1, The dweiling house known as
“Edgeclifl’, with forty six acres of land

in the parish of St
six acres are arable
is let to monthiy and weekly tenants
2. 1,450 square feet of land at. the
corner of Amen Alley and Marhill Street
with the store thereon and the fixtures
and fittings therein, and the entire stock-
in-trade of the drug business known as
“Olympia Pharma ,
For further particulars and conditions
of sale apply to
HUTCHINSON

John, of which twenty
The entire property





& BANFIELD
30,1.52-—5n

UNDER THE SILVER
HAMMER

MILK AND PEPPERMINTS

On FRIDAY the 1ST February we will
sell at our Mart 17 High Street 40 cz
Condensed Milk, 240 Tins Peppermin












containing by admeasurement 6502'4 Square feet or thereabouts butting and bouna~
ing on a place called or known as Sea View Hotel, on lands formerly of Mary Ann
Cooper, but now or late of Frank Craig, and on the public road or however else
amount in excess of $25,000.00 is imme-| the same may butt and bound SECONDLY ALL THAT certain messuage dwelling-
diately reassured with zome other Com-| house or store situate in High Street in the City of Bridgetown in this Island
pany or Society of unques{ionable stand-| aud numbered 15 in the said Street together with the land whereon the same
ing, and the Society thereby reli¢ved of| stands and thereto belonging containing by admeasurement 1116 square feet or

be accepted and no policy or policies
shall be issued on any one life for a
sum exceeding $25,000.00 unless the



any direct lability in respect of such | thereabouts butting and bounding on the premises known as Number 156 Roebuck
reassured amount, Street aud 14 High Street and on the premises known 4s No. 16 High Street and on
Provided always that in arriv‘og at) High Street aforesaid or however else the same may butt and bound AND







the same aggregate sum of $25,000.09 no| THIRDLY AL, THAT certain piece or parcel of land with the dwellinghouse

account shall be taken of existing or| thereon called “BARTICA” containing by admeasurement 9016 square feet oF
prospective Reversionary Bonus Addi-| thereabouts (formerly part of two acres and thirty one perches) and also 840
tion. | square feet of the public road situate in or near the district called the Cocaaput
C. K, BROWNE, | Walk beyond the district called Hustings in the said paris of Christ Church in

Secretary. | {his Island butting and bounding on iands now or late of one Mrs, Inniss, on the

27.1.52—6n, Sea, on lands now or late of Marcus Grannum et al, and on the Public Road or





and bound Togegher with the messuages or
all other the erections and buildings on the
nd built standing and being with theit

however else the same may butt
dwelling houses and buildings and
said respective parcels of land erected a
| appurtenances.

Bill filed; 3rd December, 1951,
Dated: Sist December, 1951

Income Tax Notice



H, WILLIAMS,

NOTICE 1S HEREBY GIVEN that Registrar-in-Chancery.
1,3.

Income Tax returns are required from
every married man whose income is
.00 per annum or over, from every
ether person whose income is $720.00 per
annum or over and from companies
whether incorporated or unincorporated,
societies, persons engaged in any trade
or profession, and owners of land or
property whether a taxable income has
accrued during the past year or not,

Forms of Return may be obtained from
the Income Tax Department AFTER THE
1ST DAY OF JANUARY, 1952, and the
forms duly filled in must be delivered
to me on or before the following
respective dates;

1. Returns of persons whose books
were closed on the 3ist day of
December, 1961, on or before the
Sist day of Mareh, 1952,

Returns of persons whose principal
place of business is not situate in
the island on or before the 30th
day of June, 1962.

Returns of all other persons, on or
before the S3ist day of January,

1952.
N. D. OSBORNE,
Commissioner of

Income Tax and Death Duties (Ag.)
Note:—-Any person failing to make his
return within the due date will

be liable to a fine not exceeding

£100 and not less than £2 and

will be prosecuted



HOUSE & LAND

ENJOY SECURITY “ON ONE ACRE OF GOOD EARTH!”
A Comfortahge Home with ‘all Modern Conveniences, ‘in-
cluding Telephone, standing on_one acre of Good Land, suitable
for Kitéhen Garden; near town.

CECIL JEMMOTT, sit
Upstairs Knight’s Building,
33, Broad Street.
Phone 4563.

Consult:

to

We will wepicon your Orders
or...

Tins Koo Grapes—Varlo Peaches—Varlo Pears—Carlton Pears

ry
satisfactory reason is ea :
10.1,52—7n. | —Bendigo Apricots—Birds Cherries—Heinz Vegetable Salads



Revitalise Your

KIDNEYS

And You'll Feel Young—Look Young



—Velop Whole Tomatoes—Sawyers Whole Tomatoes—Smed-
leys Garden Peas—Farrows Processed Peas,
AND ALL OTHER 1ST CLASS GROCERY ITEMS.





Nothing ages men er woman more
than aches caused through bad kidney
retion. ‘This makes you suffer from = ae
Seeing an eee Burni Nesting
Passagds, Nerves, Dizzin Rheu- +
matism, Backache, Leg Pa Circles ¥ q N td
under Eyes, Swelien Ankl Loss of JONUN D. TA YLOR & 8$O! s L °



Appetite, Energy, etc., be se kid-
neys which should filter blood fail to
dhvow off acids and poisons, now creep-
tng to joints and muscles, tn 24 hours
Cystex kills kidney germs, strength-
eons kidneys and expels acids and poi-
sons, Get Cystex from any Chemist en
‘yarantee to put you right or money
back, Aet Now! In 24 hours you will
feel better and be completely well in

one week,
oe Cystex ji, Si:

antee pro.

5 OOS TOS O TOPO F OOTP SIDES TOP POP PNG

FOR SALE
-CARLDIEM”



Sale 12.90 o'clock Terms Cash For Kidneys, Kheumatiom, Bladder tects vou.
BRANKER, TROTMAN & CO-| .66.65656690000000600000",
Auctioneers. a x 3 a two storeyed dwellinghouse standing on 10,770 square feet
20.1.58—2n % NOTI x of land on the incomparable St, Lawrence Coast.
UNDER THE SILVER is CE Ss Excellent sea bathing. Dwellinghouse contains verandah
HAMMER 'Â¥ > upstairs and down, dining and sitting rooms, 4 bedrooms, pan-
SALE. TO DA , % en x try and kitchen, Electric light, gas and water installed, Garage
' eee ; ‘ and servants rooms.
The Household Effects of Ca (es , ;
Reed at No. ry Omicers uniter’ ces ab BLOCK STONE x Purchaser to have option of buying furniture and effects.
vitop inchuding good Alpine Gas Stove x Inspection by appointment. Dial 8137. (Mrs, K, R. Hunte).
NEKR, TROTMAN ¢ 12 FO! x The above will be offered for sale at public competition on
= Agaloneen. alana x R SALE 3 Friday, the 9th February, 1952, at 2 pm,, at the office of the
30 1,.62—1n. 1% x undersigned from whom further particulars and conditions of
So —— | , uild- <> sale can be obtained,
S209 D PDD 9 PO SPV OOSISSSE |B ‘oo uanitty = % COTTLE, CATFORD & CO.,
; =r. % Solicitors.
HOT WATER ON 38 ue eee $ 24.1.52—15n
S TAPfor YOUR BATH 3|% cm delivered immedl- 3) osscunsiserstootseortooossOoossoosooosso0os
With one of the lovely White Por- x y
celain Gas Geysers—You can have x Dial 2656. x %,
pares oe sak bat = x % >
nutes ©) up. < >
omically prised sh CHEAP to KEITH RAYSIDE, 8 %,
run with Natural Gas. A few are Manager . ‘ v
now available at your GAS % :
WORKS, BAY STREET. 3 3 Lodge Stone Works Co s
y
4

REAL ESTATE

JOHN M. BLADON & CO.
F.V.A.
BEPUTATION.

A.F.S.



e

Due to a change in schedule effective February,
Ist, 1952, will all passengers holding reserva-
tions with us on or after this date, please check

with our Office.



BRITISH WEST INDIAN
AIRWAYS LTD.

Lower Broad Street. Phone 2789, 4585

SELLS LOGEC PLOY

4
>

x

%
3

V66695

$6666
ee

SSOSSS SS SSO LOS SSS SSS SSS OSS SPSS

\

POSS






SHIPPING NOTICES

M.V. parenoce =

Carge Passengers for
St Teeets. St. Vincent, Grenada
and Aruba. Sailing Wednesday
28rd inst.

The M.VÂ¥. CARIBBEE wil)

Cargo and Passengers for

Besntinice a, Montserrat,

levis and . Kitts Sailing
Friday ist February 1952.

The MV. MONEKA will
aceept Cargo and Passengers for
Dominica, Antigua, Montserrat,
Nevis and St. Kitts. Sailing, Date
to be notified.







SCHOONER OWNERS’



rr |

Canadian National Steamships



Sails Arrives Sails
Boston Barbados Barbados
- 6 Feby. 7 Feby.

15 Feby. 24 Feby. 25 Feby





29 Feby. 9 March 10 March
- 23 Mareh 24 March
Arrives Arrives Arrives
Barbados Barbados Boston St. John Halifax
“LADY fe o by, 7 ¥Feby. 16 Feby. 17 Feby. 20 Feby
“CAN. * Soe 21 roy, _ 28 Feby. 1 March
“LADY wd . 8 March 9 March 20 March 21 March 24 March
“LADY a nee 22 March 24 March 3 April 4 April 7 April
“CAN. 2 29 .. 4 April 7 April a 14 April 17 April

For further particulars, apply to—



GARDINER AUSTIN & CO,, LTD,—Agents.

. HARRISON LINE

OUTWARD FROM THRE UNITED KINGDOM



Due
Vessel From Leaves Barbados
ss. “4 ye . New &
perennial le = ee oh gon. eg a
SS. “ i . Mbrougn a 1l an, st Jan.
SS. “I Piss . Liverpool 13th Jan. 27th Jan.
S.S. “PR " .-Lendon 25th Jan. 7th Feb.







HOMEWARD FOR THE UNITED KINGDOM

Closes in Barbados
6th Feb.

Vessel For
S.S. “HERDSMAN” .. London

For further Information apply 4 .. -

DA COSTA & co., LTD.—Agents







S$. S. “GOLFITO”







OUTWARD HOMEWARD
Arrive & Sail |Arrive & Sail) Arrive
Southington Barbados Barbados | Southampton
February 18th |February 27t! | March 9th March 29th
March 29th April 7th April 18th April 27th



cinemas Menuneen oteieaitentiahanervaeatea tage
Will all passengers for above sailings please note,
WILKINSON &

HAYNES CO., LTD,





CG" TRANSATL

Sailings from Southampton to Guadeloupe, Martinique, Barba-
dos, Trinidad, LaGuaira, Curacao, Cartagena and Jamaica.



From Southampton Arrives Barbados



“COLOMBIE”........ 7th Feb., 1952 20th Feb., 1952
“COLOMBIE”.... 20th Mareh, 1952 2nd April, 1952
*“DE GRASSE”.... 24th April, 1952 __.... 6th May, 1952

*Not calling at Guadeloupe,
SAILING FROM BARBADOS TO EUROPE

From Barbados Arrives Southampton
“COLOMBIE”.... 2nd March, 1952 14th March, 1952
“COLOMBIE”.,.. 13th April, 1952 25th April, 1952
*“GE GRASSE”.... 19th May, 1952 29th May, 1952

*Sailing Direct to Southampton.

K. M. JONES & CO., LTD.—Agents.





TX

SOSSSOSOOOS BODO OOOO OPI GS SSS GGG GIOIA SO TE
g
DO YOU REQUIRE PORCELAIN =
KITCHEN SINKS ? x
>
WE CAN SUPPLY %
- >
CENTRAL EMPORIUM x
Corner Broad & Tudor Streets, 3
os

Cable Address
“ Realtors "

REAL ESTATE AGENTS,

AUCTIONEERS,
VALUERS,

BUILDING CONTRACTORS.

151 & 152 Roebuck Street,
Telephone No. 4900.




WEDNESDAY, JANUARY 30, 1952 BARBADOS, ADVOCATE PAGE NINE

HENRY

SSS

[POND |
coh cacam |
rd

1 vena? } It’s easy to keep
oe = the lavatory clean!
—— Shake some ‘ Harpic’ into the bow!
leave overnight — then flush
That's all. No brush ts needed.
‘Harpic’s’ thorough action cleans,

ee disinfects aud deodorises the whole
°
POND’S COLD CREAA4 to cleanse and soften

pan—even where no brush can reach















BY ALAN STRANKS







your skin. , and leaves the air refreshed.
(OUMP THAT AMBULANCE, LINK, WHILE - "FLAME?! THIS :
/ SEE THIS rote aaa tha Fed WHAT'S GOT INTO - ’ 4 s bye POND’S VANISHING CREAN Harpic’ is safe to use in all lavatories,
4 WANT TO HEAR.... HER 2 SHE LOOKS ; y THE} |

including those connected to septic tanks.
SHINER ..1 MARRIED VOv. j

to protect your skin b Vv é
ven ARN, p 3 kin by day and to bold your

1
£ ore } ®
‘ paw" YOU KILLED TiVO MEN... powder matt. ; ;
| SOMEBODY CAUGHT YOU
MORE THAN ‘ \ ANO VOU WERE SENT THO SAFE LAVATORY CLEANSER
WaALe Pane AND THAT'S WHAT 0 DARTMOOR

» a1
GIVEN HER A + GOING TO GET~ 7 was... FLINT #
MAN-S/ZED THE TRUTH! | m

/, OKAY, SHINER # SURE! FLINT'S
1 GUESS WE FOXED NOBODY'S
FLINT ~ BRINGING | / FOOL!

FLAME HERE iN c

THAT THING...



ee ate a sn as





ae

otter these Beauty fod uct: s

|

Gland Discover
Restores Youi
in 24 Hours

ers from loss of vigour, nery-
. Weak body, impure blood,
and who are old and
heir time will be de-
a new gland diseov-
ry by an American doctor,

This new discovery makes it pos-
i . ible to quickly and easily restore vi-
| —_ | rour to your glande and body, to build
° ‘ ‘ . 4 rich, pure bloed, to strengthen your
POND’S FACE POWDER: clinging, EZ | inna Rnd momory and feet like a new
i a me | man in only 8 days. In fact, this dis-

perfumed, sceintifically blended, for ¢o

ery which is a home medicine in

a glamorously matt complexion. ms “ | p Asant, easy-to take tablet form,

does « , ule yperation#s and

POND’S LIPSTICK $ smooths being to bulld new Vigour and energy

80 easily onto your lips; the | lug! Ged'matral fm potions ame

i ribrs . ave ‘he sucee of this amas dis-

rich vibrant colour stays on | core eet VI-TAES. haw Diane

and on and on, | gr ig distributed

ull chemists here ur ra guarantee

fi of complete satisfmetion or money

Here is a range of beauty products used by lovely suciety women everv- back. Int other words, Vj-TABS snes

‘ . - ‘ : . make you fee igo c
where. Simple and inexpensive, they ar¢ all you need to keep you looking PS

flawlessly lovely, feeling your very best at all times

at all the best beauty counters.



“Tp tears
A LOT OF
NONSENSE

({ MONEY ONLY SPOILS
7 PEOPLE WHO ARE
{ SPOILED TO BEGIN WITH





S THATS WHY I TOLO ALVIN
I WAS GOING RIGHT AHEAD.
~ A AND ASK YOU FOR
] at =A FIFTY-CENT
« \>> RAISE IN MY
“ £72) ALLOWANCE
wf Ne

—-<\







2 irs young
wv + ‘ ‘or verely ptt the emply
You will find them | pe : vr oy baer,

Vi-T

Restores Manhood and Vitality

IT PAYS YOU TO DEAL HERE

B MEANWHILE, In THE space | WMAT'SA MATTER, LITTLE eer =
PRISON LABORATORY — | MAN ¥ YA BEEN JUMPY AS
AN OL HEN SINCE THAT
ROCKET LANDED!
HATCHIN’ ANY IDBAS®



B / THANKS, WARDEN! LOOKS

a LIKE YOU'LL HAVE TO PUT

{IMs US UP _IN PRISON UNTIL

| THIS T WE GET OUR ROCKET COME, I'LL SHOW YOU
| WE'LL DO ALL WE REPAIRED ’ AROUND THE PRISON

| CAN TO HELP you! y — WHILE YOU'RE WAITING /

SPECIAL offers to all Cash and Credit Customers for Monday to Wednesday only
SPECIAL OFFERS are now @vailable at our Hranechnes “Tweedside,
Speightstown and Swan Street

Usually NOW Usually Now
Tins Peaches 81 72 Pkgs. P. F. Sweet Biscuits — 36

Tins Corned Mutton 66 60 Tins Four Cows Milk 33 OSI
Pkgs. Quaker Oats 30 27 Tins Smedley Peas 49 45

D. V. SCOTT & Co. Ltd. Broad: Street

THE COLONNADE GROCERIES

NY PEOPLE EVER
TO SEE THis
“As spectators! }*



Ca SS I ee CES a as a ee
JOHNNY HAZARD BY FRANK ROBBINS

WHICH IS TO GET INTO

THE MIDPLE EAST ANP
COLLECT DATA ON ALLIED

AIR BASES / WHERE DOES
h SHE FIT IN? =4























AFTER BEING MARRIED IN
PARIS SHE RETURNS TO THE
MIDDLE EAST WITH HER HUS
BAND! WHAT BETTER WAY TO
MOVE AROUND FREELY, THAN
AS THE WIFE OF A REPUTABLE
EMPLOYEE OF A MIPDLE-EAST
r OIL FIRM





DR. ANTON / YOU Paay PLAN |S BETTER
GPEAK IN CIRCLES | THAN THAT, MY DEAR.
WHAT DOI DO? | YOU ARE GOING TO

HIDE IN HER MARRY WEE












| ABOUT THAT LAURIE
| GIRL... GHE SHOULD FIT
IN WELL WITH YOUR
|NEXT ASSIGNMENT /









BY GEORGE MC. MANUS

ar

Wa, Ms
| YES-MRS. JIGGS-THIG WAS, }
| FORMERLY PROFESSOR Nf
DRUMMOND FIFES suiTe- (fr)
WE WAS A GREAT ere ee

my

4 OHH
i Cc



(



LL MCVE TOA
K- I'LL MISS MY
GING LESSONS /”— |

We take pleasure in announcing the operting of another





uptodate Book Shep and Stationery situated in the tranquil






atmosphere of Greystone Village, Balmoral Gap. This gap runs
off the Hastings main road immediately opposite the Ocean View

Hotel.

Here, for the convenience of visitors to the island and resi

RIP KIRBY

dents of the surrounding district, will be found al! the latest in

ae Wk. a
a em \





~ Books and English Magazines that there is to be read, Soon, we

(I DON'T UNDERS C

\. BUT THE TONE O SL
VOICE SOUNDED LIKE

TROUBLE

LET ME_ADMIT TO YOU,
LEMEN, THAT I 4
U RSTAND ENGLISH
PERFECTLY/ YOUR c
FEARS ARE

WELL POUNDED!





also hope to stock the most popular American Magazines.



In the line of stationery we will have everything possible

while local souvenirs will also be in stock, The “Parbados Advo

\ cate” will be on sale here every day except on Sundays
|

{
y












A FASCINATING LEGEND. SOME SAY
HES AS TALL AS ATREE, STRONG AS
TEN TIGERS os oe penn
= a aR HE CAN+~

«BE A DOZEN PLACES AT ONCE <~
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ASTHEGHOST
NHO WALKS? J





INTERESTING. DOESNT
IT, FELLA?



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a i PLAT MANNA EAR, ERNE ORRIN WARE NE 2 DOA BS a oe




PAGE TEN



The first major Club
day when the Belleville
Tournament

Tournament fer 1952
Tennis

opens to-
Club will stage its annual

The number of entries is not as large as usual and this is

somewhat surprising in view of the “Herculean”

efforts the

Barbados Lawn Tennis Association have been making in the
last few months to encourage public interest in the game.

