Citation
The Barbados advocate

Material Information

Title:
The Barbados advocate
Uniform Title:
Barbados advocate (Bridgetown, Barbados : 1983)
Portion of title:
Sunday advocate
Place of Publication:
Bridgetown Barbados
Bridgetown, Barbados
Publisher:
Advocate Co.
Publication Date:
Frequency:
Daily
regular
Language:
English

Subjects

Subjects / Keywords:
Newspapers -- Bridgetown (Barbados) ( lcsh )
Genre:
newspaper ( sobekcm )
Spatial Coverage:
Barbados -- Bridgetown

Notes

Dates or Sequential Designation:
Apr. 22, 1983-
Numbering Peculiarities:
No issue published for May 3, 1983.
General Note:
On Sunday published as: Sunday advocate.
General Note:
Microfilm produced before 1988 may be substandard.
General Note:
Latest issue consulted: Feb. 28, 2005.

Record Information

Source Institution:
University of Florida
Holding Location:
University of Florida
Rights Management:
Copyright Advocate Co.. Permission granted to University of Florida to digitize and display this item for non-profit research and educational purposes. Any reuse of this item in excess of fair use or other copyright exemptions requires permission of the copyright holder.
Resource Identifier:
17931718 ( OCLC )
sn 88063345 ( LCCN )
Classification:
Newspaper ( lcc )

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Preceded by:
Advocate-news (Bridgetown, Barbados)

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Full Text


Oe ray

Sunday Adbocate



ESTABLISHED 1895

Barbados In Good

Homesters All



Out For 337

Jamaica Reply With 109]5 |

SCORING 337 for all by tea time yesterday, Barbados |

gaye Jamaica 427 runs to get

for victory with two days still |

to go, and by close of play at 5.25 when Binns was granted |
an appeal for light, had claimed five of their second innings ,

wickets for 109 runs.

|

The loss of five wickets in 85 minutes came as a surprise |
following a very auspicious start by openers John Prescod |

and Denis Thorbourn who added 44 for the first wicket in
35 minutes as they proceeded to treat severely the Barbados
opening pacemen Frank King and H. Barker.

Milk Glut In
Georgetown

(From Our Own Correspond



26.

GEORGETOWN, B.G., Jan.
Gallons of milk are being
thrown down the drains of

Georgetown daily during the past
month, following an alarming glut
of fresh milk here. Officials be-
lieve the glut to be due to increas-
ed prices given producers which
caused them to step-up supplies
and also that following the rice
reaping, the land is now covered
with grass where the cows fatten
and produce more.

It was further disclosed that
some dairy farmers are depriving
calves of milk to sell to the Con-
trol Board. The Governor has
issued instructions to provide all
institutions with fresh milk where

The rout started when Barker |
after conceding 17 runs in 3 overs |
hit Thorbourn with one and was
upheld in his appeal for leg
before. Prescod followed with
the score at 57, and after a third|
wicket partnership of 32 between
Neville Bonitto and McLeod, C.
B. Williams claimed three cheap
wickets in consecutive overs,
two in his last of the day.

Farmer who scored 275 in his
first iNnings of the first match,
completed another century yes-
terday when he scored 107, Tail-
enders Horace King and Clair-
monte DePeiza in an enterpris-
ing knock, helped to boost the
Baibados total from 313 to 330.
King meade 19 including 4 bound-
aries and DePeiza_ scored 16
including three boundaries.

A Maiden
Hunte (76) and Farmer (18)
resumed the Barbados second
innings with the score standing
at i+1 for the loss of two wickets.















eee

BARBADOS, JANUARY 27, 9

Positics





TAYLOR CAUGHT,



BINNS makes a confident |
appeal and Charlie Taylor is |

| WICKET-KEEPER ALFIE
out for a “duck” caught be-

Red Delegate “Indo-China,






7 hind the wicket. The other

powdered milk was formerly sup-] Miller bowled the first over from oer ey Bi F s “ . Pa

plied and arrangements are being}|the s:reen end and sent down a oo ig or oe eerie pie urma: ext

made to increase free supplies to} maiden to Hunte. Farmer took ‘ . ss ; :

school children, orphanages and]a single off Goodridge’s over to H B |

charitable institutions point. In the third over of the 1s rite 1es ‘ . a + . e¢ argets
Milk Control authorities declare i s cf ied see me ~— PANMUNJOM, Jan.’ 26 I RENCH TROOPS

that to reduce the price would hire ie very to sen up —f o. Sars aes : PARIS, J ‘

; ; 4 jew OW s st < ricket- United States Rear Admiral R. » Jan, 26.
reverse the situation, as the dairy ‘who snicked the last and wicket ; tates F ‘ t ck —
farmers’ GAeoine would be cut andj keeper Binns held the catch. E. Libby, angrily _told the _Com- PA TROL TUNIS oe ee eee
as before the zeal to supply will Hunte did not add to his over- munist truce delegate he was get- - “ bagartate ia Yeiect ‘ ’ " nd a
be lessened. Milk is now being|night score of 76 which included|ting a __ little too big for his STREETS . Se meek Ane ie
sold at 84 cents per gallon 12}9 boundaries and lasted for 145]britches.” Libby's heated denun- and Burma a8 their next target
cents per pint retail. In an effort! minutes, : } ciation of North Korean Maj. Gen- TUNIS, Jan. 26. Pe au a conquest. Nationali 1
to use some of the excess milk, The total was 143 and Boogles eral Lee Sand Cho, came during \ Heavily reinforced French troops iinese de egate T. F. Tsiang
a Government pilot plant is manu- Williams joined Farmer who Ci an angry exchange in the Armis-fand polce patrolled the streets of | *? aking before the Us N. main
facturing a limited supply of]@ couple to mid wicket aff Go -|tice Sub-Committee on war pris-]Tynisia breaking up crowds and Folitical Committee urged the
butter, ghee and cream and a) Tidge to make his score 22, oners - arresting suspects following the 11 United Nations to halt this “mad
cable has been desvatched to} Farmer singled wide of mid on| Libby told Lee “United Nations] qays of Nationalist uprisings inj ®@vemture” on the China main-
Trinidad for equipment to expand |‘ ff Goodridge and Williams broke

butter production i

Admiral Carney Ta
Confer With Top |
French Officials |



t

NAPLES, Jan. 26. |

| 5
uk Ritts? RORY Barn

his duck with an easy single to
cover. He later sent the total to
151 in 157 minutes with a drive
to the extra cover boundary and
then singled with a cut to point.
Goodridge’s next over yielded two
singles.

Farmer got a couple to mid
wicket off Miller and then glanc-
ed for a_ single. Williams en-
tered double figures with a
boundary to square leg off the
last from Miller, Farmer turned
one from ie to fine leg

Commander-in-Chief of the Allied/for a couple and then got a

forces in Southern Europe will |
leave his Naples headquarters by
air Monday to confer with top
French officials in North Africa.
His itinerary called for stops in



|the last.

boundary through the slips.

Miller continued from the
sereen end and Williams got an}
easy single to mid wicket.:
Farmer then singled to cover off
The batsmen took three |

Algeria and French Morocco and ‘singles off Goodridge’s next over.

did not include Tunisia.

He is also expected to visit
American airfields in the sector.
—vU..P



Sir John Saint To
Represent Island
In Industry Talks

His Excellency the Governor
has nominated Sir John Saint, Kt.,
C.M.G., O.B.E., as the Barbados
representative at the Conference
for Industrial Developmené which
is being convened by the Carib-
bean Commission in Puerto Rico
from the 11th to 20th February,
1952. The Honourable K. R. Hunte,
M.L.C., has also been nominated
by His Excellency to attend the
Conference as an Adviser

aby



Easy Single

Farmer got an easy single to
square leg off the second he re-
ceived from Miller and Williams
got another with a glance to deep
fine leg. Taking strike from
Goodridge he got a couple to
square leg, the only runs of the
over.

With the total at 177, Tulloch
replaced Miller at the screen end,
He bowled to Farmer who sin-
gled to extra cover off the second,
Williams then took two bound-
aries in succession with cover
drives to make his score 24.

Skipper Bonitto persisted with
Goodridge from the paviljon end
and Farmer got an_ easy single
wide of mid on. Williams also
singled to cover and later got
another off Tulloch to long on,

Mudie was now brought on in
place of Goodridge at the_pavil-
ion end. He bowled to Farmer
@ On Page 4

CARIEBEAN CRUISE

The American pleasure yacht “When and If” is tied up alongside the

Careenage where she is taking fuel

“When and If”, owned by Mrs.

George 8. Patton, widow of General Patton of the U.S., is on a Carib-

bean cruise.






Command is not here for the pur-
pose of satisfying you. Let that
be thoroughly understood. There
apparently is no limit whatso®ver
to your greed and to your rapacity

He








land. said the Asian Red con-
ference under the chairmanship of
Communist Chinese President
Mao Tze Tung recently laid out a
three pronged plin of expansion

vhich 69 persons have been killed
and more than 200 injured.
Troops arrived in the North
African French protector ite yes-
terday by sea, road and railroud as





Second Test

| Egyptian Students
Demand War With U.K.

CAIRO, Jan. 26,

Fifteen thousand Egyptian students marched on the
office of Premier Mustapha El Nahas Pasha shouting de-
mands that he declare war on Britain.
The United States ambassador, Jefferson Caffery is under-
stood to have launched an eleventh-hour mediation eftort to
prevent an open diplomatic break between Egypt and
Britain

Some Press reports said that the Egyptian Cabinet had
already decided to sever relations with London as a result
of yesterday’s Anglo-Egyptian battle in Ismailia



erved all mide |
{ a sous a ‘, a ay raps ar bs
ime prevented four pene, C@MUNISTS



) plane
| Farouk
) finally

ogit

from Cairo!
night, but

them to take

leaving
Airport, last
permitted
this morning,

Airport Authorities saig that in
{facilities would be extended to

LOSE 15 JETS
IN 7 DAYS

FIFTH AIR FORCE,

QUARTERS, Korea, Jan, 26

HEA)





A Fifth Air Force out of the Empire,
her the huge assets ‘4

Battalions” carrying rifles. Shouts to zero for the Allies, proved thir Malaya ig racked with banditry
of “Declare War Nahas” rang out Red jets still have not learned how and is sinking back to lawlessne

Students cried for vengeance for |t@ halt U.N. air operations oy er}from which she was rescued.
ithe deaths of at least 46 Egyptian North Korea Huge prensa m Persia ba

lice i > battle .w r i , | gone, @ypi is grabbing for the

poline “We ae ,warety « batiie- onih The Fifth Airforce announe™i|Sudan and Britain has offered to

that 15 Russian built MIG-~-15 relinquish control of the Suez

A late report from Cairo were shot down last week by F-“6]Ganal to internationel forces:

stated thet the Egyptian Army a : darted’

seized control of flaming riot-
torn Cairo on Saturday night
and the Ministry of Interior
said military law has been de
clared in Egypt to cope with
“organized revolution.” Cairo
has been put under a military
Governor General after day-
long rioting in which tens of
thousands of arsonists set fire
to American and British prop
erty and called for war with
Britain.

There has been no immedi-
ate clarification of the Minis
try of Interior's reference to
revolution. Premier Mustapha
El Nahas Pasha was named
Governor General and the
Government announced all
universities and schools closed
indefinitely. Rioting began
with demonstrations at schools,

was lost. It said UN did howeve
lose fighter bombers to Red ground
fire

The officer said the Fiftn Ai
force has had “quite a few week
in which no Sabre have been k
from MIG
battles this
numbered ar
and still destroyed
hot figure speaks for itself
to Red
| Thunde
| Star, They were shot down while
making low level attacks on Com-
} munist targets,

fire. He
week
high as
15

said “in
r

I
we wet rule
four to one
MIG jets
Lost
ground fire were 3 F-84
sand one F-80 Soooting



| The officer said “the four that
| we lost to groundfire were 50 per
cent, less than last week despite
the fact that enemy anti-aircraft



Bri¥ish aircraft.
Student demon Uons agains:
Britain sprang up all over Cairo ‘
aces” his * 16.000 stron ; spokesm \n | Burma is
parade. Prominent in the line of said the Communists in losin Came with
march were student “Liberation | Jet fighters in the past seven doys to painful build-up

Sabrejets while not one Allied : Egypt come many





PRICE: SIX CENTS

The British
Empire Must

Not Break Up

From Our Own Correspondent)

LONDON, Jan. 26,
Following is an article by
Lord Beaverbrook which will
appear in to-morrow’s Supday .
Express undg@ the heading/
“Do You Caré lf We Lose The
Empire?” It is timed as a
message to the British Empire
and Commonwealth peoples
just before a session of the
British Parliament.

The article begins: The
British Empire must not
break up.

But in the post-war period
enemies within and without
have inflicted startling calam-
ities upon the British Com-
monwealth and Empire.

Never in history has any great
empire sustained such blows of
adversity and with such frighten-
ing repetition. In six short year
Sovialists have undone much
york of splendid centuries,

India ts Out

India walks her own way alone

ot
the

possibly involving the U.S.A, in a
measure\outstripping British
lems.

yrob-

There is no doubt the Empire
is damaged. Great territories and
great industrial and commercial
asset ire dropping away to the
accompaniment of hoot nd jeer
from mobs inflamed with hatred

Nobody seems to care That is

the most incredible aspect of the
whole tragic situation. The great-
est and most promising bond of
human brotherhood thay the world
has even Known is under he ivy
fire, Rut the vublie here and
rbroad st twir shev' ers and
regard this cg@flamitous snvec‘acle
with indifference



Uxplanaioa
What is the explanation of this

and apparently there is no limit to for Communism in Asia pre. Was: AP ee ence taggering apathy’ It is due in
3 . 4 aon’, ohfliinds sia. - been encotntered.”—-U.P. stagge 5 apath) 5 cue

You Stree eo a ete oe ag os an Tsiang said Communists had] ritish troops in the Suez Canal Oe eee ita part to the indifference of the
Oe : as se coee tale to the Freneh bid picked Indo-China and Burma for}Zone city of Ismailia, yesterday, SNES ET IT British people. Poisoned by 50

Re en Carer ne earn ve , the “centres of military struggle i years of Socialist propaganda,
meeting to return all interned a Wwe Maile 1 were killed yester-| for the immediate future.” fre oo eae oman. re- Police Band To | multitudes in Britain are half
Allied civilians who “wished to|day—a daily low since the inde-| said Malaya and Indonesia were nebtea’ by the. peo-didvernthedt ; \ashamed of the Empire. Some of
return” after the Armistice but] pendence seeking Nationalists be-| named » pb .

“centres for economic
struggle» and that the mid-East-
ern Communists were to be urged
to join the Asia revolutionary co-
ordinating cammittee









Libby said there was no guaran-
tee “they will send anyone back,”

Communists handed over the
names of 48 North Korean Allied

gan their campaign of violence â„¢,
January 16 me
—U-P.



civilians now held behind their z He told the Committee that the
lines. They said these were all Roosevelt Will sk place to stop Mao’s expansion
held by their side. United Nations 1 aN 1 th s Cr

‘vy Bi . c é 3 ‘ plan “was not along re China
had asked for information on 57] [Â¥,> saa "Et fringe but on the mainland of
civilians. Longre 5S I oO Carteel China.” He said “this is the single

issue facing the United
toda

He asked the
condemn Russia

the 1945 Chine

Big Unknown Nations

In Tokyo Supreme United Na-
tions Commander General Ridg-
way told a Press conference, he
did not know what was going to

ludia’s Debt

NEW YORK, Jan
Congressional Representative

United Nations to
for violation of
e-Soviet friendship




happen to Panmunjom. He call- Franklin D. Roosevelt, JÂ¥nior, ane ae t sity ea ih thao the
ed the Truce Conference a “big|"0Unced on Saturday that he etter Uni ; a Soviet saitoh
unknown”. He said “negotiations | Plans to seek Congressional can- ae Oni eons ane * Ol See ae of
are extremely delicate, extremely |Ccllation of a $190,000,000 debt Saas . wate eT ss net gti country.’
dificult. We are doing the best}/™dia owes the U.S, for last year’s ing raat te Bed Ativan e at
we can under the circumstances, |@â„¢ersency wheat shipments. which ten Asiatic nations were

Roosevelt told an India League
America

Libby’s bitter outburst in the ' represented met in Peiping Octo-
oO







Prisoner Sub-Committee was pro- meeting: “India has}),.; 4 1951, He said: “Along the
voked by the Communist General |‘#ken two important steps down] whole frontier from Tibet in the
Lee’s refusal to answer his ques-|the long, hard road to economit| extreme west to Kwangsi and
tion as to whether Reds intend to] sufficiency and political stabilit¥.| Kwangtung in the southw , poli-
furiish the requested information| Democratic elections which thefticeal and military preparations
on 99,000 missing South Korean , Indian Government is now hold-| were made for further expansion.”

prisoners. ing for the first time in her his- UP.





; 1
Lee said “I am not satisfied with | tory well as the eagerness r
that answer” Libby said “I asked} which her leaders have shown in e
you General Lee a question. You]co-operating in the administration Derelict Off

gave me no answer. You have|jof our Point Four programme in-
the brazen effrontery to say I am
not satisfied with that answer”.
It seems to us that you are tting
a little too big for your britches.’

dicate clearly, that India, although
she may still be going through |
some economic and political grow-
ing pains promises to become a




Chacachacare





U.P. Poulwark of strength and stability} Two cablegrams received by
: ised on democracy in Asia, |the lo eee iaer oan best
a aste » . day « t
Man-in-the-Street —UP.|‘orday purported that a derelict
‘ sighted off Chacachacare eee
» oe ee . * ‘was believed t the schooner
Little Affected | Sutlin’s Negotiations | y2%4 M8 8s WON
, ; Mj ae i to be over a month overdue ol
By Nationalisation Going Ahead Well her voyage from Barbados tt

British Guiana,
But a later cablegram receive

TEHERAN, Jan. 26

Despite predictions of an early NASSAU, Jan



25,

man in the street has been little| Marks is expected to arrive sooa;ping Master was | left









Cinema, Gardening
Hints, Farm & Gar- |}
den |

terity policies
Government made efforts to
fiid other jobs for labour thrown



Japs Seek Trade



























d Fire! Fire!

; 4 ns . : , ~aused ambig because Demonstrators, set fire to the
and complete crackup of Iran’s William Butlin announced today | by him caused ambiguity ! De i

economy following the with-|that negotiations with Ljonei’ it seemed to state that the dere-|Brit'sh Overseas Airlines booking)
drawal of the British nine months} Marks, an American who holds an| lict which was sighted was the|centre here,

of nationalisation brought little if| option. on Butlin’s vacation vil- schooner Elody M. found ¢ 1p ized
any change in the standard of |lage, Grand Bahamas, were going|four miles off Chacac nt me
‘living of the average Iranian. The! quite satisfactorily. Island. The Harbour and Ship

uncertain |partly British
laffected by the loss of Anglo-|to confer with Butlin, Butlin is|whether the derelict that was the |the furniture, and started setting

Iranian Oil Company revenues. }lJeaving for Bermuda on Wednes-|Elody M. was what was thought|fire to the building. The demon-
Prices of such basic commodi- ; day oo will be returning to}to be the Zenith or whether there|strators also broke into the
ties as tea, sugar, bread, cotton, Nassau in March. From Bermuda] were two independent incidents. Metro Cinema owned by Metro-
goods either remained stational] he will be going to London to The first cablegram reaching|Goldwy-Mayer, smashed all the
or thave risen not more than five} attend an annual reunion at \the Harbour and Shipping Master! windows and attempted to set it
}per cent over last year ? the Albert Hall of former Butliny W@*% from the Captain of the S.S.,on fire. Earlier, they crashed
With the upper and middle holide s (CP) Ancap Tercero on Friday stating}into the Café Opera Square, drove
classes however it is a different site eile ES ashen lthat he (the captain) received|out patrons, smashed the chairs
matter. Prices of luxury goods ———————" from Puerto Cabello radio the)and tables and then set them afire,
skyrocketed because of heavy WHAT’S INSIDE TO-DAY information that a timber ship —UP.
\taxes and reduced imports. Some Page 2. Carib, Tourism lwas sighted in lattitude 10.545
90% of the population was not : 7 . \north, longitude 62.06.3 west. The
affected by Government’s aus- » 3 FEATURES: At the @ On Page 16

newspaper Al Misri to have de-
cided unanimously last night to
break off diplomatic relations with
Britain, but put off any announce-
ment for. 24 to 48 hours Another

Attend Funeral

Owing to the death of
one of the members of the
Barbados Police Force





| beliet that the Empire was en-

members of that

false and dishonest

ihe ignorant

arty have a

tirely built %y brutal force. and

‘exploitation”

’ i i the 2 > » has
Cabinet me s sche But if pride in the Empire has
Sender maering scheduled on! hand will be attending his fun- een weakened and if sneaking
Al Misri reported the Ismailio eral at 4 pm. today, and hame } tak place, is it
battle under scresming red ban- regret thai they will be unable iot still obvious to the most care-
er lines. It said that the fight | to take thelr customary part in e eye that the whole economy
constituted a “Declaration § of} the Annual Harvest Festiva! of Britain built upon the
VWar” by Britain Service at St. Luke’s Church } Empire, that the Empire the
It said editorially “Britain has} St. George | ndation on which prosperity
lost Egypt.” We régret out loyal- ~ _ | rests? How can 50,000,000 people
ty to Britain in 1942, when the ‘s l}expect to live on one small 1 ri
Germang drove the British before | OLIVE OIL, REFINER) | f the lose the huge support of
them to the gates of Alexandri ; | overseas territories? :
Such an ‘event will come again, EXPLODES | The mere self interest should
d then we won't make the same | nake them realise the terrible
mistake, LISBON, Jan. 26 hreat to their well-being that the
| A state of emergency was de- An olive oil refinery exploded | 'o of the Empire involves,
clared in Cairo, but failed to stop |Ftiday night in Alvito village, 82! ‘The consequences of such 4
students demonstrations, coin- miles south of Lisbon killing two} tragedy will be dire indeed,
ciding with the re-opening of persons and seriously injuring six.|Make no mistake about it. It
schools following a week's sus- |The explosion shook houses over the Empire goes, the sterling



pension for previous student|@ mile area panicking 3,000 resi-
‘ting. British authorities said, |dents—U.P,

Henceforth, the Egyptian Gov- —

rnment will not be able either to|

close or re-open universities and

chool We shall clot them |

when we deem it necessary.” ; Whenever

It was estimated that 15,000, |

emonstrators broke through a ‘

police cordon thrown around

Premier Nahas’ offices,
,| One demonstrator asked the

Social Affairs Minister, Abdel



Fattah Sallan, “Are you going to
jjbreak diplomatic relations with
Britain and fight Britain? The
;| Minister replied, “Tomorrow you
,/will hear that the Government
,|les taken decisions along those
lines.”

Dinner, Luncheon,

Egyptian students in an anny
enti-British demonstration broke
-jinto the Rivoli Cinema, which is
owned, smashed





Japan Plans Treaty
With Nationalist









out of york by the curtailment of » &SPORT FEA- } . .
the oil industry’s operations, The TURES: Bookie, | P. t With Ar entina China COST OF LIVING
international trade on cash basis ee. Jamaica ae 1 gs ; TOKYO, Jan. 26 rescue also.
is practically at a standstill owing * , an, 26 Prime Minister Shigeru Yoshida
to lack of foreign exchange. 5. SPORT REPORTS: | TOKYO, Jan, 26 indics ted that h Wao nent
Mossadegh’s Government is mak- Fifth Test, Table | A Japanese trade mission } 1 ‘ t . t ie ith F Chit
:: . E sa e “he > “ave enting ans 4 é y 2 ese
ing every effort to avoid economic Tennis, Yachting, jeenedwie a e ay at frm ae Nati hatint ‘Gevitien it as the
ollapse. The step was to Football Pols ; = Pile epee: By has - 4 s i Wi f
ayt . » ‘wy : 7 trade agreement. It will replace}Government of Formosa and not Forei ines o
jenpecta fre £40 ~ 000 ~ oe ea Family the reat agreement signed|of China He told the Diet of; gn
d it annually con- . oy ra “ests i
“luded barter de I Nets cleee 7. Sewing Circle, Your | Jume 23rd 1949 which expir ever rer, Sorhaueht a ere Portugal because
ear = ; : ' , apan becomes a sovereign! Wi e Government o 5
the gap. Baby and You, when Japan a At tnmat: Kwan? wk. anki . E
ised to. buy of its What’s Cooking state again. ; Fees OS seen Saeee) ae ee admitted into the
imports in the sterling area but 8. Editorials; Book The head of the delegation has) !0'0 eee itis ‘ of Chi 2 r
after restrictions imposed by the Review not yet been announced but} bs. ice ss eb ovld crs | iti j
British Treasury this amount wa , 9, Bermuda House of || the most likely candidate is re-| Japanese observers said Yoshi~ British Preferenti
halved. So far barter deals have Assembly and “The ported to be Hirohi Takasu ex- “#5 Fé ply : full of nuances
been completed h Russia, Gazette” port section chief in the Trad which ; reflected pressure 3 be-}
Germany, France and _ others » 10. West Indian News Ministry. jing put on him xe clarify his lk |
Negotations are under way 11. Books. Japanese Trade officials said|ter to John Fo’ = Dulle J fiirm=|
with Italy, Hu vy, Czecho lo- | 12. Church Services Japan is seeking a million dollars|ing@ tha Japan was prepare - |
vakia, Poland Jap Sugar a as ‘id , two way trade lly vith | S0o0n € ¥Y Possipie to Cite
ieficits have been made up fairly or, re Apuantinal’ He wants|clude with the National Govera-|
uccessfully by barter with Rus- 13. Comic Strips raw cotton, wor and | ™e . ona a — — h KWV SHERRIES
sia and other countries | ie * he tal wheat from 1 wants | Will re-establish normal relations, aw 5
A national six per cent. two vear 16. Local News. te ; oi pe geht ' {between the two Governments.
joan has been floated. —U.P. anil P= J —U?P.

irea will go as well and Britain
! @ On Page 5

You - -



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New Zealand, Sweden and many other
Countries of the World, including the
British West Indies

And in these burdensome days of HIGH

KX.W.V. comes to your

K.W.V. Wines COST much less than

France, Spain, and
K.W.V. Wines are

» Colony under the

al Tariff

EES Se FALE! A AR RS A WAR

K.W.V. Paarl Tawny, K.W.V. Coronation Wine,
K.W.V. Sweet Vermouth, K.W.V. Dry Ver-
mouth, K.W.V. SPARKLING WHITE WINE,





PAGE TWO





SANETTA DRESS SHOP

BATHING

Best
the





wA-



selection

Island for



o-â„¢-
~ GLOBE

Lower Broad Street

and

Girls

of styles
Ladies,





“Om, Con

colours



SUITS

in

and Boys.

SF

Con

POSITIVE MOVIE LEADERS

To-nite, 8.30 p.m. Monday — Tuesday, 5.00 & 8.30



/Ricy younGn!

Jane POWELL - Danielle D
Wendell COREY - remand taki

with Marcel Dalio

4

+ Una Merkel + Richard Anderson + Jean Murat





Extra Attraction Tonite, Monday and Tuesday
Ist Pictures of THE AUSTRALIA-.WEST INDIES

=

SPECIAL MIDWEEK ATTRACTION

CRICKET TOUR.
Thrilling Scenes of the 2nd





Test

Wednesday, January 30th, Thursday 31st, at 5.00 & 8.30

Enmeide Straight ~

BARRY SULLIVAN

ARLENE





William Fogarty (B

DAHL

0s, Limited

Announcing our re-opening

After Stocktahing

Many Clearance Bargains

In Every Department

To make way for NEW GOODS, we
have REDUCED lots of Items to a frac-
tion of what you would originally pay.

It is customary for us to have a Clear-
ance after Stocktaking—so DOWN go
the PRICES on some of our Very Best,
Very Newest MATERIALS, SHOES,
HATS, Etc., Ete., Ete.

ge Pay US a Visit without Delay

GENTLEMEN!

WILLIAM FOGARTY (B'dos.) Limited

continues to
uphold

THE TRADITIONS OF

FINE TAILORING

Meticulous care taken
in the making of all

Marked

Cut, Fit and Style

Full Satisfaction

Guaranteed





SUITS
e

Experiness in

" —————







SSS

PLL LL LLLELLE PAS LSELPFELD |

T0-DAY'S NEWS FLASH

WHIPAKER’S ALMANAC

Thousands of L.8.« tudents - DECOR

throughout the British Empire 24 PIECE ATED

hav« increased their salaries |

through studying our easy postal TEA only

courses in BOOK-KEEPING,

SECRETARYSHII BUSINESS 16

ORGANISATION, COMMERCIAL for 6 persons .

LAW, ECONOMICS, ete. Reduced

fees to oversens students

Diplomas swarded Prospectus y t ‘

a G. W. Huteh

LONDON SCHOOL OF r : ule ISON
COMMERCE

(Dept. B.A.4), 116 High Hylborn, - & CO,, LTD.

London, W.C.1., England. Broad St. — Diai



BROWN’S NAUTICAL ALMANAC

DAILY MAIL
PLASTIC SCHOOL RULERS

VIOLIN BOWS &
PIANO INSULATORS |

8
S

tes



LEARN TO EARN



|
1952 |
Unabridged Edition }
1952 |
YEAR BOOK 1952

BOW HAIR

UNSHADES FOR DOLLS
EPARATOR OIL by the Pint.
—_ ot —
JOHNSON'S STATIONERY
& HARDWARE



TODAY To TUESDAY 4.45

Alfred HITCHCOCK'S Thrilling Masterpiece !

“STRANGERS on a TRAIN”

——$—$——_____—. |

Special

At J. BALDINI & CO.,

Office at Lashley’s Ltd.
Prince



«DAY ADVOCATE





Value



WATCH REPAIRS

William Henry Street.



—

& 8.30 P.M.

Farley Ruth Robert
GRANGER — ROMAN — WALKER LZ
Ss ecial THU ts 3 E m ning Friday ist
wf That us se r nite *

“GUN RUNNERS MITCHUM RYAN in A

Jimmy WAKELY & “TRE RACKET’

“ROLLIN: WESTWARD with Lizabeth

Tex RITTER Action—Packed Suspense

OISTIN

PELAZA

Michae! O'SHEA &
“RIO GRANDE ‘
John WAYNE



Coming (Serial) |
FEDERAL AGENTS vs.
UNDERWORLD, INC



putas! GARETY

To-day and To-morrow 4.45 & 8.30 p.m’ |
MAN FROM FRISCO’

Phylis CAL

Mat. To-day 5 p.m

Warners Technicolor Action!
Randolph

SCOTT in—
FORT WORTH”

David BRAIN—Phyilis THAXTER

—_————$——— —

Tues. & Wed, 6.30 p.m

THE GOLDEN MADONNA”
VERT--Michael RENNEE &














The Garder
8ST. JAMES

To-day & To-morrow 8.30 p.m.



be





Kirk ALYN—James DALE } vavthNo® ALi ——
12 Thrilling Chapters { Arthur KENNEDY
Tah? nauk =” ~~
“"" $O-DAY TO TUESDAY, 445 & 830 PM.
ALE
ver-before-told story
of the “kept men” of that




Saturday Afternoon Racket!




stariog JOWN DEREK - Donna REED





+ Produced euD0Y » Directed by DAVIO MILLER + Based
Lompell « Writes ie the Sercen by MILLARD COME ond SHOMEY BOCA oe aa
Extra
Short

“POOR ELMER”

WEDNESDAY AND THURSDAY, 4.45 & 8.30 P.M.

Paramount Presents . . .

“HER WONDERFUL LIFE”

ROY

LAST 2 SHOWS TO-DAY
4.30 & 8.15
Â¥

Paramount Presents .. .





“THE GREAT”
MISSOURI RAID”
Starring :

WENDELL COREY
McDONALD CAREY

Extra :
“TALE OF TWO CAFES”

!

OLYMPIC

AL

?arameunt Double

BARBARA STANWYCK
BURT LANCASTER

in

“SORRY WRONG
NUMB)

And

“ADVENTURE ISLAND”

TO-DAY AND TO-MORROW, 4.30 & 8.15 P.M.

COLUMBIA ACTION DOUBLE |

ge CoCewrorpreree, |
“ae EXOTIC CAIRO FLARES ;





TUESDAY AND WEDNE
Columbia Double.
JON HALL -

AND

SAVAGE BATTLE
ama at
AND WOMEN

eel:
N

ve
bt
LTT

oerge cher - Preteen ty WALACL MMDORALD - Dowcted

SDAY, 4.30 & 8.15 P.M.

NINA FOCH in

“THE MUTINEERS"

AND

“DARK

Starr
WILLIAM HOLDEN

TO-DAY AND TO-MOR

Columbia Double.

“LAST OF THE

Starr
PAUL HENRIED

PAST’

ing:

xy

ROW, 4.30 & 8.15 P.M.

LEE J. COBB

BUCCANEERS”

JACK OAKTE

AND

“BLACK

Starr
LOUIS HAYWARD

ARROW”

ing :
GEORGE MACREADY

To-morrow & Tues,, 4.30 & 8.15



arriving
evening by the Jamaica ’plane.
1

HH Excellency the Governor
and Lady Savage -accom-
p.nied by Major Detinis Vaughan
attended the third day’s play of
the second Intercolonial cricket
‘gume between Barbados and
jJumaica at Kensington yesterday.

' Attended Provincial Synod
1S Lordship Bishop Mancde-
vill’ who left Barbados on
January 7th to attend the Pro-
vincial Synod in Nassau returned
jon Friday evening by B.W.IA.
via Puerto Rico.

Barbados Heliday
IR Alfred and Laay #rown
were among the passengers
at Seawell on Friday

Sir Alfred who was born in
Qctober 1883 was educated at
Northampton County School and
Lendon University, He was
married in 1910 to the daughter
of Frederick Plessen of Neubran-
denburg. They have two daught-
ers. He obtained his LL.B, with
class honours in 1903, his
LL.D. in 1905 and later was ad-
as a solicitor.

as a Lieutenant in i909.
entered the Department of His
Treasury Solicitor in 1905 and
. Treasury
1936; Solicitor H.M.
Customs and Excise 1941-44; Con-
trol Commission for Germany
1944; Legal Adviser to Foreign
Office (German Section) 1947, He
has also been a member of
several international legal con-
ferences.

Since 1949 he has been Legal
Adviser to British Military Gov-
ernor in Germany.

Engaged
engagement was an-~
nounced on Friday night
between Miss Heather Rosemary
Ramsay, second daughter of Mr.
Hugh ‘O. Ramsay and the late
Mrs. Ramsay of Carlisle View
Bay Street and Mr. George
Richard Barnes, eldest son of
Capt. and Mrs. Robert C, Barnes
of 6th Avenue Belleville.

Mr. Barnes has recently returned
on vacation from the U.S. where
he is a Graduate Fellow, Emory
University,

He returns to the U.S. on Thurs-

day accompanied by his sister
.gnes who also resides in the
United States,

After Six Weeks
ul Eee. spending an enjoyable
holiday in Barbados, Mrs.
Alfred Holder and Miss Lilian
Barker two Barbadians residing
at Jamaica, Long Island, New

nine years in the army he §

jesty’s Procurator General and fj





SUNDAY, JANUARY
ne Neen ee

9"

27, 1952

Caub Calling

LADIES AT POLO

ie
Le
\



A BECTION of the crowd, most of them ladies, who saw the final polo game at the Garrison Savannah

yesterday afternoon.

Staying With Parents
R. AND MRS. RUPERT
CHEEKES fiew in from

Trinidad on Friday by B.W.1.A.
on a short visit. Mr. Cheekes is
a Director of Central Cariobean
Distributors, Trinidad. Hig wife
is the former Mary Bourne,
daughter of Mr. and Mrs. E.
Carlyle Bourne of “Cedar Hill”,
Government Hill, with whom they
are staying.

They will be returning to Trini-

dad early in the week.

Antigua Visit
Bee ard Mrs, Hugh Wilkin
4 who arrived trom the U.S

recently are due to ieave to-
morrow morning by B.W.LA, for
Antigua on a short visit. They
will be returning in a couple of

days.
Festival Today

HERE will be a Harvest Festi-
val at St. Luke’s Church,
St. George this afternoon at 4

o'clock, The Police Band will be
in attendance and the church
choir will render a programme of
Church Music.

‘Final Game

iorty spectators, (most
them ladies in colourful
frocks) watched the
final game of the 1951—52 Polo
Season from the enclosure
around the Polo Hut at the Gar-
rison Savannah yesterday after+
noon. Many other polo fans saw
the game from around the touch-
line.

VER
of
afternoon

Amongst the crowd were sev-

eral Canadian, English and
American visitors to the colony
and they seemed to enjoy the

game quite as much as the local
spectators, some comparing the
game with polo “at home.”

It was a lovely sunny after-
noon with a cool breeze blowing
across the ground.

Six Lectures

M* J. CAMERON TUDOR,
M.A., will give a series of
six lectures in the Library at
Harrison College, beginning on
Tuesday February 5th at 8 p.m.
The title of his lectures. is
“Great Britain and Her Em-

pires—1764—1914,”

Indefinite Stay
M“* C, O, STANLEY, C.B.E.,

Chairman and Managing
Director of Pye Ltd., Cambridge
accompanied by Mrs. Stanley ar-
rived from England by air on
Friday evening via the U.S, and
Jamaica, They were met at Sea-
well by Mr. and Mrs. Rod Stewart
of Pye Ltd, and Mr, P, C, S.
Maffei. Barbados Agent of the
company.

After a holiday here they plan
to visit some of the other West
Indian islands. This is their first
visit to Barbados.

Mr, and Mrs, Sianley ire
guests at the Rockley Beach Club,
Best Nurse

ISS OLGA I. WORRELL, of

Bush Hall, St. Michael and

a Senior Nurse at the General

Hospital will be leaving to-day by

B.W.LA. for Trinidad on a three-

months’ course at the Carib Medi-
cal Centre, Port-of-Spain,

At the recent presentation “of
ce tificates and Prizes to nurses
at the General Hospital, Nurse
Worrell was awarded a special
prize for being the best practical
nurse of 1951,

York, are due to leave tomorrow
by B.W.1.A. for Puerto Rico where
they will remain for ancther week
before returning home.

They have been staying at
“Leaton-on-Sea”, The Stream for
the past six weeks.

This was Mrs. Holder’, first
visit back here since she left 35
years ago and also the first time
for Miss Barker in 23 years.

Back To St. Lucia
R. and MRS. FREDDIE POT-
TER who have been here
for just over a week, are expected
to return to St. Lucia to-day
where Mr, Potter is Manager of
Cable and Wireless’ Branch.
Regular Visitors
R. and MRS, CHARLES Mc-
Enearney of Trinidad, are
at present spending a short holi-
day in Barbados, and are guests
at Cacrabank.

Regular visitors to Barbados
they plan to return to Trinidad
on Tuesday.

Mr. McEnearney is Managing
Director of Messrs. Chas. Me



Enearney and Co., Ltd., Barbados
and a Director of Messrs, Chas.{
McEnearney and Co., Lad, "
dad.

“EVERYBODY ASHORE”—seemed to be the order of the day on Thursday when the

“Lady Nelson” and
Tourists from both ships spent the
are seen landing at the Baggage

“Lady Rodney” met in Carlisle Bay for the first time in many years.

Here a group of them

day on shore shopping and touring the Island.
Warehouse steps.





;
OSSD

Genuine Bargains! Genuine Bargains!

REAL LEATHER HANDBAGS. British Made

$7.10 now $2.50. $9.68 now $3.00. $11.49 now $4.00. $14.29 now $5.00,
IMITATION LEATHER AND PLASTIC. All Colours.

$6.91 now $2.80, $6.48 now $2.10, $5.45 now $1.80. $2.33 new $1.30,
FLOWERED GEORGETTES ............................ $2.00 now $1.00
CHARNOS FULLY FASHIONED NYLON HOSE $2.33 now $1.80
BURT MRED SBME TO oi. vein od cn la avn cu svamiekoneniry. $3.24 now $1.60

40 & 50 cents
$1.00
all at 4 cents Yd.

T. R. EVANS & WHITFIELDS

THE BARBADOS AQUATIC
CLUB

(Local and Visiting Members
Only)

on
SATURDAY, February 2nd

ESSE

BOYS’ and YOUNG MEN’S WHITE KNITTED SHIRTS
RICK RACK and SILK BRAIDS

Music by Mr. C. Curwen's
Orchestra

% Members are cordially invited







%
(Free Admission to Ballroom) 8 Dial 4220 YOUR SHOE STORES :
$5608600080060605000060" Dial 4606
| PROPS SSS S8 OY 956555598695 “
¢
‘ %
THE WOMEN’S | ii CT OCKS| ‘
% %
$ %
igs oO

CANADIAN CLUB

CLOCKS!

Annual Dance

A large selection of The Famous

Kienzle Clock

a

in aid of
LOCAL CHARITY

under the Avspices of His Excellency the Governor Just arrived —

4









|
and Lady SAVAGE 1%
%,
at ‘thie : 1» | SS Travelling Alarms, Beige, Green Black, etc, y
| * f Small Coloured Fancy Alarms, various prices, :
© ‘
Marine Hotel | ‘The Office Clock that you were enquiring for— x
. | Table Model Chiming Clocks, also Regulators. :
— ON — i | $
+
SATURDAY EVENING, February 23rd S EE THES E Now! %
iS 7
GAMES iS at ;
BRIDGE ig %
PALMISTRY . %
s
| Snr wie : Louis L. Bayley :
e 2
| ADMISSION _— $1.00 rae §
8 >
tee SSAA | "oc oocosscessessosososcossnesosoooocooososesooos:”







SUNDAY, JANUARY 27, 1952

————

SUNDAY

ADVOCATE



PACE

THREE









AT THE CINEMA

Strangers On A Train

. ¢
My GB.
FROM having no Hitchcock films for some time, as I

mentioned three weeks

ago when

“Stage Fright” was

showing, we now have th's gentleman’s latest thriller
STRANGERS ON A TRAIN, so I can’t complain any more.

It ha
the others—SATURDAY’S

ms to be my choice for the best film this week, but

HERO and RICH,, YOUNG

AND: PRETTY are each entertaining in their own way and
I enjoyed them as well. My predilection for Mr. Hitchcock
stems from an early taste for thrills and suspense, so let’s
have a look at STRANGERS IN A TRAIN first.

To begin with, there’s no de-
nying the fact that the plot is
weak, but that has not deterred
the. director in the slightest and
he has produced a chiller full of
mounting suspense and cumula-
tive horrer, topped off with a
hair-raising climax which is in
the best Hitchcock tradition.
Murder, tennis, nyphomania and
a runaway merry-go-round are
all taken in his stride and all his
tricks and techniques are brought
into play as each situation takes
its toll of gasps right to the whirl-
ing’ climax.

The-story concerns a young ten-
nis player. About to divoree his
wife, he is engaged in conversation
on, @ train by a young man who
turns out to be a psychopath. Hav-
ing read all about the tennis play-
er and his marital troubles in the
papers, the lunatic makes the
friendly offer to kill his wife, if,
as a return favour, the sportsman
will do away with his father.
After all, one good turn deserves
another! Our hero, quite natur-
ally,, finds this suggestion repug-
nant, but the psychopath thinks it’s
a@ deal, tracks the wife to an
amusement park and strangles her.
News of this action comes as a rude
shock. to the athlete, who bumbles
about. all over the place instead
of going to the police. More
shoeks are in store for him when
he finds he is being tailed by
the madman who keeps reminding
him of his part of the bargain.
To. make a long story short, the
two of them finally fight it out to
the death on a runaway carousel.

Though the story is anything but
credible, it offers a myriad of op-
portunities for Mr. Hitchcock's
photographic skill. To mention
just one, the strangling of the girl
in. the amusement park—as seen
through her glasses which she has
dropped—appears to be two fig-
ures locked in a_ slow-motion
death-struggle, under water.
Hitchcock’s skill with the camera
is second to none, and though
many of his angular shots are
familiar, they are never boring.

Farley Granger, Ruth Roman
and Robert Walker head the cast,
As the involved tennis-player, Mr.
Granger certainly takes the whole
affair very calmly which tends to
make the character rather colour-
less, and it is hard to believe that
Miss Roman, as a sophisticated
society girl, could be in love with
anyone quite as juvenile. Robert
WaNer plays the psychopathic
play-boy with conviction and the
supporting cast is up to scratch.

The music—especially composed
and arranged for the film—leaves
nothing to be desired,

SATURDAY’S HERO

“SATURDAY’S HERO”, now
showing at the Empire, is a well
integrated sports drama that de-
parts from the usual formula and
emerges with a few significant
comments on “amateur” college
athletics in the United States.
Directed and acted with integrity,
it turns a beacon light on the evils
of “buying” players—in this in-
stance football players—for vari-
ous colleges teams. This is not a
problem with which West Indians
are faced, but it is a momentous
one in the U.S. and this film is an
jndietment of such practices.

The story concerns the ambi-
tious son of a Polish immigrant,
who accepts a football scholarship
to gain entrance to a reputable

southern university, only to find,
that owing to football, there is
little or no time for studies in his
college career. He is further dis-
illusioned by the fact that the
alumnus who is his “benefactor”
is concerned with him only insofar
as he can farther the man’s. poli-
tical ambitions by becoming an
“All American” star. A, perman-
ent injury sustained in his final
match brings the realization that
the university has no further use
for him, and he returns, to his home
br pick up the strings of his former
ife.

In the leading roles, the char-
acters «are life-size and John
Derek, a handsome young actor
and one to watch, plays the prin-
cipal part with a quiet, innate dig-

nity and sensitivity—not often
seen in one so young. As his im-
migrant father, Sandro Giglio
gives a fine sympathetic perform-

ance which is lighted by the prin-
ciples with which he imbues his
sons, The suave, charming man-
ner of Sydney Blackmer, the bene-
factor, cloaks his ruthless ambi-
tions and desire for personal pow-
er through promoting a successful

team at any cost to the boys who
do the playing. Alexander Knox
gives a sympathetic and interest-



ing portrayal of our football hero's
English professor, who realizes the
boy's ambitions and understands
why he is unable to attain them.

There are detailed and authentic
equences of intensive football
training, topped off with exciting
games. Whether you like football
or not-—and I am not one of its
fans—it is an original and well-
done film.

21CH, YOUNG AND PRETTY

the Globe, “RICH,
AND PRETTY” is a
musical starring Jane
Danielle Darrieux, with
newcomer Vic Damone, Wendell
Corey and Una Merkel, Producer

Playing at
YOUNG
gaily clad
Powell,



Pasternak has filled the basket
lavishly vith gorgeous clothes,
£ norous sets and a dreamy
Ps background. (A Texas busi-
ness man and ranch-owner, di-
voreed for many years from his
French wife, goes to Paris on
United Nations business, With him
is his pretty young deughter who
is under the impression that her
mother is dead. Of course, the two
meet, to the consternation of the

father, and the girl, who has al-
ways loved singing and dancing,
finds that her mother is the pre-
miere entertainer and chanteuse
in Paris. She also has a delight-
ful romance, and everything ends
up just as it should. Not an out-
standing plot, but it is more
charmingly done than many musi-
cals I have seen.

Little Miss Powell is as attrac-
tive as ever and it is a pleasure to
wateh her sing and dance, and she
i pe foil for the sophistica-
io nd faseinating charm of

rfect

i
4







Da Darrieux who plays her
nother. Vie Darmone plays oppo-
site Miss Powell, and judging from

his voice, he will probably be seen
in many musicals along with Fer-
nando Lamas, another newcomer,
who with Miss Darrieux, puts over
come catchy songs. Wendell Corey
and Una Merkel both give good
performances, With a talented
casts glamorous technicolour and
good tunes, “RICH, YOUNG AND
PRETTY” is pleasant entertain-
ment.



The Family Welfare
Society

THE FAMILY WELFARE
SOCIETY was established in
1930 to provide relief to per-
sons in distressed circum-
stances in St. Michael’s Parish
who would not normally re-
ceive help from the Poor Law
Guardians.

The Committee of the Society
includes the Churchwarden of St.
Michael and representatives of
the Anglican, Methodist and
Moravian Churches, the Salvation
Army, the Girls’ Friendly Society
and the Mothers’ Union—all of
whom have practical knowledge
and experience in the assistance
of the poor and needy. Every
case is carefully investigated
individually and the homes of
applicants are visited before help
is given.

The Society helps many Tespec-
table folks who have fallen on
evil times through no fault of
their own, and who do not present
themselves for charity, but whose
need is discovered by some of the
Committee. There is no distinction
of class, colour or creed. The
Society has assisted unemployed
clerks, seamstresses, plantation

JUST RECEIVED

47
Eau de Quinine

Hair Tonic

A HAIR TONIC Indispensable
for the care of the scalp and
hair, Removes and prevents the

further development of
DANDRUFF
It leaves the hair soft and silky
and leaves a refreshing perfume
Two Sizes

®
% (¢. CARLTON BROWNE

£666,659
Spb :636,405 OOOO OOOO LDAOGLES SOS

overseers, widows with young
children, nurses, and many old
people who are beyond work and
who depend on the monthly grant
from the Family Welfare Society
to pay their rent, or help with
daily necessities.

122 Cases

At present there are 122 cases
on the books reeeiving grants of
money or groceries each month
at a cost of £370 a month, but all
of these cannot be continued
without further funds. Some of
the firms and companies in the
city are most faithful supporters
of this charity, and many Clubs
and private individuals have
given generous subscriptions and
donations over a period of 20
years and have made it possible
for this work to go on. But there
are many who do not seem to
have heard of the Family Welfare
Society and it is to them, and to
the welcome visitors to our Island
that this appeal is made,

The Society has cases in which
there are 6 or 7 children under
14 years of age and a father out
of work; cases who gre suffer-
ing from the effects “df serious
illness or accident and some who



£5600",

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OPS PPO SS POOPED errr

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wheat germ has been designed
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and fitness.

S|
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>is
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TRY IT TO-DAY :
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EMPROTE, a concentrated food composed of milk powders,
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TRY A TIN—YOU’LL FEEL THE DIFFERENCE
COLLINS DRUG STORES

Broad & Tudor Streets
OLE OOSOSOGO OO GOSL LOCOCO

hardening Hints Fy -m And Garden|

For Amateurs

Garden Paths

With the plan of the garden
before us, we see that so far the

(1) boundary of the land

_ has been considered and

(2) the trees have also been
discussed,

Next on the pian come the

garden paths and the question
arises as to the kind of paths the
garden is to have.

Garden paths are important,
and should never degenerate into
just that strip of ground be-
tween two beds. They must be
the proper width, and, have a
good foundation.

The choice will lie between
“grass,” “cement,” “gravel,” brick
and “Crazy,” but there is no
reason why a garden should not

have more than one type of
path.
All garden paths should be

four feet, te four feet six inches
wide. This width allows two
people to walk the path com-
tortably side by side.

In all cases a foundation cf
twelve inches deep should be
dug, and the cavity filled in, with
stones, broken bricks, rubbish,
and the whole rolled and rammed
to a body ready for the surface,
Such a foundation ensures a
certain amount of drainage.

In the case of a gravel path,
after this foundation has been
laid, five inches of course gravel
should be added, This must be
watered and rolled to a finm
body, Finally, top the path with
two inches of fine gravel. Water
and roll this in turn, taking
special care of the edges, roll
until a solid surface is formed.
When making a gravel path it
is advisable to make the surface
slightly convex to ensure good
drainage.

In making the Cement path
the foundation should be made
exactly as has already been des.
cribed. Bring this foundation to
within three inches of the final
level required,

Mix the concrete for the sur-
face of the path in the following
strength.

4 parts of shingle.
2 parts of sand,
1 part of cement,

Mix the ingredients dry, and
then add water, turning and
mixing until it is of a good con-
sistency to spread. The nearer
to the path that this can be done
the better. As concrete should
be used half an hour from the
time the water is added do not
mix much at one time.

Put the mixed concrete in
blobs on the path and level and
edge each blob before adding the
next, The path need not be
finished at one time.

A concrete path is permanen:,
weed proof and dries off quickly
after rain,

For the Crazy path again the
foundation is the same,

The stones for the crazy path,
if not obtainable otherwise, can
be made of the same concrete
mixture as that given for the
cement path, shaping them in a
wooden mould,

These slabs should be laid on
a foundation of cement and the
eracks in-between filled in with
some of the same cement.

Another method is to fill in the

cracks with earth, and plant
clumps of growing plants in-
between,

The Brick path again uses the
same foundation originally given.

The Bricks are laid either on
edge, or flat, on a bed of cement.
They can be arranged in a
pattern.

The Grass path is not laid on
any foundation, and, although it
is simpler and less expensive to
make in the beginning, yet a
grass path, entails constant
labour to keep it in order. It
must be kept free of weeds, cut
and rolled regularly.

Paths, garden beds, and lawns,
should all be neatly edged, and
there is no better edge than our
local sawn stones cut suitably. |

Each sawn-stone block meas- |
ures roughly 2 feet by 1 foot.

These blocks should be sawn
in three, lengthwise, so giving
three 2 feet lengths by 4 in
thick by 1 ft. deep. |

Now saw each of these length- |
wise in half. Result, 12 feet of)
edging 4 inches thick by 6 inches
deep, in six lengths, |

As these blocks sell at 2s, per |
block the number of blocks that}
will be needed, and the cost can}
easily be worked out, |



|

are blind or crippled. In all these |
cases it would be tragic to have
to discontinue assistance.

Wherever possible the family is
encouraged to help themselves,
and as soon as the children are
old enough to earn money and |
help, the grant is discontinued
and used for the benefit of other
deserving cases.

The Society needs money
urgently to carry on this essential
work and the Committee appeal
earnestly to all to give as gener-
ously as they can, Dona’ ons may
be sent to: —

Miss Sybil Chandler, Ever-
green Cottage, Navy Gardens, St.
Michael, 18, and will be acknow-
ledged in the Advocate News-
paper. |

|





to provide in a palatable form 4
beverage, rich in protein, the

s

5550S OOS OOCDSGOPOOOSO PGES

2506

By AGRICOLA
CITRUS

We have a letter from corres-
pondent F.G. to consider to-day.

Such letters and requests are
greatly appreciated: they are
helpful and encouraging to a

columnist trying to be of seal! times to assist.
infor: ¥

assistance in the spread of
mation in the realms of agri
ture, economics and related fields
of endeavour
better homes and greater
sufficiency in these tr

times.

At the outset, F.@. poses
general question of growing cit=
rus trees on what he describes as
the “unsuitable soil of Barbados,
at least on the lower levels”. Most
people with any experience at all
would agree that on the ‘wind-
swept lowlands with a rainfall,
on the average, well below: the
requirements of citrus—not @x-
cluding even the harder lime—it
would be futile to consiuer the
cultivation of this group of plants
on any scale. That, of course, is
not to say that householders with
back-yard space, including ade-
quate wind protection, and will-
ing to devote reasonable care to
a tree or two—may be of lime,
orange or other kinds as desired
—should not try to meet home
requirements, at the same time
providing a useful hobby for
spare time leisure. It is surpris-
ing what can be done and exam-
ples locally of this kind of effort
are not entirely lacking. Indeed,
we recall that an exhibit of sweet
oranges, grown on _ the Christ
Church coast not 100 yards from
the sea, carried off the first prize
at the last Annual Exhibition.
Fruit of such quality we usually
expect from the higher levels
where the rainfall is ample, the
climate cooler and shelter avail-
able in the little valleys and
gullies which occur. There usea
to be and still are, no doubt,
estate houses and homes (large
end small) in these aress “sith
small orchards attached. In such
conditions, even without continu~
ous care, trees seem to thrive

B.B.C. Radio Notes

English Cricketers Review W.1. Tour

With C. B, Clarke on

In the BBC’s “Calling the Wes\
Indies” on Wednesday, 30th Jan-
uany listeners will hear a review
of the West Indies tour of Aus-
tralia. Provided the Fifth Test
goes to five days that will be the
last day of the’ match and will be
a fitting date for this programme.
Cc. B. Clarke the former West In-
dies slow bowler will sum up the
series and will invite two or three
distinguished cricketers to join
him in assessing the tour. The en
tire half-hour of the West Indies
broadcast will be devoted to thi
cricket review. It begins at the
regular time of 7.15 p.m.

West Indian Writers

In ‘Caribbean Voices’ on Sun-
day, 27th, inst. we shall hear «
story from a newcomer to this
series of contemporary writite.
She is Mrs. Rose Auguste of St.
Lucia who in her story, ‘Toast of
the Caribs,’ gives a chapter of the
past in 17th. century St, Lucia,
This marks one of the rare occa-
sions—with the exception of Derek
Walcott’s verse—when one of the
smaller islands in the Caribbean
is represented in this series, The
half-hour closes with poems by
Byron S. Fraser of Jamaica who
has not been heard for some years.
Broadcast begins at the usual time
of West Indies programmes from
London, namely 7.15 p.m.
European or Atlantic Union?

A number of talks and discus-
sion programmes in the BBC's
General Overseas Service in the
coming week will be devoted to
the prospects and problems of
unity among the nations of West-














Cane Bills S
Cutlasses

Galvanised Buckets Stencil Ink

looking towards come

a

Sewing Twine

and produce. But, neglect of |
trees on the drier and less favour
able levels is fatal—they must be
tended, watered and cared and
above all, kept free from scale in
sects by periodic spraying. We
know the Agriculture De
partment is ready and willing a!

‘© give another example ot
k-yard: effort: some of the

citrus fruits we have
across, we enjoyed at :
ranch home in the Rupununi Dis
tyict of British Guiana, an are.
known to be relatively uninvit
ing, agriculturally speaking. Thx
soil is very sandy and infertilt
for the most part, producing
herbage of an inferior quality. A
this home of which we speak, th:
rancher and his family had dug
eapacious holes in the shelter o!
the house and filled them wit!
rotted manure from the cattl
corrals; in such artificial condi-
tions, lemons and oranges wer
yielding fruit of good quality. I
cidentally, at the same home
long trays constructed of split
palm-tree logs, set on legs an
filed with coral manure, were
serving as beds for growing ex
cellent lettuce, tomatoes anc
onions. So, it is the same old
story repeating itself here: given
the will, there is usually a way.

Now, to return to F.G's rea!
yreaiest coneerning one or tw«
citrus seedling trees, roughly twc
years old: whether he can carry
them on to bearing age and, if so
when they are likely to fruit
With the care which he pear:
to be giving, the chances are that
they can be brought to the fruit-
ing stage, which may be expected
(a few scattered fruits only) at
three to four years with most
citrus: limes possibly a little ear-
lier. It is unlikely that there will
be much of a crop before five t
six years, depending on the size
and’ vigour of the trees. How-
ever, as seedlings are, for the
most part, uncertain as regards
quality, F.G. is advised to get an
officer of the Agriculture Depart-
ment to top-work his plants with
a selected variety.



Wednesday

ern Europe and the North Atlantic
and their relations with the other
countries of the Free World. These
programmes will draw on the ex-
perience and opinions of a wide
range of participants and observ -
ers. Here is a list of these pro-
grammes:

Monday, 28th. 8.30 pm, The
European Idea — a summary
of the history and achieve-
ments of the various move-
ments towards unity in
Western Europe.

Tuesday, 8.30 p.m, The Atlantic
Purpose — a review of the
aims of N.A.T.O. and its im-
plications.

Tuesday 9.00 p.m, The Common-
wealth Viewpoint of this
unity.

Wednesday 7.15 p.m, The Na-
tional Viewpoints — promin-
ent personalities in Europe
and North America state theit
attitudes (not on our direct
beams).

Wednesday 8.30 p.m. The Eco~
nomic Problems — a survey of
the factors to be considered
in any form of union and of
developments to date.

Thursday 8.30 p.m. The Strategic
Needs — a consideration of
the requirements of defence

Friday 8.30 pam. The Political
Possibilities — a summing up
of the problems and prospegts
of the future.

In addition ‘Books to Read’ pr
Wednesday at 5.30 p.m. will deal
with books relating to the question
of European or Atlantic Union and
on Sunday 3rd Feb, ‘London
Forum’ at 10.15 p.m, will present
a discussion on the subject.



tencil Brushes

Enamel Jugs—1 gln. L.C.MS.

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Spanners

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Cotton Waste

BARBADOS
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LTD








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FRPP 9SGGSPIOGOGIOOF

5
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If you are the holder of any of these

bonds which may be called for repay-

ment on

that you obtain from us recommendations

for the re-investment of these funds.

A. §. BRYDEN & SONS (arbaéoy LTD.

Barbados Correspondents for

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(Callable Ist July 1952—55)

i5th July 1952, we suggest

Royal Securities Corp. Ltd.

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PAGE FOUR



JAMAICA 309 RUNS BEHIND PACES
ALMOST IMPOSSIBLE TASK
Farmer Scores Chanceless Century







By O. S. COPPIN
nen ‘ already to their credit in their Inter-
colon ia are now poised for another
victor I oe i Te When play closed yesterday
at Kensing Oval, Jatne vith. but five wickets in hand still
needed 317 runs t ff defeat
I il be able to put up these
runs when t on wicket four days’ old
although it will only | n d upon for three days with Sun-
day intervening age nother da

HUNTE OUT

} ARBADOS terday ith 141 runs on the tins for the loss,of
two Wiekets received no further help from Hunte, 76 not out,
ce he snicked one to Bir behind the wicket off a Miller outswing-

er for the former to tak
him.

It was the
yesterday, wa
colonial cricket ag

mple catch behind the wicket to dismiss

concens

s of Opinion that Hunte’s innings, that closed
one t

best he has played since his debut in Inter-
nidad just over a year ago. It is comfort-
ing too to see that t tural role which he had recently adopted,
and no doubt which he S put behind him forever, had not affected
him to the ‘extent as to have prevented him from giving such a con-
vineing testimony of | return to form as he did by virtue of his

innings of 76 in thi
HIGHLIGHT
t SGarbados innings was the partnérship between
skipper Farmer | “Boogles” Williams that put on 93 for the
fourth wicket

Williams who left at 51 is fast staking his claim as being the best
stroke player in Barbados to-day. Eight boundaries that came from
his bat in his score of 51 were without blemish and it was truly anti-
climatic to see him pat a half volley from Bonitto to Prescod at silly
midon to bring an end to an innings so full of promise and entertain-

ment.
FARMER SCORES CENTURY

oR

. fr ‘MER went on to complete his individual cen-
/ tury and his dismissal at 107 brought an end

oO ar nings that not only proved to be top score
: o%

for his team but which was also the nucleus around
4 x

which the final Barbados total of 337 was built.
W. FARMER







IGHLIGHT of the













I could find no fault with Farmer's innings yes-
terday It was a century well earned, the result

of direct personal planning and rigid self-discip-
line and restraint.

ie played himself.in, negotiated the bowlers on
their merit and I saw him relax concentration

and throw a swipe only when his score had reach-
ed 102. Fven.if he had been dismissed at that time
there sul would have been no blemish on_ his
chanceless Century but rather spontaneous exten-
uation “even for his momentary lapse in concen-
tration after a long innings in which he had given
no quarter nor had seemingly invited any.
BRIGHT LIGHT

HE remaindet of the Barbados innings: invites no particularly

congratulatory comment at least from the point of view of the
batsmen Charlie Taylor, suffering from sore. throat and certainly
not in his best form for this tournament was out for “duck”,

One scarcely é¢xpected dotrble figures from Frank King. He is
@ pace bowls rand as such he gave a most flattering account of him-
self in this tourpamentso far, He was out for 6 but tailenders Da
Peiza and King supplied the bright Tight at the end of the flickering
candle of the Barbados innings as it went out.

De Peiza red 16 at number nine, a total that could not have
been disgrace d if it had been made earlier in the innings while
Horace King, who would be the last man to lay personal claims for
batsmanship executed a-cover drive for four at the expense of Good-
ridge and an off drive for another boundary off. Miller in scoring 19
and both these str must automatically find a place in the select
company of the best strokes of the tournament. f

BONITTO BOWLS WELL

A ‘THUR BONITTO came into his own sudden-
af
el









ly th e Barbados innings was coming to a

se. Inspired

wicket
bowl

by his capture of so valuable a
i that of C..B. Williams he went on io
L Yorman Marshall for 10; he had Charlie
Taylor caught at the wicket before he had scored
and to mplete his bag he also had Frank King
caught. His figures then were 18/3/69/4. ;

If there was any doubt about Goodridge’s powers
of endurance we had ample proof of this. Skip-
per Bonitto bowled him for very long spells. At
one time he bowled sixteen overs only resting for







igle over during that time when he was
sy ched from one end to another, His figures of
30/4/88/1 are not as good an indication as the

valuc of his performance to his team, at any rate
I think that he has bowled well enough in this
lest as to have established his bona fides as a
promising candidate for Intercolonial and even
more important pace. bowling honours,
PROMISE

ULLOCH who only claimed Smith’s wicket in the Barbados sec-

ond innings took 1/47 in twelve overs but he has shown some
promise. He has got the greatest amount of turn on the Kensing-
ton wicket, admittedly unfriendly to bowlers, than any other bowler
on either side. His leg breaks commanded respect when he pitched
them toa good length but he was up against capable and experienced
batsmen on the Barbados team and whenever. he mispitched he
was punished. I expect to hear much more of him in the not too

distant future,
FREE BATTING
AMAICA, 426 runs behind commenced their innings completely un-
hampered. by. the magnitude of their task. Thorbourn and
Prescod tackled the job with refreshing enthusiasm. They pushed
the seore along at a rapid rate.

They put on 40. runs in the first half hour of play before Thor-
bourn was. dismissed 1.b.w. to Barker when attempting a curiously
unorthodox and inexplicable stroke. His was a bright 24 before his
disastrous experiment.

Neville Bonitto too was infected with the rungetting spirit ‘and
his first two scoring strokes wére boundaries by way of a sizaling
cover drive and a high lift to long off, both off Barker.

He saw Prescod leave |.b.w. to a very low inswinger from King
and after scoring 23 he tod patted a half volley for Williams to hold
an easy return



A. BONITTO

STILL CHEERFUL BATTING
OHN McLEOD was not to be cramped by the misfortunes of his
prevecessoys and he too seored freely afid reached 23 before
he unfortur ly trod upon his wicket trying to get one away to
square leg off Williams

It was an ke to send Tulloch a batsman of negligible batting
powers at tl Stage because he was out immediately l.b.w. to a

Williams googly to which he shaped as if for a leg break.
Mudie i ach not out played out time but theirs will









¢



be the te vith t ther batsmen to put up the 308 necessary to
avoid defeat and I « hink they ean do it to-morrow.

GOSS 5566445444444 “,¢ f
PPPOE F CPPS OOCFRS PLP LLL PELL AFE PESOS
’

BARBADOS TURF CLUB
SEASON 1952

55099954

STANDING AT BULKELEY PLANTATION,
ST. GEORGE

PRIDE OF INDIA

(Bay or Brown Horse, 1945, by Clombo out of The Bud)



STANDING AT ALLEYNEDALE PLANTATION
ST. PETER

STAR WITNESS

(Bay Horse, 1945, by Fair Trial out of Speckle)
Fee for Each Stallion .. bi me $48.00
Groom’s Fee $1.00 cash per Service

,



The above Stallion:

will be limited to:40 mares each.
Barren Mares Half

Fee return for One (1) year only.

Fo. App

D. A. V. 1



ts apply respectively to :—

9, Esqr., Jordans, Plantation,
St. George.

sq., Alleynedale Plantation,

St. Peter.

LEWIS

Secretary.



ihe D. WARD. E
G. A.

9999956 66-0656565666°

SOLED ECSC BESS OOSOSOSE



> > «
LOCOCO SOLES SSF CSLCSSSSESE CLL LLL EL LPL SS



SUNDAY ADVOCATE






Barbados In Go





a From Page 1 Mudie for an easy run single. go: two boundaries one with an
» pu a hi — to oa eres seer he drove hard to.on drive and the other with a
quare ieg boundary to senc 12 PeSCy at_silly mid 2. ve 2 é (er f i =
total to 194 and rake his individ-{"him back ~~ eg eee oad with soa tatihe ga 40-ons
ual contribution 43. He thenrqball he gave'a hard return ch “one off Marshall who had now
tickled to fine leg for three t Bonitto who’ tried to hol ‘gemie on for King, but Proverbs
send up William _ who played It which bounced - out lly put it down,
out the remainder. / hands, a bourn singled to deep
¥ P hepa took the only single! King Caught ‘a ed leg off Rarker and later
o ch’s next 0 ‘ 4 ;
Civ kacddtine cca rer a “King who had been kepl Proseod got one to cover. The
mow ii peGexess. for an hous chureh, again hit out hard to otal was now 42. Prescod sin-

which produced 57 runs

Williams singled to deep mic&Bonitto jumped to take a cate

on off Mudie to send 200 on the
board after after
play. A powerful drive to extra!
cover by William off Tulloch,
sent his score to 31. He later got}
another boundary with a cut past\

gully off the last ball of the over.“

Farmer took a long single to
extra cover off Mudie and then
went up to take strike from
Arthur Bonitto who had now
come on from the top end vice
Tulloch. He got his fifty includ-
ing three boundaries in 115 min-
utes with a_ single to mid off.
Mudie’s next over yielded three
including a late cut by Williams
for a couple,

Boundary
Farmer singled to mid on off
Bonitto and Williams drove
powerfully to the extra cover

boundary to make his score 42.
Farmer later got a couple with a
similar shot and then singled to

mid wicket off the last.
Mudie’s next over yielded a
single. Farmer singled with a

hard on drive off Bonitto’s second
delivery and Williams played
out the remainder. Farmer lift-
ed Mudie over head for a single
to send up Williams who again
played out the remainder
Arthur Bonitto continued from
the screen end and Farmer got a
long single to the on side. Wil-
liams also singled this time to
square leg. Each batsman again
took easy singles. before the over
ended. Williams got the only
single off Mudie’s next over with
An on drive and later got a couple
to long on off Bonitto. His score

was then 47. He eventually got
his half century with a pull to

the square leg boundary and then
put up an easy catch to Prescod
at mid wicket. His innings of 51
which included eight boundaries
had lasted for 88 minutes.

The luncheon interval was
then taken with the total at 236
for the loss of four wickets.
Farmer was undefeated with 60.

Marshall accompanied Farmer
out to resume the innings after
the luncheon interval, and was
off the mark with a. single off
Mudie. A _ sweep to fine leg
earned him a single off the next
over from Bonitto.

The score moved on to 250 in
37 minutes with a brace by Mar-
shall to deep long on off Bonitto
and 6 runs late farshall in at-
tempting to drive a from
this bowler, pulled it on to his
wicket 16 end his innings of 10.

The fifth Barbados wicket had



now fallen and Charlie Taylor,
who joined Farmer was walking
back to the | pavilion before he
thad scored, having snicked the
fifth ball of the same over from
Bonitto into the hands of the

wicket-keeper. It was a double-
wicket rnaiden for Bonitto whose
analysis now read 9 overs, 3
wickets for 33 runs,

256 For 6

With six wickets down for 256,
Farmer was partnered by Frank
King who survived a_ confident
appeal from Bonitto. Next over
from Mudie Farmer took a single
and King played out the remain-
der of the over.

After a long and uncomforta-
ble period, King got off the
mark with a single in which
Farmer was almost run _ out,
taking two other singles off
Bonitto,

Farmer went down on his
knees to send Mudie sizzling
through the covers to the fence,
taking another single to extra
cover off the next delivery,
King was purely defensive, and
Bonitto placed four men around
his bat—one each at the silly
flelds, a short fine leg and a
second slip, all within five yards
of the bat,

With their early successes after
lunch, the Jamaica fieldsmen. were
on their toes, picking up cleanly

and returning sharply to the
wicket. The rate of scoring fell
off, :

Next over from Bonitto, King

drove high to the right of Mudie
foy a single, and Farmer back
drove the next ball to the long off
fence, punishing the next to deep
extra cover for a single for the
score to move along to 278

King came out of his lethargy
with a full-blooded on drive off

197 minutespp¥icket.



bowler, and this time Ne

ust Over his shoulder at mic

Barbados was 7 down for 2804






through the slips off the
a. ball



from Marshall and
0 got another past
rker at mid wicket off the last.
With the total at 44, Jamaica

and as Depeiza joined his skipper, suffered their first set back when

the field

He played out the over. Ni
his century,

a single, Farmer taking

for four down to the fence
rors of the Kensington stand,
the

total moved to 293.

closed in around hi horbourn got

another. boundaries
to mid off. DePeiza crossed Mudje eo Si palingompaacaing
and

Next

into his wicket
in an. attempt to turn one from

12. for: Farmer Barker, but missed the ball which
singled. Bonitto to extra cover. ad "

DePeiza turned Bonitto ‘to the
open square leg position to ruM Walcott, He

struek his pad and an appeal for
Lb.w. was upheld by Umpire
had scored 24 in-
in 31

N. Bonitto Goes In
Neville Bonitto jomed Prescod

over he came back on his right wao was tnen 20 and played out

foot and punched Mudie thro
the covers to the fence to re
his second boundary.

A boundary given to Fa
when Tulloch misfielded a power-
ful drive through extra cover put
him within a single of hig cém-
tury, and next ball he sedonel
one which he attempted to hook,
safely at fine leg to run 2, and
reach the coveted mark in 205
minutes. The 300 went up in 295
mines, and jumping into one on
the off side, DePeiza sent it
scorching along the ground to the
fence to put his score at 13, ana
the Barbados total 312,

New Ball

Goodridge was given the new
ball at this point, bowling from
the pavilion end to Farmer who
patted the first delivery to short
silly mid on where Neville Bonitto
wag fielding. The batsman took
an easy single to cover two ball
later, and DePeiza played out
the remainder of the over.

Miller also came on at the

screen end with the second over *while

with the new ball, and in the
second delivery, Farmer's innings
came to a close as he glided very
fine for Binns to bring off a mag-
nificent eatch, falling to his left
and rolling over as he did so,

Eight wickets were down for
313, Farmer’s contribution being
107 inclysive of five fours and a
five. King joined Depeiza and
promptly straight drove Miller to
the screen for four. He snicked
this bowler dangerously past the
wicket-keeper for another four in
the next over. King drove square
of the wicket for a single, DePeiza
glanced for another and a full-
blooded cover drive by King took
this batsman’s score to 13 and
his team's total to 327.

The pace men did not worry
these two tailenders, and Depeiza
evinced this as he neatly glanced
Goodridge for singles to deep fine
leg. y

DePeiza’s innings however end-
ed when he attempted a cover
drive off Miller, and edged to give
Stan Goodridge an easy catch at
gully. The score was 330. and
DePeiza had contributed a very
valuable 16,

Barker, the last batsman came
in to jOin King who crisply cover
drove Goodridge to the fence for
four, hig fourth in his score of 17;
Barker punched Miller through
the covers for a single, and next
over from Mudie he pulled one on
to his wicket to bring the Barba-
dos innings to a close with a total
of 337 and the tea adjournment
wag taken, King had scored an
enterprising 19—undefeated.

427 For Victory

Given rans inake for
victory, vamaica opened thei
second innings with vonn Prescod
and Denis 'Thorbourn, Pace
bowler srank ming bowled the
first oven from the screen end
and Prescod took 12 off him in-
cluding a hook to the fine leg
boundary and a pull to the square
leg boundary.

424

Barker ' trungled’ from the
pavilion end and Thorbourn
opened his account with a drive
to the mid wicket boundary,
Prescod got a single to fine leg
off King and later Thorbourn
back dreve to the boundary and
then got another with a, leg
glance. He singled off the fourth
to fine leg to send up Preseod

who square cut for a couple and
then singled with a similar shot.
The total was now 29 made after
15 minutes play. Prescod was
16 and Thorbourn 13,

Prescod singled to mid wicket
off Barker and later Thorbourn





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{
Wm. Henry Sts.

the remainder of Barker's over
—a maiden wicket. Prescod

- eut one from Marshall past gully

to the boundary and later Bonitto
broke his duck with a full blood-

' ed off drive to the boundary off

Barker to send up fifty after 40
minutes’ play.
Bonitto got another boundary

when he lifted one from Barker
to long off. Marshall’s next over
yielded two singles.

With the total at 57, Frank
King was given his second spell,
this time from the pavilion end.
He bowled to Prescod who got
his pad in front of the first and
was given out Lb.w. for 25 in-
cluding three boundaries in 47
minutes,

Joba McLeod pattnered Bonit-
to whose score was eight and
played out the remainder. Nor-
man Marshall bowled a maiden
to Bonitto. McLeod opened his
account with an on drive to the
boundary off King and later sin-
gled to mid wicket. Bonitto also
took a_ single to extra cover,
McLeod got one to cover.
Bopitto entered double figures
vyhen he hooked a short one from
King viciously to the fine leg
boundary.

“Boogles” Williams came on
fer Norman. Marshall at the
Sereen end. He bowled to Mc-
Leod who got two boundaries in

this over, one with a powerful
off drive and the other with a
late cut.

Marshall now bowled from the
pavilion end and sent down a
maiden to Bonitto. McLeod took
a single to deep extra cover off
Williams next over and went
down to take strike from Mar-
shall who beat him with the first
delivery. The batsman then
erded the last to first slip, but
Fronk Kine failed to hold the
catch. McLeod was then 15.

Square Cut

bBonitlo square cut the fifth
from Wiliams (o tne boundary
tO make te total Jl and his score
iv, Meleod cut one from Mar-
shall past gully to the boundary
and then on drove for another

lo make his score 23.
Willianv? continued from the
screen end and Bonitto took an

easy single to mid off. He later
swept one from Norman Marshall
ta the square leg boundary and
then singled to extra cover.

Jamaica lost their third wicket
when Bonitto returned ome to
Wiliams and the bowler made
no mistake. The total was now
95. Bonitto had scored 23 in-
cluding five boundaries in 43
minutes,

Alfie Binns joined McLeod and
was quickly off the mark with a
single to square leg. Frank King
now bowled from the pavilion
end and Binns crashed him to
the off boundary to send up 100
runs on the board in 80 minutes.
4 full one from King wide of the
leg stump went to the boundary
for byes,

In Williams’ next over, McLeod
was dismissed when he knocked
dewn his wicket in attempting
to hook off this bowler. The
score board then read 104—4—23,
McLeod had scored 23 including
four boundaries in 33 minutes.

Horace Tulloch, the ineoming
batsman had a brief stay as he
was sent back by Williams by
the Lb.w. route before he had
scored and Jamaica had lost
another wicket without addition
to the score,

Mudie joined Binns and after
scoring five there was an appeal
for light and the game ended

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od Position

with the total at 109 for the loss
of five wickets. Binns, the other
not out batsman is five.

Following are the scores:—

BARBADOS Ist Innings
M. Taylor run out

A. M. Taylor run out ............. nM
C Hunte c Wkr. (Binns) b Miller 32
C. W. Smith b Goodridge _... a
W. A. Farmer ¢ A. Bonitto b

Proverbs ¢ wkr (Binns) b Miller

°











mMamzo
Be
3°
°

' King c&b Tulloch

H. Barker ¢ Prescod b Mudie
Extras: bi, n.b. 3 ....
WUE. basic szacthswanaei the

Fall of wickets: 1 for 22, 2 for 85, 3
for 86, 4 for 91, 5 for 136, 6 for 144,
7 for 159, 8 for 186, 9 for 190.

BOWLING ANALYSIS

F. King "
Abrahams c sub (Gri
Binns b King
Bonitto c Barker b F. K
McLeod run out
Mudie not out .
Miller b Marshall
. Bonitto c Marshall b H. King ..
Tulloch b Marshall _.
Goodridge b King ....
Extras: lb. 2, b. 3 .





DR>noSZ>e o 4 Mop:

Total

Fall of wickets:—1 for 22, 2 for 26, 3 for
“4, 4 for 68, 5 for 77, 6 for 82, 7 for 83,
8 for 84, 9 for 86.

BOWLING ANALYSIS
o mM

w
18.2 5 3 5

F. King . “

H. Barker . Sway ow 2 8

N. E. Marshall .... 23 1 «637 3
H. King 11 5 15 1
Cc. B. Williams — © _ 15 ~

BARBADOS—2nd Innings
C. Hunte c wkr (Binns) b Miller 16
W. Smith c wkr. (Binns) b Tullock 40
Proverbs b Goodridge ......... 0
. A. Farmer c wkr. (Binns) b Miller 107
B. Williams c Prescod b A. Bonitto 5
E. Marshall » A_ Bonitto 10

M. Taylor ¢ wkr. (Binns) b
A. Bonitto ase 65% » 4@
F. King c N. Bonitto b A. Bonitto (6
C. DePeiza c Goodridge b Miller 16
H. King not out .. 19
H Barker b Mudie .. . uz
Extras: b 2, lb 5, w 1, n.b. 3 il

>zasann

. 337

Total

Fall of wickets:— 1 for 90, 2 for 91, 3
for 143, 4 for 236, 5 for 256, 6 for 256,
7 for 286, 8 for 313, 9 for 330.

BOWLING ANALYSIS
oO M R Ww

S. Goodridge ...... W > 83
R. Miller . 26 8 65
G. Mudie -. 21 2 52
H. Tullock 12 — 57
A. Bonitto 18 3 69

JAMAICA — 2=ND INNINGS

D. Thorbourn lbw Barker ..,.......

J, Prescod lbw King .......... «

N. Bonitto c & b Williams ..,.....

J. McLeod hit wicket b Williams ..

A. Binns not out eeees

H. Tulloch lbw Williams

G. Mudie not out ceeseeeeres
Extras . ewe +

Total (for 5 wkts) .....



Fall of wickets:— 1 for 44, 2 for 57, 3
for 95, 4 for 104, 5 for 104.
BOWLING ANALYSIS
o M



gERe
loo

F. King . 5 1
H. Barker . : 5 1
N. E. Marshall . 2 1 4



Cc. B. Williams~



MANNING WINS
CAPTAIN’S PRIZE

Mr. Geoffrey Mannnig with an
aggregate of 34 points won the
Captain’s Prize when it was
played off yesterday afternoon at
the Rockley Golf Club, Christ
Church, ‘

Mr. Manning after play said
that the going was fair t at
times he was playing “well
above” himself,

He said that the wind did not
assist in any way, also the fair-
way afforded little help.



Song Withdrawn

COPENHAGEN, Jan. 26.

After protests by the British
Ambassador Sir Alex Randall the
Copenhagen Music Hall has witn-
drawn a song containing offen-
sive references to Princess Eliza-

beth and Princess Margaret.
The Ambassador made his
protest on Saturday to Nils
Svenningsen, Director of the
Foreign Office. Later the singer
who made the song _ popular,
Sigrid Horne Rasmussen, said
she was formally forbidden by
Justice Ministry to sing it again.
The act called for her to ap-
pear on the stage of the A.B.C.
Music Hall dressed as Prime
Minister Churchill, and the
theme of the song is that as soon
as Churchill leaves his country,
the dominions start breaking
away from Britain. It is said
that the journeys by Britain's
Princess have not helped to hold

the Commonwealth together.
—(CP)
















VUZE,

a °
Attraction in Action

Oo. BRENTFORD, mMiDDdDiases

O PSOSSOOHSS CROSS SSOP O SS OO OS OOO OVOCS BOE 9080 8SOOOD?



SATURDAY, JANUARY 26, 1952 ~

ON CLASSIFICATION
Should ‘Bright Light’ Be In C2 Or D

By



BOOKIE

A T THIS time of the year, after the classifica-

7 tion lists of both the T.T.C. and the B.T.C.

have been published, it is customary to indulge in

some form of rating for the two-year-olds we saw

raving in the previous year. In England a glance

at the weights for the Free Handicap, published at

the end of a season, usually indicates which were

the best in training. But racing out here has not

yet evolved to such a status. Unfortunately, due to

the set up of the officialdom of racing out here, there are strong

grounds for believing that it never will. At least not until we see
the formation of a West Indian Jockey Cub. -

The writer being the only one who has not ceased to believe
and hope that such a Club will one day be formed, one can guess
how remote is the possibility of a Free Handicap. Nevertheless it
would be very interesting if somebody could prevail upon the handi-
cappers of the T.T.C. and the B.T.C. to’sit down together and with
their combined efforts produce a Free Handicap.

Without this, in. order to find out what they thought about the
two-year-olds, we must refer to the two classifications which are issued
by the respective clubs every year after the Chrismas meetings.
This year we find a difference of opinion between the two bodies,
not about which horse was best, but about how good the best one
was. They both agree that Bright Light was far above
else of her age. But where the Barbados classifiers have placed her
in D proper, their counterparts in Trinidad have promoted her from
F to C2. Incidentally this is another record for Bright Light as she
now becomes the second creole ever to open her three-year-old career
in theimported classes. The first was her sister Best Wishes.

OOKING at ng displayed by these two sisters in two con-

secutive years [| am of the opinion that Bright Light has been
treated more leniently than her sister. Best Wishes, it will be remem-
bered, won two races in Barbados as a two-year-old and the Trinidad
classifiers placed her in E2, She then won two races in Trinidad at
the same age and they promoted her to C2. In none of these four races
did Best Wishes carry more than 126 lbs.

Bright Light, on the other hand, won one in Barbados, for which
she was moved from F2 to F by the T.T.C. classifiers, and then she
won four straight off the reel in Trinidad. In the last two races her
weights were 133 and 140 lbs. -

» -* while I do not agree entirely with the T.T.C. classifiers in
their placing of Bright Light, I cannot say that they are in no way
justified in so doing. In all the long list of unjustified classifications
made by the T.T.C. in regard to the creoles I have never once found
fault with them for promoting any horse too high up the list which
has won with colossal weight. In the cases of Pepper Wine, Front
Bell, Ligan, The Gambler, Ocean Pearl, Atomic II and Best Wishes,
my argument was always that inasmuch as none of them had done
more than win a few races with nominal weights, while some were
even beaten with little more than a good weight, there existed a con-
siderable amount of doubt about their capabilities, Possibly not a
jot, but enough to prevent them from skipping over two or three
classes as was done in some of the above cases,

“WHEREFORE if the T.T.C. classifiers now find that Bright Light

must go into C2, wihile I feel that it is quite enough for her to
be placed in D, I see no reason why the difference of half a class
should call for any adverse comment over a filly that has proved
herself capable of running away from her field with 140 lbs, in the
saddle. When horses do this sort of thing the doukt, in fact, must
be on the other side. The question then becomes: Not how good is
she, but what will she not be capable of?

Bright Light, as far as my ry serves me, is the tirst horse
of any age since Seawell did it in 1944, to have won four races at a
Christmas meeting and to carry 140 ibs. or more in the last event. At
the time that Seawell periormed his leat he was a three-year-old
and not only did he win with 145 lbs but he set up a track record
for the five furlong. Atver this the classitiers movea him trom #2 to
C2. I saw nothing wrong with that. The fact that Bright Light ac-
complished her task with 5 Ibs. less and did not break a record but
was a tull year behind Seawell in age, does seem to point out that
the T.T.C. classifiers are justilied im moving her one sub-class less than
they aia Seaweil.

Atter Brignt Light we
querque. Here both seis of cle





find the 1 the list is Dun-
fiers agree On heir respective lists:
sne 1s in Ez, ‘that means she is raved as 1v Lbs, interior to sright Light
in Barbados and 15 Ibs. in Triniaac As Ine Darpados Cidsoiuers saw
Dunquerque perform here and aid not see ir.gmt Light in ‘Trinidad,
wnile the Trinidad gentiemen saw Bright Lignt but not Dunquerque,
it is difficult \o Say which is the more correct estimate.
UPPOSING that we spiit the ditference our bree Handicap for two-

year-olds of 1951, based on classification, would therefore read
something like this: Bright Light 135 lbs ; Dunquerque 123 lbs.; Galiant
Rock 118 lbs.; Cavalier 118 ibs.; April’s Dream 110 lbs., Chutney 106
Ibs.; Cardinal 106 lbs.; March Winds 106 Ibs.; Flying Rock 106 lbs.;
Meditation 106 lbs.; Claire de Lune 103 lbs.; Diarose 103 lbs.; Rambler
Rose 103 lbs.; Sunina 103 tbs.; Drury Lane 101 Ibs,

The above 15 are those who were placed in the first three in
all the races for two-year-olds in Trinidad and Barbados in 1951.
With a few exceptions, such as Diarose, Claire de Lune and Sunina,
all of which I would place somewhere between April’s Dream and
Chutney, I think it gives as good an indication of the respective merits
as we can get.

next highest







LOCAL CLASSIFICATION PUBLISHED

HE local classification has come out at last. Usually the classifica-

tion comes out before the official programme is published but this
year this process was reversed.

Changes worthy of some comment, working down the list, start
with Embers. Although this is the first time she has been classified
here and it is not in the strict sense a change, yet it is reasonable to
assume that inasmuch as she was in A Class in Trinidad she would
also have been-in A class up here had she been classified before
the Christmas meeting. After all where else could one classify, the
winner of the Jamaican Derby and holder of a track record in that
colony to boot?

Nevertheless I am glad to see that she has been demoted now
that we have had an indication of her true value. It shows that but
for the stupid rule which allows no Jamaican to be placed below C2
in Barbados, our classifiers would be able to assess others from that
colony on their form in Trinidad if they had the chance. It also teaches
some of us that we must learn our lessons the hard way.

E next change I notice is the promotion of Firelady from C to

B2 and the promotion of Dashing Princess from C2 to C, Although
this means that they both went up a sub-class on their Trinidad classi-
fication for the Christmas meetfhg I did not think there was any
difference between them on the form displayed.

Another glaring error seems to be the placing of Watercress
in C2. I fail to see any method of reasoning in this when
The Eagle, who defeated her here last November is still in E class.
Mary Ann, who may have been in D2 in November but raced in D in
Trinidad, also defeated Watercress and is still in D class. Will some-
body please explain, I cannot understand it.

But the most glaring error of all is the promotion of Lunways
from C2 to C proper. Inasmuch as this horse did not win a race
at the Christmas Meeting, this is so surprising that it is completely
without precedent in the history of classification in the British West









Indies. Other than that, words fail me completely.
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SUNDAY, JANUARY 27, 1952

Australia Bat

From HAROLD DALE

: SYDNEY, Jan. 26.

First item of the programme
this morning was the summary
conclu:‘Qon o: the West Indian in-
nings, but Guillen and Valentine
refused to allow it to be quite so
summary as all that. They per-
sisted for half an hour and by
taking their stand to 18 made it
the biggest of the West Indian in-
nings.

