Citation
The Barbados advocate

Material Information

Title:
The Barbados advocate
Uniform Title:
Barbados advocate (Bridgetown, Barbados : 1983)
Portion of title:
Sunday advocate
Place of Publication:
Bridgetown Barbados
Bridgetown, Barbados
Publisher:
Advocate Co.
Publication Date:
Frequency:
Daily
regular
Language:
English

Subjects

Subjects / Keywords:
Newspapers -- Bridgetown (Barbados) ( lcsh )
Genre:
newspaper ( sobekcm )
Spatial Coverage:
Barbados -- Bridgetown

Notes

Dates or Sequential Designation:
Apr. 22, 1983-
Numbering Peculiarities:
No issue published for May 3, 1983.
General Note:
On Sunday published as: Sunday advocate.
General Note:
Microfilm produced before 1988 may be substandard.
General Note:
Latest issue consulted: Feb. 28, 2005.

Record Information

Source Institution:
University of Florida
Holding Location:
University of Florida
Rights Management:
Copyright Advocate Co.. Permission granted to University of Florida to digitize and display this item for non-profit research and educational purposes. Any reuse of this item in excess of fair use or other copyright exemptions requires permission of the copyright holder.
Resource Identifier:
17931718 ( OCLC )
sn 88063345 ( LCCN )
Classification:
Newspaper ( lcc )

Related Items

Preceded by:
Advocate-news (Bridgetown, Barbados)

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Full Text
Harb



ESTABLISHED 1895



Defeated By Casualties
‘And Faulty Umpiring

Fine Century ‘By Hassett ——————_
ail Super-human

WEST INDIES
AUSTRALIA ...



216 and (for 9) 260
THE FINAL STAGES of the Fourth Test Match saw
some dramatic scenes as the West Indies lost by one wicket

and one run. It was as tense an atmosphere as was ever
experienced in Test Cricket.



Australia resumed at one for 68} Valentine and then snicked a four
and by dogged cricket carried the| that leapt over Weckes’ hand as
score to 147 for 5. ithat slip fieldsman fell and

Hassett who contributed an ex-| brought up the 100.
cellent century fought every inch |
of the way and almost achieved Hassett then detected the first
victory. short ball from Valentine and

With the score at. 192 Guillen} @rove wide of midon for another
caught Lindwall at the wicket|four. Moroney had , stood very
and the West Indies were on top| Unhappily without scoring and ob-
again. Australia needed 58 rums| viously with few ideas how io
with 4 wickets in hand. When|combat Ramadhin when the little
Johnson and Hassett were both |man from Trinidad had him 1.b.w.
out at 218 victory was in sight for | Moroney 1.b.w. Ramadhin 5. Three
the West Indies. Ramadhin and] for 106.

Valentine were now “spinning”
for a win. The last pair met at
the wicket with 38 runs needed
ae ey made them amidst the
most dramatic scenes to win the
fourth test match and retain the ey ‘aon coming well ap to him
mythical “ashes.” ning. Eventually he chop-
This day changed with 4 | ped down on Valentine and he and

MELBOURNE, Jan.
West Indian cricketers

the spinners Valentine

also was making a vague kind of }{8ht for the Ashes rubber
attempt to dealing with bowling; Hard Fight

of clear hot sunshine. Worre!l|G°™e2 pointed at the wicket and
took the field * use his bowling the rest of the ficid shou.ed them-
—left handed of course—might be selves hoarse. Only then did the
needed. j umpire give Miller out hit wicket,
Ramadhin opened with a maiden | bowled Valentine for two, Four for
over to Harvey two balls of which 109.
c ~
ar hetanan acute sitseei-] Now the West Indies tight hard
end and Hassett forced one on the|â„¢icket was paying dividends.
leg side with a choppy stroke that!, Hole began with more freedom
had the ball bouncing three times |*© Score and generally played with
a sign that he had mistimed it.) # swinging bat but Guillen smash-
Harvey then of drove Trim for|®&@ bis wicket and his foot was only
two and the first really free stroke| inches in. After being twice hit] great dqdred—witness four

the present vital match.

deciding day with the

Australia slightly,

of the game came after 30 min- he lashed an off drive off Ramad-|before dismissals Wednesday, One
utes when Hassett drove Trim to Dim for four, Hassett’s 50 came of those decisions — that Sone

long off for three which brought] With a scrambled single off Valen- |Weekes—might cost the
up the 50 partnership in 66 min-| tine.

Trim beat Harvey in his third] Hassett not out 58 and Hole not

over with a ball that just shavea}out 7, extras 11 and the total four Doubtful

the bails but Harvey came backj wickets for 128 runs, aareeprtunstely it is regarded as a
with a delicate glance for two off doubtful decision—Weekes himself !
the next ball and the pair had Changed Fortunes believing he was not out as tho!
added 15 in half an hour this ball hit him high on the hip as,

morning—some indication of the] After lunch the West Indies|he knelt to hook Johnson, The,
struggle Australia were having|tighiened their grip and runs came |huge crowds attending the Test
for runs. lowly. The score reached 145 forj were a/godsend to the Wesi)
Trim Geis O& 4 and Goddard called for the new | {ndians. While not wiping off tne

: im Go's O: ball. — Trim off the field with we on re operations,

ps ; 5} pulled leg muscle God urne crowds paid so mucii
Again Harvey broke the re=| 4 DU tt ven ard (0k) iat the tourists do not faye to
straint by on driving Ramadhin rely on big crowds in the Fifth
Gomez took a fine catch at leg|Test at Sydney January 25,
order to square up tour expenses, |
A huge crowd was assured again)
Thursday for what promises to he

for four after he had bowled his
previous four overs for only three
runs,

Valentine relieved Trim who
went off the field with an injured] qefence and Lindwall c in to
leg and was replaced by Atkinson|ltake three fours of Ramadhin’s
Ph Bendaninrs in the fielding) next over. Together they carried
recs aay oe hooked Valentine}the score to 174 and Australia
or four af-er watching other de-l-1qwjy regained the winnin
liveries closely, Harvey had 33 lpnaition. 7 , w 8
and the score was 93 when he bene ‘
played forward and under an off With the score at 192 Lindwall
break from Valentine (a leg break eee Gin 4s: i off
to a right hander) and was bowled’ SOD Sys | Free COT. SW,
as well as Ne be. : Hassett and Johnson played until

It was a valuable wicket to take|the tea interval to carry the score
at this stage, Harvey being the)to 204 for 6 with Hassett 95 not
most prolific scorer in the Aus-|Out.
tralian team for as long as he stays :
: * ss Resuming after tea Hassett
at oe meee Memnney now re7jscored his century. The score! fp

nnings he had intern eached 218 and Johnson was{(iough new gales.
rupted last night and a tremendous caught at the wicket by Guillen
appeal for 1.b.w. off the first ball} oe Ramadhin for 6 and next over
was refused. Two balls later

Valentine had a return catch from wes the 2 at unehanaet Fae

slip to dicmiss Hole for 13.off Wor-
rell. Five for 147,

Hassett continued his stubborn
the battle of cricket giants,



LONDON, Jan.

indeed—one outstanding necessity
of the day was that every catch
had to be taken.

However, Ramadhin brought
suspense back into the game with
a deadly maiden over that had

Langley and Johnson met in the|{¢*k awash.
tense atmosphere with Ramadhin
and Valentine “spinning” for
victory.

knew to protect his stumps and Morris Ibw b Valentine ............
keep the ball out of the hand of] Moroney Ibw b Ramadhin
Goddard who was fielding three ew P Velenine ee
bf * ' er ic | alentine
yards from his bat at forward] goie'c Gomez b Worrell . :
short leg. Valentine also kept Lindwall c Guillen b Ramadhin
Moroney most apprehensive with ies sOnnEo ¢ Guillen b Ramadhin
; assett w Valentine * ’
another maiden. Langley Ibw b Valentine

Moroney now attempted 04 yonnstone not out

swing Ramadhin to leg but missed Extras Fifty passengers and crewmen

snd Cie aa se bell EE) st eg iat)... [Naeem emaaioe Saas

was clamped firmly on the bats- BOWLING ANALYSIS Fifteen of them arrived at Rot-

men who were living only from) a. o M & W |terdam, Holland, last night,

ball to ball. Shsnadisiss 2 14 9 3) The destroyer relayed to Carl-
Hassett stabbed down desper-|Vaientine . . 9 9 (5 |sen messages of encouragement

ately to keep out a shooter from'Trim . 9 © ®% ‘© |from his family and from



hope for her.—U.P,



P la tf orm Issue | Two U.N. Planes

HARRY W. FRANTZ

Shot Down

|

{

\

WASHINGTON, Jan. 2, :
Reaction here developed slowly and cautiously to Har. | Over N, Sorea

old Stassen’s announcement that he would make the ae Se 8th ARMY H. QRS. Korea, Jan 2.
gold standard “an issue in the 1952 political campaigns. Th Communist anti-aircraft guns
question is considered to have world-wide economie sabe shot down two United Nations

, planes over North Korea today,
ifications and an individual campaign proposal would cause |". Start of 1962 found the w21

no great official concern. quieter than it has been in months.
Official sources are uncertain, ernment unless they should be-| Knocked down by Red ground-

what Stassen means by the mod-|come part of the Republican! fre were a U.S. Tunder-jet and a
ern gold standard and think that) Party's platform. Shooting Star-Jet. Both were hit

Stassen threw the gold issue inj while attacking Communist ground

the significance of his proposal

a depend on his later amplifi-} the political arena, when he said! concentrations.
ation of the phrase. that there was only one real way Generally bad weather

Wide Interest tovinsure the solid dollar for a|Communist ‘territory prevented
Sources think that if Stassen| long term in the US. He said, “that| U.S, jets from avenging losses in

ally works out his pro-| way is to place the U.S. dollar) airy combat.



blic, he
poli









& Advocate
HH OTEST

CAUGHT AND BOWLED



7 BRURSDAY, JANUARY 8, 1952

W.I. LOSE FOUR





Effort Needed
For W.1. Win

(From FRANK MARGAN)

into the fourth and what promised
to be the final day of the vital
fourth Test at Melbourne needing
@ super-human effort to pull the
game their way. At the end of the
third day, Australia wanted 192
runs with nine wickets in hand,

'
!
tary Anthony Eden will make a big bid in Washington to

With the cream of the Australian
reputed batting might yet to bat,
the task appeared easy. The West
Indies chances for a win rest on

Ramadhin, They have to bowl at
Miller now joined Hasseti and, the top on this crumbling wicket
square cut Valentine for two, He} Keep the West Indies in tie



. HARVEY caught and bowled by Ramadhin after his brilliant innings of 83 in the Fourth Test at Mel

With the score at 2—1
Australia’s favour after three of
the five Tests have been played,

| Left to right; Ramadhin, Guillen, Harvey, Umpire Wright, Miller,
tance for the West Indies was one|#@Ssett ran two while Guillen and tourists cannot afford to lose

U. S, ‘Urges U. N.
To Support 4
Acheson Plan

_(Radiophoto _,

“Caronia” Will Be
Met With Flowers

Preparations For Tourists Go Ahead

West Indians are giving Australia
a hard fight in the contest foi

world ericket honours, Through.|
out the last three days of the}
game fortunes fluctuated first one:
side then the other until] at ihe

Indies spinners facing Australia’s
bats, the chances stand at even
with the betting favouring



The United States told oe ‘Uni.
ted Nations that if the
istice in Koreg fails to mate-
rialize, then the U.N, will have te
launch a new military ac
statement was made by U.S. dele-

he wicket is taking spin to al _ BASKETS of locally grown flowers will meet
Cunard White Star tourist liner Caronia, the first ship of
the season, when she anchors in Carlisle Bay at 1 p.m on}
Indies the game_and all chance

utes.. The pair stayed until lunch, |of winning the AShes this tour, The baskets of flowers will be the gift of the Barbados
Publicity Committee who are now busy preparing up-to-
date information and other things that a tourist would want
as he gets ashore.

sions at the Palais De Caillot here
after its 10-day Christmas recess

of Korea in urging support for the

the second phase of the “Acheson jthe Publicity Committee,

for strengthening the U.N

‘| MAXIM LITVINOV
DIES AT 75

MOSCOW, Jan. :
Russia announced the
Maxim Maximovich













e decorating
the building to make it more at-
> for this tourist season,

Publicity Committee have
stock of litera~

deal with any future “

armistice soon
got down a larger

ce bring an end to suffer greeting cards, r
aborators of Nikolai Lenin,

Pravda, the only morning paper
published today said Litvinov died

mark the first time in history that
an aggressor post cards and are hoping to re-
an international or-
ganization dedicated to the prin-

—UP. “Old Bolshevik”

i lay in state this morning on flower
bedecked catafalque
: ence hall of the Foreign Ministry.

Phe body ‘of the
dri sell to stamp collectors.

in the confer-
ok (
job will not Barbadian

Capiain Reniains On
Wreeked rane

in Korea The |Foreign Ministry stood guard-of-

to 50 dollars and on

n amount of U.S. ec
The flowers came :

organizations
delegations of workers who came
last respects,

from various
trary to Our cy

that aomietion s
A United States destroyer, ee
‘ng to the side of the derelict
steamer Flyimg Eaterprise, report-
ed that Captain Carlsen, the only
man aboard, was hanging on! ®°
High winds
blocked the departure of the deep
sea tug Turmail from Farnworth,
England, to the wavelashed spot,
vaeee RR : iA aie a of Ireland,
jim but dropped it. this was Sadi Pyen the spectators appeale, "| Where the Enterprise rock-

The tide changed rae ana; ed with her port rails and main

> part of all of us
The full moral

and material effects of collective » during their

Chataigneau, acting Dean

Corps offered Foreign

Nine Ships

accomplished by one or two states] _
on behalf of g world community.”

The last point amounted to an
appe al to other nations to ennai

PAL INOV'g bier, > funeral was;



public figures have been entombed.
Pravda published an obitus ary of}

»| Litvinov on the last page dese

“old bolshevik” andj; ;

The U.S. destroyer rushed to] main brunt of the fighting.
the scene at 9.30 am. through
high seas from, Bordeaux, France.
Hassett employing every device he AUSTRALIA 2ND INNINGS The destroyer commanded by
y Pp 8 y Commander W. L. Thompson, es-

12 | tablished radio telephone contact

33 | With Carlsen, who was squatting

2 | precariously on the port wall of

a the deckhguse. A US. Navy

6 {Statement issued here said that

. Carlsen remained in good spirits

mine nee Bek ' go {in the fourth day of his lovely
4

8

260

“Acheson Plan”
authorizing the
assign regional hodies such

ing him as an
a “prominent diplomat”.
patch said he had given up active

+> most of the s
spending the

to severe iinet 8.
, had been out of public! :
since his aera nt as De puty, ri oming
Fore ign Minister
> was Pde

any future aggressor. 30 a February



Season Begins
check with some

Jamaican Gaoled
On ie de Te

vigil on the 6,711 ton freighter. to Washing on
Foreign Com-

spending the

recognition in the Chancelleries
win a seat in the League
of Nations and generally extended
international
also instrument

Clenford Linton
was sent to pris san for ’ nine "month

r being in un-



brandtsen Lines, the owners of the
Flying Enterprise, Karl Meher-
wald, chief mate of the 2,400 ton

German —smerchantman Arion
ta ssen 1 EG | iit vices iy some ot “th
survivors, said on arriving at

| Liverpool, England, last night

9 ay Carlsen’s Company had told
n ar | him not to abandon the Enterprise
oO unless there was no longer any

7 ; showed tbat in
i hen arrested, sz

Linton had 12 packets
a total of 88 grains oO
Indian hemp.

+, Guest decribed him as *
foul creatures
“There can bé
; more wicked-

1 for the Soviet Govern- M
Venezuelans ¢



yet reached its peak, }



the flagdraped hearse
ers and members of the Guard-of-
Honovr wore black brass:

ri which goes
ly to the root of-the stability of
eny society than introducing it to
the use of dangerous drugs.”

who pleaded guilt

said he used the hemp to make tea
as was the practice
He admitted two previous con-

e On Page |

World Rank
Efforts Favoured
By Mossadegh

TEHERAN, Ji
Moharnmed







in Jamaica

Strange Blasts
Alarm Clerks

robbery with vintence.

24 who was coated with Linton
was sent to prison for 28 days fox
the same offence. He pleaded not
. Police said a partly-smeoked
comtaining hemp Was),

alarmed clerks in offices near the| 4



ternporarily
Prudhomme

. sound was peculiar because ssenta=-|to go home will be exchanged

Reconstruction

Leewards Receive

2 New Year Honours

Our Own Correspondent)
ANTIGUA, Jan 1.
received two New

and talked with Moss

American naval craft



and i] ese t
and presents it forcefully}on the modern gold standard.” | UWS. Sabre-Jets, patrolling] Ye:
y be able, to Gold policy has not been a|cloudy skies sighted no Red planes}!
interest in| national partisan issue in the U.S.| over “MIG Alley.” In North West
But they did not] since 1934 when the Gold Reserve | Korea only ground action was re-
" sat his view would have} Act was passed. ported along the 145-mile front,
» early influence on the Gov- —U.P. atly® —U.P.



Prudhomme,



William! naval s







first, beginning on a man for ; ;
g . e : » s these islands
and Develop-|man_ basi South Koreans im-| beimg set up on these } .
—B.UF
sed_ into Red irmies would
be reclassified a war prisoner
for this purpose *
2. Communist prisontrs £e-
maining after all U.N. prisoners DIED
ave *n releas wi > e@x- :
ave been relea ed vill be ex TORONTO. Jan. 2
hanged for interned civilians : :
| George Singleton, the first Vice
jand displaced persons ulso on i ’ if ngl 1, Wt .
nan basi President of Ulster Uni Soccer
other displaced person Club opped dead on Tuesday
ho want to go home will be He was 48 and employed by
ermitted to do so, regardless of; Reyner Construction Comp:
he number |coach of the Ulster Socceg
@ on page 6 for many year





PRICE : FIVE CENTS”

[. MATCH



\Churehill And Eden
Want U.S. Support
For Atlantic Treaty

By R. H. SHACKFORD
ABOARD QUEEN MARY AT SEA, Jan. 2,
Prime Minister Winston Churchi!] and Foreign Secre-

get United States support for major reorganization of the
North Atlantic Treaty Organization.

The major British objective will be to streamline
N.A.T.O. so that its periodic meetings will be smaller, more
informal, more intimate and more effective. The British
project will also include an icea for the political goal of the
Atlantic community as well as the strictly European
community
Eden strongly favours working “bat he’s not going to seek extra-



for what he calls a European. erdinary United States aid—
federation within an Atlantic above what Britain is expected
confederation The continental ‘0 get in the mutual security pro-

ountries would become ene unit {tamme—and he will start late in
long with the United States and January a new austerity pro-
Britain and Canada instead of as 4ramme to put Britain back onto
it present nine separate entities, ‘(he road to solvency, When the
Eden spoke emphatically about Wik at Blair House gets areuncd
he need for N.A.T.Q. reorganis- \© finances Churchill is certain
ing at the end of the recent Rome ‘(0 remind Truman—as he used ‘to
conference. It was his first post remind Roosevelt—of the tre-
war conference as Foreign Sec- | Mendous contribution Britain
retary coming on the heels of his Made during World War II.
first experience at the United | Atomic Energy
Nations Assembly in Paris. | Also high on Churchill's agenda
ae s ‘will probably be the attempt to
Civilian Director »reak down the postwar barriers
Both Churchill and Eden are | which have ‘blocked Anglo-Ameri-
known to believe that on the!lcan exchange of atomic energy
diplomatic and political side of | secrets. Churchill wants a lot
N.A.T.O. there should be a diree-!more than he can possibly get

ud nt a mee stature ree He wants the same kind of com-
wight Eisenhower in the mili-] jote partnership with the United

tary field. .
£ States on atomic energy that ex-
On the financial side Churchi we e :
s ial side a uM isteq during the war when the

will not arrive in Washington ’tomie bomb was being developed
wit to = n° hand but he But Churchill himself knows ‘hat

Britain, which steered through hat is impossible unless the U.S,
World War II crises when the} ~0Msress will make fundamental
going often looked fatal is now thanges in U.S. laws governin
ton the edge of bankruptey—as it|4tomic energy, and that Congress
has been more or ‘less ever since | Will not do that.
World War II started. Churchill is bringing with him

By the time Churchill arrives|for his conference with Truman,
n Washington gold and dollar|his atomic energy adviser—Lord
reserves figures for the last quar-}] Cherwell whose scientific advise
ters of 1951 will be known, and}.. Churchill during the last war
they are expected to show an-| was invaluable,
other overwhelming deficit for Churchill will hold some strone
the last three months. bargaining points when he sit

In simple terms it will meai{qown with Truman on this crucial
that during 1951 Britain spent | tegue:

$1,000,000,009 more than it earn-|pipog-

The British have given the
ed in dollars--like a man who p oe = ae
spends $150.00 per week but Americans key-bomber bases in

earns only $100.00 England where atomie bombers are

2 based and could take off for at-

Trade Figure Bad ena tacks against Russia if necessary.

In on dn een ane Sa Second: Britain, which con-
igure with a € & & aii . a Aaa aa asi
dollar areas remains bad. Brica.o tribu'ed the major part of basic

2 tho ox.{research on the atomi¢ bomb i
ee ee eek or ine pret now believed to be near produc-
tions during which she lived on tion of its own atomic bomb
being the trading and banking Third: Britain has made =
centre of the world. major advances in the f

It will be against this dismal neacefa’ use of atomic ener
(nancial background that Chur-}|from Churchill’ view it will not
chill will talk in Washington, But}be all take ond no give.
he has vowed before Parliament ati,

U.N. Agree To Red

Demand For Release

Of All Prisoners

PANMUNJOM, Korea, Jan. :
The United Nations have agreed to the Janta
demand for the release of all war prisoners during an
armistice, ye only under a comp]ex compromise formula.
The U.N. pre sviously had held out for a straight man-for-
man exc otal. which ‘fould have left more than 104,000 of
the 116,000 Communist prisoners in Allied hands, after all
of the 11,559 Allied prisoners: had been released.






The new U.N. proposal pro-

vides for the release of all war Rocket Revise
prisoner and interned civilians
held by both sides and also would

PL BY pole alee Gast. to te:| Where Columbus
10,000 to 70,000 captured South

-orean troops inducted into the Landed



ted = =oarmies The Communists’

rst reaction wa unfavourable. LONDON

The U.N. Rear Admiral R. E. An American guided missile

Libby said he got the impression] testing range, 600 miles log, is
hat they thought, “It stinks being built across the Bahamas,
However Libby aid that helaccording to reports reaching
jidn’t believe that the Commu-] London A landing strip and a

ists fully understood the formula.] station for recording the flight of
te said that they had agreed to|the missiles are under construc-
tudy the Six Point Compromise]tion on Watling Island, where
roposal overnight, and give a| Columbus is reputed to have first
uller answer at the Prisoner|set foot in the New World in
sub-committee Meeting at 9.00] 1492.
m. today

American engineers arrived
The Second Sub-committee,| there in September and the first
orking on the supervision of!ts Air Force ‘plane landed on
he truce, made no progress) November 14, nearly 460 years

iuring the 54 minute meeting and after
o adjourned antil 11.00 a.m.
mm Thursday, still deadlocked
over the Communist demand for Calumbus is said to have disem-
he right to repair and build barked oil itee Hi
North Korean airports during the “The Bahamas rocket

truce

Columbus. The — landins
strip is a few miles from a mOnu-
ment erected on the beach where

range ex-

tend from Cape Canaceral,

Florida. over the Grand Bat
How It Would Work Bisuthexe, Wailing Mayacuant
and Turks Island. Under an
arrangement between the British,
Bahamas and U.S. Government
observations posts linked by
radio and submarine cables at



Libby said that the U.N, formu-
la would work this way
] All + prisoners who want














PAGE TWO BARBADOS ADVOCATE THURSDAY, JANUARY 3, 1952

__—



—____—_——————

Caubh Calling









High Heeled What’s Cooking : axe "en,

Organist a = ee al al - ") GLOBE fer. a













ney the Governor Engaged Retired Telephone Or. George thalben-Bell — is wit I suppose all of you
@ aa ‘ musical adviser to the BB know to cook ham, and eggs TT
apres - CROSS ¥ 8 “HE engagement was an- Engineers Religious Department and whew but I wonder whether you have THE BIG 3 FOR BE ER MOVIES
sa sy a oar? mere. nounced on Monday night visited Australia recently his ever heard of ham suffe, It is a} Present
"Mr. Val McComi« ween me , Waverley a * PENDING a holiday in Barba- audiences were greatly intrig ied de licious dish when cooked and| TO-DAY 5 & 8.30 p.m STARTING TUES., Jan, 8th
“Cercle Fran- = L E ate Stationery Mr dos are Mr. and Mrs. John by the high heels he wears for the recipe is as follows: 5 & 8.30
c tetas; Mitedt aisle arnum, son of Mr. w. Campbell of Sarasta, Florida piaying the organ. This appar- ‘ zt and Continuing Daily and Continuing Daily
tonight at 8 o’clock _ Mrs, D. C. Farnum, of and Mr. and Mrs. W. W. Stahl ently unnecessary form of foot- For ‘our people: 5: AOS
This function will be followed 2 h > Grazettes Road, St. of California. They arrived here gear is peculiar to him, so far 5 ster 9 ae | ie perrs
by the showing of a full length ~ °°" recently by B.W.1.A. from Cara- as he knows, but be finds it a P = ; i cr Sieeth
i "re! tle “ - San2 sat aS & are staying ¢ . - reat help wher laying chords. he 2 ten
ete iN yimoent” " this ‘tlm — _, Trinidad Solicitor ie ioe Hotel. ee See The ar aan a to ann are ro b oar
all the critics’ awards in 1949 for a7 AND ene BOBBY Mr. Campbell is a retired en- nearly always played with the Ham (cooked) %b. ‘
the best TYoreign film of the year, : sR and three of their gineer of the American and Tele- ;



feet and when playing chords of |



















and a resumé of the story appear- ¢h!idi ny, Marion and geaph Company, more often several notes it is quite possible Milk 1 pint
ed in Tuesday’s Advocate, : ; arrived gl ares known as the Belle Telephone for the large flat heel of a man’s Cheese 2 tablespoonsful i
The film-show is open to the ©! ®\cslay : oe ws EE . ~* system, while Mr. Stahl is also ordinary shoe to cover one note : - |
general public and tickets can be monte rae ae a retired engineer who was until and smudge a second one slightly. Eggs 1 wgole 2 whites i : |
btair od fr the Hx Sec. M rs ao are Slay 1 a sili . . J . ty Th ben-Bz *s s scially height- * i : - é
J. M. Michell (2015). Leet a, Maxwells Oe Se ee, cae aa thed end narrowed heels “wexke Prepare beforehand a white!’ Jey, S z
» Mic ) MT . . phone and Telegraph in San ned end narrowed hee mak 2 Oo; or " : e
~ > = : t F “¢ Jo Sellier Francisco sure that he produces clean, S@uce with the ‘2.0m. of butter, op ? } W-6 -ii oresents
is a brother ) r. Joe Sellier, s 7 “~~” the 2 oz. of flour amd the pint 01} “ao ra ie li.
GOLF PRO S.J. of St. Patrick's RC. Church, They both went over to Cara- HON. GERALD LASCELLES seen *"@"P Potes_and chords. milk. (1 gave Nae. recipe or wirtvey “CHa COLO > Seeger!
Jemmotis Lane. Mr, Sellier is a ¢@S on an assignment with the hope at the races during his visit . white sauce’ three weeks ago).| °“ *= Kf : of the Texas showgiri
t fer. His son Anthony js, telephone company there which <, Barbados in 1949. He arrived B.B Cc. Radio Programmes Let it cook well so that the sauce| aise HRyy GRAYSON ; gr and the prince
ele promising player, as is took them three months. The p.6 from England via Canadc i on hae ee ae will be fairly thick.. Put it in a AYE, GAp et
; . > party w i - . 5 « Nancy . 20 a 5 : 144 fr = a} a
J ) on, who will be party with the exception of Mrs. yesterday by T.C.A. One Minute Please, 12 noon The News, mixing bowl and Met it cool NDNER as N i >
co . later in the month Stah'. will be returning to Caracas : : 12.10 p.m. News Analysis Mince 4.1) ham. Mix it with the —— Lins s N
wi i er Rita to join the on January 12 for a short visit. Last Here Ir: 1949 1.00—7.00 $1.29M Wasm Sea ttle at tinh: anal ve “OWAp FLL
family for the holiday. Rita was From Caracas, Mr. and Mrs. ON. GERALD LASCELLES, — - _ en s ih les Semiteal o “SOE fe: D K z AMO ie A,
cepain ef the Trinidad Ladies Campbell will travel on a Swed- brother of the Earl of Hare- *_4).™. The “ote $5 eS oe Bee are ee the Pp 8 egg. (Ii AARK = PRowy Hane
water pelo team which played ish ship for Lima in Peru before wood and owner of Belle and guciness, 445 p.m. Sporting Record v h = a ich welt Anke vaak Stee \ GE ¢ oh } fe es
against Barbados in Trinidad yeturnine to Florida, while: Mr. Mount Estates in Barbados, ar- § p.m. Composer of the Week, 5.15 YOU Have them you = pt ; OWrp a, nine’ [I fn \ fr?
lest September Stahl will rejoin his wife here rived from England via Canada New Records, 6 p.m. Colonial Commen- Yolks but you would find it} S38 CN CHAS ce Liddie ) Mla 2%
1d after which they will pay flying yesterday by T.C.A. on a visit. tr yell a. bag pap ~~? ither expensive now; I did minc} = fp
Back To Trinidad visits to some of the islands in = * a guest at the Colony Club, ’ pum. News Azatreis. a -~ yolk -n06 Bree. wales BORER STERLING w
FTER pending the Christ- the Caribr thei “ ack . James, 3 aisem asagm (Ih wo V tes c ; énnte
4 mas holidays with his rela- = an Mas A i mein way hee Mr. Lascelles was last in Bar- - left over from a cake) Beat the TEC IN
sat “Ravenscourt” fonlac on VER Beeeeed bados in 1949. $ 30 p.m. Foreign Wo! whites (3) until stiff. Mix every ey ae faa Api hi Ki
tives a tavenscourt,” ‘onta- Their first visit to Barbados “ A 75 p.m. One Minute . 5 n i 5 aethar “hpi : whevaiee | HAMMERSTI Why HANG it "
belle, Mr, W. K, Fergusson, Mr, Campbell said that they all _ With T.C.A., Montreal — fidio Newsrcel, #30 p.m. Special Dis- thing together now very slowly | ati
Police Magistrate of Siparia, likeq it very much and added that R. AND MRS. VERE peer. se a. ee a +e a But era South Trinidad, returned home they were rarticularly imnressed BROOKS who spent A The News, 10.10 p.m. From the Editorials mixture, Pa Seer cotaete 1 saree ae EXTRA MATINEES on SATURDAY 1.30 p.m.—Midnite
: ’ > 35 ven for about 25 minutes or hal ‘
yesterday by B.W.LA. \ He was hv the courtesy and friendliness week's holiday in Barbados left 8 wd ee ene ite p.m, The ioe Srriede. “Reais: Sal | “HOUSE OF STRANGERS” (Ed. G. Robinson — Richard Conte)
accompanied by Mrs, Fergusson. »* the peovley at vase eae the pars | “TONITE WE RAID CALAIS” (John Su‘tcn — Anna Bella)
ac Mrs ee on aye





A Subsidiar Lecturer And Writer Brooks’ relatives, They will then >it 6 12 18 Adults: Pit 10 16. 24.
R. JOHN LEE, Publicity Di- : be returning to Canada where , fupert and the Pine Ogre—3 est
\ rector for the Mene Grande MONG the passengers arriv- Vere works with T.C.A. in Mon- ~ } 4

Oil Compeay (a subsidiary of the ing by T.C.A. yesterday treal. Vere is the son of Mr. ani ; | Q Na Pp i R EK
Gulf Oil) in Venezuela, returned Morning were Mr. and Mrs. Mrs, P. S. Brooks of “Rosemary,” | K a ud
home on Tuesday by B.W.LA Neville Goddard and their Rockley.

after spending the Christmas holi- Caughter Vicki. Mr. Goddard Second Visit TO-DAY 4.45 & 8.30

days with his relatives at Black- pig Sali oo: ah Man ore R. NEIL, STEWART, T.C.A.'s ® ‘ . a
mans, St. Joseph, He was ac- yw. 3 N. Goddard of “Kensing- Medical Officer in Vancouve: FRIDAY 4th at 2.30 & 8.30 and Continuing
companied by Mrs. Lee. ton”, Fontabelle. who had been holidaying here

. “ch. Here on a _ month’s holiday with his wife and daughter re-
Spent Christmas With they are guests at the Windsor turned to Canada yesterday by
























Family Hotel. . ,ame ae ‘ipa staying at
R. CARL CHENERY who had Cacrabank Hotel. : ;
been spending the Christmas Thirty-one Years’ Service | This was Dr. Stewart's second
holidays with his family returned seid visit to Barbados. He was her : : ’
ohn tae \ FTER 31 years of unbroken in December 1950 we haven 1 when
to Trinidad on Monday by ie he Ils Pauli dj although p
BWIA service at the Advocate Venezuelans Return ~ f pais Pauune and janet are near, ig “ ms
Stationery Miss Leila Lynch of FTER spending two weeks’ and she leads hit to join them. Yo ey it
Annual Dinner peandemere, Constitution ioe, holiday in Barbados Dr. andj “a en oer have small sachs mui be od Ul aI
HE hon’ble the Colonial Sec- Carib wishes her many mare Mrs. Ploch and family returned | about the same size as his own raway. Let's meet ‘ere
retary Mr. R. N. Turner and of “happy retirement S years to Venezuela by B.W.LA. yester- We're collecting things, too,"’ she i wo hours a d cee who has
Mr, J. Cameron Tudor were the ; 3 day, Also returning to Venezuela Rat Meee ee eae SeOr OS, Se Lancaster
MR. ERNIE WAKELAM guests of honour at Club Pre- On Holiday yesterday by the same opportuni |||" popay 1 ao ae SPECIAL BAT’ O30 am BE TOWN
. miere’s Annual Dinner and ty after two weeks’ holiday here) |)a scream IN THE DARK |
-Canadian Professional Golfer, Reuite m which was held last R. B. AVERBOUKH of the were Dr. and Mrs. William Ris-| nee eee sf te
arrived from Canada yesterday saturday night at “Viamede”, New Yalta Project in Diego auez and family. They were, }) MANS OF i |
by it ee sir ae end Rockley. Martin, Trinidad, arrived here a Staying at the Hotel Royal, | !
coach at the mockiey Go and Covers were laid for 30 and couple of days ago by B.W1LA. | ;
€ ountry Club. He acted as coach among those present were Mr, ay fh weeks’ holiday and is Three Weeks : 1 4
he re last ys ur and expects to J. E. T. Brancker, M.C.P., Mr. staying with Mr. and Mrs. Airdon FTER spending three weeks’) WAYNE RYAN i @ | t
remain in Barbados until March. |) Carmichael, Mr. Julian Robin- ‘jim; “te holiday in Barbados, Mr. and} y Technicolor) alive
: ; Altman of Hart’s Gap. |
H Awat son, Miss Marjorie Rocheford, Mrs, P. MacDonald of Curacao, | Sanne TMT 7 eee dtege St
ere Again Mr. C. M. Thompson, Mr, L, A. Free Show returned home yesterday via| Aa Cunseike: jetta as gts, 8.90 Daas x

aes tNIE WAKELAM, Can- Williams, M.C.P., Mr. H.
acl n

5 Trinidad by B.W.LA. They were WARNER Bros. present Alfred HITCHCOCK'S
golf professional ar- Thorne, Miss Gloria Grimes, Miss OMORROW night at 8.15 |

stayimg at Rydal Waters Guest





, ; “og 1 1 \yips

rived from Canada yesterday by Cora Alleyne, Mr. G, Barker, Mr, o'clock there will be q free Jroiice Worthing STAGE FRIGHT A
T.C.A. Mr Vakelam was in and Mrs, B. A. Bayley, Mr. C. McD, film show at the British Council. Mr ’ MacDonald is one.-of ‘the Jane Wyman, Marlene Dietrich, Michael Wilding 1
Barbados last year when he acted Stoute, Mr. Arthur Sealy, Miss D, The Programme is — British News 4 ccitants attached to the Labour| ||————————___!ehard_Toda sh "eso
as official coach at the Rockley Thompson, Miss $, Bennett, Miss —-Children Growing up with other °°" = __ 2810



The Garden

x . r J 1 CO Department of the Sbell Com- =
Golf ana Country Club, He has I. Paris, Mr. N, Carmichael, Mr, people — Wordsworth’s Country P OISTIN =
returned “to act again as coach. S. Thompson, Miss C, Ashby, Magic Touch (Development of P@Y: a. A LA Dial 8404 G A i E T Y

























VT 8.90 a.m, |
| ah ae
NG LEATHERNECKS ||





|
meets
Corinne







‘ ‘ ST. JAMES
Acc mpanying him is his wife. Miss A. Archer rand Mr. B, Bourne, natural resources in the U.K.) * * TODAY (onky) 445° & 8.30 p.m Last Show TONITE 8.3
kecompanying “him, is. -his- wife, — Talking Point Gary COOPER in “CMISSISSIPPT RAY THM"
HE cruellest lies are often TASK FORCE = (Technicolor) Jimmie Davis and The Sunshine EXTRA: ¥
; s * — Y
told in silence. PRAIRIE THUNDER . Band & ye
: BY THE \X AY eeee By Beachcomber —R. L. Stevenson, Dick Foran y K an are THE JCatooK Quick on the VIGOR ¥
ee y #Ré & ?
‘ : SPECIAL SATURDAY 1.30 p.m == oe
HE anties indulged in by the she had a sense of humour, She control, especially as all the Incidental Intelligence A SCREAM IN THE DARK & Te agen Midnite Sat. 5th
various airlines to counter was one day flattering Antony, telephone lines have been cut. I N a battle of tongues women ac huaet ay: sie sit ea ee WILD BEAUTY R 0 wv A L
the howling boredom of journeys and ealling him the world’s seldom hold their own.—} || ——=—— ee Destiny ie en, & ill
by air are worth a word or two, greatest fisherman, With a de- 4 [Letter for Frances Rodman, FRI. to SUN ite Sat, 5th John Garfield é IDERS OF | Last 2 Shows TO-DAY 4.30 & 8.15
No sooner does on airline an- lighted smile, as they sat by the x f —L.ES, lithe dagcned..o Hib, snag TY Sesulienin | AE pion
nounce free dressing-gowns than ag cae, oveeeet, began ae W.A. Mozart Esq. Tarzan'’s Magte Song of Nevada (Color) ‘& Repu! li: Whole Serial
its rival offers free socks, There fish. tile he was tweaking her ey 1 mee Fountain R Rogers Shirley Temple Fuzzy KNIGHT ||| vepu,.\ ene
was, I believe, quite a rumpus on ear and talking nonsense to her, ay ~ i ; ————— ——— |)
aplane the other day “wren oa a slave, “previously instructed, (CULTURE will out. A lady € nossworD ————— eee THE PHANTOM RIDER”
traveller, who had been given a dived silently and tied an enor- “* Who had evidently heard the . ; : IY st LL ;
bit of peasant pottery, a dozen mous salted Bithynian, cod to the "ame Mozart on some radio pro~ YOU CAN'T TALK...YOU CAN'T MOVE...WHEN
orchids, and a Pomeranian dog, end of his line, and gave a pull, 8yamme, and liked the bit of ( with
found that she was expected to Antony hauled in, and there music of his which was played, ,
pay for the dog's licence. At was the fish. “Wonderful!” wrote the other day to. Mr. GEORGE J. LEWIS
any moment I expect to read that cried the Serpent of old Nile, Mozart at the Salzburg Mozart

hostesses in bathing costumes “Why, you can even catch salted Foundation, requesting him to
will give free swimming lessons, ced!” Antony hung his head in compose for her a harp sonata
that there will be clock golf be- shame, while the assembled com- which she was willing to pay for.



re vy i FRIDAY Only 4.30 & 8.15
HITCHCOCK ae b Republic Ac tion Double
RUSS HAYDEN _ LYNN ROBERTS





tween the seats, and that a week’s pany laughed heartily. I_ wonder if, unable to \get Mr.
holiday, all expenses paid, will he an sO te Mozart, she would have been -
given to the first passenger to eae eee ee ees ee satisfied with, perhaps, Mr
guess what country the plane is 7, ‘S4tion of decasualised dock peathoven?
Sassing rar ok y is Ie nt a= ’ rl Ty Yeo
eas ore tou ito" be. known un “SONS OF ADVENTURE
Ceci cigehgoie : ' Morny and the baron
ATER on, when airliners are ,, 12. the event of undecasualised AND
I : 5 ae ae labour units being reunde- N ARTICLE about pomposity Across 5 7 ’ Yay r Jeo
to sie woes t the bp ~s a io casualised previous to their Onitted an excellent cure 1. The rate for entertainment. (7) THE L. is7 BANDIT
Fs p. XC ¢ 1e saloon, a sh-



underecasualisation such units, for it. One day Baron de Roth- 4 Sacred story, set to music. (8)
subsequent to disunderecasualisa- Schild called on the Duc de Morny 1‘! Cared tor speed. (5)

; . ao tn i aris. . j 12. Obviously no junior. (4)
tion, may be said to be in a state in Paris. Morny did not bother {7 ppyiously pe jun it was found

shop aboard, a miniature skating-
rink, a Wurlitzer to play, ferrets
for ratting, fortune-telling, and

Starring
WILLIAM ELLIOTT - FORREST TUCKER

























|
Petia eae of potential rededisundisdere- to look up from his papers when in? (4) | PRs ora Pats
es a Perens the ae sasualisation. ; the financier was shown in. He 15 Plymouth impiem ® , : Oo LW re YM Pp I ¢
hostess s will: neve to and {ro rt me casually: “Take 4 , ma
eee at , ‘ chair.” Thé financier, infuriated 20. 8 : ise, (4) r
ae i Phen iets Pa ae The Narkover Incident by this lack of respect, said: “It Be ire’ baat tans ore Gee FINAL INSTAL OPENS asinine ft ella had
cry : whe gues yea aa .. may interest you to know that I 25: Father takes tea to chatter. (6 T ; . "
Sree See Sepa he weigh Ot HE situation at Narkover is am Maron de Rothschild.” Without 26 Bird of lake ee ATOMIC THRILLS . . . CHILLS . . . SUSPENSE
S SAUSARS, & very complicated, Alarmed jooking up. Morny said: “Take Down Can the World be Dominated by another Planet?
P.T.O. by the state of affairs, many two chairs.” The ghostof Morny's 1: Animal thet brings the roost |

) , anxious parents are visiting the grandfather, Talleyrand, must y
I N Chicago jokes are being school, and the masters are have smiled at that. 4

printed on the back of bus having difficulty in dealing with on ee ee
seer: sO ig eaters may at them owing to the large numbers Forging Ahead f > Plus three, — 5 ‘ i
he habit~of turning the tickets of bogus parents who are present- S. Part of a foot. (3) \
Seer cee. an tenets k \ 7: Make good?” Well, about to | | JANE MARLENE MICHAEL —- RICHARD

g tt selves Dr. Smart-Allick N Paris they ‘have invented * "oc rr. (6 |
jokes, they will find advertising a nee rein. hs I : Bobtcen: re 1g to a WYMAN - DIETRICH - * WILDING - Topp |

. There's no top ring to preach

Is MARS inhabited by a Hostile Race of Supermen?
ing. (4) 3. Consumed

See the Shocking Answer’ in Republic’s




Death-dealing Serial



(5)








has instituted identification “robot salesman.” The ¥%- Conveyance
matt





to re iy a ere oe parades, at which visitors are figure walks about, answers 44, pateies tt) \ aoe “4 att es: 8 GRIPPING HCW GREATNESS FROM WARNER BROc. }
‘oA hs “condition” +h public lined up, while the boys are asked questions, draws attention to Af. A, broken cl (5) SO
and to break down sales-resist. ‘© identify tneir real fathers. The the wares, and even joins in 21. ould be frozen 23.. (3) |
ance to “Cod@dleham’s Sparkling fact that so many bogus fathers private conversations. The} 23. Bhst Riding B’ TOWN
British Claret or Batehoven — ®re acting in collusion with secret of this progressive idea }
The Only Toothpaste That Tickles ™#Sters, or even with the senior is “a hidden listener with al a Dial 2310.
The Ivories. boys themselves, adds to the con- microphone.” It occurs to mée

fusion, and they are already one that a hidden customer who |

Opening Tomorrow (F ridiay) |

2.30—4.45 and 8.30 p.m.
and ‘Continuing Daily 4.45 & 8.30 p.m.

< 6554 4 “
POPPE PPP SPP SPECS OO LAP LPLOPLP PLP A LM 0

Cleopatra and the codfish or two cases of prefects refusing happened to be a ventriloquist] /aelated"

to identify their genuine fathers. could have great fun in loudly} (2h3°°)

} HE Marquis de |l'Huile de The whole situation is further contradicting the robot, and| |'5,, Naive
} Foie de Morue, who stocked complicated by an _ influx of sneering at the whole business.|

t an ornamental pond at Figeac “uncles.” A _ fight between one (“Don’t buy that, madam. It's |

with salmon, Id have appre- “uncle” and a “father” in a not worth the money.”) Apart!

ul
iated the ar who was sacked prefect's study resulted in @ real from this, I don’t see why it is














‘ Featuring

rr s =
ee Rr oO NX Y ce S WALTER REED LOIS COLLIER















om his club forbuying a = father being stunned by a chair not easier to have an _ old-, % re
(fish, secreting it, and then “catch- row Vv a stre or, . Smart- fashi DC se s : oe 5 S - - — — = is
ing’ 5 it Plutarch tells 5 st heat eae re SS that, eS ees “ iieoieoe: eee. NOW SHOWING 4.45 & 8.15 x
of Cleopatra which shows that moment, the situation is out of to the customers. $ 3 R ae xX Y
mr me x â„¢
‘2 EN DN DN DNDN RIN ON DN DN EN BN DN DN OND DN IN NN EN I ON NNN ‘ . pe ae oo
ra | g TO-DAY 4.45 & 8.18% and Continuing Daily
& W ESTCLOX ALARM CLOCKS 8 °
& ‘ ee ee
$5.86 8 :
5 CARPETS . 5 » JOHN PICTURES presents
: OHN DEREK
5 4 ft x 2 ft 6” $434 &§ : t aie ort
S| 3 \ R
e . 6 ft6" x 5 ft $1750 & wee ,
& 2 | ‘vith x with {
by oY /
& .R EVANS & WHITFIELDS 2 ANTHONY QU Joy Lowe Ao Quito Le
a Arwold Moss + Eugene Iglesias % ee ~ ni.
& YOUR SHOE STORES a ee S Soon b AL URT« Pte WA OO eat ane
& Dial 4220 Dial 4606 s on Extra:
2 Shorts: —RACING y I
_ ARENNSNENENNE Ws NEN NSN NS WN A NN NN NN NN seenooseeseneenennssooscooeoreoscosconnseooosent Shee A ee





sii

fAURSDAY, JANUARY 3, 1952



** Fred, call Myrtle—I’m not having her runnine





Germans Trying

A NEW air service will link

Jestern Europe, the Near East,

and Japan. Swift Constellations

oO Oo e a 7r72en;n of K.L.M. Royal Dutch Airlines

will leave Schiphol Airport, Am-

sterdam, once a week and fly via

n Seiad . -

HANNOVER, Sunday.—British millions for weges and supplie ee ta ooee he ont

Treasury men have warned White- of British Forees which are pai covet ait , aad b ere

hall that the Germans are trying of Germany’s defence. Bat cratine eae ny: guce

to dodge paying for European “If the British taxpayer had late: - The schedule for this new

defware to foot the whole bill fer those 9750 mile service has been

anys "new duce boom, fants.» 4 pg

1500 000 Wank toneiiane. wont eee officials now negotiaing and countries already served by

pay double the £550 million they we end ef the occupation with K.L.M. The Constellations will

now reluctantly contribute to- Premier Adenauer have been told jeave Amsterdam every Tuesday

wards British French. and U.S by Whitehall : “The Germans must evening and are due to reach the

Forces defending them. “be made to pay. They must g0 Japanese capital on Friday morn-

The Germans, réported an in- °”,SUPPlying every penny of the jng, while the return trip leaving

vestigator today, could pay for £175 million for the British garri- Tokyo on Sunday is scheduled to

the 18 Allied Giwidkasic being ‘n son, whether it is called occupa- arrive at Schiphol on Tuesday

tioned along the I Curtain tion costs or a defence contribu- afternoon, which means that the

“iiler aha tee me Vision ton. west-bound flight only takes two
frontier and for a 12-division “Not a penny can be added to Five
ee Army as well. British income tax to maintain ou

this double contribution

f in a"
would end the Germans’ attempt eneve German;

In view of the special charac



a ae - ; at Senior British staff officers say of this frat flight, the aircraft
to Seize British export markets great economies have been will carry various letters and
while Britain, he ne it is ahr re~ ymade on garrison costs in the past presents. There is a letter from
oe eat ‘nd eeu, eee year. Further cuts would serious- the Burgomaster of The Hague to
oes ene “ rae ng. prefers ly hit the living standard of his colleague in Tokyo, and a let-
1a pes hee er ny new Eritish soldiers and Service ter from the Amsterdam Cham-
factories -and me the eon families in Germany. ber of Commerce to the Tokyo
shoulder the entire defence “Why should British troops Chamber of Commerce. After
burden, defending the Germans be allowed the Constellation arrives at Hane-

Individual Germans are paying to become poor relations?” said da Airport, a young oak tree
only half what the average British & Sentor staff officer. They are from the Dutch village of Bos-
taxpayer provides for defence. @}most that as it is.” koop (a famous _ tree-growing

i sonst ropaganda against British officials believe that it centre) will be planted in one of
Alged cecupation Soave is Selng is high time Finance Minister Tokyo’s main squares, The Mayo
used as a smoke screen to cover Schaefer got down to Collecting of Tokyo will be able to make
what the Germans could pay. his own taxes instead of accusing the acquaintance of a traditional

Finance Minister Fritz Schaefer the British ot extravagance. product of Holland, as another
claims that his taxpayers cannot These officials believe the gift consists of old Buse gin
possibly afford more than £750 Germans are dodging taxes from Schiedam, in an _ earthen-

wholesale
German

In addition, the West

million a year for the Allied gar- :
yison forces and a new German Parliamem refuses to Way eligine.

