Citation
The Barbados advocate

Material Information

Title:
The Barbados advocate
Uniform Title:
Barbados advocate (Bridgetown, Barbados : 1983)
Portion of title:
Sunday advocate
Place of Publication:
Bridgetown Barbados
Bridgetown, Barbados
Publisher:
Advocate Co.
Publication Date:
Frequency:
Daily
regular
Language:
English

Subjects

Subjects / Keywords:
Newspapers -- Bridgetown (Barbados) ( lcsh )
Genre:
newspaper ( sobekcm )
Spatial Coverage:
Barbados -- Bridgetown

Notes

Dates or Sequential Designation:
Apr. 22, 1983-
Numbering Peculiarities:
No issue published for May 3, 1983.
General Note:
On Sunday published as: Sunday advocate.
General Note:
Microfilm produced before 1988 may be substandard.
General Note:
Latest issue consulted: Feb. 28, 2005.

Record Information

Source Institution:
University of Florida
Holding Location:
University of Florida
Rights Management:
Copyright Advocate Co.. Permission granted to University of Florida to digitize and display this item for non-profit research and educational purposes. Any reuse of this item in excess of fair use or other copyright exemptions requires permission of the copyright holder.
Resource Identifier:
17931718 ( OCLC )
sn 88063345 ( LCCN )
Classification:
Newspaper ( lcc )

Related Items

Preceded by:
Advocate-news (Bridgetown, Barbados)

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Full Text


Sunday Advora

ESTABLISHED 1895 BARBADOS, DECEMBER 16, 1951 PRICE: SIX CENTS

U.S. Is Trying To Solve U.K. —Egyptian Dispute

British Train | AWAY FROM THE ¢ONFERENCE TALE ikea T i“ y To Win At
Derailed | "Talks What T hey’ve



















CAIRO, Dec. 15 | { | Ky x] ti oO
tian dispute, the American Ambassador, Jefferson Caffery 408 n iS i ms

said to-day, following another visit to the acting Egyptian
Foreign Minister, Ibrahim Farag Pasha PANMUNJOM. Korea, Dec. 15
Caffery saw Farag as the Police proclaimed a state of ‘he United Nations rejected the Communist troop rotatior
emergency in Cairo for the re-opening of schools, closed oft r and accused the Reds of trying to win at the truce table
after violent student riots earlier. Police riot squads at they had lost in battle. The U.N. delegate. Maior Ger
suarded strategic points in the city and patrols around the ral Howard Turner seathingly det t Communist
et ; ma etet yo , ’ a 1 aly aen ced c mir l
Foreign Embassies and buildings were increased. rejecting the six point Red comp:



The American Ambassador has



‘ limited troop rotation and policing ar mi f

visited Farag several times be- Cl 2 The oftes would have limited the replacement of combat
Tore this week, Aa he left. the oser nity seal Gis Eu Adie intlen ia RRO bee secuinen ana
Foreign. Office, this morning, Caf- | eS ps du wir armistice to ; per m« h—we :
fery said, “We are trying to find a} B t . { K er the present MS. notation schedul ae Winnts
solution for the Anglo-Egyptian e ween e e n

those to possible Communist veto
problem.”

Sabotage | AndU.S.Likely



U.N.—Communist I
1 . ‘ till deadlocked {te » das of
. 4 tryin to work out a oO amr
A British military train wae| By BA pe ‘A Chur hill, 4 1 for insuring the observance ‘
derailed between Suez and Ismai- _ WASHINGTON, Dec. 15. s 4 x irmistice. The second Subcommit
lia today. Military authorities be- ,, Diplomatic sources predicted Brick layer tee debating of the exchange of
lieved Egyptian saboteurs caused that Prime Minister Churchill war prisoners was al s alemated
the ‘wreck. may propose on his trip here LONDON, Dee. 15
- : ‘ next month the Closer Federation 4 member of the Brick Eo : tat
. = rsd a ak re h of the British Commonwealth, layer jon caused some Fire of Suspicion
sole ier ve ke a4 eg when ; he the United States and Western; del ids embarrassment rhe U.N lel ‘ Rear A
here ee tee — 'V€| Europe. British sources said they emony for 1 Ruthven E. Libby. told tne
box cars were telescopec received no official notification of : ,



tion Utone = for is that tt
































1 he efusal t permit
British Headquarters aid : |2#2Y agenda for talks and did not aiversity for En- Red ( aa re} adnan’ ative es isit
“Sabotage is isp ecte A mili- believe be had been drawn up «ag college Before camps only “fee the 'f re
tary spokesman said the Suez- Ch ae a side. They said eudience of Cabinet Min
Port Said’ line on ‘which the wreck } nurohi was: expected to final- isters and pvreminent men Gener Turner . ily i¢
occurred would probably t peas he mae Gan wd be talks of the .calm, a0 bricklayer ; i th Communists for 1
Ce ett ee jand write any speeches he may stemmed cir at ‘al oo ini ( (
blocked: fox :Apmee Gays. {deliver during his Atlantic cross- fountain rake SS hae Soe BRET a ee
rr e . rotatio mn pm thor oO >i
At Fayid, British troops opened |ing on the Queen Mary between ped and surveyed it critical robation and’ - nape af thels
fire on Egyptians attempting to Decembet 20 and January 3. _ | ly. Not ouii> square he de ; im roe re amees LE 206
stone gun emplacements at the dl ze undearne ape “ai oped elded, and asked for a level Bed yagi gaer inane Rage Sst
Headquarters of General Sir|oMicials are _ preparing. for a| to test it. After ten minu mulld new airport n Nort!
Brian Robertsen. Brié.ah Middle |TCVvIew of the most of outstand- tes, he was satisfied, Korea
East commander jing problems in ~ the Anglo- | But nervous officers who ‘ t th i
| American relations, Sources | ssa auleteern Caines ne } You eek to gair hrough
2. 8 ee |speculated however that in his egollation what you could not
Ministere Meet desire to keep toplevel talks as COMMONWEALTH SUGAR DELEGATES with the British Minister of Food, Major Gwilym Lloyd-George, (third from right) and Sir Albe . dere aaa Yo \. ois : : ee
broad in scope and as flexible as Feave: ar, deputy secretary of the Ministry (extreme right) at a reception held in London by the West India Committee and British We z 3 : ; You seek to ( a
. : 4 ‘ ‘ : aryear, deputy The bricklayer’s name is 1)
A cording to a Paris report| possible, Churahill may be plan-| Indies-‘Sugar Association. The West Indies’ delegates were liosts to the other sngar delegations and to representatives of the Colonial Office. Winston Spencer Chu rehill t ha c ! t avoia
Egyptian Foreign Minister Salah;ning to propose some rather Board of Trade and Food Ministry. In the group are, from left, Mr. P. G. A. Atthony, Mauritius, Mr. J, M. Campbell, chairman of West : auld od the Bric kh ’ | he i tir I icceptir
E] Din Pasha met with Epyptian|sweeping measure which would India Committee and chairman of the full Commonwealth delegation, Mr. H. H. Gollins, Queensland’s Minister of Agriculture, Mr. HM. A ciet Radon U P) onlay lthe restrictions advocated by the
A bassadors from Bu ropean strike at the heart of most of Cuke, Barbados, Major Lloyd-George, Mr. T. W. White, Australian High Commissioner in the U.K. and leader of the Australian delegation, and m( ; | U.N, Corfimand you iid) mere
re the roe an coe a problems. ie ‘ oe Sir Albert, who is chairman of the Ministry team in the negotiations. L.B.8 li ept the « isation. of tirat?
bassy on aturday embe 0 Ime source said: n view vour militar apabilities which
the ae ee . iuited Natiens dele he ao, intiae 15 conti | U. Ss.’ ae" Sataw “ase rennth.ot. CHM
which laste@ about 90 minutes. | unity, and in view of Churchill's | pers
jideas on the Union of Engtish is ‘y Own 2 S, four capabilitie hould con-
The subject of the discussion|spenking people of the United isappears hie Disia finihe we ohne eet of
was not seeenees ‘ ag | States and Commdnwealth this the armistice. You lése nothing
meeting will prob ght xe heldlives cannot be absent from! --———~—- ” th ;
ither gel ” Mea etl} a You gain much, for these same
sicier, 7, nly es ih yg “Tv be m ee os os a} LE Laho ar a ACROSS CZECH BORDER limi:s are pplied to the U.N,
wT vs saa 3 Cc cies - ¥. an roup | ur ty HEIDELBERY. Dec. 15 Command, gven though you. can-
| They cited these current di 4 ss A young, United “States consta- [not todey effect then by -military
m ‘ 1 bule troop vers means ‘
Dilek” leaday te “eouel’ 4 ott Should I #iGHTA ARMY HEADQUARTERS, Korea, Dec. 15. | Policy Dold) or tts. cree taht Rete te ts. we
Czechs Aeccuse American official thinkin Ou nquir e American jet fighters shot down one Communist MIG 15 jet ippeared Wednesday and “pro Victor tnd Vanquished
t Closer Commonwealth and ‘ane and damaged six others in two air battles over north-west Mr. G ' bably was kidnapped across the
; é one . ‘ es S OV ‘ r. G, H, Adams, President of }; , ‘We . , rictor
He . . ” 1" i, \ . : ; ’ rontie ageord » £ ‘ We are not talking as victor
2 ° neeailanede Cobunioed both Ko sb rhe wACtOWy boosted the Fifth Airforce's total of ‘oe Barhados Labour Party, told poleoamianae 1) ol Ree oe over vanquished We are talking
edXe ICVALS Jhere and on the European con- n ‘0 reeadom MIG'’s to 27 destroyed or damaged in 3 days of fight over'the Advocate yesterday that he oh | to fof military: realities on which this
“ 4 jtinent over Britain’s refusal to “MIG Alley ‘ ~ a oe a eee dentify the soldier but said he {@tmistice must be based
Of Es 10ha e \align itself fully: with French PARIS, Dec. 15 All American Salt rejets and Thunderjets returned safely Elections, nor that they Seeraste was a regular army private in Turner told the Communisis that
p £ sponsored plans for economic and Canada, Denmark, iceland, the although one Sabrejet was damaged . ” | win and get at least 16 seat ie frontier-guarding crac fif- | the U.N. were still willing to con-
military integration. Churchill’s} Netherlands and Norway propos- Howeve the Fifth Airf » Stasi ¢ He had felt that they would|'eenta constabulary squadror ider any new realistic Communist
VIENNA, Dec 15, |Previous support of European|ed a five member United Nations Weve: tne tt aeorce announced it lost] Shanes | ere ie centers come honing : proposal on how to police the ar-
The pretty blonde British Bm-| Unity ideas led to this disappoint-| Commission to determine if free-| _t? Communist ground fire in the week ehded yesterday. | (+ 17. He did not gue 1 16]. 2e scounted reports that the} mistice. “We told them we are
bassy secretary wounded at an| ant when after he came to|dom exists in Eastern Germany See Lt ateare It was the largest number ot) names correctly: he thoug 4p cooper who arrived In Germa iNling to negotiate when they
alleved “espionage rendezvous” i, {rower he maintained the tradi-| ang bring about all-German elee- Allied planes ever lost in a seven! ‘ nm freceney, had planned to desert e something in the nature of
alleged “espionage rendezvous” in| ijonal British coolness to becom- s tics I da eriod in Korea. In the| @t Gamer would have got in,|He said; “In fact our informatior | BS ee :
Czechoslovakia on Monday night,|jng ; 1 i ‘ 4 tions, The proposal made in the Advocate | ; : n but doubted the success of one athe tet contrary, All;# forward step,” he said
wis aicer Communist’. polict ne invol “— in metage as purely form of amendments to the Brit- | ime period the air force's fighters i? ¢ tee Star meine i juit ue ntrar i
r ir Ss Suropean elements, = . . 7 shot dov , . nem information in oul possession t : ha , ner Suber ritte
guard in a Prague’ Hospital today.|’ The growing tendency of. suoh| ‘sh, French and American “ip- Relief Fund 1pepet vi in | SORE 4 fae “With regurd to our programme indicates he probably was kid- | in the Frapne a ie . ; a
tor ; orted resolution before the ad : : SpOy Url and policy, we have pot statec ge . . Admiral Libby again t ve Rec
Daphne Mains, who {s the per-|â„¢4Jor elements of the British P Political C tt that nore and damaged nine. . a icy, we have ne ated |napped across the frontier. The}, 7 ATI aia 4 Sire
e avhe s, ois ine ae Wat ice ‘ e t . . f j > . vat he / e ce 4 1
git hep rk nell Commonwealth as Australia and oc olitica - -ommt ee a a THE Fund was not at all None of the Allied fighters was| anything in our nanifesto that}arms aid the trooper disappear- 3 oS ahs of
er ert M British AM-|Gonada draw closer to the United|neutral commission be appointed | well supported —_yesterday oat in combat Grama fighting | we do not intend to carry out,"}ed on the Bavarian Czech border |'he mechanics of tae « Coram
woe IF acg eaté th tet on States than to Britain especially|simply to investigate conditions Thes? fishermen need your aid lalso decreased In one action| he said. “We intend to do for|but refused to identify the exact} We? prisoners unlit be ora ,
poli who fit d 4 Ros Se in military and economic affairs.jof freedom. so bring your subscription to |jalone yesterday they killed or Barbados the things that o 1 apOS The spokesman said an} ists ct me pie NAEEE Ge
el AIRES che ae P -ontinui : pate , ed 9 on have sed; » we started! investigatio ad be arted ibouts of the prisone to te
Robert Neal Gardner, the second “is neritic public et os Western sources said the amend- aoe ? R a ania ae a ni Garte= 1 at e 9 s t m | Last BAR een: al UP United Nation UP.
Secretary of the Embassy enthusiasm as for associations|â„¢ents probably would be accept- _.acknowledged $5,477.18 eds Strike Back cause we did not have a cleat
a be : sliehtly| Which might make their country ed. Haitian Bellegarde told the ae 3.00 Chinese Communists struck| working majority }
w RIGA: ab hie eadabicnay tere ities become increasingly merely part|COommittee “We don't want that GD. Jemmott 50 pack on: the: centtal—grons with There are three outstanding
OUNGEG, ‘Was, Ordered. EXDGUGG | = wurove, instead. Of. th entre Kind of unity typified by daily one of their biggest probing alt, tae : iw Pr
from Czehoslovakié It is not urope, instead @ © con : , “ts a ; Total os anit cks since the start of the, Problems before us now. The
know whether he is under arrest,| f @ worldwide commonwealth, purges characteristic in Eastern oa easefire”’ twe reek non first is the careful consid !
but. Prague Radio rep cin aid Sources pointed out that the| Europe. Germany cannot live Less $87.68 Subscribers’ Chinese’ threw ‘all ie b tt ior of our fiseal policy for the next
that he had been told to leave the|{ British people would find much long as she does to-day spelling — $5,444. | Bight HenMeas” ty. cee thousand! twelve months and thereafter of
en ey ore acce any a darfger'to the world. The same . 7 _ a ps “ \
country by 6.00 p.m. Czech time,| more acceptable any plan forja darg f : nen—against the Turkish Brig- the necessity for formulatin
‘ ’ Closer Federation which would|situation might arise in Germany en emer a ae ‘he » w Aueny slicy fast it
The couple were said to have] Place the Commonwealth on parjas in Korea where “volunteers” | ¢ ade position south of Pyongyang Bve-year | pou ; 7



i ‘ 69 » t-the apex of old ang sossible to forecast chang it
been seized by police as they| With, western Europe and with} carry guns. That, is why the Gandhi Ss Son | lay ran ip old iron triangle | ) i i

night world conditions after 1952





tried to escape fri a restricted el ee mpunes in a sort of friendly peaceful intervention of ; : United States jet fighters fire-| ie.

area ae of Prague, where} !ré world trio, or. the United Nations is necessary | Lone Hand In bombed a North Korean suppl) Social Reform

it is alleged that they picked up, oat Pavel E. Astepkenko of Byelo entre into 1 mass of flame

“espionage repor rom a “hole russia repeated Soviet charges P te st Cam raigu the Fifth Airforce announced “Our next probler whike i

in a wall.” TT : that the United Nations is not roles pe So American Thunderjets swooped|really dependent on the first, i
Prague Radio said that Gardner TRIAL RUN

Fr low over a supply area in woods | the question of prioriti in the

; Competent to discuss the German yaw prenr bd
had admitted to police that. his | k VAN REENEN, 0













































“ ” KIEL, Dec. 15. question and if an enquiry were State, Dec. | ' orth of Yangdok which , is al programme of social refo he
Pe en Zone Sh: CO 45-year-old German built wind-'needed it should be conducted by Manilal ¢ hi 1 of Mahatma oo : ee rt Bae ie ~, yong- Pai. Bs added: 1 f our
Observers here believed that}jammer Pamir, 4,500 tons, now|Germans themselve under Four Gandhi, wh ying out a ¢ v4 ae rp or pos Weecion yrs ont em ar eiacond Biel Ae
Gardner Mai: were | West Germany’s first sail training Power supervision man protest campaigr ainst{ 1, ‘ me evel thing in sight” | questior “i f kee p the
fired upo; they inadver-|Ship is to make, a trial run from] Bolivian Luis Fernando said a South. Africa egregat | {and machine-gunned every mov-| cost of living Choose a Raleigh
tently rar one of the}here tomorrow, before beginning| divided Germany “jeopardizes in- crossed into the Cer I ling get At least 26 build-| “As far as legistation cot and = you will
many police road ss through-/ its 23,700-mile round-the-world |ternational peace and security.” of the Orange Free State by 1") ing. housing Red troops and sup-| cerned which has already been possess a bicycle
out Czechoslovakia —UP. voyage, —U-P. U.P. \ to-day unhindered | plie were destroyed and forty! agreed on, and } pk ep of great strength, /
- —_—- $$$ The Orange Free State has less 4+), damaged U.P. | drafted or is in the course of smooth running,
. than 20 ! in popt on} | being drafted, we prope the eaoeties re
DRAWINGS ON SHOW Fe oe or othctals, ot tal ok CS 5 as... {earliest possible date to deal wit ie Bult ofthe
Be eh om tet East Geratait Police | tre Mewie 81 wmeh will bem nest materials in
ce res ’ t i introducec n the Hanis one} the world’s largest
: ‘a t : ‘ ) irliest meeting | and most modern
moreit est Gandhi, despi Jesert Force Dec gg eure :
ihe “uUesion oF aru | cycle flctory
he Pri: Ml qf. ea SP BERLIN, Cee. 1 ie ‘
Malan, 0 at she going to’ Nearly 2,000 Sovie. Zone P i @ On Page 9 | - fs — a
do, He r avel into t ples’ policemen—the equi t otf , *y 5 wf f
Free State t ie 1s far © two battalior have deserted from Vaffo” Strike _ wh tI Bs % vr) j
next st he Soviet East Gert at Pat ;
oP litary Force during t p 1a} THE ALL-STEEL Bit «
nonths, an official Unitec Sti t S ttl t
a | > »
High Commission Report 1 ec] & e ti ( . !
pits, ¥ Dp f models
| Union Urges I A.A, tod A wide variety of m
| e survey said that the deser NEW YORK displ d
| Wy TY eae a from Communist polion|' A”. mioken ; 1 always on display an
| Workers To Strike fron munist police] A spokesman To y :
A ’ IX] America line i
NEW YORK, De red to ihe eorre-|that the strike aboard t! ready assembled for you
| Near 6.000 P Air f it c o/ of lavt vear Alflag f eighter Yaffo w ettlec -
v een total of ‘, 847 Communist police | th discharge of half of to take away. See our
ca ht lurr Wes | the d the ship » bein tril o f ng Berlin sis lune 1950, the Report} preparec for sailing « cycle Department, first Floor
j b enkde ¢ UP December 21
1 } } ni t T FN I eli Consu Yosef Ne
| sy entered a fe day ike Friday DOLE D (
|tons end Transport W Boat Capsizes: |: » instructions from Telaviv and of AVE SHEPHERD & Co, Lid, oy
| th ‘ ‘ ; soe r | ‘ n they either could re %)
> A ¥ 7 . *. tu t ; s , ; Uf
Princess Missing _ ; & 13 Broad Stre
La \PORE, Dec ’ 2 cae Sole Distributors
includi
Prince , r
‘ te mmi
a iit r trial
i ‘ P te 1 ne | &
qi : dt ,
ee aa to a = . v t € i ve after a ew e t | a Prov oY RALMIGH INDUSTRIRA asd LIMITED, NOTTINGHAM, BNGL&NI
. Ce ee oS ~ e ; : MOT ECR. - 108. 1a elated ¢ aoe ., FIT? auey. . OR 4-BPEED GEAR
uo Btowcaea Ue cauirerron vs arawings st praser ewe yt | Unior f f t r missin P. in) ali ged the seamar ¢ I 58 WITH 6T8 Sy; GS0G88 = ¢ BB irsR
CB awe urewtags wer achers who Were tangut by Mrs. Brucs sfamilton. Ger of the | Compa Tere the deughter of the} failure : 1}
Watcher: wars give cortvates by c Gtindep Beod, Director cf Eénertion, UP Ra f Za U.P. |} -U.P ee





—

>

PAGE TWO



KE M

SONG

i
;

To-day Last 2 Shows 4.30 &
Republic Double - - -

Rod CAMERON
Forrest TUCKER

““LIGHTNING IN

WITH
DONALD BARRY



Cotumbia Action Double

WT
Sa ato:

Cm ETE

ayia



BRINGS
QUICK
RELIEF
FROM

* STAGE

DUE TO INDIGESTION

Columbia Pictures Presents
PAUL MUNI,— l(ERLE OBERON



ROYAL

THE FOREST”



OLYMPIC

TODAY AND TOMORROW 4.50 & 8.15



Written for the Sereen by Harry Lssex- Based wpon a Cosmopolitan Magazine
article by Mitton Lehman « Diroctes by EARL MCEVOY - Produced by ROBERT COHN

SUNDAY ADVOCATE
Coos
AST night a record number of
Pp 4 R E people were at Club Morgan
to wish the Frank Morgan
TO-DAY to TUESDAY — 4.45 & 8.30 “Happy Birthday” on ‘tne four-
teenth anniversary of the opening

of their club.



IN Besides the large n
local members I saw da
? @@ |jenjoying themselves |
TO REMEMBE 1 gg A rag gage

U.S. and Britain.

with There was a door priz° for the

‘ the holder of the lucky numb«r. There
CORMEL, WILDE ond. . were several novelty dances with
Extra:--LATEST BRITISH NEWSREELS prizes for the winning couples and

celebrations reached their peak
when at about midnight 1 shower

of balloons of all colours was

released from the ceiling of the

8.15 Mon. & Tues. 4.30 & 8.15 dance floor. Dancers jumped up
and scrambled in an effort to

Republic Whole Serial - - -
“MASKED MARVEL”

secure a balloon, for in many of
them were cash prizes and tickets
for “Dinner on the House”. This
was definitely the mos: popular



IN with pg er of the night.
‘ ides dancing coup\gs there
William FORREST
“ ’ ANN ” were several dinner par.ies going
OH’ SUS. A Louise CURRIF. on and what with good music
AND throughout the night everyone

agreed that this was easily one of
Wed. and Thurs. — 4.30 & 8.15) the club’s most enjoyable birinday

parties.
“ THE PRETENDER a Since 1948
al MONG the passengers ar-
* riving on Friday evening
by B.W.LA., from Jamaica wes
“ BRIMSTONE ” Miss Muriel Jackman, daughter

of Mr, and Mrs. C. B, Jeckman of
“Silver Cot”, Worthing View,
Christ Church. She has come over
to spend the Christma: holidays
with her p its.

Miss Jackman is second mis-
tress of the Cathedral High Schovl
in Spanish Town, Jamaica. This
is her first visit back home since
1948 when she was an under-
graduate at London University.
Al that time, she spent part of
her summer vacation here.

Back To Curacao
M*

CECIL GRAZETTE

2 nurse attached. to Dr. Bayley’s
Diagnostic Clinic, Beckles Road
returned to Curacao on Friday b
air to resume his
CSM.

Two One-Act Plays

duties with

of the Olympia Club presented to
an appreciative audience two one-
act plays, “Girls must talk”, a
comedy, and “Ophelia”, ay adap-
tation from Hamlet.
Congratulations to Mrs, E. W

* Cant Berton READ The first play was presented with

van who
amused

was
the

most
audience

" SMES REM TREE BEL, ES CR aes th t
win Aer

AND disgruntled manner anc





Christmas season, But one of the
many pasties I've heard of seems
to be a must on everyone's engag¢-
ment book. It's the GRAN Fiesta
at the Marine Hotel cn Saturday.
December 22nd.

talented performers as the Knight
P ef sisters (Rosalie and June), Rose-
Tudor Bridge who was re- mary Burke, Phyllis Fitzpatrick,
cently married at St, Matthias Errie Deane, Gloria Hunte, Will At
Church, to Miss Carlotta Bourbon, Nurse and many others.

popular Police Dance Orchestra

is

only will the Gran Fiesta provide

an excellent evening’s entertain-

ment, but your appearance and

lO” Friday night at the Britisn support will help raise funds for
Council the dramatic group a deserving charity.

. Hundreds of

e Barrow who was the producer tightly by their mothers streamed

Evelyn Charles * Witfiam and aiso to the members who made through Broad Street and through
with Doratty MALONE - ucla ALBRIGHT

the evening a most successful one. the many toy stores,

great self-poise and Dorothy Dono- She met Santa Claus in each of
outstanding the toy stores. How could he get
from
remarks. quickly without passing her!

SUNDAY, DECEMBER 16, 1951

MRS.

5.000

Annual Dinner
HE Loyal Brothers of the
Stars will be holding their
Annual dinner at the Miller Bros.
Tuder Street, on December 24.
The President of The association
Mr. E. Morris says that arrange-
ments for the function are almost
complete and hé Would be glad
if members Wold contact him as
soon as possible in connection with
the function,

Seeing the Empire.

R. ALAN LENNOX-BOYD,

Colonial Minister of State,
is following the example of his
chief, Mr. Oliver Lyttelton. Len-
nox-Boyd wants to see part of
the Empire for himself. He flies
to East Africa on January 3. Mr.
Lyttelton will be home from Ma-
laya before Christmas.

Lennox-Boyd will visit terri-
tories where the £30 million Co-
lonial Development Corporation
are operating.

Lord Reith has been boss of
this State-financed enterprise for
13 months. He has not yet visit-
ed any of the projects under his

control,
Will Lord Reith accompany
Lennox-Boyd on this tour?



MES. BERYL NURSE receives a clock from Rediffusion’s Manager
Col. Oliver yesterday. She is Rediffusion’s 56,000th subscriber. A
silver plaque attached to the front of the clock has engraved on it:—
“Presented te Mrs. Beryl Nurse of Beckles Rd., Bay Pasture. Redif-
fusion'’s 5,000th subscriber, 12th December, 1951.”

Double Purpose
1ERE are plenty of entertain-
ments going on over the .-

Mr.
me ~~ And it is said that
. ‘ ort eith has no immediate
Christmas Gifts plans for inspecting any of the
T Queen’s College Hall over
g CDC enterprises overseas.
60 children turned up yes- ~ yr Lennox-Boyd visited Bar-
terday evening to receive gifts pados earlier this year.
from the Olympia Club. A large Ma: bu \
Christmas Tree, loadéd with gifts, y buy Skylon
HE Marquess of Bath. wants

stood in the centre of the Hall.
Before the presentation, Mrs. to buy the Festivals’ Skylon.

D, H. L. Ward, President of the He is negotiating for its purchase,
Club, addressed the Children, She and is discussing the matter with
wished them all a very happy &n Official of the South Bank ex-
Christmas and a prosperous New hibition.

Year. The Skylon is 292 feet high.
night when lit up inside, it
The presentation lasted from could be seen from many parts of
4.00 p.m. to 6.00 p.m, The mem. London. :
bers subscribed money to buy the Lord Bath plans to re-erect it
gifts, at Longleat- Warminster, where
nearly 100,000 visitors paid about
£9,000 this year to see the family
treasures and the grounds.

Lord Bath thinks the Skylon
avould be an additional attraction
to visitors. He proposes to set it
up at a spot in the grounds
known as Heaven’s Gate.

How would the Marquess get
the Skylon to Longleat in Wilt-
shire?

The problem does not worry
him. “No goubt it will come to
pieces,” Lord Bath says, “I can-
not imagine it being taken whole
by road,”

The price, he thinks, may be
“something like four figures.”

Lord Bath will be 46 next

The floor show has in such

Dancing begins at 9 p.m, and the

supplying the music, Not

A Pillow Or Two
ESTERDAY was once agai
children’s day in Broad Street.
them being held

One little girl was puzzled.

one store to the other so



month. His wife and three child-
The second play was perhaps One point about the Santas. A ren have acted as guides when
TO TUCSON ee more popular and produced ac- pillow or two added in the ap- Longleat is open to the public.
| tresses with talent worthy of men- propriate places would help them Talking Point
a ae tion, Joan Smith, as Ophelia, and Jook somewhat more like the “Our world...needs * l-
in Technicolor Maria Barrow as Ophelia’s mother, popular conception of this popu- ings rather than “no” feel '
Starring were most suited for their parts. Jar old man, Most of the Santas * i.
Pamela Tudor, the Queen, and yesterday looked “mighty” lean. Incidental
ROD CAMERON — WAYNE MORRIS Phyllis Bowen as Ophelia’s nurse

It’s Action-packed . . .

If you sumer from STOMACH PAINS, FLATULENCE,



and the other members of the cast

No Cricket VEN if your car is a dream

you § fi all contributed to the evening's DR. A. L. STUART boat, don’t feel ti when
HEARTBURN, NAUSEA or ACIDITY Si aeee SUCCESS, HE elections were the main - . Motorist So ee en
oe ee Oa res sale a hp pa TUESDAY AND WEDNESDAY — 4.30 & 8.15 ty tee oe a Aba eee topic of conversation through- Medical Registrar - —L.E.S.
really quick rclicf! It is also. available in TABLE tose, Coltmists Z ps ‘Blues Singi out Broad Street yesterd®.and's > 4 1. STUART, son of Ma@ pt cies
Columbia Whole Serial ~ - - 4 * ai ues Singing in fact all over the island un Am ami Mrs. E A Stuart om@ CRUISER TO VISIT
RIC PHILLIPS entertained was talking about the cri - é . EB. . US "
se “Ke ° the’ ladee che : ies are well “Broughderg” Black Rock has “
{ i arge crowd which at- though the West Indies are well : : a ar
: MACLEAN JAC Z MST yf ONG leniied the Ipont. ‘Faleed Meare ae on their way to scoring a win been appointed Medical Registra: YUGOSLAVIA

BRAND .-

Stomach Powder

L. M. B, MYERS,
Bridgetown, Barbados.



SOLE AGENTS Today to Tues — 4.45 & 8.15
SL OE ATAPI

AE LAP OREN:










JANETTA

Lower Broad Street

EXCLUSIVE GOWNS
in time for CHRISTMAS GIFTS!

DRESS SHOP

Just

COCKTAIL AND EVENING BAGS
CONTINENTAL DRESS LENGTHS
51 Guage COLOURED NYLONS §2.39
Choice of Christmas Wrapping Paper 6 cents per sheet
SR OPP
BD SOLEPSS POS SSDP FLO ISSSSSSSFOO
AN OLD FRIEND .... . IN A NEW SPOT
Just A Few Yards Off Broad Street
in Pr. Wm. Henry Street

THERE’S CHRISTMAS IN THE AIR ! !
A Visit to the Cosmopolitan will convince!

GIFTS!! BEAUTIFUL GIFTS!!













$4.00
Dinner Served 7—9 Dancing 9 P.M. TO 2 A.M.
ADMISSION To Ball Room Only $1.00—Light Refreshments on Sale
Evening or Formal Dress
Music by Richie Goodridge and his Orchestra
Please Phone 2220 for Table Reservations by Friday 21st December

664664 4
$SO9BIOSOC9OS OOF vrrrer

THE ALL-AMERICAN BOY

ROXY

the Globe Theatre on Friday
night with his “Blues Singing.”

“Begin the Beguine”. Second

|
| Wed. & Thurs. — 4.30 & 8.15

“ KILL THE UMPIRE” | motts Lane who had been in B.G.
for several weeks for health
reasons is now back in Barbados.

He arrived on Thursday by
B.W.LA,.

GLOBE

TONITE — 8.30 p.m.
and Continuing

with



William BENDIX
Gloria HENRY

and








| “ TOKYO JOE ”

awith

M-G-M's STARTLING DRAMA

Humphrey BOGART i
Alexander KNOX |
4



Joho HODIAK - Nancy DAVIS

















ATTRACTIVE BALLROOM DECORATIONS

On December 24th: Potato Dance. Balloon Dance, and
Spot Waltz, for which Prizes will be given.
rMUSIC on December 24th by C. B. Browne and his

Orchestra; and on December 3lst by Sydney Niles and
his Orchestra.

“4 LAL PPPTPPPS

against West Australia,

First prize in the Talent Show business at hand. The last com-
went to Hubert Clarke who sang ment I heard about the W.I, team
—it seems so long ago now—was,
prize went to Gerald Daisley, Me; “They







of the University College of the

Ss i 5s get back to the West Indies.
So erteket fans ges bees Dr. Stuart is at present in Eng-

BELGRADE, Dec. 15.
i ~ oe — mer _ ~
land and expects to come home first American warship to visit

on holiday before going up to fet nd ge Mage the war will
them in a Jamaica to take up his appoint- | rive at port of Rijeka ear:

should put

y. The 17,000 ton U.S.S.
sang “Ole Man River.” |lighter and send ~_ re ‘ ~— das icet $i on Gh Thee tooth Desctees, gee of Vice Pra
f th agains . i nnet
| | Columbia Double - - - R Back From B.G. | Wt Auateaiic cet outers anes and was the 1940 Barbados Eeteaantier ee the Waiter State:
4 Bt alee ie ieee heart, Scholar. Sixth Mediterranean fleet will

stay four days at Rijeka.
Gardner will be on board. This






== —S—S—SSS
SPECIAL THURS, 1,30 p.m



FRONTIER INVESTIGATOR Rocky Lane lIPEAZA B’TOWN Vises Senna visit of a
SAN ANTONE AMBUSH Monte Hale | Dial 2310 ae ’ year. P.

oo
TODAY 445 & 8.30 p.m. and Continuing Daily

you CAN SEE IT NOW AT POPULAR PRICES
INGRID BERGMAN as

JOAN oF ARC

Also the Xmas Short












(Color by Technicolor)
CHRISTMAS DREAM

meine eldete 4711 Colognes
WED, & THURS. 4,30 & 8,30 pan, | See wat si 010,
Frank Buck's BRING 'EM BACK ALIVE Police Band on Stage 7.20 p.m.

- and -
ec
Gift Sets
Suitable for - - -
XMAS PRESENTS
Priced to Sell

C. CARLTON BROWNE

SEALED CARGO Diana Andrews i

P L A Z OISTIN

Dial 8404
Last 2 Shows Today 4.45 & 8.30 p.m,
Two Action Packed Features!

Double Feature 8.30 p.m.

GABE TY or sames

fast 2 Shows Today 5 & 8.30 p.m.

Warners Technicolor Action Feature

Gary COOPER, Ruth ROMAN in
DALLAS

YOUNG DANIEL BOONE
(Cinecolor) David Bruce &
James Oliver CURWOOD'S
CALL OF THE KLONDIKE
Kirby GRANT &
“CHINOOK” The Wonder Dog

TUES. 4.45 &

ae Tues, 8.30 p.m.

8.20 p.m Mon. 8.30 p.m.











THE PRIDE OF BARBADOS

7 . : j f. RASHING 8.30 p.m. |
Gifts for Some one — Gifts for Everyone ww JANIS CA TER ! Friday only — 4.30 & 8,15 2 Lewis STOWE ; Jean HAGEN ee ae ‘rene na Ee seme Te aan ad | Wholesale & Retail
Make the COSMOPOLITAN Your Gift Centre this Year Bite Tar bene, : a NOW BOG 4 ee BARRICADE asia Druggist.
ete wwe, | “ONE WOMAN'S |__&. "exindaand | mute wax” | iether | coe team
. fonder og *“reddie Stewa Dane C
P. A. CLARKE, COSMOPOLITAN PHARMACY Senn a fener ewart_] bane Cla

as ONE SHIVERY NIGHT STORY ” ! Today ose = Our at ,

RESP ES ED EES PSPSPS SAPS ODO PEP PPP SPST PPSPPPPS SSE PSSPDSSPSSP POSS SE SPATGO : or the Year | :
a FOREN CVO O > SFOS oe y | GIVE YOUR CHILDREN TOYS FOR CHRISTMAS
xR ‘ ‘ x . . :
x Lee S CHRISTMAS and THEY WOULD MAKE EXCELLENT GIFTS.
$ ce, Sr > WE HAVE:
- : OLD YEAR
S S Dolls, Toy Cars, Balls, Mouth Organs, Pistols, Horns,
% : FESTIVITIES at te eae Poe Ducks, Buckets, Watering

: i Ca usic xXes, Sets. : A
S Christmas at the Crane Hotel | ae Wheels, haat ee Stockings, Kitten
3 THE BARBADOS AQUATIC CLUB el Barro

: (MEMBERS. ONLY) Also an Assortment of MECHANICAL TOYS,

s DINNERS will be served in the Ballroom between 7 and SO PAY US A VISIT.

% 9 p.m. on MONDAY, December 24th, TUESDAY, 25ih,

; d MONDAY, 3st.

: _ » ee T.R. EVANS & WHITFIELDS
: VERY a i MENUS Dial 4606 YOUR SHOE STORES Dial 4220

: 25TH DECEMBER, 1951 MEMBERS are requested to make Reservations not later SSS

% than December 22nd for MONDAY and TUESDAY: and

| CHRISTMAS DAY DINNER jl ***8e'"

Bgee, npscnc on RELIANCE

x soe ie DANCING from 10 p.m.

x $4.00 : ey M68? 6 til 3 am. on MONDAY,

$ Very Special Six Course Menu including your Favourite Bajan Dishes : eae arn a

: 26TH DECEMBER, 1951 5 Sist.
: — SHIRTS
BOXING DAY DINNER & DANCE ; ‘
|

£0 PPPOE SEEPS EF FFF FSF

*

+“ 4 +66 be 4 < > +, ¢
PRESS PPO CF LCPDOSCD SOD SSSO 0 SIS GOS GSO S9 SPSS SOS OS FOODS OSSCOSSSSS9SETS

%/



i
}











a ee ee

SUNDAY, DECEMBER 16,

AT THE CINEMA

Maid Of



ee ee a

ee Se

1951

Orleans

BY G. Bt.

Now showing at the Plaza,
Bridgetown, is JOAN OF ARC
starring Ingrid Bergman as Joan

and Jose Ferrer as the Dauphin
and later Charles “VII of France.
This picture is indeed one which
ranks high among the finest pro-
ductions of the Motion Picture In-
dustry, Factually and historical
continuity, it is correct in every
detail, No attempt has been
made to glamourize this magni-
ficent story of a young girl’s
faith in God and her belief that
she was the recipient of revela-
tions ‘instructing her to lead the
armies of the King of France
in their victorious campaigns
against the English invaders who
pecupied her country. Her strug-
gle to reach the Dauphin at his
professedly devout but cynical
court, her valour in the field with

the Dauphin’s victorious armies
after imbueing them with the
spirit of her mission and her

eventual capture, trial and exe~
cution are all portrayed by Miss
Bergman in a manner which can
only be described as devotional.

Jose Ferrer as the Dauphin
portrays in mien, actions and reac-
tions what must surely be one of
history’s most ignoble characters
The cast includes more than forty
actors and actresses of distinc-
tion and it is virtually impossi-
ble to find any fault with either
the acting or the production. The
latter half of the story which
covers the trial at Rouen, the
least known part of Joan’s life, is
faithfully reproduced agajnst the
prevailing background of treach-
ery, political and military expe-
diency, unyielding religious dog-
ma and ecclesiastical immorality
and greed,

Produced in Technicolor and
magnificently costumed, this is a
picture well worth seeing. Tt was
shown. in Barbados about two
years ago. but its story is so
timeless and Miss Bergman’s por-
trayal so inspired that I felt it
must be given first place in this
week's reviews.

Night Into Morning
Set amid an atmosphere of
youthfulness and high spirits of a
university campus, NIGHT INTO
MORNING, playing at the Globe

Theatre is a sensitive drama about
the real problems of real people
which everyone cam understand,
The background of college life

rings true,and there js a simplicity
and sincerity about the whole film
that is moving and. helps to offset
the tragic eircumstances. around
which the plot is built,

In brief, the story concerns a
young college professor whose wife
and child are killed hy an explo-
sion in their home. Overcome, he
starts to drink heavily but through
the affection and understanding of
his friends and associates, he rises
above the tragedy. It is a film in
Which. it is particularly easy to
associate’ oneself with the experi-
ences portrayed,-and the qualities
as shown by the cifvergiit charac-
ters are trud to, life and eould be
drawn from one’s Own experience.

Ray Milland gives a superb per-
formance as Philip Ainley, the
young ‘professor whose values

become abruptly distorted by
the loss of the two people
he loves most, and who takes
the easiest way to forget ‘the
catastrophe. Mr, Milland’s emo-
tional acting is extraordinarily
real. and his reaction when the
bodies of his wife and child are

brought out of the house as well as
his ultimate breaking down are
almost unnerving in their realism,
There is a similarity in the roles
played by Milland in “Lost Week-
end and NIGHT INTO MORN-
ING in that both characters seek
escape through alcohol, but there
any further resemblance ceases,
as the realization is brought home
to Ainley that his weakness is
causing his destruction and degra-
dation and affecting the lives of
his students. :
Nancy Davis, a comparative
newcomer and one to watch, and



IRONS,
HOT PLATES,
COFFEE

PERCOLATORS
XMAS TREE LIGHTS

John Hodiak as her fiancé, whose
engagement is nearly broken up
because of her friendly sympathy
for Ainley, give excellent perform-
ances and Lewis Stone is warmly
sympathetic as the University
Dean,

Direction is good, dialogue na-
tural and all the characters com-
pletely believable and human. A
serious picture, with here and
there touches of natural humour,
and through the successes and
failures of its principal character,
we realize no one is alone and that
the human spirit is unconquerable,

Seng To Remember

The Empire is féaturing a ree
turn engagement of SONG TO
REMEMBER and most of us will
have no difficulty in recollecting
this delightful musical film based
on the life of Frédéric Chopin and
filled with his musie. It is several
years since it was last shown, but
the entertainment value of a pie-
ture of this kind never wanes.
Starring Cornel Wilde, Merle
Oberon and Paul Muni, it is a
musical feast of the glorious melo-

ilies of one of the world’s most
beloved and most brilliant com-
posers.

‘OH, I AM
SLAIN’

NEVER before have | felt it a
shortcoming in me that I cannot
speak Persian. But the account in
Wednesday’s paper of the recent
fracas in the Persian parliament
has sharpened my sense of in-
adequacy. Try as I will I
simply cannot accept the published
version of events as giving a true
picture. ’

It began, you will remember (if
you are the sort of person who
remembers what was in the paper
four days ago), with the leader
of the opposition fiercely assailing
Prime Minister Mossadeq, reach~
ing a climax with the elegant in-
vitation: “Get the hell out of
here.”

Now I quite believe that the
leader of the opposition may have
addressed the Prime Minister in
words (as they say) to that e/fect.
He would, after all, only be
echoing something that Oliver
Cromwell said in comparable cir-
cumstances three hundred years
earlier. But, to quote an old song,
it’s not what you say, it’s the way
that you say it.

No doubt there is a Persian
idiom which is most correctly
rendered as “get the hell out of
here”, It is by no :neans im-
possible, though the phrase never
occurs in the Rubaivyat. Even if
it had, 1 believe Fitzgera'’3 would
have translated it more elegantly

Of course, the Persian states-
man moy have issued his chal'engoe
In Bnglish—or rather it what Pro-
fessor Bodmer prefers to call
Anglo-American, Perhaps an
English tag in tfie Majlis {5 a sign
of erudition comparable to the
Latin tag at Westminster. Yet the
oceasion hardly seems to have
been one for @ display of learning.
It would have been as if Mr. Bevan
or Mrs. Braddock were to call out
to Mr. Churchill: “Fous-moi le
camp!” or “Vanne all ’inferno!” or
stood by the Premier, but none
of which is half so trenchant as the
same thing said in the vernacular.

So on balance 1 incline to the
belief that the Persian phrase has
been translated. Indeed, it looks
as if it must have been even more
offensive in the original, for in less
time *han it takes to roll back a
‘Persian carpet it had precipitated
a free fight among the members.

That too, of course, is not with-
out parallel further west. I am

old enough to remember Mr. L, 5S.
Amery, no less, socking a Labour
in the eye,

member though I

GEC.





TOASTERS,

KETTLES,

eee ee Se ee ee ke

By PENNY NOLAN and ANN
MUSGRAVE

Pressing

Careful pressing as you sew
has been stressed over and over
again in this column but it is
suaeriaing oan ae seen
neglec ip pertant ep.
Pressing is the most important
part in overcoming that home-
made, amateur dressmaker look.

Pressing and ironing are two
different processes, In ironing you
a | the an lean for-
wards over the cloth. In pressing
the iron is wes and oh wn
again never pushed along,
with the grain of the fabric being
very careful not to stretch bias
edges and necklines. Stay stitch-
ing should be done on these edges
before pressing.

Press as you go is the slogan
for good dressmaking. This, of
course, need not mean that you
Jump up from the sewing ma-
chine and run to the ironing
board after stitching each seam.
Each seam or dart must be pressed
before another seam is stitehed
which crosses it but if you plan
your work well you ean stitch a
number of seams and darts be-
fore making a trip to the ironing
board. In the usual dress, for in-
Stance, you can stitch all the
darts in both the bodice front and
back. You can stitch the shoulder
Seams. You can stitch the collar
seams and the sleeve seams and
the lengthwise skirt seams, Then
you have enough pressing to do
to make heating the iron worth-
while.

Except for cottons or linens al-
ways use a Press cloth. Pre-
washed muslin or heavy cotton
drill make good Press cloths. If
you are fortunate enough to have
a steam iron you won't need a
press cloth, of course,

Press on the wrong side, Press
darts first one way and then the
other way to make them lay flat-
ter. Look on the right side to be
sure the dart is pressed right with
no pucker at the end. Darts on
heavy fabrics should be slashed
open and pressed open. All hori-
zontal darts should be pressed
down.

Shoulder seams and most verti-
cal seams are best pressed open.
It is easier to press a seam open
if you first press the closed seam
to one side and then to the other
side before trying to press it open.
Press shirt seams from the bot-
tom up towards the waistline to
avoid stretching. Press your hem
from the bottom up. Pressing
around a hem is likely to cause
a ripple in the hemline. Never
press gathers flat. The edges of
collars, cuffs and necklines are

don't remember what i: was that |

provoked him to such very un-
parliamentary procedure. But in
‘the House of Commons it re-
mained a private fight, whereas in
the Majlis it soon became clear
that anyone could join in.

It was the account of this fight
that conyinced me that the hand of
a translater” was at work. We
may by a stretch of imagination
allow the leader of the opposition
his Anglo-American tag; but it
is going too far to suppose that
Persian backbenchers would have
called out in their extreme agony
“Tam killed,” or — in only slightly

less extreme agony — “I have
been struck fatally,’
The first ejaculation, indeed,

savours of exaggeration, since (as
we know) dead men tel! no tales;
though there is a parallel in Ham-
let (Polonius: “O I am slain.”)
But the cry of those struck fatally
fis one that, however heartrending
in the original Persian, strikes the
ear in translation as irresistibly
comic. It is altogether too reminis-
cent of the classic account of the
Death of Nelson, which begins:

“‘*Ardy,” says Nelson, “I’m
wounded.”

“Not mortually, 1 ’ope? ”;
and goes on to reach a piteous
climax .... +

... Which cannot, alas, be quoted
here, 64



| CITY GARAGE TRADING CO, LTD.



VICTORIA STREET





a
wpe er te ee et ttt tO A A



a —

SUNDAY ADVOCATE



~ SEWING CIRCLE °

easier pressed if they are care-
fully basted about a quarter of an
inch from the edge. This be ‘ting
and pressing should be done be-
fore attaching to the garment. The
raw neckline edges of a collar
should be basted together after
pressing before attaching the col-
lar to the neckline.

Different fabrics require differ-
ressing methods, Cottons may
y not require dampening,
coloured cottons should al-
be pressed on the wrong



ways
side to prevent shine. Eyelet em- |
broidery is best pressed on a fold- |

ed turiish towel. This prevents
flattening the embroidery pattern.
Remember your cotton dress needs

just as much pressing care as any |

other, [t will pay you well for
this care in its smarter appear-
ance.

Linen needs to be well damp-
ened and pressed with a hot iron
first on the wrong side and then
on the right. Crease resistant
linens especially are hard to press

but a thorough dampening and
high heat will usually do the
trick.

For silk use a medium heat on
the wrong side. Open the seams
first with the tip of the iron then
lace a dampened press cloth over
he seam to press. After pressing
slide the point of the iron under
the edges of the seams to remove
ridges which show on the right
side.

Some vayon will water spot. It
is best to test a scrap for this,
Rayon should always be pressed
on the wrong side with a slightly
dampened press cloth, Use a low
heat.

Nylon should be pressed with
a very low heat and should not

be dampened, Only press where
necessary,
Woollens should de steam

pressed, Let the steam do most of
the work. The whole piece should
be steam pressed before cutting
to shrink it. Always use a press
clock well dampened and a high
heat on the iron to produce quan-
tities of steam.

Velvets require very careful
handling. Stand your iron on end
and cover with a damp cloth.
Draw the wrong side of the vel-
vet ligh*:y back and forth over
the steaming cloth. Let it dry
completely before working on it.

| If you will follow these rules |

{and press as you go your finished
|dress will need very little pressing
|before you wear it and will look
much smarter,



|



-”
, b
a ‘a

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madenforms
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Frankly beautiful curves...
superb lift... definite figure ac-
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4

alt yor

Cussons

ULUXURY_~

-

TOILET, SOAPS
Paine

a ena



Are now at COLLINS’ PERFUMERY |

YARDLEYS —

Orchis, April Violets,
Bond Street.

LEN THERIC—Tweed, Miracle, Repartie.

HOUBIGANIT

Confetti
— Chantilly, Quelque
Fleurs.



COLLINS D





KRUG STORES





Give him a really practical
Gift front our wide selection
of Carpenters’, Builders’ and
Basic Engineering Tools.

Note:

We have m

| COTTON
i





ed en ts ~

Garden



Tools

ost of these, as well!

BOCK

BARBADOS C0O-0P

FACTORY

LIMITED





ae ON

PAGE THREE



ee

: , tts ,
SPOOL LPP PPPBLAPLPADLPPBDPLPPBLPL LPP ILL PLL sO008

Good Things for Xmas at Savings to You
NEW DRESSES $15 to $18 each
LADIES’ HANDBAGS, also EVENING BAGS and
TRAVELLING BAGS $3.23 to $8.95
NEW HATS, nicely styled, richly trimmed. White,
Black, Navy and also in other Colours $5.98
LADIES’ HOUSECOATS $5.98 to $15

%
; .
2 Gifts for the Entire Family at Savings



American Plastic Dolls .

84g

Paes: 8 for... viccsvigns

Inflated Rubber Toys ...

Small Valises

Plastic Feeding Sets Toy Pistols with Shots ....

Pearl Necklaces Vearl Earrings .....

Wallets with Zipps all round $1.80 Powder Compacts

Jewel Boxes

et oe 84¢

Ninon and Pure Silk Scarves $2.40

Children’s Handbags . 98¢
and many other items at prices you

Ladies’ Art Silk Stockings

2 pairs for ......... envy $1.00

can afford.

Che Modern Dress Shoppe

PLL LL LLLP LLP PP PPP PPP PPP
. :



BROAD STREET










SLOPE LLL LPL PAAR APP AAPLPPRPRALRRPPLPPLAPPPA®PPPPDES SPSS,



Printed in guaranteed fast colours

- y 0 obtainable from all leading Stores
Yec/
s ?

THE FINEST
RANGE |TO

| CHOOSE
FROM....

IN ALL
POPULAR

SIZES
6

|CONGOLEUM

CONGOLEUM SQUARES
AND RUGS

= 0 Se



we

GIVE YOUR FLOORS THIS
XMAS PRESENT

=== 6 So

THE CORNER STORE











PAGE FOUR

———



Coughing, ‘Strangling Asthma,
ronchifis Curbed in 3° Minutes

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The ‘gh

Hy Heverley

1 CANNOT believe that there is
anyone in London’s theatre world
who will not rejoice with Noel
Coward over the success of his
comedy RELATIVE VALUES at
the Savoy Theatre.

Behind the wit (not always
sparkling), the excellent main
situation (not completely new),
and the rewarding Englishness of
it all is the personal triumph of
Noel Coward, the man.

Success is like a drug to those
who attain it, and to be deprived
of it after attainment is to endure
a preview of Hell.

Coward's post - war musical,
Pacific 1860 at Drury Lane, was a
failure despite Mary Martin's best
efforts. A little later, his serious
play on an imaginary occupation
of Britain by the Germans fizzed
out. Subsequently he gave us a
thick-ear gangster play, with
music, but it was the work of a
man wha had lost his touch.

Perhaps he had died in the war
—that was the thought in many
minds. A world had perished in
the flames and a new one had been
born. Noel Coward was a ghost
oS dinner-jacket . . . or so they
said.

His Audacity

But Coward never lost faith in
himself nor did he become bitter
or show any jealousy towards
those whom the gods applauded.

At last, with an audacity which
one can only applaud, he chal-
lenged the fates by’ accepting an
engagement at the Cafe de Paris
offering the songs he had written
in the good old days. That was
bravery and it brought its re-
wards. It also must have strength-
ened and reassured him. “I have
great talent,” he once said to me
when the mourners were in deep-
est black. He spoke the words
simply and sincerely, even with
a touch of humility,

I wish that I could now pro-
claim Relative Values as the best
thing he has ever done, but it
would not be true,

The audacity of Blithe Spirit,
the neatness of Hay Fever and the
perfection of Present Laughter
are not there, But after the
laborious first act, in which the
actors have little to do but talk
about what is going to happen in
the second act, the comedy takes
form and we have a sustained
situation in the Pinero manner
with. touches of Wilde to adorn
the tale.

With commendable audacity Mr.
Coward brings us back to Horse-
back Hall, splendidly ignoring the
austerity of today. Gladys Cooper,
as Felicity, Countess of Marsh-
wood, has a butler who talks like
Shaw with the accents of Coward,
Her eldest son the Earl of Marsh-
wood, is engaged to an English-
born Hollywood star. His younger
brother has no apparent occupa-
tion except that of a Greek chorus
and their friends are people of
title.

Bravo Coward!
of that American
insists that only
can fall in love. Have not the
rich eyes, hearts, dimensions and
appetites just as much as the
poor?

When Judy Campbell, as the
Americanised fiancee, turns up,
the play leaps into life, and when
she is followed by Hugn
McDermott as her former Holly-
wood lover in a state of static
alcoholism the comedy is in full

flood.
Old Scores

Now we see Coward, the satir-
ist, determined to pay off old
scores with Hollywood.

The film actress complains to
the countess that her fiance has
gone horseback riding instead
of paying attention to her. “In
England we do not say horse-
back riding,” says the ‘countess
blandly. “Just riding.” Coward
can do this kind of thing better
than anyone else.

A little later Mr. McDermott
describes to the assembly the
nature of the new film in which
he is to star. “It is the story
of a bum,” he says with alcoholie
melancholy. “Just a guy wha

I am so weary
snobbery which
a truck driver

bums his way through life and
ain’t worth a damn.” The -oun-



LASH

MODELS

Swan & Prince



COWARD IN
CLOVER

ost in a dinner jacket
comes back with a bang...

Haxter, M.P.

tess asks if it has a happy ending.
“No ma‘am,” he answers, “It ain't
that kind of a picture.”

So much for Coward as a master
of comedy, and at best he is a
master, But he can never wholly
extinguish the sentimentalist
bis loyalty to Queen Victoria.
“There is no such thing as social
equality,” he soiemnly tells us
somewhere jin the play, but it does
not matter. The jester must be
allowed his morbid moments.

Waiting ...



SUNDAY ADVOCATE

5

8 LODGE vs, POLICE



Yesterday

phelice ...... 67 and (1

9 "Lodge 129 and (for i wkt 15
R LODGE defeated Police outiight
yesterday on the school nd
* by ten wickets, It is unde OX
however, that Police propos to
complain to the Cricket As i-
tion as regards the wicke' on
which they batted yesterday

Fast bowler Brooks of the
Lodge School was chiefly re
sponsible for the Constable de-
feat, taking six of their ond
innings’ wickets yesterday 25
runs.
On the opening day ‘of thi;

or match Police who baited first
could only make 67 runs, to ich
Lodge replied on the followin day
with 129 anq had captured 3 of
Police’s second innings’ wicke « for
36. Yesterday the remaining ats-
men ona _ difficult wicket ould
only add 35 ruris. Only FP \ack-
man with 14 runs reached c uble

Gladys Cooper is given the task
of entertaining us in the long pre-
amble while waiting for the film
stars to appear, and she does it
enchantingly. She possesses that
rare gift of turning a stage set
into a real room. And let it be
proclaimed that Angela Baddeley
as her housekeeper companion
and Richard Leech as the Shavian
butler give her inspired support.

Judy Campbell and Hugh Mc-°

Dermott steal the show however;
first, because they are very good
indeed, and secondly because
Coward does not really get going
until they arrive.

Let me repeat that this comedy
is not a masterpiece, and that
Coward should realise that no
one is very interested in hearing
about people who are not to ap-
pear for three-quarters of an

our.

POCKET CARTOON
by OSBERT LANCASTER

ak.







“Allow me to remind
Miss Maitravers !
Mickelangelo had knocked
uff work everu time tiiere
toas a trifling power eur th
Sistine Chapel wot. never
nare heen finished t,

yon,
that wu

ae es

r
* wickets early to Austin, Collapse



figures.

Lodge needing 10 run
victory, made 15 for the loss « I
wicket. This was Murray who
was run out for 2 rur Cheese-
man and Stoute each scored
runs not out.
Â¥.M.P.C. vs. COMBERMERE
Combermere. 79 and 100
Y.M.P.C. 178 and (without loss) 2

Y.M.P.C. defeated Combermere
by 10 wickets yesterday, the last
day of their first division crieket
fixture at Combermere grounds.

for





Y.MP.C., only needed two runs
in the second innings for victory
and Archer took them in Frank
King’s first over f Combermere,

On the first day of play, Com-
bermere were routed for 79 and

Y.M.P.C., batting part of that day





and well in _ second day, re-
plied with 178. Combermere in
their second venture lost two early
wickets the evening for 55 runs
and were all out before lunch
vesterday for 100 runs, Giving
Y.M.P.C. two runs for victory.

Pacer R. Austin of Y.M.P.C., who
took 6 wickets for 34 runs in 15
overs, was chiefly respor le for
the school team’s collapse in the
second innings. I Burke who took
the new ball for Y.M.P.C., with
Austin, got 4 wickets for 34 runs
in 14.4 overs,

Both bowlers held immaculate
Jengths and got the ball to move
quite a bit. They got assistance
from what was a pacer’s wicket

Skipper G. Grant and O. H.
Wilkinson batted well for Com-

bermere to make 30 and 26 in
the second innings, but no other
batsman passed double figures.
At close of play on the second
day, Grant and Wilkinson were 2

and 22 not out but they lost their
then followed.

CABLE & WIRELESS
vs.

B.C. L.

ireless &7 and 50

Cable & W (for





’s Cricket

6 i

.5 wkts.) 99

IS STOCKED BY

JUST THE FINE

NEED.

SHOP EARLY AT....

LASHLEY’S

46.09 +) BOO
friendly cricket



The first act is poor stuff com-

two-day
pared with the rest, and only an fixture between Cable and Wire-
actress like Gladys Cooper could /€ss and B.C.L. ended in a draw
hide the stark truth from us for @t Boarded Hall, St. George yes-

as long as she did, But there is terday. B.C.L. who bowled out
rich laughter to follow and we Cable & Wireless on the first day
should not begrudge the waiting. Of play for 87 runs replied yester-

Noel Coward has come back witn day with 155 rung for the loss of
a bang. five wickets declared.
While Mr. Coward stages his The B.C.L. first innings was

come-back a neglected young marked by a breezy 70 by B. Pin-
actress named Margaret Johnson der who was stumped by wicket
has arrived in SUMMER AND*keeper N. Clarke off the bowling
SMOKE at the Lyric, Hammer-\
smith. She had three drawbacks |
to overcome in the London theatre’
—beauty, youth and sensitiveness. ;

It is truly sad and sadly true how “ “ POLICE V. LODGE
itie . strust VOLICE Ist Innings a7
British managements distrust Onar tn Seiper sn

these attributes,







POLICE 2nd ngs

The first half of Mr. Tennessee B. Kinch b Wilkie 1
William’s play (which came be- 1} Morris © Brooks b \ }
fore his Streetcar epic) is beau- 2° Blenman thw MeCon .
tifully written and beautifully G. Cheitenham ec Stou 3
acted. As the fluttering refined ;) Byer ¢ Cheeseman b Brooks a
. . : ackman b Brooks j
and expressed daughter of an Or- § Greene c Murray b Brooks ...... 4
thodox clergyman and. a crazy M. Haynes not out 1
mother Miss Johnston touches the = int < Pasi poche :
emotions with an exquisite deli- Dates 8 Gen Gees ike ;
cacy. When later in the play she a
has to show the deadening process Total i
of sex frustration she avoids pay o¢ wickets: 1 for 12: 2 fo



boredom and wins our pity.

Mr. Williams is an author who
has no great regard for reticence.
For example he causes his young

36; 4 for 42; 5 for 60; 6 for 62.
8 for 67, 9 for 6
a

BOWLING AWALYSIS

oM R wW
sensualist doctor to produce the Welch Oo gi 1
drawing of a skeleton so that he pinta. oo ee ae
can lecture to Miss Johnston on Wik ase ae
the anatomy of love. The play Goddard 41 4
never quite recovers from this __ LODGE 2nd innings

absurdity. But it is not the fault [heesman not out prearaiag
of an excellent Canadian actor, stoute not out 6
Mr. William Sylvester, who gives Extras: 1 1.b 1
us a most likeable cad. eles tor 1 wiaket) ae

World Copyright Reserved.
—L.E.S.

WANDERERS 219 & (for 3 wickets) 14







{ Lawk *G. Kirton

scored

the nex € core of 28. The

wicket was a bit tricky when play

began yesterday but as the day

progressed the wicket became
!

For Cable & Wireless C. B.
Lawless, E. Branker and E. Mat-
thews each took two wickets. In
their second turn at the wicket

&

&

Cable
for t

Wireless scored 50 runs
loss of five wickets when
were drawn, R. Croney hit

25 and R. McKenzie 12.

WANDERERS vs. CARLTON
Wanderers 219 and (for 3 wkts.)

C, B. WILLIAMS played a bril-
liant innings of 160 against Wan-
derers at Carlton yesterday-to help
fis team gain first innings leaa
points. Williams played a conti-
dent innings threughout and de-
lighted the crowd with his fre
quent boundaries.

Carlton replied with 302 for the
lass of five wickets to Wanderers’
first innings score of 219. With
a lead of 83 runs, they declared
wanderers scored 124 fox
s of three wickets by
of play.

On all occasions of the
batting gained mastery
the bowling and in each
scores were made.

On the first day of play, Wan-
lerers batted all day, but were all
out early on the second Saturday
for 219.

Besides





ti



i



the ena

maten,
over
innings

+}
the

nign

Williams, the batsmen
who assisted Carlton to reach 302
runs, were N. S. Lucas who joined
Williams when Cariton had los
two wickets for nine runs. Heé
cored 62 and helped Williams t&
carry the total to 146 before he
W djudged lb.w. to
bowling.

R. Hutchinson scored 36.
two not out batsmen vy
Greenidge who scored 31 and A. ¢
Browne 2.

The most successful bo
Atkinson who
for 51 runs in 17 over
Knowles and E. Atkinson
good start for Wanderers
in their-second innings. The part-
nexthip yielded 38 runs before it
was broken. Knowles made 20
and Atkinson 24. G. Proverb:
scored 19 and Norman Marshall
was not out with 19 when play
ended. The other not out batsman
was A, O. N. Skinner with nine.

SPARTAN vs. HARRISON
COLLEGE ’

“arrison College 99

and (for 4 wickets) 101
Spartan » 10:00. a 5/4 /y eaiebeney ea
Spartan secured first innings
lead points from Harrison Col-
lege is their First Division
cricket me ended at Queen’s
Park yesterday afternoon,
[The Park team who had



ccinnsciioniotscataianitiihcantoioetereisnidter Seige ean casein ceases letaecibicyenaneseneenslapepetiiaiibiebimniianinianinataon saetinintianametinyerentminininnentitie

Peirce’s



Eric ook thr
“ icke ts
WwW.

made a







kittled. out their opponents for
in their first innings, were 38
the loss of 2
play ended on the first. day.
On the second day there was
no play owing to the bad condi-
tion of parts of the outfield,
Continuing their first innings
yesterday, Spartan with two men
were dismissed for 120.
In the remaining minutes for
play Harrison College had scored
101 for the loss of four wickets.

VN.

wickets when
*

for

absent

B. Harrison top scored with
41. Other useful contributions
were made by C. W. Smith 28
and C; N. Blackman 22 not out.

SCOREBOARD

CARLTON V. WANDERERS

CARLTON (for 5 wickets decld ) 302
CARLTON Ist Innings

C. MeKenzie b Atkinson 1
P. Kennedy c Marshall b Atkinson 7
Cc. B, Williams ¢ Pierce b Atkinson 160
N. § ucas Ibw b Pierce 62
inson c Atkinson b Green-







Vises 36

A 16 not out 2
K nidge not out 31
3

Total (for 5 wickets) 302

Fall of wickets: 1 for 8, 2 for 9, 3 for











SUNDAY, DECEMBER i6, =:
NAN TUDOR PASSES
bers Should Win Trinidad Derby
By BOOKIE



Em

OW that the preparation gallops for the Christ-

mas meeting are warming up we begin to geta
clearer picture of what to expect come next Box-
ing Day. It is therefore with much regret that at
this stage the death of Nan Tudor, one of the
foremost in the Barbados contingent, should have
to be announced.

Imported by the Barbados Turf Club and bought
by Mr. M. E. R. Bourne from the ticket holders, this dainty filly by
Owen Tudor out of Glenfinnan (by King Salmon) lost no time-in
proving her mettle soon after she arrived in the West Indies: She
won in C class in Trinidad last Christmas over 9 furlongs, in_Barba-
dos she won a B class 5% furlong race in March and again in Trinidad
in June she gave a B class field including White Company, a sound
thrashing over six furlongs.

Built on slender lines she was nevertheless well put together and
would undoubtedly have proved an asset as a brood mare because
of her breeding. I understand from Mr. Bourne, Jr. that she died
of pneumonia, doubtlessly contracted on her trip over to Trinidad
last week.

In the absence of Nan our hopes shall now be pinned on such
as Pretty Way, Landmark and Fuss Budget. I did not see Mr. Chase’s
big mare exercising on Saturday but I had a look at the Budget
and she is looking in particularly good health. One begins to view
her chances in the Governor's Cup in a far better light than that of
a mere sprinter with light weight endeavouring to get a distance.
In fact she should now move up several points in the betting. >

From reports from Trinidad it seems that Lupinus is still the
favourite but Mark Twain has slipped considerably. Meanwhile the
newly imported Kandy Tuft has come to the fore. He is reported.
to have done an excellent gallop last Sunday and being a new one
naturally tongues are already wagging while hopes no doubt are high
that some new champion is about to emerge. Such things are com-
monplace in Trinidad. :



In fact I am very surprised that we have not yet heard any-
thing about Astrion’s progress. Trained, and owned in partnership
with others, by Dr, Cyril Gittens, he raced in good company in Eng-
land and his chances out here should therefore be very good indeed

However from the way that he is entered it would indicate that he

nmaay not be given a very trying meeting forthe first time out. ‘This

is a good indication and I hope that Astrion’s connections will stick

to this policy. So many good ones have alreddy been ‘ruined by.
ard racing too early after their arrival.
‘

Perhaps one of the most impressive gallops I ‘noticed if the

Trinidad press was one by Bright Light. Mr. Cyril Barnard’s chief

hope for the Breeders’ Stakes, this filly was reported: to. have done

half mile with the imported Galashiels in 50 seconds. ‘Now the
frinidad track is faster than the Garrison over anything from: three
to five and therefore this is not such wonderful time ag it may seem.
Hov - | am told that there has been some regular rain in Trinidad
now so evidently the going could not have.been on the
We have had two-year-olds do four on the Queen’s Park
Savannah in 48 flat before the races and still not done better. than

third in the Breeders’ Stakes.









But obviously if Bright Light ¢an extcnd an imported two-year=
old she cannot be in very bad shape. Her stable companion Best
Wishes, on the other hand, appears be still in poor condition.
The prospects of the Derby going to some horse-other than a Jamaican
therefore appear gloomier than ever.

to

However one cannot but be amused at a line of argument in the
Trinidad press by one of the numerous writers on racing which seem
to abound in that colony. This time one of my ‘friends has :set: out
to prove that The Jester is a stayer and Best Wishes merely a sprinter,
One of the biggest flaws in his argument is the erroneous impression
that nine furlongs on the Garrison is easier than a mile.and 130
yards on the Queen’s Park Track. Perhaps a look atthe records:
for the respective tracks will correct this impression, Elizabethan
holds the record for our nine furlongs and 14 yards in 1.53%. , Atomic
ll holds the record for the 9% furlongs on Queen’s Park track in
1.573. A difference of only 3 seconds for a difference.in dis-
tance of 41 yards.

The next thing which my friend seems to have lost sight of is
the fact that Best Wishes won the Barbados Guineas over 74 furlongs
very easily as early as March. The horse who ran second to her tn
wus race, Cross Roads, won a nine furlong D class race on the’ das.
aay of the’same meeting in better time than any other three+year-
cla, including imported horses, has eVer done, Heyy, de these, per-
sormances compare with The Jester II's form at Union Park or his
yarely scraping home against Rosemary over the mile and 130+yards-
of the Port-of-Spain track last June?

It is quite true to say that Best Wishes did not win-the Barbades
Derby easily. But it is entirely wrong to conclude that. this was:
due to the fact that she could not stay well enough, Best Wishes had
« difficult task to win the Derby for two reasons only. Number. 1
xer state of health was poor indeed, Number 2—Holder thought ‘he.
had the race won and dropped his hands with nearly a furlong left to.
be run. Then when Usher mace his challenge Best Wishes, although
half fit, responded to the cali as only a true stayer would. Again
bow does this compare with a 100-per-cent-fit Jester Il doing as
already quoted above? 13 ak

l am sorry my friend did not leave out the part about Best Wishes’
ancestry for when he said that Colorado Kid, the sire of Felicitas,
was also a sprinter, he only displayed his complete ignorance of this
house's form in England. Nothing could be further from the truth,

I am not saying that Best Wishes will out-stay either The Jester
II, Embers or any other horse in the Derby for that mavter,., Her
present condition does not warrant any contidence at all. Whatt
am convinced of however is that, if both fit and well, Best Wishes anu
Cross Roads are far better stayers than The’ Jester II.

Meanwhile on the strength of the preparation gallops, if what we
read in the press is correct, the Trinidad Derby appears to be a better
thing than ever for Embers. For in the very next column to the re-
marks of my above friend is a report that The Jester II finished a
gallop over the Derby distance flat on his face. He will have to im-

146; 4 for 244; 5 for 291. prove on this considerably if he wants to beat the Jamaican Derby
BOWLING ANALYSIS winner in the Trinidad classic. ¥
oO â„¢M R W ;
C.R. Packer .. a a Le, ee I am also glad to see that the three-year-old Rock Diamond did
ee aeerenai M7 2 «3 Ja very good gallop on Sunday last. He may well be better than. his
A. Greenidge . 21 #6 6 1 |form in the earlier part of this year suggests and he may cause some
H.'L. Toppin .. ae ee 23 = |surprises. On the other hand I am sorry to see that Paris cowld not
te adage eet “2 7 make the grade and has been withdrawn, from the classic, No doubt
WANDERERS 2ND ENNINGS this is due to his being unwell. re a
SA Se ahyty on heaee b> he remainder of the Barbados contifgeikehould be going over
~ “Williams vs) oeiegen 24 1to ‘Trinidad some time this week, Another.jho impressed me at
G. Proverbs Ibw McKensis.+..-...) 7 exercise yesterday morning was Miracle, This disregarded three-yeat-
s Marshall not oe eigen 9 }old is one of those natural race horses which can be spotted the
Extras: i ssccecesccthoetouebaes 7 |minute they are seen galloping., Possessed of a beautiful action she
‘ cuts) “Jaa | Moves over the ground even better than Wilt O the Wisp ITI or Comet,
Botal (C083 WiCKRNAD Vinny <8 _ [her full sister and brother respectively. If she can strike her best
on page 5. form in Trinidad, I think she will be a good thing for the Apex Piste.
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SUNDAY, DECEMBER 16,



~~ = | ln il

1951



W. Australia Make 108

W. Indies 133—5

From HAROLD DALE

SYDNEY, Dec. 16.

The West Indies have performed another of their incon-
sistent tricks in cricket matches—having been skittléd out

in their first inn
and then

Everybody given up

they more than skittled West Australia
n to lose wickets all over again.

to work out the reasons for
all or any of this. And in Ceevtnde I inelude John Goddard.

He can now do no more than
say “surely our batsmen must

only hope it is not too late.”

Manager Merry has lost his ear-
lier goog humour, He sits alone in
corners Li ine, about
the awful deficit in West Indian
cricket funds that this tour will
cause uhless the side suddenly
comes alight and wins at Adelaide,

Jobn Trim has been the hero of
the Perth game. At one time he
had’ seven for 38 before the last
wicket stand held him up.

Then when the West Indies had
raised themselves to a position of
easy command Stollmeyer and Rae
once again failed miserably.

Sturdy Walcott again reached 50
but one could detect in his tear-
away style a feeling that he is a
little tired of always being the one
man who must come off. They still
have a chance to}make good in
this match but once again we are
down to Goddard as the hope of
the side—a pesition that has be-
come grimly familiar,

Ramadhin Lacks Confidence

Since the first Test, the team
has steadily lost its fighting spirit
and it would take an immense ef-
fort for the present rather dis-
spirited side to win the third Test.

It is still possible; it would mean
the salvation of their reputation
and finances if they achieve it,
but it means that players such as
—Stollmeyer, Rae and Worrell—
have got to get down to a real
job of work, and Ramadhin has
to rediscover his confidence and
show some of the fortitude of Val-
entine who never gives up while
he is stiil on his feet.

The scores :
WEST INDIES—First Innings



Rae c Frankish b Puckett 14
Stollmeyer c Frankish b Puckett 12
Rickards c Puckett b Price 24
Walcott run out 1
Gomez c Munro b Puckett 24
Goddard ¢ Williams b Puckett 13
Atkinson b Price ............. 23
Christiani ¢ Munro b Puckett . 0
Guillen Lb.w, Dunn avve 23
Trim not out &
Valentine b Price 0
Extras .... 1
Total 151
BOWLING ANALYSIS
o M R w
Price ll 2 35 3
Dunn. 15 1 44 1
Puckett 19 6 45 5
Sarre cae 5 — 15 -
Frankish . 1 — 4 -
Outridge 4 1 7 oa
WEST AUSTRALIA—Ist Innings
Williams ec Christiani b Trim .. 4
Sabre c Walcott b Atkinson 5
Frankish b Trim ....... 8
Langdom b Trim ........ 2
Outridge L.b.w. b Trim ... 0
Carmody ¢ Walcott b Trim ... 13
Edwards c Goddard b Trim .. 12
Munro b Trim ... 1
Puckett not out .. 24
Dunn b Atkinson 10
Price c Guillen b Atkinson 22
Total . 108
BOWLING ANALYSIS
Oo M R. W.
Bete as. deen 16 1 #80 f
Dr ss tns «3, - 5 Oo
Akinson -.+...ss ces wi 3 2 3
WEST INDIES—2nd mnings
Rae c Langdom b Dunn 5 a ae
Stolimeyer b Dunn ... sar ae
@hirstiani c Munro b Puckett .... 6
Walcott c&b Puckett ,.........0+ + 50
z Lb.w. b Dunn ..:........... 2
kards not out ....... 18
dard not out 8
Extras +s ? 2
Total (for 5 wkts) ... 133





—— WONDER WHEELS N° |

The story of the name

ercules

we

Ts

6AS, 14/74



Davidson

GEDODES

shake his head wearily and
strike form sooner or Jater. |



CLYDE WALCOTT



Schroeder Defeats
Davidson

MELBOURNE, Australia, Dec, 15,
Ted Schfoeder beat Sven
6—2, 6—2, 6—1l, and
gave the United States a five to
zero victory over Sweden in the
Davis Cup inter-zone finals.

Just a few minutes before
Schroeder thumped Davidson, 21
year-old Tony Trabert had turned
back Lenard Barglin 6—1, 10—8.

An American squad under
Captain Frank Shields now is
ready to take on Australia, defend-
ing champion, in the finals,

Off their showing against the
powerful Swedes who had swept
through the European Zone play, it
it doubtful that Shields will be
able to name any of the other team
members for .matches against
Australia,

—U.P.

India Score 485
Against England

BOMBAY, Dec.

England facing a record first
innings total of 485 for nine
declared by India scored 40 for the
loss of one wicket on the second



15,

day of the second cricket Test
here Saturday,
India’s total of which the

captain Vijay Hazare scored 155
was their highest in any Test. It
beat the 454— against the West
Indies at New Delhi three years
ago—(CP)




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County Cricket

HERE is a sad blow for county
cricket. MCC have notified the 17
first class counties that they are
unable to make any distribution
to them out of the profits of the
1950-51 tour of Australia.

Each county received
after the 1946-47 tour.

Tn a letter of explanation to the
counties, MCC give the profit for
the 1950-51 tour as £3,842 against
£17,505 for the 1946-47 visit. In-
creased costs and loss of revenue,
because of wet Saturdays, are given
as the reasons for the disappoint-
ing financial results.

£79 debt remains
When losses

£850

and charges in
connection with other foreign
tours since 1947, amounting to

£3,592, were deducted, only £250
remained for distribution. and
MCC decided to donate this to the
Minor Counties Cricket Association
which does not receive a share of

profits from Test matches at
home.
MCC state that a debt of £79

remains to be carried forward in
the accounts of tours, and this
figure may be supplemented by
further outstanding bills in con-
nection with the 1950-51 Australian
tour.

CCPR criticised

WHILE the Opposition’s censure
en the Government's housing pro-
gramme was being defeated in the
House of Commons last night
criticism of that prosaically named
body, the Central Council of
Physical Recreation was being
cefended in the precincts of the

House—in room No. 8, to be exact. |

At a private meeting of sports~
men and MPs the CCPR were
criticised for the way in which
they spent the money granted by
the Ministry of Education and
the results achieved,

During the year ended March
31, 1951. £66,000 was received
from the Ministry. The Scottish
Education Department subscribed
nearly £14,000, the Northern Ire-
land Ministry of Education £2,700
and the Kent Education Com-
mittee £600. mat

Their aim

The aim of the C.C.P.R, is to
promote all forms of outdoor and
indoor physical recreation among
those over school age.

“The meeting had been called
by a group of sportsmen to
present “on behalf of the
informal committee” a 12-page
8,000 word document described
as a “Short survey of conditions
relating to amateur sport in
Great Britain, with recommen-
dations for improving same.”

While much of the criticism of
the C.C.P.R. contained in the
document was successfully
defended by the council’s gen-
eral secretary, Miss P. C, Colson,
the outcome of the meeting may
prompt consideration of reorgan-
ising the C.C.P.R,

For a start why not a more
attractive title? No one wants
a Central Council in amateur
spott unless it be a totalitarian

state; and mention of a physical
recreation suggests only gym-
nasties to most people though
the C.C.P.R’s activities embrace
more than 40 sports and pas-
times.

Any suggestions

192 had failed

Peter Waterman, 17-year-old
Caius B.C, light-welter-weight
and one of our brightest amateur
boxing prospects, was on the
losing side when a team of Yugo-
slavs beat his club 3—2 at Nine
Elms Baths, Battersea, but he
succeeded where 192 other box-

a

SUNDAY ADVOCATE

PAGE FIVE



Labour V Dance | DEC.9 — NO. 202

Attracts Crowd

Thousands crowded the Princess
Alice Playing Field last nigh
many only to get a, glimpse
of the big Labour Victory Dance
that was held at the Paviliot
of the Playing Field, The dancé
Was a toast to the Labour Party’s
victery at the General Election
last Thursday.

With the bright moon, the soft
breezes and the waves of the
nearby sea breaking on the beach,
the atmosphere of the Playing
Field was quiet despite the large
crowd,

The majority of those who
went down had the idea that the
dance was a free one, but when
they reached they found out that

they had to y two shillings if
they wanted to enter the dance
room, This did not prevent a

great number from going in and
dancing however.
One woman. said as she left the

feld, on hearing she would have
had to pay, “If it was a freeness
though, somebody would have
been killed tonight. Somebody
would have been crushed by that
crowd.”

Near 11 o’¢lock, hundreds of
men and women were still
making their way towards the

playing field.

A few of the successful Labour-
ites were about the Playing Field
during the night,

The people seemed to in a
jovial, easy mood and f were
discussing the results of the elecs
tions,

_

SCOREBOARD |

@ From Page 4
wickets: 1 for 36; 8 for 58 8 for





Fall of
103
Â¥.M.P.C. V COMBERMERE
COMBERMERE wm & WO
Y.M P.C 178 & (without loss) 2

COMBERMERE’S 2nd Innings
Fror

fe thw Rowke *

L. K. Brathwaite c (wkpr, Archer)

A

b Austin 6
©. H, Wilkinson b Austin 26
G. Grant © sub, b Austin 30
Mr, Giasgow b Austin 4
F. King ¢ (wkpr. Archer b Burke 8
bh, Alb yne ce & b Butke 0
Mr. Smith c sub, b Austin 8
K. Lewis not out 2
©, Becklés b Austin se
W. Maxwell stpd. (sub) b. Burke 7
Extras 7
Total 100
Fall of wickets; 1—2, 2—14, 3—63, 418,
5—78, 678, 782, B90, 9-03, 10—100,
BOWLING ANALYSIS
oO M R w
1 Burke 44 3 “4 4
R. Austin 1 3 “ 6
E. Branker a 4 *
K. Branker 2 is
G. Archer 4 1 o
YM.P.C.'s 2nd INNINGS
Ingram not out 0
Areher not out 2
Total twithout lows) 2





Before this visit
171 of his 192 contests in nine
years; boxed 27 times against
foreign opponents, ahd captained
the European team against the
U.S.A,

The bout
reflection,

It was announced before the
international contests that each
boxer who was floored must stay
down for eight secohd but in
Sovljanski’s case, referee C,
Stichley allowed him to continue
eurlier.

The A.B.A, adopted rules com-
mon with other international
boxing associations this season,
One concerned this eight-second |
provision. |

The A.B.A. should ensure that |
the rules—this one in particular

he had won

produced one bad

which is intended to lessen the |
chances of injury — are rigidly
enforced. —L.E.S.

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Palve Sovijanski — for the past
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try.

This is Waterman’s best per-
formance, and it took him less
than one round,

Though only 24, Sovijanski has
had considerable experience.

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The

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And Lou reminded Joe again

the battle done

That Bajans don't fun

The people, yea the people
Have made their own dear choice
For boys it was the people

Who have the loudest veice
. *

make

The people, yes the ptdple
Who went and voted glad
And left out one the leaders
Now playing they are sad
To them beth Joe and Rebert
Repeat this prayer anew
“Forgive them oh my Fathér
They know not what they do.”
° .

Well “laboug’, “labour,” “labour”
Was the lon@ cry that day

And who ditin't fepeat “labour”
Had nothing much to say
Lou said Joe, 1 am worried
Beli¢ve me Joe, bilieve

I've love a dear Old comrade
To whom now must I cleave?

He promised he would take us
Back to our dear Hhome-land
But sinew he is defeated

We don't know where we stand

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They expect things galore
Rich lands of milk and honey
And gold paved to their door

Roads built leading to heaven
With sunshine all the way
Two hundred thousand people
Will all live great and gay

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A house for every homeless
A job for every one
Te poverty and worry
They'll simply saY—begone

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Well boys what a utopia
This will be all the while
The people say it's possible
On just a few square miles
: ° .
We who know little better

Will stand aside to see

The people, all the year round
Enjoy prosperity ‘
We send tongratulations

To all the new and old

Who now led By one shepherd

Are safely in one fold, ‘
: .



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Even those Who through their own wills

In the past went astray

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ee ee ee ee ae ‘oe a



PAGE SIX SUNDAY ADVOCATE SUNDAY, DECEMBER 16, 1951
nid Startling Predictions
Guide Notes | | ith scient bat:
yu oles In Your Horoscope _ MILLIONS OF FAMILIES agree with scientific findings that :
Enrolments : : 4S SAS Se a :
Ont Tube Gan itkianes tow Raat Life rae Free i” ees é Pe
Mrs, H. A. Talma, District Corn- emiak enon Mieeds Gee ae ‘os 2 | >
missioner, enrolled 3 Guides at Pour noet capetizesen vee tron ae BX .
Sharon, Miss E, Small is the Guide; ] weak points, etc? Here ts your arive | “eles
in charge and now these Guide = EEE Oe AR oh, Pasees abore, ga





ve been enrolled, the Company











nas built up ar

will be registered at Imperia!] applying the ‘a
Headquarters. ; clent feience cao ¥ CLEANS YOUR ba338,
On Thursday, 29th Novemiser | Uretul Purpose \ > % ’
pores Talma visited 9th (St. Mary's} ton? The aconanes hy 4 “ i
3irls’ School), 11th (Hindsbury] of his predictions “KY j ;
Girls’ School) and 12th (West- AD a 7 ¥ CLEANS b4o)ti* BREATH as *,
bury Girls’ School), These 3 Guid ——. Psat. ? ana i a (s
Companies meet at Westbury Girls] Horoscopes op / = S : +
School, Mrs, Talma enrolled 3] Susiness, Speculs b- S PREVENT DECAY
Guides of 9th, 5 of 11th and 7 of} "2". pn gy n, ita P
The vast new drive to develop By FREDERICK ELLIS Wales coal mines formed the big- 12th, making a total of 15 Guides.) ricnds. beri. =
Emp esources—a drive already T Rugby company will run gest group in Britain before na- The same afternoon Mrs. Talrnal Lotteries, Travels A )
invulving millions of pounds of ant tionalisation, are putting both enrolled 3 Brownies of 9th Pack. oanaee, . Lattin R "
Brits »-enterprise oney M . Redcish, who has spent two money and “know-how” into 2 * lon, Lucky Time
ine t s $90,000 re 9 neastie, eal on the nite lave “Only campaign to ex oe ye ‘ok te z ; Hikes ; ee TY ‘ WHS COLGATE WAY 39 ComP
got a £1,600,00C r 3 k 3 ) pag } k r In spite of the h astounded = educat
Mr. Halford Reddish, the cement ning Up in the Empire can the fabulous Wankie coalfield in Pp ie heavy rain on









Saturday, 3rd November, 19 Guides| “? "°° ‘

HOME DENTAL CANE

maker, unfolded a plan to build t ho'd her standards of liv- Rhodesia, of 4th Gui
g Trinidé a a ee ake | ue uides (Queen’s College) | world over. GEORGE MACKEY of New

cement works in Trinidad, It irg f This near-opencast field has a with their Captain, Miss Joyce] York believes that Tabore must alah ‘ Always brush your teeth
will-make 100,000 tons of cement Wo k has aiready started on the seam of coal up to 28ft. thick—the Bowen and the Acting Li + | s€s8 some sort of second-sight. right after eating with
a yéar, Will be the first cement «e” lopment drive's biggest pro- thickest in the world, No one really Miss M, Martineau ~~ oes To popularise his system Tabore will |
plant in the colony. jec in £8,000,000 steelworks at knows how much coal is there the Skeete of Ist Bangers Siene at aie a Be Re dia Bp Bo ea al COLGATE DENTAL CREAM

rot Kembla, Australia. field is so rich, l " ov he) (Mr. Mrs. or Miss), address and date

Mr. Reddish’s Rugby Portland It is being built by Guest, Keen, All over the Empire Britain’s aaa eee ers 7 he} of birth all clearly writen by ourself | fs at No
Cement company will put up £450,000 of the money. Lord Reith’s combine whose steelworks in ool groun postage etc., but send 6d in Brit ‘osta

Colonia] Development Corporation Britain were nationalised.
will put up the rest, Powell Duffryn, whose South

2m. For S.D.A.
Work In Caribbean,

(From Our Own

Tourism Needs

Govt. Aid

Correspondent)

2 . ‘ :
4 DE P( Ss TS N B G Marjorie Pemberton hiked Make Men Old
(From Our Own Correspondent) ia aad al FORT-OF“SE ALN, ae I = I °~* South Point on Saturday, 24th s }
PORT-OF-SPAIN, Dec. 7. Financia) _ Seimaee sid aves GEORGETOWN, November. They left Bridgetown] _,Getting up nights, burning sensation of

gramme of work for the Seventh
Day Adventist missions throughout
the Caribbean area is being con-
sidered by the Mr. Glenn Calkins

Mr, Vernon F. Wharton, Chair-
man of the Trinidad and Tobago
Tourist Board stated in a Press
Release; “If with Government aid

and assured of the solid backing Vice-President of the General Con- (Canada) Ltd. Veins have been Utes. The Guides explored the] few scientific discovery called Rogene.
of the Commercial Community, ference of Seven.h Day Adventist found close to the surface levei 8Tounds around the Lighthouse] No matter how long you have suffered |
7 Rogene is guaranteed to set yeu right,

the Tourist Board can be instru- "Ow visiting Trinidad. Mr. Calkins
mental in producing an attractive who is also President of Inter-
scheme for hotel and beach resort American Division of the Seventh
development, the future of tourism Day Adventist said that Two mil-
in the Colony will be assured.’ In lion dollars (U.S.) had been voted
his release which follows a meeting by the headquarters of the or-
of the Board's 1952 programme and ganisation in Miami to work in
its pla for the development of the Caribbean area.






















new plants to produce things rang- under water ¢ " ”
ing from bicycles to paper, rayon to pint. at ata the midday
to cables, timber to paint. meal was prepared and cooked

Order for stationery, testimon «ls ete. !
You will be amazed at the rem «rkeble |
accuracy of his statements about -ou and
your affairs. Write offer

: now as t
—LES. under shelter. They thorougai) | may not be made again. Addres: PUN- |
enjoyed the experience and begged] O!T TABORE (Dept. 213—-« Upper

Forjett Street. Bombay 26
To India 4 cents

Postage
to be allowed to go to camp as India. Postag

BIG NEW a s a The party ‘eft
Spei stown a _m.
MANGANESE "4, Guides of Tt B, (St

Michael's Girls School) with M

organs, whitish discharge, dull ache at base
of spine, groin and leg pains, nervousness,

ness and loss of manly vigour are
tus by a disease of the Prosta‘e Gland
& most important sex gland In men). To
Overcome these troubles in 24 hours and
quickly restore vigour and health, ‘ake the

Discovery of extensive deposits bY Bus at 9.30 a.m, but did not
of manganese in the northwestern travel all the way by bus. They
areas of British Guiana is report- Teached South Point at 10,25 a.m.,
ed by the Barima Gold Mining Co., having walked for about 25 min-

and workable to a vertical depth Md had some cocoa. They pre-
of 100 feet. pared and cooked their meal

“Preliminary tests indicate a Which they had about 1.30. After
large tonnage of rather low-grade lunch they sang old songs and
ore, apt to be processed into a learnt some new ones, At 4 p.m.
high-grade product of 48 per ceut they had some fruit juice, tidied
or more metallic manganese,” re- UP the camp site, packed their
ported the company. “There are ©@Uipment and left for town ay

reinvigorate your Prostage Gland and make
a feel 10 to 20 years younger cr money

ack. Get Regena from your chemist.
suarantee protects you.


















indications of deposits of higher- 480 p.m, arriving there at 6 p.m.
needs of- tourists, he states: “In “This will be augmented by the 8tade ores which can be shipped The Barn Dance

confiection with the Tourist Board’, income from the many Carib- /”_ their natural state.” The Barn Dance organised by
cesire to obtain an export survey bean territories which will equal _ The discovery may be of the Ist Rangers (Queén’s College) has
of the hotel situation in 1952 I the amounts voted from the Army &'eatest importance to the world cleared the magnificent sum af
should like to state that this is oy more”, the Executive. said. He re-armament drives now going on. $252.48. The Rangers are to be
only one part of the Board’s 1952 wi}) visit British Guiana, Bar- ¥Ssia is the world’s largest pro- congratulated and the Association

hotels in the Colony to satisfy the










programme for hotel development, bados, Venezuela, Curacao and
On the question of finance the paiti’ which will include the 27
Board has made strong represen~ ...ntries in his territory.

tations to Government requesting :



the creation of an industrial loan large needs and until now hus Christmas Party
fund for tourism. Tourism as an obtained most of its supplies from The 15th Brownies with the
industry qualified for attention FINANCE COM. END Russia. Other important produc- Wolf Cubs of the Linden Grove
within the scope of an industrial o are India, brazil and West School had a delightful Christmas}}! e
loan fund. 7 rica. Party on Monday, 10th December.
REVIEW OF ESTIMATES —B.U.P. The parents of the children, the



(From Our Own Correspondent)
ST. GEORGE'S, Dec. 8

Brazil Passengers _ Ater « tut! week of all-day sit-
tings, the Finance Committee of

Stranded In T’dad the Legislative Council has now



completed its review of the Esti- f Hudson. With Mrs, Hudson the]} jonre hele ae Ml hea smoothes on such an airy delicate film, fragrant, fluffy and .
(rom Our Own Correspondeny ‘Mates for 1952 which willbe Assets Brownies and Cubs have madel) fev sonda geek eR eraed ie {| aaah aes
PORT-OF-SPAIN, Dec, 10 presented in open Council about and painted 2 Christmas trees and]; Wh give you gentle but effective overnight ’ non-greasy, forming a light but lasting base for your
As a result of a national strike the middle of the month. ‘Then, a0 ae LONDON. presents for a couple of poor oR RCM { :
in Brazil passengers are now the M.M.W.U. bloc will be seen in Assets of Trinidad Leasenoids, families and the children are tol) dients of fruits, vewctables and kerbs Is | Yardley Complexion Powder.
stranded in this Colony. It is re« public action for the first. time. Ltd., expanded trom £14,0s0,svs take these gifts to these 2 homes|} ‘pecial bowel eopdition after hartntu wastes i
ported that all airports in Brazil A keen debate is expected. to £18,062,185 during the year on Christmas Eve. The trees are Some’ Indian “Hoot {| Follow through this make-up scheme for loveliness
are closed down. Operating nine ended last June 30, according to beautifully made and decorated Pills today. 1
lines in Trinidad affected by wats se company’s report, just pub- idee plegoure to 3 i with a glorious, glowing Yardley Lipstick.
strike are Pan aa Say lished in London, Net profi. for ‘Me children who receive them, Tig nf
Airways and ete Wael. at DROUGHT IN BRITISH the year, after providing Jor taxa- yee ra bag ae 9 Hudson. have ia : (
the moment 44 passengers on board tion and all other contingencies, is {Pace lovely Totem Pole, which ’ ; : ,
the “El Presidente” are athe janes VIRGIN ISLANDS put at £1,470,705, as against £906, they have called “Rollo” and Mrs, chi 4 ts YA R D LE Y Foundation Cream
care of gt the Pan American Guest 7 : : 399 in the preceding year. WEIR WOO RENOR LODERNEEE It] iar eoceaben owas ain mem eo entnies Ste ae
. , BRITISH VIRGIN. ISLANDS . - Rs to the Pack, which she did con-|! ! vy NV
House, Piarco, No word can be , > Mr. Simon J..Vos, the Chair- : en BEWARE OF WORMS! to iouid F.
sees eens: To, ae it’ 48 While most other colonies of the pan points out that the comple. Satulating the boys on their good ! i > also Liquid Foundation English Complexion Creat
ee eeher SAG, Bs * Leewards have enjoyed a year of jjon’ r ae oe ee rete rele, ¥ Be sure your family is protected with | g “Make-up Base’ + Rouge + Lipstick
reported that all communication exceptionally. good rainfall, the tion of the extensive work now § Comstock's Worm Pellets, Made by, the ; M. Eye Shad ; \
2 aaaviat exce all, . 4 a . 7 ti i ; : re Eye Shadow Jomplexion Mi
is severed. Virgin Islands experienced a mild- being undertaken at the Trini- {makers of Dr. Morse's Indian Rog Pills. | ascara ye Shadow Complexi f\lk

yeay drought so severe that over
two hundred head of cattle died
and in order to save the remain-
ing herds elephant grass had to



Liaison Officer














ducer of manganese, a vital min- thanks them most sincerely fot
eral indispensable for making their splendid contribution to the
tougher steel, The United States new wall at Pax Hill.
produces only a fraction of its own




















Island Commissioner and Mrs,
A. W. Scott, District Commissioner
were present. After some team
games, Mrs. Scott presented the
ist Class Brownie Badge to Jan

MORSES
pn1 PILLS

Big Expansion In
T’dad Leaseholds







dad refinery, the development ot
Canadian and other subsidiary
interests and the building of ad-
ditional tanker tonnage involve

Police Band At
Bay St. Esplanade



PPPOE “~ “ CPO?










