Citation
The Barbados advocate

Material Information

Title:
The Barbados advocate
Uniform Title:
Barbados advocate (Bridgetown, Barbados : 1983)
Portion of title:
Sunday advocate
Place of Publication:
Bridgetown Barbados
Bridgetown, Barbados
Publisher:
Advocate Co.
Publication Date:
Frequency:
Daily
regular
Language:
English

Subjects

Subjects / Keywords:
Newspapers -- Bridgetown (Barbados) ( lcsh )
Genre:
newspaper ( sobekcm )
Spatial Coverage:
Barbados -- Bridgetown

Notes

Dates or Sequential Designation:
Apr. 22, 1983-
Numbering Peculiarities:
No issue published for May 3, 1983.
General Note:
On Sunday published as: Sunday advocate.
General Note:
Microfilm produced before 1988 may be substandard.
General Note:
Latest issue consulted: Feb. 28, 2005.

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University of Florida
Holding Location:
University of Florida
Rights Management:
Copyright Advocate Co.. Permission granted to University of Florida to digitize and display this item for non-profit research and educational purposes. Any reuse of this item in excess of fair use or other copyright exemptions requires permission of the copyright holder.
Resource Identifier:
17931718 ( OCLC )
sn 88063345 ( LCCN )
Classification:
Newspaper ( lcc )

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Preceded by:
Advocate-news (Bridgetown, Barbados)

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Full Text






ESTABLISHED 1895



Reds Prepare ,

New Offensive

If Peace Talks Fail

_ 8TH ARMY, H.Q,, Korea, Nov. 30,
The Communists massed one of their biggest troops

and s buildups of the Korean war, while their arm-
3 oes fought the Allied demand for an arms

ted Nations planes reported that an unpre-
cecunted 9,220 Communist trucks were clogging the North
orean supply roads last night and to-day. The number

is nearly twice the previ i ;
narmal waffic previous record sighted and four times



Education
‘alks Open



_.The Reds appeared to be tak-
ing advantage of the lull in ground
fighting to strengthen their de-
pleted armies for ‘® big new of-
fensive, if the truce talks collapse.

The buildup may explain the
reason for the Communist rejec-
tion of the U.N. demand in the
truce talks for a ban on the rein-
forcement of their side during the





A British Caribbean education
conference opens on Monday, the
3rd December, at Hastings House,
the headquarters of the Develop-
ment and Welfare Organization,
and will continue for the rest of
the week,

Sir George Seel, K.C.M.G.,
Comptroller for Development and
We » Will open the first
session. Mr, J. L. Nicol, O.B.E.,
Education Adviser to the Comp-
troller, will be in the chair.

ie provisional agenda contains
some 15 items. Among them are
the provision of staff and accom-
modation to meet the needs of the
largely increased school popula-
tion; the provision of technical—
ineluding commercial and agri-
cultural—education; school broad-
casting; literacy campaigns; train-
ing in handcrafts, and housecraft
instruction for girls; the produc-
tion and supply of textbooks,
school feeding and medical ser-
vices.

Delegates will discuss the reso-
lutions of the Fifth Delegate Con-
ference of the Caribbean Union
of Teachers held in August, 1950.

The following will be present: .—

Chairman :—J. L. Nicol, O.B.E., Edu-
cation Adviser to the Comptroller for
Development and Welfare.

Barbados :—C. G. Reed, Director of
Education.

E. C. M. Theobalds, Deputy Director
of Education.

A. W. Roberts, Principal,
TBM $B iamiton, Prine
bados ‘Evening Institute, si aepblgae

British Guiana :—F, Ogle, Director of

Erdiston

Education.

Major C, E. Darlington, T.D., Prin-
cipal, Technical Institute.

R. C. G. Potter, Principal, Govern-

ment Training College,

British Honduras :—E. B. V. Browh,
Director of Education.

Jamaioa :—The Hon. J. Z. Malcolm,
Minister for Education,

H. Houghton, Director of Educatton.

A. J. Newman, M.C., Principal, Mico
Training College.

R. M. Murray, Education Officer.

Leeward Islands—D. L. Matheson, Act-
ing Federal Education Officer.

Trinidad :—Capt. E. W. Daniel, Direc-
tor of Education.

L. Kenworthy,
Training College.
WINDWARD ISLANDS:

Dominica :—J, H. Maurice, Education
Officer.

Grenada :—A. C. G. Palmer, O.B.E.,
Education Officer

St. Lucia :—O. A. Walker, Acting Edu-
Renner

incent :--C. V. D. Hadley, Educa-

tion Officer. ’

Secretaty:—M. S. Staveley, Develop-/
ment and Welfare Organisation.

In addition, Mr, Kenneth Ablack will
attend the discussions on school broad-
casting.

U.S. Renientbers
Pearl Harbour

NEW YORK, Nov. 30,

The national magazine Colliers
said editorially Friday that “Am-
ericans have not forgotten Pearl
Harbour ... but they put old ani-
mosities aside because they must
be put aside.”

The editorial, in connection with
the tenth anniversary of the Pearl
Harbour attack, said the United
States made a formal peace with
Japan and granted limited sov-
ereignty to Germany ‘“‘not because
there is necessarily any love be-
tween the victors and the van-
quished, but because both are
faced with a common threat to
their freedom and existence.” te

Principal Government



Korean armistice, and the right
of inspection teams to check be-
hind the Red lines for violations.
Red Convoys Attacked
Night flying B26 light bombers
and shore-based marine planes
raked Communist truck convoys
with bullets, bombs, and rockets.
They claimed to have destroyed
at least 300 and damaged uncount-
ed others in dusk to dawn raids. |
The pilots reported that the Red |
trucks moved in long convoys with |
lights blazing in defiance of Allied |
raiders. The heaviest traffic was
on the Wonsan-Pyongyang east
west highway and on the two SYDNEY, Dec. 1.
main north south arteries from] West Indians have the chance)
Manchuria through Western]of a lifetime of giving Australia|
Korea. a drubbing in the Second Test!
U.N. fighter bombers took over|being played at Sydney cricket)
attacks in daylight, hitting rail-|8Tound. After a great day’s play |
lines in addition to highways|0” Friday heavy rain fell Friday}
leading to supply dumps. night with Australia to bat Satur-
An Eighth Army communique day. If the West Indians dont
reported that two Communist|Win this Test the chances of de-

platoons attacked a U.N. advance} feating Australia at all in this
tour are slim to a point of non-

turn to Clarence House to see his

W. Indies |
Can Win

From FRANK MARGAN

BIRTHDAY PICTURE of Prince Charlos,
year-old cousin Prince Ricnard of Gloucester in the Paik, who walked beside Prince



position southwest of Kumsong| tout as yesterday had begun, and who sent a lethal postal package] only the creation of a war machine |acterized the latest. Russian move
on the central front, soon after Soca Ph AR gi eae Oe brought rugs and blankets | to a Adoif Wolfard, the editor/with an “aggressive” potential andjes a positive step with hopeful
midnight. The is were re-|*") ne inate Cante = Lin isay; From the start of the gamejwhether the, purpose of merely of emen Natchichten and two] that it does not preclude the crea- | possibilities, though nobody en-
pulsed after a two-hour fight. Sone y Pig hiteats ey eorltiae {neither Goddard nor Gomez felt at }staying in should not now be| ther persons, tion of land forces to be knit into]tertains any illusions about the
No Action coe badly Bap he co Yer liberty to take any action that] nodifled and attention paid to the Wolford was killed when heja collective security arrangement)East ironing out the conflicting
An estimated Red platoon a itsaine than at “first thought might warnr themselves. They}ueed for runs, opened the cylindrical package|in which United States and other} Rast—~West standpoints on dis-
which launched a second attack | Hassett thought the Test wicket to |be#an by watching every ball on} Against Lindwall however, who} in his office here, and his secre-| regional powers would provide sea j armament particularly the prob-
east of the Pukhan River, south-|be sporty added a that gale to the bat while Lindwall using} was bowling a number of balls| tary and another member of and air power, liems of controls inspection,
east of Kumsong was also thrown| blowing right down the pitch that|the ball now old, worked up to} shat kept low, it was obvious that] the newspaper staff was serious-| There are those who assert that, Aside from affirmations on the
back within a half hour. U.N.| would assist his speed attack. So|'5 best pace. ioddard and Gomez could do} ly injured. A second bomb explo-|the proper eS of the necessity for the reduction of
infantryman on the Western be exe this Went: Y diane in.” Butt Johnston Uncertain ittle but defend. It was lucky for | ded in a letter box of the crowded sconstitution would forbid even the | armament, the banning of the
Front reported their fourth|the wicket proved easy and the| At the other end Bill Johnston hem that their foe was not armed | Post Office killing a girl, creation of limited land contin=|atom bomb and the conclusion of
straight day of no action except| batsmen were able to. overcome|seemed uncertain just what role vith the new tae for the swing The third bomb was received gents. —U.P. par a Big Five peace pact the Rus-
for occasional patrol skirmishes|the pace bowling to a tune of 286)|to adopt. He was torn between! '¢ imparts to it would have| by a grain dealey in the nearby sian press has not yet given any
in No Man’s Land, after whichyruns with six wickets down. pace and flight and obviously} eer probably too great @ menace sown: cf Verben, Mg heard ‘tedie C’WEALT#I SUGAR PACT intimations pt the proposed tour
each side returned to its own] Now with rain Friday night the |doubted whether the wicket would or them to conquer. warnings, broadcast after the " power meeting.
position . great spin combination of Valen-jitake spin should he fall back op Rum Would Have Been first two explosions, however, WILL BE SIGNED a
However, Allied artillery on]|tine and Ramadhin is likely to his stock of leg breaks. Con~ tt he immediately took the parcel
the Western Front was back in|press home the advantage the!sequently he served up a mixe dg) Better to the police, who rendered it WITHIN 10 DAYS M ~ DEPOT.
action, iteresumed “normal fire”|batsmen have given them andjjob of — bowing — occasional? Aiter this hour iced drinks were | harmless. Tie became suspicious : , AR Ss . :
on Thursday after falling silent] force Australia into defeat, startling Gomez with one that[brought out. I don't believe there |when he read the notice “to be From OM NONDON Nov at Ip
for 24 hours, owing to a misin-| If Australia somehow manages|came over with all the strength}is any rule about intimidating }opened personally by recipient.” Th we as th, vagal BLOWN u
terpretation of Van Fleet’s ‘No to win this Test the tourists only|of his shoulders, and then trying> batsmen by giving them cold The death package to Wolfard ais ant I ay (igen iL Athi 5 ‘
Attack” order to mean ceasefire, |ihave themselves to blame, to float one into the wind, drinks on a cold day but I am|ecarried the same notice, Some [ieee ne iee aaa nee ee aes within BERLIN, Nov. 30.
U.N. guns fired 2,400 shells at} Four West Indians on Friday} Gomez is of the very character} certain that both would have given | officials have labelled the plot as|)° ar Pp ere: —. An Anti-Communist organiza-
Communist positions on the West-| after batting brilliantly presented|to mect such mixture He thim-Jall the iced drinks on earth for | political, and the work of “either Meeiite The ‘Aeininies ae — tion in a report based on the testi-
ern Front in the past 24 hours. their wickets to Australia by}self has a wide mixture of abilityJsome hot rum from their native J leftwing or rightwing extremists.” PARE ae ote this. te ae mony of Iron Curtain refugees
The Reds replied with 300 rounds stupid strokes that a schoolboy and patience to sort things out}islands. Maybe I am putting my U.P, it is Aenean thet excevt for mak said Friday that armed Czecho-
of mixed mortar and artillery fire,| would think twice about playing. like an old lady untangling wool] thoughts into their heads, as s , I

At sea, Allied warships con-
tinued a non-stop bombardment

of the Communist East Coast] Viewpoint

ports of Wonsan and Hungnam,
and extended operations as far
north as Songijin.

War In The Air

destroyed the largest total o
Communist planes in the war to-
day, shooting down 10 probably
destroying one and damaging four.

Thirty-one F86 Sabre Jets sight-
ed 12 medium bombers similar to
the U.S. B26’s south of Antung
on the South Korean side of the
Yalu River, shooting down six of
the bombers, probably destroying
three, and destroying one M.1.G.
15.

It was the first time that bomb-
ers had been encountered south
of the Yalu River, since June 20,
when the Fifth Air Force fighters
shot down a two-engined bomber.
All U.N. jets returned safely to
their bases.

The F86’s were on a fighting
sweep far into “M.I.G.” Alley”
near the Yalu when pilots spotted
12 T42 bombers at about 250
m.p.h. about 15,000 ft. up. The
bombers were sighted near An-
tung and were flying on a south-
ern course. U.



Blow S
West In

: make Fo

r

Mid-East

(By SAM SOUKI)

CAIRO, Nov. 30,

The West Indians are wonderful
cricketers from

strokes all the time but foolish
indiscretions don’t win Tests—
especially against Australia. If

the tourists use a little more con-
centration the
In the air, U.N. jet fighters]the Aussies
jcrown for

macy will be much easier.

Stollmeyer
mammoth score
wickets flicking at
should have been left alone. The
Australians would have left them

mind that during
with them is business, grim busi-|

cott all lost their
same manner as the openers.

the spectators’

since they go for

task of defeating
and securing the
world cricket supre-}



Rae and
for a

their
which

On Friday openers
looked set
but lost
balls

alone although they have been'
barracked by the crowd for)
stodginess. The Australians dont}

a Test—cricket |

ness. Worrell, Christiani and Wal-
wickets in the!

If the tourists rid themselves of

these indiscretions no bowler in
the world have much chance
capturing their wickets. A win

in this Test might break the tour-
ists out of this bad batting habit.
If it does the West Indians will
win the Test rubber.

—U.P.



Argentine Govt.

Y |Takes Over Shaw’s

Royalties

BUENOS AIRES, Nov. 30.
Bernard Shaw’s accumulated
literary rights and royalties from
the sale of books and

Argentina .were' ordered pro-

Lt. Col. Adid El Shishaklj in seizing control of Syria onj visionally to be paid to the Gov-

Wednesday night, struck a b

low for the Western Powers in

the Middle East, that has been drifting steadily away from

the West.

ernment Friday by Federal Civil
Judge Roberto Tieghi because he
left no heirs.

Under Argentine legislation

The immediate reason for overthrowing the newly] estates pass to the Ministry of

formed Government of Dr. Maaruf Dawalibi was to return] Education where

the Defence Ministry to army hands,

But Shishakli is said to want
close co-operation with the Uni-
ted States, and observers here be-
lieve he will try to form a Gov-
ernment which will seek a form-~-
ula for: working with the Western
Powers. *

Dawalibi, on the other hand, al-
ways advocated a Friendship Pact
with Russia. It is felt here that
Shishakli wants to promote a deal
under which Syria will be the
corner-stone of a Western Arab
Defence Pact against Soviet ag-
gression.

In return, Syria will expect the
United States to modernize her
army as it has done Turkey’s.

Military Training

Shishakli began his military
training under the French who
then held mandate over Syria.
His studies included a course at
the French West Point at St. Cyri,
where he later held various posts.
During fighting in Palestine, he
formed a volunteer force composed

of Syrians and a few Iraqis.
force carried out several raids o
Jewish settlements in the Holy
Land.

Observers in Cairo think that it| Shaw’s

Shishakli can find and implement
a formula under which Syria will]
get some of her requirements
quickly, such as modern army
equipment, he may score a knock-
out in the first round against
neutralist factions in his country.
But if the fight drags through
several more undecided rounds, it
might have serious repercussions
throughout the uneasy Middle
East.—U.P,

Congratulations

LONDON, Nov. 30.
Near East Arab radio reported
Friday night that Damascus radio
broke a 24 hours silence on the



Shishakly. —U.P.

This; forward.
n| allowed the intervention of the

there are no

heirs. The court advertised in
the newspapers no heirs came
However the Court

British Embassy through the
Argentine Foreign Ministry, since
heirs are the British
the Royal Academy and
—W.P.

Museum,
Irish National Gallery.



Sudanese Envoys
Confer With M.P’s

LONDON, Nov. 30.
A three-man Sudanese delega-
tion, which is opposed to Egypt's
claim to the Sudan, conferred on
Thursday night at the House of

Commons with 50 members of
Parliament in an hour long ses-

sion. Labourite Fermer Brockway
presided over the méeting, during
which Yacoub Osman, the leader
of the delegation, made a 30-min-

internal situation with a series of|ute statement on the Sudan's de-
messages from various Syrian|sire for self-determination. The
provincial towns congratulating] delegation was leaving to-day for



the United Nations in Paris,—U.P.

' met

plays in’



SATURDAY, DECEMBER 1,. 19



PRINCE CHARLES ON THIR? BURTHDAY



Miss Heler

m=

with his nanny,

birthday presen.

a

West Indies
Out For. 362

(From HAC

o
>

THE WEST INDIES. were: al
in the Second Test here, heli
luncheon period.

In overcast weather with
come Goddard and Gomez t

ing the West Indies overnight









in her work basket. Both batsmen having no doubt 2 5 or two points, the draft document army munitions repot recently.
Bill Johnston therefore found] shuddered after such refreshment . 7 -om * 4%, jdrawn up during their own pre- The report said that partisan

that all his efforts met with anjas they were offered, now este’ Make Surprise Raid ee talks is now ready for activity apaiat eres rulers

appropriate defence and when he ed and runs immediately began to, E i ti ; P li iva Sete " increased greatly in Czechoslo-

had run out of ideas Hassett}come more quickly. “Goddard’s £yp an OCE ee ” vakia and Poland.—U.P

brought on Ring. Gomez wel-|neat leg glance brought him steady THE EVA PERON Loman , .

comed this change with a straight} profit while Gomez scorched out CAIRO, Nov. 30,

driven four probably from the}the off side os eee a. Egyptian police staged a sur- IS hua

relief of meeting a man whofsent the agile Archer dashing| prise raid on underground guer- | BIRKENHEAD, England, Nov. 30 Bene nes ,

bowls leg breaks which although} along the off boundary to cut fours|jila headquarters here last night] The 18,000 tanker Eva Peron, SECOND TEST MATCH

they turn hardly at all could still}into twos In 84 minutes the playtand seized stocks of home-made)the last of four vessels built by West Indies 362

be classified as such had added 50, . —— feng ecd bombs and quantities of explo-|the firm of Cammel Laird for a stralia (f k
Lindwail -Sivikes Cnddaed ment anid wat examnpls $0 he more’ sives. ‘The headquarters were [petroleum firm of Buenos Aires, Austra (for 3 Ww cts)
Goddard at the other end Ga the pavilial The ene how bhid operated by Ahmed Hussein of }Was launched to-day. The vessel] } vcs eeers 131

adopted the part of anchor, He}y).4 th esr- cotital last out the whats the Socialist Party which directed wae christened by the wife of the Close Of Play

refers to himself in this wWway,} coceion before lunch: Hole, who hadj UNderground training. Argentine Ambassador in London, 7

and modestly — disclaiming much got rid of Christian in yesterday's The party chief protested Carlos Hogan.—U.P. Mintitniédihdinemmme

hope of making runs, declared}j.c¢ over was brought on to see|®sainst the police action to the

he feels he can stay whentir he could repeat the trick but he| Egyptian Government.

wanted, He underestimates him-Poouid not and went off in favour] Informed sources regarded the

self—he gets runs as well butler jan Johnson’s intelligent off|raid as Government implementa-

this morning he certainly stayed spinners. Gomez’ 50 came up just} tion of the recent decision to take

He faced Lindwall with all the
certainty he showed when he first
him and after half an hour
anyone entering the ground would
have supposed he was watchin;
the two openers. They were ¢or



Well Diggers Die In
Freak Accident

CHILE, SANTIAGO, Nov. 30,

Three well diggers were killed
and four other persons
two seriously, in a freak accident
at one of the local suburbs last
night. One worker, who had been
digging at about a 17 ft. level and
called for help was apparently,
trapped in a small cavine.

Two workers, who went down

ex about 30 minutes after thi
c 3 t « are vl . ”
rect, studied _and apparent! | interval MAC ARTHUR
immovable. So immovable indec ASHLAND WISCONSIN, Nov. 30.
that Lindwall finally rt WES? INDIZS—1st Inning The complete slate of "delegates
yery short be é 70d~ | Rae ¢ lan Johnson t Johnstone 17 ers ,
tgerg Goddard Malt Par teed ea Blots: ever : ei tase y rane neering MacArthur for ee don
eee ee es Lindwall 36 | wi ye entered soon in the New
ee | nid eet hin Sed — Worrell b lan Johnson 64 | Hampshire Presidential Primary,
shoulder, Lindwall was immediate~- | weeke b Lindwall 5 . 2 7 re ‘T
ly shocked by the blow and stood | Waleott ¢ Langley b Ring 60 John Chapple lahat a 18 at
with hand to his mouth. Goddard {Christiant b Hole . of the “Fighters for MacArthur’ |
| , a \ as Gamez ibw Johnston h club said Friday
| straightened himself, stood with | Goadard cl) Johnson b Johnste 3 New Hamp ite will ba the fort |
great dignity and gravely sur-{Jones Ibw Lindwall 1 ‘ ' id. ’ Pre eatin
veyed the bowler who had thus) Rartadhin b Lindwall state to 1Ol¢ a residential
oe id bi t ea firm | Valentine not out 6 | Primary next year with th
coer Bim Re eM ty Extras 16 | election slated for March 11, to
rs » ‘le » : ational
| After one hour the score hac | ‘Total 162 name delegates to the —
risen only by 25 nuns and doubt | Convention. wth.
{was beginning to creep in as to} ;
} |
‘ '
}

|

including the two
cuers and the Intendente of
Province, who was watching
rescue operations.—U.P.

re
tt

persons,
i

the



Explorer Seeks Bones
Of Ancient Indians











BUENOS AIRES, Nov. 3

Swedish explorer Stig Ry@en
who is plar go to Bolivia
in, search fe he bones of archaic
indians postponed until Saturday,
his depar for Lapaz he
could not obtain pullman space in
i ntert in —WU.P.

i



5

1



|

Nine Men
Take Over
In Thailand

BANGKOK, Thailand, Nov
A nine-man Military

30
Council
imposed iron rule on this ancient
oriental kingdom after

immediate campaign to drive all






—ON DISARMAMENT

PARIS, Nov. 30.

Russia to-day joined the Western Powers in accepting
the Small Powers proposal for secret United Nations Big
Four disarmament talks. The Soviet Foreign Minister,
Andrei Vyshinsky announced the Kremlin's willingness
to go along, in his speech to the General Assembly’s main
Political Committee. But the road to private Big Power
talks is not yet completely open, because Vyshinsky made
no reference in his 29-page performance to the Western
demand for a 10-day time limit




+ -- —— -~ - . The United States delegate
~ Philip C. Jessup, took the floor,

~ right after Vyshinsky to “wel-

It Is For Japan (cine: Miccoe S tceptance, ana
‘ to make clear the West's insist-

| > » ence that the talks should be

oO Decide strictly limited—both in time and

in subject matter

WASHINGTON, Nov. 30




alleged Communism and
from the Pibul Government
Pibul, the wartime Premier un-
der Japanese occupation, survived
a brief uprising of dissident Navy

graft} Questions as to whether Japan

should re-arm to a limited extent
and if so whether this would re-
quire constitutional amendment

He met his seven-
Charles on his re

n Lightbody.



ae : are for the people of Japan to de-
officers, last June. He swam to] cide without outside pressure
Shore from a warship, after be-

That is the view of the majority
of American officials closely con-
nected with diplomatic matters in
the Japanese area

Many of them,
no secret of the fact that they be-
lieve some Japanese “unrealistic”
when they believe they can remain
totally disarmed and make no con-
tribution to collective security ar-
rangements in the Pacifie.

ing Kidnapped, and

role as the

strongman,—-U.P
gmat —t P.

resumed his

nation’s postwar

MURDER ti
BY MAIL



. BREMEN, Germany, Nov. $ Officials here well realize that

LD DALE) td | Bremen police ined. inane hl gu eg ch ge ro 3

SYDNEY, Dee. 1 marks, ($2,400) reward for in-| concede the necessity for limited

lL out for 362 against Australia formation leading to the arrest aie i by the creation _of

an hour after the end of the | of persons responsible for the ip Bagel com Ba Pag ari

jtriple bombing, that yesterday pine constitution woulda hanes ‘

: . | killed two and seriously injured}}. . 4 ee oe
promise of light showers to} 13° others. i North Ger cae ©) be amended to permit this

egan their task of consolidat- | siuatineweumaiian le as There are those who contend

. ¢ | A major investigation is also}that article nine of the constitu-

total. The day was as cold| underway to find the person| tion can he interpreted to prohibit

stripping
Premier Pibul Songgram ot tis
administrative powers in 4 blood-
less revolt. The provisional Exec-
utive Council composed of three
Army Chiefs, three Admirals and
three Airforce Officers ordered an

most of the 18,000 crowd had



28 Vyshin=
speech were devoted to a
of the familiar Soviet
on the armaments race,

was not in the

The first of
sky's
repetition
arguments
3ut his language
scathing sarcastic tradition.

There is little hope, here, that
the talks will get very far on dis-
armament. Jessup underlined the
Western, attitude to the talks in
terms that would appear com-
pletely unacceptable to the Rus-
sians.—U,P.

CAUTIOUS
OPTIMISM

pages



MOSCOW, Nov. 30.
Diplomatic cireles greeted the
report of Vyshinsky’s announce~

ment that Russia is ready to join

four power disarmament

with cautious optimism
Some Western gpservers char-

talks



injurec|, |

to aid him, were themselves “Historically, politically, geo- |
trapped. Firemen rescuers brought graphically, economically, ethno

them up unconscious, but the _« . ogically, linguistically and re- |
oxygen tube the firemen were Russian Geologist ligiously, Egypt and the Sudan |
using to revive them, exploded. form a cohesive unit.” He said}
The explosion killed the uncon- Flees To Freedom WAY dividing line between Egypt |
scious workers, and injured fourt ~ a ry and the Sudan “is entirely arti-









before tunch, a priceless and typi-
eal innings A pull for two by
Goddard brought up 350

The players then went to lunch.
The West Indies innings ended for

over control of irregular “Libep-
ation Battalions” and incorperate
them in the Armed Forces.—-U.P.

“FIGHTERS FOR







Egypt And Sudan
Form One Unit |

(By K. C. THALER)
PARIS, Nov. 30,
Egyptian Ambassador Mahmoud Fawzi Bey charged to
day in a prepared statement that Britain’s attitude in the
Sudan question was “still another case of John Bull poking |
his nose where it does not belong and indulging in his usual |
unwarranted imposition.







BERLIN, Nov. 30 ficial and has no topographieal or |

er tx : artin teen |

One of e Russian bosses of fab ea ze Brien hp
Soviet Germany’s uranium mines} *! 38 4 Briti ta ine, it intrudes on
fled through the iron curtain toj7@ality and does violence to the

sa , "
freedom, the West German news- | @ture of things.













paper Die Welt reported Satur- Fawzi Bey said the 1899 agree
day. ment: ith Britain on the Sudan
| ‘ which zgypt ha recently de-

The newspaper said Coloneljnounced “were of a purely ad-
Fedja Astapchoy, chief geologist] ministrative nature and did in no
of the uranium project escaped| way affect or involve the political
from the closely guarded Aue dis-!status of the Sudan and they were
jtrict near the Czech border where] but arrangements for the tem-
{Die Welt said 380,000 Germans. porary extending by Britain of
}were forced to dig uranium to,some sort of technical assistance
tfeed Russia’s atomic plants. in the 1dministration of the|
{ —U.P. |Sudan.”—U.P,



slovak partisans blew up a Czech











—_





IT’S THE TOBACCO THAT COUNTS

ROLLING ae Sr aan RN SIRE ai Sa Rta Roa a









_P AGE TWO



Carub Calling

. oe SAVAGE, wife of His
Excellency the Governor will

1’ the Annual Bazaar at 3
o'clock this afternoon at the Drill
Hall,

Years ago the bazaar used to be
held at Queen’s Park, but for the
past couple of years the Drill
Hall has been chosen and has
proved to be quite as popular.

Always a must on the children’s
programme of activities over
Christmas, it also provides the

grown-ups with a chance to buy
Christmas presents without
trudging into town. The Cook-
Shop Stall is another great attrac-
tion with its many ready cooked
West Indian dishes. Bring along
a container though, if you want to
make a purchase,
To-night’s Dance
BOUT two hours after the
annual bazaar ends another
entertainment goes into action.
Down at the Paradise Beach Club
the Cariton Club are having a
dance, proceeds from which will
go to help pay for their new
pavilion now being erected.
Dancing begins shortly after
9 o'clock.
What’s In A Name
UCKY DIP” produced by
Miles Wood in April 1942
was the Bridgetown Players’ first
production. Somerset Maugham’s
“The Circle’ which has just fin-
ished its run ig probably their
last.
There is rumour of an amalga-
mation between the Players and
the Barbados Dramatic Club.
When the meeting takes place to
discuss final plans for this amal-
gamation, one of the first items
to be discussed will be of course
a name for the combine. Maybe
they will retain the name of the
Bridgetown Players as it is the
older of the-two groups. They may
however choose the name of the
Barbados Dramatic Club arguing
that this weuld be a more appro-
priate titleâ„¢hs it bears the name
of the island. On the other hand
they may hoose a_ completely
new name.“

of Sure
M* C.~ E. SHEPHERD of
“Colleton House”, St. Peter
is due to fly this morning by
T.C.A. to Ganada. He is en route
to Englandsen a visit. How long

is he going to be away? Mr.
Shepherd could not say.

Destination Jamaica

R. v. W. HARKNESS, C.D.
and W’s Medical Adviser
and Mr. C.°A. Grossmith, Admin-
istrative Secretary of the same
organisation left for Trinidad
yesterday by the same _ plane.
Both are en route to Jamaica: Dr.
Harkness to attend a meeting of
the Caribbean Council of the
British Medical Association (as
an observer) and Mr. Grossmith
to attend the forthcoming meet-
ing of the Regional Labour Board.
Dr. Harkness is expected back
on December 12th; Mr, Gross-
mith five days earlier.

PT '

a_ co
Fi Hi
oa
tt
. gue
shea PELE
Bae

Across

Coudiment, perhaps? (9)
3p FF Tent may be a breach of
tulthe (7)
Greab site for gem displays. (9)
B mene, to a doctor. (4

Eak ime-boat for women. (5)
*o'oureol more dread threats. (3)
5 oro®en trip needs little science
to pruduce writing. (6)

Got Up before entraining. (6)
Sown wild early on, (4)

Rent fem. a bird ? (4)
Mustewt=instrument. (5)

ae mt for we unmounted, (4)

r {







+ inedstek ip wearer
SPESSta Toe-c oe

Down
frectea in remembrance (6)
Gptical instrument that will
make lt mere ore. (9)
A card bans the blow gun, (9)
fal ymously known. (9)
insert on intermediate pages, (9)
Born in fine elegance. (3)
Pant. 44)
it you do, you may find. (4)
Meanyy he’s almost remiss. (5)
Careful, Wt stings. (6)
Treated by the physician. (5)
Habitation in nasty surround-
ings. (3)

c~-

WOKKCISGO HE

Solution of vest€rday’s pursle. =~ Across:
1, Avparitor: 9. Naive; Tl, Cave; 18,
Gloom: 15, One; 14, Centre; 15, Samba:
?, Ball; 20. Gan: 21. Ripe: 22, Adorn:
> Sew. 24, Loans; 25, Sent, Down:

Anselicale: 4, Palate: 5S. Pious: 4,
Remember; Icon; i” Tantalise; 7,
Over: 8, amet? mien 16.

Alpen; 18” End.

i*
23
1

Barns: 17



She says ‘No’



The girl Hollywood is grooming
to be a new Jean Harlow rebelli-
ously declines the honor. She js
23-year-old Marilyn Monroe, dub-
bed in American magazines Miss
Cheesecake of 1951

her in All

Do you remember
About Eve—the dumb blonde at
the party? Miss Monroe wants
you to forget all about her party
piece,

“I'm blonde, but neither
nor dizzy,”’ she insists.
actress, that’s me.”

Why must these young actresses
take themselves so _ seriously?
There is fame and fortune in being
ow blonde of the Jean Harlow

ind

dumb
“A serious

Many “serious” actresses are out
of work—in Hollywood as well as
England,

1 te

At Sea
A’ present holidaying in Bar-
bados is Mr, Charles Brad-
shaw who arrived from Canada a
few weeks ago. He is staying with
relatives at “Haynes Hill’, St.
John,

Mr, Bradshaw left Barbados in
1945 and since that time has spent
most of his time at sea, travelling
between North and South Ameri-
ea, Europe, the Persian Gulf and
many other places.

Before he left Barbados he was

on the staff of Cable and Wire-
less.

He expects to be here until
January.

For The Scientific Mind
‘WO films to be shown at the
British Council on December
4 at 8 o'clock will be of special
interest to those of us with a
scientific turn of mind. “Rock of
Industry” which shows quarry-
ing, processing and everyday uses
of limestone, and “Nobel Began
It” describing the making, uses
and commercial by-products of
explosives,

Produced by Imperial Chemical
Industries they are shown locally
through the initiative of the_Bar-
bados Co-operative Cotton “t'ac-
tory. There is no admission

charge. me tiy Y

Civil Aviation Officer

R. I. T. LAWMAN, an officer

of the Ministry of Civ:)
Aviation, England arrived from
British Guiana on Thursday by
B.W.1.A. and is a guest of Wing
Comdr, L. A. Egglesfield, Direc-
tor General of Civil Aviation and
Mrs. Egglesfield. He leaves Bar-
bados tomorrow,

Mr, Lawman attended the re-
cent 1.C.A.0O, Regional Confer-
ence in Buenos Aires as a mem-
ber of the U.K. delegation, He is
on his way back to England but
is taking the opportunity of
visiting as many W.I. territories
as possible during his journey,

Travelling up the West Coast
of South America to Panama he
has already visited Trinidad and
British Guiana, ‘Tomorrow he
will «fly through the northern
islands en route for Jamaica from
where he will fly to the U.K. via
Nassau.

Warner’s Will Film
Grace Moore’s Life

HOLLYWOOD, Nov. 30,

The life story of the late sopra-
no, Grace Moore, will be screened
by Warner Bros. The picture will
depict her life from childhood in
Tennesse, and will range from
night club entertainment to the
Metropolitan Opera. Henry Blanke
will produce the Moore biography
from the screen play peers by
John Monks, Jr.—U.P



ARSON
LISBON:

A 73-year-old Spaniard set fire

to his home in a fit of madness
while his great-grandchild,
3 was sleeping. The child
saved by the mother who
alcohol on a slight burn on
groin, Then the girl died. In u
fit of distraction, the mother had
used sulphuric acid,

put

Rupert and the Lion Rock —12 2



The admiral gazes at the paper in

growing excitement. ‘* What are
all those queer marks on it ?"’ asks
Rupert,. “*Why, don’t you see!
This ig the same code as | solved

with my handyman," cries the
admiral, “*It alters everything

This is whar u says: ‘Ye who
have sought thus far, know ye that
my treasure is not here but lieth
safe in the Lion’s Mouth,’" He
turns and points at a cleft in the
tock above. "Little bear,’ he
bread ** you may yer have saved
the day tor us."



BARBADOS ADVOCATE

Three Antigua Artists

At the Museum, three artists
from Antigua are holding a joint
exhibition, Garner Francis, Arnold

Prince and Cecil Adams. Both
Francis and Prince have held pre-
vious exhibitions of their work
here; Adams, however, is a com-
paratively new comer. Although
junior to his fellow artists, his
work blends well with theirs in
the exhibition

Since a verdict of the recent

wotks of Francis and Prince must
be in the nature of a “Progress Re-
port”, it would be more convenient
to discuss Adams’ work first. This
artist shows two interesting por-
traits, indeed his portraits are his
strongest work, both show much
promise, “Portrait of Eileen” is a

arefully composed painting, while
“Portrait of a Man” suffers from
too heavy a background. In both
attention has been paid to the
bone structure and the skin tex-
tures are pleasing. Unfortunately
“Cotton Pickers” is marred by the
poor anatomy of the figures in the
toreground, for this picture 1s, In
other respects, a piece of realistic
painting. The most successful
iandscape shown by Adams is
“Donkey and Cart”, which is not
only gay, but has charm.

The work of both Francis and
Prince shows an improvement
since their last exhibition. Both
appear to be studying a more real-
istic approach to their subjects,
whether this is to be preferred to
their earlier work is a matter of
individual taste. Certainly both
their drawing and brush-work has
improved.

Francis undoubtedly has a feel-
ing for trees: this can be seen in
“The Country Lane”, “Cathedral
and Trees” and “The Park Road”.
Of the three “The Park Road” is
the most attractive and the most
interesting of his recent paintings.
It is a well balanced composition,
and that the subject does not re-
semble Antigua is a minor matter
to the critic, but may be a very
important one to the souvenir
hunter. In fact, none of these
three paintings are in any way
reminiscent of the tropics in gen-
eral, or of Antigua in particular.
since the greens are much too
“lush”. The colouring suggests
the persistent rainfall of a more
temperate climate, where trees are
more thickly leafed and grass a
more luxuriant green than in the
tropics, where tints of yellow and
brown are found in its vegetation

Then, there is an extravagant
use of too pure a blue by both
artists. An unwary use of white
with such blue in “The Wharf” by
Francis, has produced a_ winter
scene reminiscent of a Dutch canal.
“The Wharf” is, obviously, An-
tigua, and the cold ice-blue setting
was intended for a still, hot day
with reflections in a glassy sea.
Unfortunately, a climatically op-
posite effect has been achieved.

Prince exhibits several seascapes
of which “The Inlet” is the most
successful, since it lacks the lab-
oured effect common to the others,
where rocks although dark and |
heavy give no feeling of mass or
solidity. “Sunlight on the Hills”
is an attractive landscape and
nicely balanced, His “Portrait of
Fines” shows great improvement
in the technique of portrait paint-
ing, and the skin texture is ex-
cellent,

The work of all three artists
would have been greatly enhanced
by frames. The importance of good

framing can scarcely be over-
stressed. “After.the Storm’ lent
by J. M. Charters, Esq., and St
John’s Cathedral lent by Mrs.

M. P. Merrick both show what a
difference a frame makes to a
painting. There appears to be a
highly mistaken view held by
some Caribbean artists that paint-
ings for exhibition do not require



B.B.C. Radio
Programme

SATURDAY, December 1, 1951.
11.10 a.m. Ulster v. The South Africans;
12,00 (noon) The News; 12.10 p.m, News
Analysis.
4.00-—-7.15 2:



48.43 M 31





410 T Daily
League Football,
30 p.m. Sports

4. 00 p-m, The News;
Service; 4.15 Rusby
4.25 p.m. Sports Review;



Y



Review; 5.00 p.m. Ulster v. South Afri
cans; 5.05 p.m Interlude; 5.15 p.m,
From Grand Hotel; 6.00 pm. Music
for Dancing; 645 p.m, Programme
Parade; 7.00 p.m. The News; 7.10 p.m
News Analysis; 7.15 p.m. Behind the
News; 7.30 p.m. Montmartre Players

74A5—10.50 p.m, 31.32 M 48.43 M







Review

743 p.m. Sports ; 815 p.m,
Radi Newsreel; 8.30 p.m. Radio Thea-
tre; 00 The News; 10.10 p.m. From
the itorials; 10.15 p.m. Yours Faithful

ly; 10.30 p.m, All Hale









aged
was

CARLTON CLUB

the

ANNUAL DANCE

Ae

PARADISE BEACH
CLUB

TO-NIGHT

Music by Mr. Carl
Curwen’s Orchestra

Dancing 9 p.m.
e

Admission: $1.00
SSS





JUST ARRIVED

A

DOULTON FIGURES

SHIPMENT OF

BESTFORM _ BRASSIERES

PRAM COVERS

ASSORTED PATTERNS in

Risiediindnneenp liao — 5000

ea iietdiibcontlicinn uccnae ae

PINK, BLUE,

& WHITE

T.R. EVANS & WHITFIELDS

Dial 4606

YOUR SHOE STORES

Dial 4220

frames. Nothing looks more un-
finished than a canvas without a
frame or a watercolour without a
mount The public cannot be

blamed if it fails to visualise what
a painting would look like in a
frame, and, therefore, desists from
buying badly presented work.

Good frames are, undoubtedly, |
an expensive item today, but
elaborate framing is not required.
The artist can exhibit his work inj
frames which are not for sale, or,
with a little ingenuity attractive |
frames can be produced jby the
use of paint, cork, lino, sani, rope
ete.. and a plain wooden frame

The exhibition of oil paintings,
by Cecil Adams, Garner Francis
and Arnold Prince, together with
that of Watercolours and tempra |
paintings by Peggy .Merrick con- |
tinue until 15th December at the}
Museum.

!

|

NOT ACCEPTED |
PRETORIA: |

A 21-year-old South African)
woman is angry because her
country’s airlines will not let her!
become an airliner pilot, A quali-;
fied air charter pilot, she won an!
award for the best woman pilot|
of the year at a recent air rally|
in Capetown. South African air-|
ways argue that they do not em-}
ploy women as pilots because the}
work is too strenuous, |





LIVED

ROME: |

Police, in a motor launch,
cescuing people marooned by the
Po floods, found the body of a
few months old baby wedged in
the branches of a submerged tree,
Not wanting the rescued woman
to see tihe baby’s body, they
wrapped it im a blanket and hid
it under the bonnet of the engine.

Later, they heard a faint cry and}
discovered that the baby had re-
vived through the heat of the
engine.



&

Contains
D.D.T.

Large, medium and small size Tins

ANTS BEETLES

waa THs











Christian Science
Reading Room

“What Christmas Means
and other Christmas
By MARY BAKER
$1.75
Purchased at this
Bowen & Sons,
Open Tuesdays,
Fridays, from 10 a.m
on Saturdays 10

To Me
Messages’
EDDY

room over
Broad Street.
Wednesdays,

2 p.m. and
12 o'clock.

All are Welcome



Get
fancy
the

ANNIVERSARY HOP

of Caribbean Revelry
presented by
Miss Judy Graham's Bridge-
town Theatrical Group

At The



~

MODERN HIGH SCHOOL

TO-NIGHT

out your Hot Shirts
skirts and Jeans for |
|
Music by Percy Green's Orchestra
|
}
|

SUBSCRIPTION — 2/
Refreshments on Sale
REDIFFUSION will bring you the
Test Match commentary right on

the Spot. {
Don't Miss This, ‘















KEEP THIS

DATE OPEN...

Saturday, Ist December,
1951

THE ANNUAL
BAZAAR

will be held
at
THE DRILL HALL,

in aid of the Old Ladies’
Home

XMAS GIFTS

for all ages
TOYS from 1/- up |
Beautiful DOLLS and

i

DOLLS’ HOUSES
| STATION WAGONS

NOVELTIES of all sorts

t
COOKED FOOD,
CAKES, SWEETS,
5

TEAS & ICES

A well-stocked Bar

Many Attractions
FILM SHOW at 5.30
PUNCH & JUDY SHOW
POLICE BAND
LUCKY DIPS &
GAMES OF CHANCE

the children to
themselves.

Bring
enjoy

Shop for Christmas
in comfort & a cool
atmosphere.

1/-
6d.

Admission: :-:

Children & Nurses:







aoe JRON BEDSTEADS WITH SPRINGS

% PRES E LLP PD A LFF LL PEP PDA AEA PPP FFF SFC S SS PPS SITET IIS

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1951

SATURDAY,

DECEMBER 1,









—— SS",







B’TOWN
Dial 2310

oi Heile Boys and Girls! —What's On?
i if A GRAND
f Service of Songs & Dance

will be given b

PREAZA

ONLY

COMING
YOUNG DANIEL BOONE cintcolor
CALL of the KLONDYKE




















TO-DAY TO-MORROW

VOR NOVELLO'S

“The DANCING YEARS”

and 145 & 8.30 PM.

——— Fes

|
i
|
|
}

At the first sneeze, put i MRS as sean suers
th Dennis PRICE » PREVILLE ; , at her residence ser Hindsbu
With Dennis PRICE, Gisele PREVILLE (Color by Technicolor | oe Sie = Vicks Road on SUNDAY. December

9 7 . ~~ TS -tro-nol ach nos 2nd 1951

TWO NEW WESTERN THRILLERS TO-DAÂ¥ Dec. Ist AT | tril. Va-tro-nol soothes ADMISSION 1

| s 3 ts 3

9.30 A.M., 1.30 P.M. AND AT MIDNITE | ak - helps y To Service of one Gents 1/¢

Monte HALE in Alan “Rocky” LANE in | prevery bad colds and Te Dance Gente 8/-, Ladies 1/6

A Popular Orchestra in Attendance

“SAN ANTONE “ FRONTIER













AMBUSH ” INVESTIGATOR ” Miss this and blame yourself
PRAZA jis || GAME DW Se Sores]

Jj] Te-day to Sun. 4.90 & 8.50 pm
Joan) CRAWFORD — David BRIAN in
“THE DAMNED DON’T CRY" &

“GREAT JEWEL ROBBER’

TODAY TO SUN. 8.30 p.m.
Mat. SUN. 5 p.m.
CAGED with Eleanor PARKER -









Agnes MOOREHEAD &
David Brian, Marjorie Reynolds LULLABY eof BROADWAY”
To-day 1.30 p.m Midnite Tonite Color by Technicolor |
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‘Hidden Danger BROWN OO

Johnny Mack “Little Joe, The MIDNITE TONITE bs ie
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TUESDAY—5 & 8.15 P.M.



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:

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Read these Prices visit
KIDS:—-Pit 6 House 12 Bal. 18
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SATURDAY, DECEMBER






Ninety-five thousand, six hun-
dred peor jarbados have been

Ked by forty-six candidates,
(forty-five men and a_ single
lady), to come to the polis on
rt lay, December 13 and cast
the votes in their favour

But only twenty-four of these
ean be returned, under the present

onstitution,
stituencies
is divided,

Here are the forty-six and some
facts about them.

The City

Mr. E. D. Mottley was senior
member for the City during the
last session of the House. He is a
real estate broker in private life
and has been a@ vestryman since
1941, A member of the House of
Assembly since 1946, he has served
as Direetor of the Sugar Agricul-
tural Bank and member of the
Housing Board.

Mr. A. E. S. Lewis was Junior
member for the City during the
session. He was first a mer-
ant’s clerk and then travelling
agent. First elected to the House
r 1942, he has served as Deputy
Speaker.

Mr. V. Chase, commission mer-
chant, has had experience of
parochial politics as a member of
the St. Michael and Christ Church
Vestries.

Mr. T. W. Miller, merchant, has
also had experience of parochial
politics. He has been a member
of the St. Michael's Vestry for
some years,

Mr. A. A, Maynard, real estate
and Commission merchant, has
taken much interest in politics but

the twelve con-
which the island

for
into




has so far been defeated at the
polls for election to the General
Assembly.

St. Michael

Mr. M. E, Cox, Garage Propri-
etor, was semor member for St.
Michael during the last session of
House. He took charge of
frade, Commerce, Customs and
Post Office, Water and Light when
eppointed a member of the Exec-
utive Committee.

Mr. T. O. Bryan was junior
member for St. Michael during the
jast session of the House, First a
clerk, he is now a merchant in
private life

Mr. A. R.

ine

Toppin, Company
Director, has experience of paro-
chial politics as a member of St.
Vichael’s Vestry. Has already run
for election the General As-
sembly without success. )
Mr. Vincent Griffith, Auctioneer,

eck for the first

lo

ing election

time
Christ Church

Mr. F. ©. Goddard, was senior
member for Christ Chureh during
the last session of the House.
Merchant and Company Director,
he also has experience of paroehial
politics as member of the Vestries
of St. Michael and Christ Church.

He is also a Sanitary Commis-
sioner and member of the Board
of Health,

Mr. W. W. Reece, K.C., Junior
member for Christ Church during
the last session of the House.
One of the most experienced
members in the House of Assem-

bly last Session, once represent-
ing St, Michael in the 30's. Soli-
citor General since 1942 and
King’s Counsel since 1948.

Mr. C. E, Talma, former mem-
ber of the House of Assembly
but was not re-elected last ses-
ion. Formerly articled clerk to
firm of solicitors’ then real es-
tate broker. Former member of

3arbados Labour Party but now
seeking re-election on independ-

ent Labour ticket.
Mr. A. W. Birch, motor omni-
bus concessionaire. Has experi-

ence of parochial politics as mem-
ber of Vestry of Christ Church.
Has tried unsuccessfully several
times for election to the General
Assembly and is trying again.

Mr. Lloyd Brathwaite, shop-
seeper is seeking election for the
rst time.





Do You

O





1, 1951

St. George

Mr. F. E. Miller was senior
member for St. George in the
last session of the House. He is a
company director in a firm of
electrical refrigeration engin-
eers,

Mr. H. A. Dowding, was junior
member for St. George in ine
last session of the House. A
planter, Mr. Dowding saw, service
overseas in the last war.

Mr. E. W. Carrow, barrister-at-
law, Former Island scholar and
old Harrisonian and served with

the R.A.P. im the Jast war. Has
also obtained degree in Eco-
nomics. Seeking election for the
first time.
St. Lucy
Mr. E. L. Ward, planter, was

senior member for St. Lucy du-
ring the last session of the House.
Has had several years experience
as a member of the House of As-
sembly.

Mr. J. E. T. Brancker, barrister-
at-law was junior member for
St. Lucy during the last session
of the House. Mr. Brancker has
had considerable experience in
the House and has held the ap-
pointment as Deputy Speaker.

Mr. LL. A. Williams, barrister-
at-law. Saw service in the last
war with the R.A.F. Is seeking
election for the first time.

Mr. 8S. A. Waleott, planter,
served in earlier House of Assem-
bly for the constituency of St.
James, Has experience of paro-

chial politics, having served as
a member of the Vestry of St.
James for several years.

Mr. I. C. Sobers, salesman, Mas
experience of parochial politics
having served as a member of the
Vestry of St. Lucy. Is seeking
election to the General Assembly
for the first time.

St. James
Mr. J. H. Wilkinson, O.B.E.,
head of the firm of Wilkinson,

Haynes and Co., entered Barbados
politics as a member of the House
of Assembly in March 1931 long
before the introduction of Party
Politics. Is Chairman of Barbados
Foundry Ltd., Knight's Estates,
Porter's Ltd. and has an executive
post with many other established
business firms in the island, Serv-
eq for years as a member of the
Executive Committee and the
Executive Council. Acted as a
member of the Legislative Coun-
cil on two occasions. Has experi-
ence of parochial politics as a
member of the Vestry of St.
James. Was made Leader of the
Opposition on the intreduction of

Party Politics as leader of the
Electors’ Association.
her. &. K. Waleott, K.C., bar-

rister-at law, was junior member
for St, James in the last session
of the House, Served as Attorney
General from 1936-1947. Was a
member of the House of Assembly
since 1925 and has served ever
since except in 1946-48. Saw
service in 1914-18 war.

Mr. E. 8S. A. Holder, former
elementary schoolteacher and
now peasant proprietor, has ex-
perience of parochial politics as
a member of the Vestry of St.

James. Seeking election for first
time.
St. Peter
Mr. F. L. Walcott, formerly

clerk, now General Secretary of
Barbados Workers’ Union, was
senior member for St. Peter du-
ring the last session of the House
and took charge of Agriculture
and Fisheries, Communications
and Public Works as a member of
the Executive Committee.

Mr, K. N. R. Husbands, former
elementary schoolteacher and
now Assistant Secretary Barba-
dos Workers’ Union. Was junior
member for St. Peter during the
last session of the House and was
elected Speaker during the last
session.

Mr. C. C. Cumberbatch, planter
and city businessman has been

MOTORIST

Know That The Best

TOR

‘CASTROL?’ woror ot



interested in politics

a

MEET THE FORTY-SE

for many Mr. D. A. Foster, formerly M.C.P.

BARBADOS ADVOCATE

years now. Is making his fourth for St. Andrew. Mrs Bourne has

attempt at election.

St. Joseph
Mr. G. HM. Adams, barrister-at-
law. Leader of the House of As-

experience
as a member of the Vestry or St.

Andrew.

in parochial polit

St. Thomas
Dr. H. G. Cummins, was return-

sembly during the last session of eq senior member for St. Thom. s

the House and Leader

Official Labour Party in

the “Bushe Experiment.”

of the during

the last session of the

the House. A member of the House of
House from the introduction of Assembly since 1937,

mins was Deputy

Dr.
Leader

Cum-
of the

Mr. Adams was a member of House during the last session

the House of Assembly since 1934
and was

A Doctor by profession he tock

member of the Execti- charge of médical, health, so:itl

tive Committee since 1942. He has services, police and pensions on
been Leader Writer of the Adve- the Executive Committee duri g

cate, Editor of the
Reporter, and Editor of the Bea-
con.

Barbados
The

Progressive
Barbados Workers

Agricultural the last session.

Mr. J. W. Hewitt, Merchant

; Tailor is seeking election to the
Mr. Adams is President of the General

Assembly for the first

League, time. Has experience of parochial
Union, polities as a member of the Ves-

the Barbades Labour Party and try of St. Michael

the Caribbean
He was a member

Labour Congress,
of the U.K.

delegation to the U.N. meeting im genjor
Paris and member of the Commit- during

tee of Experts on the Application,
of the International Institute oi

St. John
Mr. O. T. Allder was returned
member for St. John
the last session of the

House. Was elected to the Gener-
il Assembly in 1948 as a member

Political and Social Science (cOM-"o¢ the Labour Party. Is contesting

parative Airlisations). Mr, Adams this election

is also a member of the Carib-
bean Commission ang a member

College of the West Indies,

Mr. L. E. Smith, is a merchant.
He has been a member of the
House of Assembly since 1944.
He has experience of Parochial

: has
of the Council of the University ne

not
teacher, Chief Clerk

Department
at-law

as an independent.
Vv. B. Vaughan, § druggi

already been a member of
General Assembly but did
gain re-election last session.
Mr. G. B. Niles, former School-
in Labour
and now barrister-
Is seeking election to the

Mr.

politics as a member of the VeS- General Assembly for the’ first

try of Si. Joseph.

Mr. W. R. Coward, is a motor
omnibus concessionaire and
Churchwarden

n Ls | son
of the parish. H€ member of the General Assembly.

time.

Mr, J. C.
of

Tudor, Schoolmaster.
Mr. J. A, Tudor, former

has experience of parochial poli- yr Tudor is seeking élection to
tics as a member of the Vestry Of the General Assembly for the first
St. Joseph. This is the first time time.

that he is seeking election to the
General Assembly.

St. Philip

Mr. W. A. Crawford was Junior
member for St. Philip during the
last session of the House. Was a
member of the General Assembly
since 1940, President and Founder
of the West Indian National Cop-
gress Party and Editor and Pub-
lisher of the Weekly Newspaper

Barbados Observer. Member of
the Executive Committee in
1946—47.

Mr. Crawford was one of the

Barbados Delegates to the Confer-

ence on Closer Association held agina s.,

at Montego Bay, Jamaica and was
also one of the Barbados Dele-

of Welch Village
detained at the General Hospital
Thursday evening after part of a
quarry
about 2.30 p.m. Gilkes’ back was

Mr. E. Me G. Webster,

shop-

keeper is seeking election for the
first

time,

BACK INJURED
Thirty-year-old Winston Gilkes
St. John was



at Bath fell upon him

injured



Sch. Lady Noeleen, Sch Lucille M
Smith, Sch. Enterprise S., Sch, Lydia
Sch. Marien Belle Wolfe,

M.V, T, B. Rador, Sch, Frances W. Smiths
Sch. Burma D., Sch. Mary M. Lewm
Sch. Cyril E. Smith, Sch. Island Star,

gates to the West Indian Confer- sen. Adalina, Sch. N. Molly Jones, Sch

ence (Third Session) at Guade-
loupe.
Mr. D. D. Garner, was senior

Rosaline M., Sch

for St.