Army. But the British Treasury impose heavier taxation = — This will not be the first time
rejects this. apparently in th belief that the thet Dutch authorities have sent
Said a senior Brittsn financial Western Allies \ iti go on footing & letter to Japan on the occasion
ffi vial ‘ a We af i . wna & 87 rart of € many’s cefence of a first trip. In the early 17th
officia oday: ‘“‘We insist, an : g st F arly
important Americans agree, that bi . century when rumours of the
the Germans are well able to nd. Prominent German» ou,side the possibilities of trade with Japan
something over £1,000 millic Cwverns ere that there is pegan to reach Holland, the then
year. That would be about ten \ cesp™* . ion, ‘The pro- Stadtholder, Prince Maurice,
per cent. of Western Germany’s Vine cr cf Lower Saxony, wrote a personal letter to the
gross national inome,. Heinric p recenity told pyler of Japan.
~ “Tf the Germans refuse, a most 3ritish ! that Germany 3 <
serious situation wil arise. Br n could 1 Y h more money if On July 6, 1609, after a very
has a very hoavy three-year - the cr me enforced ‘the long voyage, two Dutch East In-
cae a nm is re : aws en — e “Red Lion wit!
jence programme. It is qu:.e pre x on laws. diamen the ed 5
: i increas ‘ < ’ Im tant ¢ mans allege that Arrows” and the “Griffen” cost
impossible to increase that ex} - i 1 so
iture no matter how much ne! the Go-ernment cared of big anchor in the harbour of Hirsdo,
pa howl business berons 1 the Ruhr, who not far from Nagasaki. The two
“Tf we fail to get the £175 mr ‘iiion contribu i big ms to Premier chief merchants on board ‘hen
the German. pay towards tish Adenauer’s elec’: nd were made their way to Edo, nowe“‘\ays
3 ans pay itis nd Ww 5
occupation costs will méan largely respon ior his Gov- known 4s Tokyo, ge ke
another 9d, in tI ¢ on income ernment getting in the Shogun the letter which :
tax—and the British cannot afford FOOTNOTE.—Cost of defence had brought from Prince Mau: *e
it. ORY in Britain this year is about £55 and to ¢ ‘eee ae peer
2 yerine rore th i é f the working population, betwecn the utch as ndia
“The Gerinans ignore the fact a head o ati : t n
vi 7 f he Government of
that the British taxpayer is paying L.E.S. Company and tt

SON DN TNT fs \ PSA ON NN BIN DOR NN DEON PAREN IN DAA DN AN ENE

BS

et}







WISH ‘TO
ALL OUR

CUSTOMERS
AND

FRIENDS

e
MANNING & €0O.. LTD.
THE CORNER STORE

Wh WG A NS BN BN WSS



aroun ut

|
NEW AIR 3 SERVICE “Port one —|

Ws WB 8 8s NN NB NNN NN

ter

ware container shaped like a rail-



SN NN NN NN NN NN NN A PN A BE WW NS NN MN

4

»

ww

BARBADOS ADVOCATE



| Jamaica Team
For Barbados

KINGSTON
For the second time in histor
Jamaica will send a team to Bar

bados leaving here on Jaauary 13
The first visit was in 1925
Captain is Arthur Bonitto, wh
captained the victorious tear
which beat British Guiana last
year. A leg-break bowler he
is a tolerable batsman
Wicket-keepey is Alfred Binn
who has improved not only as

wicket-keeper but also as a bate

man since he was given his first
opportunity to go to Trinidad i:
1950. Then there are the brothe:

Colin and Neville Bonitto, Neville
18 regarded as about the best bats-
man in the West Indies who did
not make the team to Australia

Colin an excellent fleldsman
Stanley Goodridge is a_ six-foo
| fast bowler and regarded by many
as the most promising new ball
bowler in the West Indices. He
can move the new ball out anc
when the shine is gone swings i
viciously into the body George
Mudie is the wonder-man
| Jamaican cricket He is a well
equipped left-hand all-rounder
and before Alfred Valentine camc
into the picture was regarded a
the best slow bowler of his typ«
n West Indies. John Prescod
is a brilliant stroke player an
Roy Miller who will pair wit!
Goodridge is a fast mediun
bowler who hits the ball dow:
ind moves it at a good length

FE. Saunders, Jnr., is a promis

is

the
















ing all-rounder just out of schooi
Dwr? ‘ » as, Other members of the tourin
Japan. The Shogun was pleased I Princess Elizabeth team are Horace Tulloch, batsma
at this visit and he gave the ° undo off-break bowler; Regyri
merchants a personal letter to Handicap (Scarlett, a school-boy off-breai
deliver to “The King of Holland” bowler; Denis Thorburn who hac
(the Stadholder), as well as trad- (From Our Own Correspondent) 1 good senson as a batsman, anc
ing permits for two ships, Thus GEORGETOWN, B.G., Jan \Sidney Abrabams, a reliable bate
began one of the most important Port Walvis pilcted by Zapata}man whc is algo Seeretary of the
chapters in Holland’s history as a 126 lbs. took over the lead in the | Jamaica Cricket Board of Contro
great naval power, viz, that of straight from haid-pressed Or- ; shic ave ts
the Dutch Factory in Japan, for chis (Beckles up) carrying t | In by ag nave we
this Dutch factory (or trading imposition of 186 lbs, in the Prin- place " ene, t th = an ae on,
station) remained the sole win- cess Elizabeth Handicap over ee ou wdarnitea toate wil
dow between Japan and Europe furlongs for A Class horses on Tea Wide ona a sunt ¢
for more than two centuries. New Year's Day and got home & ae whe oa Tein
Holland now holds a leading length ahead of the hitherto un- eee aH
place in commercial aviation and beaten Lopes colt to record it |
veces: —— eG a woomnd only win for the D,.T.C, “tryout
thought to the fact that ro { -eting . r
this first official air link ous amos. RIPeviNG St Joseph Round-Up
Japan one will be able to board a The rider Beckles, was unseat
luxurious airliner in Amsterdam ¢d twice through tangling with CHILD DIES
and disembark in Tokyo less the tape. Rushfel caused the onl A
than 2) days later, as fresh as if protest of the meeting when in +
it was Merely a taxi drive from coming through the straight 10( SUDDENLY
one contine»t to another. yards from the pole in a driving
This is in striking contrast to finish with Millionaire and Swiss
the weary voyage undertaken in Roll she appeared to cross th A TWO-YEAR-OLD child, the
1598 by five Dutch vessels —Loy- former and finished half a length |son of Mr, and Mrs, Lutcher Hop
alty, Hope, Love Glad Tidings ahead of Millionaire { Cleavers Hill died suddenly a
and Faith whose captains had The Stewards consulted for 59}their residence on New Year
heen instructed to set sail for minutes and decided to disqualify |#ve A post mortem examina
Asia via South America. This her and award Millionaire second]|!ion Was performed by Dr, W. Hf
expedition was a great disap- place E., Johnson the same day and
pointment. Only one ship, the verdict of death due to natura
Love, commanded by Captain Result ‘auses, was returned
Jacob Janszoon Quaeckernaeck,
succeeded in sealing the har- a Dy la nig THE INMATES of St. Joseph’
bour of Bungo on the island of 1. SINK LASSIE, Apha “U2 tb Almshouse were entertained at
Kyushu on April 19, 1620.. The 2. GOLDN}E, Beckies (119 Ibs the Almshouse on New Year's
voyage had lasted almost 24 years, °° es Pa hr oak aac ib Eve. First was the Annual “Spe
The ship was practically derelict NEW YEAR HANDICAP ial’ Dinner and Musie supplied
and the crew had been greatly G Furls, — Class § by an amateur orchestra and the
Gepletea through _sickness and 4 i eee rete ne, Vink de) MIRRTES “CANCER.
vardship. This was the voyage 3 guNWATCH, Persaud (105 Yor
which led the Dutch Stadtholder Time; 1 Min, 20 Se THE RE-OPENING of the)
to send a letter to the Shogun Orange Cottage Social Club took
when the first expedition left Ont ROHL, HANDICAP place on New Year's Eve. The
Holland for Tokyo 1. Rolla J Te eee ti jo activities of this Club will be in-
ba) ioor games, debates,, handicrafts
Throughout the centuries of 2 POPT WALVIS, Sunich (120 Ibs) There are plans for forming a
peace and war, prosperity and RUSHFEL, Madray (108 Ib choir whieh will be conducted by
decay, the connections by sea and Cie. W knph st Aidaratkn Mr. J, N, Arthur. A music clase
hence the commercial relations, 4 Parts Class Wi will be started in the near future
were maintained as long as cir- 1 CRACKERJACK, Patrick (119 Ib
ecumst. necs permitted. The Dutch UGLY, Ferretra (196 lb : RAIN which fell over the last
arte . JUMPING BABI Persaud (100 & 7 .
imparted to the Japanese thei: a Gverwelaht week caused further damages to |
knowledge of the natural sciences, Time: 1 Min. 21 1/5 Sec St. Joseph’s roads. Cars travelling
astronom,’, medicine and mathe- m ilong Chimborazo road were held
matics, aid their influence wa: Tne Geta ene up and other traffic was forced
such that the Dutch language be- , saga poy, Suniech, “120. ibs) to turn back and go through}
came the official tongue for diplo- 2 PENSIVE, Zapata, (129 tbs) Bragges Hill by way of Sugar Hill.
matic negotiations of the Japan- 3 TR LASSIE, Aphan, (116 Ibs) The Braggs Hill pond which}
ese Government PRIVGRas ELIBABETM naNpicar [Was dried up for a number of
The development of national Seven Furlongs —— Claws A months before the rains, was
prosperity has often been pre- | PORT WALVIS Zapata, (126 Ibs) [full again. Washer women took
ce‘ed and stimulated by commun- eee at Pe eis yea, [the opportunity of using this}
ications Which opened up new * Time: 1 Min. 30 Se pond water instead of going up-
possibilities, Like their seafaring es AL, HANDICAP hill to the standpipe. The water
ancestors, the modern Flying | puasdroid, Aphan (115 ibs) was used only for washing. —
Dutchman will continue to play 9 yanIONAIRE, Singh, (116 Ibs) Very few holiday makers wer«
an active part in such develop- BROWN RUBY, Sunich (196 Ibs), it Bathsheba on Boxing Day, be-
(RUSHFEL disqualified in this reece.) Jcause of the rains. Those who

ment










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PAGE THREE









attended, aance
Berry Free



were

of the 1 t dep

Da nee ’ \

he Advocate, . the

va more ur S we , :
Christmas D ur a safe '
Holiday th +

Christma

specially

packed tin!

BATHSHEBA
th holid
Year’s Day Batl
Beach i oN
Cher

Be

Crane
Beach
Heywoods
vouri

At Bathshe
letic Sports, Cr
ea-bathing

aE ee eT



the
eke dD

C
bot

irs, lorrie und

h sides of the 1 pe
ians found it ve

get from one place

There
at Morgan Lewi S \
though
uninviting
ing at the
everyone
hemselve



Was no ex

once agai:
There v no ne
other be ‘
ob\ i e!











DON'T GET
4 BBs

NERVOUS ABOUT



. ‘ _ re Y
KEEP FIT ON
4 4 s

ae 4

BOVERIL





\ PF 4
a wer on 4

Gr




gee ore

—
tad aD ad Sis

LACKWELL





i \D CGRBAM
dL \ (LZ [b SG RAETAN
f ONE OF THE
\
\ C:B
4
WORLD-FAMOUS FOOD PRODUCTS
‘\ T. Geddes Grant Ltd., Bridgetown,
Ply? 2
i: \
\ a
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|
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| ® We'll soon, have that better

ASEPTIC OINTMENT

Children’s skin ailments need the soothing
touch of Germolene Ointment. It re-
lieves irritation, subdues inflammation and
gives protection against the ontry of
harmful bacteria You will find, too,
that Germolene draws out dirt from cuts,
abrasions, blisters and sores and stim-
ulates the growth of new skin, Keep @
tin of Germolene handy for family use,

FOR
SPOTS, RASHES, BURNS
IRRITATIONS, ABRASIONS

at a touch heals in record time.






















te ee

PAIN and WOMEN
40, 30 AND OLDER!

here's how you can
be strong and active












A if you feel run down, are not
Ay as full of life as you should be,
WS and colds hang on, you may

\\ need more A&D Vitamins.

Try scientific, good-tasting
Scott's Emulsion. Take it
regularly all year round
Vitamins and energy-building oil.
It helps build resistance, stamina
and energy.

More than just a tonle~
It’s POWERFUL NOURISHMENT

b

PTT eC

H/GH. ENERGY FOOD TONIC





Ms casy to keep
the lavatory

clean?



Shake some ‘ Harpic * into the
bowl — leave overnight ~— then
flush, That's all. No brushis need-
ed Harp thorough action
t hole pan even where
* Wary is safe to use in all lavatories,

including those connected to septic tanks,

HARPIG

THE Ss LAVATORY CLEANSER

ee ee eee ee



PAGE FOUR



BARBADOS

Cease ene Se eee tose

Printed by the Advaryte Co., Lid., Broad St., Bridgetown







Thursday, ; January 3, y 3

NEW COMPANION

MR. ADAMS is a distinguished West
Indian who has brought honour to Barba-
dos in many countries. Honours have been
accumulating upon him ever since he
represented Great Britain as a member of
the delegation that attended a meeting of
the United Nations in Paris in 1948, The
reception given to Mr. Adams later that
year on his return to Barbados has never
been accorded to any other politician. A
year later he became a member of the Com-
mittee of I.L.O. Experts on the application
of international conventions and a member



19









TON ROSSITER)
illiams, founder of the
Rhode Island, who has
been well and wisely celebrated as
one of the mest noteworthy polit
cal thinkers in colonial Americ
died more than a century
the Constitution of the United
| States was adopted. In proclaim -
ing the doctrines of liberty of con-
science and separation of church
and state, he answered propheti-
cally many questions which
treubled thinking men for genera-
tions, In expounding the rewt
liberating concepts of populai
overeignty and social compact, hi
| contributed



Colony of





before

as much as any

[colonial to the cause of seven-
teenth-ceniury republicanism. His

will be quoted by men oi

fre edom so long as freedom exisis.

It has been popular to euiogi
Witliams as visionary, This, how-
ever, ignores or undervalues the



|
|

yo ality of his experience in a wide

of the International Institute of Political ie : SP comet teas rc tcaees
7 7 : rot only 10ught, vut acted,
and Social Science. And also in 1949 he be- There was an unusually close con-
came Vice-President of the World Feder- “eons A joe aaa aoa ae
“ a : Lween eoryv ane pract ce, 4
ation of Trade Unions. He is at present a te imped his personality em-
Member of the Caribbean Commission and i: ie ci gi ate ny en ty within
whicn 1e ived, anc ne society
has been for several years a member of the turn gave form and support io
Council of the University College of the one Ee en ari
: eh ilso has been popular to ques-
West Indies. Yet it is doubtful whether Mr. | jjon the ‘validity of Rhode Island’:
Adams has been awarded a C.M.G. in the ven a - sere. experi-
ent in self-government. This, too,
New Year Honours for any of these is the judgement of persons who
achievements. isk too much of the colonists and
rea trial of freed But, -
The Order of St. Michael and St. George | 00,5" tha factors whieh taiiites
was founded in 1818 soon after the cession against the success of the
of Malta to Great Britain and just after the olony —the existence of the older
; ; q hief towns, the open hostility of
Ionian Isles came under English protection. 1eighbour colonies, the land specu-
The Order was founded with the object of ea eee Ee colonists
; ; i 5 { a »fus' oO approve,
honouring the most meritorious of the Mal-: jthe feudal designs of William
tese and Ionians as well as British sub- Coddington (another founder of
‘ s ie a os Log Rhede Island), the lack of geo-
jects who had distinguished themselves in raphic unity, the absence of law

those areas. The Order consists of Knights
Grand Cross, Knight Commanders and
Cavalieri or Companions. Mr. Adams is a
new Companion.

Members of the order enjoy rank and
precedence immediately after the corres-
ponding classes of the Order of Bath.

Today honours of this order are normally
given to colonial civil servants of wide ex-
perience and the order is employed espe-
cially to honour Colonial Governors, who
normally become Knight Commanders and
sometimes later Knights of the Grand
Cross. The Chancery of the order is at the
Colonial Office and the Grand Master is the
Earl of Athlone.

The Order of St. Michael and St. George
takes precedence over the Star of India, the

Order of the Indian Empire. the Royal Vic-
torian Order, the most excellent Order of
the British Empire and Knights Bachelor.
The choice of honour by which Mr. Adams's
distinguished political service to Barbados
has been rewarded is in itself a high com-
pliment to him. There have been honours
previously awarded to West Indian politi-
cians but few observers of the West Indian
political seene to-day can deny that the hon-
our conferred upon Mr. Adams has been
given to a man who has shown political
ability of a. high order. In congratulating
Mr. Adams on the honour he has so well
deserved Barbadians can congratulate him
too on his acceptance of an award from a
country which is showing unmistakable
signs of its willingness to co-operate with
West Indian politicians in their efforts to
run their own affairs.

Mr. Adams’ acceptance of His Majesty
the King’s recognition of his meritorious
services to Barbadian political life is a
happy augury of Barbados’ continued good
relations with a country whose history has
for so many centuries been intertwined
with ours, and whose records of achieve-
ment far exceed its lists of failures. In the
insignia of the Knights Grand Cross of the
Order of St. Michael and St. George there is
in the centre of a seven-rayed silver star
besides a representation of the Archangel
St. Michael encountering Satan the motto in
Latin “AUSPICIUM MELIORIS AEVI”.
No fitter order could be selected for any
politician at the beginning of a New Year
when the “augury of a better era” is the
most universal wish of men and women
whose prosperity depends so much on pol-
iticians’ judgments and knowledge.

Mr. A. de K. Frampton who also becomes
a Companion of the Order of St. Michael
and St. George in the New Year’s Honours
will receive the congratulations of many
Barbadians who are aware of his distin-
guished services to West Indian agricul-
ture, while the honour conferred upon Mr.
Douglas, the former Divisional Manager of
Cable & Wireless is regarded by thousands
here as an honour conferred on one of
themselves.



SWEEPING CHANGES
Jan. 2

WASHINGTON, 2,
President Truman ordered a wholesale
shakeup of the Internal Revenue Bureau
Wednesday and the chief of the scandal
shaken tax collecting agency disclosed that
53 more employees have been fired or
forced to resign.
Truman said the purpose of the “sweep-
ing reorganization” will be to take the
Revenue Bureau out of the political the-

atre and protect it from the “influence of
peddlers.”

The nation’s 64 offices of collectors of
internal revenue would be abolished in

favour of 25 District offices, each headed by
a Commissioner under the civil service.
Under the proposal, the tax system’s
only political appointee would be its top
official tax commissioner. At present all 64
collectors are political appointees,—-U.P

e ra the leniency of exis* -
ing laws, the free play accorded
ii manner of conflicting religious
beliefs, and the general spirit of
democracy and independence
(which several times erupted in
open anarchy) — it is surprising
that it survived at all to win it:

independence within the English
colonial system.

Yet Rhode Island did survive
with a minimum of bloodshed and
with its libertarian principles in a
iemarkable state of preservation,

It is a thing to be wondered at that
there in the American wildern
everal thousand men tilled the
felds and plied theiy trades with
no interference from magistrates,
‘lergy, or other holders of power,

Roger Williams, “the indispen-
ible man” in this triumph of
rimitive democracy, participated
in the political affairs of town and
colony from his first days as pro-
prietor (1636) to his last as plain
ilizen (1683). He was called upon
epeatedly by his fellow colonial
to discharge some office of the
greatest or smallest trust. As arbi-





trator, moderator, constitution-
maker, town councillor, assistant,
“chief officer,” president, peace-
maker, captain of the citizen
soldiers, committeeman, special
envoy to the American Indians,
scribe, and general handy man

for the town of Providence and the
colony, he gave uncounted years
of his many-sided life to public
service,

Few political thinkers have had
so many practical opportunities to
test their theories, nor at the same
time have drawn so many new
ideas irom experience, Williams
put the doctrines of popular re-
publicanism and religious Jiberty
to work in the Rhode Island
commonwealth. Instead of draw-
ing all his ideas from books and
theory, he acquired some of his
most cherished beliefs along the
hard road of .experience. Among
the lessons which Williams learned
by experience and the principles
he found helpful or essential to
f.ee and orderly government
were: free inquiry and free ex-
pression of the results; arbitration
of differences; the need of authority
the recognition of the rights and
duties of the individual, anc
equality of opportunity,

His letters and incidents in his
public career prove that through
most of his half-century in Rhode
sland, Roger Williams was as
much the seeker in politics as in

, minded

» ence



eligion, He came to the concjusion
that in statec: aft, as in theology,
authority grounded in doctrine
would harden into tyranny
grounded in dogma, and that open-
investigation was there-
sre only trustworthy tecue-
nique for reaching adequate
solutions to the provems faci
man-in-society, Free men, urged
Williams, must have free minds,
and he spent his life convincing
sriends and neighbours that their
way of life depended for continued
success on the cultivation of tne
habits of intellectual freedom, At

tne

the same time, he made cleay that
whatever conclusions a man
eaches by himselt he must be

prepared to discuss openly and re-
sponsibly with his ie low citizens
without fear of official interfer-
or private intolerance.
Williams was consistent in his
cesire to accord treeaom of ex-
pession to opinions thac he found
Stupid or evea cange.ous. Once,
in 1672, he rowed a oat all day
nd haif the night from Providence
to Newport to aetate before a
hostile audience, williams learned
rom positive experience — at the
assembly in Portsrnourn, wie wwa-
meeting in Providerfte,
council-fire in the Narrangense +
country—that men who will «c
openly for the truth and talk !
iy and humbly about them con-
clusions with their fellows are the
stuff of political democracy
inquiry and free expressior
experienced-proved staples
poli.ieal faith,
In keeping
emphasis on
Williams put a high value
spirit of compromise,
learned to recognise this
the magic wand thac turns lice
into liberty and thu brings
stability to free society. Following
his written advice to the inhabit-
ants of Providence in 1648, re-
garding squabbles then convulsing
the Rhode Island towns,
covenant was adopted which
asserted: “We apprehend no
so suitable to our condition as gov-
ernment way of arbitration.’
All his life he clung to the con-
viction that peacefully minded
men could settle ‘heir own differ-
ences without recourse to goverr-
mental sanctions — by referring
them to fellow citizens prepared to
examine the facts objectively and
give reasoned judgment,
While most of che
eventeenth-century
obeyed the laws,
und discharged

ana



re





with
peace among

his everlasting

men
on the
had

He
spiri



way

by



people of
Rhode Island
paid their taxes,
their obligations
faithfully as citizens of a_ free
olony, there were some who
found any kind of authority dis-
tasteful and who preached the
gospel of all-out anarchy, In a
public letter to the town of
Providence, in 1665, Williams,
leaving no doubt that it was the
civil and religious liberty of men
under a government of their own
making, not the irresponsible
license of beasts in a jungle, that
he had always championed, said:

“That ever I should speak
write a tittle, that tends to
infinite liberty of conscience,
mistake, and which I have ever
disclaimed and abhorred, To pre-
vent such mis.akes, 1 shall at
present only propose this case
There goes many a ship to se,
with many hundred souls in one
ship, whose weal and woe is com-
mon, and is a true picture of a
commonwealth, or a human com-
bination or society. It hath fallen
out sometimes, that both Catholics
and Protestants, Jews, and Turks,
may be embarked in one ship;
upon which supposal I affirm, that
all the liberty of conscience, that
ever I pleadeq for, tugns upon
these two hinges — thet none of
the Catholics, Protestants, Jews, or
Turks, be forced to come to the
ship’s prayers or worship, nor
compelled from their own particu-



or
an
is a





lar prayers or worship, if they
practis any. I further add that
notwithstanding this liberty, the

commander of this ship ought to
command the ship’s course, yeu,
and also command that justice,
peace and sobrie y, be kept and
practised. both among the seamen
and all the passengers, If any of
the seamen refuse to perform their
services, or passengers to pay their
freight; if any refuse to help. in
person or purse, towards the com-



Barbados
Eighty Million

(From a Correspondent)

THe income of the people of
Barbados as a whole was certainly
far larger in terms of money in
1951 then it has ever been before.

| Although Government here has
not yet started to put out official
computations of the “national in-
come”, one may make a_ very
| rough round-figure estimate on the
strength of such information as
j has come to hand, and it seems
j that ‘gure Of eighty million
B.V collars for the 195! national
}income einnot be far wrong.

|} Although one is within reason-
ably safe limits in pu ting forward
a total figure of this order, one is
on far more uncertain groun in
trying to estimate the parts which
| make up the total. However, em-
holdened by New Year spirits a







j prepered’ for he attack of in
\formed critics, we suggest thet th<
{income was roughly made up as
| follows:—

1(1) Sugar and other agricultural

produce,

Exported ...
| Sold locally

. $32 millions
$8 millions



(2) Goods and products manu-
factured in the Island, whether
exported or sold _ locaily

ere, ee oe $13 millions

(3) Costs of dis ribution of im-
ports and local products
EL gaan ae ea $12 millions

(4) Public utilities, domestic end
personal services $14 millions

(5) Central and local government
services $10 millions

(6) House rents and costs of new
construction and repairs

$10 millon

(7) Net income from outside the
island $5 million

Gross aggregate, say $104 millio





1s Overseas student



From .his aggregate one must
make deductions for the impovied
raw materials, fertilisers, fuel,
containers, building materials and
so on used in creating the agricul-
tural and manufactured products,
and for double counting (for ex-
ample of electric current generated
under iem 4 of our list but con-
sumed in providing services under

items 2, 3 or 5). Putting the sum
of all such deductions at bout
twen y-four million dollars, we

have reached our figure of eighty
million dollars as the gross
national product of 1951 at what is
called “factor ", that is at
market price net of customs and
excise duties and of subsidies,

To assess how much of this eighty

U.K. Christmas
For B.W.L
Students

LONDON

Colonial students in the United
Kingdom including some from the
We Indies, are taking part in
Christmas holiday courses ar-
ranged by the British Council in
various pé the country,
which will give them a traditional
Christmas and opportunities of
meeting British people in their
homes.

cos







Many invita ions
ceived from
giudents to visit them in their
homes and these are being passed
on to the students. The Council's
aim has been to ensure no
need be alone at
—B.U.P.

have
London

been re-
families for

that

Christmas-time.

- commanders ‘



1951 Ineomes:
Dollars

RARBADOS ADVOCATE

ADVOCATE Roger Williams: Leading Early

|

mon charges or defense; if any |
retuse to obey the common laws
and oraers of the ship, concerminy |
her common peace or preserva-|
tion; if amy shail mutiny and rise
up ageinst their commanders and|
olticers, if any should preach or|
write that there ought to be no)
officers, no laws
nor orders, r correcuons nor |
punishments;—I say, whatever is
pretended, the commander or com-
manders may judge, resist, compe:
and punish Such wangressors, ac-
cording to their deserts anc
merits.”

This courageous message of
persecuted individualist stands
even today as the tough-mindea
testament of one who had learnea ,
‘Mrough the hardest kind of ex-.
perience tha’ liberty without law, !
and government without authority, |
are swamps in which true freedom
sinks without a trace.

Concerning the place of the in-
dividual in the social community,
Williams’ individualism was sur-
prisingly modern in flavour. His
writings stressed the social fac
that men found the fullest ex-'!
pression of their liberty in fulfill-
ing their functions in the com-
munity. A free man had duties
as well as rights; indeed, he hac
no claim to the latter unless he wa
prepared to execute the former
The record of Williams’ years ir

* Providence shows tha‘ he came to
' this belief through saddening ex-
S perience, and that again the colony

itself accepted this man’s teaching
when the Acts and Orders of
1647 embodied the concept of re-
ciprocal rights and duties. The
‘rials of the Colony of Rhode
Island taught Williams and many

> of his fellow workers the neces-

sity of individual participation in
public life. His was a social, ever
fraternal individualism

Three centuries ago in Provi
dence, Roger Williams practisec
another belief which some met.
are still content only to preacn.
the principle of equality, perhap
the firmes., spiritual and practica:
foundation of democratic society

Williams had an intimate workin; '

knowledge of the prime import-
ance of this principle for the re-
conciliation ef liberty and orde.
under fres government. H-
arrived first at a belief in religiou
equality. Later, gar ahead of hi

age, he extended this concept to a\f

other essentials
equality in law (which wa
realized in the code of 1647) |
equality in land (which he spon
sored with a selflessness unmatch

least three

ed in colonial America), an
equality in governmen: (whic:
spurred his relentless campaig

against the pattern of feudalisn
that others sought to transplan
from the old world). Most un-
usual was his insistence on lanc
for all on equal terms, for th
late-comer as well as for the
original homesteader. The

American doctrine of equality o | |

opportunity hag at least one of it: |
roots in Williams’ democratic lanc
policy.

Williams was a_seventeenth-
century prophet of severa
momentous nineteenth and twen-
tieth-century principles. In his}
comprehension of the workings o: |
political, religious, and corporat: |
institutions, he came very close to
the concept of pluralism. Second,
he had an understanding of the
way in which economic arrange-
ments shape political institutions. |
And he seems aiso to have

per
ceived that social and politica
institutions are always in a state

of change, and that it is therefore |
inexpedient and unnatural to en-
force a rigid pattern of law and
government upon any society.
Some of his working principles
have been absorbed into the great
body of American thought, som
have not, But all were the produc’
of a general technique that un-
numbered Americans, many of!
whom never hear of Roger Wil-
liams, were to make the leading
article of their political faith. No
idea is sound until it has been
tested through experience; if it ha
been learned through experience.
so much the sounder. To ‘his ex-
tent Roger Williams was the firs‘
American political thinker.
—American Quarterly.

million dollars was actually dis-|
iributed among people working 1:
sarbados, one must make a furine:
deduction for the sums set asia
by companies and businesses b)
way of reserves for depreciation
and undistributed profits, say tive

million dollars. Another tei
millions may be deducted fo:
pensions, overseas interest anc!
remittances, rents and other “un

earned” incomes, Then the balanc’
sixty-five million dollars, repre
sents’ the sum distributed among
the men and women working her:
foy their living, who must nov
number just over 100,000. Thi
gives an average earned incom’
per worker of $650 or per famil:
of $1,250.

Our Readers Say:
Thanks
To The Editor, The Advocate—
Sir,—Early this month a com:
munication was received from ‘the
Secretary of State for the Colo-
nies saying that the Prime Min-
ister had received a personal)
message of congratulation from)
“W.P. Hastings” on his assumption
ef office, and that, since pressure
of other duties has prevented him
from making, a personal ac-





B.H. Population Continues:
American Politieal Thinker |

must be used for the transportation of sup-

| Expenditure on Colonial Delevopment and



THURSDAY, JANUARY 3.



1952

ANNAN TER DENN TN NNT DN 58 087.
A Prosperous New Years:
TO ALL








To Thin Out

Big U.K. Contributions





To Colony’s Finances | zs
LONDON. 2
British Honduras now has an estimated Advocate Stationery po



population of only 7.54 people per square mile
‘uf territory, making it the most thinly-
populated territory in the British Caribbean,
with the sole exception of British Guiana. |

Yet the trend in the movement of popula-
‘ion shows that more people are concentrat-
ing in Belize and moving away from the
agriculturally important Northern District,
| forsaking the land in search of more lucra-
tive occupations.

This trend is shown in the official report
‘or British Honduras for 1950, just published
vy the Colonial Office in London. The Colony,
with an area of 8,866 square miles, has a pop-

ulation of only 66,892, the report estimates. |
Density of population varies from 18.33 per

square mile in the Belize District down to
3.31 in Toledo.

This compares with the population in Bar-
»ados, where some 193,000 people live in 166
_quare miles, giving a population density of
1,159 people per square mile, and in Jamaica,
where the population is 296.5 per square mile.
Jalyin British Guiana is there a lower dens-
' v of population, with 4.2 per square mile.

No mention is made in the British Hon-
uras report of suggestions that emigration
schemes should be fostered to relieve the
pressure on the crowded Caribbean islands
nd to resettle unemployed people in the
mainland territories.

But the potentialities of British Honduras
3 a Colony ripe for development are refer-

d to when the reports says: “No thorough
survey of the soil of the Colony has yet been
made, but it is believed that there are several
uncultivated areas where profitable agricul-
ure could be carried on and there are similar
sopes that a geological survey would not be
ound unproductive.”

At present, the economy of the Colony de-
pends largely on timber extraction and the
sred-etion of chicle, from which chewing
um is made. Chicle bleeders form the largest
ingle occupation group in the Colony and

-eir average earnings, at $75 a month, are
‘mong the highest for labourers.

The report gives a table of occupations and
vages, which includes even the 46 labourers
nd 29 tradesmen working on the construction
f the new hotel in Belize. After the chicle
»leeders, the second largest group of workers
1 the Colony is made up of road labourers,
his*table shows.

Road construction is one of the most im-
»ortant things that must be done before the
ull economie possibilities of the Colony can
1c exploited, although the report stresses the

importance of the sea, rivers and bush trails
n communications, adding: “It is inevitable

hat these means will continue to play an
mportant part in the life of the Colony; they

BENE NG NENG NNN NNN







Secure in the knowledge thut all












your Hardware requirements for the coming
year are obtainable at Pitcher’s, where tie
economy and value of your every purchase is

a guarantee of satisfaction.

May we look forward, then, to
seeing you in the NEW YEAR at

Cc. S. PITCHER & CO.

|
}
Phone 4472
|





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WHY NOT eee VALUABLE FOOD ?

STERNE’S DEEP FREEZE

»lies to the settlements on the banks of the
ivers, for no road scheme could contemplate
nking up all the scattered communities.”

HUGE FOOD SUBSIDIES

-h a chapter on finance, the report draws
attention to the grants-in-aid made by the
mperial Exchequer over a number of years,
‘ating back to 1931 when a disastrous hurri-
ane wrecked the Colony’s economy. The
otal sums granted to the Colony up to the
ond of 1950 include $3,136,290 in grants-in-aid
ind $6,301,817 in Colonial Development and
Velfare grants. The Colony’s revenue from
soth these sources increased sharply in 1950
ind in addition there was a special grant of
$1,331,095.

Expenditure during the year included
/472,502 on subventions, which includea
$430,000 spent on subsidies on food and ne-
cessities to keep down the cost of living.



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a
Welfare schemes was nearly doubled during
the year.

The food subsidies were made necessary
by the devaluation of the B.H. dollar to the
fixed rate of $4 to the £. Previously, the B.H. START
dollar was at parity with the U.S. dollar and ‘
—unique among British Colonial currencies— THE YEAR
was so left when sterling was devalued in | RIGHT

im

September, 1949. This position proved un-
WITH THESE

tenable, says the report, and the change in
value was essential in the interests of thc |

VOURISHING
FOODS





Colony’s economy.
“Owing to the traditional local dependence

on United States sources of supply,” the re- |
port continues, “the cost of living was bounc ||

to be adversely affected by such a change, bu
His Majesty’s Government made a specia |!
grant of $450,000 for the year so as to enabl: |
the application of subsidisation measures tc |
cushion the effects of devaluation, particu



Cold Storage Hams
Cold Storage Bacon
Smoked Kippers
Smoked Haddock
Anchor Milk Powder

COCKTAILS
Plain Oliv +s }
Stuffed Olives

Cocktail Cherries



knowledgement, he (the Prime|
Minister) had asked that an ex-|
pression of his appreciation shouid| |

be conveyed te “W.P, Hastings.’

I have not been able to trace)
anyone named “W.P. Hastings”
and the initials presumably are|
those of some one living at
Hastings. I should be grateful if

you would publish this letter in|
the hope that it will catch his (or
her) eye,
I am,
Sir, |
Your obedient servant,

R, N. TURNER,

Colonial Secretary.

| the year.—B.U.P. \

Anchor Evaporaied Milk Scones i
larly in so far as the poorer classes are con- Empire Coffee Sardines \
cerned! Lipton Coffee Uffillet Puffs |}

But devaluation increased the cost oc! Ser Cheese Crisps ||
imports from $5,990,264 in 1949 to $8,787,51( AFTERNOON TEA Patek Meets
in 1950 and there was only a small increase '{] yipton Tea Gold Braid Rum 1
in the value of exports, to $4,779,802. Red Rose Tea Meltis Dates and Figs



Principal exports during the year were | pemearng ee tas ain MEAT DEPT. __ |
$1,061,887 worth of pine timber, $1,000,087||| Kraft Cheese Poultry }
worth of mahogany timber and $1,002,451 ||} Chocolate Peppermints st

worth of chicle gum. There was a strong de-
mand for pine from Trinidad, Jamaica and |
other British Caribbean colonies and export |
prices for this product were far above those 1!
| fixed for local sales, with the result that an |!
| acute local shortage of pine developed during | |

Calves Liver
Mutton Shoulders
Fresh Vegetables

Resolve to call Goddard's Daily
during 1952 for ail your
Grocery Needs

Salt Mackerel
Salt Herrings





a



”
a,

THURS RSDAY, JANUARY 1952



Woman Guilty Of
Wounding With Intent

Sentence Postponed

AFTER 15 minutes’ deliberation at the Court of Grand

ns yesterday a jury found Pearl Roach of St. Lucy
ullty of wennding Nelly Husbands of Rock Hall, St. Lucy,

te to maim, disfigure or do grievous bodily harm

ver 16 last year, The case was heard before the

e Chiet Judge Sir Aan Collymore who postponed

r

Roae ich bit off a piece of Husbands’ left ear.

nt

Septem|

Besides this





bit her in two other places. ’
rebation officers will seek information concerning
character before sentence is passed.
i nding was done af er On the Saturday after the {ght
' been a ht between Cpl. Bennett came to her and she
Roact daughter Nelly cmd Hus- ictG him then than she knew
in nothing about it. She old him
: e a clean record,” the ~o because she did not intend go-
Judge tol to before — ng at the Court to give evidence
iy from the doc “Th ere fcr “nybody.

i ttl doubt th you were ag- Eslyn Boyce of Rock Field, St
gray on behalf of your Lucy, corroborated Nelly Hus-
a4 er. It is unfor unste that bands’ evidence as to the first fight
r reason or other some Sho adced tha blood was running
people seem to lose their sense of down Pearl Roach’s forehead
resnonsib ty at excursions.” when they were on the road. She
( R. Niles was defence €id not see the biting. She came
counsel. Mr W.'W. Reece, K.C., to the scene of the second fight

ted for the crown, fterwards.
The Y cution called six wit- Nelly was learning to sew with

t anc

i tendered one for cross- her and sometimes slept at her.

on. The defence called To he Court she said that wher

four witnesses. Nelly got off the lorry there w:
Prosecution’s Case no blood on her.





























BARBADOS ADV 0c: ATE

Ltn:

MUSICAL CHAIRS





TWO competitors struggle for a chair in the Musical Chairs Competition at the Civic Day Fair at Queen's
Park on New Year's Day. The competitors had to ride donkeys.







Labourer Gets **L.ouise”’ Brings =

6 Months






100 Lb. Bill



‘isk



1

‘Phe case for the prosecution was Cpl. Samuel Bennett of District FOR STEALING SHIRT .
hat s me people including Pearl “B” said that about 6.30 p.m. on F ; t 17 Mi k t I If)
Roach, left St. Lucy on September September 16, he was sent to Theodore Harding, a 46-year rayne urs d ji ar et fi eda
16 to go on an excursion to the Windsor Road to make investiga- o)q labourer of Dé lamere Land,
eee: they were returning from ae he the Meits Pearl Roach S;. Michael was yesterday sen- THE Fishing boat Louise, owned by Mr. C. Marshall
1e Xi out 5 to 5.30 p.m, denied biting Nelly tenced tc ix months’ impris § - ? oe ‘ ’
t $ prison- rought a 100-3 ; . arket veste .
and had reached Windsor Road, St. , He observed a small abraion on ment with hard labour by Mi brought a 100-pound bill fish a0 the Fish Mat ket yesterday
Ge ’ a polar van was t’e side of Pear! Roach’s eye when C, L. Walwyn, Police Magistrate afiernoon It was the first fish to be sold in the market in
seen :nd ihe lorry stopped so that © arrived on the scene of District “A,” for stealing a 1952. Many people were around trying to buy a piece and
sor of tt Y ule ly polars. . ’ hirt ral t 8 belongi ) Jas S$ ic
wher ul i y W er sped Defence ° W. tnesses Neville. xieyos. or nS 28 — ™ — SeeRy. } ;
inusitiaris «who were on the en The aefencs called witnesses. - d 1 December 28. The Louise was also the last fishing boat to carry fish
i wh on ‘ : eab . arle 5 ay — ; ——
started to play music and many sng rie or Crab Hill, St. Alleyne told the court that he into the market in 1951. On Monday evening it carried in
who | got off the lorry began “UC; WHO also went to the ex- Icft his shirt hanging on a line 80 pounds of flying fish.
to dances Others left: the lorry °-220".°2 he jorry was the first. in a vard in Chapman's Lane, : : A fairly large number of flying
and went for a stroll : She said she saw Eslyn royce, St Michael on December 27 4 9 fish was caught on New Year
A fight over a seat on the lorry “netha Roach and Nelly Hus- The next morning he missed the Remanded For Day but the Fish Market wa
starte between Pear! nach! bands fignting on the lorry, shirt Later the same day he closed. The fish was sold alon
‘ at haar tae She saw Neily Husbands holding w tl defe I \ ing : the streets and at the \ ou
daught Agnetha and Ne 3 y sba nolding v le endant wear eae. * ari
band neat ee _ a a kerchief to her bleeding ear He reported the matter to the House Breaking beaches E
Roach arrived and cuffed Nelly a Sfter the fight on the lorry. This Police Mr, C, L. Walwyn Police ino fan ssid Peoe te
fey 3 was nearly five minutes after they Magistra “san ; sol eople con ed
ee : th had leit the lorry. : In h defence Harding said manded Prot steraieg- ounce “Dry bys Ive vg the remains of
I organize o le excursion < hat } ‘ . ‘e am and po
t 1e “Yr a sav Pearl Roach that = ae . Never tended rying eas < < ;
told ever body to g t off the lorry evening after the fight. Sometime © the hirt but wag under Mic ‘ a woe oe een Mr. G. Hinkson, clerk f the
nd shortly after they hed done s¢ier pearl arrived she saw Nell e impression that it wae not ~pecacl, Until today when he Market, told the Advocate that
1 were in the road, Pearl aut her Pear Hea Die Sane Apaeited appeared yesterday before him on fisherman and vendors still con
a5 hela Nelly. They boh fell ao es a af : charge of house breaking and tinue to sell fish along the wharf
oe 7 ; Bae? ; Jean inds o nges, St, Lucy, . arce on December 10 Z at Te .Yv f ras
sutt by the while 3 é g hac Ve . ‘ 5. co and at Temple Yard Apart fro:
gu - by on 0 ie aee s ie another defence witness, aid that , eee te ai eee re lh a Cpl. Yearwood attached to the keeping theEh areas in on ins nt
. . Fla > 4 me ar 2 ° » ND € ¢ * arrac nai ,
t. her shoulder and bit off a fter the lorry was parked, some jast conviction he was sentenced C.L.D. arrested ‘Harding on » tary condition, these vendors sell
> of her left ear of the occupants of the lorry, in- {9 four months’ imprisonment W@!tant. at black market prices
; ; ‘ cluding Pearl, got off the lorry and ; ae .
> CAS . " nce was . ’ L e y ¢ with hard labour r stealir y =
vat Pearl roach had le ne lorry Boyce, Cynthia Griffith, Nelly fre arm a Se Ae ter caaihiet men did duty in these areas and
after i parked, pnd when she Husbands. and Agnetha Road He apPe oe Ben this sentence PLATE RETURNED forced the vendors to go to the
returned, the nirce of Nelly’s ear fighting on the lorry. When they ae i ‘ r€ 4 ssistant _Court % Dr. Charles Payne, dentist of market. He honed they would |
w Ir bitten off. The piece were getting down she saw Nelly q ecttens ” th te tatrate id OF, | SEEnueee tere, erst TE ite auly, Inet Arete
: ‘ § Y decisic oO . agistrate ¢ ‘ i '
of the ear was bitten off during holding her ear; Agnetha’s clothes Seah: ae ie egies ae plate bearing his name stolen this year g ,
the on the lorry, defence were torn and her left if, aeeces ba from outside his office Tuesda In some cases the fish is sold
em arm tence of six months’ imprison- nigh from. tt boat whict sualls
counrel ested appeared to be bitten. ment with hard labour night om: the Oat Witch is Usually
‘hief W cid Someone asked Agnetha where = : Dr. Payne told the Advocate tied up near the wharf Youns
. Chie cness her mother was and she said che sakes that two little boys brought it men an} women have no difficulty
Nelly Husbands of Rock Hall, {iq no. know back yesterday. He was very in skipping into boats to purchase
St. Lucy, the chief wituess, said ~ % rm Be a much relieved since he would fish but the old people or the lk
thal on September 16, about 9 a.m. Roach coming SSreniadl the trek B. Ge s Siecshanl Of have had to pay $24 to replace it active are the ones who suffer, On
. 5 2 : ares oes ' and » j ave g ome occasions these people ar
she went ig an excursion ot the she aid. “When Pearl reached iiducation Tio Retire iy Cteciicmaacik ev’ & fortea’ts par tiie bogs four
ane, St. Philip. : a * ‘ ; A aoe , yé B s r it. : .
eantad: Main, oak #ielae: a4 “left there she asked Agnetha what had ie nante-ta' fat Sah foe them. At
the Crane at 5 p.m. and when on happened. Nelly came from be- 1 GEORGETOWN, B.G. Jan. 1 eventually they pay seven cent
ane at 5 p. u 4 , B Jan. 1. ’

Windsor road tt Fi stopped and @nd the lorry with a beer bottlel€ British Guiana’s Director ot Unlawful Possession for a fiving fish froin the bo
indsor ro0a¢ ve rry s Tae ae and threw it and cut Pearl on her pqucation, Frank Ogle, left. the On the nasture at the Fisher
“Ano et yaceati 4 yi nder head. Colony today to spend four Angus Hunte of no fixed place Office, sheds are being erected in

nother girl namec aunc i John Yearwood also -went to months’ leave abroad prior to of abode was ordered to pay a preparation for the rebuilding
as sitting on the second seat and the excursion. He said he saw retirement He intends to re- {ne of 10/- for the unlawful programme. One shed is already
as I had no seat I asked her to Roach got off the lorry and go Mien Tar Terelau bik wife’e Heavies possession of lumbey which he comvleted and another is alnos
let me sit where she was sitting for a stroll. When she returned teh urine har hat. banter in the M88 conveying along Fairchild finished
so that she could sit on me,” she Nelly hit her with a bottle and gavdation ceteup tur a tat lof 15 Street on January 1, A quantity of mahogany is also
sai {bout this time Agnetha cut her se t 7 ia yee Pree The fine is to be paid in 14 on the pasture This mahogany
¢ ars reside + go y v
Roach got up from her seat and Agnetha Roach, daughter of *°@"S: '© Tesiat days or in default 14 days’ im- will be cut to various eal om aa
started to get off the lorry, I the accused was the next de- Mr. Ogle came to British Gui- prisonment with hard labour, used In the construction of b
allowed Vaunder to sit where she fence witness called. ana in 1939 as Chief Inspector of Mr. Walwyn told him that if he
had previously been sitting and Held Down Schools and Deputy Director of Feturms and is convicted Again ’
went toward the seat Agnetha had She said that in the fight on the Education 21d became Director 4n 10°F co 1 an offence, he would “SHEFFIELD” DUE
lef vacant. Agnetha turned back lorry three were cuffing her and 1948 on the retirement of Mr, â„¢0St likely go to prison. JAN. 12
and held on to me before I reach- Eslyn Boyce bit her. One Babb [Leonard J. G. Grease. * HERE ON :
ed the seat and started to choke held her hand and as many were ‘ ey cellency » Governor!
: Le re & » His Excellency the yoverno
and cuff me. Pearl Roach, her holding on to her, she bit some- Born in Gainsborough, Lincon Careenage Che “eae d has been informed that H.MS
mother came and began to beat one. She did not know wvhom she shire, Mr. Ogle was educated at Early yesterday morning the Sheffied (Captain M. Everard)
me too.” bit. After they left the lorry “Gainsborough Grammar School, Government Dredger was at work flying the flag of Vice-Admiral
Everybody was fold to get off lags was: tio mare: fighting fQueen Mary's College, the Lo removing silt from the inner Sir William Andrews, K.B.E., ¢
the truck, she said. When she got Pearl returned to the lorry tdon Institute and the London basin of the Careenage. The D.S.O. Commander-in-Chief,
on the road she saw bottles being about 15 minutes after the fights, jInstitute of Education. During dredger looks new after her America and West Indies Station
thrown She went to the right mre saree eek pie 3 andl World War I. he served with the} yecent two-months’ overhaul andwill pay a visit to Barbados fro.
of the road and Pearl Roach stoic net Ba) y ‘ia ; th au Tank Corp in Palestine in 1917 is working smoothly the 12th to 17th January,
d-to cuff her and threw her Nelly took the ottle and struckWeie successor is not yet named
on the road. She bit her on her her with it. She did not release (CP) se aslates ‘aiwew
left ‘ast, her left shoulder and the bottle when she struck Pearl. een tte eet eee ea Mr
6 oe : a : canton mike ‘he case was going on at Board-
: ca - ot eat aah aaa Dear! ed Hall five times but neither E l Fl S
& pe ee Daniel nor Elsie Medford were in fi WHI E
ony d ee her ; ore the case. Murrel Babb got the two Lrre ynn ues
Jandaged 1er ear anc soon alter re < ; 9 fey
> witnesses, Daniel and Medford, oy? Asiis o
the Police arrived She was taken to come into the aise. GC dian Millionaire

to the General Hospital, To Mr. Reece she said she had



















To Mr. Niles she said that while given a statement to the police. NASSAU, Dec. 31.
the fight between Agnetha and She was shown the statement One hundred and eight lawyers
herself was going on Pearl was on and admitted that the signature for the Canadian millionaire,
he lorry She was the last per- was hers. The statement was read Dugan McMartin, filed a_ state-
son to get off the lorry. About 30 to the Court. ment of defence today in the
people were cround the lorry when Mr. Niles in addressing the n for £80,000 brought against
Pearl Roach as biting her jury said that they had heard hi I WV star Errol Flynn |

Docter’s Evidence the facts of the case from the y lain hat MoMartin caused |

Dr. Willi Daly who examined P2!nt of view of the Prosecution him to lose $200,000 when Me-

J id there hag been and from that of the defence. Mertin struck him “a vicious blow
: . ‘hat ece of Nelly Husbands ‘ he side of his head” at the
| abrasions on her left That a piece of Nell; : in U ide of | |
ulder and the lower ©a" Was bitten off there could be windsor Hotel, Nassau, last March |
rear was bitten off no doubt, but the question was 44} |
f oh, * who bit it.
ear left a According to Nelly she had MeMarti iefence states thai!
et: BAS s been rolling in the gutter with | £ > Filyr a light and |

_Els Medford and her mother pear) Roach about 10 minute K lap on the cheek” by,
M yrtle Daniel from Windsor, St. Many people were around the iv of farewell. MeMartin states |
George, who were passing along jorry and could have seen, yet that th vere on,» terms of|
the road the time of the fight, none went to her assistance. Was friendship and easy familiarity of '

ve corr ve evidence for that not strange, he asked. ¢ » nature that it was custom-
most part Medford differed Discrepancies ry for them to greet one anoth-
from Nelly in per evid when Nelly herself had told them er in a hearty manner.” The trial
she id thet Pearl ang were that when the ear was bitten date s not been fixed, but it
standing when Pearl bit off par: they were on the ground, and will posditly be held in March.
of her ear 7 @ On Page 6
_———_—_ =







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m

}



lave
for
March

room
the de

month



At the

rave



beer meet
more
filled to
before next ynth
Ocean \

filled and

rhe





ulready man
been refused for the mor
February at Mare r
thing apple to ¢
The St. lL
filled and
hood of its
easol rhe
n tly English
rdian
Marine

acral }
Hotel 6
every likeli
packed
visito there 4
but a number ¢
expected, Like th
management of th
made renovations
more visitors
not vet
February
also

have

awrence
there i



being

the

practicall
also had t



ey
oking
* Hotel Royal and the
the’ are a number «
taying at the hotels,
ity have not
on They

soon



vet
too

arrive;
expec
> filed up
Bright
Ps Me
Director of Messrs. Johnson
im told the Advocate that
ke last year, Barbados can look
rward to another good tourist
yn this year
He said that
could be
ierably
and

Prospects
Mi

and

the tourist indus
developed quite con
because there
of Canadians who art
willing to winter in a
uch ours which is at
when theirs is at its

are
yu
ni too
limate as

peak

r.C.A
more trips to
find Canadians

ymscious of

A develops and makes
Barbados, we will

becoming more
this part of the
Caribbean” he said, and added
there are many Barbadian
iilies living in Canada who are
y too willing to spend a short
rcation here.

\ glance at



list
how
ad

the passenger
r.C.A. gives an idea of
people have taken the
itage of the T.C.A. service
As the release of dollars be
1 more available, Canadiai
men will once again
to these shores in the in
of their firms,”
said that there has always
been a great commercial tie be-
tween Canada and Barbados and
it should be our constant endeay
our to strengthen and encouragi
our trade relations with them.
The fact that many of
hotels have had to refuse
ings is an indication of the
necessity for more hotels
mmodate the people

vel
terest
He

the
book-
grea‘

to ac

DROVE WITHOUT
LIGHTS

A FINE of 20/- to be paid in 14
d or in default 14 days’ im
prisonment was imposed by Mr
Cc. L. Walwyn on Joseph Brath
waite of Rockley, Chhirst Church
terday for driving the motor
van M-71@ on Hastings Road
Christ Chureh, without lights on
the night of December 31

Another charge of driving the
same van under the influence of |
drink was _ brought against
Brathwaite and this was adjourned

y

ve

until Friday, January 4 for medica) |

«Vidence



For Your KITCHEN

GARDEN

( Lettuce

Cauliflowei

ibbage, Beet

Cre

Tomato



\
Mustard Sweet Marjoram
rhyme Pepper Parsley {
Chinere Cabbage, Cucumber, })}
Leek, Onion, Kohl Rabi |
Squash, Radish, Brocolli \|

lery, Vege- }))

; Pumpkio |

Chard, Spinach |
For Your FLOWER
GARDEN
Antirrhinum (Snapdragon),
Zinnia (Giant Mixed) Can-
dytuft, Aster, Pholox, Indian
Pink, Coreopsis, Carnation,

{

i

(

?

