Citation
The Barbados advocate

Material Information

Title:
The Barbados advocate
Uniform Title:
Barbados advocate (Bridgetown, Barbados : 1983)
Portion of title:
Sunday advocate
Place of Publication:
Bridgetown Barbados
Bridgetown, Barbados
Publisher:
Advocate Co.
Publication Date:
Frequency:
Daily
regular
Language:
English

Subjects

Subjects / Keywords:
Newspapers -- Bridgetown (Barbados) ( lcsh )
Genre:
newspaper ( sobekcm )
Spatial Coverage:
Barbados -- Bridgetown

Notes

Dates or Sequential Designation:
Apr. 22, 1983-
Numbering Peculiarities:
No issue published for May 3, 1983.
General Note:
On Sunday published as: Sunday advocate.
General Note:
Microfilm produced before 1988 may be substandard.
General Note:
Latest issue consulted: Feb. 28, 2005.

Record Information

Source Institution:
University of Florida
Holding Location:
University of Florida
Rights Management:
Copyright Advocate Co.. Permission granted to University of Florida to digitize and display this item for non-profit research and educational purposes. Any reuse of this item in excess of fair use or other copyright exemptions requires permission of the copyright holder.
Resource Identifier:
17931718 ( OCLC )
sn 88063345 ( LCCN )
Classification:
Newspaper ( lcc )

Related Items

Preceded by:
Advocate-news (Bridgetown, Barbados)

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This item has the following downloads:


Full Text


te ie



taste letions,

not be effectecl under two vears,
After Mr. Cuke had explained ada h
the Company's position, members | the usual





ent conditions were having on the | °ne of their engineers to erect the
establishment of new industries, ; Set. After erecti '
and the community as a whole, ;|Made with the makers
_ Hon. Mr. Cuke told the meet-/| tative present. As
ing that there were about 400 ap-
plications now on the Company’s Were satisfied that the machinery
waiting list for services which the Was running satisfactorily
company could not fulfil, Hejagreed to accept delivery of the
knew that when members of the;Plant and the j king var res
public asked for a service which , closed. That was the policy which f the Jaen of pre ag agin
) e é e
enced a certain amount of frus-|through the years. They didn’t nea er eee, See Ene
tration and perhaps quite rightly.|import machinery and erect it; @¢ West Indies d

indeed quite sympathetic to those |
_ S . | years ago—in 1942—the company

7 are ? i any,
consumers who were unable to | looking to the future, made appli- .
obtain a service He _ therefore | , SPL c

Ss her a | cation to the Government here fo: . “
thought that for the, Chember of | permission to place’ onfers in from the West Indies took place

! England That application was |!@8t year in Ottawa and it was
expected then that larger quotas

Commerce as a responsible body
in the community, it was quite aj ’ ‘
proper thing for them to discuss |Utned down by the people who

ae

glad that they had given him the
en come there and} continued to press and press and Since the complete de-control ot!
First of all, the position with re
gard to generating plant was ver , :
difficult F Actually. in England! “ere given permission 1 order|freer trade relations with
there was ‘a shortage of | #dditional plant West Indies would become
current the English people who The statement had been made reality in the near future
manufactured the machinery were that Government had authorized He said that the Canadian Na-
denying themselves so as to be| the company to obtain plant from |tional Steamship Con.pany
> to export machinery to the | the U.S.A, He wanted now to kill|kept up their service back and! battle honours than other ships of
colonies. In England, however, he | that statement because it was not|/forward to the West Indies for
understood that where new houses ae = favadt fr
were built, the current was con- | Senerating set was offered from) volume of
nected but at times load shedding America, but it would have taken | gue

Wee ase q oath which the |View of the fact that alterations |

where

. anv The company placed orders for
they had to make to the company y Pp c f
as to whether it was better to con- | four new generating sets of a big-

shedding.
Cuke said, to get plant as fast as

series of unfortunate happenings
He therefore felt that when he had
explained these difficulties to the
Chamber, they would have some 2 as zy 4
understanding of the problems in- Increased Consumption

volved.
used when there was a shortage

of ships and everybody complain-
that they could not wait for

time to build a ship and have ade-
quate shipping, and so it was with
electri
this difficult shortage in England,
and that was happening all over
the Sterling Area. He felt that if
England was trying to meet their
demands, we would not get any 1n
Barbados ~

Apart from the internal diffi-
culty, the situation which he pro-
posed to relate to them in respect
of the Company would have the
effect of letting them have some
kind of sympathetic view of the
difficulties. : . i

Mr. Cuke said that im the pas

The

|

the island are completely out-of-



has been assured by the manufac-
turers, Messrs. Mulline Lid. o

f oon ft . 7 ee . . o . ~ °
vows oo “Flying Enterprise” Chinese Prisoners Prefer Suicide To Returning







ESTABLISHED 1895





Electricity Shortage
Hampers Industry

Commercial Body | ¢
Discuss Problem | Trade

OUTLINING to the Council of the Chamber of Com-

merce the difficulties experienced by the Barbados Electric

, .
- J 2 ” 9 9
Supply Corporation on Wednesday afternoon, Hon. H. A Hopes Fo: Revival

Cuke C.B.E., said that the Company had plans for two big
hut in view of certain difficulties, these could);





{
} tr



ade





> Chamber of Commerce em- | the Company got out a new gen-
sed the adverse effect pres- erating set, the makers sent out

Senate,
ion a trial run was| Senator Lambert arrived
represen-,on Wednesday by T.C,A,



staff engineers of the company



}
|

they the Marine Hotel,

transaction was |

denied them, they experi- {had always been carried out right



| themselves They only took it | ©":

When he went to England, he|over when it was handed over to; . > nce the end of the war,
a 3 moanee soe attention |them in good running order change controls interfered
oO e Directors who were very . ae substantially with the volume
well aware of the situation, and Refused Permission °

| Mr. Cuke explained that somc ee exchanass newee
countries in Canada,

ss ‘. ) < a rt
58 !had the right to turn it down. and /°!, imports and exports of

matter, and. he was only too|
. 13 they said that the plant wa

| good running order. The company | ®S_S00n as possible.

| eventually the Governor inter-|the Canadian dollar a few

j} vened in the matter and they/9s0, it has been reported



j absolutely correct. A second hand

; or six years had not
18 months to recondition it, and in : r

and any suggestion which to take the set

everybody and have load|er type than that used hitherto. | Barbados: Ideal
i : |

Not Easy
was not quite so easy, Mr.

demands increased. Apart

the difficulty of obtaining accepted |}who wants a holiday. It is quite

: Canadians are
coming more inclined all the time
to spend the winter months
Barbados whenevey possible,
1 be seen from the number
hem at present staying on

With the arrival of these new’ evident /that
sets the company experienced un-
forseen diificulties and none of the
engines were working up to ca-
pacity.

the Company had had a





Hon, Mr, Cuke observed thai the | jstand.”

consumption of current was on the

increase all over the World, and T.C.A. Service
told the Council that for three As: fax
years—1948, 1949 and 1950—local
cpnsumption had remained at 8.3
million units. In 1951, however,
it jumped to 10.6 million units.

'
had heard the =
al machinery, There a He recalled that when Mr. Nice

It however took a very long that it is re rded as a



number of people coming
Canada to these islands.



came out to Barbados a year ago,
he came to the conclusion that the
consumption of electricity in Bar-
bados would continue to increase
and that the time had come when



ing of frie
yrown, °





r

bines. That of course would have the winter months as any

reliable. place for winter vacation

1 @ on page 5



Journalist
A journalist for several



9 9 Senator Lambert said he had ex-
66 oOo or pressed a feeling of interest i:
newspaper work and journalisin

because he evolved from
feld in Canada into public affairs.

, He had served on the editorial! cruiser Scharnhorst. The Squadron
ocd use taff of the Globe of Toronto !

when it was the
tanding Liberal organ in Canada.

“Greyhound” On The Road’ os ese oieisco



the days





The Austin Mulliner Motor Coach, which arrived in the
island on Thursday last for the General Omnibus Company
Ltd., is at present being equipped with comfortable seats. | ever

bach came to Messrs. Eckstein Brothers. It is hoped ond of Word ees Bnd later €n-

7 tere iblic li ne

that from time to time it will replace the old type of bus |i ee. in 1930. he returned to
now in use in Barbados, Eastern Canada, lived in Ottawa
“The present buses in use in mer and wa ppointed to the Senate

38
38.

193
date and Barbados is lagging be- | Of
the other islands,” Mr. T ew ype



of the General Omnibus Co. Ltd.,
told the Advocate yester
He

Dowding, Managing : Bo Ei Fishing Boat J ‘ca May Dou ble



said that his fi



“Tt is however hoped that the{ $10,000 to assist these fishermeD | as many,

firm will receive the cooperation , *" buying engines He praised farmers for
of the Director of Highways and Cne fisherman is nye
Transport and the Commissioner} 20d he is building his boat at the| 54 far from the hurricane



Evelyn Babb | magnificent recovery they

t {7 ahalle lone arly
Police with a view to the Fontabelle seach. It is nearly! te,

granting of a special permit with} completed. The other boat, which’ The Governor also described
which to operate this type of] is yet in skeleton form, is bein@|the Executive Council as
coach,” Mr. Dowding said. built by Mar

“Today these buses are opera-| Street. This is being built at!administration for the
in Trinidad and other parts; B owne’s Beach. Another boat than as an instrument of policy, |



rk Forde of Bay/|tjoning more



the Commonwealth. My firm; Will be built by Frank Harewood. its preper functior (CP)





ningham,













suit tropical ey k : j
nditions.” | “INKS | TOKYO, Jan
Price Increased FALMOUTH, Jan. 10. |, Ry ith or Citsiana ar otlocet tant
Mr. Dowding said that 1¢ Commander of the Cul- " 1 e id ms ae Allie Pree -
nately ince he ¢ S| dross Royal Navy Air Statior eee as wukaida
red ome eighteen month n Thursday that the Flying turn to Comm t
. th rice has been increased! terprise sunk and is now at 1 ‘ € I 1
eyond the reac} f lot br botton Car Carlsert and thd | eiviliay wi ¢ i
companies, especi takir te of the itish tug Turmoil | aft, pe a
ideration the he ere rdere, Y the freighter be- ear ¢ ontl
t been given an rease | fore he nk tt ifternoor 1Cor
@ On Page 3 —U.P. |

de a





FRIDAY, JANUARY

LMS. SHEFF
+









’ada-W.I.

AS a result of ‘one hundred
or more of close contact in{
h the West Indies, Can-]
as the warmest feeling
istom was that when| friendship and intimacy with the:
islands said Hon'ble Norman Lam-
| bert, a member of the Canadian

soon as the | Ottawa for a month's holiday. He
S accompanied by his wife and
iaughter and they are staying at



“We in Canada” he ‘said, H.M.S. SHEFFIELD, flagship of Vice-Admiral Sir William Andrewes, K.B.E., C.B

H.M.S. Sheffield arrives here to-morrow on

Commander
in-Chief of the America-West Indie

Sir William Ani
Inset RIGHT: Captain M. Everard, R.N., Commanding Officer, H.M.S. Sheffield and Chief of Statt

Eden And
Acheson
| End ‘Talks

Inset LEFT:

to Sir William Andrewes.

H.M.LS. Sheffield —
Comes Saturday

H.M.S. Sheffield, a cruiser of the Southampton class,

Flag Ship of the America-West Indies Station, is expected

to arrive in Carlisle Boy tomorrow morning. She will leave |
on Thursday, January 17,

H.M.S. Sheffied was built on the River Tyne by Messrs

Vickers-Armstrong and was launched by Her Roya! High-

ness The Duchess of Kent on July 23, 193 Tet

Reds Riuveak Of
U.N. Proposal

PANMUNJOM, Korea, Jan

uring the



wnnference with representative



with Canada would be established WASHINGTON

aien and Secretar
Dean Acheson ended talk

During the \ view
average opportunity to en- East and Far ~ t problem
had| gage the enemy and earned more epartment

When the Germans in- terday afternoon and again thi
the} vaded Norway in April, 1940, she
st’ put detchments of Royal Marines
Namos, to

harbour and road bridges in pre-

many years Even though
trace during the

raised in formal meetings between | wield



very remunerative, the servic
F De ra eae }was, however, continued by
Chamber of Commerce could dis- | bad to be made, they decided not} .¢ reflection of the general atti-
\tude and goodwill towards
West Indies and anything else.

military forces which landed two
days later.

The ship next came prominently ‘Thursday, that
into the news in 1941 when she was
in company of H.M. Ships Renown, ‘
Malaya, Ark Royal and light naval "eed captive to choose the Gov
forces of the famous Fores 4. On +4
February 9 the warships steamed | =a
towards the ports of Genoa to open |@reds of Chinese war prisoner
of eld by the Allies, have threatened

fruitless day } firm decision in their talks

Communists

Prior to the arrival of these sets,| Asked what he thought of Bar-
the company had no trouble what-|bados as a winter resort he said:
ever, A plant came out and it was|"I have visited the Bahamian
erected by an engineer from the | group and this is my first
firm of manufacturers and de-|out here, but I think conditions
pendent on the trial run, it was|are just about ideal for anyone

beer > past,
nent, under which he will live. | been in the pa

was leutned today that hun-/ than two officials of two Govern-

the opportunity
to do before and when the meetings
ended there wa
to the other’



concentrated bombardment

Pan no doubt on either
tons of shells were fired, causing

e| Admiral R. E, Libby, U.N,
| negotiator on the prisoners, listed
warehouses
were also smashed and many fires

raged when the ships retired

Why Consnunists
Are Stalling In

le said that main objection was
self-determination.

Sheffie é e long pur- |!
heffield took part in the long pur- | are scared to death

destruction

battleship Bismark. The
ship was detached by Admiral Sir
James Somerville, G.C.B

a T.C.A.’s_ service
Barbados is concerned, he





facility towards increasing Communists

throw against the Allied proposals

HARKY FERGUSON
NEW YORK, Jan

As a result of this service here} #24 shadow the Bismark. Late in
from Canada as a whole, the feel-
liness to Barbados has
e island now ha
‘onsideration should be given to\great an opportunity of receiving
the installation of two steam iur- | veople from all over Canada during

calling for volun-

s are stalling in the Korean truce
repatriation,

aircraft carrier y|been taken out to idenify certair |}Colonial Office to meet the
Ark Royal had sighted the enemy,
H.M.S. Sheffield mace

{

t

!

juarrel in the ten|{s at Panmunjom

displaced civilians,

contact and into the status

force of naval aircraft from H.MLS. | to Improve
Ark Royal
The Bismarck sank at 11.01
on the morning of May

involved a tremendous capital’! part of the West Indies, In other
outlay From the information words, he said that Barbados
which he had, a steam turbine was known increasingly throughout
more expensive, but it was more the Dominions as “a_ delightful

provisions



ithe parole

ranean in September, 194°

bombardment
the operations

Three months later, on December
) 6th, 1943, H.M.S. Sheffield was in
that| the Cruiser

House Has No Perial | only ee
Powers Over Gazette

BERMUDA,



which was command of

botl
Vice-Admiral R ufternoon adopted the report of |. ;

Committee



H.M.S. Belfast,
in a position
Bear Island, when in the half light
Scharnhors
as sighted proceeding a
direction of the convo
The convoy was diverted to the
northward and the cruisers opened
Scharnhorst
asive action and proceed at
maximum speed to the north-east
‘ Several hours later H,M.S. Shef-



resident correspondent in the!
ern Provinces in addition
having had executive editorial
s in the head office in Toronto.
ter serving on the Globe

en years he resigned at the

I blis g
outh-east of publishing



ction ¥ deliberate challenge |
» authority and could be regard-
s contempt of the House

BRaudovin faces
Political Crisis

BRUSSELS

© approved
Committee
Legislature,
squadron engaged the Seharnhorst Legislative
forced hex
eventually to flee at speed
nearest refuge pn the Norwegian
coast. H.M.S, Sheflield
Scharnhorst
throughout the afternoon
ing her position to the battleship ,
H.M.S. Duke ef York, which wa
moving up from the south-west
to intercept. H.M.S. Duke of York
took up the fight
after darkness. |
During the war H.M.S. Sheffield

|

et up to consider the} +]
introducing |
|

7 ‘ Banana Output
brought the coach to the island as B , B ilt pC bret ess Sin) he :

a trial unit with the idea of im- ein u oi) 7 Oberg ba den 9.
roving the type of vehicle at ) he Governor announced a
eer in garvice. “But while With , view to modernising| meeting of the Agricultural

external measurements are} the local fishing industry, thre® ciety to-day that the banana out-
within the existing reguletions, fishermen are now experiment-/ put for 1953 is certain to be double
certain internal measurements| ing with a new type of fishing | the six million odd stems output
the entrance conflict these! boat. The House of Assembly on) of 1950 and it was possible that
regulations.” Tuesday passed a resolution for! the output would be three times

21-yve ar-olc |

EGYPT WARNS U.K.
TO QUIT VILLAGE

CAIRO, Jan



against a vastly wv
enemy force which attempted to | village of Kafr*Abdou or fave the
according to report
Reports said
E) Khouri Bey Egyptian Governor
of British ships involved were not) cf the Suez delivered the w
published at the time, but H.M.S | to Sir Robert Erskine Comr
this operation

consequences,
bound convoy.

security reason,s the names
as an instrument of

Sheffield’s
‘is now fully acknowledged





llome





United Nation

20,000 Chinese war prisoner











PRICE PIVE

THE RITUAL
- MURDER CASE

STATEMENTS BY ACCUSED

During the four days that the Ritual murder case was going
on at the Court of Grand Sessions, before His Lordship the
Chief Justice, 16 witnesses have given evidence. 7 t
last witness, the Government bacteriologist will be called
hen defence Counsel Mr. C. H. Clarke and the As in
; Attorney General, Mr. F. E. Field for the Crown will adetre
; the Court and jury

In the case, Burton Springer,

lias Cannon Gregory, a 23-vea

id herman of Pie Corner, S$ C wealth Talks

Lucy is charged with the murde

of 28-month-old child, Geoffrey Will Decide

joyce, on September 19
pringer is alleged to have com ’ A
sien cad the murders senbiet he / ulus e OF W * d,

wanted money to get into comm



cation with spirits, He was hop " LONDON : j
future of sever
Indians the ar

population in 20 ye

to get money from these The
pirit with which he could go West
Canada to join the Canadian Army

ing

















Mr. G. B. Niles is associated with | depend largely on what id
Mr. C. H. Clarke as defence coun it the Commonwealth Fin
sel Minister Conference com! 1
| Yesterda one Vitness Cpliing on Tuesda iid Alber
| Babb, was offered for cress-exat 7omMe Leader of the Wwe
jination, but was not cress-exam nic delegation on h rrival
ined. He was witness to a state rom Trinidad toda)
nen. Springer was alleged to hav He expressed the hope ae
made to the police West Indies would n ne AS
|} Another witness, Sgt. Clarence ected t further
Clarke, was too sick at the hospi lollat “ie teris ms
levelopment hemes
tal to attend the Court to give ie ears sid it wid he
| evide nee Set. Clarke had alse penny wise and pound ) h
j taken ‘ atement from Springer ( Britain were s estric Ww
The statement was read to th ndiat ievelopment Ss
} Court, hort-sighted policy coul ‘
| Dr, A, L, Stuart gave evidenct } esult in the extension of poverty
ptouching the inability of Sxat ‘he West Indies could hardly
Clarke to attend the Cour upport its existing opulatior
Altogether four statement nile 1eV oO
springer was alleg4 to have made | [dustry co !
to the police, were read to the ow, the f eak
| Court specu i) ‘ :
| On the third day of the hearin; te nie set} Es
the case, Mr. Clarke had int | 908 spiel sO
}mated that he was going to objec wa, 4s ,
to the admissibility of the state- | yr" iumeee that, dostaee ted
| nents being put in evidence, bu | jterling cuts would leave ull
yesterday he did not object fominion and colonial territorie
Among those to give evident 4 F xe re pa I ah . se nla
yesterday were Clarine Sobers o: | 2'% ‘at, the Co eras: Nora
‘ ; iot afford them, Both he and hi
Rock Field, St. Luey, who wa ellow delegate vould sh
picking okras ina field in Rock rmne nd jetermir " f
when she discovered th isting any uch cu
flower part of the missing a The task confror tr
lend one Madeline Rock who hat yomes and his colleag cannot
seen wecused reading a ghost Slory be underestimated Economie
in | book the day the child was missed { e on the way and the ax
Col. Harold Bryan continued tc flikely to be wielded in all
Pe. evidence when the Court re e *
sumed yesterday morning. ia
He said that on his arrival at the , Agreement Siened
Police, Station .with the accused, Since the signing of ‘he ¢
Burton Springer, he took a state- | Venwealth’s — s IEEE. Peet GOS
ment from him, Woer” t ee _caristas, — th
“At the time I did not suspect vs Ee: OW POSIT | A
. . ” egard to the dollar sho ‘
him, he said, “and therefore | been undoubtedly weaken p
did not caution him, I reread the permitting the West 1 ,
statement to him and he signed it.|selt directly to Canad 10
This was about 12.20 p.m United Kingdon G
The statement was then reac {has circumvented partial! ‘
to the Court entirely, the argument tha »
Cross-examined, he ‘old Mr. |West Indies must by I )
Clarke that on September 24 he }|maintain trade with Cannc
was taken to a place called Mt |Must receive Uollar !
Boile. At that time the police hac | Purpose \.
Korean Pruce'l alks in custody a man named Melvor xe an Nene ee e a '



Greaves, Greaves had had explo
ive substance in his possession
He had also had a funny fluid i
a phial

On September 24, Springer had

of this argument re
seen, Tomorrow they will r
at the West India Committ
talk over this and other pol
Then on Monday they go t





spots to him. On that day, too lin charge of West Indian
Greaves had been interviewed ir \for final discussior befor
@ On Pore 5 conference prope





“ Bidault Tries To



Halt Freneh Crisis

PARIS, Jan. 10
FORMER PREMIER and outgoing Defence Min
Georges Bidault, began a series of exploratory talk
France’s party politicians in an effort to halt the nat

three-day old serious internal crisis. But his chances of
forming France's 15th Cabinet in five years appeared slin
Bidault 2 Leader of the

the Popula Republi



ent (MLR.P), started

ot ee, sores | TE PRICE

he Defence Ministry Cabinet Y wy
it Vineent Auriol late j And

hether or not he think







} \ uceeed in hi missior . » »y* woe
| ull va the fourth mat 1 . i ey I unt
} tht to the Elysee Palace rears
iol leek black limousine On the wd October, 1951
night the result of the rice arbitra
i tion was announced, and 1}

He accepted the invitation afte
other political leaders| Was pointed out that the ne

offer in the course | prices would mean an increa
in the retail price of rice from
seven cents to over eleven



ult did not hide the diffi-



iltic vhich assail a would-be “

vemier, He said, “I am fully}cents a pint says an official
are of the complexity arn 7omMmMunique It was however
yee f the situation, but} stated that the question of ad
felt it va not the moment f

Fake justment within the frame-

work of equalization and/or

*¢ tarted t Me
The i arted la Mondity subsidization to cushion the
fter hostile majority yote if

h the Socialists, Communists ncrease In price was re




Gaullists rejected Premier}in further consideration











Pleven’s Financial Law| the Government
‘ t balancin the 1952 bud
( ace nt rf nereases !
The Socialist Christian Pineauea 4" Bocount oF | , os
Me : j‘rst cost of sidized foodstuff
iiled upon in the day as thef the Ca re ;
; epresentative of the Party which Pee eee nation Cri
eld esponsible for} &change, anc he proposed i
east he crisi told Auriol| crease in freight rates, the pre
lat noon yesterday that he felt his} Prices of these foodstuffs «
lor would £ a failure and} be maintained in spite of the
| ( viving ) isting subsidization budget of
| # million dollar i year
| vata tele the Parlia-] After careful . consideration
ent : ac he I 'ithe problem the Government |!
i} House tronge grou} the] deci
| ; decided
Pi ent to see Auriol with Gr pohigeceia Doct!
, r
{ o Thanh so
bs ALLOT ‘ ;
‘ j He ‘ b } ‘ ¢
per lb. for 1952; i
- : : %
1 gut 1dize rice ‘ al ex-
‘ : t which will enable t
ependent a i 1aximum retail price to t
Pau R naud fixed at 10 cents pe int fot

—U.P 1952





PAGE TWO









f aggp dem sencurs f Rona
companied y her pare:
Col, and Mrs, Ebe xr Pike
rived frem Englar yesterday
the Colombie. Here for two or
three weeks they are the gue
of Sir Edward Cunard at “Glitter
Bay,” St. James,

The Countess and her parents
are on-a tour of the Caribbean
and among the others islands they
will visit will be Jamaica and
the Bahamas

The Countess of Ronaldshay i
the wife of the Earl of Ronald-
hay, (Lawrence Aldred Mervyn

Dundas).

Timber Meeting
M’

>
v.

WILFRED WOODHOUSE

Building Development Ad-
viser, C.D. and W. is at present
in Trinidad attending meeting
of the Caribbean Commission's

Timber Trade Conimittee. He
expected back in a day or two.

Back from Trinidad
M® and MRS. THOS FITZ-
GERALD of “Rafeen,” Gar-
rison who had been holidaying in
Trinidad tor the past month
turned home on Wednesday. Th
have a daughter Pauline and
Pat living in Trinidad.
Mr. Fitzgerald is
Managing Directors
Gardiner Austin and

one '
of

Co.,

of
Mess:
Ltd

Enjoyable Holiday
FTER an enjoyable
J months’ holiday in England,
Mrs. H, A, Cuke, wife of the
Hon'ble H. A, Cuke, O.B.E., re-
turned yesterday morning by the

three

Colombie. She was accompanied
by her son David who went up
for medical treatment and is now

the picture of health
Caribbean Cruise

YASSENGERS making the,
Caribbean Cruise on the ,
Colombie ure Mr, Donald Barnes,
Managing Director of A, Barnes
and Co,, Ltd., Mrs. Barnes and
son Brian, Mr. and Mrs, Joh
Deane, Miss Anne St, John, 1)!
John Payne, Miss Monica St.
John, Mrs, Maria Lang, Miss Jean
St. John, Mr. and Mrs, T, Her-
bert, Mr, G. G, Feldman, Mis

Marjorie B. Licorish and Mr, and
M John Grace who were mar-
Patrick's R.C, Church





ied
o1

t >t
Monday.
Intransit
M* CLAUDE J], GILL, Class I
I Clerk of the Income Tax
Department, British Guiana, was
instansit on the Colombie froin

England yesterday
attending a two-year-course in ac-

morning after

counting and Income Tax at Leeds
College of Commerce.

He said that he was in the same

hall of residence as Mr, C. A.
Burton who is attending a Bri-
tish Council Librarian Course at

Leeds.





Mr

THOMAS LANG MOFPFAT—Canadian
indu

trialist is aking his fifth world
the CARONIA which
n Wednesday

Limited



f

Fifth Worl

dens Toronto,

d Cruise

> A MONG the passengers abocr
4 the R.M.S. Caronia on he
orld cruise is a slim wiry 59.
ear-old Canadian — industrialis*
10 «IS currently enjoying ul
fifth world trip, He is Thoma,
Lang Moffat, Snr., Chairman cf

the Board of Moffats Limited, anj
Canada’s most successful exponent
of foreign trade.

Over the years, he has made
many successful trips to all parts
cof the globe, and has built up
markets and established a demand
for Moffat ranges in 61 countries,

Mr, Moffat has always exhibited
a life long interest in travel and
a persistent conviction of its im-
portance in business,

During his short stay in Bar-
bados he visited the Barbados Gu
Co., Ltd, who represented hia





the dollar crisis,
Retired De

M* an

were

puty Principal
Mrs. E, Ob Pilgrim
among the passengers
airiving here yesterday morning
from England after spending six
months’ holiday. They are stay-
ing with Mr. and Mrs. Greg
Pilgrim of Bullens, St. James, _

Mr. Pilgrim who was Deputy
Principal of Queen’s College for
many years, acted Prinaipal on
three occasions before retiring five
years ago.

Five Months
FTER spending five months’
holiday in England, Rev.
S. R. Ripper, Curate in charge of
St. Lawrence, returned yesterday
morning by the French SS,
Colombie.

1
locally before the way and before

— Caub Calling

Married Yesterday

WESTERDAY afternoon at St

Luke's Church, St, George
Miss Marjorie Brewster, adopted
daughter of Mrs. Sylvia Wiles of
“Sans Souci’, Station Hill was
married to Mr. C. Sinclair Gill,
member of the Office staff of the

Y.M.C.A.
The ceremony which was per-
formed by Rev. S. A. E, Coleman

assisted by Rev. H, Lane took
place shortly after 4 o'clock.

The bride who wks given in
marriage by Mr. E. King, wore
a dress of embroidered organza
nylon—bouffant skirt, off the
shoulder bodice, scalloped neck-
line studded with rhinestones and
long close-fitting sleeves. A crino-
line headdress with rhinestones
and orange blossoms, kept in place
-tip veil of illusion tulle.
» earried a shower bouquet of
Soe lilies and white cora-
ita.

The bridesmaids were the
Misses Sylvia Wiles and Joyce
Griffith. The flower-girls were
Barbara Sargeant, Maureen Reid,
Pauline Phillips and Eugene Jor-
dan. The bridesmaids wore white
ulle over gold taffeta with a stole
attached to the shoulder. Their
headdress was of gold roses, with
crinoline fans to match the dress,
The flower girls wore dresses of
blue and pink nylon, crinaline
headdresses studded with rhine-
stones with posies to match,

The bestman was Mr, Tony
Vanterpool and the ushers were
Messrs. Neville Phillips, Alonza
Jones and Norman Gill. After
the ceremony a reception was
held at “Sans Souci’, Station Hill,
St. Michael, The honeymoon is
being spent at Fleet View. Bath-

sheba.

M* and Mrs. WILFRED ALS-
TON were among the pas-

sengers arriving by the Colombic

from England yesterday, They had

been in the U.K. for the past few

months on a visit,

Back Home
ISS CONSTANCE _INNISS,
Assistant Mistress of Christ
\nurch Girls’ Foundation School,
is now back in Barbados. She
arrived yesterday morning by the
Colombie after spending nine
months’ holiday in the U.K.
Same 'Plane
R, GILBERT “Chopper” TOP-






U.K. Visit

PIN, son of Mr. and Mrs,
L. L. Toppin of “Elridge,” 5th
Avenue Belleville, who had been

here on a short holiday
his parents, returned to
on Wednesday by T.C.A.

Leaving by the same ‘plane was

visiting
Canada

Mr. Ivan Gittens who had been
on a three week visit to his wife!
and three children who are at!

present holidaying here.



BY THE WAY eeeee By Beachcomber |

DUTCH

A Baroness with a
cauliflower ear (the result
of a row in the Koorstraat at
Alkmaar) ts said to have inven-
ted the new type of American
shoe, with “plastic soles forming
miniature goldfish tanks for live
fish,”

This is a considerable advance
on the old type of shoe, which
housed only dead fish. The plas-
tic hat with beef steak and
kidney pudding in a small

aquarium under the lining is still
only a dream, and, in any case,
would be a luxury for a few
bons viveurs, .

Orchestra gangs
strike again

HE orchestra gangs struck
again the other day. The
E-string of a violin broke in the
middle of Violin Concerto, A
well-known conductor has sug-
gested that plain-clothes men
should mingle with the players
before and during concerts, to
watoh for suspicious characters.
At Penzance a frightful-looking
man with a broken nose and a
gap in his front teeth wide
enough to admit a toy cart, was
observed to be holding his ‘cello
the wrong way up. It was dis-
eovered that he was not a ‘cellist
at all, and had no business to be

there, He was thrown out. But
in the middle of the concert the
starboard side of the pianoforte

fell to the floor with a sickening
thud, muddy water dripped from
an oboe, and a trombonist found
his mouthpiece blocked with
cement,

Correspondence now closed

H°?: Sir,

Not hedd neyther taile can
we be of making of that Welsh

B.B.C. Radio

Programme














FRIDAY, JANUARY 11, 1951
11.15 a.m. New Records, 12 noon The
News, 12.10 p.m. News Analysis
4,007.00 pom, 81.3 i8.49M
4 p.me The News, 4.10 por » Daily
Service 4.15 p.m. From the Third Pre
ime, 4 p Music Magazine
of the Week 1
5 », 6 p.m. Merechar ‘
Programm pm. Hay 45
p.m. Sports F d-up, 7 por a,
7.10 m. News Analysis



15—10,39 pom, S1.82M 48.43M



nti

n the Third Programme



answer to hus three. We hoope
Mr. Heavens the Erse’s Hamma—
tastattus will soon be well, and
that it harnt hinfeckshus. But if
he be so hill, charrutty exibishuns
his off, and look hear, hif he
thinks we hare of going to poot
wummin hon our plonk and ave
her hitting at a pea with er
nawstrils, orl we say his: Ware
lis orl that Viktawrean moddisty

and = granmoothers — sitting hat
ome himbroydeering laces, and
not fuling with their nozes hin

publick, ho yes?
We hare, Str, é
Moor in sarrow thon hin awnger,
The Filthistan Trio.

HIEF KUYYASELFA SLISA-«,|

KAKE,
Wotalotahui

who shares

I withtradict me,
the headship of thefBI laid down that married women

Are red-haired women

intelligent?

HERE should we be without

the delightful generalisations
of science? Someone has discov-
ered that women are twice as fat
as men, which is like saying that
boys are twice as ill as girls. Yet
any statistician can prove either
of these statements or any other,
by the skilful use of columns of
figures. Was it not solemnly an-
nounced some time ago that child-

ren with brown eyes are more
affectionate than any others? I
myself onee ventured to assert |

that bachelors under 40 with snub |
noses make better ironmongers
«than married men over 50 with
arge feet. Nobody dared to con-
Greatly emboldened,

Kuppakawfee tribe, will read withwith tall nieces in Rhodesia were

an answering heart
about one of

a news
his confréres

item

It says: Most of his wives do not

seem to resent his absence o7
journeys.
A few of the sentimental ones

sigh over his portrait and tie up
his letters with goko-grass. The
rest-—ah the fickle remainder!

No sooner is he gone than they
tap out on their little drums saucy
messages to the young men-about-

jungle,

They fill the witch-doctor'’s hat
with stale crocodiles’ eggs, they
pick holes in sacred trees with
spears, they play leapfrog, they
shout nonsense at each other

Then back comes their lord, and
finds them all sitting demurely on
the ground, paring their nails

rhe hussies!

kinder to animals than Dorset-
hire bailiffs with rheumatic
‘riends in Penge. This toc passed
vithout a challenge.

They always send for Suet

“‘HARLIE SUET is said to be
drawing up a_ scheme for
multi-tier price control. By in-

troducing ten or 12 separate price
levels it is hoped to bring the pro-
fits of small manufacturers more
securely within the new dividend
limitation. A sliding scale of con-
trols on costs and production will
enable the lower levels of price
controls to stabilise the gap be-
tween their price-limits and those
of the higher levels. By fixing
prices at a dozen levels instead of
at two, the spiral of increasing re-
turns and decreasing output will
be reversed, thus allowing a mar-
gin of safety until the number of
separate price levels can be doub-
led or even trebled.










word

betore
pearing. “*
for m

say
fiercely
1



Plain Crepes

Pink, Blue, Green, Lemon,

Blue, Mauve, Gr

White 36
een, White

36"

Lemon, Peach, Pink, Rose, = Turquoise,

”


Gee udue ia | a
White 36”... 9lc.

T. R. EVANS & WHITFIELDS

YOUR SHOE STORES

Dial 4220

Dial 4606

BARBADOS ADVOCATE



The Pope And The

Trinidad School Teacher
ISS EMELDA — HERBERT,
school teacher of Si
Madeline Girls’ Schoo] San Fer-
nando who had been spending the

By MICHAEL DERRICK
RECENTLY a married man was

Christmas holidays here returned i gen “ae - c ay eon
to Trinidad on Tuesday by B.W.LA.periest, at Mainz. os tae &
Â¥ audolf Goethe. He is a former

During her stay here she was thé

uest of her brother Mr, §S. @,|2a@Stor of the German Evangelical
Herbert of “Gunsite,” Brittons}Church who has becomé a Roman
Hill, Catholic, together with his wife,

The Pope gave special permis-
ion for Herr Goethe to become
i priest and at the same time to
etain his wife. Two days ago, a

Trinidad Lawyer Intransit

M* Henry L. Debi, a former
school teacher of Trinidad

who was called to the Bar at second German Protestant pastor
Grays Inn last November, told, “#5 8!'ven permission by the Pope
Carib that the happiest " year o become a Catholic priest and
of his life were those spent i: till remain married. It is a

lecision that may well have far-
eaching consequences,
Lifelong celibacy is imposed on

England as a student.
He said that the English people
were very hospitable and on the

whole, were extremely kind tc | ?0St Roman Catholic priests—
students from the Colonial Em-] ‘Ut not on all.
pire

Cardinal’s Wife
Cardinal Manning, when he was
Archbishop of Westminster, al-

Mr. Debi was among the pas-
sengers intransit on the Colombie
from England yesterday on his

way back to Trinidad to prac-| “#YS prized the photograph of his
tise his profession, wife, and there is a Catholic

He said that he lived in Eng- hurch in London where, until
land for seven years and found] “ery recently, the two priests

‘ector and curate, were father and
son, A Western Catholic priest is
not necessarily a man who has
never been married, but only a
man who has no wife alive, un-

life there very pleasant.
Although it is true he said tha
meat, butter, cheese etc. are still
rationed, yet food is subsicised
and there is equal distribution.

He paid tribute to the British| less he has received a special dis
Council in London for the ar-]| pensation,
vangements they had made in For the first three hundred years

welcoming and entertaining stu-

dents during their stay in Eng-

land.

During and after his student
days, Mr. Debi worked as Exec-
utive Officer in the office of the
High Commissioner for India and
only relinquished the post shortly
before returning to the West
Indies.

Eight-week-old Passenger
OUNGEST passenger on the
S.S. Colombe this trip was

cight-week-old Dennis Winstor

McComie, Dennis who was born

in England is the son of Mr. anc

Mes, 7. & DD McComie of

Belmont, Port-of-Spain, Trinidad. |

Mr. McComie was returning
from England after a six-months’ |
course in Hospital Administrae
tion arranged by the British
Council in conjunction with the
Institute of Hospital Administra-|
tors.

of the Christian era the govern-
ing rule was that which the East-
ern Chiarches still follow, whether
or not they are in communion
with Rome—that is to say, a man
who is already married may be-
‘ome a priest, although a man
who is already a priest may not
narry

At the Council of Elvira, in
Spain, about the year 300, the
ule was made stricter; not only
might priests not marry, but men
ordained after marriage might no
‘onger co-habit with their wives.
The Council of Nicaea, in 325, re-
‘used to extend this rule to the
whole Church, and to this day it
does not apply to the Eastern
Church. But it prevailed from
that time onwards in the West.
There were indeed times when
it was not very successfully en-
forced, especially before the reign



of the great reforming Pope
He was attached to the North- Gregory VII (1073-86), but it
ampton General HOspita} andj|remained the rule nevertheless.

fJater at the Runwell Mental Hos-|
pital, Essex. |
The course was completed at
the Bristol Infirmary which is a
University Teaching Hospital.

The first Council of the Lateran,
in 1123, declared marriage of the
Western clergy to be not merely
unlawful but invalid. But it is
bad history which dates the rule

Mr. McComie is the brother} of celibacy for the Wester rey

: C he ACY estern clergy

of Sgt G. R. McComie, Ar- from that time, and not from eight
mourer of the Barbados Regi- hundred years earlier,

ment, 1 1

There are to this day, however,
| millions of Catholics of the East-
ern Church, owing the same obe-
dience to the Pope which Western

CROSSWORD







Actuss
. Premature apparentiy. (8)
A sult | don for hearings
Dispiays Cust. (4) 12° Lyric
Por warmth (7)
Tangle. Le jeliv (8)
Rites for young Reginaia
A vroken vane. (4)
Money by rail ¢4)
Pastens te one site
Glide upset by tice?
. I start at the easel

Vown

Supremety excellent model. (7)
Contest decided by the fini
game (6)

Be idle for tooa. (6)

Grave tle in country places
Vexea when in red. (3)

A gentie Dend tn timber
Handle (3)

Sing adult It when drenched
Out of date language (5)
How | treaa tn angry speech 1h
Land of ites. (4)
Superstitioualy timurous
i tet the rvof nave tt. (4)
Upsets % uf 23 acruss. (3)
Nothing short of “No.” (3)
Sojution ol vesterday s OUsZIe — Acros,
Meringues' 7 Oleograph’ 11° Lea’
‘Reailfine) 15 Grit 14 inan
Rine 17 Went 19 Weltractes
Low 2% Morbid 24 Slide
Dowo+ 1 Monoerams 2 Eide
« Retain 4 Grainer
Shovel 8B. Gelid: 3 a 10, Pain
} Tdotiatrv): 18 Toth
av

(we
(3

\'

(8)

(4)
(5)
(6)

1B)

I



MUSIC BY PERCY

(>)

chee

DANCE ONLY





The natural way to

KEEP SLIM
ano FIT

If you want to be attractively
slim, with bright eyes, radiant
complexion, and real fitness,
Nature demands that you keep
your system cleansed of
impurities. Clinical tests by
doctors confirm that Bile Beans
do this, gently and effectively
Bile Beans are keeping million;
healthy and youthful in looks
and figure Start taking them
tonight.

Nature's Gentle Aid

BILE BEANS

Just a couple at Bedtime









To Our Friends

From Overseas

KINGSLEY
RESIDENTIAL
CLUE
Le ei
Te aC

tae a
ae eas

cay GRANT

AT BATHSHEBA

Welcomes you and offers you




LOBSTER
LUNCHES

,

DIAL 95266



Special
Dinner Dance

ORCHESTRA
UNTIL MIDNIGHT

$4.00 PER PERSON










% /
, eanne CRAIN
PeopleVjiil

Married Priest

Catholics owe, whose clergy are
not bound by the same discipline
but still follow the practice of th
irst Christian centuries.

They may not marry after or-

dination but they may retain
wives married before they were
ordained. If their wives die when
they are already priests they may
not remarry; and if they have
wives they may not become
bishops. But there are many
thousands of Catholic priests of

the various Eastern rites who have
wives and families.

There was indeed, a good deal
of embarrassment among the
Western Catholics of the United
States when Catholic priests of
the Eastern rites began to arrive
as immigrants, bringing their
w_ves and children with them and
assuming that they would be re-
ceived into the general compan)

of the Shurch in America,
‘Scandalised’
The most numerous of these
immigrants were the Ruthenian

Catholics, of which there are about
a million in the United States to-
day. They use not Latin but old
Slavonic in their liturgy, and they
come from what is now the West-
ern Ukraine, but was south-east-
ern Poland before the Yalta
Agreement

The Roman Catholics of the Unit-
ed States were amazed and scan-
dalised that their priests should
be married, and in 1929, at the
request of some of the American
bishops, Pope Pius JXI decreed
that only celibate Ruthenian
priests should be admitted to or
ordained in the United States

This was "only a reaffirmation of
an earlier papal decision, which
had been allowed to lapse because
of the discontent which it caused
among the Ruthenians.

Celibacy for the Western clergy
is part of the law of the Church
A law that the Church has made
the Church can relax,, or, indeed,

can abrogate altogether if it
should seem desirable
No Children
There is no prospect of that

Nor is it likely that dispensations
such as that given in the case of
Herr Goethe will be widely grant-
ed.



a

Herr Goethe is 69, and has no |

children. We cannot expect to}
see Western priests bringing up
families.

Moreover, the dispensation for |

Herr Goethe has only been grant- |

ed at the petition of some of the
German bishops.

seen whether any of the English |

bishops will be willing to forward

It remains to be}

to Rome similar petitions on be- |

half of convert Anglican clergy-
men who are married and
yet wish to be ordained as Catho-
lic priests.
WORLD COPYRIGHT
RESERVED
L.E.S.



MARINE
HOTEL

EVERY SATURDAY
IN JANUARY

{
;
1

SERVED FROM 7 P.M. TO 9.30

-

\/ »
ty ;
;

GREEN’S

$1.00

TABLE RESERVATIONS PHONE 3513

J

4





M4. G. 4. GLOBE 20th Century Fox

OPENING TO-DAY 5 & 8.30 P.M. & Continuing

| Pe

sce eeaennente



coruny Fox

>eP-
Tea



PRICES

PIT 16 HOUSE 36 —

BALCONY 48 — BOX 72



may }

|

(|

|
|



|
|
|
|
|
|
|
)



Republic

FRIDAY, JANUARY 11, 1952













We > , 4.45 0 und Cont Btown
DEPAY Da 44 0
Warner's Action Packed Thriller! P
“¢ ”
, BOGART The ENFORCER” || IL
Ze MOSTEI ed de CORSIA—Roy ROBERTS 4
Special Sat. 9.39 am. & 1.30 p.m Midnite Sat 12th









. ee Technicolor Double
GUN RUNNER COMANCHE TERRITORY yl
r Wakel & M ree Y Hara
ROLLING WESTWARD mceeeentayniln’ ‘ans
Tex Ritter ___ Audie Murphy 2a10
; The Garden
PEAZA oor. | GATE TW Er sauce

Te-day & To-morrow 4.45 & 8.30 p.m To-day to Sun. 8.30 p.m,

Mat. Sun. 5 p.m

TIME OF THEIR LIVES a
. “THE LOCKET”
v
COMANCHE TERRITORY Margaret Lindsey &
Technicolor) TARZAN'S MAGIC FOUNTAIN”
Maureen O’Hara--MacDonald Carey Lex Barker & Cheeta
Sat 1.30 p.m. Midnite. Sat Midnite Sat. =
Trouble en ne yee — “TAHITI HONEY”
Leo G oy y se aa Dennis O'Keefe &
a an
Brand of Fear Frontier Law “SONG OF NEVADA”
akely Russell Hayden Roy Rogers & “Trigger”

Jimmy Ws







“ANOTHER BLAZING TRIUMPH
FROM WARNER BROS.

(The CREATORS of TALKING PICTURES)

AT
BTOWNS POPULAR SHOWHOUSE

PLAZA (ore 2310)
NOW PLAYING 2.30214.15 & 8.30 p.m
and Continuing DAILY 4.45 & 8.30 p.m.











THE DOUBLE-FISTED DISTRICT ATTORNEY
WHO MATCHED BULLET FOR BULLET WITH
x THE UNDERWORLD EMPIRE THAT
SOLD MURDER FOR A PRICE!

c

“i ittan bw Martin Rackin

Coming A TOPPER OF THE MOVIE INDUSTRY!
“CAPTAIN HORATIO HORN-BLOWER” (Technicolor)

EMPIRE

OPENING TO-DAY 2.30 & 8.30 and Continuing Daily
445 & 830
Republic Pictures Presents—

LAURENCE OLIVIER —



JOAN FONTAINE
IN

“REBECCA”



ROYAL

Only, & 815 ROXY

To-day 5
Presents

**GEORGE IN CIVVY
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— WITH —
GEORGE FOMBY and others.

Columbia

Opening TO-DAY, 4.45 & 8.15
and Continuing Daily



Saturday & Sunday, 4.30 & 8.15
Republic Action Double
VERA RALSTON —
JOHN CARROLL
in

-- JACKIE

- SURRENDER”

AND

wbownr:’

Starr
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ADRIAN BOOTH

ACTION AT MID-NITE
Special MID-NITE SHOW
Saturday 12th

Whole Serial

“SHO ROBINSON

WILLIAM E






STORY”



**Kime of the
Texas Rangers”
ITS PACKED WITH ACTOIN.





OLYMPIC

OPENING TO-DAY 4.30 & 8.15 and Continuing Daily |
RKO’s Super Double -












fast-as-lightning,

behind-the-scenes
story of professional
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their loves, intrigues,
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VICTOR MATURE
LUCILLE BALL

LIZABETH SCOTT 3S’
SONNY TUFTS
LLOYD NOLAN

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PAUL STEWART - JACK PAAR ¥
ond THE LOS ANGELES RAMS
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AND +
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FRIDAY,

JANUARY II, 1952

RITUAL MURDER CASE

@ From Page 1

conection with the cuarge. The
police had visited Mclvor Greaves

house and taken away a knife and
some clothing.

The Police asked Springer
whether he could identify ihe

snife as the one he had mentioned
as belonging to Greaves. He could
not remember whether Springer
had identified the knife.

They told Greaves in the pres-
ence of Springer that Springer had
paid he (Greaves) was responsi-
ble for the child’s death. Greaves
denied it. Springer emphatically
said that Greaves was the man
who had done the deed.

Both Greaves and Springer were
detained by the Police but he could
mot remember whether Greaves
was released before Springer was
charged.

There had been a discussion be-
tween Greaves and Springer about
going to Canada,

They were at the Station when
Greaves gave an account of how
he had passed September 19, the
day of the alleged murder

Speaking for himself
only that it
er’s accusation
suspected.

P.C. Garfield
Central Police Station who also
took part in the investigalions
faid that on September 24 he was
at Crab Hill Police Station.. The
accused who had been standing
by the door, said he had not slep
at all the night before and en-
quired after the officer. He said
he was desirous of talking about
the child’s murder.

he
was after
that

could
Spring-
Greaves was

say

Sargeant of the

“T took him to Inspector Bourne
and told Inspector Bourne what
he had said.”

“The Inspector said, “sit down,”
and he sat to the Inspector's left
and I, to his left. Inspector Bourne
asked him whether he wanted to
make a statement about the child
and he said, “yes”.

“The Inspector cautioned him
by saying you are not obliged to
say anything, but anything you
say will be taken and may be
given in evidence,

“He said, “yes”, | want to give a
statement. Inspector Bourne wrote
the caution read it over to the
accused and invited him to read it
over himself. He did so and then
signed it

“Accused then gave a statement
which was written down by the
Inspector in my presence. The
statement was read over to the
accused who was invited to read
it and niake any corrections, He
read it, said it was correct and
signed it.

“As a result of the statement,

Springer was taken from the sta-
tion and he directed us to the
places mentioned in the statement.
Among the places to which he took
us were Whitters, Chandler’s
Gully and Salt Peter Hole where
he assisted us in looking for the
missing parts of the child. Nothing



was found.

“From there we went to Mc Ivor
Greaves’ home. Greaves came
home while we were there and
we then made a search,

“On the return journey, while
on Mt. Friendship or Mt, Boile
Road the van stopped. Greaves

and Springer were in the van.
spector Bourne said to Springer;
“Is this the Me Ivor Greaves to
whom you referred in your state-
ment and Springer said “yes.

“The Inspector asked him
whether the trousers and shirt
which had been taken from
Greaves’ home were those trousers
he had mentioned, He said, Wo.
He showed him a knife and as)

In-

him whether it was the «
Greaves had had on Sept. 10. Ac-
cused said that that looked li
it. Inspector Bourne then tol

Greaves the substance of the sta’ >
ment Springer had given
“Inspector Boufne then old
Springer that he was not obliged
to say anything. Anything you say
may be given in evidence. He
asked Springer whether his sum-
to

mary Greaves wa -orrect,
Springer said, “yes.”

“Greaves swore and said he
knew absolutely nothing about it.

On September 19, he had gone to
Bridgetown and returned at noon

“Greaves then went on te give
us a detailed account of his move-
ments between 6 a.m. and noon.
Sometime afterwards he gave a
detailed account of his movements
for the entire day We then left
and went on to Crab Hill Police
Station.”

He said that while Springer was
at Crab Hill before he was charged
he used to sleep in Sgt. Alleyne’s
room That was how he came to
be near Sgt. Alleyne’s door on the

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Derl soap in beth tablet and liquid form

has already been adopted by British Medical
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made
Set.

morning he
At that time
in his room

Cross-examineq he said _ that
some magazines had been taken
from Greaves’ home but he did not
know whether any police read
them, Many phials containing fluid
were also .taken from Greaves’
house,

Greaves was released on Octo-
ber 2 while Springer was charged
on September 27.

Next to give evidence was In-
spector Cecil Bourne. He was at
Crab Hill Police Station on Sep-
tember 24 during the course of in-
vestigations he was making

P.C, Sargeant brought the ac-
cused to him in the recreation
room and told him he had intim-
ated that he wanted to give a state-
ment. After being cautioned he
made a voluntary statement.

This statement was read to the
Court

As a result of the statement he
took Springer to Pie Corner as he
had agreed to show me the places
he had mentioned. At Salt Peter
Hole he made a search though at
the time he did not realise that it
had an inner chamber. Nothing
was found.

They went to Greaves’
where they made a search,
phials, clothing and a knife were
taken from his house. They lefi
there in vehicles and on the way?
to the station, they stopped at Mt. &
Boile Road.

“I asked the accused
Mclvor Greaves was the Mclvor
Greaves he had mentioned. He
said yes. I asked Mclvor Greaves
whether he knew Springer and he
said he did.

“I told Greaves of the substance
of .the statement Springer had
given against him. Springer said
that he had told it to Greaves cor-
rectly.

“Greaves strongly denied the ac-
cusations with an oath

“Accused askeq Greaves if
showed Greaves letters
Canadian Army.
ted that he had,
deny the
child,

“I showed Springer
which had been taken
Ivor Greayes’ home and he said
that looked like it. He said that
the trousers and shirt he was then

the statement
Alleyne was not

home
Some

whether

he
about the
Greaves admit-
but continued to
accusations about the



knife
from Me

the

wearing were mot those he had
been wearing on September 19
They then went back to Crab Hill

Station.

Investigations continued on Sep-
tember 25 and he _ interviewed
Colvin Phillips from whom he got
a statement As a result of that
statement he again visited Salt
Peter Hole It was.drawn to his
attention for the first time that
there was an inner chamber. He
noticed some pieces of trash and
a small stone end these he took
to the Government Bacteriologist

Insvector Bourne was not cross-
examined

Dr. A. L. Stuart tiien gave evi-
dence as to the iliness of Sjt,
Clarke who was to have been 2
witness.

