Citation
The Barbados advocate

Material Information

Title:
The Barbados advocate
Uniform Title:
Barbados advocate (Bridgetown, Barbados : 1983)
Portion of title:
Sunday advocate
Place of Publication:
Bridgetown Barbados
Bridgetown, Barbados
Publisher:
Advocate Co.
Publication Date:
Frequency:
Daily
regular
Language:
English

Subjects

Subjects / Keywords:
Newspapers -- Bridgetown (Barbados) ( lcsh )
Genre:
newspaper ( sobekcm )
Spatial Coverage:
Barbados -- Bridgetown

Notes

Dates or Sequential Designation:
Apr. 22, 1983-
Numbering Peculiarities:
No issue published for May 3, 1983.
General Note:
On Sunday published as: Sunday advocate.
General Note:
Microfilm produced before 1988 may be substandard.
General Note:
Latest issue consulted: Feb. 28, 2005.

Record Information

Source Institution:
University of Florida
Holding Location:
University of Florida
Rights Management:
Copyright Advocate Co.. Permission granted to University of Florida to digitize and display this item for non-profit research and educational purposes. Any reuse of this item in excess of fair use or other copyright exemptions requires permission of the copyright holder.
Resource Identifier:
17931718 ( OCLC )
sn 88063345 ( LCCN )
Classification:
Newspaper ( lcc )

Related Items

Preceded by:
Advocate-news (Bridgetown, Barbados)

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This item has the following downloads:


Full Text




ESTABLISHED 1895





Jamaica Collapse In Face Of

Aceurate Barbados





Bowling



BARBADOS SET FOR
SECOND WIN

(BY O. S. COPPIN)
JAMAICA collapsed in their first innings for

the face of

115 in
steady and aceurate bowling in reply to Barba-
dos’ first innings total of 204 when play on the seeond day
of the Second Barbados-Jamaica Test ended at Kensington











from All Guariers:

Her Feet Are
Her Hands

SYDNEY :

ichoolgir!



A thirteen year old
Bundaberg, Queens-
land, passed her secondary school
chola

of



yesterday. a Se gg OL EP eee
nen Jamaica had dismissed when ‘it seemed fairly remote She y - peeed yor po Hs"
Barbados for 204 runs in their with 9 wickets down for 86 runs. | has Giuenva tees dees ee
irst indings it was generally Spirited Hitting ther children use their hands.
me no bs ge could ot . Some spirited hitting by Good-]Her writing ang drawing, report-
: Derails scat but it nies ridge last man in helped to solve ed the examiners who were un-
brani ‘eabeotidiie’ cat -BelwikGe ce the problem and the century was one of her disability were ub-
this, they had placed. themselves | Doisted in 195 minutes, an average usually neat and _ well-formed,
in ¢ 0d pdsition for estabhishing scoring | of one run almost every iy ae awarded 75 per cent of
some sort of advantage for the|two minutes but it must be re-|the marks. :
first time in the tourmament, membered that whilst the first], Los Angeles; A teen-aged girl
| nifty took 150 minutes to complete }85 set up what is believed to be
Collapse the second fifty had taken but 45]the world record for an unin-
But after having scored 22 for} minutes. terrupted telephene call. She
the loss of a single wicket on! A determined assault by pace] °° t a public all box for
Thursday, nine wickets yesterday! bowler King resulted in Good-]S¢ven and a half hours straight
could only add 93 runs and they|ridge’s downfall, bowled off his | ™unc hing a sandwich lunch in
were all out for 115. pad for 15 while Mudie who had|the middle of things, while she
_Norman Marshall and Frank} played a careful innings even to| talked to her boy friend. Cost
King who took eight wickets

between them, turned in individ-
ual bowling performances that
must take pride of place among
the good deeds they have already
done and might do in future in
Intercolonial cricket.

Tables Turned

The tables have definitely
turned in favour of Barbados who
with eight wickets in hand have
established a lead of 230 runs,

There is little chance of Ja-
maica’s pinning down Barbados
to a small score today and their
only chance of avoiding defeat
will be to attempt the improbable
of batting for two days and fore~
ing a draw.

However in this game of glori-
ous uncertainties.there is always
the chance of the improbable tak-
ing place. If it does in this case
I too will be pleasantly surprised

with his cap, carrieq out his bat
for 20.
Best Performance

Norman Marshall’s figures of
23/15/37/3 must constitute one of
his best performances in Inter-
colonial cricket. T have never
seen him bowl with more guile
and resourcefulness, He cut the
ball back from the leg even more

off break but whenever he varied
his methog of attack the batsmen
were in trouble.

Good Bowling
Horace King too flighted his
deliveries cleverly and justifiea
the compliment paid him by the
selectors who brought him in even
after Holder’s performance was
satisfactory and Barbados had al-

Satie! would be well worth ready won the First Test by a
‘os SOT handsome margin.
Same Disease Frank King, who took seven

The Jamaica batsmen yesterday

suffered even more acutely from wickets in the First Test looked

every inch a match winner again

the isease which affecte

Bashaan, s rateetier ir eo = and the fact that he dismissed half
ce tigaa ie laa: a . ; the Jamaican team in the first

first innings, conservative and

innings is a worthy follow up of
his impressive performance. His
figures of 18.2/5/35/5 should not
go unrecorded by the West Indian
cricket selectors,

Smith and Hunte, the Barbados
opening pair began their task of
consolidating the Barbados 89 run
advantage and scored at an even
rate always~in front the clock.
Hunte in generous atonement for
past sins batted with a fluency
and a measure of yield that con-
twadicted the mediocrity of his
more recent innings.

He employed the off-drive, the

unenterprising batting.

It seemed if they had
proached the task of scoring 172
runs with nine wicketS in hand
as something of monumental
proportions and scarcely within
the realms of possibility although
there were the same ideal condi-
tions prevailing at Kensington
yesterday as on the previous day
—bright sunshine, a firm wicket
and a cool cloudless day.

The not out batsmen, Prescod
and Abrahams, were as subdued
as the babes in the wood to the

ap-

oe of — aie —eee s fack atl, le chile ta. thawed)
who opened the Barbados attack. around the wicket and Smith from
Caution whose bat runs have flowed this

tournament with clocklike régu-
larity was a willing partner.
Smith left at 40 after snicking
a Tulloch leg break outside the
off stump into Binns’ ready gloves
and soon after Hunte completed

But Abrahams’ caution paid no
dividends, He was caught flat-
footed right behind a King
bouncer. It was only a matter of
self defence then and up went his
bat in front it, the ball hitting the

|

handle and flying to Grant at his individual half century in 93
second slip, fielding substitute for ) minutes, ;

Taylor, and Jamaica had lost Proverbs having played on to
another wicket. 300dridge for a “duck” only let

in skipper Farmer 18 not out with
Hunte 76 not out at close of play
with the Barbados total at
the loss of two wickets.
The Test continues today

The Barbados bowling, with this
handsome and sustained flattery
and encouragement, gradually got
on top and increased the intensity
of its death-grip mercilessly as
the innings progressed, in fact, for
the latter part of the game it has
never looked so much like the
perfect machine working with re-
lentless efficiency.

Bowlers on Top

The bowlers dictated the tempo
of the game and runs came for the
most part like sweated labour.
The first fifty runs came in 150
minuteg and this was chiefly due
to a bright spot in the innings
provided by Binns and Neville
Bonitto that was really the best
partnership of the day, 34 for the
fourth wicket, before Binns was
bowled off his boot and pad by
inswinger from King pitehed
and dipping slightly

141 for







|

.



“Excuse me, but I must
practise my Leap Year
tackle——!”

an

well

|

‘
}
|



Top Score : on London Express Service.
top-scored with 27

Bonitto



but he has been flattering one | ~
t leceive. e « ‘ da G ‘
ocecewe He) Cana ets
each time that| . -
he seems set for | F N
ne seems set for! 6 Wrst Native
which I ‘know
he is capable. G [ I
“sc aed ov.-Wenera
like breaking
the spell which | OTTAWA, Jan. 25.
Marshall and; Rt. Hon. Vincent Massey 64,
King seemed to|scholar, diplomat and industrial-
have woven|ist is to become Canada’s first
around t h e|native Governor General, ending

batsmen when
he got into the
twenties with
an exquisite
N. BONITTO cover detve off
Marshall for four runs and a full
blooded hook off King soon after,

the tradition that goes back far
into this country’s colonial past.

His appointment as successor to
Viscount Alexander and the 18th
Governor General since the con-
federation was announced last
night from Buckingham Palace in



down to the deep square leg
boundary for another four, . London and from the Office of
However he followed a full toss|Prime Minister St. Laurent in



fr fing . Ottawa.
from King too far through and
sasy catc F; asthe ah Both announcements were brief,
put up an easy catch to Barker ;
at midon The London announcement said
: ,that the King is relieving Viscount
iJ a, aration | Alexander 60, so he may be free
irm bowler Horace King|t, assume other responsibilities.
now joined in the plot for the -ppis is presumed to be his expect-
ubjugation of the Jamaican bat-| r

ed appointment as British Defence
s forces and with Marshall who | Ninteter. :

been bowling for almost an | Fj,
with fabulous accuracy suc -|



He holds the rank
eld Marshal in the British Army
Mr St. Laurent's statement
in keeping the Jamaican} added that Viscount Alexander

down to minimum. jappointment is
Norman Marshall who eventual-| January 28 at
t down fifteen maiden overs} and that the

had
yur
eded

scoring a

being terminated
his own
Vice Regal

request

dut











the end of the innings was so| will be taken over by Chief J
dl accurate that at this stage|tice Thibaudeau Rinfret pending
e sent n four consecutive! the assumption of his duties
for good measur the new Governor General. T!
e Mudie defended stoical-|date when Mr. Massey now vi
1 added to the value of his| ir n Britain will take office w
i i remaining there tolr immediately disclosed.
Goodridge raise the century —(C.P))

lg





the extent of sweeping the pitch |Of call: only one nickel, as there's

no time
California.
Sydney: A Sydney department |
store erected an old English well
as part of its Christmas decora-
tions. It had no sign on it, but
the public apparently decided it
was a wishing well. This week,
when the decorations were dis-
mantled, store workers found
£407 in small change at the bot-}

limit on local calls in

this innings than he bowled his!tom of it.

Hobart,
your Star’

“Guide to
column of a woman’s
journal was the _ inspiration
which won Miss Adye Lord of
Hobart, Tasmania the first prize
of £10,000 in lottery. Her
horoscope said: “On Tuesday
January 8 buy a lottery ticket.”
Until then, she had regarded
horoscopes with scepticism.

New York: The Rev. Dr. Rob-
ert McCracken, Minister of New
York's Riverside Church, tells his
congregation that Americans neg-
lect their souls. A person’s face
is “an involuntary but accurate
index of the soul”, says the Doc-
tor, “and too many faces today

‘Tasmania:

ean be characterised as ‘vogue
outside and vague inside’.”
Sydney: Veteran cyclist Ernie
Old, 77. rode down to Bondi
Beach Sydney and dipped his
bicycle wheels in the Pacific. On
October 15th last at Perth he

dipped them in the Indian Ocean,
Old had ridden the whole inter-'
vening 3,000 miles his contri-

bution to Australia’s jubilee. |





Units Of U.K. Fleet

lui Mediterranean
Ordered Out To Sea

MALTA, Jan,

Units of the British Mediter-
ranean Feet were ordered to put
io sea from Malta. A British
Navy Headquarter spokesman
said that it was a precautionary |
measure, but would not confirm
that he meant that it was con-
rected with the Egyptian situa-
tion,

A spokesman of the British
Admiralty said that it was doubt-
ful whether there wag any par-
ticular significance in the Malta
report that* Mediterranean Fleet
units had been ordered to put to
sea. He said that he did not be-
lieve that it was anything ntore
than continuing patrols and
manoeuvres in which the fleet is

constantly engaged. He said that
two cruisers, aircraft carriers and
number of destroyers are now at
Malta and said it was very doubt-
ful if all of them had been ordered
to sea.—U.P.

—UP.

Heatwave Kills
0.000 Sheep Anid
5,000 Cattle

SYDNEY,
thi pall
cinder hung

Jan. 25

moke

A ana

ominously over
sweltering Sydney Friday night
as the nationwide heatwave en-
terect its fourth day.

It is estimated that 80,000 sheep,
5,000 cattic valuable
forests have been destroyed. More

r of

and two

than 50 homes were burned down
in fires which started hen
temperatures rose to over one
hundred degree:

Aborigines at one village

escaped from the flames by leap-
ing into nearby lake as their
homes went up in smoke.—U.P.

Malaya To Get
New Police Chief
















SATURDAY, JANUARY 26, 1952

—_——

HENDRED UP

~

CONRAD HUNTE, Barbados opening batsman sends his team’s total to 100 with a drive off his toes from
Tulloch’s bowling, yesterday the second day of the Jamaica-Barbados Test at Kensington

play Hunte was 76 not out.





W.L. DISMISSED
FOR 78 RUNS









U.K. Troops Seize
Egyptian Police
Barracks Buildin

BRITISH H.Q’RS, Suez Canal Zone, Jan. 2%
Tank-supported British troops surrounded Egyptian
police Headquarters in Ismailia and seized a barraeks build-
ing in a pitched battle with the police who defied aw order
to surrender. At least one British soldier and an undeter-
mined number of Egyptians were reported killed.
Heavy fighting was still continuing up to the last re-











ports. British tanks were firing 20-pounder guns at almost
point blank range.

—— British sou said that sim

. { 1 € unk md ar

Fre h Se d }t er of armouren

nec fi R ice ar â„¢ 000 trooy us

jrounded Poi Headquarters ant

j adjoinir bariueks in Ism@itia #

Jetsy Famks (338 e
jlay down arme ® irrendter

Into Tunisia

300 Suspects Arrested
The siege at Police Headquam

|
|

PUNKS, Jan. 25. | ters climaxed the five day British

It was officially announced that, drive against Egyptian terrorists,

Nationalist insurgents had de-\ guerillas, and saboteurs believed

ed O trains in. strite-torn! operating from Ismailia, which

run. One w derailed jlies close to the British Garrison

Djedeida on the Tunis-Algecia! Headquarters for the Suez Canal

une and the other at Depiene, 25, 70B@-

miles from Tunis. j The British already had trvrest-

There were no. carly reports of ed more than 300 suspects in a

At close of casualues and it could not be house to house search | ot the

learned whether the trains were Are> Quarters of | lsmailia —

Sekine an! Teneo eae inforen,|sei#ed a huge munitions dump in

8) r passenger Reinforce-}ihe Moslem Cemetery ey

U.N. Offer Reds| sis z:crmes ne tunti'utvor:] hee at te Fos ha. sl

| e e er e S garrisons throughout the country Sia a oon ie ocala
| were alerted to prevent a re-| have aided them.

New Plan To newal of violence, which already; The Egyptian Cabinet was sum-
has caused 69 dead and more|moned into extraordinary session
than 200 wounded in nine days.jto consider the “Battle of Is-

Speed Truce French jet fighters, tanks anc} mailia” between auxiliary police

half tracks were used for the firs




and British troops, amid specula-




















: time in the nine-day disorders;tion that the complete breakoff
r ~ 1 ay + PANMUNJOM, Korea yesterday The planes “ ~<’(of Anglo-Egyptic . .
IE H A IN , yes a) planes “buzyed’"|Of Anglo-Egyptian diplomatic
AUSS Ss VE FIRST INN GS “ ‘ a gon a. a Nation otist group besieging th: rene — be a
he United Nations offered thi | French Garrison at Kelibia 76} olitical circles also believed
LEAD or 38 RUNS Communists a new plan to spee¢ } miles from Tunis on the Cape 1 that the question of handing the
- « * up a Korean Armistice which] Peninsula | British Ambassador Sir Ralph,
igave the Reds a choice of thi« Motorized units were sent to}>tevenson his passports might be
(From HAROLD DALE) |ways of settling the deadlock over] relieve the Garrison raised, But there was no- cote
airfield construction and proposed} The planes did not five but tlew rirm iien of either possibility ag
SYDNEY, Jan, 25. junae Staff Officers begin at once}iow to frighten Nationalists esti be ben sag 8 Bigg aces, discussed
FIRST ITEM of the programme this morning was the|'®? work out the details of afmeted to number several thous W. Sean, Tanase —UP
summary conclusion of the West Indian innings, but Guil- ne cr ar uOR pe we ene. ,
Ey, . a 7 e Chinese Major Genern! Official sources said that
len and Valentine refused to allow it to be quite so summary |Heih Sang, promised to study thefeertain number of troops were}
as all that. They persisted for half an hour and by taking | proposal and reply later, possibly Jooming from Algeria. Authori TORY GOVERNMENT
their stand to 18 made it the biggest of the West Indian |@t the next meeting of the Trnee} ties are calling up reservists for | APPROVES
innings. Supervision Sub-Committee ield gendarmerie and police. | LONDON, Jan. 25
—_—_—___- — Guillen cut a grand four square The U.N. Command was be-{ whose leaves all were cancelle Prime Minister Winston
er 9 off Miler and Valentine happily Pca es _ ee ih Parts omer the Tae Churchill's Government gave
Frida Ss , achieved a similar stroke but was ee us e1 a ling a directive }emergency meeting in two days |} full approval to the disarming
Ly rewarded with only three, Va!-}/from Washington to “ease up” or}an oificial spokesman said, “th: | of Egyptian police in Ismailia,
Ye cntihne was eventually caught by Allied demands in the interest of }French Government has taken oll} which erupted into’a bloody
Cricket Was Langléy, bowled Miller for six,|@" erly armistice necessary measures to mainfiin | }¢ battle
: Guillen not out 13, Extras seven, Pete oder by reinforcing troops chars A Foreign Office statement
. fotal 7h ) War Prisoner Issue ed to insure the Regency's(} made it cloax that Lt.-Gen.
D, 7 leful In the War Prisoners \Sub-} security.’ || Six George’ Erskine had the
“ ‘a Slow Batting \. , ;Committee, the Communists be-] > Omcial sources added that the Government's backing for his
rf cBousld ai is openrd} 24% stakiig out a claim fo 3,700] Government had decided to ask! } BIA to, the Auxiliary
(From FRANK MARGAN) to Gomez and Worrell who had|e#ptured Red troops which thelthe U.N. to declare invalid the! Police, blamed for many
as SYDNEY, Jan, 26. |changed ends from the previous Allies say are South Koreans ‘"\ Friday's _doleful opening of|day. For half an hour, we had pressed into the Red Army. Th¢}should consider the dispute. j] Suarding the strategic Canal
the Fifth Test in the Australia] snail-like progress while these! U.N. Command has balked at U.P j UP.
Vs. West Indies series provided] two young men tried to erase) Teturning them to the Commu: pra
cricket that was not worth the] memories of their efforts yester- ists, by é |
name as compared with hel day, The Reds also served notice 0— Sirooet C : ;
general conception of Test] [n half an hour they scored! that they lave no intention of ! Communist | “itreet Cars Jump
match standards. Test cricket in} nine between them and against |turning back to the Allies as war Y mer :
: : ‘ > “W Nes. :
Australia which has been aero bowling inferior to that which|prisoners some 50,000 Soutt Je ts Shot Dou n Gti Prack Lines
ing a long time almost expire they had faced in the first innings. Korean troops, who since their . nw .
completely, following dreary per-| Gomez was obviously feeling the|capture have been incorporated BIGHTH ARMY HAD SOLINGEN, Germany, Jan, 25.

formances at
Ground on

On paper, the fact that 19 wic-
kets fell for 181 runs gives the
impression that it was exciting
cricket. There could be
greater misconception. The fact
is that those 19 batsmen we
out making shots any schoolt
would be ashamed of,

the Sydney Cricket

: effect of his immense three hours
Friday,

bowling in the scorching heat and

en his tired muscles,
©) began to venture scoring strokes
and Thoms drove Gomez _ with
‘ow, Lair decision while McDonald on
Â¥! drove Worrell for two delicate long
; ws 7 _|glides down to fine leg. With!
win cama or 13,000 saw} these ee chi eie ee
fee ; si 4,.+'score along with sudden rapidity
Australia collapse on a_ perfects” 5 ‘ : 7
wicket before the good but not ro athe wae nad’ 38
brilliant swing bowling of Gerry ik this. ate 2 " bAdbeinai sel
Gomez—the outstanding cricketer], “* BS ee tan Was
of the West Indies throughout brought on for Worrell who had
their tour. Gomez captured seven bowled five »vers for 13 runs,
for 55 off 18 overs in Australia’s McDonald chopped Atkinson
debacle. Set just 116 runs to! through the slips for a_ single.
4 ’ The score was 33 when Ramad-

get to equal the Aussie total,} *! ) P
th West Indians by their woe- hin relieved Gomez to bow! for
- the first time in the match, His

ful performance brought tears tojâ„¢
first over was a maiden well

the eyes of even their most avid c
supporters who by now are pitched-up and attacking the
few in number. stumps. He did not seem to be
Worst Performance getting much turn but his direc-
The day ended with the West |tion and length were goed. The
Indies nine down for 64 the|next over was also a_ maiden,
worse performance of the tour-| marked by delivery variations in
ists which will be remembered | length as if he were feeling for
merely because of the tourists’,@ Spot that would most embar-
poo performance, Australian}|rass Thoms.

bowling Friday wa more} :
hostile than on previous occa- Maiden Overs
ions F | Atkinson still bowled the
with Austra-| wicket and allowed only en oc-
the West casional single so that the scor-
due toing wa almost ceased, while
As the game|Ramadhin engaged in his duel
side has one}with the batsman, His third over
innings. The game actually com-|which contained several
mencc again on Saturday |turning shortl
Cricket-lovers are now wishing} e 6
|



on no

on
As was the ¢
lia’s inning
indies’
plain
stand

ast
earlier,

collapse,
bad batting
now, each

wa

mn Page &



n one voice that Saturday plus
the remaining days of this last
match of the West Indies’ tour
produce something like Test
Cricket







7 O. Payne, Solicitor. The plaintiff
u ry had taken out the policy on Feb-
. ° ruary 23.
9 2 z “
viet Resolution Four sudden deaths occurred
} between Thursday and yesterday.
Approved Sixty-three year old William MacArthur Will
PARIS, J >< ‘Drakes of Lightfoot Lane, 7
ARIS, Jal, ov. Michael who was admitted to the * 7 °
The United Nations Main Genaral Hospital at 1.45 p.m, on Seek To Withdraw

Political Committee approved the} thursday, died at 9.30 p.m













to-day cold wind could not enliv-;

|
After half an hour the batsmen

balls |arbitration,
was also a maid-

QUARTERS, Korea, Jan, 25,

United States Sabrejets shot
jlown 10 Communist M.LG, 15 jet
fighters today in four flaming air
battles over northwest Korea,

into Communist armies,

Nine people were killed and 25
jhospitalized when two street cars

—U.P
j (jumped the tracks and crashed
j into a suburban house telescopin«
It was the Suabrejets’ biggest ; the lead car into a trailer. Most
|bag of Red jets since December 1% pf the dead were early mornin

| when they downed a record commuters standing on open plat

ibreaking 18 Communists speedy | forms when the packed car er
\sweptback wing fighters. ed. The cause of the accident has
| —U.P. jnot been determined.—U.P.

\

\

|

Insurance Co.
Must Pay
£5,500 Damages

(From Our Own Correspondent)

GRENADA, Jan, 25
_ Justice R. G. Manning's lengthy |
judgment this morning in the }
Cromwell vs, Bankers ‘Traders
decided in favour of the plaintiff
who claimed £5,500 damages to
his dwelling and household effects
as a result of a fire on the night
of March 6 last year.

In the course of judgment Jus-
tice Manning said he was willing
to infer facts in the case that all
the subversive tendencies due to
the existence of civil commotion
died down in that part of the
island concerned after February
24 and it was found that the plain-
tiff’s house was not connected in
any way with the civil commotion |
and was independent of any
abnormal conditions arising from
the civil commotion,

The plaintiff was therefore e
titled to declaration that his
loss was covered by the policy
with the eosts in the suit to be
taxed under the conditions of ‘he |
policy and any dispute as to
amount duc be referred



|

h-



—







PETER

the
to to

Counsel for the plaintiff
Myr. F. M. Henry, barrister-at-
and senior member of the
bar.

For the
was Mr. H
ter-at-law,



\
w|
local |
defendant’

E. L.
instructed

company |
Hosten, Barris-
by Mr, A







Soviet resolution calling on the I F : ntnnutenth NEW YORK, Jan, 25
, ; Death was attributed, to cerebral ,
cur, x : ac 2 Mac. os ad sain
LONDON, Jan. 25 [Soran an e ted euelee haemorrhage. : Meared i he wil’ wihiraw From
2Ol van. ie 3 pre viously rejec pont r. Fifty-four-year old St. Clair Thu ay ei tae we yn
Col. Arthur Edwin Young, 49.|ship applications — along with a Alleyne of Paynes Bay was ad- any state residential primary in
London Police Commissioner will{new bid from Libya. The vote mitted at &30 am. on the same which his name is entered unles
fly to Malaya on February 15 to|was 21 to 12 with 25 abstentions tay and died at 3.45 p.m withdrawal is prohibited by
take over the reorganization of |The resolution ws not Weclbcalls ee Dost mortem exemination state law. era Oe oa
n va federation Police|call for a “package” deal admit- < 8 ata? “ ce la t statemen ’ }
the Mal Perea (eon ting all fourteen applicants but|°” Alleyne and Drakes’ bodies|General was made in reply to|
Fomct } . Russia made it clear in debate that) Were pet formed by Dr. Simon. questions about the entering of
eee eee ee a he that is what the resolution in-| _Marcea Batson, a _14-month- the name in the Pennsylvania
| aay ” ‘aa Council peter tended and many nations voting| old child of Spruce Street who April primary |
ote Og Young leave tor 12/0). it favour such a deal | was discharged from the hospital! “yonn Da vi Pennevivania |
montt t ke the ppointment A change of one vote from the|on Wednesday after being detain-'eCnsirman of the fighter for |
in Malaya at the re jue of Mel no to the yes column would give! ed there for six days with an ul- MacArthur” aid The Gene ral |
British Government. Young said/ine Russian resolution the two-|cerated hand, died about 12.30)authorized me to say that he has’
ts aganibinn outcrop W. N- | third majority that will be] a.m. yesterday. _ jon at least three occasions in}
-|Gray who recently resigned @5|needed for final General Assem-| Dr. Browne who performed the }eonnectior vith Tlinois, New|
| Police Cc missioner Malaya. ply ywroval, The vote today| post mortem, attributed death to}Hampshire and Wisconsin pub-|
| He I general picturé|marked one of the very few bronchial pneumonia. licly stated he not going to
s}of the there but until}times in recent history that Millicent Skeete of Holetown/jenter his name in any stat
we elf I cannot even {Sor proposal for an important); was found dead at her door about|presidential primar md if it
sue hat ref n-|i has won Political Commit-, 9.30 yesterday. entered 1 he ha power to
\izatio tee approval A post mortem examination;withdraw it he will do so.’ |
i —U?P. was performed by Dr. Kirton. | —UP. ®





PAGE TWO



ON. JAMES A, MacKINNON

Member of the Canadia
Senate who had been in Barb
dos on a short holiday ying :
the Marine Hotel left last night
by the Lady Rodney on his re
turn journey to Canada. He was

accompanied by his daughter Mr:

Harry D. Thorp. During their
holiday in the West Indies they
also spent a few days in Trinida

From St. Vincent
T present holidaying in Bar-
bados are Mr. and Mrs. V. P

Theobalds of St. Vincent. They
arrived earlier in the week and
are staying at Rydal Waters
Worthing. They plan to spend

two weeks here.
Mr. Theobalds is a retired Con-
troller of Customs St. Vincent

Beautician In U.S.

ONTSERRAT born Catherine

Williams, Beautician of New
York who spent two weeks’ holi-
day in Barbados left yesterday
by the Lady Rodney. She will
leave the ship at Montserrat and
spend two weeks in her home-
land before returning to New
York. This will be her third
visit to Montserrat since she first
left over twenty years ago, but
this was her first visit to Barba-
dos, which she thinks is the pret-
tiest of all the islands.

She studied beauty culture at
the Poro College of Beauty Cul-
ture, New York, before starting
her own business.

During her short stay here
Miss Williams was staying with
Miss Millie Gibson of Chapman
Street. Miss Gibson gave a Sur-



CATHERINE WILLIAMS

in her

prise Party honour on
Thursday night.

She visited several places of
interest including the House of
Assembly, the Nightingale Me-
morial Home, the Barbados
Museum, and the Children’s
Goodwill League, St. Michael.

She was very impressed by the
work of the League—the care of
children from infancy. The
founder of such a movement de-
verved great credit. Of the
parishes she thinks St. Andrew's
is the most beautiful.



rPHE Thames Conservanc
Board will have: somethin,
to say about the claim of a

scientist that meteors are slowly.

destroying the moon. If the
moon goes there will be no more
tides, But the word “slowly” is
reassuring to the nervous,

Last time it was announced

that St. Paul's Cathedral was
shifting towards Ludgate-hill
the word slowly was omitted
from the- report and a_ shop-

keeper at the top of the hill sold
his shop in panic and went off
to the country. Some months
later he read that St. Paul’s was
moving at the estimated pace of














Canib





Calling

ST re ge wp

woe he ee

MR. AND MRS. COLIN FELIX CAMPBELL

who were married

Married In Grenada
COLIN FELIX CAMP-

R

M BELL, son of Mr. and Mrs
Felix Campbell of St. John’s and
in overseer at Bath Plantation
was married recently in Grenada
to Miss Janet Helen Yearwood,
younger daughter of Mrs. Flor-
ence Yearwood of Grenada and
the late Mr. Howard Yearwood
The ceremony which took place
at St. Paul’s Anglican Church
was performed by Rev. John
Trenam. The service was fully
“horal.

Mr. and Mrs
pending their honeymoon
Point Salines, before taking
residence in Barbados.

For the Winter
AND MRS. HENRY

R.
M CROWE of Halifax

Campbell are
at

up

Ss
have

arrived in Barbados to spend the
winter and are guests at the
Ocean View Hotel.

Mr. Crowe flew in by T.C.A.
earlier in the week, while Mrs
Crowe arrived a couple of days

later by the Lady Nelson,

Mr. Crowe is a retired official
of Anglo-Newfoundland Develop-
ment Co,, Newfoundland and
Anglo-Canadian Pulp and Paper
Mills, Quebec.



, Nothing to do with me

The cow was towed out of the
tunnel by two firemen in a punt,

—News item.
‘D

EAR me!” exclaimed an
engine driver, as he milked
the bewildered creature into a
butcher's flower-pot

fn passing

] T looks very much as though
any Communist who, ua
future, wishes to have access to
atomic secrets, eilher by taking

® Government job or by hanging











recently,in Grenada

Golfito Due Jan. 30

TTHE 8.8. Golfito is due to
arrive here on January 30th
at 6 o’clock and will leave four
hours later for the U.K. Passen-
gers booked to leave by the Gol-
fito for England are, Mrs. M
Biggar, Miss M. Bolgar, Mr. G
Cocollis, Mr. and Mrs. Paddy
O'Dowd Egan, Miss M. C, Egan,
Cpl. W. K. Greaves, Mr. and Mrs.
F. G. Hurt, Miss E. G. Hurt, Mr.
and Mrs. H. Homer, Mr. and Mrs.
H. J. Judd, Mr. and Mrs, G.W.
Landon and infant, Miss G. Par-
fitt, Miss M. Richards, Miss K.
Richards, Mr. and Mrs. W. H
Smedley, Sgt. C. P. Seale, Mrs
J. W. Walcott, Mrs. M. Wight,
Mr, and Mrs. A. E. M. Woolf

First Meeting

ACK from attending the first

meeting of the Governing
Body of the Eastern Caribbean
Farm Institute is Mr. C. A. Gros-
smith, C.D. and W’s., Administra-
tive Secretary. He returned from
Trinidad on Thursday evening by
B.W.LA.

Mr. Grossmith attended the
meeting in the absence through
illness of Mr. A. de K. Frampton,
Agriculture Adviser C.D. and W.



4BY THE WAY . « « By BEACHCOMBE

ITHOUT any expense or in-

convenience I have secured
from myself the serial rights in a
nerve-shattering tale of espion-
age.

It tells of an attempt by a
foreign agent to procure the
secret of the Gamma-bomb (41
times as powerful as the N-bomb)
from the Bumpton Experimental
Station, Read how Désirée Farra-
gut, toast of the women police,
rams the Town Hall with a sub-
marine when the floods are out,
héw Derek Marabout hides a rare
stamp in the lining of a Cabinet









BARBADOS ADVOCATE



Annual Leave
R. GEORGE

who is on

GILLENDERS,
the staff of the

Royal Bank of Canada in Port of

Spain was an intransit passenger
through Barbados on Thursday
by B.W.LA. on his way to St
Kitts via Anticua.

George is on annual leave
which h@ will spend with his
parents who live in St. Kitts. His
father is on the technical staff of
the St. Kitts Sugar Factory.

Incidental Intelligence

ARRIAGE isn’t such a bad
institution for a man once
he becomes a trusty.
Leo J. Burke.
—L.E.S.



Beauty Sleep
Really Works,
Says Doctor

Peaches-and-Cream
Complexion Lost
By Late Nights

A beauty secret which women
have been seeking for centuries
—the natural substance which
gives young girls their peaches-
and-cream complexions has
been stumbled on by a British
scientist,

Dr. William Bullough, of Shef-
field University, has proved that
skin can replace its worn-out cells
with new ones only when it is
supplied with a substance called
glycogen

He discovered this while work-
inj; with animals, but he is con-
vinced it also applies to human
beings,

While

the body is awake, the
available supplies of glycogen
circulate in the bloodstream to
supply the muscles with energy.
So the skin is starved of it and
cannot rejuvenate itself.

When the
some of the

body goes to sleep
glycogen settles in
the skin, stimulating it to
new young cells The youthful-
ness of the skin, therefore, de-
pends directly on how much sleep
you get.

The beauty of young. girls’
complexions is largely due to the
fact that they go to bed early,
Bullough believes.

After too many late nights, the
skin looks tired because it has
not been given a chance to re-
place its aged cells with young
ones.

This sleep-and-beauty rule
holds throughout life, for human

skin retains its power to form
new cells indefinitely. _
There seems to be little hope

that women will ever be able to
rejuvenate their faces by rubbing

in extra glycogen or taking it
in tablet form. ‘
The only way they can take

advantage of Bullough’s findings
is by making sure they get plenty
of sleep.
Mother wags right after all.
destined to be brought into hide-
ous, nay, internecine conflict?
Round the plastic maypole
OITY-TOITY! Parents have
been told officially, at Rhyl,
that a financial grant to Queens
of the May “would lower the dig-
nity of May Day.” This is an
attempt to stop the abuses of pro-
fessionalism, among which is the
payment of enormous sums by
iowns to acquire, by transfer, the

best queens. But how many
amateurs have the time to de-
vote to queenship? However, if
hese queens were paid, there

vould be an uproar among dust-
bin queens and Miss 1952’s. Even
the exquisite Mimsie Slopcorner
iearly jost her amateur status

one-quarter of an inch every about among the scienusts, wilt Minister's hat, how Karl Schopp- when she accepted payment for
1,236 years. So he came back to have to answer some pretty stiff fenleuter shoots his way out of a/saying that Snibbo cures cramp.
London, smiling fairly confidently. questions. It will no longer be horse-box on Clifton bridge, and i
Yet, is it not caddish to ignore enough to come to work with a how love comes to the Rev. Edgar $$99999999099996990S9559),
posterity? Union Jack in the button-hole, Braff at Messrs. Hillyard and %
and humming “Rule, Britannia!” Hillyard’s annual stocktaking, $ %
nr ee ~ One oflicial went as far as to say, hte »
5 poor The Gamma-bomb (1) $
CROSSWORD JACK TURBOT IS M POSSIBLE! It can't be! |& %
COMING 1 . is! It’s _—_— $
By Jove, though, it is SIX x
1 cor ] ’ a t \ paper ‘Ques Dingi Poost” x x
accoré oO my paper, s- ; a . mye ‘
r ; hus muttered Colonel Egham, | % é ; ¥
tic ning of ane wae ne as he stood in the window of his % Barbados %
positive basis in future, rather 7 ondon club, trying to digest al® aa eae ‘
ativ e = ; , s,
than on a negative basis .. 28 filthy meal. He had caught sight s Cricket Association 3
before. And he went on, “An of ‘a woman of unspeakable? %& ies x
applicant will be asked to sign beauty on the far side of the, ¢ DUE to a shortage of invita- &
a declaration that all his answers street, Though she was dressed x ; ; >
are correct conventionally, he recognised his % tion tickets, Members of the x
The well-known Communist old love. But always, in the]? | Pi ts tie , cee
hatred of telling lies, or even wake of love, like a savake dog ¥ above Association and their x
trying to deceive anyone, should came Duty, Within two seconds} & friends are reminded of the ¢
end the menace pretty quickly. he had finished his brandy anc g $
‘ Stich it, Noodbler! dashed to the telephone, Sit] Dance to be held at the \
: : Serres Ras he _ Hawkesleigh Muffet, his ahief | & : %
“"y HILE making a film,” says was incredulous but — interested.| § Drill Hall TONIGHT %
Across | my paper, “she had to «pon’t lose her,” he said. Eghan x : ¥
+ Penuting your Norse pal? (8) /slap an actor. For eight hours yang off, and rushed from th¢ s 26.1.52-——-1n %
¥. Home intruder, no burglar. (6) She went on slapping him. The club, She had disappeared. He} $e¢see66¢56099999699000"
+t Ben on it for music. (4) last slap v perfect, and the swore loudly under his breath
13 Sing pare falsetto (5) actor was taken to hospital. Were love and duty once mor
+e eine the role of Knowledge. (4) | —-—— _—— nee Se eee ee
i Ussia, nO sir! (3) r
37. This wall is a fish. (3) | R t d th r 0 ra
19 Berth to run away from? (4) | u r an e une gre
20. Needs fourteen | (3) | oa ' T
22. Made frum broken cars. (4) | ps h “a” ‘ 4a
23 Usually but not necessarily sea : 7
girt. (4) P
24. Idiomatic smoke dope. (6) | MORG AN
Down ! mia
1. Write to New York. (5) |
2. It may be in 8 Across. (9)
3. Crete’s unrevealed. (6) !
4. No dole often in the suup. (6)
5. Softy. but polo is in age (9)
6. it's a mammal (5) |
7. What Reg and Dan dia? (6) |
11 Please slip away (6) '
14. Ball. but not a Rugger one (5) |
18 Much may turn on it. (4) \
19 Such gain is not only ‘for |
counsel. (3) i
2 His wife's a tady. (3) ' "
Book early holding the bird. ¢ | When Gaffer Jarge has gone yen wanted >" Rigen pecs. fe
Soiuttor | my oa » the Pine sre, ‘
vss | r des us Strange story of the Pi %
Poeker | Rupert remembers the three Gui bur the Guides only smile mischiev-
17 Be and his arrangement to meet them ously, ‘*Oh, Rupert, surely that's
pins in two hours Hurrying to the 4 dream!" says Bees). * Anyway, i
Order woods he finds them waiting for you've won the competition I can
be him. ‘You've been a long time,’ we that your sack’s full while we've
ue says Pauline, “Did you find ali fad no luck at all with the acorns,
[Rabanne opens at 3 p-m.

Genuine Bargains! Genuine Bargains!

REAL LEATHER HANDBAGS. 3
$7.10 now $2.50. $9.68 now $3.00. $11.49 now $4.00. $14.29 now $5.00.
IMITATION LEATHER AND PL/

$6.91 now $2.80. $6.48

FLOWERED GEORGE’ hier
CHARNOS FULLY FASHIONED NYLON HOSE ..
FLOWERED CREPES
27” PLAIN COTTON

BOYS’ and YOUNG MEN’S WHITE KNITTED SHIRTS
RICK RACK and SILK BRAIDS ...

T. R. EVANS & WHITFIELDS

Dial 4220



British Made



now $2.10. $5.45 now $1.80. $2.



HAIRCORD

YOUR SHOE STORES

STIC. All Colours.
33 now $1.30.

pene we $2.00 now $1.00

. $2.33 now $1.80
$3.24 now $1.60
40 & 50 cents
eiis 4 aah wens $1.00
all at 4 cents Yd.

Dial 4606



form ,

Sandringham Welcomes
A New Face To Breakfast

: (By DRUSILLA BEYFUS)
THE latest guess as husband-elect for Princess Mar-
garet is also the safest guess. For the Earl of Dalkeith, |
Walter Francis John Montagu-Douglas-Scott, could bring}
all he should to a royal line. |
he 28-year-old earl is heir tc duke, preferred his eldest son te
ae" Duke of Buccleuch (say tt do service in the family regiment,
, loo), who owns 500,000 fair the Grenadier Guards.

in Scotland and Kngland. As a compromise Dalkeith join-
ther is known as The Duke ed the R.N.V.R. and went to sea
ia"the Scottish lowlands, where on the lower deck of the destroyer
\Wre are quite a few others about. H.MLS. Viceroy.
‘he Buccleuch housing situation He was commissioned in 1943
isgomething to quicken even the and served in the frigate Wood-
heart of the Princess whom young cock, famous for U-boat killing,
tes joined at Sandringham anq the destroyers Garth and

Phere: eae y Charity.
y ere’s _Drumianrig, a pink HE hates the sophisticated life
.e@ttish castle with peerless trees; (but news pictures in the Express
Moughton at Kettering, celebrated |jprary show that he endures it
{or its silver chandeliers and with grace).

Vi finsborough portraits; Bowhill, HE doesn’t care about clothes
velkirkshire, with a fabulous gal- pe likes to wear a tweed cap, anc
isfy of Rembrandts, old jackets.

This Scottish peer also brings HE is a mild smoker, say 20 a
the best and most usual of all day, and isn’t very interested in
references for a royal match; he

wines.
Winky sisenay of the Royal “HE regards food”, said a friend

las ight, “just as s hing to
He is the nephew of the akin ae —. ere
Duehess of Gloucester, godson of :
Queen Mary, and a close friend
since nursery days of both Princess
Elizabeth and Princess Margaret.



His interests
DALKEITH’S politics are Tory

He brings precisel i at Oxford he belonged to the
cort of ana (Eton —. — Chatham and Canning Clubs, both
fggd) background. usivercity Tory clubs.
¥ “I think he’s interested in

His service politics largely so far as his

FRIENDS say that Dalkeith, a landed interests are concerned,”

naturally courageous person, Said a university friend.

wanted to join the Fleet Air Arm But not only his political in-
during the war. His father, the terests spring from his love of the
land. He is a good shot, a fine
horseman, a breeder of labradors








B B C R di (a favourite dog of the - King),
° e and an all-round lover of the
° a 10 quiet, casual, inconspicuous coun-
Pro a try life.
er mme His pleasures

PATURDAY, JANUARY fe jee BUT — say triends — THE
5 a.m Marehing an Valtzing, ‘ESS >< : :
11.25 p.m. The Barbarians v. The South PRINCESS loves night clubs,
ans, 12 noon The News, 1210 p.m, theatres, parties, all the shine o1
aie erie : society. ..... THE EARL loathes
neds», * _ 31.32 M., 4843 M. Tondon, and visits his’ flat in}



n. The News,



I 4.10 p.m, The Grosvenor-square only when he

‘ily Service, 4.15 p.m. Music from the has to, THE PRINCESS dances

G 1 Hotel, 4.55 p m. The Barbarians pocause she 1 PR. it a THE
v the South Africans, § p.m. India’s VECause She loves 1 :

Repplic Day, 5.30 p.m. Listeners’ Choice, EARL dances when he’s draggea
6 p.m, Music for Dancing, 6.45 pm. on to the floor, and then not very

Sports Round Up, 7 p.m. The News, .. . :
710 p.m. News Analysis, 7.15 p.m. Be- well, THE PRINCESS is in-
hind the News, Current Affairs and different to the routine cares of

News from the West Indies
Cricket Report on 2nd Day's
Fifth Test, 7.30 p.m. Michael
Saxophone Quartet

including
Play in
Krein

maintaining a first-class gallery of
paintings .....THE EARL can be
happy for weeks working on the

7-Ye-19.20 p.m. $i.) MS. 4048 cataloguing of the Buccleuch
7.45 pm. Sports Review, 8.15 p.m. Paintings. THE PRINCESS is

Radio Newsreel, 8.30 p.m. Radio Theatre, bored to bits on her own....THE

10 p.m. The News, 10.10 p.m. From the 7 j soli int&nse
Editorials, 1015 p.m. Music Magazine, EARL enjoys solitude int&nsely.
}

10.30 p.m, Variety Ahoy.



Mrs. Clark Gable
Injured

NASSAU, Jan, 25.

Mrs. Clark Gable was slightly
injured last night while motoring
through Oakes airfield on her way
to a dinner with friends. The
accident occurred when another
car came from the opposite direc-
tion on the wrong side of the
road resulting in a collision.

Mrs. Gable was taken to hos-
pital for first aid and subsequently
returned home suffering from
minor injuries and slight shock.

SATURDAY, JANUARY 26, 1952
TODAY a

Alfred HITCHCOCK'S Thrilling Masterpiece !

“STRANGERS on a TRAIN”



® Farley Rutt Robert 4A
S
GRANGER — ROMAN — WALKER Z
Special Today 9.30 a m. & 13 Dam. ‘ats nit Tonit
SHERIFF OF REDWOOD VALLEY RAND |
Bill ELLIOT as Red Rider & Scion ayant A
SADDLE PALS EYES OF TEXAS
Gene Autry and “Champion Trucolor) Roy Rogers |
“et OISTIN | The Garden
LAZA oT | GANETY
Last Ss

Johr



Special To-day
1.30 p.m

TRIGER TRAIL
Rod Cameron
FRONTIER LAW
Russell Hayden

‘



—(C.P.)
*

” *

ACTRESS DIES

HOLLYWOOD, Jan. 25.
Polly Moran, veteran movie |
Comedienne died of a heart ail-|
ment last night after a long ill-
ness aged 66. She achieved great
fame in movies with the late
Marie Dressler.—U.P.

TEA

TRADE WINDS HOTELS LTD.
ANNOUNCE
THE OPENING OF

}

THE CORAL REEF CLUB ||
ST. JAMES
Ist. February 1952

MARINE



HOTEL

TO-NIGHT

Special
Dinner Dance

\



for
Dinner

and

Dancing

Every Night

(Except Sunday)



SERVED FROM 7 P.M. TO 9.30

MUSIC BY PERCY GREEN’S
ORCHESTRA
UNTIL MIDNIGHT

$4.00 PER PERSON

DANCE ONLY $1.00 |

TABLE RESERVATIONS PHONE 3513






i



LAST

>

nit

Roy

and





10Ws

Carroll & |
EYES OF TEXAS

r







445 & 830pm and Continuing DAILY









ST. JAMES

x
}
To-day 4.45 & 8.30 p.m Last Show Tonite 8.20

| Warner's Technicolor Double!
FLAME AND THE ARROW
| Burt Lancaster &

PARADE OF 1951



s { ucoe ’
Rogers. (ervotiar . YOUNGER BROTHERS
Midnite Tonite | Wayne Morris i
SW'NG THE t
WESTERN WAY Midnite Tonite To-morrow |
Hoosiers ot eres eie ta and Monday |
Shots Tex Ritter MAT: SUN 5 p.m I
PRAIRIE and FORT WORTH ;
ROUNDUP Gun Runner (Color)
Charlies Starrett ' Jimmy Wakely Randolph Scott







POSITIVE MOVIE LEADERS



Presents TODAY »% & 8.30 p.m. & Contin’g

First Pictures of

AUSTRALIA
ws

The WEST INDIES
Chrilling Glimpses of the 2nd Cest

See








(i SIDNEY BLACKMER - R KNOX + Produced BUDOY ADLER + Direct) DAVID MILLER +
TE HERO, Lampell« Writes tes The Seren by MILLARD LOSPELL ond sioner ucrag °% Me Sere
Extra
Short

TO-DAY & TOMORROW 5 &
Paramount Presents

|THE GREAT MISSOURI RAID



9

Jane POWELL:
\ Wendell COREY - Fernando LAMAS

with Marcel Dalio» Una Merkel « Richard Anderson + Jean Murat

SEE—The Famous West Indians WALCOTT & WORRELL negotiating

a barrage of Bumpers from Ray Lindwall.
The “Spin-Twins” VALENTINE & RAMADHIN

PLUS THE FILM
































WE*PRETTy,

ielle DARRIEUX

EMPIRE

TO-DAY TO _ TUES.

445 & 8.30



© The never-before-told story
of the “kept men” of that
Saturday Afternoon Racket!



SATURDAYS
HERO
stariag JOHN DEREK - Donna REED



“POOR ELMER”

ROYAL

8.15



Starring

WENDELL COREY —McDONALD CAREY

EXTRA
SHORT “A TALE OF TWO CAFES”

<

OLYMPIC

TO-DAY To MONDAY 4.30 & 8.15
COLUMBIA ACTION DOUBLE

SAVAGE BATTLE
aati
AND WOMEN
IN THE WILD

ga

PRESTON

‘ FOSTER

re

with KAY BUCKLEY + WILLIAM BISHOP + FRANK Me
0 Gewrge Reicher» Pratced ty WRLC Mac ONAD ead na





ROXY

SHOWS TO-DAY

SUNDAY & MONDAY
4.30 & 8.15

4.30 & 8.15

|Columbia Double

Columbia Double

Joan CRAWFORD

We

ndell COREY
in

Last of The

Harriet Craig iit catia

| *Boedyhold”

Willard PARKER
Lola

AND
AND
with

| Biack Arrow
2 ALPRIGHT !





SATURDAY, JANUARY 26,

1952



Belize Issue Crops Up

* In “London Times”

The correspondence

columns of

LONDON, Jan. 17,
the London Times

have become the latest battleground for British Honduras
and Guatemala in their dispute concerning sovereignty over

the territory of Belize.



DURBAN.

Senator Heaton Nicholls, of the
South African Senate, has. un-
veiled a memorial to Mr. Arthur
Moorewood, founder of the Natal
sugar industry. He declared at
the ceremony:

“We are on our way to produc-
ing the million tons of sugar a
year dreamed about by many in
the pest. Only lack of farms pre-
vents us from attaining that
figure. Whatever increase we
may make will be absorbed by
our growing population. The
Union’s sugar consumption has
risen from about 30 lbs. a head
to 70 lbs. a head annually.”
South Africa’s current sugar
rop is forecast 470,000 tons,
a big drop from the 612,000 tons
produced the 1950—51 season,
but it is hoped that the crop will

f at





regain its former levels by ne
season. Under the Common-
wealth Sugar Agreement, South

Afriea is restricted to an export
quota of 200,000 tons of sugar a
year, of which 150,000 tons will
be at a guaranteed price. Brit-

ain’s imports of sugar from South
Africa during the first eleven
months of 1951 totalled 19,775

tons, as against 291,081 tons from
the British West Indies.

The memorial to Mr. Moore-
wood stands at Compensation, on
the Natal North Coast. It is a
garden on the site of the 40 acres
on which Mr. Moorewood planted
the first cane in South Africa,
imported by nim from Reunion,
There is a :¢plica of the crude
wood roller mill which he built
in 1851 out of blades of wood
sawn from the mast of a wrecked
ship.

i *
WASHINGTON.

Senator Allen Ellender, chair-
man of the U.S. Senate Agricul-
tural Committee, has indignantly
denied complaints from U.S. in-
dustrial sugar users that they are
victims of neglect under the
latest U.S. sugar policy announced

by Mr. Charles Brannan, the
Secretary of Agriculture,
Senator Ellender, who repre-

sents Louisiana, a big U.S. sugar-
producing area, has asked Mr.
Brannan to reply to this com-
plaint. If Mr. Brannan does not
do so, he said, he will reply him-
self,





“The largest industrial users
are just selfish consumer pres-
sure groups,’ he told a B.U.P.
correspondent. “Like Americans
with big Cuban interests, they
would like to see Louisiana go
out of the sugar business. They

want to run things to suit them~-
selves so as to squeeze all they can
out of the Cubans and use the
American public to their own
advantage at the same time,”
The users had alleged that Mr.
Brannan had disregarded con-
sumer interest in his recent at-
tempt to revive sugar prices. He
recently lowered the official “ceil-
ing” on U.S. mainland sugar sales
to 7,700,000 tons, a drop of 400,000
tons below annual expected de-
mand,
“ % *
SUVA, Figi

Sugar cane growing, manufac-

ture and transport forms the
largest single employing industry
in Fiji, according to the Fiji Gov-



ernment’s latest analvsis of the

distribution of workers. It em-
nlewve 2959 workers out of the
Colony's total Ishour force of
17,497 workers, the figures show
—B.U.P.



Co-ops In St. Lucia
Get Big Filip
Our Own Correspondent.)
CASTRIES, Jan. 22.
Co-operatives in St. Lucia have

received a great filip following the
recent visit of two lecturers irom

(From

the United Kingdom. Messrs.
George Webb and Raymond
Howes, at the instance of the

Comptroller for Development and
Welfare.

They examined the Dairy Co-
operatives movement operated by
the St. Theresa Co-operative
Society, Vieux Fort and made
certain recommendations to Gov-
ernment,

It has since been officially an-
nounced that the St. Lucia Gov-
ernment has applied for C.D. and
W. funds to enable the post of
Co-operative Societies Officer to
be continued until March, 1953
(instead of its closing date this
year) and Mr. Harold Simmons,
St. Lucia-born, U.K.-trained Co~-
operative Officer, who had been
engaged in numerous other Gov-
ernment duties will be relieved of

Mr. A. Wolffsohn, writing from
Belize, expressed his disappoint-
ment that the raising of the issue
before the Trusteeship Council of
the United Nations had attracted
so little attention in British news-
papers and added: “Yet the dis-
pute with Guatemala has taken a
form which suggests that it is now
becoming another weapon in the
cold war.”

A reply has now come from Sr,
Jose Luis Mendoza, Chief of the
Treaties Section and Office of Bel-
ize, in the Guatemalan Ministry
of Foreign Affairs, who declared

“I wish to state emphatically
that the de facto situation main-
tained by Great Britain in Belize
is based only on the enormous
power of the British Empire in
front of the material weakness of
my country, whichis small in
territory but big and strong in its
rights.”

Mr. Wolffshon’s
the history of
to sovereignty over British
us and continues: “In t
past few months the campaign
waged by Guafemala has taken on
a new virulefice. Broadcasts on

letter recalls



Guatemala Radio directed to Bel- !

ize have contained vicious attacks
on the British colonial system and
on the Governor, Sir Ronald Gar-
vey, in person Some of these
broadeasts have gone so far as to
advocate armed violence and the
killing of Europeans.
Communist Influence

“Thy are couched in language
which leaves no doubt of the
Communist influence behind them,
for all the well worn Communist
cliches are used, It is significant
that the present Govérnment of
Guatemala is under strong Com-
munist influence and alone among
the Central American States has
allowed itself. to be openly asso-
ciated with the Soviet Union in
Communist international confer-
ences.”

Mr. Wolffsohn stresses that most
people in British Honduras are
loyal to the British Common-
wealth, “with the exeeption of a
handful of agitators whose direct
association with Guatemala has
been known for some time.” He



concludes:

“There is an urgent need in the
colony atthe present time for
some encouragement from the
mother country and other mem-
bers of the Commonmealth. His
Majesty’s Government have

assisted it materially with finan-
cial aid both directly and through
the Colonial Development and
Welfare Organisation grants and
the Colonial Development Corpor-
ation. But there is room for an
expression of understanding from
the people of the United Kingdom
to previde the moral support
which goes so far to lessen the
feeling of isolation which can
easily arise in the one British
possession on the Central Ameri-
can mainland,”

Allegations Denied

Sr, Mendcza, who writes from
Paris, denies the allegations that
there is a Commuaist influence
behind Guatemala’s claims over
British Honduras. He recalls that
these claims date back to pre-
Communist days and adds: “‘Dur-
ing the worst period of Nazi-
Fascism in Europe, some in Lon-
don ascribed the Guatemalan
attitude to Nazi influence.

“There are now two fashionable
words,” he adds, “to describe any
attitude contrary to the interests
of colonial Powers; the word
‘Communist’ and the word ‘agita-
tor.” Aecording to this new term-

inology, all peoples who try to
cast off the yoke and fight for
their freedom and independence

are mere ‘agitators’ and ‘Com-
munists’; the people of Belize be-
cause they no ‘onger wish to be
exploited by Britain; and the
people of Guatemala because they
are claiming their legitimate
rights.”
: —B.U.P.

British riile
still in the
running

WASHINGTON, Sunday.—The
British .280 is stil in the
running as the rifle to be used
by all 12 Atlantic Pact
countries.

It has not been forced into the
background by a U.S. ‘decision
yesterday to place a multi-million
dollar order for its own

Garand rifle.

A senior British officer in
Washington said: “ Standardisa-
tion of arms for Atlantic Pac

forces was never meant to imply





an immediate switch to a new
weapon. } :
“Mr. Churchill's announcement



that the British .280 calibre rifle
could not go into full produotion
before 1954 was a realistic and
reasonable offer.”

| The reason dpr is oe is §
speed-up in the equippi anc
training of General Eisenhower's
forces in Europe and continued

other duties to enable him to per- replacements in Korea.—Express

form full time duties of Co- News Service.

operative Officer. aa London Express Service
OCC LLL LPP OLAX LPL APE LPP

SOC OFSSOF FOS

% 7
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3
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> < W E oe
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sow @ | NOW OFFER YOU a

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$1.76 ON THE AA x
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x Now @ 19 SWAN ST. ETC. %
2 SLOOP LPF PF OTF 550 56009S090000005009505000000"%



the Guatemalan |

|





Carlsen, the Law, and Mary Attlee

BARBADOS ADVOCATE

The Salvage Money

CAPTAIN KURT CARLSEN has already won a reward

beyond price—the praise of
man.

all who honour a truly brave

But will there be a cash reward too for salvage?

People who know the captain said last night: “That's
the last thing he would think of.”

The laws of salvage are laid
down in the Merchant Shipping
Act, 1894. They cover any service
which actually saves, or helps to
save, ships or lives at sea.

Salvage money is generally
divided among the owners, officers
and crew of the salving ship.

How it is calculated

If the Queen Mary breaks
down just outside harbour and
asks for help, is salvage rendered?

Yes, if there is appreciable
danger. But the amount paid
depends on the danger of the
rescue as well as the value of the
ship.

After a ship has sent out an
S.O.S., a tug or another ship may
arrive and ask the master to sign
a Lloyd’s open form. This means
that the sum paid over will be
decided later by an arbitrator.

But if the form has been signed
under the “No cure, no pay”
system, the salvage company will
get no money if they are unsuc-
cessful in saving the ship.

Ship is not ‘derelict’
When does a’ ship become
derelict?

When nobody is left on board.
That means more money for the
salvage people.

One theory put forward was
that Captain Carlsen is legally not
entitled to a penny more than his
wages despite his refusal to
abandon ship.

But, of course, there is nothing
to stop grateful underwriters from
rewarding him for the money he
has saved them in keeping the
Flying Enterprise from becoming
a total loss,

Carlsen’s one-man fight has no
precedent. The Flying Enter-
prise is said to be worth £500,000
and its cargo at least another

150,000.—L.E.S.



Ligyptian Minister
Keeps Silent

PARIS, Jan. 25

Egyptian Foreign Minister,
Salah El Din Pasha today refused
to confirm or deny reports that
he had asked the Soviet Foreign
Minister, Andrei Vyshinsky to
supply Russian arms, including}
tanks to Egypt.

Pressed by correspondents to
make a definite stgtement on the
report, the Minister evaded their
questions.

In an interview with the Cairo-
Arabic newspaper Al Misri yes-
terday, Vyshinsky was quoted as
promising that the Soviet Union
will try to assist economically
and politically all Middle East
peoples thirsty for liberty and in-
dependence to free themselves of
Western economic domination.”