(

i

: Muskmelon, ¢
table Marrow,
Swi

’





Verbena, Gaillardia, Sweet

William Bosmos Salvia
(Red) Ageratum, Holly {
hock Chrysanthemum {
Nigella, Sweet Pea Na }
irtium Alyssum, Mignon Uy
2 ett For-get-me-not Por- \{
a i, Canterbury Bell i}
Also ((
Fo Kitchen Gard iy
{{{ (Bush Lima) i)
it) (Stringless) tt
til (Bountiful or \\
t
Xt itter) 4M)
i} Buttery
tv i}
i
) V
() BRUCE WEATHERHEAD }
it " )
tu ))
it LTD. i
\\ HEAD OF BROAD STREET )
\IOOOOSUENSOTEOR OT e

ARe ‘





%
&
°
x
¢
%
e :
¥ YOU ’
‘.
% ; :
x SCARED }
x ‘
% BY :
$ ‘
% RHEUMATIC
,
‘,
% PAINS? ,
g ¥
%& Hetre’s the sure and certain x
@ wuy to conquer them. [ul %
8 in %
% %
5 .
* s
x %
¢ ind it’s penetrating powers ¥
* will act quickly and effec- %
’ tively 4
% oe :
s .
‘.
* On Sale at }
* ‘
° WITS 1 1 s
< KNIGHT'S DRUGSTORES §
90GC0OCGG00060086566605"”

de-

I

management
had t
the

The hotel is

filled an t is

«

to
Se
refused any
and March

y

but

Goddard, Managing

AT
WEATHERHEAD'S |

= FRR GEA GE SNA PA ATA DA a ein, ASA ADNAN SATAN STNG DADA A DATANT



posiooamnnasuneamnndon XE



PAGE FIVE





BROAD ST.

HARRISON Ss

STAINLESS
KITCHE

SINGLE DRAINER
DOUBLE DRAINER





STEEL
SINKS



$97.38
$127.18

Ho with Plug and Chain,

Pillar Taps, and Supporting
"ty . ®e
I\.ese Sinks will not tarni
‘heir lustre indefinitely
will add brightness
years to come

©
SWEDISH HARDBOARD

1 Pair
Brackets,

sh
and
to your

but will
once

retain
installed
kitchen for many

ny ‘ ~
This is not merely a wood substitute it Is
wood broken down by chemical action and

compressed into sheets harder

aie material. Available in ‘

‘ Thick — Sheets 8 and 10 ft. 4 ft.
sae Thick — Sheets 6, 8, 9, 10 & 12

=

than the orig-

4 ft.

OUR PRICES, are keenly competitive;

nevertheless we will grant a special
DISCOUNT (according to quantity) on
all Cash Purchases of 5 Sheets or more.

/ HARRISON’ S
NS NENSNENGNS NBN NNN
NS NN NNN NN NN NY

By SY ESE CCM EEE

BROAD ST.
TEL. 2364.
SNSNENENENENENEES
WGNGNENG eg

5






\

>
* aT atl

It has been our pleasure to serve

you during the past year and

we hope that your New Year will

be a full year of achievement.

KNIGHTS DRUG STORES

AN SN CE NN A

8
“PAN AS

Ss

GN IN DN DN IN DN DN IN NIN DN ONIN TN GN DS ON DNDN TX
SeaeBtheteguweatnhaas
Just Received —

a fresh shipment of

PURINA CHOWS

H. Jason Jones & Co, Ltd.
BEREERESBEEHRHEHEHRAES
sg NEN NNN NANG NSN NGAGE NS NG NG NG NG BNE NS
3 Seasons Greetings to fil
z



Y

Our Trieruds and

Cusiomers

Our Thanks to each one for the many
favours shown us during 1951, and our
Sincere Wishes for Good Health,
Happiness and Prosperity in the New
Year 1952.

2
3
2
a
2
2

S
eB

zw @





2 THE BARBADOS FOUNDRY

2 LIMITED,

2

2 White Park Rd. St. Michael.
INN ~





PAGE SIX

CLASSIFIED ADS.

TELEPHONE 2508.

> >
1952, at A FOR SALE
Mile Hill,—Josep’
of Lester Thorne
te otype Dept. His
funeral leaves the above address at
430 pm. to-day for St, Bernaba AUTOMOTIVE
Church. Friends are asked to attend
Adina Sinckler, Lester, and Kenneth} CAR-—One Wosley 6/80 in
Thorne, Marjorie Todd \Childre mdition under 10,000 miles
4.1.52 or 2067.















excellent
Phone 2
3.1.52—4n





N MEMORIAM



CAR—One Austin A-70 Hampshir





|
|perfect condition, under 5,000 miles
—eee= | Phone 2353 or 5105 3.1.52
RIVERA-—In loving memory of “John ) J rs
Berestord Rivera who died on 3rd.) CAR—One Austin A-40 (Devon) 2 year
Januanz 1951 old_in sound condition, going for $100.0
The midnight sta are shining

or pearest offer. Phone 4512 oppo
Dowr en a Simesy eravs Fire Brigade, Coleridge Street
Of one we loved so dearly, 31.592
But yet we could not save
Ever to be remembered by Orville, Leo
(so.s), Mrs. Phyllis Cummi M
Eileen Pock daughters tr

CAR—A 1946 Austin 10
tition. Good arres and 1m
Apply to Pastor E. J. Parchm







| Thelma, Dorie! (daughters-in laws, | | Cross Road, Collymore Nock or phone}
3.1.52—1r 3469 for particulars



— 3



vr . hh Ms
ANNOUNCEMENTS | CA 9 Chewroiet Touring Cor, ix
evlinder, M-1323 in excellent conditio
4 New Tyres, New Battery. Dial )
$5 in goods and with your cash bill] oo7. FE. H. Davis 11 52

you get a guess-coupon how many
ELECTRICAL

screws in a jar? You can win an
EKCO radio lt certainly pays to sho;
et A. BAKNES «@ Co., Ltd
WASHING MACHINES: A new ship-
nent of the famous HOOVER household
Washing Machines, only $140.00 each

23.11. 51—+t.f.n
EDUCATIONAL K. R. Hunte & Co. Ltd, Lower Broad

Street. Dial 4611 or 027











30.12. 51—3n

MECHANICAL

TYPEWRITERS: Olympia Portable





The Governors of the Combined Parry
and Coleridge Schoo! for Boy hereby
notify Parents and the General, Pubtic
that the School witli open on Monday
ld4th January 1952 at Ashton", Station | Typewriters, 1952 Models, price $140.00
Hill, St. Peter Your inspection of these superb machines

q Mr. Johw b. Smith (formerly Head-} ts invited. A. G. St. Hill, Dial 3199
T ter of the Parry Schoo! St. Lucy) 1.1.52—7 e.o.d

} has been appointed to act Headmaster | ——— sieht

ot the Combined School
By order of the Governors, SCE T
MIPOPORE BRANCKER, MIs tULANEOUS
BEST ENGLISH GALVANISE
SHEETS, Nett Cash small lot only 6

"i Secretar
$4.20, 7 ft., $4.90. 8 ft. $5.60. A. BARD

Public Official Sale | am

BUILDING SUPPLIES-—For sale cheap




























































28.12. 5S)--4n

































(The Provost Marshal's Act 101 ed building supplies (guttering, roofing
1904-%) 20) tiles, sink traps, faucets, toilet seats,
On Friday, t fth ¢ ( Ja gasoline latern, venitian blind,) Hopeweu
1952, at the he « “Kk St. Thomas, phone 4042 3.1.52-—-1n
ifternoon will be sold at my office to t —_— SC
highest bidd » fc CORN HUSKED--$5.00 per bushel
the appraised value Bennetts ‘Plantation, St. Thomas
All that certain piece of Land . 1.1.5
taining by admeasurement 8 rood AAPL OS
perches situate, st @he Poourne, ik FULLER BRUSHES--Floor Scrub
Pariah of St. John butting and bound Wet Mops, Ladjes and nts ‘Hai
on lands of one G. M. Mill on | Brushes Flesh Brushes Manicure
of J. T. Clarke, on land f one G | Brushes, Dental Plate Brushe Toot
“’ ti ; . 13 ushes, Complexion — Brush and
on @ Public Road or however else tiv ; .
same may abut and bound, appre my other Brushes. H. P. Cheesman
ne follows & Co. Ltd, Middle Street
The whole area of land appraised 29,12.51—6r
ONE THOUSAND TW TUNDREL | “Sais auliet fas ne ypdilien
at's ian 131.560), Atine es o Pri LAI ENGLISH WILTON CARPET
Albert Hold r fo a taedanda gat High quality, good condition. Box D.D
tion &C C/o Advocate Co 1.1.52—2n
N.B.+25% Depe to be paid on . ar ie
ie eieteaa Pe we cpo. SCALES—500 Ib. Platform Scales, just
. T. HEADLEY }in time for crop season, The General
Pro \ Marst | Agency Co., B'dos Itd *.1.52-6n
Provost Marshal's Office ih ve ks WHITE PILLOW CAS: = = —

Lionese Fabric A very good quality
20" 30” with flaps $1.14 each get it

INCOME TAX NOTICE 272" Son

YACHT Center Board: “Invader
Intermediate Class, 16 6" x 5 8” In
p food condition Brass and Stainless Stee!
Notice is hereby given that] Rigging. Phone Stoute at 2876 or 4675,
Income Tax returns are required 3.1 $2-—2n
from every married man whose; gy, —— -
income is $1200.00 per annum or LOST & FOUND
ever, from every other person
whose income is $720.00 pet LOST
annum or over and from compan-| “Gaara. A dite Balding Waa |
Saati Maa CAMERA A Jiffy Folding Kodak in
les whether incorporated or un-| in soft red leather case with shoulder
incorporated, societies, persons! strap Reward on returning to Caer
engaged in eny trade or profes-] bank















OF JANUARY, 1952, and be played n January
forms duly filled In must be do] for agian Oval, Tehders are invited
livered to me on or before the (a) The right to sell liquors, lunches
following respective dates: teas ete.

. . anne (b) Transportation of the Jamaican
1, Returns of persons wh« players to and from the Oval
books were closed on the} Tenders should reach the undersigne





















ti Zlst dav of December, 1951.] # Beicionn» Offices not later than Mon
| Cee d . jay January 7, at 4 mm
; : } 5 ae of ’ pur
| Oh: or betare the 3ist day The Association does not bind itself t
preh, 1952, 2ecept the lowest or any tender
9 Poeturns of persons whose] THE BARDADOS CRICKET ASSOC, Inc
tneipal place of busi 7h ee ee
1pen , Hony. Sect
ne ituate in the 2. 51—fin
petare th 8%h dav] — ne
tt 1952. i NOTICE
9. Retu > of all other “rrson HEREBY GIVEN that the partnershiy
Aesii-paie ; t present carried on by us the unde
} on or before ‘he 3st day ©!) signed G. L. W ke and) mT
; January, 195° Rogers as Solicitors the style or
. is 1 of "G. L. W. Clarke & Co is th
: N. D. OSBORNE, ay dissolved by mutual consent and
Commissioner ot t the said E. D. Rogers will continue
» practise as a Solicitor under his o-

Income Tax and Death Duties) name at James Street, Bridgetown



; (Ag.) Dated this Sist day of December, 1951
Note:—Any person failing G. L. W. CLARKE,
make his return within th: | 2 eo

1.1.8



due date will be liable to
fine not exceeding £100 an
not less tha ind will b
prosecuted less a satisfac
tory reason is given.



PARTNERSHIP NOTICE

NOTICE IS HEREBY GIVED that
he undersigned practising together ao
. oheitors under the firm name of
n!|COTTLE, CATFORD & CO ive tl
i admitted into partnership Messr
GEORGE LOUIS WHITFOOT CLARK!
nd JOSEPH! COLERIDGE ARMSTRONG
Dated this Ist day of January 1952
E, MAXWELL SHILSTONE
LINDSAY FE. R. GHA
1








1.52—


BARBADOS TURE
NOTICE

TENDERS are invited for the exc)
wht to sell Liquor, Refreshments ete
the Garrison Save ah on Race D

cLub








’ 1952
s t t be forwarded in se
lL elope arked TENDER = FO
to IQUOR AND REFRESHMENT:
; iressed to the Secretary not later
MR sin Mil EVERYROD & n 4 me ‘ TT
Barbado r THURSDAY 1 PANUARY
AON New. Vek TO Yet ee Committ ms, to ul
From G. A, SERVICE | ‘ wy
PURPOSE POD POO SSI 4



-



NDU % | 3
: TO-DAY'S NEWS FLASH 3 NOTICE
4
LARGE WALL: MAPS OF | We beg to notify our customer
WEST INDIES $9.00 4% {that we will be closed for stock
DOG COLILARS AND HAR ‘| taking from Wednesday 2nd Jan
NESS yj; untl further notice,
DOG LEADS, RUN STRAPS, % WM. D. RICHARDS & SON,
DOG WHIPS S McGregor St.
METAL WASTE PAPER ¢) 1,1,52—2n
BASKETS | ———<$<_ $5 — — — —______— :
SHOE BRUSHES % NOTICE
{ — at — ¥ | PARISH OF CHRIST CHURCH
; JOHNSON’S ST/.TIONERY % NOTICE TO DAIRY
t and s KEEPERS, Etc.
HARDWARE 8} Registration and Re-Registration of ai
R | DAIRFES, persons employed in the pro
2e~ Ate of ee eaten | iction of Milk for sale d perso ro
>| ducing Surplus Milk sale; unde



Jsiries Regulations, 1948, made by
teneral Bo. of Health unde
Net 1941 (1941-17); will take pl
' the Sanitary Inspectors’ C re
brist Church; from WEDNES a
‘ry 2nd 1952, between the hours of 9.9
.m., and 3,00 p.m. except on Saturdays
\â„¢ hen Registration, etc., will take piace
| between the hours of 9.00 a.m. and 12.00
clock noon

By order of Commissioners of Health
Parish of Christ Church

(Sed) CHAS. 8S. MacKENZIE






GOOD NEW & RENEWED Bed

oo









; aa out FOR
GOOD
—fLFURNITURE?



Steads & Deep Coil Springs, Lath Chairm
Vanities Dressing Tables § | 25.12.51
Wardrobes, Washstands |
chairs £5. oy Racks ! ) SPOS SSS SOO SOOO
Eas. & — Tables D 3 4st x
dios, tchen, Sid Cab ‘|’
Batis Kieren, sideroara oe WS ORIENTAL }
Kitchen—-DRA WING ROOM FU ‘ ¥
NITURE It, Morris. ‘Tut : VENDEMOs, sEDAs, x
feeboxes, ‘Tvpewriter, Gocarts, {| JOYERIAS Y ARTISTICAS >
PIANOS 3s CURIOSIDADES, TRAIDOS %
e % DE LA INDIA CHINA c %
i... W is iAN. :
*
.2. VWWILSON j} = THANI's S
SPRY STREET, DIAL 4009 \ Pr. Wm. Hry. St. Dial sae §
is %
SSS" 899959999966 COS SSOOE



30.12.51—tn|Was some distance awa hen
: eee
sion, and owners of land or prop-



erty whether a_ taxable income > THe The biting: took place on the
has accrued during the past year i UMLIC NOTICE is lorry. Agnetha Roach had _ told a
or not. | them that she had bitten som e
\ she “rse nt
Forms of Return may he o)- OT body. She herself had been bi
tained from the Income Tax De-} tp, a ee Intercolonial hey ri t i tes hn miRNA Dk At dal bi Dt
partment AFTER THE IST DAY] Cricket Tournament against Jamaica to BOY ee RU te ene ere tor, cheek your thermostats

{he} Pe played between January 17 and 2 the lorry Nelly





BARBADOS ADVOCATE









FOK RUST U.N. AGREE Harbour Lo
HOUSES f : Seb FI Mark, Sch. Francis W.|
—_ specail entities _ @ From Page 1 Smith, Sch. Lindsyd !, Sch. Piorence
ULCEDON MI 4 \ll war prisoners released Emanuei, M_.V. Cacique del Caribe, M.V



Lucitie M. Smith, Sch



a799. ¢ ». xchange fo ivilians shall be Lady Jey. Seb

Marea fer

eniences Garage rms against the side which son, x Enterprise $











From Trinidad—

a nde wail etta, Sch. Rosaline M., Sch | Sims, Janice Jiniin, Marianne Simpson
GILVAN, Chelsea Ga ‘ inder parole not to bear warion Belle Wolfe, Sch. Philip H, David-| Allen Vieira, Angela, Viera, Joyce Brad
Sch. Franklyn | shaw



JANUARY 3,_ 1952

Barclay’s Bank (Dominion ; Royal Bank of Canada

!
Colonial And Overseas) |" * ® Suse 8:
Draft Pp
Barbados B.W.1. one
Edwin Fairweather, Norma Fair

THURSDAY,

ae a nee

Seawell

ARRIVALS—By BWIA
On MONDAY

Carola Bovell, Carl Chenery Helen





‘ releases them DR. & D’Ortac, Sch Emeline, Sch.| weather, George Pobertson, James
) de} oS the a. Burma D
fn I : tes of the Interna ARRIVALS From Grenada— i pr. Cheques on Bankers 68 2% Pr
NSLOW ‘ ' i mittee of the Red gc arta de LARRINAGA, 4449] Cornelia Robertson NEW YORK | Demand Drafts 68.05% pr
eek j Cross shall interview all prison- tens act, Capt. Kay, from Antwerp via | Prem Pusrte Rice— 9 pr. Cheques on } Sight Draft €7.9°% pr
f Ma 1 Jyty, | nd all civilians affected, to Londen Theo. F. Cox, Muriel Ix. Cox, Alber Bankers 71 3/10% pr. | 30.7% pr. Cable x
November, Decembe pr A ike sure none is repatriated Sch. PHILLIS MARK. 5@ tons net.) Connett Louise Connett, John H. N Sight or De- } 69.2% pr. Currenc war 3 7 BS
|W. T, Gooding, Strong T inst his will Capt. McLaren, from St. Lucia Douglas, Henr Sealy, Eustace Maxwell nand Drafts 71 1/10% pr. | Coupons 66% pr
=a . i MV. WILLEMSTAD, 2,855 tons net, | Shilstone, Mary Elizabeth Shilstone pr. Cable
erate t All war prisoners who Capt. Van der Burgt, from Trinidad | From Martinique— pr. Currency

ct not to return home also ey RES és é
shall laced < S.S. RUNA, 5,1 tons net apt
‘E> 1 placed on parole not to burg. Yor Trinidad.

t agait in the Korean conflict. “yy “WILLEMSTAD, 2,855 tons net



WANT!


































—UP. Capt Van der Burgt, for Madeira
HELP noe eT Tt eee ee
CUSTOMS CLERK—Fo office * j
|} Apply in person. Wr Fogarty Ltd ce oJ
31 1—t.f.n

EXPERIENCED







t Plantatior t < a ONTREAL, AUSTRALIA AN NEW Oe oo ee PEFSSSONSSSOO,
| dutie oor possible. Ay ' ZEALAND LINE LTD.
etter to W. T. Gooding, St pi MANZ LINE

Fiantatic St. T



M.V. TEKOA is expected to load st
SERVANT oO r trallan Ports for Trinidad, Barba-
App Harci i Bermuda early Jamuary and arriv-
t it Barbados about March 20th.

This vessel has ample space for chilled



The M.V. “Caribbee” will

accept cargo and passengers
for Dominica, Antigua,




| One Typ frozen, and general cargo. Montserrat, Nevis and St,

| pe } ; © accepted on through Bills of Kitts Sailing Monday 7th
2eTSon ' ritten ap cat te the « 2 ?

iF DOWDING ESTATE & hy January.

Bridgetowt 1 é B.W.l. SCHOONER



’ * ~@y q OWNERS ASSOC. INC.
PUBLIC SALES | ponxess wimy «co, wa.





with trenshipment at Trimidad
5 h Guiana, Windward and Lee-
3 ADING CO., LIMITED, Ba eet,| ward Islands

| further particulars apply to—



















TRINIDAD Tele, 4047.
——_—— -—— B.W.1,
REAL ESTATS DaCOSTA & Co., Ltd.
—_—____—_— = BARBADOS.
SRALTAR, Cattle i f 3.9.1.
nished Offers “di writ
>. HW. Farmer ws Plantat t
| Andrew or Phone 7 29.12.51 & °
|} LA SOLACE—We VN 0.
with ¥ a \ te
ervant roo P oe
Ne not
A ‘ , or ; I t —_ -_—- ———— —
| RON , iy ~ NEW YORK SERVICE
| RICTURESQUI PO A STEAMNER Sails 4th December— arrives Barbados 25th December, 1951
| above sea we, 1 v elec . Sanaa TS ae
cre te NEW ORLEANS SERVICE
e eas w ‘e ne 5 : ‘E RY PATRAI" sails 9th Dec. —Arrives B’dos 28 December.

Dec.—Arrives B'dos 4th January.
=~ oem hc cc ccc cCccl——en



CANADIAN SERVICE



} +r \ e UTH BOUND
€
Woman Guilty nin sss: eae aan
° Monteeal Halifax Barbados
» 3 ALCOA POINTER” . 25th Nov. 51 28th Nov, 51 8th Dec. fl
ound ing ALCOA PEGASUS : Mth Dec. $1 24th Dec. 51
© ALCOA PLANTER - 28th Dee. 51 Sth Jany. 52
\ TEAMER % 3 lith Jany. 52 21st Jany. 52

@ Prom Pace 5

heer THOM LYD. — NEW YORK AND GULF sERVICE.















anothe itne Elise Viec

had gaid. they were sta SePL DA COSTA & CO. LTR —CANADIAN SERVICE
Medford had it I eters 7. 4

at first told the police that she ||] ROBERT THOM LIMITED

Tt ai oe ae ae PLANTATIONS BUILDING, LOWER BROAD STREET
a » Police iad ai }

gave evidence with all read | Passenger Sales Agents for:
In her evidence she ha frans-Canada Airlines, B.O.A.C. and B.W.1.A.

that the fight had gone on for half ALCOA STEAMSHIP COMPANY

an hour. That was an altogethe Telephone No. 4466

different story from Nell - eee
Daniel the mother had given

jslightly different version of L ' .

circumstances Daniel } i | How S Y our Cocling

that Pearl pu i Nell I

they came off 1 e e ?
“There is a teri conflict ¢ System ;
evidence from the Prosect n

he said,

We'll Check Your

There was no doubt th earl

the biting took piace.

Radiator and Pump





They could ea believe that




nwpect and replace hose if























Pearl Roach did not bite Nelly,
but even if she did tt would needed, tighten cylinder heads, _
notice that there had been no and manifeld and adjust fan MeFnearneys
evidence of malice nd it i
essential,” he said that mal belt Then you'll be sure your a 5
should be shown Hl subst posecte om the navsiol =< | Mr. Reece did not addre t |
jury | days without overheating
No Doubt
_, The Chiet Jucge wold whe sry |||. Ford-Trained Mechanics
tion to be left in no ne | d d 2 od
Bie bidede Chay conticted: Way 2. Ford-Approved Service Methods
one. ;
Rive dale -comsiderntion. . wil 3. Genuine Ford Parts
be: are you Satisfied . d all ‘ a
teasonabie doubt? You have been||| | 4, Special Ford Equipment
told that it is remarkable that no |
one went to Nelly i tanc
although a crowd of people ere
nearby.
Some people E
dents strongly impressed on tl |
minds and so there would be ¢
crepancies in a case such a I |
Nelly had said that dur

course of the trugel on |
ground she had been bitten

Tho Fyre with Built-in Dependability



}
“You have seen her and |
ner demeanour,” he saik |

|
|
|
|
|



there had been a fight in



lorry but none anywhere else } Charles |
Examining Agnetha Roa | |
evidence they would remen | |
| |
she had said she got one bite |
bit someone too | McEnearne |
| “That was one bite that | y
netha spoke of an , ! } |
tated that sl } |
tatement which had _ be | & Co Ltd |
borated by the doctor j es °
Agnetha gave in evidence |
Ishe had bitten someone and
may well think it strange tl
she had not said th vhen
Police took a statement from |

OFFICE 4493 WORKSHOP 4203

“If you feel that the biting «
curred on the lorry, then you \

have a reasonable doubt t) | PARTS DEPT. (4673
Pear! did not bite Nell |
| The jury then retired to « | NIGH, 4125

jsider their verdict
|

|







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1952





1 WONDER
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THE





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AWAY WITH
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WE NUN NS NN NW 8 WSN NN

&

a*







PAGE EIGHT



W.1I. Lead On First Innings
Stollmeyer And = gags ea ree
Gomez Bat Well

From HAROLD DALE.
MELBOURNE CRICKET GROUND, Jan. 1.

THE WEST INDIES by bowling out Australia for 216 in
their first innings established a lead of 56 runs. This they

consolidated by adding 203
Australia 260 to win.

In their second innings the Aussies have now raised 68

for the loss of one wicket.

After lunch, Valentine and Ram-
adhin continued their attempt to
Wear away the Australian innings,
but in Harvey and Miller, they
were facing the two men most
likely to be able to succeed against
them. Both are stroke players with
an unusual freedom of footwork
and brilliant sight, and each man
is willing to depend on both, and
chance his arm in an effort to
break the bowlers’ domination.

This, they proceeded to do—
not without moments of worry
when Valentine both lifted and
turned his legbreak or when
Ramadhin’s off-spinner came in
with more than usual vencm.
The wicket was not yet turning
remarkably but it was jurning
ing. The batsmen, sometimes risk-
ing three steps up the wicket.
were successful in sweeping Ram-
adhin away to leg and even off
driving him for boundaries.

Century Up

The hundred came up together
with the 50 run stand by means
of four byes—a rare lapse by Guil-
len, and at that stage Ramadhin
was relieved by Goddard. He had
bowled 11.4 overs for 42 taking
one wicket.

Harvey, whose brilliance has
been dimmed for a long while,
was playing for his place in the
Australian team and this probably

-

inspired him. He was hitting
cleanly and powerfully. He met
Goddard with a straight driven

four—that was his eighth bound-
ary in his score of 40.

A sweep by Miller that missed
the ball brought a mighty yell
from Valentine for l.b.w., but the
umpire shook his head. Miller,
gradually lost some of his flam-
boyance which was ominous for
the West Indies. Miller, gaily
flashing his bat may cost runs
while he lasts, but he is not apt to
last long. Miller, playing back, is
a sign that he, for his part, has

‘and only Ring’ of the recognised

BARBADOS ADVOCATE #+§|~



Jan. 1.

in their second innings giving

was a change especially to Lind-
wall’s liking and when Gomez ap-
peared at the other end he square
drove and on-drove him for fours
to bring up two hundred.

Miller had reached 47 after one ,
of the slowest innings of his life
when in Trim’s third over the
West Indies fast bowler achieved
his best pace and clean bowled
him with a ball that was almost
a yorker. Miller * xd been at the
wicket 159 min) 4. Six for 208.

Double ©isaster

Hassett seemed to do the West
Indies a good turn by sending in
Tan Jonson next and leaving
Ring who has twice scored sixties
against them at number nine.

Lindwall was the victim of a
double disaster. Trim hit him fair
on the toe at topspeed which sent
him hopping in pain from the
wicket. While he was away the
umpire gave him out Lb.w. He
had scored 13. seven for 209.

Trim now increased his pace
until he had excelled himself and
had Yat. Johnson snitk one to
Guillen, Johnson had scored one.
Eight for 210,

A Slight Snick

Ian Johnson looked quite in-
credulous when he saw the um-
pire’s verdict and in truth it must
have been a very slight snick
indeed. Trim new had four for 32

KEITH MILLER

gerous habit with four slips and
gully waiting, but he managed to
keep the ball down and clear of
the fieldsmen, so that his score
kept pace with Stollmeyer, whose
greater reach enabled him to be
over the ball.

Johnstone replaced Miller who
went to the other end to take over
from Lindwall. For Stollmeyer
against Johnstone, Lindsay Has-
sett called Lindwali and Noblet
into close forward short leg posi-
tions—a sound move against Stoll-
meyer, whose favourite shots are
in this are.

Stollmeyer, however, retorted by
turning the next ball extremely
fine for three and hooking the ball
after that in a huge lofted stroke
to the squareleg boundary,

The fifty for the partnership
virtually the opening partnership
—came up in 70 minutes, Stoll-
meyer 25, Rickards 20. Extras six.

The West Indies now had a 107
lead at the must useful position at
this stage.

Rickards cut Johnstone away
for two ‘nore and was then Lbw.
22. Three for 53

batsmen remained, He cut a four
off Gomez and began to show signs
of his usual liveliness but Trim
cut him short when he sent one
through low and bowled him very
completely. Ring was six and the
score nine for 215,
Trim’s Hour

It was Trim’s Hour, Since the
new ball he had taken four wick-
v9 for 10 runs and had five for
4.

Gomez finished off Johnstone
bowling him for one with Lang-
ley not out 0, extras were sixteen
and the total 216,

fhe Umpire Looks?

Next in was Everton Weekes
and if the gods of cricket were
kind, we should now see something
splendid, He had failed in the first
innings and was due for a triumph.

Johnstone appealed for l.b.w. off
the first ball but the umpire ig-
nored him. Stollmeyer glanced
Miller for a single, and Weekes
cut a single off the next ball. He
had begun. Stollmeyer cut John-



* six.



JOHNSTONE .

w. NEIL

HARVEY

Then Stollmeyer came to his 50
with a mightly lifted pull off Tan
Johnson that brought two when
it fell yards short of the
boundary. His 50 had taken 112
gpowes and the total was four for

Ring now replaced Lindwall and
was bowling with a_ carefully
varied length that kept Gomez very
watchful but generally Gomez may
‘be said to prefer slow bowlers with
fall their guile to sheer speed. At
the other end, Bill Johnstone came

Miller replaced Johnson and was on to bow! slow legbreaks. Worrell

promptly rewarded with an Lb.w paved through a maiden from him
decision against Stollmeyer, 54, but was snatching his hand away
Five for 97. in obvious pain after each contact

Gomez was next in, and it was
clear that Worrell was being kept
back, a policy which might render
him aseless in any case.

Lindwall came back for another
wicket before lunch and Chris-
tiani cut him for two to bring up
the hundred.

By lunch, Christiani was not out
17 and Gomez not out one. Extras
Total for five wickets 102.

Hassett after lunch brought up
his heavy guns—and Lindwall and
Miller were deputed to carve their
way into what remained of the
West Indian innings, Gomez and
Christiani met the onslaught with
valour and determination emerg-
ing from defence to hit about them
brightly when the opportunity
offered and 26 were added in this
way before Miller at top speed ~
compelled Christiani to play on to
his pad and thence on to the
wicket. Christiani bowled Miller,
33. Six for 128.

Enter Miter

of the bat with the ball.

However, he exchanged quick
run singles with Gomez and
brought up 151 by hooking Ring
boldly to the boundary.

Both took these spin bowlers
very carefully and were sometimes
in trouble with Balls pitched well
up to them but Gomez came out of
one difficult patch when he stood
back to hook a short ball from Ring
to the unprotected mid-wicket
boundary. Johnstone slipped in a
faster one now and then but still
Gomez saw him well enough to
keep him out, This was exactly the
play that was needed, But the new
ball was becoming due and that
would be new ordeal for this last
hope vair.

The New Ball

Lindwall duly arrived with it
and to the confusion of Australian
plans Gomez and Worrell pro-
ceeded to hammer it to all parts
of the field. They took thirty off it
in four overs of Lindwall suffering.

Miller was eventually taken off
and Bill Johnstone came to bowl
leg breaks with a ball still more or
less new. In his second over Wor-

Miller once again as often in his
career had intervened in a game
at a critical stage and swung it

There was a pleasant scene at

round. Even with their first in-

rell swung round to sweep him to

the end of the innings. Goddard
pushed Trim on ahead and Trim

raised his hand as he walked in
alone to the enormous plaudits of
the 50,900 crowd, It was good to
see so earnest and conscientious a
player have such a triumph in
his first Australian Test.
Leading

The West Indies now had a 56
lead and with Australia to bat
jast they were in a winning posi-
tion all they had to do now was
to see the game through without

decided to stay.

Goddard had now set what was
largely a defensive field, and runs
were not coming so quickly as in
the period directly after lunch, but
Harvey reached his 53 when he
turned Goddard behind him for 4
all run. Miller had 30 and the
score was three foi 136.

Guillen Struck

Guillen was struck by a ball
that came off Miller's pads when
the ba.sman kneed it away outside

stone precisely for fuur and took
his score to 30.

Then Ian Johnson came on for
Miller, and his second ball invited
Weekes to sweep it to leg. He at-
tempted, missed, and was hit on
the hip. Johnson appealed and he
was given out |.b.w. Weekes was
stunned and so were most other
people. The gods of cricket had
looked the other way—I can’t im-
agine where the umpire was look-
ing. Weekes indicated to Miller
that he had been hit on the hip.
and walked very slowly away.

the off stump, and play wes held
up for a few minutes while the
wicketkeeper bathed his mouth,
but seen through the glasses he
did not seem to be much hurt, and
resumed his job behind the stumps.

Harvey, now in the high tide of
form, continued to sweep jnd cut
Ramadhin square, when the spin
bowler came on at the otner end
for Valentine. He cut Goddard for
two successive fours to bring up
the hundred stand in 99 minutes,
and when Goddard still ignored
the new ball and brought Rama-
dhin back at the other end, he
square-drove him again to the
boundary and then—and then—;
he stepped out, misjudged the
spin “and drove the ball with
full power back at Ramadhin, who
took it with a quiet smile and
Harvey was out,

Harvey was caught and bowled
by Ramadhin for 83. The total
was 4 for 175,

Harvey had hit 15 fours in his
innings of two hours and everyone
of them was an excellent ground-
ed stroke.

Hole, who followed, was obvi-
ously unhappy and was bowled
by Valentine for 2.

On Top

It was notable that even agaist
Harvey with his splendidly con-
trolled but rapid scoring that the
West Indies had never lost their
grip of the game and now they
had reaped their reward.

At the tea score, Lindwall was
not out 0, and Miller not out 36
extras were 8, five for 176.

Lindwall who had survived a
few balls from Ramadhin before
tea was in obvious apprehension.

After tea he wildly lofted one
ball from his tormentor over
square-leg’s head for four but

thereafter continued his imperson-
ation of a human questionmark—
bent over with anxiety.

Twelve overs after the new bal)
was due Goddard took it and Trim
came back into the picture. This









AND FORM A MENTAL
ALL THE ClKARAC

[ They'll Do It Every Tirze

“You READ THE NEW BEST:



Weekes 1|.b.w. Johnson, two. Four

folly and they would come to the
for 60,

threshold of a mighty and historic
match at Sydney.

But now was to come the return
thunderbolt from Australia. God-
dard sent Guillen in witn Stoll-
meyer to open with half an hour
to go. Guillen turned Lindwat!'s
third ball into the hands of Bill
Johnstone at square leg before he
had scored.

Goddard now put himseif in and
from the next ball a loud appeal

Inspiration

Christiani began with a sweep-
ing single off Johnson, whereupo)
Stollmeyer cut him for three.
Johnstone’s next over Stollmeye:
pulled a huge four to squareleg'
and cut an excellent three off the’
next ball. The disastrous and
questionable fall of Weekes’ wick-
et had at least not affected the
scoring rate—it might even have

for l.b.w. was refused. The ball inspired it to greater heights.
after that—only the fifth of the Stollmeyer, indeed, now enlight-

innings—a similar appeal was
granted and the West Indies were
two wickets down for six runs.
Lindwall had taken two wickets in
his first over,

Rickards now joined Stolimeyer,
already gone. Goddard's scheme
was sound enough—he could not
foresee such events and Guillen
has had experience of opening
But now the West Indies were
fighting again where only a few

ened the gloom with a princely oft-
acive off Johnstone that was art-
istry and force exquisitely com-
bined. He then square-cut John-
son with a ont, Se inene bat and
g roached his 50.
Rings flighted slows were called
upon to replace Johnstone, and he
bowled a quiet over to Christiani.
_

WEATHER REPORT



moments before there had been
peace and a pleasant prospect. YESTERDAY
Stollmeyer nine and Rickards

eight played out time without fur-
ther trouble. Extras were three
and the total for two wickets 20.

A Most Critical Day

Rainfall from Coarington: nil
Highest Temperature: 82.5 °F
Lowest Temperature: 68.5 °F
Wind Velocity: 7 miles per

This third day of the Fourth hour 3 ;
Test was clearly one of the most, Barometer (9 a.m.) 29934 (3
it not the most, critical of the tour. p.m.) 29,862
The fortunes of this game would ,
turn on today’s play, and if they TODAY
turned towards the West Indies, Sunrise: 6.09 a.m.
then they would win and make Sunset: 6.49 p.m.
their great challenge at Sydney Moon: New, January 28

There were about 20,000 present Lighting: 6.00 p.m.
when Stollmeyer and Rickards High Tide: 8.58 a.m., 9.20 p.m.
went out to build up the strongest Low Tide: 2.34 a.m., 3.29 p.m.

position they could. We had news
that Worrell would bat. The in-
jured web of his right hand was
protected with plaster beneath a
special glove that fitted the en-
larged thumb and finger.
Lindwall opened with Miller at
the other end and both batsmen
proceeded to take singles from
glances and square cuts without
obvious bother. Rickards seemed
once or twice to lean for his shots
instead of moving his feet—dan-





WHAT’S ON TODAY

Police Courts and Court of
Grand Sessions—10.00 a.an.
Alliance Francaise Film Show
and presentation of med-
als at Combermere School
—8.00 p.m.

By Jimmy Hatlo |

——





Registered US Palen: Oftee

















SELLE? "THEN Said 800K IS MADE INTO ®
URE OF _ASMOVIE~s BUT JUST TRY TO
ia. SROOGNIZE CHARACTERS OR PLOT

nings lead of 56 this present total
did not seem enough for victory.
The Weekes lb.w. decision was
now costing them dear. Evidence
accumulated since his dismissal
seemed to show that not only was
the ball high when it hit him, but
that it had not been pitched on the
wicket.

Worrell was given a tremendous
reception when he came out and
immense cheers when he fine cut
Miller for four. The next moment
he confused a run call with
Gomez and was yards out when
Moroney threw back to Lindwall
who broke the wicket in a mud-
dled sort of way and Worrell was
given not out.

It we comment on one decision
we must comment on another—
his looked to be well and truly
vut. Worrell then straight drove
four i grand style. His reprieve
was valuable but hardly as
Weekes’ wicket since he was unfit,

leg but played the ball with great
force into his stumps. He had
scored 30 and the stand had real-
ised 72—a priceless help in time of
trouble. Worrell was given a great
ovation as he came in.

John Trim then went out and
ran himself out exactly as he had
in the first innings. Ramadhin
then ran himself out next bail.

World Beaters But—

There is a form of cricket lunacy
which, in my experience of every
empire team, is confined to the
West Indies. Without it they could
beat any team in the world but af-
flicted with it they impose a crip-
pling burden on themselves, Aus-
tralia escaped humiliation because
the West Indians, if left to them-
selves, can generally be relied
upon to do sufficient silly things to
ruin their own prospects. Seven
for 190, Eight for 194; nine for 194

Grand Gomez, solid and capable,
hooked Johnstone for four to bring









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up 200, himself 49 at tea Valentine]
iot Out one, extras nine; total 9 for!
200. |

Gomez came to his richly de-}
served fifty after tea with two off
Lindwall and with another single}
brought up 200. Valentine nobly}
defended against Lindwall with an
exact straight bat but in John-
stone’s next over Gomez was)
bowled by a ball that kept low.
Gomez bowled Johnstone 52; Val-
entine not out one, extras nine;}
total 203.

Austratia In :

Australia now needed 260 to win}
a figure which even yet might |
prove beyond them, but when one}
*onsidered the manner in which
the West Indies had squandered
their second innings then one real- |
ised how this Test might easily |
have been put completely beyond |
Australia’s reach. |

The wicket was wearing but not |
to any really marked degree ex-|
cept that it was showing a ten-
dency for all balls to keep low and
shoot through.

Morris Lanw

Morris again had a runner when
he came out to bat but he and
Moroney shared eight off Trim’s
first over. Off Gomez’ second over
Moroney was struck on the elbow
and spent several minutes rubbing
it and trying to restore it to action.
He then watched Morris play two
more balls and decided to leave the
field. Moroney retired hurt five.

Gomez very nearly beat Hassett
with a ball he just managed to kill
at his feet and so quiet did the
batsmen become that Trim’s fourth
over was a maiden.

“The Twins”

Then Ramadhin replaced Gomez,
Morris edged him for two and
later square cut him for three. Has-
sett followed this stroke with a
four of his own turned to fine leg.
The score had now reached 27 and
Valentine succeeded Trim, With
his third ball he had Morris 1.b.w.
for 12. One for twenty seven.

Ramadhin did not seem to be
getting the work va the ball that

he had early in the first innings | 4

but he did enough to hold Hassett
down to another maiden although
Uassett’s defensive strokes were
made without over much

Harvey had opened his innings
by straight driving Valentine
and was at once in a hunt for
runs. Valentine's next over
checked Harvey into a maiden, two
balls of which FPapyey saw very
late indeed as they came into him
as left-hander. Hassett broke the
silence with a cut for three off
Ramadhin. The score was one for

nirty seven. y
5 Neither Harvey nor Hassett in
their natural anxiety to keep their
wickets intact overnight dared
show any enterprise against the
West Indies nee — occa-
sional singles was at came
their way in the intervals of
finding Valentine and Ramadhip
increasingly bothersome.

Harvey brought up 50 by turu-
ang Valentine gently to square-leg
for two after the innings had last-
ed seventy-one minutes

Harvey's snicked four of
Ramadhin and four byes imme-
diately following helped matters
along. :

Trim came on with few min-
utes to go, to try for a shock
wicket and he bowled a maiden
to a packed offside field. Guillen
appeared to drop a quick chance
off Hassett from Trim in the last
over of the day and the pair
were still together at_ the close,
Hassett not out 23, arvey not!
out 21, extras seven, total one for|
68.

West Indies are still in the |
fight and Australia certainly does |
not yet feel safe. A lot will
depend on the bowlers tomorrow
when Moroney is expected to be
able to resume his innings. to-
night it seemed that Ramadhin
and Valentine were beginning to
get more turn out of the wicket!
in the later overs — and in_ the
amount of that turn lies the West
Indies biggest hope.







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AND EXTEND

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1952

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THE B.M.L.A. SOCIETY

AN ANNOUNCEMENT

Will Policyholders please note that owing to
circumstances beyond our control our Calen-
dars for 1952 are not yet ready for distribution.
Notice will be given when they are ready

which we expect will be in a few days time.

°

C. K. BROWNE,

Secretary.

TO ALL OUR FRIENDS
AND CUSTOMERS
‘ WE WISH

A Very Prosperous
FROM
C. B. Rice & .

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Full Text
Harb



ESTABLISHED 1895



Defeated By Casualties
‘And Faulty Umpiring

Fine Century ‘By Hassett ——————_
ail Super-human

WEST INDIES
AUSTRALIA ...



216 and (for 9) 260
THE FINAL STAGES of the Fourth Test Match saw
some dramatic scenes as the West Indies lost by one wicket

and one run. It was as tense an atmosphere as was ever
experienced in Test Cricket.



Australia resumed at one for 68} Valentine and then snicked a four
and by dogged cricket carried the| that leapt over Weckes’ hand as
score to 147 for 5. ithat slip fieldsman fell and

Hassett who contributed an ex-| brought up the 100.
cellent century fought every inch |
of the way and almost achieved Hassett then detected the first
victory. short ball from Valentine and

With the score at. 192 Guillen} @rove wide of midon for another
caught Lindwall at the wicket|four. Moroney had , stood very
and the West Indies were on top| Unhappily without scoring and ob-
again. Australia needed 58 rums| viously with few ideas how io
with 4 wickets in hand. When|combat Ramadhin when the little
Johnson and Hassett were both |man from Trinidad had him 1.b.w.
out at 218 victory was in sight for | Moroney 1.b.w. Ramadhin 5. Three
the West Indies. Ramadhin and] for 106.

Valentine were now “spinning”
for a win. The last pair met at
the wicket with 38 runs needed
ae ey made them amidst the
most dramatic scenes to win the
fourth test match and retain the ey ‘aon coming well ap to him
mythical “ashes.” ning. Eventually he chop-
This day changed with 4 | ped down on Valentine and he and

MELBOURNE, Jan.
West Indian cricketers

the spinners Valentine

also was making a vague kind of }{8ht for the Ashes rubber
attempt to dealing with bowling; Hard Fight

of clear hot sunshine. Worre!l|G°™e2 pointed at the wicket and
took the field * use his bowling the rest of the ficid shou.ed them-
—left handed of course—might be selves hoarse. Only then did the
needed. j umpire give Miller out hit wicket,
Ramadhin opened with a maiden | bowled Valentine for two, Four for
over to Harvey two balls of which 109.
c ~
ar hetanan acute sitseei-] Now the West Indies tight hard
end and Hassett forced one on the|â„¢icket was paying dividends.
leg side with a choppy stroke that!, Hole began with more freedom
had the ball bouncing three times |*© Score and generally played with
a sign that he had mistimed it.) # swinging bat but Guillen smash-
Harvey then of drove Trim for|®&@ bis wicket and his foot was only
two and the first really free stroke| inches in. After being twice hit] great dqdred—witness four

the present vital match.

deciding day with the

Australia slightly,

of the game came after 30 min- he lashed an off drive off Ramad-|before dismissals Wednesday, One
utes when Hassett drove Trim to Dim for four, Hassett’s 50 came of those decisions — that Sone

long off for three which brought] With a scrambled single off Valen- |Weekes—might cost the
up the 50 partnership in 66 min-| tine.

Trim beat Harvey in his third] Hassett not out 58 and Hole not

over with a ball that just shavea}out 7, extras 11 and the total four Doubtful

the bails but Harvey came backj wickets for 128 runs, aareeprtunstely it is regarded as a
with a delicate glance for two off doubtful decision—Weekes himself !
the next ball and the pair had Changed Fortunes believing he was not out as tho!
added 15 in half an hour this ball hit him high on the hip as,

morning—some indication of the] After lunch the West Indies|he knelt to hook Johnson, The,
struggle Australia were having|tighiened their grip and runs came |huge crowds attending the Test
for runs. lowly. The score reached 145 forj were a/godsend to the Wesi)
Trim Geis O& 4 and Goddard called for the new | {ndians. While not wiping off tne

: im Go's O: ball. — Trim off the field with we on re operations,

ps ; 5} pulled leg muscle God urne crowds paid so mucii
Again Harvey broke the re=| 4 DU tt ven ard (0k) iat the tourists do not faye to
straint by on driving Ramadhin rely on big crowds in the Fifth
Gomez took a fine catch at leg|Test at Sydney January 25,
order to square up tour expenses, |
A huge crowd was assured again)
Thursday for what promises to he

for four after he had bowled his
previous four overs for only three
runs,

Valentine relieved Trim who
went off the field with an injured] qefence and Lindwall c in to
leg and was replaced by Atkinson|ltake three fours of Ramadhin’s
Ph Bendaninrs in the fielding) next over. Together they carried
recs aay oe hooked Valentine}the score to 174 and Australia
or four af-er watching other de-l-1qwjy regained the winnin
liveries closely, Harvey had 33 lpnaition. 7 , w 8
and the score was 93 when he bene ‘
played forward and under an off With the score at 192 Lindwall
break from Valentine (a leg break eee Gin 4s: i off
to a right hander) and was bowled’ SOD Sys | Free COT. SW,
as well as Ne be. : Hassett and Johnson played until

It was a valuable wicket to take|the tea interval to carry the score
at this stage, Harvey being the)to 204 for 6 with Hassett 95 not
most prolific scorer in the Aus-|Out.
tralian team for as long as he stays :
: * ss Resuming after tea Hassett
at oe meee Memnney now re7jscored his century. The score! fp

nnings he had intern eached 218 and Johnson was{(iough new gales.
rupted last night and a tremendous caught at the wicket by Guillen
appeal for 1.b.w. off the first ball} oe Ramadhin for 6 and next over
was refused. Two balls later

Valentine had a return catch from wes the 2 at unehanaet Fae

slip to dicmiss Hole for 13.off Wor-
rell. Five for 147,

Hassett continued his stubborn
the battle of cricket giants,



LONDON, Jan.

indeed—one outstanding necessity
of the day was that every catch
had to be taken.

However, Ramadhin brought
suspense back into the game with
a deadly maiden over that had

Langley and Johnson met in the|{¢*k awash.
tense atmosphere with Ramadhin
and Valentine “spinning” for
victory.

knew to protect his stumps and Morris Ibw b Valentine ............
keep the ball out of the hand of] Moroney Ibw b Ramadhin
Goddard who was fielding three ew P Velenine ee
bf * ' er ic | alentine
yards from his bat at forward] goie'c Gomez b Worrell . :
short leg. Valentine also kept Lindwall c Guillen b Ramadhin
Moroney most apprehensive with ies sOnnEo ¢ Guillen b Ramadhin
; assett w Valentine * ’
another maiden. Langley Ibw b Valentine

Moroney now attempted 04 yonnstone not out

swing Ramadhin to leg but missed Extras Fifty passengers and crewmen

snd Cie aa se bell EE) st eg iat)... [Naeem emaaioe Saas

was clamped firmly on the bats- BOWLING ANALYSIS Fifteen of them arrived at Rot-

men who were living only from) a. o M & W |terdam, Holland, last night,

ball to ball. Shsnadisiss 2 14 9 3) The destroyer relayed to Carl-
Hassett stabbed down desper-|Vaientine . . 9 9 (5 |sen messages of encouragement

ately to keep out a shooter from'Trim . 9 © ®% ‘© |from his family and from



hope for her.—U.P,



P la tf orm Issue | Two U.N. Planes

HARRY W. FRANTZ

Shot Down

|

{

\

WASHINGTON, Jan. 2, :
Reaction here developed slowly and cautiously to Har. | Over N, Sorea

old Stassen’s announcement that he would make the ae Se 8th ARMY H. QRS. Korea, Jan 2.
gold standard “an issue in the 1952 political campaigns. Th Communist anti-aircraft guns
question is considered to have world-wide economie sabe shot down two United Nations

, planes over North Korea today,
ifications and an individual campaign proposal would cause |". Start of 1962 found the w21

no great official concern. quieter than it has been in months.
Official sources are uncertain, ernment unless they should be-| Knocked down by Red ground-

what Stassen means by the mod-|come part of the Republican! fre were a U.S. Tunder-jet and a
ern gold standard and think that) Party's platform. Shooting Star-Jet. Both were hit

Stassen threw the gold issue inj while attacking Communist ground

the significance of his proposal

a depend on his later amplifi-} the political arena, when he said! concentrations.
ation of the phrase. that there was only one real way Generally bad weather

Wide Interest tovinsure the solid dollar for a|Communist ‘territory prevented
Sources think that if Stassen| long term in the US. He said, “that| U.S, jets from avenging losses in

ally works out his pro-| way is to place the U.S. dollar) airy combat.



blic, he
poli









& Advocate
HH OTEST

CAUGHT AND BOWLED



7 BRURSDAY, JANUARY 8, 1952

W.I. LOSE FOUR





Effort Needed
For W.1. Win

(From FRANK MARGAN)

into the fourth and what promised
to be the final day of the vital
fourth Test at Melbourne needing
@ super-human effort to pull the
game their way. At the end of the
third day, Australia wanted 192
runs with nine wickets in hand,

'
!
tary Anthony Eden will make a big bid in Washington to

With the cream of the Australian
reputed batting might yet to bat,
the task appeared easy. The West
Indies chances for a win rest on

Ramadhin, They have to bowl at
Miller now joined Hasseti and, the top on this crumbling wicket
square cut Valentine for two, He} Keep the West Indies in tie



. HARVEY caught and bowled by Ramadhin after his brilliant innings of 83 in the Fourth Test at Mel

With the score at 2—1
Australia’s favour after three of
the five Tests have been played,

| Left to right; Ramadhin, Guillen, Harvey, Umpire Wright, Miller,
tance for the West Indies was one|#@Ssett ran two while Guillen and tourists cannot afford to lose

U. S, ‘Urges U. N.
To Support 4
Acheson Plan

_(Radiophoto _,

“Caronia” Will Be
Met With Flowers

Preparations For Tourists Go Ahead

West Indians are giving Australia
a hard fight in the contest foi

world ericket honours, Through.|
out the last three days of the}
game fortunes fluctuated first one:
side then the other until] at ihe

Indies spinners facing Australia’s
bats, the chances stand at even
with the betting favouring



The United States told oe ‘Uni.
ted Nations that if the
istice in Koreg fails to mate-
rialize, then the U.N, will have te
launch a new military ac
statement was made by U.S. dele-

he wicket is taking spin to al _ BASKETS of locally grown flowers will meet
Cunard White Star tourist liner Caronia, the first ship of
the season, when she anchors in Carlisle Bay at 1 p.m on}
Indies the game_and all chance

utes.. The pair stayed until lunch, |of winning the AShes this tour, The baskets of flowers will be the gift of the Barbados
Publicity Committee who are now busy preparing up-to-
date information and other things that a tourist would want
as he gets ashore.

sions at the Palais De Caillot here
after its 10-day Christmas recess

of Korea in urging support for the

the second phase of the “Acheson jthe Publicity Committee,

for strengthening the U.N

‘| MAXIM LITVINOV
DIES AT 75

MOSCOW, Jan. :
Russia announced the
Maxim Maximovich













e decorating
the building to make it more at-
> for this tourist season,

Publicity Committee have
stock of litera~

deal with any future “

armistice soon
got down a larger

ce bring an end to suffer greeting cards, r
aborators of Nikolai Lenin,

Pravda, the only morning paper
published today said Litvinov died

mark the first time in history that
an aggressor post cards and are hoping to re-
an international or-
ganization dedicated to the prin-

—UP. “Old Bolshevik”

i lay in state this morning on flower
bedecked catafalque
: ence hall of the Foreign Ministry.