Guillen cut a grand four square
off Miller and Valentine happily
achieved a similar stroke but was
rewardei with only*three. Val-
entine Was eventually caught by
Langley, bowled Miller for six,
Guillen not out 13, Extras sevén,
total 78 :

Slow Batting

McDonald and Thoms opened
to Gomez and Worrell who haa
changed ends from the previous
cay. For half an hour, we had
snail-like progress while these
two young men tried to erase
memories of their efforts yestér-
day.

In half an hour they scored
nine between them and against
bowling inferior to that which

they had faced in the first innings.
Gomez was obviously feeling the
effect to his immense three hours
bowling in the scorching heat and
to-day cold wind could not enliv-
en his tired muscles,

After half an hour the batsmen
began to venture scoring strokes
and Thoms drove Gomez with
fair decision while McDonald on
drove Worrell for two delicate long
glides down to fine leg. Wita
these methods, they pushed the
score along with sudden rapidity

and after 45 mingpites, had 28
runs on the board.
At this stage, Atkinson wos

brought on for Worrell who had
bowled five overs for 13 runs.
McDonald chopped Atkinson
through the slips for a_ single.
The score was 33 when Ramad-
hin relieved Gomez to bowl for

the first time in the match, His
first over was a maiden Well
pitehed-up and _ attacking the
stumps. He did not seem to be

getting much turn but his direc-
tion and length were good. The
next over was also a maiden,
marked by delivery variations in
length as if he were feeling for
a spot that would most embar-
rass Thoms,

Maiden Overs

Atkinson still bowled on the
wicket and allowed only an oc-
casiona] single so that the scor-
ing was almost ceased, while
Ramadhin engaged in his duel
with the batsman. His third over
which contained several balis

turning shortly was also a maid-
en, McDonald watching the ball
on the bat, but once losing sight
of it and having it spring from
his bat to square leg.

Just before lunch, Gomez took
Atkinson’s place,

Both Thoms and * McDonald
had improved on their previous
showing and were at least show-
ing careful if somewhat elumsy
defence. At last McDonald forced
Ramadhin past point for three.

The luneh score was McDonald
not out 15, Thoms not out 26,
extras 1, total—no wickets for 42.

Featureless Calm

One event broke the featureless
calm of the afternoon and that
happened early. In attempting
to pull Worrell, Thoms trod on
his wicket and was thus out for
28, and the total was one for 55.

Hassett then ventured on to the
scene and took his stand quietly
at one end, and in the course of
the next hour and a half all the
West Indies bowlers except
Gomez tried their eraft against
him and McDonald. McDonald
was the more interesting — he
slowly and cautiously emerged as
a batsman with limited strokes
but with a dogged defence that he
lightened occasionally with hooks
off Ramadhin and Valentine, both
of whom were dropping a few
short.

Somnolent Crowd

fhe afternoon was _ overcast,
the crowd was somnolent, an
the game settled down to some-
thing near monotony, but the
score moved ahead with singles
and boundaries, taken against
exactly the same field setting as
Goddard thhad used, He; had been
criticised for his one slip to his

spin bowlers and nabody els
nearer than 30 yards to the
wicket. Stollmeyer was doing

precisely the same thing and the
results were the same.
McDonald reached his 50 by
sweeping Ramadhin for four, and
Hassett brought up the hun-



BRINGS

QUICK
RELIEF
FROM

STOMACH PAIN



dred when he pulled Valentine
to the rails.

Imperceptibly, Hassett quick-
ened his rate by straight driving
Atkinson who had replaced
Ramadhin, ahd the Australian
seoré began to reach ominous
proportions.

Donald Is Out
McDonald, at 61 to Hassett’s 41
and the score at one for 133, was
beginning to sight his century in
the distance and there seemed to

be no obstaele in his way. And
the very instant I wrote those

words he was bowled by Rama-
dhin, which is one of the things
continually happening to cricket
writers, Ramadhin produced, his
offbreak kéépitig low and McDon-
ald more Or Iéss Watchéd it come
back and shattef his witFet. He
had scdred 62. TWo for 138.
Australia was now a long way
ahead of their opponents. A game
that looked like finishing in litthe
more than two days; was now
bidding fair to stretch to full
distance, as long as the West
Indies batsmen were able to reply
in kind to Australia’s present
determined concentration.

West Indies Rewarded

After tea, the West Indies had
the reward for their long drawn
effort in the field. Worrell pro-
voked in Harvey a marked tend-
ency to swing his bat just out-
side the off stump. Harveyyscores
many brilliant squaredrives and
squarecuts from this standpoint
and Worrell working up to a real
pace, twice got that extra lift
which threatened the edge of his
bat. Harvey possibly saw the trap,
but he is no man to refuse a
challenge. He lashed out again
and this time did find the edge
and Guillen made the catch. Har-
vey eight. Three for 152.

Meanwhile, Hassett plodded
past his 50 and at 57 was subject
of a tremendous appeal by Gomez
for Lb.w. Hassett was all legs in
front and looked hopelessly lost,
but he was given not out.

Miller Clowns

Miller after a slow start began
to swing his bat at the limit of
his long arms and gave ug one or
two fine drives along the ground.

He also performed mighty
sweeps and tremendous pulls
that twisted him in knots — all
without contacting the ball, al-
though once he shaded his eyes
and peered into the distance from
a sitting position to look for the
ball which had been for some
time in Guillen’s hands.

Miller is one of those rare
players who is convinced that
cricket is a game. Incidentally,
between foolery and gaiety it is
a game that he plays very
well. His next shot was four,
swept off Gomez with grand ease
and he brought up 200 with
another four through covers.

Hassett began to observe that
having had hours start, Miller
was yet overhauling him, so he
square-drove Ramadhin, who had
reappeared, for a flashing bound-
ary.

Just A Glimpse

Obviously the West Indies were
now faced with a big job, We had
seen today as we had before, in
the Second Test here, a glimpse
of Australian Test Cricket in
its traditional form.

Miller seemed lucky to get
away with the l.b.w. appeal at
48 but two balls later, Valentine
turned one widely across Has-
sett’s bat and Worrell took a slip
catch, Hassett 64, Miller not out
49, Extras five. Total four for
216. At this point, with 25 min-
utes remaining for play, the bats-
men appealed against light which
had become very grey and the
appeal was upheld.

In this long day—a dull day
until Miller livened the procéed-
ings—Australia forgot all about
its First Innings collapse, and
firmly set about building a diffi-
cult total for the West Indies to
catch. Now 254 on, with six wick-
ets to fall, they will call forth an
enormous Fourth Innings effort
from the West Indies if the
islanderg are to win. But, at least
the game is assured of a good
gate on Monday which is a pub-
lic holiday—Australia Day—with
the consequent benefit to tourists

finances. And the end is by no
means cértain yet.
The Scores :—

Australia’s Ist McDonald c Worrell b Gomez 22
Thoms b. Gomez S sakaab ab 16
Hassett c wk (Guillen) b Gomez . 2
Harvey b Gomez ‘ 18
Miller ¢ Rae b Worrell ‘ 6 20
Hole ec Gomez b Worrell . 9
Benud c Stolimeyer b Gomez 3

Lindwall c Worrell b Gomez 0



DUE TO INDIGESTION

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try just ONE DCSE
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really quick relief!

+ from STOMACH PAINS, FLATULENCE,
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It is also available in TAB

ives you
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L. M. B.

SOLE AGENTS Barbados,

MEYERS,
Bridgetown, ..i..

SUNDAY ADVOCATE

With Determination

TROPHY PRESENTATION



MRS. H. A. ARTHUR presents the
won the 1951-52 competition) at the presentation 0

Also in the picture are Mr. K. D. G. Frost, Secretary of the
and Mr. Weekss) and three other members of Busters’ team, M. Parker,

Busters Presented With
Advocate Challenge Cup

AFTER a Presentation

Polo Match at the Garrison

yesterday, Busters, this season’s Polo Cup winners, were

presented with the
Arthur, wife of the founder
Two other Cups, the H.

Advocate Challenge Cup by Mrs. H. A.

of the Barbados Polo Club.
Warner Bolton Challenge Cup

and the Y. De Lima Cup were presented to Busters and
Broncos for scoring the most goals.

Both of these teams
Mustangs and Rangers
teams which played this season
and last Wednesday, Busters
played a fast game to beat Bron-
cos and make themselves this
season’s Cup Winners.

The usual Busters team is: V.
Weekes (Capt.), K. Melville, A.
Arthur and M. Parker, but on a
few occasions, John Marsh acted
as substitute and greatly assisted
the team.

The Tournament

The Tournament provided good
entertainment for those who avail-
ed themselves of the opportunity
of watching the matches; although
the standard of play, on the whole,
was not equal to that which wes
reached last vear. This was chiefly
due to the fact that some of last
year’s Seniors were unavailable
for the matches this year with the
result that several Juniors were
included in the teams, and last
year’s Seniors were distributed
among all the teams and only one
competition, instead of a Senior
and Junior Competition, was
played. Although there was :
great improvement in the playing
of the Juniors who had been pro-
moted, the striking positioning and
marking of last year’s tournament,

defeated
the other









Ring «











Atkinson b Gomez 4
Langley ¢ ekos b Worrell 6
Jolinson not out 13
Extra, 1
Total 116
BOWLING ANALYSIS
oO M R Ww
Gomez 18 65 7
Worrell is 42 3
Atkinson 6 2 18 0
W. INDIES — 1ST INNINGS
Rae C. Langley 6 Johnson 11
Stolimeyer ihw TIohnstor 19
Walcott b Lindwall .....sseeeeee + 1
Weekes c Langiay b Lindwall
Christian? ¢ & b Miller 7
Gomez b Miller it
Worrell b Miller 6
Atkinson b Mii 6
Ramadhin b J on 0
Valentine ¢ Lan b Miller 6
Guillen not out 1
Extras 7
Total 78
BOWLANG ANALYSIS
oO M Ww
Lindy 2
Johnston 4 3 3
Miller 7.6 1 5
AUSTRALIA 2nd li
Thoms b Worrell oF
MacDonald b Ratnadh 62
Harve € Wkpr t 8
Hassett c Worrell b V 64
Miller r out
Hole not out 0
Extras 5
Total (for 4 wickets)

She





especially in the case of the Dean«
Bros’ winning team, were absent
in this tournament. Last year’s
winning team, like all the other
senior teams, was distributed
among the teams to balance them.

The teams taking part in the
competition were:—

Mustangs: Vere Deane (capt.)
Lee Deane, J. Hanschell and O, H.

Johnson,

Rangers: Col. Michelin (capt.),
Keith Deane, W. Bradshaw and
W. Chandler.

Broncos: M. Edghill (capt.)
Fric Deane, G. Emtage and K.
Frost.

Busters: V. Weekes (capt.), K.
Melville, A. Arthur and M, Parker
who was involved in a minor ac-
cident during Bronco’s first match
and whose place was taken by
John Marsh,

The two teams taking part u
yesterday’s match were Eric Dean
John Marsh, Lee Deane and Mark
Edghill—Blues; and Vietor Weekes
Col. Michelin, Keith Deane and
Vere Deane—Reds,

Reds won five goals to three.

Good Players
The outstanding players of this
match were Lee Deane who scored
four of the five goals for Reds,
Col. Michelin who seored two for
the Blues and V. Weekes and M.
Edghill who each scored one, Lee

Deate took good advantage of
passes from his team mates and
Col. Michelin was very accurate.

Reds scored in the first chukka
when Lee Deane followed up a
powerful hit from a team mate and
scored. In the second chukka, Lee
Deane scored two and Victor
Deane one,

The Blues started off the third
chukka very fast and Col, Michelin
who was getting his accuracy to
help him more than his dash, was
able to score two to put Blues in
a less unfavourable position. The
score was!now three-two, Blues
leading.

In the fourth chukka, Blues con~
tinued the spirited playing they
had begun in the previous chukka
ind V. Weekes was especially
lively in urging his horse to the
front and preventing his opponents
from hilting the ball well. He was
able to score about half way in
this chukka to draw things more
even. Reds, however, were still
leading with the score four three.

Lee Deane managed to score
early in the last chukka, but after
that goal there was an even tussle
with Blues fighting hard though
they were now getting tired. They
were unable to score again.




N POUND OVAL TINS

cence CCC CC OC CC AA A ACCC AR LL LLL

Advocate Challenge Cup te Victa: Weekes, Captain of Busters (who
f Cups at the Garrison Savannah yesterday afternoon.
Polo Club (between Mrs, H. A. Arthur

John Marsh and Keith Melville.

EMPIRE

@ From Page 1

ill be lett naked to the econ-
mic blast That is vengeance
sue so tes sareaadiui years ol in-

aulflerence,

But vengeance will not fall on
Britain alone. To vast tracts of
colonial territory Britain has
brought justice, aecency and civil-
isation, They have made it
possible for scores of millions to
live in security under law. They
have brought medical care and
education. They have brought
lignt to dark places of the earth.
But if Britain leaves, darkness
will come swooping back. All
that has been done will be brought
to ruin. Barbarism will be the
only gainer and Britain will earn
bitterly the just reproaches of
peoples whose trust they havé be-
trayed,

Forty years ago it was moved
by enthusiasm for a plan to
strengthen and solidify the British
Empire by building a fiscal and
political structure after the pat-
tern of the U.S.A. Our measure
of suceess has been small. And
that ig only another way of say-
ing—a devastating measure of
failure is giving us a sense of
utter frustration,

Never in my lifelong campaign-
ing for the cause of the Empire
have I found it so hopeless a task,

Ts it credible that a nation
can’t watch the greatest of their
achievements crumbling and the
sources of their wealth passing to
other hands with no feeling except
perhaps a faint and monetary ir-
ritation? It should be incredible,
but it may be true.

But there is a gleam of hope.
Britain is now being given another
chance. Tories control the new
Parliament though the Empire
policy play no part in their elee+
tion results just because the
British public refused to take any
interest in imperial affairs.

Over many election campaigns
in the past, however, that party
is pledged to the Empire. They
have never fulfilled their prom
ise. This time will the Tories
honour their pledge or will they
neglect and ignore it ?

It is my hope that the Tory
party will now take the lead,
making a mighty reaffirmation
of the imperial destiny. They
should be dedicated to awaken-

ing in the masses a strength of
their former pride and in
obligation of their duties to
colonial races and a sense of
present peril to their people. It
is not too late. But there must
be a new crusade,

Britain must not lose the
Empire. The British race must
not lose the will to defend it
They can only guard what is
left by reassérting their Will.
They must make it clear that
they will no longer tolerate
outside nations or international
bodies playing forfeits with

British rights and property. They
breathing

have
space

been
and

given
an

opportunity, The

Tory Government must earry ou’

its task of national revival,

—LES.

Oe

SOOSOSSOSD

*

LOPISSSS

|







Extra Engine Cleanline

JAN. 27

PAGE FIVE



NO. 208

The Topic
of

Last Week



T week was ope of oricket
The way the Wiekets fll

the A ralian teat match
Let's cal bat-and-ba



rok the
Who rose to
Haral
Yo

world's star
cricket fame

reached double figures
don't think it's a shame

batsmen

who has “engle’s” eve-stght
eclaréd without a hitet
The trowble in Australia

ts simbly with the piteh

right
Thousands of

ide a rum
nifles away
Said on a bowler's Wicket
A batsman cahnot stay

shon

When Australia Was hooked

With nine for ninety-nine

w






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for a new

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Tf you eft Of your food, feeling
ne ot fit-down, it may be that
HOSFERINE is just What you féed
© bfirig you beck ro a happy normal
wate Of health. PHOSFERINE is a /
“and festorative when reserves tun low.

_—

When the appetite fails, the
vital resources of the body fail to be
replaced. Mental and physical
energy sag. Resilience weakcas.
The cheerful rebound to life’s
difficulties deserts you. It is withix
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reverse this process — by reviving
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and vitality. You feel a new inter-
est in life, Try this grand tohic
today. In liquid or tablet form.
2 tablets of PHOSFERINE equal
10 drops.

Joe said Lou gitt 1 got you
Ma wee; for Depression, Debility, Indigestion, Sleeplessness, and
But boys the whole thing turn ‘retind after Influenza.

And Joe with staring eves
West Indies Gut Hear eighty
Said the radio telling lies



Oh boys the gossip started
And contents not so kind
Declaring the West Midians
Have something oh their mind
a . :

At any rate bou aatd this
Joe boy by Monday night
The victory for Avistralia
Will surely be in sight
. .
We comé hore to Barbados,
You ean get vex or pletse
We're beating the Jamaicans
And beating them With esse
* . :

Barbados has a young team
Who'll goon replace the old
All thesé will need is handling
There's talent we can mould

. . .

The boy vou call DePeizan
lf given a hélping hand
Will be another uret——
He keeps a wicket grand

And when ft comes to bowling,

You know how bees can sting

The very thing does happen

When batainén face Frank King.
. ;

Well our friend Norman Marshal!
Can keep down any store

One thing Lou said, he's shown
He can bow! maidens galore



Well Monday bright and early
Yes Mon@ay boys don't tear
We hope to throw Jamaicans
Right in the reverse gear,

They'll cOme and faee Gur music
We'll bowl them 61€ hy_ one,

We'll buck-up with our flelding
Till ever¥ man is gone

And fy be Tuesday evening
When we have won both test
We'll stage a J & KR party
Barbados ram that's best

sponsored by
J&R BAKERIES

makers of
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and the blenders of
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RHEUMATIC
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PAGE SIX a

MILLIONS OF FAMILIES agree with scientific findings that :








Â¥ CLEANS YOUR TEETH
YCLEANS YOUR BREATH .«

THE COLGATE WAY TO COMPLETE
HOME DENTAL CARE

Always brush your teeth
right after eating with

COLGATE DENTAL CREAM



i A th.



— WONDER WHEELS N° 4--

Why Hercules cyczzs
arrive in Barbados
in perfect condition

The special Hercules packing
methods — the result of 30 years
study of packing for countries
overseas —ensure this. The well-
wrapped parts are placed carefully
in strong cases so that they can be
simply, safely and correctly as-
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VIEW OF HERCULES
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DESPATCH DEPARTMEN

SOME WHO DO NOT

RS. GLADYS LEITH mus‘
be an exceptional woman
in these days,

It was Mrs. Leith who said (dur-
ing a court dispute with he:
dressmakers yesterday): “Some
people wi'l manage with two or
three evening frocks a yew
but I like seven or eight.”

of six housewives I spoke *

to-day not one buys more tha).
one new evening dress a year.

Usual reasons: “No money to
spare on fripperies”, “We don’t
go out enough these days”:
“Nobody seems to dress up
now,” and “It’s school uniforms
that are worrying me at pre-
sent, not evening dresses.”

Even women in public life did
not equal Mrs. Leigh's buying
record.

Jacquetta Hawkes, archaeologist
and author, with an OBE in the
last Honours List “One ful!
evening dress in two years and
about two dinner dresses.”

Cabaret star Hermione Baddeley.

“Until I was in cabaret I had
two evening drecsce year, Dut
now I need them for work !
buy six.”

Betty Jumel, this season's panto-
mime “Humpty-Dumpty”: “One
dinner dress and one full even-
ing gown see me through 12
months.”

Norma Andreotti, opera singer,

giving a recital in London this
week: “I buy about 20 a year,
averaging 100 dollars each, but
these are mostly for my work.”
My own count is one in three

years, But the one before last
did duty for ten years.
Light Up
oe of .last October's
tobacco consumption § in
Britain, announced to-day,

were the highest ever—21,130,-
0001b.

This means that manufacturers
are making more—not that the
public are necessarily buying
mpre, says Mr. Featherstone, of
the National Union of Retail]
Tobacconists.

But he points to the large post-
war increase in women smok-
ers,

‘Women face more nervous wor-
ry and strain today and find
smoking comforting,” he told
me. He quoted examples of
women who took part-time jobs
to earn their cigarette money.

A London bar-tender told me he
finds more crimson-tipped cig-
arette stubs in the ashtrays than
plain ones.

One business woman I quizzed
about her smoking habits con-
fessed that she had spent about
£100 a year on cigarettes.

I like my 10 a week, but I do NOT
like to see the following smok-
ers;

Girls under 18;

Elderly women;

Smoking in the streets;

Chain smoking;

Cigarettes dropping out of a
woman’s mouth.

Nicotine-stained fingers on a wo-
man.

Spotlight on Teenagers

EENAGE STYLES are receiv-
ing more attention from de-
signers in the New Year. Chub-
bies is a new group for girls

between 11 and 14, with more
than average puppy-fat to
camouflage.

Another range, called Miss Debut,
covers girls in their late teens
and early twenties.

Coat linings are almost more
important than the coat. Con-
trast colours are gay; quilting
is warm for the rest of the win-
ter months, bright tartan in
wool or silk is good for coun-
try wear,

Wool jersey

makes an elegant



Families in every part of the

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8 KLIMis produced und









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without refrigeration

—value to the very last ounce.

1 KLIMis pure, safe milk

4 KLIMis excellent for growing children

CO ee ee SE ee a ee a



SUNDAY ADVOCATE

a











THIN Lips

FULL LIPS y




EILEEN
ASCROFT’s
COL UMN

lining, especially when match-
ing the frock beneath.
Thinking Small
yj’ \HILDREN are larger

“4 than they were before
war,

Mothers repeatedly confirm thi:
with weight and measurement
charts. But manufacturers of
small children’s clothes refuse
to recognise facts. They still
produce pre-war sizes.

This is a typical letter from a
mother. It is from Mrs, Chris-
tine Shirley, of Town Court
Lane Petts Wood.

“My son, three years old last
September, weighs 3st, 5lbs. and
is 3ft Tins. tall. .

“At 14 months, when Stephen
was learning to walk, he had to
wear heavy walking shoes, as
manufacturers do not make kid
Shoes with non-slip soles in a
Size larger than 5. He now
wears clothes for a six-year-
old.”

The Ministry of Health have been
conducting a national survey
during the last two years to
establish the average post-war
weights and heights of children
under 3. Their findings—to be
issued in about a year—may
persuade manufacturers to
change their sizing systems,

Ministry figures already show that
school children have increas-
ed their height since before
the war by }-in.-4jin. and their
weight by 14-2lb (3-3441b. for
girls.)

Nylons to Burn

Ne ITEM FROM TEHERAN

TO-DAY. Queen Sor-
oya plans to make a bonfire of
her nylon stockings. She will be
accompanied by other Persian
women members of a league
which refuses to wear clothes
bought with foreign currency.

Result of the closing of the Per-
sian market to British nylons;
there may temporarily be a
few more nylons on sale at
home says Miss Margaret Ree-
kie of the British Nylon spin-
ners

Nylon stockings as a_ profitable
British export. The Board of
Trade’s figures for the 70 ex-
port countries up to November
30 last year are £5,638,000 for
fully-fashioned and £725,000
for seamless.

No Passes ?
HE old saying that men sel-
dom make passes at girls
who wear glasses may be up-
set by the latest spectacle
frames.

Wicks in the shafts are impreg-

nated with perfume.

TTRACTIVE Hungarian-born
Maria Hornes reads charac-

now
the

ters from her clients’ lips as!






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EFERENCE THE WORLD OVER



=
aS

t

SUNDAY, JANUARY 27, 1952



ERRQOOH Nev ytereneexovnagertevennegggpreyrnrnegHya gy Ep RE

LiPS GIVE
AWAY THE
CHARACTER



~< HEAVY LOWER LIP

~ THE CLASSICAL
MOUTH

.. » but-make-up
can tell a lie

she works to beautify them.

Rix has sketched the four main
types of mouths and Miss Hornes
gives her character reading otf
e-ch, together with practical
advice on lip make-up.

A HEAVY LOWER LIP signifies
a volatile character. Good in-
tellect, but inclined to be lazy

Emphasize the top lip with a
slightly darker shade of lip-
stick. Press lips together ana
the imprint gives a good guide.
Stop short of the corntrs of
bottom lip and shade off colour
with the little finger

THIN LIPS indicate a purposeful
charac.er and shrewdness,

Make lips look larger and fuller
by using clear, bold red and
by building up the corners un-
obtrusively, with a slight ex-
tension of the centre curves,

CLASSICALLY SHAPED
MOUTH, with clearly defined
Cupid’s bow. Set of top lip
suggests superiority,

Spotlight the perfect mouth by
wearing vivid lipsticks, Blot of}
any excess with tissue and
powder over the top. Take col-
our well inside lips to give an
even line when smiling,

FULL LIPS suggest that their
owner is generous and appre-
ciates the good things of life.

To “fine down” a large mouth,
trace the outline just inside
the natural margin. Take col-
our as high as natural lip-line
in the centre,

World Copyright Reserved
—L.E.S.

THE SOCIALIST PSALM

THE GOVERNMENT is
Shepherd, I need not work,

It allows me to lie down on good

jobs, it leadeth me beside still

factories.
destroyeth my initiative, i
leadeth me in the paths of the

Parasite for Politic’s sake,

Yea, even though I walk through
the valley of laziness and deficit
spending, I will fear no evil for
the GOVERNMENT is with me.

It prepareth me for an economic
Utopia by appropriating the
earnings of my grandchildren.

It filleth my head with Baloney;
my inefficiency runneth over.
Surely THE GOVERNMENT shall
care for me all the days of my
life, and I shall dwe.l in a Fool s

Paradise FOREVER.
—Watson A. Humphrey-Gaskin.

Public Holiday

ST, GEORGE'S.
First day of the Grenada Agri-
cultural and Industrial Exhibit-
ion, Wednesday January 30, has
been proclaimed a public holi-
day. Very keen interest in the
event is promised and so far
there have been over 700 entries,
exclusive of those for school
competitions, with just five more

| days to go before closing date.



my

It



An appeal for persons made
destitute by last Monday morn-
ing’s fire in St. George’s has
been launched by the St.
an

George’s District Board with
initial donation of $100

The flowing beauty of crc
has never been seen to greater advanta
than in Ferguson's luxurious

in a riot of lovely colours . . . s

\

superbly carried out by Fergus

A. S. Bryden & Sons (Bar

pe



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Family

Welfare

AMONG THE MANY PROBLEMS pressing upon us
in these days is one that is above all others important

preservation of our family

way of life.

Here is our top-rank social institution, and it is at the
same time the nearest many of us come to that “heaven

upon earth” that the philosophers talk about.

It is, of all

our social necessities, the most necessary. ‘

Piusveug Wit, alu Clack —
b4iae 2D thee AMMUOL didetad pe vupuiig
ave WSEAS, CUMAULE GU Seawasty.
WU PCUPAS SEE dk ULL pa Saciie Dred
Vs ovessey & WEdaeidg Ub Lue bico
Ae Med Aedddesice

WBS, Gin

acy Aves eee HAD CUssdeseUee Ss 4
dileuece WU Lue Vailies Lil dase Wiuitus
we 40s Ucar,

ducre are Causes Which we Cail-
ful Waaliie, Buu, iueCU, Caliocd
wintcu We WOWG MOL Wis WwW
Vidiuuaee, Jal We Cal GO ib duapt
Ourselves LO Ulcer. SUr eXalliyar,
we ave a@allained pusuuca
aumucracy, WOiCO Js a good Wu,
Due it Mas Suessed Cyuauty aud
tne indiviagual, woereas Wie Waui-
U0Hal laMuy iaea was Of a airecior
ana cO-Operauon, We now nave
people living in closeiy-packea
ciuues, Subject to all the distractuons
OL urpan ile, instead of the cally
let's-suck-logeimer groups of rutai
lite. We have the changed status
ot women, due to their new-lIound
economic ingependence, and there
is tne opporvwnily oltered to all
members of the family to go ic
work. “In older days, the bread-
winner was the guide, counselior,
support and law-giver of the
housenold; today, everyone has an
equai—or equally loud—voice in
family affairs.

What is the Foundation ?

The family is built upon love
All literature records the yearning
of human beings for love. The
greatest poems revolve around it.
Our noblest writers have, at tyeir
highest moments, described the
joys of fulfilled love, and have
pictured for us the wretched
sullering visited upon those who
tnrow it away or lose it.

How does love show itself in the
family? Not principally in actions,
or in bubbling-over enthusiasms,
but in the caim feeling that here
is a group of people, intimate from
the chila’s bubynood, who woula
feel pride in his success, socrow
at his failure, and shame at his
disgrace.

What is Stability ?

The family holds its pre-
eminent place in our way of life
because it is the only possible base
upon which a society of re-
sponsible human beings has ever
found it practicable tg build for
the future and maintain the values
they cherish in the present.

It seems necessary for the
peace of mind of readers who fear
the worst, to stress the fact that
in a world of change the family
also changes. But the influence of
social heritage has in the long
run outweighed social innovation.
Even if, for a time, society de-
parts from past standards, the
structure seems to right itself on
a level which fits the new en-
vironment. That is the character
of civilization, to set aside the
easy-to-follow traditional pattern
while developing into something
better. The vital thing is to pre-
serve those elements of civiliza-
tion, culture, ideals, standards and
customs which the past has found
good, and merge thpm with the
new or changed factors which the
present day believes valid,

Personal and Social

if the family were to be swept
away, the world would become
a piace of regimentation, chaos and
desolation. Why? Because the
family fulfils at least three vital
functions; it provides sustenance
and trains its members in the art
of surviving; it provides the
earliest group association, teaching
the art of social living; and it is
the primary place where the values
and knowledge of culture are
passed from generation to genera-
tion, -
But wholesome and constructive
thinking in the family will pene-
trate all society. ‘The man who
learns within the family to accom-
modate himself to others, to sub-
ordinate, when necessary, his per-
sonal interest to the interest of the
group, ahd to tolerate in others
fads and habits he would con-
demn in himself: that man has
learned many of the lessons neces-
sary to his becoming a good work-
mar, a good executive and a good
citizen.

Effect of Classes

We must pass by, in this Letter,

the disruption brought about by

the cityward trand and by inven-
tions instead, something will be
said about the eifect of social
classes on family slabilily, a phe-
homenon Win arpidly changing
and dynamic qualiues.

ii we divide tne classes arbilrar-
uly, we have three: the upper ciass,
comprisipg the old and the new;
the middie class, divided into up-
per and lower; and the working
class. These distinctions are im-
portant, because no matter what
we say about democracy anda
equality, they are there.

In the old upper class the prin-
cipal features are; who were one’s
ancestors and who are one’s rela-
tives? Background is the testing
point. One of the constant wor-
ries of this group is to keep its
young people from marrying in-
discreetly someone outside the
group.

One of the disruptive facts in
family life is that so many fam-
ilies with an urge to climb social-
ly have to break with their group
as part of the price they pay. It
is often a stiff price to pay, and
inevitably it means a rupture in
the family pattern, It is a cost
to be reckoned by any family with
climbing aspirations.

Economic Worries

Some persons will say that most
family disruption stems from fin-
ancial and economic causes, but
we need to proceed with care in
making any such judgment. No-
where is it more true than in per-
sonal relations that things are not
always what they seem. The
“financial tension” that is so ereat-
ly deplored may be merely the
overt expression of other worrie
and disappointments and troubles

Economic matters are impor-
tant in family life, but they do not
rete top billing. Persons with un-
stable personalities can quarrel as
readily over money matters as
about anything else, Those who
make sure to keep equable tem-

peraments can adjust themselves
to really trying economic prob-
lems. Let’s not take the e ey way

out by using budget dificulty'as a
neg on which to hang responsibil-
ity for a break-up.

Approaching Marriage

Marriage is not something that
iS covered in a ceremony; it is not
something in which success js as-
sured if the young people have the
same background, traditions and
economic status, It is not guanan-
teed success by books, movie-made
conceptions of married life, or
anylung else of a casual or super-
ficial nature.

_ The only thing that works effec-

lively toward successful marriage
is Kinship of ideas and ideals. No
blind faith in romantic love will
serve, though this igs a hard-to-
erase social siction,

Marriage is a combined opera-
lon, and that does away with the
treedom of isolation, Interdgpend-
ence doesn’t mean leaning, but
being able to reach out and know
that the partner is there when
needed, and planning together to
meet a big or a little crisis, and
walking hand-in-hand along both
sunlit uplands and dark valfeys.

The Family Council

To bring together in a har-
monious pattern the personal
traits and desires of its members,
and the group needs of the fam-
ily, the “family council” has been
devised.

Family Ritual

/ Very like the family council in
its effect, though not in its formal-
ity of organization, is ritual, This
is a way of acting that acquires a
certain “rightness” in each family.
It is not merely a code of behav-
jour, but extends itself to include
participatior in family prayer, in
religious observances, in hobbies,
in observing birthdays and Christ-
mas, and in many other ways, It
is largely through family ritual
that culture is developed and pass-
ed on through generations.

Mealtime provides a recurring
opportunity for ritual. It is then

at the family is at its greatest
ase; the members are together in
one place for a definite period;
and there are fewer distractions
than at most other times of the
day.



gas

all

ridgetown, |



ITCHING
INFLAMED



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SUNDAY, JANUARY 27, 1952

SEWING

By PENN

CIRCL

Â¥ NOLAN

WELL PLANNED YOKES add interest to many styles.
The home designer will find that yokes offer a fertile field

for her talents.

Of course any form of designing is also

a form of art but all of us have some art talent and even
the smallest talent will grow with practice so don’t be
frightened by the term “design”.

Study fashion pictures of various
yokes, Try drawing some of these
yokes on copies of your basic
pattern. Achieving exactly the
same proportions as the picture
your are copying may not be easy
at first but keep trying. :
- ay “Le , c="?

Figure 1 shows a round yoke.
Notice that this yoke starts from
the tip of the shoulder or where
the shoulder seam meets the
sleeve seam, The lowest point of
yoke curve is just above the first

button. On your basic bodice
front first determine where you
want this first button. Mark it
on your pattern and pin in your
basic darts then hold the pat-
tern on you in front of your mir-
ror with the neckline turned
back to form the lapels, When
you are sure you have the but-
ton in the proper location unpin
the darts so the pattern will lay
flat and draw in a gentle curve

from the shoulder tip to a point
about an half inch above the
first button, Work over the

curve until it is smooth, then re-
pin darts and try before your
mirror again. Keep working on
the curve until ‘it looks right on
you. Cut the pattern apart on
the curve and add seam allow-
ance to both edges.

The yoke in Figure 2 starts at
the underarm seam. This yoke
is designed on a kimono sleeve

~~

basic and the yoke comes from
the point on the underarm seam
where it curves out to become
the sleeve, seam. At the centre
front the yoke line comes to the
point of the V neckline. The
first step is to establish the neck-

line, Then start from the under-
arm seam and sketch in the
~urves and point, Try in front of

your mirror until achieve

the desired effect.

you



Fie 3
The yoke in Figure 3 starts
about midway on the shoulder

seams. From the position of the
underarm darts in the picture you
can see that the lowest point of
the yoke curve is about level with
ihe bust point. Try sketching
this wm and try on as before to
obtain the lines most becoming
to you. When you have cut the
yoke pattern from the bodice
pattern you will have to allow
button lap and facing on the
yoke. This yoke is also very
effective when tucked. This may
be done in two different ways.
you may tuck a section of cloth
and then cut its outlines by your
yoke pattern or you may crease
tucks in another piece of paper
and cut another yoke pattern
from the first which includes the
tucks. The last method necessi-
tates marking the tucks accurately
before stitching.

<3

After you have practised mak-
ing yoke patterns from pictures
try designing some original yokes
on your basic. The possible
designs are numerous.

The best method for stitching
most yokes is to turn under the
yoke seam and lap the yoke over
the bodice seam. Base carefully
and top stitch.

Uncomfortable
Children

“Children don’t experience phy-
sical discomfort as the adult hu-
man does. You buy them fleecy
dressing gowns and fur-lined bed-
room slippers, yet they prefer to
walk barefooted on freezing lino-
leum and stand in howling
draughts rather than put these
garments on. They can plaster
their fingers with an adhesive
mixture of congealed marmalade,
leaf mould and poster paint and
then set about some task requir-
ing delicacy of touch—such as
dealing a pack of cards or play-
ing the piano.”

—Anthony Buckeridge.







What's Cooking
In The Kitchen

Last week I gave you two
recipes for gnocchi. The follow-
ing is Agnolotti. They are mis-
taken for ravioli sometimes and
they are just as tasty and less
expensive.

Agnolotti

For 5 people
Meat ‘s Ib.
Grated cheese
Ham | sliee
Salt
Nubnes
Water 1 tablespoonful
Tomato sauce
Domed spinach 2 tablespoonsful

aS

Marsala or Rum 1 tabiespoonful
Pepper

Flour %

80 agnolotti)

Cook the slices of meat in some
butter. Mince it amd add to it
2 tablespoonsful of boiled spinach
(quite dry), 1 tables of
grated cheese, one egg yolk, 1
slice of ham minced, 1 teaspoon-
ful of Rum and a tiny bit of nut-
meg (according to taste). Mix all
with a wooden spoon, Now pre-
pare the dough. Sift the #1b of
flour on the kitchen table. Add
the two eggs and the white of
the other egg, one tablespoonful
of water and a@ pinch of salt, Work
the dough until soft and divide
it into two pieces. With the rol-
ling pin roll the dough until you
have two side sheet. Be careful
that the dough does not get dry.
On the first sheet put the mixture
in small heaps as big as a nut
leaving two inches between each.



Cover with the other sheet of
dough and press between each of

the agnolotti. Cut with a knife
that you have dipped in flour
agnolotti (like little squares)
about 2 inches by 2 inches. See
that the mixture is safely shut
inside by pressing with your fin-
ger all round each of them, Put
them to dry on a tablecloth which
you have dusted wtih flour. Put
a saucepan on the fire with some
water and salt and as soon as it
is boiling throw the agnolotti in
the water and let them boil for 10
minutes. Put them in a colander
and pour some tomato sauce on
them. Serve hot. If you don't
like tomato sauce you can put
some table butter and grate cheese
on them. In either ways they
will be very tasty. Serve hot.

And now two easy recipes for
cakes.

Savoy Biscuit

It is called biscuit not because
it is a biscuit but from the old
fashioned French BISCUIT.

Eggs: 5

Cornflour: 2 02,

Flour: 2 oz,

Icing sugar Ya Ib.

Orange or lemon peel or vanilla
essence.

. Osbert Peake,

SUNDAY ADVOCATE

You Need Charmito
Work fora Princess

By SUSAN DEACON

BUSY learning a job which may
last only three months, is 28-year-
old Iris Peake, daughter of Mr.
M.P. for Leods
North, and new temporary lady-
in-waiting to Princess Margaret.

It is a job most girls will envy.
What qualifications are needed?

A LITTLE SHORTHAND. Miss
Peake’s speed was 120 when she
finished training ten years ago.

You need to be EFFICIENT
AND HARDWORKING. In Miss
Peake’s last job, researching for
the Conservative Central Office
she “worked extremely hard an
never minded staying late.”

You need TACT, Her work in
research was “top secret”, so Miss
Peake is used to “not talking.”

You need CHARM. An ex-col-
league says: “Iris Peake is an
attractive girl and was very pop-
ular.”

You need POISE. A resident in
her father’s constituency says:
“She has so much poise I cannot
imagine her ever getting into a
panic.”

WHAT ARE HER DUTIES?

She is secretary, companion, and
Press officer combined. And almost
always on duty.

Why was she selected?

FRIENDS say she seemed most
surprised to be chosen. Miss
Peake herself says: “I have no
idea. I don’t know Princess Mar-
garet well, although I have met
her occasionally.”

Will Miss Peake need a new
wardrobe to start her new job?

No. She says: “I am buying

only a few new clothes. Probably

one of everything.”

° * .
To-day's Youngsters Are
Older
ARE children growing up more
quickly these days? The shop
buyers, the wine waiters in Lon-
don restaurants, and Mayfair
hairdressers say: “Definitely yes.”
TO-DAY girls start growing up
when they are 12 to 14, At 10,
many buy their first “below-the-
knee” party dress, and at 14 order

an ankle-length party dress.

PRE-WAR, they did not wear
a full-length dress until they were
at least 17—and there was no
intermediary stage.

Young girls to-day have a far
better fashion sense than they had
ten years ago.

THE BUYER in the “Junior
Miss” department of a store says:

“At 10 years of age, they know
exactly what they want and see
that they get it.”

» cg *

A hairdresser says:—

“They frequently have their
first grown-up hairstyle when 13
or 14. It is usually a simple half
turn pageboy, or a youthful short

cut.”
Drinking
Boys and girls START DRINK-
ING earlier. >
In France children drink wine
and water from a very early age,
and this habit is spreading to








JAGUAR.

‘A Beautifully Proportioned
Sedan of Outstanding Biegance.”
And that, Ladies and Gentiemen,
is a quote from Informaciones’
of Madrid. It is simply an echo
cf International motoring opinion
in regard to the majestic
JAGUAR XK120, Mk.VII Sedan.
The Jaguar ig now in Barbados.
Among the more important
features to note in the Jaguar
Type XK Engine — one that has
surprised the world—is that
reliance has been placed upen
new or untried inventions. Only
a blend of known and proved ce-
tail designs of the highest
efficiency has brought about the
production of so unparalleled an

“Many more teenagers now
drink beer and cider, and we
often have quite young children
asking for a little wine with
we , They -usually have one-
third wine to two-thirds water.”

Is this HARMFUL? A_ doctor

o—

“If it is a red Bordeaux, it
would contain only just over nine

cent. of alcohol, which
wouldn’t harm any child.”
Something Warmer For The
Men

| HAVE been finding out more
about the new plastic product
Terylene which Dr. Bronowski
discussed on TV.

Terylene is going to mean fo
men what nylons mean to women,

SOCKS made from it will wear
longer than nylon and be definite-

no

ly warmer Engine.... an Engine that offers
At the same time it DRIES speed only to your taste and
MORE QUICKLY, is crease- whether you drive it fast or slow,

makes not the slightest differ-

resistant, and looks far silkier than ;
ence to it’s velvet smoothness.

nylon,

Brief technical data shows the
XK120 Engine to have a Hemi-
spherical Head of high strength
Aluminum Alloy; Valve Seatings
of special high expansion Cast
Iron Alloy; Twin Overhead
Camshafts; a Crankshaft of
seven Main Bearings each of
2%” diameter, larger than have

Mr. David Crouch, of the LC.I.,
who played a part in its develop-
ment says: —

“Terylene is more like wool
than nylon. ‘It is perfect for
men’s suitings because it always
retains *t« shape.”

4 small supply of SHIRTS

AND UNDERWEAR is already

trickling into the shops. In about ever previ e .

Z aver previously been used on
See men’s socks will be in the passenger car engines and re-
shops. sponsible to a large degree for

Women's stockings? The I.C.1.

say: “No decision.”

‘Perms’ Don’t Last As Long
WOMEN complain that a pro-

fessional permanent wave does

the exceptional smoothness, with
which the Jaguar XK120 Engine
delivers its power.

The JAGUAR MKVII Sedan is

not now last as long as a pre-war at Chelsea Garage Showrooms.
perm It is one of a combination range
= . of 26 colours. When you drcp
HAIRDRESSERS reply: “So in to see it, as you certainly must,

many women want a soft, natural-
looking wave that they ask for
only a ‘light’ perm, which obvi-
ously will not last so long.”

At the prices they charge for 1

note the wonderful braking sys~
tem -—- the Dewandre Vacuum
Servo-assisted Girling System,
self - adjusting Hydraulic, T!
interior of the Jaguar is simply

rm these days I think it should
be both natural and lasting. Ee ar b, Bor finest ee
ressi eather upholstery over oam
D ing A Young Princess rubber, polished walnut instru-

‘PRINCESS ALEXANDRIA is,
at 15, now taller than her cousins
Princess Elizabeth and Margaret.

1 SAW her with her_ mother,
the Duchess of Kent, in Mr. Nor-
man Hartnell’s showroom recent-

ment panel and deep pile car-
pets over thick felt underlay.

And finally, not the least of
the Jaguar sensations, is the
marvel that the price can be a
low as ‘it is.

ly, having a fitting for a party
dress.

The Duchess wore LOW- * “ 2
HEELED SHOES, and Princess

The Household Dept. at Cave,
Shepherd & Co, Ltd, have a
most interesting range of Con-

The Duchess buys some of the goleum Floor Covering, The de-
Princess’s day clothes at te signs are many and the colours
Oxford-street branch of a London | varied. There ig probably some-
store

Her lady-in-waiting first goos
to the store and asks for some
dresses to be sent on approval

SOMETIMES the Duchess and |
her daughter go to the store to-
gether and select the dresses in
the department alongside other |

shoppers. |
The Princess takes SIZE 12, and |
usually chooses, for day ‘wear, |

simple shirt-waisted dresses. |

Alexandra looked almost as tall.
The Princess was HATLESS
and wore a loose tent coat.






Man About



EW! IMPROVED -
ODEX SOAP

© Gets skin really clean ;



PAGE SEVEN



Jown



thing for ever py}
reason of the Congoleum eing
available in strips ranging [ror
22%" up to 6 ft width. Whi
for those preferring the nishe :
product, Congoleum Rugs are in
sizes from 6’ x 9 to 9 by 12',]
Ask to see Mr. Archiebs ‘Ram-
say who will exy the



laying service.

‘Hf only 1 could do that! How

\




many times have you said the
when admiring a_ friend’s self
designed and made dress? There)
isn’t the slightest reason wh
you can’t \vecome proficient f
the art of Dress Making. The/?
Singer Sewing Academy headed |
by the extremely capable Mrs. |
Mildred Watkins (Ph. 4927) is|
accepting enrolments now Clase- |
es are two a week of two hout |
each from 8—10; 10—12; 1—3;]
and you can choose your OWN
TIME! Phone, by all means,
but come on in and say hello!
f os .

A-L-U-M-I-N-U-M in capitals

is running through much of he

new stock in the Central hin

peortum right now. You'll find

Frying Pans, Steamers, Break- " .

fast Carriers (generally do this} I dreamed T went Pree
myself), Double Borlers and | e

Cottee Pots — yeah, aluminum to a formal in ~
coffee pots, my friend. And a
aluminum tumblers, too, What ¥ Cc ’
d@you think of these? Ideal for P Pj OVTMS “
knock-mbout drinks and school TRAM CW

lunch boxes — only 36c, Ename! e/e

Table-Tops in 4 sizes have
rived and I suggest you drop
quite soon to see ’em.

ar

nn Maidenette Strapless bra

What truly beautiful hand

painted China at Y. de Lima's on
Broad Street. When I tell you

If a big occasion is on your cal-
endar, this dream of a bra-is
designed for you! Maidenette

that it's Delft from Holland and Strapless is the most fashion-
offered in such unusual pieces as able party-goer ever! Wonder-
Gin Flasks, Wine Pitchers, Ash fut ander bate-slonlveee
Trays etc, you'll appreciate how nder Hare-Sshouleerec
necessary it is for you to see evening clothes er cocktail
them, At Y. de Lima’s you'll also dresses, Maidenette* Strapless
find the incredibly rich and love~ ‘ hai s |
ly Bavarian Porcelain in Fruit fives excellent figure control,
Dishes, Coffee Cups, Vases ete Dainty insets make it extra fem-
And don’t pass by the unusual inine: feather-light boning sup-
framed Wall Plaques for Junior's” . Sere cee
badroorn, ports your carves from below.
* * " } In white or black in your faver-

At the incomparable N, E. wi-| ite fabric +

son & Co, Store you're always
certain to find something new and}
different. The packed shelves are
holding Cotton Blankets of splen-

did value and among the Men’s
Suiting lines, most excellent
quality Worsteds in Pin Stripe

and Parson’s Grey. For Ladies
there’s the Andar Serge Materi-|
als in attractive plain colours,
36 ins wide, An entirely new
shipment of Plastic Belts have}
been unpacked together with new

Ties and Hankies, Wilson's a
store that you must visit, ,

Genuine Maidenform brassjiré
are made only in the United States
of America. .

There is a Wlatden Foam

*® for every type of igure.



Harp TIMES : si
Witt BACKACHE.

Often due to sluggish kidney octtow

IFE IS NOT 80 good when
L are as with Sachacion,
rheumatic pean >» aching
muscles and joints, lum! , OF
common urinary disorders due to

sluggish kidney action. ¢
» Why put up with pain and dise
comfort when you might get happy
relief ny ta Doan’s Backache

Mix the 5 yolks of the eggs with ; he : Kidney Pills. in
; T 7 i Princess Alexandra’s party stimu

° *% the sugar and beat well for about Britain. ; . , 7 a Banishes ination odour cleanses. shigsish —
" YOUR BABY AND Y OU unty. minutes until they look J have seen children in‘many dresses are MOSTLY FULL @ persp' Soon eee Kldneyn an

restaurants drinking a weak mix-

LENGTH, in simple styles. Organ-



uric acid an

© Leaves body sweet and dainty

Odex makes a deep cleansing lather that

other impurities

soft.
m which otherwike might collect ia



za is her favourite material.

ture of wine and water, LES.

Add the flour and the cornflour A WINE WAITER says: —

(By SISTER CHARLOTTE)

SO far we have dealt with some of the p
will make for your baby, and shall now

of your baby.

Most mothers-to-be I fin
like to

ing their first babies,
mencing labour especially in
—which are not labour pain
the last two or three weeks.
It can be most disappointing to
journey to a Nursing Home or
call your Doctor only to find that
it is a “false alarm”. Much better
to know what to expect when
your little one is really ready to
arrive, and to be able to recognise
the signs of true labour which,
as a rule, are quite unmistakable.
You will find that a period-like
pain will begin low in the back
working down the sides of the
womb to the front or, if you are
relaxed you may feel them be-
ginning in the womb and going
downwards directly, These pains
will start, increase in strength
and then quite rapidly die away.
Then another pain will do pre-
cisely the same, As time goes on
they will increase with fre-
quency at regular intervals.
As soon as you think that these
regular pains have commenced
you should let your Doctor or
Nurse know. There is absclutely
no need to become anxious or
alarmed. Nor need you go to bed.
It is much better to be up and
about arranging the last minute
details to your/things.




Other signs of labour which
generally follow some hours
after the rythmic pains, but some-
times occur before, are a slight
period-like loss and a sudden rush











SWEETENED
Vanilla, Almond,
Eggnog, Cream.

reparations you
consider the birth

d, and certainly those expect-
know the symptoms of com-
fact that odd pains
e to be felt during

view of the
s—are liabl

of water. Should you experience
either, the best plan is to send for
your doctor and lie down quietly
while awaiting his arrival. If you
are going away, set off after noti-
fying your Doctor. It is better in
this case not to walk around, but

THE AWFUL CHILD—

<

CE? ME? — don't
know there's still some
ice cream left?



once again do not be alarmed, try
and relax completely, as in doing
this you will aid the muscles which
are trying to do their job in con-
tracting and expelling the contents
of the womb.






IN THE
DESERT
-OF DESSERTS—



ONLY

Ae

Raspberry, Lemon,

very slowly and mix well. Add
the orange or lemon rind or
vanilla essence. Then beat the
whites of the eggs until they are
quite stiff and add to the other
mixture. Put in a cake tin with
very high borders because it will
raise quite a lot in the oven,
Butter the tin of course and put in
a moderate oven for about % of
an hour.

Pie 1919

is a very economic and
It was given (the

This
easy recipe.

recipe I mean) to housewives in ¢

Italy in 1919 in ope of the most
popular magazines in 1919 and it
takes its name from that date.

Flour: A bit more than 1 Ib.
Sugar: 6 tablespoonsful
Butter; 1 tablespoonful
Lemon rind
Icing sugar
Salt one pinch
Egus 2

English potatoes 3
Yeast: 2 oz,

Sift the flour on the kitchen
table or the pastry board like a
fountain. In the middle put the
pinch of salt, 2 tablespoonsful of
sugar, 2 eggs, 1 tablespoonful of
butter, 3 big English potatoes
(boiled and mashed) and _a bit of
Jemon rind (grated). Mix the
yeast in little water (two table-
spoonsful) and add to the mixture.

Work the dough. Put it in a cake
tin with high border and leave it
in a warm spot for about two
hours. Bake it in a moderate oven
for about %4 of an hour, When

ready take it out of the oven and
sift some icing sugar on the top.

PUDDINGS

Rum, Mocha.







Canadian Column

$200,000,000 FISH HARVEST

Canada has one of the foremost
fisheries experimental laborator-
ies in the world with the com-
pletion in Halifax, N.S., of the
renovated and expanded quarters
of the Atlantic Fisheries Experi-
mental Station of the Fisheries
Research Board of Canada, the
Department of Fisheries announc-

Ss,

Long recognized as one of the
leading fisheries research nations,
Canada has seven stations from
Newfoundland to British Colum-
bia engaged in full-time biologi-
cal and technological studies in-
to Canada’s commercial fisheries.
This year these fisheries are ex-
pected to have a marketed valuc
of nearly $200,000,000.

“SIOUX” AIDS RESCUE
On Board HMCS Sioux, at a UN
Naval Base in Japan (delayed)

This Canadian destroyer played
an active part recently in the re-
capture from the Reds of an island
off the west coast of North Korea
and in the care of civilians and
UN fighting men wounded in the
nana for the island.




The Sioux had been assigned to
an area in which the Communists
had been launching attacks on
UN-held islands. Stationing her-
self off an island that had been
under assault, the Sioux trans-|
ferred a party of five to a South |
Korean minesweeper with instruc |
tions to ascertain the progress of |
the fighting. |

Closing the island under cover
of darkness the minesweeper
spotted two junks and, at the base
of a cliff, a party of refugees and
UN troops. They learned that the
island had fallen and that the
party on the shore was hopefully '
awaiting rescue, while being cov~-
ered by a small rear-guard at the
top of the cliff. |

One of the junks was loaded |
with refugees and this the mine-
sweeper towed to a near by!
friendly island. Then the sweeper)
returned with four small sam-}

pans which, with their shallow |
draft, could go right in to the}
beach. |

Forty persons were rescued |
They included eight wounded

two women and a@ baby.



confident.

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PAGE EIGHT





Printed by e Adverste Co., Lid., Broad Liss Brlicctown
Sunday, January 27, 1952

THIRD PARTY

THE Bill to make provision for the pro-
tection of Third Parties against risks arising
out of the use of motor vehicles makes it
unlawful for anyone to use a motor vehicle
on a public road without being insured
against liability for causing death or bodily
injury to any person by the use of such
vehicle. A motor vehicle is defined in the
Bill as a mechanically propelled vehicle
intended or adapted for use on roads.

Latest available official records show that
there are 5,960 motor vehicles using the
public roads of this island. There are 3,621
private cars, 340 hired cars, 156 omnibuses,
1,045 lorries, 381 vans, 26 hearses, 314
motor-cycles, 46 tractors and 31 trailers. In
addition to these 5,960 motor vehicles,
21,515 bicycles and 4,314 animal drawn and
push carts also use the public roads.

Tn 1951, there were 19 fatal accidents, 84
serious and 1,062 minor. Vehicles involved
in these accidents were 684 motor cars, 351
lorries, 152 omnibuses, 105 vans, 40 motor
evcles, 451 bicycles and 22 listed as “others”.

These official figures are illuminating
but two facts deserve special notice.
Although there are only 156 omnibuses
using the public roads omnibuses were in-
volved in 152 accidents during 1951. Of par-
ticular importance too is the fact that 451
bicycles were involved in a total number of
2,092 accidents.

Nobody would criticise the principle that
third party insurance is desirable for the
protection of road users. Yet the point made
by a correspondent in the Advocate of
January 23 deserves notice. The fact that a
measure introduced in England and Trini-
dad has not proved so unsatisfactory as to
be repealed, comments this subscriber, is
no reason for introducing it here.

During the discussions of the Bill in the
House of Assembly this month a lengthy
speech was made by the senior member of
St. George concerning the legal implica-
tions of the Bill. Doubtless there is great
need for the House of Assembly to be satis-
fied with the drafting of the Bill and to
understand thoroughly the meaning of its
clauses, but there is an even greater need
to understand why such a Bill should be
necessary. Much more information surely
is required from police records and from
statistics of insurance companies. What the
ordinary tax-payer wants to know about
legislati6bn is whether it is good value for
the money he or she is spending. It is so
often overlooked/by government and peo-
ple that taxation is compulsory taking from
one or more individuals and spending the
monies so compulsorily taken for the pub-
lic benefit.

If private individuals or companies ac-
quired monies in this method there would
be a legitimate outcry against such high
handed activities. All legislation must
therefore be constantly scrutinised by the
public, all of whom are indirect tax payers,
to see whether money expropriated from
them is being well spent by the government
which has been elected to power.

This point is worth making because leg-
islation aimed at protecting the commun-
ity is so often immune from criticism
because the public assumes that it is get-
ting good value for its money.

Facts and figures may prove that com-
pulsory third party insurance is in fact
necessary and will pay dividends. But so
far there has been little indication given to
the public to show why it should be neces-
sary.

Figures can be obtained quite easily and
throw much light on the subject under
discussion.

It is interesting to discover that 2,903 of
a total number of 5,960 motor vehicles in
Barbados are insured (most of them com-
prehensively) against third party risks by
five insurance companies. If the volume of
business done by the remaining twenty
insurance companies only equalled the
total coverage of these five companies no
less than 5,806 out of a total 5,960 vehicles
would be already insured.

In such an event the government might
be creating much extra work for civil ser-
vants and insurance companies by passing
the Third Party Risks Act and might in fact
be spending more than the benefits to be
derived from compulsory insurance of a
relatively small number might warrant.

Omnibuses and hired cars which have to
pay very high premiums and a minority of
commercial vehicles and private cars
appear to be the main exceptions to the
general rule in Barbados where the major-
ity of motor vehicles are already insured.

There cannot be the least doubt that
people ought to be protected from drivers
of motor vehicles in the event of accidents
causing death or bodily injury. But unless
the public is given a great deal more in-
formation as to the real need for such legis-
lation than is provided in the objects and
reasons of the Bill, it may be convinced that
some less complicated measure might have
been more suitable for Barbadian require-
ments.

If, as the figures quoted above for five
insurance companies suggest, the major-







SUNDAY ADVOCATE





ity of motor vehicles are already insured,
then there must be very good reasons why
the remainder do not take out insurance
policies.

Existing third party premiums for priv-
ate cars vary between $15 and $18 per
annum depending on the horse power of
the cars and no owner of a private car
could find these premiums prohibitive.
In Trinidad on the other hand where there
is compulsory third party insurance the
rates are two and a halt times as high.
There is therefore no grounds for assum-
ing that compulsory third party insurance
would decrease existing low premium
rates for private cars, On the contrary
there is general agreement that the rates
would have to be raised as the public be-
came more insurance conscious and made
greater claims than they do at present.

The greatest reluctance to insurance in
Barbados appears to be displayed by the
owners of omnibuses and taxis.

The reason for this shyness is readily
understood, Insurance premiums increase
with the number of passengers carried.
Taxis have therefore to pay nearly four
times and omnibuses nearly twenty times
the value of the premiums paid by the
owner of a private car. Apparently they
find it much cheaper to settle claims with-
out insurance coverage. Compulsory in-
surance will therefore almost certainly
result in increased taxi and bus fares.
This is a very important point to watch
because no legislation should add to the
already inflated cost of living.

RUM

RUM, besides being an island in the
Inner Hebrides, is gonsidered by Barba-
dians to be their national drink.

Now Dr. Joad has been taking English-
men to task for not indulging in little
England’s famous beverage.

“T consider”, writes C. E. M. Joad in
The Pleasure of Being Oneself, “one of
the most outstanding tokens of our culin-
ary d@generfacy to be the almost total
disappearance of hot concoctions from the
average repertory of English drinking. Up
to and including the time of Dickens,
English literature is full of accounts of
toddies, neguses and punches, but if you
ask for a hot drink in an English pub
today, even if it be only the hotting up of
Rum or Whisky they stare at you with
consternation .. .”

Then after describing his favourite hot
drink which has a basis of rum Dr. Joad
points to the drawback: “the absurd ex-
pensiveness of that best Empire product
—rum, ”

The West Indian Committee Circular is
to be congratulated on reproducing this
passage from C. E. M. Joad. Millions
of Englishmen will agree with his com-
ment on the drawback: “the absurd expen-
siveness of that best Empire product rum.

In the United States of America there
is an excise duty of $9 (U.S.) on every gal-
lon of rum entering the United States
from Puerto Rico. The United States em-
ploys the wine gallon as a standard of
measurement. This is approximately 20%
less than the British Imperial Gallon, But
so far from damaging the rum industry of
Puerto Rico by making rum “absurdly”
expensive the United States returns the
excise duty collected on Puerto Rican rum
to the Treasury of Puerto Rico. In 1949
the United States paid Puerto Rican ex-
porters of rum $3,011,000 for 1,043,000 gal-
lons of rum.

In addition the collectors of excise tax
collected for the Puerto Rican Treasury
$9,387,000,

In 1944 when the United States im-
posed restrictions on the manufacture of
whisky the value of Puerto Rico’s rum and
liquor exports’ reached the extraordinary
level of $35,000,000. When the $9 excise
tax per proof gallon is added to this high
sales figure it is easy to understand how
much Puerto Rican ‘prosperity is due to
its incorporation in the Commonwealth of
the United States.

The disadvantages under which Barba-
dian rum exporters to the United King-
dom operate are in marked contrast to the
advantages which accrue to Puerto Rico.

A duty of £10, 11s. 2d. per proof gallon
(imperial) has to be paid on rum entering
the United Kingdom in casks and a duty
of £10. 12s. 2d. has to be paid on the same
quantity arriving in bottles.

Instead of the United Kingdom return-
ing the duty levied in the United King-
dom on imported Barbadian rum it kee
these monies for the Exchequer of the
United Kingdom. In 1949 Barbados ex-
ported 51,079 gallons of rum to the United
Kingdom. Were the United Kingdom to
take a leaf from the United States’ book
Barbados would have profited by approxi-
mately £500,000 from duties collected in
English ports during the year. But since
Barbados is not incorporated into the
United Kingdom, like Martinique is into
France or Puerto Rico into the United
States the rum exporters of Barbados
have no legitimate grievance, What is
cause for grievance is the fact that English
warehouses are overstocked with West
Indian rum today because the United
Kingdom imposes so “absurdly expensive”
a duty on that “best Empire product—
rum”,

The position would not be so absurd if
the English man or woman disliked rum
or did not want to buy it. In an over-
taxed country like the United Kingdom
how many individuals can afford to pay

more than 26 shillings duty on a 5/6 bottle
of rum ?

The expensiveness is more than absurd,
Dr. Joad: it “spites the Englishman’s
face by cutting off the colonial’s ose.”

But our thanks are due none the less to
vou for bringing the matter up and to the
West India Committee Circular for draw-
ing your notice to our attention.






| 4

}
!

|
, f
aimed at clearin
will inc!
Senator McLarth

Blithers. ek

SUNDAY, JANUARY 27, 1952



Mo Low, wnlerviewed, said The expedition

sense abdoulT
Ts. “My staff
Canterbury,

, Wilfred Pickles, Sir Waldron
Teach the backward inhat “anls

ensure peace ong prosperily as

how To
To have

act sénsibly in a crisis. Weare





A DANE IN LONDON

WANDERINGS IN LONDON By
Ebbe Sadolin (Methuen 15/-)

THE story ts toid of Thomas
Balarey who was a taxi driver in
London for wenty-five years just
for the fun of it. When Balarey
died in 1949 it turned out that ne
was a wealthy man who had taken
up taxi driving as a hobby, but it
gave him so much enjoyment that
he simply could not give it up.

It was in in much the same spirit
that Mr. Sadolin wrote this book.
Born in Copenhagen and, as he
tells us, 191 centimetres high,
liking Virginia cigarettes, Matisse
and Agatha Christie and disliking
white tie and tails, tepid beer and
ekiing, Ebbe scon became fas-

cinated with London. But he found "’

it difficult to sketch in London:
“Not that it is such child’s play
to draw in London as it is, for
instance, in Paris, where there is
always a café facing your subject,
and a subject facing your café. In
London you usually have to stand
in a constant stream of traffic. If
you sit down on a doorstep or a
grimy heap of rubble to do a care-
ful drawing of the house opposite,
you catch only an_ occasional
glimpse of it through the endless
procession of vans and buses. And
even if you do happen to see it, a
downpour is sure to make the ink
run all over the paper, or the wind
rips the sheets off the drawing
pad.”

But despite all these handicaps
Ebbe has produced some fine
‘!drawings of London — drawings
that are very much alive. There
are pictures of every side of
London life; of quaint pubs, ugly
suburbs, Hyde Park orators, and
theatre queues —- drawings that
combined with ‘he text interpret
the character of the City.

Of pubs he writes: ‘The pub is
a phenomenon peculiar to Eng-
land. It is a place where strong
drink is served at certain hours
of the day in accordance with a
complicated set of rules and regu-
lations which the foreigner ‘nds
confusing. Even to enter a pub
presents a bit of a problem, for
there are different entrances to
different bars. Should one gc
into the Saloon Lounge, the Saloon
Bar, the Private Bar or the Public
Bar? The customers all stand or
sit about as if they belonged to
the same party, and the stranger
feels a little reluctant to intrude.
But when you have dared to go in
and have got to know the place,
you will always be captivated by
the pleasant, club-like atmosphere,
so rare in restaurants.

Mr. Sadolin soon found out that
tea in England is both a necessity
and a rite. During the war Lord
Woolton declared that tea meant
more to the English than ammuni-
tion, and whenever a bomb fell on
London the fire brigade and
ambulance at once set off for the
scene accompanied by a_ tea-
wagon,



Hy Tan Gale

Having done some research into
the matter he give; this advice on
tea-making. “You must no> begin

by pouring the tea into the cup approve of Mr, Allen’s approach |

(although that would seem the
obvious thing, so as to see how
strong the tea is). Oh no, that
simply won’t do! . The correct

procedure is as {>llows. “First
you (1) put sugav :n the cup, then
(2) the milk, th n (3) the tea
strainer, then (4) lift the teapot
(and after this o. cn (4a) put it
down again becuse you have
burned your finge and (4b.) lift

it up again, this ti. 1e with a hand-
kerchief) and pcur tea into the
cup. Then (5) lit the hotwater
jug (this time using the hand-
kerchief from the start) and pour
a little water into the cup and a
little into the teapot, Then stir
and the tea is rea ty for use.”
“Wanderings in London” is a
charming book, :nd will appeal
both to those don’: and those who
do know London. It is in no
sense a guide boc, but is rather
a series of personal impressions,
noted down quickly in the streets
of London. It ha: in consequence
a freshness and spontaneity which
succeeds admireb!y in conveying
the excitement of cxploring a great
city.
THE MIDDLE AGES By Arthur
B. Allen (Rockliffe 12/6).
This. is another book of dis-

covery, but this time it is history
and not a city that i

to be dis-

covered.

I have always liked the Middle] }

Ages, but I must say that I do not

to the subject. He considers his-

tory as a “project”, and his aim};

is to teach school-children the
“bare bones” of the “Middle Ages

with as little effort on their part as
possible. The result is a cram|
book, full of lists of names anc

dates which he intends no doubt

to be learned by heart. A third
form boy would probably find
this book useful to “swet up” just







before his exams, but
opinion it is the worst
way to teach history.
However, the book is not with-
out merit, The illustrations art
excellent most of them being re-
productions from early MSS.

in m)
possibic

woodcuts and stained glass. ‘lne)
by themselves make the boo:
worth looking at. But beside:

this there is much interesting in-
formation about architecture
dress, trades and the like in the
period, which unfortunately i:
usually omitted from the conven-
tional text books,

If Mr, Allen would consider re-
writing his book so as to make i
a continuous narrative he might
produce something which could be
for the junior school the equivalen,
of Trevelyan’s magnificent ‘‘Socia
History.”



THE NATIONAL SPORT

Wodehouse’s novels,
great national sport, trying to
assassinate Lenin with a revol-
ver.”

Most countries seem to have—
or at any rate are reputed to
nave — their great national sport.
In England it is cricket — or is
it football? (The West Indians
and Australians between them
nave rather taken charge of the
first, and as for football — aren't
Uruguay the world champions?)
in America the national sport is
canasta. In Italy it is grand
opera. In France it is — not what
you were going to say, but
bicycling.

Has Barbados a national sport?
Most people would say cricket,
That is where I differ from most
people. Not that I deny the
quality of Barbadian cricket —
that would be not only futile but
dangerous; but I have observed
that there is another game much
more universally played in the
island than cricket is. I have
christened this game “drivit” (one
long i and one short one, like
something by Picasso), and T
claim that it is the true national
{sport of Barbados.
| Any number of players up to
; one can play drivit. All the player
needs is a motor-car—not his own,
but someone else’s. The object of
the game is to get the car out of
}a gap into a main road, or through
ja difficult stretch of congested
traffic, or into a vacant space in a
ear park,

You can’t drive a hundred yards



or a bakery Noah’s-ark trundles
past, and then pentiffically beck-
ons you forward. * Drive it, mister’
he says courteously.

When playing in a car-park the
drivit player shold observe one
or two fine points. He should wait
until the driver has parked, (or
thinks he has) and got out of the
car, and locked dvors, and put the
ignition key in an inside pocket.
Bringing into play all his natural
charm and authority; the player
now shepherds the driver back to
his seat. “Come right for-
ward,” he says. The driver com-
plies. “Go back now,” orders the
player, and the driver goes back
to where he started from, “A bit
more, man,” says the player. Re-
starting his engine and breathing
heavily through his nose, the
driver puts the car into reverse.
There is a splintering crash. “Hold
now, man,” says the player, mark-
ing himself up an extra point.

If at the end of this the car is
so close to its right-hand neigh-
bour that the door won't open, the
player receives @ bonus,

Unlike other gumes in Barbados,
drivit admits a certain number of
professionals—-policemen and car-
park attendants. The relations be-
tween professionals and amateurs
are not always of the best, not so
much from any demand for a
“union shop” as on account of a
proper professional jealousy, Thus,
when a helpful passer-by has seen
you safely to an anchorage out-
side the cinema or club, you may

lin Bridgetown without seeing the still be held up by a stern figure

jdrivit players.
come to

Each time you
a blind corner, which is

in blue. He plays the parking
game superbly, as a result of years

| pretty well each time you come to of training and practice; but, ag

la corner,
position,

there, in a
stands the player.

He must point a moral.

strategic one having authority, he feels he basket offer me her advice. “Doan't
“You have get mashed,’ she said.

“You know,” said the Russian holds you with hs glittering eye you back-end too cloase to he
| visitor to England, in one of Mr. (Coleridge), looks rignt, looks left, bumper,”

he explains as you

“that is our extends an arm while a bicycle scramble through the sun-roof; ano

ir. an aside to the abashed passer-
by he adds—or is it imagination
—, “Fifteen-love,”

An elegant variation is mountec
drivit, played on a bicycle. Many
a driver feeling his way forwarc
between the high stone walls tha
flank every gateway and almos
every gap, and which effectively
mask all traffic approaching from
either side, must have admirec
the quickness with which a smal.
boy who happens to be pedalliny
by will size up the situation anc
wave him on with a graceful hali
circle of the arm; and nothing i:
polo, no t hin g even in bull-
fighting, can mateh_ the
admirable desinvolture with whicl
a cyclist, swerving without warn-
ing to the wrong side of the ‘road,
can signal a motorist by a flick of
the arm behind the back to pase
him on the wrong side.

As a true national sport, how- |

ever, drivit has one fault. It is not
played by women, Somehow they
don’t:seem to have the flair: for
the most part they leave it strictly
alone, and when they do play
they play badly.

Only recently, I was edging my
way inch by inch into Bay Street,
hoping that each bus that bore
down on me round the blind cor-
ners would be the last. A lady
with a basket on her head watch-
ed me dispassionately from °@
perfect drivit position, but despite
my patent difficulties said never a
word. At last, taking my courage
in my hands, I let in the clutch
only to come to a screaming halt
as a taxi flashed by, missing me by
inches,

Only then did the lady with the

|






















‘s
x
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*



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SUNDAY, JANUARY 21, 1952

SUNDAY ADVOCATE



BERMUDA

HAMILTON, January 10.

WITH only two members registering objection, the

approved the
report of a select committee finding that The Royal Gazette *”

House of Assembly in a two-hour debate

had committed a breach of privilege and acted in contem

t
ot an order that a debate which took place in public cheat opinion, he was unduly harsh in h
not be published. In adopting the committee’s recom-
mendations the House also agreed to a message to the
Legislative Council asking that a joint select committee
be set up to study the whole matter of Parliament's privil-

eges and powers. . =
The ban on The Royal Gazette

was rescinded in accordance with | TEXT OF MESSAGE TO

the committee recommendation | Th Bas bw a
that this was not appropriate whitch 4a i ie =
punishment. (A Royal Gazette c e House sent to

reporter was admitted to report | he Lagmmative Council was
the debate, after the House had | “Phe oud 2A b
passed a motion to this effect | 4... reesialiy cad meee
cored be the Hon. W. W. David- view the matter of privilege
er in the session, when and th ee
The Royal Gazette was not repre- e powers of - the

|
'
| appedrs, from the investi-

sented.) House relating thereto. It
The two objectors to the com-
mittee’s recommendations were gations made, that virtually

no powers vest in the House |
either to protect itself or its
proceedings, and only lim-

ited powers in control of its
own members. It seems
likely that this position also
applies to your Honourable

Mr. F. C. Misick and Mr. D. C.
Smith. Mr. Misick was in favour
of the appointment of a joint
select committee by the Upper
and Lower Houses, and he moved
an amendment which would have
left in abeyance decisions on other



eh House. l
aspects of the committee’s report. “
His sole supporter was Mr? Smith tetigdon Tiaties pre |
Mr. Misick thereupon withdrew should be further investi |
from the House, leaving Mr.

gated with a view to the
passage of legislation clear- |
ing the position, and would
uest that your Honour-
able House appoint a com-
mittee to form with a com-
mittee of the House of As-
sembly a joint select com-
mittee to investigate the
matter and to report to the
respective Houses thereon
with such recommendations
as the committee sees fit.”

Smith as the only objector in the
final stage.

The motion for approval of the
committee report and the sending
of a message to the Legislative
Council was moved by Mr. James
E. Pearman, the select committee
chairman.

Mr. Pearman said he hoped
smembers had had the opportunity
of reading the select committee's
report. beause it certainly seemed
to him and to the other members
of the committee that the matter
gave rise to things which were
extremely important to the
House, to the community at large,
and to the very root of the
authority of the House itself.

‘The report of the committee
has attempted to be completely
factual in sovfar as it has reported
the interviews it had eee the

resident of the Bermuda Press AS
Ltd. and the editor of The Royal [€¢!Sion, he continued. They
Gazette published by the Bermuda “ere tully entided to thers
Press,” he declared. opinion, As the committee stated

Mr. Pearman told the House ‘M iis report, it was unwise pro-
that, since the last day of meet- cedure tor the House to ban the
ing, the Speaker had handed him publication of a debate which had
a letter written by the president lken place in public, Disagree-
of the Bermuda Press stating that, ment with what the House did
in the opinion of the Bermuda On that occasion must be com-
Press, an inaccuracy appeared in pletely separated from the fact
the report of the committee. tnat the House made an order

Broadcasting Pesition and the order was disobeyed.

The report had stated that Mr. Not Appropriate
Gerry Wilmot, manager of the In recommending that further
Bermuda Broadcasting Company, banning of The Royal Gazette
had appeared belore the com- should be discontinued, Mr. Pear-
mittee and stated that when he man said this had been suggested
had broadcast such part of the because the punishment was in
report he had not been aware no way appropriate to the offence.
of the implications, nor had he “It does not reach in any way
been aware that non-broadcasting the person who was responsible
had been specifically referred to for the contempt and, in my view,
in the debate on the motion to it does deprive the public of a
suppress publication. knowledge of the affairs of this

The letter stated that the editor House to which they are entitled.
of the Royal Gazette had taken “A great deal has been said
steps to inform Mr, Wilmot of about the freedom of the press
the implications concerned and The freedom of the press is a
that publication by broadcasting great thing. It is a thing which
was to be on the responsibility of belongs to all the democracies
the broadcasting station alone, of the free world. The liberty

“I have been unable to verify of the press carries with it
the accuracy of that statement by responsibilities in the interests of
Mr. Wilmot because he has been the community which the press
out of Berumda and will not re- has to recognise.
turn until the end of the month. Is Applauded
As far as the report is concerned Before he moved that the report
it is completely accurate as to be adopted and that the Legislative
what was stated to the committee Council be asked to appoint mem-
by the manager of the Bermuda ters to a joint select committee of
Broadcasting Company,” said Mr. both Houses of the Legislature to
Pearman. . investigate the matter further with

It would be obvious that the a view to the passage of legisla-
radio station manager as distinet tion clearing up the position, Mr.
from the editor of The Royal Pearman was applauded by
Gazette did extend his regret and Assemblymen.
apology for what had taken place. Mr. F, C. Misick, who spoke in

Entire Responsibility opposition to the select commit-

“The entire responsibility for tee’s report, followed Mr. Pear-
the publication of the report in man. His speech was marked by
the newspaper was taken quite the contention that the committee
frankly by the editor of The should have referred the House
Royal Gazette, The editor stated to information placed before it
that he had been under no mis- by representatives of The Royal
apprehension as to the position Gazette.
and that he had published an That information, he _ said,
account of the debate with the came from an extremely authori-
deliberate intention of challeng- tative Parliamentary source which
ing the right of the Hi »se p showed that it was searcely con-
make such an order,” stated Mr. « -ivable that any such prohibition
Pearman. which the House sought to im-

“He said that he had not done pose could have been imposed by
so in any spirit of defiance but the House of Commons. _
had done so, in his view, as the Mr. Misick said: “I have listened
proper way of having the matter to the honourable member (Mr.
clarified as to whether the House Pearman) with the closest possible
did or did not have the right to attention. or I am surprised
make the order.” at the exaggePation which he

Mr. Pearman gave an account @ttaches to the control which the
of the interviews the select com- House of Commons, this House. or
mittee had had with the then any cther legislature exercises
Solicitor General, Major David over the publicatien of its debates

Huxley Crux of Question

“Any superficial student of
Farliamentary procedure knows
we have complete control. But
there are considerations which





see

veen
vere terrerd

made wW prevent
vi uesponuency
wetin auiOlg Une puplic, il was
vo we ground luke i, Was ifn ine
pubuc interest ial the aecision
was maae.

Many members did not agree
witn the wisdom of taking tnat

the
ana

Has No Power
The House had a rigIX to make
such an order but had not the
power to enforce it.
The House of Commons and the
House of Lords had penal
“IT suppose that it is the rare
occasion in these more orderly
days that any House of Parlia~
ment will wish to avail itself of ,
these penal powers. I suppose it
is a good many years since the
Commons availed itself,” Mr.
Pearman commented, they constitute so:
In Public Interest with the iat. ee
He recalled that the motion to be described a
rE

—and that is the crux of the whol.
question.

“In this day and age of re-
tions between Parliament and
press the very ancient usages and
customs are quite rightl
The only reason they
that link
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such proposals is rather an un-

should be borne in mind—that the Would listen.
Roan debate haji taken place in public hibition on members as long as



HOUSE DEBATE AND

relic of a bygone day which House is obvious:
teach us the evolution of democ- in the
racy.

that he did ic
; interests of the public is
they serve no other pur- seemingly also reason ably

cbvious,” he gommented.
Matter of Opinion Limited Number
“At various times, in my A limited number of

his criticisms of the editor of the from which they could have

The editor acted as he saw it in dollars, he contended.

-
the best interests of tne publ.c. “The editor showed great
“In the statements he made in strength cf character in dois

the paper itself and in the evi- what he did in view of the fact
dence he gave before the com- ‘het he must have known that
mittee he showed himself imbued sanctions could be imposed. Tt

with the desire to clarify an “ses not excuse that gen len

anomalous and ambiguous situa- trom showing contempt of tne
tion—primarily in the interests [fouse, but it shows great strength
of the public which he and this of char-cter.” declared Captain
House serve. Winter.

“The honourable member has The motion made by Mr. Fear-
referred to freedom of the press Man ani amen ed by Mr. Misick
being something worthy of preser- (Overed the situation f lly and
vation and it is our concern to he thought that the wh le affair
see that this and other institutions boiled down to the old adage-
are preserved. We should never “the least said the soonest
in our desire to preserve our own MEnded.” ‘
rights and privileges jeopardise Mt. D. C. Smith
those of the press.” views of Mr. Misick.

Mr. Misick recalled that he had _‘“! think he has made a very
tried 10 years ago to have set yp Valuable contribution towards
a select committee to examine the the debate. The amendment which
matter of rights and privileges, 5€ has suggested has the effect
He referred to a subsequent con- accomplishing what Mr. Pear-
versation with a Parliamentarian â„¢4" wished without passing the
from which he suspected that the TePcrt of the select committee. I
House's powers rested on “very ¢amnot support that report,” Mr,
flimsy foundations.” Smith said.

“The authority we thought we AS @ jurist he could sot cone
possessed we do not, in fact, ceive the position that there was
possess,” he added. any vight without sanction,

The member for Sandys went “To castigate an individual—the
on: “I am anxious to secure for VeTY Public-spirited editor of this
this House newspaper—as being in contempt

shared the

powers that are Es = > \
possessed by the House of Com- Of this House by dong a lawful
Mank: sand. will support. the act is stupid and therefore I cal: -
motion to set up a joint select Gruecintdan rere:
vommittee, but I cannot help “tt is only by the courageous
feeling that the context in which gots of individuals that Set
we are called upon to. consider powers can be checked. 1 cannot

stand by and see this man casti-
~ gated by this committee for doing
® a lawful act.”
He went on to praise the public-

No Gainsaying spirited action a the editor and
Fortunately,” Mr. Misick con- his courage in so far as the act
tinued, “we are a component part he did was lawful and in the
of the Fritish Commonwealth and, public interest.
although we are allowed a tre-
mendous margin of freedom in Rendered Service
the regulation of our own affairs, “How else would this matten
I am sure we would never get have come forward? He has
on our statute measures which rendered a service to the House,”
would enable us to suppress a commented Mr. Smith. “I have
debate which had taken place in been under the impression that
public. There is no gainsaying this House has been operating—
that fact. somewhat creakingly at the joints

“The House imposed a similar -—-without these vital sanctions
prohibition on its own members, We have got along all right
yet I know that many of them “If, as a resuit of this joint
published the debate very freely.” select committee, it is recommen-

At this statement Mr. Misick ded that this House shall take
was interrupted with a few shouts unto itself all the powers of the
of “Who?” High Court of Parliament in Lon-

Mr. Misick retorted; “Have you don, then I shall oppose it. The

fortunate one. The powers we
are seeking may be used in
repressive way.

persons
ad available to them informaton!

paper—that is a matter of opinion. made thousands and thousands of!

House has at the present time to
be completely inadequate, I agree
with Mr. Misick that it is unfor-
tunate we have to» debate this
matter in the present context. i
ye that in considering this mat-
we will put aside this present
e as only incidental, that
ould examine the whole
from the point of what
be our rights in this re-
8i ” said Sir John,

« Mr, Misick’s reference
® authoritative opinion, Sir John
said he had seen the same opinion.

“That opinion does not dispute
the right of the House of Com-
mons to gct as we intended to act,
but it did suggest that it would
be impractical for the House of
Commons so to act, In the House
of Commons, with 300 reporters
tresent who frequently send out
reports long before the session is
over and who could not recall
‘hose reports in time, the action
this House took could not have
een taken late in the day by the
House of Commons.

Quite Practical

“It was quite practical for the
newspapers of this Colony to ob-
Serve the instrucuons of tine
tiouse,” added Sir John.

The Speaker said he was clear
om the pot that if the powers
were not possessed by the Bermu-
aian Legislature then early steps
should be taken to see that ade-
quate and proper powers were
secured,

“There are conceivable occa-
sions when this House may wish
to take direct action against per-
sons who are not members of this
House,” he observed,

The Speaker then recalled the
report which appeared in The
Royal Gazette recording the
events of the day on which the
House had presented its reply to
the Governor's speech from’ the
throne. f

“This same newspaper whose
action we are to-day considering
then made a statement to the
effect that the House had again
divided on the issue because a
number of members absented

ve



\hemselves from attendance on
Nis Excellency. lt indicated an
ict of dis “ery otc His Excel-
leney,”” he edded,

Sir “Tohyn wert fn to te’
Heure that he hee ereulsed ef t
reporter resvonsible if there were
any grounds for essum ing thet th
members had absorted ‘hermes)ve
from discourtesy and was in
formed that there wes no recl
reason

“It was a case of misrepresenta-
tion which should not have been
published It was an act of dis.



to believe is that right cannot be
enforced without sanction, but the
fact that sanctions are not present
is no proof that right does not
exist. The simple fact is that the
House asked the newspaper to dc
something and it did not do it. If
the House had not the right then
the newspaper was discourteous in
not doing what it was asked in
view of the fact that the House
extends a courtesy in allowing a
reporter to come within the House
The editor should have said he
was sorry.

“If we had the .right then we
have no penal powers, To put
teeth in the right is a very sound
recommendation.”

Mr, Richards said he had al-
ways complained in the House
about the reports which were

given of debates of the House.

“The reporters can only do so
much in two or three hours,” he
conceded, “It is a hard grind
but you must remember this, At
this particular stage of our exis-
tence all over the world editors |
are taking on themselves the right!
of telling the public what they!
ought to know, They delete what |
they consider would not interest |
the public and they leave in wha‘
they consider the important things: |
the public should know. What we |
want is a factual presentation of |
what happened in this House; we
should have a verbatim report of |
the debates of this House.”

|

It was important that what \gas |
said in the House should be pro- |
perly presented to the public sc |
that no sort of feeling should be |
left in the minds of the public o: |
the members of the House that the |
1

press was not doing its job.

“With freedom of the pres
comes responsibility and it is tha\
responsibility which I feel mus
be brought home to one and all,
averred Mr, Richards,

Mr. A. D. Spurling told th
House that he had found it em
barrassing to be appointed tt
serve on the select committee be
eause he had voted against th:
original motion to suppress publi-
cation,

“T voted against it because, as }
said at the time, non-publicatio»
would give rise to rumours anc
more damage might have beer
done. There were peoplé her«
who had left. Publication is no
limited to the press, I am per
fectly certain I cast my vote cor
rectly,” he observed.

The British Parliament had th
right, although it was not used i
recent years, but notice of motio:
was required,

“We have the right to control
Our Own debates and as far as }



THE ROYAL GAZETTE

hot ciscussed it with other mem- Parliament in London, out of it:
bers? I know I have.” past history and its constitutional

He continued: “I for one was law based on long usage, has cer-
not in the House when the de- tain powers which are very sel-
cision was reached. That is not dom utilised. None of these ar-
beside the point because if I had bitrary powers could be en-

received any advance information trusteq to any other body,” Mr.
IT should have certainly been Smith stated,
here. : Mr, Smith noted that the com-

“The source from, Westminster mittee had found it difficult 1o
points out to the select committee distinguish between a_ secret

that any such action contemplated debate and an open, debate.
by the House of Commons would “This Parliament does not rest

have to have been preceded by on the common law brought to the
hotice of motion,

oN : Colony by the colonists. This
low we lack any specific rule parliament is based upon the
dealing with public debate and Crown rights given to it at a
in that event rule

70 comes into much later date. They are not

inherent rights. It is true that
this Parliament can by force ex-
clude anyone from the chamber
that they like. That is a sanction
based on the position of a house-

orce.””
Rule 70, he said, stated that
where there was no specific regu-
lation the usages of the House of
Commons should be followed.
“The committee should have ”
determined in the absence of any holder,” he continued.
snecifie rule what the procedure If reporters were not allowed
should have been. The Mother in the House then no reports
of Parliaments, which gave us would be made. It was within the
our rights, should always be our power of the House to exclsde
guide.” reporters. The House also had

powers over its members—simple
Proposes Amendment householders’ rights and laws. In
Mr. Misick said he was pro- the past they had_ served the

posing an amendment to the House sufficiently.
motion to accept the select com- “But having invited the public

mittee’s report. It suggested, in into the visitors’ gallery to m°rk,
fact, that the committee should learn and inwardly digest our
rise, report progress and ask for procedure and then to say we

leave to sit again. shall search their pockets and to

Captain Ross Winter describing claim the right to imprison them
Mr. Misick’s speech as a “long, in order that they might not take
involved dissertation on the sub- a shorthand note of what we have
ject,” he commented that both Mv. faid, that is going beyond 4ne
Pearman an Mr, Misick had placed rights of a householder and _ this
the pros and cons before the House, By inviting the public
House, we invite publication, and by in-
viting publication how can we

It was basically an open debate, withdraw it?” he asked.

on Winter recalled, referring
to the occasion when the sup-
pression motion had been ulead. No Right to Withdraw

During the debate a large num- “I say that this
ber of people had .been in the right to withdraw that right of
visitors’ gallery and upon them publication from the Bermuda
the House had placed no prohibi- press on this occasion. I hope
tion. They could disseminate that members will not exaggerate
the information they had heard the matter. This House should
in the House to anyone who not have to fear outside opinion
There was no pro- I will not agree with the membet
who has passed censure of con-
tempt on the editor of this news-
paper,” he concluded.

Speaker, Sir John Cox, said ie
would dispute Mr. Smith¥ poin'
The Royal that the House had not the right

,

House had no

they did not publish the debate,
but there was nothing to stop
them from using the information
for their own interests,

“The

euitor of

y ignored. Gazette must have weighed al: to adopt sanctions against person
survive is these

questions carefully in his who failed to abide by the Houce’
mind. That he did flaunt an direct instructions.
order or even a request of this “I consider the

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courtesy if members refused to
wait on the Governor and there
Was No reaSon to believe that they

did anything of the sort. There
is no authority for effective action
which this House can take.”

Sir John said he hoped that the .
message for the appointment. of
the joint select committee would
be adopted and he personally
would support the report of the
select committee

He said he would like to point
out to the editor of The Royal
Gazette that on the following day
of the meeting under discussion
if the House had reconsidered the
matter it would have been com-
petent for the House to remove
the ban and publication could
have been made some 48 hours
later,

Member's Complaint

Referring to allegations of mis-
reporting, Sir John informed the
House that Mrs. Hilda Aitken (a
member for Smith's Parish) had
complained that she had been in-
accurately and grossly misre-
perted on occasions, That had
tappened to every member of the
House, he continued. It did noi
happen with frequency and it was
net confined to one newspaper.

“There is every reason why we
thovld have some authority in
this matter,” the Speaker de-
clared

Mr. H. St. George Butterfield an-
nounced his intention of support-
ing the report of the select com-
mittee,

When members of the House |
were misquoted surely it was the
duty of the Editor to correct the
mistakes, he said, |

Answering the member who
sald that the report of the select |
committee was tak an unfair

ig at the editor of The Royal
Gazette Mr, E, T. Richards de-
clared:

“On the very next day the
editor used his own privileges

ond the means at his disposal to
give the public a very full ex-
planation of what he considered
to be his right in the matter.”