ITALIAN GOVERNMENT
DEFEATED

ROME, Jan. 25.

Premier Alcide De Gasperi's
Government suffered defeat in
Parliament Friday when the

Chamber of Deputies voted 228
to 210 to increase the pay of low
scale workers. The defeat does
not involve the Government's
resignation.—U.P.

PCLSFESSOEâ„¢,





to £634,953 against £536,746

Jca Public Service
Gets Further Gains

KINGSTON, Jan, 25.

Operating revenues of Jamaica
Public Service Company, Limited,
operating subsidiary of Jamaica
Public Serviee Limited, continue
to show improvement over last
yeay and, notwithstanding higher
operating expenses, net income
is also above that of 1950. Tt the
twelve months ended October 31,
1951 operating revenues amounted
for
the preceding 12 months. Opera-
ting revenue deductions totalled
£428,389 ag compared with £354,-
551 and net income was £125,392
as against £111,437. After an-
nual dividend requirements on
preference shares of Jamaica
Public Service Company Limited,
held by the public, there re-
mained a balance of £77,013 ap-
Plicable to securities of the parent
company, Jamaica Public Service
Limited This balance, conver-
ted to Canadian dollars at the
rate of $2.93 to the £, amounts to
$225,648 and after $15,033 expen-
ses and taxes of the parent com-
pany the remaining $210,615 is
equivalent to $1.56 per common
share of the parent company. The
balance applicable to Jamaica
Public Service Limited common
shares in respect of the 12 months
ended October 31, 1950 was
$193,464. (Sterling conversion to
Canadian dollars at same rate),
or $1.43 per share.

POLICE GET HIGHER
RATE OF SALARY

(From Our Own Correspondent)

; CASTRIES, Jan. 22.

Starting from January 1, 195%,
the St. Lucia Police Force will
get a higher rate of salary, thus
bringing them into the same
salary scale as the Grenada
Police Force. This decision was
enneunced by the Secretary of
State for the Colonies.

Cane

Leap Yeau, mp name's Gracie and bels.a radio engineer...”

Strives For





PAGE THREE





Harbour Log

In Carlisle Bay

‘Last Week-end
Was Lively ian
In Grenada oh, St es

From O ) . c

Caroline,



ST
Grenad
with

GBORGE'S . 2 sx

vs week



activities in co —
he visit of H.MLS

for Government H e ¢ :
all of Vice-Ad
Andrewes coi!
y four prot ‘ ‘
itizen who wer j
iis Excellency and La Comino
dell while the . JeCaUu il
port. ‘ re

The

ARRIVALS







A yester-

American co 3- Prom Montreal—

ed Mr. Thomas D, Cabot, unt Tr s Matthews. Bickford Gill, Mae
recently Director of Nationa eod, Mr. and Mr rbert Emery,
Seeurity for the U.S, Gov I .
in charge of the foreign a pro- ing TCA
gramme, Mrs. Cabot Stephen
Wheatland, a b iin 1

trialist, and Mrs. Paton, \ OW Te T
of the late Gen, n Q

and owner of the $250,( t Be
Which _ the are mm t 1 7 Mt E i Gibbens, Mx
leisurely Caribbean cruise

Ford

vester-



A number of ente
were also held for the « ‘ ir Guiana
men of the Sh«

On Sunday
Marines “Beat
the Market Square
Mareh Past
Excellency
floodlit,
of the

Ww 24nmn

omnp~



The
adding
cerem

ci ira, M



vas

dour

to the

nv From St. Vine
Mi M Thompson,

in representative Lloyd Aaron, Ernest Corbin

’ ‘4 se ; ae er we From Trinidad

citizens attended a ©. Chaniees, DB. tind

on the Sheffield F E

Lamdun Express Seevios \
his evening before departure

Trial Of Education: [ii evening verre
Minister Starts :

KINGSTON, J'CA, Jan. 24.

large
gathering
cocktail

of
party



ed, G. James,

Wright, E
‘ Grossmith,
D. Chadduck,

of



Speight

HEPARTURES—By B WTA,



THURSDAY











On
P » Sse . *
‘ ° The trial of Joseph Malcolm Jy Touch With Barbados ,,. antigua
R l Unit Minister of Education, his wife Cc 1 Stati “ OOS Tk
acta ‘ Ellen and Victor Graham chauf- oasta tation scene iuhes Bere. Soh :
Â¥ -ur starte av a agis- . a
: feur Starte d today in the Magis Cable and Wireless (W.1.) Ltd. adyjse Fes watt Vincent ae ree
Miss Mary Attlee, sister of the trate’s court at Old Harbour 38 wct they can new communicate with the perederick J ‘er
former Prime Minister has been miles from Kingston. : following hips through their Barbad CRO ae i a oe :
instrumental in forming a new Mrs. Malcolm and Graham are *®™*' *!tlon Owen Smith, Sophie Gingold, tone :
érganization which will work for charged on four counts of com- 55 Mafalda, Rosark UV ee eT betag, Merete Diskaeee
close; understanding among peO- spiracy to defraud and conspiracy Thetlepus, Alcon Pileri Rio Jach bene, Walter Ds . Me shop.
ples of different colours and to effect a public mischief. Mal- Color ble, F rt Miah dR a See en dencgsak: tala: OEE
creeds, Its name indicates its calm is charged on three counts Pindra, Sneaton, Dalesinan, W pit 1 Cecil Chambers
purpose—Racial Unity. of conspiring with the other Penheim, Highland Chiett SK For Trinitad— s
accused to effect a public mis- Alioth, Monte Uraquio! A lao. Es Arthur Donegan, William Templeton,
Miss Attlee spent more than 35 chief Br ual, Alcon Runner Alcoa Polaris Ante Jean Tensiatens, Frederick eas
iss , f 1 Th ‘ope Hi onito, Taverntor “er years as a missionary in Africa The trial is expected to last jon, Prospector, Vikland, M Bh Violet Murray, Edwin DaCosta, Fred
Whiten she returned to England ' three days.—(C.P.) aera aoe, meron, view
she found what seemed, to her, |
little awareness among people
here of racial discrimination in}
the world |
Racial Unity, wants to prin |
the racial question before’ the!

general public and not to concen-
trate on naturally interested par-
ties—social workers, sociologists

and so on.
The whole

subject will be dis-

cussed at a meeting in London
on February 4th. It will be
addressed by speakers from all
political parties and by Mis

Attlee and Mr. Krishan Menon
the Indian High Commissioner i

the United Kingdom
r —L.E.S.



U.C.W.L. Exhibition
For St. Lucian Girls

(From Our Own Correspondent
CASTRIES, Jan, 22.
The Government of St. Lucia

an Exhibi-
University

has decided to award
tion for Girls to the
College of the West Indies for the
acad@émic year which begins
October, 1952. Candidates must
be under twenty years of
January 31, 1952.

age

The award will be made to the
candidate who secures the best
results in the University



Scholarship Examination to be
held at St. Joseph’s Convent,
Castries, on February 25, 1 f
The award will be made in either
the Faculty of Arts of Natural
Sciences and will normally b¢«

tenable for three years.

Tuition fees, maintenance,

lowances, incidentals and passages

will be provided.

Carts

5-Ton Capacity

very strongly constructed
1050 — 11.00/20 12 ply
Heavy Duty Rear Tyres

7.5015 Front

Tyres



Jeeps

Genuine Jeeps!

| Four Wheel

See us for

they all go.

doubtful if

|
'



Drive !

these before

It is very

further supplies.

on

j

College



al-

we can _ get |
:
|

!



|

|



HEIR good looks tell you they're just right.
You know, too, when you look at the price
tag, that you can’t get finer value. Illustrated
is a Full Brogue Oxford. ‘Tied to every pair is



the John White Guarantee Shield—the sign

- which means ‘just right’! Look for it in

leading stores in Barbados.

NU-SWIFT

The Fastest Extinguisher
in the world

Types available for all
classes of hazards

"if
f
Syd Ny i

IMPORTANT

NO ANNUAL REFILS
| NECESSARY

Refil only when used

| COURTESY GARAGE

“ROBERT THOM LIMITED
i White Park — Dial 439]
”
uv

SSS Saas) |





PAGE FOUR







BARBADOS

t.---—j--

Printed by the Adverste Co., Ltd., Broad 8t, Bridsetews

Saturday, January 26, 1952
THE CONSTITUTION

Some of Mr. Adams’ statements in the
House of Assembly on Tuesday during the
debate on the reply to the speech made by
His Excellency the Governor at the open-
ing of the Legislature on December 18, 1951
need clarification. What for instance is Mr.
Adams’ authority for stating that “if we
had a Governor who was not sympathetic
to whatever party was in power he would
have to go?” The Governor of Barbados is
appointed by the Crown; represents the
Crown and is responsible to the Crown.
He must obey any instructions that he re-
ceives from the Secretary of State for the
Colonies through the Colonial Office.

Barbados like Bahamas and Bermuda is
a colony that possesses a representative
assembly but it has not got responsible gov-
ernment. Barbados’ constitution is written
in two documents, the letters patent which
constitute the office of Governor and pro-
vide for the Government of the Colony and
the instructions to the Governor of the
Colony,

The Legislature of Barbados consists of
the Governor, the Legislative Council and
House of Assembly. The Executive is vested
in the Governor, Executive Council and
Executive Committee. The Executive Com-
mittee came into being in 1881. Since 1946
four members of the party commanding a
majority in the House of Assembly are ap-
pointed to the Executive Committee at the
beginning of a new session of the House of
Assembly. On December 18, 1951 His Excel-
lency the Governor Sir Alfred Savage,
K.C.M.G., announced to the President and
Honourable Members of the Legislative
Council and to Mr. Speaker and the mem-
bers of the House of Assembly that he had
provisionally appointed the Hon. John
Chandler, M.L.C., President of the Legisla-
tive Council as a member of the Executive
Council, the Hon. H. A. Cuke, C.B.E.,
M.LL.C., to be a member of the Executive
Committee and on the nomination of the
leader of the majority party in the House of
Assembly Mr. G. H. Adams, Dr. H. G. Cum-
mins, Mr. M. E. Cox and Mr. F. L. Walcott
to be members of the Executive Committee.

The five members of the Executive Coun-
cil who are His Excellency the Governor,
the Hon. The Colonial Secretary, the Hon.
the Attorney General, the Hon. John
Chandler, M.L.C., the Hon. Sir John Saint
and the Hon. H. A. Cuke, Mr. G. H. Adams,
Dr H, G. Cummins, Mr. M. E. Cox and Mr.
F. L. Walcott are the ten members of the
Executive Committee.

This Committee introduces all money
votes prepares the estimates and initiates all
Goyernment measures: it is also respons-
ible for the conduct of public works and the
control and management of Government
property. It discharges in fact almost all
the functions of the Executive Council.

Since Barbados is governed as described
above, what interpretation is to be placed
on Mr, Adams’ claim that “we are the only
government in the whole of the Colonial
Empire that have our policy carried out
without modification or qualification by the
Governor or the Colonial Office?” So much
depends on Mr. Adams’ interpretation of
“We” and “Our”,

If he is referring to government as
effected by the Executive Committee then
the remark seems superfluous since govern-
ment through the Executive Committee is
the legitimate machinery for government
approved by the Constitution. If, however,
he is referring to government by the major-
ity party in power then there is urgent need
for clarification, because nowhere in the
written constitution of Barbados is there
any mention of government by a majority
party.

Until Barbados changes its present repre-
sentative institutions for full responsible
Government, any talk of a Governor's
tenure of office being dependent on his sym-
pathy towards a party in power does not
appear to be in accordance with the consti-
tution of this island.

The Governor is appointed by the Crown,
represents the Crown and is responsible to
the Crown. In Barbados the Crown retains
a veto on legislation and the Secretary of
States for the Colonies has the right to ap-
point and control public officers. The three
B’s—Barbados, Bermuda and Bahamas—
have representative institutions but they
none of them enjoy responsible govern-
ment.

SYNTHETIC ALCOHOL

Synthetic production of industrial alco-
hol will shortly replace the fermentation

“process based on blackstrap molasses, be-
lieve experts in the U.S. industrial alcohol
industry. An increasing amount of the in-
dustrial alcohol now available in the United
States is being produced by a synthetic pro-
cess and prices are falling.

In view of the growing demand for black-
strap molasses for livestock feed, great ex-
pansion of synthetic production is now
taking place in the United States. It is not
expected that costs of molasses will ever
again become sufficiently low to enable the
fermentation process to compete with the
synthetic producers. The only large users
of molasses as a basic material would thus
be producers of cattle feed.—B.U.P.









BARBADOS

ADVOCATE



af I Were Sitting

Each wéek during the war
a British Intelligence Officer
wrote for his chiefs an appre-
ciation of the war situation as
it was likely to appear to Hit-
ler’s staff. Today I put myself
in the position of a Russian—
a Soviet Intelligence Officer
writing for Stalin and his
Politburo on the situation cre-
ated by news of a junior atom

By SEFTON DELMER ‘
MEMORANDUM TO THE

DEPUTY CHAIRMAN OF THE

SOVIET COUNCIL OF MIN-

ISTERS:—

“WE here in the Kremlin have
been confident hitherto that fear
of reprisals would deter the
Western Imperialists fram using
the atom boâ„¢b against us unless
we used it against them first.

The mere suggestion in Novem-
ber, 1950 that the Americans con-
templated the possibility of using
the atomic bomb in Korea or
China was almost enofigh to split
the North Atlantic bloc.

Wide popular antipathy to the
bomb on humanitarian grounds
has joined up in the West with
the conviction — carefully foster-
ed by our political agencies—that
Western Europe rather than the
United States would be the victims
of the first reprisal raids from the
Red Air Force,

But the -development
miniature atom bomb
Americans makes it urgently
necessary to revise our political
thinking, not only about the bomb
itself but to review once more the
whole world political situation
affected by this,

1, INTERNAL SECURITY: It
is by no means safe to assume
now that the West can be deterred
from using the miniature bomb.

Instead of using it openly them-
selves they might hand it secretly
to terrorist groups inside our
borders to use against us,

This would revolutionise the
security position overnight, not
only in China and the European
People’s Democracies, but within
the Soviet Union itself.

It would put the imperialist and
capitalist conspirators in the West
in a position to inflict on us
Russians damage vastly exceeding
that caused to them by our Com-
munist partisans in Malaya, Indo-
China, Burma, and elsewhere.

As is known there has been a
great increase during the last six
months in the number of agents
and traitors infiltrating across our
borders both in Europe and in
Asia.

The Americans, ag we have
already officially and openly com-
plained, are spending vast sums in
recruiting, instructing, and equip-
ping those elements. They also
help them to penetrate our
frontiers,

An unsatisfactorily large num-
ber of men and women agents is
still at large within Soviet borders.
Evidence from those captured
Shows that their mission is to
establish contact with dissident
groups am*ng the nationalist
elements, as well ag with the

ot
by the

Seat
criminal organisations in the de-
portation areas of Central Asia
and Siberia.

We have undoubtedly succeeded
by our security measures during
the last two years in suppressing
the activity of reactionary and
nationalis’ opposition elements in

the People’s Democracies of
Europe,

Lying Low
SIMILAR progress has been

made in China. There is reason,
however, to believe that the illegal
organisation in Poland, Czecho-
slovakia, Hungary, and Rumania
still exist. They are only lying
low.

If the Americans dare to use the
atomic bomb in a_ clandestine
internal war against us—similar,
they will say, to our war against
the Western colonial Powers in
Asia — then these underground
forces will emerge once more.

We. must expect to find them
with a strength exceeding that
which they displayed against
Fascist Germany in the last war.

2. THE ANGLO-AMERICAN
ALLIANCE. The British deieat
in Persia displayed during 1951
a most encouraging conflict in
policy between the United States
and Great Britain,

It demonstrated the skill of our
political and diplomatic agencies
in splitting the Western world into
two camps — that of the colonial
Powers (Britain, France, Holland)
and that of the United States.

New Factors

IN the last montns, however,
new factors have arisen simui-
taneously with the advent of the
miniature atom bomb. They look
like creating an Anglo-American
solidarity of unprecedented firm-
ness,

These are:—

THE establishment of Winston
Churchill as Britain’s Premier;

CHURCHILL’S recent visit to
Washington;

THE probability that
Eisenhower will
Truman this year.
The public confidence which

Eisenhower enjoys in the United

States and in Europe—reinforced

by the possession of the new bomb

with all its possibilities—-will en-
able him to pursue a muci
stronger policy,

In this he will find himself in
closest alignment with the Britain
of Churchill.

3. WEST EUROPEAN RE-
ARMAMENT: In the last 12
months the European nations of the
North Atlantic Treaty Organisation
have increased their war budgets
by an average of 75 per cent. This
is 95 per cent. of the effort of the
United States asked for.

They have extended their terms
of military service by an average
of 35 per cent. They have in-
creased munitions production by
70 per cent. And they have
doubled the combat effectivene’s
of their forces,

General
succeed Mr.



NEW YORK,



SATURDAY, JANUARY 26,



In Stalin’s

In the West of Europe under
General Eisenhower, stands a
force of 20 combat-ready divisions
(six American, four British, ten
French), matching roughly the 26
small divisions we have in Easi
Germany and Poland

This force is no match what-
ever for the 200 divisions we
could mobilise immediately for a
blow against the West of Europe

were this to be’
While far effective in
challenging our it superior-

ity, the economic: ge 4 which
this rearmament is

imposing on
Western Europe is helping to

undermine capitals solidarity
and capitalist morale.
It is opening “avenues for

subversive agi which will

help to speed the collapse of the
capitalist system,
‘Precarious’

BRITAIN, and the Sterling Area,
for which acts as banker,
find themselves in a particularly
precarious position,

Our Soviet economists predict
the continued drain on
Sterling Area resources—due to
deficit trading with the dollar
pool and the rest of the non-
Sterling world—will bring aboui
a new devaluation crisis between
spring and summer,

This crisis may even, they say,
lead to the liquidation of the
Sterling Area as an economic
unit.

An event of this kind would
have the strongest repercussion
on the economic, military, and
political position of the whole
of the Western capitalist world.

4. THE INDUSTRIAL _ RE-
ARMAMENT OF THE U.S.S.R.:
The past year has seen the
greatest expansion yet in our
heavy industries. We have got
half-way to the targets set in
1946 by J. V. Stalin—targets
whose achievement, he said,
woufd make our Soviet Union
safe from “accidents.”

The surprise which the per-
formance and quality of our
Soviet fighters have caused to
American and other Western ex-
perts in Korea shows that. we are

keeping pace with design.

vise!
CONCLUSION: But for the
development of the miniature

atom borab we could’ remain
confident that in the arms race
we shoujd always remain strong
enough to deter the Western
enemy. (1) From launching
against us a_ preventive war:
(2) From interfering with our
support of Asiatic and African
rebellion against him.

At the same time the Western
world itself would continue to
be submitted to the moral and
economical exhaustion of un-
productive rearmament — 4
strain to which the disciplined

Seviet world is less vulnerable

than the West.
As it is, we must revise our
policy, At once.”
YES, Sefton Delmer sums up, if I
were in the Kremlin I would
order “Full Speed Astern.”



—L.E.S.
So, at midnight, they went Three years’ drought has
aboard their luxurious yacht, ravaged farms, Production of

EVA PERON—wife of the Dic-
tator of the Argentine and prob-
ably the most erful force in
that country—is a very sick
woman,

_ It is strongly reported that she
i. dying of cancer. She is only

The millions of humble le
who worship her in the Argen-
tine do not know how gravely ill
she is.

All they have been told is that
she has had a slight relapse while
convalescing after her operation
~--last November. They do not
ji any details about the oper-
ation.

Prayers For Her

Three times last month, Dr
George Thomas Pack, the Ameri-
can cancer specialist who was
present at the operation, was
flown secretly from New York
to examine her.

I have just come back from
Buenos Aires, Prayers are being
said daily throughout the coun-
try for Eva's restoration to
health.

But persistent rumours — circu-
late in neighbouring Brazil that
she is going to Switzerland for a
protracted convalescence, or per-
haps for the rest of her life.

If she goes there, Peron,
who is devoted to her, ‘may
be tempted to go with her. If
he does, it may mean the end
of his rule. Few people think
he could ever get back after
an absence of any length of
time, even if her desired to do
so.

In the magnificent Palm Palace
in Buenos Aires I talked with
Eva's secretary, Jorge Martinez.

He assured me there is no
possibility of her leaving the
country at present. She is not
Btrang enough to undertake a
strenuous journey.

Despite her doctors’ insistence
that she must seek relief from
the oppressive, 100-in-the-shade
heat of the Argentine’s summer
she keeps saying that she wants
to get back to work.

I caught a glimpse of ‘her
before I left. She was sitting in
a wheelchair beneath the shade
of a jacaranda tree in the exten-
sive and beautiful palace grounds,
Her husband's hand rested lightly
near her shoulder as he took her
round the exquisite azalea Leds,

She is a sadly different womaa
these days. She is much thinner,
has dark rings under her once
lovely eyes, and looks ten years
older,

Peron, too, is’ thinner, His
vulet told me that since Eva’s
illness he has lost more than a
stone and a half in weight.

His lined forehead and tight-
lipped smile show all too clearly
the double strain imposed by
Eva's breakdown and the coun-
try’s mounting economic crisis.

Kept Promise

Eva had publicly promised to
accompany her husband when he
opened a gigantic riverside ex-
plosive factory recently. Wor-
ried by her health, Peron per-
suaded her to compromise,

Tacuara, and steamed 21 miles to
the factory.

She kept her promise. She was
present—but on board the yacht
in her wheelchair, for once the

least limelighted of all the
grandees.
Dr. Ricardo Finochietto, the

cancer surgeon in charge of the
hospital where the operation on
Eva took place, told me that he
is trying to persuade her to take
a lengthy holiday abroad.

The Argentine’s aged Vice-
President, Dr, Juan Quijano, told
me:—

“She has only two interests
in life—-her husband and her
country. I do not think she
will ever leave either for an
instant.”

Anti-Peronists — and there are
many in the Argentine — say
that the President is so affected
by his wife's illness that he is

POCKET CARTOON
by OSBERT LANCASTER

* There’s no babdainn him,

Sir ~ says he regards himself
as the Carlsen of culture.”’

delegating his duties and respon-
sibilities more and mere to his
chief associates.
Great Wealth

If Peron should weaken be-
neath his crushing political bur-
dens, and put leve for his dyna-
mic wife before personal ambition
and duty to his country, then his
escape route appears to be well
prepared,

The Perons have undoubted-
ly amassed great wealth, Ac-
cording to one report, they
have already bought a house in
Switzerland and established a
bank account there (as well as
in New York),

Their private fortune is said
to have been swollen by foreign
and home trade deals, includ-
ing the importation of Scotch
whisky and tea for sale much
above the normal prices.

From one recent coup. the
Perons are said to have made
half a million American dollars.

Whether they leave the coun-
try or stay, the Argentine infla-
tion spiral gets steadily higher as
the value of the peso falls.



wheat and beef, the chief exports,
from which urgently needed
foreign exchange can be secured,

has shrunk to such an extent that |
to meet)”

it is now_ insufficient
home needs alone.

Butter ig being smuggled in
from Uruguay. As Britons know
only too well—several shipments
of meat which should have been
sent under the British agreement
have not gone.

Incompetents *

Peron has not improved the
position by putting incompetents
in tions of power.

e army which lifted him
into office can toss him out, de-
spite the failure of the revolt.

The working class of the
Agentine remains the
buttress of the regime. Peron,
with the powerful help of Eva,
bought its support with higher
pay, shorter hours, and lavish
charity paid for out of public
money.

Even so, and notwithstanding
Peron’s recent sweeping election
victory, which gave him six more
years of office, his supporters
have lost much of their enthu-
siasm as crops fail and living
costs soar,

If the Perons go, what then?
The only alternative to army
rule, as those who know the
American continent see it, is
the emergence of one of Peron’:
aides, who would offer the coun-
try a modified form of Peronism.

That would mean _ watering
down the excessive nationalism
that led Peron into absurd
attempts at achieving seif-
sufficiency for the Argentine.

Foreign trade might then be
conducted on lines more agree-
able to Britain, and the Argen-
tinos, with whom we must
negotiate a new meat agreement
before March, and who are cry-
ing out for British goods, might
not be so stiff-necked as they
have been under Peron.

Destiny

But meanwhile the first lady
of South America is dying, and
the destiny of the country may
be changed very swiftly if her
husband gives up his place and
power out of love for her.

Few men have ever done this
for a woman. But there have
been few women like Eva.

—L.E.S.

Our Readers Say :

To The Editor, The Advocate—
Sir,—I quite agree with the let-
ter from “Film Goer”, that
Gangster Films are quite unsuit-
able, we need a set up campaign
.of moral re-armament in this
Island—Cinemas should not be
opened on Sundays, and sub-
stitute daily shows instead—many!
a visitor or unemployed would be
glad of this. |
Too much crime—check it— de-

tect the cause—get at the root.

PARENT.



NOBODY’S

Monday — There is no modern invention

Nednesday — One of the headaches which

chursday — What a day. My little diary







*riday — My excursion into the uncharted

DIARY

|

which I detest more than the telephone
and none that I find more useful.
When I consider that I can pick up
my telephone and speak to someone in
London for three minutes for three
pounds only — it makes you think,| X
doesn’t it? Actually I can’t afford that|
luxury very often and the only time
I ever did someone else paid. But that’s $
not why I detest telephones. I detest $
them because they make such an awful %
row when they ring. I have never been
convinced by the argument that a note
or two from Madame Butterfly would
not be a more soothing way of attracting
attention than the ferocious BRR-BRR
which is now employed to compel
answers, Try sleeping next to a tele-
phone and you'll realise what I mean.



COCPOOOSTC SS

-

On the credit side I’ve noticed a great
improvement in Barbadian voices dur-
ing the past two or three years. Less
people seem to answer with that jaded
tired voice nowadays. People seemed
pleased to hear that you've called, and
even when I got the wrong number a
pleasant voice asked: “is he a patient or |»,
a visitor?” Courtesy pays every time.

SCGRUCGESS

GO

Tuesday — I was looking through some old !

papers today when I stumbled upon an
advertisement in the Times of Novem-
ber 17. It was, “SUNSHINE islands
only 18 flying hours from London: 15
days’ holiday 215 guineas: 19 days’ holi-
day 255 guineas. Price includes air
travel and accommodation at good
hotels.” The reference was either to
Bermuda or Bahamas, but I thought it
might interest the publicity committee.
It looks as if there are some people with |}
money still living in England.



has not yet hit the headlines is the cost
of education. It’s an interesting subject
for discussion. But there is a point
which nobody would like to make before
the row starts. Aren’t we all rather
illogical about education? We spend
huge sums of money every year on
secondary schools, Barbados Scholar-
ships and grants in aid to a University
College presumably to increase the num-
ber of educated persons. | Yet do we
pay any attention to what educated
people say about the way we run our
affairs? You bet we don’t. We go to
the people and canvass for their support
to get elected. We all want education
but we don’t seem to know why we
want it. Because the moment an edu-
cated person opens his mouth to speak
the squeal starts. It’s the man-in-the-
street who rules the roost, not the edu-
cated. Or don’t you agree?







reminds me that on this day in 1834
Robert Owen first preached Socialism
in England. What a terrible misfortune
for England. And what a terrible mis-

fortune for little England.

Mr. Adams, C.M.G., once assured me}?
that he was a good Liberal until he
came under the Cripps-Manley influ-
ence. What a pity! Mr. Churchill was
also once a good Liberal but now he’s a
real conservative type. Frankly I’ve been
watching Mr. Adams’ socialism for some
time and apart from the tie and public
statements I should say he was a bigger
Tory than Winston. But pay no atten-
tion to Nobody please. I’ve got to do}!
this to support the kids. No quotations,
by request.

botanical seas of Barbados landed me in
well deserved disaster.

If you must stick your neck out, ex-
pect it to be trodden on and I now have
to apologise for adding to the existing
confusion which already exists about
the immortelle, The lovely tree which
first attracted my attention near the
Aquatic Club begins with an S— and
has an unpronounceable name. At the
moment I have forgotten what it is.

SOF OPEL FE

Saturday — There is nothing better, Mr.

Mottley told us this week, than to get
out of Barbados for a bit and broaden
our views. The main thing was to get
out and get broadened, This would be
worthwhile, Mr. Mottley thought, if the
emigrant got no further than Pelican
island. I agree with him; having first
emigrated to Pelican at the age of seven,
and having spent more than one-third
of my days outside Barbados, possibly
as a result. The wanderlust must start
sometime and I wouldn’t put it past
Pelican to have bitten me that afternoon
so long ago.

But what's going to bite the other
Barbadians when the deep water har-
bour is built? If you know your RIT-
CHIE like I know my Ritchie you'll
remember Pelican will disappear when
the Deep Water Harbour is built.
references to Macbeth). |

Bajan: Worse and worse, I don’t
know why I bother to read you every
Saturday.

(No

SOOO COCOA PTAA

4,
Â¥













1952



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SATURDAY, JANUARY 26, 1952

BARBADOS



East Indians “40d Round-Up

Celebrate Belleplaine

Re ublie Da Police Boys’
The P Indian section a. Club Doing Well

community will celebrate India THE MEMBERS of the Police
Republic Day today at “Chantily” Boys’ Club in Belleplaine have
St. Leonard’s Gap, the residence shown much interest and are
of Mr. T. Maraj. The Indian progressing satisfactorily, the
stores in ‘the island—four Thani Oper in charge of the Club told
Brothers, one Maraj, two Surti, s.. advocate yesterday. The boys
one Kirpalini and one India will form a Cricket team soon.

House- ll be closed for the
whole. day. 5 THE BELLEPLAINE Net Ball
Over 100 Indians will attend ang Softball Group is progressing,
this function which will include one of the members of this group
hoisting and saluting the flag, told the Advocate yesterday. The
or by pres ae members are especially interested
singing of National songs. in games. : é’ west
India was proclaimed a Re- _ This Group staged a Variety
public on January 26, 1950. In- Entertainment recently and they
dependence Day is celebrated on met with a moderate amount of
August 15. success though there was rain the
Mr. D. A. Thani received a same evening.
telegram from the Secretary to They will go on vacation soon
the indian Commissioner, Mr. A, and after a “Reunion,”
M. Sahay, whose office is at Port- ‘ Ne
of-Spain, Trinidad, stating that HAGGATT'S FACTORY is ex-
Mr. Sahay will broadcast over pected to start cane grinding next
Radio Trinidad today at 7.10 a.m, Tuesday, it was learnt yesterday.
and 6.30 p.m, in English on 31.16 Cane cutting will begin on Mon-
and 90 metres respectively. Yes- day. The Engineers at this fac-
terday at 5.30 p.m. Mr, Sahay tory were kept busy during the
gave a broadcast over Radio past few weeks preparing for the
Trinidad in Hindustani on 90 crop season, ’
metres. sii ss y
Mr. Thani told the Advocate _ AT BRUCE VALE, the other
“It is really regrettable that no St. Andrew's factory, the Engin-
friends and well wishers could be eers are still working and the
invited to the celebrations due to crop season is not likely to start
the fact that it takes place on a there before February 4.

Saturday and at an d hour in ine in . 5
. ; 8 ” A FOUTBALL TEAM from the
the: Orns Ae ese Strollers Sports team is expected

to go to Belleplaine to play a
; football game there during nex}
Watchman
P >
Imprisoned

month. Keith app will Cap-
tain the Strollers team.

of ieinecee ceeccant® whee lage areas during tne week. The

Honours of the Assistant Court of OWMers Of these aogs live tar from

Appeal, Mr. H. A. Vaughan and me roausiude and we Gogs wee

Mr. A. J, H. Hanschell said yes- sale irom tne wheeis O1 venicles.







NU FewWwe Ulin six dogs were
found aead at diiterent spots in
ue Oise Mail and pDuUrkKe Vii-

terday before confirming a decis- One dog owner old ine Aave-
ion of His Worship Mr. G. B, cate: 1 don't know wnat is caus-
Griffith who had sentenced ing deatn (oO tnese cogs; but |

Courtenay Lewis, a watchman of know the remedy to secure mine,
Rockley, to one month’s imprison- and that is, to tie it all day ana
ment for assaulting and _ beating giving it a proper feed on letting
Florence Jones, an employee of it go at 8 p.m. It wouldn't care
Hastings Hotel, on October 11. to eat anyining during the night.

Their Honours said that there MINOR REPAIRS were carried
was not even a suggestion from put on a number of roads in dif-
the evidence that the woman had ferent districts of St. Joseph dur-

provoked Lewis in any way. ing the past two weeks, in addi-

Lewis admitted having com- ,; . i ,

. tion to the construction of new

mitted the offence, but appealed tenantry roads. At present gen-
against the sentence.

Jones told the court ‘that she eral repairs are being carried out
had been near the Colonial De- 09 the Foster Hall road. A
velopment and Welfare Office Superintendent told the Advocate
when she saw Lewis directing that they are hoping to complete
the driver of a car who was re- the repairs during the next week
versing the car, The car was re= So iar there were 43 workers
we issn wah d = ‘that on tne job yesverday moraing. a
ane ane Oda hel ig Tecate yoad rouer is also om the job and
g she attre s

attention to it the road is beginning to take

Lewis took . objection to ther shape again. ‘nis damage pte
doing that, and knocked her down “one vores the Highways pes
hy cuffing her in her face. Transport road and Foster Ha
2 main road were damaged a few



‘weeks ago. in
Residents of the Frizer Gully area

Camera Stolen will benefit by a bridge in the
area which was repaired during

Mr. A. P. Taylor of the Windsor the week after being damaged a
Hotel, Hastings, Christ Church, few weeks previously. This bridge
reported that a Kodak camera and and another strip of tenantry
a torch light, valued $151.02, were road was repaired through the
stolen from the motor car X—691 efforts of the Joes River Ltd. road
while it was parked either at St. repairing, constructing and re-
Joseph, St. John or St. George constructing programme.

Parish ‘Church sometime on
Thursday.

Joyce Batson of Hunte Street,
City, reported that a gold wrist
watch valued $35 was stolen from
G. W. Hutchinson’s Store at
Broad Street between 8.30 and
9.00 a.m. on Thursday. It is her
property.

A quantity of wood valued $24
was stolen from the residence of
Agnes Charles at Belle Land,
Roebuck Street, between Decem-
ber 15 and Thursday.

Leotta Ward of Goodland, St.
Michael, reported that a quantity
of clothing valued $34.30 was
stolen from her residence between
8.30 p.m. on. Tuesday and 6.00
a.m. on Wednesday, The cloth-
ing belong to her son Errol Reid
of the same address

Letters Of

Administration

In the Court of Ordinary yes-
terday, the Acting Puisne Judge
His Lordship Mr. Justice G. L.
Taylor granted the petition of
Edmund L. Jordan of Goodland,
St. Michael, captain engineer, for
Letters of Administration, to the

ARTIE'S HEADLINE



“ Sure, sir, ’U remember—
NOT to polish the zippers.”



25/- For Speeding

estate of his father Emmanuel
Jordan, late of Goodland. A FINE of 25/- to be paid in
Mr. D. H. L. Ward instructed 14 days or in default 14 days’ im-

by Haynes & Griffith appeared for prisonment was yesterday impos-
the petitioner. ed on Desmond Johnson of
Consideration of the petition of Worthing, Christ Church, by His
Ilma Millicent Knight of Roaches, Worship Mr, E. A. McLeod for
St. Lucy, a widow, for Letters of speeding while riding the motor
Administration to the estate of cycle X-812 on Collymore Rock
her husband Charles O. Knight Road, St, Michael.
deceased, was postponed The offence was committed on
Mr, D. Malone instructed by December 10 and the Police said
Messrs. Carrington & Sealy, that the motor cycle was ridden
Solicitors, appeared for the peti- at 45 miles per hour while the
tioner. speed limit on thpt_road is 30
The wills of the following four miles per hour. Sgt. Forde prose-



persons from St. Michael were cyted for the Police.
admitted to probate:— Percy
West Browne, Clarence Baxter



Riee, Christine Parris and Bea-
trice Roach.

FISH SHORTAGE AT
Be rere ee BATHSHEBA
H.C. Master Injured High winds and choppy seas

oi 4 at Bathsheba on Thursday made
In Cycle Collision

it impossible for fishing boats to
go out. Housewives got no fish
Mr. Briggs A. Clarke, an_as- on that day.
sistant master at Harrison College The sea was left rough yester-
is still a patient at the General gay but the winds abated. Boats
Hospital suffering from wounds in were able to go out.
his head, Many people gathered at Bath-
Mr. Clarke was admitted at the sheba Bay yesterday afternoon
institution on Wednesday night in waiting for fish. The majority of

an unconscious condition as the the poats returned at about 3.00
result of an accident on My Lord s p.m. but they brought in little
Hill about 7.45 when the bicycle or no fish. Housewives were

on which he was riding ‘came into
collision with another cyclist.

He regained consciousness the
same night. .

again disappointed.



“PURITAN” BRINGS Death By Natural Causes
DEATH by natural causes was

MIXED CARGO the verdict recorded by. Coroner
A shipment of. 3,108 bags of — A. McLeod when the inquest

flour was included in the cargo concerning the death of Louise
being landed here yesterday by Watkins of Kendall Hill, Christ

the S.S. Aleoa Puritan

which Church, was concluded at District
called from Halifax.

“A" yesterday morning.

The Alcoa Puritan has also Watkins was admitted to the
brought 1,200 bags of soyabean General Hospital on January 19
meal, 2,000 bags of linseed oil- suffering ‘from burns and died

menl, 625 bags of malt sprouts, about 4.45 p.m. on January 22
560 bags of pollard, 125 bags of Dr. G, Emtage who performed

her cargo. She has called
Messrs. Da Costa & Co., Ltd.

to the General Hospital Mortuary
attributed death to pneumonia.

REBUILDING



Nineteen men are sawing up wood at the grounds
build fishing boats which were completely destroyed on the night of December

3.

beach every evening.)

Sterling

Colonies Iner

ADVOCATE



After the wood is eut into timber size it is ready for the electric saws and planes.
A Bathsheba type boat (in the background) is now being consttucted
than usual and is built for easy hauling up.

(At Bathsheba the

easing
Balances

“They Put Capital Into Britain”

LONDON,

Britain's Colonies, selling their produce to Britain be-
low the world price’ but forced to buy British goods above

the world price, are, in effect, paying Britain for goods which were being brought to this fac-

she does not deliver, says Professor W. Arthur Lewis, the

distinguished economist and
Professor Lewis, who comes
from St. Lucia and is Professor
of Political Economy at Manches-

ter University and a member of
the Colonial Development Cor-
pora‘ion, examines the problem
of the ever-increasing sterling
balances held by the Colonies, in
an article in the London Finan-
cial Times.

While the ‘sterling balances of

foreign countries and the Domin-
ion have een fluctuating down-
ward since the war, he says, only
the Colonies have invested more
every year in Britain.

Britain talks of colonial de-
velopment, but on che contrary
it is African and Malayan
peasants who are putting capi-
tal into Britain,’ writes Pro-
fessor Lewis, “For the first
time since free trade was adopt-
ed in the middle of the nine-

teenth century, the British
colonial system has become a
major means of economic
exploitation.”

Post War System

Root of the trouble, according
to Professor Lewis, is the post-
war system of exchange control
and the inconvertibility of ster-
ling. Colonies earning hard cur-
rency by their exports § are
unable to spend it but
must put it into the Empire dol-
lar pool. Colonies earning ster-
ling by their exports are unable
to convert it into other currencies
to buy the things they need from
other countries.

“If sterling became convertible,”
he continues, “we would be back
to the position of 1931 to 1939,
when membership of the sterling
area conferred two useful advan-
tages and no disadvantages, The
main way to make sterling con-
vertible, and to stop the further
accumulation of balances, is to
make British manufactures avail-
able .in such quantities and at such
prices that they displace dollar
manufactures both in and outside
the sterling area.

Compulsory Cuts

“The method which appeals
most to Great Britain, of course,
is the alternative method of im-
posing compulsory cuts on dollar
purchases, so that sterling holders
are forced either to buy expen-
sive British goods or to accumu-
late still more sterling

“There is no case for cutting

the Colonies’ imports. The
Colonies are exporting far more
than they import and are

building up large balances, They
cannot get all the imports they
need, especially of capital goods,
and their

development pro-
gramme; are in consequence
retarded. They are, in effect,

paying Britain for goods which

she does not deliver. Must

further sacrifices be imposed
upon them?”

Professor Lewis, referring to the
meeting of Commonwealth min-
isters held recently in London,
concludes: “If the Colonies were
cirectly represented at the pres-
ent talks and free to say their
say, they would have diwected
their searchlight upon those Brit-
ish policies which prevent them
from getting an adequate suppl:

of manufactures from Britain.
“Unfortunately, the Colonies
ere not allowed to speak for

themselves, or to work exchange
contro] according to their owr
rules. So doubtless the stertin-
balances of the Colonial Fmnir-
will continue to rise thpoughout
this year and the next.”

—BUP.



Conductor Fined
For Overloading

Garfield Brathwaite, a conduc-
tor of East Point, St. Philip, was
fined 15/- and 1/- costs by His
Worship Mr, C. L. Walwyn for
overloading the motor ’bus M-1914
on Trafalgar Square about 4.10
pm. on December 19
The fine is to be paid in 14 days
in default 14 day imprison-
ment. Cpl. Cyfus, attached to the
Traffic Branch at Central Station
who brought the case said that he
stopped the bus as it appeared to
him to be overloaded

Lightning Kills 8

JOHANNESBURG, Jan. 25.

ol




A single bolt of lightning killed
horsefeed and poultry feed among the post mortem examination at a native woman and seven young

it was

children Thursday night
reported from Natal.—(U.P.)







expert on Colonial Affairs.



‘Zenith’? Was
Leaking

NO information the
whereabouts of the 87-ton
schooner “Zenith” which left
Barbados since December 19
last year for British Guiana,
has yet reached the local Har-
bour and Shipping Master.

A reply to a cablegram sent
by the Harbour Master to
British Guiana was received
on Thursday evening stating
that the master of the “Pros
pector”, a bauxite ship, last
saw the “Zenith” around 11
a.m. on December 22 off Brit-
ish Guiana in the position of
7 degrees 33 minutes north
and 66 degrees 46 minutes
west.

The “Prospector’s” master
said that the “Zenith” was
reported to be leaking but
was kept almost dry by pump-
ing. She was then expected
to make land early on Decem-
ber 23,

of



50/- for Bodily Harm

THEIR HONOURS Mr. H. A.
Vaughan and Mr, A. J. H. Han-
schell, Judges of the Assistant
Court of Appeal, yesterday con-
firmed a decision of His Worship
Mr. C, L. Walwyn who ordered
Albertine Harewood of Bath Vil-
lage, Christ Church, to pay a fine
of 50/- and 2/- costs in 21 days
or one month’s imprisonment with
hard labour for inflicting bodily
harm on Leotta Savoury of Christ
Church

The offence was committed on
May 1, 1951. Their Honour
ordered 8/4 costs of appeal to be
paid. Savoury told the court that
the defendant hit her with a piece
of stick on her left hand while
she was standing outside’ her
house.

The case’ which
brought against Leotta Savoury,
Kenneth Savoury and Maggie
Crichlow for assaulting and beat-
ing her on May 1 was dismissed
without prejudice by Their Hon-
ours.

Harewood

FIRE OFFICER GOES
TO DOMINICA





Intransit on the R.M.S. Lady
Rodney which left here last night
On its way to Canada was Fir
Officer J. G. Hewitt who had
spent 29 years’ service with the
Trinidad Fire Services Depart
ment.

He has now gone to Dominica
on secondment as Chief Fire

Officer to reorganise the fire de-
partment and train personnel

NEIGHBOURS PUT
OUT CANE FIRE

A fire of unknown origin at
Green Hill, St. Michael, at about
7.00 p.m, on Tuésday burnt 200
holes of fourth crop ripe canes
valued $25. They are the prop
erty of Joseph Murray and were
not insured.

The fire was put out by neigh;

20urs,

Signalling, Training
Charts, Girl Guide A
Books.

CAVE SH

12

PROGRAMME

of the Fishery Office

fishing



Guider

Music for Camp Fire Songs
Books including Omnibus Book of Ideas, Hiking und
Light weight camping, Services and Prayers, Dril! and



EPHERD & CO, LID.

&





Canadian
Column

1952 TRADE FAIR
Exhibitor figures so far avail-
able for the 1952 Canadian Inter-
;national Trade Fair indicate that
}world buyers next June will be
presented with a more compre-

|
|
}

duction than they have ever seen
before.

Canada's Trade Fair this year
is expected to have a_ strong-
er Canadian flavour than for the
past three years, with more ex-
hibits in a wider variety of fields.
Of the Canadian applications so
far received, 34 per cent are from
manufacturers who have never
}before exhibited at the
Fair, If this trend continues which
|; Trade Fair officials believe
|likely. the 1952 Fair, to take,
place from June 2 to June 13, will
, have the most representative array
icf Canadian goods ever assembled.
| Canadian exhibits so far cover)
114 of the 16 different trade clas-;



sifications, with machinery and
plant equipment, metals and
chemicals, and transportation |

The wood will be used to re
2 and morning of December

equipment showing heaviest par-|
jticipation, Office supplies, house-
jhold furnishings, and foods and
) beverages are also well represent-
ed, while textiles will again be a}
tlarge category. Office equipment |
exhibits will be one of the major
j|features of the show this year, |
} with about 30 firms expected to
| exhibit,
| The machine tool section of the!
1952 Fair will rival last year’s in!
size and scope. Although the
; British
j will not exhibit this year officially

This type of boat is smaller
boats are hauled up on the





Nine Lactories
Have Started
Grinding Canes

Machine Tool Association







Nine factories have already |imdividual members will comprise
tarted grinding canes, Of these! @lmost as large an exhibit of Brit-

ht are making vacuum pan ish machine tools as before, In
sugar The other factories will addition, Canadian machine tool
py to a inter this month makers are expected to be better
5 q colt Aa represented than last year. Ger-
and ne . : ;

. . many, for the first time, will also

factory, St. Lucy, '

W = oe me Saat ave be well poem in the ma-|
et " oe eee | chine tool section |
canes From January 8 canes Reports reaching Trade Fair |

offices from the United States and

tory Four Square, St Philip, and} obroad indicate that foreign par-
Searles, St. Michael, started OM/) Cination this year will be more
January 14, Applewaites, Old-

extensive than last year, Upwards
of 30 countries are expected to ex-
hibit, with Canada, England, the
United States, the Netherlands,
Spencers! Germany Italy, and France prob-

bury, St. Philip and Sandy Lane, |
James started on Monday
ast; Lower Estate on Tuesday and
Fairfield on Thursday







also started to work earlier this} ably best represented.

month. Garrtinlon Bullele mir aie : 3 WORKS 14K
Hey 0 and Warrens are ex- The fifth class of the National

i ‘ted to rt on Monday, Jan-' Defence College, located at King-|

i 28: Cl. St. John on Tues- ston, Ont., consisting of 17 senior)
d Andrews, Joes River, Gui-! service officers and 9 civil repre-|



Vaucluse, on Monday, Feb-, sentatives from Canadian industry. |

ruary 4° Harrow on February 5.! began a tour of Canadian and
Three Houses on February 6,' United States industrial and de
Colleton on February 11; Lemon! fence installations on January 6.)

Arbor on February 13, Kendal on) jt has been announced by National

February 15 and Swans on) Defence Headquarters, The year-|
February 18. Newton is @X- jong Defence College course in-|
pected to start shortly. Frere .iides two tours. One covers

Pilgrim will not be working this

Ameriean and Canadian industrial)
year

; ; an ilitary establishments, and}

Mr. H. W. Forde is now Acting pr gr countries overseas |

Secretary of the Sugar Production | ’ |
nd Export Control Board, Fancy ; GUNS FOR THE

Molasses Control Marketing Board ~
and Sugar Industry Capital Re- | NETHERLANDS
habilitation Reserve Board, in| Sixteen 3.7 anti-aircraft guns
place of Mr, Peterkin. jand 13 machine guns along with
predictors, radar, spares and one
| million rounds of small arms am-
| munition will be shipped to the
| Netherlands Army from Halifax
early in January.

CONTROVERSY
OVER BRITISH 5) 2 3 cori “ecient
HONDURAS fof an equipment transfer under

ithe NATO mutual aid plan_ in
!which Canada is sending 100 of





MANCHESTER, Jan, 22. | the anti-aircraft guns to North
Another controversy over Brit-' Atlantic Tréaty countries
ish Honduras. has flared up in In mid-December, Canada ship-



the eclumns of the “Manchester ped eight of the weapons to Por-
Guardian,” arising out of a tugal Within the past year,
comment on the Guatemalan equipment for a full division has
claim by the paper's diplomatic been sent to the Netherlands,

| hensive picture of Canadian pro-|

Trade |

is
|



PAGE

GEORGE PAYNE'S

IS

GOOD COCOA

PIVE





manoracrum? * i
“ORGE payne & °°

Tower “exe*

Sompon, nore



FINE —
PURE —
SOLUBLE.



=
=





MORE AND MORE MEN
ARE CHANGING TO

‘K’ SHOES vary

Because they have become convinced
of K’s Superiority.

e

iERE ARE THREE OF THE MANY VERY GOOD
REASONS FOR THAT SUPERIORITY :

SS



(1) ‘K’ SHOES are made from the finest leathers
obtainable. Both soles and insoles are hand-
tested for flexibjlity and accurately graded
by skilled craftsmen.

THE UPPEDS of ‘K’ SHOES are selected,
hand-cut and matched by experienced crafts-
men with a care that no machine could
imitate.

(3) ‘K’ SHOES are made over the famous ‘K’
PLUS FITTING LASTS with the heel-parts
one fitting narrower than the fore-parts. The
ensures a close fit at the heel and freedom
for the toes.

6

Why not come in and be fitted with a pair
of these world famous shoes ? We are sure
you'll say like all the other ‘K’ wearers :—

PLL NEVER WEAR ANOTHER SHOE BUT ‘K'

PRICES $17.00 to $21.63

FROM







correspondent, who wrote Italy and Belgium in addition to
“Nothing much has been done 4 number of 25-pounder guns t
re ently for British Honduras Luxembourg, Total < a Aa
Once it supported 750,000 people. has been valued at about $195,-
Now its inhabitants are only 000,000,

60,000, most of them in fitful





employment,”

This statement has been chall-
nged by Mr. A. J. H. Haler,
head of the Press Section at the

#resh stock of the following:

POPULAR

Colonial Office, Mr, Haler'’s crit-
icism has drown a reply from FRENCH
Mr, Billy Strachan, seeretary ot REMEDIES
the London branch of the Carib+
bean Labour Congress, —AT—
Mr. Haler pointed out that
ince April 1, 1950, a total of Ds
£543,880 has been issued to YW
British Honduras under the Col- Es
cnial Development and Welfare “JUBOL gheel ast e 4s
Acts. He lists also the grants- For Constipation, Price 4/-

“GLOBEOL”

in-aid made by the United King- 4 ti
com in the past four years, end- A Tonic for the Heart,



ing with the £268,894 granted in Muscles & Nerves. Price
1950—51. He also outlines the a ours T/t
work of the Colonial Develop- “PAG
ment Corporation in British For Diseases of the Blad-
Honduras, der, Price . 7/6
Mr, Strachan, however believes . ES ae
that the “Nothing much has vine oughis * 5/6
been done, ” statement is SaCw sessossesezesesessriee 8
correct, or is even an under- “DESC HINES Ore aS
tatement. He recalls the action] For Anaemia, Weakne oi
f Sir Ronald Garvey, the)) overwork and general de-
Governor, in devaluing the B.H.|! bility. Price , 10/-
dollar after the géneral devalua-: ‘URODONAL ‘
n of sterling in 1949, and the For Rheumatism, Gout,
issolution by Sir Ronald of the Gravel, Pains and Acidity
Rel.ze City Council. Price 7/6
He concludes: “The best index

the welfare and contentment
of my people in this territory is

quotation from the Daily
Express “Of the 35,000 people
who can work in this land, 8,000

» unemployed and another $,0v0
no regular work.’

—B.U.P.

BRUCE WEATHERHEAD
LTD.

HEAD OF BROAD STREET i

4

} >
ive




Sas

a OO Eeqxqxq{xmmm=xm=mTEOQQDWDOoO——E OO
== ee

HARRISON'S
DIAL 2664

Sole Distributors for ‘K’ SHOES in Barbados.

eae



NOTICE



For your convenience we now have a

TELEPHONE CLERK who will receive your

orders and have them given prop: ¢ ‘tention.

We ask your co-operation by Vho 338.



KNIGHTS LTb.
PHOENIX PHARMACY


















In our Girl Guide
Department we have

a lot of new items

s note!



...and for

Songs B ro w m ies

and Marching

Painting Books
Song Books
Story Books
Games etc.

Course for Camp, Fire Lighting
nnuals, Story Books, and Painting



13 BROAD STREET



. ie ee







NOTICE





————

TENDERS are invited for the
manufacture of WIRE COAT
HANGERS. A sample can be

obtained from the Manager,

Sanitary Laundry Co. Ltd.



SANITARY LAUNDRY €0., LTD.

OF BARBADOS

{







BARBADOS ADVOCATE SATURDAY, JANUARY 26, 1952





PAGE SIX
PUBLIC SALES

CLASSIFIED ADS.

GOVERNMENT NOTICES















TELEPHONE 2508.



For Births, Marriage or Engagement

@nnouncements in

Carib Calling the

charge is $3.00 for any number of words





ANNOUNCEMENTS
|

GLADIOLI & DABLIA
Orders are now being taken for Glad-
oli and Dehlias for delivery im Decem-
ber 1962, parties interested in booking
please phone 4442, T. Geddes Grant Ltd.
10.1.52—t.£.n.

i
REAL ESTATE



FOR SALE

BUNGALOW: Three bedroom wall fun-









SHIPPING NOTICES

MONTREAL, AUSTRALIA AND NEW
‘TD.
MANZ LINE The





4
PUBLIC WORKS DEPARTMENT, DOMINICA
APPLICATIONS are invited for the post of Assistant Engineer,



M.V. DAERWOOD will
accept Cargo and Passengers for

Phone
: : 4311, Johnson. i on a 3-year contract. d| M.V. TEKOA is expected to, load at St. Lucia, St. Vincent, Grenada
Se te 2 eed peee ae Sard Ser cna 1, i Pe y act. The salary of the post is between $2,880 an | Australian Ports for Trinidad, Barba- and Aruba. Sailing Wednesday
hetwien 8.90 and 4 p.m., $183 fee Death AUTOMOTIVE LAND—Two (8) pols % Act each, : i $3,360 per annum, according to experience, plus Cost of Living Allow-| dos, Bermuda early January and arriv- 23rd_ inst.
Notices only after 4 o.m - | sttamne Black Rock. Apply: Fred| #@) it NOTICES | ance of 16 2/3% of salary. Quarters are not provided. A single man, Sits eames) foie enaein ceaeeoies emia oben uae ee =
Carmichael, Ph 2443. $2—2r e jo an ‘a! rs
a cer nrennnnieenmenn— | ccrmngey re ee teen - preferred in view of the difficult housing situation. |herd frozen, and general cargo. Dominica, Antifua, Montserrat,
CAR—-1834 V-8 Ford in good condition LAND—4% Acres, situat: lack Rock | Cargo accepted on through Bills of Nevis and St. Kitts Sailing
i ei ay M-197). C. Herbert, 55 Tudor Street. | Apply: Fred Cormilchnal Pine suas During the period of the contract thre vill be major works of | o'0c” with transhipment at Trinidad|@ Friday tst February 52
FOu BRENT %6 1.52—2n. 1. an NOTICE jetty ‘construction, building, bridge, and water supply works. Ex-~| for British Guiana, Windward and Lee- The M.V. MOXEKA will



HOUSES






















CAR—One Standard 8 Apply to L.
King c/o R. H. Edwards or Kingsley. |
Deacons Read. 26.1.52—2n.

SAINT VINCENT, B.W.1
PROPERTY —Attractive seaside property
adjoining Villa Beach, 3 acres
massive stone buiiding

IS hereby given that it is the intention
of the Westbury Cemetery Board to be
with) caused to be introduced into the House
2000 sq. | of Assembly of this Island a Bill to amend

























perience is required in the taking off of quantities, structural design | “*" '!nds.
and detailing, and in the estimating of building works. For further particulars apply to—
When submitting applications the following heads should be|!US\"SS. WITHY & Co., Lia.

accept Cargo and Passengers for
Dominica, Antigua, Montserrat,
Nevis and St. Kitts. Sailing, Date
to be notified.







aro. | CAM Vauxhall 12 in A-1 condition, | Particulars from Errol Rooks, Four Winds.| the Westbury Cemeteny Act 1908 so as | B.W.L ON en eee
APARTMENT; The Canw, St. Law-] pp 4311, Joh: 20.1 52—4n ? ; ASSOCIATION (INC)
renee-on-Sea, fully furnished. Dial 3503 oe os cut Phone 9140. 36. 1-62—8n oe — tor = (a) Name in full with date and place of birth. DaCOSTA & xs Ltd. Consignee. Tele. No. 4047.
a anes —_— $$$ ~- conduct BARBADOS
sateen Vinee Eee OY ond 1) bn stick, PROPERTY AT CHEAPSIDE Cemetery and to reduce the amount of (b) Marital state and details of family (if any). aw. b 6666 OCEOOASOSOCOOOâ„¢
FARAWAY—St. Philip Coast, Fully} np. g90.00. Telia A BARNES & COs} .,CD® Jaffe substantially built two/ notice required to be given by the Chap- educational attainment.
ARAWAY—St. Philip Coast, Fully }in.p. $605.00. Terms. A BARNES & CO.,j storey wall building just below the| lain on resignment of his appointment (ce) Qualifications and highest
furnished, 3 bedrooms, 2 servant rooms | LTD. 26.1.52—t.f.n ublic arket, ste S p. 54,000 a the various of work being
doubde carport, all conveniences, $50,0( e o land via ¢- , 1 “ E. D. MOTTLEY. 7 (a) Engineering experience, types
per month from February. "Phone 4476. Suitebs oe & Chairman of the Board % separately enumerated and some measure of the scope of
19.1.52—t.n “ ut le as a guest house or bond “hairmar

sdb i ie a eee ELECTRICAL Priced to sell. Apply to D’Arey A. | 24.1.52—3n the works being given in dimensions or cost.

MORNING SIDE-Bathsheba, Februar eee ee ly 2 Applications should be, at least in part, in the applicant’s hand ee
to June. Telephone 2481, Mrs. Wj ——————————— a a nena .

Chandler 28.1 52-81 NORGE REFRIGERATORS, a smali| PROPERTIES FOR SALE — Stone writing.

toa et ee umber of these well known American| bungalow on sea ail modern con- NOTICE The Works Dominica, OUTWARD FROM THE UNITED KINGDOM
NEWHAVEN, Grane Coast. fully tu drigerators have just been received a ae room and garage. | Director of Works, Public Department, ine

sting ‘ . ul early, at REDMAN & R'S one ingalow recently constructed, will willingly answer questions applicant might wish address
ee en” eae ARAGE LTD., Showroom. Phone 4365|in a desirable neighbourhood about 1% PARISH OF 6T. PHILIP = this Due
car Ghentn Bean February, Phone 4 4435 23.1.52~—n. | miles from eity, containing all modern | Applications for the Post of Senior|to him for a period up to two weeks from the appearance of Vessel From Leaves Barbados
- a : 10.1.80-8.1 wed requirements, servants room and garage saree = Mig . — : ee ae advertisement, :
Si a ee : REFRIGERATORS, Another shipment} One wooden bungalow, just a few be reeelw e undesst S.S. “BIOGRAPHER”

ORMISTON. 7th Ave. Belleville, 3 bed FRIGIDAIRE Refrigerators has just| steps from beach at Brighton self con- Tuesday 20th January, 1952. Applications should be submitted to His Honour the Administra- ER “pombe & 8th J 20th J
rooms, all conveniences Appl: toi | ‘Tived. On sale at K. R. Hunte & Co.,|toined, drawing and dining rooms | *pplicants must be fully qualified as) 4. Dominica, as soon as possible S.S. “TRI ” irons os San -
eee) an convene 4 id.. Lower Broad Street, for Cash or | enclosed with glass, a® ..urse and Midwife, and must forward , ' . ‘S. “TRIBESMAN' --M/brough and ith Jan. 31st Jan.