Phe body ‘of the
dri sell to stamp collectors.

in the confer-
ok (
job will not Barbadian

Capiain Reniains On
Wreeked rane

in Korea The |Foreign Ministry stood guard-of-

to 50 dollars and on

n amount of U.S. ec
The flowers came :

organizations
delegations of workers who came
last respects,

from various
trary to Our cy

that aomietion s
A United States destroyer, ee
‘ng to the side of the derelict
steamer Flyimg Eaterprise, report-
ed that Captain Carlsen, the only
man aboard, was hanging on! ®°
High winds
blocked the departure of the deep
sea tug Turmail from Farnworth,
England, to the wavelashed spot,
vaeee RR : iA aie a of Ireland,
jim but dropped it. this was Sadi Pyen the spectators appeale, "| Where the Enterprise rock-

The tide changed rae ana; ed with her port rails and main

> part of all of us
The full moral

and material effects of collective » during their

Chataigneau, acting Dean

Corps offered Foreign

Nine Ships

accomplished by one or two states] _
on behalf of g world community.”

The last point amounted to an
appe al to other nations to ennai

PAL INOV'g bier, > funeral was;



public figures have been entombed.
Pravda published an obitus ary of}

»| Litvinov on the last page dese

“old bolshevik” andj; ;

The U.S. destroyer rushed to] main brunt of the fighting.
the scene at 9.30 am. through
high seas from, Bordeaux, France.
Hassett employing every device he AUSTRALIA 2ND INNINGS The destroyer commanded by
y Pp 8 y Commander W. L. Thompson, es-

12 | tablished radio telephone contact

33 | With Carlsen, who was squatting

2 | precariously on the port wall of

a the deckhguse. A US. Navy

6 {Statement issued here said that

. Carlsen remained in good spirits

mine nee Bek ' go {in the fourth day of his lovely
4

8

260

“Acheson Plan”
authorizing the
assign regional hodies such

ing him as an
a “prominent diplomat”.
patch said he had given up active

+> most of the s
spending the

to severe iinet 8.
, had been out of public! :
since his aera nt as De puty, ri oming
Fore ign Minister
> was Pde

any future aggressor. 30 a February



Season Begins
check with some

Jamaican Gaoled
On ie de Te

vigil on the 6,711 ton freighter. to Washing on
Foreign Com-

spending the

recognition in the Chancelleries
win a seat in the League
of Nations and generally extended
international
also instrument

Clenford Linton
was sent to pris san for ’ nine "month

r being in un-



brandtsen Lines, the owners of the
Flying Enterprise, Karl Meher-
wald, chief mate of the 2,400 ton

German —smerchantman Arion
ta ssen 1 EG | iit vices iy some ot “th
survivors, said on arriving at

| Liverpool, England, last night

9 ay Carlsen’s Company had told
n ar | him not to abandon the Enterprise
oO unless there was no longer any

7 ; showed tbat in
i hen arrested, sz

Linton had 12 packets
a total of 88 grains oO
Indian hemp.

+, Guest decribed him as *
foul creatures
“There can bé
; more wicked-

1 for the Soviet Govern- M
Venezuelans ¢



yet reached its peak, }



the flagdraped hearse
ers and members of the Guard-of-
Honovr wore black brass:

ri which goes
ly to the root of-the stability of
eny society than introducing it to
the use of dangerous drugs.”

who pleaded guilt

said he used the hemp to make tea
as was the practice
He admitted two previous con-

e On Page |

World Rank
Efforts Favoured
By Mossadegh

TEHERAN, Ji
Moharnmed







in Jamaica

Strange Blasts
Alarm Clerks

robbery with vintence.

24 who was coated with Linton
was sent to prison for 28 days fox
the same offence. He pleaded not
. Police said a partly-smeoked
comtaining hemp Was),

alarmed clerks in offices near the| 4



ternporarily
Prudhomme

. sound was peculiar because ssenta=-|to go home will be exchanged

Reconstruction

Leewards Receive

2 New Year Honours

Our Own Correspondent)
ANTIGUA, Jan 1.
received two New

and talked with Moss

American naval craft



and i] ese t
and presents it forcefully}on the modern gold standard.” | UWS. Sabre-Jets, patrolling] Ye:
y be able, to Gold policy has not been a|cloudy skies sighted no Red planes}!
interest in| national partisan issue in the U.S.| over “MIG Alley.” In North West
But they did not] since 1934 when the Gold Reserve | Korea only ground action was re-
" sat his view would have} Act was passed. ported along the 145-mile front,
» early influence on the Gov- —U.P. atly® —U.P.



Prudhomme,



William! naval s







first, beginning on a man for ; ;
g . e : » s these islands
and Develop-|man_ basi South Koreans im-| beimg set up on these } .
—B.UF
sed_ into Red irmies would
be reclassified a war prisoner
for this purpose *
2. Communist prisontrs £e-
maining after all U.N. prisoners DIED
ave *n releas wi > e@x- :
ave been relea ed vill be ex TORONTO. Jan. 2
hanged for interned civilians : :
| George Singleton, the first Vice
jand displaced persons ulso on i ’ if ngl 1, Wt .
nan basi President of Ulster Uni Soccer
other displaced person Club opped dead on Tuesday
ho want to go home will be He was 48 and employed by
ermitted to do so, regardless of; Reyner Construction Comp:
he number |coach of the Ulster Socceg
@ on page 6 for many year





PRICE : FIVE CENTS”

[. MATCH



\Churehill And Eden
Want U.S. Support
For Atlantic Treaty

By R. H. SHACKFORD
ABOARD QUEEN MARY AT SEA, Jan. 2,
Prime Minister Winston Churchi!] and Foreign Secre-

get United States support for major reorganization of the
North Atlantic Treaty Organization.

The major British objective will be to streamline
N.A.T.O. so that its periodic meetings will be smaller, more
informal, more intimate and more effective. The British
project will also include an icea for the political goal of the
Atlantic community as well as the strictly European
community
Eden strongly favours working “bat he’s not going to seek extra-



for what he calls a European. erdinary United States aid—
federation within an Atlantic above what Britain is expected
confederation The continental ‘0 get in the mutual security pro-

ountries would become ene unit {tamme—and he will start late in
long with the United States and January a new austerity pro-
Britain and Canada instead of as 4ramme to put Britain back onto
it present nine separate entities, ‘(he road to solvency, When the
Eden spoke emphatically about Wik at Blair House gets areuncd
he need for N.A.T.Q. reorganis- \© finances Churchill is certain
ing at the end of the recent Rome ‘(0 remind Truman—as he used ‘to
conference. It was his first post remind Roosevelt—of the tre-
war conference as Foreign Sec- | Mendous contribution Britain
retary coming on the heels of his Made during World War II.
first experience at the United | Atomic Energy
Nations Assembly in Paris. | Also high on Churchill's agenda
ae s ‘will probably be the attempt to
Civilian Director »reak down the postwar barriers
Both Churchill and Eden are | which have ‘blocked Anglo-Ameri-
known to believe that on the!lcan exchange of atomic energy
diplomatic and political side of | secrets. Churchill wants a lot
N.A.T.O. there should be a diree-!more than he can possibly get

ud nt a mee stature ree He wants the same kind of com-
wight Eisenhower in the mili-] jote partnership with the United

tary field. .
£ States on atomic energy that ex-
On the financial side Churchi we e :
s ial side a uM isteq during the war when the

will not arrive in Washington ’tomie bomb was being developed
wit to = n° hand but he But Churchill himself knows ‘hat

Britain, which steered through hat is impossible unless the U.S,
World War II crises when the} ~0Msress will make fundamental
going often looked fatal is now thanges in U.S. laws governin
ton the edge of bankruptey—as it|4tomic energy, and that Congress
has been more or ‘less ever since | Will not do that.
World War II started. Churchill is bringing with him

By the time Churchill arrives|for his conference with Truman,
n Washington gold and dollar|his atomic energy adviser—Lord
reserves figures for the last quar-}] Cherwell whose scientific advise
ters of 1951 will be known, and}.. Churchill during the last war
they are expected to show an-| was invaluable,
other overwhelming deficit for Churchill will hold some strone
the last three months. bargaining points when he sit

In simple terms it will meai{qown with Truman on this crucial
that during 1951 Britain spent | tegue:

$1,000,000,009 more than it earn-|pipog-

The British have given the
ed in dollars--like a man who p oe = ae
spends $150.00 per week but Americans key-bomber bases in

earns only $100.00 England where atomie bombers are

2 based and could take off for at-

Trade Figure Bad ena tacks against Russia if necessary.

In on dn een ane Sa Second: Britain, which con-
igure with a € & & aii . a Aaa aa asi
dollar areas remains bad. Brica.o tribu'ed the major part of basic

2 tho ox.{research on the atomi¢ bomb i
ee ee eek or ine pret now believed to be near produc-
tions during which she lived on tion of its own atomic bomb
being the trading and banking Third: Britain has made =
centre of the world. major advances in the f

It will be against this dismal neacefa’ use of atomic ener
(nancial background that Chur-}|from Churchill’ view it will not
chill will talk in Washington, But}be all take ond no give.
he has vowed before Parliament ati,

U.N. Agree To Red

Demand For Release

Of All Prisoners

PANMUNJOM, Korea, Jan. :
The United Nations have agreed to the Janta
demand for the release of all war prisoners during an
armistice, ye only under a comp]ex compromise formula.
The U.N. pre sviously had held out for a straight man-for-
man exc otal. which ‘fould have left more than 104,000 of
the 116,000 Communist prisoners in Allied hands, after all
of the 11,559 Allied prisoners: had been released.






The new U.N. proposal pro-

vides for the release of all war Rocket Revise
prisoner and interned civilians
held by both sides and also would

PL BY pole alee Gast. to te:| Where Columbus
10,000 to 70,000 captured South

-orean troops inducted into the Landed



ted = =oarmies The Communists’

rst reaction wa unfavourable. LONDON

The U.N. Rear Admiral R. E. An American guided missile

Libby said he got the impression] testing range, 600 miles log, is
hat they thought, “It stinks being built across the Bahamas,
However Libby aid that helaccording to reports reaching
jidn’t believe that the Commu-] London A landing strip and a

ists fully understood the formula.] station for recording the flight of
te said that they had agreed to|the missiles are under construc-
tudy the Six Point Compromise]tion on Watling Island, where
roposal overnight, and give a| Columbus is reputed to have first
uller answer at the Prisoner|set foot in the New World in
sub-committee Meeting at 9.00] 1492.
m. today

American engineers arrived
The Second Sub-committee,| there in September and the first
orking on the supervision of!ts Air Force ‘plane landed on
he truce, made no progress) November 14, nearly 460 years

iuring the 54 minute meeting and after
o adjourned antil 11.00 a.m.
mm Thursday, still deadlocked
over the Communist demand for Calumbus is said to have disem-
he right to repair and build barked oil itee Hi
North Korean airports during the “The Bahamas rocket

truce

Columbus. The — landins
strip is a few miles from a mOnu-
ment erected on the beach where

range ex-

tend from Cape Canaceral,

Florida. over the Grand Bat
How It Would Work Bisuthexe, Wailing Mayacuant
and Turks Island. Under an
arrangement between the British,
Bahamas and U.S. Government
observations posts linked by
radio and submarine cables at



Libby said that the U.N, formu-
la would work this way
] All + prisoners who want











PAGE TWO BARBADOS ADVOCATE THURSDAY, JANUARY 3, 1952

__—



—____—_——————

Caubh Calling









High Heeled What’s Cooking : axe "en,

Organist a = ee al al - ") GLOBE fer. a













ney the Governor Engaged Retired Telephone Or. George thalben-Bell — is wit I suppose all of you
@ aa ‘ musical adviser to the BB know to cook ham, and eggs TT
apres - CROSS ¥ 8 “HE engagement was an- Engineers Religious Department and whew but I wonder whether you have THE BIG 3 FOR BE ER MOVIES
sa sy a oar? mere. nounced on Monday night visited Australia recently his ever heard of ham suffe, It is a} Present
"Mr. Val McComi« ween me , Waverley a * PENDING a holiday in Barba- audiences were greatly intrig ied de licious dish when cooked and| TO-DAY 5 & 8.30 p.m STARTING TUES., Jan, 8th
“Cercle Fran- = L E ate Stationery Mr dos are Mr. and Mrs. John by the high heels he wears for the recipe is as follows: 5 & 8.30
c tetas; Mitedt aisle arnum, son of Mr. w. Campbell of Sarasta, Florida piaying the organ. This appar- ‘ zt and Continuing Daily and Continuing Daily
tonight at 8 o’clock _ Mrs, D. C. Farnum, of and Mr. and Mrs. W. W. Stahl ently unnecessary form of foot- For ‘our people: 5: AOS
This function will be followed 2 h > Grazettes Road, St. of California. They arrived here gear is peculiar to him, so far 5 ster 9 ae | ie perrs
by the showing of a full length ~ °°" recently by B.W.1.A. from Cara- as he knows, but be finds it a P = ; i cr Sieeth
i "re! tle “ - San2 sat aS & are staying ¢ . - reat help wher laying chords. he 2 ten
ete iN yimoent” " this ‘tlm — _, Trinidad Solicitor ie ioe Hotel. ee See The ar aan a to ann are ro b oar
all the critics’ awards in 1949 for a7 AND ene BOBBY Mr. Campbell is a retired en- nearly always played with the Ham (cooked) %b. ‘
the best TYoreign film of the year, : sR and three of their gineer of the American and Tele- ;



feet and when playing chords of |



















and a resumé of the story appear- ¢h!idi ny, Marion and geaph Company, more often several notes it is quite possible Milk 1 pint
ed in Tuesday’s Advocate, : ; arrived gl ares known as the Belle Telephone for the large flat heel of a man’s Cheese 2 tablespoonsful i
The film-show is open to the ©! ®\cslay : oe ws EE . ~* system, while Mr. Stahl is also ordinary shoe to cover one note : - |
general public and tickets can be monte rae ae a retired engineer who was until and smudge a second one slightly. Eggs 1 wgole 2 whites i : |
btair od fr the Hx Sec. M rs ao are Slay 1 a sili . . J . ty Th ben-Bz *s s scially height- * i : - é
J. M. Michell (2015). Leet a, Maxwells Oe Se ee, cae aa thed end narrowed heels “wexke Prepare beforehand a white!’ Jey, S z
» Mic ) MT . . phone and Telegraph in San ned end narrowed hee mak 2 Oo; or " : e
~ > = : t F “¢ Jo Sellier Francisco sure that he produces clean, S@uce with the ‘2.0m. of butter, op ? } W-6 -ii oresents
is a brother ) r. Joe Sellier, s 7 “~~” the 2 oz. of flour amd the pint 01} “ao ra ie li.
GOLF PRO S.J. of St. Patrick's RC. Church, They both went over to Cara- HON. GERALD LASCELLES seen *"@"P Potes_and chords. milk. (1 gave Nae. recipe or wirtvey “CHa COLO > Seeger!
Jemmotis Lane. Mr, Sellier is a ¢@S on an assignment with the hope at the races during his visit . white sauce’ three weeks ago).| °“ *= Kf : of the Texas showgiri
t fer. His son Anthony js, telephone company there which <, Barbados in 1949. He arrived B.B Cc. Radio Programmes Let it cook well so that the sauce| aise HRyy GRAYSON ; gr and the prince
ele promising player, as is took them three months. The p.6 from England via Canadc i on hae ee ae will be fairly thick.. Put it in a AYE, GAp et
; . > party w i - . 5 « Nancy . 20 a 5 : 144 fr = a} a
J ) on, who will be party with the exception of Mrs. yesterday by T.C.A. One Minute Please, 12 noon The News, mixing bowl and Met it cool NDNER as N i >
co . later in the month Stah'. will be returning to Caracas : : 12.10 p.m. News Analysis Mince 4.1) ham. Mix it with the —— Lins s N
wi i er Rita to join the on January 12 for a short visit. Last Here Ir: 1949 1.00—7.00 $1.29M Wasm Sea ttle at tinh: anal ve “OWAp FLL
family for the holiday. Rita was From Caracas, Mr. and Mrs. ON. GERALD LASCELLES, — - _ en s ih les Semiteal o “SOE fe: D K z AMO ie A,
cepain ef the Trinidad Ladies Campbell will travel on a Swed- brother of the Earl of Hare- *_4).™. The “ote $5 eS oe Bee are ee the Pp 8 egg. (Ii AARK = PRowy Hane
water pelo team which played ish ship for Lima in Peru before wood and owner of Belle and guciness, 445 p.m. Sporting Record v h = a ich welt Anke vaak Stee \ GE ¢ oh } fe es
against Barbados in Trinidad yeturnine to Florida, while: Mr. Mount Estates in Barbados, ar- § p.m. Composer of the Week, 5.15 YOU Have them you = pt ; OWrp a, nine’ [I fn \ fr?
lest September Stahl will rejoin his wife here rived from England via Canada New Records, 6 p.m. Colonial Commen- Yolks but you would find it} S38 CN CHAS ce Liddie ) Mla 2%
1d after which they will pay flying yesterday by T.C.A. on a visit. tr yell a. bag pap ~~? ither expensive now; I did minc} = fp
Back To Trinidad visits to some of the islands in = * a guest at the Colony Club, ’ pum. News Azatreis. a -~ yolk -n06 Bree. wales BORER STERLING w
FTER pending the Christ- the Caribr thei “ ack . James, 3 aisem asagm (Ih wo V tes c ; énnte
4 mas holidays with his rela- = an Mas A i mein way hee Mr. Lascelles was last in Bar- - left over from a cake) Beat the TEC IN
sat “Ravenscourt” fonlac on VER Beeeeed bados in 1949. $ 30 p.m. Foreign Wo! whites (3) until stiff. Mix every ey ae faa Api hi Ki
tives a tavenscourt,” ‘onta- Their first visit to Barbados “ A 75 p.m. One Minute . 5 n i 5 aethar “hpi : whevaiee | HAMMERSTI Why HANG it "
belle, Mr, W. K, Fergusson, Mr, Campbell said that they all _ With T.C.A., Montreal — fidio Newsrcel, #30 p.m. Special Dis- thing together now very slowly | ati
Police Magistrate of Siparia, likeq it very much and added that R. AND MRS. VERE peer. se a. ee a +e a But era South Trinidad, returned home they were rarticularly imnressed BROOKS who spent A The News, 10.10 p.m. From the Editorials mixture, Pa Seer cotaete 1 saree ae EXTRA MATINEES on SATURDAY 1.30 p.m.—Midnite
: ’ > 35 ven for about 25 minutes or hal ‘
yesterday by B.W.LA. \ He was hv the courtesy and friendliness week's holiday in Barbados left 8 wd ee ene ite p.m, The ioe Srriede. “Reais: Sal | “HOUSE OF STRANGERS” (Ed. G. Robinson — Richard Conte)
accompanied by Mrs, Fergusson. »* the peovley at vase eae the pars | “TONITE WE RAID CALAIS” (John Su‘tcn — Anna Bella)
ac Mrs ee on aye





A Subsidiar Lecturer And Writer Brooks’ relatives, They will then >it 6 12 18 Adults: Pit 10 16. 24.
R. JOHN LEE, Publicity Di- : be returning to Canada where , fupert and the Pine Ogre—3 est
\ rector for the Mene Grande MONG the passengers arriv- Vere works with T.C.A. in Mon- ~ } 4

Oil Compeay (a subsidiary of the ing by T.C.A. yesterday treal. Vere is the son of Mr. ani ; | Q Na Pp i R EK
Gulf Oil) in Venezuela, returned Morning were Mr. and Mrs. Mrs, P. S. Brooks of “Rosemary,” | K a ud
home on Tuesday by B.W.LA Neville Goddard and their Rockley.

after spending the Christmas holi- Caughter Vicki. Mr. Goddard Second Visit TO-DAY 4.45 & 8.30

days with his relatives at Black- pig Sali oo: ah Man ore R. NEIL, STEWART, T.C.A.'s ® ‘ . a
mans, St. Joseph, He was ac- yw. 3 N. Goddard of “Kensing- Medical Officer in Vancouve: FRIDAY 4th at 2.30 & 8.30 and Continuing
companied by Mrs. Lee. ton”, Fontabelle. who had been holidaying here

. “ch. Here on a _ month’s holiday with his wife and daughter re-
Spent Christmas With they are guests at the Windsor turned to Canada yesterday by
























Family Hotel. . ,ame ae ‘ipa staying at
R. CARL CHENERY who had Cacrabank Hotel. : ;
been spending the Christmas Thirty-one Years’ Service | This was Dr. Stewart's second
holidays with his family returned seid visit to Barbados. He was her : : ’
ohn tae \ FTER 31 years of unbroken in December 1950 we haven 1 when
to Trinidad on Monday by ie he Ils Pauli dj although p
BWIA service at the Advocate Venezuelans Return ~ f pais Pauune and janet are near, ig “ ms
Stationery Miss Leila Lynch of FTER spending two weeks’ and she leads hit to join them. Yo ey it
Annual Dinner peandemere, Constitution ioe, holiday in Barbados Dr. andj “a en oer have small sachs mui be od Ul aI
HE hon’ble the Colonial Sec- Carib wishes her many mare Mrs. Ploch and family returned | about the same size as his own raway. Let's meet ‘ere
retary Mr. R. N. Turner and of “happy retirement S years to Venezuela by B.W.LA. yester- We're collecting things, too,"’ she i wo hours a d cee who has
Mr, J. Cameron Tudor were the ; 3 day, Also returning to Venezuela Rat Meee ee eae SeOr OS, Se Lancaster
MR. ERNIE WAKELAM guests of honour at Club Pre- On Holiday yesterday by the same opportuni |||" popay 1 ao ae SPECIAL BAT’ O30 am BE TOWN
. miere’s Annual Dinner and ty after two weeks’ holiday here) |)a scream IN THE DARK |
-Canadian Professional Golfer, Reuite m which was held last R. B. AVERBOUKH of the were Dr. and Mrs. William Ris-| nee eee sf te
arrived from Canada yesterday saturday night at “Viamede”, New Yalta Project in Diego auez and family. They were, }) MANS OF i |
by it ee sir ae end Rockley. Martin, Trinidad, arrived here a Staying at the Hotel Royal, | !
coach at the mockiey Go and Covers were laid for 30 and couple of days ago by B.W1LA. | ;
€ ountry Club. He acted as coach among those present were Mr, ay fh weeks’ holiday and is Three Weeks : 1 4
he re last ys ur and expects to J. E. T. Brancker, M.C.P., Mr. staying with Mr. and Mrs. Airdon FTER spending three weeks’) WAYNE RYAN i @ | t
remain in Barbados until March. |) Carmichael, Mr. Julian Robin- ‘jim; “te holiday in Barbados, Mr. and} y Technicolor) alive
: ; Altman of Hart’s Gap. |
H Awat son, Miss Marjorie Rocheford, Mrs, P. MacDonald of Curacao, | Sanne TMT 7 eee dtege St
ere Again Mr. C. M. Thompson, Mr, L, A. Free Show returned home yesterday via| Aa Cunseike: jetta as gts, 8.90 Daas x

aes tNIE WAKELAM, Can- Williams, M.C.P., Mr. H.
acl n

5 Trinidad by B.W.LA. They were WARNER Bros. present Alfred HITCHCOCK'S
golf professional ar- Thorne, Miss Gloria Grimes, Miss OMORROW night at 8.15 |

stayimg at Rydal Waters Guest





, ; “og 1 1 \yips

rived from Canada yesterday by Cora Alleyne, Mr. G, Barker, Mr, o'clock there will be q free Jroiice Worthing STAGE FRIGHT A
T.C.A. Mr Vakelam was in and Mrs, B. A. Bayley, Mr. C. McD, film show at the British Council. Mr ’ MacDonald is one.-of ‘the Jane Wyman, Marlene Dietrich, Michael Wilding 1
Barbados last year when he acted Stoute, Mr. Arthur Sealy, Miss D, The Programme is — British News 4 ccitants attached to the Labour| ||————————___!ehard_Toda sh "eso
as official coach at the Rockley Thompson, Miss $, Bennett, Miss —-Children Growing up with other °°" = __ 2810



The Garden

x . r J 1 CO Department of the Sbell Com- =
Golf ana Country Club, He has I. Paris, Mr. N, Carmichael, Mr, people — Wordsworth’s Country P OISTIN =
returned “to act again as coach. S. Thompson, Miss C, Ashby, Magic Touch (Development of P@Y: a. A LA Dial 8404 G A i E T Y

























VT 8.90 a.m, |
| ah ae
NG LEATHERNECKS ||





|
meets
Corinne







‘ ‘ ST. JAMES
Acc mpanying him is his wife. Miss A. Archer rand Mr. B, Bourne, natural resources in the U.K.) * * TODAY (onky) 445° & 8.30 p.m Last Show TONITE 8.3
kecompanying “him, is. -his- wife, — Talking Point Gary COOPER in “CMISSISSIPPT RAY THM"
HE cruellest lies are often TASK FORCE = (Technicolor) Jimmie Davis and The Sunshine EXTRA: ¥
; s * — Y
told in silence. PRAIRIE THUNDER . Band & ye
: BY THE \X AY eeee By Beachcomber —R. L. Stevenson, Dick Foran y K an are THE JCatooK Quick on the VIGOR ¥
ee y #Ré & ?
‘ : SPECIAL SATURDAY 1.30 p.m == oe
HE anties indulged in by the she had a sense of humour, She control, especially as all the Incidental Intelligence A SCREAM IN THE DARK & Te agen Midnite Sat. 5th
various airlines to counter was one day flattering Antony, telephone lines have been cut. I N a battle of tongues women ac huaet ay: sie sit ea ee WILD BEAUTY R 0 wv A L
the howling boredom of journeys and ealling him the world’s seldom hold their own.—} || ——=—— ee Destiny ie en, & ill
by air are worth a word or two, greatest fisherman, With a de- 4 [Letter for Frances Rodman, FRI. to SUN ite Sat, 5th John Garfield é IDERS OF | Last 2 Shows TO-DAY 4.30 & 8.15
No sooner does on airline an- lighted smile, as they sat by the x f —L.ES, lithe dagcned..o Hib, snag TY Sesulienin | AE pion
nounce free dressing-gowns than ag cae, oveeeet, began ae W.A. Mozart Esq. Tarzan'’s Magte Song of Nevada (Color) ‘& Repu! li: Whole Serial
its rival offers free socks, There fish. tile he was tweaking her ey 1 mee Fountain R Rogers Shirley Temple Fuzzy KNIGHT ||| vepu,.\ ene
was, I believe, quite a rumpus on ear and talking nonsense to her, ay ~ i ; ————— ——— |)
aplane the other day “wren oa a slave, “previously instructed, (CULTURE will out. A lady € nossworD ————— eee THE PHANTOM RIDER”
traveller, who had been given a dived silently and tied an enor- “* Who had evidently heard the . ; : IY st LL ;
bit of peasant pottery, a dozen mous salted Bithynian, cod to the "ame Mozart on some radio pro~ YOU CAN'T TALK...YOU CAN'T MOVE...WHEN
orchids, and a Pomeranian dog, end of his line, and gave a pull, 8yamme, and liked the bit of ( with
found that she was expected to Antony hauled in, and there music of his which was played, ,
pay for the dog's licence. At was the fish. “Wonderful!” wrote the other day to. Mr. GEORGE J. LEWIS
any moment I expect to read that cried the Serpent of old Nile, Mozart at the Salzburg Mozart

hostesses in bathing costumes “Why, you can even catch salted Foundation, requesting him to
will give free swimming lessons, ced!” Antony hung his head in compose for her a harp sonata
that there will be clock golf be- shame, while the assembled com- which she was willing to pay for.



re vy i FRIDAY Only 4.30 & 8.15
HITCHCOCK ae b Republic Ac tion Double
RUSS HAYDEN _ LYNN ROBERTS





tween the seats, and that a week’s pany laughed heartily. I_ wonder if, unable to \get Mr.
holiday, all expenses paid, will he an sO te Mozart, she would have been -
given to the first passenger to eae eee ee ees ee satisfied with, perhaps, Mr
guess what country the plane is 7, ‘S4tion of decasualised dock peathoven?
Sassing rar ok y is Ie nt a= ’ rl Ty Yeo
eas ore tou ito" be. known un “SONS OF ADVENTURE
Ceci cigehgoie : ' Morny and the baron
ATER on, when airliners are ,, 12. the event of undecasualised AND
I : 5 ae ae labour units being reunde- N ARTICLE about pomposity Across 5 7 ’ Yay r Jeo
to sie woes t the bp ~s a io casualised previous to their Onitted an excellent cure 1. The rate for entertainment. (7) THE L. is7 BANDIT
Fs p. XC ¢ 1e saloon, a sh-



underecasualisation such units, for it. One day Baron de Roth- 4 Sacred story, set to music. (8)
subsequent to disunderecasualisa- Schild called on the Duc de Morny 1‘! Cared tor speed. (5)

; . ao tn i aris. . j 12. Obviously no junior. (4)
tion, may be said to be in a state in Paris. Morny did not bother {7 ppyiously pe jun it was found

shop aboard, a miniature skating-
rink, a Wurlitzer to play, ferrets
for ratting, fortune-telling, and

Starring
WILLIAM ELLIOTT - FORREST TUCKER

























|
Petia eae of potential rededisundisdere- to look up from his papers when in? (4) | PRs ora Pats
es a Perens the ae sasualisation. ; the financier was shown in. He 15 Plymouth impiem ® , : Oo LW re YM Pp I ¢
hostess s will: neve to and {ro rt me casually: “Take 4 , ma
eee at , ‘ chair.” Thé financier, infuriated 20. 8 : ise, (4) r
ae i Phen iets Pa ae The Narkover Incident by this lack of respect, said: “It Be ire’ baat tans ore Gee FINAL INSTAL OPENS asinine ft ella had
cry : whe gues yea aa .. may interest you to know that I 25: Father takes tea to chatter. (6 T ; . "
Sree See Sepa he weigh Ot HE situation at Narkover is am Maron de Rothschild.” Without 26 Bird of lake ee ATOMIC THRILLS . . . CHILLS . . . SUSPENSE
S SAUSARS, & very complicated, Alarmed jooking up. Morny said: “Take Down Can the World be Dominated by another Planet?
P.T.O. by the state of affairs, many two chairs.” The ghostof Morny's 1: Animal thet brings the roost |

) , anxious parents are visiting the grandfather, Talleyrand, must y
I N Chicago jokes are being school, and the masters are have smiled at that. 4

printed on the back of bus having difficulty in dealing with on ee ee
seer: sO ig eaters may at them owing to the large numbers Forging Ahead f > Plus three, — 5 ‘ i
he habit~of turning the tickets of bogus parents who are present- S. Part of a foot. (3) \
Seer cee. an tenets k \ 7: Make good?” Well, about to | | JANE MARLENE MICHAEL —- RICHARD

g tt selves Dr. Smart-Allick N Paris they ‘have invented * "oc rr. (6 |
jokes, they will find advertising a nee rein. hs I : Bobtcen: re 1g to a WYMAN - DIETRICH - * WILDING - Topp |

. There's no top ring to preach

Is MARS inhabited by a Hostile Race of Supermen?
ing. (4) 3. Consumed

See the Shocking Answer’ in Republic’s




Death-dealing Serial



(5)








has instituted identification “robot salesman.” The ¥%- Conveyance
matt





to re iy a ere oe parades, at which visitors are figure walks about, answers 44, pateies tt) \ aoe “4 att es: 8 GRIPPING HCW GREATNESS FROM WARNER BROc. }
‘oA hs “condition” +h public lined up, while the boys are asked questions, draws attention to Af. A, broken cl (5) SO
and to break down sales-resist. ‘© identify tneir real fathers. The the wares, and even joins in 21. ould be frozen 23.. (3) |
ance to “Cod@dleham’s Sparkling fact that so many bogus fathers private conversations. The} 23. Bhst Riding B’ TOWN
British Claret or Batehoven — ®re acting in collusion with secret of this progressive idea }
The Only Toothpaste That Tickles ™#Sters, or even with the senior is “a hidden listener with al a Dial 2310.
The Ivories. boys themselves, adds to the con- microphone.” It occurs to mée

fusion, and they are already one that a hidden customer who |

Opening Tomorrow (F ridiay) |

2.30—4.45 and 8.30 p.m.
and ‘Continuing Daily 4.45 & 8.30 p.m.

< 6554 4 “
POPPE PPP SPP SPECS OO LAP LPLOPLP PLP A LM 0

Cleopatra and the codfish or two cases of prefects refusing happened to be a ventriloquist] /aelated"

to identify their genuine fathers. could have great fun in loudly} (2h3°°)

} HE Marquis de |l'Huile de The whole situation is further contradicting the robot, and| |'5,, Naive
} Foie de Morue, who stocked complicated by an _ influx of sneering at the whole business.|

t an ornamental pond at Figeac “uncles.” A _ fight between one (“Don’t buy that, madam. It's |

with salmon, Id have appre- “uncle” and a “father” in a not worth the money.”) Apart!

ul
iated the ar who was sacked prefect's study resulted in @ real from this, I don’t see why it is














‘ Featuring

rr s =
ee Rr oO NX Y ce S WALTER REED LOIS COLLIER















om his club forbuying a = father being stunned by a chair not easier to have an _ old-, % re
(fish, secreting it, and then “catch- row Vv a stre or, . Smart- fashi DC se s : oe 5 S - - — — = is
ing’ 5 it Plutarch tells 5 st heat eae re SS that, eS ees “ iieoieoe: eee. NOW SHOWING 4.45 & 8.15 x
of Cleopatra which shows that moment, the situation is out of to the customers. $ 3 R ae xX Y
mr me x â„¢
‘2 EN DN DN DNDN RIN ON DN DN EN BN DN DN OND DN IN NN EN I ON NNN ‘ . pe ae oo
ra | g TO-DAY 4.45 & 8.18% and Continuing Daily
& W ESTCLOX ALARM CLOCKS 8 °
& ‘ ee ee
$5.86 8 :
5 CARPETS . 5 » JOHN PICTURES presents
: OHN DEREK
5 4 ft x 2 ft 6” $434 &§ : t aie ort
S| 3 \ R
e . 6 ft6" x 5 ft $1750 & wee ,
& 2 | ‘vith x with {
by oY /
& .R EVANS & WHITFIELDS 2 ANTHONY QU Joy Lowe Ao Quito Le
a Arwold Moss + Eugene Iglesias % ee ~ ni.
& YOUR SHOE STORES a ee S Soon b AL URT« Pte WA OO eat ane
& Dial 4220 Dial 4606 s on Extra:
2 Shorts: —RACING y I
_ ARENNSNENENNE Ws NEN NSN NS WN A NN NN NN NN seenooseeseneenennssooscooeoreoscosconnseooosent Shee A ee


sii

fAURSDAY, JANUARY 3, 1952



** Fred, call Myrtle—I’m not having her runnine





Germans Trying

A NEW air service will link

Jestern Europe, the Near East,

and Japan. Swift Constellations

oO Oo e a 7r72en;n of K.L.M. Royal Dutch Airlines

will leave Schiphol Airport, Am-

sterdam, once a week and fly via

n Seiad . -

HANNOVER, Sunday.—British millions for weges and supplie ee ta ooee he ont

Treasury men have warned White- of British Forees which are pai covet ait , aad b ere

hall that the Germans are trying of Germany’s defence. Bat cratine eae ny: guce

to dodge paying for European “If the British taxpayer had late: - The schedule for this new

defware to foot the whole bill fer those 9750 mile service has been

anys "new duce boom, fants.» 4 pg

1500 000 Wank toneiiane. wont eee officials now negotiaing and countries already served by

pay double the £550 million they we end ef the occupation with K.L.M. The Constellations will

now reluctantly contribute to- Premier Adenauer have been told jeave Amsterdam every Tuesday

wards British French. and U.S by Whitehall : “The Germans must evening and are due to reach the

Forces defending them. “be made to pay. They must g0 Japanese capital on Friday morn-

The Germans, réported an in- °”,SUPPlying every penny of the jng, while the return trip leaving

vestigator today, could pay for £175 million for the British garri- Tokyo on Sunday is scheduled to

the 18 Allied Giwidkasic being ‘n son, whether it is called occupa- arrive at Schiphol on Tuesday

tioned along the I Curtain tion costs or a defence contribu- afternoon, which means that the

“iiler aha tee me Vision ton. west-bound flight only takes two
frontier and for a 12-division “Not a penny can be added to Five
ee Army as well. British income tax to maintain ou

this double contribution

f in a"
would end the Germans’ attempt eneve German;

In view of the special charac



a ae - ; at Senior British staff officers say of this frat flight, the aircraft
to Seize British export markets great economies have been will carry various letters and
while Britain, he ne it is ahr re~ ymade on garrison costs in the past presents. There is a letter from
oe eat ‘nd eeu, eee year. Further cuts would serious- the Burgomaster of The Hague to
oes ene “ rae ng. prefers ly hit the living standard of his colleague in Tokyo, and a let-
1a pes hee er ny new Eritish soldiers and Service ter from the Amsterdam Cham-
factories -and me the eon families in Germany. ber of Commerce to the Tokyo
shoulder the entire defence “Why should British troops Chamber of Commerce. After
burden, defending the Germans be allowed the Constellation arrives at Hane-

Individual Germans are paying to become poor relations?” said da Airport, a young oak tree
only half what the average British & Sentor staff officer. They are from the Dutch village of Bos-
taxpayer provides for defence. @}most that as it is.” koop (a famous _ tree-growing

i sonst ropaganda against British officials believe that it centre) will be planted in one of
Alged cecupation Soave is Selng is high time Finance Minister Tokyo’s main squares, The Mayo
used as a smoke screen to cover Schaefer got down to Collecting of Tokyo will be able to make
what the Germans could pay. his own taxes instead of accusing the acquaintance of a traditional

Finance Minister Fritz Schaefer the British ot extravagance. product of Holland, as another
claims that his taxpayers cannot These officials believe the gift consists of old Buse gin
possibly afford more than £750 Germans are dodging taxes from Schiedam, in an _ earthen-

wholesale
German

In addition, the West

million a year for the Allied gar- :
yison forces and a new German Parliamem refuses to Way eligine.

Army. But the British Treasury impose heavier taxation = — This will not be the first time
rejects this. apparently in th belief that the thet Dutch authorities have sent
Said a senior Brittsn financial Western Allies \ iti go on footing & letter to Japan on the occasion
ffi vial ‘ a We af i . wna & 87 rart of € many’s cefence of a first trip. In the early 17th
officia oday: ‘“‘We insist, an : g st F arly
important Americans agree, that bi . century when rumours of the
the Germans are well able to nd. Prominent German» ou,side the possibilities of trade with Japan
something over £1,000 millic Cwverns ere that there is pegan to reach Holland, the then
year. That would be about ten \ cesp™* . ion, ‘The pro- Stadtholder, Prince Maurice,
per cent. of Western Germany’s Vine cr cf Lower Saxony, wrote a personal letter to the
gross national inome,. Heinric p recenity told pyler of Japan.
~ “Tf the Germans refuse, a most 3ritish ! that Germany 3 <
serious situation wil arise. Br n could 1 Y h more money if On July 6, 1609, after a very
has a very hoavy three-year - the cr me enforced ‘the long voyage, two Dutch East In-
cae a nm is re : aws en — e “Red Lion wit!
jence programme. It is qu:.e pre x on laws. diamen the ed 5
: i increas ‘ < ’ Im tant ¢ mans allege that Arrows” and the “Griffen” cost
impossible to increase that ex} - i 1 so
iture no matter how much ne! the Go-ernment cared of big anchor in the harbour of Hirsdo,
pa howl business berons 1 the Ruhr, who not far from Nagasaki. The two
“Tf we fail to get the £175 mr ‘iiion contribu i big ms to Premier chief merchants on board ‘hen
the German. pay towards tish Adenauer’s elec’: nd were made their way to Edo, nowe“‘\ays
3 ans pay itis nd Ww 5
occupation costs will méan largely respon ior his Gov- known 4s Tokyo, ge ke
another 9d, in tI ¢ on income ernment getting in the Shogun the letter which :
tax—and the British cannot afford FOOTNOTE.—Cost of defence had brought from Prince Mau: *e
it. ORY in Britain this year is about £55 and to ¢ ‘eee ae peer
2 yerine rore th i é f the working population, betwecn the utch as ndia
“The Gerinans ignore the fact a head o ati : t n
vi 7 f he Government of
that the British taxpayer is paying L.E.S. Company and tt

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WISH ‘TO
ALL OUR

CUSTOMERS
AND

FRIENDS

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MANNING & €0O.. LTD.
THE CORNER STORE

Wh WG A NS BN BN WSS



aroun ut

|
NEW AIR 3 SERVICE “Port one —|

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4

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BARBADOS ADVOCATE



| Jamaica Team
For Barbados

KINGSTON
For the second time in histor
Jamaica will send a team to Bar

bados leaving here on Jaauary 13
The first visit was in 1925
Captain is Arthur Bonitto, wh
captained the victorious tear
which beat British Guiana last
year. A leg-break bowler he
is a tolerable batsman
Wicket-keepey is Alfred Binn
who has improved not only as

wicket-keeper but also as a bate

man since he was given his first
opportunity to go to Trinidad i:
1950. Then there are the brothe:

Colin and Neville Bonitto, Neville
18 regarded as about the best bats-
man in the West Indies who did
not make the team to Australia

Colin an excellent fleldsman
Stanley Goodridge is a_ six-foo
| fast bowler and regarded by many
as the most promising new ball
bowler in the West Indices. He
can move the new ball out anc
when the shine is gone swings i
viciously into the body George
Mudie is the wonder-man
| Jamaican cricket He is a well
equipped left-hand all-rounder
and before Alfred Valentine camc
into the picture was regarded a
the best slow bowler of his typ«
n West Indies. John Prescod
is a brilliant stroke player an
Roy Miller who will pair wit!
Goodridge is a fast mediun
bowler who hits the ball dow:
ind moves it at a good length

FE. Saunders, Jnr., is a promis

is

the
















ing all-rounder just out of schooi
Dwr? ‘ » as, Other members of the tourin
Japan. The Shogun was pleased I Princess Elizabeth team are Horace Tulloch, batsma
at this visit and he gave the ° undo off-break bowler; Regyri
merchants a personal letter to Handicap (Scarlett, a school-boy off-breai
deliver to “The King of Holland” bowler; Denis Thorburn who hac
(the Stadholder), as well as trad- (From Our Own Correspondent) 1 good senson as a batsman, anc
ing permits for two ships, Thus GEORGETOWN, B.G., Jan \Sidney Abrabams, a reliable bate
began one of the most important Port Walvis pilcted by Zapata}man whc is algo Seeretary of the
chapters in Holland’s history as a 126 lbs. took over the lead in the | Jamaica Cricket Board of Contro
great naval power, viz, that of straight from haid-pressed Or- ; shic ave ts
the Dutch Factory in Japan, for chis (Beckles up) carrying t | In by ag nave we
this Dutch factory (or trading imposition of 186 lbs, in the Prin- place " ene, t th = an ae on,
station) remained the sole win- cess Elizabeth Handicap over ee ou wdarnitea toate wil
dow between Japan and Europe furlongs for A Class horses on Tea Wide ona a sunt ¢
for more than two centuries. New Year's Day and got home & ae whe oa Tein
Holland now holds a leading length ahead of the hitherto un- eee aH
place in commercial aviation and beaten Lopes colt to record it |
veces: —— eG a woomnd only win for the D,.T.C, “tryout
thought to the fact that ro { -eting . r
this first official air link ous amos. RIPeviNG St Joseph Round-Up
Japan one will be able to board a The rider Beckles, was unseat
luxurious airliner in Amsterdam ¢d twice through tangling with CHILD DIES
and disembark in Tokyo less the tape. Rushfel caused the onl A
than 2) days later, as fresh as if protest of the meeting when in +
it was Merely a taxi drive from coming through the straight 10( SUDDENLY
one contine»t to another. yards from the pole in a driving
This is in striking contrast to finish with Millionaire and Swiss
the weary voyage undertaken in Roll she appeared to cross th A TWO-YEAR-OLD child, the
1598 by five Dutch vessels —Loy- former and finished half a length |son of Mr, and Mrs, Lutcher Hop
alty, Hope, Love Glad Tidings ahead of Millionaire { Cleavers Hill died suddenly a
and Faith whose captains had The Stewards consulted for 59}their residence on New Year
heen instructed to set sail for minutes and decided to disqualify |#ve A post mortem examina
Asia via South America. This her and award Millionaire second]|!ion Was performed by Dr, W. Hf
expedition was a great disap- place E., Johnson the same day and
pointment. Only one ship, the verdict of death due to natura
Love, commanded by Captain Result ‘auses, was returned
Jacob Janszoon Quaeckernaeck,
succeeded in sealing the har- a Dy la nig THE INMATES of St. Joseph’
bour of Bungo on the island of 1. SINK LASSIE, Apha “U2 tb Almshouse were entertained at
Kyushu on April 19, 1620.. The 2. GOLDN}E, Beckies (119 Ibs the Almshouse on New Year's
voyage had lasted almost 24 years, °° es Pa hr oak aac ib Eve. First was the Annual “Spe
The ship was practically derelict NEW YEAR HANDICAP ial’ Dinner and Musie supplied
and the crew had been greatly G Furls, — Class § by an amateur orchestra and the
Gepletea through _sickness and 4 i eee rete ne, Vink de) MIRRTES “CANCER.
vardship. This was the voyage 3 guNWATCH, Persaud (105 Yor
which led the Dutch Stadtholder Time; 1 Min, 20 Se THE RE-OPENING of the)
to send a letter to the Shogun Orange Cottage Social Club took
when the first expedition left Ont ROHL, HANDICAP place on New Year's Eve. The
Holland for Tokyo 1. Rolla J Te eee ti jo activities of this Club will be in-
ba) ioor games, debates,, handicrafts
Throughout the centuries of 2 POPT WALVIS, Sunich (120 Ibs) There are plans for forming a
peace and war, prosperity and RUSHFEL, Madray (108 Ib choir whieh will be conducted by
decay, the connections by sea and Cie. W knph st Aidaratkn Mr. J, N, Arthur. A music clase
hence the commercial relations, 4 Parts Class Wi will be started in the near future
were maintained as long as cir- 1 CRACKERJACK, Patrick (119 Ib
ecumst. necs permitted. The Dutch UGLY, Ferretra (196 lb : RAIN which fell over the last
arte . JUMPING BABI Persaud (100 & 7 .
imparted to the Japanese thei: a Gverwelaht week caused further damages to |
knowledge of the natural sciences, Time: 1 Min. 21 1/5 Sec St. Joseph’s roads. Cars travelling
astronom,’, medicine and mathe- m ilong Chimborazo road were held
matics, aid their influence wa: Tne Geta ene up and other traffic was forced
such that the Dutch language be- , saga poy, Suniech, “120. ibs) to turn back and go through}
came the official tongue for diplo- 2 PENSIVE, Zapata, (129 tbs) Bragges Hill by way of Sugar Hill.
matic negotiations of the Japan- 3 TR LASSIE, Aphan, (116 Ibs) The Braggs Hill pond which}
ese Government PRIVGRas ELIBABETM naNpicar [Was dried up for a number of
The development of national Seven Furlongs —— Claws A months before the rains, was
prosperity has often been pre- | PORT WALVIS Zapata, (126 Ibs) [full again. Washer women took
ce‘ed and stimulated by commun- eee at Pe eis yea, [the opportunity of using this}
ications Which opened up new * Time: 1 Min. 30 Se pond water instead of going up-
possibilities, Like their seafaring es AL, HANDICAP hill to the standpipe. The water
ancestors, the modern Flying | puasdroid, Aphan (115 ibs) was used only for washing. —
Dutchman will continue to play 9 yanIONAIRE, Singh, (116 Ibs) Very few holiday makers wer«
an active part in such develop- BROWN RUBY, Sunich (196 Ibs), it Bathsheba on Boxing Day, be-
(RUSHFEL disqualified in this reece.) Jcause of the rains. Those who

ment










THE NEW YEAR

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STOCKPORT
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PAGE THREE









attended, aance
Berry Free



were

of the 1 t dep

Da nee ’ \

he Advocate, . the

va more ur S we , :
Christmas D ur a safe '
Holiday th +

Christma

specially

packed tin!

BATHSHEBA
th holid
Year’s Day Batl
Beach i oN
Cher

Be

Crane
Beach
Heywoods
vouri

At Bathshe
letic Sports, Cr
ea-bathing

aE ee eT



the
eke dD

C
bot

irs, lorrie und

h sides of the 1 pe
ians found it ve

get from one place

There
at Morgan Lewi S \
though
uninviting
ing at the
everyone
hemselve



Was no ex

once agai:
There v no ne
other be ‘
ob\ i e!











DON'T GET
4 BBs

NERVOUS ABOUT



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KEEP FIT ON
4 4 s

ae 4

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a wer on 4

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gee ore

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i \D CGRBAM
dL \ (LZ [b SG RAETAN
f ONE OF THE
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WORLD-FAMOUS FOOD PRODUCTS
‘\ T. Geddes Grant Ltd., Bridgetown,
Ply? 2
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ASEPTIC OINTMENT

Children’s skin ailments need the soothing
touch of Germolene Ointment. It re-
lieves irritation, subdues inflammation and
gives protection against the ontry of
harmful bacteria You will find, too,
that Germolene draws out dirt from cuts,
abrasions, blisters and sores and stim-
ulates the growth of new skin, Keep @
tin of Germolene handy for family use,

FOR
SPOTS, RASHES, BURNS
IRRITATIONS, ABRASIONS

at a touch heals in record time.






















te ee

PAIN and WOMEN
40, 30 AND OLDER!

here's how you can
be strong and active












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Ay as full of life as you should be,
WS and colds hang on, you may

\\ need more A&D Vitamins.

Try scientific, good-tasting
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regularly all year round
Vitamins and energy-building oil.
It helps build resistance, stamina
and energy.

More than just a tonle~
It’s POWERFUL NOURISHMENT

b

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Ms casy to keep
the lavatory

clean?