For the editor to state that his
act was not one of defiance but a
challenging of the rights of fhe
Ifouse was a subtlety he could
not appreciate, continued Mr,
hiehards,

“It was a defiant act and noth-
ng else,” he claimed.

Was Discourteous
Mr. Richards: “The proper thing





means the very

best in Oven-Table Glassware

OC

know no notice of motion ig re
quired, I do not know of an
right or law which says we can
not close our doors to the pres
~-not that I would agree with it
Mr. Spurling said.

“L feel the report represents .
compromise in some way,” h
said,

He still regretted the origina

decision of the House, but tha
decision having been made th
House was within it rights iu

taking the only action it coul
against the newspaper which ha
defied its instructions.

“I think it is most essentia
that the disbarring should be re
moved, not out of consideration
tor that newspaper but becaus¢
of the public. [| for one fee] mos
strongly that the debates of \)
House should definitely be i
public and should be disseminate:
to the public in an accurate man
ner. For that reason 1 woul
strongly support any motion |
have a verbatim report made bs
a parliamentary reporter—no mat
ter the cost.

“I admire the editor
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PAGE TEN









St. Lucia Newsletter

‘Dinner In
Honour Of
Lady M.L.C.

From Our Own Correspondent

ASTRIES













The Honourable Grace Augu
tin, M.L.C., first Lé Member ef
the St. Lucia ire and also

f the Wind ds Councils
was the gue i dur at a
unique functio; at the Palm
Beach Aquatic Club, St. Luciz

turday f wh é hi
ading ladi Ave i r, Miss

Augustin was nominated to the
Council iy October.

The function was organised !y
Mr St. Geo'ge Murray (the
for: er Miss Margot McShine
T inidad), wife of the Assistant
Gove nment Secretary, St. Lucia,

sisted by Mrs, Ailen Lewis

wife of Mr. Allen M, Lewis, LL.B,,
Chairman of the Gastries Town
B iid himself a former legis-



Covers were laid for twenty-
nine on a_ beautifully decorated
E-shaped table. Speakers for the
evening were Mrs. William Hack-
haw, who proposed the toast
Tne Guest of Honour’, Mys,
Alen Lewis, Mrs, Caroline Harris
ind Miss Euralis Bouty,

A gift in the form of a wall
plaque wa presented by Miss
Deris McNamara.

Replying the Guest of honour

promised to do her best for the
is.and as a whole and urged the
womenfolk of St. Lucia to raily
around her,

Mr. Vernon Eastmond of
loca] Sanitation Department, ha
received news of his success in
the Tropical Hygiene and San:-
tation examination which he sat

the



recently in 3arbados under the
auspices of the Royal Sanitary
Institute.

Nurse Leotta Theodore of the
Castries Health Centre was also
siccessful in the Health Visit
examination which she took on

the same occasion,

DOS SNAKES



EAST IN

DIANS CEL

Nearly all the Bast Indians in Barbados Celebrated India Republic Day
yesterday morning.

‘Indians Celebrate
Republic Day

Over 100 East Indians of the community celebrated India

Republic Day at “Chantily”, St. Leonard’s Gap, the residence Seer
of Mr, T. Maraj, yesterday morning. The East Indian stores ,

in Bridgetown were closed. After the celebration the major-
ity of the Indians attended the Intercolonial cricket at Ken-
sington Oval.

The Indians listened to Mr. M. the people of Barbados and let
Sahay’s broadcast over Radw nothing come in the way, no
Trinidad in English at 7.10 a.m. greed, no selfish motives to mat

and 6,30 p.m, yesterday. Mr, Sahay

the good relationship.
is the Indian Commissioner, Hi









office is at Port-of-Spain, Trini- Goodwill Ambassadors

dad, The Indians all told the

Advocate that the broadcast was “Much depends on how we

very impressive, behave amongst these intelligent
At yesterday’s function Mr. ¢ 89d friendly people, We can

Mara} ‘was Chairman, Mr. Suleman either male of mar te ea

Patel, Mr. Maulvi Sayeed, Mr. and the people of Barbados. We

Singh and Mr. Bikharia all spoke are the Goodwill Ambassadors of



|

4

at “Chantily”, St, Leonard’s Gap,

\
have ome friends and well- |
wishers in our midst today to}

rejoice with us in our celebration |
of Republic Day but owing to the |
particular day of our celebration,
we decided against asking anyone,
Let us’ hope that next year we
shall have many friends with us
on this day.
“Now I to thank all of
i come here this
to join in this celebra-
let us hope that you may
yared many a year to come
together in making this
day a memorable one. Our thanks
are also due to those friends who
came and helped us in anyway
to make this affair a success”,
said Mr. Thani,

Before the funetion ended, Mr.

want

rc FACE

Thani and others sung National
songs in the Indian language.
Light refreshments were served,

Grenada Newsletter

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about the Republic, Independence
and their meaning.

Mr. Thani’s Address
Mr, Dayaldas Thani addressing
the gathering, said: “Once again

we meet under our national flag
te honour the Indian Republic
Day and pay homage to the
Father, the Great Mahatnia
Gandhi and other great leaders
the noble sons and daughters of
our motherland whose sacrifice
and struggles for freedom made
such a momentous day possible in
history r

“But for those brave and
courageous men and women we

may probably still be shackled in
the bonds of slavery and serfdom
s, it is a great thing to be a




free and independent people
because it is only with freedom of
thought, of action and of con-
cience that a nation vould act
freely without any out force or
influence from any or every
nation, and could refuse to sub-
mer,e under power politics and
thieats as India is doing to-day.

“A free nation could in no smal)
way make a real contribution to
the progress towards prosperity
stability and well being of its
and even other less fortunate,
people of the world,

Congenial Atmosphere
“Our little community in Bar-
bados have no less desire to this
end, Your presence to-day speaks
trongly for itself. We have a de-
ire too, to live side by side with
one another regardless of our
cliefs and faiths, as true sons and





our great country. It will there-
fore be to our undying credit to
enhance the reputation in which
we and our country are held.
The people and the Government
of Barbados ,have watched very
closely for a long time our trials

CARGO TO BE
UNLOADED |

ST. GEORGE'S, Jan. 10,



and struggles for freedom. and Bigge ingle go ever lands
have shown great sympathy and PRGCRE SAE CORO SVT sae
understanding in our cause ed here, 1,755 tons, was brought

Thay’ have’ sediced with u last Wednesday evening from
in our achievement of Independ- Landon by 1 ue H.L8. freighter.)
ence and will no doubt also rejoic¢ Herdsman, Consisting largely of |
to see well behaved and sincere cement, pipes and: asbestos sheet=,)
friends in us. Let us go forward ing, there were also thirty-three
with that task in hand and see tor vé hicles in the consign |
that we succeed. It is very regret- ment
table indeed that we could not . ‘

MOVIE STAR :

His Excellency the Governor
has appointed Dr, Curtis Fer- |
guson of the local Medical Ser-
vice as Honorary Police Surgeon
Grenada Volunteer Constabu-
lary. Dr. Ferguson was a former
Captain in the Royal Army}
Medical Corps.

Also newly appointed to the |
G.V.c. is Mr. Leo De Gale to}
uceeed Lieutenant Roy Hughes |

Assistant Superintendent fol- |
lowing the latter’s departure for
Trinidad to work with U.B.O.T.
Lt. Hughes, nevertheless, re-
tains his former rank as a mem-
ber of the Constabulary’s Officer
_ Reserve. |

}

Fourteen of thirty-two second- |
ary school exhibitions granted to |
elementary schools have been |
won by pupils of the St, George's |



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SUNDAY, JANUARY 27, 1952



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in “zine blende”
natural form of zine sul-
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quantities were once
mined in Britain, but






occurs
— a



{most of the world’s supply now comes from the Americas and
|

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Liars, the Ancient Greeks were smelting its ores with eopper to make
}

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| Apart from its use in alloys zine is chiefly important today for coat-

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During the morning it drank pecially to those who have ar- LITTLE LANJU THANI, who also inde ae “
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SUNDAY, JANUARY 27, 1952



ee ee eee ee ee

How Much Sense Does

T. S. Eliot Make ?

By GEORGE MALCOLM THOMSON

POLTRY AND DRAMA. By T. 8.
Eliot. Faber and Faber. 7s, 6.d.
35 pages.

THOMAS STEARNS ELIOT,
American-born poet dramatist and
critic, is immensely famous and
very obscure. In his most cele-
brated (although not his best) play
The Cocktail Party, there is a
middle-aged busybody named
Julia and a mysterious psychia-
trist named Sir Harcourt-Reilly.
Like the rest of the characters,
they are symbolic figures, But
symbolic of what? Opinions have
differed among Eliot’s admirers.

An American teenager wrote to
him cbout Julia. “She is your
dream girl, isn’t she? I enclose a
five-cent stamp for reply.”

Said James Thurber: “I am not
so stupid as to believe that the
cockiail party in The Cock-
tail Party is actually a cocktail
party. What do you think it is?”

is * *

Eliot
admirers
that the
Hercules,

But sometimes Eliot’s admirers
think they know his meaning bet-
ter than he does. Once he wrote:

disappointed
for failing
psychiatrist

with his
to realise
is really

1s



The whole world is our hospital
Endowed by the ruined million-
aire
explaining that the “ruined mil-
lionaire is Adam, But one learned
interpreter says that if Eliot thinks
he meant Adam, then he is wrong.

In this new essay, Eliot humor-
ously shows that the obscurity of
his symbolism is not the only
difficulty he experiences as
playwright writing in verse. For
what kind of verse will a moder

olerate from a modern

a

as sought to evolve a
rhythm clese to the natural stress-
t conulemporary speech, One
Y as the landlady said
ail Party: “I shouldn’t
t would go in South-
| in prose.”
poems as in his verse-
s there are too many charac-
who need—and elude—ex-
planation, For ins ance, Sweeney,
scnage who often crops up—
; he a symbol of the ordinary man
or (a illege) the portrait
‘ } n-Trish ex pug named
Steve O’Donnell who gave Eliot a
1 k eye during his undergradu-
ate days.
B ffled by Sweeney and his
ce, the exasperated reader may



ome

be tempted to throw the poems
away—and miss a line of piercing
beauty like:

Till the wind shake a thousand
whispers from the yew.

Does it really matter that to
you “yew” may mear one thing
and to Eliot another? What mat-
ters is the precise but tentative
verse, in which each line seems
to be subject to revision by the
next. With its learning, obscurity,
arreverence and occasional splen-
dour, it has done more than any-
thing else to state and frm the
thought of a generation.

And whet has he sought to
teach? The emptiness of a pagan
world. The need for religion. The
claim of the Christian religion.
Not all have accepted the teaching.

7 *

Only the other day a school-
master at a fashionable girls
school xn Brookline, Boston, was
dismissed for reading to a senior
class a “profane” poem of Eliot's.
One girl was “dumb-founded,”
another “humiliated” .to hear
Eliot’s Journey of the Magi from
a master engaged to teach “busi-
ness English.”

Eliot commented patiently “Oh
dear, this is most benighted.
Perhaps we must wait for
Christianity to reach Brookline.”

He himself was born in St.
Louis, Missouri, 63 years ago, be-
ing brought up in smart Van-
deventer Place.

tHiis tatuer was the well-to-do
Owuer Ol a brickworks, who had
wanled 10 be a Muster bul was
prevented by an impediment ot
speech. The family was Unitarian
irom New Englana, with academic
associauons, lot was the young-
est, trailest of seven, others oi
whom have won disuncuon;
brother as archaeologist, sister as
prison visitor.

At Harvard, he sought to
discipline his shyness by going
to dances and taking boxing
lessons in O’Donnell’s gymnasium.
ijegant in costume, with a gift for
naughty verse, he went on to Paris,
London, Oxford, before the 1914-18
war. England was impossible, “A
people satisfied with such disgust-
ing food is not civilised.” Oxford?
“Very pretty, but I don’t like to
be dead. Let us fly to a land
where there are no Medici prints,
nothing but concubinage and con-
versation.”

Bermuda House

@ From page 9..
MeWspuped LK 1s COULage, Le Das
sWwulg Cuaracrer, cul
SOpurlig.

roiesces Good

eC BYV0U Wwilel weouid acuuUue
lucure Was more impvuitale
Wiuch au veel
agoue, aeclared Mir. Mussel bear-
mon, ne ecailor of ine news-
pauper had been very Giscourteous
a5 well as courageous.

Mr, Pearman stated inat he
would support the report of the
select committee,

Indicating that he
views of Mr. Spurling,
Cooper announced his
of supporting the report.

“The thing that strikes me so
forcibly about this matter is this,”
he explained. “I voted against
the original motion but the de-
dision was made by the House
and it was put very fairly to the
newspapers. The editor of this
newspaper constituted himself
an arbiter of greater judgment
than the members of this House.
It was a very arrogant attitude
to take.”

Reminding the House that he
too had objected to the original
motion, Mr, Edmund Gibbons said
that whether the House was right
cr not was beside the point.

“The point was that the House
ordered the debate not to be
published. The order was ignored
by the editor of The Royal Ga-
cette. I would describe his be-
haviour as presumptuous. For
members to stand up here and

« Vely
cluaeu iv,
in we

lnan Wie warm

shared the
Mr. G.
intention

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laud the action of the editor is
ridiculous. I also thinkpit is ridi-
culous to say the editor acted in
the interest of the public. It was
not in the interests of the public.
Newspapers are in business to
make money,” he said.

Stating that a newspaper was
operated by a “hard - headed
bunch of directors,” Mr, Gibbons
added:

“They are in business to make
a profit. If they can inform the
public at the same time, so well
and good.”

Concerned About House

He was personally concerned
about the right, privileges and
dignities of the House.

I think it is high time that
some of this freedom of the press
was curtailed. We must protect

ourselves.”
Be Big

Mr. Smith took the floor ogce
rore.

“Why cannot we be big enoigth
to admit we were wrong? ny
cannot we be big enough to ad-
mit that progress in this world has
only been secured by the
courageous individuals who on
occasion flouted even parliaments,
to their ever-lasting honour and
glory.” he said.

“Whatever the editor of that
newspaper did—perhaps he was
rather rude and perhaps he was
mistaken—I maintain that he did
it lawfully. We should have the

decency and _ big-heartedness to
admire him,” commented the
Speaker.





MADE BY
BERGER PAINTS

War came and gave him an
American naval commission,
Family fortunes declined and
drove him to schoolmastering at
Highgate. He lit out for the
foreign department of Lloyds Bank
because the work was easier.
Was doing well in the City when
Hugh Walpole pushed him into
publishing, where he did beiter.
He has a good business mind. ‘The
family did not stem from New
England for nothing.

In the mid-twenties he became
famous with The Waste Land, his
first major poem. Every under-
graduate discovereg (after Eliot):

I grow old I grow old
I shall wear the bottoms of my
trousers rolled.

The turning-point in his life
tame in 1927 when:

1.—He became British (more ac-
curately English) in nationality,
and

2—Was confirmed by the
Bishop of Oxford at Cuddesdon.
He had become an Anglo-
Catholic.

He likes Kipling (as poet) cats
(as cats), cheese (high). Dislikes
the theatre (“It interferes with
one’s meals”) Milton (as man).

He is deliberate in speech judi-
cial with every sentence seems to
bring in a verdict of guilty with a
strong recommendation to mercy.
Does not so much listen to oth-
ers as appear to withdraw himself
courteously from an interior con-
versation. Has a gift for sedate
conviviality. Is not above a sly
joke at the expense of the con-
gregation.

Winnings: A handsome gold
cheque for £11,016 8s. 5d. in
cheque tor £11,916 8s, 5d. in

Swedish kroner “which my lawyer
tells me is free of income tax,”
i.e, the Nobel Prize. Also the
Order of Merit.

Most quoted pre-atomic lines?
This is the way the world ends
Not with a bang but a whimper.

His life-task is “Trying to use
words, and every attempt is a
wholly new start, and a different
kind of failure.”

“Poetry and Drama is a frank,
down-to-minute progress report
on what he himself regards as a
semi-failure, his successive at-
tempts to invade the modern
theatre with poetic dramas and
a prophetic message.

World Copyright Reserved
—L.E.S.

Debate

Mr, Pearman said the select
committee was furnished with cer-
tain information.

“It was obscure and did not
appear to carry any great enlight-
enment on the subject,” he added.

Mr. Pearman then proceeded to

disclose the nature of the infor-
mation to which Mr, Misick had

referred.
1947 Case

In 1947, he explained, the House
took a similar decision and on
that occasion The Royal Gazette
adhered to the decision under
protest. The Royal Gazette for-
warded an account of what had
happened to the Empire Press
Union. The matter was, in due
course, referred to the then Clerk
of the House of Conamons, Sir
Gilbert Campion, and a reply was
received.

The letter pointed out that only
the position with regard to the
— Parliament could be dealt
Ww. .

Breach of Privilege

“From my point of view the
order prohibiting publication of
that particular debate was in
effect shutting the stable door
after the horse had gone. I have
heard nobody question the fact
that the publication of any re-
port is a breach of privilege. To-
morrow morning when the news-
papers come out with a report of

e

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SUNDAY

For West Indian

ADVOCATE

Bookshelves |

“Unless the soul goes out to
meet what we see we do not see
it: nothing do we sé® not a beetle,
not a blade of grass.” With this
quotation from W. H. Hudson.
Amy Oakley opens Behold the
West Indies, first printed in 1941
and “with a text that is absolute-
ly up to the minute” in 1951, anc
over 100 illustrations containing
some not printed in the first
volume.

The book is dedicated to Wilson

Minshall “whose enthusiasm fo:
Trinidad we share.”
It is not surprising that Barba-

dos gets a poor owing afte:
that. Trinidad is “a terrestrial
paradise’, Pherto Rico is “incom-
parable” but Barbados is simply
“isle of sugar.”

On her way to Hackleton’s Cliff,
Mrs. Oakley describes the “Mono-
tony of the ride as being “of the
very essence of Barbados.” Mrs.
Oakley drops some bloomers. She
states inaccurately that all of the
land under cultivation is in the
possession of plantation owners
Had she taken my advice anc
checked with the Year Book o/
the West Indies she would have
discovered that peasant holding
accounted for 17,283 of the 94, 346
acres of agricultural land. There
is also great confusion in her
ming as to the difference between
Sam Lord’s and the Crane Hotel.
Visitors to the Crane Hotel are
not in the habit of exploring
ground floor rooms “with massive
four post bedsteads.”

Mrs. Oakley mentions with ap-
proval and accuracy Crane Club
and rum omelette, but she disap-
proves of frying flying fish.

“The frying of the captivating
creatures” she writes “in life irri-
descent as rainbows ana likewise
arching the waves I resented as
much as the serving in Italy of
larks and nightingales.”

She makes no mention of the
fact that whereas Italians can get
by on spaghetti and rice Barba-
dians just could not afford to live
by watching tame flying fish re-
semble rainbows,

The only place which Mrs.
Oakley seemed to enjoy in Bar
bados was Canefield House, then
in the possession of the mother of
the founder of the Mary Elizabetin
Tea Room on Fifth Avenue. Of
the 513 pages in the book Barba-
dos only gets 19, so there is plen-
ty of reading for those who are
interested in other territories ot
the Caribbean. Beginning with
Nassau, Amy Oakley takes us
with her to Cuba, “Tempestuous
Jamaica”, Haiti, San Domingo,
Puerto Rico, “Uncle Sam's Vir-
gins,” the Leewards, the Wind-
wards, Guadeloupe, Martinique,
Trinidad, Tobago, Dutch West
Indies, Venezuela, Colombia, and
leaves us in Panama.

Her husband, whom through-
out the book she describes as “my
illustrator” sketches anythiny
from a flying fish to Robinson
Crusoe. The book is very well
printed in good clean type and on
excellent paper. Some of the
illustrations lose their continuity
by having a white space between
the folds but most of them are
effective and add to the enter
tainment of the book. Amy Oak-
ley writes easily and she has a
lot of anecdote gathered in per-
son during her travels in the
Caribbean and collected from
books and other sources. Some
of her expressions jar. For in-
stance on lighting by plane at
Havana, Amy Oakley comments
“once more we felt the onrush of
the city’s Latinity, its European

etal alaianeeenterremnnimnsmnretnsinigtemesetartaiaiaseas
this debate all these newspapers
will technically be committing, a
breach of privilege. If my motion
is lost I shall ask to leave the
House,” Mr, Misick said.

Mr. Misick’s amendment was
then put. Only Mr. Smith and
Mr. Misick supported it

Mr. Misick then left the bar of
the House,

With only Mr. Smith objecting,
the report of the select committee
and the message of the Legisla-
tive Council was carried.



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background, its American fore-
ground, wave after wave of emo-
tional contact, as tangible as those
that at first impact, had seemed
about to engulf our sea-landing

plane.” is kind of gush is more
disturbi to a British reader
than the occasional American

spelling of words like “Vender”
for Vendor. If Amy Oakley could
have travelled with less interest
in “souls going out to meet her”
she might perhaps have given a|
better account of the West Indies|
and certainly of Barbados

but |
maybe the book might have then|
become less readable than it is.
The Barbados Publicity Commit-
tee ought mot however to let the
matter drop there, They should at
once send a complimentary copy
of the Advocate Year Book 1951
to Amy Oakley, c/o Longmans
Green and Co, Inc. 55 Fifth Ave-
nue, New York who have pub-
lished “Behold the West Indies”



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Twice” a thriller by George Har-
mon Coxe (Published by Alfred
A. Knopf New York at $2.50).
The Advocate is mentioned, the
Morgan night club and its pro-
prietors are referred to by name,
the Crane Hotel and a lot of other
places come into the story. There
is talk of oil and the author
shows himself familiar with Bar-|
badian customs and backgrounds.
The story itself is well- told and
holds the attention as surely as it



would have done had Honolulu
been chosen as the scene of
action instead of Barbados. If

people in fact are half as inter-
ested in reading about themselves
as the publishers of newspapers
believe them to be, The Man
Who Died Twice will be the
year’s best seller in Barbados.

The Year Book of the West
Indies and Countries of the
Caribbean continues to be the
most comprehensive and up to
date reference work serving the
Caribbean

Published by Thomas Skinner
of Canada the Year Book 1951 is
the 23rd to be printed. |

Its, price remains. £1. 15s. .in!
the West Indies although the new |
edijion has 1,044 pages as c¢omh+|
pared with 924 in 1950, hs

In the section dealing with

Barbados a street is erroneously |
said to be in Georgetown instead}
of Bridgetown but this is a small
slip that can be rectified.in a fu-
ture edition, Of special interest,
in this section is a comparative}
table of principal imports and exe}
ports 1945—49 |

The tables are especially valu-
able because they contain a re-|
minder that Barbados major ex-/
port, sugar, depends so much on!
absence of drought. In 1948 Bar-|
bados exported only 49,652 tons!
of sugar as compared with 82,461
in 1947 and 126,609 in 1949. Mo-|
lasses shew a steady decline from|
8,235,368 gallons to 6,143,926 in|
1949 and rum dropped from a
peak of 1,462,476 gallons in 1947!
to 631,926 gallons in 1949,

Statistics and information gp-!|
pear for Bermuda, Bahamas all
the British, French, Dutch, and
American Caribbean territories,
while Cuba, Haiti, San Domingo,
Columbia, Venezuela, Guatemala,
E] Salvador, Honduras, Nicara-
gua, Costa Rica, Panama Canal
Zone, the Republic of Panama are |
also included. |

There are sections on Canadian
trade, Uniteq States Trade and}
British Trade, a chapter on com-|
munications and a Gazetter and|
Index, There is an_ excellent
map. If the size of the Year|
Book increases as more and more
statistics are published by Carib-
bean territories, the Year Book
publishers might have seriously
to consider publishing in two
volumes, half-yearly, or produce
separate volumes for separate
territories. Meanwhile the use-
fulness of the Year Book grows
with its size.

GEORGE HUNTE.

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PAGE TWELVE



By Eugene Sheffer
HORLZONTAL
1—Wha‘ Apostle wrote the epistle
5—-Wh ry eee
at disciple was a physician?
(Col. 4:14) ae
&—At what river did Ezra pro-
claim a fast? (Ezra 8:21)
14—Gaelic.
15—Ireland.
16—In what wilderness did Ish-
mae) dwell? (Gen. 21:21)
17—Grows old.
18—Handle.
19—Design-stamped fabric.
20—What did Job do because of
his many afflictions? (Job 3:1)
22—Spires.
24—Ancient Jewish ascetics.
26—Sea eagle.
27—Canonical office.
298— Vipers.
33-- Worries
36--Accumulate.
38--Undermine
39—Dry.
40—Muck.
41—Where did the Holy Ghost
forbid Paul to teach the gos-
1? (Acts 16:6)
42—Corded fabric.
43—Artificial.
44—Italian city,
45—Whom did King Zedekiah send
to Jeremiah? (Jer. 21:1)
47—In what place did the witch
whom Saul consulted live?
(1 Sam. 28:7)
49—Arctic exploration base.
§1—Metal urn for keeping water

hot.

55—Respired.

58—Feast.

60—French security.

61—Charity.

63—Woe is me.

64—Weasel-like, web-footed carni-
vore.

65—Hebrew month.

66—Short letter.

CHURCH
SERVICES

ANGLICAN



8ST. PAUL'S: Patronal Festival—7.30 a.m
Holy Communion, 9.30 a.m. Proeéskion,
Solemn Mass and Sermon, §.8. Chiliren
3 p.m. Evensong, Sérmon and Parish
Procession, 7 p.m. Solemn Evensong,
Sermon and Procession. Preacher: The
Lord Bishop.

MONDAY, 2th JANUARY

6 a.m Mags, 7.30 p.m. Soléenin Evensong.
Sérmon and_ Procession—Church Army
Preacher: The Rev. B. C. Ulwett

BAPTIST

THE ST. JAMES NATIONAL BAPTIST

—Epiphan; IM, 7 pum Evengong and
Sermon, her: Rev. J. BO Grant,
L, Th. eine in charge, 4.9% pm.
Monday, Wednesday Friday, Activities for
Youths. Conducted by the Rey, L. Bruce-
Clarke (Assistant Pastor), assisted by
Mrs. Olga Browne

ST. Cate E.0. CHURCH—Dash
Road, Bank Hall, Sunday January 27th
1952. 11 aan. Morning Prayer, Preacher:
Deaconess C,. Barrow, 3 p.m. Sunday
Sehool, 7.30 p.m, Evénsong and Sermon.
Preacher: Rev. C. A. Ishmael

METHODIST
BETHEL—ii a.m. Rev. M A. E
Thomas, 7. p.m. Major Underhill.
DALKEITH—11 a.m. Mr. V. B. St. John,

7 p.m, Rev. M. A. E. Thomas

BELMONT—11 a.m. Mr. P. Deane,
7 p.m. Mr A. L. Mayers

SOUTH DISTRICT—9 a.m Mr, P.
Brucé, 7 p.m Mr. H. Grant

PROVIDENCE—11 a.m. Rev, B. Crosby,
Holy Communion, 7 p.m. Mr, B. Browne.

VAUMHALI--9 a.m. Rey. B. Crosby,
Holy Communion, 7 p.m. Mr, A, St. Hill.

At South District at 4.48 to-day there
will be a service for the dedication of
church furnishings given by friends of
the church.

JAMES STREET—11 a.m. Rev. J. S.
Boulton, 7 p.m. Rey J. S, Boulton gins. Give him a lump of sugar
PAYNES BAY--9.30 a.m Mr. @ ’
Marville, 7 p.m. Mr. Baseombe
WHITEHALL — 9 30 a.m. Rev R. ness Meeting, 3 p.m, Company Meeting,
McCullough, 7 p.m. Mr F, D. Roach 7 p.m. Salvation Meeting. Preacher: Sr.
GILL MEMORIAL, A am. Mr W, Captain Campbell
st. Hill, 7 p.m “losing eeting 0! SPE sa /
Evangelical Campaign, Rev. R. McCul- Mette eo cian a
ough 7 p.m. Salvation Meeting. Preacher: Sr.
HOLETOWN—8.30 a.m. Mrs. Morris, Captain Bishop
7 p.m. Mr. D. Scott CHECKER HALA—11 aim. Holiness
BANK HALL-—9.30 a.m. Mr. F. D. Meeting, 3 p.m. Company Meeting, 7 p.m,
Roach, 7 p.m. Supply Salvation Meeting. Preacher; Lieutenant
Reid
SPEIGHTSTOWN—11 a.m Rev I
Lawrence, 7 p.m. Mr. McLean FOUR ROADS-—11 a.m. Holiness Meet-
— ing, 3 p.m. Company Meeting, 7 p m.
Salvation Meeting. Preacher: Major
THE SALVATION ARMY Rawlins . (R).
LONG BAY—11 a.m. Holiness Meeting,
BRIDGETOWN CENTRAL ll am. 2" mâ„¢ Company Meeting, 7 p.m. Salvation
Holiness Meeting, 3 pan. Company Meet- Meeting, Preacher; Lieutenant Etienne,



ing, 7 p.m. Salvation Meeting. Preacher
Rev. B. Crosby
WELLINGTON STREET 11

a.m. Holi-



Bible Crosswords





67—Noxious plants.

68—Pithy sayings

69—Allowance for waste.

VERTICAL

1—Cessation of war.

2—Monster with a hundred eyes.
3—Utilizers.

4 -Decreased.

5—Sluggish.

6--Footed vase.

7—With what did Judas betray
Christ? (Luke 22:48)

8—Growing out.

9—Adds.

10—Dwelled tediously.
1l—Accessory seed covering.
12 —Weathercock.
13—Insects.
21—Son of Seth (Gen. 4:26)

All for Sale

N R. GONZALES, who has

given up riding, wanted to
sell his saddle, silver spurs and
sombrero. He placed an ad in a

paper, offering to sell the three
singly or in any combination.

How many ways is it possible
to sell the three articles—or any
three articies?





(AjoyeeRdos eippts)
owiquos Ts sindg “(AjoyerBdes sinds)
oxaaquios {iI sIPpEs “STpPPes tim candy
“(prosun e[Ppts) Casiquics mq sandy
‘oupaquios pute sind® Gila oIppes “(pioe
-un sunds) ogesquios Wy;M SIppwg ‘sands
quis erppeg ‘auore sundg “eucTe olaIq
“og sUOT# apPag “KAM JO sUO\wUIG
-WZO9 sjq\ssod Ua} eue essUy, *4OmNUY

ADVOCATE



23—Efface

25—Closes hermetically.
28— Afflict.

30—Being.

31—Shower.

32—Small quarrel.
33—Fruit: comb, form,
34—Scope.

35—Tears violently.
37—Prayer endings.

40—Whom did Abraham bury in

Hebron? (Gen. 23:19)
41—Haughty
43—Golf clubs.
44—Large volume.




Se hd







Copyright, 195%, King Featares Syndicate, Inc.

Western Dotograph for Juniors



HILE this fellow’s fast van-
ishing in populated areas
he’s still to be found in goodly
numbers out where the West be-



DIAMOND CORNER—11

am,



7

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[Rr en rr nnn












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{ healthy and strong. brush is enough. '
Heart che et ties tel ein ee ese cnet te een ead Wh ete rn i id cm ei
Ne other dentifrice does more thar “ KOLYNOS”
to fight tooth decay. 98

Holiness
Meeting, 3 p.m, Company Meeting, 7 p.m.

and you'll make a real friend.

It’s easy to determine what ha
is, if you haven't already guessed,
by tracing him out from dot 1
to 41.

een Meeting. Preacher: Captain FIRST CHUB oe aaa’ SUTENTIST,
MORAVIAN Upper Bay Street
Sundays 11 a.m, and 7 p.m.

ROEBBUCK STREET—9 a.m, Morning Wednesdays 8 p.m. A_ Service Which

Servies. Preacher: Rev. E. E. New, 7 p.tn.

Evening Service, Preacher: Rev F

* GRACE HILL—11 a.m. Morning Service,
Preacher: Mr. O. R. Lewis, 7 p.m. Evening

Service, Preacher: Mr. S. Weekes

FULNECK—11 a.m, Morning Service;
Preacher: Rev. E. E, New (followed by
Evening

Holy Communion), 7 p.m
Service, Preacher: Mr. G. Francis.

MONTGOMERY
Service, Preacher:

9
Mr.

p.m
U. Reid

DUNSCOMBE—7 p.m. Evening Service,

Preacher: Mr. D. Culpepper.

SHOP HILL-—7 p.m, Evening Service,

Preacher: Mr. W. S. Arthur





i)

TT CES LL

Y)
eee rr
CCYy re

ie
cel cha nla

Evening



SUNDAY
46—Mace inter
48—Hazarder
50—At whak piace did David fight
and et the Syrians? «2
Sam. 10:17)



52—Courage.

53— Winged.

54—Set again.

55—Forehead.

56—Network

57—Grafted, ther.)

58— man of Issachar was
nee grandfather? (Jude
101)

62—Deep cask.

Y








SS

Pt | WN
| tL | ENS





peek at the answers
would not be cRICket.

Ric... . Man's name
-BIO.. .« Insect
.-RIO.. Fruit
RIC. Cloths
+ RIO Of a heat unit
+ RIC Shoulder belt
RIO . Large bird
RIC. «. Negroid
»~RLIO.. . Bluffed
RIC... . Kind of disease
3a

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SUNDAY, JANUARY 27, 1952
Subject of Lesson-Sermon: TRUTH,
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‘ a on eee ou WHICH FOR YOU?
with bine alle 8: Th Accoantanty Exams. Cee at

ott Colleee viation rtificate
Bennett Coll re y (Eng. & Wire.) Road Making
nearly always more clever than Book-keeping Sanitation
they think they are, I can All Commercial Salesmanship
prove this WITH YOU! _ Subjects Secretarial Exams.
Tf yout toant- 00 succeed thete is Commercial Art. Shorthand (Pitman’'s)
nothing to step be Th etn ry wero . Short Story Writing
Bennett Collece system of || General Certificate af Telocontmunications
personal tuition will get you Education Exam, = Transport
through your exams You Journalism Public Speaking
study at home taking your own Mathematics English Ponew
time Your books are free Mechanical Eng. Short Technical
You will realise your capa- Noter Engineering Subjects

Radio Service Eng. Workshop Practice

If your subject is not on this list, torite it on
' ua Ye coupon. There are Bennett College
courses for almost every career,

bilities and your
But first, without
tion, send me th
will give you, free, my

ambition










advice, fF - oe ee See ae aay eee Ge diem date ae ay
Z —" j To the Governor, Dept, 188, ‘The Bennett
We Oe ae cx Sheffield, England. I would like to
GOVERNOR } have (at no cost) your prospectus and particulars |
The |¢—- 1

BENNETT |“
COLLEGE |__|

intl annmnmnnneGE Cif wile? 31) cesmsoenie
Your Opportunity tor | pizics wrize in biock lerters : i












Here’s a way to relief !

Do you know that one of the common : :
cause$ Of backache lies im the ki ? ow 3
When they are healthy they filter harmft , {
impurities out of the system —their natural function. When they grow slu 2 oe e
be fest accumulate and g ‘aR es 4
congestion is often the cause of backache, . {

























pared to help wake up sius
kidneys. They havea clear
antiseptic action on the
organs, soothing and re:
to their natural activit
backache foliowsas a natural’conse



DeWitt's Pills
specially for
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cs
A
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LTS,












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6

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All Trade Enquiries to
W. B. HUTCHINSON & CO
MARHILL STREET, BRIDGETOWN,





SUNDAY, JANUARY 27, 1952

HENRY BY CARL ANDERSON

BY [p= cee eo 3,
(youre wor y ay me) IE | ys tata i
| be ~_| ; en ae

rae

hun Si NISTER
THEN DUMP 7:

iV?" BPAGWOOD | [SHE FIXED THAT LEA J
Nau 8 DAUGHTER] JIN THE BATHROOM j— 9

ALL BY HERSEL ao

COOKIE 1S
ER QYLA GENIUS . WONDERFUL
} Ber | Sax (VE TRIED THREE

TIMES, BUT IT WAS

1000 MILES FROM
EARTH ROTATES THE
DREAD PRISON OF
SPACE, PEOPLED 6)

PRISONERS TOO

DESPERATE TO BE

'$ HERE THAT FLASH
GORDON'S ROCKET MUST
MAKE AN EMERGENCY
LANDING f

HEARD? THAT'S

OKAY, YOU CONS! GET | YAAA... WHAT'SA MATTER, THE MOON, My AY NECK/ \ Y-YA MEAN.
MOVING... EVERYONE GUMSHOE® AFRAID WE THE CHARACTERS IN EXPEDITION K-3
TO HIS CELL. A MIGHT WANNA GO ON EP ET ARE -« TO JUPITER F!
SHIP'S COMING INS A SIGHTSEEING TOUR THAN

TO THE MOON] WE ARE! AINTTCHA

OPEN THE LANDING Boe
HATCH/ FLIGHT X-3 sw
{S$ COMING IN/

















WILE ABOARD A CHANNEL STEAMER ba g ose
oe fp] Soave 5
AH-H! GOON, SWEET... BONNIE... = es
DBAR LAURIE, WE'LL MEET IN . 2
PARIC, CITY OF ROMANCE... AN’ noes
BE MARRIED...MAR RIED / ——|

AYE, IFA LADDIE MEET A . —=
Sf _bteaned

||

SSS

shape > ell

Parerad

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| k AS LONG AS HE |








| I THINK ILL T's GOIN’,

TONIGHT= I'LL. K | GIT A BOOK TO work! ~4 ISN'T DRESSED-

270% TO READ- ~*~ &Q\ He WON'T BE |
le LG





Se ABLE TOGO < WUT ]
= s i

PrP
MY EYE ON HIM-- |
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7 fF i 4

991. King Features Syudicate, lac, World sighes reserves



RIP KIRBY

SAS SESP RISER Bm min: ms sagen ap agnanceaa
BY LEE FALK & RAY MOORES

(VE ALREADY GOTTEN SOME TALES.
| KNOW MORE ABOUT THE P HANTOM OM





NO-ITS JUST AN ANCIENT LEGEND
ABOUT A MAN WHO CANNOT DiE.'M
7 WRITING A BOOK ABOUT IT.













IT PAYS YOU TO DEAL HERE





SUNDAY ADVOCATE PAGE THIRTEEN





RELIANCE SHIRTS

THE PRIDE OF BARBADOS

y

secon MEA ieee alm



-

By Appoiotmres
Gin Distillers
@ HLM. King George 9

pcom prec Ce

anes

Gore: tals :

Stands Supton 42





gO TRE EE RTE TS





E |

ccoasnasieciiepledldebibiteaasanenanterionss memmenaetea.eun PP rot shale ce
SPECIAL offers to all Cash and Credit Cus stomers Sun Monday to We

LS.

SPECIAL OFFERS | are mi weadigkin 4 at ouw Branches
Speightistown and Swan Strevci



Usually NOW Usual
Tins Peaches 81 72 Pkgs. P. F. Sweet Biscui 6

Tins Corned Mutton 66 60 Milk 34 32
Quaker Oats

Tins Four Cows

30 27 Tins Smedley Peas





Pkgs.
D Be ed

‘D... V. SCOTT 3 Co. Ltd. Broad Str

GROC




THE COLONNADE k RES



GUINNESS
STOUT

- FOR STRFNGTH

PATE STORET ES TE

SS 5 SL TT



\'|

| ! \ |
C. F. HARRISON & CO. (warsapos) Ltd. | |
P.O. BOX t
_BARBA |

meses



EE eres comes ; ae-sceess







EEE wee /

PAGE FOURTEEN ; SUNDAY ADVOCATE

C LA S SI F I E D A D S| Bacco SALES a GOVERNMENT NOTICE |

TELEPHONE 2508. |
} DENTURES: Yo Broki Denta!-
REAL ESTATE Plates, skilfully sepeited: the in
three hours, By (SQUARE
ELNTURE REPAIR SERVICE: Upper

SUNDAY, JANUARY 27, 1952

FOR SALE
HOUSES














































































NEXT TYPEWRITING
EXAMINATION
ALL CANDIDATES who desire

to sit must register before the end
| of this month with Mrs. James







— —_



PART ONE ORDERS

For Births, Marriage or Engagement |
announcements in Carib Calling the!



(Advocate) or with me an

FOR SALE BUNGALOW: Newty built Bungalow

Saturday, Combermere (from 10







charge Is $3.00 fof any number of words} st Brighton, Need, Black: Rock, 290 yards | =°C? Streets 6.1.88%40 By a.m, to 12 noon).
c up to 50 and 6 cents per word for each from beach, containing 3 bedrooms,|” - guapsom a DABLIA — Lieut.-Col. J. CONNELL, O.B.E., ED., Must cable at once number of
additional word. Terms cash, Phone 2506

drawing and dining rooms, verandah, awl
| tiled bath, kitchen and servants room,

| gerage, self-contained of modern design
| Dial 4321 or 3231.

Sal - fn tbicdabaed ct

CAR—One_ 1949

papers needed. Fees must be p id
beforehand.

Those who desire to sit in other
subjects (Book-keeping, Frenc?
English, Arithmetic etc.) must



MARINE GARDENS
A solidly constructed 2-storey
residence, standing about 9,000
sq ft. containing 3 bedrooms.

between 8.90 and 4 p.m., 3113 for Death
Natices only. after 4 p.m

Commanding,

ing taken for Glad-
. The Barbados Regiment

now

ioli and Dahlias for delivery in

26.8.51—3n ber 1952, parties interested in
btehe please phone 4442, T. Geddes Grant




AUTOMOTIVE

Issue Mo, 4 25th Jan. 52







En

10.1.52—tf.n. | 7











——_—_———_—_-——_—-—- nee along with all modern con-

" . = auxhall Velox, Ex- ARGALINS. A PARADES. register before the end of next br :

ENGAGEMENT cellent condition N W Crosby, is wie Not Be . eee All ranks will parade at Regt. HQ. at 1700 hours on Thursday 21 Jan. 52 month. } er eee ee out gardens:

on cr Fa — | (Home) or 4700 (Office). 27.1,52—In.| Price and Suitability count Not Boost- Coys. whi “arry out training as per training programme for the 3 Jan. Guana 5 } popular bashing snot a

“MISS DAPHNE BREWSTER CAR-Vauxhall Velox tn perfect col Tom oe Sees Ar eee a FOK RENT Rent vane” tot Drill Lecture/Discussion—taken by Ofivers “Rockerest’, Oistin. Hill, i) tevely priced.
The engasement was announced re-| dition, Apply Gerald E. Ward, Jason| Bungalow, Ideal oe ae nee. The Signal's Course will be held on, Mon, 28, Wed 30 Jan. 52 Christ Church. MAXWELL COAST

ene. oe, ee ae an a of | Jones’ Garage 27.1.52—2n | INGS, MARINE & NAVY and Near these HO Band * Rey . “a | ) A 4 bed-room nee house
Ss an Ma a mer USES ‘ . Wed, Thurs. an command a ivalled view

of Searborough Christ Church. SAtGne Prefect Pord in good se CORR Gere hha or. WORTENG: Band. practiges will be held: on Mon. 28, & & } nmanding an unrival vie



















































































27,1.52-—~ a —_—$— Reeraits < = 5564208 OC0OOK a" of the Christ) Chureh coast; excel-
1.52--In,} dition, Phone 4351. 27.1.52~—3n. | MAXWELL, MAXWELL COAST, BELLE-| AGENTS OFFICE, cool, with. six win- Recruite will) parade for training on Mon. 28: & Wed: 30 Jan, 52. Soon: PLLPEPPVPLE EEE. lent bathing; well suited for ay
eS nin Ladle — VILLE, FONTABELLE, BRIGHTON, ST. | dows, situated centrally in Bolton Lane. Officers’ Leetwre % % Small Guest Howse (Owner leav-
DIED CAR—Vauxhall 1947 12 H.P. very sood| JAMES and ELSEWHERE—Several New | Dial 4582—J. B, Field & Co. ‘All Officers will attend; a leeture hy the Staff Officer on Riot Drill, at 1716 % ing Colony).
a > oa condition, Dial 0109. 27.1.52—3n. | Bungalows, Stone & Concrete, Other Resi- 27.1.52-—2n. hours. on Tuesday 29 Jan. . A. M. WEBB & (2) A substantial stone build-
“LARKE-—On Saturday, 8 5 ae’ 4 senate ane EEC < - dences and Building Sites inching Soee——————————s « ing, standing on approximately 2
CoA OO ARERCE yee nuary gh] CAR—19%4 V-8 Ford in. good condition | side, and Facing Sea with Right-of-way, FARAWAY—St. Philip Coast, Fully} *~ w= OPPICER AND ORDERLY SERJEANT FOR WEEK expiva «Tm, ° STOCKBROKER 3 acres of land, completely enclosed,
Te Saneeay Sa tate, Mrs. Albetinat ter” Metbert, 86 Dudes ree. By WHITE PARK—3 Bedroom Partly | furnished, 3 bedrooms, 2 servant. rooms, Cudelay Gilaab end. Sheuk AH. Cathe Ss —_— . ‘with a productive orchard; good
Boxhill's residence Martinique, Gov- 26 1.52—2n.| Stone Residence—Going Under £1,400|doubie carport, all conveniences, $59.00 Seder darieank fe Serjeant Willams, 8. D $ COMMONWEALTH OF $1 )}} escposition for a aevelopment.
ernment Hill at 4 o'clock this after- CAR LOWER BAY ST.—Two—2 Bedroom (One | per month from February. ‘Phone b Next A Dus . ; . AUSTRALIA xt (3) One of the most modernly
noon for St. Patricks, Christ Church 2 One Standard 8. Apply to L.| Seaside) Stone Residences—Going Under 19.1,52—t.f,n. - x 5% BONDS, due 1955 called for » constructed buildings on this
Friends are asked to attend. King c/o R. H. Edwards or Kingsley. | 1,000 and £1,180: BLAGK ROGK—3 Orderly. Officer Lieut, SiG. Lashley . redemption nest July. x coast; containing 3 bedrooms, each:
Ruby Clarke (Wifes, Albertha Clarke [Desens Head 26.1.5%—2n. | Bedroom Migne Besidence, pars Gon- FLAT: A. self-contained Flat af 7 Orderly Serjeant 283 L/S Turney, D.G. 8 ore % with attached tiled | baths: tiled
(mother), Gwen,..Una and Velda (sis-} “WaoroReyCLE ee ee veniences, im . over 5 Acres, Going | rooms unfurnished or partly furnished in _ itchenette; garage for ears;
ters}, James and Frank Clarke ‘broth- MOTORCYCLE—Only one (1) in stock, | Reasonable. WHAT SAYS YOU about}a cool, quiet country home with ger- L. S, CHASE, Major, ar eke Wik hee coud og thos x servants’ quarters with bath and
te Daehnt and tna Boxhill: (sisters-1 Aueeeeees Supreme, Spring crane, 2| INSPECTIONS? — THE PLEASURE is|dens, excellent surroundings, avai Adjutant, (Ag) . Wishing to repatrinte their funds toilet attached; standing on an
in-law), oF ala aa BARNES & CO.,| M7NEI Call at “Olive Bough”, Hastings. | from February ist. Apply: Mayers. of The Barbados Regiment. = : 3 euclosed area of one aere.
27.152. LTD. 26,1.52—t.f.n | aera - cy as a Advocate Advertising Dept. Phone 208. PARI 0 ORDERS es i 33 Broad Street, Bridgetown. 2 ST. JAMES consT
= eS THE BARBADOS REGIMENT RIAL . 4 *harmacy) - well a pinted m
EDWARDS—On January 26th, 1952, at |p F. de Abreu. In NELSON 'ST,,| MORNING SIDE—Bathsheba, February e . = % ota ee % iecclanlowr ceeeaanaaa a0 nine 9
the General Hospital, EVANS ED ELECTRICAL |By The Bus Co. 2Storay Stona}to June. Telephone 2481, Mrs. W-1 4 s@RENGTH INCREASE—Attestations a s or LS Sen oinete. WO ta: aes
WARDS. Axe #9 years, His iunere Business Premises and Residense, | Chandler 26.1.52-—3n. | 490 Cdt. Roachforde, K Hand. Attested and taken on Strength wef & | %6966%606666646990066 so near the town: on a good bus
leaves his late residence Mango Lane - _—-—--—_-—— oe ree area Good Condition, Ideal se cease ee ae ae P , Nov. 61 ‘ ot a ee route
St. Peter, at 4.30 p.m. to-day for St.. NORGE REFRIGERATORS, a small|for any usiness, Going Under| NEWHAVEN, Crane Coast, fully fur- wee : . vet
Peter's Cemetery i number of these well known American | £2,300, IN TUDOR ST.—Large 2+Sterey|nished, 4 bedrooms, 3 servant roams. em Pe. Rdgnill, C. i, panels es ee prea oe é a D
ENID EDWARDS widow) Refrigerators have just been received.| Stone Business Premises & Residence| double garage all conveniences. 360 dk
MAUDE WELCH isister) Call early, at REDMAN & TAYLOR’S| with a Large Garage or Workshop, all|per month from February. Phone . 1..A. CHASE, Major.
es |GARAGE LTD., Showroom, Phone 495| Conveniences, A-1 Gondition, Ideal for 19,1, 52—t.f) n. “The Barbados Regiment. NOTICE ST, PETER
HUSBANDS: On the 26th January 1952] or 4435 23.1.52—5n. | any Business, Vacant, Can Yield $120.00} — . Adjutant, (Ag.). An old-fashioned country resi-
oe one. 2nd. Ave peters ——$_ | f). FT Dan iat oo Buy It—Pluis ROOM—A very large reccy, with a NOTICE * iets standing on 4% acres an
. Bank Hall, Aleitha Husbands REFRIGERATORS. Another shipment) Appraised alue © Land, UPPER | conveniences. Apply “Westmeath” ‘an, 52 on -------—~ lan ol re:
Her funeral will take place at’ 4|of FRIGIDAIRE Refrigerators has just|NELSON ST.,-3 Bedroom Residence, Whitepark Road. r 27.1.52—in The Volley Ball field will be open for practice from Wed. 30 J nd which is well laid out in a

every Wed. & Fri. in preparation for the Annual Volley Ball Cormtpetition

——
RESIDENCE Roebuck Street next to] " Fri. 15 Feb. 52

Me for Almost Anything in Real Estate. | Cedars Gap. Dial 2525, Harold ore

25.1.52,—8n.| "Ht I Can't—Who Will? Call at “Olive|& Co. Ltd. a Ay a

Bough", Hastings. 27.1.52—1n,

WIRING DEVICES: Joint Bowes Cd —_—_—_—_—_——_——Ll——————
ing Roses, Cord-grip Holders, Batten Dwelling house called “GILVAN"” with
Holders, Surface Switches, Flush Switches | 10,803 square feet of land situate at Chel-
Fuses, etc. Laurie Dash & Co. Tudor|sea Gardens, St. Michael.

Flower and Vegetable garden. .The
mas building has 7 bedrooms, large
Dr. MARIE LOUISE BAYLEY flush hall, surrounding galleries,
electric light and water, and
clients, commands an unobstructed view

Sine y a
cartes EAs Se certaa atl have of the countny-side, Quiet and
exclusive area.

kindly sent in their congratula-
tions on the occasion of my ST. PETER
having obtained my “Doctor of Two one-acre plots, opposite

o'clock this afternoon at the Breth- j arrived. On sale at K. R. Hunte & Co.,| Conveniences, Good Condition, about
ren Meeting Room, Peterkins Roda,|Ltd., Lower Broad Street, for Cash or 3,500 sq. ft., Going Below £800. Contact
and thence to the Westbury Ceme-]on Terms. Dial 4611 or 5027
tery for internment Friends are
asked to attend
Mabel Burton (Daughter), Lionel
Burton (P.C. 372) (Grandson)







TO LET
Any period from April ist Country
House, in St. Peter, 1% miles from Sea
The house] stands high Fully furnished (except



27.1.52



















































‘J Street, Phone 5061 23.1.52—1n | contains Drawing Room, Living Room, | plate, linen), 3 bedrooms, 2 dressing rooms Optometry degree.” Fourwinds Club, with right-away
THANKS 4 bedrooms, Garage, Toilet, Bath and|Wectricity, Geyser, Telephon ie é iad ie By pa as — fox, bulla
usual conveniences. 2949. 26.1. My office wi remain at m ing a modern home.
JONBS—We the undersigned beg through FURNITURE ‘The above property will be set up for see PRA, NETHERLANDS & residence “St. Michael's Lodge”. ST, JAMES
ie eee Wo SSR a vay other sale by Public Competition at our office] TWO LARGE COOL ROOMS—Furnishe@, The M.V. DAERWOOD will St. Michael's How. Under the Holders Hill—A little over Ya
so kindly sent flowers and in any other James Street on Friday 8th February,| running water, with or without % STEAMSHIP co. accept Cargo and Passengers for same well knewn and well worn ace arable land, well suited to
way expressed sympathy in our recent oases in iain came Oates in oC h 1952, at 2 pam, 10 minutes walk to Yacht Club or Me St. Lucia, St, Vincent, Grenada name Dr. J. Hahnemann P. cane growing or vegetables.
midice Jones (wife), Harold, Ivor, and Rs, Sains Sete ct detnds Sot | maa Retina: Ledeen, toa Well Woedside Gardens, Dial, 2206. AILING. FROM EUROPE and Aruba, Sailing Wednesday astey". (irr Inte TUNEmES? Priced to sell for $200
a i BD, ae . Wat 7 man, 0) Ze. Ja! A : *; -
Orrie Jones, Jack Montell, Meta Sealey, | your home. A. BARNES & Co., Ltd. . YEARWOOD & BOYCE, a ‘py, Oe he 89: Comm i eE 1908 oo om Vv. CARIBBEE will To those who have so kintily —_—-
(children), Seon Coombes (nephew). : 18,1,52—t.£.n. Solicitors. TONITY—Palm Bee Beach, Hastings fully s eee eb, 1982. acoupt Cargo and Passengers for commended their work to gy NTED TO RENT
eee | “Ralph Beard offers the following Bar 271.58-—10n.| furnished 3 Bedrooms. ‘Apply to Mre.| "SAILING TO PLYMOUTH Dominica, Antigua, | Montserrat, care in the past. 1 must Tet thin WA
outa oe . at J i - a : ises. - . Kitts. Sailing know what a very strong in- 7 2 aad
IN MEMORIAM ee Mag. “Dinte Cosine $22.00 pr., Birch LAND—Two (2) Spots % Acre each, ene errs 27,1,.52—-2n ; Orand ae peen en 1952 tard eS icary 1952. ean a had in ay ee 5 A eutey, TelteNe eS iepown
Mag. a : .. Birch | situs : : MS; jestad, 29th “» . a Raee ea ;
‘ —— j pining Chairs $18.00 pr, Mag. Vanities | Carmichael Phone au, '28-1-82~n- | ~y —__—_——~ SAILING. TO PARAMARIBO AND ‘The MeV. MONEKA will SE Te a ae chien with about 2 acres of land; electria
COPPIN—In loving memory of our dear from $75.00 upwards, Cedar China Cab- See : , : WINSLEY — Bathsheba. February to GUIANA accept Cargo and Passengers for ee cada tnspisatioes” light and! water.
mother and grandmother META COP"| inets ‘from $49.00 up, Steel Upright meee lune, Teapnene 201, Mrs, Cae M.S. Agamemnon, 30th Jan., 1962, Dominica, Antigua, Montserrat, 7 eT
PIN who departed this life January] Chairs $8.50 ea., Steel Arm Chairs $12.00| Apply; Fred Carmichael, Phone 2443.— 52—3n./| MS. Stentor, 28th Feb , 1952 Nevis and St, Kitts. Sailing, Date Any, work entrusted. ta, nay office Consult: ,
2 ee 5 life di each, Deal Kitchen Tables from $8.00 , 26.1,52—2n | SAILING, TO TRINIDAD, PARAMARIBO: to be notified. will be promptly and carefully 4
aba ive he eal is conten. upwards, Iron boards from $6.00 up- att . - 7 = AND BRITISH GUIANA. wwit SCHOONER eae: ) > CECH JEMMOTT
Phellis, Wilfred, . Valda, Norma, ete ee ee Tables from $35.00) “LOVE COT"—Wall House situated St PURLIC NO ricks. = Cottica, ith, Feb, > "ASSOCIATION. (ENC. “flip
Marva, Audrey, Grace and Gene. good Sehend hand furniture. Lower Bay cawrents, eee teats the Gospel : M.S. Bonaire, 18th; March, : Consignee, Tele, No, 4047. MARIE LOUISE BAYLEY, | Upstairs Knights 1 Buildings
27.1.52—In, inal - . all, rooms, living rooms, dining) —————————— NLT | Opt. D. , Br .
tae ee. | Street. Phone 6010, 27.1.52—1N | room, toilet and bath, 2 small rooms THE BARBADOS MUTUAL Ss. PB. MUSSGN, SON & CO, * 97.1.52—1n Phone 4563.
cu In. loving memory of our A



downstairs, water and electric, garage.
Apply to Ethel Wiltshire, near Roekley
Yard or Ventnor, Ch. Ch,

LIFE, ASSUR ANT ENERAL
MBBETING

nebseaustie * —— —
—-——— NOTICE is hereby given that an Ex. a e s St 8 |
AIN . r Meeting of
POULTRY: 90 E hire a ed SAINT VINCENT, B.W.1, traordinary General tional eamship
Plymouth Rock er gee PROPERTY Attractive seaside property qualified Policyholders of the above a S

months. old, also. Hampshire Hatching | @dotning Villa Beach, 3 acres with Society Wil be held at the office,

beloved mother LAURA CUMMINS

who died on the 27th Jan. 1950.

Two years has passed since that sad
day

When one we loved was called away

God. took her home it was his will

But in our hearts we love her still.
Ever to be remembered by Eustace,

Lettie (children), Courtney, Harry,

Huge, Harmond tgrand-children) . ‘

; 52—1n



POULTRY



27.1.52—In




















fags 38 cents ea. App! Erié Denny, | ™assive stone building 2000 sq. feet. of the Society, Beckwith ieiday. 15 ccnp ihellbatesaicaneniisiitiia iit O LS
Bridge Gap, Black Rock 26 1,52—1n | Particulars from Errol Rooks, Four Winds, town, at 3 Oc he’ SOUTHBOUND Sails Arrives

Sea February 1952, for the purpose of con-
Pegs poste oa sidering and passing with or without Bh aie ts

Stone | amendment the following Resolution:



PROPERTIES FOR SALE -








“In lo ory of our Des “ iret . pon 6Feby. 7 Feby.

MORRIS—In loving memory of our Dear re T bungalow on m all. modern, con-| SeecnvED that ished oot ee CANADIAN CRUISER’. t “i igpy. ‘ai , a Fen, 28 Feby.

Died daughter “MILLICENT EU- IVESTOCK Veniences, servants room. and. garage. |of Settlement be delet 206 eee sie i. 15-Reby: 25 March 10 March AMPS, & B.V.A.
Fi rm en athe; Sepanted this Stone bungalow recently constructed, |'°W'"S “assurance or assurances shall IAN CRUISER” .. .- 14 March. - 23 March 24 March












in a desirable neighbourhoed about 1%
miles from city, containing all modern
requirements, servants room and garage





be accepted and no policy or policies

RACEHO. s . 7 y
RSES in training. Bay filly, shall be issued on any one life for a

sreress, Br. gelding, Colleton. Apply

If life ahd care would death prevent,

Arrives = Arrives
Her love on earth would still be spent

Arrives
St. John Halifax












x
Hementina§ Morris (mother), Robert! to J. D. Chandler. Gun Site One wooden bungalow, just a few | sum exceeding | $25,000.00 op is immes Ba es ? 1@-Feby. 17/Feby, 20)Feby SELECTION OF PROPERTIES
Elliott Smith (father), The Me 26.1.52—2n, | steps from beach at Brighton self con- anos’ D cxeed with some other Com “LADY NELSON” by & Feby. a . Beby. ixoe: "i aseceh

and Smith's Families. 1,52—1n. tained, drawing and dining rooms| ‘ately renault stand. | “CAN. os 20 Feby. 2 ‘ i FOR SALE

soe aR aan pany or Society of unqui



r ; estionable “ 8 March 9 Marety
enclosed with glass pany sod the Society thereby relieved of LADY RODNEYâ„¢ "98 March 2&Mareh 3) April



















as oe . 4 ‘ 4 April 7 April
PHILLIPS—In_ dear memory of my SCELLAN Lavinia—Three roof house, containing ys ‘LADY NELSON” *e
cousin ALFRED | TOBIAS Pe vii MISCE EOUS ast cintage teoaktest and’ ewe bape |Ste coun ecew. Sener such | “GAN, ST dpettt ame a MAb I Aaa niisnaiae ns. “HOS Dm, OWEN; Mee 2
who us 10 “for ever ei ale ae rooms, flush toilet and bath, with house : atvivings at " ”, Rockley New Rd— “HOL: 7 , St; James
the Lotd”’ Jan 28th., -1951. ANTQUES — Of avery aescription |i. back standing on §,460 sqr. ft. of land. Pg et ap ae For further:particulars, apply to— ‘ aheatia tout, pre-veas: mone An Estate house built of stone
(Evening) Then all by chance or fate} iiss’ China, oid Jewels, fine silver | , Marshville—Three root, dwellmenovss: | account shall, be taken, of ng OF bungalow of first class construetion with pine floors. and shingle reef.
Femoved like spirits crowd upon the) yiiiss Chinas sot books, Maps, Auto. | stinding on 5,445 sar. ft. of land. All| prospective Reversionary Bonus Addi- throughout. The 3 bedrooms are 2 reception, 5 bedrooms, verandahs
ore i veg | Rraphs ete “at Gorringes " ntiais Shop | modern conveniences, along Bank Hall fy provided with. washbasins and all etc., also garage and usual out-
The few we liked, the one wo love adjoining Royal Yacht Club e P| main road. : Cc, K, BROWNE, GARDINER AUSTIN & co., LTD.—Agents. have a cool exposure, There is a buildings. The house stands on
And the whole heart is memory 3/10,51—t.t.n |, Land—A_ desirable building site, con- Secretary. : large lounge, dining room, front approx. 4 acres of well
Love's last gift is remembrance, AO5I—t.£-0) ining 11,000 square feet of land 5 verandah, kitchen, and in the base- land (mahogany) approached by a
— Phillips, “Sunny Side”, Sivethe situated in Navy Gardens. One building 27.1,52—6n. eet ment ere extensive storerooms. long driveway flanked wittr closely
clyde. ‘ehh “oO TT i. —— | site located in Weleches Road, containing Garage and servants’ quarters are planted Mahogany trees. e 01
WHITTAKER 1 loving | memory re a fhe dopniar DARWAX CLEAN. 5,000 square feet, And 7 sends ot Income Tax Notice e acs ving of me. is over sanaite epoachan yet rere
n 2) | | 2 P + 9 a alate s the very lovely whic
properties; and houses, ‘or information 20, sq. t. and unobstructed is very lov e
‘ Jook like new after using, LARWAS— | 2st call at: 0. views are obtained across the golf the advantage of being well ele-
pene +S beck rey a really marvellous! Dial 4391, Courtesy EBONY BARES ek COMRATEITON ane course. A popular and select ve Peyt Ay = views on
er to be remem sara: s . district. all sides. Coas ess than a mile
ra Franklin (mother), Ivy of eaesaue, 95.1.58,—4. Marhill Street. Dial 5001, NOTICE 1S HEREBY GIVEN that ne. away and town 6 miles.
(sisters), Douglas Whittaker and tHos- 26,1.52—2n.| {Income Tax returns are required from “ROUMAIKA", Dayrell’s Rd.—
kins Franklin (brothers), George Whit-



rf Cc NTS 1. ie every married man whose income is Attractive and imposing property. “WYNDOVER”, St. Peter—A
taker and Alfred Dottin Sune) calenteia sent ie Ma aot ea oes SALE NOTICE $1200.00 per annum or over, from every Driveway flanked by mehogany solid one storey stone residence
leta Pile fiancee, Samuel and Denis ; ame Hee per! he undersigned will offer for sale| cther persen whose income is $720.00 per trees. 2 reception rooms, 6 bed- with shingled roof, lately ex-
Pile (sons), Leroy Franklin (father-in- Wilsons $1.40, C, Herbert, 55 Tudor



at their office, No, 1%, High Street,| annum or: over and from compa’
Bridgetown, on Thursday the Bist day| whether incorporated or unincorpora

of January, = = = Ce ee) aoaiatlete persons, § in, ang sree
building lot of land containing ‘ or profession, owners of land =

square feet or thereabouts situate on jerty whether a taxable income has A STEAMER sails 15th FebruarY— arrives Barbados 26th February, 1952.
top of Rendezvous Hill lying to the east| accrued during the past year or not. \ / RESIDENCE, Maxwells Coast— bedrooms (with wash basins),
of and adjacent to the lands of Cloud Forms of Return may be obtained from ‘ ~ he Se aamvaes pro Seitation. lainaty, servantet

Walk the residence of Sir Dudley Lea-| the Income Tax Department AFTER. s perty with 3 bedrooms, large ters and garage, Grounds are

cock, The site is in within easy reach|;sT DAY OF JANUARY, 1952, and the NEW ORLEANS SERVICE ; 4 ~ over 444 eres with productive
A STEAMER sails 18th January— arrives. Barbados Sist January, 1952. diming-reom, drawing room, loung ,

1952

26.1.52—2n. NEW YORK SERVICE

A STEAMER sails 25th January--arrives Barbados Sth February, 1952.

tensively re-modelled with great
care by the present owner. The
house has 2 wide roomy. verandahs
at front and side, large drawing
room, separate dining room, 3

law), George Williams (cousin)

rooms, kitehen, pantry and large
27.1.52-—1n.

verandahs, garage and storerooms.
Grounds approx. 2 acres. Ideal
Guest House proposition,

Clyde Whittaker, who departed 3 AND POLISH just arrived—-Ojd Cars
|











JEWELLERY—Topaz Pendant Ring
ind) Earrings Set, all matched; large
stones 18 carat Gold and Diamonds,
land-made settings. Call EVANS, 8225.

25,1.52.—3.



WANTED

HELE
































—_—_——

of the Golf Club and commands a} forms duly filled in must be delivered orehard, flower and vegetable







galleries, 2 arages, servants’
LADIES VESTS Z beautiful. view, to me on or before the following A STEAMER sails 30th January—arrives Barbados 14th February Stone tert ane i gardens, driveway and large park-
- ioe aes a sili pee ou. + further particulars and conditions| respeetive dates; A STEAMER sails 13th Pebruary— arrives Barbados 28th February, 1952. naitana, ger or) Meat et ing space for cars. “‘Wyndover”
Experienced Shirt Makers. Apply De- | duced for one week only, Three for|°f Sale apply tor 1. Returns of persons whose books ' about % ofan aere theuring com- is well elevated on the ridge,
Luxe Shirt Factory, Spry Stross ca 2.60. KIRPALANT S& eran ane COTTLE, CATFORD fe. were closed on the sist day x EE plete privacy. Further details always benefits from a breeze ang
. ¢ 0) rs. mber, 1951, on or re i commands wfect views of
RAPHER & TYPIST for ou Ltn +20.1,52—-10n. Se Starch, 1908. CANADIAN SERVICE upon: application. faery
STENOG s or ———____—__—_—_———| 2. Returns of persons whose principal “CAS AMLANC A”, Maxwells
Office, apply by letter and in person- Long Playing Records and 78 RPM The undersigned will offer for sale at place of business is not situate in SORREROUND Coast—A_ beautiful eee “LINSLBY", Garden Gap,
T. Geddes Grant Lid, 23.1.52—t f n 4ocords and we book orders too. A.| jel office, No. 17, High Street, Bridge- the island on or before the 30th : ‘ :

‘ARNES & Co., Ltd *|Cown, on Friday the Ist February, 1952, Name of Ship Sails Halifax Arrives Barbados bodying the finest pre-war work- Worthing—A modern, nicely plan-

day of June, 1952.















" ve . 2 coral stone bungalow with

oo cs led manship, Well designed for easy ne
_ ; , 18.1.82—t.8.n, | 8t,, 1:30, .Pm;, the dwellinghouse cal 3. Returns of all other persons, om or|s.s. “ALCOA PURITAN” 3 5 nia’ aa a dens , shingle roof, Select residential

SALES. ave to cover “ELLERS anuary 14th January 24th running with 2 reception, 4 bed
, thi LESMAN; WY naward “lands Rapes en Ire pyre mga gm) PRETO anes sah ve Se ae taares before the Sist day of JanGsry, | 5.8. “ALCOA _ PIONEER” January 29th February 8th rooms, verandah, kitchen, pantry, area, ideal for quick access to
e Leeward (and Wwindreated confiden- | SUITCASES — Valises, attache, cases, | ayoute adjoining "Dr. Bancroft’s _resi- 1963, ss. “ALCOA PLANTER” .. Sebrdery ists Wisruare sand patabh. stpeeratche oto. ‘Tha. nd Town, Hotels & Clubs. Excellent
interva 3 S Advocate a te turdy and lightweight, double locks,|Gence at Lower Fontabelle, The house N. D. . OSBORNE, A STEAMER... February 26th March 7th is approx. 2 acres with flower and safe bathing from sandy beach
Way, SOx, Ss Uta en [19.96 to $6.24. A BARNES & CO. LTD, P Commissioner of A STEAMER ae dernht sath March sith vonsiatia +. gatdensl: penauctive two minutes distant, also at the
13.1.52—t.f.1 ‘24 contains. downstairs, drawing and dining Income Tax and Death Duties (Ag) A t c E popular Rockley Beach which is
edainaained —_— 1,52=t.f.0: | rooms, breakfast room, two bedrooms,| . 40: any person failing to make his STEAMER March 23rd April 2nd orchard and coconut grove, One a

Traffic Clerks for our Office All ae
cants must apply in writing, with refer
ences and photographs, to BRITISH
WEST INDIAN AIRWAYS LTD., Lower
Broad Street, Bridgetow 271.52
————

MISCELLANEOUS



toilet and bath and upstairs 3 bed-
rooms, Electric light, company’s water
and gas turned in,

Inspection any day between the hours
27.1.52—2n of 1 pain and 3 p.m. on application on

iat EnE Ee enna ae 1 ee pees.

TORNADO—International K.41, Beauti-| Por further particulars and conditions
ul condition, excellent equipment, good | of sale apply to:—

acing record, Cost $700.00 now $500,00, COTTLE, CATFORD & Co.,





: vere walled garden may be sold nearhy. A comimodious lounge/
return within the due date These vessels have limited passe ’ bui t living roorn runs the entire depth
be liable to a fine not exceeding passenger accommodation. separateky as building site. =

i 2 and t the house opening onto a
£100 and not less than & ROBERT 1 pleasant cove" porch, There
will be prosecuted unless a THOM LTD. — NEW YORK AND GULF’ SERVICE. red

APPLY:—DA COSTA & CO,, LTD.—CANADIAN SEBVICE

SUIT—One new Ladies’ two piece suit.

olour—Dark Beige—size 18. Phone 2933, “BUNGALOW”, Rockley—A very

comfortable compact timber
bungalow in good residential area
on main road. Accommodation
comprises front covered verandah,



are 3 pleasant bedrooms, modern

satisfactory reason is given. compact kitehen, servants’ quart-

10.1.52—Tn. ers and garage, One of the more

attractive small houses very easy
to run with one servant,





Hook — BARBADOS GARDENING

°, drawing room, breakfast room, 3
No offers. Hicks. Telephone 3189. ‘ s bedrooms, kitchen, ian
BOOK required. Will anyone who has & 18.11.51—t.f.n OT otis, 1 nereaets quarters. Wibnpant vesden “DURHAM”, Worthing, Modern



copy of this book for sale please contact
Advocate Advertising Office.

stone bungalow in pieasant resi-
dentjal area. Accommodation: com~

MODER prises: lounge, dining-room, three

os Hall g-edithear behenaeindd a) cited bedrooms with running water, bath
e with parapet roof. This property
. has the advantage of a corner site



and a good yard at rear,

RADIO NEWS

How long since your radio beem
to the dentist?

- --——=- -—---- eee
TELLODONT” Tablets make a pleas- WENSLOW, CATTLE WASH, St, Joseph
wit refreshing mouthwash and sargle| Fully furnished. Standing on 1 acre 1
foe bad breath, so try a bottle if your|;ood of land, for inspection apply to the
breath is offensive. Price 2/9 bot. caretaker,

KNIGHT'S LTD, 27,1.52—2n Offers will be received by Mrs. W. T.

27.1.61—In





Furnished House or Bungalow; English

with hot water and modern kitch-
family. 1 child school age; not on coast





















Ralph Beard F.V.A. Lower
Bay Street, Phone 5010,
offers you 2 outstanding Bar-
gains in Properties.
WORTHY DOWN
Situated at Top Rock Ch
Ch, having 3 bedrooms with



FOR SALE





Square Tip-Top Dining Table, Upright
Chairs, Sideboard, Morris Suite 3 Arm
Chairs and Settee with Cushions; Hat-
stand, Book-case; Desk-chair, Couch,
Ornament Tables all in Mahogany,
Carpet, Congoleum, Card Table, Pictures,
Flat Top Desks; Jalousie Screens, Ru:
Chairs, Uphols. Couch, Berbice Chair;





Capt. C. A. Reed we will sell at No, 28.
Officers Quarters, Garrison, his Furniture

which includes













rooms, large living room, kitchen,
garage, servants’ qyarters. A
pleasantly located property for
sale at a very competitive figure.

“GRANVILLE”, Flint Hall—
Roomy 2 storey house with galler-
jes, living and dining rooms,
kitehen, pantry and storerooms;
enclosed yard with stock pens,
garage and large out-buildings.
Grounds are about “4 of an agre







Ay al You can't neglect your radio and enetter Land is over % acre all
Phone 8273. hacen Gooding, Stronghope Plantation, St get away with it any more than and a very fine view seawards qencee and there are many fruit
SSS Thomas, 20.1.52—3n you can a teeth, Pay sate and t t standi n70 Coe are 3 good bedrooms with :
\ : Nisei Ae Oh Re let the radio dentist look it over a two storeyed dwellinghouse standing on 10, square feet built-in» wardrobes, Large lounge “PEMERSYDE"
tt , y' . re 5 . R DE”, St. Lawrence:
PITMAN’S SHORTHAND AUCTION oe ee as a ent Meanie of’ land on the incomparable St, Lawrence Coast. a geee ban rece. pec herrrts Spacious stone built bungalow
INSTITUTE BXAMINATION ORIENTAL “ UNDER THE S SILVER but if it's so far gone that we bave Recolianst sea bathing. Dwellinghouse contains verandah } ||} well supplied with fitted "cum ar ers ar Fieger aoe rent
4 r to make an extraction, you ca upstairs and down, dining and sitting roums, 4 bedrooms, pan- »oards, Posserses 2-car garage, 2 . i
Applications from intereged at » 1 Inge s oums, 4 ms, Pp re sane 7 , und side, 2 enclosed
persons ite enigr a Theory, and SOUVENIRS HAMMER Oe ee ee aaceibesibiy sad try and kitchen. Electric light, gas and water installed. Garage boy? psec ihe y agen joes a large airy lounge and dining room,
Sut NE a te = — ue Tuesday 5th February by order of we leave a set operating in your and servants rooms. “THE RISK", St. James—Large saseot e eee ata od
n either arch or . 2. Irs. Hannah J s u i 2 *. * st and c te 2 2 suse v. rv rooms, garage
for the certificates of the Pitman’s SILKS, CURIOS, ARTS Seis BRERA. JOR, TS EN eae Reon ace’ thie. ex poe Purchaser to. have option of buying furniture and effects. % Santino’ tn oraunds at a and outhouses. The land ‘is com-
Shorthand Institute, London, will VENDEMOS, SEDAS, ver Plated Ware, Good Glass, Lustre & oan ion puneeneaea call oo Inspection by appointment. Dial 8137. (Mrs. K, R, Hunte). % ive aces. Cool position and’ ex- pletely enclosed and there is-direct
Manto, EO, Box. 300 ‘hridiietown. QUMOSIDADES. TRAIDOS Bohernlan wlast etc. etc: Full wAaUlagS |Hh, veitassontiience, The above will be offered for sale at public competition on % | cellent safe bathing from sands access to the sek With good Dath-
MNS, Eis, 4 . 2 ater. beach opposite. Extensive accom- ting.
not later than Saturday, oth DE INDIA CHIN BRANKE Laat yaa Friday, the 9th. February. 1952, at 2 pm., at the e of the a > 1
of | pach LA Ae R, TROTMAN & CO. + * ey % modation with 2 large reception aia 7
aCe 1980 Fae $1.90 for each BJIPTO Auctioneers. THE ee mene Lt SHOP undensigned bons whom further particulars and conditions of $ rooms, office, [kitchen ‘and onbTRATamORs, Culloden Ra.
152—1n ROEB TREET sale ained. y oms an "
Nr, Moravian Church. -—s. y Enquiries invited built to last with type of
Ss. IR HUNTE, ’ Enquiries invited.
Sicistany set Anoltcarsiping BUGy- THANI’S UNDER THE SILVER J. K _GULSTONE, COTTLE, CATFORD & CO., material rarely seen to-day. Ac-
retary - Radio Technici: Solicitors, BUNGALOW, Maxwell Coast—A eommodation comprises enclosed
26.1,52—2n. Pr. Wm. Hry. St., Dial 3466 HAMMER mown 4.1 52-—15n well built bungalow with 3. bed- galleries, 2 reception, dining room,
ON WEDNESDAY 80th ty order of om § _Detrpomas,

kitchen, pantry,
storerooms, garage ete. Well re-
commended at the greatly reduced
price now asked.

“HOMEMEDE”, Garrison—. This
property is ideally situated for
most people in this ever popular
district, ““Homemede”, whilst not
isolated, is quite private and its
verandah cannot be overlooked, a
fault so common with modern
























a warm or hot bath within 8

@ ‘ j —





LAND . S trees sture. houses. This bungalow was erect-
connecting Toilets and Baths, Ciaee Sines gad ten Mervinnes Waenicns SILK psi esangie. cathe apr gyic Mago ed about 1939 & is constructed of
Modern built in Kitchen, 2 Fittings, Double Bedstead with Spring @ uregS aye. secu vsineane vine, cog
large Balconies, Large and Dunlopillo Mattress; Single Bedstead 7 7 Hehe Se eed gr ren ne ee
Lounge, Dining Room, Out- Several spots at Maxwell ne Poet ee al —_ 3e. sousine ie oY ae a quarters, double garage etc. Land
La atau, 38 a i.e’ ests § Now’ @ | NOW OFFER YOU Paes.
Setvgnt’s Room, fully en- r) Spring Cot, Cavas Cot, White Dressing 50c ; bath and toilet, kitchen, garage and
closed ‘ : : Table with Press combined; New Jones ‘ out-buildings. Good arable land el
wea iON _ 43,000 sq. ft. at Rockley Machine; Books, , Ice Box, Larders, ————————— over one acre, all enclosed with
: EVANTYOD New Road. Kitchen Tables and Utensiis; and other ( PING wall and fencing, very suitable RENTALS
Situated at Top Rock items Flowered Corded market gardening or chicken farm
having % bedrooms with aad ar ro i Sale at 11.30 o’clock. Terms cash. LI , Low figure asked, ae
Lounge, Dining Room and 2 roods 34 perches at Brit- BRANKER, TROTMAN & CO POPLIN : p ! wie silico Bia FENSHAW", Wildey—Modern
i y € ton’s Hill en a road leading iy ? e+ cored ‘buneslgiy meets Sar
sun nge, 2 fully tiled = Auctioneers. | v rington Hill, St. Michael.—Th nished. Av.
sh Sou ae 7 i 7 — to Club Morgan. 24.1.52—2n 1.76 fine old country mansion was iamed te me tee
Baths and Toilets with Hot | e . recenly conifetted into. 4 spacious jate ‘possession,
Water Built in Cupboards }))| ’ ; | ‘ NOW luxury flats fitted with all Modern RESIDENCE, Sheringham Gar-
throughout,. outside 2 Car {{{| Several spots at the Pine OOO SPPPPSS PPPS OPPS OSES | @ FOLLOWING ge NOW conveniences. There are approx: dens. Fully furnished, available
Garage, Servant’s room, Play | Hill ranging between 11,000 & 1% 5 acres surrounding the house om lease. immediate possession.
‘ & 14,000 sa. ft its HOT WAT ER ON 1% $1.00 s. | laid out with lawns, shrubberies
Room. The Gardens are well ’ Sq. =f. | ; oer m8 sini ak
pom. rdens-are we S | i S $1.18 and gardens, The iong drivewa NEWTON LODGE”, Maxwell
laid out having numerous ${}| ae % TAPfor YOUR BATH A approach is flanked by mat ( Rul tarmac Sean
} ‘ } . ; mahogany tfee: Good in sailabl ,
aie: Several spots at Hothersal $ | Crepe Back ST | aeRO meme a ae ae s. H in lable long lease as from Feb.
he above Properties are Turning beside the main | With one of the lovely White Por- SATIN ARTING TODAY. SATURDAY 26TH | :
, r & ’ - on : . ’ ETC.
available with possession road, 1% calain Gas Geysers—You can have .
e
ie
igs
s
1s
| g



LLL







within one month. The Own- e inut of ligt 7 Boon< | f 7 “ SATIN ai
ee ee een, tl mae manus of lighting, “wp, Bron: 81S $1.74 GEORGE SAHELY & cO., LTD. ETC. REAL ESTATE AGENTS, AUCTIONEERS and SURVEYORS
reasonable offer for a quick to D’Arcy A. Scott, Magazine { ae ee Theta aS a MeN GAS 1% NOW @ 19 WW, ee eee ae
sale, 25,1.52—3n Lane. 26.1.52--2n W1% Works, BAY STREET, 13 $1.50 SWAN ST, ETC. PLANTATIONS BUILDINGS — Phone 4640
'
SSS! —_ FESS ae ¥ 459999999999 9SGO SS OGOA ; .





SUNDAY, JANUARY 27, 1952





KITCHEN & PANTRY

Double & Single Drainboard
Sink units, drainboards and
sinks, in aluminum, plastic
and enamel. Oil stoves, all
Sizes and types, and ovens.

A. BARNES & CO., LTD.





The

) of a

Breeze Lotion
in a of the |
Bottle | Caribbean
THAT'S THAT'S



Rooms with or without
Private bath.

We specialise in Fish
and Lobster j
Luncheons,
Dinners,

Bargain House Weekly Bulletin of Buys.
KHAKI SHIRTS

Short and Long Sleeves .............. $3.25 up
DUNGAREE
Suitable to stand hard wear........ $1.38 yd.
WORKING SHIRTS
Big Stock to choose from ........ 2 for $5.00
4. COLOURED DRILL
Reduced from $1.18
PE MRI yoo vn insieocnnicieaneytyend $1.08 now
5. NEW AMERICAN B.V.D.'s ...........:se0000 $1.20

Other Styles
WHIRLWIND SHIRTS—Reduced Now
MEN’S SPORT SHIRTS $2.95 up
BOYS’ DRESS & SPORT SHIRTS $2.46 & up

BOYS’ VEST SHIRTS .....cccccccccssssscsccossses
SCHOOL CAPS

e
A Big Selection of Hosiery, Pyjamas, Neck Ties,
Kerchiefs, Vests, Shoes and Hats

THE BARGAIN HOUSE

30, SWAN STREET "PHONE 2702

S. ALTMAN — Proprietor



Cone













SOOO SOS SSO SSS SFOS FFF OOOO

.
*
°

NOTICE



VPPVOOPEPLPPPPLLPPPPVAMALPL MM (LK Ns

Due to a change in schedule effective February,

Ist, 1952, will all passengers holding reserva-

tions with us on or after this date, please check

with our Office.



BRITISH WEST INDIAN
AIRWAYS LTD.

Lower Broad Street. Phone 2789, 4585

«

POSS OOP SOP O OE.

999999556 966655566664



Anti-Corrosive Gripon Red
Roofing Paint for metal.
Minerva Red Roofing Paint
for shingles.
Figaro House Paint in colour.
Oblita Undercoating.
Marine Gloss White.
Also:
Paint Brushes, Turpentine
and all other Paint Materials.
a

Let Us Supply Your
Requiremenis.

PLANTATIONS LTD.









FLASH NEWS!

w FACTORY OWNERS AND CONTRACTORS
We are now in a position to supply you

with your Requirements of

GALVANISED PIPE

Ranging from 1” to 3” Bore
aS
ALSO

A LARGE ASSORTMENT OF FITTINGS



,

ge Pay Us a Visit To-day and Get Yours





BARBADOS HARDWARE Co. Ltd.
.

‘4
+
‘s
‘s
o
s
%

'

(THE HOUSE FOR BARGAINS)
No. 16, Swan Street ’Phone 2109, 4406, or 3534





Hercules
Bicycle
The. go ie day
New Shipment

OF

SPORTS
' MODELS








CENTRAL EMPORIUM



Cnr. Broad & Tudor Street
PHONES: 4200, 4235, 4702



POOSCT ESOP EOE CELE,

PPPELIPPAGL LL

COSC LPPLPL LLL LPP LLL







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PPT

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-,










|

SELES

*
%
~

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%

%
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%

% |

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+
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as

—

SUNDAY ADVOCATE









PAGE FIFTEEN

999990 SF SOOO SOPOT SOO SOS OS “s
s » ‘ 1
We car ipply % \
* 6 PORCELAIN TILES * ili Ritasade sia
. ‘
» ‘
> a variety of Colours ys AMENDED OFFICIAL CLASSIFICATION SPRING
* asians a , % MEETING 1952
S CENT RAL EMI ORI M > ©. 2. (Continued) F. 2. (Continued)
S Cnr. Broad & Tudor Sts. x Distinction Decuher
99669869066 B SSS OFBS POC OPUSOO SOS OVI OCIOHOEEE Doldrum Diarose
SODSSSOF5 FFF FS PSST VPV ETOYS SG SOOO VSA ITV IOPOO EN, | Fabulow: Dunese
> ile d’lrar Spicure
‘ y P y ‘Ce s French Flutter Facetious
ror THE OFFIC KE ia ; x Galashiels First Admiral
Letter Balances «» Stapling Machines » Love Potent Foxglove
Large and Small Clips for the above x m1 eek chece $A Prine
Foolscap and Letter Files for Cabinets Bleue Streak Miss Panic Soit Cosnonsina
File Fasteners — «» fypewriter Ribbons % | Demure Red Coat Jolly Miller
Carbon Paper «» Adding Machine Rolls % Flying Dragon Street Arab Ladys Man
e ¥ | Fuse Budget Test Match Love Nest
% Landmark The ching . Se inte
| Notonite Tiberian Lady May y
ROBERTS & Co. ” Dial 3301 8 | Grehis Trimbrook cle
3 Pretty Way — ee
High Street. Red Cheeks . My Love Il.
.. s : 8 Slainte Oberon
CSO OOOO PS OSSOOS e800 * Sunny Game Ali Baba Perseverance
{ Bright Light Rambler Rose
B. 2. Cross Bow ing
Belle Surprise Mary Ann Soprano
, r Tr ¥ r r . z :
B Oo Embers Oateake Sunbean
t » N eae Firelady Sun Fire
E King Soloman D. 2. Sunina
For GUARD WALLS and Mrs, Bear Cross Roads were 0
Pepper Wine Top Flight aterbel
ENCLOSURES River Sprite
‘ Spear Grass E. 1. ’ G. 1.
We have ~« Yasmeen The Eagle Ben Hur
Betsam
EXPANDED METAL ©. 1. E. 2. Blue Diamond
Aberford Apollo Blue Grass
Cb r bl 5 i Bow Bells Assurance —
fainable in various Dashing Princess Colleton Drury ne
Fair Front Dunquerqut oer nn
c Fair Sally Flame Flower s orship
Lengths and Mesh Flieuxee Usher Just by Chance II
, ¥ ye High and Low Vanguard Monsoon
N. i. HOW ELL Leading Article er
Lunways F. 1. St. un
Lumber & Hardware.Bay Street \Red_ Velvet lien cia alt Starlet
St. Moritz Cavalier Vigilan:
Dial 3306 | Sweet Rocket Diamoa
Topsy Miss Friendship G, 2.
i ln lt aati | Windsor Glen Will o’ the Wisp II posh Boy
R | ‘ottage
\% x } ©. 2. F. 2. Flying Ann
' FOR COMFORT (gest ES
% 8 | Aim Low April’s Dream Front Hopper
% | Arunda April Flowers Gallant Hawk
sy | Best Wishes Apronusk Joan’s Star
% | Blue Nelly Bouquet Maytime
% RIDE A % | Cantaquisine Caprice Sea Bequest
& % | Careful Annie Cardinal Sun Jewel
> % | Castle in the Air Champagne IT. Twinkle
», 8 .
% 3 | Darham Jane Chutney Valeska
% | Devil's Symphony Clementina Wilmar
. %& | Dim View Colombus Zaleika
> | ‘
% | Subject to change in the event of any horse taking part in any
% | Meeting prior to the Barbados Spring Meeting, 1952
x G. A. LEWIS, Secretary.
»%

LEO OD

mee — Sede
POLSSOOSOCSSOLOE SOOO SEE EASPORTS SS CDSE

pares ereereree SO

BICYCLE

THE BARBADOS FOUNDRY LUD.

Whitepark Road












&
FITTINGS

PIPES’? 4" — 8% 25 1" 2. 91" a BP

FITTINGS: Elbows — Tees — Unions



CITY GARAGE

VICTORIA STREET.



RICKETI

4.448

STREET
SO ool

.
.
sy
GOOLE LLLP





Make Shopping a Pleasure at - -
EAL HARDWARE svertics

(Opposite Post Office)

AOE 4,454 ¢ >
LELLLLPI LLLP LLLP POOLE POOLE OPEL IE LLL POOLS

24th January, 1952



64,6554
—PLLCSESCE LLL LLL

5.Ton Capacity

very strongly



Cane Carts

constructed

10.50 — 11.00/20 12 ply

7.50/15 Front Tyres

| Heavy Duty Rear Tyres

| Jeeps

Genuine Jeeps!

Four Wheel Drive!

| See us for these before
| they all go. It is very
doubtful if we can get

further supplies.

wirn A FULL

STOCK OF
HARDWARE, GLASSWARE, ENAMELWARE,
ELECTRICAL GOODS & HOUSEHOLD

REQUIREMENTS
i
COURTEOUS SERVICE
EXCELLENT VALUES

EASY PARKING
FACILITIES

PHONE 4918 ,

—— SSF
POOLE



COLE & CO.. LTD.



uot oiae

<
.
~



OF PPPS SFO SOSS







..