_ ids, 1 n Terms. Dial 461i or 5027. Lavinla—Three roof house, containing With their applications their Baptismal S$.S. “INVENTOR” .. . . Liverpool 13th Jan. 27th Jan.
* 25.1.52.—3n. | drawing, dining, breakfast and two bed- aun well as their Certificates of |Goyvernment Office, S.S. “PROSPECTOR” London 25th Jan. Tth Feb

Peete ae " rooms, flush toilet and bath, with house , «ompetency. sadhcndieiihkecstaiba te tia. . At *
Cedars Gap. Dini 2525, Harold Proverb: in back standing on 5,400 sqr. ft. of land. | The salary attached to this, post is| Dominica. HOMEWARD FOR THE UNITED KINGDOM
ac a : 26 1.52—1n FURNITURE Marshville—Three roof dwellinghouse, $20.00 per month. Uniforms, including 81st December, 1951. U Dp G

ence ae of standing on 5.445 sar. ft. of land, All shoes. and quarters Geneete ae 17.1.52—2n ‘
; modern conveniences, along Bank Hall e successfu ndidate w je re- ar : Vessel For Closes in Barbados

Aele Seniod ‘Brome Agr Ae aR ote eee eee we See ee | {quired to assume duties on the 28th S.S. “HERDSMAN” London 6th Feb
House, In St. Peter, 1% miles from Sea) our home, A. BARNES & Co. Ltd.|,,land—4, desirable bullding site, eon. | February 1902 DEPARTMENT OF EDUCATION For furth a 1

: ; 2 [ak “s + 1,000 re ma of iand | ‘or er Information Busi
stands high Fulhy furnished (excep 18,1.52—t.f.n. wane, an Waser "Garamhis dine building | P. Ss. W. scortT, | apply to

plate, linen), 3 bedrooms, 2 dressing rooms






Clerk to the Board of Guardians,



site located in Welches Road, containing
Ss gras ee ee MECHANICAL 5,000 é St. Philip. BARBADOS EVENING INSTITUTE DACOSTA & CO., LTD.
J a square feet. And many other small 7 ——
2049. 26.1.52—t.f.n, a SF et ae MT eeeaee 19.1.58—7n » Agents





TWO LARGE COOL ROOMS—Furnisnea
running water, with or without meals
10 minutes walk to Yacht Club or City

Woodside Gardens. Dial 3356.

22.1.52--t.f.n

WINSLEY — Bathshebs, February to

June. Telephone 2481, Mrs. W

Chandler

26.1.52—-3n

ne

WANTED



HELE

POLAR CARTMEN wanted
Polar Products, Rickett Street







Apply to

24,1.52-—2n



STENOGRAPHER & TYPIST for our

RACEHORS:
Office, apply by letter and in person—| w ES ih training.

T. Geddes Grant Lid





SINGER SEWING MACHINE—In good
Apply to Stanley Clarke, c/o
25.1.52—2n

ondition.
3, P. Musson, Son & Co,

POULTRY







just call at:
EBONY

Marhill Street. Dia) 5001.

26.1.52—2n

REALTY & COMMISSION
AGENCY





ALFRED TOBIAS PHILLIPS

NOTICE

Re the Estate of





NENE-DAY CHICKS unsexed, from ghe| The undersigned will offer for sale} NOTICE IS HEREBY GIVEN that all
famous WHITE LEGHORN CHAR IS]at their office, No. 17, High Street,!} Persons having any debt er claim upon
train, layers last season of 240 eggs in| Bridgetown, on Thursday the S3ist day | or affecting the estate of Alfred Tobias
10 months 80c. Hatching eggs 30c. Post|of January, 1952, at 2 p.m, the desirable | Phillips late of Strathclyde in the parish
rders to Bennett near Gregg Farm, St.| building. lot of land containing 17,964/0f St. Michael in this Island, who died
Andrew. 25.1.5—2n|square feet or thereabouts situate on)‘ this Island on 28th day of January
top of Rendezvous Hill lying to the easi i951 are hereby required to send in their
30 Hampshire and Barred|of and adjacent to the lands of Cloud Claims, duly attested, to me the under-
Rock Pullets imported 68| Walk the residence of Sir Dudley Lea- signed Timothy Theophilus Headley,
also Hampshire Hatching|cock. The site is in within easy reach Public Trust e of the Island of Barbados
ges 36 cents ea. Apply: Erie Denny,|of the Golf Club and commands a | qualified Administrator to the estate of
Bridge Gap, Black Rock. 26 1.52—1n | beautiful view. Alfred Tobias Phillips deceased Public
wee For further particulars and conditions | Buildings on or before the 15th day of
of sale apply to:— February 1952 after which date } shall

COTTLE, CATFORD & Co., proceed to distribute the assets of the
Solicitors. said estate among the parties entitled
20.1.52—10n. | thereto having regard to the debts and

claims only of which I shall then have
had notice at the time of such distribu-
tion and that I shall not be liable for



POULTRY:
Plymouth
months old,

LIVESTOCK





Bay filly,| The undersigned will offer for sale at

atercress. Br. gelding, Colleton. Apply | their office, No. 17, High Street, Bridge-







Technical Classes

(a) Applications will now be considered for entry to beginners’
classes in:—

(i) Internal Combustion Engineering

(ii) Electricity. :

These classes will be preparing for examinations of the City
and Guilds of London Institute.

(b) The present Junior Classes will continue as Senior Classes.
A few new students may be admitted, provided that their
knowledge of the subject concerned and general education
is of a satisfactory standard.

(c) The Classes will be held at Richmond House, St. Leonard’s
School, and will commence in May 1952. ASTRA i

(d) There will be two lectures a week of two hours in each | A STEAMER sail ‘Toth "sub --aravte Weed aie teks “108,
subjest. | STEAMER sails 30th Jan.—arrives B'dos 14th Feb. 1952.

(e) Applicants must be over 15 years of age on Ist May 1952. ee

\eme Alcoa, Steamahip Co.



NEW YORK SERVICE

A STEAMER sails 25th January-~:
s a y-~arrives Barbados Sth February, 1952
A STEAMER sails 15th February— arrives Barbados 26th February, 1952.



NEW ORLEANS SERVICE

23.1.92—t £.n,} to J. D. Chandler. Gun Site, town, on Friday the ist February, 1962, | assets so distribuled to amy person of (f) Selection for the Classes will be made according to general CANADIAN SERVICE
——- $$$. 26.1.52—2n. }at 1.30 p.m, the dwellinghouse called | whose debt or claim I shall not have ill be to Si iseath
SALESMAN: Will also have to cover “ELLERSLIE” with the land thereto) had notice. educational attainment. Preference w given to applicants SOUTHBOUND

the Leeward and Windward Islands at

intervals.
tially. Box ¥, Advocate Co , Ltd

Application treated confiden-

13.'1.52—t.f.n


















containing 1 rood, 3 perches or there-
abouts adjoining Dr. Bancroft's resi-
dence at Lower Fontabeile. The house
contains downstairs, drawing and dining
rooms, breakfast room, two bedrooms,

And all persons indebted to the said
estate are requested to settle their ac-
counts without delay,

Dated this 7th day of December 1951.

TIMOTHY THEOPHILUS HEADLEY,

MISCELLANEOUS

Se
AUTO POLISHES & WAXES—A ship-



possessing a School Certificate or its equivalent. Consideration) = 4 sTEAMER sails 16th January—arrives Barbados Sist_ January, 1962

will however be given to applicants with practical workshop = eeanaree ta Bead FE ee Ae arrives Barbados 14th Februany, 1952
STEAM sa : yy — arrive 2 ;

experience, plus a good elementary school record, endorsed + whquaty— artives. Barhades 2th February, 1008

= toilet and bath and upstairs 3 bed- Qualified Administrator to the Estate by the applicant’s former Head or other Senior teacher. These vessels have limited passenger accommodation.
MISCELLANEOUS ER AND POLISH just arrived--Old Cars << UC See ee eee (a) A tee of $5 00 per term, payable during the first week of the} ROBERT THOM LTD. — NEW YORK AND GULF
SFP ING URS P SEE STEEDRETS ike “|and gas \. 8.12.51—4n . > sais ,
MACHINES—Old Sewing Machines out ey haar using LARWAX— Inspection any day between the hours [ G SERVICE

of order, Apply: Mrs. V. Vaughn, King's

Street or corner Faivchild and Probyn
12.1 52—10n

Streets.



nd ®heumatism
hile You Sleep

it you suffer sharp stabbing pains,

if joints are swollen

it shows your

blood is potsuned through faulty kid-
ney action Other symptoms of Kid-



ney Disor are Burning,
Passages, “Getting up Nigh
aches, Lumbago, Leg Pain
mess, Dizziness, Headaches, Col
Pufiy Ankles, Circles under Ey




Itching



Lack of Energy, Appetite etc Ordi-







i ; , is enclosed more, M.L.C., J.P., Deputy Chair- tained after that date. request,

rary medicines can't help much —you er -_——_——- a *

; ; 4 ; ; Inspection any day on application to| man, Department of Education, Britain's largest and foremost With one of the lovely White Por-
must Kill the germs ruining health JEWELLERY—Topaz Pendant Ring ‘ , 0! lovely ‘or
ee toon Ee r cP BIAS Be ces and Earrings Set, all matched; large Ar tortie arian ack. obeane Mr. Lewis was Deputy Chair- 23rd January, 1952. Publishers will send a Beautiful celain Gas Geysers—You can have
poor ig (ne cause Get Cystex trom | Stones 18. carat Gold and Diamonds.| tions of sale apply:— man in 1951 after having previous- aret tiene ee:
Du right or money back Act Now! | 44nd-made settings, Call EVANS, 6225. ly served as Chairman for three SPCR TE, Gentes Agi. Write today. comically ‘priced ‘ani CHEAP to
In 44 hours you wit feel better and 25.1,52.—3, COTTLE, CATFORD & Co., : Colly- Highest Commission paid. Jones, Pi an

& conpletely well in one

week

The Guar-

oo GwStex ante e

protects




Dial 4391, Courtesy

Garage. 25.1.52. of 1 p.m. and 3 p.m, on application on

Castries Board



Shoes and Blocks, Pedal Rubbers, Locks, |°! 8 Spply, to:—

Handle Grips, Trouser Bands, Tyres and Re re en ea.

Tubes. Laurie Dash & Co. Tudor Street



term, covers all subjects taken. Failure to pay the fee at the
time stated may lead to the exclusion of the student. 80%
of the fees paid will be refunded at the end of the session to
all students who have, in the opinion of the Principal, Dean,

APPLY:—DA COSTA & CO., LTD.—CANADIAN SERVICE
lll,

ROBERT THOM LIMITED

Tee Ae Boor Bireet, 20 1 52—in. Elects Officers — Lecturers, worked satisfactorily, and attended regularly PLANTATIONS BUILDING, LOWER BROAD STREET
Garni sie aamiaaninmmpanmteme and punctually. Passenger Sales :
CURRANTS — Notice to housewives The quimeteenan’ on tues for sale at (Prom Our Own Correspondent.) P er Agents for:

Currants 40 cents, Hams Maple $1.28 per th:
tb., Wilsons $1.40. C. Herbert, 55 Tudor

Street. 26.1.52—2n,
seen emereram | PEE Mulpereaes
CHAIR CUSHION SPRING UNITS—A| fi00 aa” feat eh IMME RE Welchas row

new shipment of HEAVY TYPE Spring} Road, St
Cushion Units, Ready for Packing and] contains —
Cevering. A real improvement on our rooms, 2
last Stock. See them on display at our and bath, electrie light and running

Showrooms. The Standard Agency 3 and f
(B'dos) Co., 14 Swan Street, Dial 3620, | Water. Garage “helt "of ihe land

25.1.52,—3n,

CASTRIES, Jan. 22.

At the first meeting of the
Castries Town Board for 1952 Mr.
Allen M. Lewis, LL.B., Barrister-
at-law, and brother of Professor
Arthur Lewis of Manchester
University, was elected Chairman
and the Hon, Herman B. Colly-

eir office, No. 17, High Street, Bridge-
town, on Friday, the ist February, 195% at
1,30 p.m. the newly erected stone wall







Michael. The dwellinghouse
verandah, sitting and dining
bedrooms, kitchenette, toilet

yard. Approximately, half of the land



~wineemninsaatenanainasiioniienemamoe | ip, Sea
BICYCLE ACCESSORIES—Bells, Brake For further particulars and ;

lieitors, | consecutive terms. Mr. |
2 1 6390 {more was Chairman in 1951,
—— Mr. Lewis is President of the St.

SE EERIE
LADIES BATH SUYTS—A quality of
letest fashion in green, goid, blue and
red with skirt all sizes. $3.51 each,













(h) Students will be required to supply their own stationery and
text-books as required by the Lecturers.

(i) Applicants must obtain from the office of the Department of
Education application forms, which must be filled in and for-
warded to the Dean of Technical Studies, the Barbados Eve-
ning Institute, at the office of the Department not later than
Saturday, 2nd March, 1952. No applications will be enter-

Trans-Canada Airlines, B.O.A.C. and B.W.I.A.
ALCOA STEAMSHIP COMPANY
Telephone No, 4466
|

Esk sdeensel inne eee QOPI O SSO FISS TSO

i .

and. more by taking orders fox | HOT WATER ON :
wna Calmuea “On tgacct ¢|¢ TAP for YOUR BATH x






run with Natural Gas, A few are ,

Williams & Co., Dept. 9, Victoria GAS

now _ available
Works, Preston, England.

at your
WORKS, BAY .

REGISTRATION OF ALIENS ORDER, 1951

:
Free Sample Book for 1952 to & warm or hot bath within 8
6







Soe Kidneys, Rheumatism, Bisdder you Kirpalani, 52 Swan Street. Lucia Labour Party which now AAA AAA AAA
r 26.1.80—1n.| Kor MResults . ~~ |ias eight members on the nine- 09 Fee POCO
‘ aa cc oenpsnpseensasesasfunisnsaninalinisniaaiinidininneedeamenaben tos In exercise of the powers conferred upon the Governor by section
YPPOS99 99999996 44FSGG099, | “Long Playing Records and 78 RPM man municipal Board. 8 of ‘
Si egtaens gar re took ae a“ 3 of the Aliens Restriction Act, 1939, the following Order is hereby We can supply
BARBADOS — gy] '42Es & co, Lta. Advertise in the made:—
Oi PRAf-ti.n. 7 1. This Order may be cited as the Registration of Aliens Order, 6” PORCELAIN TILES
POLO CLUEB — &] surreases — vatises, attache cases.| Ai i geoeate 00 CSSUE | 1952
| ‘urdy and lightweight, double locks, 7 in a variety of Colours
Presentation Match 3] "°°" *°8°.tiSic%% Kills Men & Women | * sciucic é
: ¢ » fn ‘ = “
%, Twice as many women as men suf- aiGince” smtas the conmary Cerelne-aey ane CENTRAL EMPORIUM
white Ataesocmres x uaa an a as fer from High Biood Pressure, which where an alien has more than one dwelling-place, each of Cur. Broad: & Tudor Sts.
4.30 oe “ baat tke that oc ier Pita arts such dwelling-places; provided that where an alien has no :
FOUR CHUKKAS : CHRISTI AN SCIENCE Ws the reel camape oetadah Rea t trouble ordinary dwelling-place, the expression “residence” shall
Entrance to enclosure * { READING ROOM mon symptoms of High B a eres be construed as meaning his place of abode for the time
1/— > top and back of head Rnd nuove cn, being; “ship” includes aircraft, and the expression “port” ALE
96.1.82—in $ Breath, paine in hearse, paipleation, shall be interpreted accordingly. FOR S$
Via M y i. 3 @: . ie
1.5 n ¢ The Story of Christian Solence poor sleep, loss of memory Ere enerey: 8. Subject to the provisions of this Order, every alien who has



FOR SALE

1,200 sq. ft. each.

e
43,000 sq. ft. at Rockley
New Road.

e
2 roods 34 perches at Brit-

Several spots at the Pine
Hill ranging between 11,000
& 14,000 sq. ft.

Several spots at Hothersal
Turning beside the main
road,

e





Bay Street, Phone 5010
offers you 2 outstanding Bar
gains in Properties.
WORTHY DOWN
Situated at Top Rock Ch
Ch. having 3 bedrooms with
connecting Toilets and Baths,
Modern built in Kitchen, 2
large Balconies, Large
Lounge, Dining Room, Out-
side 2 Car Garage, Laundry,
Servant’s Room. fully en-

Several spots at Maxwell

ASAI FIT







Wartime Activities 1939-1946
easily excited, fear and worry. If you
this book with its inspiring suffer any of these axmnntart. don't
delay treatment @ single day, because
your life may be in danger. Noxco
| (formerly known as Hynox), a new
medical discovery, reduces High Blood
Pressure with the first dose, takes a
heavy load off the heart, and makes

account at the—

READING ROOM
over Bowen & Sons, 20 Broad St.
Open on Tuesdays, Wednesdays,
Fridays from 10 a.m. —2 p.m.
and on Saturdays 10 a,m.—12



ae +e ee ce
wwoewwoww®

you feel years younger in a few days. E i i
‘clock. Get N t 7 xcellent sea bathing. Dwellinghouse contains verandah
aE ute waretes hh Meese fron a goers \ the matters set out in the Schedule to this Order, and shall, upstairs and down, dining and sitting rooms, 4 bedrooms, pan-
wwwuww and strong or money back, on the request of the Commissioner, produce a document try and kitchen. Eectric light, gas and water installed. Garage

|



ORIENTAL
SOUVENIRS

SILKS, CURIOS, ARTS
VENDEMOS, SEDAS,

HI
JORDAN'S LAUNDRY

H
1
BAY STREET
Opposite Combermere |

eee

Stree
















T0-DAY'S NEWS FLASH

WHITAKER’S ALMANAC 1952.
Unabridged Edition

re NAUTICAL ALMANAC

DAILY MAL YEAR BOOK 1952
PLASTIC SCHOOL RULERS

VIOLIN BOWS & BOW HAIR
PIANO INSULATORS

THANI’S
Pr. Wm. Hry, St., Dial 3466



GOOD
FURNITURE

A te, OD












Special Value





)



Wardrobes, Marble top and other
Washstands

TABLES for Dining, Kitchen,
Radio and Fancy use, Larders,
Waggons, Tea Trolleys—China,
Kitehen’ & Bedroom Cabinets—
Tea Trolleys-DRAWING ROOM
FURNITURE in Morris, Tub and
other styles,

L. 8. WILSON

PITMAN’S SHORTHAND
INSTITUTE EXAMINATION

Gi. W. Hutchinson

& CO,, LTD.
Broad St. _ Dial 4222

Applications from interested
persons to enter a Theory and
Speed Examinations to be held
in either March or April. 1952,
for the certificates of the Pitman's
Shorthand Institute, London, will
be received by Mr, ‘S, St. Clair
Hunte, P.O. Box 200, Bridgetown.
not later than Saturday, § 9th
eae 1952. Fee $1.50 for each
entry,
















éttained the age of sixteen years shall, on the publication of this Order

in the Official Gazette, comply with the following requirements as to
registration :—

(a) he shall within one month of the date of this Order furn-

ish to the Commissioner of Police full particulars as to

- CARLDIEM”

a two storeyed dwellinghouse standing on 10,770 square feet
of land on the incomparable St, Lawrence Coast.



or documents establishing his national status and identity;
(b) he shall within one week after the occurrence of any
circumstances affecting in any manner the accuracy of
the particulars previously furnished by him for the pur-
pose of registration, furnish particulars of those circum-
stances to the Commissioner of Police, and generally shall
supply to that office all information that may be necessary
for maintaining the accuracy of the register kept under

and servants’ rooms.

Purchaser te have option of buying furniture and effects.
Inspection by appointment. Dial 8137. (Mrs. K. R. Hunte). %
The above will be offered for sale at public competition on

Friday, the 9th February, 1952, at 2 pm., at the office of the
undersigned from whom further particulars and conditions of
sale can be obtained.

COTTLE, CATFORD & CO., %
Solicitors. %







ton’s Hill a leading JOYERIAS Y ARTISTICAS this Order; 24.1.52—-15n %
— te kk ee ae (c) he shall, if he ig about to change his residence, furnish to COLA LALLLE™
e EJIPTO 5 TESTS for the Commissioner of Police, particulars as to the date on

which his residence is to be changed, and as to his in-
tended place of residence,

(d) he shall, if at any time, without having changed his resi-
dence, he is absent from his registered place of residence
for a continuous period exceeding one month, notify in
writing to the Commissioner of Police his address at the
end of the said period and any other address which he e

REALTORS LIMITED.

|
tt Aes ‘ ‘ ee SUNSHADES FOR DOLLS x | Suitability—-Durability—Comfort may subsequently have during his absence and, when he
écbae acon, 2 24-PIECE DECORATED SEPARATOR OIL by the Pint. | aster ecunetne are Appeal returns to his residence, the fact that he has done so.
Lane. 26,1,52—2n TE A SETS only 0GRGiing wae dake 3 Those Teste— esr ae _ 4, Any person who acts in contravention of. this Order shall be
& HARDWARE iS ond other shapes with Bevelled {| SUilty of an offence, ters Cable Address
——— £ = for 6 persons $10.16 S|} ond. other Mirrors, ‘Bedsteads, 5. This Order shall not apply— ,
Ralph Beard F.V.A. Lower LLEBOOGSOSA—SSSSSISD | radles, Springs. Beds $10.50 up,

(a) to any alien not resident in this Island who is an officer, or “ R ealt ”
member of the crew, of a ship at a port in this Island, and ors
who does not land in this Island for discharge;

(b) to any alien not resident im this Island who is an intransit :

passenger by any ship, provided that his stay in this Island
does not exceed one month; REAL ESTATE AGENTS,
(c) to any duly accredited head of a foreign diplomatic mission
or any member of his official ‘staff or household; .
(d) to any alien duly exempted from compliance with this
Order by the Governor.
Made by the Governor this 2nd day of January, one thousand nine

e te eda SPHY ov, loumttteertece AUCTIONEERS,
‘/EVANTON THE followi Secretary of the Examining Body. . .
wing Stores will 26,1, 52—2n By Command,
’ Situated at Top Rock Sas ; TURNER
having 3 bedrooms with for the Indian Republic Day ; Sah” ~s a V ALUERS
Lounge, Dining Reon: and Customers may please make aaa Colonial Secretary. ’
Sun Lounge, 2 fully tiled a note and arrange ‘their SCHEDULE

Baths amd Teilets with Hot
Water Built in Cupboards
throughout, outside 2 Car
Garage., Servant’s room, Play
Room. The Gardens are well

shopping accordingly.

THANI BROS. Pr. Wm. Hry.
& Swan Street.



ST. JAMES

If you wish to buy or rent a house on this coast, we
have several from which you can choose. Prices from
% SURTI UNITED CO Swan &

1. Name in full and sex.

2. Present nationality and how and when acquired and previous
nationality (if any).

3. Date and country of birth.

BUILDING CONTRACTORS.

aid omits having » numerous £5,000 up. We also have a number of houses in other 4. Profession or
Trees. % High Streets, portions of the coast and inland, tg .



The above Propertics are



% 'T. MARAJ, Swan Street. Ring: 4683

be closed on 26th Saturday
%
+
x
x
‘\









5. Address of residence in this Island.



av ilable with possession % or enquire from 6. Address of last residence outside this Island. 151 & 152 Roebuck Street,
within one month. The Own- % D. P. KIRPALANI, Swan 7. Signature.
er is willing to accept any * Street, , r 3 NOTE:—Any person affected by this Order who wishes to comply in
Se ee One for A auIee aS ' : : B EARD : & GREIG person should visit Police Headquarters between the hours | Telephone No. 4900. h
sale, 25.1.52—38n * INDIA HOUSE, Swan Street. Prince William Henry Street
: of 8.15 a.m. and 4 pm. | j
SS SSF SOFRGSSSSSSSSSSGGS: ——_——_—SSSSSSSSSSSSSSSSSSSSSS 26.1,52—1n, !







cai ii ai i |






















SATURDAY, JANUARY 26, 1952 BARBADOS ADVOCATE -PAGE SEVEN

as



et re a



HENRY

|| ARr

| EXHIBIT

os |
“A





BY CARL ANDERSON











A_REMINDE





| BUY
PEEK
FREAN

BISCUITS
TO-DAY.

Bie





BY ALAN STRANKS & GEORGE DAVIES

Just put a few drops of
icks Va-tro-nol Open A
nostril. Va-tro-nol pene-
trates deep into the nasal
passages, soothes irrita-
tion, c S stuffiness, lets mt
\“owbreathe freely again! <="

wexs VA-TRO-NO

| MOSE DROPS
|

AS LONG AS YOU WEAR

THAT BRAND YOU'RE MINE

AND THAT MAKES /T
PERMANENT !




YOU, FLAME~-
y AND THE NAME OF
H THE SQUEALER WHO
SHOPPED me ®..








IT SAYS ALL
THOSE THINGS
ON THIS LITTLE



GOING TO INHERIT
HUGE FORTUNE
WITHIN THIRTY











HORNIMAN’S
TEA

——. ——— = - a
on | rHE Pp :
FLASH GORDON __BY DAN BARRY | A R i S WE LOVE
a iM aren so, w TWS FLIGHT TO JUPITER IS » OKAY!... TULIVER, RADIO



































THE
peer ' FLASH! WITH OUR RISKY ENOUGH! I'D HATE orn eva ence,
| ARE YOU SURE THE ¥ BOOSTER-ROCKET TELL ]
| SPACE PRI s KA, JAMMED, WE'O JusT

CY ABOUT MAKE IT AT
OUR PRESENT SPEED!
WE COULD TURN BACK
FOR EARTH!





ONLY E
} LANDING STATION
| WITHIN REACH?






RGENC j
Mone 7 Frees, ) By Dore Ogrizek
\ AP'N! —/



Se j : 7 ‘he Te
| am v.. TAN t
—— Aen |

A

ft th SEG” as
La aa

This new Book is on sale at ADVOCATE STATIONERY











__IT PAYS YOU TO DEAL HER

























SS ne SS SS eS
SPECIAL offers to all Cash and Credit Customers for Thursday to Saturday only
Rn ana ne SS gp
SPECIAL OFFERS are now @vailable at our Branches T weedside,
Speighistown and Swan Street
HOW WiLL AN CPENING THIRTEEN HOLS TWENTY | NEEDING THE TIME TLL Me Usually NOW Usually Now
ON THE FLIGHT MINUTES... A*AND THREE YOUR WEDDING ...TO DRESS




SECONDS MORE THAT T'LL
BE KEPT FROM M’ BONNIE

A MITE... MORE...

Pkgs. Mixed Nuts 110 100 Tins Rose's Sweet Biscuits 147 L236
Pkgs. Kellog's Corn Flakes 39 36
Tins My Lady Soup

Bottles O'keefs Beer 26 22 Onion: Pea. Vegetable 29 24

D. V. SCOTT & Go. Ltd. Broad; Street

THE COLONNADE GROCERIES





Tins Corned Beef Loaf 1.07 1.00







ee

THE MORRIS OXFORD
gels car-connoisseurs talking

BRITISH CAR SETS NEW (mm
STANDARD OF VALUE!

Wherever a new Morris-
Oxford makes its appear-
ance it is at once a centre §
of interest, for here from
| Britain is a ‘quality first”
| car with world appeal,
From ample ground clear-
ance to precision engineer-
ing features it is full of
" ralicing pointe ” for che
YO WAS NOT ALONE IN WISHING TO car=proud owner, and it a
TAME ee SRT VON Calan totes ; a still retains the traditional PLENTY OF SPACE As tor p:
& SHEIK'S ANGER ANDI AM KOW,~~ Gost Morris economy inrunning Seated comfortably in eoithoeet
YOUR FRIEND...BUT OTHERS 5 AND 1 and maintenance plenty of room for ike wc
STILL RESENT AND THOUGHT I HAD touring
HATE you / =i IT TOUGH IN o










-L. DO AS I SAY-I'VE HIRED
T FOR YOU-HE'LL SHOW

. IN SOCIETY-=-
é (VE BEEN ON TH!
Oe! | DEBIT SIDE- y
; x7
NN = Raney



T WILL NOW
START IN BY
DRESSING



























“It feels as if there's always some
thing in my eyes,” cries John. Mother
worries; “Oh! fs his sight alright?”

4) HORSE-POWER
ENGINE

“His sight is fine!” says Doctor The
trouble is inflammation caused b’
glare and dust. I advise Optrex.”




Here's lively
highly respon
sive power
with a reserve
for fast, safe
jreles
driving on
any highway
of the world
coupled with |
al that '
mechanical!
reliability s«
typically

So, every day John bathes his eyes
with Optrex, washing away all dirt
and germs, soothing tiny eye vein

Well!” says Mother some days lat
“I'm glad we learned about Opt
you're a real ‘bright-eyes’ now John!

PROTECT YOUR EYES wezh

| i
% A '
Sr > ' J |
~ tHe | }
a sei hw — fr
HANDY GEAR CHANGE The goa | by one of lever is ¢ pavenisnts don | z* ‘
nces in modern car de- the steering column et 5 - Papin.
ypment accounts for the should be for quick change EYE LOTION [OPTREX) | 4 ;
Morris provides and comfort, ' ’w
SUR echt = _-— | ne 1 {
. ‘ 4 ¥ | Y Ke oy j ,
FORT ROYau GARAGE vi aN THIS TES?

|
PHONE 2385 —SOLE DISTRIBUTORS | "i












118 IMPORTANT TO ME To
FIND THE RIGHT GUIDE
TO TAKE ME INTO
THE JUNGLE.

THAT LOUT
NEEDED A
LESSON.

ER+SiR«| DON'T KNO
HOW TO THANK You








PHONE 4504 :







PAGE EIGHT





BARBA



ADVOCATE

SATURDAY, JANUARY 26, 1952





Barbados Hit 141 For 2 In Second Innings |

J’ca Bowled Out For 115 ~

BARBADOS skittled out Jamaica for a meagre 115 in another as the result of an over-
reply to their first innings total of 204 and then went on to, or Miller bowled another

seore 141 for the loss of two

. . maiden over, his third in success-
wickets by close of play i.








ion. Hunte sent ten on tt board

The Barbados bowlers took the initiative on resumption with a glance to fine leg for
yesterday morning and remained on top throughout the Gw¥ple off Goodridge and then

innings. singled with a ho

Pace bowler Frank King was Eun was taken at the end of 24 UP Smith who. cut one dar
the most successful. taking 5 for the nex Kf over with the ore at eeu ly high past Miller at gully

35 in 18.2 overs, five of which 79, Bonitto not out and McLeod fF another single. sda
were maidens, while Norman who went in whe inns was out, Mudie replac ed Milles at the
Marshall who had bowled steadily 1 not out. pavilipn end and Smith singled to
throughout captured 3 for 37 in After Lunch mid on. Hunte later sent his score

23 overs, 15 of which were maid-
ens,

Of the Jamaica batsmen Neville
3onitto top-scored with a useful
27 while George Mudie at number
seven carried nis bat for 20U.

Conrad Hunte and Camie Smith
who opened the Barbados sec

- innings, gave their team a good
start by putting on 90 for the urst
wicket when Smith went caught
behind the wicket off the bowling
of Horace Tulloch, Hunte went
on to score an undefeated 76.

Prescod 11 and Abrahams 0
not out resumed the Jamaica
innings of 22 for 1 wicket, and *





King who still had to bawl three Ysa) board then read 77—-5—27.
balls to complete his over _trom @.
the previous evening conceded a.
four to Abrahams who snickedt,”

the last ball for four runs.

Exit Abrahams
Marshall sent down a maiden
to Prescod, and in King’s next



over, Abrahams skied a bounce) ‘4

to second slip where Grant field
ing for Taylor took a catch. The
first wicket of the day had fallen
after 2.3 overs, and Jamaica were
2 down for 26,

Prescod accepted a second
maiten from Marshall who was
bowling from the screen end, and
in King’s next over Binns took a
four and a couple. Again Nor-
man Marshall tossed up a maiden
to Prescod, his third of the day
and his fourth in his spell of five
overs,

With only 12 runs added to the
overnight score, Jamaica lost
their third wicket when Marshall
got one to touch the edge of
Prescod's bat and the ball lodged
in the wicket-keeper’s pads.
Within a second of Umpire Wal-
cott’s hand going in the air, the
ball rolled from DePeiza’s pads,
but nonetheless, Prescod was out.
He had not added to his over-
night score and the score was 34
for 3.

Joining Binns, Neville Bonitto
opened his account with a single

the last ball of Marshall's
over, and this bowler sent down
another maiden to Binns after
Bonitto had accepted one from
King.

Barker, whose analysis was 4
overs at a cost of 7 runs at the
end of the first day, was brought
on for his second spell, relieving
King at the pavilion end, and he
bowled a maiden to Bonitto,

Binns forced Marshall away to
the onside fence for four and
next ball singled to mid _ on,
Bonitto taking another single to
the right of extra cover.

For three overs the score re~
mained at 44, and here Horace
King came on for Barker at, the
. pavilion end but still the score
remained unchanged as he tossed
up a maiden to Binns.

Bowlers on Top

The bowlers were undoubtedly
on top, and the batsmen were
playing themselves in, taking no
chances whatever in view of
their team’s position. Marshall
and King again bowled maidens
and at the end of the thirtieth
over, fifteen maidens had been
bowled.

After the long sojourn at 44,
Bonitto singled Norman Mar-
shall to midoff, and Binns played
out the remainder. The first hour
of play had yieldea only 23 runs.
Marshall sending down nine
maidens in 13 overs at a cost of
12 runs,

The score moved on to 48 after
another 3 overs, and Williams
bowled in place of Marshall at
the sereen end, conceding a sin-
gle to Neville Bonitto. The fifty-
run mark arrived with a_ single
past the bowler by Bonitto off
King in 150 minutes, and the
batsmen took three singles off the
remainder of the over.

A cut to the fence past point
by Bonitto off Williams and an-
other late cut for four livened up
proceedings after a very dull
period, and the score moved on
to 62, each batsman 17 runs.

Frank King replaced Horace
King at the pavilion end, ane
bowled a maiden to Binns. In
the next over from this bowler,
Bonitto hooked a bouncer off his
body for two down to backward
square leg, and cocked another
just short of Marshall at square
leg to run a single.

Last ball of King’s over hit
Binns on his pads and went onto
the wicket for this bowler to
claim his third wicket for 25
runs in 12 overs. It was anothei
serious blow to Jamaica, three
wickets falling for 46 runs in the
pre-lunch period, and the score
68 for 4. Binns had scored 19 iv
70 minutes,













@pme TO MEET THE squaw-in-Law, | |TE2t EON THE DAY OF MOMS DEPARTURE ‘
HELL DOODLE , DAWDLE,
HEM AND HAW==+s5



/ VERMIN! AREN'T You EVEN,

/ DRESSED YET? MOTHERS

\ 6 DUE AT 9:30 AND ITS 9.
y Now! YOU KNOW GOOD AND
WELL IT TAKES OVER HALF

at HOUR TO ORIVE es THE

hh

They'll Do It Every T

. to double figures with a cx
_King took charge from the pa- drive eS the eae ‘ae hi
vilion end after lunch. He bowled bowler's expense ; Pe

ta McLeod who got the only rufl Goodridge continued from ti

of the over with a neat glide to .oreen end ang his over yielded
deep fine leg. Norman Marshall , single, a crisp square cut by
bewled from the screen end and smith, Smith got a couple wide
sent down a maiden to McLeod. 6 square leg off Mudie and then

Bonitto singled with a crisp cut i
’ . entered double figures with a
to point off King and a leg bye drive to extra cover for another
sent the total to 73. couple
Marshall bowled another Pe

Miller came on for Goodride
at the screen end and Hunt
straight drove him for a commen e
and then got two more to mid
wicket, The total was now 26
with Hunte 16 and Smith 10.

“4 <4 +
GBonitto had batted 77 minutes for 40 in 45 Minutes
uis innings which incluaed three _ Smith took a long single i
oundaries: point off Goodridge who was now
King had now sent down 15 bowling from the pavilion end

‘overs of which five were maidens #4 later Hunte glanced him for
zand had taken’ four wickets for #,8ingle, Hunte drove the first of
29 runs. Miller’s next over beautifully to

George Mudie joined McLeod the extra cover boundary and
yhose score was 1. Marshall con- then played out the remainder
wnued from the screen end and Goodridge’s next over resulted in
vient down another maiden to ®@ single. Smith cover drove one

maiden to McLeod. Bonitto hook-
ed a short one from King to the
square leg boundary and then on
drove a low full one to Barker at
ymid on who held the catch. The

4 acLeod. Mudie opened his ac- ‘0M Miller and got a boundary

count with a single off King with When Thornbourn misfielded and
a hook to deep fine leg. He then then singled with a similar shot
got ~ couple to extra cover off the Each batsman then singled to mid
fourth from Marshall and turned ff to bring the total to 40 after
the next to fine leg for a similar 45 minutes’ play. The tea inter-
amount val was then taken with Hunte
Horace King replaced Frank 22 2nd Smith 18
King at the pavilion end with the After Tea
total at 82. He bowled to McLeod Goodridgé bowled the first over
who cut one to Proverbs at point after tea to Smith who cut the
and owing to some misunder- last ball of the over for a couple.
standing between the. batsmen, Hunte turned Miller who contin-
McLeod was run out when Pro- Ued the attack for a single to for-
verbs returned to the wicket W@td square leg and Smith took
keeper with the batsman yards @nother to the same_ position,
down the field. The score board *kipper Bonitto having to run
read 82—6—1. around from mid on to field the
Off The Mark Par:

By good running between wick-
Miller the incoming batsman ets, the bastmen put 50 up on the

was quickly off the mark with a tins with a single by Smith off

single to long on off the fifth. Mi in 55 .
was later beaten and bowled by ieee tee ok ae, Powe nets

Marshall and Jamaica had lost Smith in attem
§ at pting to turn a
their seventh wicket for 83. short one from Goodridge, cocked
Skipper Arthur Bonitto joined the ball uppishly to short square
Mudie and played out the re- leg and ran a single, Hunte cut-
mainder of Marshall's over. ting the next down to deep point
Horace King bowled a maiden to for another.
Mudie, and Marshall sent down The score reached 64 with
one to Bonitto. King bowled an- sharply run singles and twos, and
other maiden and so did Mar- Tulloch came on for Miller at the
shall. Mudie singled to mid screen end, Hunte late cut the
wicket off King to send up third delivery for four, punching
ve who stented 8 big hit ee through the covers for an-
off the next only to sky the ball other boundary two balls later.
to give Marshall at square leg an Goodridge was kept on at the
easy catch, The score board then pavilion end bowling his thir-
read 84—8—0. teenth over and Smith pushed him
Horace Tulloch the incoming away on the on side for a single,
batsman had a brief stay. After Hunte gliding fine for another
turning the first he received from boundary. A beautiful late cut
Marshall to square leg for a Past a slip for 4 saw Hunte
couple, he was bowled with the race to
third and Jamaica had lost an- . Smith swept one of Tulloch’s leg
other oicker with the score at 86, breaks to the fence for four, just
Goodridge the last man in played peetlna Mets ana, — Rng bi 2
out the remainder. ater he cut at one outside 1e 0
Mudie pulled King to the fine stump, and snicked behind to give
leg boundary to enter double keeper Binns an easy catch.
figures and then took a single to Si
mid wicket. Goodridge then Proverbs Goes In
broke his duck with a sharp sin- The opening partnership had
gle to extra cover. In Marshall’s pul cr 90 runs in 83 m.autes, and
next over Goodridge got a boun- Smith’s score of 40 included 2
dary high over the head of Smith fours. Proverbs joined Hunte, and
at cover to send a hundred on the the first ball he received from
board after 195 minutes’ play. Tulloch rapped him on the pads
Frank King was now brought 8S he played back to turn a leg
back from the pavilion end and brgek Se ingled has bist ;
his over yielded three singles . oodridge to senc
Mudie ase = from wees Proverbs rs to take strike, but
to fine leg for three and later he played back toa short one
Goodridge hit Marshall to wey Sot Ceedridee w hich he did not
long off boundary and then got 8 behind and oe the ball on
another boundary with a big hit t@ his wicket without scoring.
to long on, Barbados had lost their second
Mudie pushed one from King weet for vr additional run. t
to midwicket and the batsmen _°*!pper Farmer came in to
ran an easy single. King bowled partner Hunte, and after playing
Goodridge with his second deliv- Goodridge uppishly to square leg
ery to bring the innings to a close he singled Tulloch to open his

: : scoring.
= oe — * is a a“ A sweep for 4 to leg by Hunte
scored 15 Fncluding Ger boun- 84ve this batsman his 50 in 93

:_ minutes; he had hit 6 fours. Hunte
bat for 20 with one boundary to tured the last ball of Goodridge's

next over for 2 to send up an
his credit. even 100 in 97 ae:

» = Bas He was batting freely and took
B'dos Starts 2nd Innings consecutive twos off Tulloch with
Barbados opened their second ciy7jing cover drives, Farmer

innings with Conrad Hunte and pushed Miller to Abrahams at
Camie Smith, Stan Goodridge cover and as the Batsmen ran a
was entrusted with the attack quick single, the fielder took a
from the screen end. He bowled shy at the wicket at the bowler’s
to Hunte who took three to the eng, missed and the ball went to
left of square leg off the first the boundary to give Farmer &
while Smith got a couple with a During a spell of 7 overs Tul-
crisp square cut off the next, The Jock had conceded 34 runs, and
batsman then played out the re- the batsmen choosing the open
mainder, spots in the field, and running
Roy Miller bowled from the pa- quickly between the wickets car-
vilion end and sent down a ried the total to 130,
maiden to Hunte. Smith singled With 5 minutes to go, Skipper
with a push to extra cover off the Bonitto brought Goodridge back
first from Goodridge and Hunte into the attack in place of Tulloch,
played out the remainder. Miller and Hunte twice forced him away
bowled another maiden this time to the boundary on the mid-
to Smith. Hunte singled to square wicket fence to take his score to
leg off Goodridge and then got 76 and the total to 139.

Time s=simeee By Jimmy Hatlo |

HE'S UP AT DAWN
TO MAKE THE START SURE +=-~

AH» KEEP

i MACKINAW
Colt

WHATS THE

RUSH THEM PLANES

ARE NEVER ON
TIME ANYHOO!





BINNS bowled off his pads by Prank King for 19 runs when Jamaica continued the first innings of their
second Test against Barbados at Kensington yesterday.
Here George Mudie also came
into the attack and wicket-keepet

Binns eonceded two extras.

Stumps were drawn with Bar-
bados 141 for two wickets and an
lead of 230 runs. Hunte

overall
not out
The s



76, Farmer not out 18



BADOS Ist Innings



A M or run out
C Hunte ce Wkr. (Binns) b Mille
Cc. W. Smith b Goodridge 6)

w A. Farmer c A. Bonitto b
Goodridge

G. Proverbs c wkr (Binns) b Miller

C. B. Williams not out

N. EB, Marshall b Mudie

F. King ¢ Prescod b Goodridge ..

DePeiza c Mudie b Tulloch

{, King c&b Tulloch ........+5++

{, Barker c Prescod b Mudie

Extras: b 1, n.b, 3

Total 24 setes 204

Fall of wickets: 1 for 22, 2 for 85,
for 86, 4 for 91, 5 for 136, 6 for 144,

7 for 159, 8 for 186, 9 for 190.
BOWLING ANALYSIS

QoQ M R
S. Goodridgr ‘ 22 a 45
R, Miller .. sidass aD 1 63
A. R. Bonitto il = â„¢
G. Mudie .. : Bet 49
H Tulloch . . 4 1 9
oe A ist Innings 115
Prescod c wk. (De Peizi yb

Marshall

DPD. Thorbourn c wk. (De Peiza) b
F. King
Abrahams c sub (Grant) b F. King

. Binns b King esedace
Bonitto c Barker b F, King
McLeod run out ‘

. Mudie not out .

. Miller b Marshall bee
Bonitto c Marshall b H. King
Tulloch b Marshall
Goodridge b King .

Extras: lb, 2, b. 3 .

FPRZQOH-Z2>z

yr

Total ees vevveves 115

Fall of wickets:— Mor 22, 2 for 26, 3 for
M4, 4 for 68, 5 for 77, 6 for 82, 7 for 83,

8 for 84, 9 for 86.
BOWLING ANALYSIS
o M

fF. King geese 18.2 5 35
H. Barker . Ars 7 2 8
N. E. Marshall 23 15 37
H. King . ‘ ¥ 5 15
Cc. B. Wiltiams ‘ 15

BARBADOS — “ND INNINGS
Cc. C. Hunte not out
Cc, Smith ec (wkpr.) Binns b Tulloch
G. Proverbs b Goodridge oe
W. Farmer not out
Extras (b 2; Lb, 2; w 1; mb. 2



Total (for 2 wickets) .... 141

Fall of wickets:— 1 for 90, 2 for 91.

BOWLING ANALYSIS

Oo R
S. Goodridge seoacs ky 0 55
R. Miller + 4 4 32
G. Mudie ........... 3 1 9
H. Tullock . sere & — 38



Cricket At Merlyn

The Commonwealth Sports ;
Club of St. Michael will meet
St. James Sports Club in a cricket
match at Merlyn Grounds, St.
James at 1.00 p.m. on Sunday

The teams are as follows:—

Commonwealth; E. W. Drayton
(Capt.), C. C. Clarke, E. W. Bar-
row, E. D. Mottley, Jnr. J. Q.
Tudor, Jnr. J. Lorde, H. Wal-
cott, P. A. Vanterpool, E. Elcock,
C. Cox, St, Claiy Blackman, St. C.
Downes and C. Perking (Twelfth
and S, Packer (twelfth man).

St. James Sports Club: L. Best
. and his discomfort great—especial- J
ly against Miller who was bringing Atkinson’s place.
the ball in viciously. With this type Both Thoms and McDonald
of ball he now bowled Worrell and had improved on their previous
showing and were at least show-
ing careful if somewhat clumsy
there defence, At last McDonald forced
Ramadhin past point for three.

The lunch score was McDonald

(Capt.), H. ffill, D. Reeves,
Cumberbatch, L. Walcott,
Richards, J. Byer, W. Gilkes,

Lewis, A. Marshall, G. Richards

and S. Packer (twelfth man).



TOMORROW'S MATCH

AT GARRISON

A team led by Mr. E.

McLeod will engage the Barbados
Regiment cricket XI in a cricket
match at the Garrison tomorrow.

Play will begin punctually
12.30 p.m.

Mr. McLeod's XI will be
McLeod (Capt.), F. Taylor,

Thomas, C. Depeiza, K. Griffith,
C. Pollard, G. Downes, C. Wood,
R. Norville, R. Craigg and S.
Spencer. Twelfth man will be H.





Police Courts 10 a.m,
Second Jamaica-Barbados Test
Match continues—Srd day
11.30 a.m.

Presentation Polo Match at
Garrison—5 p.m.

Golf at the Rockley Golf and
Country Club

Police Band Drill Hall—9.00
p.m.

Fe ue Je
|| WEATHER REPORT
YESTERDAY
Rainfat! from Codrington: .
in.
Total Rainfall for month to
yesterday: .35 in,
Highest Temperature: 83.5 °F
Lowest Temperature: 69.5 °F
Wind Velocity: 9 miles per
hour
Barometer: (9 a.m.) 29.988
(3 pan.) 29.917
TO-DAY
Sunrise: 6.13 a.m.
Sunset: 5.55 p.m.
Moon: Last Geectali January
20
: 6,30 p.m,
High Tide: 3.20 a.m,, 3.03 p.m.
Low Tide: 8.17 a.m, 9.15 p.m,
WHAT’S ON TODAY



BINNS

W.1.Shattered Australia
And Then Themselves,

(From HAROLD DALE)

60
understandable.
account, but wickets were valuable.
minutes for 17 runs of which Stollmeyer had ten when he
played over a ball keeping low from Johnston and was Ibw. |

Walcott scored a swiped single
' before tea and was out immediate-

remarkable since :t came from one
geod length balls
Lindwall delivered. He was bump-
ing more than half of his bowling
and this was unsettling the bats-
Weekes who
was out three balls later for zero
trying to hook one of the bumpers, the first innings total.
mistiming it and being caught by The Seores :—

It unsettled

At three for eighteen we had the Harvey > Gomez ...

in are unreal.

curious spell,

As witness Christiani,
shared a few with Rae but when W.
Miller relieved Lindwall he play~
is first ball, a

He had Atkinson .

half volley Walcott b Lindwall ....
gently back into Miller’s hand. He Weekes © eae
had scored seven. Four for thirty- GDrsUan! © ee

Hoon

Five for 34.
Gomez Cheered

There was an enormous cheer Lindwal! ne 8 r 2
for Gomez—in fact the only per-
cheering was é
Gomez. His feet were killing him. Australia’s 2nd Innings
But he stuck it out and scored six {hone tia Rama Scere
before Worrell
had scored any at all, However
coom sat upon his brow,

After gallantly, equalling the
existing top score of 11, he pulled
a ball from Miller into his wicket
with the inside edge of his bat. Six © McDonald watching the ball
on the bat, but once losing sighs

Worrell had lasted a long time Of it and having it spring from
but his scoring shots had been few his bat to square leg.
Just before lunch, Gomez took

son present

predecessor

the board said Worrell six, total
seven wickets for 56.

i obviously felt
was little hope for him. He essayed
a few strokes at balls often short

| but was bowled all over by Miller not out 15, Thoms not out

for six. Eight for 59. extras 1, total—no wickets for 42.

44.4

SREP OE COED

%
R



HOWLED

SYDNEY, Jan. 25,

Stollmeyer and Rae opened the West Indies Innings’
with exceeding care—care that was almost painful but well
Runs were of no account, time was of no!
So they stayed 36|

Australia’s ist innings
MeDonaid ¢ Worrell b Gomez
Thoms b. Gomez
Hassett c wk (Guillen

Miller c Rae b Worre!

feeling that has become familiar— Hole ¢ Gomez b Worrell . Gy
the Tests that the West Indies play Benud ¢ Stolimeyer b Gomez ......
They do something Lindwall ¢ Worrell b Gomez ..... .





Ring c Atkinson b Gomez .....

it some Langley ec. Weekes b Worrell ....
a kind of Midsum- Johnson not out eikee

mer madness where sanity is out- Sxtrae
lawed and chaos is the rule. By DOS rhieennkas
of it they had
Australia and were now shattering



shattered

BOWLING ANALYSIS
o M R
Gomez ’ 18 3 6S
Worrell



Rae C. Langley b Johnson .,
Stolimeyer Lb.w. Johnston



Gomez b Miller
Worrell b Miller .

was bewitched and Atkinson b Miler Reka di
after 80 minutes his patience rose
outside the off Guillen not out
stump to be caught Langley bowl- Extras

ed Johnston 11.

Ramadhin b Johnson +e
Valentine c Langley b Miller .

Total
BOWLING ANALYSIS
‘ oO M R
Johnston 14 3 25
Miller alnaesié 7@ 2% 26

McDonald b Ramadhin ...



5th. Test

@ From Page 1

LLLP PPLE LLAMA LLLP ALL LPVPPL DIE

BARBADOS TURF CLUB
SEASON 1952

STANDING AT BULKELEY PLANTATION,
ST. GEORGE

PRIDE OF INDIA

(Bay or Brown Horse, 1945, by Clombo out of The Bud)

STANDING AT ALLEYNEDALE PLANTATION,

ST. PETER

STAR WITNESS

(Bay Horse, 1945, by Fair Trial out of Speckle)
Fee for Each Stallion .. ait $48.00
Groom's Fee $1. 00 cash ‘per Service

The above Stallions will be limited to 40 mares each
Barren Mares Half Fee return for One (1) year only

For Appointments apply respectively to :—
D. A. V. WEEKES, Esqr., Jordans, Plantation,

St. George.

D. WARD, Esq., Alleynedale Plantation,

St. Peter.
A. LEWIS
Secretary,

PLES PSCC CCSPOO A.



Rangers’ S.C. Holds:
General Meeting |



r; Vice Capt., N. A, Worrell.



——-



Johnston then bowled Ramadhin
who had not scored. Nine for 60.
ly after tea going forward to make Guillen and Valentine
a yorker out of a good length ball
from Lindwall.
Lindwall one. Two for eighteen.

played out time, Guillen not out
Walcott bowled four, Valentine not out two, ex-
tras six total nine wickets for 64.
This dismissal was all the moie Nobody could have imagined
that the West Indies would be in
such a position ater hustling Aus-
tralia out for 116. On a pitch no
more than of moderate pace they
had succumbed as if hypnotised.
They still of course can win easily.

Anybody can when a hundred is



SSOP OPO OOP OL OL LEE AP PPL PIPES





: : i ois 3
ee



56606

ca

i

SCPC

SoS

-

CLL CLP LPP PESOS



POLICE HAND



















ST. CECILIA BARRACKS
The thirteenth Annual Gener ) a ae
ting of Ran ’ Sports Club 4 age ha
heid at t Everton Club, \
Reed Street t, last Sunday n
Sousa un ae 8 A cua
ted for the year 1952—53 )
, Af "KE
Management Committee: | £
O. ICT a Vice
L hus ESDAY, 29th JANUARY
1, C. B, Seott; Trustees 1 Dance Orchestra
S. Grant, D. Norville and Me 3
Jones, Clarke, and N ION 3
Worrell. members of in i ; =
Committee cket Capt. “ . Refre on Sate
team, S. Grant ice Capt G9 oak esi
Clarke. Crieket Capi. “B’ m
® Norville:Vice Capt., R udolph
Pinder.!Football Capt., Rawl Pin-



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en



Full Text




ESTABLISHED 1895





Jamaica Collapse In Face Of

Aceurate Barbados





Bowling



BARBADOS SET FOR
SECOND WIN

(BY O. S. COPPIN)
JAMAICA collapsed in their first innings for

the face of

115 in
steady and aceurate bowling in reply to Barba-
dos’ first innings total of 204 when play on the seeond day
of the Second Barbados-Jamaica Test ended at Kensington











from All Guariers:

Her Feet Are
Her Hands

SYDNEY :

ichoolgir!



A thirteen year old
Bundaberg, Queens-
land, passed her secondary school
chola

of



yesterday. a Se gg OL EP eee
nen Jamaica had dismissed when ‘it seemed fairly remote She y - peeed yor po Hs"
Barbados for 204 runs in their with 9 wickets down for 86 runs. | has Giuenva tees dees ee
irst indings it was generally Spirited Hitting ther children use their hands.
me no bs ge could ot . Some spirited hitting by Good-]Her writing ang drawing, report-
: Derails scat but it nies ridge last man in helped to solve ed the examiners who were un-
brani ‘eabeotidiie’ cat -BelwikGe ce the problem and the century was one of her disability were ub-
this, they had placed. themselves | Doisted in 195 minutes, an average usually neat and _ well-formed,
in ¢ 0d pdsition for estabhishing scoring | of one run almost every iy ae awarded 75 per cent of
some sort of advantage for the|two minutes but it must be re-|the marks. :
first time in the tourmament, membered that whilst the first], Los Angeles; A teen-aged girl
| nifty took 150 minutes to complete }85 set up what is believed to be
Collapse the second fifty had taken but 45]the world record for an unin-
But after having scored 22 for} minutes. terrupted telephene call. She
the loss of a single wicket on! A determined assault by pace] °° t a public all box for
Thursday, nine wickets yesterday! bowler King resulted in Good-]S¢ven and a half hours straight
could only add 93 runs and they|ridge’s downfall, bowled off his | ™unc hing a sandwich lunch in
were all out for 115. pad for 15 while Mudie who had|the middle of things, while she
_Norman Marshall and Frank} played a careful innings even to| talked to her boy friend. Cost
King who took eight wickets

between them, turned in individ-
ual bowling performances that
must take pride of place among
the good deeds they have already
done and might do in future in
Intercolonial cricket.

Tables Turned

The tables have definitely
turned in favour of Barbados who
with eight wickets in hand have
established a lead of 230 runs,

There is little chance of Ja-
maica’s pinning down Barbados
to a small score today and their
only chance of avoiding defeat
will be to attempt the improbable
of batting for two days and fore~
ing a draw.

However in this game of glori-
ous uncertainties.there is always
the chance of the improbable tak-
ing place. If it does in this case
I too will be pleasantly surprised

with his cap, carrieq out his bat
for 20.
Best Performance

Norman Marshall’s figures of
23/15/37/3 must constitute one of
his best performances in Inter-
colonial cricket. T have never
seen him bowl with more guile
and resourcefulness, He cut the
ball back from the leg even more

off break but whenever he varied
his methog of attack the batsmen
were in trouble.

Good Bowling
Horace King too flighted his
deliveries cleverly and justifiea
the compliment paid him by the
selectors who brought him in even
after Holder’s performance was
satisfactory and Barbados had al-

Satie! would be well worth ready won the First Test by a
‘os SOT handsome margin.
Same Disease Frank King, who took seven

The Jamaica batsmen yesterday

suffered even more acutely from wickets in the First Test looked

every inch a match winner again

the isease which affecte

Bashaan, s rateetier ir eo = and the fact that he dismissed half
ce tigaa ie laa: a . ; the Jamaican team in the first

first innings, conservative and

innings is a worthy follow up of
his impressive performance. His
figures of 18.2/5/35/5 should not
go unrecorded by the West Indian
cricket selectors,

Smith and Hunte, the Barbados
opening pair began their task of
consolidating the Barbados 89 run
advantage and scored at an even
rate always~in front the clock.
Hunte in generous atonement for
past sins batted with a fluency
and a measure of yield that con-
twadicted the mediocrity of his
more recent innings.

He employed the off-drive, the

unenterprising batting.

It seemed if they had
proached the task of scoring 172
runs with nine wicketS in hand
as something of monumental
proportions and scarcely within
the realms of possibility although
there were the same ideal condi-
tions prevailing at Kensington
yesterday as on the previous day
—bright sunshine, a firm wicket
and a cool cloudless day.

The not out batsmen, Prescod
and Abrahams, were as subdued
as the babes in the wood to the

ap-

oe of — aie —eee s fack atl, le chile ta. thawed)
who opened the Barbados attack. around the wicket and Smith from
Caution whose bat runs have flowed this

tournament with clocklike régu-
larity was a willing partner.
Smith left at 40 after snicking
a Tulloch leg break outside the
off stump into Binns’ ready gloves
and soon after Hunte completed

But Abrahams’ caution paid no
dividends, He was caught flat-
footed right behind a King
bouncer. It was only a matter of
self defence then and up went his
bat in front it, the ball hitting the

|

handle and flying to Grant at his individual half century in 93
second slip, fielding substitute for ) minutes, ;

Taylor, and Jamaica had lost Proverbs having played on to
another wicket. 300dridge for a “duck” only let

in skipper Farmer 18 not out with
Hunte 76 not out at close of play
with the Barbados total at
the loss of two wickets.
The Test continues today

The Barbados bowling, with this
handsome and sustained flattery
and encouragement, gradually got
on top and increased the intensity
of its death-grip mercilessly as
the innings progressed, in fact, for
the latter part of the game it has
never looked so much like the
perfect machine working with re-
lentless efficiency.