To have and to hold your powder all day long! Yardley Foundation Crean








YARDLEY - 83 OLD BON}! vow LORDOS

£56,6,66066CCO

3 34,6606607 66%.
SPOOL OOOO OOOO POPPI PPP ALLA PPA PPO PAPPP PID APR
















: ee ; substanial financial commitments. ‘ Nd
Mrs, L, R. Richardson has been °@ Tationed. MMe +i —B.U.P. The Police Band conducted by x x
appointed by the Secretary of — Sjt. G. Archer will render a pro-|%
State for the Colonies as Assistant gramme of music at the Esplanade x y
Linton Officer for West indian JAMAICA WANTS MEMBER OF T.A.S.P.O. Bay Strect, at 4.45 p.m. to-day. 3 %
on wies effec’ rom e ist . THE . ~ aa ¥
November, 1951. BIG U.K LOAN Jo MARRY IN U.K. a) MAO ae x :
A Trinidadian by birth, Mrs, PORT-OF-SPAIN Dee 10 {2) QVERTURE, Juanita $ $
Richardson was employed in the KINGSTON, When members of the TASPO ville ON: M** Cloches De Como. | 8
Control of Imports and Exports The Jamaican House of Repre- steel band return to th Cc lony (4) VALSE, Christmas Roses Waldteufel %
Department, Trinidad, from 1942 sentatives has decideq_ that fete the United Ki rc grind (5) GAVOTTE, Hearts and Flowers|
to 1948. In 1948 she accompanied Jamaica should ask Britain or will be shc ae pecom 7 bpd ‘ J ie pals Tobani| %
her husband to the United King- other countries for a £25,000,000 Potancourt, who hat meio ed eh SELECTION, BENS ieee |
dom and was attached to the West loan to assist in the economic and En oy Kerry an oer tha i. ae) ow sullivan x ,
Indian Committee until January, industrial development of the |; * * i es, a London medi- (@) CHARACTERISTIC PIECE, The But-| %
1950. Since February 1950, she island and to carry out the on pg a ee symm 00,4 &. ia OA Sordan eae
has acted as personal assistant to Colony’s revised ten-year develop- deliver#’ bo i . Trin Mad Was ® the Baptists cry. eer ae
the Liason Officer, ment plan.—B.U.P. : f Ong s0e midad News “Hymn 83. A. &. M. Hark! the glad| @
paper. sound! The Saviour comes ;
%
| —th ow SN ee ¥
: $
A ial gift ! —Thi ‘
| special gi t: Is new |x
| ‘+
4 “ey 9) ~
| PARKER. ”
| ‘ i oe ’ 4 x ry x
‘It’s the only pen with ¢
|
) the AERO-METRIC $
%,
, ove > ‘s iS
INK SYSTEM % .
Re 8
} x $
“ x »
S. Sy i s
ary g
x i : >
| % . Ba >
s °
| x be
| x x
j %
| % >
| %,
| S °"S GIFT TIME, GIVE
| * WHEN IT I IME, IV
a x
s
F iS
} ¢
% L I M.
| x
is
| 1% ;
RS
| { S, mea —IET > TC
} & IR IT’S A GIFT THAT HAS EVERYTHING TO COMMEND IT.
3 4 i Remember, it’s the FAVOURITE TOILET LOTION OF THE CARIBBEAN,
®, % simply because it is useful in so many ways. $
s ; :
| Scare ) 1s It can be used as a rub-down, a deodorant, a soothing lotion for sun-
- suveny seat | RS burn or for after-shaving, or for relieving insect-stings. And when it comes ;
Here’s one gift you know is wanted! This \ $ to sick-room requirements, it simply can’t be beaten. ;
| ‘ey? with its re s : Rare . %
| Aatcumetine ik Oeties, eines 1% What could be a better gift in the tropics than “the freshness of a g
i —aw ‘ re J no ~
different, scientific method of drawing in, % penne th 8 ee =
storing, safeguarding and releasing ink. 1X %
See this wonderful new Parker ‘51’ x 3
3 eRe "7 6 te ' ?
h— at zo Sool s. - a very special - +: jemi pein: in co & >
+». or for yourself... it’s the perfect 4 wew INK FLOW GOVERNOR | 88 $
choice. @ NEW PLI-GLASS RESERVOIR x %
Prices: RotLeD GoLp Cap $24.05 @ NEW VISIBLE INK SUPPLY x x
~ . “7 %,
LustraLoy Cap $19. and 4 other great advances % ; R
~= s x
> C2 7%.. eo is lori hl | ¢s x
Marked TEBILIZED for testes crease-resistance, wasbable Sather Of woilis most wantid Fift fete iS >
and TOOTAL guaranteed, , . 9965999995 V9 9099S OFF S9S OSD SPOOLS LOL LOPE CPE ELS PPP ASS SLOOP LPP LE POSTTP

~



SUNDAY,

DECEMBER 16,

1951



Drawing Certificates
Presented To Teachers

Certificates for drawing were presented to a number of
teachers at Erdiston College yesterday by Mr, C. Glyndon

Reed, Director of Education.

The teachers were trained in

drawing by Mrs, Bruce Hamilton who has been connected
with the Teachers Drawing Classes for 11 years.

After Mrs. Hamilton told teachers of the object of the
classes and Mr. Reed distributed the prizes, the drawings
were put on show for the benefit of those who attended

the distribution.
This is the first tithe that cer-

fieates have been distributed,
aith there have been yearly
exhibitions, There are two
classes, each of which has 24

teachers to be trained in the
senior and junior divisions.

The drawings were of a fair
Standard. Easily the best were
those illustrating the alphabet—
“A” is for Ant, “B” is for But-
terfly, etc. The ant was prettily
drawn within the “A” by R. i.
Sobers who seems to have devel-
oped a special technique for this
type of drawing. R. I. Sobers

~ also made a pleasing drawing of
a spider within an “S”. All these
iMustrations were well done and
in bright colours.

There were drawings of fish,
of hou of people and scene-
ries, besides others. The fish, too,
were well drawn. There were for
the most part the red fish which
are caught around these shores.

The drawings of pottery lacked
symmetry, although perhaps they
were true drawings from the
pottery which was locally made.

Books Illustrated

“An interesting feature was
some small note books with select-
ed poems written in neatly on half
the pages and on the other half
pictures of local sceneries.

The drawirys the Director of
Education praised were drawings
of such things as ducks, lamps,
moths and vines beside which
the names were printed. He
felt it was a good way of teach-
ing children various objects. He
liked these best because of the
educational value, but they were
not the most attractive of the
collection.

Before the prizes were distri-
buted, Mrs. Hamilton said that
one of the objects of the classes
was to make people begin to see
and draw for themselves, to con-
centrate and to observe.

“It is a very good thing for
a child to play about with
colour,” she said, and gradually
learn how to use the brush. If
there is genius among them,
it is the best way it can be dis-
covered. “It is very important
for people to use their own
designs and it is becoming more
and more important as more
and more tourists come to the
island. They like to see new
things, not pictures or sketches
from magazines from where they
may have come. “They want to
see what our island has to offer.”

Mrs. Hamilton then continued
to speak of the interest the
teachers had shown and the keen
interest that was necessary.

Before distributing the prizes,
Mr. Reed said:

Dislike for School

I think one of the most inter-
esting developments in the edu-
cational field during the last fifty
years has been the change in the
attitude of children towards going
to school. When I was young it
was the exceptional @hild who
liked going to school. In Eng-

| They'll Do






DOLLED UP SO



It Every Time

land at any rate in those days
most children regardeq school as
a necessary evil which had to be
endured. Some of you will re-
member the novelist, Evelyn
Waugh’s definition of a public
school education as “five years of
absolute hell” and I have heard
this opinion endorsed over and
over again by men and women of
approximately my own age-
group,

To-day in England it is the ex-
ceptional child who does not want
to go to school.

Now this change in attitude on
the part of the child did not hap-
pen by chance. It is the result
of a definite policy which is based
on a far better knowledge of the
child and his needs than hither-
to. One of the things we educa-
tionists have discovered is that
the young child loves to learn by
doing, and above all he enjoys
making pictures.

Psychologists have made a
special study of the Art of child-
ren and they tell us that up to
the age of about 7 or 8 the draw-
ings of children are mainly sym-
bolic. There is little or no at-
tempt at realism. The drawings
express movement and the child
applies his pencil, crayon or
paint brush with intense vigour
and concentration, The finished
pictures are often a maze of
lines and scribbles. If you ask
what such a picture represents
the child will give an answer
such as this—"“That is Uncle Bill
falling into the duck-pond”.

After the age of eight the young

artist improves in skill and
draughtsmanship. He is not a
bit embarrassed about his pic-

tures but readily exhibits them
to all who are interested.
Favourite Subjects

The favourite subjects for
English children are human
beings. Then mechanical vehicles.
Girls love flowers and all are fas-
cinated by colour work. The
child is a real post-impressionist
and cares little for things like
proportion or perspective, There
is much to be said for the teacher
allowing the child to have full
freedomy to express his interest in
the human figure by depicting it
in his own way.

After 11 the child begins to get
shy about his art. Ability in
drawing declines in many child-
ren. At this stage they are more
content to learn than to create,
and those who have talent are
more willing to be shown the
techniques of drawing and paint-
ing than they were before.

Remember always that the in-
tention of art teaching in school
is to give an outlet to the child's
instinctive sense of pleasure in
form, eau, spt vement. It is
not to odtce Reval cademic-
ians.

Make your art lessons periods of
happy achievement and you will be
doing your part towards making
school life as vital, interesting
and attractive as it ought to be.





THE

NEIGHBORS'LL THINK {7

HE'S AN EXECUTIVE
INSTEAD OF A »
GREASE “ONKry!



THOMPSON’S
Seedless .Raisins and
Choice Juicy Prunes

APIE
Peanut Butter

Oatmeal and Cereal.

POOP OFFCOO

Y WORLD RIGHT: = BY








OOPS oO CSL PPRAOPPPLPTE

—After our little talk with Mrs. Housewife, here’s further Good News—
by the s.s. “Kallada” come the Goods for an enjoyable Xmas and New Year!

KOO







STANSFELD

G. C. WARD & Co,
KEY BRANDS TO BETTER AND CHEAPER LIVING!

.
DVLPLLLOLLLLLPPELDLLPDLI LLL PPELPLEPL PAPAL ELITR



SUNDAY

ELECTION RESULTS
SURPRISING

oe
The end of the elections brought surprises to many when it

came to certain candidates
didates, who were least ex
chosen.

being dropped and other can-
pected to be successful, being

But as far as a majority for the Labour Party was concerned,

it was pop

ular belief among various sections of the com-

munity that the Labour Party would have got not less than

15. seats,

Quite a number of voters told
the Advocate yopverter that they
were glad that the Labour
Party had got a sweeping ma-
jority but most of them said that
they were sorry Mr, J. H, Wil-
kinson had lost his seat. There
were a few people who said: that
they would have liked the two
major parties to get as many
seats.

Surprised
A dry goods clerk said that he
was not surprised that Labour
was returned with suah an over-
whelming majority as there was
a definite turn to labour in all

the other islands due to Adult
Suffrage.

“It is a glorious victory for
labour” he said and added that
he hoped the members of the
party would pull together and
continue to improve the condi-

tions of the masses,

Another clerk said that he was
not at all surprised at the results.
A majority for labour would tend
smoother running. He _ thought
that great credit should be given
to the Labour Party for sending
the first woman to the House of
Assembly and as senior member
of her constituency.

A cabinet maker said that the
elections were run very satis-
factorily and although he had
expected the Labour Party to get
a majority, he did not expect
them to capture so many seats.

He felt that the members
would give a good account of
themselves, especially when it

was seen that they had a better
selection including four lawyers.

A school master said: “The
voice of the pegale has been
answered and I think the results
have been very gratifying. We
however hope that those in the
Government will do all in their

ower to fulfil what was set out
n the Party’s manifesto so that
the people of the island on the
whole will benefit.”

A boatman said that he de-
finitely disagreed with the results
of the elections. He felt that
labour should not have had that
big majority, At present, there
was no opposition and to his
way of thinking, half of the can-
didates should be conservative
and the remainder labour.

A pedler also had the same
views as the boatman and hoped
that the life of the House would
be three years and not five.

Better Than Last

A city businessman felt that
the future Government was
bound to be better than the last
as the Labour Party had better
qualified and educated men in
their ranks.

A city photographer said that
he did not think the right type of

rsons had been sent to the

ouse. They had elected people
whg hi no financial or econo~
mic r nsibility and he failed
to see how they were going to do
their jobs.

“T am not surprised at the re-
sults of the elections” he said
because the people were merely
following the trend of the other





THERES ONE IN EVERY
SHOP THEYLL DO IT
QUITTING TIME=>++

West Indian islands who had been

granted Adult Suffrage. They
were not educated to it and
therefore had to follow what

others told them,

Now that all the territories in
the Caribbean area had been
granted this Adult Suffrage, he
did not think that there would
be Federation for the simple
reason that each leader in the
colonies would want to be Prime
Minister.



Exhibition Of
French Magazines

During the week ending Decem-
ber 15 there was an interesting
Exhibition of French magazines i:
the S.P.C.K. Book Department at
Messrs C. F. Harrison & Co., helu
by the local branch of the Alliance
Francaise. The Exhibition was
made possible the kind co-
operation of Mr. Idris Mills, Re-
gional Manager of the S.P.C.K.
Book Department

The magazines displayed ineclud-
ed a large variety of fashion,
scientific, medical and general in-
terest periodicals. They provided
a zolourful ana interesting selec-

by

tion of modern French illustrated
magazine production

The display attracted a great
deal of attention and the fashion
magazines had particular interest
for the ladies The medical and
scientific magazines covered many
specialised fields of medical

practice and should be of interest
to any medical practitioner who
might be interested in current
French thought and practice in this
field.

The magazines
tained by the Committee of the
Alliance Francaise and any one
who did not have the opportunity
of seeing them at the S p C.K. De-
partment! will be able to sge them

are being ree

at the monthly meeting of the
Alliance Francaise at the British
Couneil, “Wakefield” in January

The magazines will be kept there
by kind permission of the British
Council!

The magazines and periodicals
were sent fo the Committée of the
Alliance Franeaise by the French
Council in Trinidad, Mr. Idris
Mills has consented to act as agent
in Barbados for those displayed.

The Alliance Franéaise had been
functioning in Barbados since last
August and at present has a mem-
bership of nearly 50 people who
are interested in French thought,
life and culture.

CAROLS AT JAMES ST.
METHODIST CHURCH

The Sunday School scholars of
the James Street Methodist
Churoh will be rendering a
Christmas Carol and Tey Service
at 3.15 p.m,

A special programme of carols,
recitations and musical items
will be given.

Guest artists will also partici-
pate.



MADE













=

Pest

MOIR’S
Vanilla Essences

CANNED FRUITS. ,

GOLDEN GLORY
Pineapple Rings

CLAPP’S BABY FOODS.

This Nutricious American Baby Food is now available
Baby and Junior sized strajned fruits, and ready-cooked Quick-to-serve
Here is the chance for loving Mothers to have baby
looking the picture of health. Obtainable from: —
ALLEYNE, ARTHUR & Co,, Ltd.
H. P. HARRIS & €o.

SCOTT & Co,, Ltd.

oe

LL EO

TALC AND

DUSTING POWDER
| Each a lovely gift, Goya's after-the-both luxuries,
| Tale or a drum of Ou puff
|

Powder, with



Ste LD

CHRISTMAS
CARD



in @ pretty f

rol frag
ore! box



a at ae ee eee eee ee ee ee ee ee ee a ee

ADVOCATE



Wan about Jown

i tried
cial line of the trick-

bedside Clocks
in an age—and AT A

A ver
lest aesk nd

you've seer

SPECIAI DISCOUNT of 10%.
Now, that really is a Christmas
attractior the clocks are quite

lifferent from the usual run, some

ire no larger than a Cigarette
Case. Here, too, is a new ship-
ment of magnificent Diamond

Rings ranging from $60 to $2,000
(wow!). You'll see countless won-
jerful China Gifts of Bavarian
Porcelain, Limoge and _ British
Bone all in this shop of the Season
—Louis L. Bayley of Bolton Lane.
* ” ¥

A Merry Christmas, West In-
jian style and here’s how to say
it—with a selection of fascinating
nd characteristic local Handicraft
rom the Dominica Handicraft
Company.!*The crowded store is
coloured with a Tropical gaiety
and Raffia Mats, Flowered Shop-
ping Baskets and Handbags (all
so very reasonably priced) and
the cutest little “carry-bags” for
purse and cigars. Thermos Bas-
kets, Table-mats, Coasters and
West Indian Wood Carvings. Come
» in and make it a West Indian
Christmas.

House Full! That's the sign of a

really successful Hotel. Here at
sun-kissed Cacrabank there's al-
ways a welcome for non-resident
guests (especially for the Marvel-
lous Curry Luneh on Sundays).

Excellent food from a Chef, skilled
literally over years and continents,
has brought the Cacrabank cuisine
to a level of sheer delight to those
fortunate enough to experience it,
Hospitality is here to greet you, so
do come alorg next Sunday to this

wonderfully located Cacrabank
Hotel
.

Now he time (you're just in
time) to colour up for Christmas
Here's where to get everything
you could possibly wish for
Brown Varnish Cleag Varnish
for floors, Enamels and Paint
And, of course, any type of
Brush you wish---at C, S. Piteher
& Co. ph. 4472. A note in pass
ing on Piteher’s Floor Varnish.
Even although you've never done
it before, you (even I, and that's
saying aelot) could perform this
near miracle. It slides on in two
smooth coats to finish the job
Ask for Lifeguard Varnish

* %

The coolest place in Town
here where rhe Flying Fish
Club right at the back of the

AN sen i a
First Prize Day

A large number of parents and

pupils attended the First Prize
Day to be held by the Arlingtos
High School on Friday. The
School Choir entertained the au-
dience with many Christmas Car-
ols

Mr. G. V. Batson, Headmaster,
addressed parents He reviewed

the work of the school from its in-

ception. He suid that several pu-
pils had entered for public ex-
aminations and a good number

of them were successful

Mr, Batson said that the school

was fortunate in gaining five dis-
tinetions and three passes in the
last L.C.C. examinations,

Mr. H. Marshall distributed the

prizes after which 4 vote of thanks
was moved by Mr. A. D. Edwards,

BY THE MONKS

OF BUCKFAST ABBEY

generally run down a glass or two a day of
Buckfast Tonic Wine will quickly restore lost
energy and tone up the whole nervous system.
Giving new vitality it fortifies you against fever
and exhaustion and remember, Buckfast Tonic
Wine is especially valuable after illness.

If you feel worn out, depressed, or |

COFFRET
A luxury gift of fragrance—Coffret containing «
Perfurre Treasure Chest, Both Salts, Perfurned
Cologne and Soap t match






CHRISTMAS TREE
GIFT SeT

FOUR
PHIAL
COLLECTION

or her

for the wee
t of perfume ond a bettie of mutch
Perfumed Colagee ; or you can choose o Colle

LOND
NEW YO

+ @ handb

blag



Sele @iwribuvors: L. M. B. Meyers & Co. Ltd., P, O, Box i7/ Bridgevown

















Colonnade Stcre. Recently
switched to the capable hands ©
new Manageress, Carmen Hamil



ton, formerly of Trinidad,

‘Fish’ serves, cold lunches and
sandwiches and every drink you
could think of from the woll
stocked Bar—but at moderate
prices—an important point. The
exotic green of its causerina

foliage coolly contrasts the deep
red of shuttered frames and mir-
rored windows. The Flying Fis
Club, a delightful meeting plac;
FORTIPHONE HEARING
AIDS—available only throvg: |
Manning & Co, Lid., these beuu
tifully made and compact hea
ing aids are designed both for tr
ear and the ear bone (behind ky)

ear). For many, this necessary
and very marvellous equipmen
can simplify a major probiem

indeed, supply a complete answer
to deafness. Manning's fully
service these electrical (battery
operated) FORTIPHONES = anu
invite you to have a test (nv
charge) with their special test
ing equipment. Ask to see Mr. |
Lamming or phone 4289. |
t 7

-

A North American Christma
this time—at Rockley Beach an
Residential Club. Yes, siree an

with all the trimmings. Remem
ber ‘em? It’s to be a Dinner i:
real old world style (and that
new world custom, I'm tellin
you, folks) and you're sui
gonna love just every bite ani
every minute of it. This even!
jis a natural sequel to the high



successful Thanksgiving Dine
and requests have flooded in t
Jam and Marion O'Neal for :
repeat performarce. So resery
by phone (8585) and come ai
along }
* ‘ |
Beautiul Yardley Gift Sets foi |
Men (after-shave Lotion an |
Cologne, Shaving Bow! anc |
Soap) a splendid suggestion if
may say so and I can’t be mor
blunt about it. You'll find thes
at Da _ Costa's Toilet Counte
together with Ladies’ Perfume
and Dusting Powders and a hua
stock of Colognes by the bes! |
makers Such names as Nay
Factor and Du Barry are well
represented as is the Contineni
with numerous beautiful and
highly exclusive —perfumes—D

Costa & Co. Ltd.

hints are
hints at

if they're
heavy as

gentle and
all they're as

bricks. This Xmas, maybe mâ„¢)
two supporters would consider ;
gift from Decoration House Ltd
it their new COLONY SHOP a

Porter's +--Roads, on

One Unusual Sporting
and the Cries of London in
Mat designs;

Highwa
Print
Table
Handmade Costum:
Jewellery; most unusual Cocktail
‘Cups’ in sets and varieties of
colours and—a very different and
unusual table lamp—there is only

one—a 138th Century Chinese
Wine Bottle
It’s the 10 ewt. Model ‘J’ and

about the smartest Light Delivery
Van you'll see anywhere. The
Fort Royal Garage have them in
now and Perey Gooding pointed
out the many attractive features

gonstruction, a

cool Cabin by reason of open door |
travelling if you wish, Brakes |
are Lockheed Hydraulic and the |
whole job makes this Model

highly attractive ‘buy’.

‘Ja



® ‘
Now, nobody can ever say my

Among them is rugged ail-stee! |
14 hop. Engine, |
Sliding Doors (no door-flap, ideal |
in narrow lanes) and beautifully |

PAGE SEVEN

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Cashmere Bouquet's gentle
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J ~~: Me

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Yes, tonightil you ¥ ' }

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Dewey loveliness!
e Fregrenily clean, f
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oar wosy-to-manegs, perfect
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e Glistening with sheen. Neo
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PAGE EIGHT



BARBADOS Sq ADVOGAT

trae ae
Printed by the Advocate Co., Lid., Broad St, Bri town






‘Sunday, December 16, 1951



DEEP WATER

RIGHT ‘at the head of .the
priorities demanding urgent
from the new Government
Deep, Water Harbour.

The Government must
ately whether the deep
is to be built or NOT. There is nothing
to be gained by an inquest on the past.

queue of
attention
stands the
decide immedi-

water harbour

Why we have not got a deep water
harbour when St. Lucia has one, when
Curacao has one, Aruba has one, Guade-
loupe has one, Martinique has one and
Trinidad has one is no concern of ours.
What we want to know is when we are
going to get one. That is the question
that the new Government MUST answer:
and on their answer depends the whole
future and prosperity of ourselves and
our children.

The time for dilly-dallying, for uncer-
tainty, for “waiting and’ seeing” is past.
Either Barbados gets a deep water har-
bour or it prepares to emigrate its people
There is no
other way of expanding Barbados’ econo-
my or reducing high freight rates than
by building a deep water _ harbour.
Freight rates which are chiefly responsi-
ble for the continuous rise in the cost of
living have been increased during 1951 by
the European shipping companies. And
only last week Aleoa, Canadian National
and Saguenay Terminals announced their
intention of imposing a surcharge of
15% on the gross freight on all shipments
frorn eastern Canadian ports to Bridgetown
with effect from January Ist, 1952. The
reasons for this surcharge are stated with
clarity. “It is the aim” of the shipping
companies “to provide the best possible
service at low freight rates, but as our
operating costs have been mounting stead-
ily at Barbados due to increased cargo
operating expenses etc.,” the companies re-
gret having no alternative but to establish
a surcharge which they hope will be of
short duration.

There is no likelihood of this hope being
achieved unless Barbados builds a deep
water harbour,

Barbados is a small island in the Atlantic
Ocean. It is entirely surrounded by sea and
dependent on imported food to feed its
very large population, The cost of living in
Barbados must always therefore depend on
the cost of handling sea cargoes, The pres
ent lighterage system is an anachronism in
1951 and is responsible for the increase in
freight rates, which makes food, clothing,
building materials and all essentials for the
good life more expensive than.they ought
to be.

it is no good putting the blame on rising
world prices until we set our own, house in
order—-until in other words we build our
deep water harbour,

by thousands every year.

Rising freight rates are not however the
only bubbles threatening our life line.

At the fourteenth annual general meet-
ing of CARONI LTD., held in London on
December 12 1951, Mr. G. Vernon Tate the
Chairman said “practically the whole of
our raw sugar exports in 1951 were shipped
in bulk and we are hoping to develop this
system further in 1952. The successful de-
velopment of this new method for hand-
ling sugar is the result of close co-operation
between refiners, shipping lines and pro-
ducers. It is not unreasonable to suppose
that the time is not far distant when a very
large proportion of West Indian sugar will
be handled in this way.” It is not unreason-
able indeed, and the new Government will
have to tell us not later than January 1952
what steps they are taking to makeé*cer-
tain that Barbados is not left behind when
bulk shipment really becomes universal.

The connection between bulk shipment
and a deep water harbour is so near as
almost to be intermingled. And it is not
only at CARONI LTD., where bulk-ship-
ment looms large. The Empire Producer
for October 1951 noted that “a further step
towards. bringing a substantial part of
Britain sugar imports in bulk has been
taken by the foundation of a new shipping
company known as Sugar Line Ltd., in
which Tate & Lyle, United Molasses and
the West Indies Sugar Co., are jointly con-
cerned. Tate and Lyle have a 45 per cent.
interest United Molasses and the West In-
dies Sugar Co., each hold 25 per cent, and
Tate & Lyle investments 5 per cent.”

The rest of the world has not been sitting
idle while Barbados waited to make up its
mind about the deep water harbour, But
the new Government cannot afford to wait
any longer. It must answer the question to
build or not to build.?

Every day that passes makes construc-

tion more ex;2nsive. The French in Martin-

ique have recently opened new harbour in-
stallation at Fort de France the capital.
The new 200 metre dry dock is said to be
the largest in the Caribbean. Martinique is
of course a Department of France and bene-
fits from the fact that the French in France
wanted Martinique to have new harbour
installations and were prepared to foot the
Bill. Barbados which is not prepared to be-



come a Department to the United Kingdom
cannot claim any assistance from the tax-
payers of the United Kingdom to help in
building a harbour; but the Government
of the United Kingdom will most certainly
help Barbados with advice and in other
ways when the local government has de-
cided that we cannot afford to go on with-
out a deep water harbour.

Much talk has circulated in Bridgetown
about the deep water harbour since Sir
Douglas Ritchie’s report was published.
The opinion was expressed by certain
influential individuals at the time that
Barbados, could not afford to pay for a
deep water harbour, Today no such opinion
is heard in influential quarters. The ques-
tion most current is rather can Barbados
afford not to have a deep water harbour?
The Government need have no fear that
public opinion is against them. The over-
whelming majority of the people want a
deep water harbour, because they realise
that the cost of living will never stop rising,
until freight rates go down. And freight
rates will never go down so long as the
present antiquated lighterage system is
maintained.

The deep water harbour must be built.

POWER

WiTHOUT power no new industries can
be started in Barbados, That is a simple
statement of fact. It is so simple a state-
ment indeed that at first sight it seems un-
necessary to make it. Yet it must be made.
Because to-day new industries cannot get
power in Barbados to drive its machines.

One such industry which proposes to
manufacture materials for housebuilding
and to employ more than one hundred
workers has been told that the electricity
company cannot supply power. This is a
serious position for Barbados to be in.
But it is only a symptom of a greater dan-
per that threatens. The public will remem-

er with displeasure the clectricity cuts
which began in 1949 and lasted until the
early months of 1950. The displeasure
whick the general public felt was naturally
directed against the Barbados Electric
Company and it took several months before
people realised that the Company was
not to blame for what was proved to be
inevitable rationing of available power.

To-day the position is much more serious
than it was at the time of the power cuts.
Since then the Barbados Legislature has
passed the Public Utilities Act 1951. One
clause of this Act is, it is claimed by the
London Office of the Barbados Electrical
Company, preventing the subscription of
capital necessary for purchasing new
machines now wanted by the company to
preserve a margin of safety in the capacity
of its present plant.

The London Company is so concerned
about the clause in the Publie Utilities
Act that it has already sent a petition to
His Majesty’s Privy Council. There the
matter stands pending further decision.

Meanwhile the public of Barbados must
realise the gravity of the situation which
threatens.

It is certain that power cuts will be in-
evitable unless the company acquires
reserve machines. These cannot be
acquired until the company can get further
capital subscriptions ,in London, The
Chairman’s speech at the forty first annual
general meeting of the Company held in
London on 20th March, 1951, indicated
then that the financing of “No. 10 set and
of other necessary additions” was being
financed by means of a loan from the Com-
pany’s bankers,

Despite the increase in revenue earned
by the company it is not possible for the
company either to maintain its existing
services with adequate reserves or to con-
template necessary expansion’ without fur-
ther capital subscriptions.

The Public Utilities Act which has pass-
ed the Legislature but not yet received the
Governor’s assent would modify the com-
pany’s rights under existing acts and
orders and it is for this reason that the
directors in London have decided to peti-
tion the Privy Council for redress.

The position is very grave if only because
it raises constitutional issues of the high-
est importance. But it is acutely serious
for urgent economic reasons,

The demands now made on the Barba-
dos Electridal Company warrant the
expansion of the existing Power Station
beyond its present capacity. This expendi-
ture would be of the order of £250,000.
The expansion is not only warranted by
present demands but is indispensable for
the economic development of the island
and the extension of electricity service to
more and more people.

But even without expansion the Com-
pany has not got adequate reserves to
maintain its present requirements with-
out load shedding. The major consumers
of electrical power are helping the com-
pany to carry on now by shifting their
load requirements in peak periods. The
present position is acute and can only be
alleviated by an expenditure of some
£60,000. Housebuilding and new indus-
tries are now being handicapped; the
revenue of the electric company is restrict-
ed with a consequent loss to the Treasury
and Vestry of company and trade tax; and
unemployment threatens some _ thirty:
employees of the Barbados Electricity
Company taken on when expansion seemed
possible,

Without electrical power no new indus-
tries can be attracted to Barbados and
local industries are already threatened.

But the whole electrical supply of the
island is at stake as a result of one clause
in the Public Utilities Act 1951.

The new Government will surely lose no
time in giving the Barbados Electricity
Supply Co., an assurance that it does not
intend to jeopardise Barbados’ economy

because of one clause in an Act. They can- |

not afford the public’s certain disapproval
of any further restrictions or cuts on exist-
ing tenuous supplies of electrical power
or light.

































































SUNDAY

Although Governor Pope-Hen-
nessy heft Barbados on Ist
November 1876, . the newspapers
were full of Hennessy and con-
federation right up till the end of
the year. But the island was
slowly getting back to normal
and the shops were advertising
their Xmas attractions at this
time 75 years ago.

Life was hard on some people
of course.

The owner of Rural. Cottage
Sugar Work Plantation for in-
jou il wie parish of st, George
The Court of Chancery had
de.reed in November tinat he
was to be sold out and the Globe
of December 18th was advertis-
ing his “18 acres of land or thei.
abouts with Windmill, Boiling
House, Buildings and appurten-~

ances,” And the price with
“growing crops thereon”? Only
£1,800 _ Seems quite cheap
aoesn't it.

Property was cheap in those
day. Things were much worse
for the owners in Antigua.

In the Court of the Commis-
sioners for sale of incumbered
estates in the West Indies 527%
acres We:e advertised for sale in
Antigua for “the purpose of

dischargin g the ineumbrance
thereon.”

There just didn't seem to be
much money around,
kven W. PB. Leacock & Co.,

were prepared to offer accom-
modating terms to the purchaser
of “the smart rumble buggy of
the usual superior style’ which
had come from New York op the
E, i Eaton, ,

Oney must have been “awful”
short in those days,

Carrots and be-troot were only
4 cents per lb. but not everybody
could afford to pay 12 dollars a
month rent not even for Wilville
which was an “eight room cottage
with stable ete, situated in
Holborn Village Fontabelle “and”
with watereturned on.”

Any of us would snap up an
offer like that today but not in
December ‘76. An eight. room
house for 12 dollars ? Who could
lay their hands on such money.’
And Fontabelle didn’t seem to
attract a certain gentleman who



was advertising for # “small
unfurnished cottage within 1
mile of the Public Buildings,

Fontabelle objected to.”

Yes it had been a hectic year
1876, but with beets and carrots
at 4 cents per lb, and iron bed-
steads at $7.20, you had to count
every penny if you were a gov-
ernment servant, Why just fancy
what you had to pay for chairs—
$18 a dozen. If the government
didn't give cost of living allow-
ance soon who would be able
to live anywhere in Bridgetown?
But Fontabelle certainly not.
Nobody could pay $12 a month
on that salary,

Things seemed tough even out-
side fashionable Fontabelle. Poor
Rev. Ambridge now. There was
he, a B.A,, of St, John’s College
Cambridge and an Assistant mas-
ter at Harrison's College Forsooth,
living at Granville Cottage St
Michael on an assistant. master’s
pay. Why he just couldn’t do it.
So in goes the advertisement to
the West Indian for all the
Governor's to read: The Rev.
F. J. Ambridge ete. etc. ‘takes
a few boarders into his house
who either are or intend to
beeome pupils at the College,
They will receive most careful
assistance and _ supervision § in
their studies, Terms on applica-
tion.”

And _ references ?
Headmaster of course,

Why the

UTURE Home Guardsmen are

fortunate that Mr. Shinwell’s
amendment to the Home Guard
Bill to include women in the force
was redueed to a comparatively
harmless clause admitting them as
unarmed cooks and telephonists.

To a nervous’ man like your
Uncle Nat, it has always seemed
dangerous enough to trust 65-
year-old grandfathers with fire-
arms and explosives unless they
eae Regular time-serving sol-
diers

But if 65-year-old grandmoth-
ers had been armed, training
would have been a nightmare.

* * *

All right, there you are on
parade in the Drill Hall,

You are learning to slope arms
by numbers. Bayonets have been
fixed in case the H.G..has to take
over guard duties at Buckingham
Palace again. So wake
up.

You are in the rear rank and
old Mrs. Rumpus, mother of six
and grandmother of four, is in
front of you.

On the command “One” old
Mrs. Rumpus cants the rifle
smartly up on her right side,

catching the small of the butt in
her right hand (we hope), steady-
ing the rifle with her left and
sticking the bayonet clean through
her grey perm.

When the drill sergeant has
disentangled the hair from the
bayonet, he then gives the order
“Two”, whereupon old Mrs. Rum-
pus carries the rifle smartly across
to her left shoulder in one move-
ment, gripping the heel of the
butt with her left hand and
steadying the rifle with her right

* ¥ +

On the command “Three” she
cuts her right hand smartly away
to her right side, keeping her
thumb in line with the seam of
jher trousers,

|

| At this moment you in the rear
}rank may have had it, chum,

|

|

The weight of the rifle and
| bayonet will be too much for
Granny’s left hand. It will come
jerashing over her shoulder ang
| you will be lucky if you don't lose
an eye,

More jittery still would have
}been the day the old ladies par-
aded at'the bombing range to
}throw live hand grenades.

“Got your pin out?” the bomb-

yourself ,

ADVOCATE

in Rumble Bugsy Days

By GEORGE HUNTE

There were some people
dic aoo.~nnd ihe
dollars so pressing. There were
cthey places where yo could
spend two or three years vithout
having te worsy about where the
rent was comuig from.

Prince William Moscly for
imstance. «He pleaded guilty at
the Court of Grand Ses:.ons to
an indictment charging him with

who
short.ge of

the lacceny of a gold watcn chain.
He was sentenced to years
penal servitude, having “en twice
before convicted of feliny and
twice of pe ty theft.

And Samuel Earnest Ea: 'e, alias
Happy Jack being an old offender

was sentenced to 2 ye:rs hard
4abour for the larceny o/ & coat.
reople used to die as » Ul as go

to prison in 18/8, and R. H. King
o 79 Tudor Street was ‘.e place
to go in those days if you wanted
to save trouble anti fuss. He ad-
ver.ised in four newspapers that
he was an “importer of funeral
NOTIONS such as Burial wrappers
for gentlemen; burial roves and
caps for young and old ladies.”

But even though people had to
die in 1876 one thing was perfect
if only it was a straw broom” just
received, quite new perfect and
full sized 1s. eac...’

The patent mec-cine merchants
were well entrenched.

There was a pic.ure of Peleg
Simmons with iecad falling off
behing the back of his head, Peleg
“as he was before using Streeter’s

ointment” and o1 the other side

the picture “since using
Streeter’s oin!tment You
wouldn't know it was Peleg,
siraight- as an arrow, top-hat,

frock-coat, cane . nd gun mouth
trousers the sor* of man that any
woman would \vant to be her
escort when she went to hear the
Christy Minstrei, at the Albert
Hall, Bridgetow.. But the ad-
vertisers were not content with
the evidence of {ic photographers.
They fearlessly « y::ounced “$1,000
forfeited if abc is not true.”
Whether they \ ~v-e referring to
‘the truth of Pc!+s's claim or to
the virtues of the ointment is a
bit difficult to :scertain after 75
years, but with money in short
supply $1,000 were a lot to lose.

If newspaper < Jvertisements are
any indicator of prosperity
Nightingale and Co. seemed to be
the big noise in “road Street that
year. They haq a full page in the
“Globe” and their wares ranged
from Table and Hanging Lamps,
through Marble ‘lop Tables, buggy
furniture, Tool chests, Croquet
Sets, oak crusiier mills, 8 day
clocks down to black Welsh and
Red Paying squares. But people
had time for other things besides
shops. There was a lecture on
Hai:i advertised for December 18
at the Moravian Chapel Roebuck
Street when Rev. J. N. Durant
would speak on Haiti, with a brief
account of the revolution of April
last. And there was an _ hotel
ealled the Albion in the heart of
the city at Cumberland Street.

But the major show of the year

was the Chris.y Minstrels, a
company compos°d of English and
American Gent!'men and mem-
bers of the 35°; Royal Sussex
Regiment, who «ave a_perform-
ance at the All -*t Hall Bridge-
town on Tuesca. December 19th.

The minstrels ~howed “Amevi-
ean plan‘ation ‘gro life in all

: Sitting On The Fence

By NATHAN ~L GUBBINS

ing sergeant ask a shaking gran-
ny. “Right. Prep re to throw.

Throw.”
“She's dropped it,” shouts
observer. “Down, everybody.”

the

After four s°--nds there is a
bang, and at le.st one more va-
cancy in the Ho 1e Guard.

“Who's next?’ asksethe ob-
server.

“Old Granny Rumpus,” some-
body shouts.

“Then I’m reigning,” says the
bombing sergean‘. “I felt safer in
the Commandos.”

A Boston, U.S. judge has

——THE AWFUL CHILD——



“What am | doin
having a rest before tea
like you told me to.”

? I'm





granted a woman a divorce
because her husband read
crime stories when they were
dining out.

Dinner At Eight

ON’T you
menu, dear?

want to see the

Can’t you see I’m reading?
Taking soup, dear?
No, thanks. Thetf/ve found the

body
What body, dear?

Of the murdered
course.

woman, of

Would you like a fillet of steak,
dear?

No, thanks. There was a
trail of blood from the library.
They bashed her head in,

I don’t think I'll have a steak,
either.

The murderer must have
dragged it through the _ hall,
past the gun room, out of the

Le ee le Se

*piouga, Mi.

ee ee ee



its eccentricijies” and the perform-
ance’ comprised glee songs,
Ethiopian farces, original an«
evaume FSU etc., ete.

And reserved seats were 3/-
unreserved 2/- and be-k seats 1/-
Then on December 23rd two day
before Christmas in came the
German training ship NYMPH
after taking 42 days from Monte-
video, The Nymph according tt
the Times carried “a crew of 24.
Boys” The Times had an origina:
motto. On its editorial page i:
announced;

“Sworn to no party, of no sec
am I

I can’t be silent, and I will no
lie.”

It has since been able to per-
form both these functions suc-
cessfully but in 1876 it was still
going strong.

Apart from reading four news-
papers, and going to lectures
minstrel shows, Christmas tree
bazaars and entertaining trainin;
ships the exhibition was a big at-
traction then as always for the
people. The best fat barrov
weighed 700 lbs. Mr. Da Costa’
“imported” fowls were splendic
Mr. Massiah's 25 lbs. pair of gees”
were noble birds . . . there were
some prodigious beans grown i:
the yard of the Gas Company’
Works in Bay Street—a good
specimen of the nutritive proper
ties of manure—from gas manu-
facture refuse.

inere were excelieny s.mMypic
of corfee of native grows. sucr~
were several specimesis OF ivi. Ww
Vrumms cuemicat Manure prem
pared locally.... Native maiu-
saceurers were wal, MauyS pace
SouepNediuds wie.
pump worked py vanes, 4 gu.
catue yoKe and sume naliVe 8... ~-
by Mr. Bourne,...

dorvoise sutal ormamenis auc
iinke.s were really exquisiuc....
tne iadieés were w tue front as
usual in needlework Of every Kine
irom tne delicaleiy embrvuiucire.
nandkercniels to the rich looking
quilt,,..there were beauutui ais-
plays of artificial flowers maace
irom Spanish needle fronds, cori
nusks, meh scales ete.

There is not one word about
wha. the ladies wore or whetner
they were aamitted to Marsnaius
Hall where the exhibition wa.
neld. But dresses were cheap like
everything else “new prints at 6
cents, calicoes at 6 cents, Oxford
shirtings at 8 cents, whi.e iace
stripe muslin. at 9 cents, check
ginghams at 12 cents” and Whit-
fields were advertising their
“greatest inconsistency; elegant
cashmere furniture prinis hitherto
priced 18 cents now being sold at
10 cents per yard.”

And the beauty specialists were
leading the field with Barry's Pearl
Cream “important to the ladies,
Wrinkles removed! Sunburn Re-
moved: Tan Removed! Every
blemish removed from the skin.
Sallow and dark skin made clear,
pure and white as alabaster.
Youth restored. Ladies of fifty
made to appear like twenty by a
single application of the Barry’s
Pearl Cream.” Perhaps its just
as well that these secrets have not
come down to us in 1951, but what
with Pope-Hennessy’s promises
and all, it’s nqt surprising that
1876 was a turbulent year if
newspapers used to publish thir
kind of ad. on one page while they
slanged Pope Hennessy on all th?
others. What a year! Even
though Hip Baths were in good
supply and galvanised bucke-s
cost one shilling.

kitchen door, and into the or-
chard.

Dragged what, dear?
The body, of course,

Would you fancy pheasant, dear?

No, thanks. It had been there
three weeks.

What had, dear?

1 keep on telling you. The
body. It must have been pret-
ty high.

Well, no. I don’t think I'll have
pheasant, either. Do you mind if
we go home, dear?

Go home?
“come out,

"I'm feeling rather faint, dear.

Just like @ woman to spoil an
evening when a man’s enjoy-
ing himself.

“Small gentleman up to
three inches taller in our own
bespoke shoes, . . ."—Adver-..
tisement,

Christmas Carol
C—_ cheer up little gentlemen
may nothing you dismay

I wish you joy and happiness this
coming Christmas Day

For then, in shining shoes bespoke
with added inches three

Your little hand may reach the
top of any Christmas tree

Oh, lucky little gentlemen, nc
more to skip and hop

To grab at richer prizes which arc
always at the top,

For life is like a Christmas tree
my little gentles all;

The world is kinder to the strong
the handsome anda the tall.

No more my little gentlemen
shall lovely women frown

We've only just

On gallant little gentlemen; no
more shall they look down

With callous, half-amused grim-
ace, with haughty look askance

When gallant little gentlemen are
pleading for a dance.

Oh, tragic little gentlemen, oh,
gallant gentles small,

Like Cinderellas dancing at the
Fairv Prince’s ball,

So soon to doff the magic shoes
that like glass slippers shone
A little gentleman abed, his bor-
rowed inches gone.
L.E.S.















an ee. oe

16, 1951

SUNDAY, DECEMBER



WE Weak A Wide Range Suitable fogs
CHRISTMAS PRESENTS
ADVOCATE STATIONERY.

% [ney Wh.
















pay

Te Rae ee may necessitate ( ? -
tees your taking final Ry
Fr Ye > stock of Kitehen & *
woe oer



Table requirements G i

We have almost
everything you are
likely to need

You are invited to
phone 4472 or call
at our store with its
easy parking nearby

C. S. Pitcher & Co.





DaCosta
oAhll! be & Co.,Ltd.

Ie Ke



Next Week

Of course you
know my favourite
drink

GODDARD'S

GOLD BRAID

RUM.







SUNDAY, DECEMBER 16, 1951

Ce



SUNDAY ADVOCATE



PAGE NINE



INCIDENTS. FROM THE SECOND TEST



KEITH MILLER at 94 has a “life” when West Indian Everton Weck:s drops a chance off Frank Worrell’s
bowling. The wicketkeeper is Clyde Walcott. Miller went on to make 129.

Second Test-—-Sydney cricket ground—3,12.51. Consolidated Press Photo.



WEST INDIES batsman J. Stollmeyer hit on head by ball from Ray Lindwall during the Second Test on
4.12.6) ; Consolidated Press Photo.
BPS Fy ee F A> * sha

y





—'r 2 - - - ee Oe —_——_— * SS __-= _ 2
Ee oem ies eee ee OF ne, 5 tee : ees
woiuated Press Pico.
Sa a mjtcnewee-eernaer or “aren cmreemtamanmamnens



Se Rees Serato nist ore oe LOI —_— SSE
eer Ta SD eee eae oe a ee ON PR eee

Perfumery for
the coming season

< WH Boy) ed ye soon, GOWA Craewers, GOYA



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m tt cae

tt) woces, YAhUOLEY Bond
. «ct fdine yn unft Boxes with or without Powder and

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And for GENTLEMEN

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ly

WEST INDIAN snin bewler Ramadhin bowk 1 by VW

Test at , ayansy ‘etioket ground on 5.12.61,

Labour Party’ Ss
Policy Told

@ from page

service of civil servants is one of
the highest priorities and will be
proceeded with very early in the
year. We have been losing the
services of too many profession-
ally cytalified men to put off any
longey this question.



“We have found it difficult to
keep some officials or even more
to attract back into the area, well
qualified West Indians.

Public Health Bill

As soon as the Maude Bill is
passed the House, we will pro-
seed to deal with a new Public
Health Bill and #® new Town and
Country Planning Bill. They will
however, have to await considera-
tion after the Estimates have
been dealt with.

“We shall, at an early date, put
into execution, plans now under
cuntideration for inere ¢ f-od
ard milk production an’! the

tension of the fishing industry.
We ar actively “engug in
restoring the loss of kaats and

lready work is being done on
the repair of those which are
repairable.







At.an carly dae too, we shall
tackle the proclem irit;
of land tenure, always hearing
in .mind the necessity for the
conservation of the fertility of

food-producing arable land

Adam

major leg

In conclusion Mr.
“I think this is
enough for us to g® on wi
the rext six months There Ui
ke of course a nhumerer o nor
resolutions that will crop up in
that period, not to ment h
work. cf investigation of
versial matt relating to ex
ion and ca 1 work



Mr. E. K Walcot! Deputy
ender of the Opposition in th»
ouse of t t



d not
‘Ss mumpre
but promised to do so at some
otier time



TREATMEMT SALON

| c% at
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me in Barbados

Children’s Xmas Part
Enlivened By Calypsoe. |

|
THE Children’s Section of the Public Library was live |
trom 3.00 p.m. to 5.45 p.m. yesterday.
conducted of §
vichael’s Girls’ School and junior members of the Librai |

Band,

the Police

Miel

all cx atc to the success of the Christmas Party which

was held at the L ibre



-
The hall was pace ked~ with cuil-

dren between the ages of three

and 16. Many parents joined in Test Match Pictures

the singing. The Party was organ-
ised by Mrs. Marjorie Callende:
who is in charge of the Children’s
Library and her helpers.
Perhaps the most joyful) part of
the programme was the end. Chil-
Uren were on the stage, on chairs,
ou desks and benches, They wer«







Johnston for 3 during last day's play of the Secon:

ry for the children,

all doings the same thing-—dancing

the mariece while the Police

Band played such Calypsoes ;

“Food From The West Indies” and
“Kitch”

The Party opened with th

e Band playing the Mareh



ithor Rhine.” Miss
d a story after
a Musical Quiz,
Tune Quiz

Kay Clark
which thet

For this Quiz the Band layed

28 tunes. First prize went to
irlyne Morris of St. Michae
] School who got 20 tune
Second was Miss





rvest
Harev
18; third Master C,

nd fourth Master Padmore.
The St, Michael's Girls’ Schoo!
, conducted by Miss N.- Taitt
a variety of Christmas Cai
The girls were accompanied

eno

tne Folee Band. The audien:
ined in with the girls and sary
) Come All Ye Paithful.’

Also ineluded i the progran
a recitation, “Night Be
stm by Miss Faria lows
103 by members of the Band ¢
ala Hole in the Sack,
? 'y members of the (



1. B vas loudly applaude
bis Bell solo “Bells of Chijst-
n " The show ended wi'th the

whole

Bells.”

audience singing “Jinal«

Bridgetown

there
for you to enjoy
woncerfully re.
nts at the new
“ning on January
nt will mak








ee amazing differer t kin that -
( come tired anc €
WY
a Book your appointme to-day
| Ye ae or bib — ¢
Nannedl JN J , ee

Joyce
ood of the same school who

Kennedy

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Consolidated Press Photo

unrivalled strength. The
World’s leading quality
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The junior members :
by Cpl. Best, pupils

Radioed To B.W.I.

CANBERRA.

A direct radio photo-telegram
service is fucticning between At
trelia and Barbados for *he
tion of the
tween Au

The Aristocrat of all Bicycles

dura
Test Cricket peries be-
ralia and the West
Indies, it is announced in Can
berra by Mr. Hubert Anthony, thé
Australian Postmaster-General

~ A SUPERB

The vervice ts primerily to ¢
ble cricket photographs to be XMAS GIFT
nt to the Wes’ Indies and jt wi'l
eontinue until the end of next FOR
March While it is in operat

ANY MEMBER
OF THE

photogrephs or documents can b
sent direct from Australia to Bar-









to £11, ane a coe fe hg ) FAMILY
ductions for additional pictures. * i Siete

BU (. BF, Harrison & Co., Ltd. ft aoe

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PAGE TEN




Convention Overboard

New Opera-With-Profit Bid

Billy Budd, Benjamin Brit.cn’s
seventh opera in ten years, is
nearly ready for: curtain-rise at
Covent Garden, The first per-
formangee, on Saturday night, will
be conducted by Britten himself,
who, in slacks and windbreaker
jacket, has spent @ month of
mornings and afternoons in the
Covent Garden crush room and
other. places coaching 16 or so
pringipal singers to the sour tinkle
of rehearsal pianos.

it cannot be said that he-an’



his librettists (&. M. Forster, the
novelist, and Fric Crozier) have
gone out of their way to make
things easy for the box office

There are no women in the cast.
Therefore there are no love duets,
hitherto the staple diet of opera-
gders.

The sixteen principals, like the
entire chorus, are men and boys
serving aboard the 74-gun Indomi-
table, warthip of Nelson's
day. Budd is a handsome, virtue

ous foretopman who, loved by all
but the ship’s sinister master at
arms. is betrayed into an offence



against the Mutiny Act and, after
court martial, hanged from the
yard-arm. Such is the theme
hi Br r and Crovier have
from Herman Melville.

e possibility that an all-malk
c scayo the conventionally
ie re Covent Garden
' while the

stock

; hie

@ saic to i the
Budd is an opera

of itten. T haver
tly foout any rs
vy Grimes.” And off he

another two-hour trudge
the salt marshes near hi
Al rq (Suffolk) home to
work outeim his head the music
for the-next dozen pages
This eehakings of Budd with
Grimes “3S “logical, Both are in
dividuals: at loggerheads with thei
environment. The significant thins
is that BEittén has been at logger-
heads himself. His phase of con-

flict came on the eve of the war
when heivas 25,
ARISE!
For six yearg he had been |

reasonably thriving freelance cor
poser for films, theatres, festival
Proms, and yo on, But there wa:
@ persistent malaise. The prospe

of war angered him, He felt ver)



The Anti-War Composer Takes
A-Nelson Warship—and Throws







For His

MAN OF CONFLICT
Beniamia Britten

at home with the Blooms-
bury Leftists

For mixed. yoices he wrote 4
fervent choral piece, Advance De-
moeracy, in the spring of 1939, to
words by Randal Swinger,
which, after deelaring that the
“big bosses” were plotting our
doom, called upon the people to
rise against war.

much

Rise ag a single being

On one resolve arrayed—

Life shall be for the people

That's for the people made.

Advance Democracy is now out
of print. But the mood that dictat-
ed it has itg importance in the
Britten record.

On the crest of that mood he
and the tenor Peter Pears, who
has been his companion and musi-
cal partner ever since sailed for
America in the early summer of
1939. Britten talked of becoming
an American and staying in the
U.S.A. for good

He reckoned without home-
sickness however. Wartime Britain
exercised a queer pull over exiles
of every stripe $y March, 1942,
after much composing and joint
concert giving, he and Pears were
back in London. Britten was
anxious to help the common cause,
if he could, through music.

But no fighting, no khaki for
was firm about that. His

first. appearance before a C.O.
tribunal did not prosper; but in



August, 1942, an appeal board at
Ebury House, Victoria, granted
him unconditional exemption from
armed service (a rare thing) be-
cause of the importanee go the
nation of his music-making.

Since 1942 Britten has renounced
none of his pacifist principles. But
nine years bring a difference of
emphasis, especially if they are
vears of success. And _Britten’s
success has, in its way, been un-
matehed.

Son of a Lowestoft dentist who
left £15,000 and three other chil-
dren, Ben decided at 19 (after
Gresham's School.and Royal Col-
lege of Music) to earn his aoe
with hig pen...At first he plodde
Peter Grimes cost him a full year’s
work (the whole of 1943) and cre-
ative pangs unimaginable, The
immediate Anancial return, includ-
ing royalties on the first six per-
formances at Sadier’s~~ Wells
(where Pears created the

———_ ne

Parliamentary Questions

Mr. R. W, Sorensen (Labour,
Leyton) asked the Secretary 0+
State for the Colonies if ne i+
aware of the» overcrowaing ©:
prisons in Jamaica; and what step
are being taken to deal witn thi
matter,

The Minister’ of State for Colon-
jal Affairs, Mr. Alan Lennox
Boyd, replied: “The Governmen
of Jamaica have sought to reliev.
overcrowding by *he construction
of additional buildings in the
existing prisons and of «© new
‘open’ prison for 200 first off » ders.
{ am asking the Governor for 4
report on the position anu 1 wail
write to the hon, Marnier when |
receive it.”

Mr. Sorensen: “Ig the right
hon, Gentleman aware that mean-
whe overc.owding a@maunis in
some instances to 50, 60 and some-
times 70 perf cent, above what the
numbers shguld be, and is he giv-
ing further advice with a view to
reueving .this serious ‘state of
affairs?” ~.

Mr. Lennox-Boyd: “We very
much hope-that overcrowding will
diminish partly through the pro-
Viewon of new facies and partly
through the decline in the amount
of crime.”

Mr, Ronald Russell (Conserva-
tive, Wembley) asked the Secre-
tary of State for the Colonies it
he will give further details of his
proposals for developing the pro-
duction of essential raw materials
and foodstuffs in the Colonies,

The Minister of State for Colon-
ial Affairs, Mr. Alan Lennox-
Boyd. replied: “My right hon
Friend informed the House on 8th
November that the scope for im-
mediate increases in the produc-
tion of raw materials and food-

stuffs in the colonial territories 18
limited, and that most of our hopes
must be concentrated on the mid-
term and long-term prospects. Mi.
Majesty's Government are how
examining the different measures
which can be taken to secure in-
creases. This examination covers
a wide field of Government action
in this country no less than it
the Colonies, and I do not expec
that it will be possible to mak«
a further statement at an early
date,

“The commodities in which there
/ uw prospect of increasing supply
tu this country In the short term
are copper, cotton, manganese,
pe roleam, pyrites, sugar, timber,
vegetable oils and oilseeds.”

Mr, Russell: “Would my right
hon. Friend agree that the policy
of His Majesty’s Government is
rather to create conditions under
which private enterprise can de-
velop the Colonies rather than
that the Government should start
schemes on their own?”

Mr. Lennox-Boyd; “I very much
hope it will be the result of en-
lightened partnership between the
Government and private enter-
prise.”

Mr. Frederic Harris (Conserva-
tive, Croydon); “Does that reply
mean that my right hon, Friend
will freely support the import to
this country from our Colonies of

all foodstuffs available to come
here?”
Mr. Lennox-Boyd: “I should

like to know precisely what my
hon, Friend has in mind. In gen-
eval, we are only too glad to have
supplies of foodstuffs from the
Brilish Colonial Empire in the in-
terest of the Colonies and in our

own interest.
B.U.P.



___â„¢ Benn hy. College
YOUR CAREER and

my ‘personel

_ are prebably more
cleaver than you know.
? eat prove this.,.

ucantee that T will
ve ne of my
h tuition until be
i¢ examination for
mos enrolled.” You









guarantee

“*het me be
your Father’

To ou the re 1K
hele teat a « father

would offer.
















have
your career at heart, I will eet ,
wou will be forever grateful. CIB.

WHICH FOR YOUT

e¢, 4 liye trom experience

, mem who start with The Accountancy Exams, Overseas
' College, that they are ayeten a Wi Read Maki
nea h smore clever than seceding re) pad Ny
t they are I can All Commercial Salesmanshi
prove trheWWhh YOU! Subjects Secretarial
{f som toanet to succeed there is Commercial Art Shorthand ‘s)
nothing to stop. you. The Oraughtsmanship Short Story Writing
Bennet” College- system of Encoolenls ineering Surveying

: eneral ficate Telecom:

personal tuition will get you Education Bram, Transport
thre your cxams. You Journalism Public ing
st ay home taking your own Mathemat English
ti Nour books are free Mechanical Eng. Short Technical
You will realise your capa- oer Engineering jubjects
bilities and your’ ambitions. adio Service Eng. Workshop e
n first, without any obliga- subject 1s not on this list, corte it on





tion, send mé the coupon. |
will give you, free, my private
advice.

(fo Mifer- GOVERNOR
The





BENNETT!

COLLEGE |**"

Your Opportunity fer |
Personal Guccess|

© Governor

Please writs in block letters

oupon. There are Bennett College
courses for almost every career,

ee ee ee ee

Dept

i 188, The Bennett
Sheffield, England

I would like to

at no cost) your prospectus and particulars l

woee AGB (if andet 21) eepemesenieinee |

an

om

name

hy CHARLES.REID

part) cannot have been more than
£750

But Grimes brought fame, and
fame is a better investment than

rubies.
The Miracle

At once Britten and Pears were
in universal demand as recital-
ists. Often they would give four
recitals in one week, Every four
recitals meant another hundred
guineas in Britten's pocket, (Since
then his fees have risen.)

To get about the country more
handily he bought a 1929 Rolls~

2oyee for £700 later replacing it
by a 1935 model, There were
United States and Continental
trips.

Peter Grimes was followed by
four other stage works; The Rap
of Lucretia, Albert Herring, 4 new
etling of The Beggar's Opera and
The Little Sweep. In five years
his operas had 600 performances
in nine languages in 1 countries

At last the mircale had hap-
pened. Here was English opera

—or, at any rate, serious opera--
which was pleasing to the home
market and fit for export,

Meanwhile Britten’s social life
was beginning to glitter, The man
who in 1939 contributed anti-war
musie (imeluding a satirical Dance
of Death) to a Festival of Music
‘or the People at the old Queen’s
Hall stood eleven years later as
godparent with Queen Mary and
Princess Elizabeth at the christen-
ing of the Earl and Countess of
Harewood’s baby.

At first his Suffolk retreat was
a converted stump of windmill at
Snape. Now he has a solid, bour-
geois-looking house facing the sea
at Aldeburgh. In the music room
are enviable paintings 4 Blake, a
Cotman, a Bonington, a Turner, a
Constable, “But,” he explains, “it’s
Feter who’s the expert on paint-
ings. He can tell you much more
about them than 1.”

Hit Tunes? No

Although modest enough of
manner, Britten has a clear idea
cf his merits, The morning after
a first performance he has been
known to serew up a newspaper
containing a criticism not to his

liking and pitch it disgustedly
into a corner.
On the other hand he has, I

think too much good sense to credit
the extremist clique who say in all
seriousness that he is the most im-
portant thing that has hit music
since Mozart. His output since 16
has been great; its quality uneven

He could not for the life of
him write a hit like One Fine Day
or Your Tiny Hand Is Frozen even
if he wanted to—which he ostenta-
tiously does not, (He has a rather
childlike contempt for Puccini.)

That he has a measure oi
enius is, however, undoubted. In
some ways you have to go back to
Henry Purcell (who die) over 250
vears ago) before you come upon
his equal or his like In home-
frown music

WORLD COPYRIGHT RESERVED
—L.E.S



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SUNDAY





'

Diplomatic Status
For B.W.I.
Commissioner

LONDON. |
When the British Caribbean!
Trade Commissioner takes yp his |
duties in London, he will have
diplomatic immunity similar to
that enjoyed by foreign Ambss-
sadors. It will be granted under
the Diplomatic Immunities (Com-
monweéalth Countries and Republic
of Ireland) Bill, which comes into)
force next March 1 and which will |
apply to all Commonwealth High
Commissioners in London.
The Rill confers immunity from

euit and legal process, and in-
violability of premises and)
ayehives, It also enables the}

King by Order in Council to)
grant similar immunity to ser-|
vants of Commonwealth Govern- |
ments who are doing work like
that of foreign consuls.

—B.ULP.



No Opening For
Coloured Migrants
In Australia

MELBOURNE.

Australia does not intend to start
any scheme to attract coloured
poopie from other parts of the

mpire as immigrants, Mr. Harold
Holt, the Australian Minister of
Immigration, has stated in Mel-
bourne,

The Minister was replying to a
suggestion, made by the Earl of
Hardwicke, now visiting Australia.
that the Government could halt.
the drift of farm people into the
citles by allowing coloured domes-
tic and farm la to enter into
Australia on a controlled basis.

“Austjalian housewives are not)
having children because they have
© do all the backbreaking house-
werk themselves,” said Lord Hard-
wiecke. “Coloured domestic help
to solve that problem and colour-
ed farm help would make a big
difference to agricultural, produc-
tion.”

3ut although Australia is short |
of labour and has been for several

ears engaged on a big drive to
attract immigrants, Mr, Holt made |
ihis statement in reply to Lord
Hardwicke’s suggestion:

“I do not share Lord Hard-
wicke’s gloomy attitude om Aus-
tralian mothers. Australia’s birth-

ate has climed steadily in recent
sears. In the last three years
alone, Australian mothers have
riven birth to more than 500,000
babies |

“When hard work is necessary,
Australian women will not shirk
it. Australia has no need to look
o coloured people to fill its im-
inigration programme. The num- |}
ver of British migrants coming to
Australia this year will be a

ecord, Immigration from non-

svitish European countries it at |
i high level,’

—B.U.P. |

|













Power Take-off

Gives a powerful shaft or pulley
drive for generators, compres-
sors, or agricultural equipment.

Chassh)

Side und cross members of
box section, Light hut excep-
tionally rigid

SS

—— |

REDMAN & TAYLOR'S
GARAGE LTD.



ADVOCATE

Stop Gus
= ) Quicn
. Phensic





and pain behind the eyes. They bring down high temperature,
relieve stuffy, congested feelings, at the same time soothing the
nerves and counteracting depression. The aches and pains of ’Flu
disappear in no time. PHENSIC tablets act quickly and safely.
They neither harm the heart nor uj

the stomach. Keep a
supply of P

SIC tablets by you always.

Phensic

TWO TABLETS BRING QU/CK RELIEF
FROM RHEUMATIC PAINS, LUMBAGO, NERVE PAINS,
HEADACHES, NEURALGIA, INFLUENZA, COLDS & CHILLS

PHENSIC tablets clear the head and dispel tightness |
}
'
i
|
|

POPS FOS

LEE PEPS LOPLI OSSD



4

|
|
|

4

/Platiggum| —
wi

g
an falar
PENS from $1.00 to $1.32. |
RBALL-POINTS $1.08 (Refills 36¢)





SOOO TE

:

LOW-COST LUXURY



% Valve-in-head Engines (47 b.h.p. in the Consul; 68 b.h.p. in
the Zephyr Six). x Super-strong, safety-ensuring All-Steel
Welded Integral Body Construction. %& Centre-slung seating
«+» Pestful, relaxing. + Coil-sprung Independent Front Wheel
Suspension; built-in double-acting shock absorbers.
action, smooth-stopping Hydraulic Brakes,

SEE THE ‘FIVE-STAR’ ZEPHYR SIX AND GONSUL.
Charles McEnearney

& Co. Ltd. |

OFFICE ; : : : ; 4493

* Instant.

EPC PPPOE LOL LLL LE LLLPD ALLA LLL LAS 4

CF)

PARTS DEPT 4673



WORKSHOP 4203 NIGHT 4125







PHILLIPS
PHILIPS

SS ee

MODERN SCHOOL ATLAS
ELEMENTARY ATLAS OF

COMPARATIVE GEOGRAPHY

Wm. FOGARTY (eds) LTD,

CUT-RITE PAPER

ROBERTS & Co.

' CHRISTMAS

There is a spirit which pervades our World

at this time.

SUNDAY, DECEMBER 16, 1051



We feel it in the Joy of giving GIFTS ... and 3

FOGARTY’S

has the grandest selection ever.

GIFTS that will be treasured as well as used %
GIFTS that are a precious joy to the receiver }

GIFTS . . . He or She will be proud to display
We also have a handsome group of

and novelty arrangements, modestly priced.

CHRISTMAS TREES

Latest attraction of our...

XMAS SHOES SERIES

Ladies’ Windsor Shoes—White Nu-Buck. Dutch

Heels, Backless and Toeless

VELVET EVENING CAPES

CAPES That are Rich-looking and well Tailored
CAPES ... to wrap you with warmth and
—The Price $18.00 each.

—$10.40 & $10.59 per pair.

Ladies’ Windsor Shoes—Brown & Black Calf
Style as above...
—$10.43 per pair.

OF BEAUTY

The most exciting...

DRESS MATERIAL

The richness of feel confirms what the eye §

.,. this CHRISTMAS §

BERNE SILK

appraises. Ask for these designs—

EASTERN WISDOM............... $6.22 per yd.

CAMBERWELL GREEN ........ $4.97
WEDDING MARCH .............. $4.35

DAILY DIPPERS' DELIGHT!
LASTEX SWIM- WEAR

Plain and Floral, one and two-pieces styles

From $12.00 to $22.00 each
BEACH BAGS ............ $4.46 to $6.00 each.

* GENTLEMAN'S guide to good buys



ENGLISH SHOES—Brown Suede $10.43 per pair

o

NIRVANA ART SILK SPORT SHIRTS $3.21 each

« —Brown Suede Brogue

$11.05 per pair
RELIANCE SHIRTS—Striped ............ $4.55 each

WHITE ARROW SHIRTS—ALI sizes

Win FOGARTY (%:) ED,

x
3
| SESS SELLE LL LLL LEELA





SUNDAY, DECEMBER 16, SUNDAY PAGE RBLEVEN

ADVOCATE

1951









Vo keep that special
appointment .....

——~



MAKE THIS COLLAR
FOR YOURSELF





This is the punctual friendly clock that reminds
the world of its appointments—-a VICTORY
Smith Alarm. In cream, blue or green cases
with plated fittings. A 30-hour alarm
clock with 4-inch dial carrying luminous
spots. Also available non-luminous

British precision-made by Smiths English |
Clocks Ltd



Good grooming
for the entire
fa. a” ih Y




lool at a
Waterman's!

thy a
Waterman's !
then you'll buy a
Waterman's! |



Federal Grand Jury Must Sift Fact From Fiction
















































Break off.
Attach thread at oppo-
site side

the next Annual Industrial
Exhibition for the best
»-ece of work from any of






30 Swan Street

eczem"

soon disappeat §

and work td

Sister says:

WASHINGTON, Dec. 15. Goverument _wrongdoers, __ He |
La It now is up to the Federal returned to Washington from |
Grand Jury to sift fact from fic- vacation to develop this pro- | ‘ ’
tion in the amazing and confltic- gramme in the wake of tax } : | ‘
j ting s ories studding an investi- scandals. | ne : with
| ation of Federal tax scandals. |
Thi Chairman Cecil King (Dem. | Ty “
|} 4his Was apparent Saturday as Calif.) ordered a transcript of the .% . / oO V nye r
| coats ts of the House of Repre- testimony to be sent to the Jus- | ' Every year at holiday tims PALM LI E BRILL A is as
oo Sub-comunittes wearied tice Department~last week. He | more and more people di
9y lengthy hearings highlighted did so after Abraham Teitelbaum, | cover there’s no gift lik | The y 3 } :
by everything from mink coats Ghicago lawyer, named Bert K. | ss hrilaiel ne g ea | The handsome family is sure of good grooming
ss to $500,000 “shakedowns” tempor- Naster and Frank Nathan two | ToS Palmolive Brillantine DOUBLE USE Way:
IRISH CROCHET COLLAR |ifece’ 2 SHES Reker, | 2
days. $5 Ap Ther , j
Js. purported $500,000 shakedown | Famous the World over a - .
. Sree meer! Grand Jury is due attempt on the claim that they for their master cr areal wn As an Oil ior Moseagos: Before wa bing hair,
Model No, 4101, work an edging all soon to pick up where the Com- could tix his tax troubles ‘ Sad oan ih massage seaip briskiy tit Palmolive ih? Ne.
= . , € mittee » niet a ~de4 rath: Saatuns shi and beauty, WATER F
Coats Chain Mercer-Crochet No. round outer edges as| ‘Tru a ay and’ Frosident Bot! Nathan ane Natres } Ve r — ib Leave oil on scalp for 10 minutes and thin ash.
60° (20 Gr: ‘ ® tn | an may announce today a denounced Teitelbaum’s story as MAN’S pens are sold in a ams
60° (20 Gram). follows: 3 ch, 2 tr into] broad programme t J : ; This massage helps remove dandruff r wo)
2 Balls selected colour. next loop, 2 ch, 3 tr es 1¢ to eliminate lies.—(CP) conmplete range of styles and Ip f fect cl ; eee re
Milwards Steel Crochet Hook into same loop (1 individual writing point sculp for perfect cleansing.
No, 5. shell). x 2 ch, 1 de into; 2 to please every taste, suit
3 (Slack workers could use a next loop, 2 ch; into a every purse. Fach pen with To Comb and Perfume Hair: Pe:
No. 5% hook and tight workers next loop work 3 tr|j] #5 ee ee t! a little Palmolive Brillantine in the
a No. 4%) 2 ch 3 tr; repeat from a l4-carat gold point :
x round to foundation 4 7 palm of the hand. Moh bands
Tension ch at opposite side. il} together; smooth «re t And
7 loops make 2 in. (5 em.); 8 Break off. | y KS oa é 3 e ee comb!
rows make 1 in. (2.5 cm.) il] = PRESENTS THE FINEST IN een
Abbreviations Rosette | Daan eassin . ~" : BS cue te
eh—-chain; de—double crochet; Commence with 6 ch, join with | : ‘N Then, notice the dancing highlivits. ..
half tr—half treble; tr—treble; Ss to form ring. OUALI i Y and VALUE. gift », the beautiful grooming ot yur ;
ss+-slip stitch sp—space Ist Row: 6 ch, x 1 tr into ring, | “4 Aa ponpoct " see
3 ch; repeat from x 4] r Yo i ae r
Collar times more, join with | : (waterman 4 NS oy PA LM & # 4 aNd iK ates go
Gommence with 265+ ch (to ss into 8rd of 6 ch (6} a \ Nr "t if eo
measure about 15 in.—38 em.) spaces), = i | _agents nT ‘ jaa WB 4 er ge)
turn 2nd Row: Into each space of 3| BUY TO-DA Y—DON’T DELAY 1 aRppEs G ZANT, Ltd ae ¥ 4 i B R i i i. A iN Buk § goin ” )
: - e a ’ = ’
ist Row} 1 de into 3rd ch from ch work 1 de 1 half tr) hook (to form picot) ora n tr I half tr 1 de vommes: ' “ De ..0 cb ~ : : or
4 ch, 1 de into 3rd ch %F¢ Row: us row is worked at , a ¥ mt Ty
from hook. 1 ch, 1 d¢ back, 5 ch, 1 de into} NMAS IS JUST AROUND
into 10th of foundation first tr of first row, 5 "= . y 1m
S ch (including ch of ch, x 1 de into next | THE CORNER. — - er o " renee sea rrneiryieereeneenrnrenieentoeies tater iter ear nt we tnt rat ee
first picot) 4 ch, x 1 tr of first row, 5 ch; | ;
picot, 4 ch, 1 picot, 1 repeat from x all
eh- miss 4-ch, 1 de into 4th R rome. n FOR LADIES { FOR MEN; HARD TIMES = ——a
“ i Tey 2 : t , slit | ere
next ch, 4 ch; repeat aN cae qach apace of 5 (1) Be the Hit of the Party | a & +e | BS ESS — EES SS
from x across working as Tn, Fp I ralf tr) in the new FRENCH JAC- (1) ELITE the best selling —_ cate
5 ch at end of last Sth Row : This ng seo Bet t| QUARD CREPE Dom shirt of the year. In White | With BACKACHE bau aoe
repeat, turn, ' " e . ea at) Brown, Green, Wine, Aqu ‘ sige ¢ trey 7
I back, 7 ch, x 1 de into G Blue, Black man citi Blue, Beige and Grey—$4.73 Often due to sluggish kidney action
2nd Row: x | picot, 4 ch, 1 picot, de between petals of Cream and $5.70. IFE IS NOT 80 good you j »11€ mM
i ch, 1 de in loop be- 3rd row, 7 ch; repeat (2) Dont envy the looks of L are troubled with an Quick reile ro
tween 2 picots of pre- from x all round, others. Wou. tod can 160k (2) Long-Sleeve SPORT dhernatia stiff, ped
vious row, 4 ch, re- 6th Row: Into each space of 7} mart in a FANCY STRIPED SHIRTS. Two-tone in gay muscles joints, tum or
peat from x across ch work 1 de 1 half! TAFFETA (Copper-Green), hieattive Wastes KE.08 common urinary disorders re )
omitting 4 ch in last 5 oa aT my arer Gold-Black, Blue-Rust, and ee ry ; sluggish kidney action.
repeat, 5 ch, turn, Re- reak off Emerald-Rust r Wh
“at 2 “Ov ee TT ee sone Also § , SHIRTS ¥ put up with pain and dise
peat 2nd row, increas- Shaiuroele (3) A full Assortment of | *! a ae mfort when you might get hap 5
ing 4 loops at equal : . JEWELLED CLOTHS Nylon relief by Doan’s Backache
distance apart on ‘next si Be Si | Finish suitable for Matinees (3) Special Offer: Teri Ast Kidney Pills. stimulate and
row and every other ommence with 16 ch, 1 de into That concludes in Cocktails sorted Shirts to choose from Cleanse sluggish # and) 90
thereafter until there ist ch; :% : * 1 de ante sane ae pin Foe is wen S ; ely thems to sid the blood of excess
are 72 loops in the row Place as last de repeat from x : : re ~ : any 2 for $5.00. uric aci other impurities
to ure pea eta 9 once more, (4) A Big A sortment of which otherwise might collect im
( Tear ist Row: Into each’ sb of 16 c NIGHT GOWNS @ 83.00 the system and cause d
loops in 1 loop). Do * ‘ emi ae - of 16 ch BRASSIERES (4) Striped TWEEDS and Doan’s Pills have helped many + £ S
noe have jncresees i ib Malet tae eas cach Ac ct $1.12; $1.25; $1.44; $2.36 | PARSON GREY to suit any |}| thousands; let them help you, roc i iS
previous increase row. previous row, 20 ch, House Coats, $4.50 up occasion—$4.75 and $5.46, jae ay DOAN’S H ? a
Work straight until turn and work 1 de ‘ $1.86 BOYS’ SHIRTS—sizes 13 & = ble
piece measures, 24 in, into, each ch across, | Plastic Table Cloths, Rain- 13%.
(6.5 em.), on ae stem, | coats, and Baby Pants, }
: reak off, (5) For the women wh 3 is
Next Row: Work in pattern across Make 12 rosettes and 2 sham- aaah r. Teaattty thal bles A full range of SHOES a
first 15 loups, \5 ch, rocks. Place 12 rosettes all round | CURTAIN, NET—i : BELTS, PYJAMAS, TIES
: : oe ee AIN, NE n various LES, AMAS, WS, [OMRON Ef
turn, Decrease 3 loops outer edge of collar, as in illustra-|] patterns-sfrom 56c up. HOSE and KERCHIEFS. i Sessa ys
at end of each row tion, and sew in position. Then f & €
until 3 loops remain sew a shamrock between 2 ros- | . ER é E
(to decrease omit the ettes at each end of collar. x + - 1 | ~ 0G =
last 3 loops). Note:—A prize will be given at I HE BARGAIN HO SI |@%. .
k e given %, { nq, |B. i





correspond, Attach the patterns appearing in +799 . , .

thread at beginning of this newspaper during the: DIAL 2702 ot S. ALTMAN—Proprietor. |

foundation ch and serene === ——'| | The agony and maddening itch of At the first sign of a cold or cough, rub
ulcers eczema are ended at the and

Thermogene Rub on your chest, throat,
back. Feel its penetrating warmth doing you
good, stimulating your circulation, dispersing
Breathe-in its pleasar edicated

first touch of D.D.D. cnener. This
deep penetrating liquid kills the
oon
uickly clears wu
bs soeen. GET A BOTTLE TODAY.
Obtainable from all Cheaaists.

congestion!
vapour to soothe sore lungs and throat, disperse
Also stir



stuffiness, and ease your breathing!
a teaspoonful of the Rub into a jug of hot water
and inhale the steam, ular aches
and pains by rubbing in Thermogene Rub.
where the pain is. So healing! So soothing!
Try it—you say that
Thermogene Medicated Rub
is a real blessing!

In extra large jars
and handy tins

Relieve mus

Head and Chest Colds, Coughs

Massage Thermogene Medicated Rub

liberally into throat and chest

will

Muscular Pains

Gently massage the painful part with
Thermogene Medicated Rub

v=

\S



in ect Bites ani Stnis
Apply Thermogene Mediet
to the s

rene



ELASTIC TOP Obtainable from SE QO

BRIEFS || â„¢



all good stores and chemists








RHEUMATIC Be prepared — get some Thermogene Medicated Rud toJay:











. e e y
American Hose ie. PAINS? 7 omen oa tap
SEA ISLAND,| >a. er, ne te tad emits | ‘Hi ERMOG ge phy Ge
79 = ; & i to $ ew ow ae
From ¥ up || SPORTS and eed * CUSTOM TAILORING : S ACROOL : re eT
A Xmas Saving of |]DRESS SHIRTS! iy / ®.READYMADE CLOTHES ff [8 ina its penetrating powers § MEDIC ATED R BP ed
40 From 275 u kal oy e ; ; will act wer | and effec- : :
along % ; : oS sey Apection 8 For Colds and Coughs, Aches and Pains
THE LONDON SHOP #15] 1 ei .0m = bod
§ KMGHT'S DRUGSTORES : a ae = eens as
[LLL LLLSLLOGLOE:













Gardening Hints What's B.B.C. Radio farm AndGarden
For Amateurs Cooking In Notes By AGRICOLA
mie carves = The Kitclvers’ “serine Seat Week. sean ann

DECEMBER IN a column, necessarily re-



PAGE TWELVE SUNDAY ADVOCATE SUNDAY, DECEMBER 16, 1951




























































. ; BA } pro- stricted, it is only possible to touch

Garden Diseases And Just before Christmas there is “7 va mh or he salanel wart on the ‘fringes of the background

Garden Pests usually a rush of children’s partie Soe wick ie allie Chiveonah siory of this rematkable plant—a

Few gardens even in this sunny and of friends coming to call On )ooorammes althougn Christmas story of fascinating and absorbing

island éscape entirely from the you. Everybody naturally likes to jj.) jtself dos not coulfg inte interest of a food crop too often,

séourge of garden pests and dis- have something in their larder to y43: week Firet of all there will unfortunately, the victim of casual
pases, and it is of great ad- serve either with soft drinks or c :

be two Carol programmes, the cultural attention uf worthy of its
first a Carol Service from Hinde great value. There are enough



vantage to the gardener to be with Rum and Soda or Rum and

able to recognise these pests, and Ginger. Here are 3 fecipes to Street Methodist Chureh, London, data on the economic, agricultural
so tobe in a position to deal make sweet biscuits and salted with more than 700 students, 400 and’ commercial aspects of the
with them promptly. biscuits. You can make them of them from overseas, besides panana to fill a volume, all of

This of course is easier said when you have a little time to jhe usual congregation. Broadeast which must be condensed in a
than done, for few amateur gar- spare. The first and third are very

will be at the reguiar time Of series of short notes, acceptable
deners know much about these easy ones and you can keep them the Sunday service, 8.30 p.m. on we hope, to readers ;
things, and not many gardens jn an air-tight tin and serve them ,

4 the the 16th, inst. Tht second is y
are well equipped to deal with when you want to. Probably it is jn "Musica Britannica’ the weekly Let us look briefly at the
them in the way of Sprays, wise to put the biscuits in the

; programme at 9.30 pm. on structure of the plant itself, since
Dusters and Chemicals. oven again just before serving Friday, 21st. inst this provides a clue to its success-
This second disadvantage how- them especially the salted on

,
$ On Saturday there will be a ful culture. There are, generally
ever can be overcome as Sprays as they need to be crispy. Christmas play, ‘Emmanuel’ speaking, both horizontal and



This sovereign Whisky possesses that distinction of favour
=’ which will claim your allegiance from the first sip.

HIGHLAND
QUEEN










and Dusting apparatus can be Entglish Biscuits specially written for broadcasting vertier roots, the latter often SCOTCH WHISKY

loaned from the Department of For 1 tb. of biseuits: by John Forsyth. It is another found three or four feet deep. The

Science and Agriculture to any~- Flour: % Ib. telling of the birth of Christ but, main roots are fleshy and cord- tainentown,

one who applies for them, plus Butter or Margarine: 4 oz. as Mr. Forsyth explains, it ‘is nov like from which the feeding roots |, BARBADOS

advice as to the best way in Sugar: 4 oz. Religious Drama; except as its are developed; under favourable ' "Tc

which to use them, Milk: % glass. subject is of religion and its stuff conditions, the former make rapid ‘
But, the owner of a garden of Baking powder: 1% table- drama,’—8.30 p.m. growth, as much as two feet in a

any size should himself own the
proper equipment to keep his
garden in good order, instead of

spoonful, On the following Sunday, 23rd, month being recorded for Gros

Sift flour ahd put it on a table or inst. there will be excerpts from: Michel, and may extend laterally
of pastry board. Make a hole in the Handel’s ‘Messiah’ by the B,B.C- for a considerable distance. The
having the bother of borrowing middle and add the 4 oz, of butter Symphony Orchestta aha B.B.C. trué stem is thé bulb froth which
= eee ee ge healthy or margarine (melted), the 4 oz. Cherus conducted, by | Charles roots ang stickers are developed.
ary articles. ough a healthy "st sugar, % glass of milk and 14 Groves, Broadcast is at 9.00 p.m From this also springs the fruiting

well Geained ya — for — tablespoonsful of baking powder. ‘Caribbean Voices’ also stalk which pushes its way through
ae eee as arent jie Mix everything together and work The weekly programme of West the cylinder of leaf tissue forming
‘ z jo

- : 3 s heron ~ dough until smooth and soft. Indian prose and verse broadcast the trunk and eventually produces
tions, it is ‘as well for every pe Make it into a ball and let it rest €ach Sunday under the title of gowers and fruit. On the size and
See geen the. ee he s< fOr % of an hour. ‘Caribbean Voices’ will also PY€~ foog stored in the bulb will depend
them. From the Garden Book Put a little flour on the table. sent special Christmas pr0O- ¢h6 size of the bunch, and if too
of Barbados, we learn that po) the dough until it is % of an @rammes on the 16th inst. These any suckets ate allowed to drain
Garden Pests come under two inch thick. Cut into rounds ot take the form of two short :

; the bulb the bunches will natural-

Reecings. fancy shapes (I use a glass my- Stories, the first by Samuel 1, 1 small. It takes a bunch from

Garden Pests self). Repeat until all the dough Selvon and the second by John i115, to six weeks to make the

(1) Chewing insects (cater- jg finished. Place biscuits on a Wickham, the former now living nassage from the bulb to the apex

pillars, Slugs) buttered baking tin and bake them 1% England and the latter now ee ‘from two and a half to four

(2) Sucking insects, such aS jn moderate oven for half an hour Working in Trinidad though at oi. after shooting before the

Scale insects, plant Bugs, till they are crisp and golden, Barbadian by birth. Both are Pili’ ’ one longer time being
Aphides (black or green When you place them on the frequent contributors to the fruit is full, long

fly) and plant lice. baking tin be careful to leave a series, ‘Caribbean Voices.’ Broad- taken in the dry season.

Aon sy ar -as' > > lar time ' . , et:
Besides Pests there are space between them, cast will be at the regu The plant is propagated vegeta-
also Garden Diseases the This recipe is very useful es- of all West Indies programmes tively ang produces two types of

a
-
.
©
2
*
.
t









three chief of which are:— pecially because it doesn’t need pane Nochial tis Banavii suckers; (1) broad leafed suck- :
(1) Black Spot. any eggs now that they are quite Kecital By Segovia __, ers which from the beginning de- OUTSTANDING
(2) Mildew, expensive and not exactly plenti- Andres Segovia, acknowledged velop leat blades of the same gen- ee
A) ie ful. Siitetet’ with dive a Festal tn tee ee eee cee Baul VAN HeUsEN—the only collar easily, wears toagest. VAN eae
aver ss Small Maddalene or) - B B.C’s Benertt Cbarie : — ny ete tae a whieh, because it is woven HBUSEN, the smartest and the Soe
y 5 rege " Siar © . sees ers; (2 1a oa S P ’
Whovina Sane io 4 oa This is a recipe for small cakes. Service in the coming week. siiece: the small early leaves on the curve if special most practical coliat in the sé@e
Caterpillars and Slugs no When done properly they are Segovia who had to overcome 4 giving place later to adult foliage. multi-ply fabric, setssmartly world—and the most eaaeesere
description is necessary. They °*duisite. They are very ligtt great aeal of opposition from his Sfaiden suckers, arise at the top ill day long and looks just famous. — Five styles, all sosee seee
are only too well known, and cakes and very nourishing and parents and music masters who of the parent bulb and show little tight whether you are collars individually eeooeveveee
in’ spite of much advice as to in Europe they are given to small did not consider the guitar suit- bulb growth of their own compared beiftg Cofiveritional or wrapped, First - lass ebevevsete
how to-get rid of them, the only children from the time they Jearn able for serious study has been with the sword type whieh origin- entull. In waahes Gutfitters stock them, seeeezeces
really-- effectual way is hand atria S00us, said to have created a style of ate deep in the ground and thick- SoSeercoee
picking caterpillars by day, slugs, . ee playing the guitar quite different en out before beginning to show eae Rca a eveseveaee
with the aid of a torch, by night. Eggs: 2 1. Yolls from the tradiuional techmique, much above the surface. Experi- ¥ eeeecoeseesd
the “Sucking pests” we a: 3 02. os 1 0% making it ‘into a magnificent or- anced cultivators recognize the :
hide: _ as it’s com- our: 2 02, utter: 1 0z. chestra, complete, rich, sonorous rence fi it ig important tc ; 2 ‘ v:
attain green fly, or black «Grated Lemon (lime) rind. and adapted to ‘classical music. ciecacd toe malael pe aan The perfume with the Jonger-/asting fragrance
fly first, for it is Chrysanthemum _,, rey Pt ; __.« His recital will be broadcast 0M ing since, if used, it will take a
Resend thee wretched tile 2M) vot. and ad fhe 3 or, ct pinning ay 1030 pane. Vey ne, time to susan, maturity ¥ BOURJOIS
insects often attac! rysanthe- © “we = \ mM, and fruit compared with the swor 7 a . E a te
mum flowers, a ee Be wee ce Other Music sucker. In large commercial The Original Semi-Stiff Collar PERFUME (3 sizes) and EAU DE COLOGNE
In appearance black fly look ahd beat it ntil th Petit ot Other musical programmes to plahtations, it is considered good ‘
like minute little black specks. a up © mixture 48 be broadcast in the coming week practice to allow sword suckers to

On closely examining the flower pny «to mi aa beng alg by the B.B.C. include the Sunday make substantial growth when
that is attacked, it will be seen wea y oy” Take — Lng off the evening concert ‘B.B.C Symphony they are topped to within six or
that it is covered in these tiny W@™™). take the saucepan o Orchestra’ with Sir Thomas eight inches of the bulbs which

little specks swarming in their ne coe caplet unt Beecham as conductor playing are planted after the roots have
thousands. The flower presents and looks frothy a pieces by Mendelssohn, Tchai- been trimmed; side buds from
a wilted withered look, and is - kovsky, and Rimsky-Korsakov. these are then allowed to develop

doomed, and is no longer any use it ory: Sat elt iene tone ae This will begin at 9.00 p.m. on into new plants. From our studies
for picking. At the first sign of |~* a . the 16th. inst. On Monday, 17th. and experience of the Dwarf

bon without breaking. ‘ : :
black fly the plant. must be F ae vi at the same time you can_hear in (Cavendish) variety we arrived at
sprayed with soap dmd water Add now the cornflour (1 oz.)

11 , ‘From the Third Programme’ the the conclusion that there was

(1% of soft sodp to six gallons of 224 the 2 oz.,of flour. They have 7 hao, pnilharmonic © Orchestra little to choose from in either tn-
. f to be sifted together a little at a ;
water) or Niagra Emulso which time. Then add the melted but-gcOnducted by Norman del Mar topped sword suckers or bulbs, ex-
latter used to be obtained locally j¢: ana the lemon rind. Butter theg’he thirty-two year old British cept that the latter are preferable
ready mixed, Both of these 19 ‘snall cake tins and flourgcOMductor who was for some for securing a better anchorage in
sprays are the recommendation thom gentl Pour the mix-â„¢years associate conductor to Sir the ground and are more reliable
of the Garden book of Barbados gery Th Beech: th the Royal nfavourable soil and weather
; ture in each of them with Caeser atn With tne koyes in. wevoursne s d

but of the two, the soap and tablespoon. Be careful not to fill Philharmonic Orchestra. This conditions. On the other hehd,
water spray is by far the sim- them right to the top. Bake intogptosramme consists of Wagner's the untopped swords may produce
plest, and it can of course be , moderate oven for a quarter of@Overture: King Enzio (1832); good bunches earlier than side
mixed in larger or smaller quan- 4, hour until the cakes lookgBenjamin Britten’s Sinfonia da buds from bulbs but not earlier
tities as needed. golden, Take them out of thegRequiem and ‘Kara-Guez’ by the than heart (central) buds from


































Garden Diseases oven and sift some icing sugar onglurkish composer, Djemal Rechid bulbs. Growth from a heart bud

Of the garden diseases, in an- each of them. Let them cool andgtey. is usually the earliest producer of
swer to an enquiry, we will take Serve. “1 gWE3.B.C. Advance Programme #!! but gives the smallest bunch
. Mildew first, Mildew is a fun- Salted Biscuits Information and, “im practite, is covert ee FOR EXTRA
gus, and in appearance it looks Flour: 7 oz. B. Cotrestions week beginning Pressed. When good s ckets are
like a fluffy dusting of snow or Butter or Margarine: 3% 0z.§16th December, 1951. scarce, it is possible to cut up
powder, generally appearing on Milk or Water: % glass. if Please substitute below for pro- !atg@ heads into the two or more SMOOTH
the top or underside of the leaf Salt. we tgrammes listed in O.P.B. pieces of, say three or four pounds
of the afflicted plant. 2 tablespoonsful of grated! Sunday 16.—23.15—23.45—‘C: each, with at least one good eye

One reader having washed the cheese, -ibbean Voices”—Christmas stories and planted with the cut surface

RIDING

mildew off her plant, described Mix everything on a table or iby Samuel Selvon and John Wick- up.
how the white substance floated pastry board until dough is a: of Trinidad ee s
on the top of the water, and little @mooth. Make the dough into a , Monday — 23.15—-23.45 — 3rd

: 7 : ; Ss ay Gay's play in W.I. vs. West Aus-
white things appeared to fly off ball and let it rest for half an train. review of last week's cricket


















it, which made her think they hour. Roll it until it-is % of an ; : Sn » ie

were insects, But mildew is a inch thick and cut it in small aie caer Guar tet. Geiniens Public Xmas Tree
fungus, and the appearance of round pieces (2% inches wide) Report on 4th day’s play in WI

little bits floating away, was Repeat until dough is finished and ys West Australia and’ ‘Rendez- ST. GEORGES,
probably the wind blowing off place on a buttered tin. Sift a yous’ with Commonwealth Artists.

the top fluff as is floated on the small pinch of salt on each of Wednesday — 23,.15—28.45 — : Grenada, Dee, 13
water. them and bake in hot oven until Calling the West Indies (From Our Own Correspondent)

When a plant is attacked by biscuits are crisp and golden. Thursday — 23, 15—23.45—“We | P Preature of Chri ae - A
Mildew the treatment is a dust- Take them out of the oven and See Britain” with John Metcalf me erenne. Coristnas woh
ing with Flowers of Sulphur, or |et them cool. You can keep these Antony Brown and A. E. 'T. Henry. here, one of the huge trees on the









spraying with Bordeaux Mixture. biscuits for a long time if you _ Friday — 23.15—23.45 West. eaplanade being Utiised 9. +

Of these two remedies the keep them in an air-tight tin Indian Diary. purpose and electrically illumin-
simplest for the Amateur would _. Saturday—29.15—23.45 — Be- ated. Organiser is Mrs. Nelson (ECKSTEIN BROS.)
be to dust with Flowers of Sul- dust the afflicted parts. Repeat bind the News current affairs Buxo whose plan was unworkable *
phur. Put the Sulphur powder at intervals until the plant re- imeluding cricket report on Ist last year due to a technical hiteh Distributors
in a linen or similar bag, and covers. day’s play in Third Test, and news in electricity supply which limited 8

from the West Indies urrent,

on JOINT AND
PHOSFERINE ¢ MUSCLE PAINS
for a new at







aA

‘ a etite ! Say as A function of the isto eliminate ‘ : 3
t yoo a Pe eas | ‘ 1951 RACING SUCCESSES
nervy or run-down, it may be that oy y

|

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}

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| VHOSFERINE t what ¥ bed
Th ® to bring you back to Na happy normal ‘ait adhe

e Only Pain Reliever | state of health, PHOSFERINE is a

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eae F British Empire Trophy

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Start taking YEAST-VITE
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Pd

—_ ee ee a eee EEE Se ES ee a ee ee ee ee a ae ee eS Se ee

SUNDAY, DECEMBER 16, 1951 SUNDAY ADVOCATE PAGE THIRTEEN
- = a ED CERES A ee SRN TIEN IT a

BY CARL ANDERSON







HENRY

pa

epee a













\ ii (
éL
\
UA
a ~ ae
| |——
fp eee
By Appoiutroess
Gio Distillers t
@ GM. King George

FLINT OF THE FLYING SQUAD....

