Citation
The Barbados advocate

Material Information

Title:
The Barbados advocate
Uniform Title:
Barbados advocate (Bridgetown, Barbados : 1983)
Portion of title:
Sunday advocate
Place of Publication:
Bridgetown Barbados
Bridgetown, Barbados
Publisher:
Advocate Co.
Publication Date:
Frequency:
Daily
regular
Language:
English

Subjects

Subjects / Keywords:
Newspapers -- Bridgetown (Barbados) ( lcsh )
Genre:
newspaper ( sobekcm )
Spatial Coverage:
Barbados -- Bridgetown

Notes

Dates or Sequential Designation:
Apr. 22, 1983-
Numbering Peculiarities:
No issue published for May 3, 1983.
General Note:
On Sunday published as: Sunday advocate.
General Note:
Microfilm produced before 1988 may be substandard.
General Note:
Latest issue consulted: Feb. 28, 2005.

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Source Institution:
University of Florida
Holding Location:
University of Florida
Rights Management:
Copyright Advocate Co.. Permission granted to University of Florida to digitize and display this item for non-profit research and educational purposes. Any reuse of this item in excess of fair use or other copyright exemptions requires permission of the copyright holder.
Resource Identifier:
17931718 ( OCLC )
sn 88063345 ( LCCN )
Classification:
Newspaper ( lcc )

Related Items

Preceded by:
Advocate-news (Bridgetown, Barbados)

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a.





ESTABLISHED 1895





Franco Wants U.K. To
Return Gibraltar

LONDON, Nov. 27,
The British Foreign Office declined any comment or
Generalissimo Franco's proposal in an interview with jh«
Sunday Times of London that Britain ghould re-open ne-
gotiations to return the fortress of Gibraltar to Spain.
To all inquiries on the lengthy interview, the Foreign
Office replied, “No Comment.”
bintidiaipialegriptRialioanesetinaettinariiemen sme

* There has been no
Air War

reaction to the interview so far.
Reliable sources said, however,
Over Korea
Renewed

that Britain has no intention of

discussing the return of the rocky
8TH ARMY H.Q., Korea, Nov. 27.
United States jet fighter pilots

fortress to Spair
shot down four Communist jet

newspaper



value, These quarters said that
wer proved its valué to Britain in
keeping open the lifeline to the
Mediterranean, Africa, the Middle
East, and the Far East.

A Free Port

om AWE 42, Li»
WR ZZ

British quarters unofficially re-
jected Franco’s contention that
Gibraltar was of doubtful military
fighters and lost one of their planes
in a sharp renewal of the air war
over Korea today, but ground

fighting subsided along the 145- One source said, “Gibraltar is
thi ceasefire battle line. An|20ot a port. It isa military base—
Eighth Army communique said and an important one.”

that allied troops re-took two ad-
vance positions on the Central

Front, which had been lost to correspondent Cedric Salter, that
bu le-blowing Chinese attackers Anglo-Spanish relations could
last night. ~pnever be “wholly satisfactory” so)

However, the communique re-
ported nothing but patrol activity
from the rest of the frozen front,
which will become the permanent
ceasefire line if the remaining
armistice terms are settled within
30 days. \

Brilliant Flares

In his interview Franco suggest-
ed that Gibraltar could become a
“free port.”

Franco said in the copyrighted
interview with the Sunday Times

long as Gibraltar remained
bone of contention between them.
The interview was released by the
Spanish Government this morning.
Franco proposed that Britain
should discuss the problem now
before time and_ circumstances
force you to do so.”

Since the Conservatives returned

the}





LORD PORTEOUS (Frank Collymore) tries to finish a game of patience
Lady Kitty (Greta Bancroft) and Clive Champion-Gheney (James Gro
CIRCLE presented by the Bridgetown Players last night.



Saale sohsoe




7
AY



spite of interruptions from
th). A scene from THE

N.A-T.O. Near
|

| Europe's Army






IVE CENTS

CHINESE RE =
START CAMPAIGN TO
CONQUER ALL S.b. ASIA

er After Korean Cease-fire

(By ARTHUR GOUL)
FORMOSA, Nov. 27,
One of Nationalist China’s highest ranking mainland
intelligence analysts claimed that a ceasefire in Korea

Agreement On

would help the Chinese Communists to begin a vast carm-
(By FPF. H. SHACKFORD). paign for the conquest of all Southeast Asia
ROME, Noy, 2/ rhe official, who asked net

North Atlantic powers near

Aingl agreement Tuesday night or
the proposal to speed the forma-

Po Water ) the ‘SinosRe a ‘ ar ‘ » ain

yi { E th doned their desite [op ie cue

“or of a Eurepean army and us 7% que Formosa, the weisht ef
a quest of rmosa,

German Goes own the evidence of their mainiand

them to give it
age forward.”

The European Army idea call
for a continental army of mixed
divisions of French, German, Ital-
ian, Belgian, Dutch and Scandina
vian troops, as the only way the
French will agree to the re-arma-
ment of Germany,

Canada’s Lester B, Pearson
President of the N.A.T.O, Counei)
announced at a Press Conference
after this morning’s meeting, tha
the US Secretary of State

a “big quick pass



movements points directly to their

ying in the side ot Viet-
LAN, Nov 27 | moving ir on | a

The sdieaiake eee sters of |Minh to clear Tonking of Freneh

the Po River is diminishing in; and Viet reaps fon = oe aan

the flooded northeastern zones }!eaving th —* € v f Maint

ufter engineers set off 165 dyna- China to the forces of iet in

mite charges to reduce the flow|‘? begin their own Kremlin

f ter , rs th the main rive directed campaigns against Burma
DY eee ee Rega ind Thailand.

bed set off

sounds of dynamite Build-up of Strength
ypen a 330 metre breach This, of course,

Engineers over



To-day, as the situation show yperations in South China, which
ed definite signs of improvermer jearly reveal the
around Fovigo and other trength and transport
seriously hit over one week ag ung Kwangst,

buildup «of
in Kwan-
Yun Nam

cite

and

Chinese Communists set off a
series of brilliant green, red, and
yellow signal flares during the
night. No attacks followed, how-
ever, and it was believed that the
Reds might be celebrating the
agreement on the tentative truce
line,

Allied observers expect ground
fighting to die down altogether
while the truce teams at Panmun-
jom try to complete their agenda]ant Secretary that Britain hoped
by the December 27th deadline. If |to maintain “correct” and “friend-
they succeed, the opposing armies |jy" relations with Spain, —U,P.
would have to give up any terrain

WAR

to power in Britain, there has been
an attempt to improve Anglo-
Spanish relations, which plunged
to its depths during the six years
of Socialist rule in Britain,

During a call at the British For-
eign Office, earlier this month, the
Spanish Ambassador, Duke Primo
De Rivera was told by Geoffrey
Harrison, the Foreign Office Assist-



they took in the interim, and would
have to return to their present
positions for the ceasefire.

But war will go on unabated in
the air and at sea. Two air battles
flared over Northwest Korea to-
day. In the first, some Soviet
M.1.G.-15 jets pounced on some |
slower U.S, F-80 Shooting Star jet
fighter-bombers in an unsuccessful |
attempt to break up an attack on
Communist railway targets. i

IN KOREAN

Truce Teams |
Meet Snag
PANMUNJOM, Korea, Nov. 27.

The United Nations demanded
the right to go behind Communist
lines as far north as the Manchu-
rian border, during the Armistice, i
to make sure that the Reds do not ; ‘
build a new invasion army.

The chief U.N. delegate, Vice
Admiral C. Turner Joy made this |
demand in presenting a seven-
noint keep-the-peace programme
to the Communists. | awarded the “S Korean

The Communists at once reject- Highest Military Medal.’
ted the proposal and pressed for The Medal of Houses of S.



Edward Cecil Clarke, son
of Mr, and Mrs. E. D. Clarke
of “Spooners”, St. John, was




the adoption of a five-point pro- Korea—by the President of

gramme of their own, Joy said S Mores for outstanding

that it- was “not broad enough.” | '

Both sides agreed to study the | ee it tantind aikton:

question further, j ae arine on.
The impasse’ is temporary |

major rail junctions in N.
Korea, destroying all the ob-
jectives, baffling all the
movements of troops and
equipment across the Man-
churia Border into N. Korea.
For this very heroic deed
where only 4 of the 22 men
mission returned, the United
States Navy Cross was
awarded to all 4 who re-
turned by General O. P-.
Smith of the Ist Marine Di-

though it may dim hopes for an
armistice by Christmas.



—U-P.

Italian Reds Stage

Protest March |
Against N.A.T.O. Talks

ROME, Nov. 27,

Riot squads were called out in! a
Central Rome, to-night, to break | yinien of the field in Korea
up an attempt by some 500 Com- | or outstanding gallantry
munist “partisans of peace” to|| beyond the call of duty of
march on Parliament to their country, the United
the Atlantic Pact Council States of America, |
ing in Rome.—vU.P.

RUSSIA EXTENDS
SLAVE SYSTEM

(By W. A, RYSER)
LONDON, Nov. 27,

Radical organizational changes in the Soviet forced
labour system, as well zs its considerable extension, were
revealed by authoritative sources here. The changes con-
sist in the total reversion of policy concerning the use of
“slave lebour” and the location of the concentration camps
in Soviet Russia.

The sources said that what was the exception yester-
day has become the rule to-day. Until recently, it was
Moscow’s policy to confine permanent concentration camps
to certain remote regions of the country.

Sources said today such camps ~



|
|
On a Commando raid on (3) |
|
{

protest
meet-











are found near almost every Soviet aa
oo centre, including Mos- WAR WOULD MEAN
cow.

In addition to permanent camps,
the Soviet authorities are known
to have used forced labour for cer- |
tain definite largescale projects, |
such as the White Sea Canal, but
to have avoided the use of politi-
cal prisoners for normal industrial

LOSS OF INDEPENDENCE

PHILADELPHIA, Nov. 27.
Indonesia is maintaining an in-
dependent foreign policy because
}another World War would mean
work. Now, such prisoners are | the loss of its dreams for complete
put to work alongside free work- |ii@ePendence, Dr, Ali S. A. S,
ers, often in the same factories. |Troamidjo Indonesian Ambassa-
The sources ?:uoted eyewitnesses, wr 9 the U.S. said Tuesday at a
oric










| price of

Tories Not Likely |
To Abolish Sugar |
Rationing

(From Our Own Correspondent)

LONDON, Noy, 27.

ernment, there is no immediate
likelihood that sugar rationing in

the United Kingdom is being
abolished, The factors against it
can be summed up as follows:

1, Britain cannot obtain suffi-|
cient supplies from Empire sources
to meet demands and with our dol-
lar position as it is to-day, it is
hardly likely that any Govern~
ment would allow indiscriminate
use of dollans that de-controi
would involve.

2. In view of the present high
sugar, the holding of
stocks, by refiners, manufacturers
and wholesale dealers would im-
pose on all of them a consider-
able financial burden.

3. De-rationing would probably

mean an annual increase of
abeut 400,000 tons in U.K.. con-
| sumption, and before’ such

which manufacturers pay one

penny per pound more than the] folk

housewife would have to ws
abolished: There would have to
be one basic price only.

EGYPT issued a warning w all shipping companies

Egypt Clamps
On Unloading Of
$a vies “Goods For U.K. Forces

Down

CAIRO, Nov. 27.

against unloading goods compared to British forces with-

out the authorization of the

ustoms authorities,

The warning was contained in a circular sei all ship-

pers,

stating that they would not be responsible for “the

violation of customs regulations” if any of their ships dis-
charged goods in Britain-controlled ports in the Suez Canal

Zone.

Victims Of Red
Blackmail Refuse
To Pay More Money

SAN FRANCISCO, Nov. 27
Some 40 victims of a Chinese



a}lCommunist extortion racket were
‘measure is taken, the system by]under solemn pledge to send na

more money to ransom, their kins-
threatened with imprison-
ment, torture, and death.

At a meeting held here on Sun-
day night, the rank and file vic-

But say E. D. and F. Man in|tims of the Red blackmail voted |

The circular ad@ed that ships
should be unloaded @mly at such
ports where the Egyptian customs
Were operating, and qnly after the
payment of duties.

Meanwhile, Parliament drafted
a message to King by? un-
ani iy. su rtin overn-
abrogation of the 1}

Key plan the ur
of Egypt and the Su an, and the

ousting of British troops from the
Canal Zone,—U,P,

| ARTIE'’S HEADLINE

}
|

i participation in
the Western defence.

Delegates to the North Atlanti
Treaty Organization conferen
urgently considered the matte
after the United States called upor

which
invaded
Donads

the

the waters broke throug! | ihe official
the new gap the town’ | tical
of Loreto, Rosolin ivive
stiuated in Previ- | against

the poli-
indicate a
than

pointed to
motives which
southward, rather
Formosa alone.

Acheson was heading the move
ment to get action on the Euro
pean Army idea.
hower yesterday

and

General Eisen
Lowlands

vlaced the

1,00
blasting
throug depends 0
which tons of muddy water push | whether the fighting ends in Korea
ed their way into the Lowlan Aside from the purely mil y
pro










ject at the top of his list of im.]°US te dynamiting, army boats He said that Sino-Red involve-
portant and urgent things to be} evacuated the towns’ inhabitants; ment in Indo-China w suld be
done. to safety spots from where they arrying out

Eisenhower was present at to-| moved during the night to Padu Ist One of the cardinal prin-
day’s meeting, and answered ques- | and Treviso.—vU.P, ciples of the Kremlin — to keep
tions on various subjects—-¢s ee the Western Powers,—specifieally
pecially about his feeling otf the United States involved In a
urgency to get the European Army) ’ Y hooting war, in which fio~Rus-
with German padticleniion Teheran Students ians are participating ~in the

The French Foreign Minister x o front line This is more likely
Robert Schuman, gave a progres D>, ®P? lin Indo-China than in Formosa
report on recent work in Paris on Clash With I olice 2nd The chances of suecess in

the European Army idea, He wa





TEHERAN, Noy. 27 iding Viet Minh drive the French
followed by Acheson who told the Fighting pineal pee aeain ti om Tonking are greater “than
pune about on recent 81 tween Persian polic swat wi he Chinese Red attempt ‘te in-
Three Foreign inisters confer~ oie 7 ’ en? ,dle. Formosa
ence with the West German Chan- dent * to-day when th polt 7 3rd The thinty veiled threat
eellor Konrad Adenauer entered Teheran schools to at . .F ann aa

"wp, |rest students suspected of tak include Formosa aa earth
ing part in last night’s clashes, Te discussions would _ indicate
° ° ~ in which 100 people were injur hat the ; hinose rer os
‘Ike Will Seek od The police, 500 trong a aoe Pesan bey we ta ae
brought prison vans to take Ni . 2 i‘ ant i ‘ 1s possi-
° to do politically
a away the suspects
Presidency Students poured out of the Already Manped-out

VBC. lorre nde Says echools = in thousands om . .
B Cor apo dent § ) shouting “Down With Mossa- T h e Nationalist Intelligence
NEW YORK, Nov. 27. degh” and some “Long Live)}ofiicer said that it had ~ been
A National Broadcasting Com- Mogsadegh,”’ but all resisting the}.carned from mainiand sources
pany correspondent reported from /Police. Fighting continued spas~ that the Chinese Reds alreaay
Rome Tuesday night that General |modically during the — morning. have mapped out the Indo-China
Dwight Eisenhower has indicated|The number of injured and or-|campaign—with Russian direetion

he will resign his European Com-|rested to-day was not disclosed, | which calls for fighting alongsiie

mand early next year to “seek Last night troubles which led|the Viet Minh only until Ton-
and accept” Republican Presi-}to the resignation of the Police king is safe in the Communist
dential nomination, Chief, General Mansouri Mozay orbit,

Correspondent Jack Degon said|eni, began when the police clash- The Chinese Red assessment cf

jabove the

their latest circular, “it is felt that
the eventual de-control of sugar
is more likely under a conserviu-
tive Government than under the
late administration.”

E. D. and F. Man add that the
same amount (850.000 tons) cf
dollar sugar as last year may be

imported into the U.K, this year,
| in consequence of the small Com-| threatening

monwealth production.



World Sugar Crop |
1951-52 Will Total |
36,500,000 Tons

WASHINGTON, Novy, 27.

The Office of Foreign Agricul-
tural Relations in its curren: issue
on foreign crops and markets pre-
dicted that the world production
of cane and beet sugar in 1951—52
would total 36,500,000 tons slight- |
ly more than the 36,400,000 tens |
of last season and would be well}
1935—39 average of}
28,900,000 tons.

According to the Agency’s annual |
fall summary, world wool produc- |
tion this year is now estimated at
4,070,000,000, a 60,000,000 gain over
last -year. i

An all time peak of 4,000,000,-
000 pounds of wool was produced
in 1941. The report said that
favourable weather conditions and
rising prices helped to increase
wool production during the lk
your years.—U.P





Italian Membership
On U.N. Discussed

PARIS, Nov. 27.
France, supported by Britain,
the United States and most of the |

Arab and Latin blocs, jormally
proposeti Tuesday that Italy be
given full United Nations mem-
bership.

The resolution recalled that the
U.N, already has elevated Italy to
a seat without vote on the U.N.|
trusteeship Council but that to do
its job properly it should be given
a vote in that body.

—U.P.

U.S. DEPENDS MORE
ON FOREIGN SOURCES
OF RAW MATERIALS

WASHINGTON,



Nov. 27.

to cut off the flow of money to
Peiping Governmert, although it
undoubtedly meant an end of their
hopes to keep their relatives in
China alive,

The meeting was an outgrowth
of the recent publicity given to
the Communist method of acquir-
ing valuable foreign exchange by
lives of mainland
Chinese, who have _ relatives
abroad.

Meanwhile, it was learned that
the Executive Council of the
powerful “Six Companies” which
virtually runs the affairs of San
Francisco's Populous “Chinatown”
has scheduled a meeting soon to
discuss the problem. —U.P,



MONEY OR ELSE!

from Chtnede Communists
to kill their relatives in
China unless they pay: sub-
stantial ransom to agents
in Hong Kong. They thought
that the Communists
discovered their
through
New

One Chinese market gar-
dener said that he had al-
ready paid two demands and

had

where-

remittances
Zealand,

abouts

sent from

Vas now faced
third He wa

end more

with the
unable to
money

UP.



British Claim
The Moon

LONDON, Noy. 27

sritish seientists staked» the
world’s first “elaim” on the moon
and planets today. The British
Interplanetary Society which in-
cludes some of the nation’s lead-
ing cientists issued members’
‘passports” for interspage travel.
he 40-page documents include
spaces for visas to land at all
planets of solar system “an for
any British territories that might
be annexed in the heavens.”

Members who planned passports
very similar to the official British




Oe
T

bluebond documents admitted
the issue was a kind of joke,” but
the Societys leaders to whom

interplanetary oke

said they

travel is no

would useful to



AUCKLAND, Nov. 27. ;
Several Chinese residents
here, have reported threats




j)
|

‘

“1 hate Britain...
| hate

Britain ..

| hate Britain...” |
ee



| _-—- -—

| Japan Will Not Be

Pressed For Forees

WASHINGTON, Novy. 27,

John Foster Dulles, chief arehi-
tect of the Japanese peace treaty
has no intention of pressing the
Japanese for definite rearmament
commitments when he visits Tokyo
next month, according to sources
in position to knew,

However, it is considered her«
that the Japanese soon must begin
to face more realistically the post
treaty necessity for the creation of
adequately armed ground forces
which eventually would be knit in
with American sea and air forces
in the Western Pacific as part of
the bulwark against possible Com-
munist aggression,

Tr the light of this factor it is
not impossible that Dulles may

other Japanese officials to devote
more thought to this
within the immediate

question
future
—U.P.



CZECH VICE-PREMIER
ARRESTED

VIENNA, Nov, 27
Czechoslovakia announced the
arrest of Rudolf, Vice Premier and
former Secretary-General of the
Czech Communist Party in what
appeared to be the prelude to an-
Party

other drastic purge.—U.P.

on a news broadcast heard here
that Eisenhower gave the indica-
tion to military associates at the
Rome meeting of the North At-
lantic Council —(CU.P.)



Guerillas Fight
All Out Battle

SINGAPORE, Nov. 27

Communist Guerillas in Malaya
are now fully committed to bat-
tle deploying all their forces in
order to exist, Lieutenant Gen, Sn
H, Briggs declared today,

The retiring direcior of opera-
tions in Malaya was speaking at
a Press conference with his suc-
cessor General Sir Robert Lock-
hart who takes over command to-
day.

“We have much evidence to
show that Communists are putting
, their all into this battle’, he said.
Life in the jungle is no longer the
easy life it was. Food is scarcer
and they have to split into smaller
groups and work harder to get it.

We have some way to go before
the day comes when Communist
morale is broken, but broken
will be.”’"—U,P.



Iran Will Sell Oil

To Eastern Bloc

TEHERAN, Nov. 27

Deputy Premier Hossein Fate
mi announced that Ira would
start selling oil to the
bloc” soon as the necess
formalities are completed. He told
a Press Conference that Iran
viewed oil sales as an economic
not a political matter, and did not
care about political views of po-
tential customers The Fatemi







said Iran is now “legally free” to
sell oil where she pleased because

had
which

former purchasers
time to make offers
not been forthcoming

He said Premier Mohpmmed
Mossadegh would attend the next
Hague Court meeting “if neces-
sary” to establish the internation-
al body’s incompetence to settle
the oil dispute. —U.P.

ample
had



Disarmament To Be

ed with girls from the Nurbaaksh

High School, who had gone on
strike in sympathy with seven
girls expelled for Communist

activities. —U.2.



The “ADVOCATE”
pays for NEWS
Dial 3113
Day or Night.



«



to my lips’.

“Altogether, we

one can get”.



“a



|














| They're always

} **Not one of my worries, thank
goodness; but I must say Edo
like the way they never stick

seem to
have discovered just about
the best-behaved cigarette

the situation is that once Tonkiag
is under their control, the Viet
Minh, would be able to envelope
the remainder of the country.

Communist attention then wouid
be aimed at Burma and Thailand.
Plans for overall conquest oy
Southeast are being drawn
up by a special ageney in Peiping
culled the Southeast Asia Revolu-
ticnary Committee, The Commit-

Asia

tee members represent Russia, Red
Chine, Indo-China, Burma, Thal-
land, Indonesia and the Philip-
pines

—UP.

so well-mannered!”

“T think I know what you
mean. Never any heat,
never a trace of harshness;
always cool, calm and
collected”.

“And none of those
little bits of loose
tobacco on my lips
to spoil my make-

up”.

ee
o J a

**Not to mention the aristocratic



Discussed With Russia’



|
ge Premier Shigeru Yoshida and







a. ' i : s prove

mainly Soviet soldiers who escaped Affairs Council luncheon.| The United States has become! anyone travelling 7 to space

to the West after being on leave in —U.P. {steadily more dependent upon ‘aa PARIS, Nov, 27 and Russian plans might facilitate |
various, parts of European Russia | | foreign sources of raw material —_— Britain. France and the United the work oi dis rmament nic]
as evidence that many such camps ical analysis of long- . . a a Ww ' armamen







; ; : | A statist
exist near industrial towns on the NO CAUSE FOR WORRY | sate trends issued by the Depart-|
Volga, in the industrial region west | os |ment of Commerce showed even
of the Urals and in the Ukraine. | NEW YORK, Nov. :

1} ;
‘ . yefore the launching of the pres =f
Informants have noticed that Moukhtar A. Zaki, Press Secre-} that!

;ent great defence programme

States are in broad agreement that |
they should meet Soviet delegates |
to thresh out disarmament prob-

ARGENTINA EXPECTS
GOOD FRUIT HARVESTS

The
the United

American
States

spokesman said
would reserve

There'll never be a betier cigareiie





















| lems if the U.N. Political Commit- | the right, if it was thought advis- ij i is
| tow f 4 ne wi » >» ‘ a tini } > sugge sibl e -
great part, perhaps the majority of | ‘a?y of the Egyptian Embassy in| the U.S. had reversed its former! WASHINGTON, Nov. 27 be. wishe d the m to do sq, a United pene. to iggest pos ible chang’ B ' wy a
slave labourers working in the | Washington said in a letter to] position as wall roducer off Argentina has prospects for bet-!* tates spokesman said today |} in the wording of the Resolution | SY oA & 3
Ukrainian towns are young wo-|the Herald Tribune Tuesday. that vee ‘a ee ee y : y comtae e pepects por b Feeling in the Political Com- | calling for such a meeting intro-
men, They are mainl a then > we tig Shae ea gE Oe) ee ee 1an average narve of apples, mittee, he said, seemed general |duced yesterday by Pakistan, Iraq} THE EXCLUSIVE FILTER TIP CIGARETTE sate ie Tieatias
en y are mainly ¢ ved | was no foundation for al-| many categories of raws was to-| pears, plums and table grapes in|that the rojected four-power land Syria. India has c 9 } , MADE IN ENGLAND
in the construction of new fac- | leged Vatican concern aver rd th pli f t ver|the 1961—-82 season according to ap pro} . pur“ DOWN: | * eee, sree oe oe eee OLE DI *! 7 ¢ LTD -
tories hristians in Egypt 1 ¢ [nee eee ee Ob SOT Se ivol—-o2 season according '©/meeting with the General Assem- | posed the for ion of a group to LB DI G53) ele ene ae Lid.
. jcoristians in Egypt because of the{exports or the reduction in the; the U.S. Department of Agricul-'bly President, Dr. Luis Padilla |study disarmament plan Se ee tal Sg te ae reee oA eee ee
ie ipresent ct UP t ; - _ i I
vl : = ee net volume of export U.P —U.F Nervo to try and reconcile Western | —U.P.



a

“>

PAGE TWO
At The Theatre

THE CIRCLE

THE = Circle
Somerset

years late
dom there



was writter

the





per year. In 1946 the figure h:

risen to $31,457 and it ha

alimt Y highe ever nee in
the United States during i
Cleven year period 1936-46 there
were 3,739,000 divorces or 4.9
marriages for every divorce re-
ported,

When Scfherset Maugham wrote

the Circte,-members of Parliament
could lose their seats if they be-



came divbr¢éed. Until quite re-
gentiy a divorced person had
le hope of a knighthood or
honour from the King. To-

t some” of the most distin-
guished people in the United
Kingdora--are divorced. Unless
these facts Are known it is im-

possible to appreciate the Circle.

Somerset Maugham is one of
these aecomplished playwrights
whose ability is known by the

number of plays they have run-

by
Maugham in 1921. Eight

in United King- companied
were only 4,018 divorces A.D.C, Maj. Dennis Vaughan and
d

heen night

Caub Calling |.

muel GOLDWYN’S |

{lOUR VERY OWN & MYSTERY in MEXICO

IS EXCELLENCY
ernor and Lady
by the

the
Savage
Governor's

Gov-

ac-

a small party attended the opening
of Somerse Maughain’s
1 he Cire le,” a Brid retown
Players presentation.

Included in the Governor's party
were Sir Allan and Lady Colly-
more, Mrs. Dorothy Hutson, Sir
Rupert Briercliffe and Mrs. Biggar.

From British Columbia

vi" AND MRS. GEORGE ASH-

WORTH arrived from Puer-
to Rico on Monday. by b.W.1.a.
en route from Canada where their
heme is in British Columbia.
Here for a few month,’ holiday
they are s.aying at “Strathallan”,
Rockley.

Mr. Ashworth has visited Bar-
bados on several occasions but this
is his wife's first visit.

They were accompanied by their

ning in London at the same time, @-ughter Martha.

Only Bernard
plays running
Maugham~at one period.
ean be no question then
Maugham’s technique in

Shaw had
in London

more
than
There
as to
writing

for the theatre. The action of the year writes

Circle moves as effortlessly as the

pencil of any doodler. But the
Circle has nothing to do with
doodlears,

Its name is derived from an-

other source. The wheel has come

Great Grandfather
GEORGE DOORLY who

R.
M visited Barbados earlier thi:
me from Bloomfield !

N. J. to say that he is the first
of the nine sons of Martin Edward
Doorly of Durham and Katherine
Isabella Doorly of Barbados, to be-
come a greet grandfather.

A son “Christopher” was born

full circle, That is what the Circle to his grandson Peter on October

is all about.

divorced women were
as definitely not upper drawer.
the genius of Maugham found

scope in presenting a play of the
moment. But to-day when divorce
has become so cheap, so matter
of fact, so unblushingly something
which rrises no eyebrows, it is
impossible fcr any but an unso-
phisticated audience to find the
Circle anything’ but a period
piece
The fact that in spite of its ab-
sence of topicality the Circle stitl
can interest. the theatre goer, 1s
a tribute to author and players.
A Barbadian. audience, accustomed
it is 6b society where the
non-mar ied» exceed the married,
if statistiesacan be trusted, will
naturally not react ‘to the subject
of diverce in the same way as a
London or New York audience.
Last“ntgnt’s audience was not
however a typical Barbadian
audietite and their reactions were
very aoe in the first Act. Not
even the players seemed to find
the cOnversations in a drawing
room ery exciting and we had
to wait a long time for Greta
Bancr@ft and Frank Collymore
to give us cause for laughter. In
the seeond act Michael Timpson
as thé aggrieved husband gav

the finest individual acting per-@ "DOW.

And in 1921 when 8. Mr. Doorly
regarded April.

will be 75 next

U.C.W.I. Scholarship

AMONG the passengers leaving

for Jamaica las. week was
Mr. C. D. Barrow, formerly a
pupil of Lodge School. Mr. Bar-
row has been awarded an Exhibi-
tion at the University College of
the West Indies on the results of a
competitive examination held
earlier this year. He recently ob-
tained his Higher Cer.ificate in
English, Latin and History and
will be studying for his degree in
these subjects. This Exhibition
which covers all expenses is for a
minimum period of three years. He
hopes, after completing his degree

, course to read for the Diploma in

Education.

Super-Star Show

UBERT CLARKE was awarded

first prize when the Super

Star Talent Show was held at the

Globe Theatre over the week-end.

Clarke sang the classical tune,
“Bless This House.”

Nine contestants took part, This
was a repeat performance of the
On the first occasion the

formance of the evening, with /U4ges did not arrive at a decision.

James=Grossmith as a close run«
ner up. Pauline Dowding’s cold
added-a certain charm to her dif-
ficult part, anc the surliness of
Dereks Fontes as Edward Luton
was eonvincing if monotonous.

The-climax of the play occurs
in theethird Act. By this time all
the players were fully at home in
their Toles and the “theatre” of
the Imst act itself assisted the
players in showing what they
could “do.