Bowlers on Top

The bowlers dictated the tempo
of the game and runs came for the
most part like sweated labour.
The first fifty runs came in 150
minuteg and this was chiefly due
to a bright spot in the innings
provided by Binns and Neville
Bonitto that was really the best
partnership of the day, 34 for the
fourth wicket, before Binns was
bowled off his boot and pad by
inswinger from King pitehed
and dipping slightly

141 for







|

.



“Excuse me, but I must
practise my Leap Year
tackle——!”

an

well

|

‘
}
|



Top Score : on London Express Service.
top-scored with 27

Bonitto



but he has been flattering one | ~
t leceive. e « ‘ da G ‘
ocecewe He) Cana ets
each time that| . -
he seems set for | F N
ne seems set for! 6 Wrst Native
which I ‘know
he is capable. G [ I
“sc aed ov.-Wenera
like breaking
the spell which | OTTAWA, Jan. 25.
Marshall and; Rt. Hon. Vincent Massey 64,
King seemed to|scholar, diplomat and industrial-
have woven|ist is to become Canada’s first
around t h e|native Governor General, ending

batsmen when
he got into the
twenties with
an exquisite
N. BONITTO cover detve off
Marshall for four runs and a full
blooded hook off King soon after,

the tradition that goes back far
into this country’s colonial past.

His appointment as successor to
Viscount Alexander and the 18th
Governor General since the con-
federation was announced last
night from Buckingham Palace in



down to the deep square leg
boundary for another four, . London and from the Office of
However he followed a full toss|Prime Minister St. Laurent in



fr fing . Ottawa.
from King too far through and
sasy catc F; asthe ah Both announcements were brief,
put up an easy catch to Barker ;
at midon The London announcement said
: ,that the King is relieving Viscount
iJ a, aration | Alexander 60, so he may be free
irm bowler Horace King|t, assume other responsibilities.
now joined in the plot for the -ppis is presumed to be his expect-
ubjugation of the Jamaican bat-| r

ed appointment as British Defence
s forces and with Marshall who | Ninteter. :

been bowling for almost an | Fj,
with fabulous accuracy suc -|



He holds the rank
eld Marshal in the British Army
Mr St. Laurent's statement
in keeping the Jamaican} added that Viscount Alexander

down to minimum. jappointment is
Norman Marshall who eventual-| January 28 at
t down fifteen maiden overs} and that the

had
yur
eded

scoring a

being terminated
his own
Vice Regal

request

dut











the end of the innings was so| will be taken over by Chief J
dl accurate that at this stage|tice Thibaudeau Rinfret pending
e sent n four consecutive! the assumption of his duties
for good measur the new Governor General. T!
e Mudie defended stoical-|date when Mr. Massey now vi
1 added to the value of his| ir n Britain will take office w
i i remaining there tolr immediately disclosed.
Goodridge raise the century —(C.P))

lg





the extent of sweeping the pitch |Of call: only one nickel, as there's

no time
California.
Sydney: A Sydney department |
store erected an old English well
as part of its Christmas decora-
tions. It had no sign on it, but
the public apparently decided it
was a wishing well. This week,
when the decorations were dis-
mantled, store workers found
£407 in small change at the bot-}

limit on local calls in

this innings than he bowled his!tom of it.

Hobart,
your Star’

“Guide to
column of a woman’s
journal was the _ inspiration
which won Miss Adye Lord of
Hobart, Tasmania the first prize
of £10,000 in lottery. Her
horoscope said: “On Tuesday
January 8 buy a lottery ticket.”
Until then, she had regarded
horoscopes with scepticism.

New York: The Rev. Dr. Rob-
ert McCracken, Minister of New
York's Riverside Church, tells his
congregation that Americans neg-
lect their souls. A person’s face
is “an involuntary but accurate
index of the soul”, says the Doc-
tor, “and too many faces today

‘Tasmania:

ean be characterised as ‘vogue
outside and vague inside’.”
Sydney: Veteran cyclist Ernie
Old, 77. rode down to Bondi
Beach Sydney and dipped his
bicycle wheels in the Pacific. On
October 15th last at Perth he

dipped them in the Indian Ocean,
Old had ridden the whole inter-'
vening 3,000 miles his contri-

bution to Australia’s jubilee. |





Units Of U.K. Fleet

lui Mediterranean
Ordered Out To Sea

MALTA, Jan,

Units of the British Mediter-
ranean Feet were ordered to put
io sea from Malta. A British
Navy Headquarter spokesman
said that it was a precautionary |
measure, but would not confirm
that he meant that it was con-
rected with the Egyptian situa-
tion,

A spokesman of the British
Admiralty said that it was doubt-
ful whether there wag any par-
ticular significance in the Malta
report that* Mediterranean Fleet
units had been ordered to put to
sea. He said that he did not be-
lieve that it was anything ntore
than continuing patrols and
manoeuvres in which the fleet is

constantly engaged. He said that
two cruisers, aircraft carriers and
number of destroyers are now at
Malta and said it was very doubt-
ful if all of them had been ordered
to sea.—U.P.

—UP.

Heatwave Kills
0.000 Sheep Anid
5,000 Cattle

SYDNEY,
thi pall
cinder hung

Jan. 25

moke

A ana

ominously over
sweltering Sydney Friday night
as the nationwide heatwave en-
terect its fourth day.

It is estimated that 80,000 sheep,
5,000 cattic valuable
forests have been destroyed. More

r of

and two

than 50 homes were burned down
in fires which started hen
temperatures rose to over one
hundred degree:

Aborigines at one village

escaped from the flames by leap-
ing into nearby lake as their
homes went up in smoke.—U.P.

Malaya To Get
New Police Chief
















SATURDAY, JANUARY 26, 1952

—_——

HENDRED UP

~

CONRAD HUNTE, Barbados opening batsman sends his team’s total to 100 with a drive off his toes from
Tulloch’s bowling, yesterday the second day of the Jamaica-Barbados Test at Kensington

play Hunte was 76 not out.





W.L. DISMISSED
FOR 78 RUNS









U.K. Troops Seize
Egyptian Police
Barracks Buildin

BRITISH H.Q’RS, Suez Canal Zone, Jan. 2%
Tank-supported British troops surrounded Egyptian
police Headquarters in Ismailia and seized a barraeks build-
ing in a pitched battle with the police who defied aw order
to surrender. At least one British soldier and an undeter-
mined number of Egyptians were reported killed.
Heavy fighting was still continuing up to the last re-











ports. British tanks were firing 20-pounder guns at almost
point blank range.

—— British sou said that sim

. { 1 € unk md ar

Fre h Se d }t er of armouren

nec fi R ice ar â„¢ 000 trooy us

jrounded Poi Headquarters ant

j adjoinir bariueks in Ism@itia #

Jetsy Famks (338 e
jlay down arme ® irrendter

Into Tunisia

300 Suspects Arrested
The siege at Police Headquam

|
|

PUNKS, Jan. 25. | ters climaxed the five day British

It was officially announced that, drive against Egyptian terrorists,

Nationalist insurgents had de-\ guerillas, and saboteurs believed

ed O trains in. strite-torn! operating from Ismailia, which

run. One w derailed jlies close to the British Garrison

Djedeida on the Tunis-Algecia! Headquarters for the Suez Canal

une and the other at Depiene, 25, 70B@-

miles from Tunis. j The British already had trvrest-

There were no. carly reports of ed more than 300 suspects in a

At close of casualues and it could not be house to house search | ot the

learned whether the trains were Are> Quarters of | lsmailia —

Sekine an! Teneo eae inforen,|sei#ed a huge munitions dump in

8) r passenger Reinforce-}ihe Moslem Cemetery ey

U.N. Offer Reds| sis z:crmes ne tunti'utvor:] hee at te Fos ha. sl

| e e er e S garrisons throughout the country Sia a oon ie ocala
| were alerted to prevent a re-| have aided them.

New Plan To newal of violence, which already; The Egyptian Cabinet was sum-
has caused 69 dead and more|moned into extraordinary session
than 200 wounded in nine days.jto consider the “Battle of Is-

Speed Truce French jet fighters, tanks anc} mailia” between auxiliary police

half tracks were used for the firs




and British troops, amid specula-




















: time in the nine-day disorders;tion that the complete breakoff
r ~ 1 ay + PANMUNJOM, Korea yesterday The planes “ ~<’(of Anglo-Egyptic . .
IE H A IN , yes a) planes “buzyed’"|Of Anglo-Egyptian diplomatic
AUSS Ss VE FIRST INN GS “ ‘ a gon a. a Nation otist group besieging th: rene — be a
he United Nations offered thi | French Garrison at Kelibia 76} olitical circles also believed
LEAD or 38 RUNS Communists a new plan to spee¢ } miles from Tunis on the Cape 1 that the question of handing the
- « * up a Korean Armistice which] Peninsula | British Ambassador Sir Ralph,
igave the Reds a choice of thi« Motorized units were sent to}>tevenson his passports might be
(From HAROLD DALE) |ways of settling the deadlock over] relieve the Garrison raised, But there was no- cote
airfield construction and proposed} The planes did not five but tlew rirm iien of either possibility ag
SYDNEY, Jan, 25. junae Staff Officers begin at once}iow to frighten Nationalists esti be ben sag 8 Bigg aces, discussed
FIRST ITEM of the programme this morning was the|'®? work out the details of afmeted to number several thous W. Sean, Tanase —UP
summary conclusion of the West Indian innings, but Guil- ne cr ar uOR pe we ene. ,
Ey, . a 7 e Chinese Major Genern! Official sources said that
len and Valentine refused to allow it to be quite so summary |Heih Sang, promised to study thefeertain number of troops were}
as all that. They persisted for half an hour and by taking | proposal and reply later, possibly Jooming from Algeria. Authori TORY GOVERNMENT
their stand to 18 made it the biggest of the West Indian |@t the next meeting of the Trnee} ties are calling up reservists for | APPROVES
innings. Supervision Sub-Committee ield gendarmerie and police. | LONDON, Jan. 25
—_—_—___- — Guillen cut a grand four square The U.N. Command was be-{ whose leaves all were cancelle Prime Minister Winston
er 9 off Miler and Valentine happily Pca es _ ee ih Parts omer the Tae Churchill's Government gave
Frida Ss , achieved a similar stroke but was ee us e1 a ling a directive }emergency meeting in two days |} full approval to the disarming
Ly rewarded with only three, Va!-}/from Washington to “ease up” or}an oificial spokesman said, “th: | of Egyptian police in Ismailia,
Ye cntihne was eventually caught by Allied demands in the interest of }French Government has taken oll} which erupted into’a bloody
Cricket Was Langléy, bowled Miller for six,|@" erly armistice necessary measures to mainfiin | }¢ battle
: Guillen not out 13, Extras seven, Pete oder by reinforcing troops chars A Foreign Office statement
. fotal 7h ) War Prisoner Issue ed to insure the Regency's(} made it cloax that Lt.-Gen.
D, 7 leful In the War Prisoners \Sub-} security.’ || Six George’ Erskine had the
“ ‘a Slow Batting \. , ;Committee, the Communists be-] > Omcial sources added that the Government's backing for his
rf cBousld ai is openrd} 24% stakiig out a claim fo 3,700] Government had decided to ask! } BIA to, the Auxiliary
(From FRANK MARGAN) to Gomez and Worrell who had|e#ptured Red troops which thelthe U.N. to declare invalid the! Police, blamed for many
as SYDNEY, Jan, 26. |changed ends from the previous Allies say are South Koreans ‘"\ Friday's _doleful opening of|day. For half an hour, we had pressed into the Red Army. Th¢}should consider the dispute. j] Suarding the strategic Canal
the Fifth Test in the Australia] snail-like progress while these! U.N. Command has balked at U.P j UP.
Vs. West Indies series provided] two young men tried to erase) Teturning them to the Commu: pra
cricket that was not worth the] memories of their efforts yester- ists, by é |
name as compared with hel day, The Reds also served notice 0— Sirooet C : ;
general conception of Test] [n half an hour they scored! that they lave no intention of ! Communist | “itreet Cars Jump
match standards. Test cricket in} nine between them and against |turning back to the Allies as war Y mer :
: : ‘ > “W Nes. :
Australia which has been aero bowling inferior to that which|prisoners some 50,000 Soutt Je ts Shot Dou n Gti Prack Lines
ing a long time almost expire they had faced in the first innings. Korean troops, who since their . nw .
completely, following dreary per-| Gomez was obviously feeling the|capture have been incorporated BIGHTH ARMY HAD SOLINGEN, Germany, Jan, 25.

formances at
Ground on

On paper, the fact that 19 wic-
kets fell for 181 runs gives the
impression that it was exciting
cricket. There could be
greater misconception. The fact
is that those 19 batsmen we
out making shots any schoolt
would be ashamed of,

the Sydney Cricket

: effect of his immense three hours
Friday,

bowling in the scorching heat and

en his tired muscles,
©) began to venture scoring strokes
and Thoms drove Gomez _ with
‘ow, Lair decision while McDonald on
Â¥! drove Worrell for two delicate long
; ws 7 _|glides down to fine leg. With!
win cama or 13,000 saw} these ee chi eie ee
fee ; si 4,.+'score along with sudden rapidity
Australia collapse on a_ perfects” 5 ‘ : 7
wicket before the good but not ro athe wae nad’ 38
brilliant swing bowling of Gerry ik this. ate 2 " bAdbeinai sel
Gomez—the outstanding cricketer], “* BS ee tan Was
of the West Indies throughout brought on for Worrell who had
their tour. Gomez captured seven bowled five »vers for 13 runs,
for 55 off 18 overs in Australia’s McDonald chopped Atkinson
debacle. Set just 116 runs to! through the slips for a_ single.
4 ’ The score was 33 when Ramad-

get to equal the Aussie total,} *! ) P
th West Indians by their woe- hin relieved Gomez to bow! for
- the first time in the match, His

ful performance brought tears tojâ„¢
first over was a maiden well

the eyes of even their most avid c
supporters who by now are pitched-up and attacking the
few in number. stumps. He did not seem to be
Worst Performance getting much turn but his direc-
The day ended with the West |tion and length were goed. The
Indies nine down for 64 the|next over was also a_ maiden,
worse performance of the tour-| marked by delivery variations in
ists which will be remembered | length as if he were feeling for
merely because of the tourists’,@ Spot that would most embar-
poo performance, Australian}|rass Thoms.

bowling Friday wa more} :
hostile than on previous occa- Maiden Overs
ions F | Atkinson still bowled the
with Austra-| wicket and allowed only en oc-
the West casional single so that the scor-
due toing wa almost ceased, while
As the game|Ramadhin engaged in his duel
side has one}with the batsman, His third over
innings. The game actually com-|which contained several
mencc again on Saturday |turning shortl
Cricket-lovers are now wishing} e 6
|



on no

on
As was the ¢
lia’s inning
indies’
plain
stand

ast
earlier,

collapse,
bad batting
now, each

wa

mn Page &



n one voice that Saturday plus
the remaining days of this last
match of the West Indies’ tour
produce something like Test
Cricket







7 O. Payne, Solicitor. The plaintiff
u ry had taken out the policy on Feb-
. ° ruary 23.
9 2 z “
viet Resolution Four sudden deaths occurred
} between Thursday and yesterday.
Approved Sixty-three year old William MacArthur Will
PARIS, J >< ‘Drakes of Lightfoot Lane, 7
ARIS, Jal, ov. Michael who was admitted to the * 7 °
The United Nations Main Genaral Hospital at 1.45 p.m, on Seek To Withdraw

Political Committee approved the} thursday, died at 9.30 p.m













to-day cold wind could not enliv-;

|
After half an hour the batsmen

balls |arbitration,
was also a maid-

QUARTERS, Korea, Jan, 25,

United States Sabrejets shot
jlown 10 Communist M.LG, 15 jet
fighters today in four flaming air
battles over northwest Korea,

into Communist armies,

Nine people were killed and 25
jhospitalized when two street cars

—U.P
j (jumped the tracks and crashed
j into a suburban house telescopin«
It was the Suabrejets’ biggest ; the lead car into a trailer. Most
|bag of Red jets since December 1% pf the dead were early mornin

| when they downed a record commuters standing on open plat

ibreaking 18 Communists speedy | forms when the packed car er
\sweptback wing fighters. ed. The cause of the accident has
| —U.P. jnot been determined.—U.P.

\

\

|

Insurance Co.
Must Pay
£5,500 Damages

(From Our Own Correspondent)

GRENADA, Jan, 25
_ Justice R. G. Manning's lengthy |
judgment this morning in the }
Cromwell vs, Bankers ‘Traders
decided in favour of the plaintiff
who claimed £5,500 damages to
his dwelling and household effects
as a result of a fire on the night
of March 6 last year.

In the course of judgment Jus-
tice Manning said he was willing
to infer facts in the case that all
the subversive tendencies due to
the existence of civil commotion
died down in that part of the
island concerned after February
24 and it was found that the plain-
tiff’s house was not connected in
any way with the civil commotion |
and was independent of any
abnormal conditions arising from
the civil commotion,

The plaintiff was therefore e
titled to declaration that his
loss was covered by the policy
with the eosts in the suit to be
taxed under the conditions of ‘he |
policy and any dispute as to
amount duc be referred



|

h-



—







PETER

the
to to

Counsel for the plaintiff
Myr. F. M. Henry, barrister-at-
and senior member of the
bar.

For the
was Mr. H
ter-at-law,



\
w|
local |
defendant’

E. L.
instructed

company |
Hosten, Barris-
by Mr, A







Soviet resolution calling on the I F : ntnnutenth NEW YORK, Jan, 25
, ; Death was attributed, to cerebral ,
cur, x : ac 2 Mac. os ad sain
LONDON, Jan. 25 [Soran an e ted euelee haemorrhage. : Meared i he wil’ wihiraw From
2Ol van. ie 3 pre viously rejec pont r. Fifty-four-year old St. Clair Thu ay ei tae we yn
Col. Arthur Edwin Young, 49.|ship applications — along with a Alleyne of Paynes Bay was ad- any state residential primary in
London Police Commissioner will{new bid from Libya. The vote mitted at &30 am. on the same which his name is entered unles
fly to Malaya on February 15 to|was 21 to 12 with 25 abstentions tay and died at 3.45 p.m withdrawal is prohibited by
take over the reorganization of |The resolution ws not Weclbcalls ee Dost mortem exemination state law. era Oe oa
n va federation Police|call for a “package” deal admit- < 8 ata? “ ce la t statemen ’ }
the Mal Perea (eon ting all fourteen applicants but|°” Alleyne and Drakes’ bodies|General was made in reply to|
Fomct } . Russia made it clear in debate that) Were pet formed by Dr. Simon. questions about the entering of
eee eee ee a he that is what the resolution in-| _Marcea Batson, a _14-month- the name in the Pennsylvania
| aay ” ‘aa Council peter tended and many nations voting| old child of Spruce Street who April primary |
ote Og Young leave tor 12/0). it favour such a deal | was discharged from the hospital! “yonn Da vi Pennevivania |
montt t ke the ppointment A change of one vote from the|on Wednesday after being detain-'eCnsirman of the fighter for |
in Malaya at the re jue of Mel no to the yes column would give! ed there for six days with an ul- MacArthur” aid The Gene ral |
British Government. Young said/ine Russian resolution the two-|cerated hand, died about 12.30)authorized me to say that he has’
ts aganibinn outcrop W. N- | third majority that will be] a.m. yesterday. _ jon at least three occasions in}
-|Gray who recently resigned @5|needed for final General Assem-| Dr. Browne who performed the }eonnectior vith Tlinois, New|
| Police Cc missioner Malaya. ply ywroval, The vote today| post mortem, attributed death to}Hampshire and Wisconsin pub-|
| He I general picturé|marked one of the very few bronchial pneumonia. licly stated he not going to
s}of the there but until}times in recent history that Millicent Skeete of Holetown/jenter his name in any stat
we elf I cannot even {Sor proposal for an important); was found dead at her door about|presidential primar md if it
sue hat ref n-|i has won Political Commit-, 9.30 yesterday. entered 1 he ha power to
\izatio tee approval A post mortem examination;withdraw it he will do so.’ |
i —U?P. was performed by Dr. Kirton. | —UP. ®


PAGE TWO



ON. JAMES A, MacKINNON

Member of the Canadia
Senate who had been in Barb
dos on a short holiday ying :
the Marine Hotel left last night
by the Lady Rodney on his re
turn journey to Canada. He was

accompanied by his daughter Mr:

Harry D. Thorp. During their
holiday in the West Indies they
also spent a few days in Trinida

From St. Vincent
T present holidaying in Bar-
bados are Mr. and Mrs. V. P

Theobalds of St. Vincent. They
arrived earlier in the week and
are staying at Rydal Waters
Worthing. They plan to spend

two weeks here.
Mr. Theobalds is a retired Con-
troller of Customs St. Vincent

Beautician In U.S.

ONTSERRAT born Catherine

Williams, Beautician of New
York who spent two weeks’ holi-
day in Barbados left yesterday
by the Lady Rodney. She will
leave the ship at Montserrat and
spend two weeks in her home-
land before returning to New
York. This will be her third
visit to Montserrat since she first
left over twenty years ago, but
this was her first visit to Barba-
dos, which she thinks is the pret-
tiest of all the islands.

She studied beauty culture at
the Poro College of Beauty Cul-
ture, New York, before starting
her own business.

During her short stay here
Miss Williams was staying with
Miss Millie Gibson of Chapman
Street. Miss Gibson gave a Sur-



CATHERINE WILLIAMS

in her

prise Party honour on
Thursday night.

She visited several places of
interest including the House of
Assembly, the Nightingale Me-
morial Home, the Barbados
Museum, and the Children’s
Goodwill League, St. Michael.

She was very impressed by the
work of the League—the care of
children from infancy. The
founder of such a movement de-
verved great credit. Of the
parishes she thinks St. Andrew's
is the most beautiful.



rPHE Thames Conservanc
Board will have: somethin,
to say about the claim of a

scientist that meteors are slowly.

destroying the moon. If the
moon goes there will be no more
tides, But the word “slowly” is
reassuring to the nervous,

Last time it was announced

that St. Paul's Cathedral was
shifting towards Ludgate-hill
the word slowly was omitted
from the- report and a_ shop-

keeper at the top of the hill sold
his shop in panic and went off
to the country. Some months
later he read that St. Paul’s was
moving at the estimated pace of














Canib





Calling

ST re ge wp

woe he ee

MR. AND MRS. COLIN FELIX CAMPBELL

who were married

Married In Grenada
COLIN FELIX CAMP-

R

M BELL, son of Mr. and Mrs
Felix Campbell of St. John’s and
in overseer at Bath Plantation
was married recently in Grenada
to Miss Janet Helen Yearwood,
younger daughter of Mrs. Flor-
ence Yearwood of Grenada and
the late Mr. Howard Yearwood
The ceremony which took place
at St. Paul’s Anglican Church
was performed by Rev. John
Trenam. The service was fully
“horal.

Mr. and Mrs
pending their honeymoon
Point Salines, before taking
residence in Barbados.

For the Winter
AND MRS. HENRY

R.
M CROWE of Halifax

Campbell are
at

up

Ss
have

arrived in Barbados to spend the
winter and are guests at the
Ocean View Hotel.

Mr. Crowe flew in by T.C.A.
earlier in the week, while Mrs
Crowe arrived a couple of days

later by the Lady Nelson,

Mr. Crowe is a retired official
of Anglo-Newfoundland Develop-
ment Co,, Newfoundland and
Anglo-Canadian Pulp and Paper
Mills, Quebec.



, Nothing to do with me

The cow was towed out of the
tunnel by two firemen in a punt,

—News item.
‘D

EAR me!” exclaimed an
engine driver, as he milked
the bewildered creature into a
butcher's flower-pot

fn passing

] T looks very much as though
any Communist who, ua
future, wishes to have access to
atomic secrets, eilher by taking

® Government job or by hanging











recently,in Grenada

Golfito Due Jan. 30

TTHE 8.8. Golfito is due to
arrive here on January 30th
at 6 o’clock and will leave four
hours later for the U.K. Passen-
gers booked to leave by the Gol-
fito for England are, Mrs. M
Biggar, Miss M. Bolgar, Mr. G
Cocollis, Mr. and Mrs. Paddy
O'Dowd Egan, Miss M. C, Egan,
Cpl. W. K. Greaves, Mr. and Mrs.
F. G. Hurt, Miss E. G. Hurt, Mr.
and Mrs. H. Homer, Mr. and Mrs.
H. J. Judd, Mr. and Mrs, G.W.
Landon and infant, Miss G. Par-
fitt, Miss M. Richards, Miss K.
Richards, Mr. and Mrs. W. H
Smedley, Sgt. C. P. Seale, Mrs
J. W. Walcott, Mrs. M. Wight,
Mr, and Mrs. A. E. M. Woolf

First Meeting

ACK from attending the first

meeting of the Governing
Body of the Eastern Caribbean
Farm Institute is Mr. C. A. Gros-
smith, C.D. and W’s., Administra-
tive Secretary. He returned from
Trinidad on Thursday evening by
B.W.LA.

Mr. Grossmith attended the
meeting in the absence through
illness of Mr. A. de K. Frampton,
Agriculture Adviser C.D. and W.



4BY THE WAY . « « By BEACHCOMBE

ITHOUT any expense or in-

convenience I have secured
from myself the serial rights in a
nerve-shattering tale of espion-
age.

It tells of an attempt by a
foreign agent to procure the
secret of the Gamma-bomb (41
times as powerful as the N-bomb)
from the Bumpton Experimental
Station, Read how Désirée Farra-
gut, toast of the women police,
rams the Town Hall with a sub-
marine when the floods are out,
héw Derek Marabout hides a rare
stamp in the lining of a Cabinet









BARBADOS ADVOCATE



Annual Leave
R. GEORGE

who is on

GILLENDERS,
the staff of the

Royal Bank of Canada in Port of

Spain was an intransit passenger
through Barbados on Thursday
by B.W.LA. on his way to St
Kitts via Anticua.

George is on annual leave
which h@ will spend with his
parents who live in St. Kitts. His
father is on the technical staff of
the St. Kitts Sugar Factory.

Incidental Intelligence

ARRIAGE isn’t such a bad
institution for a man once
he becomes a trusty.
Leo J. Burke.
—L.E.S.



Beauty Sleep
Really Works,
Says Doctor

Peaches-and-Cream
Complexion Lost
By Late Nights

A beauty secret which women
have been seeking for centuries
—the natural substance which
gives young girls their peaches-
and-cream complexions has
been stumbled on by a British
scientist,

Dr. William Bullough, of Shef-
field University, has proved that
skin can replace its worn-out cells
with new ones only when it is
supplied with a substance called
glycogen

He discovered this while work-
inj; with animals, but he is con-
vinced it also applies to human
beings,

While

the body is awake, the
available supplies of glycogen
circulate in the bloodstream to
supply the muscles with energy.
So the skin is starved of it and
cannot rejuvenate itself.

When the
some of the

body goes to sleep
glycogen settles in
the skin, stimulating it to
new young cells The youthful-
ness of the skin, therefore, de-
pends directly on how much sleep
you get.

The beauty of young. girls’
complexions is largely due to the
fact that they go to bed early,
Bullough believes.

After too many late nights, the
skin looks tired because it has
not been given a chance to re-
place its aged cells with young
ones.

This sleep-and-beauty rule
holds throughout life, for human

skin retains its power to form
new cells indefinitely. _
There seems to be little hope

that women will ever be able to
rejuvenate their faces by rubbing

in extra glycogen or taking it
in tablet form. ‘
The only way they can take

advantage of Bullough’s findings
is by making sure they get plenty
of sleep.
Mother wags right after all.
destined to be brought into hide-
ous, nay, internecine conflict?
Round the plastic maypole
OITY-TOITY! Parents have
been told officially, at Rhyl,
that a financial grant to Queens
of the May “would lower the dig-
nity of May Day.” This is an
attempt to stop the abuses of pro-
fessionalism, among which is the
payment of enormous sums by
iowns to acquire, by transfer, the

best queens. But how many
amateurs have the time to de-
vote to queenship? However, if
hese queens were paid, there

vould be an uproar among dust-
bin queens and Miss 1952’s. Even
the exquisite Mimsie Slopcorner
iearly jost her amateur status

one-quarter of an inch every about among the scienusts, wilt Minister's hat, how Karl Schopp- when she accepted payment for
1,236 years. So he came back to have to answer some pretty stiff fenleuter shoots his way out of a/saying that Snibbo cures cramp.
London, smiling fairly confidently. questions. It will no longer be horse-box on Clifton bridge, and i
Yet, is it not caddish to ignore enough to come to work with a how love comes to the Rev. Edgar $$99999999099996990S9559),
posterity? Union Jack in the button-hole, Braff at Messrs. Hillyard and %
and humming “Rule, Britannia!” Hillyard’s annual stocktaking, $ %
nr ee ~ One oflicial went as far as to say, hte »
5 poor The Gamma-bomb (1) $
CROSSWORD JACK TURBOT IS M POSSIBLE! It can't be! |& %
COMING 1 . is! It’s _—_— $
By Jove, though, it is SIX x
1 cor ] ’ a t \ paper ‘Ques Dingi Poost” x x
accoré oO my paper, s- ; a . mye ‘
r ; hus muttered Colonel Egham, | % é ; ¥
tic ning of ane wae ne as he stood in the window of his % Barbados %
positive basis in future, rather 7 ondon club, trying to digest al® aa eae ‘
ativ e = ; , s,
than on a negative basis .. 28 filthy meal. He had caught sight s Cricket Association 3
before. And he went on, “An of ‘a woman of unspeakable? %& ies x
applicant will be asked to sign beauty on the far side of the, ¢ DUE to a shortage of invita- &
a declaration that all his answers street, Though she was dressed x ; ; >
are correct conventionally, he recognised his % tion tickets, Members of the x
The well-known Communist old love. But always, in the]? | Pi ts tie , cee
hatred of telling lies, or even wake of love, like a savake dog ¥ above Association and their x
trying to deceive anyone, should came Duty, Within two seconds} & friends are reminded of the ¢
end the menace pretty quickly. he had finished his brandy anc g $
‘ Stich it, Noodbler! dashed to the telephone, Sit] Dance to be held at the \
: : Serres Ras he _ Hawkesleigh Muffet, his ahief | & : %
“"y HILE making a film,” says was incredulous but — interested.| § Drill Hall TONIGHT %
Across | my paper, “she had to «pon’t lose her,” he said. Eghan x : ¥
+ Penuting your Norse pal? (8) /slap an actor. For eight hours yang off, and rushed from th¢ s 26.1.52-——-1n %
¥. Home intruder, no burglar. (6) She went on slapping him. The club, She had disappeared. He} $e¢see66¢56099999699000"
+t Ben on it for music. (4) last slap v perfect, and the swore loudly under his breath
13 Sing pare falsetto (5) actor was taken to hospital. Were love and duty once mor
+e eine the role of Knowledge. (4) | —-—— _—— nee Se eee ee
i Ussia, nO sir! (3) r
37. This wall is a fish. (3) | R t d th r 0 ra
19 Berth to run away from? (4) | u r an e une gre
20. Needs fourteen | (3) | oa ' T
22. Made frum broken cars. (4) | ps h “a” ‘ 4a
23 Usually but not necessarily sea : 7
girt. (4) P
24. Idiomatic smoke dope. (6) | MORG AN
Down ! mia
1. Write to New York. (5) |
2. It may be in 8 Across. (9)
3. Crete’s unrevealed. (6) !
4. No dole often in the suup. (6)
5. Softy. but polo is in age (9)
6. it's a mammal (5) |
7. What Reg and Dan dia? (6) |
11 Please slip away (6) '
14. Ball. but not a Rugger one (5) |
18 Much may turn on it. (4) \
19 Such gain is not only ‘for |
counsel. (3) i
2 His wife's a tady. (3) ' "
Book early holding the bird. ¢ | When Gaffer Jarge has gone yen wanted >" Rigen pecs. fe
Soiuttor | my oa » the Pine sre, ‘
vss | r des us Strange story of the Pi %
Poeker | Rupert remembers the three Gui bur the Guides only smile mischiev-
17 Be and his arrangement to meet them ously, ‘*Oh, Rupert, surely that's
pins in two hours Hurrying to the 4 dream!" says Bees). * Anyway, i
Order woods he finds them waiting for you've won the competition I can
be him. ‘You've been a long time,’ we that your sack’s full while we've
ue says Pauline, “Did you find ali fad no luck at all with the acorns,
[Rabanne opens at 3 p-m.

Genuine Bargains! Genuine Bargains!

REAL LEATHER HANDBAGS. 3
$7.10 now $2.50. $9.68 now $3.00. $11.49 now $4.00. $14.29 now $5.00.
IMITATION LEATHER AND PL/

$6.91 now $2.80. $6.48

FLOWERED GEORGE’ hier
CHARNOS FULLY FASHIONED NYLON HOSE ..
FLOWERED CREPES
27” PLAIN COTTON

BOYS’ and YOUNG MEN’S WHITE KNITTED SHIRTS
RICK RACK and SILK BRAIDS ...

T. R. EVANS & WHITFIELDS

Dial 4220



British Made



now $2.10. $5.45 now $1.80. $2.



HAIRCORD

YOUR SHOE STORES

STIC. All Colours.
33 now $1.30.

pene we $2.00 now $1.00

. $2.33 now $1.80
$3.24 now $1.60
40 & 50 cents
eiis 4 aah wens $1.00
all at 4 cents Yd.

Dial 4606



form ,

Sandringham Welcomes
A New Face To Breakfast

: (By DRUSILLA BEYFUS)
THE latest guess as husband-elect for Princess Mar-
garet is also the safest guess. For the Earl of Dalkeith, |
Walter Francis John Montagu-Douglas-Scott, could bring}
all he should to a royal line. |
he 28-year-old earl is heir tc duke, preferred his eldest son te
ae" Duke of Buccleuch (say tt do service in the family regiment,
, loo), who owns 500,000 fair the Grenadier Guards.

in Scotland and Kngland. As a compromise Dalkeith join-
ther is known as The Duke ed the R.N.V.R. and went to sea
ia"the Scottish lowlands, where on the lower deck of the destroyer
\Wre are quite a few others about. H.MLS. Viceroy.
‘he Buccleuch housing situation He was commissioned in 1943
isgomething to quicken even the and served in the frigate Wood-
heart of the Princess whom young cock, famous for U-boat killing,
tes joined at Sandringham anq the destroyers Garth and

Phere: eae y Charity.
y ere’s _Drumianrig, a pink HE hates the sophisticated life
.e@ttish castle with peerless trees; (but news pictures in the Express
Moughton at Kettering, celebrated |jprary show that he endures it
{or its silver chandeliers and with grace).

Vi finsborough portraits; Bowhill, HE doesn’t care about clothes
velkirkshire, with a fabulous gal- pe likes to wear a tweed cap, anc
isfy of Rembrandts, old jackets.

This Scottish peer also brings HE is a mild smoker, say 20 a
the best and most usual of all day, and isn’t very interested in
references for a royal match; he

wines.
Winky sisenay of the Royal “HE regards food”, said a friend

las ight, “just as s hing to
He is the nephew of the akin ae —. ere
Duehess of Gloucester, godson of :
Queen Mary, and a close friend
since nursery days of both Princess
Elizabeth and Princess Margaret.



His interests
DALKEITH’S politics are Tory

He brings precisel i at Oxford he belonged to the
cort of ana (Eton —. — Chatham and Canning Clubs, both
fggd) background. usivercity Tory clubs.
¥ “I think he’s interested in

His service politics largely so far as his

FRIENDS say that Dalkeith, a landed interests are concerned,”

naturally courageous person, Said a university friend.

wanted to join the Fleet Air Arm But not only his political in-
during the war. His father, the terests spring from his love of the
land. He is a good shot, a fine
horseman, a breeder of labradors








B B C R di (a favourite dog of the - King),
° e and an all-round lover of the
° a 10 quiet, casual, inconspicuous coun-
Pro a try life.
er mme His pleasures

PATURDAY, JANUARY fe jee BUT — say triends — THE
5 a.m Marehing an Valtzing, ‘ESS >< : :
11.25 p.m. The Barbarians v. The South PRINCESS loves night clubs,
ans, 12 noon The News, 1210 p.m, theatres, parties, all the shine o1
aie erie : society. ..... THE EARL loathes
neds», * _ 31.32 M., 4843 M. Tondon, and visits his’ flat in}



n. The News,



I 4.10 p.m, The Grosvenor-square only when he

‘ily Service, 4.15 p.m. Music from the has to, THE PRINCESS dances

G 1 Hotel, 4.55 p m. The Barbarians pocause she 1 PR. it a THE
v the South Africans, § p.m. India’s VECause She loves 1 :

Repplic Day, 5.30 p.m. Listeners’ Choice, EARL dances when he’s draggea
6 p.m, Music for Dancing, 6.45 pm. on to the floor, and then not very

Sports Round Up, 7 p.m. The News, .. . :
710 p.m. News Analysis, 7.15 p.m. Be- well, THE PRINCESS is in-
hind the News, Current Affairs and different to the routine cares of

News from the West Indies
Cricket Report on 2nd Day's
Fifth Test, 7.30 p.m. Michael
Saxophone Quartet

including
Play in
Krein

maintaining a first-class gallery of
paintings .....THE EARL can be
happy for weeks working on the

7-Ye-19.20 p.m. $i.) MS. 4048 cataloguing of the Buccleuch
7.45 pm. Sports Review, 8.15 p.m. Paintings. THE PRINCESS is

Radio Newsreel, 8.30 p.m. Radio Theatre, bored to bits on her own....THE

10 p.m. The News, 10.10 p.m. From the 7 j soli int&nse
Editorials, 1015 p.m. Music Magazine, EARL enjoys solitude int&nsely.
}

10.30 p.m, Variety Ahoy.



Mrs. Clark Gable
Injured

NASSAU, Jan, 25.

Mrs. Clark Gable was slightly
injured last night while motoring
through Oakes airfield on her way
to a dinner with friends. The
accident occurred when another
car came from the opposite direc-
tion on the wrong side of the
road resulting in a collision.

Mrs. Gable was taken to hos-
pital for first aid and subsequently
returned home suffering from
minor injuries and slight shock.

SATURDAY, JANUARY 26, 1952
TODAY a

Alfred HITCHCOCK'S Thrilling Masterpiece !

“STRANGERS on a TRAIN”



® Farley Rutt Robert 4A
S
GRANGER — ROMAN — WALKER Z
Special Today 9.30 a m. & 13 Dam. ‘ats nit Tonit
SHERIFF OF REDWOOD VALLEY RAND |
Bill ELLIOT as Red Rider & Scion ayant A
SADDLE PALS EYES OF TEXAS
Gene Autry and “Champion Trucolor) Roy Rogers |
“et OISTIN | The Garden
LAZA oT | GANETY
Last Ss

Johr



Special To-day
1.30 p.m

TRIGER TRAIL
Rod Cameron
FRONTIER LAW
Russell Hayden

‘



—(C.P.)
*

” *

ACTRESS DIES

HOLLYWOOD, Jan. 25.
Polly Moran, veteran movie |
Comedienne died of a heart ail-|
ment last night after a long ill-
ness aged 66. She achieved great
fame in movies with the late
Marie Dressler.—U.P.

TEA

TRADE WINDS HOTELS LTD.
ANNOUNCE
THE OPENING OF

}

THE CORAL REEF CLUB ||
ST. JAMES
Ist. February 1952

MARINE



HOTEL

TO-NIGHT

Special
Dinner Dance

\



for
Dinner

and

Dancing

Every Night

(Except Sunday)



SERVED FROM 7 P.M. TO 9.30

MUSIC BY PERCY GREEN’S
ORCHESTRA
UNTIL MIDNIGHT

$4.00 PER PERSON

DANCE ONLY $1.00 |

TABLE RESERVATIONS PHONE 3513






i



LAST

>

nit

Roy

and





10Ws

Carroll & |
EYES OF TEXAS

r







445 & 830pm and Continuing DAILY









ST. JAMES

x
}
To-day 4.45 & 8.30 p.m Last Show Tonite 8.20

| Warner's Technicolor Double!
FLAME AND THE ARROW
| Burt Lancaster &

PARADE OF 1951



s { ucoe ’
Rogers. (ervotiar . YOUNGER BROTHERS
Midnite Tonite | Wayne Morris i
SW'NG THE t
WESTERN WAY Midnite Tonite To-morrow |
Hoosiers ot eres eie ta and Monday |
Shots Tex Ritter MAT: SUN 5 p.m I
PRAIRIE and FORT WORTH ;
ROUNDUP Gun Runner (Color)
Charlies Starrett ' Jimmy Wakely Randolph Scott







POSITIVE MOVIE LEADERS



Presents TODAY »% & 8.30 p.m. & Contin’g

First Pictures of

AUSTRALIA
ws

The WEST INDIES
Chrilling Glimpses of the 2nd Cest

See








(i SIDNEY BLACKMER - R KNOX + Produced BUDOY ADLER + Direct) DAVID MILLER +
TE HERO, Lampell« Writes tes The Seren by MILLARD LOSPELL ond sioner ucrag °% Me Sere
Extra
Short

TO-DAY & TOMORROW 5 &
Paramount Presents

|THE GREAT MISSOURI RAID



9

Jane POWELL:
\ Wendell COREY - Fernando LAMAS

with Marcel Dalio» Una Merkel « Richard Anderson + Jean Murat

SEE—The Famous West Indians WALCOTT & WORRELL negotiating

a barrage of Bumpers from Ray Lindwall.
The “Spin-Twins” VALENTINE & RAMADHIN

PLUS THE FILM
































WE*PRETTy,

ielle DARRIEUX

EMPIRE

TO-DAY TO _ TUES.

445 & 8.30



© The never-before-told story
of the “kept men” of that
Saturday Afternoon Racket!



SATURDAYS
HERO
stariag JOHN DEREK - Donna REED



“POOR ELMER”

ROYAL

8.15



Starring

WENDELL COREY —McDONALD CAREY

EXTRA
SHORT “A TALE OF TWO CAFES”

<

OLYMPIC

TO-DAY To MONDAY 4.30 & 8.15
COLUMBIA ACTION DOUBLE

SAVAGE BATTLE
aati
AND WOMEN
IN THE WILD

ga

PRESTON

‘ FOSTER

re

with KAY BUCKLEY + WILLIAM BISHOP + FRANK Me
0 Gewrge Reicher» Pratced ty WRLC Mac ONAD ead na





ROXY

SHOWS TO-DAY

SUNDAY & MONDAY
4.30 & 8.15

4.30 & 8.15

|Columbia Double

Columbia Double

Joan CRAWFORD

We

ndell COREY
in

Last of The

Harriet Craig iit catia

| *Boedyhold”

Willard PARKER
Lola

AND
AND
with

| Biack Arrow
2 ALPRIGHT !


SATURDAY, JANUARY 26,

1952



Belize Issue Crops Up

* In “London Times”

The correspondence

columns of

LONDON, Jan. 17,
the London Times

have become the latest battleground for British Honduras
and Guatemala in their dispute concerning sovereignty over

the territory of Belize.



DURBAN.

Senator Heaton Nicholls, of the
South African Senate, has. un-
veiled a memorial to Mr. Arthur
Moorewood, founder of the Natal
sugar industry. He declared at
the ceremony:

“We are on our way to produc-
ing the million tons of sugar a
year dreamed about by many in
the pest. Only lack of farms pre-
vents us from attaining that
figure. Whatever increase we
may make will be absorbed by
our growing population. The
Union’s sugar consumption has
risen from about 30 lbs. a head
to 70 lbs. a head annually.”
South Africa’s current sugar
rop is forecast 470,000 tons,
a big drop from the 612,000 tons
produced the 1950—51 season,
but it is hoped that the crop will

f at





regain its former levels by ne
season. Under the Common-
wealth Sugar Agreement, South

Afriea is restricted to an export
quota of 200,000 tons of sugar a
year, of which 150,000 tons will
be at a guaranteed price. Brit-

ain’s imports of sugar from South
Africa during the first eleven
months of 1951 totalled 19,775

tons, as against 291,081 tons from
the British West Indies.

The memorial to Mr. Moore-
wood stands at Compensation, on
the Natal North Coast. It is a
garden on the site of the 40 acres
on which Mr. Moorewood planted
the first cane in South Africa,
imported by nim from Reunion,
There is a :¢plica of the crude
wood roller mill which he built
in 1851 out of blades of wood
sawn from the mast of a wrecked
ship.

i *
WASHINGTON.

Senator Allen Ellender, chair-
man of the U.S. Senate Agricul-
tural Committee, has indignantly
denied complaints from U.S. in-
dustrial sugar users that they are
victims of neglect under the
latest U.S. sugar policy announced

by Mr. Charles Brannan, the
Secretary of Agriculture,
Senator Ellender, who repre-

sents Louisiana, a big U.S. sugar-
producing area, has asked Mr.
Brannan to reply to this com-
plaint. If Mr. Brannan does not
do so, he said, he will reply him-
self,





“The largest industrial users
are just selfish consumer pres-
sure groups,’ he told a B.U.P.
correspondent. “Like Americans
with big Cuban interests, they
would like to see Louisiana go
out of the sugar business. They

want to run things to suit them~-
selves so as to squeeze all they can
out of the Cubans and use the
American public to their own
advantage at the same time,”
The users had alleged that Mr.
Brannan had disregarded con-
sumer interest in his recent at-
tempt to revive sugar prices. He
recently lowered the official “ceil-
ing” on U.S. mainland sugar sales
to 7,700,000 tons, a drop of 400,000
tons below annual expected de-
mand,
“ % *
SUVA, Figi

Sugar cane growing, manufac-

ture and transport forms the
largest single employing industry
in Fiji, according to the Fiji Gov-



ernment’s latest analvsis of the

distribution of workers. It em-
nlewve 2959 workers out of the
Colony's total Ishour force of
17,497 workers, the figures show
—B.U.P.



Co-ops In St. Lucia
Get Big Filip
Our Own Correspondent.)
CASTRIES, Jan. 22.
Co-operatives in St. Lucia have

received a great filip following the
recent visit of two lecturers irom

(From

the United Kingdom. Messrs.
George Webb and Raymond
Howes, at the instance of the

Comptroller for Development and
Welfare.

They examined the Dairy Co-
operatives movement operated by
the St. Theresa Co-operative
Society, Vieux Fort and made
certain recommendations to Gov-
ernment,

It has since been officially an-
nounced that the St. Lucia Gov-
ernment has applied for C.D. and
W. funds to enable the post of
Co-operative Societies Officer to
be continued until March, 1953
(instead of its closing date this
year) and Mr. Harold Simmons,
St. Lucia-born, U.K.-trained Co~-
operative Officer, who had been
engaged in numerous other Gov-
ernment duties will be relieved of

Mr. A. Wolffsohn, writing from
Belize, expressed his disappoint-
ment that the raising of the issue
before the Trusteeship Council of
the United Nations had attracted
so little attention in British news-
papers and added: “Yet the dis-
pute with Guatemala has taken a
form which suggests that it is now
becoming another weapon in the
cold war.”

A reply has now come from Sr,
Jose Luis Mendoza, Chief of the
Treaties Section and Office of Bel-
ize, in the Guatemalan Ministry
of Foreign Affairs, who declared

“I wish to state emphatically
that the de facto situation main-
tained by Great Britain in Belize
is based only on the enormous
power of the British Empire in
front of the material weakness of
my country, whichis small in
territory but big and strong in its
rights.”

Mr. Wolffshon’s
the history of
to sovereignty over British
us and continues: “In t
past few months the campaign
waged by Guafemala has taken on
a new virulefice. Broadcasts on

letter recalls



Guatemala Radio directed to Bel- !

ize have contained vicious attacks
on the British colonial system and
on the Governor, Sir Ronald Gar-
vey, in person Some of these
broadeasts have gone so far as to
advocate armed violence and the
killing of Europeans.
Communist Influence

“Thy are couched in language
which leaves no doubt of the
Communist influence behind them,
for all the well worn Communist
cliches are used, It is significant
that the present Govérnment of
Guatemala is under strong Com-
munist influence and alone among
the Central American States has
allowed itself. to be openly asso-
ciated with the Soviet Union in
Communist international confer-
ences.”

Mr. Wolffsohn stresses that most
people in British Honduras are
loyal to the British Common-
wealth, “with the exeeption of a
handful of agitators whose direct
association with Guatemala has
been known for some time.” He



concludes:

“There is an urgent need in the
colony atthe present time for
some encouragement from the
mother country and other mem-
bers of the Commonmealth. His
Majesty’s Government have

assisted it materially with finan-
cial aid both directly and through
the Colonial Development and
Welfare Organisation grants and
the Colonial Development Corpor-
ation. But there is room for an
expression of understanding from
the people of the United Kingdom
to previde the moral support
which goes so far to lessen the
feeling of isolation which can
easily arise in the one British
possession on the Central Ameri-
can mainland,”

Allegations Denied

Sr, Mendcza, who writes from
Paris, denies the allegations that
there is a Commuaist influence
behind Guatemala’s claims over
British Honduras. He recalls that
these claims date back to pre-
Communist days and adds: “‘Dur-
ing the worst period of Nazi-
Fascism in Europe, some in Lon-
don ascribed the Guatemalan
attitude to Nazi influence.

“There are now two fashionable
words,” he adds, “to describe any
attitude contrary to the interests
of colonial Powers; the word
‘Communist’ and the word ‘agita-
tor.” Aecording to this new term-

inology, all peoples who try to
cast off the yoke and fight for
their freedom and independence

are mere ‘agitators’ and ‘Com-
munists’; the people of Belize be-
cause they no ‘onger wish to be
exploited by Britain; and the
people of Guatemala because they
are claiming their legitimate
rights.”
: —B.U.P.

British riile
still in the
running

WASHINGTON, Sunday.—The
British .280 is stil in the
running as the rifle to be used
by all 12 Atlantic Pact
countries.

It has not been forced into the
background by a U.S. ‘decision
yesterday to place a multi-million
dollar order for its own

Garand rifle.

A senior British officer in
Washington said: “ Standardisa-
tion of arms for Atlantic Pac

forces was never meant to imply





an immediate switch to a new
weapon. } :
“Mr. Churchill's announcement



that the British .280 calibre rifle
could not go into full produotion
before 1954 was a realistic and
reasonable offer.”

| The reason dpr is oe is §
speed-up in the equippi anc
training of General Eisenhower's
forces in Europe and continued

other duties to enable him to per- replacements in Korea.—Express

form full time duties of Co- News Service.

operative Officer. aa London Express Service
OCC LLL LPP OLAX LPL APE LPP

SOC OFSSOF FOS

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x Now @ 19 SWAN ST. ETC. %
2 SLOOP LPF PF OTF 550 56009S090000005009505000000"%



the Guatemalan |

|





Carlsen, the Law, and Mary Attlee

BARBADOS ADVOCATE

The Salvage Money

CAPTAIN KURT CARLSEN has already won a reward

beyond price—the praise of
man.

all who honour a truly brave

But will there be a cash reward too for salvage?

People who know the captain said last night: “That's
the last thing he would think of.”

The laws of salvage are laid
down in the Merchant Shipping
Act, 1894. They cover any service
which actually saves, or helps to
save, ships or lives at sea.

Salvage money is generally
divided among the owners, officers
and crew of the salving ship.

How it is calculated

If the Queen Mary breaks
down just outside harbour and
asks for help, is salvage rendered?

Yes, if there is appreciable
danger. But the amount paid
depends on the danger of the
rescue as well as the value of the
ship.

After a ship has sent out an
S.O.S., a tug or another ship may
arrive and ask the master to sign
a Lloyd’s open form. This means
that the sum paid over will be
decided later by an arbitrator.

But if the form has been signed
under the “No cure, no pay”
system, the salvage company will
get no money if they are unsuc-
cessful in saving the ship.

Ship is not ‘derelict’
When does a’ ship become
derelict?

When nobody is left on board.
That means more money for the
salvage people.

One theory put forward was
that Captain Carlsen is legally not
entitled to a penny more than his
wages despite his refusal to
abandon ship.

But, of course, there is nothing
to stop grateful underwriters from
rewarding him for the money he
has saved them in keeping the
Flying Enterprise from becoming
a total loss,

Carlsen’s one-man fight has no
precedent. The Flying Enter-
prise is said to be worth £500,000
and its cargo at least another

150,000.—L.E.S.



Ligyptian Minister
Keeps Silent

PARIS, Jan. 25

Egyptian Foreign Minister,
Salah El Din Pasha today refused
to confirm or deny reports that
he had asked the Soviet Foreign
Minister, Andrei Vyshinsky to
supply Russian arms, including}
tanks to Egypt.

Pressed by correspondents to
make a definite stgtement on the
report, the Minister evaded their
questions.

In an interview with the Cairo-
Arabic newspaper Al Misri yes-
terday, Vyshinsky was quoted as
promising that the Soviet Union
will try to assist economically
and politically all Middle East
peoples thirsty for liberty and in-
dependence to free themselves of
Western economic domination.”

ITALIAN GOVERNMENT
DEFEATED

ROME, Jan. 25.

Premier Alcide De Gasperi's
Government suffered defeat in
Parliament Friday when the

Chamber of Deputies voted 228
to 210 to increase the pay of low
scale workers. The defeat does
not involve the Government's
resignation.—U.P.

PCLSFESSOEâ„¢,





to £634,953 against £536,746

Jca Public Service
Gets Further Gains

KINGSTON, Jan, 25.

Operating revenues of Jamaica
Public Service Company, Limited,
operating subsidiary of Jamaica
Public Serviee Limited, continue
to show improvement over last
yeay and, notwithstanding higher
operating expenses, net income
is also above that of 1950. Tt the
twelve months ended October 31,
1951 operating revenues amounted
for
the preceding 12 months. Opera-
ting revenue deductions totalled
£428,389 ag compared with £354,-
551 and net income was £125,392
as against £111,437. After an-
nual dividend requirements on
preference shares of Jamaica
Public Service Company Limited,
held by the public, there re-
mained a balance of £77,013 ap-
Plicable to securities of the parent
company, Jamaica Public Service
Limited This balance, conver-
ted to Canadian dollars at the
rate of $2.93 to the £, amounts to
$225,648 and after $15,033 expen-
ses and taxes of the parent com-
pany the remaining $210,615 is
equivalent to $1.56 per common
share of the parent company. The
balance applicable to Jamaica
Public Service Limited common
shares in respect of the 12 months
ended October 31, 1950 was
$193,464. (Sterling conversion to
Canadian dollars at same rate),
or $1.43 per share.

POLICE GET HIGHER
RATE OF SALARY

(From Our Own Correspondent)

; CASTRIES, Jan. 22.

Starting from January 1, 195%,
the St. Lucia Police Force will
get a higher rate of salary, thus
bringing them into the same
salary scale as the Grenada
Police Force. This decision was
enneunced by the Secretary of
State for the Colonies.

Cane

Leap Yeau, mp name's Gracie and bels.a radio engineer...”

Strives For





PAGE THREE





Harbour Log

In Carlisle Bay

‘Last Week-end
Was Lively ian
In Grenada oh, St es

From O ) . c

Caroline,



ST
Grenad
with

GBORGE'S . 2 sx

vs week



activities in co —
he visit of H.MLS

for Government H e ¢ :
all of Vice-Ad
Andrewes coi!
y four prot ‘ ‘
itizen who wer j
iis Excellency and La Comino
dell while the . JeCaUu il
port. ‘ re

The

ARRIVALS







A yester-

American co 3- Prom Montreal—

ed Mr. Thomas D, Cabot, unt Tr s Matthews. Bickford Gill, Mae
recently Director of Nationa eod, Mr. and Mr rbert Emery,
Seeurity for the U.S, Gov I .
in charge of the foreign a pro- ing TCA
gramme, Mrs. Cabot Stephen
Wheatland, a b iin 1

trialist, and Mrs. Paton, \ OW Te T
of the late Gen, n Q

and owner of the $250,( t Be
Which _ the are mm t 1 7 Mt E i Gibbens, Mx
leisurely Caribbean cruise

Ford

vester-



A number of ente
were also held for the « ‘ ir Guiana
men of the Sh«

On Sunday
Marines “Beat
the Market Square
Mareh Past
Excellency
floodlit,
of the

Ww 24nmn

omnp~



The
adding
cerem

ci ira, M



vas

dour

to the

nv From St. Vine
Mi M Thompson,

in representative Lloyd Aaron, Ernest Corbin

’ ‘4 se ; ae er we From Trinidad

citizens attended a ©. Chaniees, DB. tind

on the Sheffield F E

Lamdun Express Seevios \
his evening before departure

Trial Of Education: [ii evening verre
Minister Starts :

KINGSTON, J'CA, Jan. 24.

large
gathering
cocktail

of
party



ed, G. James,

Wright, E
‘ Grossmith,
D. Chadduck,

of



Speight

HEPARTURES—By B WTA,



THURSDAY











On
P » Sse . *
‘ ° The trial of Joseph Malcolm Jy Touch With Barbados ,,. antigua
R l Unit Minister of Education, his wife Cc 1 Stati “ OOS Tk
acta ‘ Ellen and Victor Graham chauf- oasta tation scene iuhes Bere. Soh :
Â¥ -ur starte av a agis- . a
: feur Starte d today in the Magis Cable and Wireless (W.1.) Ltd. adyjse Fes watt Vincent ae ree
Miss Mary Attlee, sister of the trate’s court at Old Harbour 38 wct they can new communicate with the perederick J ‘er
former Prime Minister has been miles from Kingston. : following hips through their Barbad CRO ae i a oe :
instrumental in forming a new Mrs. Malcolm and Graham are *®™*' *!tlon Owen Smith, Sophie Gingold, tone :
érganization which will work for charged on four counts of com- 55 Mafalda, Rosark UV ee eT betag, Merete Diskaeee
close; understanding among peO- spiracy to defraud and conspiracy Thetlepus, Alcon Pileri Rio Jach bene, Walter Ds . Me shop.
ples of different colours and to effect a public mischief. Mal- Color ble, F rt Miah dR a See en dencgsak: tala: OEE
creeds, Its name indicates its calm is charged on three counts Pindra, Sneaton, Dalesinan, W pit 1 Cecil Chambers
purpose—Racial Unity. of conspiring with the other Penheim, Highland Chiett SK For Trinitad— s
accused to effect a public mis- Alioth, Monte Uraquio! A lao. Es Arthur Donegan, William Templeton,
Miss Attlee spent more than 35 chief Br ual, Alcon Runner Alcoa Polaris Ante Jean Tensiatens, Frederick eas
iss , f 1 Th ‘ope Hi onito, Taverntor “er years as a missionary in Africa The trial is expected to last jon, Prospector, Vikland, M Bh Violet Murray, Edwin DaCosta, Fred
Whiten she returned to England ' three days.—(C.P.) aera aoe, meron, view
she found what seemed, to her, |
little awareness among people
here of racial discrimination in}
the world |
Racial Unity, wants to prin |
the racial question before’ the!

general public and not to concen-
trate on naturally interested par-
ties—social workers, sociologists

and so on.
The whole

subject will be dis-

cussed at a meeting in London
on February 4th. It will be
addressed by speakers from all
political parties and by Mis

Attlee and Mr. Krishan Menon
the Indian High Commissioner i

the United Kingdom
r —L.E.S.



U.C.W.L. Exhibition
For St. Lucian Girls

(From Our Own Correspondent
CASTRIES, Jan, 22.
The Government of St. Lucia

an Exhibi-
University

has decided to award
tion for Girls to the
College of the West Indies for the
acad@émic year which begins
October, 1952. Candidates must
be under twenty years of
January 31, 1952.

age

The award will be made to the
candidate who secures the best
results in the University



Scholarship Examination to be
held at St. Joseph’s Convent,
Castries, on February 25, 1 f
The award will be made in either
the Faculty of Arts of Natural
Sciences and will normally b¢«

tenable for three years.

Tuition fees, maintenance,

lowances, incidentals and passages

will be provided.