4 UH 7 = \ 71 LOOK HERE, SPADONi...
URE. F " \ ( by ] LINK LOGAN AND ME ARE
| \\ RIGHT: NOW.. SHINER KS, OF:










<
SOME OAV HELL
©. COME ALONG...



f HOLING UP AT BAR
qd SINISTER -DEUCE STEE
—~

SCAT RIS





Te TAMIA Ao
Cait ae








BY CHIC YOUNG




SPECIAL offers to all Cash and Credit Customers for Monday to Wednesday only

| | . SPECIAL OFFERS are now etadlabbe at our Branches Tweedside,
Speightstown and Swan Street



Usually Now . Usually NOW
HAMS (Cold Storage) Limited Quan- Bottles PAARL TAWNY PORT... 2.16 2.00
tity Leg & Picnic—per Ib. .. 95 Pkgs. JACK STRAWS ......... 61 54
APPLES — per Ib. .......... A0 36 Bottles COCKTAIL ONIONS ... 15 70

CHOCOLATES in Boxes Tins FANCY BISCUITS
POT OF GOLD ..................... 2.77 2.50 CHa Oe. uh os owen cies 141 1.25

DAIRY GIRL ....... ; 2.52 2.24 Decorated Tins (Good Com-
AMO iin FRG what eg ace 1.95 1,75
l

D. V. SCOTT & Co. Ltd. Broad Street



KK
FESS AFAGIGSSGLGYGG$YPG4e LAGHAGYA9Y¢GY9GG9LGYG¢LPYG09YSGPGIGCE%

You get stile more in the LATEST Minx










ee

JOHNNY HAZARD BY FRANK ROBBINS
«ae. eve.) eS fees Ne
ONL AN? TONIGHT....7 sae re! ce /

ZH



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performance with traditional Minx reliability and economy,





LISTEN-STUPID-]|

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pees SI far TOULEARNED HOM] [BUT--WHAT--) YOURE A ewan woman] [ OUCH? 7S Wie | §

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Cha LS man Tull by the Coals THOU

Delivery of one of these Cars can be effected #nmediately

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FIAEFPAFAAAEDFFAFAFAFAFPFFFPASFFAFS







PAGE FOURTEEN



CLASSIFIED ADS) 4 e=.








SUNDAY ADVOCATE

PUBLIC SALES














SUNDAY, DECEMBER 16, 1951
a



FOK RENT
HOUSES



WANTED GOVERNMENT NOTICES





NOTICE TO DAIRY-KEEPERS & MILK VENDORS IN THE



en ae NOTICE i AT TUDOR ST,—BUSINESS PREM- HELP PARISH OF ST. MICHAEL
—s PARISH OF ST. JOSEPH A ment attractive Business site standing | ISEB with Very Roos. ‘, “Ee blished f b der th
2 : SALE This serves to inf the Taxpayera|cn 6, sq. ft. situated on @ Main | LARGE or WORKSHOP. Both) —— i i is! or general information that under the
dapeitenonte sia tothe Se ae FOR Ss of this parish ‘and. the Geneval Dubie, Read being a few hundred yards from the | Vacant. itely Only Responsible ° | ‘ It ou mag gre iti g : = Foy tificates issued during
ctharge is $3.00 for any number of words that Mr, J. M McCARTY of The | beart of the City, having 4 large show | Persons Need Apply. _ Dia 3111—Strictly STENOGRAPHER and general office| Dairy Regulations o , it is requir at certifica 1ss

tp te 50 and 6 cents per word for each































Haven", Church Village. St, Joseph, has | Windows,









light



and delightfully cool,
























as Advertised.



16.12.51—1n. | assistant.

Central Caribbean Distributors | 195) be surrendered to the Commissioners of Health during the month









i 5 been Assesso take effect | reeentl tructed havi: es | Ltd, Room 304, Plantations Building. . . .
a oo er Riis na beste AUTOMOTIVE from a int Joe iho po “A ti tt. m ee ead “ATHLONE”: Fontabelle, two flats, very| Bring written application. of January 1952, when re-registering of the dairies for that year
gt yy cierk, seienap ttauy. | partedirs apply’ Ralsh Benea, ‘tower| awiats, sppiy toe: Banaiord, Spry Bt SSissi—* | must be done on or before the fifth day of January.

For Births, Marriage or Engagement; CAg—Austin A-70 Hampshire, excei- jerk, . Joseph's y- pa ‘ularg apply: ip ard, er . 7 ca . * ; *
announcements. in. Carib Calling the| icnt condition, mileage under 5000. 14.12.5ler3n. | Bay Street. 15.12.$1—2n | City. Phone 2974. 16.12.51—2n US __ Persons granted permits to dispose * surplus milk, along we
bingy pooh g A enlraip bogrenet re Dag «4 8d a. Manta 1.13.8)-~80. NOTI BUNGALOW? Newy built Bungsiow | ROOMS—Gpol end Comfortable with or MISCELLANEO milk vendors who have obtained licenses are also required to renew
anteater’ “Terms cash. Phone 2508] “¢ AR—Standard 8 h.p. 2 door Saloon so lineisite os rg a o ond. Black Rock, 200 yards | without meals. Die] 4669, = :16.12.51—1n their permits and licenses.

8.30 and 4 p.m., 3113 for Death] , attractive ce. Dial 76. ancl F 8st. JOSE rom each, containing 3 bedrooms, | —————— UE JEWELLERY & SCRAP i egi ati obtain ro! e
beewomn 8.30 and 4 p.m. r at attractive price. Dial 9478. Francis) 41 cpaxes owing to this parish, and| drawing and dining S. verandah, | The, > storey building sityated at the oats = : Forms of application for registration can be ed from thi
was 1 not paid by the 27th December, 1951, will | tiled bath, kitehen and servants room, ord, James and a A po ae 2.1%.51-—t.n,| Sanitation Department-of St. Michael.

MARRIAGE CAR 107 Chevrolet. First offer §2,200| be collteted according to law garage, self-contained of modern design. | 5 ccupled tay Mrs Paul Wilkins. (Sgd.) J. M. KIDNEY,
é “ ; yy A wd A. T. KING, | Dial 4821 or $231. 26.8. 51—3n | P it occupied Mrs. Paw . WANTED TO RENT ‘
accepted. Dial 3336 15.12.51—6n, Parochial Treasurer, St, JO8@Ph. | een re vic. C/o Da Costa &) souse or FLAT: Small House or Fist Chairman,

PILGRIM: BANNATYNE — On Decem 14.12.51—2n BUSINESS STAND—A first class busi-| Coy Lad 11,12,.81—-@n. | 4,"the vicinity of Garrison, Beckles Rd. Commissioners of Health
ber 15th Mr, Vernon Francis Pilgrim son —_— ~| ness stand with residence (solid wall), Prittons Hill, ete. Apply to Advocate :
of . and Mrs, Francis Frere Pilgrin ‘i y i : R RENT OR SHORT LEASE y i re
See Se rane Pee are ELECTRICAL NOTIC Quopn's Street, Bt. Michael. Apply to] |, FOR, RENT. Mo eee ear | Advtg. Dept. in Writing. St. Michael

t : J ker, corner St. Michael’s Row newly built bunga 7.12.51—2n
Bannatyne denepter of Cmdr ene Tees ees oe Fa § he Consignoss and Garnett Street, opposite Nelson Gate,| Appleby on the St. James = having ana
St. Seuveu es Monts INBFEAA “Vs respons! , é i room,
Neen ne Oe at ine. “Piigrim have| jgSCNPEAM ELECTRIC RAZOR. Phone |tor any debt or debts contracted by the | (uses Perk. 18, 18.01—2n.|| cree r_aitting room, dining wen, | PONY—Wanted by eleven year old POLICE TRAFFIC NOTICE.
h

chosen Bermuda for their




































WA























iING MACHINE AND RINGER—

in port.



Crew of the same vessel during her stay



























HIGH WIND8—Cattle Wash—Bathsheba.











tellet and bath, also garage and servants’



be pleasant. Phone Lee, 9524’



saad From now onwards, Dial 2650. room. 16,12.51—an
The ideal machine for washing babies’ sae a oa 11.12.51—3n.
DIED clothing and other light germents. A ‘Consignees.
bargain. Darey A. Seott, Central Auction | 16 1951.3, M BUNGALOW — Situated at
MASSIAH—On December 14th, Miriam] Mort, Magazine Lane. 14 12.51—3n Sedan All prarers, Scovenceees, to
Beatrice. Age 71. The interment took - ESTOCK NOTICE three ‘room ate built-in presses and | ——oooro
plage at the Westbury Cemetery. LIVE ELECTION OF MEMBERS OF THE |eupboprds. A bargain, contact W. Wells| § im goods and with your eash pill
Buvolly tanthie Bayley (caus ‘ monn —-— GENERAL ASSEMBLY at T, Geddes Grant Ltd., Phone 2861 or | YOU get @ guess-coupon: how many
Holborn (Holly) Bayley (son-r BITCH — One imported Pure bred Parish of St. James home 4085. 9,12.51—7n | Screws in a jar? ¥ can win an
16.12, Pedigree Alsatian Bitch, 18 months old.| Notice is hereby given thet at the}. ~ | EKCO radio. It pays to shop
> 15th December Arsene ss 15.12.51—2n. | holding by me of the Election of Mem- EVANTON at A. BARNES & Co,, Ltd.
ROCK—On the 15th December -l bers to serve in the General Assembly| Top Rock, having 4 bedrooms, Dining $3.11.01—€.£.n,
Mann | Sia. funtrel will leave ENGLISH PEDIGREE BULL MAST#FF | of this Island for the\ Parish of St.| Room, Sun Lounge, 2 fully tiled Toilets
Funeral Home « f Burton & Co., PUPS~—Apply: B. E. Stoute, Smal) Ridge | Ji.mes on Spuredey, ‘the. Te ee -o8l sal thoveane with’ Hot velar Siaden Neus from the “Mayfair Gift Sho
Romer ser Pe SD OC Some Plantation, Christ Church or H. Mayhew, | December, 1961, the following is the| Kitchen, Outside 2 Cars Garage, Servant| There will be Lucky Dips for Boys and
noon for the Westbury Cemetery 14] _Wallsbrook", River Read, St. Michael. | resulti-— Room, Play Room, Toilet and’ Shower, | Girls from Monday }7th 10 a.m.—12 noon
re ane oe aaa = soe Dial 2382, 15 12, 5l-2n Mr. Ellesworth St. Aubyn Holder hat| The Gardens are well laid out having a| 4nd 46.30 p.m. Father Xmas will wel-
Lodgs are indiy askec o a

Brethren of the Loyal Paradise

Ledge (London Unity of Oddfellows.)

16.12.61






EEE






MULES—Seven (7)
dale Plantation, St.



Peter.
15.12.51—3n

——












Mules at Alleyne-



received 3,080 votes.
1,489 votes,

Mr. John Hadley Wilkinsen has reteiv-

dual Entrance. The above property

Mr, Edward Keith Walcott has received | be purehaged fully Furnished. For viewing

O10 or 8657
DOWN, Top Rock,

15.12.51



can
—2n

hrist

come them himself on 18th end 21st from

4,.30—6 p.m,
er 14,12.61—2n,

_———S
DENTURES—Have your Broken Den-












. ed 1,361 votes. ; WORTHY c ;
THANKS PETS~-Nice Christmas presents, Siamese | Mr, Bllesworth St. Aubyn Holder and|Churgh, having 3° bedrooms with con- | ‘Fes Repaired peters mas, evi the
Kittens — Budgerigars. All’ golours. | mr, Edward Keith Walcott were there-|neoting Toilets and Showers, Large out-| Tush, the wore fn” Denture
ST. HILI—We the undersigned beg] Phone 3121. 16.12.51—In | fore declared duly elected. side Balconies, Lounge, Dining Room, Seoeis aareiee ne” aiteet
through this medium to return thanks Dated this 14th day of December, 1951, | huilt in cupboards throughout. Outside Repa| » Reed 15.12.51—2n.
to all those kind friends and relatives MECHANICAL JOHN H, C, THORNE, 2 Car Garage, 2 servant's Room, Laun- "








who attended the funeral, sent wreaths, Returning Officer, dry, Toilet, and Shower. Bex fully} *







































































cards and letters of sympathy in our SHOT GUN: One Shot Gun 12 gauge, St. James. enclosed. For viewing ring 5010 or
recent bereavement occasioned by the} srowning Automatic, made by Fabrique 16.12.51—1n. | 9647 6. 12. 1—4n.
death of Iris Ottalie St en os Nationale, $150.00. Canon Harvey Read.
Irvin St, Hill (husband), Emsie Haynes.] prone 3046. 16.12.51—~1n. CTI
Chalmer, Celia, and Brenda St. Hill, NOTICE By inst fy ON, will sell on
‘childyen), Clarence Haynes (Son-in- | PyPRWRITEN—One (1) Royal Type- wareitenee ede ce T pm et Bain
Law), 16.12.51--1” | writer (26) Carriage, in good condition, Village St. Lawrence Ch. Ch., a double
a] Apply: Steamship Dept , aed. ty 16
WAITHE—We the undersigned beg to . BP. MUSSON, SON & CO,, LTD. ? ‘ . | reofed boarded and shing! ouse x
return thanks to all those who 50 at No. 4613. {3 12.51in.| UNIVERSITY COLLEGE OF | 10 x 9 shed 16 x 8, kitehen, closet, palings.

Land ean be rented. TERMS CASH ON

kindly sympathised with us in various FAtL OF HAMMER, Dial 2947 R. Archer

THe WEST invins.










a at the cent passing of Helena > . S
Rumustus Waithe, who died 4th Dectm- MISCELLANEUUS BARBADUS —. McKenzie. 16.12.51—3n
ber 1951, late of Harts Gap, Christ Sarees OF — —- The Ruan ; 2. . irk > z Di 3D
Church. : UES — desc! e nauen for UNDER THE AMOND

James T. Waittte. tetdowert; Marjorie, | Giese, China, old Jewels, fine Silver | Barpnados iamnriesie ) Mahibia
_ . HAMMER
Gloria, Joyce, Hubert, Amold Waithe Watercolours, Early books, Maps, Auto- :
children), Aleatha Welch (mother), graphs etc., at Gorringes Antique Shop|ons tenable at tne University] 1 have been instructed by the Tele-



16.12.51—1n. J adjoining Royal Yacht Club,

College of the West Indies will
$.10,51-t.f.n

be conducted in Barbados by the

pone- Company to sell at their yard
lames Street on Fri 2ist December



















girl in time for Xmas, a pony who would
like to be loved. A, porn, Eaccie foe SS
right pony, need not youn but must

11,12.51—4n

eS

; Opening of the Legislature by H.E. the Governor on
18th December, 1951

peg



1. All drivers of vehieles conveying persons to the Ceremony
shall enter the Public Buildings Yard by the South Gate in single
line and after having set down their occupants shall immediately
leave by the North Gate and park as directed by the Police.

2. Drivers of vehicles, other than those mentioned in para. 1,
shall not enter the Public Buildings Yard between 9.15 a.m. and 11.30
aim,

3. After the Ceremony, drivers of vehicles returning for their
secupants shall enter the Public Buildings Yard by the North Gate
and leave by the South Gate.

4. No vehicle shall park in or be allowed _to remain in the Pub-
lic Buildings Yard between the hours of 8.30 a.m. and 11,30 a.m,

5. Parking space will be available in Rickett Street for the cars
of owner drivers attending the Ceremony.

Made under Regulation 22 of the Bridgetown and Speightstown
(Traffic) (Amendment) Regulations 1943.

R. T. MICHELIN,
Commissioner of Police.



ALUMINIUM

Police Headquarters,
Bridgetown,

Adorned with rubies and 13th December, 1951.

sapphires from the Mogok
mines of Burma this Shan
woman prepares her food,
These jewels and the com-
mon clay of her ornate bowl
are but a few of the many
minerals containing alu-
minium. Though first iso-

SHIPPING NOTICES

ROYAL © NETHERLANDS
STEAMSHIP CO.

SAILING FROM EUROPE
M.8. Poseidon 20th Dec.,





















The M.V. “CARIBBEE”
will accept Cargo and Pas-

1951, sengers for Dominca, Anti-



enna apeliihebeceeeteiiapaia teams eaian tte Apaches ehtanncicataee aE





rSTERN Through this sdium we a ——————— , : 1 o'clock, the following :— Several lated in 1826, it was not] ms. 28th Dee, 1951. serr
re Section tanks Ae atl thoee kind A Bell & Howell, 16mm sound Projector University College in consultation 16 ft lengths of large sized railwi iron, until 1886 that its ‘od Ma Haan tn ane tise ua, propia: Nevis and
friends who sent wreaths, l-tters off in perfect condition. Also a winder; a|with the Director of Education,| several lengths of medium sii rail- pr duce SAILING TO PLYMOUTH AND t, Kitts. Sailing Thursday
condolence, or in any way axpreeeer splicest: sutra 10m im apa religious and will consist of:— way 1r06,_ 8 -coleetios oh elanitak od tion became commercially | AMSTERDAM 20th inst.
a ibe . pce! preave- ms. an : 5 ; 4 : seve! +
tlie? ermgathy in aur regent bereave-| Doon. Cee eee Ts eked (i) a written examination to] telephone boxes, a lot of cable drums, a practicable. Most of the|gititna SO tn Rimano aiiD "
Aubray. Seymour, Lydia domaberents cara ss anaes ~ be held in the week be- conection ct gsivenion, and tia wire. world’s aluminium is now muyTIsi GUIANA wee wy: CLM. ram.
3 . daughter-in-law), ulian, s— uantity of brieks, en r i i | 2 several 8. id Jan., 1952. WHL acce argo an
Bee e one! and. Giendine ‘(grind | seen at "Woodstock", Spooners Hill, Se. ginning Monday, Febru-|tiow "torches, one old water pump, and| Produced by dissolving an ore named bauxite in molten eryolite, a| s Meine a ane a eb MA. eaten ees _ Bete
eniareny, 16.12.51—1n. | Michael by communication with’ K- ary 25th, 1952. et I eee: annticnaen mineral obtained from Greenland, and passing an electric current|IBO AND BRIT. GUIANA Sailing Monday 17th inst.
IN MEMORIAM ee ee enor 1ab1-2n - be held in April, 1952 ” . : 13.18, 51—8n through the solution. In combination with other metals such as M Bonaire. sth’ Jai , 1952 ° ;
Candidat aspen eee magnesium or copper, aluminium forms light alloys, some of which, \S41ING TO TRINIDAD & CURACAO B.W-t., GOUES . OWNERS
loving memory” oF | 5, GAR, TYRES in the following siew:—| Candidates must be:— UNDER THE DIAMOND [though only about one-third of the wei ‘ i : paar iae ree ee
Aiur rarer incr "ana sronamtte: [Ss 2 aeons a) ue aha eter ane | (°) Under, twenty |(20) years strong and not rust andro heya ed aed a gy | Sat
a an ner | 5 B00 x h F ‘ " ig a : ; “ ;

Catherine Alleyne (Kate) who departe* 1599 *\ 19, also ‘in. stock’ truck tyres. of age on the'S1st Janu-) 1 1 ive been instructed by Mr. George B ane not rust. The famous statue of Eros in Piccadilly Circus, Agents. 566$9696606046666566666:
this life on December 14th, 1949 Enquire Auto Tyre Co., Trafalgar & Spry ary, 1952;























3 bets Collins to sell by publie auction en the
(b) Natives of this island; or] spot at Brereton’s Village, St. Philip,

i i at 2 pm. on Wednesday next 19th
(ce) oe i. native of December his house which is built of
?

(d) Children pin in and out, It is 22 x 12

“Gone but not forgotten’
Ever fo be remembered by her children
and Grandchiidren. 16.12.5111

GREENIDGR—In ever loving memory of

a beloved nusband and father Adolphur

Streets. Phdhe 2696, 8.12.51—t.f.n

CURTAIN LACE & CRETTONES: You
must see our wide range on Sale at
THAN! Bros, Dial 3466. 19.19, 8l--t-fony

—w








of persons who] with shed a8'x ® and kitehen, and stands

x, Terms cash,







at Waunarlwydd in South Wales.




































one of the earliest large aluminium castings, shows no signs of
corrosion after 40 years of exposure to London smoke.

One of the largest factories producing wrought aluminium and its
alloys in the form of sheet, strip, and extrusions is the I.C.I. works






Canadian National Steamships












‘reenidge Paw) wo ws oa a |- GHURORIAD OREN Ter ak Cer ee pe Sopiee. and have on lands of Sip, ; Poe These go to help P SOUTHBOUND mths, git: Areives geet,
on ember 11, . : colourful Wallet with Zipp all around bee! < Auctioneer. in the producti os ados
yg, ng ea 2 covourtul Wallet with & inland dow a -nesind -Ai-eshl cia seietee de eee production of all manner of finished articles IC! “CANADIAN CRUISER" *.. ..14Decr. — 283 Decr. 24 Decr.
Anpee aye wrolesme you on that 16.12. Ble-@n. less than oe (10) years. UNDER THE SILVER Soin: aa ; i “LADY RODNEY”... +B Dose: y pase, 2 tony. By deny.

. pane ioe saesietepulges ta ecrwemnsaintyienshehaminddeiaetaeinaian ; + * epans to a ane: " NELSON" #8 any. any. any. any.

Ever te be remiumbered by Ane (whee, | EXPANDED METAL —2” Mesh 8 x 4 produce. with their seein HAMMER = eroplanes, ecaffolding poles te | SGARADIAN CRUISER” “a8 Jony. = t eby. 1 Roby.
n aughter), Shirley. Lance | sheets, 3” I” x & and 12 x # Sheets. , Q ashtra, OS i, Beg med per vee ney
Imin, Karl (grandehiidren), Bannister’s | Qn) Sai ce ons ated irth ificates togeth: ON TUESDAY i8th by order of Mrs, ys, motor ear parts to egg cups, ° A “LADY NELSON” |. : +.27 Feby. 20 Feby. 9 March 10 Maryeh
Land, St, Miehael 16.12.5t-18 | goticited. eo oe eee Tahidied eeatecneta Cele That Ki the Top Fiat 7 rr cone Trade Mark of I ndustri z Seeceeienarrces Sreeeramngasion see peeerneete

THE BARBADOS FOUNDRY LTD:, re ; mperial Chemica

PORPOOPE ESOP SOP OE Phone 4846 16.12.51-8n. | they have been receiving their] at daspeene (Ose woh ees 7 re as es Ltd., London, England NORTHBOUND Arrives Sails Arrives Arrives Arrives

% education for the past three (3) Mocris eneire, aaron one mad : Barbados Barbados Boston St. John Halifax

FOR RENT % FRENCH FASHION JOURNALS -Atte | years in this colony and that their] Ornament Tables, Tea Trolley; Berbice gorge ae “LADY NELSON" .-92 Deer, 23 Deer, 3 Jany 4 Jany. 7 Jany.

x oe cmsignt A few more French Fashion | moral character and general con-|Chair, Vitrolite Top Table; all in * " . CRUISER” -» @Jany. 7 Jany. — i4Jany. 17 Jany.

Most Attractive small furnished %f Journals has arrived and going fast. duct 3 tisfacto! Mahogany: Glass Ware, Tea Service, LADY RODNEY" ++ 22 Jany. @Jany, 2Â¥Feby, 2Feby. 6 Feby.
Holiday Beach House, Everything 3 aT con t meen eee a panteeae yrs sie fe he * Fp ai teal Pictures, Rugh Chairs, Rockers and Tables : uBek catniie “ae env: 7 Feby. 16 Feby. u gery) ” Mpa de

s, Telephone. rst served. y Dress Shop, Upper cations for jon as ; ; yi . . y¥. 21 P.by. he y. are!
Be icc pei G | Reed ‘Street. 15, 12.51—2n cendillates for. the Exchibitions| Crabeood Bidebourd: GE oe 5 “LADY RODNEY” 8 March 9 March 20 March 21 March 24 Mareh
, Just Completed % . ; must be sent to the Director of| ¥°"° Springs. Duchesse Dressing Table LY | BLADON fe coe ee ees, 33 March 28 Maven 8. Apel: (2 Ape an
Telephone 4683 . ae HONE RECORDS: Latest - FOF! cit in Mahogany: very good Deep Sleep e e “CAN, CRUISER + 4 April 7 April a 14 April 17 April
% Galyoso weet nee Test Match, ymca Education Office, The} \iattress; Hair Bed, Mird. Press Dressing ‘
. Table, Single Bedstead and Spring in
Sotind Boxes. Phone 4919, New Market | G&*tison, St, Michael, not later s AF.S., & F.V.A.
Store, Cheapside. * Te sian | than Tuesday, 22nd January, 1952,|Manchineel Mahog. Book Table, Sum "»



a mons Spring Cot, Small Mird. Press;
Applicants for admission a8} 9 purer Oil Stove, Kitchen Tables and

candidates for Barbados Govern- Utensils aa mirc. eo pistes
ment Exhibitions must also for-| tron ne oar ‘erns an other ms.
ward direct to the Registrar of| yj ij) o'clock, Terms cathe
the University College of the West} BRANKER, TROTMAN & CO.
ne seen their applica- Auctioneers,

t or Entrance to the Univer-

sity College, The closing date for
applications for Entrance is 31st
January, 1952,

N.B.—Forms of Application for



HOT SHIRTS: Lovely Barbados Views
and many other design Shirts for Dances
Holiday and Sport. Let THANDS show
them to you 16.12.51—t fn

INDIAN LEATHER SANDALS in lovely
new designs Treat yourself to one at
THANI’S, Pr William Henry Street

15,12.51—t,f.n.

MOTOR LAUNCH 26ft, strongly built
beamy Motor Launch, Large Cabin, ample
head room, good cockpit, Morris M: e













STOCKBROKER.
Barbados Investments.
Oversea Orders Executed.

33, Broad Street,
Bridgetown,

TOBRUK, Cattlewash, Bathsheba
—a picturesque holiday home on
the beach with about % of an
acre of land, Timber construc-
tion raised on stone pillars, sound
construction throughout. There are
3 bedrooms wit! wash-basins,
lounge, wide gallery overlooking
the sea, kiteh servants rooms






14.12.51—2n.

UNDER THE DIAMOND











I have been instrueted by Mrs. Mabel









(over Phoenix Pharmacy) Gngire all i m Johnson to sell by public auction on the and outside bathing cubleles. Offers
Apply: Young, Gas Co. 08 ee Entrance to the University Col- spot on Thursday 20th December at invited.
Dial 4796. — Hours 9-3. 1.12.51. PIN STRIPE 100% Woollen Tweed} Sary qualifications for Matricula-| !s 18 x 10 and 20 x 11 with shed. ‘The WINDY WILLOWS, St. James—



house is situated on lands of Benjamin
Miller at Workmans, St. George.
cash,

Navy and Brown. Just a small quantity

Delightful bungalow hquse with
at $10.36 a yd. THANT'S.
15,12. 51- 4.f.n.

open verandah commanding mag-
nificent view of sta and stretches



tion, and an outline of the courses
available must be obtained from

‘Terms













SJ the Registrar of the University DARCY A. SORE Br Dene Large lounge, 3 bed-
} PLAYBALLS; Children’s Multi-Col- . » verandahs, nen, pantry
oured Playballs, all sizes, new ship- soem seepalen, rem he local EEE and servants’ rooms. Storerooms in
FOR SALE ment, obtainable from Bi'dos, | Cotton | ,-CPresentative, r. . A! £OST & FOUND basement. Offers considered.
Factory, Central Foundry Ltd., Manning} Vaughan, c/o Y.M.C.A., Pinfold er



INCH MARLOW — On approx, 2
acres coastland near Silver Sands,
A solidly

& Co., Corner Store, get yours early
kK. J. Hamel-Smith & Co., Dtd. Distrib-
itors, Trafalgar

Street, Bridgetown, or from the
Director of Education.



FOUND
KEYS—A bunch of keys in Queen’s

































. Street, Dial 4748 constructed stone house
Partly Wena Gen h d 4 e 15,12.51—gn | Department of Education, Park, on leather strap with mark. with shingle roof and pine flooring.
ane iy ene Sen pate Ae ae ll ee 24th November, 1951 Owner can recover same by applying 4 reception, 3 bedrooms, verandah,
Dini vs “es *h ‘ v ‘dah PERFUMES: Chanel No. 5, Joy, Amour . ‘ to the Advocate Advertising Dept. and 2 bathrooms and toilet: kitchens,
Divi ng and Living Room, erence Riaziie, Stak Winaa ond’ toes dion 27.11.51—3n. | paying the cost of this Advertisement. 2 servants’ rooms, 2 garages. Any
at aatley,. pot vane 180 Pabde asant Perfumes Incence Sticks ete. Available ; reasonable oiler considered.
the sea. — . ‘t THANT'S, Pr. Wm. Henry St, Dial FOR SALE BAGATELLE HOU
CHURCHILL M66. 15.12 61—t.t.n. : Thomas — a spacious reanooe
Stone Bungalow, comprising 3 country hou vith
: RING—Large real Pearl Set with ' i oo with appres, &
Pear Duane. tnd Yaving SismondaBides, Apnly: Michards i fon, MISCELLANEOUS It is notified for general inform- sepeq pus Baditignal Pie epee it
SAE thntaae aiteatet at jeweller, McGregor Street. -————— ___ [ation that The Public Library and S eaese a eee pee.
Maxwells, Christ Church, 15.12. 51—2n A FINE CHRISTMAS GIFT--Three|the Speightstown Branch Library 5 . ng-rearhy 2 enclose:
. r n [oan eee | colourful Plastic Hangers. All for $1.00 : galleries, 2 bathrooms, kitehen,
Seiilds Seapstew "oc. ego RAISINS AND CURRANTS—Notice to] The Modern Dress Shoppe, wan De clad, on Monday 36m, Soa?) DArvAnty NOOeAA\ Se: Eneaiee
ie ee ee no SPRroe acareteee we can supply Raisins 40c 16.12 51—2n, | December at 3 p,m. oe, Various Guipide Taulailee,

imately 16,000 square feet of land,
overlooking Golf Course with view







This property is well elevated and
commands excellent views of the

ver Ib. and Currants 40c. per lb. C By order of the Trustees,



RECORDS—Calysos,











pk : Herbert, 55 Tudor Street, City, Kitch, Mary Ann E. L. WALCOTT

Searpers “Drewing aL, "Dining 15.12 51—2n. Also toe smn and Carols Public Librarian «6: beberle daois

Room, Kitchen. Spacious Games reenter ig rom Wm. Fogarty, Broad — ae

Room underneath, also Garage. poe Ait at the RantbrGen ona vee eee Le i A A A A aencdeeene it coeeliy

; vere sold out at the E> n bu y

fo Pee, ae ees ne ye bought at Johnson's Stationery and poe ROE OusrErs : The wift that REMEMBER:— eee NT lags ee
7 y he Advocate Store, price 6 cents each. | ? sul appreciate. wimited igew ay. 5 ‘

Roekk’y Wee moans ou approx- 12.12 $1—an, | Wvantity only, Dial — Hardware; THE SALVATION ARMY ft. This well built prope: con-



tains a front gallery, large lounge,

imately 19,000, square feet of land, separate dining-room, 3 large bed-

Magnificent view inchiding Golf

B'dos Co-op, Cotton Paetory, 16,12.51—8n. CHRISTMAS CHEER
SS

—
STRAW MATS: Faney Bedroom Straw ( >


















Send your Donation now to P.O. rooms, toilet, pantry, and kitchen.

Mats, lovely designs $1.84. Visit Thani |, Cigarettes in Xmas Presentation Boxes r :

hung’ ee ee Sawin Ane tros, Dial 3466. 15,12.51—t..n, Du Mauriets 80/8, Craven “A” 50's, State Box 57, Bridgetown. Good courtyard at rear.

hy ane 8 ‘ 's a a @ uy in ti a
Room with Bath’ att, Tolle and TORYADO-International K.41, Beautt- | Ardath presentation pkus of 200's SS eS eet eeneae, wpe tte eae
enough room for Laundry or wl ae et excellent sauternent. goed | 5 CURRED 6 Solapy *16-12.81—3n, 18" stone walls and heavy asbee-
Workshop, r ecing record. Cost $700.00 now $500.00. aon q ;
* > atiNGALOW No offers. Hicks, Telephone $189, New Shipment of aoq ‘root, There is 4 large 1



— udiewienves
ISOVAC JUGS for Ice Water from

shaped living-room, 2 double bed-
\4/- to 18/- Thermos Jugs for Ice

18.11,51—t.f.p) JAMAICAN SOLE rooms with built-in wardrobes,

Comprising 3 Bedrooms, 2 with

———————=—_—— ——————————=—=—=













FOR SALE

Srarrat bigest: Tollat aa pee 400 ft. Man-Proof fencing 2” mesh, 8ft from $5.80 to $21.00. A serviceable ana LEA E kitchen, pantry, nee KEAN,
Dining and Living Room, large gh, with 28 posts of 2M" steel piping | Useful Purchase for Xmas. Obtainable Arrived pike ieeeiipe, taibetingons, “paonee
Verâ„¢dah on West and medium Fotalling 210 ft., and top-runners 300 |* night's Ltd. pe at Aare enya ea ton
fize patio to the East, Kitchen, t.. 1%" steel piping. Each post with | ___ WARal—e, PASTERS’ LEATHER af sings 4 goes ore heavily wood-
2 Servants Rooms with Tollet and 3 ld Nene om One “Exacta” Camera V.P. complete STORE ed with Mahogany and Flamboy-

wth, Garage, Situate at Graem~ {ff ‘ with accessories and enla A J ant trees, lawns and stone flagged
Hall errace, and standing on Connell, 5 terrace are in secluded wall gar-
feuren mately 22,000 square feet of } WOMEN'S SELF HELP e. Attractive location close to

SORN

Bungalow situate at Strathelyde,
comprising 2 Bedrooms,, one large
enough to be converted into two
rooms, Dining and Living Room,
enclosed Gallery, Kitchen,) Toilet
and Bath, Washroom,, Buttery and
Storage Room, 2 Servants Rooms,
Standing on approximately 7,000





Special sale of Cakes Mince Pies!

CAKE SALE

DEC, 218T

Xmas Puddings.

NOTICE

Church Choir will be rend-

The Roebuck St. Moravian
aring a CAROL SERVICE










CRANE HOUSE, St. Philip-—
One of the most charmingly situ-
ated properties of this nature in
the Island. The house contains
five large bedrooms (with hot and
cold water), spacious lounges, din-
ing-room, large cocktail bar with
bafnhog decor, wide shady galler-
















































REAL ESTATE AGENTS, AUCTIONEERS and SURVEYORS
PLANTATIONS BUILDINGS — Phone 4640

square f+ of lend egmpletely . garage, storerooms, bathing
enclosed. Pr) on Monday, December 17th, chalet, heavy deisel lighting plant
BUILDING at 7.45 p.m. Programmes 94d. and the amenities usual with this
Se ienaute ame epi ape etisnie RECIT. AL OF OLD and NEW each, a Silver Collection will type of property,
adjoining China Doll Restaurant. bri ‘ : be taken up for Church is extensi reage in-
Standing on approximately 10,000 XMAS MUSIC Christmas Aas "are, nected easier when Funds. ieee . Tore cree i a
square feet of land with a frontage , GAS FOR COOKING All heartily welcome. Crane beach, large coconut rove.
of npproximatey 120 feet on : Book your Gas Cooker to-day 16.12.51.—In a aes Seen, ce Sere
p pte.ol~ . shrul rees, graz-
Approxi toe he oon féet . ing fe ihe coastal views oe
2proximately 000 square fee
withetane vg vara, ove anal |{ THE BARBADOS CHORAL rauees nse Infgmmion
stonewall building thereon, situate ‘ an may be obtained from the sole
at Ronbuck Strect, Bridgetown. A | CATHEDRAL CHOIR RECITAL agents or Messrs, Carrington &
portion of the land now being AT ST MICHAEL'S prow;
oceupied by Marshali’s Garage é . Ef
atte CATHEDRAL be “DURHAM, Worthing,, Modern
, We : stone bungalow with ajiminum
arias | Vednesday, December 19th, WE are having record, XMAS MUSIC rooting i leasant residential area.
REALTORS Limited oe = i a Christmas sales which proves at acuiaen, tase bona with
: Coa Admission by Programme that we have the GOODS. , running water, bath with hot water
REAL ESTATE AGENTS | Programme 1/6 (contain- e GOOD! ST. MARY’S CHURCH Seen ep hcuenahin Toea fe
AUCTIONEERS |} ing words of Carols) and 6d. £2,000 more in» Xmas Sunday, 30th December over ¥@ aare all fenced in and there
VALUERS can be obtained from the Goods opening this week, &50 pm. OFF ne oan
BUILDING CONTRACTORS Advocate Stationery or from SILVER COLLECTION | .
151/152 ‘Roebuck Street, | the Clerk at the Cathedral. JOHNSON’S STATIONERY at DOORS |
Bridgetown, | 9.12.51.—2n. . Programmes are now on . {{{!
12.12.51—2n Hi i ‘Sale. Price: One Shilling }}}|
BESS | SSS PPVOSOS
—_—

“

























GARDINER AUSTIN & CO., LTD.—Agents.
ROBERT THOM LIMITED

PLANTATIONS BUILDING, LOWER BROAD STREET
Passenger Sales Agents for:
Trans-Canada Airlines, B.O.A.C. and B.W.1.A.
ALCOA STEAMSHIP COMPANY
Telephone No. 4466








MODERN 8TONE BUNGALOW,
Graeme Hall Terrace-—A modern
bungalow of stene construction
with parapet roof. This property
has the advantage of a corner site
and a very *fine view seawards.
There are 3 good bedrooms with
built-in wardrobes. Large lounge/
living room with 2 verandahs
leading from it. The kitchen is
well supplied with fitted cup-
boards. es 2-car garage, 2
servants’ rooms and laundry,



















For Toys, small Xmas Trees, & Xmas Decorations
BUY FROM

CENTRAL EMPORIUM

Cnr, Broad & Tudor Sts.

“MALTA”, St. Peter—A modern
stone built house of extremely
solid construction and extensively
re-modelled to give added attrac-
tion. The ground floor contains 2
garages, servant's quarters with
toilet facilities, storerooms and
laundry, On the first floor (where
there is usually a cooling breeze)
there is a wide and spacious cov-
ered verandah with outlook sea-
wards, a large bathroom, drawing
room, 2 bathrooms one with hot
water installed, 3 bedrooms (1
with own bath and toilet) butler’s
pantry and modern kitchen
Approx: %4 acre of land well laid
out and irrigated from own water
supply, also Mains water and light,
Right of way t6 beach and good
bathing opposite bouse.















“LEETON ON SEA", Near
Olstins—An attractive fully furn-
ished sea-side bungalow built
right on a sandy beach with
excellent bathing facilities, Thei
is a wide front verandah extend-
ing the whole frontage, 4 bed-
rooms, (3 with basins), large
L-shaped lounge with cocktail
bar, kitchen, garage and servants’
quarters.

“BEMERSYDE"”, St. Lawrence
Spacious stone built bungalow
with shingle roof, very well plan-
ned with wide verandahs at front
and side, 2 enclosed galleries,
large airy lounge and dining room,
3 double bedrooms, kitchen and
pantry, 3 servants’ rooms, garage
and outhouses. The house is com-
pletely enclosed and there is direct

AGGATTS
GROUP



Offers will be considered for the purchase of the
above group, consisting of Haggatts Factory and the
following estates :—

aecess to the sea with good bath- Arable Total

ing. ) Acres Acres
ree ses | esters:

80) one storey ne . 4 ree T approx. a,

insively Aenodelica with greet HIM Bawden & River approx, ....... 266 521

house has 2 wide roomy verandane {fj} Friendship approx. ..,.,......., 115 211

at front and ne : :

ee ieee wan baal, Haggatts Factory has been extensively modernised

kitchen, laundry, servants’ quar-

and is oa PPrsrivg the 1001 fancy molasses as well as
} D.C, sugar. the 1951 crop, the factory produced
{ 4,352 tons of sugar, The bags required for the 1952 crop
have been secured.

ters and garage. Grounds are
over 4% acres with productive
orchard, flower and vegetable
gardens, driveway and large park-
ing space for cars. ‘Wyndover’’
is well elevated on the ridge,
always benefits from a breeze and
commands perfect views of the
coastline.

The mechanical equipment of the group includes
among other items the following International Har-

“HOLDER'S HOUSE”, St. J.
e ye cn vester tractors :—

An Estate house built of stone
with pine floors and shingle roof.
3 reception, 5 bedrooms, verandahs
etc,, also garage and usual out-
buildings. The house stands on
approx. 4 acres of well timbered
land (mahogany) approached by a
long driveway flanked with closely
planted Mahogany trees. The out-
standing attraction of ‘“‘Holder’s”
is the very lovely site which has
the advantage of being well ele-
vated and cool, with fine views on
all sides. Coast is less than a mile
away and town 6 miles.

1—TD14 Crawler Tractor with bulldozer.
1—WD9, 1—Farmall H.
Also 1—Caterpillar D2
ploughs,
1—dise plough, 1—brushbreaker plougi.
8 Dodge Trucks, 1 Austin Truck, 11 cane carts for
Tractors.
Livestock includes 14 horses, 12 mules.

tractor, 2—Subsoiler

WE ALWAYS HAVE A COM-

PREHENSIVE LIST OF HOUSES, Further details and .onditions of sale may be

obtained from,

S. P. MUSSON, SON & CO., LTD.,
Broad Street, Bridgetown.





SUNDAY, DECEMBER 16,



CHURCH

SERVICES

METHODIST

BETHEL—11 am. Rey A. E
Types, 7 p.m. Mr. H. Grant

LKEITH—Harvest Festival Services:

11 a.m. Rev. B. Crosby, 3.15 p.m. Harvest

Cantata. 7 p.m. Rev. M. A. E Thomas

BELMONT—11

M

a.m Mr. J
7 pm. Mr. F. Moore re
SOUTH DISTRICT—9 a.m. Rev, M A.E
Themas, 7 p.m. Mr. G Bascombe
PROVIDENCE—11 am Mr. C Best
* GAUMHALL fa
“11 am. Mr. P uce
7 pm. Mr. &. Blackman ee
JAMES STREET—11 a.m Rev. R
MeGullough, 7 p.m. Rev. J. § Boulton

Carol and Xmas Gift Service
PAYNES BAY—9.30 a.m. Mrs, Phillips

7 pm. Mr. F. D. Reach
/ TTEHALL—930 a.m. Rev. R. Me-
Cullough, 7 p.m: Bethel Local Preacher
GILL MEMORIAL—11 Rev
Lawrence, 7 p.m. Mr. P. Deane ,
HOLETOWN—#£.30 a.m. Rev
rence, 7 p.m. Mr. D. Scott
BANK HALI—9 30 a.m
os 7 p.m. Mr
IGHTSTOWN—11 a.m. Mr ean
7 p.m. Rev. F. Lawrence Marten
SALVATION ARMY
BRIDGETOWN CENTRAL — 11 am
AY te tad p.m. Company Meet-
. 7 pan. vation Meeting.
Major Smith. oe Traces
WELLINGTON STREET—11 a.m. Ho-
limess Meeting, 3 p.m Company Meeting
7 p.m. Salvation Meeting Preacher
Major Gibbs.
CARLTON—li a.m. Holiness Meeting
3 p.m. Company Meeting, 7 p.m. Salva
tion Meeting. Preacher: Captain Bourne

a.m,

F

FP. Law-
Rey

J. 8
G. Harper

CHECKER HALL—11 a.m. Holiness
Meeting, 3 p.m. Company Meeting, 7
pam. Salvation Meeting. Preacher

Lieutenant Reid.

SEA VIEW—1l1 am. Holiness Meeting,
3 pm. Company Meeting, 7 p.ii. Sal-
vation Meeting. Preacher: Lieutenant
Hinds,

PIE CORNER—11 a.m. Holiness Meet-
ing, 3 p.m. Company Meeting, 7 p.m.
Salvation Meeting. Preacher: Sr. Major
Hollingsworth.

DIAMOND CORNER—11 a.m. Holiness

Meeting, 3 p.m. Company Meeting
7 p.m, Salvation Meeting. Preacher:
Captain Moore.

MORAVIAN

ROEBUCK STREET—11 a.m.
Service, Preacher: Rev. E. E. New

Morning
7pm

Bvening Service, Preacher: Rev. E. E
New.

GRACE HILI—11 a.m. Morning Service,
Preacher: Mr. F. G. Downes: 7 p.m

Evening Service, Preacher: Mr. W. Deane
FULNECK—1l1 a.m. Morning Service

7 +pm. Evening Service, Preacher
Mr. W. Swire.

MONTGOMERY — 7 p.m Evening
Service; Preacher: Mr. D. Culpepper

SHOP HILL—7 p.m. Evening Service;
Preacher: Mr. F. G. Smith.

DUNSCOMBE—. 11 am. Morning
Service, Preacher: U. Reid; 7 pm
Evening Service, Preacher Mr. 61

Oxtey.
THE ST. JAMES NATIONAL BAPTIST
7 p.m. Evensong and Sermon, Preacher
Rev. J. B. Grant L.Th. Minister in charge;
Youths’ activities during the week, con-
ducted by the Rev. L. Bruce-Clarke,
(Assistant Pastor) assisted by Mrs. Olga
Browne.

FIRST CHURCH OF CHRI
BRIDGETOWN
Upper Bay Street

Sundays 11 a.m. and 7 p.m

Wednesdays 8 p.m. A Service which
ineludes Testimonies of Christian Science
Healing.

SUNDAY, DECEMBER 16, 19651.

Subject of Lesson Sermon: GOD THE
PRESERVER OF MAN,

Golden Text: In God is my salvation
and my glory: the rock of my strength,
and my*refuge, is in God. Psalm 62:7.

The following Citations are included in
the Lesson-Sermon The Bible: Fear
ye not, stand still, and see the salvation
of the Lord;.



SCTENTIST



Exodus 14: 13

Science and Health with Key to the
Seriptures,

By MARY BAKER EDDY.

Spirit imparts the understanding which

uplifts consciousness and leads into all

truth,
Page 505.

Harbour Log

IN CARLISLE BAY
Sch, Bel Queen, Sch. Marea Henrietta,
Sch, Zenith, Sch, Mary M. Lewis, Sch

Wonderful Counsellor, Sch. Mary E
Caroline, Sch, Zita Wonita, Sch. Ada-
lina, MV. CLM. Tannis, Sch.

M. Smith, Sch, Clondia S, MV. Blue

Star, Sch. United Pilgrim &
ARRIVALS
M.V. Lady, 81 tons net, Capt. Martin,
from French Guiana
SS. Starcrest, 4,208 tons net,
Miller, from London
Schooner Franklyn D. R., 82 tons net,
Capt. Sealy, from British Guiana.
DEPARTURES
Schooner Amanda T., 70 tons net,
Capt. Tannis, for British Guiana.
Sehooner Gardenia, 48 tons net. Capt.
Wallace, for St. Vincent.

John Gregory Made B.G.
Comptroller Of Customs

GEORGETOWN, Dec. 15.

The new Comptroller of Cus-
toms, John William Gregory, ar-
Yived on Friday and straightway
assumed duty. Until recently
Assistant Director of Customs for
Palestine, Gregory of Nottingham,
England, has been appointed for
three years from December 14,
1951 inelusive and succeeds Mr.
E, V. D. Goulding, now retired.-Cp)

Capt

1951



SEEN landing on the Wharf at
part of a shipment of the famous

animal and poultry feeds from this famous manu faciurer.
cotton bags in gay colours or plain white. This is certainly a plus value, in these days, for the house-
wife. Robert Thom Ltd., are the local agents and by next week this feed will be distributed to the
Further shipments will be arriving later.

lucky buyers,



B.B.C. Radio

Programmes

SUNDAY, DECEMBER 16, 1951
11,15 a.m. Programme Parade, 11.30 a.m
Ray's a Laugh, 12.00 (noon) The News,
12.10 p.m. News Analysis
4,007.15 pom.

31.32M 48.43M









4.00 p.m. The News, 4.10 p.m. Interlude,
4.15 p.m. United Nations Report, 4.30 p.m.
Sunday Half Hour, 5.00 p.m. Composer of
the Week, 5.15 pun. Listeners’ Choice,
6.00 p.m, Oliver Vella, 6.15 p.m, Over To
You, 645 p.m. Programme Parade, 6.6
p.m. What's Cooking, 7.00 p.m. The News,
7.10 p.m, News Analysis, 7.15 p.m. Carib-
bean Voices, 7.30 p.m. Piano Playtime
745—10.45 p.m. S1.22M 44.45M
ae

7.45 p.m. Ray Martin and his Concert
Orchestra, 8.15 p.m. Radio Newsreel, 8.30
p.m. Carel Service, 9.00 p.m. BBC S
rhony Orchestra, 10.00 p.m. The News,
10.10 p.m. From the Editorials, 10.15 p.m





London Forum, 10.45 p.m. Music Maga-
vam
BOSTON
WRUL 11.29 Mc. WRUW 11.75 Mc WRUX

7.75 Me
MONDAY, DECEMBER 17, 1051

11.15 a.m. Programme Paradé, 11.30
a.m, All Hale, 12,00 (noon) The News, |
12.10 p.m, News Analysis
10-715 pom. S1.32M 48.49M

4.00 p.m. The News, 4.10 p.m. The
Daily Service, 4.15 p.m. BBC Northern |
Orchestra, 5.00 p.m, Composer of the |

Week, 5.15 p.m. At the Opera, 6.00 p.m
Man and the Soil, 6.15 p.m. Gracie Sings,
645 p.m. Programme Parade, 6.55 p.m
Today's Sport, 7.00 p.m, The News, 7.10
p.m. News Analysis

7.45—10.30 pom. S1.32M 48.43M



8.00 p.m. Musie for Pleasure, 8.15 p.m.
Radio Newsreel, 8.30 p.m. Asian Survey,
8.45 p.m. Composer of the Week, 9.00 p.m,
From the Third Programme, 10.00 p.m.
The News, 10.10 p.m. From the Editorials,
10.15 p.m. Science Review, 10,30 p.m,
Tip Top Tunes.

““MACORIS”’ SPRINGS
ALEAK IN B.G.

GEORGETOWN, Dec. 15.

The motor vessel Macoris, 1,052
tons, of Honduran registry and
chartered by Saguenay Terminals
asa shuttler of bauxite from
British Guiana to Trinidad, lay
beached at port Georgetown to-
day. With a cargo of 3,000 tons of
bauxite ore, she sprang aleak
while awaiting high tide on Friday
and efforts were successfully made
to get her away from the small
channel.—(CP)

MAIL NOTICE

Muils for the United Kingdom by_ the
S.S. Golfito will be closed at the Gen
eral Post Office as under:-



Parcel Mail at 10 @m., Registered
Maii at 2 p.m., Ordinary Mail at 2 30
p.m. on the 17th December 1951



PPSSSSESSOES SOS OSSD

4,
POPEPPPOPIOA AOE

‘REMEMBER"
THE FORTRESS CLUB



50 in



SUNDAY ADVOCATE





REST FEED

CLE?

Robert Thom’s Warehouse from the Alcoa Steamship Tindra, is
¢ Pillsbury “Cham pion-’ Mixed Dairy Feed. This is the first shipment
of this outstanding Pillsbury feed to come to Bat bados and is the forerunner of a complete line of

Pillsbury’s feeds come in good quality

CPS OCE %

Fire Enquiry Commission |
Set Up In B.G. |

GEORGETOWN, Dec. 15.
His Excellency the Governor, Sir
Charles woolley has appointed a

Chairman ang Mr. Percy W. King, |
O.B.E., is to furnish Government |
with a full statement of proceed- |

PLPLELE LPO











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DELIGHT !!



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DIAL 4045

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that will effectively cover all Marine risks
We shall be pleased to give you any information
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DACOSTA & CO., LTD. Acexrs



Oy,

issi > re « . : : of) .
Two Man Commission to enquire ings of the Commission and reasons | ¢?2%00%%GG9S96GFSF9995G56555S59505499949O0550500O
into the causes and circumstances jeading to the conclusion report. | Q) SSS {

of the fire of November 30 last

which caused millions of dollars on. |
in damage to property and stock Meanwhile, the Police have!
i the commercial cenfre of carried out intensive investiga- |
Georgetown, tions in an effort to solve the
The Commission whieh com- mystery surrounding the con-
prises Judge H. J. Hughes as flagration.—(CPp)








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PAGE FIFTEEN












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At this season of the year you will requires—

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| AND WROUGHT STEEL BUTTS.

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DIAL 3306 Lumber & Hardware, Bay Street.



MRS. HOUSEWIFE
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Roebuck Street “I











NOTICE



The public are hereby notified that our PARTS





APPL CPPLLP LPP AAPA PPPOE EEL

BARBADOS BOYS’ AND GIRLS’ CLUBS



The Draw for the Barbados Boys’ and Girls’ Clubs

Raffle takes place at the

PLAZA THEATRE

BRIDGETOWN at 8.00 p.m. on

THURSDAY, DECEMBER 20th

The Results will be broadcast by Rediffusion

as the Draw takes place



FREE SHOW



.

>

FAA O46 64 bb t tt tL LAL Ab OE.

noe

66,6666, 64-6668

PLL LLL FE ELLE LEI IAAI LLL E ASD

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4 £1,066 COCOT?.
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FOOL-PROOF :: TIME-PROOF :; HAZARD-PROOL

THE DOMINION OF CANADA

GENERAL INSURANCE CO.

dy 6 : z f ~% DEPARTMENT will be closed from Saturday mid-day %
sturdy frame to its smart chromium plating and 1g 22nd December and will reopen on Wednesday morn- §| Agents:— ¥
gicaming enamel— is made to last you longer % ing, January 2nd, 1952. The purpose of this closing is $|$ Those showing a Boys’ Club Raffle Ticket at the door J. B. LESLIE & CO., LTD.,

and serve you better.



for our



ANNUAL STOCK TAKING

PPLE LLLP

between 7.20 and 7.55 p.m. will be admitted free ot
charge to the Show.



44,4546
PFE POS FOS

Collins Building,
Broad Street.

LC SVSEE EASES

“« + < PA OOP 6 b+ tb + +o
LLLP LLL PLEAS PL PLP PEE SFP EPPS PP

R e a x Canvasser
: * M. CARLOTA CUSSO GONSALVES
“a . . a
i % FORT ROYAL GARAGE Ea : The Police Band will play from 7.20 to 7.50 p.m. : ae ee
a err renee, SUUAAEG - Tila cascdedi uacietacadebaiell Boia buludhseiaphsberebiecesacnessedcocedsocsoeed | Sesinoesereorseesentnoneneeenuienenseenstnhee

i



a PL or

—

PAGE SIXTEEN

ence







Good Attendance At
Missionary Service

A large section of the laity attended the Annual Missionary faces

service which was held at the Empire Theatre on Friday
ifternoon. In his address the Lord Bishop said:

In the vear 1848 Sir Williar







Colebrook ippointed Gov
ernor, at that time Thomas Parry
was Bishop of the Diocese, and
Richard Rawle w Principal of
Codrington, It is due to these

under God, that the
vision of starting
Mission in West

three men,
Diocese had the
the Rio Pongas
Africé After the) had taken
council together and agreed on the
importance of sending the Gospel
from these shores to West Africa,
ut Bishop immoned a special
mecting of the Barbados Church
Society, which met on the Ist of
November 1850, and was attended
by all the Clergy and by a great
r ber of persons of all classes
in the island



, Resolution
the opinion that the time was ripe
to undertake such an enterprise,
ar that Barbados should lead,

was passed stating



a that co-operation should be
sought from the whole of the West

Indian Church. A Committee of
eleven person as appointed with
the Bishop as Chairman—with the
enthusiasm of the Principal of
Codrington College, who was
afterwards Bishop Rawle of Trini-

dad—-accommodation was provid-
ed on the grounds of Codrington
College for the reception of seven
students to be trained for Mission
work—-the training College was
opened with two boys from Africa
and two from St. Kitts

Auxiliary Committee

In 1855 an auxiliary Committee
was formed in England and in
the same year the 60-year-old
Viear of St. Leonard, Rev. Ham-
ble James Leacock, of imperish-
able fame, volunteered to go to
Africa and found the Mission.

He arrived in Africa on the 14th
ct November 1895, accompanied
by Mr. J. Dupont, the first student
trained by Bishop Rawle for the
mission. The missionaries pro-
ceeded first to Tinterra, where
they suffered great hardship and
then to Fallangia, to which they
were specially invited by the
Chief, Richard Wilkinson. The
chief had been in England as a
lad, had been instructed in Chri
tianity, had subsequently lapsed
to heathenism, had repented, and
had constantly prayed that God
‘would some day send a mi: sionary
to his land, now the day had come
to praise God, and to co-operate
fully with the missionaries. Ham-
ble James Leacock lived for one
year, and died on the 20th of
December 1856,

This was the record of several
of the early missionaries—en-
thusiasm, a year to two's work, a
#rave in Africa, Dupont’s health
endured amidst the fevers of the
West Coast, and he was a tower

SAAB
%

‘

ose
BPAF








DRESSING SETS
SHAVING BRUSHES
JAMAICAN CIGARS

DUNHILL PIPES

WARDONIA RAZORS
GILETTE RAZORS
SEAFORTH’S GIFT SETS

COMB AND BRUSH SETS.

BABY RATTLERS
BABY SOAP DISHES

BABY SILVER SPOONS & FORKS





FOUNTAIN PENS & PENCILS SETS

COMOY TRADITION & GRAND SLAM PIPES
CIGARETTE CASES & RONSON LIGHTERS

c Johnson & Johnson Sets
CUMBELLA CLEANING TISSUES

of strength—aided by Priests from

the West Indies, Mr, Ewan and
D who translated the
p to Susu—and Far-



book



Archdeacon

After vicissitudes and va ious
set backs, a young Priest John
appointed Bisnop 15
years ago, and this was like an
infusion of new blood to possese
their own bishop, and the work
has gone forward, in what is a
very difficult task, in a land where

ere are so many Mohammedans,
This year Bishop Daly was trans-
ferred to Accra and the Rev. Rod-
erick Coot was appointed second
Bishop of Gambia.

Daly was

The Bishop then read extracts
from the Bishop's letter: “I have

write and assure you of my pray-
ers that-God may richly bless your
Episcopate. The fact that my own
consecration took place not very
long before yours. meant that at
the time your consecration was
approaching I was floundering
somewhat tr) to take





the second ye
onto

the special s
year,—his
invited to be
Chairman of

third—he v



sar he wa

the platform to pe

peake ma
on the platform a
the Meeting

He said it was a very impres-
sive sight to see probably as
many as 700 people of different

paying
Faith He
tance of the
the Church a
doing a great
selves
our help to f
work of spreé

stressed the

their
impor-

tribute to

missionary
Ithough Africa wa

deal to help them- ;;
they stili

depended
orward the
aiding the Faitt

upon
great



Missionary Revival

Canon Johnson gave a most

interesting tal

k on the work or-

ganised by the S.P.G. to celebrate

their 250th
this great
organised by t
with the
which was a
held in ‘all

Festival

birthday, and that
missionary

revival
hem also co-incidec
of 3ritain
Iso organised and
towns cities and

villages in England.

He spoke of the daily
throughout the

held

services
Festival in

St. John's Church, Waterloo. In

this church

choirs from 150

villages and towns rendered some
had it in mind for a long time to of the old and beautiful music of

the Church,

Canon Johnson

ended by re-

minding the laity of the respon-

sibility of
Mission work
calling them t
selves for he

helping the great
of the Church ,
o look to them-

ere surely as in

over England and elsewhere the recall

things that were new and strange to the Faith was vital

to me, and at the same time pack-
ing up to go home on furlough

Not Ungrateful

We are all very conscious in ‘hi
Diocese of what your Dio¢ese coes
for us, and we are not lackimg in
gratitude.,] would dearly love ‘to
be able to pay a visit to Barbados
some time, and have an idea that
1 shall manage to bring it off some
time between now and the cen-
tenary of the arrival of th. rst
West Indian missionary to the io
Pongas—that will be in 195 ne
the 16th this year was, of course,
the centenary of the founding of
the mission, but S.P.G,’s 250th
birthday had to take pride of place.
Everything is going well in French
Guinea, The African Priest in
Conakry, whom I have made per-
manent Commissary, is first class,
and keeps a fatherly eye on other
Churches in French Guinea, when
I am up in Gambia or in Dakar.
The mining of aluminium ore
(bauxite) is going to grow into a
very big coneern, and we must
take our place in it ag new staff
in large quantities is brought to
the site, both white and coloured.

I shall do my very best to keep
the link strong between this dio-
cese and yours by keeping you all
in touch with what is happening
Once more my best wishes to you
personally, and our gratitude to
your people.



Signed ROBIN GAMBIA.
Governor’s Speech

His Excellency after being in-
troduced as Chairman by the
Lord Bishop said that his first
year in Barbados he was invited
and was seated in the audience,



Man Saved From
Drowning

Jack Jeffers
of the Govern
was just in
morning to

Careenage and

Sealy of
drowned,

Sealy was
Head fishing

time on

Halls Road

, ordinary seaman
ment Water Boats,
Thursday
into the
Courtenay
from being

plunge
save

sitting on the Pier
when he suddenly

took ill and fell into the Careen-

age. He was

in difficulties when

Jeffers jumped for him.



WHAT’S

Sunrise: 6,
5.37 p.m.

Full, December 13

Sunset ;

Moon :
Lighting :

ON TODAY

00 a.m.

6.00 p.m.

High Tide: 3.43 a.m. 4.48

p.m,
Low Tide :
p.m,



10.41 a.m. 11,41



YESTERDAY’S
WEATHER REPORT

Rainfall:

-08 in,

Total Rainfall for Month to
Yesterday : 1.25 ins.

Temperature :

14.5 F.

Wind Velocity: 11 miles per

hour
Barometer :
(3 p.m.)





LAB Bo BSB BS EO OOS
;

-.. at your Draug Stora!

uF =

ee

(9 a.m,) 29.958
29,942



a a

oS

End Of Term
At St. Mark’s
Girls’ School

Elections seem to have put the
of Blades
the St
was on the
the staff and pupils of
School and parents and



vork of +

children perform a Nativity

Headmaster of the Boys’ |
presided, as the Chair-}
Managers was unavoid-

Hunte |
the staff of the Boys’ School and
the parents
given her

Anthem.



THE SALVATION ARMY
ANNUAL SOCIAL WORK %
APPEAL 1%

Miss LaBorde

Allan Coliymore
s Gas Company





Greaves

Chelsea Garage
7 Bowring
T. B. Gooding

& Sons



Barbados Turf Club
Naomi Rock

“SPY” SHOT

woman stenographer of the
Embassy in
shot by the Czechs on Thursday
earrying out
broadcast

radio said on Friday night.—U.P.

9 Baby

delightful cream-like lather
Cuticura Soap

emollient ana medicinal
P which keep his |
t skin healthy and \)

free from blemishes, ex-
quisitely soft and velvety.

SUNDAY

64,4444

-
‘
‘
x
‘

Hill in festive |
Mark’s Girls’
following day

had come to see}

At the end of the
the Head Teacher
thanked her staff, |
for the hearty co-
during the/

pleasant function
the singing of the

” 63656546
COE LLLEL LP LEN CPLA LLPEELSSELSSES

i’
1%






VIENNA, Dec. 14.
Prague was

“espionage” | «sv
of the Czech] 1%:



revels inthe
i of



It combines
















ion

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MECHANICAL TOPS AND FLUTES

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From The ADVOCATE COMPANY LIMITED.

SUNDAY, DECEMBER 16th, 1951.
























“*
\

Bey ANN NSN NNN NNN NGI NNN SG NENG NNN SN NN NN NS Ps
a), PS U LY &
[Met
PRESENTING

PHILIPS

1951—1952

CUCL ECCS

aS

we

2 Sg pide aa aia

PEP DEIN TEIN TS GS PEPE PE DNR BN DR NN IN PS TS RIN PN RIS DEDEDE KK DK OH NN OR KK DH OH EE ETN AN NN BLT DARA a A

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eran









,



SUNDAY, DECEMBER 16,

1951



CHRISTMAS SUPPLEMENT





PAGE THREE



THE LIGHT—sy euzasera WALCOTT

fWWO shabby figures, a little

Boy and his Mother, walked
rather wearily through the al-
inost deserted village street which
was bordered by brightly lizhted
houses.

“Let's go to that one,” said the
little Boy eagerly, pointing to a
wig house on the outskirts. Even
at that distance he could sce che
outline and twinkling lights of a
Jarge Xmas tree placed against a
wide glass-window. As they came
to the imposing entrance, people
were driving away in grand
moior-cars and calling ga‘ly to
their host and hostess who stood
at the open front door: ‘Merry
Christmas!” or “See you later!”
When the last car had driven
away, the Mother and Child
walked towards the front door
where a man, woman and little
girl were standing, but before
they could reach it, the door
slammed shut and the three had
gone inside,

The li.tle boy tugged at his
mother’s hand, drawing her 1o
the window. “isn’t it beautiful?’
he breathed, gazing at the glit-
tering decorations of the Xmas

Tree, and its many-coloured
lights winking on and off.
Through the open top of the

window the voices of those in-
side came clearly and the boy
caught a glimpse of the room and
its occupants through the branch-
es.

‘Thank goodness that’s over,”

said the woman fretfully. One
could imagine her flinging her-
self into a chair. “Light me a

eigare.te John.” A short silence,
then a man spoke in a flat, bored
voice: “All a lot of nonsense,
this Christmas business,” he said.
“Just one mad rush for weeks
before, and a bad head on Xmas
morning. Oughtn’t we to be get-
ting ready to go to the dance?”

“Yes, I suppose so,” sighed his

wife. “Come on, Jill .. off to
bed .. Here's Nurse ready for
you.” At once the child’s voice

rose shrilly, pleading not to go
to bed.
“Nonsense Jill, of course you
must go,” said her father.
“Gocdnyzht dear... you ean
come down early in the morning
ae play again,” her mother told



“Now then, come on,” urged the
nurse. There was a scream, and
the sound of a smash.

“You naughty girl,” reproved
the mother luke-warmly. . . . “One
of your most expensive toys too.”

“Come with me, Mummy,” wept
the child.

“Oh, I can’t, Jill,” answered her
mother impatiently. “I've had you
down w*h us the whole afternoon,

but I’ve simply got to go and“

change at once to go out.”

“Come with'’me. Daddy,” pleaded:
Jill, The man stepped forward as
if to go but Nurse had briskly
started upstairs with the screann-
ing child.

“She’s just tired,” explained ube
mother indifferently; “and no won-
der: four parties in one week, I
feel all in myself.”

“Then why let’s bother to go to
the dance?” suggested her hus-
band, turning to switch off “he
lights, ‘

“Oh I suppose we mus: go...
there’s the dinner first at John’s
and Mary's, and everybody would
wender why we hadn't gone,” che
replied. “Besides, what on earth
would we do at home?” .

The man was still standing at
the tree. ;

“Oh do come on” called his wife
erossly. “It’s horrid here now .. .
so dark after all the lights.” She
shivered,

The man came slowly toward*
here. “There’s still quite © lot of
light from the window,” he mut-
tered. . . . “Rather strange, now
that al) the lights on the Tree are
off.””

“Rubbish!” answered hi
“Why should it be strang»? |
just the light from the street.”

A aS KS

A SR
HE Mother and Child
away.

“That wesn’t a nice house inside.
said the boy. “Was that why you
though it locks so grand ouside
didn't go in :

“They wouldn't have had time
to spare for us, Son,” his smother
answered. “We'll try the’ other
house.” She pointed to an equally
large and brilliantly lit ene. It
too had a large Xmas tree against
a window

wife.
It's

iurnet





Again they stood outside but
they could see more clearly into
the room. A man, comfortably

stretched out in om easy chair, had
a small boy in his lap, and a wo-

man in evening dress was reading HE Mother and Child waten-

aloud from a book with a large
picture of Santa Claus on the
back, where the title “The Night
Before Christmas” also stood out
clearly

“Happy Xmas to 2!\. and to ali a
Goodnight As she read these
words, she shut the book and went
over to the two sitting near by.
Holding out her hand to the boy
she said gaily “Did you hear that,
Jackie? GOODNIGHT! That goes
for you too.”

The little boy slipped off his
father’s lap and took her hand
readily. The man stood up. “I'll

0 and tidy up,” he said, “But I'll
look in on you, son, before we go
off to the dance,”

“You're ready Mummy, aren't
you?” said the child. “You look
lovely.”

“Thank you, darling.” she
laughed. “I expect I'll have some
tidying up to do too after seeing

you go to bed, but who cares? And
now, here’s Nurse. but I'm coming

ap in a few minutes.

“It's been a lovely Xmas Eve,
Mummy,” said the child and wen
happily out with Nurse.



“Where's the small Xmas tree
that always stands on the table by
the big one?” asked the man, who
had been wandering around pick-
ing up toys strewn about. “Re-
member hew we used to have it
on the dinner table when we were
first married?”

“Of course I do,” she answered
tenderly, putting her arm through
his, and leaning against him, “But
I didn’t think you'd miss it now,
and Jsckie begged to be allowed
to give it to Sam the gardener’s
boy, who didn't have any. I didn’t
like to check his generous in-
stincts. Is it all right?” She look-
ed anxiously at him.

“Certainly it’s all right,’ he re-
plied, and kissed her. Then he
switched off the lights. Seeing her
still standing before the tree, he
came back and put his arm round
her. “Can’t you bear to leave it?”
He asked, laughing.

“It still seems to shine, doesn’t
it?” she said wonderingly.
“Yes.” he agreed slowly.

“Strange,” There seem: to be a
light behind it.”

“Tt's not strange ai ail,” she
whispered, smiling, “this is Holy
Night, and that’s the light from
the Christmas Star.” ;

He laughed indulgently, and she
joined him, as if amused at her
own fancy, then they left the
room.

England, they say, is a man’s
country. America, we heir, is
ruled by the women. But in one
small country in Europe, .he chil-
dren reign supreme. Holland is
notable for tulips, superb feats of
water engineering, cheeses ana
children. It hardly seems fair that
the unsuspeciing stranger s!iouia
receive no warning oi what lies
ahead.

The Scoo er season comes wits
the spring. Round corners an
along main streets, at a amuzing
speed, hurtle small blue-eyed
blonde fiends on large dangerou:
machines, Nothing like the primi-
ive playthings of our youth
these are fit ed with bells, hooters,
rubber wheels, and often hove
small seat on the back. They can
hold two children, excluding the
driver, and are apt to be found
in packs of twelve or more.

BASAL AL ANAS



Hoops usually follow. ug.
hoops—bowled with reckless
abandon among shoppers and
pedestrians.

Holes in .he road are an open
invitation to all the local smal!
iry. What are heaps of sand for,
if not to play game” in? Why have
a hole with no-one in it? Buch
and spades, dungarees and dé
Miination, are synonymous w
the sign “Road Up.” Admittedly,
in a country where the Jand jev-.
‘re constantly sinking, and where
streets are periodically uprooted
‘2eving tram rails naked above the
rubble, the temptstion to take
part in this wholesale destruction
must be irresistible. At all events,
the workmen seem to be unper-
turbed.

With







the approach
comes the Sledging

suon as the ground is hard and
slippery enough, out comes the
sledges. The sight of four diminu-
tive figures being towed along on
a sledge roped to the back «

of
season

winter

AS

fa car

ing from outside turned away.

“Mother I like thig house. Why
didn't we go in there?” asked the
child, “I’m sure they would have
welcomed us.” “Tney have wel-
cvmid us,” answ.ied his iMoue,
mystericusly, but he seemed to
uLJerstand,




7TTHE next house, much furthe>
i on, was of humble though not





poverty-stricken appearance.
they near-d it, a boy of about
ran past them and into the house.
There was no fence or railing
between it ond the street, so ~he
Mether and Child could go right
upto the window which was bare
of any .Xmas tree, A_ surly-
looking man sat at a table, with a
bottle and glass before him, and

tired-looking woman was gather-
ing up plates and dishes whicn
had evidently just been used for
+ meal. The twelve-year-old boy











who had just come in sat down
without a wo f g°ceting.

“Why re Uu Su ia-e, you youn
rascil?” growled the man,
before th could answer, hi
nother v “1 thought you'd
bave som< ver Up ‘There, so
there's no.hing ich for you,’

“Oh I had lenty up there,”

inswered the boy in a disagreeable
fort of way. “You bet I took
everything I could get: Ham, ice-
cream, cake, and a lot of other
things ... all I could stuff. But i
pitched away the old piece of
Xmas Tree Jackie gave me.” He
locked defiantly at them.



“Why'd you do that, Boy?”
osked his mother severely. “.t
would've looked gosd at th:
window. And Jackie meant it



I knew

‘ine boy pushed back his chair.
‘No! he shouted. If I can’t hove
a big, nevy Xmas tree like Jackies
1 ec.’ want none at all!”

The man struck his fist on the
table, muking the glass and bottle
hake,

ihondly,





“Right, boy!” he “To
hi wi.a cl Wwny we
ssouidn’t have ino-ey same as
them te buy geand Xmas trees?

But look, boy,” he lowered his
Vaice tonfidentiall:-, “perhaps
some day the won't have no
avand Amis trea: neither!”

“And what good will that do
u3, I'd bike to know?” demande:
the woman bitterly. “You and
ycur foolish talk . .. filling the





stead of being glad the people in
the big heure up there got money
to pay decent wages thet i bus
our food and your b+ttles o rum!”

Shut y’ mouth woman!” shouted
the man. The boy turne igrily
‘ her teo, and their ve rose
mm heorted Prrumoeont,

Outside the Mother ar Child
crew 1 but they turned
wway they heard the wonan ioside
fay: Hy ! Somebody's just
fiashed a light at the window.”
There wes a lull in’ the room
“Yerhaps the neignbours are spy-
ing on us,”’ whispered the wo
tuo man went ts the winccw
sSiammed it shut.

“Nobody there .
a Hght from
grumbled.

SAS AANA AS







ices



id



back, 2s





na
- mus’ ha’ been
the street,” he





i* silence he Mother and
Child hurriea past me un-

lighted houses and reached a
s! home which was bright
s fendles and oil lamps, and
f people. .. tiny, rather
Xmas tree, iis base

sadied in a butter-tin

yund with red tissue



Or, od 01.2 sinall ucble be-
tore the window. Several children
and an old coup! gazea at it

iGiniringly.

“Don’t it look nice, Grandma?”
asked one small boy.

“'Deed it does, child,’ she re-
plied, “tell your pran’pa how you
come by it. He warn’t here when
you brought it, remember?”

“I found it on the road,
Grandpa,” exnlsined the little boy
eagerly. “Just outside the bie
house Up There.’ He nodded in
the direction. “Where Jackie
hives,” he added.

The children all pranced about,
commenting on the tres, and busily
rutting together long pieces of
coloured paper. They then stood
on chairs and ,astened the festoons
“cress the top of the window and
the lintel of the door, The grand-
mother, who had been stunding at
the table bending over a box, now
turned and held up a piece of
glittering tinsel and a few chipped
coloured glass balls, at which the
children exclaimed deligntealy.

“I got these f.om t.e other
house Up There when | took in

the washing this afternoon,” she
“Tney were going to
throw them away, but t!h.cugh we
sull
never
boy’s head with bad ideas....in- know when a thing ma” be use- vith song.

exp!ained.

didn’t have a
begged for them.

tree the., I
You

by Joan Schoup-£rshine

or motor cycle swinging round
corners «at a frightening speed,
may unnerve you, the visitor, but

egard ft as all par of the winie
scene.
The children often wegr tall
pix. hoods, trouwvers tight io th
kic and long capes, usu lly-in
navy blue, The effect is ratner



as if a tribe of malicious gnomes
h d descended on the own. Sm4il,
reund-faced dwarfs with big bluc
cyes, ruddy cheeks, sturdy bodies
and -adistic minds, They have an
acmiratie disregard for the law
(which stalks about in boots wit!
a revolver at its bel ), an unn t-
ural interest in adults, and a ten-
tency \to obstinacy—which their
‘o‘ing mommas do everything to
fos For this country, never
forget, is ruled by the child.
Wednesday afternoons should be
‘voided at all costs—for then he
precious ones are relezsed from
school and are quite apt to pull
your scarf off, tip your hat from
your head, spill your shopping
t or bring forth canded com-
on the quality of your make-





IA A AS AS A

While parents in otker countries
ire getting into a panic three dy.
before Christmas, the Dutch ar?
feeling mightily complacent, fer
ill their pregent-giving and feast-
ing proper, is over. Christmas i
merely a peaceful follow-up of the
buying and eating orgy by which
Holland—for no apparent reason—
celebrates the birthday of a medie-
val Spanish bishop, St. Nicholas
who was well known for his kind-
ness to children. Christmas is pri-
marily a religious occasion with
the Christmas tree as a relic of
paganism, and Santa Claus figur-
ing only as an ornament in win-
dow displays.

December Fifth St.

ip Nichola

Day. It is a national occasion
grown-ups and children alike
sharing the fun. Abou. two w:

before the great day, all c! n
begin a nightly routine of plac-
ing their clogs before the fives'4e
The clogs are stuffed wi! v
and decorated wih a c rrot. Off
to bed go Jan and Anne je, in the
firm belief that Piet, t negr<
servant of St. Nicholas, will climb
down the chimney to take away
all the straw and carrot» es food
for the saint’s white horse on
which he is riding over the reof-
tops. Piet is supposeq .o fill the
clogs with presents, and every
morning when all the little Jans
and Annetjes wake, they find a
sweet or fi tle something which is
designed to entertain their belief
in the miracle cf a bisiop who
pokes fun at the most serious
end -unshaken laws of nature.

3 A AR A A

Wen the evening of December
Fifth is reached, tension is ai
treak:ng point. Jan and Annetje
are evting huge quantities of
“speculaas” —hbiscuits made of a
mixture of cinnamon, nutmeg
and ground cloves. Suddenly
there are strange noises in the
house. They look at their
parents with fear and, for once,
they are docile and well behaved.
They know that St. Nicholas will
be accompanied by Black Piet
who carries a big savk. This sack
can contain their happiness or
their doom: the longed-for pres-
ents or a whip. One never knows
what is in the Saint's Dooms Day
Pook and Piet is quick in carry-
"@ out ‘he sentence: to be put in







the and taken away to Spain
Jan never saw t havpen be-
cause his parents always inter-
fered at the last moment with a
word in his defence—but one
never knows what will happen
this year. Smashed window
panes tolen apples, the cross

il!” She laughed “Miss Jill want-
cd to hang them on the big Xmas
tree there, but they wouldn't let
her. Said these are old things she
ound, and too shabby.”

“Oh, Gran’ma, it'll be like a real
mas tree now,” the children de=
clared, They came to help hang

the seanty decorations on the
ittle tree,

‘Look! Look!” exclaimed one,
ond held up a tiny tinsel star
‘hat had been tangled between
the leng strip. Proudly — they.

fastened it to the top of the tree,

“Gran’ma” said one of the chil-
‘ven while this was being done,
“Could we go out to old Neddy's
;table at midnight? They were
‘elling us a story at school, that
nimals go on their knees at mid-
light on Xmas Eve, and when [I
told Jackie at the house Up There,
he said he’d beg his mother to
ict him come too.”

“Well, well, think of that now,”
chuckled the old man, “I'd like
‘o see old Neddy saying his
prayers myself!” They all laughed.

“We'll see if you’re awake at
midnight,” said the old woman,
gently,

“Anyway, let’s go now and
decorate old Neddy’s shed,” sug-
gested one of the children. All
the others agreed delightedly, so
they took one of the paper stream<
ers and trooped out of the back
door, followed more slowly by the

ld grandparents,

SYA AR AREAS

: H, Mother,” whispered the

Child outside the window,
‘This is a nice place: see how
pretty these children have made
the little tree which that cross
boy threw away.” He reached up
end touched the tiny star,

“Come, my Son,” said his
his Mother. “We shall rest here,
in Neddy’s stable.” They turned
“way as the children and the oid
ouple returned through the back
door,

“OH! Look! LOOK!” they ex-
claimed in awed through joyful
tones.

Dull old eyes and bright young
vunes gazed at the tiny tinsel stan
‘vhich seemed to illumine the
window, and for a moment there
was silence,

Suddenly the old woman sta:t-
ed to sing “Oh come all ye faith-
ul,” and as the children joined
in, “the shabby room was filled

ON CHILDREN AND SAINTS AND CHIRSTMASES

face of a policeman, suddenly be~
come vivid memories,

Meanwhile, portly Tom Klop~
vers from next door, is struggling
vith a mass of white cotton wool
which has a life of its own and
refuses to resemble a beard. He
urses his rash promise to act as
Ais year's St. Nicholas for all the
families in the street. Besides,
ve is not at all sure of Jan who
has reached the dangerous age of

even and knows cotton wool
when he sees it, With a final jerk
Tom flings a gold embroidered

red cloik round his shoulders,
grasps his cardboard crozier, and
2uts on a mitre which gives him
‘rouble for the rest of the eve-
ning. Black Piet hands him a list
of particulars, indicating where
a reproving remark or a word of
praise would not come amiss, and

the couple start their annual
round.
The belief in St, Nicholas is

‘nostly shattered when the Jans
and Annetjes reach the critical
nge of seven or eight, but it is
encoureged as long as possible by
lazy parents who lack authority
and ‘can threaten conveniently
with the arrival of the kind but
Just saint. The general improve-
ment of young Holland’s conduct
during this period is really re«
markab’e,

SASS SAGAS

But St. Nicholas is not merely
* sain® kept alive for the benefit
of childven. Adults take a serious

art sn this day. Weeks before,
ieople are secretly buying and
‘rapping presents, and writing
he Jong poems which must,
according to tradition, be attach-
ed to them, A St, Nicholas
rerent is nothing without a
lengthy poem, which may hint at
fencer words of love but usually

ends by being a series of gibes at
persona! idiosyncrasies, habita
end incidents. These are meant
to be read in the family circle—
‘nd higoly embarrassing it all is,
On the evening of the fifth,

@ On Page 24









PAGE FOUR

CHRISTMAS SUPPLEMENT

SUNDAY, DECEMBER 16, 1951

DANCING DAN'S XMAS

OW one time it comes on Christmas, and in fact it is

the evening before Christmas, and I am in Good Time
Charley Bernstein’s little speakeasy in West Forty-seventh
Street, wishing Charley a Merry Christmas and having a
few hot Tom and Jerrys with him.

This hot Tom and Jerry is an old-time drink that is
once used by one and all in this country to celebrate Christ-
mas with, and in fact it is once so popular that many peo-
ple think Christmas is invented only to furnish an excuse
for hot Tom and Jerry although of course this is by no

means true.

But anybody will tell you that there is nothing that
brings out the true holiday spirit like hot Tom and Jerry,

and I hear that since Tom and Jerr

the United States the holiday spirit is never quite the

same.

The reason hot Tom and Jerry
goes out of style is because it is
necessary to use rum and one
thing and another in making Tom
and Jerry, and naturally when
rum becomes illegal in this country
Tom and Jerry is also against the
law, because rum is something
that is very hard to get around
town these days.

For a while some people try
making hot Tom and Jerry with-
out putting rum in it, but somehow
it never has the same old holiday
spirit, so nearly everybody finally
gives up in disgust, and this is not
surprising, as making Tom and
Jerry is by no means child's play.
In fact, it takes quite an expert
to make good Tom and Jerry, and
in the days when it is not illegal
a good hot Tom and Jerry maker
commands good wages and many
friends. r

Now of course Good Time
Charley and I are not using rum
in the Tom and Jerry we are
making, as we do not wish to do
anything illegal. What we are
using is rye whisky that Good
Time Charley gets on a doctor's
prescription from a drug store, as
we are personally drinking this
hot Tom and Jerry and naturally
we are not foolish enough to use
any of Good Time Charley’s own
rye in it,

The prescription for the rye
whisky comes from old Doe Moggs
who prescribes it for Good Time
Charley’s rheumatism in case
Charley happens to get any
rheumatism, as Doc Moggs says
there is nothing better for rheu-
matism than rye whisky, especially
if it is made up in a hot Tom and
Jerry. In fact, old Doc Moggs
comes around and has a few
siedels of hot Tom and Jerry with
us for his own rheumatism.

He comes around during the
afternoon, for Good Time Charley
and I start making this Tom and
Jerry early in the day, so as to
be sure to have enough to last us
over Christmas, and it is now
along towards six o’clock and our
holiday spirit is practically 100
per cent.

Weil, as Goce. Time Charley and
I are expressing our holiday senti-
ments to each other over our hot

Tom and J , and f am trying
to think up poem about the
night before Christmas and all

through the house, which I know
will interest Charley no little, ail
of a sudden there is a big knock
at the front door, when
Charley opens the door who comes
im carrying a large package under
one arm but a guy by the name of
Dancing Dan.

‘This Dancing Dan is a good-
locking y guy, who always
seems well , and he is
ealled by the name of Dancing
Dan because he is a great hand
tor dancing around and abou! with
dolls in night clubs and other spots
where there is any dancing. ;

In fact, Dan never seems to be

doing anyth else, although |
hear rumours that when he is not
d he is carrying on in 4

most illegal manner at ome thing
and another. But, of course, you
can always hear rumours in this
town about anybody, and per-
sonally I am rather fond of
Dancing Dan as he always seems
to be getting a great belt of life.

Anybody in town will tell you
that Dancing Dan is a guy with
no Barnaby whatever in him, and,
in fact, ho has ~-about as much
gizzard. as anybody around,
although I wish to say I always
question his judgment in dancing
so much with Miss Muriel O'Neill,
who works in the Half Moon Night
Club. :

And the reason I question his
judgment in this respect is because
everybody knows that Miss Muriel
O'Neill is a doll who is very well
thought ef by Heine Schmitz, and
Heine Schmitz is not such a guy
as will take kindly to anybody
dancing more than once and a half
with a doll that he thinks well of.

This Heine Schmitz is a very
influential citizen of Harlem
where he has large interests in

beer, and other business enter-
prises, and it is by no means
violating any confidence to tell
you that Heine Schmitz will just
as soon blow your brains out as
look at you. In fact, I hear,
sooner.

Anyway, he is not a guy to
monkey with and many citizens
take the trouble to advise Danang
Dan that he is not only away out
of line in dancing with Miss Muriel
O'Neill, but that he is knocking
his awn price down to where he
is no price at all.

But Dancing Dan only laughs
ha-ha, and goes on dancing with
Miss Muriel O’Neill any time he
gets a chance, and Good Time
Charley says he does not blame
him, at that, as Miss Muriel O'Neill
is so beautiful that he will be
dancing with her himself no
matter what, if he is five years
younger and can get a Roscoe out
as fast as in the days when he
runs with Paddy the Link and
other fast guys.

Well, anyways, as Dancing Dan
comes in he weighs up the joint
in one quick peek, and then he
tosses the package he is carrying
into a corner where is goes plunk,
as if there is something very
heavy in it, and then he steps up
to the bar alongside of Charley
and me and wishes to know what
we are drinking.

Naturally we start boosting hot
Tom and Jerry to Dancing Dan,
and he says he will take a crack
at it with us, and after one crack
Dancing Dan says he will have
snother crack, and Merry Christ-
mas to us with it, and the first
thing anybody knows it is a couple
of hours later and we are still
having cracks at the hot Tom and
Jerry with Dancing Dan, and Dan



goes out of style in

ee



Introducing DANCING
DAN, a man who leads a
double life, for “when he
is not dancing he’s carry-
ing on in a most illegal
manner at one thing and
another,” but “always seems
to be getting a great belt
of life,”

and
GAMMER O'NEILL, “an old
doll gomg on ninety-odd,’
who “always believes Santa
Claus will come along some
Christmas and fill the stock-
ing full of beautiful gifts.”





with us, and wish him plenty of
Merry Christnias.

But old Ooky is not accustomed
to Tom and Jerry and after about
the fifth mug he folds up in a
chair, and goes right to sleep on us.
He is wearing a pretty good Santa
Claus make-up, what with a nice
red suit trimmed with ~ white
cotton, and a wig, and false nose,
and long white whiskers, and a
big sack stuffed with excelsior on
his back and if I do, not know
Santa Claus is not apt to be such
a guy as will snore loud enough
to rattle the windows I will think
Ooky is Santa Claus sure enough.

Well, we forget Ooky and let him
sleep and go on with our hot Tom
and Jerry, and in the meantime
we try to think up a few songs
appropriate to Christmas and
Dancing Dan finally renders “My
Dad’s Dinner Pail” in a_ nice
baritone and very loud, while I do
first-rate with “Will you Love Me
in December—As you Do in May?”
But personally I always think
Good Time Charley Bernstein is a
little cut of line trying to sing a
hymn in Jewish on such a night,
and it causes words between us.

While we are singing many
customers come to the door and
knock, and then they read
Charley’s sign and this seems to
cause some unrest among them,
and some of them stand outside
saying it is a great outrage, until
Charley sticks his noggin out the
dcor and threatens to bust some-
body’s breezer if they do not go
cn about their business and stop
disturbing peaceful citizens.

Naturally the customers go
away, as they do not wish their
breezers busted, and Dancing Dan
and Charley and I continue drink-
ing our hot Tom and Jerry, and

ee

By ;
DAMON RUNYON



says he never drinks anything so
soothing in his life.

In fact, Dancing Dan says he
will recommend Tom and Jerry to
everybody he knows, only he does
net know anybody good enough
tor Tom and Jerry, except maybe
Miss Muriel O'Neill, and she does
not drink anything with drugstore
rye in it,

Well, several times while we are
drinking this Tom and Jerry,
customers come to the door of
Good Time Charley's little speak-
easy and knock, but by now
Charley is commencing. to be
atraid they will wish Tom agi
Jerry too, and he does mot feel
we will have enough for ourselves,
so he hangs out a sign which says,
“Closed on Account of Christmas,”
and the only one he will let in is a
guy by the name of Ooky, who 1s
nothing but an old rum-drum, and
whe is going around all week
dressed like Santa Claus and
carrying a sign advertising Moe
Lewinsky’s clothing joint around
in Sixth-Avenue

Ooky is stil) wearing his Santa
Claus outfit when Charley lets him
1, and the reason Charley permits
such a character' as Ooky in his
joimt is because Ooky does the
porter wark for Charley, when he
is not Santa Claus for Moe Lew-
insky, such as sweeping out, and
washing the glasses, and one thing
and another.

Well, it about nine-thirty
when Ooky comes in, and his
puppies are aching, and he is ali
petered out generally from walk-
ing up and down and here and
there with his sign, for any time
a guy is Santa Claus for Moe
Lewinsky he must earn his dough.
In tact, Ooky is so fatigued, and
his puppies hurt him so much that

is

Dancing Dan and Good Time
Charley and I all feel very sorry
for him, and invite him to have a
few mugs of hot Tom and Jerry,



—

with each Tom and Jerry we are
wishing one another a very Merry
Christmas, and sometimes a very
Happy New Year, although of
course this does not go for Good
Time Charley as yet, because
Charley has his New Year separate
fram Dancing Dan and me.

By and by we take to waking
Ooky up in his Santa Claus outfit
and offering him more hot Tom
and Jerry, and wishing him Merry
Christmas, but Ooky only gets
sore and calls us names, so we can
see he does not have the right
holiday spirit in him, and let him
alone unti! along about mid-night
when Dancing Dan wishes to see
how he looks as Santa Claus.

So Good Time Charley and I
help Dancing Dan pull off Ooky’s
outfit and put it on Dan, and this
is easy as Ooky only has this Santa
Claus outfit on over his ordinary
clothes, and he does not even wake
up when we are undressing him of
the Santa Claus uniform.

Well, I wish to say I see many
Santa Claus in my time, but I
never ste a better-looking Santa
Claus thar Dancing Dan, especi-
ally after ue geis the wig and
white whiskers fixed just right,
and we put a sofa pillow that
Good Time Charley happens to
have around the joint for the cat
tv sleep on down his pants to give
Dancing Dan a nice fat stomach
such as Santa Claus is bound to
have.

In fact, after Dancing Dan looks
at himself in a mirror awhile he
is greatly pleased with his appear-
ance while Good Time Charley is
practically hysterical, although
personally I am commencing to
resent Chariey’s interest in Santa
Claus, and Christmas generally, as
he by no means has any claim on
these matters. But then I ren.em-
ber Charley furnishes the hot Tom
and Gerry, so I
towards him

um more tolerant

“Well,” Charley finally says, “it
is a great pity we do not know
where there are some stockings
hung up somewhere, because
then,” he says, “you can go around
and stuff things in these stockings,
as I always hear this is the main
idea of Santa Claus. But,’’ Charley
says, “I do not suppose anybody
in this section has any stockings
hung up, or if they have,” he says,
“the chances are they are so full
of holes they will not hold any-
thing. Anyway,” Charley says,
“even if there are any stockings
hung up we do not have anything
to stuff in them although per-
sonally,” he says, “I will gladly
donate a few pints of Scotch.”

Well, I am pointing out that we
have no reindeer, and that a Santa
Claus is bound to look like a ter-
rible sap if he goes around without
any reindeer, but Charley’s re-
marks seem to give Dancing Dan
an idea, for all of a sudden he
speaks as follows:

“Why,” Dancing Dan says, “I
know where a stocking is hung
up. It is hung up at Miss Muriel
O'Neill’s flat over here in West
Forty-ninth;street. This stocking
is hung up by nobody but a party
by the name of Gammer O'Neill,
who is Miss Muriel O’Neill’s
grandmamma,” Dancing Dan says.
“Gammer O'Neill is going on
nimety-odd,” he says, and Miss
Muriel tells me she cannct hold
out much longer, what with one
thing and another, including being
a little childish in spots.

“Now,” Dancing Dan says, “L
yemember Miss Muriel O'Neill
was telling me just the other night
how Gammer O'Neill hangs up
her stocking on Christmas Eve
all her life, and,” he says, “I
judge from what Miss Muriel
O'Neill says that the old doll
always believe Santa Claus will
come along some Christmas and
fill the stocking full of beautiful
gifts. But,” Dancing Dan says,
“Miss Muriel O’Neill tells me
Santa Claus never does this, al-
though Miss Muriel O’Neill per-
sonally always takes a few gifts
home and pops them inw the
stocking to make Gammer O'Neill
feel better.

“But, of course,” Dancing Dan
says, “these gifts are nothing
much because Miss Muriel O'Neill
is very ‘poor, and proud, and also
good, and will not take a dime
off anybody and I can lick the
guy who says she will, al-
though,” Dancing Dan says, “be-

tween me and Heine Sehmitz, Bu

and a raft ef other guys I can
mention, Miss Muriel O’Neill can
take plenty”.

Well, I know what
Dan states about Miss Muriel
O'Neill is quite true, and in
fact it is a matter that is often
discussed on Broadway, because
Miss Muriel O’Neill cannot get
more than twenty bobs per week
working in the Half Moon, and
it is well known to one and all
that this is no kind of dough for
a doll as beautiful as Miss Muriel
O'Neill,

“Now,” Dancing Dan goes on,
“it seems that while Gammer
O'Neill is very happy to get
whatever she finds in her stock-
ing on Christmas morning, she
does not understand why Santa
Claus is not more liberal, and,”
hé says, “Miss Muriel O'Neill is
saying to me that she only wishes
she can give Gammer O'Neill one
real big Christmas before the old
doll puts her checks back in the
rack.”

“So,” Dancing Dan _ states,
“here is a job for us. Miss Muriel
O'Neill and her grandmanima
live all alone in this flat over in
West Forty-ninth Street, and” he
says, “at such an hour as this
Miss Muriel O'Neill is bound to
be working, and the chances are
Gammer O’Neill is sound asleep,
and we will just hop over there
and Santa Claus will fill up her
stocking with beautiful gifts.”