The Circle jis another success
for the Bridgetown Players and
the members of the Dramatic
Club who took part, but it can-

not be regarded as one of the
most successful choices of plays.
Period pieces are always difficult

but we are still too near to 1921
to derive the full benefit of the
Circlewas a Comedy of Manners
in the ’twenties.

G.H.
_—__.

BBC, Radio Pragramme

WEDNESDAY, NOVEMBER 28, 1961
11.15 4.0". Programme Parade, 11,30 a.in.
England ve Australia, 12 (noon) The

S1.32M 412.43M

4 p.m, The News. 4.10 5
Servic, 415 p.m







‘m,. The Daily
Rugby League
Football, 4.25 p.m. BBC Midland Light
Orchestfa, 5 p.m. North of Scotland vs
The SdPth Africans, 5,05 p.m. Interlude,
5.15 pan. BBC Symphony Orchestra,
6 p.me-Souvenirs of Music,, 6.45 p.m
Programme Parade, 6.55 p.m. To-day's
6 aig ear 7 pm. The News, 7.10 p.m.
News nalysis,

715-1080 pom. |

si

SL32M 48.45o



_7.15 fim. Co-operatives and the Future
No, 4.Summing Up, 7.45 Pm. Twenty
Questions, 815 p.m. Radio Newsreel,
0.30 P.M. State nt of Account, 8.45 Pm,
Compdger of e Week, 9 p.m. Smail
Fortune, 10 pam. The News, 10.10 p.m,
From ths the Editorials, 10.15 p.m
Mid-wegk Tal 10.30 p.m. John Bull.
. C.B, CROGRAMME
WEDNESDAY, NOVEMBER 28, 1951
10.05—28,20 p.m News

Chronicle.

10.20—T6.35 p.m
11.76 Més 25.60M

Canadian

Second prize went to teenager
Orvil Granderson who sang
“Because.” It was expected that
these two Talent winners will tour
St. Vincent shortly.

First Visit

RS. INEZ JACKSON of New
York City arrived in the
island over the week-end by
3.W.LA. She came from New York
via Jamaica, Puerto Rico and An-
‘tigua.

Mrs, Jackson expects to spend
two weeks in the island, She is
Staying at the residence of Mrs.
D. Riviera, Barbarees Hill, St.
Michael,

She was accompanied by her
aunt, Mrs. Gramie Tull, a Barba-
dian, who hag been living in the
U.S.A., for the past 42 years. Mrs.
Tull told Carib that she is very
much impressed with the changes
made in Barbados,

Rupert and the



pay % |

a,



In their haste the two pals take
a shorter way down the slope and
find it leads right on to the Lion
Rock, ‘*There they are, down
beside the tree. Hi, wait for us.
We're coming,” shouts Rupert.
They scramble and slide the rest
of the descent and are met by two





Capt. BEN FAIRWEATHER

Here For Christmas
EN FAIRWEATHER a Barba-

dian and Old Harrisonian
has just returned from Korean
Combat and is at present in New
York City on leave. He is a Cap-
tain in the Medical Service Corps
of the U.S. Army. His wife Nor-
ma is a_ graduate architect of
Columbia University and Assist-
ant Architect for the City of New
York,

Part of his leave he plans to
spend in Surinam with his wife
and when they leave there about
December 21st their next stop
will be Barbados where they will
spend Christmas. They expect to
be here for a little over two
weeks, .

Friends

R, GEORGE D. CUMMINGS
) of Springfield, Massachu-
setts, arrived on Monday evening
by B.W.LA. from Puerto Rico
for a visit with Mr. and Mrs,
Peter Morgan of St.
Hotel at whose wedding he was
bestman.

Mr, Cummings and Mr. Mor-
fan were together at Hotel
School in Switzerland and sub-
sequently at .the Caribe Hilton,
San Juan, Puerto Rico | where
Mr. Cummings is at present
Purchasing Agent.

He will probably be in Bar-

bados for about two weeks.
For ‘the Winter
N BARBADOS for the winter
are Dr. and Mrs. A. Clifford
Jack of Montreal. They arrived
over the week-end by the Lady
Kodney and are staying at the
Marine Hotel.

Also arriving by the Lady
Rodney and staying at the Mar-
ine are Dr, and Mrs. C, R. Cowar.
of Boston, Dr. Cowan is spend-
ing two weeks’ holiday while his
wile is remaining for the winter.
With Cable And Wireless
M* RUDY KIRTON who had

been in Barbados for three
weeks’ holiday returned to St.
Vineent on Monday by B.G. Air-
ways, He ig at present stationed
at Cable and Wireless’ branch in
that colony.

During his holiday he was stay-
ing with his parents Mr. and Mrs.
Irwin Kirton of “Sandown”, Fon-
tabelle,

Incidental Intelligence
HEN BOAC get the Comets
in service, New Yorkers will

be able to take a swim in Ber-
muda and dry themselves at
home,—Sir Miles Thomas in New
York yesterday.

L.E.S§

Lion



“T've seen that

familar figures.
gentleman somewhere," says Rollo.
‘And, good gracious, the other
one is Sailor Sam from Nu:wood |"
“Hullo, admiral,’ cries Rupert,
“Thank goodness you're here!"
Bur the admiral looks both angry





———é—逗<€_========



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Royal Calypso re

ing library of calypsoes on

gramophone records are by Rae-

fae!

went

to

Steel Percussion Orchestra dur-
ing the Festival of Britain last
summer. His first recording has

just been issued in London, with
Freddy Grant’s Caribbean|
Rhythm accompanying. On oz

side is “Spanish Calypso” and 4
the reverse is “Royal Weddin?|
Calypso,” an amusing fantasy
about what happened to The!

Lion when he was invited to the ---
wedding
and Prince Philip.

) R. PATRICK LEIGH-FERM-

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Sunday Times
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OR, author of “The Trav-
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THE CIRCLE

by Somerset Maugham




A COMEDY IN 3 ACTS
To-night, 28 & 29
EMPIRE THEATRE

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OPENING FRIDAY 30th 2.30 & 8.30

OF SPECIAL INTEREST TO ALL
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Columbia Pictures presents—
‘THE HARLEM GLOBE TROTTERS’®
Starring :

THOMAS GOMEZ — DOROTHY DANDRIDGE and the
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Starring

James STUART
Brian DONLEVY

Starring
Howard DUFF — Ann BLYTH

OLYMPIC
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py ne ance

WEDNESDAY,

IN

LTT




* But, Mr,
think what would happen
Persia 1} my
collapsed for lack of dollars



[Labour Cause

Needs Help

MRS, E. E. BOURNE told the
electorate of Chalky Mount, St.
Andrew, last night that the labour
movement is a cause which’ néeds
assistance and it is for them the
workers to give it that assistance
by going to the polls on Decem-
ber 13 and giving their support to
labour.

Mrs. Bourne was speaking at the
Labour Party’s political. meeting
which was held in support of her
candidature for.a seat in the
House of Assembly as a represen-
tative of the parish at the forth-
coming General Elections.

Although the loud _ speaking
apparatus refused to work, there
was still a big crowd who turned
out and remained to hear the
various speakers.

Among those who addressed the
electorate were Mr. F, L. Walcott,
Mr, James A. Tudor, and Mr.
G. H. Adams.

ARRIVALS BY B.W.LA. ON MONDAY
From GRENADA—Adela Phillip, Doreen
Gittens, Christine Powell, Edward Powell
and Maciej Zwiera

From TRINIDAD—K. T
Geodsman, J. Pena, H
Applewhite, C. Ap
med, M, Baksh, B



Murray R
Applewhite, N
ewhite, G. Moham-
ichards, M. Richards
wis, C. Phillip,

Cc. Ramnath,
dG. Chan Sing















MARTIN [Hubert Prior,
val and J Melir
GUADELOUPE—Philippe Berry

ST. VINCENT—Edwin Joyce
Harold Eames,, Wilbert Walker, Frank
t und Samuel Browne

F PUERTO RICO—Hazcl Bowen,
George Ashworth, Marian Grant Ash-
George Cummings, James Lionel Clarke,

orth, Martha Rapsey Ash



orth, (child)

and Schie Wolf Pillersdorf
DEPARTURES BY B.W.LA. ON
MONDAY
GRENADA—John Lang E





nes Babb, Fernando Degatres,
Moumit Hadeed and Henry Shrawson

For TRINIDAD—Arthur Delima, Arthur
Procope, Peter Batten, Dr. Lionel Stewart
and Mervin Washburn

Por ANTIGUA—Margaret
Eieanor Lee

For ST. VINCENT—Pete Tarrant,
Rudolph Kirton and George Luz

For MARTINIQUE—Marthe Hayot, Karl
Sommer-Jonsen ‘and Guy Leguene.

For PUERTO RICO—Joan Ince, Joseph
erson, Laura Myerson, Clarenie Loene,
Elizabeth Locke, Eugene Dawson and
Rachel, Dawson

Foste and







In Touch With Barbados |

Coastal Station

Cable and Wireles (W.L) Ltd., advise
that they can now ecgmmunicate with
the following ships through their Bar-
bados Coast Station:

s.s. Diane, s Cedar Dale, s.s. Alcoa

Planter,
Valley,

Sweet
British

Water, s.s, Sun
Resolution, 8.8
Jessie Lykes,
s.s. Rosario
Wanda, 8.5







Utilitas, s.s. Bonito, s. Tamaroa, 8 8
Fresno Star Axios, 8.8 Esso
Bethlehem, s.s Orinoco, 8.8 Rio
Tunuyar s Presidente Futra,

Alcoa Runner, Vulcania, 8.8 8

Rosa, s.s. Alcoa Clipper, s.s
Aagtedijk, s.s
Aleoa Polar

s. Halyc

RATES OF EXCHANGE
CANADA
NOVEMBER 27, 1951
65 6/10 pr. Cheques on

Libreville,
Ocean Ranger, 5.5







Bankers 63 G/10% pr.
Demand Drafts 63.46% pr
Sight Drafts 63 3/10% pr
65 6/10% pr. Cable
64 1/10 pr. Currency 62 1/10 pr
Coupons 61 4/10 pr
Silve



NOVEMBER

President, just

Government

s. Tamaroa, s,s. Rodas,

28, 195%

Mn

1

m

Everybody that sat in the
House of Assembly when
$192,000 were voted to send Bar-
badian emigrants to the U.S.A.
knew that the scheme would be
a failure and knew that he was
doing wrong, Mr. L. E. Ward said
at a political meeting held by the
Eleetors’ Association at Pie Corn-
er on Monday night in the sup-
port of the candidatures of Mr.
S. A. Walcott and himself.

Mr. Ward said that the Labour
Party was not giving the people
all the amenities that they were
talking about.

None of the people knew what
percentage they would get next
year, but they knew that rice was
going up and that the price of
meat was going up. Nobody was
coming to them and telling them
that they would get better wages.

The labour people in England
tried a Labour Government and
the result was that England was

bankrupt. The Labowr Govern-
ment in England had the people
starving as the Labour Govern-

ment of Barbados will surely do.

The West Indies were getting ¢
better price for their sugar today
because the British Government
wanted the West Indies to pro-
duce more sugar for their market,
he said. “That and God's rain
was responsible for the labourers
getting back pay; not Ward or the
Labour Party or anybody else.
The Labour Party was dishonest
when they said that they got
back pay for the workers.”

“If you read our manifesto, you
will see that there is not much
difference between ours and the
Labour Party’s,” he sid. “Do
you think that Barbados with its
economy can do what the Labour
Party come and promise to you?
“Barbados is too small; it prim-
arity produces children and then
sugar and its economy can’t ful-
fil these promises.”

Speaking on Emigration, Mr.
Ward said that the Barbados Gov-
ernment voted $192,000 the last
session to send emigrants to
America. Everybody in the
House of Assembly at the time
knew that he was doing wrong
to send thtm to America, Every
body knew. that. it would. be a

Are now at COLLINS’

YARDLEYS -

LEN THERIEIC—Tweed, Miracle, Repartie.

HOUBIGANT



|



THE FINEST
RANGE TO

CHOOSE
FROM....

IN ALL
POPULAR
SIZES

_
IC

COLLINS DRUG

“Age Grouping Rotten”

—Says WARD

failure but had to do it because
the people were promised that
they would be sent out whenever
emigration was possible. America
would prefer to take workers
from Mexico and Jamaica because
these places were nearer to her
and hence the labour cheaper

The Government should have
taken Mr. Crawford's advice and
spent the money on _ building
roads which would give the
people employment for some time.
Added to this, Barbados — unlike
Jamaica — was not properly
represented in America and was
taken advantage of. His party
felt that a permanent representa-
tive should be sent to America.

There was also the Evans pro-
posal to send Barbadians to the
hinterland of British Honduras.
That would bound to fail because
Barbadians would not be satis-
fied to go to British Honduras
and have to. cut down forest and
kill snakes before they could find
living conditions.

Coming to the cost of living, he
was not saying that the Barbados
Government was responsible for
the high cost of living but he
knew that they could do a lot to
cushion it. The Electors’ Associa-
tion would do a lot to cushion
it if they got power. ‘They were
men of business ability

Food and clothing were con-
trotted in England but as soon as
the English exporter was sending
out his goods, there was no con-
trol. His party felt that a dele-
gation should be sent up to the
Secretary of State for the Colonies
and make demands just as Busta-
mante did.

Mr. Ward said that the Welfare
set-up was not fair He, as a
factory owner, was getting £1 per
ton free for his sugar factory
while the labourer was only get-
ting 10/-. He never had to pay
back one cent while the labourers
had to pay back every cent that
they got from the Labour Wel-
fare Fund. His party felt that the
labourers should be given up to
one third of what they borrow.

Mr. Smith recommended in the
House that the Government should
bring in tractors to help the peas-
ants. The Government could not
do it because they were

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afraid

Se re

BARBADOS

re

ADVOCATE

Londnan Exoress Service

that they offended the labourers.
But still the Government were
telling the peasants to pool their
resources together.

@ On Page 5.

.

Riot Damage
LONDON
In the House of Commons on

November 21, Mr, Thomas, Reed
(Labour, Swindon) asked the Se:-

retary of State for the Colonies
what was the value of damage
done in recent riots in Grenada;

and to what extent the cost was
met by the culprits, the property
owners, the Colonial Government
and the British taxpayer, respec-
tively.

Mr. Oliver Lyttelton, the Colo-

nial Secretary, replied: “Damage
incurred during the Grenada
strike is now estimated at about

£65,000. An accurate assessment
is impossible since the principal
claims relate to unharvested crops
alleged to have been stolen. No
part of the cost has been met by
the culprits or the United King-
dom taxpayer. A claim by the local
agricultural association for com-
pensation amounting to £45,036 in
respect of uninsured or inunsura-
ble losses incurred by private
owners is now being considered
by the Grenada Government, The
Grenada Government will also
meet the cost of repairing or re-
placing Government property.”
—B.U.P.

is

}









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Gaol Break

HAVANA, Cuba, Nov. 26,
Cuban Minister of the Interior
Segundo Corti, has resigned fol-
lowing yesterday's prison break
by four gangsters from the Havana
main gaol Gangsters escaped
with the aid of members of thei:
gang dressed as policemen and

armed with machine guns.
—UP.

U.S. EMBASSY COURTER |
WOUNDED IN CAIRO |

CAIRO, Nov. 26
A United States Embassy
spokesman said Monday 25-yeur-

old Frank Boyd, the third Embassy

courier sustained minor injuries
when attacked: by a crowd ol!
Egyptians Sunday while takin

photographs of a_ trolleycar i

Zamelek residential area of Cairo, |

Britisher
—UP.

fe was mistaken for a

BRISBANE

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THE ADVOCATE

STATIONERY







PAGE FOUR

BARBADOS &

=~

Printed by the




Ltd., Broad St.

Wednesday, November 28, 1951

EGYPT

IN days when the peoples of the world
are growing more and more tired of armed
conflict it is very tempting to see in
Britain’s attitude in the @anal Zone a
throw back to the days of jingoism. The
non-British peoples of the world accus-
tomed to the enormous might and power
of an Empire over which no sun sets have
grown either disinterested in Great
Britain’s future as a world power or
actively hostile. They have not yet grown
accustomed to Russian imperialism and,
indoctrinated as so many are with West-

Advocate Co Bridgetown

ern ideas of democracy, they fondly
imagine that a world in which British
“aggressiveness” has been eliminated

peace would triumph.

Those who know Great Britain and other
countries of the British Commonwealth
where the British way of life has been
successfully grafted into other,.continents
know how stupid these impressions are.
They know that Great Britain’s continu-
ance as a Great power is essential to the
peace of the world which we all desire.
But the world is not principally inhabited
by lovers of the British way of life, and
it requires little skill or imagination to
paint a picture of “perfidious Albion” or
of a British lion rampant seeking what
people it can devour.

Added to this picture of an aggressive
nation seekifig political domination and
world influence is the economic argument.

This points to Malayan rubber‘ and tin
as the greatest dollar earner for the ster-
ling area and accuses Great Britain of
exploiting other countries. The propagan-
dists have done their work well. And they
have had a major success in Egypt. The
silent demonstration of marching thous-
ands in Cairo and Alexandria this month
has caused many to reflect that the Egyp-
tians really want the British out of Egypt.
Workers in British camps have gone away
except for a small number from jobs
which were relatively highly paid by
Egyptian standards.

The question of Britain’s presence
Egypt touches Egyptian’ honour. Yet
Britain’s presence in the Canal Zone is
still considered. vital to the defence of the
free world. Must Britain bow to the storm
and try to find an~aiternative military
base ? Which will be the lesser evil, Egyp-
tian repudiation of a valid treaty or the
use of British military force against a
civilian population in a country whose
very independence is safeguarded by the
presence of British troops there ?

Supposing an alternative base were
found, would the United States be pre-
pared to pay a large part of the cost of re-
moval ?

The future of Egypt is not a subject for
comforting speculation. Only those who
have become indoctrinated with the active
virus of anti-British hatred can approve
of the very real difficulties which confront
the United Kingdom in this regard.





UNEMPLOYMENT

THE visit of Sir George Seel’s Labour
Adviser to Jamaica last week is a remind-
er of the West. Indies’ unemployment
problem. That problem in its most acute
form exists in Jamaica.

During the last great war Jamaica made
its own arrangements with the United
States for sending seasonal labour to that
country. This policy was adopted by other
British Caribbean territories and ended
in a certain. jockeying for quotas Which
annoyed the American employers and ex-
acerbated inter-Caribbean jealousies.

In July 1951, a Regional Labour Board
was formed to negotiate seasonal labour
requirements with the United States on a
representative basis, Members of the
Board are dfawn from all> participating
British Caribbean territories, ‘The Board
has its headquarters in Kingston. and a
staff in Washington of betwWéen twenty-
five and thirty people. .The Washington
staff negotiates with employers and pre-
pares contracts for each worker and pro-
vides liaison officers to visit the men at

work. Representatives of the United
States Employers’: ‘Federation will be
present in Kingston during the Board

meeting which opens on Saturday. .

The machinery for providing temporary
outlets for unemployed West Indians is
well oiled, But only Jamaica gets the
benefit of the employers’ contract to pay
passages back to Jamaica or its equivalent.

Islands like Barbados ought to be think-
ing hard in an effort to stop the subsidisa-
tion of privileged workers to the United
States at the expense of local capital
works and of providing employment for
those left behind.

The American employers are quite will-
ing to recruit Jamaicans only and every-
one knows that Jamaican needs are great-
er than ours, but Barbados has needs too,
and a sound “seasonal emigration” policy
is badly needed.


































BARBADOS ADVOCATE



make my



|

HEADLINE today

Parliamentary pastime of Pate-spotting

PROPOSE today to discuss baldness among members of Parlia-

__I know it sounds an irreverent approach to politics, but as you
will understand shortly it has an important bearing on the manage-
ment and welfare of the country, and is therefore a legitimate topic

for discussion.

You see it is largely by the tops of their heads that parliament-

ary reporters in the Press Gallery
below,

| there’d be absolute chaos throughout the country.

;} know who had said what.

I was struck by this aspect of
public life when I went to the
gallery this week to have a look
at the new House, and noticed that
now they’ve changed sides, like
fielders at cricket, the scenery is
entirely different.

Gallery View

EADERS of the Daily Express,
the Evening Standard, the
Newcastle Journal, and the Scots-
man get their reports of Parlia-
ment from men sitting perched in
the gallery to the Speaker's left,
and for six years they have iden-

tified the Tories below by the
shapes of their heads and the
Socialists opposite Ly thew faces.

Now that the parties have

crossed sides, they’ve had to start
all over again. It is the Socialists
they study with a critical barber's-
eye view, and the Tories they look
in the face,

For reporters sitting on the op-
posite side of the gallery it is
naturally vice-versa.

Contrasts

HIS is where the importance

of baldness enters into poli-
tics, because bald heads make for
easy recognition, No reporter
could ever confuse the two pates
of the past and the present Pre-
miers, for instance.

There, on the Government front
bench, the voice of Mr, Churchill
comes from beneath a magnificent
dome, tinged with pink like St.
Paul's Cathedral at sunset. It is
what anthropologists would call a
typical brachycephalic or broad
head,

And opposite, the Leader of the

Opposition speaks from beneath a
perfect dolichocephalic or long-

in | headed pate like a brown egg lying

on its side. ;
Equally distinct is the broad,
bare plain that tops the new lead-

United States Defence Secre-
tary Robert Lovett has arrived
in France to inspect military in-
stallations. What state of pre-
paredness will he find? A British
expert on armoured warfare gives
the answer.

I HAVE just paid a visit to
France in order to see for myself
how the European Army plans
are getting on.

It is no good talking about the
defence of the West: We have to
turn the talk into armed men.
am not forgetting the atom bomb
and the jet airplane. Both have
their function. But neither alters
the need for a Western Army.

I can report that General Eisen-
hower is getting on with the job
of creating the Western Army.
He has succeeded in obtaining the
complete confidence of every one
of the nations concerned—-no
small feat, this: and he is forging
ahead with the task.

NOT YET

There has been a great change
in broad policy. The general plan
after fhe war was to build up a
manpower army which would
hold some form of linear defence
in the event of attack by the
much larger Russian forceg, This
would have had little chance of
success,

More recently counter propo-
sals were made that the Western
nations should build up forces
consisting of infantry and ar-
moure@ divisions in about equal
strength. If the Russians advanc-
ed against us the former would
hold firm bases from which the
latter would launch their attacks
in co-operation with a strong
tactical air force. These proposals
are now accepted.

There is a general hope thai the
Western nations will be able to
build wp 40 or perhaps 50 divis-
ions during the next two years
and thet half of them will be
‘armoured divisions.

~

identify the speakers on the floor

Bernard Wicksteed learns the rules of the

and if they weren’t proficient in their headtop recognition

Nobody would

MARVEL AT THE VARIOUS
HAIRS

TRICKS WITH SO FEW

aS






ww

East we wee






Row

nprecemmuanee tet e

rn
=F
ee 2 -

a The far

vive

Qu. oe oe

er af the House, Mr, Crookshank;

the almost Oriental minaret sur-
mounting Mr, Dalton, and the twin
peaks (fore and aft) of Home

Secretary Sir David Maxwell Fyfe.

The Tories have a clear majority
of bald heads, I made two counts
or polls in the evening. At the
first the Government had 13 bald
heads to six for the Opposition,
and at the second the gap had
closed to 18 for the Tories to 13
for the Socialists,

The Spread

EXT there are the nearly or

thinly disguised bald heads
with which the reporter must keep
up to date, for they are constantly
changing as members try out new
methods of camouflage.

One marvels at the variety of
ways there are of spreading a
dozen hairs over an expanse in-
tended for several thousand, Some
legislators favour the sideways
spread, and others the fore and
aft.

Some boldly concentrate what
hair is left in a_ single defiant
streak, and others devote goodness
knows how much care to impart-
ing a curl in the strands that sur-
vive.

With a European Army of this
kind we shall be able to talk to

Russia from sirength (the most when he is weak and avoid fight-| manufacture the high-quality goods which

certain method of obtaining
peace), To judge from my own
discussions with the

not believe they will ever dare
to advance against us in Europe
once we have a force of the kind
now being created

We have not got it yet; let that

be clear. Britain hag four divis- tanks for the two roles and that| oils and petroleum. Each of these has its own

ions in Germany with the hope
of another division being available
l>ter. The United States is due to
have six divisions in Germany by
the end of 1951. France aims to

have 10 divisions ready by the period of two years before the ments,

end of 1951, The Benelux coun-
tries should provide another five
or six divisions.

This brings the total to about
26 divisions by the end of 1951.

The gap between this and the
40 or 50 divisions which we need
cannot possibly be filled without
a quota from Germany. The
ways in which the German share
of the European Army is to be
built up have not yet been set-
tled in detail. But the necessity
for it has been accepted.

What must we now do go as to
have the European Army ready
in two years’ time?

THE TANKS

First we mugt realise the great quite wrong, A long period passed| the Colonies.—B.U.P.

difference between armoured and

infantry divisions. The former
must be highly mobile. They
must be able to move rapidly

round the enemy forces and re-
main there for a considerable
time. The German Panzer forces
did this consistently in the early
stages of the war and gained
decisive success.

Our armoured divisions must
not be given heavy weapons such

os heavy tanks, which increase
their administrative tail and
therefore reduce their mobility.




“streae

e

IAS

. But whatever the system em-| only for Britain’s rearmament drive, but also

ployed, the watchdogs of the Press,
looking down like gargoyles from

the gallery, know them all, just as | export goods.

they know that Mr. Speaker's wig
has a patch like half a crown on
top, and that the roof of his ornate
chair is covered with lino,

The Press Gallery over-

hangs the Chamber like the| sugar, Sea Island cotton and British Guiana

dress circle in a theatre, so
a member who speaks from
not seen at all by the re-
porters immediately above
him. He has to be identi-
fied by sound. not sight.

me that for years he has
known Commander Williams,
the Tory member for Tor-
quay,*by his voice. but has
never learned what he looks
like.

Now. that the voice has
moved to the other side of
the House and become a face
he is blessed if he can pick
him out.

No Notes

TRICTLY speaking, it is still
forbidden to report the speech-
es made in Parliament, you know.
The ban on publication, dating
back to the struggles between King
and Commons, is still unrepealed.
The penalty is imprisonment
the Tower.
The first reporters had to re-
member not only faces and tops of



heads, they had to memorise the] [

speeches as well, for they weren't
allowed to make notes. Dr, John-
son used to employ “memory men”
to tell him what was said and then

write up his reports of Parliament} resources,

from that.

Publicity

Y the time Dickens became a
parliamentary reporter note-

taking was allowed, but in the] and it must find timber and other materials

Commons he had to write on his
knee, and in the Lords he had to

scribble standing up, huddled with ed. That is one reason why urgent attention
other reporters like sheep in al jc being given to the possibility of using Col-

pen.

Now politics and the Press are| 0nial hardwoods in British houses.

so interwoven that parliamentary
Government as we know it in this
country would not work without
publicity—and the accurate iden-
tification of speakers by their
heads.—L.E.S.



How Strong Is IKE’S ARMY?

Wy Lieut..General SIR GIFFARD MARTEL

The armoured division must use
its mobility to attack the enemy

ing streng:h,

On the other hand, the in-

Russians fantry division is a slower mov-] portant in the export drive to dollar coun-
towards the end of the war I de ing anq harder-hitting formation.) ¢ pj a5

It needs heavy tanks both for de-
fence and attack in position war-
fare.

It
must

is now accep.ed
have heavy and _ cruiser
a dual-purpose tank is nonsense.
It was never anything else.

The Germans worked hard to| Siraightened out by Colonial Office experts,
this}in consultation with the Colonial Govern-

develop the technique for
form of mobile warfare over a

war, and with fully equipped ar-
moured divisions. It is a deep
study and takes considerable

time. Thus they were ready when| Minor measures would produce quick results
t

he war broke out.
The European Army, however,
has not yet begun to study and

prepare the technique which we}next year.

need to-day for this form of war-
fare. I have been pyessing fér

several years that we should do} African groundnuts scheme, will be avoided.

so, but without success,

TACKLE IT!

It is argued that as we would
not have the troops available to
carry out this role for some time

we need not at present concern} predicted that the new Government envis-

ourselves with the technique
which would be needed. This is

before we accepted the necessity
to use this modern type of war.
Let us hope that we will not
repeat this long delay before we
develop the technique for these
operations,

Since the war there has been
a dearth of officers with real ex-
perience in armoured warfare in
the higher posts on the General
Staff and as commanders, This
should be rectified, for it has been
fhe cause of these delays.

(World Copyright Reserved)

—L.E.S.



IBY THE WAY...

PTAHE official reason given for an

engine’s failure to drag its
train up a hill the other day was
“lack of steam.”

Lack of steam! And there is
that man at Babington “with more
steam than I know what to do
with.” He cannot move for steam,
It emanates from him like egg-
shell from a_ grocer’s beard at
twilight. Doctors say he is suffer-
ing. from Schnockenspieler’s dis-
ease of the respiratory glands.
There he is, steaming like one ,of
the new bubble-sSausages stuck to
an Iceland geyser. The whole
house hisses like a net of hooded
scorpions when he scratches his

ear. Steam pours from every
window.
If the firemen weren’t all up

trees coaxing cats, there might be
a devilish deal of hosing ere
nightfall. Boys passing the cloud-
enveloped house make foghorn
| noises, and shout, “Ahoy, there!
jis this Cadiz harbour?” And yet
it is beyond the ingenuity of our

great railways to collect the
and ram it into these
engines,

Local Initiative
RECALL a,steam-famine on
the branch-line from Snatchine

St. Martin to Prinees Burlap (via
Buncombe, Snyothe, Chortlewych
end Bottle Bnd), The Mayor of
Kipperminister made an appeal,
and those living near the line
caught the steam from their tea-
kettles and pushed it through old
bits of piping which they con-
nected up with a large disused
cistern at Buncombe Station. Each
failing engine helps itself from the
cistern,. which is the least one
could expect.

Diary Of The Future

November 15, 1952: A bonus
Jump (4 inch by 1 inch) of Grade
VI coal is to be given, tax-free, to
any householder who returns his
vearly allowance of 1 cwt. of coal
to his coal merchant. The tonnage
thus saved will be exported to

tuff
féeble



By Beachcomber he wanted — British-bred pure Italians,

Java, and the money earned will
enable us to buy some Jepango,
the nourishing root which contains
as much vitamin F per square inch
as three pounds of rump steak.