Carts

5-Ton Capacity

very strongly constructed
1050 — 11.00/20 12 ply
Heavy Duty Rear Tyres

7.5015 Front

Tyres



Jeeps

Genuine Jeeps!

| Four Wheel

See us for

they all go.

doubtful if

|
'



Drive !

these before

It is very

further supplies.

on

j

College



al-

we can _ get |
:
|

!



|

|



HEIR good looks tell you they're just right.
You know, too, when you look at the price
tag, that you can’t get finer value. Illustrated
is a Full Brogue Oxford. ‘Tied to every pair is



the John White Guarantee Shield—the sign

- which means ‘just right’! Look for it in

leading stores in Barbados.

NU-SWIFT

The Fastest Extinguisher
in the world

Types available for all
classes of hazards

"if
f
Syd Ny i

IMPORTANT

NO ANNUAL REFILS
| NECESSARY

Refil only when used

| COURTESY GARAGE

“ROBERT THOM LIMITED
i White Park — Dial 439]
”
uv

SSS Saas) |


PAGE FOUR







BARBADOS

t.---—j--

Printed by the Adverste Co., Ltd., Broad 8t, Bridsetews

Saturday, January 26, 1952
THE CONSTITUTION

Some of Mr. Adams’ statements in the
House of Assembly on Tuesday during the
debate on the reply to the speech made by
His Excellency the Governor at the open-
ing of the Legislature on December 18, 1951
need clarification. What for instance is Mr.
Adams’ authority for stating that “if we
had a Governor who was not sympathetic
to whatever party was in power he would
have to go?” The Governor of Barbados is
appointed by the Crown; represents the
Crown and is responsible to the Crown.
He must obey any instructions that he re-
ceives from the Secretary of State for the
Colonies through the Colonial Office.

Barbados like Bahamas and Bermuda is
a colony that possesses a representative
assembly but it has not got responsible gov-
ernment. Barbados’ constitution is written
in two documents, the letters patent which
constitute the office of Governor and pro-
vide for the Government of the Colony and
the instructions to the Governor of the
Colony,

The Legislature of Barbados consists of
the Governor, the Legislative Council and
House of Assembly. The Executive is vested
in the Governor, Executive Council and
Executive Committee. The Executive Com-
mittee came into being in 1881. Since 1946
four members of the party commanding a
majority in the House of Assembly are ap-
pointed to the Executive Committee at the
beginning of a new session of the House of
Assembly. On December 18, 1951 His Excel-
lency the Governor Sir Alfred Savage,
K.C.M.G., announced to the President and
Honourable Members of the Legislative
Council and to Mr. Speaker and the mem-
bers of the House of Assembly that he had
provisionally appointed the Hon. John
Chandler, M.L.C., President of the Legisla-
tive Council as a member of the Executive
Council, the Hon. H. A. Cuke, C.B.E.,
M.LL.C., to be a member of the Executive
Committee and on the nomination of the
leader of the majority party in the House of
Assembly Mr. G. H. Adams, Dr. H. G. Cum-
mins, Mr. M. E. Cox and Mr. F. L. Walcott
to be members of the Executive Committee.

The five members of the Executive Coun-
cil who are His Excellency the Governor,
the Hon. The Colonial Secretary, the Hon.
the Attorney General, the Hon. John
Chandler, M.L.C., the Hon. Sir John Saint
and the Hon. H. A. Cuke, Mr. G. H. Adams,
Dr H, G. Cummins, Mr. M. E. Cox and Mr.
F. L. Walcott are the ten members of the
Executive Committee.

This Committee introduces all money
votes prepares the estimates and initiates all
Goyernment measures: it is also respons-
ible for the conduct of public works and the
control and management of Government
property. It discharges in fact almost all
the functions of the Executive Council.

Since Barbados is governed as described
above, what interpretation is to be placed
on Mr, Adams’ claim that “we are the only
government in the whole of the Colonial
Empire that have our policy carried out
without modification or qualification by the
Governor or the Colonial Office?” So much
depends on Mr. Adams’ interpretation of
“We” and “Our”,

If he is referring to government as
effected by the Executive Committee then
the remark seems superfluous since govern-
ment through the Executive Committee is
the legitimate machinery for government
approved by the Constitution. If, however,
he is referring to government by the major-
ity party in power then there is urgent need
for clarification, because nowhere in the
written constitution of Barbados is there
any mention of government by a majority
party.

Until Barbados changes its present repre-
sentative institutions for full responsible
Government, any talk of a Governor's
tenure of office being dependent on his sym-
pathy towards a party in power does not
appear to be in accordance with the consti-
tution of this island.

The Governor is appointed by the Crown,
represents the Crown and is responsible to
the Crown. In Barbados the Crown retains
a veto on legislation and the Secretary of
States for the Colonies has the right to ap-
point and control public officers. The three
B’s—Barbados, Bermuda and Bahamas—
have representative institutions but they
none of them enjoy responsible govern-
ment.

SYNTHETIC ALCOHOL

Synthetic production of industrial alco-
hol will shortly replace the fermentation

“process based on blackstrap molasses, be-
lieve experts in the U.S. industrial alcohol
industry. An increasing amount of the in-
dustrial alcohol now available in the United
States is being produced by a synthetic pro-
cess and prices are falling.

In view of the growing demand for black-
strap molasses for livestock feed, great ex-
pansion of synthetic production is now
taking place in the United States. It is not
expected that costs of molasses will ever
again become sufficiently low to enable the
fermentation process to compete with the
synthetic producers. The only large users
of molasses as a basic material would thus
be producers of cattle feed.—B.U.P.









BARBADOS

ADVOCATE



af I Were Sitting

Each wéek during the war
a British Intelligence Officer
wrote for his chiefs an appre-
ciation of the war situation as
it was likely to appear to Hit-
ler’s staff. Today I put myself
in the position of a Russian—
a Soviet Intelligence Officer
writing for Stalin and his
Politburo on the situation cre-
ated by news of a junior atom

By SEFTON DELMER ‘
MEMORANDUM TO THE

DEPUTY CHAIRMAN OF THE

SOVIET COUNCIL OF MIN-

ISTERS:—

“WE here in the Kremlin have
been confident hitherto that fear
of reprisals would deter the
Western Imperialists fram using
the atom boâ„¢b against us unless
we used it against them first.

The mere suggestion in Novem-
ber, 1950 that the Americans con-
templated the possibility of using
the atomic bomb in Korea or
China was almost enofigh to split
the North Atlantic bloc.

Wide popular antipathy to the
bomb on humanitarian grounds
has joined up in the West with
the conviction — carefully foster-
ed by our political agencies—that
Western Europe rather than the
United States would be the victims
of the first reprisal raids from the
Red Air Force,

But the -development
miniature atom bomb
Americans makes it urgently
necessary to revise our political
thinking, not only about the bomb
itself but to review once more the
whole world political situation
affected by this,

1, INTERNAL SECURITY: It
is by no means safe to assume
now that the West can be deterred
from using the miniature bomb.

Instead of using it openly them-
selves they might hand it secretly
to terrorist groups inside our
borders to use against us,

This would revolutionise the
security position overnight, not
only in China and the European
People’s Democracies, but within
the Soviet Union itself.

It would put the imperialist and
capitalist conspirators in the West
in a position to inflict on us
Russians damage vastly exceeding
that caused to them by our Com-
munist partisans in Malaya, Indo-
China, Burma, and elsewhere.

As is known there has been a
great increase during the last six
months in the number of agents
and traitors infiltrating across our
borders both in Europe and in
Asia.

The Americans, ag we have
already officially and openly com-
plained, are spending vast sums in
recruiting, instructing, and equip-
ping those elements. They also
help them to penetrate our
frontiers,

An unsatisfactorily large num-
ber of men and women agents is
still at large within Soviet borders.
Evidence from those captured
Shows that their mission is to
establish contact with dissident
groups am*ng the nationalist
elements, as well ag with the

ot
by the

Seat
criminal organisations in the de-
portation areas of Central Asia
and Siberia.

We have undoubtedly succeeded
by our security measures during
the last two years in suppressing
the activity of reactionary and
nationalis’ opposition elements in

the People’s Democracies of
Europe,

Lying Low
SIMILAR progress has been

made in China. There is reason,
however, to believe that the illegal
organisation in Poland, Czecho-
slovakia, Hungary, and Rumania
still exist. They are only lying
low.

If the Americans dare to use the
atomic bomb in a_ clandestine
internal war against us—similar,
they will say, to our war against
the Western colonial Powers in
Asia — then these underground
forces will emerge once more.

We. must expect to find them
with a strength exceeding that
which they displayed against
Fascist Germany in the last war.

2. THE ANGLO-AMERICAN
ALLIANCE. The British deieat
in Persia displayed during 1951
a most encouraging conflict in
policy between the United States
and Great Britain,

It demonstrated the skill of our
political and diplomatic agencies
in splitting the Western world into
two camps — that of the colonial
Powers (Britain, France, Holland)
and that of the United States.

New Factors

IN the last montns, however,
new factors have arisen simui-
taneously with the advent of the
miniature atom bomb. They look
like creating an Anglo-American
solidarity of unprecedented firm-
ness,

These are:—

THE establishment of Winston
Churchill as Britain’s Premier;

CHURCHILL’S recent visit to
Washington;

THE probability that
Eisenhower will
Truman this year.
The public confidence which

Eisenhower enjoys in the United

States and in Europe—reinforced

by the possession of the new bomb

with all its possibilities—-will en-
able him to pursue a muci
stronger policy,

In this he will find himself in
closest alignment with the Britain
of Churchill.

3. WEST EUROPEAN RE-
ARMAMENT: In the last 12
months the European nations of the
North Atlantic Treaty Organisation
have increased their war budgets
by an average of 75 per cent. This
is 95 per cent. of the effort of the
United States asked for.

They have extended their terms
of military service by an average
of 35 per cent. They have in-
creased munitions production by
70 per cent. And they have
doubled the combat effectivene’s
of their forces,

General
succeed Mr.



NEW YORK,



SATURDAY, JANUARY 26,



In Stalin’s

In the West of Europe under
General Eisenhower, stands a
force of 20 combat-ready divisions
(six American, four British, ten
French), matching roughly the 26
small divisions we have in Easi
Germany and Poland

This force is no match what-
ever for the 200 divisions we
could mobilise immediately for a
blow against the West of Europe

were this to be’
While far effective in
challenging our it superior-

ity, the economic: ge 4 which
this rearmament is

imposing on
Western Europe is helping to

undermine capitals solidarity
and capitalist morale.
It is opening “avenues for

subversive agi which will

help to speed the collapse of the
capitalist system,
‘Precarious’

BRITAIN, and the Sterling Area,
for which acts as banker,
find themselves in a particularly
precarious position,

Our Soviet economists predict
the continued drain on
Sterling Area resources—due to
deficit trading with the dollar
pool and the rest of the non-
Sterling world—will bring aboui
a new devaluation crisis between
spring and summer,

This crisis may even, they say,
lead to the liquidation of the
Sterling Area as an economic
unit.

An event of this kind would
have the strongest repercussion
on the economic, military, and
political position of the whole
of the Western capitalist world.

4. THE INDUSTRIAL _ RE-
ARMAMENT OF THE U.S.S.R.:
The past year has seen the
greatest expansion yet in our
heavy industries. We have got
half-way to the targets set in
1946 by J. V. Stalin—targets
whose achievement, he said,
woufd make our Soviet Union
safe from “accidents.”

The surprise which the per-
formance and quality of our
Soviet fighters have caused to
American and other Western ex-
perts in Korea shows that. we are

keeping pace with design.

vise!
CONCLUSION: But for the
development of the miniature

atom borab we could’ remain
confident that in the arms race
we shoujd always remain strong
enough to deter the Western
enemy. (1) From launching
against us a_ preventive war:
(2) From interfering with our
support of Asiatic and African
rebellion against him.

At the same time the Western
world itself would continue to
be submitted to the moral and
economical exhaustion of un-
productive rearmament — 4
strain to which the disciplined

Seviet world is less vulnerable

than the West.
As it is, we must revise our
policy, At once.”
YES, Sefton Delmer sums up, if I
were in the Kremlin I would
order “Full Speed Astern.”



—L.E.S.
So, at midnight, they went Three years’ drought has
aboard their luxurious yacht, ravaged farms, Production of

EVA PERON—wife of the Dic-
tator of the Argentine and prob-
ably the most erful force in
that country—is a very sick
woman,

_ It is strongly reported that she
i. dying of cancer. She is only

The millions of humble le
who worship her in the Argen-
tine do not know how gravely ill
she is.

All they have been told is that
she has had a slight relapse while
convalescing after her operation
~--last November. They do not
ji any details about the oper-
ation.

Prayers For Her

Three times last month, Dr
George Thomas Pack, the Ameri-
can cancer specialist who was
present at the operation, was
flown secretly from New York
to examine her.

I have just come back from
Buenos Aires, Prayers are being
said daily throughout the coun-
try for Eva's restoration to
health.

But persistent rumours — circu-
late in neighbouring Brazil that
she is going to Switzerland for a
protracted convalescence, or per-
haps for the rest of her life.

If she goes there, Peron,
who is devoted to her, ‘may
be tempted to go with her. If
he does, it may mean the end
of his rule. Few people think
he could ever get back after
an absence of any length of
time, even if her desired to do
so.

In the magnificent Palm Palace
in Buenos Aires I talked with
Eva's secretary, Jorge Martinez.

He assured me there is no
possibility of her leaving the
country at present. She is not
Btrang enough to undertake a
strenuous journey.

Despite her doctors’ insistence
that she must seek relief from
the oppressive, 100-in-the-shade
heat of the Argentine’s summer
she keeps saying that she wants
to get back to work.

I caught a glimpse of ‘her
before I left. She was sitting in
a wheelchair beneath the shade
of a jacaranda tree in the exten-
sive and beautiful palace grounds,
Her husband's hand rested lightly
near her shoulder as he took her
round the exquisite azalea Leds,

She is a sadly different womaa
these days. She is much thinner,
has dark rings under her once
lovely eyes, and looks ten years
older,

Peron, too, is’ thinner, His
vulet told me that since Eva’s
illness he has lost more than a
stone and a half in weight.

His lined forehead and tight-
lipped smile show all too clearly
the double strain imposed by
Eva's breakdown and the coun-
try’s mounting economic crisis.

Kept Promise

Eva had publicly promised to
accompany her husband when he
opened a gigantic riverside ex-
plosive factory recently. Wor-
ried by her health, Peron per-
suaded her to compromise,

Tacuara, and steamed 21 miles to
the factory.

She kept her promise. She was
present—but on board the yacht
in her wheelchair, for once the

least limelighted of all the
grandees.
Dr. Ricardo Finochietto, the

cancer surgeon in charge of the
hospital where the operation on
Eva took place, told me that he
is trying to persuade her to take
a lengthy holiday abroad.

The Argentine’s aged Vice-
President, Dr, Juan Quijano, told
me:—

“She has only two interests
in life—-her husband and her
country. I do not think she
will ever leave either for an
instant.”

Anti-Peronists — and there are
many in the Argentine — say
that the President is so affected
by his wife's illness that he is

POCKET CARTOON
by OSBERT LANCASTER

* There’s no babdainn him,

Sir ~ says he regards himself
as the Carlsen of culture.”’

delegating his duties and respon-
sibilities more and mere to his
chief associates.
Great Wealth

If Peron should weaken be-
neath his crushing political bur-
dens, and put leve for his dyna-
mic wife before personal ambition
and duty to his country, then his
escape route appears to be well
prepared,

The Perons have undoubted-
ly amassed great wealth, Ac-
cording to one report, they
have already bought a house in
Switzerland and established a
bank account there (as well as
in New York),

Their private fortune is said
to have been swollen by foreign
and home trade deals, includ-
ing the importation of Scotch
whisky and tea for sale much
above the normal prices.

From one recent coup. the
Perons are said to have made
half a million American dollars.

Whether they leave the coun-
try or stay, the Argentine infla-
tion spiral gets steadily higher as
the value of the peso falls.



wheat and beef, the chief exports,
from which urgently needed
foreign exchange can be secured,

has shrunk to such an extent that |
to meet)”

it is now_ insufficient
home needs alone.

Butter ig being smuggled in
from Uruguay. As Britons know
only too well—several shipments
of meat which should have been
sent under the British agreement
have not gone.

Incompetents *

Peron has not improved the
position by putting incompetents
in tions of power.

e army which lifted him
into office can toss him out, de-
spite the failure of the revolt.

The working class of the
Agentine remains the
buttress of the regime. Peron,
with the powerful help of Eva,
bought its support with higher
pay, shorter hours, and lavish
charity paid for out of public
money.

Even so, and notwithstanding
Peron’s recent sweeping election
victory, which gave him six more
years of office, his supporters
have lost much of their enthu-
siasm as crops fail and living
costs soar,

If the Perons go, what then?
The only alternative to army
rule, as those who know the
American continent see it, is
the emergence of one of Peron’:
aides, who would offer the coun-
try a modified form of Peronism.

That would mean _ watering
down the excessive nationalism
that led Peron into absurd
attempts at achieving seif-
sufficiency for the Argentine.

Foreign trade might then be
conducted on lines more agree-
able to Britain, and the Argen-
tinos, with whom we must
negotiate a new meat agreement
before March, and who are cry-
ing out for British goods, might
not be so stiff-necked as they
have been under Peron.

Destiny

But meanwhile the first lady
of South America is dying, and
the destiny of the country may
be changed very swiftly if her
husband gives up his place and
power out of love for her.

Few men have ever done this
for a woman. But there have
been few women like Eva.

—L.E.S.

Our Readers Say :

To The Editor, The Advocate—
Sir,—I quite agree with the let-
ter from “Film Goer”, that
Gangster Films are quite unsuit-
able, we need a set up campaign
.of moral re-armament in this
Island—Cinemas should not be
opened on Sundays, and sub-
stitute daily shows instead—many!
a visitor or unemployed would be
glad of this. |
Too much crime—check it— de-

tect the cause—get at the root.

PARENT.



NOBODY’S

Monday — There is no modern invention

Nednesday — One of the headaches which

chursday — What a day. My little diary







*riday — My excursion into the uncharted

DIARY

|

which I detest more than the telephone
and none that I find more useful.
When I consider that I can pick up
my telephone and speak to someone in
London for three minutes for three
pounds only — it makes you think,| X
doesn’t it? Actually I can’t afford that|
luxury very often and the only time
I ever did someone else paid. But that’s $
not why I detest telephones. I detest $
them because they make such an awful %
row when they ring. I have never been
convinced by the argument that a note
or two from Madame Butterfly would
not be a more soothing way of attracting
attention than the ferocious BRR-BRR
which is now employed to compel
answers, Try sleeping next to a tele-
phone and you'll realise what I mean.



COCPOOOSTC SS

-

On the credit side I’ve noticed a great
improvement in Barbadian voices dur-
ing the past two or three years. Less
people seem to answer with that jaded
tired voice nowadays. People seemed
pleased to hear that you've called, and
even when I got the wrong number a
pleasant voice asked: “is he a patient or |»,
a visitor?” Courtesy pays every time.

SCGRUCGESS

GO

Tuesday — I was looking through some old !

papers today when I stumbled upon an
advertisement in the Times of Novem-
ber 17. It was, “SUNSHINE islands
only 18 flying hours from London: 15
days’ holiday 215 guineas: 19 days’ holi-
day 255 guineas. Price includes air
travel and accommodation at good
hotels.” The reference was either to
Bermuda or Bahamas, but I thought it
might interest the publicity committee.
It looks as if there are some people with |}
money still living in England.



has not yet hit the headlines is the cost
of education. It’s an interesting subject
for discussion. But there is a point
which nobody would like to make before
the row starts. Aren’t we all rather
illogical about education? We spend
huge sums of money every year on
secondary schools, Barbados Scholar-
ships and grants in aid to a University
College presumably to increase the num-
ber of educated persons. | Yet do we
pay any attention to what educated
people say about the way we run our
affairs? You bet we don’t. We go to
the people and canvass for their support
to get elected. We all want education
but we don’t seem to know why we
want it. Because the moment an edu-
cated person opens his mouth to speak
the squeal starts. It’s the man-in-the-
street who rules the roost, not the edu-
cated. Or don’t you agree?







reminds me that on this day in 1834
Robert Owen first preached Socialism
in England. What a terrible misfortune
for England. And what a terrible mis-

fortune for little England.

Mr. Adams, C.M.G., once assured me}?
that he was a good Liberal until he
came under the Cripps-Manley influ-
ence. What a pity! Mr. Churchill was
also once a good Liberal but now he’s a
real conservative type. Frankly I’ve been
watching Mr. Adams’ socialism for some
time and apart from the tie and public
statements I should say he was a bigger
Tory than Winston. But pay no atten-
tion to Nobody please. I’ve got to do}!
this to support the kids. No quotations,
by request.

botanical seas of Barbados landed me in
well deserved disaster.

If you must stick your neck out, ex-
pect it to be trodden on and I now have
to apologise for adding to the existing
confusion which already exists about
the immortelle, The lovely tree which
first attracted my attention near the
Aquatic Club begins with an S— and
has an unpronounceable name. At the
moment I have forgotten what it is.

SOF OPEL FE

Saturday — There is nothing better, Mr.

Mottley told us this week, than to get
out of Barbados for a bit and broaden
our views. The main thing was to get
out and get broadened, This would be
worthwhile, Mr. Mottley thought, if the
emigrant got no further than Pelican
island. I agree with him; having first
emigrated to Pelican at the age of seven,
and having spent more than one-third
of my days outside Barbados, possibly
as a result. The wanderlust must start
sometime and I wouldn’t put it past
Pelican to have bitten me that afternoon
so long ago.

But what's going to bite the other
Barbadians when the deep water har-
bour is built? If you know your RIT-
CHIE like I know my Ritchie you'll
remember Pelican will disappear when
the Deep Water Harbour is built.
references to Macbeth). |

Bajan: Worse and worse, I don’t
know why I bother to read you every
Saturday.

(No

SOOO COCOA PTAA

4,
Â¥













1952



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SATURDAY, JANUARY 26, 1952

BARBADOS



East Indians “40d Round-Up

Celebrate Belleplaine

Re ublie Da Police Boys’
The P Indian section a. Club Doing Well

community will celebrate India THE MEMBERS of the Police
Republic Day today at “Chantily” Boys’ Club in Belleplaine have
St. Leonard’s Gap, the residence shown much interest and are
of Mr. T. Maraj. The Indian progressing satisfactorily, the
stores in ‘the island—four Thani Oper in charge of the Club told
Brothers, one Maraj, two Surti, s.. advocate yesterday. The boys
one Kirpalini and one India will form a Cricket team soon.

House- ll be closed for the
whole. day. 5 THE BELLEPLAINE Net Ball
Over 100 Indians will attend ang Softball Group is progressing,
this function which will include one of the members of this group
hoisting and saluting the flag, told the Advocate yesterday. The
or by pres ae members are especially interested
singing of National songs. in games. : é’ west
India was proclaimed a Re- _ This Group staged a Variety
public on January 26, 1950. In- Entertainment recently and they
dependence Day is celebrated on met with a moderate amount of
August 15. success though there was rain the
Mr. D. A. Thani received a same evening.
telegram from the Secretary to They will go on vacation soon
the indian Commissioner, Mr. A, and after a “Reunion,”
M. Sahay, whose office is at Port- ‘ Ne
of-Spain, Trinidad, stating that HAGGATT'S FACTORY is ex-
Mr. Sahay will broadcast over pected to start cane grinding next
Radio Trinidad today at 7.10 a.m, Tuesday, it was learnt yesterday.
and 6.30 p.m, in English on 31.16 Cane cutting will begin on Mon-
and 90 metres respectively. Yes- day. The Engineers at this fac-
terday at 5.30 p.m. Mr, Sahay tory were kept busy during the
gave a broadcast over Radio past few weeks preparing for the
Trinidad in Hindustani on 90 crop season, ’
metres. sii ss y
Mr. Thani told the Advocate _ AT BRUCE VALE, the other
“It is really regrettable that no St. Andrew's factory, the Engin-
friends and well wishers could be eers are still working and the
invited to the celebrations due to crop season is not likely to start
the fact that it takes place on a there before February 4.

Saturday and at an d hour in ine in . 5
. ; 8 ” A FOUTBALL TEAM from the
the: Orns Ae ese Strollers Sports team is expected

to go to Belleplaine to play a
; football game there during nex}
Watchman
P >
Imprisoned

month. Keith app will Cap-
tain the Strollers team.

of ieinecee ceeccant® whee lage areas during tne week. The

Honours of the Assistant Court of OWMers Of these aogs live tar from

Appeal, Mr. H. A. Vaughan and me roausiude and we Gogs wee

Mr. A. J, H. Hanschell said yes- sale irom tne wheeis O1 venicles.







NU FewWwe Ulin six dogs were
found aead at diiterent spots in
ue Oise Mail and pDuUrkKe Vii-

terday before confirming a decis- One dog owner old ine Aave-
ion of His Worship Mr. G. B, cate: 1 don't know wnat is caus-
Griffith who had sentenced ing deatn (oO tnese cogs; but |

Courtenay Lewis, a watchman of know the remedy to secure mine,
Rockley, to one month’s imprison- and that is, to tie it all day ana
ment for assaulting and _ beating giving it a proper feed on letting
Florence Jones, an employee of it go at 8 p.m. It wouldn't care
Hastings Hotel, on October 11. to eat anyining during the night.

Their Honours said that there MINOR REPAIRS were carried
was not even a suggestion from put on a number of roads in dif-
the evidence that the woman had ferent districts of St. Joseph dur-

provoked Lewis in any way. ing the past two weeks, in addi-

Lewis admitted having com- ,; . i ,

. tion to the construction of new

mitted the offence, but appealed tenantry roads. At present gen-
against the sentence.

Jones told the court ‘that she eral repairs are being carried out
had been near the Colonial De- 09 the Foster Hall road. A
velopment and Welfare Office Superintendent told the Advocate
when she saw Lewis directing that they are hoping to complete
the driver of a car who was re- the repairs during the next week
versing the car, The car was re= So iar there were 43 workers
we issn wah d = ‘that on tne job yesverday moraing. a
ane ane Oda hel ig Tecate yoad rouer is also om the job and
g she attre s

attention to it the road is beginning to take

Lewis took . objection to ther shape again. ‘nis damage pte
doing that, and knocked her down “one vores the Highways pes
hy cuffing her in her face. Transport road and Foster Ha
2 main road were damaged a few



‘weeks ago. in
Residents of the Frizer Gully area

Camera Stolen will benefit by a bridge in the
area which was repaired during

Mr. A. P. Taylor of the Windsor the week after being damaged a
Hotel, Hastings, Christ Church, few weeks previously. This bridge
reported that a Kodak camera and and another strip of tenantry
a torch light, valued $151.02, were road was repaired through the
stolen from the motor car X—691 efforts of the Joes River Ltd. road
while it was parked either at St. repairing, constructing and re-
Joseph, St. John or St. George constructing programme.

Parish ‘Church sometime on
Thursday.

Joyce Batson of Hunte Street,
City, reported that a gold wrist
watch valued $35 was stolen from
G. W. Hutchinson’s Store at
Broad Street between 8.30 and
9.00 a.m. on Thursday. It is her
property.

A quantity of wood valued $24
was stolen from the residence of
Agnes Charles at Belle Land,
Roebuck Street, between Decem-
ber 15 and Thursday.

Leotta Ward of Goodland, St.
Michael, reported that a quantity
of clothing valued $34.30 was
stolen from her residence between
8.30 p.m. on. Tuesday and 6.00
a.m. on Wednesday, The cloth-
ing belong to her son Errol Reid
of the same address

Letters Of

Administration

In the Court of Ordinary yes-
terday, the Acting Puisne Judge
His Lordship Mr. Justice G. L.
Taylor granted the petition of
Edmund L. Jordan of Goodland,
St. Michael, captain engineer, for
Letters of Administration, to the

ARTIE'S HEADLINE



“ Sure, sir, ’U remember—
NOT to polish the zippers.”



25/- For Speeding

estate of his father Emmanuel
Jordan, late of Goodland. A FINE of 25/- to be paid in
Mr. D. H. L. Ward instructed 14 days or in default 14 days’ im-

by Haynes & Griffith appeared for prisonment was yesterday impos-
the petitioner. ed on Desmond Johnson of
Consideration of the petition of Worthing, Christ Church, by His
Ilma Millicent Knight of Roaches, Worship Mr, E. A. McLeod for
St. Lucy, a widow, for Letters of speeding while riding the motor
Administration to the estate of cycle X-812 on Collymore Rock
her husband Charles O. Knight Road, St, Michael.
deceased, was postponed The offence was committed on
Mr, D. Malone instructed by December 10 and the Police said
Messrs. Carrington & Sealy, that the motor cycle was ridden
Solicitors, appeared for the peti- at 45 miles per hour while the
tioner. speed limit on thpt_road is 30
The wills of the following four miles per hour. Sgt. Forde prose-



persons from St. Michael were cyted for the Police.
admitted to probate:— Percy
West Browne, Clarence Baxter



Riee, Christine Parris and Bea-
trice Roach.

FISH SHORTAGE AT
Be rere ee BATHSHEBA
H.C. Master Injured High winds and choppy seas

oi 4 at Bathsheba on Thursday made
In Cycle Collision

it impossible for fishing boats to
go out. Housewives got no fish
Mr. Briggs A. Clarke, an_as- on that day.
sistant master at Harrison College The sea was left rough yester-
is still a patient at the General gay but the winds abated. Boats
Hospital suffering from wounds in were able to go out.
his head, Many people gathered at Bath-
Mr. Clarke was admitted at the sheba Bay yesterday afternoon
institution on Wednesday night in waiting for fish. The majority of

an unconscious condition as the the poats returned at about 3.00
result of an accident on My Lord s p.m. but they brought in little
Hill about 7.45 when the bicycle or no fish. Housewives were

on which he was riding ‘came into
collision with another cyclist.

He regained consciousness the
same night. .

again disappointed.



“PURITAN” BRINGS Death By Natural Causes
DEATH by natural causes was

MIXED CARGO the verdict recorded by. Coroner
A shipment of. 3,108 bags of — A. McLeod when the inquest

flour was included in the cargo concerning the death of Louise
being landed here yesterday by Watkins of Kendall Hill, Christ

the S.S. Aleoa Puritan

which Church, was concluded at District
called from Halifax.

“A" yesterday morning.

The Alcoa Puritan has also Watkins was admitted to the
brought 1,200 bags of soyabean General Hospital on January 19
meal, 2,000 bags of linseed oil- suffering ‘from burns and died

menl, 625 bags of malt sprouts, about 4.45 p.m. on January 22
560 bags of pollard, 125 bags of Dr. G, Emtage who performed

her cargo. She has called
Messrs. Da Costa & Co., Ltd.

to the General Hospital Mortuary
attributed death to pneumonia.

REBUILDING



Nineteen men are sawing up wood at the grounds
build fishing boats which were completely destroyed on the night of December

3.

beach every evening.)

Sterling

Colonies Iner

ADVOCATE



After the wood is eut into timber size it is ready for the electric saws and planes.
A Bathsheba type boat (in the background) is now being consttucted
than usual and is built for easy hauling up.

(At Bathsheba the

easing
Balances

“They Put Capital Into Britain”

LONDON,

Britain's Colonies, selling their produce to Britain be-
low the world price’ but forced to buy British goods above

the world price, are, in effect, paying Britain for goods which were being brought to this fac-

she does not deliver, says Professor W. Arthur Lewis, the

distinguished economist and
Professor Lewis, who comes
from St. Lucia and is Professor
of Political Economy at Manches-

ter University and a member of
the Colonial Development Cor-
pora‘ion, examines the problem
of the ever-increasing sterling
balances held by the Colonies, in
an article in the London Finan-
cial Times.

While the ‘sterling balances of

foreign countries and the Domin-
ion have een fluctuating down-
ward since the war, he says, only
the Colonies have invested more
every year in Britain.

Britain talks of colonial de-
velopment, but on che contrary
it is African and Malayan
peasants who are putting capi-
tal into Britain,’ writes Pro-
fessor Lewis, “For the first
time since free trade was adopt-
ed in the middle of the nine-

teenth century, the British
colonial system has become a
major means of economic
exploitation.”

Post War System

Root of the trouble, according
to Professor Lewis, is the post-
war system of exchange control
and the inconvertibility of ster-
ling. Colonies earning hard cur-
rency by their exports § are
unable to spend it but
must put it into the Empire dol-
lar pool. Colonies earning ster-
ling by their exports are unable
to convert it into other currencies
to buy the things they need from
other countries.

“If sterling became convertible,”
he continues, “we would be back
to the position of 1931 to 1939,
when membership of the sterling
area conferred two useful advan-
tages and no disadvantages, The
main way to make sterling con-
vertible, and to stop the further
accumulation of balances, is to
make British manufactures avail-
able .in such quantities and at such
prices that they displace dollar
manufactures both in and outside
the sterling area.

Compulsory Cuts

“The method which appeals
most to Great Britain, of course,
is the alternative method of im-
posing compulsory cuts on dollar
purchases, so that sterling holders
are forced either to buy expen-
sive British goods or to accumu-
late still more sterling

“There is no case for cutting

the Colonies’ imports. The
Colonies are exporting far more
than they import and are

building up large balances, They
cannot get all the imports they
need, especially of capital goods,
and their

development pro-
gramme; are in consequence
retarded. They are, in effect,

paying Britain for goods which

she does not deliver. Must

further sacrifices be imposed
upon them?”

Professor Lewis, referring to the
meeting of Commonwealth min-
isters held recently in London,
concludes: “If the Colonies were
cirectly represented at the pres-
ent talks and free to say their
say, they would have diwected
their searchlight upon those Brit-
ish policies which prevent them
from getting an adequate suppl:

of manufactures from Britain.
“Unfortunately, the Colonies
ere not allowed to speak for

themselves, or to work exchange
contro] according to their owr
rules. So doubtless the stertin-
balances of the Colonial Fmnir-
will continue to rise thpoughout
this year and the next.”

—BUP.



Conductor Fined
For Overloading

Garfield Brathwaite, a conduc-
tor of East Point, St. Philip, was
fined 15/- and 1/- costs by His
Worship Mr, C. L. Walwyn for
overloading the motor ’bus M-1914
on Trafalgar Square about 4.10
pm. on December 19
The fine is to be paid in 14 days
in default 14 day imprison-
ment. Cpl. Cyfus, attached to the
Traffic Branch at Central Station
who brought the case said that he
stopped the bus as it appeared to
him to be overloaded

Lightning Kills 8

JOHANNESBURG, Jan. 25.

ol




A single bolt of lightning killed
horsefeed and poultry feed among the post mortem examination at a native woman and seven young

it was

children Thursday night
reported from Natal.—(U.P.)







expert on Colonial Affairs.



‘Zenith’? Was
Leaking

NO information the
whereabouts of the 87-ton
schooner “Zenith” which left
Barbados since December 19
last year for British Guiana,
has yet reached the local Har-
bour and Shipping Master.

A reply to a cablegram sent
by the Harbour Master to
British Guiana was received
on Thursday evening stating
that the master of the “Pros
pector”, a bauxite ship, last
saw the “Zenith” around 11
a.m. on December 22 off Brit-
ish Guiana in the position of
7 degrees 33 minutes north
and 66 degrees 46 minutes
west.

The “Prospector’s” master
said that the “Zenith” was
reported to be leaking but
was kept almost dry by pump-
ing. She was then expected
to make land early on Decem-
ber 23,

of



50/- for Bodily Harm

THEIR HONOURS Mr. H. A.
Vaughan and Mr, A. J. H. Han-
schell, Judges of the Assistant
Court of Appeal, yesterday con-
firmed a decision of His Worship
Mr. C, L. Walwyn who ordered
Albertine Harewood of Bath Vil-
lage, Christ Church, to pay a fine
of 50/- and 2/- costs in 21 days
or one month’s imprisonment with
hard labour for inflicting bodily
harm on Leotta Savoury of Christ
Church

The offence was committed on
May 1, 1951. Their Honour
ordered 8/4 costs of appeal to be
paid. Savoury told the court that
the defendant hit her with a piece
of stick on her left hand while
she was standing outside’ her
house.

The case’ which
brought against Leotta Savoury,
Kenneth Savoury and Maggie
Crichlow for assaulting and beat-
ing her on May 1 was dismissed
without prejudice by Their Hon-
ours.

Harewood

FIRE OFFICER GOES
TO DOMINICA





Intransit on the R.M.S. Lady
Rodney which left here last night
On its way to Canada was Fir
Officer J. G. Hewitt who had
spent 29 years’ service with the
Trinidad Fire Services Depart
ment.

He has now gone to Dominica
on secondment as Chief Fire

Officer to reorganise the fire de-
partment and train personnel

NEIGHBOURS PUT
OUT CANE FIRE

A fire of unknown origin at
Green Hill, St. Michael, at about
7.00 p.m, on Tuésday burnt 200
holes of fourth crop ripe canes
valued $25. They are the prop
erty of Joseph Murray and were
not insured.

The fire was put out by neigh;

20urs,

Signalling, Training
Charts, Girl Guide A
Books.

CAVE SH

12

PROGRAMME

of the Fishery Office

fishing



Guider

Music for Camp Fire Songs
Books including Omnibus Book of Ideas, Hiking und
Light weight camping, Services and Prayers, Dril! and



EPHERD & CO, LID.

&





Canadian
Column

1952 TRADE FAIR
Exhibitor figures so far avail-
able for the 1952 Canadian Inter-
;national Trade Fair indicate that
}world buyers next June will be
presented with a more compre-

|
|
}

duction than they have ever seen
before.

Canada's Trade Fair this year
is expected to have a_ strong-
er Canadian flavour than for the
past three years, with more ex-
hibits in a wider variety of fields.
Of the Canadian applications so
far received, 34 per cent are from
manufacturers who have never
}before exhibited at the
Fair, If this trend continues which
|; Trade Fair officials believe
|likely. the 1952 Fair, to take,
place from June 2 to June 13, will
, have the most representative array
icf Canadian goods ever assembled.
| Canadian exhibits so far cover)
114 of the 16 different trade clas-;



sifications, with machinery and
plant equipment, metals and
chemicals, and transportation |

The wood will be used to re
2 and morning of December

equipment showing heaviest par-|
jticipation, Office supplies, house-
jhold furnishings, and foods and
) beverages are also well represent-
ed, while textiles will again be a}
tlarge category. Office equipment |
exhibits will be one of the major
j|features of the show this year, |
} with about 30 firms expected to
| exhibit,
| The machine tool section of the!
1952 Fair will rival last year’s in!
size and scope. Although the
; British
j will not exhibit this year officially

This type of boat is smaller
boats are hauled up on the





Nine Lactories
Have Started
Grinding Canes

Machine Tool Association







Nine factories have already |imdividual members will comprise
tarted grinding canes, Of these! @lmost as large an exhibit of Brit-

ht are making vacuum pan ish machine tools as before, In
sugar The other factories will addition, Canadian machine tool
py to a inter this month makers are expected to be better
5 q colt Aa represented than last year. Ger-
and ne . : ;

. . many, for the first time, will also

factory, St. Lucy, '

W = oe me Saat ave be well poem in the ma-|
et " oe eee | chine tool section |
canes From January 8 canes Reports reaching Trade Fair |

offices from the United States and

tory Four Square, St Philip, and} obroad indicate that foreign par-
Searles, St. Michael, started OM/) Cination this year will be more
January 14, Applewaites, Old-

extensive than last year, Upwards
of 30 countries are expected to ex-
hibit, with Canada, England, the
United States, the Netherlands,
Spencers! Germany Italy, and France prob-

bury, St. Philip and Sandy Lane, |
James started on Monday
ast; Lower Estate on Tuesday and
Fairfield on Thursday







also started to work earlier this} ably best represented.

month. Garrtinlon Bullele mir aie : 3 WORKS 14K
Hey 0 and Warrens are ex- The fifth class of the National

i ‘ted to rt on Monday, Jan-' Defence College, located at King-|

i 28: Cl. St. John on Tues- ston, Ont., consisting of 17 senior)
d Andrews, Joes River, Gui-! service officers and 9 civil repre-|



Vaucluse, on Monday, Feb-, sentatives from Canadian industry. |

ruary 4° Harrow on February 5.! began a tour of Canadian and
Three Houses on February 6,' United States industrial and de
Colleton on February 11; Lemon! fence installations on January 6.)

Arbor on February 13, Kendal on) jt has been announced by National

February 15 and Swans on) Defence Headquarters, The year-|
February 18. Newton is @X- jong Defence College course in-|
pected to start shortly. Frere .iides two tours. One covers

Pilgrim will not be working this

Ameriean and Canadian industrial)
year

; ; an ilitary establishments, and}

Mr. H. W. Forde is now Acting pr gr countries overseas |

Secretary of the Sugar Production | ’ |
nd Export Control Board, Fancy ; GUNS FOR THE

Molasses Control Marketing Board ~
and Sugar Industry Capital Re- | NETHERLANDS
habilitation Reserve Board, in| Sixteen 3.7 anti-aircraft guns
place of Mr, Peterkin. jand 13 machine guns along with
predictors, radar, spares and one
| million rounds of small arms am-
| munition will be shipped to the
| Netherlands Army from Halifax
early in January.

CONTROVERSY
OVER BRITISH 5) 2 3 cori “ecient
HONDURAS fof an equipment transfer under

ithe NATO mutual aid plan_ in
!which Canada is sending 100 of





MANCHESTER, Jan, 22. | the anti-aircraft guns to North
Another controversy over Brit-' Atlantic Tréaty countries
ish Honduras. has flared up in In mid-December, Canada ship-



the eclumns of the “Manchester ped eight of the weapons to Por-
Guardian,” arising out of a tugal Within the past year,
comment on the Guatemalan equipment for a full division has
claim by the paper's diplomatic been sent to the Netherlands,

| hensive picture of Canadian pro-|

Trade |

is
|



PAGE

GEORGE PAYNE'S

IS

GOOD COCOA

PIVE





manoracrum? * i
“ORGE payne & °°

Tower “exe*

Sompon, nore



FINE —
PURE —
SOLUBLE.



=
=





MORE AND MORE MEN
ARE CHANGING TO

‘K’ SHOES vary

Because they have become convinced
of K’s Superiority.

e

iERE ARE THREE OF THE MANY VERY GOOD
REASONS FOR THAT SUPERIORITY :

SS



(1) ‘K’ SHOES are made from the finest leathers
obtainable. Both soles and insoles are hand-
tested for flexibjlity and accurately graded
by skilled craftsmen.

THE UPPEDS of ‘K’ SHOES are selected,
hand-cut and matched by experienced crafts-
men with a care that no machine could
imitate.

(3) ‘K’ SHOES are made over the famous ‘K’
PLUS FITTING LASTS with the heel-parts
one fitting narrower than the fore-parts. The
ensures a close fit at the heel and freedom
for the toes.

6

Why not come in and be fitted with a pair
of these world famous shoes ? We are sure
you'll say like all the other ‘K’ wearers :—

PLL NEVER WEAR ANOTHER SHOE BUT ‘K'

PRICES $17.00 to $21.63

FROM







correspondent, who wrote Italy and Belgium in addition to
“Nothing much has been done 4 number of 25-pounder guns t
re ently for British Honduras Luxembourg, Total < a Aa
Once it supported 750,000 people. has been valued at about $195,-
Now its inhabitants are only 000,000,

60,000, most of them in fitful





employment,”

This statement has been chall-
nged by Mr. A. J. H. Haler,
head of the Press Section at the

#resh stock of the following:

POPULAR

Colonial Office, Mr, Haler'’s crit-
icism has drown a reply from FRENCH
Mr, Billy Strachan, seeretary ot REMEDIES
the London branch of the Carib+
bean Labour Congress, —AT—
Mr. Haler pointed out that
ince April 1, 1950, a total of Ds
£543,880 has been issued to YW
British Honduras under the Col- Es
cnial Development and Welfare “JUBOL gheel ast e 4s
Acts. He lists also the grants- For Constipation, Price 4/-

“GLOBEOL”

in-aid made by the United King- 4 ti
com in the past four years, end- A Tonic for the Heart,



ing with the £268,894 granted in Muscles & Nerves. Price
1950—51. He also outlines the a ours T/t
work of the Colonial Develop- “PAG
ment Corporation in British For Diseases of the Blad-
Honduras, der, Price . 7/6
Mr, Strachan, however believes . ES ae
that the “Nothing much has vine oughis * 5/6
been done, ” statement is SaCw sessossesezesesessriee 8
correct, or is even an under- “DESC HINES Ore aS
tatement. He recalls the action] For Anaemia, Weakne oi
f Sir Ronald Garvey, the)) overwork and general de-
Governor, in devaluing the B.H.|! bility. Price , 10/-
dollar after the géneral devalua-: ‘URODONAL ‘
n of sterling in 1949, and the For Rheumatism, Gout,
issolution by Sir Ronald of the Gravel, Pains and Acidity
Rel.ze City Council. Price 7/6
He concludes: “The best index

the welfare and contentment
of my people in this territory is

quotation from the Daily
Express “Of the 35,000 people
who can work in this land, 8,000

» unemployed and another $,0v0
no regular work.’

—B.U.P.

BRUCE WEATHERHEAD
LTD.

HEAD OF BROAD STREET i

4

} >
ive




Sas

a OO Eeqxqxq{xmmm=xm=mTEOQQDWDOoO——E OO
== ee

HARRISON'S
DIAL 2664

Sole Distributors for ‘K’ SHOES in Barbados.

eae



NOTICE



For your convenience we now have a

TELEPHONE CLERK who will receive your

orders and have them given prop: ¢ ‘tention.

We ask your co-operation by Vho 338.



KNIGHTS LTb.
PHOENIX PHARMACY


















In our Girl Guide
Department we have

a lot of new items

s note!



...and for

Songs B ro w m ies

and Marching

Painting Books
Song Books
Story Books
Games etc.

Course for Camp, Fire Lighting
nnuals, Story Books, and Painting



13 BROAD STREET



. ie ee







NOTICE





————

TENDERS are invited for the
manufacture of WIRE COAT
HANGERS. A sample can be

obtained from the Manager,

Sanitary Laundry Co. Ltd.



SANITARY LAUNDRY €0., LTD.

OF BARBADOS

{




BARBADOS ADVOCATE SATURDAY, JANUARY 26, 1952





PAGE SIX
PUBLIC SALES

CLASSIFIED ADS.

GOVERNMENT NOTICES















TELEPHONE 2508.



For Births, Marriage or Engagement

@nnouncements in

Carib Calling the

charge is $3.00 for any number of words





ANNOUNCEMENTS
|

GLADIOLI & DABLIA
Orders are now being taken for Glad-
oli and Dehlias for delivery im Decem-
ber 1962, parties interested in booking
please phone 4442, T. Geddes Grant Ltd.
10.1.52—t.£.n.

i
REAL ESTATE



FOR SALE

BUNGALOW: Three bedroom wall fun-









SHIPPING NOTICES

MONTREAL, AUSTRALIA AND NEW
‘TD.
MANZ LINE The





4
PUBLIC WORKS DEPARTMENT, DOMINICA
APPLICATIONS are invited for the post of Assistant Engineer,



M.V. DAERWOOD will
accept Cargo and Passengers for

Phone
: : 4311, Johnson. i on a 3-year contract. d| M.V. TEKOA is expected to, load at St. Lucia, St. Vincent, Grenada
Se te 2 eed peee ae Sard Ser cna 1, i Pe y act. The salary of the post is between $2,880 an | Australian Ports for Trinidad, Barba- and Aruba. Sailing Wednesday
hetwien 8.90 and 4 p.m., $183 fee Death AUTOMOTIVE LAND—Two (8) pols % Act each, : i $3,360 per annum, according to experience, plus Cost of Living Allow-| dos, Bermuda early January and arriv- 23rd_ inst.
Notices only after 4 o.m - | sttamne Black Rock. Apply: Fred| #@) it NOTICES | ance of 16 2/3% of salary. Quarters are not provided. A single man, Sits eames) foie enaein ceaeeoies emia oben uae ee =
Carmichael, Ph 2443. $2—2r e jo an ‘a! rs
a cer nrennnnieenmenn— | ccrmngey re ee teen - preferred in view of the difficult housing situation. |herd frozen, and general cargo. Dominica, Antifua, Montserrat,
CAR—-1834 V-8 Ford in good condition LAND—4% Acres, situat: lack Rock | Cargo accepted on through Bills of Nevis and St. Kitts Sailing
i ei ay M-197). C. Herbert, 55 Tudor Street. | Apply: Fred Cormilchnal Pine suas During the period of the contract thre vill be major works of | o'0c” with transhipment at Trinidad|@ Friday tst February 52
FOu BRENT %6 1.52—2n. 1. an NOTICE jetty ‘construction, building, bridge, and water supply works. Ex-~| for British Guiana, Windward and Lee- The M.V. MOXEKA will



HOUSES






















CAR—One Standard 8 Apply to L.
King c/o R. H. Edwards or Kingsley. |
Deacons Read. 26.1.52—2n.

SAINT VINCENT, B.W.1
PROPERTY —Attractive seaside property
adjoining Villa Beach, 3 acres
massive stone buiiding

IS hereby given that it is the intention
of the Westbury Cemetery Board to be
with) caused to be introduced into the House
2000 sq. | of Assembly of this Island a Bill to amend

























perience is required in the taking off of quantities, structural design | “*" '!nds.
and detailing, and in the estimating of building works. For further particulars apply to—
When submitting applications the following heads should be|!US\"SS. WITHY & Co., Lia.

accept Cargo and Passengers for
Dominica, Antigua, Montserrat,
Nevis and St. Kitts. Sailing, Date
to be notified.







aro. | CAM Vauxhall 12 in A-1 condition, | Particulars from Errol Rooks, Four Winds.| the Westbury Cemeteny Act 1908 so as | B.W.L ON en eee
APARTMENT; The Canw, St. Law-] pp 4311, Joh: 20.1 52—4n ? ; ASSOCIATION (INC)
renee-on-Sea, fully furnished. Dial 3503 oe os cut Phone 9140. 36. 1-62—8n oe — tor = (a) Name in full with date and place of birth. DaCOSTA & xs Ltd. Consignee. Tele. No. 4047.
a anes —_— $$$ ~- conduct BARBADOS
sateen Vinee Eee OY ond 1) bn stick, PROPERTY AT CHEAPSIDE Cemetery and to reduce the amount of (b) Marital state and details of family (if any). aw. b 6666 OCEOOASOSOCOOOâ„¢
FARAWAY—St. Philip Coast, Fully} np. g90.00. Telia A BARNES & COs} .,CD® Jaffe substantially built two/ notice required to be given by the Chap- educational attainment.
ARAWAY—St. Philip Coast, Fully }in.p. $605.00. Terms. A BARNES & CO.,j storey wall building just below the| lain on resignment of his appointment (ce) Qualifications and highest
furnished, 3 bedrooms, 2 servant rooms | LTD. 26.1.52—t.f.n ublic arket, ste S p. 54,000 a the various of work being
doubde carport, all conveniences, $50,0( e o land via ¢- , 1 “ E. D. MOTTLEY. 7 (a) Engineering experience, types
per month from February. "Phone 4476. Suitebs oe & Chairman of the Board % separately enumerated and some measure of the scope of
19.1.52—t.n “ ut le as a guest house or bond “hairmar

sdb i ie a eee ELECTRICAL Priced to sell. Apply to D’Arey A. | 24.1.52—3n the works being given in dimensions or cost.

MORNING SIDE-Bathsheba, Februar eee ee ly 2 Applications should be, at least in part, in the applicant’s hand ee
to June. Telephone 2481, Mrs. Wj ——————————— a a nena .

Chandler 28.1 52-81 NORGE REFRIGERATORS, a smali| PROPERTIES FOR SALE — Stone writing.

toa et ee umber of these well known American| bungalow on sea ail modern con- NOTICE The Works Dominica, OUTWARD FROM THE UNITED KINGDOM
NEWHAVEN, Grane Coast. fully tu drigerators have just been received a ae room and garage. | Director of Works, Public Department, ine

sting ‘ . ul early, at REDMAN & R'S one ingalow recently constructed, will willingly answer questions applicant might wish address
ee en” eae ARAGE LTD., Showroom. Phone 4365|in a desirable neighbourhood about 1% PARISH OF 6T. PHILIP = this Due
car Ghentn Bean February, Phone 4 4435 23.1.52~—n. | miles from eity, containing all modern | Applications for the Post of Senior|to him for a period up to two weeks from the appearance of Vessel From Leaves Barbados
- a : 10.1.80-8.1 wed requirements, servants room and garage saree = Mig . — : ee ae advertisement, :
Si a ee : REFRIGERATORS, Another shipment} One wooden bungalow, just a few be reeelw e undesst S.S. “BIOGRAPHER”

ORMISTON. 7th Ave. Belleville, 3 bed FRIGIDAIRE Refrigerators has just| steps from beach at Brighton self con- Tuesday 20th January, 1952. Applications should be submitted to His Honour the Administra- ER “pombe & 8th J 20th J
rooms, all conveniences Appl: toi | ‘Tived. On sale at K. R. Hunte & Co.,|toined, drawing and dining rooms | *pplicants must be fully qualified as) 4. Dominica, as soon as possible S.S. “TRI ” irons os San -
eee) an convene 4 id.. Lower Broad Street, for Cash or | enclosed with glass, a® ..urse and Midwife, and must forward , ' . ‘S. “TRIBESMAN' --M/brough and ith Jan. 31st Jan.

_ ids, 1 n Terms. Dial 461i or 5027. Lavinla—Three roof house, containing With their applications their Baptismal S$.S. “INVENTOR” .. . . Liverpool 13th Jan. 27th Jan.
* 25.1.52.—3n. | drawing, dining, breakfast and two bed- aun well as their Certificates of |Goyvernment Office, S.S. “PROSPECTOR” London 25th Jan. Tth Feb

Peete ae " rooms, flush toilet and bath, with house , «ompetency. sadhcndieiihkecstaiba te tia. . At *
Cedars Gap. Dini 2525, Harold Proverb: in back standing on 5,400 sqr. ft. of land. | The salary attached to this, post is| Dominica. HOMEWARD FOR THE UNITED KINGDOM
ac a : 26 1.52—1n FURNITURE Marshville—Three roof dwellinghouse, $20.00 per month. Uniforms, including 81st December, 1951. U Dp G

ence ae of standing on 5.445 sar. ft. of land, All shoes. and quarters Geneete ae 17.1.52—2n ‘
; modern conveniences, along Bank Hall e successfu ndidate w je re- ar : Vessel For Closes in Barbados

Aele Seniod ‘Brome Agr Ae aR ote eee eee we See ee | {quired to assume duties on the 28th S.S. “HERDSMAN” London 6th Feb
House, In St. Peter, 1% miles from Sea) our home, A. BARNES & Co. Ltd.|,,land—4, desirable bullding site, eon. | February 1902 DEPARTMENT OF EDUCATION For furth a 1

: ; 2 [ak “s + 1,000 re ma of iand | ‘or er Information Busi
stands high Fulhy furnished (excep 18,1.52—t.f.n. wane, an Waser "Garamhis dine building | P. Ss. W. scortT, | apply to

plate, linen), 3 bedrooms, 2 dressing rooms






Clerk to the Board of Guardians,



site located in Welches Road, containing
Ss gras ee ee MECHANICAL 5,000 é St. Philip. BARBADOS EVENING INSTITUTE DACOSTA & CO., LTD.
J a square feet. And many other small 7 ——
2049. 26.1.52—t.f.n, a SF et ae MT eeeaee 19.1.58—7n » Agents





TWO LARGE COOL ROOMS—Furnisnea
running water, with or without meals
10 minutes walk to Yacht Club or City

Woodside Gardens. Dial 3356.

22.1.52--t.f.n

WINSLEY — Bathshebs, February to

June. Telephone 2481, Mrs. W

Chandler

26.1.52—-3n

ne

WANTED



HELE

POLAR CARTMEN wanted
Polar Products, Rickett Street







Apply to

24,1.52-—2n



STENOGRAPHER & TYPIST for our

RACEHORS:
Office, apply by letter and in person—| w ES ih training.

T. Geddes Grant Lid





SINGER SEWING MACHINE—In good
Apply to Stanley Clarke, c/o
25.1.52—2n

ondition.
3, P. Musson, Son & Co,

POULTRY







just call at:
EBONY

Marhill Street. Dia) 5001.

26.1.52—2n

REALTY & COMMISSION
AGENCY





ALFRED TOBIAS PHILLIPS

NOTICE

Re the Estate of





NENE-DAY CHICKS unsexed, from ghe| The undersigned will offer for sale} NOTICE IS HEREBY GIVEN that all
famous WHITE LEGHORN CHAR IS]at their office, No. 17, High Street,!} Persons having any debt er claim upon
train, layers last season of 240 eggs in| Bridgetown, on Thursday the S3ist day | or affecting the estate of Alfred Tobias
10 months 80c. Hatching eggs 30c. Post|of January, 1952, at 2 p.m, the desirable | Phillips late of Strathclyde in the parish
rders to Bennett near Gregg Farm, St.| building. lot of land containing 17,964/0f St. Michael in this Island, who died
Andrew. 25.1.5—2n|square feet or thereabouts situate on)‘ this Island on 28th day of January
top of Rendezvous Hill lying to the easi i951 are hereby required to send in their
30 Hampshire and Barred|of and adjacent to the lands of Cloud Claims, duly attested, to me the under-
Rock Pullets imported 68| Walk the residence of Sir Dudley Lea- signed Timothy Theophilus Headley,
also Hampshire Hatching|cock. The site is in within easy reach Public Trust e of the Island of Barbados
ges 36 cents ea. Apply: Erie Denny,|of the Golf Club and commands a | qualified Administrator to the estate of
Bridge Gap, Black Rock. 26 1.52—1n | beautiful view. Alfred Tobias Phillips deceased Public
wee For further particulars and conditions | Buildings on or before the 15th day of
of sale apply to:— February 1952 after which date } shall

COTTLE, CATFORD & Co., proceed to distribute the assets of the
Solicitors. said estate among the parties entitled
20.1.52—10n. | thereto having regard to the debts and

claims only of which I shall then have
had notice at the time of such distribu-
tion and that I shall not be liable for



POULTRY:
Plymouth
months old,

LIVESTOCK





Bay filly,| The undersigned will offer for sale at

atercress. Br. gelding, Colleton. Apply | their office, No. 17, High Street, Bridge-







Technical Classes

(a) Applications will now be considered for entry to beginners’
classes in:—

(i) Internal Combustion Engineering

(ii) Electricity. :

These classes will be preparing for examinations of the City
and Guilds of London Institute.

(b) The present Junior Classes will continue as Senior Classes.
A few new students may be admitted, provided that their
knowledge of the subject concerned and general education
is of a satisfactory standard.

(c) The Classes will be held at Richmond House, St. Leonard’s
School, and will commence in May 1952. ASTRA i

(d) There will be two lectures a week of two hours in each | A STEAMER sail ‘Toth "sub --aravte Weed aie teks “108,
subjest. | STEAMER sails 30th Jan.—arrives B'dos 14th Feb. 1952.

(e) Applicants must be over 15 years of age on Ist May 1952. ee

\eme Alcoa, Steamahip Co.



NEW YORK SERVICE

A STEAMER sails 25th January-~:
s a y-~arrives Barbados Sth February, 1952
A STEAMER sails 15th February— arrives Barbados 26th February, 1952.