Notable absentees ‘in the

Taylor, Peter Patterson, Geoffrey Manning and Dr.

ning, who up to the end of
well have been dubbed ‘

Turk Defeats
Swede At Wrestling

STOCKHOLM, Jan. 29.
Turkey's flyweight Ali Yucel
Gained the first victory of the
Swedo Turkish wrestling meet
here to-day. The free-style Yucel
threw the Swedish veteran Malte

Moeller in two minutes fifty three
seconds, locking the Swede’s legs

in Turkish fashion and applying
the back-hammer.
The Turk took the initiative

from the beginning and had the
Swede in several difficult situa-
tions, The capacity crowd saw the
opening night of the two day meet
devoted to free style.

The team of Turkish wrestlers
who are engaged in the first match
of the Swedish Tour are in the
peak of form Manager Akifoglu
said. The snow covered Stock-
holm has a temperature of ten
degrees below zero centigrade,
but the Turkish visitors claim
they enjoy it. “All the boys are
in good form” said the manager.”
They have been flourishing here
in Sweden although the food is
heaviey than they are used to,

—U-P.

Sehagen Knocks
Out McGowan

LONDON, Jan. 2§

Willie Schagen . of Soilend
weighing 167% pounds knocked
cut Johnny McGowan of Wakefield
167% pounds in the third round of
a scheduled ten-rounder at the
Albert Hall.

A right to the chin in the third
round put McGowan down on his
face, He attempted to rise and ap-
peared just to beat the count, but
referee Archie Sexaton ruled a
knockout.—U.P.

‘The Big Four”

men’s singles are Messrs. Eric
Man-
last year’s tournaments could
of local tennis.
However, the standard of play
should not be jeopardised as in the
last year, players such as Dennis
Worme, David Lawless, Louis St

Hill and the ever steady Darrel!
Trimingham have improved to
uch an extent that most tennis
fans were looking forward to see-
ing them clash with last year’s
champions

It is also heartenifig to see no
less than four promising teen-
gers are among the male entries
nd one would suggest that they
try and acquire as much Tourna-
n.ent experience and tempera-
ment as possible, as it will serve
them in good stead in the future
The ‘old brigade” are well
represented in the persons of
Messrs. Donald Barnes, John Mc-
Kinstry, Bobby Edgehill, and Mr.
K. D. “Tommy” Edwards, a one
time champion who has teamed up
with H. L. Toppin in the men’:
doubles

The Ladies entries have been

very poor, the singles having only
six entrants, here the only conso
lation is that four of the six are all

young and _ promising players,
Among the latter, Miss Charmaine
Goddard, a niece of the W.I.
cricket Captain, although very

young shows much promise and
providing she sticks_at the game
should have a very bright future.

Fixtures of each day’s play will
appear in the daily paper along
with the results of the preceding
cay’s matches.

Today's fixtures are as follows:—

MEN'S SINGLES

W. H.C. Knowles vs. H. L. Top-
pin

D, E. Worme vs. D, E. V Cuke

V. Roach vs. J. L, St. Hill.

S. P. Edgehill vs. D. I .Lawless.

J.D. Trimingham vs. C. B. Law-
less.

G Hunte vs. M. G. Worme

BIG DIPPER CAN BOOST
BLOODSTOCK SALES

RICHARD BAERLEIN)
(Racing Reporter
THE eyes of the _ bloodstock
world will be upon the Irish-bred
Windy City and Big Dipper, when
they race in the Santa Anita
Derby and Santa Anita Handicap,
respectively, for they can provide

by the champion American jockey,
kddie Arcaro, who is also going
to ride him in his preliminary
work to save him some of the
unnecessary rigours of an Ameri-
can preparation,

Prendergast Advises

His former trainer, Irishman

the greatest American advertise- padqy Prendergast, has been out

ment British bloodstock has yet there this winter and discussed

achieved. ; » # the colt fully with his trainer and
Three years ago I suggested yider,

that the British Government His advice was most helpful,

should sponsor a scheme and this headstrong colt should

for
sending their National Stud me

outelass the opposition, @ven if

lings and others, if necessary, he is not an out and out stayer.
to America, where they would" ‘This time last year Big Dipper
advertise our horses in front olg\was favourite for the Derby. He
the Americans and so increase}then went wrong and never ran as
our dollar exports, a three-year-old in this country.

Though this scheme has not being sent to America quite early
been auoptea by tne WWavriona! in the season. His trouble was

Stud or auy ower stud in bngiana,
il 1s sull not lwo late lo atlempt i.
Last year two. famous irish
studs sent thelr yearlings to Un
Saratoga Sales aud obtaine.
tremenaous prices for them.
They will repeat the perform-
ance this year and other Irish
studs are to follow suit. 1 under-
stand that t..e Aga Khan is one of
those who will be sending some
Irish-bred yearlings to Saratoga
this year.
The Irish have
business to attack

made
the

it their
American

market and they are being justly
rewarded But Big Dipper and
Windy City can boost their sales
considerably.

These two colts headed the
English Two-Year-Old Free

Handicap in successive years, and
it is a sign of the times to find
them both competing in America.

Both are expected to succeed.
Windy City, a “flying
machine” in Europe last season,
has lost about 6st. in weight

and harsh measures had to be
adopted to get him to go into
the American starting gate
They were finally successful

He is to be ridden in this Derby

| They'll ll Do It Every



located, treated and has yielded to
treatment,

The colt is in strong work again
and his home form has given his
connections the utmost confidence
wh his abilitv to win this big
handicap.—X..E.8,



WHAT’S ON TODAY

Police Courts and Court of
Original Jurisdiction 10.00

a.m,

Court of Common Pleas 16.36
a.m.

Police Band Concert at

Chalky Mount district 3.00
p.m,
Police Band plays at Mount
Hillaby district 4.00 p.m.
Concert by the Police Band

at Welchman Hall district
5.00 p.m,

A.C.S.B. Committee Meeting
at the British Council,
Wakefield.

Mobile Cinema Show at
Locust Hall Plantation

yard, 7.45 p.m.



Time






lakes ais ase By _Jimmy Haclo



Be 2

LINDWALL

RAY







BARBADOS ADVOCATE

Belleville Tennis T ourney Opens Today |

First 1952 Major
Tournament

By THE SPORTS EDITOR

JEFF STOLLMEYER



Make The
Batsman Hit
That Ball

(By JOHN MACADAM)

THE
again

reformers are at work
-not the ponderous pontiffs

who sit in the high places; but
the jolly lesser ones who sit in

such low places as houses of pub-

lic refreshment or medium-high
ones like the privacy of their own
drawing-rooms

You recall H. t&. Pawle, who
suggested that current concentra-
tion on points for first innings
lead in county cricket was ruining
the overall aspect of the match?

Back comes Mr. Pawle with
the additional suggestion that
cricket would be brightened con-
siderably if no points were allot-
ted for a draw

So far, so good but listen
to Walter Th. Curiger, of London,
W.2, a visitor to this country who
watched both county and public
school games last season

His observation is that batsmen
woud be encouraged to hit the
ball more if for every maiden
over the fielding side should be
credited with six runs—a_ pretty
stringent incentive, but big-time
cricket can do with some such
shots in the arm,

E. F, Levitt takes the bull firm-
ly by the horns by suggesting 20
points for an outright win and
only a meagre couple for that
baneful first-innings lead Again
the idea is to make them play to

win—as if that should be neces-
sary in this day and age. But it
is
Soccer, Too

Soccer doesn’t escape the at-
tention of the curers-of-ills.
Here is John G. Sumner, of
Brixton, London, expressing in-
tense irritation at the prolonged

Club of Controversy, He appears
to over-simplify a little, but his
suggestion is worth some study.

He would have the F.A
League finance and run
own Soccer club, with its own
ground, manager, trainers, and a
playing staff of around 75 players

The F.A.-League Club would be
run in four teams tagged I, II,
III (N.), and III (S.), with the
first team in the First Division,
and the others as they are tagged

He would have these players
start in one of the IIT (N.) or Ul
(S.) teams, and graduate as far
as their ability could take them,
(We can say from our own ex-
perience that Scandinavian and
Dutch teams have such a_ policy,
and it appears to work with
them.)



and the
their

ane players would be paid by
the F.A-League and would get
benefits and bonuses just as any
other players do; but they would
belong to England—and not to
any one club, so that the Club
or Country question need never
arise.

Revolutionary...but there does
look here like the nucleus of the
fully integrated national side we
have been looking for since the
Continental challenge became
strong.

They lay dear old Arnold Wil-
son to rest at Golders Green. this
morning and so sever one more
link with the great Corinthian
days before boxing got ‘“wide’’.

We knew the Major well in our
own early days along what we
were pleased to call The Alley
gentleman of any school, who
met his promotional Waterloo
with his greatest fight.

So many people ballyhooed his
Bloomt.eld-Gibbons open-air
scrap that the public, scared of a
stampede, stayed away in thous-
ands. Rest him well

50














WE DON'T NEED

COME IN EARLY
AND SHE WONT



4 GERTY WAS
7 JUST COMPLAIN-








7 NO AIR-RAID SIREN »- GIVE YOU A RUMBLE* | ING ABOUT A
YOU CAN HEAR GERTY I THINK SHE SORE THROAT |
EIGHT BLOCKS AWAY ! ANO BIGDOME ID HATE TO |
BUT ONLY WHEN YOU GOT SIGNALS ){ HEAR HER WHEN
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; 00D",

@N, | ANNOUNCERS IN

AW: EVERY OFFICE*

at THANK To KALPH H.STEARNS, |
yy 26/9 BROWNELL BLVG, |



TRY AND GET
HER TO OKAY AN



Tree's ONE_OF |
THESE LADY TRAIN |
|
|
i



FLINT, MICH.
ciohinsibandainnsshaiatsinssel

Racecourses

Should Run
Own Totes

By RICHARD BAERLEIN

Mr. Stanley Wootton, chairman
of K em pton Park racecourse,
sends q circular to all members
in which he states that to record
further progress the club must be
allowed “to operate their own
totalisator, as is done at grey-
hound meetings and all race meet-
ings abroad.”

Mr. Wootton has been an
owner-trainer in this country for
as long as the present generation
of rac@goers can remember and
has a vast experience of
throughout the world,

He is a member of the council
of the Racehorse Owners’ Associa-
tion and his efforts are almost
entirely directed these days to
improving the state of racing in
this country.

The totalisator abroad is alone
responsible for the healthy state
of racing in every country in
which it is employed. In many
eases it is the only reason that
racing can be carried on at all.
Visitors to America are loud in

its praise and it’ helps to put up
some of the enormous prize money.
It has also entirely eliminated
credit betting in America and this
is a decided advantage.

Big Benefit

In the Malay States prize money
has gone up from about £100 per
race to £1,000 all because they
run their own totalisators.

Yet in England, the greatest
racing country in the world, the
tote is almost a parasite. It has

ploughed back some of the
profits into racing, but the
benefits are far too small in

comparison to the turnover, The
running expenses are t0o high,

Stanley Wootton rightly wants
all racecourses to run their own
totes, and the profits can then be
used for raising the stake moneys
and improving the course for the
benefit of the public.

But before we arrive in this
position the Government must
accept the recommendations of the
Betting and Lotteries Commission,
whose report was published about
fm year ago.

No Help

Then we can go even further in
our efforts to benefit this great
racing sport and industry, There
are about 200,000 starting-price
bookmakers up and down the
country whose turnover does not
help racing at all,

Why not? Why should not
off-the-course >etting contri-
bute something to the sport
which keeps it give?

A tax of 2% per cent on win-
ning and losing bets would be of
enormous assistance to racing. The
ideal would be for the tote to
perate In every town and village
n the land, so that racing would
receive its percentage,

The totalisator is the only hope
‘f raising stake money in this
country to-day and, unless stake
money ig raised, owners are not
going to be able to carry on,

LES.



WEATHER REPORT
YESTERDAY.
Rainfali from Codrington:

nil.
Total Rainfall for Month to
date: .43 in,
Highest Temperature: 84.5°F
Lowest Temperature: 67.0°F.
Wind Velocity: 7 miles per

hour.
Barometer (9 a.m.) 29.989;
(3 p.m.) 29.902,

TO-DAY
Sunrise: 6.12 a.m.
Sunset: 5.55 p.m.
Moon: New, January 26.
Lighting : 6.30 p.m.
High Tide: 6.40 a.m., 6.53





Pm
Low Tide: 12.1 a.m., 12.39
p.m.
OA POSSO SO POTE,

DANCE

THE BARBADOS AQUATIC
CLUB

SOLSLESSSIS SSE,
x

= %

| %

: 3

:

% CLocal and Visiting Members
% Only)

+.

N on

. SATURDAY, February 2nd

x

% centile

S Music by Mr. ©, Curwen’s

x Orchestra

Pa

s Sides

%

%& Members are cordially invited ¢
¢

x (Free Admission to Ballroom) §
666

POOOSOOSOS SSS OSG.

POSSESS

racing



iW. I. Lost, But Were The!
More Brilliant Team

From HAROLD DALE

29.

SYDNEY, Jan, 2

Australia won the Fifth Test at Sydney yesterday by

202 runs. Looking back on it all, it is clear that the more
brilliant team of cricketers was the West Indian team, but
the more efficient—the Australians. And I would say as a

', last word—the fewer cricketers the West Indies allow to slip
«away to the Lancashire League, the better cricket there
will be in the islands. League methods can only harm

first class cricketers.

Prompt Disaster

Disaster hit the West Indies
promptly and shockingly directly
after lunch, Stollmeyer was
beaten by Miller’s first ball, but
the wicket remained intact, and
he took two to leg off the next
Then he played a return short to
Benaud at mid-on. Worrell came
halfway down the wicket to back
up, but was sent back. Worrell
turned and went back, but Ben-
dud’s threw hit the wicket and
Worrell was still a yard out.
Worrell, run out 18. Four for 191

From Lindwall’s next over
Stollmeyer was I.b.w. for 104, The
new ball had taken instant toll,
and at five for 192, the West In-
dies chances once at least fair,
were now written off.

If there were any doubts re-
maining, Miller—it’s always Miller
—settled it. He bowled Gomez
on the off stump, after he had
scored two. Six for 194,

Three wickets had fallen for
three runs, and the West Indies
effort was finishing with brittle
collapse.

The Last Hours

It was more or less appropriate,
I suppose, although rather sad,
that the last hours of the tour
should emphasise the lack of sta-
bility that has characterised the
islanders throughout their Austra-
lian crusade.

They had the talent, but not the

solid basis of unremitting deter-
mination, and they allowed them-
selves to be beaten by the weak-
est team Australia has fielded for
25 years.
‘I think that a lot of their lack
in this respect can be put down
to the fact that they had no play-
ers in the side who had previously
played Australia, They came as
strangers and met a series of
shocks for which experience on
the part of some of the members
would have prepared them.

Christiani was next out, after
scoring four. when he_ turned
Lindwall into Johnston’s hands at
square leg. Truly, the curtain was
descending fast. Seven for 200.

Atkinson and Guillen still faced
Miller and Lindwall, but not for
long, Atkinson made a very fine
square drive off Lindwall for four,
but in so doing, removed the off
bail from the wicket with his bat.
Atkinson out for two, Eight for
205,

Guillen’s Life Saved

Guillen and Ramadhin now



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dashed through for a short run.
Hassett threw a head high return
with immense force, and Lang-
ley’s dive into the air to hold it
probably saved Guillen’s life—it
looked as if the return would have
hit Guillen square on the head, but
for Langley’s intervention.

Now Lindwall, deadly with the
new ball against _ tail-enders,
knocked back Guillen’s off stump
after the wicketkeeper had scored
six. Nine for 212.

Now, Hassett put on young
Richie Benaud, to give him his
first Test wicket. He bowled Val-
entine for 0, Ramadhin, not out
three. Extras 16. Total 213.

An Anti-Climax

It had all ended in an
climax, but still there will be
notable memories of the tour, and
for Stollmeyer, the experiente that
Goddard has endured all through
—star players letting him down in
moments of crisis.

anti-

BOWLING ANALYSIS
fe} M. R Ww.
Lindwall 21 4 52 5
Johnston 10 2 30 0
Miller 19 2 57 2
Ring 13 1 44 1
Benaud 43 0 14 1



T’dad Cricket
Team Chosen

PORT-OF-SPAIN, Jan. 28.
Opening batsman Noel Guillen
brother of West Indies wicket
keeper Simpson now playing the
fifth Test at Sydney is one of the
players selected to represent Trini-
dad against British Guiana in the

intercolonial tournament opening
February 9.
Other new players were fast

medium bowlers McD. Forde and
Oliver Demming.

Guillen practically played him-
self into the team during the
weekend, scoring an undefeated
hundred and one retired for Tang
Choon’s team in the last. trial
match,

The full team comprises Rupert

Tang Choon (Captain), Guillen
Nyron Asgarali, D. Fitzpatrick
Ralph Legall, Clarence Skecfe
Chiki Sampath, Forde, Bunny

Butler, S. Jackbir, Demming and

Ken Corbie twelfth man,
—(C.P.)