Well I say, I do not see where,
we are going to get any beauti-
ful gifts at this time of night,
what with all the stores being
closed, unless we dash into an
all-night. drug store and buy @
few bottles of perfume and a bum
toilet set as guys always do when

Dancing

they forget about their ever-
loving wives until after store
hours on Christmas Eve, but

Dancing Dan says never mind
about this, but let us have a few

more Tom and Jerry's first.
So we have a few more Tom

and Jerry’s, and then © Dancing

Dan picks up the package he

heaves into the corner, and dumps
most of the excelsior out of
Ooky’s Santa Claus sack, and

puts the bundle in and Good
Time Charley turns out all the
lights but one, and leaves a

bottle of Scotch on the table in
front of Ooky for a Christmas
gift and away we go.

Personally, I regret very much
leaving the hot Tom and Jerry
but then I am also very enthu-
siastic about going along to help
Dancing Dan play Santa Claus,
while Good Time Charley is
practically overjoyed, as it is the
first time in his life Charley is
ever mixed up in so much holiday
spirit.

In fact, nothing will do Char-
ley but that we stop in a couple
of spots and have a few drinks to
Santa Claus’s health, and these
visits are a big success, although
everybody is much surprised to
see Charley and me with Santa
Claus, especially Charley, al-
though nobody recognises Danc-
ing Dan.

But of course there are no hot
Tom and Jerry’s in these spots
we visit, and we have to drink
whatever is on hand, and per-
sonally I will always believe
that thé noggin I have on me
afterwards comes of mixing the
drinks we get in these spots with
my Tom and Jerry.

As we go up Broadway, headed
tor Forty-ninth Street, Charley
and I see many citizens we know
and give them a large hello, and
wish them Merry Christmas, and
some of these citizens shake
hands with Santa Claus, not
knowing he is nobody but Danc-
ing Dan, although later I under-
stand there is some gossip among
these citizens because they claim
a santa Claus with such a breath
on him as our Santa Claus has
is a little out of line.

And once we are somewhat
embarrassed when a lot of little
kids going home with their
parents from a late Christmas
party somewhere gather about
Santa Claus with shouts of child-
ish glee, and some of them wish
to climb up Santa Claus’s legs.
Naturally, Santa Claus gets a
little peevish, and calls them a
few names, and one of the
parents comes up and wishes to
know what is the idea of Santa
Claus using such language, and
Santa Claus takes a punch at
the parent, all of which is no
doubt most astonishing to the
little kids who have an idea of
Santa Claus as a very kindly old.

iy.

But of course they do not know
about Dancing Dan mixing the
liquor we get in the spots we visit
with his Tom and Jerry, or they
will understand how even Santa
Claus can lose his temper.

Well, finally we arrive in front
of the place where Dancing Dan
says Miss Muriel O’Neill and her
grandmama live, and it is nothing
but a tenement house not far back
of Madison Square Gardens, and
furthermore it is a walk-up and
at this time there are no lights
burning in the joint except a gas
jet in the main hall, and by the
light of this jet we look at the
names on the letter-boxes, such
as you always find in the hall of
these joints, and we see that Miss
Muriel O’Neill and her grandmp-
ma live on the fifth floor,

This is the top floor, and per-
sonally I do not like the idea of
walking up five flights of stairs,
and I am willing to let Dancing
Dan and Good Time Charley go,
but Dancing Dan insists we must
all go, and finally I agree because
Charley is commencing to argue
that the right say for us to do is
to get on the roof and let Santa
Claus go down a chimney, and is
making so much noise J am afraid
he will wake y up.

So upstairs we climb, and final-
ly we come to a door on the top
floor that has a little card in a slot
reach our destination. Dancing
Dan tries the door knob, and right
away the, door opens, and we are
in a little two or three-room flat,
w'th not much furniture in it, and
what furniture there is is very
poor. One single gas jet is burn-
ing near a bed in a fvom just
off the one the door opens into,
and by this light we see a very
old doll is sleeping om the bed,
so we judge this is nobody but
Gammer O'Neill.

On her face is a large smile, as
if she is dreaming of something
very pleasant. On a chair at the
head of the bed is hung a long
black stocking, and it seems to be
such a stocking as is often patched
and mended, so I can see what
Miss Muriel O’Neill tells Dancing

@ On Page 12





SUNDAY, DECEMBER 16, 1951 CHRISTMAS SUPPLEMENT

PAGE FIVE



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ew
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ENB NG NES






Pure Irish Linen HAND-
KERCHIEFS hemstitched
with popular initials.

FOR THE
CHILDREN

WOODEN GOLLIWOGS
Locally Made STUFFED
TOYS.

Locally Made SHELL
DOLLS.

BOXES OF SWEETS.
Tiny-Tots Madeira ROM-
PERS.

WOOLLEN COATS for
children 4 to 8 years
old.



5 SN NS NSN NG NN GS GN NN NN 8 NN HA NY NNN NNN NNN MN CN SUNN ENC NSS UNA NG NBN,

CAVE |
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& Co.. Ltd.

10-13 Broad Street

a mecsilslel

STA PAT BAS Gh GA AN ANS SH SH SH A SA RS RN Si 8 A 8 4B 8 i A OT

FOR GENTS

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SPORTS COATINGS in
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Torioise-Shell TIE CLIPS
and LINKS.

TIES in a large
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designs.

Patent

Leather

EVENING
SHOES.

Tortoise-Sheil

CIGARETTE CASES
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LEATHER SLIPPERS with
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CONSULATE SHIRTS in
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PILLOW CASES and
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LIBERTY BED SPREADS.

TRAVELLING BLANKETS
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WHITE WOOLLEN
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CANE LILY SLIPPERS and
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CHECKED RAYON
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PLAIN VELVET and
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Sa





—

PAGE SIX



CHRI

STMAS SUPPLEMENT SUNDAY, DECEMBER 16, 1951





wonderful creatures, to see if he

* THE MIDNIGHT BELL =

By Anne Barrett

There were fotir of them in
the field, Silver the grey mare
with Quicksilver, her foal Kitty
the mewcomer, a lively black
pony and, down in the cornet,
rhe little dun coloured donkey
to whom nobody had erer both-
«red to give a name.

The foal had been born in May
wheg tha turf was soft and
springy, he was eager and in-
quisitive and would gallop back
from all corners of the field to
nuzzle his mother and jerk up
her neck with his head, asking
her the meaning of each new
thing he saw.

Broad and leisurely, her strong
shoulders bent to the sweet grass,
bis mother would lift her head
slowly and reply, often as not
in the same words:—

“One day you will learn wis-
dom, my son.”

At first Quicksilver delighted
to play with the domkey, capering
tround her and poking at her
rough, soft sides with his head,
standing close beside her like a
shadow when their playing was
done.- The donkey would frisk
away on her little hooves and
then stand waiting for the next
invitation, looking at Quicksilver
with gentle eyes. When Kitty
came all this was altered

AL Nil”
ZAIN, JA
} The donkey had been bought
for the farmer's children to ride,
but they soon grew too leggy for
her tubby sides and far too im-
patient to endure her jogging
paces. On the eldest boy’s birth-
day Kitty had appeared in the
field, brisk and shining, with
a glossy new saddle, and from
jthen on the baby, still in his
woolly leggings, was the only one
twho would scramble up the pa-
tient dun coloured flanks and
bundle along behind the others.
That birthday was a morning
never to be forgotten, As the
young master trotted and can-
jtered the new pony round the
“eld, Quicksilver threw up his
heels in excitement and made
wild galloping rushes in all
directions, stopping dead with all
four feet planted firm, his nos-
‘rils and the white hairs on his
chin quivering. When the saddle
was off and the children had
gone home, he timidly appreached
tthe stranger, who was cropping
in the sunset. After that he
played with the donkey no more.
Kitty’s talk was all of some-
thing splendid and mysterious
that happened when the leaves
turned yellow and the first light
frosts silvered the ground; when
men put on scarlet coats and rode
away over the country, leaping
avalls and hedges and ditches as
they went. She would sniff the
full summer air as she spoke,
las though she could imagine the
scent of frost on it already.
Wild with excitement the foal
was away and across the field
to ask his mother; she stopped
cropping und raised her head.

\

Ly LeL[e

'
| “Hunting!” she said, and her
eyes looked far away, for once,
when his own horse was lame
the master had taken her out
hunting too. “Perhaps you'll be
ww hunter one day, my 80n, for
your father was a racehorse, the
best one in England.”

“Do donkeys go hunting?” the
foal asked his new friend, and
skittered a few s backwards as
Kitty blew scornfully down her
nostrils.

“Donkeys!” she said. “Donkeys

made to carry loads!” and
from then on nobody but the
baby ever looked at the donkey
fat all. Even he, as the splendour
pf a new birthday approached,
grew as proud as Quicksilver
and at last there came an eve-
hing when he strutted down
through the long grass in new
breaches and insisted on being
hoisted up on Kitty when the
pthers had their turn.
| That night, as Quicksilver
stood by his mother in the moon-
Night, the donkey lifted her
heavy head and brayed, a lonely,
cesolate, discordant cry which
«choed to the sky.

“What a stupid, ugly, vulgar
noise!” said Quicksilver conceit-
reily to the mare, and tried out
his silvery whinny. From across
the. moonlit cow parsley Kitty
answered back.

“There will come a night when

























you will learn wisdom, my son,”
said his mother, and she pushed
him away. Ags she pasted by
the donkey that night Quick-
silvery saw that she blew gently
at the long and tousled ears,

The sweet hay lengthened and
was eut all round them, the corn
turned slowly to gold and then
was cut too and the sheaves
stooked in the fields till they
looked like regiments of march-
ing men; the mysterious, the ex-
citing season that Kitty talked
about was approaching. Sud-
denly one morning when the
blackberries were purple and the
bushes white with cobwebs the
pony galloped up with fire in her
eyes, her nostrils wide and quiv-
ering.

“Smell!” she snorted, end as
Quicksilver spread out his delicate
velvet nose the faint clear tang
of frost came stealing in.

7
Were He
yY, : we
7) TAS.
“I'm to take the young master

to the first meet!” said Kitty,
and the foal was wild with envy.
From then on he nibbled at the |
grass all day so that he might)
grow faster, and galloped up and)
dwn the meadow to strengthen |
his lanky legs. From his new)
height as he passed he noticed |
for the’ first time the two black
stripes that lay across the don- |
key’s back and whinnied in de-
rision. Swinging her clumsy
head, the donkey 1ooked up sadly.

The frosty weather brought |
other changes too, and on the
very same day that Kitty and
the young master trotted off, the
master came into the field at
evening, bringing two of the
farm hands with him. Slowly
they closed round the foal and
his mother, waving their arms
and making strange noises, till
terror drove Quicksilver straight
into a corner and into the arms
of the master. Then, before he
realised what was happening, a
trope was slipped over his head
and there was a man holding
the end of it.

“Fine little hunter you've got
coming on hero,” said the man,
“just look at those shoulders!
and Quicksilver was in such @
quiver of pride that he never
noticed how he was led into a
little wooden box, smaller even
than the smiallest space where
he'd ever stood between two
trees. His mother was with him,

Be Oo HE

“A hunter!” he whinnied it to
Kitty in the box on the other
side. In the glow of his pride|
he looked round for someone else!

|
|
|



to tell too and shouted again,
this time to the neglected donkey.
Forlorn and humble the answer}
came faintly back from across}
the fields. |

“Donkeys stay out in the win-|
ter!” said Kitty scornfully, “Tt’s|
only we who have splendid sta-|
bles where the wind doesn’t blow, |
and have bundles of hay and
vats brought to us instead of
cropping; on the frozen grass.”
For just a moment Quicksilver
thought sadly of his old compan-
jon but soon his thoughts went
flying off again.

Every so often now the young

Gi DSN DN DH DN GN DH DN DN DN DN NR OE OE TE

had grown,

3ut when the next day came
and he woke in the morning, his
eyes opened wide in astonishment
Phe ground had turned to solid
silver and the afr was full of
things that looked like goose-
teathers, floating and. circling
down. Had the fox been back in
the yard again? He whinnied in
surprise.

“Snow,” said his mother, and
rnaoved further back into the warm
lepths of the stable. The young
master came out in his ordinary
clothes and gave Kitty a dispirited
oat on the nose.

The goosefeathers stopped fall-
ng, and for a week the frost held,
urning the straws that lay in the
yard to stiff little bars of gold,
-ying like silver fur along the
fates and walls.

It was on me of these days
hat the foal saw a_ splendid
nachine sweep up the drive to the
wouse, red like his beloved hunts-
nen’s coats, decorated with letters
_ ind with a golden crown.
“Does it. belong to a king?” he
iisked his mother.

“To the king of England,” said
the mare, and he watched as the
postman got down from the van
and the children came running

master would come down in his the yard. It seemed to Quick- eS lat wae in. their

ret hay eae Se rat 1 silver, watching mystified, that ms
and he anc itty would ride off he must be lord of everythin ae . Sad
do the meatinteraiene beck tithe ne ite eanbe of: weain A wine “Shall 1 see him one day?
evening full of tales of glory. brought and emptied at his di- Only if you become. champion
Once > whole fie ‘ji 3 parti hunter »nd are ridden in shows,
mee the whole field of ridievs rection, of the cows and sheep sony ,
and hounds met in front of the that were led by for his inspec- my son, it takes heart and patience
farmhouse and Quicksilver near- tion, of the birds that were held and wisdom for that. As the red
ly broke his neck straining to yp for him to examine. Most The foal stared on. a Biss
see the scarlet coats and the wonderful of all was the strange shape vanished down the eva
shining horses, Even his mother machine that lived in ; another age and the sound of pe coeine
stretched out her head beside gtable in the yard and which died on the still air, another sound
him and neighed wistfully as at a touch of his finger would: cme stealing in to take its place.
they all moved off. spring into quivering life and “Mother! What's that? He
From then on he spent manv pear him away â„¢ moved restlessly till his head was
hours measuring himself against Ay near to hers, his ears pricked
the door of his stable, anxiously Is he king of the earth?” the forward. The sound rang on,
watching the size of his slowly foal asked .his mother. echoing across the frostbound
inereasing hoofmarks in the soft She shook her head. earth and through the wintry
earth by the door, looking for the “Not even of England, but just Tees. : :
silver hairs that came thicker of this farm.” “Bells,” said his mother.
and thicker through his lead Quicksilver marveled, then ,. “Bells for the king? __ asked
coloured coat. quickly forgot, for the very next Quicksilver; it seemed to him that
On the aays when there was day the hunt was to meet at the only for a king could there be
no hunting there was always the farm again and once more he Such a lovely sound.
aster to look at, working in could ccmpare himself with the @ On page 10




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SUNDAY, DECEMBER 16, 1951 CHRISTMAS SUPPLEMENT PAGE SEVEN
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PAGE EIGHT CHRISTMAS SUPPLEMENT SUNDAY, DECEMBER 16, 1951

1851—The First Fat_X'mas

By Charles Ried '

ed for an evangelical mission hall.
Two days before Christmas a
baron of beef cut from a spanking
Devon ox was hung to roast at
eleven in the morning. The roast-
ing went on till eleven at night.
Turning the scale at near four
hundredweight the baron was
placed cold on a sideboard for the
royal banquet on Christmas Day.
Tn addition there were sixty roast
turkeys, a boar’s head and a pie
which the newspapers evasively
described as “impleasurable.” The
papers added that most of the fare
would be eaten by the Household
and royal servants.

Not only was Christmas 1851
the first fat Christmas. It ranks
also as the first distinctively ‘“Vic-
torian” one. Hitherto England
had been living*in the Georgian
afterglow, its manners and plea-
sures, its homes and its habits
conditioned as much by the 18th
as by the 19th century. It was
worked the vital change. Christ-

Week saw the last of the
$ Palace exhibits sold by.
You could pitk up giant
Sevres vases worth five hundred
pounds at two hundred the pair,
eight-day clocks in the form of
trees with mechanical birds for
i ‘ ,, twenty guineas or so, But Exhibi-
“This won’t do at all,” tion styles had begun to percolate









“E
ss lies.
Not fat tor everybody, agreed. length.

~~

Th: Cur.stmas Eve newspapers grieved the marketmen, “there’s into English homes long before

reported that within one weck .a
(Carnae,. Town tabourerfs wife,
aged wurty-nine, and eight babies
elsewhere in London had died
from, exhaustion for want of pro-
per nourishment. in plainer kng-
lish they had starved to death.
Such cas@s were, however, an
anomalous hangover from the
Hungry ‘Forties. For most Brit-
ons Christmas 1851 was comlort-
ing enough. Even the parish pau-
per was given something that
wold, in Cobtett’s phrase, stick
to his ribs. Good harvests plus
invaxed wheat imports had



brought bread down to sixpence
«ne focr pound loaf, lowest price
of the century. This may seem

no grcat boon from to-day’s view-

yint, but for the labouring class-
es, as they were lottily called by

rrybody whe wore the white
shirt and stovepipe hat of respec-
tability, bread was still the staple
ugtcle of diet a hundred years
ng,

Falling prices and more jobs,

fol'owed presently by a general
ris? in wages, incidentally

effected 4 great political assuage-
ment, The extremer Chartists,
who had known what it was to
live on crusts, boiled nettles and
inflammatory sreeshes, were vut-
ting away their pikes and their
dreams. Plenty was at hand,
Barricades and political reform
no longer seemed so agonisingly
urgent. Revolution was ad-

journed.

All the more reason for eating,
drinking and making merry, At
ia shop off the Strand which spe-
cialised in Christmes hamovers
you could buy a bottle each of
Scotch. gin, rum, French brandy
port and sherry, all of the very
best, for less than a pound. In
muddy, roaring Cheapside the
mest fashionable fishmonger in
town was selling oysters four
hours after their being taken
from the Burnham river at sev-
envence the dozen.

Food was avalanching into
London from all points of the
compass, jamming docks, rail-
ways, and, market alleys. Never
before had so many geese and
turkeys came in from France,
Holland, Belgium. Nor did the
English countries lag bhebted yy
Spristmas Eve railways in the
London area were overloaded
with poultry from Shropshire
Yorkshire, Lancashire, Norfolk
“Not only.” wrote an chrever
“were all the railwaytrucks >e-
quisitioned to meet the emer-
gency but on some lines: all
second and third class carriages
were crammed with tur-
kevs and hampers containing
presents from country friends.’
Ths Leadenhall and Newgate
markets, where you eould buy
a turkey for, as little as five
shillings, had seen nothing like

before and, having hoped for
didn’t particularly

seese,




tex prices, the Me Ve. ae f the
: ‘cade wenuih) eh ing like it wu vi » Yeomen o he
‘ ; they saw nothing Kitche tn oten dee
- Scour hree Men of Green
The me abundance prevailed Off 1 vege-
Covent Garden, Boys scram- }
i unreproved around the mar- ¢ en va
spillings holly flare ind turnspits at the bidding “
Chri trees of t, the Queen's chef BRIDG
re ‘ fte wh



lon



ioo much of everything.”

the Exhibition’s

treasures were

The butchers were in like frame dispersed, The Christmas parties

earlier,
show

of mind. Ten days
Smithfieid’s annual

at of the up-to-date were held in
\ no of parlours where patent lamps with
Christmas cattle, the critics had frosted glass

globes burned on

been mainly concerned not with circular mahogany tables, throw-
the weight of the beasts but with jing an urbane glow on magenta

their style and symmetry.
ers and dealers disct





Breed- rep curtains, hour-glass ottomans,
sed Out- wax fruit under glass domes and

standing Herefords much as the steel-mounted fireplaces with gar-

cognescenti had
ary at the Great Exhibition in
Hyde Park a few months earlier.
Quantity was a bore, something
you took for granted.

cattle imports front
alone had increased

and-fifty fold in
Cattle breeding

thirty years.
was now

discussed statu- Jands and cherubic heads in cast-

iron. 4

Such was the typica: decor of

London's 1851—sign of a new and prancing
Aberdeen prosperity.
a hundred- ning to dawn on Britain that she
was the workshop
a counter of the world.

The fact was begin-

and trading
Her har-

branch of aesthetics. The Prince bours and sea roads were crowded

Consort won twenty guineas

prize money with a pair of oxen ends of. the earth.
sicamship was only
the horizon,
growing portentously.

which were considered to be
unimpeacrably modelled.

eg |

By Christmas Eve mild, humid
weather had forced a meat glut,
With cold storage as yet undevel- |
oped, butchers looked in Gismay at |
their immense stocks and, know- |
ing the stuff would not keep, re- |
luctantly unloaded, Even in the |
City. which was still a residential |
quarter for bankers, merchants |
and their lawyers, fine sirloin was
going in some shops at fivepence |
a pdund, At Smithfield prices fell |
until they were “almost nominal”. |
The survey which The Times used
to print annually under the rubric
Christmas Day in the Werkhouse

howed that eighty or ninety
thousand paupers in the London |
poor law districts dined on half-a-
pound of bonefree beef each, fol- |
lowed by plum pudding and other |
delicacies. the whole washed down
by, a pint of porter. In many
workhouses, we read, “rectors,
ladies and gentlemen” attended to
see the paupers enioy then-
selves, Victorian charity did not
excel in tact. |

There were many wretched fam-
ilies whe proudly preferred to give |
the workhouse a wide berth, Vic- |
torian sociology classified these as |
the deserving poor. Ten thousand |
deserving poor. young Bnd old,
were invited by the Leicester
Square souv kitchen managers to
creaking tables in a bunting he- |
de-ked enclosure where, to the
wo of the entire neigh. |
bour*erd a whole ov bed haen
roasted by gas under the direction









eft a vo ile gas co’npany s@er-
n erde The aggregate bill of |
aré i-tuded rine thousand |
rev Wref pnd hakad 4074/6
> of hundred beef pies. fitty |
han sixty rabbit pies, fifty |
wrk and mutton vies wei¢ 1 .
to e xiv pounds eah, twentr

LSE GGG NG NG GN NG BN SGN NB NB SM NSN

a
aA.
&S

geese, floods of porter, a mountain
of plum pudding, cakes, chestnuts,

oranges. ...



The Leicester Square arrange-
ments quite elipsed the royal |
tables. Even so, the Queen's cheer
was not to be despised. In the re- |
built kitchen at Windsor Castle ;

two Mester Cooks, two Yeomen of





2 a
x

NEMESIS

%

of with sail bound to and from the

The upstart
a smudge on
But the smudge was
On Christ-






SrNte

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BROOMS,
BRUSHES
of all Kinds

HOUSEHOLD
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ELECTRIC KETTLES

GLASSES of
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all kinds





RS

GING NG NG NG NG NG NENG NG NS NEN

x

CHEMICO SNAP BOX-ALL



mas Eve a new Cunarder, the
Arabia, was launched at Greenock
for the Liverpool-New York ser-
vice. She had engines rating a
thousand horsepower, paddle
wheels as high as a two-storey
house, twin funnels as compared
with the usual single funnel, and
masts which had been put in for
form rather than for function.
“The Arabia's ence’, wrote an awed shipping
reporter, “will be on the immens-
ity of her steam power,”

The new won hulls, like the old
ones of teak, were needed
for human as well as commodity

cargoes. Emigration, for some
years a sorrowful necessity
among the impoverished irish,

had boesme2 big business among
knowing Englishmen After look~«
ing at the machine-made lace







+



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VARNISHES
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curtains and the gold moun.ed
memento bracelets in human hair
which. were the great Christmas
novelty gifts of the year, the
shopper was invited to make his
choice between alternative lines
in patent folding emigrants’
tents, complete with slung cots,
tables and camp stools. There
were patent folding emigrants’
boats as well, safe, strong, cheap,
roomy, handsome, easy to row
and easy to re-sell—or so it was
claimed.. “No emigrant,” urged
the makers, “should proceed to
any part of the globe without
taking one or more of these
boats with jim.”

What beckoned the 1851 emi-
grant above all else were gold.
The recently opened Australian

@ On Page 29

x






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AA RARE TERR



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:



SUNDAY, DECEMBER 16, 1951

A Childs Xmas Letter

Dear friend 1 write
To you to-night
Dear Chimney Sweep
Please tr; to keep
The chimneys clean
For Santa’s seen
With all his toys
And Xmas joys
Down chimneys come
To give to some
Whe have been good
‘Tis undersiood,
These Xmas things

« Whith pleasirre brings
To tiny tots
And otver lots

Now tor our sake
He soon will make
His visit her
This very year
On Xmas Eve,
I do believe
Dear Chimney Sweep
Oh how I'll weep
Should Santa pass
Me jst Xmas!
Pleake don't forget
My heart is set,
Mest hard I've tried
This Xmas tide.
& wish I could
Always be good!

. .



.
Please Chimney Sweep
My letter keep,

And if you do

As I ask you,

Brooms and nice food,
And all that’s good,
Sweet, red, red wine
This friend of mine
Santa will give

Â¥ou if you live.

He's oh so kind!
Your house he'll find.
The streets he knows
Where e'er he goes

ROSALIND RUSSELL
GLAMOROUS HOLLYWOOD STAR

All I've told you,
Oh yes, ‘tis true.

. > .
Dear Chimney Sweep,
‘Tis time to sleep.
Tip on my toes
For no one knows.
Then into bed,
My Prayers I've said,
For Santa too,
And also you.
My letter end,
My love | send.
“Good night’—to sleep
Dear Chimney Sweep

. .
This lovely child
Now sleeps awhile,
And then she cries
Mid dreams and smiles,
Her vision bright
She sees this night—
Oh Chimney Swerp!
Am I asleep?
Is this a dream
All that I am seeing?
Fair angels bright!
I see tonight,
The Baby King!
To Him they sing
The way along
I hear sweet song

: . .
Dear Chimney Sweep
This promise keep,
When Santa brings
My Xmas things,
Please give poor Jane
In bed with pain
New toys galore

Of Xmas store,
Santa ‘ll bring more,
Of this I am sure

And when the Xmas morn had dawned,

This little Angel's spirit had gone
With Angles to the heaven's above
Te join the baby King in love.















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CHRISTMAS SUPPLEMENT



PAGE N



Xmas Work Keeps Tradesmen Busy

All types of artisans and
tradesmen are having a pressing
but profitable period trying to
cope with the fbundant work
which the Christmas season has
brought. Most of them are work-
ing until far into the night to
be able to serve their customers
and at the same time work for
an amount of money which they
could never hope to work for at
other times of the year.

For the past few weeks, pass-
érsby along certain roads at mid-
night could still hear the tap of
the shoemakexr’s hammer or see
him sharpening his knife to cut
the leather. Besides new shoes,
the shoemakers are getting quite
a number of shoes to repair.

“It is always like this,” a shoe-
maker told the Advocate yester-
day. “The shoe business now is
not as prosperous as it used to
be in Barbados during the war
years. Then, more people had to
buy shoes from us, but nowadays
more shoes come to the island,
and people like the 1dea of going
straight to the store and buying
their shoes.”

Women Tailors
Another artisan who is taking an
all day and almost all night spell
at work is the tailor. Since the
Christmas season has come, some
tailors are employing women to
help them do some stitching.






WoW

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we
>
Non-dryir ' r J SF Easily tucked away for
: a g toe <[) —_ y y
eels refreshe never 7
tight) drawn, or dry. Ly ad
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Unlike many shoemakers, tailors
generally work in groups and so
the long nights at work pass with
less dreariness.

Joiners, too, are having but
few hours of rest in these last
weeks before Christmas. At this
time, their work consists more
of repairing and polishing than
building new chairs.

“After a family man has
bought clothes, and his Christmas
groceries,” a joiner said, “he sel-
dom has much left for building
new furniture, and the most he
can do is content himself with
repairing and polishing the old
furniture.

“But this still keeps us busy,”
he said, “because *everybedy
waits until the week before
Christmas to do their. polishing
and sometimes there are so many
that we cannot servesall.”

The poorest man likes the idea
of putting on two pots at the same
time on Christmas Day, a tin-
smith said yesterday and there
are always more saucepans and
cooking vessels to solder at this
time of the year.

Travelling Tinsmiths
Tinsmiths are rounding up the
work by travelling about the
eountry districts and asking
housewives whether they have
amy saucepans or other utensils
to solder. These journeying tin-~

vwooo

IN SEVEN GORGEOUS SHADES...

pStick /

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smiths cover many miles in a day
and do the job on the spot. A
tinsmith always looks ferward to
this time of the year when he is
doing most of his work by going
from house to house with his
tools. Not only does he like it
because the is getting more
money, but he gets more fresh
air and feels more lively than
when he is working in his small
Village shor

Of painiers, masons and ¢ar-
penters, painters are doing the
most. work now, “Many people
like a Christmas shine and paint”
a painter said. Besides a few
windows and doors, the carpen-
ter is having little more repairs
to do_than ordinary. The masons
are not having’ much repairing
to do either, but most masons,
wash walls at this time of the
year,

Basket makers did the most of
their hurrying a few months ago
when, they made many baskets
in preparation for the season.

“A basket maker has to make
his baskets long before the,
Christmas Season sets in,” one’
said, “When women start shop-
ping from November for the
Industrial Exhibition and for
Christmas ,they buy their baskets
early and the basket makers who
have in a good stock in Noveme
ber easily get them sold,



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PAGE TEN

THE MIDNIGHT BELL SNR

@ from page 6

For the King of the World,”
said his mother, and he looked at
her amazed.

“Where does he Tive?
ever see him?”

“In the earth and the sky, in
mon and beast,” and then she went
pack to her old words, “one night
you will learn wisdom, my son.”

It was two days later that he
heard the bells again, faint in the
snow laden air. They rang and
reog, first from one village and
then from another, rang ‘as the
children came laughing up the
drive with branches of holly, and
rang as the red sun went down.
They were ringing as people came
dn the dusk with lanterns to sing
in fromi of the house and ringing
still as the last of them went home
and the lights in the houses went
out one by one

Shall [

“Why do they ring so much?”
asked Quicksilver impatiently,
pawing the ground and snorting
till his breath hung in silvery
wreaths on the air, for there was
a strange feeling of excitement
about.

“For the King of the World’s
birthday,” answered his mother
and looked at her son.

“It must have been a very
splendid palace where He was
bern, bigzer even than the

masters’s, surely all made of gold!
Shall I ever see that?” The foal
whinnied with excitement.

“To-night you will learn
wisdom, my son,” ard the mare
went back to her hay.

Boo

The snow stopped falling and
the stars came out in the sky; as
“the bells rang on the excitement
‘that was abroad in the farmyard
mrew and Quicksilver knew that
mo creature slept. As he stared
at the glittering sky he heard
mncises and stirrings all round him,
clucking and gabbling of hens and
geese, the bull’s quick impatient
snort; lowing of cattle in their
sheds and the farm dog's soft
punting; the flight and ruffling of
innumerable birds. It seemed as
i the whole world were waiting.
For what?

\s his rolling, anxious eyes
looked out at the sky he saw that
it lightened; there was something
that glowed upon the far horizon
and then rose behind the naked
trees to shine in the heavens. . It
was a star, brighter than any that
be been in the sky before. As
he looked at it a strange wild long-
ing filled him, to follow something,
to go somewhere; he know not
av“atnor where,

Suddenly as if the dawn had
come, the farmyard cock started
ito crow and, as though at a signal,
all roundNhim the heavy doors
sswung open, doors of stable and
ibyre and stye; the great door of

tthe yard beyond them. Lit by
tthe soft light from the sky, in
solemn procession the creatures

came out, thei footsteps muffled
4m the snow. The great bull
sswung his heavy shoulders as ne
yadded down the drive, the cows
micked their way behind him;
sheep and pigs and all the inhabi-
tants of the farmyard followed
after with the farm dog walking
silently at their heels, Quicksilver
followed close behifid his mother,
through the gate and into the
drive, past the long field where
he'd played in summer, out of the
big gates and down to the village,
while from all sides newcomers,
padding softly down the lanes,
joined the procession.

eres WE

Down the silent road and past
tthe shuttered houses they went,
ytowards the little church from
“whose tower the bell was ringing,
eonly one bell now, ringing on and
on insistently while above it shone
ithe star.

“And then the bell stopped and
‘there was no sound except that
of the shuffling footsteps in the
show.

‘The beasts ahead were passing
through the open gates, onto the
Sguare of grass in front of the

lurch. Quicksilver slipped in
Behind his mother and through the
‘straying backs and horns in front
of him he could see that the wide
edoor of the church was open and
that from it a soft light glowed
out onto the snow. He tried to

push forward but his mother
pressed him back, and then it
seemed that all the beasts moved
backwards too, flank against
shoulder and. shoulder against
flank, till there was a clearing uy
the centre of the path towards



where the light shone out.

The foal stretch his neck to see
and his mother’s breath was warm
in his ear.





CHRISTMAS SUPPLEMENT

‘ This iv the birthplace of your
King. my son.”

Eagerly he stretched out fur-
ther, and then with a sudden snort
drew be.k. Could that be it? He
looked again, There in the door-
way of the porch it stood, made
lovingly from wood and straw; no
palace but a stable like his own.

There was even a manger, he
could see it quite plain, as well
as the plaster figures that leant
over it, familiar people, shepherds,
with crooks and lambs. A great
feeling of comfort flowed into him,
there was a horse there, and a
‘donkey and an ox, But where
was the King?

7 A \

Arching his neck he looked into
the manger, searching among the
gold, familiar hay. And there he
saw Him, the King who from out
of all the world had chosen to
be born in his stable, in his man-
ger, With a wild whinny he tried
to canter forward, to obey the
tremendous impulse of love that
drove him on, but still his mother
pressed him back, looking along
the way they had come.

Of course! How could he be
first? The bull in his pride must
lead or the beautiful Jersey cow,
the proud strong hunters on whom
the King might ride; which would
it be? At last he saw.

Her little hooves chipping the
trodden snow. her coat grown
shaggy in the winter nights, the
little dun coloured donkey came
slowly between them, Bending
her Knees in the snow she bowed
her head before the King of the
World.

For a moment she knelt“there,
the black cross where He had
chosen to ride marked plain upon
ber back, and then slowly, one by
one, the host of beasts went down
behind her. Heavy and awkward
they knelt and for a moment the
star shone full on their besea
acks. Then, swaying to their
rest egain they silently plodded
home. /

The goosefeather snow whirled
yut of the sky once more, filling
up footstep and cart rut and track;
when the farmer’s children looked
out on Christmas morning the path
was unbroken white as though
nothing had ever trodden it.

Beltaville Whites
U.S. Jurkeys
Are Popular

BELTSVILLE, Maryland.

A email compac. turkey whose
meat is all white is in great de-
mand by small families and apart
ment dwellers in the United States.
Known as the Beltsville White, it
was developed in 1934 by re-
search workers at the U.S. De-
partment of Agricul.ure’s Re-
search Center here.

The new turkey was developed
by crossing standardbred varieties.
The Beltsville Whites are raised
on a year-round basis, and to-day
account for about 16 per cent. of
all turkeys raised in the United
States. About 8,000,000 were
raised in 1951.

The Beltsville Whites are ready
for market between 12 and 16
weeks. They average 4 to 8 pounds
(1.8 to 3.6 kilograms) drevsed.
The birds mature in about 24
weeks, and weigh 9 to 15 pounds
(4 to 7 kilograms).

In addition to being a market-
able size, these turkeys are excel-
lent layers—an important item
because a steady supply of hatch-
ing eggs is necessary to furnish
turkeys on a year-round basis.
The cost of the poult is a major
production item and a large num-
ber of eggs per breeder hen is
needed to hold down hatching
egg costs.

The birds convert feed to me¢t
very efficiently. Beltsville Whi es
marketed around 16 weeks of age
produce I pound (0.45 kilogram)
of gain on 2 to 3 pounds § (0.9-te
1,8 kilograms) of feed.

Development of this turkey has
created a new market, but they
will not displace the ‘eavier
breeds of turkeys, according to the
U.S. ‘Depar'ment
Large familiés, institutions, restau-
rants, and hotels still need the
larger birds.

Turkey raising has long been
on important and profitable ferm-
ing operation in the United States
Up to 60,000 turkeys have been
raised in one season by a large
commercial» hatchery. Usually.
however, not more ‘than 5,000 ore
yeared in one flock. Flecks of
1,500 to 2,500 are popular. sizes.



of Agriculture. |

SUNDAY, DECEMBER 16, 1951



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PAGE TWELVE

from page 4

CHRISTMAS SUPPLEMENT

CHRISTMAS RECIPES

Dancing Dan's Christmas

Dan about her grandmama hang-
ing up her stocking is really true,
although up to this time I have
my doubts.

Well, I am willing to pack in
after one gander at the old doll,

especielly as Good Time Charley
is commencing to prowl around
the flat to see if there is a chim-
ney where Santa Claus can come

down, and is knocking things over,
but Dancing Dan stands looking
down at Gammer O'Neill for a
dong time.

Finauy he unslings the sack on
his back, and takes out his pack-
age, and unties this package, and

al! of a sudden out. pops a raft of
big diamond bracelets, and dia-
mond rings, and diamand brooch-
es, and diamond necklaces, and I

do not know what all else in the

Way of diamonds, and Dancing
Dan and I begin stuffing these
diemonds into the stocking and

Good Time Charley pitches in and
help us.

There are enough diamonds to
fill the stocking to the muzzle, and
it is no small stocking at that,
and I judge that Gammer O'Neill
has a pretty fair set of bunting
sticks when she is young. In fact,
there are so many diamonds that
we have enough left over to make
a nice little pile on the chair after

we fill the stocking plumb up,
leaving a_ nice diamond-st udded
vanity case sticking out the top

where we figure it will hit Gam-
mec O'Neill's eye when she wnkes
up

» And it is not until IT get out
fm the fresh air again that all of
a sidden I remember seeing large
hecdiines in the afternoon papers
abut a five-hundred G's stick-
up in the afternedm of one of the
biggest diamond merchants of
Maiden Lane while he is sitting
in his office, and I also recal' once
heerins rumours that Dancing
Dan is one of the best lone-hand
git’-ern-ur guys in the world

Natvrvaity, I cammence to won-
der if . au in the proper c-mpany
whe i ;.a With Denein; Dan,
even if he is Santa Claus. So L
‘cave him on the next corner ar-

uing with Good Time Charley
ehout whether they ought to go

nd find some more presents
mewhere, and look for other
stockings to stuff, and I hasten

‘on home, and go to bed,

The next day I find I have such
» noggin that 1 do not care to stir
around, and in fact I do not stir
sround much for a couple of
weeks.

“hen one night I drop around
to Good Time Charley's little
speakeasy, and ask Charley what
is doing.

“Well,” Charley says, “many
things»are doing and personally,”
he says, “I am greatly surprised
J do not see you at Gammer
O'Neill's wake.

You know Gam-

~3>F Soro oS
BBASFKA FE ASEH

SALAES



mer O'Neill leaves this wicked
old world a eouple of days after
Christmas”. Good Time Char-
ley says, “and,” he says, “Miss
Muriel O'Neill states that Doe
Moggs claims it is at least a day
after she is entitled to go, but she
is sustained, Charley says, “by
great happiness on finding her
stocking filled with beautiful gifts
on Christmas morning.

“According to Miss Muriel
O'Neill,” Charley says, “Gammer
O'Neill dies practically convinced
that there is a Santa Claus, al-
though of course,” he says, “Miss
Muriel O'Neill does not tell her
the real owner of the gifts, an
all-right guy by the name of
Shapiro leaves the gifts with her
after Miss Muriel O’Niell notifies
him of the finding of same.

“It seems,” Charley says, “this
Shapiro is a tender-hearted guy,
who is willing to help keep Gam-

mer O'Neill with us a little long- .

er when Doc Moggs says leaving
the gifts with her will co it.

“So,” Charley says, “every-
thing is quite all right, as the cop-
pers cannot figure anything

except that maybe the rascal who
conscience stricken, and leaves
them the first place he can, and
Miss Muriel O’Neill receives a
ten-G's reward for finding the
gifts and returning them. And,
Charley says, “I hear Dancing Dan
is in San Francisco and is figuring
on reforming and becoming a
dancing teacher, so he can marry
Miss Muriel O'Neill, and of
course,’ he says, “we hope and
trust she never learns any details
of Dancing Dan’s career.”

Well, it is Christmas Eve a year
later that I run into a guy by the
name of Shotgun Sam, who is
mobbed up with Heine Schmitz
in Harlem, and who is a very,
very oknoxious character indeed.

“Well, well, well,” Shotgun
says “the last time I see you ix
another Christmas Eve like this,
and you are coming out of Good
Time Cnarley’s jomt and,” he
bays} “you certainly have your
pots on.”

“Well, Shotgun,” I say, “I am
sorry you got such a wrong im-

pression of me, but the truth is,”

I say, “on the occasion you speak
of, I am suffering from a dizzy
feeling in my head.”

“It is all right with me,” Shot-
gun says, “I have a tip this guy
Dancing Dan is in Good Time
Charley's the night I see you and
Mockie Morgan, and Gunner Jack
and me are casing the joint, be-
cause,” he says, “Heine Schmitz
is all sored up at Dan over some
doll, although of course,” Shot-
gun says, “it is all right now, as
Heine has another doll

“Anyway,” he says, “we never
get to see Dancing Dan. We
watch the joint from. six-thirty
in, the evening until daylight

a.

SUNDAY, DECEMBER 16, 1951



—Selected by Dorothy Barkley .,,...

The English Christmas, we are
often told, consists in eating. But
the rest of the world has surely,
by now, copied England, Every-
where it is the time for little
“extras” which for most of the
year would be extravagant.

Although our Christmas is an
essentially national occasion, with
essentially English traditions in
food and drink, cosmopolitan flav-
ours creep into the party fare, as
souvenirs of a holiday abroad,
perhaps, with a gateau after the
French, or a cheese dish after the
Swiss.

Here. are a few suggestions for
you, if you would like to try
out some of our Christmas party
cooking.

SWEETS

Arrange the party sweets at-
tractively in dishes, so that guests
can admire them before sarapling.

Chocolate Truffles

6 oz chocolate

4 cup butter

1 cup powdered sugar
1 teaspoon vanilla
cocoa

Melt chocolate and butter in top
of double boiler. Add sugar and
stir until the sugar is well blend-
ed. Add vanilla and if the mix-
ture is too dry, add a little cream.
It should be firm and moist enough
to form into small balls. Roll
the little balls in cocoa and place
in individual candy papers.

Nutty Leaves

2 oz hazel nuts
1 oz almonds
3 oz castor sugar
1 heaped teaspoonful checolate
powder
1 egg white
A little ground rice
Chop up nuts and mix them
with all sugar and chocolate pow-



Christmas momning and nobody
oes in all night but old Ookey
the Santa Claus guy in his Santa
Claus make-up, and” Shotgun
says, “nobody comes out except
you and Good Time Charley and
Ooky. <

“Well,” Shotgun says, “it ts a
great break for Dancing Dan he
nevér goeS in or comes out of
Good Time Charley’s at that, be-
cause,” he says, “we are waiting
for him on the seeond-floor front
of the building across the way
with some nice little sawed-offs,
and under orders from Heine not
to miss.”

“Well, Shotgun,”
Christmas.”

“Well, all right,”
“Merry Christmas” .

I say, “Merry

Shotgun says,

good friends get



families



unite, when

people

der, Beat white of egg stiffly and
add to nut mixture. Add enough
ground rice to bind mixture to
a pasté. Roll out %% inch thick,
using ground rice to dust rolling
pin and board. Stamp or cut into

leaf shapes. Gake in a_ slow
oven, for about 20-25 minutes.
PUDDINGS

These will be invaluable to the
cook-hostess, as they can be made
in advance and served cold with-
out any last-minute worry.

Gateau a la Francaise
145 I sponge finger biscuits
% I ground almonds
% I butter
% 1 castor sugar
1 egg yolk
% pint milk
Sherry

Coffee essence or grated choco-
late, nuts or cherries

Cream sugar and butter; add
yolk of egg and beat. Add milk,
and ground almonds‘slowly. Beat
until quite smooth. Add coffee
essence or grated chocolate. Dip
biscuits in and out of half a break-
fastcupful of milk and sherry
mixed, then arrange on a dish in
layers of biscuits and mixture.
Finally coat top with remaining
mixture, and decorate with nuts

Lemon Meringue Pie

6 oz short-crust pastry
or cherries.
1 oz cornflour
4 pint water
juice and grated rind of 1 lemon
4 oz sugar
4 oz butter
2 egg yolks

For the meringue top:

2 egg whites
4 oz sugar
Glace cherries and angelica to
decorate
Line a pie-plate with pastry,
finishing with a raised flute rim
and bake. Blend the « cornfiour

with some of the water, ‘eat the
rest and when it is boiling, pour
it on to the cornflour, stirring.
Return to the saucepan, add the
lemon juice and boil for 4-5 min-
utes, stirring constantly. Add
sugar, butter and, lemen, rind,
cool slightly and beet in egg
yolks one by one, Pour into the
pastry case. Whisk the egg whites
very stiffly, whisk in a teaspoon-
ful of the sugar, then fold im re-
maining sugar. Pile on top of the
lemon mixture and bake in a slow
oven for about 30° minutes, until
the filling is set, and the meringue
crisp to the touch and a pale fawn
colour, Decorate with glace cher-
ries and angelica and serve cold

i

together, “When

everywhere



filled with the joy and fellowship of the season of goo will
that above all times is the occasion for...

SBBFA8ESR

,» HENNE SA Dini

“THE BRANDY THAT MADE COGNAC FAMOUS"

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SAVOURY DISH

is a suggestion for an
informal party:
Swiss Fondue

Per person:
34 oz Gruyere cheese (or any
other fatty cheese)

2 wineglasses of dry white wine

34 oz flour

brandy glass of kirsch

Cut cheese into very fine slices,
and place with wine in frying pan,
which has been rubbed round
with garlic. Stir with wooder
spoon, making sure mixture does
not stick to the bottom. Mix in
the flour and kirsch slowly;
season with pepper. When it is
bubbling, it is ready to eat. Serve
immediately with white bread cut
into small slices.

Our Swiss friends tell us to
drink a glass of kirsch afterwards,
to aid the digestion.

DRINK
Two drinks which really create
the party atmosphere;
Russian Punch
2 bottles of champagne
1 large fresh pineappple, peeled
and cut in pieces
1 cup kirsch, rum or cognac
Combine ingredients in large
silver punch bow!. Touch with @
lighted match.
the punch is hot — a matter of a
few moments, and pour inte
punch glasses, There should be
a piece of pineapple in each g!ass.
If you want a cool drink, serve
very cold with ice.
Raspberry Eggnog
1 cupful fresh raspberries (or
any other soft fruit)

} Oz sugar

1 egg

1 pint \nilk

Heat raspberries and sugar
gently in a saucepan, pressing

with a wooden spoon to extract
the juice. When soft, press through
a fine sieve, and leave to coeb.
Separate yolk from white of egg,
and heat the milk almost to boih-
ing point. Pour hot milk on te
egg-yolk and mix well. Leave te
cool. When quite cold, add the
raspberry puree, and fold in white
of egg, beaten to a stiff froth.
Serve very coid.

Hot Orange Wine

And, finally, here is a recipe fou
“Hot Orange Wine”, as the French
make it:

1 litre bottle of light red wine

7 oz sugar

2 oranges

Melt sugar im boiling water; add
the peel of the two oranges, cover
dish, and leave for half an hour.
Remove the peel, add the juice of
the two oranges. Heat the wine,
and adq this liquid to it. Serve
hot, with a round of orange im
each glass.

N.B. Warm the glasses firs: to
prevent cracking.



Ss
®

Let it burn until *







SUNDAY, DECEMBER 16, 1951 CHRISTMAS SUPPLEMENT PAGE THIRTEEN



Bf BBS RM SNS




rig COMPARE OUR VALUES.
CB. Rice ad Co.

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WS BB 5 SAS GAS SAS SS BG BS BBB BS AR AK AG AK AY A BG BY BY

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PAGE FOURTEEN



CHRISTMAS SUPPLEMENT



THE 1951 YEAR

The year 1951 has been an
important one in the history of
local sport. The year saw ex-

changes of visits between Barba-
dos and neighbouring territories
on a scale that happily proved
that not only had several forms
of sport which up to a year or
two ago were not even on the
map of organised games, had ar-
rived to stay but they had
progressed in pqpularity and
prosperity beyond all measure,
EXCHANGE OF VISITS
ARBADOS entertained Trini-
dad at cricket earlier in the
year and then sent a representa-
tive team to British Guiana.
‘The B.A.F_A. sponsored the visit
of a Jamaica football team here
for the first time in the history of
the colony; the Barbados Water
Polo Association sent a team to
Trinidad; a Leeward and Wind-
ward Islands and British Guiana
Schoolboys team were enter-
tained here and a Harrison Col-
lege team visited Trinidad; the
Amateur Athletic Association of
Barbados staged a Cycle and
Athletic Meet of real Intercol-
onial flavour and the Basketball
Association received a visit from
a Trinidad team; the Barbados
Amateur Lawn Tennis Associa-
tion had been represented in
the Brandon Trophy matches in
Trinidad and the Netball Associ-
fAtion entertained a Grenada team.
I am sure that this record of
Bperting achievement has never

been equalled before, And now
for a look at the various
branches.

CRICKET

FPTHE season commenced in 1950

was not completed until Jan<
uary this year. Police C.C. had
been admitted to the First Divis-
ion, Cable and Wireless and Men-
tal Hospital were promoted and
Foundation were relegated to
the Second Division,

Central, Leeward and Regiment
were adimitted to the Second
Division and so the total number
«f teams competing in the Bar-
bados Cricket Association games
29.9 in the First Division, 8 in
the Intermediate Division and 12
‘> the’ Second Division,

Wanderers won the First Divis-

ion Cap in a close finish from
Pickwiek and Y.M.P.C, carried
off the Intermediate competition.
Empire won by a single point
from the Barbados Regiment in

the third Division.



as

eae en.
1 Cc, WALCOTT
TRINIDAD TOURNAMENT

In February Barbados enter-
tained a Trinidad team and both
games were drawn. The games
were fairly evenly contested and
were only remarkable for two
excellent double century innings
in the second match by Jeffrey
Stollmeyer and Clyde Walcott who
scored 208 and 209 respectively.

Later this year a Barbados team
toured British Guiana. They were
defeated in the first Test and the
second Test was left drawn, The
Barbados team was extremely
week in bowling and the huge
score of 692 for 9 wickets declared
and defeated Barbados by an
innings.

*The outstanding feature of the
game was a record first wicket
partnership between Leslie Wight
end Glendon Gibbs who put on
390 for the first wicket. Gibbs
scored 216 and Wight carried his
bat through the innings for 262,

WIGHT’S RECORDS

Wight who scored 145 run out
im the second Test gained the
distinction of having batted for
1,098 minutes. to score 407 runs
before he was once out.

The local season has not yet
been completed but Windward
have already won the Intermediate



vw wewvevevewvewnrâ„¢

By ©. S. COPPIN

SUNDAY, DECEMBER 16, 1951



OF SPORT

Cup and in the second Divisionthe previous year and had been ever, from the spectators’ poiat of

the issue seems to have resolved

promoted to the First Division,

view the season was at times un-

itself into a fight for the champion- won also in the Third Division interesting.

ship between Police and Empire.

In the First Division competition
Carlton and Empire have drawn
away from the rest of the com-
petitors*in this division and the
championship should be decided
between them, A single series
remains to be played and this
should not be long now.



FOOTBALL
‘HE 1951 season run by the
the Barbados Amateur Foot-

competition this year and have
earned promotion of the third
team to the Second Division,

' TIED
ARRISON COLLEGE and
Lodge School tied in the
Schools’ Competition and there

was no award, There seems to be
some gentleman’s agreement that
there should not be a bracketing
of the teams.

The diagonal system of referee-
ing in which one referee and two
referee linesmen control the
game was again employed with
satisfaction and this system has
of the football public for local
refereeing than anything else.

WATER POLO

— main points highlight

the water polo season which
ended on Friday, October 26th,
1951. For the first time this year
water polo was played by ladies
done more to foster the respect
on a league basis. Secondly, a
ladies’ team and a men’s team
visited Trinidad in September and
both were triumphant. Thirdly,
the Barbados Amateur Water
Polo and Swimming Association
became affiliated in August to the
Federation Internationale de Nata-
tion Amateur (the International
organisation governing water
polo).

An analysis of these three points
is interesting and shows just how
far the association has progressed
during the year now coming to a
close.

LADIES’ WATER POLO

ADIES first started to take an muda into this Intercolonial tour-

ball Seon was another
successfu one. Highlight of ; i
the season was the successful ae een sean

sponsoring of a tour of a J.
football team,

In the Colony games Barbados
won the rubber by two Tests to
one. The football was of a good
standard as compared with the
performances of island teams
over the past three years but
the visitors although defeated
showed a superiority in midfield
play and ball control, but their
finishing efforts were faulty,

The Barbados team, coached
by Mr. Graham Wilkes only a
few weeks
ment showed an improvement
almost beyond recognition and it
was this that gave them the
chance to develop the thrust
necessary to gain the edge on the
Jamaica players.

BEST FOOTBALLER
UDLEY SMITH, centre half
, for the visitors was a tower

of strength and was easily the
best footballer on either

not only a colourful performer
but a safe one as well.

“Brickie” Lucas was the best
Barbados forward while Fred
Cozier gave what was perhaps
the best performance of his

career in these games, bringing
off on two occasions saves that
could only be described as mag-
nificent.



D. SMITH

LOCAL SEASON
The local season had to be
shortened for more reasons than
one but the most important was
that the date for the opening of

the cricket season had been
advanced and so there was no
Knockout Competition,

Spartan carried off the First
Division competition for the
third year in guccession and

Harrison College won all their
fixtures in the Second Division
to carry off the championship of
this Division and Notre Dame,
who had carried off the champ-
ionship of the “Second Division

ww xe

before the tourna- ;

.

Next year it might be possible
for the men to have a first and
second division, thus ensuring that
the high standard of play will be
maintained among the better
teams, while the weaker teams
will find more even competition
and thus will not become so easily
disheartened,

OUTSTANDING WIN

ARRISON COLLEGE'S win in

the league competition was an
outstanding performance, doubly
so because this was the first time
the school had entered a team,
However, it seems necessary to
throw out a warning to these
youngsters and the ones who will
start the game next year. It takes
a great deal of hard work and
organising to promote any form
of sport. The younger players
must realise that the older play-
ers cannot go on doing the hard
work and adminstration indefin-
itely. They must help shoulder
some of the responsibility and not
just play the game,

CONFIDENT

HE Water Polo Association can

look confidently to the future.
Harrison College’s victory has
been a tonic, in that it is definite
proof that there is a wealth of
young talent coming up to take
over from the older players and
with the visit of a Trinidad team
to Barbados next year in mind,
they can plan from early to com-
bat this ever improving foe. It is
understood that efforts are being
made to draw Jamaica and Ber-

nament, If these attempts are suc-
cessful then water polo will

amaica nounced that Trinidad was willing shortly become one of the major

to send over a ladies’ team with sports in the W.I,

their men’s team
intercolonial water

in the annual
polo tourna-

general idea of the game.
lost this first tournament but they
were not disgraced.

From the handful of girls who nadoes from Barbados and three

started playing in 1950 the num-
ber grew rapidly as plans for this
year’s season got underway, and
by the time the season opened five
ladies’ teams had registered. They
had a most successful season and
Starfish, captained by Frieda Car-
michael won both the league and
Knock-Out competitions. They
completed their competitions over
a‘month before the team left for
Trinidad and continued practising
hard right up until a couple of
days before leaving

The Barbados ladies won all of

side their matches against Trinidad [0% 4 ‘ad’s 39
while Ronnie Cooper in goal was and showed a vast superiority over Trini¢ad’s . ;

The Trinidad ladies Bryden Trophy. For the best indi- show he was chosen Mr. Bridge-
promising Vidual performance our veteran town and at'the last one he gained

their rivals.

YACHTING

A new page was written in the
ment between these two colonies. history of West Indian yachting
This gave our ladies just over six this year when the first Inter-
weeks to learn the rules and get a colonial Tornado Yachting series
They ever to be held in the West Indies

took-place in Trinidad in October.
The races were between three Tor-

from Trinidad.

Barbados scored a convincing
victory. This cleared up the issue
as’ to whether the Trinidadian
helmsmen could handle the swift
Tornadoes. better than the local
crews. 7

Representing Barbados’ were
Vamoose, Cyclone and Edril, with
their crews, Teddy and Tony Hoad,
Peter Ince and Gefald Nicholls and
Ivan Perkins and Jackie Hoad.

VETERAN
At the end of the series Barba-
ios had scored 54 points as against
and so won the





Cup and Olive Blossom the “D”

Class. In both the Intermediate
and “D” Class the competition
was keen ,even in the closing
stages.

The racing in both the R.B.Y.C,
and Tornado series next year
promises to be even more success-
ful. However, the highlight of
yachting in 1952 will be the visit
of three Trinidad Tornadoes to
Barbados to take part in the sec-
gnd Intercolonial Tornado Yacht-
ing series.

WEIGHTLIFTING
HE newly formed Amateur
Weightlifting Association of
Barbados revived weightlifting in
the island during the year. For
many years this type of sport was
dormant. But today, we have tae
A.W.A.B. bringing everything to
the public, explaining the “fine
points” and, most important of all,
staged two shows. The first wos
their bodies.

During the year the A.W.A.B.
encouraging Barbadians to develop
a great success and the second
even greater, both financially and
on the standard of performance.
At both shows there were many
side attractions, including con-
tortionist displays, muscle control
and trapeze work.



L. MALONEY-

MUSCLE MAN
HE, muscle man of the year is
Basil Grant. By the decision
of the judges, he is the best devel-
oped man in Barbados. At the first

however, have some
yourtgsters who should do well helmsman Teddy Hoad was award- the honour, Mr. Barbados.
next year. ed the DeLima Cup. He scored 204 rs main aS = the last
- oints in Vamoose, the Tornado Show was he ody Beauty
DOUBLE VICTORY IN which he ‘himself constructed at Contest for women. Miss Sheila
TRINIDAD Vaudluse, St. Thomas. A close Hinds was selected Miss Bridge-
The Barbados Men narrowly second was Ivan Perkins’ Edril town. It was however deplorable
won the rubber from Trinidad. In with 194 points. = eee the small number of entries,
each of the:tests, there wag only a necause, according to the Registra-
goal difference in the final scores; The only tion list, there are more women
and Trinidad took the final test. g) Trinidad Tor- than men in Bridgetown, There
This was the first time ever, since nado to cause were only four entrants.
the series began in July 1949 that an upset among In the lifting Edwin Rogers of
Â¥ the Barbadian Palm Springs Barbell Club, Hast-

a Barbados team has been defeat-
ed by Trinidad, This is a grim
warning that Trinidad is improv-
ing yearly. Our players must take
early notice and prepare for the
battle next year,

AFFILIATED TO F.I.N.A.
N August 25th at a meeting of
the Federation Internationale

de Natation Amateur (F.LN.A.)
in Helsinki, the Barbados Amateur
Water Polo and Swimming Asso-
ciation became affiliated to this
International body. Thus, this
association which met in July and
formed an Olympic Committtee, to
become affiliated to its parent in-
ternational body. Each member
association of this committee must
become so affiliated before the
Barbados Olympic Committee can
be recognised by the International
Olympic Committee.

ONE-SIDED

NE other point in the season

under review which would
bear *ome comment was the one
sided results in the men’s league,
Harrison College, Snappers and
Swordfish showed an early superi-
ority over the vther teams. This
made several oc? the games onc-
sided and although it was hoped
that this state of affairs would im-
prove as the season got older, it
unfortunately continned through-
out the competition. This by no
means detracts from te glory of
Harrison College’s win in the
league and Snappers taking the
Knock-Out . competition for the
fourth year in succession. How-










ranks was TK45
Be) Whose crew was
“Binks” Bynoe,

be

aaa Barbadian
and . de-
.Gannes. This

me tied with Cy-

clone for third

E. L. G NoAp position with 14
points,

Vamoose and Edril returned to
Barbados to take part in next
year’s racing but Cyclone was solid
in Trinidad.

R.B.Y.C.

The Royal Barbados Yacht Club
had another successful year. The
1951 Series ended on Thursday,
Juné 7, with the race for the
Frontenac Trophy. It was won by
a boat of the “C” Class, Folly,
skippered by Pat Toppin.

This race, as usual, was the
main attraction of the season. In
1949 when the Trophy was first
presented it was won by Donald
Stoute in his Intermediate boat
Invader.

Moyra Blair won the “A” Class
Cup. Of the old “A” boats which
now sail in the “B” Class, she gave
the best performance.

War Cloud, which finished with
a percentage of 69.69 won the
“BY” Class Trophy.

TORNADO FORCE
AMOOSE, showing that the
Tornado is a force to be
reckoned with, carried off the
“C” Class Cup with 69.44 per cent.
Coronetta won the Intermediate

ings, shuwed that his invaluable
quality is determination. He end-
ed champion of the Light Heavy-
weight” Division, defeating C.
Goodridge, a plucky youngster, by
the lighter bodyweight after they
both totalled 640 pounds.

The competition in the Middle-
weight Division was also] very
keen. There were two veteran
lifters matching their experience
and skill, George Bynoe and Sam
Maloney. Maloney defeated Bynoe
by 20 pounds to become cham-
pion — two yictories for Palm
Springs Barbell Club.

It is generally felt that Seibert
Rudder of York Barbell Club will
one day become Barbados’ number
one lifter. Only a few years ago
Rudder began ifting. He was able
to defeat H. Thompson of Unique
Club and become champion of the
Featherweight Division.

H. Stoddard of York Barbell
Club was Bantamweight Cham~
pion and Clement Jackman. cham-
pion of the Lightweight Division.

The A.W.A.B, is aiming at even
a higher standard of lifting in
1952. The Association is hoping to
see more lifters in the Heavy and
Light Heavyweight Classes.

TABLE TENNIS
HIS year’s Table Tennis was
highlighted by the introduc-
tion of the Ladies Island Cham-
pionship. This was the first time
in the history of the island tnat
fhe local ladies were given a

@ On page 15





SUNDAY, DECEMBER 16, 1951 CHRISTMAS SUPPLEMENT PAGE FIFTEEN

NL

THE 1951 YEAR |
OF SPORT

@ From page 14
chance to prove their worth at
Table Tennis. Miss Margaret
Wood of Queen’s College, in a very
interesting match, defeated Miss
Patsy Howard of Barna Club by
three games to one to become the
first Ladies Island Champion of
Barbados.

For the Men’s Island Champion-
ship, Norman Gill, skipper of
Everton Club, with his aggressive
style, defeated Campbell Green-
idge of Barna Club.

Table Tennis enthusiasts were
looking forward to Louis Stoute,
Island Champion of 1949 and 50,
to regain the honour this year. He
was however defeated in the
semi-finals by his team-mate
Greenidge.

GOOD “B” MAN

Eddie Goodridgé of Barna Club
must be complimented for his very
grand display in the “B” Class.
He became champion. His team-
mates insist that he only began
playing table tennis éarlier in the
year, If this is so, well then, this



youngster is making rapid strides.team just to salv

He is now promoted to the A”
Class and perhaps he will have a
crack at the Island Championship
next year.

Norman Gill, who defeated Blair
Murray also won the Handicap
Championship. The Boys Cham-
pionship was won by H. Bourne.

The year 1952 will welcome an
extensive Table Tennis programme
in Barbados. It is undoubtably
the most extensive programme the
island has ever had.

LAWN TENNIS

ere TENNIS onganised on
Association lines in Barbados
was run during the year by the
Barbados Amateur Lawn Tennis
Association. The officers are:—
Dr. Harold Skeete, President, Hon,
V..C. Gale, Vice-President and
E. P.. Taylor, Honorary Secretary.

Seven clubs now comprise the
Association — Belleville, Strath-
clyde, Summerhayes, Melwi,
Premiere, Y.M.C.A, and Cable and
Wireless,

The Association sent a team to
Trinidad during the year to repre-
sent Barbados in Trinidad in the
Brandon Trophy. The team was a
three-man one but actually only
E. P. Taylor left Barbados as Ralph



A’ FABRICATION

Hullo Sports Fans, wherever
you are. A happy Christmas to
you and plenty of good playing
and good watching in the New
Year. Here are 25 not-too-diffi-
cult questions selected from
events in the past twelve months
just to keep you in trim until you
next go to see or play your
favourite game.

1. Name the Captain of the
British Ryder Cup team which
recently visited America.

2. Name the winner of the 1951
Cesarewitch. And how about the
Jockey.

3. Where was the last England-
Scotland Soccer _ International
played—Hampden Park or Wem-
bley? And what was the score?

4. Which Dominion Rugby side
is now touring Great Britain?
And are they playing Rugby
Union or Rugby League?

5. What is the name of the
Captain of the West Indies
Cricket team now in Austrilia.

6. Who won the men’s singles
title at Wimbleton this year.

7. And who won the Cup
Final?

8. Max Faulkener, the well-
known golfer, this year achieved
a feat unparalleled in the history
of the game. Can you say what
it was.

9. What norse won the Grand
National this year.

10. The record transfer fee for
a footballer is £34,000. Can_ you
say who paid it to who and for
whom.

11. Who is the European
Heavyweight Boxing Champion.

12. What famous French tennis
player and former Wimbledon
Champion announced his _ retire-
ment this year.

13. Which County won the
English Cricket Championship.

14. A famous English sports-
man was fecently married. in
South Africa His face has
eared On an advertisement in







Y y different countries. Wha‘
is his name a
15. A f is English jockey
cer set 1 a new record by
recently set up a ee ae



riding | 200th winns

H
xt rik



Legall and R. Carter arbadians,
already resident in Trinidad were
chosen to represent Barbados.

LEGALL TOPS

There was a be iy of opinion
who felt that R. Legall should not
have been asked to represent Bar-
bados inasmuch as he is now domi-
ciled in Trinidad that some
Barbadian who had taker part in
the Trials here should have been
preferred

I prefer to err with that school
of thought who subscribe to the
view that it was more important |
to have Barbados represented by
the best Barbadian talent avail-
able and even if we had to draw
upon Legall and Carter who were
already in Trinidad, and who, it
has been freely admitted even by
the opponents of the scheme, play
tennis up to a standard superior to
that of anyone whom the selectors
had at their disposal at the time.

The question of finance in these
intercolonial fixtures although it
is not the be-all and end-all is
still a most important factor and |
it is no point sending a weak
e the feelings of
local enthusiasts who are not up
to the required standard.

In addition I cannot agree that
this will stifle enthusiasm here as
the door is wide open whenever
the local players are good enough.

GOOD ACCOUNT

It will be remembereq _ that |
Taylor and Carter gave a g00d ac-
count of themselveg against Sturdy |
and Leahong, taking them to 8—6 |
m the first set and winning the |
third. Sturdy and Leahong, a |
perfect combina jon beat Noth- |
nagel and Thavenot in Jamaica in |
three straight sets in 45 minutes.

The Association sponsored a club |
tournament between clubs belong- |
ing to the Association and this took |
the form of two Doubles and one
Singles, the Doubles to be the |
best of fifteen games, return |
matches to be played and the
Singles the best of three sets.

Barbados has decided to enter a |
team for the Brandon Trophy |
games to be played in Jamaica |
next year and I suggest that should |
local players not be considered up
to a standard that would reflect
some credit on Barbados tennis or |
at least would ensure that Barba- |
dos is not disgraced.



16. Who is the A.A.A. Mile
Champion,

17, What team won the First |
Division soccer Championship? . |
18. Can you name the rugby
union player whose nickname is |

“The Boot”.

19. In which round did Sugar
Ray Robinson defeat Randolph
Turpin to regain the world Mid-
dleweight Boxing title. And in |
what month,

20. Who won the English |
Amateur Golf Championship.

21. Britain’s sprint champion is
McDonald Bailey. Where was he |
born.

22. Who won the boat race,
Oxford or Cambridge.

23. Who captained the South
African cricketers in England.

24. There is only one English |
first division club beside Charlton
which kes never valid more than
£15,000 for a footballer. Can you
name the Club.

25. And finally,, the name of
the MCC captain now in India,

ANSWERS TO SPORTS QUIZ

|
|

1. Arthur Lacey. - Non-playing |
Captain.

2. Three Cheers. E. Mercer. |

3. Wembley, Scotland won 3-2. |

4. South Africa. Rugby Union,

5. John Goddard. j

6. Dick Savitt (U.S.A.)

7. Newcastle United.

8. He’'won the Open and the

Masters Tournaments _ this |
year.
9. Nickel Coin.
10. Sheffield Wednesday to Notts
County for Ja well



11. Hein Ten Hoff

12. Jean Borotra

13. Warwickshire.

14. Denis Co
1

Gordon




inidad.
2. Cambridge
3. Dudley Nourse.

24. Arsenal Sur I n't it?



















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|
|





PAGE SIXTEEN



Ellen Glasgow, chronicling in serious
or comic vein the mores of the life she
knew, contributed a treasury of histor
ical novels to American literature

By W. ELIZABETH MONROE
From America.

Though passed over in silence
by many present-day critics,
Ellen Glasgow will always en-
joy a secure place in American
letters. She was born in the

southern State of. Virginia in
1874 and spent most of her time
there until her q@eath in 1945.
Her historical novels represent
the fictional equivalents of
major historical and social move-
ments in that section of the
American South, from 1850 to
1912; her comedies of . manners
and her more serious works
create a number of memorable
eharacters, apply a delicate
craftsmanship to. the portrayal
the American scene as it existed
in Virginia during the early part
of the twentieth century, and
delineate manners with unerring
rightness and vision. Her art is
formal in the extreme, and her
skill with descriptive prose,
which gives the effect of narra-
tive and captures incidents
which reveal and define charac-
ter, might well be envied by
greater novelists.

Perhaps Ellen Glasgow has
been neglected by the critics
because there was nothing

bizarre in her life or work to be
relished by any’ ‘literary cult.
Her book “In A Certain
Measure,” published in 1938,
explains her technique and the
inception of her stories. Though
it is a book no one concerned
with the technique of the novel
ean afford to miss, it is too sim-
ple and unmannered to catch the
attention of critics who live by
discovering something new and
striking every day. She knew
that no small voice can expect
to be heard in American litera-
ture over a long period of time,
but continued to practice for
exacting art for almost 40 years

serene disregard of that
‘knowledge. She thinks that to
move freely in an imagined uni-
verse is success whether that
success be recognized or not. Ske
mever went out deliberately to
observe a scene. or way of life
and never invented one out of
whole cloth, but waited for her
observation of life to sift itself
down inher imagination before
beginning to. write. The oharac-
ter Dorinda Oakley, for example,

that

NGG 1S GS 8





4x

ES



CHRISTMAS SUPPLEMENT

had been in her mind ten years
before she began to write the
novel “Barren Ground,” and
even then was given room to
grow and change.

Miss Glasgow worked hard
over her stories, always prepar-
ing three drafts, except with her
last novel, and never beginning
until she had distinguished_ the
point of view or points of view
from which the narrative was to

be tolfl. Unfortunately, she
suffered from the disadvantage
of being a socially prominent

woman herself and choosing to
write about “high society” in the
United States where there has
been no social tradition inclusive
enough to be accepted as a
matter of course in literature or
in life. For the most part
Americans have been in too much
of a hurry to get things done to
be concerned with affectation,
customs, or codes. All this con-
stitutes a great loss to the novel
to which manners customs, codes,
and traditions are the very stuff
of life. Ellen Glasgow, born into
a relatively stable social tradi-
tion, was giverr no encourage-
ment from the general public,
which knew little and cared less
about the chivalric tradition. She
sees to the core the vanities and
pretensions of the world she de-
scribes, its apathy and _ disen-
chantment, its evasiveness and
disorientation, and yet is unwill-
ing to condemn it outright. The
intention of such an art is to dis-
cover gharacter not only to the
reader but to the characters
themselves, and here Miss Glas-
gow’s urbane and ironical treat-
ment is invaluable. She has
created a whole assemblage of
people who have lost their way
in the world, but who are not
without some .of the dignity
proper to man.

Miss Glasgow knows for in-
stance, that Judge Gamaliel
Bland Honeywell (“The Roman-
tic Comedians,” 1926) is some-
thing of a pious fraud, yet she
allows him his hour of bliss, then
dismisses him from the scene
with the dignity a Virginia gen-
tleman deserves. He is not taken
directly from life; he is rather a
stylized version of life, and
placed in the perfect setting this
illusions call for, Mr. Virginius
Curle Littlepage (“They Stooped



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Ellen Glasgow

of fun, though he has amusing
moments—had he not contemplat-
ed infidelity over the better part
of a lifetime, only to become the
victim of his own good habits?
Occasionally his creator prods him,
but never harshly and, though she
laughs at his antics, she never lets
him lose face with the reader.
“The Sheltered Life” (1932) slips
a sharp rapier into the cult of de-
votion to beauty. Miss Glasgow
knew intuitively that in this novel
the points of view must determine
the form, and so the romantic
legend is viewed by an old man
whose futile life is behind him and
by a young girl who, in throwing
herself at her friend’s husband,
Says in essence: “I did not mean
anything. I only wanted to be
happy.”

Miss Glasgow is at her best in
the delineation of manners, a task
for which she was prepared by
birth, temperament, and experi-
ence. The comedy of manners re-
quires precise observation of man-
ners, a sense of form, a detached
point of view, wit and charm, the
ability to make little things inten-

esting and, above all, a civilised |

society, It requires also the ability

to see beneath and beyond detaiis |
to what Miss Glasgow calls the

eternal verities. 4

The comic spirit breathes
through all her works. She is
never heavy-handed or tedious,
never didactic, never exaggerated.
Cancerned with a society in search
of Rappiness, yet with no plan or
chart to guide it, furnished only
with a code of manners divorced
from its religious and moral bases
and almost without social mean-

ing, she sees that she must treat

her characters with ironical de-
ference. Even though leading a
tranced existence, they are so clear
that they seem to be suspended in
crystal. They never act except in

conformity with other people’s

ideals or with the exactions of an
inherited code.

many frustrated people, too many

despairing moods, too many gal-

lant poses in Miss Glasgow's
novels, While she is not respons-

ible for the malaise that afflicts

her characters, she might have

it ; broadened her subject and ‘given
to Folly,” 1929) is still less a figurehere and there a positive quality



REDMAN & TAYLOR'S GARAGE LTD.
ARAN DD DRDO RKS BiG



There are too





SUNDAY, DECEMBER 16, 1951

The American Novel Through Fifty Years:

to her treatment. That is to say,
her elegiac note could have been
fuller, richer, more varied, while
still remaining true to itself. There
is every reason to believe that Miss
Glasgow saw. no way to escape
futility except through . courage,
gallantry, and integrity. These are
great qualities, but not great
enough to redeem an age from
futility. Surely there must have
been someone in the society she
represents who saw that natural
values will not remain at the
human level without the support
of supernatural values. However,
in her books religion is always
treated skeptically and ironically,
as though the novelist herself saw
religion only as part of an out-
worn code.

While all of Miss Glasgow's
novels may’ be classified as
historical, they fall imto three
groups: the early works which
cover the period from 1850 to 1912,
a time during which the American
South fought in and lost the War
Between the States; went through
the subsequent difficult days of
political and economic reconstruc-
tion and finally entered a period
of industrial development; second-
ly, the three comedies already dis-



cussed which treat manners as
the fruit of history; and the three
final books, “Baron Ground”
(1925), “Vein of Iron” (1936), and
“In This Our Life” (1941), in
which Miss Glasgow varies her
descriptive method, creates ehar-
acter in the round, and broadens
her theme. These last three are
not novels of situation, but are
more dramatic than her earlier
works, and the separate incidents
bear a casual relationship one to
the other.

In “Barren Ground” nothing is
allowed to come into the story
except what the heroine might
have experienced, Miss Glasgow
considers this novel her greatest
work, With the writing of “Bar-
ren Ground” she asked searching
questions about the life she had
been observing from childhood on,
and created characters who are
not passive before experience, but
who now and then take a hand
in their own destiny. “Barren
Ground” is the story of a woman
who transcends all the bitter re-
versals of life through hard work
and an enduring spirit. She be-
longs to the race of the undefeat-
ed and would have been a great
character wherever the author
might have placed her; in this

@ On page 23








































SUNDAY, DECEMBER 16, 1951 CHRISTMAS SUPPLEMENT PAGE SEVENTEEN

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Friends from near and far
Will celebrate with

J&R”

CHRISTMAS IS NO CHRISTMAS WITHOUT’



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PAGE EIGHTEEN CHRISTMAS SUPPLEMENT SUNDAY, DECEMBER 16, 1951



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The Office adn Reception point. All orders |
on a tour over the plant. Orders are accep
and refrigerator equipment loaned free of
attention to each such order.

WE LOOK
TO SERVING YOU I







SUNDAY, DECEMBER 16, 1951 CHRISTMAS SUPPLEMENT PAGE NINETEEN











d completed in June 1951. Built by Clarke & Tucker
nd was designed by the Directors of Bottlers Ltd.

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z0 through here and all visitors are welcomed and taken
ted for parties, special events, etc.. in any quantity
charge. There is also a special staff to give personal

FORWARD
N THE NEW YEAR

LERS LTD.

Y STREET.



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PAGE TWENTY



CHRISTMAS SUPPLEMENT SUNDAY, DECEMBER 16, 1951














COSTUME JEWELLERY, etc., etc.

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; Win a 15 Ib. ... Sablon and your 3
© favourite Wines. 6
© This year our competition takes the form of clues and questions to be
answered similar to those we published Jast year. This type of competi-
tion seems to be more popular than the writing of stories.
The prize is once again a lovely 15 lbs. Christmas turkey, a bottle of 0
Dry Monopole Champagne, a bottle of the Sherry you like best, a bottle
Qo! Gold Braid Rum and a bottle of Hennessy’s Brandy.
Here are the rules of the competition :
1) For each clue, question, or space left out in the following 43 posers
you will find an answer in each advertisement.
2) The answer might be the name of a firm, an item in the advertise-
ment, a slogan, sentence or name. rd
3) Only one answer will be found in each advertisement, therefore , a bs
& all the advertisements appearing in the issue must be consulted. ‘ ~ 0
4) The first correct solution to all 43 clues opened by the Advertising ‘
© Manager of the Barbados Advocate will be the winner of the Com-
petition. P
5) In the event of no completely correct solution being received the
&) highest number of correct answers first opened will receive the
% prize.
Here is an example to guide you.
0 Let us suppose the clue was “A famous Artist.” The answer might be CLUES Answers.
@ “Goya”. This name appears on an item in DaCosta & Co.’s advertise- 36. De Lima for Diamonds but ......... 6s scees eee enene
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SUNDAY, DECEMBER 16, 1951

CHRISTMAS SUPPLEMENT



The Way

To Peace

By Wheeler McMillen

President, Americf£n Chemurgic
Council,

The chronic hunger of millions
of the earth’s people is a neediess
hunger. Through wise use of land,
the farmers of the world could
grow enough food to feed every-
one, In so doing, they would help
lay the foundation for lasting
world peace,

There are some people who be-
lieve that man cannot increase the
food supply rapidly enough to sup-
ply an expanding world popula-
tion. Ido not agree with them.
They fail to appreciate the re-
sourcefulness of the leaders of
men, They have little wunder-
standing of the potentials of agri-
culture. They have made their
forecasts on the basis of what has
happened — and those who look
backward are often wrong about
the future.

I believe that calm attention to
agricultural progress could appease
people’s hunger, relieve people's
misery, drown out the distractions
‘of communism’s evil promises, and
create the peace and abundance
that men universally desire. I do
not need to leave the United States
to find proof that man can over-
come his age-old enemy — hunger.

Eighty years ago the average
yield of oats in the then still com-
paratively new State of Illinois in
the central section of the United
States was only 28 bushels per
acre (1.75 metric tons per hectare).
Now it is 42 bushels per acre (2.62
metric tons per hectare). The
average Illinois farm 80 years ago-
yielded 10 bushels of wheat to the
acre (.68 metric ton per hectare);
now it yields 20 bushels per acre
(1.34 metric tons per hectare). In
parts of the United States single
fields have produced more than 100
bushels of wheat per acre (6.8
metric tons pere hectare) 200
bushels of corn per acre (13.6
metric tong per hectare).

The U.S. national average yield
of potatoes rose from 90 bushels
per acre (6.1 metric tons per hec-
tare) to 204 bushels per acre (13.9
metric tons per hectare) in 1950.
During the same period cotton
yields were nearly doubled.

Dr. Robert M. Salter, head of

:
And Plenty
|

the U.S, Soil Conservation Service,
has caleulated that at least 1,300,-
000,000 acres (520,000,000 hec- |
tares) of additional land could be
brought into food production in
the world and that fertilizer sup-
plies could be provided for such
additional acreage. ‘Other scient-
ists have estimated that an in-
crease of 10 per cent. in ihe rice
production of Chima and India
could provide food for an addition-
al 58,000,000 people in these
areas.

Knowledge of the land itself) is
still far from complete or perfect.
Within 50 miles (80 kilometers) of
my home in the State of New Jer-
bey I could take you to land which
the experts a few years ago classi-
fied as marginal or sub-marginal.
It could have been bought then for
$15 an acre (0.4 hectare), Now
the same land could not be pur-
chased for $1,000 an acre. It is
no longer marginal. It is no long-
er sub-marginal. This once $15-an-
acre land is $1,000-an-acre land
now because it has been found
that on no other soil can blue-
berries be grown so well. And the
blueberries are the triumph of
those who selected and bred
superior varieties from wild strains
that grew little heeded in the New
Jersey swamps.

This is but one example of how
marginal land may merely be land
for which no one has yet discover-
ed a proper use—just as a weed is
a plant for which no profitable
use has been discovered. The age
of discovery has not yet been
closed.

Only a very little of the earth’s
farm land produces as much food
and fibre and industrial raw mate-
rial as the land is capable of pro-
ducing. Science has gone but a
short distance on the long, long
way of exploring the frontiers of
soils and plants.

Man does not need to resort to
the despair of war. He does not
need to submit to the indignities
of tyranny to improve his material
well-being. Let him, instead, fol-
low the instruction of divine
nature. He will fing that God has
filled the earth with possibilities
for plenty and with inexhausti-
ble profits for the ways of peace.





U.S. ‘Marketing Rosoarch
Helps Farmors

WASHINGTON, D.C.

The marketing system for farm
products in the United States is
one that ‘has helped to bring about
the highest level of agricultural
and industrial productivity the
world has ever seen”, according
to U.S. Secretary of Agriculture
Charles F. Brannan, “It has helped
to raise the Nation’; useful em-
ployment, and in so doing has
helped to raise the Nation’: stan-
dard of living to its present pinna-
cle of progress,” he adds.

In 1946 the U.S, Congress passed
the Research and Marketing Act
which directed the U.S. Depart-
ment of Agriculture to undertake
“a scientific approach to the progr
blems of marketing, transporta-
tion, and distribution of agricul-
tural products, so that such pro-
ducts capable of being produced
in abundance may be marketed in
an orderly manner and efficiently
distributed.”

One of the market research pro-
jects already carried out by the
Department of Agriculture is a
study of the packaging of fresh
fruits and vegetables. Ag a result,
the packaging of corn, tomatoes,
spinach, kale, celery, and various
types of salad mixes has developed
into a sizable industry at terminal
markets.

For example, a_ study of the
packaging of sweet corn grown in
Florida during the winter months
for sale in northen States has open-
ed a new market. Northern house-
wives report they dike the yfick-
aged corn and have found it
reasonable in cost. The study also
revealed that corn husks and trim-
mings could be used to feed live-
stock at the point of production
and thus not be wasted

To acquaint retailers with the
latest developments in the mer-

chandising of fresh fruits and
vegetables, the U.S. Department of
Agficulture in co-operation with
the United Fresh Fruit and Vege-

table Associatior provided U.S.

retailers and their ployees with

a training course in merchan-
dising methods. The course in-
cluded instruction in produce trim-
ming, colour contrast, building of
rack displays, selective and mass
displays, day and night care of
produce, and other practices con-
ducive to less waste and greate?
sales,

The courses were started in
November, 1947. Within two years
some 15,000 grocers in 69 cities
and 29 States had taken the train-
ing. Many grocers adopted the
practices recommended in the
course. Some even remodeled
their entire produce departments.

Another part of the research
programme is directed toward im-
proving the market place itself.
More than 60 different cities in
producing areas of the United
States have requested studies of
their market facilities. For many
of these cities the Department of
Agriculture has made recom-
mendations that reduce operating
costs and deliver the products in
better condition to the consumers,

ew wholesale market facil-
ities have been built or are be-
ing built in 15 places as a result
of recommendations. One of the
largest of these is in Puerto Rico,
where a_ study of the Island’s
wholesale markets was begun in|
1949. The principal aim here is}
to facilitate the distribution of
commodities grown on the Island
and commodities imported so that
production can be increased and}
living standards of the people|
raised. j

Work has begun on this project. |
In 1950 the Puer.o Rico legisla-|
ture appropriated $200,000 to de-|
velop port facilities, and legisla- |

tors have recommended that more |
money be given for further de-|
velopments. }

Private research agencies, State
agricultural colleges, State denart-!
ments of Agriculture, and others
co-operate in the research pro-!
gramme to improve marketing
practices and facilitie, on local
State, and regional ba





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PAGE

TWENTY-ONE













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FACTORY LTD.
es Fe ute







PAGE TWENTY-TWO



CHRISTMAS SUPPLEMENT

SUNDAY, DECEMBER 16, 1951







WOMEN’S ROLE IN THE PURSUIT OF WORLD PEACE

For the first

time in history women

throughout much of the ‘werld are’ equal

partners with men in laying the founda-
tions of an enduring world peace

The twentieth century ushered

in an era of change and develop-
ment of new attitudes and new
values. To date, it has witnessed
two major wars and the birth of
many revolutionary movements.
As the logical and imevitabl gui-
come of such events and forces,
women have acquired a new
status, In world history for the
first time, in the more progressive
countries, they stand shoulder to
shoulder with men, as equal
partners in creating and shaping a
new social order.

However, the story of women’s
emancipation began much earlier
than the twentieth century when
the courageous defiance of the
English. author Mary Wollstone-
craft Godwin (1759—1797) and
the French novelist Amandine
Dudevant (1804—-1876) who wrote
under the man’s name of George
Sand broke into the complacency

of a conventiofial world. Later,
the constructive genius of two
English philanthropists — Eliza-

beth Fry (1780—1845) the prison

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a

reformer and Florence Nightengale
(1820—-1910) the reformer of hos-
pital nursing—added dignity and
importance to women of their
generation and the generations to
come. The list of women pioneers
continued to grow, and when the
twentieth century ushered in the
suffrage question there were stal-
wart women leadeis io inspire and
guide the bitter fight for political
freedom,

In the political annals of the
world, the proud achievements of
the early suffragettes constitute a
brilliant and poignant chapter.
The names of the American leader
and lecturer Carrie Chapman Catt
(1859—1947), the English leaders
Emmeline Pankhurst (1858—-1928)
ind Annie Besant (1847—1933),
and the Indian poet and. political
leader Sarojini Naidu (1879--——)
are familiar to all, but behind
these great suffragette leaders
were countless other women whose
names are not remembered but
whose tireless work and co-opera-
tive effort made possible the ulti-
mate victory.

Outstanding as the results of
the women’s movement have been,
one should not overlook the dy-

rae mi

will

CO Lae vangagte

ava P AP ALaL ath Parra ataratatara tar ata tat arat arate!

wards meeting the pressing needs
-of women throughout the world.
The recent resolution of the Com-
mission for the Status of Women,

By Hannah Sen

namic ‘significance of the long homes to take up positions in gov- Pressed for the inclusion of wo~
years of struggle to attain national ernments and in public offices. If Men in visiting missions to trust
independence or to achieve a de- the rate of progress was slow, it territories, opens up a new path-
mocratic society which character- was not discrimatory legislation way for such service.
ized some of the countries in that stood in the way, so much as The political pattern of each
which the women lived. New the forces of custom and tradition. country should indicate—but does
governments and new nations The backwardness of centuries not always do so—the status that
were born in Europe and, in more could not be obliterated in a day. women have reached in other di-
recent years, in Asia, These have But with the legal basis for dis- rections as well. In _ countries
been great factors in promoting crimination removed, the task of Whers ‘vdependence from foreigu
social, justice and in elevating the helping women to complete theif domination has been a matter of
status of women, It was but na- emancipation was greatly sim- recent occurrence, women’s politi-
tural that women, having shared plified, cal progress has tended to outstrip
in the hazards of war, should Despite the fact that in the en- their educational and economic
share in the triumphs of peace. franchised countries women are advancement. The explanation
Women’s equality with men in taking up administrative appoint- for this poorly balanced develop-
every field of human endeavour ments at all government levels, ment often lies in the unavailabil-
gained increasing recognition as a there are millions of them every- ity of adequate finances to imple-
precondition of a true democracy. where who have to be awakened ment programmes of educational
By the time the twentieth cen--to the decisive role they should and economic betterment. But
tury had reached its halfway play in national and world affairs. there are other causes as well that
mark this principle of women’s Hitherto, it was women’s organi- retard the education of women,
equality had become an accepted zations which carried the main such as social prejudices and out-
fact in large areas of the world. burden of reforming old concepts moded beliefs,
In India, Pakistan, and elsewheré, and of educating women for their j
it was incorporated in newly new role. But with the establish- . UNESCO proposes holding an
drafted constitutions, With new ment of the United Nations Com- iMternational seminar in 1953 to
opportunities came new responsi- mission on the Status of Women, Study the means for overcoming
bilities and women began to the promotion of women’s rights Such obstacles. UNESCO also
emerge from the seclusion of their and the implementation of the Plans to call a conference in 1952
principle of equality become the devoted solely to the subject of
concern of governments as well, | Women's education. This trend in
With the birth of the United Na- international interest augurs well
tions, new hopes dawned for the for the future. An enlightened
peoples of the world. And with Womanhood is of far-reaching sig-
the reaffirmation of its faith in Mificance in the pursuit of happi-
the equal rights of men and wo- Pess and world amity.
men, new interest centred around _ Pertinent to the question of wo-
the advancement of women, Men's development is the economic
Therefore, among the commissions Problem of equal pay for work of
set up to perform the many func- equal value, with all its implica-
tions of the Economic and Social tions. This principle has been em-
Council of the United Nations was bodied in the Universal Declara-
included the Commission on the tion of Human Rights and has
Status of Women. been accepted by governments. Its
full implimentation, however, has
The Commission has served as a been delayed. In technically less
very effective instrument for col- developed countries, it is contend-
lecting data and focussing atten- ed that the absence of a well or-
tion on instances of discrimination ganized wage-fixing machinery
and backwardness. What has add- has underlined the inevitability of
ed considerable value to its de- gradualness.
liberations has been the presence, ah
at its meetings, of representatives The work initiated by the Inter-
of important non-governmental national Labour Organization in
organizations and specialized agen- this field has been commendable.
cies, working in related fields. The Due to the series of conferences
progress which the Commission it has arranged—between repre-
has made in its programme, since sentatives of governments, of em~
its inception in 1946, reflects very ployers, and of employees—there
largely the condition of women in has been general agreement on
the present day world. The in- the manner in which this prob-
vestigation and researches, con- jem may be approached and on
ducted under its auspices, have the need for international reg-
rer ed ee me ye yt ulations. Doubtless women’s or-
sition of women in the eren’ ionti ‘ ;
regions and even among the mem- eee ae ee “oo
ber States, which have signed the “UesUO eq s
United Nations’ Charter and the will continue to watch further
Universal Declaration of Human developments and to work for the
Rights, While such inequalities final elimination of discrimina-
exist, there cannot be lasting ‘tion,
yo ere ere oe at There are many other tasks
rights accruing to women, fran- that confront the women of to-
chise and the eligibility to hold day, and there are other facets
public office and to exercise ,1b- to the over-all problem of equal
lic functions are regarded as the rights that must not be neglected.
most fundamental. In reviewing All these tasks may be safely left
women’s political status and its re- to the care of women’s organiza-
/cent development, the years fcl- tions and the UN Commission on
lowing the signing of the United the Status of Women.
Nations Charter in 1945 seem to
be the most fruitful. An analysis
of the eet sia. that before
Wovrid War » women en- I se
joyed the right to vete in four ket My r
coumerian only: Australia, Finland, Rac At City Kall
New Zealand, and Norway. By big clock at city hall takes
the end of World War II (1945), | eunall
31 more countries had conceded xactly 30.seconds to strike
these rights, and, in the five suc- *!X o'clock. It takes more than
/ceeding years, another 21 coun- -twice as long to strike twelve.
tries enfranchised their women. Can you tell us why, and how
The problem of how best to much time elapses between the
speed up tihe emancipation of wo- first stroke and the last stroke of
men in the less advanced countries twelve?
has for many years engaged the
attention of women’s organiza-
tions. The twin methods of edu-
cation and propaganda were con-
sidered the most effective. With
the entry of the Commission on
the Status of Women into the
struggle for women’s rights, opin-
ion in favour of a convention
gained in strength. It was felt that
a more potent weapon should be
added to the other modes of at-









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your cows and I'll have twice

4s many as you have.”
Albert replied, “It would be

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At \tack, Consequently, when the
mK Hi Commission that in 1950 and 1951, â„¢ore fair for you to give me one
it set about adopting a comprehen- of your cows, for then we'd be
mt |}sive Convention on__ Political even.”
re Ss |Rights. Such a_conventon, if ac- How many cows did each have?
| cepted by the Economic and So- “AB WOATY pue eXcd
$2 | cial Council and ratified by the "4% O*a essa wnm s2uqy :someuy
s |member states of the United Na- —
#& | tions, would offer women through- [s)OMTTIVISISIH[S| Ons!
S| out the world a wider range of {V) 13} vy) =
= political opportunities and new N og a, |
Be avenues for service. $6 OVCIN HS IY
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& lating to their — status are avail- 0 Sia TiS 1a
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CARIBBEAN = and it is possible that their a 9 - 4 :
ill be repeated 2 4

ARAATRARAGE "ben thei



energies 10-da to- ‘





SUNDAY, DECEMBER 16, 1951

Outdoor Exhibit Brings Unknown Artists Before

One of the most colourful sights
in the art world is the outdoor
exhibit in which art works are
displayed right out on the streets.
This type of exhibit has been
held in cities all over the world
and is now flourishing in many
American cities.

The first of these exhibits and
the largest and most popular in
the United States is the one held
twice each year in the Greenwich
Village section of New York City.
This section of the Nation's
largest city serves as an especial-
ly colourful and appropriate
backdrop for an art exhibit,
Traditionally artists from all over
the world have lived, studied, and
created in this picturesque area
in the lower part of Manhattan
Island.

The exhibits are held around
Washington Square with the art
works exhibited along the streets
and alleys in the area. The space
is used with the permission of the
City of New York and private
property owners who allow their
fences to hold the paintings.

The Washington Square Out-
door Art Exhibits were started in
1932 to bring art works to the
public at no expense to the artists
who are thus enabled to reach
an audience which might other-
wise be unaware of their exist-
ence. The exhibits were origin-
ally organized on an _ informal
basis by a group of American art
museum directors. The future
of the show has been threatened
many times during the past 20
years because of lack of funds but
each time interested citizens
banded together and saved it.
Five years ago the show was put
on a more formal basis through
the formation of the Washington
Square Outdoor Art Exhibit, Inc.,
“a non-profit organization with
the avowed purpose of stimulat-
ing, promoting, and preserving
contemporary American art.”

Any artist who so desires may
exhibit, and sell his works during
the exhibit as long as he can
prove to the exhibit’s directors
that his work is original. To
stimulate wider interest in the ex-
hibit, during the past several
years civic and community groups
and individuals have offered cash
prizes for the best works exhib-
ited in the show. These works
are selected by juries of national-
ly-known artists and art critics.
Registration has grown. steadily
in the show, with over 250 artists
participating in the fortieth show
held in the fall of 1951 and over
350 in the spring exhibit. which
is traditionally larger.

Public interest also has grown
during the years and as many as
100,000 persons visited the latest
exhibits‘in one day. Many lead-
ing Americans including the
mayors of various American
cities, United Nations’ represen-
tatives, and members of arts and
science groups in. the United
States and other countries, are
regular visitors to the exhibits.
The two exhibits held in 1951
received official recognition by the
City of New York.. The Mayor
of the City proclaimed the weeks
set aside for them as “Washington
Squar Outdoor Art Exhibit
Weeks,” and many special events
were held honouring the directors
of the exhibits. Special television
and radio programmes have re-
ported on the exhibits and the
participating artists to more per-
sons than ever throughout the
United States and in other coun-
tries. E

The show has been attempting
recently to attraqt artists from

The American
We
hifty

@ from page 16
story she is given the perfect set-
ting for her courage and power
to endure. A note of triumph
sounds through the beautiful but
austere narrative, which is re-
markable for its close unity of
theme, mood, character, and place.
In “Vein of Iron” and “In This
Our Life,” Ellen Glasgow broad-
ens her theme still further. What
happens to man when all supports
are taken away; what happens
when he stands face to face with
his ultimate fate? Is it the “vein
of iron” that keeps him upright—
or an inexhaustible instinct for
survival—or individual integrity?
These questions are all the more
poignant inasmuch ag the author
appears to be seeking the answer
for herself as well as for her
characters, and whether the
. answers are satisfying or not, they
are germane to the character him-
self and to his story; In both
these novels Miss Glasgow nitkes
style, structure, even language
work for her in interpreting the





The Public

By NORMAN SMITH

many walks of life, not only pro-
fessional artists, Hospitalized
war veterans. for example, are
encouraged to exhibit their
works, and volunteers are pro-
vided by the show to take care
of their exhibits. In addition,
the interest of children has been
stimulated by exhibits sponsored
by such groups as the Girl and
Boy Scouts.