NEW ORLEANS SERVICE

23.1.92—t £.n,} to J. D. Chandler. Gun Site, town, on Friday the ist February, 1962, | assets so distribuled to amy person of (f) Selection for the Classes will be made according to general CANADIAN SERVICE
——- $$$. 26.1.52—2n. }at 1.30 p.m, the dwellinghouse called | whose debt or claim I shall not have ill be to Si iseath
SALESMAN: Will also have to cover “ELLERSLIE” with the land thereto) had notice. educational attainment. Preference w given to applicants SOUTHBOUND

the Leeward and Windward Islands at

intervals.
tially. Box ¥, Advocate Co , Ltd

Application treated confiden-

13.'1.52—t.f.n


















containing 1 rood, 3 perches or there-
abouts adjoining Dr. Bancroft's resi-
dence at Lower Fontabeile. The house
contains downstairs, drawing and dining
rooms, breakfast room, two bedrooms,

And all persons indebted to the said
estate are requested to settle their ac-
counts without delay,

Dated this 7th day of December 1951.

TIMOTHY THEOPHILUS HEADLEY,

MISCELLANEOUS

Se
AUTO POLISHES & WAXES—A ship-



possessing a School Certificate or its equivalent. Consideration) = 4 sTEAMER sails 16th January—arrives Barbados Sist_ January, 1962

will however be given to applicants with practical workshop = eeanaree ta Bead FE ee Ae arrives Barbados 14th Februany, 1952
STEAM sa : yy — arrive 2 ;

experience, plus a good elementary school record, endorsed + whquaty— artives. Barhades 2th February, 1008

= toilet and bath and upstairs 3 bed- Qualified Administrator to the Estate by the applicant’s former Head or other Senior teacher. These vessels have limited passenger accommodation.
MISCELLANEOUS ER AND POLISH just arrived--Old Cars << UC See ee eee (a) A tee of $5 00 per term, payable during the first week of the} ROBERT THOM LTD. — NEW YORK AND GULF
SFP ING URS P SEE STEEDRETS ike “|and gas \. 8.12.51—4n . > sais ,
MACHINES—Old Sewing Machines out ey haar using LARWAX— Inspection any day between the hours [ G SERVICE

of order, Apply: Mrs. V. Vaughn, King's

Street or corner Faivchild and Probyn
12.1 52—10n

Streets.



nd ®heumatism
hile You Sleep

it you suffer sharp stabbing pains,

if joints are swollen

it shows your

blood is potsuned through faulty kid-
ney action Other symptoms of Kid-



ney Disor are Burning,
Passages, “Getting up Nigh
aches, Lumbago, Leg Pain
mess, Dizziness, Headaches, Col
Pufiy Ankles, Circles under Ey




Itching



Lack of Energy, Appetite etc Ordi-







i ; , is enclosed more, M.L.C., J.P., Deputy Chair- tained after that date. request,

rary medicines can't help much —you er -_——_——- a *

; ; 4 ; ; Inspection any day on application to| man, Department of Education, Britain's largest and foremost With one of the lovely White Por-
must Kill the germs ruining health JEWELLERY—Topaz Pendant Ring ‘ , 0! lovely ‘or
ee toon Ee r cP BIAS Be ces and Earrings Set, all matched; large Ar tortie arian ack. obeane Mr. Lewis was Deputy Chair- 23rd January, 1952. Publishers will send a Beautiful celain Gas Geysers—You can have
poor ig (ne cause Get Cystex trom | Stones 18. carat Gold and Diamonds.| tions of sale apply:— man in 1951 after having previous- aret tiene ee:
Du right or money back Act Now! | 44nd-made settings, Call EVANS, 6225. ly served as Chairman for three SPCR TE, Gentes Agi. Write today. comically ‘priced ‘ani CHEAP to
In 44 hours you wit feel better and 25.1,52.—3, COTTLE, CATFORD & Co., : Colly- Highest Commission paid. Jones, Pi an

& conpletely well in one

week

The Guar-

oo GwStex ante e

protects




Dial 4391, Courtesy

Garage. 25.1.52. of 1 p.m. and 3 p.m, on application on

Castries Board



Shoes and Blocks, Pedal Rubbers, Locks, |°! 8 Spply, to:—

Handle Grips, Trouser Bands, Tyres and Re re en ea.

Tubes. Laurie Dash & Co. Tudor Street



term, covers all subjects taken. Failure to pay the fee at the
time stated may lead to the exclusion of the student. 80%
of the fees paid will be refunded at the end of the session to
all students who have, in the opinion of the Principal, Dean,

APPLY:—DA COSTA & CO., LTD.—CANADIAN SERVICE
lll,

ROBERT THOM LIMITED

Tee Ae Boor Bireet, 20 1 52—in. Elects Officers — Lecturers, worked satisfactorily, and attended regularly PLANTATIONS BUILDING, LOWER BROAD STREET
Garni sie aamiaaninmmpanmteme and punctually. Passenger Sales :
CURRANTS — Notice to housewives The quimeteenan’ on tues for sale at (Prom Our Own Correspondent.) P er Agents for:

Currants 40 cents, Hams Maple $1.28 per th:
tb., Wilsons $1.40. C. Herbert, 55 Tudor

Street. 26.1.52—2n,
seen emereram | PEE Mulpereaes
CHAIR CUSHION SPRING UNITS—A| fi00 aa” feat eh IMME RE Welchas row

new shipment of HEAVY TYPE Spring} Road, St
Cushion Units, Ready for Packing and] contains —
Cevering. A real improvement on our rooms, 2
last Stock. See them on display at our and bath, electrie light and running

Showrooms. The Standard Agency 3 and f
(B'dos) Co., 14 Swan Street, Dial 3620, | Water. Garage “helt "of ihe land

25.1.52,—3n,

CASTRIES, Jan. 22.

At the first meeting of the
Castries Town Board for 1952 Mr.
Allen M. Lewis, LL.B., Barrister-
at-law, and brother of Professor
Arthur Lewis of Manchester
University, was elected Chairman
and the Hon, Herman B. Colly-

eir office, No. 17, High Street, Bridge-
town, on Friday, the ist February, 195% at
1,30 p.m. the newly erected stone wall







Michael. The dwellinghouse
verandah, sitting and dining
bedrooms, kitchenette, toilet

yard. Approximately, half of the land



~wineemninsaatenanainasiioniienemamoe | ip, Sea
BICYCLE ACCESSORIES—Bells, Brake For further particulars and ;

lieitors, | consecutive terms. Mr. |
2 1 6390 {more was Chairman in 1951,
—— Mr. Lewis is President of the St.

SE EERIE
LADIES BATH SUYTS—A quality of
letest fashion in green, goid, blue and
red with skirt all sizes. $3.51 each,













(h) Students will be required to supply their own stationery and
text-books as required by the Lecturers.

(i) Applicants must obtain from the office of the Department of
Education application forms, which must be filled in and for-
warded to the Dean of Technical Studies, the Barbados Eve-
ning Institute, at the office of the Department not later than
Saturday, 2nd March, 1952. No applications will be enter-

Trans-Canada Airlines, B.O.A.C. and B.W.I.A.
ALCOA STEAMSHIP COMPANY
Telephone No, 4466
|

Esk sdeensel inne eee QOPI O SSO FISS TSO

i .

and. more by taking orders fox | HOT WATER ON :
wna Calmuea “On tgacct ¢|¢ TAP for YOUR BATH x






run with Natural Gas, A few are ,

Williams & Co., Dept. 9, Victoria GAS

now _ available
Works, Preston, England.

at your
WORKS, BAY .

REGISTRATION OF ALIENS ORDER, 1951

:
Free Sample Book for 1952 to & warm or hot bath within 8
6







Soe Kidneys, Rheumatism, Bisdder you Kirpalani, 52 Swan Street. Lucia Labour Party which now AAA AAA AAA
r 26.1.80—1n.| Kor MResults . ~~ |ias eight members on the nine- 09 Fee POCO
‘ aa cc oenpsnpseensasesasfunisnsaninalinisniaaiinidininneedeamenaben tos In exercise of the powers conferred upon the Governor by section
YPPOS99 99999996 44FSGG099, | “Long Playing Records and 78 RPM man municipal Board. 8 of ‘
Si egtaens gar re took ae a“ 3 of the Aliens Restriction Act, 1939, the following Order is hereby We can supply
BARBADOS — gy] '42Es & co, Lta. Advertise in the made:—
Oi PRAf-ti.n. 7 1. This Order may be cited as the Registration of Aliens Order, 6” PORCELAIN TILES
POLO CLUEB — &] surreases — vatises, attache cases.| Ai i geoeate 00 CSSUE | 1952
| ‘urdy and lightweight, double locks, 7 in a variety of Colours
Presentation Match 3] "°°" *°8°.tiSic%% Kills Men & Women | * sciucic é
: ¢ » fn ‘ = “
%, Twice as many women as men suf- aiGince” smtas the conmary Cerelne-aey ane CENTRAL EMPORIUM
white Ataesocmres x uaa an a as fer from High Biood Pressure, which where an alien has more than one dwelling-place, each of Cur. Broad: & Tudor Sts.
4.30 oe “ baat tke that oc ier Pita arts such dwelling-places; provided that where an alien has no :
FOUR CHUKKAS : CHRISTI AN SCIENCE Ws the reel camape oetadah Rea t trouble ordinary dwelling-place, the expression “residence” shall
Entrance to enclosure * { READING ROOM mon symptoms of High B a eres be construed as meaning his place of abode for the time
1/— > top and back of head Rnd nuove cn, being; “ship” includes aircraft, and the expression “port” ALE
96.1.82—in $ Breath, paine in hearse, paipleation, shall be interpreted accordingly. FOR S$
Via M y i. 3 @: . ie
1.5 n ¢ The Story of Christian Solence poor sleep, loss of memory Ere enerey: 8. Subject to the provisions of this Order, every alien who has



FOR SALE

1,200 sq. ft. each.

e
43,000 sq. ft. at Rockley
New Road.

e
2 roods 34 perches at Brit-

Several spots at the Pine
Hill ranging between 11,000
& 14,000 sq. ft.

Several spots at Hothersal
Turning beside the main
road,

e





Bay Street, Phone 5010
offers you 2 outstanding Bar
gains in Properties.
WORTHY DOWN
Situated at Top Rock Ch
Ch. having 3 bedrooms with
connecting Toilets and Baths,
Modern built in Kitchen, 2
large Balconies, Large
Lounge, Dining Room, Out-
side 2 Car Garage, Laundry,
Servant’s Room. fully en-

Several spots at Maxwell

ASAI FIT







Wartime Activities 1939-1946
easily excited, fear and worry. If you
this book with its inspiring suffer any of these axmnntart. don't
delay treatment @ single day, because
your life may be in danger. Noxco
| (formerly known as Hynox), a new
medical discovery, reduces High Blood
Pressure with the first dose, takes a
heavy load off the heart, and makes

account at the—

READING ROOM
over Bowen & Sons, 20 Broad St.
Open on Tuesdays, Wednesdays,
Fridays from 10 a.m. —2 p.m.
and on Saturdays 10 a,m.—12



ae +e ee ce
wwoewwoww®

you feel years younger in a few days. E i i
‘clock. Get N t 7 xcellent sea bathing. Dwellinghouse contains verandah
aE ute waretes hh Meese fron a goers \ the matters set out in the Schedule to this Order, and shall, upstairs and down, dining and sitting rooms, 4 bedrooms, pan-
wwwuww and strong or money back, on the request of the Commissioner, produce a document try and kitchen. Eectric light, gas and water installed. Garage

|



ORIENTAL
SOUVENIRS

SILKS, CURIOS, ARTS
VENDEMOS, SEDAS,

HI
JORDAN'S LAUNDRY

H
1
BAY STREET
Opposite Combermere |

eee

Stree
















T0-DAY'S NEWS FLASH

WHITAKER’S ALMANAC 1952.
Unabridged Edition

re NAUTICAL ALMANAC

DAILY MAL YEAR BOOK 1952
PLASTIC SCHOOL RULERS

VIOLIN BOWS & BOW HAIR
PIANO INSULATORS

THANI’S
Pr. Wm. Hry, St., Dial 3466



GOOD
FURNITURE

A te, OD












Special Value





)



Wardrobes, Marble top and other
Washstands

TABLES for Dining, Kitchen,
Radio and Fancy use, Larders,
Waggons, Tea Trolleys—China,
Kitehen’ & Bedroom Cabinets—
Tea Trolleys-DRAWING ROOM
FURNITURE in Morris, Tub and
other styles,

L. 8. WILSON

PITMAN’S SHORTHAND
INSTITUTE EXAMINATION

Gi. W. Hutchinson

& CO,, LTD.
Broad St. _ Dial 4222

Applications from interested
persons to enter a Theory and
Speed Examinations to be held
in either March or April. 1952,
for the certificates of the Pitman's
Shorthand Institute, London, will
be received by Mr, ‘S, St. Clair
Hunte, P.O. Box 200, Bridgetown.
not later than Saturday, § 9th
eae 1952. Fee $1.50 for each
entry,
















éttained the age of sixteen years shall, on the publication of this Order

in the Official Gazette, comply with the following requirements as to
registration :—

(a) he shall within one month of the date of this Order furn-

ish to the Commissioner of Police full particulars as to

- CARLDIEM”

a two storeyed dwellinghouse standing on 10,770 square feet
of land on the incomparable St, Lawrence Coast.



or documents establishing his national status and identity;
(b) he shall within one week after the occurrence of any
circumstances affecting in any manner the accuracy of
the particulars previously furnished by him for the pur-
pose of registration, furnish particulars of those circum-
stances to the Commissioner of Police, and generally shall
supply to that office all information that may be necessary
for maintaining the accuracy of the register kept under

and servants’ rooms.

Purchaser te have option of buying furniture and effects.
Inspection by appointment. Dial 8137. (Mrs. K. R. Hunte). %
The above will be offered for sale at public competition on

Friday, the 9th February, 1952, at 2 pm., at the office of the
undersigned from whom further particulars and conditions of
sale can be obtained.

COTTLE, CATFORD & CO., %
Solicitors. %







ton’s Hill a leading JOYERIAS Y ARTISTICAS this Order; 24.1.52—-15n %
— te kk ee ae (c) he shall, if he ig about to change his residence, furnish to COLA LALLLE™
e EJIPTO 5 TESTS for the Commissioner of Police, particulars as to the date on

which his residence is to be changed, and as to his in-
tended place of residence,

(d) he shall, if at any time, without having changed his resi-
dence, he is absent from his registered place of residence
for a continuous period exceeding one month, notify in
writing to the Commissioner of Police his address at the
end of the said period and any other address which he e

REALTORS LIMITED.

|
tt Aes ‘ ‘ ee SUNSHADES FOR DOLLS x | Suitability—-Durability—Comfort may subsequently have during his absence and, when he
écbae acon, 2 24-PIECE DECORATED SEPARATOR OIL by the Pint. | aster ecunetne are Appeal returns to his residence, the fact that he has done so.
Lane. 26,1,52—2n TE A SETS only 0GRGiing wae dake 3 Those Teste— esr ae _ 4, Any person who acts in contravention of. this Order shall be
& HARDWARE iS ond other shapes with Bevelled {| SUilty of an offence, ters Cable Address
——— £ = for 6 persons $10.16 S|} ond. other Mirrors, ‘Bedsteads, 5. This Order shall not apply— ,
Ralph Beard F.V.A. Lower LLEBOOGSOSA—SSSSSISD | radles, Springs. Beds $10.50 up,

(a) to any alien not resident in this Island who is an officer, or “ R ealt ”
member of the crew, of a ship at a port in this Island, and ors
who does not land in this Island for discharge;

(b) to any alien not resident im this Island who is an intransit :

passenger by any ship, provided that his stay in this Island
does not exceed one month; REAL ESTATE AGENTS,
(c) to any duly accredited head of a foreign diplomatic mission
or any member of his official ‘staff or household; .
(d) to any alien duly exempted from compliance with this
Order by the Governor.
Made by the Governor this 2nd day of January, one thousand nine

e te eda SPHY ov, loumttteertece AUCTIONEERS,
‘/EVANTON THE followi Secretary of the Examining Body. . .
wing Stores will 26,1, 52—2n By Command,
’ Situated at Top Rock Sas ; TURNER
having 3 bedrooms with for the Indian Republic Day ; Sah” ~s a V ALUERS
Lounge, Dining Reon: and Customers may please make aaa Colonial Secretary. ’
Sun Lounge, 2 fully tiled a note and arrange ‘their SCHEDULE

Baths amd Teilets with Hot
Water Built in Cupboards
throughout, outside 2 Car
Garage., Servant’s room, Play
Room. The Gardens are well

shopping accordingly.

THANI BROS. Pr. Wm. Hry.
& Swan Street.



ST. JAMES

If you wish to buy or rent a house on this coast, we
have several from which you can choose. Prices from
% SURTI UNITED CO Swan &

1. Name in full and sex.

2. Present nationality and how and when acquired and previous
nationality (if any).

3. Date and country of birth.

BUILDING CONTRACTORS.

aid omits having » numerous £5,000 up. We also have a number of houses in other 4. Profession or
Trees. % High Streets, portions of the coast and inland, tg .



The above Propertics are



% 'T. MARAJ, Swan Street. Ring: 4683

be closed on 26th Saturday
%
+
x
x
‘\









5. Address of residence in this Island.



av ilable with possession % or enquire from 6. Address of last residence outside this Island. 151 & 152 Roebuck Street,
within one month. The Own- % D. P. KIRPALANI, Swan 7. Signature.
er is willing to accept any * Street, , r 3 NOTE:—Any person affected by this Order who wishes to comply in
Se ee One for A auIee aS ' : : B EARD : & GREIG person should visit Police Headquarters between the hours | Telephone No. 4900. h
sale, 25.1.52—38n * INDIA HOUSE, Swan Street. Prince William Henry Street
: of 8.15 a.m. and 4 pm. | j
SS SSF SOFRGSSSSSSSSSSGGS: ——_——_—SSSSSSSSSSSSSSSSSSSSSS 26.1,52—1n, !







cai ii ai i |



















SATURDAY, JANUARY 26, 1952 BARBADOS ADVOCATE -PAGE SEVEN

as



et re a



HENRY

|| ARr

| EXHIBIT

os |
“A





BY CARL ANDERSON











A_REMINDE





| BUY
PEEK
FREAN

BISCUITS
TO-DAY.

Bie





BY ALAN STRANKS & GEORGE DAVIES

Just put a few drops of
icks Va-tro-nol Open A
nostril. Va-tro-nol pene-
trates deep into the nasal
passages, soothes irrita-
tion, c S stuffiness, lets mt
\“owbreathe freely again! <="

wexs VA-TRO-NO

| MOSE DROPS
|

AS LONG AS YOU WEAR

THAT BRAND YOU'RE MINE

AND THAT MAKES /T
PERMANENT !




YOU, FLAME~-
y AND THE NAME OF
H THE SQUEALER WHO
SHOPPED me ®..








IT SAYS ALL
THOSE THINGS
ON THIS LITTLE



GOING TO INHERIT
HUGE FORTUNE
WITHIN THIRTY











HORNIMAN’S
TEA

——. ——— = - a
on | rHE Pp :
FLASH GORDON __BY DAN BARRY | A R i S WE LOVE
a iM aren so, w TWS FLIGHT TO JUPITER IS » OKAY!... TULIVER, RADIO



































THE
peer ' FLASH! WITH OUR RISKY ENOUGH! I'D HATE orn eva ence,
| ARE YOU SURE THE ¥ BOOSTER-ROCKET TELL ]
| SPACE PRI s KA, JAMMED, WE'O JusT

CY ABOUT MAKE IT AT
OUR PRESENT SPEED!
WE COULD TURN BACK
FOR EARTH!





ONLY E
} LANDING STATION
| WITHIN REACH?






RGENC j
Mone 7 Frees, ) By Dore Ogrizek
\ AP'N! —/



Se j : 7 ‘he Te
| am v.. TAN t
—— Aen |

A

ft th SEG” as
La aa

This new Book is on sale at ADVOCATE STATIONERY











__IT PAYS YOU TO DEAL HER

























SS ne SS SS eS
SPECIAL offers to all Cash and Credit Customers for Thursday to Saturday only
Rn ana ne SS gp
SPECIAL OFFERS are now @vailable at our Branches T weedside,
Speighistown and Swan Street
HOW WiLL AN CPENING THIRTEEN HOLS TWENTY | NEEDING THE TIME TLL Me Usually NOW Usually Now
ON THE FLIGHT MINUTES... A*AND THREE YOUR WEDDING ...TO DRESS




SECONDS MORE THAT T'LL
BE KEPT FROM M’ BONNIE

A MITE... MORE...

Pkgs. Mixed Nuts 110 100 Tins Rose's Sweet Biscuits 147 L236
Pkgs. Kellog's Corn Flakes 39 36
Tins My Lady Soup

Bottles O'keefs Beer 26 22 Onion: Pea. Vegetable 29 24

D. V. SCOTT & Go. Ltd. Broad; Street

THE COLONNADE GROCERIES





Tins Corned Beef Loaf 1.07 1.00







ee

THE MORRIS OXFORD
gels car-connoisseurs talking

BRITISH CAR SETS NEW (mm
STANDARD OF VALUE!

Wherever a new Morris-
Oxford makes its appear-
ance it is at once a centre §
of interest, for here from
| Britain is a ‘quality first”
| car with world appeal,
From ample ground clear-
ance to precision engineer-
ing features it is full of
" ralicing pointe ” for che
YO WAS NOT ALONE IN WISHING TO car=proud owner, and it a
TAME ee SRT VON Calan totes ; a still retains the traditional PLENTY OF SPACE As tor p:
& SHEIK'S ANGER ANDI AM KOW,~~ Gost Morris economy inrunning Seated comfortably in eoithoeet
YOUR FRIEND...BUT OTHERS 5 AND 1 and maintenance plenty of room for ike wc
STILL RESENT AND THOUGHT I HAD touring
HATE you / =i IT TOUGH IN o










-L. DO AS I SAY-I'VE HIRED
T FOR YOU-HE'LL SHOW

. IN SOCIETY-=-
é (VE BEEN ON TH!
Oe! | DEBIT SIDE- y
; x7
NN = Raney



T WILL NOW
START IN BY
DRESSING



























“It feels as if there's always some
thing in my eyes,” cries John. Mother
worries; “Oh! fs his sight alright?”

4) HORSE-POWER
ENGINE

“His sight is fine!” says Doctor The
trouble is inflammation caused b’
glare and dust. I advise Optrex.”




Here's lively
highly respon
sive power
with a reserve
for fast, safe
jreles
driving on
any highway
of the world
coupled with |
al that '
mechanical!
reliability s«
typically

So, every day John bathes his eyes
with Optrex, washing away all dirt
and germs, soothing tiny eye vein

Well!” says Mother some days lat
“I'm glad we learned about Opt
you're a real ‘bright-eyes’ now John!

PROTECT YOUR EYES wezh

| i
% A '
Sr > ' J |
~ tHe | }
a sei hw — fr
HANDY GEAR CHANGE The goa | by one of lever is ¢ pavenisnts don | z* ‘
nces in modern car de- the steering column et 5 - Papin.
ypment accounts for the should be for quick change EYE LOTION [OPTREX) | 4 ;
Morris provides and comfort, ' ’w
SUR echt = _-— | ne 1 {
. ‘ 4 ¥ | Y Ke oy j ,
FORT ROYau GARAGE vi aN THIS TES?

|
PHONE 2385 —SOLE DISTRIBUTORS | "i












118 IMPORTANT TO ME To
FIND THE RIGHT GUIDE
TO TAKE ME INTO
THE JUNGLE.

THAT LOUT
NEEDED A
LESSON.

ER+SiR«| DON'T KNO
HOW TO THANK You








PHONE 4504 :




PAGE EIGHT





BARBA



ADVOCATE

SATURDAY, JANUARY 26, 1952





Barbados Hit 141 For 2 In Second Innings |

J’ca Bowled Out For 115 ~

BARBADOS skittled out Jamaica for a meagre 115 in another as the result of an over-
reply to their first innings total of 204 and then went on to, or Miller bowled another

seore 141 for the loss of two

. . maiden over, his third in success-
wickets by close of play i.








ion. Hunte sent ten on tt board

The Barbados bowlers took the initiative on resumption with a glance to fine leg for
yesterday morning and remained on top throughout the Gw¥ple off Goodridge and then

innings. singled with a ho

Pace bowler Frank King was Eun was taken at the end of 24 UP Smith who. cut one dar
the most successful. taking 5 for the nex Kf over with the ore at eeu ly high past Miller at gully

35 in 18.2 overs, five of which 79, Bonitto not out and McLeod fF another single. sda
were maidens, while Norman who went in whe inns was out, Mudie replac ed Milles at the
Marshall who had bowled steadily 1 not out. pavilipn end and Smith singled to
throughout captured 3 for 37 in After Lunch mid on. Hunte later sent his score

23 overs, 15 of which were maid-
ens,

Of the Jamaica batsmen Neville
3onitto top-scored with a useful
27 while George Mudie at number
seven carried nis bat for 20U.

Conrad Hunte and Camie Smith
who opened the Barbados sec

- innings, gave their team a good
start by putting on 90 for the urst
wicket when Smith went caught
behind the wicket off the bowling
of Horace Tulloch, Hunte went
on to score an undefeated 76.

Prescod 11 and Abrahams 0
not out resumed the Jamaica
innings of 22 for 1 wicket, and *





King who still had to bawl three Ysa) board then read 77—-5—27.
balls to complete his over _trom @.
the previous evening conceded a.
four to Abrahams who snickedt,”

the last ball for four runs.

Exit Abrahams
Marshall sent down a maiden
to Prescod, and in King’s next



over, Abrahams skied a bounce) ‘4

to second slip where Grant field
ing for Taylor took a catch. The
first wicket of the day had fallen
after 2.3 overs, and Jamaica were
2 down for 26,

Prescod accepted a second
maiten from Marshall who was
bowling from the screen end, and
in King’s next over Binns took a
four and a couple. Again Nor-
man Marshall tossed up a maiden
to Prescod, his third of the day
and his fourth in his spell of five
overs,

With only 12 runs added to the
overnight score, Jamaica lost
their third wicket when Marshall
got one to touch the edge of
Prescod's bat and the ball lodged
in the wicket-keeper’s pads.
Within a second of Umpire Wal-
cott’s hand going in the air, the
ball rolled from DePeiza’s pads,
but nonetheless, Prescod was out.
He had not added to his over-
night score and the score was 34
for 3.

Joining Binns, Neville Bonitto
opened his account with a single

the last ball of Marshall's
over, and this bowler sent down
another maiden to Binns after
Bonitto had accepted one from
King.

Barker, whose analysis was 4
overs at a cost of 7 runs at the
end of the first day, was brought
on for his second spell, relieving
King at the pavilion end, and he
bowled a maiden to Bonitto,

Binns forced Marshall away to
the onside fence for four and
next ball singled to mid _ on,
Bonitto taking another single to
the right of extra cover.

For three overs the score re~
mained at 44, and here Horace
King came on for Barker at, the
. pavilion end but still the score
remained unchanged as he tossed
up a maiden to Binns.

Bowlers on Top

The bowlers were undoubtedly
on top, and the batsmen were
playing themselves in, taking no
chances whatever in view of
their team’s position. Marshall
and King again bowled maidens
and at the end of the thirtieth
over, fifteen maidens had been
bowled.

After the long sojourn at 44,
Bonitto singled Norman Mar-
shall to midoff, and Binns played
out the remainder. The first hour
of play had yieldea only 23 runs.
Marshall sending down nine
maidens in 13 overs at a cost of
12 runs,

The score moved on to 48 after
another 3 overs, and Williams
bowled in place of Marshall at
the sereen end, conceding a sin-
gle to Neville Bonitto. The fifty-
run mark arrived with a_ single
past the bowler by Bonitto off
King in 150 minutes, and the
batsmen took three singles off the
remainder of the over.

A cut to the fence past point
by Bonitto off Williams and an-
other late cut for four livened up
proceedings after a very dull
period, and the score moved on
to 62, each batsman 17 runs.

Frank King replaced Horace
King at the pavilion end, ane
bowled a maiden to Binns. In
the next over from this bowler,
Bonitto hooked a bouncer off his
body for two down to backward
square leg, and cocked another
just short of Marshall at square
leg to run a single.

Last ball of King’s over hit
Binns on his pads and went onto
the wicket for this bowler to
claim his third wicket for 25
runs in 12 overs. It was anothei
serious blow to Jamaica, three
wickets falling for 46 runs in the
pre-lunch period, and the score
68 for 4. Binns had scored 19 iv
70 minutes,













@pme TO MEET THE squaw-in-Law, | |TE2t EON THE DAY OF MOMS DEPARTURE ‘
HELL DOODLE , DAWDLE,
HEM AND HAW==+s5



/ VERMIN! AREN'T You EVEN,

/ DRESSED YET? MOTHERS

\ 6 DUE AT 9:30 AND ITS 9.
y Now! YOU KNOW GOOD AND
WELL IT TAKES OVER HALF

at HOUR TO ORIVE es THE

hh

They'll Do It Every T

. to double figures with a cx
_King took charge from the pa- drive eS the eae ‘ae hi
vilion end after lunch. He bowled bowler's expense ; Pe

ta McLeod who got the only rufl Goodridge continued from ti

of the over with a neat glide to .oreen end ang his over yielded
deep fine leg. Norman Marshall , single, a crisp square cut by
bewled from the screen end and smith, Smith got a couple wide
sent down a maiden to McLeod. 6 square leg off Mudie and then

Bonitto singled with a crisp cut i
’ . entered double figures with a
to point off King and a leg bye drive to extra cover for another
sent the total to 73. couple
Marshall bowled another Pe

Miller came on for Goodride
at the screen end and Hunt
straight drove him for a commen e
and then got two more to mid
wicket, The total was now 26
with Hunte 16 and Smith 10.

“4 <4 +
GBonitto had batted 77 minutes for 40 in 45 Minutes
uis innings which incluaed three _ Smith took a long single i
oundaries: point off Goodridge who was now
King had now sent down 15 bowling from the pavilion end

‘overs of which five were maidens #4 later Hunte glanced him for
zand had taken’ four wickets for #,8ingle, Hunte drove the first of
29 runs. Miller’s next over beautifully to

George Mudie joined McLeod the extra cover boundary and
yhose score was 1. Marshall con- then played out the remainder
wnued from the screen end and Goodridge’s next over resulted in
vient down another maiden to ®@ single. Smith cover drove one

maiden to McLeod. Bonitto hook-
ed a short one from King to the
square leg boundary and then on
drove a low full one to Barker at
ymid on who held the catch. The

4 acLeod. Mudie opened his ac- ‘0M Miller and got a boundary

count with a single off King with When Thornbourn misfielded and
a hook to deep fine leg. He then then singled with a similar shot
got ~ couple to extra cover off the Each batsman then singled to mid
fourth from Marshall and turned ff to bring the total to 40 after
the next to fine leg for a similar 45 minutes’ play. The tea inter-
amount val was then taken with Hunte
Horace King replaced Frank 22 2nd Smith 18
King at the pavilion end with the After Tea
total at 82. He bowled to McLeod Goodridgé bowled the first over
who cut one to Proverbs at point after tea to Smith who cut the
and owing to some misunder- last ball of the over for a couple.
standing between the. batsmen, Hunte turned Miller who contin-
McLeod was run out when Pro- Ued the attack for a single to for-
verbs returned to the wicket W@td square leg and Smith took
keeper with the batsman yards @nother to the same_ position,
down the field. The score board *kipper Bonitto having to run
read 82—6—1. around from mid on to field the
Off The Mark Par:

By good running between wick-
Miller the incoming batsman ets, the bastmen put 50 up on the

was quickly off the mark with a tins with a single by Smith off

single to long on off the fifth. Mi in 55 .
was later beaten and bowled by ieee tee ok ae, Powe nets

Marshall and Jamaica had lost Smith in attem
§ at pting to turn a
their seventh wicket for 83. short one from Goodridge, cocked
Skipper Arthur Bonitto joined the ball uppishly to short square
Mudie and played out the re- leg and ran a single, Hunte cut-
mainder of Marshall's over. ting the next down to deep point
Horace King bowled a maiden to for another.
Mudie, and Marshall sent down The score reached 64 with
one to Bonitto. King bowled an- sharply run singles and twos, and
other maiden and so did Mar- Tulloch came on for Miller at the
shall. Mudie singled to mid screen end, Hunte late cut the
wicket off King to send up third delivery for four, punching
ve who stented 8 big hit ee through the covers for an-
off the next only to sky the ball other boundary two balls later.
to give Marshall at square leg an Goodridge was kept on at the
easy catch, The score board then pavilion end bowling his thir-
read 84—8—0. teenth over and Smith pushed him
Horace Tulloch the incoming away on the on side for a single,
batsman had a brief stay. After Hunte gliding fine for another
turning the first he received from boundary. A beautiful late cut
Marshall to square leg for a Past a slip for 4 saw Hunte
couple, he was bowled with the race to
third and Jamaica had lost an- . Smith swept one of Tulloch’s leg
other oicker with the score at 86, breaks to the fence for four, just
Goodridge the last man in played peetlna Mets ana, — Rng bi 2
out the remainder. ater he cut at one outside 1e 0
Mudie pulled King to the fine stump, and snicked behind to give
leg boundary to enter double keeper Binns an easy catch.
figures and then took a single to Si
mid wicket. Goodridge then Proverbs Goes In
broke his duck with a sharp sin- The opening partnership had
gle to extra cover. In Marshall’s pul cr 90 runs in 83 m.autes, and
next over Goodridge got a boun- Smith’s score of 40 included 2
dary high over the head of Smith fours. Proverbs joined Hunte, and
at cover to send a hundred on the the first ball he received from
board after 195 minutes’ play. Tulloch rapped him on the pads
Frank King was now brought 8S he played back to turn a leg
back from the pavilion end and brgek Se ingled has bist ;
his over yielded three singles . oodridge to senc
Mudie ase = from wees Proverbs rs to take strike, but
to fine leg for three and later he played back toa short one
Goodridge hit Marshall to wey Sot Ceedridee w hich he did not
long off boundary and then got 8 behind and oe the ball on
another boundary with a big hit t@ his wicket without scoring.
to long on, Barbados had lost their second
Mudie pushed one from King weet for vr additional run. t
to midwicket and the batsmen _°*!pper Farmer came in to
ran an easy single. King bowled partner Hunte, and after playing
Goodridge with his second deliv- Goodridge uppishly to square leg
ery to bring the innings to a close he singled Tulloch to open his

: : scoring.
= oe — * is a a“ A sweep for 4 to leg by Hunte
scored 15 Fncluding Ger boun- 84ve this batsman his 50 in 93

:_ minutes; he had hit 6 fours. Hunte
bat for 20 with one boundary to tured the last ball of Goodridge's

next over for 2 to send up an
his credit. even 100 in 97 ae:

» = Bas He was batting freely and took
B'dos Starts 2nd Innings consecutive twos off Tulloch with
Barbados opened their second ciy7jing cover drives, Farmer

innings with Conrad Hunte and pushed Miller to Abrahams at
Camie Smith, Stan Goodridge cover and as the Batsmen ran a
was entrusted with the attack quick single, the fielder took a
from the screen end. He bowled shy at the wicket at the bowler’s
to Hunte who took three to the eng, missed and the ball went to
left of square leg off the first the boundary to give Farmer &
while Smith got a couple with a During a spell of 7 overs Tul-
crisp square cut off the next, The Jock had conceded 34 runs, and
batsman then played out the re- the batsmen choosing the open
mainder, spots in the field, and running
Roy Miller bowled from the pa- quickly between the wickets car-
vilion end and sent down a ried the total to 130,
maiden to Hunte. Smith singled With 5 minutes to go, Skipper
with a push to extra cover off the Bonitto brought Goodridge back
first from Goodridge and Hunte into the attack in place of Tulloch,
played out the remainder. Miller and Hunte twice forced him away
bowled another maiden this time to the boundary on the mid-
to Smith. Hunte singled to square wicket fence to take his score to
leg off Goodridge and then got 76 and the total to 139.

Time s=simeee By Jimmy Hatlo |

HE'S UP AT DAWN
TO MAKE THE START SURE +=-~

AH» KEEP

i MACKINAW
Colt

WHATS THE

RUSH THEM PLANES

ARE NEVER ON
TIME ANYHOO!





BINNS bowled off his pads by Prank King for 19 runs when Jamaica continued the first innings of their
second Test against Barbados at Kensington yesterday.
Here George Mudie also came
into the attack and wicket-keepet

Binns eonceded two extras.

Stumps were drawn with Bar-
bados 141 for two wickets and an
lead of 230 runs. Hunte

overall
not out
The s



76, Farmer not out 18



BADOS Ist Innings



A M or run out
C Hunte ce Wkr. (Binns) b Mille
Cc. W. Smith b Goodridge 6)

w A. Farmer c A. Bonitto b
Goodridge

G. Proverbs c wkr (Binns) b Miller

C. B. Williams not out

N. EB, Marshall b Mudie

F. King ¢ Prescod b Goodridge ..

DePeiza c Mudie b Tulloch

{, King c&b Tulloch ........+5++

{, Barker c Prescod b Mudie

Extras: b 1, n.b, 3

Total 24 setes 204

Fall of wickets: 1 for 22, 2 for 85,
for 86, 4 for 91, 5 for 136, 6 for 144,

7 for 159, 8 for 186, 9 for 190.
BOWLING ANALYSIS

QoQ M R
S. Goodridgr ‘ 22 a 45
R, Miller .. sidass aD 1 63
A. R. Bonitto il = â„¢
G. Mudie .. : Bet 49
H Tulloch . . 4 1 9
oe A ist Innings 115
Prescod c wk. (De Peizi yb

Marshall

DPD. Thorbourn c wk. (De Peiza) b
F. King
Abrahams c sub (Grant) b F. King

. Binns b King esedace
Bonitto c Barker b F, King
McLeod run out ‘

. Mudie not out .

. Miller b Marshall bee
Bonitto c Marshall b H. King
Tulloch b Marshall
Goodridge b King .

Extras: lb, 2, b. 3 .

FPRZQOH-Z2>z

yr

Total ees vevveves 115

Fall of wickets:— Mor 22, 2 for 26, 3 for
M4, 4 for 68, 5 for 77, 6 for 82, 7 for 83,

8 for 84, 9 for 86.
BOWLING ANALYSIS
o M

fF. King geese 18.2 5 35
H. Barker . Ars 7 2 8
N. E. Marshall 23 15 37
H. King . ‘ ¥ 5 15
Cc. B. Wiltiams ‘ 15

BARBADOS — “ND INNINGS
Cc. C. Hunte not out
Cc, Smith ec (wkpr.) Binns b Tulloch
G. Proverbs b Goodridge oe
W. Farmer not out
Extras (b 2; Lb, 2; w 1; mb. 2



Total (for 2 wickets) .... 141

Fall of wickets:— 1 for 90, 2 for 91.

BOWLING ANALYSIS

Oo R
S. Goodridge seoacs ky 0 55
R. Miller + 4 4 32
G. Mudie ........... 3 1 9
H. Tullock . sere & — 38



Cricket At Merlyn

The Commonwealth Sports ;
Club of St. Michael will meet
St. James Sports Club in a cricket
match at Merlyn Grounds, St.
James at 1.00 p.m. on Sunday

The teams are as follows:—

Commonwealth; E. W. Drayton
(Capt.), C. C. Clarke, E. W. Bar-
row, E. D. Mottley, Jnr. J. Q.
Tudor, Jnr. J. Lorde, H. Wal-
cott, P. A. Vanterpool, E. Elcock,
C. Cox, St, Claiy Blackman, St. C.
Downes and C. Perking (Twelfth
and S, Packer (twelfth man).

St. James Sports Club: L. Best
. and his discomfort great—especial- J
ly against Miller who was bringing Atkinson’s place.
the ball in viciously. With this type Both Thoms and McDonald
of ball he now bowled Worrell and had improved on their previous
showing and were at least show-
ing careful if somewhat clumsy
there defence, At last McDonald forced
Ramadhin past point for three.

The lunch score was McDonald

(Capt.), H. ffill, D. Reeves,
Cumberbatch, L. Walcott,
Richards, J. Byer, W. Gilkes,

Lewis, A. Marshall, G. Richards

and S. Packer (twelfth man).



TOMORROW'S MATCH

AT GARRISON

A team led by Mr. E.

McLeod will engage the Barbados
Regiment cricket XI in a cricket
match at the Garrison tomorrow.

Play will begin punctually
12.30 p.m.

Mr. McLeod's XI will be
McLeod (Capt.), F. Taylor,

Thomas, C. Depeiza, K. Griffith,
C. Pollard, G. Downes, C. Wood,
R. Norville, R. Craigg and S.
Spencer. Twelfth man will be H.





Police Courts 10 a.m,
Second Jamaica-Barbados Test
Match continues—Srd day
11.30 a.m.

Presentation Polo Match at
Garrison—5 p.m.

Golf at the Rockley Golf and
Country Club

Police Band Drill Hall—9.00
p.m.

Fe ue Je
|| WEATHER REPORT
YESTERDAY
Rainfat! from Codrington: .
in.
Total Rainfall for month to
yesterday: .35 in,
Highest Temperature: 83.5 °F
Lowest Temperature: 69.5 °F
Wind Velocity: 9 miles per
hour
Barometer: (9 a.m.) 29.988
(3 pan.) 29.917
TO-DAY
Sunrise: 6.13 a.m.
Sunset: 5.55 p.m.
Moon: Last Geectali January
20
: 6,30 p.m,
High Tide: 3.20 a.m,, 3.03 p.m.
Low Tide: 8.17 a.m, 9.15 p.m,
WHAT’S ON TODAY



BINNS

W.1.Shattered Australia
And Then Themselves,

(From HAROLD DALE)

60
understandable.
account, but wickets were valuable.
minutes for 17 runs of which Stollmeyer had ten when he
played over a ball keeping low from Johnston and was Ibw. |

Walcott scored a swiped single
' before tea and was out immediate-

remarkable since :t came from one
geod length balls
Lindwall delivered. He was bump-
ing more than half of his bowling
and this was unsettling the bats-
Weekes who
was out three balls later for zero
trying to hook one of the bumpers, the first innings total.
mistiming it and being caught by The Seores :—

It unsettled

At three for eighteen we had the Harvey > Gomez ...

in are unreal.

curious spell,

As witness Christiani,
shared a few with Rae but when W.
Miller relieved Lindwall he play~
is first ball, a

He had Atkinson .

half volley Walcott b Lindwall ....
gently back into Miller’s hand. He Weekes © eae
had scored seven. Four for thirty- GDrsUan! © ee

Hoon

Five for 34.
Gomez Cheered

There was an enormous cheer Lindwal! ne 8 r 2
for Gomez—in fact the only per-
cheering was é
Gomez. His feet were killing him. Australia’s 2nd Innings
But he stuck it out and scored six {hone tia Rama Scere
before Worrell
had scored any at all, However
coom sat upon his brow,

After gallantly, equalling the
existing top score of 11, he pulled
a ball from Miller into his wicket
with the inside edge of his bat. Six © McDonald watching the ball
on the bat, but once losing sighs

Worrell had lasted a long time Of it and having it spring from
but his scoring shots had been few his bat to square leg.
Just before lunch, Gomez took

son present

predecessor

the board said Worrell six, total
seven wickets for 56.

i obviously felt
was little hope for him. He essayed
a few strokes at balls often short

| but was bowled all over by Miller not out 15, Thoms not out

for six. Eight for 59. extras 1, total—no wickets for 42.

44.4

SREP OE COED

%
R



HOWLED

SYDNEY, Jan. 25,

Stollmeyer and Rae opened the West Indies Innings’
with exceeding care—care that was almost painful but well
Runs were of no account, time was of no!
So they stayed 36|

Australia’s ist innings
MeDonaid ¢ Worrell b Gomez
Thoms b. Gomez
Hassett c wk (Guillen

Miller c Rae b Worre!

feeling that has become familiar— Hole ¢ Gomez b Worrell . Gy
the Tests that the West Indies play Benud ¢ Stolimeyer b Gomez ......
They do something Lindwall ¢ Worrell b Gomez ..... .





Ring c Atkinson b Gomez .....

it some Langley ec. Weekes b Worrell ....
a kind of Midsum- Johnson not out eikee

mer madness where sanity is out- Sxtrae
lawed and chaos is the rule. By DOS rhieennkas
of it they had
Australia and were now shattering



shattered

BOWLING ANALYSIS
o M R
Gomez ’ 18 3 6S
Worrell



Rae C. Langley b Johnson .,
Stolimeyer Lb.w. Johnston



Gomez b Miller
Worrell b Miller .

was bewitched and Atkinson b Miler Reka di
after 80 minutes his patience rose
outside the off Guillen not out
stump to be caught Langley bowl- Extras

ed Johnston 11.

Ramadhin b Johnson +e
Valentine c Langley b Miller .

Total
BOWLING ANALYSIS
‘ oO M R
Johnston 14 3 25
Miller alnaesié 7@ 2% 26

McDonald b Ramadhin ...



5th. Test

@ From Page 1

LLLP PPLE LLAMA LLLP ALL LPVPPL DIE

BARBADOS TURF CLUB
SEASON 1952

STANDING AT BULKELEY PLANTATION,
ST. GEORGE

PRIDE OF INDIA

(Bay or Brown Horse, 1945, by Clombo out of The Bud)

STANDING AT ALLEYNEDALE PLANTATION,

ST. PETER

STAR WITNESS

(Bay Horse, 1945, by Fair Trial out of Speckle)
Fee for Each Stallion .. ait $48.00
Groom's Fee $1. 00 cash ‘per Service

The above Stallions will be limited to 40 mares each
Barren Mares Half Fee return for One (1) year only

For Appointments apply respectively to :—
D. A. V. WEEKES, Esqr., Jordans, Plantation,

St. George.

D. WARD, Esq., Alleynedale Plantation,

St. Peter.
A. LEWIS
Secretary,

PLES PSCC CCSPOO A.



Rangers’ S.C. Holds:
General Meeting |



r; Vice Capt., N. A, Worrell.



——-



Johnston then bowled Ramadhin
who had not scored. Nine for 60.
ly after tea going forward to make Guillen and Valentine
a yorker out of a good length ball
from Lindwall.
Lindwall one. Two for eighteen.

played out time, Guillen not out
Walcott bowled four, Valentine not out two, ex-
tras six total nine wickets for 64.
This dismissal was all the moie Nobody could have imagined
that the West Indies would be in
such a position ater hustling Aus-
tralia out for 116. On a pitch no
more than of moderate pace they
had succumbed as if hypnotised.
They still of course can win easily.

Anybody can when a hundred is



SSOP OPO OOP OL OL LEE AP PPL PIPES





: : i ois 3
ee



56606

ca

i

SCPC

SoS

-

CLL CLP LPP PESOS



POLICE HAND



















ST. CECILIA BARRACKS
The thirteenth Annual Gener ) a ae
ting of Ran ’ Sports Club 4 age ha
heid at t Everton Club, \
Reed Street t, last Sunday n
Sousa un ae 8 A cua
ted for the year 1952—53 )
, Af "KE
Management Committee: | £
O. ICT a Vice
L hus ESDAY, 29th JANUARY
1, C. B, Seott; Trustees 1 Dance Orchestra
S. Grant, D. Norville and Me 3
Jones, Clarke, and N ION 3
Worrell. members of in i ; =
Committee cket Capt. “ . Refre on Sate
team, S. Grant ice Capt G9 oak esi
Clarke. Crieket Capi. “B’ m
® Norville:Vice Capt., R udolph
Pinder.!Football Capt., Rawl Pin-



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PAGE 1

SATLRDAY, JANUARY M. 1M2 BARBADOS ADVo, v I; PAG I THREE Belize Issue Crops Up In ••London Times Sugar News ." • LONDON, Jan. 17. rrvspondtrni column* ..[ the Londoti Tim.tost battleground f nduras 1 %  Mr. A. WoMfseiiiv writing frorr %  muil that the tn| of before the Truster-thip Council of the United Nation* lud attracted UL-hi-'AN. so little attention in British MWboUa, u| the papers and added 'Vet the disSoutn African Senau-. has unDtrte with Guatemala haa taken a \L.H-U ., m MOTiaJ u Mr. AiUiur form which luunu that it kg now Moore wooo. founder of the NaUl Incoming another weapon in the %  UPBT industry. He declared at cold war." the ceiemony; A reply ha* now rotn" from Sr "We -re on our way to producJ*"** ->"* Mindoza, Chief of UM Ing the million tona of sugar a Treaties Section and OfrU year dreamed about by many in lxe \" lh e Guatemalan Ministry I .... of Foreign Aftaii %  tram attaining, thai %  ' = ai^iio-all> ligure. Whatever increase Wt) IJt M d ,a "" %  ** '" %  m '" rn..y mise -ill be ;.h*orW,i Britain in Bell* our growing population. The D Kr,t %  '" n <" :DSgajrj of the British Empire : ..„ "about so ibV h.-.,. 2?**j,""SK 17^3!'S . T<*5.. _M < M n. ,,.,.„, to ,0^^^., ^ British but it is hopett • regain itformer level mouthl the campaign aeaaon. Under the gad] ,.. Gua*emal;i haa Taken on wealth Sugar A *i cement. South a %  ***• virulefl ee Broadcasts on Africa U restricted to an export GuatemQla Radio directed to Belr INI totalled 19.775 advocate armed violence and the %  t 291.081 tons from killing of Europeans the Brh..' Communist Influence The memorial to Mr. Moore-Thy are couched in language Kinds at Compensation, on which leaves no doubt ii North Coast, it [S a Conuntntlst influencebatata %  the 40 acres for :ill the will uorn Communivt on whu-li Mr. Mnorew.i..,! ul.nitrd cliches are used. It Is significant the first cine in Snuth Africa. ,n *' th Present Government of imported by idtn from Reunion. Gu l em 1 ,s under %  t ron Com Tliere M I iJpUca of tin erode n ? unl l Influence and alone among wood roller mill which he built ^JZT'f* 1 .f?** !" ^T"' *? IMSI \\ eek-end Was Liveh In Grenada Ifarbour Log In Carlisle Bay %  Carlsen, the Law, and \i aiy \ttlt-<> The Salvage Money Strives For Racial Unity Trial (M KdwMlion Minister Starts I ST I i 4 n *•' imsBtM Ma %  II of V i stsw Wa t f I .1 It | dell wall) loi-l. TinVmerican p od Mr Has recent l> %  In charge o/ the I %  D %  Seawelt %  ..! ..( < .use A m mlOn Bund %  i -. i %  i stntattva ended a cork in 11 party on u%  f |l v t-h.Mia-r* n M*dees. O Oraaasusn. 11 taste** ra Attlee M Usler of tho •*n from U,c m. at TO kcd ^^1^^ m^SSS^HS*?. tTliK.'^^"^^ !" WW> ^nret." which actually saves, or helps to .. D ....."-.Mr Wolffsohn stresses that most ve. ship^ or lives at sea. WASHINOTON. people i„ British Honduras are Salvage mooey Is generally Senator Allen Ellender. chairio ya i to hc Bntah Commondivided among the owners, oflieeis man ot UN i .S. Senate Agnculwealth, "with the exception of a and crew of the salving ship. turol Committee, has Indignantly handful of agitators whose direct Mow it i calculated denied complaints from U.S. inassociation wit), Guatemala has if ,,„. SJgVa \far dustrial sugar BPtl r been known for Mime tune" Ha %  ..imi "( neglect undtr the concludes: latest U.S. sugar policy announced "There ia an urgent need in the KlrfOSTON \ 1 oil Idneatton Fllen and Victor Graham h.nifI.-IIIstititi'd today ill the Moms uit at Old Harbour JS miles from Kingston. u>< Qrahajn are ehaVf^al on four counts of eonaplfS* I iid conspiracy nd to effect a public mischief MilM>|in is elvarged on thretciHins • itaelal Unity. ol conspwtng with the %  -' %  f-t % %  *i i ""il t1 • %  IT*** I .i public •LftlHS rU-rilier WUIIIb Maal AUW sp.-..L mote Ihau 35 ratasf. tlM ni-1 is %  Kp ac ta d to Witei, sha reAurnad to IjigUnd U u-days.—(C.P.I 'areness an %  %  CAPTAIN KURT CARI.SEN hatlr?-Kiy mm I nwii I %  nee—the praise of all who honour a truly brave mini. But will there be a cash reward loo for nil rVo|ili> wh., kimw the captain said la-st night: "That\i mtfrummtai in rormlnf the last thinn he would think of.*' drnnttalioo whkh wi Tba laws of salvage are laid '''" < plgtj, In Touch With Barbados Coastal Station in run m* 1 %  w i a. 0a nii'nuuv i Ti-in_WM I differ) I -I -I .!.....< risssAll-oil % %  IH*I. %  I-' ! %  .. %  I. H-4 J aswas KINGSTON Operating revenue* Pit.InService Company. Llmiu-d. [.tie oparaUnj subsldlarj of Jan doiim JHtt outside harbour and Public Sea-vice l-imiU\|, continue %  a*ks lor help, u aaluatic readercd? to show improvement over tsSl MWliI ven r ;inrt. notwithstanding iigher In racial quest lot: ll'K-l last Willlun TV".p>li.. i %  i US i.i Uta.-. DC Senator Ell... %  moth. -, country ami. .the, ' %  "'dependa on the dsuasjr of Iht J*^^ months ended O^-loher 31. liw _* B l:; siana. a big US sugar$•'" C^rn^mealth. His ^ wr „ h ,.„,„,. ,,, (h ,. IMI operating ravaouas amounted ^ so on. producing areji. has asked Mr. Malasty s Government have U, r*34.853 aniinst £M6.746 for AtTlee* .. M the Indian High Comml *elf. "The l.rwest industrial h consumer i %  J|II. '" lie told a B.I! The whole | ither'shirTmnv l,n r VB ''Ue deductions totalled cussed at a i R p -presaion of understanding from decided later by an arbitrator. Draht-aWAu!!.' rf 5* **•-•' %  .u_ — „ i_ %  •— n_i._j I..J — _..... J __ >_ %  .. : ._ inrnreiKf. snares of Jl Kingdom i l v.oul.l IQW I u I! i? Nil !" wBT CIS ^ .. balance of £77.013 ap..ut of the sugar business. They S" ariw m tte onTliriKh '"' ?> m00ey ,f 5? f n UnM """ l*''We h, sreunt..^ of th, ,sasalu want to run thingto suit themp,^^ on lh( c^u-., Am „,. '"-'"A''' --vmg I he ship y^ny. JniC. Public S.rvice r l |.' v I. ,I|U IOI ,11 they can J^n malm r Ship is nut •derelict Limited This balance, conwrl> •*-*•• %  • I-\HlilUi' i out of the Cubans and u-o the „ ... When does a ship become ted to Camtdla n doUars at the _, ,,. . s--_i AirstrtctUl public to Mr own AlleKalunis Denied nrti of t2N to in,, f. arnounu hi L Ol' M. Lltt'lUlI dirll adv^nun at the same time" „ S r Mendcia. who wrtU-s from When nobody is left on board. $225.1*48 and alter l!>,033 e*,,.,,The users had alleged that Mr. ggf J 1 ^"""'V",mnuSt"'-----" ThaX m *" n mu !" m n ,01 lh "" r,n '',mxn f %  > ,J "*" 1 paa\v the ramaining *2lo.6lft pi to $I.M per common BM p m-rit company. The than his balance applicable l„ Jamaica refusal lo Public Service Limited common trttw tempt to revu-e lOkW prices. He J} !" 1 c la?m* *tc I'.CT^" L thai Captain Carlaen la I8| ""Communist day, and adds ijut ntlrtf d to a ps .ng" on ITS mainland ""' in, the worst period of Nazi* %  •?• *y" to 7.7110000 ton*. I drop of 4nn.onq Fa^,,,,) in K, iropo Mimc ),, Lo,,. abandoi. trm; below r.nnual expecte.l dedo,, aasjribad the Guatemalan Hut. of course, there is nothing Binnd. .atitiide lo Nazi influence. I %  grateful underwriterfrom J-M*>*'• • • Ttu r. are now two fashionable rewarding him for the money he St'VA. r*pl words." be adds, "to describe any has saved them in keeping the I c BO crowing. rmnuf !" ealtitude contrary to the interests Flying Enterprise from becoming lure and trnnsnnr* form* the of colonial Powers: the word a totl loss. rmDlnvlng. Indiwtrv 'Communlst• and the word 'agttaCnrlsen's one-man fight ha* no v -i-nir in the FHi Govtor.* According to this new termpm ^,i,. nt The Hying Knte!'the inology all peoples who try to ^ , M)( to ^ wnrfh f snn nnn %  I. rmcast off the joke and right for r.,lom and independence „f are mare -agltatoi %  '"" share, in respect of the 12 i ended October 11, 1950 13,464. (Sterling conversion .Canadian dollars at same rate), $1.43 per share. POLICE GET HIGHER RATE OF SALARY ni'P Co-ops Iii Si. Lu-ria G<'t Big FiHp Did munists'. the DeOpIS ol cause they no Ynger Sfl exploited by Britain; and UM people of Guatemala because thi> in clalniing their legitimate rights.'* -BX' r ear BO ISO.000— I..E.S. least ;mother CASl'HiliS, Jan. 22. Oo-oparattvoa in stLuwa bave received o great tUlp following the %  ccant visit of two lecu.i -' %  tne United Kinguom, MessrsGeorge Webb and Raymond Howes, at the instance of the Cunpuoller for Development and Welfare. They examined the Dtirj I i operatives movement op the St. Theresa i/o-opcrativc Society. Vicux "Port snd made rert.iin iiuomiiicndations to Government. It has -ince been officiaUy announced that the St. Lucia Govl rngoant has applied for CD. and W. funds to enable the post of H ,ich. 1963 %  instead of its cU-sing date this setr) and Mr. Harold Simmons. St. LucU-born, U.K -'r-ilned Couparauve omcer. who h:id been ngaged in numerous oth. T Opv. i nm.nt duties will b. relieved ol otbOT duties to enable him to p,rronB full time duties of CoBritish rifle still in the running WASHtSOTON. Sunday—The 280 Is still in the running a* the rifle to be useu by all 12 Atlantic Pact otwtrfc i II has not oeen rorced .nto tne baekground br a 0.8. d.-esion \es:erday to place a mult:-niiliu dollar order for i Garand nlle. A senior Brush \Vaab>ngton satd : Siandaroisa1 on ol arms for AUantx Paf rorces WOJ 1 W" meant to impi%  a mm-d-a**s;tch 'o %  • %  n • ir.nciunremrfl .it %  ; ii:. .... 280 riv rine iot go mo lull produotion ')5i iu a realistic an^ reasonable oner" The reason tor this order to a speed-up in the equipping BIHI tr, n :i* Q sns t il r Mswei forces in Europe _ano cmtinoen rents Ktcpis Sili'iil PAHIS. Jan. 2 Koieign Minister. Salah El Din Pasha today refused i or deny reports that he had asked the Bons4 Foreign Andrei VyaUnak* to supply HusAian arms, including tanks to Egypt. Pressed by correspondents to make a definite statemeni on the report, the Minister evaded their tjuest In an interview with the CairoArabic newspaper Al Ml-rl lerday. Vyshinsky was quoted as lhat Ina Bovwl L'nmn will try to assist economically and poiiticilly all Middle East peoples thirsty for liberty and independence to free themeotvas of Wrstei:i economie dominaUon." —r.p CASTRIES. Jan. &3, .skirting from Jjnuary 1, is th,. St. UICI Policy Fonv wm Set a higher rat,, of salarv thus -*• Acuity bringing them into the *-amo S-'iences i CASTKIrS. .) 1 lion tor Girls to the I I College of the Wot Indies for the academic year to October, !:>_' be under twenty vSsM January 31. 1P53. The award wOl results in the Unlvaralt) College %  ..n rebruar, The aw rd arlH win bon salary scale as the Grenadi '''""ble for three years. Police Force. This decision was To* "H.ouneed by th 0 Secretary of |r,w.mcc. incidental* and pan ft" btate for the Colonies. ,-,ww.-, FLASH-CALLING ALL LADY SHOPPERS 7.1c. NOW 50c. tvered Corded POPl.lN remier Alcide De Ca*pert'*i Government suffered defParliament Friday when the Chamber of Deputies voted nn to 210 lo increase the pay ol low rfcata. Tlie dnfaoi doe In the Government'.-' tt Munition.— V-9*. NU-SWIFT Ths Fasleal Extinguisher in tha world Types available for all classes ol hazards f.lff*Olf'f'.I.Yf NO ANNUAL REFILS NECESSARY Relil only when used COURTESY GARAGE "ROBERT THOM LIMITED White Park Dial 433)