Shake some ‘ Harpic * into the
bowl — leave overnight ~— then
flush, That's all. No brushis need-
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including those connected to septic tanks,

HARPIG

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ee ee eee ee
PAGE FOUR



BARBADOS

Cease ene Se eee tose

Printed by the Advaryte Co., Lid., Broad St., Bridgetown







Thursday, ; January 3, y 3

NEW COMPANION

MR. ADAMS is a distinguished West
Indian who has brought honour to Barba-
dos in many countries. Honours have been
accumulating upon him ever since he
represented Great Britain as a member of
the delegation that attended a meeting of
the United Nations in Paris in 1948, The
reception given to Mr. Adams later that
year on his return to Barbados has never
been accorded to any other politician. A
year later he became a member of the Com-
mittee of I.L.O. Experts on the application
of international conventions and a member



19









TON ROSSITER)
illiams, founder of the
Rhode Island, who has
been well and wisely celebrated as
one of the mest noteworthy polit
cal thinkers in colonial Americ
died more than a century
the Constitution of the United
| States was adopted. In proclaim -
ing the doctrines of liberty of con-
science and separation of church
and state, he answered propheti-
cally many questions which
treubled thinking men for genera-
tions, In expounding the rewt
liberating concepts of populai
overeignty and social compact, hi
| contributed



Colony of





before

as much as any

[colonial to the cause of seven-
teenth-ceniury republicanism. His

will be quoted by men oi

fre edom so long as freedom exisis.

It has been popular to euiogi
Witliams as visionary, This, how-
ever, ignores or undervalues the



|
|

yo ality of his experience in a wide

of the International Institute of Political ie : SP comet teas rc tcaees
7 7 : rot only 10ught, vut acted,
and Social Science. And also in 1949 he be- There was an unusually close con-
came Vice-President of the World Feder- “eons A joe aaa aoa ae
“ a : Lween eoryv ane pract ce, 4
ation of Trade Unions. He is at present a te imped his personality em-
Member of the Caribbean Commission and i: ie ci gi ate ny en ty within
whicn 1e ived, anc ne society
has been for several years a member of the turn gave form and support io
Council of the University College of the one Ee en ari
: eh ilso has been popular to ques-
West Indies. Yet it is doubtful whether Mr. | jjon the ‘validity of Rhode Island’:
Adams has been awarded a C.M.G. in the ven a - sere. experi-
ent in self-government. This, too,
New Year Honours for any of these is the judgement of persons who
achievements. isk too much of the colonists and
rea trial of freed But, -
The Order of St. Michael and St. George | 00,5" tha factors whieh taiiites
was founded in 1818 soon after the cession against the success of the
of Malta to Great Britain and just after the olony —the existence of the older
; ; q hief towns, the open hostility of
Ionian Isles came under English protection. 1eighbour colonies, the land specu-
The Order was founded with the object of ea eee Ee colonists
; ; i 5 { a »fus' oO approve,
honouring the most meritorious of the Mal-: jthe feudal designs of William
tese and Ionians as well as British sub- Coddington (another founder of
‘ s ie a os Log Rhede Island), the lack of geo-
jects who had distinguished themselves in raphic unity, the absence of law

those areas. The Order consists of Knights
Grand Cross, Knight Commanders and
Cavalieri or Companions. Mr. Adams is a
new Companion.

Members of the order enjoy rank and
precedence immediately after the corres-
ponding classes of the Order of Bath.

Today honours of this order are normally
given to colonial civil servants of wide ex-
perience and the order is employed espe-
cially to honour Colonial Governors, who
normally become Knight Commanders and
sometimes later Knights of the Grand
Cross. The Chancery of the order is at the
Colonial Office and the Grand Master is the
Earl of Athlone.

The Order of St. Michael and St. George
takes precedence over the Star of India, the

Order of the Indian Empire. the Royal Vic-
torian Order, the most excellent Order of
the British Empire and Knights Bachelor.
The choice of honour by which Mr. Adams's
distinguished political service to Barbados
has been rewarded is in itself a high com-
pliment to him. There have been honours
previously awarded to West Indian politi-
cians but few observers of the West Indian
political seene to-day can deny that the hon-
our conferred upon Mr. Adams has been
given to a man who has shown political
ability of a. high order. In congratulating
Mr. Adams on the honour he has so well
deserved Barbadians can congratulate him
too on his acceptance of an award from a
country which is showing unmistakable
signs of its willingness to co-operate with
West Indian politicians in their efforts to
run their own affairs.

Mr. Adams’ acceptance of His Majesty
the King’s recognition of his meritorious
services to Barbadian political life is a
happy augury of Barbados’ continued good
relations with a country whose history has
for so many centuries been intertwined
with ours, and whose records of achieve-
ment far exceed its lists of failures. In the
insignia of the Knights Grand Cross of the
Order of St. Michael and St. George there is
in the centre of a seven-rayed silver star
besides a representation of the Archangel
St. Michael encountering Satan the motto in
Latin “AUSPICIUM MELIORIS AEVI”.
No fitter order could be selected for any
politician at the beginning of a New Year
when the “augury of a better era” is the
most universal wish of men and women
whose prosperity depends so much on pol-
iticians’ judgments and knowledge.

Mr. A. de K. Frampton who also becomes
a Companion of the Order of St. Michael
and St. George in the New Year’s Honours
will receive the congratulations of many
Barbadians who are aware of his distin-
guished services to West Indian agricul-
ture, while the honour conferred upon Mr.
Douglas, the former Divisional Manager of
Cable & Wireless is regarded by thousands
here as an honour conferred on one of
themselves.



SWEEPING CHANGES
Jan. 2

WASHINGTON, 2,
President Truman ordered a wholesale
shakeup of the Internal Revenue Bureau
Wednesday and the chief of the scandal
shaken tax collecting agency disclosed that
53 more employees have been fired or
forced to resign.
Truman said the purpose of the “sweep-
ing reorganization” will be to take the
Revenue Bureau out of the political the-

atre and protect it from the “influence of
peddlers.”

The nation’s 64 offices of collectors of
internal revenue would be abolished in

favour of 25 District offices, each headed by
a Commissioner under the civil service.
Under the proposal, the tax system’s
only political appointee would be its top
official tax commissioner. At present all 64
collectors are political appointees,—-U.P

e ra the leniency of exis* -
ing laws, the free play accorded
ii manner of conflicting religious
beliefs, and the general spirit of
democracy and independence
(which several times erupted in
open anarchy) — it is surprising
that it survived at all to win it:

independence within the English
colonial system.

Yet Rhode Island did survive
with a minimum of bloodshed and
with its libertarian principles in a
iemarkable state of preservation,

It is a thing to be wondered at that
there in the American wildern
everal thousand men tilled the
felds and plied theiy trades with
no interference from magistrates,
‘lergy, or other holders of power,

Roger Williams, “the indispen-
ible man” in this triumph of
rimitive democracy, participated
in the political affairs of town and
colony from his first days as pro-
prietor (1636) to his last as plain
ilizen (1683). He was called upon
epeatedly by his fellow colonial
to discharge some office of the
greatest or smallest trust. As arbi-





trator, moderator, constitution-
maker, town councillor, assistant,
“chief officer,” president, peace-
maker, captain of the citizen
soldiers, committeeman, special
envoy to the American Indians,
scribe, and general handy man

for the town of Providence and the
colony, he gave uncounted years
of his many-sided life to public
service,

Few political thinkers have had
so many practical opportunities to
test their theories, nor at the same
time have drawn so many new
ideas irom experience, Williams
put the doctrines of popular re-
publicanism and religious Jiberty
to work in the Rhode Island
commonwealth. Instead of draw-
ing all his ideas from books and
theory, he acquired some of his
most cherished beliefs along the
hard road of .experience. Among
the lessons which Williams learned
by experience and the principles
he found helpful or essential to
f.ee and orderly government
were: free inquiry and free ex-
pression of the results; arbitration
of differences; the need of authority
the recognition of the rights and
duties of the individual, anc
equality of opportunity,

His letters and incidents in his
public career prove that through
most of his half-century in Rhode
sland, Roger Williams was as
much the seeker in politics as in

, minded

» ence



eligion, He came to the concjusion
that in statec: aft, as in theology,
authority grounded in doctrine
would harden into tyranny
grounded in dogma, and that open-
investigation was there-
sre only trustworthy tecue-
nique for reaching adequate
solutions to the provems faci
man-in-society, Free men, urged
Williams, must have free minds,
and he spent his life convincing
sriends and neighbours that their
way of life depended for continued
success on the cultivation of tne
habits of intellectual freedom, At

tne

the same time, he made cleay that
whatever conclusions a man
eaches by himselt he must be

prepared to discuss openly and re-
sponsibly with his ie low citizens
without fear of official interfer-
or private intolerance.
Williams was consistent in his
cesire to accord treeaom of ex-
pession to opinions thac he found
Stupid or evea cange.ous. Once,
in 1672, he rowed a oat all day
nd haif the night from Providence
to Newport to aetate before a
hostile audience, williams learned
rom positive experience — at the
assembly in Portsrnourn, wie wwa-
meeting in Providerfte,
council-fire in the Narrangense +
country—that men who will «c
openly for the truth and talk !
iy and humbly about them con-
clusions with their fellows are the
stuff of political democracy
inquiry and free expressior
experienced-proved staples
poli.ieal faith,
In keeping
emphasis on
Williams put a high value
spirit of compromise,
learned to recognise this
the magic wand thac turns lice
into liberty and thu brings
stability to free society. Following
his written advice to the inhabit-
ants of Providence in 1648, re-
garding squabbles then convulsing
the Rhode Island towns,
covenant was adopted which
asserted: “We apprehend no
so suitable to our condition as gov-
ernment way of arbitration.’
All his life he clung to the con-
viction that peacefully minded
men could settle ‘heir own differ-
ences without recourse to goverr-
mental sanctions — by referring
them to fellow citizens prepared to
examine the facts objectively and
give reasoned judgment,
While most of che
eventeenth-century
obeyed the laws,
und discharged

ana



re





with
peace among

his everlasting

men
on the
had

He
spiri



way

by



people of
Rhode Island
paid their taxes,
their obligations
faithfully as citizens of a_ free
olony, there were some who
found any kind of authority dis-
tasteful and who preached the
gospel of all-out anarchy, In a
public letter to the town of
Providence, in 1665, Williams,
leaving no doubt that it was the
civil and religious liberty of men
under a government of their own
making, not the irresponsible
license of beasts in a jungle, that
he had always championed, said:

“That ever I should speak
write a tittle, that tends to
infinite liberty of conscience,
mistake, and which I have ever
disclaimed and abhorred, To pre-
vent such mis.akes, 1 shall at
present only propose this case
There goes many a ship to se,
with many hundred souls in one
ship, whose weal and woe is com-
mon, and is a true picture of a
commonwealth, or a human com-
bination or society. It hath fallen
out sometimes, that both Catholics
and Protestants, Jews, and Turks,
may be embarked in one ship;
upon which supposal I affirm, that
all the liberty of conscience, that
ever I pleadeq for, tugns upon
these two hinges — thet none of
the Catholics, Protestants, Jews, or
Turks, be forced to come to the
ship’s prayers or worship, nor
compelled from their own particu-



or
an
is a





lar prayers or worship, if they
practis any. I further add that
notwithstanding this liberty, the

commander of this ship ought to
command the ship’s course, yeu,
and also command that justice,
peace and sobrie y, be kept and
practised. both among the seamen
and all the passengers, If any of
the seamen refuse to perform their
services, or passengers to pay their
freight; if any refuse to help. in
person or purse, towards the com-



Barbados
Eighty Million

(From a Correspondent)

THe income of the people of
Barbados as a whole was certainly
far larger in terms of money in
1951 then it has ever been before.

| Although Government here has
not yet started to put out official
computations of the “national in-
come”, one may make a_ very
| rough round-figure estimate on the
strength of such information as
j has come to hand, and it seems
j that ‘gure Of eighty million
B.V collars for the 195! national
}income einnot be far wrong.

|} Although one is within reason-
ably safe limits in pu ting forward
a total figure of this order, one is
on far more uncertain groun in
trying to estimate the parts which
| make up the total. However, em-
holdened by New Year spirits a







j prepered’ for he attack of in
\formed critics, we suggest thet th<
{income was roughly made up as
| follows:—

1(1) Sugar and other agricultural

produce,

Exported ...
| Sold locally

. $32 millions
$8 millions



(2) Goods and products manu-
factured in the Island, whether
exported or sold _ locaily

ere, ee oe $13 millions

(3) Costs of dis ribution of im-
ports and local products
EL gaan ae ea $12 millions

(4) Public utilities, domestic end
personal services $14 millions

(5) Central and local government
services $10 millions

(6) House rents and costs of new
construction and repairs

$10 millon

(7) Net income from outside the
island $5 million

Gross aggregate, say $104 millio





1s Overseas student



From .his aggregate one must
make deductions for the impovied
raw materials, fertilisers, fuel,
containers, building materials and
so on used in creating the agricul-
tural and manufactured products,
and for double counting (for ex-
ample of electric current generated
under iem 4 of our list but con-
sumed in providing services under

items 2, 3 or 5). Putting the sum
of all such deductions at bout
twen y-four million dollars, we

have reached our figure of eighty
million dollars as the gross
national product of 1951 at what is
called “factor ", that is at
market price net of customs and
excise duties and of subsidies,

To assess how much of this eighty

U.K. Christmas
For B.W.L
Students

LONDON

Colonial students in the United
Kingdom including some from the
We Indies, are taking part in
Christmas holiday courses ar-
ranged by the British Council in
various pé the country,
which will give them a traditional
Christmas and opportunities of
meeting British people in their
homes.

cos







Many invita ions
ceived from
giudents to visit them in their
homes and these are being passed
on to the students. The Council's
aim has been to ensure no
need be alone at
—B.U.P.

have
London

been re-
families for

that

Christmas-time.

- commanders ‘



1951 Ineomes:
Dollars

RARBADOS ADVOCATE

ADVOCATE Roger Williams: Leading Early

|

mon charges or defense; if any |
retuse to obey the common laws
and oraers of the ship, concerminy |
her common peace or preserva-|
tion; if amy shail mutiny and rise
up ageinst their commanders and|
olticers, if any should preach or|
write that there ought to be no)
officers, no laws
nor orders, r correcuons nor |
punishments;—I say, whatever is
pretended, the commander or com-
manders may judge, resist, compe:
and punish Such wangressors, ac-
cording to their deserts anc
merits.”

This courageous message of
persecuted individualist stands
even today as the tough-mindea
testament of one who had learnea ,
‘Mrough the hardest kind of ex-.
perience tha’ liberty without law, !
and government without authority, |
are swamps in which true freedom
sinks without a trace.

Concerning the place of the in-
dividual in the social community,
Williams’ individualism was sur-
prisingly modern in flavour. His
writings stressed the social fac
that men found the fullest ex-'!
pression of their liberty in fulfill-
ing their functions in the com-
munity. A free man had duties
as well as rights; indeed, he hac
no claim to the latter unless he wa
prepared to execute the former
The record of Williams’ years ir

* Providence shows tha‘ he came to
' this belief through saddening ex-
S perience, and that again the colony

itself accepted this man’s teaching
when the Acts and Orders of
1647 embodied the concept of re-
ciprocal rights and duties. The
‘rials of the Colony of Rhode
Island taught Williams and many

> of his fellow workers the neces-

sity of individual participation in
public life. His was a social, ever
fraternal individualism

Three centuries ago in Provi
dence, Roger Williams practisec
another belief which some met.
are still content only to preacn.
the principle of equality, perhap
the firmes., spiritual and practica:
foundation of democratic society

Williams had an intimate workin; '

knowledge of the prime import-
ance of this principle for the re-
conciliation ef liberty and orde.
under fres government. H-
arrived first at a belief in religiou
equality. Later, gar ahead of hi

age, he extended this concept to a\f

other essentials
equality in law (which wa
realized in the code of 1647) |
equality in land (which he spon
sored with a selflessness unmatch

least three

ed in colonial America), an
equality in governmen: (whic:
spurred his relentless campaig

against the pattern of feudalisn
that others sought to transplan
from the old world). Most un-
usual was his insistence on lanc
for all on equal terms, for th
late-comer as well as for the
original homesteader. The

American doctrine of equality o | |

opportunity hag at least one of it: |
roots in Williams’ democratic lanc
policy.

Williams was a_seventeenth-
century prophet of severa
momentous nineteenth and twen-
tieth-century principles. In his}
comprehension of the workings o: |
political, religious, and corporat: |
institutions, he came very close to
the concept of pluralism. Second,
he had an understanding of the
way in which economic arrange-
ments shape political institutions. |
And he seems aiso to have

per
ceived that social and politica
institutions are always in a state

of change, and that it is therefore |
inexpedient and unnatural to en-
force a rigid pattern of law and
government upon any society.
Some of his working principles
have been absorbed into the great
body of American thought, som
have not, But all were the produc’
of a general technique that un-
numbered Americans, many of!
whom never hear of Roger Wil-
liams, were to make the leading
article of their political faith. No
idea is sound until it has been
tested through experience; if it ha
been learned through experience.
so much the sounder. To ‘his ex-
tent Roger Williams was the firs‘
American political thinker.
—American Quarterly.

million dollars was actually dis-|
iributed among people working 1:
sarbados, one must make a furine:
deduction for the sums set asia
by companies and businesses b)
way of reserves for depreciation
and undistributed profits, say tive

million dollars. Another tei
millions may be deducted fo:
pensions, overseas interest anc!
remittances, rents and other “un

earned” incomes, Then the balanc’
sixty-five million dollars, repre
sents’ the sum distributed among
the men and women working her:
foy their living, who must nov
number just over 100,000. Thi
gives an average earned incom’
per worker of $650 or per famil:
of $1,250.

Our Readers Say:
Thanks
To The Editor, The Advocate—
Sir,—Early this month a com:
munication was received from ‘the
Secretary of State for the Colo-
nies saying that the Prime Min-
ister had received a personal)
message of congratulation from)
“W.P. Hastings” on his assumption
ef office, and that, since pressure
of other duties has prevented him
from making, a personal ac-





B.H. Population Continues:
American Politieal Thinker |

must be used for the transportation of sup-

| Expenditure on Colonial Delevopment and



THURSDAY, JANUARY 3.



1952

ANNAN TER DENN TN NNT DN 58 087.
A Prosperous New Years:
TO ALL








To Thin Out

Big U.K. Contributions





To Colony’s Finances | zs
LONDON. 2
British Honduras now has an estimated Advocate Stationery po



population of only 7.54 people per square mile
‘uf territory, making it the most thinly-
populated territory in the British Caribbean,
with the sole exception of British Guiana. |

Yet the trend in the movement of popula-
‘ion shows that more people are concentrat-
ing in Belize and moving away from the
agriculturally important Northern District,
| forsaking the land in search of more lucra-
tive occupations.

This trend is shown in the official report
‘or British Honduras for 1950, just published
vy the Colonial Office in London. The Colony,
with an area of 8,866 square miles, has a pop-

ulation of only 66,892, the report estimates. |
Density of population varies from 18.33 per

square mile in the Belize District down to
3.31 in Toledo.

This compares with the population in Bar-
»ados, where some 193,000 people live in 166
_quare miles, giving a population density of
1,159 people per square mile, and in Jamaica,
where the population is 296.5 per square mile.
Jalyin British Guiana is there a lower dens-
' v of population, with 4.2 per square mile.

No mention is made in the British Hon-
uras report of suggestions that emigration
schemes should be fostered to relieve the
pressure on the crowded Caribbean islands
nd to resettle unemployed people in the
mainland territories.

But the potentialities of British Honduras
3 a Colony ripe for development are refer-

d to when the reports says: “No thorough
survey of the soil of the Colony has yet been
made, but it is believed that there are several
uncultivated areas where profitable agricul-
ure could be carried on and there are similar
sopes that a geological survey would not be
ound unproductive.”

At present, the economy of the Colony de-
pends largely on timber extraction and the
sred-etion of chicle, from which chewing
um is made. Chicle bleeders form the largest
ingle occupation group in the Colony and

-eir average earnings, at $75 a month, are
‘mong the highest for labourers.

The report gives a table of occupations and
vages, which includes even the 46 labourers
nd 29 tradesmen working on the construction
f the new hotel in Belize. After the chicle
»leeders, the second largest group of workers
1 the Colony is made up of road labourers,
his*table shows.

Road construction is one of the most im-
»ortant things that must be done before the
ull economie possibilities of the Colony can
1c exploited, although the report stresses the

importance of the sea, rivers and bush trails
n communications, adding: “It is inevitable

hat these means will continue to play an
mportant part in the life of the Colony; they

BENE NG NENG NNN NNN







Secure in the knowledge thut all












your Hardware requirements for the coming
year are obtainable at Pitcher’s, where tie
economy and value of your every purchase is

a guarantee of satisfaction.

May we look forward, then, to
seeing you in the NEW YEAR at

Cc. S. PITCHER & CO.

|
}
Phone 4472
|





| “Tm smart, f gave these
to DaCosta’s for you
| to take home!”












LAMBSMERE
A Range of fine and
colorful checks in

pure Wool loomed in

Scotland.
58/60” Wide $10.82 p. yd.

DOESKIN

by
Hunt & Winterbotham
of England

in glorious colours

58/60" Wide $10.98
per yd.

Da Costa & Co.. Ltd.

WHY NOT eee VALUABLE FOOD ?

STERNE’S DEEP FREEZE

»lies to the settlements on the banks of the
ivers, for no road scheme could contemplate
nking up all the scattered communities.”

HUGE FOOD SUBSIDIES

-h a chapter on finance, the report draws
attention to the grants-in-aid made by the
mperial Exchequer over a number of years,
‘ating back to 1931 when a disastrous hurri-
ane wrecked the Colony’s economy. The
otal sums granted to the Colony up to the
ond of 1950 include $3,136,290 in grants-in-aid
ind $6,301,817 in Colonial Development and
Velfare grants. The Colony’s revenue from
soth these sources increased sharply in 1950
ind in addition there was a special grant of
$1,331,095.

Expenditure during the year included
/472,502 on subventions, which includea
$430,000 spent on subsidies on food and ne-
cessities to keep down the cost of living.



GRR NS ADELE NON A IN GN ANIA AN TS HN NEN NIN

— AVAILABLE FROM SIOCK —

DaCOSTA & Co... Lid. Elec. Dept.



ie:

SG NGNGNGNONG NG WA NONE NENG NGNGNGNG NENG SGNGNGNG NGS. NY

a
Welfare schemes was nearly doubled during
the year.

The food subsidies were made necessary
by the devaluation of the B.H. dollar to the
fixed rate of $4 to the £. Previously, the B.H. START
dollar was at parity with the U.S. dollar and ‘
—unique among British Colonial currencies— THE YEAR
was so left when sterling was devalued in | RIGHT

im

September, 1949. This position proved un-
WITH THESE

tenable, says the report, and the change in
value was essential in the interests of thc |

VOURISHING
FOODS





Colony’s economy.
“Owing to the traditional local dependence

on United States sources of supply,” the re- |
port continues, “the cost of living was bounc ||

to be adversely affected by such a change, bu
His Majesty’s Government made a specia |!
grant of $450,000 for the year so as to enabl: |
the application of subsidisation measures tc |
cushion the effects of devaluation, particu



Cold Storage Hams
Cold Storage Bacon
Smoked Kippers
Smoked Haddock
Anchor Milk Powder

COCKTAILS
Plain Oliv +s }
Stuffed Olives

Cocktail Cherries



knowledgement, he (the Prime|
Minister) had asked that an ex-|
pression of his appreciation shouid| |

be conveyed te “W.P, Hastings.’

I have not been able to trace)
anyone named “W.P. Hastings”
and the initials presumably are|
those of some one living at
Hastings. I should be grateful if

you would publish this letter in|
the hope that it will catch his (or
her) eye,
I am,
Sir, |
Your obedient servant,

R, N. TURNER,

Colonial Secretary.

| the year.—B.U.P. \

Anchor Evaporaied Milk Scones i
larly in so far as the poorer classes are con- Empire Coffee Sardines \
cerned! Lipton Coffee Uffillet Puffs |}

But devaluation increased the cost oc! Ser Cheese Crisps ||
imports from $5,990,264 in 1949 to $8,787,51( AFTERNOON TEA Patek Meets
in 1950 and there was only a small increase '{] yipton Tea Gold Braid Rum 1
in the value of exports, to $4,779,802. Red Rose Tea Meltis Dates and Figs



Principal exports during the year were | pemearng ee tas ain MEAT DEPT. __ |
$1,061,887 worth of pine timber, $1,000,087||| Kraft Cheese Poultry }
worth of mahogany timber and $1,002,451 ||} Chocolate Peppermints st

worth of chicle gum. There was a strong de-
mand for pine from Trinidad, Jamaica and |
other British Caribbean colonies and export |
prices for this product were far above those 1!
| fixed for local sales, with the result that an |!
| acute local shortage of pine developed during | |

Calves Liver
Mutton Shoulders
Fresh Vegetables

Resolve to call Goddard's Daily
during 1952 for ail your
Grocery Needs

Salt Mackerel
Salt Herrings





a
”
a,

THURS RSDAY, JANUARY 1952



Woman Guilty Of
Wounding With Intent

Sentence Postponed

AFTER 15 minutes’ deliberation at the Court of Grand

ns yesterday a jury found Pearl Roach of St. Lucy
ullty of wennding Nelly Husbands of Rock Hall, St. Lucy,

te to maim, disfigure or do grievous bodily harm

ver 16 last year, The case was heard before the

e Chiet Judge Sir Aan Collymore who postponed

r

Roae ich bit off a piece of Husbands’ left ear.

nt

Septem|

Besides this





bit her in two other places. ’
rebation officers will seek information concerning
character before sentence is passed.
i nding was done af er On the Saturday after the {ght
' been a ht between Cpl. Bennett came to her and she
Roact daughter Nelly cmd Hus- ictG him then than she knew
in nothing about it. She old him
: e a clean record,” the ~o because she did not intend go-
Judge tol to before — ng at the Court to give evidence
iy from the doc “Th ere fcr “nybody.

i ttl doubt th you were ag- Eslyn Boyce of Rock Field, St
gray on behalf of your Lucy, corroborated Nelly Hus-
a4 er. It is unfor unste that bands’ evidence as to the first fight
r reason or other some Sho adced tha blood was running
people seem to lose their sense of down Pearl Roach’s forehead
resnonsib ty at excursions.” when they were on the road. She
( R. Niles was defence €id not see the biting. She came
counsel. Mr W.'W. Reece, K.C., to the scene of the second fight

ted for the crown, fterwards.
The Y cution called six wit- Nelly was learning to sew with

t anc

i tendered one for cross- her and sometimes slept at her.

on. The defence called To he Court she said that wher

four witnesses. Nelly got off the lorry there w:
Prosecution’s Case no blood on her.





























BARBADOS ADV 0c: ATE

Ltn:

MUSICAL CHAIRS





TWO competitors struggle for a chair in the Musical Chairs Competition at the Civic Day Fair at Queen's
Park on New Year's Day. The competitors had to ride donkeys.







Labourer Gets **L.ouise”’ Brings =

6 Months






100 Lb. Bill



‘isk



1

‘Phe case for the prosecution was Cpl. Samuel Bennett of District FOR STEALING SHIRT .
hat s me people including Pearl “B” said that about 6.30 p.m. on F ; t 17 Mi k t I If)
Roach, left St. Lucy on September September 16, he was sent to Theodore Harding, a 46-year rayne urs d ji ar et fi eda
16 to go on an excursion to the Windsor Road to make investiga- o)q labourer of Dé lamere Land,
eee: they were returning from ae he the Meits Pearl Roach S;. Michael was yesterday sen- THE Fishing boat Louise, owned by Mr. C. Marshall
1e Xi out 5 to 5.30 p.m, denied biting Nelly tenced tc ix months’ impris § - ? oe ‘ ’
t $ prison- rought a 100-3 ; . arket veste .
and had reached Windsor Road, St. , He observed a small abraion on ment with hard labour by Mi brought a 100-pound bill fish a0 the Fish Mat ket yesterday
Ge ’ a polar van was t’e side of Pear! Roach’s eye when C, L. Walwyn, Police Magistrate afiernoon It was the first fish to be sold in the market in
seen :nd ihe lorry stopped so that © arrived on the scene of District “A,” for stealing a 1952. Many people were around trying to buy a piece and
sor of tt Y ule ly polars. . ’ hirt ral t 8 belongi ) Jas S$ ic
wher ul i y W er sped Defence ° W. tnesses Neville. xieyos. or nS 28 — ™ — SeeRy. } ;
inusitiaris «who were on the en The aefencs called witnesses. - d 1 December 28. The Louise was also the last fishing boat to carry fish
i wh on ‘ : eab . arle 5 ay — ; ——
started to play music and many sng rie or Crab Hill, St. Alleyne told the court that he into the market in 1951. On Monday evening it carried in
who | got off the lorry began “UC; WHO also went to the ex- Icft his shirt hanging on a line 80 pounds of flying fish.
to dances Others left: the lorry °-220".°2 he jorry was the first. in a vard in Chapman's Lane, : : A fairly large number of flying
and went for a stroll : She said she saw Eslyn royce, St Michael on December 27 4 9 fish was caught on New Year
A fight over a seat on the lorry “netha Roach and Nelly Hus- The next morning he missed the Remanded For Day but the Fish Market wa
starte between Pear! nach! bands fignting on the lorry, shirt Later the same day he closed. The fish was sold alon
‘ at haar tae She saw Neily Husbands holding w tl defe I \ ing : the streets and at the \ ou
daught Agnetha and Ne 3 y sba nolding v le endant wear eae. * ari
band neat ee _ a a kerchief to her bleeding ear He reported the matter to the House Breaking beaches E
Roach arrived and cuffed Nelly a Sfter the fight on the lorry. This Police Mr, C, L. Walwyn Police ino fan ssid Peoe te
fey 3 was nearly five minutes after they Magistra “san ; sol eople con ed
ee : th had leit the lorry. : In h defence Harding said manded Prot steraieg- ounce “Dry bys Ive vg the remains of
I organize o le excursion < hat } ‘ . ‘e am and po
t 1e “Yr a sav Pearl Roach that = ae . Never tended rying eas < < ;
told ever body to g t off the lorry evening after the fight. Sometime © the hirt but wag under Mic ‘ a woe oe een Mr. G. Hinkson, clerk f the
nd shortly after they hed done s¢ier pearl arrived she saw Nell e impression that it wae not ~pecacl, Until today when he Market, told the Advocate that
1 were in the road, Pearl aut her Pear Hea Die Sane Apaeited appeared yesterday before him on fisherman and vendors still con
a5 hela Nelly. They boh fell ao es a af : charge of house breaking and tinue to sell fish along the wharf
oe 7 ; Bae? ; Jean inds o nges, St, Lucy, . arce on December 10 Z at Te .Yv f ras
sutt by the while 3 é g hac Ve . ‘ 5. co and at Temple Yard Apart fro:
gu - by on 0 ie aee s ie another defence witness, aid that , eee te ai eee re lh a Cpl. Yearwood attached to the keeping theEh areas in on ins nt
. . Fla > 4 me ar 2 ° » ND € ¢ * arrac nai ,
t. her shoulder and bit off a fter the lorry was parked, some jast conviction he was sentenced C.L.D. arrested ‘Harding on » tary condition, these vendors sell
> of her left ear of the occupants of the lorry, in- {9 four months’ imprisonment W@!tant. at black market prices
; ; ‘ cluding Pearl, got off the lorry and ; ae .
> CAS . " nce was . ’ L e y ¢ with hard labour r stealir y =
vat Pearl roach had le ne lorry Boyce, Cynthia Griffith, Nelly fre arm a Se Ae ter caaihiet men did duty in these areas and
after i parked, pnd when she Husbands. and Agnetha Road He apPe oe Ben this sentence PLATE RETURNED forced the vendors to go to the
returned, the nirce of Nelly’s ear fighting on the lorry. When they ae i ‘ r€ 4 ssistant _Court % Dr. Charles Payne, dentist of market. He honed they would |
w Ir bitten off. The piece were getting down she saw Nelly q ecttens ” th te tatrate id OF, | SEEnueee tere, erst TE ite auly, Inet Arete
: ‘ § Y decisic oO . agistrate ¢ ‘ i '
of the ear was bitten off during holding her ear; Agnetha’s clothes Seah: ae ie egies ae plate bearing his name stolen this year g ,
the on the lorry, defence were torn and her left if, aeeces ba from outside his office Tuesda In some cases the fish is sold
em arm tence of six months’ imprison- nigh from. tt boat whict sualls
counrel ested appeared to be bitten. ment with hard labour night om: the Oat Witch is Usually
‘hief W cid Someone asked Agnetha where = : Dr. Payne told the Advocate tied up near the wharf Youns
. Chie cness her mother was and she said che sakes that two little boys brought it men an} women have no difficulty
Nelly Husbands of Rock Hall, {iq no. know back yesterday. He was very in skipping into boats to purchase
St. Lucy, the chief wituess, said ~ % rm Be a much relieved since he would fish but the old people or the lk
thal on September 16, about 9 a.m. Roach coming SSreniadl the trek B. Ge s Siecshanl Of have had to pay $24 to replace it active are the ones who suffer, On
. 5 2 : ares oes ' and » j ave g ome occasions these people ar
she went ig an excursion ot the she aid. “When Pearl reached iiducation Tio Retire iy Cteciicmaacik ev’ & fortea’ts par tiie bogs four
ane, St. Philip. : a * ‘ ; A aoe , yé B s r it. : .
eantad: Main, oak #ielae: a4 “left there she asked Agnetha what had ie nante-ta' fat Sah foe them. At
the Crane at 5 p.m. and when on happened. Nelly came from be- 1 GEORGETOWN, B.G. Jan. 1 eventually they pay seven cent
ane at 5 p. u 4 , B Jan. 1. ’

Windsor road tt Fi stopped and @nd the lorry with a beer bottlel€ British Guiana’s Director ot Unlawful Possession for a fiving fish froin the bo
indsor ro0a¢ ve rry s Tae ae and threw it and cut Pearl on her pqucation, Frank Ogle, left. the On the nasture at the Fisher
“Ano et yaceati 4 yi nder head. Colony today to spend four Angus Hunte of no fixed place Office, sheds are being erected in

nother girl namec aunc i John Yearwood also -went to months’ leave abroad prior to of abode was ordered to pay a preparation for the rebuilding
as sitting on the second seat and the excursion. He said he saw retirement He intends to re- {ne of 10/- for the unlawful programme. One shed is already
as I had no seat I asked her to Roach got off the lorry and go Mien Tar Terelau bik wife’e Heavies possession of lumbey which he comvleted and another is alnos
let me sit where she was sitting for a stroll. When she returned teh urine har hat. banter in the M88 conveying along Fairchild finished
so that she could sit on me,” she Nelly hit her with a bottle and gavdation ceteup tur a tat lof 15 Street on January 1, A quantity of mahogany is also
sai {bout this time Agnetha cut her se t 7 ia yee Pree The fine is to be paid in 14 on the pasture This mahogany
¢ ars reside + go y v
Roach got up from her seat and Agnetha Roach, daughter of *°@"S: '© Tesiat days or in default 14 days’ im- will be cut to various eal om aa
started to get off the lorry, I the accused was the next de- Mr. Ogle came to British Gui- prisonment with hard labour, used In the construction of b
allowed Vaunder to sit where she fence witness called. ana in 1939 as Chief Inspector of Mr. Walwyn told him that if he
had previously been sitting and Held Down Schools and Deputy Director of Feturms and is convicted Again ’
went toward the seat Agnetha had She said that in the fight on the Education 21d became Director 4n 10°F co 1 an offence, he would “SHEFFIELD” DUE
lef vacant. Agnetha turned back lorry three were cuffing her and 1948 on the retirement of Mr, â„¢0St likely go to prison. JAN. 12
and held on to me before I reach- Eslyn Boyce bit her. One Babb [Leonard J. G. Grease. * HERE ON :
ed the seat and started to choke held her hand and as many were ‘ ey cellency » Governor!
: Le re & » His Excellency the yoverno
and cuff me. Pearl Roach, her holding on to her, she bit some- Born in Gainsborough, Lincon Careenage Che “eae d has been informed that H.MS
mother came and began to beat one. She did not know wvhom she shire, Mr. Ogle was educated at Early yesterday morning the Sheffied (Captain M. Everard)
me too.” bit. After they left the lorry “Gainsborough Grammar School, Government Dredger was at work flying the flag of Vice-Admiral
Everybody was fold to get off lags was: tio mare: fighting fQueen Mary's College, the Lo removing silt from the inner Sir William Andrews, K.B.E., ¢
the truck, she said. When she got Pearl returned to the lorry tdon Institute and the London basin of the Careenage. The D.S.O. Commander-in-Chief,
on the road she saw bottles being about 15 minutes after the fights, jInstitute of Education. During dredger looks new after her America and West Indies Station
thrown She went to the right mre saree eek pie 3 andl World War I. he served with the} yecent two-months’ overhaul andwill pay a visit to Barbados fro.
of the road and Pearl Roach stoic net Ba) y ‘ia ; th au Tank Corp in Palestine in 1917 is working smoothly the 12th to 17th January,
d-to cuff her and threw her Nelly took the ottle and struckWeie successor is not yet named
on the road. She bit her on her her with it. She did not release (CP) se aslates ‘aiwew
left ‘ast, her left shoulder and the bottle when she struck Pearl. een tte eet eee ea Mr
6 oe : a : canton mike ‘he case was going on at Board-
: ca - ot eat aah aaa Dear! ed Hall five times but neither E l Fl S
& pe ee Daniel nor Elsie Medford were in fi WHI E
ony d ee her ; ore the case. Murrel Babb got the two Lrre ynn ues
Jandaged 1er ear anc soon alter re < ; 9 fey
> witnesses, Daniel and Medford, oy? Asiis o
the Police arrived She was taken to come into the aise. GC dian Millionaire

to the General Hospital, To Mr. Reece she said she had



















To Mr. Niles she said that while given a statement to the police. NASSAU, Dec. 31.
the fight between Agnetha and She was shown the statement One hundred and eight lawyers
herself was going on Pearl was on and admitted that the signature for the Canadian millionaire,
he lorry She was the last per- was hers. The statement was read Dugan McMartin, filed a_ state-
son to get off the lorry. About 30 to the Court. ment of defence today in the
people were cround the lorry when Mr. Niles in addressing the n for £80,000 brought against
Pearl Roach as biting her jury said that they had heard hi I WV star Errol Flynn |

Docter’s Evidence the facts of the case from the y lain hat MoMartin caused |

Dr. Willi Daly who examined P2!nt of view of the Prosecution him to lose $200,000 when Me-

J id there hag been and from that of the defence. Mertin struck him “a vicious blow
: . ‘hat ece of Nelly Husbands ‘ he side of his head” at the
| abrasions on her left That a piece of Nell; : in U ide of | |
ulder and the lower ©a" Was bitten off there could be windsor Hotel, Nassau, last March |
rear was bitten off no doubt, but the question was 44} |
f oh, * who bit it.
ear left a According to Nelly she had MeMarti iefence states thai!
et: BAS s been rolling in the gutter with | £ > Filyr a light and |

_Els Medford and her mother pear) Roach about 10 minute K lap on the cheek” by,
M yrtle Daniel from Windsor, St. Many people were around the iv of farewell. MeMartin states |
George, who were passing along jorry and could have seen, yet that th vere on,» terms of|
the road the time of the fight, none went to her assistance. Was friendship and easy familiarity of '

ve corr ve evidence for that not strange, he asked. ¢ » nature that it was custom-
most part Medford differed Discrepancies ry for them to greet one anoth-
from Nelly in per evid when Nelly herself had told them er in a hearty manner.” The trial
she id thet Pearl ang were that when the ear was bitten date s not been fixed, but it
standing when Pearl bit off par: they were on the ground, and will posditly be held in March.
of her ear 7 @ On Page 6
_———_—_ =







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papers
WHIZZ
WHIZZ
WHI 7, 7, FOR INFL

Scotch Whisky

In olden days, the crest emblazoned
ona Knight’s shield proclaimed his
noble ancestry.

To-day, there is another sign of
worth: the white horse that pro-
claims a Scotch; a whisky whose
excellence has been famous
for over 200 years.

Sole
FRANK B, Al






od

FOR

Remember Whizz

is foil

for Freshness

Distributors

FOR











IMSTRONG LID

sae AA DAA RAAAABARAADAARRDDARA ADS .

PAIN

COLDS



em

WNZA

-packed



-ARONTA”

@ From Page 1

tors. So

hotel
that
the

$1 great is the
accommodation 1
the

ho



for
land
me of
fus many bo.
February and
Marine nm
added t
mana for visitor
than half
expected te be
m

}



lave
for
March

room
the de

month



At the

rave



beer meet
more
filled to
before next ynth
Ocean \

filled and

rhe





ulready man
been refused for the mor
February at Mare r
thing apple to ¢
The St. lL
filled and
hood of its
easol rhe
n tly English
rdian
Marine

acral }
Hotel 6
every likeli
packed
visito there 4
but a number ¢
expected, Like th
management of th
made renovations
more visitors
not vet
February
also

have

awrence
there i



being

the

practicall
also had t



ey
oking
* Hotel Royal and the
the’ are a number «
taying at the hotels,
ity have not
on They

soon



vet
too

arrive;
expec
> filed up
Bright
Ps Me
Director of Messrs. Johnson
im told the Advocate that
ke last year, Barbados can look
rward to another good tourist
yn this year
He said that
could be
ierably
and

Prospects
Mi

and

the tourist indus
developed quite con
because there
of Canadians who art
willing to winter in a
uch ours which is at
when theirs is at its

are
yu
ni too
limate as

peak

r.C.A
more trips to
find Canadians

ymscious of

A develops and makes
Barbados, we will

becoming more
this part of the
Caribbean” he said, and added
there are many Barbadian
iilies living in Canada who are
y too willing to spend a short
rcation here.

\ glance at



list
how
ad

the passenger
r.C.A. gives an idea of
people have taken the
itage of the T.C.A. service
As the release of dollars be
1 more available, Canadiai
men will once again
to these shores in the in
of their firms,”
said that there has always
been a great commercial tie be-
tween Canada and Barbados and
it should be our constant endeay
our to strengthen and encouragi
our trade relations with them.
The fact that many of
hotels have had to refuse
ings is an indication of the
necessity for more hotels
mmodate the people

vel
terest
He

the
book-
grea‘

to ac

DROVE WITHOUT
LIGHTS

A FINE of 20/- to be paid in 14
d or in default 14 days’ im
prisonment was imposed by Mr
Cc. L. Walwyn on Joseph Brath
waite of Rockley, Chhirst Church
terday for driving the motor
van M-71@ on Hastings Road
Christ Chureh, without lights on
the night of December 31

Another charge of driving the
same van under the influence of |
drink was _ brought against
Brathwaite and this was adjourned

y

ve

until Friday, January 4 for medica) |

«Vidence



For Your KITCHEN

GARDEN

( Lettuce

Cauliflowei

ibbage, Beet

Cre

Tomato



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rhyme Pepper Parsley {
Chinere Cabbage, Cucumber, })}
Leek, Onion, Kohl Rabi |
Squash, Radish, Brocolli \|

lery, Vege- }))

; Pumpkio |

Chard, Spinach |
For Your FLOWER
GARDEN
Antirrhinum (Snapdragon),
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: Muskmelon, ¢
table Marrow,
Swi

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Verbena, Gaillardia, Sweet

William Bosmos Salvia
(Red) Ageratum, Holly {
hock Chrysanthemum {
Nigella, Sweet Pea Na }
irtium Alyssum, Mignon Uy
2 ett For-get-me-not Por- \{
a i, Canterbury Bell i}
Also ((
Fo Kitchen Gard iy
{{{ (Bush Lima) i)
it) (Stringless) tt
til (Bountiful or \\
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i} Buttery
tv i}
i
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() BRUCE WEATHERHEAD }
it " )
tu ))
it LTD. i
\\ HEAD OF BROAD STREET )
\IOOOOSUENSOTEOR OT e

ARe ‘





%
&
°
x
¢
%
e :
¥ YOU ’
‘.
% ; :
x SCARED }
x ‘
% BY :
$ ‘
% RHEUMATIC
,
‘,
% PAINS? ,
g ¥
%& Hetre’s the sure and certain x
@ wuy to conquer them. [ul %
8 in %
% %
5 .
* s
x %
¢ ind it’s penetrating powers ¥
* will act quickly and effec- %
’ tively 4
% oe :
s .
‘.
* On Sale at }
* ‘
° WITS 1 1 s
< KNIGHT'S DRUGSTORES §
90GC0OCGG00060086566605"”

de-

I

management
had t
the

The hotel is

filled an t is

«

to
Se
refused any
and March

y

but

Goddard, Managing

AT
WEATHERHEAD'S |

= FRR GEA GE SNA PA ATA DA a ein, ASA ADNAN SATAN STNG DADA A DATANT



posiooamnnasuneamnndon XE



PAGE FIVE





BROAD ST.

HARRISON Ss

STAINLESS
KITCHE

SINGLE DRAINER
DOUBLE DRAINER





STEEL
SINKS



$97.38
$127.18

Ho with Plug and Chain,

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"ty . ®e
I\.ese Sinks will not tarni
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will add brightness
years to come

©
SWEDISH HARDBOARD

1 Pair
Brackets,

sh
and
to your

but will
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installed
kitchen for many

ny ‘ ~
This is not merely a wood substitute it Is
wood broken down by chemical action and

compressed into sheets harder

aie material. Available in ‘

‘ Thick — Sheets 8 and 10 ft. 4 ft.
sae Thick — Sheets 6, 8, 9, 10 & 12

=

than the orig-

4 ft.

OUR PRICES, are keenly competitive;

nevertheless we will grant a special
DISCOUNT (according to quantity) on
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/ HARRISON’ S
NS NENSNENGNS NBN NNN
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By SY ESE CCM EEE

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TEL. 2364.
SNSNENENENENENEES
WGNGNENG eg

5






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>
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It has been our pleasure to serve

you during the past year and

we hope that your New Year will

be a full year of achievement.

KNIGHTS DRUG STORES

AN SN CE NN A

8
“PAN AS

Ss

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SeaeBtheteguweatnhaas
Just Received —

a fresh shipment of

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sg NEN NNN NANG NSN NGAGE NS NG NG NG NG BNE NS
3 Seasons Greetings to fil
z



Y

Our Trieruds and

Cusiomers

Our Thanks to each one for the many
favours shown us during 1951, and our
Sincere Wishes for Good Health,
Happiness and Prosperity in the New
Year 1952.

2
3
2
a
2
2

S
eB

zw @





2 THE BARBADOS FOUNDRY

2 LIMITED,

2

2 White Park Rd. St. Michael.
INN ~


PAGE SIX

CLASSIFIED ADS.

TELEPHONE 2508.

> >
1952, at A FOR SALE
Mile Hill,—Josep’
of Lester Thorne
te otype Dept. His
funeral leaves the above address at
430 pm. to-day for St, Bernaba AUTOMOTIVE
Church. Friends are asked to attend
Adina Sinckler, Lester, and Kenneth} CAR-—One Wosley 6/80 in
Thorne, Marjorie Todd \Childre mdition under 10,000 miles
4.1.52 or 2067.















excellent
Phone 2
3.1.52—4n





N MEMORIAM



CAR—One Austin A-70 Hampshir





|
|perfect condition, under 5,000 miles
—eee= | Phone 2353 or 5105 3.1.52
RIVERA-—In loving memory of “John ) J rs
Berestord Rivera who died on 3rd.) CAR—One Austin A-40 (Devon) 2 year
Januanz 1951 old_in sound condition, going for $100.0
The midnight sta are shining

or pearest offer. Phone 4512 oppo
Dowr en a Simesy eravs Fire Brigade, Coleridge Street
Of one we loved so dearly, 31.592
But yet we could not save
Ever to be remembered by Orville, Leo
(so.s), Mrs. Phyllis Cummi M
Eileen Pock daughters tr

CAR—A 1946 Austin 10
tition. Good arres and 1m
Apply to Pastor E. J. Parchm







| Thelma, Dorie! (daughters-in laws, | | Cross Road, Collymore Nock or phone}
3.1.52—1r 3469 for particulars



— 3



vr . hh Ms
ANNOUNCEMENTS | CA 9 Chewroiet Touring Cor, ix
evlinder, M-1323 in excellent conditio
4 New Tyres, New Battery. Dial )
$5 in goods and with your cash bill] oo7. FE. H. Davis 11 52

you get a guess-coupon how many
ELECTRICAL

screws in a jar? You can win an
EKCO radio lt certainly pays to sho;
et A. BAKNES «@ Co., Ltd
WASHING MACHINES: A new ship-
nent of the famous HOOVER household
Washing Machines, only $140.00 each

23.11. 51—+t.f.n
EDUCATIONAL K. R. Hunte & Co. Ltd, Lower Broad

Street. Dial 4611 or 027











30.12. 51—3n

MECHANICAL

TYPEWRITERS: Olympia Portable





The Governors of the Combined Parry
and Coleridge Schoo! for Boy hereby
notify Parents and the General, Pubtic
that the School witli open on Monday
ld4th January 1952 at Ashton", Station | Typewriters, 1952 Models, price $140.00
Hill, St. Peter Your inspection of these superb machines

q Mr. Johw b. Smith (formerly Head-} ts invited. A. G. St. Hill, Dial 3199
T ter of the Parry Schoo! St. Lucy) 1.1.52—7 e.o.d

} has been appointed to act Headmaster | ——— sieht

ot the Combined School
By order of the Governors, SCE T
MIPOPORE BRANCKER, MIs tULANEOUS
BEST ENGLISH GALVANISE
SHEETS, Nett Cash small lot only 6

"i Secretar
$4.20, 7 ft., $4.90. 8 ft. $5.60. A. BARD

Public Official Sale | am

BUILDING SUPPLIES-—For sale cheap




























































28.12. 5S)--4n

































(The Provost Marshal's Act 101 ed building supplies (guttering, roofing
1904-%) 20) tiles, sink traps, faucets, toilet seats,
On Friday, t fth ¢ ( Ja gasoline latern, venitian blind,) Hopeweu
1952, at the he « “Kk St. Thomas, phone 4042 3.1.52-—-1n
ifternoon will be sold at my office to t —_— SC
highest bidd » fc CORN HUSKED--$5.00 per bushel
the appraised value Bennetts ‘Plantation, St. Thomas
All that certain piece of Land . 1.1.5
taining by admeasurement 8 rood AAPL OS
perches situate, st @he Poourne, ik FULLER BRUSHES--Floor Scrub
Pariah of St. John butting and bound Wet Mops, Ladjes and nts ‘Hai
on lands of one G. M. Mill on | Brushes Flesh Brushes Manicure
of J. T. Clarke, on land f one G | Brushes, Dental Plate Brushe Toot
“’ ti ; . 13 ushes, Complexion — Brush and
on @ Public Road or however else tiv ; .
same may abut and bound, appre my other Brushes. H. P. Cheesman
ne follows & Co. Ltd, Middle Street
The whole area of land appraised 29,12.51—6r
ONE THOUSAND TW TUNDREL | “Sais auliet fas ne ypdilien
at's ian 131.560), Atine es o Pri LAI ENGLISH WILTON CARPET
Albert Hold r fo a taedanda gat High quality, good condition. Box D.D
tion &C C/o Advocate Co 1.1.52—2n
N.B.+25% Depe to be paid on . ar ie
ie eieteaa Pe we cpo. SCALES—500 Ib. Platform Scales, just
. T. HEADLEY }in time for crop season, The General
Pro \ Marst | Agency Co., B'dos Itd *.1.52-6n
Provost Marshal's Office ih ve ks WHITE PILLOW CAS: = = —

Lionese Fabric A very good quality
20" 30” with flaps $1.14 each get it

INCOME TAX NOTICE 272" Son

YACHT Center Board: “Invader
Intermediate Class, 16 6" x 5 8” In
p food condition Brass and Stainless Stee!
Notice is hereby given that] Rigging. Phone Stoute at 2876 or 4675,
Income Tax returns are required 3.1 $2-—2n
from every married man whose; gy, —— -
income is $1200.00 per annum or LOST & FOUND
ever, from every other person
whose income is $720.00 pet LOST
annum or over and from compan-| “Gaara. A dite Balding Waa |
Saati Maa CAMERA A Jiffy Folding Kodak in
les whether incorporated or un-| in soft red leather case with shoulder
incorporated, societies, persons! strap Reward on returning to Caer
engaged in eny trade or profes-] bank















OF JANUARY, 1952, and be played n January
forms duly filled In must be do] for agian Oval, Tehders are invited
livered to me on or before the (a) The right to sell liquors, lunches
following respective dates: teas ete.