He said IT have seen Sgt, Clarence
V. Clarke as a patient and subse
quently admitted him at the hos-
pital, From that date he has been
kept in bed. He is quite ill and
1 consider it very dangerous for
him to come to th: Court and give
evidence





Sup ‘dent Simmonds was
recalleq and ne said that Springer
was charged on September 27
After he wus cautioned a state-
ment was taken from him He
had becn prcsent when Sgt. Clarke
gave evidence before Magistrate

, Nurse, The s Ament was read
over, e accused was represent-
ed at tne time by Mr. Clarke whc
had an opportunity to cross-exam-

ine him. He recognised the signa-
ture of the Police Magistrate to
Clarke’s evidence
This statement «
Court.
Another Statcment

Cpl. Willem
to District “E”

read to the

Gaskin attached
Police Station in
September last year, On Septem-
ber 20 whilé passing near a cell in
which Springer was, Springer
called him and told him he wanted
o see the Sergeant to give a state-

ment, Sgt. Clarke was the Ser-
geant,
Sgt. Clarke and 1 went to the

cell and he said he wanted to give



BARBADOS ADVOCATE



was at the station

was charged hie
a statement which
was taken down by him. He read
it to Springer and he signed it
He said he had not been present
at the station when Springer was

that he
when Springer
elected vo give

Said

first brought there
The accused had been at the
Station sometime before he was

charged as he said he was afraid
of the people of his district.
Greaves had been at the station
until October 20. Darwin Boyce
had been at the station and had
given a statement.
Remains Found
Clarine Sobers, a domestic
vant of Rock Field, St. Lucy, said
that about 8 a.m. on September
21 she went into the canes to pick
okras. The okras were in a drain

ser-

what they were looking for
There nad been much rain that
lay
Under cross-examination, he

said when Springer told him that
the police did not know where to
look, he did not question him.

At The Rum Shop

George Harris, a shopkeeper of
Pie Corner, St. Lucy, said he knew
the accused. On September 19 he
was in his shop when he heard
about the missing, child. During
the evening a policeman passed.

About 8 p.m. accused came to
his shop, He called him towards
the bar. He said he wanted some-
thing to drink but did not have
sufficient money to buy drinks for
all in the shop.

He offered mea drink and we
each had one. He told me to call

in the field ; , Colvin Phillips who was in the
I saw the insteps of a child feet grocery department of the shop.
near the okra tree,” she said, “The «] called him and Colvin went to
insteps were covered with trash. the accused 1 left them to-
{ was so afraid that I ran. I ran gether.” :
to one Athelstan and told him Cross-examined he said it was
what I had seen. While I told the g common thing for Burton to buy
neighbours, he left to report it to drinks from him,

the police Later the police and
the doctor visited the scene.”

She was not cross-examined

Missing

Rock of
said she

Madeline
St. Lucy,
Springer. On
came to her mother's house and
asked how late it was. She told
him it was 12.15 p.m, but thought
the clock was slow. He said he
had been on the cliff sitting and
yone Elsie Mahon had asked him
iwhether he had seen a little boy
pass that way. He said that Elsie
had told him that Mar Boyce had
lest one of her children

He asked Colvin Phillips who
was also there, whether he had
seen the mid-day bus come up aad
Colvin told him it had come and
gone

She had told him the clock was
slow because it had stopped in the
morning and she had set it, but
was not sure whether it was right.

Reading A Book

About an hour later Colvin asix-
ed Burton whether he was going
to look for the child and he said
he was not going. He then sat in
the wild canes below the house
and read a book. The book
one about ghost stories

People call Springer
Gregory,” she said. Colvin stayed
there about an hour and a half
and went away and _ “returned
about 5.30 p.m. Colvin and Bur-
ton afterwards went away togeth-
er between 6 and 6.30 p.m.’

She did not see Greaves that
day.

Cross-examined, she said that
her sister and Colvin Phillips were
first cousins.

The distance between their
house and Boyce’s house was
about 200 yards. She did not know
Chandler’s Gully, ;

Phillips lived about a mile from
Thereza Boyce When Phillips
came at them that day it was
about 12.10 p.m The cliff
Springer had referred to when
telling of the time he had been
asked whether he had seen the
children, was a few yards from
Boyce’s house.

A Voice

Agatha Corbin of Pie Corner
Said she rememberea the Wednes-
day the child was missing. She
had been home the night and her
husband Frank was over the halt
door with tne window above the
door half closed.

‘I heard a voice saying, Christ,
she aint going find it either,’ she
said. ‘Soon after I heard a voice
say, ‘Burton come aiong, and an-
otner say, ‘Colvin man wait for
me, I going down the road and
fire some rum. I recognized Bur-
ton’s

“I have known Burton about 17

Corner
Burton
19 he

Pie
knew
September

was

Cannon



months. I think it was about 10
o'clock”.

Cross-examined she said she
had only heard the voice but had

not seen the speakers, The voices
were about eight feet off. If her
husband was looking, he would
have seen the speakers.
An Enquiry

P.C, Gordon Burrowes of the
“rab Hill Police Station was nex
to give evidence, On September
19 he was looking for the
ing child About
saw Burton

He told me the police were

a statement, Sgt. Clarke told him idiots and did not know where to

he would have to write it and look for the child.

brought him to the office The “On September 21, I went to

sergeant cautioned him. make a further search. On my
Sgt. Clarke recorded the state- way there I sheltered in Harris’

ment from him in my presence,” shop about 7.45 a.m. from the

he said. It was read to him and
he signed it.

Lee Set Harold Alleyne in
charge of Crab Hill Police Station.

Germicidal Soap containing

Hexachlorophene

Deri is a new kind of dual purpose soap and
is the first soap manufactured in the United
Kingdom to contain the germicide Hexachlor-
ophene, technically known as G.11.

good preventive

personal hygiene.
tie qualities of Derl Soap that in many hos-
pitals, where Derl is used, the ten minute
pre-operational scrubs have now been reduced
to a three minute wash.

Derl should exert a marked benefit to per-
sonnel in Industrial Plants because of its

rain. Burton Springer was ther
discussing the missing child with
other men

“He said the Police did not know

x
Se

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On Sale at all Drug Stores

All Public Medical Clinics would benefit
with the use of such a soap.

Der!



PO Ce “ oe COCO Ay OCCT * SF eF



LLCS POSE POFSS

OS

At tyt,
LLL CLES

miss-

thild. 9.45 p.m, he

saw a Springer in front

Thereza Boyce’s house. He came

and enquired whether the police

had searched the sea coast. He

told him the police had done so,
but had found nothing.

Colvin was not
in the habit of buying but he
would drink with Burton. He
said he did not know whether any-
body else drank rum that night

Re-examined he said that when
he said that no one drank more
rum that night, he was referring
to what drinking went on at his
shop. Colvin and Burton appear-
ed to be friends

Cpl. Thomas Babb was offered
for cross-examination but was no
cross-examined,

Recalled

Mc Ivor Greaves was recalled
He said he was friendly with Bur-
ton Springer before he joined the
army He said he was not friend-





ly with him after the army days
He was present at the Court
when Burton’s statement was
read. “I could bring witnesses to
rebut that statement,” he said.
He knew Darwen Boyce or
Collymore. He was not with him
on September 19 They were
friendly through their member-

ship of the Church Lad’s Brigade,

Cross-examined, he said he
knew Burton when he was a child.
They lived about three quarters
of a mile from each other.

Superintendent Simmonds was
also recalled. He said the knife
which they had brought from

Greaves’ home was about seven to
eight inches long. It was not like

a sickle.

The Court was
10 am. to-day

“NEW LOOK”

@ From Page |
in fares since 1939. “It is how-
ever hoped that some increase in
fares will take place when con-
cessions are granted in March
this year,” he said.

He expressed the hope that the
General Omnibus Co. will be able
to acquire more cOaches of this
type if the trial unit proves sat~

adjourned until

isfactory to the public and stands
up to local road conditions. In
this case it is likely that there

will be a possible change in the
type of buses which is now being
used, depending on increases in
the present fares,

Greyhound

The coach, which has the ap-
pearance of the Greyhound Coach
seen in Trinidad, is built on an
Austin chassis. It has seating
accommodation for 34. The load-
ing door is of the jack-knife type
and is manually operated by the
control at the right of the driver,

It is also equipped with built-
in direction indicators in the
front and rear and has a revolv-
ing sign panel in the front. The
iighting system provides a more
nomely atmosphere than the sys-
tem of the present buses and also
has a soothing effect on the eye
The bell, used by passengers to
stop the coach, gives one clang!
instead of the drawling sound of
the present bell, The push button
is in the roof instead of on the
upright.

On a whole this type of bus is
a vast improvement over the one
at present in use and brings the
new look” to Barbados.





HARKBADO
POLO CLUB

THIRD MATCH IN CUP
SERIES
RANGERS vs BRONCOS
at Garrison Savannah



SATURDAY, 12th Jany
at 4.30 P.M.

1/-
—2n

Entrance to Pnclosure
11,1.52.-

coughs



AND when you have a stuffy cold, alw

FROM ALL GOOD CHEMIS

Agent T



The remedy for the whole family
ren love this pleasant-tasting syrup.
sure you have a bottle of Zubes
Mixture in your home

Zubes Cough Lozenges

Handy,
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In pocket sized tins, Zubes are ready to
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sign of

S. GARRAWA























Harbour Log
IN CARLISLE BAY
Sch Pr Mark Sc I
Smith, M.V. Cacique del ¢ a
Marea Henrietta, Sch. R« e M., Se
Burma D., Sch. Ad *
Smith, M.V. J. W. Rogers,
Caroline, Sx Mandalay IT,
ARRIVALS
ss ylombie, 7,380. tons net, “Capt
Kerharo, f Le Mavrr
SS. Libervilte, 4,365 et, Capt
Hvass, from Port-au-Prince
DEPARTURES
$.S. Colombie, 7,380 tons net, Capt
Kerharé, for Trinidad
Schooner Emeline, 72 tons net, Capt
Clarke, for British C 4
Schoaner Frances W. Smith, 74 tons
net, Capt. Hassell, for British Guiana
Passengers landing here yesterday from
the French Liner SS. “Col bie’ were:--
From Southampton Wilfred Atston,
Margarét. Alston, Hylda E s, David EB
Cuke, Iss Te Cuke, Marg t Dewhurst,
John R. Constance iss, Anthony
Orpen, Col Eben Pike, Olive C.
Pike, Countess of Ronaidshay, Cohn A
Famsay, Cohn C. Ramsay, Violet Alport,
Anne A. Bentley, H. M. Houldsworth,
C. W. Houldsworth, Louis Larrouy, Marie
l arrouy Art s, Edward
“ilgrim, FE 2 Rev. Sydney
Fr. Rippe Je William W

















Alex, Ch. Phil : Phillips, Rev
8. A Sunderlanc William F
Thomas.

From Dominica C otte Corriette
Ingrid ©

Passen & Barbados yesterday
cvening t » French Liner “Colombite
were

Fer Jamaica— Dr Harold M Forde
ife and child, Rev. F. M. Dowlen and

fe Makinsor «a wife, George
Lawards, James Edwards, Doris Wiltshire.

For Cartagena—Luis A, Cabrera, wife
and child, Dr. John Elemndorf

For Curacao Chesterfield Springer,
Kenneth N. Sea Clement Worrell
Newton A. Bovell, George F. L. Charles
Gwendelyn Sand Esther Sandiford,
Oscar F. G. Gibb

For Trinidad Kath een O'Ne Hariet
Fimendori, Earl Parchment, w 3
children, sh, Joan A, M
Agnes Cc Boy
Small Daisy



George W
Gladys Kirto
Anne M. Vida
Cutting Bryer
and wife, John Deane vd
St. John, John Pay Monica St
Maria Lang, Berbara | r, Jean St. Joh
T. Herbert and
wife, Getrel ¢
Licorish



wife, John Grace and
Feldmenr Ma¥iorie B

Seawell

ARRIVALS By B.W.LA
WEDNESDAY

From Trinidad—T. Edwards, FE

G. Raveneau, E. Myles, FE. Myles, C. B

Escalante, E. Massimine, 1. Massimine

C. Massimine, C. Massimine, F. Comber

ON



Ward



G. Gomer, E. Reefer, R. Reefer, B
Reefer, R. Samaroo, FR Samaroo R
Goodsman, D. Johnston, D. West, ¢

Cabrera, C

Cabrera
From Trinidad Yesterday F

Jordan, A, McKenzie. J

Cabrera J Cabrera KF

Durr, H
Bowen, H

















Creque, L. Akow, H. Creque C u
Drew, A. De Lima, A. De Lima, 8
De Lima, Z. De Lima, G. Taylor, D
Taylor, J_ Taylor, W. Taylor, J. Roach
M. Gooding, J. Shields, M. Shields, L,
Greenidge, M. Greenidge
From St. Vincent—Ian Howell, Arwel
Nichols avid Abbott, Bernard Abbott
Bruce Sadley, Robin Austin
DEPARTURES By BW.LA. ON
WEDNESDAY

For Trinidad—Eve\ White, rene
White Honor Dunn pxander Dunn
Nora Fr he, John Turner, Christine
Turner Marie Glady Mac
Alister, Joyee Jones, Frederick Greenidge
Andrew Shepar Harriet Shepard
Liewellyn Tull ard Spierman, Erie
Traub, Eileer Sylvia Shores
James = Ber 1 Ber Mstr
James Berw Marion Hut won, Robert
Henders« Angela Kellmar Citfford
Manning

For Puerto Rico Yesterday Riehard
Paddon, Lydia Paddo Catherine
Mitchell, Carlisie Jordan, Shirley Tudo
Howard Griffith, Herbert King, Keelat
King

For Dominica Yesterday Geors
Gomez, Frank Cumber

Fe Samaica—-S/Lar. David West, S
George Seel, Muriel Jackman, Theodors
Soutzos, Dora Tbberson

In Fouch With Barbados
Coastal Station





Cable and Wireless (W.1.) Ltd., advis
that they can now communicate witt
the following ships through thetr Bar
bados Coast Station 5.8. Mormactide
8.8. Mormacrio, SS. Northfield, S'S
American Eagle, § Li ville, S.S

‘aition, SS, Ragnhild Droving

British ¢



Chase away
coughs?

TWO WONDERFUL REMEDIES

Zubes Cough Mixture

An excellent remedy that rapidly soothes

a congested chest.
child-
Be
Cough

and comfort

easy to take, they make short

dry or sore throat.



ays carry ther
in your pocket or handbag. A sniff wil!

, ZUBES INHALER

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TS AND
Y & CO., Br

STORES







PAGE THREE |





MAIL NOTICES





















> ‘s’ Clubs: Cyclist Injured
Dominica and Antigua by the| I Boys’ Clubs: syelist nj urec
Sch. Phyllis Mark will be closed at the 2 - -
seneral Post Office as under Th Gi 1 . GEORGE FOSTER 4 seni
> - I i arpent
el Ms ’ Registered MM re -
“ \ ; dinat "ean lat 9 a ». on the ‘ vires . on Village, St. Michael
Jar y, 1952 | There ‘ ; 1 and discharged at the
for $t. Vincent by the Sch | There are 15 boy ik Me Tene suain’ fap uiieen ens |
Ma y MM will be ed at the Gene ; island with a membe p 64 ne ; ;
most ’ it . oF th . * «) it ha >s 1ined when
Post Office as de | boys and three gir lu V : ' i oA
Parcel Mail at 12 noon, Registered Mall | ' : The three bai’ adash sicycle while
at 2D nd Ordis Mai ao | con ore $t pall aga ah % B ridir ixter’s Road, St
TO-DAY ith Jane 1952 ire at Bay Stre Cleaver Hill M el ss. wukerda
; St Joseph and § vell, Christ we i, rdé
RATES OF EXCHANGE Church Major R, Craggs told the 7 * We
10TH JANUARY, 1962 Advocate yesterday in an inter- gcc
NEW YORK view,
73 6/10 pr. Cheques on
a ao 72 3/10% pr He said that during the Christ- ing d the public saw this when
Sanaa Drafts 71 1/10 pr Mas season many boys went the Boys’ and Girls’ Clubs stall
73 6/10% pr around spreading the good cheer was among many stalls at the
72 2/10% pr 69 7/10% } at the Almshouses in the island Annual Agricultura) Exhibition
0% pr ve ie os nging carols and acting pl: The ndard of the exhibit
dae ‘CANADA The instructors who are té h- which included shogs, mats, hats,
72 6/10% pr ing the boys and girls carpent brushes ete was high and after
making, embroidery, cook- the exhibition all the exhibits
etc. are well pleased with were bought quickly by the pub-
72 6/10% pr. Cable the response their pupils are giv- lie é
71 1/10% pr. Currenc) 68 6/10% pr
Coupons 67 9/10% pr
0% pr Silver 20% pr

Sas



ee
-_
on,

i

Cheques on

Bankers 70 1/10% pr hoe
Demand Drafts 69 95% pr
Sight Drafts+ 69 8/10% pr ery













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PAGE FOUR

BARBADOS Go ADVOGATE |

SoS Reseed

Lta., Breed St. Bridgetown

1952





an by he Adverste Co.,



Friday, January 11,

* 4s" ‘ y
ELECTRI
48484
,

THE Barbados Flectric

tion began operatic

Supply Corpora-
1910 in Barbados
supplied current in 1911. There
generating sets of 135 kilo-
at that time. In 1951 there
total

ms in
and first
were only two
watts installed
generating sets of a
capacity of 3,700 kilowatts.

The Company began with a franchise to
supply electricity to an area within 5 miles
of Bridgetown. In 1936 permission was
obtained to supply the whole island. For
the first 16 years of operation no dividend
was paid to shareholders but since 1926 an
average dividend of 5% has been declared.

During the last four years the Company
has spent nearly £100,000 in new gener-
ating sets to cope with increased demands
for None of this
secret published

were seven

information is
by the Electric
Advocate Year

was stated

supply
and was
Supply Corporation in the
Book 1951 In
the time that the company has been greatly
handicapped
ible and engine makers repre-

addition it at

owing “to these sets proving
very unrelié

sentatives have been in this island for the

past two years making the necessary
adjustments.”
On Wednesday the Hon. H. A. Cuke,

C.B.E.,. M.L:C.,
tion’s Advisory
took the
confidence and explained to their members
Company was
the position confronting Barbados
today because of the Company’s inability
to supply all the electricity demanded.
Hon. H. A. Cuke,
hundred applications on the
waiting list of the company.
The Company, he said, had
far back as 1942 the need for
and had continued to press for permission

a member of the Corpora-
Committee in Barbados,
Chamber of Commerce into his

that the not ignorant of

serious

There were, said the

me four

realised as

expansion

to obtain generators when this permission
refused. The then Governor
Barbados had intervened on behalf of the
Electricity Company and in January 1943
The
Company placed orders for four new gen-
erating sets. in 1947,
1949, 1950 and 1951. They had all given
trouble. Had these sets not all given
trouble the Company would have been
able to supply existing demands and would
be in a healthy position to go ahead with
plans for expansion. It was quite unfair,
said the Hon. H. A. Cuke, to say that the
Company ‘had done’ nothing to consider
the interests of the people of Barbados.
The Company had met with a series of
unfortunate accidents, he said, and its
present plans for expansion were being
held up because one of the clauses in the
Public Utilities Act (1951) was frightening
away new capital on the London Stock
Exchange.

Many members of the Barbados Chamber
of Commerce expressed the view that the
Electric Supply Corporation was not con-
sidering the interests of the people of
Barbados and Mr. D. G. Leacock the Chair-
man, suggested that the Company had
been unsuccessful in its public relations.

Mr. Lucie-Smith wanted to know
whether capital could not be obtained
locally and expressed concern that re-
stricted electricity supply would lead to
unemployment and would prevent the ex-
pansion of local industries. He said there
was no use throwing mud at the company.
What he wanted was to get Government
and the Electricity Company together to
find ways and means of overcoming the
serious situation which had arisen and
which affected the bread and butter of the
people.

Finally the Chamber .of Commerce
appointed a Conimittee to: discuss with the
Governor the existing situation and the
Hon, H. A. Cuke agreed to notify the Elec-
tricity Company in London of the feelings
of the Chamber of Commerce as expressed
at the meeting.

Something more is being done to bring
home to the people of Barbados the serious
position of an island where demands for
electricity exceed supply and where there
are no new generators on order to cope
with present supplies.

But the Chamber of Commerce cannot
be congratulated for their acrimonious
discussion of this serious position, The
Electric Supply Corporation may have
failed to take the public into their confi-
dence, but it has, on the evidence, been
very active in coping with serious diffi-
culties, while their silence has been due to
the highest motives of not imputing blame
to others, The feeling of the Chamber of
Commerce as expressed by several mem-
bers was too akin to that of fault-finding
and there was no complete constructive
suggestion made. The appointment of a
Committee can hardlyimpro6ve the position
unless that Committee employs expert
technical opinion to advise Jit.

Most of the criticisms made at Wednes-
day’s meeting were based on generaliza-
tions which would have had no effect had
there been a technical expert present.
Recriminations and mud throwing are not
going to add one kilowatt to the total elec-
tricity supplied in Barbados. At the same
time it is regrettable that so’ much heat
should be generated in a matter of grave
public concern and there is no daubt that
improved public relations are better than
last minute inquests. What is vitally neces-
sary is that mutual confidence be restored
immediately between the Government
and the Corporation and that orders for
new generating plant be placed at the
earliest opportunity.

was first of

indents for generators were sent on.

These sets arrived





A Visitor In New
York

Hest OF Luck
in

By BARNEY MILLAR







NEW YORK, Jan. 2
The tumult and the shout ing
dies! The Xmas holidays are ove
in fact alf the holiday r
‘ er and Ne Ww Y TK 1e est
ohristian l seitlec
to the daily d and
ym task of its everyday
existence As far as the word
ettled” can be applied to this
|busy bustling city, it has settled
jafter a full period of high pres-

ure celebration
| To skip from
| Year! This 1952
j}hundreds of

Xmas to the New
was welcomed by
thousands of people
jam-packed in Times Square —
the centre of the city All traffic
| had been diverted from this area,
and the stores and busing

houses had boarded up their
[Plate glass, windows. From early
Monday—-New Year's Eve, it
jis called here, all roads led to
| Square, and as the restau-
| rants, and all refreshment places
j had been given permission to
jremain open all night, brisk busi-
jness was on. The area steadily
| filled, and by night fall it was
jimpossible to move more than a
jfew inches at a time amid the
vast throng of humanity that
filled the square around the
| illuminated, towering Times
building. The whole area indeed
was a blaze of brilliant illumina-
| tion with gaily coloured balloons
jdangling from the tall building

| At the stroke of midnight—a
| huge white balloon was cut
jand as it floated slowly down
}full view of the crowded
}oughfare, gave the signal that a
|New Year had dawned. Cheers,
houts, calls of all kinds rent the
air, as the traditional greeting
Was exchanged “Happy New
Year”
Indoors,
exclusive

on

Tir



loose

wi in
thor-

the fashionable and
eating places had their
midnight suppers and drinking
parties, apart from those who
welcomed the New Year at their
various places of worship. And
jthese were many, for suprising
as it may seem to some there is
a solid block of Church-goers who



find time for religious practice
jamid the hustle and bustle of
busy life.

And so I join in at this point
to say, even if belatedly, “Happy
|New Year.” Exactly what it holds
jin store, no one can tell although
it comes pregnant with possibili-
ties on every hand. But, does
worrying help?
| The year is gone, no need to
| rue,

} A new one comes to me and
| you:
| So goodbye 1951, and welcome
1952,
|
* ,

Before I
holiday, it is

dismiss the Xmas
interesting to note,

that here the day after Xmas is
NOT a holiday, Unknown or
unobserved by Americans is what
we know as Boxing Day— the
day which one yule-tide wit
described as the period of recov-
ery from the Xmas celebrations.
No! Uncle Sam is a busy man,

and with him it is production and
more production all the time.
This is the guiding theme of all
Americans,

This year—-or rather last year
the day before Xmas,, the Monday
was proclaimed a holiday, so that
those who were minded to do so
could enjoy a four-day break
from their labours. That is to
say—-Saturday, Sunday, Monday

By SEFTON DELMER
First man whose story I extract
from the dossiers is the corporal
who had served as a_ cobbler
“acting unpaid” in the Red Army.
So he knew all about boots and

shoes. And he started—says the
official British interrogation re-
port—with incredulous delight at
a pair of civilian leather shoes
given him by the British.
“Never, never did IT expect to
have such wonderful shoes for

myself,” he rejoiced, “Oh such a
splendid suit of clothes.”

He fingered lovingly the not-
vory-first-class German material
of his 90s. reach-me-down,

“No one had a suit as good as
this at home, not even the direc-
tor of the tractor station,” he said.



|

| ‘And shoes! There were only six

} out of 800 in our village who

| had leather ones. The others all
wore bast shoes made of straw
nd puttees. I know because I






one

} Ten days before this the cor-
|} poral had deserted from Stalin’s
Army, made his way across the
| frontier,

The commander of his Soviet
}unit had been over to see him
in British hands and had ap-
pealed to him to come back.

But the corporal had firmly
turned the Soviet commander
| down,
oe Flood Of Words

Now he was free free to

| marvel at all the good things in
| the way of clothes, cooking pots,
| furniture, lighting, food, housing,

which life holds for people out-
| side the Seviet Union

Above all he was free to
The corporal talked and
and talked. There was no
ping him

It is a ‘normal
terrogators. knew,
ef psychological liberation.

Again and again, in reports
prepared by the British authoeri-
ties, I have read that refugees
have arrived, tired and evasive:
they stil] feared the spy for
Stalin was lurking behind every
wall.

Then the dam would suddenly
b» lifted, and thoughts and ob-
servations pent up in years of
repression would come bursting
out in q non-stop flood. Like the
corpor il all the fugitives have
one constant refrain; “At home
no one knows it is like this out-
side. They think the way they
live is the way the whole world
lives,”

speak.
talked
ston-

in-

2eSs

stage, his
in the proc

Deserter

corporal was born ot
29, 1928, in Kuksovo,

ud-track village of
med wooden house
n water, or li
10oling, like that of the vast
majority of Soviet children, be-





BARBADOS ADVOCATE

1952"



BARNEY MILLAR








and Tuesday, Very little work is
done in the city on Saturday as
labour regulations call for a five-
day week. So on this occasion
there a real holiday break
for many,, which began froin the
evening of Friday, Dec. 21

This long holiday period had
its attendant evils. It was estima-

ted that 600 people would die in
traffic accidents between Friday
evening and Wednesday morning.
1ally 516 died, and the heavy
snowfall in certain areas which
restricted travel somewhat might
have been the biggest factor in
keeping the number below the
estimate
This bit of information was re-



ieased at the same time as the
Xmas., death figures. A woman,
Miss Wilhelmina WISCHMEIER,

of.Ohio, who was killed on Friday
evening was the millionth victim
of automobile accidents in New
York in 50 years. This stovgering
iccomplishment, actually stretch-
’ over a period of just over 50
years, because this count started





ith the death of a Mr. H. H.
Bliss, killed by a car ag he
stepped off a bus on Sept. 13,
1899. It still represents a condi-
ion which the National Safety
C-unci! described as one which
“ne. civilized count ry should ever
ce.” This could be avoided, he
said = b ‘a little more civilized

behaviour

Barbadian Students

I ran into a bunch—or rather

they invaded a small party which
I attended last Saturday night.
The word “small” is a purely rela-
uve term in this city. I journeyed
to Brooklyn to meet an old friend,
vho is as udent in C

The Cobbler. Thel
And The Convict

gan at the age of eight, and
ended when he was 12.
In 1945, after doing his basic

military training, he was schooled
as a plasterer and sent to work
in Moscow :

In three months there nearly
all his classmates deserted.

The corporal decided to follow
their example, but he was
caught and sent to jail. When
he came out the Red Army
summoned him once more and
he was sent to Germany.

ss
| 2.—The Film Girl |

Valentina was a secretary sten-
ographer with a Soviet film unit
making a rosy documentary of
life under Stalin in “liberated
«East Germany

“Before I was
o location,”

Leningrad.”

Here what she had
ebout the struggle to get y little
fuel for the stove in her 12ft.. by
12ft. room, (As a great privilege
she had this room to herself
The other four‘rooms in the flat
sharing the same _ kitchen, are
occupied by four large-size fam-
ilies.)

“First a permit had to be Ob+
tained for the fuel. The best way
to get it was to bribe an official,
The permit would be for three
cubic feet of wood, the entire
ration for the bitterly cold Len-
ingrad winter,

“Next I would have to go to
the fuel depot—but NOT in office
hours.

“As often as
would bes
would be





sent to Germany
she said, “I lived

to say

not
fruitless,
closed or

my journey
The depot
no fuel would

be in stock
“Next the transport problem.
I would club with friends and

> a van—but we had to follow
1e wood on its way through the
streets to make sure that no One
stole any. And even when it
was in my room I could not be
sure it was safe even under my
bed,

“People are so short of every-
thing there are no morals about
stealing even from friends.”







2 The Renviet |

The Lieutenant,
convict, is number three cn my
lists. I call him ex-convic: be-
cause when he was still a private
he served an li-month jail term
fo over-staying his leave by
seven hours.

who is an ex-





He i fanatical Russian pat-
rot, and broke with ‘Stalin and
deserted because he became con-
vinced that the Russian reople
re being ruined by men “who
eare nothing for the Russian

people.

spending a few holiday days down
here. This was Eric Worrell, son of
Canon W. E. Worrell.
met for about 5 years,
ted until about midnight.
polities, the army came up for dis-
cussion and I was saying “good
night”
the party stared. The new com-
ers were led by Shirley Smith,
younger. brother of Dr.
Smith, sons of
“Jimmy” Smith; Ted Haynes, son

big
money.”

ynada but was and leave us alone.

primitive and overcrowded.
hovels and barracks, men, women

ment
about this rule of vodka.

roam
wherever
have fought pitched battles with
crack
police.

chaotic
resistance against the régime it
might
a headache even greater
the

Army



We hadn't
so we chat-
Cricket,

when three cars arrived and

“Bunny”
Mr. and Mrs.
of Mr. and Mrs. Douglas Haynes,
who is studying Architecture;
“Bunny” Hope of St. Lawrence
now pursuing a pre-med course,
and Ralph Prescod doing work in
optemetry. Of course there were
ladies in the party, among them
Miss Iris Cozier, a sister of Mr.
E. L. Cozier and once again the
conversation swung for a_ time,
around to things Barbadian. Music
and refreshment appeared as if by
magic. and when I stole away at
4.30 things were not quite ended

This was the second time in two
deys, that I had mixed with some
Barbadians studying here. On the
previous night, the West Indies
Students’ Association sponsored a
Dance at the luxuriously appointed
Chateau Gardens and among
others I had run across Vere W>'-
kins, a nephew of Mr. James Mil!-
ington. studying Medicine at
Columbia University, and Mi~
Enid Marshall formerly on the ste ff
ef the Barbados Public Librarv
who is nearing the end of her
course in Commercial Administr»-
tion at the New York University

Winfield Pelew, of St. James, -r

Ola Combermerian hes taken bh’
â„¢ Se, at the Long Island Univer
‘itv, and Arnold Bovce. both
whom are medical students wv
alen anvion, and interested ‘no he
“hout their “Small island” hom*

Doing Well

I was especially delighted t
hear from the boys from Canad
that Dr. Bunny Smith was doing
quite well and making quite 4
name for himself. Working on the
staff of the Veterans Hospital, he
so impressed medical circles that
he was given an appointment on
the staff of one of Canada’s big-
gest hospitals. Now he has got a

scholarship which will enable him

to go to Europe in pursuit of fur-

ther study, and it is quite on the

ecards that we shall hear quite a
good deal of this old Harrisonian
in the not too distant future. If J

reed between the lines correctly.

we might even see him in the West
Indies on special duty

* * +

ON the bus a few mornings ago,
I saw a sign which réad this way:
“For Sale—the rear door of this
bus—very little used.” This was a
reminder to passengers that they
must uSe the rear door for leaving
the vehicle, as the front one was

chiefly for passengers getting into

ihe bus.
‘ * * *
WHY don’t you go in for building

and loan?” shouted an irate clerk
to a newcomer,

“Building and loan? What’s that
boy? I haven’t got any

“IT mean go out of this building
We are busy.

ila Girl

“They are only concerned wit!
spreading Communism over th
world, and they are doing it a
our expense,” he said. He we
born and brought up in the new
industrial area in the Urals
which he visited recently on
leave.

Inhabitants there, he said, are
foy the most part deportee
Men uprooted from their homes
in the Ukraine, the Baltic pro-
vinees, Rumania, the Crimea, or
one or the many other region
where Stalin considers the native
population unreliable.

Then there are the inmates c
the many forced labour camns-
efficers from the Soviet occupa-
tion army in Germany, fo
instance, who talked of the sv
periority of German industria!
methods. And there are the
thousands who have been re-
leased from these camps or have
escaped from them,

All of these people, said th
lieutenant, have undoubtedly
become demoralised by their ex-
periences. Appalling living con-
ditions in this industrial area de

the rest.

There is little food, housing is
In

and children are dying off daily
in thousands without any notice
being taken.

Vodka is the main factor in
life. There is no other amuse-
ment. Everyone drinks heavily,
from the miners in the coal
mines, where there are accidents
all the time, to the chiefs of the
party and the secret police.

Rule of Vodka

Said the lieutenant: “While 1
was home in Polovainka the
police chief of my town shot

dead two workers while he was
He was},

drunk in a restaurant,
sentenced to five years.

“In fact, that sentence would
mean death. For the inmates of
the labour camps are a law unto
themselves, and no police official
can survive among them.

“The party and the Govern-
authorities do nothing
Prob-
ably they think that alcohol is
the best way of preventing any
trouble here.”

Headache?

He may well be right. Already
today bands of escaped prisoners
the countryside pillaging
they please. They

troops of Stalin’s special

If turn this

organised

were to
fnarchy into

anyone

provide the Kremlin wth
than
desertions from the Red
in Germany.

—L.E.S.



Months Of —
Work Behind
Royal Tour |

By LOUIS WULFF

who, as a Court reporter, has
accompanied the British Royal
Fami.y on may overseas tours

Thc rew: that
Duke, of Edinburgh will undertake the tour

of Australia and New Zealand in place of the

King and Queen has meant much extra work
for officials both in Britain and in
longer itinerary, to begin with,

there.

|

But basically, the work of organisation will |
remain the same as if the King and Queen |
much
For organising
a Royal tour overseas involves a major effort
of planning that begins a year or more before |

had been undertaking the tour; and
will already have been done.

the Royal arrival.

In its complexity, its attention to the min- |
utest detail, and its exact timing over a period
of many weeks, involving journeys by road,
rail, air and sea, 4 Royal tour is an amazing
piece of organisation. Underlying everything, |
from the moment when the Prime-Minister
of the country to be visited sends the formal |

invitation to the Royal travellers in the name |
of his Government, until they return,
concept that all must go smoothly and with-
out hitch.

Because the Princess and the Duke are the
guests of the nation concerned, the
outlines of the tour,
detail of which places shall be visited, and

how long shall be spent at each, will be left |

to them to devise.



The one broad ‘principle

which the Princess will lay down is that she
and the Duke will want to see as much of

the country they are visiting as is possible |
in the time, and that as many people as possi- |

ble shall be given the chance to see them. |
During the Canadian tour, in 1939, for exam- |

ple, it is estimated that at least 70 per cent.

of the entire population saw King George |
and Queen Elizabeth at one point or another. |

THOUGHT FOR CHILDREN

One further point which will be stressed

by the Princess and her husband in this con- |

nection is that special consideration shall be
given throughout to children and ex-Service
men and women.

Naturally it is in the country concerned |

that the first draft of the Royal programme
is made. Once the dates of arrival and de-
parture from Britain have been approved, a
committee set up by the Prime Minister con-
cerned will begin to work with maps, time-
tables and schedules. This means sorting out
and balancing a host of claims and counter-
claims, dealing sometimes with local and in-
ter-State or inter-town rivalries.

Before any of the programme can be r¢
garded as settled, it will have to be seen an
examined by the Princess and the Duke. Thi
is no mere routine formality. Point by poin
town by town, engagement by engagemen‘
the Royal couple will go over the outlin«

proposals, probably with the chief organise”

appointed for the tour by the Governmen
concerned. In the present case, the plans wei

discussed at length on several occasions wit >

General Berryman, of Australia, and M:
‘| Harper of New Zealand, who travelled spe-
cially to London for the purpose.

THE QUESTION OF CLOTHES

Clothes form a separate and distinct prob-
lem for the Royal travellers. The Princes
will have planned and ordered her wardrobe
immediately she learned she and the Duk
would take the place of the King and Queer
Her,clothes will be adjusted so that they wil
be adequate for the number of fugetions t:
be attended, and yet not so large as to be un-
manageable in the stress of thousands 0'
miles of travel with repeated changes fron
ship to train, from train to car, from car to
aircraft, from . battleship Government
House, from Government House to hotel
For his part the Duke must include both nava!
uniforms and civilian attire.

Among the most important, and one of th
least realised, points about a Royal tour o!
this kind is that all expenses are borne b
the Government concerned with the sing]
exception of the aircraft and the ship whic!
will carry the Royal travellers out and back

to

these will be the responsibility of Britain. |

All the cars which the Princess and he:
husband will use in Australia and New Zea
land, for example, have been bought by th«
two Governments, and will remain their
property when the tour is over.

Similarly, it

to the Princess’s household travel
where on the tour with them.

Nothing, indeed, is left undone to make the |
and one that will re- ||

il

tour a successful one,
main in the memory of both hosts and guests
as an event long to be remembered.



Princess Elizabeth and the |

the |
Dominions to be visited. There will be a
although |
some modification may be necessary here and








is the;



broad |
as well as most of the!











is on members of the home |
security police that responsibility for the |
personal safety of the Royal visitors fall, |
though the plain clothes officers of the Metro- |
politan Police who are permanently attached |
every- |



FRIDAY, JANUARY 11, 1952





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FRIDAY, JANUARY 11, 1952

Mlectricity Shortage
tiampers Industry

@ from pace 1

He said that the company was
now considering the putting down
of one steam turbine engine, and
for future expansion, using diesels
during the peak hours. As con-
sumption moved up, they would
put down a second turbine.

It was a

xe very expensive pro-
position, and the company was
oo up plans to see exactly
what e

the capital cost would be.

'n the meantime this difficulty
urose sy
Capital
It was very doubtful, with the
present Bill which was passed in

the legislature in connection with
Public Utilities, if the company
would be able to raise any money
for the proposed capital outlay.
They had sounded out the posi-
Hon, and it Was very unlikely that
anybody in England would be
willing to supply fresh capital,
He had asked what the capital ex-
penditure would be in the future,
and they were getting out exact
figures.

In the meantime the company
had launched a_ protest against
certain clauses in the Bill, but the
matter was not settled. Until the

natter was settled the company
could not really go forward to
raise any capital, but they were

making all plans for the require-
ments in the future.

As far as he gould see, even if
the matter was successfully dis-
posed of from the point of view
of getting adjustments made to the
Bill the raising‘of the necessary
capital was not an easy matter. 4

When they spoke of raising
money in the Stock Exchange, he
saw the last prospectus which the
company issued and the informa-
tion which they had to give, and
he would assure the meeting that
he never had any conception of
what the company had to go
through to raise iresh capital.

“We in this island have to get
electric current Wherever the
money comes from,” Mr, Cuke
said “But whatever happens, I
do not see, even if we get these
present four engines running
right, that you could get any big
installation under two years, if
they did come in two years.

He counselled members not to




fo into the Public Utilities Bill
nee the matter was still sub-
judice, and was now before the
legal people in England.

Hon. Mr. Cuke said that the

company would have considerable
difficulty in raising fresh capital
in England if the Public Utilities
Bill did go through in its present
form. What would happen if it
was amended to meet certain con-
ditions was left to be seen, but the
capital would have to be raised
anyhow

No Excuse

He was not making any excuse
for the company. It was a fact
that the four engines have given
a certain amount of trouble, and
if they had worked quite well, the
company would have had time to
overhaul the old ones.

It was not quite fair to the com-
pany when the facts were known,
to say that they did not make pro-

vision for increasing the plant
capacity. It was not quite true to
say so. One could quite see the
Directors’ hesitancy in making
any public statement.

Everyone knew that a Public

Utility “tis a monopoly”. The Elec-
tric Company was not opposed to
the idea of having a Public Ser-
vice Commission, Nobody antici-
pated that the terms gontained in
the present Utilities Bill would
have been so stringent.

- Delay

Hon. K. R. Hunte enquired what
clauses of the Bill the company
had protested against, and opined
that the Electric Company, like
the Telephone Company, could
have sent out a Director to inter-
view the members of the legisla-
ture prior to the Bill being sent
down, and not wait until it had
been passed to protest against it.

Mr. Cuke replied that the point
had been put that the restrictions
imposed by the Bill would have
an adverse effect in the com-
pany’s raising capital in England.

Phenomenal
Mr, D, G. Leacock Jnr., thought
it a phenomenal occurrence for the
four engines to break down at one

time, and queried whether they
were properly inspected before
being sent out, and went on to
suy that before the war, Consult-
ing Engineers were called in to
inspect the plants during a
twenty-four’ or thirty-six-hour
trial run.
Criticism
Mr. D. Lucie-Smith who first

brought up the matter at a meet-
ing of the Council of the Chamber,
sais thac he did not bring the mat-

ter up in order to criticise the
Electric Company or the Govern-
ment. He was not interested in

politics, he said, He did not think
hat the company had acted 100
per cent, in the interest of the com-
munity and the people of Barba-
dos. They saw tiie demand for in-
creased current, yet there was no
equipment, or any attempt to raise
the capital locally.

He knew that about one million
dollars was rai in,the local
market by private companies
“What is the situation with which
we are faced?" Mr. Lucie-Smith
asked. “We are citizens of an
island in which we pay a lot of
taxes, and there is an agreement
between the Government and the
Electric Company as a public ser-
vice and we expect to get electric
current in a modern, civilized, up-
to-date place. If the Government
gives the company a monopoly,
both sides have a responsibility,
and it ig up to them to give the
public decent and reasonable ser-
vice, We are faced with the issue
of raising capital. There are people
out of work today; there are wire-
men lajd off because people can-
not wire houses, and there is a
large amount of equipment im-
ported hy firms, which cannot be
sold because there is no current.”





Industry Hampered



Government had passed a law
to assist local industry, but you
could not have local industry

without power. It would be hope-
less, he said, for anybody to set up
a new industry if they cannot gei
power, and he could foresee that
in this year many more people
would be out of work, He wanted
to consider ways and means of
getting the power because they
needed it. “The economy of the
island needs it,’ Mr, Lucie-Smith
said.

Mr. Lucie-Smith said had
great sympathy for the company,
but he really did not feel in his
heart of hearts that they were
very active in the interest of the
island. It was unfortunate that the
company was an English Com-
pany, and the Directors were not
living here.

Not Correct

Replying to these criticisms, Mr
Cuke said that from the point of
view of demand Mr. Lucie-Smith
was correct, but he was not quite
so correct in assuming that the
company could get electrical
equipment in England by just
orderjng it.

Survey Needed

Hon. Mr. Hunte said they were
in sericus trouble, and put for-
ward the suggestion that a survey
should be made of the island with
a view to finding out what help
the company could get from those
factories which had their owr
generating plants, He had under-
steod that Spring Hall had a 1400-
kilowat plant.

Mr. Cuke said that the state-
ment had been made that Spring
Hall had generating sets, and ex-
plained that it was not so easy
to tap current from one plant into
another

Mr. Hunte suggested further
that there were plants for trans-
forming current, and said that in
view of the fact that the Electric
Company could not get generating
plants for two years, or possibly
three, they should try to get some
transformers and go around to the
factory owners and get some of
their current for distribution

he



Mr, Bryden explained that he
had been informed by the staff
engineers of the company that a
transformer would cost in the
vicinity of £2,400, and would only
arrive about three months ahead
of a generating plant. All those
points had been gone into, when
some years ago another factory
offered to help the company.

Mr. Hunte said they did not feel
that the company was putting
every effort into solving the prob-
lem, and Mr. Lucie-Smith queried
whether they had approached
Government or Colonial Develop-
ment and Welfare for a loan.

Mr. Lucie-Smith argued that it
was a question of the bread and
butter of the people, many of
whom were out of work

Mr. W. A. Atkinson asked if all
the engines were working whether
the company could supply current
to the entire island, and expressed
the view that the company was
not looking sufficiently into the
future. He said that at least one
Director should have come to Bar-
bados, since even if new machin-
ery were ordered now, it would
be two or three years before more
current could be produced,

Mr. G, H. King was of opinion
that a Director should have come
out and let the public know what
was happening, and show that they
were taking a real interest. He
personally felt that they were not

sufficiently interested in whether
there was sufficient current in
Barbados or not.

Unfair

Mr. Cuke said that suci a criti-
cism V not quite fair, and as-
sured the meeting that he had
taken up the point with the Caner
iis



tors. He felt sire that after
explanation, they must appreciate
the fact that the company has

made every effort to have a power
plant. They had suffered the ter-
rible set back of which he had
spoken, fand which was beyond
their control, and secondly, that
they were actively making plar
for the future

Mr. Leacock asked if
could be raised locally, why
should they worry about the
Capital Issues Committee in Lon-
don, and Mr. Cuke replied that he
had spoken with the Directors,
and knowing their difficulties, he

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BARBADOS ADVOCATE
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Commander of

A.W.L. Station
Will Pay Visit

ARRIVING in Barbados on Sat
urday On board the H.M.S. SHEF-
FIELD which flies his flag, will be
Vice-Admiral Sir Willia
Andrewes, K.B.E.. C.B, D.S.O
Commander-in-Chief of the Ame -
ca—West Indies Station
ir William Andrewes took uy
office Commander-in-Chief or
October 15, 1951, in succession of
vice-Admiral Sir Richard Sym-
onds-Tayler, K.B.E., C.B., D.S.(

He was born on the 38rd Novem-
Lov, 1889, and went to sea in 1915
Midshipman in H.M.S. CAD



as

as a





ADA in the Grand Fleet and
present at the Battle of Jutlan
Atter this he served in vario
destroyers, and was in the Balt «
tn 1919 He specialised in To
pedots in 1923, and after vario
specialist appointments was aj
pointed as Fleet Torpedo Offic:
China Fleet, in 1930
Lieutenant Commander A
drewes was promoted to Cor
Pictured above ‘s the Austin Mulliner Motor Coach’ the property of the General Omnibus Co., Ltd., mander in 1932, and in 1934 pass
which, it is hoped, will replace the present type of bus now being used in Barbados. the Staff course. After his pron
Z “ ~—(Story on page 1) tion to Captain in 1938, he was a
ya ——— student at the Imperial Defen:«
rg ‘ e College in 1939
was not quite s symps .
‘ear eee Saem~—enets — PoOligeman Saved ove sien wines
be constructive, Mr Cuke said World War Captai Andre wes W
People in England were quarrel. in command of H.MS. ALBA
ling because they were not being on e ROSS, but left her in January
supplied with el! the current they ye T 1940, to become a member of t
wanted ° I om row nin Joint Planning Siaff in the Wa
Same In U.S.A. 33 pate ivbinet Offices in London Fren
Mr. A. S. Bryden said he had non re 1942 to 1943 Captain Andrewé
been informed by a gentleman P.C. 327 JONES, attached to the Speightstown Police commanded H.M.S. UGANDA in
jetine to do with Public Utili- Post, was saved from being drowned about 10.30 a.m. ves- i Atlantic ms an yee ee n
ies in America a at count asst . eee eR : ; ker , te 1@ invasion of Sicily, where he
Sel fo revs ‘ta Mg Sood terday while he was sea-bathing at a beach near Queen was mentioned in despatches. le

neck due to similar difficulties
Hon. Mr, Hunte said he realised

that the company could not get
new generators for about two
years, and suggested that two

officers should be sent to the Di-
rectors to tell them of the feeling
of the Chamber of Commerce and
to ask them whether they consider
it advisable to make a survey of
the present generators in Barba-
dos, and what could be done to
put them into service They want-
ed to see soineone come out to go
to the factories and see what could
be done.

Mr. Lucie-Smith was not satis-
filed that the Electric Company, as
such, was taking reasonable steps
to try and put the matter right.
If it were his own private business
and he had found himself in such
difficulties, he would seek out all
means possible to remedy it. Right
back from 1950 the Electric Com-
pany should have taken’ such
steps.

When Hon. Mr. Cuke again re-
ferred to Government's refusal to
give permission to the Company
to import a plant in 1942, Mr,
Leacock said that on one occasion
he happened to be interested in a
company which really wanted a
generating plant at the time, and
they were offered three or four
second hand 1,000-kilowat plants
which could have been shipped
within a month or two, He agreed
however, that the company would
hesitate to import reconditioned
second band plant except to tide
them over a difficulty







“a eport
Mr. Cuke gave the meeting the
assurance that he would prepare
a report of the discussion which
had taken place, emphasizing the
various points which had _ been
brought out both as regards second



hand machinery and the other
question which Mr. Hunte had
raised. Having prepared the re~-

port along those lines, he would
let members of the Chamber see
it, and send it on to the Directors
because he knew that they were
worried, and he knew it was not
true to say that they were just sit-
ting down in England doing no-

thing
The Future

Mr. DeL. inniss said it was time
one of the English Directors come

down to Barbados and make a
proper survey of things. He felt
that if that were done, things

would be better. He said it should
be pointed out to the Directors
that the Chamber of Commerce
“take a serious view, not of the
past, but of the immediate future.”
He said it was up to the Chamber
to make representation to the
Government, and asked what new

industry could be established
without electricity.

Mr, Inniss suggested that a
small committee sheuld be ap-

pointed to wait on the Governor,
and bring to his notice the serious-
ness of the situation. The Electric
Company was controlled from
London, and he felt that a scheme
should be put forward to the Gov-
ernment to press the Electric Com-
pany to try and do certain things
to tide them over the difficulties,

Committee
A committee was subsequently
appointed to meet and hold pre-
liminary discussions with a view
to taking the matter up with the
Governor Apes © a Corts
i vere Mr he weacock
Tee Bae K. R. Hunte, Mr. T. O
low Lucie-Smith and






Dowding; Mr. D
King

Mr. G. H

|
j

|
|
|



)





Street

Jones, who can swim, found the tide too hard for him
and was about 100 yards out to sea when Vin Richardson,
proprietor of the Astor Theatre, and Merlyn Babb, a young

shipwright, rescued him in a moses.

!so took part in the invasion of
Italy and for services in that oper
ation was made a Companion
the Distinguished Service Ord

In 1944 Captain Andrewes wa
appointed Chief Staff Officer to the

A little boy made the alarm Commander-in-Chief, Portsrmout!
C e 1 anes sous gee Kye be in diffi- for the administration of the
; Ser j culty in ichardson got oars i force: of the Norman
- wi P 4 vant from Sir Rupert Briercliffe’s yard faneitiae For ‘iin a ie x

Qualifies As *
Barrister

Mr. A. .T

rvant at‘ached

beat he

ped
Warner, a Civil
to the Emi-

‘
the



hegan to drift
men found it

moses

with it
very
back ashore

and along with Merlyn Babb, went
Jones
After Jones was taken up in the
said that when he
help was coming to him, he ct
fighting against the tide and !%«
The oars-
difficult to get

realised



op- oe

was graciously pleased to appo
aptain Andrewes to be a Co
mander of the Military Divisio:
the Most Excellent Order o
British Empire... From 194
to 1945 he was Chief of Staff
Vice-Admiral (Administratic
British Pacific Fleet and in 194



gration Department in Trini- 3ig waves, at times rising to was appointed in command of th
dad, is now on his way back heishts of eight_ and 10 feet, were aircraft catrier INDOMITABL}
home after alifying . , pounding the Speightstown coast He was Chief of Staff to the Com
rome alter qualifying as @ al yesterday. They were bulding mander-in-Chief, Portsmouth
barrister in England last year. as far as 100 yards out to sea 1947, and in the same year wa
He arrived here yesterday and gained in height as they came jpyointed Aide de Camp to H
morning on the Colombie in- ayes Scie Seach. neomsotnd Majesty the King. On 8th Janu
transit from the United King- mr. L, B. Waithe, District Scout °"Y, 1948, Captain Andrewes wa
dom. Commissioner of St. Peter, and promoted Rear-Admiral oye
He said that he went up to Mr. Sasil King, the, Secretary, to pointed Senior Naval Member «

England in September 1949, qual:-

and send

get in touch with some scouts of

Speightstown them

to

the Directing Staff of the Imperi

Defence College. In 1949 he wa

a a7 : erie < oe the Heywoods beach to warn made a Companion of the mo
1951 and was called to the Bar in xe cia ielaw ‘
November of the sz ha + pienickers that the tide is hard Honourable Order of the Bath
Sea 4 ath alle pod bere: ce tales along the Speightstown coast From 1950 to 1951 Rear
een aa i. whenever there are big waves. Admiral Andrewes commande
t aaate ene he wo at os Some of the pienickers persisted «he Fifth Cruiser Squadron anc
ime Assistant Secretary’ ofthe iy sathing was Second-in-Command, Fa)
West Indian Students’ Union in The breakers provided lots Of past Station, On the outbreak o
London. : fun for men and boys who were the Korean War he assumed com
He said that the Union serves “hulling’—a form of skiing To mand of the British, Common
to bring together for social and the contrary, they were hazards wealth, French and Dutch ship
ati fg ~ . ° , eTe Z ’ °
educational — purposes, students for fishermen who Peat at taking part. Later his commanc
from all parts of the West Indiés moses to tender fishing boats wh also included’ some 80° ships 0

and added that it is also actively
concerned with any problem
which West Indians have to face

for

they returned to the Speightstown
mooring with catches of fish

One difficulty the fishermen

For thes
Andrewe:
was knighted by His Majesty thi

the United States Navy.
services Rear-Admiral




like accommodation, ete. was to get me se ato wees King, and was awarded the Silv«
The Union enjoys full recognition into the gee ' age there was the Star by the President of the Uni «
from the Colgnial Office. It played waves and en atarit julating back {States
an important part in bringing Ce tne tbe aden with fish On Ist December, 1950, Rea
about settlements recently in a ated the boats being over- Admiral Andrewes was promot
dispute between the British Coun- fe at in the surf to Viee-Admiral
cil and Colonial students n ithe “pullers” made their jumps During the course of hi
The basis for amicable settle- into the sea from the Challenor’s vice Vice-Admiral Andrewes r¢
ments and the general improve- jetty and swam out distances tO coived the Greek Military Cros
ment of conditions for students, be brought back ashore by the (1943) and the American Legic
was agreed upon at a meeting held waves while they lay with their of Merit (1944)
last August between the then chests on broad pieces of board Captain Muchael Bverard, R.N
Secretary of State for the Colonies, Picnic Party has been Commander of th



Mr. James Griffiths, and various
students’ unions.