PAGE SIXTEEN SUNDAY ADVOCATE
> 9 ON PLEASURE CRUISE
General Patton’s

Widow On Yacht




































Nurse Chosen For
Special Course

Miss Olga Ilene Worrell, Staff
Nurse, General Hospital, has been

He is pleased





F aa selected to undergo a _ speciai
ee - 7 } course of study at the Venereal ~
When And If Diseases Clinic, Caribbean Medical about his
| Centre, Port-of-Spa T G4
By H. O. HUSBANDS This course covers a period of}

CHAUFFEUR

CAP
We ee in alt § : ol
}

A descendant of that intrepid Italian navigator in the
English Service, John Cabot who during the reign of Henry
VII was engaged in the search of the Northwest Passage to
India, arrived here this week.

It was aboard the sleek white-painted pleasure yacht
When and Ifi—what a peculiar name—that I called on the
Hon. Thomas D. Cabot, a resigned American official who
has either inculcated or inherited a passion for the sea.
Thomas Cabot is making a planned a world cruise in hep,

Caribbean cruise with Mrs. never thinking that war would
George S. Patton, the owner of have come along. He was not
the yaaht, his wife, Steven Wheat- privileged to cruise the world in
land (a friend of Mrs. Patton), his yacht. Mrs. Patton is now on
Captain Rose and Joseph Ekeland, her first trip to these waters,
two professional members of the Built of steel, When and If
crew. weighs 22 tons and draws 94 feet
hose who keep in touch with of water. She has an_ overall
world affairs may remember Mr. length of 63 feet and a_ beam of
Cabot taking charge of the Norti: 144 feet Although most of the

oe
about three months and Miss}
Worrell leaves for Trinidad on
Sund y, 27th instant





‘ua nv
RE FRE= At all times, and
especially in the bath. Cuticura
oap makes the skin deligh *
fully smecth and preserves \es,
@ youthiul complexion :
Its emollient properties
remove al! trace of




sizes only

also

HELMETS















Atlantic aty Organisation sailing is done under canvas, she

(N.A.T.O.) as deputy of the Sec- is equipped with an auxiliary Ready for shore are (left to right) Mr. Thomas Cabot, Mrs. George S. Patton, Mrs. Cabot and Mrs. Khaki and Plain e

retary of State. He spoke for the engine. Lighting and cooking is Steven Wheatland who arrived here on Thursday from Tobago in the pleasure yacht “When and If”. es

U.S. Government during the done by electricity Mrs. Patton is in her mid-sixties but gets around the yacht as if 50 years younger. Whi All . E ® + ®

International Security Affairs. Everywhere — on deck, in the vr eee RE or: . Th ru in ite sizes. Ca. : a ~~

Until November last year when chart room, the small kitchen, the . t # eyes

he relinquished his post to Mr. bunks and even in the engine Speightstown Round-up B.B.C. RADIO e ! ; ny ae

William Averell Harriman, room, the yacht is spick and span; : he ~

Thomas Cabot was in charge of the brass shining and the wood- PROGRAMMES Y r Horosc

America’s Foreign Aid Pro- work well polished. e - ou ope 1

gramme. While he was in_ this Itine «,, BUNDAT, JANUARE. 21, pee fe

office, America spent 64 billion r ‘ The g wigs ' n 1¢ Ss < I fh a tnt ME digg — _ ()
Thomas Cabot and the two paid . oon The News, 12.10 p.m ee

U.S. dollars for the mutual security

hands sailed her from Manchester News Analysis



of the free world.



Would you like to know what the

on November 10. She called at . . 31.828 . : .

7 : Stu 5 a Stars indicate for you ? Would you like

World Security Bermuda, Virgin Islands, Dom- 4 p.m. The News, 4.10 p.m_ Int »,| to test free the skill of Pundit Tabore,
“It is not that America wants inica, Martinique and St. Lucia ea a k United Nations Renort, 4.20 p.m.| India's most famous Astrologer, who by

to make gifts to other countries’, where she was Mrs A ?





10, 11, 12 & 13, BROAD STREET










joined by nd Half Soe, 5 P m vane Band. applying the
he expleined, “but it is the only Patton, Mrs. Cabot and Mr. a” aa mC Backtish Orchesten, anctent science 1
; * RNDWw Bs Wiican ; ? ; 1. What's usef purpose
way that they can secure them- Wheatland. They arrived at Bar- EVANS EDWARDS, fish-v endor, of Mango Lane, °." . aa re U2. a pas pee “EO
selves and others against Russia.” bados via St. Vincent, the Grena- Speightstown, died at the General Hospital shortly after p10. News Analysis, 7.15 p.m Caribbean | enviable reputo-,
He told me that Harriman asked dines, Grenada (where they were rentardnay . ae « ¢ fe ine Review p.m Piano Playtime, 7.46] tion? The ¢
1 , i noon yesterday, two hours after he had his head crushed to he Bi %5 with > a 4
for eight billion U.S, dollars this guests of Sir_ Robert Arundell) Messrs: R. & G. Challe a I i : Suatahts Sin eS SMa idan > a uaa es py eau a ae
year for mutual security but was and Tobago. Fred Ayer, who is essrs. f 1a eno! s bond at + pe ightstown DY a a | the sound practi For Permanent Floors & Walls, easy to clean, and ever-lasting,
granted seven billion, three a brother to Mrs. Patton, is water-logged wooden raft which would weigh between four _ 8.15 p m. Radio Newsreel, 8.30 p.m. | cal advice cor :
. : Reli 5 S 9 So od ni
million U.S. dollars, expected to fly from Boston to and five tons. He was exactly 36 years old yesterday. a ga ress eg gt Age ral ae gents Ep nie ES be WE SUGGEST :—
Thomas Cabot is President of join the party later in the cruise Edwards was rushed to the Ger s liana fave i 1 the Fuitorials, 10.15 pm. London} Business, Sve
the United Fruit Company and When and If will be cecaving gpa) Hospital while blood wa thie bis Seeil poy / Tine x saete Forum, 10.45 p.m. Singing is so good a lation, Finances FLOOR TILES,
Executive Vice-President of God- Barbados in a few days for Mar- )ouring fr Sia ene 7 ie bus because they were expect= ay Love aft . : ee
frey I Cabot Inc.,, U.S., the tinique and expects to call at pouring from his mouth, nose and ing to hear the clock strike as a pbosToN Friends, Enemies, Red and Speckled Cream, 6” x 6
: a Bos ans . - oY CREE varni . . j WRUL 11,25 yRUW 5 Me WRUX erie: , ‘
largest producers in the world of Antigua and various Dutch warning to get on the main road PRL: 21.88 Me Were ETS Ble We peer ate While, 3” x 3”
F : nn and others, whose watcl sare 11.76, Ms have astounded
carbon blacks, charcoal and pine Islands, Thomas Cabot told me A group of men were employed 22° 2 Ss, whose watches were ad educated peovie
tar. that he does not know when they to have the raft loaded on the = , . se >» reac Ros agai ca at dein ace ehe , “ne drivers’, have sufferec le same 11.15 a.m. Personal Portrait, 11.30 a.m,| George Mackey i 5
Mrs. Patton, w ho is in her mid- W ill be reac hing Boston again. lorry, E-276, and Edwards willing- Seer oore s Jb oe Soa. Persoeal F eaten Green. eee Blue, White, Green, Black, 6” x 6”
sixties, is_ the widow | of Major We have had a very. pleasant ly joined them to give them a ‘ 5m. News. Analysis lieves that Tabore must possess some sort
General George S, Patton, the trip’ Thomas Cabot intimated hand. 4.00—7.15 p.m. 31.32M 48.48M | of second-sight RED COLORCRETE CEMENT

American Commander of the U.S. and when asked whether he met He was standing behind the . This week the members of th« ». “ To popularise his system Tabore will
Seventh Army 1943—44 and of rough weather coming from Bos- lorry and the raft while, with Speightstown Boys’ Club were 4 p.m. The News, 4.10 p.m. The Daily | send you FREE your Astral Interpreta-







: : : ; . : ys 7 " -« — . wr

the U.S. Third Army since 1944. ton, he remarked nonchalantly ropes attached, the men were try- entertained to a, film show spon- Siiyiet heat eh ae eat ‘ake aso eee 9 blag A Ba WHITE SNOWCRETE CEMENT

Major General Patton made the “occasionally the weather is ing to get the raft upright and Sored by the Police Department at the Opera 6.45 p.m. Sports Roundup, | birth all clearly written by yourself, No For Partitions, Ceilings, Door Panels ete. we offer:—
great advance from the beach- rough, but a trip is always pleas- then on to the platform of the Speightstown Police Post. The 7 pm. The News, 7.10 pm News | money wanted for Astrological Work,

head of Cherbourg, France, which ant once you are not drowned”. lorry : boa enieved 2 film A may a An ly : i s. Pm ricket Raper on Fostage €0.- pee mee te: oe contac STANDARD HARDBOARD SHEETS

resulted in the recapture of_most Perhaps this was was the resur- ‘ To The Ba ame” ‘where. they: *°¢ Day's Play in Fifth ‘Test Review of © Postal Ordos coating ieerauure, You will 5

of France by the Allies. He died gent spirit of John Cabot. Bystanders said that the raft|saw hockey, football, rugby and ne ey hie Hele A A es eae on Wor pee genie wager Sie y | Ss er of Lee? re Serene proof,

in 1946 at the age of 61 after a skidded out and falling, caught|other games played in America these Things, 8.15 p.m. Radio Newsree!l, | of his statements about you and your | 4” thick, 4 x 6’, 8’, 10’ long.

jeep accident in Germany. Edwards against the wall, 2.30 p.m. European or Atlantic Union, | affairs. Write now as this offer may not



TEMPERED HARDBOARD SHEETS

: T , ; 5p rhe » Carlo Ré , 5 ag Address; PUNDIT |
Steven Wheatland is Manager 6@ t’’ ® d The raft, which was used to The: boys are hard at practice 8,45 p.m. The Monte Carlo Rally, 9 p.m. | be | made again. cere
3 G I e ‘ . Fr the Third Programme, 10 BORE, (Dept. 213-D), Upper Forjett
of timber properties in the U.S., oo in ) repair schooners at the Speights-. with the football and hope to play Prom so re ae oe p.m. | TABOF (en 1” thick, 4’ x 6’, 10’ long.

; The News, 10.10 p.m. From the Edi- | Street, Bombay 26, India, Postage to India |
President of Paboby Museum, town moorings, had been towed {quite a few matches during the orials, 10.15 p.m. Science Review, 10.30 | is 4 cents

*Massachusetts, the oldest 30 Shilli ashore and lifted on Messrs R, & G, }coming season, pm. tp Top “Tune ieee iin cite Nitin ipcenemne ee Se sce
Museum in the U.S.A. in continu- mgs Challenor’s jetty by crans A eee — ————————eeeeeeeoe i Phone 4267.

ous existence. " ‘ trolley took it to the terminus of e a | ‘
And now to When and If in F | the wharf lines where Edwards ‘ WILKINSON & HAYN \ (‘0 LT)
which these American personali- or oitering met with the fatal accident an POLICE B 1 dk Jeg 4 .
ties are enjoying their cruise as
— ST. CECILIA BARRACKS _ SSS »











sone family”. Rigged a. 8 Het bert Hutson alias “Goot” of A post mortem examination was
schooner with squaresails, When Bay Land, St. Michael, was fined held yesterday evening by Dr. J. A

a
and If was built in 1938 for 30/- in 14 days or in defualt one Browne the same day
Major General Patton by Pendel- month’s imprisonment with hard Fvirfield Factory, St. Lucy,
ton Bros., Wiscasset, Maine — labour by His Worship Mr. G. B. started grinding her 1952 crop on































~~ lice tenn neertniitiame same neiadia
Passage Rd. - FFAS
Famous boat builders of the U.S. Griffith who found him guilty of Friday. With Haymans Factory. —
to the design of John G. Alden, loitering in the private yard of St. Peter, starting off on Monday,
Squaresails are very useful when Gwendolyn Rowe at Taylor’s Gap, the three sugar factories of St. A GRAND
sailing with the trade winds and Bannister Land, St. Michael, with Peter and St. Lucy will all be at
hence in Caribbean cruising. intent to commit a felony. work, Springhall Factory, _ St
Major General Patton had Counsel in the case was Mr, Lucy, was the first to begin grind- ante the discovery, of Winpderes been | hades erat skin, making it jth a Se
" “4 , maki ,
* E. W. Barrow for the defendant. '"8: sary for anyone to suffer from ‘u#iy. dis. and velvety smooth. tn iat & day’ or two D
yi “uti th an is! ny in emishes our mirror will tell you that here at last
. . = aot ae pei ae Messrs Plantations Ltd. and Such "hs Bezema, Pi Hes, Rash, "Ring: | s the scientific treatment you have been
Sa a e saw son in © Mess: R. & G. Challenor & Co worm. Psoriasis, Acne, Blackheads, Scabies | needing to clear your skin—the treatmen|
yar , ny i ot ¥ ; ate “t nd Red Blotches. Don't let a bad skin | to make you look more attractive, to help . ‘a ;
Derelict yard of Gwendolyn Rowe quite Ltd., sugar shippers of Speights- make You feel inferfor and eatise vou to you win friends. Nixoderm has brought TUESDAY 20th Guarantee A Perfect FIT
>e » . ‘ : ‘ 5 th w arer, healthier skins t ousands, suc
near to her sheep pen. He knew town, are getting their ware- Lote your friends ean’ let a ad akin | aS Mr, R. K., who writes. “I suffered from . 7 ] ;
@ From Page 1 it was the defendant. houses ready for storing part of make people think you are diseased. terribly ‘itching, burning and smarting to every SHAPE.
ship was described as 98 feet Mr. Barrow in his address suk- the produce of these factories A New Discovery Penepe tor 33 rears. Fried a teeopes on ANU. A RY
long, carrying two masts, black mitted that the witnesses of the Warehouses are at Speightstown,

Nixoderm is an ointment, but different itching in 10 minutes I could see my skin
from any ointment you have ever seen or | Clearing up on the second gay All the red
felt. It Is a new ‘dscavary. and ig not | dafiguring blotches and scaly skin disap-
greasy but feels almost like a powder when | eared in 10 days. My friends were wmnase.
you apply it. It penetrates rapidly into the | at the improvement in my appearance
pores and fights the cause of surface blem- | ;

Sones. Nixoderm contains 9 ingredient Satisfaction Guaranteed

which fight skin troubles in these 3 ways. | Nixederm costs absolutely nothing un-
1. It fights and kills the microbes or para- less it clears your skin to your comple
sites often responsible for skin disorders. | satisfaction. Get Nixederm from t
2. It stops itching, burning and smarting chemist today. Look in the mirror in (ve
in 7 to 10 minutes, and cools and soothes | morning and you will be amazed at the
the skin, 3. It helps nature heal the skin | improvement, Then just keep on & ing

hull, white gunwale, red careen- prosecution could not be relied on, Six Men’s and Shermans

ing with one “W" as name, The identity was not established and A i. daseb play
oo went on to on = the onus was upon the shoulders R Pe rikoee Co. a —s
me aera nai ries ne ioe of the prosecution to establish just ia “enlar ‘eit and renov-
d mee a po ratte poat was identity. ated The Wibshaves which used
, “The local Macheur om Shipping € aie selanen ae a ma tice to hold pio tons St sugar, oa now
Master cabled this information to at the aetandaat ot evidence hold between 950 and 1,000 tons |
the Harbour Master of British ;)° nt was the man in



POLICE BAND DANCE
ORCHESTRA





We have







done it in










of sugar. Ten bags of sugar weigh clear, soft and velvety smooth, Nixoderm {or one week and at the end o s

Guiana the same day and got the the yard. Emerson Howard, keep~ a ton Works Fast Son cleat, envooth ‘and. Saenabeslly et
reply “contact Trinidad.” er of the criminal records, told the | Because Nixoderm is scientifically com. | tractive must give you the aharever you ————

‘After contacting Trinidad, he Court that he knows the defend- Springhall’s sugar is now being | Fee e Ee ae en ec aeiers geen in | €0, OF you simply return the empty prck
got the reply yesterday morning ant who has one previous convic- stored at Messrs¢ Manning’s ware- | your life before, It stops the burn | aKe and your money wit) be. fas ut der
that no information was availa- tion for housebreaking and lar- houses in Bridgetown but when | Ng And Smeg De ee mautiog and | today. The guarantee protects you. We can
ble there regarding the survivors ceny, five petit larcenies and three the crop reaches the peak, some of \CGPPRPPRRRIT VPP IPOS DIOY
of the schooner Zenith but th convictions for loitering under the her sugar will be stored at Six si
Trinidad Harbour Master hac Vagrancy Act. In the year 1932 he Men's. . Messrs R. &. G. Challenor's OUR AGENTS are making £100

do it all

cabled to the British Consul, of was deemed a rogue and a vaga- warehouses at Speightstown store
Carupano, Venezuela, The cable- bond. for Haymans Factory while Messrs

x
and more by taking orders fow ¥
Personal Christmas Greeting Cards % |

Â¥,
a









SECCOFOOOOTD



































|
|

gram also stated that it was not Yesterday, Mr. Griffith also Plantations Ltd. store for Hay- |- eal re ee ny ee the TIME,
confirmed that the derelict was deemed him an incorrigible rogue. 'â„¢@"S and Fairfield, ny bD -Suninnees: Hit tenepamenyettnl

aaa ‘ incansten : . a ublishers will send a Beau |
a — Bo oe agg “Speightstonians look forward |}( F ALE | Free Sample Book for 1952 to | \
were in progress and the local , i | Genuine Agents Write today }
Harbour and. Shipping Master to calls from sugar ships at riahest detects paid eed e
would be further advised, Caru- WEATHER REPORT ee ee tineie’ ink Saath edhuciadtindiaiads 8 Williams ‘& Co., Dept. 9, Victoria

ano we: ere e crew 0 ne D Ss no kely that a s gly Se alg .
Susken ‘Queris May lanae a a YESTERDAY anchor in that port to load before x We re !
life boats some time ago. Rainfall from Codrington: March,” a shipping clerk told the BUNGALOW 1? 4.66.4.546665656566665600 p C S MAFFE! & CO LTD

A subsequent cablegram reach- OL in. Advocate yesterday Rockley New Road: « »x ee ete or es nen e 7 ~ od ’
ing the local Harbour and Ship- Total Rainfall for month to The St. Peter’s Church clock, imately 19,000, square feet of land
ping Master from Trinidad yes- date: .36 ins. the “Big, Ben” of Speightstown Magnificent view including Golf ' Top Scorers in Tailoring
a of ited aA the fence eee 69.0 °F. has stopped working. Throughout Brite Seca. Kieren, ee
Elody M. capsized four miles from nd Velocity 6 miles per riday the dial read 9.55 and yes ‘Downstairs: Garage, Servants | ;
Chacachacare Island around 19 hour = i gp te gi Room with Bath and Toilet, and Prince Wm. Henry Street {
a.m. on Friday last Barometer (9 a.m.) 30.020 For some weeks now the church enough reom for Laundry er SSS f

Seven survivors were reported (11 a.m.) 30.010 clock has been mis-striking Pee SSS
to be clinging to the upturned TO-DAY nothing at 9 a.m., 11 at 10 a.m. BUILDING (SS SSS ey
portion of the hull and the vessei Sunrise : 6.13 a.m. two at 1 p.m. etc.—but yet it car-
was presumed to be drifting west, Sunset: 5.55 p.m. ried good time. Warehouse and Building toate

The cablegram further advised Moon: Last Quarter, Jany * eres area oe oe
that an air and sea search was in 20. ; +, The clock is now undergoing ctandile on canceoktnney 30,000,
progress and all ships in the Lighting: 6.00 p.m repairs, Bus drivers, who usually quure feet of land with a frontage
vicinity were requested to keep a High Tide: 4.13 am. 4.02 waited until the clock struck the of approximately 120 feet on
sharp look out. p.m. ton Cen ieee hours before they left the bus bese Peseta’ in gas Galena

The Zenith left here under Low Tide: 10.01 a.m, 10.43 stand at Orange Street, Speights- tor dividing and renting into #aall
Captain P. A. Tannis on Decem- pm. town, now leave when their stores or large Textile Factory,
ber 19 with a crew of 11 anda a watches tell them that the hour is my .Factory

load of stone for Springlands.



up.

Thes"ll Do It Every Time Seca cme 20 By Jimmy Hai! )

: Zz U7 WY), _ _ \
{ i HAVEN'T I SEEN HER, LL IT BACK YZ
ir ts Pear THATS ALL RIGHT! \“p ayiNG TACKLE FOR THE )/4 | ELLEN WITH THE a
BUT IF MADAM I'M STARTING ON MY ) Gpeen Bay PACKERS © SEAMS OUT AND THE
WiLL PARDON oy DIET AND EXERCISES \ Tie only : ZIPPER SPRUNG AND
TS OA FOURTEEN (4 AGAN TOMORROW OR T SHELL (0 IS THE OLD BLAME IT ON US s=-
AND YOU SHOULD )\ NEXT WEEK -“IN MAN'S BANK ACCOUNT>++
fd wens x TIME AT ALL“TeErHEE™
S TEEN IT'LL. PROBAB
UH=AN EIGHTEENâ„¢ v

LAND



Approximately 18,000 square feet
of land with one large and one

small stonewall building thereon








eS |



situate at Roebuck Street, just












above Crumpton Street and
opposite to James A. Tudor & Co

ADMISSION - 3]-
Refreshments On Sale
Dancing 9 p.m.—2 a.m.

This lund runs through to Gills






Rood with an approximate front-
age of 70 feet, and is suitable for
warehouses





AUBURN DALI

Two storey residence comprising

Situate at Navy Gardens, Hastyygs.

SWEET FIELD
Lovely Stone House: comprisihg
upstairs three Bedrooms, Jag
Living, Roem Dining Room 2
Toilets and Bat! ene with Tub
Bath and h ad cold water”
Gallery

On landing in the Tropics, Clothes are uppermost
in mind! The House of C. B. Rice on Bolton Lane, have

made it their business over a long number of years, f

to tailor to the requirements of the Barbados visitor
and resident alike.
t

Introduces

THE VIKING SUPPER |



tiehen, and Sbhev
ing on approx!mat>
land about 100 yards
Beach. | ction by





served every Sunday evening
from 7 to 10 o'clock...a’ delightful
variation to the pleasures of
“eating out”

The superb quality of imported materials, English
Worsteds, Tropicals, Gabardines and Linens—to men-
tion a few, are a section of Rice’ v





I xe of Mens-
wear for work and play. A rdrobe of quality, value

and pleasurable wear



REALTORS Limited

REAL ESTATE AGENTS |
)
)
)
)



ing.



"HE OD SHOE FITS | |
’ | TLL TAKE SA” DAME --

THANX TO MRS.ROMONA GAHL,| |

CARMEL , CALIFORNIA (({

C. B. Rice & Co.

Table reservations only. |
Merchant Tailors

151/152 Roebuck Street,



Phone 494

)
;
of three Bedrooms, Living and
Dining Room. Ali modern con-
veniences. Standing on apppox-
imately 8,000 square feet of lWidl
(

,
AN UR

AUCTIONEERS
VALUERS
{
4
{
(

\
i
BUILDING CONTRACT $
i



SSS







=







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BUMMY, JANUARY IT. l§5t BUND \ ADVOCATE PACiK FIVE JAN. 27 — NO. 208 Australia Bat With Determination The Topic [Milled Valentine rear a -in ThllBII Fnm HAROLD IM-t dred weien SYDNEY, Jn. M. o the rails rirrt item of the programme I^pe'cepUbly. Ilw this fronting was th MMWf ened ma !" l b > straight driving lonclu-Vo o tha Was* Indian in* !" g! wh ,*a ,t* d rf P | co1 r.lngs, b-jt rjUlUen and Valentine ""^"""V ivftiMd to glow it i,, be quite *o %  **** ..l"**" U that. Thiy pe.I"*-Portl<9 .. Hated for half an h. in and bv Mrllonald Is Onl Hiring their stand t.. IS made H McDonald, a: gl to Ha-sett's 41 the We* Indian inand the srore ai i-nf ft begfcsaftng to 'ight hi* ean* .. | . emtd to off Miller and Vsl.-ntme happily ** no ob clf m nl *JSn And ,-e but was w v *'y instant I ww wr .*ward> " I"" waa bo*led b? Rama.ntnre wan eventually taught b* ">"• *iH ch U on r tnr lh "," s Langler. bowled Mlllei for sU, %  t""'"' 1 happening U> Uulllet, not out 11 Iain. p**v*n .-,.. -j %  -.rt'ping low and hteDon'* 1 ..1.1 more .w less *otehed %  _,,• b**" anA -hatter M, wltM He Mi> Hailing aj Tw „ r,,. j:<8 MtDuiiald any Thuius opemJ Australia wa now a long way to Gomez and Worrell who ha-1 ahead of their opponent* A game >hang.-d ends from the previous that looked like finishing In tutKi ay. To: hall an hour, we had more than two days, waa now k* pragma while these bidding fnir to stretrh to full two young men tried to erase distant*, as long a* the Wi memories of their efforts yesterIndies batimen were able M rep!) dar. in kind lo Australia'* pre—-nt In half an hour they scored determined concentration. •MM them and again't ... ,. D _J.I bowl.:. ihai whki. WmtmmmWmntmt they had faced in the first Innings. After tea. the Weal Indies had leelma tinthe reward for their long d rawn urn. BOUTS Wr1 In ihe Bald. Worrell prooowling in the winching heat and voked in Harvey a marked tendto-day cold wind couldnot enllvemy to swing his bat just outiri.i naBSMllsg, Mde the off stump. Harvey scores Alter half an hour the batsmen many brilliant aquaredrlvea anci began lo venture scuilng struk** iquareeula from thli standpoint „nd Thorns drove Gomez with and Worrell working up log real fair deciaum while McDonald on Pc. twice got that extm tin Worrell foi two delicate long which snrcatenod the edfr oi down tu BM leg. Watt ^V\£^^ !" 7r7ri&Jr^ they pushed the J2-2J* ." X>d outSsin i niona with ..iHd^n ranidiirf challenge. He waned OUt • %  >"> and this time did find the edge ..rid C, in lien made the catch. Haisight. Three for 152. I iiui'ii \ PKESEVTAl lO\ of Last Week PHOSFERINE for a new appetite! ir fn m ff wr r ^' -'-g — TT "t run- !" n. it mat r* thK IttlSFPHIX* ian .nui von need 1 !• raa-r* imiml ~\ run k*a MM A ARTHTJR prtMOb the Advocate Challeuit Cap W Vi.-a Weak**, Oaptam at Baatara (wa. 10bl-N eompeUUoai at the plantation of Cnpa at the Oair-aon Bavaiinali y"t*rt- aftarn' AUo in th. pleinra ara Mr. K D O Fro-t aMrcUry of tke Polo dob jbaiwe and Mr. VMko) and three other m*mt>*T" of Bnaterv team. M Artbui nRei. John Marah and Keith Melville and after 45 mii^ites. tuns on the board. At ihis %  Bam Atkinson hi I U.' .,„ 7 m „„ ,•* who h.d jnrsfa, srsr.-' IKIW or) live aver* for 11 runs T . L.. —X._^_ i Busters Presented Witli Advocate Challenge Cup iwied live overs for 13 runs I raw Page 1 i. II nakwd to the econriM .i Dgp hasM UH ureaoiui yBari oi mIhil vengeance will nut fall on BjrttaJa ukine. To vast MoM n • olonial leintory Britain has ^JS*1!L V5 ilnae hto'lonaTarmg and gaveu, o'nV | much turn but his direc-_ ,.* ._.--,.,„_. lhB „_,„ two Hue drives H-along the ground. uked by delivery variations length as if he were feeling for w apot that would moai Maiden Oven* Atkinson still bowled on the wicket and allowed only an oc,,m ?.asiona| single so that the P00I ing was almost ceased, whl Hamadhin engaged in hU du AKTKR a Praentatfun Polo Match at the c;arrlson veslnduv. Bustrrs, this season's Pln Cup winners, weiv Arthur, wife of the r oi I-1 erf tha Btftado. ftto Club "2L t£Hm?2 JSSL u. Two other Cups. Ih. 11 Wanm Bolton t hdDenga Cup J lv , n mrunV undfT llW rh ev and thr Y. D 1 Lima Cup were presented to Busters anil pjiva brought medical care and BrorM kg the most Roals. education. They have brought tha easa oi the Demlujai M darkDaamg aj the ears Of m wan afcao^i But if Britain leaeaa. daifaM ..HI .omc >woopiug back. All Ihnt has l>een domwill be brought and Britain will ean just reproaches abQtl BTVM they hav^ l>e%  ,'ext "over*"?.! ^2 mflid !" "">"•I "^ "performed "might.aaaaon jn this tournanant Lad ml ,,Cn • sweeps and tremendous pulls., ...mng learn, like ..II the oth<. that twisted him in knot*—all played a fast game lo beat Bronlet Was distributed to ruin Ba.uariam will i "TiVr. wWhOUl conUcUng the ball. Picos tod make n.. -i .m.. ng Huteams t balance m >>nly gam though once he shaded his eyea aeaaoni Cup Wlm Toa learns ti.kmg part in the bitterly ih. and peered into the distance from The usual Bust V. cotnoaUttOti ptoplai a Sitting DOalUon to look for the Weeke. lC.pl I, K. M.lvillr. A. MsnUaara: VOCO Deiilie (capt.l ball which had been for some Arthur and M. Parker, but on a l*e Deam. J. Hansehell and O. H. FMrty years agoii was moved in Guillen's hands. John M .rsh acted Johnson t>y enthusiasm for M pim Miller is one of those rare as ^ubstilute and greallv assailed Bangera: CiH Michelin (capt.1. -trengthen and nolidlfy the Hrlli-h players who Is convinced that tha team. „„.., cricket Is a game. Incld. The Tournament ivlth the batsman. His third over between foolery and gaiety it ITh,l which contained several balls a game that he plays yery entertainment far those who avuilturning shortly was also a maid*'H ,,1S ncxl tho ^ was tour. ,.,, ,hrmelve nf the oapoi en aEDonaBl watching the bail swept off Gomez with grind %  > •• „f wa tchina the matches; although bat. but once losing sfcfM " J* tha flva gOais f<>> rOrts, l'..rliiim.-nt Ihough the Emjure ~ at c*f>l. Michelin who scored two for policy showing and ware at least showarT Ing careful if somewhat tlumy defence. At last McDonald hfl %  I hin pa^t point for three. Obviously inA i The lunch score was McDonald now faced with a bht )ob. not out 15, Thorns not out 2, soon loday as we had belore. in dorad. Alih. extras 1. total—no wickets for 42. the Second Tost here, a glimpao —^ impruy,.,,,,.,,, „, uip nlavuip uf Australian Te-1 Cricket IB rf ^^ Joinof, Who had boOsTpeoFeuturelesA Calm its traditional form. moted. the striking positioning e event broke the featureless Miller aeemed lucky to gtt calm of Iba nfteniui>n and that away with the l.b.w. appeal happened early. In attempting 48 but two balls later, Valentine to pull Worrell. Thorns trod on turned one widely across Hashis Bvickct and WU tJius owl for goU'i bat and Wckrell look n slip 28. and the total wat ooa f"r 55. catch. Hassett 4. Miller not aul Hassett then ventured on to the 4 9( Extras five. Total four for ai scene and took hi stand quietly 2 i6. At this point, with 25 mlnl gnd m the course t>f ules rffma | n ing for play, t! the next hour sndnhalf all the mrn upp Oeataj b lUJla ,rf „ho.r. were drop,,,,,,' I nra alch. Now 254 on with six W-K 1.%  '.,11. they arin caU forth an Al *" enormous Fourth Innings < Boti Somnnlent Crowd from the Wo-t Indies if the fhe dfternoon was overcast, lilgllisalj are to win. Rui. tlKcrowd was somnolent, anrf tho game Is assuntl of I ihe game settlwl down to some„„(,. on Monday which |l a inlthing near monotony, but the h( no ||dav—Australia Day—with moved ahead with slnsles Inp r(M sequent benefit to tourists and boundaries, taken against nnantP . And the end Is by %  % %  **• %  !" B P M means certain \f' trd had used. He had been t Itictseo for his one slip to his Tnr < ie<1TVt : boilers and no*>idy e*ao Ihaa 30 yards to the „ wicket StoUmeycT was doing T..II. b OM ... precisely the name thing and the iiu~tt • %  a ia ( iui-n. fa roWlbJ were the same StlhTr ftsT !" Wan*n M Don Id roachod Idi 50 by Hii|c e Q„ mr ., b Wu ,„n sweeping Ramadhin for four, and n— >ii c s*>mne*T b Ow w Hassett brought up the hunundwaii c Keith IX-ane. W Cham Bnini* Fi-. •. Busier^: V. Weekes (OBpt), K A. Arthur and M. Farkei who was involved fan a minor K ii nig Bronco's first match oat place was taken 1" John Marsh. The twn teams taking part U yesterday's match *.n-Km Deem %  ; ; Bluea; ltd Vletoi Weeke. Col. Michelin, Keith Deane and \Daana Rada %  Good Floyers TBa "iits'.andlng playei oi th mr.trh were I^e Deane who p en fOd Bridshaw "and bnptra by building a teal and i iihix ..| stito'tuif lifti tin %  ton Of the U.S.A. Our m.asui. of nieces* hua been Miiall. And 1 that i only another way of sav,ni .< devastating measure ot failure Is giving; us u sense of .diet fiustrauoo. Never in my lifelong campaignng lor the cause of Ihe Brnl>ire |um I round It PB hnpeleai a task 1 it credible that a nation can't v.atch the greatest of then l .FT mis rrumblmg and the t their wealth pawing to other hands with no feeling except perhaps a faint and monetary li realUonT It nhould ha In i but It inav ba line Hut there is a gleam of hope. Hrltain is now being given anothi Icy play i part in their wat lt*l~nn b O r Wn-k.ii li Wofll |S|,|| v I.I l-.-.l.c. %  I -M spt.l AostralU-s IM SBaafanl %  "• i Miller AUSTHA1.IA .1 ii RnmndhlTi %  %  Mole not fill Tr.i ffM i BOB M th.BtUoil and V. Weekes and M. lion resulta Just because th Id. i ill who each scored .'in'. LaO Hrltlsh public refused to take nni -ik good advanlage of Interest In lmjM>rla1 affairs, from hitaOBI matea and Ovai many el.vlion campaign' %  ,te. in Ihe past, however, that part. Beds scored in the firs! chufcha >s pladgOd to tha Empir--. They when Lag Dene rollow.ii II i %  %  nilnllad thel •1 hit from a team mate .owl i-e. This time will u* nd chukka, i -.• % %  "'" %  '•>••'' iie.ige Desna acored two and Vktoi n-'giect and ignore t I Daane one. • W *ff '; Th.Blues started off the third P^g wt "•* chukka very fast and Col. Michelin yetting his accuracy to dash, was able lo leora two to put Blues in %  favourable poaUhxa. Tlie score was now thtee-two. Bluet i urth rhukka. Bl unuad the tpuitad phi h id begun In the pravloul chukka Urging hr. hi'i %  • %  to th. fronl gnd pntw I from hilling the ball well. He v pbki to tn They entlkka I" draw thing-, n.nre u,. even. Beds, howevii. were -till BUUddc | with the score four three, i.odtes i.ee Daa n a mansBsd to icari British rigM and early In the last chukka. but after havs baon gl that goal there was an even tussle %  pace and an with Blue-: fighting hind though Tory Oovarnasant mutt carry < they were now getting tired. They it ta-k of national irvlval. riable to score again. aBSjaM paaa *M nut tl the h"H>"in| t \ ,i Jur -It" •W"l"k r..uia ww*n Ail lh*M -•• k l. .41.1-. T.i-.r • laNtU WS < %  mibar vwi e*u OePtWi u k'o r • fa*ip"i aaM Win be iMrfk'i nerhr He k*wm a wWlrl rrand Uuaa *"* %  h*i*iii WMei uwiiii far* rranv KIU* (rtsad Htwrnaii Marahall • r1n*n (ii %  >( %  I M. i MI aawl .i MOBM galars . i Masaktj beSBM %  ., itilr.ii> •aonsored by J & R BAKERIES makers of ENRICHED BREAD and thr blenders of J & R RUM OAV'/*'SlO'/iV-'*'.V/>'jVvV/ THE GREATEST OF ALL TONICS far Otfe %  asss*. BSaaaBy, ladlsssassa, SH*pl#fifs. aflrr Influrnia Tho Only Pain Reliever containing Vitamin Bi If *ou are lufftring from %  Cold, %  Man last i You aril bt ihe d a. Y. V t| led iver %  u mutu I RIIIEVES TOUa PAIN and *£ %  • •( i/n T" "^*T*^ There's nothing HEADACHES ( . < i ITI It's ihe NERVE PAINS J2R1 ^ i"-'" r "" v COLDS. CHILIS s sasa n, i C i ..i reufi Ii •upoly i^ .•. S^ 1 SK[ y,: i'*owu IATIC CTO DAI fhart ibe and RIUUTAAT1C ielr pmi % %  I will the Tory r the laa t nighty leafllrmatio.i .if the imperial destinv They ahouhl be de.iii.ited to awakening in the masses a rtrength their former pnde and obligation of their duties ...loni'l r.n-e ...id tarn II to then paopla Bui Inari ai I.i new < ruSUde. Brtli %  TSw'nU" vJJ\ PAINS %  **v to gn quick re• Jflerty Thev braathlng unity. T '-*#'*'#'*'-'.*.''*'-*'*'"•*'****'**•**'**'''*'*'*'*• STOMACH PAINS DUE TO INDIGESTION cj*rr-s. If TOO lW"t Ml S1T)MA(.1I PAINS. FLATLIJiNCB. Una, h^nord lormuU V %  VvX>K> i %>^ %  11 slso availahk -^ yon I ABLET form. MACLEAN BRAND Stomach Powder , Mtl |, L M.B.MEYERS, SOLE AOENIJ Baibados. Bridgetown, j %  %  jt.t POUND 0*l. TIM! Something "EXTRA for your money EXTRA MOTOR OIL 1 Extra Protection Extra Oil Economy Extra Engine Cleanliness | s.T*S^Sl*# 2*# ***** Z v.*-* **~*#~^% THERE'S LOTS t& LOTS t& LOTS OF WALK-OVER MODEL DELUXE SHOES YOU CAN RELY ON THEM DURABILITY • RELIABILITY ^ DEPENDABILITY k ^ No Wonder Why. Monlh Alter Month Sales ar e All Tim e* HIGH DA COSTA & CO.. LTD. • CAVE. SHEPHERD & CO.. LTD. \ J. FREDERICK CAMERON The Aqenl oi Yesterday . %  To-day and To-morrow REPRESENTING KINGSWAY Woollen, ol SB Forever. % ^



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SI SOW J UflJABI 27. IM2 -.1 \ii\Y U> I'M.I -.IMN \\ hat's Cooking In ThKitchen SEWING CIRCLE n rtwv NOLAN WELL PLANNED YOKES add interest to many styles. The hon.. .11 Hnd that yokes offer a fertile field ukc|1 tuT rav 0 i, sometimes and You Need Charm to Titan about Jown 1 %  %eek recipe* (or gno< '. for ho talents. Of HMMMJ n >' form of designing is also n ev are %  farm of art but all of us have some art talent and even %  latent will grow with practice biflhtai Study f annum picture,.i fw Trj drawing smie of these yokes on copies or your basic pattern. Achieving exactly the sain* proportions as the picture your are copying may not be ca*> nt ftrst but keep trying Figure 1 Show* • n*ind yoke. Notice that this yoke the tip of the shoulder or where the shoulder seam meets the sleeve scam. The lowest point oi yoke curve Is just above the ilrst twb m& M Unolnll, Workfor a Princess j g^^. JAGUAR. By SUSAN DEACON lii.W .ndbu Uiame." >|uote 1"' 1,1... ; ... l..\ '.* i Th ikjout Cook the slice* of meat in some AND~ H ARDWOHKING In Mi butter Ml nee it and add to it peake'* \ mt \ job. researching for 2 tablespoons!ul of bo.led spinach X he Conservative Central O trice, (quite dry), 1 tablespoenful of sni worked extremely hard and grated cheese, one en **>"* %  never minded staying late." Figuie 3 Hart* -lice of ham minced. I teaspoonin the shoulder '" %  ( ltum and • un D of nul You "**** TACT "'!. WCC A '" of the "'! laccord.im U taste). Mix all research was nop secret .so M.sa ,? with a wooden spoon. Now prePeake u used to "not talking the dough Sift the , of You need CHARM. An ea-colFrom the position ndcrarm darts in the picture you ee that the lowest point of UCSY icrning a Job whfc h n i> -W i nagers last only three nonUM. is 28-....rdrink, beer an.i ,ider. aae, we old Iris Peaka, ilnuMi .N'^-^wTh MR fo. Uds isklnc I I "\ *•*" North, and new temporary ladyw.MM. The, ">"-> '"" JT ling to Princes* Marg..r. i thirt wine to <*£" !" w V !" : It .s.JobmortgIrUv.111 cm,. 1. tk*. HAIIMFL'L. A docto. What QU.llflc.Uon. are needed sv^ ^ ^^^ „ A LITTLE SHORTHAND MM would eonttsn only just over nine JAG UAH XKI2". Mk \ II BM Peake-) speed was 120 when he fm cent of aiciml. which The Jaguar i. now in Baroao luushed naming ten veert ago. wouldn't haim .my child • | the moi. KFFlCIFN-l s. luethini; Warmer For The leatures to note In • Men rypa KR one that HWI -. new pHiv.ic produ -l. 1 ikl new or untne.i inv. a blend .1 kn-wn and pre,. rcntottg w imiw M eieai to tan designs of the high^t Tint Rtm what "id MM brought about the but eo f so unparalleled an i than nylon and be defin. | %  an F-ninnc that onv. < for those preferring U I . Ask to M•WUt the ih.t" Mo You need :,ned and mane *rees There • the slightest MM vou cant JCC n S able Mr, lldred Wntkins (PI ouae v thai placed July each from %  the kitchen table. and the Add league of attractive glil li Peake li ear] !" %  : mm i* about level with ,,0,lr ol hust point. Tiy skeUhmg ie iw %  — T. —:~ >T 1 ui, r %  • | S on as before to £ £ %  e. one tijbWpotjJh.l ^ R A ^^ in fc / obtain the lines most becoming of water and i, P m,n ,,( ^j' "^ her father's constituency says to vou. When vou have cut the the dough until M.ft and dtvirf. ^ JJ JJ mU( h ^^^ ( aM „„ l button On your basic bodice yoke pattern from the bodice Into ,wo J^'". *i! JJ5 i'ou ""-W 1 "' •* %  %  >Wa ,l1 on your pattern and pin u bade darts then hold th inches between each. \\ ifgXDMi \t UM DRIM M"UE IJl'HK. ndBrfun Mr Pavirl CrOHCH, Of Hk I Slieert onh .t taste a'ld %  %  %  makes not MM elvel lluef n-.him.il J.:ia BMN UM Her >our p.ttern on you in front of your mirror with the neckline turned back to form the lapels. When you are sure you have the button in the proper location unpin the darts so the pattern will lay from lhe nr „ t wnirn mc i u iUt and draw In a gentle curve (rom the shoulder tip to point about an half inch above the first button. Work over the < urve until it i* smooth, then repin darts and try before your >n lap and facing ~. voke This yoke U also vei • Ugh does not get a when tucked This may On the first sheet put the mixture be done in two dlSerent way*, in small heaps a* big vou may tuck section of cloth leaving two and then cut its outlines by your yoke pattern or you may crease tucks in another piece of paper and cut another yoke pattern includes the tOCks. The last method necessitates marking the tucks accurately before stitching. Mi of eg*r)gtt* the underarm iour basic. The possible you. Cut the pattern %  parl -.n designs are numerous. Cover ith •• %  ** %  the curve and add *cam allowThe best method for stitch tog douin atld press between Mft of anc* toTooth cdgMV most 1 W I '" 'f" ">der the th e agnolotli. Cut with a knife TV voki In Slurc 2 start* at yoke seam and lap the yoke over ^ you haV e dipped in flour ieM .. Si Tl.-voke the bailee seam. Base carefully lgno iotti (like Irtue suaies) huytn ihe wine waiters In Lonkimono lee\e • ^^ (ho ml „ lure ls ^f^iy hut h-irdressers say: -Deflidtely ucs." .nsi.le by pressing with your nnTO-DAY girls start growing up %  %  ger all nAind each of them. Put when they are 12 to 14. At 10. I n. rrdmbo I" start her new lob.' U Ml No. She says: "I am bapiu f,mg] pern Wai only %  /• new clothes. Probablif not now la^t ;i> long as a pre-' c] %  i %  bow *lll be in the Iron Aiioy. %  ..,,,. Man %  i ever DM MOjgl %  the MR To-dnv's Youn|i>lers Arc Older children growing up more these days* The shop Children "Children don't experience phy, aajl Mid M soon as i'. PRK-WAR. Ha > did : SboUln. 'throw L agnolotli u. afull-lc.ngih dress until they the water and let them boil for 10 •* %  —— ^gsana_j >..i.i.ri I~.! "i. tan years Ihe point on curvMJ % %  • .'.I %  ... %  [ront the yoki point of UM v Hr step ii to esUblUh the neckUn£ Twn SUM from the underttm gM^rtotrt and sketch In the ing et they prefer i om( tilll | c l(U ,i or anr | grate chceoo M( (IK M. troaa waft b-refootod on ^ % %  M"g p on tham in either ways they the underarm seam leum and stand In howlm u ,^, serve hot u t to become draughts rather than put these An<) now bm ra y ^ip,. for At tho centra gnrments on. They can pla.ur — ^ their fingers with an ^ealve i>ecklinc. The mixture of congealed inarnwlad. %  leaf mould and p-tor paint and !ne task requlriiiiuh— such a il i%  biscuit but fi ardTor ptayfashioned French BISCUIT. HA1HDI KS^I '' %  rnjm want a MR, i %  P jo-.king wave trill they ask foi only a 'light' perm, which ohvi0Uly will not last o long At the prices they charge for n K im these day* 1 Ihink it should both natural and lasting |i.i-sii.i: \ Noon : I'rni.." PRINCftSfl Al-EXANDHIA i* u< IS. now taller than her cousiniprlneees Eliral-eth and Margaret 1 SAW DM with h. t.ie Duchess of Kent, in Mr. Nori .an HartnclU showrnom recently, having a fitting for a port' have a far dreys. , •tsTMs. -• %  -5RS." ..rr^';v; M "j'i jyssnj i?. ss s raja. '"^ '.eo i xiepti..nal smoothneas, with UM J.'guar XK'. The JAOCAR MkVlI I .,! ChOMM Uarage HI ttoa i. of 2o colours. Wag* in to see . .s you tortoi noU the wonueriul br.iKiug M U-m the DtWI ..-ted Qirbng Maf aujusting liydtaula 1 interior of the Jaguar I -.upcib, with flnuat i|ual.'> k .it her upholstery over foam rubbar, polished walnut htotrumont |>aiivl and Owl* pUj < i thick felt underlay And finally, not the Mogl th>' Jaguar MSuations, is IM MWVtl UMrt the p.i"' can be alow as It Is. A-l.-l %  poctum right DOW H r i rug PMB Bf %  MM %  %  kiininn toJMMi iinka and scl „. a — only 3b. %  %  I quite soon to MM What uuiy boaullful ttand lama's on Broad Street. When I tell %'-i that it's ivm from iu.ii.ttui Mid %  I MII Kl.sk'. Win. Pttd pro) ok pMJ %  %  Hnd '*>e lti.ie.hhh rCn and lOVCiii Fruit An.i goal pass by tho framed Wall Plaque, for Junior %  bodroon I .!i. Hti'ori( end see The Duchess buys some ,He„m(U" Piincess's day clothes IMM eg o'( U." at 1 Ia>nd i Savoy Kiscuil A hairdresser says: — •They frequently have 11 Is %  %  nn-h More that) H lad) h -waiting first g< hen 13 to UM store and ssks for so> BJOM | Ml oni sigiv ore DWRV and UM sol Pll IM W . -.. At the II %  Wl ',OM k l • I ttuoK new and I holding Cotton Bl i dig valua snd si Suiting lines. UiMlItt WiCKtetlin Pll %  < %  IM in .ittractive plain 36 ins wid.v An entirely ii<- havt %  Hankie: the : lf Yonto, B^M*!** mirror until you achieve lug the P !" ^ Rurkertdse. r. s .ir nl' T Hour; 2 YOUll BABY AND YOU turn punwr. or J { .. i„Li.... l't ,hr dl (HM "l ^_ Mix the 5 yolks of the eggs \ '" >k_ .......> ...... tuvii unll (or ,il the sugar UK) he.it waU for BbOUl B, ,: ''" lllm(U .s imtll -hev look JJ2Z* WIllC. twenty anft. aa?RAaf aa."3&s' Add QU H">ur and the cornflour vary slowly and mix well. Add (Bv SISTER CHARLOTTE) SO Ul w, have dealt With snme j^JE !" ^^ S ori .n K e >r" lemon rind vanilla essence. Tl.cn l*:.\ Bt until Ihcy are (ar* of leiiic and u'alcr. A WINE WA1TKU >ayi:,.,'( „,.,!, II.. I I make for your baby, and shall of your baby. vour bahv. .. .. .. white, of the cgK, until they are Most mothors-to.be 1 And. and certainly those expect„,„ „„ rt M lhf „, h „ 5* c i ILL. 1,1.0 In lmnvv tinsymptoms o( commixture. Put In a enke tin with I their first babies like to Know t^ m i ... h tanlm ,„ auv „ wl „ an hour mi: their first DaDies. ^ 0 """".'.'(l ,,,.,'that odd pains ry hlah bonier, lc.u. .t will menrtncUbour especially in view nt the fac-lina ou H j- ^ ^ ^ which are not labour pains—are liable lo be felt dunm, j—j^ i^ f ,„„„„,„„ ,„„ tho last tWO or 'hree weeka. a an acHBW moderate oven for about ', g rwBs*s or S^HHsSS SSs n %  ''hen nrr lolnl away.-• 5 %  V rJTZ*. ^around, but HM AWFU CH.lt>— irrlval. If you ,,ff aiui notlDoctor. It is bet'or In Pie ltl Canadian Column nm.mm.mm FISH IIAKVI.ST •y^jBJflB SSS Canada has one of the foremost .A. | >_ n i aufKn hi|. %  *-••* "" fisheries expel nnenti.l laboratur„„.. Rationing herles in the world with the com( off lillllul ni ,, h off been pletlon In Halifax. N.B., of th fl assault, the Sioux trsnsnovated and expanded auarurs 1lirrmA tt ^^f ,rf rive to a South rub %  '" i< the Atlantic rwi mental Station of the Fisheric very economic and R.^^,,,^ Board of Canada, the It was given (the Apartment of Flthertos nnnounc I M iiiir'ustikablc |1 iimi ,hnt a period-like pain will bcg>n ,ow '" tho b c fc working s of the womb to the front or. if MM are relaxed you may feel them beKinnitut in the womb and goinj; .lownw.'rda directly. These pain* will start. Increase In strength md then quite rapidly die sway. Than another pain will do pre• %  isely the same. As time goes on Ihev" will increase *'dh fretiuency •-' regular inteiv.d*. As soon as you think thr-T these regular pains have commenced vou should le* rour I' 101 M now. There %  no need to become anxious or alarmed. Nor need you go to bed. It || much better t he up and ..bout arranging the last minute details to your things. which Italy in 1&*11in ope of the i popular magannes in 1919 an I name from that dale .. t • ial>i*tp*<>nM>ii I taMw-paor.ful i rii Other sign* generally fnll' iftt* the rvthmic pall... ..,ur before, ar. a shght JCUJ S pegiod-Uke loss and a sudden rush of lh v-on but somefcu.%  F.igiuh pouaa I V-..I I f Sift the Hour on the kitchei table or thu pastry board like fountain. In the middle put pinch of salt. 2 tablespoonslul MMH I eggs. I tabl. butter. 3 big English potato*'. (boiled and mashed) and . bit lemon rind (grated). Mix tie ve.ist in UtUe water 'two tabli spoonsful) and add to the mixtur. W*jrk UM dougn Put it in do not be alarmed, try en with high border and 1completely, as in doing in a warm spot lor about tara tl aid the muscles which hours. Bake it in a moderate ov-i for about * of an hour. When d expelling the cotltMIU ready take it out of the oven and omb. l,t some icing sugar on the top DAaNC'fc '.' MET — dost }lf*M tbarrt..Mil lee cream Hit T Long recognized as one of the leading fisheries research nation* Canada has seven station* from Newfoundland to British Columbia engaged in full-time biol'.gieal and technological studies Into Canada's commercial fisheries. This year theso fisheries are exiiet'ed to havt. %  marketed %-alu o| iMtrly 9SOb,OOO.0O0 "SIOUX"' AIDS I'.l M l l On Board HMCS Sioux, at a UN Ur*! N'sval Base In Japan (delayed) • put to' Tn() t ', M dlan destroyer played Km H ul , an active part r.cently in the rel ""' %  ,u, capture from the Rods ol in tsUi d off the west coast of North Korea and :n tba MM ol c.vil. II UN nghUng men wouruk-d In Hi %  druggie for tlM ULand ferred a party erf nve to Korean minesweeper with Instruetlons to ascertain the progn-ss ot :he tlghtinn CloasMJ the island under covei of darkness the mlnaawaeper %  (-.tted two Junks and. at U.e bas, f. %  party ol lefugaa. and UN troops They learned that the bland had f.illen iOd party on the shore * %  •" hopefuii* %  roeeue, while i Md l.v a small rear-guard at the : a Ol tta lifT i i, t.i the juiikt was loaded with refugees and this the minesweeper towed to a nearby sweeuer returnet with four mall SMIW pans Which, With Ihen sh '11' draft. eOUld k" "Rhl m to beach. rurt] per* a ||kt| mil %  • I eight wounded two women and a baby. asffjr/ IMPROVED ODEX SOAP O Cell skin really clean O Bmiirin ptttpifalion odour LMHI My sweel and dainty AVOID 0FFENDINC-USE_Op_EX maidenjbrm Uaidh m le StrapJi • %  > !ra ieoa roan caT l>ro ie \I .'d. -i-Ue %  ful under 1' ireihouldeted >• ktarl • %  1 imnr li iili' i li^tii boo port | In wbjl U HrYOT' lie Id., I 1 .,1 V.n.i.. ,. li... .. NBBBBI 'V-W ^ I., I HARD TIMES WITH BACKACHE OfWi AM to AiggM kMnr •cOBSf I Il-H ISN(rr wgood when voo 1 art troubled wtdi bsckacba, iheomjttc pain*, inff. scbiag %  osde. sivf jauin, lumbago or common urinary diioiden due M iluggiih kidney acaoa. t Why put up with pain and dls>ben '"i migbi ger hinpf t-hci ev tailing Ouao'i Hi.Ka.'lM Kidney Pill*. They Mimubmind dearie duggin"i kidoeyi and n>. the blood ,.i . em MM Ida mi>4 other impur tMe BMlen f>n'i Pills hare helped many (houMnds | let then heir vou. I^J-DOANS ^ THE EXCITING Ntm \H FABRICS IS HIGH FASHION labour •" nou^ • '-""'~„VVoTo"lM• m.i.l,." prinUno\7 aSafafouM indbvpUe* foods txt)B to thaaarUy rlroi j womtn of today.' i'..--i.iii(icP rinuat tubmi RDVtsat... cool, comfortably li R hi in.l I wearinu SM your own from "Tex-made" prii. You will get thai pHmlw diatinction of a "T, %  •dt" fabric drww ... in a amart combination at high f.iahion an



Oe ray

Sunday Adbocate



ESTABLISHED 1895

Barbados In Good

Homesters All



Out For 337

Jamaica Reply With 109]5 |

SCORING 337 for all by tea time yesterday, Barbados |

gaye Jamaica 427 runs to get

for victory with two days still |

to go, and by close of play at 5.25 when Binns was granted |
an appeal for light, had claimed five of their second innings ,

wickets for 109 runs.

|

The loss of five wickets in 85 minutes came as a surprise |
following a very auspicious start by openers John Prescod |

and Denis Thorbourn who added 44 for the first wicket in
35 minutes as they proceeded to treat severely the Barbados
opening pacemen Frank King and H. Barker.

Milk Glut In
Georgetown

(From Our Own Correspond



26.

GEORGETOWN, B.G., Jan.
Gallons of milk are being
thrown down the drains of

Georgetown daily during the past
month, following an alarming glut
of fresh milk here. Officials be-
lieve the glut to be due to increas-
ed prices given producers which
caused them to step-up supplies
and also that following the rice
reaping, the land is now covered
with grass where the cows fatten
and produce more.

It was further disclosed that
some dairy farmers are depriving
calves of milk to sell to the Con-
trol Board. The Governor has
issued instructions to provide all
institutions with fresh milk where

The rout started when Barker |
after conceding 17 runs in 3 overs |
hit Thorbourn with one and was
upheld in his appeal for leg
before. Prescod followed with
the score at 57, and after a third|
wicket partnership of 32 between
Neville Bonitto and McLeod, C.
B. Williams claimed three cheap
wickets in consecutive overs,
two in his last of the day.

Farmer who scored 275 in his
first iNnings of the first match,
completed another century yes-
terday when he scored 107, Tail-
enders Horace King and Clair-
monte DePeiza in an enterpris-
ing knock, helped to boost the
Baibados total from 313 to 330.
King meade 19 including 4 bound-
aries and DePeiza_ scored 16
including three boundaries.

A Maiden
Hunte (76) and Farmer (18)
resumed the Barbados second
innings with the score standing
at i+1 for the loss of two wickets.















eee

BARBADOS, JANUARY 27, 9

Positics





TAYLOR CAUGHT,



BINNS makes a confident |
appeal and Charlie Taylor is |

| WICKET-KEEPER ALFIE
out for a “duck” caught be-

Red Delegate “Indo-China,






7 hind the wicket. The other

powdered milk was formerly sup-] Miller bowled the first over from oer ey Bi F s “ . Pa

plied and arrangements are being}|the s:reen end and sent down a oo ig or oe eerie pie urma: ext

made to increase free supplies to} maiden to Hunte. Farmer took ‘ . ss ; :

school children, orphanages and]a single off Goodridge’s over to H B |

charitable institutions point. In the third over of the 1s rite 1es ‘ . a + . e¢ argets
Milk Control authorities declare i s cf ied see me ~— PANMUNJOM, Jan.’ 26 I RENCH TROOPS

that to reduce the price would hire ie very to sen up —f o. Sars aes : PARIS, J ‘

; ; 4 jew OW s st < ricket- United States Rear Admiral R. » Jan, 26.
reverse the situation, as the dairy ‘who snicked the last and wicket ; tates F ‘ t ck —
farmers’ GAeoine would be cut andj keeper Binns held the catch. E. Libby, angrily _told the _Com- PA TROL TUNIS oe ee eee
as before the zeal to supply will Hunte did not add to his over- munist truce delegate he was get- - “ bagartate ia Yeiect ‘ ’ " nd a
be lessened. Milk is now being|night score of 76 which included|ting a __ little too big for his STREETS . Se meek Ane ie
sold at 84 cents per gallon 12}9 boundaries and lasted for 145]britches.” Libby's heated denun- and Burma a8 their next target
cents per pint retail. In an effort! minutes, : } ciation of North Korean Maj. Gen- TUNIS, Jan. 26. Pe au a conquest. Nationali 1
to use some of the excess milk, The total was 143 and Boogles eral Lee Sand Cho, came during \ Heavily reinforced French troops iinese de egate T. F. Tsiang
a Government pilot plant is manu- Williams joined Farmer who Ci an angry exchange in the Armis-fand polce patrolled the streets of | *? aking before the Us N. main
facturing a limited supply of]@ couple to mid wicket aff Go -|tice Sub-Committee on war pris-]Tynisia breaking up crowds and Folitical Committee urged the
butter, ghee and cream and a) Tidge to make his score 22, oners - arresting suspects following the 11 United Nations to halt this “mad
cable has been desvatched to} Farmer singled wide of mid on| Libby told Lee “United Nations] qays of Nationalist uprisings inj ®@vemture” on the China main-
Trinidad for equipment to expand |‘ ff Goodridge and Williams broke

butter production i

Admiral Carney Ta
Confer With Top |
French Officials |



t

NAPLES, Jan. 26. |

| 5
uk Ritts? RORY Barn

his duck with an easy single to
cover. He later sent the total to
151 in 157 minutes with a drive
to the extra cover boundary and
then singled with a cut to point.
Goodridge’s next over yielded two
singles.

Farmer got a couple to mid
wicket off Miller and then glanc-
ed for a_ single. Williams en-
tered double figures with a
boundary to square leg off the
last from Miller, Farmer turned
one from ie to fine leg

Commander-in-Chief of the Allied/for a couple and then got a

forces in Southern Europe will |
leave his Naples headquarters by
air Monday to confer with top
French officials in North Africa.
His itinerary called for stops in



|the last.

boundary through the slips.

Miller continued from the
sereen end and Williams got an}
easy single to mid wicket.:
Farmer then singled to cover off
The batsmen took three |

Algeria and French Morocco and ‘singles off Goodridge’s next over.

did not include Tunisia.

He is also expected to visit
American airfields in the sector.
—vU..P



Sir John Saint To
Represent Island
In Industry Talks

His Excellency the Governor
has nominated Sir John Saint, Kt.,
C.M.G., O.B.E., as the Barbados
representative at the Conference
for Industrial Developmené which
is being convened by the Carib-
bean Commission in Puerto Rico
from the 11th to 20th February,
1952. The Honourable K. R. Hunte,
M.L.C., has also been nominated
by His Excellency to attend the
Conference as an Adviser

aby



Easy Single

Farmer got an easy single to
square leg off the second he re-
ceived from Miller and Williams
got another with a glance to deep
fine leg. Taking strike from
Goodridge he got a couple to
square leg, the only runs of the
over.

With the total at 177, Tulloch
replaced Miller at the screen end,
He bowled to Farmer who sin-
gled to extra cover off the second,
Williams then took two bound-
aries in succession with cover
drives to make his score 24.

Skipper Bonitto persisted with
Goodridge from the paviljon end
and Farmer got an_ easy single
wide of mid on. Williams also
singled to cover and later got
another off Tulloch to long on,

Mudie was now brought on in
place of Goodridge at the_pavil-
ion end. He bowled to Farmer
@ On Page 4

CARIEBEAN CRUISE

The American pleasure yacht “When and If” is tied up alongside the

Careenage where she is taking fuel

“When and If”, owned by Mrs.

George 8. Patton, widow of General Patton of the U.S., is on a Carib-

bean cruise.






Command is not here for the pur-
pose of satisfying you. Let that
be thoroughly understood. There
apparently is no limit whatso®ver
to your greed and to your rapacity

He








land. said the Asian Red con-
ference under the chairmanship of
Communist Chinese President
Mao Tze Tung recently laid out a
three pronged plin of expansion

vhich 69 persons have been killed
and more than 200 injured.
Troops arrived in the North
African French protector ite yes-
terday by sea, road and railroud as





Second Test

| Egyptian Students
Demand War With U.K.

CAIRO, Jan. 26,

Fifteen thousand Egyptian students marched on the
office of Premier Mustapha El Nahas Pasha shouting de-
mands that he declare war on Britain.
The United States ambassador, Jefferson Caffery is under-
stood to have launched an eleventh-hour mediation eftort to
prevent an open diplomatic break between Egypt and
Britain

Some Press reports said that the Egyptian Cabinet had
already decided to sever relations with London as a result
of yesterday’s Anglo-Egyptian battle in Ismailia



erved all mide |
{ a sous a ‘, a ay raps ar bs
ime prevented four pene, C@MUNISTS



) plane
| Farouk
) finally

ogit

from Cairo!
night, but

them to take

leaving
Airport, last
permitted
this morning,

Airport Authorities saig that in
{facilities would be extended to

LOSE 15 JETS
IN 7 DAYS

FIFTH AIR FORCE,

QUARTERS, Korea, Jan, 26

HEA)





A Fifth Air Force out of the Empire,
her the huge assets ‘4

Battalions” carrying rifles. Shouts to zero for the Allies, proved thir Malaya ig racked with banditry
of “Declare War Nahas” rang out Red jets still have not learned how and is sinking back to lawlessne

Students cried for vengeance for |t@ halt U.N. air operations oy er}from which she was rescued.
ithe deaths of at least 46 Egyptian North Korea Huge prensa m Persia ba

lice i > battle .w r i , | gone, @ypi is grabbing for the

poline “We ae ,warety « batiie- onih The Fifth Airforce announe™i|Sudan and Britain has offered to

that 15 Russian built MIG-~-15 relinquish control of the Suez

A late report from Cairo were shot down last week by F-“6]Ganal to internationel forces:

stated thet the Egyptian Army a : darted’

seized control of flaming riot-
torn Cairo on Saturday night
and the Ministry of Interior
said military law has been de
clared in Egypt to cope with
“organized revolution.” Cairo
has been put under a military
Governor General after day-
long rioting in which tens of
thousands of arsonists set fire
to American and British prop
erty and called for war with
Britain.

There has been no immedi-
ate clarification of the Minis
try of Interior's reference to
revolution. Premier Mustapha
El Nahas Pasha was named
Governor General and the
Government announced all
universities and schools closed
indefinitely. Rioting began
with demonstrations at schools,

was lost. It said UN did howeve
lose fighter bombers to Red ground
fire

The officer said the Fiftn Ai
force has had “quite a few week
in which no Sabre have been k
from MIG
battles this
numbered ar
and still destroyed
hot figure speaks for itself
to Red
| Thunde
| Star, They were shot down while
making low level attacks on Com-
} munist targets,

fire. He
week
high as
15

said “in
r

I
we wet rule
four to one
MIG jets
Lost
ground fire were 3 F-84
sand one F-80 Soooting



| The officer said “the four that
| we lost to groundfire were 50 per
cent, less than last week despite
the fact that enemy anti-aircraft



Bri¥ish aircraft.
Student demon Uons agains:
Britain sprang up all over Cairo ‘
aces” his * 16.000 stron ; spokesm \n | Burma is
parade. Prominent in the line of said the Communists in losin Came with
march were student “Liberation | Jet fighters in the past seven doys to painful build-up

Sabrejets while not one Allied : Egypt come many





PRICE: SIX CENTS

The British
Empire Must

Not Break Up

From Our Own Correspondent)

LONDON, Jan. 26,
Following is an article by
Lord Beaverbrook which will
appear in to-morrow’s Supday .
Express undg@ the heading/
“Do You Caré lf We Lose The
Empire?” It is timed as a
message to the British Empire
and Commonwealth peoples
just before a session of the
British Parliament.

The article begins: The
British Empire must not
break up.

But in the post-war period
enemies within and without
have inflicted startling calam-
ities upon the British Com-
monwealth and Empire.

Never in history has any great
empire sustained such blows of
adversity and with such frighten-
ing repetition. In six short year
Sovialists have undone much
york of splendid centuries,

India ts Out

India walks her own way alone

ot
the

possibly involving the U.S.A, in a
measure\outstripping British
lems.

yrob-

There is no doubt the Empire
is damaged. Great territories and
great industrial and commercial
asset ire dropping away to the
accompaniment of hoot nd jeer
from mobs inflamed with hatred

Nobody seems to care That is

the most incredible aspect of the
whole tragic situation. The great-
est and most promising bond of
human brotherhood thay the world
has even Known is under he ivy
fire, Rut the vublie here and
rbroad st twir shev' ers and
regard this cg@flamitous snvec‘acle
with indifference



Uxplanaioa
What is the explanation of this

and apparently there is no limit to for Communism in Asia pre. Was: AP ee ence taggering apathy’ It is due in
3 . 4 aon’, ohfliinds sia. - been encotntered.”—-U.P. stagge 5 apath) 5 cue

You Stree eo a ete oe ag os an Tsiang said Communists had] ritish troops in the Suez Canal Oe eee ita part to the indifference of the
Oe : as se coee tale to the Freneh bid picked Indo-China and Burma for}Zone city of Ismailia, yesterday, SNES ET IT British people. Poisoned by 50

Re en Carer ne earn ve , the “centres of military struggle i years of Socialist propaganda,
meeting to return all interned a Wwe Maile 1 were killed yester-| for the immediate future.” fre oo eae oman. re- Police Band To | multitudes in Britain are half
Allied civilians who “wished to|day—a daily low since the inde-| said Malaya and Indonesia were nebtea’ by the. peo-didvernthedt ; \ashamed of the Empire. Some of
return” after the Armistice but] pendence seeking Nationalists be-| named » pb .

“centres for economic
struggle» and that the mid-East-
ern Communists were to be urged
to join the Asia revolutionary co-
ordinating cammittee









Libby said there was no guaran-
tee “they will send anyone back,”

Communists handed over the
names of 48 North Korean Allied

gan their campaign of violence â„¢,
January 16 me
—U-P.



civilians now held behind their z He told the Committee that the
lines. They said these were all Roosevelt Will sk place to stop Mao’s expansion
held by their side. United Nations 1 aN 1 th s Cr

‘vy Bi . c é 3 ‘ plan “was not along re China
had asked for information on 57] [Â¥,> saa "Et fringe but on the mainland of
civilians. Longre 5S I oO Carteel China.” He said “this is the single

issue facing the United
toda

He asked the
condemn Russia

the 1945 Chine

Big Unknown Nations

In Tokyo Supreme United Na-
tions Commander General Ridg-
way told a Press conference, he
did not know what was going to

ludia’s Debt

NEW YORK, Jan
Congressional Representative

United Nations to
for violation of
e-Soviet friendship




happen to Panmunjom. He call- Franklin D. Roosevelt, JÂ¥nior, ane ae t sity ea ih thao the
ed the Truce Conference a “big|"0Unced on Saturday that he etter Uni ; a Soviet saitoh
unknown”. He said “negotiations | Plans to seek Congressional can- ae Oni eons ane * Ol See ae of
are extremely delicate, extremely |Ccllation of a $190,000,000 debt Saas . wate eT ss net gti country.’
dificult. We are doing the best}/™dia owes the U.S, for last year’s ing raat te Bed Ativan e at
we can under the circumstances, |@â„¢ersency wheat shipments. which ten Asiatic nations were

Roosevelt told an India League
America

Libby’s bitter outburst in the ' represented met in Peiping Octo-
oO







Prisoner Sub-Committee was pro- meeting: “India has}),.; 4 1951, He said: “Along the
voked by the Communist General |‘#ken two important steps down] whole frontier from Tibet in the
Lee’s refusal to answer his ques-|the long, hard road to economit| extreme west to Kwangsi and
tion as to whether Reds intend to] sufficiency and political stabilit¥.| Kwangtung in the southw , poli-
furiish the requested information| Democratic elections which thefticeal and military preparations
on 99,000 missing South Korean , Indian Government is now hold-| were made for further expansion.”

prisoners. ing for the first time in her his- UP.





; 1
Lee said “I am not satisfied with | tory well as the eagerness r
that answer” Libby said “I asked} which her leaders have shown in e
you General Lee a question. You]co-operating in the administration Derelict Off

gave me no answer. You have|jof our Point Four programme in-
the brazen effrontery to say I am
not satisfied with that answer”.
It seems to us that you are tting
a little too big for your britches.’

dicate clearly, that India, although
she may still be going through |
some economic and political grow-
ing pains promises to become a




Chacachacare





U.P. Poulwark of strength and stability} Two cablegrams received by
: ised on democracy in Asia, |the lo eee iaer oan best
a aste » . day « t
Man-in-the-Street —UP.|‘orday purported that a derelict
‘ sighted off Chacachacare eee
» oe ee . * ‘was believed t the schooner
Little Affected | Sutlin’s Negotiations | y2%4 M8 8s WON
, ; Mj ae i to be over a month overdue ol
By Nationalisation Going Ahead Well her voyage from Barbados tt

British Guiana,
But a later cablegram receive

TEHERAN, Jan. 26

Despite predictions of an early NASSAU, Jan



25,

man in the street has been little| Marks is expected to arrive sooa;ping Master was | left









Cinema, Gardening
Hints, Farm & Gar- |}
den |

terity policies
Government made efforts to
fiid other jobs for labour thrown



Japs Seek Trade



























d Fire! Fire!

; 4 ns . : , ~aused ambig because Demonstrators, set fire to the
and complete crackup of Iran’s William Butlin announced today | by him caused ambiguity ! De i

economy following the with-|that negotiations with Ljonei’ it seemed to state that the dere-|Brit'sh Overseas Airlines booking)
drawal of the British nine months} Marks, an American who holds an| lict which was sighted was the|centre here,

of nationalisation brought little if| option. on Butlin’s vacation vil- schooner Elody M. found ¢ 1p ized
any change in the standard of |lage, Grand Bahamas, were going|four miles off Chacac nt me
‘living of the average Iranian. The! quite satisfactorily. Island. The Harbour and Ship

uncertain |partly British
laffected by the loss of Anglo-|to confer with Butlin, Butlin is|whether the derelict that was the |the furniture, and started setting

Iranian Oil Company revenues. }lJeaving for Bermuda on Wednes-|Elody M. was what was thought|fire to the building. The demon-
Prices of such basic commodi- ; day oo will be returning to}to be the Zenith or whether there|strators also broke into the
ties as tea, sugar, bread, cotton, Nassau in March. From Bermuda] were two independent incidents. Metro Cinema owned by Metro-
goods either remained stational] he will be going to London to The first cablegram reaching|Goldwy-Mayer, smashed all the
or thave risen not more than five} attend an annual reunion at \the Harbour and Shipping Master! windows and attempted to set it
}per cent over last year ? the Albert Hall of former Butliny W@*% from the Captain of the S.S.,on fire. Earlier, they crashed
With the upper and middle holide s (CP) Ancap Tercero on Friday stating}into the Café Opera Square, drove
classes however it is a different site eile ES ashen lthat he (the captain) received|out patrons, smashed the chairs
matter. Prices of luxury goods ———————" from Puerto Cabello radio the)and tables and then set them afire,
skyrocketed because of heavy WHAT’S INSIDE TO-DAY information that a timber ship —UP.
\taxes and reduced imports. Some Page 2. Carib, Tourism lwas sighted in lattitude 10.545
90% of the population was not : 7 . \north, longitude 62.06.3 west. The
affected by Government’s aus- » 3 FEATURES: At the @ On Page 16

newspaper Al Misri to have de-
cided unanimously last night to
break off diplomatic relations with
Britain, but put off any announce-
ment for. 24 to 48 hours Another

Attend Funeral

Owing to the death of
one of the members of the
Barbados Police Force





| beliet that the Empire was en-

members of that

false and dishonest

ihe ignorant

arty have a

tirely built %y brutal force. and

‘exploitation”

’ i i the 2 > » has
Cabinet me s sche But if pride in the Empire has
Sender maering scheduled on! hand will be attending his fun- een weakened and if sneaking
Al Misri reported the Ismailio eral at 4 pm. today, and hame } tak place, is it
battle under scresming red ban- regret thai they will be unable iot still obvious to the most care-
er lines. It said that the fight | to take thelr customary part in e eye that the whole economy
constituted a “Declaration § of} the Annual Harvest Festiva! of Britain built upon the
VWar” by Britain Service at St. Luke’s Church } Empire, that the Empire the
It said editorially “Britain has} St. George | ndation on which prosperity
lost Egypt.” We régret out loyal- ~ _ | rests? How can 50,000,000 people
ty to Britain in 1942, when the ‘s l}expect to live on one small 1 ri
Germang drove the British before | OLIVE OIL, REFINER) | f the lose the huge support of
them to the gates of Alexandri ; | overseas territories? :
Such an ‘event will come again, EXPLODES | The mere self interest should
d then we won't make the same | nake them realise the terrible
mistake, LISBON, Jan. 26 hreat to their well-being that the
| A state of emergency was de- An olive oil refinery exploded | 'o of the Empire involves,
clared in Cairo, but failed to stop |Ftiday night in Alvito village, 82! ‘The consequences of such 4
students demonstrations, coin- miles south of Lisbon killing two} tragedy will be dire indeed,
ciding with the re-opening of persons and seriously injuring six.|Make no mistake about it. It
schools following a week's sus- |The explosion shook houses over the Empire goes, the sterling



pension for previous student|@ mile area panicking 3,000 resi-
‘ting. British authorities said, |dents—U.P,

Henceforth, the Egyptian Gov- —

rnment will not be able either to|

close or re-open universities and

chool We shall clot them |

when we deem it necessary.” ; Whenever

It was estimated that 15,000, |

emonstrators broke through a ‘

police cordon thrown around

Premier Nahas’ offices,
,| One demonstrator asked the

Social Affairs Minister, Abdel



Fattah Sallan, “Are you going to
jjbreak diplomatic relations with
Britain and fight Britain? The
;| Minister replied, “Tomorrow you
,/will hear that the Government
,|les taken decisions along those
lines.”

Dinner, Luncheon,

Egyptian students in an anny
enti-British demonstration broke
-jinto the Rivoli Cinema, which is
owned, smashed





Japan Plans Treaty
With Nationalist









out of york by the curtailment of » &SPORT FEA- } . .
the oil industry’s operations, The TURES: Bookie, | P. t With Ar entina China COST OF LIVING
international trade on cash basis ee. Jamaica ae 1 gs ; TOKYO, Jan. 26 rescue also.
is practically at a standstill owing * , an, 26 Prime Minister Shigeru Yoshida
to lack of foreign exchange. 5. SPORT REPORTS: | TOKYO, Jan, 26 indics ted that h Wao nent
Mossadegh’s Government is mak- Fifth Test, Table | A Japanese trade mission } 1 ‘ t . t ie ith F Chit
:: . E sa e “he > “ave enting ans 4 é y 2 ese
ing every effort to avoid economic Tennis, Yachting, jeenedwie a e ay at frm ae Nati hatint ‘Gevitien it as the
ollapse. The step was to Football Pols ; = Pile epee: By has - 4 s i Wi f
ayt . » ‘wy : 7 trade agreement. It will replace}Government of Formosa and not Forei ines o
jenpecta fre £40 ~ 000 ~ oe ea Family the reat agreement signed|of China He told the Diet of; gn
d it annually con- . oy ra “ests i
“luded barter de I Nets cleee 7. Sewing Circle, Your | Jume 23rd 1949 which expir ever rer, Sorhaueht a ere Portugal because
ear = ; : ' , apan becomes a sovereign! Wi e Government o 5
the gap. Baby and You, when Japan a At tnmat: Kwan? wk. anki . E
ised to. buy of its What’s Cooking state again. ; Fees OS seen Saeee) ae ee admitted into the
imports in the sterling area but 8. Editorials; Book The head of the delegation has) !0'0 eee itis ‘ of Chi 2 r
after restrictions imposed by the Review not yet been announced but} bs. ice ss eb ovld crs | iti j
British Treasury this amount wa , 9, Bermuda House of || the most likely candidate is re-| Japanese observers said Yoshi~ British Preferenti
halved. So far barter deals have Assembly and “The ported to be Hirohi Takasu ex- “#5 Fé ply : full of nuances
been completed h Russia, Gazette” port section chief in the Trad which ; reflected pressure 3 be-}
Germany, France and _ others » 10. West Indian News Ministry. jing put on him xe clarify his lk |
Negotations are under way 11. Books. Japanese Trade officials said|ter to John Fo’ = Dulle J fiirm=|
with Italy, Hu vy, Czecho lo- | 12. Church Services Japan is seeking a million dollars|ing@ tha Japan was prepare - |
vakia, Poland Jap Sugar a as ‘id , two way trade lly vith | S0o0n € ¥Y Possipie to Cite
ieficits have been made up fairly or, re Apuantinal’ He wants|clude with the National Govera-|
uccessfully by barter with Rus- 13. Comic Strips raw cotton, wor and | ™e . ona a — — h KWV SHERRIES
sia and other countries | ie * he tal wheat from 1 wants | Will re-establish normal relations, aw 5
A national six per cent. two vear 16. Local News. te ; oi pe geht ' {between the two Governments.
joan has been floated. —U.P. anil P= J —U?P.

irea will go as well and Britain
! @ On Page 5

You - -



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or for your own quiet enjoyment at home—

K. W. V.

can add to that enjoyment, as
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are Quality Wines,
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And in these burdensome days of HIGH

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PAGE TWO





SANETTA DRESS SHOP

BATHING

Best
the





wA-



selection

Island for



o-â„¢-
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Lower Broad Street

and

Girls

of styles
Ladies,





“Om, Con

colours



SUITS

in

and Boys.

SF

Con

POSITIVE MOVIE LEADERS

To-nite, 8.30 p.m. Monday — Tuesday, 5.00 & 8.30



/Ricy younGn!

Jane POWELL - Danielle D
Wendell COREY - remand taki

with Marcel Dalio

4

+ Una Merkel + Richard Anderson + Jean Murat





Extra Attraction Tonite, Monday and Tuesday
Ist Pictures of THE AUSTRALIA-.WEST INDIES

=

SPECIAL MIDWEEK ATTRACTION

CRICKET TOUR.
Thrilling Scenes of the 2nd





Test

Wednesday, January 30th, Thursday 31st, at 5.00 & 8.30

Enmeide Straight ~

BARRY SULLIVAN

ARLENE





William Fogarty (B

DAHL

0s, Limited

Announcing our re-opening

After Stocktahing

Many Clearance Bargains

In Every Department

To make way for NEW GOODS, we
have REDUCED lots of Items to a frac-
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It is customary for us to have a Clear-
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the PRICES on some of our Very Best,
Very Newest MATERIALS, SHOES,
HATS, Etc., Ete., Ete.

ge Pay US a Visit without Delay

GENTLEMEN!

WILLIAM FOGARTY (B'dos.) Limited

continues to
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Meticulous care taken
in the making of all

Marked

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Full Satisfaction

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SUITS
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" —————







SSS

PLL LL LLLELLE PAS LSELPFELD |

T0-DAY'S NEWS FLASH

WHIPAKER’S ALMANAC

Thousands of L.8.« tudents - DECOR

throughout the British Empire 24 PIECE ATED

hav« increased their salaries |

through studying our easy postal TEA only

courses in BOOK-KEEPING,

SECRETARYSHII BUSINESS 16

ORGANISATION, COMMERCIAL for 6 persons .

LAW, ECONOMICS, ete. Reduced

fees to oversens students

Diplomas swarded Prospectus y t ‘

a G. W. Huteh

LONDON SCHOOL OF r : ule ISON
COMMERCE

(Dept. B.A.4), 116 High Hylborn, - & CO,, LTD.

London, W.C.1., England. Broad St. — Diai



BROWN’S NAUTICAL ALMANAC

DAILY MAIL
PLASTIC SCHOOL RULERS

VIOLIN BOWS &
PIANO INSULATORS |

8
S

tes



LEARN TO EARN



|
1952 |
Unabridged Edition }
1952 |
YEAR BOOK 1952

BOW HAIR

UNSHADES FOR DOLLS
EPARATOR OIL by the Pint.
—_ ot —
JOHNSON'S STATIONERY
& HARDWARE



TODAY To TUESDAY 4.45

Alfred HITCHCOCK'S Thrilling Masterpiece !

“STRANGERS on a TRAIN”

——$—$——_____—. |

Special

At J. BALDINI & CO.,

Office at Lashley’s Ltd.
Prince



«DAY ADVOCATE





Value



WATCH REPAIRS

William Henry Street.



—

& 8.30 P.M.

Farley Ruth Robert
GRANGER — ROMAN — WALKER LZ
Ss ecial THU ts 3 E m ning Friday ist
wf That us se r nite *

“GUN RUNNERS MITCHUM RYAN in A

Jimmy WAKELY & “TRE RACKET’

“ROLLIN: WESTWARD with Lizabeth

Tex RITTER Action—Packed Suspense

OISTIN

PELAZA

Michae! O'SHEA &
“RIO GRANDE ‘
John WAYNE



Coming (Serial) |
FEDERAL AGENTS vs.
UNDERWORLD, INC



putas! GARETY

To-day and To-morrow 4.45 & 8.30 p.m’ |
MAN FROM FRISCO’

Phylis CAL

Mat. To-day 5 p.m

Warners Technicolor Action!
Randolph

SCOTT in—
FORT WORTH”

David BRAIN—Phyilis THAXTER

—_————$——— —

Tues. & Wed, 6.30 p.m

THE GOLDEN MADONNA”
VERT--Michael RENNEE &














The Garder
8ST. JAMES

To-day & To-morrow 8.30 p.m.



be





Kirk ALYN—James DALE } vavthNo® ALi ——
12 Thrilling Chapters { Arthur KENNEDY
Tah? nauk =” ~~
“"" $O-DAY TO TUESDAY, 445 & 830 PM.
ALE
ver-before-told story
of the “kept men” of that




Saturday Afternoon Racket!




stariog JOWN DEREK - Donna REED





+ Produced euD0Y » Directed by DAVIO MILLER + Based
Lompell « Writes ie the Sercen by MILLARD COME ond SHOMEY BOCA oe aa
Extra
Short

“POOR ELMER”

WEDNESDAY AND THURSDAY, 4.45 & 8.30 P.M.

Paramount Presents . . .

“HER WONDERFUL LIFE”

ROY

LAST 2 SHOWS TO-DAY
4.30 & 8.15
Â¥

Paramount Presents .. .





“THE GREAT”
MISSOURI RAID”
Starring :

WENDELL COREY
McDONALD CAREY

Extra :
“TALE OF TWO CAFES”

!

OLYMPIC

AL

?arameunt Double

BARBARA STANWYCK
BURT LANCASTER

in

“SORRY WRONG
NUMB)

And

“ADVENTURE ISLAND”

TO-DAY AND TO-MORROW, 4.30 & 8.15 P.M.

COLUMBIA ACTION DOUBLE |

ge CoCewrorpreree, |
“ae EXOTIC CAIRO FLARES ;





TUESDAY AND WEDNE
Columbia Double.
JON HALL -

AND

SAVAGE BATTLE
ama at
AND WOMEN

eel:
N

ve
bt
LTT

oerge cher - Preteen ty WALACL MMDORALD - Dowcted

SDAY, 4.30 & 8.15 P.M.

NINA FOCH in

“THE MUTINEERS"

AND

“DARK

Starr
WILLIAM HOLDEN

TO-DAY AND TO-MOR

Columbia Double.

“LAST OF THE

Starr
PAUL HENRIED

PAST’

ing:

xy

ROW, 4.30 & 8.15 P.M.

LEE J. COBB

BUCCANEERS”

JACK OAKTE

AND

“BLACK

Starr
LOUIS HAYWARD

ARROW”

ing :
GEORGE MACREADY

To-morrow & Tues,, 4.30 & 8.15



arriving
evening by the Jamaica ’plane.
1

HH Excellency the Governor
and Lady Savage -accom-
p.nied by Major Detinis Vaughan
attended the third day’s play of
the second Intercolonial cricket
‘gume between Barbados and
jJumaica at Kensington yesterday.

' Attended Provincial Synod
1S Lordship Bishop Mancde-
vill’ who left Barbados on
January 7th to attend the Pro-
vincial Synod in Nassau returned
jon Friday evening by B.W.IA.
via Puerto Rico.

Barbados Heliday
IR Alfred and Laay #rown
were among the passengers
at Seawell on Friday

Sir Alfred who was born in
Qctober 1883 was educated at
Northampton County School and
Lendon University, He was
married in 1910 to the daughter
of Frederick Plessen of Neubran-
denburg. They have two daught-
ers. He obtained his LL.B, with
class honours in 1903, his
LL.D. in 1905 and later was ad-
as a solicitor.

as a Lieutenant in i909.
entered the Department of His
Treasury Solicitor in 1905 and
. Treasury
1936; Solicitor H.M.
Customs and Excise 1941-44; Con-
trol Commission for Germany
1944; Legal Adviser to Foreign
Office (German Section) 1947, He
has also been a member of
several international legal con-
ferences.

Since 1949 he has been Legal
Adviser to British Military Gov-
ernor in Germany.

Engaged
engagement was an-~
nounced on Friday night
between Miss Heather Rosemary
Ramsay, second daughter of Mr.
Hugh ‘O. Ramsay and the late
Mrs. Ramsay of Carlisle View
Bay Street and Mr. George
Richard Barnes, eldest son of
Capt. and Mrs. Robert C, Barnes
of 6th Avenue Belleville.

Mr. Barnes has recently returned
on vacation from the U.S. where
he is a Graduate Fellow, Emory
University,

He returns to the U.S. on Thurs-

day accompanied by his sister
.gnes who also resides in the
United States,

After Six Weeks
ul Eee. spending an enjoyable
holiday in Barbados, Mrs.
Alfred Holder and Miss Lilian
Barker two Barbadians residing
at Jamaica, Long Island, New

nine years in the army he §

jesty’s Procurator General and fj





SUNDAY, JANUARY
ne Neen ee

9"

27, 1952

Caub Calling

LADIES AT POLO

ie
Le
\



A BECTION of the crowd, most of them ladies, who saw the final polo game at the Garrison Savannah

yesterday afternoon.

Staying With Parents
R. AND MRS. RUPERT
CHEEKES fiew in from

Trinidad on Friday by B.W.1.A.
on a short visit. Mr. Cheekes is
a Director of Central Cariobean
Distributors, Trinidad. Hig wife
is the former Mary Bourne,
daughter of Mr. and Mrs. E.
Carlyle Bourne of “Cedar Hill”,
Government Hill, with whom they
are staying.

They will be returning to Trini-

dad early in the week.

Antigua Visit
Bee ard Mrs, Hugh Wilkin
4 who arrived trom the U.S

recently are due to ieave to-
morrow morning by B.W.LA, for
Antigua on a short visit. They
will be returning in a couple of

days.
Festival Today

HERE will be a Harvest Festi-
val at St. Luke’s Church,
St. George this afternoon at 4

o'clock, The Police Band will be
in attendance and the church
choir will render a programme of
Church Music.

‘Final Game

iorty spectators, (most
them ladies in colourful
frocks) watched the
final game of the 1951—52 Polo
Season from the enclosure
around the Polo Hut at the Gar-
rison Savannah yesterday after+
noon. Many other polo fans saw
the game from around the touch-
line.