For the first time, during the
1951 spring show, paintings by
children of New York City were
sent to Paris, France, in exchange
for paintings by the children of
that city. This exchange was
sponsored by the exhibit in the
interest of mutual understanding
among all nations and lasting
peace, Paintings by the French
children were included in the fall
exhibit. A similar project is now
underway with children of Rome,
Italy, and it is expected that
works by these children will be
exhibited in the 1952 spring show.

Cultural Notes and Briefs

The exhibitions and the educa-
tional programme of the Heard
Museum at Phoenix in the south-
western State of Arizona, is de-
signed primarily to foster an
appreciation of the American
Indian as an artist, together with
an understanding of his progress
through prehistoric times to the
present. The Museum was found-
ed by Mr. and Mrs. Dwight B.
Heard so that their vast collec-
tion of Indian arts and crafts
might be made available to the
public. The museum sponsors
annual lecture’ series on the
works of the Indians,

m a

A_ two-volume work designed
to help Americans understand
their past has been published in
the United States. Titled “Life
in America,” the work, containing
1,200 illustrations and 250.000
words, is essentially a history
book with the story told primarily

through illustrations. This an-}

nual historical work was pre-

pared by Marshall B. Davidson, |

who took a five-year leave of
absence from his position as a
curator at the Metropolitan
Museum of Art in New York
City to complete the project,

A collection of art treaures,
worth more than $1,000,000 and
considered by many art experts
to be one of the finest privately-
owned collections in the world,
has been distributed among four
American museums and one uni-
versity as ‘provided for in the
will of its late owner. He was
Samuel A. Lewisohn, American
industrialist, philanthropist, and
art collector. The collection con-
tains 184 items, including works
by Rousseau, Gauguin, Van Gogh
Renoir, and Picasso

The Civic Opera group in Flint,
Michigan in the midwestern
United States, has presented 46
performances of 15 different)
operas in English translation,
during the 20 past years. The

of this group. which is
of local talent,

success
composed entirely





has inspired many other Ameri-'
can cities to organize their own

Civic opera groups,

In 1910 there were some 600

museums in the United States. By |

1939 there were 2,500.

Novel Through
Years

theme. In the first chapters of
“Vein of Iron” she distinguishes
five different points of view
‘hrough the prose cadences and
the use of dissonant and harmoni-
ous sounds in the recollections of
her characters. “In This Our
Life” she uses language and re-
current images much more subtly |
to show the illusory nature of the
experience and the insubstantial
nature of a world that has lost its
moorings. Through symbolism
she shows how her characters find
happiness slipping through their
fingers at the very moment certi-
tude seems to be theirs. Such a
writer as Ellen Glasgow, with so
much to say and so conscious of}
the means of saying it, need not

FGA AT ATK BA BN PDN NR HN DUR SAN PER



worry and neglect, (LITERA-
TURE)
This is one in a series of 13 articles |

which appeared tn America, a Catholie |
retiew of the week, edited and pub-
lished by the Jesuit Fathers of the}
The writer is assistan)
English at Brooklyn Col-
y of New York, and







author

and Society”.

CHRISTMAS SUPPLEMENT



What Americans Are
Thinking

“The able marching band....
is supreme because it can both
march and play, and do each
equally well. It can march with
precision, in perfect alignment, at
a conservative cadence: with
erect carriage, unity of step and
Stride, coordination of bodily
movement, and smartness of exe-
cution This band performs
music which is well-adapted to
the marching band’s instrumenta-
tion and which is not too difficult.
Music of conservative range and
not too rhythmically complex,
and whose technical demands are
not beyond the proficiency of the
bandsmen.”

—William D. Revelli, conduc-

tor of the University of Mich-

igan band.

* ca *

“Love of one’s work is of ut-
most importance. There is no
room for forced labour. Self-
discipline and concentration are
important...It is my firm belief
that long hours of practice are
not so helpful as a few hours of
intense and concentrated study.
It is physically impossible to ex-
ercise your best powers, at high-
est level, for longer than two or
three hours at a time ... After
that ... refresh yourself ... then
go back to work ... Interpreta-
tion ..+ should always be
approached with a fresh mind.”
—Viadimir Horowitz, Russian-
bern American pianist,

*

“People write quality
stories because they must: not.
because they hope to get
rich, or even to make a liv-
ing, from writing them,”
—Herschel Brickell, author,

editor, and critic.

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PAGE TWENTY-THREE



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PAGE

TWENTY-FOUR



CHRISTMAS SUPPLEMENT



SUNDAY, DECEMBER 16,

1951



oe Fon Christmas Partios |



By Dorothy Barkley

North, East, South or West ? A
‘white’ Christmas, or tropical
temperatures? Indoor parties, or
outdoor picnics — which is it for
you? Wherever you are, Christ-

mas has come, bringing its junket-
ing and merrymaki ng.

The food and the decorations
are traditional. The plum pudding
(using grandmother's recipe) has
been stirred and cooked; the fairy;
lights (carefully put away each
year), have been brought out

again; the Christmas shopping (in
spite of firm resolutions) has
somehow been left to the lasi

minu e.

But what of yourself? Are you
prepared, down to the very last
detail, for the gamut of parties

that come with Christmas? Have
you dreamed up ways and means
to créate a new you, sparkling
and gli.tering specially for the

festivities? For, if there is one
thing which is not traditional
about Christmas, it is dressing

Woethex
informal par

for the party.
‘Separates’ for an
or a gown with yards of dia-
phanoug tulle for a formal func-
tion, you must create a very spec-
ial kind ‘of look for these very
special occasions.

Perhaps the most important
thing to remember is that acces-
sories, more than the most giam-
orous dress in the world, pro-

ide the Keynote to individuality.
They add extra sparkle even to





the newest of new lines in
dresses; and alternatively trans-
form the humblest black dress into
something rich and rare; the
glitter of jewellery on black vel-
vet. flamingo pink or citrus
yellow with black... embroider-
ed sweaters.

Here are some suggestions for
adding Christmas sparkle and
glitter to your accessories. And
you will find .hat you can make
many of them yourself at home.

Handbags: The newest styles
are made in soft black suede, cut
in six sections, and finished with
matching cord. To add sparkle,
new beads or diamante round the
edge to match diamine on_ your
shoes. (Illustrated).

Belts: Infinite variety can be
introduced with these. We have
selected two different styles; .he




al are lace RAR RNAS. beice

YOUR CHRISTMAS CRACKER © @zr Children And Saints & (hrustmases

By LAWRENCE BENEDICT
HOW CLEVER OF YOU TO
THINK OF IT!

He has ample scope to err

In the choice of a gift from him
to her.

She can more
swim

In the re.urn from her to him.

It’s not the present that counts,
but the thought,

Of what the money could have
bought.

easily sink than

NOT QUITE SO ROUGH, DEAR
The heart lights up, at first, to

see

The little ones at their party
tea.

But the domestic havoc they

leave in their tracks is
Like the work of maniacs with
axes,



BF. GONE DULL CARE — BUT
NOT TOO FAR
How pleasant it is to joke and

laugh
At.the party for the staffj if )\
“Fancy her in — Fancy that!
Why there’s. the boss in a paper
hat !”

From Page 3

Holland is converted into one
huge kindergarten; cinemas’ and
restaurants are almost empty, and
= few stray people in the streets
are carrying parcels and hurrying
to some warm fireside, where the
home-made poetical efforts are
read and huge mugs of hot
chocolate are drunk.

If you come ‘to Holland in
December, bring with you a good
appetite. Hardly recovered from

the hangover of December 6th,
the Dutch housewife, who firmly
believes that a happy life depends
en a well-filled stomach, prepares
herself for the serious task of
Christmas cooking, which runs



But, remember to moderate your
Taufiiter,
For there will be many
ings after.

morn-

ABOVE PROOF — BELOW PAR
The proof of the pudding is in
the eating:
The proof of the egg is
breaking:
The proof of the lovers is in the

in the

moie or less on the same lines as
its British counterpart, il
the traditional pudding is un-|
known, and olie bollen take its |
place.
lated loosely by the English into
oily balls) are delicious bun-like
affairs stuffed with spice and
currants and peel, dipped into
kot butter and. fried golden}
brown. A dish of toast covered
with smoked eel,, a flagon of
heavy Dutch gin, and we are set|
for the evening. In many fami-

iies, the Christmas tree comes to
a glorious end. After looking
out of the window to make sure
no unsuspecting persons are
beneath, the tree in all its
sparkling glory, is casually drop-
ped out. This is more amusing

if you live on the third or fourth |

floor. Depending on how merry
were the Christmas festivities, a
cautious member of the family |
Und creeps down and
the tree in the middle of the road |
It is often joined by others before
morning, and a row of
trees are suddenly growing in the |

street. Wiho is happiest when it
meeting } is {all vover? Probably tic â„¢. who |
The proof ‘of, the frink +t the djastmot shave to hg a
head tha aching. nore. + :



BRE NN ANN ANE NN AN NN PN NN ON NN NN EN NN RN NNN PAS

Olie bollen (Usually trans- |

stands |

little fir |

first, iif plain Jeather* â„¢ fastens
padlocks (Illustrated)... “Phe sec-
ond, @ belt, button, and pocke’
set, will be saving grace-for any
black dtess. The entire set is made
.n black grosgrain, decorated as
you please with clusters of col-
oured stones. (Illustrated).

Sweaters: The party air
a difference comes in
oo, If you havea fine jong-
sleeved cashmere sweater —moss
green is a good colour —team it
with a satin skirt, (perhaps in a
soft shade of gardenia); make
collar and cuffs for the sweater
in satin to match the skirt.

White is always a good colour
tor evening wraps, so by way ol
a change from the ubiquitous tulle
stole, knit yourself a white wool
bolero, and fringe it all the way
round with bobbles. (Illustrated).

Sca.terpins; More Christmas
sparkle comes in the scatterpins,
which are more lifelike than eve1
this year: crabs, giant flies, even
snakes, are scattered realistically
on berets, scarves, cocktail hats,
and evening dresses, Chovre a
bright emerald green wool scarf
to go Wih a black evening dress,
and scatter one end with a
swarm of insects. If you have a
strapless evening dress, why not
relieve the bareless of the should-
ers by pinning a really life-like
snake to the cuff of the dress?
(Tilustrated) If you do this, you
will be among an honoured com-
pany of Lady Mayoresses, and
actresses.

with
sweaters



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HIGHWAY ONE,








Veils:
Christmas
want

Strange advice for

sparkle here if you
to make the most of your
eyes, veil them. For there is
nothing more fascinating or
sophisticated than a veil. The
most effective is the new ‘visor’
veil, which covers only the eyes.
(Iflustrated) If you are wearing
gilt jewellery, choose an eye veil
in golq net; if there ure sequins
on your dress, spangle you veii
with sequins.

Necklaces:
to make for
Take a

Here is another idea

yourself at home,
piece of narrow velve-
ribbon, and sew half a dozen
small rein - bells to it; make a
bracelet in the same way.

Now here are a few last-min-
ute suggestions:

Wind fresh flowers round plain
gold earrings;

Pin a glittering brooch across
the back of your hair; it iooks
wonderful with a long style.

With a black sweater and skiri,

wear a tartan stole and matching
tartan ballet pumps. (It’s the
greatest sin in a Scotman’s eyes

to mingle tartans).

Hang a tiny perfume dispenser
from your bracelet — a good way
to make the fragrance last the
entire evening.

One final word: allow your-
elf plenty of time to prepare for
the party; for half the fun of,the
party lies in preparing for it.
Handbag, gloves, scarf — all pres-
ent and correct? Off you go, you
lucky girl.

Sees tae



pores

PORTER'S X-RDS.

Ey oui ak NN AON NTN EAN NH AH NH ON DR NN







SUNDAY, DECEMBER 16, 1951 CHRISTMAS SUPPLEMENT PAGE TWENTY-FIVE
SNe inne cena” sesame nmneeness















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PAGE TWENTY-SIX





CHRISTMAS SUPPLEMENT

The Racing

It is ai frieult to wrile,a review
ef racing im Barbados without
mentioning the sport im. Trinidad
because the two ‘have become sv
integrated. But for the purposes
of this article, it would be found
too lengthy if we endeavoured to
review the racing year in both
places in detail. It is therefore
intended to make only limited
references to meetings in Trini-
dad in cases.where horses trained
in Barbados took part.

Looking at racing in Barbados
from the financial point of view
it is clear that 1951 has been a
good year. Although the big

broke easily in front of Usher,
Vanguard, Hi-Lo and Soprano.
Best Wishes soon went into the
lead running freely but still on the
bit and Cross Roads was tucked in
behind her by O’Neal as_ they
reunded the paddock bend. Afier
this there was little"change in the
order and running on_a length or
two in front ot Cross Roads all the
way Bést Wishes came home a
very easy winny of the second
Barbados Guineas. In fact Holder
actually eased her up a few strides
before the winning post. Cross
Roads was second some lengths in
front of Usher but the rest of the

Bost Wishes §xc optio

sweepstake run on the August
meeting did not reach the record
sum attained in 1950, yet this
was in some respects made up
for by the increased attendance
at the actual meetings themselves

and a consequential increase in
spending on the actual days of
racing.

The Barbados Turf Club staged
their first four-day fixture at
their annual.August meeting and
throughout the days of racing
records for the turn over in the
Pari-Mutuel, Betting Forecast and
Field Sweep went toppling. In
the Field Sweep particularly was
this so and on the final day of the
meeting the first prize in each
of the last three events rose to
over $1,000.

A second four-day meeting was

also held in November and but
for inclement weather this too
might have seen some extra
prizes. 3ut although the weath-
er rendered the November meet-

ing only a partial success on the

actual days of racing, yet it was



fortified by a record sweepstake
for this time of the year. The
first prize in this sweep vas
$32,000.
fhe Three-Year-Old Creoles
Amony the three-year-old
horses, bred in the B,W., the
Chri¢tma meeting of 1950 in
Trinidad had own Chat there

were some unusually fine creoles
in the offing for the classic races
of 1951. From Jamaica had come
the Jester ard Paris, two sons of
the famous stallion. Merry Mark
and while each managed only a

single win they did so in the
style of real champions. The
Jester won the classic Breeders’
Stakes for two-year-olds and

Paris, who was beaten into third
place in this event, found his true
form on the third day when he
defeated a field of all ages in the
Marave! Handicap for D class and
lower.

Also r Cnris*
meeting were Best Wishes, a filly
by Burning Bow out of Felicitas
bred in St. Vineent by Mr. Cyril
Barnard, and Cross Roads, a
gelding by Dunusk out of April
Showers, bred in Barbados by Mr
Lisle Ward but owned by Mr.
Alexander Chin of B.G, Cross
Roads ran fourth in the Breeders’
Stakes and Best Wishes was un-
placed in this event, but later on
both found their form and while
Cross Roads won three races for
two-year-olds in F class with
consummate ease, the last with
136 lbs Best Wishes won two
in class E against horses of all

es

il ‘t toe

1951 therefore opened witn @&
promise of some keen rivalry be-
tween Best Wishes and Cross
Roads and the Barbados Guineas,
a classic for three-year-olds run
over 7% furlongs at the B.T.C.
March fixture, was eagerly await-
ed when it was known that these
two would meet each other in
this race. What slight difference
there was in the betting was in
favour of Cross Roads, for al-
though it was felt that Best
Wishes was a very good one her
condition did not please and it
was doubtful if she could pro-
duce her best form,

One of the detracting features
of the Guineas in 1951 was also
the poor quality of the rest of

the company in contrast to Best
Wishes and Cross Roads. There
were five and of these only Van-
guard Vv a winner. He had
secured a single win as a two-
year-old in vember in the
previous year but this was
against poor Opposition and so his
chances in the Guineas did not
lonk very rosy.

Eventually there were six
starters and immediately the gates

flew Best Wishe





ana Cross I 1ds

field was tailed off a good dis-
tance behind.

It was now clear that Best
Wishes Was a filly of exceptional
class. She had not only won a very
race from a good horse like
C.oss Roads and set up a new
time record for this classic, but in
doing so she ran her race faster
than it had taken the older creoles
Mary Ann, Wacercress and Bow
Bells to do the same distance vn
the same day in the Castle Grant
Stakes fo: D elass. In as much
as Mary Ann had wen her race in
a pillar to post gallop while Best
Wishes was never really extended






Year

The Trial Stakes was won by
the Jester II. but both Paris and
Rock Diamond, the other favour-
ites were also off form.

The contest for the Barbados
Derby therefore appeared to be
in open one when Best Wishes
and Cross Roads returned from
Trinidad in such poor condition.

Mr. M. E. R. Bourne’s Usher, a
gelding by Dunusk out of the
good creole mare Maid of Hon-

our, had been improving steadily.
He had won @ race at the March
meeting after he took part in the
Guineas but was disqualified; On
the third day of the same meeting

—y Hookie

he had been beaten over 74 fur-
longs by Waterbell, a_ filly. by
Restigouche out of Belleplain
ered and owned by Hon. J. D.
Chandler. However he was con-
eding her some weight and so he
was not disgraced. At the June
meeting he had also run well and
after being placed twice won a
six furlong event from other three-
year-olds in F. Class.

With Waterbelle and an improv-
ed Usher in the Derby it therefore
seemed as if it would not be the

two horse race which the Guineas
had been. The betting -therefore

Tn

See 37 RR Joe
SUNDAY, DECEMBER 16,

Barbados

when obviously in very poor con-
dition and indeed it was only few
days before the race that she had
been given a proper gallop, Even
this was not more than a mile at a
very restrained pace. Once again
she had also broken a record her
time of 1.57 2/5 beating the pre-
vious best set up by Watercress
the year before by nearly a
second.

Best Wishes’ breeding is in-
teresting from the point of view
that her dam Felicitas, by Colora-
do Kid out of Happier, by Flam-
ingo, was imported to the West
Indies by Mr. Cyril Barnard after
she had produced the good winner
Toronto, who raced and won in
very good company in England,
The next foal was Genghis Khan,
a colt by Tai Yang which was
foaled in England soon after Mr.
Barnard bought Felicitas. Be-
fore leaving England Felicitas pro-
duced a filly foal to the cover of
Felstead and then arrived in the
West Indies carrying a foal to the
cover of Bobsleigh. Genghis
Khan raced in Barbados and was
successful in C class and then
again in two A class_ races,
Felicity Bay, the filly by Felstead
raced only two or three times and
was en retited due to a chronic
ickness which rendered her al-
most useless as a race horse. St.
Mori z, the colt by Bobsleigh, was



HON. V. C. GALF and Miss Toves Deane. sister of Mrs. Cyril Barnard, leading in Best Wishes (Holder

up) after her victory in the Barbados Derby at the

it was reasonabie to

“ne una at this early stage of
her career Best Wishes was al-
ready one of the best creoles in
raining in Barbados. Only Gun
Site, Atomic II and Oatcake, the
first two in A class and the latter

h evcnt




in C2 could be considered better.
. Best Wishes aid not race again
at the March meeting but Cross
Roads took part in three races

The first was
later on the same day as_ the
Guineas when the ran second to
Mary Ann in the race ie erred ‘0
above. The second was in, the
Moctls Gront Handicap over five

halt furtongs where he ran
us coud to BoW Bells, and
e third was’ oa ihe lav day
when he won the Bowring
Memorial Handicap over 9 fur-
longs from Bow Bells, Mary Ann
end Watercress in that order, In
cach race his weight was natu-
really light and in the final one
particularly he was receiving 18
lbs. from Bow Bells and 11 from
Mary Ann. However it was alsu
clear that Cross Roads too was a
very good creole and indeed his
time of 1.56} for the nine fur-
longs in March was by far the
best ever recorded for any

three-year-old in Barbados.
y

odes ves). 2s
The Barbacos Derb
Turning to events leading up
to the Barbados Derby it must
first be recorded that both Cross
Poads and Best Wishes went to
Trinidad to race in the classic

after the Guineas







Trial Stakes at the June meeting
However. both” w unfit and
unwell and ‘nfter racing in The
Trial Stakes last and one tefore
last respectively, they never re-
covered sufficiently to reproduce
anything like their best form.
Best Wishes, did not race at the
meeting after the classic while
Cross Roads ran twice but was

hopvéléssly tailed off on each oc

perked un a f2v weeks bot=c> the

event,

As the preparations went on for
the August meeting both Best
Wishes and Cross Roads appeared
to recover very slowly and it was
only in the last week that either
of them displayed any relish for
work; In the end Waterbelle was
withdrawn and the final field was
made up of five as follows: Best
Wishes, Cross Roads, Usher,
Hi-Lo and, Vanguard

As the gates went up it was
onee-again Best Wishes who struck
out in front. She was followed bv





Crocs Roads with Vanguard ard
Hi-Lo next while Usher, v2r,
much «1 the hit, t St un the
rear. ‘This order w main‘ainec

up the stretch for the firsi time
and around the paddock bend and

B.T.C, August meeting this year.

Urneucally no g90d at three years
old but has since won
Trinidad-in C class and A class now
that he is a four-year-old.

Felicitas first creole foal was
Bow Bells who won the classic
Trial Stakes in Trinidad last yecr
and Best Wishes is her full sister
both being by Burning Bow. Where
Bow Bells has shown more speed
than stamina Best Wishes appears
to combine both and so makes a:.
excellent middle distance runne:
as we have seen above.

At the remainder of the August
meeting Usher continued to im-
prove and with little oppovition of
any account in F he fairl wined
rhe board. In three starts h2 wes
beaten once only by Miracle and
Waterbelle who finished in front



races in 76:

-

1951



of Hurricane, by Sunplant, won
the first two races for this elass
and showed that he had improved
a bit since August. His second win
especially was achieved with top
weight, and was therefore very
meritorious. Next best was Vice-
roy, a gelding bred in St. Lucia by
Roidan out of Schiavina who ran
second to Vanguard once, and then
second twice to the four-year
Colleton, at less than weight-for-
age.

On the whole there was a big gap
between the three best three-year-
olds of 1951—-Best Wishes, Cross
Roads and Usher on the one hand,
and the rest—Vanguard, Miracle,
Waterbelle, Viceroy, Hi-Lo, So-
prano, Clementina and River Mist
etc. on the other. Excuses might
be forthcoming for both Waterbelle
and Miracle however, because
while the former broke down at
the August meeting the latter was
seen in only one race which she
won. About the latter especially
does one feel enthusiastic because
she was backward to the point of
being ridiculously unfit when she
won her one and only engagement
from flag to finish. Only superior
quality made her spread-eagle her
field as she did over 5} furlongs in
this event. She is another cross of
Battle Front and Marshlight bred
by Mr. C. A. Proverbs and there-
fore sister to Will O'the Wisp II,
who won the Breeders’ Stakes in
Trinidad in 1947. Miracle should
prove a good one in the future
and needs some watching.

Yue Top Class Races
lYoi saw the increased importa-
tion of good class horses. irom
England, while some that had come
aown in 1900 made ‘their debut,
Cimet among these was Hon. J. D.

Cnanaler’s Burns. A bay coil by
the S.. Ledger winner = scousn
Onion out of Bon Mot, by Geres-
lord out of Happy Climax, the gam
ef the iemous Panorama his
n.orse had fready run: tor five







easons in En



and before coming
to the Wes; Indies. In that perioa
he had won some eight or nine
umes and raced with some of the
yes. horses in England from six
furlong” to a mile in races such as
the Koyal Hunt Cup at Ascot.
therefore when he first appeared
on the track in Barbados he was a
seven-year-old.

While it was hot to be expevied
that Burns could reproduce the
form of his younger days yet a
horse of this class had never been
seen racing in Barbados before and
his appearance naturally aroused
much interest, He made his bow to
local. racing at the March meet-
ing, and his rivals were Atomic II,
Elizabethan, Gun Site, and Pepper
Wine. Of these only Atomec II
and Gun Site appeared to have any
chance, Elizabethan i. was. well

} mover 1 well on the hard
ig, while Pepper Wine w.s ob-
viously on the down grade afier a
brilliant career,

In as much as Atomic II, the
best son of the great O-T.C., had
just won the Governor’s Cup in
Trinidad, a race between himself
and Burns was eagerly looked for-
werd to. The Barbados Turf Club
S'akes of 9 furlongs and 14 yards
just the right distance and
veryone gathered to see exactly
10w the pride of the island would
fear against such a good one from



was





Enelend. The result was a bit of
4 Agn

which five took the field At the
start Atomic IT was left. Eliza-

bethan never strided out properly

Buns Races Jn Barbados

of him in this order in the Mer-and it was left to the imported

although a spurt was made by
Hi-Lo between the five and. the
four it did not seem to make much
difference. After vassing the four
Usher improved his position and
ran into third birth. Presently
Cross Roads delivered his chal-
lenge to Best Wishes between the
three and the two furlong potes,
but Best Wishes shook off this
challenge successfully and entered
the ‘stretch a length to the good
while Cross Roads begun to fall
back a beaten horse.

At this stage of the race Holder
on Rest Wishes thousst he had
nothing more to worry about and
begun to ease her. He was soon
made aware of his er however
by a strong bid by Usher who was
being well ridden by the new-
eomer Frank Quested and two
then raced together to the nning
nost. In the last few strides Best
Wishes forged ahead to





take the





Derby by a neck.

It was her last appearance on
‘He pass treok ; f +
eal She had

chants’ St kes for F Class three-
year-olds, On the third day he won
over 7% furlongs when he toox«
top weight in the Merchants Hand-
isap and gave away from 8 to 15
Ibs. to his contemporaries. Again
on the fourth day he scored an-
other easy victory with top weight
while conceding from 22 to 29 lbs

a> his rivals.

The August meeting saw the end
of special races for three-year-olds
in Barbados. There being no classic
at the November meeting all horses
of this age were forced to compete
against the older ones. In addition
the top notchers were -!1 absent.
Best Wish~= »vas in the island but
not in good health, Cross Roads
bad heen shipped to Trinidad
where he was in Treining for th
Trinidad Derby and. Usher
very near ‘o deaths door
tomach trouble of some «ind,

However, the three-vear-old
r 1 \ lA +h yf ? ‘ 1



was

with



filly Rebate to make the pace.
Burns followed her with Gun Site
plugging away in the rear until
Elizabethan dropped behind him.
Rebate held the lead until she
reached the two furlong pole and
them made Burnis run a very hard
race indeed before he finally got
the better of her in the last fifty
yards.

Burns therefore won his first
race in Barbados but it was obvi-
ous that he was a horse long past
his best. He raced once more fot
the year and that was on the
second day of the March meeting
when with 142 lbs. in the saddle
he was beaten by only two half
lengths by the fillies Demure and
Sun Queen to whom he was allow-
ing the large concessions of 41 and
20 Ibs., respectively. In fact, this
was a very good effort as in addi-
tion to the time of the race being
very fast Burns finished in front
of others to whom he was also

allowing many pounds.
ore




for the August
@ on page 28

nen in treinine







SUNDAY, DECEMBER 16, 1951 CHRISTMAS SUPPLEMENT PAGEL TWELNTY-SEVEN

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PAGE TWENTY-EIGHT



CHRISTMAS SUPPLEMENT SUNDAY, DECEMBER 16, 1951





The Racing Year In Barbados—from page 26

Many Good T'wo-year-olds In 1951

meeting Burns wrenched a joint
and had to be withdraWn from all
his enagagements, He was retired
to the stud a few months after this
and much to the regret cf breeders
in the colony, his death was sn-
nounced in November this year

Reviewing the rest of those whe
raced in A class in Barbados dur-
ing 1951 it is to be recorded that
there was a mixed bag of results
which proved that there was no
single outstanding performer, but,
nevertheless, the standard was
fairly high

Good performances were turned
in by Rebate, a filly by Pay Up
out of Bachelor’s Dream, who won
the Dalkeith Handicap over 7%
furlongs at the Maych meetizg in
excellent time. She then went to
Trimidad for the June meetiug
where she was unlucky not to have
won the T.T.C. Plate and came
back to Barbados in August to take
the Steward’s Stakes, Here agein
she returned, a good time figure
and when on the third day she ran
second to Elizabethan by a short
head it signified her true value as
a filly with plenty of courage.

The old gelding Gun Site owned
by Mrs. J. D. Chandler, also had a
good season in A glass and won
half a race over nine furlongs at
the March meeting when he dead-
heated with Slainte and another
over the same distance when he
took the South Caribbean Stakes
in November. His old rival, the
Irish bred Elizabethan, who js still
the record holder for the nine fur-
long in Barbados, was only seen at
her best once and that was when
she won the Stewards’ Hanaicap
from Rebate as mentioned above.
She has been retired to the stud.

There were several newcomers
during the year and chief ur:ong
these were Red Cheeks, Har-
roween and Pretty Way. Red
Cheeks proved the best, winning
twice in A class while Pretty Way



JOCKEY Gilbert Yvonet has been
riding in races longer than any other
jockey in Barbados.

won once. Harroween, although
10t a winner in A class won two in
C and two in B class before being
promoted to the top.

Others wno did well during the
year in the imported classes were
No-to-Nite a colt by Fairfax out of
Empress Josephine; Landmark, a
filly by Pylon II out of Esperance






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third race. The result of this was
that Cavalier, a gelding by Burn-
ing Bow out of Chivalry, won
in the former division, and April’s
Dream, a filly by Jim Cracker
Jack out of April Showers, (dam
cf Atomic II and Cross Roads)
won in the latter. In the third
event they were both beaten by
Bright Light, another of the fam-
ous Buring Bow-Felicitas combin-
ation bred and owned by Mr
Cyril Barnard.

In November a new champion
emerged in the shape of the smal)
filly Dunquerque. Bred and owned
by Hon, J. D. Chandler she is
from O.T.C. and Belledune, the
latter the winner of both the Bar-
bados and Trinidad. Derbies in
1943. She raced in August and was
third in both her starts, first to
April’s Dream and Bright Light
and then to Bright Light and her
stable companion Chutney. How-
ever, she must have been back-
ward as subsequent events proved.

Racing at the November meet-
ing she won The Trumpeter Cup
with consummate ease from a field
of twelve including both sexes.
Then she defeated the fillies with



A GROUP of prominent owners and trainers caught by the “Advocate” Camera during a race at the :
August meeting. Left to right: Mr. ©. A. Proverbs, Mr. Roy Gill, Mr. 8S. A. Walcott, Mr. Jack Gill, Mr. only Sunina, = filly by Sunplant
John Marsh (behind post), Mr. A. Hayling (head turned), Mr. Farmer. Mr. Alexander Chin of British cut of China Clipper, being capa-
Guiana. ble of matching strides with her
for the first three and a half fur-
bred by His Majesty the King; caught Mary Ann near the finish ous Gleneagle, who had been in longs. Finally she took on both
Fuss Budget, a filly by Bobsleigh to peat her going away by half Barbados simee August when he sexes again and gave them weight
out of Palm Lily. No-to-Nite won length. Unfortunately at her Shered the honours of winner of and a sound thrashing to end up
two races in C class at the March dicst att es ae ed the sweep with Usher, and was the meeting with an unbeaten re-
meeting, then went to Trinidad first attempt in a C class event she ),.,,, showimg improved form. cord of three wins and the sweep
where he won another in the same Was struck into and injured so in the bag.
division and followed this up by badly that she has now been re- The Two-Year-Olds Thus ended the racing year in
coming back to the August meet- tired to the stud Barbados and it is only to be men-
ing to win yet another, this time in There was a numerous and, on tioned now that the great sire
B class. In November he account Mery Ann came out again in the whole, good crop of two-year O.T.C. passed away at “Castle
ed for the South Caribbean Handi- November to take the opening D olds in Barbados in 1951. They Grant Estate in November for this
cap, the last A. class nine furlong class race over 5% furlongs but were divided into separate races artitle to be completed. By Oblit-
a year, a ne aed br beg was beaten on the second day by for colts and geldings on the one erate out of Telephone Call,
oon ‘ te pk goal ‘; coule Ge Watercress over 7%, The third hand and fillies on the other, for O.T.C. sired 43 winners of 283
enact aAil the time race for this class went to The their first appearances in August races valued $296,626.57 during his
a . Eagle, son of Flotsam and the fam- and _ then brought together in & 14 years at stud in Barbados.

The Older Creoles

There were some exceptionalls |} S
gcod creoles racing in class D .
during the year, the best of them | fet
being Mr. Cyril Barnard’s Bow
Bells. Her chief rival and the one
who proved herself second best
was.Mary Ann, a filly by O.T.C. | §
out of Flak, bred and owned by |}
Mr. Fred Bethel. z

ys



Actually, Mary Ann defeated
Bew Bells at their first meeting for
the year in March. This was in
the face already referred to in
the notes on Best Washes. How-
ever, Bow Bells established two
records foy D Class over 5% fur-
longs, the first when she won the
Castle Grant Handie»p in 1,074 in
March and the second when she
came back in August to lower
this mark by doing it in 1.06 . This| 9
second performance was a pariic- | 5
ularly outstanding one indeed. In | 3
this race Bow Bells carried 4



wanna ouinaamens



full weight-for-age of 130 Ibs., and
ran the distance in the same time
as the imported filly Harroween
did on the same day carrying six

ss, Once again, therefore,
record standing at the
same figure as the one for B class,
the other bemg the one for 9 fur-
longs set_up by Qatcake in 1950.






Bow Bells won another good
race on the second day of the
August meeting when she again

ee

RENN NN NNN





."



AT

JACOBS



x,



' a Festive Air at this and

all Seasons of the Year



i ULNA INES DNDN DNDN GRIN GRINDS DN TADN: :

i



*







5 ‘

SUNDAY, DECEMBER 16, 1951



HOGMANAY

Should auld acquaintance be
forgot

And never brought to mind....

The ingrate who resents the
ubiquity of the Scot would be
puzzled no en if told that these
opening words of Auld Lang Syne
represent for the Scot, at home or
abroad, an unending challenge to
him in his relations with the rest
of mankind, Believe me, it weighs
heavily upon him, year in, year
out. With the exception, of
course, of one night in the year—
Hogmanay. Wherever he may be
that night, he then becomes as
free a man as ever Rabbie Burns
could have wished for. His spirit
soars, untrammeled.

Gone for this one glorious
night are the cares he shoulders
for the world during the previous
364 days. Gone are the so called
nationalist inhibitions attributed
to him—drowned (literally may-
be!) in the spirit of his all-en-
compassing compassion for man-

kind. It can be = argued by the
less enlightened that the afore-
said spirit seems to be _ pretty

dourly bottled-up except for the
saving Hogmanay Nicht. We'll
let that pass.

Before engaging in some recol-
lections, pleasant and_ otiherwise,
of Hogmanay celebrated in exile,
it may be advisable to guide the
uninitiated a little further into
the mysteries of the Gréat
Occasion.

Hogmanay may have its gleeful
opening (as I, with some regret,
can vouch) at any time in the 24
hours. preceding the midnight
welcome-to the New Year, The
celebration’s end, on the other
hand, is entirely dependent on
individual capacities, in quite a
variety of directions, These
range from intake of ginger beer
(for the youngsters, chiefly) to
the devouring of the traditional
Black Bun (a solid guaranteeing
indigestion for many hours of the
New Year and requiring. liberal
liquidation, I would prescribe
Scotch.)

Churlish Sassenach souls are
prone to suggest that the real in-
spiration of Hogmanay is to be
found in the .opening—rather
opened—Scots bars (they call
them pubs in England). What of
it? It is to be remembered,
after all, that on New Year's Day
itself not one drop of ‘spirit can
be secured in any Scottish bar to
give the New Year the necessary
auspicious _ start. New Year's
Day is a holiday for all Scotland
—for the innkeeper as well as the
brewer.

Which brings me right down to



——————



By DOU GLAS COBHAM

the amazing business of celebrat-
ing Hogmanay in the places of
this earth where one can get a
drink, if one is so thirstily in-
elined, on New Year’s Day.
Amazing? Well, admittedly the
viewpoint depends on how effec-
tively or ineffectually Hogmanay

itself has been celebrated. The
New Year’s Day “drappie” from
some kindly bottle, might well

earn the adjective comforting in
certain post-Hogmanay circum-
stances. “Hair of the dog” is the
more crude usual way of express-
ing the sentiment, I believe.

There’s a fine romantie flavour
in recollection of our Hogmanays
spent as an exile.

Ever been on Coney Island on
Hogmanay? I haven't. But I bet
it’s fun. Blackpool, Brighton,
Festival Battersea—throw them
all in and they could not offer
more, I swear, than the “Coney
Island” party staged by American
friends on my last Hogmanay
spent in Baghdad. All the fun
of the fair—and what Scot
doesn’t enjoy that—was to hand,
There may not have been un-
limited supplies of native-born
Scotch available—the war was but
over and the “craitur” still costly
and scarce Highballs of Cana-
dian rye and high-jinks, however,
mixed excellently in this Ameri-
can sample of a real Scots, “let-
the-hair-down”, Hogmanay revel.
Only one thing was missing—a
bit of Scots dancing, That was
made up for, before dawn, how-
ever, in continued celebrations on
the home front of resident Scots
friends in this Capital of the
Caliphs. Peace to their shades,
which must have been more than
a little ruffled by the unwonted
Hogmanay ongoings of what
memorable night.

The mind also turns with no
little pleasure, to that first Hog-
manay night in Baghdad when we
left the Old Year dying fast on
one bank of the Tigris to be rowed
across that fine river in time to
welcome the New Year on the
opposite bank. The mellowness
of the occasion did not dim
recognition of the loveliness of
the midnight hour, with the full
moon’s rays filtering through the
palms to silver the historic waters,
And what -recked we if the
occasion did provide our dusky
boatman, full of the guile of his
illustrious ancestor, Ali Baba,
with easy opportunity to extort—
from a Seoisman for once—the
fils ad lib. "Twas Hogmanay and
worth the price in memories.

There have been other queerly



THE FIRST FAT CHRISTMAS

@ From Page 8

and Californian fields had occa-
sioned a rush whien Christmas
festivities were powerless to hait.
On Christmas vay the steamer
Medway, newly out of Sou hamp-
ton, was heading down-Channel
on the first leg of her voyage to
San Francisco with a party of
assayers, artisans and muners on
board who were under orders to
exploit the Californian holdings
of a mushroom firm known as
the Nouveau Monde Gold Min-
ing Company. “We are daily
gaining confidence in the rich-
ness of the Californian vein; and
in their permanence,” disclosed
the Nouveau Monde blurb writ-
ers. Hopes in the Australian
ficlds ran equally high. Many a
City man, while taking his
Christmas pork, read the pros-
pectus of the British-Australian
Gold Mining Company and,
through the genial haze of cigar
smoke, had visions of ingots
piling profitably at Summer Hill
Crgek and along the Hunter
River.

Already gold was sireaming
back into the cellars of the Bank
of England. Mos. of it came in
as payment for Britain’s new and
thriving exports. Bullion was al-
most as plentiful as beef, in fact.
Every crack clipper or mail pack-
et that put into Mersey or So-
lent during Christmas week had

specie in her hold amounting to
scores or hundred of thousands
of dollars, So much bullion was
in ,transit that. occasional hunks
went astray. Before rising for
the Christmas vacation, the Court
of Exchequer found the South

railway to bleme for

Western

losins




box of gold dust be-

Rott ; «hich

or



Panama Isthmus, By, the end of
Christrhas week the gove ors of
the reckoned they were



to the

iune of nearly seventeen
million

sterling — “a larger
émount oprerved one com-
mentator, “ian c.uld auve pecs
areamed of a few years ago.”
Most Englishn.en were too pre-
occupied with the priva.e affairs |
and seasonal pleasures to reflect |
that the country was in the
throes of economic evolution. At
Sadler’s Wells theatre on Boxing
Night The Lady of Lyons a
curtain raiser, was acted in dumvu
show amid shouting, screaming,
concerted stamping, orange peel
throwing and free fights. Mos:
audiences in London were be-
having at the same time in ex-
actly the same way. Mild rioting
was a cherished Boxing Night
convention in the theatre, part
of the Londoners’s licensed fun. At

Hungarian revolutionary, was a
female wearing baggy trousers,
invention of the American dregs
reformer, Amelia Jenks Bloomer.
favourite jest of the season, to
whom Mr. Punch devoted what)
was, in effect, a special number.)
Three centenarians and a hun-,
dred or two men and women over
eighty doddered into the Royal
Almonry Office near Whitehall
and were each given two half

crowns, newly struck by the
Royal Mint, as the Queen’s
Christmas Bounty. Theâ„¢~ Queen

herself, having packed off all her
Christme* presents. wrote to her
uncle the King of the Belgians
? letter full of italics saying how

relieved she was that the reck-
less, incorrigible Palmersten had
heen ousted from the Foreign
Secretaryship.

Through the fogs of Christmas
Day the sun was seen to be. wear-
ng two black spots joined by a
bar The super stele us thought
th 1 sinister rient They



have jitte ad: England

he brink of ney

need not



the Tussaud wax works the Atl
popular figure after Kossuth, va

DEEN NPE DNDN DUN GEDA DN DR GA GDN BON DN RDN GAN RTA

CHRISTMAS eee.



PAGE TWENTY-NINE



IN . BXTE % ananarca

= c
\e

|
j
|

situated Hogmanays.
for example, with the tom-toms
maintaining monotonous rivalry
with the drone of bagpipes as we
went a congo-ing round a huge
bonfire in the African “bush.” A
truly witching hour, with fireflies
as substitute for

Hogmanay,

carry out the traditional “first-
footing” before daybreak.

Back, still earlier, to a Hog-!
manay, with spuriously jovial

spirits awaiting the crash of the
next terrorists’ bomb—in the hal-
lowed ‘‘peace”
crash that never came, however.
The spirit of Hogmanay proved

strong enough, for that one night, |

anyway. to embrace the Holy City
in a full, if uneasy, armistice.

In memory’s revilings, nothing
stands out more disturbingly than
our first Hogmanay in England,
and our first in Exile! It will be
charitable, no doubt, *to make
clear that it was at an early stage
in World War Il, and that this
particular Hogmanay found us in
what seemed that night to be the
loneliest Ack-Ack site over.

There we were, in this Southern
England camp—two lone, newly |
attached Scots,
regiment of indifferent - English- |
men, and a few yet more indiffer- |
ent Welshmen, whose sole con-
cern. was—bed.

Bed! On Hogmanay! It took
hours to get ourselves accustomed
to the shock. In the end we, too,
found there was no escé
bed (the term, of course, being
used euphemistically). By the}



only
early- closing |

er and myself shared the
bottle of beer the

Naafi had left after ull the Christ- | ;
watches |

mas revelries. As our
signalled midnight, we drank
from the previously guarded wee
bottle of Scotch—all that was left
in it by then. To the accompany-
ing snores in the freezing hut we
toasted the New Year in, In

hoarse croaks that fortunately TAGS
did not penetrate the subconscious
of nearby “authority” we had the
temerity to render a_ stanza of
Auld Lang Syne. "Bir
“We'll tak’ a cup o’ kindness + Y
rt ROBERTS & CO
“For the days o' Auld Lang al e
Syne.”
‘What a Hogmanay! Across. the HIGH STREET ~_ DIAL 3301
space between our beds two hande

clesped in sympathy. “Should
auld acquaintance be es I
fell aslecp wondering, .



whatever your tastes
large selection you'll
want,





lanterns to help | 3

of Jerusalem. The |

surrounded by a)

IR KX DNS NBR A AA AT BA A A OAT



Whatever the styling of your, costumes,





LOUIS L.






in ROBERTS’? TOYLAND®

So ee emmaas



: TRAINS, GUNS and CAPS, BALLS, AEROPLAN
Toys of various kiads .

e





2

light of a torch, my fellow- suffer- | §





oe



DOLI

S, DOLL’S HOUSE

FURNITURE in Plastic



ALSO



}CHILDREN’S BOOKS, BALLOONS, X’MAS TREES,
and DECORATIONS, X’MAS, CARDS, SEALS and

scsi iaianee austen



SGN GN DNDN DNDN DN DNDN IK DN DNDN NT GN DN NTN NON ON



in jewelry in our
find just what you

DIAMOND
RINGS
+
GOLD
NECKLACES
«
COSTUME
JEWELLERY

¢

CIRO
PEARLS

+



Parking Space
Opposite.
Makes Your
Shopping a
Pleasure

‘BAYL EY



SU UUU ENE SOUS ECCS CE RRERE SERRE CE EUEEEECEREEEEE







PAGE THIRTY CHRISTMAS SUPPLEMENT SUNDAY, DECEMBER 16, 1951

Ist. r
Head of an Old Indian by
Jerry Lomer ($50).

Ene

Jerry Lomer’s “Head of an Old
Indian” won the $50 first prize in
the Advocate Photo Competition.
The judges were: Mr. R. LeFanu
of the British Council, Mr. Peter
Hall and Mrs. Hall, photograph-
ers who live in Montreal,
Canada,

Owing to the poor = response,
both in quality and quantity, to
the Holiday Snaps Competition
it was necessary to cancel that
competition ye substitute an-
other competition which w held
in collaboration with the Camera
Club,

An excellent collection of pic-
tures was entered for the com-
petition and Mrs. Hall remarked
that “the standard of photograhpy
was as high as most of the com-
petitions she had seen in Canada.














SUN AY, “ vi oe “ 4 x -
D ¢ PAGE T T NE

o———_0

4th.
} Port- of - Spain Savannah:
Jerry Lomer ($10).

Shi _

iv
2nd.
Alley near Suttle Street, by
R, W. Bell ($25).





__ PAGE GE_ THIRTY-TWO TWO





DU ilder

QUIZ - “CROSSWORD

By Eugene Sheffer
HORIZONTAL
1—What is euoshey name for the

men
5—To whom aid Joshua give
lebron for an inheritance?

1 ne of the five kin
anites plain by the fase
um. 31:8)

20—"A pageect. x ae mam: into a
wise undred
bripes into : bol Pr 17:10)
22—What “place of pee =
at Jerusalem, 8
south of the c city? ¢ 30: 3)
24—Stratagem.
25—Nest o: young ae
Vise aan
33—Palm leaf (var.)
34—Takes out,




2-2)
SEAOZETERAZBEOM
INT aI SOP sia! a vigeZ7 ai 95190}
ae Ht ora al iyi)
HEY IN VIE] aININ] 11S)
CEL SAMs VACAGA
slits obta wales









BIE
&)
19)
3
Z
13)

whole Talo]



vis} sletAelst wot toteln
CROSSWORD PUZZLE SOLUTION



soaps Seeates,

sb—the Devi
ualizes,
a ype bol as
—what aia What" king of | of Syria besieged
5i—“The young men of —— and
< beseth shall fall by by the

" (Ezek, 30:17)
52—Bulecrian coins,

S3—Wrongdoer.
of » 2
son p Shobal (1 Chr. 1:40)

a
i
E

i
Fee
a
z
Fre?

He did that, too, He thought
a @ sentence using only 32 let-

“Can you do as well?

CHRISTMAS SUPPLEMENT

Slane puzzle won't go to your
head,
"Cause it's about shoes, instead.
Let’s criss-cross or fill-in, All
the words given below, describing
varieties of footwear, are to be
fitted into the diagram above.
They will interlock vertically and
horizontally. One word is in its
correct position as a starter,

38 letters—
Gym Ice

4 letters—
Boys Polo
Home

5 letters—
Beach Nurse
Creep Sport

61—Wrathful.
63—Dreadful.
64—To leer.
valleys. {
Brother of Ram (1 Chr. 2:25)
68—Scrutinizers,
69—Stains.

2
g
i
g
i

spanning my whole,
As to what Mes beneath or

concealed,
Will oft prove as false as the base
flatterer’s
When facts, stubborn facts are
revealed.

“Primal” and “final’ refer to
shorter words within the “whole”
word you are to guess.

What is it?
“eoujins # 3y : MONIOg



Riding

7 ile
Athlete Lowheel
Bowling Service
Gripper Skaters
Hunting Teenage
Loafers

8 le
Baseball Stroller
Snowshoe Tramping

9 letters—

use

10 letters—



25—The first. month of the He-
brew calendar. -
26—In what place did Moses strike
the to pring forth water
17:
—A shade of greer

28—A black bi
a A portioned.

Oo was sRebekah’s brother?

338—.
38 Helghten



es
oe
VA



ed



Copyright, 1951, King Feateres Syndicate. Inc.

|
NSS BSS BS SS 5S RAS ASA BG AB AG ASS A BAG AS AY AR ANS BORN BBN BN AE AN RO BB

tod Tt ea tae
PCO
PCO Ba
Se a
Ve | TT ett

De ae |
St ee eT
a At
te

SUNDAY, DECEMBER 16, 1951

PUZZLES & PASTIMES v2?”

FILLING A LOT OF SHOES

Money Spree

ITH ali, of us up in the alr
about money these holiday
shopping days, here is a magic
trick especially appropriate.
Using it, the amatevr magician
performing at a party can so
specd up the Workin of com
pound interest that the “inves-
tor’s” lonely doljar can be tripled,
quadrupled, sextupled, or what
have you, in the bat of an eyelash.
Borrowing a single ck m ar from
someone in the auc dien Ie e per-
formér holds it in his outs tretch-
ed palm, showing that otherwise
both hands are empty. Suddenly,
with a wave of his hand in the
air, a dozen or more bills flutter
from out of nowhere. (Just one
word of caution: Keep far enough

nway from the crowd!)

The trick is done this way:

Extra bills are rolled up tightly
beforehand and concealed in the
bend of the left elbow by a fold
of the magician's sieeve. After
displaying his empty hands, the
performer pulls up his sleeves,
grabbing the concealed bills in
his right hand as he does, Un-
rolling the bills and causing them
to appear at the fingertips while
waving the hand in the air be-
comes &n easy matter.

Conundrums
What grows bigger, the more
you contract it?
‘Wap vy t4eusuy
What joins two pople, yet
touches wear

In what Sante oo do women: talk

least ?
“MIUOT) 18908 eyI—AreTUGeW t4uMSsUaYy

AYALA
Checkoff



I, marks in the squares so tha
» mo more than two checks are ip
amy row, vertical, horizontal ‘

43—Redeem.

45—Variable star.

48—Ridic

oe what place did the Philis
tines take

the ark when the
captured it? (1 Sama: D
n

52—More recent.

rami rfidious friend.
ello's iend.

55—Light a tint —

59—F Oiiek
‘emale chickens.
62—Beam.









hk rr
Za} | | ft

49

WSR

; ; ; amen ummm |
of ans aman aacamaaamaa tease mee amacrine ra aa eee ea emma ce cas OR a iT i i tat





SUNDAY, DECEMBER 16, 1951

BSB EEN

DIAL 4606 and



Fine “GIFTS”

to Suit every Pocket



CHRISTMAS SUPPLEMENT

T.R.EVANS &@ WHITFIELDS geet

For QUICK=COURTE OUS=SHOPPING SERVICE





PAGE THIRTY-THREE

SS

SS

4220



8 A.M. to 4 P.M.

FOR HIM FOR HER ALSO
Bilis LATEST STYLE SHEETS
a ia hs a TABLE CLOTHS
SEES Rvtanee HANDBAGS & BLACK CRETONNES |
=~ EVENING BAGS TAPESTRY
Arrow

HATS in all colours

DRESS MATERIALS
PRESENTATION | GIFT SETS
PEARL, NECKLACES = 42c,
COSTUME JEWELLERY

OILCLOTH

CONGOLEUM SQUARES
GLASS WARE

CHINA

CUTLERY

NEW RANGE DOULTON FIGURINES

TIES many colourful designs
SHOES by JOHN WHITE
SUITINGS—PINSTRIPES &
PLAINS



Toys Toys Toys Toys; CHILDREN'S
—————————SS>>>—=E—>=—Eoo yyy ————————— i : OOOO
For every Girl and Boy ; 4 COLOURED
Downstairs at Evans : PRAMS &
Upstairs at Whitlields 2 ‘i COT COVERS

BUTTERICK PATTERNS

AS AS YA A A A AA
SSNS NN NNN NNN NE NN NN NN NNN :

YOUR SHOE STORES

BN A AAA A A
Ii Sy Sy AS NSA, A AG, ARAN Ay A AAA A A A AA AN

x
&
&
&
&
&
&
:





RARARAAARLS Sy

a



Season is bound to make extra
Kitchen and Table

Appointments so—be prepared for all eventualities.

Festive

The

demands upon your



NOW is the time to ensure that you have everythicg
we can help, If you require anything in

DOMESTIC GLASS, CHINA and EARTHENWARE
GENERAL DOMESTIC HARDWARE.

needful and this is where



or anything in

Remember we have a complete range of requisites including:—
Pyrex Oven Glassware ,Ham Boilers

Phoenix Water Coolers

Ice Cream Freezers | Plastic Measuring
Black Japd. Waiters pce he Strainers

| Potato Washers
Chippers
Tin and Enamelied

, Wood Pastry Rollers

on Syringes and
Tubes



Roasters



Si FR GRE PASS GS SNA A SARS FN UT NR



ee ee ee ee

Wire Dish Covers Metal Toasters | Cooks’ Sieves (Egg Beaters &
: , Single & Double Ovens) 'Tin Graters Rd. & Sae! Timers
Beith , ALSO EVERYTHING IN:—

&
Gs
Gin, Enamelled. and Aluminum [Ware &
iw
&
z
REMEMBER — I's HARRISON S ror HARDWARE. @
oe
ria? i aa







PAGE THIRTY-FOUR





a .Â¥
» By Eugene Sheffer

HORIZONTAL

1—Who delivered the children of
Israe! from Eglon, ing of
wepah by killing him? (Judg.
215)



5—What king of Persia made a
proclamation concerning the
building of the saapre at Jeru-
salem? (2 Chr. 36:23)

10—One of the places built by
King Asa from the stones
taken from Ramah (1 Ki. 15:22)

14—Bird of peace.

15—Dwelling.

16—Marsh bird.

17—Unconcealed.

18—Sea eagles.

19—Minutes of court proceedings.
20—Due extent.

22—A man's name.

24—Epoch.

25—Prior to, in time.
26—Dejecte
29—South African antelope.

own
iJS[a|NEAwl 3] 4] [VAS] a1 eH
ay sla} aA ain] vIn WAaINT ll
Stal ]oVAelvlH] veel 3]! vi
fal ai ul vl alwisiZzuly] iv) ul al S|
CAAA WAAL VA
s13| aAa1 WA vi aAvi a) a
sialal viaZAwii| SALINI al
hwlstulwi v3] (aAal vial al
a}ol vA Slol¥INYZ als] ely)
Simi asia WA NINIOalyl s:
AAA al 8 SAA aA
N}al Hil 3[11S74alulolsl vl a1
ial] VV SI aI] I aN al dl O}
POCTEZHEOONZEROE
WIS] al DLASI AL SIAISVZGINIHI 3}

CROSRWORD PUZZLE SULUTION
























What
Pet?

: 8 soon as

Johnny saw

be lots of fun. To
find out what
animal it fs, con-
nect lines from
dot 1 to dot 43.
Where two num-
bers are close to
one lot, use it for
both. Color the
completed sketch
with your
crayons.

“orueds
dempon 8 :sOsUY

GadZOOks!
HEN asked
how many

birds and beasts
he had, the zoo-
keeper (a cagey
devil) replied:
“There are 36
heads and 100
feet among
them.” How were
the heads and
feet distributed ?

001-1929) TIO) ‘On

epwou 18101, “War
oe 6(‘Splja Fe fas
OS SABQ DINO MeLeED
vaarmod teaatiwnw — &

CHRISTMAS SUPPLEMEN










31—Possessive pronoun.



32—Printer’s measures.
35—Ori, ite.
37—Ponies,
39—Plant of lily family.
onaniiinn,,
Limerickograin

IF. YOU like to solve crypto-
grams and laugh at limericks,
you can do both in the “limerick-
ogram.” For the beginner in
solving a crypt some hints may
be necessary. Each letter below
is a substitute for some other let-
ter—always the same letter.

A study of the crypt shows a
single-letter word, D. It must
then represent either A or L

The frequency of the three-
letter word LDE indicates that it
may stand for THE, Those two
clues should be enough to enable
you to determine the identity of
the rest of the letters.

D WIN EBISADWR
QGDdDQQrIRA

#) feng Om e7eyA ovOS BYq sus /—oUES
“0194 pesn sug /aVe29 Suyeq poom
(228 9t) Fags) uy orqneny pe /ojeK
perwo [US IUBAIIS meu yf BOTRTOR






ES AN

bullde
- CROSSWORD

o 8/y 23 o
re . OES





42—Who was killed by Joab?

(2 Sam. 20:10) ;
$3-Eenitentia} season.

Heroine (Hindu myth.)
45—Device for stamping dates.
46—Greek letter.
47—Close comrade.

48— r of law (abbr.)
50—S-shaped worm.

51—Male cat.

52—Unwell.

54—-Who was Joab's father?

Qi Chr, 4:14)
58—Daubed.
62—God of war.
63—Who was saved by Joshua be-

cause she had hidden his mes-

scngers who came to spy out

Jericho? (Josh, 6:25)
65—Plunge into water.
66—Liquid measure.
67—Senseless
68—Garden from which Adam and

Eve were banished.
69—Detest.
70—Viper.
71—Cozy place.

VERTICAL

1—Throughout all of what place
did King David put garrisons?
(2 Sam. 8:14)
2—Trust.
3—Inner coat of the iris.
4—Thick.
5—Fourth son of Dishon (Gen,
36:26)
6—Time jong past (obs,)
7—Move swiftly
8—Utilizes.
9—Six-liné stanzas.
10—Pulpy fruit.
11—Apiece.
12—Seize with the teeth.
13—Short-eared mastiff (her.)
21—Impelled.
23—Bitter vetch.
26—Asiatic carnivore.
27—Authoritative decree.
28— What goddess was Worshigned
yy the Ephesians? (Acts 19:34)
30—Up to the time that.
a of Shemaiah (1 Chr.
222)

PAS TIMES

oe

SS



SUNDAY,






ETT ain

DECEMBER 16, 1951



32—Pulf up
383—Whom did the Lord tell to go
unto Pharaoh and say “Let
my people go”? (Ex. 9:1)
34—Blasts.
rch
Il island
39—Eucharistic wine vessel.
42—Muddle.

44-—-Where Pras Ring Ahab buried?

(1 Ki, 22:3
47—Hawaiian food.
49—Pliant.




Cee

WN
a




\
\

LL.

Leda
| =
ed ton toe

oO
a

as

fel. J
Pt tt NN TEN *

Wi
PTY TT Ty

ot tee ti

PT
TEN





Copyright, 195), King Featares Syndicate, inc,

BES NG IN NS NS NSN 5 NN NN NN NS KW HM GSN SLG
THIS IS LOSING GAME

NIG NS NS NN NN NN I 8 NN

es ig a lively variety of
the games of Checkers or
Draughts. Many who are not
skilled players prefer it to the
normal game because of the
amusement it affords. Still, al-
though too slight to be ranked
among the scientific games, it has
its niceties, and it would be quite
erroneous to suppose that it re-
quires no skil) or attention.

The game {s won by the player
who succeeds in first losing all
his men, Each player is obliged
to take every piece that is of-
fered to him.

It is best for the first few
moves, to make equal exchanges.

\ Then, by systematically opening

up his back squares, a player may
frequently compel his adversary
to take two, and sometimes three
or four, in exchange for one. In
order to accomplish this it is well
to play toward the sides, and to
open up the back squares so that
the adversary may be compelled
to advance to the top of the
board.

When *, player has reduced the
number of his men to three, his
adversary, we will suppose, hav-
ing double that number, it is well
for the former to pause before he
gets rid of any more of his men,
unless, indeed, there is a certain

rFrrayrr ery er
ELE

U4.
WAL

HH
a
EN
ES
a
N
ia

Ltt NW AW
pS | iS





51—Savor.

58—Burdened.

54—Which of the giant’s sons was
slain by Sibechai, one of
David's mighty men? (2 Sam.
21;18)



Assam silkworm.
56— Lease.
57—The foot of an ape.
58— Rational.

59—Be carried.

60—Nights before holidays.
61—Slight depression.

64— Possessed.




N

i a

PT Tt WW TT
oa
N |
NS

WWW TAN TTA
PC aw

prospect of his compelling th

ve ee ee

adversary to take the whole of

them. In most positions @ playe

Tr

with two or three, or even. four,

men has a decided advantag:

over the player who has only one,
and may generally compel him to
take the remaining number in

succegsion.

Kings are often more useful
towards the close of a game than

men, as in the normal game.

CAN YOU DO IT?

For a good way to pick up th
slack when things get a littl

cull at your next party, try this:
Request a Volunteer to stand

up straight and cross a leg abov

the knee. As he (or she!) obliges,
place a chair directly behind him
and invite the victim to sit down
without uncrossing his legs and
without moving the foot on which

he is standing.
Sounds easy—but just try it.

Track Of Time

OW long would it take a train
one mile Iong, traveling 60

miles an hour to enter and clea
a tunnel] 1 mile long?

r

“Wh 2279 02 ein

“Ul 9UO FUR A[o;a}dWi0 fauEN] Oy? Je;U
O tanuiW euQ ‘sejnU;W Om] :4OMsUy



/

. \ | Z
Fie OL He

,







IRISH LINEN HANKIES SWIM SUITS by
NYLON SLIPS OPAL MUSLIN HANKIES Jantzen and Martin
and PANTIES. Individual and in Presenta- : White
tion Boxes aSingle and MTwo-

% Piece.






BABYWEAR

a Jersey Silk * (
Dresses; oe
e > Pique Sun Suits » } ¥





PERFUMES and

TOILET WATERS
Yardley, Goya and 4
Max Factor Gift Sets,4




SOCKS, TIES and HANDKERCHIEFS
Tie and Kerchief Sets.
SHIRTS by Consula‘e

ow
Elite

HM.Y. AUTO-
MATIC IRON

HOT PLATES
And Combined Hot
Plates and Stoves

HOUSE-SLIPPERS

Satin, Felt Leather






Ba

NYLON HOSE

Fully Fashioned by
Camay, Gauge 60—-51
by Plaza, Gauge 54.

STITCHMASTER
ELECTRIC SEW-
ING MACHINE

HANDBAGS
Day and Ev
Plastic and C













A BLUE LABEL
tr BEER







Sage

F

b 2. “3 ?
eT ie

Yeh 1

e ped oy ay

e Sf 9 ay!

Se oa





Christmas Cheer,
Will always be there,

If you are well stocked,

With Frontenac Beer,

>> >> »>

THE SEASON'S GREETINGS

From

R, M. JONES & CO, LTD.

— Agents, —



rt LLL Le

Give your car that
Chrstmas feeling
throughout the year

fT

by using



| =SSO Oils for





QUALITY
ECONOMY
PROTECTION

THE SEASON'S GREETING FROM

i vr ~\ ay
. = oh Happy Wlotorung
| ie
wy, oy 709
oa wi he
| &
{

R. M. JONES & CO., LTD.—AGENTS.



SEE KPN KP ee





|
° $

oy

Â¥

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Full Text

PAGE 1

PACK THIRTY-TWO CHRISTMAS SL'PPI.KMENT SUNDAY. HI ( I Mill li It, I!i.-,I PUZZLES TELLTALE PANE : PASTIMES FTLLING A LOT OF SHOES Money Spree W ITH all of us up in the air about MOM] shopping day*. here u> a magic Inck • %  p• I a 11 v :i[.; .li,naie. Uatng It. tM amateur magician perform"a nt a party >n s<> pound interest trim UM inventor's" lonely dojiat quadrupled, aetlupicti, : have you. in (he bal of ai i Borrowing a Muckdol II orOsn %  omeono in ihe aj former holds il In Ala uula tret cited palm, anowtag. lhal otherwise both hands me amply with a wave of hia linnO in 'he air, a dozen or more r>iia flutter fiom out ol nowhere Uual ona word of caution: Keep i.n enough i.way from Ihe crowd!) The trick is done thi* wgfj Extra Dills ate rulk i up tightly beforehand and concernr i in the bend ol Uia Ml a bow by a fold of the magician'* BaN After displaying his empty hsnds the performer pulls up m* sleeve*, grabbing the concealed hi)la in hla right hand aa ha dots, Un> rolling the bills and cuuknig them 10 appear al the flngerlipa while waving UM hand in the air become* an easy mailer Conundrums What growa Dlggej you contract It? What Joins two louchea one? -j-Hlfl puxali head. 'Cauat it'a about ahoea, Inatcad. Let'a criss-cross or Bil-in. All the word* given below, describing varieties of footwear, axe to bo fitted Into the diagram above. They will Interlock vertically and horlaontally. One word la In Its correct position aa a starter. I lettersGym lew letters— Beys Polo Home Beach Creep Nurse Bport • letters— Arctic Soccer Casual Tennis Riding 7 letter*Athlete Lowhccl Bowling Service tirtpper Skaters Hunting Teenage Loaiera • letters— Baseball Stroller Snowshoe Tramping ff letters— Soft-Houae It letters— Basketball U Archaupport is I Imary school Checkoff •TO solve this, arrange 1] c 1 marks In the squares so thai no more than two checks are la> any row. vertical, horizontal diagonal. Think I (Solution elsewhere vage. If you need I :abulary builder QUIZ CROSSWORD By Eugene Sheffcr HORIZONTAL l—What ia another name for Ihe BibUcal wlaa men? 3—To whom did Joshua give Hebron foi an inheritance? (Josh. 14:13) 10—One of the five kings of the Mldianiles sl,in by the Israelites n*FirrUhl) nVSU SOLVTIO!* 38—The theater. 37—Split. 3ft—The Devil. 41—Progenitor. 43— Equalizes. 44—River to Nigeria. 4fl—A primsry color. 7-What king of Syria besieged SamartaT OKL 20:11 Jf-Seaahores *' — Tne young men of and of Pl-beseth shall fall by the . 5??" 1 <>*-30:17) '?—gu'iariancolno. S3—wrongdoer 3— A eon of Shobal orrowa H—Scrutinliera Bft-Stslns. VKatTICAI, I—Additional amount 2— Prayer ending, 3—Exploit 4—Buries. 3—Embraces. WR 7—Thto I ft— Eut-s -Arouse to "vigorous action. *>— Holds sacred ll-"Duko (On. 34 41) 12—Ruin 13—The dUL ai-Regretted extremely. £&~ Harem rooms. Word Play arlSMJ la found where the wild wares are dashing. And thick falls the cold briny pray; Mjr final la seen where the fierce eyes are flsahlng. And fortunos are oft thrown away. To draw your conclusions by spanning my wfcoie, Aa to what Has beneath or concealed. Will oft prove as false as the base flatterer's soul, When facts, stubborn facts are revealed. ••Prknor* and "A**!" re/er to shorter words within the "tcaole" word you ore fo oners. Iv-ftaf to Ut %  eaeissi n u % %  qmi-s Cesrrtf hi, |sa|. Bu>a f>alare* IrseleeU. I. 0—The drat, month ol the Hebrew calendar. 3d—In what place did Mooes itrlko ll, *.'? c k to bring Jorlh water lo drink? cEx. ]f) 27— A ibad* of greer 2— A black bird. 28— Apportioned. 30-Dens. 31-Heron 32—Planl ovules. 33—Who was Rebekaha brotherT < Gen. 24:2ft) 3d—Heightens. 40—Precision. 43—Hcdeem. 45— Variable s Ur. 4ft—Ridicule. 50—To what place did Ihe Phil.! tinea take the ark when the captured II? (] Sam. 5:1) 52—More recent S3—Sluggish. M—Othello* perftdioui It lend. 53-LJght green Unt 3d—Mascutma. So— woody plant so—Female chic-oos.



PAGE 1

SUNDAY. DKKMHKK l. |;,| CHRISTMAS SIPPLKMKST PACK TIIKIK THE LIGHT — BY ELIZABETH WALCOTT T*WO shabby tigures a UtUe Boy iBd l.iMoth) t lUMff MrUy tnrough the al.nost descried \.llhge street which %  iMfeBjei 1 %  I i %  %  HtUt BO) • ltfeUJ to .. %  at that i %  ., %  Otttlfa %  and twinkling lights of a large Xm.is tree placed against a wtdit flaw-window. At they c me lo the imposing entrance, 'people were driving away in ^rand their host .uul hostes who stood ;>t .n.open h ml don Htn i 1 91 Boa von later'" When '.he las! COf I %  way, ON Mothei and child walked towards the front door v.h.r. .i man wonu i and little girl wwrm standing, but before they could reach .1. tl.,> do.n %  lammed shut Jhd the Ihree had none inside. The li-lie ooy lugged at his hand, dnwi The window, 'isn't it beautiful"' he breathed, gazing %  the glittering decorations of the JCOUI Tree, and it* nwny-colourad light* winking on and off. Through he open top of the window Uu vownj of those inside rame clearly and | caught u glimpse of the room and it* occiipanls through the htmnehThank gOodnOf -•aid the wormm tretfully. One could imagine her dinging herself into a chair "Ugj rtgarc.te John." A short silence, then a man spoke in a flat, bored voice: All a lot of nonsense, ini CnrMmai l)uilnseg,~ he said. "Just one mad rush for W— hi before, and a bad head on Xmas morning. Oughtn't we to be (felting ready to go lo the dance"" "Yes, I suppose so," tlghea nil wife. "Come on, Jill . off to bed Here's Nurse ready for you." At once the child'i voice rose shrilly, pleading not to wo to bed. "Nonsense Jill, of course you nv„: go." said her father. "<;ocdn,(ht dear ... you can enmc down early in th morning and play again." her mother told her. "Now then, come on," urged the nurse. There was a scream, and the sound of a smash "You naughty girl," reproved the mother luke-warmly "One of your most expensive toys too" "Come with me Mummy," wepl the child "Oh. I can't. Jill." answered he, mother Impatiently. "I've had you down w'.'h us the whole afternoon, but I've simply got lo go and change at once to go out." "Come with me Daddv." pleaded Jill. Th„ man stepped forward ag If to go but Nurse had brisk I v started upstairwith the icrtl,' >• *ng child "She's just tired." explained e mother indifferent I v. '.inn no W> • derfour parties in one a/ajafc I feel all in myself." Then whv Jet's bother to go to the dance?" suggested I.cr hi %band, turning lo switch off # .ie light* Oh I suppose we mus go there's the dinner first ai John'i find Mary"*, and everybody woi.ld wonder whv we hadn't gone." "• raplled "lleatdea, erbai on earth would we do at home?" The man w,., still standing %  ) the tree "Oh do come on called his wife crawly. "It's horrid here now . ao dark after all the light* She shivered The man came slowly toward' here. "There's still quite light frorr the window,'' hi :nutleicd K.ther strant.-" now that Rll the light, or. tbl off" "Rubbish! ..' Oukl it 1>C *tiang>* It's I s.trei •" K Mother gl d Coil ' %  > i i n ii oonk with a large picture i t i N lghi Before < hi Istn also "• %  .... %  Hatdini to the bog %  %  rhat goes ti'l >oii too rj oir bli lap and :<-ik I readily. The man stor*i go and lid) Moi !']| look in on you, son. before we go off to thi "You're ready Mumn. you?" said the child. Invel> darling" thi laughe • exoei I I'll have some you go to bed. out who cares* Am 1 now. here I ; Ut with Nurse. %  wivi. s in. n %  %  i had been wande, ing groi ing up tO) membei hi i m on the dlnm llrst married.'" "Of courne ,i tenderly, m through his, and leaning against bun But I didn't think you'd miss it now. and Jsckie begged to b to give It to Sum the Hardener';; bay, who didn't haw any. I didn't like to check his gen i stincts is it all right %  Shi looked anxiously at him. "Certainly •** %  -di riahC he replied, and kissed her. Then he switched off the lights. Seeing her sun itanding bet the tree, hi came back and put his nrn her. "Can't you bea t to leave ,1"" He asked, laughing. "It still seems lo shim do ao*1 I'"" gba. aid wondering^ "Yes he agree. I lowjj ThruM?cm-. lo lie a light behind it." il.s not siraiik'" ••• -'-I." ihl whispered, smiling, "this || Holv Night, and that's the light from the Christmas Star." He laughed Indulgently, and she joined him as if amused at hei own fancy, then they left the room. I ing fn ID outsule turn.d awa>. %  dWB I wi then I n ill-" i I km %  ''. won hirtrM bb though noi %  %  1 % %  h or i.ni'i,"" I Child could go right i'.jo iii „-, kdon w.'ich was bare Xmai tree. A surlyI i 1 i %  %  %  used f.%  i old bov %  l %  1 %  1 thought you' 1 rhen "Oh i n p UM I : i %  %  .%  ihii he old %  BM II' %  do tl %  B %  rarely, ".i %  %  %  ' %  .. %  lacks) meant || %  %  Inc boy ptu-hed Imek h "No! he hi i led if | i i,'i h \hi .i id i ... %  The man struck his fift on th. %  i II ... win 3 nnj *• %  .... ... U %  %  %  %  ,. Hut look, bo*, 1 he low red M V' '• i %  %  "pcrhap'i seme day thi w< i't tune n I 'And What m >"ll trial d' u.;, I'd LttM • ' %  %  il> -Vi.il .mi. viur fool>'. | ilk . %  i % % %  dm inm c %  %  %  i %  then ^-"'i. %  %  turned idy'i lusi i ill .it ihe room an s, ; %  th* wb II shtl. %  a 1-gl.t from the sli i he -*-. -->SN .. I I %  fUll Of pt>3| %  M i %  %  Deed it Ud bom rou come by It He i tn i (i nd 'he road. i iittig bo) the Mi Louse IV the itu JOCkM %  I The chfl n i and oiis i> putting Uigjetbei l.mg COM ured panel They tl %  • ban %  %  f< i (10* the lop 01 I M ^ ll os* the* The giaiiunx thi %  • %  %  : %  %  using ..i I i>o*. now ...iil ( lnl pal he s-id ihes* are old things she to shabby.*' i Gran*na it'll i>e lUu r. -ii now. (he ihiidrcn iiel -• b) help hailff deoorattoni a %  i--.kr i — OB ,i Uaj tinsel star bean UUVM I i Dj the* %  to the top ol UM in a, ma" said one of thInl.<• i while this was being dona. 1 uld we gi. out to old Nedde'a ible .it midnight? They were) eulna us a story at achool. that in n.ib. go on their knee>, | niulIghl on Xinu Eve. and when I %  .it tho house Up There, he'd beg his rne) one loo "Well, well, think of that now,' 1 %  huckled the old man. r.i Ilka i •. (1 |,i Neddy s. % %  myeaU i, laufbi U t/l 1 MM if rottrt BWalH ..I Didnight," said the old -nm.m nuj if, let's go BOW UdJ Old Neddy's tbl d tsetad one of the .ljil.ii tii A 1 In* others agreed delightedly, ao Lbey t' "k .me of the paper htream* • is and trooped mil of the bark door, followed more slowly by Ihe Id grandparent*. ****** O H. Mother," wrmpcied the CMld outside the window, 'Thla la a nice place: aee how I b Usage children have madu Ihe tittle tree which that cross l oy threw away." He reached up •Ud touched the tiny star. "Come, my Son," said his M ther. We shall rest here, in Nfddy's sUible." They tunu I way as the children and Ihe oij Ojple returned through the liack t)M l-ik' 1XX)K!" tlioy exclaimed in awed through joyful Dull old eyes and bright youi.a ^nes gaged at the uny tinsel Mar vhirh seemed to Illumine the -iti.i..-. and for a momont there %  nee, Sorid.-niy the old woman su.lcd to sing "Oh come all ye faithul." and as the children joiiiij in. >4he shabby room was filled .•lib i 114 T "Tha' M use insld". '. %  r %  • ihoiich it i.-.ks so grand %  m ildn't hoeh..d tirn-' lo spare for us. Son." I.. answered. We'll \t\ i house" SI large a: too had a large v Again II ud ssw Tuo-ii b the room A "-an, comfortably i out In i o easy chair, had a small boy in hi* lap. and n wo Englmid, they say. Is a man's country. America, we he r, Is ruled by the women. But in one unall country in Europe. ,he Chlldren reign supreme, llolbind is I'oi.ible for tulips, superb teils ol water engineering, < r-.> i t h.ldren. It hardly seem, fair that the unsuspecting itranaa receive no warning ot what lies ahead The Scoo er e.the spring, ROUIM %  long main streets, a! .. amazing speed, hurtle small blonde fiends on largo %  rrnchine*. Kithing like • %  I v? playthings ..r ti>"sff are fit ed with bel % %  . small seat on the l H hold two cMldren in packs or twelve > ^***i^ Hoops usually follow, ,|ug. fr'> >pa—bowled wilh abandon among snoppi pedestrians. in he road are an open i \ ftatton b .a] (imJll fry, What are hOapi of if not I" play eami %  ..in spades, dungarees ....nation, are the sign "Road Up." Admittedly. HI a country where th* l .king, and where i^ro>te.i tl un rail* naked above thnobl e, the temptation to iak" I tri In thl* wholesale .i. r, st be irresistible At • inarorfcosM MI n lurbed •A'lth the approath 0J • %  son. A' hard and ppery enough, out come* the r diminutive ngures being towed along on %  ANII SAINTS AND 4?y Jhoft Sdwtip-fiiAAitvr r mouxr cycle swinging lound oorntfl ..t ,i inghteni. may unnu | hutor, but .. ight '..I tht %  .%  > !lv In .b rataer ••> if tribe of nvillcinu* gnomes %  %  i tnda. i %  %  rd foi %  .. revolver at r. iral inlrr;>-1 In iidulUi. %  b %  Ai. •i 'thing i< i' r thai eounti 1 I Died i •• ih. eMM. Wrdnevlay aftaj I precious one* are released from %  d are -,Liite apt to pull i "fT Ha your ha* from s^ill your shopping %  mnkeDay. It hi l national %  grown-ups and c.iildi n ahk' sharing the lun. Ab.iu two w before the great day. all ef jp ushtiy routine i pneing ihelr clogs befase in• la The clogs are stuff.-d „ r and decorated wi n % %  I rrat tifl lo bed go Jan and Anne '< %  rfl the rlrrn belief Ihat p %  %  servant '>f st Nlehohu, win dhnb down the chimney to take away ill ihe suraw and tirror rs food lor Ihe saint's, while horse on lopi Piet is supposed 0 all tin <-logs with presents, amt OVti v morning when all the little Jans and Annetjc. wake, Un Ii He somChln* b a bis'inp who ii kr-i fun at Ihe nd baton I%  *,**** 9 ****** whiie pareol .re getting into a pani, r DutCfc ai-'wling n Meat, 1-r 11 tlWir pre#>t ( t-giving ai i.stmai i i peaceful follow-up of the buying and eating orgy by wblefl Holland—for no apparen' nday of a medieval Spanish bis;,., who ws well known for %  %  %  manlj a religious o. r DM Christmas tr#y. as B .'ito Ctaus f'Kiir% %  %  % % %  %  dow displays. Decero'* 1 %  % % %  V of Ie.emlw, is a> : an huge quai I I ll rnlxtui Dutmeg %  %  • DOUKM bl th-i i. i .ok at their i irenU wilh ( ai .* what will Mppen %  %  %  policeman, suddenly ban M. anwhUe, i,ortiy Tom KJopler* from next door, is struggling; vllh a mass of white cotton wool .vhleh lias a life of IU own and %  • resemble a beard. Ho Bl M hla rash promise to act ai %  St Nirholas for all Ih.hi the street. Beside*. >e la not at all sure of Jan who I hul the dangerous age of even and knows cotton wool n i MOI it. With a final jerk, Tom Ihngs a gold embroidered ed eJOJk round hi. shoulder*, (rasps his cardboard crorJar. and >u1s on a milre whioh gives him 'rouble for the rest of the evening. Black Plot hands him a list '.f |>ar.lcutars, uidi.aling where pn ring remark or a word ot* nraise would not come amiss, HIK | <• start their annual round Ihe )>ellef | n St. Nicholas bl i Us battered when ,: and A> neties reanh the erttlcal ge of seven m eight, but It In %  d as long as possible by %  I i> rente who lack authority and < %  m threalen i r kind but improve^ "Uf^g Holland's conduct ul nu this period h n • %  ^***** Nlchotei %  i al %  %  alivi t % %  M.I AdulU taki %  • writini* poems weiich must, to tradlUon, be attach. A St Nlrholae nothing without i .-.;itl p>M*m. which niav hint .t Drdl of love but usually -ing a series of gibes at idiosyncrasies. habrte lentr. Theae are meant i in ihe familv cir-!^ Dd M| ily emharrasamg It it I veiling of Ihe ft fin. g> On Page 24



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PAOB-WO SUNDAY ADVOCATE SUNDAY, DECEMBER U, 1M1 D. 12/S *? EMPIRE TO-DAY la TUESDAY — 4 4f> 4 8 3. ('•iNmMa PicMirrs plWRMfl PAUL MUNI — ? 'KFLF OBERON r VW.VfV # &f LI MIMIll It CORNEL WILDE and Others Extrl I.ATRST nRITISH NEWSIlCTI-S %  I O Y A L To-day I.iut B aal 4.M A I.1S ..... Rod CAMEHON ForrMI TUCKXR IN •OH' SUSANNA" LIGHTNING IN THE FOREST" WITH DONALO BARRY a Tor*. Ill I.IS ll.-p.bliWhole Seru MASKED MARVEL William TORHEST Loulae CURRIE Wee mil Than. — I %  . a 8. IS "THE PRETENDER" BRIMSTONE OLYMPIC TOIAY AND TOMORROW EVENINC CONTINENTAL DRESS LENGTHS H tkmm coi.oi RIII NYLONS tc.H ( ni.es going •m and what with god music inmughout the night everyone agreed that thi* was ea> y one of the club's most enjuyabh blr'nday •,.ir',. Swcc lt48 A MONO the paean ter. arriving on Prid*.. evening by IIW 1 A from Jan ma fM Mis> Muriel Jarkman. daughtrr of Mr and Mrs. C B. J. ckman at s.l\.-, Oat", WorUim View. Christ Church. She ha* ome OVCL I spend the ChrlaUna holidaya ith hei parent*. J.icRman it wi aid ml)Ctvab Qcdlinq HilS. .s.OOO Annual Dinner T HE Loyal Brothers of the Stars will be hording then Annual dinner at the Miller Bros. TudcStr—• nn Decemf—r S". The President of The association Mr. E. Morris save thai arrangemeats for the function are almost complete a nd he would be glad if nannbers U'AfM contact him %  Mxa as possiMe in connactkm with the function. Seeing the Empire M R. ALAN LENNOX-BOYD, Colonial M.iusler of Stale, is following the example of his chief, Mr Oliver Lyiieltnn. Lennox -Boyd wants to see part of the Empire for himself He flies to East Africa on January S. Mr. LyHelton will be home from Malaya before Christinas. I#nnox-Boyd will visit ternbar* the £M million Colonial Dtvelopment Corporation arc operating. Lord Rrlth has been boas of this Si,.ic-financed enterprise for 13 iTtonths. He has not yet visited any of the projects under hilonlrol. Will Lord Reith accompany Mr. Lennox-Boyd on this tour? He will not. And It is said that Chrittmna Gift* l ^* a Rtl,h ***" no % % % %  %  *• A T LW^TII^ Han ^- P lHns ,or 'iwpecting any of the T Queen. c_o lege Hall o%er CDC mlr n>rU* overaam 60 tfuJdren turned up yesM r. Lennox-Boyd visited Barlerda* ( tvjjjiiK to receive 0fU ^^ MrlM!r ihls ytmr ^ fioin the Olympia Club. A Urge sg,_, |__ BT* %  Christmas Tree. loaded with Rtfla, M *' r buv ^"y' 0 slood in the centre of the Hall T^HE Marquess of Bath wants tba presentation. Un. %  *to buy the Festivals' Sky Ion. I). II. L Ward. President of the He is negotiating for its purchase. Club, addressed the Children She d '" discussing the matter with ... .*%  *.. """' ,h '"' "U %  very happy anlomcial of the South Bank ex" sisters (Roaulle and June). RoseChristmas and a prosperous Ife.v nitution. %  > %  mary Burke, Phyllis Pltzpatrtck. Year. • Mansger 5.000tb .ubscribsr. A MRS BERYL NURSE receives •**•* Irom Rrdil1u< Col Olivai yanardajr. Ska %  Rsdiflu-ion Ml PIMBS Bttackad to ta front of the clock has engraved on :• Pre-rnud M Mr.. Reryl Narsa ol Hackle* Rd., Bay Pasture. R-dif fwoea's ft^Rttfc saaacrlbat, ltti Dscambor, 1B51." DouhJe Purpose 'TpiiEKE are plenty of entertain, !" ..... c-au-dr.,. m •*-; iSS JS2. SC, iT„, t at the Marine Hotel < n Saturday The : .i,,..c, show has in rformert mt the Krngi.: Big| graduate at London 1 ui versify. At that time, she spesl part at her summer vacation here. Back To Curacao M R. CECIL CRA2ETTE Tudor Bridge wh> was cenUy married at St Matthias e^i, Deane! Gloria Hunle. Will Church. u> Mlsa Orloiti Bourbou. fi ut tr -n d man* other; ^nurse attached to D. Barley's r^neing begins at pjn. and tb. SSiSS^ ?^J ***£., ""f • PlHilar Police Dance Oreheat... returned to Curacsw on rrtdaybr ^ .upplytof the music. Rot Rjr to resume hid..ti With „,, ^T) ,he Ore. Flea* prov.o. ~ „, Bfl scellent evening's anlertan TWO One-Act Plmy ment. but your appearance MV O N Friday night at the Brtti. i cupport will help raise funds fn Council the dramatic group a dew r ving charitj <4 the Olympia Club presented I The Skylon is 292 feet high. At night when lit up inside, it The presentation lasted from eould be seen from many parts of 4.00 p.m t„ 6.00 p.m. The memLondon. ban subscribed money to buy the gifts. Lord Bath plans to re-erect it LonuleatWarmlnster. where appreciative audience two onset plays. -Girls must talk" a comedy, and "Ophelia" an adaptation from H.i Congratulations u> Mnt, fc V Barrow aho was the produ A Pillow Or Two Y ESTERDAY was once agar childien's day In Broad Sin' Hundreds of them being he tightly by their mothers stream' and also U the meinlx-n who made through Broad Street and throuiN the evening a most sucvtjaful one ihe many toy stores. | li The Rrsl play was ptev auM wit'i One rrest self-poise and Di>thy Don.Snr met SanU Claus in each little girl was puzzle.!. Tl'FSDAY AND WEDNESDAY — • %  A 815 Columbia Whole Serial K ^W JACK iltllSIIIOXf. • %  THE AI.l.-AMKHICAN BOY ; %  amused the audience with her f loni w More to ihe ilisgruntled iiumnnam rananXs. M uieklv *nh.ii passing karl The second play was pcih.. .i jix^t the S-JI* A more popular and produced atpdiow or hwo %  dded li ursacs with talent wortiiy of menpropriate places would ht.p UM I I non. Joan Smith. MOpWpa, and look somewhat nvre like the Maria Barrow as Oph--1 thai popuwtwe moat suited for tiieir pa.ti,.,old man, Most of the Santas .ma l., Tudor, the Qdtw light Phyllis Bower as Ophella'i tun 0d the other meinb-. A the ansl No Cricket II contributed to the evening's , eg-MlE BlBCvkEM M re ine mat.i %  y Mrs. IJH. L. Ward. „ u ,, :( ,.| Slree yctRam jnd Blues Singing In tod ill vei the Wand. C EDKlc I'HilMJs rntcrtaiOtd WM talking abi^ul (he crli Ihe large crowd which |l though tended the local Talent Sliow **J * coting 'he Globe Theatrw on Frtdl H**a1 West Australl IIR. A. L. -• I l \i: i Medical Registrar HO V Y Today to Tae — 4.45 1.15 Wed. A Thurv — 4 10 & 1.15 Columbin Double "KILL THE UMPIRE" .JANIS CARTER hnattnrlW4 nto top ( law I. EXTRA ONI! SIIIYIKV NIUII1 i BJNDDE HFNRY "TOKYO JOE wilh Humphrey BOGART Alaxandei KNOX Frldsy anl t 4.30 A %  I %  "ONE WOMAN'S STORY R. A L. STUART, stn of Ml* ^i. ^ ggfj Mrs. K A. Stuart of* I "Broughdorg" Black Rock has |, beta ap|>oinled Medical Hegistraof the University College of the "Irht wfttl hi.s""fliur. sVngingT'' "So "cricket fan gW DBJ* lo the *"•< 'nd*First prize in the Talent Show bUftMM t hand. The last com**• f*3^"X* went to Hubert Clarke who '"I l, ,,ut thc w 'Xeam i. .-? ox '' !" 'Begin the B*2D7. tJES 'I "ns so lonfi ago now-was. ^ holiday before going up prize went to (;e,a|„ |,.i.l?T .1 'Hu-y should put then, to a Jf to take up rus appoint' %  %  Man i; iliKhtcBMdl bOBU.* 1 "*vll" ,. Let's hone the match against ** %  Stuart is PR. A. PARKINSON. S.J of' W %  ££*"* !" n !" U ^" *">*' Setl %  si Patrick' nearly 100,000 visitors paid about £9.000 this year to see the family treasures and the grounds. Lord Bath thinks the Skylon would be an additional attraction to visitors. He proposes to set it up at a spot in the grounds Known as Heaven's Gate. How would the Marquess get the Shvlon to Longleat in Wiltshire 0 The problem does not worrv hurt. "No ooubt It will come to pieces." Lord Bath says. M I cannot imagine It being taken whole hy road." The price, he thinks, may be something like four figures." :. % %  Bath Will be 46 next month. His wife and three children have acted as guides when I*ongleat is open to the public. Talking; Point •Oar world... needs "ytf feetirim rather fhau "no" feelino*. —Bertrand HuaaHI. Incidental In(*llifcnc C*VEN if your ear Is a dream you go sailing.—The %  '"-on,,,. boat, don't feel tipsy when Mew York ifS. CRUISER TO VISIT YUGOSLAVIA Back From B.C. S.J., of h. Jemmotts Lane who had been m llfi. tor several weeks for health reasons Is now back in Barbados. He arrived on Thuradav bv B.W.I.A. GLOBE TONITE — R.30 p.m. and ( .. illinium. PAY MIILAND k*::oci Nrcrvii Lewis SION' %  Jean "G[N fl^ CHRISTMAS DAY DINNER $4.00 Very Special Six l'mir>e Menu inclitdins your r'it\i>tiritc Bajatt lli.hf". 2uTII Minimi; I9S1 DINNER & DANCE $4.00 —•> H..1.1 inu 1 P.M. TO 2 A.M. BOXING DAY Dinner Scr \II\IISSH>\ To Ball K Kvening MIIMC In KM hie t.ooriridce Please I'lmne BM for Tnl.le ,a1IIW|| Only M.iril—l.i^lu Kefreshmentv on Sale rormiil Dress %  nd Ills t hrlieslr.i iiiv l>\ I 'riilny 21*1 Heceinber All sur Talent \mliii..i Today 9.3U a.m. Our Final for the Year H ..' %  gala PLAZA HELGrlADE, Dec. 15. gr,.. It has neen announced that the peels to come home rs L Am r r,c ? n wa !" hl P u v !" \ Yugoslavia since Ihe war wilt arrive at the port of Rijeka early Monday. The 17.000 ton VSS. Deimiiict, flagship of Vice Ad.mral Mattlas Rennet Gardner Commander of the United States Sixth Mediterranean fleet will stay four days at Rijeka. Gardner will be on board. This ithe second courtesy visit of a western warship this year %  Tie Clan old llarrisonian 1040 Barbados BTOWN Dial MlJOAK OF AIM CUM Rasrl iColaf bv Te.Heo o. 4-HBJOtMAS DUAM I Tliuns JO & BM pm I IS a • • S %  > Two Ac lion rjf.'tf IVHuHa' • m M, MMII aoosr %  CH-KUW-O D-lld KriKn t, immmm Oliv-r fUBWOcMra *IX or TBE NXONDIU r;ii T>Won !...( f ha*i T.M S a SSS p.m Wirtim Twch-leolor Aruoa rertoi Osry COTJPfW. Rulh ROMAH i" • J* r %  IL -II.I i l— Mill -I LOVELY GIFTS 4711 Colognes and Gift Sets Suitable for XMAS PRESENTS Priced to Sell C. (ARLFO.N BROWNE Wholesale & Retail Drugnat136 Roebuck St. Dial 2813 DINE llllilMMW and OLD im FESTIVITIES at '.'.•.'*'**,'.'.*.'. .-.-.'.'.v.*.'*'.-.---.-.-.-.-.'.'.-; Till: IIAHIl \IIIIS AIM AIM III H •AEMIEKS 0t*v; DINNERS will bo aervad in the Ballroom betwaan 7 and 9 p.m. on MONDAY. December 24m. TUESDAY, 25ili. and MONDAY. 31 el. Price: S3.00 VERY SPECIAL MENUS MEMBERS are reauwled lo make Reeervation. not later than December 22nd lor MONDAY and TUESDAY: and 29th lor MONDAY lOld Yeai DANCING bom 10 pjn. all 3 a-m. on MONDAY. December 24th: and MONDAY. December 31et. ""tickets: IIATTRACTIVE BALLROOM DECORATIONS On December 24th: Potato Dance. Balloon Dance, and Spot Walli. lor which Prlsee will be given. .MUSIC on December 24th by C. B. Browne and im Orcheatra; and on December Slat by Sydney Nilee and hie Orcheetra. GIVE YOUR CHILDREN TOYS FOR CHRISTMAS ran WOULD MOD. EXCELLENT GIFTS. WE HAVE: Dolls. Toy Cars. Balls, Mouth Organs. Pistols. Horns, Floating Ducks, Buckets, Watering Games. Xylophons, Cans, Musical Boxes, Tool Sets. Xmas Stockings Wheels, Wheel Barrows. Also an Assortment of Kitten MECHANICAL TOYS. SO PAY US A VISIT. I. II. EVANS •% DUl 4606 YOUR SHOE WHITFIELDS STORES DUl 4220 RELIANCE SHIRTS Till: I'll I III OF BARBADOS i MM -?~55=5= LL_" W I |,..^