‘Mid The Traffie’s Roar
SUET, ESQ., spent yesterday
driving round the streets to

observe certain aspects of the|“smoker” to control his bees. A puff of smoke

traffic problem, At the corner of
Mallock-road the following dia-
logue took place between Suet and
an official:—
“Why can’t they send them
round instead of straight on?”
“Round what, Mr. Suet?” ~*
“That's not the point.
come this way, too?”
“Yes, if they are going away
from the opposite direction.” —
“Then, if they went round, those

Do they

going in both directions would| with his queens.

avoid each other.”
“Both directions, Mr. Suet
“IT mean going backward and

forwards, referring to the’ traffic] w

as a whole, not to each vehicle.”
“Oh.”

one of the back benches is} |.

One reporter was telling] been started by the Colonial Office into the

in‘

that we

WEDNESDAY,

NOVEMBER 28, 1951



U.K. WANTS MORE | FOR FINEST

SUGAR, TIMBER, COTTON || CHRISTMAS CARDS

LONDON, eeeeneninane

First practical plan to enable the Colonial)

Empire to play its part in easing Britain’s

economic position has been placed before the

British Cabinet by Mr. Oliver Lyttelton, the
Colonial Secretary.

It envisages increased production of Col-




Call and Select Early from
STATIONERY.

ADVOCATE



COO



ca
onial commodities to add to Britain’s supply
of raw materials. Materials are needed not
for a renewed housing programme and for N oO T i CE

e

Three commodities that are wanted in
greater quantities from the West Indies— From Ist December, 1951 our HARDWARE and
LUMBER DEPARTMENTS will be closed for breakfast

from 11 a.m. to 12 noon except on Saturdays when we

timber—are specifically mentioned in Mr.
yttelton’s plan. Full details of the means to
inerease production, however, have not yet

will be open from 8 a.m. to 12 noon.
Leen worked out, but a full investigation has

Will all custom-

ers please note.

e
possibilities of improving Colonial output.

WILKINSON & HAYNES CO., LTD.,
It is expected that the scope of the sugar
talks now going on in London will be broad-
ened to cover Mr. Lyttelton’s proposals.
Increased sugar production in the West In-
dies, Fiji and Mauritius is largely a matter
of financial and political arrangement and
if Mr. Lyttelton wants to stimulate produc-
tion, he must offer the Colonial producers
the protection they demand of better prices
and guaranteed markets.

— Successors to —

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SS CCSOSO COC OS COO FOCCOO GOSS

| WHEELS anv CASTORS

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Plenty of timber is available in the Colo-




















’
ies, particularly in British Guiana, British CASTORS WITH SOCKETS
lfonduras and the African territories. Mr. Per Set of Four.
yttelton’s advisers are reviewing the labour a pete :. cn ae
id shippin bl th romium ate: f astic.... éo. .
Cr eee te nt ae Furniture Castors 156” Bakelite... $1.60
8 se valuable Ball Bearing 158” Bakelite... $2.10
Nickel Plated 156” Rubber.. $2.86
Britain’s post-war housing shortage has
been caused primarily by lack of raw mate- HEE
rials. The new Government has set itself a w LS Each
housing target of 300,000 new houses a year 7” x 14%” Cushion Tyred Swivel Castor.... $6.62
10” x 2” Roller Bearing Industrial Type
from somewhere if this target is to be reach- Rubber Tyred vo» $10.07
9” x 13%” Hospital Type vee $4.65
14” x 3” Heavy Duty Truck...............000 $10.11

DACOSTA & CO,, LTD.
Dial 4689

‘

Hardwood is more expensive and more
difficult to work than the softwoods to which
British builders are accustomed. The prob-
lcm would involve changes in working prac-
tices if the fullest possible use is to be made
of these potential Colonial supplies.





Most of the Colonial cotton which Britain

hopes to obtain will come from Uganda, but
there is an important contribution to be made

by Sea Island cotton, which is needed to

JACKETS
FABRICS...

Fine Tropical & Linen

STYLES.....

Single & Double Breasted

COLOURS...

Cream & White

And 3-Piece
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lave made Britain’s textile industry so im-

Other commodities wanted from the Col-
onies include copper, manganese, vegetable

production problems, which will have to be

Mr. Lyttelton believes that comparatively

in Colonial production and it is hoped that
practical results will become evident early
Large-scale projects requiring
heavy capital investments, such as the East

Mr. Lyttelton is an expert on securing sup-
plies of raw materials and when his appoint-
ment as Colonial Secretary was announced a
few weeks ago, political observers in London

aged a vast drive for more commodities from



HAPPY BEES DON'T STING

WHEN his doctor ordered an open-air life
36 years ago, Mr. Frederick Claridge, of Cop-
ford, near Colchester, bought two colonies
of bees. Within two years, after being stung
a great many times, he decided to rear
“docile but vigorous and hardy” queen bees.

It took him 15 years to produce the strain

GODDARD'S
FOR THESE





noted for their gentleness.









FISH
Now he has 75 colonies off the main Lon- Salmon..
don road. Every year hundreds of bees are Sole:
sent through the post in small narrow cages Haddock. s
t 1 y ~ Kippers.
0 oes - senna . CHEESE Pilchards.
y y ridge use a veil or Cit, Mea ‘Ciieees | Sardines,
from a cigarette is enough. tase as
sondde ducks, | SPECIALS
“Under certain conditions,” he said to-day, | Cheddar in Tins., Processed Peas,
“you can pick them up in handfuls without a Ca peo. per. Mn.
. . . . Fish P r
being stung. They are really too disciplined, MEATS | Gonnae. Snpysthe” oie ‘tin
and do not look after themselves enough.” cee he | Strawberry Jam
: ’ ‘ : . s 94c. r tin.
Mr. Claridge’s worrying time is when Smoked Hams. Fruit’ Salad—Dried
other swarms trespass and occasionally mate Smoked Bacon. i5e. per Pkg
\ That upsets the strain. “It Smoked: Salami.
is one of the banes of my life,” he said. 1 : Fresh
B hi r Veal Kidneys.
ut his queens cannot escape. Their ,
ings are clipped. Rabbits. Vegetables
—LES. |

—————————_—_—$—$$$—_——$—$$$$————— ————___________ —



WEDNESDAY,

NOVEMBER 28,

1951

For Murder Of
Lorry Driver

EWART OWEN THORNHILL, a bus driver of the Ivy
Land, was yesterday sentenced to be hanged by The Hon.

The Chief Judge, Sir Allan

Collymore, after a jury found

him guilty of murdering 39-year-old Leroy Worrell, a
lorry owner of Bank Hall, on August 6. The jury were
an hour and a half deliberating.

As

the foreman pronounced

the verdict—guilty,

Thornhill’s chest began to heave as he breathed heavily,
and his eyes were red. He was asked whether he had
anything to say, but he did not reply.

Thornhill was represented by
Mr. Lorenzo Williams who told
the jury that the case was one of
criminal negligence and not a‘case
of murder,

Mr. W. W. Reece, K.C., Solicitor
General, prosecuted for the crown.

Hundreds of people were outside
the Courtyard waiting to hear the
verdict and possibly see the police
van take Thorfhill back to prison.
The police, however, took the
Frisoner by way of Baxters Road.

About eight minutes after the
verdict was given, a conductor
who had left the court and
reached the junction of Pinfold
and Roebuck Streets, lay, rolled
in the read and wept, saying,

“Oh! oh! Owen is gone, is gone,

is gon:!”

On the first day of hearing, the
Prosecution called 17 witnesses.
Yesterday Mr. Williams addressed
the jury for 35 minutes, Mr. Reece
for nearly an hour and then the
Chief Justice summed up.

Return Trip

The Prosecution’s case was that
a club of the Girls’ Industrial
Union had an excursion at St
Lucy on August 6. Thornhill was
driving one of the buses which
took the people and Worrell was
driving his’ lorry. When the
vehicles were returning, Worrell
and Thornhill were each speeding
ond trying to overtake each other.
Worrell passed out Thornhill on
the improper side at least cn one
occasion and another time when
one was attempting to pass the
other, the vehicles were brought to
a stand-still as they were raking
each other.

When they eventually reached
town, Worrell started a row with
Thornhill and at one time Thorn-
hill pulled out a penknife and at
ancther had two stones in his
hand, but he never used either.
One witness told the Court he
heard Thornhill tell Worrell, “You
are out for trouble and if you do
not leave me I will do something
to you this same night,”

He left after the row, drove to
the corner at Belmont and Martin-
cale’s roads, turned around the bus
and drove back down Constitution
where the row had been carried
on. The bus swerved when it got
near to the place where Worrell
was standing at the side of the
lorry. It struck the lorry and
Worrell was killed.

Addressing the jury, Mr. Wil-
liams told them that it was agreed
that when the vehicles were re-

turning, the drivers were all
speeding.
He said it was perhaps un-

fortunate that they had had the
type of witnesses they had had,
two civil servants and two teachers
besides others. Their stories were
all much the same.

Changed Gear

“When George Brewster told
you that Thornhill changed gear
just when the bus swerved and
went in the direction of Worrell
and the lorry,” he said, “he was
trying to get the idea im your
r.inds that there was some wicked
intention in the changing of the
gear, but there is nothing to invite
you to believe that there was such
an intention.

“Brewster himself is no driver
and would not know what a
driver would have to do at various
points. You all have seen the
seene and know that there is an
incline just there and it was quite
reasonable for the driver to change
gear.”

He said he was putting up a
defence of criminal negligence.
There was nothing to suggest the
wilful killing of Worrell. The
buses and lorries had gone on an
excursion, not to a Sunday School
party, and it was reasonable to
expect that would be high spirits.

When the people saw Thornhill
swerve when driving back from
Belmont Road they were just
surprised and scampered away.

Only one witness had said
that he heard Thornhill tell





ASSIZE DIARY

Wednesday

No. 23 Rex vs Wilbert
Blackman

No. 34 Rex vs James Wil-
liams
Thursday

No. 24 Rex vs Theophilus
Clarke

No. 33 Rex vs Simeon
Springer

No. 20 Rex vs_ Bertrem
Ward and George
Butts,

Friday
No. 4 Rex vs Elbert Brown
No. 18 Rex vs Oliver Mill-

ington and Bertram
Ward.

__

Worrell that he had been look-
ing for trouble and if he did not
leave him he would have got it
that same night and because of
that the jury would know what
strength to attach to it.

He reminded the jury that it
was for the Prosecution to
prove their case beyond a reas-
onable doubt. If they felt that
Worrell was killed accidentally
or had any doubts as to Thorn-
hill’s intentions, ~ they should
return a verdict of not guilty of
murd

Penknite Opened

Mr. Reece for the Prosecution
said that there was no doubt that
Worrell started the row. Thorn-
hill, he reminded them, had
opened his penknife at one stage
and at another taken two stones
from the bus, though, he did not
Use them.

George Brewster had told them
that he did not know whether
Thornhill had intended taking
those who were in the bus nea
home or in the bus stand..

“But the fact remains,” he said,
“that he had gone to Belmoni
Corner when the turned back.
You have seen the place and you
ean ask yourself if he could not
have turned by going into the
Queen's Park gate if he really
intended to go to the bus stand.”

It was for them to say whether.
in the light of the facts, Thornhill
did not deliberately change his
course and go and strike Worrell.
If they came to that decision,
then their verdict had to be one
of murder as it did not matter
what kind of weapon was used to
do a killing.

It had been suggested, he said,
that there might have been a de-
fect about the bus, and, realising
it, Thornhill had tried to put right
the defect and during that time

could not have been’ exercising
the proper care which was nor-
mally required. But, Mr. Far-

num, the bus inspector, had ex-
amined the bus and had _ told
them that he had found nothing
wrong with it. '
No Sympathy

1
Summing up, The Chief Judge
told the jury that when they came

to deliberate, they would put out }

cc That du rett
throu mut; here is It
teda The Prosecuti
atisfy you f the a. t
accused. If they satisfy
yond a sasonable dou
hall find him guilty
He told them that there coul
be one of three verdicts returned
guilty of murder, guilty of man- he
slaughter, or not guilty of any
offence. ing.
Murder, he said, was the un-
lawful killing of a person with

malice aforethought, expressed or
implied. Malice meant a wicked
intention, and it could either be

expressed or imolied

If

to kill
but had killed someone else,

tne

THORNHILL SENTENCED TO HANG —





Driving Win intent

Thornhill had driven the bus
some particular person
he

weuld be still guilty of murder
of course. assuming he had
driven a bus to kill anyone

A person was guilty of man-
slaughter by negligent drivin

the driving with a wanton disré







FISH are
along the

st

heard one

fish,







yesterday





| Dy.taniite: Fish

being dynamited

James coast. A
resident of ihat area tola the
“Advocate”

that
explosion at

7.45 o'clock yesterday morn-
Explosiens
during the day and there was
another at 1.30.

It was not known who was
doing the actual dynamiting
but a group of about a dozen
young boys were
aing into the surf after each
explosion to collect the stun-
ned

continued

seen run-





Christmas

Food Will

gard of human life and safety,
the wicked intention to kill bein xy
absent, Cost More
The main defence put to the
though it w J als ete to ares po erall picture of the stock
ry eee eee f Ch s food in. the — stores
them on every phase. } 134 .
He talked of the rivalry | Stet OSS UGE AO, MANY, BROWS
tween Thornhill and Wor fry “SOF "there will be an ample: aup-
driving fast when they we eee 1 SUES ah. Sones
turning from the excur 1; the e reulatia aes day. rey
he went on talk of discreperc : Wee eae higher prices
It had been pointed cut, he saia, “22 PY kel Jase ERT,” Be said.
that there shad been discreps) t ; {
but they were of such a eos. a ‘ i in =
nature that he thought them suct i. aati cel se
as could be expected. ; : ike saad
There had been a row bet 5 j } ey eet
Thornhill and Worrell whicl Fn: "
Worrell had started and Thorn Hams ,will be in excess of last
hill had to be restrained when he yes: ip! They will be sold
had a penknife. At another tinte a: py: ; ranging between 5/6
ae ae stones, but he never us 6/- per lb., which will. be
either. ore expensive than. last. year’s
The Prosecution had showed that The ahnie thing applies to dried
Thornhill had driven the bu : d canned fruit. There will be
far as Belmont corner anc nple supplies at higher © prices.
returned .and. could have: turned Unfortunately, -he said, the same

in the Queen’s Park gate if he had

thing cannot be

said about butter.







intended to go..te the bus -starid
Well, he. said,. that was a matte At present, the” island is in
entirely for them, short sipply of butter and. the
Theres was” no dispiiting tyat next shipment of butter from
Worrell met his death .by bein y Australias, that, “i expected to
struck with the ik Ch come d arly next month is
should, however, judge» Thovon- expected to be sold at $1.18 or
hill’s intention from the evidence, $1.15 per tin, A shipment of
He finally reminded them of New Zealand butter in slabs is
the. suggestion that there had .expected around the same time
been excursion feelings and ex- and it will be sold at cheaper
cursion driving. prices
The jury then deliberated for . ;
an hour and a half before they A shipment of cooking butter is
returned their verdict. “"fxpected. soon’ to arrive with a
upply .of table butter, the prices
2. ee of which have already been
” . advanced. The merchant® thought
Police Bureau the rise in the price of butter due
to the Australian Government
The Information Bureau at the having to levy a cess on those
Central Police Station has not *Sipment own to prolong
been receiving as many enquiries Sikes among the dock workers
during the last month as it did ‘here
when it was first opened, The merchant said thet there
The Bureau is opened between has been a definite increase in the
8.00 am. and 4.30 p.m, from Supplies of most of the Christmas
Monday to Friday and from 8.00 $00dS arriving at Barbados within
a.m. to 1.00 p.m. on Saturday the past three or four weeks, and
Most of the questions asked are hams will be coming in good
about the prices of controlled SUPplies around December 9,
articles, queries about traffic regu- : \
lations an& the addresses of “And don’t forget, ue said
officials and the whereabouts of “there will be lots of drink to ada
their offices, to’ the Gonviviality of Christmas.’
The clerk in charge of the And as to West Indian pro-
Information Bureau is Cpl. God- ducts, oranges, grapefruits, mane
dard. He is assisted by Police- derines and spices arrive in
woman Clarke f Barbados by the majority of the
: schooners that call here Within
the last two months, the schooner

Case Dismissed



traffic has increased, Trays in
Bridgetown are taking good shape
for the holidays







of their minds all considerations ;
of sympathy for the accused, for |

the position he was in or sym-

pathy for the deceased or his
family. They would put sym-
pathy out of their minds. along
with anything they might have

heard outside in the clamour and

excitement when people had been#g;

expressing opinions, whetiher {=
favourable to the one party or to
the other.

He said that if in the course of
his remarks to them he expressed
any opinion on the facts, they
would realise that they were their
own judges of the facts and it was
for them to discard any opinions
he expressed if they disagreed
with them, So far as the law was
concerned, they had to take the
law from him.

“Now, in this case,” he said, “it
has been pointed out by counsel
that it is the duty of the Prosecu-
tion to establish the guilt of the

A case brought by the Police The lumber yards are filled
charging Eric Burnett of Chelsea with scores of people making|
Road, St. Michael with larceny as purchase The buyers are for
a bailee of $5 belonging to Charles the most part of the working
Sandiford was yesterday dismiss- class, whose purchases are gen-
ed without prejudice by Mr. G: B. erally a few bundles of shingles,
Griffith, Acting Police Magistrate a few feet of ‘board and some
of District “A”. lathing for repairing their houses

nd putting n in shape, té use
their own words, before the big
ACCIDENT day arrives
i. i » Polis

“Saul” Hewitt of Black Rock. * Furniture Polish setting
3 ; iu 7 Several people jou are getting
St. Michael, was knocked down their supplies’of varnish, turpen-
iby the motor bus, M.335 (owned tell SUPE rp :

any) around Harrison's Corne: sure that when the big rush takes
about 1.05 p.m. yesterday, Thr place for these.things, theirs will
bus ..was driven’ by Gordon not be the uncomfortable experi-
Straughn of Beckles Road, St énee to be among the crowd, As
Michael. one trousewife told an Advocate
i A Policé lotry took Hewitt t reporter yesterday: “When later
the General Hospital some people ‘will be getting
piel Sala crushed to secure their require-
ment of these things, my furniture
FINED 40/- ill 5 have been cleaned

and tened up for the holi- 1}

Mr. G, B, Griffith, Acting Police da) i ; sar- ||

Magistrate of District “A” yester- Another evidence of the eh ie i
day fined Eustace Wilson of ness of Christmas and incidentally
Station Hill, St. Michael 40/- to. the Exhibition, is tte busy tailor
be paid in seven days or in default and dressmaker shops. ie for
one month's imprisonment for workers are already, os eel

using indecent language on Pro- imto the night in order to mM

by the National Motor Bus Gom-

byn Street on November

variou



the de

26.



“TT

tine, polish and_ the

hardware



tores,

like from the

making

RADIAC REX PIN STRIPED SHIRT with fused collar
87.74

CONSULATE SELF COLOUR SHIRTS with trubenised
collar attached. Coat style assorted sleeve lengths.

attached. Sizes 14} to 17 ins,

Sizes 14 to 17. Each .

88.54

ELITE SEA ISLAND COTTON SHIRTS, 100% truben-
ised collar aitached in shades of White, Blud, Grey,

$8.17

RADIAC MARCELLA WHITE DRESS SHIRTS, with

Wit

Cream. Each

two separate collars. Sizes 14 to
h Sofi Collar attached, 14 to 18.

tS.
Hach



$7.5

ach. Sab.cb4a>
1

SILK SCARVES in plain white and white with self
$1.85

BOYS’ STRIPED PYJAMA SUITS, attractive designs
$4.28

Stripes and coleurs, Prices fro

Sizes 26 to 34. Each

m



———





10, 11, 12 & 13 BROAD STREET

CAVE SHEPHERD & CO., LTD |



nds of thejr ‘customers.

ae Cet

BARBADOS ADVOCATE

Queen’s House

Gets Repaired \. ::%

And Painted

Fhe interior of Queen's
t - ss Park has been repaired
and painted. Many other repairs
are also being carried out at

Park and it should look quite
attractive for the Arnual Indus-
trial Exhibition.

The many promenades
the Bandstand area are being

House

around ple don’t want electricity ‘before |

—.

Political Meeting

From page 3

seawell, the Government
of land
1t un Mto. sever
#iving 28 people an acre each Bi

Reads in the parish wanted re-
pairing and a lot of money
lying down in the treasury

i not the Goverr

was
Why
ment come and}

the ‘ke over Colleton and develop a|

using scheme, putting up toilets
and baths’ They were talking of
giving the people electricity which
they would never get. ‘THe peo-|

CONG

they want houses. Many of them

resurfaced and guard walls built €Moy opening their front door and)

up at the sides of each. Guard

walls have also been built around feel quite happy with an oil lamp

the trees which have been trim-
med

The seats have been repainted
and more are now being built

Mr. G
told the Advocate that the walls
surrounding the Park will be
waied in the near future



*rincess Alice Grass
Being Cleared

THREE men with hoes were
clearing away some of the
grass from the Princess Alice
Playing Field yesterday This
work has been going on for many
wee Owing to the recent
heavy rains the grass has grown
considerably

The Caretaker at the Playin;

Field told the Advocate that
mower. He said that inasmuch as
the fteld is so large, the hand
mowers are unable to cope with
he growth of the grass.

|
Dances are kept in the pavilion |
tennis is!

regularly and lawn
pliyed on one court.

Ohristmas Vendors
Invade City

Vendors, carrying boxes con-
taining Christmas Greeting cards
and tags, have invaded the City.
These vendors sell mainly along
Broad Stréet and Swan Street,

Religious pictures
Moore Almanacs are
sold by some of

end
also being
these vendors

Both the almanacs and pictures
were on the road for many
months now,
4 ‘ ee
The cards are selling from six

cents to 12 cents and in some cases

Ola

Morris, Superintendent, that age grouping is all right but]

long had not got a better price for their |

eration and the B.W.U. The Labour |
he
is awaiting the arrival of a motor| the werkers 19 per cent but they |

|

|
|



higher One vendor told the
Advocate: “It is hard work walk-
ing around in the sun trying to
sell our cards and yet we make
only a very small profit, Many
people prefer to purchase their
eatds direct from the stores
otherwise we would make a good
profit.’ He however felt that it
is a good way to occupy the idle
~~





2



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Prices Start at $18.00
wonderful quality & values
At Your JEWELLERS
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A 4-Wheel Drive Tractor
A Delivery Wagon

letting the moonlight come in and

The system of age grouping wa



rotten. The children are coming}
cut of school not knowing any
thing. The teachers are saying}

they want more teachers and more}
schools. The Government is say-| ff}
ing that they can’t afford to spend |@!
more money on employing, teach-
ers. Mr. Wilkinson, the Leader
of his party, said that he felt that

19 per cent was not given the peo-|§}
ple by the Labour Party. It was/ |
an agreement and not law. If they |

canes, the labourers would never
have got the back ‘pay It
fortunate that the island had a

bumper crop

The agreemeni was reacned be- |

een the Sugar Producers’ Fed- |

t
Party were saying that they gave
were not telling them that they
ere taking away $3.80 from every
n of canes grown

ee

tc



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SLIPS

in Satin, Jersey, Crepe

Colours :
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HALE SLIPS

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A Mobile Power Plant

Engine
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more than 50 B.H.P?. 25-27
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ey
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non-corrodible ”

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Mr. S, A. Walcott said that the | @)

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Colours: Pink, Peach, Helio
Blue, White and Black,

Nylon From $2.43 to $9.87

HARRISON'S



PAGE FIVE





OLEUM.



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ee ee

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eee eee A





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PAGE SIX

CLASSIFIED ADS.







PUBLIC SALES ° WANTED





























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T z neements of FOR SALE ALL THAT certain stone-wall dweling- | wanted, preferably with recommendation. By K. ¢. TF R 3 Lowell Putnam is to contract ne-| IS THE SAFE, EFFECTIVE WAY TO
he ¢harge for announcements _ of 8&2 house 30 ft by 22 ft comprising open | Broadway Dress Shop. 25.11.51—Sn. | i PARIS, Nov. 27. — gotiations opening today between | v
Marriages, __D = Lalicry, dtawing, dining and thre béd-| ——-—-—-————<————<—<————« | Official sources disclosed Tues- the steel industry and 1,000 000 | ;
e a aes rooms with kitchen and usual outoffices| COLONY CLUB, St. James. have a/day behind-scenes moves for a CIO k Putra |
$1 os and § AUTOMOTIVE ind small shop all standing on two roods| vacancy for an Assistant Manager or | conciliation in the West’ flic 1.0. steel workers. ‘utrpam j
‘or nDeE os words of land at Ellerton, Saint George abutting | Manageress; applications should be made) 1 mp “ S conflict succeeds to the post of stabilizing
ae per word on we a" =| - 7 on the public road. There is a guurd| in writing, in the first plase, giving unl | with Bypt over Mid-East defence wages, salaries and prices on De-
ae 2 Soe Se ee | Ate So . Oe or il to the front, and an enclosed yard. j particulars and experienge. plans on Egypt's dispute with Brit- cember 1 in piace of Eric A. John- ,
ee Butcher, McHnearney & Water service is connected. , 7.11.51—n. | ain over treaties and the Suez son who resigned last week to re
+ 2 ace cE mt For further particulars an SPC) ——$—_— | is —
For Bi Marriage (ot ee - apply on premises to RICHARD HENRY | “BISHOP'S HIGH S€ROOL, TOBAGO CRE turn to the Presidency of the Mo-
’ in Carib allind ts CAR—1961_ Morris Oxfo Mileage 25.11.51—2n | CO-EDUCATIONAL The chief initiative reportedly tion Picture Association —U.P o 2
sha for any number o 4 Condition as new. For inapectic PE ata leame from Pakistan’s Foreign : : :
and 6 cents per word for each] ..\; Raiph Beard, Lower Bay Street ee : _| Applications are invited for the posts > :
nl word. foemanh. aoc otreet: | “By instructions received from the Har-| | ATRiG tant femches empable of Minister Sir Zafrullah Khan who

en 8.30 and 4 p.m., 3213 for Death bour & Shipping Master

Netices only after 4 p.m

rr —one , Am . ott at the Baggage Ware-
AR—One (1) A-40 Car public Auction a

A-l condi-



c * sday the 2th day of Standard.
EE | tion New Battery and Tyres Price reac Thursd »’clock (a) Geography.
DIED $1,600. For information Dial 2143 November, pegirinlng oS aie ouins (b) Mathematics.
- 25.11.51.—3n.} VPS’ Yundred pounds of scrap metal, | Salary—$2,160—$2,800 (Degree Applicants) |
November, 1951, | > —————— 2, New | Brass and Copper, 53 used tyres, (1) $1,440—$1,680 Cipher Certificate |
gyereaee CAR—One Singer, 9 good tyres. New| crane and one Mill roller (app. 3 to 4 with Distinction).
funeral} Battery. Going cheap. Suitable for making



one speed hand
Several pieces

tons dismantled), (1)
operator vertical winch
of rubber mattings. Several empty 6 gal

Pick-up. Apply G. E. Martin, Brighton

r Singer Co

Maasiah Street
ck this evening

1951.
25.11.51—-34 Apply te ps































































Cer Friends are |] ——_—_—_— re aati t ace Mr. KENNETH REID, ‘week and later with Britain’s
CAR-—Drop-head Convertible Ford V-8] ONTlg, Si cons. of Nncering wire, (3) | Concordia, Tobago. | Minister of State for Foreign
Toppin (widow), Thomas,! in good condition. Going cheap. Apply: thr six volt Batteries, 65 sq ft. pan- %4.11.51—én | Affairs Mr. Selwyn Lloyd.
George and MacDonaia} Cole & Co., Limited. Phone 4516 elling. (24) row locks. (13) tife belt, ADAIrS, : y oyd.
28.11.51—1n , 23.11.51-—t.£.0.] 3) fre extinguishers, (2) life boat sea| SIGN PAINTER —Apply Colonial adver. —USF. T DMIRAL
——— _—_-— ————-———=—- | a.chors and three Oildrums, (2) rud- | tising Co., Shepherd Street, between HE A MI oe
= CHRYSLER (WINDSOR) 1947 Model! #ucbo™ ' “lam. Bring samples of work.
THANKS with New Tyres. Fluid drive with auto epeene: Wits PRES Oe ee itil e 27,11.51=2n JAP TREATY REVISION PASTURE,
k ES. Ww ky thank our frie nas natic Transmission Mileage 33,000 and cae B ook-case with glass front, (1) Pro- SUGGESTED IN U.K.
S—We sincerely K i . tion—Dial Courtesy Bung ) —. i ili
Satie wee. quae Menlo S eT Wee’ st oh aoe pelle, (1) life host sooupass abinnacte, MISCELLANEOUS LONDON, Nov. 27. Six Roads, St. Philip
aths Z a eat exch ere ae . —————$$—$—$___———————_ =r Y *
pathy by sending cards, wre aths, ————— nn | | veral oth ic 00 tee to mentien. British newspapers were divided
or ed the funeral of our beloved ELECTRICAL several other item: a ee Af BOTTIES—Clean ony SP ae at Tuesday over the C ps debate TO-NIGHT
a 5 vu R s : ‘'48e. per dozen—deliver Colonnade Stores, aS ommo
ister if ache |
The Gilkes family 28.11.51—1n ee a Govt, Auctioneer. | White Park Road. 11,11.51—t.f.n. | on the Japanese treaty and several Wedn y Nov. 28th IRON BEDSTEADS WITH SPRINGS
sn ta————__~Ee! REFRIGERATOR: One (Electrolux) 51— " t ednesda F
r " Of Burning Refrigerator in pertect | __eeemencees | WANTED to purchase an unused suggested that th he treaty should be and SPRING FILLED MATTRESSES
IN MEMORIAM ' : ’ ‘o\revised where it applies to Japan- at 7 p.m.
* order. Apply to T. Sydney Kinch, ‘TORNADO—International K.41. Beauti-| Electric Service. Apply B,D. C/o pps pe : f th recently received, do not wait until the last moment
‘1 ‘ die” osu; Seite Cmte New Building, R wd a7). | ful condition, excellent equipment, good | Advocate. 27.11.51—3n | ese overseas trade.—U.P. in support of the BUY NOW
. Fei 7 o por ‘ ° racing record. Cost $700.00 now $500.00. ee j
2 a See ee be No ‘offers. Hicks, ‘Telephone, $100, ON PAROLE ee ;
SS So yes eee FURNITURE vn ter | ANNOUNCEMENTS CENTRAL







Boy your poor mother is still leaning D



















iit TABLE—One modern mahogany Dining ‘ aot wena Sth vee a nicinimvsainaiitaasitieasieatinsnediiimmminmindet |

He has promised Table. AS new. Phone 3050. |) ae oe. ) Ltd. Further particu! $5 in goods and with your cash bill

A ev leave nor forsake m 27.11.51—2n | lars, apply Wm. Fogarty eitat. tia you get a guess-coupon: how many

t I Graonum (mother), Mrs. bs Spee . screws in a jar? You can win an

PW w (U.S.A.), Mrs. Peg MISCELLANEUVUUS EKCO radio, It certainly pays to shop

Wilson, Be ters 28.11, 51-—-In . at A. BARNES & Co., Ltd
———_ mn | ARERIGAN PLASTIC DOLLS—Fair AUCTION 23.11.51—t.f.n.
Dur ” SWAT? Size Only @4c. each. Modern Dress

GOVERNMENT NOTICE | s:200e 211.813
GU bh \ \ N ib Shoppe. a meth — ‘ESDAY 28th at 12 noom BAY)



FOK RENT

cET opposite Beckwith St. Mahogany
Tub Chairs, Arm Chairs, Mahogany Wash |
Stand Marble Top, Iron bedsteads, painted

AMERICAN BRASSLERES—Endorsed by
Good Housekeeping — Pink and white,







‘ A and B cups, sizes 32—38 $1.50 per pr
Appomtment of = Warden,| iicdern Dress ‘Shoppe Pall Si —3n Dressing tables, Mrdicine cabinet, Press, HOUSES
7 > Home General __.._. | Hat Rack with Mirror, Hocker, ware,| _ a
Nurses ’ ANE QUES Of every description | ives, spoons, wash stands, Ladies Desk| “ReResPORD—Maxwell Road, Christ
Hospital class, China, old Jewels, fine Silver 9 hg ar peel Cams R-) church. From Ist December Apply next
Watercolours. Early books, Maps, Auto- " iY eerer door to Lashley. 28.11, 5i—4n

j oe
TIONS are invited for 25,.11.51—3n

ionabie appointment ol
Nurses’ rlome, General

graphs ete., at Gorringes Antique Shop
sdjoining Royal Yacht Club..
3.10.51—t.f.n

PPLICA



“UNDER THE SILVER
HAMMER




BLANKETS: Good quality Assd. shades







BARBADOS ADVOCATE

teaching Subjects up te Higher Certificate | discreetly offered his good offices
;when the U.N. General Asse-ably
eonvened here earlier this month.

ported to have had a series of
|meetings wi

Closing Date: Saturday, 28nd December, /Nyries Said Pasha shortly before
| the latter's return to Baghdad last



WEDNESDAY, NOVEMBER 28, 1951








Science Reveals

'
|











PAKISTAN OFFERS ’s Bi ' Seen ae.
AKISTANOFFERS = Putnam's Big Task | |. NOW! Dental
WASHINGTON, Nov. 27. |



‘with

Colgate Dental Cream

Zafrullah Khan is reliably re-

Iraq’s Premier



MEETING







EMPORIUM

Corner Broad and Tudor Streets

W. A. CRAWFORD
and
J. C. MOTTLEY

as Representatives for
the parish in the General
Assembly.