Mary EF. Caroline
DEPARTURES
Ketch Onrust, # tons net,
Vineent
Schooner Philip H

Capt, Tober

Davidson, 87 ton

member for St. Philip during the net, Capt. Seaty, for British Guiana

last session of the House. A plan-
ter in private life, Mr. Garner has
served on the Highways Board
and the Board of Sanitary Com-
missioners for the parish of St.
Philip and has had considerable
experience of parochial politics

as a member of the Vestry of St. James Winter and W

Philip.

proprietor. He has never sought
election to the General Assembly

before but he has been a very
staunch campaigner in the parish
during the past fourteen years.
He saw service in the 1914—18
war.
St. Andrew

Mr. J. A. Haynes, planter,
was senior member for St. An-
drew during the last session of

the House. Has had considerable scat ee

experience as a member of the
House of Assembly. ’
Mr. Haynes has had experience

of parochial politics as a member

of the St. Andrew and St. Joseph | eral Post Office as under

Vestries. “|
Mr. L. E. R. Gill, was junior
member for St. Andrew during
the last session of the House. A
Solicitor—Partner in the firm of
Cottle Catford & Co., Mr. Gill
first gained a seat for the constit-
uency of St. Andrew in 1948.
Mrs. E. E. Bourne, school-
teacher, is a daughter of the late
















mond

Mr. J. C. Mottley, is a peasant Marie Alves

Angel
Ochoa,
Browne

Antwerp, Amsterdam by

Seawell

ARRIVALS BY BWA. ON

Taylor, T

4 Headley
From

Dominica

and C
Leslie

Bourne
Warren, Rev
B. Browne.

Ada Marshall,

Arnold Michael

From St. Vinaent

Chapman,

Ra
and

DEPARTURES BY B.W.1LA,
THURSDAY
For Trinidad—Marilyn Pollonais, Rus-
sell Day, Seth White, Charles Kum,
George McMillan, Eileen Robinson, Grant
Neville
Ochoa,
Earl

ON

Estwick, Warren, Hal
Ochoa,

and

Ward,
Naney
William

Mercedes
Parchment

MAIL NOTICES

Madetra

THURSDAY of the
From British Guiana, Melean, J.] with me on tl
Hunt, D, Hunt, L, De Souza, WH. Ashford SSS

Mails for United Kingdom,
the M.S. Oran
jestad will be closed at the General Post
Office as under

Mail at 10

p.m

Registered
2.30

a.m,;
Ordinary Mafl at
3rd December, 1951.

ail at 1
p.m. on the

Matis for St Lucia, Dominica, Montser-
rat, Antiwua, St Kitts, Bermuda, St
John, N B., Halifax N.S., by the

Parcel Mail at 10 am.;
at 2 p.m.;

Registered Mail
Ordinary Mail at 2.30 p.m
the 5th December, 1951

N.B. This is the last known oppor
tunity for despatch of surface mails to
Bermuda

on

and Canada before Christmas.



Twice as many &\
fer from High Blood

as
is a Sternee Chee
about the time of C! oft
is the real cause of much heart

and later on of parslt tic ateekes,
mon symptoms of High
sure are: Nervousness,
top and back of head and
ressure in head, dizginess,
reath, paing in heart,
poor sleep, loas of memory >
easily excited, fear and worry. If you
suffer any of these symptoms, don’t
delay treatment a single day, because
your life may be ia danger. Moxce
(formerly known as Hynox), a sew
medical discovery, reduces High Blood
Pressure with the firat dose, takes a
heavy load off the heart, and makes
you feel years younger in a few days.
Get Noxco from your chemist today.
teat Bi
’



[t is guaranteed to make you
and strong or money bask, -
ce





shows your blood ts poisoned

sam shrough faulty oe oe
ay Other symptoms ©! idney
Disorders are Backache, Aoh-
ing Joints and Limbs, Sciatice,
Getting

Er dTRh matism
me te ‘
While: You} leep
Pre @ If you suffer sharp stabbing
pains, if joints are swollen, it
C
4 Neuritis,
Ci es o ing, 1
rcies under Eyes, Burn tching
Pevteses Loss of Energ' ‘and Appetite ond Fre.
quent Headaches Colds, Ete. Ordinary
ned@icines can’t help much because you must
to the root cause of the trouble. ‘
Fire Cystex treatment is specially compounded
@ soothe, tone and clean raw, sore, sick kidneys
and bladder and remove acids and poisons from
your system safely, quickly and surely, yet cone
yains no harmful or dangerous drugs. Cystex
works in 3 ways to end your troubles /
1, Starts killing the germs which « ttacking
your Kidneys, Bladder and Urinary System
in two hours, yet is absolutely harmless to
4 human tissue. -- - 4
2. Gets rid of health-destroying, deadly poison-
ous acids with which your system has be-
come saturated. 4 - '
3. Strengthens and reinvigorates the kidneys,
. protects from the ravages of disease -attack

on the delicate filter organism, and stimu:

fates the entire system. a“ ¥
piiaeed by Doctors, Chemists, and

®., © One-time Sufferers &

Tystex is approved by Doctors and Chemists Ip
73 countries and by one-time sufferers from tie
troubles shown above. Mr. J. C. writes: “I arm
70 gears old and have suffered with terribl
backachés and pains, continwally getting up a
night, and, thanks to Cystex J am uch better
than I have been for years.” Mr. P.O. “The
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‘Gucronteed to Put You Right
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\ Get Cystex from your chemist
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E

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A well in 1 week or your money |
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BLADDER )))



DISCUSSION ON PLAYING
FIELDS POSTPONED

By St. Michael Vestry

Owing to a late hour, some of
the members of the St. Michael
Vestry left the meeting on Thurs-
day when the Vestry was dis-
cussing a@ letter from the Colonia!
Secretary in reply to one from
the Vestry dated August 3, set-
ting out the view of the Gov-
ernor-in-Executive Committee on
thg statements made before thc

Malone Commission of Enquiry
by Mr. M. E. Cox, and the fur-
ther development of other ares
as playing flelds.

Discussion of the matter wa
therefore postponed due to the
lack of a quorum.

The Vestry’s letter to the

Financial Secretary dated August
3 reads as follows:
3rd August, 1951
Sir,
At a meeting of the Vestry held
on the 30th ultimo, your letter No.

6149/S. 1/1/43 of the 4th Jul
relative to the administration of
playing fields was discussed.

In reply I was instructed to
inform you that:—

(a) As a result of the accusa-

tion made by qg member of the
Government at the Princess Alice
Playing Field Inquiry, that this
Vestry was a most corrupt body

a
(b) That in the absence of ad-
equate machinery of this Vestry
to take care of the erection of
buildings on and the laying out of
roads etc., at the various sites
selected for playing flelds in this
parish, the Vestry will be unable,
in future, to undertake any cap-
ital expenditure on playing fields.
The Vestry therefore suggest
that the Public Works Depart-
ment be made responsible for al!
capital expenditure on playing
fields for this parish, and the
Vestry assures the Government
of its ready and willing co-opet
ation in the administration o!
these playing fields after they
have been established.
[ have the honour to be,
Sir,
Your Obedient servant,
E, C. Redman,
Clerk, St. Michael's Vestr)
Col. Sec’s Reply

The reply from the Colonial
Secretary to the Vestry reads
follows

Colonial Secretary's Office,
Barbados.

22nd October, 1051
Sir,

I am directed to refer to your
letter of the 3rd August to the
Financial Seeretary, on the sub-
ject of the establishment of play
ing fields in the parish of St.
Michael, and to inform you tl

the Governor-in-Executive Cor













2. With regard to the reference
at ») in vour letter 1 am to say
that it is quite clear from th
report of Sir Clement Malone on
his Commission of Enquiry im
certain matters connec ted W
the establishment of e Prince $
Alice Playing ld and from 9
proceedings of t wuiry wt
were published in the Press at the
time. that Mr. M. E, Cox appeare
before the Commissio in -
private capacity and t what-
ever he said in evidence at %)
Enqu was said in that capacit

The Governor-in-Executive Com-

mittee is indeed surprised
learn that there has been an)
other interpretation,

3. With regard to reference a
(b) it is the view of the Govern
or-in-Exeeutive Committee that
the completion of the playin
fields at Welches (Carringtor
Village) and Friendship, which
are the projects immediate!
under consideration, ought not &
be beyond the resources of _ the
Ves but the Goverrmor in-Exe
cutive Committee, bearing
the Vestry ifficultic
to the

try,

W }L(U
a

mined
prepared
ing

assist follow
exten! If the Vestry w!}

agree to furnish estimates of tt

cost af he facilities requwre
buildings, levelling ete.)

‘Celanese’ Sports Shirts
Wel , } i
Welches and Friendship, to
gether with plans and details ¢
the Scheme, the
Executive Committee
available the services
Colonial Engineer fot

of ti
vettin
them. In the event of the plan
being approved, it 1s sugseste

economical.
Governor-tt

will makr|

e
SPORTS SHIRTS





PAGE THREE



- FOR MEN

are popular for both work

and play because they look and feel good and are
Made from
are obtainable in various shades and sizes,

*Celanese’ Jersey, they

ATHLETIC UNDERWEAR





Clad

ys

that the Vestry should call fe
tenders and award the contracts }
and that the supervision of tt
work should be carried out by tt
Vestry, although the services *
the Colonial Engineer will 1 SS &
made available to give advice
and when it may be required N
It should be added that th ow Save Mone
slbaacien must be dependent ¢ eee ‘eiiiis

the return to health of the Colo
nial Engineer who is at presen
on prolonged sick leave

5. I am to ask you to let mé
know at your convenience wheth
er the proposals set out in para
graph 3 above are acceptable t
the Vestry

I am

Sir,

Your

Save

obedient servant,
RK. N. TURNER,
Colonial Seeretary

Letter Circulated

The Clerk informed the Vesti
that the Colonial Secretary
letter dated October 22 had bee
circulated and asked that it |
taken as read, He further dre
the Vestry’s attention to the fact
that paragraph three needed a

mittee has reconsidered its co.- reply and asked fou the direction
tents In the light of the vie vs of the Vestry in the matter
expressed by the representatives Mr. E, D Mottley said th
Vestry at their meetix¢ there was ho reson why h
1e .






so you are invited to call in and serve yourself

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PAGE FOUR



BARBADOS Sg ADVOGATE

Baer fase)

Printed by the Advocate Co, Ltd., Broad St., Bridgetown

Saturday, December 1, 1951

FEDERATION

RECENT statements by Sir David Max-
well Fyfe in Strasbourg and Mr. Anthony
Eden in Rome make it clear that public
opinion in. the United Kingdom is not yet
ready to sacrifice national interests for the
common good of Europe,
Britain becoming
of they do in
Europe and that twenty-one miles of sea

The people of

Great are gradually

aware the fact that live

ig no longer the effective barrier to in-

it
ruled the waves.

vasion that

used to be when Britain

But they are still very far from identi-
fying their interests with those of French-
They
maintain, through their spokesmen, and
in Press and radio that Great Britain has
other that the
centre of a great Commonwealth and is

men, Italians, Dutch, and Belgians.

responsibilities, she is

only partly European.

The British

closer

are prepared to join in

association with the other nations
of Europe but they are not prepared to
join a political federation of Europe. The
British cannot understand why the people
of the continent shoula not recognise their
own special position.

They point, with reason, to the existence
of a Parliament with no large majority
and. packed with hundreds of Labour
members whose party has been less
European-minded than the present Gov-
ernment. They say that it is no good to
talk of political federation until the over-
whelming pressure of public opinion is in
favour and they are strongly sceptical
whether the British public will ever
favour a federation based on the sacrifi-
cing of their own political sovereignty.

The people on the continent of Europe,
on the other hand, are much more ad-
vanced in thinking that political federa-
tion without Great Britain would be no
federation at all. There the deadlock re-
mains, and many besides Mr, Schuman
and General Eisenhower are disappointed
at the lukewarmness of a Conservative
Government's approach to a question
which needs answering if Europe is not to
be further sub-divided into more pockets
of Eastern and Western influence. The
British, despite the presence at the head
of their Government of the architect of
European Union, Mr. Winston Churchill,
are still isolationist so far as Europe is
concerned. This isolationism does not sur-
prise anyone who knows how very little
the average Briton knows of his European
neighbours. When, however, propagandists
for British isolationism appeal to Britain’s
responsibilities and duties as centre of a
great independent Commonwealth the
argument appears more emotional than
logical, Because the average Briton knows
much less of the Commonwealth than he
does of neighbouring Europe. The fact
that France which is the centre of the very
large French Union does not consider that
her responsibilities and duties to the
French Union prohibit her from taking
the lead in promoting a European Parlia-
ment confirms the popular view that the
French are far more logical and more
politically conscious than the British. It
is also regrettable that the more Great
Britain stresses her responsibilities (and
ipso facto opportunities) in the British
Commonwealth, the more will those
European countries without overseas
possess¥ons or dpminions be envious of
Great Britain’s privileged position and dis-
trust her motives. The 5,000,000 unem-
ployed of Europe are all on the French
side of the ‘channel.

Historians will be better able to analyse
the apparent failure of the United King-
dom to realise that they belong to Europe
and that only when Europe is peaceful and
free from internal dissension will there be
a good chance for the British Common-
wealth to benefit fully from its British
Association.

Meanwhile those who are lukewarm
about political federation in the British
West Indies will no doubt ask why an
island separated by only twenty-one miles
sea from the European mainland
should be so reluctant to unite politically
with Europe and should be so aggressively
sure that islands separated by hundreds
of miles of ocean can only face the future
with confidence when they have achieved
political federation. Democracy cannot
be understood to depend on public opinion
in the United Kingdom and to be repre-
sented by an infinitesimal
interested pe in the

till the best f

ol

percentage of
Ex-
of leadership

yple Caribbean:

nple i rn

OST EE

BARBADOS. ADVOCATE



To Clinhb—Or Not To

By BRETT OLIVER

LONDON

“For Heaven’s sake climb the
wretched thing and let’s get back
to some proper mountainepring.”

And that, believe it or not, was
said of unconquered Everest by
one famous mountaineer to an-
other famous mountaineer about

15 years ago. The man implored
to get it over and done with was
Eric Shipton who to-day is strug-
gling up Everest again in an at-
tempt to find a new route which
might lead to the conquest of the
great peak. Unlike 1938, when he
got within 2,000 ft. of the top,
this expedition is reconnoitring
the southern slopes, a_ hitherto
untried approach, It may lead to
a full-scale attempt

Let’s turn again to the advice
which Shipton got 15 years ago.
He was then off on his third at-
tempt to beat Everest. Why climb
Everest? What on earth is the use
of it? Why do it, why go risking
your neck in the most appalling
conditions just for the sake of
standing, exhausted, insensible,

atop 29,000 ft. of useless rock’
Why?

The thought has probably oc-
curred to many who have read of
death and agony on its treacher-
ous slopes, of men driving them
selves to the limit of human en-
durance only to inch down, de-
feated. It is a point for debate,

It was, in fact, debated in Lon-
don this week by the City’s oldest
organized body of arguers
Sylvan Debating Club.

I went along out of
The subject concerned Shipton
and whether his present efforts
were a waste of effort, As I ex-
pected, the debate soon left Ship-
ton to go his own way and devoted
itself to the all-embracing argu-
ment of why climb Everest at all

The speaker with the job of
convincing everyone it was just
plain silly got off to an uncon-
vincing start by admitting he wa:
a “hill climb” and had actually
been in the Himalayas at one time
But he had never been on Ever-
est and never wanted to.

He sided himself instead with
the Tibetans who live below
Everest and look upon it as some-
thing sacred. They call it Chomol-
ungma, or “Goddess Mother of
the Snows” and find it inexplica-
ble why anyone should want to
reach its summit when as a simple
object of contemplation from afar,
the mountain, is beautiful, majes-
tic.

“These Tibetans when they hear






























































the

curiosity

By VAUGHAN JONES.

LONDON, November 21,

Sit tight is Mr .Churchill’s slo-
gan today as Egypt seeks to drive
Britain’s troops from the Canal
Zone and Iran tries in vain to sell
her own oil following her expul-
sion of Britain's oil men from
Abadan.

pease demands which he
peremptory and unreasonable. His
sit tight policy, he thinks, will

tremist policy towards Britain.
In their dispute, Egypt and Iran

have the sympathy of the Arab

world. Britain, however, has the

nations, led by the United States.
And America’s aim is to avoid a
weakening of Britain's
position in the Middle East in view
of the spreading menace of com-
munism,

Against Iran, Britain’s prime
move following the appropriation
of the Anglo-Iranian Oil
pany’s £350,000,000 refinery and
installations at Abadan, Kermen-
shah and Bandur Marshur, will be
the continued deprivation of the
company’s tanker fleet and oil
sales organisation,

Previously, over 300 tankers,
half the company’s own, half
chartered, were collecting and de-
livering nearly 32,000,000 tons of
refined and crude oil annually the
world over. And much of its sale
was organised through the British
Company's subsidiaries and affili-
ates.

However, following the com-

any’s expulsion, Iran’s Premier,
Dr. Mossadeq, has been able to ex-

rt only a trickle.

PBoriax his recent visit to Ameri-
ca he found he was unable to char-
ter tankers. He learnt too that
foreign oil companies would not
help him with their sales organi-
sation. He cannot build ships,
for his country has no yards. He
cannot buy sufficient numbers, for
most shipyards the world over are
booked up to three years ahead,
And the sympathy of oilmen the
world over is against him for his
expulsion of Britain’s 3,000 strong
staft who ran his oil industry.

The remaining 70,000 Persians





For in both cases, Mr. Churchill
has made it clear he will not ap-
thinks ff

force both the Egyptian and Iran
governments to modify their ex- ]

unqualified backing of the Western }

strategic }

Com- }j

a es oo ee

Climb

of new disasters on Everest shake
their heads and wonder at. the
stupidity of the white man. They
feel the toll of life is a just re-
tribution for the sacrilege of at-
tempting to conquer such a
masterpiece of nature.”

And, besides this morai argu-
ment, the Sylvan debater put up
a strong case on the sheer physical
and mental impossibility of ever
conquering Everest. In all the at-
tempts made, only seven men had
reached 28,000 ft. A bare thousand
feet to go, yet the summit was
still untrod. He maintained that
the extreme cold, thin air, sudden,
blinding gales and blizzards and
the immense physical hardship
made the mountain inviolate.

“Even if a man does reach the
top—-it could only be through
an absolute freak in the weather
—what is his reward? He gets
there, exhausted, his mind dulled
to insensibility. If his eyes can

see, he may look out and below
him but, unless everything is
clear, he sees nothing. And if he

does, he is too far gone to appre-
ciate it.”

The speaker was warming up.
He quoted from the accounts of
men who have got so far and no
further on Everest and whom
after their experience could look
on it only with horror—how they
were completely exhausted,
drained of will and praying for a
safe retreat and relief from their
uffering, These men had written

that the effects of altitude and
old changed them into some-
thing that was not a _ proper

hurman being.
“There is really no sense in it,

is there?” queried the debater,
“There is, besides, no _ earthly
practical use in_ standing on
Everest’s summit. The world
won't gain anything. . . it seems

these aspirants want to get there
just for the kudos of it or because
they are gamblers and like to risk
their lives and the lives of their
hired porters. You can’t measure
your chances on Everest.”
Internationally, too, invading
Everest was a bad thing. The
mountain was regarded as
Britain’s for the conquering of,
just as two other peaks in the
Himalayas, K2 and Kanchenjunga,
were before the war respectively
the domain of Italian and Ger-
man mountaineering madmen,
“Look what happened when the
Americans horned in on_ the



~ ~~
HON, WINSTON CHURCHILL
and 2,000 Indians can still continue
producing reduced quantities. But
Dr. Mossadeq’s nightmare remains,
His 2,000,000 ton storage tanks are
overflowing, and he cannot dispose
of further production, His great
industry has come to a standstill.
And though, following his Cairo
visit, he faces demands from Com-
munist sympathisers that he
should seek hhlp from Soviet Rus-
sia.he wishes to avoid doing so,

The Anglo-Iranian Oil Company,
meantime, is prospecting for new
suceess in Nigeria, Trinidad, Papua
and Sicily, It is obtaining in-
creased supplies from Iraq and
Kuwait. And it is pushing ahead
its programme for constructing re-
fineries in Britain.

Further, to avoid imposing hard-
ships on foreign states, 19 Ameri-
can oil companies have worked out
a plan whereby previous Anglo-
Iranian customers will receive: oil

Our Readers Say



Italian’s K2. There was almost an
international incident. I hate to
think what would happen these
days if the Russians decided to
climb Everest.”

And so he condemned and
cajoled, this renegade “hill
climber” as he brought his argu-
ment to an end, saying: “I believe
it is impossible to climb Everest
and an impertinence to attempt
it.” ,

Opposing him was an elderly
gentleman, so indignant at the
suggestions put forward, that for
a start he could only invoke in
retaliation a string of meaningful
grunts and waves of his hand.
Then he remembered it was a
polite debate and began his
answer: “Mountaineering is a
sport which, in turn is a goal of
the impossible. If you are going
to regard sport as something
which should have no risk in it,
you will have to confine it tc
tiddleywinks and marbles.

“If there is an objection on the
grounds it is a waste of time and
life, well, what about the time
wasted on the football fields all
over the world or in the holy
game of cricket. Both these sport:
are dangerous and there have
even been cases of death among
the public watching—and paying
for it. It is hard to draw the line
but I maintain mountaineering is
a sport. If they want to risk their
necks and break their bones, it is
probably from a feeling that per-
haps it can be done.

“Further, mountaineering is the
effort to resolve mountaineer!ng
problems. On principle, there i:
nothing against an attempt to
climb Everest. Why condemn it if
some people enjoy it? If they
want to climb Everest, well let
them. Their attitude is praise-
worthy and justifiable.”

As the old man continued his
defence, I detected a feeling in
his words of “Gad sir, if we didn’t
have Everest to climb, what woulc
the British people come to.”

The debate rumbled on. There
was talk of the high moral valu:
of high endeavour, the spirit of
adventure which surely should be
encouraged, human nature, the
beauty of the eternal snows, o!
Everest’s rain, mist, ice, biting
winds, butterflies. ....

And when everyone had addec
his piece, they put it to the vote
Glory be, Shipton, you can con-
tinue your expedition, The Sylvar

Debating Club applauds your
work by two to one.
End piece: The man_ whc

debated against climbing Everest
at the Sylvan Club really didn’t
have his heart in it. You see, he’:
really all for it.





Churchill Refuses To Appease
Egypt. Iran

from other countries. Under this
plan, for instance, Pakistan wil’
get oil from Saudi Arabia insteac

_ of Persia.

Attitude of Britain, however wil
change immediately Iran show:
goodwill by offering to negotiate
on the basis of existing proposals

Points made by Britain are:

1. The industry should be effi-
ciently organised and operated a
all stages to ensure a regulatec
flow at economic prices from thc
oil fields to the customers abroad
And provisionally, this necessitate:
expert management includin;
trained British technicians, a tank-
er fleet, and a worldwide sale
organisation.

2. The profits should be sharex
between Persia and Britain or
perhaps a fifty-fifty basis, with oi
selling prices fixed to compet
fairly with those of other produc.
ing countries.

3. The amount of compensatior
for the nationalisation of the in.
dustry to be fixed by agreement o
arbitration—and not by a unilat-
eral ruling of either country.

In the case of Egypt, Britain i:
quite prepared to face further ter-
rorist action against British troop
and property in the Canal Zone
For Britain’s prevailing necessity;

J is the retention in safe hands o;

the Suez life-line to the Orient,

However, she is ready to nego-
tiate with the Egyptian govern-
ment for a revision of the twenty
year Anglo-Egyptian treaty whict
runs till 1955. And she holds oper
the offer to replace British troop:
guarding the Suez life-line by ar
international force composed oi
American, French, Turkish anc
British troops with whom Egyp
would be associated in equal part-
nership,

Continued but unavailing ter-
rorism, it is believed, cannot in-
fluence Britain’s main policy, bu
is more likely to shake the posi-
tion of the Egyptian governmen‘
amongst its own 20,000,000 people

For the Egyptians are alread)
discontented by the Government’:
maladministration and corruption
and their own widespread and bit-
ter poverty. Loss of Egyptian lifc
and failure to achieve Britain’s ex-
pulsion might eventually causc
the Nahas Pasha administration tc



“we

—

NOBODY'S |
DIARY |

MONDAY-—In my first novel which lies wait-
ing at the publisher until the English taste
for fiction grows greater there is a pas-
sage about cultural activities in the
West Indies. Frankly it is dull reading
compared to what actually takes place.
Here for instance is an extract from a
local newspaper “The newly inaugu-
rated ........ theatrical group pre-
sents their anniversary hop........ the
group hopes to specialise in the cultur-
ing of Caribbean dancing music drama.”
And this after so many years of the
British Council, not to mention the
Bridgetown Players. It’s enough to make
strong hearts break.

rUESDAY—On Sunday after Tosca was
ended they played Tchaikovsky’s “Fran-
cesca da Rimini”. There was culture if
you like coming out of a box and a turn
of the knob. Dante started the story
going in his fifth canto of the inferno
and nobody has been able to leave Fran-
cesca alone since then. Leigh Hunt, Sil-
vio Pellico, d’Annunzio in literature:
Ingres, Scheffer, G. F. Watts and Caba-
nel in art: and then Tchaikovsky the
Russian in music. And where did it
come from? Radio San Domingo. I
take my culture the easy way. No hops
for me.

WEDNESDAY—Looking at the postmen in
their cool khaki shirt and hot woollen
long trousers pedalling stickily along the
Esplanade you’d never dream of them as
carriers of dangerous missives. Yet my
post bag last week contained some very
hot stuff. The first was a batch of Com-
munist literature from Hong Kong: the
second a very cheap and very nasty
patent medicine pamphlet professing to
cure every known and unknown disease
under the sun.
Some of the testimonials advertising the
most frightful cures are too embarrass-
ing even for this outspoken diary but
one or two deserve preservation. A man
in an Indian Commercial House writes
“Frankly to speak I kept mum to see the
result and now I am glad to have con-
vinced myself of the efficacy of your
medicines.”

A goods clerk had this to say “I am
using your medicines since 19 days and
she feel improvement.”

There are medicines to end household
quarrels and to win law suits.

So next time you feel like saying “Isn't
progress wonderful” please remember
the postman and the tripe he sometimes
has to carry without knowing. So much
for mass education, A little reading is
a wondrous thing.

THURSDAY—The B.B.C. Year Book for

1952 contains a gem which is said to be
thirty five years old. With the price of
meat going up all round I’m going to
risk quoting it.
How much for that rabbit? Three pounds.
That’s a stiff price for a rabbit. It’s a stiff
rabbit. Don’t blame me if that doesn’t
make you laugh. Not everybody is
blessed with a sense of humour. °

"RIDAY—The Bay Street window looks as
glary and as untidy as ever. Its origin-
ator I understand is drawing a pension
from the Colonial Office. I wonder how
many more people will be on the pension
list before we get one single flowering
tree planted there. The more demo-
cratic we become the more we seem to
forget what the fruits of democracy are
supposed to be.

3ATURDAY—Philosophy is not | always
gained from books. I was passing along
the highways this week drinking in with
my ears all the local folklore that came
my way. There had been an accident
(they’re always having them) and she
was telling her audience, a man “All
that get knock down aint drunk chile”
How true, but those who knock them
down might be. A pity my profession
doesn’t allow me to join in these street
corner debates. They’re so like the Ox-
ford Union, at which I would never open
my mouth. People talk too much.
















It came from i



|

Unemployment

SIR,— In the leading article
headed “Unemployment” appear-
ing in the Barbados Advocate of
Wednesday, the 28th of November,
1951, it is stated in the fourth
paragraph that “only Jamaica get
the benefit of the employers’ con-
tract to pay passages back to
Jamaica or its equivalent.”

The position regarding the cost
of repatriation of workers from
the U.S.A, is that the employers
pay the cost of transportation from
the place of employment in the
U.S.A. to Jamaica or its equiva-
jent of all British Wes! Indian
workers, including Barbadians.

R. NICHOLAS JACK,
Labour Commissioner.

EDITOR'S NOTE

The Labour Commissioners’
statement in the second paragraph
is correct, and confirms the state-
ment which he quotes from the
Advocate’s editorial where it is
stated that the employers contract
to pay passages back to Jamaica
or its equivalent.

If. this sentence is taken out
of the full editorial, it appear
need correction, but the



editorial makes it clear that wt
Barbadian and other Caribbean
workers have their passages paid
by employers a far back

Jamaica (if they

travel



Jamaica) or as far back as a dis-
tance equivalent to the distance
from the United States to
Jamaica (if they do not travel via
Jamaica), their passages from
Jamaica or its equivalent back to
Barbados or to some other Carib-

bean territory still have io be
paid.
How to gain as much benefit

from the present arrangement tor
Barbados as Jamaica derives for
its workers is the task the Barba-
dos Government must face. Since
it is quite clear that when
Jamaicans have their passages
paid to Jamaica they have return-
ed home.
dians have their passages paid as
far as Jamaica, there is still some
thousand miles of sea to be crossed
and if neither the .employer nor
the worker pays for this essential
art of the journey, then the tax-
payer must foot the bill or the
workers do not go. In view of
arrangements currently being dis-
cussed in Jamaica for next year’s



quota the question is one for
immediate concern,
To the Editor, the Advocate;
SIR, Kindly accept congratu-
lations on the concise, renewed
publication of the “Daily Tides”
under the caption of “What's on
to-day.” his mean much to

of who follow high tide

Whereas while Barba-,

around the clock to enjoy our daily
health swim,
Gratefully yours,
St. C. HARLOW,
(Retired U.S.A.)
St. Clair Harlow,
“Medway”
Government Hill.
November 29th, 1951.

19 Per Cent

To The Editor, The Advocate—

SIR,—Kindly permit me to ex-
press certain facts to which in
my humble opinion most people
would certainly agree. Certain
politicians are saying that they
were. instrumental in a_ profit
sharing bonus of 19 per cent.
thinking that would help their
political’ campaign so as’ to get
everybody shouting for Labour!
The sugar crop is the chief crop
as well as the upkeep of the
island, and I feel that everybody
should benefit by it. I also feel
that if it was divided thus that
all would be satisfied. Sugar
workers’ 9 per cent for subsidi-
sation, 5 per cent i.e, letting gov-
ernment ‘pay some and reduce the
price of rice, fish, etc,, and 5 per
cent, for repairs to roads used for
transportation. or trade of the
same cane and sugar _ industry.
Do you.all not think this would
have been better?

G.C.P

28th

Nov,, 1951

Voters Don’t Know

SIR,— 1 would like to make a
few observations in connection
with the voting on the 13th
December. The assigning of the
various districts to the various
polling stations is an extremely
good idea, but it is going to cause
great confusion unless some not-
ice — official or otherwise — is
issued instructing the electorate
to which polling station they
should go to record their vote.

For instance, I myself did not
know to what district I belonged
and the particular polling station I
should go to, until I looked up
the voters’ list for the parish.
Not everyone has access to a list
of voters, as the notices which
were stuck up, here and there,
about the parish, have long since
been torn down, hence the major-
ity of the electorate remain in
ignorance as to the number of
their district and the correct poll-
ing station.

I write this letter with the hope
that it will catch the eye of those
responsible for the arrangements
and that they will make every
effort to ensure that everything
works smoothly on that very im-
portant day.

“SCORPIO”
28th November, 1951.



SATURDAY, DECEMBER 1, 1951









FOR FINEST
CHRISTMAS CARDS —

Ce

Call and Select Early from
ADVOCATE STATIONERY.










SATO

NOTICE



From 1st December, 1951 our HARDWARE and
LUMBER DEPARTMENTS will be closed for breakfast
from 11 a.m. to 12 noon except on Saturdays when we
will be open from 8 a.m. to 12 noon. Will all custom-

ers please note.
e

WILKINSON & HAYNES CO., LTD.,

— Successors to —

C.S. PITCHER & CO. LTD.

Phones: 4413, 4687, 4472











SANTON
WATER HEATERS

SANTON FOR QUALITY



5-gIn. HIGH PRESSURE TYPE
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Available from Stock.

DACOSTA & CO,, LTD.
ELECTRICAL DEPARTMENT







JACKETS
FABRICS...

Fine Tropical & Linen

STYLES...

Single & Double Breasted

COLOURS...

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DiSTRICTS must be in by the day before they
are expected to be received. No order from
these districts will be accepted for delivery

the same day it is received.

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be in by 11 a.m. the same day that delivery is
expected,

ORDER DEPARTMENT — Phone 3571

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SATURDAY, DECEMBER



I, 1951



= BARBADOS ADVOCATE

Labourer Not Guilty Of DISCUSSION ON PLAYING
Administering Poison

THE HON. the Chief Justice Sir Allan Collymore at

the Court of Grand Sessions

yesterday discharged 24-year-

old labourer Elbert Browne of Hillaby, St. Andrew after
an Assize jury found him not guilty of administering poison
so as to endanger the life of Elize Moaze with an alternative

count of administering poison with

Browne was not represented by

counsel, Mr. W. W. Reece, K.C.,
Solicitor General appeared for
the Crown. The prosecution

called on ten witnesses while the
defence called one.

The prosecution alleged that on
July 9 the accused BrOwne—after
having a quarrel with Elize Moaze
the previous day—obtained the
key to Moaze’s house from a boy
named Oliver Neblett and went
in the house and mixed a quantity
of substance containing arsenic
with the rum she_ had left in :
bottle ai the side of her bed.

Bitter Tasting Rum

Moaze returned to the house
about 2.30 p.m, the same day and
in ‘drinking the remainder of the
rum she had left by her bed,
found that it was of a bitter taste.
She went to Dr. Cummins and
was treated there. The bottle and
contents were sent to the Gov-
ernment Analyst.

First witness called for the
prosecution was Sgt. Henderson
attached to the District “F’’ Police
Station. He said that he arrested
Browne and took him to the Dis-
trict “F” Station where he made
a voluntary statement.

Lilian Watson of Hillaby, St.
Andrew, said that Elize Moaze is

her daughter. On July 10 she
went to her place and took a

towel from her.
gave to the Police.

Elize Moaze told tihe court that
she is a hawker of Hillaby, St.
Andrew, and knew Browne who
used to stay at her house working
for her. On July 8 she went to a
dance and bought a bottle of rum
and carried it home.

On July 9 about 8 am.
drank some of the rum
placed the remainder at the side
of the bed. She went to town that
day and returned about 2.30 p.m,
After she returned to the house
she took up the remainder of the
rum to drink and while drinking
she found that it tasted funny.

Treated

She went to Dr. Cummins and
he examined and_ treated het
About 6.45 p.m. the same day
she saw Browne at the George
Washington Club and they had a
conversation, She told her mother
Lilian Watson what had _ hap-
pened.

Once or twice she had a quarrel
with Browne about fowls she
missed from her yard.

Dr. Cummins told the court that
on July 9 he examined Moaze at
his surgery in Bank Hall, St.
Michael, She made a statement
to him and showed him a towel
and a bottle. In the bottle there
was a liquid of a yellow colour.

Oliver Neblett, son of Iris
Neblett of Hillaby, St. Andrew
said that on July 9 Moaze gave
him the key to her house just
before she left for town with his
mother. Later the same day
Browne came to him and he
(Neblett) gave him the key to
Moaze’s house,

Mr. J. D, Robinson said that on
July 13 while he was acting as
Government Analyst he received
a bottle containing yellow liquid
and a towel from Police Constable
101 Farley, The liquid in the
bottle was rum and the rum con-
tained a quantity of arsenic.

The strength of the arsenic was
.1408 grammes, At this stage the
case for the prosecution was
closed. The only witness for the
defence was Rueben Taylor who
could not remember the date on
which the offence was alleged to
have been committed, but said
that the accused was with him
all the time ‘on the day in ques-
tion.”

Browne then addressed the
jury and The Hon, the Chief Jus-
tice summed up and after a short
deliberation the jury returned a
verdict of not guilty.

L.C.C. RESULTS

Pupils of the Modern High
School gained 32 passes at the
July 1951 London Chamber of
Commerce Examination (certifi-
cate stage).

Detailed results are as follows:

English: Janet Brathwaite, Ers-
‘kine Carter, Velcie Crichlow,
Anita Khan, Valmour Lyte, Felix
Mascoll, Lucille Niles, Iris Rad-
way, Claudine Sobers, Phyllis
Willett, Le Roy Weekes.

Maths: Rufus Bryan (with dis-
tinction) Erskine Carter (with
distinction) Arthur Griffith (with
distinction) Janet Brathwaite,
Celestine Burrowes, Earl Bur-

This towel she

she
and



owes, Dennis Holder, Claudine
Sobers, Phyllis Willett, Le Roy

Weekes.

ARITHMETIC: Janet Brath-
waite, Rufus Bryan, Earl Bur-
rowes, Erskine Carter, Velcie
Crichlow.

FRENCH: Only two candidates
were entered for this subject.
Both passed with distinction.
They were: Lawson Belle, dis-
tinction passes in both written
and oral; Erskine Carter pass
with distinction in written.



intent on July 9.

Profit Means
Prosperity
SAYS MOTTLEY

Mr. E. D. Mattley, at a
tical Meeting at Nelson Street on
Thursday night in support of his
candidature for the City of Bridge-
town, said that he was indeed gla
to see the large crowd that turned
out to hear him because after the
last two harangues which “were
held here by the obviously paid
assassins to destroy him shows
that they are really interested in
the truth, justice and rigateous-
ness.” The meeting was held by
the Barbados Electors’ Associa-
tion,

“As a Conservative I fee] that
my duty is to maintain, uphold and
elevate, Maintain the economic
fabric and structure of the colony
Uphold the constitution and ele-

vate the people.

H:: said that he had told them
on several occasions that be
differed fundamentally with the
Labour Party on the question
of nationalisation, He stood for
free enterprise and the more ne
read the literature on both sides

of the question the more he was
convinced that free enterprise was
the correct thing for any com-
munity.

Referring to the debates of the
House on measures which we
passed during the last three
years, he pointed out his contri-
bution in respect of the follow-
ing:

Health Measures

He reminded listeners
had got an address
ing for the erection of a T.b.
Sanitarium, He was surprised at
the reply that it would be too
costly. He wanted to assure them
that he was motivated in mov-
ing this address after seeing the
sufferings of several people in this
country, It was known that if
people of the middle and lower
classes in this colony became af-
flicted with this disease there was
no chance for them but to go to
the Almshouse where there is a
ward known as a T.B. Ward and
there wait to die. But, on the
other hand, for persons who can
afford, they may go to Trinidad
ov Jamaica and there receive the
most modern treatment for this
most dreadful disease. He felt that
something should be done in this
respect.

He said it would be remembered
the criticism which he offered the
Government when it was discov-
ered that 536 people were on the
waiting list to be ‘hospitalised at

that he
passed ask-

the General Hospital and the
doors were closed to them. The
answer being there were no

nurses available,

He said there would also re-
member his debating the ques-
tion of a Radiologist and Surgeon
General for the General Hospital
when he pointed out to the Gov-
ernment that there was no reason
to argue that because a Director
of Medical Services received a
salary of £1,300 a year or a Colo-
nial Secretary: £1,500, that special-
ists to look after the health of the
people, where you had one Hos-
pital for 200,000 people, should get
a salary below theirs. He argued
that it was the duty of the Gov-
ernment to get the best specialists
at the Hospital and to get the
best they must pay them, for in-
deed the more well-to-do people
in this country, when they are
ill, are able to seek medical ad-
vice and attention abroad while
the middle and lower classes are
dependent upon the skill of the
men at their hospital. “I sav it
now and I said it then, the best
should be obtained and they must
be paid and I know you i: gree
that they should be well paid.”
' Old Age Fensions

He said that in and out of sea-
sons on the floor of the House he
had stressed the fact that ‘he
destitute old people iu this colony
should receive a pension at the
age of 65. Three years ago he told
them he should support an ia-
‘rease for the old people. “I did
so.”

Transport

“T realise I have made some
enemies because of the stand I
took in this matter.

“You will remember reading in



a particular day bus fs
in this colony would go up. De-
spite the fact that the leader cof
my Party, Mr. Wilkinson, who
was a member of the Transport
Board had knowledge of it, and
despite the fact that Mr. Dowding,
a member of my Party, who is
interested in the biggest bus ser
vice in this colony, I made it elear
that from the returns which I had
seen at the Vestry of the General
Bus Company that I was satisfied



We have them in Gold and Silver Kid in a variety

heels,



Poli- ;

2 quoted an

FIELDS POSTPONED

@ From Page 3
should change his mind
regard to that matter.

with
In his

opinion, the Vestry did not have
the necessary machinery at their
disposal for establishing these
fields.

The letter before. them ° asked
for estimates and plans. Members
wuld appreciate that on the last

occasion they got estimates for
which they paid nothing and
other persons were given the

work. It could not be expected of
them to ask people to give esti-
mates and plans free. He con-
sidered the Public Works De-
partment the right authority to
he work and then let the
take it over to administer

He would counsel members
that whatever they did, they were
still among the Government
members, the type of person who,
as long as one of their friends dia

not get the job, would be pre-
pared to speak ill of the Vestry
He for one, was not prepared to

vote that the Vestry undertake the
work.
Vestry’s Reply
Mr. Mottley then moved that
the Vestry reply to the Colonial

Secretary saying that under the
circumstances, they regret much
that they would be unable to

change their previous decision as
set out in their letter of August
3 and hope that Government
would do everything to expedite
the establishment of these play-
ing fields.

Mr. D. G, Leacock seconded and
said that he saw nothing to make
him change his mind concerning
the letter of August 3 to the
Financial Secretary.

Since thatNime, he had learnt
things which had even made him
strengthen his opinion as regards
the method of furnishing estim-
ates of plans for buildings. He
instance where a cer-
tsin building was being erected,
the cost had exceeded the original
estimate by 250 per cent.

“In these days, giving an es-
timate is only a piece of guess
work, because the contractor is
working with unknown cost of
materials and unknown cost of
labour” he said

When the Vestry’s Act was first
passed, the work of the Church-
warden was very different from
what it is to-day. It was some
years since he was Churchwarden
and there were now various ac-
tivities which came under the
Churchwarden’s_ direction that
did not exist two or three years
ago,

“We have reached the stage
where the Churchwarden would
have to keep a close eye on build-
ing of this sort and he would have
to spend a great deal of his time
on that.”

Responsibility
the Government’s part, I
there is a laudable desire
to get these playing fields, but
they seem to be going to, every
possible length they could to
avoid having any responsibility
for themselves.

“They had been so much criti-
cism levelled at this Vestry for
the setting up of the first playing
field that the Churchwarden is
being put in a peculiar position.

I do not see why we, who have



“On
think

no building department, should
be expected to carry out this
work’ when the Government say

they cannot, although they have a
Public Works Department. I
think our position is absolutely
sound, The Government could es-
tablish as many playing fields as
they liked, ond the Vestry should
look after them when established,
but | think it would be a mistake
to say that the Vestry | should
have to look after the erection
of the buildings when they did
not have the necessary machin-
ery.”

Hor’ble Mr. Gale said that there
was a certain amount of truth in
what Mr. Mottley and Mr
Leareck had said. They had no
department to carry out those
thines. but an Act was passed by
the Legislature to do so. The Gov-
ernment wenld grent the money
for these playing fields and the
land could even be leased,

_



that they were naking money and
was not entitled to any increase.
I felt although it might. not have
directly affected my constituents
it meant that a lot of middle class!



people in the country areas who!
were struggling to send their
children to school would have
their bus fa increased some 40
cents a week, which they couid
ill-afford,

“Itse.efore, soliciting the sup-
po:t of other members in the
Heuse and impressing upon My:,

D. D, Garner that it was wrong!
in principle, you were prevented
from paying more bus fares.”
He said that when an attempt
was made to prevent lorry own-
ers from taking .around~a~ few
excursionists or from transporting
from one church to another, mem-|
bers of the various religious or-
ganisations who indeed could ill-
afford to pay the price for bus
transportation, he again contri-
buted his quota by leading the
arguments for its defeat. |





Evening Sandals

to go with any costume you desire

of attractive designs, with high heels





‘I am looking at the matter from
a different point of view, We
should not worry over the past”
he said. The parishes were re-
sponsible for looking after th«
Waying fields.

Majority’s Wish

We are the Vestrymen of tie
parish representing the people cf
St. Michael and I think the m-
jority of people in the parish
would like to have playing fields.
The fields had been bought and
now no one was prepared to e-
tablish them. Are we saying that
we are incapable of establishing
these fields?”

He said that the Vestry had
undertaken bigger projects than
playing fleids and mentioned the
establishment of the Nightengale
Home in Black Rock. The Govern-
ment was prepared to grant them
the money and he saw no reason
why they should not establish the
fields.

Mr. A. R. Toppin supported
Mr, Gale's remarks. He said that
they were the city fathers and

S.ould see after the playing fields
He thought that they should be a
little bigger than what they were
and get ahead with the work.

Mr. Tudor had done a_ splen-
did job as far as the Princess
Alice Playing Field was con-
cerned and I think that the play-
ing fields should be done by this
Vestry and as soon as possible
in order that the children should
have the benefit of them.

Mr. F. McD. Symmonds said
that he would like to see the
playing fields established in the

parish and was willing to co-ov-
erate with the Government or any-
one else with a certain amount of

dignity, He was however not pre-
pared to be pushed around and
treated with disrespect by the

Social Welfare Officer or anyone
else in leffer form or otherwise.

Negotiations

“Negotiations have reached the
Vestry in the name of the Gov-
ernment, If the Government per-
mitted any officer to use the name
of the Executive in such a way
as to throw direct insult upon the
Executive members of this Vestry
in matters of playing flelds or any
other form, I will always object
to it.”

“Mudh as I would like to co-
operate in this matter, I certain<
ly would not be the one to co-
operate if the co-operation, meant
that I would have to do a thing
of that kind under the present
circumstances,

I feel the Colonial Secretary is
making a very l&idable effort to
smoothe out the differences be-
tween this Vestry, the Govern-
ment and the Social Welfare
Officer on this matter. I feel that
if the entire matter is approached
in a spirit of goodwill on all sides,
the playing fields would be put
up without any rancour.

Mr. Mottley replying said that
with the situation as fluid as it
was, it would be a difficult thing
to get anyone to undertake a
job building by contract. It was
to be noted that the letter said
that they were to get plans and
the money would be granted only
if the Government approved o1f
these plans,

“Would it not be better for
the Government to send them the
type of plan they wanted and
have a department estimating the
cost?” He thought that would even
be a_ little better, but for the
Vestry to estimate, then get
plans, the type of which might
rot Mg approved by the Govern-
ment, was merely trying to pa
the buck, cit rae

He considered that they should
be responsible mainly for the ad-
ininistration of the fields, The
spending of the money for theii
establishment should be the rc-
sponsibility of a department of
the Government,

ASSIZE DIARY

MONDAY, DEC.

Rex vs. Carmen Marshall
Rex va Winifred Hoyte
TUESDAY, DEC. 4

No, 35 Rex



No. 17
No. M4





“Go” Says Mr. Williams

WHENEVER there is an opportunity for the people ot

Barbados to get out, they should go, Mr. L

A. Williams told

a crowd at a Labour Party’s meeting held at the Hope R ac
St. Lucy, in support of the candidatures of Mr. J. E. 1

Brancker and himself.

Mr. Williams said that the Labour Party came into pow-
er in 1938 because of the insurgent movement throughout
the whole of the West Indies. They might have known wher
Trinidad, Jamaica and those islands rioted because of eco

nomic conditions.

Because of a similar movement

locally,
and es a result,
now getting adult

the people
suffrage,

England,
that they
Since

they could boldly
were talking nonsens:
the Labour Party

Mr. Ward had said at Half Moo

a commission came down Fort that he did not have enougl
ire time to represent the people
So estly
when anyone came and told them cided
that they got adult suffrage from some people asked
say

hon-
ae
bu

in the House
not to come

and so he
forward
hiny to come
and he decided to come back. “You
will therefore be unfair to the en-

came tre island and the people of yow

into power, they tried to do some- parish in particular if you vote foi

thing tor the people’s good, Mr, & man who doesn't have the time
Wilkinson said that “men of to_represent you honestly.”
ability were wanted.” If Mr. Wii- Mr. Brancker said that the rea

kinson meant men of commerce,

son why the housing programm

he (Mr, Williams) was saying has not yet been carried out a

that men of commerce were not Clinketts, St Lucy, was becaus¢

recessarily men of ability the owner of the land, who is it

’ v* re . } » tit
Mr, Ward had told the peopi the : S., could not find the titl
: reds

that everybody in the House knew — “ aiken, Oh lat

he was wrong for sending the He he fi sens om ie hg neil

people to America on this last form of ee mor 7 oa Lal

time. “I am telling the men of ne even ee ee oe :

, yur’s polic

St. Lucy that whenever you get ‘

a chance to get out of this island,

go. It does not only bring you

money but you gain a lot of ex-

perience and education.”

Subsidisation

Mr. Ward was telling them of
the high cost of living, which was
another snare used to catch votes.

Trinidad and Jamaica paid

cents and 26 cents per pint for
rice and they are living. The Bar- toot

Dirk Continues

World Cruise

DIRK TOBER, 26-year-o}

48 Dutch Yachtsman who is makin
a world cruise alone in his 3
Ketch Otrust Teft Barbadkc

bados Labour Party favoured sub- on Thursday afternoon for S
sidisation which would lower the Vincent. Dirk anchored his ket«
cost of living and the price of off the Aquatic Club on Noven
rice. It was nonsense to make ber 15 after he had _ finishe
capital out of the cost of living 2,700-mile cross-Atlantic ru:
because it was not the Govern- He is taking Onrust back hen
ment’s fault. in Amsterdam via St. Vince:
_ Before the war, Barbados bought Martinique, Curacao, Panam
rice from Burma and India but Tahete (Pacific), New Zealan
difficulty in transportation hid Australia and South Africa

put Barbados in a precarious posi- Dirk said that ne énjoyed
tion. British Guiana grew rice and sty nore ‘and “regretted that }
it was so much the better to cet | id hha 1 longe
the rice from there a aat ae crak Meine hs

B.G. said
that because of world conditions,

jarbados, He was hoping to m

they were forced to carry up SM weather on his way bac
their rice and after arbitration home
Barbados finally found that they ,, 1° WS spared quite a lot
would have to buy the rice from tme on his cross-Atlantic run
British Guiana at the advanced because of the use of twin stay
price Subsidisation was the Sls which with the trade wind
answer to the question, steered the boat—but he is pre
“The Government feels that it Pared to put in quite a numbe

is their duty to lower duty on food Of hours at the helm when he i

and clothing for the benefit of the crossing the Pacific

He expect

workers. They were, too, going to to be five years on the cruise ani

encourage capital into the colony
when they saw it possible to do
They were, however, going to
ensure that when enterprise came
was
The Gov-
ernment’s programme was second
Foreign politi- G. L.
the local Gov-
pro-

so

into the island, the colony
properly remunerated, ,
to none, he said,
cians commended
ernment for their
gramme

housing

Mr. Brancker said that he had
been representing the parish of St.
Lucey for quite a number of years
and the people never let him down,
In the neighbouring colonies, the
people voted labour and he was
telling them that Barbados, which
was expected to set the political
‘standard of the West Indies was
being looked forward to fall into

line.
New Voters

He was asking the people to
give their support to himself and
Mr. Williams. There
new voters added to St. Lucy and
he wanted the old voters to tutor
the new. The children would be
committing no breach of the law
if they ran behind Mr, Walcott’
car when he came into St, Lucy
and shout “go away Buccaneer”
St. Thomas had refused Mr. S
Walcott and was St. Lucy going
to accept a political refugee?

In 1938, the St, Lucey electors
repudiated Mr. Henry Alleyne
chiefly because they saw to it that
they were not tied up in a factory

owner combination, They shou!d|

now stick to precedent. “You will
hear them saying now, ‘Oh

vs. Christopher If) the time.”

a
a \
s eee eee ee a le
z IT’S HERE AGAIN !! 2
e

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DECREE ABSOLUTE

THE Hon. the Puisne Judge |
Taylor yesterday pro
nounced decree absolute in th
Court for Divorce and = Matri
monial Causes in the suit o
Gladys Griffith, petitioner an
Gordon Griffith, responden

Decree nisi was pronounced o
October 5.
Decree nisi

was pronounced i

fhe suit of Robert A. Greenida
petitioner and Claudine Gree
idge, respondent,

Mr. E. K. Walcott, K.C., in
structed by Mr. H. L. Thoma
solicitor of the firm of Carring

Robo

ton & Sealy, appeared for
Greenidge.

WILLS ADMITTED
TO PROBATE

At the Court of Ordinary
terday, the Hon, Puisne Judges



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Adviona Carrington of St, Josen!

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PAGE SIX

BARBADOS A



CLASSIFIED ADS.

TELEPHONE 2508.

annowncements of
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1 Memoriam notices is)

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IN MEMORIAM

ALLEYNE—In loving’ memory of our





de father James Adolphus Alleyne.
eho departed tis life an
leat
vears have passed since that
‘ we sved was called awny
He Tosu 2on to rise
When the 7 trump shall rend the
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ORKMEN ket workmen to di
oufwork De ABREU TAILORING CO









Morhill Street 29.11,51—3n
MISCELLANEOUS
“BOTTLES —Clean empty nip bottler a
48c. per core liver Colonnade Stores
White Park Pood 11.11.51—t.£.n

HIGH C..ASS JOBNERS' WORK
Willing to purchase High Class Joiners
work, ih Mag ui Cedar ly Prefer
ably Dining Tatle Vanities, China Cabi-
nets, and C \oply Ralph Beard
lawer Bay St 20,11. 53-1











In food condition. Telephone
30.1151

DINGHY
2520.
Wariter
Service
115d

{ERVICE
Vleectric





UNUSED ELECTRIC
fo parch nl

Apply: f

26 PIECES 12” Caat
Apply D. M. Simpson



co
1.12 Slevin





IMPORTANT !
YOUR GAS COOKER
TO-DAY

ant
tl

BOOK

If “you -w
future. We
dist!

You newre
ey ooking
Why potent
room, B.
Cookers

one in the near
have @ waiting

quicker delivery

advante

it your Gas Show-
Street, and see the Gos

Where before delivery







a

PSPS VCCPP FED PSPPOOVSE,

10-DAY'S NEWS FLASH

2000 COMIC PAPERS JUST
ARRIVED

Our Toys are the

talk of the town,
Novels

and Pepular Literature in
Beautiful Binding

Souvenir Goods in Large Variet’y,
ENAMEILe-It in all Colours.

JOHNSON’S STATIONERY
and HARDWARE

The most satisfactory
method of selling your
property is through an
established firm of
Agents.

JOHN
M4.
i ADON

& Co.

AF.S., F.V.A,
have

the reputation
for results

Phone 4640 Plantations Ltd.





PPC LEE LEE >





-
mo)
E ‘
‘ TO-DAY
x %.
~ s
* THE ANNUAL BAZAAR §
t a
w will be held at %
a »,
S THE DRILL HALL
t from 3 to 7 p.m. $
* Under the Distinguished Patron- 3
ase of His Excellency the Gov-
aS ernor and Lady Savage $
% Tove will be a *
S Fas SHOW and PUNCH ¥
~ aue o. OY SHOW at 5.30. &
% and many other attractions %
% for young and old, x
% Beautiful CHRISTMAS \
%- GIFTS, Novelties, TOYS of 3
% all sorts, x
~ Completely equipped Ser- X
* vice Station for Boys—fully s
furnished., xs
% DOLLS HOUSES for Girls
* and many other interesting
% toys % {
* CHRISTMAS OARDS > |
* COOKED FOOD, i
% CAKES and SWEETS, 3)
% A WELL STOCKED BAR. ¥)
* The POLICE BAND will be al
x in attendance . x
%\ In aid of The Old Ladies’ x
s Home. %
% Bring all the Children and 4 |
x Help a Good Cause. y)
*% ADMISSION + Be BI
% Children and Nurses 6d. |
sBSSS0SCCCCCC SSSCUSESS..