VER
of
afternoon

Amongst the crowd were sev-

eral Canadian, English and
American visitors to the colony
and they seemed to enjoy the

game quite as much as the local
spectators, some comparing the
game with polo “at home.”

It was a lovely sunny after-
noon with a cool breeze blowing
across the ground.

Six Lectures

M* J. CAMERON TUDOR,
M.A., will give a series of
six lectures in the Library at
Harrison College, beginning on
Tuesday February 5th at 8 p.m.
The title of his lectures. is
“Great Britain and Her Em-

pires—1764—1914,”

Indefinite Stay
M“* C, O, STANLEY, C.B.E.,

Chairman and Managing
Director of Pye Ltd., Cambridge
accompanied by Mrs. Stanley ar-
rived from England by air on
Friday evening via the U.S, and
Jamaica, They were met at Sea-
well by Mr. and Mrs. Rod Stewart
of Pye Ltd, and Mr, P, C, S.
Maffei. Barbados Agent of the
company.

After a holiday here they plan
to visit some of the other West
Indian islands. This is their first
visit to Barbados.

Mr, and Mrs, Sianley ire
guests at the Rockley Beach Club,
Best Nurse

ISS OLGA I. WORRELL, of

Bush Hall, St. Michael and

a Senior Nurse at the General

Hospital will be leaving to-day by

B.W.LA. for Trinidad on a three-

months’ course at the Carib Medi-
cal Centre, Port-of-Spain,

At the recent presentation “of
ce tificates and Prizes to nurses
at the General Hospital, Nurse
Worrell was awarded a special
prize for being the best practical
nurse of 1951,

York, are due to leave tomorrow
by B.W.1.A. for Puerto Rico where
they will remain for ancther week
before returning home.

They have been staying at
“Leaton-on-Sea”, The Stream for
the past six weeks.

This was Mrs. Holder’, first
visit back here since she left 35
years ago and also the first time
for Miss Barker in 23 years.

Back To St. Lucia
R. and MRS. FREDDIE POT-
TER who have been here
for just over a week, are expected
to return to St. Lucia to-day
where Mr, Potter is Manager of
Cable and Wireless’ Branch.
Regular Visitors
R. and MRS, CHARLES Mc-
Enearney of Trinidad, are
at present spending a short holi-
day in Barbados, and are guests
at Cacrabank.

Regular visitors to Barbados
they plan to return to Trinidad
on Tuesday.

Mr. McEnearney is Managing
Director of Messrs. Chas. Me



Enearney and Co., Ltd., Barbados
and a Director of Messrs, Chas.{
McEnearney and Co., Lad, "
dad.

“EVERYBODY ASHORE”—seemed to be the order of the day on Thursday when the

“Lady Nelson” and
Tourists from both ships spent the
are seen landing at the Baggage

“Lady Rodney” met in Carlisle Bay for the first time in many years.

Here a group of them

day on shore shopping and touring the Island.
Warehouse steps.





;
OSSD

Genuine Bargains! Genuine Bargains!

REAL LEATHER HANDBAGS. British Made

$7.10 now $2.50. $9.68 now $3.00. $11.49 now $4.00. $14.29 now $5.00,
IMITATION LEATHER AND PLASTIC. All Colours.

$6.91 now $2.80, $6.48 now $2.10, $5.45 now $1.80. $2.33 new $1.30,
FLOWERED GEORGETTES ............................ $2.00 now $1.00
CHARNOS FULLY FASHIONED NYLON HOSE $2.33 now $1.80
BURT MRED SBME TO oi. vein od cn la avn cu svamiekoneniry. $3.24 now $1.60

40 & 50 cents
$1.00
all at 4 cents Yd.

T. R. EVANS & WHITFIELDS

THE BARBADOS AQUATIC
CLUB

(Local and Visiting Members
Only)

on
SATURDAY, February 2nd

ESSE

BOYS’ and YOUNG MEN’S WHITE KNITTED SHIRTS
RICK RACK and SILK BRAIDS

Music by Mr. C. Curwen's
Orchestra

% Members are cordially invited







%
(Free Admission to Ballroom) 8 Dial 4220 YOUR SHOE STORES :
$5608600080060605000060" Dial 4606
| PROPS SSS S8 OY 956555598695 “
¢
‘ %
THE WOMEN’S | ii CT OCKS| ‘
% %
$ %
igs oO

CANADIAN CLUB

CLOCKS!

Annual Dance

A large selection of The Famous

Kienzle Clock

a

in aid of
LOCAL CHARITY

under the Avspices of His Excellency the Governor Just arrived —

4









|
and Lady SAVAGE 1%
%,
at ‘thie : 1» | SS Travelling Alarms, Beige, Green Black, etc, y
| * f Small Coloured Fancy Alarms, various prices, :
© ‘
Marine Hotel | ‘The Office Clock that you were enquiring for— x
. | Table Model Chiming Clocks, also Regulators. :
— ON — i | $
+
SATURDAY EVENING, February 23rd S EE THES E Now! %
iS 7
GAMES iS at ;
BRIDGE ig %
PALMISTRY . %
s
| Snr wie : Louis L. Bayley :
e 2
| ADMISSION _— $1.00 rae §
8 >
tee SSAA | "oc oocosscessessosososcossnesosoooocooososesooos:”




SUNDAY, JANUARY 27, 1952

————

SUNDAY

ADVOCATE



PACE

THREE









AT THE CINEMA

Strangers On A Train

. ¢
My GB.
FROM having no Hitchcock films for some time, as I

mentioned three weeks

ago when

“Stage Fright” was

showing, we now have th's gentleman’s latest thriller
STRANGERS ON A TRAIN, so I can’t complain any more.

It ha
the others—SATURDAY’S

ms to be my choice for the best film this week, but

HERO and RICH,, YOUNG

AND: PRETTY are each entertaining in their own way and
I enjoyed them as well. My predilection for Mr. Hitchcock
stems from an early taste for thrills and suspense, so let’s
have a look at STRANGERS IN A TRAIN first.

To begin with, there’s no de-
nying the fact that the plot is
weak, but that has not deterred
the. director in the slightest and
he has produced a chiller full of
mounting suspense and cumula-
tive horrer, topped off with a
hair-raising climax which is in
the best Hitchcock tradition.
Murder, tennis, nyphomania and
a runaway merry-go-round are
all taken in his stride and all his
tricks and techniques are brought
into play as each situation takes
its toll of gasps right to the whirl-
ing’ climax.

The-story concerns a young ten-
nis player. About to divoree his
wife, he is engaged in conversation
on, @ train by a young man who
turns out to be a psychopath. Hav-
ing read all about the tennis play-
er and his marital troubles in the
papers, the lunatic makes the
friendly offer to kill his wife, if,
as a return favour, the sportsman
will do away with his father.
After all, one good turn deserves
another! Our hero, quite natur-
ally,, finds this suggestion repug-
nant, but the psychopath thinks it’s
a@ deal, tracks the wife to an
amusement park and strangles her.
News of this action comes as a rude
shock. to the athlete, who bumbles
about. all over the place instead
of going to the police. More
shoeks are in store for him when
he finds he is being tailed by
the madman who keeps reminding
him of his part of the bargain.
To. make a long story short, the
two of them finally fight it out to
the death on a runaway carousel.

Though the story is anything but
credible, it offers a myriad of op-
portunities for Mr. Hitchcock's
photographic skill. To mention
just one, the strangling of the girl
in. the amusement park—as seen
through her glasses which she has
dropped—appears to be two fig-
ures locked in a_ slow-motion
death-struggle, under water.
Hitchcock’s skill with the camera
is second to none, and though
many of his angular shots are
familiar, they are never boring.

Farley Granger, Ruth Roman
and Robert Walker head the cast,
As the involved tennis-player, Mr.
Granger certainly takes the whole
affair very calmly which tends to
make the character rather colour-
less, and it is hard to believe that
Miss Roman, as a sophisticated
society girl, could be in love with
anyone quite as juvenile. Robert
WaNer plays the psychopathic
play-boy with conviction and the
supporting cast is up to scratch.

The music—especially composed
and arranged for the film—leaves
nothing to be desired,

SATURDAY’S HERO

“SATURDAY’S HERO”, now
showing at the Empire, is a well
integrated sports drama that de-
parts from the usual formula and
emerges with a few significant
comments on “amateur” college
athletics in the United States.
Directed and acted with integrity,
it turns a beacon light on the evils
of “buying” players—in this in-
stance football players—for vari-
ous colleges teams. This is not a
problem with which West Indians
are faced, but it is a momentous
one in the U.S. and this film is an
jndietment of such practices.

The story concerns the ambi-
tious son of a Polish immigrant,
who accepts a football scholarship
to gain entrance to a reputable

southern university, only to find,
that owing to football, there is
little or no time for studies in his
college career. He is further dis-
illusioned by the fact that the
alumnus who is his “benefactor”
is concerned with him only insofar
as he can farther the man’s. poli-
tical ambitions by becoming an
“All American” star. A, perman-
ent injury sustained in his final
match brings the realization that
the university has no further use
for him, and he returns, to his home
br pick up the strings of his former
ife.

In the leading roles, the char-
acters «are life-size and John
Derek, a handsome young actor
and one to watch, plays the prin-
cipal part with a quiet, innate dig-

nity and sensitivity—not often
seen in one so young. As his im-
migrant father, Sandro Giglio
gives a fine sympathetic perform-

ance which is lighted by the prin-
ciples with which he imbues his
sons, The suave, charming man-
ner of Sydney Blackmer, the bene-
factor, cloaks his ruthless ambi-
tions and desire for personal pow-
er through promoting a successful

team at any cost to the boys who
do the playing. Alexander Knox
gives a sympathetic and interest-



ing portrayal of our football hero's
English professor, who realizes the
boy's ambitions and understands
why he is unable to attain them.

There are detailed and authentic
equences of intensive football
training, topped off with exciting
games. Whether you like football
or not-—and I am not one of its
fans—it is an original and well-
done film.

21CH, YOUNG AND PRETTY

the Globe, “RICH,
AND PRETTY” is a
musical starring Jane
Danielle Darrieux, with
newcomer Vic Damone, Wendell
Corey and Una Merkel, Producer

Playing at
YOUNG
gaily clad
Powell,



Pasternak has filled the basket
lavishly vith gorgeous clothes,
£ norous sets and a dreamy
Ps background. (A Texas busi-
ness man and ranch-owner, di-
voreed for many years from his
French wife, goes to Paris on
United Nations business, With him
is his pretty young deughter who
is under the impression that her
mother is dead. Of course, the two
meet, to the consternation of the

father, and the girl, who has al-
ways loved singing and dancing,
finds that her mother is the pre-
miere entertainer and chanteuse
in Paris. She also has a delight-
ful romance, and everything ends
up just as it should. Not an out-
standing plot, but it is more
charmingly done than many musi-
cals I have seen.

Little Miss Powell is as attrac-
tive as ever and it is a pleasure to
wateh her sing and dance, and she
i pe foil for the sophistica-
io nd faseinating charm of

rfect

i
4







Da Darrieux who plays her
nother. Vie Darmone plays oppo-
site Miss Powell, and judging from

his voice, he will probably be seen
in many musicals along with Fer-
nando Lamas, another newcomer,
who with Miss Darrieux, puts over
come catchy songs. Wendell Corey
and Una Merkel both give good
performances, With a talented
casts glamorous technicolour and
good tunes, “RICH, YOUNG AND
PRETTY” is pleasant entertain-
ment.



The Family Welfare
Society

THE FAMILY WELFARE
SOCIETY was established in
1930 to provide relief to per-
sons in distressed circum-
stances in St. Michael’s Parish
who would not normally re-
ceive help from the Poor Law
Guardians.

The Committee of the Society
includes the Churchwarden of St.
Michael and representatives of
the Anglican, Methodist and
Moravian Churches, the Salvation
Army, the Girls’ Friendly Society
and the Mothers’ Union—all of
whom have practical knowledge
and experience in the assistance
of the poor and needy. Every
case is carefully investigated
individually and the homes of
applicants are visited before help
is given.

The Society helps many Tespec-
table folks who have fallen on
evil times through no fault of
their own, and who do not present
themselves for charity, but whose
need is discovered by some of the
Committee. There is no distinction
of class, colour or creed. The
Society has assisted unemployed
clerks, seamstresses, plantation

JUST RECEIVED

47
Eau de Quinine

Hair Tonic

A HAIR TONIC Indispensable
for the care of the scalp and
hair, Removes and prevents the

further development of
DANDRUFF
It leaves the hair soft and silky
and leaves a refreshing perfume
Two Sizes

®
% (¢. CARLTON BROWNE

£666,659
Spb :636,405 OOOO OOOO LDAOGLES SOS

overseers, widows with young
children, nurses, and many old
people who are beyond work and
who depend on the monthly grant
from the Family Welfare Society
to pay their rent, or help with
daily necessities.

122 Cases

At present there are 122 cases
on the books reeeiving grants of
money or groceries each month
at a cost of £370 a month, but all
of these cannot be continued
without further funds. Some of
the firms and companies in the
city are most faithful supporters
of this charity, and many Clubs
and private individuals have
given generous subscriptions and
donations over a period of 20
years and have made it possible
for this work to go on. But there
are many who do not seem to
have heard of the Family Welfare
Society and it is to them, and to
the welcome visitors to our Island
that this appeal is made,

The Society has cases in which
there are 6 or 7 children under
14 years of age and a father out
of work; cases who gre suffer-
ing from the effects “df serious
illness or accident and some who



£5600",

PSPS

< 45466065
OPS PPO SS POOPED errr

RICH IN PROTEIN,

wheat germ has been designed
particularly nourishing food

and fitness.

S|
*
>is
% Wholesale & Retail Druggist 5)
$ 136 Roebuck St. Dial 2813 3 sS
9369969659909 OOC0SSG00E | GODOSOGGIGON

TRY IT TO-DAY :
EMPROTE

THE FOOD FOR MUSCLE,
BRAIN AND NERVE

EMPROTE, a concentrated food composed of milk powders,
both skimmed and full cream, specially cooked and processed
soya, National and barley flours, soluble casein and prepared

nitrogenous principle of food so necessary for the building up

of the nerve and body tissues and the maintenance of health
TRY A TIN—YOU’LL FEEL THE DIFFERENCE
COLLINS DRUG STORES

Broad & Tudor Streets
OLE OOSOSOGO OO GOSL LOCOCO

hardening Hints Fy -m And Garden|

For Amateurs

Garden Paths

With the plan of the garden
before us, we see that so far the

(1) boundary of the land

_ has been considered and

(2) the trees have also been
discussed,

Next on the pian come the

garden paths and the question
arises as to the kind of paths the
garden is to have.

Garden paths are important,
and should never degenerate into
just that strip of ground be-
tween two beds. They must be
the proper width, and, have a
good foundation.

The choice will lie between
“grass,” “cement,” “gravel,” brick
and “Crazy,” but there is no
reason why a garden should not

have more than one type of
path.
All garden paths should be

four feet, te four feet six inches
wide. This width allows two
people to walk the path com-
tortably side by side.

In all cases a foundation cf
twelve inches deep should be
dug, and the cavity filled in, with
stones, broken bricks, rubbish,
and the whole rolled and rammed
to a body ready for the surface,
Such a foundation ensures a
certain amount of drainage.

In the case of a gravel path,
after this foundation has been
laid, five inches of course gravel
should be added, This must be
watered and rolled to a finm
body, Finally, top the path with
two inches of fine gravel. Water
and roll this in turn, taking
special care of the edges, roll
until a solid surface is formed.
When making a gravel path it
is advisable to make the surface
slightly convex to ensure good
drainage.

In making the Cement path
the foundation should be made
exactly as has already been des.
cribed. Bring this foundation to
within three inches of the final
level required,

Mix the concrete for the sur-
face of the path in the following
strength.

4 parts of shingle.
2 parts of sand,
1 part of cement,

Mix the ingredients dry, and
then add water, turning and
mixing until it is of a good con-
sistency to spread. The nearer
to the path that this can be done
the better. As concrete should
be used half an hour from the
time the water is added do not
mix much at one time.

Put the mixed concrete in
blobs on the path and level and
edge each blob before adding the
next, The path need not be
finished at one time.

A concrete path is permanen:,
weed proof and dries off quickly
after rain,

For the Crazy path again the
foundation is the same,

The stones for the crazy path,
if not obtainable otherwise, can
be made of the same concrete
mixture as that given for the
cement path, shaping them in a
wooden mould,

These slabs should be laid on
a foundation of cement and the
eracks in-between filled in with
some of the same cement.

Another method is to fill in the

cracks with earth, and plant
clumps of growing plants in-
between,

The Brick path again uses the
same foundation originally given.

The Bricks are laid either on
edge, or flat, on a bed of cement.
They can be arranged in a
pattern.

The Grass path is not laid on
any foundation, and, although it
is simpler and less expensive to
make in the beginning, yet a
grass path, entails constant
labour to keep it in order. It
must be kept free of weeds, cut
and rolled regularly.

Paths, garden beds, and lawns,
should all be neatly edged, and
there is no better edge than our
local sawn stones cut suitably. |

Each sawn-stone block meas- |
ures roughly 2 feet by 1 foot.

These blocks should be sawn
in three, lengthwise, so giving
three 2 feet lengths by 4 in
thick by 1 ft. deep. |

Now saw each of these length- |
wise in half. Result, 12 feet of)
edging 4 inches thick by 6 inches
deep, in six lengths, |

As these blocks sell at 2s, per |
block the number of blocks that}
will be needed, and the cost can}
easily be worked out, |



|

are blind or crippled. In all these |
cases it would be tragic to have
to discontinue assistance.

Wherever possible the family is
encouraged to help themselves,
and as soon as the children are
old enough to earn money and |
help, the grant is discontinued
and used for the benefit of other
deserving cases.

The Society needs money
urgently to carry on this essential
work and the Committee appeal
earnestly to all to give as gener-
ously as they can, Dona’ ons may
be sent to: —

Miss Sybil Chandler, Ever-
green Cottage, Navy Gardens, St.
Michael, 18, and will be acknow-
ledged in the Advocate News-
paper. |

|





to provide in a palatable form 4
beverage, rich in protein, the

s

5550S OOS OOCDSGOPOOOSO PGES

2506

By AGRICOLA
CITRUS

We have a letter from corres-
pondent F.G. to consider to-day.

Such letters and requests are
greatly appreciated: they are
helpful and encouraging to a

columnist trying to be of seal! times to assist.
infor: ¥

assistance in the spread of
mation in the realms of agri
ture, economics and related fields
of endeavour
better homes and greater
sufficiency in these tr

times.

At the outset, F.@. poses
general question of growing cit=
rus trees on what he describes as
the “unsuitable soil of Barbados,
at least on the lower levels”. Most
people with any experience at all
would agree that on the ‘wind-
swept lowlands with a rainfall,
on the average, well below: the
requirements of citrus—not @x-
cluding even the harder lime—it
would be futile to consiuer the
cultivation of this group of plants
on any scale. That, of course, is
not to say that householders with
back-yard space, including ade-
quate wind protection, and will-
ing to devote reasonable care to
a tree or two—may be of lime,
orange or other kinds as desired
—should not try to meet home
requirements, at the same time
providing a useful hobby for
spare time leisure. It is surpris-
ing what can be done and exam-
ples locally of this kind of effort
are not entirely lacking. Indeed,
we recall that an exhibit of sweet
oranges, grown on _ the Christ
Church coast not 100 yards from
the sea, carried off the first prize
at the last Annual Exhibition.
Fruit of such quality we usually
expect from the higher levels
where the rainfall is ample, the
climate cooler and shelter avail-
able in the little valleys and
gullies which occur. There usea
to be and still are, no doubt,
estate houses and homes (large
end small) in these aress “sith
small orchards attached. In such
conditions, even without continu~
ous care, trees seem to thrive

B.B.C. Radio Notes

English Cricketers Review W.1. Tour

With C. B, Clarke on

In the BBC’s “Calling the Wes\
Indies” on Wednesday, 30th Jan-
uany listeners will hear a review
of the West Indies tour of Aus-
tralia. Provided the Fifth Test
goes to five days that will be the
last day of the’ match and will be
a fitting date for this programme.
Cc. B. Clarke the former West In-
dies slow bowler will sum up the
series and will invite two or three
distinguished cricketers to join
him in assessing the tour. The en
tire half-hour of the West Indies
broadcast will be devoted to thi
cricket review. It begins at the
regular time of 7.15 p.m.

West Indian Writers

In ‘Caribbean Voices’ on Sun-
day, 27th, inst. we shall hear «
story from a newcomer to this
series of contemporary writite.
She is Mrs. Rose Auguste of St.
Lucia who in her story, ‘Toast of
the Caribs,’ gives a chapter of the
past in 17th. century St, Lucia,
This marks one of the rare occa-
sions—with the exception of Derek
Walcott’s verse—when one of the
smaller islands in the Caribbean
is represented in this series, The
half-hour closes with poems by
Byron S. Fraser of Jamaica who
has not been heard for some years.
Broadcast begins at the usual time
of West Indies programmes from
London, namely 7.15 p.m.
European or Atlantic Union?

A number of talks and discus-
sion programmes in the BBC's
General Overseas Service in the
coming week will be devoted to
the prospects and problems of
unity among the nations of West-














Cane Bills S
Cutlasses

Galvanised Buckets Stencil Ink

looking towards come

a

Sewing Twine

and produce. But, neglect of |
trees on the drier and less favour
able levels is fatal—they must be
tended, watered and cared and
above all, kept free from scale in
sects by periodic spraying. We
know the Agriculture De
partment is ready and willing a!

‘© give another example ot
k-yard: effort: some of the

citrus fruits we have
across, we enjoyed at :
ranch home in the Rupununi Dis
tyict of British Guiana, an are.
known to be relatively uninvit
ing, agriculturally speaking. Thx
soil is very sandy and infertilt
for the most part, producing
herbage of an inferior quality. A
this home of which we speak, th:
rancher and his family had dug
eapacious holes in the shelter o!
the house and filled them wit!
rotted manure from the cattl
corrals; in such artificial condi-
tions, lemons and oranges wer
yielding fruit of good quality. I
cidentally, at the same home
long trays constructed of split
palm-tree logs, set on legs an
filed with coral manure, were
serving as beds for growing ex
cellent lettuce, tomatoes anc
onions. So, it is the same old
story repeating itself here: given
the will, there is usually a way.

Now, to return to F.G's rea!
yreaiest coneerning one or tw«
citrus seedling trees, roughly twc
years old: whether he can carry
them on to bearing age and, if so
when they are likely to fruit
With the care which he pear:
to be giving, the chances are that
they can be brought to the fruit-
ing stage, which may be expected
(a few scattered fruits only) at
three to four years with most
citrus: limes possibly a little ear-
lier. It is unlikely that there will
be much of a crop before five t
six years, depending on the size
and’ vigour of the trees. How-
ever, as seedlings are, for the
most part, uncertain as regards
quality, F.G. is advised to get an
officer of the Agriculture Depart-
ment to top-work his plants with
a selected variety.



Wednesday

ern Europe and the North Atlantic
and their relations with the other
countries of the Free World. These
programmes will draw on the ex-
perience and opinions of a wide
range of participants and observ -
ers. Here is a list of these pro-
grammes:

Monday, 28th. 8.30 pm, The
European Idea — a summary
of the history and achieve-
ments of the various move-
ments towards unity in
Western Europe.

Tuesday, 8.30 p.m, The Atlantic
Purpose — a review of the
aims of N.A.T.O. and its im-
plications.

Tuesday 9.00 p.m, The Common-
wealth Viewpoint of this
unity.

Wednesday 7.15 p.m, The Na-
tional Viewpoints — promin-
ent personalities in Europe
and North America state theit
attitudes (not on our direct
beams).

Wednesday 8.30 p.m. The Eco~
nomic Problems — a survey of
the factors to be considered
in any form of union and of
developments to date.

Thursday 8.30 p.m. The Strategic
Needs — a consideration of
the requirements of defence

Friday 8.30 pam. The Political
Possibilities — a summing up
of the problems and prospegts
of the future.

In addition ‘Books to Read’ pr
Wednesday at 5.30 p.m. will deal
with books relating to the question
of European or Atlantic Union and
on Sunday 3rd Feb, ‘London
Forum’ at 10.15 p.m, will present
a discussion on the subject.



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PAGE FOUR



JAMAICA 309 RUNS BEHIND PACES
ALMOST IMPOSSIBLE TASK
Farmer Scores Chanceless Century







By O. S. COPPIN
nen ‘ already to their credit in their Inter-
colon ia are now poised for another
victor I oe i Te When play closed yesterday
at Kensing Oval, Jatne vith. but five wickets in hand still
needed 317 runs t ff defeat
I il be able to put up these
runs when t on wicket four days’ old
although it will only | n d upon for three days with Sun-
day intervening age nother da

HUNTE OUT

} ARBADOS terday ith 141 runs on the tins for the loss,of
two Wiekets received no further help from Hunte, 76 not out,
ce he snicked one to Bir behind the wicket off a Miller outswing-

er for the former to tak
him.

It was the
yesterday, wa
colonial cricket ag

mple catch behind the wicket to dismiss

concens

s of Opinion that Hunte’s innings, that closed
one t

best he has played since his debut in Inter-
nidad just over a year ago. It is comfort-
ing too to see that t tural role which he had recently adopted,
and no doubt which he S put behind him forever, had not affected
him to the ‘extent as to have prevented him from giving such a con-
vineing testimony of | return to form as he did by virtue of his

innings of 76 in thi
HIGHLIGHT
t SGarbados innings was the partnérship between
skipper Farmer | “Boogles” Williams that put on 93 for the
fourth wicket

Williams who left at 51 is fast staking his claim as being the best
stroke player in Barbados to-day. Eight boundaries that came from
his bat in his score of 51 were without blemish and it was truly anti-
climatic to see him pat a half volley from Bonitto to Prescod at silly
midon to bring an end to an innings so full of promise and entertain-

ment.
FARMER SCORES CENTURY

oR

. fr ‘MER went on to complete his individual cen-
/ tury and his dismissal at 107 brought an end

oO ar nings that not only proved to be top score
: o%

for his team but which was also the nucleus around
4 x

which the final Barbados total of 337 was built.
W. FARMER







IGHLIGHT of the













I could find no fault with Farmer's innings yes-
terday It was a century well earned, the result

of direct personal planning and rigid self-discip-
line and restraint.

ie played himself.in, negotiated the bowlers on
their merit and I saw him relax concentration

and throw a swipe only when his score had reach-
ed 102. Fven.if he had been dismissed at that time
there sul would have been no blemish on_ his
chanceless Century but rather spontaneous exten-
uation “even for his momentary lapse in concen-
tration after a long innings in which he had given
no quarter nor had seemingly invited any.
BRIGHT LIGHT

HE remaindet of the Barbados innings: invites no particularly

congratulatory comment at least from the point of view of the
batsmen Charlie Taylor, suffering from sore. throat and certainly
not in his best form for this tournament was out for “duck”,

One scarcely é¢xpected dotrble figures from Frank King. He is
@ pace bowls rand as such he gave a most flattering account of him-
self in this tourpamentso far, He was out for 6 but tailenders Da
Peiza and King supplied the bright Tight at the end of the flickering
candle of the Barbados innings as it went out.

De Peiza red 16 at number nine, a total that could not have
been disgrace d if it had been made earlier in the innings while
Horace King, who would be the last man to lay personal claims for
batsmanship executed a-cover drive for four at the expense of Good-
ridge and an off drive for another boundary off. Miller in scoring 19
and both these str must automatically find a place in the select
company of the best strokes of the tournament. f

BONITTO BOWLS WELL

A ‘THUR BONITTO came into his own sudden-
af
el









ly th e Barbados innings was coming to a

se. Inspired

wicket
bowl

by his capture of so valuable a
i that of C..B. Williams he went on io
L Yorman Marshall for 10; he had Charlie
Taylor caught at the wicket before he had scored
and to mplete his bag he also had Frank King
caught. His figures then were 18/3/69/4. ;

If there was any doubt about Goodridge’s powers
of endurance we had ample proof of this. Skip-
per Bonitto bowled him for very long spells. At
one time he bowled sixteen overs only resting for







igle over during that time when he was
sy ched from one end to another, His figures of
30/4/88/1 are not as good an indication as the

valuc of his performance to his team, at any rate
I think that he has bowled well enough in this
lest as to have established his bona fides as a
promising candidate for Intercolonial and even
more important pace. bowling honours,
PROMISE

ULLOCH who only claimed Smith’s wicket in the Barbados sec-

ond innings took 1/47 in twelve overs but he has shown some
promise. He has got the greatest amount of turn on the Kensing-
ton wicket, admittedly unfriendly to bowlers, than any other bowler
on either side. His leg breaks commanded respect when he pitched
them toa good length but he was up against capable and experienced
batsmen on the Barbados team and whenever. he mispitched he
was punished. I expect to hear much more of him in the not too

distant future,
FREE BATTING
AMAICA, 426 runs behind commenced their innings completely un-
hampered. by. the magnitude of their task. Thorbourn and
Prescod tackled the job with refreshing enthusiasm. They pushed
the seore along at a rapid rate.

They put on 40. runs in the first half hour of play before Thor-
bourn was. dismissed 1.b.w. to Barker when attempting a curiously
unorthodox and inexplicable stroke. His was a bright 24 before his
disastrous experiment.

Neville Bonitto too was infected with the rungetting spirit ‘and
his first two scoring strokes wére boundaries by way of a sizaling
cover drive and a high lift to long off, both off Barker.

He saw Prescod leave |.b.w. to a very low inswinger from King
and after scoring 23 he tod patted a half volley for Williams to hold
an easy return



A. BONITTO

STILL CHEERFUL BATTING
OHN McLEOD was not to be cramped by the misfortunes of his
prevecessoys and he too seored freely afid reached 23 before
he unfortur ly trod upon his wicket trying to get one away to
square leg off Williams

It was an ke to send Tulloch a batsman of negligible batting
powers at tl Stage because he was out immediately l.b.w. to a

Williams googly to which he shaped as if for a leg break.
Mudie i ach not out played out time but theirs will









¢



be the te vith t ther batsmen to put up the 308 necessary to
avoid defeat and I « hink they ean do it to-morrow.

GOSS 5566445444444 “,¢ f
PPPOE F CPPS OOCFRS PLP LLL PELL AFE PESOS
’

BARBADOS TURF CLUB
SEASON 1952

55099954

STANDING AT BULKELEY PLANTATION,
ST. GEORGE

PRIDE OF INDIA

(Bay or Brown Horse, 1945, by Clombo out of The Bud)



STANDING AT ALLEYNEDALE PLANTATION
ST. PETER

STAR WITNESS

(Bay Horse, 1945, by Fair Trial out of Speckle)
Fee for Each Stallion .. bi me $48.00
Groom’s Fee $1.00 cash per Service

,



The above Stallion:

will be limited to:40 mares each.
Barren Mares Half

Fee return for One (1) year only.

Fo. App

D. A. V. 1



ts apply respectively to :—

9, Esqr., Jordans, Plantation,
St. George.

sq., Alleynedale Plantation,

St. Peter.

LEWIS

Secretary.



ihe D. WARD. E
G. A.

9999956 66-0656565666°

SOLED ECSC BESS OOSOSOSE



> > «
LOCOCO SOLES SSF CSLCSSSSESE CLL LLL EL LPL SS



SUNDAY ADVOCATE






Barbados In Go





a From Page 1 Mudie for an easy run single. go: two boundaries one with an
» pu a hi — to oa eres seer he drove hard to.on drive and the other with a
quare ieg boundary to senc 12 PeSCy at_silly mid 2. ve 2 é (er f i =
total to 194 and rake his individ-{"him back ~~ eg eee oad with soa tatihe ga 40-ons
ual contribution 43. He thenrqball he gave'a hard return ch “one off Marshall who had now
tickled to fine leg for three t Bonitto who’ tried to hol ‘gemie on for King, but Proverbs
send up William _ who played It which bounced - out lly put it down,
out the remainder. / hands, a bourn singled to deep
¥ P hepa took the only single! King Caught ‘a ed leg off Rarker and later
o ch’s next 0 ‘ 4 ;
Civ kacddtine cca rer a “King who had been kepl Proseod got one to cover. The
mow ii peGexess. for an hous chureh, again hit out hard to otal was now 42. Prescod sin-

which produced 57 runs

Williams singled to deep mic&Bonitto jumped to take a cate

on off Mudie to send 200 on the
board after after
play. A powerful drive to extra!
cover by William off Tulloch,
sent his score to 31. He later got}
another boundary with a cut past\

gully off the last ball of the over.“

Farmer took a long single to
extra cover off Mudie and then
went up to take strike from
Arthur Bonitto who had now
come on from the top end vice
Tulloch. He got his fifty includ-
ing three boundaries in 115 min-
utes with a_ single to mid off.
Mudie’s next over yielded three
including a late cut by Williams
for a couple,

Boundary
Farmer singled to mid on off
Bonitto and Williams drove
powerfully to the extra cover

boundary to make his score 42.
Farmer later got a couple with a
similar shot and then singled to

mid wicket off the last.
Mudie’s next over yielded a
single. Farmer singled with a

hard on drive off Bonitto’s second
delivery and Williams played
out the remainder. Farmer lift-
ed Mudie over head for a single
to send up Williams who again
played out the remainder
Arthur Bonitto continued from
the screen end and Farmer got a
long single to the on side. Wil-
liams also singled this time to
square leg. Each batsman again
took easy singles. before the over
ended. Williams got the only
single off Mudie’s next over with
An on drive and later got a couple
to long on off Bonitto. His score

was then 47. He eventually got
his half century with a pull to

the square leg boundary and then
put up an easy catch to Prescod
at mid wicket. His innings of 51
which included eight boundaries
had lasted for 88 minutes.

The luncheon interval was
then taken with the total at 236
for the loss of four wickets.
Farmer was undefeated with 60.

Marshall accompanied Farmer
out to resume the innings after
the luncheon interval, and was
off the mark with a. single off
Mudie. A _ sweep to fine leg
earned him a single off the next
over from Bonitto.

The score moved on to 250 in
37 minutes with a brace by Mar-
shall to deep long on off Bonitto
and 6 runs late farshall in at-
tempting to drive a from
this bowler, pulled it on to his
wicket 16 end his innings of 10.

The fifth Barbados wicket had



now fallen and Charlie Taylor,
who joined Farmer was walking
back to the | pavilion before he
thad scored, having snicked the
fifth ball of the same over from
Bonitto into the hands of the

wicket-keeper. It was a double-
wicket rnaiden for Bonitto whose
analysis now read 9 overs, 3
wickets for 33 runs,

256 For 6

With six wickets down for 256,
Farmer was partnered by Frank
King who survived a_ confident
appeal from Bonitto. Next over
from Mudie Farmer took a single
and King played out the remain-
der of the over.

After a long and uncomforta-
ble period, King got off the
mark with a single in which
Farmer was almost run _ out,
taking two other singles off
Bonitto,

Farmer went down on his
knees to send Mudie sizzling
through the covers to the fence,
taking another single to extra
cover off the next delivery,
King was purely defensive, and
Bonitto placed four men around
his bat—one each at the silly
flelds, a short fine leg and a
second slip, all within five yards
of the bat,

With their early successes after
lunch, the Jamaica fieldsmen. were
on their toes, picking up cleanly

and returning sharply to the
wicket. The rate of scoring fell
off, :

Next over from Bonitto, King

drove high to the right of Mudie
foy a single, and Farmer back
drove the next ball to the long off
fence, punishing the next to deep
extra cover for a single for the
score to move along to 278

King came out of his lethargy
with a full-blooded on drive off

197 minutespp¥icket.



bowler, and this time Ne

ust Over his shoulder at mic

Barbados was 7 down for 2804






through the slips off the
a. ball



from Marshall and
0 got another past
rker at mid wicket off the last.
With the total at 44, Jamaica

and as Depeiza joined his skipper, suffered their first set back when

the field

He played out the over. Ni
his century,

a single, Farmer taking

for four down to the fence
rors of the Kensington stand,
the

total moved to 293.

closed in around hi horbourn got

another. boundaries
to mid off. DePeiza crossed Mudje eo Si palingompaacaing
and

Next

into his wicket
in an. attempt to turn one from

12. for: Farmer Barker, but missed the ball which
singled. Bonitto to extra cover. ad "

DePeiza turned Bonitto ‘to the
open square leg position to ruM Walcott, He

struek his pad and an appeal for
Lb.w. was upheld by Umpire
had scored 24 in-
in 31

N. Bonitto Goes In
Neville Bonitto jomed Prescod

over he came back on his right wao was tnen 20 and played out

foot and punched Mudie thro
the covers to the fence to re
his second boundary.

A boundary given to Fa
when Tulloch misfielded a power-
ful drive through extra cover put
him within a single of hig cém-
tury, and next ball he sedonel
one which he attempted to hook,
safely at fine leg to run 2, and
reach the coveted mark in 205
minutes. The 300 went up in 295
mines, and jumping into one on
the off side, DePeiza sent it
scorching along the ground to the
fence to put his score at 13, ana
the Barbados total 312,

New Ball

Goodridge was given the new
ball at this point, bowling from
the pavilion end to Farmer who
patted the first delivery to short
silly mid on where Neville Bonitto
wag fielding. The batsman took
an easy single to cover two ball
later, and DePeiza played out
the remainder of the over.

Miller also came on at the

screen end with the second over *while

with the new ball, and in the
second delivery, Farmer's innings
came to a close as he glided very
fine for Binns to bring off a mag-
nificent eatch, falling to his left
and rolling over as he did so,

Eight wickets were down for
313, Farmer’s contribution being
107 inclysive of five fours and a
five. King joined Depeiza and
promptly straight drove Miller to
the screen for four. He snicked
this bowler dangerously past the
wicket-keeper for another four in
the next over. King drove square
of the wicket for a single, DePeiza
glanced for another and a full-
blooded cover drive by King took
this batsman’s score to 13 and
his team's total to 327.

The pace men did not worry
these two tailenders, and Depeiza
evinced this as he neatly glanced
Goodridge for singles to deep fine
leg. y

DePeiza’s innings however end-
ed when he attempted a cover
drive off Miller, and edged to give
Stan Goodridge an easy catch at
gully. The score was 330. and
DePeiza had contributed a very
valuable 16,

Barker, the last batsman came
in to jOin King who crisply cover
drove Goodridge to the fence for
four, hig fourth in his score of 17;
Barker punched Miller through
the covers for a single, and next
over from Mudie he pulled one on
to his wicket to bring the Barba-
dos innings to a close with a total
of 337 and the tea adjournment
wag taken, King had scored an
enterprising 19—undefeated.

427 For Victory

Given rans inake for
victory, vamaica opened thei
second innings with vonn Prescod
and Denis 'Thorbourn, Pace
bowler srank ming bowled the
first oven from the screen end
and Prescod took 12 off him in-
cluding a hook to the fine leg
boundary and a pull to the square
leg boundary.

424

Barker ' trungled’ from the
pavilion end and Thorbourn
opened his account with a drive
to the mid wicket boundary,
Prescod got a single to fine leg
off King and later Thorbourn
back dreve to the boundary and
then got another with a, leg
glance. He singled off the fourth
to fine leg to send up Preseod

who square cut for a couple and
then singled with a similar shot.
The total was now 29 made after
15 minutes play. Prescod was
16 and Thorbourn 13,

Prescod singled to mid wicket
off Barker and later Thorbourn





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{
Wm. Henry Sts.

the remainder of Barker's over
—a maiden wicket. Prescod

- eut one from Marshall past gully

to the boundary and later Bonitto
broke his duck with a full blood-

' ed off drive to the boundary off

Barker to send up fifty after 40
minutes’ play.
Bonitto got another boundary

when he lifted one from Barker
to long off. Marshall’s next over
yielded two singles.

With the total at 57, Frank
King was given his second spell,
this time from the pavilion end.
He bowled to Prescod who got
his pad in front of the first and
was given out Lb.w. for 25 in-
cluding three boundaries in 47
minutes,

Joba McLeod pattnered Bonit-
to whose score was eight and
played out the remainder. Nor-
man Marshall bowled a maiden
to Bonitto. McLeod opened his
account with an on drive to the
boundary off King and later sin-
gled to mid wicket. Bonitto also
took a_ single to extra cover,
McLeod got one to cover.
Bopitto entered double figures
vyhen he hooked a short one from
King viciously to the fine leg
boundary.

“Boogles” Williams came on
fer Norman. Marshall at the
Sereen end. He bowled to Mc-
Leod who got two boundaries in

this over, one with a powerful
off drive and the other with a
late cut.

Marshall now bowled from the
pavilion end and sent down a
maiden to Bonitto. McLeod took
a single to deep extra cover off
Williams next over and went
down to take strike from Mar-
shall who beat him with the first
delivery. The batsman then
erded the last to first slip, but
Fronk Kine failed to hold the
catch. McLeod was then 15.

Square Cut

bBonitlo square cut the fifth
from Wiliams (o tne boundary
tO make te total Jl and his score
iv, Meleod cut one from Mar-
shall past gully to the boundary
and then on drove for another

lo make his score 23.
Willianv? continued from the
screen end and Bonitto took an

easy single to mid off. He later
swept one from Norman Marshall
ta the square leg boundary and
then singled to extra cover.

Jamaica lost their third wicket
when Bonitto returned ome to
Wiliams and the bowler made
no mistake. The total was now
95. Bonitto had scored 23 in-
cluding five boundaries in 43
minutes,

Alfie Binns joined McLeod and
was quickly off the mark with a
single to square leg. Frank King
now bowled from the pavilion
end and Binns crashed him to
the off boundary to send up 100
runs on the board in 80 minutes.
4 full one from King wide of the
leg stump went to the boundary
for byes,

In Williams’ next over, McLeod
was dismissed when he knocked
dewn his wicket in attempting
to hook off this bowler. The
score board then read 104—4—23,
McLeod had scored 23 including
four boundaries in 33 minutes.

Horace Tulloch, the ineoming
batsman had a brief stay as he
was sent back by Williams by
the Lb.w. route before he had
scored and Jamaica had lost
another wicket without addition
to the score,

Mudie joined Binns and after
scoring five there was an appeal
for light and the game ended

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od Position

with the total at 109 for the loss
of five wickets. Binns, the other
not out batsman is five.

Following are the scores:—

BARBADOS Ist Innings
M. Taylor run out

A. M. Taylor run out ............. nM
C Hunte c Wkr. (Binns) b Miller 32
C. W. Smith b Goodridge _... a
W. A. Farmer ¢ A. Bonitto b

Proverbs ¢ wkr (Binns) b Miller

°











mMamzo
Be
3°
°

' King c&b Tulloch

H. Barker ¢ Prescod b Mudie
Extras: bi, n.b. 3 ....
WUE. basic szacthswanaei the

Fall of wickets: 1 for 22, 2 for 85, 3
for 86, 4 for 91, 5 for 136, 6 for 144,
7 for 159, 8 for 186, 9 for 190.

BOWLING ANALYSIS

F. King "
Abrahams c sub (Gri
Binns b King
Bonitto c Barker b F. K
McLeod run out
Mudie not out .
Miller b Marshall
. Bonitto c Marshall b H. King ..
Tulloch b Marshall _.
Goodridge b King ....
Extras: lb. 2, b. 3 .





DR>noSZ>e o 4 Mop:

Total

Fall of wickets:—1 for 22, 2 for 26, 3 for
“4, 4 for 68, 5 for 77, 6 for 82, 7 for 83,
8 for 84, 9 for 86.

BOWLING ANALYSIS
o mM

w
18.2 5 3 5

F. King . “

H. Barker . Sway ow 2 8

N. E. Marshall .... 23 1 «637 3
H. King 11 5 15 1
Cc. B. Williams — © _ 15 ~

BARBADOS—2nd Innings
C. Hunte c wkr (Binns) b Miller 16
W. Smith c wkr. (Binns) b Tullock 40
Proverbs b Goodridge ......... 0
. A. Farmer c wkr. (Binns) b Miller 107
B. Williams c Prescod b A. Bonitto 5
E. Marshall » A_ Bonitto 10

M. Taylor ¢ wkr. (Binns) b
A. Bonitto ase 65% » 4@
F. King c N. Bonitto b A. Bonitto (6
C. DePeiza c Goodridge b Miller 16
H. King not out .. 19
H Barker b Mudie .. . uz
Extras: b 2, lb 5, w 1, n.b. 3 il

>zasann

. 337

Total

Fall of wickets:— 1 for 90, 2 for 91, 3
for 143, 4 for 236, 5 for 256, 6 for 256,
7 for 286, 8 for 313, 9 for 330.

BOWLING ANALYSIS
oO M R Ww

S. Goodridge ...... W > 83
R. Miller . 26 8 65
G. Mudie -. 21 2 52
H. Tullock 12 — 57
A. Bonitto 18 3 69

JAMAICA — 2=ND INNINGS

D. Thorbourn lbw Barker ..,.......

J, Prescod lbw King .......... «

N. Bonitto c & b Williams ..,.....

J. McLeod hit wicket b Williams ..

A. Binns not out eeees

H. Tulloch lbw Williams

G. Mudie not out ceeseeeeres
Extras . ewe +

Total (for 5 wkts) .....



Fall of wickets:— 1 for 44, 2 for 57, 3
for 95, 4 for 104, 5 for 104.
BOWLING ANALYSIS
o M



gERe
loo

F. King . 5 1
H. Barker . : 5 1
N. E. Marshall . 2 1 4



Cc. B. Williams~



MANNING WINS
CAPTAIN’S PRIZE

Mr. Geoffrey Mannnig with an
aggregate of 34 points won the
Captain’s Prize when it was
played off yesterday afternoon at
the Rockley Golf Club, Christ
Church, ‘

Mr. Manning after play said
that the going was fair t at
times he was playing “well
above” himself,

He said that the wind did not
assist in any way, also the fair-
way afforded little help.



Song Withdrawn

COPENHAGEN, Jan. 26.

After protests by the British
Ambassador Sir Alex Randall the
Copenhagen Music Hall has witn-
drawn a song containing offen-
sive references to Princess Eliza-

beth and Princess Margaret.
The Ambassador made his
protest on Saturday to Nils
Svenningsen, Director of the
Foreign Office. Later the singer
who made the song _ popular,
Sigrid Horne Rasmussen, said
she was formally forbidden by
Justice Ministry to sing it again.
The act called for her to ap-
pear on the stage of the A.B.C.
Music Hall dressed as Prime
Minister Churchill, and the
theme of the song is that as soon
as Churchill leaves his country,
the dominions start breaking
away from Britain. It is said
that the journeys by Britain's
Princess have not helped to hold

the Commonwealth together.
—(CP)
















VUZE,

a °
Attraction in Action

Oo. BRENTFORD, mMiDDdDiases

O PSOSSOOHSS CROSS SSOP O SS OO OS OOO OVOCS BOE 9080 8SOOOD?



SATURDAY, JANUARY 26, 1952 ~

ON CLASSIFICATION
Should ‘Bright Light’ Be In C2 Or D

By



BOOKIE

A T THIS time of the year, after the classifica-

7 tion lists of both the T.T.C. and the B.T.C.

have been published, it is customary to indulge in

some form of rating for the two-year-olds we saw

raving in the previous year. In England a glance

at the weights for the Free Handicap, published at

the end of a season, usually indicates which were

the best in training. But racing out here has not

yet evolved to such a status. Unfortunately, due to

the set up of the officialdom of racing out here, there are strong

grounds for believing that it never will. At least not until we see
the formation of a West Indian Jockey Cub. -

The writer being the only one who has not ceased to believe
and hope that such a Club will one day be formed, one can guess
how remote is the possibility of a Free Handicap. Nevertheless it
would be very interesting if somebody could prevail upon the handi-
cappers of the T.T.C. and the B.T.C. to’sit down together and with
their combined efforts produce a Free Handicap.

Without this, in. order to find out what they thought about the
two-year-olds, we must refer to the two classifications which are issued
by the respective clubs every year after the Chrismas meetings.
This year we find a difference of opinion between the two bodies,
not about which horse was best, but about how good the best one
was. They both agree that Bright Light was far above
else of her age. But where the Barbados classifiers have placed her
in D proper, their counterparts in Trinidad have promoted her from
F to C2. Incidentally this is another record for Bright Light as she
now becomes the second creole ever to open her three-year-old career
in theimported classes. The first was her sister Best Wishes.

OOKING at ng displayed by these two sisters in two con-

secutive years [| am of the opinion that Bright Light has been
treated more leniently than her sister. Best Wishes, it will be remem-
bered, won two races in Barbados as a two-year-old and the Trinidad
classifiers placed her in E2, She then won two races in Trinidad at
the same age and they promoted her to C2. In none of these four races
did Best Wishes carry more than 126 lbs.

Bright Light, on the other hand, won one in Barbados, for which
she was moved from F2 to F by the T.T.C. classifiers, and then she
won four straight off the reel in Trinidad. In the last two races her
weights were 133 and 140 lbs. -

» -* while I do not agree entirely with the T.T.C. classifiers in
their placing of Bright Light, I cannot say that they are in no way
justified in so doing. In all the long list of unjustified classifications
made by the T.T.C. in regard to the creoles I have never once found
fault with them for promoting any horse too high up the list which
has won with colossal weight. In the cases of Pepper Wine, Front
Bell, Ligan, The Gambler, Ocean Pearl, Atomic II and Best Wishes,
my argument was always that inasmuch as none of them had done
more than win a few races with nominal weights, while some were
even beaten with little more than a good weight, there existed a con-
siderable amount of doubt about their capabilities, Possibly not a
jot, but enough to prevent them from skipping over two or three
classes as was done in some of the above cases,

“WHEREFORE if the T.T.C. classifiers now find that Bright Light

must go into C2, wihile I feel that it is quite enough for her to
be placed in D, I see no reason why the difference of half a class
should call for any adverse comment over a filly that has proved
herself capable of running away from her field with 140 lbs, in the
saddle. When horses do this sort of thing the doukt, in fact, must
be on the other side. The question then becomes: Not how good is
she, but what will she not be capable of?

Bright Light, as far as my ry serves me, is the tirst horse
of any age since Seawell did it in 1944, to have won four races at a
Christmas meeting and to carry 140 ibs. or more in the last event. At
the time that Seawell periormed his leat he was a three-year-old
and not only did he win with 145 lbs but he set up a track record
for the five furlong. Atver this the classitiers movea him trom #2 to
C2. I saw nothing wrong with that. The fact that Bright Light ac-
complished her task with 5 Ibs. less and did not break a record but
was a tull year behind Seawell in age, does seem to point out that
the T.T.C. classifiers are justilied im moving her one sub-class less than
they aia Seaweil.

Atter Brignt Light we
querque. Here both seis of cle





find the 1 the list is Dun-
fiers agree On heir respective lists:
sne 1s in Ez, ‘that means she is raved as 1v Lbs, interior to sright Light
in Barbados and 15 Ibs. in Triniaac As Ine Darpados Cidsoiuers saw
Dunquerque perform here and aid not see ir.gmt Light in ‘Trinidad,
wnile the Trinidad gentiemen saw Bright Lignt but not Dunquerque,
it is difficult \o Say which is the more correct estimate.
UPPOSING that we spiit the ditference our bree Handicap for two-

year-olds of 1951, based on classification, would therefore read
something like this: Bright Light 135 lbs ; Dunquerque 123 lbs.; Galiant
Rock 118 lbs.; Cavalier 118 ibs.; April’s Dream 110 lbs., Chutney 106
Ibs.; Cardinal 106 lbs.; March Winds 106 Ibs.; Flying Rock 106 lbs.;
Meditation 106 lbs.; Claire de Lune 103 lbs.; Diarose 103 lbs.; Rambler
Rose 103 lbs.; Sunina 103 tbs.; Drury Lane 101 Ibs,

The above 15 are those who were placed in the first three in
all the races for two-year-olds in Trinidad and Barbados in 1951.
With a few exceptions, such as Diarose, Claire de Lune and Sunina,
all of which I would place somewhere between April’s Dream and
Chutney, I think it gives as good an indication of the respective merits
as we can get.

next highest







LOCAL CLASSIFICATION PUBLISHED

HE local classification has come out at last. Usually the classifica-

tion comes out before the official programme is published but this
year this process was reversed.

Changes worthy of some comment, working down the list, start
with Embers. Although this is the first time she has been classified
here and it is not in the strict sense a change, yet it is reasonable to
assume that inasmuch as she was in A Class in Trinidad she would
also have been-in A class up here had she been classified before
the Christmas meeting. After all where else could one classify, the
winner of the Jamaican Derby and holder of a track record in that
colony to boot?

Nevertheless I am glad to see that she has been demoted now
that we have had an indication of her true value. It shows that but
for the stupid rule which allows no Jamaican to be placed below C2
in Barbados, our classifiers would be able to assess others from that
colony on their form in Trinidad if they had the chance. It also teaches
some of us that we must learn our lessons the hard way.

E next change I notice is the promotion of Firelady from C to

B2 and the promotion of Dashing Princess from C2 to C, Although
this means that they both went up a sub-class on their Trinidad classi-
fication for the Christmas meetfhg I did not think there was any
difference between them on the form displayed.

Another glaring error seems to be the placing of Watercress
in C2. I fail to see any method of reasoning in this when
The Eagle, who defeated her here last November is still in E class.
Mary Ann, who may have been in D2 in November but raced in D in
Trinidad, also defeated Watercress and is still in D class. Will some-
body please explain, I cannot understand it.

But the most glaring error of all is the promotion of Lunways
from C2 to C proper. Inasmuch as this horse did not win a race
at the Christmas Meeting, this is so surprising that it is completely
without precedent in the history of classification in the British West









Indies. Other than that, words fail me completely.
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SUNDAY, JANUARY 27, 1952

Australia Bat

From HAROLD DALE

: SYDNEY, Jan. 26.

First item of the programme
this morning was the summary
conclu:‘Qon o: the West Indian in-
nings, but Guillen and Valentine
refused to allow it to be quite so
summary as all that. They per-
sisted for half an hour and by
taking their stand to 18 made it
the biggest of the West Indian in-
nings.

Guillen cut a grand four square
off Miller and Valentine happily
achieved a similar stroke but was
rewardei with only*three. Val-
entine Was eventually caught by
Langley, bowled Miller for six,
Guillen not out 13, Extras sevén,
total 78 :

Slow Batting

McDonald and Thoms opened
to Gomez and Worrell who haa
changed ends from the previous
cay. For half an hour, we had
snail-like progress while these
two young men tried to erase
memories of their efforts yestér-
day.

In half an hour they scored
nine between them and against
bowling inferior to that which

they had faced in the first innings.
Gomez was obviously feeling the
effect to his immense three hours
bowling in the scorching heat and
to-day cold wind could not enliv-
en his tired muscles,

After half an hour the batsmen
began to venture scoring strokes
and Thoms drove Gomez with
fair decision while McDonald on
drove Worrell for two delicate long
glides down to fine leg. Wita
these methods, they pushed the
score along with sudden rapidity

and after 45 mingpites, had 28
runs on the board.
At this stage, Atkinson wos

brought on for Worrell who had
bowled five overs for 13 runs.
McDonald chopped Atkinson
through the slips for a_ single.
The score was 33 when Ramad-
hin relieved Gomez to bowl for

the first time in the match, His
first over was a maiden Well
pitehed-up and _ attacking the
stumps. He did not seem to be

getting much turn but his direc-
tion and length were good. The
next over was also a maiden,
marked by delivery variations in
length as if he were feeling for
a spot that would most embar-
rass Thoms,

Maiden Overs

Atkinson still bowled on the
wicket and allowed only an oc-
casiona] single so that the scor-
ing was almost ceased, while
Ramadhin engaged in his duel
with the batsman. His third over
which contained several balis

turning shortly was also a maid-
en, McDonald watching the ball
on the bat, but once losing sight
of it and having it spring from
his bat to square leg.

Just before lunch, Gomez took
Atkinson’s place,

Both Thoms and * McDonald
had improved on their previous
showing and were at least show-
ing careful if somewhat elumsy
defence. At last McDonald forced
Ramadhin past point for three.

The luneh score was McDonald
not out 15, Thoms not out 26,
extras 1, total—no wickets for 42.

Featureless Calm

One event broke the featureless
calm of the afternoon and that
happened early. In attempting
to pull Worrell, Thoms trod on
his wicket and was thus out for
28, and the total was one for 55.

Hassett then ventured on to the
scene and took his stand quietly
at one end, and in the course of
the next hour and a half all the
West Indies bowlers except
Gomez tried their eraft against
him and McDonald. McDonald
was the more interesting — he
slowly and cautiously emerged as
a batsman with limited strokes
but with a dogged defence that he
lightened occasionally with hooks
off Ramadhin and Valentine, both
of whom were dropping a few
short.

Somnolent Crowd

fhe afternoon was _ overcast,
the crowd was somnolent, an
the game settled down to some-
thing near monotony, but the
score moved ahead with singles
and boundaries, taken against
exactly the same field setting as
Goddard thhad used, He; had been
criticised for his one slip to his

spin bowlers and nabody els
nearer than 30 yards to the
wicket. Stollmeyer was doing

precisely the same thing and the
results were the same.
McDonald reached his 50 by
sweeping Ramadhin for four, and
Hassett brought up the hun-



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FROM

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dred when he pulled Valentine
to the rails.

Imperceptibly, Hassett quick-
ened his rate by straight driving
Atkinson who had replaced
Ramadhin, ahd the Australian
seoré began to reach ominous
proportions.

Donald Is Out
McDonald, at 61 to Hassett’s 41
and the score at one for 133, was
beginning to sight his century in
the distance and there seemed to

be no obstaele in his way. And
the very instant I wrote those

words he was bowled by Rama-
dhin, which is one of the things
continually happening to cricket
writers, Ramadhin produced, his
offbreak kéépitig low and McDon-
ald more Or Iéss Watchéd it come
back and shattef his witFet. He
had scdred 62. TWo for 138.
Australia was now a long way
ahead of their opponents. A game
that looked like finishing in litthe
more than two days; was now
bidding fair to stretch to full
distance, as long as the West
Indies batsmen were able to reply
in kind to Australia’s present
determined concentration.

West Indies Rewarded

After tea, the West Indies had
the reward for their long drawn
effort in the field. Worrell pro-
voked in Harvey a marked tend-
ency to swing his bat just out-
side the off stump. Harveyyscores
many brilliant squaredrives and
squarecuts from this standpoint
and Worrell working up to a real
pace, twice got that extra lift
which threatened the edge of his
bat. Harvey possibly saw the trap,
but he is no man to refuse a
challenge. He lashed out again
and this time did find the edge
and Guillen made the catch. Har-
vey eight. Three for 152.

Meanwhile, Hassett plodded
past his 50 and at 57 was subject
of a tremendous appeal by Gomez
for Lb.w. Hassett was all legs in
front and looked hopelessly lost,
but he was given not out.

Miller Clowns

Miller after a slow start began
to swing his bat at the limit of
his long arms and gave ug one or
two fine drives along the ground.

He also performed mighty
sweeps and tremendous pulls
that twisted him in knots — all
without contacting the ball, al-
though once he shaded his eyes
and peered into the distance from
a sitting position to look for the
ball which had been for some
time in Guillen’s hands.

Miller is one of those rare
players who is convinced that
cricket is a game. Incidentally,
between foolery and gaiety it is
a game that he plays very
well. His next shot was four,
swept off Gomez with grand ease
and he brought up 200 with
another four through covers.

Hassett began to observe that
having had hours start, Miller
was yet overhauling him, so he
square-drove Ramadhin, who had
reappeared, for a flashing bound-
ary.

Just A Glimpse

Obviously the West Indies were
now faced with a big job, We had
seen today as we had before, in
the Second Test here, a glimpse
of Australian Test Cricket in
its traditional form.

Miller seemed lucky to get
away with the l.b.w. appeal at
48 but two balls later, Valentine
turned one widely across Has-
sett’s bat and Worrell took a slip
catch, Hassett 64, Miller not out
49, Extras five. Total four for
216. At this point, with 25 min-
utes remaining for play, the bats-
men appealed against light which
had become very grey and the
appeal was upheld.

In this long day—a dull day
until Miller livened the procéed-
ings—Australia forgot all about
its First Innings collapse, and
firmly set about building a diffi-
cult total for the West Indies to
catch. Now 254 on, with six wick-
ets to fall, they will call forth an
enormous Fourth Innings effort
from the West Indies if the
islanderg are to win. But, at least
the game is assured of a good
gate on Monday which is a pub-
lic holiday—Australia Day—with
the consequent benefit to tourists

finances. And the end is by no
means cértain yet.
The Scores :—

Australia’s Ist McDonald c Worrell b Gomez 22
Thoms b. Gomez S sakaab ab 16
Hassett c wk (Guillen) b Gomez . 2
Harvey b Gomez ‘ 18
Miller ¢ Rae b Worrell ‘ 6 20
Hole ec Gomez b Worrell . 9
Benud c Stolimeyer b Gomez 3

Lindwall c Worrell b Gomez 0



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SUNDAY ADVOCATE

With Determination

TROPHY PRESENTATION



MRS. H. A. ARTHUR presents the
won the 1951-52 competition) at the presentation 0

Also in the picture are Mr. K. D. G. Frost, Secretary of the
and Mr. Weekss) and three other members of Busters’ team, M. Parker,

Busters Presented With
Advocate Challenge Cup

AFTER a Presentation

Polo Match at the Garrison

yesterday, Busters, this season’s Polo Cup winners, were

presented with the
Arthur, wife of the founder
Two other Cups, the H.

Advocate Challenge Cup by Mrs. H. A.

of the Barbados Polo Club.
Warner Bolton Challenge Cup

and the Y. De Lima Cup were presented to Busters and
Broncos for scoring the most goals.

Both of these teams
Mustangs and Rangers
teams which played this season
and last Wednesday, Busters
played a fast game to beat Bron-
cos and make themselves this
season’s Cup Winners.

The usual Busters team is: V.
Weekes (Capt.), K. Melville, A.
Arthur and M. Parker, but on a
few occasions, John Marsh acted
as substitute and greatly assisted
the team.

The Tournament

The Tournament provided good
entertainment for those who avail-
ed themselves of the opportunity
of watching the matches; although
the standard of play, on the whole,
was not equal to that which wes
reached last vear. This was chiefly
due to the fact that some of last
year’s Seniors were unavailable
for the matches this year with the
result that several Juniors were
included in the teams, and last
year’s Seniors were distributed
among all the teams and only one
competition, instead of a Senior
and Junior Competition, was
played. Although there was :
great improvement in the playing
of the Juniors who had been pro-
moted, the striking positioning and
marking of last year’s tournament,

defeated
the other









Ring «











Atkinson b Gomez 4
Langley ¢ ekos b Worrell 6
Jolinson not out 13
Extra, 1
Total 116
BOWLING ANALYSIS
oO M R Ww
Gomez 18 65 7
Worrell is 42 3
Atkinson 6 2 18 0
W. INDIES — 1ST INNINGS
Rae C. Langley 6 Johnson 11
Stolimeyer ihw TIohnstor 19
Walcott b Lindwall .....sseeeeee + 1
Weekes c Langiay b Lindwall
Christian? ¢ & b Miller 7
Gomez b Miller it
Worrell b Miller 6
Atkinson b Mii 6
Ramadhin b J on 0
Valentine ¢ Lan b Miller 6
Guillen not out 1
Extras 7
Total 78
BOWLANG ANALYSIS
oO M Ww
Lindy 2
Johnston 4 3 3
Miller 7.6 1 5
AUSTRALIA 2nd li
Thoms b Worrell oF
MacDonald b Ratnadh 62
Harve € Wkpr t 8
Hassett c Worrell b V 64
Miller r out
Hole not out 0
Extras 5
Total (for 4 wickets)

She





especially in the case of the Dean«
Bros’ winning team, were absent
in this tournament. Last year’s
winning team, like all the other
senior teams, was distributed
among the teams to balance them.

The teams taking part in the
competition were:—

Mustangs: Vere Deane (capt.)
Lee Deane, J. Hanschell and O, H.

Johnson,

Rangers: Col. Michelin (capt.),
Keith Deane, W. Bradshaw and
W. Chandler.

Broncos: M. Edghill (capt.)
Fric Deane, G. Emtage and K.
Frost.

Busters: V. Weekes (capt.), K.
Melville, A. Arthur and M, Parker
who was involved in a minor ac-
cident during Bronco’s first match
and whose place was taken by
John Marsh,

The two teams taking part u
yesterday’s match were Eric Dean
John Marsh, Lee Deane and Mark
Edghill—Blues; and Vietor Weekes
Col. Michelin, Keith Deane and
Vere Deane—Reds,

Reds won five goals to three.

Good Players
The outstanding players of this
match were Lee Deane who scored
four of the five goals for Reds,
Col. Michelin who seored two for
the Blues and V. Weekes and M.
Edghill who each scored one, Lee

Deate took good advantage of
passes from his team mates and
Col. Michelin was very accurate.

Reds scored in the first chukka
when Lee Deane followed up a
powerful hit from a team mate and
scored. In the second chukka, Lee
Deane scored two and Victor
Deane one,

The Blues started off the third
chukka very fast and Col, Michelin
who was getting his accuracy to
help him more than his dash, was
able to score two to put Blues in
a less unfavourable position. The
score was!now three-two, Blues
leading.

In the fourth chukka, Blues con~
tinued the spirited playing they
had begun in the previous chukka
ind V. Weekes was especially
lively in urging his horse to the
front and preventing his opponents
from hilting the ball well. He was
able to score about half way in
this chukka to draw things more
even. Reds, however, were still
leading with the score four three.

Lee Deane managed to score
early in the last chukka, but after
that goal there was an even tussle
with Blues fighting hard though
they were now getting tired. They
were unable to score again.




N POUND OVAL TINS

cence CCC CC OC CC AA A ACCC AR LL LLL

Advocate Challenge Cup te Victa: Weekes, Captain of Busters (who
f Cups at the Garrison Savannah yesterday afternoon.
Polo Club (between Mrs, H. A. Arthur

John Marsh and Keith Melville.

EMPIRE

@ From Page 1

ill be lett naked to the econ-
mic blast That is vengeance
sue so tes sareaadiui years ol in-

aulflerence,

But vengeance will not fall on
Britain alone. To vast tracts of
colonial territory Britain has
brought justice, aecency and civil-
isation, They have made it
possible for scores of millions to
live in security under law. They
have brought medical care and
education. They have brought
lignt to dark places of the earth.
But if Britain leaves, darkness
will come swooping back. All
that has been done will be brought
to ruin. Barbarism will be the
only gainer and Britain will earn
bitterly the just reproaches of
peoples whose trust they havé be-
trayed,

Forty years ago it was moved
by enthusiasm for a plan to
strengthen and solidify the British
Empire by building a fiscal and
political structure after the pat-
tern of the U.S.A. Our measure
of suceess has been small. And
that ig only another way of say-
ing—a devastating measure of
failure is giving us a sense of
utter frustration,

Never in my lifelong campaign-
ing for the cause of the Empire
have I found it so hopeless a task,

Ts it credible that a nation
can’t watch the greatest of their
achievements crumbling and the
sources of their wealth passing to
other hands with no feeling except
perhaps a faint and monetary ir-
ritation? It should be incredible,
but it may be true.

But there is a gleam of hope.
Britain is now being given another
chance. Tories control the new
Parliament though the Empire
policy play no part in their elee+
tion results just because the
British public refused to take any
interest in imperial affairs.

Over many election campaigns
in the past, however, that party
is pledged to the Empire. They
have never fulfilled their prom
ise. This time will the Tories
honour their pledge or will they
neglect and ignore it ?

It is my hope that the Tory
party will now take the lead,
making a mighty reaffirmation
of the imperial destiny. They
should be dedicated to awaken-

ing in the masses a strength of
their former pride and in
obligation of their duties to
colonial races and a sense of
present peril to their people. It
is not too late. But there must
be a new crusade,

Britain must not lose the
Empire. The British race must
not lose the will to defend it
They can only guard what is
left by reassérting their Will.
They must make it clear that
they will no longer tolerate
outside nations or international
bodies playing forfeits with

British rights and property. They
breathing

have
space

been
and

given
an

opportunity, The

Tory Government must earry ou’

its task of national revival,

—LES.

Oe

SOOSOSSOSD

*

LOPISSSS

|







Extra Engine Cleanline

JAN. 27

PAGE FIVE



NO. 208

The Topic
of

Last Week



T week was ope of oricket
The way the Wiekets fll

the A ralian teat match
Let's cal bat-and-ba



rok the
Who rose to
Haral
Yo

world's star
cricket fame

reached double figures
don't think it's a shame

batsmen

who has “engle’s” eve-stght
eclaréd without a hitet
The trowble in Australia

ts simbly with the piteh

right
Thousands of

ide a rum
nifles away
Said on a bowler's Wicket
A batsman cahnot stay

shon

When Australia Was hooked

With nine for ninety-nine

w






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10 drops.

Joe said Lou gitt 1 got you
Ma wee; for Depression, Debility, Indigestion, Sleeplessness, and
But boys the whole thing turn ‘retind after Influenza.

And Joe with staring eves
West Indies Gut Hear eighty
Said the radio telling lies



Oh boys the gossip started
And contents not so kind
Declaring the West Midians
Have something oh their mind
a . :

At any rate bou aatd this
Joe boy by Monday night
The victory for Avistralia
Will surely be in sight
. .
We comé hore to Barbados,
You ean get vex or pletse
We're beating the Jamaicans
And beating them With esse
* . :

Barbados has a young team
Who'll goon replace the old
All thesé will need is handling
There's talent we can mould

. . .

The boy vou call DePeizan
lf given a hélping hand
Will be another uret——
He keeps a wicket grand

And when ft comes to bowling,

You know how bees can sting

The very thing does happen

When batainén face Frank King.
. ;

Well our friend Norman Marshal!
Can keep down any store

One thing Lou said, he's shown
He can bow! maidens galore



Well Monday bright and early
Yes Mon@ay boys don't tear
We hope to throw Jamaicans
Right in the reverse gear,

They'll cOme and faee Gur music
We'll bowl them 61€ hy_ one,

We'll buck-up with our flelding
Till ever¥ man is gone

And fy be Tuesday evening
When we have won both test
We'll stage a J & KR party
Barbados ram that's best

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PAGE SIX a

MILLIONS OF FAMILIES agree with scientific findings that :








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DESPATCH DEPARTMEN

SOME WHO DO NOT

RS. GLADYS LEITH mus‘
be an exceptional woman
in these days,

It was Mrs. Leith who said (dur-
ing a court dispute with he:
dressmakers yesterday): “Some
people wi'l manage with two or
three evening frocks a yew
but I like seven or eight.”

of six housewives I spoke *

to-day not one buys more tha).
one new evening dress a year.

Usual reasons: “No money to
spare on fripperies”, “We don’t
go out enough these days”:
“Nobody seems to dress up
now,” and “It’s school uniforms
that are worrying me at pre-
sent, not evening dresses.”

Even women in public life did
not equal Mrs. Leigh's buying
record.

Jacquetta Hawkes, archaeologist
and author, with an OBE in the
last Honours List “One ful!
evening dress in two years and
about two dinner dresses.”

Cabaret star Hermione Baddeley.

“Until I was in cabaret I had
two evening drecsce year, Dut
now I need them for work !
buy six.”

Betty Jumel, this season's panto-
mime “Humpty-Dumpty”: “One
dinner dress and one full even-
ing gown see me through 12
months.”

Norma Andreotti, opera singer,

giving a recital in London this
week: “I buy about 20 a year,
averaging 100 dollars each, but
these are mostly for my work.”
My own count is one in three

years, But the one before last
did duty for ten years.
Light Up
oe of .last October's
tobacco consumption § in
Britain, announced to-day,

were the highest ever—21,130,-
0001b.

This means that manufacturers
are making more—not that the
public are necessarily buying
mpre, says Mr. Featherstone, of
the National Union of Retail]
Tobacconists.

But he points to the large post-
war increase in women smok-
ers,

‘Women face more nervous wor-
ry and strain today and find
smoking comforting,” he told
me. He quoted examples of
women who took part-time jobs
to earn their cigarette money.

A London bar-tender told me he
finds more crimson-tipped cig-
arette stubs in the ashtrays than
plain ones.

One business woman I quizzed
about her smoking habits con-
fessed that she had spent about
£100 a year on cigarettes.

I like my 10 a week, but I do NOT
like to see the following smok-
ers;

Girls under 18;

Elderly women;

Smoking in the streets;

Chain smoking;

Cigarettes dropping out of a
woman’s mouth.

Nicotine-stained fingers on a wo-
man.

Spotlight on Teenagers

EENAGE STYLES are receiv-
ing more attention from de-
signers in the New Year. Chub-
bies is a new group for girls

between 11 and 14, with more
than average puppy-fat to
camouflage.

Another range, called Miss Debut,
covers girls in their late teens
and early twenties.

Coat linings are almost more
important than the coat. Con-
trast colours are gay; quilting
is warm for the rest of the win-
ter months, bright tartan in
wool or silk is good for coun-
try wear,

Wool jersey

makes an elegant



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a











THIN Lips

FULL LIPS y




EILEEN
ASCROFT’s
COL UMN

lining, especially when match-
ing the frock beneath.
Thinking Small
yj’ \HILDREN are larger

“4 than they were before
war,

Mothers repeatedly confirm thi:
with weight and measurement
charts. But manufacturers of
small children’s clothes refuse
to recognise facts. They still
produce pre-war sizes.

This is a typical letter from a
mother. It is from Mrs, Chris-
tine Shirley, of Town Court
Lane Petts Wood.

“My son, three years old last
September, weighs 3st, 5lbs. and
is 3ft Tins. tall. .

“At 14 months, when Stephen
was learning to walk, he had to
wear heavy walking shoes, as
manufacturers do not make kid
Shoes with non-slip soles in a
Size larger than 5. He now
wears clothes for a six-year-
old.”

The Ministry of Health have been
conducting a national survey
during the last two years to
establish the average post-war
weights and heights of children
under 3. Their findings—to be
issued in about a year—may
persuade manufacturers to
change their sizing systems,

Ministry figures already show that
school children have increas-
ed their height since before
the war by }-in.-4jin. and their
weight by 14-2lb (3-3441b. for
girls.)

Nylons to Burn

Ne ITEM FROM TEHERAN

TO-DAY. Queen Sor-
oya plans to make a bonfire of
her nylon stockings. She will be
accompanied by other Persian
women members of a league
which refuses to wear clothes
bought with foreign currency.

Result of the closing of the Per-
sian market to British nylons;
there may temporarily be a
few more nylons on sale at
home says Miss Margaret Ree-
kie of the British Nylon spin-
ners

Nylon stockings as a_ profitable
British export. The Board of
Trade’s figures for the 70 ex-
port countries up to November
30 last year are £5,638,000 for
fully-fashioned and £725,000
for seamless.

No Passes ?
HE old saying that men sel-
dom make passes at girls
who wear glasses may be up-
set by the latest spectacle
frames.

Wicks in the shafts are impreg-

nated with perfume.

TTRACTIVE Hungarian-born
Maria Hornes reads charac-

now
the

ters from her clients’ lips as!






Copr. 1950
Borden Co.
Internat’! Copr.
Reserved

world are assured of milk un-

failingly safe and healthful when they use KLIM.
Your KLIM milk is protected in the tin against dampness,

... it keeps without refriger-

ation. Since with KLIM there is no waste or spoilage, you

of this superior quality milk

5 KLIMadds nourishment to cooked dishes
6 KLIMis recommended for infant feeding
7 KLIMis safe in the specially-packed tin

ler strictest control

‘
i
‘
’

—— a om

Take pure water, add KLIM,
stir and you have
pure, safe milk

EFERENCE THE WORLD OVER



=
aS

t

SUNDAY, JANUARY 27, 1952



ERRQOOH Nev ytereneexovnagertevennegggpreyrnrnegHya gy Ep RE

LiPS GIVE
AWAY THE
CHARACTER



~< HEAVY LOWER LIP

~ THE CLASSICAL
MOUTH

.. » but-make-up
can tell a lie

she works to beautify them.

Rix has sketched the four main
types of mouths and Miss Hornes
gives her character reading otf
e-ch, together with practical
advice on lip make-up.

A HEAVY LOWER LIP signifies
a volatile character. Good in-
tellect, but inclined to be lazy

Emphasize the top lip with a
slightly darker shade of lip-
stick. Press lips together ana
the imprint gives a good guide.
Stop short of the corntrs of
bottom lip and shade off colour
with the little finger

THIN LIPS indicate a purposeful
charac.er and shrewdness,

Make lips look larger and fuller
by using clear, bold red and
by building up the corners un-
obtrusively, with a slight ex-
tension of the centre curves,

CLASSICALLY SHAPED
MOUTH, with clearly defined
Cupid’s bow. Set of top lip
suggests superiority,

Spotlight the perfect mouth by
wearing vivid lipsticks, Blot of}
any excess with tissue and
powder over the top. Take col-
our well inside lips to give an
even line when smiling,

FULL LIPS suggest that their
owner is generous and appre-
ciates the good things of life.

To “fine down” a large mouth,
trace the outline just inside
the natural margin. Take col-
our as high as natural lip-line
in the centre,

World Copyright Reserved
—L.E.S.

THE SOCIALIST PSALM

THE GOVERNMENT is
Shepherd, I need not work,

It allows me to lie down on good

jobs, it leadeth me beside still

factories.
destroyeth my initiative, i
leadeth me in the paths of the

Parasite for Politic’s sake,

Yea, even though I walk through
the valley of laziness and deficit
spending, I will fear no evil for
the GOVERNMENT is with me.

It prepareth me for an economic
Utopia by appropriating the
earnings of my grandchildren.

It filleth my head with Baloney;
my inefficiency runneth over.
Surely THE GOVERNMENT shall
care for me all the days of my
life, and I shall dwe.l in a Fool s

Paradise FOREVER.
—Watson A. Humphrey-Gaskin.

Public Holiday

ST, GEORGE'S.
First day of the Grenada Agri-
cultural and Industrial Exhibit-
ion, Wednesday January 30, has
been proclaimed a public holi-
day. Very keen interest in the
event is promised and so far
there have been over 700 entries,
exclusive of those for school
competitions, with just five more

| days to go before closing date.



my

It



An appeal for persons made
destitute by last Monday morn-
ing’s fire in St. George’s has
been launched by the St.
an

George’s District Board with
initial donation of $100

The flowing beauty of crc
has never been seen to greater advanta
than in Ferguson's luxurious

in a riot of lovely colours . . . s

\

superbly carried out by Fergus

A. S. Bryden & Sons (Bar

pe



traditional, some new and daring...

on craftsmen



Family

Welfare

AMONG THE MANY PROBLEMS pressing upon us
in these days is one that is above all others important

preservation of our family

way of life.

Here is our top-rank social institution, and it is at the
same time the nearest many of us come to that “heaven

upon earth” that the philosophers talk about.

It is, of all

our social necessities, the most necessary. ‘

Piusveug Wit, alu Clack —
b4iae 2D thee AMMUOL didetad pe vupuiig
ave WSEAS, CUMAULE GU Seawasty.
WU PCUPAS SEE dk ULL pa Saciie Dred
Vs ovessey & WEdaeidg Ub Lue bico
Ae Med Aedddesice

WBS, Gin

acy Aves eee HAD CUssdeseUee Ss 4
dileuece WU Lue Vailies Lil dase Wiuitus
we 40s Ucar,

ducre are Causes Which we Cail-
ful Waaliie, Buu, iueCU, Caliocd
wintcu We WOWG MOL Wis WwW
Vidiuuaee, Jal We Cal GO ib duapt
Ourselves LO Ulcer. SUr eXalliyar,
we ave a@allained pusuuca
aumucracy, WOiCO Js a good Wu,
Due it Mas Suessed Cyuauty aud
tne indiviagual, woereas Wie Waui-
U0Hal laMuy iaea was Of a airecior
ana cO-Operauon, We now nave
people living in closeiy-packea
ciuues, Subject to all the distractuons
OL urpan ile, instead of the cally
let's-suck-logeimer groups of rutai
lite. We have the changed status
ot women, due to their new-lIound
economic ingependence, and there
is tne opporvwnily oltered to all
members of the family to go ic
work. “In older days, the bread-
winner was the guide, counselior,
support and law-giver of the
housenold; today, everyone has an
equai—or equally loud—voice in
family affairs.

What is the Foundation ?

The family is built upon love
All literature records the yearning
of human beings for love. The
greatest poems revolve around it.
Our noblest writers have, at tyeir
highest moments, described the
joys of fulfilled love, and have
pictured for us the wretched
sullering visited upon those who
tnrow it away or lose it.

How does love show itself in the
family? Not principally in actions,
or in bubbling-over enthusiasms,
but in the caim feeling that here
is a group of people, intimate from
the chila’s bubynood, who woula
feel pride in his success, socrow
at his failure, and shame at his
disgrace.

What is Stability ?

The family holds its pre-
eminent place in our way of life
because it is the only possible base
upon which a society of re-
sponsible human beings has ever
found it practicable tg build for
the future and maintain the values
they cherish in the present.

It seems necessary for the
peace of mind of readers who fear
the worst, to stress the fact that
in a world of change the family
also changes. But the influence of
social heritage has in the long
run outweighed social innovation.
Even if, for a time, society de-
parts from past standards, the
structure seems to right itself on
a level which fits the new en-
vironment. That is the character
of civilization, to set aside the
easy-to-follow traditional pattern
while developing into something
better. The vital thing is to pre-
serve those elements of civiliza-
tion, culture, ideals, standards and
customs which the past has found
good, and merge thpm with the
new or changed factors which the
present day believes valid,

Personal and Social

if the family were to be swept
away, the world would become
a piace of regimentation, chaos and
desolation. Why? Because the
family fulfils at least three vital
functions; it provides sustenance
and trains its members in the art
of surviving; it provides the
earliest group association, teaching
the art of social living; and it is
the primary place where the values
and knowledge of culture are
passed from generation to genera-
tion, -
But wholesome and constructive
thinking in the family will pene-
trate all society. ‘The man who
learns within the family to accom-
modate himself to others, to sub-
ordinate, when necessary, his per-
sonal interest to the interest of the
group, ahd to tolerate in others
fads and habits he would con-
demn in himself: that man has
learned many of the lessons neces-
sary to his becoming a good work-
mar, a good executive and a good
citizen.

Effect of Classes

We must pass by, in this Letter,

the disruption brought about by

the cityward trand and by inven-
tions instead, something will be
said about the eifect of social
classes on family slabilily, a phe-
homenon Win arpidly changing
and dynamic qualiues.

ii we divide tne classes arbilrar-
uly, we have three: the upper ciass,
comprisipg the old and the new;
the middie class, divided into up-
per and lower; and the working
class. These distinctions are im-
portant, because no matter what
we say about democracy anda
equality, they are there.

In the old upper class the prin-
cipal features are; who were one’s
ancestors and who are one’s rela-
tives? Background is the testing
point. One of the constant wor-
ries of this group is to keep its
young people from marrying in-
discreetly someone outside the
group.

One of the disruptive facts in
family life is that so many fam-
ilies with an urge to climb social-
ly have to break with their group
as part of the price they pay. It
is often a stiff price to pay, and
inevitably it means a rupture in
the family pattern, It is a cost
to be reckoned by any family with
climbing aspirations.

Economic Worries

Some persons will say that most
family disruption stems from fin-
ancial and economic causes, but
we need to proceed with care in
making any such judgment. No-
where is it more true than in per-
sonal relations that things are not
always what they seem. The
“financial tension” that is so ereat-
ly deplored may be merely the
overt expression of other worrie
and disappointments and troubles

Economic matters are impor-
tant in family life, but they do not
rete top billing. Persons with un-
stable personalities can quarrel as
readily over money matters as
about anything else, Those who
make sure to keep equable tem-

peraments can adjust themselves
to really trying economic prob-
lems. Let’s not take the e ey way

out by using budget dificulty'as a
neg on which to hang responsibil-
ity for a break-up.

Approaching Marriage

Marriage is not something that
iS covered in a ceremony; it is not
something in which success js as-
sured if the young people have the
same background, traditions and
economic status, It is not guanan-
teed success by books, movie-made
conceptions of married life, or
anylung else of a casual or super-
ficial nature.

_ The only thing that works effec-

lively toward successful marriage
is Kinship of ideas and ideals. No
blind faith in romantic love will
serve, though this igs a hard-to-
erase social siction,

Marriage is a combined opera-
lon, and that does away with the
treedom of isolation, Interdgpend-
ence doesn’t mean leaning, but
being able to reach out and know
that the partner is there when
needed, and planning together to
meet a big or a little crisis, and
walking hand-in-hand along both
sunlit uplands and dark valfeys.

The Family Council

To bring together in a har-
monious pattern the personal
traits and desires of its members,
and the group needs of the fam-
ily, the “family council” has been
devised.

Family Ritual

/ Very like the family council in
its effect, though not in its formal-
ity of organization, is ritual, This
is a way of acting that acquires a
certain “rightness” in each family.
It is not merely a code of behav-
jour, but extends itself to include
participatior in family prayer, in
religious observances, in hobbies,
in observing birthdays and Christ-
mas, and in many other ways, It
is largely through family ritual
that culture is developed and pass-
ed on through generations.

Mealtime provides a recurring
opportunity for ritual. It is then

at the family is at its greatest
ase; the members are together in
one place for a definite period;
and there are fewer distractions
than at most other times of the
day.



gas

all

ridgetown, |



ITCHING
INFLAMED



Relentless itching—caused by germs under
the skin, speedily develops into irritating
pimples and open sores unless checked.
Thousands of skin sufferers have proved
that there is nothing more sure in results
than D.D.D. Prescription. This famous
liquid healer does penctrate the tortured
skin tissues, attack the festering germs and
drive out the infection. Whatever form of
skin trouble is giving you pain and distress
— ECZEMA, PSORIASIS, BOILS,
ERUPTIONS, PRICKLY HEAT,
MALARIA SORES or RINGWORM-—
just a few applications of wonderful
D.D.D. Prescription will give instant
relief. Persevere, and me good resu!:s

will be lasting! D.D.D. Prescription is

obtainable from chemists and stores
| everywhere.

Distributors :

F.B.Armstrong Ltd., Bridgetowr

DD)

"3 PRESCRIPTION ‘


SUNDAY, JANUARY 27, 1952

SEWING

By PENN

CIRCL

Â¥ NOLAN

WELL PLANNED YOKES add interest to many styles.
The home designer will find that yokes offer a fertile field

for her talents.

Of course any form of designing is also

a form of art but all of us have some art talent and even
the smallest talent will grow with practice so don’t be
frightened by the term “design”.

Study fashion pictures of various
yokes, Try drawing some of these
yokes on copies of your basic
pattern. Achieving exactly the
same proportions as the picture
your are copying may not be easy
at first but keep trying. :
- ay “Le , c="?

Figure 1 shows a round yoke.
Notice that this yoke starts from
the tip of the shoulder or where
the shoulder seam meets the
sleeve seam, The lowest point of
yoke curve is just above the first

button. On your basic bodice
front first determine where you
want this first button. Mark it
on your pattern and pin in your
basic darts then hold the pat-
tern on you in front of your mir-
ror with the neckline turned
back to form the lapels, When
you are sure you have the but-
ton in the proper location unpin
the darts so the pattern will lay
flat and draw in a gentle curve

from the shoulder tip to a point
about an half inch above the
first button, Work over the

curve until it is smooth, then re-
pin darts and try before your
mirror again. Keep working on
the curve until ‘it looks right on
you. Cut the pattern apart on
the curve and add seam allow-
ance to both edges.

The yoke in Figure 2 starts at
the underarm seam. This yoke
is designed on a kimono sleeve

~~

basic and the yoke comes from
the point on the underarm seam
where it curves out to become
the sleeve, seam. At the centre
front the yoke line comes to the
point of the V neckline. The
first step is to establish the neck-

line, Then start from the under-
arm seam and sketch in the
~urves and point, Try in front of

your mirror until achieve

the desired effect.

you



Fie 3
The yoke in Figure 3 starts
about midway on the shoulder

seams. From the position of the
underarm darts in the picture you
can see that the lowest point of
the yoke curve is about level with
ihe bust point. Try sketching
this wm and try on as before to
obtain the lines most becoming
to you. When you have cut the
yoke pattern from the bodice
pattern you will have to allow
button lap and facing on the
yoke. This yoke is also very
effective when tucked. This may
be done in two different ways.
you may tuck a section of cloth
and then cut its outlines by your
yoke pattern or you may crease
tucks in another piece of paper
and cut another yoke pattern
from the first which includes the
tucks. The last method necessi-
tates marking the tucks accurately
before stitching.

<3

After you have practised mak-
ing yoke patterns from pictures
try designing some original yokes
on your basic. The possible
designs are numerous.

The best method for stitching
most yokes is to turn under the
yoke seam and lap the yoke over
the bodice seam. Base carefully
and top stitch.

Uncomfortable
Children

“Children don’t experience phy-
sical discomfort as the adult hu-
man does. You buy them fleecy
dressing gowns and fur-lined bed-
room slippers, yet they prefer to
walk barefooted on freezing lino-
leum and stand in howling
draughts rather than put these
garments on. They can plaster
their fingers with an adhesive
mixture of congealed marmalade,
leaf mould and poster paint and
then set about some task requir-
ing delicacy of touch—such as
dealing a pack of cards or play-
ing the piano.”

—Anthony Buckeridge.







What's Cooking
In The Kitchen

Last week I gave you two
recipes for gnocchi. The follow-
ing is Agnolotti. They are mis-
taken for ravioli sometimes and
they are just as tasty and less
expensive.

Agnolotti

For 5 people
Meat ‘s Ib.
Grated cheese
Ham | sliee
Salt
Nubnes
Water 1 tablespoonful
Tomato sauce
Domed spinach 2 tablespoonsful

aS

Marsala or Rum 1 tabiespoonful
Pepper

Flour %

80 agnolotti)

Cook the slices of meat in some
butter. Mince it amd add to it
2 tablespoonsful of boiled spinach
(quite dry), 1 tables of
grated cheese, one egg yolk, 1
slice of ham minced, 1 teaspoon-
ful of Rum and a tiny bit of nut-
meg (according to taste). Mix all
with a wooden spoon, Now pre-
pare the dough. Sift the #1b of
flour on the kitchen table. Add
the two eggs and the white of
the other egg, one tablespoonful
of water and a@ pinch of salt, Work
the dough until soft and divide
it into two pieces. With the rol-
ling pin roll the dough until you
have two side sheet. Be careful
that the dough does not get dry.
On the first sheet put the mixture
in small heaps as big as a nut
leaving two inches between each.