BONN, Nov. 27.
Major General Kurt Meyer serv-
ing 2 life term in connection with
the World War II slaying of Cana-
dian troops recently was granted
parole from a war crimes prison
on “urgent compassionate grounds”
according to British authorities.
U.P.



White shoes, to pass muster
in company, must be spot-
less, immaculate. Use











Propert’s White Renovato
or Propert’s Shuwhite. No
surer way of making sure


















i 1 ata salar) 2: sin
ee ’ me roe hd x oe rvs nd sizes $3.25 and /4.26 at THANIS, On Thursday 29th by order of Mrs. P. C
ammual increments , a ee conn x Brench we will sell her Furniture at
Wm. Hry .St. 27.11.51—t.f.n | Brenen = w
2 per annum, plus a temporary Zs i aid e “Good Hope”, Gibbs, St, Peter, : “ Nags
Cost of L : Allowance at Gov-] BARBADOS VIEW SCARVES 100 ; h includes
ramet es. In addition, quar-] 2ure suk with lovely views of Barbados Upright and Arm Chairs, Tables, Couch, w & e REGS
eroment rat a t » Que An ideal Gift to give or own. THANI'S | Sideboard all in Mahogany, Glass Ware,
ters in the. Home and board art} nia: 3466 27.11,.51—t.f.1 |] Dinner and Tea Services; Barrel Shade,
provided .* eee | Iron Sufe-on-Stand; Old China Plates;
n } . > 1e CHILDREN'S HANDBAGS—Useful for | Double Tron Bedsteads and Beds; Cedar
Applicants should not be ovei EN Sa BAGS Usitul tor) Devee, Cedar, Deak, Rockers, 'Mahog.
40 years of age, should be unmar-fon6 for your child and the other as a| Dressing Table and Chest of Drawers; wv
ried or..witiows without eneum: | gift for your friend. “Special jarge | Deal Tables, Kitehen Utensils, Books.
brances, should have attained i pcre aeinite vile Ce ey Two for pants and othes items, Sale 11.30 o'clock.
00. Mo PSs . ; SH.
satisfactory standard of education | * en Dress snopes 11.51—an. | BRANKER, TROTMAN & CO.







and have had experience of the
prepatation and service of meals

———$—$<$S—_—

EGYPTIAN LEATHER ARTICLES:

Just opened a large assortment of Gents

Auctioneers

25.11.51—2n











1 8 knowledge of domesti¢e du- fancy wallets and Ladies’ pure leather or a ay Et
ties on a large seale. purses: Ide for Gifts at THAN? BROS.] — — ~
The duties will include the] Dial 3466, 27,.11.51—t.in | p '
ain a » iscipli j hel —_—_—————————————— rf
maintenanee of discipline in the) Sey amaw Mats for powon||| OMEN TAL
{Uurses om * lovely designs $1.8 each THANI'S Pr ’
Applications should be forward-| Wm. Hry, St. Dial 3466 SOUVEN IRS |
‘ a iad . nt ge 26.11.51.—t.f.n
ed to the S« cretary, General 0 nu Sewn 4 CURIOS ANTIQUES, |
ital, not leter than 8rd December, “inpiaN SANDALS—Another shipment EWELS, CARVINGS |
i951, and should be on the form] just arrived. (Last one soid out immedi- EMBROIDERIES, Etc. |
of rable from the Secretary’s| #tely) come and secure yours a
Office, General Hospital THANFS. Dial 3466 27.11.51—t.f.1







J

!
|





































iii ctabene ° INE
28.11.51—2n. YTALIAN BORDERED SPUN—Anti- THANI Ss HARRISON L
Crease in thirty-four lovely designs Pr. Wm. Hry. St. :: Dial 3466
‘| Reduced from $1.86 to $1.73 yard up to cere ee
8 ® ext Saturday only. Better buy now at] )——————————— =
4 BY i Vv Kirpalani 52 Swan Street OUTWARD FROM THE UNITED KINGDOM
a k 28 11.51—In SOSCSPOSOSOOSSPOPP OPES,
re
® ° LADIES' HATS-—-New Ladies’ hats g % Due
ust opened. The latest creations Nylon] ®& NO IcE om is
a @$ ores ou traws and regular braids $5.41 — $8.50 T % Vessel Fr Leaves Barbado:
. ‘ Modern Dress Shoppe 28,11.51—3n » S.S. “LINARTIA” London 9th Nov. 3rd Dec
© 4 hemes eine eH “ a <“ . * ° “~
i 2 RUBBER TOYS—Largs Size Inflated}R po. constructi 7 % Theres a «: |S.S. “PLANTER” ‘ .. London 24th Nov. 7th Dec.
if} ours: Toys — Elephants, giraffes, rabbits, tigers ‘or construction of Roads ¥ SlISCO Paint for every S.S, TRADER” a we Liverpool. 27th Nov. 10th Dec.
’ ; and many others — Bde, nck. Monee and Yards; supply of Block % ose S.S. “ASTRONOMER Glasgow Ist Dec. 12th Dec.
sufferers from lone of vigour, nervous. | ?'°* Pe a stone, Rubble st Sand x ij + + |S.S. “DALESMAN” London 5th Dec. 19th Dec.
s, wealf’ body, Impure blood, falling H PIN wir , e stone, ,Sand, & ae ta
horny, and who are old and worn-out | SHOPPING BAGS & S& CASES-~ and Machine broken flint % SISSONS BROTHERS
see thetweaime will be delighted to learn | Cheapest prices at THANI'S Dial 2466. 0 % S COMPANY, LTD HOMEWARD FO =
now gland discovery by an American 27.11.51—t.f.n stone, Dial 2656 ) | meee LONG ON meet R THE UNITED KINGDOM
DHoetory — a2 woe v a bv T
Chis new discovery makes it possible to SHIRTS—For Sport, Holiday, work or] ¢ a ae ne Se eae . eniae Vessel For Closes ‘in
nd easily restore vigour to your | ocherwise. For the widest variety try] @ KEITH RAYSIDE, 9 | Co. Barbados Co-Operative Cotton Barbados
hea eur maint arcttobmcey and TRARY Aree ° teal Soe 27.11,51—t.f x Manager % Factory, N. B. Howell, G. W ee i = ———
like anew man in only 8 days, In fact, . “tin Lodge Stone Works. son & Co. Ltd., T. J. Sealy, Central] ™- .~
discovery which Is @ home medicine in reel = —— 12 X Foundry Ltd., Watkins & Co. Ltd., For further Information apply lo. . .
ant, easy-to-take tablet form, does SOAP—Famous Turtle Oil Soap, Supert 4606 6 CCCOSSSCE989960S00" and the B'des Hardware Co., Ltd.
with gland operations and begins to; 7uelity. Boxed for gift-giving at 40 and ce ao DA COSTA & co LTD A:
build pew Vigour and energy in 24 hours, | $3.00, exclusively at the Turtle Shop in —_ = ai
t it is absolutely harmless and natural in| the Marine Hotel 28.11.51—1n. |" * 5 gents

action

The suceess of this amazing discovery,
siied Vi- Tabs has been so great In Amer-
. that it is now being distributed by all
here under a guarantee of-com-
plete faction or money back. In other
vords, Vi- Tabs must make you feel full of
ir and energy and from 10 to 20 years
younger, or you merely return the empty
package and get your money back. A spe-
cial, Gouble-strength bottle of 48 Vi-Tabs



Phone 4267 for

UNITEX INSULATING WALLBOARD SHEETS
%” thick, 4’, x 8’, 9’, 10’, 12”

9 .

PERSONAL
“The public are hereby warned against
@iving credit to amy one in my name

without a written order signed by me
having left thé island on the Mth of

















November, 1951

ere costs little and the GOULBOURNE ASHLEY ALLEYNE, . 28

VieTabs ee Ebenezer, St. Philip WALLBOARD MOULDING (for covering joints)
4 27,11.51—2n

fiesteres Manhood and Vitality

The public are hereby warned against
civing credit to my wife, OLGA YEAR-
WOOD inee WYDICA) as I do not hold
myself responsible for her or anyone
else contracting amy debt or debts in my
name unless by a written order signed by
me.

STANDARD HARDBOARD SHEETS
4” thick, 4’ x 6’, 8’, 10’



TSR SS

SEA VIEW QUEST
HOUSE

HASTINGS BARBADOS

Under new management.

Daily and longterm rates
quoted on request

TEMPERED HARDBOARD SHEETS
4” thick, 4’ x 6’, 10’
NATHANIEL YEARWOOD,
King Street,
St, Michael.
27.11,51-—-2n

PLYWOOD SHEETS
%” thick, 4 x 8



I am not responsible for any debt or
debts contracted by anyone except by a
written order signed by me.

TURNALL ASBESTOS WOOD SHEETS



Permanent guests AUSTIN §S, HOLDER, 3/16” thick 4 x 8’
welcome, 27.11.51—2n
Dinner and Cocktail

ALL THESE BUILDING BOARDS ARE TREATED TO
RESIST THE ATTACK: OF WOOD ANTS AND OTHER
TERMITES.

parties arranged,

1, H, BUCKLAND,
Proprietor.

POLITICAL
MEETING

IN SUPPORT OF

MOTTLEY

FOR THE CITY



“Phone 4267.

WILKINSON & HAYNES C0.. LTD.





















CHRISTMAS IS NEAR AT HAND

See that you get your supply of :
Raisins, Currants, Prunes, Citron, Essence
Baking Powder, Icing Sugar,

Killed in 7 Minutes

Your skin has nearly 50 million tiny
seams and pores where germs hide
and cause terrible Itching, Cracking,
Eczema, Peeling, Burning, Acne,
Ringworm, Psoriasis, Blackheads,
Pimples, Foot Itch and other blem-
ishes. Ordinary treatments give only
temporary relief because they do not
kill the germ cause. e new discov-
ery, Nixoderm, kills the germs in 7

ne

We can supply you with —

5-lb. Tins Table Butter
Come Early and do not be disappointed.

°
JOHN D. TAYLOR & SONS LTD.

minutes and is guaranteed to give you





CAT—Female cat, fluffy tabby answer-
ing to the name of “Snookie”. Finder
cial 8295 Mrs. V. C. Gale

27.11.51—3n
——— Sas a













AT a soft, clear, attractive, smooth skin
. 15 one weak. 6 Money Dace on eager :
NELS + y ' Nixederm thon your chomist todayand Roebuck Street rer Dial 4335
I ee
NELSON STREET }) Nixoderm Feal cause
°o 8 n
For Skin Troubles trouble.
on
|__|] SANTA says—
WANTED TO BUY
f .
Thursday Night STAMPS STAMPS |! DELIGHT
,
All Kinds of STAMPS
Tay. oar at the THE
NOV. 29TH 8 O'CLOCK CARIBBEAN STAMP |
SOCIETY f !
‘ No. 10, Swan Street.
Syeakits:— 0. 10, Swan Street Ht CHITDREN
{
Messrs. VINCENT sear oT
orirrirn {i we offer — —
‘ Sait | JIG-SAW PUZZLES FOR
C. B. LAYNE, JUST THE THING CHILDREN AND GROWN-UPS
E. D. MOTTLEY ce See toe NURSERY RHYMES
“The Junior General" ‘ - ‘
SYDNEY | A compact little table Model Gas CUT-OUT re
WALCOTT it Cooker with 2 Boiling Burners and DOLLY BOOKS
| aa Anmiiated sen
Miss A. MANNING | yn bake a Chicken or a cake with H P HARRIS & co
and others Ak yea Go ean Plantations New Building — Lower Broad Street
Bay St. DIAL 4045





_—













GUIANA Sailings to
M8. STENTOR—€th December, 1951. ENGLAND & FRANCE
nl ah. s — January, 1952. ”

SAILING TO TRINIDAD, PARAMARIBO “GASCOGNE” — November
BL ace ca ore & B.C. 3rd, 1951, via St. Lucia, Mar-

8 C iCA—17th December, 1951. ini . n
SAILING TO TRINIDAD & CURACAO ante Guadeloupe . 606 e
M.S. HAARLEM—22nd December, 1951. gua.

that white shoes are white!

PROPERT’S

SHUWHITE & WHITE RENOVATOR

an



in Cartons with Sponge








SHIPPING NOTICES






























Canadian National Steamships

SOUTHBOUND



& Co. Ltd.




















Salls Sails Sails Arrives Sails OFFICE 4493 WORKSHOP 4203

“LADY RODNEY” wre ice Ma Nov ie Nov Bars Nov Seen

fe I as sg 0 ‘ov 0. ov v. - :

“CAN CONSTRUCTOR” 23 Novy 25 Nov 5 Dec 5 Dec PARTS DEPT. 4673

LAD NELSON - - do Nw 9 Dec 10 Dec

—_____—. ptenieiosel?” & thaneimiaaaas

NORTHBOUND S NIGHT 4125
soit nee ane Arrives wt Arrives
7 os n Halit .

“LADY RODNEY” 6 Dee 8 Dec 17, Dec ee ie mee

i 1952 1952

LADY NELSON” 22 Dec 24 Dec 3 Jan 4 Jan



GARDINER AUSTIN & CO., LTD.—Agents.

— =

ROYAL NETHERLANDS
STEAMSHIP CO.

SAILING FROM EUROPE

8.8. COTTICA—30th November, 1951.
M.S. HAARLEM—Sth November, 1951.
M.S. POSEIDON—20th December, 1951.

SAILING TO PLYMOUTH and

AMSTERDAM

M.S. ORANJESTAD—4th December, 1951.
SAILING TO PARAMARIBO & BRITISH

: FOR SALE
| HAGGATTS

|
|
|
|





——————



SSS,

FRENCH LINE
Cie Gle Transatlantique




























S. P. MUSSON, SON & CO., LTD. “COLOMBIE” 24th Novem-

Offers will be considered for the purchase of the
ber, 1951, via Martinique and

above group, consisting of Haggatts Factory and the






ee Vera Guadaloupe. following estates ;—
ance eee will a 33532882
a c a s ngers
Dominica, Antigua, pronteetant, SOUTHBOUND Arable Total
Nevis and St. Kitts, Sailing 30th coe we Moxersher, Acres Acres
The 2 “ ie a 1951, calling at Trinidad, La H o ¢ ‘ 713
The M.V. “Monek il t , aggatts & Bruce Vale approx. 305 7
Cargo und. Passthgers for Guaira, Curacao, Cartagena, }}) Greeninnd & Overhill saevor 324 644
Hovis’ snd “ae mister sieee ot eee Bawden & River approx 266 521
Soha ie onload, sys | Friendship approx, ..........4: Pr ae 211
BSEO Bed, Pees | 3a. N Accepting Passengers, Cargo
Arabs. “Date of "dwarine to he and Mail. | Haggatts Factory has been extensively modernised
ao" e : . - a
B.W.I. SCHOONER OWNERS : ONES 3 and is equipped to produce fancy molasses as well as
. R. M. J & Co D.C. sugar. During the 1951 crop, the factory produced
4,352 tons of sugar. The bags required for the 1952 crop
5O90066SS6 have been secured.
|
|

The mechanical equipment of the group includes
| among other items the following International Har-
vester tractors :—

REAL ESTATE)

Property & Land
: FOR SALE

t



1—TD14 Crawler Tractor with bulldozer.

1—WD9, 1—Farmall H.

Also 1—Caterpillar D2 2—Subsoiler
ploughs,

1—disc plough, 1—brushbreaker plough.

8 Dodge Trucks, 1 Austin Truck, 11 cane carts for
Tractors.

Livestock includes 14 horses, 12 mules.





tractor,



|
| Further details and conditions of sale may be
obtained from, i £y. he oR eis
|! S. P. MUSSON, SON & CO., LTD.,

Broad Street,

JOHN MM. BLADON & Co.

AF.S., F.V.A.
Auctioneers & Building Surveyors
> Plantations Building.

Real Estate Agents,
‘Phone 4640



3ridgetown



=









WV
WH
~

SS
RMVMAAAUVW

WOW
RABypy
WN
CVOOOAV’IM*4s
RA OQMBWiOW

WEDNESDAY, NOVEMBER 28, 1954 BARBADOS ADVOCATE PAGE SEVEN
BY CARL ANDERSON , LE EY |
Ee —) (Rew ig youn moraER | | 2 a ee sii or Me | ; Poole Pottery
f | } Ce es = y — A inti sal << ubet et : f : “a a , y , e Aa A new shipment

> =a = Book Ends, Flying Ducks,
= Blue Birds, Sea Gulls,
— } | Vases, etc.
Ai

Every normal skin needs










at your Jewellers

Y. De LUMA









non-greasy cream wiil hold your powder matt for hours, and protect
your complexion from sun and wind.

way to conquer them, Rub

$<. TS MY TOCK-TOCK?] [ISN’ TLL SAY! IT CAN MOVE if
Kucitimie once iT TELLS TIME? US FORWARD OR | cc ©
OF YOUR DAFFY ——~ UNUSA ( BACKWARD HUNDREDS ' l HESE ( REA MS & CO., LTD.
INVENTIONS, UNCLE a pn . |
WOMBAT ? 5 —/ f WRIST WATCHE) / Broad Street
3 mit Ay } F P | o 294808888 ge oe ,
! 40% Oi oe CIAMAAIIA TT IIA ANAL As SESS RIO TOA DTPOPOCOPOT
it XK Lovely Society women all over the >
‘R j cas FOLLOW THE BEAUTY y
405 world follow this simple, inexpen- CARE OF SOCIETY'S = $ ARE
sive beauty care; one that is LOVELIEST WOMEN P 4 > $
EVERYWHERE 2 % YOU :
within the reach of everyone of = % %
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PAGE EIGHT



WALCOTT POSE THRE

CATCH IN IT

John Goddard, captain of the
West Indies side in Australia, is
not afraid to express opinions
about “incidents” during play. No
other captain, English, Australian
er South African, has dared to
court trouble in this manner

His latest criticism has been of
an Australian umpire in disallow-
ing a catch made by Goddard, who
threw the bail up in exuberance
and then failed to retain it.

Only the umpire can decide
whether a catch has been com-
pleted before the ball goes up
Here at home I have often won-
dered, after seeing catch and
throw-up as a simultaneous act
what woukl happen if the ball
were droped on descent. Fieids-
men had better not take this risk

~—Sportsman’s Diary.
—L.ES.

MATCH ABANDONED

From HAROLD DALE.
SYDNEY, Nov. 27.
The match between Victoria and
the West Indies here was aljan-
doned after rain today, schedulec
to have been the last day of play.
The West Indies had made 230

runs in their first innings to
which Victoria had replied with
195.

On ‘the third day of play the

West Indies made a rain-interruss-
ed 181 for 2 wickets.

Griffith Discusses
Education

The present educational system
and the food problem were the
main items explained by Mr. Vin-
cent Griffith when the Barbados
flectors’ Association kept a politi-
eal meeting at Layne’s Road,
3rittons Hilt last night in support
of his candidature for the parish
of §t. Michael. A crowd of
approximately 1,000 attended the
meeting.

Mr. Griffith



said that he was
very proud to see that the day
had come when he could offer
himself to be of service to the
people, He was very proud to see
that in the island of Barbados he
had lived such a life that it was
impossible for any man to lift a
finger or say,a thing against his
character. “Any man who can do
that—that finger is a lying finger
and that tongue is a lying torgue.”
Mr: J. W. Hewitt, who is offer-
ing himself as a candidate for St.
Thomas, was the Chairman, Other
speakers were Mr. E, D. Mottley,
Mr. John Maynard and Miss Reid.
Mr. Seibert Leacock introduced
the Chairman, .

NEW U.S. ECONOMIC

ADVISER
KEY WEST FLA., Nov. 26
Truman Monday elected Roger
Putnam, member of an old new





NEW SOUTH WALES batsman Jack Morone

on the pads,
19.11.51.)





As I Saw It—By Peter Ditton
Chelsea The Unpredictables

Fine Victory Over Manchester United

LONDON, Nov.

The butt of music-hall comedians for more years than
they care to remember, Chelsea are again proving them-

selves the unpredictables of

English soccer. Graced dur-

ing their existence with numerous famous players includ-

) ing Tommy Lawton, Hughie Gallache rs
England family and onetime Walker, Chelsea have ne ar! rise t ae i a
Democratic candidate for Gov- 2 ¥ ave never risen to the heights.
ernor of Massachusetts, as new The Cup and the Lea rd

1 achus , nev } f League on Saturday (November 10th).
a ne neee Adminis- Championship have always es- They were. playing Manchester
ator.—U.P, caped them. Each year they United at Stamford Bridge and,
penne So much only to leave really, no one could have given

i ‘ at promise un-fulfilled, and them much chance of emerging
WHAT S ON TODAY their supporters bewitched, both- successful {from the encounter

Court of Grand Sessions
10.00 a.m.
Police Courts 10.00 a.m.

Film Show—British Council,

Wakefield, for Barbados
Technologists’ Association
only 1.30 p.m.

ered and bewildered.

Last year Chelsea experienced
their worst fright for some time.
Only a near- miracle, so it
seemed, could save them from
relegation to the Second Division.
And that near miracle occurred

Olympic Club rehearsal at On the last Saturday of the
British Council 4,30 p.m. season, ro»

Police Band plays at St. Mar- Sheffield Wednesday were al-
garet’s School Pasture, ready doomed and so, it ap-
St. Philip 4.30 p.m. peared, were Chelsea, But the

Mobile Cinema film show ‘Pensioners’—as Chelsea are af-
Gellacs wave St. fectionately known—beat Bolton

John, 7.30 p.m,

Labour Political meeting, St.
Elizabeth Village, St.
Joseph in support of Mr.
G. H, Adams and Mr, L.
Smith, 8.00 p.m.

Labour Party Political meet-
ing at Spooner’s Hill, St.
Michael in support of Mr.
M. E. Cox and Mr. T. O.
Bryan 8.00 p.m.

Sunrise: 5.59 a.m.
Sunset: 5.36 p.m.
Moon: New.
Lighting: 6.00 p.m.

High Tide; 2.58 am, 2,46
p.m.

Low Tide; 8.53 a.m., 9.45
p.m,

See a

YESTERDAY’S
WEATHER REPORT
(From Codrington)

by four goals to nil and Sheffield
drubbed Everton to the tune of
5—1. High-speed after-the-match
calculations In the Chelsea board-
room revealed the fact that rele-
gation had been saved by .03 of
a goal.

At the commencement of the
present season Chelsea were in
further trouble, International in-
side-forward Bentley joined the
I-want-a-transfer brigade, as did
centrehalf Harris. On top of that
players such as Billington and
Hughes quit the club for South-
ern League football and Inter-
national outside-right Parsons
showed no sign of recovery from
the knee injury which had put
him out of the game at the close
of the previous season.

It was not surprising therefore
oe re off under a
cloud. ey a surprisingly
fo0d away win at Blackpool in
their first game but then came
a run of five successive defeats—
three of them at home. With the
return of Bentley and Harris the

Rainfall: Nil. “rot” was temporarily halted.
Total Rainfall for month (o But until the game at Stoke a
date: 6.49 Ins. fortnight ago Chelsea had not

Highest Temperature; 84.5 °F
Lowest Temperature: 71.5 °F
Wind Velocity: 7 miles per

gathered a point in three matches,
Stokes, on the othe; hand were
on the crest of the wave. They

nati had ven a matches in succes-
Pa sion. ut what happened when
es sen nem: they met Chelsea. Yes, chat’s















1 BEING A MEALTIME PAPER
OKRA LOOKED FORWARD

UNE SOWING up
‘SO SHED HAVE :
SOMEONE TO

TALC, WITH:



Wet
A CHIP
THEY
BETWEEN ’EM Now:

WURRA , WURRA/-

af
‘te

a

ON ACCOUNT OF HER HUSBAND'S

right. Chelsea beat them.
The “Pensioners” did it again



PERUSER,
TO :

JUNIOR IS GROWING’UP-
OFF THE OLD POTATO...
SPLIT THE PAPER



Manchester were at full-strength
with a powerful forward line
reading from left to right. Row-
ley, Downie, Aston, Pearson and
Berry, sia

As though resigned to their
chances Chelsea commenced in
mediocre fashion. Inside 17 min-
utes Manchester were two up
and it might easily have been
four. There was little or no evi-
dence of what lay in store for the
48,000 fans who had braved the
cold wind and drizzle rain to see
the match.

Inside a minute, following the
second Manchester goal, Chelsea
had reduced the arrears through }
new-boy D’arcy, signed from |
Charlton a couple of weeks pre- |
viously. That wag the first sign |
that the match still held some
hope for Chelsea and when ten
minutes before half-time Bentley
found the back of the net with

a truly great shot from 25 yards}

the issue was as open as it had
ever been,

But whereas Manchester had}
Seized the initiative and had not
been able to capitalise on it, now
it was Chelsea who found them-
selves getting on top. Nor did
they allow the opportunity to
slip from their grasp. Dickson
and Armstrong the two wing-|
halves obtained control of the
centre-field and as their opposite

nambers Cockburn and_= Gibson
were forced more and more)
on the defensive, so the tide of}

battle turned. |

Not even the cool head of}
Johnny Carey, the Manchester}
skipper and right-back could
halt the onsurge of the men in|
blue and for the first time in
many matches signs of panic be-
gan to show in the Manchester)
defence,



T

me F

y looks uncertain as a ball from Alfred Valentine raps him
But the umpire disallowed keeper Guillen’s appeal for L.B.W. (West Indies vy. N.S.W.

-Consolidated Press Photo.

the end, the turnabout was com-
plete. Chelsea, the unpredictables
had done it again.

The heroes of the afternoon?
All the Chelsea team, And on the
Manchester side I would count
butside-left Rowley who has now
collected 18 goals this season
and full-back Carey, still one of
the game’s great players.

CHELSEA: Robertson, Bath-
gate, Tickridge, Armstrong, Har-
vis, Dickson, Gary, D'arcy, Smith
(R), Bentley, Campbell.

MANCHESTER UNITED: Al-
len Carey, Redman, Gibson, Chil-

BARBADOS ADV< CL



ATE WEDNESDAY. NOVEMBER 28, 1951



IN 2ND TEST

Australian Prestige |
In For Buffeting |
|








F — the name FAMOUS for Pickles
for generations

Branston Pickle
Mixed Pickles
Gherkins
Picca

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White Onions
Cocktail Onions
Chow Chow
Walnuts

World-famous ay food products

Local Agents:
T. Geddes Grant Ltd., Bridgetown

(From FRANK MARGAN)

SYDNEY, Nov. 28,
Following their great Test trial against Victoria in the
match ended on Tuesday, West Indies tourists seem quit |
capable of giving Australia’s cricket prestige the greatesi
buffeting it received in the last decade.



West Indians are in great heart}











for the Second Test commenc ino! Second Test, to all appearances i ri
on Friday a Sydney cricke.| Will be drawing a sellout crowc
ground Tf ose as the of 40,000, the. capacity of the | POLLO EAP SO OSS SPE EPPA SS LAPP PIPE AAS PP PPPFOAP TG es
Australians at the beginning! famous Sydney cricket ground. !Â¥
knew, their success depends on a x |
good start being given by the It was on this ground where |
opening bafsmen. the great Bradman scored his |
hundredth century versus Nor-j} 2
The dashing form shown by|man Yardley’s English tourists. |
the “old. firm” Rae and Stoli- —UP. |
meyer in the Victorian game |

shows the tourists are now capa-
ble of starting the side off well

The improved form of giant
wicket-keeper batsman Clyde
Walcott shows him to be a po-
tential threat in the Test.”Better
things are to be expected of
suave flashy Frank Worrell who
has been off the line in all his
appearances to date. Apparent,

he has not yet lost his Lancashire
League outlook where the aim is
to score off every ball if possibk
and make every shot a_ sixer.
Worrell came straight from the
Lancashire League to take up
the Australian tour.