FOR



SALE

AUTOMOTIVE

CAR—Ford Prefect 11,000 miles. Con-
tact Butcher, McEnearney & Co. Garage.
2.11.51—in







Plymouth Sedan,
miles. For particulars
Kinch 2861 or 4790
30.11.51—@n
_—_————
CAR—Drop-head Convertible Ford V-8
in good condition. Going cheap. Apply:
Cole & Co., Limited Phone 4516
28.11 .51-—t.f.n

CAR—One Deluxe
done only 15,000
apriy to S. H



CAR—One Anglia 8 h.p. (M. 1349) in
fairly good condition. Dial 3982 or Blades
C/o B’dos Foundry, 29.11.51—3n

CAR—1 Citroen Car,
old, done 9,000 miles. In perfect order
Nearest offer to $2,400.00 accepted. Dial
2204 Dr. C. G. Manning or 4418 G. E.







under one year









Ward. 27.11.51--4n
CAR—One (1) 1947 Morris 8 H.P. Car
n good condition. Dial 3232, C. A. Fields.
1 12. 51—2n
CAP.—One (1) Standard Vanguard Car,
in excellent working order, apply
Redman & Taylor's Garage Ltd
1.12.51—3n

(

ANNOUNCEMENTS) = ELECTION





$5 im goods and with your cash bill |
you get a guess-coupor; how many 5 ae OF 8T. MICHAEL rARene OF 8T. LUCY
screws in o jar? You can win an {ERNBY give notice that | have I HERES give netice that I have ‘
EKCO radio it certainly pays to shop | sppointed the Parechial Building, Cum-, appointed the Vestry Feom near the REAL ESTATE
at A. BARNES & Co., Lid beriand Street, Bridgetown, as the place |Parish Church as the place where ult
23.12.51—t.f.n. }where Porishioners of the purist; of St. | person duly qualiled to vote at ony |
eens |Michaei and other persons duly qualified jclection of Vestrymen for the said Parina DEBFNTURES—4% Debentures, Mar-
c NOTICES to vote at any election of Vestrymen {for |may assenible on Tuesday, the 7th day| ine Hotel (1969 Ltd. Further particu-
PURLI . the said Parish mav assemble om Tues- of January, 195%, between the heory of }/#rs, apply Wm. Fogarty (B’dos.) Ltd.
antimetinna day the 7th day of January, 1952, be-' 10 and 1! o'clock in the morning-to elect 16.11.51 —t.4.n.
NOTKICE ttween the hours of 10 and fl a.m. to Vesie for the Pariah of St. Lucy for
}eleet a Vestry for the Parish of St.[the year 1992 House at Maxwell Road with three side
The following have agreed to close | Michael for the year 1952. OSWALD DEANE, verandah, drawing, dining and breakfast
for the two half-days of the Annual HF BURTON, Parochiol Treasurer. rooms, 4 bedroems. toilet dnd bath,
Agricultural Exhibition, Wednesday Sth Parochio! Treasurer, | St. Lucy. kitechenctte, garage, and standing on %
and Thursday 6th December. St. Michael. | 1.12 3n | Acre of land. It can be bought on very
Messrs Da Costa & Co, Lid 1.12.51—3n | ——-——___—— - attractive terms. A small amount can
Colonnade Stores. | PARISH OF ST. PEEUIP be paid down and the balance monthly
C. F. Harrison & Co., Lid | PARISH OF CHRIST CHURCH i HEREBY give notice that 1 have ap- | F Otherwise.
Jason Jones & Co., Ltd. 5 HEREBY give notice that I have}pointed the Chureh Boys’ School near| Apply to D'Arcy A. Scott, Magazine
K. R. Hunte & Co., Ltd. eppointed the New Vestry Room adjoin-|the Parish Church, as the place where Lane. 30.11. 51—2n

ing the Vestry Room, Oistin, as the place
where all persons duly qualified to vote
at any election of Vestrymen for the said
T. Sydney Kinch Lid Parish may assemble on Tuesday, the
Stokés & Bynoe Ltd. 7th day of January, 1952, between the
Barbados Mutual Lite Assurance | hours of 10 and 11 o'clock in the morn-
Society. ing to elect a Vestr’ for the Pariah of
The Wilkinson & Haynes | Christ Church for the year 1962.

Charlies McEnearney & Co. Ltd }
Plantations Ltd. .
Robert Thom Ltd.

Co., Lid. wooD DDARD,

Cc. S. Pitcher & Co. Ltd. Parochial Treasurer,
Barbados Fire Insurance Co. Christ Church.
Singer Sewing Machine Co. | 1.32.51—n
Alfonse B. De Lima & Co., Ltd. sialic ale asda lip

PARISA OF ST. JOSEPH

J. N. Goddard & Sons Ltd Saale
L HEREBY give

Bata Shoe Store. notice that I have
P. C. S. Maffei & Co., LAd appointed the Vestry Room at the Dis-
T. S. Garraway & Co pensary as the plac. where all persons

Johnson's Stationery. duly qualified to vote at any election
Alex Bayley & Co, of Vestrymen for the said Parish may

i Modern Dress Shoppe. assembie on Tuesday, the Tih day of

as G. W. Hutchinson & Co., Ltd. | Januar’, 1952, between the hours of 10

Collins Ltd. and Ii o'clock in the morning to «lect
T. Geddes Grant Lid. a Vestry for the year 1952.

Louls L. Bayley. A. T. KING,
CARS—«(1) Morris Oxford done 14,000 J. B. Lesiie & Co., Lid. Parochial Treasurer,
miles like new. (1) Chevrolet 1937 not T. R. Evans & Whitfields St. Joseph
pigs ogg en Standard 8 and small R. H. Edwards Ltd, | 1.12.51~3n

Roebuek Street. 29.11.51—2n

_——$—S$—
CARS—End of year close out of used

cars all must be sold, 1 Wolseley 6/80

Saloon, 8,000 miles, First class condition.

1 Morris Oxford. 1 Morris Minor 10,000

miles. Like new

good condition.

GARAGE LTD



CHRYSLER

matic Transmission. Mileage 33,000 and
in perfect condition—Dial 4616, Courtesy
Garage 22.11. 5i—12n

RELIANT TRUCK—Recent!y overhaul-
sd and painted, apply Barbados Agencies,

telephone 29.11.51 --6n

|

ELECTRivAL

(2) JUKE BOX—One Juke musical box,
olivys twelve



records for one shilling, in
ood working order, Ring 4908, Barbados















Phone 4977. Medley Works | *

1 Austin A-40. Very
Cheap. FORT ROYAL
Telephone 4504,
1.12.51—6n
(WINDSOR) 1947 Mode!
with New Tyres. Fluid drive with auto-

Stansfeld Scott & Co, Lid.
Cave Shepherd & Co., Lid, |





PARISH OF ST. PETER
oa s . I HEREBY give notice to all persons
» YY De Lima & Co, Ltd. duly qualified to vote at the election of
ee 3 Co. Vestrymen for this Parish, that I have
appointed the Parish Room, Speights-
|town as the place where all such per-
| cons may meet on Tuesday, the 7th day
|of January, 1962, between the hours of
|10 and 31 o'clock m_ the morning to
| elect a Vestry for the Parish of St. Peter
| for the vear 1952.

Evelyn Hoaeh & Co., Ltd
A. Barnes & Co, Ltd.
Cole & Co,, Ltd.

N. B. Howell & Co
Manning & Co., Ltd.

R, & G. Challenor Ltd.



General Traders Ltd. | 10 and 11 o'clock in the morning to elect

< Gardiner Austin & Co,, Ltd. a Vestry for the your 1952.











*

DVOCATE

NOTICES | PUBLIC SALES















parishioners of the parish of St. Philip,
and other persons duly qualified to vote
at any Election of Vestrymen for the
said Parish, may assemble on Tuesday
7th day of January, 1952 between the
hours of 10 and 11 a.m, to elect a Vestry
eg Parish of St. Philip for the year





SMALL COTTAGE in Alkins’ Road,
Carrington’s Village, standing on 2,067
sq. ft. of land. Conveniently situated
near two important bus routes, For
further particulars and terms of purchase
apply to Mrs. G. Connell, “Fairbank,”
Upper Belmont Road, St. Michael,

1.12.51—2n.

P. Ss. W. SCOTT,
Parochial Treasurer,
St. Philip.
1.12.51—3n



AUCTION

GOVERNMENT NOTICE

B.W.L. CENTRAL SUGAR CANE
BREEDING STATION
DEPARTMENT OF SCIENCE
AND AGRICULTURE





PARISH OF ST. ANDREW
1 HEREBY give notice thet I have
appointed the Vestry Room near the
Almshouse as the place wher. all persons
Guly qualified to vote at any election of
Vestrymen for the said Parish may
assembie on Tuesday, the 7th da of
January, 1952, between the hours of 10
end 11 o'clock in the morning to elect
a Vestry for the Parish of St. Andrew
for the year 1952.
Cc. A. SKINNER,
Parociial Treasurer,



St er ie Agricultural Assistant, B.W.1.
me Central Sugar Cane Breeding
PARISH OF ST. GEORGE Station

| HEREBY give notice to all persons
duly qualified to vote at the lection
of Vestrymen for this Parish, that I have
appointed the St. George's Vestry Room
as the place where all such persons may
meet on Tucsday, the 7th de, of January,
1952,. between the hours of 10 and 11
o'clock in the morning to elect a Vestry
for the Parish of St. George for the

Applications are invited for the
of Agricultural Assistant,
B.W.I. Central Sugar Cane Breed-





Hanschell, Larsen & Co., Ltd. } G. Ss. conan. Year 1952. ’ eee. ns ocala ae
ov R. M. Jones & Co., Ltd. Parochial easurer, H. JOHNSON, ‘7 .B.) xX 6— st “ .
James A. Lynch & Co., Ltd. | St. Parochial Treasurer, annum and the point of “eatry MONTREAL, AUSTRALIA, NEW
“A Barbados Hardware Co., Ltd. 1.12,51—n St. George. th 1 ill d d th 1 ZEALAND LINE, LIMITED
"©. B. Rice & Co., Ltd. fates a 1,12,51—an | he scale wi epend on the qual- (ANZ, Line) The M.V. “Caribbee” will accept
W. A. Griffith & Co. | PARISH OF ST. JAMES —_—_-— ifications and experience of the; ss. “PORT ADELAIDE” is sched- Cargo and Passengers for
Cole's Stationery | & HEREBY give notice that I have PARISH OF ST. THOMAS successful applicant. The post is| wled to sail from Hobart September 25th Dominica, Antigua, Montserrat,
; Alleyne, Arthur & Co., Ltd ‘appointed the Vestyy Room near the 1 HEREBY give notice that I have} not pensionable but after a year’s | Melbourne October 4th, Sydney October Nevis and St. Kifte. Sailing 20th
5 Harold Proverbs & Co, Ltd. | Parish Church as the place where all appointed the School House near the bati t ° “120th, Gladstone October 6th, Port instant.
Martin Deorly & Co, Ltd | persons duly qualified to vote at any | Parish Church as the place where all probationary service the officer) Aima October 20th, Brisbane October The M.V. “Moneka” will accept
Johnson & Redman. lection of Vestrymen for the said Parisi: | Persons duly Qualified to vote at any] May join a Provident Fund. 2th, arriving at Trinidad about end Cargo and Passengers for
s T. Horbert Ltd, may assemble on Tuesday, the Tth day | election of vary men for the said Parish 3. The successful applicant November and Barbados about December eee Antigua, Montserrat,
may rt . « . vis .
is Ince & Co., Ltd. |of January, 1952 between the hours ef ee ee e on Tuesday, the 7th day} witt be required to provide Han. Sth. evis and St. Kitts. Date of

1952, between the hours of
10 and 11 o'clock in the morning to elect











ing Station, Department of Agri-|
culture.

'
2. The salary attached to the| HIPPING

self with a motor car, a loan to-!

SATURDAY, DECEMBER 1951

GOVERNMENT NOTICE

VACANCY FOR EDUCATION OFFICER, EDUCATION
DEPARTMENT — BRITISH HONDURAS

1,



1

i There is a vacancy in the Education Department, British Hon<
jduras, for an Education Officer.
Duties.

In addition to the general supervision of elementary schools the
duties will include advising teachers on teaching methods and school
organization, assisting in the organisation of pupil teacher training
and performing such other duties as the Director may decide .
Quatifications.

Applicants should have been trained at recognised training col-
leges, should possess a teacher’s diploma or certificate and should
have teaching experience in elementary schools; a University degree,
though not essential, will be an additional qualification.

Emoluments.

The salary will be on the scale $1,464 x 72—$1,824 (£1 Sterling is
equivalent to $4 British Honduras) the point of entry being depend-
ent on age, qualifications and experience. There is also a provisional
| Cost of Living Allowance of $280 (£70) p.a. The revision of salaries
jit at present under active consideration and it is expected that the
| salary quoted will be substantially increased. The post is pension-
able. Vaeation leave is with full pay, free leave passages being
provided to the United Kingdom and back. Travelling expenses and
subsistence allowance for periods spent away from headquarters are
paid. Free passages will be provided for the suecessful candidate,
wife and two children.

Applications.

Applications, accompanied by copies of two testimonials and giv-
ing two references, should reach the Director of Education, Barbados,
by the 15th December, 1951, They should state fully, particulars of
applicants’ experience and qualifications, including any subjects or
activities in which applicants may have specialised.

30.11.51.—3n.

NOTICES













wm addition to general cargo this ves- departure to be notified.

gel has ample space for chilled and hard The M.V, Daerwood will accept



SOOO GSS OSS SOP PF FS GOSES































i
Agencies. 29.11,51--6n » Stuart & deuigson Ltd. z S. TARRION, . veer? pid ng Parish of St. Thomas hate = purchase of which will| frozen cargo. sara Cargo peer ri a
” Perkins & Co | arochial Treasurer, OF yes made o; itions Cargo accepted on through s of Lad- a, St. neent, Grenada anc

“FRIGIDAIRE''—Deepfreezers, a limt- : S. EB. Cole & Co., Ltd St. James. : FP, F. PILGRIM, ictas to oe ao eae ing for trans-shipment at Trinidad to Aruba. Date of departure to be
ted quantity of large 9 Cubic feet Deep- J, O. Tudor & Co. 1.12.51-—3n “arochial Treasurer, . are applix| British Guiana, Leeward and Windward notified.
freezers just arrived, call early at K. R. Simeon Hunte & Sons Ltd -—--— — St. Thomas. eable to travelling officers of the} Isianas. B.W.I. SCHOONER, OWNERS
1UNTE & CO., LTD. Phone; 4611 or John D. Taylor & Sons, DXi. PARISH OF ST. JOHN 1.12.51—3n] Barbados Government Service. For further yerticulars eppiy— ASSOC. Inc.

027 30.11.51—-3n * a Barbados Foundry Ltd. I HEREBY give notiee that I have} —--—~--"" ——— }A mileage allowance will be paid | FURNESS. WITHY & Co., Lid Tele. 4047.
Sat pon cena eas Bidas Co-operative Cotton . | appointed the Vestry Room at the Parish RATES OF EXCHAN at standard Government rates TRINIDAD tN

; One (Electrolux) Factory Ltd. burch as ace where all persons HA a ; . .
Of Buming Refrigerator | in perfect Central Ageney Ltd. duly qualified to vote at any electior Woe, a we GE is Applications, stating age,| B.W.I. ‘i eis SOSSSS5 rs ot
order Apply to T. Sydney Kinch, J. N. Harriman & Co., Lid of Voesteymen for the said Parish, may FF éducational qualificati ine DaCOSTA & Co., Ltd.
eiantations New Building, Phone #270, 4 Frank B. Armstrong Ltd. |assernble on Tuesday, the 7th day off.) 14. PB hg perience tonethen with ond eae | BARBADOS. IT PAYS TO ADVERTISE
wt 3070. 21 11.51—12n Thursday, 6th December Only | January, 195%, between the hours of 10) 5° > Pr. jeqnes on ae Sie t A.W.

n2iptarecthlilhnillipsenieneninshtintndboremaltditle i .. Bookers’ (B'dos: Drug Stores| and 1) o'clock im the moming to elect eee 64 6/10% pr. tof testimonials should be address- |
eee ae Te at kad. B. ta Vestr A Parish of St. John for ot 4.45% pe ed to the Direetor of Agriculture,
me “Presteold” 44, Cu. Ft, refrigerator is N. PB. Wilson Co | the year 1952 shatts < 5 i ps e
mby two years old, being seid to get a Lashleys Ltd. c HM. S. FRASER, sam " ess Fark, and will be aceept
arger one, Also one 5 Cu. Ft, G.EC., <2 Carlton Browne & Co. | Parochial Treasurer, a oe Drafts 64 .2/10% pr. Cd Up to 12 noon on Thursday 6th | ‘0.
hree months old. Apply K. R. HUNTE " A.B Taglod Led. } ae. sone: BES Ue De Eaesenay 6 110% pr, December, 1951.

& CO., LTD. Phone: 4611 ot ee nee 1.12.51—41n, | 112.5130 ; Ceupons 62 4/10" pr. 25.11.51.—4n. Inc.
. = _——————_— msec plllitlen tiene
VACANT POST | an. eae ————--- -
. 2 slstainpebbiie cides
FURNITURE Headmaster, Grenada Reys’ Secondary | FOK RENT POLICE TRAFFIC NOTICE cele aimee hameeone
Sehool x
S c ORREC r. BOSTURS. AtRe with APPLICATIONS are invited for filling AGRICULTURAL EXHIBITION ON 5TH AND 6TH A STEAMER Sails 23rd November— arrives Barbados 4th December, 1951.

eat een a tm ie the vacant post of Headmaster, Grenada | DECEMBE A STEAMER Sails 14th December— arrives Barbados 25th December, 1951.
Ybtainable from stock at T, Geddes Boys’ Secondary School, The sglury of | HOUSES ! Th , 1951. eam aia a Se =
Jrant Ltd, Phone 4442." ss si—dn. | the post. which is pensionable, is RI | mecctcsre cies ti —senarentnaieesasese aa , e drivers and riders of alt vehicles approaching Queen's NEW ORLEANS SERVICE

e (£600) per annum rising by annual| BEDROOM—One (1) Furnished Bed- Park between the hours of 11 am. and 11 p.m. shall do so b f .

“FILING CABINETS — Roneo Four | merem-nts of $96 (220) to $3,120 (2660) | room, om the Seaside at Rockley use Of bp i oy and Cru s ’ are F So Dy Way Of |s s “OCEAN RANGER" Sailed 7th Nov ember—arrives B’dos 24th Nov., 1951.
srawer Filing Cabinets, Foolecap size § 4 annum in addition to a temporary | Kitchen, and Maid, if required. Phone : umpton Streets only, and leave by way of Constitution | 4 STEAMER Sails 2ist November— arrives Barbados 5th December, 1951
New stocks juct recelvid by T. Gedde | at Of Bving allowance at the rate of | 8553 29.11.51-—5n |Road or St. Michael's Row. A STEAMER Sails 5th December-- arrives Barbados 19th December 1951.
Ae ee ee oO ee Ae the maximare salary of | LITTLE MAMILTON — St. Lawrence 2. The following street and roads shall be one-way to all vehi ne ee et eee ALOT

29 11.51-—4n | 1 erade if necessary, should the quaif-|Gap. From Ist December. Unfurnished y Jar traffid)— y aus : : CANADIAN SERVICE
“TSTATIONERY CUPBOARDS 72” x 36 jeations of the candidate appcar to|3 Bedrooms. Water and Elcetrie. Apply SOUTHBOUND

« 18° with three adjustable shelves, s.«
hem at T. Geddes Grant Ltd. Bolto

sane,”’ 29.11.51-—4n
——_
LIVESTOCK



i i ne

COW--1 Guernsey Cow, heavy in calf
gave 32 pts last calf, 1 Holstein anc
Zebu Cow. 7 months im calf 30 pts las
calf. Apply W. C. L, Maynard, Frenches

St. George. 29.11.5121
ONE HEIFER CALF4 weeks old
Mother: Graded Guernsey, 36 pts, Father

Mr. J. Smith's Pure Bred Holstein Bull.
Dial 2084, Philip N. Pilgrim

1.12.51-—In

MECHANICAL
re ae
TYPEWRITERS—AIl! sizes, portable and

ong carriage machines also adding and
culating machines. BRADSHAW &
COMPANY. 29,11.51—@n

MISCELLANEOUS

BELTS—Fine quatity in white kid, or
navy, black, brown, green or red suede
at $1.50 each. The Turtle Shop, Marine
Hotel. 1,12 51—1n













CHRISTMAS GIFTS
PRIMUS STOVES and Lanterns, Pho-
tograph albums, Voightlander Cameras,
Webley air pistols and rifles. BRADSHAW
& COMP. Te 29.11.51—3n

CLEARANCE SALE

DECCA RECORDS—Three records for
$2.00 grab while the offer lasts.
BRADSHAW & COMPANY.

29.11,51—3n

———
GENTS SWIMMING TRUNKS—Woollen
superfine quality Maroon Colour, Size to
at everyone don't forget to buy for next
sea-bath. Visit Kirpalani, 52 ee a
1.12.51—In

—

GALVANISED SHEETS — A_ limited

quality of Galvanised Sheets 6 f{t, to
® ft, Attractive prices, Enquire Auto
Tyre Co. Phone 20696. 1,12.51—t.f.n,







HANDICRAFTS PLASTIC KIT—Com-
prising all the material and Tools to
make Plastic Novelties. Just the present
to give your Boy or Girl at Xmas.
KNIGHT'S PHOENIX PHARMACY.
90,11.51—2n

actin atiaminetnaninctniaiaanisaiiienstelanlteritamne

GLASS FINGER BOWLS—Fine quality.
sparkling glass as regularly sold at 96
cents. A special purchase enable us to
offer these at the bargain price of 72
cents each. Obtainable only from
HARRISON'S HARDWARE STORE,
Broad St. 29.11.51—-8n

EEE

LADIES SWIMMING SUITS with skirt
everlasting quality in Blue, Gold, Green
and Red. Sizes 32 to 40 only $3.51 at
Kirpalani, 52 Swan Street, 1 12.51—I1n.

PRESSURE LANTERNS: Kero. Oil,
very bright light — 350 candle power.
A useful standby and a necessity where
electricity is unobtainable. Dial 2039—
Hardware, B'dos, Coop. Cotton Factory.

20,11,51—3n

eoeerettel heating

TOY CARS: Pedal-driven. The ideal
eift for children $10 years. Only a few
left, Dial 2039 Hardware, B'dos,
Coop. Cotton Faetory. 30,11.51—3n

Piano; good tone, in good
Payne, Chapman Street,
Road. 1.42.51-—-In

PIANO—One
condition, S.
near Baxt





THANrS












PARADISE BEACH
CLUB

NOTICE TO MEMBERS

The Club will be closed
under Rule 34 on Satur-
day, December Ist from
8 p.m.














ustify such a concession. Miss Bayley. Marathon, St. Lawrence.
2 The qualifications required are a| Dial 8144. No dogs.

University degree, professional training

n education, appropriate experience, and LIQUOR LICENSE NOTICE

im interest in elementary school work. The applicat of Lisle Parkinson

At least two testimonials should aecom- | warcon of Gregg Farm, St. Andrew, for

pany the spplication. permission to sel! Spirits, Malt Liquors,
&c., at a beard and shingled shop with

3. The Headmaster will be required
to take charge of the boarding estab-| goivanized foot attached “to a house at
Grewe Farm, St. Andrew.

lishment in eee ts of which he
will be provi w ree quarters. 7 .

4. The average daily attendance of eee Oe ne woe
the Sehool is 300 and the boarding estab~ Police “Magistrate, :

lishment ean accommodate 50 students, Distric
5. Applications should be addressed to LISLE PARKINSON WATSON.
Applicant

the Administrator, Administrator's Office,
GRENADA, and should be reeefved not do ¥
later than’ the 18th DecemBer veel. | VR "heatine tout toe meld ai
(Sad) W. MACMILLAN. — | Pouce Court, District “F', on Friday the
Administrator, Grenada. ogra ge gt? :
Administrator's Office,

0.11 Sin.















Grenada, B.W.1, or J. R. EDWARDS.
1.12.51-—2n, Police Magistrate, Dist ;
1.12.51—in
FOKM I. ee

The Land Acquisition Act,
1949

(Notioe required by Section %)

LIQUOK LICENSE NOTICE

The application of Clevis Bannister,
shopkeeper of Hillaby, St, Andr.w, for
permission to sell Spirits, Malt Liquors,
&e., at a board and shingle shop, situated
at Hillaby, St. Andrew,

(a) Ciuimpcon Street, from Roebuck Street.

(4) St. Michael’s Row from the corner of Crumpton Street

and Constitution Road.

(c) Constitution Road, from the corner of Crumpton Street | 5

and St. Michael's Row, with the exceptions noted in
para, 4.

3. The drivers of motor cars shall be allowed to park on Con-| *
1951, | Stitution Road facing north, and when leaving, shall do so by way of

Belmont Road.
4.

Road between the hours of 11 a.m. and 11 p.m,, except when returning
to remove exhibits.

Park by the Governor’s Gate returning the same way, and proceed
in single line by way of Belmont Read.
Made under Regulation 2 of the Bridgetown and Speightstown
(Traffic) (Amendment) Regulations 1943.
R. T. MICHELIN,

f Commissioner of Police.
Police Headquarters,

Bridgetown,

No persons in charge of any vehicle of burthen shall be per-
mitted through St. Michael’s Row, Crumpton Street, or Constitution

; These shall only be allowed to pass down Con-
7th day of December, 1951, at 11 o'clock, | Stitution Road, from Belmont corner in single line and enter Queen’s




NOTICH is hereby given that it appears
to the Governor in Executive Committee
that the lands described in the Schedule
hereto and situate at Westbury Road,
in the parish of Saint Michael, in the
Island of Barbados are likely to be
needed for purposes which in the opinion
of the Governor-in-Executive Committee
are public purposes, namely for enlarg-
ing the playing ground and otherwise
for the use of the Westbury Sehool.

THE SCHEDULE

A pareel of land containing by
estimation Sixty-five thousand nine
hundred and one (65,901) square feet
situate to the south of Westbury
Boys’ School in Westbury Road in the
parish of Saint Michael and tsland of
Barbados, bounding on the
lands of the Westbury School,
east dnd west on lands of Stanley A.
Hawkins and on the south on lands
formetly of Kensington plantation and
on the Westbury Drain.

Dated this 26th day of November 1951,
at the Public Buildings in the City of
Bridgetown in the Island of Barbados.

By Commend

Colontal Secretary.
29.11. 51—3n



FORM I.

The Land Acquisition Act,
1949

(Notice required by Section » |

THE acquisition, fer publie purposes,
of the following parcels of land con-
taining One rood and seven perc
mere or less situate at the District of
Saint Christopher in the parish of Christ
Chureh in the Island of Barbados
described in the Sehedule hereto and
more particularly shown and delineated
and coloured Pink on a plan of survey
signed by Mr. C, K. Nichols, Sworn
Surveyor, and dated the 15th day of
May 1951, and filed in the oMce of the
Colonial Engineer having been decided
on by the Governor with the approval
of both Houses of the Legislature of the
Island of Barbados by resolution of the
Houses of the Legislature, it is hereby
deciared in pursuance of Section 5 of
the Land Acquisition Act, 189, that
the said lands have been acquired for
the following purposes: For increasing
school buildings and furnishing play-
grounds for Saint Christopher's Girls’

School.
THE SCHEDULE

ALL. THAT pareel of land containing
one rood and seven perehes adjoining
lands of Saint Christopher's Girls’ Sehooi
in the parish of Christ Church and
bounding on lands of M, Hazlewood on
lands of A. Clarke on lands of Estwick
Kirton on lands of the said Saint
Christopher's Girls’ School and on the
public Highway and particularly shown
and delineated on the plan thereof dated

the 15th day of May 1951, certified by
Cc. K. Nichols, Sworn Surveyor.
sted this twenty-seventh day of



Zz

ember 1951, at Government House in
the Island of Barbados
ALFRED SAVAGE,
Governor
1.12. 51—3n

WANTED TO BUY

STAMPS STAMPS
All Kinds of STAMPS

at the
CARIBBEAN STAMP
SOCIETY
No. 10, Swan Street.










Dated this Zird day of November 1951,} 15th November, 1951.
To J. R. EDWARDS, Esq.,

Police Magistrate, Dist “F''.

Signed CLEVIS BANNISTER,
Applicant

N.B.—This application will be con-
sidered at a Licensing Court te be held
at Police Court, District “F" on Friday.



the 7th day of December, 1951, at 11
o'clock, a.m.
J. RB. EDWARDS,
Police Magistrate, Dist. “F.”
1,12.51—In

PERSONAL

$$
The public are hereby warned against
giving credit to my wife JESTINE
MASON (nce LORD) as I do not hold
myself responsible for her or amyone cise
contracting any debt or debts in my name

Ss
Ss



——

The public are hereby warned against
giving credit to any person or persons
whomsoever im my name as I do not
hold myself responsible for anyone else
eontracting any debt or debts in my
name unless by a written order signed b





The public are hereby warned against
giving credit to my wife CLARI
FORDE (nee Kellman) as I do not hold
myself responsible for her or anyone
else contracting amy debt or debts in my
name unless by a written order signed

by me.
ST. CLAIR FORDE,
Glebe Land,
St. George
112.512". | ‘Strong, yet smooth and flexible,
‘LIGHTNING’ is @ fastener to be

relied upon, Look for the name on the



This serves to inform the public and
all concerned that L have not heard of

the whe of my wife IRENE) giger
ADELA ‘OD (nee Greaves) of dull,
Half Moon Port, St. Lucy, for the past f. GEDDES, GRANT ETD.,

twenty years, and it is my intention to
re-marr, in the noar future,
BR. PRESCOD,
Airy Cot,
Half Moon Fort, St. Lucy
1,12.51—1n

Agents,
=



NOTICE
The Transfer Booka of the Company
will be closed from the Ist day of Decem-
ber, 1951 to the I4th day of December,
1951, both days inclusive,
Dated this 26th day of November, 1951.
By Order of the d of Directors,
THE BARBADOS CO-OPERATIVE
COTTON FACTORY LTD.
E. M. LEACH,
Secretary.
30.11.51 —3t

A. M. WEBB

STOCKBROKER .
Barbados Investments.





















27.11.51—6n



1.12.5).

|
n





gall itbe SPOT AMES, MASON, "*| IMPERTAL LEATHER « LINDEN BLOSSOM « BLUE HyaciNTH| |
St. Philip.
1,12,51—2n

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me *

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1.12.51—2n 7

‘S
reeiliva-b-i lsistyy

Are now at COLLINS’
YARDLEYWS — Orchis, April

LENT HERIC—Tweed, Miracle, Repartie.

COLLINS DRUG

1.12.51—3n.



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S.S. “LINARIA” a .. London 9th Nov. 8rd Dec.
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S.S. “TRADER” .. ts Liverpool. 27th Nov. 10th Dec.
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EEE
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ATTENTION!
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Why not come in and let us
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——





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1,12.51—2n.

AL OCCPO

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SPRY ST.

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SATURDAY, DECEMBER 1, 1951 BARBADOS





HENRY





|
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ADVOCATE

FOR THE

QUALITY &« SHADES



PAGE SEVEN





BEST








CAN'T YOU

| STOP THAT
| THING? WE'RE
[IN THE MIDDLE
HE LAST



} MACHINE OF

| UNCLE

WOMBAT
Mw |





/ IT SEEMS TO
’

BE STUCK?












EVER COME OVER
» HERE AGAIN!
UNDERSTAND ?



LONE RANGER

THE

Ba a sais
(9) MBL IN THIS HIDEOUT WE SHOULD FIND
SOME OF THE STOLEN GOODS TO PROVE THAT TH

PRISONERS ARE OUTLAWS

te
‘ore

JOHNNY HAZARD

ie

S





cs = =
= q
~ I NEVER ciate A

TO SEE HIM AGAIN
AS LONG AS

LIVE





MAD AT THE
LITTLE Boy? )

WHAT IS YOUR IN




Sey)



WHY DID YOU GET ) (TI HAVENT ANY]
~--THAT'S THE
GOOD THING
( ABOUT BEING
REASON ? “SM age~, A WOMAN




| ‘ '
eS
ran OG

BY CHIC YOUNG

Pas eek ate)
oy v ”

( )
YOU DONT *
C nave TO Have )
A REASON
aaa
\
Sasa '
3D





BY FRANK STRIKER





UP HALF THE TOWN ! pyrgirezs

NO NEED...T.N.T, ... HE
DIDN'T PUT UP MUCH OF A
TUSGLE...HES WEAK FROM

fam LONG INACTIVITY /

MRS. JIGS
LAST WEEK-

DOWN TO INSPE






PTERE'S ENOUGH POWDER HERE TO BLOW )( TH

wHMM, HE SURE BAN
ONE BiG MEGS /

AT DOESN'T PROVE WERE })
mT OUTLAWS!’ :

A cep



WHAT'S

<<

THANKS FOR THE ASSIST,
TABBY... IF YOU HADN'T
BITTEN HIS KNIFE HAND...
UP BE ONE BIG MESS

Now / =
=.

ON SECOND THOUGHT
I THINK I'LL GO TO THE
OPERA TONIGHT-



TAKE ANOTHER LOOK AT THE AH, I COMPREHEND! me
ws PICTURE BisOU MADE OF THE THE LETTERS Hi-D AR® a SHEIK EL KAZAR .., DON’T LOOK AT NOT IN “SEASPRAYY/ THIS ,
AMAZE ME, HIM, LOOK AT THE LIFE PRESERVER PICTURE WAS TAKEN








YOU SAY BiJ0U BE
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HOw DO YOU
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IN THE arrears ue hee
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4
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LEP L LLL OBR

PN aad

PAGE EIGHT

WEST INDIES IN SOUND POS

Defy Australian

Attack:

286—6

(From HAROLD DALE)

The West Indies proved conclusively to-day that Lind-
say Hassett blundered when he won the toss and put them in

SYDNEY, Nov. 30,

to bat. With nearly 300 on the board they are in a reasonably
sound position, but once again wickets were yielded that
were never earned by the Australians.

If anything, the islanders showed
that they are good enough to stay
in against the Australian attack
for ever. Only Weekes and Stoll-
meyer were out to balls that gave
them no chance. The others fell to
traps of their own devising, and—
once again the last over cost a
priceless batsman. Christiani, who
had excelled, muddled a ball that
came in to him, and was bowled
with the last ball of the day.

The Second Test here began
with a sensation. Lindsay Hassett
won the toss and decided to put
the West Indies in. His reasons
were believed to be that there was
a patch at mid-wicket where some
rain had seeped under the covers
during the night, and that there
was a stiff breeze which could be
used to assist Lindwall. If these
were the reasons and indeed none
other could be found, then there
are probably the slightest reasons
that have ever influenced a cap-
tain to condemn himself to a
fourth innings,

In every other respect the wicket
seemed made for batsmen and
when Rae and Stollmeyer opened
they suddenly proved it. None was
in any trouble from the beginning.
The wicket played so easy as to be
almost lifeless and as for wind—
all it achieved in the first hour was
to blow Hassett’s hat off.

Lacked Accuracy

Lindwall while finding good
length lacked his usual accuracy.
He obliged the openers by bowling
frequently outside the off stump,
leaving them the freedom to ignore
the ball, which they did,

We saw now that both batsmen
are obviously fully imbued with a
sense of responsibility. West In-
dian batting is always refreshing
in its vigour, but it was even more

eshing in its restraint during
the dangerous hour with Miller
and Lindwall working up to full
speed with the vagaries of a stiff
wind always to be reckoned in the
batsman’s calculations.

“Scoring strokes were almost en-
tirely limited to the leg side where
both Rae and Stollmeyer made de-
lightful placement, using their
wrists to get the ball off their toes.
Stollmeyer once straight drove
Miller for a powerful three and
turned him hard to square leg for
four. Generally, however, his
mood was a quiet and efficient
concentration, leaving Hassett to
entertain the beginning of dread-
ful doubt.

Lindwall twice bowled short at
maximum speed in an effort to lift
the ball but the best he could
achieve was only waist high to
Stollmeyer who played him easily

into the ground.

i —



Why Not Marshall?

While this resolute partnership
continued, Goddard had time to
reflect. He had banked on losing
the toss and had decided to include
Prior Jones in place of Marshall,
thus having his fastest bowler to
take advantage of the conditions
that had attracted Hassett.

He did lose the toss, but Hassett
confounded him by sending the
West Indies in to bat. Now, he was
without a first class batsman in
circumstances he had never im-
agined.

In any case there were grounds

for criticising this choice. Marshall
had scored a century on this very

ground and has been the most con-
sistent batsman since the tour be-
If anyone had to give way to
Jones, it would better have been

gan.

Christiani,

However, the deed was done.

Rae Out
After an hour

lashed at a
stone.

He mistimed the ball completely
and cocked it up behind the wicket
where Johnson took a simple catch.
bowled
Johnstone, 17. One wicket for 33

Rae, caught Johnson,

runs.
Stollmeyer now

for four.

Undeterred by this escape, and,
perhaps even encouraged by his
hooked
Miller for four and straight drove
him for four, these strokes coming
between periods of watchfulness
which always contained the hint
In 20
minutes he had passed Stollmeyer
who was still giving nothing away
—an attitude of mind eminently

good fortune, Worrell

of menace for the bowler.

suited to the circumstances,
Worrell seemed

ently
that it could be hit,

Worrell Hits Out

The crowd which had grown to
12,000 began to murmur excitedly
as the West Indian star spread-
eagled the field with glances and
drives always reaching away to
within yards of the fence. The 50
came-up in 80 minutes, Stollmeyer
took his runs still safely on the leg



side, but Worrell even wnen play-
the ball with moré finish.

68, Stollmeyer not out 25, Worrell

had yielded 28
runs and both Miller and Lindwall
had been tried with the wind and
Bill Johnstone against it, Rae, en-
couraged by a powerful square cut
that had earned him runs before,
full toss from John-

16 was joined
by Frank Worrell who immediately
scored off the first ball and was
missed off a knife edge chance by
Ian Johnson whose fingers scraped
the ball as he flung himself full
length to the next one which went

determined to
establish quickly his superiority
over the bowling, having appar-
decided from the pavilion

BARBADOS ADVOCATE *



a eee

bee

R. CHRISTIANI

tae



F. WORRELL C.

WALCOTT
a half stroke to a ball from
Lindwall that came in to him and
took the off bail

Weekes, bowled Lindwall for 5,
and the score 3 for 99.

Worrell’s High Fortune

Two wickets had gone far tuo
easily, but Worrell was still there,
playing with attitude of command
that seemed blithely innocent of
the risks he took and the disaster

moved. I am told that no sound
came from them—which was prob-
ably as well for his immediate lis-
teners.

Worrell, bowled Ian Johnson, 64.
Four for 139.

ing defensively, insisted on hitting
At lunch the score was one for

25; extras one. It was apparent
that Hassett’s inexplicably daring
gamble had failed. If the West
Indies now fell short of a reall
substantial total, it would be their
own fault, unassisted by anything
i the wicket.

The West Indies ran into a bad

Walcott Emerges
Walcott now emerged from his
place where he had waited in the
wings scoring 14, and joined by
Christiani, proceeded to adminis-

period after lunch, Stollmeyer oe spared. He flashed his bat ee eee ee a ee
and Worrell had kept the score ?/1¢ Commanded luck to serve him. yore.” Ghristiani went eagerl
moving briskly alony’, with prom- !t did, probably fascinatei like after the runs as usual, but it was
ise of more humiliation for the the crowd, by such casual ease Walcott who dominated, hitting
unfortunate Hassett, and sudden flashes of punishing para down the line of the ball and
power + ammnadl rivi

Most Masterly Shot We had an outstanding example ice th soiielan, tie ‘cae

One shot in particular from of his high fortune, when he and jian field retreated into the middle
Stollmeyer thad been the most aot ree confused a distance, while Walcott hooked
masterly of the day—almost the Short run, arvey, a deadly an led th -
most masterly of any day—when thrower, was fielding close to the rack i ponies ae eee

drove with stinging power—
specially stinging to the hands of
any fielder unlucky enough to
have to intercept the ball, Miller,
erought on, was soon taken off
again. Bowling savagely short, he
was repeatedly hooked by Walcott,
who disdained to notice that some
of these shots were being danger-
ously lofted around Neil Harvey.

he turned Lindwall off his toes
for four to square leg, It was a
wicked ball at a tremendous pace,
keeping low, and swinging in late
to the wicket, It deserved to dis-
miss any batsman in the world.
Instead, Stollmeyer turned i*
into the boundary—a feat possi-
ble only to a batsman of the very
highest class,

wicket. Worrell made only a token
run back half the length of the
wicket so hopeless did it seem, but
Harvey threw madly wide of the
stumps. Langley did a goalkeeper
leap to take the ball, and then
flung himself ball and all upon the
wicket. To Worrell’s ainazement,
this pantomime had taken long
enough for him to be home.

, , 1 ; The 200 came up in 248 minutes.
It was all more tragic that this _ He immediately cut Lindwan 0 i i
elegant opener should fall to the head high through the slips wide of eee Nh a dh aiden
comparatively simple temptation Miller. The ball went to the V

The West Indies were fighting
into a strong position when Ring
was brought on. He had been
bowling his flighted slows into a
strong wind, but the wind had
seemed to hamper rather than hel
him. Now he tried again, and o!
his second ball Walcott played a
shot under the rise, and Langley
took a gentle catch,

Walcott, caught Langley, bowled
Ring, 60. Five wickets for 218,

of a ball rising over the wicket.
He touched it with fatal result,
and was caught at first slip by
Ian Johnson, bowled Lindwall for
36. Two wickets for 85,
Weekes Not Himself

Worrell, now 30 was joined by
Weekes, who strode out with what
seemed his usual magnificent
confidence, But it was quickly
obvious that he was far from
himself. He flashed out his hall-
mark—the savage hook, but one It
sensed a lack of his usual zest,
He could run only two when three
were possible, and once pulled up
in mid-wicket with what seemed
a sudden strain,

With growing disappointment,
one began to realise that this
would not be the day for one of
his electrifying innings, It was
little surprise when he made only

boundary while the crowd gaped
in amazement at a man who saw
no risk anywhere.

Walcott was already showing a
Swinging bat that was eager for
runs, but he had to mark time
while Worrell swept Ian Johnson
away behind square-leg and sent
Miller back on his heels with
straight drives that hissed past his
teet,

Worrell! Out
seemed that nothing morta)
could stop him reaching his hun-
dred. It proved that only one
mortal could—Worrell himself, T«
what was nearly a long-hop from
Ian Johnson, he had so many al-
ternative opportunities of hitting
the boundary that he could not
choose between them, He pulled
the ball onto his wicket with the
inside edge of the bat. His lips

Gomez Floppy Hot

Gerry Gomez in his pe:sonal
floppy white hat came out to face
Lindwall with the new ball, not a
situation he would prefer if he
had any choice. But he is a hardy
plant and flourishes in any type of
soil. He let Christiani shoot into
‘he lead, and busied himself with
staying in and taking a run here

——-







RECENT COOKING TESTS
HAVE PROVED THAT

MELLO-KREEM

AND

GLOW SPREAD MARGARINE
‘can be used in the place of BUTTER

for Cooking at great Saving especially
since COOKING BUTTER has been
recently advance I2¢ per lb.

Remember the Price of MELLO-KREEM
and GLOW SPREAD MARGARINE

remains the same.

Send to your Grocer for a Tin To-day
and see why others are Cooking with
MARGARINE instead of Butter.

MELLO-KREEM

$2.70 per 5 lb Tin or GI? per lb. Tin

GLOW SPREAD MARGARINE
$2.75 per 5 lb Tin or @2¢ per pk.





SITION





and a run there, whenever they
came to him.

Christiani on War Path

Not so Christiani. He assaulted
Ring and Miller as they have sel-
dom been as#aulted and roared
his score along to 50, passed Wor-
rell’s previous top score, and ad-
vanced into the seventies with
every stroke in the book, notably
featuring his straight drive and leg
sweep. He was facing a tiring
field (who would no doubt have
something to say later in the eve-
ning to Lindsay Hassett whose
bright idea this all was) and he
took full advantage of them. The
score was five for 286 when Hole,
who had been brought on in des-
peration, beat Christiani with a
ball that turned into him. Again
Christiani was bowled by Hole,
for 76.

U.K. Yacht To
Compete In
Berniuda Race

LONDON, Nov. 30.



Britain has built a new 58 foot
six inch yacht to compete in next
the most
the
world which always has been
won by Americans. The new
challenger is being built to order
by Liloyd’s Yacht Club and _ is
over £15,000.
The crew will be ten. Lloyds will
The Yacht will be
she
time to
sail the Atlantic for the race in

year’s Bermuda race,
important yacht race in

expected to cost

sail her home,
shipped via New York as
won't be completed ih

' June.

i

; YESTERDAY’S
WEATHER REPORT

FROM CODRINGTON
Rainfall: Nil
Total Rainfali for Month to
date: 6.78 ins,
Highest Temperature: 84.5 °F
Lowest Temperature: 71.5 °F
Wind Velocity 8 miles per
hour

+ (9 a.m.) 29.983
(3 pam.) 29.917



~

WHAT’S ON TODAY

Film Show for children at
the British Council, “Wake-
field” 9.00 a.m.

Police Courts 10.00 a.m.

First and Second Division
and Intermediate cricket

| at the various grounds 1.30

p.m.

!| Police Band plays for the

| Old Ladies Annual Bazaar

at the Drill Hall 3.00 p.m.

| Sunrise: 6.00 a.m.
Sunset: 5.36 p.m.
|] Moon: New, November 28
t Lighting: 6.00 p.m.
|} High Tide: 5.58 a.m.,
p.m.
Low Tide: 11.16 a.m.

aaa

5.26

'











is the word

for these

Five Piece Sets in blue, green and Pink.

Three Piece Sets with pattern ee: $1 4.39
































SATURDAY, DECEMBER i, 1951

‘LADIES

DRESSING TABLE SETS

64.27
$22.47
620.33



Per Set



Five Piece Sets with a charming pattern
on the backs. Per Set ...........



Three Piece Sets in blue, pink and green.
Per Set $14.28 and

Per Set

Cave Shepherd & Co., Ltd.

10, 11, 12 & 13 BROAD STREET









encom rma ete ie

lll again ARMM BN am



Full Text






ESTABLISHED 1895



Reds Prepare ,

New Offensive

If Peace Talks Fail

_ 8TH ARMY, H.Q,, Korea, Nov. 30,
The Communists massed one of their biggest troops

and s buildups of the Korean war, while their arm-
3 oes fought the Allied demand for an arms

ted Nations planes reported that an unpre-
cecunted 9,220 Communist trucks were clogging the North
orean supply roads last night and to-day. The number

is nearly twice the previ i ;
narmal waffic previous record sighted and four times



Education
‘alks Open



_.The Reds appeared to be tak-
ing advantage of the lull in ground
fighting to strengthen their de-
pleted armies for ‘® big new of-
fensive, if the truce talks collapse.

The buildup may explain the
reason for the Communist rejec-
tion of the U.N. demand in the
truce talks for a ban on the rein-
forcement of their side during the





A British Caribbean education
conference opens on Monday, the
3rd December, at Hastings House,
the headquarters of the Develop-
ment and Welfare Organization,
and will continue for the rest of
the week,

Sir George Seel, K.C.M.G.,
Comptroller for Development and
We » Will open the first
session. Mr, J. L. Nicol, O.B.E.,
Education Adviser to the Comp-
troller, will be in the chair.

ie provisional agenda contains
some 15 items. Among them are
the provision of staff and accom-
modation to meet the needs of the
largely increased school popula-
tion; the provision of technical—
ineluding commercial and agri-
cultural—education; school broad-
casting; literacy campaigns; train-
ing in handcrafts, and housecraft
instruction for girls; the produc-
tion and supply of textbooks,
school feeding and medical ser-
vices.

Delegates will discuss the reso-
lutions of the Fifth Delegate Con-
ference of the Caribbean Union
of Teachers held in August, 1950.

The following will be present: .—

Chairman :—J. L. Nicol, O.B.E., Edu-
cation Adviser to the Comptroller for
Development and Welfare.

Barbados :—C. G. Reed, Director of
Education.

E. C. M. Theobalds, Deputy Director
of Education.

A. W. Roberts, Principal,
TBM $B iamiton, Prine
bados ‘Evening Institute, si aepblgae

British Guiana :—F, Ogle, Director of

Erdiston

Education.

Major C, E. Darlington, T.D., Prin-
cipal, Technical Institute.

R. C. G. Potter, Principal, Govern-

ment Training College,

British Honduras :—E. B. V. Browh,
Director of Education.

Jamaioa :—The Hon. J. Z. Malcolm,
Minister for Education,

H. Houghton, Director of Educatton.

A. J. Newman, M.C., Principal, Mico
Training College.

R. M. Murray, Education Officer.

Leeward Islands—D. L. Matheson, Act-
ing Federal Education Officer.

Trinidad :—Capt. E. W. Daniel, Direc-
tor of Education.

L. Kenworthy,
Training College.
WINDWARD ISLANDS:

Dominica :—J, H. Maurice, Education
Officer.

Grenada :—A. C. G. Palmer, O.B.E.,
Education Officer

St. Lucia :—O. A. Walker, Acting Edu-
Renner

incent :--C. V. D. Hadley, Educa-

tion Officer. ’

Secretaty:—M. S. Staveley, Develop-/
ment and Welfare Organisation.

In addition, Mr, Kenneth Ablack will
attend the discussions on school broad-
casting.

U.S. Renientbers
Pearl Harbour

NEW YORK, Nov. 30,

The national magazine Colliers
said editorially Friday that “Am-
ericans have not forgotten Pearl
Harbour ... but they put old ani-
mosities aside because they must
be put aside.”

The editorial, in connection with
the tenth anniversary of the Pearl
Harbour attack, said the United
States made a formal peace with
Japan and granted limited sov-
ereignty to Germany ‘“‘not because
there is necessarily any love be-
tween the victors and the van-
quished, but because both are
faced with a common threat to
their freedom and existence.” te

Principal Government



Korean armistice, and the right
of inspection teams to check be-
hind the Red lines for violations.
Red Convoys Attacked
Night flying B26 light bombers
and shore-based marine planes
raked Communist truck convoys
with bullets, bombs, and rockets.
They claimed to have destroyed
at least 300 and damaged uncount-
ed others in dusk to dawn raids. |
The pilots reported that the Red |
trucks moved in long convoys with |
lights blazing in defiance of Allied |
raiders. The heaviest traffic was
on the Wonsan-Pyongyang east
west highway and on the two SYDNEY, Dec. 1.
main north south arteries from] West Indians have the chance)
Manchuria through Western]of a lifetime of giving Australia|
Korea. a drubbing in the Second Test!
U.N. fighter bombers took over|being played at Sydney cricket)
attacks in daylight, hitting rail-|8Tound. After a great day’s play |
lines in addition to highways|0” Friday heavy rain fell Friday}
leading to supply dumps. night with Australia to bat Satur-
An Eighth Army communique day. If the West Indians dont
reported that two Communist|Win this Test the chances of de-

platoons attacked a U.N. advance} feating Australia at all in this
tour are slim to a point of non-

turn to Clarence House to see his

W. Indies |
Can Win

From FRANK MARGAN

BIRTHDAY PICTURE of Prince Charlos,
year-old cousin Prince Ricnard of Gloucester in the Paik, who walked beside Prince



position southwest of Kumsong| tout as yesterday had begun, and who sent a lethal postal package] only the creation of a war machine |acterized the latest. Russian move
on the central front, soon after Soca Ph AR gi eae Oe brought rugs and blankets | to a Adoif Wolfard, the editor/with an “aggressive” potential andjes a positive step with hopeful
midnight. The is were re-|*") ne inate Cante = Lin isay; From the start of the gamejwhether the, purpose of merely of emen Natchichten and two] that it does not preclude the crea- | possibilities, though nobody en-
pulsed after a two-hour fight. Sone y Pig hiteats ey eorltiae {neither Goddard nor Gomez felt at }staying in should not now be| ther persons, tion of land forces to be knit into]tertains any illusions about the
No Action coe badly Bap he co Yer liberty to take any action that] nodifled and attention paid to the Wolford was killed when heja collective security arrangement)East ironing out the conflicting
An estimated Red platoon a itsaine than at “first thought might warnr themselves. They}ueed for runs, opened the cylindrical package|in which United States and other} Rast—~West standpoints on dis-
which launched a second attack | Hassett thought the Test wicket to |be#an by watching every ball on} Against Lindwall however, who} in his office here, and his secre-| regional powers would provide sea j armament particularly the prob-
east of the Pukhan River, south-|be sporty added a that gale to the bat while Lindwall using} was bowling a number of balls| tary and another member of and air power, liems of controls inspection,
east of Kumsong was also thrown| blowing right down the pitch that|the ball now old, worked up to} shat kept low, it was obvious that] the newspaper staff was serious-| There are those who assert that, Aside from affirmations on the
back within a half hour. U.N.| would assist his speed attack. So|'5 best pace. ioddard and Gomez could do} ly injured. A second bomb explo-|the proper eS of the necessity for the reduction of
infantryman on the Western be exe this Went: Y diane in.” Butt Johnston Uncertain ittle but defend. It was lucky for | ded in a letter box of the crowded sconstitution would forbid even the | armament, the banning of the
Front reported their fourth|the wicket proved easy and the| At the other end Bill Johnston hem that their foe was not armed | Post Office killing a girl, creation of limited land contin=|atom bomb and the conclusion of
straight day of no action except| batsmen were able to. overcome|seemed uncertain just what role vith the new tae for the swing The third bomb was received gents. —U.P. par a Big Five peace pact the Rus-
for occasional patrol skirmishes|the pace bowling to a tune of 286)|to adopt. He was torn between! '¢ imparts to it would have| by a grain dealey in the nearby sian press has not yet given any
in No Man’s Land, after whichyruns with six wickets down. pace and flight and obviously} eer probably too great @ menace sown: cf Verben, Mg heard ‘tedie C’WEALT#I SUGAR PACT intimations pt the proposed tour
each side returned to its own] Now with rain Friday night the |doubted whether the wicket would or them to conquer. warnings, broadcast after the " power meeting.
position . great spin combination of Valen-jitake spin should he fall back op Rum Would Have Been first two explosions, however, WILL BE SIGNED a
However, Allied artillery on]|tine and Ramadhin is likely to his stock of leg breaks. Con~ tt he immediately took the parcel
the Western Front was back in|press home the advantage the!sequently he served up a mixe dg) Better to the police, who rendered it WITHIN 10 DAYS M ~ DEPOT.
action, iteresumed “normal fire”|batsmen have given them andjjob of — bowing — occasional? Aiter this hour iced drinks were | harmless. Tie became suspicious : , AR Ss . :
on Thursday after falling silent] force Australia into defeat, startling Gomez with one that[brought out. I don't believe there |when he read the notice “to be From OM NONDON Nov at Ip
for 24 hours, owing to a misin-| If Australia somehow manages|came over with all the strength}is any rule about intimidating }opened personally by recipient.” Th we as th, vagal BLOWN u
terpretation of Van Fleet’s ‘No to win this Test the tourists only|of his shoulders, and then trying> batsmen by giving them cold The death package to Wolfard ais ant I ay (igen iL Athi 5 ‘
Attack” order to mean ceasefire, |ihave themselves to blame, to float one into the wind, drinks on a cold day but I am|ecarried the same notice, Some [ieee ne iee aaa nee ee aes within BERLIN, Nov. 30.
U.N. guns fired 2,400 shells at} Four West Indians on Friday} Gomez is of the very character} certain that both would have given | officials have labelled the plot as|)° ar Pp ere: —. An Anti-Communist organiza-
Communist positions on the West-| after batting brilliantly presented|to mect such mixture He thim-Jall the iced drinks on earth for | political, and the work of “either Meeiite The ‘Aeininies ae — tion in a report based on the testi-
ern Front in the past 24 hours. their wickets to Australia by}self has a wide mixture of abilityJsome hot rum from their native J leftwing or rightwing extremists.” PARE ae ote this. te ae mony of Iron Curtain refugees
The Reds replied with 300 rounds stupid strokes that a schoolboy and patience to sort things out}islands. Maybe I am putting my U.P, it is Aenean thet excevt for mak said Friday that armed Czecho-
of mixed mortar and artillery fire,| would think twice about playing. like an old lady untangling wool] thoughts into their heads, as s , I

At sea, Allied warships con-
tinued a non-stop bombardment

of the Communist East Coast] Viewpoint

ports of Wonsan and Hungnam,
and extended operations as far
north as Songijin.