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i J&lnrcafe EMTAIILISHED 1895 SATURDAY. \N \RV M, l52 Jamaica Collapse In Fact' Of Accurate Barbados Bowling BARB WOS SET FOB SECOND WIN (BY O. S. COPPIN) : i 11") IT. I rate OOWIIPH in ri-pi;. to Barbi a total of 204 when play on ihe wcond day B trh>dO>i JraMJH Test ended al KvrMmgton 'lay. hen :i seemed fairtj SOU. UOWB li-l (Mt ,1 had %  liimlasad in :( %  • %  crnenajgy %  %  i (I it4isning %  ocnr sort of advantage) for the %  uiuroament. Collapse Bul a; l i-l 22 foi Iho low of %  N ygstevdas odd 93 runs md they I | uui for 115. Norman Marshall and Frank Kin* who :ook eight wickets than), turned iii individual bowling performances thai murt lake pride of place among the good deeds the) uw already d might d" in future in Intercolonial rrirket Table. Turned The tables have deriiutaiy tamed In favour of Barbados who with eight wickets in hand have %  •%  .tbliihcd %  lead of 230 rut*. There Is litUe chance of Jamaica's pinning down Barbados to a small score today and thetr only chance of avoiding defeat will be to attempt the improbable nf bulling for two dass and forcing a draw. %  i.t. game of glorious untcrtatnUcs there la always the chance of the improbable takif it does In I too "ill Upleasantly surpruaxi bUI it would be v watching. Some DKeooc The Jamaica batsmen yesterday suffered even more OCUtaJy from OM which afT Barbados batsmen in then own first innings, conservative and unenterprising hiring. It sterner! as if they had aping task of •coring. 173 runs with nine wicket: a' something of monumental proportions and scarcely the realms of possibility although thenwere the same ideal conditions prevailing %  ) Kensington I —bright "imshlne. a firm alekel iii,i %  cool cloudlet day. The not out battman, Pre rod IDd Abraham*, were as subdued as the babes In the wood to the bowling of Kin* and Marshall who opened the [Uuba i Caution Bui Abrahams' i-uln.ii o-iu no dividends. Be aas i -ugni flat* nght behind a King i only a mailer of I ua own; all i..i III Ironl it, the ball hitting the Qranl at Utul to* bad leal %  nother wicket. %  Dd.su lauwd flattary .uragement. gradually got m intensity of it* death-grip mercilessly as the innings progreed, in 1:'. lot i part of the game .1 h ookad v.. much ttto DM BVKhlne working Wll lent less efficiency, i IC< vtlers on Top The bowlers dictated lag Isgoao i runs came ha the • Hba rat Mad labour.. The first fifty runs came hi ISO mlniitej, and trtln was chiefly dug in | brikht spot in the inningprovided by Btonj and Neville Itonltto that was reall\ the day. 34 for the fourth wicket, before HumWSJ bowled off his boot and pod by an Inswlnger from King pitched %  nd dipping I Top Bcon Bonitlo top-scored witti £~ but he to deceive H. %  l %  %  %  big things of I gfT i TT* II c looked Ukc breaking i ill and %  med to woven els tiowa lor Wi iuii.Spirtled I let ting pirited hitting b in helped to solve gaa and the cenlury war) n sverage scoting ul one run glmo two m mules but it must be leinerabered lha whilst the tlrsl ilfty look 130 minutes to the second fifty had taken but 4a minutes. A determined BJgguU bowler King resulted ridge's downfall, bowh-.i pad for 13 while Mudie lAayad %  caralul the extent of sweeping the pHCB wiin bis cap, carried oul for 20. Hi t Performance Norman Marshall's figure* ol I musl eonstitute one of his best performances In Intercolonial nickel. | have never seen hun ix>wl with m .md resourcefulness. He cut Ine b ill back from the teg even more this Innings than he bowled his off break but whenever be varied his method of attack the batsmen were in trouble All <.'•""'• Her Feel Ate Her Hands .... %  her pen held between tboui arms and nas alway. us* | %  kg, report•1 111! ...' %  I !-formed, pet < ein of law Astseles: 11 d record for I : box lor %  %  %  talked to of call: only one nickel, us there's nr. lime hunt on In, ll %  jdaejr: A Sydney den store erected in old T.v. %  %  ttoM it had no stag on It, bed Ihr public apparentlv decided it i hing well. This week. when the '!eror>ti'n< mantled, store £407 in small change at the bottom of it PRICE FIVE OMggV U.K. Troops Seize Egyptian Police Barracks Building BRITISH H.g.'HS Sue/ ( | H tdquartaca in bra i pitched battle will tla? police v. u. -uir.-iHlei At least Qtat llrttish golditi and 3ii DB mined number of E.nypu:tn wart raportgd killed. Wahting was still cdttUnuu laat ra> Bl m tankM were flritiy" 20-p>ai;ider ourvt gt glsnnst point blank range %  %  — — ^. %  CONRAD HUNTE. Baibaeo* apeuuui b.Um.u ssnds his teasa's total u 100 willi drlva oa his tosa fion Tuuacks Iweuna. yasUreay UV second dsy or tho Jm*lc Rarbado. Tr.t t Ken-angiou At close of play aT— M WM 7* not sat Hobart. your Star'* column journal was the inspiration which won Miss Ad ye Lord of Hobart, Tasmania the fir*t prise of C 10.000 in s lottery Her horoscope said • "On Tuesday January ft buy s lottery ticket.' Until then, -lie had regarded horoscopes with scepticism. Good Bowline Horace hung too (lighted hot deliveries cleverly and htsUfMJQ the compluneni paid hun by the selectors who brought hun la even uftcr Holder's performance was .uui UaiUados bad already won the First Test by a handsome margin. Frank King, who t-ok seven wtCket* in the First Test looked every inch a match winner again and the fact that he dismissed half %  innings is a worthy follow up of mi. tapBRsgdve ugrtorm figures of 18.2/5/35/5 should not go unrecorded by tin \. gal si lector.. :i opening pair began thoir hUk ol consolidaUng the HarbaOos • run advantage and scored at an even rate always in front the clock. Hunte in generous atonement for tteit wilh %  re of yield thnt lonUauistwd the mediocrity of his more recent innings-. He employed the off-drive, th' hook and late cute to score all around Ibfl wlckej and Smith lioni whose bat runs have flowed tni* tuurnamei.' with clocklike rt'cui if.I,.,.*.*! i litl 'Vt\ Wlita Igrttv was .. willing partner i>rUl Tl (1 I fUA 1 U QBI M Iggft ! Di. Rob%  York's Kivwrude Church, tells his ingregattnii th-i Americana neglect their souls. A tier-sou's face is "an involuntary but accurate la leg of the -ml" I) the Doctor, "and ^oo mam faces today can be characterise l as 'vogue. Sydney: Veteran cycl I I Old. 77 rode down to Bonoi Dcscli Sydney and dipped his hjgyclc wheels hi the PBCUBC. On October 15th last at lerlh he dipped them in Uie Indian Ocean. Old bad niiiien the whole Intervening 3,000 miles as his eonlributfon to Australia's Jubtl* Unils (>f U.K. H.'.l 111 'Oiilili ri-.nnau W.I. DISMISSED l if*0 f > r 'K ,s FOR 78 RUNS SpeedT^uee AUSSIES HAVF IIKSI 1 INNINGS' LEAD Or' .18 RUNS (From ll \i:ii| It HALE) SYDNEY, Jan. 25 FIRST ITEM of the programme this morning was the .summary conclusion of the West Indian innings, but Qtlll' .en and Valentine refused. w allow it to be quite so summary %  all that. Tbey persisted for half an hour and by takJn.; land t<> IH made it Ihe biRgest of the Wcht bulaU %  >-rr Mi.i' Una happily atlueved i bnllar stroke i>ut wag iMi.. V.'''vaiiluaUy < aught by Langtay. bowled Uiiu-. Smith lefl at 40 after snicking Tulloch leg break outside the off stump into Binn-" ready glove. nnd soon after Hunte completed his Individual ''"'f eenli : minutes. Proverbs having played on to Ooodridge for a 'duck" onlv let In skipper Farmer 18 not out with Hunte 70 not out at close of piny with the Barbados total at Itl for the loss of two The Test continues today 10 UAIV1 I a blediler%  from Malta n Ice I %  %  %  u that %  %  m conraated with Hn tion. pofcaaman ol the I Admiralty said thai N '"" doubtful whelm r Sng p-rni the Malta %  UM bad bean ordagad so p sea. He said thai he %  • i n<" be" lievr Ibril it was aiivlbiiik RlOrO than continuum patrols, and manoeuvre. In WaUCtl UM BBOI %  engaged. He said that Iwo rruiseiT. aireraft cai number of destroyers are now at Malta end %  'l""biful if all of them had Iteon ordered to sen 0 r. —r.r* Friday's Cricket Wm Doleful %  From FRANK MAROAN) sviwfiy i Frlday*i doleful opening o the Fifth Test in the Austrnli \ Wi %  %  ir i. grii provide cricket that was not worth Itl lompared with lh gene sal eonceplion of Test landarda. Test i rtekrl Australia which has been sicki ing a long llmr aim cocoplatat) following cii-eery |i I Syiln.A I'r • i. I %  UM fget lhat IB r TB1 rims gives Iho that il w. CXI ig %  %  %  %  %  ptlon. IV boisi 104*1 ^ ut 13, kxliaild and Tli oil and aforiell who had Itanggd ends from Uie pravioui For half mi hour, we had bgag PANMI H HM i utad Nalai i offered th. Cornnuinsssj tie* i Km Iteds a choice 0| thn lion and proposed thai Hast Oflicers hegm \"'ik oul 8k :ii,. rna I ll nes> \i. %  %  i' promised to iropnsal and reph li* l| the ii.xl IMgfnl Of i %  >., Th. U N Command wi %  %  %  b.... Vt dogji i %  %  h UM a % %  • n • %  1'risnnei Issue In the Wat Prisvu %  %  To :i.'ii" sapiund Rod troops wrhk i> th< '' irau Ph< _Jl-Uk piogresa while the': l;N ''-' %  '" "•nig men tried to erase'""'""""a ,n, 'm to Ihe t i leg. '" diiy. Keuslaa sarvad BO thai th* ...v,. mi turning bad to tit,. Allies as prisoners some ,u ii s. u i; iggg men saaaan have tweu Ineorporai %  ii ii .i —i* i* French Send Jets* Tanks Into Tunisia i i .ut. -torn %  luius-Ak'' m %  %  .1.1 OOt i'K. learnad whethei the uauu> were !<• uiloli %  ah ,i io 1 ui.i %  i gounti i'le alerliNl In |>| %  i %  ..ii 'i %  %  i'.|i ni which is caused OP dead BgM an 200 wounde.i m all %  French jel tlghteis, i I mg III uie III -lc-dav disonier.' %  HaiSDsHsUal group ItealeainK in. i i ::. I %  vii i.Hi/.a mils' won • .rresn I at F-iil.. diive against Kg., pt cuertllas. and sab< operaUng from Ismallia, whldh lies close to ihe rlntisn i Hsadgfuaiaat. •• the Sui Cai si "•re. The Bntish already h . td SSggg than .100 suspects n | bouse bi house eatch of the Aisb Quarters of lsman setted a huge munitions dump m UM M D -lem Cemetery Th.-\ hargi-d U>1 the P>4ke h;Kl fniliguinst the terrorists. %  %  i-red to Mi! The Egyp'iMii < maawd into extraordinary scasioti %  ktr the "BalUe al %  .it. police niid Bruish troops, amid speculatina that the comple'c breakoff f Angln-EgyptMn dip 4SBSjd —r.r .i -3 '.a:,i tb.,! tertaJn nu .'.. : 1 I i polite .f i %  %  meeting m tw. aORgj aid, th I ik< n t> %  vdeib\ M 'i • i ed *o .ii nu the i*. %  %  Government Jind ilectdod to ask ihs t'N to deekra Ini I . the d Is put I i r TORY GOVERNMENT APPROVES LONDON. J4ii !. I'liinMnu.tn Winston 111' Oastiun.at gsvs .It ippreval to U eaekfag for kia UISH to diaoiai tas Auxiliary Pftbcm. blsaied for msny atlsekon British troops (lurdln* ill* -trstegir Osnsl ton.O P. Canada Gets First Native Gov.-Gcneral BUN1TT4I shall for four runs and xled hook off King soon "..:. Bfessj wl.i ii be got into ihe with sgg) ,, .:,drive i,IT full (tar, lag Howe from K ,>ut up at mull Another Plotter arTAWA, Jan. 25. lit. Hon. Vuicei.t .Maaaey i scholar, aipionut jmi tnilmlr"*'* isl is to become Canada's flrst nativi Ooagffnor General, sggftaai Ihr braaatsen mat goes back far into UUs country • ggapnl lbs appointment as successor to Vi coam Alcxaiidvr and the 18Ui General since ihe confederation was announced last night from Buckingham Panic*: in London and from the Office of Prime Minister St. Laurent H Ottasra. Bolh auiMiunceinenU I The London announcement said that the King Is relieving Viscount Alexander 60, so he may be free rm bowler Horace Kingj to n-gponsibllllles. hp This is pre5umed to be his expected appointment as BrU lanUstei He holds the rank Field Marshal m the British Ail Mi St. Laurent's added that Vin-mnt AJ< %  January* a*n request Ami th.,will lie taken over by Chief Ju. tice Thibaudeaii Rinfrf the assumption of bis i date when Mr. Maisey DO ing in Britain will take office w not immediately disclosed. — (O.P.I Hi ,il>'ii\< Kills 80000t%66p Ami 5,000 Oatfle %  VDMl iweltermg Byi sfj i;iuj nisJM %  %  : %  forests have been destroyed. Merc icssad dawn l Aborigine:. 0M villsgc escaped from the namta | ing into %  DOarb y lake as their gg—U.P. out making She srould (Msatkaniad "t small crowd of 13,000 Si Australia collapse on parfl -I but i 1,-rilli.mt swing bowling Q Gomel—the outstanding cricketer of the West Indies InrougJkDUl ipturad acx'cn H IB -ivers in Australia's debacst. s<'t just n nu g.-t to equal Ihe Aussie total. the West Indians by their v ful performance brbUfhl laai the i %  > % %  "' um then inn%  upportari who by now few In number. Wor-.t Performance The day ended with Ihe W-s' M down fnr 64 — lh" ivorse uBgXrgnguusea ol the touiwlll be remembeied .' thi %  rfoi matni %  Uuwlkng i I % %  hi i/i "/;/,• %  >• C.O. Munt i*ay C.7..>00 Damage half an houi the% nine between them and again.it l.iwliriK mfeiior to thst which they had faced in Uie rtrst inningv liomez was obviously feeling flat '" %  immense three hours Iwiwling in the scorching heat and to-dsy cold wind could not eullv • it his Hied muscles. After hgtf an hour the batsmen i liegtiii to venture scoring stroke UIMI Thorns drove Gome/ wllhi fslr decision while McDonald on] drove Worrell for two delicate Ions glides down to fine leg, WlUi' '(these methods, they pushed lhe| .jscore along with sudden rapidity | iptom (>u <*wn r %  JMHIIIH iftei IS miouies, had GRENADA. Jan. 19 "Td. | JiisUce R. C. Manning's length Ai ibis >tage. Atkinson WJ* judgrnem thl. monung in lh brought on for Worrell who had |CrcanwaU rail bowled five 'Vers for 13 iuns. -decided in favour of Iho plalnUfl MeDoiiald chopped AUxInson Who Claimed £5.300 damage through the slips for a single, his dwelling and hou .*.o!.I tb The score was 33 when Rama ahm i-lieved Gomes to bowl (or the first time in Ihe match, lbs first over Waa %  maiden well pltahad Up and attacking the -'iiiiMi lbdid getting much turn but I Hog ami length gjarg goed. The ar was also a maiden, marked by delivery variations in length as if he were feeling for I spot that would most embsrrsss TV %  10 Communist Jots Shot Down 11 AM ,v llfcAl' WUAR'ii.ns | Btali i S-brejeU shot %  own in M LO. la iei I Koroa Slifi'I Curs Jitjii|> on rrutk i.inrs gV lUNOaW ' .. Nine |* td aitd -" thospilab/>-d witen Iwo '.! %  lumped the tracks and crashed suburban house lele It ... ril ll... .In ul IIIMI ...iln mn— Hi bag of Had Jot Inea Dacaatbai 11 nt the (k Mt %  downed %  record "' ,,mu,< ' I" n P*** 1 irrakitig IS Communists speedy bims when the ,,.„ .,,,1, lightei ed The cause of the nccid-: —t'.F. | not beta determined.—|t.p. ihe can %  %  uggd ava %  %  kckei %  wishini' 1 at Saturday plu 4 this las' West Indies' to* %  'hing like Teit now joined %  Bon igad with snarl I .n e-a H b aw M agj roi ii raisulnug BO '..laraaican own to a minimum. Norman Marshall who eientuallOara fifteen maidrn overs by the end of the InBll I iccuralg that at this stage %  v 'y and added to the value of his • %  malnlgtff there "iridge raise the century Malawi 15a Got New Pjolkci CgUef LONIKN. Jan. 25. Col. Arlbur fcdwin Young, 4 London Pol %  | %  '-il Thurs%  HNri of the %  • .gned as %  %  — HP i Maiden Over. Atkuu>"ti till bowled on the iUi Au-st'-*""krt and %  nowad onlj the VI ceased. w|nl< bis duel on with the batsman His thud ova i.ii b contajnad tain %  rtly was also a maid• On i' %  %  X SotJfaJ Rfnolution Approved Four Die Suddenly ll' of of Mai h 'i Igsggj In the course <4 |udgment Jusnet Muning said he was willmr to infer facts in Ihe caat lhal the subversive ugndancleg due to r . ., i. Ol I Ol Civil eommoti"ii lie-l own in that pan <.f the Island coiurerned afU'i Pebt 24 anil i. was IIXIIKI lhat Uie pla.ohouse ami not eoiiiicctod in ith UM civil i .' ....;.. %  dant al .bnoiinal condTlUl < The plalnUfl i liM.-i U) that hH Iota was ovarad by • %  t.ixi'i indei the i-ondUlona of '*w %  ne 'ii la 't arbitiatusi. unttfl Mr F. M. Henry. arvi scnioi %  n l>. of the local bar y i %  i. Baniter-at-law. insti II 0. Paym Sotli Ifb* The plaintiff hao taken oul Ihe poih i on FebFour sudden death, ixcuire.1 l*tween Thuisday and %  Sistv-tbree year old Willium Drake: of l.lghtfoot Lane. St Michael mo *• odmittl I I i p.m. on at 90 p in. iMuth ^ %  % %  I I haemoi rhl fifi>-four-yeor old St. Claur Aileyne of Paynes Bay was adm.tted •! ao am on the none ,b/ snd died at 3.41 p.ni %  i i on AjJeyni and Dnikat bodaa wrro perfoimeii by Dr. Sur.Ofl Bataon, a old child of Spruce Street who Ihe hospitnl ggj detion, i ihen r %  ith sn ulcerated hand, died about tUJO a in. yesterday. Dr. Browne who [leifornanl the post morteii attnbuled death U" I pneumonia MOlk-ent Skeelc of Holetown was found dead at her door about Cbnunlt930 yesterday. A post mortem sxaminat.'m PARIS. Jan 2S. iib-l Nations Main i tss calling on th-Council to reconsidei .,. ship applications along with a from Ubyn. as 21 to 12 With U abstentions The roaoiulion cud not spa i -'Dockage" deal admitllcanta but Russia made It clear in del %  foi it i oral. • . from %  g .-, %  %  %  %  %  will lie i,<--ii-i lot SjSal %  • '•' %  il h % %  •% %  %  marked ggfl I ery few limes in recent I Soviet proposal for an important %  —I'F. •:. performed by Dr. Klrton. Mm Arthur Will Smh To Withdraw HfW VOUK atArU l %  he will wUhdraw from gfhieh his name i entered unU>ss withdrawal is prohibited by state law. Tini it*--' statement of Ihe Ml questions about the entering "f %  i ..f lh.ft, cArthui ..! !• Hampsliue and Wisconsin DUb.. 0. 11 enlei his presidential primary and if II and h>' hai it he will Jo so." —I'.P.


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r PACl FOIK HARBMsO*; ADVOCATE SMI U.UW J XS1 \K\ M IM1 i\KKU>U> :J§2L AUvOjsflE ItHt •! Kfl4l*Mw Saturday. January 2, 1952 ~~THK MIXVTITI TIO.\ — Some <>f Mr. Adams" statements in the House of Assembly on Tuesday during the debate on the reply to the speech made by His Excellency the Governor at the opening o( the Legislature on December 18,1951 need clarification. What for instance is Mr. Adams' authority for stating that "If we had a Governor who was not sympathetic to whatever party was in power he would The Governor of Barbados is appointed by the Crown; represents the Crown and is responsible to the Crown. He must obey any instructions that he receives from the Secretary of State for the Colonies throunh the Colonial Office. Barbados like Bahamas and Bermuda is a colony that possesses a representative assembly but it has not Hot responsible government. Barbados' constitution is written in two documents, the letters patent which constitute the office of Governor and provide for the Government of tht Colony and the instructions to the Governor of the Colony The Legislature of Barbados consists of the Governor, the Legislative Council and House of Assembly. The Executive is vested in the Governor, Executive Council and Executive Committee. The Executive Committee came into being in 1881. Since 1M6 four members of the party commanding a majority in the House of Assembly are appointed to the Executive Committee at the beginning of a new session of the House of Assembly On December 18,1951 His Excellency the Governor Sir Alfred Savage. K.C.MG, announced to the President and Honourable Members of the Legislative Council and to Mr. Speaker and the members of the House of Assembly that he had provisionally appointed the Hon. John Chandler. M.L.C.. President of the Legislative Council as a member of the Executive Council, the Hon. H. A. Cuke. C.B.E.. M.LC. to be a member of the Executive Committee and on the nomination of the leader of the majority party in the House of Assembly Mr. G. H. Adams, Dr. H. G. Cummins, Mr. M. E. Cox and Mr. F. L Walcott to be members of the Executive Committee. The live members of the Executive Council who are His Excellency the Governor, the Hon. The Colonial Secretary, the Hon. the Attorney General, the Hon. John Chandler. M.L.C., the Hon. Sir John Saint and the Hon. H. A. Cuke, Mr. G. H. Adams, Dr H. G. Cummins, Mr. M. E. Cox and Mr. F. L. Walcott are the ten members of the Executive Committee. This Committee introduces all money votes prepares the estimates and initiates all Government measures: it is also reipons ible for the conduct of public works and the control and management of Government property. It discharges in fact almost all the functions of the Executive Council. Since Barbados is governed as described above, what interpretation is to be placed on Mr. Adams' claim that "we are the only government in the whole of the Colonial Empire that have our policy carried out without modification or qualification by the Governor or the Colonial Office?" So much depends on Mr. Adams' interpretation of "We" and "Our". If he is referring to government as effected by the Executive Committee then the remark seems superfluous since government through the Executive Committee is the legitimate machinery for government approved by the Constitution. If. however, he is referring to government by the majority party in power then there is urgent need for clarification, because nowhere in the written constitution of Barbados is there any mention of government by a majority party. Until Barbados changes its present representative institutions for full responsible Government, any talk of a Governor's tenure of office being dependent on his sympathy towards a party in power does not appear to be in accordance with the constitution of this island. The Governor is appointed by the Crown, represents the Crown and is responsible to the Crown. In Barbados the Crown retains a veto on legislation and the Secretary of States for the Colonies has the right to appoint and control public officers. The three B's—Barbados, Bermuda and Bahamas— have representative institutions but they none of them enjoy lesponsible government. SYVrHKTH AMOHOI Synthetic production of industrial alcohol will shortly replace the fermentation process based on blackstrap molasses, believe experts in the U.S. industrial alcohol industry. An increasing amount of the industrial alcohol now available in the United States is being produced by a synthetic process and prices are falling. In view of the growing demand for blackstrap molasses for livestock feed, great expansion of synthetic production is now taking place in the United States. It is not expected that costs of molasses will ever again become sufficiently low to enable the fermentation process to compete with the synthetic producers. The only large users of molasses as a basic material would thus be producers of cattle feed.—B.U.P. I Were Silling In Stalin's Seat I ... h \*k tl urine Hit war a Brills* Inu-llu.n.r in..,.. wrotr i>>r in. iii-i4n *ii|ifr i 1.1 of UV war UluaUea a* II waa Ukrl> u. appear to Mil Irr's sUIT. today I put nijsrll In ihr position at a Raaalan— a Soviet Inlelllsrnc* Officer writing for Stalin and hi* Politburo on In* -.lUulion rrr%  iiil b* nrwa of %  lunmr alam bomb. Weal of Europe under Oaiwral Eisenhower, stand* a tore* of 20 combat-ready division* .ial.on.lu opposition tlamanti in uS In br SSKUlM. I he People'. Democr.ce, ol rSErtecu.. u> B. IBROM MtUUB K"~Pe. rt.II.nnns; our (maml suptnorMEMOKANUl'M TO TilE %  . it, the KoiionuTlvuaship which DEPUTY CHAIHMAN OF THK ..,„„. *•>''"• I-w „ u& reJoulMOl Ulmpiin, SOVIET COUNCIL OF MINSIMILAR progress tu been 2 !" J^"T£!2S TISSI ISTEKS: rn.de In chin.. There If reason, WE here lies for subversive agitation which will Western Europe is helping to apltahsl solidarity .Mii.jr I.I .**..,. ft. *i %  * *• a^j—*m>.. WE here in the Kremlin n.ve however-to bell... that the Illegal JJS^SffillW iaamlt been cowldenl hiilivru, Ih.t rear ors^lsallor. In Poland, Ccho %  tropeKng^Eii I ol reprisal, would ue.c. the .ov.kl. Hungary, and Hum.n,. %  P help to speed the collapse of the Wrslrrn Imperialists fro*, usinii gjj • %  *• Thr r arc ^^ 'y ln the atom bo nb against us unless low. %  atiitalli.t system wc used It .gainst then. Ilrst. 'he Americandare to UK the "piwnal system. The mere suggestion in Novrmatomic bomb In clandestine Preeg ber. I50 that the Am. n...i t ..... internal war against us—similar. BRITAIN, and the Sterling Are., lempl.ted the pos-ibilily tf usinii 'hey wlU say. to our war against for wnicn tne MU „ s banaei. the atomic bomb In K..rea 01 the WeMem colonial Powers In nIU ,„„„,,„„ m particularly China was almost enooah to gplll Asia — then these underground prw-r | oul position. tha Mdrth Atlantic bloc. lorce. will emerge once more our Soviet economliu predict Wide popular anlipalhy to the We. must expect to nnd them ntt lhe continued dram bomb on humanitarian grounds with strength exceeding that sterunJ Ant resource*-due ._ ha. loined up in lhe West with which they displayed against elicit trading with the doll-i the conviction — carefully fosterFa-clst Germany In the last war. _„(,, ^a ^ mt e f ne non NOBODY'S DIARY Monday — There is no modern invention which I detest more than the telephone and none that I 6nd more useful. When I consider that I can pick up my telephone and speak to someone in London for three minutes lor three pounds only — it makes you think.|\ doesn't it? Actually I cant afford thatj^ luxury very often and the only time j \ I ever did someone else paid. But that's | > not why I detest telephones. I detest j; them because they make such an awful t .\ row when they ring. 1 have never been, I* convinced by the argument that a note i ^ or two from Madame Butterfly would !* not be a more soothing way of attracting .* attention than the ferocious BRR-BRR g /•V# von to raiems OYKHSKXS Barbados Annual Review 3/from Advocate Stationery Chrome Plated Fittings d by liolltical aacncieat—that THE ANGLO-AM* Kit AN Sterling world—will bring abou nocauary lo revise our puiiiii tlniiKirii,, not only '.bout lhe bom if itself but lu review once man Uv whole world political allccteU by UlU. Western Europe rather than tin \IJ.IAMI. The British deieai %  new devaluation crisis between United Stales would be the victim* m p ertla displayed Uurina 1M1 prlng and summer. of the Ilrst reprisal raids from the ^ m0| encouraging conflict in ThU crisis may even, they say. Red Air Force. ., ^^^ u,,, Umled States le*d to e UquldaUon ol the But the development ol a JJJJj Gre|lt Brluin SlerUng ArM as an economic miniature atom bomb by the dernonatraled lhe skill ot our unit %  American^ make, it urgently .^|„ lcu | and diplomats agencies An awnt of this kind woulo %  in splitum in Western world into have the strongtst repercussior two campa — that of lhe colonial on the economic, military, and K "" IVwen (BriUui, France, HoUanr i political position of lhe whole ,u *" 1 "" and that of the United Stales. ' lho „^ wt S!L. !" £|i B 1 iV *.> %  UlU. 4. THE INDt'STKlAI. REIMERNAI. M taiTV; II New Factors ARMAMENT OF THE r.S.HJL: is by no means safe to assume IN lhe last nnnun. Iiowevrr. The pan year has seen lhe now thai the West can be detert.-il new (actors nave arisen annulgreatest expansion yet in our from using lhe miniature bomb. taneously with the .u\ml ul UM heavy Industries. We have got Instead of using it openly themminiature atom bomb. They look half-way to the targets set In selves they might hand it Meratij like treating an Anglo-American IMS by J. V. Stalin—targets '<> MnOffM groups inside OUJ solidarity ol unprecedented i.nnwhose achievement. he "aid borders to use against us. lies*. wou|d make our BovM Unkm This would revolutionise the These arc.— safe from "accidents." M'curity position overnight. BOl THE establishment of Winston The surprise which the paronly in China and the European Churchill as Britain's premier, formance and quality of people's Democracies, but within CIIUUCHllX'S recent vi-.it to Soviet fighters have caused lo lhe Soviet Union Itself. Washington; American and other Weftern exit would pul the imperialist and THE probability that General perls in Korea shows that capitalist conspirators in the West Elsenhower wdl succeed Mr keeping pace with design in a position to inflict on us Truman this year. Retiae! Russians damage vastly exceeding The public confidence whici CONCLUSION: But for the that caused to them by our ComEisenhower enjoys In the United development of the miniature munlst partisans in Malaya, IndoStates and in Europe'—reinforceJ atom bomb we could remain China, Burma, and elsewhere. by the possession of the new bomb conn dent thai In the arm* race As is known there has been a with all il s posslbllltl**—will enwe shouji always remain strong great increase during the lau six able him to pursue a niuc > enough t o deter the Western months In the number of agents stronger policy. enemy. (11 From launching and traitors Infiltrating across our In this he will And himself in against us a preventive war borders both in Europe and In closest alignment with the Britain (2) From interfering with our Asia. | urchin support of Asiatic and AMOU The Americans, a„ we have 3. WEST EUROPEAN RErebellion against him. already officially and openly comARMAMENT: In the la t 12 At the same time the Western plained, are spending vast sums In months the European nations ol the world itself would continue to %  nig, instructing, nnd etpjipNorth Atlantic Treaty Organisation be submitted to the moral and ping tho*.' element'. They also have increased their war budgets economical exhaustion f imhelp them to penetrate our by an average of 75 per cent. Thin productive rearmament — a frontiers. is 9i per tent of the effort of the ".train lo which the disciplinec 1 An unsatisfactorily large miniUnited State* isked for Soviet world is less vulnerable ber of men and women agents is They have extended their terms than the West. Htill nt large within Soviet bnr.In • or military service by an average As it Is. we mu't Evidence from those captured of 33 per cent. They have innolicy. At once %  shows that their mission Is to creased munitions production by TEH. HefUn Detmer uim up If I establl*h contact With itis-sidenl Tn per cent. And they have *rrr In thr Kremlin I would groups iniT'nK the nationalist doubled the combat effec'tivcnc | order "Full Speed Astern." '.as well ii, with the of their forces. —L.E.S. EVA PERON NEW YORK. So. al midnight, they went Three years' drought has EVA PERON—wife of the Dieaboard their luxurious yacht, ravaged farms. Production of ustor Of the Argentine and probTacuara. and steamed 21 miles to wheat and beef, the chief exports. ably the most powerful force ir lhe fartorv. from which urgently needed that country—Ti a very sick She kept her promise. She was foreign exchange can be secured, woman. present—but on board the yacht has shrunk to such an extent taW it is strongly reported that she in her wheelchair, for once the 11 Is now insufficient to meet is dying of cancer She Is only least limelighted of all the home needs alone 31 grandees. Butter la being smuggled in Tha it illlons of humble people Dr. Rlcardo Finochietto. the from Uruguay. As Britons know who worship her in the Argcncancer surgeon In charge of the only too well—several shipments tine do not know how gravelv ill hospital where the operation on of meat which should have been she is. Eva took place, told me that he sent under the British agreement All they have been told Is that 1 trying lo persuade her to lake have not gone, she has had a slight relapse while a lengthy holiday abroad. convalescing after her operation Trie Argentine's aged Vicelast November. They do not President. Dr. Juan Quljnno, told which is now employed to compe answers. Try sleeping next to a telephone and you'll realise what I mean. On the credit side I've noticed a great improvement in Barbadian voices during the past two or three years. Less people seem to answer with that jaded tired voice nowadays. People seemed pleased to hear that you've called, and even when I got the wrong number a pleasant voice asked: "is he a patient or a visitor?" Courtesy pays every time. '. uesday 1 was looking through some old papers today when 1 stumbled upon an advertisement in the Times of November 17. It was, "SUNSHINE islands only 18 flying hours from London: 15 days' holiday 215 guineas: 19 days' holiday 255 guineas. Price includes air travel and accommodation at good hotels" The reference was either to Bermuda or Bahamas, but I thought it might interest the publicity committee. It looks as if there are some people with money still living in England. .W-dnesday — One of the headaches which has not yet hit the headlines is the cost of education. It's an interesting subject for discussion. But there is a point which nobody would like to make before the row starts. Aren't we all rather illogical about education? We spend huge sums of money every year on secondary schools. Barbados Scholarships and grants in aid to a University College presumably to increase the number of educated persons. Yet do we pay any attention to what educated people say about the way we run our affairs? You bet we don't. We go to-j the people and canvass for their support to get elected. We all want education but wc don't seem to know why we want it. Because the moment an educated person opens his mouth to speak the squeal starts It's the man-in-thestreet who rules the roost, not the educated. Or don't you agree? Loose Pin Butts Chain Bolts — 3" — 6" Foot Bolts — 3" — 6" Neck Bolts — 3" — 4" — 6" Handles — 3" — 5' Indicating Bolts Cover Catah e 3 Door Stops Wardrobe Hooks Casement Stays Coat Hooks Casement Fasteners C. S. PITCHER & CO. Ph. 4472 Incompetents details about the operme: — Peron has not Improved the Prayer* For Her Three times last monUi. Dr George Thomas Pack, the American cancer specialist who wag present al the operation. wa> flown secretly from New York lo examine her. I huve Jusl come back from Buenos Aires. Prayers are being said dally throughout the country for Eva's restoration in health. But persistent rumours circulate In neighbouring Bmzil that idie is going to Switzerland for a proti i.ti-ii ii-iii.iicM'i.r.'. nr par* haps for the rcsl <>f her life If she goes there, Feran. who K rievoled lo her, m .<. he temp'ed to go with her. If he dors. It may mean tinend of his rule. Few people Uilik he could ever grl back afler an absence of any length of time, even If her desired lo do %  sitiim by putting ittcompetenbin positions of power. Trie army which lifted him into office can toss him out, despite the failure of the revolt The working class of the the President Is so affected hi, wire's illness that he Is b^ ugh ^ by SAXONE E I €' I. I j I V I T O %  Oil MEN Beautifully Styled and made -Shoeg by MAXOXK are designed for comfort and lasting wear. We have an excellent stock of all sizes. Illiirk llox tall Hrmu Willa* < ulf. Da Costa & Co., Ltd. People who KNOW t'OCKET CARTOON iMll Kl LANCASTER shr has only two intereaU in llfe^—her husband and her country. I do not think she will ever leave either for sn Instant.'' Anti-Pernnim — andI there are A g Cn tln o remains the strong !" ^^!) !!T ..V-w^lwi buttress *>' ** regime. Peron. with the powerful help of Eva, i support with higher pay. Shorter hours, and lavish .h.nty paid for out of public money. Even so. and notwithstanding Peron's recent sweeping election victory, which gave him six >ears of office, his supporters have lost much of their enthusnim as crops fall and living aotM ntr. If the Peronn go, what then* The only alternative lo army rule, as those who know the American continent see it. i lhe emergence of one of Peron'. jnde*. who would offer the country a modified form of Peron ism That would mean watering down lhe excessive naUonalism I hat led f^ron Into absurd attempts at achieving seifsufficiency for the Argentine. huJgtni him. IjNlWkaMHl night the In the Magnificent Palm Palace in Buaooa Aires I talked with Eva's secretary. Jorge Martinez. He assured me there Is no ibtlilies more and mere to his I caught a glimpse of her chief associates, before 1 left She was sitting in Great Wealth Bui meanwhile the first lady If Paron should weaken be,..' South An.ei.ci is dying, and th his crushing political burthe destiny of the country ">*>' is. and put If* for tits dyna^ changed ver. swiftly if her Ic itY U-fore PfTfonal •; mb j" husband gives up his place an power oul of love for her Fgrvf men have ever done th for a woman. But there ha\ Foreign trane cenductod on Hi able to Britain, and the Argentlnu, with whom we must negotiate H new meat agreement before March, and who are crying out for British goods, might not be so stiff-necked u they 1 been under Peron Jasstfftksf )ac..rarda tree In the exten^ lty and beautiful palace ground*. dcil ,_ and pu , r .,,. j M j,t„ .| vna ." ,,_-., Her husbands hand rested lightly imi „ 1U Mm personal ambition ^ near her shoulder as he took her -rill (Ull ,„ lu £untry, then his round the exquisite ntalea leds. e *.ai>e route appear* t.. l-e well She is a sadly different womb a i. !" ,^,-,.,. these days She is much thinner has dark rings under her once |,>\ch i-.es. and looks ten years older. Peron, too, is thinner. His v..irl told me that since Eva's Illness he has lost more than %  st.-niand a half In weight. HI Unod foreheiid nnd tinhtlippeil smile show all too clearly the double strain imposed by Eva'* breakdown and the country's mounting economic crisis. UE.SThe Peroaa hare undoubtedb *" f w wom "> llke Eva ip amosied preal uvalrh. Airord.na fo one ivporr. fhep hoi'e alreodi/ botiphl a house m Nirilr.rlnnd and established 1 bank account thee IOJ teell as in NeuYorki. To The Editor, The Advocate— Their prtnue fortune is saul Sir,--I quite agree with the M hare been itrollcn by forelirri ,,. r f,„ m -Film Oogr", th..t OIIIiCi'iitlrrs Sn* : Kept Pronme — — -. — w f— *\ ici ti^aiii i iini s*a-aaa .,. .. and home trade deaU. Inrliufti.iiitrstir Films .ue quite unsuitino the tmponoMon of Scotch i|Ml !" licwl ; „. t up c mpMga whisky and tea for sale BMCh ((f nwral ^.r^ment in this above rhc mmnal prices. island—CUiemas should not be Prtm "ne recent coup the opened on Sundays, and subEva had publklv promised to pernn> are said to have mad.'Hint'' daily shows instead—many accompany hme husband when he half a million American dollar*. %  visitor or unemployed would bi* opened a gigantic riverside exWhether they leave the .nunH'nd of this. plosive factory recently Wortry or stay, the Argentine inflaToo much crime—cheek It—dcrled by her health, Peron perlion spiral gets steadily higher as 'ret the cause—get at the root, suaded ber to compromise. the value ot the peso fall*. PARENT. hursday — What a day. My little diary reminds me that on this day in 1834 Robert Owen first preached Socialism in England. What a terrible misfortune for England. And what a terrible misfortune for little England. Mr. Adams, C.M.G., once assured me that he was a good Liberal until he came under the Cripps-Manley influence. What a pity! Mr. Churchill was also once a good Liberal but now he's a real conservative type. Frankly I've been watching Mr. Adams' socialism for some I time and apart from the tie and public | statements I should say he was a bigger j Tory than Winston. But pay no atten-i tion to Nobody please. I've got to do this to support the kids. No quotations, by request. riday — Miy excursion into the uncharted botanical seas of Barbados landed me in well deserved disaster. If you must stick your neck out. expect it to be trodden on and I now have to apologise for adding to the existing confusion which already exists about the immortelle. The lovely tree which first attracted my attention near the Aquatic Club begins with an S— and has an unpronounceable name. At the moment I have forgotten what it is. Saturday — There is nothing better, Mr. Mottley told us this week, than to get out of Barbados for a bit and broaden our views. The main thing was to get out and get broadened. This would be worthwhile, Mr. Mottley thought, if the emigrant got no further than Pelican island. I agree with him; having first emigrated to Pelican at lhe age of seven, and having spent more than one-third of my days outside Barbados, possibly' as a result The wanderlust must start' sometime and I wouldn't put it past) Pelican to have bitten me that afternoon J so long ago. $ But what's going to bite the other ^ RYI VYIIISKY Barbadians when the deep water har;t i HM M: WHISKY hour is built? If you know your RIT;.! ,Yi\v. : sTotT CHIE like I know my Ritchie you'll 1$ HMM'M > remember Pelican will disappear when IS — the Deep Water Harbour is built (No,^ references to Macbeth). Bajan : Worse and worse. I don't know why I bother to read you every Saturday. —always ask for HARTLE the greatest name in jam-making -//aVV//.V,V/.V.V/-V/AV//.V/.V,'.V.V-V.V//.V/-V : ORDER NOW FOR YOUR WEEK-END r SEEDS CHOICE MEATS FOR THOSE WHO CHOOSE THR FiNLST V1ELLE i i i.i GRAND MARNIhK < -IIARTKM'SF CtJBAOO I'Kt'MfcK BRAM1V Ml MM s CHAMPAGNE Mills ROI.m.RERt. 1IRV MONOI'llli. SAt'TERNl-:* I II Kl i: M Mill II KO> \I HHHI I --III KIM •HIV ELY SHERRY IRY HACK SHERRY HKISTOI. CREAM SHERRY (No .> Phone $ GODDARDS | NOW!! MILK FEt> TI I.KI .MILK Ell" l III' Kl NS MILK IEH DUCKLINGS' J>|[| sM n K MlllllS OnHSEO TRIPE 1 '.(II \ I M I \MR < HOI'S IAMB si.on.nERs >\\l I I m: I *ns i ILVEJI LIVER Kl IM V OX TONC,II HADDOCK s\| MON (n"V"l VITTON LOBST1 I SPECIALS THICK SALT PVfl 'B<\> n:r. I prrlbj; ITALIAN KETCH I I' O 7' .. HOT 46c. J MORTON | FINE CM i MI \i. in. 11\ ::r. ;, OAT II VK'| ?4c. f*r Ti I ( \RR s i MM \M CBACKERS *1 %  ,! ... r TIN .;



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PACE TWO \ BARBADOS ADVOCATE \ SATURDAY. JAM'ARY 26. 1952 the week Water* plan ictired CinH ON. JAMES A. MacKINNON MemUi of tin I Swi^tr who had been b Uos on a short >••'.. Use Marina Hotel left last night by the Lady K*4ae T on his return journey to C11..1I., awotnpanied by his daughter Mi tog then I n the West Imties thev auto spent a lev. ,.. trow St. Vincent \ T present holirlayini in Barbados at* Mr. and M Theobalds u.' S' arrived earlier are staying at Worthing. Thej two weeks here. Mr. Theobalds 1 %  roller of Custom* Si \ Beautician In U.S. M ONTSEMKAT born i U.lliam*. BOOUticlan 1 York artw spent two w. day m Barbados left yesterday by the Lady Redney. leave the ship at Montierrai and 1 W weeks in her home, land before returning to New Y01K. il visit to Montserral nine I twenty years -go, but this was her first visit to Barbados, which she thinks is the prettiest of all the islands. She studied bc.iuty culture at the Poro College ol Beauty Culture. New York, bcloi. her own business. During hei short stay here, MM wniuuni SMXS ttaying with Miss Millie Gibson of I Street. Miss Gibson gave a SurQahib QaUmq, M" Annual Leave %  %  -tuff of UM Ku)*U b.ink of Canada Spain was an intransit pass imps, r through Barbados on Thursday by B.W.I A. on his way to St Kltts via Antir 1a. George is on ajkN %  rbiea h% will spend with hiparents who live in St. Kitts. His father is on the technical staff of the St Kltts Sugar Factory. Sandringham Welcomes A New Face To Breakfast Incidental Intelligence such a man [AltltlAGE isn't institution for a he become s a trusty. L* J Burke lira iilv Sleep Realty Works, Says Doctor Peaches-and-Cieam Complexion Lost By Lale Mights frrtnees for a royal matci. hpractlrally one of the Royal A brant, aarrrt lil.h ttomm s\ mily already, have been seeking fer renturfea II.is the nephew of the the natural subalanrr whleh I Ji-riesa of Gloucester, godson of flvea vounc rlrls their peaeheaI nr-en Mary, and a close friend and-erram lomplrsluaa — baa since nursery days of both Princes. been stumbled on by a British Elizabeth and Princess Margaret -"""si lie brlnffa precisely the niht (B> DKUSILLA 111 1 I I THE latest guess as husband-elect lor Prince*!. Mar Krel is also the safest guess For the Earl of Dam. ittl Waller Francis John Montagu-Douglas-facolt. could urinn all he should to a royal line. Jaw 21-year-old earl la heir u duke, preferred hi. eldest son to v Uuae of Buccleuch (say It do .ervice in the family reiunenl. %  /, who owns 5U0.UOO fair ihc Grenadier Guards. I ill Scotland and la.alaiul. Aa a compromise Dalkelth ji.m£". ..^"I" ** P* Duk • d "" BN V.H. and went to MB h. Scottish lowlands, win, deck of the destroyer arrc are quite a few others about. H.M.S. Vsearay haBucclcuch houslnj utuatioii H c was commissioned in IM3 ;.^2.*'£ > u :k,n *"" ""• %  and Mrvsd in the tnale Was* rssrt of Ule Princess whom youim eaek. famou. for U-boat killinf. sjyi.-itn )oined at Sandringham ,,nd the destroyers Garta ana *EEr n Cmsvrny. There Drumianng. ., pink BE hales the sophistlc„u-.l Ufa ttuh i-a.tle with peerleatrees. bu „., p clu ,e, ,„ the Espress %  oughton at Kelterlng. celebrated „„„„ .how ,h„ he endure-, i, "I* ^' r cl, anclellers and wlln ,,,>. lOUSJl portrait,: BnwhlU. ||E do.an'1 care about clothes adklrkshlre. with a fabulous galhe likes to wear a tweed I 'ry of Itcmbrandts. ld ,,,..,,. This Scottish peer also bring. H i „ m „d „„„„„. „, 20 e best and mo-t usual of all d y „,, ,,„., very m ter. TODAY .si gjopASfMl HITCHCOCK'S THrill.oo Mattvo •STRANQERS on fartov BsSl GRANGER ROMAN "a TRAINMart WALKER Bag 1MB, %  PLAZA OISTIN 111.I -|M| I A Z A !( %  or TIXA-. i Hagr .Tru>lofi CAIETWS*-^ 1—t SJhtnv Tonil, %  *. Wwrmn TsrcrttlKOMir DvutMC riaAMI *SI> IHI M.KII1. gpaal. ft tas n it.i i a AII M:.i lt| Tf. m "WXll TI i-Mins Wat M**Sn Ch.rl*. -Matrrrtl MMn 1" T.,...'. T. • irraa a.iuf. ..!-. >4 snd Mtxxl.v T. Hltlrr MAT !1-N %  p f asttt mitT OB HI Married In Grenada Gollilo Due Jan. 30 M l: When, lh e body goes to sleep home pf the glycogen the skin, <.tirt.ii1aUng It to form r'r'.I.IX CAMP TMIK S.S. tiollitu IN lue t.i BELL, son of Mr. and Mrs. arrive here on January 3011' .mpbell of St. Johns and at 6 o'clock and will leave but .n overseer %  ( H.th I'l.tn'.i' \m hi •*• UX Possen,1 Grenada eers Imoked to leave by the GolM in II u for England are. Mrs. M v ninger d.ni,' i Iliggar. Ml" M. Bolgar. Mr YmntOOi %  : i.ienada and Cocollis, %  : was pe.rcrineii by RV Johl n %  Ml II. Homer Mr. and Mrs. j^^ b( autv ot young gtr i,The service Was rully II. J Judd, Mr and Mr>. C. /V. ^. |1 p | P .i OI 11 it i ar|e |y due to ihe London and a lnUnt._ Miss^^Parf|ltt h (l thl v ^ to hed carly Bui lough believes. After too many late ntgtltg, the "HE n-itard* food", sai I lat night. "Jut as something to %  LMtatB the body. Hi*. Intfimu LALKtiTirS politics are Tory %  I Oxford he belonged - the %  >r UillUsn Bulouih. ,,( sin-fbit of personal (Eton and OxCh.ithi.ni and Canning Clul%  Held Univenity. has pro*. I ltd] bnckground. ,r %  * Tory clubs, 'kin can replace its worn-out I "I think he's interested in with new ones only when • His s-frvife (* %  -Utit %  ; largely so far as his %  Ippljid wiih %  Ml i,-.t.,M<, eBiltsd HIIENDS say that Dalkeith. a landed interests are concerned." njturaJljcourageous person. Skid a university friend. H lUacOVWad thi. whil workwa-ited t-> join the Fleet Air Arm But not only hi, political inbut he %  condudng the war His father, the tcrests spring from his love of the l mil Mihorseman. %  breeder of labrador* (a favourite dog ..I the K.iiah and an all-round lover <>f the quM. casual. In trj i.fe vi.' GLOBE —. I'OMini MOVIE LtADIII* also applies to human Whii.UM body i> ..wake. OM .iv.ul.ilil,. MiupliL>s of glveogeu (iiciilnli m the blond'' "i'1'ply the muscles with energy So the skin is starved of It and I rejuvenate itself B.B.C. Radio Programme II.pleasures *r. j.sNtaav ,,.,.. _— „.....,.. %  • % %  • ,(,, ,kln, atltnulatlng It to torn CoeoUi, Mr. and Mrv Paddy c ( n po,, lh ,„,. BUT say friends — THE Tha %  .rinL./v TSVM. "'"INcESS loves night club, rx 11 nnoi> Th P N*w*. 11 10 y m theatres, parties, all the shine . tisstt s.c.1. : v '"' ,y THE EAiU l ltUv n> u m The Grosvenor-square only when hc *"•'* '•" %  • has to. THK Pitl.NctSb d-nces T 11.. li.f.ar. tig.'. Pg % % %  — %  IODU •lfl.l.. M .|f( llr%t Plclvrr* l HIMKil li %  %  a. wni IMMIS SKE—The Famous ttr.l Indians WALCOTT A tVIIKHFLL negotiating i a barrage of Humpers from Kay Llndwall See The "Spin-Twins" VALENTIN*: X RAMADIIIN I'll S THE Hi M Mi md Mii %  aii.(.i-!l art litt. Miss M. Richards. Miss K ri at Idihaids. Mr. and Mrs. W. 1 before taking up Smedley, Sgt. C. P. Scale. M %  %  %  e in Barbados. < VIII. RlNr. \VII.I.1\,IS For the Winttr 1 |K AMD MH8 MKN-KV J. W. Wnlcott. Mr Mr. and Mrs. A E M skin looks tired been M Woolt J}*'" not been g< Firt Meeting ng the r 'ist.' Party in her honour hursday night. She vuir: sveial placeut lWK IKOWE of HMW*X have D ACK from attend: interest including the Motive ol %  "*'<* %  "> Barbados to spend the |J IT1P ,,„ n| Q | the Governing Assembly, the Nightingale Mew _' nUr n<1 M *** the k(Hv of th# Eastern C mortal Home. the Barbados C*"" X' ew "i cl L Farm Institute Is Mr. C i Museum, and the Child.en', ""^ "ew in by T C.A. J'flg c D nn „ yy,. Adminlslra Gno-iwiU league. St. Michael *'"*' m the week, while .Mrs Secretarv. He returned from ,v > She was very impressed by the p"*? "*£'*?* f couple of days Trimd d on Thursday evening by ,n by the Lady Nelsan B.W.I.A. work of the Leagu—the caie ni • Clill'tren from infancy. The Mr. Crowe is a retired o'fflcial of such a iT..,veni.iit deof Anglo-Newfoundland DevelopMr. Grossmith attended great credit Of the tn.-nt (*<. N. %  t undljnd ami meeting in the absence tin pa nes >he thinks St. Andrew's Anglo-Canstdlan Pulp ind Paptf illness of Mr. A. de K. Fnimpton. (tag most boaiittfllt MtlU. Q Agriculture Adviser CD. and W. place its aged cells ones. Thr. sleep-and-beiiuty rule A—, holds throughout lite, for humnn km retains 1U power to form jew celU iiidenniiely There seems to be little hope hat women will ever be able !< %  •heir faces by rabbit*! extra glycogen or taking IT ... tablet form. The only way the v can Uke i nc advantage of Bullougn's ilnding>, „„!, iby making sure they get plenty p m The Nr*< %  ., IS p •SSSAZ. nirsss <-"<— "•' %  • ii •"'• n-iianr Dv. Ba pm Lutonar*citoiec. EAHL dances when he's draggeu J x 1l* SS ""•""'* ** .V %  •-'! to the floor, and then not 7^; ';^ 1 % n al. u J EJ, u ^.% 1S T ^ m N • 1 t^ %  ** %  THE PHINCESS .. hu '" %  < %  %  •• Haws. Curratii AITXI. ssal itilferent to the routine **'^*k-.' R^t^en^ I ^'.'pl!. ud, '' 1 %  •" %  taininii a rirst-class gallery of ith young rut* T*t. 7 je p m M*I.I K..-"' peUrtl n g THE EARL can be •***>* Quartet happy for weeks working on the **-** -• ** u cataloguing of the Buccleuch %  aorta Review, s is P m paintings. THE PRINCESS U %  so p m Kadio ThMtr*. bored to bits on her own THE EARL enjoys solitude intensely. —I-E.S. 1 chance to 10 P m The Mn. ratio Mali. 10 IS pro Maaic "-g-"— l< -) p in VaiMty At,ay ,.! imp. Mothei right after ill. Mrs. Clark Gable Injured NASSAU, Jan. 25. Mrs Clark Gable was slightly L . uia. "'Jurcd last night while motoring 7Sr*s? irS^V^ l HL WAY • • • B y B CHCO m •^ %  £ttisg+ ::^s-^^ STUB So'j!ni h .hrr,n" re ,? 1 "Tn' %  !" W* >• %  %  % %  <** -„ %  SX/ITIKWr an, expense or InIS^^SSmJS^i K ^T^T^TSS'S^. moon goes Um .ll !>.• no rsxr? Tl "•"• teas loieed out ..) Ihe ," convenience 1 have secured ..,.„ tmmcM arant to JJueens road leaultlng In a collulon. tides, ^ut til"word ^owli^lT runnel ""• f""' "" ,mm m l"!' !*" "', .' £> "' "><• "> "•""" u >•"" ,he d, Mr " was taken to hos%  WaWlB. toth. ncrv.iu, -New. ttem. ..eive-shulterlng lale of esplonnUv „, May Do y" This Is an pital for llrst aid and subs N uenllj%  —,KAH ii.C' exclaimed an 'T. ..„ ^ ,„.„^ fcv "lempt to stop the abuaea_oC proreturned home suffering from inor iniurles and alight shock. —1C.P.) D y time it was announced LKZZUn* drhw ssi hsimllkisd 't tells of an %  ttjgpt byi> ^rirsnaUsTn, gmons; wfaeh b'ttw that St Paul's Cathedral WU foreign agent to procure the flymenl „, enormous sums b> gffiiBI tOWirdi Lud^Me-lntl !..,..?,', ,Vd crrt of ,he ^f"P m V b \? Li 4 ,', '" Wl ' *-'luire. by transfer, the UM word ilowly was omitted Hirstsi as pm*rtul as the N-boinbi ,,,., ,,,„.,.„. B ut how many from :: fm pami/U Bumpton Experimental .. n .atcur* have the lime to dehj. shop ,n p,u, and w,,, of. J .. < ..;; '. .' '„ ,' ; !" g fjj£ o the country. Some months future, ... ,,, .. ,, T1 h(1 (loods urv ,,, later h c read that St. Pauls was atomic aecreU, MtfUH i... I uj hlUv r> rok M.rabout hides a rare moving at the estimated pace of I UOIWniMIi. Job at I ,, r the llnim, of a Cabinet one-iuarter of an m.h vei > .bout among UM ICMOUSU, v.iu Minister's hat. how Karl Scbopp1.236 years. So he came back M have lo answer some preuy gbff Oioots his way out of a %  ndon, smiling fairly confidently. quecUona It mil no longer lo hoise-ln-x on Clifton bridge, and Yet. Is it not posterity? Yiddish to ignor. UMUgh IJniou .! ant] tiumming %  %  i CROSSWORD i iT" !—n n R r ~ !" + '0 M it j pi 9 %  ~ —{ — PI 1" IM "1 IT is — J 3I __:__ IAI-K TI-RIMYT 1H t llMINf. %  COM to tha iiev. Bdasai the button-hole, lh.lt at Mes>rs Hillyard and 'Rule. HriUiinia" Hillyaid'annual stocktaking. %  %  '•' l •' %  %  %  •" , %  ... //I.' I.IIHIIIIII IIKIIIII (I) 1 M POB smi. Bl it can't bI n\ Java, thourfi. a laf ifDinB Pooa'" TbUa inutteie-l Colonel Ellliaoi %  d Hi the VMici laondon club, ti-ylng to %  L He had caught Might ii 1 D .uluic. rallu-i than on ii i" I on. "An g| woman of unspeakable • ••• %  |o OJUMBI mi 8ttM were %  % %  mid M an upnwr bin queens and Mis Howawar, U paid, triere %  i OBJ duat* loen Even the exquisite Mini -nSI ope urn %  ACTRESS DIES IkilJ.YWOOD. Jan. 25. Polly Moran, veteran movk Comedienne died of a heart "T ,,."'ama.eurs.atu. -"• >"> "Jgh. alter, a long ,Mwhen she accepted payment for saying that Snibbo cures cramp. aged 66. She achieved great fame in movies with the lale Marie Dressier.—UJ*. HORNIMAN'S TEA I. Uan.illnf your Nu..<< D| a Cloas 1H1 J il. rm aiiruder no Durgia iti Rny ..a ii tur muaic >4i SO Nreii, (jurtaen It-**. 131 Vnd K*n did Y 1S1 ;i PtasK .up sa. mi ii ?,'" DUl "*• us*( un> 1, s MUCH aui 1 urn MI it II %  30 HIS srlteV•'taos. JI Jl U- pan, a,,'.iiiis in* Dird ,1 I M '„ ill v ., **' applicant will he asked to sign beauty on the far aide of the • % %  >t .-ill his answers *trret. Though she was dressed conventionally, he recognised hi; The well-kr..i.\Ti Communist old love. But always, in tht iiatn.t oi tolling Uaa awajti wako ol lov like a savage dog trying hovM oamo i>ut> Within two seconds <>nrt the p ": quickly, he had finished hi* brandy ant dashod to the telephone. Sli 1 igh Mullet, his triief 1 I* !" v -'>" .aiii.iedulous but mteresle.l my paper, "she had to "Dont looo hor," hc said. Eghan Lght hours r ,, n| > off. and rushed from th 1 h04 i' % % %  1 -ted. Hi iron inudl> under hi* breath #1 1 in aiat dtitv once mor. Stiel //. VoCbhH Rupert and the Pine Ogre—18 !" if-f 1 Whaa Gflar I'.ga hss gone Rupert ramamba-. tha ttoM GasOM tied h>s srruiii*ii>*t lo meat thtn at two Ivouis Huriymg ta iht •oodt lv find, ihrm I "'You'.a be*n J long nnv," u.i Paulina. Dvd vvu find *C ) Kuparl pourt oul ut ttringr uory ol [hi I'" Pjhl bui (he Cuidas only asusi %  oui!|. "*>>. kupan. n!y IBM I %  drain.!" ssfl Bf>l. "Aaya '< %  II I tan vour sack*! toll *htlt aaw %  A ai ail will. :ht Morn.." Genuine Bargains! Genuine Bargains! Ill \1. I.KATHKK II WIIHAC.S llrilislt Made S7.10 now $2.50. S9.68 now S.1.IIII. SI 1.49 now SI.IHI $11.29 now S5.1HI. DaTTATION LEATHKK AMI PLASTIC. All Colour* Mi.l noM S2.HD SS.I8 now S2.ll>. S3.I3 now SI.S". S2.:i:l now SI.20. FI.O\VI.|{i:il (.1 DI'.I.ITTKS $ 2.00 now SI.110 CHASNOS I'CI.IA I \SMIi: v .\ IIOII:I. • VW -•. %  r-bUr.tala. narf •' '•• "liapi mm" • %  lhal tartttralay A,ioi.... Da<>.0..lMMMHl. BOTKDUaoruic: tM l TWt* r ~^T~" MaJy.j ir fir MORRIS FOSTER W iovGom