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PACI io BARBADOS ADVOCA1L WEDNESDAY, IAN1 nil Z L ORD AND LADY OLlVEIi :iHg the 1 ^ % %  Mpluta* %  %  •• %  *• %  %  i^l^Btst • I — Mill tln'ii Dinner Party IV Mrs K. M. B. SU i 'f • Jinei iriy at then a •. ST %  > %  •Baa, at hontu. t> M and Mine Vladi• KUeM* invited War* .. Dr. i • ,-Mr. J. BrOtne I Clarke. Mm. M. Lodge School Magazine \ re1 -I turn Mr Keith B.>~en %  ,.: act I itc il amonf i hooL In order %  %  >' printing, • i rx* thai 4 heir interest % %  *m iinv/rn. :lirl i 1 I A. Mm Qahib CaUwcf W* <.'...! 3 3. MR. MBS COLIN a. cox Firtt Vint Sine* 1917 WALT,,,..,,. !" ....,., CSUT...'^.' A Wr-I Indies Uying With Siater months' holiday )d ietui .Ianaer of Central Northern Air*in Ltd., 'if Canada is enjnym* %  Barbui !! %  -rnved from Canada last veefc by TCA and is a truest %  ofCWbrtdfeflVl '<> %  nere reemtlr by the OaWHi la be in Barbados until about mtdl.irrii Mr Ca rte l now retired nird u. lie Manager at Ihe London heart offlr...f Royal Insurance. Mr. f-.rriib.mk. Ho haV already' 'amdc~u %  ...veiled •-xtenatvcly motor tour around the island ud d among the eotintr.es he has thinks it's .1 grand spot. Puerto K %  %  'h.' US. Cinda. AusCapt Brown has been flying New Zealand and Japan ,nce IB17 when he flew with' the nrrt vlit hi itnyM Flying (v.rps diirtnK DM first World W I Mr. Carter was .1 warded hW Ho "• own m Winnipeg and I Ml Munition for %  '" '.,' : "" headyuarters ; with the Board of Trade ,h r *' Moat r ,n P*"""" n *"dealing In '* ny "P""'" • pontoons and Baruado* l ..vine This u lived m he US. for jaan nirhodr.^. %  an -he hai been the guest of Mi Hall SI Michael. Mrs I %  On Honeyrrx>on .. %  1 %  cnoMik Leaving To-day D ining for Puert.. Hico by B W.I.A on Vi. tor Spencer -•• % %  moon. Mr. %  %  • nt in Brit%  v here for or to going lo St %  • %  %  -. .. !" ... ... * are the guest* of Mm. Itobert C. Barnes Mrs. Angela Bnrt .f "Annevill* BtUevtlle. Back To Trinidad ( in Jet* 1 Georite eldest * %  ighb 1 %  I '-ii Hugh 6 Itamany ol Carlisle View, Kay itanuay is %  .. tha r.s .,,. Capl ll.,i Gradu te fellow of Kmory UrnB W I A pllol a ad ol wheels, due to cold oondltkma throughout the territory tear whi.11 they n>. Capt. ganrn Himself 1* quite aecu*tn:< %  he came • he experienced tern perf g| bel.iw. Talking Point Thtxiuht depends nbiolufely cm I'Irromuch. —Voltaire. ^Incidental Intelligence nung I resolved ry until I found inc ineal woman. Some years later But she was looking for in.: 'Urn star Michel .>> m, —Tuff. W HEN I not to BY THE WAY B y Beachcomber QB1NG picture of two 1 wry <-atly dressed, each in a neat little hat I couk ?2 !!.ir" ,h * n wh,cn "vn-flal lyllcl ecoiiomp.' One (mt ai-icce—oh. what a waste' Each litflc wearer stands die praced ''' '"il|/ see Titte Utltc hfart* in one larp.' hat in u low, %  OW happy I rmild be. %  atialai re made bp /oo|t, fthe thai. hallentnoJce a hat. I Cmatttmg* %  %  M. cllloi> i.f Aruiidi 1 to appear \t quarterly mect< decided nut to wear their civic robes, because UttOMI ..11. %  Nor do lounge .lulls. Nor do clothes of any tort rin l.iinuim-humh (til) D LXPAM KOULHUK was : UM BWal trusted foreign il Hun,,.ton. and possibly .-ho iully understood what the devil was going on kasM 'he BBBBT i the (Jamma-bomb, and hod sucrce-tf,! in harnessing Heeuf huh %  powerful she knows are not ,1 stacntixt 1 ut (rom Itala Bsomani charge "t BttBaplon. Koolruk iii be tol I vou. and v. Ii> wc ..tv sending Ha ill ! %  able to give you ioma nrl "i baformaUoe Dan will sound plniulble to DingtI*. os. Pass it on I., bar, and let her get out o( tin country with it in fact, go io the ir-peti with her. Well >ev that she meets no difficulty theie" "It's onl-proofrcried KKham. "It has to IK-, with pou at work," said MiilTet bluntly. Two days later Rghain arrived at Bumpton. But Ding|-Poo* was already one more %  he id. n*<'m*'ni/T ejagag irninnvrm i 1. IKK tha niggaaooa that ikindness fo unimals is not enough, and that courtesy is needed an well. Anybody eap tin | n bit of flih lo a eit Nature's gentleman will pass it to the eat 0,1 I Matt Similarly, many .1 dog*! feelings are hurt (and an infeilority complex set up) whan you forget to remove your glove belowshaking hands with it. Again, it you are Introduced to an animal ..ho is a stranger to you, II %  kind to say. '7 think we met at Mrs. Dctntold's. How's your father?" It is little things like' this I that oil the wheels of social life By the way. if you are sitting nex* to a dog at dinner, don'r talk aeros* il. "Give Your Child A Chance*' AM Locally Produced Film By f.VI L I O-.ll i; AJI euuciuonal film phot> kiaphcd in Barbados — acUXl prOneed and directed by Harto be released at fhe rieginuing of next month at fee Plaza Theatre, Bridgetown. In Tact, the only non-Barbauian i.art of the r*Ui pr<-t Tlie Voice" that ives the commentary ihioughrtut me giro. %  • voke, u easentul facto nan production, and one that most Barbadians l:now quite well. The com1 ieniary Is given by Jamai'-n-hom Kin* .t K. le -at %  •. • nt in Australia with the Weal a >elor. lure at the plaza It | cCbance" and deals with the Mibject at ilui ;ny pragMDerUnder the directiao of Mr. Isaac CarimchaH. Act nf Supervisor of Visual EducaUon, II is a production or the Barbados film Unit. Tha Film Unit bj all t.-hed to the Department of Education "assn the scheme ha s )>een made possible through a W.st [ndian Film Training project, spctr %  %  fare. it "Ohm you thud 1 is lust .1 beginning of what Uui department can do thei rulness to the coturt will become a iiermnncnt part if our education %  < %  After it* run at the I' film will be shown by the Mafeue cinema 111 the pjirtshe*. 1; mm. blm is used In Its proouction while >lamiard theatre projectors are 35 mm. 1'lasa are th'-refonarranging tc uly install a Ig mm projector in their opera 1 and attach their soui % %  aigga menl to the sound track so r enable the film to be show that theatre. In this way it will be seen by many who would not see it had It been Issued duer: to the Mobile Cine CHva Your Child a Chance is a story of an expectant mother who is uneasy about the future of her unborn babe due to previous experience with her flrsl child who has been sickly from the time of his birth—all due to her negligence during pregnancy. Through the advl friend she visits the Maternity Hoapital and benefits by frequent medical attention. As a result she produces a vcrg healthy baby and seta the stage for its usefulness In life. The alory is simply told cleverly interwoven into the educational side of the film and the peopli In the cast all help in make trn production VOTy 1 neliig. The film for this 1 supplied by the Col %  /< %  //• iromin htm 11 fnrlumIIIHULT 1 ilrnh (aW) ir.'The DaringOf Mr. Willis By I K I HI KM K COOK MSn YORK. P -but nut glamorous. Good figures—but they rude them Very attractive—but apparently quite unaware of it. Those are English women in the opinion of a l N'ew Yorker, who thank* he knows all there is to know about women. In the fast few years he hi lofd 3ae.OM women what h rong with them, their general tape* and their cloth*ly sias be atirtdved. but he haa ade for hunelf some C44.0l year In dung It. A'i I Ufa blue pinb land happily married effOB though he chooses all I data and clothes)_run* a flve%  Industry of r.and raw material shortiges. last year's record figure of A ulream of women trot dubww'f 20 orm foreign visitors will ruHy before his fssOMri awh day be surpassed. ^ "T"? Z £2 *LZ a £*£ Th '** %  %  NWyg a valuable ff'wSi. ^2. T?5lXh ve Sho ^""" w 'orBrltl* goods, {^ Ji^ M ^if.. Thi ^ ha l %  1 n %  '''" dgnifieance this ^ u ld an?iu B i!^' ,^1 „" *•" % %  The new balance of pay"aSrho?' .11:1' S Ta^SK Mfn,, ,,,.-_• '"" the II.I.f. is considered one of loo awaosntj th# ch|cf n^an, bv wmcn hu „. 'To start with," he said toduy, Pn*1n can be achieved. too severe. Mr P „ cr Thorneycrolt, PresiWho tan ace a pretty figure In a 0^, ot lhe Bo or d 0 f Trade, has suit or coat cut straight up-and(alk( | lhc Falr .. a foM -QI,,, OI ^ d '" : •"•* our export trade". Writing in the And uerhaps tidier than Board of Trade Journal he points American women But how )lU nrU lt nol „,, enables foramiut a bit more glamourA eign buyers to compare British dress thai clings, perhaps. A price, an d style* with those of colour in materials v touch more make~ll| S (or the 1952 British Industries Fair-the Slat—arc already well In hand The Board daye-atweek television pro%£"* *Wl *< d -P'",hl aramme lo New York ealk I,ooklng At You. %  CR05SWOHU Rupert and the Pine Ogre—20 io ilna-tl* and %  •naMioaai i' U. Wnst • U*MI i (t> 13 in s •ieamr mux*. % %  i i i*i n On TUP -v out lo. Othi ne-nold it, it i s Dgggg) MMUSBO* I"I IV. Sort ol mr. ill etruanw. i ff ltnll•m^-l '. Dawh i. BWloaa the pen w nri .'. It < n M eai < ciest Knn .UM f I I', J nd <6> in lretainer* i wMtea. IBi BC "" ilpi IS I J j S Pari ol it Uui %  um Roomt ith li ,utr. i. Allrr nrxla till* Sh nsi t. a i^ >De>nl •sal i !• %  %  %  >•.•. "B ill ihc %  mil be lias %  sttBH han. Why. of coo:*. I know who may have isken ihun." he chackki. Choosiag a tree thai H c*iy to dimb h soon discovMi i squirrel. Hi. h.v you and your piU beta uking > %  •* ail UM %  r" as calf i fin,. Film Lint who also conducted the Training Course in the West Indies (in Jamaica) for the British Colonies, and which Mr. t'armlchael attended. All investigation, treatment scriiitlng, commentaries a* well as actual "shooting" are done locally under the technical guidance of the Colonial Film Unit The exposed film |g gMg England to be processed and edited. The rough edition Is sent back to Barbados for comments before flnallsatJon 1 ; 'Midi Film Un.l %  I i .i .... the dlstnbininn oi laeal mat. to other Weit Indian islands and vice-versa. This Is necessary "ii of subject! It at understood that the Barbado. Film Unit h now working on a production for the Soc %  /•Uan DapartaMiM Quite wealth of subjects yet remain !• tackled among which are problems of Road Safetv, agriculture, housing sanitation, development of Ihe fishing Industry. <•:<. rfa -in fact there i* no shortage of 'inT.il.d Prepare. Far British Fair Mr Willis pull, no punches In telling his television victim* henihey sy wrong. If a figure other countries, but also provides a meeting place where lasting business friendships can be f..llT.II is true. Of course, he ge 'that we have undertaken a r*i of minor repair*, or heavy programme of defence pro%  BggefS -\-rhaul. he is ,!,„,,,.. m ,| „,. ,re determined to T*I\Y IIAYWOKTH *H LADY FROM SHANGHAI & LOST TRIBE s*acMl I a* p m 01 % i SM %  %  N i-rw van *** %  %  Ml lllKII 1 I > %  > mm a riCTIRES o be l L A Z A PI 1/1 DISH'S • %  / * % %  Dial aacd Wliol* Sri Mi raajgajai Ar-iTT .. Miimomi. UM KllA1.VN-J | a || fT W The Carder. *** % %  %  gT JAMES %  t *IS|iiI.IIIM gesffgi j.. Jjlu. C*rmLI a E Al V i II lh TO-IIAl A T<-WIKR And there is some evidence P n Th* Ne among his lremendou.i fan mall ^"i^L ..* that he may be right. He shows riipm' with pride for instance, a letter Books io from a husband in a distant city. • p mB Willis." wrote the ? !" *'T^T m*' %  m Compass nag iBss/aen llw W"t Pleas., Mr, husband, "accept mu uraleful fhanJr.i for t.-Him IH|| V minutes what 1 nave hen irnit inu tit fell IK r for the last 35 near*.*' WOMI.D coevBicitr an —I..E.S The Art* Hayes. IS P m Vtatmt • m SsorU Itaiindiis *"d iaOr, T v n, Th* N"l IN em Ncrt Anabrsu. ?!*•>. Crlckrl Rnt on rtnsl Oar"' rUy in ft" T- and n>vtew of W I unar of \ i..ti alia T*i p.m. Over lo Yoo. B.1I pm. Radio Nw*r*l. • p.m. dropM" or AUaiih fi.ioi aa pm. Compo-jT oi Ihe Week. OMI Mow H can be TWd. ,H e w ISIS pm. From the Kdilonal. W.I1 pm M.d-- %  !. Talk IS 3S p m M -ehina and Wsllrlnfl mil JUST RECEIVED SILVER SWALLOW ENAMEL-WARE ;•! DDING II \sl\s-_70c. Sic 91c. HOWLS—42c. :.l, '.Hi 71, il GS—He. SI.22. Sl.:u. si.tii I'll. IIISHIS— :19,'. IS.-. s.. XII.. BASINS—TOt. 80c. lc. w, Bn PAILS with .'overs—I2.f,ll PAILS WITHOUT COVERS—$2.11 (IIAMBKRS—8Sc. Sl.2fl KNAMEI. PLATES—29c. 31c. 40c. KITTLES—2 af OHf m 4 |il—S1.S0 T. R. EVANS & WHIT FIELDS Dial 4220 YOUR SHOE STORES Dial 4606 JAM I I A IMIISS SIMM' Lower Broad Street DKr.SSKH—(or every occasion nATIIINC; SI*ITS— in many styles mid lolours ll Ki: WOOL TWINSKTS—from Scotland IRISH I.IXKN— I.nm-hi and Tea Sets LOCAL HANIK KAKTS—Baskets Kinliniidererl Souvenirs ii H'lii'.i..Hand ^ss^ s ^ • I'IKIM. EXPRESS Starring:—JOSEPH GOTTEN—CORINNE I'Al1 EDMUND OWW II O 1 A I. TO-DAY A, lO-MORltovi !.::') x HI PAH AMOUNT DOtTBUf HENRY W1LCOX90N YOUNfi IN -THE I 111>AIMS A.M. ii si ii i n HI Suirmj : BUHT LANCASTEH l.l/.M'.l I'll SCOTT I'HIIAV ONLV. ..30 A HI.. IIEPUBLIC WHOLE SERIAL "ii .MEA AIAEK I OIK.I i Starrinu CLAYTON MOORE O I Y M l I 4 TO-DAY ONLY. I 3S A B.15 COLUMBIA ACTION DOUBLE — JON — NINA HALL FOCK IN -THE >H I IMI IIS IIA UK l.\T" siJiiing WllXIAM HOIJJEN LEO S. COBB llll It'll \\ (*M.Y. 130* g IS COLUMBIA DOUBLE GEORGE FOMBY In (.1(1111.1 IS i IVVY St.' "HOHYHOIJI" With WILLARD PARKER — LOLA ALBRIGHT I.IOBE TO-DAY and TO-MORROW 5 ft 38 • l..*i.l M %  .i s lhi ARLEN'E DM1L BARRY SULLIVAN EMOT/O/V SWEPT THEM LIKE A TIDAL WAVE! OPENING FRIDAY :. ft 8.30 P.M. ILIZABETH JANE GREER DENNIS O'KEEFE Tht Company She Keeps OPENING FRIDAY I tt. FEBRUARY ll-K-o Super Donhlc : Shocking Secrets of "Respectable" People £ t ;A Bared in "Killer Sejrch! ROSY LAST TWO ^MOHs' tll-KtV. I i* ft HI.'. RRFUBL1C DOUBLE A DELE MAPI W HREN DOUOLA8 m "THE ISSER IIIH IK -I SMASKEH" Storrlns ROBERT ROCKWKLI. PARITARA FULLER TIII'RSDAV IIM1 I 111 A R.1S lEPflu.H WHO) r m G MES SEVER EOIH.ET With CLAYTON MOORE