War In The Air

destroyed the largest total o
Communist planes in the war to-
day, shooting down 10 probably
destroying one and damaging four.

Thirty-one F86 Sabre Jets sight-
ed 12 medium bombers similar to
the U.S. B26’s south of Antung
on the South Korean side of the
Yalu River, shooting down six of
the bombers, probably destroying
three, and destroying one M.1.G.
15.

It was the first time that bomb-
ers had been encountered south
of the Yalu River, since June 20,
when the Fifth Air Force fighters
shot down a two-engined bomber.
All U.N. jets returned safely to
their bases.

The F86’s were on a fighting
sweep far into “M.I.G.” Alley”
near the Yalu when pilots spotted
12 T42 bombers at about 250
m.p.h. about 15,000 ft. up. The
bombers were sighted near An-
tung and were flying on a south-
ern course. U.



Blow S
West In

: make Fo

r

Mid-East

(By SAM SOUKI)

CAIRO, Nov. 30,

The West Indians are wonderful
cricketers from

strokes all the time but foolish
indiscretions don’t win Tests—
especially against Australia. If

the tourists use a little more con-
centration the
In the air, U.N. jet fighters]the Aussies
jcrown for

macy will be much easier.

Stollmeyer
mammoth score
wickets flicking at
should have been left alone. The
Australians would have left them

mind that during
with them is business, grim busi-|

cott all lost their
same manner as the openers.

the spectators’

since they go for

task of defeating
and securing the
world cricket supre-}



Rae and
for a

their
which

On Friday openers
looked set
but lost
balls

alone although they have been'
barracked by the crowd for)
stodginess. The Australians dont}

a Test—cricket |

ness. Worrell, Christiani and Wal-
wickets in the!

If the tourists rid themselves of

these indiscretions no bowler in
the world have much chance
capturing their wickets. A win

in this Test might break the tour-
ists out of this bad batting habit.
If it does the West Indians will
win the Test rubber.

—U.P.



Argentine Govt.

Y |Takes Over Shaw’s

Royalties

BUENOS AIRES, Nov. 30.
Bernard Shaw’s accumulated
literary rights and royalties from
the sale of books and

Argentina .were' ordered pro-

Lt. Col. Adid El Shishaklj in seizing control of Syria onj visionally to be paid to the Gov-

Wednesday night, struck a b

low for the Western Powers in

the Middle East, that has been drifting steadily away from

the West.

ernment Friday by Federal Civil
Judge Roberto Tieghi because he
left no heirs.

Under Argentine legislation

The immediate reason for overthrowing the newly] estates pass to the Ministry of

formed Government of Dr. Maaruf Dawalibi was to return] Education where

the Defence Ministry to army hands,

But Shishakli is said to want
close co-operation with the Uni-
ted States, and observers here be-
lieve he will try to form a Gov-
ernment which will seek a form-~-
ula for: working with the Western
Powers. *

Dawalibi, on the other hand, al-
ways advocated a Friendship Pact
with Russia. It is felt here that
Shishakli wants to promote a deal
under which Syria will be the
corner-stone of a Western Arab
Defence Pact against Soviet ag-
gression.

In return, Syria will expect the
United States to modernize her
army as it has done Turkey’s.

Military Training

Shishakli began his military
training under the French who
then held mandate over Syria.
His studies included a course at
the French West Point at St. Cyri,
where he later held various posts.
During fighting in Palestine, he
formed a volunteer force composed

of Syrians and a few Iraqis.
force carried out several raids o
Jewish settlements in the Holy
Land.

Observers in Cairo think that it| Shaw’s

Shishakli can find and implement
a formula under which Syria will]
get some of her requirements
quickly, such as modern army
equipment, he may score a knock-
out in the first round against
neutralist factions in his country.
But if the fight drags through
several more undecided rounds, it
might have serious repercussions
throughout the uneasy Middle
East.—U.P,

Congratulations

LONDON, Nov. 30.
Near East Arab radio reported
Friday night that Damascus radio
broke a 24 hours silence on the



Shishakly. —U.P.

This; forward.
n| allowed the intervention of the

there are no

heirs. The court advertised in
the newspapers no heirs came
However the Court

British Embassy through the
Argentine Foreign Ministry, since
heirs are the British
the Royal Academy and
—W.P.

Museum,
Irish National Gallery.



Sudanese Envoys
Confer With M.P’s

LONDON, Nov. 30.
A three-man Sudanese delega-
tion, which is opposed to Egypt's
claim to the Sudan, conferred on
Thursday night at the House of

Commons with 50 members of
Parliament in an hour long ses-

sion. Labourite Fermer Brockway
presided over the méeting, during
which Yacoub Osman, the leader
of the delegation, made a 30-min-

internal situation with a series of|ute statement on the Sudan's de-
messages from various Syrian|sire for self-determination. The
provincial towns congratulating] delegation was leaving to-day for



the United Nations in Paris,—U.P.

' met

plays in’



SATURDAY, DECEMBER 1,. 19



PRINCE CHARLES ON THIR? BURTHDAY



Miss Heler

m=

with his nanny,

birthday presen.

a

West Indies
Out For. 362

(From HAC

o
>

THE WEST INDIES. were: al
in the Second Test here, heli
luncheon period.

In overcast weather with
come Goddard and Gomez t

ing the West Indies overnight









in her work basket. Both batsmen having no doubt 2 5 or two points, the draft document army munitions repot recently.
Bill Johnston therefore found] shuddered after such refreshment . 7 -om * 4%, jdrawn up during their own pre- The report said that partisan

that all his efforts met with anjas they were offered, now este’ Make Surprise Raid ee talks is now ready for activity apaiat eres rulers

appropriate defence and when he ed and runs immediately began to, E i ti ; P li iva Sete " increased greatly in Czechoslo-

had run out of ideas Hassett}come more quickly. “Goddard’s £yp an OCE ee ” vakia and Poland.—U.P

brought on Ring. Gomez wel-|neat leg glance brought him steady THE EVA PERON Loman , .

comed this change with a straight} profit while Gomez scorched out CAIRO, Nov. 30,

driven four probably from the}the off side os eee a. Egyptian police staged a sur- IS hua

relief of meeting a man whofsent the agile Archer dashing| prise raid on underground guer- | BIRKENHEAD, England, Nov. 30 Bene nes ,

bowls leg breaks which although} along the off boundary to cut fours|jila headquarters here last night] The 18,000 tanker Eva Peron, SECOND TEST MATCH

they turn hardly at all could still}into twos In 84 minutes the playtand seized stocks of home-made)the last of four vessels built by West Indies 362

be classified as such had added 50, . —— feng ecd bombs and quantities of explo-|the firm of Cammel Laird for a stralia (f k
Lindwail -Sivikes Cnddaed ment anid wat examnpls $0 he more’ sives. ‘The headquarters were [petroleum firm of Buenos Aires, Austra (for 3 Ww cts)
Goddard at the other end Ga the pavilial The ene how bhid operated by Ahmed Hussein of }Was launched to-day. The vessel] } vcs eeers 131

adopted the part of anchor, He}y).4 th esr- cotital last out the whats the Socialist Party which directed wae christened by the wife of the Close Of Play

refers to himself in this wWway,} coceion before lunch: Hole, who hadj UNderground training. Argentine Ambassador in London, 7

and modestly — disclaiming much got rid of Christian in yesterday's The party chief protested Carlos Hogan.—U.P. Mintitniédihdinemmme

hope of making runs, declared}j.c¢ over was brought on to see|®sainst the police action to the

he feels he can stay whentir he could repeat the trick but he| Egyptian Government.

wanted, He underestimates him-Poouid not and went off in favour] Informed sources regarded the

self—he gets runs as well butler jan Johnson’s intelligent off|raid as Government implementa-

this morning he certainly stayed spinners. Gomez’ 50 came up just} tion of the recent decision to take

He faced Lindwall with all the
certainty he showed when he first
him and after half an hour
anyone entering the ground would
have supposed he was watchin;
the two openers. They were ¢or



Well Diggers Die In
Freak Accident

CHILE, SANTIAGO, Nov. 30,

Three well diggers were killed
and four other persons
two seriously, in a freak accident
at one of the local suburbs last
night. One worker, who had been
digging at about a 17 ft. level and
called for help was apparently,
trapped in a small cavine.

Two workers, who went down

ex about 30 minutes after thi
c 3 t « are vl . ”
rect, studied _and apparent! | interval MAC ARTHUR
immovable. So immovable indec ASHLAND WISCONSIN, Nov. 30.
that Lindwall finally rt WES? INDIZS—1st Inning The complete slate of "delegates
yery short be é 70d~ | Rae ¢ lan Johnson t Johnstone 17 ers ,
tgerg Goddard Malt Par teed ea Blots: ever : ei tase y rane neering MacArthur for ee don
eee ee es Lindwall 36 | wi ye entered soon in the New
ee | nid eet hin Sed — Worrell b lan Johnson 64 | Hampshire Presidential Primary,
shoulder, Lindwall was immediate~- | weeke b Lindwall 5 . 2 7 re ‘T
ly shocked by the blow and stood | Waleott ¢ Langley b Ring 60 John Chapple lahat a 18 at
with hand to his mouth. Goddard {Christiant b Hole . of the “Fighters for MacArthur’ |
| , a \ as Gamez ibw Johnston h club said Friday
| straightened himself, stood with | Goadard cl) Johnson b Johnste 3 New Hamp ite will ba the fort |
great dignity and gravely sur-{Jones Ibw Lindwall 1 ‘ ' id. ’ Pre eatin
veyed the bowler who had thus) Rartadhin b Lindwall state to 1Ol¢ a residential
oe id bi t ea firm | Valentine not out 6 | Primary next year with th
coer Bim Re eM ty Extras 16 | election slated for March 11, to
rs » ‘le » : ational
| After one hour the score hac | ‘Total 162 name delegates to the —
risen only by 25 nuns and doubt | Convention. wth.
{was beginning to creep in as to} ;
} |
‘ '
}

|

including the two
cuers and the Intendente of
Province, who was watching
rescue operations.—U.P.

re
tt

persons,
i

the



Explorer Seeks Bones
Of Ancient Indians











BUENOS AIRES, Nov. 3

Swedish explorer Stig Ry@en
who is plar go to Bolivia
in, search fe he bones of archaic
indians postponed until Saturday,
his depar for Lapaz he
could not obtain pullman space in
i ntert in —WU.P.

i



5

1



|

Nine Men
Take Over
In Thailand

BANGKOK, Thailand, Nov
A nine-man Military

30
Council
imposed iron rule on this ancient
oriental kingdom after

immediate campaign to drive all






—ON DISARMAMENT

PARIS, Nov. 30.

Russia to-day joined the Western Powers in accepting
the Small Powers proposal for secret United Nations Big
Four disarmament talks. The Soviet Foreign Minister,
Andrei Vyshinsky announced the Kremlin's willingness
to go along, in his speech to the General Assembly’s main
Political Committee. But the road to private Big Power
talks is not yet completely open, because Vyshinsky made
no reference in his 29-page performance to the Western
demand for a 10-day time limit




+ -- —— -~ - . The United States delegate
~ Philip C. Jessup, took the floor,

~ right after Vyshinsky to “wel-

It Is For Japan (cine: Miccoe S tceptance, ana
‘ to make clear the West's insist-

| > » ence that the talks should be

oO Decide strictly limited—both in time and

in subject matter

WASHINGTON, Nov. 30




alleged Communism and
from the Pibul Government
Pibul, the wartime Premier un-
der Japanese occupation, survived
a brief uprising of dissident Navy

graft} Questions as to whether Japan

should re-arm to a limited extent
and if so whether this would re-
quire constitutional amendment

He met his seven-
Charles on his re

n Lightbody.



ae : are for the people of Japan to de-
officers, last June. He swam to] cide without outside pressure
Shore from a warship, after be-

That is the view of the majority
of American officials closely con-
nected with diplomatic matters in
the Japanese area

Many of them,
no secret of the fact that they be-
lieve some Japanese “unrealistic”
when they believe they can remain
totally disarmed and make no con-
tribution to collective security ar-
rangements in the Pacifie.

ing Kidnapped, and

role as the

strongman,—-U.P
gmat —t P.

resumed his

nation’s postwar

MURDER ti
BY MAIL



. BREMEN, Germany, Nov. $ Officials here well realize that

LD DALE) td | Bremen police ined. inane hl gu eg ch ge ro 3

SYDNEY, Dee. 1 marks, ($2,400) reward for in-| concede the necessity for limited

lL out for 362 against Australia formation leading to the arrest aie i by the creation _of

an hour after the end of the | of persons responsible for the ip Bagel com Ba Pag ari

jtriple bombing, that yesterday pine constitution woulda hanes ‘

: . | killed two and seriously injured}}. . 4 ee oe
promise of light showers to} 13° others. i North Ger cae ©) be amended to permit this

egan their task of consolidat- | siuatineweumaiian le as There are those who contend

. ¢ | A major investigation is also}that article nine of the constitu-

total. The day was as cold| underway to find the person| tion can he interpreted to prohibit

stripping
Premier Pibul Songgram ot tis
administrative powers in 4 blood-
less revolt. The provisional Exec-
utive Council composed of three
Army Chiefs, three Admirals and
three Airforce Officers ordered an

most of the 18,000 crowd had



28 Vyshin=
speech were devoted to a
of the familiar Soviet
on the armaments race,

was not in the

The first of
sky's
repetition
arguments
3ut his language
scathing sarcastic tradition.

There is little hope, here, that
the talks will get very far on dis-
armament. Jessup underlined the
Western, attitude to the talks in
terms that would appear com-
pletely unacceptable to the Rus-
sians.—U,P.

CAUTIOUS
OPTIMISM

pages



MOSCOW, Nov. 30.
Diplomatic cireles greeted the
report of Vyshinsky’s announce~

ment that Russia is ready to join

four power disarmament

with cautious optimism
Some Western gpservers char-

talks



injurec|, |

to aid him, were themselves “Historically, politically, geo- |
trapped. Firemen rescuers brought graphically, economically, ethno

them up unconscious, but the _« . ogically, linguistically and re- |
oxygen tube the firemen were Russian Geologist ligiously, Egypt and the Sudan |
using to revive them, exploded. form a cohesive unit.” He said}
The explosion killed the uncon- Flees To Freedom WAY dividing line between Egypt |
scious workers, and injured fourt ~ a ry and the Sudan “is entirely arti-









before tunch, a priceless and typi-
eal innings A pull for two by
Goddard brought up 350

The players then went to lunch.
The West Indies innings ended for

over control of irregular “Libep-
ation Battalions” and incorperate
them in the Armed Forces.—-U.P.

“FIGHTERS FOR







Egypt And Sudan
Form One Unit |

(By K. C. THALER)
PARIS, Nov. 30,
Egyptian Ambassador Mahmoud Fawzi Bey charged to
day in a prepared statement that Britain’s attitude in the
Sudan question was “still another case of John Bull poking |
his nose where it does not belong and indulging in his usual |
unwarranted imposition.







BERLIN, Nov. 30 ficial and has no topographieal or |

er tx : artin teen |

One of e Russian bosses of fab ea ze Brien hp
Soviet Germany’s uranium mines} *! 38 4 Briti ta ine, it intrudes on
fled through the iron curtain toj7@ality and does violence to the

sa , "
freedom, the West German news- | @ture of things.













paper Die Welt reported Satur- Fawzi Bey said the 1899 agree
day. ment: ith Britain on the Sudan
| ‘ which zgypt ha recently de-

The newspaper said Coloneljnounced “were of a purely ad-
Fedja Astapchoy, chief geologist] ministrative nature and did in no
of the uranium project escaped| way affect or involve the political
from the closely guarded Aue dis-!status of the Sudan and they were
jtrict near the Czech border where] but arrangements for the tem-
{Die Welt said 380,000 Germans. porary extending by Britain of
}were forced to dig uranium to,some sort of technical assistance
tfeed Russia’s atomic plants. in the 1dministration of the|
{ —U.P. |Sudan.”—U.P,



slovak partisans blew up a Czech











—_





IT’S THE TOBACCO THAT COUNTS

ROLLING ae Sr aan RN SIRE ai Sa Rta Roa a






_P AGE TWO



Carub Calling

. oe SAVAGE, wife of His
Excellency the Governor will

1’ the Annual Bazaar at 3
o'clock this afternoon at the Drill
Hall,

Years ago the bazaar used to be
held at Queen’s Park, but for the
past couple of years the Drill
Hall has been chosen and has
proved to be quite as popular.

Always a must on the children’s
programme of activities over
Christmas, it also provides the

grown-ups with a chance to buy
Christmas presents without
trudging into town. The Cook-
Shop Stall is another great attrac-
tion with its many ready cooked
West Indian dishes. Bring along
a container though, if you want to
make a purchase,
To-night’s Dance
BOUT two hours after the
annual bazaar ends another
entertainment goes into action.
Down at the Paradise Beach Club
the Cariton Club are having a
dance, proceeds from which will
go to help pay for their new
pavilion now being erected.
Dancing begins shortly after
9 o'clock.
What’s In A Name
UCKY DIP” produced by
Miles Wood in April 1942
was the Bridgetown Players’ first
production. Somerset Maugham’s
“The Circle’ which has just fin-
ished its run ig probably their
last.
There is rumour of an amalga-
mation between the Players and
the Barbados Dramatic Club.
When the meeting takes place to
discuss final plans for this amal-
gamation, one of the first items
to be discussed will be of course
a name for the combine. Maybe
they will retain the name of the
Bridgetown Players as it is the
older of the-two groups. They may
however choose the name of the
Barbados Dramatic Club arguing
that this weuld be a more appro-
priate titleâ„¢hs it bears the name
of the island. On the other hand
they may hoose a_ completely
new name.“

of Sure
M* C.~ E. SHEPHERD of
“Colleton House”, St. Peter
is due to fly this morning by
T.C.A. to Ganada. He is en route
to Englandsen a visit. How long

is he going to be away? Mr.
Shepherd could not say.

Destination Jamaica

R. v. W. HARKNESS, C.D.
and W’s Medical Adviser
and Mr. C.°A. Grossmith, Admin-
istrative Secretary of the same
organisation left for Trinidad
yesterday by the same _ plane.
Both are en route to Jamaica: Dr.
Harkness to attend a meeting of
the Caribbean Council of the
British Medical Association (as
an observer) and Mr. Grossmith
to attend the forthcoming meet-
ing of the Regional Labour Board.
Dr. Harkness is expected back
on December 12th; Mr, Gross-
mith five days earlier.

PT '

a_ co
Fi Hi
oa
tt
. gue
shea PELE
Bae

Across

Coudiment, perhaps? (9)
3p FF Tent may be a breach of
tulthe (7)
Greab site for gem displays. (9)
B mene, to a doctor. (4

Eak ime-boat for women. (5)
*o'oureol more dread threats. (3)
5 oro®en trip needs little science
to pruduce writing. (6)

Got Up before entraining. (6)
Sown wild early on, (4)

Rent fem. a bird ? (4)
Mustewt=instrument. (5)

ae mt for we unmounted, (4)

r {







+ inedstek ip wearer
SPESSta Toe-c oe

Down
frectea in remembrance (6)
Gptical instrument that will
make lt mere ore. (9)
A card bans the blow gun, (9)
fal ymously known. (9)
insert on intermediate pages, (9)
Born in fine elegance. (3)
Pant. 44)
it you do, you may find. (4)
Meanyy he’s almost remiss. (5)
Careful, Wt stings. (6)
Treated by the physician. (5)
Habitation in nasty surround-
ings. (3)

c~-

WOKKCISGO HE

Solution of vest€rday’s pursle. =~ Across:
1, Avparitor: 9. Naive; Tl, Cave; 18,
Gloom: 15, One; 14, Centre; 15, Samba:
?, Ball; 20. Gan: 21. Ripe: 22, Adorn:
> Sew. 24, Loans; 25, Sent, Down:

Anselicale: 4, Palate: 5S. Pious: 4,
Remember; Icon; i” Tantalise; 7,
Over: 8, amet? mien 16.

Alpen; 18” End.

i*
23
1

Barns: 17



She says ‘No’



The girl Hollywood is grooming
to be a new Jean Harlow rebelli-
ously declines the honor. She js
23-year-old Marilyn Monroe, dub-
bed in American magazines Miss
Cheesecake of 1951

her in All

Do you remember
About Eve—the dumb blonde at
the party? Miss Monroe wants
you to forget all about her party
piece,

“I'm blonde, but neither
nor dizzy,”’ she insists.
actress, that’s me.”

Why must these young actresses
take themselves so _ seriously?
There is fame and fortune in being
ow blonde of the Jean Harlow

ind

dumb
“A serious

Many “serious” actresses are out
of work—in Hollywood as well as
England,

1 te

At Sea
A’ present holidaying in Bar-
bados is Mr, Charles Brad-
shaw who arrived from Canada a
few weeks ago. He is staying with
relatives at “Haynes Hill’, St.
John,

Mr, Bradshaw left Barbados in
1945 and since that time has spent
most of his time at sea, travelling
between North and South Ameri-
ea, Europe, the Persian Gulf and
many other places.

Before he left Barbados he was

on the staff of Cable and Wire-
less.

He expects to be here until
January.

For The Scientific Mind
‘WO films to be shown at the
British Council on December
4 at 8 o'clock will be of special
interest to those of us with a
scientific turn of mind. “Rock of
Industry” which shows quarry-
ing, processing and everyday uses
of limestone, and “Nobel Began
It” describing the making, uses
and commercial by-products of
explosives,

Produced by Imperial Chemical
Industries they are shown locally
through the initiative of the_Bar-
bados Co-operative Cotton “t'ac-
tory. There is no admission

charge. me tiy Y

Civil Aviation Officer

R. I. T. LAWMAN, an officer

of the Ministry of Civ:)
Aviation, England arrived from
British Guiana on Thursday by
B.W.1.A. and is a guest of Wing
Comdr, L. A. Egglesfield, Direc-
tor General of Civil Aviation and
Mrs. Egglesfield. He leaves Bar-
bados tomorrow,

Mr, Lawman attended the re-
cent 1.C.A.0O, Regional Confer-
ence in Buenos Aires as a mem-
ber of the U.K. delegation, He is
on his way back to England but
is taking the opportunity of
visiting as many W.I. territories
as possible during his journey,

Travelling up the West Coast
of South America to Panama he
has already visited Trinidad and
British Guiana, ‘Tomorrow he
will «fly through the northern
islands en route for Jamaica from
where he will fly to the U.K. via
Nassau.

Warner’s Will Film
Grace Moore’s Life

HOLLYWOOD, Nov. 30,

The life story of the late sopra-
no, Grace Moore, will be screened
by Warner Bros. The picture will
depict her life from childhood in
Tennesse, and will range from
night club entertainment to the
Metropolitan Opera. Henry Blanke
will produce the Moore biography
from the screen play peers by
John Monks, Jr.—U.P



ARSON
LISBON:

A 73-year-old Spaniard set fire

to his home in a fit of madness
while his great-grandchild,
3 was sleeping. The child
saved by the mother who
alcohol on a slight burn on
groin, Then the girl died. In u
fit of distraction, the mother had
used sulphuric acid,

put

Rupert and the Lion Rock —12 2



The admiral gazes at the paper in

growing excitement. ‘* What are
all those queer marks on it ?"’ asks
Rupert,. “*Why, don’t you see!
This ig the same code as | solved

with my handyman," cries the
admiral, “*It alters everything

This is whar u says: ‘Ye who
have sought thus far, know ye that
my treasure is not here but lieth
safe in the Lion’s Mouth,’" He
turns and points at a cleft in the
tock above. "Little bear,’ he
bread ** you may yer have saved
the day tor us."



BARBADOS ADVOCATE

Three Antigua Artists

At the Museum, three artists
from Antigua are holding a joint
exhibition, Garner Francis, Arnold

Prince and Cecil Adams. Both
Francis and Prince have held pre-
vious exhibitions of their work
here; Adams, however, is a com-
paratively new comer. Although
junior to his fellow artists, his
work blends well with theirs in
the exhibition

Since a verdict of the recent

wotks of Francis and Prince must
be in the nature of a “Progress Re-
port”, it would be more convenient
to discuss Adams’ work first. This
artist shows two interesting por-
traits, indeed his portraits are his
strongest work, both show much
promise, “Portrait of Eileen” is a

arefully composed painting, while
“Portrait of a Man” suffers from
too heavy a background. In both
attention has been paid to the
bone structure and the skin tex-
tures are pleasing. Unfortunately
“Cotton Pickers” is marred by the
poor anatomy of the figures in the
toreground, for this picture 1s, In
other respects, a piece of realistic
painting. The most successful
iandscape shown by Adams is
“Donkey and Cart”, which is not
only gay, but has charm.

The work of both Francis and
Prince shows an improvement
since their last exhibition. Both
appear to be studying a more real-
istic approach to their subjects,
whether this is to be preferred to
their earlier work is a matter of
individual taste. Certainly both
their drawing and brush-work has
improved.

Francis undoubtedly has a feel-
ing for trees: this can be seen in
“The Country Lane”, “Cathedral
and Trees” and “The Park Road”.
Of the three “The Park Road” is
the most attractive and the most
interesting of his recent paintings.
It is a well balanced composition,
and that the subject does not re-
semble Antigua is a minor matter
to the critic, but may be a very
important one to the souvenir
hunter. In fact, none of these
three paintings are in any way
reminiscent of the tropics in gen-
eral, or of Antigua in particular.
since the greens are much too
“lush”. The colouring suggests
the persistent rainfall of a more
temperate climate, where trees are
more thickly leafed and grass a
more luxuriant green than in the
tropics, where tints of yellow and
brown are found in its vegetation

Then, there is an extravagant
use of too pure a blue by both
artists. An unwary use of white
with such blue in “The Wharf” by
Francis, has produced a_ winter
scene reminiscent of a Dutch canal.
“The Wharf” is, obviously, An-
tigua, and the cold ice-blue setting
was intended for a still, hot day
with reflections in a glassy sea.
Unfortunately, a climatically op-
posite effect has been achieved.

Prince exhibits several seascapes
of which “The Inlet” is the most
successful, since it lacks the lab-
oured effect common to the others,
where rocks although dark and |
heavy give no feeling of mass or
solidity. “Sunlight on the Hills”
is an attractive landscape and
nicely balanced, His “Portrait of
Fines” shows great improvement
in the technique of portrait paint-
ing, and the skin texture is ex-
cellent,

The work of all three artists
would have been greatly enhanced
by frames. The importance of good

framing can scarcely be over-
stressed. “After.the Storm’ lent
by J. M. Charters, Esq., and St
John’s Cathedral lent by Mrs.

M. P. Merrick both show what a
difference a frame makes to a
painting. There appears to be a
highly mistaken view held by
some Caribbean artists that paint-
ings for exhibition do not require



B.B.C. Radio
Programme

SATURDAY, December 1, 1951.
11.10 a.m. Ulster v. The South Africans;
12,00 (noon) The News; 12.10 p.m, News
Analysis.
4.00-—-7.15 2:



48.43 M 31





410 T Daily
League Football,
30 p.m. Sports

4. 00 p-m, The News;
Service; 4.15 Rusby
4.25 p.m. Sports Review;



Y



Review; 5.00 p.m. Ulster v. South Afri
cans; 5.05 p.m Interlude; 5.15 p.m,
From Grand Hotel; 6.00 pm. Music
for Dancing; 645 p.m, Programme
Parade; 7.00 p.m. The News; 7.10 p.m
News Analysis; 7.15 p.m. Behind the
News; 7.30 p.m. Montmartre Players

74A5—10.50 p.m, 31.32 M 48.43 M







Review

743 p.m. Sports ; 815 p.m,
Radi Newsreel; 8.30 p.m. Radio Thea-
tre; 00 The News; 10.10 p.m. From
the itorials; 10.15 p.m. Yours Faithful

ly; 10.30 p.m, All Hale









aged
was

CARLTON CLUB

the

ANNUAL DANCE

Ae

PARADISE BEACH
CLUB

TO-NIGHT

Music by Mr. Carl
Curwen’s Orchestra

Dancing 9 p.m.
e

Admission: $1.00
SSS





JUST ARRIVED

A

DOULTON FIGURES

SHIPMENT OF

BESTFORM _ BRASSIERES

PRAM COVERS

ASSORTED PATTERNS in

Risiediindnneenp liao — 5000

ea iietdiibcontlicinn uccnae ae

PINK, BLUE,

& WHITE

T.R. EVANS & WHITFIELDS

Dial 4606

YOUR SHOE STORES

Dial 4220

frames. Nothing looks more un-
finished than a canvas without a
frame or a watercolour without a
mount The public cannot be

blamed if it fails to visualise what
a painting would look like in a
frame, and, therefore, desists from
buying badly presented work.

Good frames are, undoubtedly, |
an expensive item today, but
elaborate framing is not required.
The artist can exhibit his work inj
frames which are not for sale, or,
with a little ingenuity attractive |
frames can be produced jby the
use of paint, cork, lino, sani, rope
ete.. and a plain wooden frame

The exhibition of oil paintings,
by Cecil Adams, Garner Francis
and Arnold Prince, together with
that of Watercolours and tempra |
paintings by Peggy .Merrick con- |
tinue until 15th December at the}
Museum.

!

|

NOT ACCEPTED |
PRETORIA: |

A 21-year-old South African)
woman is angry because her
country’s airlines will not let her!
become an airliner pilot, A quali-;
fied air charter pilot, she won an!
award for the best woman pilot|
of the year at a recent air rally|
in Capetown. South African air-|
ways argue that they do not em-}
ploy women as pilots because the}
work is too strenuous, |





LIVED

ROME: |

Police, in a motor launch,
cescuing people marooned by the
Po floods, found the body of a
few months old baby wedged in
the branches of a submerged tree,
Not wanting the rescued woman
to see tihe baby’s body, they
wrapped it im a blanket and hid
it under the bonnet of the engine.

Later, they heard a faint cry and}
discovered that the baby had re-
vived through the heat of the
engine.



&

Contains
D.D.T.

Large, medium and small size Tins

ANTS BEETLES

waa THs











Christian Science
Reading Room

“What Christmas Means
and other Christmas
By MARY BAKER
$1.75
Purchased at this
Bowen & Sons,
Open Tuesdays,
Fridays, from 10 a.m
on Saturdays 10

To Me
Messages’
EDDY

room over
Broad Street.
Wednesdays,

2 p.m. and
12 o'clock.

All are Welcome



Get
fancy
the

ANNIVERSARY HOP

of Caribbean Revelry
presented by
Miss Judy Graham's Bridge-
town Theatrical Group

At The



~

MODERN HIGH SCHOOL

TO-NIGHT

out your Hot Shirts
skirts and Jeans for |
|
Music by Percy Green's Orchestra
|
}
|

SUBSCRIPTION — 2/
Refreshments on Sale
REDIFFUSION will bring you the
Test Match commentary right on

the Spot. {
Don't Miss This, ‘















KEEP THIS

DATE OPEN...

Saturday, Ist December,
1951

THE ANNUAL
BAZAAR

will be held
at
THE DRILL HALL,

in aid of the Old Ladies’
Home

XMAS GIFTS

for all ages
TOYS from 1/- up |
Beautiful DOLLS and

i

DOLLS’ HOUSES
| STATION WAGONS

NOVELTIES of all sorts

t
COOKED FOOD,
CAKES, SWEETS,
5

TEAS & ICES

A well-stocked Bar

Many Attractions
FILM SHOW at 5.30
PUNCH & JUDY SHOW
POLICE BAND
LUCKY DIPS &
GAMES OF CHANCE

the children to
themselves.

Bring
enjoy

Shop for Christmas
in comfort & a cool
atmosphere.

1/-
6d.

Admission: :-:

Children & Nurses:







aoe JRON BEDSTEADS WITH SPRINGS

% PRES E LLP PD A LFF LL PEP PDA AEA PPP FFF SFC S SS PPS SITET IIS

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$ WE CAN SUPPLY FROM STOCK:— Ss

$

° s |

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s %

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OUTWARD OPENING CASEMENT WINDOWS | ROBERT PRESTON - CHILL WILLS’
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% The whole Door slides and folds to one side. %| EXTRA:

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1951

SATURDAY,

DECEMBER 1,









—— SS",







B’TOWN
Dial 2310

oi Heile Boys and Girls! —What's On?
i if A GRAND
f Service of Songs & Dance

will be given b

PREAZA

ONLY

COMING
YOUNG DANIEL BOONE cintcolor
CALL of the KLONDYKE




















TO-DAY TO-MORROW

VOR NOVELLO'S

“The DANCING YEARS”

and 145 & 8.30 PM.

——— Fes

|
i
|
|
}

At the first sneeze, put i MRS as sean suers
th Dennis PRICE » PREVILLE ; , at her residence ser Hindsbu
With Dennis PRICE, Gisele PREVILLE (Color by Technicolor | oe Sie = Vicks Road on SUNDAY. December

9 7 . ~~ TS -tro-nol ach nos 2nd 1951

TWO NEW WESTERN THRILLERS TO-DAÂ¥ Dec. Ist AT | tril. Va-tro-nol soothes ADMISSION 1

| s 3 ts 3

9.30 A.M., 1.30 P.M. AND AT MIDNITE | ak - helps y To Service of one Gents 1/¢

Monte HALE in Alan “Rocky” LANE in | prevery bad colds and Te Dance Gente 8/-, Ladies 1/6

A Popular Orchestra in Attendance

“SAN ANTONE “ FRONTIER













AMBUSH ” INVESTIGATOR ” Miss this and blame yourself
PRAZA jis || GAME DW Se Sores]

Jj] Te-day to Sun. 4.90 & 8.50 pm
Joan) CRAWFORD — David BRIAN in
“THE DAMNED DON’T CRY" &

“GREAT JEWEL ROBBER’

TODAY TO SUN. 8.30 p.m.
Mat. SUN. 5 p.m.
CAGED with Eleanor PARKER -









Agnes MOOREHEAD &
David Brian, Marjorie Reynolds LULLABY eof BROADWAY”
To-day 1.30 p.m Midnite Tonite Color by Technicolor |
Johnny Mack Doris DAY — Gene NELSON | Cashmere Bouquct Face Powder

‘Hidden Danger BROWN OO

Johnny Mack “Little Joe, The MIDNITE TONITE bs ie
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:

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Read these Prices visit
KIDS:—-Pit 6 House 12 Bal. 18
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SATURDAY, DECEMBER






Ninety-five thousand, six hun-
dred peor jarbados have been

Ked by forty-six candidates,
(forty-five men and a_ single
lady), to come to the polis on
rt lay, December 13 and cast
the votes in their favour

But only twenty-four of these
ean be returned, under the present

onstitution,
stituencies
is divided,

Here are the forty-six and some
facts about them.

The City

Mr. E. D. Mottley was senior
member for the City during the
last session of the House. He is a
real estate broker in private life
and has been a@ vestryman since
1941, A member of the House of
Assembly since 1946, he has served
as Direetor of the Sugar Agricul-
tural Bank and member of the
Housing Board.

Mr. A. E. S. Lewis was Junior
member for the City during the
session. He was first a mer-
ant’s clerk and then travelling
agent. First elected to the House
r 1942, he has served as Deputy
Speaker.

Mr. V. Chase, commission mer-
chant, has had experience of
parochial politics as a member of
the St. Michael and Christ Church
Vestries.

Mr. T. W. Miller, merchant, has
also had experience of parochial
politics. He has been a member
of the St. Michael's Vestry for
some years,

Mr. A. A, Maynard, real estate
and Commission merchant, has
taken much interest in politics but

the twelve con-
which the island

for
into




has so far been defeated at the
polls for election to the General
Assembly.

St. Michael

Mr. M. E, Cox, Garage Propri-
etor, was semor member for St.
Michael during the last session of
House. He took charge of
frade, Commerce, Customs and
Post Office, Water and Light when
eppointed a member of the Exec-
utive Committee.

Mr. T. O. Bryan was junior
member for St. Michael during the
jast session of the House, First a
clerk, he is now a merchant in
private life

Mr. A. R.

ine

Toppin, Company
Director, has experience of paro-
chial politics as a member of St.
Vichael’s Vestry. Has already run
for election the General As-
sembly without success. )
Mr. Vincent Griffith, Auctioneer,

eck for the first

lo

ing election

time
Christ Church

Mr. F. ©. Goddard, was senior
member for Christ Chureh during
the last session of the House.
Merchant and Company Director,
he also has experience of paroehial
politics as member of the Vestries
of St. Michael and Christ Church.

He is also a Sanitary Commis-
sioner and member of the Board
of Health,

Mr. W. W. Reece, K.C., Junior
member for Christ Church during
the last session of the House.
One of the most experienced
members in the House of Assem-

bly last Session, once represent-
ing St, Michael in the 30's. Soli-
citor General since 1942 and
King’s Counsel since 1948.

Mr. C. E, Talma, former mem-
ber of the House of Assembly
but was not re-elected last ses-
ion. Formerly articled clerk to
firm of solicitors’ then real es-
tate broker. Former member of

3arbados Labour Party but now
seeking re-election on independ-

ent Labour ticket.
Mr. A. W. Birch, motor omni-
bus concessionaire. Has experi-

ence of parochial politics as mem-
ber of Vestry of Christ Church.
Has tried unsuccessfully several
times for election to the General
Assembly and is trying again.

Mr. Lloyd Brathwaite, shop-
seeper is seeking election for the
rst time.





Do You

O





1, 1951

St. George

Mr. F. E. Miller was senior
member for St. George in the
last session of the House. He is a
company director in a firm of
electrical refrigeration engin-
eers,

Mr. H. A. Dowding, was junior
member for St. George in ine
last session of the House. A
planter, Mr. Dowding saw, service
overseas in the last war.

Mr. E. W. Carrow, barrister-at-
law, Former Island scholar and
old Harrisonian and served with

the R.A.P. im the Jast war. Has
also obtained degree in Eco-
nomics. Seeking election for the
first time.
St. Lucy
Mr. E. L. Ward, planter, was

senior member for St. Lucy du-
ring the last session of the House.
Has had several years experience
as a member of the House of As-
sembly.

Mr. J. E. T. Brancker, barrister-
at-law was junior member for
St. Lucy during the last session
of the House. Mr. Brancker has
had considerable experience in
the House and has held the ap-
pointment as Deputy Speaker.

Mr. LL. A. Williams, barrister-
at-law. Saw service in the last
war with the R.A.F. Is seeking
election for the first time.

Mr. 8S. A. Waleott, planter,
served in earlier House of Assem-
bly for the constituency of St.
James, Has experience of paro-

chial politics, having served as
a member of the Vestry of St.
James for several years.

Mr. I. C. Sobers, salesman, Mas
experience of parochial politics
having served as a member of the
Vestry of St. Lucy. Is seeking
election to the General Assembly
for the first time.

St. James
Mr. J. H. Wilkinson, O.B.E.,
head of the firm of Wilkinson,

Haynes and Co., entered Barbados
politics as a member of the House
of Assembly in March 1931 long
before the introduction of Party
Politics. Is Chairman of Barbados
Foundry Ltd., Knight's Estates,
Porter's Ltd. and has an executive
post with many other established
business firms in the island, Serv-
eq for years as a member of the
Executive Committee and the
Executive Council. Acted as a
member of the Legislative Coun-
cil on two occasions. Has experi-
ence of parochial politics as a
member of the Vestry of St.
James. Was made Leader of the
Opposition on the intreduction of

Party Politics as leader of the
Electors’ Association.
her. &. K. Waleott, K.C., bar-

rister-at law, was junior member
for St, James in the last session
of the House, Served as Attorney
General from 1936-1947. Was a
member of the House of Assembly
since 1925 and has served ever
since except in 1946-48. Saw
service in 1914-18 war.

Mr. E. 8S. A. Holder, former
elementary schoolteacher and
now peasant proprietor, has ex-
perience of parochial politics as
a member of the Vestry of St.

James. Seeking election for first
time.
St. Peter
Mr. F. L. Walcott, formerly

clerk, now General Secretary of
Barbados Workers’ Union, was
senior member for St. Peter du-
ring the last session of the House
and took charge of Agriculture
and Fisheries, Communications
and Public Works as a member of
the Executive Committee.

Mr, K. N. R. Husbands, former
elementary schoolteacher and
now Assistant Secretary Barba-
dos Workers’ Union. Was junior
member for St. Peter during the
last session of the House and was
elected Speaker during the last
session.

Mr. C. C. Cumberbatch, planter
and city businessman has been

MOTORIST

Know That The Best

TOR

‘CASTROL?’ woror ot



interested in politics

a

MEET THE FORTY-SE

for many Mr. D. A. Foster, formerly M.C.P.

BARBADOS ADVOCATE

years now. Is making his fourth for St. Andrew. Mrs Bourne has

attempt at election.

St. Joseph
Mr. G. HM. Adams, barrister-at-
law. Leader of the House of As-

experience
as a member of the Vestry or St.

Andrew.

in parochial polit

St. Thomas
Dr. H. G. Cummins, was return-

sembly during the last session of eq senior member for St. Thom. s

the House and Leader

Official Labour Party in

the “Bushe Experiment.”

of the during

the last session of the

the House. A member of the House of
House from the introduction of Assembly since 1937,

mins was Deputy

Dr.
Leader

Cum-
of the

Mr. Adams was a member of House during the last session

the House of Assembly since 1934
and was

A Doctor by profession he tock

member of the Execti- charge of médical, health, so:itl

tive Committee since 1942. He has services, police and pensions on
been Leader Writer of the Adve- the Executive Committee duri g

cate, Editor of the
Reporter, and Editor of the Bea-
con.

Barbados
The

Progressive
Barbados Workers

Agricultural the last session.

Mr. J. W. Hewitt, Merchant

; Tailor is seeking election to the
Mr. Adams is President of the General

Assembly for the first

League, time. Has experience of parochial
Union, polities as a member of the Ves-

the Barbades Labour Party and try of St. Michael

the Caribbean
He was a member

Labour Congress,
of the U.K.

delegation to the U.N. meeting im genjor
Paris and member of the Commit- during

tee of Experts on the Application,
of the International Institute oi

St. John
Mr. O. T. Allder was returned
member for St. John
the last session of the

House. Was elected to the Gener-
il Assembly in 1948 as a member

Political and Social Science (cOM-"o¢ the Labour Party. Is contesting

parative Airlisations). Mr, Adams this election

is also a member of the Carib-
bean Commission ang a member

College of the West Indies,

Mr. L. E. Smith, is a merchant.
He has been a member of the
House of Assembly since 1944.
He has experience of Parochial

: has
of the Council of the University ne

not
teacher, Chief Clerk

Department
at-law

as an independent.
Vv. B. Vaughan, § druggi

already been a member of
General Assembly but did
gain re-election last session.
Mr. G. B. Niles, former School-
in Labour
and now barrister-
Is seeking election to the

Mr.

politics as a member of the VeS- General Assembly for the’ first

try of Si. Joseph.

Mr. W. R. Coward, is a motor
omnibus concessionaire and
Churchwarden

n Ls | son
of the parish. H€ member of the General Assembly.

time.

Mr, J. C.
of

Tudor, Schoolmaster.
Mr. J. A, Tudor, former

has experience of parochial poli- yr Tudor is seeking élection to
tics as a member of the Vestry Of the General Assembly for the first
St. Joseph. This is the first time time.

that he is seeking election to the
General Assembly.

St. Philip

Mr. W. A. Crawford was Junior
member for St. Philip during the
last session of the House. Was a
member of the General Assembly
since 1940, President and Founder
of the West Indian National Cop-
gress Party and Editor and Pub-
lisher of the Weekly Newspaper

Barbados Observer. Member of
the Executive Committee in
1946—47.

Mr. Crawford was one of the

Barbados Delegates to the Confer-

ence on Closer Association held agina s.,

at Montego Bay, Jamaica and was
also one of the Barbados Dele-

of Welch Village
detained at the General Hospital
Thursday evening after part of a
quarry
about 2.30 p.m. Gilkes’ back was

Mr. E. Me G. Webster,

shop-

keeper is seeking election for the
first

time,

BACK INJURED
Thirty-year-old Winston Gilkes
St. John was



at Bath fell upon him

injured



Sch. Lady Noeleen, Sch Lucille M
Smith, Sch. Enterprise S., Sch, Lydia
Sch. Marien Belle Wolfe,

M.V, T, B. Rador, Sch, Frances W. Smiths
Sch. Burma D., Sch. Mary M. Lewm
Sch. Cyril E. Smith, Sch. Island Star,

gates to the West Indian Confer- sen. Adalina, Sch. N. Molly Jones, Sch

ence (Third Session) at Guade-
loupe.
Mr. D. D. Garner, was senior

Rosaline M., Sch

for St.

Mary EF. Caroline
DEPARTURES
Ketch Onrust, # tons net,
Vineent
Schooner Philip H

Capt, Tober

Davidson, 87 ton

member for St. Philip during the net, Capt. Seaty, for British Guiana

last session of the House. A plan-
ter in private life, Mr. Garner has
served on the Highways Board
and the Board of Sanitary Com-
missioners for the parish of St.
Philip and has had considerable
experience of parochial politics

as a member of the Vestry of St. James Winter and W

Philip.

proprietor. He has never sought
election to the General Assembly

before but he has been a very
staunch campaigner in the parish
during the past fourteen years.
He saw service in the 1914—18
war.
St. Andrew

Mr. J. A. Haynes, planter,
was senior member for St. An-
drew during the last session of

the House. Has had considerable scat ee

experience as a member of the
House of Assembly. ’
Mr. Haynes has had experience

of parochial politics as a member

of the St. Andrew and St. Joseph | eral Post Office as under

Vestries. “|
Mr. L. E. R. Gill, was junior
member for St. Andrew during
the last session of the House. A
Solicitor—Partner in the firm of
Cottle Catford & Co., Mr. Gill
first gained a seat for the constit-
uency of St. Andrew in 1948.
Mrs. E. E. Bourne, school-
teacher, is a daughter of the late
















mond

Mr. J. C. Mottley, is a peasant Marie Alves

Angel
Ochoa,
Browne

Antwerp, Amsterdam by

Seawell

ARRIVALS BY BWA. ON

Taylor, T

4 Headley
From

Dominica

and C
Leslie

Bourne
Warren, Rev
B. Browne.

Ada Marshall,

Arnold Michael

From St. Vinaent

Chapman,

Ra
and

DEPARTURES BY B.W.1LA,
THURSDAY
For Trinidad—Marilyn Pollonais, Rus-
sell Day, Seth White, Charles Kum,
George McMillan, Eileen Robinson, Grant
Neville
Ochoa,
Earl

ON

Estwick, Warren, Hal
Ochoa,

and

Ward,
Naney
William

Mercedes
Parchment

MAIL NOTICES

Madetra

THURSDAY of the
From British Guiana, Melean, J.] with me on tl
Hunt, D, Hunt, L, De Souza, WH. Ashford SSS

Mails for United Kingdom,
the M.S. Oran
jestad will be closed at the General Post
Office as under

Mail at 10

p.m

Registered
2.30

a.m,;
Ordinary Mafl at
3rd December, 1951.

ail at 1
p.m. on the

Matis for St Lucia, Dominica, Montser-
rat, Antiwua, St Kitts, Bermuda, St
John, N B., Halifax N.S., by the

Parcel Mail at 10 am.;
at 2 p.m.;

Registered Mail
Ordinary Mail at 2.30 p.m
the 5th December, 1951

N.B. This is the last known oppor
tunity for despatch of surface mails to
Bermuda

on

and Canada before Christmas.



Twice as many &\
fer from High Blood

as
is a Sternee Chee
about the time of C! oft
is the real cause of much heart

and later on of parslt tic ateekes,
mon symptoms of High
sure are: Nervousness,
top and back of head and
ressure in head, dizginess,
reath, paing in heart,
poor sleep, loas of memory >
easily excited, fear and worry. If you
suffer any of these symptoms, don’t
delay treatment a single day, because
your life may be ia danger. Moxce
(formerly known as Hynox), a sew
medical discovery, reduces High Blood
Pressure with the firat dose, takes a
heavy load off the heart, and makes
you feel years younger in a few days.
Get Noxco from your chemist today.
teat Bi
’



[t is guaranteed to make you
and strong or money bask, -
ce





shows your blood ts poisoned

sam shrough faulty oe oe
ay Other symptoms ©! idney
Disorders are Backache, Aoh-
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Getting

Er dTRh matism
me te ‘
While: You} leep
Pre @ If you suffer sharp stabbing
pains, if joints are swollen, it
C
4 Neuritis,
Ci es o ing, 1
rcies under Eyes, Burn tching
Pevteses Loss of Energ' ‘and Appetite ond Fre.
quent Headaches Colds, Ete. Ordinary
ned@icines can’t help much because you must
to the root cause of the trouble. ‘
Fire Cystex treatment is specially compounded
@ soothe, tone and clean raw, sore, sick kidneys
and bladder and remove acids and poisons from
your system safely, quickly and surely, yet cone
yains no harmful or dangerous drugs. Cystex
works in 3 ways to end your troubles /
1, Starts killing the germs which « ttacking
your Kidneys, Bladder and Urinary System
in two hours, yet is absolutely harmless to
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2. Gets rid of health-destroying, deadly poison-
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3. Strengthens and reinvigorates the kidneys,
. protects from the ravages of disease -attack

on the delicate filter organism, and stimu:

fates the entire system. a“ ¥
piiaeed by Doctors, Chemists, and

®., © One-time Sufferers &

Tystex is approved by Doctors and Chemists Ip
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DISCUSSION ON PLAYING
FIELDS POSTPONED

By St. Michael Vestry

Owing to a late hour, some of
the members of the St. Michael
Vestry left the meeting on Thurs-
day when the Vestry was dis-
cussing a@ letter from the Colonia!
Secretary in reply to one from
the Vestry dated August 3, set-
ting out the view of the Gov-
ernor-in-Executive Committee on
thg statements made before thc

Malone Commission of Enquiry
by Mr. M. E. Cox, and the fur-
ther development of other ares
as playing flelds.

Discussion of the matter wa
therefore postponed due to the
lack of a quorum.

The Vestry’s letter to the

Financial Secretary dated August
3 reads as follows:
3rd August, 1951
Sir,
At a meeting of the Vestry held
on the 30th ultimo, your letter No.

6149/S. 1/1/43 of the 4th Jul
relative to the administration of
playing fields was discussed.

In reply I was instructed to
inform you that:—

(a) As a result of the accusa-

tion made by qg member of the
Government at the Princess Alice
Playing Field Inquiry, that this
Vestry was a most corrupt body

a
(b) That in the absence of ad-
equate machinery of this Vestry
to take care of the erection of
buildings on and the laying out of
roads etc., at the various sites
selected for playing flelds in this
parish, the Vestry will be unable,
in future, to undertake any cap-
ital expenditure on playing fields.
The Vestry therefore suggest
that the Public Works Depart-
ment be made responsible for al!
capital expenditure on playing
fields for this parish, and the
Vestry assures the Government
of its ready and willing co-opet
ation in the administration o!
these playing fields after they
have been established.
[ have the honour to be,
Sir,
Your Obedient servant,
E, C. Redman,
Clerk, St. Michael's Vestr)
Col. Sec’s Reply

The reply from the Colonial
Secretary to the Vestry reads
follows

Colonial Secretary's Office,
Barbados.

22nd October, 1051
Sir,

I am directed to refer to your
letter of the 3rd August to the
Financial Seeretary, on the sub-
ject of the establishment of play
ing fields in the parish of St.
Michael, and to inform you tl

the Governor-in-Executive Cor













2. With regard to the reference
at ») in vour letter 1 am to say
that it is quite clear from th
report of Sir Clement Malone on
his Commission of Enquiry im
certain matters connec ted W
the establishment of e Prince $
Alice Playing ld and from 9
proceedings of t wuiry wt
were published in the Press at the
time. that Mr. M. E, Cox appeare
before the Commissio in -
private capacity and t what-
ever he said in evidence at %)
Enqu was said in that capacit

The Governor-in-Executive Com-

mittee is indeed surprised
learn that there has been an)
other interpretation,

3. With regard to reference a
(b) it is the view of the Govern
or-in-Exeeutive Committee that
the completion of the playin
fields at Welches (Carringtor
Village) and Friendship, which
are the projects immediate!
under consideration, ought not &
be beyond the resources of _ the
Ves but the Goverrmor in-Exe
cutive Committee, bearing
the Vestry ifficultic
to the

try,

W }L(U
a

mined
prepared
ing

assist follow
exten! If the Vestry w!}

agree to furnish estimates of tt

cost af he facilities requwre
buildings, levelling ete.)

‘Celanese’ Sports Shirts
Wel , } i
Welches and Friendship, to
gether with plans and details ¢
the Scheme, the
Executive Committee
available the services
Colonial Engineer fot

of ti
vettin
them. In the event of the plan
being approved, it 1s sugseste

economical.
Governor-tt

will makr|

e
SPORTS SHIRTS





PAGE THREE



- FOR MEN

are popular for both work

and play because they look and feel good and are
Made from
are obtainable in various shades and sizes,

*Celanese’ Jersey, they

ATHLETIC UNDERWEAR





Clad

ys

that the Vestry should call fe
tenders and award the contracts }
and that the supervision of tt
work should be carried out by tt
Vestry, although the services *
the Colonial Engineer will 1 SS &
made available to give advice
and when it may be required N
It should be added that th ow Save Mone
slbaacien must be dependent ¢ eee ‘eiiiis

the return to health of the Colo
nial Engineer who is at presen
on prolonged sick leave

5. I am to ask you to let mé
know at your convenience wheth
er the proposals set out in para
graph 3 above are acceptable t
the Vestry

I am

Sir,

Your

Save

obedient servant,
RK. N. TURNER,
Colonial Seeretary

Letter Circulated

The Clerk informed the Vesti
that the Colonial Secretary
letter dated October 22 had bee
circulated and asked that it |
taken as read, He further dre
the Vestry’s attention to the fact
that paragraph three needed a

mittee has reconsidered its co.- reply and asked fou the direction
tents In the light of the vie vs of the Vestry in the matter
expressed by the representatives Mr. E, D Mottley said th
Vestry at their meetix¢ there was ho reson why h
1e .






so you are invited to call in and serve yourself

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PAGE FOUR



BARBADOS Sg ADVOGATE

Baer fase)

Printed by the Advocate Co, Ltd., Broad St., Bridgetown

Saturday, December 1, 1951

FEDERATION

RECENT statements by Sir David Max-
well Fyfe in Strasbourg and Mr. Anthony
Eden in Rome make it clear that public
opinion in. the United Kingdom is not yet
ready to sacrifice national interests for the
common good of Europe,
Britain becoming
of they do in
Europe and that twenty-one miles of sea

The people of

Great are gradually

aware the fact that live

ig no longer the effective barrier to in-

it
ruled the waves.

vasion that

used to be when Britain

But they are still very far from identi-
fying their interests with those of French-
They
maintain, through their spokesmen, and
in Press and radio that Great Britain has
other that the
centre of a great Commonwealth and is

men, Italians, Dutch, and Belgians.

responsibilities, she is

only partly European.

The British

closer

are prepared to join in

association with the other nations
of Europe but they are not prepared to
join a political federation of Europe. The
British cannot understand why the people
of the continent shoula not recognise their
own special position.

They point, with reason, to the existence
of a Parliament with no large majority
and. packed with hundreds of Labour
members whose party has been less
European-minded than the present Gov-
ernment. They say that it is no good to
talk of political federation until the over-
whelming pressure of public opinion is in
favour and they are strongly sceptical
whether the British public will ever
favour a federation based on the sacrifi-
cing of their own political sovereignty.