. . anne (b) Transportation of the Jamaican
1, Returns of persons wh« players to and from the Oval
books were closed on the} Tenders should reach the undersigne





















ti Zlst dav of December, 1951.] # Beicionn» Offices not later than Mon
| Cee d . jay January 7, at 4 mm
; : } 5 ae of ’ pur
| Oh: or betare the 3ist day The Association does not bind itself t
preh, 1952, 2ecept the lowest or any tender
9 Poeturns of persons whose] THE BARDADOS CRICKET ASSOC, Inc
tneipal place of busi 7h ee ee
1pen , Hony. Sect
ne ituate in the 2. 51—fin
petare th 8%h dav] — ne
tt 1952. i NOTICE
9. Retu > of all other “rrson HEREBY GIVEN that the partnershiy
Aesii-paie ; t present carried on by us the unde
} on or before ‘he 3st day ©!) signed G. L. W ke and) mT
; January, 195° Rogers as Solicitors the style or
. is 1 of "G. L. W. Clarke & Co is th
: N. D. OSBORNE, ay dissolved by mutual consent and
Commissioner ot t the said E. D. Rogers will continue
» practise as a Solicitor under his o-

Income Tax and Death Duties) name at James Street, Bridgetown



; (Ag.) Dated this Sist day of December, 1951
Note:—Any person failing G. L. W. CLARKE,
make his return within th: | 2 eo

1.1.8



due date will be liable to
fine not exceeding £100 an
not less tha ind will b
prosecuted less a satisfac
tory reason is given.



PARTNERSHIP NOTICE

NOTICE IS HEREBY GIVED that
he undersigned practising together ao
. oheitors under the firm name of
n!|COTTLE, CATFORD & CO ive tl
i admitted into partnership Messr
GEORGE LOUIS WHITFOOT CLARK!
nd JOSEPH! COLERIDGE ARMSTRONG
Dated this Ist day of January 1952
E, MAXWELL SHILSTONE
LINDSAY FE. R. GHA
1








1.52—


BARBADOS TURE
NOTICE

TENDERS are invited for the exc)
wht to sell Liquor, Refreshments ete
the Garrison Save ah on Race D

cLub








’ 1952
s t t be forwarded in se
lL elope arked TENDER = FO
to IQUOR AND REFRESHMENT:
; iressed to the Secretary not later
MR sin Mil EVERYROD & n 4 me ‘ TT
Barbado r THURSDAY 1 PANUARY
AON New. Vek TO Yet ee Committ ms, to ul
From G. A, SERVICE | ‘ wy
PURPOSE POD POO SSI 4



-



NDU % | 3
: TO-DAY'S NEWS FLASH 3 NOTICE
4
LARGE WALL: MAPS OF | We beg to notify our customer
WEST INDIES $9.00 4% {that we will be closed for stock
DOG COLILARS AND HAR ‘| taking from Wednesday 2nd Jan
NESS yj; untl further notice,
DOG LEADS, RUN STRAPS, % WM. D. RICHARDS & SON,
DOG WHIPS S McGregor St.
METAL WASTE PAPER ¢) 1,1,52—2n
BASKETS | ———<$<_ $5 — — — —______— :
SHOE BRUSHES % NOTICE
{ — at — ¥ | PARISH OF CHRIST CHURCH
; JOHNSON’S ST/.TIONERY % NOTICE TO DAIRY
t and s KEEPERS, Etc.
HARDWARE 8} Registration and Re-Registration of ai
R | DAIRFES, persons employed in the pro
2e~ Ate of ee eaten | iction of Milk for sale d perso ro
>| ducing Surplus Milk sale; unde



Jsiries Regulations, 1948, made by
teneral Bo. of Health unde
Net 1941 (1941-17); will take pl
' the Sanitary Inspectors’ C re
brist Church; from WEDNES a
‘ry 2nd 1952, between the hours of 9.9
.m., and 3,00 p.m. except on Saturdays
\â„¢ hen Registration, etc., will take piace
| between the hours of 9.00 a.m. and 12.00
clock noon

By order of Commissioners of Health
Parish of Christ Church

(Sed) CHAS. 8S. MacKENZIE






GOOD NEW & RENEWED Bed

oo









; aa out FOR
GOOD
—fLFURNITURE?



Steads & Deep Coil Springs, Lath Chairm
Vanities Dressing Tables § | 25.12.51
Wardrobes, Washstands |
chairs £5. oy Racks ! ) SPOS SSS SOO SOOO
Eas. & — Tables D 3 4st x
dios, tchen, Sid Cab ‘|’
Batis Kieren, sideroara oe WS ORIENTAL }
Kitchen—-DRA WING ROOM FU ‘ ¥
NITURE It, Morris. ‘Tut : VENDEMOs, sEDAs, x
feeboxes, ‘Tvpewriter, Gocarts, {| JOYERIAS Y ARTISTICAS >
PIANOS 3s CURIOSIDADES, TRAIDOS %
e % DE LA INDIA CHINA c %
i... W is iAN. :
*
.2. VWWILSON j} = THANI's S
SPRY STREET, DIAL 4009 \ Pr. Wm. Hry. St. Dial sae §
is %
SSS" 899959999966 COS SSOOE



30.12.51—tn|Was some distance awa hen
: eee
sion, and owners of land or prop-



erty whether a_ taxable income > THe The biting: took place on the
has accrued during the past year i UMLIC NOTICE is lorry. Agnetha Roach had _ told a
or not. | them that she had bitten som e
\ she “rse nt
Forms of Return may he o)- OT body. She herself had been bi
tained from the Income Tax De-} tp, a ee Intercolonial hey ri t i tes hn miRNA Dk At dal bi Dt
partment AFTER THE IST DAY] Cricket Tournament against Jamaica to BOY ee RU te ene ere tor, cheek your thermostats

{he} Pe played between January 17 and 2 the lorry Nelly





BARBADOS ADVOCATE









FOK RUST U.N. AGREE Harbour Lo
HOUSES f : Seb FI Mark, Sch. Francis W.|
—_ specail entities _ @ From Page 1 Smith, Sch. Lindsyd !, Sch. Piorence
ULCEDON MI 4 \ll war prisoners released Emanuei, M_.V. Cacique del Caribe, M.V



Lucitie M. Smith, Sch



a799. ¢ ». xchange fo ivilians shall be Lady Jey. Seb

Marea fer

eniences Garage rms against the side which son, x Enterprise $











From Trinidad—

a nde wail etta, Sch. Rosaline M., Sch | Sims, Janice Jiniin, Marianne Simpson
GILVAN, Chelsea Ga ‘ inder parole not to bear warion Belle Wolfe, Sch. Philip H, David-| Allen Vieira, Angela, Viera, Joyce Brad
Sch. Franklyn | shaw



JANUARY 3,_ 1952

Barclay’s Bank (Dominion ; Royal Bank of Canada

!
Colonial And Overseas) |" * ® Suse 8:
Draft Pp
Barbados B.W.1. one
Edwin Fairweather, Norma Fair

THURSDAY,

ae a nee

Seawell

ARRIVALS—By BWIA
On MONDAY

Carola Bovell, Carl Chenery Helen





‘ releases them DR. & D’Ortac, Sch Emeline, Sch.| weather, George Pobertson, James
) de} oS the a. Burma D
fn I : tes of the Interna ARRIVALS From Grenada— i pr. Cheques on Bankers 68 2% Pr
NSLOW ‘ ' i mittee of the Red gc arta de LARRINAGA, 4449] Cornelia Robertson NEW YORK | Demand Drafts 68.05% pr
eek j Cross shall interview all prison- tens act, Capt. Kay, from Antwerp via | Prem Pusrte Rice— 9 pr. Cheques on } Sight Draft €7.9°% pr
f Ma 1 Jyty, | nd all civilians affected, to Londen Theo. F. Cox, Muriel Ix. Cox, Alber Bankers 71 3/10% pr. | 30.7% pr. Cable x
November, Decembe pr A ike sure none is repatriated Sch. PHILLIS MARK. 5@ tons net.) Connett Louise Connett, John H. N Sight or De- } 69.2% pr. Currenc war 3 7 BS
|W. T, Gooding, Strong T inst his will Capt. McLaren, from St. Lucia Douglas, Henr Sealy, Eustace Maxwell nand Drafts 71 1/10% pr. | Coupons 66% pr
=a . i MV. WILLEMSTAD, 2,855 tons net, | Shilstone, Mary Elizabeth Shilstone pr. Cable
erate t All war prisoners who Capt. Van der Burgt, from Trinidad | From Martinique— pr. Currency

ct not to return home also ey RES és é
shall laced < S.S. RUNA, 5,1 tons net apt
‘E> 1 placed on parole not to burg. Yor Trinidad.

t agait in the Korean conflict. “yy “WILLEMSTAD, 2,855 tons net



WANT!


































—UP. Capt Van der Burgt, for Madeira
HELP noe eT Tt eee ee
CUSTOMS CLERK—Fo office * j
|} Apply in person. Wr Fogarty Ltd ce oJ
31 1—t.f.n

EXPERIENCED







t Plantatior t < a ONTREAL, AUSTRALIA AN NEW Oe oo ee PEFSSSONSSSOO,
| dutie oor possible. Ay ' ZEALAND LINE LTD.
etter to W. T. Gooding, St pi MANZ LINE

Fiantatic St. T



M.V. TEKOA is expected to load st
SERVANT oO r trallan Ports for Trinidad, Barba-
App Harci i Bermuda early Jamuary and arriv-
t it Barbados about March 20th.

This vessel has ample space for chilled



The M.V. “Caribbee” will

accept cargo and passengers
for Dominica, Antigua,




| One Typ frozen, and general cargo. Montserrat, Nevis and St,

| pe } ; © accepted on through Bills of Kitts Sailing Monday 7th
2eTSon ' ritten ap cat te the « 2 ?

iF DOWDING ESTATE & hy January.

Bridgetowt 1 é B.W.l. SCHOONER



’ * ~@y q OWNERS ASSOC. INC.
PUBLIC SALES | ponxess wimy «co, wa.





with trenshipment at Trimidad
5 h Guiana, Windward and Lee-
3 ADING CO., LIMITED, Ba eet,| ward Islands

| further particulars apply to—



















TRINIDAD Tele, 4047.
——_—— -—— B.W.1,
REAL ESTATS DaCOSTA & Co., Ltd.
—_—____—_— = BARBADOS.
SRALTAR, Cattle i f 3.9.1.
nished Offers “di writ
>. HW. Farmer ws Plantat t
| Andrew or Phone 7 29.12.51 & °
|} LA SOLACE—We VN 0.
with ¥ a \ te
ervant roo P oe
Ne not
A ‘ , or ; I t —_ -_—- ———— —
| RON , iy ~ NEW YORK SERVICE
| RICTURESQUI PO A STEAMNER Sails 4th December— arrives Barbados 25th December, 1951
| above sea we, 1 v elec . Sanaa TS ae
cre te NEW ORLEANS SERVICE
e eas w ‘e ne 5 : ‘E RY PATRAI" sails 9th Dec. —Arrives B’dos 28 December.

Dec.—Arrives B'dos 4th January.
=~ oem hc cc ccc cCccl——en



CANADIAN SERVICE



} +r \ e UTH BOUND
€
Woman Guilty nin sss: eae aan
° Monteeal Halifax Barbados
» 3 ALCOA POINTER” . 25th Nov. 51 28th Nov, 51 8th Dec. fl
ound ing ALCOA PEGASUS : Mth Dec. $1 24th Dec. 51
© ALCOA PLANTER - 28th Dee. 51 Sth Jany. 52
\ TEAMER % 3 lith Jany. 52 21st Jany. 52

@ Prom Pace 5

heer THOM LYD. — NEW YORK AND GULF sERVICE.















anothe itne Elise Viec

had gaid. they were sta SePL DA COSTA & CO. LTR —CANADIAN SERVICE
Medford had it I eters 7. 4

at first told the police that she ||] ROBERT THOM LIMITED

Tt ai oe ae ae PLANTATIONS BUILDING, LOWER BROAD STREET
a » Police iad ai }

gave evidence with all read | Passenger Sales Agents for:
In her evidence she ha frans-Canada Airlines, B.O.A.C. and B.W.1.A.

that the fight had gone on for half ALCOA STEAMSHIP COMPANY

an hour. That was an altogethe Telephone No. 4466

different story from Nell - eee
Daniel the mother had given

jslightly different version of L ' .

circumstances Daniel } i | How S Y our Cocling

that Pearl pu i Nell I

they came off 1 e e ?
“There is a teri conflict ¢ System ;
evidence from the Prosect n

he said,

We'll Check Your

There was no doubt th earl

the biting took piace.

Radiator and Pump





They could ea believe that




nwpect and replace hose if























Pearl Roach did not bite Nelly,
but even if she did tt would needed, tighten cylinder heads, _
notice that there had been no and manifeld and adjust fan MeFnearneys
evidence of malice nd it i
essential,” he said that mal belt Then you'll be sure your a 5
should be shown Hl subst posecte om the navsiol =< | Mr. Reece did not addre t |
jury | days without overheating
No Doubt
_, The Chiet Jucge wold whe sry |||. Ford-Trained Mechanics
tion to be left in no ne | d d 2 od
Bie bidede Chay conticted: Way 2. Ford-Approved Service Methods
one. ;
Rive dale -comsiderntion. . wil 3. Genuine Ford Parts
be: are you Satisfied . d all ‘ a
teasonabie doubt? You have been||| | 4, Special Ford Equipment
told that it is remarkable that no |
one went to Nelly i tanc
although a crowd of people ere
nearby.
Some people E
dents strongly impressed on tl |
minds and so there would be ¢
crepancies in a case such a I |
Nelly had said that dur

course of the trugel on |
ground she had been bitten

Tho Fyre with Built-in Dependability



}
“You have seen her and |
ner demeanour,” he saik |

|
|
|
|
|



there had been a fight in



lorry but none anywhere else } Charles |
Examining Agnetha Roa | |
evidence they would remen | |
| |
she had said she got one bite |
bit someone too | McEnearne |
| “That was one bite that | y
netha spoke of an , ! } |
tated that sl } |
tatement which had _ be | & Co Ltd |
borated by the doctor j es °
Agnetha gave in evidence |
Ishe had bitten someone and
may well think it strange tl
she had not said th vhen
Police took a statement from |

OFFICE 4493 WORKSHOP 4203

“If you feel that the biting «
curred on the lorry, then you \

have a reasonable doubt t) | PARTS DEPT. (4673
Pear! did not bite Nell |
| The jury then retired to « | NIGH, 4125

jsider their verdict
|

|







69 7/10% pr

———
HONOURED : DIED
BLACKBURNE, England,
Tuesday.

| Albert Duxbury 69-year-old
Jemand Drafts 68.05" “= \textile worker died to-day — six

Yves Massel, Doreen Massel, John De
Lore, Laura Laguarigue
DEPARTURES—By B.W.1A.
On TUESDAY
fer Veneruria—-

Pierre Garsonnin, Sincisir Spence
Robertina Sperce, Kerin Sper, Betty
Cox, Maurice Jones, Niguel berrueco,
Angostine Berrueco, Jose Mateu, Mar-
cedes Mateu, Jessica Lee, John lee
Cabriela Bohn.

For Trinidad—

Thomas Wali, Hans Heiman, Tt.eodore
Kirby, Elien Kirby, Mary Kirby, Charles
Barrow. Wilfred Ferguson, Isabella, Bea-
van Archibald, Margaret Wight, Joe
Hannan, John Loder. Philip Habib, ;
Howard Dudley, Margaret Dudley |
For St. Lucia— i
Horace Wason, Lynette, Lillianne “a

Coupons 69 1/10% pr. |
pr Silver 20% pr |
CANADA |

10°% pr. Cheques on
Bankers 68 2/10%



70

cots Sight Dratt
i® 7/10% pr. Cable

69

67 9/10% pr. |hours after he had been awarded
ithe Bri Empire Medal in the
New Year’s Honours list for lous
—U.P.



ne

10% pr. Currency 66 7/10 pr
Coupons 66% pr
Silver

ton, Jannie Garretson, Neville ‘. RATES OF EXCHANGE I

| service in industry.






SSS
SSS SE.

HAVE YOU BOUGHT YOUR CURTAINS YET?
if not see our selection of

PLASTIC SHEETING

tor Curtains.

CENTRAL EMPORIUM
Corner Broad & Tudor Streets

Frank Humphrey, Anthony Leo, Urina
Issac
ARRIVALS—By TCA
On TUESDAY |

From Mentreal—

Dorothy Clark, Lucille Hutchinson. |
William Morrison, Beatrice ‘Tempte; | SSS
Reginald Temple, Eve Goodson, Gerald | 9°56565454644656GGVG9OOPO FES







4, 44 te*, 4, 46,457.
Lascelles, Eric Edwards, Joan Fernandez | SOLELY OOS Oo%
Dorothy Lewis, Walter Lewis, Glad s 4
Manning, Hugh Manning, Anne Rowland g REAL ESTATE
Percival Rowland, Hertha Jarvis, Augusta , X&
Jorvis, Earnest Wakeland, Bess Wakeland, | %
Mabel Davis, Irving Davis, Capt. George &
Proctor, Marguerite Proctor, Sydney
Fitzgerald. .

DEPARTURES—By 1.C A
For Trintdad—
On TUESDAY
Grace Horrocks

In Touch With Barbados
Coastal Station

Cable and Wireless (W.1.) Ltd, advise
that they can now communicate with the
following ships through thetr Barbados:



PPP PE LE LLL

os; 4,6,
56 OOOO CALLE ELAS?



Coast Station >
SS. Runa, Carina, Mesa Verde, 9

Rangnhild, Brovig, S. Sofia, Ole bull %
Alabama, Steelore, Uruguay, Empress of <
Scotland Rosaura, S. Paula, Argentina, | % ¥
Willemstad, Successor, Sunray, Athellaird, | § *
Ivy, Green Raven Trails, British Cava- | %
lier, Alcoa Cavalier, Poseidon, Urania, | 2
Navigator, Hera Templebar, Myriam. | . $
Mormacqyork, Jean Lykes, Atlantic § %
porter, and Amado S.S. S. Friade x
>

Â¥

OOOO OOOO? *

x

NOTICE ,





The Raleigh Bicycle which

“This one in John M. Bladon’s listing looks as though it might
suit us. We had better call and have a chat with him as I know

>

.

%

%

~

9 *

was drawn at Queen’s Park %
+

¢ a %

from his reputation he will give us 4.) the help he can and in any y
D4

%,

mS

~

x

%

s

2

on 1/1/52, Civic Day, was
won by Ticket No. A 347
DARNLEY ROCK,

Bridgetown Ice Factory.

3.1.52—1n Phone 4640

5 :
656666066668 LG OCDO OV ROI OPP POOPED D OC SC OEE POCO LL EAA ADOT

OOOO SEEEELELLPP PPLE PEEPS PES PEEP PPP E PEEPS PPPSE
%

Arrived in time 3

For



case he usually has for sale everything worth having.”

JOHN M. BLADON & CO.

.» F.V.A.
Plantations Building



ee OA AFF OF Fe,
OF ESOP EOFS PS eerrrrrr

OSLO EL ELE
PCOS

ot

POSS OSOSOS PS

.
oe


































the Crop

>
YOUR ENQUIRIES INVITED! s

TRACTORS —=-— COURTESY |
ik to GARAGE |

2

ROBERT THOM LIMITED ¥

CANE CARTS) â„¢"""
»

—AGENTS— >
%
OOS 2 LPSLPOSPEPOOCSS ELLOS CCOL LL LE SOCOCCOCGO OOD POO PPOPOGE





HE WORLD'S
FIRST CHOICE IN

G8.1-50.17

CITY GARAGE TRADING Co., Ltd.

VICTORIA STREET



° QTHE LONG-LIFE HARDEST-WEARING TYRE





plies,


THURSDAY,
sk eenaneiaiy









°_ONDIE





e

pe -
aa

~





JANUARY 3,

_—

1952





1 WONDER
ousTy Dean \
Whe STKL BE }

THERE
oe JS





THE





. KIRBY
AWAY WITH
S LAUNCH...THEN
LORS ATTACKED
/



eM
KNOW Wt act
I iO HEN &

Z
AY
ABOUT IT HEL L) seyy)

SES

| NO
lL oF
OES SWOOK ‘ *
2nd 0 2 Woe (zs) ae HE HEARS <
= , ClWeBEFITTO.
> BE TIED
pas : * 3
HIM YE / \ beers
OT ; / A | | /
dorsi Hf ANA || /
F _ ier Jt ES? | E
. Lee + rT
4
F

pROP

|| STOP TALKING
|| FOR A MINUTE

YOUR THROAT-



UNDER SUR ICE.

YOU WISH TO PRESS CHA

AGAINST THESE CREW

~ cee NEN?
ae



FAITH! BUT HURRY... THAT FORT

{ ft wish Youd |

SOI CAN SEE |

WHATS THE )
MATTER, =")
DAGWOOD?) ens
ARE YOUR SQ 73
EARS Ne
BURNING ? )@
—_— —) '




IF WE SURRENDER, WELL BE J WE a



OUR GUNS, SHOW OUR GOOD

MABY GO ANY MINUTE /



i

|

|

| SHE MUSTNT SING

OR TALK FOR AT
EAST A MONTH -

SEE THAT SHE

|

|

i

|

EYS MY ORDERS! | \_
—f£

7, 2

AND NOT WITHOUT
FRIENOS IN TUNIS?

RGES



SEE, MOM, WE VE
WAITED SO LONG?
WONDER WAAT

' ENED TO HIM!)







SEE



Can

BY ALAN STRANKS






Jf BE YOUR ABE,
| HOPELESS $ YOU'RE
{ &D ENOUGH TO BF



ila |



AS MUCH AS POSSIBLE-IN FACT

FES THRosT | parr , «
BOY- THIS IS
WHAT T CALL
| BEIN’ ON A

baal | VACATION //

ean Mibiew pie

|| ITLL BEA

|| PLEASURE! ¥ “MEM



on
VOR

BARBADOS



BY CARL ANDERSON



oO















NO, BUT MY
PANTS ARE!

te





TRAY “TWE CROOKS AND THE LAWMEN/ BUT WZ
(TS OuR ONLY CHANCE TO BRING } f

“THE REAL MURDERERS TO
BEAL a%

wy



BY GEORGE MC. MANUS









a |

: , ;@ iw3O
dieters Vi LLab wet
‘ c in f "

\ AS YOU WISH, /7
KIRBY... CA
RELEASE THEM AND

LET'S FORGET THE WHC
,BUSINGSS,..ALL. WANT !5 TO
BE ON MY WAY BEFORE THE
SHEIK AND BIJOU BENSON WE WILL
GET TOO MUCH OF A HEAD “ CONSIDER
i“ “THE INCIDENT
CLOSED! @



ee












Siecle ret
[HERE HE COMES, MOM? AND) ia4°-*;
HES GOTA PASSENGER! tg’ * =

AT BRAVE,
DERFULMAN
AGAIN.







[Se ere

ADVOCATE




7-H R good looks tell you they're just right.

Yeo iknow, téo, when you lookgat the price










tag, th it you can’t get finer value. lustrated
‘is a Tyo-tone Brogue. ‘Tied to every pair is
the Jein White Guarantee Shield—the sign
whick means ‘just right’! Look for it in

leadin,, stores in Barbados.

1

!

IT PAY

‘all Cash and Credit

SPECIAL offers to al

Speighistow

Usually NO

Tins ANCHOR I VILLAS 96

POTATOES |



Tins HEINZ TOMATO SOU! 6
Tins BROOKS PI!
Pkgs. RINSO

YOU'RE SURE TO LIKE

Maralyn

MILK PLUS








Maralyn is a fine bed-time drink
and helps you to sleep soundly
And nothing could be nicer...
Maralyn is creamy milk deliciously _—=
flavoured, and enriched with ener- ome

gising sugar, malt and yeast MARALYN wnx evo:

A BOVRIL QUALITY PRODUCT ptiesidineibiigubidicniaencwadontiie A



NO NEED TO ADD
MILK OR SUGAR |

* +

MADE BY THE MONKS OF BUCKFAST Ai3!







Ltd





TONE SVINE
a i a WU WAN ks

; oe

—
TE means m

SPECIAL OFFERS are now avi

PAGE SEVEN










aae
just right

orem |)



or ee mer



S YOU TO DEAL HERE

Customers for Thursday to Saturday only



a and Swan Street

AY Usually Now
fins PALETHORPE’S

SAUSAGE . ; 78 72

Tins APRICOT-JUICE 40 36

Bottles FRONTENAC BEER 6 22



SAVE FEED —

antl
> ot Chick
Goo Got az




M”™ profitable egg production will
usually follow whenafeeding plan
calling for Ful-O-Pep Chick Starter &
Growing Mash {s used.

FUL-Q-PEP
SS Ss

——-




ad





Ful O-Pep
Growing Mash
from six weeks

until loying
period starts

°
Meade by
The Quaker Oats Company

.
For Information and orders, ¢antacti
R. M. JONES & CO., Ltd,

- ©. Box 241 Bridgetown

.
Ful-O-Pep Poultry Feeding Guide

it’s Freel





DOW DING
TRADING

ESTATES AND

COMPANY LTD.

o NINGN GN NU NS NS NG NG NS NW NIN
LP wh, WR
“4 ee
Saari = fen
Cni POY 2 S
OUT Fy “7 2 oe
any tis
as &
If you feel worn out, essed, « <, 4
y &e
generally run down a glass or tw P| = a
ay Pers iver
a day of Buckfast Tonic Wine will 2: Va Die Le =
: ws gas ” oa
quickly restore lost energy and xy f 8 cE 1B? 2 ; ven.
tone up the whole nervous system we, od wy =
ing new vitality it fortifies you | ia a vee
Giving new vita ere ae AT THE CLOSE of another ws
against fever anc | soy Year we look back with Gow
hetienaioa £8 VW < gratitude to the support as
S o : aif and co-operation of those es
y Hie Io) is espe y valuab a we have had the pleas- *<
i el ey ifter illne a ure of serving through- ie
dT al (oy 4 Win : 2 out 1951 cud take this iz
Nad a0 oaeaaet Se b>] opportunity of © express- ‘ae
, WP aa ing our sincere ‘thanks’ =
. = and extend Best Wishes oe
“ane, Fo POPs ‘ ‘
as aoe > ee . y
===> |2 A Prosperous 1952 ©
Sy yer:
' WYQ ‘Sy BY A aE 2 =
) Aw ke =
|e &
Zz &
= &
2 &

T4026: BOWS 8B: BOT TES TCOA







WE NUN NS NN NW 8 WSN NN

&

a*




PAGE EIGHT



W.1I. Lead On First Innings
Stollmeyer And = gags ea ree
Gomez Bat Well

From HAROLD DALE.
MELBOURNE CRICKET GROUND, Jan. 1.

THE WEST INDIES by bowling out Australia for 216 in
their first innings established a lead of 56 runs. This they

consolidated by adding 203
Australia 260 to win.

In their second innings the Aussies have now raised 68

for the loss of one wicket.

After lunch, Valentine and Ram-
adhin continued their attempt to
Wear away the Australian innings,
but in Harvey and Miller, they
were facing the two men most
likely to be able to succeed against
them. Both are stroke players with
an unusual freedom of footwork
and brilliant sight, and each man
is willing to depend on both, and
chance his arm in an effort to
break the bowlers’ domination.

This, they proceeded to do—
not without moments of worry
when Valentine both lifted and
turned his legbreak or when
Ramadhin’s off-spinner came in
with more than usual vencm.
The wicket was not yet turning
remarkably but it was jurning
ing. The batsmen, sometimes risk-
ing three steps up the wicket.
were successful in sweeping Ram-
adhin away to leg and even off
driving him for boundaries.

Century Up

The hundred came up together
with the 50 run stand by means
of four byes—a rare lapse by Guil-
len, and at that stage Ramadhin
was relieved by Goddard. He had
bowled 11.4 overs for 42 taking
one wicket.

Harvey, whose brilliance has
been dimmed for a long while,
was playing for his place in the
Australian team and this probably

-

inspired him. He was hitting
cleanly and powerfully. He met
Goddard with a straight driven

four—that was his eighth bound-
ary in his score of 40.

A sweep by Miller that missed
the ball brought a mighty yell
from Valentine for l.b.w., but the
umpire shook his head. Miller,
gradually lost some of his flam-
boyance which was ominous for
the West Indies. Miller, gaily
flashing his bat may cost runs
while he lasts, but he is not apt to
last long. Miller, playing back, is
a sign that he, for his part, has

‘and only Ring’ of the recognised

BARBADOS ADVOCATE #+§|~



Jan. 1.

in their second innings giving

was a change especially to Lind-
wall’s liking and when Gomez ap-
peared at the other end he square
drove and on-drove him for fours
to bring up two hundred.

Miller had reached 47 after one ,
of the slowest innings of his life
when in Trim’s third over the
West Indies fast bowler achieved
his best pace and clean bowled
him with a ball that was almost
a yorker. Miller * xd been at the
wicket 159 min) 4. Six for 208.

Double ©isaster

Hassett seemed to do the West
Indies a good turn by sending in
Tan Jonson next and leaving
Ring who has twice scored sixties
against them at number nine.

Lindwall was the victim of a
double disaster. Trim hit him fair
on the toe at topspeed which sent
him hopping in pain from the
wicket. While he was away the
umpire gave him out Lb.w. He
had scored 13. seven for 209.

Trim now increased his pace
until he had excelled himself and
had Yat. Johnson snitk one to
Guillen, Johnson had scored one.
Eight for 210,

A Slight Snick

Ian Johnson looked quite in-
credulous when he saw the um-
pire’s verdict and in truth it must
have been a very slight snick
indeed. Trim new had four for 32

KEITH MILLER

gerous habit with four slips and
gully waiting, but he managed to
keep the ball down and clear of
the fieldsmen, so that his score
kept pace with Stollmeyer, whose
greater reach enabled him to be
over the ball.

Johnstone replaced Miller who
went to the other end to take over
from Lindwall. For Stollmeyer
against Johnstone, Lindsay Has-
sett called Lindwali and Noblet
into close forward short leg posi-
tions—a sound move against Stoll-
meyer, whose favourite shots are
in this are.

Stollmeyer, however, retorted by
turning the next ball extremely
fine for three and hooking the ball
after that in a huge lofted stroke
to the squareleg boundary,

The fifty for the partnership
virtually the opening partnership
—came up in 70 minutes, Stoll-
meyer 25, Rickards 20. Extras six.

The West Indies now had a 107
lead at the must useful position at
this stage.

Rickards cut Johnstone away
for two ‘nore and was then Lbw.
22. Three for 53

batsmen remained, He cut a four
off Gomez and began to show signs
of his usual liveliness but Trim
cut him short when he sent one
through low and bowled him very
completely. Ring was six and the
score nine for 215,
Trim’s Hour

It was Trim’s Hour, Since the
new ball he had taken four wick-
v9 for 10 runs and had five for
4.

Gomez finished off Johnstone
bowling him for one with Lang-
ley not out 0, extras were sixteen
and the total 216,

fhe Umpire Looks?

Next in was Everton Weekes
and if the gods of cricket were
kind, we should now see something
splendid, He had failed in the first
innings and was due for a triumph.

Johnstone appealed for l.b.w. off
the first ball but the umpire ig-
nored him. Stollmeyer glanced
Miller for a single, and Weekes
cut a single off the next ball. He
had begun. Stollmeyer cut John-



* six.



JOHNSTONE .

w. NEIL

HARVEY

Then Stollmeyer came to his 50
with a mightly lifted pull off Tan
Johnson that brought two when
it fell yards short of the
boundary. His 50 had taken 112
gpowes and the total was four for

Ring now replaced Lindwall and
was bowling with a_ carefully
varied length that kept Gomez very
watchful but generally Gomez may
‘be said to prefer slow bowlers with
fall their guile to sheer speed. At
the other end, Bill Johnstone came

Miller replaced Johnson and was on to bow! slow legbreaks. Worrell

promptly rewarded with an Lb.w paved through a maiden from him
decision against Stollmeyer, 54, but was snatching his hand away
Five for 97. in obvious pain after each contact

Gomez was next in, and it was
clear that Worrell was being kept
back, a policy which might render
him aseless in any case.

Lindwall came back for another
wicket before lunch and Chris-
tiani cut him for two to bring up
the hundred.

By lunch, Christiani was not out
17 and Gomez not out one. Extras
Total for five wickets 102.

Hassett after lunch brought up
his heavy guns—and Lindwall and
Miller were deputed to carve their
way into what remained of the
West Indian innings, Gomez and
Christiani met the onslaught with
valour and determination emerg-
ing from defence to hit about them
brightly when the opportunity
offered and 26 were added in this
way before Miller at top speed ~
compelled Christiani to play on to
his pad and thence on to the
wicket. Christiani bowled Miller,
33. Six for 128.

Enter Miter

of the bat with the ball.

However, he exchanged quick
run singles with Gomez and
brought up 151 by hooking Ring
boldly to the boundary.

Both took these spin bowlers
very carefully and were sometimes
in trouble with Balls pitched well
up to them but Gomez came out of
one difficult patch when he stood
back to hook a short ball from Ring
to the unprotected mid-wicket
boundary. Johnstone slipped in a
faster one now and then but still
Gomez saw him well enough to
keep him out, This was exactly the
play that was needed, But the new
ball was becoming due and that
would be new ordeal for this last
hope vair.

The New Ball

Lindwall duly arrived with it
and to the confusion of Australian
plans Gomez and Worrell pro-
ceeded to hammer it to all parts
of the field. They took thirty off it
in four overs of Lindwall suffering.

Miller was eventually taken off
and Bill Johnstone came to bowl
leg breaks with a ball still more or
less new. In his second over Wor-

Miller once again as often in his
career had intervened in a game
at a critical stage and swung it

There was a pleasant scene at

round. Even with their first in-

rell swung round to sweep him to

the end of the innings. Goddard
pushed Trim on ahead and Trim

raised his hand as he walked in
alone to the enormous plaudits of
the 50,900 crowd, It was good to
see so earnest and conscientious a
player have such a triumph in
his first Australian Test.
Leading

The West Indies now had a 56
lead and with Australia to bat
jast they were in a winning posi-
tion all they had to do now was
to see the game through without

decided to stay.

Goddard had now set what was
largely a defensive field, and runs
were not coming so quickly as in
the period directly after lunch, but
Harvey reached his 53 when he
turned Goddard behind him for 4
all run. Miller had 30 and the
score was three foi 136.

Guillen Struck

Guillen was struck by a ball
that came off Miller's pads when
the ba.sman kneed it away outside

stone precisely for fuur and took
his score to 30.

Then Ian Johnson came on for
Miller, and his second ball invited
Weekes to sweep it to leg. He at-
tempted, missed, and was hit on
the hip. Johnson appealed and he
was given out |.b.w. Weekes was
stunned and so were most other
people. The gods of cricket had
looked the other way—I can’t im-
agine where the umpire was look-
ing. Weekes indicated to Miller
that he had been hit on the hip.
and walked very slowly away.

the off stump, and play wes held
up for a few minutes while the
wicketkeeper bathed his mouth,
but seen through the glasses he
did not seem to be much hurt, and
resumed his job behind the stumps.

Harvey, now in the high tide of
form, continued to sweep jnd cut
Ramadhin square, when the spin
bowler came on at the otner end
for Valentine. He cut Goddard for
two successive fours to bring up
the hundred stand in 99 minutes,
and when Goddard still ignored
the new ball and brought Rama-
dhin back at the other end, he
square-drove him again to the
boundary and then—and then—;
he stepped out, misjudged the
spin “and drove the ball with
full power back at Ramadhin, who
took it with a quiet smile and
Harvey was out,

Harvey was caught and bowled
by Ramadhin for 83. The total
was 4 for 175,

Harvey had hit 15 fours in his
innings of two hours and everyone
of them was an excellent ground-
ed stroke.

Hole, who followed, was obvi-
ously unhappy and was bowled
by Valentine for 2.

On Top

It was notable that even agaist
Harvey with his splendidly con-
trolled but rapid scoring that the
West Indies had never lost their
grip of the game and now they
had reaped their reward.

At the tea score, Lindwall was
not out 0, and Miller not out 36
extras were 8, five for 176.

Lindwall who had survived a
few balls from Ramadhin before
tea was in obvious apprehension.

After tea he wildly lofted one
ball from his tormentor over
square-leg’s head for four but

thereafter continued his imperson-
ation of a human questionmark—
bent over with anxiety.

Twelve overs after the new bal)
was due Goddard took it and Trim
came back into the picture. This









AND FORM A MENTAL
ALL THE ClKARAC

[ They'll Do It Every Tirze

“You READ THE NEW BEST:



Weekes 1|.b.w. Johnson, two. Four

folly and they would come to the
for 60,

threshold of a mighty and historic
match at Sydney.

But now was to come the return
thunderbolt from Australia. God-
dard sent Guillen in witn Stoll-
meyer to open with half an hour
to go. Guillen turned Lindwat!'s
third ball into the hands of Bill
Johnstone at square leg before he
had scored.

Goddard now put himseif in and
from the next ball a loud appeal

Inspiration

Christiani began with a sweep-
ing single off Johnson, whereupo)
Stollmeyer cut him for three.
Johnstone’s next over Stollmeye:
pulled a huge four to squareleg'
and cut an excellent three off the’
next ball. The disastrous and
questionable fall of Weekes’ wick-
et had at least not affected the
scoring rate—it might even have

for l.b.w. was refused. The ball inspired it to greater heights.
after that—only the fifth of the Stollmeyer, indeed, now enlight-

innings—a similar appeal was
granted and the West Indies were
two wickets down for six runs.
Lindwall had taken two wickets in
his first over,

Rickards now joined Stolimeyer,
already gone. Goddard's scheme
was sound enough—he could not
foresee such events and Guillen
has had experience of opening
But now the West Indies were
fighting again where only a few

ened the gloom with a princely oft-
acive off Johnstone that was art-
istry and force exquisitely com-
bined. He then square-cut John-
son with a ont, Se inene bat and
g roached his 50.
Rings flighted slows were called
upon to replace Johnstone, and he
bowled a quiet over to Christiani.
_

WEATHER REPORT



moments before there had been
peace and a pleasant prospect. YESTERDAY
Stollmeyer nine and Rickards

eight played out time without fur-
ther trouble. Extras were three
and the total for two wickets 20.

A Most Critical Day

Rainfall from Coarington: nil
Highest Temperature: 82.5 °F
Lowest Temperature: 68.5 °F
Wind Velocity: 7 miles per

This third day of the Fourth hour 3 ;
Test was clearly one of the most, Barometer (9 a.m.) 29934 (3
it not the most, critical of the tour. p.m.) 29,862
The fortunes of this game would ,
turn on today’s play, and if they TODAY
turned towards the West Indies, Sunrise: 6.09 a.m.
then they would win and make Sunset: 6.49 p.m.
their great challenge at Sydney Moon: New, January 28

There were about 20,000 present Lighting: 6.00 p.m.
when Stollmeyer and Rickards High Tide: 8.58 a.m., 9.20 p.m.
went out to build up the strongest Low Tide: 2.34 a.m., 3.29 p.m.

position they could. We had news
that Worrell would bat. The in-
jured web of his right hand was
protected with plaster beneath a
special glove that fitted the en-
larged thumb and finger.
Lindwall opened with Miller at
the other end and both batsmen
proceeded to take singles from
glances and square cuts without
obvious bother. Rickards seemed
once or twice to lean for his shots
instead of moving his feet—dan-





WHAT’S ON TODAY

Police Courts and Court of
Grand Sessions—10.00 a.an.
Alliance Francaise Film Show
and presentation of med-
als at Combermere School
—8.00 p.m.

By Jimmy Hatlo |

——





Registered US Palen: Oftee

















SELLE? "THEN Said 800K IS MADE INTO ®
URE OF _ASMOVIE~s BUT JUST TRY TO
ia. SROOGNIZE CHARACTERS OR PLOT

nings lead of 56 this present total
did not seem enough for victory.
The Weekes lb.w. decision was
now costing them dear. Evidence
accumulated since his dismissal
seemed to show that not only was
the ball high when it hit him, but
that it had not been pitched on the
wicket.

Worrell was given a tremendous
reception when he came out and
immense cheers when he fine cut
Miller for four. The next moment
he confused a run call with
Gomez and was yards out when
Moroney threw back to Lindwall
who broke the wicket in a mud-
dled sort of way and Worrell was
given not out.

It we comment on one decision
we must comment on another—
his looked to be well and truly
vut. Worrell then straight drove
four i grand style. His reprieve
was valuable but hardly as
Weekes’ wicket since he was unfit,

leg but played the ball with great
force into his stumps. He had
scored 30 and the stand had real-
ised 72—a priceless help in time of
trouble. Worrell was given a great
ovation as he came in.

John Trim then went out and
ran himself out exactly as he had
in the first innings. Ramadhin
then ran himself out next bail.

World Beaters But—

There is a form of cricket lunacy
which, in my experience of every
empire team, is confined to the
West Indies. Without it they could
beat any team in the world but af-
flicted with it they impose a crip-
pling burden on themselves, Aus-
tralia escaped humiliation because
the West Indians, if left to them-
selves, can generally be relied
upon to do sufficient silly things to
ruin their own prospects. Seven
for 190, Eight for 194; nine for 194

Grand Gomez, solid and capable,
hooked Johnstone for four to bring









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LALLY

up 200, himself 49 at tea Valentine]
iot Out one, extras nine; total 9 for!
200. |

Gomez came to his richly de-}
served fifty after tea with two off
Lindwall and with another single}
brought up 200. Valentine nobly}
defended against Lindwall with an
exact straight bat but in John-
stone’s next over Gomez was)
bowled by a ball that kept low.
Gomez bowled Johnstone 52; Val-
entine not out one, extras nine;}
total 203.

Austratia In :

Australia now needed 260 to win}
a figure which even yet might |
prove beyond them, but when one}
*onsidered the manner in which
the West Indies had squandered
their second innings then one real- |
ised how this Test might easily |
have been put completely beyond |
Australia’s reach. |

The wicket was wearing but not |
to any really marked degree ex-|
cept that it was showing a ten-
dency for all balls to keep low and
shoot through.

Morris Lanw

Morris again had a runner when
he came out to bat but he and
Moroney shared eight off Trim’s
first over. Off Gomez’ second over
Moroney was struck on the elbow
and spent several minutes rubbing
it and trying to restore it to action.
He then watched Morris play two
more balls and decided to leave the
field. Moroney retired hurt five.

Gomez very nearly beat Hassett
with a ball he just managed to kill
at his feet and so quiet did the
batsmen become that Trim’s fourth
over was a maiden.

“The Twins”

Then Ramadhin replaced Gomez,
Morris edged him for two and
later square cut him for three. Has-
sett followed this stroke with a
four of his own turned to fine leg.
The score had now reached 27 and
Valentine succeeded Trim, With
his third ball he had Morris 1.b.w.
for 12. One for twenty seven.

Ramadhin did not seem to be
getting the work va the ball that

he had early in the first innings | 4

but he did enough to hold Hassett
down to another maiden although
Uassett’s defensive strokes were
made without over much

Harvey had opened his innings
by straight driving Valentine
and was at once in a hunt for
runs. Valentine's next over
checked Harvey into a maiden, two
balls of which FPapyey saw very
late indeed as they came into him
as left-hander. Hassett broke the
silence with a cut for three off
Ramadhin. The score was one for

nirty seven. y
5 Neither Harvey nor Hassett in
their natural anxiety to keep their
wickets intact overnight dared
show any enterprise against the
West Indies nee — occa-
sional singles was at came
their way in the intervals of
finding Valentine and Ramadhip
increasingly bothersome.

Harvey brought up 50 by turu-
ang Valentine gently to square-leg
for two after the innings had last-
ed seventy-one minutes

Harvey's snicked four of
Ramadhin and four byes imme-
diately following helped matters
along. :

Trim came on with few min-
utes to go, to try for a shock
wicket and he bowled a maiden
to a packed offside field. Guillen
appeared to drop a quick chance
off Hassett from Trim in the last
over of the day and the pair
were still together at_ the close,
Hassett not out 23, arvey not!
out 21, extras seven, total one for|
68.

West Indies are still in the |
fight and Australia certainly does |
not yet feel safe. A lot will
depend on the bowlers tomorrow
when Moroney is expected to be
able to resume his innings. to-
night it seemed that Ramadhin
and Valentine were beginning to
get more turn out of the wicket!
in the later overs — and in_ the
amount of that turn lies the West
Indies biggest hope.







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1952

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THE B.M.L.A. SOCIETY

AN ANNOUNCEMENT

Will Policyholders please note that owing to
circumstances beyond our control our Calen-
dars for 1952 are not yet ready for distribution.
Notice will be given when they are ready

which we expect will be in a few days time.

°

C. K. BROWNE,

Secretary.

TO ALL OUR FRIENDS
AND CUSTOMERS
‘ WE WISH

A Very Prosperous
FROM
C. B. Rice & .