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PAGE FOCR BARBADOS ADVOCATE WEDNESDAY. JANUARY n. 1* BAKHADOS^AIAOWTE (. J f .1 Hi-.in.-sil.,. January :l. 1S2 EGYPT T1IK change of (.nvernmenl in Egypt does nut mean that till is now right in the Middle Eastern World. Tindismissal of one Egyptian Prime Minister by King Farouk on the grounds that he was no longer capable of maintaining law and order will not increase Egypt's affection for the United Kingdom. And the newPrime Minister, despite Ins liking for the United Kingdom is still committed to a policy which has for its aim the evacuation of British troops from the Suez Canal area, and the acquisition of the Sudan for Egypt. In 1947 British troops evacuated Alexandria and Cairo in implementation of a British proposal of 7th May, 1946, to withdraw all British sea, land and air forces from Efypt. Under Article 8 of the Anglo-Egyptian Treaty of Alliance of 1936, Egypt authorised, without prejudice to her sovereign rights, Great Britain to station 10,000 troops and 400 airmen with the necessary staff in the vicinity of the canal until such time as the contracting parties agree that the Egyptian Army can ensure by its own resources the liberty and entire security of navigation of the Canal. By an agreement of March 7. 1949, between Egypt and the Sue/. Canal Company the property of the Company reverts to the Egyptian Government at the end of the ninety-nine year concession in 1968. Meanwhile Egypt takes annually seven per cent, of the gross profits of the Company. The British contention is that the Egyptian Army is clearly not in a position to secure by its own resources the liberty of navigation of the canal agreed to in Article 8 of the Treaty of Alliance of 1936. Their contention is supported by the action of the Egyptian monarch in dismissing a Prime Minister for failure to maintain law and order in Egypt itself. But treaty rights are in themselves weak bargaining counters against fanatical nationalism. British statesmanship in Egypt will have to find a solution which will satisfy Egyptian honour and maintain the security of a Canal necessary for the strategic defence of the free world. How this solution is to be found at a time when national sentiments have been aroused is not clear but the possibilities of a solution are, if not greater, certainly not lessened by the accession to power of a Prime Minister who is not violently antiBritish. FAIt EAST INFORMED commentators are more pessimistic today about affairs in the Far East than they are about Egypt. The news from the Far East points to a wide spread Far Eastern war within a month or two. The Chinese are, according to the evidence, preparing to attack Indo-China, in the event of a truce in Korea. In the United States serious discussions are taking place with regard to the advisability of intensifying the war against the Chinese, if there is no truce. In addition to urging extension of the blockade to stop strategic materials, the bombing of Manchuria and China proper is openly advocated. Uneasiness has been expressed in the United Kingdom about any commitments Mr. Churchill may have made during his recent discussions with President Truman. Neither the British nor the French nor any other Western European nation afre enthusiastic about the prospects of a large scale conflict with China. The Chinese themselves appear to view war with equanimity, probably because they have been lighting almost continuously for some thirty years. The Korean truce talks have given them a breathing space to strengthen their forces and they are unlikely to sign an armistice except on their terms. On the other hand, Russia cannot want the Korean war to develop into a global conflict which would commit Russia even more deeply than she is already committed through having to supply the Chinese with equipment. The Americans want above everything else to get their troops home. Unless Russian and American reluctance to engage in large scale war in China proves stronger than Chinese ambitions, the Korean war may soon flare up and spread to China. Another period of crisis in the Far East has arrived. i'tmftiHvii Combination' To The Editor. The Advocate— SIR.—In his criticism of the book; "Behold The West Indies", your correspondent tells that the writer. Mrs. Oakley, "drops some bloonu-rs While I agree that the inaccuracies complained of might be referred to as "dropping a buck" or "making a bloomer", I am sure no lady would be guilty of the misdemeanour Mr. Hunte suggests' Could it be that they both got confused with their combinations* A. G. L. 17th January, 1952. SPACESHIP EXPEDITION A Book That Will Raise The Roof By JOIIN GORDON friend: sharing hi* ideals, deterShe believes in the direct frontal stand with him In bring,attack in the swiftest way to vicHOW did Itussia. so near to collapse in the war, come to be so powerful when it ended that she • ..iiId terrify the world* A book published this week "The Struggle for Europe", b) Choitsa Wilmot. claims lo give the answer Even more important, while vigorously and righily upholding •> close British-American alli.iner a* %  i fundamental policy for both nations, the author, with tremendous persuasive power, build. inn pc id ,.;i nu'ii a i ide i the world and liberty to. .. .lid !• the end the most eeoical in lives. t. "took h _. And sne icgards military victory as the only thing Ihal matters. We might have taken Berlin u.-. never cloud the picture ~>k asserts, a I a] da/1 Hi the (ln.il week:. Hnt.nn. %  ritfl :i n n-slienirth ini.f the war when the tragedy could flnlteslmal compaicd with Amerihtvo bam avortod i •"' aei *.n differently. Montgomery was In a position to Through hlstor) aba has beaten take Berlin long before the Rusenemies much stronger than hcrfor • stronger degree of Britlinnn could axl thenVienna was " by Unease and stratagem, ish independence within the aliiwide open to the Americans. So c ^ ancc was Prague always aTOkH itut the itiiii.. ..r st.i.u Mfaa i.w. 1Blve frontal blow. For ihe dared For he shows-from the eOUTM e,'. tnth^end ''" "* k hri " MM ' <*'" * -t history:,„ keeping 'with Roosevelt's "S^fi t 01J ul P. (I The danger we face If we parp „„nl*es £ hl m the forces of the i\^J91 wap "'^"bandoned IBM DM Army and Air Force WlM „,.,,. checked IB order thai '' hudoric strategy. She merged to pass out of our control an 1 stahn should enter them first. %£& *' ,,h J ,r,d a !" P" *** i ontment. and although she become an integrated part of .i WHY '!). %  < (I European army The price we might have to mad*? Mi Wilmot expresses the paj if i* .icicpl foreign conview lli,.I the) roM "ul of 5UIrol and command m looted deep in hiatory Na <3> The folly we commit if we meekly agree to run our Empire as some other naUon, wiih less experience and le* understanding. thinks we should run it <*) The futility of cherishing rosy hopes of world pence 1 lectncally to the British Empire, Imperialism." ntered the war, Mr. Wilmot mistakes emerged victorious she pretty neartj died from :he mauling. In 193s she began with the same At Dunkirk her life hung lbs I'luiereait thread. Bui miraculously it held. The wisdom of the Hies. With Hitlei | Europe, Churchil nfers, not only firmly determined "'tTl',,^ ?£ Go To Russia? —Say the shipping men ...and the Men h.mi Nam crews answer— No, Thanks! By TREVOR EVANS MOST of us wuuld like to put a foot ashore I in Russia—just for the experience. But Merchant Navy men who have tried it recently' borrow the .Sam Guldwyn phrase and say: "Includeseus out." In the Untied States serious discussions Don't dub them anti-Communist on that account; politics has nothing to do with itNut all Merchant Navy men would go as far as CAPTAIN THOMAS DOUGHTY, of WiUerby, Hull, who threw up his command rather than go back to a North Russian port lie was without a job for nine months, and has told an official inquiry:— "I would go through it all again rather man go back to Russia. 1 would not take another cargo for Russia for all the gold in the world." He did not like the treatment hi* and his crew received. The unpopularity of the Russian trip is •iiore startling because there was no trouble tn man the ships during the war when the trip around North Norway was through Suicide Alley." As soon as loading is complete, ships have i> Mi ordered off the quay and have put to s-a before their hatches were battened down. It seems that the brotherhood of the sea rutnol thaw out the cold war. • STH1KING JOKE The clash between the London Electricity >ard and its striking meter readers has the i:stinction of giving birth to a joke—while 11 u. still on. Half the meter readers—who have been a %  eused of spending too much time in cafes —are still at work. They go round the MUM with the new supervisors, whose appointment led to the strike and whose job ;^%^ov,\^^v/,v//>,v,',-,-,--'--.',',',','-.-,-,',',',-,-,v,';',',','-'-/ Aii Kmptv Box— is this YOUR Tool-Kit? //'* %  •* a -thrlum of rtfrvilay Tool' front our ron*iil*nihlr fastest J Saws 21" md 36" naw riles—3 r—A" Plans Irons— 1*;" Single Plane ironsl'," Douhla Oo.igos.-y,-—V_l" Sockot OhUMU— y t -— 4'* Serow DriversSt.i.Uy naaM Spokeshives Hand Drills Vlcoa Hammers C. S. Pitcher & Co. Phoiw 1172 c master of restored the! Wr |,;.... ;, Jt ihe Wttern Desert of North Africa ,lltlve phoned me to say that a prize-win '' u that policy retui—' • FIRST VISIT How's this for coincidence ? A lilm exe' iVHillxl. M a fruitful probably Ihemost Interesting and JVV ? n d th f Du,ch %  n 1 l F "' nch We penuaderi VIU1 book on reeent history yet < """"^ ~> a,em - w <"' ,.gauul U,,ir intt pulihohfl. || is terl'iinly tinino.xt ..Hl'.H.VCTM.ll ,111.1 BIOVOI 'llVI iwill CHUSC a storm in the United States. But many in Brit.mi will find it |>a)dtable. I (Hum. nil-.is .I]"IIK Cm pi re UlC Alni'i .• |Qi ill lo play the nlO| choir of young miners was coming to ihe Twickenham England v. Wales match. Would I like to meet them .' Indeed I would. NoM "f the lads had been to London beand since they had to be back at work INKtether .-st Ag:.ln the diviaemt was tremendous. I h I In! not mciin that he Sought %  ..— ._ . wprifterizz >"•• *-* ** **** ^^ first time saw the red light of America as 'the enlightened son *<">irig disaster. The Atlantic PsWt, Mr. Wilmot the foothold, we had the Army, was I iieiibei.iL,iep ta snd %  tbg head Of it the greatest general of the war—Britain's Alexander. It seeks to establish from selected documents and events that the —and the world—would have developed if Britain's advice had been taken. It assert., that the emergence of the most powerful that end. COrdall Hull, than Secretary nation in Europe was the ineviBUta, mg quite frank about the table consequence of political misPrggMsot'a purpoga. Ha wrote:— Judgments made by President Roosevelt in face of strong protests from the much wiser Churchill Political war was lint bad del'miU: tO the future of IBS llnii-.ii Colonial Empire on which we dilferrd with Hie British." So we went to Normandy KOOSEVELT. isundersi.iiiciu It agrees that because of America's tremendous strength we could fcmpirv, developed ^n equll> nrttjose the war curious misunderstanding of Stalin lliit It makes the ease that unt Ru**'*Roosevelt—always our most loval i,c "-ga'ded the United BtaM and pOstWful friend through the • in"*> %  This can come only from and defend Roosevelt's ideals of own wisdom la our best guide a politician. liberty and democracy ilka than we must retain our inde^ j These are Mr. Attlocs personal views. J '"" %  • '.ml. rue and see that our view* .... ... .. ....... ih„ i-fi........ ..._ ALL ..._.. I I hev will be his ua But St din was 'a much wily oaalai Hi in RoostvoM lived la it.' %  •• We must never be forced dowi For he bough* the right to Outer paths we hesitate to tread. W> gOd hold the landt that nnw lie must never commit to others con; of the principles of freedom as laid bound and helpless behind the tn>l of the forces upon which our I ,nd most influential men in Britain, has been down in ihe Atlantic charter for lion Curtain, with power to control liberty and our lives depend. ;isked to call a special conference to define which we fought Our trouble* ventuall) Manchuria and China The protection of our Island, the today, it argues, are he price of as well, foi the price of joining "astery of the skies above It, and those mistakes. UNO The world rocki to-d.iv drl "e keeping of the seas around it. w_u. .... .... elaiva Mr. Wilmni. because of that •* 'heir first ano most vital re1T IS the author s view-and he Bt oii,.i,in fc diplomatic triumph. *ponslbillt>-. Whenand how they fight to fulthough we won the military ... tory, we lost*.he political war upon which the future depended. By losing it we left Stalin the master of Europe. Iff om bun control of Eastern Europe, which he would never have won by force of arms. We gave him mastery of the ll.llk.lllv We put him In a position to preHit the application to half Europe mimH IB tune. He hail no doubt w lendence and see that our views ;-ni_ 1 ive the iniHiciKc wc think the) ' v wl bc n,s Pfl")' s \ r iews before Farhahould have. j ment meets. • PLEASE DEFINE Sir Archibald Forbes, one of the busiest i futility nihtary side of and he has powerful British support for It vVduVio' Bsal HI the laie summer of 1944 :T ,., l .,. the Weatarn POWOII had it in then wn \ ; |M)wt-i to ensure that the gre capitata of Eastarn Eunipe. Berlin. Prague, and Vienna, would be libAmerica, says Mr. Wilmot. a naerated from the West. UOB or great man-power and in-KSLuiThere would h.ive l>een no Ruscomparable industrial DOWtr, si in threat over Euro|w today had lights her w.irs in a meth.nl th.it that been done. suiu I %  But the oppoilunity was OMt ll< til that duty and purpose must ways be our deeitlon. For our life dc.nds upon it. ,JUi5 M £ N W " WOTE THE BOOK; Chester WUmot i. an i and i-. the trar had a %  ride exp,^,encc as a reporter in the 'iiiil n m Jcdk o( ths Jown !•*' in London and \>w York! (BWlbsLAAlf Coats... 4a IIM-III ailMen's Double Breasted. Belled Stjrl*. Cawhmere Men's lx,.ise Filling, Single Breasted. t. n be ii I i ne Men's Lo,*se Drape Single Breasted, Slant Pockets. IIIJIIT' I asliiiii re I mil-. Belled Style Slit Pockets Da Costa & Co., lid. People who KNOW — always ask for. HARTLEY'S jam the greatest name in jam-making '.VW t 0 00 00 0 0 O OOO0 O OBaaW or d^cult in.-id that fliuiehill could offer sClllOVg \ trtoi ^.th absolute eerMd runt to 35Q t>0Q u-ords ''""e" that Stalin had become hi) trusting t.unty And she proved her ease. |_ E s NEW PANS Amateur theatre CHURCHILL catches that spirit when he ^^^^^^ LcaUa it competitive enterprise. IT ONLY MEANS. . A CANADIAN magazine has been having i some fun unmasking the verbal camouflage dubs sAdj u **d by Important P-ople. It publishes a "What Do They Mean When They Say-?" Dope running is exciting can. It moves like a pistol shot enough as a subject (or a thriller: and Ihs. hero is one of those very schools will find Pan's new eolbut when Trinidad is the scene of very tough guys without a shred lections of Seven Short Ways a action the interest is trebled of feeling. The girl is the wickuseful text book. Nod Coward's Clnssary, including : — Murder In Trinidad by J. W, Vanedest anybody can Imagine, still Life, and Ijiurence Houadercook is the most exciting book Everybody wants the Falcon and man's r—isalsa are the two that Pan has published for son rbodw gatl killed or main 1 tract ions. There are live v *'rsation is .substituted for the dreariness of wort and the loneliness of thought CONFERENCE—A place where conThe ;. tlOB rnlour swiftly frorr There a result. something One of them i the Queens Park to the Carom about the Sea Tower by Sir Hugh Dr""jc*nsOT"and^ C otmM d w!'h • CONSULTANT or EXPERT—Anv or•wamps and as far as the_FI Walpole. _The rtorj IJ icmmisBon, (hliarv ^ y ,„„,.,. lhan M mUcs from home Ialaads. Thoaa who know Trimrent of Rebecca, with a backPan has also recently oubhsh-1 dad will want to read It lor ground of g laifM oountn house The rravincUU Lady • A PRCX1RAMME — Any assignment lt ^-" f.*" *.. 0 ^.-^ D o lgfloisl in m hti cant be completeo by one toiopbon* n who never sranted ar rhr ,; rr ., m riescripti know. TllOOt i'nmy n. ,l. 0B0I P O0i H/7 DFUMK



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BUTLER TO SACK 10,000 CIVIL SERVANTS Conservatives announce super-austerity programme Imports Slashed: Foodstuffs Cut PATIENTS MUST PA} FOR MEDICAL AID By EDWAED JACKSON LONDON, Jan. n> rtrrca weim Mllimil II Q. Sun Canal Zone. Sui 2D ( H*ti report* nwlifd from the [British Kmbiis." it, Cairo un (Tuesday said that the "general tempo of life" WM slowly rrturnQQ litif in riot-swept and the stillCONSERVATIVE GOVERNMENT TSSS^JSPSB TK?" overturned .11 id burned out by Saturday's mobs were still strewn in some of Cairo'* main thorouKhfare*. but many shops rei the City's commercial life started again. The British Embaaay was reportedly "sealed off" by strong military guards front the rest of .ciil I'tih BOM with -|-> l.,| |.,|V-, A.-IV twill* %  UOwd into the Embassy area The Embassy added that al night when the curfew was in force, "the normal hum of tram: subdued, and the city absolutely quiet." Ke|M>ri reaching British Headquarters here, said that the Cairo riots had heen "premeditated over u long period." and some of the Britons who lost tlieir lives had :l*r;itely murdered. An Embassy report said that • li.an Bishop of Cairo rimducted a memorial service vestrrdav for three Britons killed in the riots. — v,r. tZSZ V.K. Hopes For NormaiTempo Agreement With Egypt Over Sue s.%. \Ha:vn\A fHE announced a Super-austerity Programme on Tuesday in a drastic bid to save Britain from bank ruptcy and keep her in the front line of Western defence The Chancellor of the Exchequer. R A Butler, rocked the reconvened House of Commons with the announcement that he would fire 10,000 civil servants in the next six months, slash coal imports from the United States, and reduce the nation's already meagre food supplies. He warned that the alternative to the sacrifices he outlined was "starvation and unemployment for this island, and disaster for other memhers of the Commonwealth." Health Service-. Butler invaded the national Health Service to announce a charge of one shilling on every prescription and of one pound on most dental services. He said. "Government mean to carry out as quickly as we can the defence programme started by our predecessors We cannot do so without a strong and healthy economy In a series of shocks for "the nation which haa known nothing but austerity since the null re.ik of World War II. Butler Ranouni %  M that a saving will be effeeted In tobacco imports. Coal Imports from the U.S. will be dashed to the tune of £2.500.000. Supplies of foodstuffs. Including hams, meats, canned fish, fruit, vegetables and certain fresh fruits, will be reduced The weekly meat ratten is. now -worth one shilling two pence Bui except for homes, that too win be cut. Reconstruction of Milled cities .-w H\ IIAKOI. < GUAM) LONDON, Foreign Secretary. Anthony Eden, said <> Ttiuaaiay that Britain hoped lo reach an agieemeru foi tl fence of the Suez Canal Zone which still would meet "Egyptian .ispirationa". Eden told the House cdgCognmons in n special staternanl thai Britain was still ready to enter negotiations f>i the revision of the l**:tfi Anglo-Egyptian Treaty which E junked He said It is the aim of Hb MgJaHj'i Government to reach w i t-* w* %  agreement on arrangements for W UIIIIIII.>Ithe adequate defence of the Canal i tJ eC/e LMJIIIIM I Zone which would meet Egyptian ^.^ hxplodcs aspirations We fully understand that thin U by no means exclusivelv .HI Anglo-Egyptian interest, hut one In which we have nn intertional responsibil;'' R A r.l i i i i. limited by tightened credit regul.itions. and Imports of clothing, furniture, carpets, shoes, and toys, wlU be slashed. Uuih i Mid "It u viUl that the country should understand the sort of urgency which Inspires the Government. I had not intended to open the budget until late In 'April, but I now will do go on March Hfc," During Flight The I9:i6 Treaty Kden made It clear, however, that lintean will stand on the IMC Treaty and reject any compromise factories using steel will encounter restriction %  Total deliveries of plant machinery and vehicles for civil use will be slashed E200.000.000 below the 1930 level The motor Industry will he a*ed u> release onl>60 000 ear. JJP * !" f* '£*"* '" and 60.000 commercial vehicle. *** ****** to 12 80 foe the home market aa eom-1 pared with 110.000 sod 106.000 respectively i %  M year There The llrittsh Commonweallh is ming at balrucing it. book, by the end of thl %  year, as the first pound -i\r. will be less rake, and candy In MoSlOlilS UOatlDDOli the diops, due to the reduced) ** Eg}|>tiaa Premier dim aliiin of vinr.ir oils, and fal* Direction CM I-abour M,lln : To achieve this Defence Programme and keep Britain's export programme in high gear. Butler took a step toward Government direction of labour with the announcement that employers could only hire workers through local Government Labour Exchanges Butler said that he would present the budget for the criUcal next fiscal year on March 4th. a month ahead of schedule Ten thooaands civil servanta will be Bred In the next six months, savin* £ 12.SO0.0OO. and Government'Information Services will be slashed to a total [110,000 at home and abroad. In addition to motor cars, those items will be limited to about two thirds of last \eais supplies motorcycles, bicycles, radio*, tele vision sets, refrigerators, washing machines, vacuum cleaners, metal furniture and sports goods. Instalment buying of motor vehicles, bicycles, radio and television set* .inn electrical appliances, will be restricted. I the daman. Other instalment buying will be CAIRO. Jan. 2 The leader of the IfCSSaBB od said that his group 'Xpected to support the new |'ienier. Aly Mahei Pash.i. bfl i n ited drive to restore order lo Egypt and oust Britain from the Suez Canal Zone. U.S. Not Modiatiii£ In UK—Egypt Iasiie WASHINGTON, Jan. 29. State Department spokesman, Michael J. McDerrnoH said on Tuesday th;.t the United Stales ,.i planning lo mediate In the Anglo-Egyptian dispute, "in any formal sens* ~ He added that the good office* of the l.'.S were continually uVBilable In both countries. i. ud, "We are > nur good efrlce* to '' L that Is possible tit the present tune. Hut I I'liiphasise that *c m not mediating in any sense of that word. Hut we hove been exercising our good offices by urging both *lde to use i timi." McDeimoti sold that the una thai In did nut believe the UM wou i Dpai mediator in the dispute wus that it was a party %  > the proposals for the cn Middle 11 i %  which the E had reji Decl.iting, "we have not been asked to mediate yet.McDe:mott said, "I du not know whose >t move, but it is not oura —t'P. was touring scarred • to see for himself the damage done in Saturday's riots, when the Brotherhood's Supreme Guide, Hassan El HobeiUy. culled at the Premier's residence this morning. Hoheiby said that the Brotherhood wss likely to support Maher in view of the Premier's decl. tlons that he intends to try to achieve Egypt's national aspirations Maher obtained the support of the majority of the Wafdist Party and other group, last night Cairo remained rjuiet with III malnstreeti jammed with a seething mass of cars and pet transacting business and ^eeln| for themselves. —t.P. Top Treasury Agent Resigns Service TIIK HB ARUENT1NA will dio|> -ucaot In OarbsU Bay at "Amentias" WM.il days' Carnival Oraise to Ho. lodsy for a stx-hour iUy hers. TOKYO, %  %  A United Sl.uci Airfort ssnboi expii-i<-i in Hi ILILI tail.. l mt lh II cn a n i The buruuig pLuutin i gnto the mutsiri.ii iroa on On itakut.s of Tokyo ,ul tltai .ill the !-i. .vinon wen U'Uoved to have Bshwokntod to bifety. but only II si | hive telephoned Off POSO %  Yeggru, wo I ol Itahyo, The ooiitU i had chetk'-il %  nn win t'.i! myom p*'d iti the pi. i %  i [ore I out himself. A i j ot ui srnan said thai the knu •onglned bombei lU.ible U Ssstl.ng. but only ,i fi •4ai4ed bef re %  % %  %  i The homliei Ihiarrrmtd in flame.. npeayeae police gald thai the plane erashefi b etfeon Tokyo mid Yokoi'hum Djtar %  prlni.irv school Tin-* mro unoblo %  do %  %  |f the pi until Egypt halts terrorism In had u Cairo and the Canal Zone. [any penons 00 Of Eden recounled for the House.!,.., .I4nt*K fn. ..mktan >h.l I^J.... RUSSIA WARNS MID-FAST UMfMOr, Jan. at* I 00 da) 'hat Allied %  .In for a Middle m.l violated the 1 nlted Nations charter, thnw Ihern Into %  on i ( % %  "...^ ud would (brco tfii n It %  -...%  Middle Bftg) mfiar bui unidenii. i| represent ihe United BMo*, Britain, fVsnce, Turkey yesterday in Moscow I'U to iheti i>.. scolior euhi. I noi '< %  to the llstributed by Tai pr iposed Mid | | h pi pool to "aggresstve'Atlantic part. ttrr c while MldtO'lig lo oust Britain that the four |*wer* hoped to bring in the troops of other Western states an well —c.r wniovv Britain's four written and ma" verbal protests against attacks by Eioptian "auxillarv polite" .< Bi lllsh Tommies h> the Zone. He said: "The Isle r. ,pl Oovi rnmotil ptid "" hv measures whkh had lo be taken there, to round up the terrorists, the British Commander had no alternative but to disarm ithe auxiliary police The latter CHICAGO. Jan. 20 ihad explicit instructions from the The Treasury Agent, who played then Esypt |a ri Government to resist, and consequently. General Erskine had no option but to use fori'c." Eden was cheered when he added. "In this and Indeed throughout, ho had full authority J'CA'S 1ST CEMFNT FACTORY OPENED KINGSTON. J*e. J Janok i'g flrsl was opened to-day by ern.ii It will start with a 100.000 tons vearly output which will fully slatlsfy the local demand The i lin Leg. ,. | boot II "i" 1 %  CeHNsh MinisItT (hi TrriiKfui rii.ii!'i VIENNA, Jan 20 Rudolf M.iiKiiliut acting chief i .echo-lovukia Foreign %  BO arrest.^ usd tiarsjed r ith toeaaon tnfomw'j < Harried as "hnlns" of the ministry WOO •iiiinr deimtv and m charge durig %  the .tt.:'-rn.. <-r la b Uregmhas been in Moscow for sptelal roejsopg %  | negotiations with Ihe •Xporl [Soviet Government. -r.p. the leading pah in sending 'Scarface" Al Capone and some of his associates to Jail on Tuesday announced his resignation. Ha | A P. Madden. Chief of the Intelligence Unit of th Buienu of Internal Revenue here. He said that for reasons of his own health and that of his wif? he was submitting his resignation. Madden refused to gl h. 10 .'[ % %  %  I M I hi %  u. and support from His Majesty'i Government Eden listed casualties as lour Britons killed, and IS wounded with unconfirmed figure* of 42 Egyptians killed and 560 wounded tor federal income lax violations, utter stale courts, had proven him. —IP 11 hsi, however, done nothing t diminish the ability and detci-i ,..,--, ,, ...... fment 10 maintain their rights on-) VIEWSOV AUJM) BUJEPBBTt Coa Propose Select Committee On Immigration SUBJECT lo agrtamenl b] tha Botltgt ol Assembly with the propoesal by tinl^>uislative Council in their Meai 17th Jui> i I Macl Coounlttasj of bxh ID "to txainlna the • I to make iro>nimrr..1.il: r. dot fl| with this problem." .mill yesterday passed serve with Honourable %  i %  i itlve i louncfl on . Joint inliie the .ii -popuLition In 'n make reoomfor dealing with this *nd would be grateful whether Table House is In Mg prupit.-..l and, %  %  %  00 'he umnlnatlon >f member, to servo on the pronoeod Jottil Crenmlfoso Asking the Council to approve > %  • %  II %  lied that some i maddla <>r last year raised and a %  I'. i-i • to ti.other the subject asking ihem Ul i igreo lo th.> setting 1 :T ttee in investlgatu the question of i^'er-popuf the islsnd. r.>r ->" renMMi m another. nothing had lieen done ulxxit it. %  i i he Iherefora lagged to move M. ... lie sent to UW • "li.r PI %  The Hon. In-. C H. St John c.ondrd the uuglon for the psestng of the Address which was igreed to tiem con Communist Jel Doinaged KK.ini' AltMV II K{ KOBE Allied jet pilot, said bV %  jed i,Iil MM, day after a bt %  itttuik I 11,1 I JCI !..,•Prtday AlU %  %  iraafriii of tinei 1 both sldei i i ishe i i m %  %  i in iho n "iniii i % %  ngjM norlboaal of < hoi eon on ihe %  etorn front oi lash sotith of R I wet VANCOUVKR, Bi Cohunbla %  utdaring f"i i M ot the Danish fielgh'er • laloadlng %  earns og i %  en peaoag of 'ire nghu nut rijmi i. i tlre-lHiat were called lnt> artlou. Tind.nii'Bi v.i intncl. lut firemen gold 'rial lid %  be i %  %  —U.P. %  gtsgMlon Capone to %  "'':'" %  IrteV'the'TTOOty of VJ0. until sucti %  early 1030 -* I ,i m< . „ new agreement In repla.c the Treaty can be 'oachedj II III II l> "* —VP Allies At A Disadvantage PARIS. Jan. 20 General Eisenhowers Chief of Staff General Alfred Cruonther warned that Alli<-d forces in Europe would be at a "disadvantagein the event of e showdown Mth Russia in 1952 In a radio interview with United Nation* correspondents Gruenther repotted the progress of 12 European member, of NATO m building their force* had bee-i greater than expected during the last year. He -.aid: I would say al this time the fortes under SHAPEif there were a determined attar* made—would be at a disadvantage. Although the progress which 1,. t i>een made is very marked it has not reached the stage where it can guarantee against an art of aggresr r. Police Kill Curfew Violators In Cairo CAIRO. Jan. 2. Egypt""' ollici.ils .iin.iMinriMl 'i! Tuesday thut Ihn-e curfew violalurs had boon killed ami six injured by the Police inf.i %  d.iy tm'hl. while Sifurity Chiefs met III rounrl-the-el'K-k COUft Iffl bl UM country i .itro waa lammed %  ith thou A %  %  %  %  i today, as curious Igvptloj ii ..f won M. %  i-inesa houses paraded a area of dagirurtion • l \l. M.i) I %  Ui nwl H il \ H Hill ba i s.\N J m "i Ungj with MainUnited Natiisr Stall OfAn took •>ftl"' .ire to -..k.(he pulse w..i-. ol con BW en I t Molem bluenrta! loi safeguarding UM Brotherhood, eaUad %  •' KNUMM irml r while the premier was United Nation hi tour, but left erord ad)oinitig truce lent throw 'in thai Ihe powerf il responsibility for breaking ''%  probebl> would bach U deadlocked prisoner exenanaj ml as long as It worked talks squarely in the Osmmunlafa • oust Britain front th" Sue/ lap. MV-. ..1 ready has won the United Notlona and Commui "working level officers" erorl .. %¡ ovornmei through the f'Nutli pegi paragraph b.v paragraph survey) of th17-pago draft Monday [ ,%> w (whine! Ministers without serifais disiign-php new Premier Is plannlr Wedrw d face poaaible disagreement on Us actual marhiner. |f i|ng at least of an armbuild-up after Ih. IT AKNOU) niimi 1 truce. An outburst of ( ommuni-l arllvit> coincided ith Ihe atTtval l Irli.rjn <>f Mr Xvrrll II.HIIII.K and rulmlnated in Mots -i:d -hootinc v.hlrh v.err quelled ui'li t.nk^ .nd tear saa. Man, people, inrludlnc 29 police, were in in red ami nn* %  >ntirni-d rrporl* --a* ihst U drmun%lralori ere killed as the mob of 10.0(H) lauiht with stlrks tonr> and rrvnlvrrs. KloU hrohr out when liidrd .( ommunlstl Party "I'artisan or Peace* demonslralini aialnst Mr. llarriman "Analo-American hlood-seckmc Imperlalhrte" and the Anilo-IranUn Oil (ompuij, clashed **itii Iheir biUer enemies. ska NeUeauJ Freat whe were nuudnf a demooslrsllon en much Use same lines. —Express, B.O.A.C. AIRLINER CRASH LANDS TOKYO. Jon 39 A British Overseas Airways Corporation i'trllner crash-landed at Haneda Airport al approximately 0.00 p.m. last night No casualties were reported Earlv reports said that the 'plane ran off the runway during its land-V.T. Possible stumbling blocks facing staff tiffi< agreement on points to be Inspected behind Ihe Communist lines. The Allied blueprint su. or two place. In Red territory, five of which :>re lncnled In the Yalu Rivt field country. oppose neutral Inspc'. so close t'i the Manchiirian border. Tag* tough I raghi Bey area il i.v the %  i .'ing further : trlsls Most ol bu knoos Ufa •., normal lab •he banks opened only nhousends of ... %  %  Tuesday. Iiowd bagged fo plan to wash "heir hendi off u Korean ti leave North K %  UM North Kurr .,_ —IT —IT (xJ&lcojnje hi the PaiAsjufeAA, Qopioin and (jMuoof S. S. \ II1.1: N TI \ % Wliilr IV., .Ion) I II .rI....I. %  gMia I, llllll-ll w. ,,, Blockld invlli' v.ill In V .ilinu and Ci ul: %  I uur .I.,I,' ipuny (Lou* Hi..qmililv I nuli.l, ( hin.i MHlmlilli: WMaMMM ( MlMMH S\.,'.,I..I. IN, I I ",i. Il.ir.kiii (;lt.\.'s Argyll' Bockl MM U.l.v MADI BOUVBOSI SPKIALTY. CAVE SHEPHERD & Co., ltd. ID. II. 12 & II llruacl Mmt r