PAGE 1

sUTIslsUW, IWUKV U IK2 BARBADOS .\DV(>( \ i r PAflt mT. East Indians Celebrate Republic Day Ti:i r Si. Xmlrrir Rnunil-I p ttvllvptainv Police Boys' Club Doing Well III III II IMM. PIIM.IIA>I>II mllan section of the coi.rr..'.aty will celebrate India Republic Day today at **Chantily-' Roy, CJub in Belleplaine Leonards G-p. the rrndtnn shown much interest Till MCMU1 r> l„l MTC of Mr. T. Maraj. The Indian ro %  'he lrland—four Than! RETi! Brothers, on* Maraj, two Surti. ;>allnl and one India House—will be closed for l*.e wfapii u.i> 100 Indian* will attend ^^ Softball Groui> "ill include hoisting and saluting the flag. satisfactor.]>. Officer in charge of the Club told the Advocate .vaaterday The boys will form a Cricket team soon. fill. bH.LIPLAIM. Net 11..1I one of. the member* of this group English .nid" Hindustani and of National songs. was proclaimed a Re%  January 2. 1950. ln•• Ds) >J .elebrated August 15. Mr. D. A. Thsni received telegram from the Secretary i msaioner, Mr. M Sahay. who*.office is at Portof-Spain, Trinidad, stating that %  ., %  l Trinidad today at 7.10 a.m. and 630 p.m. in English on 31.l Cane cutting will begin and 90 metres respectively. Yesday. The Kngim-ers at thh (ae,'i.30 pm. Mr. Sahav tory were kept busy during the MI Radio in*,! fmm weeks preparing for the ID Hindustani on 90 crop season. ,,.„„ Md ttM Adocaie c AT BMTK VAUK .the other "It Is Malt* n-grettable that no St. Andrews faelory. the BUfjO| Swell wishers could be eers are %  till working and the invited to the celebrations due to crop scaaon is not likely to s'art in Ihis Group staged a Variety Knteiiamment recently ami they lOderste earnest Be success though there wai. rain the* rsnlng. i They will so on vacation soon inl after n "Reunion." HAGOATT S FACTORY is exC ied to start cone grinding next %  sday. U was learnt yesterday 1 i [TO rf f"^fflfcuf^; <*> VT^:-, S)?^**-~ x Niii't.-ii nien are rawing up wood at the grounds ol -Is which worr completely destroyed on I 1 Aft i %  ,| -i,( inn, umber slsr it l ready foi A Bathslitb* type boat (in the background) la now tbsii usual and i built for easy hauling up. (At Bat beacb every evening 1 %  Fl-hory Office The wood will be used to re melst of D'if"i!ni 2 ind morning of DfiWi i.ala clf H - iad piiie> •te.1 Thl type of bot is smaller il on Ue •here before February 4. A FOOTBALL TEAM (gOB. IBs Strollers bporu tvum is expected to go to Ucllcplaine to play %  t<-itt>.ll game there during next month. Keith Mapp will Captain the Strollers teu-n. :s imiB [fsi .i m OQf vgffl louuU jvau at u.ilviriil %  >*. ill Colonies Increasiii Sterling Balances "TJiey Put Capita! Into liritain" %  the fact that it takes place on Saturday and at an odd hour i th.morning—8 00 a.m Watchman Imprisoned ••There 15 loo much ot Ihli lypc !J" ''"''' ""','' iLssrnL'ts8srJS% * %  '— s. ... Appeal. Mr. H. A. Vaunhaii and "^ >*io ana uM uog www Mr. A. J. H H arise hell said yes%  *!• irum UM WO* %  mllrming a decisUrnuog w*n*. tout MIS Ion of Hi* Worship Mr. G. B. sate: I own know NOBI causGriffith who had sentenced mg Wssui * >"* <" %  •;• %  "fi i Courtenay Le*'is. a watchman of gnow Ua* fwcAwB} to sscurs DUB*. ii,.,.., si. Lucia end is Professor Rorkley. to one month"* imprisonand that i. to tie it all day tno ol i> 0 | m cal l Wnchcsmsnl for ns*aulting and beating giving n a proper feed on u.tting u r fiuveiMl% and a member of ii 1 neg Jones, an employee of it go at 8 p.m. it woulau't care ne C\JIQIU ,l" DcvslnDmem c. 1 nn :"£" '„' %  "•'*' •""'""' 0u n •'" "*" %  '' %  .-..". I thai lta MINOR miAIHS were tame wu no. m. ., .uawallo.. from „„,.„,., ,„,ml ., : ., fcC.ta provoiT^f. .n^nyTav 1 ^ '"'"' ?S2^ £ i"""" J2 pr.rt rodd8 ^, pr ^,.,„ ^ i0im| ( J ^ M told UM oourt vuu she •?> .'T? "^L^ b ^ 1 2,"!!!!? "' "" l I1 *% % %  dowt£ \mt' factories Hbee Start**! (Grinding Cants LONDON. Hi it.tins Colonteft, spiling Iheir pfOduGw t.> Brit low UM world price* but forced lo buy Brill tin' world pi ..! %  an tgjflgcl puriogllntgtUT 1 sh-_ doeg not dcliVtr, says Professor '.V Arthur Lewis, lh(hul i-o r,. III.^T and vxpt-rt un t'ololU*] Allairs. Profassoi %  %  — the Colonial DeWelfare Office superintendent told the Advocate n.,. OaaonlM ham Uw—tad not* • %  vdopment and .• saw laewi. dbraetlngj UM drlm Of ; car who was rev.-mni: the enr The car was rego verssd into such a position that 0|| vm pnvaotsd from passing and she altracU-d the driver' attention to It. Lewis took objection to her i?.'" 1 .fJK the Foster Hall road. A M Myi nnl> thai UM* ai "e hoping to complete the repairs during the nexl week ii (bare wire 4J job yesierua> moriUng, .v rouor is also on UM juu an i road ii.'kiiniuig to _.-. r !" a ,.r= damaged lain road eeks ago. RcsidenUof the friier Otllb %  •**•' .ill benefit by a bridge in the irca which was repaired during Mr. A. P. Taylor of the Windsor the week after being damaged a Hotel, Hastuigi, Christ Church, f,-w weeks previously. This bridge M reported that a Kodak camera and and another strip of tenantry Camera Stolen -i i .11 in Hrilain. Il'ilaln a %  Ik', of culonl.il dr%rlpni"iil. but on ,hr rnnlrary it i Afrlran and Malayan I--.II,ulio are putting raplUl iito HriUIn, write* proIcsor IMirEg, For the first lime since Iree trade %  > adopted In the middle of Ihe nineteenth crnlur>. the British calani.il s>Hlrm lias heroine i major meanof economic r\pt stem Ro.it uf the trouble, according Rrofessiir L*srla\ Ml the postsystem of exchange control a torch light, valued SIM 02, were road was repaired through the and OM IneoovtrUbUlty of sterslolcn from the motor car X—891 efforts of the Joes River Ltd. road ""g COKMlM earning hard curwlnle it WHS parked either at St. repairing, constructing and rereniy by their export Joseph, Si. John or St. George constructing prugrammi Parish Church sometime on Thursdsy. Joyce Batson of Hunte Street, "Zenith Was I.raking NO infoinatlon of ihwhcrvabouu or UM B.-ton %  cboouer '-EenlUi" which left Barbados sine* Decmbr 19 laat year for Briu-li Oman., has yet reached the local liar boor and Shipping Matter A reply to a cablegram seat by the Harbour Master to British Ouiana was received on Thursday evening stating that tho master of the "Pros pactor". a bauxite ship. l-t aaw the Zenith" around 11 a.m. on December 22 off British Ouiana in the position of 7 degree* 33 minutes north and M degrees 4(1 minutes wast. The "Prospector's" master said that the "Zenith" was reported to be leaking but was kept almost dry by pump ing. Bhe was then expected to make land early on Deceni bar 23. Canadian Column If S3 TK.\IK FAIR lor figure* so far availlag 1852 Canadian International Trade Fair indicate that liyate next June will be | presented with .. im-rc eoaaPf Dsetvre "f Canadian production than the* have i before i'a Trade Tair lhi> y-ai i !• expected to have a %  .mmgj er Canadian flavour than for the I past three yens, with B I a loar variety of fields, c tin* Canadian iVpUeaUoni -*• %  ;re from i nuuiufactunri wlm have aavei at the Trade, Fair If this trend continues whten rrada Pair offldala b e li eve la K.-1> ihe 1952 Fair, to take aeifrom June 2 t,. June 13 will ve the Btoat repteeantat if Canadian od evt BaaaaMsM vei U Ol UN Itdifferent t| ..lUatnan. with machinery and plant equipmenl, metals and and transportation i i.-Mt pai Mippliev Iwnisei hold furnishings, and foods and o well lepresent%  laMJIaB will ..gam M a I'.egory. Office eojulpntanl .exhibits will In i.nc uf the mujoi u ..'.in, ,.( ihe how '• with about N I ',".1 MM Uon "f Hi 1952 Fair will rival last years n BCCgM Although the Machine Tout Association win nut exhibit tinyear officially ndiviriual memben ^iii rornprise ilmost a^ lai II ol Mulish machine tools as befuti' In BddfUon, Canadiin machli %  i (lei i UM Hi't Nine. \ o| ;tii countrlei fapai %  llh Canada. England, th. I'nile.i States, the Netherlands i .un s. of these eight arc nuking vacuum pan i MM "ill k ; ifc Ihtt muiitli ^ %  montn Sprlnghall Faelory. 81 i> la ^.it arlndlng wnci Frcm Januai} H canag ighi t tins lac* I Bl PhlUp, and lartad an \ i hst, Oldstarted "ii M"nday %  %  %  %  HI Thursdaj Ba#nearaJorman3 Italy, snd Frai %  irll hu | %  %  ri 11' • 'it.. i TOI'K I'.S. DBPBNI I '''' I u-.iuuc rto fifth cUaa oj UN National %  at j on !,., Mon Onl rh.eis mid 9 civil ie.in nca, Vau I I Iron C a n adian Industi) 1 i f Canada Three Mouses on Fetnruar) 6, United States industrial and de (.FORCE PAYNES IS GOOD COCOA FINE — PURESOLUBl uJlatlons on Januao •*> i. an announced by Naiionai uf.,., ii. ad luarteTi The real loni i" hini i i two hull %  Oha i '"' 1 American and Canadian industrial and military arbMUahnwantt ihe thai i nu %  50/forHorJiIylIarin THEIR HONOURS City, reported that a gold wrist watch valued 535 was stolen from O. W. Hutchinson's Store at Hi aal batwaaa fl.3o and 9.00 a.m. on Thursday. It It her property. A quantity of wood valued 124 wai stolen from the residence of Bl Belle Land. Ben Deremhor 15 and Tru W. rd <>r Ooodland, St. Midi el reported that n iuantlty of clothing valued 3-..30 was stolen from her res i dence between n,i Tuesday and 11.00 n.m <>n Wednaadav The dothIne helnn1o her BOn Errnl Held Letter* Of A dm in istra tion In the Court of Ordinary yestTd.iv, the Acting Puisne Judgo Tfis Ixwdship Mr. Justice O. L. ;-*'. %  %  ,. Bdmund IJordan of Goodland. St Michael, captain engineer, for Letters of Administration, to the estate of his father Emmanuel %  | r.ondtand. ARTIE'S HEADLINE Swrr, sir, I'll rewiemb**— NOT to polish the iipperi,' unable to spend it but must pnl it into the Empire dolTHEIR HONOURS M lar pool. Colonies earning sterVaughan and Mr. A. J. H. Hanlinn < > InetT exports are unable scheTl, Judges of the Assistant to convert It into other currencies Court of Appeal, yesterday conto buy the things they need from firmed a decision of His Wurship tn.-i countries. Mr. C. L Walwyn who o %  if starting hetama "invcrtibie," Albert me Haraarood ol Math vnilrl uf .in eiiuipment transfer undei the NATO mutual Bid plan U wJmh Cjiiiaiiii isending 1011 or Hi,,-inU-alrcraft gun* to North Atlantic rn \n mid i" ped eig*tl of the sraaponi to P i lng.il Within the past year. i t ,n division ha %  Ital) and Heigmm In addition w of gft-pounder guns t. • %  it H9S.000.000. OVER iiRirisir BONDURAS MAN< IllS'irii .Ian 22. •i I 1 II.. .-.( up 'i •in "Munt-hcstc. %  .,r Of loounaol <>'i the tiuatemalasi : •Bar's diplomatic dent who wrote eon don 1 %  %  %  ..!..'. ,II,I>.M |M'|ill Now its inhabiiants are only i DOO i f tin rn in Bttul %  %  i %  has I'een chall. Mi A J. ii BaMr, lion "t tno %  lit',,Mi Halar'i crtt%  a reply from Compulsory Cuts Tin which Hsrewo Slischan, -.ecretary "The method which appeals brought against Leottn Savoi n of the Caribiosl to Great llntain, of course. Xenneth Savoury and 1.1.. | Labour •he alternative method of imCrichlow for assaulting and beatM; Kalef pointed "n thai BBtnl ds or to accumulate still more sterling There is no case for cutting the Colonies' imports. The Blag are exporting far more than they import and are Intranul on the h\l.S. Lady l.mlii.ng UP large Winnies. They Rodney Which l0f| toft nnot get all the imports they ,l w -> ' FIRE OFFICER CUES TO LX)MINICA %  ed, especially of capital goods. omc rJ O. Hewitt srbo ii. nduraa undei the Coli Developniant and Welfaie \ • II.lists also the grantsm-ntd mad Had Kwg, in n. tie past lu.yean, ending with the E268B94 granted in '950—51. He alto outlines UW the Colonial Doven i iporutlon in Bfitlgh Mr D. H I. Ward instructed 14 days or in default 14 days' I :*nth appeared for prlaonment was yesterday impos% %  otier. cd on Desmond Johnson of of the petition of Worthing, Christ Church, by His lima Milllcent Knlg-ht of Roaches. Worship Mr. E. A McLcod for St. Luey, 1 widow, for letters of speeding while ilding the motor Administration to the estate of cyc i c X-812 on Colly more Rock Mod Charles O. Knight Hoad. St. Michael The offence was committed on Mr. D. Ma!.M. instructed by December 10 and Ihe Police said Messrs. Carringt..n 4 Seeiy, xhii the motor i-yclc was ridden s nnaarad for the peti,1 45 miles per hour while the speed limit or The wilts of the .following four miles per hou itn u pro"P*"' %  ye"' aervlce Tnnids ment. He ha* now | secondment ma Chat I I nise UK u,nnel persons from St Michael were c "uicd for the Police. udmitted to probate-— Percy U7aat Hiowne. Clarence Baxter — rhristlne Parris and Bealrlce Roach. Bnd 'heir ilevel. gramme, are in conse<|uence 1 They are, In effect. paying Britain f'0 ent talks and free '" >' their 7.00 pan. on Tuesdi-s I Sgt Forde prosesay, they would have digected holes of fourMORE AND MORE MEN ARE CHANGING TO ... K SHOES DAILY Because Ihey have become convinced of K's Superiority. Ir.Kt. ARK THRU OF Till HANI VERY <.1> REASONS HHt THAT HITr.KIOKITY : i l) 'K' SHOLS .ii* made from tha finest laattbtn uhimiiiihlc Both solrs and IngOhhl UCJ hund'i.i l(r Mexihjliiy ind act urately graded by skilled craftsmen (J) THE Vmm .'i K* SIIOKS are s. lee ted, hand -ul and ni-ilfh. d b) %  h^gfftolietd craftsmen with o care that nu machine could imitate. (1) 'K* SHOES ..ii madg OVaf the famous *K' PLUS rrTTINa LASTS with UM h.-ei-paru one litlirm riaiiuwer than the fure-parts. The ensures a cloM lit at the heel and freedom for the iocs Why mil come in and lie liii.d uilh a pair uf thee world famous shoes H'e are sure you'll \ay like all the other K' wearers:— IIJ. NEVER WEAR ANOTHEB SHOE BCT K' PRICES FROM $17.00 to $21.63 HARRISON'S DIAL 2664 Sole DislrHiulnrs fur K SHOES in ll.irhadus ll.C Master Injtnred 111 Gvcle Collision FISH SHORTAGE AT BATHSHEBA High winds and choppy seaa _. Bathsheba on Thursday made |t Impossible for nshiryj boats to l alanc go out. Housewives got no fish un that day. The sea was left rough jesterit..' rcnlighl upon those Brit%  rani then' %  oi BtanufaeturM from Britain. "Unfortunately, the cnlonle* %  • I to pe,iV fnte work exchang' I S dnihtle Ihe ''eHin of the Colon Mr Briggs A Clarke, an assistant master at Harrison College la still a patient at the General day but the winds abated Hospital suffering from wounds In w( rr able to go out. Ii 1 head. Many people gathered at BathMr. Clarke was admitted at the nheba Bav yesterday afternoon Uon on Wednesday night in wa ,t, n| f nr nsh The majority of onactOUl condition as the hc boatj returned at BO lent on My Lord's hut thpv hrnught m little .,[ 1 45 when the bteyele ^ p ,,., ,, . ,., ,. tr on which he was riding came into rii.onA(nted coMision uith another cyclist. a ,,,n a'^PP 0 1 '^ %  He regained consciousness the game night. '1 continue to rise throughout Bd the next —n v f riHii t\" ntti\<;s WIXMD CAMGO shipment of. 3.108 bags Death By Natural Causes 'Hondusrfor Fined For Overloading 1 IM ..( last Paten Bl riniip. *. ts by H Mr C I. Walwvn for H M-I14 %  ; ; pm in December 111 The fine is to ho paid in 14 days alued 125. Th' r.\ '.f i %  %  .;• d The Are lours. Mr Sli.ichan, however haUaVtl that the N' thing much has stiiiemrnt i ll H Is even an under-! He n f So Ronald Garvey. th* 1 %  i. H Uh ggsM rfi % %  %  i in,g in iMll. and the issolutlo-i by Sir Ronald of the %  Ce null hides "The best lndc-c • the welfare and consentim-nt til niv jieople in 'i Hall, ixpreaa : Of the 35.0CMI peopUirork in this land. 8.000 un< mplo %  11 d regulai work." —Bl 1* WKATIIERIIEAD'S JUBOL For Constipation. I'I ice 4 A Tonic foi thHeart. Muscles & Nerves Price 7/C PA0BC4. Pot Diseases of the Bladdai I'n" 7/ PUtMO HAH.I.Y" l'u I'oughU A Cold,. Priea *"* [if S< MINKS SYUII" Tor Anaemi I, Weakness. %  I i" rftODONAL." rei Rb (.ravel. I'ains Bl J'':. 0 ma wiuHnui im. HEAD Of III-.CIAII ITKCr.T NOTICE Foi your COnVgnMfsM wo now have .1 TELEPHONE CLERK who will %  IM! h.'i\i' tliiin ['.in pi. t-ntinn WP ask your cx*pi t;is KM 4.11 is LTD. I'llOI M\ I'llAIOI \< V DEATH by natural causes was tin verdict recorded bv Coroner E A McLeod When the Inquest flour was included m the 1 . h ,. rtr .,th 0 f Loul^ T-affl'Branch ..t l being landed here yesterdaj DV Watklrat of Kendall Hill. Christ wh. %  thai he the SS AICM rarkan tmh ,.,„„, n was included at IHstn' ..red t called from Halifax. -A" yesterday morning n.m to ha 0Vt1 The Aleaa ParBaa has also Watkln was admitted to the . ..,, 0 brought 1.200 bags of soyabean r.enera I Hospital on January 10 IJ^ III 111 I?" Kill* f> meal. 2.W> o*** ol lin****! ol1 suffering from burns and died Jf. .. !" „Tl-. meftl 625 bags of malt sprouts, gbout 4.45 p.m. on Janusry 22 JOHANNESBURG. Jan. 25. MO bags of pollard. 125 bags of Dr. G Emtage who performed A single bolt of lightning killed horteferd and poultry feed among the post mortem examination at s native woman and seven young her cargo She has called to the General Hospital Mortuary children Thursday night it Megan. Ds Costa tc Co.. Ltd. attributed death lo pneumonia. reported from Natal.—ill*.) in ii if If r-s 11 !<>! Music foi Camp PU ind Marchmr Books iDcludil Ol Book ot Ideas, HiMl wtight camping. Service* and Pray Signallii Training < %  Camp, Flra U Charts. G %  % % %  Booka, and Paintlnu Booka 1 ffl 1 tp 11 T11 lit *e have 1 lot of Bg | ...and for Ift r % n le B Painting a>ks Song Books Story Books (;amea etc. CAVE SHEPHERD & CO., LTD. 10. II. 12 & 11 BROAD STREET NOTICE TENDERS are inviled lor the manufacture oi WIRE COAT HANGERS. A sample can be obtained lrom the Manager. Sanitary Laundry Co. Ltd. SANITARY LAUNDRY CO.. LTD. OF BARBADOS





PAGE 1

PAGE SIX BARBADOS ADVOCATE SATURDAY. JANUARY 24, 1M1 CLASSIFIED ADS. 1 HBLK SALES * !"!" !" T GOVERNMENT NOTICES SHIPPING NOTICES TELEPHONE 250aV Far Birth*. Marriaa* oa *>> % %  — %  "' MNaNDNU in Carib CaiUng IM chars* i. %i M for anv numb*. of rorda at % %  M .n* t ran'r. par -o.J for earn MdftD. ; • %  >*** on*.' alia• i* %  *• I Oil IU..M HOtSES fbftUtlMaV doubl* carpafl. all onvemanc*.. BM.X par BKIh fram lrtui.li fluna 44*1 I. 1 .! II I MOHVINC im i lo June Telaa-oon. ;*M. Mi* W PI BagM. M i v* i %  .... nlahad. bad ].fnm I Ma*aiU* ORMIHTON. TOi A*r BaUt-vi la. 3 I— room*. aU i %  %  i A.vl to Urant. Wh.tfl. a.. L'I.M SI %  .. I iu:i>EMCa>-Raahi.c-k Btraat na*t u MM r..* n .. ; %  ; i .i i. %  % %  Co Lid. I i t \-.\ %  -. r %  H. aafe .• % %  i %  Un* hl S platr. Ilnam 1(W4IOMM.1 TWO 1 AlUir. COOl ROOMJ i mr.ninf *a'n with nr ithoul meal tf> W.M Walk I*. Ya*hl Club or Clt -. N.IM %  i %  Jon*. Trlaphoc.Mat, Mr W Chandler \\ AM lift IIE..I rn SAJLI AUTOMOTIVE REAL ESTATE m*NOAl/)W Th-ee..l" l.l MM.il I aj I rnomr* art nr> Win* u>n | loll anal Dahlia* tar dallaary |bar ISM. ,nrttM lniir.HK PaMM pt*0 4441 T ..I .... i| .Mm i 9 I SJ—*n. sea wnrtwvcix only on# Hi in .toeh. aliiiiln Supreme. Bprlnf frama. 1 " CO.. ELKCTKK.AL %  -. TAVLOkS inii.ll.MOU. Ai...thrr anipmonl 'HJUlUAlKt Rofri(arj1or. ha* Ju.t rd On Hlr al K R. Hunt* Co.. I..n.r Broad btraat. la. Caah or DM 4441 or 9MT. %  bim as, FI:KMTUKE iiA.C-. CBBB A IIAKMA al i_o Lid UNO S A;.,!, -M i aaaj If. %  i %  i 11 %  1M 1 S443 %  1.. BT VIMCSNT. Ill PtIOPDtTYAilinl.it *e.iUr proparty .djolmru? Villa Beach. J atraa with "'"" atoraa l-,..dUuj MM M fMt 1'artlculara from B>rol Hooka. Pom Wind. Phono >IM W I M a. mortal*: AT CMtAr-mt %  a lara %  ubataalull* bii.li io %  torar wall buUdlnd invi balaw in* ixjbllc maxkel. %  tannjlna, on M.BOO tq it* land llh a frontaa* of IM (t sjiiaMo a* a (uaat haia of bond Prtcaal lo —II Appl> lo D'Arr% A •Ml*. M*a*H*e l-.n* M 1 U In rtm %Ait. ail %  laaja, aaMtfara i a daalraole i.rn i Ml*. < aquirvrnriiU. r.-\. <>na nodM room and larad* dbourhood .iboul !•, intalnlng a!l in-dun I'l'BLIC WORKS DEPARTMENT, DOMINICA i i A'I m.14 >onti> NOIICI •.i. aMaaj IMJ • Waaiburr Com. .—d M bo introdMcod into th* Houaa E T> MOTT1XY NOTKI: r*ki*n or at rnn.il> i ol Srator KNIHtkl*l Philip.-. Alm.h-..— will •>• unataratawad u> M 1-. ..I]. -.1 %  Dunfaiow. |UM Brlfhlnn ll i .d dknlr.a room* *M>IK-anU rnu.l ba fnlly quj tavhla^iw roof houaa, rwUlr.nt "' "'*'• apB.K.'.na. m^ir Baettaa drawind. 4anin. braaaL-x and io bad. Oartlft IM M aMl .UI *M1 m t :: %  i fi-\ > Iho Vaid of Guardian Bl PftUlp W.1M-1 I'OLI.TRY Ni'.F I1AV niirK" unaawad. from Iha %  '-'"> WIlfTP. lXGIKJIIN CIIAItTmiS laal ataaon of MD .m, la moniha Mr Halchlna ran Mr Foal dart to Bannrtt nanr Gran Farm. HI nilrow I i—In -n> "i %  i 1 llrtJI.TtlVM I Rock Pullota lniporla TYPIST far ouOHIca. apply b} lattrr and In panan— T. Oaddaa Grant Lid Kl.l.aaV-4 I a. UXaaaaalAal Will aim ha* In* Laaward and Windaard laiarvala Antllcallon iraalaa lUUy Baa V. Adv.^ata Co 11 1 .*- f n MlSt T aLANEOVS 'Mll.'l 5i %  %  > i la—tan End kheumafbm While You Sleep LIVESTOCK MISCKLLANLOL'S AlTf) i-iiiisNta A W41I wnl of lb* popular LAHWA ii AND POLISH Inal irma BaCVCU Ai ITSKOH1ESII Ihnaa and Blocba. Padal BuM %  rtpa. Trmiarr liinrta. APPLICATIONS are invited for the post of Assistant hafjbaMr. ad a S-yiar contract. Thr aalary of lire post U bctwvam 12.880 and $3.*>o par annum, accctrding to vxpv-ricnc*', plus Coat of Living Allowance of 18 2.3% of .alary Quarters are not providad. A single man ia prc'.Tred in view of the difficult housing situaitian. During the period of the contract *re viU be ma]or works of )etty 'construction, building, bridge, and water supply works. Experiem* is required in the taking off of quantities, structural design and detailing, and In the estimating of building works. When submitting duplications the following heads should be used (B) Name in full with date and place of birth (b) Marital state and details of family (If any). (c) Qualification* and highest educational attainment (d) Erudneenng experience, the various types of work being'. • separately enumerated and some measure of the scope of n the works being given In dimensioi i or cost Applications should be. at least In part. In the applicant's hand writing. The Director of Works, Public Works Derasatment, Dominica, will willingly answer any questions applicant might wish to addreee to him for a period up to two weeks from the appearance of this advertlsernent. Applications srwuld be submitted to His Honour the Administrator. Dominica, as soon as possible. Government Office. Dominica. SI st December, 1141. IOWSI \i At araALtA AXB HW ZRAXAND UMB LTD. MANl MM '•' V TKXOA hi npaclad to mad M iitiatum port* for Tiinadad Ba.ba**. Uoranuda aarlv January and armIf at Barbadaa about March MU> Thia vaaaal baa am*La ayaoa fat chiliad iid fraaan. and aa u aiai nu|a t-to aci-aptad an Utrough TtllU rat ad.nd allb Uaaahlpmant at Trinidad Brltlah Guiana. Windward and Loo... i Basaafa] For fartha* paruculan apply M— rfHAIBS WITHV Si CO Lid TRINIDAD. BW L Tho M V DAEP-WOOD ol' %  reapt Caasa and Ikaa^m la SI Liarto. ST Vlan-ri. On a-a ....d Aruba BatUnd WaSuilMl BM mm Th* M V accapS Cars. Domlaaca. AatiiMa. Kavt. and SI Kilt* BatUnf FfWa. lat FaMvar* .Ml Tha M V MO..EKA will lidua. arm Moaia andfll Kltta SalUna). Data u W 1 ai of BIH! anlacant to lha land* of Cloud Walk, lha inHrmr of Sir Dudlay Laacoak. Tha -M in within ray raach irf tha Golf Club and commanda a L is iau raj ma. For lurthar particular* SBfl eondltlona Of mla apply to:COTTLB. CATFORD %  Co. Solicium MlU-IOn Tha undantsnad will oflar fa mla al h.ir ofhea. No IT. linn "ml nndaauwn. on Friday ih l>i !'• %  ••'* IML il IM pm. lha dwallinsheum aaJIad rontalnirif I rood, 1 pardim or thrrr%  boula adtolnlns D> Banrrofla raallanca at Lowar FontabaUa Tna houaa • inUWa downaUlta. drawlns and duilna unma, braakfait room, two badroanva. oilat and bath and tapaulr. 1 badi.,ma BlarrrMUahL campanya watar "id aaa turned In. iiMpaxiion any day balwaan tha hour* if I p m and ) p.m. on application on BM ranMatSBI For furthar particulaf* and condition* of aala apply to: COTTLE. CATFORD A Ol Ii Bat la l a, %  ALB NOTICE undaMilpird *lll olfar for mla at Hc*. No. IT. ttlah Utrart. Btider I.II Irldar. Ua la* >aa-raa>f. IM* M m tha nawlv ..t.^t-l atotka trail bungalow ..Had "MIDGET' aUndlim .n Ba iho Eatata of ALTR1UI TOBIAS I1IXLLIP5 NOTICB IS HBIUWIV filVBN thai aU aavUaJ -a* d-bt or claim upon aftaatlnc tha **IMa of Alf.ad Tobla* llllpa lala of Su-U.il.d" Ui lha parlU. .1 S' Mlehn. %  II U\l> laland on *HUi dav ol January ilrSI nra haraby rroulrad In .and In thatr I II II %  tad, to mo tha underraJi Thpophlliin llaadla). .1 tha Iland of Uarbado* qu.tlinad Adminiatr.Un to tin aatata of A.Iran Tobaaa RhilUpa dacaaaad Public IMHIdlruii on ia bafora tha ISUi day al Fabmary IM) after -hh procaad to dtatnh-uta UW aaaata ..f lha MM aatata amons th* i-artir. rntitlcO IberoM baviM raaard to lha dabu and rlalma onl> of whu h I ahall than hava had rmUca at thuma of .uch dlatnbulon and that I ahall not ba lubl* for laacta nv of ihaaa aymnloma. don I in 'K.im.ni it %  tnula day. L.cauao lire may b* in dam-r Naaca 1 >. h*tl al Claaaea (a> Applications will now be considered fur entry to beginners' classes In:— (1) Internal Combustion Engineering (ii) Klectrteitj. These classes will be preparing for examinations of the City and Guilds of London Institute. (b) The present Junior Classes will continue as Senior Classes A few new students may be admitted, provided that their j knowledge of the subject concerned and general education Is of a satisfactory standard. (c) The classes will be held at Richmond House St. Leonard'School, and will commence in May 1952. (d) There will be two lectures a watk of two hours in each subject. (O Applicants must be over IS years of age on 1st May 1932. (f) Selection for the Classes will be made according to general educational attainment. Pieference will be given to applicants possessing a School Certificate or Its equivalent. Consideratlo-i I will however be given to applicants with practical workshop i experience, plus a good elementary school record, endorsed I by the applicant'* former Head or other Senior teacher. (g) A fee of $5.00 per term, payable during the first week of the i term, covers all subjects tt-ken. Failure to pay the fee at the | time stated may lead to the exclusion of the student. 80''. i of the tees paid will be refunded at the end of the session to all students who have, in the opinion of tho Principal. Dean,, and Lecturers, worked satisfactorily, and attended regularly ; and punctually. (h) Students will be required to supply their own stationery and! text-books as required by the Lecturers. (il Applicants must obtain from the office of the Department of F.ducatioii application forms, which must be filled In and for| warded tn the Dcon of Technical Studies, the Barbados Evening Institute, at the office of the Deportment not later than Saturday, 2nd March, 1952. No appUcaUons will be enteriii" i after that date. Department of Education, 23rd January. 1932. mn in 9tt£. NEW YORK SERVICE NEW ORLEANS SERVICE "J^AAIEH MIL imh j. arrive. B'doa Slat Jan ISSf Ml, Jan.—arrlvaa B dot Itth Fob. 1SU STEAMER pa... CANADIAN SERVILE IOI IN not\u vnuMEh uiio STTAMW aafl* STEAMER ..H. lath January—airlv** Barbado* Slat January. IMC Mlh Januaiy arrlve> Rarbadoa Itin Fabiuara" ISM |Jth Fabruary—arrti'aa Barbadoa Mlh FatMuary. llfti Thaw irurii have limltad puHerdrr -crommodatlon. ROBERT THOM LTD. — NEW TORE AND (lli.l SERVICE. \r II ^ l> \ ni,Ti •> CO.. LTO—CANADIAN SERVICE aoiwiiT niovi i MII n e. I'l.AM \ilii\s in II DIM, LOWER BROAD STREET Paaaencer Hales Agents for: Trans-Canada Airlines. B.O.A.C. and B W I.A. ALCOA HTEAMBHIP COMPANY Trlephone No. 446G --VWa*a*a**-a-a**WXA**-e'-'-'v REGISTRATION OF ALIENS ORDER, 1951 BUR AGENTS an. mnl.nl *1* d moaa by tablnd ordara faaj TBonal ChUWata* UraaUna Card* id Calaudaia. On iiaunl, lirltaln'* larscat and fiM*inn*l Publiahaia will aand a Beautiful Fri-a Sample Book for ISS1 lo i Oanuln* Asant* Wrila today lllfhe-l Conimlaalon paid Jonea. Wllllama Co.. Dapt t. Victoria i Worki. ; *e--',-,',*,-,*e-a*,*,*aW*e**V'e-e'a-a.'e; i $ HOT WATER ON I 1 I TAP for YOUR BATH celiiin Ua* Gayaara—You can hava .*e*-----*e'.*,'-'e*,*-%'eWe'e*.V-*-! In exercise of the powers conferred upon the Governor by section 3 of the Aliens Restriction Act, 1939, the following Order is hereby made:— 1. This Order may be cited as the Registration of Aliens Order, 1932. 2. In this Order— "residence" rnasBril the ordinary dwelling-place, and where an alien has more than one dwelling-place, each of such dwelling-places; provided that where an alien has ordinary dwelling-place, the expression "residence 1 be construed as meaning his place of abode for the time being; "ship" includes aircraft, jnd the expression "port" shall be interpreted accordingly. 3. Subject to the provisions of this Order, every alien who has i tUlncd the age of sixteen years shall, on the publication of this Order in the Official Gacttfte, comply with the following requirements as to reRistratlon:— (a) he shnll within one month of the date of this Order furnish to the Commissioner of Police full particulars as to Ihe matters set out In the Schedule to this Order, and shall, on the request of the Commissioner, produce a document or documents establishing his national status and Identity; (b) he shall within one week after the occurrence of any circumstances affecting in any manner the accuracy of the particulars previously furnished by him for the purpose of registration, furnish particulars ot those circumstances to the Commissioner of Police, and generally shall supply to that office all information that may be necessary for maintaining the accuracy of the register kept under this Order; (c) he shall, if he ut about to change his residence, furnish to the commissioner of Police, particulars as to the date on which his residence is to be changed, and as to his Intended place of residence, < (d) he shall, if at any time, without having changed his residence, he is absent from his registered place of residence for a continuous period exceeding one month, notify in writing to the Commissioner of Police his address at the end of the said period and any other address which he may fubsequently have during his nbsence and, when he returns to his residence, the fact that he has done so. 4. Any person who acts in contravention of this Order shall be suilty of an offence. 5. This Order shall not apply— (a) to anv alien not resident in this Island who is an officer, or member of the crew, of a ship at a port in this Island, and who does not land in this Island for discharge; (b) to any alien not resident In this island who Is an Intransit passenger by any ship, provided that his stay In this Island does not exceed one month; 1 i in Broad at Tudor tita. shall > /.V,V^V//.V//A^V*^VV///,V.V-V.V-V/,V/-V//-V.V.'* I OK SW& "C^MBBLDIEM" two storryed dwelllngttotive standing on 10.770 square feet of land on the incomparable St. Lawrence Coast. Excellent sea bathing. Dwellinghouse contains verandah upstairs and down, dining and silting rooms, 4 bedrooms, pantry and kitchen. Metric light, gas and water Installed. Garage and servants' rooms. Purchaser to have option of buying furniture and effects. Inspection by Eppolntmrnt. Dial 8137. (Mrs. K. R. Hunte). The above will be offered for sale at public competition on V Friday, the 9lh February. 1952, at 2 pm.. at the office of the X undersigned from whom further particulars and conditions of *? sale can be obtained. *. COTTLE. CATFORD & CO.. *. Solicitors. X 24.1.52—lSn 0 REALTORS LIMITED. Cable Address Realtors REAL ESTATE AGENTS, AUCTIONEERS, VALUERS, J BUILDING CONTRACTORS. 151 & 152 Roebuck Street. Telephone No. 4900.



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PAGE I II.Ill BAMMPty ADVOCATE S\T1RI)\V JWl'XRV 2f. I Barbados Hit 141 For 2 In Second Innings J'ca Bowled Oul For 115 iiiws IMUII:I BARBADOS skittled oul in another u ihc rr i i'lay. The : vestirday mori UVsssafh.,: <*p:urtd 2 for 17 It ra mn, is of %  %  it) a I mil MM \lh r l.unrh Kin* tix>k I him frosa the p*it\ cud after lumri. He MrLcod who got tne :he over with a n,;i | gUU* 10 nbrr uep line leg. Norman Mar.n.1, bowled from trie scita* enu du %  Hho u * llonitto singled with ,. .rap cut %  ncir team a ood to point off Kins stnrt by loch. .Hum> . .. M ,„ lhf %  km lull owe to j MM tha -J i* r ttitn read i to score an II and A i %  ewtnaa ,.t n for i wickt. JIKI I id to bowl Mire, —-'y^lnTrimMifcd % %  hit over fron rlous evening roncaded aJ four n> „ %  * **"* • M %  h i';i .uiih. ; %  I ..:. I v.i.k'i of tiuda) had tall ifter 2J rr X. I'I i nowling i: in Kin):'next o four Bad ."i "'" man Mjrsh.dl tossed up to Prescod. hi* third <>f th* la] and his r i* 11 <>f BVfJ oVt'l Wiih onl) II null Midi ovemlgfri acore, Jamaica i (hear u i Prescod'-. bal and the bal i 'a p-ds. v. coil's band coing in On hall rolled front DolViza'a pads, but nonetheless, Pretcod was nut. He had not added to hi. ovcrlUght score and thtcore wan 94 for a MMnad nil u i Mini a .* oft tbC )nst lull I t nnd tinbOWMl Bant d %  %  •ant down %  %  count rtit;i | '. %  .IT K a hook to deep AM leg. Ha then %  %  %  Rorai %  King raplacad Frank pa with tha %  who Mil "in to I i muundar... abii %  ill M<-1 .cod WSJ run out wni i I.I i to n„ u to iialL :,! the .-ltd .J Mrt 1 p Sm,th w( i parvQIpn I ingled to to double Uguies wltB the boundary at th bowler's cxpeni.:.om t. %  e r a— end and hu over yield." %  ImJUa Suuih am %  aaupli astus al "* straight drove him for %  MM total w* Hunte 18 and Sno iMrtaate li.Menerles % %  howlmn In i %  ifelgsS Hunt. UUJM I x* • % %  i .'Ail boundary and %  played out the ren reen and and S ll *lJ*|S ,fl : a sinith'. Smith • < ir .in Millar and got „ l>oundjir> when Thornbourn then mngli Kach baliman then MiiRleti to oft to bring the total to 40 idler 45 minutes' play. The tea Intel val was then taken with Hitnto ft UMl Smith 18 Aft.-r Taa %  Rangers' AC Holds <>Vnrr.U \fc*<'lini raapaaiiu %  larke. Crieket • IMII i< t: A GRAND DANCE i Frank King for IV raaa whan Juilu cui.Unaad the Onrt Innings of th^Ir -•con Ta-t against Barbitdoat KanMngtoa rsataioay. int.. the att.ii k and wlek" %  •M.-eded two < \' tfcrg drav n with BW • .11 lead of 230 m .lit 1(1 I W HIT it t .' %  an > b Milki b G.mdndS %  %  t b %  iflei l'.. to Smllh ii.ii-.f ii Mi OH %  read 82 — 4—1. Off The Mark Miller the incoming batsman tvu quickly off the mark with %  Mi singjaj to long on off die fifth. He M,^ m r."s ndnutc< beaten and bowled by mi were then at UUrahan „nd .i...,,.,,.., i-. ,i i„ • S(1 l)h ln ,.„.,,,,,.,. .,. ,,.,„ „ -nth wicket fur 83. s |„ Pll .„,,. ,, SK PP" Aithi.i BOOitto jmned the ball uppishlv to short square Mudie and played out the reit* and ran %  single, Hunte cut%  H;::":'r K 4^ls h ::': Mudie, and Mai hull enl down The score reached 64 lb .hn cut %  all ball "i %  couple. Huntfl turned MUIM whi :Uto for..nd Smith took liter to I kipper Booltto having to run around from mid on to field the ball. By good running batwaon ariefc•l th-ba •" aaj I %  .'i : on tha Una with .. dncl. HotiUto had King Barker whOBB MMUyaii was 4 overs at u cost of 7 run end of Una ttl day, was brought on rm h i. relieving King at tha pavilion end. and ho i %  %  %  f.nc f4 i a. i t %  I..I as. foi si. i i ikt r i..r tw. a iw ias a ta iw nOWLIMI AW O M B m H GoodrtSmV M i . J it Mui i a i A R Botoll.. II S* ti Ui.di. ia j i • i II Tullotll I 11} J J*ir~ %  b 0. Tltorbmirn %  'D"IVnB' B ... W S Abraham* r -ib lOrant. b T. Kins KV •• Bsri b I Kk I MaLaad i W.I.Shatlrrecl Australia And Then Themselves (From HUH-Ml DAI.I I SYDNaaY, .Ian. 25. StiulineytT and EUi o|M i ni>il the West undies Innings with exceeding care-rare that was almost painful but well understandable. Runs were of I ime was of no I .(.count, but wickets winvaluable. So they stayed .'(*> minutes for 17 runs uf which Stollmeyer hud ten whin he played aver a ball keeping low from Johnston and was lbw. Walcoit scored a swiped single Johnston then bowled Hamadhin before taw and was out immediatevino had not scored. Nine for 80. ^ forward to make Guillen and Valentine now I .nrker out uf a good length ball BtajfaJ Ms) time. Guillen not out from UfkdwalL Walcott bowled four. Valentine not out t Lindwall one. Two for aigbtl six total nine wickets for 64. This dismissal was all tha mo;" Nobody could have laaaUtnad mM from one MIJI the West Iiiiw would be in of the few g. od length boll* uvh a posUiun atcr hustling AusLindwall deliveud. He was bumptr.ilia out for 118. On a pitch DO ing more than half of his bowling more than of moderate pace they and this was unsettling the batshad naaotanbtd as if hypnotised. men. It unsettled Weekes who They still of course can win easily. was out three balls later for zero Anybody can when %  hundn d is Uanltall b II Kind Tullorh b Marshall UoudJ^oa U Kins KaUa*. l-b. 1. b. i one to Bonitto. King Ix.wled ;msharply run singles and twos, and . M 'aai other maiden and so did MarTUIUM-II came on for Miller at the ,( "'" •> Mrahrtl shall. Mud Itsingled to mid serein end Hunte late cut the •rlckat off King to send ..IT. tot tour, imnelimg who attempted a big hit bun through the covers for anoff the next only to skv the hall other boundary IwO balll Inter to give M i M leg an (OKKIIIU.. •I ealeh. The^oi.I lllOQ end Itowlini; his thlriciid 84——0. b I Dth over and Sinitd pushad bin Horace Tullorh the incoming way on the on fide foi a single. batsman had I brief May, After Hunt., gliding bna foi turning the tint he received trom boundary. A beautiful I trying to hook one of the bumper qg It and being caught by Langley. the Hi-1 mi.mgs total. %  "raa:— l for 84. ( nowuso ANAl.van bUrahaU pa*t the lone slip (or 4 saw Hunte n Smith swept one of Tulloch's leg I. II ik-; d> Ini moa for Fot beating M I kad i %  l an easy catch. Proverbs GtM In square lag Tor u Kiiiic ciine on tof Barker at the coupla. he was bowled with the pavilion end but >Ull th.> wcum , and the bat' inen agsj "gures and then took %  single to playing themselves in, taking HO ""<' wnket. OooaTMn then (glances whatever in view of broke his duck with a sharp siniha opening partnership had their team's position. Marshall gle to extra cover. In Marshall's P"i f W runs In 83 m.nulcs, and nnd King again bowled maidens next over Goodnnge got a byunSmith's score of 40 included 2 and at the end of tha thiiii.ih dary high over the head of Smith fours. I'roveibs joined Hunte, nnd ,.\.i .(-.-• maidens had oct'ii al cover to nend a huudie.1 on the lht "r"* ha" he IM>W1H) board after 1H minutes' play. Tulloeh rupped him on ih.BSHM After the long .sojourn at 44. Frank King was no* brought %  '" u "'> a ' BonllU) back liom the pavil sbnll to mldoff. ami llinn, pla>eil his over ylaldad three ingles Hunte-inglcd Gondridge to send .ml the remainder. The ftrst houi Mudie turned one fom Marshall Proverbs down to lal Bilb of pla) had %  iI %  to Una lag for three and later je played back to a short one Marshall sending down nn-.Goodrldgo hit Marshall to .,,. i 5" ,e ? .t" dens in coat ni long off boundary and then got get behmd and played Kins naitri BOWLaHa UIALYI i"AiMtrslU's m innings McDonald c WorraU b Owiai .. fc Haasan wh .UUIM> b Qo—. Al three for eighteen we had th'^.Z?* tw'^'t^^u T-i "" feeling lhat has become familiarlT f aZ,iS Nirfa^d. -uhrM.ll-rM.3to, the Tests that the West Indiesipby "--* "wl^^bctaSr M. for aa. s lea TT. a tar a. 1 li M. u are do something I. %  %  ^i^tmSS i" 'i mil ti wanasi %  II, a kind Of Mi.isuu n i ; in tdnen where sanity is outaasraa lawi-t and dhaoa k QM %  TI means of it they had shattered Australia anil were now shattering themselves. Cm,-. I 41 A |[e had AUUnaon n J IS shared a few .th Rae but when "iPfS ;'" ,SSIN "Miller relieved Undwall he played his lirst INIII. a half vollev Walrstt b UiM aak He LiaewaU had scored seven. Four for thlrtj „" r ^ four. MUl.r Then nne was bewitched and **aSsai after HII minutes bia itience ron %*?), vutmr to a rising ball outside the ofl stump to N> caught Langley bowl•ti JbhnstOB ii Use for 34. 11 Hans tl S It 1 I M WIUM.HM k > %  ntini MI DTHWOI • %  PAI !" ,t 1* • %  few %  ..i b OK .II.I," %  a .ii i* %  !. || Mb t T I Kkdja> %  .... erlSa> Q. Mud*Cricket At M'rl)ii (MIIIIC/ Cheered 12 vad on to 48 aftianother 3 overs, and WUUama kBWkkl In place Of Mar Kill .,' tha screen end, • 0g t.. NesrlUa Bonitto run mark trrtved srtth past the Uiwlcr bv Honillo oil KlOg Id lag minute antl I HI batsmen took three smglos off t'ie n rnalndi %  of tni A rut to the fence past po :' by Bonitto off W Other late Mil fo foul iga afti r .1 verj di ^i %  to 82. each bataman n rum i -i Hora i King at the DBWUMD end, l-iwled %  01 .I'ten to Btl the next Bonitto %  %  qunro leg end rot %  Last ball of K Minns on his pads and < the wicket for this claim hli Ihlrd eii ket foi I runs in 12 ossara. it a low in Jamaica, three :d ling for 4ti runs In the pre-lusM h paaiod, end thi UK foi 4. Blnns had scored l In 7U minutes. %  -" %  strt.. Igr with his second ttelivbrlng the innings (o a el with the score at IIS after 1*02 minutes' play. Goodrldge had Snored. 18 including three boundaiies while Mudie carried bis bet for '20 with one Iwuiuiai' lo his credit. Cfoodrtdge uppishly to aqun tingled Tulloeh to open g. UliK |i for 4 to leg by Hunte gave this batsman his 50 In 3 minutes; he had hit 6 fours. Hunte turned the last bail of (< tor a t r.'i up HI even 100 in 97 mil He was batting freely and took twos off Tulloeh with %  tilling COTM dm.nrmer %  .. %  '. %  • .is the RatMi.. the fleldcr took The Commonwealth Sports Club Od St. Mi.li.nl ill me-t St. Jam.-* Sporta club in a cricket I match id Meilyn Ground.. B1 n coo p.m on Btindaj Thg team.-, ate a. follows: — itwcalUi: K. w. Drayt % %  • C Clarke, E W. Barium. E. Ii Mouley. Jnr.. J. O Tudor. Jnr. J. Lorde, A. Vanlerpool, There WSS 10 %  for Gomwm fart the only par* j eon present not cheering WM Gome/ Mr. f. el Witt killliitf lum. Itut he attseh it ,an and scored six ; before Worrell his predecessor had scored any at all. However -oom sat upon his brow. After gallantly, eriualhng the V/al•".'•> lop score of 11. he pulled Elcock. a ball from Miller into his wicket IKIWIOM; ANALYS4S AbMlrallas |Ss| lnnir5tha iVsl e> i i. II. i'I lacDoneld watching the but once losing i B'aoa Starts 2nd lagdajjgi Barbados opened then rinmga with Conrad Hunte and Cainie Smith. Stan Goodndge v/mM entrusted with the attack ti.uu the screen end. He box le i | It tha bOWb to Hunte who took three to the lt ,ut tinl all Utt o| square leg off the rmer 5 while Smith got a couple With %  | ,,. n : . .., crisp square cut off the next riu ,.,.. i batsman then played out the Read, and running Hoy Miller bowled fioin tin paipinklt between Us i 11 ion end and sent down a n„| the total i.> IN '• %  Hunte Smith singled With 8 minute: to t*ith a push to extra COVet •fl the BordttO brought Goodridgi bach tint from Goodndge ..n,| Hin.te Into the attack In pl.i.e of Tulh>< li. id the leiii.iu, .II ktlLV bowled another luulen this lutie to the liound.il*> mi t 1 10 Smith. Hunte singled to square u u ket fence to bdu bis score to g OoodridgC end then got ft and UN aOkd to 139. BL( %  n Ub.-m.SM' 'Aithtlu-insidaedgeol his bat. Six ':c;i l on m" H M Wor.el, had lasted a long Ume ? -d havmg it spring fl • i Club: L, Bent h ut his scoring shots had been few his hat to square leg. I | h* loll, 0 Ii"" H. anad. XI In %  ctichci I Ulc ll.tlllMUl liMlim roW XI v. ill p t. I I rhonias, C. Depvlza, K itraiud, <1. Down.. C W^ort. ,11c. R. Cralgl .ncl %  r-.nih Bum will b^ IM£ TO MEET WE SQ MW-IM-LAW, H'EU. DOOPLE OWPLE, MEM >S7 HAWvenuml AZEH'r >oo Even 6 DUE AT 9-'30 AHO ITS 9 %  >...'. • % %  .'..' L ir TA&S C TO= CM WE WYCP MOMS OEPARTURE %  WES OP AT PAM TO M* lu. Highest Tamperatare: 83 fi F Lowa-t Tampersture B f> -F Wind V-loclty: I mileper honr Barnnetar: IV %  n I H 06* (3 P.M.) 29917 TO-DAY Huiirina: t-l.i s.m Sunset: B.S!T pn. Moon: Last Quarter. January 90 Lighting i. :k) p.n. High Tide :VM ia, ;i03 p.m Low TM" aU7 a.M.. 9.t:i p.m. WHAT'S ON TODAY ..in Second Jau M aaaetenM 'MA day II ...I I 111 PrasanUUoa Polo Match at Oarriupc. Oolf at Uie Rotkley Oolf and Country Otnh Police Band Drill 11.11 P(-> pn. IIAIIIIAIIOS II III i I.I II SI A SON l!l,2 AT Rll.KKI.KV ST. GIOBCS PLANTATIOV. PRIDE OF INDIA IBJV or Broun Hnrsr. IM4.%. h I lombo oul ot Thr Bud) STANDING AT Al.l.KVMIHI I ST. I'lTIK I.ANTATIIIN STAR WITNESS IB-* Horse. 1115. kg Pafg Trial oul of Speckle) ee for Each Stallion S4K.IHI Gfajajga/g Fee SI.IHI cash |>cr Service Fleet Foot SHOES The Shoe o/ Champions Cushioned bi proej arch support, cushiuned astwl, reinforced toe cap and mud siuard. Obtainable in %  variety uf Styles for Ladies. (ii*tttlemen and Children CAVE SHEPRERI) & CO.. LTD. 10. II. 12 & 13 Broad Street V,*,W,-.*,-,',-.'.'-', '.•.'.%','. %  .'.'. %  ,'.' IllRRAYS MILK 7 STOUT EDINBURGH SCOTLAND AGENTS. '.V.V,'.'.','.-,-,-.'.-.-.-,.'.1ke*i cM. idee HORN I MANS TEA e, above Stallions will LHlimited to 40 mares eacl: real Mares Half Kee return for tnie ill year only. *! F >\ AppoiiHmeiiti appl> to:— ^ l) A v. WHKBS, E .nun. * st. t S A. D WAMD. Ki Alleynedggg I'Lmtation. *: st. p. t< ^ A LKWIS ^ Secretary. r Pernunent rToor> A. Walls. WE SUGGEST :— IKM1R TII.I %  Red and Siw.klct Iream. '/' \ flUhlle. T' x 3" l.l \/l II tVAl.I. III.l B Blue. While. Green. MasOgt, •." X ' RH rOI.ORrRI II I Ml \ I w in 11 BhrOWtnal H I I Ml N I For r*4rldiuii>. Oagassl Dsnir 1'iuelo r effer:— --I \Mi\KH l|\RliHO\):ii -ii The Beard of 1,999 aaca. Termite proaf. loaut. II MI'I i:i n II \i imo\KU lli i i |" thick. 4' \ •* lu long. WILKINSON a EAYNES CO.. LTD.



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SAT! KDAV JANXAKV IS. UK HENRY BARBADOS ADVOCATE JMUk SEVEN BY CARL ANDERSON \ x / o Y J w %  1 FLINT OF, THE FLYING SQUAD .... BY ALAN STRANKS 6 GEORGE DAVIES BLONDIE ~FZ WONOBcPUL NEVJS COB GC>^1QTSECIT WITHIN TWiCTV CAV5 BY CHIC YOUNG IT £AVS A 1.1. fHOH THINGS fHOSt THINGS J ON TH.S LITTLE V*. ^ FOOTOME CAW JM. • flf W£IGMING ^Jv ef. y, JuST ONE PiSAPPONTMENt THOUGH-IM TWO POUNDS .-. %  .C.-.e SHT TLASH GORDON "C-nfpsrr Tifpur V i#r Ttr it nrVPTkFt * AT 'ftMM.'wf've LEAST A rTAK HtM <^C~-E t-l %  f (BH9 TerAOTn ^ ftJOTi •TCM K IWNT-tP t**v wow A s-we StlTIO" BY DAN BARRY srAct rinso* STATION • I T(u Tat* *t B[ . ~M*H.n JOHNNY HAZAR!: BY FRANK ROBBINS THF PHANTOM BY LEE FALK ft RAY MOORES IM WCKWttBJC.Ey.TWY'W? HEteE rtCimUKOMflRJsiIDCWN. IMDNT6E1 • *' ii MD < ; .v. %  rut. PWAWOM. *S?# 4 REMINDER BUY PEEK FREAN BISCUITS TO-DAY. KEATINCS h Contain D.D.T., tl. medium and u K i pirt a (mr Jim* ,rf A JB^J k V-(nwioJ u r <•* h >*\f^' nostril. Wtro-nnl pcnetn,lccpinnihenjM| !'***•. **i hrm* %  n%rfcir-ttlin.-v-.l. rfredy again •> VA-TRONOL MOPS THE p A R | S WK OVE By Dore Ogrizek This new Book is on sale al ADVOCATE STATIONERY W = PAYS _YOU TO DEAL HERE SWCIALofer s to all Cash and Cr^Jt^sjom ^Tlnursday lo Saturday only SVSCIAE OFFEII* rr HUH available f.,r Rrnnrhn Te^i*7.l7. S| iitlilolon % %  ;, nl | Mwau .S|ra-a-l tlraally NOW Usually Now Pkgs. Mixed Nuts 1.10 I.OO Tins Rose's Sweet Biscuits 1.47 l.:ili Tins Corned Beef Loaf 1.07 I.OO ^ W* Corn Flakes 39 M I ins My Lady Soup Bottles O keels Beer 26 M Onion Pea Vegetable 29 2 1 D. V. SCOTT & Co. Ltd. Broad Street Til E C O I, O N X A U I 4. II O B HIES THE MORRIS OXFOR; gets car-connoisseurs talking BRITISH CAR SETS NEW STANDARD OF VALUE! .. an Itorrti Oxford ni-ikpn iu appoar :Qtrv uioa ii i "' Intan t. for henfron, • 'nunllly first" rr wllh world UMal Horn anii>l.' jfrotiii'l i i.-.u 1 '• I %  %  %  I .Kin I'DKlllMT I illK fi-niur H It IH full of % %  l.ilkmn points for the I • %  md nwnr. nn*l it. 1 tr