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PAGE SIX SUNDAY ADVOCATE SUNDAY. DECEMBER lli. 1931 TOWARDS A RICHER EMPIRE Guide Nolis drive alreadv I pounds i f %  %  u r prise money i.iK),O00 l>oost recently, jlford Re.l. n, of co.1 up lo 28fl thick -..,, SilJ.„^SS iS'SS,.^,,^""' IhfckaM In the worM. No on. raall, SETl Stonln^Sil MK^,"' ia.000.000 .lool.ck, .< know, how n,,.Sk,^,,f l^H^^JJ^T ? *r tba En.,,,,. ,. „„„ ,,.„ lown ^, aw sres? c orpor """' t ^^sj^rs&. ** tr&ftss s sx; ;: on ss*~ i^-Jrsss undef i-heltcr. They thoroug 11} enjoyed the experience and begged to !* %  allowed to go to camp * soon as possible. The paty eft Speightstown about 5 pjn. 24 Guides of 7lh 11 UM ^tmAnsss .. Michael's Girls School, vith lun DEPOSITS IN H(. Pemberlon hiked GEORGETOWN, November. They lc(I BriagMowl —L.r Tourism Needs Govt. Aid >•• o.. o-. C IIIISS — H s u • i'Al.V [> %  ( 12m. Por S.D.A. \\ taadared and cooked Iheir meal %cheme for hotel and beach resort American Division of the Seventh I'I cliniinary tests indicate a which they had about 1.30. After Advcntist said t"al Two millarge tonnage of rather low-gra.le (unch Ihey sang old I tiv will be assured." In lion dollars (U.S i had been voted Of* apt to be procesBed into ,i 'f* !" some new ones. At 4 p.m. b ffllkrm %  mwllnj b$ UN haajquarteil <>f UM orhigh-grade product of 40 per cent 'hey had some fruit JuJee, tidied of the Board's 1952 programme und gUlsMrtson in Mi.mil ti> work in '" ">'re nieuilllc nianganese," i-e"P J* 1 camp site, packed llu-i 01 n toCSBlBl "I tinCaribbean urea. ported the company. "There are oquipment and left for town a; lioteU in the Colony to satisfy Hit indications of deposits of higher*•*" Pm nrrivlng there at 6 p '•. he states: "In -This will be augmented b v the K<*do ores which can be shipped The Bam Dance .viih tin-Tourisl Board' inmnie from the many Carlb'"their natural stale." The Barn Dance organised -, obtain <.n export survey u%.n temiorie wtilch will equal T,ie discovery may be of the lit Rangers (Queen's College) has Of the hotel situation in 1952 the amount* voted from the Armv '' r,| i"-! imi-rtance to the worid cleared the magnificent sum of should like lo =tale that this is „, ( ,tivc %ald He *-rmBment drivet now going on. ^52 48 i.nly one part of the Board's 1952 v n vli) Briltfh Guiana, Bnriograiiime foi %  liotri[development. |( M Veneiuela. Curacao and On Ihe queMiou of finance the „„ lH w „ lrh w ,„ lnclurt( In Your llorvefop' Your Real Life Told Fit* Wul4 T*V UK* U UM* %  .t • fc.1 in. BUr* inai. -w I.., i n_( i .:i saserlsaesa, iw> i • J ***k iwinM. MC* Han U %  W tat nil IM %  anil ol Pundll >bor. Indwa SMM ttSMu* *s> m^ %  pplrlnc Ih. ?.* %  miLUOMS Of FAMIUK agrtt with stintiSc findings Isst: \x M COLGAT '-"-" "" — %  saSBSBBBSSBll i itniICiffi B BH UmGnk *4 PMpta U. bfUfaili %  ind you ntXC four A>U*t I lion II ou forward htm -.o.t 1 Mr Mra or Mini, •( liitth all stasrli W, IK. oo>ui tc but ami d in i:mi Poalal %  N mm hi asssssa .-. u u -nd .our aR.U* Wrila now • %  I • ofln rnar Mrt ba ma. -sain Aldrr rt.N. PIT TAIIOKE llWpl JIJ—<* 1 Fwlall Kin.' BOCTI v *' India, PM < >/ CLEANS YOUR TEETH MCLEANS YOUR BREATH L VHELPS PREVENT DECAY ; ftsSh^7^ TNI COICATI WAT TO COMf'UTI HOMI DiNTAl CA'.t Always brvih yawr taata right afiar aalla* wlrh COLGATE DENTAL CREAM Celling Up Nighls Makes Men Old ilaa. |rofn and lac pali i as.'-, fN4 hr a dlaaaa' of IAa r....u %  GUi 4 Stranded In T'dud FINANCE COM. END REVIEW OF ESTIMATES iFraaa Oat Ooa I atfoaandanll SI C,Hiln;KS, DII. B fUtet | full week of ,.11-di.y illUnga. ihe pnanoe Committee ol the Legislstlve O imi I t review of the Estimate* for 1952 which will b* %  undl nbout -tault of a national strike 'he middle of the month. Then, in Brazil passengers are now the M.M.W.U. bloc will be seen in stranded In this Colony, It If republic action for the first time ported that nil airports in Brazil A keen debate is expociem sitd down, tesntiiil .,nhues in Trinidad aBerted by .nls fluke .ire Pan American World nid Aerovla* R A ths moment 44 passengers on hoard I 1 •resideute" are being taken • it the Pan American Guest UIUTMH VIBGIH ISIANDS ' ' ..?" wor 5* •" While most other colonies Islands experieiu. I a ml dItussia is the world's largest progiatulated an,,, the 27 *' ra '•"''•Pensable for making theni.plendid contrihutioti to the tougher steel. The United Stales now wall at Pan Hill. piiMlures only a fraction ol Its own I needs and until now has Christmas Parlv i bUlfsfd mosl of Us supplies from The 15th Brownies with the; Kussi.. Other Important producWolf Cubs of the Unden Grove arc India, ma/ll and West School had a dehgtilful Christm.is Africa. n.r.p. Uig I.\ |aii~iiiii In I'dad LeiteHioIdc. Asst'ta DROUGHT //V BRITISH VIRGIN ISLANDS l'-m> on Monday, 10th December The parents of the children, the Island Commissioner aim Mr* 1 A. W. Scott. District Commiaslonei *erc present. After some team famm Mrs. Scott preenle. Hudson ihe l'.iwnles and Cubs have .. .mil painted 2 Christmas trees IA1INIXJIV. preasjntl for a duple of po,. AmoU of Trinidad 1-lilies and the children are t Ltd., expanded Irom ll4,o0o,j>.n '"ko the*i •> booie to Ue;uta,l|| tuning w jraai u 'hn.sim.is Kve, The trees .i eiided lust June 3u. ssKordlng to beautifully made and decorate tin comp.uiy's njxirl, ju..t uub" nll and all other contingencies, is madc ." lovel v Totem Pole, win h nf.ill, put at SI 47U.70S, as against 3th* in tlic preceding year Hi Simon J. v. -. i man. points out thai the coi llOa 01 the extensive work now being undertaken at lh I sitse" hs martc n vely Totem Pole. t ItsW, Wl || ( l|n W(l9 $mM ,,, nd MiI to the Pack, which she did i Liaison Officer Mrs. L. R. Richardson hus been iippoiiited by the Secretary of State for the Colonies as Assistant Liaison Officer ft* W. t Imii.i-i Students wles effect from trie 1ft November. 1951. A Trlnidadian by birth, Mrs. Hicharoson was einp|..ye,i in the Control of Impo t< and Export! Department. Trinidad to 1948. In 1948 she <,,,, hundred head ol nltl. dltd h.^ !" ." "."1"?"',. ""'"'•'/ id 10 order to save th c I bocdi atephanl pan rationed. JAMAICA H IA7S ittt; th un\ interests and the building of additional tanker tonnage invnlvr substiinial financial commltmairl % % %  . ajj -fj.r.r. MEMBER OF T.A.S.P.O. TO MARRY IN U.K. KINGSTON, The .1.-IH..1. .,i. House of Keprcfnm 1B4H •entatives has decided that companled Jamaica .should ask Britain or her husband to the United Kins;other countries for a £25.000,000 dom and was attached to the West loan lo auisl In the economic and Irdtan Committee until January, Industrial development of the 1950. Since Tebruary 1950. she island and to carry out the u !\l W .". Ct d "P ers n "' aujlslont lo Colony's revised len-year develop,;.,,.' '^v the Uason Officer. menl plan—B.U.P. d. lueryboy lORT-OF-SPAIN Dec i When memlicts of Um IASIM steel band return lo On from the United Klngr Ersgland for a Trmidaii newsi .p.i PoUoe Band At Ruy St. Esplaiiach^ The IViu-e ILmd conducted bv Bjt 0, Ai.hci will rend) i gramma ol musli al Ihe i: Hay Stn-'l. at 4.45 m N>Cati0vbtor natural loveliness aa**^^W^e*aa 1( tAM I I BEWARE OF WORMSI j taasat* Dr. Muaaa'a tailian R.l Tilh. | To have and to bold your powder all day IfMsf* V.r.iUv Fbund <: % % %  smootheaon such an airy delicate film, fragnint, Hut!. and mm-grtaij, tonning a li^lii but IsWtfalfJ bftW '.. ( sw Yardley Complexion fowtjej Follow through (his mikc-upM hemr fol k with a gloriou*, glawmS Vardlrv Up uV h YAR D L E Y Foundation O^irvn TAKE j inexpensive TOOTAL TIES Here's one gift you knoa is wanted! This neto Parker '51* with its icrnarksble Aero-mctric Ink System — a wholly dilfercni, scirnlific method ol di.iuing in, storing, ufeguarding and rclcsMOg ink. Sec this wonderful nttv Parker '51' at your dealer's. As a very special gift ... or for yourself .. it's the perfect choice. Pruts. K.n 1 ID Gou CAP $24.05 LUSIKALOV CAP $19.77 GIVE a NIW fOTO-fui null a MIW INK HOW GOV|Noa a Mtw at.i-c.iASi siiisvom • NIW vinfc.1 IN* supnr and 4 •"**' /"*" *Aaias*! SUfkaJ jeUiLlir.ll fw lt' rraaa*Matt add IWtaX idiuual ^riAtb. d/j^ute&cti'.mMZu>a*ta<£ ptftj/uvi LIMACOL ITS A GIFT THAT HAS EVERYTHING TO COMMEND IT. IUIIH Mubcr. it s thc FAVOURITE TOILET LOTION OF THE CARIBBEAN, simply because it is useful in so many ways. It can be used as a rub-down, a deodorant, a soothing lotion for sunburn or for altri -' n ,01 i< r r.-hcving insect-slings. And when it comes %  xim requirements, it simply can't be beaten. What could he a belter uift in the tropics than "the fresJinev. of a lirre/c in 11 bottle"? ILIMACOL 'V.v.v,v,v.v,-.•.v.v.v.^^•.•,v.v.v.-.v,v.^v,v^v.^v.•.r.v/'^v.v.•.w^///^^^



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PAGE SIX CHRISTMAS SIPPI.KMKNT SUNDAY. DECEMBER It. 1*51 £r THE MIDNIGHT BELL *%$, fit) (bine SaiAsdl Theio were four <>f lncm in i othi glva a name. fhi foal hud been bor r in May v h-n lha turf was soft and ipringy, ha was eager and i"nuJ Hlva and would gallop back from all corners or the Held lo nuzzle hi* mother and jerk up her neck uiih hu head, asking her the mcunlni of each new thing he saw. Broad and leisurely, her strong shoulders bent to the sweet gi;i:.s, liis mother would lift her head slowly and reply, often as not in 'he same words: — "One day you will |gegfl wisdom, my son." At first Quicksilver delighted lo ploy with the donkey, capering %  round her and poking tit her rouidi, soft bides with his head, standing close beside her like a Shadow when their playing waa done. %  Thp donkey would frisk aw.iv on her little hooves and tfatn stand waiting f<.r the next Invitation, looking at Quicksilver wr i i %  %  %  <-\es, When Kitty came all this was altered aatu to I h ii i The do tan bought for the farmoVi children to riflsa, but tin f %  leggy fcr her tul I iWas end far too im( %  ,, enduro her logging I i Ids I bojr'i birthdaa Kitty bad ap poa r ad in to* • ni shining, with new saddle. D (then on 'he bab>. still La his woolly leggings, was the only one %  who would scramble up the patient dun coloured flank." and bundle along behind the others. That bu.mlay wis a morning rawer t ( be forgotten. As the young master trotted and can(tcrwl the new pony round the aid, Q.ucksllver threw up his heels in excitement and BUKal wild tulloping rushes in oil dbectiona, -stopping dead r*W) nil i^ur feet planted firm, his r.os-rils and the white hair* on nw chni quivering. When the saddle was off and the children had :ono home, he timidly app^ctied the stranger, who was rrupping in the sunset. After n,.i he piaved with the donkey no more. j t.dk was all of southing splendid and •-.;,-lenous •hat happened when the leaves turned .cllow and the first !** frosts silvered the ground; when man put on scarlet coats and rode nwny over the country, leaping walls and hedges and ditches as they went. She would sniff the full summer air as she spoke, at though she could imagine the ace-t of frost on It alreadv. Wild with excitement Ihe foal was away and across thai field to ask his mother; she stopped cropping and raised her head. you will learn wisdom, my son." said hi* mother, and m %  fan away. As she pa*cd by the donkey that night Quicksilver saw that she Mr* gently at the Icing and tousled eirs. The sweet ha..lengthened and waa eut all round (hem. the corn turned slowly to gold and then was cut too and the sheaves stooked in the fields till ihey looked like regimental of marching men: the mysterious, the exciting season that Kitty talked about was approaching. Suddenly one morning a ere purple mid Uie bushes white with cobwebs the pony galloped up with lire in bsV eyes, her nostrils wide and qufvcring"Smell!" she snorted, pnd a QuickaOvet spread out hi \ el vet M ose the faint clear tang of frost came stealing to. master would cnm. down in his smart black coat and U .md he and Kitty would nde onto the meet, to come bock lo the evening full of talcs of glory. .vhole geld and hounds met in froni 01 Ihe %  ins neck straining to %  •tuning hortj nmother out her head beside him and neighed wistfUly gg they all moved oft. From then on ho spent man* himself Igainsl i Watching the size of his slowly ,: hoofmarks In the aofl eartii lw the door, looking for the diver bagfl that came thicker and thicker through hilead e" loured coat. On the oays when tsstl no hunting there ava* always the '.. k-ik at, working in I amed to QuickIvar, watching mystified, that he must be lord < f everything, if the each 4 rain 'hat were l rough! ami cmplicd at his direction, of the n.ws and sheep thai were led by fo r hu inspection, of ih, blrdi that wre held up for him to examine. Most l was the strange Ibal lived la the yard and which, ..t a touch id nil linger, would into quivering 111* and beer nut luothar, England, but )ust of Ujua (.on,Quit Dad, then quickly forgot, for the rerj next day the hunl was to meet ut the larm again and ome nvjre he OOUld i.tnp.tre himself with Uio t A hen the next dgj and he woke In the morning. In. %  The ground had turned to soli i silver and the air was full of things that looked like i it hers, floating and i an. Had the tg dn' He '.vhunited m no*." said his mother, and r,\ .-it further i„uk into Uii 11 irpths of the stable. The young :. i came out In hi* ordinary %  nave Kitty I dispirited the noae. l.t goose feat hers stopped fall I < and for a week the frost held. ..n.mg the straws that lay in the % pg to 'tiff little bars of guld. vuig like silver fur along the Mtiand walls. It was on one of these days hat the foal saw a splendid %  .jchine sweep up the drive to the touse, red like his beloved huntsler.'a coals, decorated with letters •pel with a golden crown. Does it belong to a king?" he •Kl his mother. •To the king of England." said Uie mare, and he watched %  the postman got down from the van and the children came running out to get their parcels, carrying ,v piled high in their arms. •Shall I see him r.ne day" %  Only if you become a champ.on hut '• i ud are ridden In shows, my son. u takes heart and patience, and wlsdorr for thai."' The f il stared on. As the rod shape vanished down tl l again and the sound of ft died on die still air. another sound lUtsg in to lake its plaee. "Mother! What'i ihat?* Ha moved resllessb* till bis head was near to hers, his ears pricked I i ojnd rang on. echoing across tho h^aatbound nd through the wtntry trees•nells." aaid his mother. "Bella for the king Quicksilver; it seemed to him that only for a king could there bo such a lovely sound m on I...** ia 0 0"-l£S J 0 |,ft^5*HHHp*&SS^ft5^MHfta5 fit I^^*l ^Sii* Ml I "Hunting!" she said, and her eyci looked far away, for once, when his own horso was lame. the master had taken her out hunting too. "Perhaps you'll be n hunter one day, my son, for your father was a racehorse, tha beat one in England." t "Do donkeys go hunting*" the foal asked his new friend, and akttteved a few steps backwards as Kitty blew scornfully down her notn!. U Donkeys'." she said. "Donkeys made to carry loads!" and from then on nobodv but the baby ever looked at the aonkey ht all. Even he. as the s p sss fl doB f rtf a new birthday approached, grew as proud as QuieVulver and at last there came an overling when he strutted down through th* long grass in new breaches and insisted on being hoisted up on Kitty when the Others had their turn. i That night, as Quicksilver Moi ,( tag his mother ha the moonlight, the donkey lifted her %  id and brayed, a lonely, discordant cry which to the sky. "What a stupid, ugly, vulgar 'he mare, and tried out try whinny. From across %  itiit con> pai a i swarvd back. "There will come a nigh* when I'm lo take the young mastc to the first meet'" said Kitty. and the foal was wild with envy. From then on he nibbled at the grass all day so that he might grow laster. und Kallopcd up and d'.wn the meadow lo strengthen ins lank* legs. From his new height as he passed he noticed for tha first time th* two black stripes that lay across the donkey's bock and whinnied in derision. Swinging her clumsy head, the donkey looked up sadly. The" frosty weather brought other changes too. and on uie very same day that Kitty and the young master trotted off. the master came into die field at evening, bringing two '. e farm hands with him. Slowly they closed round the foal and his mother, waving theli arms and making strange noises, till terror drove Quicksilver tralght into a corner and into the arms of Ihe master. Then, before he realised what was happening, a rope was slipped over his head and there was a man holding the end of it. "Fine UlUe hunter you re Rot coming on hero," aaid t*e man, %  Just look at those shoulders. and Quicksilver was in such a quiver of prtda that he never noticed bow he was led into a littl* wooden box, smaller even than the smallest space where he'd ever stood between two trees His mother was with him. *^=*=^>: \uV^ \ "A hunU-r!" he whinnied it to Kitty m the box on the othea slde. In the glow of hu pride he looked round for someone else to tell too nnd shouted again, this time to the neglected donkey. Forlorn and humble the answer < came faintly back from across the fields. %  Donkeys stay MM in the winter:" said Kitty -.nrnfully. 'It's only we who have splendid sta. %  tb wind doesn't blow.' and have bundles of hay and bats brought to us Instead of mi the frozen grass." For lust a moment Quicksilver .idly of hi* oh' jon but soon hi* thotii;) flying off again. Every to often now the young' '#'# %  # mn*1ant r/*mr/ for thin t'imnm\ It* ft MM ti vr#/ri /* i#\v iri'f f/rim intf /ntfH'1-iriti/. K. R. HUNTE .v (< LTD, Agjctttt. '" ' i i Mi % % % % % % % % % % % % %  .i I M I I



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ixr.r trv srsn.w ADVOCATE SI'NDAY. DBCEMSES IS. MM BRITTEN MAKES IT SEVEN.,. The Anti-War Compoier Taket A Nil.ui. Wanhip—and Throws CoffVention Overboard For Hii Nw Oprra-With-Profit Bid by CHARLES REID i.ic %  ml than Kni ftilh u< %  %  • '< vontd upt'i.i in 'en %  '•" %  •early reau\ lot eurtain-r: I %  %  %  ring n| beconduct..! by Britten himwll b HaiidalT aVMngi' wh... n mwki and wind lackei. bM MM I inonlh ol -big boase*wnre I i %  •" itMnUBfi and afternooni in the doom, called upon %  paovw irusli room and tM againsl war ul reoeai ii pi .1,1 thm in* nlft UbTM Forster novellM. ..n.l gone Ht of 11 \> foi tin peo^l. Thais l Il>' i-vupW made Advance Drn.oaacv Is now i rrsfc The Miracle in universal demand as recitaltifirn Ihey would give (our recitals in ont week Ivary four i iiuimred guineas in Bntten'a uuckel (Sine* then hu (tea have risen ) To gat about Ihe country morn M bought a 1KB P'"i1 loyce 'or (TOO later replacing it i-. .. 1935 model Thsre were kUlM •'"> CanllKMMl .i urn* Wl '"i fo r BthOT stage work*. The Ha,. || AIL*.: Hming. a new i Tinbagg-i Oprra and i .MI.IvfM %  ri rive yean I .i ulna language ..H.JII had hapi i .,.-i Here wa. Engll any ml**. serious opera— which was pleasing to Uie home market and HI for export. MaenvrhUg Brilten'a social lire ruling lo glitter The man Aha in 1MB .ontributed anil-war :. ludlng a satirical Deuce .,: Death) lo a Festival o Music :„r the People nt the old Queen l!;iil itood eleven years later %  ::o-ipreni with Queen Mary and I'nncaaa Hiiabeth al the chrlaten:ii|)lonmiif Stafcu* For B.W.I. Commissioner 1XJNDON Viliah Caribbean ; duties in l-otuiou bjg will ngvi diplomatic immunity similar U thai enjoyed by foreign Amu t| will be granted under the Diplomatic Immunitie, (Commonwealth Countries and Hepubli' .I ii.i-iKil BUI. which cornea into force next March I and which will apply to all Commonweelth Hig'i Commissioners in London The pill confers immunity from legal process, and inIt also rnMid i King by Order in Co*M> P grant similar Immunity to aervanls of Commonwealth uovernmenu who are dulii* work llk • %  eggt B,ll,cn VlSS' On the crest of that mood he \ng of thn atari and Counlea. ol rooaTa baby **> ... „ K „ ha* been his companion and muslAt flrat hia Suffolk retreat was fV.v!! cJl pEtner ever nw called for „ .unvaried stump of windmill al back In London ,,,mmon cause. . m MHing, .'.o khaki for m nui that. HU tf %  i %  i tit, opeir %  ill' T Orm." AnrI ff hi ^h|^l> %  I Lib nit Ihem HU Tune*? No A.iiiough modest enough pi nner, Britten has a clear ideo Ins ineriu. The morning altej lust performance h has been to screw up a newspapei ing .< crttM %  '!" not I ... work .%  %  % %  rhi -eankhu id H il Both are inrtivuiuali '' %  '**" t i,vir'.nment The aignini II %  miV.i hat been ;it lognerhends hlmw^f Hlg phaae ol coii%  %  AlUSt I yeail • ld be*'n ,n( fr<;alane* con. prxer fur films. ^g^g^g^g^H^S A But tfcei.Wi -le. TheprwsiL .i ,i irujerad m Kr felt vcrj t,.(QCC a CO did not Dt-iej; bUl .Ul *"> So-.'Vc.A^SntS iwSfr' .he importance jo the think too much good aen*-i nation of hla musir-mskwm. %  ; '' %  "" ''';""' W ,K.^L,,m Hlnte ia2 BrUtr-ti linn renounced -. iloumcaa that he is the mp*t imriDCfpUai Bul i ll thing that ha* hit ggajali a dlfieiei %  <•( c. %  H • mpha> espeefally if they are haa heen greet; its quality ujicver cars ol aucces*. And Britlen-a VUOMH has. in |ta w;iv, been un.nutched Son ol BflUft who %  .;i i 1BJWC and %  <••• ""'.-i %  miIdtd at 19 Cider '' tsH living i He could not lor The life of htm write a hit like One l on Your Tiny Hand Is Ki I he wanted to which hi :iouslv doe-, net (He hi* a rather tiuldltke contempt lor Puccini ) THM he has u PMI g lo yg b-ik l %  %  I 1 ntlve pwii^. uiiitnagiimble. The lirurawiialVnnahei;,! i. lom UK IUU ealed the ri:iine formances al .where Pears 'can agi-j before you cume upon i aqueJ In imiu.>wn mur.i' WUBLU coevaiuHi HIIIKMU —L.r-s No Opening For Coloured Migrants In Australia MELBOURNE Australia doe* not intend to start any scheme lo attract coloured S ropJe from other parts of th mplre as immigranta. Mr. Harold Hull, ihe Australian Minister ol immlfratlon. has staled in Melbourne. The Minister was replying to i >iiggeai|on. made by the Earl of H....iwiike. now viaitlng Australi < tliai the Government couW halt ihe drift of farm people into (be i liters by allowing coloured domestic and farm labour to enter Into Australia on a controlled basis. Ausi allan housewives are not nevlfaf ihlldren because they havi> o do all the backbreaktng housewi rk themselves," said Lord Hard.vicke Coloured domeetic help LO so.ve that problem and coloured farm help would make a M tliffeiciice to agricultural, produc;ion." lint although Auslralla bj good ^nd has been for several %  .. %  • ra< • iin Igranta Mr, Holt ma-ie in irplv lo Lord ,ii dwicke't susgeaUon: *| do not share 1-ord Hardgloomy attitude nr Aust.ulian mothers. Australia's birth. limed aleadlly in ret it ID the last ihrci u,. UaftraUaii mothers have > %  lo more than 500.1M0 %  When hard work bj ig|cgggau-y, w'Miirn will not chiik ii. Auitralia has no need to look ,o coloured ueupht<. nil itIm. prog .linnThe iiuuim i British DilgrmnlJ con.Ing t i Australia this \ear w.U he aajord Imiiugiation from nonintish Euiii|>eaii %  >untiles It at i high level" — B.U.P. Parliamentary Questwns r Mr. HWSyreUAvti d-boio Leyionj .isfcedlhe beer, iri State lor th. Colonies il ne i jware ..( IIW overcTowoini % %  .i.iLn.iK.1. and ore being taken to deal w'ltn till mattrr. The Mm. t.i ..! Slat. fOI COlOtl ,.•1 Affairs. Mr. Alan 1-ei.nos UO.LI. ifl.l.eU Th* I ul Jamaica have sought overcrowding by -he i %  J additional buildings hi the existing urisoiu. ana r opAi' prison for 200 a .si >••• > ( am asking the G'-vcnun n>i report on the pOait <-• ai-u i write to the him. Mu..laei when I receive It." Mr. Soronagn: "U ll hon. Ucntlcmgn Ui it. v.in.e overt.owding d some in-ianogs lo M. BO and somn10 | erf cent, above what the noui.i IK. and is lie gn mg lurther advice with a view lo relieving this serious atale ol ailaura'" Mx. Lcnnox-Boyd: Wo very mu.-n hopc-hht overcrowding will liiiiklnlgh partly through the pro. g* la.iuties and partly through the decline in the amount of crime." Mr. Ronald 8u**el| (ConserVi.tivi. Wembley) asked I lary Of State lor the Colonies |: he will give further deiails of hi" proposals for developing the production of essential raw materials ..nd foodstuffs in the Colonies. The Minister of State for Coloiial Affairs. Mr Alan LennoxMi nfh' i-.M" Friend informed the House on 8'h November Uiat the scope for immedMte increases in ihe induction of raw materials and focir„ir in the colomol tern limited, and that most ol our h*pea .nust be eoncentraled on the nudicrm and long-unu i i MajestyV Government (ajBUJUhg ItM itlffelili' wnlgh .an be taken |o secure in! leases loI gggejMti %  I i of Government action m this country no lea* than H. ihe Colonies, and I do not cxi>c< that it will be possible to mak. 'iii'imin Bl an early date. i ,„ nunodltii In arfalcb Innra el o| mcreaaing supply ountry In the short term ittOn, niaiiK.mi-si. v' iWs, %  ugar, timber, ind oil-*eeds." Mi Rtivsell Would my righl I Friend ugretthat the polh'V of His Ma)ely'>. Govei nun-lit is rjlhy i" orontn eosadJaarw under which pnvule nUMrprlM CU • 'veiogl Uie Colonies rnther tl ihat the Qajyeannonl ri.mid start schemes on their nwn"" Mr. Leniiox-lkivd I very iniah hope it will be the ranull of enlightened partnership between th* Ciovernment and privaic enterprhe." \Ii Ki< O'l ii 11. i i live. Croydon); "Does that reply mean that my right hon. Fncmi will freely auppon the import lo this ootmlry from our Ool all loodstuffs available to come here?" Mr. Lennox-Boyd: "I she like to know precisely what my hon. Friend ha* in mind. In general, we are only loo glad to have supplies of loodstuffs from the ri. i-li Colonial Empire In the interest of the Colonies and in our •>wn inlerest. B-C.P. Hair on your comb? you run the risk of baldness ACT NOW! Ila.rr.ilh. mil bevau* the root* arc *i.med tf their vital foe' Tha^'* ark) yOU ncc.l s.Kiknn. nrgcnilv lor Sihikrin vontaiiu. MI GQgmnti lied i*-><". 0 l touncen csscnual hair-lorming %  UkstteaXgf. Ma^Jprd into live ICah*i Silnknn IKHI> iiiiuri%hes ihe hail IOOU— ami aOOn hair |fO i-saau \.^ . %  %  u %  -I(IKI( snv (*h, %  >11 in e you. tict, my pi 1 advice Tkt ill ** /*r<* i-Mou priMpKiiu sag asrassssn | I 1 — I —•* +lmm I !l .ur-trlinder c Develops uwn to nn." s5-r V.-.r l.k-.(T Giv" %  porlul •tut) or ixiHf* di..a lot aeiirmiiir*. eumprea •ott. or •ancullur.il ruuipmanl 1 hrrtll %  1 -..t, Tn ran t*r*. i .1 MMMg laaht but ip H/lflt A TAYIAHTS GAHAGE I in r ST0P C0LBS, lV %  *• li/ %-^ Phensic PHENSIC tablets clear the heed and dispel tightness and pain behind the cyo They bring down high temperature, relieve stuffy, congested h-eling*, at the same time southing the nerves and counteracting -Icprcision. The aches and pains of 'Flu disappear in DO time. IMIEXSIC tablets act quickly and lately. Tbev neither harm the loan nor upset the stomach. Keep • surr'y of PHENSIC tablets by you always. Ph enstc V: TWO USLETS BRING QU'CK RELIEF FROM RHEUMATIC "HNS, LUMBAGO. NERVE PAINS, HEADACHES. NEURAIGIA, INFLUENZA, COLDS CHILLS y Never hrqetf best to bui| num PENS from SI 00 to J 1.32. IBALIP0IMTS $1.06 (Rifilli 36C: X B N S U Li.on-ntsr II vi II i Vslve-ln-head Enflnes (47 bh.p In ih% Cemul. 48 M p m tfc Zephyr Six). Suptr-ironf, MkiT-eniorinj AllSi^sl Welded Iniagrsl Body Conuiucuon. gf Cgi gl l ahiag aaaeaaj . restful, rtlaiutf Coti**primi Indeptndini From Wheel Suipeniion: bold-in Ooubltit'-^f iNx* sbseiDl't IMMM' action, lmooih-noppmf Hydraulic Brakes. FPHYR SIX AFVD tOSSUL 'FIYl-STAR', Charles McEnearney & Co.. Ltd. OFIICI WORK5KOP 4203 PARtS DEPI 4673 Wm. FOGARTY aa LTD. e CHRISTMAS There is a ipirit which pervade* out World at this lime. We leel il in the Joy ol giving GIFTS . and FOGARTY'S has the grandest selection ever. GIFTS lhal will be treasured aa well as used GIFTS Ihat are a precious ioy lo th* receiver GIFTS . He or She will be proud lo display We also have a handsome group ol CHRISTMAS TREES and novelty arrangements, modestly priced. • Latest attraction ol our . XMAS SHOES SERIES ladies' Windsor Shoes—While Nu-Buek. Dutch Heels. Backless and Toeless -S10.40 & $10.59 per pair. Ladles' Windsor Shoes—Brown & Black Call $ Style as above . —$10.43 per pair. VELVET EVENING CAPES OF BEAUTY CAPES That are Rich-looking and well Tailored |: CAPES ... to wrap you with warmth and —The Price $18.00 each. The moel exciting . DRESS MATERIAL ...IhtoCWlUTMAB BERNE SILK The richness ol leel conlirme what the eye appraises. Ask for these designs— EASTERN WISDOM $ 8.22 per yd. CAMBERWELL GREEN $ 4.97 .. .. WEDDING MARCH $4.35 „ 5 DAILY DIPPERS" DELIGHT! LASTEX SWIM-WEAR Plain and Floral, one and two-pieces styles From $12.00 to $22.00 each BEACH BAGS $4.46 to $6.00 each. GENTLEMAN'S guide to good buys ENGLISH SHOES—Brown Suede $10.43 per pair —Brown Suede Brogue $11.05 per pair RELIANCE SHIRTS—Striped $4.55 each NIRVANA ART SILK SPORT SHIRTS $3.21 each WHITE ARROW SHIRTS—AU sizes s Win. FOGARTY ( %  *•) LTD. *-, -.---.v-*,'.'.-•---*--•,'---•,•. .v/^/,y,v//A'////rV,v*',v/.'



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I'M.I TIIIHTV 1111 II CHKISTMXS MTN.DMKNT SUNDAY. DrthMHHI 16, 1951 !' UES AND PAS ry buiidei QUIZ CROSSWORD m *mmf m t&i# t >; ***wa&sMr+m&&m By Euorne Shtffrr HOItl/.ONTAJ 1-Who delivered Ihe chlldreo of Israel from Kglon, king of Moab. By killing him* (Judg. 5 -What king of Persia mod* %  proclamation concerning the building of the temple at Jerusalem? (2Chr 3023) 10—One of the place* built by King Aii from lh stones taken from Ramah (1 Kl 15:22) 1*—Bird of peace. 14— Dwelling. 10—Marsh aitd 17 — Unconcealed. 18—Sea eaglet 19—Minute* of court proceedings. 20—Due extent. 22—A miD'i fume. 24—Epoch. 25—Prioi to, In lime. JB— Delected. r, *v AI finrcBCH^trniiDrfiii ft !lliClBH'<*KCrj -OPI! riRBnz; nFiEEDHtMmnwnriiir: kmcnHnnKCrpp:r-i uauu 31—Possessive pronoun. 32—Printer'* meaiures. 3V-Originate. 37_PonW 39—Plant of lily family. Limcrickagram SOU Ilk* to solve -ryptograms and laugh at limericks, you emit do both In the "llmerlckogram." For lh begir.nar In solving a crypt some hint, may be ne ce ssary. Bach letter below Is a aubatllute for some other letter—always the same leth A atady of the crypt ahowa a elngle-kttter word. D. It must then represent either A or I. The frequency of the threeletter word LDK Indicates that It may atand for THE. Those two i lues should be enough to enable vou to dctermins the Identity of the rest of the letter* D V. I N R I H A 11 H It KMNQ G n l( Q I II %1 D S M n I. D H II s \ \ I ./ I M x\ I, M K I K M \\ h III atla, K I I N X X H I I M x\ h HHIIR %  LI VIIR P I 8 XB I W I,— ELI LDK k\HI NLISI it J i mi! "it HSMia I u 'I| Ni •*•* %  —* PN MB /-*••• 40—Plait 41—Bind. 42-Who was killed by Joab? *I Sam-20:101 43— Penitential season. 44—Heroine i Hindu myth.) 45— Device for stamping dates. 4t—Creek letter 47—Close comrade. 48-Doctor Of taw labbr) 9t—8-shaped worm. SI-Male ct S2-Unwcll 54-Who waa Joab* father? 11 Chr. 4 141 MDaubed 82—God of war 63Who waa saved by Joshua b*. cause she hod bidden hi icngers who came (o spy out Jericho' iJosh 623) fiS—Plunge into water, aft-Liquid meair*. 67-Sen %  68—Garden from which Adam and Kve were banished. %  ptmt 70—Viper. 71—Cory place. VaVmOAJL 1—Throughout all of what place did Kins. David put garrisons* '2 Sam 1 I4 2—Trust. 2—Inner cost of the irt* 4—Thick. 6— Fourth son ol Dinlton her.l II—Impelled 21—Bittrr eeteh 28--Asiatic carnivore. 27—Authoritative decree. 28—.Vhat goddes waworshipped by the Epheslans? AcUl6:34i 30—up to Ihe time that SI-A son at Shemaiah UChr. 222.


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PACE Eir.HT SCMUY ADVOCATE SCVDAY. DECEMBEB l. 1Jt wmmt a* •*>• Unai c.. IM. * %  >* a u. ecu — uw Sunday, December Ifi. 1*51 IlKEP WATER RIGHT at ibe head uf the qw priorities demanding urgent from the ni' enl stands tht Deep Wl&tt HarlxHir. The Government n unmedi ater harbour buUl Of NOT There is nothing on the PI g ratva not ^ol a deep water u ..'ii Sl.ucia has one. when ILLS one, Aruha has one. Guadeloupe hat on Martinique bu one ami i has one is no concern of ours. m hi when we are jJuinK to el DM That Ll |h • that the new Government MUST and on their answer depends the whole re and prosperity of ourselves and our children, The time for diUy-dattjrlng, lor uncettajnty. lor "waiting and seeing" is pasl Esther Barfai I deep water harbour or it p t* its people hy ihouaandf every year. There u> no Other •'•''• ol expanding Barbados' economy or reducing high, freight rates than by bu Ul i deep water harbour. i chiefly responsible for the continuous rise m the cost of living have bean increased during lM by the European shipping companies And only last week Ale... Canadian National and Saguenay Terminals announced their intention oi imposing %  Mircharge ol lf'.' on the gross freight on all shipment Imir iuan ports to Bi .dnetown with effect from January 1st. I90B The For tins surcharge are stated with clarity. "Il is the aim" of the slipping .mies "to provide the best possible nrvlta at low freight rates, but .is our operating costs have been mounting steeally at Barbados due to increased cargo operating expense.-i the < mparies regret having no alternative but to establish a surcharge which they hope will be of short duration. There is no likelihood of this hope being achieved unless Barbados builds a deep water harbour, Barbados is a small island in the Atlantic Ocean. It is entirely surrounded by sea and dependent on imported food to feed its very large population. The cost of living in Barbados must always tlierefore depend on the coal of handling eta cur*.*?-.. The off) ent 1 ten u an anachronism in 1951 and Is responsible for the increase in freight rates, winch makes food, clpjhlng, building materials and all essential! for the good life more expensive than they ought to be t b no good putting the blame on rising world prices until we set our own house in orderuntil in other words we build our dei p water harbour. Rising freight rates are not however the only bubbles threatening our life line. At the fourteenth annual general meeting of CARON1 LTD., held in London on December 1J 1951. Mr Q. Vernon Tate the Chairman said "practical'> thfl "hole of our raw sugar exports In 1981 were shipped in bulk and we are hoping to develop this system further in 1952. The successful development of this new method for handling sugar is the result of close co-operation between refiners, shipping lines and producers. It is not unreasonable to suppose that the time is not far distant when a very Large proportion ol West Indian sugar will be handled in this way." It is not unreasonable indeed, and the new Government will have to tell us not later than January' 195what steps they are taking to make? certain that Barbados is not left behind when bulk shipment really becomes universal. The connection between bulk shipment and a deep water harbour is so near as almost to be intermingled. And it is not only at CARONI LTD where bulk-shipment looms large. The Kinnire Producer for October 1951 noted that "a further step towards bringing a substantial part of Britain sugar imports in bulk has been taken hy the foundation of a new shipping company known as Sugar Line Ltd.. in which Tate 5: Lyle, United Molasses and the West Indies Sugar Co.. are jointly concerned. Tate and Lyle have a 45 per cent, interest United Molasses and the West Indies Sugar Co.. each hold 25 per cent, and Tate & Lyle investments 5 per cent." %  st of the world has nQl been sitting idle while Barbados waited to make up its mind about the deep water harbour. But the new Government cannot afford to wait any longer. It must answer the question to build or not to build." Every day that passes makes construction more ex^nsive. The French in Martinique have recently opened new harbour installation ;it Port de France the capital The new 200 metre dry dock is laid '<> be the largest In the Caribbean Marttltio of course a Department of France and benefits from the fact that the French in France tried Martinique to have new I arbour installations and were prepared to foot the Bill Barbados which is r't prepared tobe' %  the United Kingdom any assistance from the taxUnHed Kingdom to help in butldln ; a harbour; hut the Government of the United Kingdom will most certainly help Barbados with advice and in other ways when the local government has decided that we cannot afford to go on without a deep water harbour. Much talk has circulated in Bridgetown about the deep water harbour since Sir Douglas Ritchie's report was published. The opinion was expressed by certain influential individuals at the lime that Barbados, could not afford to pay for a deep water harbour. Today no such opinion is heard in influential quarters The question most current is rather can Barbados afford not to have a deep water harbour'' Thf Government need have no fear that public opinion is against them The overwhelming majority of the people want a deep water harbour, because they ranlaM that the cost of living will never stop rising, until freight lates go down And freight rates will never go down so long as the present antiquated lighterage system is maintained. The deep water harbour must be built In It I I i n l If Buggy Days IMUVIIl V. i PHOU1 DOWSS no new industries can be started in Barbados. That is a simple statement of fact. It is so simple a tsji ment indeed that at lirst sight it seems unnecessary to make it. Yet it must be made. Because to-day new industries cannot get power in Barbados to drive its mm One such industry which proposes to manufacture materials for housebuilding and to employ more than one hundred workers has been told that the electrintv company cannot supply power. This is a serious position for Barbados to be in. But it li only a symptom of a greater danE LT that threatens. The public will remanv PT with displeasure the electricity cuts which began in 1949 and lasted until the aarly months of 1000 The displeasure which the general public felt was naturally directed B| oust the Barbados Electric Company and it took several months before people realised that the Company was not to blame for what was proved to be inevitable rationing of available power To-day the position is much mure serious than it was at the time of the power cuts. Since then the Barbados legislature has passed the Public Utilities Act 1951. One eUuae of this Act is. it is claimed by the London Office of the Barbados Klectncal Company, preventing the subscription of capital necessary Tor purchasing new machines now wanted by the company to preserve a margin of safety in the capacity %  f its present plant. Tin 1 l.ondoti Company is so concerned about the clause in the Public Utilities Act that it has already sent %  petition to His Majesty's Privy Council. There the matter stands pending further decision. Veanwhile the public of Barbados must the gravity of the situation which threatens. It is certain that power ruts will be inevitable unless the company acquires %  machines. These cannot be acquired until the company can get further capital subscriptions in lamdon. The Qhalrrnai bet the forty lirst annual general meeting of the Company held in London on Mu March. 1951. liMfcated then that the financing of "No 10 set ami of other necessary additions" was being BtIMM ed by means of a loan from the Company's bankers. Despite the increase in revenue earned by the company it is not possible for the company either to maintain its existing s with adequate reserves or to contemplate necessary expansionwithout furipilal subscriptions The Public Utilities Act which has passed the legislature but not yet received the Governor's assent would modify the company's rights under existing acts and orders and it is for this reason that the directors in London have decided to petition the Privy Council for redress. The position is very grave if only because it raises constitutional issues of the highest importance. But it is acutely serious for urgent economic reasons. The demands now made on the Barbados EUecUiep Company warrant the expansion ol the existing Power Station beyond its present capacity. This expeudiI ire would be of the order of £250.000. The expansion is not only warranted by present demands but is indi peusable for the economic developm nt f the island and the extension of electrici'v service to more and more people. But even without expansion the Company has not got adequate reserves to maintain its present requirements without load shedding. The major consumers -ii electrical power are helping the company to carry on now by shifting their load requirements in peak periods. The present position is acute and can only be alleviated by an expenditure of some ii 60,000 Housebuilding and new industries are now being handicapped; the revenue ol the electric rompany %  restricted with a consequent loss to the Treasury and Vestry of company and trade tax; and unemployment threatens some thirty employees of the Barbados Electricity Company taken on when expansion seemed possible. Without electrical power no new industries can be attracted to Barbados and local industries are already threatened. But the whole electrical supply of the island is ..' stake U %  result of one clause in the Public Utilities Act 1951. The new Government will surely lose no lime in giving the Barbados Elivtncity Supply Co., an assurance that it does not intend to jeopardise Barbados' economy because of one clause in an Act. The} QSfl> II %  id the public's certain disapproval further restrictions or cuts on existing tenuous supplies of electrical power or light. Although Governor Pope-Hon%  n Barbados on lit November 1876. the m Weft full <>f lieniir**) .. federation ngni up till U the yeaj-. Bui the island ate •lowly getting back to normal md the shops were uu. Uu-ir XITIII attraction' time 75 years ago Life w * hard on some people of course. The owner of Rural Collage Sugar Work Plantation for tni ef a i I Court of Chancerv had ... ,i and the (ilstr December 18th wu advertising his "IS acres of land or tiw.. il* w,Ui Windmill, 'Jo.llng House. Buildings and appurtenances," And the price with* tcr>iwing crops thereon'' Ou £1.800 Seems quite cheap Property was cneap In those '' %  •• in.:.,:> wars nu for the owners in Antigua In tinCourt ol the SIOIICTS lot sale of Incumbcrcd ihe West gad i • advertised for sale in AnUeUa KM the purpose of diichargingthr Incurnbrance H ere m uet didn't seem t„ be much money around. -n W. p. Leacock Co.. •tared to oITi i meet„ and carrots at 4 cent* per lb. and iron bedsteads at $7 20. you had to count if you were a govenuuaut servant why just fancy what vou had to pay for chairs SIB a dozen. If the government Iva cost of living allowI n who would be able my wherem Bridgetown' Bul F'ontabelU. cwrtainlv ,,..t Nobody could pay SI2 a monlh ~l lhat salary. Things seemed tough even outside fashionable Fontabelle Poor AV \ Ambridge now. There wa* he. a B.A., of St. John's College %  S and an AsslsUnt msler al liarrlson s College Forsooth, living al Oranvllle Cottage SI N l) i B .ihslstant masters' pay Why he just couldn't do It. So In Boej 'he advertisement to • lie West Indian for all lh*> Oovernor*a to r.mi ^> • it i F Ami 1 iikea l tvm (Marders into hi h house Whs either "re or intend to me pupils at th. College. I rill receive most careful assistance and supervision In their studies Terms on application And references ? Why the !,. %  i >! %  "U> % % %  By GEORGE HUNTE There were some peo|> %  who o.e .,. dollars so pressing. Ti • win. plaosa %  here y could spend two or thrrsj real having U. woi.> about .s re ihe rant was gessiog) from. Prince William Mos< y for Instance. He pieadad g dty al the Court of (.land Bet ons to an indictment charging I Ihe Uicaaf oi a sold wai chain. He was sentenced to years penal servitude, having • i |WtC4 i of fcl ly and twice o( pe ty the/t. And Samml C.rnest E.> t, alias Happy Jack being ,*n aid Tender wal sentenced to 2 y< s hard labour for the larceny o: a coat. U as go 1. King wanted He ad•rs lhat funeral reapers < seed i > die as %  to prison in lH.o. and H. o 79 Tudor BUaet w to go 111 tnose d-iys if yo to save trouble and fuss vei iscd HI four uewsp^ he was an "Importer 01 NOTIONS such as Burial for gentlemen: burial r> >cs and caps lor young and old i dies.' But even thou^n peopl had to die in 1876 one thing v. if only it was a -traw bi >m' just received, yuile nrw pe ect and full sued Is. eac. The patent Rk were well entie iched. There was t, p..-.ure t I'eleg Simmon!> with need fa.-lng off behind Ihe back ( his hi '• Petti "as he was before using Streeear*s parfonnr, prised glee s o n g >. Ethiopian farces, original ani %  And reserved seats were S/unrescrved 2/ana U..'k seals 1/-, f nen on December 23rd two da> before Christmas in came the German (raining ship NYMPI. alter t-ging 42 day from Montevideo. The Nysaa* according u tiiv Tiasea carried "a crew of 2 Boys' The Tunas had an origuiai motto. On Its editor Ul pasr i announced; Sworn to no parly, of no sec am I i can't be silent, and I will no lie." 1: has since been able to perform both these functions sue cessfully but In 1878 il was still going strong. Apart from reading four newspapers, and going to lecture minstrel shows, Christmas tres bazaars and entertaining trainin ships ihe exhibition was a big attraction then as always for thi people. The best fat b.irrov weighed 700 lbs. Mr. Da Costa "imported" fowls were splendl* Mr. Massiah'g 25 lbs. pair of gees were aobla birds %  there wer* some prodigious beans grown i the yard of the Gas Company' Work* in Bay Street—a good specimen of the nutritive proper ties of manure—from gas manufacture refuse. .. i psytw oi esnea "' native grewu*. .....arem several epectseeas oi .. .. men i' the plctdtreeler's o i Aouldnt km' s.ralght as u frock-coat, cai trousers the BOf of woman would the o' "afnet using nen: You I was Peleg. new, lop-hat. nd gu i mouth thai any be her escort when she sranl to hear the Christy Minstr.. at : AJbert Hall, Bridgctow i. But the advertiser; were I .. cor. at with the evidence of i ..• phot>*raphers. They fearlessly I ,ounn ,| "$1.0UO loi '.< lb d Whether they v the truth of pt the virtues of t. hit difficult to years, but with supply $1,000 w H newspaper any indicatoi Nightingale and I the big noise u. year. They ha,i "Globe" and Ih i from Table and through Marble I furniture. Tool Set*, oak ems:, clock* down to Bed Paying qc. bad time for oilshops. There v Haul advertised at the Moravi. %  Street when Hi would spa i account of the last. And the called the Albie the dty at Cum* But the mail'! was Ihe Chn< company tempo American <;< %  •' bers of the :t" Regiment, spho ance at the AM town on Tuaadi The mit.'tret^ %  %  i is not true." %  %  n rring to v .1 .m or to ic ointment Is a %  tftali attai n money In short ns a lot to lose. tvertasarasnis are of |irosperity .. seemed to be -toad Street that %  full page in the ir wares ranged Hanging Lamps, p Tables, buggy chests, Croquet tT milts, 8 day %  lack Welsh and ires. But psOPWl r things beside U a lecture on 'r Dei-ember IK Chapel Roebuck \ J. N. Durant Haiti, with a brlel 'Volution of April •-<• was an hotel i m ihe ncait of •Hand Street. shOW Of H: v lOnsh I of KngHsh and lien and niem| Royal Si.-. •ive a performt Hull liriria.IVeember 19th. hovved "Ameri%  • pared locally. . Nat.ve BbuSUlauMsran wnot mX. >.'Mjt pa*n. piougo. %  ' %  -""'ii'i'^n *•*• puin,* WOi*eU oy valio, a _. • di.itJUKI: unQ some n^uve laix uy Mr. bourne.... ,,.i oinamanu %  mine k a/ere really exquiai.-... in laeHa >m w ma trow u UatUU m nvediewoiK oi evotrv Kitnuni uiv ueiicaleiy SBasM*Nsr napaharcaaatg to me nen louainb t|Uilt there were beauiUul Oia plays ol aruftclal Mowers mao< iron Spanish needle nvnds, ei nusks. u*h scales etc. Tnere is not one word -bo... wna, ihe ladlea arora or whemcr the* were aumilted to Marsn. H..H wnerc the exhibmon neld. Bul dresses wen I it everything else "new prints al 'i oenu. calicoes at 6 cents, Oxford shirting/, at 8 cents, wni.e iaiv stripe muslin at 0 cents, check ginghams at 12 cents" and Whr.flelds were advertising tnc.r "greatest inconsistency: elegant i-ashini-re furniture prims hitherto priced 18 cents now being sold at 10 cents per yard.*" And ihe beauly .specialists were leading the field with Barry s pearl Cream "important to the ladies Wnnklc?. removed! Sunburn Removed: Tan Removed! Every blemish removed from the skin. Sallow and dark skin BU pure and white as alabaster. Youth restored. Indies of ntty made In appear like twenty by a single application of the Barry's Pearl Cream Perhaps its Just ns well that these secret* have net come down to u* in I9S1. but what with Pope-Hennessy's promises and all. it's not surprising ih it 1876 was a turbulent year if newspapers used to pfjbl li tk kind of ad. on one page while thev slanged Pope Hennessy on all th' others. What a year' Evethough Hip Baths were in goo t supply and galvanised buck* %  cost one shilling. Sitting On The Fence F UTURE Home Guardsmen are fort mats thai Mr Shinwell's eminent t.> the Home Guard Hill to include women in the force was reduced to a comparatively Wniless clause admitting Ihem ns inarmed cooks and telephonists To a nervous man like your Uncle Nat, it has always seemed dangerous enough to trust 85vear-old grandfathers with flreirms and explosives unless they were Regular time-serving solrliers By \\T||\N |, QfJBBINS Ing sergeant ask Eht Pre] l.'irow %  'She', droppe \ observer. "Dow'r. Afler four s bang, and at la* cano in the Ho ••Who's next? esr*er> %  shaking gran%  to throw. it," ihouta the L'verybody." %  Quard ..-K.-llMUtehea door, and into the chard. Dragged what, dear? The body, of course. Would >ou fancy pheasant, dear? So, thanks. K had been there Ihree weeks. What had. dear? >n reltinp pou. Tht nl hnie been UTCIn>o n as -ia -_ u. "Old Granny Rumpus," someBut If 65-year-old grandmothh(riv .hout* %  i-had l>een armed, training ild have been a nmhtTnare. All right, there you are on parade in the Drill Hall. You are learning to slope arms by number*. Bayonets have been fixed In ease Ihe K.C. has to take over guard duties at Buckingham Palace again. So wake v .urself up. You are In the rear rank and old Mrs Rumpus, mother of sis and grandmother of four. Is In front of you "II the command "One" old Mrs. Rumpus cants the rifle 'martly up on her right tide, latching the small of the butt In her righl hand (we hopei. steadying the n!\r with her left and sticking Ihe bayonet clean through her grey perm. When the drill sergeant has disentangled the hair from the bayonet, he then gives ihe order Two", whereupon old Mrs. Rumpus carries the rifle smartly across to her left shoulder in one movement, gripping the heel of (he butt with her left hand and steadying the rifle with her right "Then I'm rs bombing sergean the Commando* A Boston I gning," says the *'I felt safer in I keep hodu. ft t ty hiph. Well. no. I don't think I'll have pheasant, el.her. Do vou mind II we en home, dear? We're only hi* THE AWHJL CHILD granted a woman a dtVOTV* because her husband read crime Storlta -hen they gages dining out Go home? come out. In; MsUnj rather faint, dear Just like a tcornan fo spoil ar ewenino when a man* mfoying himself. "Small genUeman up to three inches laller in our own bespoke shoes. . "—Adcrr-. flsemrni. ChriMma* Carol C OME, cheer up little gentlemen may nothing you dismay I wish you Joy and happiness thl.coming Christmas Day For then, in shining shoes bespoke with added Inches three Your little hand may reach UH top of any Christmas tree Oh. lucky little gentlemen. M more to skip and hop D Dinner At Right dear? On the command "Three" she [cuts her right hand smartly away 1 to her right side, keeping her I thumb In line with the seam of i her trousers. At this moment you in the rear rank may have had It, chum. The weight of the rifle and \ bayonet will be too much for j Granny's left hand It will come [crashing over her shoulder and %  i don't lose Ml 11 Ltterj atHI BMUU have | been the day the old ladies pariaded at the bombing range to live hand grenades. "Got your pin out?" the bombCan'f i*ou sec fns reading? Taking soup. dearT So. thanks. Thev*e found rhr hodp What body, dear? Of Ihe murdered u'oman. of ourse. Would you like %  fillet of steak, dear? No, thanks. There tra* a trail of blood from (he library. They bajhfd her head in. I don't think I'll have either. The murderer must hacc dropped if through fhc hall. pu*( the ffun room, out of the To grab at richer prizes which an always at the top. For life is like a Christmas trr< ant to see the my little gentles all: The world Is kinder to the strong the handsome and the t*U. No more my little genllemee shall lovely women frown On gallant little gentlemen; It shall they look down With callous, half-amused grimace, with haughty look askance .ant httle gentlemen arc pleading for a dance. Oh. tragic little gentlemen, oh. gaPant gentles small. Like Ondcrelja) Falrv piince's dam mt ball. So soon to doff the magic shoe.' that like glass slippers shone A liyle gentleman abed, his borrowed Inches gone. UTS BOOKS WE Have A Wide Range Suitable for— CHRIST MAS P RESENTS UlVOI VII. STATIOXKRY. m fi^#&**9 may RNMSSP vour taking final gnej tikrlv lo BsBSel J in rirr invitril ' l>h<>/, i$-$72 or rail at our nlor*' with itiii*y parking nearby C. S. Pitcher & Co. #IF3 f s#Of course you know my favourite drink GOOOARD'S 1.1H It It It lilt RUM.



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SUNDAY, UIX'F.MBKK IS. I9il C IIKISTMAS MTI'l.llil.M PAGK TWKNTV-ONK. The Way To Peace And Plenty Sit whaskn wwrruikn l'i( -ulrnl \ merit £n Chemursic The chronic hunger of million* of the earth's people is a neediest hunger. Through wise use of land, the farmers of Ihe world could grow enough food to feed everyone. In so doing, they would help lay the foundation for lasting world peace. There arc some people who believe that man cannot increase the food supply iapidly enough to supply an expandlnit world populitlion. I do not agree with tnem. They fail to appreciate the resource fulnesi of the leader* uf men. They have hitlc understanding or the potentials of agriculture. They have made their forecasts on the basis of what has happened — and those who look backward are often wrong about the future. I believe th.it calm attention to agricultural progress could appease people's hunger, relievo people's mhery. drown out the distraction* of communism's evil promises, and create the peace and abundance that men universally desire, t do not need to leave the United States to find proof that man can overcome his age-old enemy — hunger. Eighty years ago the average yield of oat, in the then still comparatively new State of Illinois in the central section of the Untied States was only 28 bushels per acre (1.75 metric tons per hectare). How It is 42 bushels per acre (2.62 metric tons per hectare). The average Illinois farm 80 yeaxi agoyielded 10 bushels of wheat to the acre (.88 metric ton per hectare). now it yield* 20 bushels per acre (I 34 metric tons per hectare). In parts of the United States single Held* have produced more than 100 bushels of wheat per acre (1.8 metric tons pere hectare i and 20" bushels of corn per acre (1J-6 metric lon s per heotani The U.S. national average yield of potatoes rose from 90 bushels per acre (6.1 metric tons per hectare) to 204 bu\hels per acre (1S-9 metric tons per hectare) in 1050. During the same period cotton vtelds were nearly doubled. Dr. Robert M. Sailer, head of the U& Soil Conservation Service, has calculated that at least 1.100.000,000 acre* (520,000,000 hectares) of additional land could be brought into food production in the world and that fertilizer supplies could be provided for such additional acreage. Other scientists have estimated that an increase of 10 per cent, in |ba raw production of China and India could provide food for an additional 5ft.000.000 people m th.se areas. Knowledge of the land Itself is still far from complete or perfect. Within 50 miles 180 tdOOBMien) of my home In the State of New Jersey I could take you to land which the experts a few years ago classified a* marginal or sub-marginal, it could have been bought then for $15 an acre blems of marketing, transportation, and distribution of agricultural products, so that such producta capable of being produced In abundance may be marketed in an orderly manner and efficiently distributed." One of the market research projects already carried out by the Department of Agriculture is a Btudy of the packaging of fresh fruits and vegetables. As a result, the packaging of corn, tomatoes, spinach, kale, celery, and various type-, of salad mixes has developed into a sizable industry at terminal Stark! %  %  For example, n study of t' c packaging of sweet corn giown in Florida during the winter months for Bale In northen State* ha opened a new market. Northern housewives report they like the il.ckaged corn and have found it reasonable in cost. The study alcr revealed that corn husk mings could be used to fee*eIssjoelatton pr' mailer? and Ihe r employees with a training course in merchandising methods. The course Ineluded Instruction in produce trimming, colour contrast, building of rack displays, ^elective aim maa,* displays, day and night care of produce, and other practices conducive to less waste and greatel •ales. The courses were started in Wovembcr, 1947. Within two year, some 15,000 grocers in 60 cities and 29 States had taken the training. Many grocers adopted the practices recommended In the course. Some even remodeled their entire produce departments. Another part of the research programme is directed toward improving the market place itself. More than 60 different cities in producing areas of the Uniiefl States have requested studies of their market facilities. For many of these cities the Department of Agriculture has made recommendations that reduce costs and deliver the product* in better condition to the (onsumers. New wholesale m.irke: facilities have been built or are being built In 15 places as a result of recommendations. One of the largest of these |g in Puerto Hico. where a study of the Island's %  markets was begun in 1040. The principal aim here Is ... %  SSSSM dttOM :• %  i n ai UH Island and commodities irr.porVd so that D can be increased and living standardof the people raised. Work ha* begun oh this project. In 1950 the P.. ture appropriated $200,000 to develop port facilities, and legislators have i Ifjat more money be iun for further developments research agei. agricultural college*. State drnartments of Agriculture. co-operate in the research programme to improve marketing practices and fnrilitte, on a local. State, and regional basis. BARBADOS CO-OP COTTON FACTORY LTD.



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SUNDAY, DECr.MBtK 16. 1951 SUNDAY ADVOCATE PAGE THREE .VI TME-CINEMA Maid Oi Orleans SEWING CIRCLE BY .'. K. Now thawing at the i'laza, Uridsjetowu. i* JOAN O F ABC Marring Ingrid i'< and JosI and lain ranks high among the) I ductlons of dustrjr. Paetuall*mid historical ity. u u corret* detail. No altamp. ha* been mad* to glamourise this magnilicent story of a young girl's tftth m God and her belief that *be WM the recipient ol revelation, instructing her at armies oi ihe King <.f Fi.ince in their vietortous campaigns .igainet the Engiuh invaders who •N-rupted he. c %  KU* to reach the Daup" professedly devout DM %  valour in da| the Dauphin', vittoHoui erniiea JHielng them *i'h the % %  pint ni tM* %  ".! OBptUrV, tri.il i-ution tn i by Mbs Bergman in a manner whirh can only be descTlued aa d* Jose Ferrer as the Dauphin ttOQfl hilt imijl BSsTSsTtJ IK OH Of %  %  The cut includes mori' I %  tlon and It is virtually impossi%  -..., ur the production. The latter half of tho .story which coven tin irijl at I, least known port of JoBI f.uthfullv reproduced B, prevailti,,. cry. pel'i. dleney, un i"i dogma and immorality nud greed. Produced in Teihiu. magniflcanUy costumed, thta it a picture well worth seeing. It wax n In Barbados aboul two years ago but ila story la so Md IUH Reigman's porIneplred thai 1 f %  It H niven first pluee In H"~ week's i' | Night Into Horninf Set unaj BB alnn.-. v ou'thfulnt'ss and high university campus. NIGHT INTO • %  <*., playing a' U ThMtn U %  • aensiUve drama abo H I he real i which ev< %  '.'.icrstand. The back • %  and sincerity ,ii out iin i is around Which the pint | In brief, the 1*017 -1 oung college professor whose wife and -hil-t are hilled hj aton in theft iiom. I'hilip Amity, Ihjg young professor whose values abruptly duturtcd by two people mod Mid who takes the easiest my to forget this at**. Mi. Mil?II tlonal acting I real ani 1 I brought out of the hoUM his ultimate break < almost unnerving in tneil There i> I 1 the roles Mllland In I KIOHT INK. MOMNING In that both thnraciers sees: escape through %  I coh ol. but there .my further resemblance censes, us the realisation Is brought home to Ainley th.il In., weakness Is causing his destruction and degradation and atiecUng the live* of his students. Nancy lvi>, a cot newcomer and one to watch, and John Hodlak as her fiance, whoso engagement la nearly broken up ; rcr friendly sympathy lor Ainh_\, give excellent petiorm%  warmly sympathetic -> the University Dean. Direction Is good, dialogue natural and all the characters completely believable and human. A serious picture, with here and there touch** of natural humour. and Uuough the successes and failures of its principal character. We realize no one u alone and that the human spirit is unconquerable. Song: To Remember The Empire Is featuring a return engagement of SONG TO UEMEMBER and most of us will have no difficulty In recollecting this delightful musical lilm based mi the life .1! Fre> %  years since It was last shown, but I value of a pie%  I UaH kind never argejga, Wilde, Merle gnd Paul Muni. 11 is a the ejortoua nseto* < na Ot the world's must beloved and most brilliant composers. OH, I AM SLAIN' NEVEK bacon have 1 NM n 1 ling in nu* that I cannot (Stan. Hut the account in :.., .. %  %  %  [Man parliament baa sharpened my sense i IBadequacy. Try aa I willI simply cannot accept the published veeflaOn of events as giving a true picture. It began, you will remember (If you are Ihe sort of person who remembers what was in the paper four dnys ogo). with the leader i.i unopposition fiercely assailing Prime Minister Mussadeq. reacting .1 climax with the elegant InGei the hell out of ban Now I quite believe that the :ho opposition nw> I iV* I the Frtme iUnutei bi words (as they say) to that eilcel. Ho would, after all, only be echoing something that Oliver Cromwell said In comparable cirouaHamncee three hundred years eatUgt 1 But, to quota an old song. it's, not what you say. U*a 'he way that you say it. No doubt there Is a Persian in which is most corrtsctly r lulered as "t-ct the he 1 out O* II I %  ..-, as %  .Miposcible, though the pni the Rubalvyat Kvaa if II bad I believe ritS*W*'3 would have ti:n the wrong side. Press darts first one way and the 0 the other way to make them lay flatter. Look on the right side to be sure the dart is pressed right with no pucker at the end. Dartt on heavy fabrics should be slashed open and pressed open All horizontal darts should be pressed down. Shoulder seams and mosl vertical seams are beat pressed open. it is easier to press a seam open if you first press the closed seam :n one side and then Ui tile other -ide before trying to pres* It open. Press shirt seams from the bottom up towards the waistline to avoid stretching Press your hem from the bottom up Pressing around a hem is likely to cause a ripple in the hemline. Never Prjfi aethers flat The edges of collars, cuffs and necklines an uuii l uinciuuci ajtatl ,. gfj thai provoked him to such vciy unparliamentary procedure. Hut in gjba House 01 Commons 11 remained a private light, whereas in the Majlis it soon became clear that anyone could Jot" in. It was the account, of tins light tbat cunvlncajl me that the hand ol 1 t" BgMar was at work. We may by a slralch of UMsjlnaUon allow Ihe leader of the opposition hig Anglo-Amen can tag, nut it IF going loo far to suppose thai I'II lafl backbenchers would have called out In their extreme agony "1 am killed," or — n only slightly llssl extreme agony w I have been struck fatally. 1 The first ejeculatkn savours of exdRgeiatloi since (us we know) dead men tell 110 talct; though there | n a parallel In Hamlet (Poloniuv "O I am slum.") But the cry of those struck fal.lly ii one that, however heartrending In the original Persian, strikes the car in translation as Irresistibly comic It Is altogether loo reminiscent of the classic account of the Death ol Nelson, which begins: Ardv." say Nelson, "I'm wounded." "Not inortually. 1 'ope'.' "; and goes on to reach a piteous climax.... -*1 ... Which cannot, alas, be quoted here. • 1 aastei pressed if thaj arc carefully 'tasted about a quarter of an 11 the edge ThJ and t rearing should be dona bsforc .uK-hing to the gaimrnt The raw isckline edges of a collar I shiiul be basted together after C -cssi g before attaching the cot| r to the neckline. Dlft rent fabrics require dlfferIng methods. Cottons may 1 or IT t BO! ivquire dampening '•red cottons should always be pressed on the wrong aide t prevent shine. Eyelet embroidi v Is best pressed on a folded hi much pressing care as any other. It will pay yatJ well fur this tars) in its smarter appear-1 ance. Line needs to be well damp, oned id pressed with a hot iron first o the wrong side 1 on U n^hl 1 linen. pceially are hard to press but %  Qnrougn dampaning and. high .eat will usually do the trick. For ;.lk use a medium heat on | the wi >ng side Ongff) Q llrl With the tip of the iron then I e ce a dampened press cloth over sea i to prcs 1 -. After pressing slide baa imint of the iron under the edg s of die seams to remove ridges which show on the right side. Some rayon will w*tvi spot It is best to test a scrap for this, 1 bg pressed on the \ rung Mdc with a slightly danipcm 1 press cloth. Use a low heat. Nylon should be pressed witii .1 vci> iw hc.it ana rrrWlM not be dani,veiled. Only pits? ivbjtlfl necessar). Woolh-ns should be at pressed. it the lUmn do most of ihe work The whole piece should be stean pressed before cutting to shrink it. Alway clock we.I dampened .nut heat on 1 is iron %  titles of steam. Vvtvata require very handling Bland your mm and covir with a damp %  rrong mde ol tin vet lighr i hack and forth over the etca dug i loth, lott it dry loinpietei before worsting set If you will follow these rules and press aa you go your iWuahvd dress will need very little pressing Ufnie y 11 -. wear it and will look much sma.ter. I Qood Things for Xnuu at Sacings to You NEW DRESSES $15 to $18 each LADIES' HANDBACS. tUo EVENING BAGS and TRAVELLING BAGS $3.23 lo $8.95 NEW HATS, nicdy ilylcd. richly irimmed. While. Black. Navy and alia in other Coloun $5.98 LADIES' HOUSECOATS $5.9$ io $15 • aBR C}i/ts for the Entire Family at Savings Am.rlrun riusiic l>„IU I'.nciU 3 lor. I'la-.lir CeriliiiK Svls '.irl Nrcklarci PIT.. %  inith riu.n. ..i.ful I.II Cllit .1.-11. Thf ISSN you've ilri'imii'il pi in >our. with maidenferms > %  tin alt ii Frankly beautiful curves... superb lift... ctefiqitr fiaurca< feiitualion llnillie hi-.ii.:> of wearing Maiili-nform's AIlocite* lira! Try AUo-ette lorlav You'll sat if a If* finrft flallrr\ your lipirr ever had! In TO fa*rile mlors ami fabrics. vj Wallcls Milh Zipps all rmmv $ Jewel II %  %  v. Q£,. 84. 10/ %  $1.80 i Lidiii' Art Silk Sl^kinc, ^ 2 pair. Ur $1.00 Inflalrd Rubber Toys .... Small Valises Toy PMols wild Shots ''earl I %  • n, Powder t' puds .•Jinon mid liire Silk Si r\ Children's llundbugi. .... .MHI many oilier items ul price* you run aftoril. I Xo/iC %\fodern S)ress Shoppe BROAD STREET TOASTERS, KETTLES, IRONS, HOT PLATES, COFFEE PERCOLATORS XMAS TREE LIGHTS CITY GARAGE TRADING CO., LTD. VICTORIA STREET Give him a really pruetieul Gift from our wide seleelion of Carpenters', BuilderH* and Basic Engineering Tools. \olr.l.urtUn Trail* We fair.' aaoal o/ /*<•<•. ••• "'" %  BCCF mint nuts ni-on IOTTO.X FACTORY CONGOLEUM CONGOLEUM SQUARES AND__fUJGS GIVE YOUR FLOORS THIS XMAS PRESENT THE CORNER STORE



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SUNDAY. Di.tl.MBUI li, 1*91 CHRISTMAS SUPPLEMENT PAGE FIVE a a I a %  a %  %  a a a 3 a I I I I 3 3 3 %  B %  %  %  a at i a i a a a 9 a 9) a a a a a a a a a a C 3&& Xti& tl&tsC^e t&atnettf GENTS Pure Irish Unen HAND KEHCHIEFS hemstitched with popular initial*. FOR THE CHILDREN WOODEN GOLLIWOGS Locally Made STUFFED TOYS. Locally Mad. SHELL DOLLS. BOXES OF SWEETS. Tiny-Tola Madaiia ROMPERS. WOOLLEN COATS lor children. 4 to 8 yeais old. CREAM FLANNELS While and Fawn DOE SKIN FLANNELS. SPORTS COATINGS In Fawn, Grey and Brown. Torloise-Shell TIE CLIPS and LINKS. TIES in a large variety ol design.-.. Patent Leather EVENING SHOES. Toitoise-Sheil CIGARETTE CASES and WATCH STRAPS. LEATHER SLIPPERS with Ml solea. CONSULATE SHIRTS in aeli colours ol While, Blue. Grey and Cream, with txubenisod collars attached and delached. PURE UNEN BATHROBES Ready Made EVENING DRESS JACKETS, ol Cream Gruberdine. Ready Made EVENING leady DRES: %  PANTS. TROPICAL READY MADE SUITS at prices lar below tailor made <;ui ments. TIE BOXES Torlois^Shell HAIR BRUSHES and COMBS. Torloiae-SheU MARKS and KNIVES. ELITE SHIRTS in sell col ours ol While. Blue. Grey and Cream, with trubenised collars attached. FOR LADIES WEEK-END CASES HAT BOXES Hand Made BASKET WORK lor Shopping. NEEDLE WORK BASKETS SPICE BASKETS LAUNDRY BASKETS. CANE LILY SLIPPERS and HATS. CANE ULY MATS. Hand Made CROCHET SETS. CROCHET LUNCHEON SETS and BUFFET SETS CROCHET BUREAU SETS EMBROIDERED CENTRE PIECES. GLASS HANDKERCHIEF BOXES. DRESSING TABLE SETS. COSMETIC GIFT SETS and WRITING CASES EVENING SHOES in Gold and Sliver with high heels and Cuban heels. COSY SLIPPERS in lelt or Satin in a variety ol styles and colourt-. CHECKED RAYON UMBRELLAS. Pretty NIGHT DRESSES. ROMAINE CREPES in a wide range ol colours. CREPE BACK SATIN in Gold. Oyster. Pink. Slate and Grey. PLAIN VELVET and STAMPED VELVETS. CLOQUE in Pink, Grey. Blue. Toast. Olive Green ond While Lamb.' Wool PULLOVERS ond CARDIGANS LIBERTY SCARVES. FOR THE HOME CARPETS. CONGOLEUM RUGS. FURNITURE and CROCKERY. WOODEN NOVELTIES. MEMENTOES ol Barbados PILLOW CASES and SHEETS to match In Pink, Green, Blue and Lemon Sets. MADEIRA LUNCHEON SETS. LIBERTY BED SPREADS. TRAVELLING BLANKETS in coloured wool. WHITE WOOLLEN BLANKETS CAVE SHEPHERD & Co., Ltd. 10-13 Broad Street £7 5 tiiiinwiii— % % % % % % % % % % % %  %  — % %  !• %  !! itmwMMmtmnMmnnnnanMWf % 



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IHHHm3KW^ a a a a a PROUDLY PRESENTING PHILIPS 1951—1952 RADIOPLAYERS VI Variety it's a magic woid. It's the spice ol life. Variety of food makes us love our meals. Variety ol design and objects turns a house into a charming home. Variety ol clothing puts the pleasure into our appearance. And varioty in ladio makes us appreciate that brilliant entertainment so much more Philips provide that variety in their now range in a surprising manner. In this range r.ets (or a variety ol purposes and for a variety ol Choose now, lor here is the radio line to choose horn. As superb as the variety of this range is trM variety of entertainment you can get on a Philips set. High selectivity, grand sound performance, Increased *hort-wave possibilities guarantee variety for kMpf MANNING & CO., LTD Agents aBBBBBWBBBBBBnHBBBBBrir.KK:^ -^BBBBBBBRBBWBBWftBBBBBBBBBBHBBftnHHafi&tf



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MAHAY. I>KKMItKK Ifi. 1951 I IIKISTMAS SI'PPl.KMKNT PAi.fc HFTrKV %  hip, Norman OflJ, Evcrton Club, u-ilh his aggressi % %  Am o. P.. mi.i <"\ ib THE 1951 YEAR OF SPORT # From paKF 14 Lcgull 10 prova. tluar vvr*:i .11 .ilrt.,,', Tablr Tennis. M, s M.irniiii'. .-huMi to ados WoodotQuaan'aCo l l a w tows l.ii.wi. TOPS Patty Howard of Uarna Club b> who Ml lhat R. la-gall ahogld not the have Men asked lo reprt I nrct Ladles Island Champion or bados Inasmuch at "VJf'a.—. i a !" In Trtnldid and that aorao Pol in.:i,rii s Island I preh %  ;u err wltli a "C5 pya VJWP. of thouKhl who aul Table Tennis tnthufuuMa wenew th.it %  looking forward to laiuis St'iute. lo have Barbado Island Champion of 1949 and 50. the b. -t Barba to regain the honour this year. He able and t • • „ nraw was however defeated in the upon LegJI anil %  emi-ntials by his team-mate already in Trmiilad, aim who it Croenldge. has been freely admitted even by i i in -a" Mtv Ulc e-PPOifnts of the seheme, play Prfril. r!" i.iM ., ,-. %  """ "P '" %  """lard fupenor to Eddie Coodridge of Barna Club that of anyone whom the selectors mu„ ?, "^ youngster Is making rapid itildes.ieom Just to salve the feelings o He h now promoted to the A" local enthusiast,who ace not up Claaa and perhaps he will have a to the required standard crack at the Island Championship (n addition I cannot airs* that neat year this will stifle enthusiasm here a. Norman GUI. who defeated Blair the door „ wide open n'L'ZjS, ""V.. "•£*— "* "' P"W !" >" 8od enough Chumpionshtp The Boys Cham„„ pionship was won by H. Bourne. .M1D ACCOINT The year 1952 will welcome an It will be remembered that extensive Table Tennis programme Taylor and Carter gave a good acIn Barbados. It is undoubtably cm ^'\ ol themselves against Sturdy the most extensive programmthe and Leahong. taking them lo a—6 t'land has ever had. ,n the first set and winning the I AWN TrsiKK h '', d S '""^ ncl < %  *">* %  %  L.AVVN TtNNIS perfect combina .-on beat NothL AWN TENNIS oasaniced on ??*" "" d .Tj>nt In Jamaica in Association lines in Barbados '^fiSLw? '" %  "'"•• was run during the year by the ,~~'^ e l* , 1 " Z^gft ** Barbados Amateur liwn Tennis 'C,"'^"! b ">~" '>"* belong. Aiaoelation. The omcers are_ "* ', ""' A "^l"'n and this took Dr. Harold Skeete, President. Hon. sJEJET' ,h„ "rS, ^" bl ? nd ""' V C. Gale, Vlce-Presideni and g"*'^ %J?" b \" '" ","" . P. Taylor, HonorarySecretary. %!. r SL V !" !" *," m %  %  "•> Seven clubs now comprise the siiata? thi i~, ",".V "*. llK A.socl.tlon Belleville StrathS 'X£j£* „""" .' a " U Clyde, Summerhayes, M e 1 w 1. ,„""'?"''* ,f' ""'"^ < -"'" -1 Premiere, Y.M.C.A. and Cable and „ n n L'' A 1 ?""?"" Tr "P h > r Wireless. wme. to be played In Jamaica The Association sent a learn to "SK*?' ""' "< Bjlt •hoald Trinidad during the v ear to rciire! '?>? ""'. ^ considered up sent Barbados in Trinidad in the '" "ISI"" S"[ would "1"*' Brandon Trophy. The team W.K I '""' "" n Barbados tennis or A'FABRICATION Hullo Sportt Fans, wherever you are. A happy Chrtatmaj to you and plenty of good playing and good watching in the New Year. Here are 25 not-too-difilcult questions selected front events In the past twelve months lust to keep you In trim until you next go to see or pl^y your favourite game. 1. Name the Captain of th British Ryder Cup team which recenUy visited America. 2. Name the winner of the 10M Cesarcwitch. And how about the Jockey. 3 Where was the last EjiijlandSeotlund Soccer InteriwtlonsJ played Hampdcn Park or Wembley? And what was the score? 4. Which Dominion Ruffa *'ion club bcshl< I which U %  not* ;han £ 15.000 lor a footballer. Can you name the Club. 25. And finally, the name of the MCC captain now in India. ANSWERS TO SPORTS QUIZ 1. Arthur I-acey. Non-plaving Captain. 2. Three Cheers. E. Mercer. 3. Wembley. Scotland won 3-2. 4. South Africa. Rugby Union. 5 John God-m Toum.in-'f's this year. 1 Coin. It Sin tVcl'l W> %  inod.lv *.o Notta Sewell. 1! Hein T. any). b Icshlre. 14 Denis Con \ 15 Gordon Richards. 16 Roger Bam %  GefTln of South Africa. his prof< %  Ch.-ipman (US.A.) 21 Trinidad. -idge. '•urae. %  *ey soko £ FORD 1952 w V*l,e-ii..h*d Enflnes (47 b h p in (ha Consul; it b h p it the Zcphf Six). Super.tirons. ufMy-cmunni AllStcal Welded Irigrsl tody ConsomctrO". Centre-* lung Mtting . restful, njljiirrf Co-l-ip'unj independent fro't W*il Sutpent-on. built-m deubfe-odmf ihorti sbsO'beri. %  action, imooth-ltopping Hrdrjuli' Rnsbes. IIVH-STAir ZEPHYR IX A\D COHULI %  IT IOIIII of lat*4nl.am At CHARLES McENEARNEY & CO., LTD. a



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PA<;F THIRTY CHRISTMAS St'PPLEMF.NT SUNDAY, DECEMBER li, 151 H S T i, i Is*. It Head o( an Old Indian by Jtrrj Lomcr ($50). £ Jury LonMr*s "llt-id of an Old lr (h.in* won the $50 ilnii prlEc tn Iho Advocate Photo Competition. The judfes were: Mr. R. LcFanu of the British Council. Mr. Peter Hall and Mrs. Hall, photographers who live In Mntn il. Owing to Ue poor 11 both In quality and iniahtiiv. iu the Holiday Snaps OOanpetitloti it was neceaaaxy to cancel ihni competition and substitute another competition which in collaboration with the I Club. An excellent COlatCtfcM M entered for the competition and Mrs. Hall remarked that'the standard of photogrohpy was as high as most of the competition! u> %  Canada. £



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r i< R KrVn.W ADVOCATE si \l>\\ Dl.riMBRR 16. 15I (oughing. Strangling Asthma, Bronchitis Curbed in 3"Minutes n I.. ..-_. %  _.i... .. .11 .._ i .a I.-. .-Ti „_. I al—D|k* t < %  • %  %  m traatr. %  hard ,-, tUTr-d" l>" .i I..1 waaa .. andha\< to I.. ... tul r-n I, r.n'l .al ..-i.i" f.• I" %  I • Ulf-r, .: %  | MM! IM.. laaakt, •a) MWltH All veu da H (aha ta taata hua tall, i-m r tola and raajf .tia.ka i—" %  ] T. Ma—• •tarli -"•uaa tat. i.l, rS* M-*d aid in*; MUt. I" diaaorva ' %  hliajit. prwatnaa rtaa ->q braaihli • I* i-'itdm and ttrr fcoalM** but r.i,ii-la J> lh ..(,., I,. -,.. 1 tml rW IMUK. j Id, hard* HamaKoa. OM la. had l—i *0 Iba, lullrr^ ..'Hah. • - %  .%  and •M-a1i>tf arar* afeahL i i alaap. • % %  wtaaT m til*. aaaaidaaa niwd Asthma pa— T. Araf filffhl and % %  Had ifkaa •• %  , In nvr % %  • mn NMMflMka rn. *ar* Aral daa. • ihi Tha*ar* %  %  :• %  %  I. Ml ,' I tt ma* a rm -ir.naai T>* Mai mi— t k*rh iiitii" T*u tMaaaac* i % %  i-r an undrr an ln,n .. WMJ hark auarani.-Ton hi. hidfa II *M don't l**i .rai-ly wall. Ilka a Saa> r*raaa. and full* aanarlad alcr (akina Maada.a Juai r.lor,. Iht *"|-> %  -*. laa-a aad ha full ftari-ltaaa •.>• will** olttndad (5rl Maada.a (rant **ur Otafkti.l tada and •*• haw "all *au a l*a a nil*! ai>d how ncli h*(l*r ton wig J Mendaco -./• I..* jf . .ir-w Tha COWARD IN CLOVER The 'ghost in a dinner jacket" comes back with a hang ... B> Hrirrlrt KasK-r. .H.l. I A eslcrria \ \s Cricket | LOIH.t vs POI M < : retire ........ I*U. !!! 1M| ,.„ I a**. %  % %  non u regards UM Fart bow In 1 CANNOT believe that Uivie i iMi a*k* if it lt> a happy endm*-. Lodge S-ln.-. anyone in London's theatre world "No ma'am." ha -'lawem. It tin I %  poncibta fur who will not rejoice with Noel that kind of a picture.'' feat, taking Coward over the %  uccem of his So much for Coward as a masu-i innings* wkkel comedy RBLATTVC VALt'EK al of comedy, and .it beat Ike U a run*. the Savoy Theatre rtauter. But he can never wholi.. On the opanio^ flay ol Behind the wit (not alwayx extinguish thiM -nilmentalisi %  matel Pi parklingi, the excellent main hit loyaJi) to tjueen Vlctoru. could only m... %  K %  tkl 15 wkkri was a bll i Bla & Wireleu C. B. K. Matk •urn a: the wicket %  %  .. %  %  %  %  rVANDEREB8 >< ( AKLTON n ili and (fat laM ilchir ...uralii in. Smarting ofp E c z e Stopped In 10 Minutes fc2Ksffl i %  all. A' I ; ' %  o arr duaaatd. A New DiKovery N/. D a..r-%  dlffrrrnl %  1 aid ft,hu l MdM ol Nriara >> hUm. Uhaa WJ a aaWi reiHUni a i iinootb. Wor-it Fa.t MTCBIH' N.udnili arlrntlflaaJlf eBpaaiil i litM >: %  uoubi... n 0 rkf i iMt-.ii,. jaa ha.. a* a l.a ninutaa, ilwii turta to werk ln.r-.-' :::,. 'lairhnf and btaltDg a it akav i .i>ir^ ii anitot. *hHrr and rat* atiioiih. In ]iiat %  dar or two Vttur aiKDUDd irtaUtoM mi bar* htaii i.ccdlna; p ->. to rlrar your akin th* trralmrr.l to matin ic-.t mota atlrati a. to halp )ou an. tnar>oa Jh a iddrai lit brou|lil claam. i.tiliM-r allna to tbatiaanda, au.li aa Mr l( K who vritta' "f-Ul.iMl froan Urrlhlr Liri.inj and imatllna MBlilt for II v.an Triad erarrlhint Al ;.n I haard %  Nl.adaaaa. II .1-t p. uch thing fj aoenl Lodi replk .md the rewarding Rngluhneu of equality." he soiemnly telli uwith I3t il all u the personal triumph of bomewherc in the play, but it t int ,r Success u. Ilka a drug to those allowed his morbid moments. oatti a who attain It, and to he deprived Wailine %  %  '" a throughoi. of it after attainment U to endure Gladys Cooperi* given th %  u> -• -n.n. v % %  %  preview or Hell. of entertaining us in the long prefigures, post war musical. j, m ble while waiting for th, at pmry Lane, was a aUr t o appear, and she does 11 victory, rmide 18 foi %  Mtchanlingly. She possesses that -rick", ln ^g I.* co^ • ot J l ;.TV gift of turning stage set was run out t B3 runs, the nto a real room And let It be nu iroclalmod that ArsgeU Baddelcy runr ...s her housekeeper companion y.M.P.C. w CdMHUni Rl and Richard Lceeh as the ShavL.r. <>mbPnn rr ft MM bullcr give her inspired support v M.IM ITJudy Campbell and Hugh M. Y M P C ,it u '' d J ** Uatt m Oermott steal the show howcvei. ilV in wickrt'v rah l m ,d irSB ^J^SS^L dh^'ln nrst b eeMue lhv "• ver y • 0wl & Of S %  world hart pwlshedln indecdt >nd .^Bdj, beca,,., I day, but were all onenndheen coward does not really get fBtng v U Py "" •'"' t 1 '' ihi they arrive. in the seeon I Let mc repeat that this cornedand Archo, tool is not a masterpiece and that Kli g"! 1: Ills AudaciU Coward should realise that no On thi But Coward never lost faith in one '* vcr J f tn'J'rested in hearing 1 1 liimseU nor did he beconus bitter ubout P*"P'e who are not to apV.MP.C or show any jealousy toward* P*"" for three-ouartcrs of Cowud*) Pacific 1B60 failure despite Mary Martin's best eflorts. A little later, his serious play on an imaginary occupation of Britain by the Germans fUsed out. Subsequently he gave us a (hick-ear gangster play, with music, but it was the work of man who. had lost his touch. Perhapi he had riled in the < that rtlnds. the flames and a r born. Noel Coward In a dinner-jacket %  aid. ghost ;o ther •srnSf awtton Guflra*jiTS)a)d and ion D1 ha amaaad -I iasaj 1 la Imi.r wii .1 1 N..ada>lor ot* tb.l lima II muas i>ur akin aon. taat, aaaeeUi aid ir.aanail*ally altractlvr mull alaa u tba kind ol Uln that hill Mala m adBiirtd o-baravar *OB a* or rou aimplr rrluin Iba anipir psrkata and row laaitT %  :il 1.* r-rnndad In lull on tflaadana mm fast Obaauat loda*. TM saaraatoa prala u a those whom the gods applauded. At last, with an audacity which one can only applaud, he challenged the fates by accepting an engagement ut the Caff de 1'aiis offering the songs he hart written In the good old days. That was bravery and it brought its rewards. It also must have strengthmud and reassured him. "1 have great talent," he once said to me when the mourners were in deepest black. He "poke the words •imply and sincere!}, even #lth %  touch of humility. I wish that I could now proclaim Relative Values as the best thing he has ever done, but it would not .be true. The audacity of Blithe Spirit, the neatness of Hay Fever and the perfection of Present Laughter are not there. But after the laborious first act, in which the actors have little to do but talk about whit Is going to happen in the second act, the comedy takes form and we have a sustained situation in the Plnero manner with touches of Wilde to adorn the talc With commendable audacity Mr. Coward btingi us bock ID Ba %  hack Hall, splendidly Ignoring iho austerity of today. Gladys Cooper, as Felicity, Countess of Marshwood, has a butler win Shaw with the accent Her 1.-ui %  '.J and helped I Ih f*A ( %  bem re In y the total to 144 NAN TUDOR PASSES timbers Should Win Trinidad Derby lly UK Ik 11 M. \1 plied ..... fot 100 runt. V MI'C two 1 II Pacer R. AuMl I ir 51 runs in 17 m %  the new U.ll ; .r mi %  and Atkln I Q scored 1 '• was not nut with l! • Auviin In 14.4 overs. Both Don li lengthl and got thri>aU h move Iron hai mi iear*a -vicket Skipper G. Grant ami O. H. %  %  the second Innings, but n.. othn nMatnu DM M 1 % %  liblt B am. At close of play 1 n the second r ^1 r nd Tl not out 1 .ut the* 1t thi U then followed. ended. 'I -\\ Ita'^m., A. O. N. Sklnnor with nine. %  *J ci rr %  %  %  %  CABLE A: UiKi LI SS I i % %  v time a Winner . RAM ID I I VNDKERCHIERS ti 'burs /<>r men and women A rOOTAX PRODUCT .-afca. gPAKI \N \N. H\KKISO\ ( OLLBOE College 99 hrli rkoai) II 12D innings %  %  dad at Queen's ^ s noon. B, 1'. I.. rhe Park tasun who had C-lilr & Wirele M h; and M (far OM nuts for M k i. B.C.L 15:, for the loss "f 2 wickets when The tlrst act is poor stuil comTHI I '"-' ,""> <"ay. IlkQ pared With Ule lest. BBd pOaJ M i:x '"' n ,n Of Coward, actn-ss like Gladys Cooper aottld ''v '" ll1 l; ' ldest son tba Earl Of Marshhide the slark truth from us (or •'' gp** 9 wood. Is engaged to an Knglishas lung as m*did. But than al x <<'i->> uri. ui born Hollywood star. Hks younger rich laughter to follow ana we Cable A Wn brother has no apparent occupashould not bogruugc Uio wanting, W j.l.ty for 87 runs rei |nlng minute, for lion except that of? a Greek chorus Noel Coward has come back wiin day wilh 155 run, foi and their friends are people of <• bang. llvr "" l title. While Mr Coward stages bis The B.C.L. tlrsl uMthun v.. .., scored with Bravo Coward! I am so weary come-back a neglected yuung marked by a breezy 10 by B. Pin41. Other useful contributions of that American snobbery which actress named Margaiet Joimsoi, dcr who C W. I iltfa II Insists that only a truck driver has arrived in SUMMER AJUp'tataepM W. Clarka ofl the bowling and C. N. Dl.ickinan 22 tot out. can fall In love. Have not the 8MOKK at the Lyric, Hammer, rich eyes, hearts, dimensions and smith. She had three draw! <4 4 k I I-' I'4 t 1 •"/* sppetltes Just as much as the to overcome in the Ijondon lh> L) l# t/il /*/* t//lil /' poor? —beauty, youth and a When Judy Campbell, as the H • truly .-ad and sadly true how" 1*011.1 \ 1 wii-.s | ,MMII Americanised fiancee. turn> up. MtUfa I .anage-inents dibtiust %  the piny leaps into life, and when these attributes, ihe is followed by Hugn The ilrst half of Mi r. .mo .v ui ctmdiileld. Continuimtheir first iimit.R%  : With I %  hOUCI I4DOI lal lanl-a. Klnrb b v MT4I. 1 .%  : I.F.ii McDermott ns her former HolTvWllliani* ulaj iwhu-n ..nne be•' JJ wood lover m a state of static fore his Sireatear epic) is beaualcohollsm the comedy Is In full ttfully written and beautifully o Chall flood. acted. As the fluttering refined ,,%,r c t"ha !" -ji> i> Brook. Old Scores and expressed daughter of an or,': ihodox clergyman and craxy M iiavrm not out now we see coward, the saUrmother Miss Johnston touches the 1st, determined to pay otl old emotion, „uh an exquisite deli' scores with Hollywood. ,...->. Wh. n later in the play ahsj me film actress complains to has to show the deadening process the countess that her fiance has of sex frustration she avoids gone horseback riding instead boredom and wins our pity of paying attention to her. "In Mr. Williams is an author who tiiKiand we do not say horseha1 1 DjieK rldinsf, says the countesa For example he cause* his young oiandiy. Just riding." Coward sensualist doctor to pioh,.< UM can do this kind of thing better drawing o| 0 thai he "ftathan anyone else. rall SU hUai Johnsln,, on g_§£ A llule later Mr McDermott the anatomy of love. The play new-noes to the assembly the never quite recovers from this nature of Ihe new film in which absurdity. But it is not the fault "L ' ..'!? %  "' U lh0 ;, rv ' -n excellent Canadian actor, s^-to'-i bum he says wilh alcoholic Mr. William Sylvester, who giveEu-i melancholy. "Just a guy who us a most likeable cad. .".T nb ,. wu y '""X-Kh IK' and World Copyright Hewed. ••In t worth a damn." The -oun| JT I .HI 11 daald I SM CAJiLTON Irt Innlns* .... aab %  %  %  AtMl ini fa OSaMSD1 K A r*rilda" • ToUl Fall o# > 4 IM tj S (or SO 1 (or Si. • (or as B I urcoi nJBSa A-Al .YSIS n gallops for the Chrlst%  %  th much regiel i). death of Nai. 1 I DM • Barbados contingeni. alu-ulu" have I 'he Barbados Turf Club and boughl holders, this dainty filly by dor out of Clenfinnai DMOl lost no time In W< %  won in C class in Trinidad last Christmas over 9 furlongs, in Barboaon a B class 5' 3 furiotsa race in March and again in Trinidad e gave .i B class field including White Company, a sound ng over six furlongs. Built on slender lines she was nevertheless well put together and would undoubtedlv havg inovcd an asset as a brood mare because reeding. I understand from Mr. Bourne. Jr. that she died •acted on her trip over to Trinidad last week. In the absen I hopes shall now be pinned on such Way. Landmark and Fu.s Budget I did not see Mr I %  1 isc on Saturday hut I had a look at Ihe Budget Ircgins to view her chars 1 nor's Cup In a far better light than that of "eavouring to get a distance. I now move up several points in the betting. reports) from Trinidad it seems that I.upinus is still the %  rk Twain has slipped considerably. Meanwhile the He is reported ..T' haipg -i new one ..rule hopes no doubt are high Buck things are com,i. Tiinidad. nun not yet heard anr%  i owned in partnership with on,. red In (ood ooBrpanai in Eng0 hi very good indeed. 1 red it would indicate that he %  • %  This 1 ortnactloni will stick baan ruined by %  il ,:. I noticed in ihe Mi 1 I Barnard'* chief I 10 have done OOdg. Now the Garrison over snyUgng from, three .is ii may seem. |ul i„ Ln 'i'linidad ould not hav. I Dt done Ix'ttej than a third IT. Siakcs. KB %  potuaj tuo-y earold she cannot be in V*. '..hie companion Best %  bastill in pi-ir condition. The prospects of the Dcii' %  •.tintiu.11 a Jamaican appear gloonu. Buwaii 1 ... Trinidad press b) which seam to abound ln UaBl ntj irltnas has set out to prove lb rely a sprinter. One of the biggest Sawg In hi., argument u the erroneoug iuipresslon than a mile and Uu yard! on. the G 1 — t at the records for the i< Elizabethan holds the rei old ioi oui nine 1. ..3^.. Atomic %  1 Park track in 1.57*1. A : only 3.t seconds for* UUlercuc*.in distaiue i.f 41 yards. ... Q . iiujUs, won a nine lurloi D OO the iaai Bttar time man anj % %  %  mrci *t'.n .iu, includini; impo r tad tal .. BjQ u %  ••' %  lhi Jester Jl's form at Union Pal o.iitiy acraptng b laTd yards I It is .(iiite bmi lo say Ulat 1 hiruudaa to conclxida that this wo* duatoUk I ^.11 eiioagii. HestWi.i.' uifflcult Usk lo win thi Of only. Nuni"* l MT state oi health wai > i Idac Ihougbt hnands with nearly a furlong loft lo. contributions be I -"cs, although f ni, respoodad la Uv %  1 wouiu. Again II 11 doing as ..heady quoted above? .. I am sorry ni> | out Best Wishes" |I lit "I r'e.lHUlS, spnniei. ne ool) displayed 1 us compleU; Ignorance of mis ijigland. NothlngeOUl ..u : ie Hull'. 1 am not laying thai Beat wishes 1 Jester II. Kmheii pa any otiui note in ihe Derby tor tn.ii mailer, lid I rant any eontldence ut alt. What 1 %  a corvrlii u that, if iwih i.t in well, Boat Wishes and Cross Roads are tar better s.ta>er a than The Jeslei il. Meanwhile on the strength of the preparation gallops, if what we read In the press bl correct, the Trinidad LVrby appears to be a better thing than over for Embers. For in the very next column lo the remarks of 1 that The Jester II finished a 111 the Derby distance flat on hi* face. He will have to improve on this considerably if he WBBhl to beat the Jamaican Derby winner in the Trinidad classic. Marahal' b Aikinaon ptori %  1. ajaansoti 1 HUM •• lor 1 11. krr — IT IS A Clreanldat • 11 1. Topptn — ,\ ii rkapss 1 1 11 kNOI UBS so BNMtMOl %  1... %  "' %  • %  P. Ibw McKatUM I %  %  %  \ \siMRias 11a a HANDY AMERICAN TOOLS You Should Never Motor Without . SOCKET SETS OPEN END SPANNERS BOX i OPEN END SPANNERS SOCKETS from V to II ," TOPOUE WRENCHES RATCHET HANDLES EXTENSIONS SPEED BRACES WALDEN WRE.Cni-S SCREW DRIVERS J 4", 5', 6" I" And LARGE SUr : .ON TOOLS ECKSTEIN BROS. PHONE 4269 + RAY YOi'H AHIV HAT IS STOCKED LASHLEY'S JUST THE FINE MODELS YOU'LL NEED. SHOP EARLY AT .... LASHLEY'S Swan 6t Prince Wm. 1 am also glad to sec that the three-year-old Rock Diamonii did very good gallop OB Sui.day laft. He may well be better lh:n. bj foi in in tin aai let Dart of thiyear suggests and he : surprises. On the other hand 1 am sorry to see that Pans t< the classic. No doubt this is duo to his being unwell. (hi icmamdcr of the Marhado* coatdasg-iajarlsouU m -going over to Trinidad some time this week. AuoUit* iyho im| exercise ycsU-rday morning was Miracle, This disregarded Ihrce-yearold is one of those natural race horses which can be spott IT. mute they .ne seen galloping., Possessed of %  beautiful action she moves over the ground D Will O ihe Wisp II or Cornet. istar and broiher respectively. If she enn strike her best ten in Trinidad, I think she will bo a good thing for the Apex PMc. \NtlC0NK Lei Your XMAS GIFT be a II O L E X XMAS GIFTS GALORE | AT YOUR FAVOURITE STORE S "BOOKER'S" The Masterpiece of Watch Craftsmanship. I ear IkeI •. %  >%:— Im %  %  '.' Table Sets Potter .. etc. etc. Pay u% a vhlt and be con\lii