MERCHANT ‘TAILORS
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PAGE 1

PACK. TWO RARBAOOS ADVOCATE nil ii-i>\> r.i \RY i. iij! Cahib gaMiny Mr, ht*ri> MIS**, bl ConiJxr.iure School %  liiwina of a full Icntfth illm in Frt-ii. h • %  ntiUi-d "Mon. ncnit M This film won n IM9 for the br*t Ytaviitn film of I thr story npprar• tdvaraii lm-show Is OP* ; ibllr and tickets can be %  %  I J M. Michell 120131 GOLF nil* Retired Telephone Engineers S I.N'G holid.> do* ar Mr. andMrs. John W. Campbell of P-rasta, Florida and Mr. and Mn. W M "f California. They arrived hare liWi A from Caracal and are staying at the Wind%  0 tf.t.i \li i''.inipl.rll is •" it %  tat American %  i %  .i[>ii OoaanasQ asart Oai tnr ll'ilr IWaajhOM s>slern. vrhik Ml St.hl is ..!> %  I %  inPacific Talephone and Telegraph in San Ft MSctaCB Thay both went over to Caracal on an alignment with thl. kaabOM company there which look them three month* Th" • SpUot) of Mr. B *ah' will be returning to Caracas On .1 miarv 12 for a abort viii'. From Caracas. Mr. and Vr-. < %  mobail will travel on a Swedish ship for Lima In Peru before r-turnin* to Florida, while Mr St.hl will pftotfl hi* wife here ft*r which they will o*v flying "Mi' to tome of the lilandi in •he Carlht^an on their way back h""vie M Their flri vialt to Barhedo* Mr ramnbell said that thev -II HUM It vrv rr ( —h -.nd adrlerl 'hat Hi#* anWa 'irtlrolnrlv inii>i*M("l *>v the eonrteav and fi M '•' iho pi Lecturer And Writer A MONG the passengers arriving by T.C.A. yeaterday morning were Mr. and Mri. Neville Goddard and their dnuahter Virki Mr Qoddard who i a lecturer and writer lives in New York. He It the son of Mr. J N. Goddard of %  'Kensington". Fontabellc. Here on a month'i holiday thev are guest.* at the Windsor Hotel. M R. CAHI. CHKNKKY who had been spending the Christmas Thirty-one Yean' Service ith his family returned i': Trriiilad on Monday by n w i A Engaged T HE engagement was an%  %  am, son of Mr. l > C Tamum, of %  %  Trinidad Solicitor M BOBBY" %  I %  : Trinidad mgtaaggtag) la in BarFhey are slaving at %  i f fl l"e S.-llier, k'i pc entire*. %  %  as is J M will be %  > i ] itei in thi Rll ...tn Ihr I which played iturbados In Trinidad Back To Trinidad \ Christ mas holkteyi with his relaI HiMr W K Ferguston. %  la of Siparla. s lUtii Trinidad, returned MRM B w i A Ha a.s Mi fir iiaiinii A Subsidiary \ I ..IN LEa. Put %  i 1 .1 i.f (in Gulf Oil i in Van return* ... tn nwi.A • %  li.ii holiii BlackJoatpB He was accompanied by Mrs. Lee. Spent Christmas With Family KOL IKMr. HAKH.AM —Canodiair Profi BStoMa. Golfer, amivil mm Canada • i bu T.C..1 Hi roach at Ihr Rorklr' I d as coach ,' | i • ( March. Here Afain M M can. II profi i'wial ar% %  i.i iv by T.< '. n was In > %  !( % %  kley CIul He baa raturned to gel again i Annual Dinner 7 MIE hon'ble the Colonial Secratar) Ml H N. Turner and Mi J Cunaron Tudor were the honour tit Club Pretnnual Duuaar and RatUUOn which was held lait Saturday night at "Viamede", %  arara laid (at 30 and % %  %  pnaanl were Mr. 1 I r Bran Mr, M r.i\. Mr. • ,. %  !, Mr. Julian RobinSon, Miss Marjorie Kocrieford, M Thoni|is-.m. Mr. I. A. i M.C.P.. Mi II I .. eta (-.nines, Miss % %  Mi Q llniker. Mr. I A ILiyliy. Mi C MetArthur BHIJ, MlSS D. %  M. s Bannett, Mlsi i %  .-,'.! %  ilcbael, Mr. S. Thompson. Miss C, Ashby, A Ai.lui .tii.l Mr B. Bourne. A FTER 31 years of unbroken service .it the Advocate | Miss Leila Lynch of "Landsmere". Const Hut ion Road. retired on December 31*1. 199.1. Canb wi-hes her many yeans of happy retirement. On Holiday M il H AVEHBOUKIl of the New Yalta Project in Diego Martin, Tiimdad, arrived here a couple of days ago by B.W.I.A. for |wo waaks' holiday and is Btaylni v^i'tl Mi and Mm. Simon Altman of Hart's Gap. Free Show T OMORROW night at S.15 o'clock Inert will be a free Illm show at the Britlah Council. TinI'miii in.is British New.-. I i inj up with oihe. Wordsworth's Country llagk Touch (Development of natural resource, in the UK.i BY THE WAY By Beachcomber T RI gntias indulged various an lines UM howliDI bored' i % %  asorlh No sooner does by the she had a lenn counter snai one day i of journeys and calling word Of two. greatest llshen 1 %  iif hUHMUf. She control, Ranarlntj Antony, talephoi tinworld's HI Wilh a de; liny sat by the dally as all th PS have been cut I Lvtli-r // HON. OIRAL1) LAM KLLBS SSaSi hcee at the raeea during hU visit la Rarbado* In 194*. He arrived Iff* freoi Knilind via t ansdr .. i. r.i , bv TO.A. Last Herein 1949 H UN OBRALO LABC BLI I B, brotti' i H WUKI and ownai of B Mount Batatas la Ilaibadoa, arr.ved from England via Canada yvsterd-y by T I'.A. on a visit. He Is a guest at the Colony Club. M Jan a Mr. Lascellea was last in Barbados in 1849. With T.C.A., Montreal M R. AND MRS. VERL BROOKS who spent a week's noil I i<.idoa left yesterday bv TC'.A. lo spend a week In Trinidad with Ml i will thei> ( %  reUiriuiiK '" • I %  III |i -\ braaL Vi rs the Von of Mr an t Mrp B Brook, of "Ronemory.' Rocklej Second Visit D P MJBL STEWART. T.C A.\ Medical (MVicei m Vancouvewho had baan hoUdaylnf Kara with his wife and daughter returned to Caiuu T.CA. They were staying at This w.iv Dr. ; %  visit to Barlindolie was her>' li. i>n h< 'i %  Venezuelans Return A FTER sending |Wo " %  holiday in Barbados Dr. ami Mrs. Ploch and faintly returned by B.W JLA sstei day. Also returning to Venezuela by tiic s line opportuna* tv after tWO week--' hoUda were Dr and Mrs. Wllllnr d family T' e. Moving at the II Three Weeks A FTER holiday in ii.ui.auuv Mrs. P. MacDonald ol CWtCao, returned home jaslaid ^ vi • I-I i i by B w i. A. [tM staying at Rydal Wat. | Mouse, Worthing. Mr. Ma. I>r.iial.l %  %  %  ( th. Assistants attached to the Labour %  ; i %  nant of Uta shell Cnm%  pany. Tnlkinf Point T HI iruellest lies arc often told in sUence, —R. L. St Incidental Intelligence I N a battle of tongtt seldom hold their Frances flyman. High Heeled (Irgunisl Dr ... -Ball |a %  %  %  Religpoui Department %  : Australia recently his OF the high hafts he pi..ii. the organ. This appar. gaeaaaary forsn r '*r >s pi '.. so far i he knows, !<•.' t e.it iicip arnan playtni chord*. i %  het and when playing chords of 'Att.il itotes it is .(Uile possible f'.' the large flat heel i I %  .id amudge a second one >liahtl>. : %  n ar rowed he* %  re that he produces clean. 'arp notes and chords. W/ifi/*.-* CdoUng In The kitchen • %  •k I am gon . with ham. I suppoM.... I0h ham, and eggs BdJar whether you have d of ham sunV %  the recipe u as follows: Far *i B.B.C. Radio Programmes 4 |i in Th* Krwi 4 10 p % %  ITh* Waal m as. 4 S p m St-n-Una fUrnrrt I %  •npoaer of th* Wr-k. S IS . H.."!s p m Colonial Csmsssn11 p at, tcoiuah hUataUnv, S.4S a %  p \ paua. s %  Tlw Mw illpm •atrel. Ipn. *fci !>. %  3pm Conii-"' "I lb •*. ire Up the Cuitain. IS p m IS 10 pm Ftoin II 1 A Oond lob. 10 M pm Thr wil*lr of BatS-i. Butter 2 0*. I oe. Ham (cooked) Hltt. Milk I pun Cheese 2 Ubiespooiuu'ul Eggs 1 %  | Prepare beforehand Of butler. the 2 oz. of flour aad the pu.l 01 ; aaw ,.n. .. recipe tm white saiwe thuc weeks ago) Let it cook well so that the sauc. '. II in mixing i W V cool I with tin white sane two tablespoonsful ol |ut threi yolks but you %  %  %  %  %  (I had I left over | Beat tin whites (3) until sliff. M thing together now very ilowlv %  an hour. Serve not Rupert and the Pine Ogn —3 Th. • t (<( i ilui her pjl. raabas .nd |.nr. ,„ near. snd hc MLMH !..>! %  to win iheau lo hit tuipr w ihcy hsvi about th. HUM ... .H We're oo U|1 '* '" ilrhough then iboal svaryi %  ivn't found IT/ psi I iIVI Pur't*. "bw iheri mil M.I. Wo:arl. K„,. C ULTLT.E will out. A lady who had evidently heard the %  "ii than river bank, Antony began to n rival %  Iras oeks. There fish. While he was tweaking bar DUlta a iiimpu* on par unA talking nonsense to her. i< piano Ins otl i %  > ilaae. i i -tmctod, traveller, who had ben given I dived Mlentl.v and tied mi enorbll nt lb 1 Hahytuan, cod lo the '"""r 1 Moiart on some rndm %  %  'orchid., and a Pomeranian dog, and of his line, and gave a pull. Krammc. and liked the bit of found that she was exiH-clcd lo Antony hauled in. and there music of his which was played. i 'indog's Ueanea At was UM n*h. "Wonderful'" wrote bna other day tn Mi buy mi tha: eiie-l the Serpent of old Nile. Mozart at the Salzburg Morar* ll Why you Can even CatCh salted Foundation, requesting him to r" Anton) bung bis head in compose for ner a harp sonatn. **\n\ there ill bs do k roll be'• %  whlla tha assembled conwhich shp was willing to pav sari cat*, and that a week's pany Iiiugthed heartily. -,n he iriven to th Un plans aim i aTjej alumni L ATER on. when alrll .: to rirle i shop aboard, a miniature ikatblf* rink, a Wurht/er to play ntrret l mg. and on. And bo aha .HI hostesses will move to anil fi>. ililie>HUll %  now, with Inclothes for any%  guesses the weight of a sausage. l WOndar if, unable hi i-e' Mi Mozart, she would have bssn •ati-fied with, perhaps. Mr Beethoven* Horny mil Ihr hurim \ N ARTICLE about pomposity oii.i >.ed an cellcnt cure for it. One day Baron de Rothschild culled on the Due de Morny Hon. may be said to be in a slate in Paris. Morny did not bother Of potential rededisundisderc< look up from his papers when i ilinn the llnuncier was shown in. He simply said casually: "Take a „,, _, ... chair" The financier, infuriated /** %  msMswar Invultnl |, V n,is lack of rcapecl. said h may interest you to know thid I F l' 1 M %  %  % %  "M I.,.. of SS\VOIII> %  t 'i J 1 %  • I S^ 1 I —— %  .-' | .I'! 1 Tlie r.' i itory. srt : i csred [or speed. II Obvuii. ii run > 11 T*ilK I'.T.O. \ as are being aghooL and the masters of bus bavtni dlffleulty ui rtaalhig with at people may get UMKfl owing to the Urge numbara ll Nokove. is „ m Baron de Rothschild WKhnut is P-rt ol complicated. Alarmed looking up. Mumy said. "Take by the slate ..( ..it.uis. nutn> tw„ chain." The ghost of Morny's *lV m .V, anxious parents are visiting Uio grandfather, Talleyrand have smiled at that. %  %  .-.>. i %  22. From a p'.uir I • %  as. riiin Uhaa Ml .... %  .ii i.... iiil of iiinnni: %  e day. instead of „^. ihenwelvas in Smart-Allick ntlhcation B0 if the habit spreads t wo haelcs nau ba tha public, \ ;-l! %  %  r'orfiinti \hvuil I the^ have meente I alesman." The .bout, answer, attention Coadlaham'i Bparkllng lj r tl tha B rhal Tickles The Ivories I .tr.uli uoed up. while the boys arc asked questions, draws t.i identify tneir real fathen The itie wares, and even Joins in \ bogus fathers private conversations. Th • acting in collusion with secret of this progressive idea alters, or even with tha -enmr i, -g, hidden listener wttfe I boys tharoaaives, adds to the conmicrophone." It occurs to nv? fumon. and they ate a'.ieady one that a hidden customer wh*| Clvn/Hilrti mill Ihr ivtlfih IW0 cases of prefm-U refur.iw happened lo ba a ventriloquist' i.lify their genuine fathers, could have great fun in loudly! T HE MaTQUls de l*HtlQa de Ttuwhole situation is further contradicting the robot, and who Blocked implicated by an Influx of sneering at the whole business.) I at Plgaac "uncle*." A light between one ("Don't buv that, madam. It's I nra appra"uncle" and a "father" uv a not worth 'the money.") Apart aackad t rafaet'S study raaulted In a real from this. I don't see whv it is 1 rge IAO aim tunned b> -. chair not aaaler to hava ari oldthen catchti„.,*,, by a stranger. Dr. SmarttahlOMd. unhidden salesmai Plutarch tall lorj \n.ok admits thai 1. Vitmsi tliai ixnitf* 'II* rvut l ••I. • %  •: .-•. (SI J. nirrc no t>u nii| lu inf. i4i 1. c msumad %  *. How -t a ii :.i ird itir mnr ... %  r.'tf. ill 41. Psrt ot < fool .1. 1. Mil' Sooil } Sfall about u> %  -. ill) til dsrKir. |_7| 1*. To alma? Wsii. nui a IT, A biuSrii cell. 1*1 YOU CANT TALK...\OU CANT MOVE...WHEN JANK MAHLKNC MICHAEL RICHARD WYMAN %  DIETRICH • WILDING • TODD ampf:-;,; :•.•# CREATNgaa FROM Wn:} 2.:iOl.l.a ami K.:iO Ml. and Continuing Doily 4.45 & 8.30 nm. •'-'-***'"*****-*''-'-'-'.''*'-'-'.-.-.-,•.-,-.-,'.-,-.-,*,' %  ,*,,• that. ithoul ut ui to the custi iiuTOphn: •& a £ %  a %  a a a %  a a : :M-4M( w,xWM\t\uw,yM\iimmnnn*umwMW4 WESTCLOX ALARM CLOCKS $5.86 2 ft 6" $4.34 x 5 ft $17.50 T. R. EVANS & WHITFIELDS CARPETS 4 ft x 6 ft 6" YOUR SHOE STORES Dial 4220 Dial 4606 BH*3*3i'ili*i*{liHii^iMW5V?^'JV{Jiiiaa .^•> s ^ %  >„ Iff '' % %  :> C.LOBE I Hi: IIII. .'I MMt 111 II I ll MO\ II S TO-DAY 5 a 830 p.m. and Continuing Dally OAT STARTING TUES. Jan. I 5 ft 8 30 and Continuing Daily _, %  *** 'H" Uanaraad ./ f*r T'EMI laas-rtr.' l\\\T. • i /EziOa c t.UL : rst'ii .V 1.30 p.m.—Midnite • HOUS1 l O. Robinson — Richard Conte) TONITE WE ItMH CALAIS' (John Su'.UW — Ann i: >i i i II i. TO-DAY 4 45 I 8 30 FRIDAY 4m at 2 30 & 8.30 and Continuing DYNAMITE hits the when Burt Lancaster meets J Corinne Calvef 'Scutd, EXTRA: Quick on the VIGOR It O V A L Lost 2 Shows TO-DAY 4 30 & 8 15 Bl Till-: PHANTOM it i in: it~ GEORGE J. LEWIS FRIDAY Only 4 30 & 8 15 Double BUSS HAYDEM LYNN ROBERTS %  SO.XS Ol'' AOlK.MTHir Aftr/j •THE LIST BANDIT" Slii: l WILLIAM ELLIOTT — FORREST TUCKER O I. Y M I* I (TO-DAY & TOMORROW 4.45 & 8 IS ATOMIC THRILLS . CHILLS . SUSPENSE Can the World be Dominated b.v another Planet? la MARS I n habi te d by a Hostile Race of Superimn? Shocking Anscrt in Republic's Dealh-dcaling Serial WALTER MED — LOIS COLI.'ER r It O V Y TO-DAY 4.45 & 8.1 and Continum k LVENGER TdaJaSat rWaWPS-JskuasjaiS M aas [aBH IpkHl V*****S'**SSSS**&.*SS&*^*+vsSS&**&.*S**iV*f's %  Vi JOHN DEREK !" **V Anihony Quinn-Joih | 3 u..Shorts: i UH4NES WISE OWL



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I'.W.I I II.II I BARBADOS AI1VOC ATK THIHSOAV. JANUARY J, US2 W.I. Lead On First Innings Stollmeyer And Gomez Bat Well tram II \ROM) 1IAI.I.. MKLBOUKNE CRICKET GROUND, Jan. 1 J-i. l THE WEST INDIES by bowling oul AustraUa for 216 In their lirst irinmys established a lead of 56 run*. This they consolidated by adding 203 in their second innings giving Australia 260 to win. In their second innings the Aussies have now raised 68 %  loss of one wicket. Altar lunch, V-ileutine and IUmwa* a change especially to Undadinn continued Utatr attempt u, wall's liking and when Oaa varar lv "*• Australian innings, peered at the olhrr cnU l.< but In Harvey and Miller, the> drove and on-drove him for fourvatre faring the two men nsOel lo brini up two hundred. like It U) Uable lo succeed a Rains' Miller had reached 47 after one them lk>th are stroke player* witn of ahe iloweat Inning* "f U Mfi MdOUO of footwork Alien m Truafa third over Ihe an W. : f n dtal fast l"iwler achieved U UIIIIIIK to depend on both, and has DSJBt pare and clean bowlen chance hi* arm In an effort to hlni ith a ball thai wa* almoat l.re.,k the bowler*" donnnatinii. %  Vrker. Miller -d been at the ,r ••dad u do— "larat I5B minp Six for not a/tl of worry Double isasler ...U sucmed to ilu the Weat h turned hat MtM %  \ <* aVM been put completely beyond ; Australia's reach. The wnXi t .i.i waring but not > any really marked degree exi-pl that K wa* showing a tendency for all balls lo keep low and shoot through. Mortal LMM Mom-..gam had a runner when i came out to bat but he and Moroney snared eight off Trim first over. Off Gomez' second over Moroney was struck on U Minutes lubblni: it and trying to restore it to action He then watched Morris play two more balls and decided to |e.,v tM Held. Moron.' retired hurt live. Gomez very' nearly beat Hassett with a ball he Just managed to kill t his feet and so quid ZT. Ti.T,* tT7. '*"" *•>""'"* and Then Stollmeyer came to his 50 Ring now rapLacad Und ffl U with a mlghtly lifted pull off Ian was bowlimt with a carefully ar of Johnw)n that brought two when varied length that kept Gomez very %  tori It fell only yards short of the wnUhful Inr. k %  ,.rallv Gomez nu-v boundary. His 50 had taken 1U b. said to pi.'. slow'bowlers with i, !" -nT*pnnur thatYrim'S teurih minutes and the toUl was four for .11 th. rer speed At ^l^^^alden Inn i ' 91 the other end. Bill Jnhnatone came Miller replaced Johnson and wai on to bowl slow legbreaka, Worrell -The Twms" went to the other end to akeov^r promptly r ewde,l with an lb w pUy*l through < rruuden from hto Tlll „ R ,,* a(llll „ ,pUcl Gomez. Stollmeyer decision against Stollmeyer. 54 . hand away Ml t „" edgJ him for two and ah and K.'Ul.-; HasFive for 97 Uons-a irbo i Gome, waa n in, and I, waa of the M wiih v forward aliort M IM-l-r * Wrtl w being lu^t bVmew, be exchanged quick ' ''fh,Vo n turned t gainst Mollback, a policy which might render ra „ ul J^ %£ KM Trim. With ,., had M-rrla l.b .nd ChrisBoth took these spin bowlers tiani cut him for two to bring up very %  artfully and were sometimes trjamadbin did not aaem to be trouble with Bfalb pitched well H puiTig UHwork ud the ball that a poll sm akKiaarul m sweeping Ramumpire ,,,,. him oul 11. " R Billon away lo lag and avan off had scored 13. seven for 208. •riving him kbuundarlas. r,,,,, pow in. reaaed his pace Century Up until he had rscetted hlrnaair and The hundred eame up together ' ".on with th.' i mean SSK** 1 J n "* M haii sro "'cd l, s 7h/t' r ,'ulr'^l';,ht E '" h ,0 4, 2 ak-h. s.,.k :; B, lunch. OhrlMi.nl WM M • up io" ih" !" Mo7 !" !" ,; !" i5 C rajBarttiStrjKstws ^KSSESSSF %  M tOmm. l*"'verdict and in truth It muM !!Vame up n TO r"hud** Stoll' HaM tI B lor lunch brou hl U P ^ ,n,, n J>^t* mid-wick. Har* .. -in ., very slight snlrk „„., dimmed for %  long whu*. "• %  "* %  "*.'"-l ur lur 3? The Wiwt Indies now had him useless in any case." brought "up 151 'by hooking RIIIK VafenUne 'met n tin.-arc. .... UndwaU came back (or another boldly to kaVlhhrfhall I Stollrneyer. however rctorled by w cket ^^ ]unch „„,, Chria ^ |ook |hM ^ ln |M)W1( ^ g* 1^ OaS^Ior tw. turning the mely innl ,. ul hlm for wo l(1 brlnR very canrfuU • lor three and I hr hundred. „, trouble wk* %  '. ; :' Tolal for five wukcls '02. hack to hook a abort hall from Hliig down t. Ilassett after lunch brought up t<> the unprotected mld-wtrk. %  • hit. heavy guns—and LI nd wall and b-undary. Johnstone slipp^ in a Miller were deputed to carve thrir farter one now ud then but still n. u | all MU.H way into what remained of the Gomez saw him well enough to t „ ctraigtM drtving ValSlltl was playing for his place in the ^"""' "J" 1 ?..::', '.'i;: /^Tf?,^ iu?" V^ !" *" "**'"' pns, on Bi West Indian inning. Gomez anf keep him out. Thlr. was exactly the 1( w ^ ".„ ,,, '. hunt Mr p&VrtATvSS sSSiSa tS STSMS awtr 5 rrtr or •"" LSHsffi.is. hu* four-thai was hll eighth boundlh ^ UR i; ow ^. l,d lM wl d m .•* rt s. ... —..• offered and 26 were addaTm this a. left-hander. Ha. ary In bla score of 40. A sweep by Miller that missed the ball hrought a mighty yell from Valentine for I l.w.. but the Umpire shook his head. Millet. minoleU'U. Ruig was nd tlio flu luipire Looks.' nine for 215. I .. i toi. Wnk.i Trim's Hour *nd if lha u<-i. of em to vea Trtm*i HOUJ Mne* ttv I %  ' %  •' %  ihouldnow seesometMng lntb.Bn. gradually losl i I lua UasV •4 lar i" iuns and had II Rnished Johnstone .i l hum [ih ... -jopeeled wi i.•> %  I.IT the first bull but the umpire lgStollnv ur glanced %  .... .„!.' W..k.. at ball, lie Btollmoyat cut John'ly for fou for %  ii m %  % %  •-">" ui ud M.iiii. boyance which was ominous for •* the West Indies. Miller, gall. ''','"''' % %  %  -•" %  %  • -.....%  ashing bis bat may cost rum ft""?? ."!, u '"' W '"' fcfff" MUlei While he lasts, but he is no, apt to S-* ""} P'-ff 1 WCr '' !,,X, "'-> t a s.l.gl, last lonV Miller, pl.iy.ng back. S ^** k lsccliC al "ad hc.u* VttlS f i -" u £r£r TT "rrr 1 K^s Godrinrd had nov. set what was Cf" 1 J!_ H ?*__? *?* ,, ". < !" !D Then Ii largely a wcie nai the period srS„ Miitr"; hii ; d ,o im f oi ; h 4 %  %  u rst A"*^*n * %  SSnSd aear^wa. fh^U", Tit Leadin. people. The god •core was ^ %  %  The West Indies now hud a 56 look'<' f.milt n stnick i M d lltl d with Australia to ba* 08"> wh,,r Guillen was MfUCfe b) i nal. a they were in a winning posi">* *•* %  t came off Miller's pad' >vhon ikm aU they had to do now was ,h: 1 ht hl d b, '*' n l>efore Miller at lop speed compelled Chnallam lo play on to his pad and thence on to the witkct. Christiam bowled MIHC N Sifor 128 I MI. i Miller Style for all occasions! FLOWEKKU LINGERIE 36 in wide Yd $1 SO STRIPED SHAMBRA M la idf Si. .... $1.32 OBEY GABERDINES 36 in. wide. Yd $ 1.93 STAMP FOULARD in Ireen, &t Beitfe PIT Yd $ 174 PLATO TAFFETA in umall and large designs in shades of Blue. Red. Brown, & Mulli tulnurs 36 in. wide. Yd. $1.53 CAVE SHEPHERD & CO., LTD. 10-13 Broad Street ^1>W>WW'| the ba sm.in kneed it away Hit-i.i>' -., >.-e the gamr through willv' v *\? the off stump, and play Wts >><' folly end they would come lo the Weekes 1 b.w. Johnsn up for a few minutes wnile the ihrealudd rf a mighty and hlstorl* wickctkecper bathed his m-iufh, match at Sydney. but seen through the gjggfl %  bfl Bu The New Ball I imadbin. The score was OM %  r nd to the confusion of Australian thirty seven, plans Gomez and Worrell proNeither Harvey nor Hasactt m ceeded to hammer it to all parts their natural anxiety to keep then of the Held. They took thirty off jt vicJuiU intact overnight daieo in four ovor*. of UndwaU suffering how any eiU-rprL-e against the MilUr a/aa avaDtuaUa taken ofl a/aai mutes spuuters and occaMiller once agam as often m his and Bill Johnstone came to bowl ,ional nuufles was all thai came rwr had intervened in a game leg breaks with a ball at ill more or h „ , wuv in the intervals of a critical stage and swung II Una i-w In bla second over WorQno^n. Valentin, and Ramadhu. id look ro, Kl Eyen with their first InreU swung round lo iwoap him U. iQcneaaingly bolheisorue. nings lead or 56 this present total i. E p ut played the ball with great HarveV bruught up 60 by lur-ifor. i ld n S *? m fnuih for victor:, (orce into his atump*. lie had mt£ ValeuUi,< %  gelltl %  to sauare-leC The Weekes l.b.w decision was „, OIlU ju ull( , llt sU ,7i luid nal !" J £?3m thTinnuu*. had last1 % % %  ".iing than dear Evidence 1S ,., 17 2 a pnwlsw help in •ime %  packed oifs.de At THE MANAGEMENT AND STAFF OF ;^ and run. T^ "M*" * T^Stf '" "'> U mv,!c,1 uuicklv as ?n '""^ "' !, he •" %  PlaudiU of A'oBfce. to .weep it to leg Ha %  *1 nccUv ,r,^H,fe ( r h,. :l "' M00C C nvd w s "^ lo tempted, miase.1. and WI I i>;^2 1, ^ * Mrnert and eoMCHwttous .. the hip J 222 J£. i't" 1 **" " i, > ,e, • ,iave '"f' 1 %  triumph in Wj given Mil Lb. Weekes was .„ the hall high when it hit him, but ^noii other ll,at had no b< n I'ilrbed on the tri cricket had *" r ,, ,, -1 can't |mWorrell wu.given a tremendous wag look"cccption when he came out and ;low!> A ay. to r for four. The next moment confused a run call with vlilch. In i Four %  lha retun Inspiration Christioni licgan with did nol seem to be much hurt, and tliundertili from AiMi.li., iiod". dngUl ofl Johnaon, wheitu|Km resumed his Job behind the .tumps, ilard sent Guillen m witn Si %  i cut him tor Unee. Of Harrey DO* m to high uda of mayai toonan with ball an hou Johnstone'i neal ovct stollraeye. form, continued to sweep mil cui '" go. (iuillen turned l.iihlw.i! pulled a huge four to squareleaB (|1 Itamadhm square, when th %  -pui "urd ball Into the ban %  i BU and cut n eaeellcnl Ihree nil >"^ ltl( Uiwler came on at the ol.ier cuu J"hntone at squ:< ball The disastrous and Cionwi and was yards out Moroney threw back to IJndwall uho broks the wietot in a muddled sort ut *ti,i and Worrell was swoupgiven not out. %  %  x %  %  at 1 for Va lent II cut Goddurd foi Iwo successive fours to hrlBd up the hundred stand m U9 minuter. and WOOD Goddard gill] lgBOf*l the new ball .mil brought Haniudhln ba I. | end. to square-drove him again to the .luestionable fall Ol Week*.' Ooddang DOW put himself In and at had at least not aflected the from the next ball a loud appeal scoring rate—It might even have ioi I b.w was refused. The toll inspired it to greater heights, after that—only the Bfh of the stollmever. Indeed now nllghU a Minilar saapaal wj ,-ped the gloom with a princely granted and the West Indiei warp „(i V e off Johnstone that was artt"o wiekrtt. down xperience of every Uclc chance ,. hCT) empire leeJ Is i mined to the . Trim In the last %  ndlaa. Without it they could liv ,. r 0 f UW day and Ihe pair i. am tn tin'world but afu .,., r aUU together at the close, fllcU-d with I* they impose a clipHasaatl not out 23. Harvey not pling burdi n on themselvaa. Ausnut ]| , total one for 1 trails escaped humiliation because iH wr comment *> >nc deoitiou (ha Wagt Indians, if left to them^ ,. ptO] in the 1 inuai comment on another— tttnt, can generally be rebel „-_, illlu Aust..,li.. certainly does lb upon to do sufficient silly things U. n ,,. >( .i fr--l ttf*. A M wffl dp| • % %  rnotTOW whan Moroney Is expected to be, ahw to uaiaiui bla innings, to-, night it named that Ramadlun, und Valentine were beginning to 1 turn out of the wkket iii the later ..vers — and ln the %  mmail of thai turn lies the West [nbal | blggi I hope. i BARBADOS HARDWARE CO.. LTD. I THANK YOU FOR YOUR KIND PATRONAGE S DURING THE PAST YEAR AND EXTEND TO YOU THEIR SINCERE WISH FOR A HAPPY AND PROSPEROUS 1952 gg No. 16. Swan SIM Phone 2109, 4406. or 3534 Worrell then straight drove lum their own prospects. Seven in grand style. His reprieve for 190. Eight for 1B4. mne tor 194 valuable but hardly as Gnnd dome/, solid and capable, lies' wicket aince he was until hooked Johnstone for lour to brin* ivi, k-'t .11 istrjand force exquisitely coi bined. He then square-cut Johnwllb a ( % %  •, swingina bat r boundary and II j mdwalj hod h*keii tvi he steppe.1 out. misjudged the i u Pr?l t spin and drove the ball with R|,k.n.lnow JolDOd Stollmeyer. n n D roachcd his 50. full power l>aek at lUmadhm. who already R one ii..,l.i rf ,d t i,cme Rlrur's flighUd slows were called took it with a .iuiet :imle and was sound enough he could not upon to replace Johnstone. and he Harvey was out. forteee such events and Guillen Harvey was caught and bowled has had experience of opening by Ramaddin for 83. The total ..> moments before there had been peace and a pleasant Stollmeyer nine and Rlckards eight played out lime without further trouble. Ext aad the total for two wickets 20 A Moat Critical Day This third day of the rourtcl Test was clearly one at the n o if not Ihe most, rrllical of the lour The fortunes of the. game would turn on today's play, and if they turned towards the West Indies. %  lieu they would win and make their great chalUni;.' al There were alniul 20.000 when Stollmeyer and Richards went out to build up th j position tluv could We had that Worrell would bat Tl v pprchci.,1... 1"'' *•**> "[I"*' ,Khl ''""' •square-leg head tor f our bu t Undwall opened with Mill. %  • thereafter continued his^ unperson^ olhtfr £% an(| ^^ ,,_,,..., ,, atlon of u human quesUonmark ptoctcde.! to take single* from bent over with anxiety. glances and square cuts without Twelve overs after tin new ban obvious botrur Hlckards % %  •mad was dueGoddard look it and Tmn „ n ce or twici to lean for his shots came hack into the pidure Thl>instead of moving his feet—dant 4 for 175. Harvey had hit 11 fours In 1 iniiio^-of two hours and eveij of them wa> an excellent gnuiiidcd stroke. Hole, who followed, was obvil u.ly unhappy and was bowled by Valentine for 2. On Top It wa/i D0tabta ItuM even agAMUtl Harvey wl.h his splendidly trolled but rapid storing that ihWest Indies had never lust thei: iri|> ot UM lama and now the. II.KI reaped Uieir reward. At the tea score. Lmdwall w." not out 0. and Miller not out 31* extras were H. live Liudwall who had survival L f>orfor^ & IVaVBM Recammvmt /dmBuk HitWorU-fcmomi Ihrlml SKIN OINTMENT Imtkm — Puri/in-llvalt THE B.M.L.A. SOCIETY AN ANNOUNCEMENT Will Policy-holders ploaso note thai owing to circumstances beyond our control our Calendars for 1952 are nol yet ready for distribution. NotitM will be Kiven when they arc ready which m expect will be in a few days time. C. K. BROWNE. Secretary. They'll Do It Every Tii'.c USED TO WAKE II FEELING TIRED -Y>U ?EAD TVE NEW BEST-=n _fc ~ AIO PDfJM A CENTAL PICTURE. a<-AU. THE OAR4CTERS—• TO ALL OUR FRIENDS AND CUSTOMERS WE WISH fit..-. lull I ajr> jil Urt lor A .k il you Nak-' up leellog tlrea uo %  .,... .1..:. ad H beuu l-'-n-k and full ofenentv tine woman who can sopreelste the difference from at own esperlence. writes to Before taadn* K ruse hen. 1 always nad to wake In the > moraine feellns very tired Now S i have ldt all that tlrednees and I wake (iellnr full of enirsy : Lha User, kidneys and bonela and keens tham all working asooothly +aA effjcientlr. The r*wsnl of thla Internal claaallneas Ua,freaaen*4 nnd Invigorated body, roiaonous waste materials are expelled and the pains or rheumatism oeeae. And as yon continue with Kru, schan. your whole body responds \ to iu porlfylng force. A Eruschsn Is > ''lalcaols from all 5 ^heoslsu and Stores. s \d UsAL} pA0Ap£A0J4A$ m 7hw y&aA FROM MERCHANT TAILORS OF BOLTON LANE i a. I %  %  %  %  A X X I I i vi;^nMiftifffffifiniiiiifi?t? /



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p.w.r FOIH n\RR\DOs ADVOCATH Tllllisnxv. JAMABV BARBADOS S. T— — ADVOCATE -—f 1 Thursday. Janu.tr> ... IKZ NEW COMPANION MR. ADAMS is ,, distil Indian who has brought tionour to Uarbadoa in many countm rve been accumulating upun hint ever since he represented Croat Hi it...! .(.1 n %  1 the delegation :i | a meeting <.f the United Nations in Pans in 194tt. Th. reception given to Mr AdeflM life year on his return to K;m been accorded to any other politician. A year lain be btCUM .1 member < %  the CQBB> miitee oi I 1,0. Experti on the application >f tntcrnationaJ eonvantSoni and ;i mambw of the (ntenutionaj institute of Political and Social Science. Anil also m IMS OHM Vicr-President of tha World rYdn atm.'i of Ti.i'io Unions. Hiis at Dfl Member of the Caribbean Commis-siun ami has been for several years a member of the Council of the I'niv.'iMtv Collage ol tho West Indies Yet it is doubtful wh< th. 1 Mi Adams has been uwarded .1 CM ponding classes of the Order of Bath. Today honours of this order are normally given to colonial civil servants ol wide experience and the order is employed especially to honour Colonial Qovoruora, Who normally become Knight Commanders and sometimes later Knight* oi thl Cross. The Chancery of the ordoi Li at the Colonial Oflice and the Grand afoatoi U* Earl of Athlone. The Or.ler of St. Michael and St George takes precedence over the Star ol India, the Order of the Indian Empire the 1' torian Order, the most excellent Ordoi "I the British Empire and Knights Bat helm The choice of honour by which Mi A distinguished political %  orvice to Borbodo has been rewarded is in itself a Ugh com pliment to him. There have bi-en honours previously awarded to West Indian politicians but few observers ,,t the West Indian political scene to-day can deny that tin honour conferred upon Mr. Adams has been tfiven to a man who has shown politico! ability of a high order. In congratulating Mr. Adams on the honour he has so well deserved Barbadians can congratulate him too on his acceptance of an award from a country which is ihowing unmistakable signs of its willingness to co-operate with West Indian politicians in their efforts to run their own affairs. Mr. Adams' acceptance of His Majesty the King's recognition of hhi m services to Barbadian political life i* I happy augury of Barbados' continued good relations with a country whose history has for so many centuries boon Intertwined with ours, and whose raconk of 1 ment far exceed its Uiti of failures. In the insignia of the Knights Cram! Cn Order of St. Michael and St. George there is in the centre of a seven-iayed .silver star besides a representation of the Archangel St. Michael encountering Satan tho motto ui Latin "AUSPICSUM MEI.IOHIS AEVI'. No fitter order could be Mloctod fa an) politician at the beginning of %  New Year when the "augury of a better era" is the most universal wish of men and women whose prosperity depends so much on politicians' judgments and knowledge. Mr. A. do K. Krampton who ol0 DOCOmei a Companion of the Order ol St. Michael and St. George In the New Years Honours will receive the congratulations of many Barbadians who are BWOTO "I Oil 01st,;. gUlshod services to West lr.di.i ture, while the honour conferred upon Mr. Douglas, tho forme* Divisional M Cable & Wireless 1 %  here as an honour conferred on one ol themselves Hot*<*r William*: Leading Karly American l*ol % % %  <•; %  I Thinker mi < L1NTON mi-Mil t %  : *-hi. h... %  ral think. %  %  %  Itig U.K. Contributions To Colony's Finances LONDON British Honduras now has an estimated population of only 7.54 people per square mile I territory, making it the most thinlypulated tei with the sole exception of British Guiana Vet the trend in the movement of popu ui shows Uiat more people are concentrat, ii*r> ui %  1 oruera of IflC '' ,-.. % %  tirouiided In doeBU, and Uut opaUOB; H HH k iu.. i^.i-.ion *as thereUl) (galMI \ttmu 1 1 *, i( ny *r>iiid preach 01 It* Itial UlW* uagl.l l" OK •• icra *pr officers, no la %  '^de?o7conT OI "•*' %  c : • .ted territory in the British Caribbea p nded ror continue > J d,ir "*" %  %  ', fZZZ „, I \o uKir awns am Vet the trend in the movement of popuia%  %  %  %  % %  courageous mwe must be permuted individual m i'^i , m u^-hzv and moving awav fmm the 1 .nenYofaLwhcfhad'IearwI IBN culturally important Northern District. 'hly with his ni <• *"•* no u "' *s J f ,j. u .,fp, through the hardest Kind oi ex[oissJung the land in search ol more lucra-1 It hah I*1.1 private InlolM %  %  UbertJ witlioul Law, ,...,.,„,.,... .. %  ;. r.iriit without authority. %  * uwupiww. %  raousi in which tiue tYeedcn This trend is shown in the official report { **• • " British Honduras for 1950. just published %  tui Id 01 em Concenuaa lbs placa "i tha W ' 1.,. dlTldual In the netal community „y the Colonial Ofnce in London, rnetolony, .-.th an area of 8.866 square miles, has a popInglv mooarn In flavoui 11 „„.,„„,, dlatMM) of only 66.892, the report 00011 Density ol population varies from 18.;i3 per 1 rasnon of tMr Ubrtj %  • \ M n .r rountry—that men who will • ..ho hac DO 1 \> %  :.red to execute the toimci "' The record of Williams' p B.H. Population Continues ^nmmmmmmammmHm^i-. lo ihin Out I A Prosperous New Yearg TO ALL • 5 3. X I 3. Advocate Stationery %  %  %  %  been popu .., 1..merit of perms wh .nquii thi* belief through saddening 1 'tM^ n't % %  and 'h.t atnin th.colon) |] ...„M.fdthl. man', u I %  5 n %  • %  %  . ,, >' 17 emb Ued the concept of reuu 3 r of (p irit ,,f rompromtot Hi .. .,.,. ,,.. ,,* ru.<w. re_ %  ... quare mile in the BollM DtOtliol down to i :(1 in Toledo. It. K.mpares with the population in Bar1 loo, when some lM.OOO people live in 166 nune mllee, giving a population density of nniwntla| M I 1h.1t w 1111.111 i.s roftued to uppco idal % %  I %  '. iti i.i 'ii (another %  "ioiln mmy. tin* %  baani %  %  .. the fret plaj iccordi I S|ll %  upted . boon anan aooUm bi-licf wUcb BOBM lontuit only p, 1(ll c of rT *y per, %  i..s.. tpintual and prao..-.. tiiutidittion of dcmixTJti, Williams had an intimate wOftdDj he."",wn".l..Ir. kno Ied *' o f *" R?"*, ***** I .1 Uld Mttli ancc of this principle for the IS conciliation f liberty opea that a geological smvev would not be iund unproductive." At present, the economy of the Colony depends largely on timber extraction and the ion of chicle, from which cheering u in is made Chicle bleeders form the largest CCUpettOn group in the Colony and I %  eJTilnss, at $75 a month, are mong the highest for labourers. The report gives a table of occupations and \ Inch includes even the 46 labourer* %  id 29 tradesmen working on the construction f the new hotel in Belize. After the chicle tho second largest group of workers the Colony is made up oi road labourers. table shows. Road construction is one of the most im>.rtant things that must ho done before the nomlo possibilities of the Colony can < 1 xplolted. although the report stresses the ship whose weal and % % %  Inttitutiona, ho ram, very dots lol .mportance of the sea. rivers and bush trails ,,,„. ,.. %  m ,., UM concept t tjundbtnt Ssooi , n communications, adding: "It is inevitable he bad an understanding f UM th fallen sj "' which economic arrango< %  .,„ %  poUUeal InsUtuUors And he seenu auo to bsvi bi fml % % %  1 dial social and pOUUCl (hal "Lstitullons are always in .1 MaU %  >f change, and that it is therefor ilhoul rerourse to fov refei %  1 %  < -i meni H %  men tille.l 11.. 1 Idand pint! then liadrt. with .md ,n land (which he spun MSd with a >elneHne>s unmaich H aril I m 1 %  ooloiusl America), an iblc man' 1 In Ulb tnumph <>f Uuteful and wlm equality In governmen (whici %  %  i • %  ;; : %  1 % %  %  n an 1 % %  to th town >" %  %  I"*' ""* P* n< D hli di't daji .. proProvld> I Ihera aKiu to transplan „,, ( | OU |„ tha .;.. rrom the old world). Most 111 i-,ual was hit insistence on lam rellow colonial ill an equal ternu, for th ttpopilbh t*bl OOruSt a* well as for UM ortalDal homesteader Th< in doctrine of M] h ,„. opportunity ha, at least one of n ,, M[ , .,..„ ... reotam Williams* denocraUi lam fcer. caj I pulley. I which I haw eve, William. Ml w '"' "" •*•" Indian -ntury prophet of lV< 1 1 1 i' 1 i-i'Hiy man vvn \ .... |)(: .,,,.. 1 n .u %  nMnMntoua DSsneenth ind n 1 .tury principles. In hi in, reh n f the workings 01 political, rt-ligious, and corpoi.it flessjra in Urn toewJootj"'"''"'' yatr Ifcioh—ie rss^MVeaossift for Ik* • year are oMmmtblv ot FU*k*r% 'i< %  the rconomv anil ntluo uf your wry pmnhaM U a fSjejiaTfes) 0/ *titi*fiirlimi. May ire Umlt foruanl. Ih.-n. I" mukig you in /A" *W IsMst oi C. S. PITCHER & CO. Phon, un •1 111 smart. 1 (tm nw III Da CMU'S (or you 1 l 0 lake hoini !" %  111 old; propo %  olony, be ^..v.uncount. hu nan] r*u poUUcaJ pninfcei ..r 1 rnvldence and the lad jrasi d> publl< baee be 1 test their theories, nor at the same %  Williams put the deetrinei •' i>puiai reribUcej %  :.. work In the Rhoda IsL i [• %  ""' ;""" "'"'-"utal to 'orce a rigid pattern of law and ,.vtnn,e..t ,,,,„„ any soeiety. rM to the Some uf his workm,; pnneiplrt P( „oi have been absorbed nun the me.,I trtl prlncipli "' American Jhougnt, 50m t i,i,. or enantial >blp if iiiey bate nor. But all were the produc orderii rpvariimea lecbniqus thai unWl I tie iiiqiui, and tr* "ni thi.liberlv. the numborert Amcrlcnis. many 1 aaanei ol the Multa; %  rbUrauon commandei o| this ship oughi % %  !" ini nesei bsai ol Roesi vru P need of authority commind On ttiip'i oourea, v-.. ,l; m *. were to make the leadlnj tha is oenltlon of I '• M then political faith. No 1 the Individual, and .;.* and '' 01, ls "und until it has been at opportunity, unen tted through experience; It it hi His Letteri and Inddenie In bb j een learned ihrounh expariencf public cause p ove thai tbrough • . ao mueb the %  ouader< To ins exI 'i bbJ half-century m RbOd iy their lent Hotter Williams was the lli>' land, Hogrr Williams w&. refuse to I rip In American political thinker h the Nekei \ olill; or pot* tows the —American Quarterly. llarhatloM I5l.il IIM-OIIMS: i.i*4lil\ >IIIIIOII llolhns L sivn.n.M. eii.\.>4.i:s WASHINGTON Jan. 2, President Tl shakeup i>i tinInternal Revenue Bureau lay and the ohlol of tho acandal shaken t; ( \ coUoctlnf .. lOOOd thai .j:i more employeei have boon And or forced to msl Truman Bald I ing reorganization" will be to take the Kevenue Bureau out of the political theatre and protect it fron lh< influence oi peddlers." The naiion'i M offlcei ol coll* 1 I internal revenue would !> %  favour of 2;i District offices, each I. a Commissioner under the civil • %  Under the proposal, the 1 only political appi ii tee official tax conin issi ei Al p 1 1 tit all ii4 collectors are political appointees— V. P. ilmm a forresptindent) [Mi-: ii-.. %  urnui the people <>' .1* a whole ens 1 1.11 l.uger in term0| 1 Although tJiivinunetit here bai %  **"> an %  rouith roun 1 % %  > %  %  %  %  ., H.W %  •< %  ... .1 Ife %  ' 1 more uncertain t trying i" estimate the p rt make u bSe .... % %  From 1 a dollar! was actually disarnong people workmic 1 raw n irbedJoa, one mu>t make a fui-un 1 iinn maiertaU and deduction for the nuns a the .IKIHUI by comneniai and businesses b) ervei lor depreolattoi double COuntll id undiotribulcd profits, say ilv. un*. Ilkai dollars. Another to nir list but %  1 may be deducted to "verswai Interest am I • Put %  %  rente and other • in. Then the bal %  %  ".-live million dollar*, repn e nun distributed .''men. tenable, says the report, and the change D lbs grow the men and women working v : value was essential in the interests of th theb living, who must nov .,-, , called "factoi cos", that (1 : r umber just over 100.000. Th' Colony s economy. ind give* an average earned incvir ;^r worker of $450 or per fund '.250 hat thooa means will continue to play an m port ant part in the life of the Colony; they mist \n' used for the transportation of supiu\s t< the settlements on the banks of the ivers. for no road scheme could contemplate nklng up all the scattered communities" HUGE FOOD SUBSIDIES Ii a chapter on finance, the report draws ittention to the grants-m-aid made by the mperial Exchequer over a number of years. latlng back to 1931 when a disastrous humane wrecked the Colony's economy. The o'.al sums granted to the Colony up lo the md of 1950 include $3,136,290 in grants-in-aid -nd $6,301,817 in Colonial Development and '.Vli.iugrants. The Colony's revenue from >oth these sources increased sharply in 1950 .nd in addition there was a special grant of $ 1.331.095 Expenditure during the year included 472,502 on subventions, which includeo -430,000 spent on subsidies on food and necessities to keep down the cost of living. Expenditure on Colonial Delevopment ami Welfare schemes was nearly doubled during ;he year. The food subsidies were made necessary by the devaluation of the B.H. dollar to the fixed rale of $4 to the £. Previously, the B.!l dollar was at parity with the U.S. dollar and unique among British Colonial currencies was so left when sterling was devalued ii September. 1949. This position proved u DOESKIN by Hunl&ttintrrbothAin ol England in gloriuus colours 58/60" Wide $10.98 per yd. I.AMBSMEKF A Range of line and colorful checks in pure Wool loomed in Scotland. 58/tiO" Wide S10.S2 p. yd. Da Costa & Co., Lid. : s *ftfinKHKKKftM*Mifti*; %  >"SaHHHHWWMM*3MSMJM>: Busai jinnluce, I .k.iilirislinas For B.WX Stinl k nts Our "Owing to the traditional local dependent on United States sources of supply." the re port continues, "the cost of living was bounc .0 be adversely affected by such a change, bu Mis Majesty's Government made a ssccia j ^rant of $450,000 for the year so as to enabU the application of subsidisation measures Ii .S3'! million K mllHon lit Gixtds and products manufactured in the 1 b sipp hnd tcretved a person.'", iir-nage of vonsralulalton fro> v m his assumption ( OiTlre. .tiid that, since prruun iuu h*s prevented bin including mn personal acindic5. ur^ti.kini: part in knowledgemmt; be (the Prim 1 orti 1 1 1 ked Uutt .-. t| 1 adatlon ihoui) id I .'. p $12 mlllloni whlcl will gly 1 have not been able to tnrt Public ui named w.p Hertnei M presumably ai* mm* ni hnmoa. ami 0M %  ould i-dbllnh ihla letter in %  i that H will lio m %  ien In tfaeif "' %  Ins Council'* %  .. ; _BII llrjiilerw Stay 1 Thank* Tt T' F.d lor, Th* Advocate— Si.. Ea l.i '.lii* month a conua| received from tin .;;•;.'.,: nubta Uw effects of devaluation, particu In so (ar as the poorer classes are con lerned." But devaluation increased the cist i imports from $5,990,264 in 1949 to $8,787,511 in 1950 and there ra .'iil\ .i small mClftl m the value of exports, to $4,779,802 Principal exports durniL; the year were SI.061,887 worth of pine timber. $1,000,087 tlmbtr and $1,002,451 urortn of chicle ginn. There was a strong de mand for pine from Trinidad. Jama. •tch his (oi other British Caribbean colonial tmi prices for this product were far above thosi Sir. ti\i-tl for local sales, with the result that sn Your obedleat rvant. R. N. TURNER. Colonial Secretao the veal —B.L.r. ST.IHI THE KBSSJ mmir WITH I III SI \IH HISIIl.XU limits Cold Storair llinis CeM sinraie Haron -• iimk '-•) Kipprr* smoked M iti.i,. , \nfhor Milk %  ..%  % %  \mhor Kvaporaierl Milk i.mpirr Oerfar I.lplun ColTnJrVR Bread \rTKK\(MIN TVS Llplon Tea Red ROMTea Choier Tip-. Tea Carr'n Sweel Hi-, mi. Kraft Cases* ( It 'idI'epperminU Salt Mackerel Salt Herring* ( *>f hi MI Runted 'II i in ktiii i hriran 1'eaiiut* Nardlnrs i niiirt run* i'run %  Cesaai Creaai Tomato Pjnle Itiiiiilit Ketchup OeM BrsM Rum Herns Dean ud i %  Ml \I III IT l'oullr\ Kafceeti ru I*-1 i iiwUvet Mutton Shmililrr. re-h \ . %  i.i ocuto local shortage of pine developed during feV%o/.r> #f# r/# #.fr//#/r#/\ ihtilpf tin i-in if iH.VJ tor nit >/'"" 1*rin-fiil \<<>ifs L\





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THURSDAY iwrvrtv Woman Guilty Of Wounding With Intent sentence Postponed AFTER IS minuteV deliberation ..i the Couil 13 %  jury found Pearl Roach "'. St Lucy 1 unding Nelly Husbands of Rock Hail. St Lucy. 1. disfigure or do %  ... bai tn ft : ThtCOM TSS baud before the n %  IHtttba i-. left ear. Beskn tl two other plao 1 % % %  will seek informal! n % %  '. %  ..1 tl 11. u.e Nutm.l |) %  .. %  .--: m then then a* ix htng about it. She old him D l*cause she did no; intend fO%  1 : vbody. thai you wore agEslyn Boyce Of Rock Field. Si %  i. q ombsratsd Neii. tc thai 1 ..... d 11 ••-., i .. ,• %  %  %  1 • 1 thc UUni st 1 KJ % %  M of UM M^ond riant ftera Wall] wai learning to sew with mctln %  -ioiii .11 hi-i defence railed To he Court gh< Nellv got off the lorry tin i'it s.-culion's Caseno blood on her. 1 uUonwat r i''-Samuel Bennett at District UKhidlngj Paarl """ ^'d that about 6.S0 p.m. on R S %  mlvr Ifi (,. %  V.MS Btn| lo '[• %  .,,, ,,. IfafMu „ . „ to.JMjd tonrtgm^-Ujj. " "" <••"• P'l Hoach S. Nallv H .. % %  .:,. . i*nlp.ir' Roih IUHB\nOS ADVOCXTE PAf.r nvr Ml SU\I II .Ills .(niggle for > chair in th* Musical Chan. COmpetl'u ft Day Thicompetitor-; had to ride donkeys at the ClviiDay Tali al Quern 1 Labourer Gets 6 Months run STKALIW Slllltl "Louise" Brings In 100 Lb. Bill Fish —First M Market In '52 ih %  | r %  %  %  1 the lorry ind many UH lorrj i %  %  %  %  the lorry %  %  %  .. pti I : Tl i bo l i HI %  %  1 %  '" '" %  of tlrJuMnt n • Praai r*ae I the de%  M.ifth rooSM %  l ill %  .. I %  I %  %  1 • %  pi I Like Hi Marina, % %  %  nit oi thi .... ., Kon s ( %  pi •cticall) • %  %  %  %  • imbai %  %  % %  arrival i : %  Unuhl Trrsprils I %  M. m Jnhiuon aii.i Iman told thi 4dv-*i* thai Bet badot can look %  % %  reei thai lha tout I q ,.N' eon tn | • i %  .. i. % %  t< %  '. intei u paafc whan Ihetra i* / %  Neville A.' Dafauca'i pTrtueeses Tha oafi Crab Ihii. st. AJJ ha, ,,, -.m i, tha e> c .r.on on he ,orry w, the Arsl. ,„ Snc said -he sjxv Elyti aye t •'! Aflnatha Roach and HaUj Huananilng on lha I I tab .niiboldini '!!!(• Kishiti^ boat l.miise, owneil by Mi C MarahaU, bill fl into) i %  ".' h wai the Aral old In tha mai 11 1852 Man] p*' o p!'* were around trying to bu\ %  Id quickly. The LaaAaa ahw the last flshlnj boat to carry nsl On Monday evening II can ll %  markel In 19ft] i t \ lavalopa and naka %  %  11 %  i> %  ..t th. .. karchai %  HgM on thlorr) ll I) !.'. %  nunuM tfla lorry. Roach thai 'ter the llcht aitat Paarl ciil hn. He %  II ti i | tha Impraaalon thai II n pounds ol Hying Rah Rvmaiulvtl /'or 11 mist' Hrvaking POUCH %  ; k "s„: Cynthia Grimth I in iand Aanathi %  Nrthr ear nuh-jna on tha lorrj Wh %  ha taw Nail -n off rtnrlno holding ha 1 %  i i oti the a> parkerl. months' impt illna two thai thara art man) Barbod .X ... in i ria in Canada wh.. an m w .11.n^ tn -in-ml a shin' .i . ation hare, closed. The Bah tit %  IICM lanci it th.paaaoagai | A iv. ,u ulia ..t hOV takon lha •< %  ,".! i" !?i' '. ".'""' '!_''' 'T Mr '' %  ,I,KV ,l,lk r lhc travel lo th.In Mut.,,1 unnl UKI.IV whru I" M.nkfl I. .1.1 Ih, Mr. ... i : %  ., v 1,-tur.. him ,,., ,,., .,,„.„ . %  ol hou. brooklni ..,. i iin.i.la ..'11 lUh .In. Ih, ,i i„ ,„ 1 HARRISONS BROAD X X i X X STAINLESS KITCIIIA STEEL SINKS Ian, Cpl. YearuiKid attached lu ih. C.ID %  mated 'Harding on wirniiil. and hri u-fi t'-'l ba l.iitt-ii ...... an „_, *„K 11.11. 1"r'k„c,w '""•'" J -AbOUl Ihll lime I mm Pearl HI low.rdl the truck", -2X-r^TiS -l.K-tion To !t..tir. .| I n lli.i i ii pla Yard keeiimji lha* tl i i.ti %  eondiuon, thaai it black market 1 i i i STOLEN BRASS PLATE RETURNEb Dr Charki Payne dantial would h:leewion of th c Ma RU> lraie nd id Barbed .i,t andi Mil lo •strengthen ind encotll i HI them I'lif t.n't Ih ll ni.mv Of inns i.n ndicaUOn <( lha n .. teli • |. -i Deopla i ieiu with hard labour. from i iKht IU.."s Director Of tl pt >ti on her British Oulana %  Dir ubrida in-, ofllcc Tutsd t 1 Payne lold lha *.dvorai> tied up neoi thc wharf Youi that two Untie boy s brouirht l %  terdaj n. much relievi'd SUKC hiXXOHIH 'ish bui th, have bed to pay $24 to ren and. the thief w.-uld i i. nis ror it. lo pay 1 itli IK rani h fe\\ Unlawful Possession r>n 11 • AnajUf Hunu of no & of abode * ordered to s '' line of 10 for the unlawful prol .-• %  . I wu converine nton Palrchlld Rnl %  January 1 i %  %  "'" %  ,hi %  in default u deyt' ima I Mr. Ogle came to I Mr Walwyp told him thai %  — I I. an i %  DROVr. WITHOUT LIGHTS X X X X X X \m SINGLE DRAINER $97.38 DOUBLE DRAINER ."$127.18 i ompfou iih Flu and I aatn, I Pah l^illiir Tups, mill Supportinu Brachala, • r..vac Sinks will %  ..' ,ii retain 'hair I11M10 Indefinitely an 1 one. installed will .uUl brightm to your kitchi ytui t,, ,111111. ASU WISH l/i RDBOARI) Th Prank Ogle, left Colony lodSt] nitmtli> Irjvi' ,1111-.,1 1 ii.11 1.. 1. I %  [l %  : "5?L.fS hJi 1, hi a ih 1 11. .IIL. land, where he had %  I %  :,t .ind threw it ; %  PkVhead, %  %  Teai BOd al" went to %  M the pxcuismn H, v,:,l h• 1 her to Roach not ..ff the Ii vhera the wu sitting # or a s rmil. When iha returnad 10 mc." lhc Netty hit her with a bottle and \: %  || her Koach got up Setba Roach, daughter of 1 accuned was the next de%  M.ng and Held I>o.vn A (netha had She said that in the fight on the BducaUi bach lortj threa were cuffing her and i Born in ualntbonnigh, LUWO ''ill ll * T oi' ** %  *III t and began to bat lid not know thorn the ihlra Mr, O i ,,| lerday i me loo." *:' After they left the lor i. ,rem''V I SHEFFIELD" DUE HERE ON JAN. 12 rnin. HU Ex I..C M, II,. ,1 told 10 %  '. otr there wag DO more lighting. %  > Quee M %  \,< the tru when she got PJhui raturned to the Jorry .,,„. %  i belni f***' J 5 nmu i, e "„ art *' ,hc hth'l.ih-i: % %  >•• of Bdu> Wilbo %  the right Ilihh handed Nelly a bottle tndl{ Wl i ..'ii" Roach •'"'?. h er 1 . h, L Jlf 3 1 .*"!' UllTail ......... D took Ih. bottit and i-ucirf,,,. I ith it. She dm nol relai i P '!" %  boUla whan iha iti lick Pi i J ca as i -ln| on al Boai I ad II. .il tive times hut neltli Daniel nor Elme Medforcl ML.; rel It.ilili gi : the .-. %  witnenset. Daniel and Medforit. to come Into the ease. To Mr. Reecc lha Mid 'he had statement to the police. shown the statement %  eai. Blood %  I %  wai taken I To Mr. Nib thai bile given the Agh' -nd she I,I 1917 rel named %  I Errol Ffynn Sues C V///i Millionaire basin of the I dredger look-, M West 1 Station recent I ill jwn 11.1 ••I the 12th to iTt* January NASSAU, Da hundrtit and eight 1 : rlwaaon and admirted thai the ilanatura tot UM perwas hers. The statement a: Un. tned a Al N to the Court. today lorrj lien Mr. Nile-* In addreenns UM I .i. i |ury said thjt thi-> bad heat I -tar Errol D • %  11 i deuce ;rl OI ,n< f"" tr,im lh nad P O, P of H had bean bruising ai %  %  %  fl Of M %  and from that of the defend Tint i iiiecof Nell> II n hi i • lha question was ^.i, vae i>u it %  . t! • PI truck hi nj ti Nell) ha I 1 %  i p. %  Roacl t 10 in nutc %  round tin .! '..have MI %  .. ii.' 1 i hack b) MCMMI'I -. un %  lha OsfaL none wenl to her aenatence Wt r thai not strange, he aske.1. i nature that It was custom part. But Medford dill Mifropasiclea i The trial I :•-. %  ten Axed but "t Pearl Ul Off par* they were on the pound. March. WHITE HORSE Scotch Whisky In olden davi, the en a Kniubis djlU noble anyctrv. To-da,, there is worth l the v\hit.dauna a Bcotdl ; excellenee has |>< UT over ZOO ve -; Ii ind merely .1 n 1 lubatiUita it IS wood brokefi down i %  chemical action and amtpraaaed Into >\\<-v\^ harder than the original material Available In . • K Thick — Sheets K mid lit ft. 4 fl. .I/Mi" Thick — Shasta < 1.1. i rea aaHng UM aasf rssi JKI we hupp thai rent N"- Vesr m lie j full snr <,W53Sl1S4iS*;?S t 4i4MW < f'ftwtf (,r<-fiiiu/% In /III '• IrSfntS* und fiiiiiinim Our Thanks to each one for the many favours shown us during 1951, anil our Sincere Wishes for Good Health, Happiness and Prosperity in the New Year 1952. THE BARBADOS FOUNDRY LIMITED. White Park Rd. St. Michael. o'-'X.^<^co :'. -','. faKMifmfmM*'Ai\SWm\f*Vi&ViPitoti$ A