Hundreds of picnickers from St

H.M.S. SHEFFIELD for over a ye



Josepn spent yesterday at Hey- After spending two years at th
Mr. Warner said that the Union woods Trees, the most popular Admiralty as Naval Assistant t
is also actively interested in all bathing beach of Speightsfown. the Admiral Commanding Re
matters Caribbean, but is non- Music, dancing, seabathing and jeryes, Captain Everard assum
partisan in politics feasting made their day an €N- Gommand of the H.M.S. SHEF
ret yoy aie One ‘ many FIELD, on December 15, 1950 a:
About 26 buses, just as re - : be 9 - ¢
Car Runs Off Road histo cars and also lorries filled Comms ioned net aS aay —"
with the eae pulled Prt {
SHORTLY after 4.50 p.m. yes- Heywoods arounc a.m. and lef oe 5 ran COC
teraay the motor car M 2658 in the eee It ae oe St 33 Le ave Jn.
driven by Michael Eastmond of Joseph's Chureh excursion eo .
Cleaver's Hill, St. Joseph, ran off Some of the vehicles wert Colombie
Colleton Road St Peter, and parked among the trees and on an
struck a wall on the side af that open piece of grass land on the The French passenger = sh
pond. Maser Me ni , "other side of the road while 4 sen8 Colombie arrived here yesterda
ad, ; ses ¢ or- .
‘ line of motor cars, buses anc : with 59 passengers from Englar
Aubrey Edwards, an occupant aw . je of
. * ries vias drawn up at the side , J f
of the car was taken to the Gen- ii ae Meares Sy Oe anne te nate hoard
eral Hospital and detained A polleeman was.on duty trying win peeve ee
J A policeman wi Wee Og her here and she left port yeste
incepta to maintain a rts bah oo a es day evening for Trinidad Ss
CIVIL SERVICE fic but ere hae arte aetecl will also be making calls at |!
r r and venice . G a, Curacao and Cartuge
y 10 "4" > ‘ s resulte juaira, Curacao i
COMMISSION SET UP ran iocks rosiled tho’ Colmble_ icons
1 es : . § ‘ssrs. R Jones & Cr
KINGSTON, J’ca., Jan, 10. jitterbug shirts of &azzling colours Messt I
A Public ervice Commission gnq@ women wearing slacks ore CARGO OF FLOUR
free from Government or politi- p and down Speightstown having A thousand sacks of wheat
cal influence has just been set g jook around. Quite a number | 97 bags of cornmeal and
up to make recommendations 1o went into St. Peter’s Church for drums of pork arrived here fr«
appoint civil servants ‘. the first time. G ‘ ‘ he U.S. yesterday by the ale
Its Chairman i Charl The “No Tresspassers § sign re teamship Liberville.
Rudolph Campbell, Privy Cour Heywoods seemed to as or ‘ jh The Liberville also brought 5.
cillor Another member is Dr. gentle reminder to picnickers —i"" vundle: of headings, 2,000 bund
Thomas Taylor, Principal of ‘he they must first be oven ee , Of headings and a small suppl;
West Indian University ane on ae they can camp amony linseed of], She is consig-
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PAGE SIX



CLASSIFIE

TELEPHONE 2508.





























































PUMLIC NOTICES |

NOTICE |

ISH OF ST. JAMES



D ADS,

P













































































































BARBADOS ADVOCATE



FRIDAY, JAN





PUBLIC SALES FOK RENT

HOUSES

WANTED





4
REAL ESTATE




































































































ee — Sinner mien eesine HELP
DIED I hereby give Notice that as 13 persons | : _ | APARTMENT—Very comfortable Apart-
" | FOR SAI E have been nominated as fit and proper| ALLEYNE VILLE--Hastings cn the sea | ments Hastings, near Aquatic Club sganese app
See oO : s ; w 4 persons to serv n the Vestry for the | side next to Royal Hotel, for inspection | coptainins one room or two rooms EXPERIENCED LADY STENO-TYPIST
A nm 4 ue : 7 : t Parish of St. James for the year 1952,| appiy on premises. For all information, | furnished ot unfurnished each room| Apply: Alleyne Arthur & Co, Ltd., Office
General Hosp Berkeley mou and as only 10 pefsons are required by | please contact West 17 Blue with aie ater Inspection High Stregt 5.1.52--t f.1
\ r | - O51 tant Pt 4 V ning “ 2 $) ’ D) + sg pt § 2 ’
Davis, eldest sou of the late Wallac AUTOMOTIVE law, I will hold a poll at the Vestry | 41 aeauthtment. Fe aa, :
Bedford D His funeral lea hiv | Room, St. James, next Monday the 14th | —— ‘ ia a ed A. E. Taylor’ 4 a i a
late residence, Pavilion Road, Rank| -———— ay of January, 1968 between the h bend : . " — A. E. Taylor's Ltd OFFKE CLERK—During Crop, office
H. 4 n. tedan for the West. | CAR—One Austin (A-40 Devon) sound | 97%, 9). {iy ie es a we ROCKLEY NEW ROAD—Newly built Dial 4100. clerk, previous experience an advantage
all, at 4.30 p.r day fo : of 8 a.m. and 4.00 p.m nwdern stone b i : 5 oY s ae
bury Cemetery. No cards. Friends are | condition. Going for $1500.00 or just -_ e bungalow with built-in 10.1.52—4n | Apply: Manager, Lower Estate Factory
Dy - . ¢ oards. ary a 4
invited. 2 ' vuder. Phone 4512, Garage opposite Fire a. 8 baat or on ds, Standing on approx. 16,000) -———- 9.1.52—Tn
Frederick B. Davis, Clatadelie A. | Brigade, Coleridge Street 9.1.52—3n a1 s2—4n a. t. land. Entire house built on large BUNCALOW—One Furnished Bungalow
Pavis, Harold E, Davis, Seibert O i one three bedrooms all to| at Goral Sands, Worthing, to an approved CLERK—Junior Office Clerk, appky in
Davis, Vera F. Davis. 11.1,52 1947 Hudson Sedan 14,000 miles. Excel- onda st, specious bathroom etc., kitchen, | tendnt. For particulars apply on premises| person R. M. JONES & COMPANY
lent condition and just right for Tourist NOTICE Saene Ene Evie Sees Wie Ween er © oe eee eT a tn, | TED. 11.1.59—7n
es lal Trade. PARISH OF ST. PETER vier Rolf , rrespondin| St TT
IN MEMORIAM 1938 Chrysler Royal going cheap could] 1 HEREBY GIVE NOTICE to all persons ee aide tien cet saggy
eacliy Ge made Into 6 pick-up. Fort] qual6ds te Vien Bt the Bisttion of Mem- | Swyante: foce, beth and folles, sarees) FEAT One i) Sees beat ae.
- ——- ——e= | Royal Garage Ltd Telephone 4504. | bers of the Vestry for the Parish of St. | oe yo unary e tor large hobby room| furnished at Abergeldie, Dayrells Road.
SKERTE—In lovire memory of our deat 9.1.52-6n| Peter that } have appointed the Parish | )/aunary, Dial.4235, Mr. EB. C. Field.
mother Dorothy Stcete who died 1it is Room, Speightstown as the place where | (sundays) 2005 wi eee Phone 8481 210.1,52—Tn
January, 1950 ELECTRICAL all such persons may meet on Monday, | ~ > . Week-days 8 a4 Dim, | et
aaa Ir emories tive 7“ us ; January Ith 1982, between the hours 6.1.52—5n * ae cea oP to
ay and the da, she passed awa enna a ae > _m,. mm. ber, 1e st January, ruary, |. May,
dod took her home it was his will FLUORESCENT FITTINGS: Just re-}2! &%.m. and 4 p.m. to elect ten Members| RiLBROOK—A dwelling house bullt| June, July. Apply Mrs L. Weatherhead
G to serve the Parish of St. Peter in the . 3 pply
But in our hearts she'liveth still ceived, Single and Twin 20 watt, 2 ft;| yestry for the ensuing year. pertly of stone and partly of wood com-| C/o J. N. Harryman & Co.
Eurie Moore, Doreen All e ghter ingle and twin 40 watt, 4 ft. and twin 40 G. Ss. CORBIN, | Prising an open verandah, drawing and 11.1.52—4n
11,1.52--11 J watt 2ft. types _Dial 3878 DaCosta & Parochial Treasurer | soiles’ aan Gans e eel kitchen, -
o, Ltd. Electrical Department 8.1 52—4n a! , Standing on Acres 2 rOR RENT OR LEASE
ern i eee | OCR TE Pete ian Oe ari Bt Top Rock, ROOSEVELT—Maxwell Coast Road.
Police Notices ‘ . N Ic ae ee > dtd of the late| Fully furnished including ae
DEEP FREEZE—One _ second hand OT darth, decease Telephone, Rediffusion. Good sea-bathing
RESTCOLD Deep Freeze in good work- PARISH OF ST. PETER The above will be set up for sale by| Available ist March. Phone 2224. ‘
g condition Apply Hastings mene | I HEREBY GIVE NOTICE, that more competition at our office, James 9.1.52t.f.n
Lid 11.1.52—6n I than ten persons having been nominated on Friday the 13th January 1952, | ccc RT
IMPORTANT - 'to serve as Vestrymen for the Parish of | @! 2 p.m. For inspection apply on the NOTICE
. LIVESTOCK j St. Peter of the ensuing year, that a | premises any day between the hours of - ®
Renewal of Firearm Licences us poll will be taken on January 14th 1952, | a.m. and 4 p.m. For further particulars | {S HEREBY GIVEN that it is the in-
Owners of Firearms are hereb; SALE wo Riding Doreen | ere me Been Fe 8 Sik. is Spam te @ COM TCHINSON & BANPIEL of the Pu Ue et Gate Ciotee and Saint
ors earms a iereb: E ° ing Horses. | 2 IDs S i1INSON N Dd e Parishes 0
reminded that under Section 5 0 3668 11.1.52-—an | Sheriff, Foish fn Fuled. 5.1.52—5n Thowas at this jatena to, cause “fo be
the Firearms 1896—4 + 6.1.8—40. | -—— - introduced into the Legislature of s
licences are 1 by the MECHANICAL | | (2 Barbados Ges Co, L9., with islan® 2 Bilt authorising the said Com- |
= ie: acerue a 2 s .
15th January, 1952. TYPEWRIT= ie Oly Portabl NOTICE December 1951 } 14 Increase the salary of the coeiiian |
All expiring licences must br Peete? dete ibadale "rise 4140.00, PARISH OF ST. JOSEPM | 250 (£1) Barbados Shiping & Trading | of Highways of the said Parishes
roduced at the time of renewa yur inspériion of these su eee machines | leet GIVE NOTICE that as i} Co., Ltd. with dividend accur- | to a sum not exceeding £500 per|
bp hel he Pea sae. 5 es yo a ~ D 7 Hn Candidates have been nominated as fit ing at 3ist January 1952 annum, and
for cancellation by the Police invited - G8 a en and proper persons to represent the $1 Sharés Rights Barbados Shipping tb¥ Increase the travelling allowance
pping
(Sed.) R. T. MICHELIN, 1.1,52—In.—e.0.4- | Vestry for the Parish of St. Joseph for & Trading Co., Ltd of the said Inspector to a sum not
‘ommissioner of Police a the year 1952 and as only ten are re-) The Ww € t up for sale by} exceeding £100 per annum,
Police H wd ; shane ee : MISCELLANEOUS quired by law I will hold « Poll at the| Public Competition at our Office James| The said increases to have effect from
olice Headquarters, witfebattinete sacl Vestry Room over the Dispensary next | street, Bridgetown, on Friday lith Jan-| the Ist day of April, 1951. |
Bridgetown, Barbados, : '$—Torchlig Monday, the 14th day of January, 1952, | uary instant at 2 p,m Dated this 8th day of January, 1952. |
Dated 10th January, 1952. ts each. Penlight Batteries 12 cenis| between the hours of 8 a.m. and 4 p.m, | YEARWOOD & BOYCE CARRINGTON & SEALY,
1} | 52—2n.] sch. Fresh Stock. G. W. Hutchinsor Bs Bh Pe oe ee || Solicitors } Boubibors.
Co, Ltd., Broad Street. Dial 42: Sheri | 6.1.52—8n 10.1.52—3n
9.1. 82--8n 8.1.52—4n pia eicapioliiclacs eat |
asthenia dct iaiadben sii liionean SHARES & BONDS—The undersigned
RENEWAL OF PETROLEUM EUCRYL DENTURE POWDER to NOTICE will offer for sale at their office No 7. ANNOUNCEMENTS
LICENCES uke the wearing of false truth a com- PARISH OF 8ST. LUCY Hig Street Bridgetown, on Friday, the
ACE : rt, 1/9 per tin. Knights Ltd. 1 HERDS ive NOTICE thatas 24|iith January, at 2 p.m. the OHO WH | |
7 en ERE S i naa” toni “a ”
Persons licensed to sell, stor 9.1.52—3n | persons have been nominated as fit and | eerie a ‘ceed a OL ADEOES + a ie
73 > vey er nt ~ _ _ -~— ~— _—— prope . serve in the Vestry fo sa Jarbade Prhnmen ers are P mf a |
and keep Volatile Petroleum at CANE CARTS—5-6 ton Heavy duty prope Pe ar se fier fe a year 1053, | _ Bonds | Gladioli and Dahlias for delivery in)
hereby reminded that under pai th pneumatic tyres and over-rur ; a ‘in : . = 2%—Shares Barbados Ice Co. Limited.| December 1952, parties interested in|
- . se end as only 10 persons are required by | 60 B'd * ‘ J
graphs 5 and 7 of the Regulation akes. Courtesy Garage. Dial 4616 : law. L will hold a poll at the Vestry | “ eae goa ae | booking please phone 4442, if “—
made under the Petroleum Ac! 8.1,52--f | Room, St. Lucy, next Monday, the 14th) fila, Pn eee | ee oe SOAS Ayes
1882-2, licence wre renewable b 500R M ATS_Fibré Door Mate 1 1 28, of January 1952, between the hours | es a By a" Trading. Co.
2-2, licences ¢ able b, Dox MATS—Fibr , Mats o ados ppl é ;
the 15th January, 1952, veral sizes and designs. Unbeatable} * © “™ "El SP" Griperry, COTTLE, CATFORD & CO TAKE NOTICE
R. T, MICHELIN ices. G. W, Hutchinson & Co. Ltd Sheriff bis, ORD & i ents
Commblédione® af Police | TOA Street. Dak SE. 9.1.52—3n Dc Pm 9.1.52—2n SPLENDOR «with ingredients of Vicks VapoRub
i hinahlapeaesinias , is Sa eS
Police Headquarters, TLIZER DISTRIBUTOR — Massey | iach SHARES FOR SALE pune iiibass r conan creme
Bridgetown, Barbados, rris. Courtesy Garage. Dial 4616. NOTICE | 775 (£1) Barbados Gas Co. Ltd. with | Ong existing under the laws of the king- |
Dated Wth Januury, 1952 8.1.52—6n Applications for the vacant Hawley’s | dividend accrued aot 318t] Gam of The Netherlands, whose trad* or|
rar ae ee eee ee | Annuity will be received by the Clerk | December 1951 business address is St. Anndstreat 198, |
11.1,52-——2a GRASS RAKES—12 wide, Heavy duty} of the Vestry up to 12 o'clock noon on £1) (Old Issue)) Barbados Ship-| Nijmegen, The Netherlands, has applied
ores nstruction. Courtesy Garage, Dial 4616.{ Saturday the 12th January, 1952 ping and Trading Co., Ltd..! .) the registration of a trade mark in
8 1.52-6n_] Applicants must be widows, of the} with dividend accruing at|{°" "he registration oF *espect of electric S I OMAC YH
‘ -—_____— ain nner : t- | gist January, 1952 r of Register in respec
TAKE NOTICE parish of St. Michael, who are in strait- | ist a lighting installations, apparatus, articles;
MANU SPREADERS— Massey-larris, | ened circumstances. | 31. Share Rights (new Issue) Barbados 4 4 ta a. oc
IANURE SPREAL @ | : 4 : and@â„¢ materials, particularly electric in-
e duty. Ideal for applying Megasse, Forms of application can be obtained | Shipping & Trading Co.. Ltd ctadaseent lainpé, fArshlight lamp upse. Ss
- mud or pen manure. Dial] from the Vestry Clerk's Office ‘ | 180 as ados a Insurance Co. p discharge lamps fluorescent lamps |
irtesy Garage 8.1,52—6n E. C, REDMAN, The above will be set up for sale by | jercury-va cae : 1; :
: -vapour lamps, sodium lamps, .
a Clerk, St. Michael's Vestry iblic Competition at our Office James | eon jam . 5 Atti When the stomach is upset
Pp 5 . — : : ad al dl i amps, lighting urnaments,, fittings, is upse
ROSAS eee Sree y Sotane, Hades Cie Bae ee Friday 1th) bulbs, reflectors, light shades, auxiliar/ as a result of hyperacidity, a
“ws 2 n oa 1 & ir - = e ae .
‘ VE 7 . paratus exclusively destined for use| dose of De itt’s Antacid
- itthias Gap, land side, furniture, bed BARWOOD & BOYCE, [ower ree er oman Ge t
That PETROLEUM MARKETING COM anata” oat NEARS, Aik) onl NOTICE wg Solichors, | im the electric lighting fleld such as | Powder will disperse the pain
PANY (West Jnudies) LIMITED, a Cor cieae At a meeting of the Governing Body of 11.1.52—in | choke-coils, condensers, transformers, and distress right awa
y orgar t the laws of Crea ul 7 i " ; resistances, ignition switches, safet'- | ‘y-
piny orga a oun e in Cr 10.1 2n| the Lodge School held on January 9th, societies Tin inate cia | ‘ Flatulence, heartburn and in-
Britain, whore trade or business addres 19582, Mr. T, L. Farmer of the Firm of | « aa _ | fuses and automatic installations for safc ‘ € . a ny
eG : : ‘ . —— — — . STEWARTVILLE"—A_ bungalow sit ding, and will be entitled to register digestion are some of the
ig 22 Greot St. Helen's, London, F ¢ SROMOL MOTH RINGS with D.D.T ,| Messrs. Yearwood & Boyce, has been ap-| uate at Rockley, Christ Church, standing | Sint as th from the! e :
England. M-rchants, has applied, for 1 NOMoths and. larvae, 1/- per pk_| pointed to the part-time post of Secretary | on 13,198 square feet of land extending Stes eae eit Jamuary, 468b, eh el symptoms that this excess of
registration of m trade mark in Part “A nights Ltd 9.1,52—Gn, | 2nd Treasurer of the School. from the Public Road to the sea ae ee Thall in the seantine give notice} acid in the stomach can brin,
eee ree mary at —$—$— $$ — Signed, . The house contains drawing and dining | POT! Toate to me at my office of inits train. De Witt's Anta
Tate to red ‘Ga Sark eer OF TANKS—Galv, Tanks 200 gallon. The W. A. FARMER, rooms, 3 bedrooms, kitchen etc. electric- | Gpposition of such registration, The Powder soon neutralises the
titled to regist t ame after . . Headmaster it na oa writ ter installed. Ser- Ppo: : :
month from the {th day of Janua neral Agency Co., B’dos Ltd., 14 High H160—16 | Vince donee A Yar aie ae ltrade mark can be seen on application acid and at the same time
1952, unless some petson shall in tt es 5.1.52-—-Gn. st peed eit tindaient ae he a vith. the |2t ny_office. other ingredients in the well-
fiaantime give notice in duplicate to 1 + Inspection by appointment with the |" pated this 28th day of December, 1951. Talkiagt Taeiavin acotiie. eal
at my office of opposition of such re; VICKS COUGH SYRUP-—Medicates as undersigned H. W#LLIAMS, ja ormula soothe an
. . penetrates into areas ordinary Cough The property will be set up for sale rar of Trade Marke otect the delicate stomach
tration. Ths trade mark can be seen ¢ Registra pT
craiine at iny Oee ; medies do not reach. 2 sizes, Knights by Public Competition at our Office | 10.1.52—3n ining. Get a supply right
“PBnted thig 3ist day of December, 195) 1 9.1.52—3n James Street, Bridgetown, on Friday) away ’
me ‘Fey fth instant, at 2 pan P
H. WILLIAMS FORTRIS e a
. YEARWOOD & BOYCE PIGS . Contents.
nies | TAKE NOTICE Hise.) TAKE NOTICE t soz
” peewee ABRAC AUCTION s AR BRAN D Ve
TAKE NOTICE That A. BOAKE, ROBERTS & COM- bob duos 4 S
PANY LIMITED,

That PETROLEUM MARKETING COM
LIMITED, a Com

PANY (West Indies)









a British Company,
whose trade or business address is 100
Carpenters Road, Stratford, London, Eng-
lond, has applied for the registration of a
trade mark in Part “A” of Register in
respect of chemical substances used in
manufactures, photography, or philoso-
phical research, and anti-corrosives; sub-
stances used as food or as ingredients in
food; flavouring essences for beverages,
fruit extracts, essential oils, and will be
entitled to register the same after one
month from the 9th day of Januany,
1952, unless some person shall in the
meantime give notice in duplicate to me

|
|
|













pany organised under the laws of Great | my office of 0} sition of each regis- | Whose trade or business address is King-
Britain, wees trade or business address Aes The oo aie can be are ston Works, Dansom Lane, Hull, England,
is 22 Great St. Helen's, London, 3. | application at my office Manufacturers, has applied for the reg’

England, Merchants, has applied for the | "Dated this 3ist day of December, 1951.' tration of @ trade merk in Part A” of



















registration of a trade mark in Part H. WILLEAMS Register in respect of pharmaceutical and
of Register in respect of gases in liquid | Registrar of Trade Marks. | medicinal preparations, and will be en-
solid or gaseous form, and will be ei- | 9.1.52—3n. | titled to register the same after one
titled to register the same after one, month from the §th day of January,
month from the 9th day of January, 1952, unless some person shall in the
1052, unless some person eho! » th TAKE NOTICE meantime give notice in dupligate to me
meantime give notice in dv oiicat: . at at my office of opposition of such regis-
at my office of oppositi sch regis | tration. The trade mark can be seen on
tration. Th» trade mark be seen oF application at my office

application at my offic Dated this 31st day of December,





December, 1951. |





Dated this 31st day of Ti WILLE
1 WILLIAMS | Registrar of Trade
Registrar of Trade Marks 9.1.5
9.1,52—3n ee sentineatemniiiie
—



TAKE NOTICE

Ae








eh

IPD



; jin the County of Laneaster, England,
LIMITED CHO Aah i cpgptaperd| Glass Manufacturers, has applied for the
trade oF business nddregs is 20 Soho | '°#stration of a trade mark m Part “A”
Square, London, W,, England, Manu i Register in respect of flat and con
facturers, has applied for the registration tructional glass generally, for example = :
of a trade mark in Part “A” of Registe late glass, sheet glass, rolled glass, Duar i
in respect of canned fich, and will be athedral glass and ornamental glass; That J. & W. NICHOLSON & ce
enticed to regicter the same after or | | articles of glass and crystal, and] LIMITED, a British Limited Liabttit
month from the 10th day of January, | * iI} be entitled to register the same after | Company, whose trade or — busines
1982, unless gore person shall in tl | th from the 10th day of January, Jaddress is Distillery, 195 Saint Jot a |
meantime give notice in duplic | unless some person shall in the] Street, Clerkenwell, London, E.C.)
me at my office of opposition Lie ntime give notice in duplicate to] England, Disti!ters and Wine and Spi
regist: ation, The trade mar n t at mr office of Opposition of such [ Merehants, has applied for the register
seen on appliention at my tration. The tradem ark can be seen] tion of a trade mark in Part «
Dated this 28th day of Der 195 1 apt tion at my office Register in respect of wines and spirit
: s H. We Dated this 28th day of December, 1951. { and will be entitled to register the sam >
Registrar of Trade Mar H. WHLIAMS after one month from the 10th day of
10,1, 52—3r Registrar of Trade Marks January, 1952, unless some person shall



ORIENTAL
SOUVENIRS

SILKS, CURTOS, ARTS
VENDEMOS, SEDAS,
JOYERIAS Y ARTISTICAS
CURIOSIDADES, TRAIDOS
DE LA INDIA CHINA e

EJIPTO

THANI’S

Pr. Wm. Hry. St. Dial 3466







TAKE NOTIC







That PILKINGTON BROTHERS i N {i
(MITED, a company incorporated under Js a | LUSH Fe i
he laws of Great Britain, whose trade as -
business address is 277/283 Martins
rank Building, Water Street, Liverpool 2,

1
t

|
|
|
|







10.1.52—3n.}; the meantime give notice in dupticat
to me at my office of opposition of suc.
registration. The trade mark can t

seen on application at my office,
Dated this 28th day of December, 195)
H. WEBLIAMS,
Registrar of Trade Marks
10.1 62-31

Advertise in the
Advocate
For Results...

GOVERNMENT NOTICE







Attention is drawn to the Control of Prices (Defence) (Amend-
rent) Order, 1952, which will be published in the Official Gazette of
Yhursday, 10th January, 1952.

2. Under this Order the maximum wholesale and retail selling
prices of “Flour” and “Rice—All Qualities” are as follows: —

WHOLESALE PRICE ; RETAIL PRICE





















tists stp OOS SCOTS ARTICLE (not more than) (not more than)
: ‘ ‘ Of,
% , veumsey S| Flour i . | $8.86 per cotton bag of
; ART CLASSES 100 Ibs. 10c. per Ib.
- are Rice——All Qualities . | $18.90 per bag of
vient eae 180 Ibs. 10c, per pint
NACHOUMOFF
mu x 10th January, 1952. 11.1,52—1n
of Paris,“who is now %|—= —
sa tidae Lt SSE SS | SPO POPE PO
$ exhibiting his work at ¥| y Reeser
% the Museum, is willing ¢ ) ’ ?
3s ogi 2 8 .
to give instruction to a | DANCING CLASSES * A MODERN BATH ROOM
limited ~_number of }} % isa necessity and with an.
upils in drawing and §& Cath Cineten a ® ... ALL- -
Pp Pp Sine Sle a % olub will c rife oh the sith x LAIN GEYSER a warm or
painting in oils and &| § : ;

Nile ; 3. “Ol January. % hot bdth is obtainable in a
watercolours at his || rs aCe matter of minutes MORN-
studio, SA) sgt URSON .0rt ie TOF, % ING, NOON, or NIGHT . . §

St. Leonard’s House | ; g See them ~
. ’ % | Classes are being formed for ane <
St. Leonard’s Avenue. } oom Dancing and Keep Fit % x
, sata! % || sii i % At Your Gas Showroom, and x
Telephone 3085 ¥ 1) Ter Teather % book one to-day from our x
4.1,52—Tn. % } : a S next shipment. 3

> (tl >
9G00999594990000000000, ee Cesonescessseneeeseneee®
















The undersignéd will set up for sale

it Public Auction approximately 1500
Barbados Shipping & Trading © Share
Rights on Friday next the lith Jan- POW D E R
sy OE ARRINGTON & SEALY saliorahe ger
y, . ’ ;
Limeetetrett. i Soothes Stomach Relieves Pain

10,1.52—2n |

@ For use away from home—





|
|





UNDER THE IVORY HAMMER & Prompt cist De WITS
[Dy tratrostions seepived + wih ane . @ Easily carried ANTACID
on Friday January 11th (1) 1980 Hillman +? Cell-sealed TABLETS
* er iDarhaneistt accidentr, Sale! | > ees i 24 Tablets
VINCENT GRIFFITH, conomy Size, 60 Tablets

Auctioneer

Bite an |. That A. BOAKE, ROBERTS & COM-

"ANY LIMITED,

a British Company,

whose trade or business address is 100
Carpenters Road, Stratford, London, Eng-
lend, has applied for the registration of a
trade mark in Part “A" of Register in
| espect of flavouring essences for articles



TAKE NOTICE
GREETINGS.

WE take this opportunity to wish

our Friends, Patrons and ail

BARBADOS a happy 1952,

RAYMOND JORDAN, Laundry,

Bay St., Opp. Combermere Street.
29.12.51—t.f.n.

of food, and colourings for articles of
food, (the said colourings becoming in use
ingredients In the articles of food);
flavouring essences for beverages, fruit
xtracts, ilavouring essences alcoholic;
essential oils,




fine chemicals for use in
the manufacture of perfumeny and soap,
paraldehyde, thymol, menthol, acetic
seid, and alcohol substitutes, all being
chemical substances







prepared for use
rhedicine and pharmacy and will
be entitled to register the same after
| cone month from the 9th day of January,
1g unless some person shall in
ihe meantime give notice in duplicate
+) me at my office of opposition of such
egistration. The trade mark can be seen
application at my office.
Dated this 31st day of December, 1951.
H. WILLEAMS
Registrar of Trade Marks,
9.1.52—3n.

ae ROYAL BARBADOS
YACHT CLUB

NOTICE
A COCK AIL DANCE

In Honour of
the visit of Vice Admiral
SIR WILLIAM ANDREWS,
K.B.E., C.B., D.S.O.,
Commander-in-Chief of
America and West Indies





|
| That PILKINGTON BROTHERS
LIMSTED, a company incorporated unde:

| laws of Great Britain, whose trade
|< business address is 277/283 Martins
jin the County



ank Building, Water Stréet, Liverpool 2,
of Lancaster, England,
ilass Manufacturers, has applied for the
registration of a trade mark in Part “A”™



‘Gums Bleed?










i Register in respect of flat_and con Station
\ctructional glass generally, ({6F example and the
| plate glass, sheet glagk, pol Blass, Bleeding Gums, Sore Mouth and Captain and Officers of
cathedral glass and ornamental glass; and Loose Teeth mean that you may H.M.S. “SHEFFIELD”
jerticles of § and erystal, and will pe have Py ea, Trench Mouth or AVL SD

hutled to register the same after one! perhaps some bad disease that will will be held on
onth from the Wth day of January sooner or later cause your teeth to SATURDAY 12th January.
1962, unless gome person shall in tho| fall out and may also cause Rheu-

1952
Dancing from 7.00 p.m.
to 10.00 pm.
T. BRUCE LEWIS,

matism and Heart Trouble, Amosan
sto) gum bleeding the first day,
ends, sore mouth and quickly tight-
ens the teeth. Iron clad guarantee
Amosan must make your mouth wel!

meantime give notice in duplicate to me

t m office of opposition of such
| vegistration. The trade mark can be seer
een on application at mi office

Dated this 28th day of December, 195 back
: r and save your teeth or money ba Secretary.
H, WILLIAMS on return of empty package. Get 6.1.52 3
| Registrar of Trade Amosan from your chemist today -1.92-—on,



t

The cuarantee protects you



BIEL

Ideal for

intimate







&








personal

use

rOET TG

MODERN ANTISEPTIC

) Lor ?
FOR TH
PICTURE OF

DR. SLOAN

2

nM
Oe aeiiks THE



Rerregt any tygeeye
ladbsinrniinh lad lash alas idea J



PLeasant AND GENTLE
Dors Nort Strain





PLLLELEESSFOS IPP SESE,

T0-DAY'S NEWS FLASH

Dropor ant AND RerresHiING

“4



yt
SLSSSOOE
>
Xx








- ©

[AND BOOK OF OLD POTTERY 9
and PORCELAIN MARKS OPPS PO PSO SSG G9 OOS 99OG9 DDD POPOO IDF OPP IAFF PIII,
| by C. JORDAN THORN $6.00 .
.: % STOP THOSE LEAKING TAPS WITH x
% CHAMBERS TECHNICAL DIC- x %
TIONERY containing terms used » °
R in Science, Medicine, Engineering. y x HOLDTITE TAP WASHERS >
Industries, etc $6.00 . s'
x +
% BLUE BAND WARE JUST Ris sin, AND 44 in. OBTAINABLE x
R OPENED Rin RR - &
i% : SIX AT ~
‘ JOHNSON’S STATIONERY & x 1% .
io 4 ‘ =e + Y %,
$ HARDWARE LR CENTRAL EMPORIUM %
ae s
\ six Cnr. Brood & Tudor Sts. x
SESSOCESSSSES SSS SS OVGSSS | x
PEL SCS LOSS SSS SFOS POSS SSPE OEE EEL EEA ALE



SHIPPING













SOUTHBOUND Sails Sails Arrives Sails
Halifax Boston Barbados Barbados
“LADY RODNEY" Deer 31 Deer 1 Jany 11 Jan
“LADY NELSON” . . Jany 14 Jany. 23 Jany 2 Jany.
“CANADIAN CRUISER” +. 28 Jany - 6 Feby. 7 Feby.
| “LADY RODNEY" ‘ -.13 Feby. 15 Feby. 24 Feby. 25 Feby.
“LADY NELSON” 26 ++27 Feby. 29 Feby. 9 March 10 March
“CANADIAN CRUISER” ..14 March. - 23 March 24 March
NORTHBOUND Sails Arrives Arrives Arrives
Boston St. John Halifax
“CAN. CRUISER” 7 Jany _ 14 Jany. 17 Jany.
‘LADY RODNEY” 23 Jany 2 Feby. 3 Feby. G Feby.
“LADY NELSON" y. 7 Feby. 16 Feby. 17 Feby. 20 Feby
“CAN. CRUISER” -20 Feby. 21 Feby. _ 28 Feby. 1 March
| “LADY RODNEY" +. 8 March 9 Mareh 20 Mareh 21 March 24 March
} “LADY NELSON” .-22 March 24 March 3 April 4 April 7 April
“CAN. CRUISER” -. 4 April 7 April - 14 April 17 April
}
} For further particulars, apply to—
°

GARDINER AUSTIN co.,

LTD.—Agerts.

FRENCH LINE
Cie Gle Lransatlantique

Sailings to ‘Southampton

STEAMSHIP ©O.

| SAILING FROM EUROPE
| M.S. AGAMEMNON—17th January 1952
S$. COTTICA—25th January, 1952
8. STENTORN—14th February, 1952°
SAILING TO PLYMOUTH AND
| AMSTERDAM
M 8. ORANJESTAD—29th January,

s
M

1952
SAILING TO PARAMARIBO AND and France
| sie. eonatDGNe ait Seuuaey,, 1988 on Se ie
; souery, . Martinique and Guadeloupe
M 8. AGAMEMNON—30th January 1952. 7 -
| SAILING TO TRINIDAD, PARAMARIBO “COLOMBIE,” 2ist Janu-
Ins. RONAIRE—14th, Foon alg : aa peers
MS. — anuary, F “ a
$8. COTTICA—1ith February, 1952. COLOMBIE,” 2nd March,
SAILING TO TRINIDAD AND 1952.
CURACAO “COLOMBIE,” 13th April,
| M.S. STENTOR—2éth Februany, 1952 1952.
8. FP, MUSBON, SON @ CO. a
gen| a
South-Bound and Cruise.
SSF BOVSPOCOBGSOTIOVSSOO” . ‘
peret % Calling at: Trinidad, La
' en tay WARenie wilt % Guaira, 2 as Carta-
% accept Cargo and Passengers for s gena, Jamaica.
Dominica, Antigua, Montserrat, “COLOMBIE,” 10th January.
|@ Nevis and St. Kitts, Sailing 1952
ty cer tee om “COLOMBIE,” 20th Feby.
| The M/V “DAERWOOD" will 1952,
| accept Cargo and Passengers for “COLOMBIE,” 2nd April,
% St. Lucia, St. Vincent, Grenada, 1952
| and Aruba. Date of sailing to ae ¢
3 be notified. Accepting Passengers —



Cargo — Mail.

R. M. JONES & Co.
Ltd.— Agents.

B.W.I. SCHOONER
OWNERS ASSOC. INC.

Tele. 4047.

{

%

1g

ARY 11, 1952

NOTICES
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FRIDAY, JANUARY 11, 1952



BARBADOS ADVOCATE PAGE SEVEN’ “











HENRY









Ca +*
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PAGE EIGHT



BARBADOS ADVOCATE FRIDAY, JANUARY 11, 195
Saprteslc caine settee ne num neninssianiesinsieiniiessinaitecsineattai na

W.I. Beat Tasmania By 10 Wkts. ~“ :
Ferguson Bags : a : “Whee Who In The “B” And



















IN FOR LUNCH ee 99 | eeene . S ~ S ee ae t yeas
WW ; C Classes herself an Ranger. ;
Six ickets By Our Yachting Correspondent “C” Class

From HAROLD DALE
SYDNEY, Jan. 11.

Davidson of Tasmania was the only batsman to offer ans
opposition to the West Indies today at Launceston, and
his 71 saved them from -eomplete collapse. With their
opponents all out for 120, the West Indies scored 22 with-
out loss to win by 10 wickets.
Willy Ferguson had a_ bright-

OWEN BURKE'S Resolute is returning to the water this ae toe ag. =~ Mig eee a
season after a rest last year. Resolute skippered by Ham- sailed for the first time last yea
mond Burke, is expected to sail in the first Regatta of the Built in 1950 but did not race that
Royal Barbados Yacht Club which takes place on Saturday year. Repainted and recondition«
afternoon. for this season’s races.

The season promises to be interesting although many bt Senet crt eee
yacht owners did not enter their boats on time. The veter- be making her debut this seasor
ans predict strong winds and heavy seas for the better part
of the season.

r

i looks in good trim. Should
give a good performance. j



day and took six for 45 i‘ Thirteen boa.s are expected tc, Harold McChelery and of course C2 Scamp. Owned. and skip-

News of the invalids is that V I Racin On sail in the “B” Class. They are as “Pucks.” pered by Leonard Archer. A boat
Walcott has recovered from the eRe / £ follows:— . B481 Fantasy. Owned and of the Lightning Class which made
effects of a displaced disc in his

B4 Hi Ho. This boat was for-






































































































1 i skippered by Vice Commodore her debut in 1950. Does not give
spine. He, Weekes, and Worrell ¢ I ‘ 1 B merly owned by the late Father Teddy Hoad. A veteran of the ood a performance as hex
1” p- rac e Hopkins who sailed it in the “C” Star Class and in its time has won “ister, Rogue.
Class. It dominated all other boats many prizes. Practically rebuilt fou C8 Peggy Nan. Another Sea- i
THE standard of racing in the =) that lass and therefore had this season’s races and is expected 8ull. Owned by W. Alston who i
West Indies as seen by Mr. Frank : arranted 8 promo.ion, It has to give an improved performance. ® out of the island. O j
Durr, First Jockey for the Duke bo oot competing for the last B482 Circe. Did not sail las. one spent five years
of Norfolk Stables, is on the up- "hie sa ; season as her owner Dr. J.W.P Trinidad.
ie and is on a par with stand- 2 ae was bought by Frank Harkness was constantly out of s 9 Folly. Owned by Lester
ards which obtain in India and ce 9 who will skipper her the island. Another veteran of the Toppin but sailed by hi on, Als«
South Africa, where Mr. Durr has ulm elt. His crew will be Dr. Mal- Star Class but once spent many 4 Seagull. Formerly named C ‘
ridden on previous occasions. olm Proverbs and William Good- vears in Trinidad. Has new tim- Cll Magwin, Owned lit
man. Frank has _ reconditioned pers, beams and new top boaras to Bellamy and skippered last year 1
.nis view was expressed by Mr. Hi Ho and he is hoping shortly to strengthen her. May not be ready William Atkinson. Yet anothe:
Durr in an interview with tne * equip her with new sails. for the first race as Dr. Harkness Veteran Seagull
Advocate yesterday Mr, Durr oes Bl Gipsy. Owned by Lester js awaiting a new spar. C10 Gannet. A Seagull owne:
hat rw Bi Trestrail in the 4 Toppin and skippered by Watchie : id skippered by Peter Ince. H
Christmas Meeting held recently + Burke, this is one of the scraten 2%13 Ranger. Owned and skip- been repainted and reconditione
i Port-of-Spain, Trinidad. It i & boa‘s of this Class. She has vee pered by Stanley Cheeseman. for this year’s ra
Mr. Durr’s first visit to the West repainted and is in good trin A year. Gives a good all-round per- C7 Rogue. A yacht of tt
Ir.dies, and when he leaves Bar- years ago it was fitted wiih tr ey e in medium and light Lightning Cla Owned a
kados next Thursday, he will visit C. SMITH (not out 60) and K. Walcott (not ont 5) returning to the ‘yj 5 v suit of Ratsey sails. winds, skippered by ld Nicholl
; a a f et pavilion for the luncheon interval 9 ; ‘ . . "i . y reralt Nicholl
Jamaica prior to returning to in yesterday's play in the final cricket trial game. Mr. Keith Walcott’s team had then scored 84 runs B.2 Resolute. Returns this Bie Wizard. Owned and skip- Competition is ee keen be
Hnglend in late February or early for the loss of two wickets in their first innings in reply to Mr. Farmer's XI score of 330 runs. season after taking a rest last vear.[pered by Jim Jones. Was also tween herself and Gannet
March BVO, OER MOUS, SNC Ca UN UR i
Mr, Durr told the Advocate that “ ~ ott 5. Smith reached his 50 after ‘he averneee, coe in’ some cisrclasliRe ee eT
he has been riding for the past ten * eing at the wicket for 55 min- 't was felt that she should have
years, and during the last two Smit cores ites and hit six fours, won the Trophy, Hammond Burke
easons in England, he has been K After the luncheon interval will be at the helm. Last year
under contract with the Duke of Lawless bowling leg spinners Hammond too decided to take a
- Sa le Norfolk who owns one of largest : as e bowled to Smith who took a rest but eventually he found him- ‘
W., FERGUSON. stable ight eoaand. , In Crie ‘a el ria ngle in the second ball. Waleott self going out ‘three times in
: ; matt J cut the fifth ball for four, When Moyra Blair and also on four o.her &
should | all be available for the He has had about 325 rides his score was 12 Walcott played occasions. Hammond’s crew will @ |
Fifth Test. The only remaining, during his ten years in the game. over a ball from King and was be brother Vincent Burke, and
doubt is Marshall's leg strain, and Pome ss more bom 30 . 43 A chanceless 99 scored by C. Smith of Harrison College bowled. “Fellow” Marshall.
SOAMANLA Shh PaReree cds So ee ee ana he batting for Mr. Keith Walcott’s team in their first inning Atkinson Lbw. B3 War Cloud. Owned and Guarantee A Perfect FIT
Morrisby bp. Jones 4 in practically all the big handicaps was the highlight of yesterday’s play the second day inthe — Erie Atkinson joined Smith cee a peadiey: “er ,
t t n b Ferguson ¢ eee . —— : ; s ‘ : a S por @ ne, . ene ; 2 may ne 2 § , p
Pte wares, P «) in England, including the Derby final cricket trial game which is being played at Kensington a Sine’ ? ba wee i tone ca a the ae by to every SHAPE.
Javideon b Ferguso | ? 3 Ste aw Sb zs se > Qieaes 2. a os Ys ‘J , @ single, nga Ss moment was '?: dé he § : ar
ir See ae cate bh Forsieo: ean the Ascot Stake 5 over 2% Oval. Smith hit 14 fours and took 170 minutes is making bowling with more accuracy and ently Jack still seems annoyed
Sst Cullen ere ; miles, and last season rode a sec- his 99 which was crisp from beginning to end, speed and checked Smith for « Over some incident which occurred
Cowley b Ferguson 4 -“— an the Compe enecshins t He drove, cut and forced away Holder tilled the breach and he time. Atkinson pulled a_ bali Ivst year. e
st AA ape ° S Pereiaoe Ms i Me ws a Poe ett the ball in good style but was most opened his account by hitting a from Lawiess to the legside for War Cloud is one of the
plose c Valentine b Ferguso as avery > two-year- severe with the pace bowlers, At ball from King for six. The three to put the 100 in 90 min- ; :
Alexander not out 4 a : i “ . sat a rom ing for a six, he iree to pu 1¢ in 90 mir maliest boats in this Class
Maddos did not bat » Chestnut colt called Olympic the luncheon interval he was un- score was now 320, The next over utes, Atkinson was given out leg eae the “BP Trophy . cae pe: We have
Extra: 3 which he rates as about the third defeated with 60 runs and at no Bowen who was brought on ia before to King for four runs in , a pate p 9 ra as
fade tap) PeSt. two-year-old in England. time did he look perturbed. place of Smith beat Holder with King’s ninth over, — years. It ee eet yee
0 12 , Ae ge aha strong breeses. Jack save. thé +r
i Mr. Durr had a word of praise ats . what seemed a good length ley Scoreboard. read 102—4—4. & ‘ mg breezes, ack says that done it in
Ferguson 6 for 45, Valentine 2 for 40, for Mr, Wolley Smyth the trainer ‘ Mr, Farmer’s XI who had scored j,k but Holder stepped out and Grant of Combermere followed he will be pleasure cruising during
. > ce . < sre 287 s > s of > — si oir 1 X the earlier par ; > See
Jones 1 for oF Sac for the Duke of Norfolk. There 87 runs for the los ix wick- Hit the next bali for a single, Atkinson and played out the re- eres ties _DOFy af the season bu
Guill ot ee are about 52 horses at the Stables, ate gt the end of play on the first eine the other batsman had three mainder of King's over. Grant â„¢#y race later in order to qualify the PAST
uillen not out ' . ay arrie aj score 3° +h atsmaé - 6 : . g . . Rr wnac Rare a ,
At & out ‘ and these are trained by Mr. if a eet ee cane ative 7° runs to his credit and was look- started off with a single. At 138 for the een Race. He nas his
Folai(tor no. wkt 2 =Smyth was #iven bythe E aoe a . : like settling down. Holder was Grant stretching forward to the SY& on the coveted Frontenac
2 : i. ee be alee Hi a we a arm ¢ eve waett ati is bowled by Bowen wiih fourth ball of Norman Marshall's Trophy.’ He will be launching We can
Local Racing cree are gee at the score at 325, Holder made 12, first over.edged and was caught !@ter_this month,
ones up with the bowling figures Pace bowler Rudder went in and by Frank King at second slip B5 Mischiet. This is owned by a ‘ ll
Asked how local racing com- 28 overs, six maidens, 77 runs, «.,. nd the reme : ren’s Grant scored 10. ~* John Toppin but will be skippered o it a
° . ‘ Caesar Brion Goes pares with what he has seen in a ander mie ie ‘amuvee, | over. An appeal for leg before by et by his son Stanton, Another
3 N Cetiee Dh con Mr. os wate a8 pune © two wiekets 10" Bowen for King was upheld by Smith Out At 99 ee ¥ is pines ag vag the TIME
A ‘ nought it was as good as could be ‘* iS. Umpire MeComic this jbringing _ R. Lawless went in and joined ter of Gipsy. Formerly keen racing | *
Up s+ otch found anywhere else, He said the At the end of play Mr. Keith Mr. Farmer's XI first innings to a Smith but when his score was W285 witnessed between herself,
ST. LOUIS, Missouri, Jan, 10 local jockeys were very good, COM wrajcott's team had replied with close, The total score was 330. 99 Smith was given out leg be- Gipsy and Shamrock. The latter |
The Argentine heavyweight sidering that they never served 82 196 runs for the loss of eigiit Mr. Walcoti’s XI Bat fore. He made his 99 in 170 min- ®0w in Venezuela, has been re-} e@ q
] ‘aesar Brion, moyed up a noteh apprenteemy. aie, Te wickets, Pace bowler Frank King At 2.30 p.m. Smith of Harrison oer At 99 he played out three painted and reconditioned. |
Fae e Ee ag served, would help to i * took three wickets for 56 1s, College ; < of Spartan Maiden overs from Norman Mar- — B6 Fiirt. Formerly owned by
or two in the challengers’ ranks, their judgment of place, one of the ing was Se en ae ee a and A; Aticing: of Spart " shall before he attempted to puil P. Brannum t later boug by!
o Kin t . 70 > ; r 2 I to pu B nur but er bought
after hammering out a unanimous \ory j sayit enmmantiote ng was not too impressive a¥ opened the innings for Mr. Keit! i r
10-round decision over the pre- ¢ Un RGraD! Seem cet the early stage but after lunch Walcott XI. The first over was ‘Pe ball on the leg side. Dr, Kinch, its present owner, Was p MAFFEI & O LTD
’ : Despite the disadvantage of not jing pow! th venom an Se , fing f Branker filled the breach and one of the boats involved in the . . . .
viously unbeaten Wesbury Bascom cory; ‘ ; -enticesht Mr ig bowled with venom and ac ent down by F. King from the ~ e >
ae at Louis Tilinols, last vee 7 oa or * - curacy. The wicket was as on the screen end. Atkins hit the first ae a scoring was soon collision at the start of ihe race for } T |
as - Louis, nese urr thought tha e local jock- first day of play—easy and giving ball to mid-on for a brace, King’s *.°¥C*: The score was 166 for the Frontenac Cup last year. It is To Scorers i ilori
oats serie d . , ~. : * mn sy § ' , ré ace, 3 nd ae : " — "| in ‘aliorin
night. eys anticipated extremely well po help to the pacers but King t over did not worry the bats- 5!* wickets. A rising ball g fairly new boat but was very Pp g i
Bascom’s supporters believed when at the gates. got one or two to rise sudden} 1en who were getting well over £T°™ eae Lawless and he unfortunate last season. Prince Wm Henry Street }
; . ; otire riffi ¥ a s i: 2, , . }
; that a change of tactics led to the ~~ yr. Durr said that the Officials, ° 5 the ball, At the other end Rudder’s ore ad Pal ra thi Re ian _B7 Moyra Blair. Owned by
; downfall of the hard-punching starters . ade The Play first over conceded eight runs, ; 7 1e received from Commodore J. H. Wilkinson and
: Starters and everybody had made - entthy “savanna y nical ; King was given out leg before. skippe : ane Ba " ———— SSS SSS
negro who sustained his first de- jim more than comfortable, and hii at), - i a SU COVER Grove nicely for fout oe a. Ya ee \; skippered by his son Tom. Moyra FSS
Wh lay start terd \ 5 Play ended with the t 19 ’
feat in 14 professional fights. Bas- je was very b to ride : 7 a ED Diay started yesterday Le 1s in this over. King also came ‘ 1 the score at 186 was formerly one of the old “A
ree oe 5 F 1@ was very happy to ride among fieiza and Lawless continued the in for > s} satme: , runs for the loss of eight wick- ana te oil Lig Gater-« *
com, 180 pounds, previously had g nice bunch of boys. He has been first innings of Mr. F eS or some rough treatment in ets Class boats. She won the first three
arte Teast , : z ° be : es r, Farmer's Xi. his second over. Smith glided his **S- races in the “B” Class last season.
mployed a hit and run attack, se § . , 7 re OS ne : a ith glided his ~"*, oo & races in th 3 ass last season D.
aes Soe gen his cupement ae, imcganned, mies prpaaens. th re aomee wes gf ae pPePeiza first bal] for four runs and drove The scores Alvo repainted and reconditioned. oes your Roo need {
; a ; s e fron rrison the als > ary ; sei
and firing punches year to take part in the next College Spehiag batsman Sua he a tenga te oe Tay eran ee a iw clee Seen — ig Ss Pi L 7 7 |
1 sl a ‘“ ate Netia tee , oe —_—, tr se > is the ) 5 aylor c (w.k. Griffith) t ered by George Stoute, ascal 1s
Bascom’s style was just what Christmas Meeting at Trinidad. | played out an over. King of Em , aihineoa ” nes : 12 ae sister ae Flirt She hives a ainting
Brion apparent! inted. When Racing in the West Indies is pire was brought on at the oth: Atkins Run Out C. Hunte retired 82 “all , vartormente 4 {
appé y we definitely on the up-grade,” Mr. to t awless wh tkis tent, G- Proverbs run out 33 good all-round performance in Ty 14 ; ; (
the fight ended, Bascom’s face was Pee. ee ; end to bowl to Lawless who hai Atkins was also comfortable W, ‘Farmer retired 9 spite of being one of the smaller Then BOWRANITE it—and forget it. )
suffy and his left eye completely Durr said, “Each year owners are not scored and in his second ball against Rudder At 40 skipper N. Marshall c Bowen b H. King 7 boats of the Class a f ae )
‘ y fore the fight, on was getting a better type of animal, the batsmen ran a run for a leg Farmer brought on Holder of ©. Williams b H. King o oats of the Class. _ For the best protection against '
closed. Before the fight, Brion waS nq for that reason local jockeys bye, DePei le , Oe Wh lands an > : N. Lucas ¢ King b Smith 33 B9 Okapi. Repainted and re- Rust and Corrosion use ‘
heavy 1 é s al) 3 ye, DePeiza pulled the next ba!) Empire in place of Rudder to bowl x ; ve ,
ranked seventh among heavy~- ight be taugt k + 4 : ae aos . See ; De Peiza b H. King 16 conditioned at Burke’s Beach.|})! {
: ' latest !musht taught to take part in tor four arid took a single off the and in his first over conceded two C. Lawless ¢ Smith b H. King 6 ; }
weight contenders in the lates feat ata ha ad hic! fth. The : ead * dl ‘ set Rta a J Rae ‘ King 6 Owned by Mrs. J. D. Chandler }
z M: ” standings. Bas- longer distanced races, which iifth, The 300 mark was reached runs, Smith and Atkins getting,a ¥. King Lb.w. b Bowen 1 all be ? a. en }
ig aeted t th t th > mag- would enable them to use their after 15 minutes of play and th ingle each, At the other end A: Holder b Bowen x Sey a ne re as reaay
com was ra re aah fe) . eet judgment more, There are two first maiden was sent down by “Boogles” Williams tossed down ~ * Maes a 1 Pirsig es = the - alan ;
azine among = light-heav} many short sprints, Mr, Durr H, King to Lawles When the an over which yielded 7 runs and ; lass boats and shows exceile
ence Lg the crown of Joey , nined score had reached 309 Lawless in in this over Atkins was ai out Total 330 ae very os ~~ Cpeer na
ape altel trying to pull the fourth ball of after he tried to take a “cheeky” . gn o for ica g DE Hon and Mrs. J. D. Chandler -
cnn King’s 25th over gave Smith a ian. Atkins made 19. Harrison for 1614 for 210, 8 for 210, ght. LN A Tee se ERA a NRE
im . eatch to end his stay. He mad lowed and wa bowled by 7 for 287. 8 for 3¢ or 312, 10 for 325. w. Rranker not out 5
WEATHER REPORT 15 hosen 6. This over was another maiden Holder before he could score, BOWLING ANALYSt8 get aie Grigth bw. b King 2 dime Warthest sc: eaete Longeat
sent down by King Frank Kine Scoreboard now read 57—2—0, rf . ; MYER NOL OU 2
B. Bie ad § 2—0. F. Atkinson 9) eet tras a . si ane :
: joined DePeiza’ who was then 16, Walcott the next batsman opened 4 Darker 22210 «8 eee | One Gallon will cover 700—1,000 sq. feet.
YESTERDAY aan olan a oe Shortly after DePeiza was bowlé is scoring with a single from } King oP Total (for 8 wkts.) 196 | Stocked in RED, GREY, BLACK
he seco da he al by King, Holder but S$ >eme. ve Bowen a 2 fo ~ ee) i rums and tins of Imperial Measure
Rainfall from Codrington: nil | cricket trial game at Kensington, turbed. eines “y comin aa Bigrent ’ 39 _ Pall of wickets—1 for $4, 2 for 54, 8 for ne cok peri Meee
Total Rainfall for month to the Barbados Cricket Selectors gain ‘with the score at 80 to © Smith Ree ee team ee ae cee i
date: .01 in. chose 15 players from which the | Walcott. Walcott got over an in- MR. K. WALCOTT'S XI BOWLING ANaLvele n Ww r }
Highest Temperature: 83.5 °F. Barbados XI will be taken + 9 r swinger = ae ngy & Atkins run out 19 Oo. M A ) ‘ ({
Lowest Temperature: 70.0 °F. play Jamaica in the first Inter- W hat son Today i a a nia, This wee Oa x arr ae Ho er ney * - Suda 4 1 ot f & rT) 4 . ))
: ‘lac at ; ost ” a . . ’ ‘ My fe £ as e a son olde Rudder ) } a
Wind Velocity: 8 miles per colonial Cricket Tournament at Court of Grand Sessions (Mur t over before lunch and the &- Waleott b F. King 12 A. Holder 8 31 1 | i
hour llensington, der case)—10.00 a.m ctal was 84 for the loss a ae fF. Atkinson |L.b.w. b F. King 4 Cc. Lawles 7 : 24 et PHONE 4456 — Agents. 4)
Barometer: (9 a.m.) 30.040, The 15 players are W. A, Farmey : mahes vickets with Smith 60 a 1 Wake Peete tied ‘hurt. + SN. Mase i ey % ~ | y
(3 p.m.) 29.946 Capt. (Police), E. Atkinson | Court of Appeal and Police ; , GAG. WARE Fav nee TeHres Hurt : Williams . |\3 SSS SSS a
(Wanderers), H,. Barker (Em- Courts—10.00 a.m. —————————— = . ews a=) | —— — ))
TO-DAY aap See! nee \ = : FASE ] j
pire); K. Bowen (Spartan) Cc. Police Band plays at District ii | |
Sunrise: 6.11 a.m. DePeiza (B.C.L.) E, Grant (Com- “B” Station—7.45 p.m. i \ | When V acationin (
Sunset; 6.51 p.m. " aera A. nner eaeere c, British Council film shows | | g
unte mmpire . ing tt J \
Moon: First Quarter, January aN F King’ (Cratiaencaey M vil Poli show ; ‘ | | ® : "
4 pire), , g Y : obile Cinema show at Law F \ n th ® ibbean }
; N Marshall (Wanderers), G. ming's Pasture, St. Josep) 1\i1 1 e ar {
Lighting: 6.00 p.m. Proverbs (Wanderers), C, Smith --8 pm : ; ||
High Tide: 3.47 a.m,, 2.22 p.m. Le ta) . A ae a xs soeigen erent macaasnionsatt ».
’ (Harrison College); A, M. Te : ‘

Low Tide: 8.46 a.m., 9.46 p.m. (Pickwick), and C. B. Williams

(Carlton).