The people on the continent of Europe,
on the other hand, are much more ad-
vanced in thinking that political federa-
tion without Great Britain would be no
federation at all. There the deadlock re-
mains, and many besides Mr, Schuman
and General Eisenhower are disappointed
at the lukewarmness of a Conservative
Government's approach to a question
which needs answering if Europe is not to
be further sub-divided into more pockets
of Eastern and Western influence. The
British, despite the presence at the head
of their Government of the architect of
European Union, Mr. Winston Churchill,
are still isolationist so far as Europe is
concerned. This isolationism does not sur-
prise anyone who knows how very little
the average Briton knows of his European
neighbours. When, however, propagandists
for British isolationism appeal to Britain’s
responsibilities and duties as centre of a
great independent Commonwealth the
argument appears more emotional than
logical, Because the average Briton knows
much less of the Commonwealth than he
does of neighbouring Europe. The fact
that France which is the centre of the very
large French Union does not consider that
her responsibilities and duties to the
French Union prohibit her from taking
the lead in promoting a European Parlia-
ment confirms the popular view that the
French are far more logical and more
politically conscious than the British. It
is also regrettable that the more Great
Britain stresses her responsibilities (and
ipso facto opportunities) in the British
Commonwealth, the more will those
European countries without overseas
possess¥ons or dpminions be envious of
Great Britain’s privileged position and dis-
trust her motives. The 5,000,000 unem-
ployed of Europe are all on the French
side of the ‘channel.

Historians will be better able to analyse
the apparent failure of the United King-
dom to realise that they belong to Europe
and that only when Europe is peaceful and
free from internal dissension will there be
a good chance for the British Common-
wealth to benefit fully from its British
Association.

Meanwhile those who are lukewarm
about political federation in the British
West Indies will no doubt ask why an
island separated by only twenty-one miles
sea from the European mainland
should be so reluctant to unite politically
with Europe and should be so aggressively
sure that islands separated by hundreds
of miles of ocean can only face the future
with confidence when they have achieved
political federation. Democracy cannot
be understood to depend on public opinion
in the United Kingdom and to be repre-
sented by an infinitesimal
interested pe in the

till the best f

ol

percentage of
Ex-
of leadership

yple Caribbean:

nple i rn

OST EE

BARBADOS. ADVOCATE



To Clinhb—Or Not To

By BRETT OLIVER

LONDON

“For Heaven’s sake climb the
wretched thing and let’s get back
to some proper mountainepring.”

And that, believe it or not, was
said of unconquered Everest by
one famous mountaineer to an-
other famous mountaineer about

15 years ago. The man implored
to get it over and done with was
Eric Shipton who to-day is strug-
gling up Everest again in an at-
tempt to find a new route which
might lead to the conquest of the
great peak. Unlike 1938, when he
got within 2,000 ft. of the top,
this expedition is reconnoitring
the southern slopes, a_ hitherto
untried approach, It may lead to
a full-scale attempt

Let’s turn again to the advice
which Shipton got 15 years ago.
He was then off on his third at-
tempt to beat Everest. Why climb
Everest? What on earth is the use
of it? Why do it, why go risking
your neck in the most appalling
conditions just for the sake of
standing, exhausted, insensible,

atop 29,000 ft. of useless rock’
Why?

The thought has probably oc-
curred to many who have read of
death and agony on its treacher-
ous slopes, of men driving them
selves to the limit of human en-
durance only to inch down, de-
feated. It is a point for debate,

It was, in fact, debated in Lon-
don this week by the City’s oldest
organized body of arguers
Sylvan Debating Club.

I went along out of
The subject concerned Shipton
and whether his present efforts
were a waste of effort, As I ex-
pected, the debate soon left Ship-
ton to go his own way and devoted
itself to the all-embracing argu-
ment of why climb Everest at all

The speaker with the job of
convincing everyone it was just
plain silly got off to an uncon-
vincing start by admitting he wa:
a “hill climb” and had actually
been in the Himalayas at one time
But he had never been on Ever-
est and never wanted to.

He sided himself instead with
the Tibetans who live below
Everest and look upon it as some-
thing sacred. They call it Chomol-
ungma, or “Goddess Mother of
the Snows” and find it inexplica-
ble why anyone should want to
reach its summit when as a simple
object of contemplation from afar,
the mountain, is beautiful, majes-
tic.

“These Tibetans when they hear






























































the

curiosity

By VAUGHAN JONES.

LONDON, November 21,

Sit tight is Mr .Churchill’s slo-
gan today as Egypt seeks to drive
Britain’s troops from the Canal
Zone and Iran tries in vain to sell
her own oil following her expul-
sion of Britain's oil men from
Abadan.

pease demands which he
peremptory and unreasonable. His
sit tight policy, he thinks, will

tremist policy towards Britain.
In their dispute, Egypt and Iran

have the sympathy of the Arab

world. Britain, however, has the

nations, led by the United States.
And America’s aim is to avoid a
weakening of Britain's
position in the Middle East in view
of the spreading menace of com-
munism,

Against Iran, Britain’s prime
move following the appropriation
of the Anglo-Iranian Oil
pany’s £350,000,000 refinery and
installations at Abadan, Kermen-
shah and Bandur Marshur, will be
the continued deprivation of the
company’s tanker fleet and oil
sales organisation,

Previously, over 300 tankers,
half the company’s own, half
chartered, were collecting and de-
livering nearly 32,000,000 tons of
refined and crude oil annually the
world over. And much of its sale
was organised through the British
Company's subsidiaries and affili-
ates.

However, following the com-

any’s expulsion, Iran’s Premier,
Dr. Mossadeq, has been able to ex-

rt only a trickle.

PBoriax his recent visit to Ameri-
ca he found he was unable to char-
ter tankers. He learnt too that
foreign oil companies would not
help him with their sales organi-
sation. He cannot build ships,
for his country has no yards. He
cannot buy sufficient numbers, for
most shipyards the world over are
booked up to three years ahead,
And the sympathy of oilmen the
world over is against him for his
expulsion of Britain’s 3,000 strong
staft who ran his oil industry.

The remaining 70,000 Persians





For in both cases, Mr. Churchill
has made it clear he will not ap-
thinks ff

force both the Egyptian and Iran
governments to modify their ex- ]

unqualified backing of the Western }

strategic }

Com- }j

a es oo ee

Climb

of new disasters on Everest shake
their heads and wonder at. the
stupidity of the white man. They
feel the toll of life is a just re-
tribution for the sacrilege of at-
tempting to conquer such a
masterpiece of nature.”

And, besides this morai argu-
ment, the Sylvan debater put up
a strong case on the sheer physical
and mental impossibility of ever
conquering Everest. In all the at-
tempts made, only seven men had
reached 28,000 ft. A bare thousand
feet to go, yet the summit was
still untrod. He maintained that
the extreme cold, thin air, sudden,
blinding gales and blizzards and
the immense physical hardship
made the mountain inviolate.

“Even if a man does reach the
top—-it could only be through
an absolute freak in the weather
—what is his reward? He gets
there, exhausted, his mind dulled
to insensibility. If his eyes can

see, he may look out and below
him but, unless everything is
clear, he sees nothing. And if he

does, he is too far gone to appre-
ciate it.”

The speaker was warming up.
He quoted from the accounts of
men who have got so far and no
further on Everest and whom
after their experience could look
on it only with horror—how they
were completely exhausted,
drained of will and praying for a
safe retreat and relief from their
uffering, These men had written

that the effects of altitude and
old changed them into some-
thing that was not a _ proper

hurman being.
“There is really no sense in it,

is there?” queried the debater,
“There is, besides, no _ earthly
practical use in_ standing on
Everest’s summit. The world
won't gain anything. . . it seems

these aspirants want to get there
just for the kudos of it or because
they are gamblers and like to risk
their lives and the lives of their
hired porters. You can’t measure
your chances on Everest.”
Internationally, too, invading
Everest was a bad thing. The
mountain was regarded as
Britain’s for the conquering of,
just as two other peaks in the
Himalayas, K2 and Kanchenjunga,
were before the war respectively
the domain of Italian and Ger-
man mountaineering madmen,
“Look what happened when the
Americans horned in on_ the



~ ~~
HON, WINSTON CHURCHILL
and 2,000 Indians can still continue
producing reduced quantities. But
Dr. Mossadeq’s nightmare remains,
His 2,000,000 ton storage tanks are
overflowing, and he cannot dispose
of further production, His great
industry has come to a standstill.
And though, following his Cairo
visit, he faces demands from Com-
munist sympathisers that he
should seek hhlp from Soviet Rus-
sia.he wishes to avoid doing so,

The Anglo-Iranian Oil Company,
meantime, is prospecting for new
suceess in Nigeria, Trinidad, Papua
and Sicily, It is obtaining in-
creased supplies from Iraq and
Kuwait. And it is pushing ahead
its programme for constructing re-
fineries in Britain.

Further, to avoid imposing hard-
ships on foreign states, 19 Ameri-
can oil companies have worked out
a plan whereby previous Anglo-
Iranian customers will receive: oil

Our Readers Say



Italian’s K2. There was almost an
international incident. I hate to
think what would happen these
days if the Russians decided to
climb Everest.”

And so he condemned and
cajoled, this renegade “hill
climber” as he brought his argu-
ment to an end, saying: “I believe
it is impossible to climb Everest
and an impertinence to attempt
it.” ,

Opposing him was an elderly
gentleman, so indignant at the
suggestions put forward, that for
a start he could only invoke in
retaliation a string of meaningful
grunts and waves of his hand.
Then he remembered it was a
polite debate and began his
answer: “Mountaineering is a
sport which, in turn is a goal of
the impossible. If you are going
to regard sport as something
which should have no risk in it,
you will have to confine it tc
tiddleywinks and marbles.

“If there is an objection on the
grounds it is a waste of time and
life, well, what about the time
wasted on the football fields all
over the world or in the holy
game of cricket. Both these sport:
are dangerous and there have
even been cases of death among
the public watching—and paying
for it. It is hard to draw the line
but I maintain mountaineering is
a sport. If they want to risk their
necks and break their bones, it is
probably from a feeling that per-
haps it can be done.

“Further, mountaineering is the
effort to resolve mountaineer!ng
problems. On principle, there i:
nothing against an attempt to
climb Everest. Why condemn it if
some people enjoy it? If they
want to climb Everest, well let
them. Their attitude is praise-
worthy and justifiable.”

As the old man continued his
defence, I detected a feeling in
his words of “Gad sir, if we didn’t
have Everest to climb, what woulc
the British people come to.”

The debate rumbled on. There
was talk of the high moral valu:
of high endeavour, the spirit of
adventure which surely should be
encouraged, human nature, the
beauty of the eternal snows, o!
Everest’s rain, mist, ice, biting
winds, butterflies. ....

And when everyone had addec
his piece, they put it to the vote
Glory be, Shipton, you can con-
tinue your expedition, The Sylvar

Debating Club applauds your
work by two to one.
End piece: The man_ whc

debated against climbing Everest
at the Sylvan Club really didn’t
have his heart in it. You see, he’:
really all for it.





Churchill Refuses To Appease
Egypt. Iran

from other countries. Under this
plan, for instance, Pakistan wil’
get oil from Saudi Arabia insteac

_ of Persia.

Attitude of Britain, however wil
change immediately Iran show:
goodwill by offering to negotiate
on the basis of existing proposals

Points made by Britain are:

1. The industry should be effi-
ciently organised and operated a
all stages to ensure a regulatec
flow at economic prices from thc
oil fields to the customers abroad
And provisionally, this necessitate:
expert management includin;
trained British technicians, a tank-
er fleet, and a worldwide sale
organisation.

2. The profits should be sharex
between Persia and Britain or
perhaps a fifty-fifty basis, with oi
selling prices fixed to compet
fairly with those of other produc.
ing countries.

3. The amount of compensatior
for the nationalisation of the in.
dustry to be fixed by agreement o
arbitration—and not by a unilat-
eral ruling of either country.

In the case of Egypt, Britain i:
quite prepared to face further ter-
rorist action against British troop
and property in the Canal Zone
For Britain’s prevailing necessity;

J is the retention in safe hands o;

the Suez life-line to the Orient,

However, she is ready to nego-
tiate with the Egyptian govern-
ment for a revision of the twenty
year Anglo-Egyptian treaty whict
runs till 1955. And she holds oper
the offer to replace British troop:
guarding the Suez life-line by ar
international force composed oi
American, French, Turkish anc
British troops with whom Egyp
would be associated in equal part-
nership,

Continued but unavailing ter-
rorism, it is believed, cannot in-
fluence Britain’s main policy, bu
is more likely to shake the posi-
tion of the Egyptian governmen‘
amongst its own 20,000,000 people

For the Egyptians are alread)
discontented by the Government’:
maladministration and corruption
and their own widespread and bit-
ter poverty. Loss of Egyptian lifc
and failure to achieve Britain’s ex-
pulsion might eventually causc
the Nahas Pasha administration tc



“we

—

NOBODY'S |
DIARY |

MONDAY-—In my first novel which lies wait-
ing at the publisher until the English taste
for fiction grows greater there is a pas-
sage about cultural activities in the
West Indies. Frankly it is dull reading
compared to what actually takes place.
Here for instance is an extract from a
local newspaper “The newly inaugu-
rated ........ theatrical group pre-
sents their anniversary hop........ the
group hopes to specialise in the cultur-
ing of Caribbean dancing music drama.”
And this after so many years of the
British Council, not to mention the
Bridgetown Players. It’s enough to make
strong hearts break.

rUESDAY—On Sunday after Tosca was
ended they played Tchaikovsky’s “Fran-
cesca da Rimini”. There was culture if
you like coming out of a box and a turn
of the knob. Dante started the story
going in his fifth canto of the inferno
and nobody has been able to leave Fran-
cesca alone since then. Leigh Hunt, Sil-
vio Pellico, d’Annunzio in literature:
Ingres, Scheffer, G. F. Watts and Caba-
nel in art: and then Tchaikovsky the
Russian in music. And where did it
come from? Radio San Domingo. I
take my culture the easy way. No hops
for me.

WEDNESDAY—Looking at the postmen in
their cool khaki shirt and hot woollen
long trousers pedalling stickily along the
Esplanade you’d never dream of them as
carriers of dangerous missives. Yet my
post bag last week contained some very
hot stuff. The first was a batch of Com-
munist literature from Hong Kong: the
second a very cheap and very nasty
patent medicine pamphlet professing to
cure every known and unknown disease
under the sun.
Some of the testimonials advertising the
most frightful cures are too embarrass-
ing even for this outspoken diary but
one or two deserve preservation. A man
in an Indian Commercial House writes
“Frankly to speak I kept mum to see the
result and now I am glad to have con-
vinced myself of the efficacy of your
medicines.”

A goods clerk had this to say “I am
using your medicines since 19 days and
she feel improvement.”

There are medicines to end household
quarrels and to win law suits.

So next time you feel like saying “Isn't
progress wonderful” please remember
the postman and the tripe he sometimes
has to carry without knowing. So much
for mass education, A little reading is
a wondrous thing.

THURSDAY—The B.B.C. Year Book for

1952 contains a gem which is said to be
thirty five years old. With the price of
meat going up all round I’m going to
risk quoting it.
How much for that rabbit? Three pounds.
That’s a stiff price for a rabbit. It’s a stiff
rabbit. Don’t blame me if that doesn’t
make you laugh. Not everybody is
blessed with a sense of humour. °

"RIDAY—The Bay Street window looks as
glary and as untidy as ever. Its origin-
ator I understand is drawing a pension
from the Colonial Office. I wonder how
many more people will be on the pension
list before we get one single flowering
tree planted there. The more demo-
cratic we become the more we seem to
forget what the fruits of democracy are
supposed to be.

3ATURDAY—Philosophy is not | always
gained from books. I was passing along
the highways this week drinking in with
my ears all the local folklore that came
my way. There had been an accident
(they’re always having them) and she
was telling her audience, a man “All
that get knock down aint drunk chile”
How true, but those who knock them
down might be. A pity my profession
doesn’t allow me to join in these street
corner debates. They’re so like the Ox-
ford Union, at which I would never open
my mouth. People talk too much.
















It came from i



|

Unemployment

SIR,— In the leading article
headed “Unemployment” appear-
ing in the Barbados Advocate of
Wednesday, the 28th of November,
1951, it is stated in the fourth
paragraph that “only Jamaica get
the benefit of the employers’ con-
tract to pay passages back to
Jamaica or its equivalent.”

The position regarding the cost
of repatriation of workers from
the U.S.A, is that the employers
pay the cost of transportation from
the place of employment in the
U.S.A. to Jamaica or its equiva-
jent of all British Wes! Indian
workers, including Barbadians.

R. NICHOLAS JACK,
Labour Commissioner.

EDITOR'S NOTE

The Labour Commissioners’
statement in the second paragraph
is correct, and confirms the state-
ment which he quotes from the
Advocate’s editorial where it is
stated that the employers contract
to pay passages back to Jamaica
or its equivalent.

If. this sentence is taken out
of the full editorial, it appear
need correction, but the



editorial makes it clear that wt
Barbadian and other Caribbean
workers have their passages paid
by employers a far back

Jamaica (if they

travel



Jamaica) or as far back as a dis-
tance equivalent to the distance
from the United States to
Jamaica (if they do not travel via
Jamaica), their passages from
Jamaica or its equivalent back to
Barbados or to some other Carib-

bean territory still have io be
paid.
How to gain as much benefit

from the present arrangement tor
Barbados as Jamaica derives for
its workers is the task the Barba-
dos Government must face. Since
it is quite clear that when
Jamaicans have their passages
paid to Jamaica they have return-
ed home.
dians have their passages paid as
far as Jamaica, there is still some
thousand miles of sea to be crossed
and if neither the .employer nor
the worker pays for this essential
art of the journey, then the tax-
payer must foot the bill or the
workers do not go. In view of
arrangements currently being dis-
cussed in Jamaica for next year’s



quota the question is one for
immediate concern,
To the Editor, the Advocate;
SIR, Kindly accept congratu-
lations on the concise, renewed
publication of the “Daily Tides”
under the caption of “What's on
to-day.” his mean much to

of who follow high tide

Whereas while Barba-,

around the clock to enjoy our daily
health swim,
Gratefully yours,
St. C. HARLOW,
(Retired U.S.A.)
St. Clair Harlow,
“Medway”
Government Hill.
November 29th, 1951.

19 Per Cent

To The Editor, The Advocate—

SIR,—Kindly permit me to ex-
press certain facts to which in
my humble opinion most people
would certainly agree. Certain
politicians are saying that they
were. instrumental in a_ profit
sharing bonus of 19 per cent.
thinking that would help their
political’ campaign so as’ to get
everybody shouting for Labour!
The sugar crop is the chief crop
as well as the upkeep of the
island, and I feel that everybody
should benefit by it. I also feel
that if it was divided thus that
all would be satisfied. Sugar
workers’ 9 per cent for subsidi-
sation, 5 per cent i.e, letting gov-
ernment ‘pay some and reduce the
price of rice, fish, etc,, and 5 per
cent, for repairs to roads used for
transportation. or trade of the
same cane and sugar _ industry.
Do you.all not think this would
have been better?

G.C.P

28th

Nov,, 1951

Voters Don’t Know

SIR,— 1 would like to make a
few observations in connection
with the voting on the 13th
December. The assigning of the
various districts to the various
polling stations is an extremely
good idea, but it is going to cause
great confusion unless some not-
ice — official or otherwise — is
issued instructing the electorate
to which polling station they
should go to record their vote.

For instance, I myself did not
know to what district I belonged
and the particular polling station I
should go to, until I looked up
the voters’ list for the parish.
Not everyone has access to a list
of voters, as the notices which
were stuck up, here and there,
about the parish, have long since
been torn down, hence the major-
ity of the electorate remain in
ignorance as to the number of
their district and the correct poll-
ing station.

I write this letter with the hope
that it will catch the eye of those
responsible for the arrangements
and that they will make every
effort to ensure that everything
works smoothly on that very im-
portant day.

“SCORPIO”
28th November, 1951.



SATURDAY, DECEMBER 1, 1951









FOR FINEST
CHRISTMAS CARDS —

Ce

Call and Select Early from
ADVOCATE STATIONERY.










SATO

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From 1st December, 1951 our HARDWARE and
LUMBER DEPARTMENTS will be closed for breakfast
from 11 a.m. to 12 noon except on Saturdays when we
will be open from 8 a.m. to 12 noon. Will all custom-

ers please note.
e

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— Successors to —

C.S. PITCHER & CO. LTD.

Phones: 4413, 4687, 4472











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SANTON FOR QUALITY



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Available from Stock.

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SATURDAY, DECEMBER



I, 1951



= BARBADOS ADVOCATE

Labourer Not Guilty Of DISCUSSION ON PLAYING
Administering Poison

THE HON. the Chief Justice Sir Allan Collymore at

the Court of Grand Sessions

yesterday discharged 24-year-

old labourer Elbert Browne of Hillaby, St. Andrew after
an Assize jury found him not guilty of administering poison
so as to endanger the life of Elize Moaze with an alternative

count of administering poison with

Browne was not represented by

counsel, Mr. W. W. Reece, K.C.,
Solicitor General appeared for
the Crown. The prosecution

called on ten witnesses while the
defence called one.

The prosecution alleged that on
July 9 the accused BrOwne—after
having a quarrel with Elize Moaze
the previous day—obtained the
key to Moaze’s house from a boy
named Oliver Neblett and went
in the house and mixed a quantity
of substance containing arsenic
with the rum she_ had left in :
bottle ai the side of her bed.

Bitter Tasting Rum

Moaze returned to the house
about 2.30 p.m, the same day and
in ‘drinking the remainder of the
rum she had left by her bed,
found that it was of a bitter taste.
She went to Dr. Cummins and
was treated there. The bottle and
contents were sent to the Gov-
ernment Analyst.

First witness called for the
prosecution was Sgt. Henderson
attached to the District “F’’ Police
Station. He said that he arrested
Browne and took him to the Dis-
trict “F” Station where he made
a voluntary statement.

Lilian Watson of Hillaby, St.
Andrew, said that Elize Moaze is

her daughter. On July 10 she
went to her place and took a

towel from her.
gave to the Police.

Elize Moaze told tihe court that
she is a hawker of Hillaby, St.
Andrew, and knew Browne who
used to stay at her house working
for her. On July 8 she went to a
dance and bought a bottle of rum
and carried it home.

On July 9 about 8 am.
drank some of the rum
placed the remainder at the side
of the bed. She went to town that
day and returned about 2.30 p.m,
After she returned to the house
she took up the remainder of the
rum to drink and while drinking
she found that it tasted funny.

Treated

She went to Dr. Cummins and
he examined and_ treated het
About 6.45 p.m. the same day
she saw Browne at the George
Washington Club and they had a
conversation, She told her mother
Lilian Watson what had _ hap-
pened.

Once or twice she had a quarrel
with Browne about fowls she
missed from her yard.

Dr. Cummins told the court that
on July 9 he examined Moaze at
his surgery in Bank Hall, St.
Michael, She made a statement
to him and showed him a towel
and a bottle. In the bottle there
was a liquid of a yellow colour.

Oliver Neblett, son of Iris
Neblett of Hillaby, St. Andrew
said that on July 9 Moaze gave
him the key to her house just
before she left for town with his
mother. Later the same day
Browne came to him and he
(Neblett) gave him the key to
Moaze’s house,

Mr. J. D, Robinson said that on
July 13 while he was acting as
Government Analyst he received
a bottle containing yellow liquid
and a towel from Police Constable
101 Farley, The liquid in the
bottle was rum and the rum con-
tained a quantity of arsenic.

The strength of the arsenic was
.1408 grammes, At this stage the
case for the prosecution was
closed. The only witness for the
defence was Rueben Taylor who
could not remember the date on
which the offence was alleged to
have been committed, but said
that the accused was with him
all the time ‘on the day in ques-
tion.”

Browne then addressed the
jury and The Hon, the Chief Jus-
tice summed up and after a short
deliberation the jury returned a
verdict of not guilty.

L.C.C. RESULTS

Pupils of the Modern High
School gained 32 passes at the
July 1951 London Chamber of
Commerce Examination (certifi-
cate stage).

Detailed results are as follows:

English: Janet Brathwaite, Ers-
‘kine Carter, Velcie Crichlow,
Anita Khan, Valmour Lyte, Felix
Mascoll, Lucille Niles, Iris Rad-
way, Claudine Sobers, Phyllis
Willett, Le Roy Weekes.

Maths: Rufus Bryan (with dis-
tinction) Erskine Carter (with
distinction) Arthur Griffith (with
distinction) Janet Brathwaite,
Celestine Burrowes, Earl Bur-

This towel she

she
and



owes, Dennis Holder, Claudine
Sobers, Phyllis Willett, Le Roy

Weekes.

ARITHMETIC: Janet Brath-
waite, Rufus Bryan, Earl Bur-
rowes, Erskine Carter, Velcie
Crichlow.

FRENCH: Only two candidates
were entered for this subject.
Both passed with distinction.
They were: Lawson Belle, dis-
tinction passes in both written
and oral; Erskine Carter pass
with distinction in written.



intent on July 9.

Profit Means
Prosperity
SAYS MOTTLEY

Mr. E. D. Mattley, at a
tical Meeting at Nelson Street on
Thursday night in support of his
candidature for the City of Bridge-
town, said that he was indeed gla
to see the large crowd that turned
out to hear him because after the
last two harangues which “were
held here by the obviously paid
assassins to destroy him shows
that they are really interested in
the truth, justice and rigateous-
ness.” The meeting was held by
the Barbados Electors’ Associa-
tion,

“As a Conservative I fee] that
my duty is to maintain, uphold and
elevate, Maintain the economic
fabric and structure of the colony
Uphold the constitution and ele-

vate the people.

H:: said that he had told them
on several occasions that be
differed fundamentally with the
Labour Party on the question
of nationalisation, He stood for
free enterprise and the more ne
read the literature on both sides

of the question the more he was
convinced that free enterprise was
the correct thing for any com-
munity.

Referring to the debates of the
House on measures which we
passed during the last three
years, he pointed out his contri-
bution in respect of the follow-
ing:

Health Measures

He reminded listeners
had got an address
ing for the erection of a T.b.
Sanitarium, He was surprised at
the reply that it would be too
costly. He wanted to assure them
that he was motivated in mov-
ing this address after seeing the
sufferings of several people in this
country, It was known that if
people of the middle and lower
classes in this colony became af-
flicted with this disease there was
no chance for them but to go to
the Almshouse where there is a
ward known as a T.B. Ward and
there wait to die. But, on the
other hand, for persons who can
afford, they may go to Trinidad
ov Jamaica and there receive the
most modern treatment for this
most dreadful disease. He felt that
something should be done in this
respect.

He said it would be remembered
the criticism which he offered the
Government when it was discov-
ered that 536 people were on the
waiting list to be ‘hospitalised at

that he
passed ask-

the General Hospital and the
doors were closed to them. The
answer being there were no

nurses available,

He said there would also re-
member his debating the ques-
tion of a Radiologist and Surgeon
General for the General Hospital
when he pointed out to the Gov-
ernment that there was no reason
to argue that because a Director
of Medical Services received a
salary of £1,300 a year or a Colo-
nial Secretary: £1,500, that special-
ists to look after the health of the
people, where you had one Hos-
pital for 200,000 people, should get
a salary below theirs. He argued
that it was the duty of the Gov-
ernment to get the best specialists
at the Hospital and to get the
best they must pay them, for in-
deed the more well-to-do people
in this country, when they are
ill, are able to seek medical ad-
vice and attention abroad while
the middle and lower classes are
dependent upon the skill of the
men at their hospital. “I sav it
now and I said it then, the best
should be obtained and they must
be paid and I know you i: gree
that they should be well paid.”
' Old Age Fensions

He said that in and out of sea-
sons on the floor of the House he
had stressed the fact that ‘he
destitute old people iu this colony
should receive a pension at the
age of 65. Three years ago he told
them he should support an ia-
‘rease for the old people. “I did
so.”

Transport

“T realise I have made some
enemies because of the stand I
took in this matter.

“You will remember reading in



a particular day bus fs
in this colony would go up. De-
spite the fact that the leader cof
my Party, Mr. Wilkinson, who
was a member of the Transport
Board had knowledge of it, and
despite the fact that Mr. Dowding,
a member of my Party, who is
interested in the biggest bus ser
vice in this colony, I made it elear
that from the returns which I had
seen at the Vestry of the General
Bus Company that I was satisfied



We have them in Gold and Silver Kid in a variety

heels,



Poli- ;

2 quoted an

FIELDS POSTPONED

@ From Page 3
should change his mind
regard to that matter.

with
In his

opinion, the Vestry did not have
the necessary machinery at their
disposal for establishing these
fields.

The letter before. them ° asked
for estimates and plans. Members
wuld appreciate that on the last

occasion they got estimates for
which they paid nothing and
other persons were given the

work. It could not be expected of
them to ask people to give esti-
mates and plans free. He con-
sidered the Public Works De-
partment the right authority to
he work and then let the
take it over to administer

He would counsel members
that whatever they did, they were
still among the Government
members, the type of person who,
as long as one of their friends dia

not get the job, would be pre-
pared to speak ill of the Vestry
He for one, was not prepared to

vote that the Vestry undertake the
work.
Vestry’s Reply
Mr. Mottley then moved that
the Vestry reply to the Colonial

Secretary saying that under the
circumstances, they regret much
that they would be unable to

change their previous decision as
set out in their letter of August
3 and hope that Government
would do everything to expedite
the establishment of these play-
ing fields.

Mr. D. G, Leacock seconded and
said that he saw nothing to make
him change his mind concerning
the letter of August 3 to the
Financial Secretary.

Since thatNime, he had learnt
things which had even made him
strengthen his opinion as regards
the method of furnishing estim-
ates of plans for buildings. He
instance where a cer-
tsin building was being erected,
the cost had exceeded the original
estimate by 250 per cent.

“In these days, giving an es-
timate is only a piece of guess
work, because the contractor is
working with unknown cost of
materials and unknown cost of
labour” he said

When the Vestry’s Act was first
passed, the work of the Church-
warden was very different from
what it is to-day. It was some
years since he was Churchwarden
and there were now various ac-
tivities which came under the
Churchwarden’s_ direction that
did not exist two or three years
ago,

“We have reached the stage
where the Churchwarden would
have to keep a close eye on build-
ing of this sort and he would have
to spend a great deal of his time
on that.”

Responsibility
the Government’s part, I
there is a laudable desire
to get these playing fields, but
they seem to be going to, every
possible length they could to
avoid having any responsibility
for themselves.

“They had been so much criti-
cism levelled at this Vestry for
the setting up of the first playing
field that the Churchwarden is
being put in a peculiar position.

I do not see why we, who have



“On
think

no building department, should
be expected to carry out this
work’ when the Government say

they cannot, although they have a
Public Works Department. I
think our position is absolutely
sound, The Government could es-
tablish as many playing fields as
they liked, ond the Vestry should
look after them when established,
but | think it would be a mistake
to say that the Vestry | should
have to look after the erection
of the buildings when they did
not have the necessary machin-
ery.”

Hor’ble Mr. Gale said that there
was a certain amount of truth in
what Mr. Mottley and Mr
Leareck had said. They had no
department to carry out those
thines. but an Act was passed by
the Legislature to do so. The Gov-
ernment wenld grent the money
for these playing fields and the
land could even be leased,

_



that they were naking money and
was not entitled to any increase.
I felt although it might. not have
directly affected my constituents
it meant that a lot of middle class!



people in the country areas who!
were struggling to send their
children to school would have
their bus fa increased some 40
cents a week, which they couid
ill-afford,

“Itse.efore, soliciting the sup-
po:t of other members in the
Heuse and impressing upon My:,

D. D, Garner that it was wrong!
in principle, you were prevented
from paying more bus fares.”
He said that when an attempt
was made to prevent lorry own-
ers from taking .around~a~ few
excursionists or from transporting
from one church to another, mem-|
bers of the various religious or-
ganisations who indeed could ill-
afford to pay the price for bus
transportation, he again contri-
buted his quota by leading the
arguments for its defeat. |





Evening Sandals

to go with any costume you desire

of attractive designs, with high heels





‘I am looking at the matter from
a different point of view, We
should not worry over the past”
he said. The parishes were re-
sponsible for looking after th«
Waying fields.

Majority’s Wish

We are the Vestrymen of tie
parish representing the people cf
St. Michael and I think the m-
jority of people in the parish
would like to have playing fields.
The fields had been bought and
now no one was prepared to e-
tablish them. Are we saying that
we are incapable of establishing
these fields?”

He said that the Vestry had
undertaken bigger projects than
playing fleids and mentioned the
establishment of the Nightengale
Home in Black Rock. The Govern-
ment was prepared to grant them
the money and he saw no reason
why they should not establish the
fields.

Mr. A. R. Toppin supported
Mr, Gale's remarks. He said that
they were the city fathers and

S.ould see after the playing fields
He thought that they should be a
little bigger than what they were
and get ahead with the work.

Mr. Tudor had done a_ splen-
did job as far as the Princess
Alice Playing Field was con-
cerned and I think that the play-
ing fields should be done by this
Vestry and as soon as possible
in order that the children should
have the benefit of them.

Mr. F. McD. Symmonds said
that he would like to see the
playing fields established in the

parish and was willing to co-ov-
erate with the Government or any-
one else with a certain amount of

dignity, He was however not pre-
pared to be pushed around and
treated with disrespect by the

Social Welfare Officer or anyone
else in leffer form or otherwise.

Negotiations

“Negotiations have reached the
Vestry in the name of the Gov-
ernment, If the Government per-
mitted any officer to use the name
of the Executive in such a way
as to throw direct insult upon the
Executive members of this Vestry
in matters of playing flelds or any
other form, I will always object
to it.”

“Mudh as I would like to co-
operate in this matter, I certain<
ly would not be the one to co-
operate if the co-operation, meant
that I would have to do a thing
of that kind under the present
circumstances,

I feel the Colonial Secretary is
making a very l&idable effort to
smoothe out the differences be-
tween this Vestry, the Govern-
ment and the Social Welfare
Officer on this matter. I feel that
if the entire matter is approached
in a spirit of goodwill on all sides,
the playing fields would be put
up without any rancour.

Mr. Mottley replying said that
with the situation as fluid as it
was, it would be a difficult thing
to get anyone to undertake a
job building by contract. It was
to be noted that the letter said
that they were to get plans and
the money would be granted only
if the Government approved o1f
these plans,

“Would it not be better for
the Government to send them the
type of plan they wanted and
have a department estimating the
cost?” He thought that would even
be a_ little better, but for the
Vestry to estimate, then get
plans, the type of which might
rot Mg approved by the Govern-
ment, was merely trying to pa
the buck, cit rae

He considered that they should
be responsible mainly for the ad-
ininistration of the fields, The
spending of the money for theii
establishment should be the rc-
sponsibility of a department of
the Government,

ASSIZE DIARY

MONDAY, DEC.

Rex vs. Carmen Marshall
Rex va Winifred Hoyte
TUESDAY, DEC. 4

No, 35 Rex



No. 17
No. M4





“Go” Says Mr. Williams

WHENEVER there is an opportunity for the people ot

Barbados to get out, they should go, Mr. L

A. Williams told

a crowd at a Labour Party’s meeting held at the Hope R ac
St. Lucy, in support of the candidatures of Mr. J. E. 1

Brancker and himself.

Mr. Williams said that the Labour Party came into pow-
er in 1938 because of the insurgent movement throughout
the whole of the West Indies. They might have known wher
Trinidad, Jamaica and those islands rioted because of eco

nomic conditions.

Because of a similar movement

locally,
and es a result,
now getting adult

the people
suffrage,

England,
that they
Since

they could boldly
were talking nonsens:
the Labour Party

Mr. Ward had said at Half Moo

a commission came down Fort that he did not have enougl
ire time to represent the people
So estly
when anyone came and told them cided
that they got adult suffrage from some people asked
say

hon-
ae
bu

in the House
not to come

and so he
forward
hiny to come
and he decided to come back. “You
will therefore be unfair to the en-

came tre island and the people of yow

into power, they tried to do some- parish in particular if you vote foi

thing tor the people’s good, Mr, & man who doesn't have the time
Wilkinson said that “men of to_represent you honestly.”
ability were wanted.” If Mr. Wii- Mr. Brancker said that the rea

kinson meant men of commerce,

son why the housing programm

he (Mr, Williams) was saying has not yet been carried out a

that men of commerce were not Clinketts, St Lucy, was becaus¢

recessarily men of ability the owner of the land, who is it

’ v* re . } » tit
Mr, Ward had told the peopi the : S., could not find the titl
: reds

that everybody in the House knew — “ aiken, Oh lat

he was wrong for sending the He he fi sens om ie hg neil

people to America on this last form of ee mor 7 oa Lal

time. “I am telling the men of ne even ee ee oe :

, yur’s polic

St. Lucy that whenever you get ‘

a chance to get out of this island,

go. It does not only bring you

money but you gain a lot of ex-

perience and education.”

Subsidisation

Mr. Ward was telling them of
the high cost of living, which was
another snare used to catch votes.

Trinidad and Jamaica paid

cents and 26 cents per pint for
rice and they are living. The Bar- toot

Dirk Continues

World Cruise

DIRK TOBER, 26-year-o}

48 Dutch Yachtsman who is makin
a world cruise alone in his 3
Ketch Otrust Teft Barbadkc

bados Labour Party favoured sub- on Thursday afternoon for S
sidisation which would lower the Vincent. Dirk anchored his ket«
cost of living and the price of off the Aquatic Club on Noven
rice. It was nonsense to make ber 15 after he had _ finishe
capital out of the cost of living 2,700-mile cross-Atlantic ru:
because it was not the Govern- He is taking Onrust back hen
ment’s fault. in Amsterdam via St. Vince:
_ Before the war, Barbados bought Martinique, Curacao, Panam
rice from Burma and India but Tahete (Pacific), New Zealan
difficulty in transportation hid Australia and South Africa

put Barbados in a precarious posi- Dirk said that ne énjoyed
tion. British Guiana grew rice and sty nore ‘and “regretted that }
it was so much the better to cet | id hha 1 longe
the rice from there a aat ae crak Meine hs

B.G. said
that because of world conditions,

jarbados, He was hoping to m

they were forced to carry up SM weather on his way bac
their rice and after arbitration home
Barbados finally found that they ,, 1° WS spared quite a lot
would have to buy the rice from tme on his cross-Atlantic run
British Guiana at the advanced because of the use of twin stay
price Subsidisation was the Sls which with the trade wind
answer to the question, steered the boat—but he is pre
“The Government feels that it Pared to put in quite a numbe

is their duty to lower duty on food Of hours at the helm when he i

and clothing for the benefit of the crossing the Pacific

He expect

workers. They were, too, going to to be five years on the cruise ani

encourage capital into the colony
when they saw it possible to do
They were, however, going to
ensure that when enterprise came
was
The Gov-
ernment’s programme was second
Foreign politi- G. L.
the local Gov-
pro-

so

into the island, the colony
properly remunerated, ,
to none, he said,
cians commended
ernment for their
gramme

housing

Mr. Brancker said that he had
been representing the parish of St.
Lucey for quite a number of years
and the people never let him down,
In the neighbouring colonies, the
people voted labour and he was
telling them that Barbados, which
was expected to set the political
‘standard of the West Indies was
being looked forward to fall into

line.
New Voters

He was asking the people to
give their support to himself and
Mr. Williams. There
new voters added to St. Lucy and
he wanted the old voters to tutor
the new. The children would be
committing no breach of the law
if they ran behind Mr, Walcott’
car when he came into St, Lucy
and shout “go away Buccaneer”
St. Thomas had refused Mr. S
Walcott and was St. Lucy going
to accept a political refugee?

In 1938, the St, Lucey electors
repudiated Mr. Henry Alleyne
chiefly because they saw to it that
they were not tied up in a factory

owner combination, They shou!d|

now stick to precedent. “You will
hear them saying now, ‘Oh

vs. Christopher If) the time.”

a
a \
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DECREE ABSOLUTE

THE Hon. the Puisne Judge |
Taylor yesterday pro
nounced decree absolute in th
Court for Divorce and = Matri
monial Causes in the suit o
Gladys Griffith, petitioner an
Gordon Griffith, responden

Decree nisi was pronounced o
October 5.
Decree nisi

was pronounced i

fhe suit of Robert A. Greenida
petitioner and Claudine Gree
idge, respondent,

Mr. E. K. Walcott, K.C., in
structed by Mr. H. L. Thoma
solicitor of the firm of Carring

Robo

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WILLS ADMITTED
TO PROBATE

At the Court of Ordinary
terday, the Hon, Puisne Judges



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PAGE SIX

BARBADOS A



CLASSIFIED ADS.

TELEPHONE 2508.

annowncements of
Deaths, Acknowl-}|
1 Memoriam notices is)

rt charge
igement
$1 50 oF

for
lage
and



week-days and $1.89 on Sundays}
for any number of words up to 50, and
» cents per word on Week-days and

4 cents per word om Sundays for each
pdditienal ward

For B
mmnounr



1s, Marriage er Engagement
ents Carib Calling the
é s $2.00 for any number of words
xp to 50 and’ 6 cents per word for each
additional werd. Terms cash. Phone 250€
petween 8.30 and 4 p.m., 31139 for Death
Netices only after 4 D.â„¢.







—$$$$$$ LT

IN MEMORIAM

ALLEYNE—In loving’ memory of our





de father James Adolphus Alleyne.
eho departed tis life an
leat
vears have passed since that
‘ we sved was called awny
He Tosu 2on to rise
When the 7 trump shall rend the
Then Christ the fetters of the tomb
§ wake im full Unmortal bloom















































E t . ibe gdb. Justiz
vt wif Erne and Goulbourne
Maja end Jenetha (daugnters

1.12. S1—-in

WANTED







- HELP
Overse An experienced Sugar Fa to
ry Overseer for the 1962 crop season at
Fairfi.ld Feetory Apply by letter onty
to the Mai fim No interviews. Applica-
tions received up to December 6th, 1951
25.11.51











LUB, St





COLONY James, have @
vacer Lor. as Acristant Manager or
Minageress: applications should be made
in writing, In fhe first place, giving ful



particulars and e
27.11.51—7n
1
STENOGRAPHEN An experiencec
t spher for Realtors Limited, Appl
ror n the first tnstance. Ad

Rogbuck Street, City
28.11.51-—4.4.1



4



ORKMEN ket workmen to di
oufwork De ABREU TAILORING CO









Morhill Street 29.11,51—3n
MISCELLANEOUS
“BOTTLES —Clean empty nip bottler a
48c. per core liver Colonnade Stores
White Park Pood 11.11.51—t.£.n

HIGH C..ASS JOBNERS' WORK
Willing to purchase High Class Joiners
work, ih Mag ui Cedar ly Prefer
ably Dining Tatle Vanities, China Cabi-
nets, and C \oply Ralph Beard
lawer Bay St 20,11. 53-1











In food condition. Telephone
30.1151

DINGHY
2520.
Wariter
Service
115d

{ERVICE
Vleectric





UNUSED ELECTRIC
fo parch nl

Apply: f

26 PIECES 12” Caat
Apply D. M. Simpson



co
1.12 Slevin





IMPORTANT !
YOUR GAS COOKER
TO-DAY

ant
tl

BOOK

If “you -w
future. We
dist!

You newre
ey ooking
Why potent
room, B.
Cookers

one in the near
have @ waiting

quicker delivery

advante

it your Gas Show-
Street, and see the Gos

Where before delivery







a

PSPS VCCPP FED PSPPOOVSE,

10-DAY'S NEWS FLASH

2000 COMIC PAPERS JUST
ARRIVED

Our Toys are the

talk of the town,
Novels

and Pepular Literature in
Beautiful Binding

Souvenir Goods in Large Variet’y,
ENAMEILe-It in all Colours.

JOHNSON’S STATIONERY
and HARDWARE

The most satisfactory
method of selling your
property is through an
established firm of
Agents.

JOHN
M4.
i ADON

& Co.

AF.S., F.V.A,
have

the reputation
for results

Phone 4640 Plantations Ltd.





PPC LEE LEE >





-
mo)
E ‘
‘ TO-DAY
x %.
~ s
* THE ANNUAL BAZAAR §
t a
w will be held at %
a »,
S THE DRILL HALL
t from 3 to 7 p.m. $
* Under the Distinguished Patron- 3
ase of His Excellency the Gov-
aS ernor and Lady Savage $
% Tove will be a *
S Fas SHOW and PUNCH ¥
~ aue o. OY SHOW at 5.30. &
% and many other attractions %
% for young and old, x
% Beautiful CHRISTMAS \
%- GIFTS, Novelties, TOYS of 3
% all sorts, x
~ Completely equipped Ser- X
* vice Station for Boys—fully s
furnished., xs
% DOLLS HOUSES for Girls
* and many other interesting
% toys % {
* CHRISTMAS OARDS > |
* COOKED FOOD, i
% CAKES and SWEETS, 3)
% A WELL STOCKED BAR. ¥)
* The POLICE BAND will be al
x in attendance . x
%\ In aid of The Old Ladies’ x
s Home. %
% Bring all the Children and 4 |
x Help a Good Cause. y)
*% ADMISSION + Be BI
% Children and Nurses 6d. |
sBSSS0SCCCCCC SSSCUSESS..



FOR



SALE

AUTOMOTIVE

CAR—Ford Prefect 11,000 miles. Con-
tact Butcher, McEnearney & Co. Garage.
2.11.51—in







Plymouth Sedan,
miles. For particulars
Kinch 2861 or 4790
30.11.51—@n
_—_————
CAR—Drop-head Convertible Ford V-8
in good condition. Going cheap. Apply:
Cole & Co., Limited Phone 4516
28.11 .51-—t.f.n

CAR—One Deluxe
done only 15,000
apriy to S. H



CAR—One Anglia 8 h.p. (M. 1349) in
fairly good condition. Dial 3982 or Blades
C/o B’dos Foundry, 29.11.51—3n

CAR—1 Citroen Car,
old, done 9,000 miles. In perfect order
Nearest offer to $2,400.00 accepted. Dial
2204 Dr. C. G. Manning or 4418 G. E.







under one year









Ward. 27.11.51--4n
CAR—One (1) 1947 Morris 8 H.P. Car
n good condition. Dial 3232, C. A. Fields.
1 12. 51—2n
CAP.—One (1) Standard Vanguard Car,
in excellent working order, apply
Redman & Taylor's Garage Ltd
1.12.51—3n

(

ANNOUNCEMENTS) = ELECTION





$5 im goods and with your cash bill |
you get a guess-coupor; how many 5 ae OF 8T. MICHAEL rARene OF 8T. LUCY
screws in o jar? You can win an {ERNBY give notice that | have I HERES give netice that I have ‘
EKCO radio it certainly pays to shop | sppointed the Parechial Building, Cum-, appointed the Vestry Feom near the REAL ESTATE
at A. BARNES & Co., Lid beriand Street, Bridgetown, as the place |Parish Church as the place where ult
23.12.51—t.f.n. }where Porishioners of the purist; of St. | person duly qualiled to vote at ony |
eens |Michaei and other persons duly qualified jclection of Vestrymen for the said Parina DEBFNTURES—4% Debentures, Mar-
c NOTICES to vote at any election of Vestrymen {for |may assenible on Tuesday, the 7th day| ine Hotel (1969 Ltd. Further particu-
PURLI . the said Parish mav assemble om Tues- of January, 195%, between the heory of }/#rs, apply Wm. Fogarty (B’dos.) Ltd.
antimetinna day the 7th day of January, 1952, be-' 10 and 1! o'clock in the morning-to elect 16.11.51 —t.4.n.
NOTKICE ttween the hours of 10 and fl a.m. to Vesie for the Pariah of St. Lucy for
}eleet a Vestry for the Parish of St.[the year 1992 House at Maxwell Road with three side
The following have agreed to close | Michael for the year 1952. OSWALD DEANE, verandah, drawing, dining and breakfast
for the two half-days of the Annual HF BURTON, Parochiol Treasurer. rooms, 4 bedroems. toilet dnd bath,
Agricultural Exhibition, Wednesday Sth Parochio! Treasurer, | St. Lucy. kitechenctte, garage, and standing on %
and Thursday 6th December. St. Michael. | 1.12 3n | Acre of land. It can be bought on very
Messrs Da Costa & Co, Lid 1.12.51—3n | ——-——___—— - attractive terms. A small amount can
Colonnade Stores. | PARISH OF ST. PEEUIP be paid down and the balance monthly
C. F. Harrison & Co., Lid | PARISH OF CHRIST CHURCH i HEREBY give notice that 1 have ap- | F Otherwise.
Jason Jones & Co., Ltd. 5 HEREBY give notice that I have}pointed the Chureh Boys’ School near| Apply to D'Arcy A. Scott, Magazine
K. R. Hunte & Co., Ltd. eppointed the New Vestry Room adjoin-|the Parish Church, as the place where Lane. 30.11. 51—2n

ing the Vestry Room, Oistin, as the place
where all persons duly qualified to vote
at any election of Vestrymen for the said
T. Sydney Kinch Lid Parish may assemble on Tuesday, the
Stokés & Bynoe Ltd. 7th day of January, 1952, between the
Barbados Mutual Lite Assurance | hours of 10 and 11 o'clock in the morn-
Society. ing to elect a Vestr’ for the Pariah of
The Wilkinson & Haynes | Christ Church for the year 1962.

Charlies McEnearney & Co. Ltd }
Plantations Ltd. .
Robert Thom Ltd.

Co., Lid. wooD DDARD,

Cc. S. Pitcher & Co. Ltd. Parochial Treasurer,
Barbados Fire Insurance Co. Christ Church.
Singer Sewing Machine Co. | 1.32.51—n
Alfonse B. De Lima & Co., Ltd. sialic ale asda lip

PARISA OF ST. JOSEPH

J. N. Goddard & Sons Ltd Saale
L HEREBY give

Bata Shoe Store. notice that I have
P. C. S. Maffei & Co., LAd appointed the Vestry Room at the Dis-
T. S. Garraway & Co pensary as the plac. where all persons

Johnson's Stationery. duly qualified to vote at any election
Alex Bayley & Co, of Vestrymen for the said Parish may

i Modern Dress Shoppe. assembie on Tuesday, the Tih day of

as G. W. Hutchinson & Co., Ltd. | Januar’, 1952, between the hours of 10

Collins Ltd. and Ii o'clock in the morning to «lect
T. Geddes Grant Lid. a Vestry for the year 1952.

Louls L. Bayley. A. T. KING,
CARS—«(1) Morris Oxford done 14,000 J. B. Lesiie & Co., Lid. Parochial Treasurer,
miles like new. (1) Chevrolet 1937 not T. R. Evans & Whitfields St. Joseph
pigs ogg en Standard 8 and small R. H. Edwards Ltd, | 1.12.51~3n

Roebuek Street. 29.11.51—2n

_——$—S$—
CARS—End of year close out of used

cars all must be sold, 1 Wolseley 6/80

Saloon, 8,000 miles, First class condition.

1 Morris Oxford. 1 Morris Minor 10,000

miles. Like new

good condition.

GARAGE LTD



CHRYSLER

matic Transmission. Mileage 33,000 and
in perfect condition—Dial 4616, Courtesy
Garage 22.11. 5i—12n

RELIANT TRUCK—Recent!y overhaul-
sd and painted, apply Barbados Agencies,

telephone 29.11.51 --6n

|

ELECTRivAL

(2) JUKE BOX—One Juke musical box,
olivys twelve



records for one shilling, in
ood working order, Ring 4908, Barbados















Phone 4977. Medley Works | *

1 Austin A-40. Very
Cheap. FORT ROYAL
Telephone 4504,
1.12.51—6n
(WINDSOR) 1947 Mode!
with New Tyres. Fluid drive with auto-

Stansfeld Scott & Co, Lid.
Cave Shepherd & Co., Lid, |





PARISH OF ST. PETER
oa s . I HEREBY give notice to all persons
» YY De Lima & Co, Ltd. duly qualified to vote at the election of
ee 3 Co. Vestrymen for this Parish, that I have
appointed the Parish Room, Speights-
|town as the place where all such per-
| cons may meet on Tuesday, the 7th day
|of January, 1962, between the hours of
|10 and 31 o'clock m_ the morning to
| elect a Vestry for the Parish of St. Peter
| for the vear 1952.

Evelyn Hoaeh & Co., Ltd
A. Barnes & Co, Ltd.
Cole & Co,, Ltd.

N. B. Howell & Co
Manning & Co., Ltd.

R, & G. Challenor Ltd.



General Traders Ltd. | 10 and 11 o'clock in the morning to elect

< Gardiner Austin & Co,, Ltd. a Vestry for the your 1952.











*

DVOCATE

NOTICES | PUBLIC SALES















parishioners of the parish of St. Philip,
and other persons duly qualified to vote
at any Election of Vestrymen for the
said Parish, may assemble on Tuesday
7th day of January, 1952 between the
hours of 10 and 11 a.m, to elect a Vestry
eg Parish of St. Philip for the year





SMALL COTTAGE in Alkins’ Road,
Carrington’s Village, standing on 2,067
sq. ft. of land. Conveniently situated
near two important bus routes, For
further particulars and terms of purchase
apply to Mrs. G. Connell, “Fairbank,”
Upper Belmont Road, St. Michael,

1.12.51—2n.

P. Ss. W. SCOTT,
Parochial Treasurer,
St. Philip.
1.12.51—3n



AUCTION

GOVERNMENT NOTICE

B.W.L. CENTRAL SUGAR CANE
BREEDING STATION
DEPARTMENT OF SCIENCE
AND AGRICULTURE





PARISH OF ST. ANDREW
1 HEREBY give notice thet I have
appointed the Vestry Room near the
Almshouse as the place wher. all persons
Guly qualified to vote at any election of
Vestrymen for the said Parish may
assembie on Tuesday, the 7th da of
January, 1952, between the hours of 10
end 11 o'clock in the morning to elect
a Vestry for the Parish of St. Andrew
for the year 1952.
Cc. A. SKINNER,
Parociial Treasurer,



St er ie Agricultural Assistant, B.W.1.
me Central Sugar Cane Breeding
PARISH OF ST. GEORGE Station

| HEREBY give notice to all persons
duly qualified to vote at the lection
of Vestrymen for this Parish, that I have
appointed the St. George's Vestry Room
as the place where all such persons may
meet on Tucsday, the 7th de, of January,
1952,. between the hours of 10 and 11
o'clock in the morning to elect a Vestry
for the Parish of St. George for the

Applications are invited for the
of Agricultural Assistant,
B.W.I. Central Sugar Cane Breed-





Hanschell, Larsen & Co., Ltd. } G. Ss. conan. Year 1952. ’ eee. ns ocala ae
ov R. M. Jones & Co., Ltd. Parochial easurer, H. JOHNSON, ‘7 .B.) xX 6— st “ .
James A. Lynch & Co., Ltd. | St. Parochial Treasurer, annum and the point of “eatry MONTREAL, AUSTRALIA, NEW
“A Barbados Hardware Co., Ltd. 1.12,51—n St. George. th 1 ill d d th 1 ZEALAND LINE, LIMITED
"©. B. Rice & Co., Ltd. fates a 1,12,51—an | he scale wi epend on the qual- (ANZ, Line) The M.V. “Caribbee” will accept
W. A. Griffith & Co. | PARISH OF ST. JAMES —_—_-— ifications and experience of the; ss. “PORT ADELAIDE” is sched- Cargo and Passengers for
Cole's Stationery | & HEREBY give notice that I have PARISH OF ST. THOMAS successful applicant. The post is| wled to sail from Hobart September 25th Dominica, Antigua, Montserrat,
; Alleyne, Arthur & Co., Ltd ‘appointed the Vestyy Room near the 1 HEREBY give notice that I have} not pensionable but after a year’s | Melbourne October 4th, Sydney October Nevis and St. Kifte. Sailing 20th
5 Harold Proverbs & Co, Ltd. | Parish Church as the place where all appointed the School House near the bati t ° “120th, Gladstone October 6th, Port instant.
Martin Deorly & Co, Ltd | persons duly qualified to vote at any | Parish Church as the place where all probationary service the officer) Aima October 20th, Brisbane October The M.V. “Moneka” will accept
Johnson & Redman. lection of Vestrymen for the said Parisi: | Persons duly Qualified to vote at any] May join a Provident Fund. 2th, arriving at Trinidad about end Cargo and Passengers for
s T. Horbert Ltd, may assemble on Tuesday, the Tth day | election of vary men for the said Parish 3. The successful applicant November and Barbados about December eee Antigua, Montserrat,
may rt . « . vis .
is Ince & Co., Ltd. |of January, 1952 between the hours ef ee ee e on Tuesday, the 7th day} witt be required to provide Han. Sth. evis and St. Kitts. Date of

1952, between the hours of
10 and 11 o'clock in the morning to elect











ing Station, Department of Agri-|
culture.

'
2. The salary attached to the| HIPPING

self with a motor car, a loan to-!