Worrell is now learning that
the Australian attack in cricket
outlook is vastly different fron
the Lancashire League and he
is making appropriate changes
in his approach. So keen were |
the West Indians to gain all]
available bowling practice in the,
Victorian game that they batted
in semi-darkness on Monday. |
The game was abandoned on)
Tuesday due to a spell of notori-:
ous Melbourne weather. '

“Bradman of Barbados” Ever-
ton Weekes who stayed at Syd-/

ney in an attempt to recover)
from a thigh muscle injury had
his first practice on’ Tuesday |
since the accident a_ fortnight
ago. |

Captain Goddard said: “We are
anxious to see how Weekes
stands up to hard practice but it
is far too early to decide his fit-
mess for the Test.”

Weekes batted against God-
dard, Gomez and Atkinson who
also stayed at Sydney for a rest.





ton, Cockburn, Berry, Péarson, Interest in the West Indies
Aston, Downie. Rowley, tour continues to grow. For the





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Full Text

PAGE 1

'' %  i \ h h\\ M.VI MB] I 2*. IMa n\l;l!\IK)S ADVOCATI: r vr.i -i vi s' HENRY BY CARL ANDERSON MICKvY MOUSE BY WALT DISNEY *NOT*e ONE L O* >CHjR DAP*> s r— %  — %  —, i —r **&, I I— SAvr .T CAN M^HE DO CoCwAfiD OK _,, OF ^AM: ^ X v*v -o set T vvoc,r ) ~r BLONDIE BY CHIC YOUNG :-3 0^.v ft) i'£ AC-." ESSPO^SiB 1 ;. OP MAM -. ; ri UAGWOOD.' C~i" ^> A .' 1Mb" LONE RANGER %  i, MrF7^r**r£>fcLMM BY FRANK STRIKER U BE EJLOV.N g LETS &CT *rTC 0 T-OSC CKOS JOHNNY HAZARD BY FRANK ROBBINS > "CViAffP | xcw, i NT . WSOF C-tSl5 SENDOE AT THAT TIMC u I KIRBY IS THAT NO-CUT AP£WiVOE WiPES-AND T EN POUND A IX KUI HAMMER TK PPCCEi^ POP A (SMOCK 1 A-H6N I ME TRIES TO PLAV THAT PIANO. CH -J03S-2VB 06ODSD UP PiVJO IWOF. CHP* SENOOE VAV BJ** '. "E U_ (*W Uff EO0 38 i BY ALEX RAYMOND LS"S*< >CU O-APS.. %  rOfAVTWf M *3oT c* >* OU>'AffTA...-E'S SvC-*5" --.ES 'it pPOPUNP.,.Tl PSA-VAN *-0 T• OiN9 *0WA*M"0=5 ****-TONE 0*0U*... %  VBN M ^b\ _/*-, •UNO-... y^A'i •VtAM' WE PHANTOM BY LEE FALK RAY MOORES VOUFOOL'TMEK'S MEKO0SIN6INC Hl*BV ITUR OUMW PLMIM 9M • HWM.I SHOULD ', .V VOU L Every nornud skin needs THESE 2 CREAMS i rOUOrt 1111 BTAVTT^ CAM or *MEN EVKftVW HUE J + 4*4444444 14444444 + 4S • 4444***** Level} Society women all OUT iU> world follow this simple. lncxi>rr\. slve beauty cure; one that is Titian Ho mi11 oi i %  you. This It what you t with your rtm;.-! Up Ri and with it *r*0 ..rap of dirt and m.ilte-up Tr* rttt nior* Cold Cream. Tor pull! ftPPIMJIH. extra-softcninK. \'iy sotni, your %  kin will he i IMP I i FOUNDATION AND PROTBCTION By day. use a touch of PundV Vanithini Cream as a foundation. Thia nc>n-^:^^J^> %  %  your complexion fmm sun .tnd wind. PONDS Vnniihmg Cram Cold Craam Start now to win '.he lovehness that ean be foan vrhM you UM Ponds Cream>. Y. nil find the > %  lin at all M COUP ei. Poolc Pottery A new shipment %  took I nds. Ilnnr Dueks. Rlur Blrdn. Sea null*. Vaa. etr at your Jewellers 1. lie UNA A IO.. Ill* Broad Street ;---'.-,-,'>*-,'-'.%------,'-•,-*--'---'--* RHEUMATIC 'he *ure and certain q .i them. Rub SACROOl nut it 4 penetrating powers .sill pet quukly and effectively I WOn DRUGSTORES j: IT PAYS YOU TO DEAL HERE SPECIAL offers to all Cash and Credit Customers for Monday to Wednesday only M'M'IAI. OI I i:ilS nn mm uciilublr al our Ifrrnnrhrw Twredwidr. S|i. it;lil-.lii ti .MMI Snail SI/ a ii-.il lit . |i GENERAL HARDWARE SUPPLIES AND Select Your FLORENCE Early from THE CITY GARAGE TRADING CO. LTD. Vidoria SI. -.*'.'-',*.-''..',',.',•.'.•,'..'.', ', .'-•*,• %  ..','„'.*,'.-,*,*, -,'--,'-





PAGE 1

NnwcaoAi v.vr.MBrt . IKI IHKBXIKX ADVOCATE PACE FIVE THORNHILL SENTENCED TO HANG For Murder Lorry Driver Of I %  %  Tosecu i ,-turned %  EWAKT OWEN THORNHILL, a bus driver of the Ivy ^ ght r or " Land, was yesterday sentenced to be handed by The Hon. Murder. *"* said ai the i_n< The Chief .lud^e. Sir Allan Cullymore, after a jury fnund lawful killing of ii per*.n wltl him tfuiliv of murdering 39-year-old Leroy Worrell, a malice aforethi-.. lony uwner of Bank Hall, on August 6. The jury were figHg^ "^" an hour and a half deliberating. As the foreman pronounced the verdict—guilty, Thornhill's cheit began to heave as he breathed heavily. and his eyes were red He was asked whether he had anything to say. but he did not reply Thornhill was represented by ~" Mr. Lorenzo Williams who told the jury that the caw was one of criminal negligence and not a'cate of murder. Mr. W W. Reece. K.C.. Solicitor General, prosecuted for the crown. Hundred* of people were outside the Courtyard waiting to hear the verdict and possibly paa the police vin lax.Th.—fuli _*ofc The poll..towajMT, took the Pit* Ml %  • v, .. i.l U ixU-rs 1( .... Abcut Hi hi Minute* after the verdict was given. riaaHMtor who had lell Ui raurt and reached the Junction of Pinfold and Roebuck su-erU. lay. rolled In the read and urpl. *_yin_ "Oh; oh? Owen U gone, fat gone, U gon '" On in.irM daj of hagilng. the Prosecution railed 17 .iddressed the jury for 35 minutes. Mi Raw for nearly an hour and than the Chief Justice BUIlUMll up. Return Trip The Prosecution's case was thai a_ club of the Girls' Industrial Union had an excursion at St I.ucy on August 6. Thornhill was driving one of the buses which took the people and Woricll was driving his lorry, ffben ihvehidr. wore returning, WorraU and Thornhill w> i i HK) trying t overt ike e.\ u ThriM'llilnCtarac Na, n Rex v Simeon Springrr No. 21 Re* v* Rrrtr 1 in Hard and tironce Bulls. Friday No. 4 Rex vs F.lberl Brown No. IB Rex v* Oliver MilliiiKion and Bertram Hard Driving; vtiui Intent ii Tha • %  SrOMld bt ItlU |ullt) M %  slaughlci : Ins with a wan %  ill liei %  ; ; 1>\ iMlN.lr: lish ..united aJaaa ir, tj umn raaal lal.| inc. "Adv*e_.< roototvsaj lh-1 lie heard our axploolaa al 7.41 o't-i. k rcatoraai m*nlag. Explu-ton-s coilnHctl during lite da> and l_N I anotsier at 1.39. ii i> agd tsaaan _r_M>*"M doing ihe actual _vn_rml.ii; bin a ^r>nio -I -o. ul a dnie* roouat !->•. m mi rs_a* k UM mi .tier rarh • %  SJSBBBHM l" I "He I I'll -um ncd li*h. l %  in the i %  each other. opened his uonkmlV al When they eventually reach:-.! .ind at another tab town. Worrell started a row with from the bus. though, he did not Thornhill and at MM time Thornrae them. hill pulled out a penknife and at George Brewster had I another hail two stones In his "hat he did not know Wbothei hand, but he never used either Th.nnhiil had intended taking One witness told the Court he those who were m the bus nen heard Thornhill tell Worrell. "You home or in the bug stand are out for trouble and i! you do "But the fact remains," he said, not leave me I will do sorm-lhinit "'hat he had gone to Belrnom to you this same night Corner when tic turned back Ho left after the row. drove to You hnvrseen ;' %  p|g iwln defer* %  %  %  v, %  B %  that then%  nature thai ascould exp There • %  W.in.-II that bC had been loOfc''I 111 '"'"!! ing for trouble and if he did not v •'•" %  leave In.n he WDUld hOTO BJSg it hl11 that same night and because of £d a p an a n hTa W that ihe jury would know whal "* hu<1 stones, but I strength to attach to Ii. e Ji hcr r ^ He raminded teie jury thai it Tfl was for the Prosecution to Thornhill ru> their ense beyond a reas'ar aa ] MM onabst doubt If thev felt that relumed and could %  %  WOrrtll wai killed neeidentjdlv m the Qtieci.' P or had any doubts ns to Thorn'i>'"icii to g> to ih.bus rtla'i inn %  i bay should w, n I return ;> verdict of not RUllti "t enMrerjr roi marri imiT.I Thj Worrell n i hi %  <• I'lnkiiiic Opeieil Hrueh with Ihe Mr, Rasjca f^i tha Pro hat there was no doubt that htH'i intention fron II started the row. Thorn them of he reminded them. had Mi tUgfM ,, nhad Christmas Footl Will Cost MtHt> Queen e: Housr (ii'ls Hepaireil And Painted Park \\* l>c.'i. i i %  cr 11-pairs uring carried | I || NsOUld look quite Ihe Arnual Indus%  traa are h>uu d and guar.i sral % %  witlls hA\r also been bin I u %  %  %  idJvo iM I ill i-c •i \hc near future. -i %  %  and < %  tones "ursion rated for an hour and %  half btfi PoKtSe ltui-i-;tu The InfonnaUon Bureau al the %  1 .. -,..,,-...,,. and you %  ••" raca4vlng ..%  the corner at Helmont and Martin' %  '" al* yOUraaU if be could BO) "'""K ihe last month H dalt'l roads, turned ..round the bus hve turned by golriK M-> the ^'"" %  r "petiod. and drove back down Constitution Queen. Park g>t if he really £he ""' %  " i" where the row had been carrWd intended to go to the bus stand" !" ;'' "f! en. Tha bus nrarvad whan It got ••".r tn. % %  near to the place where Worrell '" * light of the facts, Thornhill ''"' %  > > P '" %  was standing at the side of th,,i,, ,,ot neliber.,:. ^ %  %  "< lorrv Itnick the Jrv • ml -"'.rHe and go and ,tnke W.T.CII %  boul tha price, ot utaTrtltad **y came to that deci-i. then their verdict had to be one vl'^"* an ^ .*** Hinder as II did noi matter o""' 1 "!""i Hie what kind of weapon was used t<> '"''5 "' T, ce f, d3 a killing. T '* e vil,,k •" eha.ge .if Hull had been suggested, he said, '"' pi <;<"!that there might have been a de. g*£j %  %  Wad bj Polleefect about Ihe bus, and. realising" wo 'na Clarke il Thornhill had tried to put right _______^_ and during that time uld not have been n the proper enrr which was normally required But. Mr. FarA case brought by ti %  num. the bus inspector, had exchargini Eric Bu nmlncd the hus and had told Road! St Iflchaal with bu '%  lem thai he had found nothing a bailee of $8 belonging 1 i vrong with It, N Nympnlh.v ^Jnfflth. Acting Pol Summing Up, The Chief Judge]*> f "' %  %  '' Worrell was killed. Addressing the Jury. Mr WilIaims told them that II was agreed that when the vehicles were returning, the drivers were %  y aadl n i He sild it was perhaps fortunate that they had had thitype of witnesses they had had. 'KJ^OS Iwo civil servants and two teachers ,n besides others. Their itortM wara all much the same. Changed Gear "When George Brewster told you that Thornhill changed geat just when the bus swerved and went in the direction of Worrell and the lorry." he said, "he was trying lo get the Idea m your Case Dismissal r.inds that there was some wicked U, M the jury that when th. { intention in the changing of the * deliberate, they would put out } gear, but there is nothing to invite J 'heir minds all considerations you to believe that there was such an intention. "Brewster himself is no dri _nd would not know what a driver would have to do at various points. You all have seen the scene and know that there is an incline Just there and It was quite reasonable for the driver to change Df sympathy for th ACCIDENT heard outside" In the e-unour amlHSg' ,"" una excitement when people had baenl£ ou ' '" expressing opinions. wheHierl !" a *" v favourable to the one partv or to StrauRhn of He Kk i Ihe other. Jflirhael He said that If in the course of A Pollca IOM V look Hi his remarks to them he expressed the Gencr t] H %  i any opinion on the facts thc> would reulise that they were then DUW ** _J ,or r, r!i M ^' ""'• '"'*"! own ludCN .( ;fte facts and ii was FINED 40', '^"_' J no t '.?..." _SS_?S W S t !" tfim to too_o ny ilnioni rintu -IU ha m ra—d if they dlMgretd Mr. O. B. Qrjntl with them. So far as the law was Magistrate of District I, they had to take the day fined I i from him. Station Hill. 81 HI Now. m this case." he said, "it be paid in i has been pointed out by counsel one month's IRUJ the duty of the Prosecuusing indecent l_nfUUI stabllsh the guilt of Ihe bin Btraet IKT 26. He said he was putting up a defence of criminal negligence. There was nothing to suggest the wilful killing of Worrell. Tho buses and lorries had gone on lion, not to a Sunday Setparty, and it was reasonable to expect that would be high spirits. When Ihe people saw Thornhill ._ swerve when driving back from | aw Belni on t Road they were lust surpused and scampered i Only one witness had said t h a t it i, that he heard Thornhill tell llon lo • • it_usr %  I I %  %  i' II > likelihood %  It,,--. V I Which "ll be %  t will be pricelha Mini%  mid tha %  %  A shipment of i %  i'.\ In* sold M \ buttei I n with the pricei of whlel : .iiiei due prolong t thero %  %  i %  %  ginini II. ..-. i II nf 'link lo ..'111 Vlvlallt) ..r < I I, ,n pro%  rrtvt ID %  %  • %  %  go ul Kaape foi the ho The lui re RLUd %  .ii,' ror ./ UM worfclni %  %  %  i bra the big I immure I'.li-li %  %  %  Mirr that wlien tha big I %  % %  %  %  %  I! the crowd. A%  %  %  %  I will b gatttng • reo^ufaruinnui b* n cleaned the holi%  %  The** ,,:kmg fai I order tu meet %  Print t v ss Alitvlirass EMng Clfurt'tl I i nen with hoes wer. clearing away some of Ihe long \ Pla>mg PMd yeaterda) This I i a grown urataktr at th uyui| \dv*cle Hi.i' h %  %  4 motoi -much lithe hand i>Un.,l bj i,. Of the grass, are kept in the pavilion %  cgi: irb and lawn -: eourl Olirislnias \ ciultns [nvode <;il\ tN.lilh-ul \| t iin_ # rreaa page S %  %  %  I pairing and a 1.1 oi mo Ij mg (town urj Wh; %  1 %  %  \ %  %  %  %  ij baton %  %  feel quite happy with an I 1 knouin. .iris 'lung. Th,bead U ,' am grouiMruj H .ill right but %  %  %  V. of his parti gald tint be felt thai p ago groupuu %  hould bo dona %  is I that Hii: bg tha Lotwui P urt. it was d not law If they | •.ii then %  n waaj fortunate bumpei i I T*Hf .... > • t i %  II %  !' %  .• .Hour %  t irtj wore -a> Ing that tl lM a I rkeil i > %  wan U"t lalltguj iharn tii^t they] i fron %  Lay "SILVER STAR" CONGOLEUM. as a FLOOR COVERING For LASTING BEAUTY on, can I i.n-tn Tin mil boMN i n i,.i |ho ell namlv • %  %  _u k an itao boiruj vendi.r•ilmanacs mid ptctUTOl the road for many now. %  I %  %  iiigt. i Ono nndoi told lha rUh %  • n ibard work walktun trying to MO co %  %  we nuke "iil^ %  ifgsr) intall profit, Manv fei i,. purchase then curd dire-1 from II we would make a good urofl!" Ho howavat Ml lha) It %  I--, upy tha Idle it \IH \( R| \ PIN BTRJPED snnti wUh htsed collar attached. Sizes |4| lo 17 Inv M7.7 I CONSUI-ATeBBLFCOLOl'i: SHIUTS nl. m.l.. n. I collar attached. < • %  i. ,1 iftggVfl loa_gt__, M/e. II I,i 17. I.aili X..| il.ITi;sr:\ ISLAND COTTON SHIMB, • It^mmi-l riillur aitnched in si. \\\ u Hlutf. Gray, ( rciiin 1:1,1, Sit. 17 RADIAI M\i:(:t!\ VHITI DRESS SIIIKIS. a Ufa iMoxepwiiHr BoUUBi UB 1 :H II Sn.-'tJIVrith Sofi CaUar Mtackad, 14 i %  i, %1 ..1 I SILK sCAitvrs in ph.,,i __* and rrhito with self Mripes mi eeronn P ihi ii _rwn M.U.s BOTS'STRIPED PYJAMA SUITS IT li-fciiii Sbai M lo :i. En I. %t.2H CAVE SHEPHERD & CO.. LTD 10, II. 12 & 13 BROAD STREET DIAMOND RINGS no finer gifl from you lo lier Prices Start at $18.00 wociderlul quality & values A. -lour JEWELLERS Y. De LMM A C. I.TW. 20 Broad Street £&+' WMfNAMIAOCOlD.i.ilts rt IBS, nuke MHH noM'mufc _ikl II n k-i Hikk r, id SO EASVI hiHi pin ,| t,„ ,|,. 1( -dupoarhM tnl Thenl.xl ih. ~|..,. ,drop* tl" i" %  rl HM n_ht where Mi, iniuhlc KIOMt AWAY. Vi.k* V Nose Drops give you brooihlngc-nsfcni imtaUon is toothed. tiiiliiH's umnf,. and yout nose "opens tip —and siays,lc,ir lorhnort Mmi. ilvn rrht/l Try II VICKS VATRONOL NOSE DROPS LuMeiOuVV PIS III % in Art Silk and Njlmi I nun lie. In SI. 17 ColoUtl! Pink. IViirh. Il.h,. Itlnc. Wliiliami ltl.„ I. SUPS in Satin. Jrrsry. (rrpr and Nylon rr..m $2.4.1 In $9 K7 < "I VI Tiiik. Prarh. end Whit.-. II411 *IIP* in Nylnn Cohant it S7.67 nk. Mark and Whit.PI J 4X4.% in Snrny g *4.:t ("lours: IVarh. Ivy & Sky Mf.ll I %  Mil NM S III Jersey mul N\lon From $3.13 to $20.00 CotoUtl Pink. Blue and White. HARRISON'S : %  BBiimiTiiriiiiiiiJ. >!uniiiiii>iiiiii^ IT'S HERE AGAIN 11 %  PURINA MILK CHOW 2" A 4-W/ie*i Drive Ttactor A Delivery Wagon A Mobile Power Plant J£$S* r-fln lli.h %  t-|MKii itn ftl-HSpl m-n St ii i P JS-il "< V %  i I.>!• • %  %  • %  Km 1 I'.-r. t-M -B ii;ui lull,/ _n lor % %  • •_• %  m -tricniiiM. i *Mm niul Steal m-mtairt of ma #rtV)o l.ishi IH-I "p %  i_td %  it fs a l HEBMAN A TAYLOR'S GARAGE 1.1 If. •C H. Jason Jones 6 Co.. Ltd.— Distributors % % % % % % % % % % % % % % %  • Ill's I IS livsl lllif MAS Qifts Sets ^Harriet ZHubbard ZRyer 'Canada/ PINR ( I.OVKK COLOONI & TALCUM POWDSI HUM Vsl ( Kl.i: COI.OGNR & T.M.Cl'M I'OHDEK OOLD-N CHANCI PINK i LOVBM SOAP TALCUM POWDEK MOM V Sl( KM: OOLOEN CHANCI SOAP & TALCUM POWDER MM I HE AM SOAP t:t cakes t.i Bo| KNIGHTS DRUG STORES