L They i Do it Every ‘ime Rratoned U1 Ptet Omen By I ae Hie do |

Maoe in ENGLAND












A ( WONDERFUL PARTY, EFFIE «BUT ry (OH,NO™HA-HA- Mal
RS. TREMBLECHIN WHY WON'T YOU LET US HELP ( pare NOTHING TO IT.
| WOULDN'T THINK OF STRAIGHTEN UP MANY HANDS, t ane THINK OF
} LETTING THE GUE YOU KNOWâ„¢AT LEAST LET TITS JUST A BREEZE!
1 00 ANY POST-PARTY iT US ORy THE DISHES - wy ear WHIP THROUGH IT
















CHORES >-- ar THE MORNING ++



Just to remind you that
your favourites have
ence again arrived with
new styles and shades
predominating.

i

+ aa ital

and on visiting Barbados, an. excel-

Pat lent port of call is the Custom Tailor-




ing and Menswear Store on Bolton

I WAS NEV [care ; J t $768 & $7.89

ALL MY LIFE-UH-USE STEEL



of class












WOOL ON THE POTS AND FANS Lane. You will most likely find here, {
AND WASH THE GLASSES IN, } : eal ee 4)
SUDSOâ„¢WRAP THE LEFTOVERS i all your Tropical and Sportswear {
IN WAX PAPER=OO0H~ 4, \ 2 ; }
IM MUST ABOUT Dead i needs — certainly unsurpassed in } |
CAVE SHEPHERD & CO, UD. | 0) 6p Seo 4
) :
12 & 13 Broad Street Ni ¢q. BR. Rice & Co. :
i)
\K ri
NW Merchant Tailors







Full Text



PAGE 1

PAGE TWO BARIUDOS ADVOCATE imnw JINUABT n. itM CaJtib Callinq T l I .1:.. %  -UfltfSB .llltl I UT on a tour f the Caribbean and among the i maica and the Bah shay. (Uwwm '] in.In r Meeting M R. flURID UN H JDHOUfl %  in Trtnul %  iiml e. Ill . daj or rin Back from Trinidad M ints PHO %  %  • mi-nth • % %  Wi day. Tiny na and w %  I %  jelad. Ml PIU aid of Austin and i Enjoyable Holiday A FTEH an enjoyable three the' holiday in England. I '•BE, reln| by the CoiOSWOtt She was ncrontpitnied rid M i'ii ml U| %  rul Is now %  he plctur* of ii'iiith Caribbean Cruise : on the < nlomhlr Din t A. Bam*-. M ,,r.-i '.' i John. 1 j bn p ||< Diet s. %  St John. H i Hi %  <: (. p*ldm n M '. %  ; Ml .ill.I %  %  l .nl*y. Inlranait M il l LAl'Dt I <;ii.t, Cl.ii I ILL mi •in <'ahitnikir from KUKIWDII yesterday mo* %  %  counting ii I %  i . | Ca i I %  He said thai inmi in tiiami M hall ol residence ai Mt. C. A. Mm tun I Fifth World Cruiie A M' >.M. |h< | fcLfl Oaraada on hi •I.Ml \M|\ h^l %  I %  llj i iijiiyinu jl Hi H % %  Chad %  % %  %  %  xpooaai trade %  %  III part* built ut> 1 1 %  %  In 81 eountriai [f %  %  '' exhibited %  1MB lon| %  aval ind It! im%  hi. MI, i: %  • %  ., |„ Bap %  -i-.it.,( iha Barl < i... Ltd wi.„ rapraaantcd tim locally before the wat the < lurnad i morning b) thg French S.S. Colombie, Married Yesterday \ RDAY afternoon at St 1 %  Hill wa married to Mr C, Sinclair Gil 1 I uTl.r staff of th< The ceremony which was perfi.rmed l,y It.-v S A. I Colcman H. L,me took place shortly after 4 o'clock The bride who wV b) Mi I King, wore a dress of embroidered organzn nylon—bouffnnt ?wer-girls were Barbara Sargeunt, M.ureen Reld. Pi illne Phillips and Eugene Jordan The bridesmaids wore white idle over gold taffeta with a stole lor. Their headdress was of gold roses, with crinoline fans to match the dress The flower girls wore dresses of Muo ..nd pink nylon, ertnoBUM headdresses studded with rhlnesfith posies to match The best man was Mr Tony Vanterpool and the uahi Messrs. Neville Phillips. Alon/a Jones and Norman Gill After r.mony a reception WH hi i K Basal BOW V BwkM HID, St Michael. The honeymoon is being spent at Fleet View. Bathsheba. U.K. Vigil M R and Mis. WILFRED ALSTON were among U I i riving by the ColosnMc %  nd yesterday. They had boon m tha W.K (or the past B months on a visit. Back Home M ISS CONSTANCE INNISS. Assistant Mistress of Christ C'lineh Girls' Foundation School. Is now back In I arrived %estcrday morning by the Colombia iflaf spending nlno months' hoh in the UK. Same 'Plane M R. GILBERT 'Chopper" TOPPIN. KM of Mi. ,,i M L. L. TOMB of laridja," Wt Avenue Hflleville. | here on %  ghorl hoUda) irbrtUni his parents, returned to CHI.MI.I on dfidnaadiy by T.c A. Leaving by the same Mr Ivan OlttOm who on a three week visit to his wire' %  !' %  I %  | %  %  • -\ Hi.,-.insj ban Trinidad School Teacher M ISS EMELDA HERBUtl school Bctaool Ban Nrrtando who had been s| il holidays here lad on Tuesday by I! W I A During her stay here she was tha • uest of her brother Mr S. H -.( -GunBlte.'Ilnttot.' Mill. Trinidad Lawyer Intranait M r. Henry L. Debi. | school teacher of Tnnidau .ailed tr> th> Grays Inn last NovemUi. IOM Cartb that the happiest year I* those spent ii M a student. He said that the English people ) hospitable and on thi kind l< students from th,. Colonial Empire Mr. IXi,i was among the passengers Intrnnsit „ u the i olvmbie from England yesterday jj in wa> back to Trinidad to practise his profession. lie gsJa that he lived in Eng land for seven years and hand life there very pleasant. Althrmgh it Is true h*. said thaii ine.it. bUlMT, fhee'ittC hiUoaad I ..bu^-.dd : W equal distribution Ha paid tribute to the British Coiiiuii u, London for the arrancamont* ihey had made in sr o tOO fnln sj ami entertaining students during their stav in F-iigbMML During and after his .student days. Mr. Debi worked as Executive Officer in the office of the High Commissioner for India anrl only relinquished the post shortly before returning to the West Indies. Eifht.week-old Pauenier Y OUNGEST passenger on tht ss ( ohimhe Ud| trip was %  "-oi,i Dannti M M I %  Donnii who in England is the so n Of Mr in Mrs. F. E. D. McCom e of Belmont. P-.n-of-Spain. Trinidad Hi MeComle was returning rjand aftr r a siK-months* Hospital Adl tion arranged by the Council in cot,j. II Institute of Hospital Administrators. The Pope And The Married Priest IL ftUCHAKL IIIKKK K : man Wl •idauied as a Roman Catholi Maim. Hut name %  % %  ethe. He is a fermer ,,astor of the German Evangelical ^ inj: who has become a Roman rd VT 'V' CattsoUc, together with his wife ^eTire The Pope gave special | %  not Ixiuixl b) the same but still %  tea ol thi arst Christian caol They may not marry after for Herr Goethe to become fives i hey they ihey wcr %  %  nd if the* ha* l: .*. I ei priest and at the same time to bishops. Bi etam his wife Two dayi a*o. i ihoaaandg ol Catholk prl .econd German Protestant pastor the various Eastern rites a I A as given permission by Iha I' %  .milier o become a Catholic priest am Then was indeed, a good deal till remain married. It is i of embarrassment an.01 :. that may well have farWestern Catholics of the United caching consequences. >*** when Catholic priests of UMoag celibacy is imposed on l * %  "*• %  "'" •* nogl Roman Catholic i • BBS, Cardinal* Wil c .. Manu.ng. *j.. i ArcniiiMiop of WaaSjain pho4oajrapb oi bii and mere is a Catnoin ting tin ves and children with lb assuming that they would be ui-eived into the general compan> ol th. Thurch In America. Scandalised' IOI\^ The ENFORCER ->.. t .i aas *• aaa, a is* si*-*. • %  i "GUN RUNNER" ROLLING WESTWARD P I. A Z A " l -'^ / Dial KI(M I..*-, A N B UBW im"si" IIHI ot Mil %  UfH OM.M M > IIKSIIOII1 Irafcsri UI.MH O'lUiaMocDonald Crr S-.I I JO V II (!> %  •.4 %  ( In i p,i, ran i o, n i Manaicl I I ti O— a, I ^M^ MAI.K MM VTr. isNiri Hostr lnni UKflr a *M, Ol si \ \OA worm it HI. iz#w. i*tu \it>u MOM %% MtXM WV (The CREATORS of TALKING PICT1 KCS> The most numerous i £&& er> recently the two pne-t n m.nion in the Uniterl Sr %  eetor and eUraU ., Ijllm bol „],[ on. A Western Catholic prie-* tbdr htuin'. and they ot necessarily a man who ha> come from what is i.ow thi never been married, but only %  ern t'kraine. but was south-eaMman who has no wife alive, unern Poland before the V lass he has received a special dtl Agie. The RootM Catholic* ol St Am three huiidu.i vaal ssl BtatOI were in A the Christian era the governdalised that then Jig rule was that which the East>>c married, and In 1MB tlOHNs I'OI'I LAK MIOUIKH -l I'I 1/ 4 (Bill M| VII f#..n#.v#. -J..IU-I.I.1 A n.:io P .m. %  nd Continuing DAILY 4.45 c 8.30 p m. BY THE WAY A H Baroness with a :' ..... .11 i Un raiult Koontraat a' i said to hi ted tha now typo of American %  %  goldfish tankfiii live fish on th.. old typa of ihoa, winch housed only dead fish. The plastic h.tt Sftth bex-f r.teak ami in a small aquarium undai tha lining u still nd. in any can-, would be n luxury for a few lions eircurs. On k m i rm up. it arai dhiOt a 'cellist It .,11. and had lio buHniM to I" tn Me was thrown about one ,,i in.onfreres. It says: Most of AM wir. ,1 • r,i.iii his nfjniirncp* I %  mn ovt i it and I I ittoi *i, toko-^rasa. The tho Bekla ramalndi 11 lu tone than they tap out on that) little druma saucy %  : jungle HI He muh-doctor's hat with itah erocotUlei' eggs, they pick bolt's in lacrad traai with laaptros. tha) then lot D ill -HtiiiK deiiuiielv OH the gjround paring tht that "only celibate "Rutheman • %  *ho is already a priest may not an eat y, cr papal decision, whl-h d MV had been alfo At the Council of Elvira, in of the discontent which it cause.! Oat 300. the among the Ruthenlans *ule was made stricter; not oni> Celibacy for the Wester night pi i. but imii is part of tlie law of the Church >rdaine, a nd has no forced, i %  ^n children. We cannot exited : %  • of the great resuming %  prleatl bringing up i B ac h ed to tag NorthOregory vn (io,3-8il) but n 'amiiies Qeoaral Hoapltal m,i remained the rule n.<.eithelei. „ Mor ove r he d 'JP<' 1 nM,lon f ,r jatar at the Runweii Mem il HoaThe Brai CouncU ot \ H I", G .^ ,hp ,f f V !" SfTh," ttPS "crc'l'v Slrn^bllh^ WCMIIII clergy to be not merely ^^ *Mhrr anv of the Enelish unlawfu! but invalid. Hut it S ggSn?w^"wtt*S I i 'i dates (he role ,Rome finx t\„ petiUons on beof celibacy for the Western clergy na i, n f convert Anglican from that time, and not from eight men who are married at hundred yean earlier v et wish to be ordained as Cathnraere are w thl .. however, lie priests. millions of Catl BaitWORLD COPYRIGHT kirch, owing the same obeRBSERVED dlenee to the Pope which Western I> Ii; The course wu oomplated ... B ml Infirmary which is a tniversity Teaching Hospital. Mr. McConne is the brother of Sgt c; B. McComic. Armourer of the Barbados RegiHy ittHwheom ber In rri/hnirfd wumvn inlvlligvnt.' W HERE should we be withou the delightful generalisations Ol lenie'' Someone has discovered that women are twice as fat as men, which Is like saying that boys are twice as III as girls Yet any statistician can prove eithe, of these statements or any other. b> the skilful use of columns of figures Was it not solemnly an-' ornc time ago th.it children with brown eyes n affectionate than any others? I in.-elf nine ventured to as eit that bachelors under 40 with snub noses make better ironmongers • than married men over SO with .large feet. Nobody dared to con,tradict me. Greatly emboldened. %  I laid down that married women vith tall nieces in Rhodesia were liukr to animals than Dogaat* hire bailiffs with rheumatic Mendi in P. nge Tbli lot pa %  'ithoul a challenge. 'In iilttii.* iriiti fur Sut'l '/-^MAItl.IE SUET ix Hid to be drawing up a scheme lot multi-tier price control llv Introducing ten or 12 separate price %  .i is it Ii hoped to bring the pro" all manufacturers more securejy within the new dividend limitation. A sliding scale of consists and production will enable the lower levels of price controls to stabilise the gap between theli prlee-tlmiti and those of the hlghei levels itv Bxlng i down leveL Instead of at Ueo. Iha spiral Of liu 11 %  turns and decreasing output wfll In niii'd. thus allowing a marglO 'if safety until the number of %  epariti price laeali can be double, i or oven trebled. CrIOSSWURO i r • r-f1 V H i r%  — H" • %  • OOUBlt • e T *.toascv MO MATCHED BU | %  i nut LTT WllM 1"L UNDCRV.OnLP 1 MPtlrl THAT ^^** SOLD Muaorst r.-R A PRICf Comini A TOPPER OF THE MOVIE INDUSTRY! Ml MS IIHI! ATIO HtlKN BLOWIK < Technicolor) It.H.C. Radio Vograiiime p. Rupert and lite Pine Ogre — 8 T>. \.. .(..Ill .-....,. MM a 1 l.l p in M % %  • I p in %  %  10 | li—1" (.-. 1 M %  UM %  %  rest. B 3, 1 anal %  htOf Kiun.l i i % %  oi, ,%  %  .." BMNN %  . | • i • -. i 1. framsturs PIHI Psan I' i Jh (iidup-t M. I start at t :.'!*, Uvin 1 H\ipr.-m t rciucnl moa< j l>,n">i a:iaui>B I5 H How i irrin in .n'v •o-err, in Lvin ,i_ itw (*i l\* i .,1 UM ruM r.%e 11. il VI Up-rt> Ii .1 a err.-* (Jl tt siirnmc -nort >• Be." IS %  asgaT" ln I? i B ... The natural way Co KEEP SUM AND FIT If you warn ii> he attractiveh %  lim. with bright cyci. rsdlaai complcsmn. an.l raal ii.nc. Nature demand* that you seep your ivitem clean-. I impiiriiicv Chhkal icn h\ docton contirm ihjt Hik B i H ,h,t gently snd CtwUleJt Mile HI-JI,ate krrpmg miUio healthy and vouihlul in ent Bgart Sun isVing the-n 'onighi. M A ii I .\ i %  : HOTEL KVKKV SATLKHAY IN JAMARY n inner Mia nee %  BBVBI FROM 7 P.M. TO 9.M Ml'SIC BY PERCY (1RKENS ORCHESTRA t'NTIL MIDNIOIIT $4.00 PER PERSON DANCE TABLE RESERVATIONS E M %  I II E tH'IMNfi TO-DAY 2.30 A 8.S0 and t ontlnuinc Dally 4.45 A 8 31 Pfcturea Presents— I AIHKNVK iM.IVIEH -JOAN KONTAINE It I It I I 4 A' K ONLY SUB I VAT1)NS PHONE BHI \ IIOYAI. la-aaj only. 5 A K I J O lumbtl IYe;e! "GEORGE IN CIVVY STREET" — WITH — <.l OIK.I I ((Mm ind olh-rSalurda> A Sunday. 4.J0 A 1.15 itepubl., VEHA RALSTON — JOHN i \UIioI.I. siniai viii ik AND MKIHIMIHN WILLIAM ELLIOTT — AUUIAN BOOTH I Njlu'i i Cmle Kl BILE BEANS I. CM. |>l It It I seat CMkn %  •* OPENING TO-DAY 5 A g.30 P.M. A t onlinuinj I • • ACTION AT Mlli-NITE SiK^i-l M1U-MTE SHOW MtUTd.y l!th Republic Whole S, "Kiiiof laiI "eh* llehRR4t*l'n>" irs PACKED WITH IIOXY Opening; TO-DAY. 4.45 A 1.15 and Continuing HaUy -J4CRII IC01IIS.SON ion%O I. Y >l l> I I Plain Crepes Pink. Blue. Green. Lemon. White 36" $1.16 per yd. Blue, Mauve. Green, White 36" 98c. Lemon, Peach. Pink. Rose, Turquoise, White 36 91c, T. R. EVANS & WHITFIELDS Dl.l 4220 YOUR SHOE STORES Dial 4606 T Our Eriends Enun ONMM KIM.M.KV IIKSIIICMIAI. II.IH \T B\THSHI:B.\ LOBSTER LUNCHES ; IT'S THE PICTURE THAT TIKES A NEW LOOK AT LIFE! on M\i. TO-OAV 1311 A 1.11 -"I I % % % %  tnuiiiii: Dally RKO's Super Double — fast-as-ltghtning, behind • t h e -sc eaes ttary ot professional faothaH playen .. rvei, lalri^uei, ha d-hitting eteresi LUCILLE BALL ti>*zf&. LIZABETH SCOTT r^iV SONNY TUFTS LL6YI NOLAN il •MnH^OIA'MllllABl v people?,!!! JWfc ~M pupn PIT lti HOtSI 3* — BALOOrTT 48 — BOX 72 r-*ui mwAt: JACM *t UP THT ::U1WD TH£ MTKW!



PAGE 1

FRIDAY. JANIARY II. 19.12 BARBADOS ADVOC\TF PAf.F FIVF. Electricity Shortage Hampers Industry NBW HI* • Uam pan I He said thai • %  1,1 • aboul on. atillMM aaupn aw ,.1-1,1 lt :i„ i, HJ II £1? ? ^£? d l^* SS Uwn ,hc vernment and the position .nrf^L ?Sr" VC ,,r E,wlnc Cc.mp.ny M a public scrwhat lL r B St.^^ W exactly current In a modern. civilized, up. jroJ. m *"""""' *ta n.pany men laid oft* because people can* (o? .1-. "'"" %  '"• l ba ,„,:|..,l,o -v l„n„. „l,i,l, i %  SVi"'"" !" "" 1 "" ft. .'V':,,,',:!".',' ,Indu ,rv H..np.rrt pauUtun would i-nw'Sf" ,"i ,„ C "r r n '!"''", h "5 "* 5M cor..,,, C1.UK, in .RVBIII. EuT tS "'* '"", """' ">'• u nol MUM Unl,l v. ''„";;'"' '""" ,,m~ .he company ., ul d 'y'u. of way. and Capital lOUfetfuL with the paaaed In ; Commander of A.W.I. Station \\ ill I'av \ isil ft hen bathing your dog . nut auto > umymuathrUc the matter was successfully disposed of from tinpoint of view made lo the CTV?? Mill tha rail of tha necessary raiffna .ViV^ri" i UTvat they Same In I'.S.A. Mi A S Brj km nid i u had been informed bv a L<' %  do with Pul II inin America, that thai m was also suffering from a bottleforlunate that the nc £r du J," rni|ar dtiTlculilet, English ComHf,n "" %  unte said he realised needed it island need said. Mr. Lucie-Simth said he had great sympathy for the coi Id not feel in hi*. th-i tha) win"<> v icUva Hi tba lutar it npany Noi Cornel Iti-pi.Miig to tb* 1 i thai froii the point of aw of demand Mi Lucle-SmlU. us correct, but he was not quite I in assuming that the mi Id aat all in Fngl.nd b, |uai fSTu^lnlo -taw the insprospectus which the Mnv nd thr ,„ company issued and the informaH 7| lu ; TJr rr ) had to give, and ' hCr he would assure the rneetlog that he never had any conception of ad to go through to ralae Ireah capital. We in Utti laUnd ban i the from," Mr. Cuke ,m Pany But PVbatCVei happens, I equipment t tbeee ""dTjiig it. fnui ansdnaa runningSurvey Needed thai you could get any big Hon Mr Hunte laid ih. • wen matter wai still ibthe company could g*t from tho*.If ll were hi'own .wivatP 1..1.1, pwnriwni 111 irini %  legal people 1:1 Kngland. generating plantl M. hail UDderaifnculties he would seel 1 %  flH Wlcr •(iiahl\Mi 10 f!wS?rfS! (lllg H *" h>d l400 me,n ". rm*VJ?.io remedy it Htghl bun iMci In BngUnd ll Hi' .11 I IM'U l.i-ir Jfl mi i i.nu: on lha CortaBbk ••' %  %  •<.. %  % % %  •miiini were not "'*' -" v company could nol get new generators for about two %  "• ,ld suggested thut two lO the IJireetors to tell th(m of UM Ptalini <>t the Ch ii.erca and .it... ,,( the present gan aratoii in Barbados, and what could be done In •m Into -< nriea Thaj srant%  %  Mh.ieone come out to go in tha factorial and see what could be done Lunc-Smith was not salisAltltlVlNC, in Bai . : na --'in l-IKl.l) which Hie\ his rlag. will t.< Vice-Admiral ill W lllta D.S.O ii-r-Hi-fhief of tt %  v %  llHUaa Station IV tan U %  %  .. %  Ml K C It l> S IKwas born on tha ird Nov*m< iHt-tl. and went to sea In IV • 1 H M s CA! %  at and • ll tha B.ittle <>l I tha ii. in 1910 1 in TV %  sftl l KM I I % %  nliil.nutvi A tod I I %  U ha .iI Defi ; 193K outbraah at 0 %  In cosnmand of 11 M s AIIH bai % %  1 Joint Planning Stall in the W et Ofltci In 1 i HI 10 IMI < %  ptain Andrew 1 P.C art JONES, attached I tin Spttghtttown Pol UOANDA m ; % %  ,avi -I rrom being droM ttianUi and latai took pan n %  took part in Uv nvi .. who can fwim, found the tide too hard tor him Ital) and I %  it oc* madi COBM Mton ot M ting ilahad laraii %  Motor Couch' the property of Ibe Oenerai Omiiil>ii r-tnt type of bunow hrins. u>nt in pitrhadol~iy, Policeman Saved From Drowning use — -i-i* 1—— 'TetmosoV Soap tog HUM RLAM'NS — 'IcIHIOM)!' Siup vontaim Tetmoaol', j -.ale yet poicm in.JivJincni whuh quickl\ kills Hc*s Hca aad ottan ikia pean The Soap IN ot tha haa*aaH quaUtr, plcs-antlv perfumed. and agreeable M uac Ii il non-irritant and non-iniurious to hut', man and domcMKami 1 'Tetavoaol' Soap van encasarajn ihe growth of a healthy. BJfaBrj voat TETM0S0L SOAP IS AVAILABLE IN 3 02. TAILETS A prodii.t m laapanal < benucs rltarmaceuuosli ^^^^ I Mnttcd / IC I A s Mr..1.0 A so,,. Barbadoi LcdaAganti %  bout 100 yards out to s<-;i when Vin K %  .if the Astnr Theatre, and Merlyn Babl !i*-d him In a m A tittle boy Civil Semant Qualifies As Barrister 11 le the alarm seemed to be 111 dllH%  1 Kuhardsun got oars Rupert linen llfl After Jones was tnken up In Uw %  %  that whan he n 1 .?. to htni in %  lop %  I1SJ .n;.lllisl thr 1 %  oanID Ifl ||t b . • \ A in iwi Captain Amu. %  tuff O0 Commandar-tn-CI %  i • %  1 '1 ttO, 0| thr r n ai of the N landing v t thai work Uw K aialj piaaaad to app> \ 1 1 Co of tha Mllltarj %¡ : i ,.. 1 M BHUafa Knipiie prom IU fHi he was Chief of Stall Hit; Hon rompany would haw considerablp kilowat plant b;ick from IWll ihe EkTtrlc CoinlIU 1.1 raising fresh capital Mr Cuke said that the statepany should have lakm tOCh -. EogOand if iho Public Utilities inent had been made that Sprint steps nil IIIII. pmnnpl VI.ill hi.il arnaaall.. %  J aTiT Bill did go through in Its present Hall had gen form. What would happen if it plained tha ind 1 amended to meet certain ditions was left to be see.i. but the capital would have to be raised anyhow Win 11 Hon. Mr Cuke again retiansil from. Ihe United Km. aaas tared t" Qovarnment'i refusal to dm. I,.. K %  : 10 fi.: wan ... ntatovi I ',1 %  iirn %  1 f.n .( %  100 faro out to % % %  1 d Ui w tght u Uw ) 1 ama TinJon— in mi nl ; .1 (Adn lalatratb tap ciittf-n! Iioir. one p|jnt Into anethei Mr Hunte piggaatad turthet that there were plantl branafc forming current, and Mid U,u\ In No hxriiMview of the fact that the Bketrii „ Company could not get gen He was nol making any excuse plants for iw.. v.-.,,,. ,„ posalhb n.pany It was a fact hrw .. h ,. v shou i d lrv l(l -2 rSrSTn "StLZSP ITJZELKEk \ !" *<* !"!" 1 *> aitwind to tha within a month o.'two".'lie'..greed Woal Indian BtudtnUf \u t. S2&.S*2&JL&£& a nd %  "> %  owneri an.i 1 biwavar, that tha eorapanj arotdd I rrent for distribution hesitate to Imootl m %  ..tiditn.nci H.n|d that lh Unloi second hand plant except to tide to taring togjgthai ttn" soclil and nryoan explained mat he h(tn OV er a dim.ultv educational purpos. from nil |.,Cof 'l„ v nd artdwi that it | s al0 uetlvoty tinparmlaalon io thr 1 to Import %  plan) la itM2. M--. [*aeock said that on one occasion he happened to be interested in a company which realK % %  | 1 ganaratlng plant at the time, and i' or four '....mil hand 1.000-kilowat plants rthuh could have been shippe to 1 • in SeptemN 1 1951 and was oaUod to the Bat n November of the same year at Orayi Inn While ui KMfdand, tie .i at one Asaistair. Scu.1.1, of H id wortted auUa araU, the [^ company would have had time to overhaul the old ones ML II was not quite fair to the comhad been" informed by the stall an the facia were known, engineers of the companv that a that they did not make protransformer would cost in the tha pl-.nl vuinitv of £1,400, and WOUld only It was not quite true to arrive about three months abend lulta aaa the of a generating plant All thoaa l>l^, c,, >" maltina poinU had been gon, into, when any public staiemmi knew that ..years ago anothei .5 ry, b1 "' oflered to help the cot OJfllt* The ElecMr Hunte said they did not f. el n>aa not opposed to ,|, at 1ni I'ulilie S.-IA Steport Mr. Cuke gave the meeting the ri „ 1( ,. rilll rtlIh nny ptobU „„ !".!" r • h %  "• ,l |,M i ,i,, 1 •rhk* ATaal Indiana nav. a leport of the discussion which ny,, „~-J„_„„,J_,, ,brought out tx.lh as regards second '"'" "eColtnial Offlci II hand machlnorj UM the other "'' "npori mt purl 111 bringing question which Mr Hunte had ; ItlUfananta racenrlj u n cimpany was putting raised Having prepared the redispute lielwren the British Couneffort Into solving the probport aloni thoaa Una*, he would oil ind Coatnlal itti h i.ueie-smith queried fat tnombara of Ihe Chamber see r %  rot r i %  ran cagrier INIXiMITAKl I 1 hi.-t %  1 Btafl to tha Con bulding Port am ouUi 1W7. ami In the MRM real a imp to 11 Majesty the King On flth Jam Hi 1. B Walthi Durtrld Seoul l "•* %  l: ,] "''*"'"' %  Pen: .' i'""j-"-'' "f""* 0 !" ihe Socret 11 10 J;"' %  s uch with some scouts of the Dlred ruj si.or of tha Imper, Spei^htstown and send them to IVfeiue CoUoga In m!i hg a .,., Hi baach to warn made J Coinpanion >f the n .. irabla Ordjai ot Ihe Bath along %  .1 out Prom iso to iim Ri %  t there %  '!• %  I mlral Andrewoa on %  %  pifth Cnun %  Waa Si oii.l-iii-Cotiiinaiid, K Tha %  Ban Station On the outl %  f,m (or 11 n -mil l-ivs who %  ., "hulilni .. torn of kilng ro ni| ,,, h( ,i llhs( comma -hcv were haiarda wii |(i KM II<( irt i-.t.-i ha Included some W ships • Stales Navy Km ti • Rear-Admlral Andrewi ujalnal uw heav) King, and waa awarded the 81I— n tin re was the Star for nihermeii %  " .' ., vice Cpinmi'siini NobOlU antlcii,.,, IMtalnefl in wh ither they had approached fi,"gno r aend it on"to tt.. 1. ad 1 1 ants and the aenei | would Government or Colonial bovalopbecause he knew that they ment and Welfare for a loan worried, and he knew it waa not Mr laUcie-Smith argued that it tnif to say that they were just .itwas a question of the bread and ting down in England doing nobutter of the people, many of thing. whom were out of work Tl VSSOHM the BUI the company Mr W A Atkinson asked II all I h! %  liturc students unions, bad Dt-OtaaMd against, and opined the engines wer. working whether ;,( r rx-L .nniss said ll was tune Ml w rnpr %  "• that th. ihai the Electric Company, like thr company could supplv current 0 u „. .1,,. K n u||sh Directors come uts %  c *lvel> intercste 1|( ualnga H. : I have been so stringent Delay Hon. K. it. Hunte enquired what irf. thali lumpi UH Chahanorr nd swam out M Itock Ihe President of the 1 abore ta the ment of COndlttOI was agreed up-.n al a meeting held ww h u last Augu-t between tha then C bcs' %  n broad pu 1 of toard Picnic Partj ,,„ ken from s 1 Mr. Jamas Ortffltha, an I :, . %  prompt tO Vl.e-Aillllil..l During the COUrae of hi Admiral Andn %  %  %  1 (19431 all.i UM Aloe, „ ., 1 of Merit l Admiralty as Naval Aaalatant ll bathuiK beach "f Bpeighulown •"Music, dan U 'ua and lay an enhave sent out a Director to interthe view that f m of the WKisianot looking isjfftclaoUy' Into tha U1 .,t' d that' were dime, things turi priOl to the Bill ing sent mture. He said that at least one wouhi „, | ...d U should r< n ,,rr am %  A'""' 2,i lMU "'' ,l ," f* m f, ny down, and not wait until it had Director should ban out to the Director* ( *Ur lUMlS < ff f |{n;|f been paaaed to protest against It badi %  1 if new machlnthat the Chambei of Commerce In ptcnlchoi pulled US II Mr Cuke ronUod ' UM point ciy wr re ordered now. it would T,J,, U M .riou-. ftW, Ltot of UM SIMiHTLY after 4 M) 1JB %  ll'vw.wd* around ll a in and left had been put that the restrictions be two or three years before more patti DUt of the immediate futuu u m... the motoi .1 M imposed by the Bill would have CU irent could be produced. He said it was up to the ('. hurch %  '•"''Mr. G H. King was of opinion lo make rrprc ntatlon b thai .... Hill, St. Joseph. panys raising capital in England that a Director should bai remment, and aaked what new CoUafon llkl 84 ,,,„„„„„_„,. oul f"* 1 lcl ,h P u bl c kno w ,* ha industry could U a gt abl l l h ad „ I!1( k WB |, o„ lhe fhenomemil was happening and show that they w |,h 0 ut electricity. roa( t Mr. D. G. I-eacock Jnr thought were taking a real InU real "' %  Mr Inniss suggested that a it a phenomenal occurrence for the personally felt that they were not mgy eOCDI • four engines to break down at one sufllclenlly Interested In whether p^med to . to maas Urauun'diacuaaaoM with a taTaking the matter up with th. JU Chairman 1 Oovemor Appointed to the ComRudolph Campbell. mittee were Mr D G, .l>acOek othei %  "I. of tin road while a lOtlg "' %  "•nd lorries v/as drawn up It Uh %  t] trying ruai . ,.too 'I an) i" PH • I aulted Ian 10 ol '*.i/'iink coloura n %  llh ih pol illness of the situation TI.. I Company waa controlled fn-m London, and he lelt thai Mr. Cuke said that sUCll • iriti,hould he put forward to thi %  ernment to press the Elect 1 Hired the muting thai ha had p^y ,„ lrv and do certain thing* taken up the point will I %  1 1 tors He felt sure that after his Committee explanation, they mual mmmiHcr waa aubseqi Mr D Lucie-Smith who nrat the fart that the company has 'V. !" ".' "[]: l mec •a meetmad. %  have powei ^ p t Q „Trv diseussior bambar, pian: %  ..a-, 'ha. h^ did not l-ring the matrtblc set back of which he had :,, up liticlse the spoken, and which was t>e-.,,„u _"";''";,.,',:'' ^""D G U-.e .k rUloi . .i ;i.c Governtheir control and second.) %  "•' %  „" K p Hunte. Mr. T O Thotr,.. merit li. i %  ntcrested In th. %  < and We-.t ii nlvei lly Colleger. ,. .. v ; 1 ii.-l III\\ I HOWS KABV HMiV CBOCHR BONNKTS, Bach IIABV (l.nill BOHNSIS, .Jth BABV OBOSMIMI HOSNfcTS I Ii M ". I H *I.S0 BABY SIN BON.SKTS. Back *l 5" %  *l 1 BAB1 BOOma, Btk 73r; ••'• BABY COATS, Each *'•*" 82*. 1 \ -: :, $1.:.2 AT SI r.r, %  H. Jason Jones & Co.. Ltd. CAVE SHEPHERD & Co.. Ltd. 10, II, 12 ^ 13. BROAD STMET !**bkydt in the wiirfiti ainies this mark of perfection Tht llumhcr irdmrii ] ll your ninilt. "1 llin# tjufi.iv An* sppMniKc snO uiuivallrd urrnilh. Tb* World t Icsdiasqusldy t aaafatafatj ntt of 1.1. ItRwa I <.. 1 ui. A KL'l.l. BANG! OK SIZES AMI MIIDII.S IN ROOK .v^//^v.v.v.v.v^v.w.MW.w.w.v/.v.v.v.-.v, $ "TOPS IN J FLAVOUR" OUR I I DELIGHTFUL $ PRUNE CREAMS ll\ /W-llll'S SI"I I I VI KNIGHTS PHOENIX SODA FOUNTAIN • % %  • %  ''. %  s.vs.vssss.vs.v.-.-.-.v.w.-.-.-.-.-.-s,-.-.-.'.-s,-.-.-.-,.. FOR COMFORT RIDE A HOPPER ( BICYCLE THI BARBADOS FOUNDRY LTD. Whitepark Road



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FRIDAY. JVM \\KV II 1932 KXKBADOS ADVOCATE fAGr m' Hi ripBY CARL ANDERSON FLINT OF THE FLYING SQUAD BY ALAN STRANKS & GEORGE DAVIES BLONDIF BY CHIC YOUNG %  _f-> B-O TUP r He'cae %  i 3*5355 ATDPrvCLS V.AS %  .•'... ; %  %  '.' V AND I IT. ? PICKT COv-N I r AND eOvJ^HT ] THE LONE RANGER BY FRANK STRIKER JOHNNY HAZARD BY FRANK ROBBINS BRINGING UP FATHEK BY GEORGE MC. MANUS AflaMtJ MAN TO SEE >OUvm j > HtfO MM F NQ OJ-.:.• %  TELL MIM TO TAKE A SEAT ANO MAlCE MiM5E1_F co MC o* ? rABLE • 1 HAVE SOV£ LETTE?S TO CSNILL 'SEE MIM IN TWO MlNU T ES I OCNT UflN R R HIM T MAKE MiM SELF THAT % %  : % %  AttO-OEfl MAc5t>E6 BKOTHBR SOC^V-SIRI DQNT __= KAV I COULD M.E WADE SUCH A M-STAtfE.* RIP Klhiiv BY ALEX RAYMOND * PEEK FREAN (HUM \l\ S III SI IIISIIIIM OBTAINABLE AT ALL LEADING STORES TRY THESE FAMOUS PARTY AIDS CHEESELETS W MARTINI CRACKERS PLAY BOX TWIGLETS Etc. Etc. DELICIOUS & APPETISING • s lerr The. Arc I.FT i SIMM & SAMPSON :> (1938) LID. II. i." irltn for BM Run \ v*•.:•.•,',;:***.•,%•.',;;',', %; --*. o Wo havo just Received Phis KrlliKKi All BM Htgfl Shrrtldnl M li< .L 1 lb I'kjs St. HUM-UIU. • 't.i.ii.i < rram Trlirull Puffs. Assorts Pit-a-takr. I' I Short, 4 |, r M ,IM ViU Wral I Hi nil yr Tbta AwMVlrd Sw-nrl BJsrutU I'ruil G \ lin\ Sir >>t Iwrrlrs 8 £ ,;„„.. V Tinftmrnmam Tins Mi. .1 n A' Sunburn M.ixwi U I..M i'M> r.i I INCE & Co. Ltd. •WC.W-V.W/// IT PAYS YOU TO DEAL HERE SPECIAL offers to all Cash and Credit Customers for Thursday to Saturday only SPECIAL Ol I LIIS lire % %  <• iiailllr ul mir llrmifliro I'M


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ILYJU'IK^ Atotrrafc <&"o^ Electricity Shortage Hampers Industry Commercial Body Discuss Problem l.tl.S. Sill I I HI I %  a Barbados 1 H II A %  id thai tl %  i n, mcmbets lh < ll at whe„ %  %  -ondltlons were having on ihe C'ada-W.I. Trade i Hopes For Revival AS %  %  %  Hon. Mr. Ctlke ing th.it i Company*! "' waiting company could not fulfil. H. of th, know thai whi public, aiked foi .1 service which closed Tl %  %  %  trattoi denied I hem I them, ihcy expert, out rli ,''"' ,V ,P rtaln amount of frus-1 through the years thaj did! %  %  %  reeling K00 bort, a mi %  Lan n arrived hi N l.t'A from .< ..1 1. ., moi panyjwaa accompanied b) hll I an naybuj 11 Hotel l f UM volume of trade that m fe & %  -* b" ->w~ >d perhaps Quite right U. import When ho went to England, lie 1 over %  %  drew the matter to the attention : 'miniwho ACII awara of the situation, and indeed quite sympathctir to those consumers who wan unabll u< •btain 1 service Ha thought thai Commerce as a rotponill in (ha 1 onvnunh %  %  ted thai thej had given him the address them with re%  Actually, m England Whan thl utage of %  ..It 1 erect %  1 ended ovei %  !" i "i good running order. Raraaad Panakaton Mr Cul hat Hum 1, I %  looking to the futuj E l %  %  %  %  Ight to turn it %  • %  good running 01 -i. 1 the mallei %  %  The itetenwnl had been H^SS^S. 1 £&•' %  '&*' THE RITUAL MURDER CASE STATEMENT* B\ fcCCVSED Durui 1 • %  the 0 Mr. C H Clarki Mr. F E Kiold for the Crown will add; I jury. %  ogUsh people wfi %  I colonies In Enuland. how %  islands and %  : %  1 inada, .11 lepresentaiivc %  ffi . took plao In Ottawa and it am than thai larger quota i %  of BO.' k %  ible. igo, it has baai ..ith the iiwomf 1 raaJIt) in tl t naai futura ulian UP %  HBFCTMJ). fl** Lip of Vu Au.. in Chlrf of the Amm W.--T Indie* Station In-et LIIFT Sir William Andfwr. Int RIUlIT Captain M Eersrd BN to Su Willwm Andrews* .nding Om.ti II MB atirgUht % % %  the coni|>. the ISA H. wanted now to l their lervlca bad %  built, the current was %  1 %  That WU a point which the Chambei OUM dfa%  they had to make to the company a* to whether it was belter to con.ivbody and have load 1 h add t i a j Sol I I not quite MI easy. Mr Cuke said, to Bel plan' the demands increased. Apart obtaining plant, tl %  series of unfortunate happening! fore MI thai win explained these difficult %  'tilems Involved. ll, Q tin re was a shortage of ship%  ihlpi i' %  %  %  %  1 England. II. felt that If England was trying to meet their wv would not Barbado .._ Apart from the internal dim' %  %  %  of the Compan> would have the effect of letting them have some sympathetic view Mr" Cuke said that i %  ujiue it was not %  rid hand • f from America, but it would have taken iodltior> it and In .... had to he 1 t.. take tl The company placad ,;cnei atmg nets of a big•iian that used hitherto rival of these sets, the company had no trouhle whatna ul and it was ard %  • m • Indies for % %  H.ugh the volume of Iradj during the I.' n m had %  1 i-IVI. • %  ontlauad i.v way %  lude and goodwill towards the ahtc, Barbados.: Ideal Asked what he thought of liai %  1 %  > 1 ha\e U.M.S. Sheffield Comes Saturday H H S Slirflirlil. • UII. .vi ui UH >..|illiiini| 1 .• Anitrica Wen liuiii-. stiiiiiiii. 1 r.|. %  Bo) lom 1 %  -.ill i. ,,\. •Mi Thuraday. January IT. H.ILS sht-nir' large 1 British DUlltar) torcea which landed Iwe The ship naxt came 1 into the newi 111 i4i whan ihe arai in .oiop-n> of H.M. Ship'Krauwn. Malaya. Ark Royal and light naval Feluiiary If the warship* steamed *•* leiTierf Tc-rtrty fh if hun • ." return w \SHIN< 1 %  |.i> with "gn*"t potted %  NJOM Nation t: %  : I I .. %  %  j the um. %  I Kdcn ui l In 1 !" %  l ropa: %  e.1 i.iptlve to ihipn steamed %  %  nuiit.ir* || <. %  %  %  %  %  and wan I %  raged Wtl I -i'. Shrftlrld .. lung puron of tin ; Hkamark. The .. i '.:.:(. Admiral Sii J-ine> Bomcn die. G.C.H K I: I D.8.0 nying hh Bat in H.MJJ %  eoowa. |] prdj 1 anil shadov the lUaaaark. I Ihe Bfterno I Mth, aftei aircraft from the aircraft carrier \rk lt..>..l M \1 S Mirftirld tnkmg II MS \rk r.iivji Launched BanaMea reds Of I %  %  %  %  Il lera, litlad %  gate %  the Aiii.si 1 Uon was 11. %  %  l||l |pt| VI %  1 1 I rhey objai %  %  %  %  M hangi 1 1 ... %  the h < %  A I'.N |>IOVIMOI>> calling for inparoti the I prom 1 1 r ).-. 11 I'OH. %  Hi in use 1 tl .'. out-ofI Barbados u lagging be%  %  I 1 \ I ;i il ui.1' Witfl the Ida proving By) whUa %  %  1 1 %  regutel New Type Of Fishing Boul Being Built %  H H.MJJ %  heleld 1 %  ui ui Balem %  M M s iaaalBll i • 1 ifcharnharal %  r Hi.a %  1 • %  ui standing Lib) N l S.O .1 in II :.I S Rrlfail. 1 %  ihBw half iigi'i %  :, I %  %  .,; -.< iurnlMr>i %  l it the in 1 .. .•..'. 1 Can1 ^eaarnhent to II Ma^XolVuul < Kirisii/i'M* %  %  1 %  1 Ih., u. do 1 %  1 on ttthei irr.) %  an, Burtoi %  %  %  1 1 1 %  %  Mi <: 11 Nileii asaoctated ith \h i H.I %  1 ,.: %  %  Al %  Court %  11, \ !"• %  llll,Mill'. I I Al-'igi t 1 tpelngs 1 *' I I %  %  II %  I .. terda) wen L'lai Lucy, who .t ... %  %  1 ,: idi in., K... I %  %  I %  1 n letd mil %  %  ... %  %  \\ Ilx ( din jiin,iii-l\i idling in Korean I'l IW'I* I ttlka K. 11 mm I I Hi.1 SON NEW \ 1 HK %  %  %  njon %  %  Ml fn hi A' UH lime 1 H"! UI,,/' >,. 1 t[ 1 1 . 11 I0 hin, .ml 1 %  This vi .1 1 1 t .. 1 1 h. I I ilgned il in Sepu 1 : %  %  uftod %  1 soli I rluld 1 knaei hi ... ... on page 1 Will Dmeide Future Of W.I. 11. 1.'. We-t Lndlai .! I it the Coo %  %  IIB on i %  la %  I 1 V %  %  %  I 1 %  %  %  %  .. %  I 0 %  While torung %  %  %  td thai ll %  i. %  %  1 %  1 %  %  Agreement SI V %  iMHiwealil ihortly I WMI Iegard to ih< %  11. w. 1 du n ti, lo Klngd % %  %  . purp %  I %  %  wan %  %  %  t UM w. 1 ii"i t111.1i % %  %  1 1 %  V • 111 Ottawa i || %  lagfl DA .1 The Houa uwon %  %  ... 1 %  %  %  %  baUrnge %  The < %  %  %  1 %  %  %  holh qil.i %  %  '. %  %  J'ca May Don bit' Banana Output Jan U red at 1 With ., view lom il lithmg indiit. f. three . %  pa of HahJng •, . .. it Th %  % %  b|y mi ormit with which t.. operate this type of coach," Mr. Dowdmg said. other parts nf the t Birmingham. England, that the I Plica Increnserl %  ago, the price has been Mar-aaaadl nlea. especially %  !%  -il.|. 1h.il ould be three times • isao and .tv many. '1 %  vi far fi" K eiigli %  %  % his h"at a! the It is nearly %  %  iment of %  built at.,,.. 1 r .18 aaaafl loin! I Held and the other ship gohamherai %  1 %  ..'.'.. peed ... rhe coast. 11 MS, Khert.rl.l %  nhainkorat h| : r ing her position . TnmMll %  • tin Pale 3 —I'.P. Chinese Prisoners Prefer Suieide To l{riiirnin


PAGE 1

PACE SIX BARBADOS ADVOCATE FRIDAY JAMWRl II 1952 CLASSIFIED ADS. PI in ir NVTICa PI III ii Mm i mi man TELtPMONt 2S0I HIM SAU %  Hi ad prrdn.. %  It iWvi. Ifna.1 Ifc No cam. I IS MEM0K1AM • KM H %  O-a t I .T .1. • n itd lit r *1 %  iKr da h* p.nwH Police Notices Ft-tlOMBCCNT riTTiNO^ Jurt r*iivM. Smla and Tln So -_it i ft. >--rUand lln U 4 ft and lo tt %  ll Mt !%• IHal !: %  DaCoMa %  Urpaiunrnt • I U-n IMPORT Off ll>nr 11 of FtrMirn liaMMM Ov.lll % %  I %  mrniuiod 'hat unrtrr S the Plfi 1896-4 I %  All o*pirlr.: licence*, mut h* product-d for oar.ii EUM ( %  B .rhnflnn. | 1952. %  12—2n. UHBWAI 01 rl i SOLrTM 1 .it 1 M I I Paraona ttewMd lo Mil. *<<•> and keep %  .i-.. ; nd 7 o( the Regulation .-iMim Ac IBB. 1 -.'. the Iftlfa Jam .i.v. 1BS2. n i KICHBUK, %  i of Poll Potlcr II.'..'i.,i. ' %  D %  AUTOMOTIVE .AH OfW A ...Pa >A<4S Davon %  rdilion Gwn tor liaoo on or %  M I-I...I.. (ill C< .n* Il-.i 1 iX1# Cnlctiogp Street • I M .. % %  i %  .i. la .. r.i TAYLOR snaniT. Mil" ELECTRICAL NOTICE rAKi-H III i ririn DIBV OIVB Nonet w all i Cert lo vote at ilia tJ**uen of Matnof the .. r„„H of SI Pet*r that 1 have apfxilnted the Parl.K .loom. %  prtrilalcwn * I • pl< *her* .11 iufh firni ma* meat on Monday ;ph ltH. b#ta-*n lh< hoiP .1 %  i in ana I pi... lo fWi lan Mmtwri Mi patith of Hi a***** in llw |ha -nuiiiH fan. a • (IIHIIIN Parochial Tr*aaurr REAL ESTATE %  KM'KljrY NEW I .oderii •tone Bunfibiw With built-in tunboardi Stand) n on apptoa. le.at-J •a), ft land Eiillrr houa* built an tarp* *>ale romprlilrie thie* bedroom* all to <*•• Eaai. aparloui bathroom iv kitchen in room* with • onderfv.l %  %  I-.II. .. i HBM 1 aaa a .11..... 1, %  w la J mry rat PiM a Ma % % %  M rai n >- >.. 1 H . HOUSES APARTUfNT V" r—rforlaMe %  %  • I'I !" A r Taytor. Lid VUn Pufniihae) BungaMw it ( %  *•< lanaM. Wen rum to an approved ifnaj.i rot aaruculara apply It fto tAl-B Ijtahl.. W\>ill HELP I Xl rtUtMKn l-APY STKNO Api.lv AH) It.a*. .tra4 I oma cum D %  ng Crop, oflkv .,. %  JvaaHwi t ... %  K..1... a i *3-Tn \9V\y Maaa. LajBMt _iMiTtn J %  T Oflfcrt fOMal 1 > a> OOaftFAM %  SHIPPING NOTICES Canadian INational SteamHhi|>8 l-.HV lUaDNKV" i NAD1AN rRUMEMIADV BODKKV l-ADV Nla*ON(WNAD1AN CRU1SXR" 1) frtr IS r.by. n r-i. aj Paki U Manrb — TS Jant M J-n. a Frb Manrh IB Ma.rh Marrh M Mmfi MIHIMMIII Ml •1. I.b. 1 Jai 11 Jany J ra.> C r*y H Frtw *• rrty la Pa*,. 1 Marrh It March M Marrh • Apol I April It April %  : April 5 ol Pans, who is now X pxhibiting hi' work at j Ihe Musouni. i; willing * to Rivt Instruction to a UBUHKJ number u( pupils in drawing and bainUng in oils i waiercoluu! ^ .ii his studio. Bt LiMnanl's House, St. Lvonard'i Avi out. '''e'leph'" 4.1.52—7n. STOP TIIORr. LEAKING TAPS WITH HOLDTITE TAP WASHERS I In. AND '.in. OBTAIN ABU. rt.VTKAi V;MI-OHH>I Cnr. Bnfd Tudor Mta.




te ie



taste letions,

not be effectecl under two vears,
After Mr. Cuke had explained ada h
the Company's position, members | the usual





ent conditions were having on the | °ne of their engineers to erect the
establishment of new industries, ; Set. After erecti '
and the community as a whole, ;|Made with the makers
_ Hon. Mr. Cuke told the meet-/| tative present. As
ing that there were about 400 ap-
plications now on the Company’s Were satisfied that the machinery
waiting list for services which the Was running satisfactorily
company could not fulfil, Hejagreed to accept delivery of the
knew that when members of the;Plant and the j king var res
public asked for a service which , closed. That was the policy which f the Jaen of pre ag agin
) e é e
enced a certain amount of frus-|through the years. They didn’t nea er eee, See Ene
tration and perhaps quite rightly.|import machinery and erect it; @¢ West Indies d

indeed quite sympathetic to those |
_ S . | years ago—in 1942—the company

7 are ? i any,
consumers who were unable to | looking to the future, made appli- .
obtain a service He _ therefore | , SPL c

Ss her a | cation to the Government here fo: . “
thought that for the, Chember of | permission to place’ onfers in from the West Indies took place

! England That application was |!@8t year in Ottawa and it was
expected then that larger quotas

Commerce as a responsible body
in the community, it was quite aj ’ ‘
proper thing for them to discuss |Utned down by the people who

ae

glad that they had given him the
en come there and} continued to press and press and Since the complete de-control ot!
First of all, the position with re
gard to generating plant was ver , :
difficult F Actually. in England! “ere given permission 1 order|freer trade relations with
there was ‘a shortage of | #dditional plant West Indies would become
current the English people who The statement had been made reality in the near future
manufactured the machinery were that Government had authorized He said that the Canadian Na-
denying themselves so as to be| the company to obtain plant from |tional Steamship Con.pany
> to export machinery to the | the U.S.A, He wanted now to kill|kept up their service back and! battle honours than other ships of
colonies. In England, however, he | that statement because it was not|/forward to the West Indies for
understood that where new houses ae = favadt fr
were built, the current was con- | Senerating set was offered from) volume of
nected but at times load shedding America, but it would have taken | gue

Wee ase q oath which the |View of the fact that alterations |

where

. anv The company placed orders for
they had to make to the company y Pp c f
as to whether it was better to con- | four new generating sets of a big-

shedding.
Cuke said, to get plant as fast as

series of unfortunate happenings
He therefore felt that when he had
explained these difficulties to the
Chamber, they would have some 2 as zy 4
understanding of the problems in- Increased Consumption

volved.
used when there was a shortage

of ships and everybody complain-
that they could not wait for

time to build a ship and have ade-
quate shipping, and so it was with
electri
this difficult shortage in England,
and that was happening all over
the Sterling Area. He felt that if
England was trying to meet their
demands, we would not get any 1n
Barbados ~

Apart from the internal diffi-
culty, the situation which he pro-
posed to relate to them in respect
of the Company would have the
effect of letting them have some
kind of sympathetic view of the
difficulties. : . i

Mr. Cuke said that im the pas

The

|

the island are completely out-of-



has been assured by the manufac-
turers, Messrs. Mulline Lid. o

f oon ft . 7 ee . . o . ~ °
vows oo “Flying Enterprise” Chinese Prisoners Prefer Suicide To Returning







ESTABLISHED 1895





Electricity Shortage
Hampers Industry

Commercial Body | ¢
Discuss Problem | Trade

OUTLINING to the Council of the Chamber of Com-

merce the difficulties experienced by the Barbados Electric

, .
- J 2 ” 9 9
Supply Corporation on Wednesday afternoon, Hon. H. A Hopes Fo: Revival

Cuke C.B.E., said that the Company had plans for two big
hut in view of certain difficulties, these could);





{
} tr



ade





> Chamber of Commerce em- | the Company got out a new gen-
sed the adverse effect pres- erating set, the makers sent out

Senate,
ion a trial run was| Senator Lambert arrived
represen-,on Wednesday by T.C,A,



staff engineers of the company



}
|

they the Marine Hotel,

transaction was |

denied them, they experi- {had always been carried out right



| themselves They only took it | ©":

When he went to England, he|over when it was handed over to; . > nce the end of the war,
a 3 moanee soe attention |them in good running order change controls interfered
oO e Directors who were very . ae substantially with the volume
well aware of the situation, and Refused Permission °

| Mr. Cuke explained that somc ee exchanass newee
countries in Canada,

ss ‘. ) < a rt
58 !had the right to turn it down. and /°!, imports and exports of

matter, and. he was only too|
. 13 they said that the plant wa

| good running order. The company | ®S_S00n as possible.

| eventually the Governor inter-|the Canadian dollar a few

j} vened in the matter and they/9s0, it has been reported



j absolutely correct. A second hand

; or six years had not
18 months to recondition it, and in : r

and any suggestion which to take the set

everybody and have load|er type than that used hitherto. | Barbados: Ideal
i : |

Not Easy
was not quite so easy, Mr.

demands increased. Apart

the difficulty of obtaining accepted |}who wants a holiday. It is quite

: Canadians are
coming more inclined all the time
to spend the winter months
Barbados whenevey possible,
1 be seen from the number
hem at present staying on

With the arrival of these new’ evident /that
sets the company experienced un-
forseen diificulties and none of the
engines were working up to ca-
pacity.

the Company had had a





Hon, Mr, Cuke observed thai the | jstand.”

consumption of current was on the

increase all over the World, and T.C.A. Service
told the Council that for three As: fax
years—1948, 1949 and 1950—local
cpnsumption had remained at 8.3
million units. In 1951, however,
it jumped to 10.6 million units.