SATURDAY, DECEMBER 1951

GOVERNMENT NOTICE

VACANCY FOR EDUCATION OFFICER, EDUCATION
DEPARTMENT — BRITISH HONDURAS

1,



1

i There is a vacancy in the Education Department, British Hon<
jduras, for an Education Officer.
Duties.

In addition to the general supervision of elementary schools the
duties will include advising teachers on teaching methods and school
organization, assisting in the organisation of pupil teacher training
and performing such other duties as the Director may decide .
Quatifications.

Applicants should have been trained at recognised training col-
leges, should possess a teacher’s diploma or certificate and should
have teaching experience in elementary schools; a University degree,
though not essential, will be an additional qualification.

Emoluments.

The salary will be on the scale $1,464 x 72—$1,824 (£1 Sterling is
equivalent to $4 British Honduras) the point of entry being depend-
ent on age, qualifications and experience. There is also a provisional
| Cost of Living Allowance of $280 (£70) p.a. The revision of salaries
jit at present under active consideration and it is expected that the
| salary quoted will be substantially increased. The post is pension-
able. Vaeation leave is with full pay, free leave passages being
provided to the United Kingdom and back. Travelling expenses and
subsistence allowance for periods spent away from headquarters are
paid. Free passages will be provided for the suecessful candidate,
wife and two children.

Applications.

Applications, accompanied by copies of two testimonials and giv-
ing two references, should reach the Director of Education, Barbados,
by the 15th December, 1951, They should state fully, particulars of
applicants’ experience and qualifications, including any subjects or
activities in which applicants may have specialised.

30.11.51.—3n.

NOTICES













wm addition to general cargo this ves- departure to be notified.

gel has ample space for chilled and hard The M.V, Daerwood will accept



SOOO GSS OSS SOP PF FS GOSES































i
Agencies. 29.11,51--6n » Stuart & deuigson Ltd. z S. TARRION, . veer? pid ng Parish of St. Thomas hate = purchase of which will| frozen cargo. sara Cargo peer ri a
” Perkins & Co | arochial Treasurer, OF yes made o; itions Cargo accepted on through s of Lad- a, St. neent, Grenada anc

“FRIGIDAIRE''—Deepfreezers, a limt- : S. EB. Cole & Co., Ltd St. James. : FP, F. PILGRIM, ictas to oe ao eae ing for trans-shipment at Trinidad to Aruba. Date of departure to be
ted quantity of large 9 Cubic feet Deep- J, O. Tudor & Co. 1.12.51-—3n “arochial Treasurer, . are applix| British Guiana, Leeward and Windward notified.
freezers just arrived, call early at K. R. Simeon Hunte & Sons Ltd -—--— — St. Thomas. eable to travelling officers of the} Isianas. B.W.I. SCHOONER, OWNERS
1UNTE & CO., LTD. Phone; 4611 or John D. Taylor & Sons, DXi. PARISH OF ST. JOHN 1.12.51—3n] Barbados Government Service. For further yerticulars eppiy— ASSOC. Inc.

027 30.11.51—-3n * a Barbados Foundry Ltd. I HEREBY give notiee that I have} —--—~--"" ——— }A mileage allowance will be paid | FURNESS. WITHY & Co., Lid Tele. 4047.
Sat pon cena eas Bidas Co-operative Cotton . | appointed the Vestry Room at the Parish RATES OF EXCHAN at standard Government rates TRINIDAD tN

; One (Electrolux) Factory Ltd. burch as ace where all persons HA a ; . .
Of Buming Refrigerator | in perfect Central Ageney Ltd. duly qualified to vote at any electior Woe, a we GE is Applications, stating age,| B.W.I. ‘i eis SOSSSS5 rs ot
order Apply to T. Sydney Kinch, J. N. Harriman & Co., Lid of Voesteymen for the said Parish, may FF éducational qualificati ine DaCOSTA & Co., Ltd.
eiantations New Building, Phone #270, 4 Frank B. Armstrong Ltd. |assernble on Tuesday, the 7th day off.) 14. PB hg perience tonethen with ond eae | BARBADOS. IT PAYS TO ADVERTISE
wt 3070. 21 11.51—12n Thursday, 6th December Only | January, 195%, between the hours of 10) 5° > Pr. jeqnes on ae Sie t A.W.

n2iptarecthlilhnillipsenieneninshtintndboremaltditle i .. Bookers’ (B'dos: Drug Stores| and 1) o'clock im the moming to elect eee 64 6/10% pr. tof testimonials should be address- |
eee ae Te at kad. B. ta Vestr A Parish of St. John for ot 4.45% pe ed to the Direetor of Agriculture,
me “Presteold” 44, Cu. Ft, refrigerator is N. PB. Wilson Co | the year 1952 shatts < 5 i ps e
mby two years old, being seid to get a Lashleys Ltd. c HM. S. FRASER, sam " ess Fark, and will be aceept
arger one, Also one 5 Cu. Ft, G.EC., <2 Carlton Browne & Co. | Parochial Treasurer, a oe Drafts 64 .2/10% pr. Cd Up to 12 noon on Thursday 6th | ‘0.
hree months old. Apply K. R. HUNTE " A.B Taglod Led. } ae. sone: BES Ue De Eaesenay 6 110% pr, December, 1951.

& CO., LTD. Phone: 4611 ot ee nee 1.12.51—41n, | 112.5130 ; Ceupons 62 4/10" pr. 25.11.51.—4n. Inc.
. = _——————_— msec plllitlen tiene
VACANT POST | an. eae ————--- -
. 2 slstainpebbiie cides
FURNITURE Headmaster, Grenada Reys’ Secondary | FOK RENT POLICE TRAFFIC NOTICE cele aimee hameeone
Sehool x
S c ORREC r. BOSTURS. AtRe with APPLICATIONS are invited for filling AGRICULTURAL EXHIBITION ON 5TH AND 6TH A STEAMER Sails 23rd November— arrives Barbados 4th December, 1951.

eat een a tm ie the vacant post of Headmaster, Grenada | DECEMBE A STEAMER Sails 14th December— arrives Barbados 25th December, 1951.
Ybtainable from stock at T, Geddes Boys’ Secondary School, The sglury of | HOUSES ! Th , 1951. eam aia a Se =
Jrant Ltd, Phone 4442." ss si—dn. | the post. which is pensionable, is RI | mecctcsre cies ti —senarentnaieesasese aa , e drivers and riders of alt vehicles approaching Queen's NEW ORLEANS SERVICE

e (£600) per annum rising by annual| BEDROOM—One (1) Furnished Bed- Park between the hours of 11 am. and 11 p.m. shall do so b f .

“FILING CABINETS — Roneo Four | merem-nts of $96 (220) to $3,120 (2660) | room, om the Seaside at Rockley use Of bp i oy and Cru s ’ are F So Dy Way Of |s s “OCEAN RANGER" Sailed 7th Nov ember—arrives B’dos 24th Nov., 1951.
srawer Filing Cabinets, Foolecap size § 4 annum in addition to a temporary | Kitchen, and Maid, if required. Phone : umpton Streets only, and leave by way of Constitution | 4 STEAMER Sails 2ist November— arrives Barbados 5th December, 1951
New stocks juct recelvid by T. Gedde | at Of Bving allowance at the rate of | 8553 29.11.51-—5n |Road or St. Michael's Row. A STEAMER Sails 5th December-- arrives Barbados 19th December 1951.
Ae ee ee oO ee Ae the maximare salary of | LITTLE MAMILTON — St. Lawrence 2. The following street and roads shall be one-way to all vehi ne ee et eee ALOT

29 11.51-—4n | 1 erade if necessary, should the quaif-|Gap. From Ist December. Unfurnished y Jar traffid)— y aus : : CANADIAN SERVICE
“TSTATIONERY CUPBOARDS 72” x 36 jeations of the candidate appcar to|3 Bedrooms. Water and Elcetrie. Apply SOUTHBOUND

« 18° with three adjustable shelves, s.«
hem at T. Geddes Grant Ltd. Bolto

sane,”’ 29.11.51-—4n
——_
LIVESTOCK



i i ne

COW--1 Guernsey Cow, heavy in calf
gave 32 pts last calf, 1 Holstein anc
Zebu Cow. 7 months im calf 30 pts las
calf. Apply W. C. L, Maynard, Frenches

St. George. 29.11.5121
ONE HEIFER CALF4 weeks old
Mother: Graded Guernsey, 36 pts, Father

Mr. J. Smith's Pure Bred Holstein Bull.
Dial 2084, Philip N. Pilgrim

1.12.51-—In

MECHANICAL
re ae
TYPEWRITERS—AIl! sizes, portable and

ong carriage machines also adding and
culating machines. BRADSHAW &
COMPANY. 29,11.51—@n

MISCELLANEOUS

BELTS—Fine quatity in white kid, or
navy, black, brown, green or red suede
at $1.50 each. The Turtle Shop, Marine
Hotel. 1,12 51—1n













CHRISTMAS GIFTS
PRIMUS STOVES and Lanterns, Pho-
tograph albums, Voightlander Cameras,
Webley air pistols and rifles. BRADSHAW
& COMP. Te 29.11.51—3n

CLEARANCE SALE

DECCA RECORDS—Three records for
$2.00 grab while the offer lasts.
BRADSHAW & COMPANY.

29.11,51—3n

———
GENTS SWIMMING TRUNKS—Woollen
superfine quality Maroon Colour, Size to
at everyone don't forget to buy for next
sea-bath. Visit Kirpalani, 52 ee a
1.12.51—In

—

GALVANISED SHEETS — A_ limited

quality of Galvanised Sheets 6 f{t, to
® ft, Attractive prices, Enquire Auto
Tyre Co. Phone 20696. 1,12.51—t.f.n,







HANDICRAFTS PLASTIC KIT—Com-
prising all the material and Tools to
make Plastic Novelties. Just the present
to give your Boy or Girl at Xmas.
KNIGHT'S PHOENIX PHARMACY.
90,11.51—2n

actin atiaminetnaninctniaiaanisaiiienstelanlteritamne

GLASS FINGER BOWLS—Fine quality.
sparkling glass as regularly sold at 96
cents. A special purchase enable us to
offer these at the bargain price of 72
cents each. Obtainable only from
HARRISON'S HARDWARE STORE,
Broad St. 29.11.51—-8n

EEE

LADIES SWIMMING SUITS with skirt
everlasting quality in Blue, Gold, Green
and Red. Sizes 32 to 40 only $3.51 at
Kirpalani, 52 Swan Street, 1 12.51—I1n.

PRESSURE LANTERNS: Kero. Oil,
very bright light — 350 candle power.
A useful standby and a necessity where
electricity is unobtainable. Dial 2039—
Hardware, B'dos, Coop. Cotton Factory.

20,11,51—3n

eoeerettel heating

TOY CARS: Pedal-driven. The ideal
eift for children $10 years. Only a few
left, Dial 2039 Hardware, B'dos,
Coop. Cotton Faetory. 30,11.51—3n

Piano; good tone, in good
Payne, Chapman Street,
Road. 1.42.51-—-In

PIANO—One
condition, S.
near Baxt





THANrS












PARADISE BEACH
CLUB

NOTICE TO MEMBERS

The Club will be closed
under Rule 34 on Satur-
day, December Ist from
8 p.m.














ustify such a concession. Miss Bayley. Marathon, St. Lawrence.
2 The qualifications required are a| Dial 8144. No dogs.

University degree, professional training

n education, appropriate experience, and LIQUOR LICENSE NOTICE

im interest in elementary school work. The applicat of Lisle Parkinson

At least two testimonials should aecom- | warcon of Gregg Farm, St. Andrew, for

pany the spplication. permission to sel! Spirits, Malt Liquors,
&c., at a beard and shingled shop with

3. The Headmaster will be required
to take charge of the boarding estab-| goivanized foot attached “to a house at
Grewe Farm, St. Andrew.

lishment in eee ts of which he
will be provi w ree quarters. 7 .

4. The average daily attendance of eee Oe ne woe
the Sehool is 300 and the boarding estab~ Police “Magistrate, :

lishment ean accommodate 50 students, Distric
5. Applications should be addressed to LISLE PARKINSON WATSON.
Applicant

the Administrator, Administrator's Office,
GRENADA, and should be reeefved not do ¥
later than’ the 18th DecemBer veel. | VR "heatine tout toe meld ai
(Sad) W. MACMILLAN. — | Pouce Court, District “F', on Friday the
Administrator, Grenada. ogra ge gt? :
Administrator's Office,

0.11 Sin.















Grenada, B.W.1, or J. R. EDWARDS.
1.12.51-—2n, Police Magistrate, Dist ;
1.12.51—in
FOKM I. ee

The Land Acquisition Act,
1949

(Notioe required by Section %)

LIQUOK LICENSE NOTICE

The application of Clevis Bannister,
shopkeeper of Hillaby, St, Andr.w, for
permission to sell Spirits, Malt Liquors,
&e., at a board and shingle shop, situated
at Hillaby, St. Andrew,

(a) Ciuimpcon Street, from Roebuck Street.

(4) St. Michael’s Row from the corner of Crumpton Street

and Constitution Road.

(c) Constitution Road, from the corner of Crumpton Street | 5

and St. Michael's Row, with the exceptions noted in
para, 4.

3. The drivers of motor cars shall be allowed to park on Con-| *
1951, | Stitution Road facing north, and when leaving, shall do so by way of

Belmont Road.
4.

Road between the hours of 11 a.m. and 11 p.m,, except when returning
to remove exhibits.

Park by the Governor’s Gate returning the same way, and proceed
in single line by way of Belmont Read.
Made under Regulation 2 of the Bridgetown and Speightstown
(Traffic) (Amendment) Regulations 1943.
R. T. MICHELIN,

f Commissioner of Police.
Police Headquarters,

Bridgetown,

No persons in charge of any vehicle of burthen shall be per-
mitted through St. Michael’s Row, Crumpton Street, or Constitution

; These shall only be allowed to pass down Con-
7th day of December, 1951, at 11 o'clock, | Stitution Road, from Belmont corner in single line and enter Queen’s




NOTICH is hereby given that it appears
to the Governor in Executive Committee
that the lands described in the Schedule
hereto and situate at Westbury Road,
in the parish of Saint Michael, in the
Island of Barbados are likely to be
needed for purposes which in the opinion
of the Governor-in-Executive Committee
are public purposes, namely for enlarg-
ing the playing ground and otherwise
for the use of the Westbury Sehool.

THE SCHEDULE

A pareel of land containing by
estimation Sixty-five thousand nine
hundred and one (65,901) square feet
situate to the south of Westbury
Boys’ School in Westbury Road in the
parish of Saint Michael and tsland of
Barbados, bounding on the
lands of the Westbury School,
east dnd west on lands of Stanley A.
Hawkins and on the south on lands
formetly of Kensington plantation and
on the Westbury Drain.

Dated this 26th day of November 1951,
at the Public Buildings in the City of
Bridgetown in the Island of Barbados.

By Commend

Colontal Secretary.
29.11. 51—3n



FORM I.

The Land Acquisition Act,
1949

(Notice required by Section » |

THE acquisition, fer publie purposes,
of the following parcels of land con-
taining One rood and seven perc
mere or less situate at the District of
Saint Christopher in the parish of Christ
Chureh in the Island of Barbados
described in the Sehedule hereto and
more particularly shown and delineated
and coloured Pink on a plan of survey
signed by Mr. C, K. Nichols, Sworn
Surveyor, and dated the 15th day of
May 1951, and filed in the oMce of the
Colonial Engineer having been decided
on by the Governor with the approval
of both Houses of the Legislature of the
Island of Barbados by resolution of the
Houses of the Legislature, it is hereby
deciared in pursuance of Section 5 of
the Land Acquisition Act, 189, that
the said lands have been acquired for
the following purposes: For increasing
school buildings and furnishing play-
grounds for Saint Christopher's Girls’

School.
THE SCHEDULE

ALL. THAT pareel of land containing
one rood and seven perehes adjoining
lands of Saint Christopher's Girls’ Sehooi
in the parish of Christ Church and
bounding on lands of M, Hazlewood on
lands of A. Clarke on lands of Estwick
Kirton on lands of the said Saint
Christopher's Girls’ School and on the
public Highway and particularly shown
and delineated on the plan thereof dated

the 15th day of May 1951, certified by
Cc. K. Nichols, Sworn Surveyor.
sted this twenty-seventh day of



Zz

ember 1951, at Government House in
the Island of Barbados
ALFRED SAVAGE,
Governor
1.12. 51—3n

WANTED TO BUY

STAMPS STAMPS
All Kinds of STAMPS

at the
CARIBBEAN STAMP
SOCIETY
No. 10, Swan Street.










Dated this Zird day of November 1951,} 15th November, 1951.
To J. R. EDWARDS, Esq.,

Police Magistrate, Dist “F''.

Signed CLEVIS BANNISTER,
Applicant

N.B.—This application will be con-
sidered at a Licensing Court te be held
at Police Court, District “F" on Friday.



the 7th day of December, 1951, at 11
o'clock, a.m.
J. RB. EDWARDS,
Police Magistrate, Dist. “F.”
1,12.51—In

PERSONAL

$$
The public are hereby warned against
giving credit to my wife JESTINE
MASON (nce LORD) as I do not hold
myself responsible for her or amyone cise
contracting any debt or debts in my name

Ss
Ss



——

The public are hereby warned against
giving credit to any person or persons
whomsoever im my name as I do not
hold myself responsible for anyone else
eontracting any debt or debts in my
name unless by a written order signed b





The public are hereby warned against
giving credit to my wife CLARI
FORDE (nee Kellman) as I do not hold
myself responsible for her or anyone
else contracting amy debt or debts in my
name unless by a written order signed

by me.
ST. CLAIR FORDE,
Glebe Land,
St. George
112.512". | ‘Strong, yet smooth and flexible,
‘LIGHTNING’ is @ fastener to be

relied upon, Look for the name on the



This serves to inform the public and
all concerned that L have not heard of

the whe of my wife IRENE) giger
ADELA ‘OD (nee Greaves) of dull,
Half Moon Port, St. Lucy, for the past f. GEDDES, GRANT ETD.,

twenty years, and it is my intention to
re-marr, in the noar future,
BR. PRESCOD,
Airy Cot,
Half Moon Fort, St. Lucy
1,12.51—1n

Agents,
=



NOTICE
The Transfer Booka of the Company
will be closed from the Ist day of Decem-
ber, 1951 to the I4th day of December,
1951, both days inclusive,
Dated this 26th day of November, 1951.
By Order of the d of Directors,
THE BARBADOS CO-OPERATIVE
COTTON FACTORY LTD.
E. M. LEACH,
Secretary.
30.11.51 —3t

A. M. WEBB

STOCKBROKER .
Barbados Investments.





















27.11.51—6n



1.12.5).

|
n





gall itbe SPOT AMES, MASON, "*| IMPERTAL LEATHER « LINDEN BLOSSOM « BLUE HyaciNTH| |
St. Philip.
1,12,51—2n

LIGHTNIN

me *

EDWARD V. STUART, ¥
Station Hill, :
St. Michael. ‘0.7
1.12.51—2n 7

‘S
reeiliva-b-i lsistyy

Are now at COLLINS’
YARDLEYWS — Orchis, April

LENT HERIC—Tweed, Miracle, Repartie.

COLLINS DRUG

1.12.51—3n.



Cussons.

LUXURY -
TOILET,SOAPS,














‘Lightning’ fasteners
are manufactured by

LIGHTNING FASTENERS LTD.

(A subsidiary company of
Imperial Chemical Industries Ltd.)










PERFUMERY !
Violets,

Bond Street.



Oversea Orders Executed. Confetti
33, Broad Street, Bridge- HOUBIGANE — Chantilly, Quelque
town (upstairs Phoenix
Pharmacy Fleurs.
Dial 4796. — Hours 9-3

STORES









Name ot Ship Saits Salis Arrives

Montreal Halifax Barbados
$.S. “ALCOA POINTER” 25th Nov. 51 26th Nov. 51 8th Dee, St
S.S. “ALCOA PEGASUS” =_- Mth Dec. 51 24th Dec. 5L
“ALCOA PLANTER" = 28th Dec. 51 8th Jany. 52
“A” STEAMER llth Jany. 52 21st Jany, 52

ROBERT THOM LTD. — NEW YORK AND GULF »ERVICE.
APPLY:—DA COSTA & CO., LTID.—CANADIAN SERVICE



. HARRISON LINE

OUTWARD FROM THE UNITED KINGDOM













Due
Vessel From Leaves Barbados
S.S. “LINARIA” a .. London 9th Nov. 8rd Dec.
S.S. “PLANTER” ie .. London 24th Nov. 7th Dec,
S.S. “TRADER” .. ts Liverpool. 27th Nov. 10th Dec.
S.S. “ASTRONOMER”... Glasgow lst Dec. 12th Dec.
S.S. “DALESMAN” .. .. London 5th Dec. 19th Dec.
HOMEWARD FOR THE UNITED KINGDOM
Vessel For Closes in
Barbados



For further Information apply .. .
DA COSTA & CO., LTD.—Agents ;

EEE
SDSS OS POOP OO OFS IOTF

REAL ESTATE

ATTENTION!
ATTENTION!

L am still prepared to give
you a HOUSE on terms.
Why not come in and let us
go through my list together.



——





in Christmas Style

STYLISH New

and Renewed
Wardrobes,

rd Chests-of-Drawers,
Vanities and space-saving Dressing
Tables, $14 up, Stools, Beauty-
Bedsteads in 4 sizes with or with+
out deeper sleeper Springs, Laths,
Separate iron Siderails, Night-
chairs.

TABLES in big range of woods,
shapes and sizes for Dining,
Kitchen, Fancy and other uses,
China, Kitchen and Bedroom
Cabinets. Waggons, Larders.

DRAWING ROOM FURNITURE
in Morris, Tub, Rush. Upright,

}
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|
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everyone. If you are inter-
ested come in and see,

DARCY A. SCOTT,
Magazine Lane.
1,12.51—2n.

AL OCCPO

MONEY SAVING PRICES.

L. S. WILSON

SPRY ST.

OPP POPP PPE PEEP PFI OS

LPL APE CSS



SHOE STORE

No. 35, Broad Street

| PAY US A VISIT.


SATURDAY, DECEMBER 1, 1951 BARBADOS





HENRY





|
|







ADVOCATE

FOR THE

QUALITY &« SHADES



PAGE SEVEN





BEST








CAN'T YOU

| STOP THAT
| THING? WE'RE
[IN THE MIDDLE
HE LAST



} MACHINE OF

| UNCLE

WOMBAT
Mw |





/ IT SEEMS TO
’

BE STUCK?












EVER COME OVER
» HERE AGAIN!
UNDERSTAND ?



LONE RANGER

THE

Ba a sais
(9) MBL IN THIS HIDEOUT WE SHOULD FIND
SOME OF THE STOLEN GOODS TO PROVE THAT TH

PRISONERS ARE OUTLAWS

te
‘ore

JOHNNY HAZARD

ie

S





cs = =
= q
~ I NEVER ciate A

TO SEE HIM AGAIN
AS LONG AS

LIVE





MAD AT THE
LITTLE Boy? )

WHAT IS YOUR IN




Sey)



WHY DID YOU GET ) (TI HAVENT ANY]
~--THAT'S THE
GOOD THING
( ABOUT BEING
REASON ? “SM age~, A WOMAN




| ‘ '
eS
ran OG

BY CHIC YOUNG

Pas eek ate)
oy v ”

( )
YOU DONT *
C nave TO Have )
A REASON
aaa
\
Sasa '
3D





BY FRANK STRIKER





UP HALF THE TOWN ! pyrgirezs

NO NEED...T.N.T, ... HE
DIDN'T PUT UP MUCH OF A
TUSGLE...HES WEAK FROM

fam LONG INACTIVITY /

MRS. JIGS
LAST WEEK-

DOWN TO INSPE






PTERE'S ENOUGH POWDER HERE TO BLOW )( TH

wHMM, HE SURE BAN
ONE BiG MEGS /

AT DOESN'T PROVE WERE })
mT OUTLAWS!’ :

A cep



WHAT'S

<<

THANKS FOR THE ASSIST,
TABBY... IF YOU HADN'T
BITTEN HIS KNIFE HAND...
UP BE ONE BIG MESS

Now / =
=.

ON SECOND THOUGHT
I THINK I'LL GO TO THE
OPERA TONIGHT-



TAKE ANOTHER LOOK AT THE AH, I COMPREHEND! me
ws PICTURE BisOU MADE OF THE THE LETTERS Hi-D AR® a SHEIK EL KAZAR .., DON’T LOOK AT NOT IN “SEASPRAYY/ THIS ,
AMAZE ME, HIM, LOOK AT THE LIFE PRESERVER PICTURE WAS TAKEN








YOU SAY BiJ0U BE
| NEVER GOT ASHOR
HOw DO YOU
hy KNOW ?













IN THE arrears ue hee
: tO xd






ON ANOTHER

4
(







|
| INSIST












ON





rT \ WN \\

TTY

TI

Oa

Ty sv
" Peel LL Lay
Senile LT Mala

STC rte Pe

S
WSs

\

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STORES |





It PAYS YOU

SPECIAL offers to all Cash and: Credit: Custonians

ener” tent een









Speightstown and Swan Street
Usually Now

Kraft Macaroni with Cheese, Tins 41
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2 |b. Tins 3.89

36 Fruit Salad

Hams,





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3.50 O'Keefes Beer, Bots



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bullding herever there are files.

! The tar, size Cooper's Aerosol Fiy-
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spray: the small size equals about one-~
third of a gail,

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ROBEBESON LTD., BERKHAMSTED,
BERTS, ENGLAND,

Cas Be Obtained From:—

| On sale at all Stores



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a

for Thursday to Saturday only
= z , ——S————— — —————————————————_———————

SPECIAL OFFERS are now available at our Branches Tweedside,

Usually Now

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26 20

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et Ast teeta ettdaaen
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SILKS—~ WASHES THEM
CLEANER, BRIGHTER

| ° . diay yi AF
[OD 0 Why
5 UG) ? Dunlopillo is the most
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to wear out the covering material.

WOOLLIES AND SILKY THINGS
NEED DREFT’S SAVING CARE!

Yes! Other washing products
may eventually have a harmful
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|

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The new word for mpout

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MADE IN ENGLAND, BY DUNLOP CRAFTSMEN,

=
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i ~ 0
ict a Sac ata



j

OBE OABPBL EDL ELLE

LEP L LLL OBR

PN aad

PAGE EIGHT

WEST INDIES IN SOUND POS

Defy Australian

Attack:

286—6

(From HAROLD DALE)

The West Indies proved conclusively to-day that Lind-
say Hassett blundered when he won the toss and put them in

SYDNEY, Nov. 30,

to bat. With nearly 300 on the board they are in a reasonably
sound position, but once again wickets were yielded that
were never earned by the Australians.

If anything, the islanders showed
that they are good enough to stay
in against the Australian attack
for ever. Only Weekes and Stoll-
meyer were out to balls that gave
them no chance. The others fell to
traps of their own devising, and—
once again the last over cost a
priceless batsman. Christiani, who
had excelled, muddled a ball that
came in to him, and was bowled
with the last ball of the day.

The Second Test here began
with a sensation. Lindsay Hassett
won the toss and decided to put
the West Indies in. His reasons
were believed to be that there was
a patch at mid-wicket where some
rain had seeped under the covers
during the night, and that there
was a stiff breeze which could be
used to assist Lindwall. If these
were the reasons and indeed none
other could be found, then there
are probably the slightest reasons
that have ever influenced a cap-
tain to condemn himself to a
fourth innings,

In every other respect the wicket
seemed made for batsmen and
when Rae and Stollmeyer opened
they suddenly proved it. None was
in any trouble from the beginning.
The wicket played so easy as to be
almost lifeless and as for wind—
all it achieved in the first hour was
to blow Hassett’s hat off.

Lacked Accuracy

Lindwall while finding good
length lacked his usual accuracy.
He obliged the openers by bowling
frequently outside the off stump,
leaving them the freedom to ignore
the ball, which they did,

We saw now that both batsmen
are obviously fully imbued with a
sense of responsibility. West In-
dian batting is always refreshing
in its vigour, but it was even more

eshing in its restraint during
the dangerous hour with Miller
and Lindwall working up to full
speed with the vagaries of a stiff
wind always to be reckoned in the
batsman’s calculations.

“Scoring strokes were almost en-
tirely limited to the leg side where
both Rae and Stollmeyer made de-
lightful placement, using their
wrists to get the ball off their toes.
Stollmeyer once straight drove
Miller for a powerful three and
turned him hard to square leg for
four. Generally, however, his
mood was a quiet and efficient
concentration, leaving Hassett to
entertain the beginning of dread-
ful doubt.

Lindwall twice bowled short at
maximum speed in an effort to lift
the ball but the best he could
achieve was only waist high to
Stollmeyer who played him easily

into the ground.

i —



Why Not Marshall?

While this resolute partnership
continued, Goddard had time to
reflect. He had banked on losing
the toss and had decided to include
Prior Jones in place of Marshall,
thus having his fastest bowler to
take advantage of the conditions
that had attracted Hassett.

He did lose the toss, but Hassett
confounded him by sending the
West Indies in to bat. Now, he was
without a first class batsman in
circumstances he had never im-
agined.

In any case there were grounds

for criticising this choice. Marshall
had scored a century on this very

ground and has been the most con-
sistent batsman since the tour be-
If anyone had to give way to
Jones, it would better have been

gan.

Christiani,

However, the deed was done.

Rae Out
After an hour

lashed at a
stone.

He mistimed the ball completely
and cocked it up behind the wicket
where Johnson took a simple catch.
bowled
Johnstone, 17. One wicket for 33

Rae, caught Johnson,

runs.
Stollmeyer now

for four.

Undeterred by this escape, and,
perhaps even encouraged by his
hooked
Miller for four and straight drove
him for four, these strokes coming
between periods of watchfulness
which always contained the hint
In 20
minutes he had passed Stollmeyer
who was still giving nothing away
—an attitude of mind eminently

good fortune, Worrell

of menace for the bowler.

suited to the circumstances,
Worrell seemed

ently
that it could be hit,

Worrell Hits Out

The crowd which had grown to
12,000 began to murmur excitedly
as the West Indian star spread-
eagled the field with glances and
drives always reaching away to
within yards of the fence. The 50
came-up in 80 minutes, Stollmeyer
took his runs still safely on the leg



side, but Worrell even wnen play-
the ball with moré finish.

68, Stollmeyer not out 25, Worrell

had yielded 28
runs and both Miller and Lindwall
had been tried with the wind and
Bill Johnstone against it, Rae, en-
couraged by a powerful square cut
that had earned him runs before,
full toss from John-

16 was joined
by Frank Worrell who immediately
scored off the first ball and was
missed off a knife edge chance by
Ian Johnson whose fingers scraped
the ball as he flung himself full
length to the next one which went

determined to
establish quickly his superiority
over the bowling, having appar-
decided from the pavilion

BARBADOS ADVOCATE *



a eee

bee

R. CHRISTIANI

tae



F. WORRELL C.

WALCOTT
a half stroke to a ball from
Lindwall that came in to him and
took the off bail

Weekes, bowled Lindwall for 5,
and the score 3 for 99.

Worrell’s High Fortune

Two wickets had gone far tuo
easily, but Worrell was still there,
playing with attitude of command
that seemed blithely innocent of
the risks he took and the disaster

moved. I am told that no sound
came from them—which was prob-
ably as well for his immediate lis-
teners.

Worrell, bowled Ian Johnson, 64.
Four for 139.

ing defensively, insisted on hitting
At lunch the score was one for

25; extras one. It was apparent
that Hassett’s inexplicably daring
gamble had failed. If the West
Indies now fell short of a reall
substantial total, it would be their
own fault, unassisted by anything
i the wicket.

The West Indies ran into a bad

Walcott Emerges
Walcott now emerged from his
place where he had waited in the
wings scoring 14, and joined by
Christiani, proceeded to adminis-

period after lunch, Stollmeyer oe spared. He flashed his bat ee eee ee a ee
and Worrell had kept the score ?/1¢ Commanded luck to serve him. yore.” Ghristiani went eagerl
moving briskly alony’, with prom- !t did, probably fascinatei like after the runs as usual, but it was
ise of more humiliation for the the crowd, by such casual ease Walcott who dominated, hitting
unfortunate Hassett, and sudden flashes of punishing para down the line of the ball and
power + ammnadl rivi

Most Masterly Shot We had an outstanding example ice th soiielan, tie ‘cae

One shot in particular from of his high fortune, when he and jian field retreated into the middle
Stollmeyer thad been the most aot ree confused a distance, while Walcott hooked
masterly of the day—almost the Short run, arvey, a deadly an led th -
most masterly of any day—when thrower, was fielding close to the rack i ponies ae eee

drove with stinging power—
specially stinging to the hands of
any fielder unlucky enough to
have to intercept the ball, Miller,
erought on, was soon taken off
again. Bowling savagely short, he
was repeatedly hooked by Walcott,
who disdained to notice that some
of these shots were being danger-
ously lofted around Neil Harvey.

he turned Lindwall off his toes
for four to square leg, It was a
wicked ball at a tremendous pace,
keeping low, and swinging in late
to the wicket, It deserved to dis-
miss any batsman in the world.
Instead, Stollmeyer turned i*
into the boundary—a feat possi-
ble only to a batsman of the very
highest class,

wicket. Worrell made only a token
run back half the length of the
wicket so hopeless did it seem, but
Harvey threw madly wide of the
stumps. Langley did a goalkeeper
leap to take the ball, and then
flung himself ball and all upon the
wicket. To Worrell’s ainazement,
this pantomime had taken long
enough for him to be home.

, , 1 ; The 200 came up in 248 minutes.
It was all more tragic that this _ He immediately cut Lindwan 0 i i
elegant opener should fall to the head high through the slips wide of eee Nh a dh aiden
comparatively simple temptation Miller. The ball went to the V

The West Indies were fighting
into a strong position when Ring
was brought on. He had been
bowling his flighted slows into a
strong wind, but the wind had
seemed to hamper rather than hel
him. Now he tried again, and o!
his second ball Walcott played a
shot under the rise, and Langley
took a gentle catch,

Walcott, caught Langley, bowled
Ring, 60. Five wickets for 218,

of a ball rising over the wicket.
He touched it with fatal result,
and was caught at first slip by
Ian Johnson, bowled Lindwall for
36. Two wickets for 85,
Weekes Not Himself

Worrell, now 30 was joined by
Weekes, who strode out with what
seemed his usual magnificent
confidence, But it was quickly
obvious that he was far from
himself. He flashed out his hall-
mark—the savage hook, but one It
sensed a lack of his usual zest,
He could run only two when three
were possible, and once pulled up
in mid-wicket with what seemed
a sudden strain,

With growing disappointment,
one began to realise that this
would not be the day for one of
his electrifying innings, It was
little surprise when he made only

boundary while the crowd gaped
in amazement at a man who saw
no risk anywhere.

Walcott was already showing a
Swinging bat that was eager for
runs, but he had to mark time
while Worrell swept Ian Johnson
away behind square-leg and sent
Miller back on his heels with
straight drives that hissed past his
teet,

Worrell! Out
seemed that nothing morta)
could stop him reaching his hun-
dred. It proved that only one
mortal could—Worrell himself, T«
what was nearly a long-hop from
Ian Johnson, he had so many al-
ternative opportunities of hitting
the boundary that he could not
choose between them, He pulled
the ball onto his wicket with the
inside edge of the bat. His lips

Gomez Floppy Hot

Gerry Gomez in his pe:sonal
floppy white hat came out to face
Lindwall with the new ball, not a
situation he would prefer if he
had any choice. But he is a hardy
plant and flourishes in any type of
soil. He let Christiani shoot into
‘he lead, and busied himself with
staying in and taking a run here

——-







RECENT COOKING TESTS
HAVE PROVED THAT

MELLO-KREEM

AND

GLOW SPREAD MARGARINE
‘can be used in the place of BUTTER

for Cooking at great Saving especially
since COOKING BUTTER has been
recently advance I2¢ per lb.

Remember the Price of MELLO-KREEM
and GLOW SPREAD MARGARINE

remains the same.

Send to your Grocer for a Tin To-day
and see why others are Cooking with
MARGARINE instead of Butter.

MELLO-KREEM

$2.70 per 5 lb Tin or GI? per lb. Tin

GLOW SPREAD MARGARINE
$2.75 per 5 lb Tin or @2¢ per pk.





SITION





and a run there, whenever they
came to him.

Christiani on War Path

Not so Christiani. He assaulted
Ring and Miller as they have sel-
dom been as#aulted and roared
his score along to 50, passed Wor-
rell’s previous top score, and ad-
vanced into the seventies with
every stroke in the book, notably
featuring his straight drive and leg
sweep. He was facing a tiring
field (who would no doubt have
something to say later in the eve-
ning to Lindsay Hassett whose
bright idea this all was) and he
took full advantage of them. The
score was five for 286 when Hole,
who had been brought on in des-
peration, beat Christiani with a
ball that turned into him. Again
Christiani was bowled by Hole,
for 76.

U.K. Yacht To
Compete In
Berniuda Race

LONDON, Nov. 30.



Britain has built a new 58 foot
six inch yacht to compete in next
the most
the
world which always has been
won by Americans. The new
challenger is being built to order
by Liloyd’s Yacht Club and _ is
over £15,000.
The crew will be ten. Lloyds will
The Yacht will be
she
time to
sail the Atlantic for the race in

year’s Bermuda race,
important yacht race in

expected to cost

sail her home,
shipped via New York as
won't be completed ih

' June.

i

; YESTERDAY’S
WEATHER REPORT

FROM CODRINGTON
Rainfall: Nil
Total Rainfali for Month to
date: 6.78 ins,
Highest Temperature: 84.5 °F
Lowest Temperature: 71.5 °F
Wind Velocity 8 miles per
hour

+ (9 a.m.) 29.983
(3 pam.) 29.917



~

WHAT’S ON TODAY

Film Show for children at
the British Council, “Wake-
field” 9.00 a.m.

Police Courts 10.00 a.m.

First and Second Division
and Intermediate cricket

| at the various grounds 1.30

p.m.

!| Police Band plays for the

| Old Ladies Annual Bazaar

at the Drill Hall 3.00 p.m.

| Sunrise: 6.00 a.m.
Sunset: 5.36 p.m.
|] Moon: New, November 28
t Lighting: 6.00 p.m.
|} High Tide: 5.58 a.m.,
p.m.
Low Tide: 11.16 a.m.

aaa

5.26

'











is the word

for these

Five Piece Sets in blue, green and Pink.

Three Piece Sets with pattern ee: $1 4.39
































SATURDAY, DECEMBER i, 1951

‘LADIES

DRESSING TABLE SETS

64.27
$22.47
620.33



Per Set



Five Piece Sets with a charming pattern
on the backs. Per Set ...........



Three Piece Sets in blue, pink and green.
Per Set $14.28 and

Per Set

Cave Shepherd & Co., Ltd.

10, 11, 12 & 13 BROAD STREET









encom rma ete ie

lll again ARMM BN am




PAGE 1

TAGF. EIGHT BARBADOS ADVOCATE • SATVRDAY DF.rF.MBni 1. 1M1 WEST INDIES IN SOUND POSITION Defy Australian Attack: 286-6 (From HAKOLD I) \l I i SYDNEY. Nov 30, TheWest Indies proved conclusively to-day that Li H iaa*t1 hlundered when he won the toss and |>ut them in to bat. With nearly 300 on the board tin-\ an sound position, but once a^jiin wickets were \ leldect that urn> nevi r earned by the Australians. Ifanvlhing. theUiandctsshowed Why Not M(.r>hall? mai ihcy iregoM enough to May WhlU hls r „ 0 luui. % %  In against the Australian attack continued, Godd.n d for ever. Only Week and Stollr#flcct Hc h d l(0nk( ,, on orinf ^r^' ,, K C ^ 1 !: ^J ,all A. ,ha, ,*f v 1 in* (hem no chance The other* Tell to poor Jonas ill pine* Of Marshall, Irap* of their own devising, and thut haVin| htfl tlliUst llowlcr u, pSl^-man'* ?>£&&%& K£ ^^^ n^t^^ had excelled. "'uddled I ball ih X did "i^tSTSi Hassstt 2Et?.i! ..^J •"***" howled oonfounde.1 him by sending the with jhe last hall of II.. %  W.'H. %  I here .began w |, h .,ut „ first class batsman In circumstances he had never imaglned. with n sensation. Lindsay Hassetl won the toss and decided to put and a run then. *hene\er ihev came to him Christian! on War Path Not so Chmtiani He assaulted Ring and Miller as they have seldom been assaulted and roared •us score along to SO. passed Worrell's previous top score, and advanced Into the seventies with every stroke in the book, notably featuring his straight drive and leg %  weep. He was facing a tiring field (who would no doubt have something to say later in the evening to Lindsay Hassett whose bright idea this all was) and ha took full advantage of them. The score was five for 286 when Hole, who had been brought on in desperation, beat Christian! with a ball that turned into him. Again Christum was bowled by Hole, for 76 WALfOTT %  tdi hut Worrell even wnen t Indies In II In any case there wereground in* detWvel*, Insisted on hitting Ij,,,,. ~, ,',7V„ Pin ., titling 1. half stroke ball ..eved to be th..l there was for criticism* thischotcs Mai shall t,„ i.all *lth more finish h at mld-wlrkel where SBtM hait ,,,„,.„ ;i century on thil very At lunch ths". % %  lad seeped under the covers fround and has been the most con** S gnt. and that there H istfnt batsman sines tin lour lie">y extraone It was 'aoi *7*JiL fi r iT^ '"' ? an •>"** %  hart * lvo wav te thai Haasctfs JnexphrabK oani iscd to assist Lmdw.ll. M these Kr.es, ,t would letter have been gamblo haii tM J „ ,)„ %  West the J mis and indeed none CkriAl How other could be found, then then are probably the slightest reasons that have er opriicd they suddenly proved It None a*ai in any trouble from thr beginning I'hs wicket played so easy as to I* '""" almost lifeless and si for wind— !" j ne .ill !t sehlsrod in the ilrst hour was to blow Hassctt's hat off. from moved. I am told lhat no sound ... and came fn-m the in which was proh""' ofl bail lbly as well for his immediate lisWeek.s bowled Undwall for 5, leners. % %  M. 11. bowled Ian Johnson, 64 , ., Four for 139. Wi I I, II ||li;h 1 iil'lilli Walcoit Kmerge* Walcott now emerged from hi: rsal ll'ltf Kae Out ,,, lh vftskst After an hour had yielded ZH The West Indies ran Into a bad runs and both Milli'i and LtndwaU period after lunch StoMineyer bad bssn trltd with the wind and niul Worrell had kept the score UN Johnstons against it. Kae. mmoving briskly aksv, with promU.K. Yacht To Compote In Bermuda Race LONDON. Nov. 30. Britain has built a new M foot six inch yacht to compete in next year's Bermuda race, the moat important yacht race In the world which always has been won by Americana. The new ..hallenger is being built to order by Lloyd's Yacht Club and is expected to cost over £ 15,000. The crew will be ten Lloyds will sail her home. The Yacht will be O.I uuragetl by %  powerful square rat IM of more humiliation that had earned bun runs before, unfortunate l lashed at a full toss from JohnMusi MaMerlv Shot 0 isd ths ball completes] one shot in psrttculsi and cocked it up behind ths wicket StaiJroaysr had bssn lb the I sail the Atlantic for the I June. where Johnson took a simple cab h rron. H klootl Lacked Accuracy Undwall while finding good length lacked his usual accuracy. He obliged the openers by bowling Jolinstone. 17. One wicket for 33 ,„ runs w. lot four io square leg, It was n run back half I %  j %  omr 16 was join.-i wlcksd bsU st a tismsodous ] t, ****** *> bopslssi did It ssern, bm outride the off stump" " Frank Wiirwll who immediately keeping low. and swinging in lab J" !" 3 '!'" ;i lta?ing them the (imlmn to ,-nore !* * ^S^J^J^JT* the WsShst It dsesTesS Io U> km to ignore "?££, 7 i^t. it,— AiA miased off w. LQI ball, which they did. now that both batsmen sly fully imbued with a iponiihlltty. Weal Inisc of responsibility West In' %  "•" %  in batting Is always refreshing '* jr 1 ,Uiit r J knits) SslffS chance by miss uny baUman in the world. Ian Johnson whose lingers scraped [natssd, Stollmever turned ) %  '""'g him-. the ball U lu Hong nlRlSSlf full Into UtS boundary—S tl "^ '" WorrsHs amazement length to the next one which went |,]^ on | v m a bataman n,' the verv ""s pantomime hi Undeterred by this escape, and. pcrha| even encouraged by higr.d forlune. Worrell hooki-d and Undwall working up to full MlllCT for four • nd raight drove stared with the vagaries of a stiff him for four, these gtfsksa coming H. i vigour, hut It was even more refreshing in its restraint during the dangerous hour with Mille wimi alwsyi to IKrsckonsd in ustsman's calculations Scoring str<)kes were almost lbs SSTESSHOl ...where hc had w.hed in the ,1 """ tl r:ns 14, and Joined b>' htisliani. proceeded to admlnls'"' '' <" % %  '!'„' 0, • ,, '"" •'• %  llni lo ever>—; -"7" N """YorK a she nded luck to i hlfe nal1 wthln ht* reach—and most .shipped VI.I New Tom as . MM cascrly I S'. I* .completed lh time to i 0M run, H u.uul. hut It was '.'7!S^nd llel.1 r.treated .nt.> the middle f !" 1 '-'" •" "•w "*" w iin,..d,,.„,v„,„ k ,„ ,';;,v aUy "V, ns „."to"Sc hS'ot m ii i nough lo aavs to intercept the ball. Miller, drought on. was soon taken of? aruiii. Bowling savagely short, he was repeatedly hooked by Walcott. who disdained to notice that some hots were being danger! 'aifmore tr.,, ,ha, this WJIW ^ j 'SS'^S etsgsnl rail to *e bead high through JJfJJJ w hav,n£ rr,ved ,n n eomparatively simple temptation Miller The ball went to the Th(Y WpsI i lu „e. w r .. flehtlna f ., ball rising ovsf ths srtskst. boundary whll tj i iM „,.„" RISJ man who snv WJU brought on Ho had been YESTERDAY'S WEATHER REPORT FROM CODRINOTON Rainfall: NU Total Rainfall for .Month to date: fl.1l In*. Ililhest Temperature; -l '. • Loweat Tems>erature: : i %  *Y Wind Velocity g niilea per hour parameter: (• ...mi Zt.MS (3 p.m.) 29.917 1 t touchwl it with fatal result, i" amazement and was caught at first slip by '" !'; k snywhers bowling hTi flighted alt,,. Ian Johnson, bowled Undwall tor WsaBOtt wag SlTSS4l nliowmg %  . Tnn u.i n H iiot the wind had of menace for .the bowler,. In 20 sg Two wicket, tar 85 iwlngltlg bat that was eager fo, SmS, *'^Sm^ r I?h e than help Now he tried again periods of watrhfulii always contained the hint tireiv limited to the leg side where minute* he had passed Stollmever VVn-krs Not Miniself hoth Rac and Stollmcyer made dcwho was still giving nothing away Worrel i. now 30 was jol lightiul placement, using their "" %  J 1 ""''*' !" n d sspi nSBUy Wsashsa, who Strods out with what suited lo the clreumsl.inces wrists to get the ball off their toes. straight drove Worrell seemed determined to seemed his usual confidence. But il was qulekl) Stoll Miller for a powerful three and *fW** Muirkly hi* suneriorltv ,. llVio ls „,„, hr wut (( f;(1(n turned him hard to square leg for over the Ix.wling having appnrhimseIf Mc nashed out hl% h „. four. Garters!!*, however, his SW^daddSed^ftrptn the pavilion |nar)( (l| u ,., h Hlk hu lltl0 i .i lark of bis usual runs bul he bat) to whlk Worn away behind square-leg and aent Miller bl I,.', Worrell (Mil it sssmsij that nothini nortsl Ug bun I Snlv his second ball Walcotl played a %  i the rise, and I-augley took .i gentle catch. i aught Langley. bowled King, flu Five wickets for 218. (•nine/ floppy MM Gorry Gomez In his peisonal .. .„-.-„-.. .... ----decided from th. pavilion nood was a quiet and efficient in"t K "'ulti be hit concent rat urn. leaving Hassetl to Worrell Hits Out tie could run > %  ;U two whan three enleil.uii the Ixrginnlng of dreadThe crowd which had grown ti mi posslhlo. arid once |iulleri Dp niortal could Worrell himself. T floppy white hat came OuTto i"a*v ful doubt 12.000 began to murmur excitedly m inM-wlckff itb what seemed what was nearly a long-hop from Undwall with the new ball not a Lindwall twice bowled short at as the West Indian star spreadg sudden strain. Ian Johnson, lie had so many alsituation he would prefer if hc maximum speed in in effort to lift cagled the Held with glances and With growing disappointment. IsragtrVS opportunities of hutn had aw rhsios Hut he Is a hardy he could drives always reaching away to one began to realise that thi<* the boundary that he could not plant and flourishes in any type of Id not be the flay for one of ehOOBI between them. Hi puflll I MIL Me let Christian! shoot into QlS ball but the l.est achieve was only waist high to within yards of the fence. The SO Stollmcyer who played him easily came up in 80 minutes Stollmever his elsctrtfylni Innings into the ground. took his runs still safely on lh.> leg little surprise wtficn he mad It *as the ball onto his wtckst wiih the 'he lead, and busied himself with nly inside edge of the bat Mil lip itaying in and taking a run here WHAT'S ON TODAY Film Show for children at the in nisi, council. "Wakefield 90S a.m. Police ("mi. 10.00 i ni I'lrat and Second IMvlslon and Intermesltate cricket at the various grounds 1.30 P.m. follre Band plays for thr Old l ...in-Annual Bataar at the in ill Hall 3 90 p mNunrlae: i. •< M m Sunset: S.M p.m. Moon: New, Noveanaer tt lighting: fl.SS p.m. High Tide; -.. a.m.. 5.2* p.m. |SW9 Tide: 11.16 a.m. LADIES" IHIIESSING TABLE SETS FiVf Pi Sell in blu. |HM n* Pink. $91.27 Five Piece Sell, with a charming pattern MM l-J on thr barlu. Per Set V^ Three Piece Set in blue, pink and green. Per Set S14.M and Three Piece Sets with putti-rn hacks. Per Set to* $14-= Cave Shepherd & Co., Ltd. 10, 11, 12 & 13 BROAD STREET RECENT COOKING TESTS HAVE PROVED THAT MELLO-KREEM AND GLOW SPREAD MARGARINE can be used in the place of BUTTER for Cooking at great Saving especially since COOKING BUTTER has been recently advance VZf per lb. Remember the Price of MELLO-KREEM and GLOW SPREAD MARGARINE remains the same. Send to your Grocer for a Tin To-day and see why others are Cooking with MARGARINE instead of Butter. MELLO-KREEM $2,741 per 5 lb Tin or liiy per lb. Tin GLOW SPREAD MARGARINE S'2.75 per 5 lb Tin or 62^ per pk.