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i DM -mi i wi UIY na II Mill Mil iADVOCATE f'VGf SHIN $246,000 TO SUPPLEMENT ESTIMATES Money Passed For 20 Departments to Touch With Barbados Coastal Station i AsM-mbly yettarday passed a Resolution %  pl< m nt th. E rtta tau • 051 >'2 The nt 20 Heads smoiuj which wore Coi.mial Treasure! 1 lu ''' I and Mi^crllaneous. which introduced Kivingj the Account*!* QsjMraJ le ana on wftaBi kllOVMKH would make n DtuaUy taken wu him encroach on the duties of the Dial TreasAuditor or make him fed that he %  AJS COUW over-rule the Auditor Genil who is a colonial, be would %  the $60. to do a certain amount of traveUMay Create Precedent JSHIH?. Pr ^'"'^ n W K" 9 "*""** *' : *l*tt IE, uid that required lo meet ^rh experuei. if U VM distinct ironi tun some members questioned the Imvclling of the Audit DefheHctu:il work Of tlh Unent. he did not think they ueneral and Hid that his work did should pay tt He pointed o U t not necessitate travelling. Some ">Jt if one of the enioi office:* members asked whether that oltl o he acceptOaneral Ml >M jm1 i lr;ivellmK WSS ed ••• for trj.elling allowance ri had DOl I officer would say lhat the % %  It A division was Accountanl i \\ ,, IU i he %  -old get it too. It ii.i >>e deleted, gomg to pay the Account.. ... tu Vlmil %  *-< tally, tiny would be starting .. .. M 'he principle that if every other r nil Notes. Mi. Adam. (L) Raid that the they would have to pay f.. lull ling. 1 K tha Colonial telm Laid At tolkr* • Th* Ovll tatabl tali man! lOantrat' AH'Mdmrn). inwt |*U Th* Civil bubluhiorni '0*n*raD •AmandmeMi No I Order. ISM Quarter!) Saturn of Tranurllsni in Hum lo )Ut Daembvr ISM Hoe. J. A U.nen p....,w l'Hi|toii (roni lh* Ht(ti**y Com"""* %  Ol lh* partahaa of 81 n*.n* and St Thoanaa. for par nuaalon lo incrraar lh* aalartaa i-nd travailing alkrwancaa of than In a p art on ol RoadS. Hon r C Hulaon gava n.rtit* paaaad 1.. th* OUw. Sl (M* of f JB.I.1 Salarl Houaaa "to •Kaniirr *f ovar-posHilalMn in Sarh-wio* and mah* r*aAnunandaUi>n> toi daaiinc with lha V rabaMt Th* Council conruffvd In lh* folMwins Rvaolullon lo auUtorla* lh* ttovrinor lo anlri uilo an •|T(*intii( with a pmmi lo atr\ in lha %  %  %  %  • %  %  %  R*BOIUI*>II lo plat* In* aum ../ ll.SSt al lh* dopoaal of lh* Oovrinot-i" Exarulivr Commit!** to %  upplamciil th* tatimalaa. ISM H. Pan I hoi> In lh* Suppl*m*ni.rv Satimataa. ItSI. Ko St R*aoluUoti toauUioru* th* Utrac Iota of lh* Sating* Bahk to pa< lh* aum ..t .1. h.mdi*d Ukfl OMftJ dolUr. from in* f u nda of IB* ttarih a> |t-' H.i Ittn.lut—n to apf>io\* lh* Ordn rnllllad 'Thr Prnaimu < Ttnalon%  Ma cm \ .i Otd*r ISftl. mad* h, lh* Uotonor on Uw HOI da. of Ulub*f. ItSl und*i Wh*n th* Houa* of th* CBnimltt** to tupplm Eatitnaia. 1H,|. PMI n_c.p. Ital aa ahon in th* Supi Ur. SMimal** ININ No *J. ohioh form the a******!* (a |ha> %  • -i H Dr Cummlru Raaulullon to '" Ofc-liv. CommitIr* ID laaa* to th* V*atr> of hi JaaaM a portion of land al R*ld'i Bar. aitiut* in th* panah.ot St Jaip> %  nd ivnlainans b> .idanraaurI ni*nl It t paieh** lor lha p\ttpoaa* of aracllng bathing ahad* mad* ii lawful (or th* V**Wy of St Jama* lo Waa* from lh* Uu>aiii>x i r...%  t*a a portloii of land at Raid %  Ba> alluat* n th* t>ai.<: ri JafHr* and MSSMalag '" admaui ur*m*nt Ifl 1 pt--. BOB* of nwlii* oalhiiig >had* Iftt: R*gul; •a fts* rntn %  M. n is %  Hh ( Srni Urcamaar. ikSI. i lha ptovWoni of rrtlo St ol th* Kt-Klt>*lH .>n lo plac* lh* aum ol SSSffkSW at ih* dMowal ol tna BWfBCBt Ml >aaSSI -' %  ".CM BUSBH to auppl*m*nl th* EaUi"alr Ifttl-H. r**tt I CWVMl BJ ISSW in Si.pph-nwnlai > t.U-i-t*. %  SM-U. No 1 .hull I. S.h*d.il* lo Ihr HrtBli.il... Raaolurton lo pla** Ihr lum ol tM.SIB hi Ih, diM*— "I th. (iCM'TIi-.. lo %  upplrmcnt th.. t.lm ..irll|M. Part ll-Capitai. a. HupvlammUl l E.limatrIBI 41. HHit-h form ih* Sthr %  Haaolutlon to apptiiv* Ih* Urdc> rnllll*d Th* Cull R h lal.li.Hrn*..| Oanfiali Aiiiriulinrt.ti No | 0*d*r ISU, mad* b> th* Uonmat %  past %  < t. isu. i Th* laSSSt adjournad el ling for estimslrs not agree with that. He said that If trial officer eras to have travellnifc allowanie. ttu-n tar that matter, the OOSOnial Ssrretary could get. Molion For Deletion that officer when the L-y uxs )ut as ftshermen paid, down. He did Mr. Lewi* drew attention to Iho note on Fodder which said that in order to effect an economy, efnly in the year, the amount of foddei supplied lo the liorass wss reduced. I rasas it was nacga sa ry however to relormaT ration so as to that the should be ^Hc would be prepared to preset vc the cnidition of the snimab The price of fodder has ..Iso increased conaiderabl>. rta said he wondered Jt trie tonerft) Bosssseae hjd had n h a note liefoie the FI1..I1CV lu can bu. %  eeus) then nwned that l.ontes," he said, "and give th" AS, Travelling—(SO be dopolice department and they, sen i l'lii* motion was seconded and tell you that thev delibe; 0 T. Allder (I). alely refused to give the Iwrss. Mr Allder ill said that before the adequate amount because ot .tsreeing with the motion for economy, and then incrsasse It to he had Mod to convince hnng them back to their former aaOt the travelling was slate" rj 1'iit had been unable te lm,si, ,i %  knew that the Thev .h-niid be able U. take %  ml General had to do the particular person and tic.it HI In his (oband unless him worse than the horses were full details had been given as to treated A charge shoolil M the travelling he had to do. he brought against htm by the could not vote for it SI'i \ s %  ettfataOfl iraMlad Mr. A K. S. l-rwts rvpeatt.l i n.i.i ,.„ the BO had preMt J ET Hranchei %  vioualy used. He said that he had "' %  '' Bto*) thai been trying; all elong to get gooseVi -< : "' the Royal Canadla*t liody In tell lum the actual duUen Mounted I'oliceffsre tsM kept of 'he Accountant General If thev In • halt l.iivnl i-.tiditum M could find out what he had to dn. weefc4ored whetbei irhen llrej Ihey would be .ii>l. In mine t" .. t'i< kej I in 'h;it o.mlr The Senior Momaot foi psrfo, St Joseph could only say that I A „• read the note on %  iit.nled tuiveihnj: but ""nileie.t whetliei 0O0 *-" "' *)• BVRCA I %  could toko these short '; VVI > ""' k %  a|a-4tfa piosecui %  It..w iiMiiv times IM ., d-v """ t '. p 1 e for ill-tieating sa. he could g.. t„ St Andrew it antm *\* ,""" ,l ' 1 '' WOJ aiiunals he .vatite.l |. •_." 'r. 1 1 ". ,,,,tr -'•" 1 ^ 1 Cabl* Rilbm ing ahip* Ihiough thai Cavaal •Utn-i as San Andraa. IK K.-I.. |l DlSli SS SUla Knudaan. SS Athaa SS Kingahorough II Navtaro. SS 1-d. N*laoa IS Mathan*. SSHerda inar. s Akraa Potnarr. SS Viklaro iitatoa* Kill*. Ik Araata. g g A.J 0. h K Hittancuurt I %  S S TNeaa. S S Oaaaral Artiga*. s S Prantw P Hart. S S Raa Aluai. 9 I Alaoa. B S It .-natabal S S OalafRxd •• %  .S S Qu**n of R*i> .. a,. -, i v s %  rv.,n s ^ h a Roaano S S Samana. %  a Polar* %  h* S Nadu. II Rxmana 0 Tram I'arilV. S I IJMV Rodnay. II Invanaor. I S SUndtal. I I IkwCllpwr SS K.—-,-*! SS Uallt I I Will** Branch. S S Alcoa Pilgrim I S Akai II,nun. S I BM Agaiwa m aii. 0 S ParUV Ualt %  Pimples Go Cause Killed in 3 Days •...afar-. | i .Mi. •* %  << anf) aaaoMh as Nixoderm ui'"^ r*r Mktm Tr Tru MM mnaai WITH THE DELICIOUS flavour ROSSE & LACKWELL '•aais-i*Ho U i H, i ir n %  Grant lid giiSfi • la afesnboi foi si | 01 bad pmiouols teteied tw the Auditor General as a watch dosj % %  the treasu then bai .','' tog two watch d rhe ineetoB thai the Item be deleted erg! dOfeattd by a 9—8 intv The VOtlni was as fol| %  %  [arwt. ci iwfM I, .' C Mottla ajidkn Hayn. i: K Waleott r. ii Hottley and Against the deh-r Talnu t'uimiui Iloiini. Brya llol.lei Brsncksi Mr M. itt ley .said that the fact %  r Urlng bad |Dne up mujhi be put eg .i n lha required additional oniounl lnA.ev.-i. "ondored wheth %  i I kae-s thai there was J grave dissatisfaction Inside the I'-.tne F„ar Mr i,u thin,;thai > ajDSM into Ihere should put allowance, he ,ii,i The other Heads wore pissod after further ducussion and the nnally passed. IS!!?,w %  i ii ,.,busln %  should bo |i I 1 iibout ii I Court Keporler Hint to idered. Mr. Untie krr I l.l i • ted ih.t the two iiiirhrnurti i sit simultaneously. Jilso .said thnt there was need where he lell luM uiumg aim the Goveininenl fuisds and s corhe make a charge lor travelling aitain amount of travelling alb -><••'-> ance was necessary by virtue ul* sin They had to trust somebody his otbee. He would not be get and il wu uuuc po*a.uli mat thai ling travelling allowance to take lor %  regular court reporter. laOOSv. %  General in the travelling allowot thal mcvr ' lhv c,vu *u.bhim to and from his job , %  ,., m( .-.|. Jr .i. had oflltial ;roup. lishmont. if he had travelling lo "I hope Honourable nmnlxT. y, bfflnora ,i hish At A Disadvanlaue **• Im ni "> hl tr veUcd fty **" Mr. E. W. Harrow (Li ,U„ lmle wncn hl -d oul y UavelleU critiiiscd the Ken under Colonial *' but nw^rthelsss Uiey had to Treauiur in which It wa. ram. ma ** regulations when a man waJfU VllllOIUK-r Imiu trial i>.'\tlupiUCIlt H:llt that the %  pio. %  ntitled lo travel. II Public %  ill uke this said, "ahal there suppose that this Gitverimieiit igoing lo let any individual member of the Civil Service plsy fast Jam Kl.v, Ha r.a..*.. N loose with aL money." • mMr A by tnc the i payers vhich S> l ^ a lo aTani w a. travelling %  _"";• .vcllina a. a. a-u g s J--g M crewfw uch i me to Barbado ii,. m •• that if they had to go i p to GovTh cre wcte pul thfTe ,„ DaM bat at least one set of a deserved their trav%  %  re ti. %  Proej ,Phej did a gi^Ki job Mr Adams said that it was neceti'flry to get reporteni to take coiiiisel'i speeches and the Judges sun up m important cases, but a ici-.rter i .. Liaaitod ani.i. a blggei pi<-1 bauxite mining and •anufacturc totalling pounced t> gianiiue % %  aluminium I 3O.50O.UOO. B lm ultaneouslj the Jaman Own M.I ia HI .inn.mined that team of Hritlsh Industrialists were being invited here to t %  MCI in .!< tail whal .lietnes industrial develnpnieiit uagbt I* ad in Jamaica and h,t D ,cf i I i.iken to atn.i.t pnvale capital to finance thjit that Was precisely what they Adams saidwere doing. That $50 had not yet been The Item appeared very small earned. The Accountant General bu was a very important prehad said that the duties he was ccdenl and the Senior Mfinber for 11-,1-latluii /o| th. community. Dr. Cnassausj (L) In ex plans,„. Bt o[ tne v \
t,lU> tm led t.ikinv notes. Any ive to get etnper npeetori to e down USB virh.itim notes, he uld readily support. VIMI the various and far out Gov. i \ | %  %  %  lxw Sum -„!-.: %  'heir disposal for social ser-l oclor in e nouss, inoro wou Vks* ir a man's employment du| !" """ "r travelling for wasessss not caU 'or UavcUing, they shoul 1 :Ti'y-tiicnt. ,," OOt lxasked to grant $5Q because/l The y nad '""'"ted that mer %  %  %  { ''. Mr Arianw said that he would %  the notte ..r the Bs u* %  CoinmlUee, He said that it luie that the reporters could rnofl muney. as In Barbado%  ,nade said that in dcefung fending the item, the Senior MemThe Senior Member for the trying to coui ^ "o* be disclosed lo member ber for St. Joseph had strayed City had emphasised the neceasin of the House, but the other memfrom the point raised by Honourty for clearly defining the funcLluntiv Qoi m eouW ot l*0"Uao aiiytluiiK able Honour*: The specific point tions. i| Osfsstal un Possible secret information, he had been called upon to answer Not F.ntitled To More has been r> He was against and would always was whether travelling was Obviously, originally the Gov. oppose any instances of a public duty of the Accountant General eminent did not feel that theru .,... officer being given such licence, and whether he wan an auditor was need for that travelling He would to BeeweU There was a clawic example of it or not. After a careful scrutiny, allowance. If the only travelling at somct. cirge bis In the Police Force in which thev he could find no provision which was from Ihe Audit Office_to the Ho felt ii-.it he asked for had a man who was Lord High g*ve the Accountant GenTreasury where they lost SH.owi mil tfie House this and Lord High that and Social *'ral power to go around and he did not see where the travelshould i Ithe Welfare OfTI..,. who came to the investigate. ling wsa in that. If as hrtOwn I H use and got such votes Ho As the Senior Member for made clear hts w ^ k n ,, r !" **f d had arrogated to himself funo<*"•! Church had put it. that ^ ve ,n ;JJ r \.. mtHt^voTSt Mr. Lewis (L) H A .. b be WSJ not clled to might only be putting in the thin J lh V "<'* „ !" s ennium tS i ., was supposed perform when he took up the Job. edge of the wedge and on another n ^ in 5 !" jL nflteAaOi the to Instil' • %  00> They had to be SaTy ..ccasion when perhaps money for „ mwnbc ff) .. gt Joaepii UM Auditor Genthey approved of estimates of thai a car for someone wa, to be voted. W(ml(l mgnt t-ial who.. to l lecll nature. The affairs of any Head Honourable memberi. would IKtravelling that nfll "' or a Department WH ll much in reminded that they had agreed in doing was ortglnallv intended hun as il the Accountant General nocd ot scrutiny i nnciple to it. that the money t*Vv v. ; % % %  %  ehe's in the c-mAiuinlj. AllnwanrrNecensary hlBI *-as enough to do d. He Js'FsLZmKz MTSttSunx vm*i < : LS?rS*ftS Z3&3 %-A\^a-i artjaftM". i M tne eonstituuon of H-rbadox. he CcnerHl or „„ Clvt servant had providing some travel!: JTnXTSftrf^f.t "'.^ 1-^ *0 1" unless it was laid down by ance for that departm., law or regulations. The Accounthad not uld that. int General had been responsible had gone on for pointing out past leakages in would be an sllo. position of Jam.11. a make recommendations wilh eve to attracting VS capital A bill to set up an development corporation t o A eminent funds Is also before the legislature on similar lines to the aic> icullural devclopi oration now being set up by OoeOHlB I a^VaVaSI '.'^. '.I',-,'.'*','*'.'.-**','. uid To Men an 1 XI -nt was the dilapidation lhat when peat maf-tern examinations hi 111 DO peiformed. diK-lors fantrslly r.-f.i %  ,,,t the ex.,. ,,.. .. 1 %  • %  it'll, maid PuUetf dor which 4 supplementary amount is, t. DO VOled is %  For..e." Mr. Allder said lhat he had always suggested that formal functions which "%  much should be done Thf nutavber of horse* ; hOUM I-"' reduced 01 there rhould ir none st all %  is were only kept so lhal when lliKxiclleucy was goIng to Ihe r .<<• %  thev would curvi t .t-,ut him. 'le ss rnen! inould were not Upkeep of .' 1 • who kept BiirveUUnce %  rachti avhlch beiong Lo nen. They should be made to SCARED BY RHEUMATIC PAINS? Bly Auditor '. same thing he had said, but thai Late,. l mber could not that he was surprised al th wrong. duties he heard were those of i %  It was not that that $50 had ACCOUN' H '•' and the Accountant Qeneral was trying to get it back When he went out In a moUir car • went out to do duties he had i-nd not to vidt the \ • f tto ura Of Barbs| dos. The Accounts could not get a car and dn %  „ i Far hiiilur ot 01 fii§ rolour It cleans and how it preservei r retailer for Propert's. Nothing cKe i% quite (he same. Watch the difference ii makes 10 your shoes! -^ • %  ^ P ROIM'RrS I H B O E CREAM lm(Mllllimil(llllililt1HIHltl(HlllllltlltlH That BSffaatbOff that there e for travBEYOND EUPHRATES Autobiography 1928-1933 BY FREYA STARK ON SALE AT ADVOCATE STATIONERY Ill tl 1>4ilSfitttf m The TAN SAD •VICTOR" TRUE POSTURE CHAIR | Advaiiluues embodied in these Hue CHAIRS include— • Perfect Balance • Adjustable Heat and Buck • Seat Anatomically Designed • Beautiful Upholstery • Filled wilh Caslers or Rubber Cushioned Dome*. See (hem on display at — S. P. Musson, Son & Co., Ltd. Dial 3713 AWrtV / VA'A'/AV/rtV/,V/^A'^'. Don't Ruin Your TIRES! Putting Wheeli in Linr Can Save 5000 Miles of Rubber %  rsst vassal aM >••> n.. SACROOL KMUHfs DKIIli STORES \ ...... i. %  aai at FLASH MEWSI I .(TORY OWNKRS AND CONTRACTORS Warc now in a position to supply you with your Requirements of GALVANISM FIFE KanginK from In X' Bore A I M!i.I ASSORTMENT Of FITTINGS Pay U • VUll To-day and Cln Yuan TSre$tone JJte JifAs with Built-in (Dependability ? BARBADOS HARDWARE CBL Ltd. L (TIIK HOUSE FOR BARGAINS) IB, Swan ir~-. 'Phone 21(. MN, fr 3514 Charles McEnearney & Co., Ltd. We'll Adjutt 'Em Expertly for Summer Driving TTIIIIH Ifeal taaa'k '<• %  %  laaiifala IUB .aja.l I 4493 OfFICE WORKSHOP 4203 PARIS DIPT 4673 NIGHT -!!25 j I 1 *.'*V. .V////W,