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I've i icin 11 N < HKISTMAS SI rn.l.MKNT St'NUAV. IIKt r.MBI.I! 10, 13.il o^w;: s^xm THE STORY OF i „ &f ** Tht buildins w* started In October 1MQ u ffi^\a* It i. co MtncM of siMl Mi loc.il to i on A loor ov#r ih. ••:.. I Qf*n re acotp and nfrtgmtor equipment iotid frw of attention t ach nch order. WE LOOK S Eli VIM you i BOTT1 BA



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PACE 1"! M -SIX CHRISTMAS St'PPLKMKNT SUNDAY. DHKMIIKR 16. 1951 The Racing Year In Barbados it > iV.gqft ta.write i no w.thout Vai guard, rO-Lo iMly IM The Trial Stakl Ihe Jester II. bul I >nd, the other fa I off form front of Uihcr. and Sopi mentioning the spoil in Tnm *ent into the curdays before the race that she had and showed that he hao %  been given a proper gallop. Even .1 bit alnce August. His •* references to meeungs In Trinlway Best Wishes dad in CUM where horses trained very easy winn| ontest for the Barbados this was not more than a mile at a especially was achieved with top appeared to be very restrained pace Once again wc ,ght, and was therefore very hen Best Wishes "* had *"•> broken a record DM „„. n iorious. Next best was ViceRoads returned from lime ' V 57 z/5 ^ Un fc thl P !T" ,,,y %  eldm b,cd u s lM ia by vious best set up by Watercress Hoidan out of Setuavina who ran Ihe year before by nearly %  ^^4 u Vanguard once, and then home a gelding bv 1( f the sec nd Kf the ol n %  second. Best Wishes' breeding Is Insecond twice to the CoUeton. at less thai four-year %  cight-fork p;.n Barbados Guineas. In fact Holder our, had been improving steadily tereiUn from ne point of view **? %  .. Looking at racing In Barlwdos actually eased her UP I few %  wheel He had won a race at the March lnat nC[ dam Felicilas, by Colora n !nc from the financial point of view before the winning post. Cross meeting after he took part in the dQ Kld u(|| of Happier, by Flambc w 1 1. 'I.it 1951 has been • Roads was eiond some length* in Guineas but was disqualified. On lng> WM imported to the Weat olo > r-"i {Bail (jJiAhsiA £x£ AfttUmat—*? %  *•** hole there was a big gap the three best three-yearlined. On ^goTwaVimported'to "the West fW <* 1951-Bet Wishes. Cross meeting llld i Ca 1>V Mr C ynl Barnard after Roads and Usher on the on she'had produced the good winner and the re.-1--Vanguard, Miracle, Toronto, who raced and won in Waterhelle, Viceroy. Hl-Ia>. Sovery good company In England, prano. Clementina and River Mist The next foal was Genghis Khan. etc. on the other. Excuses might off a good dishe had liecn beaten over 7( fura colt by Tai Yang which was be forthcoming '<* both Waterbelle lungs by Waterbell, %  Illy by foaled in England soon after Mr. j, n d Miracle however, because cle„ that Beit Hrstigouche out of Bcll.plam Barnard bought Fejlcitas. Bewhile the former broke down at (Illy of exceptional C red and owned by Hon. J. D. fore leaving England Felicltas prolnt August meeting the latter was not",.nlv won a very Chandler However be was conduced a Ally foal to the cover of rwn tn on| y me ract yvhlch she I m %  good noise UK.' adlfll her .omf weight and so he Felstead and then arrived in the won Aboul nf | aHer especially r 01 Roads and set up a new war nut disgraced. At the June West indie*, carrying a foal to the ()oM onf ietl ent huiaetie because time record for this classic, but in meeting he had alao run well and cover of Bobsleigh. <£W<' s|u wus i ckwiir d to the point of doinii to idle ran her iace fasUr after being placed twice won %  Kl-an raced in Barbados and was ^ rid .culously unfit when she Turf Club staged than it h. i taken the oUtl creohM six furlong %  von'.l.ui, oth. threeMNN^alJ l ais „ 1 n nd JS WOO her -me and only engagement sweepstake run on the August field was tailet meeting dul not reach the record tance behind. sum attained in 1850. yet this It *U now was in some respects made up Wishes Was for by the Increased attendance ] at the actual meetings UHBJHMVM ... and a consequential increase in C 1 andirvi %  n the actual duyi "f 1." 11 1 The Barbad 1 >ear-olds 1 V Class. With Waterbelle* their first four-day fixture at Mar> Ann. Wa.ercress and Bow their annual August meeting and Bells to do UU gam.iMsnie ..n throughout Hie days of rating the same day in the Cattle Orani records for the turn over in the Stake* to 1) SUSS In as much ed Usher In the Derby it %  I %  ... %  !. btottsni Forecast .nd U Marv Ann had w. n her race_in seasned W il .1 would not be the Field Bweea went touulint In %  gUlai to posl gallop while Best two horse race which tn.Guineas STrieid swi-epr^.ticulailv sru Wishes fM never .eally extended had been. The belting the.efo. %  this so and on the final dcy of the I iirite in each of the last three events rose to over |l %  1 this too might hy gM BXtn sjrlv Bul [hhougfa '. 1 %  ci it wag %  %  %  %  %  J32.000. The Threc-Ycar-OW Cggstl Amoiij' %  ihr* 1. ... ihi nw.i. Uia IBM 1., in the ofllng for the classic races ,f LM1. From Jama* had eomt Q lOOt "I 11sii.Mmn Merry Mark iiiiri while each managed only a single win they did so in the -t.|. <>f real 1 h.iin, Jester won the .lassie Breeders' Slakes for two-year-oldfi and M was beaten Into third place in this wot. found his true I,. .1 I .1... .. + .ho Khan raced in Barbados and threesuccessful in C class and t UM third daM when hff . asBfei in the Marav; < Handicap for l> I lower. Mi .1 Wtshe*. a nlly iv Burning Bow out ol FaUcit* bred in St. Vincent by Mr. Cyril nard, and Cross Roads. RON V C OAT.r tad MK * —* B-OUa, is-fr of Mrs Oyrll Barnard, lesdlng In Bast Wli %  gl .ri lie. fietarg Ul ui i*-bd. Drr..v M ths BTC. Aognst laaetlng UUs year. 1..1.. ...oiv no .J-Ki ut tlircc yearold but rtas since won f^RTdStt "roni? J.UI . *. did over Mrurlonj, t .. hid. rendered her .1<>•>' ,""" S hr K ••noB'er rroH_ol met uKltl • r.ce hon,c. St Ble lYcnl .nd M.nhli.h, bred „,,,, me eo„ o, ww . K, r ";„,-.* 0 ssrswwSrs who won the Breeder';• Stake. Hi Trinidad in 1947. Miracle shoulJ prove a good one in the future HIM watching l .. Top C las* Race* %  UOD Ol *l'"i eta England, while some taal b opwn in ittao made tAotf dtbuL %  ttie S.I %  '. ,. % % %  < ..i 1 Dre coming .'. pa.... K %  %  I .ii. || Hold Cup ,v 111 il in Ins! %  %  on the track in Barbados he was a aar-old. While it was not to be %  I that Bui.is could reproduce the .mm of his younger days yet a horse of lhl s class had never been gflgB i.iriiig in bar bade s !• %  I in.ipoearauce naturally much interest. He made hi local racing at the March meeting, and hi> rivals were Atomic H. Elizabethan, (inn Site, and P.pper Wine. Of these only Atoms II and Gun Site appeared to have any ,-hance. Elizabethan i was well : vjf ran well on the lard : N : ill : I: As the DfSfliantlons went 0 tor Trmidad-tn C class and A clan on thr down grade af.cr a -^_. ... > ar-olo. ., %  %  .... .i .II i.iki 't • %  MI • w was alAs t>~ ~i — — %  In the August meeting !*>* B.-vt that he is „ four-year-old hr Ulant career. Gun Wishes and Cross Roads ap^.red Fellcitoa first crcole foal was In as much as Atomic II. the •^VJ !" ", u "n..**~7%\"?~Am>i sn, Uornb ii ...i Oatealte. the to recover very ssowl] and II was Bow Bells who won %  t son of the great O-.T.c. had m^rSdoJbyB '• '•'•"•' ODb n the last week that cither TrU l Stakes m Trinidad last r*.r tott wc the (governor's Cup In ::r'i!•.. .... ih. ..mi. dav as the lii-I-o and vaniuara s thgates went up it was sagain Best Wishes w-ho struck "* Of then displayed any iclish fo vak. In the end Wab _"al the Mind RMigUni bul Cross withdrawn and the final field Stakes 'and Best W.shea w unK. ; -ds u-.k % % % %  P •**• B i mis event, but lean -n afq Tue fiist was wi>h< h round their form and while !ater on the same day as Cross Roads* won three races for Quins* when be ran Deal w,-n. H andlcaB over five r>-i |a caan B tgalnal horaai %  • an Hi-i-> n i and Best Wishes is her full sister Trinidad, a race between him-elf both being by Burning Bow. Where and Burns was eagerly looked forBow Bells has shown snore spe M rd to. TinBWl'Dadee Tor: Club than stamina Best Wishes appears S akes of 9 furlongs and I %  thr right distau.. BBjg exc-ellenl middle distance runner -vcryone gathered to see < • Hj love 'IT pnde of the island would At Ihe remainder of ihe .-.. ,. ^y^-h a BOOf | ,,. meeting Usher continued to imEn-l-nri. Tn bit of prove and with little oppn Itlon of a <^„ !" ,,..,, ...... lie DOara m inree jisiri ..].. ., five look the fiel- l %  1 M | tt.ere.ora ond wito J df ^*fflfc iffi %  "" ne beaten ., %  ,..WJ > .x^-^and : : A,,,, M .^ wK,,.promUe of some keen r.. J H .,Hlic.p over B torand around the p-dd* tween Best Wishes and i.r.s iVwn TUtw Hells, Man Ann Roads and the Barbadaa Guineas. |XWalrrrrriw „ thai order In classic for three-year-olds !" _n ^^ |acf h(i w ,., lh wmJ na t u made by of him in this order in the Mer!" d it was left to the imported and the chants' S: kes for F Class three"*l. v Rebate to make the pace, four It did not seem to make much year-olds. On the third day he won "ns followed her 'l.fTerencc. After online ihe fOUf „.rr 1* f.i.longs w>en he to. B l ."i" Usher improved his position and to.^ wrlght in the MerchanU Handran into third birth, l'resciiilv ,. ;m an( j „ HVC way from 6 lo 15 j Cms* Rnds delivered hil chalih^ 0 hi, ,. .nUmporar'es. Again %  ir'.ly Ugh! and in the final over 7 4 furlongs at the BTC. March tlxtuie. was eagerly await"Vrticuiari;y "he was receiving IS J: S 1 ou h .•^ ur L nJo ed when it was known that these {^ f(0(n ^^ Belu and ,, from Hl-Lo between the live %  era would meet each other in Marv Ann However it • this race. What slight difference ||ear hat Clo-J( Roads tK> n there was in the betting was in KOO(| prWllr und in deed his Cross Roads, foralIimo of 5S | fl(I lh( „\n* r„, it ;. an> accoiuii . r l TS^ %  'he boarri. In three %  ..,.. for ihe M I rime beaten once "..!> b] Mlnci and trt e paddock bend and Waterbelle who finished in front bethar (BuhnA (Rac&A Qn dtahbadoA trlded out favour very good one ncr teegB levMarch was I i vet recorded please and it (i,rec-vear*old tn B.irbados. IC could pro• — %  \J^ though II was felt that Best Wl-'i. e condnk.il did was doubtful if she could pro. -— %  flirm The Ilarba....Dei by Turning to evcnl-. lc.iding up One o( the delractlng teati | it must of the Ouineas ID 1951 was also rust be recorded lhai both Crosa the poor quality of the rest of |' W( |, ,„., ..cut to the company In contrast to l ., Wishes and Croas Roads. There Trial StaV meeting |ye and theaa ordv VanHowever boUi w. unfit and guard was a *eci red %  >e'-old In N year ,-lth Gun Site rear until Elizabethan dropped behind him. Rebate held the lead until she reached the two furlong pole and them made Burns run a very hard for any ! %  "> ^ WUh ", *£"" £? " !" '" dm > hp %  *•>> ace" Ind'eed Ke'^VfinaUv-'em K Bny three -nd the two furtona P V. () h 'eav MI to, v w.,1. top weight ^JS^JT^J L2 r ^i y mlR three and the Iwo fmlmir p.' rn cjyi 1 1( ,„, v ^,,11, 1 r ihe ran Rot* '.? ^ 1 ^ d :\^ c "^? n „ r Jl ss t h > *" %  •> **.> n n,t WlsVM thou,'he had nothing more to worrv about and begun lo ease her. He as soon ( He had ;.'„ %  .. %  np'in The bvB^trorigVid byW %  ;V '" xh "' ,;,^ '• but et, t *J b ,hp riMlM Immure and twoTnal BtckcI.. % %  and is -ell ndden bv Ihe BOWnot in goo 1 '.ealth. Cross Roads Sun Queen to whom he was allow1 the lat espectively. Krank Quested and the two h-.d w, hioncd to Tn %  idad Li*.*"* 1 '" conceaHons of 41 and this was r, ,, bice then ./ether to the winning % %  Tr Inm* for again*! poor oppo-n.n and so his anything liktf.cir beat IOHM ,..,.(. In the |SgSj SOW BtlMes Best Trinidad Derby and I.'. ihan.es in the Guineas did not Best Wisi. 'O %  lk <" ,h e vrrv tn door 1,-* very *>•. meeting afl*r Ihe clasaie while Oerby bv n ne~k. Tir ^ mt Eventually thec m IwtM but was | t v -as her la> aonoea m anovrtng P -tarter t—'mlng for the August flew B year. She had won onre agnla • on page nt nber meeting all horses the). year gad that waa on' the f thi aee "e forced to compete second day of 'he March 1 gainst the oMer one-. In addition when with 142 lbs. in the saddle however ,nr ,on %  0 *befg were i| abaenl he %  • l>eaten by only two half reeBectlvslT in 1 very good effort as in addition to the time o' the race being very fast Burns finished In front of others to whom he was alao



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From The ADVOCATE COMPANY LIMITED. SUNDAY. DECEMBER 16th. 1951.



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PACE TWEI.VE MMIIV XDVOCATF. Gardening Hints What's B.B.C. Radio Farm And Garden For Amateurs Cooking in >..> The Kitchen THE <\Klh\ IN DECEMBER (.ardrn DiseaseAnd Jutt ^^^ tn risin. Garden I'. % %  its usually ;. rush <>t ..uldiwi px Few n.i' I QU* tunny and of friends coming % %  csUl %  IKentirely from the you. Everybody natu aoourgu of garden pests and diehave something in II and It i> of gro.it adsnvr cither with soft drink* Hi \<;HK-OLA HRISTMAS PROGRAM Ml The Banana • % %  IN a BBsasf-% rehl ardj paaaitaai tot i 11 II>. ion :n 'rihgw of thr iMckgf. ind j maj i ory of this remarkiibl.| lory of fascinating and ebeotuing :creet of a food %  J| unfortunately, the tin cultural attention ui worthy of lb vant.ge to the gardener to be with Hum and Soda or etui Jua, Thera ara "enough able to recounts, thaae paatl, and Ginger. Her* are 3 recap, dart church, London, data on the economic. agriculture so to be m a position to deal make sweet btacuils and salted wllh more u^ 700 students, 4uu and commercial aspects of th with them promptly uaW, You can make linn. .,,, t ,.d-.-s banana to fill a volume, ull < This at course U easier said when you have a little lime l" U|V UIUM | ro,usregati J 1 kkriadcast which must be condensed ID than done, for few amateur gar%  .pare The first and thint at me ie, erica of short notes, acceptjfc.. dencrs know much about those PaS y ones and you cm .Keep then tM 8un'Ui> %  BYVtcv, 8.30 p.m. 0 i wC hope, to readers. things, and not many a>rdns in an air-tight tin and serve them y^ u^ igih mat. Tht second it •re wall equipped to deal with w he n you want to. probably it is ln 'Muaica Britain. them in the way of Sprays, wt Dusters and Chemicals. a*) This second disadvantage how|h aver can be overcome as Sprays g* and Dusting apparatus can be loaned from the Department ol Science and Agriculture to anyone who applies fothem, plu_ advice as to the best way in which to UM them. But. the owner of a garden of Imuld himself own the proper equipment to keep his In good order, instead of having the bother of borrowing god i .-turning these very necevi-w S.'SSfS Al h u h f h i' h / of SSSVlmU Di "M.k and IV* well drained and tared 'or garl blr p lOI „ fll | ,. r ,„,,.,.,,. p„wder. may not suffer toany gre-l M|X ,..,,. ryihH1I together and work to put the biscuits m tho progi.n again iuit before serving -,. ,. n espeeially the salted one* On Saturday there will Us ihev need to >• %  Eiiulish HiM-iiii> I I 11.. of biscuits. Flour N lb. Butter or Margarine Sugar; 4 uz. Milk M, glass. BK r spoonful. Sift flour and put it on a table a pastry board. Make a hole in (In idd the 4 or. of butt* Had i Let us loo* briefly at the 930 [in. "i structure of the plant itself, this provide* a clue to ItIII lul cullvre. There are. genet. following Sunday, 23rd m0 nlh beinj recorded rl iii-i lb Michel, ..rid m-iy evlend HansM'S Maaaiali' by tha I* lit i„ r ,-nn.nlefable distance. The _. Sympi and IIHI. ,„„. .„„, „ h b uit. from which the 4 w t'hwnis conduced by 2*"_ roobi "nd suckers are developed. Grovea. Broadcast ut at Bio p.m. From hu llw> g pr | n gs the fruiting 'Caribbean V tatl' abo (Uig w hkh pushes Its way BftSj WhUky SOSSSSSM IBSl 4 : dtMi year aaagUnc* ftow m am a k wh ,,. m .., The weekly progra the cylinder of leaf tissue forming xtent fr.m the garden amir,, ougll yn(U imoo ih and soft. Indian pros and Vetae broadcaai ( hp | fU nk and eventually produces kg well for every garM>kp „ (n(0 m bmli 8Bd cl „ ^^ *•!, Sunday under the tiUe of n OW ers and fruit. On the slae and dener to have some knowledge tf ^ |f n nour Caribbean Vol ,„, ml ln he bulb will dej-t.fl lh*m. Trom the Giirdcii BOOK PW lilllp In ..ir ih.l.il.l.—* Wdl Viu" 1 !" ** J""' '•' "' *> bunch, rnul W loo of Barbado. wf Icurn Ihnl mjneZ Houih Vinlll II l '. of HI •""" %  •• •.*• W* %  ri m under two thick, t'ut into rounds latai ih ( form of two !" ""y many -\iikers are allowed • "T 1 ** the bulb the hunches will naturalGarden Pe*l fancy shapes (I use a glass my*>"". the dm to h SaJ J| u *i ly be small. It takes bunch mtU all the dough Sf25-l^J l a^~l M 5 .2S three to six weeks to mab 111 Chewing insects (C*UM Pusea biseulU rm u lc ia f 1 """ '"""^ [*" !" passage from the bulb kO 0 aiUM slum ^.... ^-i,.„-., =*^ .-.K— in EngiuiiU and the latter now ^^ *_ A fc lf , pillars, Slursl (2) Sucking insects, such as Scale insects, plan: Bugs. Aphides (black at Kreen md plant lice Besides Peato there are also Garden lltaeases three chief of which a 11) Black Spot. <2> Mildew. (3) Rust. Pest* Now as regards the first two I in UIIIK pests." which n Cut or pi liars and Slugs, no %  WeripHon is necessaryThey ;ite Mill loo w'ell known, and ii -\n\r of much advice aa to how to get rid of them, tin 01 i.Hily effectual way is hand picking caterpillars by day. slugs, with the nld of a 'orch. by night. Of the "sin kinpe-.U" v. will take Aphides, or, u it's commonly known green fly. or blacfc fly first, for It Is Chrysanthemiini bultrrw b.k,n, lln and bak. Ihm '" "*" T„„Xo u\ !" ,„ and from iwo and a half • till they are crisp and golden When yon pUot them on the baking tin be i ref, %  %  J* space between them. thu xhls recipe is very u lif '— liecially batsHsM It doe-n't any eggs now that they are quite expensive and not exactly plentiful Small Maddalrne I'H' % %  %  ' Servl. 0M I i.M.in: When done piopcrly they an BtgJOVla WOO bad h Tlicy are very ligil arasll lUoa ErOBE aner snooj.ng before th trSSor. to !K Ju %  • W'. J" 1 t,m "W I .rlbbean Voices.' Broad•" ,n ,h dry aaason. i tha trguUr time TUc | anl u propagated vegcu..f .,ll West Indie* programmea |1VC) and produces two typ.of from London—7.15 pjn (1( broad lettea ,,„i;. to < ii. il Bjr .... i i „, whll h ltom lh( beginning deAIUI. [op looj blades of the same geo.IR the world. .; form jlf those of the adult will give a racltaj in p Unt and known us maiden suckthc B.B.CI fJeneral Ovaraeai ll>; ( it narrow leafed or sword HIGHLAND QUEEN SCOTCH WHISKY Sols Importars s> '.LHOtMOf CO. LTD .MIOCflTOWN, SUNDAY. DECE MBrK U. Wl 1 ^mb: Lai. NEVUS i to. ITS. A new perfume for YOU..." *(<& Qftl Trtt ^T^so^^ li lt eaeeaeeee* !k suckers, the small early sMVi giving place later to adult lollaga axqutslte; Tboj are very iigi.1 ajraaf aaal of opaoaiUoo from bw ii JUlc „ suckera arise at the top cakes and vei> (| t ., ,rent bulb and show litth* in Europe they are given to small uid not consider the guit-r suiti, u | og ,,. ., compared children from the time they learn .,ble for attioul Itlldjr ha t been to ippiccirtto solid foods. said to .,-, %  ii,., j, ,IL the ground and thlckPoj id ..iKi— playing the guitar ; ,. u bafora in-glnning to show Eflgs. 2 1 Yolk radllio n ai techiUque, niut .i, gbovo the surface. Expertto/ Cornflour: 1 Oa. making it 'into a magnitlceii'. Of,. llM .i cultivators recognize th* Flour; 2 •>/. Butter. 1 oz. ,. |jt important to (lime) rind. an d adapleu I ll( maiden typa for plji> —Icmg sugar.. l|U recital will be broada %  %  .o,,-, if u sed, it will Uka %  time and these wretched little ^t in a saucei*n the two egw w^ ""cepan on the Other >IIIM. sucker. In large con In appearance black flv look ^re (tnoflim? mi.K be quite lo I ,„, ,. H ( p^gr^,,,,, .„„, ix a considered goo like minute litUe black specks. ._„,-. %  ,"', ""' ,*zLZ £ be broadcast In the coming io allow -word suckers to On closelv examining the flower \ w,,n **" ,,.".''. i J Ul "" %  ,lw Sunday make sutaUntial growth wher It and you will Vel H almost luke., u Sym|(| , n wtlh|n m w that Is attacked, it will be that It is covered in these tiny little specks swarming in their thousands. The flower present-. .i wilted withered look, and Is doomed, and is no lunger -ny DM for picking. At the first sign of black flv the plant must be %  rayed With spas >U-d water warm) Take the saueep.ii. ..rf the Ul JH ... „ ft inchci'of the bulbs wb hT mlxtur^ iTcSotefcIv "1 1 *" ro0, h the mixture u, compki.1 |illdi Uom kovsky. and Kimsky-Korsako.. these are then allowed to develop %  •" p.m. on into new plants. From our studies the 16th.. mst. On Monday, 17th. and experience of the Dwarf ..( ihe aame Lima m can bear i" (Cavendlah} variety we arrived rron the flUrd KroKramme' the tha ronclasion lial there w. (lib of soft soap te six gallons of ;'"JJ ',-' V i !" .,-ihilr HI.IL* %  London Philharmonic hoose froni in either tinwater) or Niagra Emulan which !" %  -"J !" '"f" '"'J ",' "', ,"',' mtductod by Norman del alai topped -word suckera or bulba, "' ^^Un-W^nn,lZ^L ^e^rXyX,, >e..r ,. that the |„j.r-a,e %  IS small cake (m.s and Hour conductor .h, . for ^rlng n better ""^'f* 1 them gentlj Pour Uie %  > %  ''''^ a'''ate conr,ie oven for ,i ouarter of ()1 "' K '' %  <"< %  • (1W2); good lynches earlier than side mixed in larger or 'trailer qua?.n(( nour un ,j, (h# cJnte, \ w ,^ Benjamin fgrtth Sinfonla da budi from bulbs but not earll them out of theB ReQ |lle ''> "d by the than heart (central) buds fmn Tuikiph eiitnposer, DJemal Rechld I ilbe Growth from a heart bu Hy the earliest producer 0 J.B.C*. Advance I'rug rum me but giver the smaUo-t buml Salted Biscuits Informal,..,. Flour. 7 oz. Correstlona w.s* b. Butter or Margarine$'s or. 116th December. 1951 pieased, When good sckers are oil nil' r snaiganiir. "J ui. %  mm nn rmuri u> i "?! ", ,. _. Milk or Water: tt glaaa. ,1 Plraxjub.-.iiute below lor pro,ir hr d '";" "" %  ''" r m0 ,' K %  rwhranui '.i.^ or four pound a Ubtanoaaarilll <* anaal 3.15—23.4fVCur' h. wllh al lr-t one 1100a pv rl,r !" r ibbran Voi.-c i 1 ulanlrd wllh Ihr ml .urfa.o %  ( %  rv!hln or. a table or %  '" a '"' Jllhn w k how iho white auUtannItoaUfl pantry board unUl doujh 1^ ,li_lL,J'"" '.", ,. „,,, ,.^ .m llie lop of the water. :ind lltllc an.th. Make Iho dmuth into .-. !" "' while thinan appeared to fly oil ball and let il CM for half an '* * " '" ,, it. which made her think they hour Boll it until l| i< V. of an ; d „„.,,' were Inaceta. But mildew ,s ., Ineh thick and rul il in %  null "uiitav luiifius. and the appearance of round pieces I2U, mrhes wide) H.-I-M MI Wl iitllo bits noiitlnii away, was Be|e:a until douKh is nniahed ami y. y/eat Ausli .Ii.. ai li.-n.l. -probably the wind bluwina ofl place on a buttered tin. Sift a cons' wllh Commonwealth Artisu.. the top fluff as Is floated on the small pinch of salt on each of Wednesday — 23.15—23.45 -water. Ihem and bake in hot oven until c.dlinn lln Wl When a plant Is atUrked by hisculls are ulsp and colden ThuratU) ~* 15 13 45—"We I'liblitXmus Tree ST. GEORGES. Q MB % %  I i ... O.i OB. I ..rr-...d*.n Mildew the treatment is a dustTake Ihem out of Ihe oven and See Britain" With John Melcall "[ "* %  !' '", '"J '"• '. J*Ti;r >n( with Flower, of Sulphur. %  Kn lhe„, cool Yo„ Kn k.. ,. lln— Anton Brow; I \ I I He.ii. ' • %  "<'*' h "*?.,'" "," S" %  praying with Bordeau, Mlaturc l,ls,.oIs lot %  ton. I.mc if you Trl.!.,, I InK u Uiml W U,e,e two rein^lo he keep then, in an alr-li• • %  *J,';„ 1 ,";, .1^ Oi'ls^' 1 M^'Sn simplest for the Amateur would be uhur. dust with Flowers of Sul'lust Uie affikted purU. itcuvat Put the Sulphur powder d mtrrvnls until the plant linen or similar bag. an-i .overs. hind the News currant affairs Buxo whose plan was unworkable Including cricket report on 1-t !"*' year due Io a technical hitch ... in Third Teat %  uttv supply which limited .irrent. Ol rSTANDINC easil>, *enri kusssH. VAN IS wo.cn iin M'.. the smarten and the on the cvrw ill spccinl most practical collar in ttbc nstnartly world und the matt ,.1,-t'Hi ..U it w<4hes moiw Pm stylea, all .ollar" individually ippcd. lirst-asaas %  %  'cis (.<:k tkeea. 0: Van Heusen Tht On^iiinl Si-ml-Stlff Collmr DUNLOP t Road*** the cyclist's choice 1 • •eeea *•>• iKaixiii i**tii>(i %  • %  • %  ••(>• • m9m ••• a •>eee*e*e i aeaaeaaa* • .. •••• eaae The perfume with the longer-tasting traRrance BOURJOIS PFfcrUMB 1s alssa) and EAl DE CX)LCK;M. DOWDINd ESTATES & TRADING CO., LTD. ma's A CIASS t \ HO wtubtft UHKIMSVm 1/ TASrtTMCttAM] HALF POUND ^S\ (BCKSTEIN BROS.) Diltributor. & YEASTVIT i ^? The Only Pain Reliever containing Vitamin B< If you arc su*t ( ng from a Cold, ( hill, llcsdxbc or N*cr\-e Psin uari taking VKAST-VIT1. labkii AT ONCE. You will he overjoyed n. the dilftfrnce n makeiioyou. \our Pun. told, or Chill ymp>on will qunkly dnjtppcsr. and >u II feel ever so much brner. RELIEVES TOUR PAIW PHOSFEPJNE for a neiv appetite! If yiii filling ocrry or urn1*11. u i.-... |OM what you need ^.'^-^ naai at >•: ..iji.-.ii'i-u'.. inMBManai ^S^N^^ HEADACHES NERVE PAINS COLDS, CHILLS < and RHEUMATIC PAINS MAKEJ TOO H£L WEU Thcre' noilung eh* like YHAST-VITE. It', die ONLY pain reliever which ALSO cm lain* DM IBBB. V.tsmm H, Gci '"until. tupprr of VI \si VTTB Tshlen TO-OATI Thst'i the bet way to gel quick relief and feel belter, too I When the %  ppctitr fail*, ihe of the body till i^bc repuord. Menial and physical energy sag. ResiticiKc weak^M. The cheerful rebound to iitc'i deaera stni H n snthii. tie power of Plltvsl I R1N1 i.< reverie this pnxest •by reri-ing the appetite II creaiT-) new energy and rkaliry. You feel s new interI T,d toak ioda\. In It.juid or lahlet form. 2 taosM of PHOSP1 KING equal i.^ onpi YEASI-VITE THE GREATEST OF ALL TONICS tcr Deprc...*:-.. D.. '. I^.^I-HI, Sl M flf SI W offer Influenjo. JOINT AND MUSCLE PAINS may ntsan kidney troublt A runcti*o of IkM kidoeya is to euromaie harmful imptmiMMfiomtheaystera. If the ksdawra grow sluggisik. these impiinlieain psrticwlar eacaa* sod •ccsssulalc sod settle, and become %  caaae at pain and suffMil -a Joints aad ssueclea Taa wy to uckJa the root of the Uouble is to help the kidneys. They should be toned up with D Witt's PdUthemedicine saada S ftoaUy for this purpose. Dc Witts Fills have a soothing, clcaasias: nod aatiaapaic action oo the tudnaj* thai g keiags them back to perform tfaeu ** natural f UDCDOD propsdy. De Witt's Pula ara a very walWned remedy. They are sold all over the world and we have many tetters from sufferers telling of relief gained, after years of aasSeruig alter taking Dc Witt i Pills. They act on the kidneys quickly. Why not try them for your trouble r Go to your chemist and obtain a supply to-day. DE WITT'S PILLS for Kidney and Bladder Troubles THATS WHY I JAY... 4 want .•/•/•SVSMVSIVSSS.VSSSS'V.V.VSS.'.-.-.-.'.-.V.-.-.VS.VS'V'iDt Witts Pills anauasiaaaalTtw BACKACHE IOINT PAINS RHEUMATIC PAIKS \ LUMBAGO SCIATICA OUR GUMtNTEE De Witt's Pill, are made under stridlf lliaiaiai coodibons aij the me-rdknia all contorm to rigid standards of purrtj. J 1951 RACING SUCCESSES | include Isis of Man T. T. Races Ulstar Tiophy British Empire Trophy Daily Express Production Car Race Le Mans 24 Hour Road Race The Alpine Rally R.A.C. Ulster T.T. MT PAYS TO SA > >,W.W*WM -.','--,*,•.*--,'-•,-,-,:



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PACE TWH.VF. CHRISTMAS SUPPLEMENT SUNDAY. DECEMBER IS. 1931 fiom page 4 Dancing Dan's Christmas CHRISTMAS RECIPES -Selected by Dorothy Barkley Da i alx.ut h*i grandma ma hangmar O'Neill leaves this wicked %  ng up her stock % %  g k really true, old world a eouple of days after although up to iius lima I have Christmas". Good Time Char.„„,, ly "ays. "and/' he says, "Mas -.1 l .mi willing to pack in Muriel O'Neill slates lhat Doc gftet DIM gander uU the old doll. Majfi claims it la at least a day the reat ,_ — S C.-KI Tinie Charley %  she Is entitled to go. but she by now. copied England. Everya past*. Roil oul • cueing to prowl ..round H Wia ra l n a rt, Charley says, "by where It Is the Mil than is a t-hlni*}*"} happiness on finding her "exli which ft BJI come stocking IHIed with beautiful gifts year would be extravagant down^knd ..ik^kRiithinpom " Christmas mo. rung. Although our Christina, ,s an I ut Dancing Dan stands looking "Accordlnfc to Miss Muriel c^ctitmllv naUonal occasion, with l Null for :i O'Neill,' Charley says, •'Gammer essentially English traditions In 1 '" e O'Neill dies practically convinced food and drink, cosmopolitan Bav_ that there U a SanU Claus. alD urs creep into the party fare, as though of course." he says. "Mlm souvenirs of a holiday abroad. Muriel O'Neill does not tell heg perhaps, w jth a gateau after the iha raai ownei of tingifts, an kwE oc a ehtaai Lath aflat fti ll-nghi guy by the name of c„.,_ ihapiro leaves the gifis with bat " !" fter Miss Muriel (VNiell notifies Her are a few suggestions for im of the finding of same. you, if you would like to try "It seems." Charley says, "this oul some of our Christmas party Shapiro is a lender-hearted guy. cooking, who a willing to help keep GamSWEETS r O'Neill with us a little longArrange the party N when I>oc MaVe In a slow IKH.1 20-25 minutes. II Hill M.oavi ny last-minute worry. Galeau a la ir.iin.n-.,14 lb sponge finger biscuits 'i lb ground almonds '4 m butter 'i lb castor sugar 1 egg yolk \t pint milk Sherry Coffee essence i late, nuts or ii gcakad i hernt-s atlrk.-hen -he kj young, hi fact. HH Jiamonda ifcat we h.iw %  twSJfJl left over t<> mako a gaga Uttla put <"> nie gbgii iBa* .we hll Baa -locking plumb up. las/in ; and Muda)M vai i' C KM sticking out Die lip wr: iva figure it will hit Carnage.O'Neills < %  >. adatB she wafcaa up I (richer, the tint plaae Muriel O'Neill pa eceivea a ten-GV rewaru foi unaUug the aifta and retui-naag tfcann. 6 oi chocolate t fi IM buUai 1 mpi*- t taa-poon cacaa Cream sugar and butter; add volk of egg and beat. Add milk, and ground almonds' slowly. Beat until quitt smooth. Add coffee hc flour and kirsch slowly Mason wiili pepper. When it is bubbling, it is ready to eat. Serve immediately with white bread cut into small slices Our Swiss friend* tell ui to drink a glass of kirsch afterwards, to aid the digestion. Km Two drink* which really crest*" ,,the party atmosphere. Baaaiaa l-uach 2 bottles of champagne dd i large fresh ptneappple. peeled and cut In pieces I cup kirsch. rum or cognac Combine ingredients •i a not until T gel out w iba traak air ..gam th all of f u I a ^" c n ",' CH 1 r ';; I remember *ee. l.irgd "' "anring Dan* e-re he-. Hi .i> m the artemoon papeis at ut a nve-hun.iic.l Gs rtatfcup in the aftemndte of one i>f ll"' nig;e' diamond merchants of KaMM" laiaal while he la silting in his itkc. and I -dao racal 1 onco nagaaaaa th-t Daoaing Dan if. one of the Hmt Uiic-hand irit'ei -it" guy* in the world ...y. I cumm-nce i> w.m€ i il ai. m thp ir nfl Aj wh i . .i wi-i> D ncm Dai Melt chocolate and Uutici u ley says I hear Dancing Dun ^ dwtoh? t-sitor. Add sugar and layers of biscuits M in San Francisco and is figuring • n 1 Ul u r %  weU blendFinally coat top mi reforming and becoming a *< %  Add vanllto and if the mx•lancing teacher so lie can marry ture is too dry. add a little cream. Miss Muriel O'Neill, and of It should be firm and moist enougii-oiiin-' he says. *'we hope and to form into small balls. Roll iy rietaiLs the little bolls in cocoa and place or c | lMr e reer in individual candy paper*. ( OL cor ••••nee or grata* chocofcrta. D! sfhrer ptmeh bowl. Touch with a biscuits in and ou of half n :>reaklighted match. Let it burn until fastcupful of milk and sherry the punch is hot — a matter of %  mixed, then arrange on a dish in few momemu, and pour taaa *l miature. punch glassta. There should a* ith remaining a piece of pineapple in each g'aat. ith nuts if yo u want a cool drink, serve very coli) with I lixture. Irawn id decorata Meruagae Pie short-crurt pastry Well, it is Christmas Eve a year later that I run into a guy by the name of Shotgun Sam. who hi mobbed up with in II il.-ni. and \ I I v nl I'OXIOU* i Well well, the lasl Natty Loaves ither Christmiis Eve like this, I you are commit out Of Good ie < iiarlej'f juii -, %  ou certauil .... | i! he %  Santa Chi So I !•,'; 2 ox hazel nuts I oz almonds 3 oz castor sugar 1 heaped teapoonful chocolate powder l *tt white A little ground n*. Chop up rusts and mix them id." he w( th a u jrugsr and chocolate powhave your Schmitr. is a very. '. | null M Shotgun you 1 pint water lulce and grated rind < 4 oz sugar i oz butter 2 egg yolks JUsabefTy Bggnag 1 cupful fresh raspberries (dc any other tofl fruitt I oz suar 1 e gg I pint .nilk For the meringue top 2 egg whites 4 oz sugar Glace cherries and decorate e -plate "Welt. Sholgu ta. i nun on the next corner ar%  ,„„ w.th a--l Tin..Ctartey %  £: '"'' S ' Mnd Mime mure presents tro. and look for other to kings to stuff, and I hasten and vo u> hed. 1 he uaxt day I find I have such ,i dial I gp not .' 'I am greatly surprised get to see Dancir I do' not see vou al Gammer walch the joint fO'Neills wake. Ymi know Gamin. the evening t f 1 lemon Heat rifpucrriv* and lugaa itcntlv in saucepan, pressiag with •• wooden spoon to extract the juice. When left, press thraugfa a fine sieve, and leave to coal Separate yolk (fan white of effg, ngelicu lo and heat the milk almost to boating point. Pour hot milk on fc egg-yolk and mix well. I-eave to with pastry. coo \ when quite cold, add tb tushing with a raised flute rim raspberry puree, and fold in white id bake. Blend the cornflour of eR(l OMU n ta a stiff tm ^ ,ith some tf l h< water, ••oat the Serve ver\ cold. kat and when it is boiling, pour on to the cornflour, stirring. Hot Orange Wine P l Reluru to the saucapan, add the And. finally, hare a a recipe fat "** iemon Juice and boll for 4-5 min"Hot Orange Wine", us tl %  I ,tes. ^Urring conp>UnUy. Add m*ka it: sugar, butter and. lemon rind. I litre bottle of Itgln red w toe slightly and beat in egg 7 m sugar „ yolk' one by one. P*r infcs the 2 oranged Gunner Jack G.-ud Time Charley s at that, oapu|rt ( .. iBe u/hisk the agg whiles Malt sugar m kvilmg water. ..ad nd me are ensing the jomt. be'*aw. • %  ! !" e a a e *"', !" nr\ "stiftly, whisk in a teaspoonthe peel of the two oranges, cover ause," he says. "Haine Srhmitz for him i the -^"Bo0 ^ !" f u | of the sugar, then fold ra redish, -nd leava rac hah? an hour. all sored up at Dan over some . !" __ !" !" ,n {!,{j_^ M "ed.^ffs rn.uning sugar. Pile m lop of ttW) Remove the peel, add the juice of -,.,i, ' *.f..'i' ^ Christmas moaning and nobody uffei mg from a d\/.ry U head.' feeling in -It is all right v gun says, "1 have i)„i the Claus make-up. and" Shotgun says, "nobody comes out exc you and Good Time Charley i me," ShotOoky. tip this guy %  •Wall." Shotgun says. %  k* is in Good Time great break for Dancing Dan he ight I see you and rsttrfj %  ** %  in Dan. lAJs^jwrJri ^JKS&'SZ.-'SZTZ r:t*Kis ax a^iK t^ i ni x-thirty davlight Well, all right." Shotgui %  i atmaa". say*. i.i,, Decorate witn xlaci id angel'ca and aar* cli-i o|„ Waaga i... prevent tracking. s{$$?222$2 z ? # * %  ** z* ******* ** ztz z $***?****&•* %  ***:* ***&*£ 2 2* r*&& ; 'Whan good friends gel together, c When families unite, when people everywhere are filled with the joy and fellowship of the season of goodwill that abooe all times is the occasion for . HENNESSY „„ "THE BRANDY THAT MADE COGNAC FAMOUS"



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1 \ll\\ lll( IMRI I It, Itgl MAKE THIS COLLAR FOR YOURSELF si MDA1 \I>MII Ml PACE F.I.F.VEN To livvp Ihal spvviul appointment Ihi.it the punctual ttiendlvclixh il ihemirhl of iti %  ppcMiwami iVM IOK> Smith Uarai tacre*Bna,bko< pmmtmm *iih pUictl tiitinir. A MMm .irr>iti luminous \ l* available n,m I iminmiN Krilidi precision, ni.t.tc hi Smith. I nfli-.li i locki Ihl #*%&* n £fnmtfl (a\m3 lim Bourn vita Federal Grand Jury Must Sift Fact From Fiction IRISH CROCHET COLLAR i>ulii lllttlt V Model No. 4101. iiMis rhaH M am ft enp.il > M Cnml ted colour tftha ird Steel Ci Nd, 5. N i \'. i Ten*Urn %  iksj | HI i' cm.); 8 rotfJ D %  I BL) Abbreviations uii: dc—double crochet, I t: %  %  Collar yommenciwilh 2tt ch (to %  turn laf Rn to Ird ch from (to form pleot) 4 eh, I dc iniu 3rd ch from hook. I ch, 1 d into 10th of] (ii (Including oh of lir.-t ptoot) 4 eh, x I picot. 4 ch. I ptCQt, 1 --It. *• 4 C*1 I de mU, r. x' ch, i ch; fw il u orklng I ch it md um v turn. BH RH i loop bel Ch, re%  omitting 4 an In huW rcpe.i!. 5 ch, turn. Being 4 loops at equal %  liter until then 1 loops In iho row (to increase make 2 loop* in I loop), Do not have increases fall directly OVIT those of Work straight until piece measures 2| in. (*5 cm). NH lUiw Work iii pailarn across 1 IS UMS. I5 ch, turn. Decrease 3 loops .it end of each row until 3 loopi (to dm last 3 loops). Break off. Attach thread at oppoI work i* roma. The ..:, n 1 OnBnd Jury is due the Commay annouiu.%  Covi >ment wrongdovi-. llreturned to Washington rron to develop U In the rraksj of tax scandals. King (Dem %  rpt of UM the JusUCC I %  portment "last week. He % %  i Bert K. ik Nathan two en of the i sMHi.OOo sh.ikcio* n %  ii ii tbej ibia N .mil Naster ii T*itoll)aiiin ... KB !i i to form ring. 1st Mow: Koselte with 6 ch, j ,ith 6 ch, x 1 li |l :i en; lopaal I limes more, Join with ss Into 3rd of 6 ch (0 spacee). 2nd R.m : Ii In ch work I dc 1 half tr 3 tr I half tr 1 dC M Row: This row Is worked at back. 5 ch. 1 dc into first tr of first row. 5 ch, x 1 dc n %  tr of first row, 5 ch; repeat from x all round. Ilk Row: Into each space of 3 cfj work I dc I ball -r 5 lr I half tr I dc. rih Row i Thta row is worked el %  i. 7 ch. x 1 dc into ,lc tietween petals of 3rd row. 7 ch; n-pcut from x all round. fclh Kuw : Into > ch work 1 dc I half lr 7 tr 1 half tr I dc. h off Ml. Ml MM, k 16 ch. i de Into III ch. x 16 ch. 1 dc II place as last dc repeat from x Ul Rum: Into each sp of 16 ch work 24 dC %  sal Row : I d into each dc of previous roe turn nnd work i do into each d thus forming off, %  rocks. Flea %  %  •. .,1) round outer eiige of collar, as in illusli <' MO Bad sew In positi-. sew a shamrock between 2 ros%  i I Of collar. Nat*-:—A i rJaal arlll be given t Annual Industrial Fxhlhitlor tOI tl 11of work fcon the pattern* %  MMl thia newspeper durini; tin BARGAIN HOUSE PRICSF.NTS THE FINEST IN WIALIU A d V4I Ul. IWY TO-DAY—DON'T DELAY XMAS is .ii sr uiorxn WOn I,.\IH:S 111 Be th. Hit of Uu Part I It) \(H *ACIM \ ft I t Ml PI I (; Blue, "Jack and ivorj %  %  'i look a FANCY sntirm I M I I I > %  %  (3) A full v urtment ol IKWtXLEIl n %  l I %  rhai %  >!..i ng, Mi A %  %  nl ol NIGHT GOWN'S 3.ill bMisniu 51.13: Sl.W: 1.44; ga\M House OMfeti MLti "P t S1.H6 Plegfk Table < loth* RJIIIiau. ,n,i n.i.> Pnats. (3) For the women who %  • I 111 \IN M I • aive of p<*.i BT^H Palmolivr Hr.lUnl,.,, DCM BLB I SB Wyi A % %  (HI MW M .i| .; Hrl %  1 : neeaiffi %  ,' brisl .. Pah I ,%<• <.il on .. ilj (MI 10 miiiiilra BsW IsHI Th maasaer h*lrmnnvr dauJrisU .. •rj||! for persWl cl. an*iri|;. TB I iHiih antl IVrtuin, lUlr: Pe .i littlr PUeaelrn rMfcaWkso in tb ...I,,, .,t il,. I,.,, l '• > ; ,,,1, £ I. I %  .. T .11 OtJ | %  SSJsW Tl %  • % %  in.' ii %  dew | %  i.i r>ts, Ill'l-aiilifiil p'Ounkil <>• }.ha, rrnnuiK naini. 1(111, aching nnisdea and touus, luaibaao ue oaciimnp unnjry diioiJen due us tliigKiih kidney action. Why put op wKb pate and dt*> oamfi*t when you might art tupp* K, 1 lnryP.a.. ThereEteiubr .ud dearm sluggish rtrlnrrs and • hehj> them to nd the blood o|. >,cH w sctd sad other itn;< itira which otherwise migfal coil, i < %  ihf mem and osuse .1 i re**, Doaa'i Fill, hate helped many tlmuMnda let them help vo*. i^ DOANSj Quick relief from Golds, Coughs Sore Throats Bronchitis Uwff 4//s4f^00r/t Th sawny aad e as ssewawM B*h •! ulcer* and ecaema ara aswted at tha trii ton. h of I)D-D. Prescription. ThU deep peactrating liquid haaiar k illi tha polaonoue |mi balow usa aUa and quickly clears up arasi the %  Pains Sister says: In rxtra larg* Jors and hondy tins Hias sad ChaM date*. Cau t.jiy. THERMOGEK MEDICATED RU! For Colds and Coughs, Aches and P<



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hmmjM NYLON IUPI % %  i I'AMIIS CHRISTMAS DA COSTA & CO., LTi). t egvs 1KIMI MM N IIVNKIFS >IM SI IIS OPAL M1M IN HANKIES J..:.!/%  :. ..rid Individual and in PresentaWhite lion Boxes. -Single ami TwoI I \ MICKS. THIS anil HAMlKKKl HIM-s Tie and Kerrhiel Seta. SHIRTS by Conaula'e Arrow nit* G& toqM IIOl St-SLII'I'I !! %  F-U Leather. n \MHI\.S Day and Even mi Bags in Plaalie and Crpee. .' ma lean Raffla B | J £5 II M V \l Id M\ll( IKON NVI OM BOM PuhloDad b: Camay, Gauge W—ft hy Plaza. Gauge 54. HI M)I\ WTUMATIC HOME LAUNDRY -II M 1IM\STFK II I ( lliir SEWINU MAI HINE



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TACT. rOVMRN CHRISTMAS SUPPLEMENT SUNDAY. DECEMBER It, Vr.l THE 1951 YEAR OF SPORT By O. S COPPIM Ml has been an tmjiortani one in the *aw exchanges of visits between BarbaCup and in Hie second 1 >-vlous yea %  Ml neighbouring territories ihe issue seems to have resolved promoted to the i scale thai happily proved Hsclf into a fight for the championwon also in th Cup and Olive Blossom the "D* Class. In both (he Intermediate IV Claw the competition and had been ever. from the spectators' poll* of was keen even in the closing Fun Dtvuloa, new tag isMon mi % %  HM %  gagga Third Division interesting. ,„ ,„,„, h ,. H gjjy r thai BM only had reverar forms ship between Police and Empire, competition this year and have Next yea* d might be possible and Tornado series next year • .t sport which up to a year or In the First Division competition earned promotion of the third tor the men to have a first and promises to be even more successtw„ ago were not even on the Carlton and Empire have drawn team tn the Second Division. second division, thus ensuring that 1( | However the highlight of map of organised games, had aritway from the raM of the nunI 11 I the high standard of play will be yichting in 19^2 will be the visit kD sUy but they had pettier** In this division and (he TJARRISON COLLEGE and maintained among the bolter ^ href| Tnntdad Tornadoes to progressed in popularity and championship should be decided JT idge School tied In the e 1 a n mi J: T^SS weaker teams Barbados lo t,-,,. !" rt tn the scc pi. "por.ty beyond all measure. between Ihem. A single series Schools' Competition and there *" %  nri 7". or V*" !" mpe J 1,lon and Intercolonial Tornado Yachtr XCHANGE OF VISITS remains to be played and this was no award. There seems to be "* h us *'" no < bccom *> ""'v ?„*££ rn ao !" rni some gentleman's agreement that aismru.nca. WUf'HTI IFTlNf tofigjUM be bracken,,, OUTSTANDING WIN ^ „„T "mM Am„, fcdEl ny-tcn, o< refereeH^?" COLL i l !! S w,n '" WeiKhUlftin. Aaoctatta. of Ing In which one referee and two "ihe le.iuecompcUlii>n waa an Barbados revived weiihlliflmi: in referee lineimen control the oulalandins performance doubly the liltnd durlnn the year. Tor B played ARBADOS entertained Trlnishould not be long now. dad at cricket i i the >< %  %  and then sent a reprrsentati\. team to Bntish Guiana Tt %  HAF.A. sponsored the visit of a Jamaica football team here foi th> first time in the history of the colony, the Barbados Water Pt'i.i Association sent a team to Trmidad; a Leeward and Windward Islands and British Guiana Schoolboys team were entertained here and a Harrison College team visited Trinidad; the Amateur Athletic Association of Barbados staged a Cycle and Athlelir Meet of reel Intercolonial flavour and the Basketball Association received a visit from a Trinidnd team; the Barbados Amateur Lawn Tennis Association had been represented in th, Brandon Trophy matches in Trmidad and the Netbatl Assortkli> n entertained a Grenada team I am sure that thi. record of E rting achievement has never n equalled before. And now tor a look at the various* br. hi < Kit M 1 employed with gam satisfaction and this system has of the football publi I be. m I this the school had entered the first time tgg many years this type of sport '• dormant. But today, we have tne for local ow ? vcr 1 ^.T !" ,^"^^^ A.WA.B. bringing everything to Weiwing^ar.; anything else. !" L2 .*, ? !" £* ^^T the public, explaining the *hn* throw WATER POLO tBSKUSS52"MS EUrS.SSjSStSof'l'-Z X the water polo season which organising to promote any form weir bodies, ended on Friday. October 28th. of ^iX The younger players Dunn* the year the A.W.A.B. 1951 For the first time this year mUBt milst that the older playrm "* l r .inj Barbadians to develop water polo was played by ladies eri cannot go on doing the hard Btetl1 *•* *n<| the second done inere to foster the respect work and admlnstration Indetln•** %  greater, both flnancially and league basis. Secondly, a Mr, They must help shoulder " 'he standard of performance, team and a men's team uin f of the responsibility and not At both shows there were many ladie: visited Trinidad in September and iu\'\.raV"trV garneT" both were triumphant. Thirdly. CONFIDENT Barbados Amateur Water and Swimming Association affiliated in August to the "*HE Water Polo Association c look < side attractions, including contortionist displays, muscle control and trapeze work I. WIOHT FOOTBALL T^'l* %  •".,, .'• %  nmenee.l i WMrTCfE 1851 season rui U aa* n1 n nfldently to the future. Federation Internationale de NataHarrison Colleges victory has Uon Amateur (the International been a tonic. In thai It is definite organisation governing water proof that there is a wealth of polo). young talent coming up to take An analysis of these three point* over from the older players and Is Interesting and shows just how with the visit of a Trinidad team (ar the association has progressed to Barbados next year in mind, during the year now coming to a they can plan from early to cornclose, bat this ever improving foe it |g TIZTT'CM,^ 1 1 ',"!? LADIES' WATER POLO maS^raw^alca "id "£•"? inn II" c.i l..l.ee i hd lull Aujoelatloii m. another j A DIES flrrt lUrtid lo lake an muda Inlo Ihl. Intercolonial tour'd Division. In the Colony games Barbados Ih „ lp m „ n .. ,„. lm (n h ,„ m Bl ll Uenrd u ,.d lleuntent won the rubber by lwo TeiU to g£JE3A t„ J£? |Z !" „ tr.-l to the Second one. The fo.ab.ll w„. of a (ood '^,, hShllL i£L So **"**' ind K the total number standard a, rnmp.ired llh Ihe SK? £2?ZS SK hS SSSrft n .'" 0^, !" ".'" T"'"." •?">" %  .on.pelini in O* Barperformance, of Uland teams !" .li' 1 '"' h i "J" sl .„S J "" 1'"' !" S '£ C JT* 1 'ST' ,,10, Cru-ke, A,el.l.on „ame .rver bhe pa.1 three y.r. but SrS.l inSTof the S <£ ^ Thev "''""'J 0 .'",", 11 ? ^"'ii'"'! ."i" I : |n im rirat DrrtHon I la U % % %  visitor, allhonnh defeated f, 5 in. fl?3 trai.nTm, nVTml Ah^ ,7"? ** beld In the West ndle, l,,le..ucd.ate Diviaioi, and 12 showed a ,upc, „,nly ,,, mldneld !2L'"JL Ti^. n n ""' bul lhc> !?* < %  >•" '" TrlrJdl In October. • the Second Division play, and ball control, but their YACHTING A new page was writu werenot disgraced. The races were between three Torsr&SpSUK K£=irS£s rlEsSS. S^ y a .ln,le point "] !" l.>boed j „ Improvemer., a dle,-team, had rejrlBeict l-.. Handle In.swil" I'ui n.iiit't : better th.ni the leeal •. im the Barbed hard i> vision. Recmien; v.-1 re HALOKEY '' had a most %  .. %  as this that gave 'hem the Slilttlsh captained by Frieda ._..., T ,. W j.,11 ,,,,, rtlaeedi rvnoiR-i^ui CUMIP*III"II.>. im\ Vamoose, Cvcione and Ednl, ... completed their competition* over their crews. Teddv and Tony Ho-d. ill.ST HKITKVIIFK ^-month before the team left for P %  ; %  raid Nirholls and Sidles won ... o, .Jh ' ' : \u^ B,r^ BaM GiaMBv lhr ^^ ther side their matches against Trinidad ^ h *' i ^ co, r 1 54 p P ,n " a8ain J" of '^ Judgo, he is the besl develhiie RoBBle Cooper in goal was and showed > • lls 39 •" f won "" opod man I ,\t the first not only a colourful oerformei then rivali The Trinidad ladies Bryden Trophi rw the i uuhshow h WM aboata Mr. Rrldgehut .1 .,', me si sfell rer, have tome promUdni vidual performance o\\t veteran town and at-the last one he gained %  votMlgsteri who ihould do well helmsman Teddy Hoad was awanlthe_honnur. Mr Karhados. MUSCLE MAN T HE muscle man of l'i. I., Barbados for wa rd while Fred ne*t > Cozier gave what was perhaps ......ni 1' vifTnuv iv* performance "f hi IHU BLL VIC TORY IN rarar in the*.gansag. bringing TRINII>,\I) oecashma saves that The Barbados Men narro< "i ml. he described a< magwon the rubber from Trinidad. rh of the teal I ed the DeLtma C-.ip He acorad 90| XI iture Of the last piinit, in Vamoose, the Tornado show was the BratJ paauly which he himself constructed at Eft* > .Miss Sheila C. WALCOTT TltINlI).\l> TOIRNAMLNT In February Ikiri,idos cntertaii.ed a TrMdad tejin M nd both garnes were drawn. ITie gnmc* were (airly evenly contested and •rare only remarkable for two cxi client double century innlns in the iacoad mutch by Jeffrey Slollmeyer and Clyde Vt'.i'i H wl I •cored 208 and 2l> respectively 1 ater this year a Barbados team toured IlHlish Culana. They were defeated In the first Test and Ihe second Test was left drawn. The Barbadox team was extremely \.ck in howling and the huge %  core of 692 for 9 wicket-, it.-. 1.red and defeated Barbados by an innings. •The outstanding feature of the game was a record first wicket partnership bet i,i 1 dilYtrencc in the final score*. ,ind Trinidad took the Bl •he Unit time i the aeries began in July 1949 that lot team has I" i %  d by Tnmdad Thl warning that Trinidad is improvI I .i uist take early genet god prepare for the battle next year UrlUATKI) TO F.IN.A. 13th at a meeting < t I'IMII iBb iv.. itnn..-i. Amateur Helsinki, the Barbados Amatcui i >, st. TV. i with 191 pobrti A ,|, l( Hindwaa selected Mis* Brldge,-fiiil t' 1 "" It wai however deplorable %  ill number of entries, beggugf. Boooroing to the itegistran l \ '"HI li-t. | %  O: Then Torthan men In Bridgetown. to to cause were only four entrants. upset among I" the lifUng I HO* II Barbadian Plm Springs Barbell Cllll ranks was TK43 'ngs. shewed that his Invaluable whose crew was Quality Is determination. He end'Bulks" Bynoc. r -< Champion of :iie I-mht Hcavya Barbadian weight Division, defeating C. ind H. deCoodrldge, a plucky youngster, by ICannes. This the lifihter hudywei-ht after they [tied with Cyboth totalled 040 pound't for third The competition in the Middleposition with 14 weight Division was also' very points. keen. There were two veteran Vamoose and Edril returned to lifters matching their experience Water Polo and Swimming AssoBarbados to take part in next and skill, George Bynoc and Sara elation became affiliated to this year's racing but Cyclone was sold Maloney Malnney defeated Bynoe tonal bodv. Thus, this in Trinidad "v 20 pounds to become chamassorlatlon which met in July and |LB Y C P' on ,wo Jftctocies for Palm formed an Olympic Committtee, to TKD,„I n.rh*rfo vcht rh.h Sp'" 1 -^ Barbell Club. become affiliated to IU parent InKJ-VSSE ,uco-atrul vea' The U !" n "y **" lh "' ^^^ •ernal.onal body. Each member ?'£. ,n r h r !" £*f* !" T S, r Jav Ruddcr ot Yotk nBrbc11 Club w '" ,of.at|on of this committee ir.it.' 'f 8 ^""..^Sl i ^ y om? dfl >' become Barbados' number i*eome so amiiatcd before the J un I' ^ lh .J"*,," 1 for ^ " "•• Only I few years age Barb-do* Olympic Co.nrmUee can rro t ^ U,C T .^.?rJ X * ? n* Bud0>r l f n H,tln He W abto be re.ognlsed by the Internal!, pal •_*?•*_. ^Pt-T'lLS?* Folly, *. defMt P Thompson of Unique BMITII partner hip end QlanoV 3o for tiered Ugh the innings for 202. WICiHT'S RKCORDS _. jnlque skippered by Pat Toppin. club and become champion of the This race, as usual, was Ihe Featherweight Division. main attraction of the season. In H. Stoddard of York Barbell .. 1949 when the Trophy was first Club was Bantamweight ChamLOCAL SEASON V/under review which would presented It waa won by Donald pion and Clement Jackman chamThe Itcal season had to be bear *nmc comment was the one Stoute in his Intermediate beat pion of the l.igutwelght Division. litfirr WlgSJ shortened for more reasons than sided results in the men's league. Invader. O pic Committee ONE-SIDED NE other point lendon Glbbs who nut on hl 1 ">e most important was Harrison College. Snappers -.ml Moyra Hli.ii won the A CaftM a il _'i h f f t r 7* nd ? rd * V fu K m the ilrst wlefcei r.ihbs lhwl ,hr Aitl fot "" opening of Swordfish showed an early sup^iiCup. Of the old "Aboats which " Tnc „ A, oc %  l '" n %  hoping te lltlJiWm£fm&* ticket season had l*en ority over the .jthe. toams. ThU now gall to thTV Oaa.. tet>~ft !" ** *^^ *fF''* %  Utah the innings for 262. —"fS !" %  £• * ,hcrr *"* no made ^ v ^l r ; %  *• Barnes onethe best performance l r "*yweigm Classes. TORNADO FORCE Knockout Competition. sided and a'tin.ugh it "was hored war Cloud, which finished Spartan carried off the First that this state >f affairs would im, percentage of 09.09 won Uic Wight Who scored 143 run out Division competition tor the prove as the season pot older, it %  iv'CU^TVophv In the %  eeond Test gained the third year in succession and unforlunaUly eontUsaed Lhj nt having batted for HarriHon C>tlege woa all their out the competition. This by no _ '.096 minutes to score 407 runs, gxtuics in the Second Dhrbdoa means detract* from f e gl"i-y o! V' t.e'nrf he was once out. to carry off tne championship of Harrison College's win in th' r The loe.il season has not ye' this Division and Notre Dame, league and Snappers taking th-' rr-ekntud with. n.plvied but Windward who had carried off the champKnock-Out competition (or the %  '('" Clas> Cup with 69.44 per cent, tavaalraarry won the Intermediate ionship of the Second Division fourth rear in succession. HewO'onetta won the Interim dine TABLE TENNIS T tIS year's Table Tennis wae tiighllghted by the introdactkM of the Ladies Island ChamAMOOSC. showing that the pioo^ip This was the first time Tor„to is a force U be j,, the hurfcry of the island mat off the h ^ joe,; j (1[1 wcrc tiv m a



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SUNDAY. DKCKMBEB IS, Id:, l IFim.STM.VS si I'lM.hAU.VI MM IHFAIl H1F. OF OIIMWIMU m3E& %  5 i AMI;:. I %  | V %  y I B y %  I I I 9 V 5" S %  3? %  y y y I y nilSTforttrrnqth andri liabilityEVERYWHERE IN THE WORLD! Bey • Rd e c and rxprricact ihc atnuare nf rMaaj tat -~ aoltra .nd Ijct rqulpf e, c c |, ft, .,,,4. IWM Is HK world", brtni cycle ladory. IB DISTRIBUTORS J •WT ON A fTUUMT-MoSlI M VWMtClf A Cfa*** r4 Dunlop •MAXPLV TENNIS RACKET Dmilop FORT -MU lirilHmnt pmir II111 II 'l.f IMttJtaB 'Ml"-** •***•: i I X I I %  IS is £ K If IS 1 £ JOR d-IPUO __ *>•. leM.*.#ll (B'doi) I %  •—Diitrlbutort .5 m %  ••.• S B mtmmmmm tfiuifc /a—*y> y y y I y y I s I I i l.d.es Wnsl Watchci Gjld Idtfihfiuliori rll The Gift That Lasts a Lifetime! Yes! Jewelry is ihe one gifl lhat pleases EVERYONE — child teenager, or grown-up —sweetheart, mother or grandma' So why not—to the ones vou really care about—give a gift of taste, beauty and utility— a lovely personal gift— •ewe'ry! r~ %  I Gild CKa.r & H.jri Prd..Pn i P YOU* JEWELIERS Y. DE MM A & CO. LTD. I I I I



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Sl'NDAY. DECEMBER M, IMI Sl'NDAY ADVIM'.m" PAGE nvi W. Australia Make 108 W. Indies 133—5 From HAROLD DALE SYDNEY, Dec. 16. The West Indies have performed another of their inconsistent tricks in cricket matches— having been skittloti out in their first innings they more than skittled West Australia and then began to lose wickets all over again Everybody has given up trying to work out the reasons for ail or any of this. And in everybody I include John Goddard He can now do no more than shake his head wearily and say "surely our batsmen must strike form sooner orjater I only hope it u not too late Manager Merry has loii hit earlier good humour. He sits alone fen corners thinking r imagine, about the awful deficit in West Indian cricket funds that this tour will cause unless the side suddenly comet alight and wins at Adelaide. John Trim has been the heio ol the Perth came. At one time he had seven for M before the ].,.t wicket stand hald him up. Then when the West Indies had raised themselves to a position or easy command Stollmeyer and Re onee again filled miserably. Stura>Walcott again reached 50 but one could detect in his tearaway style a feeling that hem little tired of alwaya being the one man who must come off. They still have a chance to make good In this match but once again we are down to Goddard as the hope of the side—a petition that has become grimly familiar. Ramadhin Larks Confidence Since the first Test, the team ha B steadily lost its righting spirit and it would take an Immense effort for the present rather disspirited side to win the third Test. It la still possible: it would mean the salvation of their reputation and finances if they achieve it. but it means that player* Rr c lauiddoni b Dunn Stollmayar b Dunn Chinllanl c Munro b Puckatl Walrott c*b PUcKan Ootti'i 1 bw. b Dunn %  MMnot out Ooddanl not (nil f %  i -:> %  aa t India Score 485 Against England UOMBAY. Dec. 15. England facing a record lit.-t innings total of 485 for nine declared by India scored 40 for the loss of one wicket on the second day of the second cricket Test here Saturday. India's total of which th.r captain Vijay Hasan scored 155 was their highest in any Test, it beat the 454— against the West Indies at New Delhi three years No Share out Shock For County Cricket HERE is a sad blow for county t-nck.'t Mil have notified the 11 first class counties that they an i'liable to make any dtslrlbuti.it> to them out of the praAls of the IMO-31 tour of Australia. Each county received £850 after the 1848-47 tour. In a letter of explanation to the counties, MCC give the profit tot the 1950-51 tout at £3.842 against (17,505 for the 1948-47 trtall Increased costs and loss •>' because of wet Saturdays, are given a* the reasons for the disappointing financial results C79 debt remains When losses and charges In connection with other foreign tours since 1947. amounting to £3.592. were deducted, only £250 rernalncd for dsti ilmtion. and .led to donate this to the Minor Counties Cricket Association as not receive %  I inn Test matches at I a debt of £79 icmains to be carried forward in the aArounts of tours, and this i) be wipplagnaSsasj by further outstanding bills in couh the 1950-51 Australian tour. CCPH criticised WHILE the Opposition's censure rn thf c; (VaVninant*l housing programme was being defeated in the House of Commons last night 1 %  B* lag ol that pi > %  .1. all) name I %  Central Council ol Physical Itecreatinn w. had considerable experience. Labour V Dance I Attracts Crowd \ Thousands crowded the PrtncesaJ Alee Playing Field last night, nuny only It. get a glimpse of 01 the big Labour Victory iMnc* tri it wss held at the Pavilion i the Playing Field. Th dane* w-s a toast to the Labour Party's > try at the Oenerul Elect!.* ia .-ears and the waves, of Ih* m.irby sea brenkinc on the beach, the atmosphere of the Playing F.i-ld was quiet despite the large wd. The majority of those who srenl down had the idea lhat the u >ee was • fiee one, but when they reached they tound out that U • v had to pay tw u shil'.ngs if Use dance %  This did not prevent a |n i| number from going in and da oing however. une woman said as she left the rearing she would have ha.i to pay. "If it was a freeness Ih gh, somebody would havt i. killvd tonight Somebody Sffi Id have been crushed by th.it o.loik, hundreds -at men and women were still %  it Uieir way towards thS pla ing field. A few of the successful Labourites were slut the Playing Field dur -ig the night. Thfj people seemed to be In s le*i U easy mood and f#Av .. l( dm iLsaing the results of the election > SCOREBOARD DEC. 9 — NO. 202 \ I ,-,'.'.---.'.•'*'.-,--*,'--,'.-, %  ..-.. '. %  ..<-::ss.:'.',;'.'.','.%'s.'. The Topic | JAKE A TIP of %  Last Week l* THERE'S NO FINER GIFT FOR A, MAN THIS XMAS XM i -ii i I In I. K llralhwall* a (a/hpr. Arvhaai O II aiikm-x! fa AMIUI. 0 til nl I |Mb h An.u.i Mr I, Ufa* I. Aiarilrt 1 Ri< r <*A|>i Ar.-(., fa HuiS* I All IM t t Vuekr Mi a ,1th ink %  AuMlr. I .1 a.il 5 a. si*> i. kOm W U .* r u .ipd laMbi fa B-ftaS KNI... rail 4 % %  ckvt* 1 ? I it i til t I. — n :iia.iw.l aa. |* iSS mmiiM. AMI ma IKNINOS W.-II ufao.av, U*Mir lafao.it W Uia lonStrn thai daa And wh.. SMnl npfit tahrvm%  miwa *• aa* L.K. aa.d Jor. I am worrfeai I've Sri %  da-r aM enn.rartr T" whom r.oa. mwai I rfaN.a* M. -i-art ha vouHl Ul Bark U BUI rl—< l"-"ll p..i Ni— %  * i4a*aT.a -•> aa i Well cvanlM-iv'i unillns pscl iKins* Sa3r SSrh ).-•• .4 mna ana Ma AiaS avid M*ad n> IKa.> '.";.".-. i f- aauara milrWr fasaal 'onaraluUllaiu T.11 Wrta and old n. thaaa atio ihrai.si '' it* mi* wan! *U> -.ri . -in faa l*^ MWS mu ladv (nand %  sood-lll -nd rorw arm BM-SB owm io is* and tartain |. In atota, in1 I' Before this visit he had won 171 of his 192 contest, in nine vests; boxed IT times against fnivigii opponents, and captained the European team against the U.S.A The bout produced one bad refte.ii *>. li wag announced before the iuternation.il conteata that each bi>ser who was floored must stay down for eight second but In SovljiiukTs case, letVree C. Stiehley allowed him to continue .. IK IhABA. adopted rules c>mrtton wltgi otheiInternat li.mil Imams assi all the beroe*. oj olden nrac. the itrongcsi was llcrcuks. lo-d'ty the name -still represents unequalled strength, sad lac fsmous Hcrculn sfCtasaM r^>vcd itself the strongest in the world. SOLD BY ALL LEADING DEALERS Give Your Overseas SEASONS GREETINGS By Radio Telephone Satisfy that longLag to apeak to year irimdand Family Overseas filve them s surprbe during the ffstlvSeason Heroulas 7%e finest d/cye/e 8t/ifr 7b-day -o %  1 GEDDSS GRANT LTD. BRIDGETOWN Dial 00 and hook your Calk NOW \l;ll & WIRiLLSS and TIE BAIBADOS IHH'HUM TO. are at your Service For Rate* see Telephone Directory page xiii ; -.', '.*.'-. '.'.''*.--*-'-.',*---.V --VV',-.-,". %'. -J Manufadured by: v.uis mu h II • l#.*#.V#. STMKS sorvEivm HOCK TWO CEXT UM.M IIIHh KOLA C'.l.VJJi• Pure • Wholesome • Nourishing and prtcud lemaikably LOW! Alanville, THE BARBADOS CANDY COMPANY cXXXfrM Ph. 2611



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SUNDAY. I>1<) MniR IS. 1931 CHRISTMAS srPPLKMKNT PAf.l: TWKNTY-NINK HOGMANAYIN EXILE w !"!" !"!" !"!" *^ By I>Ot GLAS COBIIAM the amazing busine Id ai.1.1 forgot the amazing business of > .-u-i.i ..T tnvnU the "IK Hogmanay in the place ubiquity erf the Scot would be th> earth where one can net a wen puzzled no doubt If told that these drink, if opening words of Auld Lang Syne rimed. icquai'ifance represent for the Scot, at home or Anw.!.., %  W*jj. Hdmitledly the UtOd HftgWIH] | Hogmanay, 1 example, with the tom-tom* ilntainiiiR monotonous rivalry lth the drone of bagpipes as we i an _nt a congo-n IK round a huge *; I w. thirsuly in\ Mi t\n|q n>, Af:,... New Year's Day. (ru v W1 ichiiia hour, uge "bush." A with fireflies b.tilute for lanterns to help •broad, an unending challenge to viewpoint depends on how effoeCBrrv ,„„ lhc national "flrfl. . . -L .. flliJ ..** tnnffnjlii. I.. t*...a ... t -. him in his relations with the rest lively or ineffectually Hogmani.. ,.„..,,„. u-tn daybreak, of mankind. Believe me. it weighs se !" ,s P**" celebrated. The i lil( „ lM oarUVr, m Hogheavily upon him. year in. year Wow Jf*^* "*>' '"rappic' !" manav. with spuriously jovial out. With the exception, of toniv J"""'> bof-le. might well S()1 ,, K .iw.iitinji the .ru-h of the course, of one night in the year— *ni he udjeciive comforting in „ exl terrorists' bomb—in the halHogmaoay. WhMW he may b *rui.n post-Hogmanay circumIowcd .p ( a ce" of Jerusalem. The that night, he then become* u lan re r of the dog Is ane praan lhal nwer came, however. free a man a* ever Rabble Burns niore crude usual way of express-j^, lpi||l llf „ „, ,„.„,., could have wished for. His spirit %  "£ the sentiment. 1 believe. g ron cnoU gh. for that one night. soars, untrammeled. Th "V f. ">* romantic flavour anyway, to embrace the Hoi, City .n recollection of our Hogmanays in a 1tMt ,f unca sy, armistice QOM for this one glorious pent asI0 exile. in memory's reviling*, pothusfl night are the cares he shoulders .. Evc r been on Coney island on ^and* out more disturbingly than for the world during the previous Hogmanay? 1 haven't. But 1 bet „ ur n„ t Hogmanay 364 days. Gone are the so called '* fun. Blackpool. Brighton. a|)d „„,nrrt m Exile' nationalist inhibitions attributed Festival Batterseathrow them charitable, no duubt. '.nglnnd. It will be %  to I I %  I hxi Set Tnc ., ... :;;, Southern R Joy that—was to hand. England camp no lone, newly %  £ tlaehcd Scots, surrounded by a M to him—drowned (literally may %  n and they could not offer cieaVTruit"itwas at an early stage SB be!) In the spirit of his all-en"lore. 1 WfOOT, than the "Coney ,,, World War 11. and that thii £ compassing compasalon for man"land party staged by American particular Hogmanav fmind m in ••. • i If IN bo argued bv the friends on my but Hogmanay what aeemed thai night to be the 9 1. enjightODOd that the aforv-^"n 1 "T T 1 *" ,•*"* ,u %  OvO said spirit seems to be pretty "' • !" "~ dourly hottWI-up except for the doesnl saving Hogmana> Nicht. Well There may not have been let that past limited supplies of native-born Befea* engaging In some recolScotch available—the war was but I. UODft, pleasant and otherwise*. OT an <* lhc c !" ur ." ""J 1 mU of Hogmanay celebrated in exile, nd %  cerce Highballs >,i Canait may be advisable to guide the dl f n ryc and nigh-nnks however, uninitiated a little further Into lm, "'' l excellently in this Amenthe mysteries of the Great %  '" ""wPW <>' <• rOOl Scots, 'letOrfrton the-hair-down". Hogmanay revel. ^ Hogmanay may have its gleeful P" 1 0 10 lnin % %  miRsing-,1 |„^| (lh( lvntlr „f course," being opening (a, I. with some regret, bit of Scots dancing. That was UMV cupiii-mUtU-ally t B cun vouch) at any time in the 24 rnade up for. before dawn. ww| IRnl ( ,f a mrch. my frllow-surTcrhours preceding the midnight rvrr " cinitinued celebrations on „. an j m y>elf shared the only wekOtM to the New Y.';.r. The ""* ho^n< • rront oI resident Scots bottle of beer the aarlj %  1.tbnlion's end. ->n the other ; "' l ,,! n ,hls Capital of the Naafi had left after all the Christhund. is entirely dependent on cahpns. Peace t.. then shad. ,As our watches 5SS# ROBERTS' TOYLAND* .,-Kiment of indiifi'tent Englishmen. and a few yet mi.Te indifterBJJTKAINS. GUNS :i ettl_Wclshnjen whose sole DOBStOTB of VaflMM k cern was—bed. S Bed! On Hogmanay' It tooK 2 hours to get ourselves accustomed to the shock. In the end we. too. (OUtld there was no escape but IndrrMual capacities, In quite a variety of directions. These which i rl h;i i little ruffled 1 %  n more than .ignalled midnight, by Iho unwonted ,,„.„ : |„. prevtouHJ guarded ongoings of wha'. |>, (I i| r „f Scotch—all that was Wfi %  'Bbt. in ft by then. To the accompany' ** Ins] si:nres in the freezing hut we %  -. Yeai in In hoarse crook* thnt fortunately did not penetrate the subconscloua of nearby "authority" we had the temerity to render n stanza of Auld I...us Syne. "We'll tak' a cup o' kindness vet. "For the days o' Auld 1-ang S.vne" I I & %  (APS. BALLS, ABBOPLANBSB 1• & & & & DOLLS, DOLL'S HOUSE irilMirili: in I'hi.ii. X %  ALSO JJ A *TOY§ HCHILDREN'S H(H>KS, BALUM>\S. X MAS TKKKS.5 an and l)r.( OUATIONS X MAS C \KI)S. SIM,S and S %  i \i>, ^* -the all Scotland from a Scotsman ..., well as the flb ad lib. Twas Hogmanay _.. worth the price in nan ight aoWB f> There have l>een other queerly What a Hogmanay? Across the %  pare between OUr b-ds tw *-"Hel-sped In sympathy. "Should auld acquaintance be forgot"" I f his fr 0,I C P wofderitig. ilaba, xturt— TAGS igp from inlakr of Binger boer H0|m J' (for Ihe youns^Iers. chiefly) Co ""pmor.tb 'm' f,f"""," ',.'J r '"" to " l Tho mind aln lum. ottl M T. "" ,'" "*" d u r ">'~;; little plcd.u.e, to thai flr.t lioniiKtiKPStion for many hours of the nanjv ,,. t( ,, ... i... tf i,., ull w h..,. Sm New Year a,,,! r.^„,ri„ K tiberal "?, the OW Yea, "S^ng 5Lt on hqu„lation. I irould „re.cribe „„ r ,„,,,„ „, ,„ c TlKr J ,„,„ „ wed ?K II h „ .. %  cro ,h "" """ "• I' !" '• Cnurllah Saisenaeh .ouls are w( iene the New Ye.-.r on the prone to niuen that Uie real In„ plml lte hank The mellowne,. • niralion of Hogmanay I, to be „, lhc occa.ion uld „ M dllll 1, 2 ."" K "^",".i -"""', neopiIUca of the lovellneru of ?£Si e tnS C ??F„'SS. ri ," h S h f" <*" !" 1"'l" %  " %  with the full them pub in EniUndi. What of moon', ray, nllerlnn throunh the "„ "„';," l,: !"!"!" lfl. palm, to ailve, t he hi-torle water, aft. I all. mat on New Year a Day And what recked we if lhc ILelf not one drop of spirit can neca.ion did provide our be areured in my s,otti,h bar to boatman, full of the guile of hi> giS^^"H?3ffi ""'- oSSSffl, tVtSffl -: \WmHK*n*ViMWM*WM*toto**UMte*Km\M*V —for the innkeeper i brewer. Which brings me i HOIS! HIS A 100. & %  I £ llllill STIII IT DIAL nil M\,*M\M\W,yMsV*M*i\toM*Kf*nnMr, THE FIRST FAT CHRISTMAS sterling a large uo at tod oo ui %  few yaari ggo, %  -.1' K:...ii In, t-i ,VII< tOO Oft Boxing i jflC K a> From Page 8 to the ,i. million and Califorman fields had occaj muil!ll sionea a rush whien Cnrutunaa ., pteuvitMa arare powerieaa to nan. „,. On i_nr.slnu,uuy tne ste. Me.iw.iy, newly out of Sou hampoec U p ie d with the priva.e ajfaira ton was heauing down-Channel aBd easonal pleasures to reflect on lhc first leg of her voyage to that the country wi San Francisco with a party ot throes of economic evolulit assayers, artisans and miners on Sadler's Wells theat; board who were under orders to Kighi The Lauiy af Lr nplOlt UM Calliornian holdings cur uui raiser, was acted In dumo of a mushroom firm known as ,how amid shouting, si the Nouveau Monde Gold Mmconcerted stamping, orange peel ing Company. We are daily throwing and free lights. Mos gaining confidence ,n the richalK ti,nces in lndpn were bcness of :he Califorman vein and having It the same time in exin their permanenee.' disclosed acUy the same way. .Mild rioting the Nouveau Monde blurb writwM a cherished Boxing Nlghi ers Hopes in the Australian convention In the theatre, part fV.'.ds ran equally high. Many a ot u, c Londoners* licensed fun. At city man. while taking his i h Tussaud wax works the most Christmas pork, read the prospopular figure after Kossulh, the pectus of the British-Australian Hungarian revolutionary was a Gold Mining Company and. fem.le wearing baggy trousers.', M through the genial hare of cigar mvention of the American dress I S %  moke, had visions of ingots reformer. Amelia Jenlcs H inline profitably at Summer Hilt favourite jest of the season, to Crock and along Ihe Hunter whom Mr. Punch devoted what R'ver. was. in rft >ct. „ p>ciat number Three centenarians and a nunAlready gfId was streaming dred or two men and women OW bOOh into the cellars of the Bank eigh'y doddered Offlce Whotever the styling of your, costumes, whatever your taste* in jewelry in our large nelcUion you'll find just what you <^WATCH*W3a I %  5? %  V •2 V S 1 I I I •2 %  I I I %  COSTUME JEWELLERY &f CIRO PEARLS Parking Space OppositeMakes Your Shopping a Pleasure BAYLEY I



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PAOI TKN CHRISTMAS SIPPLKMKNT SUNDAY. UKCKMBKK It. lil THE MIDNIGHT BELL |jMisw*3BaHM &je**" lulll l f I IRRESISTIBLE* £ TAtit I HIS TIP & m y XMAS • i „ . 6 rhl I* HH birthplace ol your par ihr KinK if the World." K'K "" n ill mother, and he looked at mased. Where dOM > %  BVO* Shall I &f kir see him?" In me earth %  • %  >•) '-h. rj m 'i and beast." and then she went i to her old word*, "inc night MM will learn wisdom, my son." Ii wat two days later thai he hN id the bells attain, faint In the •now laden air. They rang and !,,.• h-Ofl %  • % %  village and tfceri from another, ung at the tinldren came laughing up the driM with branches o! holly, and rar.g as the red sun went down. Th<} were uniting as people tame In the duik vith lanterns lo dog HI (ran) of the house and ringing Mill .1* the laol of them went home and the light* in the house, went out one l>y one he stretched out fuT>ui an I then wilh a sudden snort k Could thai looked again. There In the doorIM poreh It stood, made lovlnnU from wood and straw; no i.alace but a stable like his Theie was even a manger, he %  -ould see It quite plain, as well ,.* the plaster llgures that leant over It. familiar people, shepherds, with nooks and lambs. A great feelinK of comfort flowed into him. there was a horse there, and a donkey and an ox. But where was the King* \ **Why do Uiey ru.g so ask> i Quicksilver pauiiui IK"mound IIH aiiut %  % % %  Si %  ..!! %  ,,..,-.. ., "" •'"" h, n, 1 :;";;; ,,'r,*. (MIMI ..I "Cltc^. tr.rmndou, Impute • ,on At last he „_.. little hooves clipping the i unuw har coal grown ;"hagv in the winter nights, 'he little don coloured donkev came ,.„h Ulween them Bending her knees In the snow sn bat toad lefore lh< World A For a moment she kneU~Tncre, '• %  I d falling and ',. k croM W here He had ta h %  -' tho-en to ride marked plain upon bar buck, and then slowl>. one Vg I ROM SANTA COCKTAILS i AT CHRISTMAS Arching his neek he looked Into the manger searching among the gold, familiar hay And there he oo ia ..... ~ —*T" saw Him. the King who frotn out 1|n aulckallver impatiently, of all the world had chosen to |sg| V wrt>r Compact the ground and snorting l* horn in his stable.JnjW"""^ [ gS'-e uherie Perfamas [Confetti. Abientol !* %  Ql Perfume* — Gadenia J.g-Saw Puules for Children and Grown-up* a very nrsf T " *•? %  I „ , lead o. thr braullfid Jcsrv cow, %  *" ""> .wl -,.,. n a hunlrrs on huh would Shall |H The foal il be" whinnied with .-* (. ment. r !^l • To-night row will learn *[**** wisdom, my son." ard Ihe mare Went back lo her hay I % % %  AND ^COCKTAILS K Cul-Ou Holly Book, SALL THE BEST TIME MIXED ARE THE WITH %  £8" !" C5" %  bOWM i King Ol ihe The H the Lil the bells rang out thi iMUient %  that m abroad in the farmyard • (h hor>l ot beasts went down grrcw and Quicksilver nnf*,*"** behind hei HssWJ and a* io creature slept. As he stared nt the glilU-ring sky he heard nciscs and stirrings all round him. clucking ind gabbling of hens and K-.vo. the bull-, quick snort; lowtnf of catth al.eds and the farm dog'i soft I nting: the flight and mTlmg of %  iblt birtl., It i Hie wholi' world WOgfJ waiting. I what' \his rolling, anx. OUl at the sky he saw that i: hghtriu-d. then W04 I, ii gjovci upon tlM far horizon [hoa raoo irhinri the naked I tO ahlDO in the t %  -, run that I. I been In the sky before. As he looked at it a strang. fog tilled him. to (olloo to go %  orne rtaire; In \ ,1 not %  oro ih< knelt and for a moment the backs. Then, paying to their in they •ilcntly plodded %  botr U '^. HooootMthOf snow whirled of the sky once more lining liBURNEl I S KH P HARRIS &C0-2 $ gl'!.,nlal,...i. N. BuildMfjB JJ GIN Broad Strrrt DIAL 404} £5 3, H JASON JONES 4 CO. LTD ~J*Mitifm9%f*Mif*? ;'4<-W*S*3aSW!BiSMHMai8? THE ROOM WITH ::\,;;;ov;v.mrr--.cw 1 d,rr,i 1 nothing had ever trodden It. AtUeitb White* USJuJtksij* One fiofuilafi nFI.iSVlU-t. Maiyl..ii-i .ompac. turkey whose ,11 white is in great akwung his hciw -thoulders as ne by crossing ^tandardbrcd varieties (Mdded down lh drlvr. the cows Thp ueituviUe White* are raised flicked their way behind him; on a year-round baai*. and lO-dOJf %  heep and pigs and all 'he inhabiCCiHinl ( or about 16 pei %  UnU of the farmyard followed „ lurke „s raUed In the United 8S^ sound exeep: tha' enViontly BriUvill. Wht e* Of the ihtdCH footsteps m the Se t e3Trimd 7? week, of ae The hearts ahead wore passing produce 1 pound (0.45 *nw !" "> through the open gates, onto the S|f*> on 2 to S pounds f 3 1....* of grasT in front ol the 1.3 kilograms) of fee, urrh. Quick liver slipped In Development of this turke • %  hind his m.ith.i ..nd through the crested a now markei ••raying backs and horns In front will not displa.v lh< of him he could see that the wide breeds of uirkeyi. according to 1 dotir of the cl opsi and u.g. Dppar'ment of Agricultu V from it a soft light glowed i^rge'smlllOs. U -titut: cm onto the snow He tried to rl „(, -,„ hotels still I forward but his mother lar((er blrfU -^ hll n b *' %  "** u ''\Ja Turkey rabing has lon been %  important and profit il ,^.000 turkey, have been *-* of its* oath ttv ards raised In one season by a large mw-reial hatcher, foal stretch his neck I* %  -•c however, not more than S.OOO nre nnd his mother'* breath wav v...i-in rc-ired in one flock Flecks of j ; bbl ear. LWO to 2,500 are popolar shwo. Wt've all seen the room that seems to smile. Gaily patterned curtains frame the windows, and here and there placed Just right to catch the light, t* a piece of polished brass, glistening, gleaming all day long. The floor too. sparkles with a well chosen covering that matches the curtains, and the whole atmosphere Is one of comfort and luxury. {0.9 to has ed the X V m s s I I %  m We can Itelp of beauty with ou .on tu i your home into such spot!" I LOVELY PATTERNS Or rLOOR COVERINO "DUKAOLIT" to kwp the Brmu ihining. O'CEDAR POLISH" for the furniture tad linoleum THE CENTRAL EMPORIUM Comer of Broad and Tudor 8tte-ts %  I t*k 3. I %  X X X X X V. MM*nmmm*mmmMmmmmm*m*>mn*mi*mmmwmmx*i



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SI/NDAY. DECEMBER 10. 1851 CHRISTMAS SITPI.EMKNT PAOK THIRTY ONE P H T O i : -,,,,111 Savannah: Jerry Lomr ($10). Alloy near SutUe SU< by I K. W. Bril ($15). I %  *w jfc 1 VAj # K*V 5 1 '" ••' H* X"' ""^ te lr jfejr' ^^m 18!^* %  1 <* %  %  Jx^r ^^flPT^ ^^w" ^^ § ^r Al ^^ ^ 1 ^ -%  .'MNMBHB* I 1 "1 c 3 o .* M < I P %  i E T y 1 T 1 N •;r*


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PJM1 TWKNTV-KKillT C HKISTMAs SUPPLEMENT SUNDAY, DECEMBER 16. 5J The Racing Year In Barbados— from page 26 Bums wrenched a }otnl I had lo be withdrawn from all hia enagagerncnt*. He wn retin d to the stud a few month* aBar this and much lo Ihr ("egret f bieedera In thi coll remi' I d IB V I I ml Br tl %  raced in A i lass in Barbados during 1961 n is to t>e re. there wu .i mlmd bag at aasuHa irnJch provad thai there was no •ingle 'utstanding perlBei never! In. i.lard was fairly hiuh Good pei formar* i ,v i i %  tunv i in b.v He bate. filly by Pav Up Hit of Bachelor's Dream, wfwi the Dalkeith Handicap fnrliiTiKat ihe Ma.eh mc.li.:^ hi excellent limt Shr> th< Trinidad for me Junr mMflug .-hrii I,, was unlucky not M hive woo Ihe T.T.C Plate baek l<> Barbados in August to lake the Steward'* Stake* Here -srin she returned, a KOOII time licii and when on ihe third day die ran second to Fli/.ii •• % %  head it signified her trm a tlll> with pli t.' The old gelding Gun Blta ov..... oy Mrs. J. I) Chandler. also had a gaad season in A pBM and W0.1 half n race ovei MM furlongs at the March meeting when he dcadheated with Slainte and anoth?i ovar the same distance w 1 en he took the South Caribbean Stakes lo November His old rival, 'hIriah bred Elizabethan, who is sl.H the record holder fur the mi.futlong In Barbados, was only sc?n at her best once and that was when •he won the Stewards' Hano'cap from Rabata at maMlonad abtve. She has bttn retired to the Hud. Then were several nawcdMaBra during the year nd OWM) these were Kid Cl.etk Ha roween and Pfattj W.i\ !td Cheeks proved Uw twice In A daat wMfc Pn l"y Wgj Many Good Two-year-olds In 1951 A GROUP of proniioeat owner* and trainer* caught by the "Advocate" Camera dortaa a race at the August mealing. Left M right: Mr C. A. rroverbs, Mr. ley QlU. Mr. S. A Walrott. Mr Jack Gill. Mr Hayling coming (>ack to the August meeting to win yet another, this time in B class. In No\ rnui lie account ed for the South Caribbean Handicap, the last A (last nine furlong fcr the year. A colt of uncertain health, it is eovlout that he has a great potential if onl) he could he turned out At all the time. caught M;i.' Ann near the nniih to beat her going away by half A length. Unfortunately at her •it It) %  C elaas event she was struck b)to and injured so badly ihut she da. now been retired to the stud Mary Ann canal out again In I i lo take the opening D class race o\er 5> furlongs but was beaten on the second day bv Watercress over 7>4. Tin thud %  roe thm class went lo The Eagle, son M rlotaaan and the famous GlfTieagle. who had been in Barbados sitsn August when he shared the honour* of winner of tth tap with Usher, and was .MSkg improved forsn The Two-Year Olds There was a numerous and. on the whole, good crop of two-year olds In Barbadot in 1951. They Idad Into separate races Icr colts and geldings on the one bond and nilics on the other, for iheir first appeiranccs in August and then brought together in %  JOCKKY Oflbarl Vvauet ha* been ndinK in race* lonn r than any ether taokay in Barbados won onot. Han % %  • m, attssaaflh ?** a wini %  C atki two in B CloM t>< %  • promoted to the top. Otheri wno did well during aha y-oar in lhi irrtBoiied classas were No-to-Nile a colt by Fairfax Old of ftapri's Jo-phine; Land] rilry by Pylon II out of F.-i>eranre The Older Creoles ri I'M nil epti' j,(od Creole* raring hi he baol of ihcm i ird*i Bow Balai !! %  od the one who proved herself second ben by O.T.C. a4d ol n-k. bred r.d owned l>\ Mr Prea Bethel. Actual, .<(,.,> %  Bating lui [arch, This was in •tl to III on Best Washes. However. Bow Bells tslab'nhed Iwo;_. reeordf fog I> Class over JH fur3 longs, tl%  | ha won the Castle Gram liun-bc-'p n l the 'ccoiid AugUH to lowet %  second parf< i utlanding one at thi* race Bow Bells earned her full weight-for-.i | ran the distance in IhO same thn* a* Ilia in'.porfcrd lUly llarr"*een %  ivtiin gig as. Once again. UM g efOfi. ie m Ihe ore for B claw. The rfffcer uesng the ana '• 9 furtonge **i ugj b) Oatoaka in iflftu nar goad race on 'he second da. %  f :h' August rreetiiig whin *he again i Th? result of this was thai i avaUar, a geldmg by B*imFi nit of Chivalry, ason iii (hi i-i %  ..<•' division, and April's lly by Jir.. Jack 0U1 f April Showers, (dam tf Alorrtie II and Craaa Roads) won in ihe Inter. In Mie third event they were both Bright Light, another of the famous Buring Bow-Felicita oombtnotlnn bred and owned bt Mr lamard. In Nnvcmber a new champion emerged in the shape of Hk RUj Dunquaroua. Bred and owned by Hon. J. D. Chandler she is from O.T.C. and Belledune. the lattei the wlnnae of both the Bnbados and Trinidad Derbies In 1943. She raced in August and was third in both her stall-. Ant to April's Dream and Bright Light and then to Bright Light and bar stable companion Chutney. However, she must have been backward as FUbscquent events proved. Racing at tue November meeting she won The Trumpeter Cup with consummate ease from a held of twelve including both sexes. Then ho defeated the UUag with only Sunina. a filly by Sunplani cut of China Clipper, being capable of matching strides with her for the first three and a half furlong*. Fin illy she took on both i sexes again and gave thorn weight and a sound thrashing to end UP the meeting with an unbeaten record of three wins and the sweep an the hag Thus ended Ihe racing year in Barbados and it is only to be mentioned now that the great biro O.T.C. pasaed away at Castle Grant E-wte in November for this article to be completed. By Obliterate OQl of Telephone Call. O.T.C. sued 43 winners of 283 races Valuad S296,1128 57 during Ins U vcais at stud in Barbados. sswm*s*iwm*i*s*mwm*a*i*i<*>mw HIGH ON YOUR LIST m FOR CHRISTMAS I % •2 %  •sr I I v 3? 1 IAIN. *• %  i* I - %  A small lb. HAMS In Tim. 3a n%. OLIVES. Stuned Bot R1TTKB taoklna S-lh. rtn t III LSI. 5-lh. Tin JACOB*! t RI AM IR.UKrRS III ITflt. t^hle. Tin FOI.VR l( INC Sl'OAK. Pha SHI | II It U MONTIS. n>. KIM i CHCEitC. Pki. IIKldUS 'Silver K.ilW) Of. ft TRITI. WAX PAPtR. Roll BUM H 01 < IKK Ol ATI S. for Xmas Gift* IIKIII) IRl'IT for the Cake iRaMn* (arrantI,IIII a mis XMAS GRIFFITH'S ROCKLEY 'DELIQHTFVL ASSORTMENTS ^ f Will give Your Table a FesnVe Air at this and all Seasons of the Year P'SOL LIB -...s'fcfeliGifcigilifcatMaUt?