Cover with the other sheet of
dough and press between each of

the agnolotti. Cut with a knife
that you have dipped in flour
agnolotti (like little squares)
about 2 inches by 2 inches. See
that the mixture is safely shut
inside by pressing with your fin-
ger all round each of them, Put
them to dry on a tablecloth which
you have dusted wtih flour. Put
a saucepan on the fire with some
water and salt and as soon as it
is boiling throw the agnolotti in
the water and let them boil for 10
minutes. Put them in a colander
and pour some tomato sauce on
them. Serve hot. If you don't
like tomato sauce you can put
some table butter and grate cheese
on them. In either ways they
will be very tasty. Serve hot.

And now two easy recipes for
cakes.

Savoy Biscuit

It is called biscuit not because
it is a biscuit but from the old
fashioned French BISCUIT.

Eggs: 5

Cornflour: 2 02,

Flour: 2 oz,

Icing sugar Ya Ib.

Orange or lemon peel or vanilla
essence.

. Osbert Peake,

SUNDAY ADVOCATE

You Need Charmito
Work fora Princess

By SUSAN DEACON

BUSY learning a job which may
last only three months, is 28-year-
old Iris Peake, daughter of Mr.
M.P. for Leods
North, and new temporary lady-
in-waiting to Princess Margaret.

It is a job most girls will envy.
What qualifications are needed?

A LITTLE SHORTHAND. Miss
Peake’s speed was 120 when she
finished training ten years ago.

You need to be EFFICIENT
AND HARDWORKING. In Miss
Peake’s last job, researching for
the Conservative Central Office
she “worked extremely hard an
never minded staying late.”

You need TACT, Her work in
research was “top secret”, so Miss
Peake is used to “not talking.”

You need CHARM. An ex-col-
league says: “Iris Peake is an
attractive girl and was very pop-
ular.”

You need POISE. A resident in
her father’s constituency says:
“She has so much poise I cannot
imagine her ever getting into a
panic.”

WHAT ARE HER DUTIES?

She is secretary, companion, and
Press officer combined. And almost
always on duty.

Why was she selected?

FRIENDS say she seemed most
surprised to be chosen. Miss
Peake herself says: “I have no
idea. I don’t know Princess Mar-
garet well, although I have met
her occasionally.”

Will Miss Peake need a new
wardrobe to start her new job?

No. She says: “I am buying

only a few new clothes. Probably

one of everything.”

° * .
To-day's Youngsters Are
Older
ARE children growing up more
quickly these days? The shop
buyers, the wine waiters in Lon-
don restaurants, and Mayfair
hairdressers say: “Definitely yes.”
TO-DAY girls start growing up
when they are 12 to 14, At 10,
many buy their first “below-the-
knee” party dress, and at 14 order

an ankle-length party dress.

PRE-WAR, they did not wear
a full-length dress until they were
at least 17—and there was no
intermediary stage.

Young girls to-day have a far
better fashion sense than they had
ten years ago.

THE BUYER in the “Junior
Miss” department of a store says:

“At 10 years of age, they know
exactly what they want and see
that they get it.”

» cg *

A hairdresser says:—

“They frequently have their
first grown-up hairstyle when 13
or 14. It is usually a simple half
turn pageboy, or a youthful short

cut.”
Drinking
Boys and girls START DRINK-
ING earlier. >
In France children drink wine
and water from a very early age,
and this habit is spreading to








JAGUAR.

‘A Beautifully Proportioned
Sedan of Outstanding Biegance.”
And that, Ladies and Gentiemen,
is a quote from Informaciones’
of Madrid. It is simply an echo
cf International motoring opinion
in regard to the majestic
JAGUAR XK120, Mk.VII Sedan.
The Jaguar ig now in Barbados.
Among the more important
features to note in the Jaguar
Type XK Engine — one that has
surprised the world—is that
reliance has been placed upen
new or untried inventions. Only
a blend of known and proved ce-
tail designs of the highest
efficiency has brought about the
production of so unparalleled an

“Many more teenagers now
drink beer and cider, and we
often have quite young children
asking for a little wine with
we , They -usually have one-
third wine to two-thirds water.”

Is this HARMFUL? A_ doctor

o—

“If it is a red Bordeaux, it
would contain only just over nine

cent. of alcohol, which
wouldn’t harm any child.”
Something Warmer For The
Men

| HAVE been finding out more
about the new plastic product
Terylene which Dr. Bronowski
discussed on TV.

Terylene is going to mean fo
men what nylons mean to women,

SOCKS made from it will wear
longer than nylon and be definite-

no

ly warmer Engine.... an Engine that offers
At the same time it DRIES speed only to your taste and
MORE QUICKLY, is crease- whether you drive it fast or slow,

makes not the slightest differ-

resistant, and looks far silkier than ;
ence to it’s velvet smoothness.

nylon,

Brief technical data shows the
XK120 Engine to have a Hemi-
spherical Head of high strength
Aluminum Alloy; Valve Seatings
of special high expansion Cast
Iron Alloy; Twin Overhead
Camshafts; a Crankshaft of
seven Main Bearings each of
2%” diameter, larger than have

Mr. David Crouch, of the LC.I.,
who played a part in its develop-
ment says: —

“Terylene is more like wool
than nylon. ‘It is perfect for
men’s suitings because it always
retains *t« shape.”

4 small supply of SHIRTS

AND UNDERWEAR is already

trickling into the shops. In about ever previ e .

Z aver previously been used on
See men’s socks will be in the passenger car engines and re-
shops. sponsible to a large degree for

Women's stockings? The I.C.1.

say: “No decision.”

‘Perms’ Don’t Last As Long
WOMEN complain that a pro-

fessional permanent wave does

the exceptional smoothness, with
which the Jaguar XK120 Engine
delivers its power.

The JAGUAR MKVII Sedan is

not now last as long as a pre-war at Chelsea Garage Showrooms.
perm It is one of a combination range
= . of 26 colours. When you drcp
HAIRDRESSERS reply: “So in to see it, as you certainly must,

many women want a soft, natural-
looking wave that they ask for
only a ‘light’ perm, which obvi-
ously will not last so long.”

At the prices they charge for 1

note the wonderful braking sys~
tem -—- the Dewandre Vacuum
Servo-assisted Girling System,
self - adjusting Hydraulic, T!
interior of the Jaguar is simply

rm these days I think it should
be both natural and lasting. Ee ar b, Bor finest ee
ressi eather upholstery over oam
D ing A Young Princess rubber, polished walnut instru-

‘PRINCESS ALEXANDRIA is,
at 15, now taller than her cousins
Princess Elizabeth and Margaret.

1 SAW her with her_ mother,
the Duchess of Kent, in Mr. Nor-
man Hartnell’s showroom recent-

ment panel and deep pile car-
pets over thick felt underlay.

And finally, not the least of
the Jaguar sensations, is the
marvel that the price can be a
low as ‘it is.

ly, having a fitting for a party
dress.

The Duchess wore LOW- * “ 2
HEELED SHOES, and Princess

The Household Dept. at Cave,
Shepherd & Co, Ltd, have a
most interesting range of Con-

The Duchess buys some of the goleum Floor Covering, The de-
Princess’s day clothes at te signs are many and the colours
Oxford-street branch of a London | varied. There ig probably some-
store

Her lady-in-waiting first goos
to the store and asks for some
dresses to be sent on approval

SOMETIMES the Duchess and |
her daughter go to the store to-
gether and select the dresses in
the department alongside other |

shoppers. |
The Princess takes SIZE 12, and |
usually chooses, for day ‘wear, |

simple shirt-waisted dresses. |

Alexandra looked almost as tall.
The Princess was HATLESS
and wore a loose tent coat.






Man About



EW! IMPROVED -
ODEX SOAP

© Gets skin really clean ;



PAGE SEVEN



Jown



thing for ever py}
reason of the Congoleum eing
available in strips ranging [ror
22%" up to 6 ft width. Whi
for those preferring the nishe :
product, Congoleum Rugs are in
sizes from 6’ x 9 to 9 by 12',]
Ask to see Mr. Archiebs ‘Ram-
say who will exy the



laying service.

‘Hf only 1 could do that! How

\




many times have you said the
when admiring a_ friend’s self
designed and made dress? There)
isn’t the slightest reason wh
you can’t \vecome proficient f
the art of Dress Making. The/?
Singer Sewing Academy headed |
by the extremely capable Mrs. |
Mildred Watkins (Ph. 4927) is|
accepting enrolments now Clase- |
es are two a week of two hout |
each from 8—10; 10—12; 1—3;]
and you can choose your OWN
TIME! Phone, by all means,
but come on in and say hello!
f os .

A-L-U-M-I-N-U-M in capitals

is running through much of he

new stock in the Central hin

peortum right now. You'll find

Frying Pans, Steamers, Break- " .

fast Carriers (generally do this} I dreamed T went Pree
myself), Double Borlers and | e

Cottee Pots — yeah, aluminum to a formal in ~
coffee pots, my friend. And a
aluminum tumblers, too, What ¥ Cc ’
d@you think of these? Ideal for P Pj OVTMS “
knock-mbout drinks and school TRAM CW

lunch boxes — only 36c, Ename! e/e

Table-Tops in 4 sizes have
rived and I suggest you drop
quite soon to see ’em.

ar

nn Maidenette Strapless bra

What truly beautiful hand

painted China at Y. de Lima's on
Broad Street. When I tell you

If a big occasion is on your cal-
endar, this dream of a bra-is
designed for you! Maidenette

that it's Delft from Holland and Strapless is the most fashion-
offered in such unusual pieces as able party-goer ever! Wonder-
Gin Flasks, Wine Pitchers, Ash fut ander bate-slonlveee
Trays etc, you'll appreciate how nder Hare-Sshouleerec
necessary it is for you to see evening clothes er cocktail
them, At Y. de Lima’s you'll also dresses, Maidenette* Strapless
find the incredibly rich and love~ ‘ hai s |
ly Bavarian Porcelain in Fruit fives excellent figure control,
Dishes, Coffee Cups, Vases ete Dainty insets make it extra fem-
And don’t pass by the unusual inine: feather-light boning sup-
framed Wall Plaques for Junior's” . Sere cee
badroorn, ports your carves from below.
* * " } In white or black in your faver-

At the incomparable N, E. wi-| ite fabric +

son & Co, Store you're always
certain to find something new and}
different. The packed shelves are
holding Cotton Blankets of splen-

did value and among the Men’s
Suiting lines, most excellent
quality Worsteds in Pin Stripe

and Parson’s Grey. For Ladies
there’s the Andar Serge Materi-|
als in attractive plain colours,
36 ins wide, An entirely new
shipment of Plastic Belts have}
been unpacked together with new

Ties and Hankies, Wilson's a
store that you must visit, ,

Genuine Maidenform brassjiré
are made only in the United States
of America. .

There is a Wlatden Foam

*® for every type of igure.



Harp TIMES : si
Witt BACKACHE.

Often due to sluggish kidney octtow

IFE IS NOT 80 good when
L are as with Sachacion,
rheumatic pean >» aching
muscles and joints, lum! , OF
common urinary disorders due to

sluggish kidney action. ¢
» Why put up with pain and dise
comfort when you might get happy
relief ny ta Doan’s Backache

Mix the 5 yolks of the eggs with ; he : Kidney Pills. in
; T 7 i Princess Alexandra’s party stimu

° *% the sugar and beat well for about Britain. ; . , 7 a Banishes ination odour cleanses. shigsish —
" YOUR BABY AND Y OU unty. minutes until they look J have seen children in‘many dresses are MOSTLY FULL @ persp' Soon eee Kldneyn an

restaurants drinking a weak mix-

LENGTH, in simple styles. Organ-



uric acid an

© Leaves body sweet and dainty

Odex makes a deep cleansing lather that

other impurities

soft.
m which otherwike might collect ia



za is her favourite material.

ture of wine and water, LES.

Add the flour and the cornflour A WINE WAITER says: —

(By SISTER CHARLOTTE)

SO far we have dealt with some of the p
will make for your baby, and shall now

of your baby.

Most mothers-to-be I fin
like to

ing their first babies,
mencing labour especially in
—which are not labour pain
the last two or three weeks.
It can be most disappointing to
journey to a Nursing Home or
call your Doctor only to find that
it is a “false alarm”. Much better
to know what to expect when
your little one is really ready to
arrive, and to be able to recognise
the signs of true labour which,
as a rule, are quite unmistakable.
You will find that a period-like
pain will begin low in the back
working down the sides of the
womb to the front or, if you are
relaxed you may feel them be-
ginning in the womb and going
downwards directly, These pains
will start, increase in strength
and then quite rapidly die away.
Then another pain will do pre-
cisely the same, As time goes on
they will increase with fre-
quency at regular intervals.
As soon as you think that these
regular pains have commenced
you should let your Doctor or
Nurse know. There is absclutely
no need to become anxious or
alarmed. Nor need you go to bed.
It is much better to be up and
about arranging the last minute
details to your/things.




Other signs of labour which
generally follow some hours
after the rythmic pains, but some-
times occur before, are a slight
period-like loss and a sudden rush











SWEETENED
Vanilla, Almond,
Eggnog, Cream.

reparations you
consider the birth

d, and certainly those expect-
know the symptoms of com-
fact that odd pains
e to be felt during

view of the
s—are liabl

of water. Should you experience
either, the best plan is to send for
your doctor and lie down quietly
while awaiting his arrival. If you
are going away, set off after noti-
fying your Doctor. It is better in
this case not to walk around, but

THE AWFUL CHILD—

<

CE? ME? — don't
know there's still some
ice cream left?



once again do not be alarmed, try
and relax completely, as in doing
this you will aid the muscles which
are trying to do their job in con-
tracting and expelling the contents
of the womb.






IN THE
DESERT
-OF DESSERTS—



ONLY

Ae

Raspberry, Lemon,

very slowly and mix well. Add
the orange or lemon rind or
vanilla essence. Then beat the
whites of the eggs until they are
quite stiff and add to the other
mixture. Put in a cake tin with
very high borders because it will
raise quite a lot in the oven,
Butter the tin of course and put in
a moderate oven for about % of
an hour.

Pie 1919

is a very economic and
It was given (the

This
easy recipe.

recipe I mean) to housewives in ¢

Italy in 1919 in ope of the most
popular magazines in 1919 and it
takes its name from that date.

Flour: A bit more than 1 Ib.
Sugar: 6 tablespoonsful
Butter; 1 tablespoonful
Lemon rind
Icing sugar
Salt one pinch
Egus 2

English potatoes 3
Yeast: 2 oz,

Sift the flour on the kitchen
table or the pastry board like a
fountain. In the middle put the
pinch of salt, 2 tablespoonsful of
sugar, 2 eggs, 1 tablespoonful of
butter, 3 big English potatoes
(boiled and mashed) and _a bit of
Jemon rind (grated). Mix the
yeast in little water (two table-
spoonsful) and add to the mixture.

Work the dough. Put it in a cake
tin with high border and leave it
in a warm spot for about two
hours. Bake it in a moderate oven
for about %4 of an hour, When

ready take it out of the oven and
sift some icing sugar on the top.

PUDDINGS

Rum, Mocha.







Canadian Column

$200,000,000 FISH HARVEST

Canada has one of the foremost
fisheries experimental laborator-
ies in the world with the com-
pletion in Halifax, N.S., of the
renovated and expanded quarters
of the Atlantic Fisheries Experi-
mental Station of the Fisheries
Research Board of Canada, the
Department of Fisheries announc-

Ss,

Long recognized as one of the
leading fisheries research nations,
Canada has seven stations from
Newfoundland to British Colum-
bia engaged in full-time biologi-
cal and technological studies in-
to Canada’s commercial fisheries.
This year these fisheries are ex-
pected to have a marketed valuc
of nearly $200,000,000.

“SIOUX” AIDS RESCUE
On Board HMCS Sioux, at a UN
Naval Base in Japan (delayed)

This Canadian destroyer played
an active part recently in the re-
capture from the Reds of an island
off the west coast of North Korea
and in the care of civilians and
UN fighting men wounded in the
nana for the island.




The Sioux had been assigned to
an area in which the Communists
had been launching attacks on
UN-held islands. Stationing her-
self off an island that had been
under assault, the Sioux trans-|
ferred a party of five to a South |
Korean minesweeper with instruc |
tions to ascertain the progress of |
the fighting. |

Closing the island under cover
of darkness the minesweeper
spotted two junks and, at the base
of a cliff, a party of refugees and
UN troops. They learned that the
island had fallen and that the
party on the shore was hopefully '
awaiting rescue, while being cov~-
ered by a small rear-guard at the
top of the cliff. |

One of the junks was loaded |
with refugees and this the mine-
sweeper towed to a near by!
friendly island. Then the sweeper)
returned with four small sam-}

pans which, with their shallow |
draft, could go right in to the}
beach. |

Forty persons were rescued |
They included eight wounded

two women and a@ baby.



confident.

A NEW PERFUME

Buy Goya's matching Pink Mimosa

GOYA 161 NEW BOND
Sole Distributors: L. M. B. Meyers



If you love everything new, ecxciljng, muriguing ,
Pink Mimosa is your perfume

and loveliest fragrance to make you gay

day, more tomantic. by night.

your perfurr

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to eho your perfume all day, and wery day.

|
|
|
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gloriot

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na

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BY

lusporie

|
|
|



STREET LONDON wt
& Co., Ltd., P.O. Box 17! Bridgetown.

is mild and
daily baths.















the system and cause distresa,
Doan's Pills have helped many
thousands; let them help you.

Ask vow * DCAN’S ike





entle for face, hands and
Odex is ideal for family use.



Dealer for

Old Colony, Glenwood, Victoria, Beverly and Su-
zanna... in breath-taking patterns and oxiitine

Irs... are only a few of “Tex-made”’ prints now
offering outstanding piece goods buys to the smarily
dressed women of today. ‘“Tex-made” prints are tul-
fast and sun-fast ... cool, comfortably light and lerig
wearing. Sew your own from “Tex-made” itis.
You will get that priceless distinction of a “Te:

made fabric dress .. . in a smart combination o/
high fashion and low price.

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Remember the name ‘Tex-made” , . . and look
for the identification bands and tag on the ploce

goods. They are your guarantee that the prints yo.
buy are genuine ‘‘Tex-made” fabrics.

“TEX-MADE” IS WELL MADE


PAGE EIGHT





Printed by e Adverste Co., Lid., Broad Liss Brlicctown
Sunday, January 27, 1952

THIRD PARTY

THE Bill to make provision for the pro-
tection of Third Parties against risks arising
out of the use of motor vehicles makes it
unlawful for anyone to use a motor vehicle
on a public road without being insured
against liability for causing death or bodily
injury to any person by the use of such
vehicle. A motor vehicle is defined in the
Bill as a mechanically propelled vehicle
intended or adapted for use on roads.

Latest available official records show that
there are 5,960 motor vehicles using the
public roads of this island. There are 3,621
private cars, 340 hired cars, 156 omnibuses,
1,045 lorries, 381 vans, 26 hearses, 314
motor-cycles, 46 tractors and 31 trailers. In
addition to these 5,960 motor vehicles,
21,515 bicycles and 4,314 animal drawn and
push carts also use the public roads.

Tn 1951, there were 19 fatal accidents, 84
serious and 1,062 minor. Vehicles involved
in these accidents were 684 motor cars, 351
lorries, 152 omnibuses, 105 vans, 40 motor
evcles, 451 bicycles and 22 listed as “others”.

These official figures are illuminating
but two facts deserve special notice.
Although there are only 156 omnibuses
using the public roads omnibuses were in-
volved in 152 accidents during 1951. Of par-
ticular importance too is the fact that 451
bicycles were involved in a total number of
2,092 accidents.

Nobody would criticise the principle that
third party insurance is desirable for the
protection of road users. Yet the point made
by a correspondent in the Advocate of
January 23 deserves notice. The fact that a
measure introduced in England and Trini-
dad has not proved so unsatisfactory as to
be repealed, comments this subscriber, is
no reason for introducing it here.

During the discussions of the Bill in the
House of Assembly this month a lengthy
speech was made by the senior member of
St. George concerning the legal implica-
tions of the Bill. Doubtless there is great
need for the House of Assembly to be satis-
fied with the drafting of the Bill and to
understand thoroughly the meaning of its
clauses, but there is an even greater need
to understand why such a Bill should be
necessary. Much more information surely
is required from police records and from
statistics of insurance companies. What the
ordinary tax-payer wants to know about
legislati6bn is whether it is good value for
the money he or she is spending. It is so
often overlooked/by government and peo-
ple that taxation is compulsory taking from
one or more individuals and spending the
monies so compulsorily taken for the pub-
lic benefit.

If private individuals or companies ac-
quired monies in this method there would
be a legitimate outcry against such high
handed activities. All legislation must
therefore be constantly scrutinised by the
public, all of whom are indirect tax payers,
to see whether money expropriated from
them is being well spent by the government
which has been elected to power.

This point is worth making because leg-
islation aimed at protecting the commun-
ity is so often immune from criticism
because the public assumes that it is get-
ting good value for its money.

Facts and figures may prove that com-
pulsory third party insurance is in fact
necessary and will pay dividends. But so
far there has been little indication given to
the public to show why it should be neces-
sary.

Figures can be obtained quite easily and
throw much light on the subject under
discussion.

It is interesting to discover that 2,903 of
a total number of 5,960 motor vehicles in
Barbados are insured (most of them com-
prehensively) against third party risks by
five insurance companies. If the volume of
business done by the remaining twenty
insurance companies only equalled the
total coverage of these five companies no
less than 5,806 out of a total 5,960 vehicles
would be already insured.

In such an event the government might
be creating much extra work for civil ser-
vants and insurance companies by passing
the Third Party Risks Act and might in fact
be spending more than the benefits to be
derived from compulsory insurance of a
relatively small number might warrant.

Omnibuses and hired cars which have to
pay very high premiums and a minority of
commercial vehicles and private cars
appear to be the main exceptions to the
general rule in Barbados where the major-
ity of motor vehicles are already insured.

There cannot be the least doubt that
people ought to be protected from drivers
of motor vehicles in the event of accidents
causing death or bodily injury. But unless
the public is given a great deal more in-
formation as to the real need for such legis-
lation than is provided in the objects and
reasons of the Bill, it may be convinced that
some less complicated measure might have
been more suitable for Barbadian require-
ments.

If, as the figures quoted above for five
insurance companies suggest, the major-







SUNDAY ADVOCATE





ity of motor vehicles are already insured,
then there must be very good reasons why
the remainder do not take out insurance
policies.

Existing third party premiums for priv-
ate cars vary between $15 and $18 per
annum depending on the horse power of
the cars and no owner of a private car
could find these premiums prohibitive.
In Trinidad on the other hand where there
is compulsory third party insurance the
rates are two and a halt times as high.
There is therefore no grounds for assum-
ing that compulsory third party insurance
would decrease existing low premium
rates for private cars, On the contrary
there is general agreement that the rates
would have to be raised as the public be-
came more insurance conscious and made
greater claims than they do at present.

The greatest reluctance to insurance in
Barbados appears to be displayed by the
owners of omnibuses and taxis.

The reason for this shyness is readily
understood, Insurance premiums increase
with the number of passengers carried.
Taxis have therefore to pay nearly four
times and omnibuses nearly twenty times
the value of the premiums paid by the
owner of a private car. Apparently they
find it much cheaper to settle claims with-
out insurance coverage. Compulsory in-
surance will therefore almost certainly
result in increased taxi and bus fares.
This is a very important point to watch
because no legislation should add to the
already inflated cost of living.

RUM

RUM, besides being an island in the
Inner Hebrides, is gonsidered by Barba-
dians to be their national drink.

Now Dr. Joad has been taking English-
men to task for not indulging in little
England’s famous beverage.

“T consider”, writes C. E. M. Joad in
The Pleasure of Being Oneself, “one of
the most outstanding tokens of our culin-
ary d@generfacy to be the almost total
disappearance of hot concoctions from the
average repertory of English drinking. Up
to and including the time of Dickens,
English literature is full of accounts of
toddies, neguses and punches, but if you
ask for a hot drink in an English pub
today, even if it be only the hotting up of
Rum or Whisky they stare at you with
consternation .. .”

Then after describing his favourite hot
drink which has a basis of rum Dr. Joad
points to the drawback: “the absurd ex-
pensiveness of that best Empire product
—rum, ”

The West Indian Committee Circular is
to be congratulated on reproducing this
passage from C. E. M. Joad. Millions
of Englishmen will agree with his com-
ment on the drawback: “the absurd expen-
siveness of that best Empire product rum.

In the United States of America there
is an excise duty of $9 (U.S.) on every gal-
lon of rum entering the United States
from Puerto Rico. The United States em-
ploys the wine gallon as a standard of
measurement. This is approximately 20%
less than the British Imperial Gallon, But
so far from damaging the rum industry of
Puerto Rico by making rum “absurdly”
expensive the United States returns the
excise duty collected on Puerto Rican rum
to the Treasury of Puerto Rico. In 1949
the United States paid Puerto Rican ex-
porters of rum $3,011,000 for 1,043,000 gal-
lons of rum.

In addition the collectors of excise tax
collected for the Puerto Rican Treasury
$9,387,000,

In 1944 when the United States im-
posed restrictions on the manufacture of
whisky the value of Puerto Rico’s rum and
liquor exports’ reached the extraordinary
level of $35,000,000. When the $9 excise
tax per proof gallon is added to this high
sales figure it is easy to understand how
much Puerto Rican ‘prosperity is due to
its incorporation in the Commonwealth of
the United States.

The disadvantages under which Barba-
dian rum exporters to the United King-
dom operate are in marked contrast to the
advantages which accrue to Puerto Rico.

A duty of £10, 11s. 2d. per proof gallon
(imperial) has to be paid on rum entering
the United Kingdom in casks and a duty
of £10. 12s. 2d. has to be paid on the same
quantity arriving in bottles.

Instead of the United Kingdom return-
ing the duty levied in the United King-
dom on imported Barbadian rum it kee
these monies for the Exchequer of the
United Kingdom. In 1949 Barbados ex-
ported 51,079 gallons of rum to the United
Kingdom. Were the United Kingdom to
take a leaf from the United States’ book
Barbados would have profited by approxi-
mately £500,000 from duties collected in
English ports during the year. But since
Barbados is not incorporated into the
United Kingdom, like Martinique is into
France or Puerto Rico into the United
States the rum exporters of Barbados
have no legitimate grievance, What is
cause for grievance is the fact that English
warehouses are overstocked with West
Indian rum today because the United
Kingdom imposes so “absurdly expensive”
a duty on that “best Empire product—
rum”,

The position would not be so absurd if
the English man or woman disliked rum
or did not want to buy it. In an over-
taxed country like the United Kingdom
how many individuals can afford to pay

more than 26 shillings duty on a 5/6 bottle
of rum ?

The expensiveness is more than absurd,
Dr. Joad: it “spites the Englishman’s
face by cutting off the colonial’s ose.”

But our thanks are due none the less to
vou for bringing the matter up and to the
West India Committee Circular for draw-
ing your notice to our attention.






| 4

}
!

|
, f
aimed at clearin
will inc!
Senator McLarth

Blithers. ek

SUNDAY, JANUARY 27, 1952



Mo Low, wnlerviewed, said The expedition

sense abdoulT
Ts. “My staff
Canterbury,

, Wilfred Pickles, Sir Waldron
Teach the backward inhat “anls

ensure peace ong prosperily as

how To
To have

act sénsibly in a crisis. Weare





A DANE IN LONDON

WANDERINGS IN LONDON By
Ebbe Sadolin (Methuen 15/-)

THE story ts toid of Thomas
Balarey who was a taxi driver in
London for wenty-five years just
for the fun of it. When Balarey
died in 1949 it turned out that ne
was a wealthy man who had taken
up taxi driving as a hobby, but it
gave him so much enjoyment that
he simply could not give it up.

It was in in much the same spirit
that Mr. Sadolin wrote this book.
Born in Copenhagen and, as he
tells us, 191 centimetres high,
liking Virginia cigarettes, Matisse
and Agatha Christie and disliking
white tie and tails, tepid beer and
ekiing, Ebbe scon became fas-

cinated with London. But he found "’

it difficult to sketch in London:
“Not that it is such child’s play
to draw in London as it is, for
instance, in Paris, where there is
always a café facing your subject,
and a subject facing your café. In
London you usually have to stand
in a constant stream of traffic. If
you sit down on a doorstep or a
grimy heap of rubble to do a care-
ful drawing of the house opposite,
you catch only an_ occasional
glimpse of it through the endless
procession of vans and buses. And
even if you do happen to see it, a
downpour is sure to make the ink
run all over the paper, or the wind
rips the sheets off the drawing
pad.”

But despite all these handicaps
Ebbe has produced some fine
‘!drawings of London — drawings
that are very much alive. There
are pictures of every side of
London life; of quaint pubs, ugly
suburbs, Hyde Park orators, and
theatre queues —- drawings that
combined with ‘he text interpret
the character of the City.

Of pubs he writes: ‘The pub is
a phenomenon peculiar to Eng-
land. It is a place where strong
drink is served at certain hours
of the day in accordance with a
complicated set of rules and regu-
lations which the foreigner ‘nds
confusing. Even to enter a pub
presents a bit of a problem, for
there are different entrances to
different bars. Should one gc
into the Saloon Lounge, the Saloon
Bar, the Private Bar or the Public
Bar? The customers all stand or
sit about as if they belonged to
the same party, and the stranger
feels a little reluctant to intrude.
But when you have dared to go in
and have got to know the place,
you will always be captivated by
the pleasant, club-like atmosphere,
so rare in restaurants.

Mr. Sadolin soon found out that
tea in England is both a necessity
and a rite. During the war Lord
Woolton declared that tea meant
more to the English than ammuni-
tion, and whenever a bomb fell on
London the fire brigade and
ambulance at once set off for the
scene accompanied by a_ tea-
wagon,



Hy Tan Gale

Having done some research into
the matter he give; this advice on
tea-making. “You must no> begin

by pouring the tea into the cup approve of Mr, Allen’s approach |

(although that would seem the
obvious thing, so as to see how
strong the tea is). Oh no, that
simply won’t do! . The correct

procedure is as {>llows. “First
you (1) put sugav :n the cup, then
(2) the milk, th n (3) the tea
strainer, then (4) lift the teapot
(and after this o. cn (4a) put it
down again becuse you have
burned your finge and (4b.) lift

it up again, this ti. 1e with a hand-
kerchief) and pcur tea into the
cup. Then (5) lit the hotwater
jug (this time using the hand-
kerchief from the start) and pour
a little water into the cup and a
little into the teapot, Then stir
and the tea is rea ty for use.”
“Wanderings in London” is a
charming book, :nd will appeal
both to those don’: and those who
do know London. It is in no
sense a guide boc, but is rather
a series of personal impressions,
noted down quickly in the streets
of London. It ha: in consequence
a freshness and spontaneity which
succeeds admireb!y in conveying
the excitement of cxploring a great
city.
THE MIDDLE AGES By Arthur
B. Allen (Rockliffe 12/6).
This. is another book of dis-

covery, but this time it is history
and not a city that i

to be dis-

covered.

I have always liked the Middle] }

Ages, but I must say that I do not

to the subject. He considers his-

tory as a “project”, and his aim};

is to teach school-children the
“bare bones” of the “Middle Ages

with as little effort on their part as
possible. The result is a cram|
book, full of lists of names anc

dates which he intends no doubt

to be learned by heart. A third
form boy would probably find
this book useful to “swet up” just







before his exams, but
opinion it is the worst
way to teach history.
However, the book is not with-
out merit, The illustrations art
excellent most of them being re-
productions from early MSS.

in m)
possibic

woodcuts and stained glass. ‘lne)
by themselves make the boo:
worth looking at. But beside:

this there is much interesting in-
formation about architecture
dress, trades and the like in the
period, which unfortunately i:
usually omitted from the conven-
tional text books,

If Mr, Allen would consider re-
writing his book so as to make i
a continuous narrative he might
produce something which could be
for the junior school the equivalen,
of Trevelyan’s magnificent ‘‘Socia
History.”



THE NATIONAL SPORT

Wodehouse’s novels,
great national sport, trying to
assassinate Lenin with a revol-
ver.”

Most countries seem to have—
or at any rate are reputed to
nave — their great national sport.
In England it is cricket — or is
it football? (The West Indians
and Australians between them
nave rather taken charge of the
first, and as for football — aren't
Uruguay the world champions?)
in America the national sport is
canasta. In Italy it is grand
opera. In France it is — not what
you were going to say, but
bicycling.

Has Barbados a national sport?
Most people would say cricket,
That is where I differ from most
people. Not that I deny the
quality of Barbadian cricket —
that would be not only futile but
dangerous; but I have observed
that there is another game much
more universally played in the
island than cricket is. I have
christened this game “drivit” (one
long i and one short one, like
something by Picasso), and T
claim that it is the true national
{sport of Barbados.
| Any number of players up to
; one can play drivit. All the player
needs is a motor-car—not his own,
but someone else’s. The object of
the game is to get the car out of
}a gap into a main road, or through
ja difficult stretch of congested
traffic, or into a vacant space in a
ear park,

You can’t drive a hundred yards



or a bakery Noah’s-ark trundles
past, and then pentiffically beck-
ons you forward. * Drive it, mister’
he says courteously.

When playing in a car-park the
drivit player shold observe one
or two fine points. He should wait
until the driver has parked, (or
thinks he has) and got out of the
car, and locked dvors, and put the
ignition key in an inside pocket.
Bringing into play all his natural
charm and authority; the player
now shepherds the driver back to
his seat. “Come right for-
ward,” he says. The driver com-
plies. “Go back now,” orders the
player, and the driver goes back
to where he started from, “A bit
more, man,” says the player. Re-
starting his engine and breathing
heavily through his nose, the
driver puts the car into reverse.
There is a splintering crash. “Hold
now, man,” says the player, mark-
ing himself up an extra point.

If at the end of this the car is
so close to its right-hand neigh-
bour that the door won't open, the
player receives @ bonus,

Unlike other gumes in Barbados,
drivit admits a certain number of
professionals—-policemen and car-
park attendants. The relations be-
tween professionals and amateurs
are not always of the best, not so
much from any demand for a
“union shop” as on account of a
proper professional jealousy, Thus,
when a helpful passer-by has seen
you safely to an anchorage out-
side the cinema or club, you may

lin Bridgetown without seeing the still be held up by a stern figure

jdrivit players.
come to

Each time you
a blind corner, which is

in blue. He plays the parking
game superbly, as a result of years

| pretty well each time you come to of training and practice; but, ag

la corner,
position,

there, in a
stands the player.

He must point a moral.

strategic one having authority, he feels he basket offer me her advice. “Doan't
“You have get mashed,’ she said.

“You know,” said the Russian holds you with hs glittering eye you back-end too cloase to he
| visitor to England, in one of Mr. (Coleridge), looks rignt, looks left, bumper,”

he explains as you

“that is our extends an arm while a bicycle scramble through the sun-roof; ano

ir. an aside to the abashed passer-
by he adds—or is it imagination
—, “Fifteen-love,”

An elegant variation is mountec
drivit, played on a bicycle. Many
a driver feeling his way forwarc
between the high stone walls tha
flank every gateway and almos
every gap, and which effectively
mask all traffic approaching from
either side, must have admirec
the quickness with which a smal.
boy who happens to be pedalliny
by will size up the situation anc
wave him on with a graceful hali
circle of the arm; and nothing i:
polo, no t hin g even in bull-
fighting, can mateh_ the
admirable desinvolture with whicl
a cyclist, swerving without warn-
ing to the wrong side of the ‘road,
can signal a motorist by a flick of
the arm behind the back to pase
him on the wrong side.

As a true national sport, how- |

ever, drivit has one fault. It is not
played by women, Somehow they
don’t:seem to have the flair: for
the most part they leave it strictly
alone, and when they do play
they play badly.

Only recently, I was edging my
way inch by inch into Bay Street,
hoping that each bus that bore
down on me round the blind cor-
ners would be the last. A lady
with a basket on her head watch-
ed me dispassionately from °@
perfect drivit position, but despite
my patent difficulties said never a
word. At last, taking my courage
in my hands, I let in the clutch
only to come to a screaming halt
as a taxi flashed by, missing me by
inches,

Only then did the lady with the

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SUNDAY, JANUARY 21, 1952

SUNDAY ADVOCATE



BERMUDA

HAMILTON, January 10.

WITH only two members registering objection, the

approved the
report of a select committee finding that The Royal Gazette *”

House of Assembly in a two-hour debate

had committed a breach of privilege and acted in contem

t
ot an order that a debate which took place in public cheat opinion, he was unduly harsh in h
not be published. In adopting the committee’s recom-
mendations the House also agreed to a message to the
Legislative Council asking that a joint select committee
be set up to study the whole matter of Parliament's privil-

eges and powers. . =
The ban on The Royal Gazette

was rescinded in accordance with | TEXT OF MESSAGE TO

the committee recommendation | Th Bas bw a
that this was not appropriate whitch 4a i ie =
punishment. (A Royal Gazette c e House sent to

reporter was admitted to report | he Lagmmative Council was
the debate, after the House had | “Phe oud 2A b
passed a motion to this effect | 4... reesialiy cad meee
cored be the Hon. W. W. David- view the matter of privilege
er in the session, when and th ee
The Royal Gazette was not repre- e powers of - the

|
'
| appedrs, from the investi-

sented.) House relating thereto. It
The two objectors to the com-
mittee’s recommendations were gations made, that virtually

no powers vest in the House |
either to protect itself or its
proceedings, and only lim-

ited powers in control of its
own members. It seems
likely that this position also
applies to your Honourable

Mr. F. C. Misick and Mr. D. C.
Smith. Mr. Misick was in favour
of the appointment of a joint
select committee by the Upper
and Lower Houses, and he moved
an amendment which would have
left in abeyance decisions on other



eh House. l
aspects of the committee’s report. “
His sole supporter was Mr? Smith tetigdon Tiaties pre |
Mr. Misick thereupon withdrew should be further investi |
from the House, leaving Mr.

gated with a view to the
passage of legislation clear- |
ing the position, and would
uest that your Honour-
able House appoint a com-
mittee to form with a com-
mittee of the House of As-
sembly a joint select com-
mittee to investigate the
matter and to report to the
respective Houses thereon
with such recommendations
as the committee sees fit.”

Smith as the only objector in the
final stage.

The motion for approval of the
committee report and the sending
of a message to the Legislative
Council was moved by Mr. James
E. Pearman, the select committee
chairman.

Mr. Pearman said he hoped
smembers had had the opportunity
of reading the select committee's
report. beause it certainly seemed
to him and to the other members
of the committee that the matter
gave rise to things which were
extremely important to the
House, to the community at large,
and to the very root of the
authority of the House itself.

‘The report of the committee
has attempted to be completely
factual in sovfar as it has reported
the interviews it had eee the

resident of the Bermuda Press AS
Ltd. and the editor of The Royal [€¢!Sion, he continued. They
Gazette published by the Bermuda “ere tully entided to thers
Press,” he declared. opinion, As the committee stated

Mr. Pearman told the House ‘M iis report, it was unwise pro-
that, since the last day of meet- cedure tor the House to ban the
ing, the Speaker had handed him publication of a debate which had
a letter written by the president lken place in public, Disagree-
of the Bermuda Press stating that, ment with what the House did
in the opinion of the Bermuda On that occasion must be com-
Press, an inaccuracy appeared in pletely separated from the fact
the report of the committee. tnat the House made an order

Broadcasting Pesition and the order was disobeyed.

The report had stated that Mr. Not Appropriate
Gerry Wilmot, manager of the In recommending that further
Bermuda Broadcasting Company, banning of The Royal Gazette
had appeared belore the com- should be discontinued, Mr. Pear-
mittee and stated that when he man said this had been suggested
had broadcast such part of the because the punishment was in
report he had not been aware no way appropriate to the offence.
of the implications, nor had he “It does not reach in any way
been aware that non-broadcasting the person who was responsible
had been specifically referred to for the contempt and, in my view,
in the debate on the motion to it does deprive the public of a
suppress publication. knowledge of the affairs of this

The letter stated that the editor House to which they are entitled.
of the Royal Gazette had taken “A great deal has been said
steps to inform Mr, Wilmot of about the freedom of the press
the implications concerned and The freedom of the press is a
that publication by broadcasting great thing. It is a thing which
was to be on the responsibility of belongs to all the democracies
the broadcasting station alone, of the free world. The liberty

“I have been unable to verify of the press carries with it
the accuracy of that statement by responsibilities in the interests of
Mr. Wilmot because he has been the community which the press
out of Berumda and will not re- has to recognise.
turn until the end of the month. Is Applauded
As far as the report is concerned Before he moved that the report
it is completely accurate as to be adopted and that the Legislative
what was stated to the committee Council be asked to appoint mem-
by the manager of the Bermuda ters to a joint select committee of
Broadcasting Company,” said Mr. both Houses of the Legislature to
Pearman. . investigate the matter further with

It would be obvious that the a view to the passage of legisla-
radio station manager as distinet tion clearing up the position, Mr.
from the editor of The Royal Pearman was applauded by
Gazette did extend his regret and Assemblymen.
apology for what had taken place. Mr. F, C. Misick, who spoke in

Entire Responsibility opposition to the select commit-

“The entire responsibility for tee’s report, followed Mr. Pear-
the publication of the report in man. His speech was marked by
the newspaper was taken quite the contention that the committee
frankly by the editor of The should have referred the House
Royal Gazette, The editor stated to information placed before it
that he had been under no mis- by representatives of The Royal
apprehension as to the position Gazette.
and that he had published an That information, he _ said,
account of the debate with the came from an extremely authori-
deliberate intention of challeng- tative Parliamentary source which
ing the right of the Hi »se p showed that it was searcely con-
make such an order,” stated Mr. « -ivable that any such prohibition
Pearman. which the House sought to im-

“He said that he had not done pose could have been imposed by
so in any spirit of defiance but the House of Commons. _
had done so, in his view, as the Mr. Misick said: “I have listened
proper way of having the matter to the honourable member (Mr.
clarified as to whether the House Pearman) with the closest possible
did or did not have the right to attention. or I am surprised
make the order.” at the exaggePation which he

Mr. Pearman gave an account @ttaches to the control which the
of the interviews the select com- House of Commons, this House. or
mittee had had with the then any cther legislature exercises
Solicitor General, Major David over the publicatien of its debates

Huxley Crux of Question

“Any superficial student of
Farliamentary procedure knows
we have complete control. But
there are considerations which





see

veen
vere terrerd

made wW prevent
vi uesponuency
wetin auiOlg Une puplic, il was
vo we ground luke i, Was ifn ine
pubuc interest ial the aecision
was maae.

Many members did not agree
witn the wisdom of taking tnat

the
ana

Has No Power
The House had a rigIX to make
such an order but had not the
power to enforce it.
The House of Commons and the
House of Lords had penal
“IT suppose that it is the rare
occasion in these more orderly
days that any House of Parlia~
ment will wish to avail itself of ,
these penal powers. I suppose it
is a good many years since the
Commons availed itself,” Mr.
Pearman commented, they constitute so:
In Public Interest with the iat. ee
He recalled that the motion to be described a
rE

—and that is the crux of the whol.
question.

“In this day and age of re-
tions between Parliament and
press the very ancient usages and
customs are quite rightl
The only reason they
that link
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such proposals is rather an un-

should be borne in mind—that the Would listen.
Roan debate haji taken place in public hibition on members as long as



HOUSE DEBATE AND

relic of a bygone day which House is obvious:
teach us the evolution of democ- in the
racy.

that he did ic
; interests of the public is
they serve no other pur- seemingly also reason ably

cbvious,” he gommented.
Matter of Opinion Limited Number
“At various times, in my A limited number of

his criticisms of the editor of the from which they could have

The editor acted as he saw it in dollars, he contended.

-
the best interests of tne publ.c. “The editor showed great
“In the statements he made in strength cf character in dois

the paper itself and in the evi- what he did in view of the fact
dence he gave before the com- ‘het he must have known that
mittee he showed himself imbued sanctions could be imposed. Tt

with the desire to clarify an “ses not excuse that gen len

anomalous and ambiguous situa- trom showing contempt of tne
tion—primarily in the interests [fouse, but it shows great strength
of the public which he and this of char-cter.” declared Captain
House serve. Winter.

“The honourable member has The motion made by Mr. Fear-
referred to freedom of the press Man ani amen ed by Mr. Misick
being something worthy of preser- (Overed the situation f lly and
vation and it is our concern to he thought that the wh le affair
see that this and other institutions boiled down to the old adage-
are preserved. We should never “the least said the soonest
in our desire to preserve our own MEnded.” ‘
rights and privileges jeopardise Mt. D. C. Smith
those of the press.” views of Mr. Misick.

Mr. Misick recalled that he had _‘“! think he has made a very
tried 10 years ago to have set yp Valuable contribution towards
a select committee to examine the the debate. The amendment which
matter of rights and privileges, 5€ has suggested has the effect
He referred to a subsequent con- accomplishing what Mr. Pear-
versation with a Parliamentarian â„¢4" wished without passing the
from which he suspected that the TePcrt of the select committee. I
House's powers rested on “very ¢amnot support that report,” Mr,
flimsy foundations.” Smith said.

“The authority we thought we AS @ jurist he could sot cone
possessed we do not, in fact, ceive the position that there was
possess,” he added. any vight without sanction,

The member for Sandys went “To castigate an individual—the
on: “I am anxious to secure for VeTY Public-spirited editor of this
this House newspaper—as being in contempt

shared the

powers that are Es = > \
possessed by the House of Com- Of this House by dong a lawful
Mank: sand. will support. the act is stupid and therefore I cal: -
motion to set up a joint select Gruecintdan rere:
vommittee, but I cannot help “tt is only by the courageous
feeling that the context in which gots of individuals that Set
we are called upon to. consider powers can be checked. 1 cannot

stand by and see this man casti-
~ gated by this committee for doing
® a lawful act.”
He went on to praise the public-

No Gainsaying spirited action a the editor and
Fortunately,” Mr. Misick con- his courage in so far as the act
tinued, “we are a component part he did was lawful and in the
of the Fritish Commonwealth and, public interest.
although we are allowed a tre-
mendous margin of freedom in Rendered Service
the regulation of our own affairs, “How else would this matten
I am sure we would never get have come forward? He has
on our statute measures which rendered a service to the House,”
would enable us to suppress a commented Mr. Smith. “I have
debate which had taken place in been under the impression that
public. There is no gainsaying this House has been operating—
that fact. somewhat creakingly at the joints

“The House imposed a similar -—-without these vital sanctions
prohibition on its own members, We have got along all right
yet I know that many of them “If, as a resuit of this joint
published the debate very freely.” select committee, it is recommen-

At this statement Mr. Misick ded that this House shall take
was interrupted with a few shouts unto itself all the powers of the
of “Who?” High Court of Parliament in Lon-

Mr. Misick retorted; “Have you don, then I shall oppose it. The

fortunate one. The powers we
are seeking may be used in
repressive way.

persons
ad available to them informaton!

paper—that is a matter of opinion. made thousands and thousands of!

House has at the present time to
be completely inadequate, I agree
with Mr. Misick that it is unfor-
tunate we have to» debate this
matter in the present context. i
ye that in considering this mat-
we will put aside this present
e as only incidental, that
ould examine the whole
from the point of what
be our rights in this re-
8i ” said Sir John,

« Mr, Misick’s reference
® authoritative opinion, Sir John
said he had seen the same opinion.

“That opinion does not dispute
the right of the House of Com-
mons to gct as we intended to act,
but it did suggest that it would
be impractical for the House of
Commons so to act, In the House
of Commons, with 300 reporters
tresent who frequently send out
reports long before the session is
over and who could not recall
‘hose reports in time, the action
this House took could not have
een taken late in the day by the
House of Commons.

Quite Practical

“It was quite practical for the
newspapers of this Colony to ob-
Serve the instrucuons of tine
tiouse,” added Sir John.

The Speaker said he was clear
om the pot that if the powers
were not possessed by the Bermu-
aian Legislature then early steps
should be taken to see that ade-
quate and proper powers were
secured,

“There are conceivable occa-
sions when this House may wish
to take direct action against per-
sons who are not members of this
House,” he observed,

The Speaker then recalled the
report which appeared in The
Royal Gazette recording the
events of the day on which the
House had presented its reply to
the Governor's speech from’ the
throne. f

“This same newspaper whose
action we are to-day considering
then made a statement to the
effect that the House had again
divided on the issue because a
number of members absented

ve



\hemselves from attendance on
Nis Excellency. lt indicated an
ict of dis “ery otc His Excel-
leney,”” he edded,

Sir “Tohyn wert fn to te’
Heure that he hee ereulsed ef t
reporter resvonsible if there were
any grounds for essum ing thet th
members had absorted ‘hermes)ve
from discourtesy and was in
formed that there wes no recl
reason

“It was a case of misrepresenta-
tion which should not have been
published It was an act of dis.



to believe is that right cannot be
enforced without sanction, but the
fact that sanctions are not present
is no proof that right does not
exist. The simple fact is that the
House asked the newspaper to dc
something and it did not do it. If
the House had not the right then
the newspaper was discourteous in
not doing what it was asked in
view of the fact that the House
extends a courtesy in allowing a
reporter to come within the House
The editor should have said he
was sorry.

“If we had the .right then we
have no penal powers, To put
teeth in the right is a very sound
recommendation.”

Mr, Richards said he had al-
ways complained in the House
about the reports which were

given of debates of the House.

“The reporters can only do so
much in two or three hours,” he
conceded, “It is a hard grind
but you must remember this, At
this particular stage of our exis-
tence all over the world editors |
are taking on themselves the right!
of telling the public what they!
ought to know, They delete what |
they consider would not interest |
the public and they leave in wha‘
they consider the important things: |
the public should know. What we |
want is a factual presentation of |
what happened in this House; we
should have a verbatim report of |
the debates of this House.”

|

It was important that what \gas |
said in the House should be pro- |
perly presented to the public sc |
that no sort of feeling should be |
left in the minds of the public o: |
the members of the House that the |
1

press was not doing its job.

“With freedom of the pres
comes responsibility and it is tha\
responsibility which I feel mus
be brought home to one and all,
averred Mr, Richards,

Mr. A. D. Spurling told th
House that he had found it em
barrassing to be appointed tt
serve on the select committee be
eause he had voted against th:
original motion to suppress publi-
cation,

“T voted against it because, as }
said at the time, non-publicatio»
would give rise to rumours anc
more damage might have beer
done. There were peoplé her«
who had left. Publication is no
limited to the press, I am per
fectly certain I cast my vote cor
rectly,” he observed.

The British Parliament had th
right, although it was not used i
recent years, but notice of motio:
was required,

“We have the right to control
Our Own debates and as far as }



THE ROYAL GAZETTE

hot ciscussed it with other mem- Parliament in London, out of it:
bers? I know I have.” past history and its constitutional

He continued: “I for one was law based on long usage, has cer-
not in the House when the de- tain powers which are very sel-
cision was reached. That is not dom utilised. None of these ar-
beside the point because if I had bitrary powers could be en-

received any advance information trusteq to any other body,” Mr.
IT should have certainly been Smith stated,
here. : Mr, Smith noted that the com-

“The source from, Westminster mittee had found it difficult 1o
points out to the select committee distinguish between a_ secret

that any such action contemplated debate and an open, debate.
by the House of Commons would “This Parliament does not rest

have to have been preceded by on the common law brought to the
hotice of motion,

oN : Colony by the colonists. This
low we lack any specific rule parliament is based upon the
dealing with public debate and Crown rights given to it at a
in that event rule

70 comes into much later date. They are not

inherent rights. It is true that
this Parliament can by force ex-
clude anyone from the chamber
that they like. That is a sanction
based on the position of a house-

orce.””
Rule 70, he said, stated that
where there was no specific regu-
lation the usages of the House of
Commons should be followed.
“The committee should have ”
determined in the absence of any holder,” he continued.
snecifie rule what the procedure If reporters were not allowed
should have been. The Mother in the House then no reports
of Parliaments, which gave us would be made. It was within the
our rights, should always be our power of the House to exclsde
guide.” reporters. The House also had

powers over its members—simple
Proposes Amendment householders’ rights and laws. In
Mr. Misick said he was pro- the past they had_ served the

posing an amendment to the House sufficiently.
motion to accept the select com- “But having invited the public

mittee’s report. It suggested, in into the visitors’ gallery to m°rk,
fact, that the committee should learn and inwardly digest our
rise, report progress and ask for procedure and then to say we

leave to sit again. shall search their pockets and to

Captain Ross Winter describing claim the right to imprison them
Mr. Misick’s speech as a “long, in order that they might not take
involved dissertation on the sub- a shorthand note of what we have
ject,” he commented that both Mv. faid, that is going beyond 4ne
Pearman an Mr, Misick had placed rights of a householder and _ this
the pros and cons before the House, By inviting the public
House, we invite publication, and by in-
viting publication how can we

It was basically an open debate, withdraw it?” he asked.

on Winter recalled, referring
to the occasion when the sup-
pression motion had been ulead. No Right to Withdraw

During the debate a large num- “I say that this
ber of people had .been in the right to withdraw that right of
visitors’ gallery and upon them publication from the Bermuda
the House had placed no prohibi- press on this occasion. I hope
tion. They could disseminate that members will not exaggerate
the information they had heard the matter. This House should
in the House to anyone who not have to fear outside opinion
There was no pro- I will not agree with the membet
who has passed censure of con-
tempt on the editor of this news-
paper,” he concluded.

Speaker, Sir John Cox, said ie
would dispute Mr. Smith¥ poin'
The Royal that the House had not the right

,

House had no

they did not publish the debate,
but there was nothing to stop
them from using the information
for their own interests,

“The

euitor of

y ignored. Gazette must have weighed al: to adopt sanctions against person
survive is these

questions carefully in his who failed to abide by the Houce’
mind. That he did flaunt an direct instructions.
order or even a request of this “I consider the

| PYREX

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courtesy if members refused to
wait on the Governor and there
Was No reaSon to believe that they

did anything of the sort. There
is no authority for effective action
which this House can take.”

Sir John said he hoped that the .
message for the appointment. of
the joint select committee would
be adopted and he personally
would support the report of the
select committee

He said he would like to point
out to the editor of The Royal
Gazette that on the following day
of the meeting under discussion
if the House had reconsidered the
matter it would have been com-
petent for the House to remove
the ban and publication could
have been made some 48 hours
later,

Member's Complaint

Referring to allegations of mis-
reporting, Sir John informed the
House that Mrs. Hilda Aitken (a
member for Smith's Parish) had
complained that she had been in-
accurately and grossly misre-
perted on occasions, That had
tappened to every member of the
House, he continued. It did noi
happen with frequency and it was
net confined to one newspaper.

“There is every reason why we
thovld have some authority in
this matter,” the Speaker de-
clared

Mr. H. St. George Butterfield an-
nounced his intention of support-
ing the report of the select com-
mittee,

When members of the House |
were misquoted surely it was the
duty of the Editor to correct the
mistakes, he said, |

Answering the member who
sald that the report of the select |
committee was tak an unfair

ig at the editor of The Royal
Gazette Mr, E, T. Richards de-
clared:

“On the very next day the
editor used his own privileges

ond the means at his disposal to
give the public a very full ex-
planation of what he considered
to be his right in the matter.”

For the editor to state that his
act was not one of defiance but a
challenging of the rights of fhe
Ifouse was a subtlety he could
not appreciate, continued Mr,
hiehards,

“It was a defiant act and noth-
ng else,” he claimed.

Was Discourteous
Mr. Richards: “The proper thing





means the very

best in Oven-Table Glassware

OC

know no notice of motion ig re
quired, I do not know of an
right or law which says we can
not close our doors to the pres
~-not that I would agree with it
Mr. Spurling said.

“L feel the report represents .
compromise in some way,” h
said,

He still regretted the origina

decision of the House, but tha
decision having been made th
House was within it rights iu

taking the only action it coul
against the newspaper which ha
defied its instructions.

“I think it is most essentia
that the disbarring should be re
moved, not out of consideration
tor that newspaper but becaus¢
of the public. [| for one fee] mos
strongly that the debates of \)
House should definitely be i
public and should be disseminate:
to the public in an accurate man
ner. For that reason 1 woul
strongly support any motion |
have a verbatim report made bs
a parliamentary reporter—no mat
ter the cost.

“I admire the editor
@ On Page 11

of th



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rt






PAGE TEN









St. Lucia Newsletter

‘Dinner In
Honour Of
Lady M.L.C.

From Our Own Correspondent

ASTRIES













The Honourable Grace Augu
tin, M.L.C., first Lé Member ef
the St. Lucia ire and also

f the Wind ds Councils
was the gue i dur at a
unique functio; at the Palm
Beach Aquatic Club, St. Luciz

turday f wh é hi
ading ladi Ave i r, Miss

Augustin was nominated to the
Council iy October.

The function was organised !y
Mr St. Geo'ge Murray (the
for: er Miss Margot McShine
T inidad), wife of the Assistant
Gove nment Secretary, St. Lucia,

sisted by Mrs, Ailen Lewis

wife of Mr. Allen M, Lewis, LL.B,,
Chairman of the Gastries Town
B iid himself a former legis-



Covers were laid for twenty-
nine on a_ beautifully decorated
E-shaped table. Speakers for the
evening were Mrs. William Hack-
haw, who proposed the toast
Tne Guest of Honour’, Mys,
Alen Lewis, Mrs, Caroline Harris
ind Miss Euralis Bouty,

A gift in the form of a wall
plaque wa presented by Miss
Deris McNamara.

Replying the Guest of honour

promised to do her best for the
is.and as a whole and urged the
womenfolk of St. Lucia to raily
around her,

Mr. Vernon Eastmond of
loca] Sanitation Department, ha
received news of his success in
the Tropical Hygiene and San:-
tation examination which he sat

the



recently in 3arbados under the
auspices of the Royal Sanitary
Institute.

Nurse Leotta Theodore of the
Castries Health Centre was also
siccessful in the Health Visit
examination which she took on

the same occasion,

DOS SNAKES



EAST IN

DIANS CEL

Nearly all the Bast Indians in Barbados Celebrated India Republic Day
yesterday morning.

‘Indians Celebrate
Republic Day

Over 100 East Indians of the community celebrated India

Republic Day at “Chantily”, St. Leonard’s Gap, the residence Seer
of Mr, T. Maraj, yesterday morning. The East Indian stores ,

in Bridgetown were closed. After the celebration the major-
ity of the Indians attended the Intercolonial cricket at Ken-
sington Oval.

The Indians listened to Mr. M. the people of Barbados and let
Sahay’s broadcast over Radw nothing come in the way, no
Trinidad in English at 7.10 a.m. greed, no selfish motives to mat

and 6,30 p.m, yesterday. Mr, Sahay

the good relationship.
is the Indian Commissioner, Hi









office is at Port-of-Spain, Trini- Goodwill Ambassadors

dad, The Indians all told the

Advocate that the broadcast was “Much depends on how we

very impressive, behave amongst these intelligent
At yesterday’s function Mr. ¢ 89d friendly people, We can

Mara} ‘was Chairman, Mr. Suleman either male of mar te ea

Patel, Mr. Maulvi Sayeed, Mr. and the people of Barbados. We

Singh and Mr. Bikharia all spoke are the Goodwill Ambassadors of



|

4

at “Chantily”, St, Leonard’s Gap,

\
have ome friends and well- |
wishers in our midst today to}

rejoice with us in our celebration |
of Republic Day but owing to the |
particular day of our celebration,
we decided against asking anyone,
Let us’ hope that next year we
shall have many friends with us
on this day.
“Now I to thank all of
i come here this
to join in this celebra-
let us hope that you may
yared many a year to come
together in making this
day a memorable one. Our thanks
are also due to those friends who
came and helped us in anyway
to make this affair a success”,
said Mr. Thani,

Before the funetion ended, Mr.

want

rc FACE

Thani and others sung National
songs in the Indian language.
Light refreshments were served,

Grenada Newsletter

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Se

LIPSTICK |

about the Republic, Independence
and their meaning.

Mr. Thani’s Address
Mr, Dayaldas Thani addressing
the gathering, said: “Once again

we meet under our national flag
te honour the Indian Republic
Day and pay homage to the
Father, the Great Mahatnia
Gandhi and other great leaders
the noble sons and daughters of
our motherland whose sacrifice
and struggles for freedom made
such a momentous day possible in
history r

“But for those brave and
courageous men and women we

may probably still be shackled in
the bonds of slavery and serfdom
s, it is a great thing to be a




free and independent people
because it is only with freedom of
thought, of action and of con-
cience that a nation vould act
freely without any out force or
influence from any or every
nation, and could refuse to sub-
mer,e under power politics and
thieats as India is doing to-day.

“A free nation could in no smal)
way make a real contribution to
the progress towards prosperity
stability and well being of its
and even other less fortunate,
people of the world,

Congenial Atmosphere
“Our little community in Bar-
bados have no less desire to this
end, Your presence to-day speaks
trongly for itself. We have a de-
ire too, to live side by side with
one another regardless of our
cliefs and faiths, as true sons and





our great country. It will there-
fore be to our undying credit to
enhance the reputation in which
we and our country are held.
The people and the Government
of Barbados ,have watched very
closely for a long time our trials

CARGO TO BE
UNLOADED |

ST. GEORGE'S, Jan. 10,



and struggles for freedom. and Bigge ingle go ever lands
have shown great sympathy and PRGCRE SAE CORO SVT sae
understanding in our cause ed here, 1,755 tons, was brought

Thay’ have’ sediced with u last Wednesday evening from
in our achievement of Independ- Landon by 1 ue H.L8. freighter.)
ence and will no doubt also rejoic¢ Herdsman, Consisting largely of |
to see well behaved and sincere cement, pipes and: asbestos sheet=,)
friends in us. Let us go forward ing, there were also thirty-three
with that task in hand and see tor vé hicles in the consign |
that we succeed. It is very regret- ment
table indeed that we could not . ‘

MOVIE STAR :

His Excellency the Governor
has appointed Dr, Curtis Fer- |
guson of the local Medical Ser-
vice as Honorary Police Surgeon
Grenada Volunteer Constabu-
lary. Dr. Ferguson was a former
Captain in the Royal Army}
Medical Corps.

Also newly appointed to the |
G.V.c. is Mr. Leo De Gale to}
uceeed Lieutenant Roy Hughes |

Assistant Superintendent fol- |
lowing the latter’s departure for
Trinidad to work with U.B.O.T.
Lt. Hughes, nevertheless, re-
tains his former rank as a mem-
ber of the Constabulary’s Officer
_ Reserve. |

}

Fourteen of thirty-two second- |
ary school exhibitions granted to |
elementary schools have been |
won by pupils of the St, George's |



with
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Palmolive Brillantine DOUBLE USE Way:

/,

are
ANA

As an Oil for Massages: Before washing hair,
massage scalp briskly with Palmolive Brillantine.

SS Leave oil on sealp for 10 minutés and then wash,
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To Comb and Perfume Heir: Put
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palm of the hand. Rub hands









hiss pe smooth over hair. And & Res
we: Ce Nia Seda



pte Vuauiaers)
Leah t

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the beautiful grooming of your he's!

PALMOLIVE
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SUNDAY, JANUARY 27, 1952



ZINC

The element zinc
in “zine blende”
natural form of zine sul-
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of lead and silver. A hard
bluish-white metal, zinc
was originally produced
only in China and Suma-
tra, and substantial
quantities were once
mined in Britain, but






occurs
— a



{most of the world’s supply now comes from the Americas and
|

} Australasia. Centuries before zinc was discovered in the metallic

Liars, the Ancient Greeks were smelting its ores with eopper to make
}

Jorass an alloy that has become indispensable to modern industry.
| Apart from its use in alloys zine is chiefly important today for coat-

| ing or “galvanising” iron sheet and wire to give protection against
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|

Zine is also used as a roofing material and in the manufacture

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printing. Compounds of the elements are well known in such diverse

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cessing of rubber.





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In A Class by Itself !!
THE NEW **A 40°" VAN

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day. Threo were killed, one suffo- 8€ne:al atmosphere is very con-
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still alive.

The living snake, which is being
kopt in a bottle, was brought to tho
City yesterday by Vernon Fenty, of
St. Joseph. It measures 34 inches

lovely island is particularly very
ealtoy. 1

‘Now I should like to take this
opportunity of giving a word cf
dvice to my fellow brothers, es-





During the morning it drank pecially to those who have ar- LITTLE LANJU THANI, who also inde ae “
gill of unsweetened milk and a gil! ;ived here in recent months, to attended the function, is wearing HAMS (Cooked) ............ Tins VIROL .nssssereeooes
of water. Fenty said that he has try as much as you can to value the type of dress now worn by the CHICKEN HADDIES .. _,, BOURN VITA
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onli

SUNDAY, JANUARY 27, 1952



ee ee eee ee ee

How Much Sense Does

T. S. Eliot Make ?

By GEORGE MALCOLM THOMSON

POLTRY AND DRAMA. By T. 8.
Eliot. Faber and Faber. 7s, 6.d.
35 pages.

THOMAS STEARNS ELIOT,
American-born poet dramatist and
critic, is immensely famous and
very obscure. In his most cele-
brated (although not his best) play
The Cocktail Party, there is a
middle-aged busybody named
Julia and a mysterious psychia-
trist named Sir Harcourt-Reilly.
Like the rest of the characters,
they are symbolic figures, But
symbolic of what? Opinions have
differed among Eliot’s admirers.

An American teenager wrote to
him cbout Julia. “She is your
dream girl, isn’t she? I enclose a
five-cent stamp for reply.”

Said James Thurber: “I am not
so stupid as to believe that the
cockiail party in The Cock-
tail Party is actually a cocktail
party. What do you think it is?”

is * *

Eliot
admirers
that the
Hercules,

But sometimes Eliot’s admirers
think they know his meaning bet-
ter than he does. Once he wrote:

disappointed
for failing
psychiatrist

with his
to realise
is really

1s



The whole world is our hospital
Endowed by the ruined million-
aire
explaining that the “ruined mil-
lionaire is Adam, But one learned
interpreter says that if Eliot thinks
he meant Adam, then he is wrong.

In this new essay, Eliot humor-
ously shows that the obscurity of
his symbolism is not the only
difficulty he experiences as
playwright writing in verse. For
what kind of verse will a moder

olerate from a modern

a

as sought to evolve a
rhythm clese to the natural stress-
t conulemporary speech, One
Y as the landlady said
ail Party: “I shouldn’t
t would go in South-
| in prose.”
poems as in his verse-
s there are too many charac-
who need—and elude—ex-
planation, For ins ance, Sweeney,
scnage who often crops up—
; he a symbol of the ordinary man
or (a illege) the portrait
‘ } n-Trish ex pug named
Steve O’Donnell who gave Eliot a
1 k eye during his undergradu-
ate days.
B ffled by Sweeney and his
ce, the exasperated reader may



ome

be tempted to throw the poems
away—and miss a line of piercing
beauty like:

Till the wind shake a thousand
whispers from the yew.

Does it really matter that to
you “yew” may mear one thing
and to Eliot another? What mat-
ters is the precise but tentative
verse, in which each line seems
to be subject to revision by the
next. With its learning, obscurity,
arreverence and occasional splen-
dour, it has done more than any-
thing else to state and frm the
thought of a generation.

And whet has he sought to
teach? The emptiness of a pagan
world. The need for religion. The
claim of the Christian religion.
Not all have accepted the teaching.

7 *

Only the other day a school-
master at a fashionable girls
school xn Brookline, Boston, was
dismissed for reading to a senior
class a “profane” poem of Eliot's.
One girl was “dumb-founded,”
another “humiliated” .to hear
Eliot’s Journey of the Magi from
a master engaged to teach “busi-
ness English.”

Eliot commented patiently “Oh
dear, this is most benighted.
Perhaps we must wait for
Christianity to reach Brookline.”

He himself was born in St.
Louis, Missouri, 63 years ago, be-
ing brought up in smart Van-
deventer Place.

tHiis tatuer was the well-to-do
Owuer Ol a brickworks, who had
wanled 10 be a Muster bul was
prevented by an impediment ot
speech. The family was Unitarian
irom New Englana, with academic
associauons, lot was the young-
est, trailest of seven, others oi
whom have won disuncuon;
brother as archaeologist, sister as
prison visitor.

At Harvard, he sought to
discipline his shyness by going
to dances and taking boxing
lessons in O’Donnell’s gymnasium.
ijegant in costume, with a gift for
naughty verse, he went on to Paris,
London, Oxford, before the 1914-18
war. England was impossible, “A
people satisfied with such disgust-
ing food is not civilised.” Oxford?
“Very pretty, but I don’t like to
be dead. Let us fly to a land
where there are no Medici prints,
nothing but concubinage and con-
versation.”

Bermuda House

@ From page 9..
MeWspuped LK 1s COULage, Le Das
sWwulg Cuaracrer, cul
SOpurlig.

roiesces Good

eC BYV0U Wwilel weouid acuuUue
lucure Was more impvuitale
Wiuch au veel
agoue, aeclared Mir. Mussel bear-
mon, ne ecailor of ine news-
pauper had been very Giscourteous
a5 well as courageous.

Mr, Pearman stated inat he
would support the report of the
select committee,

Indicating that he
views of Mr. Spurling,
Cooper announced his
of supporting the report.

“The thing that strikes me so
forcibly about this matter is this,”
he explained. “I voted against
the original motion but the de-
dision was made by the House
and it was put very fairly to the
newspapers. The editor of this
newspaper constituted himself
an arbiter of greater judgment
than the members of this House.
It was a very arrogant attitude
to take.”

Reminding the House that he
too had objected to the original
motion, Mr, Edmund Gibbons said
that whether the House was right
cr not was beside the point.

“The point was that the House
ordered the debate not to be
published. The order was ignored
by the editor of The Royal Ga-
cette. I would describe his be-
haviour as presumptuous. For
members to stand up here and

« Vely
cluaeu iv,
in we

lnan Wie warm

shared the
Mr. G.
intention

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GARDINER AUSTIN





laud the action of the editor is
ridiculous. I also thinkpit is ridi-
culous to say the editor acted in
the interest of the public. It was
not in the interests of the public.
Newspapers are in business to
make money,” he said.

Stating that a newspaper was
operated by a “hard - headed
bunch of directors,” Mr, Gibbons
added:

“They are in business to make
a profit. If they can inform the
public at the same time, so well
and good.”

Concerned About House

He was personally concerned
about the right, privileges and
dignities of the House.

I think it is high time that
some of this freedom of the press
was curtailed. We must protect

ourselves.”
Be Big

Mr. Smith took the floor ogce
rore.

“Why cannot we be big enoigth
to admit we were wrong? ny
cannot we be big enough to ad-
mit that progress in this world has
only been secured by the
courageous individuals who on
occasion flouted even parliaments,
to their ever-lasting honour and
glory.” he said.

“Whatever the editor of that
newspaper did—perhaps he was
rather rude and perhaps he was
mistaken—I maintain that he did
it lawfully. We should have the

decency and _ big-heartedness to
admire him,” commented the
Speaker.





MADE BY
BERGER PAINTS

War came and gave him an
American naval commission,
Family fortunes declined and
drove him to schoolmastering at
Highgate. He lit out for the
foreign department of Lloyds Bank
because the work was easier.
Was doing well in the City when
Hugh Walpole pushed him into
publishing, where he did beiter.
He has a good business mind. ‘The
family did not stem from New
England for nothing.

In the mid-twenties he became
famous with The Waste Land, his
first major poem. Every under-
graduate discovereg (after Eliot):

I grow old I grow old
I shall wear the bottoms of my
trousers rolled.

The turning-point in his life
tame in 1927 when:

1.—He became British (more ac-
curately English) in nationality,
and

2—Was confirmed by the
Bishop of Oxford at Cuddesdon.
He had become an Anglo-
Catholic.

He likes Kipling (as poet) cats
(as cats), cheese (high). Dislikes
the theatre (“It interferes with
one’s meals”) Milton (as man).

He is deliberate in speech judi-
cial with every sentence seems to
bring in a verdict of guilty with a
strong recommendation to mercy.
Does not so much listen to oth-
ers as appear to withdraw himself
courteously from an interior con-
versation. Has a gift for sedate
conviviality. Is not above a sly
joke at the expense of the con-
gregation.

Winnings: A handsome gold
cheque for £11,016 8s. 5d. in
cheque tor £11,916 8s, 5d. in

Swedish kroner “which my lawyer
tells me is free of income tax,”
i.e, the Nobel Prize. Also the
Order of Merit.

Most quoted pre-atomic lines?
This is the way the world ends
Not with a bang but a whimper.

His life-task is “Trying to use
words, and every attempt is a
wholly new start, and a different
kind of failure.”

“Poetry and Drama is a frank,
down-to-minute progress report
on what he himself regards as a
semi-failure, his successive at-
tempts to invade the modern
theatre with poetic dramas and
a prophetic message.

World Copyright Reserved
—L.E.S.

Debate

Mr, Pearman said the select
committee was furnished with cer-
tain information.

“It was obscure and did not
appear to carry any great enlight-
enment on the subject,” he added.

Mr. Pearman then proceeded to

disclose the nature of the infor-
mation to which Mr, Misick had

referred.
1947 Case

In 1947, he explained, the House
took a similar decision and on
that occasion The Royal Gazette
adhered to the decision under
protest. The Royal Gazette for-
warded an account of what had
happened to the Empire Press
Union. The matter was, in due
course, referred to the then Clerk
of the House of Conamons, Sir
Gilbert Campion, and a reply was
received.

The letter pointed out that only
the position with regard to the
— Parliament could be dealt
Ww. .

Breach of Privilege

“From my point of view the
order prohibiting publication of
that particular debate was in
effect shutting the stable door
after the horse had gone. I have
heard nobody question the fact
that the publication of any re-
port is a breach of privilege. To-
morrow morning when the news-
papers come out with a report of

e

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SUNDAY

For West Indian

ADVOCATE

Bookshelves |

“Unless the soul goes out to
meet what we see we do not see
it: nothing do we sé® not a beetle,
not a blade of grass.” With this
quotation from W. H. Hudson.
Amy Oakley opens Behold the
West Indies, first printed in 1941
and “with a text that is absolute-
ly up to the minute” in 1951, anc
over 100 illustrations containing
some not printed in the first
volume.

The book is dedicated to Wilson

Minshall “whose enthusiasm fo:
Trinidad we share.”
It is not surprising that Barba-

dos gets a poor owing afte:
that. Trinidad is “a terrestrial
paradise’, Pherto Rico is “incom-
parable” but Barbados is simply
“isle of sugar.”

On her way to Hackleton’s Cliff,
Mrs. Oakley describes the “Mono-
tony of the ride as being “of the
very essence of Barbados.” Mrs.
Oakley drops some bloomers. She
states inaccurately that all of the
land under cultivation is in the
possession of plantation owners
Had she taken my advice anc
checked with the Year Book o/
the West Indies she would have
discovered that peasant holding
accounted for 17,283 of the 94, 346
acres of agricultural land. There
is also great confusion in her
ming as to the difference between
Sam Lord’s and the Crane Hotel.
Visitors to the Crane Hotel are
not in the habit of exploring
ground floor rooms “with massive
four post bedsteads.”

Mrs. Oakley mentions with ap-
proval and accuracy Crane Club
and rum omelette, but she disap-
proves of frying flying fish.

“The frying of the captivating
creatures” she writes “in life irri-
descent as rainbows ana likewise
arching the waves I resented as
much as the serving in Italy of
larks and nightingales.”

She makes no mention of the
fact that whereas Italians can get
by on spaghetti and rice Barba-
dians just could not afford to live
by watching tame flying fish re-
semble rainbows,

The only place which Mrs.
Oakley seemed to enjoy in Bar
bados was Canefield House, then
in the possession of the mother of
the founder of the Mary Elizabetin
Tea Room on Fifth Avenue. Of
the 513 pages in the book Barba-
dos only gets 19, so there is plen-
ty of reading for those who are
interested in other territories ot
the Caribbean. Beginning with
Nassau, Amy Oakley takes us
with her to Cuba, “Tempestuous
Jamaica”, Haiti, San Domingo,
Puerto Rico, “Uncle Sam's Vir-
gins,” the Leewards, the Wind-
wards, Guadeloupe, Martinique,
Trinidad, Tobago, Dutch West
Indies, Venezuela, Colombia, and
leaves us in Panama.

Her husband, whom through-
out the book she describes as “my
illustrator” sketches anythiny
from a flying fish to Robinson
Crusoe. The book is very well
printed in good clean type and on
excellent paper. Some of the
illustrations lose their continuity
by having a white space between
the folds but most of them are
effective and add to the enter
tainment of the book. Amy Oak-
ley writes easily and she has a
lot of anecdote gathered in per-
son during her travels in the
Caribbean and collected from
books and other sources. Some
of her expressions jar. For in-
stance on lighting by plane at
Havana, Amy Oakley comments
“once more we felt the onrush of
the city’s Latinity, its European

etal alaianeeenterremnnimnsmnretnsinigtemesetartaiaiaseas
this debate all these newspapers
will technically be committing, a
breach of privilege. If my motion
is lost I shall ask to leave the
House,” Mr, Misick said.

Mr. Misick’s amendment was
then put. Only Mr. Smith and
Mr. Misick supported it

Mr. Misick then left the bar of
the House,

With only Mr. Smith objecting,
the report of the select committee
and the message of the Legisla-
tive Council was carried.



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background, its American fore-
ground, wave after wave of emo-
tional contact, as tangible as those
that at first impact, had seemed
about to engulf our sea-landing

plane.” is kind of gush is more
disturbi to a British reader
than the occasional American

spelling of words like “Vender”
for Vendor. If Amy Oakley could
have travelled with less interest
in “souls going out to meet her”
she might perhaps have given a|
better account of the West Indies|
and certainly of Barbados

but |
maybe the book might have then|
become less readable than it is.
The Barbados Publicity Commit-
tee ought mot however to let the
matter drop there, They should at
once send a complimentary copy
of the Advocate Year Book 1951
to Amy Oakley, c/o Longmans
Green and Co, Inc. 55 Fifth Ave-
nue, New York who have pub-
lished “Behold the West Indies”



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Twice” a thriller by George Har-
mon Coxe (Published by Alfred
A. Knopf New York at $2.50).
The Advocate is mentioned, the
Morgan night club and its pro-
prietors are referred to by name,
the Crane Hotel and a lot of other
places come into the story. There
is talk of oil and the author
shows himself familiar with Bar-|
badian customs and backgrounds.
The story itself is well- told and
holds the attention as surely as it



would have done had Honolulu
been chosen as the scene of
action instead of Barbados. If

people in fact are half as inter-
ested in reading about themselves
as the publishers of newspapers
believe them to be, The Man
Who Died Twice will be the
year’s best seller in Barbados.

The Year Book of the West
Indies and Countries of the
Caribbean continues to be the
most comprehensive and up to
date reference work serving the
Caribbean

Published by Thomas Skinner
of Canada the Year Book 1951 is
the 23rd to be printed. |

Its, price remains. £1. 15s. .in!
the West Indies although the new |
edijion has 1,044 pages as c¢omh+|
pared with 924 in 1950, hs

In the section dealing with

Barbados a street is erroneously |
said to be in Georgetown instead}
of Bridgetown but this is a small
slip that can be rectified.in a fu-
ture edition, Of special interest,
in this section is a comparative}
table of principal imports and exe}
ports 1945—49 |

The tables are especially valu-
able because they contain a re-|
minder that Barbados major ex-/
port, sugar, depends so much on!
absence of drought. In 1948 Bar-|
bados exported only 49,652 tons!
of sugar as compared with 82,461
in 1947 and 126,609 in 1949. Mo-|
lasses shew a steady decline from|
8,235,368 gallons to 6,143,926 in|
1949 and rum dropped from a
peak of 1,462,476 gallons in 1947!
to 631,926 gallons in 1949,

Statistics and information gp-!|
pear for Bermuda, Bahamas all
the British, French, Dutch, and
American Caribbean territories,
while Cuba, Haiti, San Domingo,
Columbia, Venezuela, Guatemala,
E] Salvador, Honduras, Nicara-
gua, Costa Rica, Panama Canal
Zone, the Republic of Panama are |
also included. |

There are sections on Canadian
trade, Uniteq States Trade and}
British Trade, a chapter on com-|
munications and a Gazetter and|
Index, There is an_ excellent
map. If the size of the Year|
Book increases as more and more
statistics are published by Carib-
bean territories, the Year Book
publishers might have seriously
to consider publishing in two
volumes, half-yearly, or produce
separate volumes for separate
territories. Meanwhile the use-
fulness of the Year Book grows
with its size.

GEORGE HUNTE.

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2739
PAGE TWELVE



By Eugene Sheffer
HORLZONTAL
1—Wha‘ Apostle wrote the epistle
5—-Wh ry eee
at disciple was a physician?
(Col. 4:14) ae
&—At what river did Ezra pro-
claim a fast? (Ezra 8:21)
14—Gaelic.
15—Ireland.
16—In what wilderness did Ish-
mae) dwell? (Gen. 21:21)
17—Grows old.
18—Handle.
19—Design-stamped fabric.
20—What did Job do because of
his many afflictions? (Job 3:1)
22—Spires.
24—Ancient Jewish ascetics.
26—Sea eagle.
27—Canonical office.
298— Vipers.
33-- Worries
36--Accumulate.
38--Undermine
39—Dry.
40—Muck.
41—Where did the Holy Ghost
forbid Paul to teach the gos-
1? (Acts 16:6)
42—Corded fabric.
43—Artificial.
44—Italian city,
45—Whom did King Zedekiah send
to Jeremiah? (Jer. 21:1)
47—In what place did the witch
whom Saul consulted live?
(1 Sam. 28:7)
49—Arctic exploration base.
§1—Metal urn for keeping water

hot.

55—Respired.

58—Feast.

60—French security.

61—Charity.

63—Woe is me.

64—Weasel-like, web-footed carni-
vore.

65—Hebrew month.

66—Short letter.

CHURCH
SERVICES

ANGLICAN



8ST. PAUL'S: Patronal Festival—7.30 a.m
Holy Communion, 9.30 a.m. Proeéskion,
Solemn Mass and Sermon, §.8. Chiliren
3 p.m. Evensong, Sérmon and Parish
Procession, 7 p.m. Solemn Evensong,
Sermon and Procession. Preacher: The
Lord Bishop.

MONDAY, 2th JANUARY

6 a.m Mags, 7.30 p.m. Soléenin Evensong.
Sérmon and_ Procession—Church Army
Preacher: The Rev. B. C. Ulwett

BAPTIST

THE ST. JAMES NATIONAL BAPTIST

—Epiphan; IM, 7 pum Evengong and
Sermon, her: Rev. J. BO Grant,
L, Th. eine in charge, 4.9% pm.
Monday, Wednesday Friday, Activities for
Youths. Conducted by the Rey, L. Bruce-
Clarke (Assistant Pastor), assisted by
Mrs. Olga Browne

ST. Cate E.0. CHURCH—Dash
Road, Bank Hall, Sunday January 27th
1952. 11 aan. Morning Prayer, Preacher:
Deaconess C,. Barrow, 3 p.m. Sunday
Sehool, 7.30 p.m, Evénsong and Sermon.
Preacher: Rev. C. A. Ishmael

METHODIST
BETHEL—ii a.m. Rev. M A. E
Thomas, 7. p.m. Major Underhill.
DALKEITH—11 a.m. Mr. V. B. St. John,

7 p.m, Rev. M. A. E. Thomas

BELMONT—11 a.m. Mr. P. Deane,
7 p.m. Mr A. L. Mayers

SOUTH DISTRICT—9 a.m Mr, P.
Brucé, 7 p.m Mr. H. Grant

PROVIDENCE—11 a.m. Rev, B. Crosby,
Holy Communion, 7 p.m. Mr, B. Browne.

VAUMHALI--9 a.m. Rey. B. Crosby,
Holy Communion, 7 p.m. Mr, A, St. Hill.

At South District at 4.48 to-day there
will be a service for the dedication of
church furnishings given by friends of
the church.

JAMES STREET—11 a.m. Rev. J. S.
Boulton, 7 p.m. Rey J. S, Boulton gins. Give him a lump of sugar
PAYNES BAY--9.30 a.m Mr. @ ’
Marville, 7 p.m. Mr. Baseombe
WHITEHALL — 9 30 a.m. Rev R. ness Meeting, 3 p.m, Company Meeting,
McCullough, 7 p.m. Mr F, D. Roach 7 p.m. Salvation Meeting. Preacher: Sr.
GILL MEMORIAL, A am. Mr W, Captain Campbell
st. Hill, 7 p.m “losing eeting 0! SPE sa /
Evangelical Campaign, Rev. R. McCul- Mette eo cian a
ough 7 p.m. Salvation Meeting. Preacher: Sr.
HOLETOWN—8.30 a.m. Mrs. Morris, Captain Bishop
7 p.m. Mr. D. Scott CHECKER HALA—11 aim. Holiness
BANK HALL-—9.30 a.m. Mr. F. D. Meeting, 3 p.m. Company Meeting, 7 p.m,
Roach, 7 p.m. Supply Salvation Meeting. Preacher; Lieutenant
Reid
SPEIGHTSTOWN—11 a.m Rev I
Lawrence, 7 p.m. Mr. McLean FOUR ROADS-—11 a.m. Holiness Meet-
— ing, 3 p.m. Company Meeting, 7 p m.
Salvation Meeting. Preacher: Major
THE SALVATION ARMY Rawlins . (R).
LONG BAY—11 a.m. Holiness Meeting,
BRIDGETOWN CENTRAL ll am. 2" mâ„¢ Company Meeting, 7 p.m. Salvation
Holiness Meeting, 3 pan. Company Meet- Meeting, Preacher; Lieutenant Etienne,



ing, 7 p.m. Salvation Meeting. Preacher
Rev. B. Crosby
WELLINGTON STREET 11

a.m. Holi-



Bible Crosswords





67—Noxious plants.

68—Pithy sayings

69—Allowance for waste.

VERTICAL

1—Cessation of war.

2—Monster with a hundred eyes.
3—Utilizers.

4 -Decreased.

5—Sluggish.

6--Footed vase.

7—With what did Judas betray
Christ? (Luke 22:48)

8—Growing out.

9—Adds.

10—Dwelled tediously.
1l—Accessory seed covering.
12 —Weathercock.
13—Insects.
21—Son of Seth (Gen. 4:26)

All for Sale

N R. GONZALES, who has

given up riding, wanted to
sell his saddle, silver spurs and
sombrero. He placed an ad in a

paper, offering to sell the three
singly or in any combination.

How many ways is it possible
to sell the three articles—or any
three articies?





(AjoyeeRdos eippts)
owiquos Ts sindg “(AjoyerBdes sinds)
oxaaquios {iI sIPpEs “STpPPes tim candy
“(prosun e[Ppts) Casiquics mq sandy
‘oupaquios pute sind® Gila oIppes “(pioe
-un sunds) ogesquios Wy;M SIppwg ‘sands
quis erppeg ‘auore sundg “eucTe olaIq
“og sUOT# apPag “KAM JO sUO\wUIG
-WZO9 sjq\ssod Ua} eue essUy, *4OmNUY

ADVOCATE



23—Efface

25—Closes hermetically.
28— Afflict.

30—Being.

31—Shower.

32—Small quarrel.
33—Fruit: comb, form,
34—Scope.

35—Tears violently.
37—Prayer endings.

40—Whom did Abraham bury in

Hebron? (Gen. 23:19)
41—Haughty
43—Golf clubs.
44—Large volume.




Se hd







Copyright, 195%, King Featares Syndicate, Inc.

Western Dotograph for Juniors



HILE this fellow’s fast van-
ishing in populated areas
he’s still to be found in goodly
numbers out where the West be-



DIAMOND CORNER—11

am,



7

for my healthy teeth

[Rr en rr nnn












! Penetrating Kolynos Kolynos keeps your |
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Heart che et ties tel ein ee ese cnet te een ead Wh ete rn i id cm ei
Ne other dentifrice does more thar “ KOLYNOS”
to fight tooth decay. 98

Holiness
Meeting, 3 p.m, Company Meeting, 7 p.m.

and you'll make a real friend.

It’s easy to determine what ha
is, if you haven't already guessed,
by tracing him out from dot 1
to 41.

een Meeting. Preacher: Captain FIRST CHUB oe aaa’ SUTENTIST,
MORAVIAN Upper Bay Street
Sundays 11 a.m, and 7 p.m.

ROEBBUCK STREET—9 a.m, Morning Wednesdays 8 p.m. A_ Service Which

Servies. Preacher: Rev. E. E. New, 7 p.tn.

Evening Service, Preacher: Rev F

* GRACE HILL—11 a.m. Morning Service,
Preacher: Mr. O. R. Lewis, 7 p.m. Evening

Service, Preacher: Mr. S. Weekes

FULNECK—11 a.m, Morning Service;
Preacher: Rev. E. E, New (followed by
Evening

Holy Communion), 7 p.m
Service, Preacher: Mr. G. Francis.

MONTGOMERY
Service, Preacher:

9
Mr.

p.m
U. Reid

DUNSCOMBE—7 p.m. Evening Service,

Preacher: Mr. D. Culpepper.

SHOP HILL-—7 p.m, Evening Service,

Preacher: Mr. W. S. Arthur





i)

TT CES LL

Y)
eee rr
CCYy re

ie
cel cha nla

Evening



SUNDAY
46—Mace inter
48—Hazarder
50—At whak piace did David fight
and et the Syrians? «2
Sam. 10:17)



52—Courage.

53— Winged.

54—Set again.

55—Forehead.

56—Network

57—Grafted, ther.)

58— man of Issachar was
nee grandfather? (Jude
101)

62—Deep cask.

Y








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Pt | WN
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peek at the answers
would not be cRICket.

Ric... . Man's name
-BIO.. .« Insect
.-RIO.. Fruit
RIC. Cloths
+ RIO Of a heat unit
+ RIC Shoulder belt
RIO . Large bird
RIC. «. Negroid
»~RLIO.. . Bluffed
RIC... . Kind of disease
3a

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VIA YInIVAS OZ Invi}

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E. Healing.

SUNDAY, JANUARY 27, 1952
Subject of Lesson-Sermon: TRUTH,
continue in

Jesus. ....e«--, 2% ye

truth shall make you free,

The following Citations are included in

the Lesson Sermon: The Bible

ye @reatness unto our God, Deut.
Seriptufes, by MARY BAKER EDDY.