'
had heard the =
al machinery, There a He recalled that when Mr. Nice

It however took a very long that it is re rded as a



number of people coming
Canada to these islands.



came out to Barbados a year ago,
he came to the conclusion that the
consumption of electricity in Bar-
bados would continue to increase
and that the time had come when



ing of frie
yrown, °





r

bines. That of course would have the winter months as any

reliable. place for winter vacation

1 @ on page 5



Journalist
A journalist for several



9 9 Senator Lambert said he had ex-
66 oOo or pressed a feeling of interest i:
newspaper work and journalisin

because he evolved from
feld in Canada into public affairs.

, He had served on the editorial! cruiser Scharnhorst. The Squadron
ocd use taff of the Globe of Toronto !

when it was the
tanding Liberal organ in Canada.

“Greyhound” On The Road’ os ese oieisco



the days





The Austin Mulliner Motor Coach, which arrived in the
island on Thursday last for the General Omnibus Company
Ltd., is at present being equipped with comfortable seats. | ever

bach came to Messrs. Eckstein Brothers. It is hoped ond of Word ees Bnd later €n-

7 tere iblic li ne

that from time to time it will replace the old type of bus |i ee. in 1930. he returned to
now in use in Barbados, Eastern Canada, lived in Ottawa
“The present buses in use in mer and wa ppointed to the Senate

38
38.

193
date and Barbados is lagging be- | Of
the other islands,” Mr. T ew ype



of the General Omnibus Co. Ltd.,
told the Advocate yester
He

Dowding, Managing : Bo Ei Fishing Boat J ‘ca May Dou ble



said that his fi



“Tt is however hoped that the{ $10,000 to assist these fishermeD | as many,

firm will receive the cooperation , *" buying engines He praised farmers for
of the Director of Highways and Cne fisherman is nye
Transport and the Commissioner} 20d he is building his boat at the| 54 far from the hurricane



Evelyn Babb | magnificent recovery they

t {7 ahalle lone arly
Police with a view to the Fontabelle seach. It is nearly! te,

granting of a special permit with} completed. The other boat, which’ The Governor also described
which to operate this type of] is yet in skeleton form, is bein@|the Executive Council as
coach,” Mr. Dowding said. built by Mar

“Today these buses are opera-| Street. This is being built at!administration for the
in Trinidad and other parts; B owne’s Beach. Another boat than as an instrument of policy, |



rk Forde of Bay/|tjoning more



the Commonwealth. My firm; Will be built by Frank Harewood. its preper functior (CP)





ningham,













suit tropical ey k : j
nditions.” | “INKS | TOKYO, Jan
Price Increased FALMOUTH, Jan. 10. |, Ry ith or Citsiana ar otlocet tant
Mr. Dowding said that 1¢ Commander of the Cul- " 1 e id ms ae Allie Pree -
nately ince he ¢ S| dross Royal Navy Air Statior eee as wukaida
red ome eighteen month n Thursday that the Flying turn to Comm t
. th rice has been increased! terprise sunk and is now at 1 ‘ € I 1
eyond the reac} f lot br botton Car Carlsert and thd | eiviliay wi ¢ i
companies, especi takir te of the itish tug Turmoil | aft, pe a
ideration the he ere rdere, Y the freighter be- ear ¢ ontl
t been given an rease | fore he nk tt ifternoor 1Cor
@ On Page 3 —U.P. |

de a





FRIDAY, JANUARY

LMS. SHEFF
+









’ada-W.I.

AS a result of ‘one hundred
or more of close contact in{
h the West Indies, Can-]
as the warmest feeling
istom was that when| friendship and intimacy with the:
islands said Hon'ble Norman Lam-
| bert, a member of the Canadian

soon as the | Ottawa for a month's holiday. He
S accompanied by his wife and
iaughter and they are staying at



“We in Canada” he ‘said, H.M.S. SHEFFIELD, flagship of Vice-Admiral Sir William Andrewes, K.B.E., C.B

H.M.S. Sheffield arrives here to-morrow on

Commander
in-Chief of the America-West Indie

Sir William Ani
Inset RIGHT: Captain M. Everard, R.N., Commanding Officer, H.M.S. Sheffield and Chief of Statt

Eden And
Acheson
| End ‘Talks

Inset LEFT:

to Sir William Andrewes.

H.M.LS. Sheffield —
Comes Saturday

H.M.S. Sheffield, a cruiser of the Southampton class,

Flag Ship of the America-West Indies Station, is expected

to arrive in Carlisle Boy tomorrow morning. She will leave |
on Thursday, January 17,

H.M.S. Sheffied was built on the River Tyne by Messrs

Vickers-Armstrong and was launched by Her Roya! High-

ness The Duchess of Kent on July 23, 193 Tet

Reds Riuveak Of
U.N. Proposal

PANMUNJOM, Korea, Jan

uring the



wnnference with representative



with Canada would be established WASHINGTON

aien and Secretar
Dean Acheson ended talk

During the \ view
average opportunity to en- East and Far ~ t problem
had| gage the enemy and earned more epartment

When the Germans in- terday afternoon and again thi
the} vaded Norway in April, 1940, she
st’ put detchments of Royal Marines
Namos, to

harbour and road bridges in pre-

many years Even though
trace during the

raised in formal meetings between | wield



very remunerative, the servic
F De ra eae }was, however, continued by
Chamber of Commerce could dis- | bad to be made, they decided not} .¢ reflection of the general atti-
\tude and goodwill towards
West Indies and anything else.

military forces which landed two
days later.

The ship next came prominently ‘Thursday, that
into the news in 1941 when she was
in company of H.M. Ships Renown, ‘
Malaya, Ark Royal and light naval "eed captive to choose the Gov
forces of the famous Fores 4. On +4
February 9 the warships steamed | =a
towards the ports of Genoa to open |@reds of Chinese war prisoner
of eld by the Allies, have threatened

fruitless day } firm decision in their talks

Communists

Prior to the arrival of these sets,| Asked what he thought of Bar-
the company had no trouble what-|bados as a winter resort he said:
ever, A plant came out and it was|"I have visited the Bahamian
erected by an engineer from the | group and this is my first
firm of manufacturers and de-|out here, but I think conditions
pendent on the trial run, it was|are just about ideal for anyone

beer > past,
nent, under which he will live. | been in the pa

was leutned today that hun-/ than two officials of two Govern-

the opportunity
to do before and when the meetings
ended there wa
to the other’



concentrated bombardment

Pan no doubt on either
tons of shells were fired, causing

e| Admiral R. E, Libby, U.N,
| negotiator on the prisoners, listed
warehouses
were also smashed and many fires

raged when the ships retired

Why Consnunists
Are Stalling In

le said that main objection was
self-determination.

Sheffie é e long pur- |!
heffield took part in the long pur- | are scared to death

destruction

battleship Bismark. The
ship was detached by Admiral Sir
James Somerville, G.C.B

a T.C.A.’s_ service
Barbados is concerned, he





facility towards increasing Communists

throw against the Allied proposals

HARKY FERGUSON
NEW YORK, Jan

As a result of this service here} #24 shadow the Bismark. Late in
from Canada as a whole, the feel-
liness to Barbados has
e island now ha
‘onsideration should be given to\great an opportunity of receiving
the installation of two steam iur- | veople from all over Canada during

calling for volun-

s are stalling in the Korean truce
repatriation,

aircraft carrier y|been taken out to idenify certair |}Colonial Office to meet the
Ark Royal had sighted the enemy,
H.M.S. Sheffield mace

{

t

!

juarrel in the ten|{s at Panmunjom

displaced civilians,

contact and into the status

force of naval aircraft from H.MLS. | to Improve
Ark Royal
The Bismarck sank at 11.01
on the morning of May

involved a tremendous capital’! part of the West Indies, In other
outlay From the information words, he said that Barbados
which he had, a steam turbine was known increasingly throughout
more expensive, but it was more the Dominions as “a_ delightful

provisions



ithe parole

ranean in September, 194°

bombardment
the operations

Three months later, on December
) 6th, 1943, H.M.S. Sheffield was in
that| the Cruiser

House Has No Perial | only ee
Powers Over Gazette

BERMUDA,



which was command of

botl
Vice-Admiral R ufternoon adopted the report of |. ;

Committee



H.M.S. Belfast,
in a position
Bear Island, when in the half light
Scharnhors
as sighted proceeding a
direction of the convo
The convoy was diverted to the
northward and the cruisers opened
Scharnhorst
asive action and proceed at
maximum speed to the north-east
‘ Several hours later H,M.S. Shef-



resident correspondent in the!
ern Provinces in addition
having had executive editorial
s in the head office in Toronto.
ter serving on the Globe

en years he resigned at the

I blis g
outh-east of publishing



ction ¥ deliberate challenge |
» authority and could be regard-
s contempt of the House

BRaudovin faces
Political Crisis

BRUSSELS

© approved
Committee
Legislature,
squadron engaged the Seharnhorst Legislative
forced hex
eventually to flee at speed
nearest refuge pn the Norwegian
coast. H.M.S, Sheflield
Scharnhorst
throughout the afternoon
ing her position to the battleship ,
H.M.S. Duke ef York, which wa
moving up from the south-west
to intercept. H.M.S. Duke of York
took up the fight
after darkness. |
During the war H.M.S. Sheffield

|

et up to consider the} +]
introducing |
|

7 ‘ Banana Output
brought the coach to the island as B , B ilt pC bret ess Sin) he :

a trial unit with the idea of im- ein u oi) 7 Oberg ba den 9.
roving the type of vehicle at ) he Governor announced a
eer in garvice. “But while With , view to modernising| meeting of the Agricultural

external measurements are} the local fishing industry, thre® ciety to-day that the banana out-
within the existing reguletions, fishermen are now experiment-/ put for 1953 is certain to be double
certain internal measurements| ing with a new type of fishing | the six million odd stems output
the entrance conflict these! boat. The House of Assembly on) of 1950 and it was possible that
regulations.” Tuesday passed a resolution for! the output would be three times

21-yve ar-olc |

EGYPT WARNS U.K.
TO QUIT VILLAGE

CAIRO, Jan



against a vastly wv
enemy force which attempted to | village of Kafr*Abdou or fave the
according to report
Reports said
E) Khouri Bey Egyptian Governor
of British ships involved were not) cf the Suez delivered the w
published at the time, but H.M.S | to Sir Robert Erskine Comr
this operation

consequences,
bound convoy.

security reason,s the names
as an instrument of

Sheffield’s
‘is now fully acknowledged





llome





United Nation

20,000 Chinese war prisoner











PRICE PIVE

THE RITUAL
- MURDER CASE

STATEMENTS BY ACCUSED

During the four days that the Ritual murder case was going
on at the Court of Grand Sessions, before His Lordship the
Chief Justice, 16 witnesses have given evidence. 7 t
last witness, the Government bacteriologist will be called
hen defence Counsel Mr. C. H. Clarke and the As in
; Attorney General, Mr. F. E. Field for the Crown will adetre
; the Court and jury

In the case, Burton Springer,

lias Cannon Gregory, a 23-vea

id herman of Pie Corner, S$ C wealth Talks

Lucy is charged with the murde

of 28-month-old child, Geoffrey Will Decide

joyce, on September 19
pringer is alleged to have com ’ A
sien cad the murders senbiet he / ulus e OF W * d,

wanted money to get into comm



cation with spirits, He was hop " LONDON : j
future of sever
Indians the ar

population in 20 ye

to get money from these The
pirit with which he could go West
Canada to join the Canadian Army

ing

















Mr. G. B. Niles is associated with | depend largely on what id
Mr. C. H. Clarke as defence coun it the Commonwealth Fin
sel Minister Conference com! 1
| Yesterda one Vitness Cpliing on Tuesda iid Alber
| Babb, was offered for cress-exat 7omMe Leader of the Wwe
jination, but was not cress-exam nic delegation on h rrival
ined. He was witness to a state rom Trinidad toda)
nen. Springer was alleged to hav He expressed the hope ae
made to the police West Indies would n ne AS
|} Another witness, Sgt. Clarence ected t further
Clarke, was too sick at the hospi lollat “ie teris ms
levelopment hemes
tal to attend the Court to give ie ears sid it wid he
| evide nee Set. Clarke had alse penny wise and pound ) h
j taken ‘ atement from Springer ( Britain were s estric Ww
The statement was read to th ndiat ievelopment Ss
} Court, hort-sighted policy coul ‘
| Dr, A, L, Stuart gave evidenct } esult in the extension of poverty
ptouching the inability of Sxat ‘he West Indies could hardly
Clarke to attend the Cour upport its existing opulatior
Altogether four statement nile 1eV oO
springer was alleg4 to have made | [dustry co !
to the police, were read to the ow, the f eak
| Court specu i) ‘ :
| On the third day of the hearin; te nie set} Es
the case, Mr. Clarke had int | 908 spiel sO
}mated that he was going to objec wa, 4s ,
to the admissibility of the state- | yr" iumeee that, dostaee ted
| nents being put in evidence, bu | jterling cuts would leave ull
yesterday he did not object fominion and colonial territorie
Among those to give evident 4 F xe re pa I ah . se nla
yesterday were Clarine Sobers o: | 2'% ‘at, the Co eras: Nora
‘ ; iot afford them, Both he and hi
Rock Field, St. Luey, who wa ellow delegate vould sh
picking okras ina field in Rock rmne nd jetermir " f
when she discovered th isting any uch cu
flower part of the missing a The task confror tr
lend one Madeline Rock who hat yomes and his colleag cannot
seen wecused reading a ghost Slory be underestimated Economie
in | book the day the child was missed { e on the way and the ax
Col. Harold Bryan continued tc flikely to be wielded in all
Pe. evidence when the Court re e *
sumed yesterday morning. ia
He said that on his arrival at the , Agreement Siened
Police, Station .with the accused, Since the signing of ‘he ¢
Burton Springer, he took a state- | Venwealth’s — s IEEE. Peet GOS
ment from him, Woer” t ee _caristas, — th
“At the time I did not suspect vs Ee: OW POSIT | A
. . ” egard to the dollar sho ‘
him, he said, “and therefore | been undoubtedly weaken p
did not caution him, I reread the permitting the West 1 ,
statement to him and he signed it.|selt directly to Canad 10
This was about 12.20 p.m United Kingdon G
The statement was then reac {has circumvented partial! ‘
to the Court entirely, the argument tha »
Cross-examined, he ‘old Mr. |West Indies must by I )
Clarke that on September 24 he }|maintain trade with Cannc
was taken to a place called Mt |Must receive Uollar !
Boile. At that time the police hac | Purpose \.
Korean Pruce'l alks in custody a man named Melvor xe an Nene ee e a '



Greaves, Greaves had had explo
ive substance in his possession
He had also had a funny fluid i
a phial

On September 24, Springer had

of this argument re
seen, Tomorrow they will r
at the West India Committ
talk over this and other pol
Then on Monday they go t





spots to him. On that day, too lin charge of West Indian
Greaves had been interviewed ir \for final discussior befor
@ On Pore 5 conference prope





“ Bidault Tries To



Halt Freneh Crisis

PARIS, Jan. 10
FORMER PREMIER and outgoing Defence Min
Georges Bidault, began a series of exploratory talk
France’s party politicians in an effort to halt the nat

three-day old serious internal crisis. But his chances of
forming France's 15th Cabinet in five years appeared slin
Bidault 2 Leader of the

the Popula Republi



ent (MLR.P), started

ot ee, sores | TE PRICE

he Defence Ministry Cabinet Y wy
it Vineent Auriol late j And

hether or not he think







} \ uceeed in hi missior . » »y* woe
| ull va the fourth mat 1 . i ey I unt
} tht to the Elysee Palace rears
iol leek black limousine On the wd October, 1951
night the result of the rice arbitra
i tion was announced, and 1}

He accepted the invitation afte
other political leaders| Was pointed out that the ne

offer in the course | prices would mean an increa
in the retail price of rice from
seven cents to over eleven



ult did not hide the diffi-



iltic vhich assail a would-be “

vemier, He said, “I am fully}cents a pint says an official
are of the complexity arn 7omMmMunique It was however
yee f the situation, but} stated that the question of ad
felt it va not the moment f

Fake justment within the frame-

work of equalization and/or

*¢ tarted t Me
The i arted la Mondity subsidization to cushion the
fter hostile majority yote if

h the Socialists, Communists ncrease In price was re




Gaullists rejected Premier}in further consideration











Pleven’s Financial Law| the Government
‘ t balancin the 1952 bud
( ace nt rf nereases !
The Socialist Christian Pineauea 4" Bocount oF | , os
Me : j‘rst cost of sidized foodstuff
iiled upon in the day as thef the Ca re ;
; epresentative of the Party which Pee eee nation Cri
eld esponsible for} &change, anc he proposed i
east he crisi told Auriol| crease in freight rates, the pre
lat noon yesterday that he felt his} Prices of these foodstuffs «
lor would £ a failure and} be maintained in spite of the
| ( viving ) isting subsidization budget of
| # million dollar i year
| vata tele the Parlia-] After careful . consideration
ent : ac he I 'ithe problem the Government |!
i} House tronge grou} the] deci
| ; decided
Pi ent to see Auriol with Gr pohigeceia Doct!
, r
{ o Thanh so
bs ALLOT ‘ ;
‘ j He ‘ b } ‘ ¢
per lb. for 1952; i
- : : %
1 gut 1dize rice ‘ al ex-
‘ : t which will enable t
ependent a i 1aximum retail price to t
Pau R naud fixed at 10 cents pe int fot

—U.P 1952


PAGE TWO









f aggp dem sencurs f Rona
companied y her pare:
Col, and Mrs, Ebe xr Pike
rived frem Englar yesterday
the Colombie. Here for two or
three weeks they are the gue
of Sir Edward Cunard at “Glitter
Bay,” St. James,

The Countess and her parents
are on-a tour of the Caribbean
and among the others islands they
will visit will be Jamaica and
the Bahamas

The Countess of Ronaldshay i
the wife of the Earl of Ronald-
hay, (Lawrence Aldred Mervyn

Dundas).

Timber Meeting
M’

>
v.

WILFRED WOODHOUSE

Building Development Ad-
viser, C.D. and W. is at present
in Trinidad attending meeting
of the Caribbean Commission's

Timber Trade Conimittee. He
expected back in a day or two.

Back from Trinidad
M® and MRS. THOS FITZ-
GERALD of “Rafeen,” Gar-
rison who had been holidaying in
Trinidad tor the past month
turned home on Wednesday. Th
have a daughter Pauline and
Pat living in Trinidad.
Mr. Fitzgerald is
Managing Directors
Gardiner Austin and

one '
of

Co.,

of
Mess:
Ltd

Enjoyable Holiday
FTER an enjoyable
J months’ holiday in England,
Mrs. H, A, Cuke, wife of the
Hon'ble H. A, Cuke, O.B.E., re-
turned yesterday morning by the

three

Colombie. She was accompanied
by her son David who went up
for medical treatment and is now

the picture of health
Caribbean Cruise

YASSENGERS making the,
Caribbean Cruise on the ,
Colombie ure Mr, Donald Barnes,
Managing Director of A, Barnes
and Co,, Ltd., Mrs. Barnes and
son Brian, Mr. and Mrs, Joh
Deane, Miss Anne St, John, 1)!
John Payne, Miss Monica St.
John, Mrs, Maria Lang, Miss Jean
St. John, Mr. and Mrs, T, Her-
bert, Mr, G. G, Feldman, Mis

Marjorie B. Licorish and Mr, and
M John Grace who were mar-
Patrick's R.C, Church





ied
o1

t >t
Monday.
Intransit
M* CLAUDE J], GILL, Class I
I Clerk of the Income Tax
Department, British Guiana, was
instansit on the Colombie froin

England yesterday
attending a two-year-course in ac-

morning after

counting and Income Tax at Leeds
College of Commerce.

He said that he was in the same

hall of residence as Mr, C. A.
Burton who is attending a Bri-
tish Council Librarian Course at

Leeds.





Mr

THOMAS LANG MOFPFAT—Canadian
indu

trialist is aking his fifth world
the CARONIA which
n Wednesday

Limited



f

Fifth Worl

dens Toronto,

d Cruise

> A MONG the passengers abocr
4 the R.M.S. Caronia on he
orld cruise is a slim wiry 59.
ear-old Canadian — industrialis*
10 «IS currently enjoying ul
fifth world trip, He is Thoma,
Lang Moffat, Snr., Chairman cf

the Board of Moffats Limited, anj
Canada’s most successful exponent
of foreign trade.

Over the years, he has made
many successful trips to all parts
cof the globe, and has built up
markets and established a demand
for Moffat ranges in 61 countries,

Mr, Moffat has always exhibited
a life long interest in travel and
a persistent conviction of its im-
portance in business,

During his short stay in Bar-
bados he visited the Barbados Gu
Co., Ltd, who represented hia





the dollar crisis,
Retired De

M* an

were

puty Principal
Mrs. E, Ob Pilgrim
among the passengers
airiving here yesterday morning
from England after spending six
months’ holiday. They are stay-
ing with Mr. and Mrs. Greg
Pilgrim of Bullens, St. James, _

Mr. Pilgrim who was Deputy
Principal of Queen’s College for
many years, acted Prinaipal on
three occasions before retiring five
years ago.

Five Months
FTER spending five months’
holiday in England, Rev.
S. R. Ripper, Curate in charge of
St. Lawrence, returned yesterday
morning by the French SS,
Colombie.

1
locally before the way and before

— Caub Calling

Married Yesterday

WESTERDAY afternoon at St

Luke's Church, St, George
Miss Marjorie Brewster, adopted
daughter of Mrs. Sylvia Wiles of
“Sans Souci’, Station Hill was
married to Mr. C. Sinclair Gill,
member of the Office staff of the

Y.M.C.A.
The ceremony which was per-
formed by Rev. S. A. E, Coleman

assisted by Rev. H, Lane took
place shortly after 4 o'clock.

The bride who wks given in
marriage by Mr. E. King, wore
a dress of embroidered organza
nylon—bouffant skirt, off the
shoulder bodice, scalloped neck-
line studded with rhinestones and
long close-fitting sleeves. A crino-
line headdress with rhinestones
and orange blossoms, kept in place
-tip veil of illusion tulle.
» earried a shower bouquet of
Soe lilies and white cora-
ita.

The bridesmaids were the
Misses Sylvia Wiles and Joyce
Griffith. The flower-girls were
Barbara Sargeant, Maureen Reid,
Pauline Phillips and Eugene Jor-
dan. The bridesmaids wore white
ulle over gold taffeta with a stole
attached to the shoulder. Their
headdress was of gold roses, with
crinoline fans to match the dress,
The flower girls wore dresses of
blue and pink nylon, crinaline
headdresses studded with rhine-
stones with posies to match,

The bestman was Mr, Tony
Vanterpool and the ushers were
Messrs. Neville Phillips, Alonza
Jones and Norman Gill. After
the ceremony a reception was
held at “Sans Souci’, Station Hill,
St. Michael, The honeymoon is
being spent at Fleet View. Bath-

sheba.

M* and Mrs. WILFRED ALS-
TON were among the pas-

sengers arriving by the Colombic

from England yesterday, They had

been in the U.K. for the past few

months on a visit,

Back Home
ISS CONSTANCE _INNISS,
Assistant Mistress of Christ
\nurch Girls’ Foundation School,
is now back in Barbados. She
arrived yesterday morning by the
Colombie after spending nine
months’ holiday in the U.K.
Same 'Plane
R, GILBERT “Chopper” TOP-






U.K. Visit

PIN, son of Mr. and Mrs,
L. L. Toppin of “Elridge,” 5th
Avenue Belleville, who had been

here on a short holiday
his parents, returned to
on Wednesday by T.C.A.

Leaving by the same ‘plane was

visiting
Canada

Mr. Ivan Gittens who had been
on a three week visit to his wife!
and three children who are at!

present holidaying here.



BY THE WAY eeeee By Beachcomber |

DUTCH

A Baroness with a
cauliflower ear (the result
of a row in the Koorstraat at
Alkmaar) ts said to have inven-
ted the new type of American
shoe, with “plastic soles forming
miniature goldfish tanks for live
fish,”

This is a considerable advance
on the old type of shoe, which
housed only dead fish. The plas-
tic hat with beef steak and
kidney pudding in a small

aquarium under the lining is still
only a dream, and, in any case,
would be a luxury for a few
bons viveurs, .

Orchestra gangs
strike again

HE orchestra gangs struck
again the other day. The
E-string of a violin broke in the
middle of Violin Concerto, A
well-known conductor has sug-
gested that plain-clothes men
should mingle with the players
before and during concerts, to
watoh for suspicious characters.
At Penzance a frightful-looking
man with a broken nose and a
gap in his front teeth wide
enough to admit a toy cart, was
observed to be holding his ‘cello
the wrong way up. It was dis-
eovered that he was not a ‘cellist
at all, and had no business to be

there, He was thrown out. But
in the middle of the concert the
starboard side of the pianoforte

fell to the floor with a sickening
thud, muddy water dripped from
an oboe, and a trombonist found
his mouthpiece blocked with
cement,

Correspondence now closed

H°?: Sir,

Not hedd neyther taile can
we be of making of that Welsh

B.B.C. Radio

Programme














FRIDAY, JANUARY 11, 1951
11.15 a.m. New Records, 12 noon The
News, 12.10 p.m. News Analysis
4,007.00 pom, 81.3 i8.49M
4 p.me The News, 4.10 por » Daily
Service 4.15 p.m. From the Third Pre
ime, 4 p Music Magazine
of the Week 1
5 », 6 p.m. Merechar ‘
Programm pm. Hay 45
p.m. Sports F d-up, 7 por a,
7.10 m. News Analysis



15—10,39 pom, S1.82M 48.43M



nti

n the Third Programme



answer to hus three. We hoope
Mr. Heavens the Erse’s Hamma—
tastattus will soon be well, and
that it harnt hinfeckshus. But if
he be so hill, charrutty exibishuns
his off, and look hear, hif he
thinks we hare of going to poot
wummin hon our plonk and ave
her hitting at a pea with er
nawstrils, orl we say his: Ware
lis orl that Viktawrean moddisty

and = granmoothers — sitting hat
ome himbroydeering laces, and
not fuling with their nozes hin

publick, ho yes?
We hare, Str, é
Moor in sarrow thon hin awnger,
The Filthistan Trio.

HIEF KUYYASELFA SLISA-«,|

KAKE,
Wotalotahui

who shares

I withtradict me,
the headship of thefBI laid down that married women

Are red-haired women

intelligent?

HERE should we be without

the delightful generalisations
of science? Someone has discov-
ered that women are twice as fat
as men, which is like saying that
boys are twice as ill as girls. Yet
any statistician can prove either
of these statements or any other,
by the skilful use of columns of
figures. Was it not solemnly an-
nounced some time ago that child-

ren with brown eyes are more
affectionate than any others? I
myself onee ventured to assert |

that bachelors under 40 with snub |
noses make better ironmongers
«than married men over 50 with
arge feet. Nobody dared to con-
Greatly emboldened,

Kuppakawfee tribe, will read withwith tall nieces in Rhodesia were

an answering heart
about one of

a news
his confréres

item

It says: Most of his wives do not

seem to resent his absence o7
journeys.
A few of the sentimental ones

sigh over his portrait and tie up
his letters with goko-grass. The
rest-—ah the fickle remainder!

No sooner is he gone than they
tap out on their little drums saucy
messages to the young men-about-

jungle,

They fill the witch-doctor'’s hat
with stale crocodiles’ eggs, they
pick holes in sacred trees with
spears, they play leapfrog, they
shout nonsense at each other

Then back comes their lord, and
finds them all sitting demurely on
the ground, paring their nails

rhe hussies!

kinder to animals than Dorset-
hire bailiffs with rheumatic
‘riends in Penge. This toc passed
vithout a challenge.

They always send for Suet

“‘HARLIE SUET is said to be
drawing up a_ scheme for
multi-tier price control. By in-

troducing ten or 12 separate price
levels it is hoped to bring the pro-
fits of small manufacturers more
securely within the new dividend
limitation. A sliding scale of con-
trols on costs and production will
enable the lower levels of price
controls to stabilise the gap be-
tween their price-limits and those
of the higher levels. By fixing
prices at a dozen levels instead of
at two, the spiral of increasing re-
turns and decreasing output will
be reversed, thus allowing a mar-
gin of safety until the number of
separate price levels can be doub-
led or even trebled.










word

betore
pearing. “*
for m

say
fiercely
1



Plain Crepes

Pink, Blue, Green, Lemon,

Blue, Mauve, Gr

White 36
een, White

36"

Lemon, Peach, Pink, Rose, = Turquoise,

”


Gee udue ia | a
White 36”... 9lc.

T. R. EVANS & WHITFIELDS

YOUR SHOE STORES

Dial 4220

Dial 4606

BARBADOS ADVOCATE



The Pope And The

Trinidad School Teacher
ISS EMELDA — HERBERT,
school teacher of Si
Madeline Girls’ Schoo] San Fer-
nando who had been spending the

By MICHAEL DERRICK
RECENTLY a married man was

Christmas holidays here returned i gen “ae - c ay eon
to Trinidad on Tuesday by B.W.LA.periest, at Mainz. os tae &
Â¥ audolf Goethe. He is a former

During her stay here she was thé

uest of her brother Mr, §S. @,|2a@Stor of the German Evangelical
Herbert of “Gunsite,” Brittons}Church who has becomé a Roman
Hill, Catholic, together with his wife,

The Pope gave special permis-
ion for Herr Goethe to become
i priest and at the same time to
etain his wife. Two days ago, a

Trinidad Lawyer Intransit

M* Henry L. Debi, a former
school teacher of Trinidad

who was called to the Bar at second German Protestant pastor
Grays Inn last November, told, “#5 8!'ven permission by the Pope
Carib that the happiest " year o become a Catholic priest and
of his life were those spent i: till remain married. It is a

lecision that may well have far-
eaching consequences,
Lifelong celibacy is imposed on

England as a student.
He said that the English people
were very hospitable and on the

whole, were extremely kind tc | ?0St Roman Catholic priests—
students from the Colonial Em-] ‘Ut not on all.
pire

Cardinal’s Wife
Cardinal Manning, when he was
Archbishop of Westminster, al-

Mr. Debi was among the pas-
sengers intransit on the Colombie
from England yesterday on his

way back to Trinidad to prac-| “#YS prized the photograph of his
tise his profession, wife, and there is a Catholic

He said that he lived in Eng- hurch in London where, until
land for seven years and found] “ery recently, the two priests

‘ector and curate, were father and
son, A Western Catholic priest is
not necessarily a man who has
never been married, but only a
man who has no wife alive, un-

life there very pleasant.
Although it is true he said tha
meat, butter, cheese etc. are still
rationed, yet food is subsicised
and there is equal distribution.

He paid tribute to the British| less he has received a special dis
Council in London for the ar-]| pensation,
vangements they had made in For the first three hundred years

welcoming and entertaining stu-

dents during their stay in Eng-

land.

During and after his student
days, Mr. Debi worked as Exec-
utive Officer in the office of the
High Commissioner for India and
only relinquished the post shortly
before returning to the West
Indies.

Eight-week-old Passenger
OUNGEST passenger on the
S.S. Colombe this trip was

cight-week-old Dennis Winstor

McComie, Dennis who was born

in England is the son of Mr. anc

Mes, 7. & DD McComie of

Belmont, Port-of-Spain, Trinidad. |

Mr. McComie was returning
from England after a six-months’ |
course in Hospital Administrae
tion arranged by the British
Council in conjunction with the
Institute of Hospital Administra-|
tors.

of the Christian era the govern-
ing rule was that which the East-
ern Chiarches still follow, whether
or not they are in communion
with Rome—that is to say, a man
who is already married may be-
‘ome a priest, although a man
who is already a priest may not
narry

At the Council of Elvira, in
Spain, about the year 300, the
ule was made stricter; not only
might priests not marry, but men
ordained after marriage might no
‘onger co-habit with their wives.
The Council of Nicaea, in 325, re-
‘used to extend this rule to the
whole Church, and to this day it
does not apply to the Eastern
Church. But it prevailed from
that time onwards in the West.
There were indeed times when
it was not very successfully en-
forced, especially before the reign



of the great reforming Pope
He was attached to the North- Gregory VII (1073-86), but it
ampton General HOspita} andj|remained the rule nevertheless.

fJater at the Runwell Mental Hos-|
pital, Essex. |
The course was completed at
the Bristol Infirmary which is a
University Teaching Hospital.

The first Council of the Lateran,
in 1123, declared marriage of the
Western clergy to be not merely
unlawful but invalid. But it is
bad history which dates the rule

Mr. McComie is the brother} of celibacy for the Wester rey

: C he ACY estern clergy

of Sgt G. R. McComie, Ar- from that time, and not from eight
mourer of the Barbados Regi- hundred years earlier,

ment, 1 1

There are to this day, however,
| millions of Catholics of the East-
ern Church, owing the same obe-
dience to the Pope which Western

CROSSWORD







Actuss
. Premature apparentiy. (8)
A sult | don for hearings
Dispiays Cust. (4) 12° Lyric
Por warmth (7)
Tangle. Le jeliv (8)
Rites for young Reginaia
A vroken vane. (4)
Money by rail ¢4)
Pastens te one site
Glide upset by tice?
. I start at the easel

Vown

Supremety excellent model. (7)
Contest decided by the fini
game (6)

Be idle for tooa. (6)

Grave tle in country places
Vexea when in red. (3)

A gentie Dend tn timber
Handle (3)

Sing adult It when drenched
Out of date language (5)
How | treaa tn angry speech 1h
Land of ites. (4)
Superstitioualy timurous
i tet the rvof nave tt. (4)
Upsets % uf 23 acruss. (3)
Nothing short of “No.” (3)
Sojution ol vesterday s OUsZIe — Acros,
Meringues' 7 Oleograph’ 11° Lea’
‘Reailfine) 15 Grit 14 inan
Rine 17 Went 19 Weltractes
Low 2% Morbid 24 Slide
Dowo+ 1 Monoerams 2 Eide
« Retain 4 Grainer
Shovel 8B. Gelid: 3 a 10, Pain
} Tdotiatrv): 18 Toth
av

(we
(3

\'

(8)

(4)
(5)
(6)

1B)

I



MUSIC BY PERCY

(>)

chee

DANCE ONLY





The natural way to

KEEP SLIM
ano FIT

If you want to be attractively
slim, with bright eyes, radiant
complexion, and real fitness,
Nature demands that you keep
your system cleansed of
impurities. Clinical tests by
doctors confirm that Bile Beans
do this, gently and effectively
Bile Beans are keeping million;
healthy and youthful in looks
and figure Start taking them
tonight.

Nature's Gentle Aid

BILE BEANS

Just a couple at Bedtime









To Our Friends

From Overseas

KINGSLEY
RESIDENTIAL
CLUE
Le ei
Te aC

tae a
ae eas

cay GRANT

AT BATHSHEBA

Welcomes you and offers you




LOBSTER
LUNCHES

,

DIAL 95266



Special
Dinner Dance

ORCHESTRA
UNTIL MIDNIGHT

$4.00 PER PERSON










% /
, eanne CRAIN
PeopleVjiil

Married Priest

Catholics owe, whose clergy are
not bound by the same discipline
but still follow the practice of th
irst Christian centuries.

They may not marry after or-

dination but they may retain
wives married before they were
ordained. If their wives die when
they are already priests they may
not remarry; and if they have
wives they may not become
bishops. But there are many
thousands of Catholic priests of

the various Eastern rites who have
wives and families.

There was indeed, a good deal
of embarrassment among the
Western Catholics of the United
States when Catholic priests of
the Eastern rites began to arrive
as immigrants, bringing their
w_ves and children with them and
assuming that they would be re-
ceived into the general compan)

of the Shurch in America,
‘Scandalised’
The most numerous of these
immigrants were the Ruthenian

Catholics, of which there are about
a million in the United States to-
day. They use not Latin but old
Slavonic in their liturgy, and they
come from what is now the West-
ern Ukraine, but was south-east-
ern Poland before the Yalta
Agreement

The Roman Catholics of the Unit-
ed States were amazed and scan-
dalised that their priests should
be married, and in 1929, at the
request of some of the American
bishops, Pope Pius JXI decreed
that only celibate Ruthenian
priests should be admitted to or
ordained in the United States

This was "only a reaffirmation of
an earlier papal decision, which
had been allowed to lapse because
of the discontent which it caused
among the Ruthenians.

Celibacy for the Western clergy
is part of the law of the Church
A law that the Church has made
the Church can relax,, or, indeed,

can abrogate altogether if it
should seem desirable
No Children
There is no prospect of that

Nor is it likely that dispensations
such as that given in the case of
Herr Goethe will be widely grant-
ed.



a

Herr Goethe is 69, and has no |

children. We cannot expect to}
see Western priests bringing up
families.

Moreover, the dispensation for |

Herr Goethe has only been grant- |

ed at the petition of some of the
German bishops.

seen whether any of the English |

bishops will be willing to forward

It remains to be}

to Rome similar petitions on be- |

half of convert Anglican clergy-
men who are married and
yet wish to be ordained as Catho-
lic priests.
WORLD COPYRIGHT
RESERVED
L.E.S.



MARINE
HOTEL

EVERY SATURDAY
IN JANUARY

{
;
1

SERVED FROM 7 P.M. TO 9.30

-

\/ »
ty ;
;

GREEN’S

$1.00

TABLE RESERVATIONS PHONE 3513

J

4





M4. G. 4. GLOBE 20th Century Fox

OPENING TO-DAY 5 & 8.30 P.M. & Continuing

| Pe

sce eeaennente



coruny Fox

>eP-
Tea



PRICES

PIT 16 HOUSE 36 —

BALCONY 48 — BOX 72



may }

|

(|

|
|



|
|
|
|
|
|
|
)



Republic

FRIDAY, JANUARY 11, 1952













We > , 4.45 0 und Cont Btown
DEPAY Da 44 0
Warner's Action Packed Thriller! P
“¢ ”
, BOGART The ENFORCER” || IL
Ze MOSTEI ed de CORSIA—Roy ROBERTS 4
Special Sat. 9.39 am. & 1.30 p.m Midnite Sat 12th









. ee Technicolor Double
GUN RUNNER COMANCHE TERRITORY yl
r Wakel & M ree Y Hara
ROLLING WESTWARD mceeeentayniln’ ‘ans
Tex Ritter ___ Audie Murphy 2a10
; The Garden
PEAZA oor. | GATE TW Er sauce

Te-day & To-morrow 4.45 & 8.30 p.m To-day to Sun. 8.30 p.m,

Mat. Sun. 5 p.m

TIME OF THEIR LIVES a
. “THE LOCKET”
v
COMANCHE TERRITORY Margaret Lindsey &
Technicolor) TARZAN'S MAGIC FOUNTAIN”
Maureen O’Hara--MacDonald Carey Lex Barker & Cheeta
Sat 1.30 p.m. Midnite. Sat Midnite Sat. =
Trouble en ne yee — “TAHITI HONEY”
Leo G oy y se aa Dennis O'Keefe &
a an
Brand of Fear Frontier Law “SONG OF NEVADA”
akely Russell Hayden Roy Rogers & “Trigger”

Jimmy Ws







“ANOTHER BLAZING TRIUMPH
FROM WARNER BROS.

(The CREATORS of TALKING PICTURES)

AT
BTOWNS POPULAR SHOWHOUSE

PLAZA (ore 2310)
NOW PLAYING 2.30214.15 & 8.30 p.m
and Continuing DAILY 4.45 & 8.30 p.m.











THE DOUBLE-FISTED DISTRICT ATTORNEY
WHO MATCHED BULLET FOR BULLET WITH
x THE UNDERWORLD EMPIRE THAT
SOLD MURDER FOR A PRICE!

c

“i ittan bw Martin Rackin

Coming A TOPPER OF THE MOVIE INDUSTRY!
“CAPTAIN HORATIO HORN-BLOWER” (Technicolor)

EMPIRE

OPENING TO-DAY 2.30 & 8.30 and Continuing Daily
445 & 830
Republic Pictures Presents—

LAURENCE OLIVIER —



JOAN FONTAINE
IN

“REBECCA”



ROYAL

Only, & 815 ROXY

To-day 5
Presents

**GEORGE IN CIVVY
STREET”

— WITH —
GEORGE FOMBY and others.

Columbia

Opening TO-DAY, 4.45 & 8.15
and Continuing Daily



Saturday & Sunday, 4.30 & 8.15
Republic Action Double
VERA RALSTON —
JOHN CARROLL
in

-- JACKIE

- SURRENDER”

AND

wbownr:’

Starr
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WILLIAM E






STORY”



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fast-as-lightning,

behind-the-scenes
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their loves, intrigues,
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VICTOR MATURE
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LIZABETH SCOTT 3S’
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LLOYD NOLAN

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FRIDAY,

JANUARY II, 1952

RITUAL MURDER CASE

@ From Page 1

conection with the cuarge. The
police had visited Mclvor Greaves

house and taken away a knife and
some clothing.

The Police asked Springer
whether he could identify ihe

snife as the one he had mentioned
as belonging to Greaves. He could
not remember whether Springer
had identified the knife.

They told Greaves in the pres-
ence of Springer that Springer had
paid he (Greaves) was responsi-
ble for the child’s death. Greaves
denied it. Springer emphatically
said that Greaves was the man
who had done the deed.

Both Greaves and Springer were
detained by the Police but he could
mot remember whether Greaves
was released before Springer was
charged.

There had been a discussion be-
tween Greaves and Springer about
going to Canada,

They were at the Station when
Greaves gave an account of how
he had passed September 19, the
day of the alleged murder

Speaking for himself
only that it
er’s accusation
suspected.

P.C. Garfield
Central Police Station who also
took part in the investigalions
faid that on September 24 he was
at Crab Hill Police Station.. The
accused who had been standing
by the door, said he had not slep
at all the night before and en-
quired after the officer. He said
he was desirous of talking about
the child’s murder.

he
was after
that

could
Spring-
Greaves was

say

Sargeant of the

“T took him to Inspector Bourne
and told Inspector Bourne what
he had said.”

“The Inspector said, “sit down,”
and he sat to the Inspector's left
and I, to his left. Inspector Bourne
asked him whether he wanted to
make a statement about the child
and he said, “yes”.

“The Inspector cautioned him
by saying you are not obliged to
say anything, but anything you
say will be taken and may be
given in evidence,

“He said, “yes”, | want to give a
statement. Inspector Bourne wrote
the caution read it over to the
accused and invited him to read it
over himself. He did so and then
signed it

“Accused then gave a statement
which was written down by the
Inspector in my presence. The
statement was read over to the
accused who was invited to read
it and niake any corrections, He
read it, said it was correct and
signed it.

“As a result of the statement,

Springer was taken from the sta-
tion and he directed us to the
places mentioned in the statement.
Among the places to which he took
us were Whitters, Chandler’s
Gully and Salt Peter Hole where
he assisted us in looking for the
missing parts of the child. Nothing



was found.

“From there we went to Mc Ivor
Greaves’ home. Greaves came
home while we were there and
we then made a search,

“On the return journey, while
on Mt. Friendship or Mt, Boile
Road the van stopped. Greaves

and Springer were in the van.
spector Bourne said to Springer;
“Is this the Me Ivor Greaves to
whom you referred in your state-
ment and Springer said “yes.

“The Inspector asked him
whether the trousers and shirt
which had been taken from
Greaves’ home were those trousers
he had mentioned, He said, Wo.
He showed him a knife and as)

In-

him whether it was the «
Greaves had had on Sept. 10. Ac-
cused said that that looked li
it. Inspector Bourne then tol

Greaves the substance of the sta’ >
ment Springer had given
“Inspector Boufne then old
Springer that he was not obliged
to say anything. Anything you say
may be given in evidence. He
asked Springer whether his sum-
to

mary Greaves wa -orrect,
Springer said, “yes.”

“Greaves swore and said he
knew absolutely nothing about it.

On September 19, he had gone to
Bridgetown and returned at noon

“Greaves then went on te give
us a detailed account of his move-
ments between 6 a.m. and noon.
Sometime afterwards he gave a
detailed account of his movements
for the entire day We then left
and went on to Crab Hill Police
Station.”

He said that while Springer was
at Crab Hill before he was charged
he used to sleep in Sgt. Alleyne’s
room That was how he came to
be near Sgt. Alleyne’s door on the

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morning he
At that time
in his room

Cross-examineq he said _ that
some magazines had been taken
from Greaves’ home but he did not
know whether any police read
them, Many phials containing fluid
were also .taken from Greaves’
house,

Greaves was released on Octo-
ber 2 while Springer was charged
on September 27.

Next to give evidence was In-
spector Cecil Bourne. He was at
Crab Hill Police Station on Sep-
tember 24 during the course of in-
vestigations he was making

P.C, Sargeant brought the ac-
cused to him in the recreation
room and told him he had intim-
ated that he wanted to give a state-
ment. After being cautioned he
made a voluntary statement.

This statement was read to the
Court

As a result of the statement he
took Springer to Pie Corner as he
had agreed to show me the places
he had mentioned. At Salt Peter
Hole he made a search though at
the time he did not realise that it
had an inner chamber. Nothing
was found.

They went to Greaves’
where they made a search,
phials, clothing and a knife were
taken from his house. They lefi
there in vehicles and on the way?
to the station, they stopped at Mt. &
Boile Road.

“I asked the accused
Mclvor Greaves was the Mclvor
Greaves he had mentioned. He
said yes. I asked Mclvor Greaves
whether he knew Springer and he
said he did.

“I told Greaves of the substance
of .the statement Springer had
given against him. Springer said
that he had told it to Greaves cor-
rectly.

“Greaves strongly denied the ac-
cusations with an oath

“Accused askeq Greaves if
showed Greaves letters
Canadian Army.
ted that he had,
deny the
child,

“I showed Springer
which had been taken
Ivor Greayes’ home and he said
that looked like it. He said that
the trousers and shirt he was then

the statement
Alleyne was not

home
Some

whether

he
about the
Greaves admit-
but continued to
accusations about the



knife
from Me

the

wearing were mot those he had
been wearing on September 19
They then went back to Crab Hill

Station.