PAGE 1

SATUSHW III I I \II;I:R |, 1MI RAKBAIMM AV(KATE PARK MM S HENRY BY CARL ANDERSON ZZW& MICKt.Y MOUSE BY WALT DISNEY / \s3 so TMS i, r TOO. NE OP %  SCNDf %  %  Ml rY PCN T sreo NO\\? t r-w --?E^ ")ipo* I I I BLONDIE BY CHIC YOUNG oo icu ar j i i HA^NT AT THE --^ >..THAIS TH£ LITTLE BOY? J V.GOCDTWNG WHAT IS "Out? V^ f A&XJT BtWS (?£ASON? --'S?*V*-> AVW**N I HE LONE RANGER BY FRANK STRIKER T^eCTS EKXJC*. PCNOeB NCBE TQPLQW X !" T l****^ POCMt WtOT -rosy JOHNNY HAZARD BY FRANK ROBBING tm "AVf COMf W TMAMK fOK IWf ittltT. LI&wT ONIMI iuBJKT ff TAIfV tOJ U9t*T Ml** ft*T RAN fl MTmitCKft 0 PC MM / XA IP M CM PC *< NO* BRINGING UP FATHER BY GEORGE MC. MANUS ANTS V£ TD60 J %  i RIP KIRBY :r IT'S THE SEQ~ MRO. JISSS ocesED LAer wEEK'-S-'eS GQMNfl D( %  '. -i \~-E;T --:•• %  H em PNO THOUGHT "-:PHI lOMSHTlk BY ALEX RAYMOND ^ AVA2E V.E *Eu' rJB'. /-E-. v S*v &/X MNSOS THEPWANTOM BY LEE FALK a RAY MOORES • 2 X v FOR THE BEST QUALITY & SHADES INSIST C)\ STOCKED BY ALL LEADING STORES nilll-Tir FlY CONTIII ry— 114 "Muimi Mum MI Hara. ai FW tlMf Of. la a am< -aatar war •* SIMM m*m-COui'i; r-.lantw.ia. MSSESSMMS and IffaM ..i.mri... ti M ii to tmn and *ln. btd-fr-K cr-.;." %  £ "" %  • lu a Ml* OlI M fl A.f.wl n* ''•• •*•"!• I" I....1I.U.I .| H | •-.. thud. .1 |4 iu. .I..1..4 %  •>•>. ::::;..": ;r,; u %  %  • %  •> % %  MI UumaWMiN LTD, DMHMAHMID. MBTS. BNOt-ANO. I'tO Of (11,1.1..* fii,_ On B.I If at all Stores Z IT PAYS YOU TO DEAL HERE SPECIAL offers to all Cash and Credit Customers for Thursday to Saturday only fHKIAL Ol I I IIS „„ %  % %  .. aw.ilal.le iTl our llriinrlin Tcc.Ui.l77~ *|M-itfhl<.fa ami Knmi Sr..l U.oally Mo VmUj „ ow Kraft Macaroni with Cheese. Tins 41 Mi Fruit Salad Tins Gilbey's Empire Port Wine Bois 2.50 '2:i I Klim. 5 lb Tins Hams, 2 lb Tins 3.89 :i..10 O'Keefes Beer. Bols 1.01 !M 5.98 5. IO 26 20 D. V. SCOTT & Co. Ltd. Broad Street W4kf \ on it Sll kS MiiiiinirriHj fai-igkl --••a lolomlul -a* WOOLLOi ANI)SII,KY THINGS KOD DUi.i i B SAVmO I ABB Vet! Olhi-r washiriit products QtuaUf have m tiarmful itTi.i en BM nbrtci but Dnfi h rcully rate} In fact, tests have proved that Drefl is safer for colourfljd vroellaoi than anything US IMI 11 till-*!. dreft MINI a 11*1.1. HEALTH BENEFITS • FREE FROM HARSH IMPURITIES • NO INJURIOUS AFTEREFFECTS • SAFE IN ACTION CASTOR OIL %  •<• k| lllll t llllllll HI., IB.001 SVtST ro wooii/ts. SflKS—WASHES THEM CUAHLR. MIGHTER .•.'.'.-.',' l -.'.'*',-*<.'.'.:','.'.-.'-:'.~.'*'.'.'s.',;:'*' r r '-'" <.' r '*'.'*',' r 'Ss % %  i • I in n lci|ii ||., is ilii> most form of cushioning in the World If II tha '1'ikfinal lures lavrt cushioiiiiut. conlaiftina million* of '• %  i .limited cells iluouuh which sir cir^uiji' %  i. (hji IIKT iiistima ta completely hyinenic — it neither nor r.irlHHir. dust and is resistant to moths and VOfUMn. '. %  >T only i. Duniopiiio bassJtnlo] Ml lOOfJ lit'it remains %  uproirM ly'•unfiiriablcunds.aniioCsaK M |BtlM ( initi ui,.-niiilortable tuouuds; %  t. in tnpioal i lima tea it stays cool. priossj or hard edit* t.. fremi out the invtimn tnstcrml. 7ft& new w&itlifons ffimdoit in mutlrpsses aiul rur*hioning MADE IN LNGLAMP ,T_ D OMLQ P C KAF TIME N



PAGE 1

PACK TWO B.IRIIADOS ADVOCATE SATfBDAY. DECEMBER I 1K1 I PcUiib PaUina Three Anti ^ ua Arthts %  V"^ **^"^' mA^r******** ^^y Al Uu Museum. U unes Nothing looks more un %*^ W^ W ttom Antigua are holding a joint finished than i L ADV SAVAGK ...i. t Bk %  open the Annual Bazaar at 3 0 clock m at Ihe Drill Hall Yean ftfo tiie bazaar used to be held al HMIP'i Park, but lor Ihe p-st couple of years Ihe Drill iuu ha* baa proved to be quite as popular Always a must un U rmmoM of activities Christmas. It also provides the grown-up* with a chance to buy %  trudging btto tnwn The I 1 sii.ll is another great attm lion wtMi Its many ready cooked Indian dishes. Bring along 'hough, if you want to She s;i\s 'No* Museurr. three artists frames Nothing looks more unfrom Anngua are hulding a joint lirmhid than J canvas without a %  ind Cecil Adams. Both mount. The pttM Francis and Prince have held preblamed if il falls to visualise what ik a pa.nling would look HI here; Adams, however, is a comframe, and. therefore, desists from paratively new comer Although buying badly presented work. Junior to his fellow artists, his Good frames ire. undoubtedly, work blends well with their* in an expensive item today, but UN exhibition. elaborate framing is not required. %  verdict of the recent The artist can exhibit his work in woiks of Francis and Prince must frames which are not for sale, or. nature of a "Progress Rewith a little Ingei jould be more convenient fiames ran be produce-! Adams' work first. This use of paint, cork I and .. plain i Fill The exhibition f oil painting* work, both show much by Cecil Adams, turner Francis promise "Fortran of Eileen" is a -nd Arnold Prince, together with composed painting, while that of Watercolours and tempra "r"ortralt of a Man" suffers from paintings by Peggy .Merrirk conThe Dirl nnllwnASl u - !" -.. ' h ** v > a background. In both unue until 15th December at the lnc girl Hollywood is grooming mention has been paid to the Museum "" m M ~ ^* THaJ JJlt ir. a > P.M. "The DANClhlQ YEARS" D*III.> I IVIUJ 9 30 AM. 1 30 P.M. AND AT MlDNITF. SAN ANTONE AMBUSH" "'^TJSSE?* Dance KaS "JSSL^i "SSf -S U £ ^TS^SS. end' i7*ta u'x~ B l 0 : n,fW 1 i Uan ••'* ,y d ^ h nes ,c l?" 0 sn lures are pleasing Unfortunately A BOUT two hours alter the M-year-..l.i Marilyn Monim-. dl : -.. kers' is marred bv the J. annual bazaar ends another J* ' American.magazines Misa poor anatomy of the figures In the gocb into action, tneeiecake of lil ion-ground, for tin* picture is, in Down at the Paradise Beach Club Mi in All „thrr respects, a piece of realist* I lob are having a •' Monde at painting. The moat dance, proceeds from which will the parly7 Mi Monroe wants landscape shown by Adams Is go to help pay for tticir new you to forget all about her party "Donkey and Carl", which Is not pavilion now being erected. P" only gay, but has charm. Dancing begins shortly after 1 m blonde, but neithei dumb The work of both Francis and I u.lock. "r dizzy she Insists. 'A serious prince shows an Improvement What's In A Name •"•''•>*, that s me" since their last exhibition. Both L LVKV DIP nroduVed bv , Why 5!!? 4 1CiC you 1 clr * %  ?!*• * be studying a more real, V, i a i X Ukc >emselves so seriously.' isW approach to their subjects. '.""' W £EL ft£d "\*"" '\ *"? """ fortunc ' b m whether this is to be preferred to .!!. '5L Bnd | town 1 P m y W 1 ar ? 1 ""> >>lo"o( the Jean Harlow .h,.„ earlier work is a matter of production. Somerset Maugham %  kind. individual taste. Certain!* both hich has Just fin\. actresses are out their drawing and brush. probably then „f work in Hollywood as well as imui Kngland. Francis undoubtedly has a feeli.,n >ui of an arnalgn -~ — )[if ror trees thlt cmn ^ ,<*.„ ,„ n al '" 1 At Sea The Country La... < A praasnl holidaying In Bar% % % % % % %  I n. Park H I". f\ badoa i Mr Charles BradOf '"•• '"".T 3t" P "a £?**" '? the meal tttracUTg and the noti iBtatssjMnaj ol Mi recent pel n ll n gi It is a well bain need eompOalUon, and that the subject does not reliable Antigua Is a minor matter IMS NOT ACCKPTKO PRETORIA i A 21-year-old South African v, oman is angry because her country's airlines will not successful tecome an airliner pilot. A qua ifled air charter pilot, she won an award for the best woman pilot of the year at a recent air rally! In Capetown South African ays argue that they do not nl and fin A GRAND SfniffISi|[.NsVtaiff II be !•" sia> i \h>4i r ... rvSBtSSHM DBfM K.^ .,n Sl'NOAi Snd 1SI \f**l* La^l1 %  DaH* I.--I. It%  1SITM lOsafc* an !>-— %  i.—i. i/a lsas i 1 P-ip'iUir Ihl> 3n liaaira m ...I Ista Maa • %  i TiuCircle" lahed its run I.,-' • nmiiug lakes plan final plans for iim. unal, one of ihe ftrsl items ?"" w * r,lvcd from Canada a usaed will b. 1 wee k,, ( -\., !c S ""fj', 1 ?." w ,h tor the comb.n. ft?"" *' "Hi-yne. Hill Bl they will retain the name of the '"'","' .. .. L ^ M. PUyen ...it .. Iha l§ Jf Sf^TtLiS 1 ,, r 1 b do '" oldei ol ihe two groups. They may M -{ d h "* n J* that t !" has spent i ^'tr^ssHSf II Europe the Persian Gulf and Barbado ub arguln. .waulrt be a more approof the inland On the other hand they may Zhoosc a completely new name.— Not Sure M R. C E SHEPHERD of 'Colleaon House", St. Peter 1* due to "By this morning by '"•'A to Ojnada. He is en route to EngUod^n a visit. i> he golnjr to he away Shepherd could not many otllM pi* Before he left Bnibadot he was on she swff of Cable and Wireless. rt n peels to be hero until For The Scientific Mind 'TWO Alms to be shown at Ihe %  Untlsh Cc to the critic, but may be a very important one to the souvenir hunter. In fact, none of these i Ungfl Ul in any way l*ejninlacarM 0l the tropics in general, or of Antigua in particul since the Ricens are much "Uis.li" The colouring suggest the persistent rainfall of a mon temperate climate, where trees an more thicklv leafed and grass more luxuriant green than in the tiopn s, where tints of yclki II found in its vegetation Then, there is an extravagant use of loo pure a blue by both artists. An unwary use of white with such blue in The Wharf" by Destination Jamaica K. a. w. HARKNES9. CD. and W:. Medical Adviser and Mr C. A. Grossmtth, Administrative Baaretary of tiie Prl pit I.IVKI* ROME In a motor launch. uing people marooned by the floods, found the body of a months old baby wedged in wanting the rescued wasnarl see the babs's body, Uw f ii In . blanket and hid it under the bonnet of the engine. • that the bsby bad Pavived through the heat of the engine. il on December -. at a o'clock will be of special SStf Mr lnlcreal to lhuMl o( "* l. a •*' sclenUflc turn of mind. "Rock of Industry" which shows quarrying, processing and everyday uses Francis, has produced a winte of limestone, and "Nobel Began scene reminiscent of a Dutch canal D n It" describing the making, use., "The Wharf is, obviously, An.,H wM.I, -i ArfJi'ti """ 'oniinerc.al b> -products of tigua, and the cold Ice-blue setting r -ipliwlvaa. was intended for a still, hot day Produced by Imperial Chemical Wl,n reflections In a glassy sea. . Industries thev arc shown lucallv l'nforlunatcl.>. a climatically opSSeSS0 !, £ -f Tr "iti. M "-'"tn the LDJUaUv. of the frf. po-ite efTcct b...been a I.iced yesterday by the same plane. b^Hos Co-OpnUv Cotton-farPrince exhibit, several i Both are en route to Jamaica. Dr. lory> Thcrc admisaiou of which "The Inlet" is the most Harknc*a to attend a meeting of charge. ... successful, since it lacks the labthe Caribbean Council of the r: u :i A„:i;„ M n:uured effect common to the others British Medical Association (as ^ ,v ftviaiion Urticer wncrc rock although dark and an observer) and Mr. Oroumith 1M R ' T LAWMAN, an officer heavy give no feeling of mass or to attend the forthcoming meet%  *"*of the Ministry of Civ.l solidity. "Sunlight on the Hills" Ing of the Regional Labour Board. Aviation. England arrived from Is an attractive landscape and Dr. Darkness Is expected back British Guiana un Thursday by nirelv balanced His "Portrait of on December 12th; Mr. GrossB.W.I.A. and is a guest of Wing Fines" shows great improvement inlth live days e.iiliei. CROSSWORD s J i i a %  ./ T" i p | 1 r 1 Acruss It-iit prrtispa? Ml msT be a biMco or gi-rn au.p.t>. tui %  doc lor. () 1 women. li| dinul tucrasm. (Si If iny nvMa nitii Mienca I e writing, (fll .^ .,• ciitrtming. (H i -. .I rur.v un. (41 lsm s bird t |*l ii tn (rumens. (&> I i Sir umnuuuttd. (4 I D HI %  asn .-i W niK.fiibrsDM (6) i.imvnt that will ...ibt the plmlclan. (Si II tlabiU'.iKii ID nssti •uitoundUkga, *)i SCT .'1 Kite am oode 4* I solved :h my hindimin." Nau Warner's Will Film Grace Moore's Life HOLLYWOOD. Nov. SO. Tho life story of the lalt sopi. no. Grace Moore, will ihy Warner Bros. The picture will depict her life from childhood in n. Tennesse. and will range from night club entertainment to the Metropolitan Opera. Henry Blanke will produce Ihe Moore biography from the screen play prepared bv John Monks, Jr.—l.p. ARSON LISBON; A 73-year-old Spaniard act II to his home In u lit of niadn-%  rhUs) Ins gieat-giaiulciiild. aged The child w. •aved by UM mother who put •loohol "ii .i -.infill burn on Ihe groin Then MM L ,,I died. In •• III of distraction, the mother had used sulphuric acid. Whil .! M" hive sought ihu< 1st. know ye ihit my tressuri o %  hen bui iieih ute in iha Uoni Mouih."* He lam. tad pOOMa ii • leh m i*c lort ibawc. "Link bear." h t JF ,11 hlV MVC.1 lor u." JI sr xiiitit i n A SIIII">IIM Ol DOULTON FIGURES e. BESTFORM BRASSIERES PRAM COVERS ASSORTED PATTERNS in PINK, T.R. EVANS &. Will I I II I IIS 1'h.tnr I26T nilhl\S<> A. HUMS (II. III). YOUR SHOE STORES Dial 4220 '--•.•.•.-.-.•.•.•-•.'-'.•.•.•--.•--.-.-.•.•-•.-.-.-.---.-.•.-.•.•.-.•.---.-.-.•-•.-.--•.-.v.'! EXTRA: Latest British News Reels


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Mtotafe ESTABLISHED 1895 SATURDAY Dt .'UMBER I. 1951 Reds Prepare New Offensive If Pence Talks Fail _. TH ARMY. H.Q, Korea, Nov. 30. The Communists massed one of their biggest troops and supply buildups of the Korean war. while their armistice delegates fought the Allied demand for an arms i Un rd Nallong planes reported that an unprecedented 9J2Q Communist trucks were clogging the North Korean supply roads last night and to-day. The number u nearly twice the previous record sighted and four times normal traffic. Education Talks Open Monday I'HIMI 4 HAIlltS O.X IIIIH, ailllTBIt.W %  Lf A British Caribbean education conference opens on Monday, the 3rd December, at Hastings House, the headquarters of the Development and Welfare Organization and will continue for the rest of the week. Sir George Seel. K.C.M.G.. I omplroller for Development and welfare, will open the first station. Mr. J. L. Nleat, O B K. Education Adviser to the Comptroller, will be In the chai The provisional agenda contains some 15 items. Among them are tin* provision of .stuff and accommodation io meet the needs of tne largely increased school population, the provision of technicalincluding commercial and agricultural—education; school broadcasting; literacy campaigns; training in handcrafts, and housecraft instruction for girls; the production and supply of textbook: school feeding and medical services. Delegates will discuss the resolutions of the Fifth Delegate Conference of the Caribbean Union of Teachers held in August, 1950. The following will be prevent Caairaaaa —J. L Niool, Oil. Kdnratlon Advlacr la ih* Comptroller foi Orv.lopmfiil -nd %  Hare Karb.da._C: O ftaWd. Oirtvt.r of Education E C M Theobaldi. D.pulv Director fl Education A. W. Robert-. Principal. Irdl.tcn Training Coll*** > % %  .in.k H.aa.r.. t-E. n V. Brown. Dxwlor V l Eduiatwn *.<•** .-Th* Mot* J T.. Malcolm Mininar for RduraUon H. Houahtan. Dirrctor of Education A. J. Newman. M.C Principal. MHO Trainih* Collate. R M Murray. Education Omcer '•••" %  IHaMa—D. I, Mafheaon. Artii* Federal Education Officer Trinidad r Capl. E. W Daniel. Director ol Education I~ KenwDiihy. Principal Government Tramlnat Colleae. MINUWAKD ISLAND* I Daaalnlca :—J. U Maurice. Education Qaessr. Grenada ;—A. C O. Palmer, QBE.. Rdut-itlun Officer SI. I...I. -. A Wallie.. Acltns Bdu cation officer. Ml. Vlaeanl r—C. V D. Hadley. Educa tion Offieer. M*rrelal* :—M. S Stavrlev Develop, ment and Welfare Orajanli In addition. Mr. Kenue attend the d lac union, on caatlna* U.S. Rementbors Pearl Harbour NEW YORK, Nov. 30. The national magazine CoMlsrS said editorially Friday that "Americans have not forgotten Pe; Harbour . but they put old animosities aside because they must bo put aside." The editorial, in connection with the tenth anniversary of the Pearl Harbour attack, said the United States made a formal peace with Japan and granted limited sovereignty to Germany "not lx*cause there is necessarily any love between the victors and the v quished. but because both are faced with a common threat to their freedom and existence." The Reds appeared to be taking advantage of the lull in ground fighting to strengthen their depleted armies for big new offensive, if the truce talks collapse The buildup may explain Unreason for the Communist rejection of the UN demand in the truce talks for a ban on the r< forcement of their side during the Korean armistice, and the right of inspection teams to check behind the Red lines for violations. Red Convoys Attacked Night flying B26 light bombers and fchorc-baavd marine planes raked Communist truck convoys with bullet*, bombs, and rockets. They claimed to have destroyed t least 3t") and damaged uncounted others in dusk to dawn raids. The pilots repotted that the Red trucks moved In long convoys with ights blaung in defiance of Allied aiders. The heaviest traffic I >n the Wonsan-Pyongyang east west highway and on the two north south arteries from Manchuria through Western Korea. UN. fighter bombers took over attacks in daylight, hitting raillines in addition to highways leading to supply dumps. An Eighth Army communique reported that two Communist platoons attacked a U.N. advance position southwest of Kumsong ltral front, soon after midnight. The Reds were repulsed after a two-hour fight. No Action An estimated Red platoon, which launched a second attack east of the Pukhan Rlvei, southeast of Kumsong was also thrown back within a half hour. U.N. infantrymen on the Western Front reported their fourth traight day of no action except for occasional patrol skirmishes In No Man's Land, after which each side returned to its own position. However, Allied artillery the Wastern Front was back in action, it resumed "normal lire Thursday after falling silent 24 hours, owing to a misin terprctalion of Van Fleet's "N< Attack" order to mean ceasefire U.N. guns fired 2,400 shells a Communist positions on the Western Front In the past 24 hours. The Reds replied with 300 rounds of mixed mortar and artillery fire. At sea. Allied warships continued a non-stop bombardment Of the Communist East Coast ports of Wonsan and Hungnam, and extended operations as far north as Songjin. War In The Air In the air, U.N. Jet tighten* destroyed the largest total Communist planes in the war today, ahooling down 10 probably destroying one and damaging foui. Thirty-one F86 Sabre Jets sighted 12 medium bombers similai the U.S. B2fis south of Antung OH the South Korean side of the Yalu River, shooting down -six of the bombers, probably destroying three, and destroying one M.I.G. RUSSIA AGREE! BIG-FOUR TALKS —4)IS DISARMAMENT BIRTHDAY PICTURE of Prime Churlr*. With I year old cousin Pnncc Kicnatd of MfHwtatsi Is Hie v .: turn io Clarence House to sac his birthday untaoin*. Hal %  mat hU aevon walk 'i beside Pr>ac< COATI** on his t 15. It was the first time that bombers had been encountered south of the Yalu River, since J when the Fifth Air Force fighters shot down a two-engined bomber All U N. jets returned safely to their bases. The FBU'f. wcie on a lighting sweep far into "M.I.G." Alley" near the Yalu when pilots spotted 12 T42 bombers at about 250 m.p.h. about 15,000 ft. up. The bombers were sighted near Antung and were (lying on a southW. Indies Can Win From FRANK MABOAN SYDNEY. Dec. I. I West Indians have the chance of a lifetime of giving Australia, drubbing in the So. being played at Sydni ground. After a great day's play on Friday heavy rain fell mdaj night with Australia to bat Saturday. If the West Indlai this Test the eham-e* of defeating Australia at all In this tour are slim to n point of nonexistence. The We*t Indians on Friday capitalised on a natural error by Aussie Capta.i Hassctt that M likely to produce S ravei c o ns eq uen t i ( % % %  a than at tlrst it Hassett thought Uie Tfsl kket to be sporty added to : ^ht down the pitch that Id assist his speed •<*' he sent the Waal Indian! in. Rut tone wicket proved i batsmen were able to the pace bowling to a tune of 286 runs with six wicket* aewn Now with rain Friday nhjht lha great pin lomhination of VelenUnu and Ramadhin is likely u> e ross home %  tsnieii have given i force Australia into daft If Australia somehow manages win this Test the touristx only nave ihri Four West Indians on Friday after hutting brilliantly presented their wicket-, to Australia by stupid strokes that a schoolboy would think twice about playing. The West Indian, are wonderful cricketers from the spectator-.' viewpoint since they go for strokes all the time hut foolish indiscretions don't win Tests— especially against Australia. If the tourists use a little more concentration the task of defeat I ni; the Aussles and recuri-ii: I crown for world eziefcl I mocy will be much easier. On Friday openers Rne ami Stollintyt ilooked atl (Of mammoth score but lost thaii wickets nicking at balls wluVh should have Ix-en lofl alOM Th. Australian %  would have left them alone although they hat barracked bv the inn-d Eos stodiinc The Australii mind that during a Teal with them is llisiiliaai. unin bustnesWorrell, rhnstiani and Walcott all lost their wkk> same manner as the 0) If the tourists rid the these indiscretions no bowler in the world hi.ve much chance capturing their wickets A win In this Test might break Hie tourWest Indies Out For 362 (From 11 M.nl.l) DALE) SYDNEY, Doc l TH* • W2 against Australia In tiir I i houi ., ei the end >if the luncheon pea Jn OVI I % %  "' BhOW %  come Goddard Hnd I an lliui: task ol ronsolidniin the i*he day was as cold as yesterday had !•; m, %  -i <"f the 18.000 crowd haii brought runs and blanket* oun i.U.P. ists out of this had baUing habii. JV" If :• J lha lll,. r l ...H ••••" If it &<** the West Indians win Kv n %  t I'. Blow Struck For West In Mid-East (By SAM SOUKI) CAIRO, Nov. :*0. Lt. Col. Adid El Shishaklt in seizing control of Syria on Wednesday night, struck a blow for the Western Powers in the Middle East, that has been drifting steadilv away from the West. The immediate reason for overthrowing the newly formed Government of Dr. Maaruf Dawalibi was to return the Defence Ministry to army hands But Shiithakh li said to want close co-operation with the United States, and observers here believe he will try to form a Government which will seek a formula fon working with the Western Powers. Dawalibi. on the other h-nd, always advocated a Friendship Pact with Russia. It is felt here that Shishaklt wants to promote a deal under which Syria will be the corner-stone of a Western Arab Defence Pact against Soviet aggression. In return. Syria will expect the United States to modernise her army a it has done Turkey's. Military Training Shlahakh besan his military training under the French who then held mandate over Syria. Hit studies included a course at the French West Point at St. Cyrl. where he later held v.nous posts. During nghUng in Palestine, he formed a volunteer force composed ins and a few Iraqis. This lined out several raids or settlements in the Hol> f Syri force c Jewish Land. Observers in Cairo think that it Shishaklt can Hud and Implement a formula under which Syria will get some of her requirement quickly, such as modern army equlpment. he may score a knockout in the first round against neutralist factions in hi< country. Hut if the light drags throutU) several more undecided rounds J' might have serious repercussions throughout the uneasy Middl East—U.P. Congratulations LONDON. Nov 30. Near East Arab radio reported y mlit that Damascus radio broke a 24 hours silence on the internal situation with a series of messages from variou provincial towns congratulating Bhishakly —U.P. From the start f th i i felt tit t.ike any %  might warm Ma rung every ball on iwall usli.f worked up !• %  .loliiiston I m-rrtaiii At the other i -. i nisi it aal role %  n .. %  ... %  !! %  %  %  %  % % %  I i'i 't • and 8 %  I .cqucntli job of bowiiug oecssJcaBanJ startling Come/ with %  r It* all the !. ajldars, and then trytri %  Into tiie ptutd, to meet sueb ivJxttire it'htas self has %  wide mixture of abUtta and path ru < %  to aort thl j ket Hill Johnston thai all | with an %  %  hi n i %  had run >ut oil i brought corned this oliange with strslght aVtven (our probably from the relief of Mieeling it man who „|bOWls leg bleaks which althoin:! i hardly at all i be classified as .uch Lindwall bUrikfM t.odclanl Ooddard "( the oOm end :.' in tin. way, H-.tly disclaiming much %  i i T%  1 Ql a ta| when wanted. He underestimates hini. %  n i troll i.r this moiu. H Eaced Ui d met hiii anyonei have supp Thi %  a/are e > %  l iinn.oviiiie. Si Immovabl Undwall Dnalsy down a very ihort b.oi darn. Ooddard half ducki %  %  %  i. ahoi' %  the snd stoo< %  nod with %  had thu. him. It w.i I Afn i one hour the mi doubi li hather th ol purpoi MKHihi nut .i i -id to the in Against Ijndwall ho*" • u bowling a number ol ball fiat kept low. it was ot>. and Qoooaa could do itlle but defend. It was lueky (or liem that Uieir (oc win not annul I %  urta '" it would have ..lily loo great .> 'it (tmqilil. Bum Would Have Hern Heller nik-i were brought oui i don't beUeve tbare n an) rula %  •soul Lnusnldaung %  %  ; but I both would have given < .ii tli [0t I rum troto Uv \1 %  I am putting ni-. in their heads. B Luving no doubi I they w< i LmtawUaltJy in-gan to i,:i,.i. Ooddard' .nee bTOUftlt hi i. Dorched oul the off sicii nf the wicket and sent the agile Arehei dashing | indarj to < ut f"uc! • ill. .i OOUlbiS .irlmvi' %  ml and an axarnpta to tha mow ol theti brotnt i n the I %  lUon The dope now was mild last out the whole lunch Hi le A ho had K 4 rid of i at over was Draught %  if he could repeat the trh'k but ha ml Oil in favour tf Ian Johnson's inteUlgsml olf %  SO ame up Just before luncl cat innings A pull Tor two bv up 330 Tho pts ' '" luni-h. ended foi %  %  i.H.. %  ..,.. l .. IS I Ian J m.-on h Nine Men Take Over In Thailand : fl man MililaiN I'oiinen n ruli %  . %  %  nftei .tripping Pn Bocasjgran] .i Dis bloodincll wwnajoaad 4 three w Admiral, and %  %  %  li MIC Odh era le campaign to %  • inieni PlhuL the wartime Pi'.-nner un| dor JapHiifKf ieupatlon. aarsrtation leading to !> aritat 4 ]-'i on. reaposi kUe i i ana ; tuple bornbiusj, thai killed two and -eilonsly riJuriM %  I i Us n ba Korth Oa 1 A iua)or Investigation if aha to find the pegvon %  (o I)r Adolf Wolf.o.l UM i Rrimrn Narrhlehtrii m .| two Woifoot was killed when ha lha > %  Undi leal %  heie. .ui.I In'. :, i.-i...> in,i ..ii.iiii, %  Disjnbtr of %  %  iv in|n;id A luiiiid borah xpioded in ., leiu-i boa ol tfa i l"rt Ofllea abuttal i |M The third bml> wag re.eived hy a gi.oo aaatatf In ">• %  neurby town of VaaiaBD. li*heard radio broadoi anei tin Hist tWO explosions, however, lie iiiuiii.ti .1' I. look to tho yoliT-. who iin.n'd K i n when he read the iiolm'to be opened peraonally by r I'll,, de.ilh p.n kage In W rd tarried tho .same riota i iv labaUad U* ptot as political, and the work klflwinf or rlghlwing exl 'I'. PAWS, Now. .10. nod the Western l J Hip; i:sar:nanuiu tuik-. The S H ign Minister. unnounced the %  rensUn'i willlnj to the GeTnfce main Bui the ii H I talka -.-.., rnj limit. i %  . It Is For Japan T Decide W aSHING I %  • N -V 30 ritould ro-artv i llr and if ao whether tiii WOUld n i-tiiutionHl %  -u tn iletitle Wfthi . if Amerii .in oflti lab 11 %  U ol them, havi aw I in lernatn nd make no ronIIIIN ar* %  %  oi limited renrmament l > the n %  of opinion over Id ti iv.io this There it* uv snd Uofl .-.ni be Interprets i to prohibit only 1 %  %  % %  %  ti..'i "t lei I 1 %  knit into lu*. live Bl n'R1 I whli 'i United Statei and othei Slid be Urns and %  l %  %  ted to a %  %  %  %  %  H ool In the ruon %  the t ik' a HI i:.t ver) far on iiilinad the %  %  terms thai i paeu" com: la to the Rusi r. CAUTIOUS OPTJMSM COW, Nov. 30. Dtplomal ll.lt .. %  .it T.ilKS v nil cauttous opt I • V.' fVc ;,-,. wttM I •body enii-nit Ulil-.fi ung out regional powi Axgentira* Govl. Tak-rs Ovor Shut's Royalties BUENOS AIRES. N Bernard Shaw's aOCUmulal literary right* and royalties from —ihe sale of books anil plays in >rdcred i \\ t'll {jlttttfitB I'll" III IVeak Veeideill Make Sur|irise Raid l.-N |.ti.ui l*nlie" CAM; 1 I la surprise raid on underground gueiilla he.tdnii.iiti'i I hull nigltt ar." Mated stocks of I %  i quantlttes oi axplo%  nfl i ): %  lii .iihiiiinters were operated by Alinn.l rhl %  .ill iiaininu :"inp ii i %  : %  .i hi i OovsgnnMot liuorrnad aouroai Kgarded the i. i si Government impli lion of tin HI rut il< i rum to '..ike .A.) control of Inasjulai laijesatton Battalionsand incorrjorlU thtm in ih,. Armed K rn r.i\ penver %  Ihe ] .i of tht l ad land eontinesni 0£ CWEALTM SUGAR PACT WILL.BE SIGNED WITHIN 10 DAYS LONDON, Now, 30. oweaJth augai %  i mi-Hi should ba atanad wrtnin i ah ar t< ii anyi I iweallh aeiog Diaeting id. Igliustri of Food alii I) thit week and i itood thai aaaept for one or two point thi draft docusnenl "rawn up during their own preiinii.iry talka la now i< i:(i.r,.ii. Wilrol I fUia-alo,: %  I laM Juliiia.il I ml"..11 i. J-.tut |0 THE IS •EVA PERON' LAUNCHED Nov P.lltKKNHr^D. Kngland I&OO0 lankei In rerea last of four vessels built hy tha i'"> "' l aounal Ualrd (••< %  IIII ut Hiieuos Aires. I.IUII. iie.i to-day, The vessel thn~ler..i bg Uaa ife of the Ambassador in I-ond le Hoajan. I'.r. IN peeUo. ma en the nactaasty foi tha raanetl rl ariuamenf, the l-annlng of the UM conclusion t.f .< Hlg five p> ace part the Ku. %  ret g i ven any Intimation I ">.sed four pn'.U] meeting. —I". PARMS DEPOT BLOWN UP ;. N An Anti-Coinnii. tlon MI a n v.,n, gf lt"ii i it' in refugees %  i. army num. n contly. bhl %  i ... Uvtt) Irwreaeed vnkia and Pol nd I'.r. P.| UM> TEST MATCH Weal Indies :Mi2 Auslraliu (for It wktt) 131 Clean of Piny "FIGHTERS FOR MACARTHUR" ASHLAND WISCONSIN. No Th.eon baeklni M win ba -t.i. red loon It Hampshire Prai IdenUal : John Chappie Nattonnl I ul I) %  Plghter tol MaeArlliui"' Prldaj New 11 impshln rwM %  !' %  %  •till ti %  i. II. to %  %  tion i r visionally to be paid to the Oovermnent Friday by FedV urine Roberto Tieghi bl i left M hen Under Argentine estates pass to the Mil Education where then heirs. The court advertised In the newspapers no heirs came forward. However the Court allowed the intervention of the British Embassy through the Argentine Foreign MlnbrtJ Shaw's heirs are the British Museum, tne Royal Academy and Irish National Gallery. —I'.P. S.udani-s<* Envoys Confer With HlTa LONDON. Nov. 30. A three-msn S Hon. which is opposed to fciuypt';. claim to the Sudan, conferred on Thursday night at the House of Common 1 with su members %  -uritp FeiWier | presided over the meeting, durum %  oub Oman, t; of the delegation, made ute statement on the Sudan's desire tor %  elf-delerminatioti The, rjaassjatlon was leaving b the United Nations in !'. %  I r CHILE SA.NT1 •ere killed Injura two at one of the lot B worker, who had bee.i %  pparently trapped in a small eavine. to aid him. 'were themselves l %  thern up rail thoxygen tube the flren.-. %  %  %  M ho was watching the I V Explorer Seeks Bones Of Ancient Indians BUENOS Ann in searrh his deps 1 '/ a* he could not obtain pullm:ni —F P. Egypt And Sudan Form One Unit (By K.C THAI.KK) PARIS', Nov. 30, Egyptian Ambassador Mahmoud Faw/l Bey i h day li pond statement that Britain's, attitude in the Sudan question mi "still another case of John Bui! pokin" -l belong and Indul^inK in his iinuai I imposition. illy, g Runninn G'oI<>giHi rifts To Freedom BEBUN, llav 30. Ruaatan b>ses o %  irnany's uranium MUM fled through Uie iron curtain lo west Get paper Die Welt reporv Bay. %  hlef geologUt from the cloaety guarded dor where le dig hod Russia*! ants. —r.r. Oaecally, llngus I i ; %  lor) "He sal-l lay divMlng line botwi ri I %  Iclnl and has no to|x.r lusl fact. %  nd docs vioh.'. %  %  ^ .i ihe 1899 aarae. r %  Blil .in on tho Sudan %  md In no %  but arrangements for the temGermans'ponuy extendnR by %  '.. hnical assistance ITS THE TOBACCO THAT COUNTS %  1 Sudan."—L'.P. i-tratlon of the





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PAGE I i il I D WtRADOS ADVOCATE -VTIKIIW KKIMKIR 1 HJ1 BARBAlWSj^AmDGCrE FiMto4 t>> Ik* .1 llr.i.U-k VMuirUv. h.t.niln-r 1 1931 I o< limli-Or Not To Climb KI i i in in i: IMHKAIIOV I David Masu.-ll KvfiIn Stngfaeurg and Mr. Anthony Eden in Rome makr it clear that public i n e United Kingdom is not yet i1 interests for the Th. people of BrlUin are gradually becoming %  ol the fad that ihey do live in Europe and thai Urenty-one aiflaa of sea the effective barrtar to invfaton lha. it uaed to be whan Britain ruled the w Bui lai freer, ldentifying thaur Intereetg with thoaa <>i Frenchmen. Italians, Dutch, and Belgians. The* man,' i their ipokeernen, and in Press and radio lhal Greal Britain has other reaponaJbUitieti thai iba is the centra ol I nmwealth and is only partly European. The British are prepared to Join in closer association with the other nations of Europe but they arc not prepared to join a political federation of Europe The British cannot understand why the people of the continent shoula not recognise their own special position. I -nut, with reason, to the existence of a Parliament with no large majority and packed with hundreds of Labour inembiierkoaa party has been less European -minded than the present Government. They say that it is no good to talk of poUUeal ted.ration until the overwhelming pressure of public opinion is in favour and they are strongly sceptical whether the British public will ever favour a federation based on the sacrificing of their own political sovereignty. The people on the continent of Europe, on the other hand, are much more advanced in thinking that political federation without Great Britain would be no federation at all. There the deadlock remains, and many besides Mr. Schuman and General aYaanhower are disappointed at the lukewarmness of a Conservative Government's approach to a question which needs ai iwerinfl II Europe is not to be further sub-divided Into more pockets of Eastern and Western influence. The British, despite the presence at the head ol their Government ol the architect of European Union, 'Mr. Winston Churchill, are still laolatiorjnri so tar aa Europa is rhil Isolationism does not surprise anyone who knows how very little the average Briton knows ol ins European neighbours. When, how* ver, propagandists for British isolationism appeal to Britain's responsibilities and duties as centre of a i |i :it Commonwealth the argument appealniuie emotional than logical. Because the average Briton knows much less of the Commonwealth than he does of neighbouring Europe. The fact that France which is the centre of the very large French Union does not consider that her responsibilities and duties to the Erench Union prohibit her from taking the lead in promoting a European Parliament confirms the popular view that the Erench are far more logical and more politically conscious than the British. It is also regrettable that the more Great Britain stresses her responsibilities (and ipso facto opportunities) in the British Commonwealth, the more will those European countries without overseas j m or dpnunions be envious of Great Britain's privileged position and distrust her motives. The 5.000,000 unemployed of Europe are all on the French %  nf the channel. Historians will be better able to analyse the apparent failure ol the United Kingdom to realise that they belong to Europe and that only when Europe is peaceful and froa from internal dissension will there be a good chance for the British Common• fully from its British Association. Meanwhile those who are lukewarm about political federation in the British West Indies will no doubt ask why an island separated by only twenty-one miles from the European mainland should be so reluctant to Unfa politically with Europe and should be so aggreeiively sure that islandseparated by hundreds ol miles a can ctfiy face the future with coi thev have limn Demociacj t annoi I>end on public opinion m tin i lorn and ti be repre%  %  t\>< Heaven*! %  *• i limb the to some [in And that, tx-iiev. >' said of anm "f thf ... ,•n , impossible '.v climb E wregl nperia met t> attempi ti KM ii ovn md done wiia mi u-m>\u\n to eo a %  ••" Eric Shipton who to-day strugma lure." Opposing him wa an glint: up B>Nr*l again in an alAnd. Ij.-ida thii moral argugentleman, so mdignani tpmpi lit flint a new roulr which ment. the Sylvan debater put up suggestion* pulfoi might lead to the conqueit of Ml iil.ytiical great peak. UnlikeIMS. when he ,KI mental impoMihih. %  got within 1.008 ft. of the top. concurring Everest. In ..II the %  %  i.en bad ipSS, .1 liithut Italian'* K2 There was almost international incident I hate think what would happen these days If the Russians decided to I trie ard, that foi start he could only invoke in rrtnliation a string -4 meaningful grunts and waves of his Hand. remembered It was a ched 28,000 ft A ban thousand * l * < %  ••• "< %  * %  hi' MONDAY—In my first novel which lies waiting at the publisher until the English taste for fiction grows greater there is a passage about cultural activities in the West Indies. Frankly it is dull reading compared to what actually takes place Her* for instance is an extract from a local newspaper "The newly inautfu-'V^>^v.^.^rf.v>^ Call and Select Early from ADVOCATE STATIOXKKY. a (uU-eeala attempt Let's turn BJBM which Bhlptofl KOI 15 answer: "Mountaineering part winch, In turn ts a goal of izxards and tt hlrh ^ ould hlivr no rtllk m „ nH the summit wis till uutt-xl He ir. %  hlindiiix faast i a and He was then ofl i itthe immense physical hardship !" W1 n have Xa connne j ( tempt to brat Everest. Why climb made BM mountain tuklh-v winks and marbles Everest? What on earth is lha uai K\ < n It .. man dOM react] the -| f lnrrf „ an objection on the Of H Why do il why go risking lop u could only !*• through grounds it Is a waste of time in the most appalbnii mdltions ju*t for Ihe sake <' ~ wnjl1 standing, exhausted, inaanell atop 28.000 ft M Why" %  curred to many who In.' %  | aeon] on Iti i-ig then i ,lv, | %  'he limn ol | i nly to ini'h down de< It era don this wee* by ">< %  Clt Sylvan Rel ind vbeta. i en %  %  I 11 what about thr iinu his reward?^ He got* wasted on the football fields all ">> dulled over the world or in the holy eon name of cricket. Both these sport k 0U1 .ind below jr . dangerous and there have him but. unless everything hi rver been caaes of dealh amonr clear, he;i nothing. And if he Uie public watching—and payini rar gong lo appref or il. It is hard to draw the lint but I maintain mountaineering ieajkar was warming up. port. If thev want to risk then ks and break their bones, it M o have got so fai and IHJ probablv from a feeling that perfurther on Bveraal and whom Haps It ran be done. r • i iiimialalaeetlna I %  n debate soon tofi was not ton i'> ejol effort to resolv)' innuntalneei tnv %  i mpletel) ei On i rtnelpki I pngrln| f<-r %  noShina against an attempt %  II tlimb Everest. Whv .ondemn it 1 ""en „ omc people enjoy if If thev md want to climb Everest, well le' :hrm Into somethem. Their attitude Is praise* i PI iMMf t.. the all-embracing argu ment of v.l I I • -st at all p tkei tli ...nvni'iiit. %  eras Jus: plain silly got off '" •• %  > uneai : mm ell actualb baen In the lim i But be had nevai been on Evrtal and never wanted '" He sidetl lunualf instead With the Tibetans who live below Everest and look upon thing sacred. The* call it Chen •i worthy and Justifiable." As the old man continued %  MOM in it. defence. I detected a feeling i^ iht'ic iiuened the debatei. hi* words of "Gad sir. if we didn %  DO earwily have Everest to cUmb. what wouh' use in standing on the British people come to." Brereari aummlt The world The debate rumbled on Than I aat nu snw taut of wte high moral valu Waal to B*1 there of high endeavour, the spirit n n i lor the kudo,.f it nc because adventure which surety should bt i gamblers and like to risk encouraged, human nature, tin .Inn Irvoa and the lives ..f their beauty of the eternal in^v 0 You can't measure Everest's rain. mist. ice. biting on Everest winds, butterflies Internal invading And when everyone had adde< was ii bad thing. The his piece, thev put It lo the vot wag regarded as Glory be. Snlpton. you can conungma. or "Goddess Mother ol Britain'! for the conquering of, linue your expeditrori The Sylvar the Snows" and find It mexplica)USl H|l lw „ „ther iieaks in the Debating Club applauds your ble why anyone should want I RJ ,,.,, K nehan anga, work by two % %  one reach Its summit when ai a slmpl* mtra bafore the war respectively End piece: The man OtapBCt of contemplation from afar, the domain of Italian and Gerdebated against climbing Everest the mnuntaln, is beautiful, ma I intalneerlnf madmen. nt the Sylvan Club really dldnl tic. H Look what happened when the have his heart in it. You see. he' "Thaw Tihcl.-ins when m*J heS( Amorlcam borne<| in on the really all for it By VAI'GIIAV JONIS LONIX)N, S'I.K I ei 2\ Sit tight Is Mr Churchill" i a gan today n* Egypt seek. t.i dn\e Britain's troops from the < ..1 Zone and Iran irk i In van t< i H her own ml following r* i I kpU sion <>1 llnlain'-. oil men IriHii Abadan f"i In both i.. M Mi < hureblU has made II eftsar M .'ill nut appease demands which he thinks liable II. % %  sit ttviiit polley, he thl rorci both the Bgvptnui and Iran gi-vi'i iiinentt,i moditv thenextremist poUcy towards Britain. In then dispute. Eflypt .md Iran have Uu •' %  pattu M the Arab Ami. i lb it. .in. however, has the unqualified baeTring' of Uai ; f the ii And Amerira'i aim i* I strategic .: i.>].' East in vh n nu oaci i.f H.IIImunlsiu. Against ii in. Britain' %  prime move foUowlna lha %  ppropnatlon of the Anglo-Iranian Oil Comi '.iti ooo.ooi) raflnei i and Installations at Abadan. Kermen;hah and Bandur Marshur. will !• the continued deprivation of the oompany*! tanaw Beal and ml %  Previously, over 3oo tannert, half tho com|>any's own, hall chartered, were collecting and delivering nearly 32.0IHI renned and crude oil annuall) me irld over. And much of its sale from other countries. Under thl plan, for Instance Pakistan wll get oil from Saudi Arabia insleac i lv,-, Attitude of Britain, however wil change immediately Iran show goodwill by offering to negotiat' on the basis of existing proposals Points made by Britain are1 The Industry •huuld be efft %  Itntly niu.;ns*d and operated a all Stage] I i. regulater flow at economic prices from thi oil fields lo the customers abroad And provisionally, this necessitate expert management includinj trained British technician:. I tank %  md .. worldwide rak organisation 2 The protlU should be share. between Per>ia and Britain oi perhaps a fifty -fifty basis, with oi prleas fixed to compet. fabiy with those of other produc lug countries. 3 The amount of compensatkoi for the nationalisation of the in dustry to be fixed by agreement e, arbitration—arid not by a unilat eral ruling of cither country. In Die case of Egypt. Britain i %  i nte pie pare*! to face further ter Uon against British troop %  nd property in the Canal Zone For Britain's prevailing necessit." in the retention in safe hands o. lha SUM ttre*nne to the Orient. However ihe is ready to negotiate with the Egyptian governnd 2.000 Indians can still continue m*nt for u revision of the twenty .. . Bu, .-ar Ati^-Lgyot.an treaty whlcl luns till IS35. And she holds oper IIUN WINSTON i HI liMITI 1 \:; M ^ide<|'i ulKl.lni.il' tubsldlar fullowlng the ..ing, and lie cannol dis[o,.. nuardlnK the Suez llfe-Unr by m ,.i rurtlwr produelloci Hll frwl inernatlonal fore* romposrd . %  Come 10 %  ItMKWllI American. French. Turkish ant comlnduitfy •i Premier And though, following hi, Cairo Britl.h troop, with whom Egjp ab l,,,,.. ,. .nandii from Comwould le aswM-ialed In equal part' he nershlp. Compam', .ii. However. K ny'a expuls '.' %  n!^hl. ,r recSllvUlttoAmltMM uSt"^ Rut%*&** hut unavailing te. • V, S, 1. --IZ iiniihlc tochai%  ".'' doing io. rori.ni. il u believed, cannot in. '• %  t X ill Ml... thai The A. : Company, lluence Britain', mjln policy, bu would not mranlin i ""•<• llllcl >' to .hake the ponrrlnload.PaMta "on of the Egyptian governmen "M ,? !" ,i b i d sh,„ %  ..mi Slcll) !• II Obtalnlni in...nongst ,t* own 20.000.000 people nation ''f,'''"""' ' ' Iraq and For the Egyptian, are alread; ter Wj ; A,t,l ,. I. pushing ahead di^tentedTy the Govemmen, "', "."'ting remaladmlnlmation and corruption meat "I'V"*' ln J^"*" !" %  h : and Ihtci ...... wide.pread and hit',""', ;'i T,,.,hTol Mime" the Further, to avoid imposing hardtar povarty. Los. of Egyptian 111, A '"' "" %  %  .'.,:' , %  ,: S m,., on l£iu %  -<" %  > Ameriand l|ure.lo achieve Britain'! .. I orketl out pulsion might eventually AngloII f.i I .1 administration I vmU over la agalnat him tor hi. .nip. on loreryn ....e.. ,,pulsion of llrltaln'. 3.000 .trong c .„, oil ompani. I Our Reoelers Say rated t heatrical group presents their anniversary hop t he group hopes to specialise in the culturniM of Caribbean dancing music drama." And this after so many years of the British Council, not to mention the Bridgetown Players. It's enough to make strong hearts break. rUESDAV—On Sunday after Toaca was ended they played Tchaikovsky's "Franj cesca da Rimini" There was culture if you like coming out of a box and a turn I of the knob. Dante started the story { going in his fifth canto of the inferno and nobody has been able to leave Francesca alone since then. Leigh Hunt. Silvio Pellico. d'Annunzio in literature; Ingres. SchefTer. Q, F. Watts and Cabanel in art : and then Tchaikovsky th,Russian in music. And whendoAdvoeale "I Wednesday, the 2Bth ol lwembe. 1951. H H staled In UW WUrUl paragraph that "only Jaman the benefit of Ihe employe! tract to pay passages back tt Jamaica or its equlv..: The position regarding u of repatriation of WOrfcaj the U.S.A. Is tbiii pay the cost of transportation from the place of employment in the U.S.A. to Jamaica 01 lent of nil British Weradian :ieludin Barl i: NICHOLAS JACK tAibeui i %  UHTORS NOTE The LabOUf I siatenieni In I ig coi n ment which he quotes Irom the Advocate's editorial when i th.ii the employer! contract to pay passages bai or Its equivalent. If Mil' %  !:• %  of the full edi ortal, it ip| • need correction, but the editorial makes It clear th.it while Barbadian workers have then by l Jamaica (If they tr.i" Jamaica) or as far back as a dks| iivalent In the distance from ine United States to Jamaica (if they do net travel via Jamaica), their psttaagskj hum its equivalent back M Barbados or to some othoi Caribbean territory si ill haee paid. Heat to gain % %  much btnet.1 from the praaanl irnngemtnt i-r Barbados a* Jamaica ilenve. (Ol .I. syorben \t -tie lath ihe Bnrtanos Government must face. Since il is quite clear that when Jamaicans have their passages mates thaj have returned home. Whereai while Barb:.-* dlans have their passages paid M ei i :n1lrs of sea to be crossed %  layer pot tinMurker pays for this essential a*r: of the fourney, than the taxpayer must foot the bill or the workers do not go, in view of %  rrangemi being dtsquota the que*tion Is one fr %  %  SIR, K %  eongratuIhe concise, renewed publication ui the "DaUe Tides" under the caption of -What's on this means much to 'ugh tides around the clock to enjoy our dally health swim. Gratefully yours. St. C. HABLOW. (Retired U.S.A.) St. Ctalr Barlow. MedwayGovernment Hill. November 2th. 1931. 19 Per Cent To The Editor. The Adi-ocal:'— Silt.—Kindly permit me to express certain facts to which In my humble opinion most people would certainly agree. Certain politicians are saying that they were imdrumental In a profit sharing bonu* or 18 per cent. .thinking that would help their poUtteae campaign so as to get everybody shouting for Labour! The sugar crop it Ihe chief crop as well as the upkeep of the )*land. and I feel that everybody should benefit by it. I also feel i was divided thus that all would be satisfied. Sugar workers' 9 per cent for subsidlI ; er ceil! i.e letting government pay some and reduce the price of rice, fish. etc.. and 3 per cent, for repairs to roads u"ed for transportation or trad~ of the *ame cane and sugar Industrv. Do vou all not th' ik this would have been better' i;r r 28th NOV. 1951. lofera Don't know SIB,— i would like to make a few observations in connection with the voting on the 13th December. The assigning of the various districts lo the varlou* polling stations Is an extremely good idea, but it Is going lo cause great confusion unless some notice — official or otherwise — is issued Instructing the electorate to which polling station the> should go to record their vote. For instance, I myself did not know to what district 1 belonged and the particular polling station 1 should go to. until I looked up the voter*' list for the parish. Not everyone has access to a list of voter*, as the notices' which were stuck up, here and there, about the parish, have long since been torn down, hence the majority of the electorate remain In Ignorance as to the number nf their district and the correct polling station. I write this letter with the hope that it will catch the eye of those •esponsible for the arrangements and that they will make every effort to ensure that everything work! smoothly on that very important day. "SCORPIO 1 28th November, 1951. From 1st December. 1951 our IIARDWAKr. and Ll'MBKIt DEPARTMENTS .sill be closed for breakfast from 11 a.m. to 12 noon • %  yeppt ggj Saturdays when we will be open from K a.m. lo 12 noon. Will all custom%  era please note. • WILKINSON & IIAYNES CO.. LTD.. — Successors lo — C. S. PITCHER & CO. LTD. Phones: Ml*, 4H7, 4172 SANTON WATER HEATERS svvios FOIl ill n II 5-((ln. Mil.II PKKSSL'RF. TYPE 12-Kln. il I' .11 PKKSSl'RK TYPK 15-gln. HIGH PRESSURE TYPE 12-glli. SANSPRAYS lor Balhs Available fmni Stork. DA COSTA & CO., LTD. ELECTRICAL DEPARTMENT f'Vvovw.>v..*..y.^*..vvv^^^ >; (J)a Qoi** 'A ',-,','--.-,',-, •,'.*.-..-*-,',DINNER JACKETS FABRICS.... Fine Tropical & Linen STYLES Single & Double Breasted COLOURS... Cream & White And 3-Piece Tuxedo Suits With all Accessories Important Notice Customers are asked to make a special note of the following:— All orders for Delivery lo the COUNTRY DiSTHICTS must be in by the day before they are expected to be received. No order from these districts will be accepted for delivery ihe same day it is received. ALL OTHER ORDERS for other districts must be in by 11 a.m. the same day that delivery Is expected. ORDER DEPARTMFNT — Phone 3571 J. N GODDARD & SONS LTD. Broad Street