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I'M. I I III R BABBADOS ADVOCATE '\II.M~I>\\ MIVKMBEB . 1931 BARBADOSjfe^i.AOVtgffE Pria,*, .> ih> UnM r< ltd %  %  < H fci'-'' u,,I..,.,).,,. Navembat :s. 1:>I M.YI'I IN days M/Mn more Urwl ol ;irmed n 1-, \. to setin BriM in a throw bach to the nays <>f Jtngotmn The imn-Hntish peoples of ihc world accustomed to the enormous might and power of mi | which no sun sets have cither disinterested in Gnat Bnt.un's futllre AS %  world power or actively hostile. 'It I yet jjrown to Russian imperialism and, indori i ,M with Western >'ii racy, they fondly imagine that a world in which British lH?n eliminated peace would triumph. Those who know Grot) Britain and other countries of the British Commonwealth where the British way ol life has been successfully grafted into fttbef continents know bow stupid these impressions are. They know that Greaj Britain's continual i Greal power is essential to the peace d which we all desire. But the world is not principally inhabited b\ lovers ol the British way of life, and little skill or imagination to i tura of "perfidious Albion" or Of a British lion rampant seeking what people it can devour. : to tins picture of en agitreasiva nation seeking political domination and world influence is the economic argument. This |M. mts to Malayan rubber and tin Mar earner for the slerGreal Britain Of exploiting otter countries Tha prop dists have done their work well. And they have had a major success in Egypt. The silent demonstration o[ marching thousands in Cairo and Alexandria this month has caused many to reflect that the Egyptians really want the British out of Egypt Workers in British camps hove gone away except for a small number from jobs which were relatively highly paid by tian standards. The question of Britain's presence in Egypt touches Egyptian honour. Yet Britain') presence in the Canal Zone is still cons i dered vital to the defence of the free WOl Id Mutl Britain bow to the storm and try to find an alternative military hase ? Which will be the lesser evil, Egyptian repudiation of a valid treaty or the use ol British military force against a civilian population In a country whose very indejx-ndence is safeguarded by the presence of British troops there? Supposing an alternative base were found, would the United States be prepared to pay a large part of the cost of removal ? The future of Egypt la not a subject for comforting speculation. Only those who have become indoctrinated with the active virus <1 anii-Biitish hatred can approve of the vvr> real difficulties which confront the United Kingdom in this regard. i M;>III.<>Y>II;\T THE visit of Sir George Seel's Labour Adviser to Jamaica last week i* a reminder of the West Indies' unemployment problem. That problem in its most acute form exists in Jamaica. During the last great war Jamaica made Its i'wn arrangements with the United States lor sending seasonal labour to that country. This policy was adopted by other British Caribbean territories and ended in a certain jockeying for quotas which annoyed the American employers and exacei beted Inter-Caribbean Jealously a. In July 1951. a Regional Labour Board formed to m laonsj labour requirements with the United States on a representative buius. Members of the Board are drawn from all participating British Caribbean territories. The Board hn^ ten is Kingston and a staff in Washing11 n of between twentyfive and thirty people The Washington stair negotiates with employers and prepare, contracts for each worker and provides liaison officers to visit the men at work. Representatives "i the United Stati "t deration will be present :n Kingston during the Board nice!: | ens n Saturday. The machinery for providing temporary outlets for unemployed West India: well oiled. But only Jamaica gets the benefit of the employers" contract to pay ftgtg back to Jamaica or its equivalent. Islands like Barbados ought to be thinking hard in an effort to stop the subsidisation of privileged workers to the United States at the expense of local capital works and of providing employment for those left behind. The American employers arc quite willing to recruit Jamaicans only and every* knows that Jamaican needs are greater than our: but Barbados has need and a sound "seasonal emigration" policy is badly needed. These make my HEADLINE today Bernard Wicksteed learns the rules of the Parliamentary pastime of Pate-spotting below, and if they weren't proficient in their headtnp recognition %  know a l %  ii.it I PR0P06I Maj U eawUBI baldness among rru.j .... Hal whatever the lyilrm .n,uluyed. the watchdog* ol the Press. I know it sound* an irreverent approach to pulttu*. but at you looking down like gargoyles from will understand shortly h ban an Important l*anng on the managethe gallery, kr.ow them all. ju-l ..men! and 'iv. and is therefore a legitimate topic they know that Mr. Speaker's wig for discussion. has %  patch like half a crown You I.' the top* of their heads that parliamenttop, and that the roof of his ornate nry reporter-, in th< Prat* Gallery Identify the ppsskSia OB 'he floor chair Is covered with lino. The Press Gallery overhangs the Chamber like the dress circle in %  thuttre. so %  member who speaks from one of the back benchei not seen at all by the reporters immediately above him. He has to be identified by sound not sight. line reporter was telling BM that '"' years he has .*e* Ma voice, but has ad what he looks Now that the voice hat ved lo the other side of House and become a face blessed If he can pick out 1 Dubik life when I went to the gallery this week la have a look at the m* House, and noticed thai now they've chunked aides, UK.' fielders nt cncki' Afferent Qallery View >allv l.\prrss. SUrwl..r.l R EADERS nf the I Ivrnliu I SfsssjasSa MARVEL T THE VARIOUS TRICKS WITH SO FEW HAIRS I WIMIU SUniljr.l. i --^w 'jfN vflT like %  rlf JMIHII mid m. s. ,i, f*~ J *\ (' S\ /" "-> I from men sitting perched in L ^J irtt 7 -* i' A. / ***>^"'VaH h '" for six years thev have iden7^^. ••* nlm i: m Mi liookshaiik. Ort atal minaret surmounting Mr Dalton. and the twin peaks (fore and aft) of Hocoa B D \\ i Maxwell Fyfc The Tories have a clear minority %  nan meat the .. %  % %  f.., .. .. .i below by tiv shapes of tat %  hi id and tha ..! % %  >, fares. Now that the parties have %  %  ve 11... I tn %  l.irt all over asain. It Is the SoelsUati they study with I critical barberV cye view, and the Tories they look lii the f.i' < For reporters sitting on the 00" I da of the gallery it la naturally vice-versa. Contrasts M where the Impa ii.iMm %  enten into i*>iibcrnuse bald heads n... % ..' %  easy recognition No reporter could ever confuse the two pairs r the pas, and the p.i,n. Pre!" *SJ No Notes TltlCTI.Y speaking, it 1: 1 forbidden to report the speechmade in Parliament, you know. The ban on publication, dating The Tones have a clear majority b Ih -, f ..„ B ip. |„., B1 ..,, Kmii or polls in the evening. At the _. .,._„,,. ,„ ,„„,,.,„„„. ., U.K. WANTS MORE SUGAR, TIMBER, COTTON LONPON. First practical plan to enable the Colonial Empire to play its part in easing Britain's momic position has been placed before the British Cabinet by Mr Oliver Lyttelton, the Colonial Secretary. It envisages increased production ol Colmal commodities to add to Britain's supply >f raw materials. Materials are needed not only for Britain's rearmament drive, but also f i a renewed housing programme and for export goods. Three commodities that are wanted in 1'ieater quantities from the West Indies— >ugar. Sea Island cotton and British Guiana limber—are specifically mentioned in Mr. I yttelton's plan. Full details of the means to icrease production, however, have not yet been worked out, but a full investigation has beail started by the C.lonul Office into the Legibilities of improving Colonial output. It is expected that the scope of the sugar talks now going on in London will be broadened to cover Mr. 1,yttelton's proposals. Increased sugar production in the West Indies. Fiji and Mauritius is largely a matter of financial and political arrangement and if Mr. Lyttelton wants to stimulate production, he must offer the Colonial producers the protection they demand of better prices and guaranteed markets FOR FINEST CHRISTMAS CARDS or ixM first the Government had 13 bald l MX fur the Opiiosition, and at the second the gap had H (oc the Tories to II ,ii' imprisonment Call and Select Early from IDV4M \II SIVIIOMIIV JVOTMCE From 1st December. 1951 our HAKDWARt and LUMBER DKPARTMiCNTS v. ill be closed for breakfast from 11 a.m. to 12 noon except on Saturdays when we will be open from H a.m. lo 12 noon. Will all customers please note. • WILKINSON & HAVNES CO., LTD., — Successors to — C. S. PITCHER &. CO. LTD. Phuiu-,: 44i:i, 4687. 4472 T IIS til I The Spread NS % %  in irlj I'M.paneltj tha Teen i The first reporters had to remember not only faces and tops of heads, they had lo memorise the speeches as well, for they weren't allowed to nuke notes. Dr, Johnson used to employ "meni(>i> man" in tell him what wan said and then writ.' up his reports of Parliament ncthods of One On then thinly disguised bald beads from that. with which in.-itIJntcr must keep rs II* • eonsta.nl> fUDtiClty hanging as members try out new %  amouflage D Y the lime Dickens became a D parliamentary reporter noteIs at the varteD at taking was allowed, but In the % there are of spreading a Commoni he had to wrile on bj| brSa3 legislator, favour the aideways "i"*^ 1 !^ 1 !" St"!*;? i" 11 i .,.„! .. ., •!„.. th ton and >-^" u %  %  "• %  %  aft prn And opposite, thr Under of Ihf N* poHUw and the Press arc Opposition peaka from beneath ., Some boldly concentrate what so interwoven that parliamentary perfect doUrhocephallc oi longhall li left in a single defiant Government as we know it in this he.dcd pati like t brnwn egg lying streak, and others devote goodness country woulrt not work without known how much care lo impartpublicity—ami the accurate idenIquallT distinct is the broad, ing %  curl In tha strands that surtlflcation of speakers b> th.i bare plain that tops thr new leadviv. liers. for Instance. Thrre. on the Government front bench, the voice of Mr. Churchill dome, tinged with pink like St Pauls Cathedral at MB what anthropologists would head. hyeephalk n 1.1 .inlled SUte. I>efence SrcreWlMi Ury Robert l...rti ha> arrived KII i an Pranee to inspect mil I Ury InItussia atal Unions. What sUte of preCertain paredneas will he find*' A Brlllkh paaCC i How S %  -iig %  IK i: S ARMY? Its Hgeli ffllallia3 SUl 4.111 Vltlft U A 111 'Eled that we ahead with the task. NOT YET There has been a fretl C nen gh tn broad policy. The general plan alter I he wai was In build up a manpower army which would hold some form uf lineai defsnoa he event of attack bj the a European Army of this The armoured division must use I shall be able to talk to |U mobility to attack the enemy from s.renglh i the most when he l 1 weak and avoid lightmethod ot obtaining ing streng.h. To judge from my own On the other hand, the Inexpert on armoured warfare gives discussions wltli the Russian! fantry division is a slower movUtr answer toward*, the end of the war I do ing and harder-hitting formation %  si nud visit to l1 "' believe they will ever dare It needs heavy tanks both for deFrance in order to tea for myself ' advance again.t us m Europe fence and attack In position warhow the biropean Army plan•"" " %  * %  of ,hc ktnd '"' %  are getting on now ,lom 8 created it is now accep H |00d talking about thr We have not go! it yet lot that must have heavy and .„.,,.,„,. ., ... w, w ,. „.,,,. | .. eleai Brttab ha. fous dh %  tanks ft ins two roiea and that turn iho ulk into armed men | "OS in Germany with the hope a dual-purpoae Unk la noiwen-e. nut fuigeiitng the atom bomb ,,f another division l>eing available it was never anything else. and the fcl itrpWMI BOt* ftsvi '•'•* %  Thf United State* Is due to The Germans worked hard to their function But nattbei alters " *ix divisions In Germany by develop the technique for this the need for a Western A.m.. 1h | <•' 9 f l rrame alms to form of mobile warfare over a„ report thai Oeneral Baenhvc 10 dwuuins ready by the period of two yean before ihc hewOf -s netting on with the mb cr "' of l951 rhf Benelux counwar, and with fully equipped arof creating the Western Army. "' should provide another five moured divisions, it is a deep He haa succeeded in obtain ing the or six divisions study and takes considerable complete confidence ..t every one lime. Thus they were ready when %  Vaver-Trts ~SH JSgy^., 10 or 50 d'vls'ons which we need p rppare ti 1P technique which we cannot possibly be Jllled without nc0fl l0 -day for this form of warI quota from Germany. The fare havc b^.,, pfps ways in which the German share wv eral years that we should do of the European Army is to be M( hut w | thoul auccw,. built up have not yet been set_ — tied In detail nut the necessity TAtflKI V. YV* tor it has beer, scceptad. l.-/UiVL*Ei Irn^i What must we now do o as to u ^ argued that as we would not have the troops availabl carry out this role for some time we need no: at present concern More recently counter propoI •IIEJ l/\lll\d ourselves with the technique sals were made that the Western which would be needed. This nations should build up forces First we mu#t realise the great quite wrong. A long period passed ,'imsi.intg of infantry and ardifference between armoured and before we accepted the necessity moured divisions in about equal Innntrj divisions. The former to use this modern type of Strength If Ing Russians advanrmust be highly mobile. They Let us hope that we will not rut us the former would mUSI be able lo move rapidly repeal this long delay before from which Ihs round the enemy forces and redevelop the technique for these latin would launeA theli attacks main thenf.n • ..petitions. in co-OVentlOn wltil •• Strong tune I'-ii' ticni .MI.the war there has been I .t;..,i i, (oree, These propoaau did tanUy In the early a dearth of ofheers with real i ,,, now ., iipted. atages of the w.ir ami gained nerteace in armoured warfare ih.ie is a general hope Ih.. the d* K ihe higher posts on the General • nations will be able to Our armoured divisions must Staff and as commanders. This I perhaps 50 divisnot be given heavy weapOM such should be re-tifled, for it has been ring the next hvn v..n .bSOVj Unks. which increase the cause of these delays. %  %  ; of tlieni will be their admlnistiat.ve tail and (World Copyright Reserved) armoured divisions, therefore reduce their mobility —UE.S. much lamer RUSMI.II l.„... Tin' %  0* t.^'V'n Arm, ready would have had little chance ol In '<> •" """' THE TANKS sm-ce-s. BY THE WAY .. B> II. a. hrombfr T'MK ottetal reason given for an great railway tngu I i % %  H Irnln up %  bill tin* othei da) wa %  %  %  Ijick of steam! And there la that man at llabingtim "with more itoesn tb.m 1 know what to do with Ha cannot move I It emanates from him like egl* sliell from a grocer's beard St twilight. Doctors My be is suffering from Schnockenspieler's disease of the respiratory glands. There he is. "teaming like one ,ot Wibbsa aeujiaai Iceland geyser The who| lo colic lTit.1 lb t Ihe '.W/.V,W,W.', .**',*-V-V-*,','-',*,%* Plenty of timber is available in the Coloiee, particularly in British Guiana, British Honduras and the African territories. Mr. '• vttelton's advisers are reviewing the labour .id shipping problems that have prevented Sritain making full use uf these valuable resources. Britain's post-war housing shortage has I i-i: caused primarily by lack of raw mateIs. The new Government has set itself a housing target of 300.000 new houses a year and it must find timber and other materials ham somewhere if this target is to be reachThat is one reason why urgent attention IJ being given to the possibility of using Colinial hardwoods in British houses. Hardwood is more expensive and more difficult to work than the softwoods to which British builders are accustomed. The probUm would involve changes in working practices if the fullest possible use is to be made of these potential Colonial supplies. Most of the Colonial cotton which Britain hopes to obtain will come from Uganda, but here is an important contribution to be made by Sea Island cotton, which is needed to manufacture the high-quality good;which Uave made Britain's textile industry so important in the export drive to dollar countries. Other commodities wanted from the Colonies include copper, manganese, vegetable <>iis and petroleum. Each of these has its own production problems, which will have to be straightened out by Colonial Ofltce experts, in consultation with the Colonial Governments. Mr. Lyttelton believes that comparatively minor measures would produce quick results in Colonial production and it is hoped that practical results will become evident early next year. Large-scale projects requiring heavy capital investments, such as the East African groundnuts scheme, will be avoided. Mr. Lyttelton is an expert on securing supplies of raw materials and when his appointment as Colonial Secretary was announced a lew weeks ago, political observers in London predicted that the new Government envisaged a vast drive for more commodities from Ihe Colonies.— B.U.P. WHEELS AND CASTORS CASTORS WITH MMKF.TS P*r Stt of Four. Chromium Plated 2" Plastic $1.46 Chromium Plnted 3" Plastic $1.M Furniture Castors IH" Bakellte SI.H Ball lir.iiinu 1">" Bakelite St.1* Nickel Plated I'a" Rubber KM WIIKELS 7" x lVs" Cushion Tyred Swivel Castor.. 10" x 2" Roller RcoriiiK Industrial Type Rubber Tyred " x IV' Hospital Type Uf x 3" Heavy Duly Truck I .nil S6.62 SI 0.07 J10.ll DA COSTA & CO., LTD Dial 4689 DINNER JACKETS FABRICS.... Fine Tropical & Linen STYLES Single & Double Breasted COLOURS... Cream & White And 3-Piece Tuxedo Suits With all Accessories i-stuff Java, and tha money earned will t ram it t'ito tneia feeMr anabat ua to buy some J*p SUET. ISQ, spent yesterduy Bunoombe. Snyothe. Chortlewych Ks drivlni round the atrvets to rmd Bottle Did). The Ma^or of oiMtTVf wrllln .specu of the Klppenrinlairr made ..n appeal, irafflc pmblem. Al ihe corner of and those living neai the line Mallock-road the following diaraught the Mv..„, fi,.,„ their tea| oguc too k place betwwn Suet and kettles and pushed It through old (in (> m c a ) bits of piping which they con-why can( th*y send them Urge disused roxmd jruus^ of gtralght on' "Hound What Mr. Suet" "' "That's not the point. Do they come this way. too?" "Yes. if they are going away nil. ... iit 7't„ ,•„.„_., fro '" ,h e opposite direction." If the firemen weren't Ml up "" '/ '"' t '" ur "Then, if they wont round, those trees coaxing cats, there might be November 15, ISSt : A bonus going In both directions "would a devilish deal of honing ere lump (j Inch by 1 inch) of Grade ovoid mch other." nightfall Boyi pasting the CloudV| coal is lo be given, ISX-tree, .. -rioth dircctlona, Mr Suet enveloped house i\.ke roghorn any hoiiieholder who returns hi* "1 mean going backward and %  >f 1 ewt. of coal for\v ^ to the'traffic %  this Cadi/ harbour inerchant The tonnage as a whole, not to ench vehicle, iily of our tlM bo exported to "Oh." with ,t Hmicomb* Station. Each .. , i j i itei II ail Duinviiiua OUIIVII. IXIVII ^^ iS e H p .j, hS fai n •" %  %  hei MseM fn,m %  when he cratche his enr. Sleaii iouni from every wmriow cistern, which %  -iiect. the leas! one HAPPY BEES DON'T STING WHEN his doctor ordered an open-air life 36 years ago, Mr. Frederick Claridge, of Copford, near Colchester, bought two colonies of bees. Within two years, after being stung a great many times, he decided to rear "docile but vigorous and hardy" queen bees. It took him 15 years to produce the strain he wanted — British-bred pure Italians, n ited for their gentleness. Now he has 75 colonies off the main London road. Every year hundreds of bees are sent through the post in small narrow cages to all parts of the world Rarely does Mr. Calridge use a veil or "smoker" to control his bees. A puff of smoke from a cigarette is enough. "Under certain conditions." he said to-day.' "you can pick them up in handfuls without! being stung. They are really too disciplined, and do not look after themselves enough." Mr. Claridge's worrying time is when other swarms trespass and occasionally mate' with his queens. That upsets the strain. "It is one of the banes of my life." he said. But his queens cannot escape. Their I wings are clipped. —L.E R. CMEBSB Can Red Cheese Dutch Head Danish | Kidneys Kabhlt*. G0DDARDS FOR THESE IISH Silnion sle ii .hi,,, i. V Kippers Pilchards Ssrdinrs Si>K1i,\LS I'roceiiaed Peas. 30 os 3ftc per Un Fish Paste—6 cents per tin. Orange Jain—48c per tin Sirs* berry Jam 94c per tin Fruit Salad—Dried 15c per Pkr //#s/f



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Franco Wants U.K. To Return Gibraltar LONDON. N..v It, Tli.British I mem or Genetalis.siino Franco*! proposal in an interview Sanday Time* (if London tha' I did rc-open ne.i'u.ns 10 return UM To all iwqi llrtol on the tafl) FnreiKn Office replied. "No Omm..|il Thci Air War Over Korea Renewed flTH ARMY II AJ United Si ib Mn palate shot dov autnlet jet fighters and lost one o( v %  in %  sharp renewal of Ihc air war over Korea today, but ground lighting subsided along lh* 14ftmlle ceasefire battle UM, An Eiajhth Army communj that allied troop* re-took two advance positions on !• % %  Front, which had be. bu lie-blow Ilia Chinese last night However. I In communique reported nothing but patrol activity from the rest of the fi" I which will become the permanent ceasefire line if the remaining arnuattce terms are settled within 3U d..v Brilliant Flares Chinese Communist-* set off a series of brilliant gr*x ,-. vellow signal flares di mghi No nttm-k> followed however, and it was betta I Reds might be agreement on lue tentaUve truce line. Allied observers enped ground lighting; to die down while the truce teams R| torn try to complete tlsl by the Deeeml)er 27th they succeed, the opposing am would have in five up gnj ten they took In th. Interim have to return to th< I positions for *'. But war will go on the air and at sea. Tun ait battle flared over Northwest KM. day. In the first, some Soviet MIC.-la jets pounced on M slower U.S. F-80 Shoot fighter-bombers In an 111 attempt to break up an attack on Communist railway Ul — v.r. Truce Teams Meet %  in no newspaper reartion to said, however. srussing the return of I British quarters unofficially ration that Gibraltar was of mmbtful military slue. T> Britain n pan tin lifeU) %  • I A Kree Port In his Interview rranco suggest i rould become a it 1 Hbraltar is %  and an importai I ) %  the copv righted ntervlew nay Time* correspondent t'edric Palter. th:ii %  long as Gibraltar remained the i retention between them The intervli ed \>\ tin %  Miui'ient Itul pcopoaad that Britain should discuss the proh\ 6 < ireumstances do so Since LheCn returned %  has been pt lo improve AngloSpanish relations, widen plunned Ihs during UM of Socialist rule in Britain. Uuniii: a call at the B> It .1 tins on.nth. the I Duke Punio i. : %  .,! bs QeoOfta Harrison, the Foreign OtV, %  iry that Britain hoped to maintain "< set" and -fnend—t'.l*. U EDNESDAY. Wi/^ aaaaaaaas! irviirvrr l.\ KOItl \\ u\n CHINESE REDS^WILL START CAMPAIGN TO CONQUER ALL S.E. ASIA After Korean Cease-fire LORD PORTEOU8 (Frank Collyiiioo Lady Kitty (Orel* Bancroft) and Clivo Champion CIRCLE presented hy the Bridgetown Player* l**t niRBtto iiiii-h • BUM of patience la spite of tnti lampion Gtwney <<-*** Oiossstutbl. A w Torio Not Likely | Egypt Clamps Down On Unloading Of Goods For U.K. Forces To Vlmlisli Su|r,ar Rationing Snap PANMUN.IOM : The United Nations ilemandrd tin right to go tie hind Communist lines as far north as the Monchurian border, during the A to make sure that the Reds do nut build .i n* %  Im Baton army. The chief U N i I % %  \ %  Admiral C. Turner Jo> made this demand In presenting %  aaVfA* i>oint k*M p t he peace programme to the Conn untati The Communist* at once rejcelted the proposal and pressed for tion i %  point programme of U i b Joy *aid that It was "not hriwid enough." lir.th atoVtl asneol to itudy tfaa question further, The iinpMA' is temporary though It may dim hopes for an armistice tiv Christmas. —U.P. Italian Keels Stage Protest Mureli Against tf.AJ.O. Talks ROMS, Nov, 17, Riot squads were galll Central Rome. tn-Miglr I up an attempt bj rnunist "parlisans ol :> march on PUilanwnt the Atlantic Pact Council meeting in Rome I'.P. I .Iw.ni Otafl (Urke. SOD of Mr. jnd Mm F. IK Clarke of "Spooners". SI. John, was awarded the "H Korean IlirlMsl MiltUry Medal. Thr Medal of Houses of 8. Korea—b> the President of s. kUrr* for outstanding I.I r..L-ni whllr detached from the IS. 1st Marine Dlvlslan. On a i % %  nun in,,., raid on <3l major rail Junctions In N. Korea. delro>lng all thr obJerlivts, baflllni all I he i%  .-!. %  •!.is of Iroop* and .IM.IIMH in asweaji Ihe Manehurla Border into N. Korea, l-or IhU very heroic de*d where only 4 of the '!Z men mUslon relumed, the L'nlted SUIr% Navy Cross was awarded lo all 4 who rei nn. .1 by General O. P Smith or the IM Marine Mvisiou of thr Held in Korea for outstanding gallantry bevond the rail or dut> of ih.ii country, the I'niied Slates of Amrrica 'IXJNDON'T'N' MI the dUasffl QtV ernment. there is no b likelihood that sugar raUl i td Kingdom is ball I ..gainst It ..ii be Miiniii'-d up as follow*: 1. Britain cannot obt pllaa from Emi>'. 1,. meet .Ivmandj and with om lol>1ay, it ih.n.ilv Ukolv that .my QovarU' merit would all.-" II.-M. [ (sOlbsBl Miai 'i< would lOffolvth •j in view of UM praaanl pi ice il RiajBr, the holding and wholesale dealers would lmi %  on %  :! M ii.i "i %  o idi able Bnanctal burden. I, Dv-rallonlng woi.l mean an annual Increase of about 400.000 toi IK ausipuon, and I % %  %  tan which manufacturers paj one penny |-| p.ntiul nmie Hum ',n. would have t> be abolished There WOUld have be one back pi k %  But say K. D. and r their latest clreuUr, "it %  i Is more likely um* than under th lata edmini tratton %  ii and f M %  -.one amount (HSO.OO" %  %  to Iha UJI %  %  Ith pn dueilon ( AIKO. NOT r EX3YPT laauod • waimn** to all shipping companies anoda coesatrsad i Brttiah tout's with* nut \\w authorization of the Customs authorities. The warning wai cnuinid In %  circular aant ail shiDpers, stainm that they v.ould m.i be foi ""h< violation ol customs regulMiuns" it any ol Ihdi in Biitaln-ci riatolled ports in the Site/ ( inal ^l'' 1 h. cireulai itead tffj aari) .. %  H I here thi Egyptian ciision wiopeiatint. and onlj aftei ii ienl < %  < N.A.T.O. Near Agreement On I\ur<>pe*sArniy >r • %  j European army and Mkta -.isten Oartnaa i>aniri|iation he Western oafeBsM Dilegates to the North Atlnnl; Traab OrganlaaUon confaren uigenth co na lda r ad ihe matu %  i>i_ quick pai %  %  %  %  ..in Tlie Ruropt if \rTnj rinantal u mj o( mbtad %  i a II it.ii n Dutch and Si %  onli i' -.> th' %  ten will agrai to the re-arma%  i < .. i %  • % %  i pew 'i Preaident ->i the N.A ro. I ouni P i"' i trUJ ma na mi etlna. the •h, U v s. rator) I ment lo get action on the Euro pean Army idea fleneral Risen %  the pro (eel al the top of nil li*t of km and urgent things lo i %  i\ II.,-. Una %  " ,!i rari ii que rarwui tubjt pacialU about his fn-lmn I i will' <•< i man pa I Uclp %  n„ Prencfl Porelan Muilatei Robert Bchuman, gave .. proarai raport "'ii ".-I* I the I ki "'* Mae He are rolltared bi Aefai ion anae told Uk room.i BDoul tin racanl M ILI.. Poretan MlnUtera confer treat <; rman Cnai %  vlloi K ad Ad< l V RUSSIA EXTENDS SLAVE SYSTEM (By H. A. KVSKK) LONDON, Mm 27, Radical organizational ehangei .n the Soviet toffeajd labour ryatem, as well PJ Its %  y*THrMtrablt extajuioo, were revealed by atithoni:ih\. aourcM here. The changes con^isin the total reversion ol policy concernim; the use of "•lave labour' and the !n ol the concentration camps In Sovlo: ;;„ Thr Kourooa Mid thai 9ihMi wai th* i day nas become the rule to-day. Until recently, It was y^ W 3 P lic >' '" confine permanent concentration camps h> certain remote regions of the counti y. Sources said today "-ucn ca \\ oriel Sugar Crop 1951^52 Will Total 36*900,000 Ions WASIIINGTdN. N The Office of I %  %  on foreign crops and markets predicted thai Ihe of cane and beet suitr.r In IMI—U arauld total 36.Mo.ooo Utm slighily more than the 3d.400.000 t'-ns of lilt season and would i>e well %  veraaa af! 28.900.000 tons. ... I" the Ateni %  fall summary, world wool Uon this %  ; , n ,,, %  . I An all time peak of 4.000.000.: 000 poiim'. n 1811. The i, avnurahli < a leans' pi lean I ooi production i —r.p Viriims Of \Ui\ iUiii kinail Rt'fus* To l*a) %  More Mom-y ] SAN HIAM is... N v %  Some 40 VlCtUni Of a Chlnei Communist extortion racket % %  lemn pledge I" aattd %  ii. liiiinom. their kin K.Ik imealened wllh hnprsfOI mem. torture, and dean At .i iiamlllll held hen da) niftil I Ua I" i.. Keo blackmail voaad \ . .ii otT UM In "i Peiplni Oo v ernme c t, although it ant an and >r tnaii hopes to kt>ep their relalives In alive. .^growth rent puMtdt) a • maihad ' %  • quli %  nig valuable foieign axd %  Chine*"-, who have relatives loir, il was learned thai Council "i 'inpowerful Six Cotnpanle vfrnialb i %  | i marling soon io II a probann P (B\ AKTIU'R 0OUI FORM' 6A On* oJ Nal mtellii i Kntfaj would hlp the CM IN> Water Goes Down MIl.W N( %  the i'n Rrvei idnntnl I Bsiia chai a 1 i %  I ,-,i tholi WB) Into % %  i %  %  i . ha am I %  hb h Hi • nsn Bin Invaded I %  %  Uuated bi KM Lowlai DUa to -iwiamir.' the to* %  %  nd i'.vH.-t.r. %  Tori %  thi .i M. nli Pi uni rarouh i .img inimli'nt Sav* NUW VOHK H A National Hroadtssting Ootn%  Ienl riooi led from K. ii.iT^asadai night that Oenaral Dwlghl Ilaenhowei bai he will resign h|a Kuiopean Command eai l> next %  > || and aeeept" RapublV in P i Pentlal iKimin.itioii. Correspondent Jack Da aa a laid on %  news broadcast heaid bara thai Elsenhower gave Ihe kndleelion to military aaaoclales at Ihe %  ling of thr Nnrth At lanlie Council —If P.I Tvheran Stmii>nts Clash With PoUee I I.hi \ twaan %  . %  I i ed II.. brought %  ped Studeni. irad out of thw %  houuni "Down Wttl Mnaisiliati" but aU raeJ bttBs] i-ioniiurd pasiin ill* dunna the morning The "lent and n reated lo-daj was noi dl Last n, ht which la I %  lie re % %  % %  Chief, Oanera rl .vh./.iv i. pnllre Kurbaakab ... .i %  expelled l acUvltlei i P luliun Men^rship On l'.\. DiseiiMed PARIS No\ 27. %  %  1 Arab and .. pro p oned Tu given full V berahlp The resolulKHi recalled Ihat the a sent aril % %  %  -houlU IH given %  %  %  —I'.P. 1 P U.S. DEPENDS MORE ON FOREIGN SOURCES OF RAW MATERIALS WABHIIKrTOn %  steadily ami upon before th. uM prm nt great defenie progii.-" ' S r r< w matei many cat, ward '.he aurpitl British Claim The Moon LONDOM Nov II %  | .i. | The Itntisii I ..huh in. %  In* scientl i | ajamben %  '•i paee liavi !. Include spaces for visas tu land al all %  lorlaa that might %  Bd in thr he;,.. %  in. i %  >, a kind ol %  '. vhon : siild they would prove —i r Japan Will Not Be Pressed For Forees WASHINGTON, Nov 27. John foster Dulles. ent< teet of Ihe Japai.i has no intention ol pressing the fur definite re., lommitmenta when he visits Tokvo next month, aeeordlug la m poattion t" knew. n • ever, Il Ii I on nicred here that the Japanese soon must begin to face mop %  %  adequately armed : e knit in i rican ea itn<\ i III II,. Wtsten. I' the hulwai %  %  Ibte Com%  h. uM light of ihis bctei It i not impossible that l>ullos may irge Premiei Bhlnrru Yosinda and mort thought to this question ut ure —r.p. (sU4 k rillas I i."hl All Oui Battle SINItE, Nov. 21 Communist Guerillas in Mai.. are now fully committed to bi Ug (leployiMK .ill lh< edi r H nan, f lautanant Gen. ii Briu '1" I'M-d ioda> ..( opei llalava ana leaking al a Press ronference with his sur,ev-,„ 4 • in Kwaui. pjli%  ihon %  lh men) Id bn i %  in J i %  .i in Formosa l ucc eaa .n I %  be ioi .king It o %  >%  Alr.ad\ Ma-*n-d-mit T h a H it had been •>uu.nd sourie. %  %  im \ i, | trill Ton.:. m ihe Communial orbit 'i I., him Red %  %  • i. tneb control Minn. >v..ui.i <• intry I I Ilium d I I'l i :e • ., 0g Orawn i P by a M 1'eiumg Revotu%  taela. Red Thailand. Indeneata and the Phiiiii-irj. Iheir all into thI Ufa in Ihe hpigU aaa* life it waa. mil thiy have lo groups and work harder |i We have some way to go bafOfe Ihe day comes when Communl broken, but I I he • -U.P. \K(,t \TI\i f.M'H IGOOD f'MUT HARVESTS CZECH VICE-PREMIER ARRESTED VIENNA. Nov 27 Cgechosiovakij %  nnouncad th arreet of liudoit Vice Premiei and former Secretary-General W the Caeeh Communln Party in what appeared to >*• lh* pn luck other rirastir Partv purgf battle", lie Pood III scared put kit Iran Will Sell Oil To Eastern Blot* 'The\ Ye always a/ SO >vell-iiiaiiiiere*' %  ind did noi ,II aboul poUUcal via an of po% %  % %  said ir.'o bi BOW "leeallj I 11 S1) oil v hi :e .1 , %  forinr i I ample offers v.hnh nad not bean Foi Ihcomiraj H i'i. mk %  MO Mossades-h would attend the next i urt meeting i h the international body'* ii P. the oil dispute r.p il.i.ik I L.i.i*. hai ^..„ Nevei my beat. I rare of liar-tiiu --; h i cola ..nJ ollreled". "Ami IIOIII a/ "' liiilr hiii i Iksaaj faaWpa " age / lip,". \ltm-tihti, wr ajgag in Inn r ,1/uoi i i ril Jlltf illHUll the hesl-bihtiinl ugmretl* Disarmament To Be Discussed With Russia 'net volume of expnr I p WASH. N 1 'na ha< prospter than ms and table grapes M—52 senson according to meeting with the General AasemI ..rtment of Agnr.il-' hlv President Hi I.un Padilla PARIS, N I Slates are in Inogd >K> eei to thresh out disarmament urob%  i them lo do s-.. Q %  seemed general that the projected four-power -i r 'Nervo to try and recon'. %  the worl mt %  \ .i i 1 ,, 1 ,liU of lloloba. I i I.., TJli.||*i -U|l• I be hae-l Iwbevg n". The American spokesman said the United State the right, if it era I %  %  %  railing for surh a meeUng Ifstra" terda> hy Pakistan. Iraq I posed thr formation of .. grouj b I inament plan, —U.P. Uumry". v | *\* There'll never be a belter ciejarotlc du MAURIER THI IXCUISIVI PnVTii fir* CIOAiEITE $1.04 for SO .rrioiswo