Investigations continued on Sep-
tember 25 and he _ interviewed
Colvin Phillips from whom he got
a statement As a result of that
statement he again visited Salt
Peter Hole It was.drawn to his
attention for the first time that
there was an inner chamber. He
noticed some pieces of trash and
a small stone end these he took
to the Government Bacteriologist

Insvector Bourne was not cross-
examined

Dr. A. L. Stuart tiien gave evi-
dence as to the iliness of Sjt,
Clarke who was to have been 2
witness.

He said IT have seen Sgt, Clarence
V. Clarke as a patient and subse
quently admitted him at the hos-
pital, From that date he has been
kept in bed. He is quite ill and
1 consider it very dangerous for
him to come to th: Court and give
evidence





Sup ‘dent Simmonds was
recalleq and ne said that Springer
was charged on September 27
After he wus cautioned a state-
ment was taken from him He
had becn prcsent when Sgt. Clarke
gave evidence before Magistrate

, Nurse, The s Ament was read
over, e accused was represent-
ed at tne time by Mr. Clarke whc
had an opportunity to cross-exam-

ine him. He recognised the signa-
ture of the Police Magistrate to
Clarke’s evidence
This statement «
Court.
Another Statcment

Cpl. Willem
to District “E”

read to the

Gaskin attached
Police Station in
September last year, On Septem-
ber 20 whilé passing near a cell in
which Springer was, Springer
called him and told him he wanted
o see the Sergeant to give a state-

ment, Sgt. Clarke was the Ser-
geant,
Sgt. Clarke and 1 went to the

cell and he said he wanted to give



BARBADOS ADVOCATE



was at the station

was charged hie
a statement which
was taken down by him. He read
it to Springer and he signed it
He said he had not been present
at the station when Springer was

that he
when Springer
elected vo give

Said

first brought there
The accused had been at the
Station sometime before he was

charged as he said he was afraid
of the people of his district.
Greaves had been at the station
until October 20. Darwin Boyce
had been at the station and had
given a statement.
Remains Found
Clarine Sobers, a domestic
vant of Rock Field, St. Lucy, said
that about 8 a.m. on September
21 she went into the canes to pick
okras. The okras were in a drain

ser-

what they were looking for
There nad been much rain that
lay
Under cross-examination, he

said when Springer told him that
the police did not know where to
look, he did not question him.

At The Rum Shop

George Harris, a shopkeeper of
Pie Corner, St. Lucy, said he knew
the accused. On September 19 he
was in his shop when he heard
about the missing, child. During
the evening a policeman passed.

About 8 p.m. accused came to
his shop, He called him towards
the bar. He said he wanted some-
thing to drink but did not have
sufficient money to buy drinks for
all in the shop.

He offered mea drink and we
each had one. He told me to call

in the field ; , Colvin Phillips who was in the
I saw the insteps of a child feet grocery department of the shop.
near the okra tree,” she said, “The «] called him and Colvin went to
insteps were covered with trash. the accused 1 left them to-
{ was so afraid that I ran. I ran gether.” :
to one Athelstan and told him Cross-examined he said it was
what I had seen. While I told the g common thing for Burton to buy
neighbours, he left to report it to drinks from him,

the police Later the police and
the doctor visited the scene.”

She was not cross-examined

Missing

Rock of
said she

Madeline
St. Lucy,
Springer. On
came to her mother's house and
asked how late it was. She told
him it was 12.15 p.m, but thought
the clock was slow. He said he
had been on the cliff sitting and
yone Elsie Mahon had asked him
iwhether he had seen a little boy
pass that way. He said that Elsie
had told him that Mar Boyce had
lest one of her children

He asked Colvin Phillips who
was also there, whether he had
seen the mid-day bus come up aad
Colvin told him it had come and
gone

She had told him the clock was
slow because it had stopped in the
morning and she had set it, but
was not sure whether it was right.

Reading A Book

About an hour later Colvin asix-
ed Burton whether he was going
to look for the child and he said
he was not going. He then sat in
the wild canes below the house
and read a book. The book
one about ghost stories

People call Springer
Gregory,” she said. Colvin stayed
there about an hour and a half
and went away and _ “returned
about 5.30 p.m. Colvin and Bur-
ton afterwards went away togeth-
er between 6 and 6.30 p.m.’

She did not see Greaves that
day.

Cross-examined, she said that
her sister and Colvin Phillips were
first cousins.

The distance between their
house and Boyce’s house was
about 200 yards. She did not know
Chandler’s Gully, ;

Phillips lived about a mile from
Thereza Boyce When Phillips
came at them that day it was
about 12.10 p.m The cliff
Springer had referred to when
telling of the time he had been
asked whether he had seen the
children, was a few yards from
Boyce’s house.

A Voice

Agatha Corbin of Pie Corner
Said she rememberea the Wednes-
day the child was missing. She
had been home the night and her
husband Frank was over the halt
door with tne window above the
door half closed.

‘I heard a voice saying, Christ,
she aint going find it either,’ she
said. ‘Soon after I heard a voice
say, ‘Burton come aiong, and an-
otner say, ‘Colvin man wait for
me, I going down the road and
fire some rum. I recognized Bur-
ton’s

“I have known Burton about 17

Corner
Burton
19 he

Pie
knew
September

was

Cannon



months. I think it was about 10
o'clock”.

Cross-examined she said she
had only heard the voice but had

not seen the speakers, The voices
were about eight feet off. If her
husband was looking, he would
have seen the speakers.
An Enquiry

P.C, Gordon Burrowes of the
“rab Hill Police Station was nex
to give evidence, On September
19 he was looking for the
ing child About
saw Burton

He told me the police were

a statement, Sgt. Clarke told him idiots and did not know where to

he would have to write it and look for the child.

brought him to the office The “On September 21, I went to

sergeant cautioned him. make a further search. On my
Sgt. Clarke recorded the state- way there I sheltered in Harris’

ment from him in my presence,” shop about 7.45 a.m. from the

he said. It was read to him and
he signed it.

Lee Set Harold Alleyne in
charge of Crab Hill Police Station.

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Deri is a new kind of dual purpose soap and
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good preventive

personal hygiene.
tie qualities of Derl Soap that in many hos-
pitals, where Derl is used, the ten minute
pre-operational scrubs have now been reduced
to a three minute wash.

Derl should exert a marked benefit to per-
sonnel in Industrial Plants because of its

rain. Burton Springer was ther
discussing the missing child with
other men

“He said the Police did not know

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PO Ce “ oe COCO Ay OCCT * SF eF



LLCS POSE POFSS

OS

At tyt,
LLL CLES

miss-

thild. 9.45 p.m, he

saw a Springer in front

Thereza Boyce’s house. He came

and enquired whether the police

had searched the sea coast. He

told him the police had done so,
but had found nothing.

Colvin was not
in the habit of buying but he
would drink with Burton. He
said he did not know whether any-
body else drank rum that night

Re-examined he said that when
he said that no one drank more
rum that night, he was referring
to what drinking went on at his
shop. Colvin and Burton appear-
ed to be friends

Cpl. Thomas Babb was offered
for cross-examination but was no
cross-examined,

Recalled

Mc Ivor Greaves was recalled
He said he was friendly with Bur-
ton Springer before he joined the
army He said he was not friend-





ly with him after the army days
He was present at the Court
when Burton’s statement was
read. “I could bring witnesses to
rebut that statement,” he said.
He knew Darwen Boyce or
Collymore. He was not with him
on September 19 They were
friendly through their member-

ship of the Church Lad’s Brigade,

Cross-examined, he said he
knew Burton when he was a child.
They lived about three quarters
of a mile from each other.

Superintendent Simmonds was
also recalled. He said the knife
which they had brought from

Greaves’ home was about seven to
eight inches long. It was not like

a sickle.

The Court was
10 am. to-day

“NEW LOOK”

@ From Page |
in fares since 1939. “It is how-
ever hoped that some increase in
fares will take place when con-
cessions are granted in March
this year,” he said.

He expressed the hope that the
General Omnibus Co. will be able
to acquire more cOaches of this
type if the trial unit proves sat~

adjourned until

isfactory to the public and stands
up to local road conditions. In
this case it is likely that there

will be a possible change in the
type of buses which is now being
used, depending on increases in
the present fares,

Greyhound

The coach, which has the ap-
pearance of the Greyhound Coach
seen in Trinidad, is built on an
Austin chassis. It has seating
accommodation for 34. The load-
ing door is of the jack-knife type
and is manually operated by the
control at the right of the driver,

It is also equipped with built-
in direction indicators in the
front and rear and has a revolv-
ing sign panel in the front. The
iighting system provides a more
nomely atmosphere than the sys-
tem of the present buses and also
has a soothing effect on the eye
The bell, used by passengers to
stop the coach, gives one clang!
instead of the drawling sound of
the present bell, The push button
is in the roof instead of on the
upright.

On a whole this type of bus is
a vast improvement over the one
at present in use and brings the
new look” to Barbados.





HARKBADO
POLO CLUB

THIRD MATCH IN CUP
SERIES
RANGERS vs BRONCOS
at Garrison Savannah



SATURDAY, 12th Jany
at 4.30 P.M.

1/-
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Entrance to Pnclosure
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S. GARRAWA























Harbour Log
IN CARLISLE BAY
Sch Pr Mark Sc I
Smith, M.V. Cacique del ¢ a
Marea Henrietta, Sch. R« e M., Se
Burma D., Sch. Ad *
Smith, M.V. J. W. Rogers,
Caroline, Sx Mandalay IT,
ARRIVALS
ss ylombie, 7,380. tons net, “Capt
Kerharo, f Le Mavrr
SS. Libervilte, 4,365 et, Capt
Hvass, from Port-au-Prince
DEPARTURES
$.S. Colombie, 7,380 tons net, Capt
Kerharé, for Trinidad
Schooner Emeline, 72 tons net, Capt
Clarke, for British C 4
Schoaner Frances W. Smith, 74 tons
net, Capt. Hassell, for British Guiana
Passengers landing here yesterday from
the French Liner SS. “Col bie’ were:--
From Southampton Wilfred Atston,
Margarét. Alston, Hylda E s, David EB
Cuke, Iss Te Cuke, Marg t Dewhurst,
John R. Constance iss, Anthony
Orpen, Col Eben Pike, Olive C.
Pike, Countess of Ronaidshay, Cohn A
Famsay, Cohn C. Ramsay, Violet Alport,
Anne A. Bentley, H. M. Houldsworth,
C. W. Houldsworth, Louis Larrouy, Marie
l arrouy Art s, Edward
“ilgrim, FE 2 Rev. Sydney
Fr. Rippe Je William W

















Alex, Ch. Phil : Phillips, Rev
8. A Sunderlanc William F
Thomas.

From Dominica C otte Corriette
Ingrid ©

Passen & Barbados yesterday
cvening t » French Liner “Colombite
were

Fer Jamaica— Dr Harold M Forde
ife and child, Rev. F. M. Dowlen and

fe Makinsor «a wife, George
Lawards, James Edwards, Doris Wiltshire.

For Cartagena—Luis A, Cabrera, wife
and child, Dr. John Elemndorf

For Curacao Chesterfield Springer,
Kenneth N. Sea Clement Worrell
Newton A. Bovell, George F. L. Charles
Gwendelyn Sand Esther Sandiford,
Oscar F. G. Gibb

For Trinidad Kath een O'Ne Hariet
Fimendori, Earl Parchment, w 3
children, sh, Joan A, M
Agnes Cc Boy
Small Daisy



George W
Gladys Kirto
Anne M. Vida
Cutting Bryer
and wife, John Deane vd
St. John, John Pay Monica St
Maria Lang, Berbara | r, Jean St. Joh
T. Herbert and
wife, Getrel ¢
Licorish



wife, John Grace and
Feldmenr Ma¥iorie B

Seawell

ARRIVALS By B.W.LA
WEDNESDAY

From Trinidad—T. Edwards, FE

G. Raveneau, E. Myles, FE. Myles, C. B

Escalante, E. Massimine, 1. Massimine

C. Massimine, C. Massimine, F. Comber

ON



Ward



G. Gomer, E. Reefer, R. Reefer, B
Reefer, R. Samaroo, FR Samaroo R
Goodsman, D. Johnston, D. West, ¢

Cabrera, C

Cabrera
From Trinidad Yesterday F

Jordan, A, McKenzie. J

Cabrera J Cabrera KF

Durr, H
Bowen, H

















Creque, L. Akow, H. Creque C u
Drew, A. De Lima, A. De Lima, 8
De Lima, Z. De Lima, G. Taylor, D
Taylor, J_ Taylor, W. Taylor, J. Roach
M. Gooding, J. Shields, M. Shields, L,
Greenidge, M. Greenidge
From St. Vincent—Ian Howell, Arwel
Nichols avid Abbott, Bernard Abbott
Bruce Sadley, Robin Austin
DEPARTURES By BW.LA. ON
WEDNESDAY

For Trinidad—Eve\ White, rene
White Honor Dunn pxander Dunn
Nora Fr he, John Turner, Christine
Turner Marie Glady Mac
Alister, Joyee Jones, Frederick Greenidge
Andrew Shepar Harriet Shepard
Liewellyn Tull ard Spierman, Erie
Traub, Eileer Sylvia Shores
James = Ber 1 Ber Mstr
James Berw Marion Hut won, Robert
Henders« Angela Kellmar Citfford
Manning

For Puerto Rico Yesterday Riehard
Paddon, Lydia Paddo Catherine
Mitchell, Carlisie Jordan, Shirley Tudo
Howard Griffith, Herbert King, Keelat
King

For Dominica Yesterday Geors
Gomez, Frank Cumber

Fe Samaica—-S/Lar. David West, S
George Seel, Muriel Jackman, Theodors
Soutzos, Dora Tbberson

In Fouch With Barbados
Coastal Station





Cable and Wireless (W.1.) Ltd., advis
that they can now communicate witt
the following ships through thetr Bar
bados Coast Station 5.8. Mormactide
8.8. Mormacrio, SS. Northfield, S'S
American Eagle, § Li ville, S.S

‘aition, SS, Ragnhild Droving

British ¢



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PAGE THREE |





MAIL NOTICES





















> ‘s’ Clubs: Cyclist Injured
Dominica and Antigua by the| I Boys’ Clubs: syelist nj urec
Sch. Phyllis Mark will be closed at the 2 - -
seneral Post Office as under Th Gi 1 . GEORGE FOSTER 4 seni
> - I i arpent
el Ms ’ Registered MM re -
“ \ ; dinat "ean lat 9 a ». on the ‘ vires . on Village, St. Michael
Jar y, 1952 | There ‘ ; 1 and discharged at the
for $t. Vincent by the Sch | There are 15 boy ik Me Tene suain’ fap uiieen ens |
Ma y MM will be ed at the Gene ; island with a membe p 64 ne ; ;
most ’ it . oF th . * «) it ha >s 1ined when
Post Office as de | boys and three gir lu V : ' i oA
Parcel Mail at 12 noon, Registered Mall | ' : The three bai’ adash sicycle while
at 2D nd Ordis Mai ao | con ore $t pall aga ah % B ridir ixter’s Road, St
TO-DAY ith Jane 1952 ire at Bay Stre Cleaver Hill M el ss. wukerda
; St Joseph and § vell, Christ we i, rdé
RATES OF EXCHANGE Church Major R, Craggs told the 7 * We
10TH JANUARY, 1962 Advocate yesterday in an inter- gcc
NEW YORK view,
73 6/10 pr. Cheques on
a ao 72 3/10% pr He said that during the Christ- ing d the public saw this when
Sanaa Drafts 71 1/10 pr Mas season many boys went the Boys’ and Girls’ Clubs stall
73 6/10% pr around spreading the good cheer was among many stalls at the
72 2/10% pr 69 7/10% } at the Almshouses in the island Annual Agricultura) Exhibition
0% pr ve ie os nging carols and acting pl: The ndard of the exhibit
dae ‘CANADA The instructors who are té h- which included shogs, mats, hats,
72 6/10% pr ing the boys and girls carpent brushes ete was high and after
making, embroidery, cook- the exhibition all the exhibits
etc. are well pleased with were bought quickly by the pub-
72 6/10% pr. Cable the response their pupils are giv- lie é
71 1/10% pr. Currenc) 68 6/10% pr
Coupons 67 9/10% pr
0% pr Silver 20% pr

Sas



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Bankers 70 1/10% pr hoe
Demand Drafts 69 95% pr
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PAGE FOUR

BARBADOS Go ADVOGATE |

SoS Reseed

Lta., Breed St. Bridgetown

1952





an by he Adverste Co.,



Friday, January 11,

* 4s" ‘ y
ELECTRI
48484
,

THE Barbados Flectric

tion began operatic

Supply Corpora-
1910 in Barbados
supplied current in 1911. There
generating sets of 135 kilo-
at that time. In 1951 there
total

ms in
and first
were only two
watts installed
generating sets of a
capacity of 3,700 kilowatts.

The Company began with a franchise to
supply electricity to an area within 5 miles
of Bridgetown. In 1936 permission was
obtained to supply the whole island. For
the first 16 years of operation no dividend
was paid to shareholders but since 1926 an
average dividend of 5% has been declared.

During the last four years the Company
has spent nearly £100,000 in new gener-
ating sets to cope with increased demands
for None of this
secret published

were seven

information is
by the Electric
Advocate Year

was stated

supply
and was
Supply Corporation in the
Book 1951 In
the time that the company has been greatly
handicapped
ible and engine makers repre-

addition it at

owing “to these sets proving
very unrelié

sentatives have been in this island for the

past two years making the necessary
adjustments.”
On Wednesday the Hon. H. A. Cuke,

C.B.E.,. M.L:C.,
tion’s Advisory
took the
confidence and explained to their members
Company was
the position confronting Barbados
today because of the Company’s inability
to supply all the electricity demanded.
Hon. H. A. Cuke,
hundred applications on the
waiting list of the company.
The Company, he said, had
far back as 1942 the need for
and had continued to press for permission

a member of the Corpora-
Committee in Barbados,
Chamber of Commerce into his

that the not ignorant of

serious

There were, said the

me four

realised as

expansion

to obtain generators when this permission
refused. The then Governor
Barbados had intervened on behalf of the
Electricity Company and in January 1943
The
Company placed orders for four new gen-
erating sets. in 1947,
1949, 1950 and 1951. They had all given
trouble. Had these sets not all given
trouble the Company would have been
able to supply existing demands and would
be in a healthy position to go ahead with
plans for expansion. It was quite unfair,
said the Hon. H. A. Cuke, to say that the
Company ‘had done’ nothing to consider
the interests of the people of Barbados.
The Company had met with a series of
unfortunate accidents, he said, and its
present plans for expansion were being
held up because one of the clauses in the
Public Utilities Act (1951) was frightening
away new capital on the London Stock
Exchange.

Many members of the Barbados Chamber
of Commerce expressed the view that the
Electric Supply Corporation was not con-
sidering the interests of the people of
Barbados and Mr. D. G. Leacock the Chair-
man, suggested that the Company had
been unsuccessful in its public relations.

Mr. Lucie-Smith wanted to know
whether capital could not be obtained
locally and expressed concern that re-
stricted electricity supply would lead to
unemployment and would prevent the ex-
pansion of local industries. He said there
was no use throwing mud at the company.
What he wanted was to get Government
and the Electricity Company together to
find ways and means of overcoming the
serious situation which had arisen and
which affected the bread and butter of the
people.

Finally the Chamber .of Commerce
appointed a Conimittee to: discuss with the
Governor the existing situation and the
Hon, H. A. Cuke agreed to notify the Elec-
tricity Company in London of the feelings
of the Chamber of Commerce as expressed
at the meeting.

Something more is being done to bring
home to the people of Barbados the serious
position of an island where demands for
electricity exceed supply and where there
are no new generators on order to cope
with present supplies.

But the Chamber of Commerce cannot
be congratulated for their acrimonious
discussion of this serious position, The
Electric Supply Corporation may have
failed to take the public into their confi-
dence, but it has, on the evidence, been
very active in coping with serious diffi-
culties, while their silence has been due to
the highest motives of not imputing blame
to others, The feeling of the Chamber of
Commerce as expressed by several mem-
bers was too akin to that of fault-finding
and there was no complete constructive
suggestion made. The appointment of a
Committee can hardlyimpro6ve the position
unless that Committee employs expert
technical opinion to advise Jit.

Most of the criticisms made at Wednes-
day’s meeting were based on generaliza-
tions which would have had no effect had
there been a technical expert present.
Recriminations and mud throwing are not
going to add one kilowatt to the total elec-
tricity supplied in Barbados. At the same
time it is regrettable that so’ much heat
should be generated in a matter of grave
public concern and there is no daubt that
improved public relations are better than
last minute inquests. What is vitally neces-
sary is that mutual confidence be restored
immediately between the Government
and the Corporation and that orders for
new generating plant be placed at the
earliest opportunity.

was first of

indents for generators were sent on.

These sets arrived





A Visitor In New
York

Hest OF Luck
in

By BARNEY MILLAR







NEW YORK, Jan. 2
The tumult and the shout ing
dies! The Xmas holidays are ove
in fact alf the holiday r
‘ er and Ne Ww Y TK 1e est
ohristian l seitlec
to the daily d and
ym task of its everyday
existence As far as the word
ettled” can be applied to this
|busy bustling city, it has settled
jafter a full period of high pres-

ure celebration
| To skip from
| Year! This 1952
j}hundreds of

Xmas to the New
was welcomed by
thousands of people
jam-packed in Times Square —
the centre of the city All traffic
| had been diverted from this area,
and the stores and busing

houses had boarded up their
[Plate glass, windows. From early
Monday—-New Year's Eve, it
jis called here, all roads led to
| Square, and as the restau-
| rants, and all refreshment places
j had been given permission to
jremain open all night, brisk busi-
jness was on. The area steadily
| filled, and by night fall it was
jimpossible to move more than a
jfew inches at a time amid the
vast throng of humanity that
filled the square around the
| illuminated, towering Times
building. The whole area indeed
was a blaze of brilliant illumina-
| tion with gaily coloured balloons
jdangling from the tall building

| At the stroke of midnight—a
| huge white balloon was cut
jand as it floated slowly down
}full view of the crowded
}oughfare, gave the signal that a
|New Year had dawned. Cheers,
houts, calls of all kinds rent the
air, as the traditional greeting
Was exchanged “Happy New
Year”
Indoors,
exclusive

on

Tir



loose

wi in
thor-

the fashionable and
eating places had their
midnight suppers and drinking
parties, apart from those who
welcomed the New Year at their
various places of worship. And
jthese were many, for suprising
as it may seem to some there is
a solid block of Church-goers who



find time for religious practice
jamid the hustle and bustle of
busy life.

And so I join in at this point
to say, even if belatedly, “Happy
|New Year.” Exactly what it holds
jin store, no one can tell although
it comes pregnant with possibili-
ties on every hand. But, does
worrying help?
| The year is gone, no need to
| rue,

} A new one comes to me and
| you:
| So goodbye 1951, and welcome
1952,
|
* ,

Before I
holiday, it is

dismiss the Xmas
interesting to note,

that here the day after Xmas is
NOT a holiday, Unknown or
unobserved by Americans is what
we know as Boxing Day— the
day which one yule-tide wit
described as the period of recov-
ery from the Xmas celebrations.
No! Uncle Sam is a busy man,

and with him it is production and
more production all the time.
This is the guiding theme of all
Americans,

This year—-or rather last year
the day before Xmas,, the Monday
was proclaimed a holiday, so that
those who were minded to do so
could enjoy a four-day break
from their labours. That is to
say—-Saturday, Sunday, Monday

By SEFTON DELMER
First man whose story I extract
from the dossiers is the corporal
who had served as a_ cobbler
“acting unpaid” in the Red Army.
So he knew all about boots and

shoes. And he started—says the
official British interrogation re-
port—with incredulous delight at
a pair of civilian leather shoes
given him by the British.
“Never, never did IT expect to
have such wonderful shoes for

myself,” he rejoiced, “Oh such a
splendid suit of clothes.”

He fingered lovingly the not-
vory-first-class German material
of his 90s. reach-me-down,

“No one had a suit as good as
this at home, not even the direc-
tor of the tractor station,” he said.



|

| ‘And shoes! There were only six

} out of 800 in our village who

| had leather ones. The others all
wore bast shoes made of straw
nd puttees. I know because I






one

} Ten days before this the cor-
|} poral had deserted from Stalin’s
Army, made his way across the
| frontier,

The commander of his Soviet
}unit had been over to see him
in British hands and had ap-
pealed to him to come back.

But the corporal had firmly
turned the Soviet commander
| down,
oe Flood Of Words

Now he was free free to

| marvel at all the good things in
| the way of clothes, cooking pots,
| furniture, lighting, food, housing,

which life holds for people out-
| side the Seviet Union

Above all he was free to
The corporal talked and
and talked. There was no
ping him

It is a ‘normal
terrogators. knew,
ef psychological liberation.

Again and again, in reports
prepared by the British authoeri-
ties, I have read that refugees
have arrived, tired and evasive:
they stil] feared the spy for
Stalin was lurking behind every
wall.

Then the dam would suddenly
b» lifted, and thoughts and ob-
servations pent up in years of
repression would come bursting
out in q non-stop flood. Like the
corpor il all the fugitives have
one constant refrain; “At home
no one knows it is like this out-
side. They think the way they
live is the way the whole world
lives,”

speak.
talked
ston-

in-

2eSs

stage, his
in the proc

Deserter

corporal was born ot
29, 1928, in Kuksovo,

ud-track village of
med wooden house
n water, or li
10oling, like that of the vast
majority of Soviet children, be-





BARBADOS ADVOCATE

1952"



BARNEY MILLAR








and Tuesday, Very little work is
done in the city on Saturday as
labour regulations call for a five-
day week. So on this occasion
there a real holiday break
for many,, which began froin the
evening of Friday, Dec. 21

This long holiday period had
its attendant evils. It was estima-

ted that 600 people would die in
traffic accidents between Friday
evening and Wednesday morning.
1ally 516 died, and the heavy
snowfall in certain areas which
restricted travel somewhat might
have been the biggest factor in
keeping the number below the
estimate
This bit of information was re-



ieased at the same time as the
Xmas., death figures. A woman,
Miss Wilhelmina WISCHMEIER,

of.Ohio, who was killed on Friday
evening was the millionth victim
of automobile accidents in New
York in 50 years. This stovgering
iccomplishment, actually stretch-
’ over a period of just over 50
years, because this count started





ith the death of a Mr. H. H.
Bliss, killed by a car ag he
stepped off a bus on Sept. 13,
1899. It still represents a condi-
ion which the National Safety
C-unci! described as one which
“ne. civilized count ry should ever
ce.” This could be avoided, he
said = b ‘a little more civilized

behaviour

Barbadian Students

I ran into a bunch—or rather

they invaded a small party which
I attended last Saturday night.
The word “small” is a purely rela-
uve term in this city. I journeyed
to Brooklyn to meet an old friend,
vho is as udent in C

The Cobbler. Thel
And The Convict

gan at the age of eight, and
ended when he was 12.
In 1945, after doing his basic

military training, he was schooled
as a plasterer and sent to work
in Moscow :

In three months there nearly
all his classmates deserted.

The corporal decided to follow
their example, but he was
caught and sent to jail. When
he came out the Red Army
summoned him once more and
he was sent to Germany.

ss
| 2.—The Film Girl |

Valentina was a secretary sten-
ographer with a Soviet film unit
making a rosy documentary of
life under Stalin in “liberated
«East Germany

“Before I was
o location,”

Leningrad.”

Here what she had
ebout the struggle to get y little
fuel for the stove in her 12ft.. by
12ft. room, (As a great privilege
she had this room to herself
The other four‘rooms in the flat
sharing the same _ kitchen, are
occupied by four large-size fam-
ilies.)

“First a permit had to be Ob+
tained for the fuel. The best way
to get it was to bribe an official,
The permit would be for three
cubic feet of wood, the entire
ration for the bitterly cold Len-
ingrad winter,

“Next I would have to go to
the fuel depot—but NOT in office
hours.

“As often as
would bes
would be





sent to Germany
she said, “I lived

to say

not
fruitless,
closed or

my journey
The depot
no fuel would

be in stock
“Next the transport problem.
I would club with friends and

> a van—but we had to follow
1e wood on its way through the
streets to make sure that no One
stole any. And even when it
was in my room I could not be
sure it was safe even under my
bed,

“People are so short of every-
thing there are no morals about
stealing even from friends.”







2 The Renviet |

The Lieutenant,
convict, is number three cn my
lists. I call him ex-convic: be-
cause when he was still a private
he served an li-month jail term
fo over-staying his leave by
seven hours.

who is an ex-





He i fanatical Russian pat-
rot, and broke with ‘Stalin and
deserted because he became con-
vinced that the Russian reople
re being ruined by men “who
eare nothing for the Russian

people.

spending a few holiday days down
here. This was Eric Worrell, son of
Canon W. E. Worrell.
met for about 5 years,
ted until about midnight.
polities, the army came up for dis-
cussion and I was saying “good
night”
the party stared. The new com-
ers were led by Shirley Smith,
younger. brother of Dr.
Smith, sons of
“Jimmy” Smith; Ted Haynes, son

big
money.”

ynada but was and leave us alone.

primitive and overcrowded.
hovels and barracks, men, women

ment
about this rule of vodka.

roam
wherever
have fought pitched battles with
crack
police.

chaotic
resistance against the régime it
might
a headache even greater
the

Army



We hadn't
so we chat-
Cricket,

when three cars arrived and

“Bunny”
Mr. and Mrs.
of Mr. and Mrs. Douglas Haynes,
who is studying Architecture;
“Bunny” Hope of St. Lawrence
now pursuing a pre-med course,
and Ralph Prescod doing work in
optemetry. Of course there were
ladies in the party, among them
Miss Iris Cozier, a sister of Mr.
E. L. Cozier and once again the
conversation swung for a_ time,
around to things Barbadian. Music
and refreshment appeared as if by
magic. and when I stole away at
4.30 things were not quite ended

This was the second time in two
deys, that I had mixed with some
Barbadians studying here. On the
previous night, the West Indies
Students’ Association sponsored a
Dance at the luxuriously appointed
Chateau Gardens and among
others I had run across Vere W>'-
kins, a nephew of Mr. James Mil!-
ington. studying Medicine at
Columbia University, and Mi~
Enid Marshall formerly on the ste ff
ef the Barbados Public Librarv
who is nearing the end of her
course in Commercial Administr»-
tion at the New York University

Winfield Pelew, of St. James, -r

Ola Combermerian hes taken bh’
â„¢ Se, at the Long Island Univer
‘itv, and Arnold Bovce. both
whom are medical students wv
alen anvion, and interested ‘no he
“hout their “Small island” hom*

Doing Well

I was especially delighted t
hear from the boys from Canad
that Dr. Bunny Smith was doing
quite well and making quite 4
name for himself. Working on the
staff of the Veterans Hospital, he
so impressed medical circles that
he was given an appointment on
the staff of one of Canada’s big-
gest hospitals. Now he has got a

scholarship which will enable him

to go to Europe in pursuit of fur-

ther study, and it is quite on the

ecards that we shall hear quite a
good deal of this old Harrisonian
in the not too distant future. If J

reed between the lines correctly.

we might even see him in the West
Indies on special duty

* * +

ON the bus a few mornings ago,
I saw a sign which réad this way:
“For Sale—the rear door of this
bus—very little used.” This was a
reminder to passengers that they
must uSe the rear door for leaving
the vehicle, as the front one was

chiefly for passengers getting into

ihe bus.
‘ * * *
WHY don’t you go in for building

and loan?” shouted an irate clerk
to a newcomer,

“Building and loan? What’s that
boy? I haven’t got any

“IT mean go out of this building
We are busy.

ila Girl

“They are only concerned wit!
spreading Communism over th
world, and they are doing it a
our expense,” he said. He we
born and brought up in the new
industrial area in the Urals
which he visited recently on
leave.

Inhabitants there, he said, are
foy the most part deportee
Men uprooted from their homes
in the Ukraine, the Baltic pro-
vinees, Rumania, the Crimea, or
one or the many other region
where Stalin considers the native
population unreliable.

Then there are the inmates c
the many forced labour camns-
efficers from the Soviet occupa-
tion army in Germany, fo
instance, who talked of the sv
periority of German industria!
methods. And there are the
thousands who have been re-
leased from these camps or have
escaped from them,

All of these people, said th
lieutenant, have undoubtedly
become demoralised by their ex-
periences. Appalling living con-
ditions in this industrial area de

the rest.

There is little food, housing is
In

and children are dying off daily
in thousands without any notice
being taken.

Vodka is the main factor in
life. There is no other amuse-
ment. Everyone drinks heavily,
from the miners in the coal
mines, where there are accidents
all the time, to the chiefs of the
party and the secret police.

Rule of Vodka

Said the lieutenant: “While 1
was home in Polovainka the
police chief of my town shot

dead two workers while he was
He was},

drunk in a restaurant,
sentenced to five years.

“In fact, that sentence would
mean death. For the inmates of
the labour camps are a law unto
themselves, and no police official
can survive among them.

“The party and the Govern-
authorities do nothing
Prob-
ably they think that alcohol is
the best way of preventing any
trouble here.”

Headache?

He may well be right. Already
today bands of escaped prisoners
the countryside pillaging
they please. They

troops of Stalin’s special

If turn this

organised

were to
fnarchy into

anyone

provide the Kremlin wth
than
desertions from the Red
in Germany.

—L.E.S.



Months Of —
Work Behind
Royal Tour |

By LOUIS WULFF

who, as a Court reporter, has
accompanied the British Royal
Fami.y on may overseas tours

Thc rew: that
Duke, of Edinburgh will undertake the tour

of Australia and New Zealand in place of the

King and Queen has meant much extra work
for officials both in Britain and in
longer itinerary, to begin with,

there.

|

But basically, the work of organisation will |
remain the same as if the King and Queen |
much
For organising
a Royal tour overseas involves a major effort
of planning that begins a year or more before |

had been undertaking the tour; and
will already have been done.

the Royal arrival.

In its complexity, its attention to the min- |
utest detail, and its exact timing over a period
of many weeks, involving journeys by road,
rail, air and sea, 4 Royal tour is an amazing
piece of organisation. Underlying everything, |
from the moment when the Prime-Minister
of the country to be visited sends the formal |

invitation to the Royal travellers in the name |
of his Government, until they return,
concept that all must go smoothly and with-
out hitch.

Because the Princess and the Duke are the
guests of the nation concerned, the
outlines of the tour,
detail of which places shall be visited, and

how long shall be spent at each, will be left |

to them to devise.



The one broad ‘principle

which the Princess will lay down is that she
and the Duke will want to see as much of

the country they are visiting as is possible |
in the time, and that as many people as possi- |

ble shall be given the chance to see them. |
During the Canadian tour, in 1939, for exam- |

ple, it is estimated that at least 70 per cent.

of the entire population saw King George |
and Queen Elizabeth at one point or another. |

THOUGHT FOR CHILDREN

One further point which will be stressed

by the Princess and her husband in this con- |

nection is that special consideration shall be
given throughout to children and ex-Service
men and women.

Naturally it is in the country concerned |

that the first draft of the Royal programme
is made. Once the dates of arrival and de-
parture from Britain have been approved, a
committee set up by the Prime Minister con-
cerned will begin to work with maps, time-
tables and schedules. This means sorting out
and balancing a host of claims and counter-
claims, dealing sometimes with local and in-
ter-State or inter-town rivalries.

Before any of the programme can be r¢
garded as settled, it will have to be seen an
examined by the Princess and the Duke. Thi
is no mere routine formality. Point by poin
town by town, engagement by engagemen‘
the Royal couple will go over the outlin«

proposals, probably with the chief organise”

appointed for the tour by the Governmen
concerned. In the present case, the plans wei

discussed at length on several occasions wit >

General Berryman, of Australia, and M:
‘| Harper of New Zealand, who travelled spe-
cially to London for the purpose.

THE QUESTION OF CLOTHES

Clothes form a separate and distinct prob-
lem for the Royal travellers. The Princes
will have planned and ordered her wardrobe
immediately she learned she and the Duk
would take the place of the King and Queer
Her,clothes will be adjusted so that they wil
be adequate for the number of fugetions t:
be attended, and yet not so large as to be un-
manageable in the stress of thousands 0'
miles of travel with repeated changes fron
ship to train, from train to car, from car to
aircraft, from . battleship Government
House, from Government House to hotel
For his part the Duke must include both nava!
uniforms and civilian attire.

Among the most important, and one of th
least realised, points about a Royal tour o!
this kind is that all expenses are borne b
the Government concerned with the sing]
exception of the aircraft and the ship whic!
will carry the Royal travellers out and back

to

these will be the responsibility of Britain. |

All the cars which the Princess and he:
husband will use in Australia and New Zea
land, for example, have been bought by th«
two Governments, and will remain their
property when the tour is over.

Similarly, it

to the Princess’s household travel
where on the tour with them.

Nothing, indeed, is left undone to make the |
and one that will re- ||

il

tour a successful one,
main in the memory of both hosts and guests
as an event long to be remembered.



Princess Elizabeth and the |

the |
Dominions to be visited. There will be a
although |
some modification may be necessary here and








is the;



broad |
as well as most of the!











is on members of the home |
security police that responsibility for the |
personal safety of the Royal visitors fall, |
though the plain clothes officers of the Metro- |
politan Police who are permanently attached |
every- |



FRIDAY, JANUARY 11, 1952





oe Annual Review

on sale at the

Advocate Stationery









“FLUNG SPRAY
—BLOWN SPUME”

The opening of the new
Racing Season calls for
perfection of boat and
gear. When overhauling
standing and running rig-
ging you can rely on
Pitcher’s ROPE and WIRE,
CANVAS and FITTINGS,
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FRIDAY, JANUARY 11, 1952

Mlectricity Shortage
tiampers Industry

@ from pace 1

He said that the company was
now considering the putting down
of one steam turbine engine, and
for future expansion, using diesels
during the peak hours. As con-
sumption moved up, they would
put down a second turbine.

It was a

xe very expensive pro-
position, and the company was
oo up plans to see exactly
what e

the capital cost would be.

'n the meantime this difficulty
urose sy
Capital
It was very doubtful, with the
present Bill which was passed in

the legislature in connection with
Public Utilities, if the company
would be able to raise any money
for the proposed capital outlay.
They had sounded out the posi-
Hon, and it Was very unlikely that
anybody in England would be
willing to supply fresh capital,
He had asked what the capital ex-
penditure would be in the future,
and they were getting out exact
figures.

In the meantime the company
had launched a_ protest against
certain clauses in the Bill, but the
matter was not settled. Until the

natter was settled the company
could not really go forward to
raise any capital, but they were

making all plans for the require-
ments in the future.

As far as he gould see, even if
the matter was successfully dis-
posed of from the point of view
of getting adjustments made to the
Bill the raising‘of the necessary
capital was not an easy matter. 4

When they spoke of raising
money in the Stock Exchange, he
saw the last prospectus which the
company issued and the informa-
tion which they had to give, and
he would assure the meeting that
he never had any conception of
what the company had to go
through to raise iresh capital.

“We in this island have to get
electric current Wherever the
money comes from,” Mr, Cuke
said “But whatever happens, I
do not see, even if we get these
present four engines running
right, that you could get any big
installation under two years, if
they did come in two years.

He counselled members not to




fo into the Public Utilities Bill
nee the matter was still sub-
judice, and was now before the
legal people in England.

Hon. Mr. Cuke said that the

company would have considerable
difficulty in raising fresh capital
in England if the Public Utilities
Bill did go through in its present
form. What would happen if it
was amended to meet certain con-
ditions was left to be seen, but the
capital would have to be raised
anyhow

No Excuse

He was not making any excuse
for the company. It was a fact
that the four engines have given
a certain amount of trouble, and
if they had worked quite well, the
company would have had time to
overhaul the old ones.

It was not quite fair to the com-
pany when the facts were known,
to say that they did not make pro-

vision for increasing the plant
capacity. It was not quite true to
say so. One could quite see the
Directors’ hesitancy in making
any public statement.

Everyone knew that a Public

Utility “tis a monopoly”. The Elec-
tric Company was not opposed to
the idea of having a Public Ser-
vice Commission, Nobody antici-
pated that the terms gontained in
the present Utilities Bill would
have been so stringent.

- Delay

Hon. K. R. Hunte enquired what
clauses of the Bill the company
had protested against, and opined
that the Electric Company, like
the Telephone Company, could
have sent out a Director to inter-
view the members of the legisla-
ture prior to the Bill being sent
down, and not wait until it had
been passed to protest against it.

Mr. Cuke replied that the point
had been put that the restrictions
imposed by the Bill would have
an adverse effect in the com-
pany’s raising capital in England.

Phenomenal
Mr, D, G. Leacock Jnr., thought
it a phenomenal occurrence for the
four engines to break down at one

time, and queried whether they
were properly inspected before
being sent out, and went on to
suy that before the war, Consult-
ing Engineers were called in to
inspect the plants during a
twenty-four’ or thirty-six-hour
trial run.
Criticism
Mr. D. Lucie-Smith who first

brought up the matter at a meet-
ing of the Council of the Chamber,
sais thac he did not bring the mat-

ter up in order to criticise the
Electric Company or the Govern-
ment. He was not interested in

politics, he said, He did not think
hat the company had acted 100
per cent, in the interest of the com-
munity and the people of Barba-
dos. They saw tiie demand for in-
creased current, yet there was no
equipment, or any attempt to raise
the capital locally.

He knew that about one million
dollars was rai in,the local
market by private companies
“What is the situation with which
we are faced?" Mr. Lucie-Smith
asked. “We are citizens of an
island in which we pay a lot of
taxes, and there is an agreement
between the Government and the
Electric Company as a public ser-
vice and we expect to get electric
current in a modern, civilized, up-
to-date place. If the Government
gives the company a monopoly,
both sides have a responsibility,
and it ig up to them to give the
public decent and reasonable ser-
vice, We are faced with the issue
of raising capital. There are people
out of work today; there are wire-
men lajd off because people can-
not wire houses, and there is a
large amount of equipment im-
ported hy firms, which cannot be
sold because there is no current.”





Industry Hampered



Government had passed a law
to assist local industry, but you
could not have local industry

without power. It would be hope-
less, he said, for anybody to set up
a new industry if they cannot gei
power, and he could foresee that
in this year many more people
would be out of work, He wanted
to consider ways and means of
getting the power because they
needed it. “The economy of the
island needs it,’ Mr, Lucie-Smith
said.

Mr. Lucie-Smith said had
great sympathy for the company,
but he really did not feel in his
heart of hearts that they were
very active in the interest of the
island. It was unfortunate that the
company was an English Com-
pany, and the Directors were not
living here.

Not Correct

Replying to these criticisms, Mr
Cuke said that from the point of
view of demand Mr. Lucie-Smith
was correct, but he was not quite
so correct in assuming that the
company could get electrical
equipment in England by just
orderjng it.

Survey Needed

Hon. Mr. Hunte said they were
in sericus trouble, and put for-
ward the suggestion that a survey
should be made of the island with
a view to finding out what help
the company could get from those
factories which had their owr
generating plants, He had under-
steod that Spring Hall had a 1400-
kilowat plant.

Mr. Cuke said that the state-
ment had been made that Spring
Hall had generating sets, and ex-
plained that it was not so easy
to tap current from one plant into
another

Mr. Hunte suggested further
that there were plants for trans-
forming current, and said that in
view of the fact that the Electric
Company could not get generating
plants for two years, or possibly
three, they should try to get some
transformers and go around to the
factory owners and get some of
their current for distribution

he



Mr, Bryden explained that he
had been informed by the staff
engineers of the company that a
transformer would cost in the
vicinity of £2,400, and would only
arrive about three months ahead
of a generating plant. All those
points had been gone into, when
some years ago another factory
offered to help the company.

Mr. Hunte said they did not feel
that the company was putting
every effort into solving the prob-
lem, and Mr. Lucie-Smith queried
whether they had approached
Government or Colonial Develop-
ment and Welfare for a loan.

Mr. Lucie-Smith argued that it
was a question of the bread and
butter of the people, many of
whom were out of work

Mr. W. A. Atkinson asked if all
the engines were working whether
the company could supply current
to the entire island, and expressed
the view that the company was
not looking sufficiently into the
future. He said that at least one
Director should have come to Bar-
bados, since even if new machin-
ery were ordered now, it would
be two or three years before more
current could be produced,

Mr. G, H. King was of opinion
that a Director should have come
out and let the public know what
was happening, and show that they
were taking a real interest. He
personally felt that they were not

sufficiently interested in whether
there was sufficient current in
Barbados or not.

Unfair

Mr. Cuke said that suci a criti-
cism V not quite fair, and as-
sured the meeting that he had
taken up the point with the Caner
iis



tors. He felt sire that after
explanation, they must appreciate
the fact that the company has

made every effort to have a power
plant. They had suffered the ter-
rible set back of which he had
spoken, fand which was beyond
their control, and secondly, that
they were actively making plar
for the future

Mr. Leacock asked if
could be raised locally, why
should they worry about the
Capital Issues Committee in Lon-
don, and Mr. Cuke replied that he
had spoken with the Directors,
and knowing their difficulties, he

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BARBADOS ADVOCATE
BUS

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Commander of

A.W.L. Station
Will Pay Visit

ARRIVING in Barbados on Sat
urday On board the H.M.S. SHEF-
FIELD which flies his flag, will be
Vice-Admiral Sir Willia
Andrewes, K.B.E.. C.B, D.S.O
Commander-in-Chief of the Ame -
ca—West Indies Station
ir William Andrewes took uy
office Commander-in-Chief or
October 15, 1951, in succession of
vice-Admiral Sir Richard Sym-
onds-Tayler, K.B.E., C.B., D.S.(

He was born on the 38rd Novem-
Lov, 1889, and went to sea in 1915
Midshipman in H.M.S. CAD



as

as a





ADA in the Grand Fleet and
present at the Battle of Jutlan
Atter this he served in vario
destroyers, and was in the Balt «
tn 1919 He specialised in To
pedots in 1923, and after vario
specialist appointments was aj
pointed as Fleet Torpedo Offic:
China Fleet, in 1930
Lieutenant Commander A
drewes was promoted to Cor
Pictured above ‘s the Austin Mulliner Motor Coach’ the property of the General Omnibus Co., Ltd., mander in 1932, and in 1934 pass
which, it is hoped, will replace the present type of bus now being used in Barbados. the Staff course. After his pron
Z “ ~—(Story on page 1) tion to Captain in 1938, he was a
ya ——— student at the Imperial Defen:«
rg ‘ e College in 1939
was not quite s symps .
‘ear eee Saem~—enets — PoOligeman Saved ove sien wines
be constructive, Mr Cuke said World War Captai Andre wes W
People in England were quarrel. in command of H.MS. ALBA
ling because they were not being on e ROSS, but left her in January
supplied with el! the current they ye T 1940, to become a member of t
wanted ° I om row nin Joint Planning Siaff in the Wa
Same In U.S.A. 33 pate ivbinet Offices in London Fren
Mr. A. S. Bryden said he had non re 1942 to 1943 Captain Andrewé
been informed by a gentleman P.C. 327 JONES, attached to the Speightstown Police commanded H.M.S. UGANDA in
jetine to do with Public Utili- Post, was saved from being drowned about 10.30 a.m. ves- i Atlantic ms an yee ee n
ies in America a at count asst . eee eR : ; ker , te 1@ invasion of Sicily, where he
Sel fo revs ‘ta Mg Sood terday while he was sea-bathing at a beach near Queen was mentioned in despatches. le

neck due to similar difficulties
Hon. Mr, Hunte said he realised

that the company could not get
new generators for about two
years, and suggested that two

officers should be sent to the Di-
rectors to tell them of the feeling
of the Chamber of Commerce and
to ask them whether they consider
it advisable to make a survey of
the present generators in Barba-
dos, and what could be done to
put them into service They want-
ed to see soineone come out to go
to the factories and see what could
be done.

Mr. Lucie-Smith was not satis-
filed that the Electric Company, as
such, was taking reasonable steps
to try and put the matter right.
If it were his own private business
and he had found himself in such
difficulties, he would seek out all
means possible to remedy it. Right
back from 1950 the Electric Com-
pany should have taken’ such
steps.

When Hon. Mr. Cuke again re-
ferred to Government's refusal to
give permission to the Company
to import a plant in 1942, Mr,
Leacock said that on one occasion
he happened to be interested in a
company which really wanted a
generating plant at the time, and
they were offered three or four
second hand 1,000-kilowat plants
which could have been shipped
within a month or two, He agreed
however, that the company would
hesitate to import reconditioned
second band plant except to tide
them over a difficulty







“a eport
Mr. Cuke gave the meeting the
assurance that he would prepare
a report of the discussion which
had taken place, emphasizing the
various points which had _ been
brought out both as regards second



hand machinery and the other
question which Mr. Hunte had
raised. Having prepared the re~-

port along those lines, he would
let members of the Chamber see
it, and send it on to the Directors
because he knew that they were
worried, and he knew it was not
true to say that they were just sit-
ting down in England doing no-

thing
The Future

Mr. DeL. inniss said it was time
one of the English Directors come

down to Barbados and make a
proper survey of things. He felt
that if that were done, things

would be better. He said it should
be pointed out to the Directors
that the Chamber of Commerce
“take a serious view, not of the
past, but of the immediate future.”
He said it was up to the Chamber
to make representation to the
Government, and asked what new

industry could be established
without electricity.

Mr, Inniss suggested that a
small committee sheuld be ap-

pointed to wait on the Governor,
and bring to his notice the serious-
ness of the situation. The Electric
Company was controlled from
London, and he felt that a scheme
should be put forward to the Gov-
ernment to press the Electric Com-
pany to try and do certain things
to tide them over the difficulties,

Committee
A committee was subsequently
appointed to meet and hold pre-
liminary discussions with a view
to taking the matter up with the
Governor Apes © a Corts
i vere Mr he weacock
Tee Bae K. R. Hunte, Mr. T. O
low Lucie-Smith and






Dowding; Mr. D
King

Mr. G. H

|
j

|
|
|



)





Street

Jones, who can swim, found the tide too hard for him
and was about 100 yards out to sea when Vin Richardson,
proprietor of the Astor Theatre, and Merlyn Babb, a young

shipwright, rescued him in a moses.

!so took part in the invasion of
Italy and for services in that oper
ation was made a Companion
the Distinguished Service Ord

In 1944 Captain Andrewes wa
appointed Chief Staff Officer to the

A little boy made the alarm Commander-in-Chief, Portsrmout!
C e 1 anes sous gee Kye be in diffi- for the administration of the
; Ser j culty in ichardson got oars i force: of the Norman
- wi P 4 vant from Sir Rupert Briercliffe’s yard faneitiae For ‘iin a ie x

Qualifies As *
Barrister

Mr. A. .T

rvant at‘ached

beat he

ped
Warner, a Civil
to the Emi-

‘
the



hegan to drift
men found it

moses

with it
very
back ashore

and along with Merlyn Babb, went
Jones
After Jones was taken up in the
said that when he
help was coming to him, he ct
fighting against the tide and !%«
The oars-
difficult to get

realised



op- oe

was graciously pleased to appo
aptain Andrewes to be a Co
mander of the Military Divisio:
the Most Excellent Order o
British Empire... From 194
to 1945 he was Chief of Staff
Vice-Admiral (Administratic
British Pacific Fleet and in 194



gration Department in Trini- 3ig waves, at times rising to was appointed in command of th
dad, is now on his way back heishts of eight_ and 10 feet, were aircraft catrier INDOMITABL}
home after alifying . , pounding the Speightstown coast He was Chief of Staff to the Com
rome alter qualifying as @ al yesterday. They were bulding mander-in-Chief, Portsmouth
barrister in England last year. as far as 100 yards out to sea 1947, and in the same year wa
He arrived here yesterday and gained in height as they came jpyointed Aide de Camp to H
morning on the Colombie in- ayes Scie Seach. neomsotnd Majesty the King. On 8th Janu
transit from the United King- mr. L, B. Waithe, District Scout °"Y, 1948, Captain Andrewes wa
dom. Commissioner of St. Peter, and promoted Rear-Admiral oye
He said that he went up to Mr. Sasil King, the, Secretary, to pointed Senior Naval Member «

England in September 1949, qual:-

and send

get in touch with some scouts of

Speightstown them

to

the Directing Staff of the Imperi

Defence College. In 1949 he wa

a a7 : erie < oe the Heywoods beach to warn made a Companion of the mo
1951 and was called to the Bar in xe cia ielaw ‘
November of the sz ha + pienickers that the tide is hard Honourable Order of the Bath
Sea 4 ath alle pod bere: ce tales along the Speightstown coast From 1950 to 1951 Rear
een aa i. whenever there are big waves. Admiral Andrewes commande
t aaate ene he wo at os Some of the pienickers persisted «he Fifth Cruiser Squadron anc
ime Assistant Secretary’ ofthe iy sathing was Second-in-Command, Fa)
West Indian Students’ Union in The breakers provided lots Of past Station, On the outbreak o
London. : fun for men and boys who were the Korean War he assumed com
He said that the Union serves “hulling’—a form of skiing To mand of the British, Common
to bring together for social and the contrary, they were hazards wealth, French and Dutch ship
ati fg ~ . ° , eTe Z ’ °
educational — purposes, students for fishermen who Peat at taking part. Later his commanc
from all parts of the West Indiés moses to tender fishing boats wh also included’ some 80° ships 0

and added that it is also actively
concerned with any problem
which West Indians have to face

for

they returned to the Speightstown
mooring with catches of fish

One difficulty the fishermen

For thes
Andrewe:
was knighted by His Majesty thi

the United States Navy.
services Rear-Admiral




like accommodation, ete. was to get me se ato wees King, and was awarded the Silv«
The Union enjoys full recognition into the gee ' age there was the Star by the President of the Uni «
from the Colgnial Office. It played waves and en atarit julating back {States
an important part in bringing Ce tne tbe aden with fish On Ist December, 1950, Rea
about settlements recently in a ated the boats being over- Admiral Andrewes was promot
dispute between the British Coun- fe at in the surf to Viee-Admiral
cil and Colonial students n ithe “pullers” made their jumps During the course of hi
The basis for amicable settle- into the sea from the Challenor’s vice Vice-Admiral Andrewes r¢
ments and the general improve- jetty and swam out distances tO coived the Greek Military Cros
ment of conditions for students, be brought back ashore by the (1943) and the American Legic
was agreed upon at a meeting held waves while they lay with their of Merit (1944)
last August between the then chests on broad pieces of board Captain Muchael Bverard, R.N
Secretary of State for the Colonies, Picnic Party has been Commander of th



Mr. James Griffiths, and various
students’ unions.