PAGE 1

PAOI TENBARBADOS ADVOCATE WEDKFSDAT JAVt'ARY M, lW Belleville Tennis Tourney Opens Today First 1952 Major Tournament \U I III SPORTS I.IHTOR The Bni major Club Tournament far 1952 opens today whei ll e Belle' h Toi nl (.'luh will stae Ita annual Tournament Tini umbt s 'i* tntriaa li not atuu I ind this is •otnewhat surprising in view of the "Herculean" efforts tht Barbados Lav n Tennis Association have been making in the last few months to encourage public interest in tingamg Notable bo an toe %  In the nMti*i itnglea arc Maaora Brt Taylor Peter PatuM on Geoffnt) Manning and Dr. Mannrho up To the end o| last year's tournaments could well have been dubbed "The Big Four" ol local t. | standard ..f piny I lirk Ill'lt'Uls uch as Dennis leas, Louis Si .**• a n Trunlnaham hav. unproved to STOCKHOLM, Jan 29. such an extent that moM MM Turkey forward to seethem clash • ...... r. Un li -daj Vucci R \ I IMiM \i.| II I I -Hill Ml 1 tit <>(•* no DAM tow pioinising leentho mnirmortal %  %  much Tournai eni experience and temperaMoellcr in two minutes aft} three seconds, locking in TUI.I the bock-bammci The Turk took Ihi ircTn the Mginn.r.fc ... i>Mlblc, as it will serve iwede in Incult utua">-m in nood ttead In Ihi lion*. The < opacity crowd saw the opening night of the two day meet PI devoted t > free style. The team of Turkish wrestlers Mi who are engaged m the first match Kinstry, I I Igahl %  f the Swedish Tour are in tho K l 'Tommy" Edward peak of form Manager Akifoxhi hmo champion who ban t) %  aid. The snow covered Stockwith H. I. Toppin In the men'" holm has n tempei tuie ol len degrees below eer 0 centigrade, but the Turkish visitors claim The Ladles entries have been they enjoy it All the boy* are V er% ,„.,, Ihl stlia Wt having only ni good Bonn" said the manager S1X entrants htra the They have been flourishing here Ution is that tour % %  : in Sweden although the food Is vmm(( „,,,, ,„„. , ., Make Tho /tats/nan Hit Thai Ball (ll\ JOHN MACADABT) Racecourses Should Kun Own Totes R. Kl< HAHII KM in I IS W.I. Lost, But Were The More Brilliant Team From HAROLD DALE SYDNEY, Jan _'< I-angleya intcrvcnUon Bensud at mid-on Worrell came Now Lindwall, deadly with the halfway down the wicket to back !" *" ball against tail-ender*. Up. but Dili sent back. Worrell knocked back Guillens off stump %  b.iek, but Henafter the wicketkeeper had dud's thro*hit the wicket and ,IX N 'c 1o < 212 Worrell was still a yard out. Now. H asset t put on young Worrell, run out IB Four for 191 Richie Benaud, to give him his From IJndwall's next over first Test wicker He howled ValStnllmeyer was I.b.w. for 104. The cnlinc for 0. Ramadhm, not out BOOMS 'i! |nibmedium-high •y of thi heavier than ihe v —ii r. Schagen Knocks Out MvGowan LON1XJN. Jan. 29. Willie Bchagen ol ilollund weighing 107*4 pound ui Johnnj McG 16TW pound* in lite third round of ilod len -roun %  Albert Hall. A right lo the i hii in the third %  ound put McGow in down on hi:. f;iee. He atternpu peared jn t I • oferee Archie Baxaton ruled %  knockout f.r. Amona %  Chi i ruteo of the w.i. crlokai Captain, although very hoWl niuih promise and pmvldint' • hould have •• vrrv bright future %  B the dally p.'lT ;il..r with Uu result* of the preceding itenoa %  II. i|M., fltllllV MF-N'S SINGI.I s V. H V Kni.wli-* va, H |. top. i) i Worms \. i>. E. v Coka v Roaeh vii J L st HMI s i' EdgoMU vs 1>. I Lawlaas. .1 I) Triminghiim VS. ( It l-.laaa. G Hunle VS M. G Worme BIG DIPPER CAN BOOST BLOODSTOCK SALES THI again— not who alt i lbs lolly lesser o ones like the prlva ioom .! II L I'j.wle, who suggested that eurreiil t OnCOO tta llon on points for first innings lead in county cricket was ruining aSpti • nf it.. %  Back comet Mr I'awle with lltlonal suggestion lhat .., if no points were allot11 r.' in Bo f.,,. po good i>ut listen • 4 Ixmdon, bOUt county and public school gari %  His otiserv.ition ithat batsmen paged to hit the %  < %  if for every maiden OVei lln lieldlng side should be credited s %  pretty strtngani I big-time i rti kat cai oma ineh shots In the arm I t I.M'.I takes the bull finni. rn '>•>' horna i p mggaatlin 20 l-nnts tor ;m OUtnght win .nno only !i neagra eoupla for that baneful load Again in maka them piny i<. win—as If that should I*neee-tan in Una du and aga B I U SiK-cer. Too Kit II \KII HAt IlLIINi (Rarlnc Reporter THE i j world will be upon the Irish-bred Windy City and ntg Dipper, when they nee in tiSanta Ami.. Derby and Santa Anita Handicap, respectively. fot they can provide the %  reatesi American adveruaetock has yet .in ed. Threp years ago [ suggested that Hie Ilntish Govciiiintnt .i schema foi. sending thali National Stud fear-l lings an*, others. If D • lo AnnTK.i. whara thi advertise our horses in front olg the An.%  our dollar exports. i has not Dy ine nmiuiwi' htud "i ait) %  M i UM i i not wo lau u> iiiicnipi it L..ai year uu umou> HIM. %  taoa aani thou roarunaa to UM .1 gaMa and ootauw hvmauaoua pticag lot than ii., will rapaal lbs perform%  nice this year and otiui briafa studs arc to follow suit, l under•I. .Oil 'I :' I A ... those who ..iii M t en d i ng torne lruh-bt. thu year. Th Irtah haw i i sttai k thi An .i can market .md the* are bel lew.irm.l Hut llig Dipper .n i Windy it) can boost %  i ibly. I 1U headed the Knglum Two-Year-Old Free . Ign oi iiio ami s to them both competing In Amei %  %  gpo tad to Wti ••. a "dying machine" m F.mope la %  -e %  -. %  has losl about Sst li und harab mi adopted to get him > the A They w on He I 1 to I i ^ the i hanipion Aimi lean 10* %  I kddUj Au.iip. who Is also gomrf to iihim in his preliminary woi k tn save him some of the i | rigQVn of mt American preparation. l'rendcrgast Advises II ^ fol II i I ll ratio. Prtndtrgaat, DM there this winter and diwussi'ii UM < "H full) '.Mill Inliana i .mil rider. d' II I' W.I! Ill.i-t I" 'PHI' I and lliiit headstrong colt should outclass tiie iippositinn. even >l iis no| iin nut and out utyi TA iimr 1. M ,.i llig Dippei [was favourite for the Derby. 'then went wrong unit never ran a* i thraa year eld In ibis country. being sent to America (piite enrh in the taaaon. His trouble .. lOBBtad, treateil ,md hat yielded tO treatment The colt Is In strong work ngain and his home form has given his mnnoclinm the utmost confidence khUH* to win thai big 11 k'..F.K. WHAT'S ON TODAY 1'iillee t'uurli and t'nurt ml ard. T.til p.m. %  Hie ..'bntlon "f UM curers-of-illII, i lOtai G Sunnier. 0l Brlaton, l^mdon, expressing Initlon at the prolonged Club of Conliovei-v lb ap|ar%  little, but lit* suggestion || e/Oftrl some studv | I have the FA anil DM League Rnancc and run their cei club, with ground, manager, tralnei loving staff ol i ,, CUrt, would inrun in four t. ,nitagg d 1. 11 Hi (Ni. and in fj I. with the %  t i. %  ,, in aha Hi I iuvisn.ii. .,:.,! tha othan ai nMa are tagged. He WOUkl have Wieso playeri %  Urt in i M of UM HI (N I HI i s i ima, and gradu.i'. as their abillt> ,\ fron. pur iwn eXIbal Bcaodlnat Dutch learns have tueh a policy, nnd It appears 'o work with them.) The players would he paid by UH KA >Lngua %  "ut there dties look here like UM nucleus of th<" fully integrated MUonal have been looking f>,i Nnea tba Continental challenge becsme o strong. i) dear old Arnold Wilton to i, een Ihli .md so sever o H link with the great I days l>cfor* boxing got "wide". Wo km v the Mai.., wall In tan own early days along what we i nod to call The Alley %  genthniaii of 00] %  CfaOOL h'i promotional With lus gieatcst light. . bally] '-*ii bli i il-Gibbons ope n-a i r .. rag that the public. • %  andn. Ilcst him well Mi ST .II ley WoOtlon. eh f K e m p t o n Park racecourse, sends Q circular to all B ha states that to record further progress the club must be ollowed "to operate their own totalisator, as Is done at greyhound meetings and all race meetings abroad." Mi Wootton has been *n owner-trainer in this country for as long as the present generation of racegoers can remember and has a vast experience of racing throughout the world It*, is a member of the council I UM Racehorse Owners' Association and his cfTorUi are almost entirely directed these dsyt to improving the state of racing In tin. country. ' .Mlisator abroad is alone responsible for the healthy state of racing in every country In w'hich it is employed. In many cases It is the only reason thai racing ca n be carried on at all. Visitors to America are loud in its prats,, and it helps to put up %  onto of (he enormous prize money. ,lso entirely eliminated credit betting In America and this is a decided advantage Big Benelll In the Malay Slates pri*f money hat gone op from about C100 per i unto aii beeouM nwy i un their own lotalisators Vet in England, the graataal | country in the world, tho Iota is almost a parasite. It has ploughed back some of the profits into racing, but the benefits are fa r too small In comparison to the turnover. Tho running expenses are too high. v.mlev Woollnn rightly wants all racecourses to run UMtf oam 'os .md the profits can then be used for raising the slake moneys and improving the eourao (Or UM ( UM public. Bul before we arrive in this UM Government must accept the recommendations of the Betting and Lotteries Commission, i-port w'ns published about i, year ago. F.xtni An Anti-Climax It had all ended in i but still than notable memories of the tour, and I — seltled It He bowled Gomez for Stollmeyer. the experience that on the off stump, after he had Goddard has endured all through | scored two. Six for 194. —star players letting him down 1 Three wickets had fallen for moments of crisis, three runs, and the West Indies ball had taken instant toll, and at five for 192, the West Indies .'bailees once at least fair. now written off. If uMca were any doubts relalnmg. Miller it's always Miller land (Kail No Help Then w e can go even furtlier in our efforts lo bsnefli this great rucmg sport and industry. Them are about 200.00) starting-price boosBmakara up and down the %  oiuitry whose lumove r jop, n0 | help racing at all. Why not? VOiy should not -course tetling contribute something t 0 the *port which keeps n Jive? A tax of 2"4 percent on wln%  ung and losing be% would be of enormous assistance to racing. Tho ideal would be for iho tote to 'Perata i n every town and village n the land, so that racing would receive its percentage. The totalisator is the only hOp.f raising stak c money m this country to-day and, unless stake raised, owners are not going to be able to carry on. HI They'll Do It Every Time By Jimmy Hat I o OC ej EAKL> ) ? J£I\^> "AS **) SHE WXT \ / JUST CCa*ft>W(oJMBL£; W6 -8vX>T A -1MMK, SHE 'l C TWCseTrOU4TETD WEAK MCR AWEN 5-€ **S PEC.:\G COCOWEATHER REPORT VriSTFRDAV .:.iid: from Codrtnglon: nU. I oi., Rainfall fur Meatth lo date: .43 la. li. ... -i Temperature: gt 5'F l.iKvrM remprralnrr: tl.m F. A n.d Velorily: 7 mile* per hour. p. 11 .un. i. i (0 a.s i 3 p.m.) 29.902 TO-IIA V Sunrise: S.lt am Sunurl: 5.5ft p.m. Moon: New, January 20. Lighting : g.39 i> m lllih Tldr: 6 18 a.m.. 0.51 p.m Una Tide 12 If j.m., It. p.m. 2^1 99S; //.W,-,V/,V DANCE THE BARBADOS AQUATIC OLUB o 1 Local and Visiting Member* Only i aATURDAY. February 2nd Mn-ic by Mr. C. Cnrwtn'. Orcbsetra Mrinb*r r# cordially Invite* C (Free Admission to Ballroom! eflort was finishing with brittle collapse The l i-i Hours leas appropriate. 1 suppose, although rather tad, that the last hours of the tour should emphasise the lack of stability that has characterised the islanders throughout their Australian crusade. r -, *-, %  They had the talent, but not the I onill I llgkVf k ll soUd baslB of unremitting deterat ^7€*UJ1 VJia"0->ia mlnstion, and they allowed themselves lo be beaten by the weakPORT-OF-SPAIN. Jan. 28. eat team Australia has fielded for Opening batsman Noel QuUlonl J5 years. brother of West Indies I think that a lot of their lack keeper Simpson now playing the I in thi* respect can be put down ufth Test al Sydney is one of the] to the fact that they had no playplayers selected to represent Trlni-I ers in the side who had previously da( | aKa inst British Guiana in tr"' played Australia. They came as intercolonial tojrnamenl openn strangers and met a series of p,.i,„,, tv . ntapaurtCM I bail from the wicket with his bat. Ralph Lcgall. Clarence Skat) | Atkinson out for two. FJghl for Chiki Sompath. Fordc. Ilunn 205. Butler, S. Jackbir. Demming an Guillen's Life Saved Ken Corbie twelfth man. Guillen and Ramadhln now —(C.r.) BACK TO SCHOOL