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PACK IWENTY-FOU1 ( IIKISTMAS Sl'PI'I.KMKNT SUNDAY, HCHBn m. 1951 jte QhhUdmaA fiwdicA ,il plain leather. fattens Veils: Strange JMvlco lor ,1 with a Kwtional dold Christmas iparWc here ti itcd). l*i ecwunt to make the runt ol >ui ond. ft MH. button, and veil Uu.in Foi tet, will be saving grace for any nothing more fascuiflting or black drvsi Th untln >et Is made sopbtoUcld than .i Mil The it black grocgtain, decorated a* most effective hi UM new 'visor' to .Listers ol colveil, which covers only thi i %  tones (Illustrated). (Illustrated) If you are wearing Sweaters: The party air with gill jewellery, choose an eye veil .! liifT'-i. % %  ..Id net; if there are sequins 00. It you have, a One longon your dress, spangle you veil leeved cashmere sweater — mow with sequins. Necklace*; Here is anothci idea o make for yourself at home. Take a piece of narrow velve ribbon, and sew half a dozen tall rein bells to it. nuke a bracelet In the same way. Now here are a few last-minPin a glittering brooch aero** the back of your hair; It looks vonderful with %  long atylc. With a black sweater and skir., hear a tartan stole vid matching green is a good colour —team with a satin skirt, (perhaps : soft shade of gardenia), n i ruffs for the sweater in satin 10 match the skirt. v. nm* is always a good colour lor evening wraps, so by way ol a change from the ubiquitous tulle round with bobbles. (Illustrated). *L' Sea lerpins: More I %  tlirklo comM In the %  catterphis, which are more lifelike than evei U tt£'J52? i c£gS*££. -= %  ""fSfcO* s ,„, .„, grt.ua sin In %  i Scotman s eye. bn|M gnorold tree., wool -rail to mingle tartan.) lovlbaU.nl.' :l . mo perlume dispenser ond scatter one end with '">m your bracel.t — a good •• mm ot insects. It you tao %  '" "W" Ir.agranco lasl the .v. nmg dress, whv not tnlltr evening. cli.-w tnc ban-let. ol the -1...UKJOne AMI word: allow >ourera by pinning a rcallv lilr-hk. toll plenty or lime to prepare lor %  oak* |0 Hie eult ol the droi : " %  ' '"'' I"" ' (Illustrated! II you da • %  preparing lor It. will be among an honoured comHondo If, r.loves. aearl — all prespiny ol Udy Mayoresses, and ent and correct? Oft you to, you Oetn lucky glrL %  dfy (DoJwihy fiaiklcy the newest of new lines in dresses; and alternatively translorm the humbles: bla.k dress Into North, l^st, Soulh or West I A that come with Christmas? Have „ m ,.. h inn rich and rare: th 'white' Christmas, or tropical V ou dreamed up ways and mean ; %  > : %  temperatures? Indoor partle.. or rf te a „ cw ou> ^arMing vet... flamingo J utdoor picnics which Is it I<-r K mcrini specially for the yellow with black •d sweaters. new you, or picnic, wn.en is M u* jnd ., u rlnf iprciaU> you? Wherever you are, Christ(MtlvitlM? For> if ihere is one mns has come, bringing Its junket( w hlch is not traditional ing and men vmaking. abWt Christmas, it dressing ations lor the p.n y. citrus •mbroidcrThe food and the decoi in* l(Hl dllU MM? urw — • %  -— or, art traditional. The plum pudding >' .using .r,,,,m,e.;.,e Ti Pe,ba. or a _.-rSLTftSE boon'&lrrodoBdcoolttff'taM'tl phanou, tulle lor livhl. carefully put away each lion, you mu't create a very sort n m idr m so n bl £,x) have boon brought out lol kind Ol look for these very ln lx , %  dol occasions. 'Mh.ius the mo-t important i"'w ...nichow „C,,| 1*1 Ul ,: t ";r r emc mW I. that accesedj, I. match d^a mlnu e. „ nore ha „ the moat glam" ("lunraiea.. ,;,„.„, .HvourseinAi. -J '„fjHere are some sugge tions for adrtlna Christmas sparkle und flitter t your access .lies. And you will find hit you an make inanv of ihcm MI. i.e.i at home. lUiMlbaC*: The mWi k suede, cut nlftied wdh itrhing cord. To sod sparkle. beads or diamante round Ihe diam in e on your ureoured. dowii to the skr) detail, to. the ^..niut uy add extra sparkle even %  m IWI (IIKISIMAS CUM KER OJI &*&** #** $**"** & &*"****** t it. I.\MHI:N( I HI Mini i 1U>W 4 I.KVI.lt OF VOI' TO THINK OF IT He has ample scope to err In the choice of a gift from bin to her. She can more easily sink than •wim ln the re.urn from her to hlir It's not the present that counts. but the thought. —Of what the money could have bought. t lrom Page converted Into %  i UM S? although 9R Holland & converted Into on-,i s Hrilirn counterpart, huge kindergarten; cinemas' and \r.v traditional pudding restaurants are almost empty, and known, and olie bollcn take its ...pie in the sto-els ilacc. Olie bnllcn dually transarc carrying parcels and hurrying utcd loosely by the bgl t warm flreside, where the oily balls I are delicious bun-like home-made poetical efforts ant RAWI stuffed with spice and read and huge mugs of hot currants and peel, dipped into chocolate are drunk. Voi butter and fried golden if .iu come to Holland In brown. A dish of toast covered December, bring with you a good vith smoked eel. a flagon of appetilc. Hardly recovered from heavy Dutch gin, and we are set %  ••w hangover of IJecetnlwr 6th. tar the evening. In many fami:he Dutch housewife, who firmly ,„.*, the Christmas tree comes to NOT QITTE SO ROI'OH. DEAR l*lleve* that a happy life depends a glorious end. After looking The hear. lights ui U k I ^.-Il-iilled stomach, prepares .iut of the window to make sure see for the serious task of no unsuspecting persons are The little ones at their ports Christmas cooklrut. which runs beneath. *he tree in all it* ea — %  %  — % % %  — ,|,nrklinn glory, is casually dropBut the domestic havoc they HuT remember to moderate your ped out. This is more amusing leave in their tracks Is nragliter. r you live on the third or fourth For there wilt be many mom^ Depending r* mer.> mgs after. g hi rjhraftmw festlvitlea. a SR..VSM,uu .ii,m MI cautious member of the family Afitniv. miMiimHOH PAR lliui(llv ,.„,,.,,, (l „^ n ., n(l ,unds The proof of the pudding ii in thfl (rpc n he m iM\ c „j t h e road the eating: |, ,^ (l ftr: The proof of the egg is in the mommg. and a row of little fir breaking: trees are suddenly growing In the The proof of the lovers is in the A treet. Wrio Is happiest when It ttn| ifalf .cear** PrnhoW*' Tr-n wh Like Die work of i axes. with HI ,.ONF. Dt I I t .Kl Ht 1 NOT TtM> FAR Howpleasant it Is to Joke and laugh At the party for the stall | her In — Fn ""'' hc bo " "" WftMKlltrfK.aKWMfe.*^^ •*^4*wnl^wlrtnwnwHW^BHjriwl'l' l, enCrgie:



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PAGE KKillT CHRISTMAS SUPPLEMENT SUNDAY. DECEMBER 16. 151 IB 51—The First Fat X'mas won't do at all." imrketmen. "there's %  very thing.*' i were In like HUM Ton ,i.,.s aarU id died Smtthfleld's annual >how of parlours where patent lamps "'-had („*ted glass globe* burned with circular mahogany tables, thi eight of tinboosts, but with Uig an urba By Charles Ried ed for an evangelical mission hall. Two days before Christmas a bnron of beef cut from a spanking Devon ox was hung to roast at eleven in the morning The roasting went on till eleven at night. Turning the scale at M hundredweight the baron was placed cold on a sideboard for the royal banquet on Christmas Day. in adtfWo n there were sixty roast turkeys, a boar*! head and a pie which the newspapers evasively described as "lmpleasurable." The papers added that most of the fare would be ealen by the Household and royal servants. Not only was Chrlslm.-s 1851 t> • isi fal Christmas. H rank* also as the first disUncttvok "Vi>an*. Hitherto England %  conditioned a* much by the I5tr us by the 19th century. It WM worked the vital change. Chi.st. saw the last of Ihe Crystal Palace exhibits sold by. %  ration You could pwk up giant UM worth frv I pounds at two hundred I eight-dav clocks in Ihe form of trees with mechanical birds for twenty guineas or so. But Exhibi*. in had lcgun to percolate Into English homes long before the Exhibition's treasures were n dispersed. The Christmas parlies Arabia, i-to-dale were held in Ith L Ijr, agreed, length. "Thin , pers grieved the i i that wiuuti one week-a loo much of i (Cano... lour, uLoureifc. wile, The uutchc" %  ignt babies of t inTi SS ChVisimasca..!,.. the crltks had jfi mel InOtatM 7fi* SB mainly ODDCMIMd nut wttta ,„ i %  inatinttnl. '" piainii *Jg ,v,-lisht of the boost! but with lu l | to death " JMJ j|((| wnmflr) Ureed £ cUr uiM. hour-glass ottoma finch COS* v.,,.. i.oweve. .... m (|M I)( IUM S dU ussed ou,. wnx frui under glass domes and I. .i^over from .In ,. 111( | inK ]| err fords much as th steel-mounted fireplaces with gar Hunfn Fbttiaa. ror most BritcHun^enii had discussed sUtuUnds and cherubic heads In castOM CnrlstriuH IHil was com-ortar) al tfte Great Exhibition in tron. v ing aaoufjn Evau the parish pan|| v de Park a few months earlier ran something thai Quantity was a bore, something Bj| In CO toll's phr,w. lUcfe you took tor giaiitcl I/*ndon"s %  il G(MK1 harvests plus cattle Imports front Aberdeen srbaal .mporls had alone had Increased a hundrcdbrcUfhl bffaad dOWB to slxpetue ic on the immensan( | easy to re-sell—or so it wv I8M-*ign of a new and prancing llv <* h r *•" %  P 0 **'" laimrd.' "No emigrant." urged pn.sp.-rHy The fail was begin~ h ,, mce the old lh niakers. "should proceed to .6 to dawn on Britain that^she Jg* r $* e k *crc ''Lid "">'. I rt "' *• lobe "nout Such was the typical decor of now Ihe Prince hours and sea roads ihe workshop and trading ** counter of the world. Her har,or human th sail hound to i il of it crowded well as commodity irgoes. Emigration. nd from the years a sorrowful The upstart among UM impovcrisHed Irlsn, .;„, : h;ccji • big bo^ncii among the hori/nn. But Ihe smudge wJ kinging BBflUaHmm Afler lookgmwin| portentously. On Christing at t!ie machine-made lace taking one or more of these ionic b 0 1 *"* im necessity Whal beckoned tne 1851 emigrant above all else were gold, opened An icenllv ooened Auslrallnr On Page rh( hnsimas Eve mild, humid Weather h"d forced a meat glut Jj "IBUJU. — %  -— ,„J „„~ inh Wi,h toM storage as yet undevelffi prices.and more Jobs. buIcncrs lookvxi n aismay a £ M'mvrd presently ^^KlWBl th( .„ lmm-nta SeVl and. knowg ly >ng the slufT would not keep, reML ^v'^itftfiiUH-iviBStj^^ by a general IncidenUlly preferred to gi\e hours altar thnr bOtaj tafin JfJ ^SSS^SHiStmVm\ from the Burnhan. river at MWtartm MK-.ology classlrted these as -. u -.i, the dnven IM '' deserving IHK.I Ten thousand Lond, -lslmas Eve railways Ui the lx-vton orea %  With poultry from Shropshire Yorkshire. Lancashire. "NH on'v." wrot" a" • v an ill lha mlhsgnru auiatUonetl to moot '' %  etK3but on sorr.p lines all second and thsrd . .iii-> .ti arfth i % %  rn>fTi oountrv rHenda ,11 and Newgate marstets, whora you could buv shillings, had seen nothing like • before and, having h^'pcd for S 1 %  I %  •ff i" v %  I HOUSEHOLD J CLEANERS— CHEMICO SNAP BOX-ALL BROOMS. BRUSHES of all Kinds TO MAKE IT A BRIGHTER XMAS s I IS i I c a losure where, in th%  % %  the • iMre n u" 0" t1 i. [ai under the direction %  i "'rrThe aggregate Nil of •in* Ir-ema-H ' hundred lieet pi^ fifty rabbtt pies, fifty geese. Hoods of porter a mountain ,.' plum pud I i haatmito, %  a. . i The |.i | rrangements nude ellpsed table*. Even sn. the Qi en's cheer was nol to he despised In the rebulll Ut r Castle %  they iaw nothing i.a K Lai V ran, Hve Reoui %  Me ...iiulance nfftvaiV :. ,' ar-Hind IV marCOOSH I ttk %  • • • In groves of unprecedented looked ;< if they had been desjgnWe have a wide ranse of PAINTS and ENAMELS VARNISHES and STAINS ELECTUC KETTLES & IKONS PLATES. CUPS & s-,i(KKS. MEAT DBBV8. VHaBTABLE OISHKS. GLASSES of all kind% KKKtlSINK OIL STOVES & OVENS ____^____^^__ = == ^^ XMAS SHOPPINQ A PLEASURE AT PLANTATIONS LTD. %  i %  a I a as m -8S ~s s a & a a a mmi BRIDGETOWN AM) SPEICHTSTOWN UfKMItliMlifff|faiaiillfKlip(sjHtKiifi|?



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*"J-e> PACE rOUUIIN SUNDAY ADVOCATE SUNDAY, DECEMBER It, 1M1 /""IT flQQTpTET) ADS P,:B,JC NOTICES PUBLIC SALES FOH BE.VT TtL£W*OMt ISM. NOTICE SEAL ESTATE ... am, UMHull C" l*. T. m an i on stir: tAkl-M ill S-OWoa r—r* rfl-i rttsft u on ir wmi-ii wit MAKKI \(-l IIII.KIU HSVtHM her IMIi VI 1 I M. %  M To Ml** Mary and Mr DUD \< rOMOTIVE i .a A ,.ic A to Hampahir*. nl %  PnA|HP. mil*-** uratMr l-no WM or 1I4A It 11.1 KLKCTKifJAL kfACllINK AND BINCMR— ideal -ni fur waohl-d h.1.1** iig .nul other IIBM *i-T.a*tu A ,.n Dare* A Soot I. Cd**i'i A HtMlM 1-n* 14 IS Bl J.i UVI-ST.HK • I.. K %  HI %  at * %  .. I .-**i lo; „nd Me.nl. M if M i .1 (MdfelloWa. THANKS %  T mi i We wha attended I card* -iid lett, %  Irvm It. Hill •!. rhalma*. Crll• , i IM %  uur nvanl ben A ikrar. O W BM U MI %  IN MKMORIAM AII.IV>>— I.. HrtM AII*. '.'•' %  r-*d bv he* rhlldn %  a* .paw. Who* • *.I'>*1 to %  "•at wild J.>i. MWi i' t**r Artg-M hove woktoMM )i •" I I* 1 *" share. %  %  Irmi. Karl larondrhildrent. BennlMi l-nd l M I A. M. WEBB STOCKBROKER TlMllOH lllM .Imenla. uted. IHri % %  llril. r Exi 53. Broad Strut. Ilriit,'i-' iwn, (over Phoenix Pharmacy) Dial 4796. — llaun 9-3 1.12.51. FOR SALE 111 "... Mint Pertly Stone and I.*lh and Plaate,, Dn.lng Bod l-v Ulfl Hr-im. Vi'nndah and u.uw Ik-ben. Tolhrt Stone Bungalow. t.r.lT- It—m. Verandah. %  and Belh. U-,... M-.weii.. ClM-tot Church -I VI HI -1 Modern BunfAlO* Lnuaali isjabi ( .... .,< ,.i land, r .Hi iir . Ile-liv*.. • Drawing -iid Dtiiing I'jxan, K.ichen Spat RaMMM urutorfHatll. alao Gaw. Servant* Room with nath and Toll*!. %  HM4.AI.OM l^^^(l.^ \,w U....I B apprM' InuWI. IB.OOO. aqu.<.. MasiilAi-ml vla Imhidlnf timl C...IIW. 1 RfdfNim. l)M>ln| and 1)1. -i.i KcK-n, Kll.hr.i and To n li>r Ml NOAIXIM r—npriimt J iirjr...n. •dlirln T.-Irt ,md II. alao a arpaialr T-olrt ... DUUllfJ and U\II K..c. Vi'*i>ti "i "• %  ruw-r„. *Lih Toilai and fLi'li, Uarasr MIRN 1 rOfi,|Mit,iiif ) aVjal r oona.one Uur %  ouiiia. Dili", ami l.i>in Room, rnr'aawd Oalkrrv, Kiu-h. ami Rut l U i MU'MUM •> appronmitdv T.tao m hajad Bl'ILUINt. M'ar*tioii
IUI s at Uaihill •Mreel. adlotPlm Ctiliui Doll |t.--Uu'*it %  I'l.iinia ..ii antinximatety lO.fM llll' S! %  lain Ai |>i."U-,j|..|> II CM) BBUHO | -id one -ni %  i.'.il binuli> u • II i . II II Sn l-r.IW.MP£ HUM. MASTM-I PUTS AKI>1> Ii K ttloula, (kmall RMa l*. .iii..i'.>n. O.rnt rhuni'h a* M M>ifhao. i. M Mvaal Hal ma. I IIM-ln ML1J34aVveii Ifl Male%  > All**!*dale Planlatia*). Pelar It 11 II 3.i i.reaat.n. a.....,-.. MHIIAMCAL lha| Mr. J .IFJtTIW UiCAR Wat*, M Men aja>> '••! Aj fr..m Hta t.i JaiiMI !.%  in I he Taiv-tax' he Qai n ral PjbiM. A T Kia> In port GUY MAMKBII. Ma.tt UANNINU CO LTD. < %  .,. ..n-rI'. 1J1I in NOTICE in v <>i Minivritin mi I.IVIMAI. 4>Mall r.n.h .1 H J-aw Mrs**) atyen thai ai iha r ..i oKI Ik* %  •rti-i af Manf th. %  < iha paapOn the Oeeaaal i..r Uw ^aiiah wl I iradaV. in* ixn dav I lie f..|lwlnn I. I >lr > .,%  .. %  A %  .. %  ...!. %  I -iv-d Ml votes •Ir Bdwant Krlth W.lrMl baa rv-alv %  r Jhi. Ilxil.. Wilklnaafi baa rtaal I..I.-I v.rd. % % %  y City, having larfa ahow datgbUuIly cool. It uaalatra and • ira roe lutl^-' I'IIH Beard. Lowrr 11 11 SIHi I t NOAI.oW: Nrw,. bulll ahjogalow I IWIdhlaa, Muad niai-k Hock. a yardraa| baatti. ri> a Advartuad. *'iMX.SH'ip I I" .> Re.ponaabWa Dial 3111 4(f4a4ly it u *i—ii ATMLONC %  ranUaelkIwo .t. vo %  MUM. lor a boaidiM ^<"—' *"'" %  • iKAil-r.. -I'T't '" K s %  Id "H 1 -* CM* PiSop* :* IB1IM— Tha 1 .lore) bulldhil canaar a( Jarre, and C s.i liable for odUs ur bjali i'-aant ocooalad M> ktra Ao*v M> V C KJIlgkl C %  to. Ltd H AMIII HELP APMIM and fatirral I'.In.tral Caribbean Dutnbutal %  Boom ML PtaaUlaoM BtilMKia %  tin* written *f%> I Italian MISCEIXANI <>l^ wnmn OOI4 PUHCIIA. ANTH.l'K SHOf i an ii M i.. ffRDUM iuii-ir-aul WFlbMu. Da i %  ••' a) II ;. %  U-dai. Mil.II MINIMI CaltkW.... Baihaheba ro.ii now onward* DWI W. II II SI—In MiiliRitN IWMUainai SII aakai %  lenu-i.rea ln* cnnvert.bla IBS Bal Ok INUII UAH A na-wly kuiil bundala* aiMaied near AB>-ky on Ike •> Jimn I'oa.t tiavlna .*n eall^n. MIlMd -. dlnma MMMMI aedroona wllh running wain. ..Irben. lotUrl and bolh. alao farale aivd aeranta J toaan. Him-* WAJH1D TO BWNT POUSB at PLAT: Small Houaa at fTat In Mkr vicinity of Qarrlaon. atocklaa Rd PillMtria Mill, rtc Apply Advkf Dept In WrttJAg. Tltll GOVERN MENT NOTICES MiIII I Ml DAIRY-KEtPERS A MILK VENDORS IV 111) i \i:i-ll OF SI Mil II \l l II is herewith published for general Information that uwlrr thr Dairy RegulaUona of 19U, II I* required that cerliflcatee issued during IffSl, be aurrendered to the Cornmlsaloners of Health during the month of January 1952, when n-resUtering of the dairies for that year must be done on or before the fifth day of January. Persona granted permits to dispose of surplus milk., along with milk vendors who have obtained Ucinses are alao required lo renew 'mil ptimlts and licensee. Forma of application for registration can be obtained fi-n Ugi Sanitation Department of St. Michael (Sgd ) J. M KIDNEY. Chairman. Commissioners of IIo.-iUli St. Up ANNOUNCEMENTS PONY Wanted by eleven year OKI girt In lime lor Xmaa. a pony who would like to be loved. A good home lor Inr rtgtit aony. naad rvi.1 Le voting bail ".ml be pk-aaant. Phone Law, aaaef i.'il.taa Qtarii Lid Phoi onlarl W Weil. • %  e 00 ** • nd w,,h I %  \*•iu\ Tup Rurk, kavli.g 4 Ba df Q — RODm. Skin Laungr. 1 lull* tiled Totlrt. and ahowora with Hoi water Modern KlUhan OuUlda 1 Cm Oarage. ibn.Fi Room. Flay Har.ru. Tollrl and SMowte. TMa Uardan* ore wrll laid out having a dual aWraiinTi. -l-.v^ i" it. i F rni.hrd ror viewing Wing Mia I 1 M %  Shut Oun 11 gauge. • made by Pabeiquo %  IS 11 51 -in Moyal Tvpe. writer ife-i Carrtagr. in good cmoition Al>pl) Steamahlp Dent S f H*iN. ION a. CO., ITT) 1J II. 11 4t. MlSCEi.l.AM-aOL'S /M'VUU Ot erarr dcacrlpl IMAM, oM Jrwrla. Mar SMI' -. rail> b->.ki. Mai.. An %  Ibph* ale, Bl aorrlngea Antique kl-i. adjoining Ruj..l Y* tie.ii-t.rn .WF.IL laVt ... aouiui rr-nacioi m IF.11,,1 rondllian Alan %  wind* land and religion. lllina Can bo aeon al St (Jeorg. '. %  arb q u n si porj | ,,... ,i i at Wi-.datork Vnii. %  indlford. ftp,, st I'll, llvono 1314 la ILSI : CAM rvitm m iha i Hi i II W i IS. ry* i ua a 10. aao %  is, uo a i wing a.r- la. Ise m > IB. and • i BnTAaM LAOS .-. < .. lafl *ee out Wide r THANI Uea. Dial Mas 1SI1SI t f .. (TIRaMTMAa OIPTS .i F,an and Mp. %  fipp all aroTud Madam Dra*. aaeaee IS It i%  > %  .i ii | 1 %  • %  TM* ItAlillAlU— I'HSDIIV .m lb I %  !. — • .: %  M.-i. • IHJ If a y MM .. i i .., -. l '.. t ,..-. %  mil goibg '• %  •! IS If 11 In I ..!.-.' %  j ( ~u %  Kllch Ilr-.ter.f !•.,,., ., ,.,-..uHihiiuaa and Pbmvr 4*T. New M-h.t "•. ChaapaUX14 II II lit 1 .1,-1. \ ..III 41,HI. l„l 1> I IM TMAM-S I nil IF kANDALSl .i %  I VI aRaTOf lAUNOII > an. > Motor UMI. %  ti n %  *.—1 i b. l-(ge Cabin, anr.l. %  kpll. Morrle MarTni > all in really good condlllort V... .,a. <;-a in IS 11 81—*. 1'IN -fTRlPH IBS-. Woollen Tweed l-vy and Brown Juil a amall qiiaiihll) I SI* IS a >d THAN IH II It II4 I I'lAYBAUJl Children* Miilll-Cavlit.red I'layballi. all r.. BM-W ehipi.rnl. oblalnabla 'ton. B'dna Cirfum -tTlral Foundry lid Manning t II t'orner More, get your* early I J llamel-Amllh A Co, TXd Ih.lrlb' Set. Dial 4T II II 11 %  *. I-CIM .Ml' Chanel N i . ley, An-.ur .. K'. I man. Inrt'.n ..nil. %  TllANIS. n Via Henry B|. Dial IB IB Sl^t 1 n B* mil lv..rl BM wllh I pl> RU-naida A V.i. *eikT. MrOragor Mraet. 11 1) 11 art %  IS Tudor Birert IS II SI 3. PC A BAM" iif Mritrv HAiKJia but nvay ii-xighi .,i %  . pn.e Si. It II SI 3n ra"H riedroeiM Straw ( %  > %  SI B4 Vlall Tbanl IS It II-I I n T11RNADO Intentillonal K record. Coat BTOO.oe I Hkki Tclipbmv. aWT II Bealillaw MOO 00 Bias. fioof leu %  iln.g 1IO ft and P." ateel piping | jgljei -i,r irket l-hamr IS U Bl in wiiMi \ ^ -ii r mi r CAKE SALE REALTORS Limited RIAL KTATT AaDfTH A L'CTION ECH& VAUI(gM (V)NTIWCTOR I 111 Roebuck Birert. Ill It, -IDWT. II II Sl-tP RECITAL OF XMAS MUSIC b, I III H A R HA DOS C1IORAI SOCIKTV And THi: M III UK AI. t IIIIIK AT ST. MICHAEL'S CATHEDKAL VF.'U.MUJ. December 1Mb. al 8.15 p.m. Admlulon by Proirimmr %  'rugramme 1/6 iroaUlnbag uorda of t'arela) and Sd. tun be ..I.IIIII.II from the '.' ,i. sutioiirrj or from t Caert al the r.illir-dral. 1251.—2n. Ki rTFlrvg OAVrr. BJ J.. .IS II 51-ln. NOTICE i Ml I BBMI < til it 1.1 OF lilt. WEST IAUIA9. BARUADU-v IkaQUW i KIN'1B51. Illl (ill two (2* Baroadoa GovtTini.unt txmUuons tenable at in*. Umveraity coiieifc of the Weal luuiva will D' conducted in Barbadoe by the L'mvcraily Uullvgu in coiiaulMtion wilh the Director of Kducaii gad will consist of:— a writ ten examinallon to be held in the week beginning Monday, February 25th. 1952. (11) mi oral i\.iimnatlon li be held in April. 1952. Cmidiuitte* must be.— (u) uniler twenty (2U) years of iige on lhe'31st January. 1852; (b) Natives of this island; or (<•) Children of a native tin.. IMIUIUI, Fjr (d) Children of pereorw who are doniieikd and ha been resident in this island for a period of not leas than lam (10) years Candidate* will be required t> produce with Uivir application*, Birth Certincalea together with certified statements declaring that they have been recei\ Rj education for the past three (3) r*a la a III this .'olotiv .mil that their il College, of Ihe Weal Indies, Jamaica, their aitpllre.. i.'ii. for Entrance lo the l*Bl*ervily (allege The dosing date far • ppllrallona for Entrance la Hal Unuarj, Its* N.B.—Form* of Application fur Entrance to the University College and particulars of the neeesary quallftcutions for Matriculalon, and an oulllne of the courses must be obtained from the KcgLstmr of the University College, Jamaica, or from the local ((.[in-M-ntnttve. Mr. H. A. V.uiirhan n Y MX.A.. Pinfold BtTSMf, Bridgetown, or from Ihe Ilirtctor of Education. IK-partment of Education, 24th November, if51. 27 11.51—3n wuerrtiY DOWN. Top Rota. Chrvn Cbundt. having S bedrooma with corri.eating T,.lleU aivd a row „ Ip L-,g. „ ut BMW Balconie*. Lounge. Duung Room. bull! in (upboarda IhroughOUt Oulalde I Car Oarage. 1 aarvant. Boom. Laundiv Toilrt, and Shower. Being lullv lor viewing ring MIO or BM1 ft Ift I—*n t'OII SAIK MISCELLANEOUS lirt-llRDH C.i!>..... Kltch. Mai B), Alan Xma< llYmru and ivuie them (rum In, Poearly. COWVJOl oirrirn. %  Kt % %  > Dial B' lU.d. i .1... CM ap i-.llon Factor) 1 %  It II Bj 1 %  •'Hi— In Xma< Preaeiuatiun tki %  Ma.iirr. So.. Craven A %  lea. Stale -t,rr. Ul) M. alao a pood buy W r.lath Ml,; preaanuilon pkga ol IN. m ObtoUiabla at KnliMi lid IS II11—Sn W.„„ (,,.,„ 1-".A( II OB lor lee %  lo IAThermaa J eaa ssao to ait as A %  •.ful puirbaar (or Xntoa %  Knlghl'. Lid Itnell rbo. • Ml 01.1) and NEW TO-DAYS NEWS FLASH WE are having record Christmas sales which proves that we have the GOODS. £2.000 more in Xmaj Goods opening this week. JOHNSON'S STATIONERY aavi HARDWARE AUCTION By Ibitructlon* recelvd 1 will tell %  rrNraT>AY Ifb at I p m. al Bath V ..age HI I-awr-tur Cn. Ch a doubl "!' Boarded and ahlngled houae IS in %  B ilteu Was. kltohan. rloaet. pallngt L-nd ran ba lanted TERMS CABH ON I AM. III the Governor on IRtb December. 1951 I. All drivers of vehicle* conveying persons to QM C\reniun> shall enter the Public Ilulldliigs Yard by the South Oatf m ainglr Having art down tbami occupunl> hal. immediately leave by the North Gate and park M direcU-d by ihe I' 1. Drlvegg of vehicles, other than those mentioned In para. 1, shall not ent.i the PubUc Building. Yard between 0 15 a.m. and 11.3b 3. After the Ceremony, drivti.. of veliuli-. uluniing foi Hun iccupanu shall enter the Public Buildings Yard by the North Gate and leave by the South Gale. 4. No vehicle shall park In or be allowed to remain In the Public Buildings Yard between the hours of 8.30 n.m. and 11.30 a.m. 5. Parking space will be available in Rickett Street for the cars of owner drivers attending the Ceremony. Made under Regulation 22 of the Bridgetown and Speighuiown (Traffic) (Amendment) Regulations 1043. R. T. MICH!.: liiinniiSMnnei % %  Police. Police Headquarters. Bridgetown. 13th December, 1051 SHIPPING NOTICES U It ,FINDKH TIIF DIAMOND HAMMER I have been InaKucled by Mr George Colilna lo aalt bv public auction on Ihe %  pot at Breretona Village. Bt. Philip. .. 1 pm on Wrdneaday next IBth December hit houa. which M built of pine and painted in and -it It la n %  II with, .had IS %  • and kllefcen. and Blandi I ri land* • %  Met. Coatx-r Tumi caad. 1VARCN' A BCOTT. t'NDER THF SILVER HAMMER ON TUESDAY 1BII, by onlri of Mra I DOmellai wr will aell h.r Eumllurr I the Top Plat of Avr i orner of Hi 1a.wre.u-* Gap w'lk-h li.clu.lea UprtBht Bnd Nare IMnliMt 1 Han Rock ..flee it Table.. Tea Trola V it mine Top Table, all •< %  ,y>. Olata Ware Tea Bm... Knili Chain. RUrkrra and Tablet palnlad Craari. ami Red Ciutgolcim Crabwnod Sideboard: Sing I. O a dtl aad s Voni. Mprtnga. Iharheaao Dreaalng Table pll H. Mab..n. very good Deep Sleep ll.ttrw-a. Hair lied. Mlrd Pieaa Droalng Tabt*. Mingle Hnl.l nd ami Spring In ,neel M-hog Ik-Table. Siin,Spriiuf C;\ Small Mlrd Preoa; rr nil Btove. Rib-hen Tablea and New Pnrrwrr gtee Hot I'l.tr BtMg ,r4. PrrIHUlltIO BRANKER. TROTMAN CO. i> I SlI'NIIKR THE DIAMOND HAMMER I ha.a been UuUuetad by Mi> Mabel %  hnron lo -ell by public auction on Ihe •pot on Tburaday BSUi Ueccmber al I p m her double roorad houae which la IS > IB -nd SS a II wllh ahed. The houae la iit.iat-d on landi ot Bc.jainin ler al Workman.. St George Trrmi DAIHV M irTT LOST A FOUND KITS— A bunch %  rk, on leather IF-. F eaa nrcovei to the Advocate A wllh mark by applying -iiui Depl a ni GOVERNMENT MM It is notified for general information thai The Public Library and the Speightstown Branch Library will be closed on Monday 24th. December at 3 p.m. By order of the Trustees. E. L. WALCOTT, Public Librana > ,, IBRISTMAB i Ml i ii a. %  Band your Donation now to P O. p I ROM B7. Bridgetown ^B. ,ja. am am at 2 REMEMBERHi SALVATION ABMT CRBISTMAS CHUB your Donalion now to P Bridget ROYAL NR1MERLANDS STEAMSHIP CO. • AII. iso PBOM ri Kopr MS Poaeidon toth Da*. 1M1. M S Bonaire Mtb Da 1WI M S lUlena Bin Jart 11.13 MUM! TO ri.VMOIIII AMD AMaliaBAM MS Millet"-'.,.! Ill Jan. IBM • AILIOO TO I'ASAMAaiBO AND MKI1I-M Ot'IAMA HI Poaeidon Ind Jan., IBM SAII.IVO TO TBIhlltAI. PAMAMAHIMO AND m.H lillANA %  a Ctiica ITih Dae. IBBI. M IL n I %  J„i. IS-.J till". I" iMMl.t i g. CCBACAO M S Haarlem 14lh Dec IBSI B llnil Jan IBM s P MI'HKON. SON A CO.. LTD. Agent!. "orrtinoi'Nn CANADIAN* CRUISERv UDV nouNEv • l-M-i NKIjaoN CANADIAN C.-RIM-.I"il I-ADT MjorjWRY'' I.Mr. NBt^oNCANADIAN CRI'ISEII" Adorned with rubies and sapphires from the alogok mines of Burma Bug Sh woman prepares her food. These Jewels and the com-l mon clay of her ornate bowl are but few of the many minerals containing aluminium. Though first isolated In 1826, It was not until 1886 that Its production became commercially practicable. Most of the world's aluminium Is now produced by dissolving an ore named hauxlte in molten crvolite, a mineral obtained from Greenland, and passing an electric'current through Ihe solution. En combination with other metals such a*. magnesium or copper, aluminium forms light alloys, some of uh,. though only about one-thlrd of the weight of slecl, are just z* strong and not rust. The fsmous statue of Eros In Piccadilly Circus one of the earliest large aluminium castings, shows no signs of corrosion ufler 40 years of exposure to London *moke. —, ,. Bka %  £ le Tj\:\V'Z':rZ".ZT^:Zl rrTc,'^: Canadian (National Steamships at Waunarlwydd in South Wsles These go to help in ihe production of all manner of finished articles from saucepans to aeroplanes, scaffolding poles to ashtrays, motor ear parts to egg cups. Trade Mark .,/ Imperial Chemical isdusfrirs Lrd., Loni The M.V % %  I'AKN'BKK" %  ill Hoi pt Cargo and Pa*sengera r.•--,-.','-'-•.--*.'-'. '*.','.',*'' II Jan. JS Jany II Peby IT r.t>. 14 Mrr Arrl.ra Sail* Barbadei rleikaga. O Darr M Deer B Jam 10 Jan. B Jany it ,'ai.t S P-by 1 PobT 14 Peby aft Peb; B March ID Match %  v..„i M .vi...... New Shipment of JAMAICAN SOLE LEATHEER Arrived PASTERS' LEATHER STORE Palmelto Slreel. NOTICE Ihe Roebuck SI. Marivlan I hurrh Choir u, ill be rend •ring a CAROL SEKVlt *. OH Monday. IK-eember 17lh. al 7 45 it .,, 1T.,;n.ih."-. -i.l each, A Sliver Collection will be taken up for Church runds. All heartily wrlrome. 16.12.51.—in. REAL ESTATE JOHN Si. BLADON b co. A.F.S., a F.V.A. FOR SALE ronm k lauirwo.i, Bathahaba % % %  holiday homo on Iha boack with .boul •, ol .11 ''* of land TArnbar ,onatr. "*, %  ""• "" %  "•"• piliart. %  ronatriK-liori Uiraur %  >%  !., .1 TI,,.-. „ • lib waiit-ba-.n U'ge. Wide B.IW,, ,„„Ug. n g • -a. Iiiiehen. aervenl. room4 -Fulaid. Lathing < tib'tlc. (JO... WINDY WILLOWS. SI. J„me. Delighilul bungalow i..,pr win, opanvrraiwj.h r w .. 1 -na,,dliui mag nlArrni tin ol ota and .tr-l.na•n beach oountry houaa with appro*. ai-rea plui addltlorutl 3', agroa If rogjulred. Thar* are S bedroom.. 1 loungea. dlitiivg room 1 encloard SoaMfM 1 bSUIBeaaMS, MaatlBM, panlry. arrvanta' n--na. S garagea and .11.10. 1.ola.de building. Thli property l> well elevated and coanmatult aacelwni vtow, of ihe St. Jamea roeeUlnr VILLA BOBA I'aaaago Road. Cltr—Altracuw and tenimlly k>ralrd StVaM bungal..BrHI rarriagewoy Appro. KAB aq ft Thi* well built proporh gaav Ulna a fronl taller v. large lounge, Oceania dining-room. 1 large bed. room*. 10IM. panuy and kltohan Good courtyard al roar. MOIM.KN HUM msr.iiDf firaama Hall Tari.cr A nu^darn I'liutolow of llano roi.lruCUon wllk parapet root. Thi. 1 r.ipartv baa Ihe Advantage ot • rornar UU and a very Una .low asawardi There are 3 good bedroorne with ln.'lt.fn laaidrobe. Large lounagV living room with a verandah. leading from II The klUhon I* well aupnltod wllh SI tod upboarda Pwaaaa-.* i-c.r garage, j aervanu' rooma and laundry ', Bt PriorA nujdom %  tn bulll houw of aairomely wild ronatrucllxri and aatan.lv.ly rr-modrlled to give added attracllon The gnwnd Boor oonialna 1 garagea. aerv.int'a quarter* with toilet far ill lira, %  torcrooma and lauiMtr.v On Ihe flnrt Boor iwhoro Ihrrr u uaually a cooling breetel I hare i> a wide and apacloua covered verandah wllh outlook aea>warda. a large bathroom, drawing 100m. t balhrooma ena" wiUi hM water lnetoll>d. 3 hnlr.. with own bain and loileti buller't panlry and modern kiuhen Approv: '. acre ol land well laid out and irrigated from own M '.rr %  upt>l>. aha Main* water and ...-hi Right of way id beach and good bathing oppoalto bouH "LBETOM ON BgA*'. Near OuiinaAn allraclivo lully lumlahed aoa-tlda bungatow built rlgbl on a aandy baafh wllh excellent bathing facllitiee TV era %  a a .IM front verandah • %  Utuling the whole frontage. bodNORTBBOI'ND I.ADV M'lJtr.Is CAR CaUhSSW Ul" IIODNBTV : \u\ hi i*.iv CAN IVtlilK "LADY S'l Raaten 13 Jar.. • Peb. %  0 Peb* IB lh. r 1 Jany JJ.. ,-. T Peby 11 r BV S Maret 34 VI. %  1 7 April T Ja. II Jan. I Peb> • Bebv • Poky. ISPwby II Febv. 10 reb* M Peby I March 10 Man* 31 M.ich 14 March 3 April 4 April 1 April 14 April I? April GARDINER AUSTIN & CO., LTD.—AgenU. HOIU in IIIO.M 1 niiiii* PLANTATIONS Bl II.DINti. luXMK BROAD STREET Paaaengrr Sale* Asenla for: Trail*.Canada Airlines. R.O.A.I and B W I A ALCOA STEAMSHIP COMPANY Telephone %  hoped ir. kilchoi larteei. ...„1 rtg* gaaj BMBR BBS >' I -cMta.il (omaoir, 1-1... IIIII Huns a low coaiairuclod In 1 IB.lone walla and fceav M.-,. .rge I RECITAL XMAS MUSIC at ST. MARY'S tilrit.il Sunday. 30lh December 4 ;.. in, SILVER COLLECTION at DOORS ITogrammes are now on Sale. l-rlee: One Shilling ahaped llving-roni rooma with built-in wardrobe* kitchen, panlry. aenanl. 1 kltohan. bathroom and tub with ahowar. BOlar hoaUng mate I la lion, garago and t aarvank)' room. The ground, ot aboul V acre are heavily wooded wllh Mahogany Plainbo. anl tree*, lawn* and .lone Saargeu terr a ** ar* In aacluded Wall gal • dan. AllraoUve local ion rtoot to CKANP ROL'BK. St Philip On* of iha mart chamm-.ai -ted prouartto* O* IkU nature In lh* lalar.d Tlti. houa* rontal... IHe Urge bednaon ...Ul waton. afto.li 11 groom, large cwktall bar wii bamboo dee**, wide ahad* gklro tea. garage. *tor*r*otn*. bathin* %  nalel. heavy dotoil llghling plum and lb* *m*n|tto* uaual I lv p* ot proporlt. Thar* la eatenaive acreage -' %  • luding a long it retch ot tn. Crane beach, Ursa imuuul greet garden* pUhtod with *• % %  %  abruba and *ltoO Ir***. alao grai. ing lanaT The coaitol vl*w. could Ivafdly be welled and lite balhirto M excellent rVilhtT Inlormali-r, maj b* obtolnod from lh* ok agenla or Mnu. O'rington A Sooty. "BaMIMarDB-. SI Lawrenca Spactoul alone BtlaH bungalow with ihingl* roof, very w*ll planned wllh wide verandah* at fronl and aide. 1 encloard gallerl". Urge air.lounge and dining room, 1 double bedrooma. kitchen anil I arTvanl*' rooms, garag* and ou I houae*. TIM houa* I* comarcea* to Ihg M* with good bathUVJ. %  'WYNDOVB.B-. St P**ar A solid on* tk.ray aton* ml Stan* wllh ahlngled roof, tatoly %  %  •natvoly re-modelled wllh groat car* by the pieaant owner Th* houto boa I wld* roomy v*f ar.dak* al froot and abM, largo room, aeparalr dining badrooma .italic ken. laundry, torvwato' ojuart*ea and farafe Ground* an "to 4i. acre* with praducUv* orohard. Aw*r and vogwt.bla garden., driveway and Urge parking apace for ear* "WrMB— to f well rlavaled on Ike ridge. lard* dnwbaj g room. 3 good waeh boaiiujF. alwo-a bri ... ,-... .1, aaggfeg vtowa ol I and lit %  HAM-. Worihing, bMNgMtoMWIUi a Mode.., Gal'. nt water. t>*t ""h ho* w*tor ru H i kitcruMiett* Land i> ..rr* Ifl (. Bjiei I.' r.d BkMN "BOLOIB'S MOt'BB ". St Jame* An E.l.itc home boill of alone with pine Soora and %  hlngl* roof. 1 rocvpUon. I be.liiH.tna, verandah* rlc alao garage and uaual outbuilding! Th* houae ilanda on appro. 4 aero* of well tlnibered land irnahnganv. approached by long driveway S.nkad with cloaely planted Mahogany troaa The .ml. atartlii'.g altractton ol 'Holder." I. the very love*. Ml* which has Iha edvantog* of being well *levatod and coM. wllh An* vtowa an all aide. Coatt la to** than a rrlU. a.y and town S ml! a. WB ALWAYS HAVE A COM. PRXHENB1VE LDTT OP HOUSBJk LAND AND IKVMWTMF ST PHOTEBTtEB POB BALE REAL ESTATE AGENTS, AI'CTIONEERR and SI RM.VORK rLANTATIONl Bl 11.1)1 NOS — Phdne 4840 FOR SALE HAGGATTS GROUP Oilers wilt bo considered for the purchase of the above group, consisting of Haggatts Factory and the following estates :— Haggatts & Bruce Vale approx. ,. Greenland & Over-hill approx. .. Bawden & River approx Friendship approx Haggatts Factory has been extensively modernised and is equipped to produce fancy molasses as well as D.C. sugar. During the 1051 crop, the factory produced 4,352 tons of sugar. The bags required for the 1952 crop have been secured. The mechanical equipment of the group includes among other items the following International Harvester tractors :— 1—TD14 Crawler Tractor with bulldorsr. 1—WD9, 1—Farmall ft Also 1—Caterpillar D2 tractor. 2—Sulvoiler ploughs. 1—disc plough, 1—brushbreaker plou^ai. 8 Dodge Trucks, 1 Austin Truck, 11 cane carta for Tractors. Livestock includes 14 horses, 12 mules. Further details and ..onditions of sale may be obtained from, S. P. MUSSON. SON & CO., LTD., Broad Street, Bridgetown. At ...il. ....... Arrt. Atrta 305 713 324 644 266 521 115 211



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imtaitt JMMwcate ESTABIISHEC BARBADOS, 11KCKM11KK 16. 1851 PRICE: SIX CENTS U.S. Is Trying To Solve U.K.—Egyptian Dispufc British Train Derailed CAIRO. Dec. 15 THE UNITED STATES is trying ID sobv the Hrit.kh-EVyptian dispute, the American Ambassador. Jefferson Cattery said to-oay, follow i the acting Egyptian Foreign Minister, Ibrahim Kara", Pasha Caffery m Psrfuj u the Police proclaimed a state of emergency in Cairo fur the PB-opetllu of schools, closed after violent student riotl earlier Police riot squads r>uaro>d trsie0c point*, in the city and patrol* srruncj ffc* •i Kmhassies and buildinijs were increased Closer Unity Between U.K. And U.S. Likely I OMIIIIM B TAHI.E The American Ambassador has visited Fame several I for. this week. As he let; the Foreign Office, this RWtn fery said, "We are trying solution for the A'lfl.-Ktoji'i. problem." Sabotage A British mllitarj I md Ismai.... • lievrd B| in caused the ml Early reports said one Hntish %  inn i in | ix>x cam were :.-ic>rnped. (itaricrs said : "Sabot* t A military spokesman said Port Saul line on which occurred WOuM probably he blocked tor Uuee'days. %  fire oil K(C>|tia:iattempting 10 stone gun enu !! %  Brian Rohc-tsen Bn 0 i Minister Meet KgypUan I El Din I'asha %  .Mi capitals a* the En .*' i %  the Egyptian touted N-.IBB. Us* gallon al •• meet in which liisle** about 90 minute. TV.ru DAVID nations WASHINGTON. Dec. IS. : Mir sources predlcteu BW Mlnislei Churchill may propose on his lilp here next month Ihe Closer Federation of Ihe Hiitish Commonwealth, the United Stales and Western British sources said the> M official notification ol any agenda for talks and did not believe one had been drawn ui on the British side. Tt %  Churohlll WSs expected Ui finalize his preparations for the talk* n.i write any speeches he mai (ieliver .luring his Atlantic crossing on the m is— Mry between December 20 and Januar\ 3 It is .mderstood that Amni.-n official* are preparing f review of Use most of outstanding problem* in the Anglorelations. Sources 'peculated however that in his Hinea v.id. "in view of c tnormous interest In contiI < nut Europe in some form of d HI View of Cl the Union of lugHshJ p'ikiriK people of hhe t'nlted Reds Try To Win At Talks What Thej Ve Lost In Fighting PAWirvi' i The United Nations rejected the Cotnn %  What they had lust in bfttOe Tl l %  1 %  teal Communists, I for a hunted trOOp rotation and polil ll N OUld have limilttl I UI-..H iroope durins an trmistice to 5,000pe* month prsssnl U.N n >'e-cted even those to possible Comnmnisl veto %  1 \ i trying to %  and Czechs Accuse U.K. Officials Of Espionage VIENNA. Dec. IS. The prettv blonde Bl bassy secretary wound! alleged "QOBSdnagB rendezvous" in Czechoslovakia on Monday night, was unosr Communist puller guard in a Prague Hospital lodfl'. Daphne Mains, who Is the personal assistant to the British Ambassador Phliip Mali Prague was wout police wh,, Bred on her and I? Secn-t ii Gerdner wounded, was ordered '-Milled from CaWhoslovakU know whotln-1 l.i' inder arrest. but Pi %  '.' % %  that he had been told lo count i.. The coups been aeba tried to escape area northwest It is alleged that I p "esplotia;;. en a "hoi. in a %  Pragui Radio id thai Gardner had adn. lied to p %  Obiei vi Osudnei I Mains v fired upo I ) inadverm through many police roadblock itwousn aw Csi i ho % % %  akil —t' r. Oo.nmeaiws.lt I %  ^ iv abaci hougi Clues* ."i** ** They cited these current devei>pments which may induce the 'rinh leader to sound out American official thinking on oser Commonwealth and Atlanu coaotBUnliy ties: DWappolrimcnt expressed both sere and on the European coninenl over BriUln's refusal to illgn Itself fully with French ipofisorcd plans for economic and mlH.ry integration. Churchill's prov.ous support of European unity Ideas led to this dlsapputntrritnt when after he came' to i iwi'ihe maintained the tradilonal British coolness to becoming involved in Europe as purely European elements. The growing tendency ofsuch iaJor elements of the British Commonwealth as Australia and Canada draw closer to the United %  an to Britain especially military and economic affairs. The continuing reluctance of %  Brlbn public to show any enthusiasm as for associations "huh might make their country l reasingly merely part COMMONWEALTH SUOAR DEI.EOATBS "lUi the British MluUUr "1 fowl. M-|m 0ilym I.Ij lo thr othn -nr w SeUgAtton* and to iSpreaantaUve. Ol lar Coloai-I Ofa, Bo*r* or Trsrtf and Food Mini-try. In u> ;ronp sro. from left Mr P A AnUMay. MsariUu-. Mr J. M Camvtwll. chiri.i..n ol vr • liuUa Oenualttee and rhainnan ol the full Comminwe*Uh delrgmion. Mi H H. Oollinv Qnsen-Und-s Mlnl-fi M Axrt.tilt,*,. Mi H. ft Ctika. Barbalos. Major Lloyil Qeoir Mr T W. While. Aii-rshn High Cimissa*IWI la Ihe U.K. and leadar Of IhS An.UaUau delegation. tSd Sn Allirrt. who Is chairman of thr Mlnlntry t -am in faM n'noti.'i.-i t. I'. I 27 Communist Jets Shot Down - IVlun Group Should Inquire Into Freedom PAKifi Dee. 15 Canada, Denmark, Iceland, the Netherlands and Norway proposed a five member United Nation* Commhalon to determine if freedom exists in Eastern Germany and bring about all-German elections. The proposal made in the form of amendments to tha Bntish, French and American "ipported resolution before the ad hoc I'olitlcal Committee that a neutral commission be appointed simply to investigate conditions of freedom. IN THREE DAYS\Uhonrvan Policy Told V'H Western sources said the amendments probably would be accepted. Haitian Bellegardc told ihc Commute. "We don't want that .:.-!i"d" of the'eentre" Wed of unity typified by daUy a worldwide commonwealth, puige* characteristic in Easterr of POasssSd out that the British i I \X Others In tWB ill bsttlM over nnrth-west The tflctoiy ho.,sle.| the Filth Airhdce Total %  % %  .( %  %  M-turneil safely slthoki i 'ii planes : MJIld lire UI Ihe WeSHI Stlfisd Vrsleidav the largest number of ChtrrrhUL 1 liricklayvr I ONDON, l).. I I lu.nilMf g| thRrl. h t III. %  d i "iInn --.mi in I ,i lai t) ni" 'I -In.. Advocate Relief Fund THF r. i a wall Mipporlrd 111 yrM-rday ii your aid so briiiK yean %  ussssripUua to tha AdvocaM Office. %  %  **'-i"ii"i n.i TSSal •pe. Germany caiiuot live long as she docs to-day spelling a dan%er to (be srend. The same silnation might arise In Germany, as in Korea where "volunteer--" ci-rry guns. Tha* is why the friendly peaceful intervention of (he United Nation" is necessary Pavel E Assephsnko of Byelo russia repeateu Soviet charges that the United tfaUOOS Is not competent to discuss [he German asjeaUOB and If an enquiry were needed It siiouid be conducted ba Oermans thcmselve UDdet POM Power supervision Bolivian I. divided Germai ternational pear, ami %  • -IP (rcunlhi's Son IMa> Loile lldild In I'rotVst Cuni|iai^ii %  VAN REENF.N ') i Fie. to-day unbind* %  bet pb 'i hait in a seven K 'i i ix, tba ; %  %  MI in GOBUSl M Ke-I destroyed four jed nine. ic of ahe Allied fighters was Oround fighting rsjoaad. in on. i h rriaj they killed • i I'sungysng i i. y tusni i m ,. %  ( lighter, Brsli mil-cl n North Korean supplv ii.ass of Bane Us I ifu. Airforrr aruiounoed rhunderjei %  %  %  Mr C. II M II I : i I the Barbados L-bour >' I the Advocate yi lerdaj U I h< i war bad iiit m to lh I. ome o| thr ilem-ial l • nt thit lh*) would win .mi -.;. %  in He i d •• %  %  • thej ouid havo gtt 16 seal' fo. 17 He did ni.BUS II name* < %  rreetl. hi thought il al Mr O an seg arould u % % %  i.nt doubl %  I of the other incmbrrs. "With regard to our r aed BoUey ee he %  %  at nnythlng m >ur manlfl %  W" liif.-rwi lo (bl I'M Irn 'hlng^ that bava proenuasd Mnoa ar. started oir party, but c uld %  w'srsung i 'i %  the careful ro %  11 %  ••: -' > I I peeitri.it. Cbeeaii Hie i mm. in lilrll brlrkUtrr ..id in.I Ihe f.uadallaa ihni he sSes" Bed md Measured d nrltti •! h) \i i .i, malt be u> a l fleaX and asked liir a Irtrl I" li -I tl \ller len iniiMi lee. he area ^aiuiirs. Itul nervous *a kidiiapp-si aeraca tth debating of the xrhange of ilei leutifj U rua a reguLni arm. pi irdli teenth • i potl %  %  %  ntrarj Allj %  sped aeeoai tha f• .utien-. The %  ... on lh" I' >• ii i'n i ''i'i but lefuscd to idintif, mi i ... • %  I IT Kite ol Sii.pu ion N %  Ri i Croa reproaantaUvi i^ tt di :he fire %  for rcfu ing to lb uie right build :• K • mVrt not %  %  %  Uon v h..i %  i eatl led by the %  %  M '.-rm ot v i Idea ikOtasssg You tain iiucli. foi these same turn s .ire ppl i'U can%  ndit .i> Vi.ioi md Vaneuaahtri I not t.ilkiiiK as victor over vnnipiash'd We are lalkinit %  hich thu Tunu t told the *oinmunlata that tha UN Brats itill willing to con. %  the arirUeUca v viiiink' he n the nature of I in the I i Admiral Libhv again told ( %  the meehai ist* disclose the names and where. nonera to tbe i r i necessity for (on , possible to r. .i %  eaat world condition) % %  it If Vanydok which port hub on UM 1 Iwaj ii" rei lad gee) napalmed "everything in sight'' %  i IB build !' %  i troop* and sup1 IT Social Referra i. ipedl really depeiKicnl mi Uk I asloL arid %  %  keei I cost of livi has elt %  I i-.nl • % %  hast (,rr;i;in PoUCC %  %  %  % % % %  i i %  Deeeii Fowse rtad from %  i %  —i.r. i.. %  'hs. an oBlclaJ I HI i flies, i { r"t's r. \. \. %  %  %  KIT Communhri %  %  i r Or Page •> ..' Boat Capita**: Princess Winning aftV" Strike Settled NKW YOHK [> for (h.' Israel Arm that the strike aboaid the Israe 1 flag f etSJhler v rfo waa seiUeti lh "Kh th** di hary.of half o' vaa iwim< for s .i i 1 i II g on Dao e mb f 21. i Hstl COB J '•• • i. froo I • laviv and i %  %  %  mm -js.-ia*-i w*r'sSfMfcs of l^tchsr. who ware tan.,., by Mrs. Bme* Uaaulu i wsce t-Tsi .:% %  •-. citis/oa atsae. itrackm sj Bd-er'-se. goctcs. In one case, v.(. tting a Mibmerged .log late," 1 Bilaafng pnn-Jelioged the seaman s •• | the daughter "f the'faUurc. l P. I Rajah of /U.P. \ -' "' i Kakigh iu •& i Ucyclc f grrai Urcngili. ssooth running, ssswior workatari ik lei and long life lluili nl DM I material* m krid'i Uig'-'i and most naalem fcytk nktory. sf*eIfl*"3.BM THE A t ; %  s i: : i IK A wid variety o( mode's always on display and ready assembled lor you lo lako away. Se our cycls Doparlmonl, lirsl floor. (WiMlii'llllUlMu.. Lid. 10. II. 12 & 13 B.oad Sli Sol Dulnbulors LIU. 'V 13



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SUNDAY, HI ( nim it u. ,.,-,, CHRISTMAS SUPPLEMENT PACE SEVEN ^IMWMIMBiSllTOlM l l lllll Hb wWWWWWWWW^WMM———— -, Spw* *'* -mux niLi. #m*uimrm! (J* """" ~ K %  (X IS £ % 6. V I %  %  I 5? %  i a %  I 2 a a a a a a a a a a a FO/? THE HOME ARE MOST USEFUL. PAY US AND A VISIT SF.LECT. &f W MILEAGE Wider, flatter, deepe with %  pattern that p to the end. tM SAFETY Seriated libs ami kr cuts tostop skidding wet surfaces. HARDWARE GLASSWARE GALVANISE. HARDBOARJ) ENAMEL-WARE PEACOCK'S PAINTS DISTEMPERS PAINTS IN OIL POWDERS ELEC. WIRE ACCESSORIES HOUSEHOLD GOODS GALVANISE HARDBOARD m COMFORT A cuing construction combining flexibility with endurance. iF THBY ARE GENERAI JAT HARDWARE IIDUNLOP a a S 5 £ Wd $ifrfotf*J*4"*;>i>*S'&'siw&i;&.HW I — — a a a a a a a a a a a a a i a i a a a a a a a a a a a a a a a a a 2 AUSTIN> % %  can f 1 •• |% %  si on il • l.K>'li:i.\ WHO* Huj Slrr*l M'iYJfc ihi'si' irnjirttri-iBifiif* ... • STEERING COLUMN GEAR CHANGE LEVER • FULL HYDRAULIC BRAKES • NEW FASCIA PANEL • MORE EFFECTIVE SHOCK ABSORBERS FOR LONGER LIFE AND IMPROVED RIDING



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PACI M\IM\ SCNIIAY AIV<1< Ml suMm DniNinrR it, 1*5/ (,ood Attendance At Missionary Service A large section c,l the laity alienfied the Animal MiwtonaQ arMdl was held .it the Krnpire Tzattttri on Fi i'ia\ n In his address the Lurd Bihnp said: %  v Prwsti from Hi twin ami iranafatsd booh %  lit l\ll %  %  %  Pi i -i ol i to the*? \f1 ..n<1 YS, lOU* llOf Priest John 11 %  i I | 11:4 noii 15 i tnt.v hud laki blood io posses*. and iiu mrk I %  %  r vr from these shores In West Ami oed i special there are so man) im-cling of tbfl Barbados Church li Duly wai transSoriely, which me I on the III ...i the K.v Rod • was appoint*' by all the Clcigv *nd by a gTc.i' B DO| ol mbla. Wi thf> ikUnri ""' ' sr,0 P "' %  i. MM in the land. A K—oluHoi In mind f*>r %  long tune to !>:• .>! iic and assure you of my pravtnal Gnd may richly bless your i-l that my own Uon took place not ver> % %  h..uof the Weal lon| before youn meant that ot %  %  .'.ion was persona wn appol I was floundering anew/hat, trying io teju ovei P Incipal of tiling* thai nd Btranaje i .'. %  v. :> %  Tl %  Ime. and .'it the ^une tinn packBo home on furlough the second yeai platform to the special rp<-,.-. %  invited to be on the pUtl tha Meeting H. said it was -.visight many a> 7oci pea faith Ha -ucsaed Ihr imporn h al*hotiith Al : %  'cd upon our help to I nit the Failh. Mlwtasaar) Revival Canon I %  < % %  • %  • lOiniwxi by tha s r %  I evival orgwrmed hv then. ..In with the Festival M %  also sr gaol held in all town villages In fasej II.' spoke of the di.ilv viv rarld throughout thi I ..'•. Church. Waterloo thi>. church choirs from lav villngo* and towna rendered some the CferUti Carww Johnaon < ndeii bj re" the laity of 'he respon,iinliiv .if helping the treat Mission work of the Church calling them Io look to themselves for lieusinely a* In England and eUcvMhcrr the recall Faith w..s vital Untl Of Term At St. Mark's Girls' School %  %  people of Iliad.-* Hill in festive. nVa Girls' lowing day n md pupU) of i asantj and friends who had COJM %  play. Tha Hi adti %  • %  i of Da Bora* School prestdc-l. as lh> 1 %  • i AH unavoidably absent. At the end of the He* Hunt* lhanked I Boys* School and the parents for trie In given he* during the pail %  %  •-" Tinearj pleasant function ended with th.aaafftafj of the N.itxwi.il Anthem. II /or liaSM ('(Oiiioiii J H^ THE SALVATION ARMY ANNUAL SOCIAL WORK APPEAL .: %  ;.,. - : Si. U-onard. Rev, II Africa found tiv Not I niiilrliil oiu in -hi ; '. %  for us. aim r re not lac*,. gratitude", 1 would .uaribe able to paj %  %  11 k) Bi k> aome lime and have an idea that i '.-inii manage to bring it on* some tune between no and the can> UM ini r ,r "'"' "' ''"" ton, but s.pt; ad I i taki pcldeof place. ii*' am i be 140 Bverythini u goii .-. %  •u In Prencfa ct November 1895. arcompanied Ouinea. The African Print! In %  iiki v, whom I ',ave made peli nnusaai i hi (a ad keeps a fatherly eye on other iinioi .-. From h iluiiiea, when aril up in GamHa or in Dakai. then to FaUangia to winch %  -' of alumlntum ore invited by the fbaittlW) 1" Bouig to grow Into a d Wilkinson, l %  I and we must chief hod been In Bngland "' %  PMWO In ii as o* ladi had been buKructed in Chi brought to antly iapseo ,hv "' %  %  '"'" l while and coloured had repented, and "' %  ''" '"• v "> ,-esl '" k,,, 'i had eon tanti d th.it CIKI ln '" l l,< %  tronfi between U m-.'ping you all to his land, now the dav bi I I %  : ur w 'th what is happenuiK and to eo-operi •'" ' %  'riahao to you full, with tha HamP*h*"U>i %  hd our gratitude It Man Sf:*Wf/ From Drowning Jack Jeftara, ordlnaq aVenunant Water Uoats. was just me Thi.rsday morning t,. plunge Into the Careenage and save Coiurtenay Bool) ol HulK Bend from being drowned. Sa ill • %  ...Ittinfl on the Pfchr i i blofl when he suddenly took ill and fell into the Careenage. He was in difMculties when JcfTem jumped for him. i asssa i. %  %  %  %  H Edvinrib < II ( .. V lUrnri Dnri Garaar v'nnm Oarage Bowrlni tan T B GIXKI.I, Mr DvAIxvu i •i l WHAT'S ON TODAY Sunrise. 'Mm 4.in. Sunset: 5.31 p.m. Moon: Full. Ii. .,.,!...i HI Lighting | r.0 p m. Huh Tide 3.43 am. II p.m. Low Tide : 10 tl a.m. II II p.m. •SPY" SHOT VIENNA Dec 14. A woman stenographer of ttal Britlah aanbaet) In ntunta wni shot by the Czechs on Thursday while carrying out %  vspioraiie' vork i bwadca al of the Czech -I %  ..i n Fi idaj %  ight—I'.r. EVENING SUIT 1 tin run ##• \iiri#>' 11 I'fi-fi-r0 fit hi, P. t. S. MAFFE1 & CO. LTD. | "Tcpscorers in Tailoring" ** Pr Wm Henry Street Home Treasures 5J> I from our %  I Home Products %  %  Department %  s Kims Khus IIANOBBS r Sl.llll '.'. '*W.'.-%  V. ---.'-'-• %  ,-,.'---'--.-,--'%  <' i | II.H.'. >II:T M I \IIIIM I I* for reinforcing concrete for fence*. *J window guards OtA, \ 3" x 12" mesh Medium & Light Gauge | ^ fl "x 6" mesh Medium Gauge 3" mesh do. BUNCHES of Khus Khus l.rantiftilK drroruleil ejch 0.32 U.icock lived f..r iim i -lied on the 20th of lh-cember 1B3. Tlds area Uu roeetd of even nf Ihe early miutonarica—enihuaiasm. .1 peai HI peopla Signed KOI1IN GAMBIA Gdfenior*s SpMch tftei betflfe| in%  %  1 .i• i.Hi-i.in i>\ the Afrtoa Dupoofi health i jBni Bishop said that his first Barbados he was Invited aaeted In Hie audaanea, %  Uu 1 1 the yeai Weal Coast, onrt he wa. towi and YESTERDAYS WEATHER REPORT Rainfall: .08 in. ToUl i:.ii!.i.ill fur Mm.th bj 1 % %  • 1.1.11. 1 l.ts ins. Trmprralurr It. ft F .Vliul V.loellv: || mil. pt-r hour rUriiinr-U-r : (0 a.m.) *. (3 p.m.) ;.92 • pab, rcvclsaidM 1-—, I dVIisliiiulcreani LikcUdwrof f \: i' stessnMs wakb keep hit -. (V / I :rr>i.r skin ln.iihv and ^ ^>i* *N luticura V^ SOAP CAVE SHEPHERD & CO.. LTD. 10-13 Broad Street uyimi\mm*mMmm*UMumniismm*&'& S ;* In S7S lb. drunm s I SMUVIItlll \\ III I I I I >ll -N I ; In 37S lb. drums I IM 11 11 I'IM: A IMIH.I is 1 111 *J Boards and Joists in various sire* \ I'hone 4267. "I ;i \\ ll.KI \SO^ A HWMS <0„ LTD. ^ 0J?Z2Z2 ^ ^ ^ iJ^rfayone MAKE THIS YOUR SHOPPING GIFT GUIDE dOuu'A to (Dad! -^Mp-rj GAIOBJ? at ipwi (Dhuq StoAs! WAKDONIA RAZORS (ULETTE RAZOR8 FOUNTAIN PEN8 \ PENCILS SETS PREHHINU SETS SHAV1NO RRUSKES JAMAICAN CIUARB UUNHILL PIPES COMOY TRADITION DIOABBTn CASES SEAI'OKTHS GIFT SETS URAND SUM PIPES RONHON LIOIITERS ^^M £%!•£?? "RUSH BET* Joh,tH.--_? BABY SILVER SPOONS & FORKS iV QIFTS FOR THE FAMILY %  • &f%  CALEY'S CRACKERS TOM SMITHS CRACKERS XMAS SERVIETTES XMAS DOYLIES PRESENTATION TINS BISCUITS By Jacobs Peek i -nan Crawford* VACCO FLASKS THERMOS FLASKS CADBURY'S FRY CHOCOLATE in PrexentaUon Boxes BLACK MAOIC CHOCOLATES a sices) MELTIS CANDIES NEWBERRY FRUIT PLUM PUDDINO CHARMS TABLE DECORATIONS XMAS TAOS. SEALS. CORD. Rl XMAS TREES XMAS TREE LIGHTS CORK MATS a#S>,i MB QIFTS FOR BOYS & Q1RLS M.1.KINTOSH TOFIUE Dscoi. I Tins SI M. SI M SHARP TOFFEE D .corv.tod Tn :i tl 40 BLUE BIRD TOFFEE COWANS CHOCOLATE 3/6 II PASCALLS MnRSHUIAI.LOWK r CALEY'S FORTUNE CHOCOLATr 70c TRY s ALMOND CHOCOLATES FRY'S HAZEL NUT CHOCOLATE 51 H |fl | CADBURY CHOCOLATES BOXC SI OH to *'J HI -iMAS STOCKINOS \MAS SNOW HOUSES MECHANICAL TOPS AND FLUTES OOYA XMAS CRACKERS .. COLOGNE ft PERFUME — | In attractive Xmapsckagfs Talcnm in TinDUHUIIR Powder ln Boxes Hand Lotion QIFT VOUCHERS FOR ARDEN'S TREATMENT Buy One For Your Friend. FRENCH PERFUMES By Lanvin My Sin. Scandal. Arpegs. r-intp By Ouerlain Shallmar. L'haure Bleu, ec Marcel Rocha." Femme, Mousse line Cbanol — Ko. 6 Jean Patou Joy. Moment Supreme. Amour Amour Ciro Reflexion*. Surrsoder. Danger Lenlheric Tweed, Kumero Dome. Miracle, Shanghai \ I,RO — FRENCH FACE POWDER COLOGNES Yardlev. Atkinsons. Piver, 4711, Bourjoi PRESENTATION SETS By MAX FACTOR .. YARDLEYS .. ELIZABETH ARDEN „ OUBSONS ^ „ RICHARD HUDKUT MORNY Buth a Toilet Soap Talc at Body Powder ln Gardenia, Jasmin SANDALWOOD French Pern. etc. VANITY CASES ft Beauty Mirrors COMB ft BRUSH SETS POWDER PUFFS in PlasUc Boxes DU BARRYS TALCUM in Boti Heart of a Rose Romance Blue Lagoon Oolden Morn Bunch of Violets SOAP by Bronnlejr — 6 to a box 1IC2 GIFT SETS by Richard Hudnut \W \fc KNIGHTS DRUG STORES v $ z



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PACK FOUR CHRISTMAS SUPPLEMENT .SUNDAY. DECEMBER IS. 15I DANCING DAN'S XMAS N ow one Uma 11 i mm on Chrlatmu, and in fact u is Ih,ev .'linstmas, and I am in Good Time Char Ivy Bernstein's UtUfl speakeasy in West Forty-sevrti). fill—I. Hfllhlng Charl %  M'iry Christmas and havinR a few hot Tom and Jerrys with him. TI hcrf Tcim and Jerry is an old-time drink that is „,,%  i, ,.; by ( IM UKI til in tins oountry t<> caddbrata ma* with, and in f... t it l| one* v) popular that many p-?ople think Christmas is invented only tn furnish an excuse for hut Tutu .'iiri Jerry althnu^h of course this is by M means true. But anybody will tell yuu that there is nothing that brings out the true holiday spirit like hot Tom and Jerry. ami 1 hear thai since Tom and Jerry gOM out of style in |h United Stales the holiday spirit is never quite At: fame. The reason ho* Tom and Jan. beer, and other business enlergoe* out it style is becauee ii is crises, and It is by no means necessary to use rum and one violating any ronndeme to tell thin* and another In makin* Tom vou that Heit.iS.hmit/ will jus' and Jarrv and ii.itm..n> when as soon blow your brains out as rum becomes Illegal in Uiistvuntry look at you. In fact. I hear. Tom -nd .Irrry is also ..gainst the sooner. lav. becausu ruin is sonMrUiiriK Anyway, he is not a guv to that is very hard to get -.round town these days. For a while some people try making hot Tom and Jerry w.thout pulling rum in it. but somehow ,i .. %  .. (hi .June old holiday spirit, so nearly everybody finally gives up In disgust, and this LB not %  mi prising'. Jam b) InlrodiKinz IMNCINC. OAN a man who lead* a dublr lite, for "when he b not danrini he'* rarryln o % In a moat llleial in %  nn. r at one thani and .1 mil In r," but "atwaya *eems to be irttlni a great bell o( life and ..VMMKK ONFJ1.L. '*H old doll %  %  mi. on ninety-odd.' who always believer Santa l lau. will rome along seme t'hrhtm.. %  and All the stoek>ng full of beautiful lifts.' W.-ll." Chatlet BlUlbj pajre. n outs the bundle In and Good U a great pity we do not know Time Charley turn* out all the where there are some st.nkings lights but one. and leaver i hung up somewhbajaaagM bottle of Scotch on the then." he says, "you can go around front of Ooky for a Christina* and ituR thing, m theae stocking*, gift and away we go. as I always hear this is the main Personally. I regrei very mu.h '"'Charley leaving the hot Tom and Jerry -i> I do not suppose anybody hut then I am also very enthuii 'Insection has any stockings tiastic about going along" to help hung up, or il they have." he says. Dancing Dan play Sant,. Claus. %  'the cbanCM are they are so full while Good Time Charley M of holes they will not hold anypractically overjoyed , ti„thing Anyway/' Charley says. lm 1me ln nls U(r Charley i t there are any stocking. ,. VOr m \ XV(t up ( n so much holiday lonkey with and many citizens take the trouble to advise Dandtng Dan that he Is not only away ou' of line O'Neill, but that tie is knocking r.i> own price down to where ha L> no price at all. But Dancing Dan only laughkinc Tom and ha-li.i. and % %  -. nig with ,. .m child'! plav. MfM Muriel O'Neill any tim;he In fact, i' takni quite ;>•• axparl aah • chance, and Good Time tc make good Tom and Jerry, and Charley says he docs not blame tn the dayi when it is not illcR;il him. at that, as Miss Muriel O'Neill a good hot Tom and Jerrv maker is so beautiful that he will be command* good wages and miny danrini; with hir himself 10 frh-ndmatter what, if h.> live years Now "f emirs.Good Time younger and can get a Roscoe out Charlev and I In the days when he ,,, T ..l. m ...i Jaffff] *• art runs with Paddy the Link an.l making, ... wa da not wish to do other fast guys. illegal. What using Is rye whisky that Good Time Charley gets on a doctor's with us, and trial, hur Merrv Chi But old Ooky is not i to Tom and Jerry and after about the fifth muii he folds up in l chair, and goes right to sleep on ua. He Is wearing a pretty good Santa i ika-un, what wilh a nice icd suit tiimmed with white cotton, and a wig, and false nose. long white whiskers, and a hung up we dr not have anythii to stuff HI Uicm although perlie says. "I will gladlv donate a few pints of Scotch." plenty ol Will. 1 tm pointing out th it am have no reindeer, and that a Santa ..usKim-l Chins ,. l-mntl tn l^.k like Ibaa sap if he goes around without reindeer, but Charley spirit. In fact, nothing will do CharIcy but that we stop m a couple of spots and have a few drinks tu Santa Claus's health, and iheie visits are a big success, although everybody Is much surprised l i*e Charley and me with Santa CufUB, especially Charley, *:","*"?" ?„","„ hi" back and II I do not know Forty-iilnth_-slrccl. This stocking rWrtj seem lo give Dancing D..n ^J, ,, va ^ aiy .ccogmsc, to.ii ul.'i. lor all of a Midden lie ln Dan ""'Why"" 'tSXSi* l>an savs I But ' tourW """" aie no hut kn.,w hy wheS" a stUing ^nuni To "' **? **?*'• £ J-J g£ It u hung up at Miss Muriel T v 1 '%  "• w. have to drink ...K,.| evc u on hand, and pally I will alway* believe that the noggin I have on me fterwards comes of mixing the drinks we get in these spot b with my Tom and Jerry. As we go up Broadway, headci for Forty-ninth Street, Charlo R imes in he weighs uo ihe iotni I.MIIH In Jewi isSaw fer*5ei-"|25S ; "' hot Tom and Jerry and naturall> v.c are not fonlisli enough to any ol Good Time Charley's own xye in it The prescription for DM I>* -husky comes fron otd Doc *U>U into a comer where is goes plunk. Wblll iis i) there Is something very customers co h,..w in It, and then h %  gegni up knoeh; ti Hi lur alongside of Ch.irli and me and wishes to know we are drinking. his back _.._ Santa Claul is not apt to be such v hung up by nobody hut a party a fuy as will snore loud enough by the name of Gammer O'Neill. •he windows I will think w ho is Miss Muriel O'Neill's Ool S mla Claus sure enough, grandmamma. Dancing Dan says. Well, we forget Ooky and let him %  'Qammai 01W1J U going on .> lii'j> and go on wltti our hot Tom r.iiiety-odd," he says, and Miss %  v. Mad in the me.mtime M„nel i'll> me she cannot hokl and 1 see many cititens we know m try to ihtnk up a few songs out much longer, what with one and give thvm a large hello, and bo Christmas and thing and another, including being wish them Merry Christmas, and Dancing Dan finally renders 'My ,, nuk. childish in spots. some of these d lutM Dad's Dinner Pall" in a nice hands with Santa Claus. not baritone and WtJ loud, while .1 do **• ?Z£?*J£L ^VN.UT knowing he U nobody bu< D rtrst-rale with "WUI you Love Me jemember Mis. Mune ONeU ^ alinough later 1 %  nber-As you Do in May?" was telling me Just the other night fcUn<) |niTi „ gome iimoait But personally 1 always think how Gammer CrT tatll bMPd Jg |i( (c ( |lizens ^^ c)> m Good Tin.Chart i M ta 11 > hat stocking on Christmas Eve ^ ^^ ^^ ^^ J hfMh .l line uymg to sing .. all her life, and, he says. i ou such a night, judge from what Miss Muriel rorda between us. O'Neill tan that the old doll always believe Santa Claus will re singing many (orne Mlong l0me Christmas and '"""""*~ to the door and „ u he Blockl ng mil of beautiful ,J, irnfv W ^ then they read ft5 Ru ,.. D-nclIllt D an says. t h.Mey %  -. sign and this seems to .. Mll Muriel O'Neill ftlls me Santa Claus never does Ihis. although Miss Muriel O'Neill peiih.ii cause some unrest among th .nd som? of them stand outside him as our Santa Claus hn OUt of line. And once we are somewhat embarrassed when a lot of little horn. with their parents from a late Christmas party somowhere gather about Santa Claus with shouts of childish glee. an n some of them wish limb up Santa Claus's legs. ally, Sanla Claus gel s a peevish, and calls them a names, and one of the „ ,. parents come, up and wishes to irse Dancing Dan know whut 1( |h> ldpi| Qf ^^ Naturally the customer, go • %  > %  mev gtfW are imihing c aus u(l) ^ UnguafSe and f It is made up In a hot Tom and "-a. *"!"''J^ %  "^ !" ,£2. w M ,hey do not wish their much because Miss Muriel ONeUl ^nt* Claus takes a pun.li |l '** of houS TXr and ii> UT&l breezers busted, and Dancing Dan b, very poor, and proud and aU*> hp t ,„ rf wW J h J naving cracks at the hot Tom ami and Charley and 1 contlnuedrink^ rf !^ w '" !" ^ ,"u^ **t moM astonishing lo Ihe Jerry with Dancing Dan. and Dan ing our hot Tom and Jerry, and off anybody and l^n lick Uie 1!t|f k(dl who hayt mn id-> ^ 3?&SSJr#-££*%£ Na'tu^llv we-.,art boosting ho, jynj it js a great oujra.^until -L^S ^ S Satu ihiuniatWm. as Doc Moggs say.there is nothing belter for rheutUsrn than r>e whisky, especially Dancing Dan says he will have on about their business and stop '',,??" another craek. and Merry Christdisturbmg p.'*ccful citlM with it. and the first Naturally the Jerry. In fact, old comes around and has sitdels of hot Tom and Jerry us for his own rheumatism. few with the and He comes around during afternoon, tor Good Time Ch; UKl 1 lUH making this Tom Tern* early In the day. so as t-> be sure lo have enough to last us over Christmas and It Is now elong towards six o'clock and our holiday spirit u practically 100 per can) Weil, ae CosC 7ia 'Jhurlcy and 1 are xi>res>ing our holiday seutlments to each other over our hoi Tom and Jerry, and I am trying to think up the poem about ihe nighl before Christina* and all through the house, which 1 know iu< know will interest Charley no little, all lor Tom and Jerry, except maybe or a sudden there is a bu> knock Miss Muriel O'Neill, and she doe at the trout door, ami when i.ot druik anything with drugs ton Charley opens the dooi who come> ry.Ui it dolls in night clubs and olh.*r spot By DAMON RUNYON guy who says she will, although." Dancing Dan says, "between me and Heine Schmltz. and raft of other gttj i mention. Miss Muriel O'Neill can lake plenty". Well. I know what Dancing Dan slates about Miss Muriel O'Neill is quite true, and in fact it Is a matter that is often discussed on Broadway, bee. Sant* Claus as a very kindly old guy. But of course they do not know about Dancing Dan mixing the liquor we get in the spots we vbwk with his Tom and Jerry, or they gettl understand how even Santa> Claus can lose his temper Well. Dually we arrive in front of the place where Dancing Dan %  CBau anything, so with each Tom and Jerry we an* Miss Muriel O'Neill cannot get says Miss Muriel O'Neill and her soothing In his life, wishing one another a very Merry more than twenty bobs per week graudmama live and it is nothing It, lael Dancing Dan says he Christmas, and sometimes a vety working in the Half Moon, and but a tenement house;noli far back •nil ,ee..mmrnd Tom and Jerry to Happy New Year, although of it is well known to one and all f* Madison Square Gardens, and everybody he knows, only he doe* course this does not go for Good that this is no kind of dough for ; u .1,!! !" , !" Lit ^ „^ JJT. my body good enough Time Charley as yet. because u doU as beautiful as Miss Muriel Charley has his New Year .separate (j'Neill. from Dancing Dan and me. By and by we lake to waking Ooky up m his Santa Claus outllt and offering him more hot Tom Well. drknUng ihi Tom and Jerry < goodcustomers come to the door of fOTr and rall> us nainps ^ we can -._r.u..i-„-. lull..—kw h( does no| hav [he rl|[(u Now." Dancing Dan "it seems that while O'Neill Is very happy lo get halevcr she linds m her stock it this time there are no lights burning in the joint except a gas jet In the main hall, and by the S 7T-TT! light of this jet we look at ho Gammer ^^ ^ MtrT hoXK%t BUC ,, and Jerry, and wishing him Merr> ^ Christmas morning, th fhiistmsR. but Onbv nlv Bets %  :. ... .. "i.T. Christi but Opky only gets holiday spur m him. and let him a-, you always find In the hall of those Joints, and we see thai Mlm Hunt! O'Neill and her grandmw.ina live on the fifth floor. Thai b) the top floor, and personally I do not like the Idea of when there i< anv dm cog i -"" "' h -' ,> t oul %  *'•" giSS th. whn ... H • % %  %  !*• •JS.** too .ui he 1 have enough for ourselves. he hangs out a sign which says. Account of Christmas.' ill l-t In is henr rumours dancing he is carrying on in i most Illegal manner at one thmt iitid another. But. of course, you can always hear rumour-. In lads town about anybod>. and pcr%  01 illv I am rather fond of Dancing. Dan as he always teems to be getting a great licit of life. Anybody in town *ill tell you that Dancing Dan i i Mi with in. Bamaby whatevn in him. and in fact, h' has atxAit ai m guzard as anybody around, although I wish to say 1 always •lUesUon Ins judgment in dancing so miidi with Mita Muriel O'Neill, who works in the Half Moon Night Club And the reason I quest not understand why Santa Claus l* not more liberal, and," ,.,„ h* says. "Mist Muriel O'Neill is .lone unf „ oni( about m |d-nighi -y in ,0 !" J 1 1 ,ne on ."j w t,h *f walking up five flight, of aUlrt. when Dancing Dnn wishes to see she can give Gammer ONeiU one and „„ wiUing to lc j Dancing how he looks .,s Sant i Claus f** 1 hig Christmas before the old D(m and Good Time Charley go. doll pu's her ci.ecks back m the bM Dancing Dan insists we must So Good Time Charley and I rack." all go, and finally I agree because help Dancing Dan pull off Ooky's ..g^„ Dancing Dan states, Charley Is commencing to argue .iutnt and put it on Dan. and thu ..^ Job fg| ug M Muriel that the nght say for us to do is ONeiU and hes grandmarhma to get on the roof and let Santa n Claus go down a chimney, and is he making so much noise I am afraid at such an hour as this he will wake somebody up l-drum. and Claus outfit on over his ordinary w "" *" m TZJTZ^L i ..11 week ,:othet. and he does not even wake ^e all alone ... UiiaBirt over ir i ire andrttainghhn of Wc *> ropy-n'nth Street, and ht Dan. and thi Ooky. who is i, easy as Ooky only has this Sant .thing bot an old ri—li m un. ">^l Claus outflt Ii.it *oitiK :itound i.'Kd llko Santa '. anyina n sign advertising Mo the Santa Clans uniform *"f • .. •Vltub'l clou.. Wrll I wlah to : I .-. %  many Miss Murlfl O^Nolll Is bound to s„ up.la.rs w climb, and Dual sixth A Sant. CUtua In m> time but I be working, and Ihe chance, are y wc come to a door on the t"P ,, „_. hialUnla never %  a better-looking Santa Gammer ONclll is ,ound asleep, floor that has a Uttle card In a k>l ' %  ..'_,. ,,,,'h, ,. Clau. lhar. Jaiidng Dan. espciand we ill iu.l hop over there „„ h our deatuvitkal ^^i.eaiSr.<-, tVoenm •"> •< •" hot. the .,,.1.1 and Sant. Claus will 1111 up her „,„ „,„ he door knob, and right 1 I?.it^ ^o&Tnbl. white wln.ke,. Used ju.t rujnt, Mocking with b.-autilul gllu." wly ,he door opens, and we are .', t^u^. o„k. do thi nd -e put %  Mil pillow that Well I • %  •..". 1 do not see where,,„ ',,„„ ,„„ „ t hr . rc< Kn a.,. ', .,e,'wik Z r^-horS. when he 0l Tun.Chute h-p,K,i. 10 -e are going to get any beaut.„., h n „, „ uch f„,„lture in it, and round ft. ,..,nt lor me cat (ul gilt, at this time of night, „.„„ un ,„ urc hl .,e U is vee, ,, ,,, out dtvd 'l~" " "" b.s pant, to .vwhat will, all the More, being r^. „„, ,., ,c, is bumwlSinftteSa^arrdo^thlTO Dancing Dai, ., nice fal stomach cleaved. unlc we d..h Into an £^ „ bed In a room lust ,S ^f„K„ %  * "• s-iil.i Can *,und 1. all-night drug .tore and buy o „,," „„ one the door opens into. tT II I, about nlne-lhirl w b " ~ *"" ' %  • <*•" and by this light we ^ %  very i Ooky co5n?.',n 'n. hu In lact. alter Dancing D-, look., tollcl -t "•''', ""JL,f ev-eTold 6M 5 "S"" "^v *& sJBLAWwrrets !XS„uT^^^.ca5 SSgatB&i B^SA^s zzftox -" ZSSS,**m a.Mi-sl in, up and down and here d ante : while l-H !" < *%£>,£ ^^ DS^M* %! I lM* smile. r' V Nelu^\i^oll*who'u"v."r'r well there"wlih his aifn.~toi Jly time i" .-i..all. hysterical. d ^5S kindly 'anybody I, STeuS„n? r,,* V .r?d then D.,Tin. n lek ...Jm, and it seem, to oJ r^jS r, r,; rr^ock, z.^j*** w 'i?." uLi^i stTi !" i,d 1 all feel very sou Ton' heaves Into tile corner, and duml : "d mgarllll, go I ". e J*l". ehe... he has large Inl C'* 1 ** ck nnd •



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RVSTlAV DWFMBFR Id ll SUNDAY \nvOCATE TAfil; NINE FROM THE SECOND TEST KEITH MILLER at 94 has a "Ufa" when Wi-t Indl*B % %%  rtoi. W* k I d.-<-p* a tbanca ofl Frank Worrell buwlm* The wlcketkeeper iClyde Walcott. Millet vent on to make 190. Second Test Sydney cricket (round 3.1261. —Conaoltdafrd Prvjf Photo WEST INDIES bat-in.m J. Stollmoyer hit on head by ball from Ray Ln.dwalt during the Second Tout on A ,.' :,< — CoiiaolidaU'd Prru Photo. Perfumery for (be coming season <^ •' %  :**. -**nov, TaO'lTA (TMWt (JTOTA MUSS, ifAhuLh* ucna . i rumr in %iff Boxes wiin or without i*ovvder and Lotion. And for GENfUMJM Yardley <;ift Set* uilh ShaviiiK HouK, AfterJ Shave Lotion and Special Cologne CAVE SHEPHERD & (0., LTD. 10—13 Broad Street WK1T INDIAN sum bwW Rainadliln bowl. by T7 Johttaton for :i during la.it day. play of UM &• %  < Ti t at Sydney cricket ground on U l Labour Party's Children's Xmas Par! Policy I old Enlivened By Galvpsoe • from pacr I %  i > -i | i %  i! %  %  tha iajMM priorities ani v. II !* %  vi-. .. Wr hj\> own Kg %  ervKOB of too many p? •illy %  ,ialifted man to i" 1 "'' an) tliis question "Wo IKIVI found it dJAcuU to keap asna aflW us to tutet bach into the area wi-n H i I'nl.l Health Hill tw n n the age* of Htm . %  %  Party was organ| Mm. Marjortt Callendei As soon as HitMaud* Hill '* wl %  I" Ul charge of The Q i UM KOU I Wli Will prot-il-mry and hrr l.i %  iire splendid tokenofgj BJJ|Uii> Xuian epirlt of goodwill Jgi V "> l^Wf FOR LINOLEUM WOOD FLgORS AND FURNITURE MANSION HYGIENIC WAX POLISH FOR BRIGHT AND HEALTHY HOMES IT'S HERE AGAIN !! I PURINA MILK CHOW H. Jason Jones & Co.. Ltd -DiMribuloa %  _•_ %  % %  %  ^ rV'sMg^rV i I, X1711 EAU DE COLOGNE %  %  There's o charming new ( &j&Zr AMU**, /" TREATMENT SALON r KNIGHTS LTD •917II m Blue | V 20. $2 (HI. i• S MJI VTOSOA 1711 ?9lOED 47M M Double Blue Oold 1711 I sS €Kn$tmas WMIMM .I:I Mi st Hrldsstum %  %  %  %  rrcslnriK Face Tr<.aimeqti :.t I ir r :"V" %  xmaunn d %  ,, ux .. -orne tired ami I 2 2 I 1 I %  ." 1 I 1 1 I storm Al*, TRRNCH I Of QUALITY 3 "CAROM nr.I.LODYIA SI4 IMI CAROM KWCI:7 PKA 5-t; OQ %  %  %  1 %  1 s 1 I:I:I i /(,. & : ro-da^ %TVF.ATIIMIIFAIIS UD.g \uiiis Irarki'rs \,,s r'li.l \,,rli..-i I t-llllwm \nias Twe Deciiraliims AII JI 11in Price' Martell Kramh \ •..\#.v 1',-i-sfnt rh...<.lalr. lull \l I.I. 11 "I %  I'. I """'" Uln.h, I ... ... I Ii4ii^. M — : fSTAJVSTELB SCOTT4 #.. IML



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PAGC SIXTHS ( MKISTMAS BCnUMNI SUNDAY, DKCEMBKR u. IT.I a .... .trti By W. U-I/ABKTII MONROC Prom America. Though passed ovei ID silence by many present-day critics. Ellen Glasgow will always ene y a secure place in Ami-i.can .11 burn in the Southern State of Virginia in 1874 Mid spent moat of her time there until hci death in 1M5. Her l;ist*njL.il nov*>{* rtgKfl • all the fictional equivalent.. ..t snajor historical and social movement-. In that section of the American SouVi from 1850 to 1912; her comedies of manners and her more serious works create a number of n* ehniuclers, apply a delicate craftsmanship to the portrayal the American scene us it existed In Virginia during the early part of the twentieth century, and manners with unerring; tightness and vision. \\format in the extreme, and her %  kill with descriptive prow, which gives the effect .if narra'i KBd captures incidents •rhich reveal and define character, might well be envied by greater novelists. J'erhaps Ellen Glasgow has been neglected by (tag cfMff because there was nothing Miarre in her life or work to be relished by any bterary cult. %  er book "In A Certain Measure." published in 1038, explains her technique and the Inception of her stories. Though at is a book no one concerned With the technique of the novel can afford to miss, it is too simps and unmanncred to catch the attention of critics who live by dJiacovcring something new and Striking every day. She knew flhat no small voice can expect to be heard in American literature over a long period of Ume, •ui continued to practice for exacting art for almost 40 years In serene disregard of that Unowlcdge. She thinks that to move rreely In an Imagined universe is success whether that success be recognized or not. SVe never went out deliberately to observe a scene or way of life and never Invented one out of whole doth, but waited for her •baervatlon of life to sift itself down in her imagination before beginning (o write The diameter Doruida Oakley, for example The American Novel Through Fifty Years: tfte Gn Ellen Glasgow had been in her mind ten before she begai novel "Barren Ground," even then was gi grow and change. Hist, Glasgow worked bard of fun. though he has amusing over her stories, always prc|K.rm, .merits—had he not contemplating three drafts, except with her cd infidelity over the better part last novel, and never beginning of g lifetime, only to become the until >he had distinguished the victim of his own good habits? point of view or points ofvtew Occasionally his creator prods him from which the narrative was to but never harshly and. though she be tolfl. Unfortunately. she laughs at his antics, she never lets suffered from the disadvantage him lose face with the reader of t