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PAGE TWO BABBADOfl ADVOCATE wrnsTsnw NOVEMBER 2*. isi At TUr Theatre THE CIRCLE Qakib Qallinq Tin: :. %  ;.,v... wnll.i liv UIS EX< Kl LB* V .' M.iuith..ni In I n ernor and Lady Savatv K Mcompjn.l-,1 bv Ih. Governor. ic M.j llrnn,. Vauhan and %  Joan %  ...id 1SJ6-.8 II 1 divortM .„ ,.,.„ "'"*'" B '-' From Briti.h Columbi. Until quite retkM R. AND Mils h H iVI WORTH ar: MM on M lu b| '"" lhe Kin Trt * route her* then e di %  ; I • possible to appreciate Hi. Circle res*. Maugham Is one of Ml A*hworth has vl this J** 0on several occasion! but th yt*. me 1. m BrttWi Columtata. %  .. %  holiday they arc s sylng at "Strathallan', 1 %  .......,-. .^ .. |.. ^. .. i t a, 11 % n lh I* Ms wife* tint Visit have'moThey were accompanied hv thci. 1 l/indon nt the %  .. '1 Martha I n..,i BMP „ play* rmiatoi in Loodon Uu threat (jrandfather Maugham HI one peiiod Ther" _ !" m*R. GEORGE DOORLY . I Usque In writing 1T visited Barbado-. earlier thi for the theatre. Tinaction of S* ff* ' '' 1 nmi .IN Barrow foim.-rlv .. ow*. It n pupfl „f [^d fc School. Mr. iiart an unso, 0vv has been awarded an Exhibitor** to find the t,.,,, at the University College of injrth-M but a period the W e,t lnd.es on the results* of a 1 ----— *... L competitive examination held 5SSBB-2H5 %  • U married. "Jfi ""'"' S 2W~" "V %  n b* rrusted, will ; n !" mP"ll "' U" Itatu-Qil. -.,. u | ))gH t nop", after completing In, d.-Ki..< .111 BIN I linu 111111: li Htre For Christmas EN FAIitWKAi'HKK n Rarba>>l ndttU md we hud G|or e Theatre over the week-end. to wait a long lime for Greta Clarke sang the ila ilc^l tune %  it and Frank Collymore "Bless This House." to fivp u cause for laughter. In .,, %  Michael Timpson Mnc ron,fS, "U look part. This as th* aggrieved husband nyf| w w repeal performanc* Ol ihe Individual actiiiH per-l *"' w ( n ,h *' nnit occasion the form.-.*-,of the evening, with u<| 8^ did not arru m it Jai Groumlth as a clie run^*"<'<"'d prize wenl to tatnaget Onrll Grandeinin who aang ti charm 10 her dnHi.., ." it was expected thai Acull jiart, nnrt ihe surline^. of these twu Taten*. winner.. wilMcm Dtrrk ,,. : ,,„,,,„ ,m. viru.nt shortly. was oonvii'cuift if nwootonoij %  lima* .,f Ui. 1 Firit Vuit %  third Act. Bv in... ti, m .,11 loll. .11 home in VfUS. INEZ JACKSON of New ( the % %  theatre" of ITJ. York Cily arrived in the the fT" net ktsell av.slstod the isUn.il over the wecn-end by ahoWln| what thrv %  l W.I.A. She came from New Y"— %  1 Jamaica. Puerto Rico nnd An, Tn ? S*? "" -'""""'r succeca tigua. Sis '^^iis^^ss^sri !" i,f,,.. :,"!,,'."' '' '*%  H.rbr HIU. It 11 %  ...,. %  ill M inl "lbut • %  >n still too |„:„ ... I..21 She was ......mii.iim.d b, her I" il.riv. Ihe full l,enrnt of the ,u %  "** %  r m '* Tull. a BarbaClrele-m a Comedy ol Manner. dl "' %  who ha b,-pn v n I" ln In the 'twenties. li.R.<. Radio I'ra^aaar rirM-r \OVIMMB ta, mi FiiKitr. 11 m n ... I"' %  %  • %  > \ %  v. .' % %  '. LVewi II MM HUH ,". N — %  W 1 '" %  The rj.ll. > 3 4* pm MKVGLttZm N..rth ..| s.,111, nj v Thr S411, Ahtcaiu IN p„, mtP.io,^ .. S., Owhia tt a. 4-1 p m in r,. .Ui > pa, 7 ia pm SIM U.MM and lh FUlurc T IA—laflS %  m lfr" Cto-optraiivM aad o^ n.i ? ** %  """ %  / "P ' P" TV.-., ?i^ 1 1? ^ 'i" "' "•" iH > N-w,ei pjt WM..B*.,,! or Aeeeum. Ml pro *.'i'PdJe> ,.1 S' w. > p m aWuu r ' %  iMe* L M m ,, m • IMP .,i„.„!.... in u o m .... ., r,lC •''">.SMMK ia!SPsK ,AV VOVRM )Mi it if l Chtx U.S.A.. for the p ast 42 years. Mr Tull told Curib that she is very much Impressed with the change made In Barbados. M ratttl Md From Korean ml in New H is a Captaln in Ihe Me.li! ol MM 1 s A,,, H.. *rlfe Noi ma Is u gr.iduate ar. %  Columbia t'rn.'erslty and Assistant Architect for the City of New York Part of his leave he plans to spend in Surinam with his wife ond when they leave there about December 21st their next stop will heBarbados where they will 1 1 i.stmas. They cxi>ect lc l-e heir for a little Air,.: Friends M R. CEORGE U CUMMINGS of Springiield, Massachusetts, arrived on Mood I by B.W.I.A. from Puerto Ri t „ for a vi.it with Mr. IVter Morgan of St IHotel at whose weddniK be was Mr. Ciimmiiigs and Mr. Mori-'-"i ware togMthaf al Hotel Seh.-.i 111 Bwitaarland and sub%  iquanU} n Uu Cimba Hilton, BBB .lu.r. i-urrto Rico where Mi. I lun adngs .,1 ptescnt Purchasing Agent He -ill prol-ably bo in Barbados for ubout two weeks. For Ihe Winter I N BARBADOS (ol lha unil.i are Dr. and Mrs. A Chlloru Jack of Montreal They arrived 'I. 1 ,.|, UMoesand are staying at the Marine lloiel Also arriving by the Lidy RodrMQ end ftayini at tne MarI* R. (.'..„.,t Dr. Cowan is spend isaaka* holiday while hi. we is remaining for the wutta. With Cable And Wireleti M R. RUDY KJIUUN who had been in Barbados lor tin., rolktaj returned to St. Vincent mi Monday by B.G. AlrV". 1 V lh I..[ 1 %  %  : %  .,•] .-., %  ui fal.le ;,ml V.11 that colony. During his holiday he was slaying with his parents Mr. and Mrs. Irwin Kirton of "Sandown". ronti. belli-. Incidental Intelligence W HEN BOAf ^.-i the Comets 01 service. N. w Yorkers will be able to take a swim in llermudi and dry themselves at home,—Sir Miles Thomm* i ntflH York yesrerdao. L r 1 Rupert and the Lion Rock—39 In ihxir hint rh i shonsr -... down find it ksdt nghi o Rock. "Thi* tHey btiidt lha lit*. Hi. w,-„ osseke." .houn Thty mmM. ind ilutr l th dM*IM I %  %  I Antifua Appointment M R. FRANK WILLOCK. B Sc On ,.. M,. U %  da :h' Antigua CJrammiit served %  AI.IHUJ where !_%_; worked on the junior staff of dV A. i.ulture Department for three years. He returned to Canade .n Acurultun_l A^t leuttun %  %  His Canadian wife ,. igptcted to arrive in Antigua a fortnight Royal Calypso L ATKST additions to the growing library of calypsoes on. gramophone lUBOrdi nre I %  RSM fael ("The Ltaar*} | went to London from to sing with the Trinidad AH Btee| ivteussion Orchestra during the Festival of Britain last" His first recording ha* jusi been issued in London, with Grant's Cai Rhythm accompanying. On '.:_• •%  i-itnish Calypso" and df, I Is 'Royal Weddin" Calypso." an amusin.: about what happened to The' Lion when he was invited to the: wedding of Princess Elizabeth Philip. Cartb Beit Seller M R. PATRICK LEIC.H-FF.RatOR. sttttMr of "Th.Trsri aUer*i TPCC." the bi story of a Journey through the Caribbean, has been awarded a i 100 priM m .- literature competition organised Lv the Sunday Times of Ixmdcn. Th* paper describes the volume as "a first book by a "Writer with a penlus (or description and an BtJte for knowledge." Talkint Point U '.on f,-ll rloirn i/esterdap. stand uu indaii. —II G Welh | TO-DAVS NEWS FLASH J r\in m • ri nirT ei.AtiNu n..i..*... I>I, I ...I New S-..-I. arMU H.kn SUMlrnw. MMrwhStS." M) And, good gucoui. rh oihti one it SiTloi Sim irom Ni.-:ood "Hullo. BSBBtnl. ii cr r R up ,„ "Think |oo.tnrii ycu'if htM I" ihe idmiril looki boili iiirii* RDHAnU/AV LEADERS FOR YOUR Di\UMUWAI CHRISTMAS SHOPPING MIOI I'AI'ETTAS EMHROIIltKfl) Wl.l.AISl KOM.XIV CUR, .SATIN PRINTED CftaVU tm\ For t hUdren PASTEL < RErE UK CHINES Plain, plastic A Printed ll.nl. tor Sl>lr and i.u.ln* — MM. other make* 1 WIIKS Mil Ol \ -HOI S CELLANESE t'NUERWEAK in Medium A i >r. : siiea NVLON STOCK1NOS. HATS A BAfiS NIC.HT GOWNS A HOUSE COATS UltO \D\\ A V IIHISS SHOP 1, Broad St.. Tel: 38H.' JfST It 14 I I \ I n III Mitt > SIIIIIIS WHITE W 4 TAN. any, BI.CE .*§. $5.57. $5.91 KENOWN I'YJAMA SlITS M.HI ELITE SPORT SIIIHTS TAN. Bl.l'E. OBEY, UROWN S5.9:i FLORAL DESIGNS M.07. S6.CIS EXCELLENT ASSORTMENT TIES Ii7c. 9:io„ S1.59. $1.78. $1.85 MEN'S HALF HOSE IDOL" lilt $1.33. $1.J7. (1.44. (1.55 WILSON HATS FAWN, Ltehl GREY. Ilurk C.REY. BROWN (S.HU. (7.19. (Kill CHILDREN'S EEI.T HATS WHITE s .. ,I \WV. (.KEY. BLUE, BROWN .'.'.'. (2 21 T.R. 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a.





ESTABLISHED 1895





Franco Wants U.K. To
Return Gibraltar

LONDON, Nov. 27,
The British Foreign Office declined any comment or
Generalissimo Franco's proposal in an interview with jh«
Sunday Times of London that Britain ghould re-open ne-
gotiations to return the fortress of Gibraltar to Spain.
To all inquiries on the lengthy interview, the Foreign
Office replied, “No Comment.”
bintidiaipialegriptRialioanesetinaettinariiemen sme

* There has been no
Air War

reaction to the interview so far.
Reliable sources said, however,
Over Korea
Renewed

that Britain has no intention of

discussing the return of the rocky
8TH ARMY H.Q., Korea, Nov. 27.
United States jet fighter pilots

fortress to Spair
shot down four Communist jet

newspaper



value, These quarters said that
wer proved its valué to Britain in
keeping open the lifeline to the
Mediterranean, Africa, the Middle
East, and the Far East.

A Free Port

om AWE 42, Li»
WR ZZ

British quarters unofficially re-
jected Franco’s contention that
Gibraltar was of doubtful military
fighters and lost one of their planes
in a sharp renewal of the air war
over Korea today, but ground

fighting subsided along the 145- One source said, “Gibraltar is
thi ceasefire battle line. An|20ot a port. It isa military base—
Eighth Army communique said and an important one.”

that allied troops re-took two ad-
vance positions on the Central

Front, which had been lost to correspondent Cedric Salter, that
bu le-blowing Chinese attackers Anglo-Spanish relations could
last night. ~pnever be “wholly satisfactory” so)

However, the communique re-
ported nothing but patrol activity
from the rest of the frozen front,
which will become the permanent
ceasefire line if the remaining
armistice terms are settled within
30 days. \

Brilliant Flares

In his interview Franco suggest-
ed that Gibraltar could become a
“free port.”

Franco said in the copyrighted
interview with the Sunday Times

long as Gibraltar remained
bone of contention between them.
The interview was released by the
Spanish Government this morning.
Franco proposed that Britain
should discuss the problem now
before time and_ circumstances
force you to do so.”

Since the Conservatives returned

the}





LORD PORTEOUS (Frank Collymore) tries to finish a game of patience
Lady Kitty (Greta Bancroft) and Clive Champion-Gheney (James Gro
CIRCLE presented by the Bridgetown Players last night.



Saale sohsoe




7
AY



spite of interruptions from
th). A scene from THE

N.A-T.O. Near
|

| Europe's Army






IVE CENTS

CHINESE RE =
START CAMPAIGN TO
CONQUER ALL S.b. ASIA

er After Korean Cease-fire

(By ARTHUR GOUL)
FORMOSA, Nov. 27,
One of Nationalist China’s highest ranking mainland
intelligence analysts claimed that a ceasefire in Korea

Agreement On

would help the Chinese Communists to begin a vast carm-
(By FPF. H. SHACKFORD). paign for the conquest of all Southeast Asia
ROME, Noy, 2/ rhe official, who asked net

North Atlantic powers near

Aingl agreement Tuesday night or
the proposal to speed the forma-

Po Water ) the ‘SinosRe a ‘ ar ‘ » ain

yi { E th doned their desite [op ie cue

“or of a Eurepean army and us 7% que Formosa, the weisht ef
a quest of rmosa,

German Goes own the evidence of their mainiand

them to give it
age forward.”

The European Army idea call
for a continental army of mixed
divisions of French, German, Ital-
ian, Belgian, Dutch and Scandina
vian troops, as the only way the
French will agree to the re-arma-
ment of Germany,

Canada’s Lester B, Pearson
President of the N.A.T.O, Counei)
announced at a Press Conference
after this morning’s meeting, tha
the US Secretary of State

a “big quick pass



movements points directly to their

ying in the side ot Viet-
LAN, Nov 27 | moving ir on | a

The sdieaiake eee sters of |Minh to clear Tonking of Freneh

the Po River is diminishing in; and Viet reaps fon = oe aan

the flooded northeastern zones }!eaving th —* € v f Maint

ufter engineers set off 165 dyna- China to the forces of iet in

mite charges to reduce the flow|‘? begin their own Kremlin

f ter , rs th the main rive directed campaigns against Burma
DY eee ee Rega ind Thailand.

bed set off

sounds of dynamite Build-up of Strength
ypen a 330 metre breach This, of course,

Engineers over



To-day, as the situation show yperations in South China, which
ed definite signs of improvermer jearly reveal the
around Fovigo and other trength and transport
seriously hit over one week ag ung Kwangst,

buildup «of
in Kwan-
Yun Nam

cite

and

Chinese Communists set off a
series of brilliant green, red, and
yellow signal flares during the
night. No attacks followed, how-
ever, and it was believed that the
Reds might be celebrating the
agreement on the tentative truce
line,

Allied observers expect ground
fighting to die down altogether
while the truce teams at Panmun-
jom try to complete their agenda]ant Secretary that Britain hoped
by the December 27th deadline. If |to maintain “correct” and “friend-
they succeed, the opposing armies |jy" relations with Spain, —U,P.
would have to give up any terrain

WAR

to power in Britain, there has been
an attempt to improve Anglo-
Spanish relations, which plunged
to its depths during the six years
of Socialist rule in Britain,

During a call at the British For-
eign Office, earlier this month, the
Spanish Ambassador, Duke Primo
De Rivera was told by Geoffrey
Harrison, the Foreign Office Assist-



they took in the interim, and would
have to return to their present
positions for the ceasefire.

But war will go on unabated in
the air and at sea. Two air battles
flared over Northwest Korea to-
day. In the first, some Soviet
M.1.G.-15 jets pounced on some |
slower U.S, F-80 Shooting Star jet
fighter-bombers in an unsuccessful |
attempt to break up an attack on
Communist railway targets. i

IN KOREAN

Truce Teams |
Meet Snag
PANMUNJOM, Korea, Nov. 27.

The United Nations demanded
the right to go behind Communist
lines as far north as the Manchu-
rian border, during the Armistice, i
to make sure that the Reds do not ; ‘
build a new invasion army.

The chief U.N. delegate, Vice
Admiral C. Turner Joy made this |
demand in presenting a seven-
noint keep-the-peace programme
to the Communists. | awarded the “S Korean

The Communists at once reject- Highest Military Medal.’
ted the proposal and pressed for The Medal of Houses of S.



Edward Cecil Clarke, son
of Mr, and Mrs. E. D. Clarke
of “Spooners”, St. John, was




the adoption of a five-point pro- Korea—by the President of

gramme of their own, Joy said S Mores for outstanding

that it- was “not broad enough.” | '

Both sides agreed to study the | ee it tantind aikton:

question further, j ae arine on.
The impasse’ is temporary |

major rail junctions in N.
Korea, destroying all the ob-
jectives, baffling all the
movements of troops and
equipment across the Man-
churia Border into N. Korea.
For this very heroic deed
where only 4 of the 22 men
mission returned, the United
States Navy Cross was
awarded to all 4 who re-
turned by General O. P-.
Smith of the Ist Marine Di-

though it may dim hopes for an
armistice by Christmas.



—U-P.

Italian Reds Stage

Protest March |
Against N.A.T.O. Talks

ROME, Nov. 27,

Riot squads were called out in! a
Central Rome, to-night, to break | yinien of the field in Korea
up an attempt by some 500 Com- | or outstanding gallantry
munist “partisans of peace” to|| beyond the call of duty of
march on Parliament to their country, the United
the Atlantic Pact Council States of America, |
ing in Rome.—vU.P.

RUSSIA EXTENDS
SLAVE SYSTEM

(By W. A, RYSER)
LONDON, Nov. 27,

Radical organizational changes in the Soviet forced
labour system, as well zs its considerable extension, were
revealed by authoritative sources here. The changes con-
sist in the total reversion of policy concerning the use of
“slave lebour” and the location of the concentration camps
in Soviet Russia.

The sources said that what was the exception yester-
day has become the rule to-day. Until recently, it was
Moscow’s policy to confine permanent concentration camps
to certain remote regions of the country.

Sources said today such camps ~



|
|
On a Commando raid on (3) |
|
{

protest
meet-











are found near almost every Soviet aa
oo centre, including Mos- WAR WOULD MEAN
cow.

In addition to permanent camps,
the Soviet authorities are known
to have used forced labour for cer- |
tain definite largescale projects, |
such as the White Sea Canal, but
to have avoided the use of politi-
cal prisoners for normal industrial

LOSS OF INDEPENDENCE

PHILADELPHIA, Nov. 27.
Indonesia is maintaining an in-
dependent foreign policy because
}another World War would mean
work. Now, such prisoners are | the loss of its dreams for complete
put to work alongside free work- |ii@ePendence, Dr, Ali S. A. S,
ers, often in the same factories. |Troamidjo Indonesian Ambassa-
The sources ?:uoted eyewitnesses, wr 9 the U.S. said Tuesday at a
oric










| price of

Tories Not Likely |
To Abolish Sugar |
Rationing

(From Our Own Correspondent)

LONDON, Noy, 27.

ernment, there is no immediate
likelihood that sugar rationing in

the United Kingdom is being
abolished, The factors against it
can be summed up as follows:

1, Britain cannot obtain suffi-|
cient supplies from Empire sources
to meet demands and with our dol-
lar position as it is to-day, it is
hardly likely that any Govern~
ment would allow indiscriminate
use of dollans that de-controi
would involve.

2. In view of the present high
sugar, the holding of
stocks, by refiners, manufacturers
and wholesale dealers would im-
pose on all of them a consider-
able financial burden.

3. De-rationing would probably

mean an annual increase of
abeut 400,000 tons in U.K.. con-
| sumption, and before’ such

which manufacturers pay one

penny per pound more than the] folk

housewife would have to ws
abolished: There would have to
be one basic price only.

EGYPT issued a warning w all shipping companies

Egypt Clamps
On Unloading Of
$a vies “Goods For U.K. Forces

Down

CAIRO, Nov. 27.

against unloading goods compared to British forces with-

out the authorization of the

ustoms authorities,

The warning was contained in a circular sei all ship-

pers,

stating that they would not be responsible for “the

violation of customs regulations” if any of their ships dis-
charged goods in Britain-controlled ports in the Suez Canal

Zone.

Victims Of Red
Blackmail Refuse
To Pay More Money

SAN FRANCISCO, Nov. 27
Some 40 victims of a Chinese



a}lCommunist extortion racket were
‘measure is taken, the system by]under solemn pledge to send na

more money to ransom, their kins-
threatened with imprison-
ment, torture, and death.

At a meeting held here on Sun-
day night, the rank and file vic-

But say E. D. and F. Man in|tims of the Red blackmail voted |

The circular ad@ed that ships
should be unloaded @mly at such
ports where the Egyptian customs
Were operating, and qnly after the
payment of duties.

Meanwhile, Parliament drafted
a message to King by? un-
ani iy. su rtin overn-
abrogation of the 1}

Key plan the ur
of Egypt and the Su an, and the

ousting of British troops from the
Canal Zone,—U,P,

| ARTIE'’S HEADLINE

}
|

i participation in
the Western defence.

Delegates to the North Atlanti
Treaty Organization conferen
urgently considered the matte
after the United States called upor

which
invaded
Donads

the

the waters broke throug! | ihe official
the new gap the town’ | tical
of Loreto, Rosolin ivive
stiuated in Previ- | against

the poli-
indicate a
than

pointed to
motives which
southward, rather
Formosa alone.

Acheson was heading the move
ment to get action on the Euro
pean Army idea.
hower yesterday

and

General Eisen
Lowlands

vlaced the

1,00
blasting
throug depends 0
which tons of muddy water push | whether the fighting ends in Korea
ed their way into the Lowlan Aside from the purely mil y
pro










ject at the top of his list of im.]°US te dynamiting, army boats He said that Sino-Red involve-
portant and urgent things to be} evacuated the towns’ inhabitants; ment in Indo-China w suld be
done. to safety spots from where they arrying out

Eisenhower was present at to-| moved during the night to Padu Ist One of the cardinal prin-
day’s meeting, and answered ques- | and Treviso.—vU.P, ciples of the Kremlin — to keep
tions on various subjects—-¢s ee the Western Powers,—specifieally
pecially about his feeling otf the United States involved In a
urgency to get the European Army) ’ Y hooting war, in which fio~Rus-
with German padticleniion Teheran Students ians are participating ~in the

The French Foreign Minister x o front line This is more likely
Robert Schuman, gave a progres D>, ®P? lin Indo-China than in Formosa
report on recent work in Paris on Clash With I olice 2nd The chances of suecess in

the European Army idea, He wa





TEHERAN, Noy. 27 iding Viet Minh drive the French
followed by Acheson who told the Fighting pineal pee aeain ti om Tonking are greater “than
pune about on recent 81 tween Persian polic swat wi he Chinese Red attempt ‘te in-
Three Foreign inisters confer~ oie 7 ’ en? ,dle. Formosa
ence with the West German Chan- dent * to-day when th polt 7 3rd The thinty veiled threat
eellor Konrad Adenauer entered Teheran schools to at . .F ann aa

"wp, |rest students suspected of tak include Formosa aa earth
ing part in last night’s clashes, Te discussions would _ indicate
° ° ~ in which 100 people were injur hat the ; hinose rer os
‘Ike Will Seek od The police, 500 trong a aoe Pesan bey we ta ae
brought prison vans to take Ni . 2 i‘ ant i ‘ 1s possi-
° to do politically
a away the suspects
Presidency Students poured out of the Already Manped-out

VBC. lorre nde Says echools = in thousands om . .
B Cor apo dent § ) shouting “Down With Mossa- T h e Nationalist Intelligence
NEW YORK, Nov. 27. degh” and some “Long Live)}ofiicer said that it had ~ been
A National Broadcasting Com- Mogsadegh,”’ but all resisting the}.carned from mainiand sources
pany correspondent reported from /Police. Fighting continued spas~ that the Chinese Reds alreaay
Rome Tuesday night that General |modically during the — morning. have mapped out the Indo-China
Dwight Eisenhower has indicated|The number of injured and or-|campaign—with Russian direetion

he will resign his European Com-|rested to-day was not disclosed, | which calls for fighting alongsiie

mand early next year to “seek Last night troubles which led|the Viet Minh only until Ton-
and accept” Republican Presi-}to the resignation of the Police king is safe in the Communist
dential nomination, Chief, General Mansouri Mozay orbit,

Correspondent Jack Degon said|eni, began when the police clash- The Chinese Red assessment cf

jabove the

their latest circular, “it is felt that
the eventual de-control of sugar
is more likely under a conserviu-
tive Government than under the
late administration.”

E. D. and F. Man add that the
same amount (850.000 tons) cf
dollar sugar as last year may be

imported into the U.K, this year,
| in consequence of the small Com-| threatening

monwealth production.



World Sugar Crop |
1951-52 Will Total |
36,500,000 Tons

WASHINGTON, Novy, 27.

The Office of Foreign Agricul-
tural Relations in its curren: issue
on foreign crops and markets pre-
dicted that the world production
of cane and beet sugar in 1951—52
would total 36,500,000 tons slight- |
ly more than the 36,400,000 tens |
of last season and would be well}
1935—39 average of}
28,900,000 tons.

According to the Agency’s annual |
fall summary, world wool produc- |
tion this year is now estimated at
4,070,000,000, a 60,000,000 gain over
last -year. i

An all time peak of 4,000,000,-
000 pounds of wool was produced
in 1941. The report said that
favourable weather conditions and
rising prices helped to increase
wool production during the lk
your years.—U.P





Italian Membership
On U.N. Discussed

PARIS, Nov. 27.
France, supported by Britain,
the United States and most of the |

Arab and Latin blocs, jormally
proposeti Tuesday that Italy be
given full United Nations mem-
bership.

The resolution recalled that the
U.N, already has elevated Italy to
a seat without vote on the U.N.|
trusteeship Council but that to do
its job properly it should be given
a vote in that body.

—U.P.

U.S. DEPENDS MORE
ON FOREIGN SOURCES
OF RAW MATERIALS

WASHINGTON,



Nov. 27.

to cut off the flow of money to
Peiping Governmert, although it
undoubtedly meant an end of their
hopes to keep their relatives in
China alive,

The meeting was an outgrowth
of the recent publicity given to
the Communist method of acquir-
ing valuable foreign exchange by
lives of mainland
Chinese, who have _ relatives
abroad.

Meanwhile, it was learned that
the Executive Council of the
powerful “Six Companies” which
virtually runs the affairs of San
Francisco's Populous “Chinatown”
has scheduled a meeting soon to
discuss the problem. —U.P,



MONEY OR ELSE!

from Chtnede Communists
to kill their relatives in
China unless they pay: sub-
stantial ransom to agents
in Hong Kong. They thought
that the Communists
discovered their
through
New

One Chinese market gar-
dener said that he had al-
ready paid two demands and

had

where-

remittances
Zealand,

abouts

sent from

Vas now faced
third He wa

end more

with the
unable to
money

UP.



British Claim
The Moon

LONDON, Noy. 27

sritish seientists staked» the
world’s first “elaim” on the moon
and planets today. The British
Interplanetary Society which in-
cludes some of the nation’s lead-
ing cientists issued members’
‘passports” for interspage travel.
he 40-page documents include
spaces for visas to land at all
planets of solar system “an for
any British territories that might
be annexed in the heavens.”

Members who planned passports
very similar to the official British




Oe
T

bluebond documents admitted
the issue was a kind of joke,” but
the Societys leaders to whom

interplanetary oke

said they

travel is no

would useful to



AUCKLAND, Nov. 27. ;
Several Chinese residents
here, have reported threats




j)
|

‘

“1 hate Britain...
| hate

Britain ..

| hate Britain...” |
ee



| _-—- -—

| Japan Will Not Be

Pressed For Forees

WASHINGTON, Novy. 27,

John Foster Dulles, chief arehi-
tect of the Japanese peace treaty
has no intention of pressing the
Japanese for definite rearmament
commitments when he visits Tokyo
next month, according to sources
in position to knew,

However, it is considered her«
that the Japanese soon must begin
to face more realistically the post
treaty necessity for the creation of
adequately armed ground forces
which eventually would be knit in
with American sea and air forces
in the Western Pacific as part of
the bulwark against possible Com-
munist aggression,

Tr the light of this factor it is
not impossible that Dulles may

other Japanese officials to devote
more thought to this
within the immediate

question
future
—U.P.



CZECH VICE-PREMIER
ARRESTED

VIENNA, Nov, 27
Czechoslovakia announced the
arrest of Rudolf, Vice Premier and
former Secretary-General of the
Czech Communist Party in what
appeared to be the prelude to an-
Party

other drastic purge.—U.P.

on a news broadcast heard here
that Eisenhower gave the indica-
tion to military associates at the
Rome meeting of the North At-
lantic Council —(CU.P.)



Guerillas Fight
All Out Battle

SINGAPORE, Nov. 27

Communist Guerillas in Malaya
are now fully committed to bat-
tle deploying all their forces in
order to exist, Lieutenant Gen, Sn
H, Briggs declared today,

The retiring direcior of opera-
tions in Malaya was speaking at
a Press conference with his suc-
cessor General Sir Robert Lock-
hart who takes over command to-
day.

“We have much evidence to
show that Communists are putting
, their all into this battle’, he said.
Life in the jungle is no longer the
easy life it was. Food is scarcer
and they have to split into smaller
groups and work harder to get it.

We have some way to go before
the day comes when Communist
morale is broken, but broken
will be.”’"—U,P.



Iran Will Sell Oil

To Eastern Bloc

TEHERAN, Nov. 27

Deputy Premier Hossein Fate
mi announced that Ira would
start selling oil to the
bloc” soon as the necess
formalities are completed. He told
a Press Conference that Iran
viewed oil sales as an economic
not a political matter, and did not
care about political views of po-
tential customers The Fatemi







said Iran is now “legally free” to
sell oil where she pleased because

had
which

former purchasers
time to make offers
not been forthcoming

He said Premier Mohpmmed
Mossadegh would attend the next
Hague Court meeting “if neces-
sary” to establish the internation-
al body’s incompetence to settle
the oil dispute. —U.P.

ample
had



Disarmament To Be

ed with girls from the Nurbaaksh

High School, who had gone on
strike in sympathy with seven
girls expelled for Communist

activities. —U.2.



The “ADVOCATE”
pays for NEWS
Dial 3113
Day or Night.



«



to my lips’.

“Altogether, we

one can get”.



“a



|














| They're always

} **Not one of my worries, thank
goodness; but I must say Edo
like the way they never stick

seem to
have discovered just about
the best-behaved cigarette

the situation is that once Tonkiag
is under their control, the Viet
Minh, would be able to envelope
the remainder of the country.

Communist attention then wouid
be aimed at Burma and Thailand.
Plans for overall conquest oy
Southeast are being drawn
up by a special ageney in Peiping
culled the Southeast Asia Revolu-
ticnary Committee, The Commit-

Asia

tee members represent Russia, Red
Chine, Indo-China, Burma, Thal-
land, Indonesia and the Philip-
pines

—UP.

so well-mannered!”

“T think I know what you
mean. Never any heat,
never a trace of harshness;
always cool, calm and
collected”.

“And none of those
little bits of loose
tobacco on my lips
to spoil my make-

up”.

ee
o J a

**Not to mention the aristocratic



Discussed With Russia’



|
ge Premier Shigeru Yoshida and







a. ' i : s prove

mainly Soviet soldiers who escaped Affairs Council luncheon.| The United States has become! anyone travelling 7 to space

to the West after being on leave in —U.P. {steadily more dependent upon ‘aa PARIS, Nov, 27 and Russian plans might facilitate |
various, parts of European Russia | | foreign sources of raw material —_— Britain. France and the United the work oi dis rmament nic]
as evidence that many such camps ical analysis of long- . . a a Ww ' armamen







; ; : | A statist
exist near industrial towns on the NO CAUSE FOR WORRY | sate trends issued by the Depart-|
Volga, in the industrial region west | os |ment of Commerce showed even
of the Urals and in the Ukraine. | NEW YORK, Nov. :

1} ;
‘ . yefore the launching of the pres =f
Informants have noticed that Moukhtar A. Zaki, Press Secre-} that!

;ent great defence programme

States are in broad agreement that |
they should meet Soviet delegates |
to thresh out disarmament prob-

ARGENTINA EXPECTS
GOOD FRUIT HARVESTS

The
the United

American
States

spokesman said
would reserve

There'll never be a betier cigareiie





















| lems if the U.N. Political Commit- | the right, if it was thought advis- ij i is
| tow f 4 ne wi » >» ‘ a tini } > sugge sibl e -
great part, perhaps the majority of | ‘a?y of the Egyptian Embassy in| the U.S. had reversed its former! WASHINGTON, Nov. 27 be. wishe d the m to do sq, a United pene. to iggest pos ible chang’ B ' wy a
slave labourers working in the | Washington said in a letter to] position as wall roducer off Argentina has prospects for bet-!* tates spokesman said today |} in the wording of the Resolution | SY oA & 3
Ukrainian towns are young wo-|the Herald Tribune Tuesday. that vee ‘a ee ee y : y comtae e pepects por b Feeling in the Political Com- | calling for such a meeting intro-
men, They are mainl a then > we tig Shae ea gE Oe) ee ee 1an average narve of apples, mittee, he said, seemed general |duced yesterday by Pakistan, Iraq} THE EXCLUSIVE FILTER TIP CIGARETTE sate ie Tieatias
en y are mainly ¢ ved | was no foundation for al-| many categories of raws was to-| pears, plums and table grapes in|that the rojected four-power land Syria. India has c 9 } , MADE IN ENGLAND
in the construction of new fac- | leged Vatican concern aver rd th pli f t ver|the 1961—-82 season according to ap pro} . pur“ DOWN: | * eee, sree oe oe eee OLE DI *! 7 ¢ LTD -
tories hristians in Egypt 1 ¢ [nee eee ee Ob SOT Se ivol—-o2 season according '©/meeting with the General Assem- | posed the for ion of a group to LB DI G53) ele ene ae Lid.
. jcoristians in Egypt because of the{exports or the reduction in the; the U.S. Department of Agricul-'bly President, Dr. Luis Padilla |study disarmament plan Se ee tal Sg te ae reee oA eee ee
ie ipresent ct UP t ; - _ i I
vl : = ee net volume of export U.P —U.F Nervo to try and reconcile Western | —U.P.
a

“>

PAGE TWO
At The Theatre

THE CIRCLE

THE = Circle
Somerset

years late
dom there



was writter

the





per year. In 1946 the figure h:

risen to $31,457 and it ha

alimt Y highe ever nee in
the United States during i
Cleven year period 1936-46 there
were 3,739,000 divorces or 4.9
marriages for every divorce re-
ported,

When Scfherset Maugham wrote

the Circte,-members of Parliament
could lose their seats if they be-



came divbr¢éed. Until quite re-
gentiy a divorced person had
le hope of a knighthood or
honour from the King. To-

t some” of the most distin-
guished people in the United
Kingdora--are divorced. Unless
these facts Are known it is im-

possible to appreciate the Circle.