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WEDNESDAY. JAM ARY ADVOIATE PAGE TUSEE Pun. \.u:l.ll,r />.,;,, Ml/ Mil 11 The Custohis Men Upset Les Girls PARIS. J^hS GIRLS at the Bal Tabann cabaret were aghast, the management spluttered with indignation and the French tourist bureau is still wringing its hands in frustration over the fact that aj th* moaiwfl there is no Fraoch Government in existence to which it can pntaat nyi llwl if U %  .1 Prancii word >-pelt -Stailetu-as %  hould b* "Omelette. Oe Gaulle Speaks Charlt-mapie ride* %  tain General Charles de Gaulle. *ur. if*i Icy disdain the of yet another political I I'ans. plans a dnunatii* to MW I aprerh rxtollmi Charh-maciie in UM rlt) of Aix-I.i-Chapelle. 1 where C'harlem.iifiif (founder Of Rnmnn Fmpire) n Cause of all this a raid by French Customs inspector* un the largely tow i-nce <>f the Tnbann in aear~h of Miiufgled watches. The raid wan carried out by 20 inspectors in mufti who posed as ordm., bers of the audience. At the interval the inspectors moved down tl aisle examining the watches of u foreigners for Custom* stamps. Result of the raid: 40 si monies and .i total of £SM lines. A French Custom' iff explained "7*0,000 wal h.- were the smuggled into France last year, but We hAd to do something about It." In ih.' speech de C.aulle will Comment by the Tabarin mansay that UM Vatican i>olicy was agrmcnl and the French tourl ; Cfcailaniaane, office: "No way to treat our forIn contrast with ita present ...-IeiRn Ruest." toward* de Gaulle's as|>ir;iBm rvisaaaaeaia. ,!p wl Blso lambast th.Kt.U CtKTAINS OOBsBfpl of n European army and PARIS "chi< i..,the Sctiumao plan and make .-i sisn Ambaxsador in I'un-. Mr. diam.ilic unYr to the Germans. Pavlov, has bought RennsisTho offer Joint Franeo-Gersance furniture for his Embassy. m n exploit.itum of French Alcoho.tcM Not So Anonymous. **"' O/ MM American ptusjtum lost _, ... In Pans last umt, ft kMn I> looking girl Casino receipt lor the pa-t '" %  !' J <* • !" !" iub and ask year show that Emthien Casino. %  ** '' %  £ %  w, *' ke to go bate nag* Par! I an QM i. %  srltl ... 'i' 1 "-' K '"' %  %  I annual taiti of (70,000; ix-au%  •* %  honrd that QPS > baton.' ville comeptCOnd With C4SI0OD '•*"'-Wl. to the *.f.. and CJI'JOOO Khan: Vou mn, All. will not • remarry. He is much happier a.s Sotha Cmlry has opened his n b *"***5 Parts house an a wsustt r w, chorpes After The Dance ti sdrntisT... my maafura? The baii room of the British Kmbaaty has A French drama critic writes been turned into a badminton In protest against the French court, adoption of the English word —L.E.S U.S. Boy. Will Hnd 'Corner Drug Store' In Britain whose fainers I m| in %  e^'iLa' I v their L*h. own American^^ style campus „* ] and corner drug store, complete tan* tvbi Aim I farhour Log In Carlisle Bay Ktl-.tB.TI %  • n hniti uwaiv. SEA WELL • 1 I 11 I %  i .. %  !_ Mkool land |his w i 11 i from all parts of t h e United % %  officer %  > M lit %  V IH OBMHMBW O. r.)llK.F,. .-•II far I >!%  • % %  Jran Cut.M*-.u4>lr r. — .l % % %  %  "... NMU I I KM r.r.i. su>*><:arl Trunk. Ma*>< iiaa Tr..ni. Urt Lrvta. IbitHftn C-MI W.lwi B SchlrlMT. Hl*ii U .# %  Ollltaii. Cl A r-arl lillon CWrMl. Kmrw Q Wl. hrt*ra-ld SIMM. Oma* lull W.n I Tr.nl. I->|MW UoV. ChaOio %  *"B nifabMh AnOeeMn. TITO ... : b n Turin— aig oon' '"—" %  ', Fill if hop,< ,i ilp"" Bir* tii.wr iTKr. KrlUl AUlmon. lrt.1 l>iM*. OUt* Ballrr. Dkpnnr \ It. !*-......! rtnh Ev. ..*• %  . %  >•*-. Mar MMAMHHtU i—'i 0*num. Anru lliaixq. r*n lll.miai I., I....... ii. it -U-. saM DUNLOP UNIVERSAL MOTOR CYCLE TYRES •Pthi Thenwill 4i thag an i \r.y American h (Id between ; is and i who wishes iw vtiool may %  M.. MAIL NOTICES M VUW-nl. Ma .\IIII*L.J. "I KIIU. %  . TSOITJ.. V t -n I Sww York linrtl rnrl ToK*.nS a 111 h. .l.a .| th* OVn-rJ PBS Oawa Tli-DAV. • th Jan,.. I--' A | at.!'Oh, hut a little thins Bag" run up for snipinc at Mr. ChiirchiH." Ixmdon Kaprew Service „, ltd II I Former Trinidatl |)<)|)C Is Jamaica's M.L.C. Shot Dead k m r. _.. POHT^F-SPAIN .j„ a Answer lo I o\eri\ Clarence Ahwih ^ >.,—,..^, ,.f •*"a.***-/ ^_^av as. %  .•—/ Mall. (.>r SS. Vtr..iK b. ihr s 11 -III hrr;,—I al n,<<„,, %  Hat OAcaai i>n4a* r-r.-l Mall lUgutrml Mall '4u.ar Mali at .St pm TO-HAY. *l* Janoitf,. itas For Extra Reliability DOWDING ESTATES & TRADING CO., LTD. (ECKSTEIN BQS.j Distributors Clarence Abuih, ., am the Trinidad Education Board and .> former member of the Executive -nd Legislative Councils was shot dead througTi ihc window of hiv home on rYiday night. The shot rang out from the dark yain. M* Abidh sat with his wife Iwg women vunter-. and .. small boy in his drawing room. -iCP> Family Week In Antigua 'i. L'hampiun. who has JU returned to Brtlaln frotn Jamaita decUrvt that enoush niuri|uaii,< aranj;., as It I, known in bhi >tor and In view o! it hartal and lltty entrant," from "vni.'iw ^d","h'.rX'"352. S , ," MM Wat Indies., eornta, out of •irrwed .o much BUM In paoIn all part, ol the iland. 'Slior! w . SL L f", ""• Canbl..-,i t. ,k, l. moiuy pie keeping better homes Internall.i-t Wednesday inomlnn theie TX.^, ,,Z V „ r "" **** "' < !"!" •*• In Ameri.;, ..n.l U> ly Mrs. Blackburne felt it would w. : aalherln, on gSSj ","' £' '*$ >B**k?> "' "nitod K.ilom. He doubut .hebe • good idea to spun. ouiuK or Government ibtin A)£i w,i, !" i, *., v ". lj c '"'" ""' J' den competltton to encourage an and HI. Excellency Mr. K. W. A r *?." .""* "J^L'JS JS J uUU %  u "~ d external pride. h,„ addr ex*!!. '!' JSSV*.*"* 1""""• In it. Ilrst year the competition plained that gardens were lU'lgcil Scotland r Yartl \fan For Kingston LONDON. THE ILLEGAL drun iraflW. which Ii ctusinf so much concern lo Britain's police at pregenl. can b IrtC. d bat* directly to Jamuica according lo Harold Champion, m an irtlcU publuhed inthe-Sundaj K"i N t- in %  "'"'"" % %  Home and Inmtly Week" wa. ha. .tlmulated considerable inaccordinv very succe^ul In Antigua last tMt There Mr, hTO hundred ^enen,. Appearance and .tandard; WeX" Ullages „ nd tha ^ objMt of tho com j Jon l-riz. lean authorities will .damping out Hie ductlon t,, assikt m ihu ever" increasing cost of living. The ur:. and himself could give the inspiration but unless people did the work on their land and gardens, there efforts would be %  n v.iln He hoped that next >r the best garden in Antigua whii. n might be p n ia tfaj l llh have u |Wueeu of gardening In his closing words His Excellency quoted Kipling's words "Oardtii i are not made by singling. Oh how beautiful. and sitting Jn thishade *' larotik Phases Su MpatMtnl Ui in. i I'.ntv weir.imed the %  atrfakaD, sevlhing population vealad "wldom and i .ill turn down a chunce, llleness" gal OLD LADY Irom bed of Beel .1 tio\ atom hidmenl 11 %  %  > %  to her prise and admire-* nut. lo make easy ml he asks, "And. believe me. reefer growing m a lush. hut-siouse inunti> like Jamalney, If you are found out. you furtable in giiol than in youtt .i arrM'ldnrn found out" He descrll*. how w.ker> In citrus groves and coffea planta. %  !. iHI aecludcd phieaa and hnpe that it will grow undetected, as it usually does. In Prises were presented by ACrs the lust few mouths, hOWavex, Blackburne. Some village* reinformers have directed tho aucelved as many u six prUas •,honti to bigger thing.. t „ v AllMah.il 1 Ltberta. Jennings and Wlllikie* "On a sunny plateau they found *>!" %  A aner i reeeived tho greatest number of nearlv a thnusand reefei plants.. honours, and It wns amaitng to worth a small fortune in the I _.. . see the numbe r r venelder I v market, of the Wlwipienls of priies. Alarm elnek Every plant was destroyed, but flash hghu and glassware wen the ownn was never urresled. liresented "Sevetal large pUintutlonsi have The gathering were then 'nvlted rcenth found in this way. but •• to impart the beautifully kept .%  no 'big' man baa been iwouahi gardens of Government House to Justice, though nearly every Lord and Lady Oliver Esher were week facM unfortun-te peasant among the gi*MU along with Mr i. hauled before a maa.iale and Mr s Mortimer Se-bur> with harged with growing a buah ur whom they are staying a t "Jolly two Hill". Mrs Seabur>' was one of "if the British Gwerrurient the judges and was keenly m,nu to put I stop to IhU tertrrcsted m he, vlsiu to ill the rible busir.e— it will " m > "t' n villagea. Mr, If. W. Pei-bles who i.,n, have to .end out I <'' w ( r *" 1 u a guest at Government H. I men from acwtiarM. thought it was a m.-st impressive Vard to assist In the !" !" n ! mlddav function and said she Kintaton's C ID. But the "eat thought the expressions on fan pa Of tU afttVlkl '-e a new .UHI generally were much hnppier v.lu.lesome prosperitv in o"' co *" than when she was here a year ony of Jamaica-" j mejj. GALVANIZED PIPES 4% FITTINGS PIPES: \" — V — 1" — \r — 2" FITTINGS : Elbows — Tees — Unions AhdulU Klialil. also leader of thLaglaUttva Anaainl that he hot I the Sudan vMiul.l DOVI |" Id i | < %  IO I I aHeini-' donunaUOB ti lo the %  i forward to a greater spirit of co-oiieratlo iiiid svn p n's alnv UM New pruna MK l'T. ASTHMA NUCUS Dissolved First i)ay WORRIED ABOUT PARKING ? USEDTOj DREAD WORK Commonwealth of Australia 5% Bonds due 1955 (Callable 1st July 1932-55) If you are the holder of any oi these bonds which may be called for repay ment on 15th July 1952, we suggest that you obtain from us recommendations for the re-investment of these funds. A. S. BRYDEN & SONS (Barb*) LTD. Barbados Correspondents for Royal Securities Corp. Ltd. CITY GARAGE VICTORIA STREET. aaaaajl r THEN SEE THE "CORG I" MOTOR CYCLE 120 Mills |..-i gallon 10 M.P.H. with IM lbs. weifhl only IXONOMV — ACCESSIBILITY — RELIABILITY — AT — Eckstein Bros aw **-,. General Hardware Supplies-Ric.e si '-',',',',',',',-.*^'-v-*-'-'-*.---:•*'• •*•>' %  •' io --.... tais man 4#*4a 0lBf to Vorb. r %  %  imsiis DSlaa in his arou naaia it tort' I naa .... f< wub It. am new tborwlily oottof and hara naar talt m r r yean I uaod to foal •maor-tnia *a>l s.uistab. bul now ii la a Pi -a U r. to worb liataad ofadroad -S.B. The palas and at-(fossa of rbaasraausni ar usually caasad by oeposds of OSOMS urio aeta la lasandiolnu Kra^hon %  ilmu.ataa -as hi-liays and otbes lat-.tlnal %  ItWMNIaltf i boalthr action %  > that all the 1 oitass artc aeM S P"f '! through 'Ha natural m.ann-ls. Bat foas. 'h^a r •' " I I are raat If TOU ar* tmahlsd el'h rboua trial %  n rrom '-tntsis and Btoraa. NOW OFFERED AT (OR\EK vroitt: A Convenient Shopping Centre ENAMEL TABLE TOPS BOX IRONS SAD IRONS PERFORATED ALUMINUM FOR LARDERS TABLE CORK MATS ALUMINUM & SILVER TRAYS PYREX WARE GLASSWARE EARTHENWARE I