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SATURDAV ni'irMRi'R |, m-,i RAKBVDOS ADVOCATE I'M.I il\l Labourer Not Guilty Of DISCUSSIOX OX PLAYING 'Go" Says Mr. Williams Administering Poison FIELDS pm TPOXED .—.,....„,,,,,„ THE HON. the Chief Justice Sir Allan Col the Court of Grand Sessions yesterday disci old labourer Elbert Browne of HlUal J an Assize jury found him not guilty ul administering: poison so as to endanger the life of BUM Moore with count of administering puismi with intent on JH\ D Browne was not lepieseiited b Profit WvuiiH Prosperity SAYS MOTTLEY ciun*l. Mr. W. W it.— K( Solicitor Oenenl pp the Crown Tea) prosecution called .m ten witnesses uhlle Ihe defence raited one. The prosecution alleged that on July 9 the accused BrOwne—after having a quarrel with Kli/e Mo*: e the previous day—obtained tno key to Moaie'ft house from n boy named Oliver Nehletl and want in the hotiw and mixed a quantity > their disposal fur establishing thew field*. : the last %  %  other persona were c work It could r. the Public Work. De:he right nuti let the t.. ...I niniste: Mi K I). Mottley, at .. Pa Ural Meet Thursday night In rapport <>f I uiro lot the rn> of ii[ i' .' Wie mallei (Tom .. .iirTerent point of view We hould not worry over the east" The parishes were resporsiuU for feoedag after lie %  Wfl Majority %  Wi*h rn ol 1 t people in Bw pariah locally, Bfould like tn have piaytng, MMI %  trad to e tbaan Are we aaj aaj thi im-apable of tsassMtshln. eMsT*' %  playing (leidi and men) .ul of the Niii' Black Rock. Tb ant the. Barbados in m a crowd at a LabotU I'"' St Lucy, in support of the candidatures ol Ml J K T Brancker and himself. Mr. Williams said that the labour Party cam* er in 1938 because of the Lnesjraanl mow the whole of the West Indies. Tin\ Trinidad. Jamaica and those islands r* ti mic conditions. %  Fort that ha did peasant the n %  %  %  tO .nil.. lot pic a*kert hint will • 1 %  : l> la poww Ihej h ted to do onv Perish inj srtli .'nil.n .•mini ill ,. no* eettii and told UMPI tiol adult sufTiJK.' ffOI ' that they were ulkn When bathing %  (hi i l"l the |"M|>1. that %  intad %  i v • %  %  Th.it ihe town, said Uurt ha wag I n deed | and h* large aowd that turned u long u one of thaii friends dM out to hear him oceans. B ol Inder if the noU1 hl '" r '' y *• l v,,,,v| > i 1 1 He : I her !*• men ..f %  Mr. A it H ad M Ward had load th> ii< %  i rbody in the Ho i r wu i ong lot sanding thi as al pie to Aawrleg ..:, this last He thought thai Ihev should lie a ttmo "I am tellmj; the im-i. of tale blajgai than what lhaj wan S) Lucy thai wbanavei bag not yet i%  He form u( Laboui .mil hf %  %  in x %  ootent were sent to the Govllu Barbado ) gel nhfj,\ with the work. >,, |., ; ernment Aaatyst n ,n First witness called for the Ai % %  ..live 1 feel th.it ctrrufll pagrct nucb did h* as far as the PMaeM nonaj but rou t.nu prosecution wai Sgt. Henders.in my duty • be unable ti Alice i'l.ivc Field was eonperlemtand adueaUon attached to the District I -•<<•%  SsalntaUl the i ga UWll prevtc corned and I think that the playStation. He said that he a^re^t. sat <>ui in their letter of August Ing fields %  houM lw done by th Subsidisation Browne and took him to the DisUphnl.i lha a that Go I %  mtnent Veatty and as MOII a* imsslbte Mr Ward was telling tliein f trict "r" Station where he made rate tne people. Ihal the ralldran BhonM the high cost of living which WM a voluntary statement. Hsaid that he had toW thi hare the benefit vf them. .nowier snare used to catch Lilian Watson of Hlllabv, St 00 lOvaral OCCasloni th.it PC i"i: Balds. Mr. F. McD. Svmmond. said Trinidad and Jamaica paid .8 Andrew, said that Flue Moaie b dilTered fundamentally with UM *Jr r> <; I |od and that he would like u. .-. the .Fits ,uul 26 eenN per Pint (m her daughter. On July 10 she Labour Pi i .thing to make playing fields established In the | ira Uvtng T! ( e went to her place and took a of nationalisation. He stood for htm chingO gnd war r/UUna w co-oobadoa labour Partv favoured nil % %  • towel from her. This towel she fiev antarpriaa and lha Ust Q anunent or anym-hsation which would lower lha vii gave to the Police. read the literature at Ftoanclal S'eretary. one else with a certain amount of "si .,r living ngcj n,,. prfea a,l< "* rum to drink and while drink.i i n u aha found thai II tasted runny. Tret led She went to Dr. Cummins and he examined and treated hei About 6.45 p.m. the fame >i .. •he saw Browne at the CIc" Washington Club and they had a .lasae ..( the <.r ith unknown coal nd unknown cost of i: He was i th;it n would bo mo %  ooatly. Ha wantad lo assure thara aaaaad, the work iJ the ChnretaIhai he %  . %  .,. Vl i %  dlA ram from ing this addresgftai .* it Is io-d.*iv Ii wi -MiiTeiuig-. of several people In I he was a irchwardM ntry, it wai known Ihal ii and there wars of the middle and 10* ,,,„• under the in this colony became .ifci direction th H-f, n the war, Rarhad. ._ „ „ I '""" Bunai and in-im & Negotinlions idb in transportation I,. 1 Nassytuuoisi have reached the i-ut Barbados in a prevnnVertry in the name of the Gov'ion. British Guiana grew rice and rnment. If ihe Gov, %  : nment perII was *> much the IH •--. frnn. there ' IHUK i Dutch v.ieiitMii.in a ii i K. i n oanat Thursday gftl H I I ihe Aqu %  IB .itt.'t he h. v OgsnaM in Ansstard ru vii St V boughl Martinique I ura ao, Pan % % %  Tahata [Pacint •. Naa .' %  i and South Africa iin K aid %  I ISf 'Tetmosol' Soap rag niisi ggAsom — 'Tetmosol' Soap Lontatn'> |Tcassjosol \ a sale rat pasta* medtcawaaaa which .inrckly kills BCaa, Hot and other \km past 1 he Soap is of the highest ojuahtv, plcasantlr perfumed. and Jgrcrahk to use li is non-irritant and non uijunous to both man and doaMatk JinmsU. • lctmos.il' Sagp also entourages the growth of a healthv, glossy coat. TETMOSOL S01P IS MAIUBU IN J . T1BLETS A pnvlu.t .'I Isspanal *WWh*al I'lurmakcutuali I muled ;— ^1^1^ \ I HrvdenA Sons (Bafhaiiott Lid.. Agents. uf the Kxecutn rle> in such .i way that because of worhj eondilluii ..r to ihraa dlrael Inault upon tin Ihey were rbeoad t.. EMcutlve inei%  %  Mt> urtiitraUun In nuitten of playing; flalds or an) Barot Ilnallj round II Uher form. I will .,!,. . i.,l have I., buj 10 It" tin Mudh .i* I would like to %  %  Subsidisation was ihe U) UUS matter. I certain'lUSter Ifl thg iine-tion ,.„-., J "Sftfi '"' ""* ," %  "• "' *: „ ll: 2ven nam t.. rlous ae,, '^' fl,e ""' BO-oparat*BD, meant a their ituiy to lowat did) that i would haw lo do thing -nd eiothmg r the bnal I conversation. She told her mother ihcted with this dis. %  %  > tl ^ nu Lilian Watson what had hapno chance for them but to go to perted. the AlaTJOtlOUea whera there is a Once or twice she had a quarrel Ui)l(j klle n i Rite hosae i. %  • because of !)"• , salb which with the u ide wind• thi .' it hi red to pui in quite food "' n """ '' ""' belm when he : benefit of the rosslng Ihi l that and a bottle. In the bottle there was a liquid of a yellow colour. Oliver Neblett, son of Iris Neblett of Hillaby. St. Andrew said that on July 9 Moa/e gave him the key to her house Just before she left for town with his mother. Later the same day Browne came lo him and %  MSI iM'i or fan re in g 'liiiii.liwi.nten -.could ( WM ... .,i s Vcsti i sye on build. m e„, Bm „^ Sli Ing of inli sort end ha w..uld have officer on this mattar f intime on that." Kesponsibilily IJI> the Oovsrranant'a part, l think there is a laudab pi tying Ihtldi at I iieouragr capital into the ( oi,.... nen Ihev saw It possible to do o They were, howev.r. going to %  iMire that when enterprise came the (aland, Ihe colony wm %  i little < DECREE ABSOLUTE I Wollare 'l" ,ls remunerated The OavI feel that r nment'i programme was sreond Tffl HOB Pul %  %  entire matter is approac h ed '' non *he said. I^Dratgri palltl0.1 in a spirit of goodwill on nil gldag, conultnded ihe local Cm-rtov the playing llelds would be pul r rnmant for thrlr housing proCourt f<>t Ww up without any rancour. i;ramme IBOnlg] I HI I Mr Mottley replylni said ih it Mr '.nu-kei with the sltunti. wa*. it wHild be a difficult thing %  m when It was cUaeovPOOMWo h-ngih they could t. % %  i't .,n>,.ii.. to uiideruiw i?!I*rEH& lnu avoid having anj responllblllts ib building by contract it was • neighbouring colonies, the to be noted that the letter mi t!_ that they were to got plans and I said th it ......-. Mid that hi had ., en representing the parish of 81 ,, Ulcult thing ,' u £Zj nr '"","' %  number of vears ,,,,,, %  'never let him down -red that 536 people were i .aitlnc lbt VTSTie^UseVat foi wtrnsalves. to be noted' that the ietteV said RX.. th^.h^rt!ilL hr w, ' the General ll,,sp,tal SDd UM "•) -<• been so much er...that they were to get plans and ?' ,1 ? ( '^ ^^^1 '' doors were closed to them. The ""' levelled at this Vestry (or J^monejf would bo granted onlv „ta n( iar.i of the Wait fndiV (Neblett) gave him the key lo mi w M?*J IX^obinson said that on "* sn d Ihere would also rebe l July IS while he was acting as member his debating the qua I Government Analvsi he received J *'' Hadlologlst and Surgeon no I n bottle containing yellow liquid Grneiai for tne Qanoral Hospital be expected la oarrj out Due and a towel from Police Constable Whan he pointed out to U rf when the i; 101 Farley. The liguid in the nment thai there v/aa no reason ih. v oannot, ai'.hough they have a bottle was rum and the rum cont.. argue fdai i.. tor p, .,i,, Work) DaparUl i tained a quantitof irsanki •' ssadJcal Servlcaa racatved %  think our |K>siiion i.* abaoniteW The strength of the arsenic W01 sbuj "f 11.300 a year or a Cor> .ound. The Government i .1408 gramme. Al this stage the Dial Secretary CI 500. thai prosecution was ists to look after lha health ot Ui %  „. hi.ed nd II. 11 (ham wh M sg up of the first playing '' the Government approved if beTniTh..krii"7orward teTfaTl iT.te ihe Churchwarden u "' f '' PJ JlJ"" "*•*"' r..rara to rail into in. .II "Would It not bo belter for %  lit. New Voters BSklna the |eople !.i telf and bad one „L. :,,,. i „„,„. %  r ., ii.III .Mieii esT.ioii.sneu. for the prosecution was ists to look aft> closed. The only srltnaai (Or the paopla, where defence was Rucben Tayli could not remember the date which the offence w.is .illegcd have been committed, but said ernment to get the be~;l ^>ci lallsti that the oceused was wilh him at the lluspilul and to get the all the time "on the day in quesbest they must pay them, for intlon." deed the more wall-to-do Browne then addressed the In this country, when lury and The Hon. theChief Jusnj, hrP able to seek medical advi.| dbroiid whii" nd .'. i>. n.ient upon lha kin of the men at their hoa now ;,nd I said it Ihon, the best thould be obtained and they ntufft be paid and I know > thai they should b" well pUd." Old fan tasssnasM He said that in and out of %  25? „'' 1 M| K ; "'"'" r* ihnew The children would be eii L "V; 1 \ h,, h m ; '' nrmiUng no breach of In. law %  i Ooveri if th< i n banlnd Mi t th t w m < ,r, 'l>"Ting t„ pa eai when nto St Luci .. %  %  %  "" e eoi Idered thai thei ihouki si Thoma had refused Mr s Orlfflth, i <' I % %  %  i (inlhth i. Decree ntai wi prot October 5. 11. %  I.. %  petiUonai and I %  n pa Mr. B. K. Waleott. K( ll -tin.ted h> Mi || L l %  i lha ii"" "' i Ion %  "-'-•' % %  ippean I building" when they %  %  not ery 'hat there artain emount of truth In > % %  h I Mi M.ittlev and Mr .1 Thaj h;id i n %  lit those in Act was passed by • The Goci %  %  % %  would er-nt ihe money for these playing fields and the Ould even bf leased. esponsihte mainly %  -. .. ition the held-. 'pending .if die money fur th-, eetabUahment should ixthe n spnnslbilily of a department • he Government i Wall hi accept st in., gomg pi | in .ii i. > %  %  WILLS ADMITTFI) TO PROBATE %  Court ol Irdli Hot ; L Taylor adn ted i r-'v.rslcv rteinel • Si r \i'i .ii.. Card Mi! V On ol bad 1 i e nuking money SHI on the floor of the House he v increase. stressed the fact that he i lllll{h Itol hil lice summed up and after a short deliberation the )urv relurned | verdict o f not guilty. L.C.C. RESULTS Pupils Of the Modern High School gained 32 passes :.t the July 1951 London Chamber of Commerce Examination (ccrtlAeate stsgp). Detailed results arc "* follows' English: Janet Brathwaite. Erseiision .it the ,i msonl thw %  ile cla:.0 Anita Khun, Valmour Lyie, Felix %  • ,( • Ttuaa yaara ago he I d ,., , in ,, v ((r Mascoll. Lucille Nlles, Iris BadIneir > he should support % %  gling to sen.i way. Claudlne Sobers. Phyllis naaaa for the old people. *-| ud llis Willell. Le Ry f r d..% bus r, an | Weekes. In this colony would go up ivfrun payln| nore bus fares." ARITHMETIC: Janet Brathspile the fact I that I hen an aUampt waite. Rufus Bryan. Earl Burmy Parly. Mr. WUttneon, who %  lorry rowes. Erskine Carter. Velcie was a member ol lha Tran pott king around u few Crichlow. Board had knowledge of it. and as FRENCH: Only two candidates despite the fact that Mr. Dowdlng, from coo hureh to .mother, meniwere entered for this subject, g memlier of my Party, srho Both passed with distinction, interested in the bigge>t who indeed could illThey were: Lawson Belle, disvice in thi.* cstloi price for bu tinction passes in both written that from the returns which J had .;in*nortatlon. he again and oral; Erskine Carter pass -een at 'he Vestry of the General buted his quota b* leading the with distinction In written. Bus Company that 1 was sal Its del ASSIZE DIARY i sec • ( hrlitaltari Iii 1938. tne si. Lucy eieeton rOpudlated Mr Henry Alleyne %  auaa they tow to ii that hi en not tied ni .i f.ti *. %  owner comblnatlan Phi now stu k i precedent .icar (hem saying now, 'Oh the / i.nt why this sudnVn mlerest in the peasants when thev have been robbing them .11 Ihe tune i ? m t B.ejSJi R ITS >Vs% l WVW*aV HERE AGAIN I! V 5 PURINA MILK CHOW %  %  5 1 lohn S Wralhrrhrad's Aijain a pUlMlll'O.K.IllS.llOKI. I II i. A I II i. U |i h A If S X .... srn I & sea mis ANM* ".~i" JJC £ I l(..\Ki I |o IA aal BoXSn M ,,II, |sj i ignn tie ii iiu Maarrai t hj 3J ell.s *ff I AMAH A t H.AK Loxtteiotw %  > 4S I II in An Silk nml XOun i ran lie, in $:I.I; Colouni I'ink. IVmli. Hallo llluv. Whiliuml Black. M U'S in Siilin. JiTsr.v. ih'il :;s/ lonrtn, Casea' Taaetelaa* S/ Ko.al I h< inn's t.rm*' /a 111*1 IN IIMI %  OK XKiAS Gifts Sets ^Harriet cHubbard Tiyer i Canada} PINK t I.OVKR COLOGNE TAI.C I'M POWDCI HONEVSUC Kl.K COI.IK.NI: & TALCUM FOWKKll i .1 .1 11| \ CHANCE ., PINK CLOVEN SOAP4 TAIXIM POWDER HONEV SI (Kl.K ., ., GOLDEN CHANCE SOAP • TALCUM POWDER Also CREAM SOAP CI cakaa lo Box) 1 i 1 1 ? %  .. %  < %  *'* AI-SO %  \ BtaaasfaJ Range nt 01 Vm Pipe* ll Ml rents BM y~ AII gataaaa anal Baat A ripe CssaaaiaaBa I/a jHEt'lpe Keamrn 1/3 • %  und II -lull aaaare Ot tad arkrn.shrll IglU AII s,/rs UMI aaaaea ITI S! IMI In *l" nnt ( herr, I'l unit •• ahagaa %  Te r. baa /...., t/ %  hi-. Ilution *W Tohaien PasieaWa, tbUhln C S %  '• %  n ne 9)t Wwi'i" W'i'riwInH 11 01 *^ *JP %  %  'rl.n l,'-l>l"* a eipe nd rtgarette i j ./see* *• 9. !* VI '"'...ii •• -ii.' PBgj I So I loot Jun'i ic* r'wy day 'No M urain ••*" I M ansi l UMS optm **.hoJ IV.JV d.i' MM '-ihnAiM.".! %m4 0pam6 %  ad ftnnt. toead up eye muwln I'll never he •.ihoui il agauL* PROTECT YOUR EYES witA KNIGHTS DRUG STORES vuniiirminiis iiD.a M A i %  TH 11 rair | Tb* nn of ibr (T* md HSM laasj SMSJII t* |pnhb| aaa (olam ll ih M rrd or in* TitrH at (far ahiiri liloialiaiil. %  evaa aaad 9 packet damigned rj i r



PAGE 1

S\T(I(I).\V. !>l < I Mill K 1. 1U1 RAKBAIHIS ADVOCATE PAGE THREE MEET THE FORTY-SIX lid, an nunM %  i i Mnfla la,; bcr for St. (.eome I. Miller was senior year* George In tftw n of the House ; director in a liroi of refrigeration eng npoUtte* tar manj M ^ A floater, formarts mafcin,; hat lourth foe St. Andrew. Mis Buuriae h Itempt at eie.'; oapenence in parochial polit C. St. Joac-pli Mri •• %  *%  aa a member 0| lha Vestry o. ~i. the as* Andrew. Si. Thuirus* MM. Leauei "I MM HWH 0j •> IH M. I. CwwIl M, \*a rrln ikdnbly durinK the la.-t .^slnn of ed senior nj the House and b*ki of the during the lavu itMHMl Official Labour Fait) m the House. A member ot the Homo House from the introduction ..f Asaemulv %  %  13 and cast . -low of those Mr BJ. a,. Dow tag. was )UHt I %  mbcr for St. lieorne in I Man, for the twelve conI*M soasion of the House. land uUiiter Mr Duwdun n* ided. nvcrUas In the UsTtar the 'Bushe Experiment mXXi6 Here are the forty-eta ami MM u,. B W. farm, barrister". Mr Ad,M *'" nwmbe ^ B ^I Houso durtnj the last aaaawr hRM Island ^holar aftd <* House of A*n* > -'>* A Doctor by proleaaw* he Thr ( .iv old Harrnanaii. and served with and •? %  nwmber of the binMr. I li MiU*v wa senior the R.A.F. A lha last war. Ifa: dining the also obtained degree in %  bl ;> noiiucs Seeking election for the i time. %  vestryman §•_ Lucy 11141. A member of th. Mr i; L. Ward, "planter, was m bl i M l-uiy dUIhe Sugar AffrfcV ... „ „, ,,.,. HuUM .. er of the Hj 5 v^ tmymral -„„ experience Housing BMrd. JS fl member of the House of Mr. \ I V Leu is A.,Junior ^n^jy -luring the Mf j E T f^^^^ barkerlast ecsa>H.n. H* ante m>l .. macat law WB , u nior member for " \* ,,m *St. Lucy during the last session I the House. Mr. Brancker ha* bid considerable experience the Houae and has held the ap' pointment at Deputy Speak DISCUSSIO\ OX PL t > / W FIELDS POSTPONED Bj si. Mi.hu.l Vestrj of tlie St M \estr* left the m*imt on Thurstho da T whan the Veturv waa costing m letter from (he Colntu. SaffaaiT rh r VMtr • thi erior-in-Execulivo C0UU1 [ %  Ihtf statements made before tin Minn* CVmmaaion of Rnqun > to Vr M F. Cox, and DM rtii -r .He a* flaying fields. 1 tharvfore |H*iponett oue to the lack ot a quorum. Th e Vestry's letter %  The and was member of the EM „ live Commlttae MIXY 1942 He has service*, police and penbeen Leader Writer of the Advaih. Executive i imltl ease. Editor o! tt.. %  Airtrultural tlM bj • session. Rrparter. and Editor of the BeaMr. J. W. HrwHt. Mai eaa. Tailor is araking election to the Financial Secretary data.' Au(u Mr. Adams is President of UW Genaral Assembly (Or the Hi t 3 Mlda as hOowa Barbados Progressive League, lime. Hu experience oi | u 3ul August, 1!>: the 1 i seeking constituency of St. He ha. experience of ParocMal ..in Part) li %  %  Mr. V. It. Y JUS nan. has already been a member .if the General Assembly but di ( lain re-election last session. Mr i. n RBaa, le.K-her. Chief Clerk in Labour lacking lie. Uc i.n the tlv-i itolltii %  as a member of the V0>ivncril a^emhl. rf l££ ISJTM *' W "' t>m ,d a """'", B. < Tudor. Schoolma.lw octn. Vlr ot s<. „„„„,„, concM., !" ,,,.,, r Ml j A ,.,„.., H. i • .._ %  .. ,„,,„ it,. l'hiiri-hwai.iii ..I in. mb ,. r „, h ,. %  Mr v chaw, eommii .. j meiiiber of , rw Chord. w '„ „ i|h hc „. AJ "Mr. M,H,r. ,, ,„,. ha. ''* %  '*•Jg** ; ^,' y, r % %  ^ ** %  .!* ind CommiMlon 'nerrh.int, h.n mfm %  akan ...... I but Jnm Cs ,or f*?^ • e .t.,i ,,t the %  "'" l CSS^S^JT^itar'SuS l' %  nmnbrr ... .h, Vr..,. M lhl i; A ,„ r hr flr .i "1' S member OTUM s jM ,p|,. Thl „ i n nr ,| u m im( Ihal he U eklns rleCion In Ihe >lr Ml „ rT „,, r .„,,,_ gg i rnt v. SI. Philip nrBt ,lm l Mr. W. A. Crawfurd ami Junloi Mr. J. II. UUKlRsmi. O.ll.K member for St. Philip during UW bead of the firm ol Wilkinson, last session of the BJN I Iftawnc* and Co.. entered Barbados member of the f> %  "" ~ nolltieis a memher of I lie Hume since 1940 Prrsuient and Founder bSVT Src.! Sil kS of the We,t mdl-n Natk. M. 1 Q Itrvan araa lunkir >* toic the introductio,, of Party grass Party ,d Editor -i %  i S",U-,:r St, is Chairnum of Barbado. haher .^f fig WjfU, V Hon., First Foundry Ltd., Knight's Ealat Barbado* Oe*er*er Memo, i oi 1 1-orter-sLtd. andhasanexoulive iho Executive t ...nm-Mee ,., I established 1948—47. I lirms fa the island. BerVMr. Crawford w-s one of the d for years ns a member ..[ the Barbados Delegates to OM t **?ralalive to Ihe administration i>< play. OK fields arg In reply | w u-. nistrintcd inform you that.— (a> A.i a nvult of tlM tail in,ide by a nvemlier of Uti enl at the l*rtncess All. Pla.v .g Field lnn'iii). that lhl %  %  a most coriupt hod] (> Th.,i m the absence of adWelch e M 'ste machmer \, tain care of in, %  linings ni and the laying oul proje> %  %  b %  %  St Michiiel Mr. M. I; cox. Qanaa Pro I for St. i %  " khg esion ol %  %  %  i atd Ltohl snaai Veatry of St. Lucy. Is seek.^ election to the General Assembly ( ( ., for the nrst time SI. Jai Mr A < Home a*] %  of p.H"BACK INJURED Thirty-year-old Winston Gilkes k* of Welch Vniace st fobfl was %  i .1 11."i 'al Thursday evenlnfl after part of g at Bath f'li upon hnn al-iut 3.30 pm dikes' ri.rk * %  I Hire.I HARBOUR LOC S.li l.l> MaBSSML S.h I K.lle V Sum.. SVh Rnt.i|i>.. S r A.iina *. Bel-. M.^n SrK. Burma D. ;," Seawell li.ppui ] '. S K;.,;,\ •oSimSrZ.TSi encJ'on Clo-i A-.-. ,„„ A .. MUM „f .he LenhUt... Coun>"",'''_ '"' "^~..'",, I .1 OK l" oeealon. Has exwniple V. UuWejl Indi... umrJ. m ^„ m, n, pa,,n,.„ poli.U ene, (Third Se n ) >. Cu„,le M % %  < 0M Vesl.j "I M. lupeMr I. II ...rn.r m % %  '" %  Chrwl Cbwcfc SS 0** "" ""' ",'^*,'"-''":",,''' member fur S.. Phil.,, Kuril Mr. r. I :.nnl '' '" la<. He-.i. f in.IlouA pUnI A-uwuil.il... ,„ |„ pnvalr lile Ui.iia.ne, h.. ... thr ...m.,>tl K. Wa.ro... K.l'.. buruerved on the ll. ini.t.... Il>u .i-al law. wa*. iun.ui nu m be r ind nBoard "i Sanlugy ComhU.1 i, lT st J...... n. u\r I..*, .--.lull mtanonerii Tor .he oavMh oi Si. H ( ''^, ^" t ,, ,'* %  i Hie Hoo* 1 Served M Alloeney Hhilip an-1 n.i, I....I ..n-i.U i-.iile T „ )or T ,,,'.,„. ... I UKl Christ Cllurcll (;,n. T ..l from I9M-1M7. Wa.1 ex|--nei..e ..I paroililal |n.l.u. ,. m u.ai.u. Commiernanibei ol .he HOUM of Aieembiy %  %  member of ihe very ... si ,;.;; %  ',, ,,„.,„ ember of .he Hoard 8mcc 1935 an( ] has served ever Philip. ,.„.,i rh-pr-o A--..,, turn* Bl iHh. Kuu ... .. xt ,.n| In 1M6-40. Saw Mr. J. G. Molllev. i" %  peaianl M %  TSuSfS %  """"-if*rT T 7 *7^ """""-""" 1 1 ii.-i Church ihiiloe Mr. E, S. A. Holder, lormer rlecllon to Ihe General A.embl ,„.,... „ ., ..;;,.;;;.:,:., ....o .no„„eai.h., /"„^ h -' :; % % %  ~• ... ml prourlelor. ha. exmunrh eampelanor ,n II i. .,,perlence ... puroehlal polilien a. durinK the asl fourteen Jem. A „ fH !" *" ,, Meat• member or it.e veiiry ..f si. He naw en !., gall->%  !•• Seebliii •Mtllea for hmi war. liML' end mne. 1 Kin. Sf. Pefer Mr. .'. I:. Talma, former memMr. F. ... Walrou. fornieily Mr. I A--.nbly clerk, now general Secretary ..I W • %  11 etaBl •* Woik.i Union, was drew durink Ihe %  .' •'_ ~'""'' .,„ber lo. SI. Peter ,l nra.lmaMe. .hopsession. uency of SI An drewm 1. 1 .seeking election ror the Mr. C. I'. Camberbeleh. planter Mr. K t. ""'*";„„,.,,,, .,,.,1 City businessman habeen le.cher. is a dauilhter "I " bW rrx Sl r- The repl.. from lha ColoOll : .... ,. %  -n %  -..>. %  orreU II ilimlos. Wild October. I r.i ..I it lives.Colonial t#na< i 1 1 .. ol i I made aval 4 i, || that in a*M ,r "' ; Uie> me return n H e•": -,.. ,.%  .,(.'..-i.i al ol plaj in the perl Mi.l iel. md 10 ti\.Co e he,* n-e.ui Merod Hi < %  Si. Andrew J A. Haine*. Psant* n-acrobet for st. AnMAIL NOTICES and St. Joaeph was Junior .drew dun 11 Worker-, union, was juuiu< • %  •—• %  % % %  — ,.„ ,.-_, „l mber for Si. Peter during the Solicitor -Partner in the 1 irrn J | session Of the House and Ml Cottl. C.tford A Z\J^SS ctcrt Siveaker during the last first #incd a _seat fa MR. MOTORMST Do You Know That The Best MOTOR OIL 4 C ASTR0L' MOTOR OIL John. K n H-.l LekdV H.rfll-. Snll -i c. %  otaei l'n-l Mn •' Ord i.e. 5th DtxinMr. 1W lb "I* l| bUattJ M llr-p-'.ll %  II/T Mi.i.i.i sad • %  ''• High Blood Presnre Kills Men &WoBen %  aa many **• %  Sa -vaa. mm* %  far Iron. Huh UU--I I'riSSI I, wSmm m mra4 nfcaan Li ner < irciilaled Clerk leaf tie Col' lated %  i furtl %  %  m ipta U nte ., ...ke.i t.ii lha dlreeOori l Mr. B. B So* -tin %  mi I... WE WELCOME YOU! COME IN AND SERVE YOURSELF W" have recently opened .1 branch grocery Ml T Road for the convenience of the many reside!.' I Government Hill and the surrounding areas, ll is full l rlca and li<|uor, phi* .. Meat Dcfl counter The rash and carry tocners with accounts at the I fWgtA Rcmembei -We 1, service al this ccnlre. go you BT Invited :.. egU n. %  *!' %  Now...Save Money... Save Time... m 1 1 ). V. SCOTT & CO. LTD. Tweedside Road FLY KM TO ALL EUROPE ONLY KIM OFFBRS ALL THIS low KLM Thilfl .eaion lores now in eflttt. Choice of 0C-6ei Co.i.i.ilui.on. Choice el three rouiei. Sleeper Seivfce. KIM "MaliiSlepavar Mon" ,,.A feaa be->l %  llawIng yau la vinl many dfie. al no eilro coil KI.M a rust .Mflii ifmn Ike. I ifiatbaaa tat Bmmpmk t.ir .nor mi., in.%  %  nirafort uml -nj>\ nivnl. You choose ll,. .1 ,-, v..u nit to K", llM-roul. v..o *nl lo Inke, the plaoe youwant to (Iv. Best or.ll V.MI krt.-w s.1, .( %  v.ryntir choke, sseakl Will be lull < oun..tvl dvliei* is Ihe wry lineal, uuu aeflv EndlRheumatism bilesYoulSleep 91! V 1. 1 •*/ /•/#/ m Sells at only 25^ per pint tAX jr~ I hi...... I^a-kaa*. &-.-, "^iV^ 7 . Nb|*t.. 0-...-..I Na>~. e.,.. C-.1-. .iX.. a-...-,. IMaWb. .•7N'MMMI mm Crtefc. IN ^"J^J rM > Cl-*l*> "~*5 U aaetlaUlf **** ***** m BaajOaf ttf^f aan ItiJI %  %  >. asW, ewf %  aaaaauaja UPS l*aaakt ana i-aio.a aciSa atiS (eMaOOi lra#ai ^lfmmiml*,*l*t*^>t^^ "".'.r!?.' roI. ^Vr.'XVnd V£7 uu-i'.' 1 I '' toatVia^Pt'.,'aJaaH*aa< l' aMa lilea r-r, t It tSSW-Uir harUaa — S. Oata MS al aiiv-iati*ifie. *••! i*iaa• aaraa aatal S a l I llrsSSSMna *a r.lnooaua lha %  -"••• | 1 earaaacK treai U ra>aa*l el itaa*-a.lla. e>ii Uw dalxala IUU' omnlim. ami aieeeea. > Pij>aa bv Ooctsn. Cfce-^eh. taaal" Ooa-t.iba St^latat a* %  aaaMtiM SIX aj eM'llav* aa.r. lrao> ifcs IraiaMu mm aasm. Mi c Maaan #4 4-4 law *.f* *..,.-, .- M... easyjo-ash oiMiay H is! Cystex.:.sj. ... (Tin. • n.i. ...... AMfUMAIlH CRAWFORD'S DELICIOUS SWEET BISCUITS ObUlnable in | wiile | .n.i. uf leinpilnc asMirtinenl— i i. li BIM uil e\|.ertl, bakeif. Ilnrr-hv riMiirinr OtOaV freihne-o. rlshl ap l the lime il rej. ties > th driv-1 un.ia.-i ro&tinually at aaesd without, atrass. 1 b MiatT Of ROOM Morris oxford la aoo ol Brll-in's most successful i" world appeal cars FORT ROYAL GARAGE LTD. Pawn* 2385 Sola Diatxibulora Phone 4504



PAGE 1

PACK SIX BARBADOS ADVOCATE -Nil ROW. DIX EMBER 1. "51 CLASSIFIED ADS. AXXorarcEMEvr* TttfPMOMe 230. %  %  '* %  UaalM. ArhitoBtt%  -t • and tl P) on SundaTai i ..-da u H U4 I %  W|M l*T •"*! %  ad.iiaaval naad Por Dirtr,, M.i .• r b car IMM I OH SAIK ALTOMin IVF < AB > %  -a ... iswl n ii.il—1 Mf a* -"-'• i %  • *nd canta pa* oard t** • l\ MIMORIAM i W AM III CAH-On* It. ..** li .th Sadai %  aa only lid"! iwlWa For p-rtu^iir pa*to f M KIMN 1MI M **> CAM—Drp-h**.d CaarveaUble Pnr.1 V. in a/tod tai.d.tion OMin cKMt Appl) 1.1* A Ca I.IOIIM f-lton* tlU CAR-l CIINfi Ct. —ab-r -,-* year eld. **. .* % %  !" 4In perf'.t order N*ai-*at a*V. ii. |i*fno.. areapi.-d lh..i %  ftM ,, t-r toll t. I ,i mi si -in %  i A T..-tor Uartaaa I i ll ii i. CARfc-,1, Ham O.lerd M U.oao .tl-. HI' I., ill rh.vr-.tet 1*37 ncH vorkm* PMraani -Unfl.nl I anil email t in Parti Phone *JtH Madia* W..iK> 71 ELECTION NOTICES NOTKK i-tm-M M -i Mil M MI nmmv iii> 11 A* app>.h.t*d ih* Paaaa :.-al BaHH %  I Bric*t.>wn a* th* ptare %  Hn> •—I—" - *ae a—'. at %  %  am >ad ath* p-cain *.n* •jiiaainril at* al an. -iii... .. V*.i. aaid P—-MA BM* .a—mbaa a., TAM IU in an •) Jaawn. i** bm th* haura V *d %  %  *, Mam Hl* III -T II *t I. %  I-.I th* V*'"/ I*—.' Th* laUrauif uv> a*reed to etaa* l.ir th* two half-dai-a of tha Annan! AcrvuMuial CahaMtMn. Wadneetla-*tb and Thutadav fth Dmnj* Ml—ii Da C"eta <"a TM ( inc. % %  *] %  Mine. • %  I IM H uin REAL EST ATIGOVERNMENT NOTICE VACANC1 MM* IM i inQM oil it I i:. i m I u ION DgfiRTMINT BHITIHII HOM'l\DHIFMT'IXM HoUl IBM* lar-J. apply I. Michael it IPU ...i %  j l ie >a#j I PaaTT B BT'AT' • *. Paeorhiai Treasurer. \OSWALD rntAIfC Iar-H-ual Tiaaaurar. St. l-ary laaan J~ I Hiiat i Ca Ltd A ca. U PLantattona Lid Robert Thorn Ltd T a.M*n* Klnch I HI •Maliaa A aTnaa ltd %  liaMH Mutual L*l*•• %  >• %  %  M*H* Tl e Wllhlr.wn A Waaj Cn Ltd C *ltol>#r A Ca.. lAd %  trbaM Ftra Inanraawa C MnaH* tawlnf WAll. B Or U*M '•• I T a. Oanawaj/ A C Jaknnn'i *tian.% A C n DT*M HFLr %  %  •I.T' t % %  • %  at' % %  %  iid hr mad. dil.r.K lul I n ii si tM ->arll'Ai %  WOHKMI r I : i.HINO D MlMIXLANimiS llOTT %  "inoH i *I H.M HOKK . Chli Okhl DDK %  %  . %  i rAPKa-Dal %  oui o* uaad ..aa*Ml 1 Walarlav •. M Kaloon. Ivd mil*. Fir.1 claaa ...n.1 Uatl MorrM O.I-d I Hbarna Waar 10 ilaa IJfea %  I A.am A-aa vn ,-uM •ar.HUait riiaac. FWT BOVAl i.APAOK ITP TalaphiM >M I U II di. CHRyiaLXH lv> wilh aulo%  MMM Trantnuaatdn HUMV U.awu BT.II F.dll.onDi-I |l Iff Mil.. IJt. awrlMul • llartada* A|ri i — BLECTEICAL lit JUKE HtlX OwJi.'. iac>Kd< lor ooa ahillina. .nod aotkind order Ri"l at, B.rlwd< -rmaiDAiiir MM IIKFtUOKHATVH One iHrtlroli U HumlBi*atotitcataloi In |>eilr>( BM| Ai.pl> it. T Hdnr Kl, ,Ai<1aii trfD i Hufc-hlnaon A Co LI i ...in. Lid. T Oaddaa Oranl lAd Icila U la*le. J n LaaUa A Ca. LML T. R. Ivana A WMUIaaaa K II F^*.nli l"l .iiaaaUI AraM k, (• !"• Cave Snaphard A Co 1-id %  m rnan, LI Y. Da Unu A Co. LM %  p M .—IMn A Ca. XM Brue< Wflliern*ad l' 1 aTMUn ffJaaan Ca Ltd A Ban*A • Maiimn. A Co.. UaL R. A O. CTaalknor Ltd HanathaM. Laraan Ca. L R M Janaa A Ca.. LM Jam*. A. W" A Ca. LM Barbadoa Hard*""* '"' %  %  [ -" : r R Rita A Co. LM W. A (irdtth A Co Coiea Siallanat. AJkne, ArfAWI I Pravarfta Co l Mwlin Daariv A Co LM Jon.iaon i HIIMI m mii-r i HI %  < N HERJUIV BM thai I W -aaaiald lha NaVeatrv Raoan adjal"II $ lha Vaanry Room. 'Matin, a. ina alaca -he.aU paraaaa dul> a.^UAad la vata %  Tth da> at Januar>. laM ti-w" UM houn ot !• and II oriota m tha %  narni>( to ete.1 . Vaalr PM ina Pa.itu< of Parac'iial Treaaum Chrarl Cnui I II*. .UV Klatlion <•( %  aM) Pai %  Ih dai >f J-inir iduri o* II >nd II a aa lo alari a Vaatry Or trie Pjrin. nl ,t Philip for lha '..r Hi have PARI4H OP BT Ml-IIH I laiBV Clvr iwn.Ihal ,.|ia>o-ilril i : %  .I tha D !—*.> ... the ftlaK -hate all paTM IMWd to aale al anv eaerll •M far tha -aid Parian r. a-aaa.auon Tuaadat the Itn d.•>< JaAUAi*', IfAP ueloarn tha haura ol and II u'rlarh m the naml-ii ta 1er: a Vmiv 'or iha vaar IM1 A T Kl*. PaiaMriMjil ftl a %  I Joaapf. • notKa Ihal I have .pOIUITII Boya' Arhaol i.ear ( "L.rrn. aa lha placa "here Philip ..!> A>ahnad to vato ol Vaatrvman far Iha I Tuaaday PARaapj U T -.MIMW I liraPBY fU e natara Ihal I haaa ippoinlad tha Vaatry Roaa* nan u .m.inuuae aa lha place .l.rr .n aataai i.ilv qualified (a vote it anv elntm l W Ihe UM) Paniri mil •aaenMMa on Tuaaaar. in* 7io da • lanuary. IMt aat.aan lh> huara al !• rnd II o'rlorK In Ih marnii.a; la ekaf I Vaatrv lor lha ParUh of Al Andrea, bar tha year IPU C A. 1KINSBP Parorluai Traaaurar. • B-daa %  LM Id II 11 I In ThfTP is d vacant durai. for an Eduxalic Area al Ltn -artit* t paid do< kta-rwall Road an-h fhrae •eraaMaa. dtata, and Maaai adaaa. u a MMMI a.d I farad— and ilandina; • U caa ba baudbt oa BMAbJ iMAi.i. rtrn\G% Alle Road. land Canvaaiantlr aMuatad near lao importarit bu rouu* Par f.irtlwr parta-ular. and terma of pur^haarapp'T l" ***** C. Cantvll %  Pairb-n* Ipp*. Aelmanl M-.-d *.f MarhaaL I II II-ah. .n frhId Ofnrrr. | II i I.. rtll-H dM .1 PI i i I nraiEffrv ive i.> io Idijjy dmaltnad ta vote at the election of I Verity man for MUa ParMh. Ibat I hav. eppMntad lha Pariah Room Spe.|hi> ttM placa ahare all earl. pr< ona nn> meet on TWadUv. tha Ith Oa 1 IIII Jn IAPIa.ll O* •?. UKOROK HTRFmBTKr fudlre io „!i penana dilT nH4ed io vato al aha atoctaan or V*au>rnan Mr Una Pariah, that I have apapaBMaaJ ih* Si Ceaoipr'a Veatry Paonv ," 'he placr hen all auch prraona mar mem an Tm ida) Ihe Tl" d.' a* lanuarr. MM Mdt* I..! MM. t f St II i I Art I Co I •' Ivraua f AiiitU) I S.I..Hi Co i pa i %  Ferhlnt K Cola A Ca ua J O T .dar A Co tunaon HunU A -on* UJ joh.. II Ta-mr A MM, IV Rarhadaa Paundo Lid liana Ca-aparali*a Callon PAAOMI AP r IAN** 1 HRRVJIV riv. natu-a UMM 1 have iaMdaBMdl trie Vaatry Hoam ndar laa Bh atha pla.oeraana dm* qnaliAad io \ola al Jn' ..arttoa al \>*r. .an fir the -aid Paiir'-. mav aaaeinbla on Tuaadai lha llh da> .1 J.n....i>. LMJ betwaan llw ha-arml IQ and II •• % %  %  Vaa-re for lha I ar IMt P H TARII.ToV Parochial Troa.aur*r. -i I...* I II M Jn UHM %  LM l-ranh B Ibaiada) P W.l-m A Ca aMhlaa/i 1.1.1 irltun Rro-aiia. Ca ptai-ii ui -I JNS I IIT.PiBY r.ve >-•lie. ihal I ,-e ai>uolrl*d the Vealrr Bourn at thr rWUB %  the pbu-e ahara all pe—m, u ... .,1. ,1 an !"• tl— —id Paoati. aaay aiar-ntrla on Tliea-I %  J.huarv IPS! helve,,, HTM hourof 10 and II %  natarb an lha laJMB 1 Veal. far lb Pali-h ol At %  IS,'" FURNITURK IMPOKTAin %  BOOK rom QAS ronwrr I I.I I •.. :.. .. j v//-.-',Vrvv//-/y/*y /.y/ I lO-DAVS MWS FLASH ;!I ... ( OMIC PAPPIS ivn •. VMPIVMi JOHNSONS sIVIIONEKY and IIAKIiW Altl I I •.! Eat date T li e ino*t taiisf^ctoO' inothod of soiling your proparty L* through an 1 firm of Agent*. JOHN M. BL4DON IV Ca. a 1 ii A putatiot. for rwulU l-honr .1.111 flanUlluns \M. TO-DAY THF AN.MAI. BAZAAR will bt lifld at nil MULL 11A tl. Iran* i li 7 p m Pa iron• lArKWrHV tCJ'llOARDa 71' II -..ith Ihia* ad'nalabla ahalv-a. aan al T Odd" fltanl LM. %  an* th* II SI UVKSTOCK ,,,11, 1 11, ...If 30 nta Ua iNE HBliril CAJJ* •"•• •<<•* Ihrr Orarten (l.iernary. *B •* %  •'" Irda, M..1.1—1 Bui 1 not. ii.iiip N piidiiio MECHANICAL TYPWipWrTrKs. A .iiiiilalina >.>>r" BHALMHAW -OMPAJTV " *' 1 Lad> II" [' t u I ., 1 la, mow ....I IMM n HM .. u IBOH M ft *• .Hid m*Mi> ntiK'i ..id olt BiyuLlul ( IIIIISIMAs I MH.IIIIV. TOVS mt I AO %  ; 1 i.mjii. lrl> • %  I>-' CAKrS jt.d SWEETT*. \ A Hill -UKKII) BAK > II .• I'lll.K 1 BAND "ill I" III ill. mljllir J-. Ill aid .f Id.OM I ftaVH II.HIM" 1 .1,11 .11 iir n and ,; llrlp A f.u.vl t'jllal%  rVDMHHON 1/I NUI..S . M -. -<-,->--', -,'-'','.:'.'.; : '. %  % %  •>'•'> MISCKiXANEOUS I IIW eneh The 'Tim oT.I CBBItTMA-l <.l, I-. I-RIML'S HTiiVaW tnil Liuitama. Pf mraph allH.ii,V.HKIHI uitWi Camai .VDlei all \< 1 HADSllArt 1 M|*Alfi vhii* k..l. or rod auart •thnp. VJafu I II SI II I I \tt\N I HA1* DECCA HCCORDB Thir* raco am grab abila in* o*Z-r IIRADSHAW A COMPANV uMtr p*f I M'ATeON-* %  Ilead">a>lai. I^nauail. saroiAiiy Arhaal Tito -il-ry •>! ., poai i-Wcti iv 1-....,..,-1.1. 1mm> XfMUi per ani.an, n-ii by annual t aw 1.sii 1. vim .ao %  u addiiiai. io a farnpuf-arv -oat M licit* allowance U Oar rata ol afO laidwi pat anr—m Appawrtinani nir ba piad* al lha masimum lalary of Urn fiad* 11 nafarT. alaM' icaikofx of lha car.didato rtviquail 1 on IM:.N 1 JOH-atON -.. l-.r-.l-it ..< 1 IIKKKUV dive o*... that I h ..11.led th* Brbool lltniar near %  aft Chiireti % %  ih* p| aoAi du'v dpjahAed lo nda at im!-* ol Veat %  % awn fOi the and I'.rleh ata nib I* on Tuaadalha 1th day Ipnujar IM>>. beta-ran Ih* houn of nd II o clot in the niorninl \n Purlah of Pt I.U.II RATES OF £XCiU\G£ In addition to liw gvnerpl pipnvrtion of pkrBMnUry achooli Ine dutapc will Lncludp advising tractMni on tPMhiRdj anrndi and choo mialion. auiatmi in lhaorgAnuM'**"" of lrU|Hl ifpcht-r tr-uning performing luch other duties Ad the Direetor mpy decide •fMalhr-plklBM. ApplKiintc ahould hpve befi trained al recogntoed training eollegM. *ould DOUCNS a laechar'* diploma or ct-rtifk-lc god should have teaching experience in clementiiry schools: a Univecity degree, Ihouah not esaemiai. wdl he M ,,L iu,i>i ^^ 1O ,, rr ra i ,..*,„ oa. ***>lf with a motor car. a loan to> .,, hk limp ie pjr e for chilled and hud ards the purchase of which will frsssn %  ." %  t>e made on terms and conditions! Cars**.-pion on through Bin-. o! i-dsim.lar to thowh.ch are WpU-|)f " 'wuMwara cable to travelling otTlcers of th. Barbados Government Serv-ci,-.. r iirih.r rfoniruinra apply— A mileage allowance will be paid PURNLSS. WITHY A C* Lid 30.11.51.—3n. NOTICES %  -.ht l>r^ ttandard Government rates. 4. Applications, stating age educational qualifications and exi perience. lugether with COPIKS MI i' u. 11 if ttraUmonlala should be addrvsa|c< to the Director of Agriculture. l>*MNm*l na, and wtt IN. aceepl-4 i M pi *.l up In 12 iiiK.n Ml Tlun December, 1951. a i ir. pr --.ii',' 4n m is I., iMi.oi.—4n. IlaCOATA A Co L BARfttHOS aiari. > •• • %  St KinDale of D be i.otaVd D^erwood will accept I an<> ana !'aaen(er. I.i,., 11 Vn.enOi.-F.ada phd Ai %  BMJ M % % %  parti %  U M notin*d n w i nicx>NFn OWNPRJ; in* T. %  Hf) IT PAYS TO WYERTISI. gHC BOUSES U On* %  Kuriuafd Had\' an. on th* *.*..>ldr l Ro.'bl> h %  JBBBB ...i u..t ,ad|uir*d Pnaoe SI *• 11II -In H LffTU nAMnms' it l^wtanea oznaii-' <"•-. %  rton. I-.I Dar.n.i.i l ..f unuthaj* „ tail Hadroonu Wat.r and •U.rtraAp ply XIIM Baylay. Maiath-.n ** Ltra-rar.ta -,.Dial IM No ddMta M II II-In II ert.i. Ivn t*alln vilt irgs uf ti. BaardiBd e-i-al.hn.enl in roi.Uderalian of walrh ba PUI I..pn1d.^ vllh I", quarter4 Th* ateraa** di.iv atlanilaiuv af |be •venom B :• -.ad Ihe baardui* eatai,. n i..,iod*t* Ml -liatoai. -,. AgpUns W aai •houkt n* addri m d to .. ,A., ii ,i Aiiii-ii-trator'> iMRCa (IRFNADA. _nd ahanld bra**t*ed I,.I 0 m ha 1Mb It-, enatw-r ISSI .tad* W BtACMH-l.AN ABMiBlatrat.it Oran.d Avlll"M-t'l'ir'' OfTlfe t:r*..ad. Bfl I 11 tl Hi -' MQl'OR LICENSE NOTICE •* %  • Tha .ippliraunn af Lnt* PatRiaao.i Wiilaon of Gl*H rjrav -tl Andra*. for MJ aall Apliif. Mjlt Uqa*' Are at a board ."id rt.n>ifl*d hop With S.>ii'ani>e.l ponf ntlarheil In a hot'Op al Cragg Paran. -.1 *i* !" n,t..i ,h,r.n.i d.i> ..I ffo^mbei i*si To J it FliWAKUA. Baa Polart Aladllrale H..II..I I I W PARKIN-ION WATSON Apath rs tii VB --Tha. applieatlan will ba caaaMet'.I .1 %  lirn it l\. irt hi be hold it PolUa-Court Dlalrwi "TP on PVMai in* Ml gffg -I l>*.-*nd"-r. IPS' "I H or!,.j n iriwARfW. %  Mj(i.uie. Dtan f" Ik Land Acquisition Act, LIQUOR LICENSE NOTICE NnTtCTi la ihOKrl Ihal ihe I. h*r*f. rtqaMed by Seeltoa i i hereby liven that II appear: rnor in linutiv, Can.mitle. OfJCra SWIMVINO TRUNKS •% uoarflne oiiaUlv MM t So n Catoui do,, i forrl lo buy l< >lt KlrpaUiu. M Shvan CAI.VAMSIll SIIECTS A Phone 2oM I IIS llANDtORAITta FLASTtC KIT Com ink* PUall* Novaltloa. Joat lha piaaan 1 %  tva paul Boy or Oitl at Xmaa KMfiilTB I'llor.MX PHARMACY 3S 11 91—n HAKDWARg *-TORP I.ADIBB RWIMM1NO gUTM wiih .1.1 vertaitlns quality In niMe. Oold. tirre %  i Red Hi/. It io at only W: I i :i,i-|..n, -.3 B.n iMisat 1 II II— n I'HghAl'HP. I^NTTJSLNS Kero tl an bright Il|ht — I'M randi* p-'i k U iv*lul rtandtjy and .• n.Haally where ,.-!,% %  to uTtobtalnable Dtol * %  ,inlwr,e. B'doa. C'-P. Cotton Pat lory II51 >i ha pariah I.: i,i.i of Bffj ...-itlT.. .... A'e-ihury lit am Dated thi. Wth da> ol Nokemba. Ill if ih* Public BulUllnia In Ihe City of Irldgalo-" in th* laUnd of Ba l bado. Ii roinmand. II N TVRNTJI. Colonial S*cr,tarv m n II— an T... •*.. %  %  orH.rat.an of Clevw Bonnnte par of Hlllabv. si Audi *. rW kin to aall Apirll-. Malt IA> • I board and ahlnlle -hop. Uluiu I Hlllabv. HI And"— i -----. %  i / %  .1 i %  : .. J it KDWARDB. Baq.. pollra Ma|i>trule. DbA I SiKtiod ClP-Vl-t BANNISTTSl AppHt.nl M II Thia applarnllon will ba eon. %  Ida-red al a Uaaaalng Court to be l-W 1 Pollca runt. Dtatrlel P"' on Fiid-tt the Tth day "1 Deternt-er. ItAI. at II rloch. PDWARDS. ..lr-tr. Dial F I II SI I l'M H I III M Ml \OIM I AORICULTDRAL EXHIBITION ON 5TH AND 6TH DECEMBER, 19&V Tli.id, MI ui,. riders of all vehicle-; approaching Queen*-. ..hauri of ll a.m. and ll p.m. shall do so by way of H k .nn ( t.in.ptoi. stfe.t „nlv. jn J lcj\.b] MTB) uf Constitution 01 It Michaels Row AM foll.^vlng -tret ai.d rogsfj shall be ona-way tu all vohicu-fflfr*— i.i i-n.pioii Mreai. (rom Roabuck Street tbi St, Michael s Row froni the comep of Crump-ton Strt et ami Ciinstitution Rood. (o) Constitution Road, from the corner of Crumpton Street iiul St Michaels Row with the exceptions noted m para. 4 l Th, drivers uf motor cars Khali be allowed to park on ConstilNti.m RfjgfJ f.iciiiK .inith. and when leaving, shall do so by wny of l!f I im.Til Road 4 No persons in charge of any vehicle of burthen VILIII !• par* niitted through St Michael's How. Crumpton Street, or ConKUtution Road bclween the hours of 11 a.m. and 11 p m ,-x.-ept u hen raturnina to M-iru.v* exiuluis. These shall only be allowed to pass down Constitution Rood, from Belmont corner in single line ggyj gffjgf Quean's Pork by the Guvei nor's Gate returning the same way, and proceoil in single line by way of Belmont Rood Mint, under Regulation 3 of the Bridgetown and Speight^toAii (Traffic) (Amendment) Regulations 1943 R. T. M1CHELIN. Commissioner of Police. Police Headquarters, Bridgetown. 15th November. 1951. 1.12.51—.In MEW YORK SERVIir NEW ORIGANS SERVICE I -OCEAN NANCr.K" Sallad Tth Nov %  ITXAAfEB SMIa Vial Noven.be, STPvtMtJt Sait* jn, DacaiBbar -i.l IIIPill so CANADIAN SERVltB I *hlp S 5 "ALCOA POINTtMt j <)A PPOASU^ s AttOA riANTTH -A* sTPvonw nun it i I HUM LTD. — NEW YOI M.atraal Balllai mm M "i jshh so*r — ma Dec i siih not -' tlaibada* lith Dec Ll Mth Dae. 'I Ain.V-li\ COfTTA a> CO.. AND GULF ofiRVlCR. LTT*—CANADIAN SKUVICI |A HARRISON LINE P OUTWARD FROM THE t SITED KINODOM Veuet SS. 'LIN-ARIA" SS. •'PLANTER" S.S. "TRADER" .. ,S S. "ASTRONOMF.R S.S •'DALESMAN" From London London Liverpool. Glasgow London Leauei Due Borbado* 9th Nov. 3rd Dec. 24th Nov. "th Dec. 27th Nov. 10th Dc 1st Dec. 12th De> 5th Dec. 19th DPC HOMEWARD TOR THE INiTED KINGDOM Vassal For Cloiei in I'KIISOWI The public ar* herein v. .rn*d aaUU ViiiK rt*dlt to m% -He JPSTINI afAAnrf r. a LOPD> H 1 :->n>ible lot h*l 01 aa • %  <• . ratuod an> 4*1.1 ar dabt >" BO ••"... ,-tea md*r alsnaa b oa JAMPS MASON. TOY CABS)SVdal-dri' .ift for rhildran l-IS raara Only a law MRS Hardware BTT*~ lartor.. -Wllll fss piano aoad Mai', in sood iPBTtoM Sll*rl II... I I IJ il in OIIIIM VI soi VI.MIIS . .: I i • ANTIOITEH. JEWELS. CARVINGS I M iiiiiiiiil r.ll EU-. TIIAJSI-S pp. Wm. Hry. SL :: Dial S4M AKAIMSF. BACH an NOTIC i: TO TIIIMIIEKS OubadlbiakBad iindaff lluU:I4 nn Saturday. Decembn Isl from ;-. p in. roiut a. Thr land Arquhilion Acl. IM iNatler raMlrrd b* Sacllaa TUP acQutailion. far public puraoa*. Df ih* li.tlnwlns parc*la of land con !.""ii.| One i-ood and aav-an pen -ha* .-.or* or toaa -ll'.ate al Ihe fhelrVi of S.,mt Ch.i.uirher in lh^ parlab of Chnat Chureh UI Ih* laland of Barb daac-rlbrd In Ih* Skhaduk* heralo moi* particularly ahaam and drltnr .'nd ralour*d link on a plan of aiirv*v ai|i>*d by Mr C K Nk-hola. Shaorn |nd dalad Ihe IMh da> nl MBV IVM. and flhd In the onV* of lha I ..icuiial Kna>n**r havinf beet, derided OH b. Ihe llt.n-r.kn .llh ih* iptav.il Of h..lh Hi>u-i of the KdUUtur* ol th* l-lnnd of Barbadoa bv raaolutlOn of Ih* II... .•** .if ih I**,.lil,ir*. if M runt" deruied .n pur.iianr* af hartnn I af lha Land Atciuicit ion Ail. IMS, IH^I Ilia *ald land, hav* barn accinlird fi Ih* folloatlnd; p-.ipoara Por intreaWtul acboal buikllna-' and fUrtNMhlnf pU)%  foundf.-i Saint Chrtotophar, OliU" %  Tiur. o'lHin All. TUAT pajajsl .He Mod -ini wvsa %  !. %  i i i l,(i>t..|>h*r %  ,iii. gafcpnl in ih* paiidi of ChrM iiiiii.ii %  i I .... I M II land* of A Olaril i land..f *>l-.,k i ...id.if Ihe old Satin rririattiphn OitlStbool and On the ,i.ibliiHafh*>ay Snd parlari.i.irlr ahown and d*lin*s.t*d on Ihe plan U,*t**f d-H.a lha trii'i da) M Ha) loi. rarun-.i bs i K N | m-eyat %  . %  %  \ -v. .'-, i.|. .it Oi-veanment Man** In i -f nMrh*da>' .MJ-RJ-.n RAVAGE. trow Ann v -rn-ART. -• .11.-7. II SI Mi. %  %  • %  Tha public..r* rarrbv uarrwd aaalnat Sivinf t'edjl lo my lf* t'l^Rlh'TlthTg >t.1li|. .r Kalbnap. aa I do nM hold ata. enntt-ti i MaV daht oi .l-hi. v a written order .ipncd riAlR Pc>aML Ul*b* Land. si G*ar* ill rontern d Ihit the BhiMbouU of tn> *U> HI AMWlfaTMOD.aaOt. -t Ka.f Moan Port. St I-^T. far ihe p-.a> i tha at at liiluaj I II II MM H | The Tranafar Boob* af ihe gdaaf, will be i bH*d from lit* let U.N •' l>-.. bar. IV0I b. the Uih ii... of Daranii 1*41. both dA inclnmv. Dalad t"i. Idtli day of Nmembei 11 B* Older r llu Board ol Due. i..t TIIF. I1AHBA1W1-* CO Olf-rlATIVr COTTOtl I'MTOKV i.TP f M IfAOl Met ret at' Information apply to DA COSTA & CO., LTD.—Agnti IMPEXIU iriTHIR. II1DIN UOSSOH-BUE RataSnW IL1I@MTMEM(S I I HMSII in Chri.tmas Style TTVI.I!W Wardrobe* Vanit*pi and T-bb.. ||4 Bad tojhsa •*Mr i (.'he.ta-of -Drawer-. [. Stool.. Reautv.ie. *ith or with* par SmiiLiiv l_.t.. Side..,II.. NightSepar .ham TABIJM In bis tanir of wooda, •h-i— and .ne. f,„ DinlTf. ..nl tU*t ua*-. Ch.na. K.i. ItT. and Ih-dintitiL Cablnel. -# .„... Ui*n. DPAWIMG BOOM rCRSITCHE in Morn.. Tub. Huah Upriaht, Kaav and Berblt* Chair MOtfaTY HAVaNG PMICPs. | REAL ESTATE | ATTENTION! ;i J ATTENTION! | ** I am still prepared lo **• 5 J you a HOUSE on M>_ O Whv not tome In and lei w ; S go ihrough ray llm toeIher nelhinB to iull U ia jua j. U you are inleresletl come in and ie*. DAI1CY A SCOTT. M;iailne Unf 1.12. SI—3" %  -.• %  -.-.-.•^. %  ^. '. H'ANTri. TO BUY STAMPS STAMPS All Kind. ..I STAMTS al tha CARIBBEAN RTAMr 80CIRTY Na. 10, MM BtaMt 7JS Are now at COLLINS' PERFUMERY I 1 AHBI 11 ** Orchis, April Violals, Bond Slreal. I I S I III KIC -Tweed. Miracle. Repartie ConUlti IIOUIII4. IS I Chantilly. Qualoue Flaurs. IOI.I.I\S llltll. STORES AT YOUR SERVICE THE NEW SHOE STORE No. 3">, Broad Strcel PAY US A VISIT.