Mortals try to be
standing Truth, vet €



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SUNDAY, JANUARY 27, 1952

HENRY BY CARL ANDERSON

BY [p= cee eo 3,
(youre wor y ay me) IE | ys tata i
| be ~_| ; en ae

rae

hun Si NISTER
THEN DUMP 7:

iV?" BPAGWOOD | [SHE FIXED THAT LEA J
Nau 8 DAUGHTER] JIN THE BATHROOM j— 9

ALL BY HERSEL ao

COOKIE 1S
ER QYLA GENIUS . WONDERFUL
} Ber | Sax (VE TRIED THREE

TIMES, BUT IT WAS

1000 MILES FROM
EARTH ROTATES THE
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SPACE, PEOPLED 6)

PRISONERS TOO

DESPERATE TO BE

'$ HERE THAT FLASH
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MAKE AN EMERGENCY
LANDING f

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WILE ABOARD A CHANNEL STEAMER ba g ose
oe fp] Soave 5
AH-H! GOON, SWEET... BONNIE... = es
DBAR LAURIE, WE'LL MEET IN . 2
PARIC, CITY OF ROMANCE... AN’ noes
BE MARRIED...MAR RIED / ——|

AYE, IFA LADDIE MEET A . —=
Sf _bteaned

||

SSS

shape > ell

Parerad

“|

us |

in hr










JIM)

| k AS LONG AS HE |








| I THINK ILL T's GOIN’,

TONIGHT= I'LL. K | GIT A BOOK TO work! ~4 ISN'T DRESSED-

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SAS SESP RISER Bm min: ms sagen ap agnanceaa
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NO-ITS JUST AN ANCIENT LEGEND
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IT PAYS YOU TO DEAL HERE





SUNDAY ADVOCATE PAGE THIRTEEN





RELIANCE SHIRTS

THE PRIDE OF BARBADOS

y

secon MEA ieee alm



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By Appoiotmres
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anes

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LS.

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Tins Corned Mutton 66 60 Milk 34 32
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PAGE FOURTEEN ; SUNDAY ADVOCATE

C LA S SI F I E D A D S| Bacco SALES a GOVERNMENT NOTICE |

TELEPHONE 2508. |
} DENTURES: Yo Broki Denta!-
REAL ESTATE Plates, skilfully sepeited: the in
three hours, By (SQUARE
ELNTURE REPAIR SERVICE: Upper

SUNDAY, JANUARY 27, 1952

FOR SALE
HOUSES














































































NEXT TYPEWRITING
EXAMINATION
ALL CANDIDATES who desire

to sit must register before the end
| of this month with Mrs. James







— —_



PART ONE ORDERS

For Births, Marriage or Engagement |
announcements in Carib Calling the!



(Advocate) or with me an

FOR SALE BUNGALOW: Newty built Bungalow

Saturday, Combermere (from 10







charge Is $3.00 fof any number of words} st Brighton, Need, Black: Rock, 290 yards | =°C? Streets 6.1.88%40 By a.m, to 12 noon).
c up to 50 and 6 cents per word for each from beach, containing 3 bedrooms,|” - guapsom a DABLIA — Lieut.-Col. J. CONNELL, O.B.E., ED., Must cable at once number of
additional word. Terms cash, Phone 2506

drawing and dining rooms, verandah, awl
| tiled bath, kitchen and servants room,

| gerage, self-contained of modern design
| Dial 4321 or 3231.

Sal - fn tbicdabaed ct

CAR—One_ 1949

papers needed. Fees must be p id
beforehand.

Those who desire to sit in other
subjects (Book-keeping, Frenc?
English, Arithmetic etc.) must



MARINE GARDENS
A solidly constructed 2-storey
residence, standing about 9,000
sq ft. containing 3 bedrooms.

between 8.90 and 4 p.m., 3113 for Death
Natices only. after 4 p.m

Commanding,

ing taken for Glad-
. The Barbados Regiment

now

ioli and Dahlias for delivery in

26.8.51—3n ber 1952, parties interested in
btehe please phone 4442, T. Geddes Grant




AUTOMOTIVE

Issue Mo, 4 25th Jan. 52







En

10.1.52—tf.n. | 7











——_—_———_—_-——_—-—- nee along with all modern con-

" . = auxhall Velox, Ex- ARGALINS. A PARADES. register before the end of next br :

ENGAGEMENT cellent condition N W Crosby, is wie Not Be . eee All ranks will parade at Regt. HQ. at 1700 hours on Thursday 21 Jan. 52 month. } er eee ee out gardens:

on cr Fa — | (Home) or 4700 (Office). 27.1,52—In.| Price and Suitability count Not Boost- Coys. whi “arry out training as per training programme for the 3 Jan. Guana 5 } popular bashing snot a

“MISS DAPHNE BREWSTER CAR-Vauxhall Velox tn perfect col Tom oe Sees Ar eee a FOK RENT Rent vane” tot Drill Lecture/Discussion—taken by Ofivers “Rockerest’, Oistin. Hill, i) tevely priced.
The engasement was announced re-| dition, Apply Gerald E. Ward, Jason| Bungalow, Ideal oe ae nee. The Signal's Course will be held on, Mon, 28, Wed 30 Jan. 52 Christ Church. MAXWELL COAST

ene. oe, ee ae an a of | Jones’ Garage 27.1.52—2n | INGS, MARINE & NAVY and Near these HO Band * Rey . “a | ) A 4 bed-room nee house
Ss an Ma a mer USES ‘ . Wed, Thurs. an command a ivalled view

of Searborough Christ Church. SAtGne Prefect Pord in good se CORR Gere hha or. WORTENG: Band. practiges will be held: on Mon. 28, & & } nmanding an unrival vie



















































































27,1.52-—~ a —_—$— Reeraits < = 5564208 OC0OOK a" of the Christ) Chureh coast; excel-
1.52--In,} dition, Phone 4351. 27.1.52~—3n. | MAXWELL, MAXWELL COAST, BELLE-| AGENTS OFFICE, cool, with. six win- Recruite will) parade for training on Mon. 28: & Wed: 30 Jan, 52. Soon: PLLPEPPVPLE EEE. lent bathing; well suited for ay
eS nin Ladle — VILLE, FONTABELLE, BRIGHTON, ST. | dows, situated centrally in Bolton Lane. Officers’ Leetwre % % Small Guest Howse (Owner leav-
DIED CAR—Vauxhall 1947 12 H.P. very sood| JAMES and ELSEWHERE—Several New | Dial 4582—J. B, Field & Co. ‘All Officers will attend; a leeture hy the Staff Officer on Riot Drill, at 1716 % ing Colony).
a > oa condition, Dial 0109. 27.1.52—3n. | Bungalows, Stone & Concrete, Other Resi- 27.1.52-—2n. hours. on Tuesday 29 Jan. . A. M. WEBB & (2) A substantial stone build-
“LARKE-—On Saturday, 8 5 ae’ 4 senate ane EEC < - dences and Building Sites inching Soee——————————s « ing, standing on approximately 2
CoA OO ARERCE yee nuary gh] CAR—19%4 V-8 Ford in. good condition | side, and Facing Sea with Right-of-way, FARAWAY—St. Philip Coast, Fully} *~ w= OPPICER AND ORDERLY SERJEANT FOR WEEK expiva «Tm, ° STOCKBROKER 3 acres of land, completely enclosed,
Te Saneeay Sa tate, Mrs. Albetinat ter” Metbert, 86 Dudes ree. By WHITE PARK—3 Bedroom Partly | furnished, 3 bedrooms, 2 servant. rooms, Cudelay Gilaab end. Sheuk AH. Cathe Ss —_— . ‘with a productive orchard; good
Boxhill's residence Martinique, Gov- 26 1.52—2n.| Stone Residence—Going Under £1,400|doubie carport, all conveniences, $59.00 Seder darieank fe Serjeant Willams, 8. D $ COMMONWEALTH OF $1 )}} escposition for a aevelopment.
ernment Hill at 4 o'clock this after- CAR LOWER BAY ST.—Two—2 Bedroom (One | per month from February. ‘Phone b Next A Dus . ; . AUSTRALIA xt (3) One of the most modernly
noon for St. Patricks, Christ Church 2 One Standard 8. Apply to L.| Seaside) Stone Residences—Going Under 19.1,52—t.f,n. - x 5% BONDS, due 1955 called for » constructed buildings on this
Friends are asked to attend. King c/o R. H. Edwards or Kingsley. | 1,000 and £1,180: BLAGK ROGK—3 Orderly. Officer Lieut, SiG. Lashley . redemption nest July. x coast; containing 3 bedrooms, each:
Ruby Clarke (Wifes, Albertha Clarke [Desens Head 26.1.5%—2n. | Bedroom Migne Besidence, pars Gon- FLAT: A. self-contained Flat af 7 Orderly Serjeant 283 L/S Turney, D.G. 8 ore % with attached tiled | baths: tiled
(mother), Gwen,..Una and Velda (sis-} “WaoroReyCLE ee ee veniences, im . over 5 Acres, Going | rooms unfurnished or partly furnished in _ itchenette; garage for ears;
ters}, James and Frank Clarke ‘broth- MOTORCYCLE—Only one (1) in stock, | Reasonable. WHAT SAYS YOU about}a cool, quiet country home with ger- L. S, CHASE, Major, ar eke Wik hee coud og thos x servants’ quarters with bath and
te Daehnt and tna Boxhill: (sisters-1 Aueeeeees Supreme, Spring crane, 2| INSPECTIONS? — THE PLEASURE is|dens, excellent surroundings, avai Adjutant, (Ag) . Wishing to repatrinte their funds toilet attached; standing on an
in-law), oF ala aa BARNES & CO.,| M7NEI Call at “Olive Bough”, Hastings. | from February ist. Apply: Mayers. of The Barbados Regiment. = : 3 euclosed area of one aere.
27.152. LTD. 26,1.52—t.f.n | aera - cy as a Advocate Advertising Dept. Phone 208. PARI 0 ORDERS es i 33 Broad Street, Bridgetown. 2 ST. JAMES consT
= eS THE BARBADOS REGIMENT RIAL . 4 *harmacy) - well a pinted m
EDWARDS—On January 26th, 1952, at |p F. de Abreu. In NELSON 'ST,,| MORNING SIDE—Bathsheba, February e . = % ota ee % iecclanlowr ceeeaanaaa a0 nine 9
the General Hospital, EVANS ED ELECTRICAL |By The Bus Co. 2Storay Stona}to June. Telephone 2481, Mrs. W-1 4 s@RENGTH INCREASE—Attestations a s or LS Sen oinete. WO ta: aes
WARDS. Axe #9 years, His iunere Business Premises and Residense, | Chandler 26.1.52-—3n. | 490 Cdt. Roachforde, K Hand. Attested and taken on Strength wef & | %6966%606666646990066 so near the town: on a good bus
leaves his late residence Mango Lane - _—-—--—_-—— oe ree area Good Condition, Ideal se cease ee ae ae P , Nov. 61 ‘ ot a ee route
St. Peter, at 4.30 p.m. to-day for St.. NORGE REFRIGERATORS, a small|for any usiness, Going Under| NEWHAVEN, Crane Coast, fully fur- wee : . vet
Peter's Cemetery i number of these well known American | £2,300, IN TUDOR ST.—Large 2+Sterey|nished, 4 bedrooms, 3 servant roams. em Pe. Rdgnill, C. i, panels es ee prea oe é a D
ENID EDWARDS widow) Refrigerators have just been received.| Stone Business Premises & Residence| double garage all conveniences. 360 dk
MAUDE WELCH isister) Call early, at REDMAN & TAYLOR’S| with a Large Garage or Workshop, all|per month from February. Phone . 1..A. CHASE, Major.
es |GARAGE LTD., Showroom, Phone 495| Conveniences, A-1 Gondition, Ideal for 19,1, 52—t.f) n. “The Barbados Regiment. NOTICE ST, PETER
HUSBANDS: On the 26th January 1952] or 4435 23.1.52—5n. | any Business, Vacant, Can Yield $120.00} — . Adjutant, (Ag.). An old-fashioned country resi-
oe one. 2nd. Ave peters ——$_ | f). FT Dan iat oo Buy It—Pluis ROOM—A very large reccy, with a NOTICE * iets standing on 4% acres an
. Bank Hall, Aleitha Husbands REFRIGERATORS. Another shipment) Appraised alue © Land, UPPER | conveniences. Apply “Westmeath” ‘an, 52 on -------—~ lan ol re:
Her funeral will take place at’ 4|of FRIGIDAIRE Refrigerators has just|NELSON ST.,-3 Bedroom Residence, Whitepark Road. r 27.1.52—in The Volley Ball field will be open for practice from Wed. 30 J nd which is well laid out in a

every Wed. & Fri. in preparation for the Annual Volley Ball Cormtpetition

——
RESIDENCE Roebuck Street next to] " Fri. 15 Feb. 52

Me for Almost Anything in Real Estate. | Cedars Gap. Dial 2525, Harold ore

25.1.52,—8n.| "Ht I Can't—Who Will? Call at “Olive|& Co. Ltd. a Ay a

Bough", Hastings. 27.1.52—1n,

WIRING DEVICES: Joint Bowes Cd —_—_—_—_—_——_——Ll——————
ing Roses, Cord-grip Holders, Batten Dwelling house called “GILVAN"” with
Holders, Surface Switches, Flush Switches | 10,803 square feet of land situate at Chel-
Fuses, etc. Laurie Dash & Co. Tudor|sea Gardens, St. Michael.

Flower and Vegetable garden. .The
mas building has 7 bedrooms, large
Dr. MARIE LOUISE BAYLEY flush hall, surrounding galleries,
electric light and water, and
clients, commands an unobstructed view

Sine y a
cartes EAs Se certaa atl have of the countny-side, Quiet and
exclusive area.

kindly sent in their congratula-
tions on the occasion of my ST. PETER
having obtained my “Doctor of Two one-acre plots, opposite

o'clock this afternoon at the Breth- j arrived. On sale at K. R. Hunte & Co.,| Conveniences, Good Condition, about
ren Meeting Room, Peterkins Roda,|Ltd., Lower Broad Street, for Cash or 3,500 sq. ft., Going Below £800. Contact
and thence to the Westbury Ceme-]on Terms. Dial 4611 or 5027
tery for internment Friends are
asked to attend
Mabel Burton (Daughter), Lionel
Burton (P.C. 372) (Grandson)







TO LET
Any period from April ist Country
House, in St. Peter, 1% miles from Sea
The house] stands high Fully furnished (except



27.1.52



















































‘J Street, Phone 5061 23.1.52—1n | contains Drawing Room, Living Room, | plate, linen), 3 bedrooms, 2 dressing rooms Optometry degree.” Fourwinds Club, with right-away
THANKS 4 bedrooms, Garage, Toilet, Bath and|Wectricity, Geyser, Telephon ie é iad ie By pa as — fox, bulla
usual conveniences. 2949. 26.1. My office wi remain at m ing a modern home.
JONBS—We the undersigned beg through FURNITURE ‘The above property will be set up for see PRA, NETHERLANDS & residence “St. Michael's Lodge”. ST, JAMES
ie eee Wo SSR a vay other sale by Public Competition at our office] TWO LARGE COOL ROOMS—Furnishe@, The M.V. DAERWOOD will St. Michael's How. Under the Holders Hill—A little over Ya
so kindly sent flowers and in any other James Street on Friday 8th February,| running water, with or without % STEAMSHIP co. accept Cargo and Passengers for same well knewn and well worn ace arable land, well suited to
way expressed sympathy in our recent oases in iain came Oates in oC h 1952, at 2 pam, 10 minutes walk to Yacht Club or Me St. Lucia, St, Vincent, Grenada name Dr. J. Hahnemann P. cane growing or vegetables.
midice Jones (wife), Harold, Ivor, and Rs, Sains Sete ct detnds Sot | maa Retina: Ledeen, toa Well Woedside Gardens, Dial, 2206. AILING. FROM EUROPE and Aruba, Sailing Wednesday astey". (irr Inte TUNEmES? Priced to sell for $200
a i BD, ae . Wat 7 man, 0) Ze. Ja! A : *; -
Orrie Jones, Jack Montell, Meta Sealey, | your home. A. BARNES & Co., Ltd. . YEARWOOD & BOYCE, a ‘py, Oe he 89: Comm i eE 1908 oo om Vv. CARIBBEE will To those who have so kintily —_—-
(children), Seon Coombes (nephew). : 18,1,52—t.£.n. Solicitors. TONITY—Palm Bee Beach, Hastings fully s eee eb, 1982. acoupt Cargo and Passengers for commended their work to gy NTED TO RENT
eee | “Ralph Beard offers the following Bar 271.58-—10n.| furnished 3 Bedrooms. ‘Apply to Mre.| "SAILING TO PLYMOUTH Dominica, Antigua, | Montserrat, care in the past. 1 must Tet thin WA
outa oe . at J i - a : ises. - . Kitts. Sailing know what a very strong in- 7 2 aad
IN MEMORIAM ee Mag. “Dinte Cosine $22.00 pr., Birch LAND—Two (2) Spots % Acre each, ene errs 27,1,.52—-2n ; Orand ae peen en 1952 tard eS icary 1952. ean a had in ay ee 5 A eutey, TelteNe eS iepown
Mag. a : .. Birch | situs : : MS; jestad, 29th “» . a Raee ea ;
‘ —— j pining Chairs $18.00 pr, Mag. Vanities | Carmichael Phone au, '28-1-82~n- | ~y —__—_——~ SAILING. TO PARAMARIBO AND ‘The MeV. MONEKA will SE Te a ae chien with about 2 acres of land; electria
COPPIN—In loving memory of our dear from $75.00 upwards, Cedar China Cab- See : , : WINSLEY — Bathsheba. February to GUIANA accept Cargo and Passengers for ee cada tnspisatioes” light and! water.
mother and grandmother META COP"| inets ‘from $49.00 up, Steel Upright meee lune, Teapnene 201, Mrs, Cae M.S. Agamemnon, 30th Jan., 1962, Dominica, Antigua, Montserrat, 7 eT
PIN who departed this life January] Chairs $8.50 ea., Steel Arm Chairs $12.00| Apply; Fred Carmichael, Phone 2443.— 52—3n./| MS. Stentor, 28th Feb , 1952 Nevis and St, Kitts. Sailing, Date Any, work entrusted. ta, nay office Consult: ,
2 ee 5 life di each, Deal Kitchen Tables from $8.00 , 26.1,52—2n | SAILING, TO TRINIDAD, PARAMARIBO: to be notified. will be promptly and carefully 4
aba ive he eal is conten. upwards, Iron boards from $6.00 up- att . - 7 = AND BRITISH GUIANA. wwit SCHOONER eae: ) > CECH JEMMOTT
Phellis, Wilfred, . Valda, Norma, ete ee ee Tables from $35.00) “LOVE COT"—Wall House situated St PURLIC NO ricks. = Cottica, ith, Feb, > "ASSOCIATION. (ENC. “flip
Marva, Audrey, Grace and Gene. good Sehend hand furniture. Lower Bay cawrents, eee teats the Gospel : M.S. Bonaire, 18th; March, : Consignee, Tele, No, 4047. MARIE LOUISE BAYLEY, | Upstairs Knights 1 Buildings
27.1.52—In, inal - . all, rooms, living rooms, dining) —————————— NLT | Opt. D. , Br .
tae ee. | Street. Phone 6010, 27.1.52—1N | room, toilet and bath, 2 small rooms THE BARBADOS MUTUAL Ss. PB. MUSSGN, SON & CO, * 97.1.52—1n Phone 4563.
cu In. loving memory of our A



downstairs, water and electric, garage.
Apply to Ethel Wiltshire, near Roekley
Yard or Ventnor, Ch. Ch,

LIFE, ASSUR ANT ENERAL
MBBETING

nebseaustie * —— —
—-——— NOTICE is hereby given that an Ex. a e s St 8 |
AIN . r Meeting of
POULTRY: 90 E hire a ed SAINT VINCENT, B.W.1, traordinary General tional eamship
Plymouth Rock er gee PROPERTY Attractive seaside property qualified Policyholders of the above a S

months. old, also. Hampshire Hatching | @dotning Villa Beach, 3 acres with Society Wil be held at the office,

beloved mother LAURA CUMMINS

who died on the 27th Jan. 1950.

Two years has passed since that sad
day

When one we loved was called away

God. took her home it was his will

But in our hearts we love her still.
Ever to be remembered by Eustace,

Lettie (children), Courtney, Harry,

Huge, Harmond tgrand-children) . ‘

; 52—1n



POULTRY



27.1.52—In




















fags 38 cents ea. App! Erié Denny, | ™assive stone building 2000 sq. feet. of the Society, Beckwith ieiday. 15 ccnp ihellbatesaicaneniisiitiia iit O LS
Bridge Gap, Black Rock 26 1,52—1n | Particulars from Errol Rooks, Four Winds, town, at 3 Oc he’ SOUTHBOUND Sails Arrives

Sea February 1952, for the purpose of con-
Pegs poste oa sidering and passing with or without Bh aie ts

Stone | amendment the following Resolution:



PROPERTIES FOR SALE -








“In lo ory of our Des “ iret . pon 6Feby. 7 Feby.

MORRIS—In loving memory of our Dear re T bungalow on m all. modern, con-| SeecnvED that ished oot ee CANADIAN CRUISER’. t “i igpy. ‘ai , a Fen, 28 Feby.

Died daughter “MILLICENT EU- IVESTOCK Veniences, servants room. and. garage. |of Settlement be delet 206 eee sie i. 15-Reby: 25 March 10 March AMPS, & B.V.A.
Fi rm en athe; Sepanted this Stone bungalow recently constructed, |'°W'"S “assurance or assurances shall IAN CRUISER” .. .- 14 March. - 23 March 24 March












in a desirable neighbourhoed about 1%
miles from city, containing all modern
requirements, servants room and garage





be accepted and no policy or policies

RACEHO. s . 7 y
RSES in training. Bay filly, shall be issued on any one life for a

sreress, Br. gelding, Colleton. Apply

If life ahd care would death prevent,

Arrives = Arrives
Her love on earth would still be spent

Arrives
St. John Halifax












x
Hementina§ Morris (mother), Robert! to J. D. Chandler. Gun Site One wooden bungalow, just a few | sum exceeding | $25,000.00 op is immes Ba es ? 1@-Feby. 17/Feby, 20)Feby SELECTION OF PROPERTIES
Elliott Smith (father), The Me 26.1.52—2n, | steps from beach at Brighton self con- anos’ D cxeed with some other Com “LADY NELSON” by & Feby. a . Beby. ixoe: "i aseceh

and Smith's Families. 1,52—1n. tained, drawing and dining rooms| ‘ately renault stand. | “CAN. os 20 Feby. 2 ‘ i FOR SALE

soe aR aan pany or Society of unqui



r ; estionable “ 8 March 9 Marety
enclosed with glass pany sod the Society thereby relieved of LADY RODNEYâ„¢ "98 March 2&Mareh 3) April



















as oe . 4 ‘ 4 April 7 April
PHILLIPS—In_ dear memory of my SCELLAN Lavinia—Three roof house, containing ys ‘LADY NELSON” *e
cousin ALFRED | TOBIAS Pe vii MISCE EOUS ast cintage teoaktest and’ ewe bape |Ste coun ecew. Sener such | “GAN, ST dpettt ame a MAb I Aaa niisnaiae ns. “HOS Dm, OWEN; Mee 2
who us 10 “for ever ei ale ae rooms, flush toilet and bath, with house : atvivings at " ”, Rockley New Rd— “HOL: 7 , St; James
the Lotd”’ Jan 28th., -1951. ANTQUES — Of avery aescription |i. back standing on §,460 sqr. ft. of land. Pg et ap ae For further:particulars, apply to— ‘ aheatia tout, pre-veas: mone An Estate house built of stone
(Evening) Then all by chance or fate} iiss’ China, oid Jewels, fine silver | , Marshville—Three root, dwellmenovss: | account shall, be taken, of ng OF bungalow of first class construetion with pine floors. and shingle reef.
Femoved like spirits crowd upon the) yiiiss Chinas sot books, Maps, Auto. | stinding on 5,445 sar. ft. of land. All| prospective Reversionary Bonus Addi- throughout. The 3 bedrooms are 2 reception, 5 bedrooms, verandahs
ore i veg | Rraphs ete “at Gorringes " ntiais Shop | modern conveniences, along Bank Hall fy provided with. washbasins and all etc., also garage and usual out-
The few we liked, the one wo love adjoining Royal Yacht Club e P| main road. : Cc, K, BROWNE, GARDINER AUSTIN & co., LTD.—Agents. have a cool exposure, There is a buildings. The house stands on
And the whole heart is memory 3/10,51—t.t.n |, Land—A_ desirable building site, con- Secretary. : large lounge, dining room, front approx. 4 acres of well
Love's last gift is remembrance, AO5I—t.£-0) ining 11,000 square feet of land 5 verandah, kitchen, and in the base- land (mahogany) approached by a
— Phillips, “Sunny Side”, Sivethe situated in Navy Gardens. One building 27.1,52—6n. eet ment ere extensive storerooms. long driveway flanked wittr closely
clyde. ‘ehh “oO TT i. —— | site located in Weleches Road, containing Garage and servants’ quarters are planted Mahogany trees. e 01
WHITTAKER 1 loving | memory re a fhe dopniar DARWAX CLEAN. 5,000 square feet, And 7 sends ot Income Tax Notice e acs ving of me. is over sanaite epoachan yet rere
n 2) | | 2 P + 9 a alate s the very lovely whic
properties; and houses, ‘or information 20, sq. t. and unobstructed is very lov e
‘ Jook like new after using, LARWAS— | 2st call at: 0. views are obtained across the golf the advantage of being well ele-
pene +S beck rey a really marvellous! Dial 4391, Courtesy EBONY BARES ek COMRATEITON ane course. A popular and select ve Peyt Ay = views on
er to be remem sara: s . district. all sides. Coas ess than a mile
ra Franklin (mother), Ivy of eaesaue, 95.1.58,—4. Marhill Street. Dial 5001, NOTICE 1S HEREBY GIVEN that ne. away and town 6 miles.
(sisters), Douglas Whittaker and tHos- 26,1.52—2n.| {Income Tax returns are required from “ROUMAIKA", Dayrell’s Rd.—
kins Franklin (brothers), George Whit-



rf Cc NTS 1. ie every married man whose income is Attractive and imposing property. “WYNDOVER”, St. Peter—A
taker and Alfred Dottin Sune) calenteia sent ie Ma aot ea oes SALE NOTICE $1200.00 per annum or over, from every Driveway flanked by mehogany solid one storey stone residence
leta Pile fiancee, Samuel and Denis ; ame Hee per! he undersigned will offer for sale| cther persen whose income is $720.00 per trees. 2 reception rooms, 6 bed- with shingled roof, lately ex-
Pile (sons), Leroy Franklin (father-in- Wilsons $1.40, C, Herbert, 55 Tudor



at their office, No, 1%, High Street,| annum or: over and from compa’
Bridgetown, on Thursday the Bist day| whether incorporated or unincorpora

of January, = = = Ce ee) aoaiatlete persons, § in, ang sree
building lot of land containing ‘ or profession, owners of land =

square feet or thereabouts situate on jerty whether a taxable income has A STEAMER sails 15th FebruarY— arrives Barbados 26th February, 1952.
top of Rendezvous Hill lying to the east| accrued during the past year or not. \ / RESIDENCE, Maxwells Coast— bedrooms (with wash basins),
of and adjacent to the lands of Cloud Forms of Return may be obtained from ‘ ~ he Se aamvaes pro Seitation. lainaty, servantet

Walk the residence of Sir Dudley Lea-| the Income Tax Department AFTER. s perty with 3 bedrooms, large ters and garage, Grounds are

cock, The site is in within easy reach|;sT DAY OF JANUARY, 1952, and the NEW ORLEANS SERVICE ; 4 ~ over 444 eres with productive
A STEAMER sails 18th January— arrives. Barbados Sist January, 1952. diming-reom, drawing room, loung ,

1952

26.1.52—2n. NEW YORK SERVICE

A STEAMER sails 25th January--arrives Barbados Sth February, 1952.

tensively re-modelled with great
care by the present owner. The
house has 2 wide roomy. verandahs
at front and side, large drawing
room, separate dining room, 3

law), George Williams (cousin)

rooms, kitehen, pantry and large
27.1.52-—1n.

verandahs, garage and storerooms.
Grounds approx. 2 acres. Ideal
Guest House proposition,

Clyde Whittaker, who departed 3 AND POLISH just arrived—-Ojd Cars
|











JEWELLERY—Topaz Pendant Ring
ind) Earrings Set, all matched; large
stones 18 carat Gold and Diamonds,
land-made settings. Call EVANS, 8225.

25,1.52.—3.



WANTED

HELE
































—_—_——

of the Golf Club and commands a} forms duly filled in must be delivered orehard, flower and vegetable







galleries, 2 arages, servants’
LADIES VESTS Z beautiful. view, to me on or before the following A STEAMER sails 30th January—arrives Barbados 14th February Stone tert ane i gardens, driveway and large park-
- ioe aes a sili pee ou. + further particulars and conditions| respeetive dates; A STEAMER sails 13th Pebruary— arrives Barbados 28th February, 1952. naitana, ger or) Meat et ing space for cars. “‘Wyndover”
Experienced Shirt Makers. Apply De- | duced for one week only, Three for|°f Sale apply tor 1. Returns of persons whose books ' about % ofan aere theuring com- is well elevated on the ridge,
Luxe Shirt Factory, Spry Stross ca 2.60. KIRPALANT S& eran ane COTTLE, CATFORD fe. were closed on the sist day x EE plete privacy. Further details always benefits from a breeze ang
. ¢ 0) rs. mber, 1951, on or re i commands wfect views of
RAPHER & TYPIST for ou Ltn +20.1,52—-10n. Se Starch, 1908. CANADIAN SERVICE upon: application. faery
STENOG s or ———____—__—_—_———| 2. Returns of persons whose principal “CAS AMLANC A”, Maxwells
Office, apply by letter and in person- Long Playing Records and 78 RPM The undersigned will offer for sale at place of business is not situate in SORREROUND Coast—A_ beautiful eee “LINSLBY", Garden Gap,
T. Geddes Grant Lid, 23.1.52—t f n 4ocords and we book orders too. A.| jel office, No. 17, High Street, Bridge- the island on or before the 30th : ‘ :

‘ARNES & Co., Ltd *|Cown, on Friday the Ist February, 1952, Name of Ship Sails Halifax Arrives Barbados bodying the finest pre-war work- Worthing—A modern, nicely plan-

day of June, 1952.















" ve . 2 coral stone bungalow with

oo cs led manship, Well designed for easy ne
_ ; , 18.1.82—t.8.n, | 8t,, 1:30, .Pm;, the dwellinghouse cal 3. Returns of all other persons, om or|s.s. “ALCOA PURITAN” 3 5 nia’ aa a dens , shingle roof, Select residential

SALES. ave to cover “ELLERS anuary 14th January 24th running with 2 reception, 4 bed
, thi LESMAN; WY naward “lands Rapes en Ire pyre mga gm) PRETO anes sah ve Se ae taares before the Sist day of JanGsry, | 5.8. “ALCOA _ PIONEER” January 29th February 8th rooms, verandah, kitchen, pantry, area, ideal for quick access to
e Leeward (and Wwindreated confiden- | SUITCASES — Valises, attache, cases, | ayoute adjoining "Dr. Bancroft’s _resi- 1963, ss. “ALCOA PLANTER” .. Sebrdery ists Wisruare sand patabh. stpeeratche oto. ‘Tha. nd Town, Hotels & Clubs. Excellent
interva 3 S Advocate a te turdy and lightweight, double locks,|Gence at Lower Fontabelle, The house N. D. . OSBORNE, A STEAMER... February 26th March 7th is approx. 2 acres with flower and safe bathing from sandy beach
Way, SOx, Ss Uta en [19.96 to $6.24. A BARNES & CO. LTD, P Commissioner of A STEAMER ae dernht sath March sith vonsiatia +. gatdensl: penauctive two minutes distant, also at the
13.1.52—t.f.1 ‘24 contains. downstairs, drawing and dining Income Tax and Death Duties (Ag) A t c E popular Rockley Beach which is
edainaained —_— 1,52=t.f.0: | rooms, breakfast room, two bedrooms,| . 40: any person failing to make his STEAMER March 23rd April 2nd orchard and coconut grove, One a

Traffic Clerks for our Office All ae
cants must apply in writing, with refer
ences and photographs, to BRITISH
WEST INDIAN AIRWAYS LTD., Lower
Broad Street, Bridgetow 271.52
————

MISCELLANEOUS



toilet and bath and upstairs 3 bed-
rooms, Electric light, company’s water
and gas turned in,

Inspection any day between the hours
27.1.52—2n of 1 pain and 3 p.m. on application on

iat EnE Ee enna ae 1 ee pees.

TORNADO—International K.41, Beauti-| Por further particulars and conditions
ul condition, excellent equipment, good | of sale apply to:—

acing record, Cost $700.00 now $500,00, COTTLE, CATFORD & Co.,





: vere walled garden may be sold nearhy. A comimodious lounge/
return within the due date These vessels have limited passe ’ bui t living roorn runs the entire depth
be liable to a fine not exceeding passenger accommodation. separateky as building site. =

i 2 and t the house opening onto a
£100 and not less than & ROBERT 1 pleasant cove" porch, There
will be prosecuted unless a THOM LTD. — NEW YORK AND GULF’ SERVICE. red

APPLY:—DA COSTA & CO,, LTD.—CANADIAN SEBVICE

SUIT—One new Ladies’ two piece suit.

olour—Dark Beige—size 18. Phone 2933, “BUNGALOW”, Rockley—A very

comfortable compact timber
bungalow in good residential area
on main road. Accommodation
comprises front covered verandah,



are 3 pleasant bedrooms, modern

satisfactory reason is given. compact kitehen, servants’ quart-

10.1.52—Tn. ers and garage, One of the more

attractive small houses very easy
to run with one servant,





Hook — BARBADOS GARDENING

°, drawing room, breakfast room, 3
No offers. Hicks. Telephone 3189. ‘ s bedrooms, kitchen, ian
BOOK required. Will anyone who has & 18.11.51—t.f.n OT otis, 1 nereaets quarters. Wibnpant vesden “DURHAM”, Worthing, Modern



copy of this book for sale please contact
Advocate Advertising Office.

stone bungalow in pieasant resi-
dentjal area. Accommodation: com~

MODER prises: lounge, dining-room, three

os Hall g-edithear behenaeindd a) cited bedrooms with running water, bath
e with parapet roof. This property
. has the advantage of a corner site



and a good yard at rear,

RADIO NEWS

How long since your radio beem
to the dentist?

- --——=- -—---- eee
TELLODONT” Tablets make a pleas- WENSLOW, CATTLE WASH, St, Joseph
wit refreshing mouthwash and sargle| Fully furnished. Standing on 1 acre 1
foe bad breath, so try a bottle if your|;ood of land, for inspection apply to the
breath is offensive. Price 2/9 bot. caretaker,

KNIGHT'S LTD, 27,1.52—2n Offers will be received by Mrs. W. T.

27.1.61—In





Furnished House or Bungalow; English

with hot water and modern kitch-
family. 1 child school age; not on coast





















Ralph Beard F.V.A. Lower
Bay Street, Phone 5010,
offers you 2 outstanding Bar-
gains in Properties.
WORTHY DOWN
Situated at Top Rock Ch
Ch, having 3 bedrooms with



FOR SALE





Square Tip-Top Dining Table, Upright
Chairs, Sideboard, Morris Suite 3 Arm
Chairs and Settee with Cushions; Hat-
stand, Book-case; Desk-chair, Couch,
Ornament Tables all in Mahogany,
Carpet, Congoleum, Card Table, Pictures,
Flat Top Desks; Jalousie Screens, Ru:
Chairs, Uphols. Couch, Berbice Chair;





Capt. C. A. Reed we will sell at No, 28.
Officers Quarters, Garrison, his Furniture

which includes













rooms, large living room, kitchen,
garage, servants’ qyarters. A
pleasantly located property for
sale at a very competitive figure.

“GRANVILLE”, Flint Hall—
Roomy 2 storey house with galler-
jes, living and dining rooms,
kitehen, pantry and storerooms;
enclosed yard with stock pens,
garage and large out-buildings.
Grounds are about “4 of an agre







Ay al You can't neglect your radio and enetter Land is over % acre all
Phone 8273. hacen Gooding, Stronghope Plantation, St get away with it any more than and a very fine view seawards qencee and there are many fruit
SSS Thomas, 20.1.52—3n you can a teeth, Pay sate and t t standi n70 Coe are 3 good bedrooms with :
\ : Nisei Ae Oh Re let the radio dentist look it over a two storeyed dwellinghouse standing on 10, square feet built-in» wardrobes, Large lounge “PEMERSYDE"
tt , y' . re 5 . R DE”, St. Lawrence:
PITMAN’S SHORTHAND AUCTION oe ee as a ent Meanie of’ land on the incomparable St, Lawrence Coast. a geee ban rece. pec herrrts Spacious stone built bungalow
INSTITUTE BXAMINATION ORIENTAL “ UNDER THE S SILVER but if it's so far gone that we bave Recolianst sea bathing. Dwellinghouse contains verandah } ||} well supplied with fitted "cum ar ers ar Fieger aoe rent
4 r to make an extraction, you ca upstairs and down, dining and sitting roums, 4 bedrooms, pan- »oards, Posserses 2-car garage, 2 . i
Applications from intereged at » 1 Inge s oums, 4 ms, Pp re sane 7 , und side, 2 enclosed
persons ite enigr a Theory, and SOUVENIRS HAMMER Oe ee ee aaceibesibiy sad try and kitchen. Electric light, gas and water installed. Garage boy? psec ihe y agen joes a large airy lounge and dining room,
Sut NE a te = — ue Tuesday 5th February by order of we leave a set operating in your and servants rooms. “THE RISK", St. James—Large saseot e eee ata od
n either arch or . 2. Irs. Hannah J s u i 2 *. * st and c te 2 2 suse v. rv rooms, garage
for the certificates of the Pitman’s SILKS, CURIOS, ARTS Seis BRERA. JOR, TS EN eae Reon ace’ thie. ex poe Purchaser to. have option of buying furniture and effects. % Santino’ tn oraunds at a and outhouses. The land ‘is com-
Shorthand Institute, London, will VENDEMOS, SEDAS, ver Plated Ware, Good Glass, Lustre & oan ion puneeneaea call oo Inspection by appointment. Dial 8137. (Mrs. K, R, Hunte). % ive aces. Cool position and’ ex- pletely enclosed and there is-direct
Manto, EO, Box. 300 ‘hridiietown. QUMOSIDADES. TRAIDOS Bohernlan wlast etc. etc: Full wAaUlagS |Hh, veitassontiience, The above will be offered for sale at public competition on % | cellent safe bathing from sands access to the sek With good Dath-
MNS, Eis, 4 . 2 ater. beach opposite. Extensive accom- ting.
not later than Saturday, oth DE INDIA CHIN BRANKE Laat yaa Friday, the 9th. February. 1952, at 2 pm., at the e of the a > 1
of | pach LA Ae R, TROTMAN & CO. + * ey % modation with 2 large reception aia 7
aCe 1980 Fae $1.90 for each BJIPTO Auctioneers. THE ee mene Lt SHOP undensigned bons whom further particulars and conditions of $ rooms, office, [kitchen ‘and onbTRATamORs, Culloden Ra.
152—1n ROEB TREET sale ained. y oms an "
Nr, Moravian Church. -—s. y Enquiries invited built to last with type of
Ss. IR HUNTE, ’ Enquiries invited.
Sicistany set Anoltcarsiping BUGy- THANI’S UNDER THE SILVER J. K _GULSTONE, COTTLE, CATFORD & CO., material rarely seen to-day. Ac-
retary - Radio Technici: Solicitors, BUNGALOW, Maxwell Coast—A eommodation comprises enclosed
26.1,52—2n. Pr. Wm. Hry. St., Dial 3466 HAMMER mown 4.1 52-—15n well built bungalow with 3. bed- galleries, 2 reception, dining room,
ON WEDNESDAY 80th ty order of om § _Detrpomas,

kitchen, pantry,
storerooms, garage ete. Well re-
commended at the greatly reduced
price now asked.

“HOMEMEDE”, Garrison—. This
property is ideally situated for
most people in this ever popular
district, ““Homemede”, whilst not
isolated, is quite private and its
verandah cannot be overlooked, a
fault so common with modern
























a warm or hot bath within 8

@ ‘ j —





LAND . S trees sture. houses. This bungalow was erect-
connecting Toilets and Baths, Ciaee Sines gad ten Mervinnes Waenicns SILK psi esangie. cathe apr gyic Mago ed about 1939 & is constructed of
Modern built in Kitchen, 2 Fittings, Double Bedstead with Spring @ uregS aye. secu vsineane vine, cog
large Balconies, Large and Dunlopillo Mattress; Single Bedstead 7 7 Hehe Se eed gr ren ne ee
Lounge, Dining Room, Out- Several spots at Maxwell ne Poet ee al —_ 3e. sousine ie oY ae a quarters, double garage etc. Land
La atau, 38 a i.e’ ests § Now’ @ | NOW OFFER YOU Paes.
Setvgnt’s Room, fully en- r) Spring Cot, Cavas Cot, White Dressing 50c ; bath and toilet, kitchen, garage and
closed ‘ : : Table with Press combined; New Jones ‘ out-buildings. Good arable land el
wea iON _ 43,000 sq. ft. at Rockley Machine; Books, , Ice Box, Larders, ————————— over one acre, all enclosed with
: EVANTYOD New Road. Kitchen Tables and Utensiis; and other ( PING wall and fencing, very suitable RENTALS
Situated at Top Rock items Flowered Corded market gardening or chicken farm
having % bedrooms with aad ar ro i Sale at 11.30 o’clock. Terms cash. LI , Low figure asked, ae
Lounge, Dining Room and 2 roods 34 perches at Brit- BRANKER, TROTMAN & CO POPLIN : p ! wie silico Bia FENSHAW", Wildey—Modern
i y € ton’s Hill en a road leading iy ? e+ cored ‘buneslgiy meets Sar
sun nge, 2 fully tiled = Auctioneers. | v rington Hill, St. Michael.—Th nished. Av.
sh Sou ae 7 i 7 — to Club Morgan. 24.1.52—2n 1.76 fine old country mansion was iamed te me tee
Baths and Toilets with Hot | e . recenly conifetted into. 4 spacious jate ‘possession,
Water Built in Cupboards }))| ’ ; | ‘ NOW luxury flats fitted with all Modern RESIDENCE, Sheringham Gar-
throughout,. outside 2 Car {{{| Several spots at the Pine OOO SPPPPSS PPPS OPPS OSES | @ FOLLOWING ge NOW conveniences. There are approx: dens. Fully furnished, available
Garage, Servant’s room, Play | Hill ranging between 11,000 & 1% 5 acres surrounding the house om lease. immediate possession.
‘ & 14,000 sa. ft its HOT WAT ER ON 1% $1.00 s. | laid out with lawns, shrubberies
Room. The Gardens are well ’ Sq. =f. | ; oer m8 sini ak
pom. rdens-are we S | i S $1.18 and gardens, The iong drivewa NEWTON LODGE”, Maxwell
laid out having numerous ${}| ae % TAPfor YOUR BATH A approach is flanked by mat ( Rul tarmac Sean
} ‘ } . ; mahogany tfee: Good in sailabl ,
aie: Several spots at Hothersal $ | Crepe Back ST | aeRO meme a ae ae s. H in lable long lease as from Feb.
he above Properties are Turning beside the main | With one of the lovely White Por- SATIN ARTING TODAY. SATURDAY 26TH | :
, r & ’ - on : . ’ ETC.
available with possession road, 1% calain Gas Geysers—You can have .
e
ie
igs
s
1s
| g



LLL







within one month. The Own- e inut of ligt 7 Boon< | f 7 “ SATIN ai
ee ee een, tl mae manus of lighting, “wp, Bron: 81S $1.74 GEORGE SAHELY & cO., LTD. ETC. REAL ESTATE AGENTS, AUCTIONEERS and SURVEYORS
reasonable offer for a quick to D’Arcy A. Scott, Magazine { ae ee Theta aS a MeN GAS 1% NOW @ 19 WW, ee eee ae
sale, 25,1.52—3n Lane. 26.1.52--2n W1% Works, BAY STREET, 13 $1.50 SWAN ST, ETC. PLANTATIONS BUILDINGS — Phone 4640
'
SSS! —_ FESS ae ¥ 459999999999 9SGO SS OGOA ; .


SUNDAY, JANUARY 27, 1952





KITCHEN & PANTRY

Double & Single Drainboard
Sink units, drainboards and
sinks, in aluminum, plastic
and enamel. Oil stoves, all
Sizes and types, and ovens.

A. BARNES & CO., LTD.





The

) of a

Breeze Lotion
in a of the |
Bottle | Caribbean
THAT'S THAT'S



Rooms with or without
Private bath.

We specialise in Fish
and Lobster j
Luncheons,
Dinners,

Bargain House Weekly Bulletin of Buys.
KHAKI SHIRTS

Short and Long Sleeves .............. $3.25 up
DUNGAREE
Suitable to stand hard wear........ $1.38 yd.
WORKING SHIRTS
Big Stock to choose from ........ 2 for $5.00
4. COLOURED DRILL
Reduced from $1.18
PE MRI yoo vn insieocnnicieaneytyend $1.08 now
5. NEW AMERICAN B.V.D.'s ...........:se0000 $1.20

Other Styles
WHIRLWIND SHIRTS—Reduced Now
MEN’S SPORT SHIRTS $2.95 up
BOYS’ DRESS & SPORT SHIRTS $2.46 & up

BOYS’ VEST SHIRTS .....cccccccccssssscsccossses
SCHOOL CAPS

e
A Big Selection of Hosiery, Pyjamas, Neck Ties,
Kerchiefs, Vests, Shoes and Hats

THE BARGAIN HOUSE

30, SWAN STREET "PHONE 2702

S. ALTMAN — Proprietor



Cone













SOOO SOS SSO SSS SFOS FFF OOOO

.
*
°

NOTICE



VPPVOOPEPLPPPPLLPPPPVAMALPL MM (LK Ns

Due to a change in schedule effective February,

Ist, 1952, will all passengers holding reserva-

tions with us on or after this date, please check

with our Office.



BRITISH WEST INDIAN
AIRWAYS LTD.

Lower Broad Street. Phone 2789, 4585

«

POSS OOP SOP O OE.

999999556 966655566664



Anti-Corrosive Gripon Red
Roofing Paint for metal.
Minerva Red Roofing Paint
for shingles.
Figaro House Paint in colour.
Oblita Undercoating.
Marine Gloss White.
Also:
Paint Brushes, Turpentine
and all other Paint Materials.
a

Let Us Supply Your
Requiremenis.

PLANTATIONS LTD.









FLASH NEWS!

w FACTORY OWNERS AND CONTRACTORS
We are now in a position to supply you

with your Requirements of

GALVANISED PIPE

Ranging from 1” to 3” Bore
aS
ALSO

A LARGE ASSORTMENT OF FITTINGS



,

ge Pay Us a Visit To-day and Get Yours





BARBADOS HARDWARE Co. Ltd.
.

‘4
+
‘s
‘s
o
s
%

'

(THE HOUSE FOR BARGAINS)
No. 16, Swan Street ’Phone 2109, 4406, or 3534





Hercules
Bicycle
The. go ie day
New Shipment

OF

SPORTS
' MODELS








CENTRAL EMPORIUM



Cnr. Broad & Tudor Street
PHONES: 4200, 4235, 4702



POOSCT ESOP EOE CELE,

PPPELIPPAGL LL

COSC LPPLPL LLL LPP LLL







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PPT

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-,










|

SELES

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%

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—

SUNDAY ADVOCATE









PAGE FIFTEEN

999990 SF SOOO SOPOT SOO SOS OS “s
s » ‘ 1
We car ipply % \
* 6 PORCELAIN TILES * ili Ritasade sia
. ‘
» ‘
> a variety of Colours ys AMENDED OFFICIAL CLASSIFICATION SPRING
* asians a , % MEETING 1952
S CENT RAL EMI ORI M > ©. 2. (Continued) F. 2. (Continued)
S Cnr. Broad & Tudor Sts. x Distinction Decuher
99669869066 B SSS OFBS POC OPUSOO SOS OVI OCIOHOEEE Doldrum Diarose
SODSSSOF5 FFF FS PSST VPV ETOYS SG SOOO VSA ITV IOPOO EN, | Fabulow: Dunese
> ile d’lrar Spicure
‘ y P y ‘Ce s French Flutter Facetious
ror THE OFFIC KE ia ; x Galashiels First Admiral
Letter Balances «» Stapling Machines » Love Potent Foxglove
Large and Small Clips for the above x m1 eek chece $A Prine
Foolscap and Letter Files for Cabinets Bleue Streak Miss Panic Soit Cosnonsina
File Fasteners — «» fypewriter Ribbons % | Demure Red Coat Jolly Miller
Carbon Paper «» Adding Machine Rolls % Flying Dragon Street Arab Ladys Man
e ¥ | Fuse Budget Test Match Love Nest
% Landmark The ching . Se inte
| Notonite Tiberian Lady May y
ROBERTS & Co. ” Dial 3301 8 | Grehis Trimbrook cle
3 Pretty Way — ee
High Street. Red Cheeks . My Love Il.
.. s : 8 Slainte Oberon
CSO OOOO PS OSSOOS e800 * Sunny Game Ali Baba Perseverance
{ Bright Light Rambler Rose
B. 2. Cross Bow ing
Belle Surprise Mary Ann Soprano
, r Tr ¥ r r . z :
B Oo Embers Oateake Sunbean
t » N eae Firelady Sun Fire
E King Soloman D. 2. Sunina
For GUARD WALLS and Mrs, Bear Cross Roads were 0
Pepper Wine Top Flight aterbel
ENCLOSURES River Sprite
‘ Spear Grass E. 1. ’ G. 1.
We have ~« Yasmeen The Eagle Ben Hur
Betsam
EXPANDED METAL ©. 1. E. 2. Blue Diamond
Aberford Apollo Blue Grass
Cb r bl 5 i Bow Bells Assurance —
fainable in various Dashing Princess Colleton Drury ne
Fair Front Dunquerqut oer nn
c Fair Sally Flame Flower s orship
Lengths and Mesh Flieuxee Usher Just by Chance II
, ¥ ye High and Low Vanguard Monsoon
N. i. HOW ELL Leading Article er
Lunways F. 1. St. un
Lumber & Hardware.Bay Street \Red_ Velvet lien cia alt Starlet
St. Moritz Cavalier Vigilan:
Dial 3306 | Sweet Rocket Diamoa
Topsy Miss Friendship G, 2.
i ln lt aati | Windsor Glen Will o’ the Wisp II posh Boy
R | ‘ottage
\% x } ©. 2. F. 2. Flying Ann
' FOR COMFORT (gest ES
% 8 | Aim Low April’s Dream Front Hopper
% | Arunda April Flowers Gallant Hawk
sy | Best Wishes Apronusk Joan’s Star
% | Blue Nelly Bouquet Maytime
% RIDE A % | Cantaquisine Caprice Sea Bequest
& % | Careful Annie Cardinal Sun Jewel
> % | Castle in the Air Champagne IT. Twinkle
», 8 .
% 3 | Darham Jane Chutney Valeska
% | Devil's Symphony Clementina Wilmar
. %& | Dim View Colombus Zaleika
> | ‘
% | Subject to change in the event of any horse taking part in any
% | Meeting prior to the Barbados Spring Meeting, 1952
x G. A. LEWIS, Secretary.
»%

LEO OD

mee — Sede
POLSSOOSOCSSOLOE SOOO SEE EASPORTS SS CDSE

pares ereereree SO

BICYCLE

THE BARBADOS FOUNDRY LUD.

Whitepark Road












&
FITTINGS

PIPES’? 4" — 8% 25 1" 2. 91" a BP

FITTINGS: Elbows — Tees — Unions



CITY GARAGE

VICTORIA STREET.



RICKETI

4.448

STREET
SO ool

.
.
sy
GOOLE LLLP





Make Shopping a Pleasure at - -
EAL HARDWARE svertics

(Opposite Post Office)

AOE 4,454 ¢ >
LELLLLPI LLLP LLLP POOLE POOLE OPEL IE LLL POOLS

24th January, 1952



64,6554
—PLLCSESCE LLL LLL

5.Ton Capacity

very strongly



Cane Carts

constructed

10.50 — 11.00/20 12 ply

7.50/15 Front Tyres

| Heavy Duty Rear Tyres

| Jeeps

Genuine Jeeps!

Four Wheel Drive!

| See us for these before
| they all go. It is very
doubtful if we can get

further supplies.

wirn A FULL

STOCK OF
HARDWARE, GLASSWARE, ENAMELWARE,
ELECTRICAL GOODS & HOUSEHOLD

REQUIREMENTS
i
COURTEOUS SERVICE
EXCELLENT VALUES

EASY PARKING
FACILITIES

PHONE 4918 ,

—— SSF
POOLE



COLE & CO.. LTD.



uot oiae

<
.
~



OF PPPS SFO SOSS




..

PAGE SIXTEEN SUNDAY ADVOCATE
> 9 ON PLEASURE CRUISE
General Patton’s

Widow On Yacht




































Nurse Chosen For
Special Course

Miss Olga Ilene Worrell, Staff
Nurse, General Hospital, has been

He is pleased





F aa selected to undergo a _ speciai
ee - 7 } course of study at the Venereal ~
When And If Diseases Clinic, Caribbean Medical about his
| Centre, Port-of-Spa T G4
By H. O. HUSBANDS This course covers a period of}

CHAUFFEUR

CAP
We ee in alt § : ol
}

A descendant of that intrepid Italian navigator in the
English Service, John Cabot who during the reign of Henry
VII was engaged in the search of the Northwest Passage to
India, arrived here this week.

It was aboard the sleek white-painted pleasure yacht
When and Ifi—what a peculiar name—that I called on the
Hon. Thomas D. Cabot, a resigned American official who
has either inculcated or inherited a passion for the sea.
Thomas Cabot is making a planned a world cruise in hep,

Caribbean cruise with Mrs. never thinking that war would
George S. Patton, the owner of have come along. He was not
the yaaht, his wife, Steven Wheat- privileged to cruise the world in
land (a friend of Mrs. Patton), his yacht. Mrs. Patton is now on
Captain Rose and Joseph Ekeland, her first trip to these waters,
two professional members of the Built of steel, When and If
crew. weighs 22 tons and draws 94 feet
hose who keep in touch with of water. She has an_ overall
world affairs may remember Mr. length of 63 feet and a_ beam of
Cabot taking charge of the Norti: 144 feet Although most of the

oe
about three months and Miss}
Worrell leaves for Trinidad on
Sund y, 27th instant





‘ua nv
RE FRE= At all times, and
especially in the bath. Cuticura
oap makes the skin deligh *
fully smecth and preserves \es,
@ youthiul complexion :
Its emollient properties
remove al! trace of




sizes only

also

HELMETS















Atlantic aty Organisation sailing is done under canvas, she

(N.A.T.O.) as deputy of the Sec- is equipped with an auxiliary Ready for shore are (left to right) Mr. Thomas Cabot, Mrs. George S. Patton, Mrs. Cabot and Mrs. Khaki and Plain e

retary of State. He spoke for the engine. Lighting and cooking is Steven Wheatland who arrived here on Thursday from Tobago in the pleasure yacht “When and If”. es

U.S. Government during the done by electricity Mrs. Patton is in her mid-sixties but gets around the yacht as if 50 years younger. Whi All . E ® + ®

International Security Affairs. Everywhere — on deck, in the vr eee RE or: . Th ru in ite sizes. Ca. : a ~~

Until November last year when chart room, the small kitchen, the . t # eyes

he relinquished his post to Mr. bunks and even in the engine Speightstown Round-up B.B.C. RADIO e ! ; ny ae

William Averell Harriman, room, the yacht is spick and span; : he ~

Thomas Cabot was in charge of the brass shining and the wood- PROGRAMMES Y r Horosc

America’s Foreign Aid Pro- work well polished. e - ou ope 1

gramme. While he was in_ this Itine «,, BUNDAT, JANUARE. 21, pee fe

office, America spent 64 billion r ‘ The g wigs ' n 1¢ Ss < I fh a tnt ME digg — _ ()
Thomas Cabot and the two paid . oon The News, 12.10 p.m ee

U.S. dollars for the mutual security

hands sailed her from Manchester News Analysis



of the free world.



Would you like to know what the

on November 10. She called at . . 31.828 . : .

7 : Stu 5 a Stars indicate for you ? Would you like

World Security Bermuda, Virgin Islands, Dom- 4 p.m. The News, 4.10 p.m_ Int »,| to test free the skill of Pundit Tabore,
“It is not that America wants inica, Martinique and St. Lucia ea a k United Nations Renort, 4.20 p.m.| India's most famous Astrologer, who by

to make gifts to other countries’, where she was Mrs A ?





10, 11, 12 & 13, BROAD STREET










joined by nd Half Soe, 5 P m vane Band. applying the
he expleined, “but it is the only Patton, Mrs. Cabot and Mr. a” aa mC Backtish Orchesten, anctent science 1
; * RNDWw Bs Wiican ; ? ; 1. What's usef purpose
way that they can secure them- Wheatland. They arrived at Bar- EVANS EDWARDS, fish-v endor, of Mango Lane, °." . aa re U2. a pas pee “EO
selves and others against Russia.” bados via St. Vincent, the Grena- Speightstown, died at the General Hospital shortly after p10. News Analysis, 7.15 p.m Caribbean | enviable reputo-,
He told me that Harriman asked dines, Grenada (where they were rentardnay . ae « ¢ fe ine Review p.m Piano Playtime, 7.46] tion? The ¢
1 , i noon yesterday, two hours after he had his head crushed to he Bi %5 with > a 4
for eight billion U.S, dollars this guests of Sir_ Robert Arundell) Messrs: R. & G. Challe a I i : Suatahts Sin eS SMa idan > a uaa es py eau a ae
year for mutual security but was and Tobago. Fred Ayer, who is essrs. f 1a eno! s bond at + pe ightstown DY a a | the sound practi For Permanent Floors & Walls, easy to clean, and ever-lasting,
granted seven billion, three a brother to Mrs. Patton, is water-logged wooden raft which would weigh between four _ 8.15 p m. Radio Newsreel, 8.30 p.m. | cal advice cor :
. : Reli 5 S 9 So od ni
million U.S. dollars, expected to fly from Boston to and five tons. He was exactly 36 years old yesterday. a ga ress eg gt Age ral ae gents Ep nie ES be WE SUGGEST :—
Thomas Cabot is President of join the party later in the cruise Edwards was rushed to the Ger s liana fave i 1 the Fuitorials, 10.15 pm. London} Business, Sve
the United Fruit Company and When and If will be cecaving gpa) Hospital while blood wa thie bis Seeil poy / Tine x saete Forum, 10.45 p.m. Singing is so good a lation, Finances FLOOR TILES,
Executive Vice-President of God- Barbados in a few days for Mar- )ouring fr Sia ene 7 ie bus because they were expect= ay Love aft . : ee
frey I Cabot Inc.,, U.S., the tinique and expects to call at pouring from his mouth, nose and ing to hear the clock strike as a pbosToN Friends, Enemies, Red and Speckled Cream, 6” x 6
: a Bos ans . - oY CREE varni . . j WRUL 11,25 yRUW 5 Me WRUX erie: , ‘
largest producers in the world of Antigua and various Dutch warning to get on the main road PRL: 21.88 Me Were ETS Ble We peer ate While, 3” x 3”
F : nn and others, whose watcl sare 11.76, Ms have astounded
carbon blacks, charcoal and pine Islands, Thomas Cabot told me A group of men were employed 22° 2 Ss, whose watches were ad educated peovie
tar. that he does not know when they to have the raft loaded on the = , . se >» reac Ros agai ca at dein ace ehe , “ne drivers’, have sufferec le same 11.15 a.m. Personal Portrait, 11.30 a.m,| George Mackey i 5
Mrs. Patton, w ho is in her mid- W ill be reac hing Boston again. lorry, E-276, and Edwards willing- Seer oore s Jb oe Soa. Persoeal F eaten Green. eee Blue, White, Green, Black, 6” x 6”
sixties, is_ the widow | of Major We have had a very. pleasant ly joined them to give them a ‘ 5m. News. Analysis lieves that Tabore must possess some sort
General George S, Patton, the trip’ Thomas Cabot intimated hand. 4.00—7.15 p.m. 31.32M 48.48M | of second-sight RED COLORCRETE CEMENT

American Commander of the U.S. and when asked whether he met He was standing behind the . This week the members of th« ». “ To popularise his system Tabore will
Seventh Army 1943—44 and of rough weather coming from Bos- lorry and the raft while, with Speightstown Boys’ Club were 4 p.m. The News, 4.10 p.m. The Daily | send you FREE your Astral Interpreta-







: : : ; . : ys 7 " -« — . wr

the U.S. Third Army since 1944. ton, he remarked nonchalantly ropes attached, the men were try- entertained to a, film show spon- Siiyiet heat eh ae eat ‘ake aso eee 9 blag A Ba WHITE SNOWCRETE CEMENT

Major General Patton made the “occasionally the weather is ing to get the raft upright and Sored by the Police Department at the Opera 6.45 p.m. Sports Roundup, | birth all clearly written by yourself, No For Partitions, Ceilings, Door Panels ete. we offer:—
great advance from the beach- rough, but a trip is always pleas- then on to the platform of the Speightstown Police Post. The 7 pm. The News, 7.10 pm News | money wanted for Astrological Work,

head of Cherbourg, France, which ant once you are not drowned”. lorry : boa enieved 2 film A may a An ly : i s. Pm ricket Raper on Fostage €0.- pee mee te: oe contac STANDARD HARDBOARD SHEETS

resulted in the recapture of_most Perhaps this was was the resur- ‘ To The Ba ame” ‘where. they: *°¢ Day's Play in Fifth ‘Test Review of © Postal Ordos coating ieerauure, You will 5

of France by the Allies. He died gent spirit of John Cabot. Bystanders said that the raft|saw hockey, football, rugby and ne ey hie Hele A A es eae on Wor pee genie wager Sie y | Ss er of Lee? re Serene proof,

in 1946 at the age of 61 after a skidded out and falling, caught|other games played in America these Things, 8.15 p.m. Radio Newsree!l, | of his statements about you and your | 4” thick, 4 x 6’, 8’, 10’ long.

jeep accident in Germany. Edwards against the wall, 2.30 p.m. European or Atlantic Union, | affairs. Write now as this offer may not



TEMPERED HARDBOARD SHEETS

: T , ; 5p rhe » Carlo Ré , 5 ag Address; PUNDIT |
Steven Wheatland is Manager 6@ t’’ ® d The raft, which was used to The: boys are hard at practice 8,45 p.m. The Monte Carlo Rally, 9 p.m. | be | made again. cere
3 G I e ‘ . Fr the Third Programme, 10 BORE, (Dept. 213-D), Upper Forjett
of timber properties in the U.S., oo in ) repair schooners at the Speights-. with the football and hope to play Prom so re ae oe p.m. | TABOF (en 1” thick, 4’ x 6’, 10’ long.

; The News, 10.10 p.m. From the Edi- | Street, Bombay 26, India, Postage to India |
President of Paboby Museum, town moorings, had been towed {quite a few matches during the orials, 10.15 p.m. Science Review, 10.30 | is 4 cents

*Massachusetts, the oldest 30 Shilli ashore and lifted on Messrs R, & G, }coming season, pm. tp Top “Tune ieee iin cite Nitin ipcenemne ee Se sce
Museum in the U.S.A. in continu- mgs Challenor’s jetty by crans A eee — ————————eeeeeeeoe i Phone 4267.

ous existence. " ‘ trolley took it to the terminus of e a | ‘
And now to When and If in F | the wharf lines where Edwards ‘ WILKINSON & HAYN \ (‘0 LT)
which these American personali- or oitering met with the fatal accident an POLICE B 1 dk Jeg 4 .
ties are enjoying their cruise as
— ST. CECILIA BARRACKS _ SSS »











sone family”. Rigged a. 8 Het bert Hutson alias “Goot” of A post mortem examination was
schooner with squaresails, When Bay Land, St. Michael, was fined held yesterday evening by Dr. J. A

a
and If was built in 1938 for 30/- in 14 days or in defualt one Browne the same day
Major General Patton by Pendel- month’s imprisonment with hard Fvirfield Factory, St. Lucy,
ton Bros., Wiscasset, Maine — labour by His Worship Mr. G. B. started grinding her 1952 crop on































~~ lice tenn neertniitiame same neiadia
Passage Rd. - FFAS
Famous boat builders of the U.S. Griffith who found him guilty of Friday. With Haymans Factory. —
to the design of John G. Alden, loitering in the private yard of St. Peter, starting off on Monday,
Squaresails are very useful when Gwendolyn Rowe at Taylor’s Gap, the three sugar factories of St. A GRAND
sailing with the trade winds and Bannister Land, St. Michael, with Peter and St. Lucy will all be at
hence in Caribbean cruising. intent to commit a felony. work, Springhall Factory, _ St
Major General Patton had Counsel in the case was Mr, Lucy, was the first to begin grind- ante the discovery, of Winpderes been | hades erat skin, making it jth a Se
" “4 , maki ,
* E. W. Barrow for the defendant. '"8: sary for anyone to suffer from ‘u#iy. dis. and velvety smooth. tn iat & day’ or two D
yi “uti th an is! ny in emishes our mirror will tell you that here at last
. . = aot ae pei ae Messrs Plantations Ltd. and Such "hs Bezema, Pi Hes, Rash, "Ring: | s the scientific treatment you have been
Sa a e saw son in © Mess: R. & G. Challenor & Co worm. Psoriasis, Acne, Blackheads, Scabies | needing to clear your skin—the treatmen|
yar , ny i ot ¥ ; ate “t nd Red Blotches. Don't let a bad skin | to make you look more attractive, to help . ‘a ;
Derelict yard of Gwendolyn Rowe quite Ltd., sugar shippers of Speights- make You feel inferfor and eatise vou to you win friends. Nixoderm has brought TUESDAY 20th Guarantee A Perfect FIT
>e » . ‘ : ‘ 5 th w arer, healthier skins t ousands, suc
near to her sheep pen. He knew town, are getting their ware- Lote your friends ean’ let a ad akin | aS Mr, R. K., who writes. “I suffered from . 7 ] ;
@ From Page 1 it was the defendant. houses ready for storing part of make people think you are diseased. terribly ‘itching, burning and smarting to every SHAPE.
ship was described as 98 feet Mr. Barrow in his address suk- the produce of these factories A New Discovery Penepe tor 33 rears. Fried a teeopes on ANU. A RY
long, carrying two masts, black mitted that the witnesses of the Warehouses are at Speightstown,

Nixoderm is an ointment, but different itching in 10 minutes I could see my skin
from any ointment you have ever seen or | Clearing up on the second gay All the red
felt. It Is a new ‘dscavary. and ig not | dafiguring blotches and scaly skin disap-
greasy but feels almost like a powder when | eared in 10 days. My friends were wmnase.
you apply it. It penetrates rapidly into the | at the improvement in my appearance
pores and fights the cause of surface blem- | ;

Sones. Nixoderm contains 9 ingredient Satisfaction Guaranteed

which fight skin troubles in these 3 ways. | Nixederm costs absolutely nothing un-
1. It fights and kills the microbes or para- less it clears your skin to your comple
sites often responsible for skin disorders. | satisfaction. Get Nixederm from t
2. It stops itching, burning and smarting chemist today. Look in the mirror in (ve
in 7 to 10 minutes, and cools and soothes | morning and you will be amazed at the
the skin, 3. It helps nature heal the skin | improvement, Then just keep on & ing

hull, white gunwale, red careen- prosecution could not be relied on, Six Men’s and Shermans

ing with one “W" as name, The identity was not established and A i. daseb play
oo went on to on = the onus was upon the shoulders R Pe rikoee Co. a —s
me aera nai ries ne ioe of the prosecution to establish just ia “enlar ‘eit and renov-
d mee a po ratte poat was identity. ated The Wibshaves which used
, “The local Macheur om Shipping € aie selanen ae a ma tice to hold pio tons St sugar, oa now
Master cabled this information to at the aetandaat ot evidence hold between 950 and 1,000 tons |
the Harbour Master of British ;)° nt was the man in



POLICE BAND DANCE
ORCHESTRA





We have







done it in










of sugar. Ten bags of sugar weigh clear, soft and velvety smooth, Nixoderm {or one week and at the end o s

Guiana the same day and got the the yard. Emerson Howard, keep~ a ton Works Fast Son cleat, envooth ‘and. Saenabeslly et
reply “contact Trinidad.” er of the criminal records, told the | Because Nixoderm is scientifically com. | tractive must give you the aharever you ————

‘After contacting Trinidad, he Court that he knows the defend- Springhall’s sugar is now being | Fee e Ee ae en ec aeiers geen in | €0, OF you simply return the empty prck
got the reply yesterday morning ant who has one previous convic- stored at Messrs¢ Manning’s ware- | your life before, It stops the burn | aKe and your money wit) be. fas ut der
that no information was availa- tion for housebreaking and lar- houses in Bridgetown but when | Ng And Smeg De ee mautiog and | today. The guarantee protects you. We can
ble there regarding the survivors ceny, five petit larcenies and three the crop reaches the peak, some of \CGPPRPPRRRIT VPP IPOS DIOY
of the schooner Zenith but th convictions for loitering under the her sugar will be stored at Six si
Trinidad Harbour Master hac Vagrancy Act. In the year 1932 he Men's. . Messrs R. &. G. Challenor's OUR AGENTS are making £100

do it all

cabled to the British Consul, of was deemed a rogue and a vaga- warehouses at Speightstown store
Carupano, Venezuela, The cable- bond. for Haymans Factory while Messrs

x
and more by taking orders fow ¥
Personal Christmas Greeting Cards % |

Â¥,
a









SECCOFOOOOTD



































|
|

gram also stated that it was not Yesterday, Mr. Griffith also Plantations Ltd. store for Hay- |- eal re ee ny ee the TIME,
confirmed that the derelict was deemed him an incorrigible rogue. 'â„¢@"S and Fairfield, ny bD -Suninnees: Hit tenepamenyettnl

aaa ‘ incansten : . a ublishers will send a Beau |
a — Bo oe agg “Speightstonians look forward |}( F ALE | Free Sample Book for 1952 to | \
were in progress and the local , i | Genuine Agents Write today }
Harbour and. Shipping Master to calls from sugar ships at riahest detects paid eed e
would be further advised, Caru- WEATHER REPORT ee ee tineie’ ink Saath edhuciadtindiaiads 8 Williams ‘& Co., Dept. 9, Victoria

ano we: ere e crew 0 ne D Ss no kely that a s gly Se alg .
Susken ‘Queris May lanae a a YESTERDAY anchor in that port to load before x We re !
life boats some time ago. Rainfall from Codrington: March,” a shipping clerk told the BUNGALOW 1? 4.66.4.546665656566665600 p C S MAFFE! & CO LTD

A subsequent cablegram reach- OL in. Advocate yesterday Rockley New Road: « »x ee ete or es nen e 7 ~ od ’
ing the local Harbour and Ship- Total Rainfall for month to The St. Peter’s Church clock, imately 19,000, square feet of land
ping Master from Trinidad yes- date: .36 ins. the “Big, Ben” of Speightstown Magnificent view including Golf ' Top Scorers in Tailoring
a of ited aA the fence eee 69.0 °F. has stopped working. Throughout Brite Seca. Kieren, ee
Elody M. capsized four miles from nd Velocity 6 miles per riday the dial read 9.55 and yes ‘Downstairs: Garage, Servants | ;
Chacachacare Island around 19 hour = i gp te gi Room with Bath and Toilet, and Prince Wm. Henry Street {
a.m. on Friday last Barometer (9 a.m.) 30.020 For some weeks now the church enough reom for Laundry er SSS f

Seven survivors were reported (11 a.m.) 30.010 clock has been mis-striking Pee SSS
to be clinging to the upturned TO-DAY nothing at 9 a.m., 11 at 10 a.m. BUILDING (SS SSS ey
portion of the hull and the vessei Sunrise : 6.13 a.m. two at 1 p.m. etc.—but yet it car-
was presumed to be drifting west, Sunset: 5.55 p.m. ried good time. Warehouse and Building toate

The cablegram further advised Moon: Last Quarter, Jany * eres area oe oe
that an air and sea search was in 20. ; +, The clock is now undergoing ctandile on canceoktnney 30,000,
progress and all ships in the Lighting: 6.00 p.m repairs, Bus drivers, who usually quure feet of land with a frontage
vicinity were requested to keep a High Tide: 4.13 am. 4.02 waited until the clock struck the of approximately 120 feet on
sharp look out. p.m. ton Cen ieee hours before they left the bus bese Peseta’ in gas Galena

The Zenith left here under Low Tide: 10.01 a.m, 10.43 stand at Orange Street, Speights- tor dividing and renting into #aall
Captain P. A. Tannis on Decem- pm. town, now leave when their stores or large Textile Factory,
ber 19 with a crew of 11 anda a watches tell them that the hour is my .Factory

load of stone for Springlands.



up.

Thes"ll Do It Every Time Seca cme 20 By Jimmy Hai! )

: Zz U7 WY), _ _ \
{ i HAVEN'T I SEEN HER, LL IT BACK YZ
ir ts Pear THATS ALL RIGHT! \“p ayiNG TACKLE FOR THE )/4 | ELLEN WITH THE a
BUT IF MADAM I'M STARTING ON MY ) Gpeen Bay PACKERS © SEAMS OUT AND THE
WiLL PARDON oy DIET AND EXERCISES \ Tie only : ZIPPER SPRUNG AND
TS OA FOURTEEN (4 AGAN TOMORROW OR T SHELL (0 IS THE OLD BLAME IT ON US s=-
AND YOU SHOULD )\ NEXT WEEK -“IN MAN'S BANK ACCOUNT>++
fd wens x TIME AT ALL“TeErHEE™
S TEEN IT'LL. PROBAB
UH=AN EIGHTEENâ„¢ v

LAND



Approximately 18,000 square feet
of land with one large and one

small stonewall building thereon








eS |



situate at Roebuck Street, just












above Crumpton Street and
opposite to James A. Tudor & Co

ADMISSION - 3]-
Refreshments On Sale
Dancing 9 p.m.—2 a.m.

This lund runs through to Gills






Rood with an approximate front-
age of 70 feet, and is suitable for
warehouses





AUBURN DALI

Two storey residence comprising

Situate at Navy Gardens, Hastyygs.

SWEET FIELD
Lovely Stone House: comprisihg
upstairs three Bedrooms, Jag
Living, Roem Dining Room 2
Toilets and Bat! ene with Tub
Bath and h ad cold water”
Gallery

On landing in the Tropics, Clothes are uppermost
in mind! The House of C. B. Rice on Bolton Lane, have

made it their business over a long number of years, f

to tailor to the requirements of the Barbados visitor
and resident alike.
t

Introduces

THE VIKING SUPPER |



tiehen, and Sbhev
ing on approx!mat>
land about 100 yards
Beach. | ction by





served every Sunday evening
from 7 to 10 o'clock...a’ delightful
variation to the pleasures of
“eating out”

The superb quality of imported materials, English
Worsteds, Tropicals, Gabardines and Linens—to men-
tion a few, are a section of Rice’ v





I xe of Mens-
wear for work and play. A rdrobe of quality, value

and pleasurable wear



REALTORS Limited

REAL ESTATE AGENTS |
)
)
)
)



ing.



"HE OD SHOE FITS | |
’ | TLL TAKE SA” DAME --

THANX TO MRS.ROMONA GAHL,| |

CARMEL , CALIFORNIA (({

C. B. Rice & Co.

Table reservations only. |
Merchant Tailors

151/152 Roebuck Street,



Phone 494

)
;
of three Bedrooms, Living and
Dining Room. Ali modern con-
veniences. Standing on apppox-
imately 8,000 square feet of lWidl
(

,
AN UR

AUCTIONEERS
VALUERS
{
4
{
(

\
i
BUILDING CONTRACT $
i



SSS







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PAGE 1

I'M.i mo II I \ IMUSS SIIOI' Lower BroHd Street VI lll\4. SUITS ction of styles and colour* in for Ladi v Girli and Boys. *•* %  V^*. GLOUI: % %  % %  i> i MSII 11 4Di its NOW N ii |i in Monday — Tue-.da\, .'..INI & K.3II Technicolorl iHOWl^ in i inuLimaui last' lane POWELL-Danielle DARRIEUX V ^1*1 k Wendell COREY • Femanlo LAMAS \3fl i IUB-UU atonal .IMMrtAndan> ton Ujti' Ao C .. H l %  tfE J VIC Iveata. 10 % KMr.i MtiMction TunUr. Mondu* and Tilesdav M ri.lnns of IB AUSTRALIA WEST INDIES CRICKET MRU Wm~ Thrilling Scenes ol the 2nd Ir>l SPECIAL MIDWEEK ATTRACTION W.. January :llllli, Thurda> 31st. al 5.IKI & b.J IMMe %lr*igM ** IIAIII. I1AIIHV SULLIVAN William Fogarly (B'dos.) Limited 1 litttntiniin/ uiir rc-fi/ii'iiiii^ IfV*r S/4,, f.itif.nn/ Many Clearance Bargains In Every Department To make way lor NEW GOODS, we have REDUCED lots oi Hems lo a fraction of what you would originally pay. • It is customary for us to have a Clearance after Stocktaking—so DOWN go the PRICES on some of our Very Best. Very Newest MATERIALS. SHOES. HATS. Etc.. Etc.. Etc. Sr Pay US a Visit wilhout Delay GENTLEMEN! WILLIAM FOG AW! (B'dos.) Limited THE TRADITIONS OF FINK TAILORING • Meticulous care taken \r in the making of all SUITS • Marked Expertness i Cut. Fit and Style • Full Satisfaction Guaranteed • Wm. Fojjarly Ut'dos.) Ltd. s| SOW I VNL'ARY 27. 132 TlHI.ll Value U-PKCI DKOKATED TEA SETS "* lor 6 person J|J|j.lO (,. W. Km. hiiiMin 10-DAYa MWS FLASH I -animst IBM iWN NAITWAl DAU.Y StAII I HOOl RVLfH< VPH.IN IOW* tDW IIAIH INU'lATCiRM SlMIIAlten roK DOLLS Sri-ARATOH Oil. by Ih* Pint HMlAV TO TUESDAY 4.45 & 8 30 PM Mred HITCHCOCK S IVt-.tli.ifl WMlt.p. STRANGERS on a TRAIN" Fartay Bu"*! tobwrl GRANGER ROMAN WALKCT virrcmni IVA\ IHI >\i>ll II', IdMbrUi %  t-OTl P L" A A % %  I A # 4 "i-11\ •T***••*./ II..! -I 1 rr 4 I im I Kill O •<• r-*alia tlary •I •*>• -kept M" ef thai ••( %  ritn Atttrno*. %  ••kMI SATURDAY'S L. / ^ HERO •^MKtaikMKB "w J J II II MW|*n • n-wg **•* win ,' ( 'Eg • %  %  %  Mi Short "POOR ELMER" IHM-I>\ Wtt THrR**I>\i I I -. A o 10 r M Paramount I'n M niv . "HER WONDERFUL LIFE" II O Y A I. I.AST 5 SHOWS TO-DAY 4.S0 k SIS P.inimonnl P rronla . "THE GREAT" MISSOURI RAID" Sttrrtni I WENDELL COREY MCDONALD CAREY Mn "TALE OF TWO CAFER" .-marrow 41 Mfc III Mini iX'tiblf HAIIliARA STANWYCK HURT LANCASTER in "SORRY WRONG NUMBER" And ADVENTURE ISLAND" Excellency the Lady Savage aceon.. M.tjm DMrw VatMthan • ended the thud day's pita • 1 e second Intercolonial 'i arriving t Seawelt on Friday *vaninK by ituJamaica 'plane. Sir Alfred who was born in October IMS was educated at .Torthampion Coui.'v School ind London Untvaralty. He was marrtad in IfflO to ihe du$ht<-i of Frederick Pletfen Of Neubran'lenburf. They have two daughter*. Ha obtained hi" LL.B. with flret ctaei honours m IBO3. his IA.D. m 1MM and later was adnlrted as a eotlcttor After nine year. In ihe army he retired as a Lieutenant in 190*. He entered the Department of K Majesty** Procurator General *nci Treasury Solicitor In ItOI mmt i>ecame Asa* Tre-ir* Ssaaeaaar. 1W4. Principal ASM Solicitor 19)8 SoTK-itor H M Customs and Exeter IMI 44 Can troi Commission for Oerman> 1*44. I*sl Advlcei to Forel#;n Ofnce (German Section) 1947. !! %  also been a member of se\-eral international lefal conference* Sinoe lfM9 he bus been LcfBl Adviser to British Militarv Govarnor In Germany Engaged T^ME enKaKement was anAl nounced on Friday night between Miss Heather Rosemary Ramsay, second daughter of Mr. Hugh O Ramsay and the latf Mrs Ramsay of Carlisle View Bay Street and Mr. Georg.Rfchard Rnrnes. eldest son. of ( .ipt. mid Mrs. Robert C. Barnes ji 6th Avanua li.iiiviiic Mr Barnen has recently returne I Hi v.i.-li.ni from the U.S whenl BW, Emory I .I'Tisily. Be returni to the U.S. on Thuradiv nccomnanled by his slate" bflaM who also re-ides it, thj Unite Mrs. Holder 1 first \ sa; iwck fnif since she left 3ft %  ears ago and also the first time n Miss Barker in 28 years. Bk To St. Lucia M R and MRS. FREDDIE POTTER who have been here tor Just over a week, are cx]ccted lo return to St. Lucia to-day .heir Mr. Potter is Manager of Cable and Wireless' Branrh. Regular Visitors M R. and MRS. CHARLES McEnearncy of Trinidad, ate it present spending a short holiP-1 rbadns, and are guesis %  1 i unabiink Rosjular visitors to Barbados theplan to return to Trinidad un Tuesday. Mr. McEnearnev is MWHgllM Dtiector of Messrs. Chas. Uc Bnoarney and Co.. Ltd.. Barbados and a Director of Me srs. Chii"! McEnearn. Qahib faffing LAsatn ft inn.** A aitcTlOM •* a* erewd. sno-t o' ypaterday afternoon Staying With Parents M R AND MRS in i\ hi CHEEKES fte m (ram Trinidad on FHday by B.W.I A on a short visit a Director of Central t Distributors, Trinidad. RU wife is the former Mary Bourne, daughter of Mr. and Mir. E Carlyle Bourne of Cedar Hill'. Government Hill, with whom they are slaying. They will be reluming to Trinidad early in the week. Antigua Visit C OL. .id Mrs Hugh V.'ilkm arrived lion. reeantly din dw morrow wonting by H.W.I.A. for Antigua on %  short visit They will he returning In .i rfrOgthl i ; days. Festival Today "T*HERE mil t| HatVtal F.-iA val at St. Luke-* Church. ; %  this afternoon at 4 %  '. l..<-k. The n.iicc Hand will IKIn attendance and the church choir will render o pr^ernrne at Church Music. Uicso Indies, wbo BBSJ Ue aaal polo Final Game O .rty %  ptcUtM UBS in colourful afternoon frocks) watched the Baal name of the 1951—52 Polo geaaoa tMsj Usa tfirliff ,i r t around the Polo Hut at the Garrison Savannah yesterday afternoon. Many other polo fans saw from around tb line. Amongst tincrowd were sevinadlan. English and American visitors lo the colony I seemed to enjoy the %  u> as much as the local dpectators, some comparing the %  ..;th polo "at home." ft was o lovely sunny afternoon with a cool breaM M awsng across the ground. Six Lectures M R J. CAMERON TUDOR. M.A., wili ,v lactttrai In the Library nt Harrison College, beginning on Tuesday February 5th at 8 p.m. The title Of his lectures Ii "Greal BrKata and Her Em1704—1914." i at the Qarrlien aavannali Indefinite Stay M R. C. O STANLEY. C.B.E. Chairman and Managing Director of I've Ltd., Cai accompanied by Mrs. Stanley irrlved from England by atr on Friday evening via the U.S. ami 1'hcy were met at Seawcll by Mr. and Mrs. Rod Stewart of Pyc Ltd., and Mr. P. C. S. MafTei Barl>adi)-Agent of the company. After a holiday here the pbri to visit aoma of the other West Indian islands. This is Bsi visit to Barbados. Mr. and Mrs. Suuley are l.uesta a'. Ike Rockley Beach Club. Best Nurse M ISS OLGA I. WORRELU ot Bush Hall. St Michael and %  Srnii-r Nurse at the flct. | Hoapltal ill !• leaving to-day bv I'.W.I A. rt Trinidad on %  tin.. %  nanthsV course at the Cai. cal Centre. Port-of-Spain. v. the raoant pn leatat* Hncatei and PHaas to nurses at the General Hospital. Nui %  Worrell was awarded a special i*ing the best practical nurse of 1951. O I. Y M PIC TO-DAY AND TO-MORROW. 4.30 X 8.15 P.M • oi I sim \ ACTION nut HI I '-*-v,*.--*.'--;v;. j DANCE THE BARBADOS AOUATIC CLCB (Local and Visltlim Member* I Only) SATURDAY, r-bni"-. 2nd \ Mnslc hy Mr C Cnrwen's 1 Orchestra o Membrs ar* cordially invited \ i (Frse Adaus-ion to Ballroom) J "EVERYBODY ABHORE seemed to bf. the order Of to* day "Lady Rodney" met in Carlisle Bay for the first time day on ihore shopptRR and tourtns the I-land. Here Warehou-e step*. Thursday when tfco "Lady Nelson" and V nan Tourist* from iwth ships spam the ol them are -em landing at the Baggage Genuine Bargains I Genuine Bargains REAL LEATHER HANDBAGS British Made S7.1II n.. $2,311. SB.liK now S3.0II. $11.19 n.m S4.UU. $14.29 now $5MI IMITATION LEATHER AMI IM.ASTIC All Clours S'^'il'i-u S 2H ". %  *"''" .ssi "'"' KAS n "" s lso M 3:| "i"-pa EI.IIWKHEO CiEORfiETTI s ( HAKNOS I ll.l.v FASRIONBO WI.ON HOSE FLOWERED CREPES 27" PLAIN COTTON IIAIRC (11(11 BOYS' and VOIN<; MEN'S WHITE KNITTED SHIRTS RICK RACK ami SILK BRAIDS S2.IMI now >l.i II i -: %  : .: now M.m $3.24 now Jl 60 I" *. :,n cents Sl.Ofl •II al 4 cenls Vd T. P.. EVANS & WHITFIELDS YOUR SHOE STORES Dial 4606 %  .: %  ..: %  %  .., %  .. .-..-....,-. ...w „ wy AWW i Dial 4220 TCKSII.W AMI WEIISTSD.W. .S A 8.15 P M. ColambU Doablr. JON HALL NINA FOCH in "THE MUTINEERS" AND "DARK PAST S'aninc : WILLIAM IIOLDEN LEE J COUB II O V \ TO-DAY AND TO-MORROW. 4.30 *. 8.15 P.M Columbia Ui.uM. "LAST OF THE BUCCANEERS" Htan-lng : PAUL HENR1ED JACK OAKTE AM) "BLACK ARROW" Starring: LOUTS HAYWARD GEORGE MACRFADY THE WOMEN'S CANADIAN CLUB Annual Dance in aid of t-OCAL CHARITA undfr Ihr Auspices of His Excellence(he Govsrnor and Lsdv SAVAGE al Hi. — ON — SATURDAY EVENING. February 23rd GAMES BRIDGE PALMISTRY FLOWER SHOT' 1 CLOCKS I CLOCKS I A larfr selection of The Famous Kienzle Clock AllMISSKaN $1.H Just arrived — Travelling Alarms. Bei",i>, Green Black, etc. Small Cohnrsd Fancy Alarms, various prices. The Office Clock thai you were enquiring for— Table Model Chiming Clocks, also Regulators. SEE THESE NOW! at Louis L. Bayley Bollon Lane t^^'*V,^',^',',',Vi<.Ot^^^^VV^VU^OOSMaBSBSMj*S>C I