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PACE EIGHT BARBADOS ADVOCATE WEDNESDAY. JANUARY M. 1SS2 CLASSIFIED ADS. TELfPHONt 230.. Mania., -i iBHMHal IN Cart* Calling the MNM % %  number *C waff* %  MrUnai M* Men*** on*. %  BIRTH KOBeMN -On eenueas . IBS* .1 D. ini Down Bfcjp B..-fc Off OWW \i\l.r -^"OS. <*f. JMItdK ss*n. Mr Mr. 1 wrote* A %  IN Ml MOK1AM D* COSTA—In our dart" %  f, 1.1 in Be i union. Irian action % %  Ansie on J.n. %  ry **h 1M4 IMIIMnVI %  on MALE AUTOMOTIVE Kill II.'.VI ITIPVU Nrri'Ch NOTICE .. ...I. .1 t ..... .11 '**n CAB— roed v s —1 ronlilit" 1MB Deal Mi 1-NHet Kl<<* cAf-t-xw ram v* II-III %  i....i ii-i. %  r model. OlMi.1 condition 43M l-'.-r." %  am and I MTOHCYtl-I iM.l or detail IB unless by a written urtn signed tr. me %  tlgoed EBNgSTT K 1) HUCKVAN. i%  .,...; i MCKilii Vill. I II P USA Twin III) 1II IS m I' II liii I..I MKHV -peed ti*[n !>! %  14 001 <.. T, good lor jou, but only *BBr.or> Di-I *i !• i. S 0al t..i-i. M I faV-i rll-isf'. : T : %  %  II. .. 1 r IIIU.IT Klll-Hn IV OIVTN na*ing an* tMl aa cle-m upem itUkg the eelebvl Allen Flu* u| Klrtons in Us* ...r,*h of %li t>*iil.O *n diel IBM .land a. Ihe Will U. al April IMI a. i ..red to Mil In BSg f ewlB>r. r .Ue*td M the an iknilrft. in rare ,,( O le BBjcjdnL Jesse* Mrt. a**tU-*n o. a. eaeece IN lh . al At... IIS* date I ahall proceed IV IM MtU a* Bbe e*tale among li.. pen>*w eMsUad U-rtM hat m* i-e.rd U. the debt, and cl.au en. el which I Have nan nul.ce. and that I-liable for .iii di< IrSbc.led to •"* p*r — "I wheaw Ml %  I iu.v. KM .-"the al %  And all pees—i* I n d en ted Mi in. seal eclat, ai MMM daMy g frfflnEet_'.e at AlUi: riff ha %  -lll I %  inaalM H *d (gnterpnWater. lihi. %  •!• -afr sea-bethinC M-.derate lent lo. ...eful tenant App^ N n Ml III. I^Maja Unad N III In Trw iil>lir ala hanrby wanird affalrvM pHlnj trnlit 1" ni% i(r. V-T1M'. AlaA.-YNt: iu aa I rio not hold .Ubla for har on anTona iW (ufilrBclliK iiny daM or datou in my nami.inlm % %  > %  nlWn ornrr aatnael by ma Slgnrd ITOXAUD AUAVMBJ, i l.vrdala Gap. HI Mlrhaal WANTED UKLi oiiNTra a Caftha-Mi Ml Ca. Taranly-n.. HI. WAHTEU Apply %  -i C*v snapnacd ailUn • nionlh tfaaaW l laaing Mra J. B. M Qaffip I oE*S K| i %  Clrtt. (oi uiii Oflk* All ai>pll muil auply In willlnB with tatarand pnaloatrapna lo HH1TWI1 INDIAN AIBWAYB LTD. Lowar I lia^. BtMMjttawn 111 II tXECTKICAl, PURMTUKK %  II aotM of tllllngi l,.i BARNU A Co. Lid II 1 Ml. in 1 %  Woeafcuda U-ii%  • 1>1->I IW a i
lil-ADa t. ira MUHIMI i-il.-rf and known by Wi'ifW-ld Uiikin MarW V.I. la lb* pariah ol tt „i PI In i in* UMrid. AaaMUnl Hchoollaa^Aar I. .... l".l Oil lani^ry l"i I 1' • i and irlln4"tahad %  , -au..-d and >doMad w4 datffM'iiavl UiaiHa'uril! on i wha 4 Tramporl Oepartmeni The po is pattMooabat wUh aalars OJ. -n* scaie l,820 x 120— 3,520 par annum. In addition a non-pamionabie coax of living allowance Is payable in accordance with approved rate* Point of entry Into tcale will be ddtcrrnined on the basis of experience and nualifica* lions. Contributions at the rate ol 4% of salary will be required under Ihc Widow* and Orphans Pension Act 1921 No quarters arc provldaxL Appointment will be on probation for tvio >c-r* and will be made %  ajlsMMdj to the tclecWaJ candkJaUbeing passed as medically At for employment in the Put Candidates should not be less than thirty 130; years of age and hi mid preferably be practising mechanics employed in J supervisory %  aparily with at least ten < 10) JrvaWs* experience In Motor Mechanics m>i Workshop practice. They should have a theoretical knowledge n| Internal Combustion Engines and will bg required to keep Labour and Distribution Rolls. Applications should be submitted to the Director, Department of Highway* and Transport. Bridgetown, to reach him not later than noon on Saturday. 9th February. 1952. 30 1 51— in SHIPPING NOTICES ROYAL NF.1MEBLANDS STEAMSHIT CO. %  AILIOO rstoM IISOTI B.l Coluca ih Jan. ISM MS OranJaaUd. JSIh j Bn iu -AiiJNu T rasAMAaiMo A!n %  aiTUN OHA.SA Ms Anannw. SStk Jan ISSI u s SMMM*. sjo.rab.vsai SAIUMO TO laiMOAI. rAAMABIhO AP aaWTI— Ol'lANA II CaMMat, lUh T>. 1SU M S Bonnli a. r. lliri March. ItU HI-I.S SOM a c Tta. U V DA' and Aluba S*iliri I In. TrM v rtldajr Ml rabruary 1ST.I Tha kg.V MOMBKA >l aaamapi -rao and ri DonunMa. AnUain I W I SCMOOMJt 11 ASSOCIATION LSC %  Conalanm TaM. No ri III H MIIS MM KSTATK •nomad : ;^ MKIIANKAI. PICYCLML a ahls-aanl kiaown B %  A Cyclaa lo I r.nl. >.moua alffr. and mm TaMor %  GaraaTff Ud MISCKLLANKOUS AN.'gUlS — Of avy daaenpnan Glaaa, Chlij, o-l Jnil.. Hlir SI... WaMrrolouia Early Wok.. Slapa, AMIO(lapha ale, al Oamnati Antique bfiap -d)oi.ilns neyal Yacfet Club 1 III 1 I i REDS INVITE U.S. ENVOY TO DEBATE COPEN11AUEN, Jan. 29. Danish Communists on Monday night invited the American ...i.l,., .. ,M Mi: Kugcni An(rerson lo a meeting to discuss the nagjro problem In the United States. The Anabassadrvss however, had In refuse the Invitation baajause she wim giving %  dinner party for tho well-known American negro l.wv-i. M* tdilb gueai 1( ihc Ambattodor*s residence during her stay in Denmark.—I'.P. %  roLiBHss a WAxrs A >M P ina popular LAIIWAX IIIAN ) POLISH luit arnvao Old I ar. I. n. altai u-iiiK I.AMWAX narvaltoui? DMI UB1. Courtaiy nAKItAlnAV.I Al HI SS copl.. toll In br aaM out 11 I rai dHi.M la Haii..o.. l i.> abroad. .i mt poal i-i l' %  'llo.it.*. Bob,,). MiKh Slrrrl. feti, RM hak kk %  i si .'-.-., I-.,.. OITR AOSMTB ara makl ul *l and more by Ukbig on rr. fOS rwraonal CnrMUnaa Clraati rcarda and CaMndaea On H| %  'i. pill.,111. l.r. i i • PUblMhart will arnd a IM.mlili.1 ISSI to Uanulna AMUI. %  %  ". Md*y. HUliHt OaaanMMlM paid J Wllllama t> Co IM %  Work. Prralo... Bri|land l-.nS 1'lmina Racuid* and wa BAHNKS) a Ca. LML AS a smiia io-'>in Hi Ain-lrd Bada II. IT ..1-1.1."' ... .1 •OS duwn PaWnl Bottle, a.tn caaaa Ion in I > MMa ol Bualnaaa can br Si.own i> ani •u.ilil-br purchaan —t informaIMm DUI SWI The i.nderalgnad orl.ia lor taia ALL .In m.p or •< lofMkai win. BM ii .,. %  .. !%  -.,.. . % %  HHUW loonas. and all invani ....1 inai.. aXatAH AIIXYNr. lh-1 SIM -vi t sum i 1st u ia sanisaed anil offer for -eto at Ih.ir onVa. Ho II. llmh Bl.^l. BOfai.1... th. I.l rtbraarr. ISM -I .liii. .i -! v. ,i.i.. Nan Tha awelllnaSiouaa nltins and diiilna i %  iae l |,,u,i .m. r,a astk ,i-> be aaamlned by ne on anj Toraday or rnd-\ between U> r.eur> of IS neon and 3 o'clock In the aluenoon al tha Hnaxraliou OfAce. r"ubl. fiaHMUngS, BrMaaaown. bafare lha Jn* day ol Drrambar ISSI. in order that eu.i clsana may be raporMd on aad rankm aeeerdaMJ to BM> nateira and prloeitv thar.-* raeprctlvely. oUtaeerlaa iuch peraona will be precluded tram tha benaai* r llyeM and be aaasivm al all clalma on as agalml Ihe aaM properly PMJrdaBT. PLTCB NIQXL HL'AN JOlUtSO.N Delaadint; DOHCAB WUXlASiS ALL THAT ccrlal.i piece or parcel of land illuale in Upper CoUm"*a tha paiUh of Saint MKBael -nd laland ol Baibadaa conUUiiug o> tflffaiiiail Mil one rood bo UM uni moia or let. butting and bound!"* on lands no*, or UM at Jama. H WiMa, of C.ittiarlna SflMa. of Clement Lucas, Of James Focd and ul Mm Louua Mallet, and on the Public Road or however else the am stay butt and bound Tosetnar with Ihe inoatuate or Dwrlunshuuaa called "AVBDON" and all and amauUr other the heuaea and outhouavi botr. freekuld and chatMl on lha Mid Und erected and built Handms and. belns will. U.r eppurtsnancei II WU-JJAMB, liai'tn-Cnaneeoy SO 10 II—b-> Canadian National Steamfihips %  OUTBSOLSU %  JanelS reb> ..n rah> 14 Hatch Beiaadaa n.iHJ %  %  rehy 1 Feb> M< fby SS Fcb> Th I* March I March St M.; NOBTBBOUHB "LADY NBLSON CAM rnUlSaUt LADY Noornrv-IJADY Ntaaoh CAS. CKt'L-iCK M.I.'. Arritaa leMaa ISVby Arrliaa Arrive* St. Jaba BMIIfa. I Feb. Tt-br. ISFeby Igf' *?'•"'", SS pab> It rcby — raby. 1 March i Hatch B March SO March March SJ M-r.1, IS March St starck 3 April 4 April .. I April 1 Aafti I An .1 for further parUculan. apply Rock Has) i i bunaaluw callad *'M %  Road. SI. MMharl %  room*. I bedrooin%  i H %  ler i.araar ani_ >ard AMHMoni.My ball ul Ihe land any day on application lo %  ither naiticulan and iwndltioiioi Mb apply COTTLt. t/.r.oiU) *. i aenrltori SB | st Sn lilt n\i;n i"iMUTl'AL lilt A US I HAM r. SO( ILT* I v esa nanwd SwrkrU *H> be li ckl al n.c uSSa. ol the Soclel, laackw II. flat e. IWldde toara. al I ....... rVHaS*. U*h rebtuary IBM. fur fia puipuaa ut aeaMdertns end pawa.ra with ee without *iitendmrnt the Ifilkiwina Reaolutlon: USOLVBD thai t"l-^aa J ol the Dee.1 ..I Satllemct be deleted and lha fad lo-ina Cleuie tub-Uiuied tneeelo.:6 N" -• %  %  -• accapleg and no ooMcy %  aaktag sss.noa.iM i I ird -HI. as* I PMU < aoclaly ol ui.t|i-a. -anbM aland re* relknwg al 1'ioVHlPt alwaill.al in .iii'M -' i*H.a ni .11 he i.k.-n ol rii.lina ,<. peaaaaajsttn Mrvet>H>nary M-n.i. Aii G K UHUWNK. -.. ,. Mes IJIM-eh. OFFICIAL NOTICE UABJaADOS I!" '''' (Ot'BT "I GSSANCKBi In purauance of Ihe Chancery Act IfOS. I do hereby five notice lo all pcyeO'va lamia or rial nuns any eatato nfhl ..i Interaat to any lien or encumbrance* In -tecUna the property hereinafter mentioned nine bef. i be I %  „ %  : I ilach BiKUetown, before ti inav If reported On eapectltcly OtherWMO u.l. pert daprivm of ail rl ajarSfl Ok) %  fMBV Htked i-i.i propcrt. of Ihc defetulanli wMb 'i-'ir witncaaea docunernt. a-^a >u> Ti.'-iW or rrlday b*lween the hour* a at the ResMralion OfAce. Public BuHduw. 4 March ISOa. in order thai auch cSSUna tceedlns to tha nature and prlottu wnl (%  ,.in.Oil from the benefit, of any I on ar againet the aald peeped ALL LNA MAY li.fend.nl CIARA ALSOP GAIL the Cine %  Ui.d* paaSfb %  < thrill Church %  i-ie-bo-.it. butllna and .. Via* Hotel, an Unda for.... H> M BBI I oi t'idiik CSala and on tha public road or hoatw lid bound SECONDLY A1J. THAT teitaln nmauas* ! ile in lU-b RtnNt Ua) Cl) I IB aWeam ... II, I. Ui lha aald atiect tucethrr with Ihe land wnaceoi l-ltoaaXKn' raHSTLY A1J. THAT i-AliADC VUEW Wltb the %  iliut.at SI. Anna, Ttte Ciarilaon in U -uKUi.iing By admaaauremmt 6S01 l place i ailed tay butt ...m II.IU -tin NARKl wl.l.i i.l for tonntip.illi.il Rheomatlun. Indise.tl-.n. i III ..I.l. i DIHNIH*. and BHiSRIII. Live. Prn* Jbaa KMi.uis LTD M I SI In aunt %  Value*, altaehe ia**a nt-i-nin double laeka, i UAIINUi a, CO I 'TH I1J>HIU OH. STOVr* ,, Burner MndeU GHFfN ARROW i> I Ilium. Model* .i.ly. lanirte f,. Tod..i "< %  TltrMADO Inlaraallunal K II. IleautlUl condition, earellent rqulptnent. good .-•ina: record Coat gTOOfas now ISSMUM. w offer* llirk. Telephone BIBs. is 11 si -l.f n W ATT3I T AFT-KT A TO-DAYS NEWS HASH WHlTAKKIt-t ALMANAC IBM Unabttdaed Kdltlon BROWN." NAUTICAL ALMANAC DAILY MAIL YT.AR ll'"'K tSB* PLASTIC SCHOOL BULUtS VIOI IN IMiWH ft BOW IIAIII PIANli INSl'IATOIUl BUNMiiAnrji roB oou-a BQ'AKATOII OIL by Ihe Plal. JOBtaON H BTATIOM.RV ORIENTAL SOUVENIRS SILKS. CURIOS. AKTB VENDEMOS. 8BDAB. JOYER1AB Y ABTIHT1CAS CUSJ0SIDADE8. TRAIDOS DE LA INDIA CHINA t EJIPTO THANI'S l-r. Wm. Ilry. SI.. Dial Hit RHEUMATIC PAINS Here Is REAL reJidf . Far real relief from rbetunalic p.,,,, it to Msmfisl to correct tBg BUM! When they are doc 10 the BSMBBBJ jlaliOB of bodily nnpiintirs it means that Tour ksdnera stsudi should BJIM away tbeae harralal unpunUca are alugunh and need a medU3JM to tone them up. Da Witti Kidney and Bladder Pills are apectallT prepared for uua prpoae. They aootbe aod tone up diaordered kidneys so eflattieely that these vital organs speedily retain to their normal luncUon of ilceume the syslein ol iinpnii'rc De WtU's Pills have u-.-i _J reheving rheomatic auHerers* I In many parts of the vrorkt wnlh grm. success Tlusftne • mrdiciiic may be jual what you fseed. Co to yoar cbenusl sod obtain a limply of DcWilfs. Pills right ii M I I raw SUong tneUI u 1 1 h durable tim-li in :; <"1 83c. G. W. llillrllilNH, Broad SI. CO,. LTD — plal l -'' SALS NOTKK The under, unil at Ihrir omce, No 11. H.s'i llrtdaatown. aa Thar^ay lha SIM day %  I Jaaaaty. IBM. at 1 p.m. Uie desirable A of Und conUinlns ITJfM esuan f**t or ihrreabouU .lluate on lp ol llandetvou* Hill lylnf to the m*M of and adlaceiil I., the lands ol Cloud Walk tha rod.nee ol Sir Dudley Leacack The .He i. in within easy reach ol the Ooll Club and command* a beaui.ful view. For liiU.i-i particulars and condiUons ol wle aopllf to:COTTLg. CATTORD Co, go .i.l-"%  III lea erSee, No U. Iliah Straat, nndae' i > .Idar It...*.r IBS!. st I Ml p m Ihe dwellinftiouae called %  IJJRSIJB" wlUi tha land thcteta 1 rood. 1 parch— or tberrauu.iU adjoin-11* l>r lUncroli rc-ldrnre st Lower FonUbelfcTha contain. d.iwn-Ulr.. .Iiawin* ..ul SSSaM rooms, hreaktaal town, two bedtootna. toilet and bath and upstair* ) bed. roam* glectrlc liahi. eonpanv'* water and aa* turned In Inspection any day hetweci Of 1 p.m. and .1 p.m. on an For lurthcr particular, ai | of Ml' aia.l%  COTTlJ <.M">mi %  •aslaBHar* Iwoinc Tax Notice i„ioriaing loaiaunng by adii ILieaboul. butllna -nd oouiidMlg on Ihe prenu-Mrael -ad It lllfh Btieel and i lllali aii.ct .-fur••aid oi hew. JillULM V Ala. THAT .erL.ui plaia theraon ..iltd UARTICA i ..i l-i. ml II"* publ* road .ti.Mtte Walk Ueyotul Ike dulrhl called IL.tmav i. I II...... |„r ., lln BY OIVtN thai no required liom whoae Income la over, from *nrv •Woe per annum or over and from companiei %  rparaled or unincorporated. %  iHieUaa. pareona 'n|*l*d In any Und* or profeasloD. sM owners of Und or liroperty whether a Liable income lv. ..'•-rued durlnd Ihe paal year or not. n.nni of Return may bo obtained T.K Hepailn^nl ABTKB TIIB 1ST DAY Ol' JANUARY, IBM, and no forma dul> Riled In tnuat be delivered la me on or barer* Ihe folle.in* rcpecUve date*, I Rrtuma of persons whose books were rloeed on the list day ol neeeaibet. 1SBI. an oe before lha of Harcli. isa %  J ItFtnrii* of persona whose principal place of bixineaa > %  not illuau in the inland on or before the Mlh a)Bj ol Jin... IB*-' 1 Hctiin.. of .ul other psraani. en or i^f.n.. the Sl.t day ol January, IBSt. N n reiaoHNF. GARDINER AUSTIN CO.. LTD.—AgenU. Hi* HARRISON LINE ~ OCTWABD ntOM THE TNITED KINGDOM VfMBMt S.S. 'BIOGBAPHKIl SS THIBESMAJv SS. "INVENTOH" SS. PROSPECTOR" fTOIB .. Newport fc mMiaag ..M/brough and [Jverp-.ol . I AJIUl, -:. DmHo'bad.. 8lb Jan 20th Jan i ltd Jan. :u • J.... 13th Jan. |7th Jan 23th Jan. 7th Fob A*D TOE THE CNITID KINGDOM VOJ.1 Fa i IIEBD8MAN" .. London ror fanh.r InronuUM MV.7 *• Closts IK Borbarfo. fllh Feb. CO., LTD.—Agent. AUCTION 1 The darelllna house • tdee. III! i*a of Land in the i-iri.h of *t Jehn. el ahwh Iwentt •I* acre* „re arable hi* ajbUp I, i.t '.. „ onthl %  .i weebl) I 1 1*1 |o.re ft of I comer of Amen Allev and M. 11 %  ... ihacaaa and the Aati.rev .id tha entire stockine d'ue bulnea. known a* i I _|] %  UNDEI TIIK SILVtB IIAMMKR i-iiri.-iM. try w.win %  1*0 Tin* rVpaennniti. HHANK1K. 1RUTMAN TO. ... OUR GUARANTEE Da Witts PilU maBiilacturrd under striitly hygienic conditioos and the ingtcdieTits conform to rigid standards of pur it j. Ln WITT SPILLS UNDER TIIK SILVER HAMMER SALE: TO-II.W Tti* Household Metis ,.f Cap* C -i %  K, 1ROTMAN OO. |JkSl Incnn-.B Tas and DraUi Duttc* ,A. I Note -Any aerwt Lilint lo make hi. return within Ihe daa date will be liable to a line no XlaO and not Ir-* than Cl will be peoeeeuled unleas u1Mi* rcaaaai la (Inn 1 I **Revitalise Yovv KIDNEYS Aad lav'll faal %  • %  •< lid T Burn •MltaaVi N.... O.ii.-o*. %  mat.sav i.x'i.. ct *>..... en %  -ntn •>•* So'"." Aakla*. Lou apa.t'1'. %  -••" •' .. Cy stex Bate BRANK rVrVrW, V.V.WIMPROVE VOI'R SPEECH >IH-.L ami Write correrU> and MIUI aW"Ji.i.i Ihe s.wi.-i. for Fluent Foailah CiJl at. . SHH'HI'.KIi •'Iiull'.'..: i. Road, For |i..i in ..I..'.: of Enroli.iint | amount to $2.00 per month. I ir-1 H iwni nt mi I nr.ilimiil Enrolment from 4.30 p.m.— CM pa. MiMMl.o-S-lurd*> S HOT WATER ON *; TAP for YOUR BATH i r I O AURKS. BAY KTHJUCT %  BBVBB-. NOTICE BLOCK STONE FOR SALE \ in..tiii.iniii i for liiiild ia purpose* BraaUi.l for -1" in. lie delivered Immediately II A."SI UK. gjj i.,.i "i I .,il... Stonr Work<" a two siorejyed dwtlliiighouae standing on 10.770 squara feat of land OB the UB*H parable St. Lawrence Coast. EBcellcnt sc.i bathing. Dwclitnghoune contains verandah Upstairs and duwn, dining and sitting r< m:., l>odroom^ pantry and Utohan. tie, t. nTigrii gas and wntar inslallcd. Garage and servant*, rooms. Purchaser to have "I'Unn of buying furniture -nd oflects. Inspiclluii bj .n.iHjiniinciil Dial B1S7. . the Oth February. 1952. -t 2 pin. ul ihc offlce of the uiMletsigiivd from whom further particulars and conditions of Bale can be obtained. COTTLE. CATFORD k CO., Solicitors. 24.1.S2—15n REAL ESTATE JOHN M. BLADON <5c CO. A.F.S. l-.V.A. Ia*E HUM nun run iui>i r.iffff.v. I'l Hi HI ri.iiii.iiions lliiililinit. NOTICE DM to %  i luuiKf iii achajdule eflrclivc F-bronry, 1^1. 1952. will all pa-seniters holding reservation* w'th us on or alter this data, please check with ,.nr Office. Hill 19MI WEST WaWAN AIHW.W*. LTD. Lower Brod Slnrl. Phone 2789. 4585 .-.-.-.-.-.-.-.-.-.-.-.•.-.-.-.-.-.-.-.-.•.-.-.-.—.•.-.-.'.•---•---•-----'-'-'-'-'-'-'-'-'--Cable Address Realtors" REAL ESTATE AGENTS. AUCTIONEERS, VALUERS, BUILDING CONTRACTORS151 & 152 Roebuck Street Telephone No. 4900. I