Hundreds of picnickers from St

H.M.S. SHEFFIELD for over a ye



Josepn spent yesterday at Hey- After spending two years at th
Mr. Warner said that the Union woods Trees, the most popular Admiralty as Naval Assistant t
is also actively interested in all bathing beach of Speightsfown. the Admiral Commanding Re
matters Caribbean, but is non- Music, dancing, seabathing and jeryes, Captain Everard assum
partisan in politics feasting made their day an €N- Gommand of the H.M.S. SHEF
ret yoy aie One ‘ many FIELD, on December 15, 1950 a:
About 26 buses, just as re - : be 9 - ¢
Car Runs Off Road histo cars and also lorries filled Comms ioned net aS aay —"
with the eae pulled Prt {
SHORTLY after 4.50 p.m. yes- Heywoods arounc a.m. and lef oe 5 ran COC
teraay the motor car M 2658 in the eee It ae oe St 33 Le ave Jn.
driven by Michael Eastmond of Joseph's Chureh excursion eo .
Cleaver's Hill, St. Joseph, ran off Some of the vehicles wert Colombie
Colleton Road St Peter, and parked among the trees and on an
struck a wall on the side af that open piece of grass land on the The French passenger = sh
pond. Maser Me ni , "other side of the road while 4 sen8 Colombie arrived here yesterda
ad, ; ses ¢ or- .
‘ line of motor cars, buses anc : with 59 passengers from Englar
Aubrey Edwards, an occupant aw . je of
. * ries vias drawn up at the side , J f
of the car was taken to the Gen- ii ae Meares Sy Oe anne te nate hoard
eral Hospital and detained A polleeman was.on duty trying win peeve ee
J A policeman wi Wee Og her here and she left port yeste
incepta to maintain a rts bah oo a es day evening for Trinidad Ss
CIVIL SERVICE fic but ere hae arte aetecl will also be making calls at |!
r r and venice . G a, Curacao and Cartuge
y 10 "4" > ‘ s resulte juaira, Curacao i
COMMISSION SET UP ran iocks rosiled tho’ Colmble_ icons
1 es : . § ‘ssrs. R Jones & Cr
KINGSTON, J’ca., Jan, 10. jitterbug shirts of &azzling colours Messt I
A Public ervice Commission gnq@ women wearing slacks ore CARGO OF FLOUR
free from Government or politi- p and down Speightstown having A thousand sacks of wheat
cal influence has just been set g jook around. Quite a number | 97 bags of cornmeal and
up to make recommendations 1o went into St. Peter’s Church for drums of pork arrived here fr«
appoint civil servants ‘. the first time. G ‘ ‘ he U.S. yesterday by the ale
Its Chairman i Charl The “No Tresspassers § sign re teamship Liberville.
Rudolph Campbell, Privy Cour Heywoods seemed to as or ‘ jh The Liberville also brought 5.
cillor Another member is Dr. gentle reminder to picnickers —i"" vundle: of headings, 2,000 bund
Thomas Taylor, Principal of ‘he they must first be oven ee , Of headings and a small suppl;
West Indian University ane on ae they can camp amony linseed of], She is consig-
. € rees



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PAGE SIX



CLASSIFIE

TELEPHONE 2508.





























































PUMLIC NOTICES |

NOTICE |

ISH OF ST. JAMES



D ADS,

P













































































































BARBADOS ADVOCATE



FRIDAY, JAN





PUBLIC SALES FOK RENT

HOUSES

WANTED





4
REAL ESTATE




































































































ee — Sinner mien eesine HELP
DIED I hereby give Notice that as 13 persons | : _ | APARTMENT—Very comfortable Apart-
" | FOR SAI E have been nominated as fit and proper| ALLEYNE VILLE--Hastings cn the sea | ments Hastings, near Aquatic Club sganese app
See oO : s ; w 4 persons to serv n the Vestry for the | side next to Royal Hotel, for inspection | coptainins one room or two rooms EXPERIENCED LADY STENO-TYPIST
A nm 4 ue : 7 : t Parish of St. James for the year 1952,| appiy on premises. For all information, | furnished ot unfurnished each room| Apply: Alleyne Arthur & Co, Ltd., Office
General Hosp Berkeley mou and as only 10 pefsons are required by | please contact West 17 Blue with aie ater Inspection High Stregt 5.1.52--t f.1
\ r | - O51 tant Pt 4 V ning “ 2 $) ’ D) + sg pt § 2 ’
Davis, eldest sou of the late Wallac AUTOMOTIVE law, I will hold a poll at the Vestry | 41 aeauthtment. Fe aa, :
Bedford D His funeral lea hiv | Room, St. James, next Monday the 14th | —— ‘ ia a ed A. E. Taylor’ 4 a i a
late residence, Pavilion Road, Rank| -———— ay of January, 1968 between the h bend : . " — A. E. Taylor's Ltd OFFKE CLERK—During Crop, office
H. 4 n. tedan for the West. | CAR—One Austin (A-40 Devon) sound | 97%, 9). {iy ie es a we ROCKLEY NEW ROAD—Newly built Dial 4100. clerk, previous experience an advantage
all, at 4.30 p.r day fo : of 8 a.m. and 4.00 p.m nwdern stone b i : 5 oY s ae
bury Cemetery. No cards. Friends are | condition. Going for $1500.00 or just -_ e bungalow with built-in 10.1.52—4n | Apply: Manager, Lower Estate Factory
Dy - . ¢ oards. ary a 4
invited. 2 ' vuder. Phone 4512, Garage opposite Fire a. 8 baat or on ds, Standing on approx. 16,000) -———- 9.1.52—Tn
Frederick B. Davis, Clatadelie A. | Brigade, Coleridge Street 9.1.52—3n a1 s2—4n a. t. land. Entire house built on large BUNCALOW—One Furnished Bungalow
Pavis, Harold E, Davis, Seibert O i one three bedrooms all to| at Goral Sands, Worthing, to an approved CLERK—Junior Office Clerk, appky in
Davis, Vera F. Davis. 11.1,52 1947 Hudson Sedan 14,000 miles. Excel- onda st, specious bathroom etc., kitchen, | tendnt. For particulars apply on premises| person R. M. JONES & COMPANY
lent condition and just right for Tourist NOTICE Saene Ene Evie Sees Wie Ween er © oe eee eT a tn, | TED. 11.1.59—7n
es lal Trade. PARISH OF ST. PETER vier Rolf , rrespondin| St TT
IN MEMORIAM 1938 Chrysler Royal going cheap could] 1 HEREBY GIVE NOTICE to all persons ee aide tien cet saggy
eacliy Ge made Into 6 pick-up. Fort] qual6ds te Vien Bt the Bisttion of Mem- | Swyante: foce, beth and folles, sarees) FEAT One i) Sees beat ae.
- ——- ——e= | Royal Garage Ltd Telephone 4504. | bers of the Vestry for the Parish of St. | oe yo unary e tor large hobby room| furnished at Abergeldie, Dayrells Road.
SKERTE—In lovire memory of our deat 9.1.52-6n| Peter that } have appointed the Parish | )/aunary, Dial.4235, Mr. EB. C. Field.
mother Dorothy Stcete who died 1it is Room, Speightstown as the place where | (sundays) 2005 wi eee Phone 8481 210.1,52—Tn
January, 1950 ELECTRICAL all such persons may meet on Monday, | ~ > . Week-days 8 a4 Dim, | et
aaa Ir emories tive 7“ us ; January Ith 1982, between the hours 6.1.52—5n * ae cea oP to
ay and the da, she passed awa enna a ae > _m,. mm. ber, 1e st January, ruary, |. May,
dod took her home it was his will FLUORESCENT FITTINGS: Just re-}2! &%.m. and 4 p.m. to elect ten Members| RiLBROOK—A dwelling house bullt| June, July. Apply Mrs L. Weatherhead
G to serve the Parish of St. Peter in the . 3 pply
But in our hearts she'liveth still ceived, Single and Twin 20 watt, 2 ft;| yestry for the ensuing year. pertly of stone and partly of wood com-| C/o J. N. Harryman & Co.
Eurie Moore, Doreen All e ghter ingle and twin 40 watt, 4 ft. and twin 40 G. Ss. CORBIN, | Prising an open verandah, drawing and 11.1.52—4n
11,1.52--11 J watt 2ft. types _Dial 3878 DaCosta & Parochial Treasurer | soiles’ aan Gans e eel kitchen, -
o, Ltd. Electrical Department 8.1 52—4n a! , Standing on Acres 2 rOR RENT OR LEASE
ern i eee | OCR TE Pete ian Oe ari Bt Top Rock, ROOSEVELT—Maxwell Coast Road.
Police Notices ‘ . N Ic ae ee > dtd of the late| Fully furnished including ae
DEEP FREEZE—One _ second hand OT darth, decease Telephone, Rediffusion. Good sea-bathing
RESTCOLD Deep Freeze in good work- PARISH OF ST. PETER The above will be set up for sale by| Available ist March. Phone 2224. ‘
g condition Apply Hastings mene | I HEREBY GIVE NOTICE, that more competition at our office, James 9.1.52t.f.n
Lid 11.1.52—6n I than ten persons having been nominated on Friday the 13th January 1952, | ccc RT
IMPORTANT - 'to serve as Vestrymen for the Parish of | @! 2 p.m. For inspection apply on the NOTICE
. LIVESTOCK j St. Peter of the ensuing year, that a | premises any day between the hours of - ®
Renewal of Firearm Licences us poll will be taken on January 14th 1952, | a.m. and 4 p.m. For further particulars | {S HEREBY GIVEN that it is the in-
Owners of Firearms are hereb; SALE wo Riding Doreen | ere me Been Fe 8 Sik. is Spam te @ COM TCHINSON & BANPIEL of the Pu Ue et Gate Ciotee and Saint
ors earms a iereb: E ° ing Horses. | 2 IDs S i1INSON N Dd e Parishes 0
reminded that under Section 5 0 3668 11.1.52-—an | Sheriff, Foish fn Fuled. 5.1.52—5n Thowas at this jatena to, cause “fo be
the Firearms 1896—4 + 6.1.8—40. | -—— - introduced into the Legislature of s
licences are 1 by the MECHANICAL | | (2 Barbados Ges Co, L9., with islan® 2 Bilt authorising the said Com- |
= ie: acerue a 2 s .
15th January, 1952. TYPEWRIT= ie Oly Portabl NOTICE December 1951 } 14 Increase the salary of the coeiiian |
All expiring licences must br Peete? dete ibadale "rise 4140.00, PARISH OF ST. JOSEPM | 250 (£1) Barbados Shiping & Trading | of Highways of the said Parishes
roduced at the time of renewa yur inspériion of these su eee machines | leet GIVE NOTICE that as i} Co., Ltd. with dividend accur- | to a sum not exceeding £500 per|
bp hel he Pea sae. 5 es yo a ~ D 7 Hn Candidates have been nominated as fit ing at 3ist January 1952 annum, and
for cancellation by the Police invited - G8 a en and proper persons to represent the $1 Sharés Rights Barbados Shipping tb¥ Increase the travelling allowance
pping
(Sed.) R. T. MICHELIN, 1.1,52—In.—e.0.4- | Vestry for the Parish of St. Joseph for & Trading Co., Ltd of the said Inspector to a sum not
‘ommissioner of Police a the year 1952 and as only ten are re-) The Ww € t up for sale by} exceeding £100 per annum,
Police H wd ; shane ee : MISCELLANEOUS quired by law I will hold « Poll at the| Public Competition at our Office James| The said increases to have effect from
olice Headquarters, witfebattinete sacl Vestry Room over the Dispensary next | street, Bridgetown, on Friday lith Jan-| the Ist day of April, 1951. |
Bridgetown, Barbados, : '$—Torchlig Monday, the 14th day of January, 1952, | uary instant at 2 p,m Dated this 8th day of January, 1952. |
Dated 10th January, 1952. ts each. Penlight Batteries 12 cenis| between the hours of 8 a.m. and 4 p.m, | YEARWOOD & BOYCE CARRINGTON & SEALY,
1} | 52—2n.] sch. Fresh Stock. G. W. Hutchinsor Bs Bh Pe oe ee || Solicitors } Boubibors.
Co, Ltd., Broad Street. Dial 42: Sheri | 6.1.52—8n 10.1.52—3n
9.1. 82--8n 8.1.52—4n pia eicapioliiclacs eat |
asthenia dct iaiadben sii liionean SHARES & BONDS—The undersigned
RENEWAL OF PETROLEUM EUCRYL DENTURE POWDER to NOTICE will offer for sale at their office No 7. ANNOUNCEMENTS
LICENCES uke the wearing of false truth a com- PARISH OF 8ST. LUCY Hig Street Bridgetown, on Friday, the
ACE : rt, 1/9 per tin. Knights Ltd. 1 HERDS ive NOTICE thatas 24|iith January, at 2 p.m. the OHO WH | |
7 en ERE S i naa” toni “a ”
Persons licensed to sell, stor 9.1.52—3n | persons have been nominated as fit and | eerie a ‘ceed a OL ADEOES + a ie
73 > vey er nt ~ _ _ -~— ~— _—— prope . serve in the Vestry fo sa Jarbade Prhnmen ers are P mf a |
and keep Volatile Petroleum at CANE CARTS—5-6 ton Heavy duty prope Pe ar se fier fe a year 1053, | _ Bonds | Gladioli and Dahlias for delivery in)
hereby reminded that under pai th pneumatic tyres and over-rur ; a ‘in : . = 2%—Shares Barbados Ice Co. Limited.| December 1952, parties interested in|
- . se end as only 10 persons are required by | 60 B'd * ‘ J
graphs 5 and 7 of the Regulation akes. Courtesy Garage. Dial 4616 : law. L will hold a poll at the Vestry | “ eae goa ae | booking please phone 4442, if “—
made under the Petroleum Ac! 8.1,52--f | Room, St. Lucy, next Monday, the 14th) fila, Pn eee | ee oe SOAS Ayes
1882-2, licence wre renewable b 500R M ATS_Fibré Door Mate 1 1 28, of January 1952, between the hours | es a By a" Trading. Co.
2-2, licences ¢ able b, Dox MATS—Fibr , Mats o ados ppl é ;
the 15th January, 1952, veral sizes and designs. Unbeatable} * © “™ "El SP" Griperry, COTTLE, CATFORD & CO TAKE NOTICE
R. T, MICHELIN ices. G. W, Hutchinson & Co. Ltd Sheriff bis, ORD & i ents
Commblédione® af Police | TOA Street. Dak SE. 9.1.52—3n Dc Pm 9.1.52—2n SPLENDOR «with ingredients of Vicks VapoRub
i hinahlapeaesinias , is Sa eS
Police Headquarters, TLIZER DISTRIBUTOR — Massey | iach SHARES FOR SALE pune iiibass r conan creme
Bridgetown, Barbados, rris. Courtesy Garage. Dial 4616. NOTICE | 775 (£1) Barbados Gas Co. Ltd. with | Ong existing under the laws of the king- |
Dated Wth Januury, 1952 8.1.52—6n Applications for the vacant Hawley’s | dividend accrued aot 318t] Gam of The Netherlands, whose trad* or|
rar ae ee eee ee | Annuity will be received by the Clerk | December 1951 business address is St. Anndstreat 198, |
11.1,52-——2a GRASS RAKES—12 wide, Heavy duty} of the Vestry up to 12 o'clock noon on £1) (Old Issue)) Barbados Ship-| Nijmegen, The Netherlands, has applied
ores nstruction. Courtesy Garage, Dial 4616.{ Saturday the 12th January, 1952 ping and Trading Co., Ltd..! .) the registration of a trade mark in
8 1.52-6n_] Applicants must be widows, of the} with dividend accruing at|{°" "he registration oF *espect of electric S I OMAC YH
‘ -—_____— ain nner : t- | gist January, 1952 r of Register in respec
TAKE NOTICE parish of St. Michael, who are in strait- | ist a lighting installations, apparatus, articles;
MANU SPREADERS— Massey-larris, | ened circumstances. | 31. Share Rights (new Issue) Barbados 4 4 ta a. oc
IANURE SPREAL @ | : 4 : and@â„¢ materials, particularly electric in-
e duty. Ideal for applying Megasse, Forms of application can be obtained | Shipping & Trading Co.. Ltd ctadaseent lainpé, fArshlight lamp upse. Ss
- mud or pen manure. Dial] from the Vestry Clerk's Office ‘ | 180 as ados a Insurance Co. p discharge lamps fluorescent lamps |
irtesy Garage 8.1,52—6n E. C, REDMAN, The above will be set up for sale by | jercury-va cae : 1; :
: -vapour lamps, sodium lamps, .
a Clerk, St. Michael's Vestry iblic Competition at our Office James | eon jam . 5 Atti When the stomach is upset
Pp 5 . — : : ad al dl i amps, lighting urnaments,, fittings, is upse
ROSAS eee Sree y Sotane, Hades Cie Bae ee Friday 1th) bulbs, reflectors, light shades, auxiliar/ as a result of hyperacidity, a
“ws 2 n oa 1 & ir - = e ae .
‘ VE 7 . paratus exclusively destined for use| dose of De itt’s Antacid
- itthias Gap, land side, furniture, bed BARWOOD & BOYCE, [ower ree er oman Ge t
That PETROLEUM MARKETING COM anata” oat NEARS, Aik) onl NOTICE wg Solichors, | im the electric lighting fleld such as | Powder will disperse the pain
PANY (West Jnudies) LIMITED, a Cor cieae At a meeting of the Governing Body of 11.1.52—in | choke-coils, condensers, transformers, and distress right awa
y orgar t the laws of Crea ul 7 i " ; resistances, ignition switches, safet'- | ‘y-
piny orga a oun e in Cr 10.1 2n| the Lodge School held on January 9th, societies Tin inate cia | ‘ Flatulence, heartburn and in-
Britain, whore trade or business addres 19582, Mr. T, L. Farmer of the Firm of | « aa _ | fuses and automatic installations for safc ‘ € . a ny
eG : : ‘ . —— — — . STEWARTVILLE"—A_ bungalow sit ding, and will be entitled to register digestion are some of the
ig 22 Greot St. Helen's, London, F ¢ SROMOL MOTH RINGS with D.D.T ,| Messrs. Yearwood & Boyce, has been ap-| uate at Rockley, Christ Church, standing | Sint as th from the! e :
England. M-rchants, has applied, for 1 NOMoths and. larvae, 1/- per pk_| pointed to the part-time post of Secretary | on 13,198 square feet of land extending Stes eae eit Jamuary, 468b, eh el symptoms that this excess of
registration of m trade mark in Part “A nights Ltd 9.1,52—Gn, | 2nd Treasurer of the School. from the Public Road to the sea ae ee Thall in the seantine give notice} acid in the stomach can brin,
eee ree mary at —$—$— $$ — Signed, . The house contains drawing and dining | POT! Toate to me at my office of inits train. De Witt's Anta
Tate to red ‘Ga Sark eer OF TANKS—Galv, Tanks 200 gallon. The W. A. FARMER, rooms, 3 bedrooms, kitchen etc. electric- | Gpposition of such registration, The Powder soon neutralises the
titled to regist t ame after . . Headmaster it na oa writ ter installed. Ser- Ppo: : :
month from the {th day of Janua neral Agency Co., B’dos Ltd., 14 High H160—16 | Vince donee A Yar aie ae ltrade mark can be seen on application acid and at the same time
1952, unless some petson shall in tt es 5.1.52-—-Gn. st peed eit tindaient ae he a vith. the |2t ny_office. other ingredients in the well-
fiaantime give notice in duplicate to 1 + Inspection by appointment with the |" pated this 28th day of December, 1951. Talkiagt Taeiavin acotiie. eal
at my office of opposition of such re; VICKS COUGH SYRUP-—Medicates as undersigned H. W#LLIAMS, ja ormula soothe an
. . penetrates into areas ordinary Cough The property will be set up for sale rar of Trade Marke otect the delicate stomach
tration. Ths trade mark can be seen ¢ Registra pT
craiine at iny Oee ; medies do not reach. 2 sizes, Knights by Public Competition at our Office | 10.1.52—3n ining. Get a supply right
“PBnted thig 3ist day of December, 195) 1 9.1.52—3n James Street, Bridgetown, on Friday) away ’
me ‘Fey fth instant, at 2 pan P
H. WILLIAMS FORTRIS e a
. YEARWOOD & BOYCE PIGS . Contents.
nies | TAKE NOTICE Hise.) TAKE NOTICE t soz
” peewee ABRAC AUCTION s AR BRAN D Ve
TAKE NOTICE That A. BOAKE, ROBERTS & COM- bob duos 4 S
PANY LIMITED,

That PETROLEUM MARKETING COM
LIMITED, a Com

PANY (West Indies)









a British Company,
whose trade or business address is 100
Carpenters Road, Stratford, London, Eng-
lond, has applied for the registration of a
trade mark in Part “A” of Register in
respect of chemical substances used in
manufactures, photography, or philoso-
phical research, and anti-corrosives; sub-
stances used as food or as ingredients in
food; flavouring essences for beverages,
fruit extracts, essential oils, and will be
entitled to register the same after one
month from the 9th day of Januany,
1952, unless some person shall in the
meantime give notice in duplicate to me

|
|
|













pany organised under the laws of Great | my office of 0} sition of each regis- | Whose trade or business address is King-
Britain, wees trade or business address Aes The oo aie can be are ston Works, Dansom Lane, Hull, England,
is 22 Great St. Helen's, London, 3. | application at my office Manufacturers, has applied for the reg’

England, Merchants, has applied for the | "Dated this 3ist day of December, 1951.' tration of @ trade merk in Part A” of



















registration of a trade mark in Part H. WILLEAMS Register in respect of pharmaceutical and
of Register in respect of gases in liquid | Registrar of Trade Marks. | medicinal preparations, and will be en-
solid or gaseous form, and will be ei- | 9.1.52—3n. | titled to register the same after one
titled to register the same after one, month from the §th day of January,
month from the 9th day of January, 1952, unless some person shall in the
1052, unless some person eho! » th TAKE NOTICE meantime give notice in dupligate to me
meantime give notice in dv oiicat: . at at my office of opposition of such regis-
at my office of oppositi sch regis | tration. The trade mark can be seen on
tration. Th» trade mark be seen oF application at my office

application at my offic Dated this 31st day of December,





December, 1951. |





Dated this 31st day of Ti WILLE
1 WILLIAMS | Registrar of Trade
Registrar of Trade Marks 9.1.5
9.1,52—3n ee sentineatemniiiie
—



TAKE NOTICE

Ae








eh

IPD



; jin the County of Laneaster, England,
LIMITED CHO Aah i cpgptaperd| Glass Manufacturers, has applied for the
trade oF business nddregs is 20 Soho | '°#stration of a trade mark m Part “A”
Square, London, W,, England, Manu i Register in respect of flat and con
facturers, has applied for the registration tructional glass generally, for example = :
of a trade mark in Part “A” of Registe late glass, sheet glass, rolled glass, Duar i
in respect of canned fich, and will be athedral glass and ornamental glass; That J. & W. NICHOLSON & ce
enticed to regicter the same after or | | articles of glass and crystal, and] LIMITED, a British Limited Liabttit
month from the 10th day of January, | * iI} be entitled to register the same after | Company, whose trade or — busines
1982, unless gore person shall in tl | th from the 10th day of January, Jaddress is Distillery, 195 Saint Jot a |
meantime give notice in duplic | unless some person shall in the] Street, Clerkenwell, London, E.C.)
me at my office of opposition Lie ntime give notice in duplicate to] England, Disti!ters and Wine and Spi
regist: ation, The trade mar n t at mr office of Opposition of such [ Merehants, has applied for the register
seen on appliention at my tration. The tradem ark can be seen] tion of a trade mark in Part «
Dated this 28th day of Der 195 1 apt tion at my office Register in respect of wines and spirit
: s H. We Dated this 28th day of December, 1951. { and will be entitled to register the sam >
Registrar of Trade Mar H. WHLIAMS after one month from the 10th day of
10,1, 52—3r Registrar of Trade Marks January, 1952, unless some person shall



ORIENTAL
SOUVENIRS

SILKS, CURTOS, ARTS
VENDEMOS, SEDAS,
JOYERIAS Y ARTISTICAS
CURIOSIDADES, TRAIDOS
DE LA INDIA CHINA e

EJIPTO

THANI’S

Pr. Wm. Hry. St. Dial 3466







TAKE NOTIC







That PILKINGTON BROTHERS i N {i
(MITED, a company incorporated under Js a | LUSH Fe i
he laws of Great Britain, whose trade as -
business address is 277/283 Martins
rank Building, Water Street, Liverpool 2,

1
t

|
|
|
|







10.1.52—3n.}; the meantime give notice in dupticat
to me at my office of opposition of suc.
registration. The trade mark can t

seen on application at my office,
Dated this 28th day of December, 195)
H. WEBLIAMS,
Registrar of Trade Marks
10.1 62-31

Advertise in the
Advocate
For Results...

GOVERNMENT NOTICE







Attention is drawn to the Control of Prices (Defence) (Amend-
rent) Order, 1952, which will be published in the Official Gazette of
Yhursday, 10th January, 1952.

2. Under this Order the maximum wholesale and retail selling
prices of “Flour” and “Rice—All Qualities” are as follows: —

WHOLESALE PRICE ; RETAIL PRICE





















tists stp OOS SCOTS ARTICLE (not more than) (not more than)
: ‘ ‘ Of,
% , veumsey S| Flour i . | $8.86 per cotton bag of
; ART CLASSES 100 Ibs. 10c. per Ib.
- are Rice——All Qualities . | $18.90 per bag of
vient eae 180 Ibs. 10c, per pint
NACHOUMOFF
mu x 10th January, 1952. 11.1,52—1n
of Paris,“who is now %|—= —
sa tidae Lt SSE SS | SPO POPE PO
$ exhibiting his work at ¥| y Reeser
% the Museum, is willing ¢ ) ’ ?
3s ogi 2 8 .
to give instruction to a | DANCING CLASSES * A MODERN BATH ROOM
limited ~_number of }} % isa necessity and with an.
upils in drawing and §& Cath Cineten a ® ... ALL- -
Pp Pp Sine Sle a % olub will c rife oh the sith x LAIN GEYSER a warm or
painting in oils and &| § : ;

Nile ; 3. “Ol January. % hot bdth is obtainable in a
watercolours at his || rs aCe matter of minutes MORN-
studio, SA) sgt URSON .0rt ie TOF, % ING, NOON, or NIGHT . . §

St. Leonard’s House | ; g See them ~
. ’ % | Classes are being formed for ane <
St. Leonard’s Avenue. } oom Dancing and Keep Fit % x
, sata! % || sii i % At Your Gas Showroom, and x
Telephone 3085 ¥ 1) Ter Teather % book one to-day from our x
4.1,52—Tn. % } : a S next shipment. 3

> (tl >
9G00999594990000000000, ee Cesonescessseneeeseneee®
















The undersignéd will set up for sale

it Public Auction approximately 1500
Barbados Shipping & Trading © Share
Rights on Friday next the lith Jan- POW D E R
sy OE ARRINGTON & SEALY saliorahe ger
y, . ’ ;
Limeetetrett. i Soothes Stomach Relieves Pain

10,1.52—2n |

@ For use away from home—





|
|





UNDER THE IVORY HAMMER & Prompt cist De WITS
[Dy tratrostions seepived + wih ane . @ Easily carried ANTACID
on Friday January 11th (1) 1980 Hillman +? Cell-sealed TABLETS
* er iDarhaneistt accidentr, Sale! | > ees i 24 Tablets
VINCENT GRIFFITH, conomy Size, 60 Tablets

Auctioneer

Bite an |. That A. BOAKE, ROBERTS & COM-

"ANY LIMITED,

a British Company,

whose trade or business address is 100
Carpenters Road, Stratford, London, Eng-
lend, has applied for the registration of a
trade mark in Part “A" of Register in
| espect of flavouring essences for articles



TAKE NOTICE
GREETINGS.

WE take this opportunity to wish

our Friends, Patrons and ail

BARBADOS a happy 1952,

RAYMOND JORDAN, Laundry,

Bay St., Opp. Combermere Street.
29.12.51—t.f.n.

of food, and colourings for articles of
food, (the said colourings becoming in use
ingredients In the articles of food);
flavouring essences for beverages, fruit
xtracts, ilavouring essences alcoholic;
essential oils,




fine chemicals for use in
the manufacture of perfumeny and soap,
paraldehyde, thymol, menthol, acetic
seid, and alcohol substitutes, all being
chemical substances







prepared for use
rhedicine and pharmacy and will
be entitled to register the same after
| cone month from the 9th day of January,
1g unless some person shall in
ihe meantime give notice in duplicate
+) me at my office of opposition of such
egistration. The trade mark can be seen
application at my office.
Dated this 31st day of December, 1951.
H. WILLEAMS
Registrar of Trade Marks,
9.1.52—3n.

ae ROYAL BARBADOS
YACHT CLUB

NOTICE
A COCK AIL DANCE

In Honour of
the visit of Vice Admiral
SIR WILLIAM ANDREWS,
K.B.E., C.B., D.S.O.,
Commander-in-Chief of
America and West Indies





|
| That PILKINGTON BROTHERS
LIMSTED, a company incorporated unde:

| laws of Great Britain, whose trade
|< business address is 277/283 Martins
jin the County



ank Building, Water Stréet, Liverpool 2,
of Lancaster, England,
ilass Manufacturers, has applied for the
registration of a trade mark in Part “A”™



‘Gums Bleed?










i Register in respect of flat_and con Station
\ctructional glass generally, ({6F example and the
| plate glass, sheet glagk, pol Blass, Bleeding Gums, Sore Mouth and Captain and Officers of
cathedral glass and ornamental glass; and Loose Teeth mean that you may H.M.S. “SHEFFIELD”
jerticles of § and erystal, and will pe have Py ea, Trench Mouth or AVL SD

hutled to register the same after one! perhaps some bad disease that will will be held on
onth from the Wth day of January sooner or later cause your teeth to SATURDAY 12th January.
1962, unless gome person shall in tho| fall out and may also cause Rheu-

1952
Dancing from 7.00 p.m.
to 10.00 pm.
T. BRUCE LEWIS,

matism and Heart Trouble, Amosan
sto) gum bleeding the first day,
ends, sore mouth and quickly tight-
ens the teeth. Iron clad guarantee
Amosan must make your mouth wel!

meantime give notice in duplicate to me

t m office of opposition of such
| vegistration. The trade mark can be seer
een on application at mi office

Dated this 28th day of December, 195 back
: r and save your teeth or money ba Secretary.
H, WILLIAMS on return of empty package. Get 6.1.52 3
| Registrar of Trade Amosan from your chemist today -1.92-—on,



t

The cuarantee protects you



BIEL

Ideal for

intimate







&








personal

use

rOET TG

MODERN ANTISEPTIC

) Lor ?
FOR TH
PICTURE OF

DR. SLOAN

2

nM
Oe aeiiks THE



Rerregt any tygeeye
ladbsinrniinh lad lash alas idea J



PLeasant AND GENTLE
Dors Nort Strain





PLLLELEESSFOS IPP SESE,

T0-DAY'S NEWS FLASH

Dropor ant AND RerresHiING

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>
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[AND BOOK OF OLD POTTERY 9
and PORCELAIN MARKS OPPS PO PSO SSG G9 OOS 99OG9 DDD POPOO IDF OPP IAFF PIII,
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TIONERY containing terms used » °
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SHIPPING













SOUTHBOUND Sails Sails Arrives Sails
Halifax Boston Barbados Barbados
“LADY RODNEY" Deer 31 Deer 1 Jany 11 Jan
“LADY NELSON” . . Jany 14 Jany. 23 Jany 2 Jany.
“CANADIAN CRUISER” +. 28 Jany - 6 Feby. 7 Feby.
| “LADY RODNEY" ‘ -.13 Feby. 15 Feby. 24 Feby. 25 Feby.
“LADY NELSON” 26 ++27 Feby. 29 Feby. 9 March 10 March
“CANADIAN CRUISER” ..14 March. - 23 March 24 March
NORTHBOUND Sails Arrives Arrives Arrives
Boston St. John Halifax
“CAN. CRUISER” 7 Jany _ 14 Jany. 17 Jany.
‘LADY RODNEY” 23 Jany 2 Feby. 3 Feby. G Feby.
“LADY NELSON" y. 7 Feby. 16 Feby. 17 Feby. 20 Feby
“CAN. CRUISER” -20 Feby. 21 Feby. _ 28 Feby. 1 March
| “LADY RODNEY" +. 8 March 9 Mareh 20 Mareh 21 March 24 March
} “LADY NELSON” .-22 March 24 March 3 April 4 April 7 April
“CAN. CRUISER” -. 4 April 7 April - 14 April 17 April
}
} For further particulars, apply to—
°

GARDINER AUSTIN co.,

LTD.—Agerts.

FRENCH LINE
Cie Gle Lransatlantique

Sailings to ‘Southampton

STEAMSHIP ©O.

| SAILING FROM EUROPE
| M.S. AGAMEMNON—17th January 1952
S$. COTTICA—25th January, 1952
8. STENTORN—14th February, 1952°
SAILING TO PLYMOUTH AND
| AMSTERDAM
M 8. ORANJESTAD—29th January,

s
M

1952
SAILING TO PARAMARIBO AND and France
| sie. eonatDGNe ait Seuuaey,, 1988 on Se ie
; souery, . Martinique and Guadeloupe
M 8. AGAMEMNON—30th January 1952. 7 -
| SAILING TO TRINIDAD, PARAMARIBO “COLOMBIE,” 2ist Janu-
Ins. RONAIRE—14th, Foon alg : aa peers
MS. — anuary, F “ a
$8. COTTICA—1ith February, 1952. COLOMBIE,” 2nd March,
SAILING TO TRINIDAD AND 1952.
CURACAO “COLOMBIE,” 13th April,
| M.S. STENTOR—2éth Februany, 1952 1952.
8. FP, MUSBON, SON @ CO. a
gen| a
South-Bound and Cruise.
SSF BOVSPOCOBGSOTIOVSSOO” . ‘
peret % Calling at: Trinidad, La
' en tay WARenie wilt % Guaira, 2 as Carta-
% accept Cargo and Passengers for s gena, Jamaica.
Dominica, Antigua, Montserrat, “COLOMBIE,” 10th January.
|@ Nevis and St. Kitts, Sailing 1952
ty cer tee om “COLOMBIE,” 20th Feby.
| The M/V “DAERWOOD" will 1952,
| accept Cargo and Passengers for “COLOMBIE,” 2nd April,
% St. Lucia, St. Vincent, Grenada, 1952
| and Aruba. Date of sailing to ae ¢
3 be notified. Accepting Passengers —



Cargo — Mail.

R. M. JONES & Co.
Ltd.— Agents.

B.W.I. SCHOONER
OWNERS ASSOC. INC.

Tele. 4047.

{

%

1g

ARY 11, 1952

NOTICES
Canadian National Steamships

ROYAL NETHERLANDS «(S223





Ve



PLANTATIONS BUILDING, LOWER BROAD STREET
Passenger Sales Agents for:
Trans-Canada Airlines, B.O.A.C. and B.W.1.A.
ALCOA STEAMSHIP COMPANY
Telephone No. 4466











REALTORS LIMITED.



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REAL ESTATE AGENTS,

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BUILDING CONTRACTORS.
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SUITS.

Marked Expertness
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e

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|
ROWERT THOM LIMITED










FRIDAY, JANUARY 11, 1952



BARBADOS ADVOCATE PAGE SEVEN’ “











HENRY









Ca +*
BY CARL ANDERSON x They i.
Y CARL ANDERSON % Here They Are 3 <<
R r SWEET CORN” x
x BAKED BEANS x
% CARDEN PEAS 3
% » SPAGHETTI & CHEESE %
| 2 MACARONI & CHEESE %
1% MINCED BEEF with CEREAL &
1 SAUSAGES e

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6 e | x GRAPES °
x PEARS >
PEACHES »
APRICOTS
PINEAPPLES

Bots. TABLE SALT

‘+ ce SAUCE
x WOR SAUCE
BACON per Ib

ee
STUART & SAMPSON
OBTAINABLE AT ALL LEADING STORES | a a

LLL
6

aap Weems TRY THESE FAMOUS PARTY AiDS We liam jt
Sov: )(ows)}/ ey , a “<5 Received %
ma ee 4 CHEESELETS |

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1% Weat, Digestive %

(HRITAIN’S HEST BISCUITS) |



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Fr THUR
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tis F Wes WE FOLLOWED YOU ALL THE WAY FROM THE FAR SIDE ,
OF "IS TUNNEL. YOUD BETTER SURRENDER, OR WELL KILL You/ ) _



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Usually NOW Usually Now
SMEDLEY'S PEAS, (Tins) 49 45 Pkgs. P. FREAN BISCUITS 36
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ANNUAL REVIEW |

> IT'S COMING FROM... <
THE PLANE.’ BUT... h
THEY'2E... DEAD! gE ni a
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4 eee

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BRINGING UP FATHEh





PLE EFF PEPE FFF FF FFF SPF FSF SPL GE LFF PELL D ILO LOLA OID

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TELL HIM TO TAKE 1 DIDN'T MEAN FOR 3
A GENTLEMAN | | A SEAT AND MAKE HIM TO MAKE HIM- 3
1S CALLING | | HIMSELF COMFORT. SELF THAT; 8
TO SEE YOU- ABLE - I HAVE SOME COMFORTABLE / ry R
MP... JIGGS - LETTERS TO SIGN: - . %
HE'S WAITING TLL SEE HIM IN ~
OUTSIDE - TWO MINUTES - R
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agazine Seller
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Z| | EERE RG
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) Spices and Assorted Deligitts



H to Choose from











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{i} 1 oz. tin Saxa Spices Pkgs. Bisto for Gravies, Soups,
i a » Nutmeg Pies or Puddings
d ‘ »* » Currie
THE PHANTOM BY LEE FALK & RAY MOORES jj) =» » % Sumie ais welll
; rae aa s Bae Na Dar a ea ei ee ee ee he ea cla » Cinnamon » Morton's Sweet Chow Chow
| [IWANTAFULL SAFARI” BUT y i JUNGLES F EN TUL TE NHED PENDS D Tve 4 I » Morton's Picoalill "
P i + ain rare | i'M ( FE TT ~ Bots. Savora Flavoured Mustard » Crosse & Blackwell's Branston
THIS IS ECT UNEXPLORED }= 1 ‘ { s
HIS IS THE WILDE : ai re a A | cK RE LIKE THATS Wow! Hi » Colman’s French Mustard une
BP ae ias eh met nec M NOT 2 ee : a { » Morton's Anchovy Sauce » Pure Honey
ITS MADNESS FORYOU 2 GOIN | hay wart a yy i} » Morton's Dried Sage » Bee-Nut Spread
TOGO.IN ALONE! js Ae, ( MINUTE. }'% »)) ., Morton's Currie Powder » Holbrook’s Punch (Pickle)
oe) fC / i <1 | fo Le {i » Dried Mixed Herbs ,, Robertson's Ginger Marmalade
"29 | \4 ype ' Blackwell's Celery
¢ de \' \ te i a an . P 4 @@ [Tins (Small) Koo Tomato Paste
at ( 7 j )) Tins Oxo Cubes Bots. Crosse & Blackwell's Anchovy
4 jc ~~} ¥ ii} Paste
| | \ r ) Pkgs. Shirriff's Lemon Pie Fieling
iat | : i) ot Fillets AIP 1" >
re | i F { Tins Crosse & Blackwell's Red oe teers, , A 'y NI AR | HUR \ ( () | td
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% ar 4 ? , Dutch Sour-Sweet Spiced
m j \ Tins Cremola (Lemonade) Crystals Gherkins “YOUR GROCERS” — High Street. a}
| 4 Ky
4
4
:


PAGE EIGHT



BARBADOS ADVOCATE FRIDAY, JANUARY 11, 195
Saprteslc caine settee ne num neninssianiesinsieiniiessinaitecsineattai na

W.I. Beat Tasmania By 10 Wkts. ~“ :
Ferguson Bags : a : “Whee Who In The “B” And



















IN FOR LUNCH ee 99 | eeene . S ~ S ee ae t yeas
WW ; C Classes herself an Ranger. ;
Six ickets By Our Yachting Correspondent “C” Class

From HAROLD DALE
SYDNEY, Jan. 11.

Davidson of Tasmania was the only batsman to offer ans
opposition to the West Indies today at Launceston, and
his 71 saved them from -eomplete collapse. With their
opponents all out for 120, the West Indies scored 22 with-
out loss to win by 10 wickets.
Willy Ferguson had a_ bright-

OWEN BURKE'S Resolute is returning to the water this ae toe ag. =~ Mig eee a
season after a rest last year. Resolute skippered by Ham- sailed for the first time last yea
mond Burke, is expected to sail in the first Regatta of the Built in 1950 but did not race that
Royal Barbados Yacht Club which takes place on Saturday year. Repainted and recondition«
afternoon. for this season’s races.

The season promises to be interesting although many bt Senet crt eee
yacht owners did not enter their boats on time. The veter- be making her debut this seasor
ans predict strong winds and heavy seas for the better part
of the season.

r

i looks in good trim. Should
give a good performance. j



day and took six for 45 i‘ Thirteen boa.s are expected tc, Harold McChelery and of course C2 Scamp. Owned. and skip-

News of the invalids is that V I Racin On sail in the “B” Class. They are as “Pucks.” pered by Leonard Archer. A boat
Walcott has recovered from the eRe / £ follows:— . B481 Fantasy. Owned and of the Lightning Class which made
effects of a displaced disc in his

B4 Hi Ho. This boat was for-






































































































1 i skippered by Vice Commodore her debut in 1950. Does not give
spine. He, Weekes, and Worrell ¢ I ‘ 1 B merly owned by the late Father Teddy Hoad. A veteran of the ood a performance as hex
1” p- rac e Hopkins who sailed it in the “C” Star Class and in its time has won “ister, Rogue.
Class. It dominated all other boats many prizes. Practically rebuilt fou C8 Peggy Nan. Another Sea- i
THE standard of racing in the =) that lass and therefore had this season’s races and is expected 8ull. Owned by W. Alston who i
West Indies as seen by Mr. Frank : arranted 8 promo.ion, It has to give an improved performance. ® out of the island. O j
Durr, First Jockey for the Duke bo oot competing for the last B482 Circe. Did not sail las. one spent five years
of Norfolk Stables, is on the up- "hie sa ; season as her owner Dr. J.W.P Trinidad.
ie and is on a par with stand- 2 ae was bought by Frank Harkness was constantly out of s 9 Folly. Owned by Lester
ards which obtain in India and ce 9 who will skipper her the island. Another veteran of the Toppin but sailed by hi on, Als«
South Africa, where Mr. Durr has ulm elt. His crew will be Dr. Mal- Star Class but once spent many 4 Seagull. Formerly named C ‘
ridden on previous occasions. olm Proverbs and William Good- vears in Trinidad. Has new tim- Cll Magwin, Owned lit
man. Frank has _ reconditioned pers, beams and new top boaras to Bellamy and skippered last year 1
.nis view was expressed by Mr. Hi Ho and he is hoping shortly to strengthen her. May not be ready William Atkinson. Yet anothe:
Durr in an interview with tne * equip her with new sails. for the first race as Dr. Harkness Veteran Seagull
Advocate yesterday Mr, Durr oes Bl Gipsy. Owned by Lester js awaiting a new spar. C10 Gannet. A Seagull owne:
hat rw Bi Trestrail in the 4 Toppin and skippered by Watchie : id skippered by Peter Ince. H
Christmas Meeting held recently + Burke, this is one of the scraten 2%13 Ranger. Owned and skip- been repainted and reconditione
i Port-of-Spain, Trinidad. It i & boa‘s of this Class. She has vee pered by Stanley Cheeseman. for this year’s ra
Mr. Durr’s first visit to the West repainted and is in good trin A year. Gives a good all-round per- C7 Rogue. A yacht of tt
Ir.dies, and when he leaves Bar- years ago it was fitted wiih tr ey e in medium and light Lightning Cla Owned a
kados next Thursday, he will visit C. SMITH (not out 60) and K. Walcott (not ont 5) returning to the ‘yj 5 v suit of Ratsey sails. winds, skippered by ld Nicholl
; a a f et pavilion for the luncheon interval 9 ; ‘ . . "i . y reralt Nicholl
Jamaica prior to returning to in yesterday's play in the final cricket trial game. Mr. Keith Walcott’s team had then scored 84 runs B.2 Resolute. Returns this Bie Wizard. Owned and skip- Competition is ee keen be
Hnglend in late February or early for the loss of two wickets in their first innings in reply to Mr. Farmer's XI score of 330 runs. season after taking a rest last vear.[pered by Jim Jones. Was also tween herself and Gannet
March BVO, OER MOUS, SNC Ca UN UR i
Mr, Durr told the Advocate that “ ~ ott 5. Smith reached his 50 after ‘he averneee, coe in’ some cisrclasliRe ee eT
he has been riding for the past ten * eing at the wicket for 55 min- 't was felt that she should have
years, and during the last two Smit cores ites and hit six fours, won the Trophy, Hammond Burke
easons in England, he has been K After the luncheon interval will be at the helm. Last year
under contract with the Duke of Lawless bowling leg spinners Hammond too decided to take a
- Sa le Norfolk who owns one of largest : as e bowled to Smith who took a rest but eventually he found him- ‘
W., FERGUSON. stable ight eoaand. , In Crie ‘a el ria ngle in the second ball. Waleott self going out ‘three times in
: ; matt J cut the fifth ball for four, When Moyra Blair and also on four o.her &
should | all be available for the He has had about 325 rides his score was 12 Walcott played occasions. Hammond’s crew will @ |
Fifth Test. The only remaining, during his ten years in the game. over a ball from King and was be brother Vincent Burke, and
doubt is Marshall's leg strain, and Pome ss more bom 30 . 43 A chanceless 99 scored by C. Smith of Harrison College bowled. “Fellow” Marshall.
SOAMANLA Shh PaReree cds So ee ee ana he batting for Mr. Keith Walcott’s team in their first inning Atkinson Lbw. B3 War Cloud. Owned and Guarantee A Perfect FIT
Morrisby bp. Jones 4 in practically all the big handicaps was the highlight of yesterday’s play the second day inthe — Erie Atkinson joined Smith cee a peadiey: “er ,
t t n b Ferguson ¢ eee . —— : ; s ‘ : a S por @ ne, . ene ; 2 may ne 2 § , p
Pte wares, P «) in England, including the Derby final cricket trial game which is being played at Kensington a Sine’ ? ba wee i tone ca a the ae by to every SHAPE.
Javideon b Ferguso | ? 3 Ste aw Sb zs se > Qieaes 2. a os Ys ‘J , @ single, nga Ss moment was '?: dé he § : ar
ir See ae cate bh Forsieo: ean the Ascot Stake 5 over 2% Oval. Smith hit 14 fours and took 170 minutes is making bowling with more accuracy and ently Jack still seems annoyed
Sst Cullen ere ; miles, and last season rode a sec- his 99 which was crisp from beginning to end, speed and checked Smith for « Over some incident which occurred
Cowley b Ferguson 4 -“— an the Compe enecshins t He drove, cut and forced away Holder tilled the breach and he time. Atkinson pulled a_ bali Ivst year. e
st AA ape ° S Pereiaoe Ms i Me ws a Poe ett the ball in good style but was most opened his account by hitting a from Lawiess to the legside for War Cloud is one of the
plose c Valentine b Ferguso as avery > two-year- severe with the pace bowlers, At ball from King for six. The three to put the 100 in 90 min- ; :
Alexander not out 4 a : i “ . sat a rom ing for a six, he iree to pu 1¢ in 90 mir maliest boats in this Class
Maddos did not bat » Chestnut colt called Olympic the luncheon interval he was un- score was now 320, The next over utes, Atkinson was given out leg eae the “BP Trophy . cae pe: We have
Extra: 3 which he rates as about the third defeated with 60 runs and at no Bowen who was brought on ia before to King for four runs in , a pate p 9 ra as
fade tap) PeSt. two-year-old in England. time did he look perturbed. place of Smith beat Holder with King’s ninth over, — years. It ee eet yee
0 12 , Ae ge aha strong breeses. Jack save. thé +r
i Mr. Durr had a word of praise ats . what seemed a good length ley Scoreboard. read 102—4—4. & ‘ mg breezes, ack says that done it in
Ferguson 6 for 45, Valentine 2 for 40, for Mr, Wolley Smyth the trainer ‘ Mr, Farmer’s XI who had scored j,k but Holder stepped out and Grant of Combermere followed he will be pleasure cruising during
. > ce . < sre 287 s > s of > — si oir 1 X the earlier par ; > See
Jones 1 for oF Sac for the Duke of Norfolk. There 87 runs for the los ix wick- Hit the next bali for a single, Atkinson and played out the re- eres ties _DOFy af the season bu
Guill ot ee are about 52 horses at the Stables, ate gt the end of play on the first eine the other batsman had three mainder of King's over. Grant â„¢#y race later in order to qualify the PAST
uillen not out ' . ay arrie aj score 3° +h atsmaé - 6 : . g . . Rr wnac Rare a ,
At & out ‘ and these are trained by Mr. if a eet ee cane ative 7° runs to his credit and was look- started off with a single. At 138 for the een Race. He nas his
Folai(tor no. wkt 2 =Smyth was #iven bythe E aoe a . : like settling down. Holder was Grant stretching forward to the SY& on the coveted Frontenac
2 : i. ee be alee Hi a we a arm ¢ eve waett ati is bowled by Bowen wiih fourth ball of Norman Marshall's Trophy.’ He will be launching We can
Local Racing cree are gee at the score at 325, Holder made 12, first over.edged and was caught !@ter_this month,
ones up with the bowling figures Pace bowler Rudder went in and by Frank King at second slip B5 Mischiet. This is owned by a ‘ ll
Asked how local racing com- 28 overs, six maidens, 77 runs, «.,. nd the reme : ren’s Grant scored 10. ~* John Toppin but will be skippered o it a
° . ‘ Caesar Brion Goes pares with what he has seen in a ander mie ie ‘amuvee, | over. An appeal for leg before by et by his son Stanton, Another
3 N Cetiee Dh con Mr. os wate a8 pune © two wiekets 10" Bowen for King was upheld by Smith Out At 99 ee ¥ is pines ag vag the TIME
A ‘ nought it was as good as could be ‘* iS. Umpire MeComic this jbringing _ R. Lawless went in and joined ter of Gipsy. Formerly keen racing | *
Up s+ otch found anywhere else, He said the At the end of play Mr. Keith Mr. Farmer's XI first innings to a Smith but when his score was W285 witnessed between herself,
ST. LOUIS, Missouri, Jan, 10 local jockeys were very good, COM wrajcott's team had replied with close, The total score was 330. 99 Smith was given out leg be- Gipsy and Shamrock. The latter |
The Argentine heavyweight sidering that they never served 82 196 runs for the loss of eigiit Mr. Walcoti’s XI Bat fore. He made his 99 in 170 min- ®0w in Venezuela, has been re-} e@ q
] ‘aesar Brion, moyed up a noteh apprenteemy. aie, Te wickets, Pace bowler Frank King At 2.30 p.m. Smith of Harrison oer At 99 he played out three painted and reconditioned. |
Fae e Ee ag served, would help to i * took three wickets for 56 1s, College ; < of Spartan Maiden overs from Norman Mar- — B6 Fiirt. Formerly owned by
or two in the challengers’ ranks, their judgment of place, one of the ing was Se en ae ee a and A; Aticing: of Spart " shall before he attempted to puil P. Brannum t later boug by!
o Kin t . 70 > ; r 2 I to pu B nur but er bought
after hammering out a unanimous \ory j sayit enmmantiote ng was not too impressive a¥ opened the innings for Mr. Keit! i r
10-round decision over the pre- ¢ Un RGraD! Seem cet the early stage but after lunch Walcott XI. The first over was ‘Pe ball on the leg side. Dr, Kinch, its present owner, Was p MAFFEI & O LTD
’ : Despite the disadvantage of not jing pow! th venom an Se , fing f Branker filled the breach and one of the boats involved in the . . . .
viously unbeaten Wesbury Bascom cory; ‘ ; -enticesht Mr ig bowled with venom and ac ent down by F. King from the ~ e >
ae at Louis Tilinols, last vee 7 oa or * - curacy. The wicket was as on the screen end. Atkins hit the first ae a scoring was soon collision at the start of ihe race for } T |
as - Louis, nese urr thought tha e local jock- first day of play—easy and giving ball to mid-on for a brace, King’s *.°¥C*: The score was 166 for the Frontenac Cup last year. It is To Scorers i ilori
oats serie d . , ~. : * mn sy § ' , ré ace, 3 nd ae : " — "| in ‘aliorin
night. eys anticipated extremely well po help to the pacers but King t over did not worry the bats- 5!* wickets. A rising ball g fairly new boat but was very Pp g i
Bascom’s supporters believed when at the gates. got one or two to rise sudden} 1en who were getting well over £T°™ eae Lawless and he unfortunate last season. Prince Wm Henry Street }
; . ; otire riffi ¥ a s i: 2, , . }
; that a change of tactics led to the ~~ yr. Durr said that the Officials, ° 5 the ball, At the other end Rudder’s ore ad Pal ra thi Re ian _B7 Moyra Blair. Owned by
; downfall of the hard-punching starters . ade The Play first over conceded eight runs, ; 7 1e received from Commodore J. H. Wilkinson and
: Starters and everybody had made - entthy “savanna y nical ; King was given out leg before. skippe : ane Ba " ———— SSS SSS
negro who sustained his first de- jim more than comfortable, and hii at), - i a SU COVER Grove nicely for fout oe a. Ya ee \; skippered by his son Tom. Moyra FSS
Wh lay start terd \ 5 Play ended with the t 19 ’
feat in 14 professional fights. Bas- je was very b to ride : 7 a ED Diay started yesterday Le 1s in this over. King also came ‘ 1 the score at 186 was formerly one of the old “A
ree oe 5 F 1@ was very happy to ride among fieiza and Lawless continued the in for > s} satme: , runs for the loss of eight wick- ana te oil Lig Gater-« *
com, 180 pounds, previously had g nice bunch of boys. He has been first innings of Mr. F eS or some rough treatment in ets Class boats. She won the first three
arte Teast , : z ° be : es r, Farmer's Xi. his second over. Smith glided his **S- races in the “B” Class last season.
mployed a hit and run attack, se § . , 7 re OS ne : a ith glided his ~"*, oo & races in th 3 ass last season D.
aes Soe gen his cupement ae, imcganned, mies prpaaens. th re aomee wes gf ae pPePeiza first bal] for four runs and drove The scores Alvo repainted and reconditioned. oes your Roo need {
; a ; s e fron rrison the als > ary ; sei
and firing punches year to take part in the next College Spehiag batsman Sua he a tenga te oe Tay eran ee a iw clee Seen — ig Ss Pi L 7 7 |
1 sl a ‘“ ate Netia tee , oe —_—, tr se > is the ) 5 aylor c (w.k. Griffith) t ered by George Stoute, ascal 1s
Bascom’s style was just what Christmas Meeting at Trinidad. | played out an over. King of Em , aihineoa ” nes : 12 ae sister ae Flirt She hives a ainting
Brion apparent! inted. When Racing in the West Indies is pire was brought on at the oth: Atkins Run Out C. Hunte retired 82 “all , vartormente 4 {
appé y we definitely on the up-grade,” Mr. to t awless wh tkis tent, G- Proverbs run out 33 good all-round performance in Ty 14 ; ; (
the fight ended, Bascom’s face was Pee. ee ; end to bowl to Lawless who hai Atkins was also comfortable W, ‘Farmer retired 9 spite of being one of the smaller Then BOWRANITE it—and forget it. )
suffy and his left eye completely Durr said, “Each year owners are not scored and in his second ball against Rudder At 40 skipper N. Marshall c Bowen b H. King 7 boats of the Class a f ae )
‘ y fore the fight, on was getting a better type of animal, the batsmen ran a run for a leg Farmer brought on Holder of ©. Williams b H. King o oats of the Class. _ For the best protection against '
closed. Before the fight, Brion waS nq for that reason local jockeys bye, DePei le , Oe Wh lands an > : N. Lucas ¢ King b Smith 33 B9 Okapi. Repainted and re- Rust and Corrosion use ‘
heavy 1 é s al) 3 ye, DePeiza pulled the next ba!) Empire in place of Rudder to bowl x ; ve ,
ranked seventh among heavy~- ight be taugt k + 4 : ae aos . See ; De Peiza b H. King 16 conditioned at Burke’s Beach.|})! {
: ' latest !musht taught to take part in tor four arid took a single off the and in his first over conceded two C. Lawless ¢ Smith b H. King 6 ; }
weight contenders in the lates feat ata ha ad hic! fth. The : ead * dl ‘ set Rta a J Rae ‘ King 6 Owned by Mrs. J. D. Chandler }
z M: ” standings. Bas- longer distanced races, which iifth, The 300 mark was reached runs, Smith and Atkins getting,a ¥. King Lb.w. b Bowen 1 all be ? a. en }
ig aeted t th t th > mag- would enable them to use their after 15 minutes of play and th ingle each, At the other end A: Holder b Bowen x Sey a ne re as reaay
com was ra re aah fe) . eet judgment more, There are two first maiden was sent down by “Boogles” Williams tossed down ~ * Maes a 1 Pirsig es = the - alan ;
azine among = light-heav} many short sprints, Mr, Durr H, King to Lawles When the an over which yielded 7 runs and ; lass boats and shows exceile
ence Lg the crown of Joey , nined score had reached 309 Lawless in in this over Atkins was ai out Total 330 ae very os ~~ Cpeer na
ape altel trying to pull the fourth ball of after he tried to take a “cheeky” . gn o for ica g DE Hon and Mrs. J. D. Chandler -
cnn King’s 25th over gave Smith a ian. Atkins made 19. Harrison for 1614 for 210, 8 for 210, ght. LN A Tee se ERA a NRE
im . eatch to end his stay. He mad lowed and wa bowled by 7 for 287. 8 for 3¢ or 312, 10 for 325. w. Rranker not out 5
WEATHER REPORT 15 hosen 6. This over was another maiden Holder before he could score, BOWLING ANALYSt8 get aie Grigth bw. b King 2 dime Warthest sc: eaete Longeat
sent down by King Frank Kine Scoreboard now read 57—2—0, rf . ; MYER NOL OU 2
B. Bie ad § 2—0. F. Atkinson 9) eet tras a . si ane :
: joined DePeiza’ who was then 16, Walcott the next batsman opened 4 Darker 22210 «8 eee | One Gallon will cover 700—1,000 sq. feet.
YESTERDAY aan olan a oe Shortly after DePeiza was bowlé is scoring with a single from } King oP Total (for 8 wkts.) 196 | Stocked in RED, GREY, BLACK
he seco da he al by King, Holder but S$ >eme. ve Bowen a 2 fo ~ ee) i rums and tins of Imperial Measure
Rainfall from Codrington: nil | cricket trial game at Kensington, turbed. eines “y comin aa Bigrent ’ 39 _ Pall of wickets—1 for $4, 2 for 54, 8 for ne cok peri Meee
Total Rainfall for month to the Barbados Cricket Selectors gain ‘with the score at 80 to © Smith Ree ee team ee ae cee i
date: .01 in. chose 15 players from which the | Walcott. Walcott got over an in- MR. K. WALCOTT'S XI BOWLING ANaLvele n Ww r }
Highest Temperature: 83.5 °F. Barbados XI will be taken + 9 r swinger = ae ngy & Atkins run out 19 Oo. M A ) ‘ ({
Lowest Temperature: 70.0 °F. play Jamaica in the first Inter- W hat son Today i a a nia, This wee Oa x arr ae Ho er ney * - Suda 4 1 ot f & rT) 4 . ))
: ‘lac at ; ost ” a . . ’ ‘ My fe £ as e a son olde Rudder ) } a
Wind Velocity: 8 miles per colonial Cricket Tournament at Court of Grand Sessions (Mur t over before lunch and the &- Waleott b F. King 12 A. Holder 8 31 1 | i
hour llensington, der case)—10.00 a.m ctal was 84 for the loss a ae fF. Atkinson |L.b.w. b F. King 4 Cc. Lawles 7 : 24 et PHONE 4456 — Agents. 4)
Barometer: (9 a.m.) 30.040, The 15 players are W. A, Farmey : mahes vickets with Smith 60 a 1 Wake Peete tied ‘hurt. + SN. Mase i ey % ~ | y
(3 p.m.) 29.946 Capt. (Police), E. Atkinson | Court of Appeal and Police ; , GAG. WARE Fav nee TeHres Hurt : Williams . |\3 SSS SSS a
(Wanderers), H,. Barker (Em- Courts—10.00 a.m. —————————— = . ews a=) | —— — ))
TO-DAY aap See! nee \ = : FASE ] j
pire); K. Bowen (Spartan) Cc. Police Band plays at District ii | |
Sunrise: 6.11 a.m. DePeiza (B.C.L.) E, Grant (Com- “B” Station—7.45 p.m. i \ | When V acationin (
Sunset; 6.51 p.m. " aera A. nner eaeere c, British Council film shows | | g
unte mmpire . ing tt J \
Moon: First Quarter, January aN F King’ (Cratiaencaey M vil Poli show ; ‘ | | ® : "
4 pire), , g Y : obile Cinema show at Law F \ n th ® ibbean }
; N Marshall (Wanderers), G. ming's Pasture, St. Josep) 1\i1 1 e ar {
Lighting: 6.00 p.m. Proverbs (Wanderers), C, Smith --8 pm : ; ||
High Tide: 3.47 a.m,, 2.22 p.m. Le ta) . A ae a xs soeigen erent macaasnionsatt ».
’ (Harrison College); A, M. Te : ‘