PAGE 1

PACE EIGHT SUNDAY ADVOCATE M \ll\Y. JANTARV K. 1K1 BAKBApOSj^Am^E SUM,!.,. .I.,nii.,r> 2* I'"'2 IIIIHII PARTY THE Bill to make provision for the protection 01" Third Parties against risks arising out of the use of motor vehicles makes it unlawful for anyone to use a motor vehicle on a public road without being insured against liability for causing death or bodily injury to any person by the use of such vehicle. A motor vehicle is defined in the Rill as %  mechanically propelled vehicle intended or adapted for use on roads. Latest available official records show that there are fi.960 motor vehicles usinff the public roads of this island. There are 3,621 private cars, 340 hired cars, 156 omnibuses. 1,045 lorries, 3B1 vans, 26 hearses, 314 motor-cycles. 46 tractors and 31 trailers. In addition to these 5,960 motor vehicles, 21.515 bicycles and 4,314 animal drawn and push carts also use the public roads. In 1951, there were 19 fatal accidents, 84 serious and 1,062 minor. Vehicles involved in these accidents were 684 motor cars, 351 lorries, 152 omnibuses. 105 vans, 40 motor cycles. 451 bicycles and 22 listed as "others". These official figures are illuminating but two facts deserve special notice Although there are only 156 omnibuses | Ihc public roads omnibuses were involved in 152 accidents during 1951 Of particular importance too is the fact that 451 bicycles were involved in a total numbc* oJ 2.092 accidents. Nobody would criticise the principle that third party insurance is desirable for the protection of road users Yet the point made by a correspondent in the Advocate of January 23 deserves notice The fact that a measure introduced in England and Trimdad has not proved so unsatisfactory as to In repealed, comments this subscriber, is no reason for introducing it here. Daring the discussions of the Bill in the House of Assembly this month a lengthy speech was made by the senior member of St. George concerning the legal implications of the Bill Doubtless there is great need for the House of Assembly to be satisfied with the drafting of the Bill and to understand thoroughly the meaning of its clauses, but there is an even greater need to understand why such a Bill should be necessary Much more information surely is required from police records and from statistics of insurance companies What the ordinary tax-payer wants to know about legislation is whether it is good value for the money he or she is spending. It is so often over looked* by government and people that taxation is compulsory taking from one or more individuals and spending the monies so compulsorily taken for the public benefit. If private individuals or companies acquired monies in this method there would be a legitimate outcry against such, high handed activities. All legislation must therefore be constantly scrutinised by the public, all of whom are indirect lax payers, to see whether money expropriated from them is being well spent by the government which has been elected to power. This point is worth making because legislation aimed at protecting the community is so often immune from criticism because the public assumes that it is getting good value for its money. Facts and figures may prove that compulsory third party insurance is in fact necessary and will pay dividends. But so far there has been little indication given to the public to show why it should be necessary. Figures can be obtained quite easily and throw much light on the subject under discussion. It is interesting to discover that 2,903 of a total number of 5,960 motor vehicles in Barbados are insured (most of them comprehensively) against third party risks by five insurance companies. If the volume of business done by the remaining twenty insurance companies only equalled the total coverage of these five companies no less than 5,806 out of a total 5.960 vehicles would be already insured. In such an event the government might be creating much extra work for civil servants and insurance companies by passing the Third Party Risks Act and might in fact be spending more than the benefits to be derived from compulsory insurance of a relatively small number might warrant. Omnibuses and hired cars which have to pay very high premiums and a minority of commercial vehicles and private cars appear to be the main exceptions to the general rule in Barbados where the majority of motor vehicles are already insured. There cannot be the least doubt that people ought to be protected from drivers of motor vehicles in the event of accidents causing death or bodily injury. But unless the public is given a great deal more information as to the real need for such legislation than is provided in the objects and reasons of the Bill, it may be convinced that some less complicated measure might have been more suitable for Barbadian requirements. If, as the figures quoted above for five insurance companies suggest, the majorItJ oi mwiui vehicles are already insured, then there must be very good reasons why J. not L.KC oui inj Existing third parly premiums hat pnvate cars vary between $15 and $18 per annum depending on the horse power of the cars and no owner of a private car could lind these premiums prohibitive. In Trinidad on the other hand where there is compulsory third party insurance he rates are two and a halt times as high. There is therefore no grounds for assuming that compulsory third party insurance would decrease existing low premium rates for private cars. On the contrary there is general agreement that the rates would have to be raised as the public became more insurance conscious and made greater claims than they do at present. The greatest reluctance to insurance in Barbados appears to be displayed by the owners of omnibuses and taxis. The reason for this shyness is readily understood. Insurance premiums increase with the number of passengers carried. Taxis have therefore to pay nearly four times and omnibuses nearly twenty times the value of the premiums paid by the owner of a private car. Apparently they find it much cheaper to settle claims without insurance coverage. Compulsory insurance will therefore almost certainly result in increased taxi and bus fares. This is a very important point to watch because no legislation should add to the already inflated cost of living. 'y'SSSrVsVsVSSrSSfSVSSt',','. HIM HUM, besides being an island in the Inner Hebrides, is considered by Barbadians to be their national drink. Now Dr. Joad has been taking RngUthmen to task for not indulging in little England's famous beverage. I consider 1 wrim C %  M J I In Its* Pleasure nf Being Oneself, "one of the most outstanding tokens of our culinary dfgenenacy to be the almost total disappearance of hot concoctions from the average repertory of English drinking. Up to and including the time of Dickens. English literature is full of accounts of toddies, neguses and punches, but if you nsk for n hot drink in an English pub today, even if it be only the hotting up of Hum or Whisky they stare at you with consternation . ." Then after describing his favourite hot drutk which has a basis of rum Dr. Joad points to the drawback: "the absurd expensiveness of that best Empire product —rum. The West Indian Committee Circular is to be congratulated on reproducing this passage from C. E. M. Joad. Millions of Englishmen will agree with his comment on the drawback; "the absurd expensiveness of that best Empire product rum." In the United States of America there is an excise duly of $9 (U.S.) on every gallon of rum entering the United States from Puerto Rico. The United States employs the wine gallon as a standard of measurement. This is approximately 20'; less than the British Imperial Gallon. But so far from damaging the rum industry of Puerto Rico by making rum "absurdly" expensive the United States returns the excise duty collected on Puerto Rican rum to the Treasury of Puerto Rico. In 1949 the United States paid Puerto Rican exporters of rum $3,011,000 for 1.043,000 gallons of rum. In addition the collectors of excise tax tad for the Puerto Rican Treasury $9,387,000. In 1944 when the United States imposed restrictions on the manufacture of whisky the value of Puerto Rico's rum and liquor exports reached the extraordinary level of $35,000,000. When the $9 excise tax per proof gallon is added to this high sales figure it Is easy to understand how much Puerto Rican prosperity is due to its incorporation in the Commonwealth of the United States. The disadvantages under which Barbadian rum exporters to the United Kingdom operate are in marked contrast to the advantages which accrue to Puerto Rico A duty of £10. 11s. 2d. per proof gallon (imperial) has to be paid on rum entering the United Kingdom in casks and a duty of £ 10 12s. 2d. has to be paid on the same quantity arriving in bottles. Instead of the United Kingdom returning the duty levied in the United Kingdom on imported Barbadian rum it keeps these monies for the Exchequer of the United Kingdom. In 1949 Barbados exC tried 51,079 gallons of rum to the United ingdom. Were the United Kingdom to take a leaf from the United States' book Barbados would have profited by approximately £500.000 from duties collected in bullish ports during the year Bui since Barbados is not incorporated into the United Kingdom, like Martinique is Into France or Puerto Rico into the United States the rum exporters of Barbados have no legitimate grievance. What is cause for grievance is the fact that English warehouses are overstocked with West Indian rum today because the United Kingdom imposes so "absurdly expensive" a duty on that "best Empire productrum". The position would not be so absurd if the English man or woman disliked rum or did not want to buy it. In an overtaxed country like the United Kingdom how many individuals can afford to pay more than 26 shillings duty on a 5'6 bottle of rum ? The expensivenes* is more than absurd. Dr. Joad: it "spites the Englishman's face by cutting off the colonial's jose But our thanks are due none the less to vou for bringing the matter up and to the West India Committee Circular for drawing your notice to our attention. \OH ra nUKNBS OVERSEAS Barbados Annual Review 3/from Advocate Stationery ,-,--'.->-*-*'**,'. %  \n Kniph Box— is tlii$ YOUR Tool-Kit? //ere'* u -ilvvlian it/ • %  nrvilnv /..../. /rum our cuttniitrniblv ntiH'k: \ UWK IX LOMM.\ U Will KIM.IN I.OMM1N I! I 1.1.. Sadolln i Mriti urn 15/> H> Inn <.lr THE story is luld of Thomas Lalurvy M was a taxi driver in Ignition for wenty-live years jusi lor lh, fu. of ... Wten Baia.ey &J2ffJ5 died in 1S4B it turned oul lhat overy. but this time II rid not a my that h to be disIhivnifc done gocut reteare i Into covered. the matter he give %  this ldvice on I have always liked Ihe Middle tea-making. "You must no*, b-.'gin Ages, but I must say that I do into the iip approve of Mr. Allen's apprt (although that v >uld Mem the to the subject. He COnld< .'l" and 36" 8aw J11s— H"— 6Plane Irons—1'," Single Plan* Irons -1' 4 Doable OoagM Vi"— %' — 1" %  oefcat CfclMla—1/"—H" V.---V-V."-!" Scraw DriversStanley Planes HpokohavM Hand DrillVice. Harametjt obvious thing. 10 I strong the tea 'as a wealthy man who had telM up taxi driving ag a hobl>> glv, him H> much enjojm.ni ttal IJfijS 1 simply could not gi.. It was in in much the same spin. >'' u Vhe milk ^ thai Mr Hartnlln wrote this book. ,.'.."* . Born U Copenhagen and. a, he :. ,, tell. u.. 11 centimetre. rUh, <"''" <"c i am the hancBar? The customers all -land or *"?*£** from lh *' •"*> and pour .it about as if they belonged to J .> %  < %  J*** 1 "* W UM same party, and the stranger %  > JJ " feels a little reluctant to Intrude. %  "> d '"**" "" But when you have dared to go in Wanderings n and have got to know the place, f 0 *""'' 18 ***>* %  you will always be captivated by !<>> to those don the pleasant, club-like atmosphere. know Londor so rare in restaurant.. *•"• %  KU,dtf *> %  Mr. Sadolln soon found out lhat %  *** %  >•* P* 1 tea in England li both rite. During the how tory gg a project", .mil h On no. that Is to teach school-children UM > The correct "bare bones" of (he "Middle ARC*' i >llows. •Tint with a* little effort on U' m Use cup. then possible. The resuli I ii (3> the to book, full of lists of a lift the teapot dates which he intend' n H) P"l 'I to be learned by heart A thul you have form bos' WTSIH probf nd (4b, llf*. this book u. ot Treve van's magnlfl ^'^ This is anothcbook of dl.IfUtory. "Sod THE NATIONAL SPOUT 'You know. ;aid tlie Russian holds you with h ; glitlcrint aye visitor to England, In one of, MiiColeridge). lookl rigjnt, l^K* left, WodehouscS novels, "lhat is our extends an arm .vnilc a bicycle pal national spoil, trying lo or a bakery No., i s-ark trundles assassinate Lenin with a revolpast, and Uien p :iti0lcally beckver," U|U > ou forward. Drive it. mister Most countries seem to have— he y. courteously. >r at any rale are reputed to When playing i i g car-park the ,ave — then great national sport, diivil player slio dd observe one .ii England it is cricket — or W or iwo nne point; He should wail .t football' (The West Indians uolil the driver nas parked, lor and Australians between them tninks he has) and got out of th lave rather taken charge of the car, and locked d >rs. and put the .irst. and as for football — aren't ignition key in n Inside pocket. 'luimay the world champions?) Bringing into pl,i. all his natural in America the national .port charm and authority, the player canasta. In Italy it la grand now shepherds His driver back to apgffl In France it Is — not what his seaL 'Come right tor.,,!, %  going la ggfi bin assid," %  • itji tie dtffvar eosn bicvrling. pile*. "Go back now," orders the Has Barbados a national sport? player, and the driver goes back aOPta would say cricket, to where he stalled from. 'A bit Thai i> wnere 1 differ from most more, man." say, the player. Rcpajople. Not thai I deny tho starting his engi ic and breattUn| lualitv of Barbadian cricket heavily through his now. tho thai would be not only futile but driver puts the into reverse. dangerous; hut I have observed There is a splintering crash Hold thai there is another game much how. man." says the player, markmore universally played In the himself up an extra point, tsl.md than cricket is. I have If at the end of this I)., rutotened this game "drivlt" (one so close to its ught-hai long i and one short one. like bour that the dot r won't open, the something bv Plcavo). and i ptayci ic. ,,%. <• %  .,.• elabn that it is the true national Unlike othn ,. moin ll.nl.udo" I Itarbados. dnvit adnut.s %  certain number ol Anv number of players up to professionals policemen and carone can play drivltAll the player park attendant rhe relations lanced, is a motor-car—not hi. own. tween prongaioruiU and imatguci t>ut someone else's. The object of ure nol always of Ihs bast, net ."• the game Is to get the car out of much from an\ tJeotamd l> I I a gap into a main road, or through "union shop" as on account of a .. difllcult stretch of congested proper professional jealousy. Thu*. traftic. or into a vacant space In a when a helpful pisser-by has seen carpark. fOB safely to an anchorage out%  *OU can't drive a hundred yards side the thiefnS or club, you may >n Bridgetown without seeing the Mill be held up hy g stem figure dnvit players Eaes time vou in blue. He pleys the parking come lo a blind corner, which i. game superbly, a. a result of yean rett* well gft h • %  jpou come to of training and practice; but. as %  comer, (here. In a strategic one having authority, he feels he position, stand, the player. He mug point a moral. "You have you back-end too cloase to hc[l' bumper," be explain, as you' scramble through the sun-roof; .no hi an aside to the abashed passerby he adds—or is it imagination %  fifteen-love." An elegant variation is inountct ilrnit, played on a bicycle. Many a drlveg feeling his way forwun between the high stone walls tha flank every gateway and almo> every gap, and which effectively mask all traffic approaching from cither side, mu.'t have admirei the quickness with whn I boy who happens to be pcdallim by will sue up the situation am wave him On with a graceful ha). circle of the arm. and nothing Ii polo, nothing even in bullfighting, can match lh< admirable daslnvvllure with wind a cyclist, swerving without warning to tfte wrong sukof Ihe roan can signal a motorLsl by a flick of the arm behind the back lo paw him on the wrong side A. a true national sport, how ever, drivlt has one fault. It is no' [ played by women. Somehow the> don't seem to have the flair* foi Ihc most part they leave it stnctK alone, and when they do play they play badly. Only recently. 1 was edging my way inch by inch into Bay Street hoping that each rus that bore di.n on me round the blind corners would be the last A lady with a basket on her head watched me dispassionately from t perfect drivlt position, but despiv my patent difficulties said never ; %  word. At last, taking mv course* In my hands. I let In the ahricri only t.. come lo a acreamine h:i!' a. a taxi Hashed by, missing me by %  Onlv thou did the lady with the j hasket offer me her advice. "Doan't j get rr.ashed,' she said. IF YOU HAVE THAT SINKING FEELING" %  •Mag / ll '-^W ^ > %  ••• J GOLD LIFTS BRAID YOU UP i i oi course Goddard's Gold Braid Rum 5 .--c-.-.-,-.-.-.-.-.-.'.-.-,',-.-.-.-.-.-,-.-.-.-.-.-,-.-.-.-,-,-,-. ;



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sl'Vnw. JAVTARV i7. 1§3 2 HENRV SCNDAT \nVOCATT BY CARL ANDERSwN FLINT OF THE FLYING SQUAD i %  "'•'• "'"/St A i ^ .. BY ALAN STRANKS ft GEORGE DAVIES i\ BLONDIE DAC.V.OCO !" "lOUO DAUGHTER Tf^l COOKIE IS K9wl O Ges "* IN i u" BWTMflOt H AtLBVhEPSELf i 1 I %  B v CHIC YOUNG FLASH GORLX>N BY DAN BARRY BRINGING UP FATHER BY GEORGE MC. MANUS kT-u I*TT rue** OUT OP THS MTUSP TO**>L*TILL KEfcP MV BVB ON MM %  "i I UMMK *J IDSJO ' auBuaaa nu RIP KIRRY BY ALEX RAYMOND VIIF PHANTOM BY LEE FALK ft RAY MOORES NO-ITS JJ I WANOENI ir %  : %  .; ABOJf A MAN MOCAWNOrftE.iM -?> •Mums, A BOCK ABcur ir. ".v nun. RELIANCE SHIRTS THE IMIIIH OF IIAIIIIAHOS tfcs^ &efc B, Arp-.—M Mi 0-..1:.,. B.M. k>- Slaga IT PAYS YOU TO DEAL HERE SPECIAL offers lo all Cash and Credit Customers for Mond.iy to Wedne; MMXI.tl. OM IMS arc uon available at ..... Hranrhrw TnrrtUide, N|M'||{III*IIM u iiiii. Smtn \i§ Unially NOW Tins Peaches 81 Tt Pkgs P. F. Sweel Hi Tins Corned Mutton 66 KO Tins Four Cow;, Mik 34 :I2 PkflS. Quaker Oats 30 SI Tins Smedley Poor, 49 li D. y. SCOTT & Co. Ltd. Broad Street i ii K c o i. o \ v \ ii i: i. it o c i; it 11: s GUIN 7 M7 4WJ V1 ss STOIT FOR STRFNGTH C. F. HARRiSON & CO. (BARBADOS) Ltd. P.O. BOX 304 BARBADOS



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pxr.r mm 111 \ SUNDAY ADVOCATR CLASSIFIED ADS. TEIEPHONE 250. ftl IIIJM SAIIvS UAL Far lit.tr... IJTW %  n a* fa7 mw~t MIVM FOR s.xi.r. -I MiW. JANfARV 27 I3M FOR SALE HOUSES AUTOMOTIVE •trawtng %  %  lied Ml*. kitchen r.ge. telf-contalned of DI tan w nai i M.U.I MI \ r The • %  %  ... -^ I %  lr, mi i) ) | 'I Kl E CLARKE I .1 Mil tTI Mr. Albertlrui Ue.hlll le.ide. Friend, ere —•. %  %  %  %  .broth %  tin \.n>0 1 %  %  i %  MAUDI , IBM \. nduien N W Creab.. 4to* Udee. i.;...... Hi-. •. I i ia*T U H.P van .—' " m*(Hl*nl I Apply to L M 1.1-^id. ..r KiaRtM.. %  %  H -<' %  "•• : u\|:-.l:I M %  nun: ME iir-.%  •. rtAbe* Bedroo m Miiiiw Not Be Wler" it 11 i: INI (, I Bungalu. Ideal I .. Wf>KT1ILM. rcnrrvon MII.I. T lAwmtCT' MAXWELL. MAX*UX COABT. MLLI| A4Je*TB I r rOKTAlUUJ HltlfiHTON RT.'daw ;!. and ELHEWHEKE aevcral New 1" %  tone CB"III'' "' (Wiirn and putlding Rile, including %  %  • .Idc and Paring ea •Hh Hlght-ot-wav. K. WHITE I'ARK-S rtedfooen Partly UIWUIAY ar Ei.gaa end i %  tmNnM. Mii Mtn. "••• TlllHI -*•'WHAT WS VOi: a*V* IRRrBCTtoN*THE M.KASUR*. i> MIKE' Call -I nnv, Hough BBBBBRMga. H\ .K\si.. (I the Wilt J.i" %  I h" n1.... iil A*r I RAW). Rei k H..II. Ai.iw> nal will take |.l, ifi; Meeting Room. Pelrrhl ELEUTRltAI. lUECHKlEKATUHH. I : tl. In..(.urn hate I'll* • %  .1 MROMAN *. TAVU** Ph. d Ml Sl-ftn Mabel Burton %  PC T I U THANKS IN MEMOKIAM 'il.l(.l.*l"lAiuillift ahlprnent MHE Refrtgeiaim-. ha. luet %  .ii al K. R Hunte *> Co ,td. Lower Broad Mrxt for Ce.h < in Tm>. Dial 4-.ll or HOT 13 1 SI >i 0 W I W Betton 111 Itwah Co.. Tudor e Mil Re.l.M FURNITURE am and t H %  1 fitting. our horn* A. MMI al Co. Ill* l.i.1 f 1 Ralph llr.i< |ajdj| I .if.aaBJgal COFFIN i moibrr and araii.Hr: PIN wlio dfpanad jath. I' TlU n PVIIi.,""WVlTr^l klarva. Aixlrry, Onf and G*r* IT I H in OUMJUlfi I ...... iMlovad motltof l-AI'BA CUMWK* who dMd U-.Two yaar i\f pa % %  day When %  >• %  lavad wai • %  Had ajnr Bill III "U< llMHl-*• '"*• '"' *"" L^ (1 icblldrafll <'"..in^ itom %  )IIM W-. Mad %  .parrt. Crfar I Hid up. Iltarl Uprohi rIBV* rm. Sl Arm Chi' Dral Kilchr-n Tablafr ... %  "!. ITM boardi from .r TUnin* Table. IK .^.1 H MUBKI' rm ib<' itland ir. untl Smith-, ran.il %  ITIM In I'OLLTRY ID Haappahlta uitd hir-i 1'ivmoulta Bavk ptili.i. iai-trd a i Naicklim r,, N rM *•" n" 1 RraMa Oap. Rlwk BacK JB I Bt-I %  AROAIW Al %  ..., Pivmlan and Rfldi ldltK.1.. „ Undar m TT Itiiliri-" I'iriiiiaaa -HI. a Lara* *I.IS. WorkaH.p. ill lllon. Idaal (ar V .r.t. Can Vla*d Um pm Unda< iluN Can Buy It—Plui Appraimad V-li -< Idwd. laPPER -.M..'f. ( ..rtvrf.lrt.rrt ('Pad Cni-I J.1P0 M It ti-vind Raw %  •. Cortlact %  linda IT" WaJ llouaa iiliulrd Rt %  bov* lha Oeapal IK u.r rooma. dlninc ba< and alarlrtr. •tfeRRlRa, O CB I.IVKSTiMK who Wtl • U to ba "lor t-ri " lh lurtd" Jan th 1*>I tftvanui*' iTTlBI H I Ii" %  )*• %  'towd UP-* h TlwVw Wd HM M M - %  "- And iltr WkOM hea" I!" n "'* v : ;..W. II. I <)/*'• %  ||> I MM l.M h* I 1-l'ftprjrrVAllracti •U-ii'Mnd Villa Ifcarn. a ajpraa wiwt m*f iva atona IxilMknd MM aq faat. I IroM Errol lluou. rti Winda. rixina •!•• I M—In. mumiiiaW Mm Ml. RKrfM ] iiindrrri m-illli: BAKBAliOS MITIAL LIFK ASM RAN tt SOCItTY i.. %  SSBUSyWB m. mn >"• '" ""JJ'^Tj Si,;„ J~ "SB!" J5S*. p| Rptll*"irnl ..IT uuiia._ _—. i daaM.il.l* nawii.l-mrWiiiiil iknul %  %  %  %  I f't' T\hi.n dapHlad i he ajal 'I.-.* and Alfred DotUH .uncla.' ._U>; Pila Itonraa, H-mual add Ddnla MIS< ri.I.ANKOUS ANTQUUI — Of vry daarrlptlw i. i r .... I Jrrl>. hnc Rllvt Uui-rcoloura. Early book.. Map*. Aulo%  I Corrlnnoa Anliqua Bnop %  -.: %  inlnl Koyal Yarbt Club a LP sii > in I'IIUBHUB a> AU> A >lii|> . ..f Iti. i-.|.,.l.r 1 ARWAX I1JAN %  I.lill u-i amvad loo* llkr na* after >aiina I.AIIWAX .rlv inarvallou. Dial JM. Courtoay DaaajR MIM RM Mepa Irom l—*> Ii al I lined, rirawlnri i I.I in>e>l -ilH Jllaw l^vuua— Tnraa nnf I nraoind. 'I •*• ruoma. Nuah loilet and P.nh. with bou^ In bark .landing on .4*D MJI MRTtftvlllr—Thre (Ml dltiow*a. i land .niaricr.. BHHIB Bal t MaaabM DUltden* all*. ... i.imM ".'•* -!'•"• toH of und -ai-tod In Naw U'rdrn.. On b.iildlnd I in IMRRM ii.ui. i-.n,umum i.i Miii-r fart. And many olRdr .mail ,, IV r.tia*. and k-vaaa. rr inl-rm-l.on Hill rJSoLVED thai CRHRB I %  •• I I \Pr D.-—I lol• L,b>1ili"l b"''>' I. adjaj 0 J ^"rp ~"-nd'r;''policy "o7" pnh.-d •U.W" Canadian National Steamships -HI i"I'm %  -CANADIAN rBUIBJEBIADY RKX1NRYIJkDT NVLRUN" CAMAD1AN CRUIBJER" % %  .. J-i.v .. :s "Vby. .. r r>-ty u ktareh Bait* Vrrl... Hail. bartaa Bafbadar Harbad" ft T*b,. 1 r*y 1 Raffty. M Febv IJ*J Rf Feby. • March in "n-th any dlrecl •MM red a BfajrtdM LADY NBUauN CAW. CRUISER' %  UAOT IRinNETl^kpY NEI-SOR" %  CAM. CRUIRBR" 8i, u TRtr. ir-b "ISS-a r I.. 11 rVby —%  %  ?' %  M ;;; i, '.. * •<"* LL aH>rcn 1ft Mar-h 3 April April ft April 7 RfBH U Api II j.1 ahall ba Uken m rrtln nl if ftM.fdB<-i n „l eajalinK '.r %  apoa A uli%  BOv" |lfc\LTV COMM1SBION Marnill Slraal. Dial SHI. %  ...am. aa .. II %  per ... wn. n .1 • < Hi r fHTl. Tudo. W.Wfi:i. UEI.I sT.Mn:"Arurr. I ii., and in I T Oe.ldr. Ur.nl l.i.l I'cndant Hind BUlfftaai: %  Mi ,; RVAJH Ml l %  -. KIRJ'ALAHI HALE NOTICE a URfftll Iliad will "far for .ale heir oeTk*. No If. HUM llruUatown. on Tairtl.r be ; ,.f iMUf. Iftfta, aft 1 pm. In.latrabU i.uililiiuj kil o| land totilalnind n.tfti %  uan fart or UtarMftrtlla all-ale on i^p ol Bendarvou.. Hill Ivuul 1. „l and adlarenl b Walk lire l aaldaofi Mill The 'He l> in -nm.i !" %  ..( lha Ooll Club and command, a 'T& i &mFv*m*n .fswRW-Bi '' "** ToTTLE. CAT1UHD a. Cft.. %  utlillin %  i* Wn. Im-oine Tax Notic POnCf 1H IIEREB IrMome Tax rftfturna ar< Irtjrf m..rrled man w liaMM per annum or i For ftutbrt raftTBaHBRBl •PR**' '* GARDBiER AUSTIN CO.. LTD.-A*eM. REAL ESTATE JOHN Si. BL4UON i> CO. in., a r.v.A. %  RnM "i MORBWRR FOR SALE %  AT. nwklrr N^. I Mcoa.Sham^CP..' ,. aa |. WRIT 1MD1AN A1HWAV Rtoad I HH1TIM1 HISCELLAN1 0U8 %  %  ,.,nr ol 11.1h-.k lo, "W pie— ftMRBVi Advocate A-tv.it. %  „,,., :..-' M %  %  family I rhiid arnool ftda; .'. I.. ,'i..'i Valtaaa, attacba ra.ea. ..tint rtoubla lcH*. A IIAHNES A, CO.. I.TD .1 K.4I. %  celienI equlpnwr rd Coal rnwoo now lltcka. Tclr-phnne I ii.r rrlXODUNTTablrta nuik. i rr'ir.liii.k RRRlllrWMal an lm lia-l breath. M* tt> a boll I ftftanalva P'i.e ; I* KNiatrrs I.TI I 1 t f n The un.leiiiied will offer for aate "I No II. Hlah Streel. Rr.dae%  WR. on Friday the I.I Frbiaary. 1HI. .1 1 JO pm. the dwrlllnfthouic called Fl.l.EHSLIE" wllh Hie land thereto I adJoi || .. %  II. n laltdl drjwn.iaftra, drawtna and diniru IT... braakfaat roam, iwn bxtioom. It and bath and up-lalr. ) bed m.. Electric lldht. companya waiei I aa. turned In. n.pecllon any day belween the houti I p m. and 3 p.m. on application ol or furlher paruculan and condition •ale aiiply tot— COITLR, CATPOKD A Co. tcMaitofl a income Ui P- over and from componieB .corporatod or unln.rpor"i* iie t* !" me Tft U DaparUnenl AFTER T1U5 1ST DAV Or JANUABY. ! %  nnd ihe ,„„>, dill, filled "> murft be dellvarftdi tn RM on or bclorft Ihe f..llo-nnfl %  ".'"ftB.^yS peraon. who~ bort!Zre clo^^rrthMM day 1 Dacember. Ifftl. on or brloea tbr Sl.t d-y of March. It* ______ Rnu.n. ol peiaon. whoae pernctoftl place nl buameaa U not .ituato_l.i the tiland on or before ihe aft* da* of June. lfM. Raliitni c.' • other perron-, or* or before the Jin da# of January. MJ, D OBBORNE. Ciimmlaalonec of tncoflto Ta and Drain Duttea lARi -Any perann falllnR lo nwko la. ithm ihe di NBW YORK HF.RVK'I f I'.Hl thrauape u l. The p:ovhtM with % %  aahbaalna haye u lane b.unar. vaawndali lui I MA IRA [>.. liv ..ml iii-i-n | prop. rt. ray Ranked lv> mahaaany kltct'ii pei.trv -id lara.. Mill HI An Bali M.ii. I'.T taoni riitldlnJa The houae iund on ,.ii,r... t aaraa ol ''! umbered and .inalaan>. .|.|>toaChed by B tno advanlMe of bains well elevaiad nnd cool, wllh fine viewe on I ,.t la l. than a mlk* uaay and town ft raltoa. ii vnovi ii %  \ RRRaHWJI NEW OBLEANR SEatTICT IMh Januar*— ..-'* Rachadoa ll*t Jar.uai :ioin January—ai'ivaa Barbndoa 14th Fabmar. %  M an Barbauoa Hth Febiuarv. 1W CANADIAN BaTBVMJfa l fine C10O and not lara U will be proaecuted aalii(actor> reaaon 1 11 i WaNRLOW CATTIJE WARM. ruiiv Barnathad. Htandina ox road] a| kaad, RW Ii %  he .I RVonahope Pu.nl AUCTION UNDER THE SILVER HAMMER HRANKrK. TROTMAN A CO ntsa ii< RADIO NEWS How iona %  IO Ihe .lent I. naajart your radio and del away with It any mara IhaR let the radki denliil look II over t..d... Maybe It. only a fUHnR .( | f— I ilranlna, i „ aine that e baVft I. %  Ml leave a ^1 OpMRU nornei. ItwN >• no charae. or %  Ol'TllHOIMl Maaae af Mup "ALCOA l't nUTAM "ALCOA I'luNEEK "AIA-OA n^NTFJl A (fTFjUltFJl A WTKAUER A Quartan, fiarnaon. hi. F\irmlorr re Tip-Top Dlnlna Table. Uprlftil Ira. %  Idaboard. Morn. Rtilte 1 An ira and Rellee wllh Cuahlana; Itald ILook-.aar. Deak-chair, Couch MMM Table* all In Mahoftan> Cbrd Table. Picture' Top Deaka. Jak.u-ie RcTeeiia. Ruth in tfpholi Couch. Bciblce Chair: .. Wara\ Wine Cooler.. Cnliaina k. DH'ner and Tea Rerv^e.: Eterni. na.. Double Becl'trad with Bprtna Ifcmloplllu Maltrraa: ftinftle aaMaftaad S|-rtrid and Hal. Mallrra*. Unen Prraa all In Mahoanriy! Double Iron Kedatoad. Bprlna and MaUraeac: Paid In* • CH Cot. White Kreaama Table with Ptrw combined. Nrw Jon.. Machine. Pooh". Ice It... l-irdei. JbM and Ulanll. ..nd other., I ja ,.. 1 iir. \M-i.K TROTMAN CO Jt I r,3 i. 1 j: HOT WATER ON ^ J TAP for YOUR BATH I ;• X -ra-Yoi 111. MMI RADIO ill I Ml' %  Tl ROEBUCK STREET Nr Moravian Church J. R. aULRTONE, These veeaeli have limited | RORCmT TflOM l-TD. — NW TOBK Al QV1* ttERVICI APFLYe—OA COSTA • CO.. CTI> —CAN AM AN SERVICE .-*>>0 r> 0 a e X r-^, CeJaR :^',->aavO',C',-^'. : ',', -, ', % ', :'. :*>: '•*'.'* %  % %  \ FOR SAI.I; %',*,-,-.-,--•>•',*•€i\RLDIEM" a two stoaayyed dw. lluiadMHiae> landing on I0.T70 s-iuaro feel of land on tho iiicumpRraW* St. Lawrence Coast. Bxrcltcnt -e---e'-'e*a 'ee*e*ram*'i*>'*'-' .'*--'--. ;*?.'*: %  >•.'.'.:: %  *' %  badroaaaa. lar \ M .. Coaat A baaottlul pmp.i bodyiriR the nnret pre-war workfiMiiidiip. Well deeMtned for aaay ni.n .na with 1 n-ceyUen. 4 bedI randah. kitchen, pantry, garadja. ayataieonai etc. Tha land vajrtabli orchard and roeonul pay* r*re walled aarden nav be raid arparatoa/ aa building Htc. %  Rl S.IAt.O* Rorkley—A Very roeafortabla curapect hunaalnw in good residential area on main road. Accommodation %  • fn>ni rovrrrd verandah. draalng room, breakfarl room. 3 1—1 mean i*. kitchen. pa'-i*. rnutrtora Plemanl garden and a good >jrd %  : MOIIIRN Rl'MIAI.OW. araeme Hall Terraaa—aHone c-iat ruction wllh parapet r— i haa Ihe advantage af a corn.r BOM and a vary fine view aeaward* aa ".in wardmbe*. Lame touaae I—, with 1 verandah* i applied wilh tilted niai. %  LINMRT". U.inlpn Oap. n#. A modern, mealy planned coral atone bunRatow wilh r.>f. Select reeldrnlUI ana. Ideal lor quick arcera lo RBvaDaaN %  Mug from aandy baach -i.nt. aleo at the i Kockley Beach whi.h %  A i-ominodiou. lounge/ ""• depth of the hotaae opening onto a pleaaanl c.ivrrrd porch. There .ire 3 pleaaa.il bedroom*, nudern compact kIWhrn. aarvanta 1 quarternnd %  •**. Ona of the more attractive .mail houaea very eaay niRRVM". Worthing. Modem inaatow In piaaaant realdentlal area. Acvwrimodatlon comprUealnungr, danng-roarn. Uuce bedroom* wilh running water, bath i a iter ..i>d --larn kitchl-uid It over '. acre all and there are many fruit bu.lt t_i..icr FLASH-CALUN6 ALL IADY SHOPPERS SILK 73c. NOW 5T 5c. [ WORKS, BAV smirr. %  ^.:;;::::% % % % % % %  .:;:;v,--\ Flowered Corded POPI.IN @> Sl.76 NOW & 11.00 Crepe Bark SATIN 11.74 NOW | si.st WE NOW OFFER YOU SWEEPING REDUCTIONS ON THE FOLLOWING V LINES STARTING TODAY. SATURDAY 26TH GEORGE SAHELY & CO., LTD. 19 SWAN Eft FLOWERED SPUN i 95c. NOW @ § 80c. rni m-h lie acaaa. Cool poaittmi and •BBBdt beach < %  '.: %  mndntion with 1 larae rerefrtion rooma, orRre. kitchen and ft good bedroom* and garage. Enquiries invited III M.MoM Maxwell Coaat A wall bm J bedrooma. l kilanwn. ("'•-. aervant. quartora. A pleaaanUv k aled pr.iaalr al a very cornpetiave figure. flftAH*IIJ4 Plml BallHoomv S etoreohouea with gallarlea. living and daMPJ rooma. pantry and atoreroorrui: garage and large .-u-bullgmg. Orounda are about %  of an acre ith fr.ul ireee and paature, alar, %  ontalna good building plot oi %  i. lit it Rut -r DTI M "Utt; TAFFETA PLAIDS $LU NOW a $1.18 ETC. ETC. ETC. ;v/.'//,v.v,'''.v////,'/.',v/,r-v/.w/-v/,'// >'.',',',', rtM %  „.,t.i: | badrt "BaBMERRTDI 1 wttii .hiagle r ne-l Wllh aide verandahi al front m '-ed gaUartra. ,: %  J double bedrootni. kitchen and raiirv. 1 irnarf rooma. guage Tha land la oajnplrtrly encluacd and there It direct :the fci wilh good bathmg. -ll.MllKUU. Cuiloden Bd. 4pecinut f-aiorey atone houae ... i with lype ol ratals teen to-day Aerommodilton c.imprleee encloaad %  allrrlea. I reaaptloo. dining room. B bedraataa. kllciven. pantry. eloreroom* (araga ate. Well reconunended at the graatly reduced a -.had. BriiB-. Carrtoan— TaK proparlv IIdeally attualed tor nv-ei peapie in ihu avar popular dleUirl. "HBmernede", whllit not le private and IU I be overlooked, a with mudam bnuen Thu bu.'galow an erected about lft* a i. oonauuetad of .i 1 . %  >.! ch> roof. There i verandah. living taonv. 4 I—ilmorc* krtrnevi, arrvanta' double gance etc Land ..bout 1.4H M ft. I toi-el %  oui-bulldlng. Oood arable land over one acre. aU amloeed with %  market gardening or chicken rim. Lo* figure oeked. RENTALS ..id ...n.tn i MOB was recently caarertad Into 4 tparioui inaurv flato awed with all Modem inavriiiet'ea*. There are B acre* eurraandmg the houae Uld out anth lawn., arirubberlee and gardaei. Tha iag tt ...ipl.MiCli .. ri:n.l..l b| Tl**'lf n.abogaany ttftaa IFNAMAW". Wildey Mudam i bedroomed b'.mgalow nicely lur. on Maaa .I* pp ia r ^ga. stntcix inf..i v Coaat I'llealurnlabed %  ..n. laaaw H fro* lath II \i l -l \ i l ML';'ii IONESU aaal Mtfl vi)K< THE FIRM WITH THE HEl'UTATlOV PLANTATIONS Bl ILIUM.S — Phone MM



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twcate 4jsss* ESTABLISH! BARBADOS. JAM'ARY .7 11 PRICE SIX Barbados In Good Position In Second Test &g. Egyptian Students Homesters All Out For 337 Jamaica Repl) WHh 109/5 aOOB %  11 by tea Una %  Barfag*da Save Jamaica 427 rani lo net for victory wiih two <'ays still to no. and by close of play at 5.25 when Binns was granted an appeal for li|;ht. h.d claimed t acond innini's wicketa (or M %  writ N ita MI K5 minutes came as a surprise ; fall* ::i. ;i verv MUSj %  %  %  .1 .'r>n %  '' --< %  %  % %  iiixl Denia Thorbourn wlio added 44 tor the first wicket in ."i5 minutes as they prOBMdad to ti opeinni; pace-men Frank Kinn and H. Buikei %  'h MM and was I •Con •'. wad with ie score At ST. and aflei %  third hip of U ba t woa P %  %  P *. La i oasa utive overs, i AY roil t Ai-niir* The British Must ak I |i Milk Glut In Georgetown QlORarrowN, B.Q Jan M Gallons of milk an I* IIIR thrown down tha Georgetown daily duiia month. ( % %  of fresh milk hi |tUl to be dutti (riven prndu< %  caused lluin in s!c|)-ui and also that following the rlca reaping, tha land La ran with gran where tl produce more it araa furthai i %  ahn ol mitt l i • to Hie Control Hoard Tbl issued Instructions to pt ,,s with freah milk where powdered milk was fot plied and arrangementmade to Increase free %  school ehOdran, orphanages and i-hnnuibkbaaUtutton Milk Control author!! i that to reduce the pri Panmunjom. ed the I %  %  we can 1.' Ltbby's 1 t In the .mittee was pro%  • : %  %  (ill il: h %  I I prisoners. Lee said "' am n that answer" Ubby sai gave me no ans.*i %  the brazen affronter] to 'ay I am • .1 seems to us thai little ton big for your I t r VMCKF.T KF.r.1'1 R AI.I'U: P N %  i'i k lonndfiit TI.I a oaoght ba%  %  W-vf 1 Danii Thorbourn 1 FRENCHTKOOft PA TROL TUNIS STREETS TUNIS Jan 2 Haavllj reu -i Fren | nd poicL patrolled ihiitreeta H braalicUii un erowdi ini usaaali mbwina the it Nationalist uprisings in > perama have been killed ra than 21H) iii)iii"l Troops arrived in tl < tcrriay by sea mad and i". It unrest eaaed off possl%  *.('. Tu nth M-1 Two poraou wan day—a dally low since the mde. waki n g Nation dt-u lagan tln-ir i-mpiH January ifl —u.p. Indo-Ghiiuia Hurina: Next Red Targets PARIS. Jan. 20. NnUon.iti!.l China t'niteu Nationa 11 and Bum I f... mflD ir T. F. Tsiang % %  FuUUcal Commtttee urgeo the 1 % % %  Itcd con1 1 hairmanohlp of mum* Demand War With U.K. CAIRO, Jan -it*. en thousand Egyptian students marched on the %  .1 nit Britain Tii.Unttad Statao %  mbagail It %  Jaffaraoii Caff< eventta-bour raadiatkm affort to p 1 m %  HI (. ( >.>* EiypUan Army -ailed control ol flaming not on Oatnrday night unit il,.Mlnl-Uy of interior --..I miUtary law has bevn dr clarad In Egypt te cops with organised revohiUon Cairo IIKUerti put uiidai • aillitary tlovornor Uoiivral aflai day lim rioting In whnli tea thouund* of araoaisb sat Bio lo Atnorli-an and Butl-li piup orty and called for war wttli hntaln TNrii* 11.> %  l"**ii mi ilium .ii at* cUrUkation of Uie M11.1 Uy of Intorlor* rafaranco la t. volution ProBili*r Mu-Lat*L< 1:1 Naba. Paafaa was nam<. UoTomoi Uoueral and the Uovpiuiuant announcd all iinivsralUaa and ackools rlosad liid*amtaly RioUng bagan -,lli .l.moii.UatlOiM at school. Il rlthTKHD Despite predictions of .1 rackup oi drawai of tha Bril .i'..,:i brought litth if aaa cswaspr in the standard of living of the average Iranian. The man tn the street has lem little i.v the loss of AngloIranian Oil Company revenues. Prices of such basic eonunodltles as tea. sugar, braa I goods either remained or -have riaen not more With Uh %  middle classes however it is %  -f luxury goods MOV) W1II1 Derelid Off Cbacachacare Two ral % %  "' %  ,l bj 1 %  Shipping %  sighted oft I land tha %  1 Dut l latei ;,, % % % %  i-ilin 1,11 which wsa ' %  1 u-u -i four m'lis if < hu< Island The Harbour ai ping Master was left whether •' *' %  ,hc Ktody M. was what wi :i'.tliir\c*gotiatioifii ,,„,„ Going VlMatl Woll skv Tba American plaaaiua yacht "Whan and If" Is Urd up aJongsida tCc Caracnage whtrs aha U taking fual "Whan and If", owned by Mrs George 8Patton. widow of Oenaral Patton of tha US., is on a Csrtbtaxci and raduca Ifaj Boata %  rvernment'i aua*lieles %  (Torta lo ions. The %  ial tiade on cash bails llj I 1 (UndjUll owing m..k1 1 -onoi %  of 111 %  • I British Tiaagui'j 111^ amount wa I with Ifus-ia. I Ncgolatlons art under way Sugar up fairly sla and o*rier count rtes A national six ; loan has been floated. —I'P. NASSAU. J.m 25. am Ilutlin aiinounc Amcm in Who held IA pptloa on Butlin's VmM) lage Grand Bahamas, were going quite satisfactorily nvr Spoil to %  mlar with Battla. Butim it Nuuu in March ITom BrmiUda |w-i.Iwo Indmndanl "MOmlp. ^-raSfc Jssr5U •he Albert Hall ol former Ilutlin, ^Jl'lpj^ f*'^Juv^tlni'i I information thai %  wai lighted in latntuaa I0J44 'nnrtli longitude 2 06.3 west The • l night to break "IT diplomatic relations with in iumi. but put off any announcement for 24 to 48 houra AjsOmml maOttaU) is schedulrd "li lundaa AI MSrt raporl -ked the) • n.l Alfal-s Minister. Al-l* ', V 1 1 U'ung '*i break diplomatic iHations with) llitain and flght Britain? The! Minister replied, "Tomorrow you ill hear thai the Oovemment 1 m taken decisions along those Inn lire' fire! Demonstrators, set fire n.itsh Overseas Airlines booking Egyptian students In an angu.h demonstration broke nb thRlvoii Cinema, which 1 a illy British owned, smarhed the furniture, and started setting : %  lo the bulHlng. The demon slratnrs also broke Into th 1 Hn-rna omcil by Metro .Inldwv-Mayer. smashed all tl' windows and attempted to apt in liie Eaillci. Ihey crashed Into the Cafe Opera Square, drove %  nd thin -et them aflie —u.p. cVOWI/7 \/.s/> LOSE ir> JETS IN 7 DAYS FIFTH All QUAlii ERS.1 1 ,1 the i let lighln*. Il ll %  % % %  • | to hall un North K Thfifth Aufoi.e ..iinouii. Kl that 15 HusMin biuli Mli. %  k 11 y 'ii %  VtttM -,oi OBI Allied |et TN did howat lose flgh'ei bombara lo i^ \ force hai bad "auHa in In 1 from Mil, Hi %  Mn". %  rh • Bgura %  i'< 'K rm itai ll i are F-H* rhunda 1 -tind ana i >BD s> St 11 T 1 %  are ab 1 di munlsl tsrgftv 1 The %  fon wra kiat to groiuidtiie .Mi. cant less than last u v. Ins i.n I thai 1 %  liie *.ihi I' r I'olicf liuiul Ho Mtriid I'lf.in i! Owlm la lb'* death l one of lite mm of Ui IliH.nl..Pnllre Fon ll. bind will he 4llendlna hio I1111eral al 4 p.m lodav and regrel thai Uir> will he ini.lii. lo lakr (heir ru*t.imin i.i-l nUM Umaal aarraal 1 laialaa at SI LOOmrk (hurrh si O earga OUVM oil *MFIMR\ KXPtOth fi LISBON, Jan M An oliva oil n Friday night m AU miles south of Lisbon killing 1 IH-rsons and sei %  Tin* 1 \ploMnii %  hOOa houses DVl a mile area psiiiekuiir | dents—IP ...i. 26. 1 I.111.1 Beaverforook which -^ ill Suifata> I.\press u'ida# the heading/ Do You Caf-TO We Ise The Kn.pin It is timed as a message to the British Empire .11. peoples before a session of the BntUh P.nliament. The article bepim. The British Emptre must not brash up But in the pi:thni and without tin red startling calam%  monwcd ". .in.i En of %  ,'eii%  .much >>' India Is Out . ION HL.IIII-. IS out ol the taking with bet taets let-up Huge mvaaUaaat m t ..' % % %  i"1 .n.l iint-uii has oflmrad t-> %  %  Behind Kgypt come awi %  involving the t' S % %  ; %  %  %  %  %  %  Nllll"! of the %  great-.11 1 %  • bill H '.^ ,.,, o. • %  %  ...i.l % % %  %  • D ... ; ijanda. half some of %  belief that U" i %  :HUI hni ii prtda In Ba Mfen wsakanatl and U inaakias %  %  It 1 1 -II %  %  %  ... 1 should %  1 U elr weU-betna I bnplra involves. nc*h a will ba (Ufa !" ** -0 ", it it ... vill I l lirtUin • (n Paae S Japs BlMk 'IVad*' Pad With .\rgoniinu TOKV> j A Japanese trail* A'gent I next month to negotiate a new trade agreement. It v. It slgne" June 23rd 19V -a. hen Japan becomes a ,H'.on Japan Plans Treaty \\ ith NutioifuJist "hiii;i TOKYO. J..11 2'. YaahtdJ indieated that his OOW or 1 baate wttli Chb (overrun* t as lh-t I Fon ind not of China M. laid lha Die of %  rtlah ng ji4a ."o with the Govartuaahi ol Poi oea I not v.%  the most likely candidate Is %  nuances 1 MinUtrv ,l m '" '-"'' JapanW Trade oaVlals rapan was nrej 1 1 .Uy nossibli %  %  . • sport maehlo —IP I nmeti's. —t'P. CtS/uUVLU&A yOJJ COViancp & (paJdij Dinner, Luncheon, Birthday, Wedding, or for your own quiet enjoyment at home K. W. V. can add to that enjoyment, as K.W.V. Wines are Quality Wines, popular throughout Great Britain, Canada, New Zealand, Sweden and many other Countries of the World, including the British West Indies And in these burcensome days of HIGH COST OP LIVING II W V comes to your rescue also. K.W.V Wines COST much less than Foreign Wines of France. Spain, and Portugal because K.W.V. Wines are admitted into the Colony under the British Preferential Tariff K.W.V Paarl Tawny, K.W.V Coronation Wine, K.W.V Sweet Vermouth, K.W.V. Dry Ver mouth, K.W.V. SPARKLING WHITE WINE, KW.V. SHERRIES



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PACE TM I I \ I SIV1JAY \DVOTATE i NDAI TWIARV n. us: T3ible Crossuiords By t i'n Shtfftl HORIZON VAL 5—Wht dUctpU wai a phyiician" (Col 4 141 •—At whit rtvtt did 1'jra proclaim a fast? l I whom Saul consulted live? Cl Sam. 28:7) 48—Arctic caplnratiot-. M-Mital urn for keeping water aS—fUrplred. 50— Feast 60—French security. 01—Charily. ra—Woo la nv. A4—WenarMikc. we b lot I 64—Hcbn w monthCHURCH SERVICES cjort AN for Stile M n If i/ou irani to start in good time n a Snilh Alarm clock lo ni. nghl <"i nnc' Th" N| v\ DAWN. gorNue or preen uw %  I tut a 4-iiH.h Jl ilh lull luminous numeral*. A"ro available non-lui s. £mit/ifj/a*ifri3 ^L~„ ($ofte$e_ GONZAUE-S. who given up rldinit. wanted to aell hi* saddle, allvrr spur* ami aombrero. He placed an ad In a paper, offering to acll the three HI ugly or Hi any combination. How many way* la It ponlble to acll the three ertirtea--or any %  • %  i.l.hl. lT. Mine MMM W*SWat Western Dotogmpb for Juniors you ever try to TtUOGBAMT If not, then a few word* at fwplanTi'H' are In order. Simply fill lo the rotating lettera Indicated by the dot* according to the deoniUona below. Tney are all aeven-letter word*. For example, "man'a name" ta RICHARD. You are given RIC as a clue on each word. Do not peak at the aniweri aa that would not be cRICket BIO. . Man's i.tuoe .BIO... Insect ..RIC.. Fndt ...BIO. Clothe .... B I O Of a heat unit ....BIO Shoulder belt ...BIO. Large bird ..BIO.. Negroid B I C . Bluffed . Kind of d tas a ae •M !" "raeoui •aa nu v *eauiee •awr*. "n*&> %  '-J"' mm %  •• l '"'"" %  I'CihiCi^i ir.'i->:^f;ncFirr,pr.mi A: vj^'t-j* %  % nirprP'^tinnriryrii n nniiSj"'r)Tiifc'H'*Pnir TOES' nHr.an^i-iF.ri'H nrFipir-Ti^nHBiPiir*** lllifcin TWi-5't ITffK %  nsnirmanpirnssiiTi .-XJ rs I'll" EP dun i .i :i" t nEriir.ki^pcri-H^EKCH Onl r the ben that *aoae* can buy i food enough for you. ALTRA Cod Li.er O.I contains 108.000 Int. Unitl of Vitamin A and 18.000 Int. Unit! of Vham D P*' ownee. Compire ihd vitanMn Kfenjih with tSit of anr other cod liver • and you'll pa* ALTRA gi-et yee>e*ce the value. 5/PER hiak rolencu COD LIVER OIL CAPSULES 100 YOUR CAREER and my personal guarantee 3 YOU pre prebabty more clave:-Lhan ycu Itnovr. I can prove t ; i . : I m c kt art free "Lclmib, your Father" l :'laaaaaaaal \ttp ifcirf j e#J /ethtr iehW Hw 1 t.ttf JM* WHICH row yUT m i > %  UK e you. (r< %  BENNETT rCOLLEGEI Tear Oa-pertunlij fee I / ;,.,„• Ptriaaal Su Glands Made Active and Youlhful Vigour Restored in 24 Hours rterlcan Doctor'* Olicovery Strengthen* alood. Nerve*. Body. Memory, Brain, Muttle, and) Endurance-Belter Than Gland Operation*. emu ceusei e* aac*'hhe* m U Vfhen tla*y are Harthy thi 6Ho hn'mfol impurities out ol fnection. When • %  imputitie* accuniiiUir .-. BH cauie of backactu. Dr Wttt'a PMII arc specially prcE ired to belp wahe • stagsTish dneys. They h*. ai-.tiaeplic action oo tl. or,-.il'-, •. %  eOing udfta nag them %  "lucncc. It i* far t>rlt-r pa bn. k.i. '-e than to go->ti %  which i beu'-d to *etec4 y M a *. Foi over hall a Win* PUla have l>rrn bruigtag relief to sufferers from bv_k.ii.he artd r have of gratitude. Go to yoer chavaiet aad eataui a supple to-day. WliniHAIJ %  %  F.v'K'li'-l C.mpaUx. II" luuch liourroHN ii" i t p in Mr D Sent! HANK IIAIJ. M Roacn, 7pm Buppl. tU-EIOIITBTDWN II Cli-ln* M-rtliw. • %  Mialing. 1 pm. Com pm Salvation Mntlnf. mpeell ti'KK.HTfrrrtWN u 7pm WriJ-lNtlTllN STIiD.T l| .ii' II rOUB %  OnJDB II %  *> llc>Un*. Hrr\ ,i a -. On Baa Me> Ilag, p ' ,tKm UrelK-H Pi... *i-r fcfajoi rinjo*nc-ii .• "re-icher Rev. T. II. u K..lin> .. t_uNU MAY-It -m Mollneia Uretlna. llOKTOOMriiv M.ilihi 1|i"i Hnlvnllon Beivle*. Ptl Maellne Preacher: l-n-.iir...... tn.mnr. DUNaCOMnr T r i noufrt KWWK'I tl a.m. ana T pm. Wednaeea*%  pm A Bertcr Whleh li-eludea Tenu.xn.-e. ..I ChrlUan Setee OAT, JAM-ABY w. itsa %  4.(-rl .1 I*.*. •" %  •• TKUfH UIBnt t: J'* 31. S3 1 Jv.ua . II ve ronlii -,ird. th,„ are >e mv dtsrtptei r .(,.'i..wed l.v and ye .hall %  • W tru* •"* n tn Ewriln* truth .tiall m.ike o>i rree BM Laeaea ier**Wi Ta. r-We li m g*ei n| will puhlU" ' %  n.nwol |He l-onl a tl IU-M Te arenlne" unj % %  <*• %  aeeaae -* HIU. .I -,,1^-t.. hi MDTOIK DIAMOND hat 11KrcnurlaWc Aero-rnetnc In' .; *../;. ./'.r-shg -. Mrgef, w.-gii.inrf.ng *' r*rai See u at youi ngareal rarb ternal lo >•*" •**! %  P" Itolled Goid Cap BM.05 LuatralO! Cap $19.77 • NIW fOTO'llflUI* %  NIW INK KOW GOVMNO* • NIW n.t-ClU BIlHVOl a NIW vmiu INK lutrxr tirrJ 4 fihi 4eb 5/ -rt&i/d) 7nMt uxmtid fisn. A. S. BRYDEN & SONS (Barbidoi) LTD. WONT PULL OUT IN USB WILL NOT LEAH mOMER THAU MUT 7YPB VULCANISED TO TUB TUBE s-ffi whenyoustop ~ pur headache? f* &f jyjgr^ ^^ S180 f#*^'



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I'ACE SIX SUNDAY ADVOCATE SUNDAY. JANl'ABY , ItSS MILUOm Of UMfUK agrtt with scientific finding! that: COLGATE V CLEANS YOUR TEETH v CLEANS YOUR BREATH J V HELPS PREVENT DECAY *'j' •^ COIGATI wr TO coMiim HOMI DfHTAl (AM — WONDER WHEELS N Why Hercules mm arrive in Barbados in perfect condition The special Hercules packing: methods the result of 30 \ean, MUJ> >>i pad ing I ...*umn'> ONntM ensure ilu>. The wellwrapped part'. jrcpli'\Ujrctulh in strong Ota RO tint thev CM he simply, safely and correct Iv assembled* on urnv.il at JCMUUIUMI. Always brvsh y~ riht D ffr ..tin, -IA COLGATE DENTAL CREAM * *t Srij** PACKING DfiPATCM OiPAHIHIN *_< Hercules IHI HfBCUllS CVCU a MOTOR COUPANVALTQ, •MMIWHHI laciaatW' 'SOLD BY ALL LEADING DEALERS T. VSEDDES GRANT LTD.. BRIDGETOWN Quick relief from iolds, Coughs Sore Throats Bronchitis 'v : •*?"3|_'< <. S/sfer says: fn extra forge Jon and handy tint ... • %  < CftMt CeMs. CMHlhi ItStSSfl l—•.•I*-* AI^I.^I.J JM Al the Km ngn ol a cold O' 1 Thermogcnc Rub on pour etc** back. Feel iti pen. • good, RlHHltatJnt %  congestion! bVtMhe-lfl vapour to soothe sore lungsind t hl stuffiness, and rise your pres t oltfl a teaipoonM of the Rub into a 1 jg of he and inhale the steam. Rciiffva mncl and pains by rubbing In 1 where the pain Is. So healing' So MO*.' Try it — you will sty Mascalar pi"i ThermogenM ..;a:cJ Ru > Is a real blessing! ifiha Ina dress a year Usual reasons. "No money to spare on fripperies". "We don', gu out enough these days": "Nobody seems to dress up Ad It's sch'-il uniform' g worrying DM at present, not evening dresses." Even women in public Ufl did not equal Mrs. X-eiEl. %  Jjinuriu Hmk'v .1. n..• %  >.lo^i .•nd autl 0 1 Ol In dM i.,-t Honoui Uil %  *'( %  rtaV •vsjnlnl drajM In two years and about two dinner drt (( % %  fr-.il!!: II n,]. |i Until I was '" %  I h.id it. Vm J need them for work : Family Welfare AMONG THE MANY PROBLEMS pressing upon us in these days is one that u above all others important : preservation of our family way of life. ReN is our top-rank social institution, and it is at the same time the nearest many of us come to that "1.. 1 upon earth" that the philosophers taik about It is, of all our social necessities, the most necessary. %  -"*• *.". NrtUCU E I I. K F. X ""RORT-. I I M N A... but make-up can tell a lie sti Rrtlt M 1 Humpty-Dun] I dinner dress and one full c\ ing gown we me through month.*." Noimi Aitdr. il'.i. opt giving a recital in London this week "1 buy about 20 a year. %  liarajlng lOO dollars each, hut thesf ;.re mostly for my Work.* 1 This i Mv ou>n count Is one In thTl year*. But the one before la:: did dull* /or ten pears Light Up F IGURES of .last October's tobacco consumption in llritaln. announced to-day, were In* htflbssri sjvor—21.131),0001b. This means that manufacturers are making more—not that Ihe public arc necessarily buyinr mpre. says Mr. naUaWOtOM, o) the National Union of Itotail T o b ae c M But he points to the large postwomen pmok* lining. ts|)ocially weien matching the frock ben I inol.... Small %  -MIILDKEN in larger no* +-* than they were before the naar, : with weigh'. But manufacturer:, of .snail children's clothes refuse (O recognise facts. They still produce pre-war sues. typical letter from she M r>rks to be lulify them. U*. kkeuned in* 1 l> pc*. of mouth* tnd M llurnes lives her < d ii 1'i. .i.li IIK oi e eh. lor.;h.i with practical advirr on Up make-up 1 HfAVY LOWER HI a BOiatiJe chararn>r. Good ii but iru iitiril to bt lazy firm Ihi I top Up u'Hh a ityfitJi/ darker shade of lipitlck. fress lip* (ooether anu ul ctured print 0fOM a uood auid Stop short o/ the eorMfl I bottom lip and shade off co^o1('• uit'i the little finger It is from Mrs ChmTHIN' UrS Indleatr a purposeful i Snirley. of Town Court charae er and slireudnesa. W<*xl. Afofce lips look lary.-r and fuller "Mi ion, tluec years old last hy uing clear, bold red and bar, weighs >sl. 5lba. and bu buildtna up the comers unJ" 1 cn la 3ft "ins. tall. oiiirii4ii>.Ii/. with "At 14 months, when Stephen tension ol the c*1 >g to walk, he had to CLASSICALLY kasMuwi ihe cityward trand and by w. MM usMisw a*tfHtMMg tio€is instead, %  OEBHMSUBBI tMMShMHi aaaa asMMaav %  said aDout the i .^ IM „. IMSSMSH S*>M (USM'S on IBUBBIJ sMOlULy, a piwHSMaH %  IM ""< '-"J Itott.viioll Mi.Il Ml paui > Hi—.fc.i._ U-L^-V* sugawMsa, ..— and 0>u..i KM " svu-i ..-• I %  we UloJI UlC ilaix, ... .<. Vsaasai "• ssisj ...v.. u >' ** have inree. Uiv HpgM eosagan .ii HM old aad ina BOWJ tauxrt wiacu wc QBSfe 1 *"*' m 'Uuie class, UIVIUIJ into upaiw, UMBSKSJ assUHi P" and lower; and BM woulu out WUH> . elaas. These distinction* HI usual, A. w kau uu . J— r port-nt, because DO inatUr what ousawnoa u> utvui. *ur fifwium we **> %  bout da M %  nave .n.iutfl yv*..*eQualiiy. they are there. trrtnintrauy. wiu.u a aoou iiui.. In Ule old upper class the pnniwu •n— buMvu Hu thai 10 DsanjF famSOOsMOUC iiiueyenueute, and linrv """ s wlUl an ur K* to climb soci-1UJ BBa opponumiy ouered to all ** have ' >> %  > with their group iiiemuera ol Uie lamUy to go ;u %  part of the price they pay. 11 worn. 'In older days, the breadls e n a pay, B nd winner was We guiue, counaeUor, Inevitably It mean* a ru; I support and law-giver ol tne the f. mily pattern || huuscuolu: today, everyone has an to be reckoned by any family with equ-i—or equally loou—voice In el-mblng a>i laiiuly affairs. Economic Worries What is the Foundation ? Some persons will say that most The family i* built upon lovo family disruption stems fr i All literature records the yearning anelal and economic causes, but rlgnifie* of human beings for love. The w* need to proceed with greatest poems revolve around itmiking any such Judgment. N.iOur noblest writers have, at U/Jir where 1^ It more true than in parlughest moments, described the vmnl relations th t thimv joys of fulfilled love, and have always what they -cem. The for us Uie wretchea "financial tension" %  ;. ^uiieimg vir>ned upon those who ly deplored may tnrow u away or lose it. overt expression of other How cioea love snow itself in the and disappointments and ti family? Not principally In acUoiu, Economic matters nr P (mn'tor in bubbhng-over enihuaiaam.. tant in f.mlly life, but they tin not but In UN calm feeling that '.. ,. r te to,, billing. Pemnnwith ur is a group of people, intimate from Hable personalities can q over money miller* wear heavy walking shoes. manufacturer* do noj make kid shoos with non-slip soles In a sfst lafflBf than S. He now dothes for a stx-yearold." The MuuMry of Health have been ( %  inducting a nntional survey ring the lau two yean to b..byiiood, who ,., leel pnue m Ins succes.s cwri-es aI lu lau n -*a u shame at his SHAPED disgrace. MOt TH. wiUi clearly deHned What M Stability ? Cupid's bow. Set of tap lip TlM family hold* It* DP i % %  !superiority. vnunent place in our way of .ii' SpoNipht the perfect mouth by because It Is the only pos.su.... taeartno vivid Upsflrlcs. Htot o0 upon which u society of It''y far %  break-tin. any excesi u-itli tusne and sponsible human beings has ever pou>d4-r over the fop. Take colfound it practicable to build for our well inside lips.lo piee on the future and maintain the valuci .(Illy %  boul nnvthlng else. T>*>-e mnko sure to keep %  qoabla Itmner:iment ran m' to r.llv Irvine rror-nrlems. Let's no t i.-ike (he g "nt bv unlnrbuHpet dlfHe on whlcn to hm rrspon*lbllV. face more nervous worrv gad strain today and find vmoking eonstOrtsCssa H he told i M. quoted example* of who took paii-tiiTie jo 1 .. to earn their ctflaiatW money A la.ndon bar-tender told me he finds more crimson-tipped riggtttte •tubs in tinishtnyi that, plain one*. mess woman I QjUaiaad about her smoking habits confexsed that she i" Mi' a year o I like mu 10 a u-eek. but / do NOT like to see the follovlng smokGirls'inder 18; FUtrrtu women; \nking in the streeU; Chain smoking; Cipareffe* dropplnp nut of a oinan'fl mouth. Virofinestained finger* on a u Spotliu-ht on TeenaRers T EENAGE STYLES are receiving more attention from designer, in the New Year. Chubhie* is a new group for girl* bttWtan 11 and 14, with more than average puppy-fat to ianinuiluge. Anothei range, called Miss I>cbul. .. the average p£-war rfi£ L VPS U a^'aeVi ih'at their lhe> chefah "' lh %  '""S*: v.ights and heights of 'children .^ ^ senerluV and ,^e l iCcnii ne Mr >' tor under 3 Their undings-to be !, ? r .v irn ^ r ??? %  %  .WP 11 ,u about | >ear-may ^^ **$ ** """ f To fine dou'n a large ?noiith. irate the outline juit Inside UM natural maratn. Take colour as high ai natural Itp-litoWorld (Dp>rliht KeM-rved —L.E.R Approaehinu Mnrriagc Marriage is not something mat i.'i a ceremony, u u, ,,ul nulling ii, winiii mccmg u M UXtd ii Uie young ptOptfl J y" bn necessary for the .. -f mind of reader who fear „,, u „ U1C the worst, to ilreag the fact that fcame backgrouuu, uauuo in a world of change the family economic status. It is not KU ilV also changes. But the Intluer.e,. of lccu aUlCt3 by ^^ mavEZmZ* social heritage has in the long co.Kepuo.uT o7 ^n-il^u Uv t Tun outweighed social mnoyat.on at> Ul ^ vUK vt u c • Even if. for a time, society deQejaj l-lui c partfrom past standards, the Ihe only ihii,g Uiat works afl*e. StruetUT. aonilo right itself on tivvl> ^ s *„. es lu p level which Its he ne w enu KlIlsaiu oI lul;-i JJ ^ vironment. Thit i* the rhraetcr u i lltd luilR n my of civiliiaUon. to set aside the „ u ^ SZT.". 1 __ not work. easy-to-follow traditional patten) ,-u. .,,, ,i n!,,,, '" a i0 ,,,,.tombte %  Mbonftn of it ..II^WS me to no down on food whlli isins|i|jlin Into %  avsttnlDg "..",..;,,, ;. im , ^lon stoekings. She wiU be jobs, it losdata ma boalda ttul baafan The vital thing is to P f* ,..:!. *" M _.'! %  "-""^""^d oparapenuade manufacturers change their sizing systems. Bgures alrtady show that mhool children have Increased their height since before bj l-Tn.-lln. and Uieir Weight bv 11-211. (3-3'-lb. for %  Iris.) Nylons to Burn THE SOCIALIST PSALM bad apant about KJEWS ITEM FROM TEHERAN THE GOVERNMENT i cigarettes 1^1 TO-OAY Queen SorShepherd. 1 need noi accompanied by other Persian factoriei women members of a league [| de-tioyeth my initial wniej refuses to wear clothes leadcth me in Ihe path.' bought with foreign currency. Result of the closing of the Persian murket to British nylon--:; thermay lempoiarily be a few more nylons on sale at horre says Miss Margaret Reekie >f the British Nylon spinnan Nylon stockings as a profitable Hri'ish export. The Board of Trade's figures for the 70 f the I'-.rasite for PoHUc'1 bake, Yea, even though I w.ilk through the valley of laziness and dobott spending, 1 will fear no evil for the GOVERNMENT U with me. It prepare!h me tor an tOBnomte Utopia by appropriating the earnings of my grandchildren. elements of rlvillsafWtOooa of sBoUt ideals, standardand -nd inai dOM ..way wiui the Intel Us.-penUserve thow tlon, culture, lueais. standardand aw UUUMI'I ,,,,,0 !" K,CK S p.,ha. rr EWSfl S3 J?%S£l aood. and mcrn Ihrm with IV „,„ llre „„,„„ „,,. new or chan,^ fndor, which the 11MdKl,„,„,„ ^ o Ftrsonal and Social walkiii, hna-m-hand along boil. It the family were 10 be swepl unl,t uplands and dark valfey.. %  way, UM world would wwui. The Family Council a Dtact) Of rifciinciitalion. chaos and orui^ logclher in a bull llllelh my head with Baloney; deflation. Why? because the nionlous pattern tho personal ..., ...o.v. m „. r ,v ~"2 'THF'clovra'ffuSiw *.ii """"' "" %  "• " BM """ v "-" ""i"'.^ dMte <" ,u mtinbtr., po:coontnes up to November .'urci> iiiboovtjii.it,v snail f uncuons lt provides sustenance -""d the group needs o( the fam$0 lar year are £ 5.03b.noo tor ,0 <"' %  " ">> ' l <•' v ..nd tr.i year fully-fashioned and £ 725,000 for -i .nrlcsNo Passes ? *TM,E old saying that men sellife. and 1 shall dw 1 in a Fool > Paradise FOREVER. —Walavon A. IKmphrey-Gakkln. I trains its members in the art "y. ,*he "family il" has basa r .>) > i i_ %  "(•> "•" *•*,* *o* iiui linn iand early twent Coal linings are almost more Important than the coat. Contrast colours are gay; quilting "r" is warm for the rest of the will ter months, bright tartan in wool or silk Is good for country wear. Wool Jersey makes tin elegant tho wear glasses may be upset by the latest spectacle frames. ST. GEORGE'S First day of the Grenada AnnIndu-tnal Exhibit^insuna; bee *day Wednesday January 3d, ha: the shafts are impregcuj^rij n .'ed with perfi A TTRACTIVE Htuiiarlaii-bara Maria Homes reads ebai trrs (Tom her clients' lips as event is 'promised and there have been over "00 entries, exclusive of those for school competitions, with Just five monlavs to go before closing date. An appeal for persons modi if survivuig; it provides the devised, earliest group association, teacnuig Family Ritual the art of social living; and it Is Very like the family council in the primary place where the values Its effect, though not in it* form 11 and knowledge of culture are ity of organization. Is ritual. Thh passed from gencrauon to generais a way of acting that acquires a **>. certain Tightness" In each family. hc4esorne and construcUve It is not merely a code of behav! b. Ilia 1 ....!....Ill .U.ttD_ L S a Hut irate "!. '""££ wU1 ""T ,our bu '"• "self to include -Icty. The nun who partlclpi.tlor in family prayer In proclaimed a public 'hoble !" within the family to accomreligious observances." In hobb'lcj Very keen interest In the modalc himself to others, to subin observing birthdavs and ChrUtoutmate when "ecessary. his perm0 s. and In many other way. It tonal interest to the interest ol the Is largely through family ritual sroup, ahd to toltrat. In other, that culture I. developed and passlads and habit, he would coned on through generations demn In himself: that man has Mealtime provides a recurring learned many of the lessons necesopportunity for ritual. It Is then sur, to his becoming a good workjU.at ,„, (aml i y „ „ ,„ p^„„ destitute by last Monday morn"tar, a good executive and a good Vase: the members are together 1" ng's Ure In St. George's ha -citizen. one place for a definite period: been launched by the St. Mitel ol Classes and there are fewer distractions George's District Board with nn We must pass by. In this Letter, than at most other time, of the Initial donation of 1100 Ihe disruption brought about by day. without refrigeration Families in every pan ol ihe world are st.ured ol milk unfailingly ir and htalihiul *hn ihey uie K1IM Your Kl IM milk ii pron-iird in the linsgainiidarrtpnew, con ism ina I ion and an> lunn . il keep* uiihtui rrlrigeraiion. Since w nh Kl IM there it no wane or ISSltsage. SOU gel your full ni.n>' worth of this supetioc quslm n>ilk —••Uw* m the very Uu ouiu*. 1 KLIM is pore, safe mils £^KLIMKEEPSWITHOUTRCFRIGEItATION J 3 KLIMquallty Is always HRrform 4 KLIM is eicellent for qrowlnq children 5 KLIM add* nourishment to cooked dishes 6 KLIM i% recommended for infant feeding 7 KLIMissofe m the spcciolly-packedlin 8 KLIMis produced under strictest control t pure wo'sr, odd KlIM, lftr and you hove pure, safe milk ITCHING INFLAMED SKIN D! TV flowing hcuity .•/ crepe n fsrif P-I'UI iYii r.' gte&ta as) t'ia in I iTifuion'i huwriotu rayon I... fctflrisft) ''•'.') w l aw n ...a* avattPbatli '"-'< gesraad at %  %  %  •>" mptrhlf ami Jcmihf I KLIM : MILK %  IMT IN PRIrlllHCI TMl WORLD OVER I .-'JK\ F.B,Armsteong Ltd V BsltaBBBBfe. SSSSSSSSS RMaolicM itchlnf-<• % %  d by gcrvai ur I > eat skss. aptedily ornlopt true it nan, puapln sad opea som unless casckra Thauataik *a* .fan •uRrrt bait prof utat utrn Is aodung men sun la mule chsa D.D.D. Presuipooa. Thss fsnviui liquid tattot aWi peorosu Ms* tortund •kia ua.n n atUKB lb* rmning irnn. anJ ddt ows the infecnon Vbarerer (brn> <•' •SiDlntabUligmaiTaupaunsoddiUrri. ECZEMA. PSORIASIS. BOIl.i. EKUPTIONS, rglCKI.V HEAT. MALARIA SORES or RINGWORM •ust a few sppLcaOODi of srooderf^ ODD Preatnr-non w.11 ite uutsn' Mbef Prrarvm. and OM aood res*.' wiUbc testing I DO D PreacnpOoa i> obUUDibte from cbemiHi and More* •^erywhare Brldraiowr aaSoMil .PRESCRIPTION



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lANLAtYn. us: SUM) XV ABMH \TI How Much Sense Does T. S. Eliot Make? PACF Ml \ i \U (KORGE MALCOLM THOMSON templed to throw the poenu War came and gave him an "!.TfIl^. m1 ** une "' P'ercing American naval comnuvMa. Family fortunes declined and thousand drove him to whooimasic-ruig at For Wesl Indian ASTHMA tv 1-j 111 loosened Firs rjooksJielves I kND MAMA. By T. S. be M.ot. Filter and fr-feer. 7s. .d. i.*a w W !" beauty like: BTBARN8 Kl.luT. '' %  ." %  %  iriiid %  *#*, . American-born poet dram-iisi aim u'tuixr, from the pew. Highgate. He lit out for'thc ,,>us and o* ' really matter that to foreign department of Lloyds Bank nis most teleyu "yew" may mean one thing because the work wu easiei I.I.I his best) play *" d to -^"l another? What matWas doing well in the City when bag* is a *•" u the precise but tentative Hugh W.lpole pushed him into i busyoody n-med ver **' "' w "ich each line seem-, publishing, where he did better. l | irobialo %  ,!, ubJect to r ,vt l **> by the He has a good bualness mind. The i Sir Harcourl-Kcilij. M *' With 1U learning, obscurity, family did not stem from New ITSI of ahe characters, irreverence and occasional splenEngland for nothing they are mi, But owur. it has done more than anyIn the mid-twenim he became opinion-; have thing cue to state and f-rm the famous with The Waste Land hi* rnong Eliot's admirers. thought of a generaUon. flrst major poem. Every underAn American teenager wrote to And wh*.t has he sought to graduate discovered (arter Eliuf it Julu. 'She it your leach' The emptiness of a pagan isn't she' I enclose a world. The need for religion. The I orouold / orow old p lor reply." claim of the Christian religion. I shall wear the bonot.n of my S...d James Thurber: "I am not t all have accepted the teaching, trousen rolled, so stupid as to believe that the • • The turning-point In his life party [a The Cock<>>'y the other day a schooltame m 1M7 when: is actually a CHKUI! master at a fashionable girls 1—He became British (more acparty. What do you think it to?" achool w Brookline, Boston, was curately English) in nationality. dismissed for reading to a senior and tinted with hi* c " a "Profane" poem of Eliot's. .—Was confirmed by the admirers for failing to realise One girl was "dumb-founded," Bishop of Oxford at Cuddcwion. that the psychiatrist Is really another "humiliated" to hear He had become an AngloElio!' Journey of the Magi from Catholic. ..dmirers a master engnged to teach "bustHe likes Kipling (as ooe') cits m his meaning betnew English." (as cats), chee-e (high). Dis'lk. s doaa, OIKC he wrote: Eliot commented palien'ly "Oh the theatre ("It Interferes with lOOrM %  uur hospital dear, this to most benighted. %  *' meals") Milton (as UKM. I ruinco mil%  Uam. But one learned t "*I B M.' !" >. that ,( Eliot thlnki L Adam, then he is wrong. I ay. Eliot humori-curity of the only BOM as a hi writing in ver'e. For : : t %  .,.: 1 t its frniiESirS*' %  kin'l Perhaps we must waif foe He u deliberate in speech judiChrlstianlty to reach Brookline." c J n w,th "'T sentence seems to He himself was bom in St. .'"" '" a ver u'ct of guilty with a M WMFa en h." ,ron r*.fOinmi-nda.k>n to merc>\ !" "' T.'>. -" 'convlvi.Hl,. Is nol above ,K "1 '" %  "' ""•• %  > %  "-"• %  •• joke al Ihc HDIW or the conprmnud u, n imoeuimciH ol (negation liuil..,ul,^ili.iuri.i, wmnlnj. A h.ncUome cold .no rmmm tunwui'.<.. ehaqua lor ciism as M I„ ...... I ol seven, olner. 01 Swedish kroner -which my lawver ,U*B Uya won UWDCUOB. t-ll, mc |, (rw gf „„ n Drama! ..i archaeologist, sister a> I.e.. Ihe Nobal Prize Aim the Order of Merit. Most quoted pre-atomlc 1 I :". S-iulhAt Harvart hi ii.-i.plinv his ahyiv wuihl to TU, u lh , ra „ hr ^.^^ „ :lU by hoing N of ^1, a ^^ DI1I fl u hl ^,„ r in" h'a v....'lu %  %  •"<" '"•> ,4k, bo,,n •"• IH-ta-k 15 "Trylnn to use N.irae%  •'son. in o Donncll, l>miia=.um. word. and ever, attempt Is I „,:,! ,„,.•',',.' %  .. ." co,tume, with nil lor wholly new .t.rt. and different .,., ruaghtryam.M wmt j.10Paw, mtfutw.ropsup— London, Oxford, before the 114-1 Poetry and Dr.m. Is a frank. ., „, war. EnilandI was impossible. A down-to-minute proereu report .... ,„ people ..tuned wlthjuchdiMi.il; n wh.t he himself re..d, a, poi named ln food Is not civilised." OxIordT eml.fallure, his successive atSteve O'Donnell who gave Eltot a "Very pretty, but I don't like to tempt, to Invade the modem H| IM. ucdantradtt• dead 1*' "s ny to 1 land theatre with poetic dram., and ..t, dan. where there are no Medici prints, a prophetic message md his nothing but concubln.ge nd conWorld Copyright Reserved Nadar may versstlon." — LSS. Bermuda House Debate a*Magj Ouod HrlUVQ >vuiu J-iiUi %  tana tviucA nau Man %  %  I % %  in 11. nit Luiiur ol -i.e. mwsI Ovtii very Ulavuunuu. •ii IU ooiaVagskSNsa, 1111 tit naiad mat he *uuiu support the repoit ol the nuiiuee. UXg Lbal he kliared the views of Mr. Spurling, Mr. O. %  JlOOIIssMd his intention of supporting the report. i.ing that strikes me so fmcib.y about this matter is this,' ho explained. "I voted against .ai motion but the de%  raj made by the House and II was put very fairly to the newspapers. The editor of this 1 constituted himself on urbiter of greater Judgment than the members of this House. It was a very arrogant attitude % %  1 ika." Ranitkdlng the House that he too had objected to the original motion. Mr. Edmund Gibbons said that whether the House was right or not was beside the point. I nnl wat that the House tba debate not to be inurder was ignored 1 Lttor of The Royal Oarfba his be%  I presumptuous. For members to stand up here und laud tlie action of the editor is ridiculous. 1 also thinks it is ridiculous to say the editor acted IB the interest of the public. It was nol in the interests of the public. Newspapers are in business tu make money," he said. Stating that a newspaper was operated by a "hard headed bunch of directors." Mr. Gibbons added: "They are in business to make a profit. If they can Inform the public at the same time, so well and good.'' Concerned About House He was personally concerned about the right, privileges and dignities of the House. 1 think it Is high time that some of this freedom of the press was curuilied. We must protect ourselves." Be Bit; Mr. Smith took Ihe floor oa.ee "Why cannot we be big enoi--h to admit we were wrong? Wny cannot we be big enough to admit that progress In this world has only been secured by the courageous individuals who on occasion flouted even parliaments, lo their ever-lasting honour and glory he said. ••Whatever the editor of that newspaper did—perhaps he was rather rude and perhaps he was mistaken—I maintain that he did It lawfully We should have the decency and big-heartednesi to admiro him," commented the Speaker, Mr. I'earmun said the feiecl ."mmitlee was furnished with certain InfonnaU a "It was obscure and did nol BSPMl 10 MIT} aUi> ml aBllgJil enmeni on the subject." he added Mr ."ear-man then proceedeJ to disclose the nature of the inforiration to whuh Mr Nlisick had 1eferred 1M? Caae In ISMT. he explained. Ihe House took a similar decision and on that occasion The Royal Gazette adhered to the decision under protest. The Royal Gazette forwarded an account of what had happened to the Empire Press Union The matter was. In due course, referred to the then Clerk of the House of Couwnons, Sir Gilbert Campion, and a reply was received. The letter pointed out that only the position with regard to the British Parliament could be dealt with. Breach of Privilege "From my point of view the order prohibiting publication of that particular debate was in effect shutting the stable door after the horse hud gone. I have heard nobody question the fact that the publication of any report is a breach of privilege. Tomorrow morning when the newspapers come out with a report ol 'Unless the soul goes out to meet what we see we do not see it nothing do we see not a beetle, not a blade of grass." With thi quotation from W. H. Hudson Amy Oakley opens Behold the Hcst Indies, first printed in 1941 and "with a teat that is absolutely up to the minute" in 1931. and over 100 illustrations contain.n,. some not printed in the M volume The book to dedicated iu Watoort Minshall "whose enthusiasm foi Trinidad we share" It to not surprising that Barbados gets a poor showing aftn that. Trinidad is "a terrestn..! paradise', Puerto Rico is "incom. parable" but Barbados is simuh "Isle of sugar." On her way to Hackleton's OUT Mrs. Oakley describes the "Monotony of the ride as being "of thvery essence of Barbados" Mr> Oakley drops some bloomers. Sh • states inaccurately that all of thf land under cultivation to in the possession of plantation owners Had she taken m> advice an< checked with the Year Hook M the West Indie?, she would hav discovered that peasant holding accounted for 17,283 of Ihc i-4. 34i. acres of agricultural land. There is also great confusion in her mind as to the difference between Sam Lord's and the Cram KotsJ Visitors to the Crane Hotel are not in the habit of exploring ground floor rooms "with mas> ve bedsteads." Mrs. Oakley mentions with approval and Man and rum omelette, but she disapproves of frying flying fish. "The frjing of the captivating creatures" she writes "in life irridescent as rainbows ana likewise arching the wives I maul much as the serving in Italy of larks and nightingales.*' MM maktsi no m fact that whereas Italian* can ge* hy on spaghetti an.i rice Barbadians just could not afford to live by watching tame (lying fish iefcemble rainbows. The only place winch Mrs Oakley seemed lo anjoy In Bai bados was Canefield House, then In the possession of the motM i the founder of the Mary Eli/abeti> Tea Room on l*ifth Avenue. Of the 513 pages In the boon Barbados only gets 19, so there Is plenty of reading for those i interested in other tcrriU.,ie> the Caribbean. Beginning with Nassau. Amy Oakley take* ui With her lo Cuba, "Tempe'Iomi:. Jamaica", Haiti. San Domingo. Puerto Rico. "Uncle Sam's Virgins." the I-eewards, the WLM.II Itiadaioupa, Haitinlque, Trinidad. TotsUO, Dult h W* I Indies. Venezuela. Colombia, an 1 leaves us In Panama. Her husband, whom throughout the book she describes us "m> illustrator" sketches aiiyUinv. from a flying fish to Robinson Crusoe. The book is vcru. printed in good clean type and on excellent paper Some J Ihe illustrations lose their continuitv by having a white space between the folds but moat of them are effective and add to the enter tainment of the book. Amy Oak ley writes easily and she has a lot of anecdote gathered in pei*on during her travels In the Caribbean and collected from books and other sources. Some of her expressions Jar. For instance ,n lighting by plane a| Havana, Amy Oakley comments "once more we< felt the onrush ol the city's Latlnlty, its European this debate all Ihe&e newspapei %  will technically be OOnunltUng. a breach of privilege. If my motnm is lost I shall ask to leave the House," Mr Mlslck said. Mr. Misick's amendment wan llieri put. Only Mr. Smiih and Mr. Mtoick supported H Mr. Mlsick then left the bar of the House. With only Mr. Smith obj^cling. the report of the select committee ,iiid the message of the Legislative Council b. Kground, its American foregi und. wave after wave of emo-' tsonal contact, as tangible as those' that al first impact, had seeme.I i about to engulf our sea-landing plane" This kind of gu>h i. BOra dtsturblJb to a BnlUh readei than the occasional American spelling of words like for Veoftar. If Amy Oakley could have travelled with less mteiot Hi "souls going out to meet her" she might perhaps have uiven %  belter account of the West Indies und certainly of Barbados but' nwybt Ihe book might have then be, ma leas readable than it is. Th. Barbados l*ublicit v t'oinmiitec uitht not however to let the! ma'ier drop there. They should at I once send a complimentary copv of ihe Advocate Year Beak 1131 to Amy Oakley, e o Longman. %  l l Co. Inc. 55 Fifth Avanuc New York who have publih-d "Behold Ihe West ladle-' by Amy and Thornton OaMct (Price $4.00). f STOF FAIN ^ QUICKLY VBtA Phasic... EXAMINE YOURSELF Can You Say 'NO' to All These Questions? Da yea soaar tnm BACKACME? RHH-MATISM! M FFPl J.WSKSS* HMHAi Ml S' ins(i| INFHl.l' T(K) IREQtiEM URINATION? If TMIMM M-VES"I Barbados gets better publicly i -UJlir,iZ VE %  'T\ i raj frutn The Man who died. ££*£? 'fUdS? , OufllM tip iSaorga M,,ffi S &*Rt ,1 ', The lamous dindbld icbon PAIN SOOl HES1 RVI S No nmui bo i hmffrm EN ariDbru comiort. quickr r th. I'HENSIC tablea neither harm ihe hcju ". DOB*1 sijbiutuicv Keep g nippl MOU 1 Dodd's Kidney Pills ^1N0THC> DEHlRKABIl IHIkC | i ABOUT WHITE ANIS . \ A ,., m i,.„ m „ ^J %  ront.ln K.. %  ^\ M .nd Wo,l.r.-. ..npl.,. jf t. n.B.*l..l t tv %  ,1 i irganiuilon bent on rapid destruction of every sort of timber. Besafe—rvmrmb. r HfOm ru.'t' 1 Knopf New York at ftJO)"" 'XnlTJZ^X^vZEL Thf Advocate kj mentioned, the ..^...Z Tl .. T7!=... .. %  night club and .to W>\VZZTSfc'S?Zttto£ pr.elors are referred to by name. *,*, M. *, ,.|. „.,. ^, ,„ ^, the Crane Hotel and a lot of other _J. ,„, U lU.. BMIU .1 io aj. j %  R come into the slory. There 1 is t..lk of oil and Ihe author shows himself huniUar trltt Barbadian eustoms mid backgiLiuiiil' | It I ir tg asglj told an.i.oi.i tba •UaoUoo as surely as it WOUld bavg odna had Honolulu basa dioaat. ag the scene of action instead of Barbados. If poop %  in fad are half as interD leading about themselves as Ihc publishers <>f newspapers n> big The Mu Who Died Tieiie will be the > ear's be I seller nt UUa is a small slip that can be rectified : Tun TABLETS 8 i I lilt Hilltf FROM aSBMUTM MM ItSt, NFKVF P*IM. Uimu sn Los a -^\wJ / ATLAS-A UNIVIRIAL-Dip or bruih lor poitilve pretMtlon afiinii WhM Ai Rot and Fun(i Paim or polnh o.er tnaied wood. No odour. No ECONOMICAL—High), When diluted lo. UN goei lurther and coin Ian PIRMANINT < Combine •rith IK* f.b.rv tooflient the limber and ma**! it fre -coiUnf. I B Co Agroii Wili..non Ha.nei Bridgetown. Barbadot Fer setmartinl pioitu*!Sla:iatics and information pP"ar for Bermuda, Bahamas all the British. French. Duleh. and CaHbbaan territories, while Cuba. Haiti, San Domingo (" % %  liiiiibia. Venezuela. (Ju-.tfinala El Salv.doi. Honduras, moan i %  • %  t.i iin .i Panaau < !anal %  Rapubu of I'anama are .1 o included. There are sections on Canadian •iade, United Stales TlMi Mid -:i I'i'.h Trade „ < hapter on communication! and a (Ja/etter and IMMX. There is an excellent map. If the slie of Ihe Year HOOK iBCraaaai us more and more %  taUstlOB are published by Caribin HiTltanag, the Year Book inil'lnhers might have seriously in consider publishing in two v.ihimes, half-yearly, or produce %  apatata volumes for senarate territories. Meanwhile the usei .Iness of the Year Book grows with its size. GEORGE IIUNTE AWAY NASTY COUGHS COLDS LIKE MAGIC %  ITI HIGHLY MEDICATED BUCKLEY'S WRITE III ** %  .* y.g*. "";**"* 5 No oth.r RUB hat lhM kry of klddl.t (old* M mvth Jt i.... .... n^u., W.J nut &f Important Features IWO-WAY MOM k-.i., H.I.. vreti 2 1 3 IMIW WMis rovm-n IUNUV k*4M btMl *p . 4 •• *e*d ww IMI .u she %  Htdaal .1...,. astto ai sistes. TIIPU1 YOOt MONRY BACK 3hm ISIIKVX RESISTS THE WEATHER i loudhwrsts, scorching; sunshine, exposure to all the winds tliai hlow—they make no difference to a roof painted with Laatikon lor galvanised, asbestos or shingled roofs Laatikon is ideal j it never fades, cracks or peels off. Economical and long-lasting 1 .asiikcn is available in various colours—ask your dealer about it. LASTIKON MADE BY BER6ER PAINTS GARDINER AUSTIN & CO., LTD.-Agents lairc-st finish fur n.ilur.il love!) Il >.i u>tafraal fUtttry of Y.rdl., ( %  Huh|| |',, u ,lr,. Manliyourc.i,^,>kintonrfrointj". ,rT %  ;; %  !ra! • • "' %  •<"<< *' %  >< '•> % %  • l.a.1..' •'...:; %  %  %  .. Brit* -Bar. FLY BOk BRITISH O V K It s i III Al 1>7!I ',_.



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PACE TEX SUNDAY U)VOCA SUNDAY. JANUARY 1J,lB (I I u. i.i \. ii 1. II. I Dinner In Honour Of LadvM.L.C The 11 un ML. i c and all f m.WU) .1 honour at %  \ %  %  Auguslin was nominated to II .. i n October. The fun Uon Mi <*| I Mr Si Geo gc Mur :oi or Mi T i idad) wile of ihc AakiaUm Bt Lucti i isted by M wife of Mr. Allen U. Lewis,