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PACF SIX i:\uu\nos ADVOCATF Tlll'IISIlAt. JAMARV X 1132 CLASSIFIED ADS. I on REvr TELCPHONC U at ol I .-an TIWM ivpt in pm V>-d*i hH M PWr*al Adtna **le. Laatar. and R>Mr> IN MEMOKI AM % %  :.. r Invert •. Milt. ,--,M % % %  M i Wfd ] arm A.\MH\KMi:XT* lllll VllO.Vtl. %  I i OK HAM; AUTOMOTIVE %  API !!• Weal*' 4. in a r Kfl CAR On. A.Mtin pr He.' "lv..-ir BU fit 91M ||..,:.p."iT \aaii %  %  i3 1 U > CAR A It** A. %  Ml" l& In %  %  i Ap-pli lo Pi-I"! C %  lM (V-WW Tomt r HUB i" eaeellrT.t N. IK %  .1 -.1 fT*. <' > 1 %  T iwwriH HELP I Y VGrtEE ffarboar Leg Seaweli • Ft*M fur I 1 All an conflict. Vv *u 1VMTAH I %  * tar.. ~i —U.F. Cap* V" rr>ir*i. I" "*.*.i- HUFFING NOTICES i\i'i it %  i ;> T %  %  1.' | %  l l:\ %  %  -. ,*l II A1 M II %  v AMI /I II * t-INF l.TB 1N I.IMF KI.FCTKICAI. .. %  DM **n MECHANICAL TI r-rwwiTRFn OtvaapM i'<>i %  • .nil inapaitui.. i>< lit. % %  k.iitrd A (1 *' H i i w h MISCKi.LANEtH-'S I'yhljl Oiliu.ll N.lir ,1k. T.-V.-I M.< lltal-1.1 %  %  II SAM* M Urrfiida eartl HIE %  1' I 1 %  1 %  Mai %  %  I.... %  to lad M N1 BatlM. „ <1 rv. • MM : REAIES1ATI Thr M.V "Carlho**" will BCCMM curfo ;.rn1 |ia"*nfM lot IVminlra. Antigua. Munt*rral, N*vlf and St Kili< SjilHnR Monriav 7th January ii w.i SCHOONER I iWNERS ASSOC INC %  ,l-t,.d Ofl... I '.','.+.'.'.'.'.'.' % % %  %  %  ^ i 9nt. i... PIMM %  •— TV*B r co> u Dau4ljn HWP tl. Iu>W lUawll •itilatonf. Mao eiMabrth hllrtiw IMMMJM— UIH: Itoini MmM. JoKn Da ir*mi in-ii, i i v mm *iibaM .-..'< %  ,i %  J MMkM Jum lortrr PM rt n,i4i-i t., M I ... AIIIVM>~K. I %  Flan "laiU.ilMI.ITIWK Hrliw TaanfkM. Rav>i)' FA* UooJau.1 Urtlln. tlw Fd"*t.lJ' n,.i.,n.. I--.WalU %  i%  IVnlval Kowland. HlliJ..i j. Tkl, Eama.l WakrUiKl. IV MaaN Davia, Irving IVivi-. Cai- a-aiiprwtor. aaUWHnla F 'lrllO tr\a*i at-—a>. i t ^ Barrla). Rank (liinniiijun (nlonial And 0\riva>) i:.irl,-ilnv B.H.I. KATtB flf t:\ni\M.i M KHfK Chaquaa on Banner. %  Man or DfInjfJ Kink %  •( liMda II p. rn-ajat. -" %  >•"%  '.!" • Pi—* Dnlt. •' %  • F* c " l %  > — CataMM *• "* is II.* aland. £, aa gMatar. •S Or-m a • a* Couaona i*l l | • |H I Mil I %  Banliar. a ) 10 ( Danvand Draft, aa o, %  HONOURED: DIED BLACKBURN!, England. TMM Uuxbury 6B-.var-oIl Mxtlk) vrortMr dn-*i io-day — si-j houra afl>t rir had been awkrd-"l ptn Mpdal in the New YearHnnouts lint f<>t baWJ MWI VIH' BlU (illT YOIR I'l'KTAINS YET? r nelrrllotl of i.n lughad MM %  All thai i i %  1 rnnri* % %  <>( J 1 < aa a Pvibhr Raaa <* ho*. %  %  %  The • %  i ipiEita aVOM 3t Dr< • ir. HI Mrrtai!tlt*rt WALES % %  in tun* for nop ''vawi 1 %  i !. 3 1 fef-Cn INCOME TAX MHICI. %  fotkl hri.l,. gtvMI Hall 11.come Tx ratua ii'im aw ii iwarrMd n .ucmne u jliiiKMJO pci •,ver. f -Y'TS oUW wliote Lnromc iS72u mi po .iiimi'.i over and frw ies Mh.lhir bworporiltad "r inperwinH vngage.l %  a oi profa tion. and i %  m n of bod of proi etiy whoiinT u uutail: Ml accrtiad during |he pasl V'l" ot not Form* i>l Return nW] bt it.niirvl fr. m Uia I ; irtl All PR THE 1ST I'-A'. OP JANUARY. 105.'. Rod ''' r-i paVaoni who I) | dav of Met .. M I %  > %  • %  'he 31st day ->f IH1. %  •' I pi f %  P 1 "• % %  : %  %  %  %  N. D, QW01 • Ml i Income ii RI .i Daath Dutie (At) *.'a(.v. pa rton (ailing i %  .. due i %  %  it.) law ajvtn. I'll!"* CAST-*, > van go* -.it, n.. ( % %  aagRj nisi i>... t.. .t. roixii Woman Guilty Of \\ ounding CANADIAN NERVICB %  II Haiti Arrtfr* ii.iK.. n.,i.-i -. I No M > FJee *•! Ii Dec 11 th Dec. SI Dre SI J-W M i Li i I'llHH NO I If • i .. Tw tia.,1 inn Jamnlci Tamil'11 I wit HaRMflt. IIIIXKI -lii TTBipot(allo.i ol lha Jamalcai playera lo and from the Oval Ti-nd*r* irmuld i~ch Hie "PrU A>nrllioii ,'• %  %  HI a b ,.,i.-r Rh KIT A5RIMlr.c HOY OS II NOTICE ,.. %  -.•%  i i %  .IV.... I ia Hoi It I lor IMWfa %  M I . I .. a. i i AJtxSi i %  l ; %  thai iluPoll %  %  hum. Ili.it /a1 MI %  Daniel 1th %  !.,., %  PMFI IT I 1 i hora Tt**ra %  was some look | %  %  %  md it %  %  %  it en %  %  i %  %  %  SH lluuht The Chlal Judgo tuiii UM jury doulH %  %  ' ona. i i i i .] i uutl I I %  i i HUM nil — NEW YORK AND OVUT sEBYlCB. ITO—/ANADIAN HKRVICR IH I'tlMTA CO.. i.OIH.IIT TltO.M I IMIII If II INTATIONS RlliniMi. LOWER BROAH STKIIT Pal ,n<;(i lairs AxenU (or: li-n-.-( JIUIIJ Airline. B.O.A.t and B W I.A. tlllit ^lr\MS.tlF COMPANY Telrphoitr Na. 446V PARTNERSHIP NOTICE IS IIKAKftY i %  i praol %  III* l\l, Mi I H I Kt-DAV'S XFWS HASH I.AROK \\ \1 I MAPS Of %  fxii; i i n i IRS v.\'i, i VR NESS ixx; LKAD %  Ii N STRAPS, DOC W METAI. WASTE PAPER BASKETS SHOE BRUSHES — at — JATfNRON'S ST .TIONERY and HARDWARE niKitiiMi. II at i i i n NOTICE Ti'M'i.i.'-. are Un led i.. %  hi I,, aril Uqvio.. R.-H. %  • %  J I M NOTICE %  ; %  .. ..:.: %  %  knii; tium Wediii-MLn : iitil futtin'i in,', i 'AM 1) RICHARDS & SON. .: 1.1 52—2n FOR ALL OUT (iOOD FIIRMTIIKF? Kit. i %  NlTiii: Ii n DI-MI.I, PO.NOI L. S. WILSON antv aTnuan. DIAL +<* NOTICE PARISH op ciuir in i II NOTICE TO HAIRY KEEPERS. Bat. RrgMtralion ".l Re-Rn I I KAIPIFH iviii.ii< nl ii.. ,.i .,, t... ,,. M %  u ir*M ReaiilalMMu lM BaarR %  %  is and Nelly l i 1 Vou %  i %  Th* !> %  -'•" %  %  n %  n %  Mtna ipoki t %  i ..... I %  .i -i on UM i' Hows Your Coding System ? Well Check Your Radiator and Pump %  nut paat, i ..mi ih>naa.lai. part .'.a paptaea h H (MM •raaMai hradaa4 .-a..ll-ia and iRpHl DM k'li ihrr >> %  II he aare oat ..r -iti aartanB - \* *-"••' §&Auk& S tation 1. Ford-Trained Mechanics 2. Ford-Approved Service Methods 3. Genuine Ford Parts 4. Special Ford Equipment Tlrestone JAc JtjAs with Built-in (Dependability Charles McEnearney k Co.. Ltd. In Touch With Barbados Coastal Station CeMr ..'<< %  that UM %  I'UII Rial Ion R %  Vauia. CM H......l.iid. RROWal %  •"•"*. Oh' AUbam*. SlerloM' i s.-iiunii Raaaura. • •' %  l Airtit. Ikii.rtad. *reuit. Rum %  ../. Oreen Ravan Tr.:.. R.tllJ. < vII... Ateoj Cavalirt. IM-M" Nangalur. Hern Temi.lfl. Mormni Ofh. Jean !.> % %  Allanllc • porter, and Antado %  R %  PrUde t^V'rVUV>C*VV*/'*'-'-'The Raleigh Bi 1PH drawn at QHRRBI Ptl* on 1/1 Hi CiYi. Diiv. v.;^ won by Ticket No. A 347 DARNLF-Y ROCK. goa LM E.nt-.i. .;.-,*-v.-v*,->-aVi ill *Thi one HI John M BUdon's li-!ig look%  though It mlalii J unit -. We hid better call and hl*| a chat with him ai I know t from hi* imitation he will glfe M h.' tta help ha can and IB any >; cane lie u-uallv Infor •! everything worth having." v .11111A LM. BI.AIIOA A CO I A.K.S.. F.V.A. Phone 4CI0 F.V.A. PVintations Building v .,..'..,-,',-,-.'.-.'.'.*.'.'.o'.*.'-'.'-*.'*'.'.'.'-'.'.'.'-'.'. *.*.-.'.'. \rrivi>tl it* timv Vor the Crop MASSEY HARRIS TRACTORS ALSO 5-6 ton CANE CARTS H'll: HNi.i'IlllFS INVITKD' V COURTESY OaARAOE ROBCRT TIIOM LIMITED — \C.ENT8— lii-l H.lii o ^ss**s^'ssrvss+*ss+*^&y+'*''**'*^^ OFFICE 449J W(,RK$MOf PARTS DCPr 4473 MICH. 4125 i mi %  I 17 %  IIAII Iii 1-M. !• %  .-.. i and a.W p.m. except en &alurd*v HeaUlialMir. all Mill %  .• pia Ixiwrea thr houn ol IR a.m. and IT: of Comn IMniA* %  Oltll VI Al ^ VENDEM*8. 8EDAS. I iWJ% IAB V ARTISTICAS :* > CURIOSIDADE8 TRAIDOH S *; 3E LA INDIA CHINA e Ji EJII'TO ^ T HANI'S $ Pr Wm Hry m 1*1 J. & R. ) /wcuL Dial i' i •; IHE WORLD'S FIRST CHOICE IN TYRES GOODYEAR iTHE LONG L1FF HARP^^T V^EARiNG TYRE l'.i7 CITY GARAGE TRADING Co., Lid. VICTORIA STRF.ET


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Atoorate r-^r-^r _•;_ RSHAY J/.'.l'ARY 3. 18S2 PRICE f.VF W.I. LOSE FOURTH TEST MATCH Defeated By Casualties And Faulty Umpiring Fine Century 'By Hassett WEST IM.ll S \l 11 KAMA m and !i THE FINAL STAGES of the Fourth Test Match saw .some dramatic scenes as the West Indies lust by one wicket and one run. It was as tense an atmosphere as was ever icad in Tst Cricket. Valentino .ind then snicked u foui that leapt over Wecki-s' hand as (hat slip fieldsman fell tad brought up the 100. itury fought every inch j ,. v and nlmuit achieved ^Haasett Australia resumed at one for 68 aud by dogged cricket carried the 10 147 (or 5. Itaeaeti who '.-untilbutvd an exeallani eg o( the Ktory. With the score at 192 Guillen %  aught l.indwall at the wicket and the West Indies were on lop again. Australia needed 58 inns with 4 wickets in hand. When JotanaOn and Hassett wore both nut at 2)8 victory was in sight tor the W.'l Indie*, itamaaiun and Valentino were now "spinning'' for %  win The last pair met at tin wicket with 38 runs needed ami they made them amid.ii the most dramatic scenes to win the lourth test match and retain the mythical "ashes." This day charged with Inipvitance for the Wast Indies was on. of clear hot "ip**""* Worrell took the field because his bowling left handed of course—-might to nee-led. itamadhin opened with a auidati | bowled Valcnt over to Harvey two halls of whlcu "* rorTTrS %  sari^ufsK s: * ** %  *• end and llaaartl forced one oo the: tr k f "•* %  P 8 >'| n dividend leg Slda with a choppy stroke that 1 Ho1 ** a*** 8 *'' %  "> mure freedom a sign that he had mistimed it. Harvey then off drove Trim for two and the lirst really free stroke of (he game came after 3U nun* utes when Hassett drwv detected %  first short ball from Valentine and drove wide ol midou for another four. Moroney had stood very unhappily without scoring and obviously with few ideas how to combat Rarnadhin when ihr little man from Tr nidad had him LB.W. Moroney l.b.w. Rarnadhin 3. Three for 106. Miller now joined Hasset square cut Valcutine for iwc. __ also was making a vague kind of attempt feo dealing with h*nrijr| that was cuming well up to him and burning Eventually he chopped uown on ValenUmand he and Hassett ran two while Guillen and Gomez pointed at the wickei and the rest of the Ik.d ihou.ed thrmselve-. hoarse. Only then did uie | umpire give Miller out hit wicket P for two Four for long off for throe which brought up the 50 pailnemhip in 66 minutes.. Trim bent Harvey In his third over with a ball that just shaveo the balls but Harvey came back with a delicate glance for two of! the next ball and the pair had added IS in half an hour this morning—some indication of th sti aggie Australia were having for runs Trim G< Off Again Hurvey broke the restraint by on driving Kasaadaln for four ufter he had bowled hu> previous four overs for only three Valentine relieved Trim who went ufl the field with an injured leg and was replaced by Atkl Bo ilisud vantage ui the fielduift strength. Hassett hooked Valentino for four altar watching other deliveries closely. Harvey had 33 and the score was 93 when played forward and under an off break from Valentine (a leg u tu a right hander) and was bowled as well as could be. It was a valuable wicket to take at this stuge. Harvey being the must tu-nlitic scorer iu the Austi .ilia11 team fur as long as he stay: at thewuk.! Muicmcv now resumed the innings he had Interrupted last night and a tremendous appeal lor Lb.tr. off the first ball was refused. Two balls late: Valentine had a return catch from him hut dropped ItThis was sad indeed—one outstanding necessit: of the day was that every catel had to be taken. However. Rarnadhin brought suspense back into the game with a deadly maiden over that had Hassett employing every device he knew io protect his stumps and keep the ball out of the hand of Goddard who was fielding three yards from his bat at forward thort !eK. Valentine also kept Moroney most apprehensive with %  nottwr maiden Moroney now attempted to swing Rarnadhin to leg but missed nnd Guillen hod the ball touching Ihe balls. The WI indies attack was e'.ampcd firmlv on the batsmen who were livlnc only from ball to ball. i U stabbed down desperMelv ukeep out a shooter from uiging bat but Guillen smashed his wicket and his foot was only inelie ; in. After being twice hit he lashed an of* drive off RamadTrim to h,n ol our Hassctt's came Kb 111! .scrambled single off VslinTTie pair stayed until lunch. Hassett not out 58 and Hole not out 7. extras 11 and the total four wickets for 128 runs. Changed Fortunes After lunch the West Indies lightened their grip and runs came slowl.vThe score reached 145 (or and Goddard culled for the new ball. WKh Trim off the field with pulled leg munchGoddard took the first over. Gomez took a fine catch at leg slip to d: :miss Hole for 13 ofT Worrell. Five for 147. Hassett continued his stubborn defence and Lindwall came in to take three fours of Kamadhin 1 ': next over. Together they carried score to 174 and Australia w 1 y regained the winning position. With the score at 192 Lindwall as caught at the wickei of? Ri.nu.dlun for 3R Six for 1W. Has'-ctt and Johnson played until the tea interval to carry the score to 204 for a with Hassett v3 not out. Resuming after tea Hassett scored has century. The score reached 2<8 and Johnson was caught at the wicket by Guillen off K a mad hi n for 6 and next over with the score unchanged Hassett was l.b.w. to Valentine for 102. Even the spectators appealed The tide changed again and L-angley and Johnson met in the tense atmosphere with Rarnadhin and Valentine "spinning" for Ictory. Super-human Effort Needed For W.I. Win i from FRANK MAKUAN) MELBOURNE, Jan. : West Indian crfckttsri a Into the fourth and what p to be the final day .if the vi fourth Test jl Melbourne need a sii|ier-human effort to pull the game their way. At the end uf Hi bird day. Australia wanted 10:.' runs with BBat wtcfcetl in hand With the cream of the Australian reputed batting might ; the task appeared eay. The West Indies chances for j win rest the spinners Valentine %  Rarnadhin. They have ti> BOwl the top un this cruoipllnj Pi keep the West Indies in fight for the Ashes rUBhgl Hard Fight With the acoie at 2-1 Australia's favour after three n,' Ihe five Tests have been pU/td, the tourists cannot afford to lu.-c the present vital match. IDS West Indians are giving Australia a hard fight in the contest foj world cricket honours. Through-, out the last three day fame fortunes fluctuated first one side then the other until at UH deciding day with the W.,i Indies spinners facing Australia 1 -, bats, the chances slain! at i tm with the betting favouring Australia slightly The wicket is taking sjm to ,i great decree— witness four leg before difiiimals Wednesday. One of those decisions — that against Weekes—might .uv IV. Indies the game and all chance winning the Ashes this low Doubtful Unfortunately it is rifarnorl doubtful decision—Weeke* liiimi-lf. believing he was not out ball hit him high on the hip he knelt to hook Johnson. 1 huge crowd* attending ihr Te l wise a godsend to Ihe Wi Indians. While not wiping .. Ihj deficit on Australian spa Melbourne crowds paid so mueh that the tourists do not have Io rely on big crowds In UM r-'iMTest at Sydney January 25. in order to square up tottr MB* 0 I A huge crowd was assured again Thursday for what prumtees to be the battle of cricket giants —r.r. HAKVEY i.i l>mini*. Left (o right JUmadlun. UnUIr rth Te-t at Ml Hsit.y. Umpir Wri K ht. Miller. Week* i Rmhop'icif" J i.s.i. g ,si.N -Caronia* Will Be AenelZiMa..! Mel With Flowers Preparation* For Tourinln fVo \hvutl Churchill And Udeii Want U.S. Support For Atlantic Treaty By K. H. SH U VOaW AI 'Mill QI'KKN MARY AT SEA J Prime MH o ChurchilJ r*nd T!>: UVSI WjJJ tit I N.A.T.O. so thai mi.>i mal, more Intimate ami • projeel will alao include an It ea *."i tiie poW.. i urniiuiriin :is \>i|| as the fttrictl) E • onununity irooau f.<\..u .11,111 .1 The bae working European mtinenuil %  PARIS, ,t. paM ih uin %  %  aonlttlicm Koi" I hava t. launch u new mllll clioi Th" %  gala, !.. %  nh I %  General A ned sessions at Uv Mot hen after itlO-ds] Christmas roeess Cohen pointed up the lessons Kore in urging suppoi *l srttAlJS "Ml INKINOS Moirll Ibw 1> V.t-nllcr Moronry tb t Rjtdhln Harvtc. b Vi>ltitutMIIW till Wkk*| b VaU-nlli>* Hole Ooum b W--n.li 1-lr-dvBll c C'llllrn b RimMWn I*n JodnwiT) r Ouilla*i b R*n*IMi Hanrli lb V-lMili**r t-s-agiey ibo Vni1 u-*Hlr,( not o.>\ JoKrXonr not out Rslrat Total ifor fl HkeU> SOSUM. AJ.AI.VSI-. Stassen Will Make Gold Standard '52 Platform Issue Uip Uxhi Itcu-iiius Oil Wrecked !~Hauuer UJUDOti. Jan. 2. A United States dtsuoyci. ra< iig to the aide of the derelic*. steamer >1> kag tay-raru-r ruourled that Captain CsgfaaQ, the only man aboard, was aai'goig on ti.iougli uvw gah Hig> WlOdS blocked the deoarturc uf the deep %  ea tug Tuxmall fzOaa Farnwurtl,. Cngiuid. tu the a pss liah a sj apol 250 miles southwest of baaand, where the Flying LaUepriar rocked wit 1 bar port iail> and main deck awash. The US desUuyei ruslico iu Iho scene at V.iiU am Uirough high sea* from bordeaux. rlan< i The destroyer conunanded by Commander W L ThuitiuM.n trtablishefl iadt<< Wleulione eonlac'. ;i : | with Carisen, who wai> *- igll on the 6.711 U| Fifty passengers and crewmen had been transferred through hunting seas Io othci Fifteen of them arrived a| Rotterdan. Holland, last night The destroyer rtUejp sen messages 1 rncouragame*it| from his (ainily and A I r,,: I'.' .', [,.M' '.i %  uv. %  i : '.' M" Flrksg Eaaer-arlae. Karl Mcherwald, chief mate of the 2.400 tori German | N aaabt U ArtoD which picked up mme of tin survivors, said on arriving at LiverDOol. England, last meht that Carlson's Company had told him not to abandon Ihj ITntafprUe unless there was no longer any hope fur her.—U.P. '' ,l 1 l-n;i:ion res-ilution, "-•''the second nhi PI ra" r tinU K eollniive msflntaarj eM deal ivilh anj future K that an armisllee soon %  Ool : will 'In II %  %  • t time in hU been forr.ii t. I to Ihe prin rips sccurit\ MAXIM LITV1NOV DIES AT 7.7 Mice >i-U ui the rnrei K !i Ministry until the a -nigm Foui igll Bcei ot tinKan % %  i, sioori guard-ofinorjl and inuu-nal agaaW the U.N. |a MI naaaad [j aan ..,„. t,,,,,, vaftow ii.ii. to %  nopss, ttutl armistice includljig i III of us ill be tequued. The I %  i t atruly c*cMipe*alive Lwo state* ol „ world .111111 The I itioni • >t11auu ii future ., largja N Karaa, awe the '' s '"-' botaa the BalMi brunt of Hi,, hglitniii %  m Ac. ,. ting ;h i-N. t" .(,--. njj IIM \ i %  i t„ art for uturc aggressor. MARRY W. FllANT/ Two U.N. Plane* Shot Down (her N Korea WASHINGTON. Jan. 2, j Reaction hero developed slowly and cautiously lo Har-1 uld Stassen's announcement that he would make the modern Btn ARMY a QHS Korea, i.'tld standard "un issue in the 1952 political campaigns. Tin* Coiamuolst anti-aircraft guns question is considered to have worldwide economic rgaaV *• down twt, United aaUuits .licat.ons and an individual campaign proposal would cause .;-"£ ^ £<$& f /U T.d illTSrl S'.nc organtxaUoni and mall ^legations DJ Prorkan arbo cam* i • i. pt A mbds-, a dor Yve, iu, acUni Dean ol tha i % %  |i offerad PeeaUfn r | %  %  envoy* and placed %  arraaUl on lalvinov',, bier. Tin (UBM l .• fen ihl aftarnooi s/llh lx '"' %  '"^ lh '" %  *• larv oi the '"" -" %  > % %  v '' %  %  BASKETS *>i locally Rrown Rowan will meet UM Cunard While Star tourist Luttr Pamaila. tht Aral ahlp ol iheaouson. when she anchor:, m t";nli--.le Hay at 1 p.111 on %  The oagketa ol Bowan will rat th.,,ni oi tha Barbados Publicity Committee who unnow busy preparing up-tuI inatiiiii and other thlnfjl th.it aj boQ| ist would want %  Miss Joan Kysh. Secretary of ii.. PubUt ltd Conunlttaa, laid Uu Advoeale yesterduy thut they i. dacoratuif the outside of .building to make it I ACltVe. fOI Ihl I. .in i .1 %  -. %  :-..il Ttie Publicltj C'oe wmi faee nnvgot down .i l.iiui'i atock of lite %  aoludlnj ii.iiii %  lascrtl %  t kntaraaa, i. greeting n l .. i i %  %  pecting ii fresh end .inhopli g t" vc tiiriii in time fe.i i ing In lebruary. The; are OKIOJ iiu atti ol stsmps t. i rba • %  %  banga rail %  .I.' .. T,.,.I> iuictilaliofl of tin%  RkMinl of Barbadian one Will gel from umiloll,i Ug t4i so daltars and on Uu ravaraa r. 1 Q] IS .HI ranog on will get front one Bgu I h I lor up to 511 Barbados doll abaoge rate ihaat %  hopping guldaa gava toui 'innduring thru one-UOSt'UW, Jan. 2. innouncad tag death of iximovieh Utvioov75. %  ..in'. sin vlvtag col" I-nil. fratda, tlir unly nmrning p^pi'i jiuUishtd today n-ni i.itv.iH.v dsad ..ttl I .1 |f %  The body ..f t'.e "Old B*.lshe%'ik ,p 1 pence ano lay m -t..tiln-. awrnasg an Bdwai i .it.itaiiiur iii the conferNine ShsM i. id iii..aUi ft .i now maiden" SOVK-I niiblK llitures have been entombed. Pravda pubtiahad an OB on UM last pan deai rib-I Wink aSOSl of the'ships will be Uplomai Tha dli u u -tt.. pan ol %  < day I' %  '' Ihe two tit, % %  ' %  '• %  % %  %  Argaaituu aod Braail U b ...• %  BXpi t-.nl Inn -. .l.ni M and rabruai? 13. will u %  %  .niiK earij diirlng tinmorning und oald-day, The major l.ngiliners, she was exi" ' oi lourasl %  %  i %  I ..i Unships v : thl y I'll > \. .ml UM United State entitle 'he Deed foi N.A.T.O n un, ( t the and %  '( tinueent Rotn* an 'i. %  it a*aa Mi Ural CM it r'lii't'ign S.raaan • %  .iinmc %  .,, UM b* i i aapi ka i %  at UM UMtad Nations AssemhU In I'.u. Civilian llirrclur it..tii Churchill and Bdcti are known to beUavi thai on UM diplomatic and iiulilu-.il side of . i .ui,, be .. dim t.ll Of Ml' Dwigh! i: UM niUlr> (Veld tin tinanancial side Churchill 1 arrive in Washington .in tu pal in in' hand bw ba %  %  %  Brita laarad Uuouah Win iii Wui ii .MMwhan UM lookad total u now edge oi bankruph i "i. ..I ii %  %  i if--. World Wa lu UM : -hun bill i (oi UM iai quarters of laal wi" ha known, and hey .lie exuevted l" % %  nther ovenrnalaalng dafleil BN ll,.' IM>I thinmonths. in mmpie bsTtna U iii aaaai th.it duruig IM1 Hi it,un ayenl u thau it carn,i.. |1 H'.llll riollei man win • 150.(10 |-i ,i,lv glOO.00. Trade FiKure Bad In eeUlU %  %  -iaU trade rtfuaa wltt i-N aoilai loaud HI. >raaaalni bad Hn %  — slill import-' i mmth.ni •". <-xports in contrast to tinagnaraln g whirl she IIVIHI on tp.nling and hanking centra ol tha world n win t-Malaal "ii* dismal rid that ChUl inii -Adi tah in Waablnaton Bui !%  nil lake ...,,, %  i. %  ',,!, %  Partiainant' %  %  u %  .. poi in Uu nutuaJ an LU %  i .., iranuns to put Hi n i i,< road to aalvaoi > Whi %  i I %  %  | .. nii.wu• Chun b i i.-iiuiiil It umaii -J> h. eanlnd Rniaianall 'i Ina I %  iiiiiluii.i miti ibution llnl. UN made during Wuiht War II Aluinic Knergy Also high on Churehura agenda Aill probabl> ba tm.i' rank down UM postwar banaai vbloh have blockod Arudo-ADMrl,ni exohangiOf atOatUj nni,%  i iu,:, bin want more thai ii.' v\ .mi-, pat sang >• %  % %  iii :, partnarahlp Ui Un .'.inn, onargj I %  tad during the war a I iinmie bomi' wa bt rig developed. Bui Churchill ii i ha) %  .-. Un] i tin11 B ; %  oil not i Churchill U liringin,; with him Truman, •us atoaale asawsB, M Charwatl ugje ndvise %  CrkurohlU during the last wnr lus Invaluable. i hurchUI will hold mr strong hurgainlng points wh an down with Truman on this emr-inl taaue: rtrati Tiu HMii.i, aavg ajaen the Aroirirtiikry -bmnhi i Rnglniid whenatari hmied and oaatd ioj<*off I tacks against Russia if ra fjaaond BMtaln wh o-itvi %  ( tinmail r p m of baalr %  -.'.ii'h '"i |he w believed (n he %  . Third: Bi ajor advaaoaIi I frm rhin.liiir %  will not l i —r.p. U.N. Agree To Red Demand For Release Of All Prisoners I'ANMIIN.H'M. Kt.iL-.i Jan l. |l Cmii-fl Nations have aKi**"b> " %  C'mmunist |..i Hitnh MMOi ;ill war pru.<.ners during an no great official concern. al sources arc uncertain what Stassen means by the mod -m gold standard and think that '.!. %  • ugnMeaassa of his propoaai his later jtnpliflI tha phrase Wide In t. i,t Sources think that if Stassen •cientitlcallv works out his programme and presents it kettanauy to the public, he may be able, to .. the subject. But they did not expert that his view would have .nfluece on the Qov, nuietor than H has beerin months. eminent unless they -Jiould heKnocked down by Red groundcome p-in of the iUpublk.fl, e were :, U.S. Turider-jet and Party's platform [Shooting Star-Jet. Both were bit Stassen tnrew the gold issue uv hile attacking Comrr.urust (niuud the political arena, whan he said concentrations that therr was only one real way Oexausil-' bau weather over to insure the ollcl dollar for a,Communist trrltoiy long term In the U.S. He said, "that' l.'.S. iet from avenging losses way is lo place the U.S. dollar air combat, on the modem gold standard." U.S. Sabre-Jets, patrolling Cold policy has not been a.cloudy skies sighWd ao Bed planenationsl partisan issue in the US over "M10 Alh-y In North We'inc. 11*34 when the Gold Reserve I Korea only ground Ni Act was passed. ported along tha 144-nula front. Jamaican Gaoled On Drug Charge 1XJNDON, %  'tionU. %  %  g in unni n.dMii MI DJ When arrested, said polue 12 paoaaju LontaiDing a u.'.iil of Hft gTaiDS '.' mi JS ,, "i of Uwe foul creatures who sell drugs" and addrd: -There can M DaUttng which g<-es roora !y t-i the IO-.I of the Ital ;ny society than introducing it Ifl Use use of dangeiou> drugs." Union, who pleaded guilt. .i. %  %  -i %  :itku •' as was the practice in Jamaica He admitted two previous convictions in Jamaica, one fO' robbery with violence, for whirl. J.I Another Jamaica! If 24 who was ili-irged wth I.into' 1 Ml sent to prison lor days BW '• IIi %  .' % %  %  : %  ,.! isaid a partly-*oaakac rigatette &^lnlog hemp ww found t hi!, last B I P. Illlll K Utvkwv bad baan nui >-i puhllvj Deputy : HI, Baton 'Inii kg was Foreiiiii Col Rfj to 1930 and Savattl \.''.'.I t. Wjshini; mi lion 1941 t IMS V rore i i .in. ciiMlnnu.iltosnillon In th. i %  at In thai .. Mflui T .... " %  -1 nbtainiriK Norlh A %  %  %  %  I (iun'v who nerved as prineiprrl pried coflbi to thf fliindraped hearse Pall-bearI k bri i irdi —1-. Strange lilastn Mann Clerks Seusoii lie-ins *i check with aaaaa cd UM loea %  i tti.it tm %  . %  %  %  i %  %  i II.II neon %  %  %  %  A in-, k .it tht %  bowad tn..t H, Bddltloi t .m rifflani Un ra art %  ..-,. AltJv I i. ,i | reaacha sra praoflealh rtUad On Fa..:. i. Blur U.giviiu; BU tb* was leaving port -j NM peculiar uei I %  ,ine %  ,nt ba pacullai one who wa* in touch with th. Navy Ut-auMthe naval craft. aotar %  > %  art me sur waa I came t„ Barh. % %  typical of A ANTKHfA, Jan I O.BJ for Aled fJriffin of Moiitsen.i I -.'.' 111! r Administrative Chan;. World lUtnk Effort* Favoured iiy Mossadegh. 'grey top-sides. %  i HERAN, Jan I' M a ned M DOS -i Wi ni %  %  QH i i Wt-rl.i • t'oit. j resolve the Iranian nil DrarUy to) ii udfaojl i l orklld Rseln %  rei %  %  merit arrived In Tebrgn Monday %  They said the had foun.l him UM n.i.K I %  the situation araaah out of • %  %  iKht this i.-Mt" l>iu k; %  %  H ,l.it. ,i pi., i / U H pavpoaal pro' all wai oat i and Inh i w i ., i .:.:,.,! ted Into the Lad annlea Tru i reacta riuu.N Raar Admltal n I ha got tht %  dd tti.it he • ii UH Commu lood tha tormula d 'ii %  • Uu | %  •" BI %  P .r.t I ..inpri %  %  ind g ] %  .,,.. Meeting at 9.00 • -1y. B ini siii.-".iiii'iiitf.'. i on uf „ no prosjraaai^ w- en Tuesdj i. All otht He was *H .inn of Rrywr Constru. %  a> on pe ti 'for narry yi



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mi I:-I>\V JAM \i:\ II.\I:I!MMIN invoi I'M.I FLINT OF THE FLYING SQUAD .... BY ALAN STRANKS & GEORGE DAVIES ONDIE 'i-iii1 Y Uf, lli i>T Ihr J. *>lii.U lij<'ii It R.HH1 IMIU %  'I %  j I'lrifhl. i IUMW) Mo, artm yen %  olr^M thi pries i \.ni i .UI'I gei in., i ..i i*. i o-li.ii.. Iln..". I i. .1 %  i %  .. i i ill Whit, (..in .ii'. < ~1. I.I llir -ipi Dnv 'jwl rigfe'J Loafc l'i 'I i %  am i made by JOHN WHITE means matte just right IT PAYS YOU TO DEAL HERE SPECIAL offers to all Cash and Credit Customers for Thursday to Saturday only .I'l a I \l Ol I I lt\ rn-amm .oiailialila' at nur Ikriiiirlia*. Tnra'aKialr. N|ii'iylilsl*i\ ii anal SMIIII Hlrrrl I.IKIIII BOW Usually Now %  AT THF CLOSE ol cnotl.or ... *• look back with gratitude to the support %  -operation ol those wo have had the pleasure of serving throughout 1951 end lake this opportunity ol express in-j our sincere "thanks' HMrtw lor Prosperous 1952 DOWBUffi ESTATES lll\IH\. KIMIMW AMI LTD. & & I VS.SMiii5>J'5Jlv:'*.S*iM'iJSllMi



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iRSDAV. JtNl'lRY 3. 1952 BARBADOS ADVOCATE I HREF. One has to be S O careful ^r*l£f Jamaica lean) Kor Barbados "ettd. .till MMII. IM. %  I.,M,IIU hpi ru Try Germans l rying To Dodge Pay men t *%  av NEW AIR SERVICE KIN' %  BecOSad "me tl ad a Tram to Bai i| no an January )!1 The %  > .925 V %  BontttO wnc I US lean iilana 1-' year A lcg.brc;ik bowler he li a tolerable batsman b Alfred Binn' improve*! not only a* i. kri-Kt-rpet hut .tlwi ai a bat*%  nan aluee be waa given hi* Brtt npportunitv to to lo Trinidad IP NavUh •d * kbOUl the best bjtsman in the Weal Indies who did tint make the learn to Australia Colin M an eacellen'. nrldsmai Stanley Qaodrldaa M a ant-fott .-I by man* .i. the most promising new ball bwtor m ih> Waal Nb Hi can move the new ball out am WDM UM -nine i* gone swing" i Mi thf i od) Georg. Mud> la law wander-man JaaMiran cricket. He la a wellleft-hand ill %  ALfit-d Valentine earn* %  it iij ai hi I] i" %  ROJ Millet whO "ill t ll fast mrdiun bawUt who hit* the b 1 UM MwaMi*. more 'ai Chrittmaa I>J tMTMVBB Sunday.. British raiUioi & Whiteof Bri hall that the Oermani an lo dodge Wtyta| defence After a secrd maivy's new industrktl imnm. UrUiah investig itori 45.000.0o0 West German pay double the £550 mil!. via ini pai n i mod ii porbant Karachi. Bangkok Mid Maml:i daw landing) lo >'• %  %  Ihal al Tokyo, i ihen I 'Dutch Factor) lit Jap -Port W*-*Ms M Wiiu Rrlnoew KI./UIHUI Iliiii(li<*U| tnm '--. I n aiiatl Gl GETOWN B.G PurHah.. pih lad %  %  ,.. atra I i' %  nc *i i day* ,hr Dutch Factor; in Japan, ha chai (Bechlea up "If th.British taxpayer hi. 1 U ,,, The schedule in. tin netlhn Dutch t.if.,„ %  (at trading aa*fs In tha Prill•tieavl l,|i| par tlHMtti fj.750 mile MtfTIM lafj Ivrn MaUOB) rtmalfl*d UM old W* .tit-re ft-OV d .. %  planned in such a v.... 'ipan and Europe haraOnai '"' l %  %  noraBg on c a clamour to bring theiTi eaUoni connections arc alao pro'or mote lhaa two rmturiaa Nc Yar*l l>t ai — ltd from many other lowtu HoUand now holdn a lending Icrajlh ahaad of U> and countries alicidy served by plncr in rnmmetcial aviatinn aixl beatt" Lopca eoM lo r of the occupation unh K.I..M. The Contellationwill le-ulf hurdly glva a second onlt win (*'i UM r:.n.:.-. Acftatiaw-r have been tol.I> Tha) musl s Jajpancac eaprtal on Friday mornJoaan oaa .n inabU lo i--rd a The i > %  r. v.. ., u pplvinn ovary penny >t the ,„. w |„i c u,,. r cium trip leaving '"tun..us kuilnei m AmMcrdam l*lci mraugn t.ini(ltn; wnti nTokvo on Sunday hi scheduled to and disembark In Tokyo lea* the t*uc Rmhfel cauaad the onl > J .-on. wtietltei It I ,. rvlve „ t %  BUSKM on Tuesday ih" Ined rtS !rSt \Z '" KSaon, "huh -eans tha. the J -•.ell. .-I.I-L — ._ But this double coatribtfl ind it at a o-i i mitt raambon of idi .. i, i off-brt bowiot. iv-,.. Tharaarn who ha< .... i i 1 i ., h,. v tbrohan i raltabte bah li i* also Soeratarj leket B ad at C nh In Iht tit.il* wbuh have Ukei ptaCW ni-lhittE hn* ho*eii 1 %  ntics kvar, but th. te ion that the Jamitca b Kite nod Ihernarlve ti Bai would end la* i %  export market:> walk Briuh) '.' ;-rming. Ami CJetnuiny thiratinK for trade and rich living, prefers to put off money %  and let the AlUts shoulder the cntln defence burden. British income tax i Germany.' ..i: • .1 view ot ihe special ehanietc Inriividual Germans an i.nly hali whal th* vc;iucBritish I And constant propaganda laajriat Allied occupation cosLs Senior British stair officers gay f "iis tfrwt flight, the .. w|fj carry vai mui l awai anr made on garrison cosu in the past presents Thete hi ;i teller frcan jear. Further cuts would seriousthe Buraomastci ol The H.iKue t^ ly hit the living; stanHaru of his colleague in Tokyo, and a let,„ Lritlah a u l iiNa -B and iervica naY Irom the Amsterdnm Champomtment in c.erniany. bei ol Commarea to tne Fokya fajii Why ihouhd Brvllth iroopg t^hambar of Commerce. Atter cielancl'iini the Cien lo become poor relation: ball officer. ;i ; rnost that ui British ofneialfl odliavi b hlch pn -At "i tin iraaattng when .i uuti dftvt Irorn eomlng duaa %  m .". iiie r-.ntinn 1 to gpotnci t.nd iron, tha pole IhU is in sitiking c MnUonaira u ,' tertaken in Hull -ne %  ppaarcd t" n 1.198 by I'mDul I i 'i !-•>rormet and rinlahod hall • lit. Ilape La*l i.U4 Tullngs hen. MH and Faith whoea eaatabia hnd baan instructad t. aai gall rot w Asia Via South America This h. paditlon waa a great IIOM I;I \lll\OI S AIIOIT II\IllEi\7,A KEEP III \ BOVBIIL n aaultad fw s- Uaaualli. Ml II i< bo aUowad tha C'onstellaiion arrives at Haneluecaadad In i %  said da Airport, a young oak tree (lour ol Bunfo koop thai it centre) ihibn Toky UM rtimap| Ship. Ihe ('uaeckt % %  jclung the hiii inland ol Dutch village of BosKyushu 00 April 19. 1620 The famous tree-growiiiB vovagc h.el lasl&i almost 21 veai-. ill be planted in one of Tn smp WBS practically derelict. iain squares. The Mayor Bn(1 ,,„ .,.., ,., ,.,. screen to %  kM down to collecting of Tokyo will he able to mak. depleted Uirough sickneaa and •crrnaniTouWiivy '""" •>" %  hMtaad n| aeeufllng the MO^iakltanaa af g t..viitinol hardahlp This *,. the v k ^^KuiTrSSchaefar Ihe produc-i ol Uu> j Ihai „ ,. „ ,„, Dulch Bt. Re %  A lAfWIr. \,. %  t II. IV .| I Mlii 1 .niiol i £750 '" d u.iwholoaale. ebnma thai inU poasibly afford more th.i mllliMii %  real t i I I i son tOTCI I I AfttQ Bui the B rejc U this. Said n senior Brltisn ilnaneial cfnclal today: Wa i inaa, that ihe Germans are well ahl. £1,000 mill" tear. Tliat would be about ten ptr cent, of Western Oftl gioaa uti %  if the Oannan i rafuaa, i an strious situation wil art-e Bt n could : the Bhoaun has a very heavy three-v lence proRtammc. It H I I '' i.-ipossible lo increase that exi i""L i.ilure no matter how much .e tha *. n howl "It wo fall lav them .big ,-,.. %  DocupaUor cosU nnother 9d. In coma ernment .8tnH ;tfl rd OH *'* rongum ol old Dutch gm lo f4tn ^ a | (Ul ., odattu Utxefrom Sehiedaaa, n tartha* „|„. T1 .|, ( „,., M. the Weat ware on I Holland %  i i r. way CMIIIIC taxiti.-r, ... u ,, Thtoughoul !h. -i. inn, a| 1 %  WlU not war prnapentt and tkcl nute 4 authorities have sent ,.,.,..,, ,,„ -• %  gnd >.. Japanion Ihe occasion hfllcr u „. CO m in ar c l al telallons. al trip I" laa i irtj i rut m ,. Bli cir century when rumours of the ,.„„,, t .,, peroUttad The Dutch %  • %  inisslbilitias of trade with Japan mpilI -.. ,, ,|„. Jgpgngaa their 1 basan i tne then know |e,i^ of the natural scicnco. siadthohier. Pi mce Ifaui ffuKUclna and ipatna:..iwer Saxony, „ n ,, e personal letter in ihe ni:i |„. t ,,.,., Oien influence wa 'v x ia tiller ol Japan. .u. It that inDutch language tathat (.crmany ,,. I toMUO far dlploOn July 6. ItHW. -I %  loag vovagc. two Dutch East I ,hc Ja an the "Hed Lion d U ... . Arrow and the "Cnffcn c si the davelopinani of national | .f bid anchor in the harbour of Hit do. pi perity has olten been preuieKuhi. la not l.u ii. %  hhdi opanad op new ell way to Edo. now; Like their %  QOVkn ' %  anoestors official: %  in th • baUerf Ui .• U Western Allies l.i go at i *• rmr* o* f %  laj bl ': %  %  %  %  %  sl* II tk Hltmi t. I"". '. 1IH IIii i Wa %  • HI n< mil II utaa \r i t -ii. i i... (TollJ R a. m ' %  I Tin.* I -II Ml ll tMUl VI • Parti i UM NI i -.1 \ %  It. %  The that th< the fnct UtStftJtllMA. 1 ^^'/^ the BhOgun the letter whu >TK. Cos! of defence had brauglrl from Prlnaa Man %  • aboul l'. r .md t> labliah otflcial ralaui, %  tinworking P>!>uUtion. Iwtwt %  > Ihe Dulch East Inch. I.E.S. Company and the Government or Dulehnv will part i l lo plaj di-velopMIMIUM • IIAMIII *!• OB. MilHWl K,.\ I il Ihal. I %  miteraaa 111* tr-i .. a .NO •"" i •ii—< %  • -UK-Ill'* rtrnklo >b. i Mian ni Tiinr I Mm M MS tl II t-.nl! te Oi,tilli .|J \,... [ Mll.l MlNAUtr. Si I CHILD DBES SUDDENLY A THllVHItni.il %  mi of Mi and Mn Lutcbar Hoax • ra Hill dMd Mddatuj i hen mideitce on Ni" ^> %  t. A [toil in i %  i aM I bt lit W H n tha same day and i • lealh due ti | K ttui nod rut iNMAff.s ,,i si Jjeaaah %  were inteitjinad al OR New Yrni I | was the Annual "Spe IfuaM NU|I|II"-I in iiiiinie\ir orchealtii .. nir U0HN1NQ ol Uii i |ub li-.k plan "ii New Y. I | Lk of Ihe ClUb ttill b0 if %  i. i ..I, handii rafts %  (ilath-, fol I %  • rhet) arhleta iit i*conducted ht Mr. J. N. Arlhiit \ i A'III be slatted in the Heat Inline RAIN which fell over Ihe last! 1 thai • la mages to! Can iiavelling uong i'hutii-i ,/• %  i ..i.t war* held up and olhet tiatnc was force*' ''i tin ti lux k and go through Lh-aggs ii*ii by way of. SUK^I Hill H:KHill pond which lip tm :\ number of nmntht before the tan men look he opportunity of using tins (Hind water instead of going Up'uii t'. the stanaptpa. The watei a>ag ued only (ot washing Veij few holiday makers ware ^t Balhsheba on lloxlng Day. he%  %  %  iitnu Ymi will BiiJ, mo, dial t .critii-kiidraws out din ftnoi cuts. i t 1" aad I IF growth of new UUa. Kaap I ot I •ennokmc hn Jy fol ItodlT USB. FOR SPOTS, HASHES. BURNS IRRITATIONS, ABRASIONS i — Iwal (W flaw. for THE NEW YEAR ME6xu„d WOMEN 40, 50 AND OLDER.' herVt how you can be strong and activ jj II yn fl run Jowr.. irt nut ^\ %  I.llolh-II >..Utl V U )dlM. *d" and mlil* liang on, wm mar 7 n.rd awra AaD Vluaakhu ll Trf Kiamili', good lattmg N .1 Malt* a lika n P^ trgularly all MU i^und i'A arg hiulding oil. ll l.li-i liuild uiiiian.a, iianlaa %  Ml I anjsy DRESS JACKETS (White) Specially Priced Mara lhan | u >> %  lamia— It's fOWEtrUL NOUBISHMIHT $32.50 STOCKPOKT • KHAKI • PANTS The finest quality of Khaki made $9.50 per pair 15k SC0TTS EMULSION HtGM Efi/eRoy FOOD TONIC iff* 1'HXfl # /. %  #'#'/* Ihv tm a tor if thiin I Shake some Harptc' into the bawl |eg*a otcrnighl then rtebrat%baaad..( %  II .i %  %  n.i'i i %  ..(-. incliKliM^ trwM.oniRcied t" M-ptie lank*. HARPIG ^3M*S8*W^^4W k 3*J'raH*S 5**? %  Aft HVATO* CUAN1IR tWof T TT^f^MntWI