Low Tide: 8.46 a.m., 9.46 p.m. (Pickwick), and C. B. Williams

(Carlton).







L They i Do it Every ‘ime Rratoned U1 Ptet Omen By I ae Hie do |

Maoe in ENGLAND












A ( WONDERFUL PARTY, EFFIE «BUT ry (OH,NO™HA-HA- Mal
RS. TREMBLECHIN WHY WON'T YOU LET US HELP ( pare NOTHING TO IT.
| WOULDN'T THINK OF STRAIGHTEN UP MANY HANDS, t ane THINK OF
} LETTING THE GUE YOU KNOWâ„¢AT LEAST LET TITS JUST A BREEZE!
1 00 ANY POST-PARTY iT US ORy THE DISHES - wy ear WHIP THROUGH IT
















CHORES >-- ar THE MORNING ++



Just to remind you that
your favourites have
ence again arrived with
new styles and shades
predominating.

i

+ aa ital

and on visiting Barbados, an. excel-

Pat lent port of call is the Custom Tailor-




ing and Menswear Store on Bolton

I WAS NEV [care ; J t $768 & $7.89

ALL MY LIFE-UH-USE STEEL



of class












WOOL ON THE POTS AND FANS Lane. You will most likely find here, {
AND WASH THE GLASSES IN, } : eal ee 4)
SUDSOâ„¢WRAP THE LEFTOVERS i all your Tropical and Sportswear {
IN WAX PAPER=OO0H~ 4, \ 2 ; }
IM MUST ABOUT Dead i needs — certainly unsurpassed in } |
CAVE SHEPHERD & CO, UD. | 0) 6p Seo 4
) :
12 & 13 Broad Street Ni ¢q. BR. Rice & Co. :
i)
\K ri
NW Merchant Tailors








PAGE 1

PACI I'OIR IIAKR.WOS ADVOI \IF FRIDAY JAM \KY l,\RR\TX)S1a*Al)''()(*ll I 1 --— f -i PtftasaS b> -tir Mw.'xu t in tw-..< st. nm nuti I t :.l..\ I.Illl! ir\ II. 1952 ELECTRICITY Barbados i 1911. There %  lime. In 1961 there %  in with a brand within 5 miles %  %  %  rfaote island. For i, no dividend ireholdere i>;.' .i:.t four yeai> 100,000 in DM Ith increased demands : • %  : %  %  I I proving Island tor the %  ii il A Cuke, :. i | i . II.IHT of Hie took Ihi J nit* his • I %  that the Oompany wae tin' Ignorant of 1 today because ol tha I in nipply all I tj demanded. I On the %  k as 1043 the no %  cpansion I cent for parmlaalon retort whan Uui permission : '.i th) n Gow nad on behalf of the and in Januai H i e sen! mi. The Company placed orden lor four i II Ivad m 1947. all given i rets not %  the C impart) would hi i able to nipplj i tandi and would i).' in a health) poail : tad with plans lor expansion, it was quite unfair, %  ii-' II A Cuke, to aav th a the done ribthlni to the intei i the pa (i' ol Bai badoi met witi a eert I unfortunate accidanta, he said, and its preaeftl plans foi expansion wan I • Id Up i l l r of the clauses in tinPublic Utilities' Act (1951) was frightening away new capital on Hie London Slock Exchai Many members ol the Bai I ..i c in meni %  %  i that 'he not considering tininterests of the pi : | and Mr. I> ( I 1.. %  ,. man, *nji had iful in its public !• Mi LUCU %  -Smith wanted tO know whether capital could not be stricter! electricity supply would lead to unemployment and would prevenl the expansion of local Indu td there %  i wing mud at the 11 %  %  i and the Electricity Company I %  ether to %  tation which had si Isen and . Finally the Chamber i a 1th the .1 i the Hon. H thi reelings of the t' ling. I %  the pi : where den here thru itors "ii ordi r to i present supplies. : %  Cotnmero ratulated ("i thi >n. The itlon may have billed to take the public into tlun conflsnee, been i n | with MI > %  .... the hiL • -vpresseu b%, several memii find inn n pleti i n i spsi %  teecs hai Hv toiprWve thi %  %  i i leal opinion to advise ii eg i %  hich would have he %  . %  %  %  iuch heat d in a mallet public concert %  last minute Ii that mutui Immediately bet\ e Corporal %  %  earliest opportunity. A Visitor In New II* H\KM \ Mil | \j. %  % %  %  %  %  %  %  %  %  %  %  %  1 %  %  %  f %  had i*i n gn en %  in'.'.. ..r T Imtforalhli .,. ihan a as "i hum in ound tic Tlmei %  %  %  %  %  d a n g l i n g ( building At thi II I!-. . %  niKlifBri' ,„i that Q i thouU. r. i l greeting table and %  midnight nippsrs and drinking %  %  Mp, *.tnl %  inertis goers who %  %  %  %  11 ipp? m i.-ii although nl Kith poMlbllli.uni But, docs help 1 %  %  %  . %  %  IM|, aini York if.si Of Lat* i.. DM3" %  few Holiday days down hfre This w.i Kt treH We hadn't w* rhst'• it until about midnli:h' cuuion and I was saying "good night" her ihre* can arrived and the party flared. The new comers *er led by Shirley Smith, vmingrr brother of Dr. "Bunn Smith, aoss of Mr. and M "Jimmy" Smith: Ted Haynes. ><> %  >f Mr and Mn. Douglas Haynes. who is studying Architect I.P-. Bunny** Hope of St. Lawrence Stnf ; pre-med course. tnd Ralph Pi<*scod doing work In v of course UMTI wars %  the party, among them /.er *nd once again 'he conversation swung for a time. Barbadian. Music %  i hm^nt anpeared as If hv •iri when I *tole away 't %  %  antm r.nt q fa This was the second time in t*e -I ys. that I had mixed with gOBM US studying here. On 'he •light, the Writ Im'i S Association sponsored . (he luxuriously appointed Chateau Gardens and amonr % %  %  • i I had run across VCT,. W-'..,.., j iffj melon. studying Medlelne .' rnlnmbla Unlversitv. ud ^* Rnld Marshall formerly on ( he itsg Pllblir t.ibr'-. nPerlng the end of hi-r rourss In Cummerrial Adminlstr•>on SI the New York 081*01 S l' an* Md Pelew. of St JSI rombermerlan •' taken *< • gjp I^ti Islnn'l tlnlv" %  v and ArnolH B -.m are medleal stud^' %  N |, began fnun the lkfl nvloil „„,, |,,tg|wito< 'o h" r Ida/, nee. 2i. M^,, 8mtU ltton0 h t tKM 1 MM I Mt odi 1932 i dJamaM tn.Xmss %  that her* the day ufter Xmaa Is NOT a holiduy. linfcno i i what Wt know av lloxinic 1) ruta-Uds ii %  %  braUona, %  %  ducUon .ill UM tin.I* Americans. [be Moi ho were minded *•> do so could enjoy a fnur-O .... IB} Bstui %  %  %  %  1 momlng. 16 died, and I tnowfall in earteln areas which t might n the biggest i I >\i ths %  a was reI Ith ttgurea. A %  lielmlna WISCH MEIER %  ho w..s killed svenlnf srss I*'.. mlUloi %  obns seeldssrts in New York In 80 %  nt, actual! I iti. tin. Mr il Ii. n nU %  condiNaQonal Safety %  i, which hould ever I be si li-ui Well I IrSS especially delighted U beei frym the boys from CSASdi Runny Smith %  I quite arsl) and making quite name for himself. Workinu on tin staff of the Veterans Hospital. In %  sssd medical circleibal he was given an appointment • i the staff nf mnof C.mada's biggest hospitals. Now he has got %  fcholanhlp which will enable him to go to Europe in pursuit of further study, and It Is quite on IhS cards that we shall hear quite a good deal of thi* old Harrison um in the not too distant future If I re d beraraen the lines correctw we mighl even aee him in the Wed %  special dot; ON the bu s a few mornings sgo, I saw a sign which read this way "For Sale—the rear door of thi? bug—very little used." This wa %  nnilnder to passengers that tluy ihe rear door for leaving IAS reMOte, as the front one WJS chiefly for passenger^ Setting into i he bus. Hi-tMriiiin Students %  .... WHY dor/t you go la for building I ran I .'her "'id loan?" shouted an Irate clerk i l h <" %  newcomer. r %  BuOdbll and loan' 1 What's that reis**£ boy? I haven't got uny I kaunatrtd money." %  nd. "I mean go out of this btntdiiu lC"n it wl Ud leave m alone. We ;u< I In Cobbler, The Film Girl And Tbe Convict Its •> %  I ION DI1MIK -t ii' 1 %  Rod Army. s %  be know sll %  led % %  '. %  tight ni i n Ulan laatl %  given him by th,. British did 1 e-*nci>i to %  I -vi "nh such .i splendid suit of clothes i tovuifSs ths iiott-clsss 0 M %  % %  i.a h %  %  %  !> %  % %  %  ; | %  %  ... %  at rsr I %  u %  bin DIM back. %  grunauder down riaad of Words Ko he M % %  tree 1 %  e lighting, food IsvsH %  %  reports I %  %  %  %  • %  Then thg daan %  pent up in would come %  %  \i ii'i", r,. one *' It I* Uke thU "Ultlsq ihtnk the way the* HVg > Ihe J SSS wludr W.trhl Iwse," Deaartar %  l %  % %  .. % %  %  : lien, begun et tin • liht, and • nded whi %  %  b lining, he wsa L to work om in three Btonthg thi %  %  Tin( bell %  *aui| -. %  but he was caught end tenl bo jsiL When the He-l Army lununoned him sad he was tenl to Oennanx 2. Tito Film Girl | Valentina wss a secretarjrsien% %  ith i Soviet 'il'u unU %  tan I fe unds-r SUIln in "libvraled %  I he said. "I lived in luul to say %  fuel for the stove in her Int. bv %  i groM privilege Ul herself IT four 'rooms in the flat %  by four large%  PI I I I I bad to be oblalned nx the fuel. Tin is oeaetsl Tns i-'i-' for tnree %  %  %  ... %  % % %  i N m .. to go io Hi, fuel depot-but NOT In office II A %  -,.. i • %  USSe. Thg depot no I %  tk . ... rough the %  : %  %  . %  tiling there ere no moral* about fV BNvM I %  %  %  ||-mont ovei lying lus ie iv by %  .-. .Pi Bl %  Russian "They are only ..morncd w.i ,r Communism ovc r th world, and they are doing it n our expense." he said. H, an i brought up in the new trial area in th,. UriL; which he visited recently oil 1. .,..' Inhubilapla there. h said. ar. f..i Bhs most part lion i|iio4>led from their bORWB m the Tkraine. lh c Baltic provinces. Humania. the Crimea, or nnn or th*. many other reglot. where Stalin considers the BStlVI :i unreliable thers me IDs inmates > the man) forced labour DOSTI fr-'in Uie Sovie! OCCUpStio n army in fjennsoy, t< Instance, who talked ol in,, -i poriorlty of German Industrial And there thousa n ds who have been rcfrom these camps oi hSW -, i|>i'<| li'.m them. All of these people, ssld th I have undoubted!* beet tine deiBOrsHSSd by |hsl| <' v Appalling living conditions in this indusUlal arc a dc %  !:, %  reel II little food, housing * puinitive and overcrowded, in bon %  md barracks, men, women and children are dying off riniH in thousands without any notice being taken. Vodka is the main factor in life There is no other amusement F.vcryono drinks heavily from the miners In th. i oil mines, where there are accidents nil the time, to the chiefs of the party and the secret police. Rule of Vodka Said Ihe lieutenant: "Whll,i n %  m Polovainkg thi Diet of my town h" i workers while he drunk in ;i restaurant If,, afsg sentenced |o Bvc "In fact that sentence would -.th For the Inmates of ni ramps are a law unto •S and no polic, can survive asnong them . and the Gover-il ithorltfcs do nothing sbOUt this rule of vodka. Proli%  3 Ihlnk that alcohol %  St WSJ 4 preventing any here Headache? He "ia v well he right Already i-M'aixxl |>r ivi.roam the MSaVtrySMs pUSfUlg wherever they please Thev have fought pitched battles ( Stalin's special police II .m. oi. were le hu a Hdi l i. int., organised reststsnos against the regime USB Kretnlin wlh a headache even greater than the desertions from th Red Arm v in Germany. Months Of Work Behind Royal Tour By LOUR Ul'LFK v*h. as a Court reporter, ha* accompanied the British Koyal 1 .HI. on m. A* avrrsias tour. Th. i W i %  %  and the Dukf nf Kdinliuri;h will undertake the lour nf Australia and New Zealand In plice of ihe! Kiii^' and Queen has meant much extra work Cor officials both in Britain and in the Dominions to be visited There will be %  :'inerary. to hfgln with, although wime modification may be necessary here and there. But b&aieally. the wnrk of orr.anisation will remain the same as if the Kiny and Queen had been undertaking the tour; and much will .i I ready have been done. For 01 a Royal tour overseas bmdvea i major eflvn of planning that begins s year i more before the Royal arrival. In its complexity, its attention to the minitest detail, and its exact liming uver a period of many weeks, rnvohrutg frurneyi bj road rail, air and sea, d Royal lour is an amazing piece of organisation. Underlying everything, from the moment when Ihe Prime-Mnn->ter %  unlry Ul be visit retum, is the concept that all must go smoothly and without hitch. Because the Princess and the Dukl gueete of the nation cortcarrsad, the broad' %  utJiiu's nf the tour, M w.-ll as most of the 1 detail of which plates shall DC VtSlted, BJ ,; 'i"\v long shall b.ipent at each, will be left to them to devise. Thv one broad principle which the Prineega will lay down la thai she and the Dune will want to see as much of the country they are visiting as is possible. in the time, and that as many people as possible .shall IKgivan the chance to see ihem i • Canadian lour, in 1939, for example, ii is estimated that at least 70 par cent if Ihe entire population saw King George and Queen Elizabeth at one point or another. TIKH';HT FOB < IIILDKKN One further point which will be gligggutl by the Princess and her husband in this connection is that special consideration shall be given throughout to children and ea>Service men and women. Naturally it is in the country concerned \ that Ihe first draft of the Royal pro is made. Once ihe dales of arrival and de-j parture from Britain have been approved, e I Committee set up by the Prime Minister con-1 jerned will begin to work with maps, time l tables and schedule* This me-uns sorting out and balancing a host ol claims and counterclaims, rlaajing %  ramettmee with local and intar-State or buei^town rivalries, Bai ire any of the programme can be M qarded as settled, it will have to be seen an examined by the Princeee and ihe Duke. Thi :s no mere routine furmaliiy. Point by poin town by town, engagement by engagcmeii the Royal couple will go over the outline pfopoaala, probably with tha Chief organisi ippointed for the tOOT l-y tin(;.>vernmei .'ormanent!y attached to the Princess's household trave where on the tour with them. Nothing, indeed. Is left undone to make the tour a successful one. and one that will remain in the memory of both hosts and guests nt long to be remembered. Barbados Annual Review •..•I, ill lli. Advocate Stationery Si Otll %  i *kel +\ Colors Da Cosla & ('o., Ltd. I e>Wkttel =^ i WHY NOT CONSruVE VALUABLE FOOD? VIUIM.A III I I' I III I /I — AVAILABLE FKUM HOOKDaceera A <>.. i.m. I:I-'• i" LUXURY FOODS FOR DELIGHTFUL DINING FOR YOUR WEEK-END PARTY Milk 1.1 i In.-h.r.. Milk Fed llu.k, ltrcsM>d R^bblU Mlncrd SUk Iroirn KUh .shenlry's Rye % %  lil hi.ul Rum Urn il | rtnl v.l.1,1 Mlvrd Nuts Mrllb Flsn Mrllil>..(. mat) Vs^stitHsa Just where you get the Beitl %  (imldanls DBaWKT* I Tins Dins JHIU-< n-'.ii.i psarese H.rd Birds Oeavai Qteaee Aprleata Shrrrlff* Puddlnco sharps Toflle* M rah M.ii.mKr.n Cheese ( .irrs BtonsHS FROM FRANC F Miiriiin I < Ii.trni. i %  %  l.oui* Rordrrer Dri Monnrolr Yrlle Cure Prunler llr.iwl> KIK till II Mill | Mr mini Fruit and Vecetihles


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PAGE 1

FRIDAY JAMABY 11. 1152 BARBADOS ADVOCAT1 PACI THRU: he stall. RITUAL MURDER CASE oking for • is'.urn tain i • tram rBr %  made the statement v was not it lO Springe. -"> Lb* police did ooi M IH* station uben Springer ww, look, he . n Mm. mornin,, he --AI1I tlOUKC ami IUkr aome clothing. TaM IVIm hthei he (suu ttenatf, %  aUtou the one he had mentioned werc abo ^j^n ^^ Gr#tV es' as belonging lo Greaves. He cmild house not remember whether Springer Greav ., WM rtle l on OctoMbM at the station and had ber a while Springer wan charged given a statement n September =7 Remain* Found Next to give evidence w.. Inciar.ne Sobei what they < been it. Una, he '-i i IItirfnnu Log MAIL NOTICES /. Boys* Clubs: Thw Girh* Cru**-examined he Ml (nought there some magt./inei had been taken ; •taUon rrmatlm* before inwn ethei any police read chanted as he said % %  them. Many phials tonUinmg fluid of the people of hi* Greaves had been at the itat had identified the knife. They told Greaves in the presence of Springer that || %  aid he (Greaves) wag rrsponsitpecXor Cec ,i Bournc H e was al „, n SMBS SSUTB JS3 SSJJfc " r! iS w 5 jS^'.k**^^ m n vcatlialiona hf n makiim who h.udone Uw dew. Pc sarfeenl brouehl MM acdeulnedbylhePoUcebuthecouId „„„ and old hlm „ 0 han ,„,„„. n-ml.r whMh... Omvei aUa lh „ waa releued before Sprm.fr oa ,.,. .„ nlllmM h (i EMnriB Boye. gf " %  . %  %  ""I .:*i reed lo The vvl i Al The Rum Sk.* IK.Harrw, %  %  h*.,--" < i -1 Bl LllCW, Mid he k-ve K I'"", i the aecu>ed. On September 111 he m % %  i vas in bi* sh.-.. when hi heard nir^anar* B a (Mombt.TWO Una net. l.pl ling a pohceman paawd "t^XJ"^^"':! ion. net, c* About B p.m. accused came to run.* far Rtmu. .. nis shop. He called him toward* *, %  %  ...> the bar. H. a domestic er, hirit to dnilh u (ltJ ,„.. llBi Id. St. Lucy, sau BU mcicnl metW3 ;>' huv dllsaXl tot "— --* %  "•"-II In the shop ' E 21 she went into the canea" to pick He offered me a drink and we I .!' <*ra*. The okras were in a dram racn had one He told me to cU ir. the fleld Phillips who wan in U>. "V .' >" "I saw the insteps of a child feet g^ry department of the shop near the okra tree, she *a.d -The oal |ed him and Colvin WWII %  %  in.<-w. —-. %  He said that dsjngsj th.Chrtatlog and law IM when mas season many ( bl stall spreading th<%  hi among many utallg si the at the All **l Agtuultui.i. %  %  The i">( "S". mat*, hnt*. shoe making, gflnbroKh the pubthe rasspoB While 1 t<>ll the iiunmoii thiii). for Bui ton to buy d gflB : Than had been a discu-iton bexhj, ,, a „. mcM and Springer about C ou,t m^n....... he i< I St," ColYto WM 0t •n" 1 took Springer to Pie Corner a. he the doctor ,.,,,, n,,,, !" (,„ -^•'^ — ; arSSs . goinif to Canada. %  i i %  .. %  i he had passed Septerr '<-> %  tri hr aUasBBd murder. r himself % %  Qekarew w w „ I0 una. came lo ^j m(llnPr -. hoUi a|Kl (1 „,,„, ,„,„,,,„„ 11V ,„ „, „ hli Si (f l Ml to Greaves >,„:,. • J-Jjct how la..it % % %  _Sh.Md ,hop. Colv.n .nd Burton appe. took j1 in the |Un,„,, Rv(raHum|nU|W there m v.hKlos gDd on the wayf(" I ned. Ker.lled \tWINGs YEAST-VITEI On Septenilvr IB he mm that night, he *i %  •ink gaor i leierrinK Mid that on September 24 he was 1 Hill Police Station. The accused who had been landing by the door, said he had not ilep m all the night lieft)-. •r. He said of t.lkme about ld*i murder. to the station, they stopped at Mt Pl"*elhi Road. ggsj the accused whethci Mclvor Greaves was the MdVOI Greaves he had mentioned II. Mid yea. I nikci Mdvor Urvavei "I took him lo Inspector Bourne said he did. ami told Inspect".Bourne what "1 told Oraavoa of the aul he had of the rtatomenl springer had "The 1 pit | In Springer said and he sal to Uy gf| tfi.it he hnd told it tn Greaves corond I. to hia left Inapaetor Bourn* lactly. a „ ' %  "' a-ked him whether he wanted to -Greav. strongly denied the ac,. R*nli ' •* make a -Mtenu-nt abont the ih.ld CUMlUoni with an oath ^ l A ^ OU "" h Ur **" C lV '" '' ''' -Act .! he w "The Inspector cautioned hlm %  howtd (.' iout th but thought ed to l-e friend He *aid he Cpl. Thomas B.ii „, IH I.'-.a i . —— %  The Only Pain Reliever containing Vitamin B< %  l way. 1 hud told him thai i li. I | seen th ii... Colvin Wild bint |0 HI •d load aim Uw Uon bacatm II had itopped in Uw Al.nl J II. If. IVOI O'reawai was re<-alled s^iX i-,x%< He said !. %  •"• %  F i-ei before he loined ihe v I ha mu not Mend !• with him afwi Ihi arm) day* %  "" *"• '" hi Ra '*<> praaant at the Court %  ban i tenant was j ",,'.. "*i i could bring arHDaataa to K. O eluit thai JSVSTtitaTi5 Seawell BWpWmMI 1 Thev *m Uiraum Ihdr miiwlut ^""mtJStn"* I Uw Chureh lad'. Brigade, tr. HIM,. "" %  '' '" %  %  * I M ..Id ht M un i l .inl l u.l ln ,. „„„,„, ,,„ „,, „, , h| | d ; For ; HEaDtCHES j J NERVE PtINS ; COLDS : CHILIS RMEUMITIC 1 •JINS by *aylnf you ate nnf okHgcd lo Canadian Army. Greave. ...tmil' uaaac but anvlhiiik von led thai h' Tined lo *"' aboul three qiiniter. o aSr^, "W '' '• %  ;. %  V o* mBo from •wn OOBW snd read a lK-k. The !>.** was SuiH-rlntend.nt S.mmonds wa g^g" ; ro— t. %  T.l..1. I Bwre aboul and went a\ ." ltd returned ahout .'> 3ll p r 1 Cilvin ton afterwards | taojath* M nhoiit seven to eight bichaa loig n sickle The Court in a m to-dav \l.\\ LOOK" "HO aald, "yen", | want to give a statement. baapectOf BOtirna wrote which had been taken from Me the caution read it over lo the Ivor Greave*' home and he said I and invited him lo read It that lr*fx<"d like it )lit tn.it over him i i i and then 'he trousers and shirt he wan then Mgncd it %  had e V" t^tween'"*" an n " Al1 i %  tine n September 19 Sh rtlH m „ -„ r.Veve that wader. an weal backto Crab Hill ^ hr md "*" %  arr xn "" Tn*iec1or in m> ptMirm Th>i Si'i>•rur^-examiiicd. hho said that II Invited t- reftd temner 2S and he bMarvlawad b*l Betai and Colvln RuUlp • rrom l*age I ,_& ( H on -vhi.'ii he got At*t cousins. in lana BlhCC IMf. "It M howN ,., ,,-.„. ,..,, ,,... %  read It. said • t ant. A^. a result of that The distance between ItWU ft h..|>ed that Iprne IncreBaa in T ^igne<--nous. _, rang will lake plaoa when .nJ "As a result of the -tatrmi-m PHar Hoi* II H drawn tohll about 200 yards. She did not know cessions are granted in Mat.'. Spunnvr w... laken from the staattanUotl tor Uv -h... Chandler sl.uiu I hut year.' he said T.. non and he Srectod ,. to £• Uwre wa* an Inner chamber H< • Ihwd abotH, mlU frfem He OKpreaaad tn, hop, that the J placementioned in • %  B**iM Bm. When PU1HBB OOM -.11 he able Amot, the plaie, W. which he look J -££* —• -•£ *V " g JS %  i I !*WS ^'peS Hoto^wK '".^^^ ; ^hjd r^rc.1 ^ when ^..to, > _,..„, Puh^j^eton* FJa-, examined CONQUER PAIN WITH he assisted ti. In lookn irts of the child NoUllgdj was found. I -Here we went to Me Ivor ri home. Greaves came homo while we were there .md WO) then made asked whethci he had seen the %  •"!• "ichildren, was a few iarda from deuce as to UM Ul n aa t of bjt. Boyce's house to have beao Hi ..id f hav V. I lark* as 1 Sgt. Clan : i dirt II > n. u J revolvinl sign panel in 'he front. The lighting 1 iionvelv atnio iheie thai teni of the pn i it buae* and aluo has n soothing afreet ''n the eye Tht hell, used by passengcts t" the coach, given on. • ill be a possible change type of buses which la i A Voice used, depending on Agatha COTDin l Ii. ^ urner • %  saiu UM I t.re>hoiind le a search. V. „..,,. dav the child warn missing. She The COMCII. which ha. -On the relurn journey, wh ll J* - ''" '""' !" " P*.nc-e of the Oreyhour OB Mt Knendvhi,, n Ht Bo0< H d t nd ManK was ovei the half •*! In Tnn.dad. H buill 00 an Hood the van stopped. | | "' -. \ ' 'u, T ''-' -"" ""' "^IldOn ibOT* < All and 8pi .• .' 1 f '"T,v, do.,, hair cioeni. accagoariodation f M rhe loadgut and (lee Q^ |nf ^ ,, „. h )il( k ., •is Uua the Mr Ivor Oi „. e immntMU „ HM aim aoina And H I 'W'T 1 whom vou referred In ynu itowSl,i .... men, and Spring.,... long, -nd an .'* -^ <*i'pprd with •>, -The inspcto, ,KH him J' ." ill to. whether the trousers and shirt ',, av i goUtf fwwn the road and Which hH Men taken I Xn SgV C.arke re some li.n,. icognwe '".""' were lhre ltou..-r. ,.,,,„.,,. i f,*e MaB.*!ra!e ,on s he had MM "I •"' "<" %  "' l> u on boul .., •!.,„.,.., .MU. 10 him whether it was the rKri., win lo.M.-s-exan.C>oaa^amln*d she said she cueetl said that that looked ll* inr ,.,. ,. llgM had only heard the voice but had ,^1^, of thc dr-wlmg sound of It. Inspector Bourne then '-' lurP of the h 0 *PJ" kor "; JJ "*?• the prawaM hall, the mi Greavea ihe substance or the Ft* •clllll were I H aW feat ..fl If "erh ,, .. This atateme, 5 i -' "" louk n 'ne then Springer thai to tay anythti may be riei asked Spring. K nlaaPfdafll IlljlwTt'd %  %  riding it at.mg Baxter's Road. S' aaas.> ''/. Y, %  'EAST-VrTB Ti gflBa i. Bderml I • ; -u Ngm n< Utl %  '• %  wbJdh Al so >MIIUU(CIUK yon get YEA I .i RELIEVES YOUR PAIN AND MAKES YOU FEEL WELL A revolutionary new Germicidal Soap containing Hexachlorophcne Ierl I* a new kind of dual pur-o*r ap and i Uie in-i -up manafartiired in the I n'ted Kinrdom to contain the germicide Hexachlorophene. technically known as G-ll. lleiurhloropliene Is a germicide that remain* fully active nhrn ued in the Perl formula and I* odorlnr. and non-lrriUllnn u> thf skin ii. 'i %  -i. iii both Ublri and liquid form Ban already lieen adaeted In HxilMh Medical and heallh auflorltle IH tors u ,t for Ihelr ......1.1 hygiene, s,. pwerfel are Ihe antlaeptie qualitir< of Iterl Soap that In many ho*plUls, where l>rrl U 0*ed. the ten minute pre-nperallonal *erub>. have now been reduced c> a three ndnate waah. Iterl -.h...ih] exert a marked benelU to perN.iiiel in Industrial Planlo because of IW .. %  -.I preventive effect en areendary InfeeUon* frum minor in)nrlen and ita promotion of rapid hi ..Iin. All Publie Medical (ilute* wenld benefit with Ihe u*e of each n eaap. '-v*-^-.-.'-'-*.'-v<.-.*--, On !*ale si all Ifrug Storn. v^'-^^--%^^vv*.*,'V^.v>'x.v-*-vx.'-'-'*^v'**-^' ( .rt fOUHJH IHfiPCDItNT IS QUIHINE! •. tatrst Has 1 tha 0l Hirer **ll-pro*i madiclivn (fhsnscenn. CW*ina jnd *,(•!,'uhi r iK Andl -.th s iouTH ingredient. And Mils loorth llHHflin aM rawfaw ike ^oihmg sctlon of the othsr ihrae, DO YOU SUFFIR FH0M TMESC P these*" H* flBaew hds(i. co*dt. toothache, (heumsmm. muarnlar atwa, nawdgu. awaetreal piim. And. hs loanh aurialw. QatWea. b...n down wealhh tamparswres hat I TMtH nttlBVt PAW ...AT ilVCf/ you var* llttla io bur J-l>lt sn.slopaof 'AMACIN'— anough 10 b'Hif reu '' '%  || t' ,r o*" %  %  "• e"' * P" tB ,,Q '" h n< *y boaei :. and botdei of SO tsb.cii lor liouiahold UM Doctori and dentnti %  meny parts •/ *mt weliomad w**OH" fV ,r-' of aw*. I" Crest 8'itawa avsr 12000 dutO'i and drrtuli retomrnaad *Vi use awN a\|l////^ f @ .0^ esr soME'AMACIN'TOOAr AMD AflM rOURSUF AC/WIST PAW .*4.' I** m*t MM ISAOIS ENGLISH ELECTRIC /.r, Chase away coughs! TWO WONC.mtVl PFWfD/£S Zubes Cough Mixture An tonUanl renx-.l. ih.it nphfr* ^oollid ^o U ^K^ jnd ommi faalat. Ihe rcnil> t.ir th.whok ra all] chttaV rcn love thi". paBaMM taUulf '••'up. Be *ure rou %  %  Z %  ough Miiturc m vow liorm. Zubes Cough Lozenges M ahorl wofko*hujiNeiK".ind thtcji IrriUtwaH in aoafcal v,&i tina, ZMbaa aw raaal) 10 be po|ined Into your mouth .it ll sign of diy oHire throat. NAME THAT STANDS FOR QUALITY IN A 2UIESINHALER .ROM *Xl GOOD CHEMISTS AND I V OAMU* .1 I REFRIGERATOR an*". m—v^ a*i< II.TIII.IICIIIV KraM I nil llraulilul In ll.-.iiin AIISIr.1 ( uhinrl llrminmiciil lo l>|H*ralr .W*ar l.n.ir inl. HI V IV KrlwEJHI BLKCMWK Hi:InU.l.ll \TOtt TH-H.XY I i ill SII silll'Mi:\l lll.ll IM HECEXTLV MAKSflNC A HI.. I l ll.-A..... IM %  l-'ll'l



PAGE 1

PACE IK.IIT BARBADOS ADVOCATE IRIDU JIMWRY 11. 1M2 W.L Beat Tasmania By 10 Wkts. Ferguson Bags l\ I Oil I.I \4 II Six Wickets Irmn IIAKOU> l>ALH SYDNEY Jan. 11. Davidson of Team opposition i" iht We.i Indirs toda) at La Ma T: mvi\l them from complete i i ttatiT opp,,, i %  ] 120, tl. WeH Indie* corad M WWH out loss t. %  win by HI wkkata. Willv I 'Kt \\ 1 I t K* I I I •> I I I I ha • %  • licit lUlfi 1 % %  IP hi* Worrell I he I p-Grade u* |Ul stand%  I i %  V aj 11 KOI RON rirth i> i %  i I trrtfKon l* m I-,., .... b V.Mtln, %  'i %  Vilvaealr dr. Hull m the %  MDun a Thursday, he will viaM uniing t'i %  Mi. Dun told tha Meet %  %  i during Ihi r.lj-ICt with the I hike Of Norfolh who owne ana of largest i .'ll'lll. %  %  during, lua ("i rean lit I M H inner*, about 24 SOCOTHK ihlrdi Mi Dun .it uracllcaUj _>il the big hi %  tea over 1 %  irnl in I hi' Cambridge*!! Who's Who In The B r And "C" Classes Ranger I 1 hM lt\ Our Yachting Curre-pondi-iH OWraBUKKESR^oluKuretu, season after a real last yeai. Resolute %  Klpp red by ngd) mond Burxe. is expected t<> aai) in tha Iii Koval Barbados Yacht Club which take* place on Satur<:. "ted and recoi I n i be Intereettruj although man) £j o"wn !" by S n A tiers did not enter their boats on time. The vetCi lebut thi, season ans predict itrofsj winds and heavy seas for the bettei | of the aeaaon, n..roid aid ka %  %  I'ucks." K4HI %  taajkaapi red VJci \ v eter a n oi %  %  many i I thi* seasons races and an improved pet But Caraa, Did not season as her ownei i Hi ii,. i ( i nil* ii i ha will skipper hei the Island, Anotla i parted t< Tnirteen boa ill in the ( %  Bt III Ha. Tbu boat waj foraned by Die l.. %  %  in thai Clans and then good |>erlornianre. t I IMBBP I %  %  I "f the Lightning CI*'* which made her debut not give e ai hei C r>t Nan %  will i %  i> Mai Jm Proverb* and William Goodear* m Tril bca-. 0 HMITH (not out ecu and K. Walcott (not out I) in veaurdar's play m thr flmti arlahal trial gam. ] for the LosOf two Wickets in thai* Bi-t inningin <> tha i ivilion tor th" luncheon inUrval Walcott %  • taam had then •.corod ttl run* i-ply to Hi Firm "! XI -<"r* of 330 rank. thi. Smith Scores 99 In Cricket Trial i ..t A chanceleei '' AT. K was the hi final cricto I rie which is bell mann ins !>y which wai cri p Iron beginning to end. iiidrove, out and fa K .... -1.' %  i m b end i Mr. Uurr said his In-st inouiH .,,,. ,. n lh ( •"''.! cvere with the pa.-c bowler*. A', hall Irom K. MX Tin ll cott railed "Olympir" tho | un heoii Interval hi which he i-tes .,ai*>ut tha thini dafaaMd wnti w > time tint he tool | %  i (.,t 45 VelaanM %  •a i |ai i%  • : i m England Mr. Durr had %  WOTd 0| l'i" IMI MI. WoUay Sin>th the ireiw i tor Iho Duke of N^if are about 52 horaea at thi trained by Mr. Leeal Kurini: Caenur Brion <-<•> L|> A Notch ST. LOVIg\ Mlaaourt, Jan. 10. Argentine beat Caesar Bnun. moved up a BOtOl etiaUangerr tank*. after hammering out a ill B owei tiie pgeviMariy unbeaten Weabury Bi Bf tail st. tflu night. found anj %  i %  Ue *ald th luiyi *ere very good, considei Ing thai thej new r served an ihip which if th lltn ...rvl urr,t,ld Mi Panm r* XI wh %  BUI gl llw end of pla> on the fl.-: I %  q Bee bov/Ui I %  low boa tr Horace K I uli the buk' ii maid' B ,,uiu i %  '"' runs. singW K a meat bowling with RV h hii .V from Lewies* to the legaide lor three to put the too in so mln• I--1 ufM mi i i i afore to King K good u-iiath i< Id<%  I rollowcd nialo. Atkinson and pi,r. %  other batsman had three n-.amder of Kinu' over. Ora>i a I with .' tingle. At 138 ii,.1.1, r l %  ; ,v, "in.,u. bowled by iitmen wtth lourth ball of rTorman Marshall' BU Be hoping shortly to nuln her 'v %  B I alagy. Owi n Burke, thi has iMi.-i' %  %  %  B.i ees^aie. Returns I %  %  | %  ,p tbini ii ad hi 50 aftehe aver-iges and in some rtrde M for K nunI a-e felt that she should hav Bit MX fours. uon the Trophy. Han. After t h e luncheon interval Will be :.l the helm. Last yea jiwless bowling lag spinnvi Hammond too rJtcraed OWlad l" Smith Who lOOlC • %  '"' but eventually he found h'tn ngla In the %  eeond ball. Walcoii "if going out three iimw i When Mit>ra Blalr nnd also i ib Mora wai i1 WakoM played ccajkrais, Bajnineauf' from King and v.. > bntbei Vmeant Burke. ;,i. FBUOWMarshall. Atki iMin I bw B :| "*" " lu ,s K other places, Mr Durr said he It will as good I improve turn judgment o( plgce, one of tha %  pori Despite the diaadvantage of not „ k l( ;, lld AlUl < VUlg an appren' i ruinot*, len ](urr nSought that the local eys anticipated anti hen ;it the ggti Mr lockwell L He. 11 n ntadi Mil m.ii '! .f Unwell'. over. An uppeal for leg before by llowen for Kim; wai upheld 1 % %  I At the end of la] Ml K. eplled wltb "'• %  "• '" ,;i1 "r" waa ISO. iim runs (or the loan ot eight Mr. Walcott^i XI Hal Pace ixiwie, Prank K of H KHik throe wloketi for M rui King was not t^o hnprt ly stage but after lunth Walcott XI The first over waa and %  %  wee eaugn eeond ifl A i 99 m and (nine i i out leg benipay n 170 ml i' of the season. Ptly Jack itUl incldonl whl %  \v-r oeaaaj one of th< ... %  B" iTOgth) lor the bkal %  laek %  i i part of the season bu. ;, >> ra.e lalei in order 10 qu..hl. /or the ft'ontanac Race, He ha. hi* eye en Ifea coveted Trophy." lie will be launch inn month. IIS Mischlel. Thai i. owned by loha Toppin Mil will be •klppereti hta son Stantoi.. Anothei •< i etch boat In this Clasb ami Ua.... fiMiieily keen oetween herself. vli i.iroi Veneauela, has IHTD roThe t' I iir-i day of plas eaay and gtvi' 1.1 help to the paoen but King Rot one or two t. circling iv/ay Mom hii and linng punches Bascoms Mvle wai Jual what Brloo ipparei tl t< %  Whan ,..,„„,.,; the fliiht ended, Baacomi face % %  puffy ami his left eye COmpt %  closed. Before the tight, iinon was ranked seventh amonit heavyweight contender! in the latest "Rfnit Maguina'' standings. Bascom was rated fourtl gghw unong light-heavyweight contenders foe —U.P. i %  t K Mom iho U tl %  • K ten who wall ovee iho ball. At the .,thar end Rudder'n (Mht < "ins. Smith co\ e I %  Ural Ingdni off Mr. Ti %  > %  %  Tha score was 28V lor ti Dei. ll for 1 and drove to the Woet IndMe next took strike from gfenith Ml i %  M elao to thi t'ollege upenlng bet) played out an %  pin wai b Aikins liun tint %  ored and iii his second i> The PU] Bascom's .supporters believed that a change of Iscttcs led t ibe Mr Durr sgid lhat the Officials, downfall ui the haid-pumhina; starters and everybody had made Bgajro who sustained his Ilrst deh|m „„,„. miin eomfurlahle. ami feat in 14 :hu. Bashe waa very hsppy to ride omon t com. 180 ixmnds, previously hint „ mc ,. bunch of bnyi. He has been employed a hit and run attack. ^ Impnfs i>oae4 t. 1 etui n ika sen In the next %  %  | .. %  Ii nul.i.l i;." ing li mi Veat I the Uj M aid H aaMh year owners OTO j i bettoi type <>r fOr I I lotkev mjghi txuught to laga pan in longer distanced racee. whim OUld '-liable them to M more There ire twe Mr, Dun Ior %  I %  Mta pulled II i WEATHER REPORT YESTERDAY Rainfall trom OodrltiRton %  nil Tout Rainfall for month to date. .01 lu Highest Tempfiatiire Hil-ft F. Lowest Tcnipeiatin. > wind Tekciti %  imirI~I host BaromaUr ("'ami 30 o|.. |3 p.m.) M4 TODAY Sunrise: till a.m. Sine-' Ml l>''i Moon PtnA Qii-vi i gaaaary 4 Lighting: r.00 p.m. High Tide: 3.47 in., 2.22 p.m Low Tide: f h. in 15 Chosen After play had ended yi i clay of th lafcet li'sl name it Kensington, bo n.iib.Ki.s Criekal Bolectori ihose 15 players from which the nfth. The 300 m minutei ol i %  i > > end lb %  llrst mail-down H King to Lawk* When 1 d raw hen BOfl '• to pull the fourtl Klng*i Sotfa over gave Smith .. .. pt. .". % %  Opel l b) King. M i Hoi ei 4 \ eof I i • i \._. ,. ,,'"£,„ t ...ih.tilo%  lay Jan %  ilonial %  gton, Th. II playen i (Police), Wanek i II K ii be %  IntarTournanient .,t ire W A. KniiH E. Atkinson linker (Emit (Spartan) I %  i EO MM (ComA Heuw iKini'i > i i llnnto ( %  rnpira), it King (Kmt Km(Contbei BO I ball (WanderiMQ (Wandareis), C. Brauh > i. A M. Taylor Pickwick and C B wllhaau (Carlton). \\ lial's on To.la 1 — 10,00 i Court of Appeal and Police Courts lo ini a.m. rolice Band play* at Di-tn.t %  B" Mtation 7l.il Briti-li Coiuii'tl film nhOK" 8 pm. MolnkCinema 'how at Lain nuiiK Pasture. t Josepl. -8 pin. : i In hi Ittl and Atkln< getting] a thar end Will ed down ovei which In this o" %  gftor he I l< \ lc IB %  • Mtf 57—2—0, r %  % % %  '' .i Kbagle I V I, I irbed Km/ was brought on <; pdn uitii the %  core at go to f A. Oft. WaUfieU gOt over an in, -winger and pushed %  ly lot • over before lunch %  trial waa 84 for the loss of tw> Ith Smith 60 ai by Frank Kit Grant scored 10. Smith tint 11 latwless went Smith but when was RIVI fore. He made his .. aj eg ,.1.,^ ,i out thr i ilntnd an in it'i iiirt. former l y owned by %  .ight b) the ball on the lei Dr KUkCh, Itl praBtnt own. %  I III Ihl %  % %  of %  lowed. Ml rear, it is A rising bail ., ralrly new boat but wai eery, I •truck lawless ami I • in and HI Moyra Blair. Owned by %  ball he received from Convnodore J H, wllkbum King wi %  ppered by h aoa Teen. Mayru %  • thi re at ltd off tha old -A" iuns for the loss „f Hght wickclass boats. She won tha AM three M in the "B" Class last season. 'inlitioneil BI Rascal. Owned %  stoute. Rascal is i of nirt. She Unbound p.'rform;mre Ifl :,cing one of thi off tin el-. B *• Okanl. Repainted and reoondltinoed ,t Burke's Bench M J. D. Chandler I : ,. %  %  % % %  I'urke. Another of the "Id "A" %  itand shows excellent Form i" very hard win*.. Crew wil' ,nd Mrs. J. n Ouutdsai The scores :— NO pAaantai u—iat i n m %  ;' lli.nlp rrllii.1 %  II KtnK ,ir. i 11 Km b nuwrn 1 I .1 I. IMI out %  SM M I lor IN J •i ii. t ti>r no. ft tot no. • for an. for 1ST. a for *. B l 311. 10 for SU IK1WI.IM. A'. U O M l W i n i II u i at i n a TI 4 11 1 TS 2 •Onffliri lb To'l 'lot Wt i rot 101. lor laa. a lor tat I tot IM IWWl ISO ANALValB Does your Roof need Painting t Then BOWRANITE il—and forget it. >r the best prntection against Unit and Corrosion use BOWRANITE ANTI-CORROSIVE PAINT Goes Farthest — Lasts Longest One Gallon will cover 700—1.000 sq. feet. Stocked in RED. GREY. BI.Al K In drums anil tins of Imiiennl Measure WILKINSON & IIAYNES (0.. I/ID. — By Jimmv H;tlo .'o*.(0-H*-**-H*! • S NO"MS TO IT< I 1 .\OUHNT TWM< OF >"'.' %  %  I .V .N THE uctonaS : 50£S CO'EM EH-HEH-HEH.'ASsfOF I W4S NC=^ SO T^E /LL My U=E-UM-JSE STEEL WOO. ON TVS CCS ASD fK5 ASO W4SH T-E S-ASSES s 5J3S0-lW&l= I' • .. mr'Mp \\ ,^Jmilrfr