Somerset Maugham is one of
these aecomplished playwrights
whose ability is known by the

number of plays they have run-

by
Maugham in 1921. Eight

in United King- companied
were only 4,018 divorces A.D.C, Maj. Dennis Vaughan and
d

heen night

Caub Calling |.

muel GOLDWYN’S |

{lOUR VERY OWN & MYSTERY in MEXICO

IS EXCELLENCY
ernor and Lady
by the

the
Savage
Governor's

Gov-

ac-

a small party attended the opening
of Somerse Maughain’s
1 he Cire le,” a Brid retown
Players presentation.

Included in the Governor's party
were Sir Allan and Lady Colly-
more, Mrs. Dorothy Hutson, Sir
Rupert Briercliffe and Mrs. Biggar.

From British Columbia

vi" AND MRS. GEORGE ASH-

WORTH arrived from Puer-
to Rico on Monday. by b.W.1.a.
en route from Canada where their
heme is in British Columbia.
Here for a few month,’ holiday
they are s.aying at “Strathallan”,
Rockley.

Mr. Ashworth has visited Bar-
bados on several occasions but this
is his wife's first visit.

They were accompanied by their

ning in London at the same time, @-ughter Martha.

Only Bernard
plays running
Maugham~at one period.
ean be no question then
Maugham’s technique in

Shaw had
in London

more
than
There
as to
writing

for the theatre. The action of the year writes

Circle moves as effortlessly as the

pencil of any doodler. But the
Circle has nothing to do with
doodlears,

Its name is derived from an-

other source. The wheel has come

Great Grandfather
GEORGE DOORLY who

R.
M visited Barbados earlier thi:
me from Bloomfield !

N. J. to say that he is the first
of the nine sons of Martin Edward
Doorly of Durham and Katherine
Isabella Doorly of Barbados, to be-
come a greet grandfather.

A son “Christopher” was born

full circle, That is what the Circle to his grandson Peter on October

is all about.

divorced women were
as definitely not upper drawer.
the genius of Maugham found

scope in presenting a play of the
moment. But to-day when divorce
has become so cheap, so matter
of fact, so unblushingly something
which rrises no eyebrows, it is
impossible fcr any but an unso-
phisticated audience to find the
Circle anything’ but a period
piece
The fact that in spite of its ab-
sence of topicality the Circle stitl
can interest. the theatre goer, 1s
a tribute to author and players.
A Barbadian. audience, accustomed
it is 6b society where the
non-mar ied» exceed the married,
if statistiesacan be trusted, will
naturally not react ‘to the subject
of diverce in the same way as a
London or New York audience.
Last“ntgnt’s audience was not
however a typical Barbadian
audietite and their reactions were
very aoe in the first Act. Not
even the players seemed to find
the cOnversations in a drawing
room ery exciting and we had
to wait a long time for Greta
Bancr@ft and Frank Collymore
to give us cause for laughter. In
the seeond act Michael Timpson
as thé aggrieved husband gav

the finest individual acting per-@ "DOW.

And in 1921 when 8. Mr. Doorly
regarded April.

will be 75 next

U.C.W.I. Scholarship

AMONG the passengers leaving

for Jamaica las. week was
Mr. C. D. Barrow, formerly a
pupil of Lodge School. Mr. Bar-
row has been awarded an Exhibi-
tion at the University College of
the West Indies on the results of a
competitive examination held
earlier this year. He recently ob-
tained his Higher Cer.ificate in
English, Latin and History and
will be studying for his degree in
these subjects. This Exhibition
which covers all expenses is for a
minimum period of three years. He
hopes, after completing his degree

, course to read for the Diploma in

Education.

Super-Star Show

UBERT CLARKE was awarded

first prize when the Super

Star Talent Show was held at the

Globe Theatre over the week-end.

Clarke sang the classical tune,
“Bless This House.”

Nine contestants took part, This
was a repeat performance of the
On the first occasion the

formance of the evening, with /U4ges did not arrive at a decision.

James=Grossmith as a close run«
ner up. Pauline Dowding’s cold
added-a certain charm to her dif-
ficult part, anc the surliness of
Dereks Fontes as Edward Luton
was eonvincing if monotonous.

The-climax of the play occurs
in theethird Act. By this time all
the players were fully at home in
their Toles and the “theatre” of
the Imst act itself assisted the
players in showing what they
could “do.

The Circle jis another success
for the Bridgetown Players and
the members of the Dramatic
Club who took part, but it can-

not be regarded as one of the
most successful choices of plays.
Period pieces are always difficult

but we are still too near to 1921
to derive the full benefit of the
Circlewas a Comedy of Manners
in the ’twenties.

G.H.
_—__.

BBC, Radio Pragramme

WEDNESDAY, NOVEMBER 28, 1961
11.15 4.0". Programme Parade, 11,30 a.in.
England ve Australia, 12 (noon) The

S1.32M 412.43M

4 p.m, The News. 4.10 5
Servic, 415 p.m







‘m,. The Daily
Rugby League
Football, 4.25 p.m. BBC Midland Light
Orchestfa, 5 p.m. North of Scotland vs
The SdPth Africans, 5,05 p.m. Interlude,
5.15 pan. BBC Symphony Orchestra,
6 p.me-Souvenirs of Music,, 6.45 p.m
Programme Parade, 6.55 p.m. To-day's
6 aig ear 7 pm. The News, 7.10 p.m.
News nalysis,

715-1080 pom. |

si

SL32M 48.45o



_7.15 fim. Co-operatives and the Future
No, 4.Summing Up, 7.45 Pm. Twenty
Questions, 815 p.m. Radio Newsreel,
0.30 P.M. State nt of Account, 8.45 Pm,
Compdger of e Week, 9 p.m. Smail
Fortune, 10 pam. The News, 10.10 p.m,
From ths the Editorials, 10.15 p.m
Mid-wegk Tal 10.30 p.m. John Bull.
. C.B, CROGRAMME
WEDNESDAY, NOVEMBER 28, 1951
10.05—28,20 p.m News

Chronicle.

10.20—T6.35 p.m
11.76 Més 25.60M

Canadian

Second prize went to teenager
Orvil Granderson who sang
“Because.” It was expected that
these two Talent winners will tour
St. Vincent shortly.

First Visit

RS. INEZ JACKSON of New
York City arrived in the
island over the week-end by
3.W.LA. She came from New York
via Jamaica, Puerto Rico and An-
‘tigua.

Mrs, Jackson expects to spend
two weeks in the island, She is
Staying at the residence of Mrs.
D. Riviera, Barbarees Hill, St.
Michael,

She was accompanied by her
aunt, Mrs. Gramie Tull, a Barba-
dian, who hag been living in the
U.S.A., for the past 42 years. Mrs.
Tull told Carib that she is very
much impressed with the changes
made in Barbados,

Rupert and the



pay % |

a,



In their haste the two pals take
a shorter way down the slope and
find it leads right on to the Lion
Rock, ‘*There they are, down
beside the tree. Hi, wait for us.
We're coming,” shouts Rupert.
They scramble and slide the rest
of the descent and are met by two





Capt. BEN FAIRWEATHER

Here For Christmas
EN FAIRWEATHER a Barba-

dian and Old Harrisonian
has just returned from Korean
Combat and is at present in New
York City on leave. He is a Cap-
tain in the Medical Service Corps
of the U.S. Army. His wife Nor-
ma is a_ graduate architect of
Columbia University and Assist-
ant Architect for the City of New
York,

Part of his leave he plans to
spend in Surinam with his wife
and when they leave there about
December 21st their next stop
will be Barbados where they will
spend Christmas. They expect to
be here for a little over two
weeks, .

Friends

R, GEORGE D. CUMMINGS
) of Springfield, Massachu-
setts, arrived on Monday evening
by B.W.LA. from Puerto Rico
for a visit with Mr. and Mrs,
Peter Morgan of St.
Hotel at whose wedding he was
bestman.

Mr, Cummings and Mr. Mor-
fan were together at Hotel
School in Switzerland and sub-
sequently at .the Caribe Hilton,
San Juan, Puerto Rico | where
Mr. Cummings is at present
Purchasing Agent.

He will probably be in Bar-

bados for about two weeks.
For ‘the Winter
N BARBADOS for the winter
are Dr. and Mrs. A. Clifford
Jack of Montreal. They arrived
over the week-end by the Lady
Kodney and are staying at the
Marine Hotel.

Also arriving by the Lady
Rodney and staying at the Mar-
ine are Dr, and Mrs. C, R. Cowar.
of Boston, Dr. Cowan is spend-
ing two weeks’ holiday while his
wile is remaining for the winter.
With Cable And Wireless
M* RUDY KIRTON who had

been in Barbados for three
weeks’ holiday returned to St.
Vineent on Monday by B.G. Air-
ways, He ig at present stationed
at Cable and Wireless’ branch in
that colony.

During his holiday he was stay-
ing with his parents Mr. and Mrs.
Irwin Kirton of “Sandown”, Fon-
tabelle,

Incidental Intelligence
HEN BOAC get the Comets
in service, New Yorkers will

be able to take a swim in Ber-
muda and dry themselves at
home,—Sir Miles Thomas in New
York yesterday.

L.E.S§

Lion



“T've seen that

familar figures.
gentleman somewhere," says Rollo.
‘And, good gracious, the other
one is Sailor Sam from Nu:wood |"
“Hullo, admiral,’ cries Rupert,
“Thank goodness you're here!"
Bur the admiral looks both angry





———é—逗<€_========



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M® FRANK WILLOCK, BSc.
- eldest son of Mr. and Mrs. Aan BLYTH—PFariey GRANGER William LUNDIGAN—Jacqueline WHITE ]] |
; V y f Antigr he ae
B. W an pois rare 1 tr Special Sat Ist Dee: % New Western Thrillers !
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days So Fran was eascste! MY) AP AZ A OTS 1G AMIE WW Be Gorse: |
the Antigua Grammar School, g , : '
nad “ or : the "Rov al Candi | TODAY & TOMORROW 5 & 5.20 p.m TODAY & TOMORROW 8.46 p.m
Air F : ails: ‘ar roet|| Preston Foster—Ann Rutherford “| CAN'T GIVE YOU ANYTHING
Air Force and after the war re- aan BUT LOVE BABY
turned to Antigua where 4 “INSIDE JOB a

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Agr

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and also a Post Graduate Course | ||* "BROWN Wrangier & Cinecolor with Jon HALI

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expected to arrive in Antigua] |} Whip WILSON ee Ny Eee

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within a fortnight.

2 Arar additions to the grow-



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He returned to Canada|}



Royal Calypso re

ing library of calypsoes on

gramophone records are by Rae-

fae!

went

to

Steel Percussion Orchestra dur-
ing the Festival of Britain last
summer. His first recording has

just been issued in London, with
Freddy Grant’s Caribbean|
Rhythm accompanying. On oz

side is “Spanish Calypso” and 4
the reverse is “Royal Weddin?|
Calypso,” an amusing fantasy
about what happened to The!

Lion when he was invited to the ---
wedding
and Prince Philip.

) R. PATRICK LEIGH-FERM-

elle

stor.

Car

spec
competition
Sunday Times
paper describes the volume as “a}
first book
genius
ivid appetite for knowledge.”

If

Lawrence stand up today.

“A
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Se re
T0-DAY'S NEWS =|

JOHNSON’S STATIONZRY x

(“The Lion’) de Leon, who {
to London from Trinidad |)

sing with the Trinidad Al!

of Princess Elizabeth |

Carib Best Seller

OR, author of “The Trav-
r’s Three,” the best-selling |~-
y of a journey through the],
ibbean. has been awarded a
‘ial £100 prize in a literature
organised by the
of London. The

by a ‘writer with a

for description and an



Talking Point iI

you fell down yesterday, | ¢

—H. G. Wells. 1

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GLOBE

OPENING FRIDAY.




A MAN wiTH ;
A GUN :
ved S
BACK- Ss
STREET S

BEAUTY!

Tangled
outside
the law!








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wo
=
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or

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RICHARD ERDMAN + WILLIAM CONRAD
REGIS TOOMEY + JEAN PORTER
Produced by SAM WIESENTHAL ang WR. FRANK
Dwecied by ROBERT PARRISH + Sereempiny by
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TONITE 8.15 P.M. FLASHING STEEL
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* But, Mr,
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Persia 1} my
collapsed for lack of dollars



[Labour Cause

Needs Help

MRS, E. E. BOURNE told the
electorate of Chalky Mount, St.
Andrew, last night that the labour
movement is a cause which’ néeds
assistance and it is for them the
workers to give it that assistance
by going to the polls on Decem-
ber 13 and giving their support to
labour.

Mrs. Bourne was speaking at the
Labour Party’s political. meeting
which was held in support of her
candidature for.a seat in the
House of Assembly as a represen-
tative of the parish at the forth-
coming General Elections.

Although the loud _ speaking
apparatus refused to work, there
was still a big crowd who turned
out and remained to hear the
various speakers.

Among those who addressed the
electorate were Mr. F, L. Walcott,
Mr, James A. Tudor, and Mr.
G. H. Adams.

ARRIVALS BY B.W.LA. ON MONDAY
From GRENADA—Adela Phillip, Doreen
Gittens, Christine Powell, Edward Powell
and Maciej Zwiera

From TRINIDAD—K. T
Geodsman, J. Pena, H
Applewhite, C. Ap
med, M, Baksh, B



Murray R
Applewhite, N
ewhite, G. Moham-
ichards, M. Richards
wis, C. Phillip,

Cc. Ramnath,
dG. Chan Sing















MARTIN [Hubert Prior,
val and J Melir
GUADELOUPE—Philippe Berry

ST. VINCENT—Edwin Joyce
Harold Eames,, Wilbert Walker, Frank
t und Samuel Browne

F PUERTO RICO—Hazcl Bowen,
George Ashworth, Marian Grant Ash-
George Cummings, James Lionel Clarke,

orth, Martha Rapsey Ash



orth, (child)

and Schie Wolf Pillersdorf
DEPARTURES BY B.W.LA. ON
MONDAY
GRENADA—John Lang E





nes Babb, Fernando Degatres,
Moumit Hadeed and Henry Shrawson

For TRINIDAD—Arthur Delima, Arthur
Procope, Peter Batten, Dr. Lionel Stewart
and Mervin Washburn

Por ANTIGUA—Margaret
Eieanor Lee

For ST. VINCENT—Pete Tarrant,
Rudolph Kirton and George Luz

For MARTINIQUE—Marthe Hayot, Karl
Sommer-Jonsen ‘and Guy Leguene.

For PUERTO RICO—Joan Ince, Joseph
erson, Laura Myerson, Clarenie Loene,
Elizabeth Locke, Eugene Dawson and
Rachel, Dawson

Foste and







In Touch With Barbados |

Coastal Station

Cable and Wireles (W.L) Ltd., advise
that they can now ecgmmunicate with
the following ships through their Bar-
bados Coast Station:

s.s. Diane, s Cedar Dale, s.s. Alcoa

Planter,
Valley,

Sweet
British

Water, s.s, Sun
Resolution, 8.8
Jessie Lykes,
s.s. Rosario
Wanda, 8.5







Utilitas, s.s. Bonito, s. Tamaroa, 8 8
Fresno Star Axios, 8.8 Esso
Bethlehem, s.s Orinoco, 8.8 Rio
Tunuyar s Presidente Futra,

Alcoa Runner, Vulcania, 8.8 8

Rosa, s.s. Alcoa Clipper, s.s
Aagtedijk, s.s
Aleoa Polar

s. Halyc

RATES OF EXCHANGE
CANADA
NOVEMBER 27, 1951
65 6/10 pr. Cheques on

Libreville,
Ocean Ranger, 5.5







Bankers 63 G/10% pr.
Demand Drafts 63.46% pr
Sight Drafts 63 3/10% pr
65 6/10% pr. Cable
64 1/10 pr. Currency 62 1/10 pr
Coupons 61 4/10 pr
Silve



NOVEMBER

President, just

Government

s. Tamaroa, s,s. Rodas,

28, 195%

Mn

1

m

Everybody that sat in the
House of Assembly when
$192,000 were voted to send Bar-
badian emigrants to the U.S.A.
knew that the scheme would be
a failure and knew that he was
doing wrong, Mr. L. E. Ward said
at a political meeting held by the
Eleetors’ Association at Pie Corn-
er on Monday night in the sup-
port of the candidatures of Mr.
S. A. Walcott and himself.

Mr. Ward said that the Labour
Party was not giving the people
all the amenities that they were
talking about.

None of the people knew what
percentage they would get next
year, but they knew that rice was
going up and that the price of
meat was going up. Nobody was
coming to them and telling them
that they would get better wages.

The labour people in England
tried a Labour Government and
the result was that England was

bankrupt. The Labowr Govern-
ment in England had the people
starving as the Labour Govern-

ment of Barbados will surely do.

The West Indies were getting ¢
better price for their sugar today
because the British Government
wanted the West Indies to pro-
duce more sugar for their market,
he said. “That and God's rain
was responsible for the labourers
getting back pay; not Ward or the
Labour Party or anybody else.
The Labour Party was dishonest
when they said that they got
back pay for the workers.”

“If you read our manifesto, you
will see that there is not much
difference between ours and the
Labour Party’s,” he sid. “Do
you think that Barbados with its
economy can do what the Labour
Party come and promise to you?
“Barbados is too small; it prim-
arity produces children and then
sugar and its economy can’t ful-
fil these promises.”

Speaking on Emigration, Mr.
Ward said that the Barbados Gov-
ernment voted $192,000 the last
session to send emigrants to
America. Everybody in the
House of Assembly at the time
knew that he was doing wrong
to send thtm to America, Every
body knew. that. it would. be a

Are now at COLLINS’

YARDLEYS -

LEN THERIEIC—Tweed, Miracle, Repartie.

HOUBIGANT



|



THE FINEST
RANGE TO

CHOOSE
FROM....

IN ALL
POPULAR
SIZES

_
IC

COLLINS DRUG

“Age Grouping Rotten”

—Says WARD

failure but had to do it because
the people were promised that
they would be sent out whenever
emigration was possible. America
would prefer to take workers
from Mexico and Jamaica because
these places were nearer to her
and hence the labour cheaper

The Government should have
taken Mr. Crawford's advice and
spent the money on _ building
roads which would give the
people employment for some time.
Added to this, Barbados — unlike
Jamaica — was not properly
represented in America and was
taken advantage of. His party
felt that a permanent representa-
tive should be sent to America.

There was also the Evans pro-
posal to send Barbadians to the
hinterland of British Honduras.
That would bound to fail because
Barbadians would not be satis-
fied to go to British Honduras
and have to. cut down forest and
kill snakes before they could find
living conditions.

Coming to the cost of living, he
was not saying that the Barbados
Government was responsible for
the high cost of living but he
knew that they could do a lot to
cushion it. The Electors’ Associa-
tion would do a lot to cushion
it if they got power. ‘They were
men of business ability

Food and clothing were con-
trotted in England but as soon as
the English exporter was sending
out his goods, there was no con-
trol. His party felt that a dele-
gation should be sent up to the
Secretary of State for the Colonies
and make demands just as Busta-
mante did.

Mr. Ward said that the Welfare
set-up was not fair He, as a
factory owner, was getting £1 per
ton free for his sugar factory
while the labourer was only get-
ting 10/-. He never had to pay
back one cent while the labourers
had to pay back every cent that
they got from the Labour Wel-
fare Fund. His party felt that the
labourers should be given up to
one third of what they borrow.

Mr. Smith recommended in the
House that the Government should
bring in tractors to help the peas-
ants. The Government could not
do it because they were

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afraid

Se re

BARBADOS

re

ADVOCATE

Londnan Exoress Service

that they offended the labourers.
But still the Government were
telling the peasants to pool their
resources together.

@ On Page 5.

.

Riot Damage
LONDON
In the House of Commons on

November 21, Mr, Thomas, Reed
(Labour, Swindon) asked the Se:-

retary of State for the Colonies
what was the value of damage
done in recent riots in Grenada;

and to what extent the cost was
met by the culprits, the property
owners, the Colonial Government
and the British taxpayer, respec-
tively.

Mr. Oliver Lyttelton, the Colo-

nial Secretary, replied: “Damage
incurred during the Grenada
strike is now estimated at about

£65,000. An accurate assessment
is impossible since the principal
claims relate to unharvested crops
alleged to have been stolen. No
part of the cost has been met by
the culprits or the United King-
dom taxpayer. A claim by the local
agricultural association for com-
pensation amounting to £45,036 in
respect of uninsured or inunsura-
ble losses incurred by private
owners is now being considered
by the Grenada Government, The
Grenada Government will also
meet the cost of repairing or re-
placing Government property.”
—B.U.P.

is

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Gaol Break

HAVANA, Cuba, Nov. 26,
Cuban Minister of the Interior
Segundo Corti, has resigned fol-
lowing yesterday's prison break
by four gangsters from the Havana
main gaol Gangsters escaped
with the aid of members of thei:
gang dressed as policemen and

armed with machine guns.
—UP.

U.S. EMBASSY COURTER |
WOUNDED IN CAIRO |

CAIRO, Nov. 26
A United States Embassy
spokesman said Monday 25-yeur-

old Frank Boyd, the third Embassy

courier sustained minor injuries
when attacked: by a crowd ol!
Egyptians Sunday while takin

photographs of a_ trolleycar i

Zamelek residential area of Cairo, |

Britisher
—UP.

fe was mistaken for a

BRISBANE

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THE ADVOCATE

STATIONERY




PAGE FOUR

BARBADOS &

=~

Printed by the




Ltd., Broad St.

Wednesday, November 28, 1951

EGYPT

IN days when the peoples of the world
are growing more and more tired of armed
conflict it is very tempting to see in
Britain’s attitude in the @anal Zone a
throw back to the days of jingoism. The
non-British peoples of the world accus-
tomed to the enormous might and power
of an Empire over which no sun sets have
grown either disinterested in Great
Britain’s future as a world power or
actively hostile. They have not yet grown
accustomed to Russian imperialism and,
indoctrinated as so many are with West-

Advocate Co Bridgetown

ern ideas of democracy, they fondly
imagine that a world in which British
“aggressiveness” has been eliminated

peace would triumph.

Those who know Great Britain and other
countries of the British Commonwealth
where the British way of life has been
successfully grafted into other,.continents
know how stupid these impressions are.
They know that Great Britain’s continu-
ance as a Great power is essential to the
peace of the world which we all desire.
But the world is not principally inhabited
by lovers of the British way of life, and
it requires little skill or imagination to
paint a picture of “perfidious Albion” or
of a British lion rampant seeking what
people it can devour.

Added to this picture of an aggressive
nation seekifig political domination and
world influence is the economic argument.

This points to Malayan rubber‘ and tin
as the greatest dollar earner for the ster-
ling area and accuses Great Britain of
exploiting other countries. The propagan-
dists have done their work well. And they
have had a major success in Egypt. The
silent demonstration of marching thous-
ands in Cairo and Alexandria this month
has caused many to reflect that the Egyp-
tians really want the British out of Egypt.
Workers in British camps have gone away
except for a small number from jobs
which were relatively highly paid by
Egyptian standards.

The question of Britain’s presence
Egypt touches Egyptian’ honour. Yet
Britain’s presence in the Canal Zone is
still considered. vital to the defence of the
free world. Must Britain bow to the storm
and try to find an~aiternative military
base ? Which will be the lesser evil, Egyp-
tian repudiation of a valid treaty or the
use of British military force against a
civilian population in a country whose
very independence is safeguarded by the
presence of British troops there ?

Supposing an alternative base were
found, would the United States be pre-
pared to pay a large part of the cost of re-
moval ?

The future of Egypt is not a subject for
comforting speculation. Only those who
have become indoctrinated with the active
virus of anti-British hatred can approve
of the very real difficulties which confront
the United Kingdom in this regard.





UNEMPLOYMENT

THE visit of Sir George Seel’s Labour
Adviser to Jamaica last week is a remind-
er of the West. Indies’ unemployment
problem. That problem in its most acute
form exists in Jamaica.

During the last great war Jamaica made
its own arrangements with the United
States for sending seasonal labour to that
country. This policy was adopted by other
British Caribbean territories and ended
in a certain. jockeying for quotas Which
annoyed the American employers and ex-
acerbated inter-Caribbean jealousies.

In July 1951, a Regional Labour Board
was formed to negotiate seasonal labour
requirements with the United States on a
representative basis, Members of the
Board are dfawn from all> participating
British Caribbean territories, ‘The Board
has its headquarters in Kingston. and a
staff in Washington of betwWéen twenty-
five and thirty people. .The Washington
staff negotiates with employers and pre-
pares contracts for each worker and pro-
vides liaison officers to visit the men at

work. Representatives of the United
States Employers’: ‘Federation will be
present in Kingston during the Board

meeting which opens on Saturday. .

The machinery for providing temporary
outlets for unemployed West Indians is
well oiled, But only Jamaica gets the
benefit of the employers’ contract to pay
passages back to Jamaica or its equivalent.

Islands like Barbados ought to be think-
ing hard in an effort to stop the subsidisa-
tion of privileged workers to the United
States at the expense of local capital
works and of providing employment for
those left behind.

The American employers are quite will-
ing to recruit Jamaicans only and every-
one knows that Jamaican needs are great-
er than ours, but Barbados has needs too,
and a sound “seasonal emigration” policy
is badly needed.


































BARBADOS ADVOCATE



make my



|

HEADLINE today

Parliamentary pastime of Pate-spotting

PROPOSE today to discuss baldness among members of Parlia-

__I know it sounds an irreverent approach to politics, but as you
will understand shortly it has an important bearing on the manage-
ment and welfare of the country, and is therefore a legitimate topic

for discussion.

You see it is largely by the tops of their heads that parliament-

ary reporters in the Press Gallery
below,

| there’d be absolute chaos throughout the country.

;} know who had said what.

I was struck by this aspect of
public life when I went to the
gallery this week to have a look
at the new House, and noticed that
now they’ve changed sides, like
fielders at cricket, the scenery is
entirely different.

Gallery View

EADERS of the Daily Express,
the Evening Standard, the
Newcastle Journal, and the Scots-
man get their reports of Parlia-
ment from men sitting perched in
the gallery to the Speaker's left,
and for six years they have iden-

tified the Tories below by the
shapes of their heads and the
Socialists opposite Ly thew faces.

Now that the parties have

crossed sides, they’ve had to start
all over again. It is the Socialists
they study with a critical barber's-
eye view, and the Tories they look
in the face,

For reporters sitting on the op-
posite side of the gallery it is
naturally vice-versa.

Contrasts

HIS is where the importance

of baldness enters into poli-
tics, because bald heads make for
easy recognition, No reporter
could ever confuse the two pates
of the past and the present Pre-
miers, for instance.

There, on the Government front
bench, the voice of Mr, Churchill
comes from beneath a magnificent
dome, tinged with pink like St.
Paul's Cathedral at sunset. It is
what anthropologists would call a
typical brachycephalic or broad
head,

And opposite, the Leader of the

Opposition speaks from beneath a
perfect dolichocephalic or long-

in | headed pate like a brown egg lying

on its side. ;
Equally distinct is the broad,
bare plain that tops the new lead-

United States Defence Secre-
tary Robert Lovett has arrived
in France to inspect military in-
stallations. What state of pre-
paredness will he find? A British
expert on armoured warfare gives
the answer.

I HAVE just paid a visit to
France in order to see for myself
how the European Army plans
are getting on.

It is no good talking about the
defence of the West: We have to
turn the talk into armed men.
am not forgetting the atom bomb
and the jet airplane. Both have
their function. But neither alters
the need for a Western Army.

I can report that General Eisen-
hower is getting on with the job
of creating the Western Army.
He has succeeded in obtaining the
complete confidence of every one
of the nations concerned—-no
small feat, this: and he is forging
ahead with the task.

NOT YET

There has been a great change
in broad policy. The general plan
after fhe war was to build up a
manpower army which would
hold some form of linear defence
in the event of attack by the
much larger Russian forceg, This
would have had little chance of
success,

More recently counter propo-
sals were made that the Western
nations should build up forces
consisting of infantry and ar-
moure@ divisions in about equal
strength. If the Russians advanc-
ed against us the former would
hold firm bases from which the
latter would launch their attacks
in co-operation with a strong
tactical air force. These proposals
are now accepted.

There is a general hope thai the
Western nations will be able to
build wp 40 or perhaps 50 divis-
ions during the next two years
and thet half of them will be
‘armoured divisions.

~

identify the speakers on the floor

Bernard Wicksteed learns the rules of the

and if they weren’t proficient in their headtop recognition

Nobody would

MARVEL AT THE VARIOUS
HAIRS

TRICKS WITH SO FEW

aS






ww

East we wee






Row

nprecemmuanee tet e

rn
=F
ee 2 -

a The far

vive

Qu. oe oe

er af the House, Mr, Crookshank;

the almost Oriental minaret sur-
mounting Mr, Dalton, and the twin
peaks (fore and aft) of Home

Secretary Sir David Maxwell Fyfe.

The Tories have a clear majority
of bald heads, I made two counts
or polls in the evening. At the
first the Government had 13 bald
heads to six for the Opposition,
and at the second the gap had
closed to 18 for the Tories to 13
for the Socialists,

The Spread

EXT there are the nearly or

thinly disguised bald heads
with which the reporter must keep
up to date, for they are constantly
changing as members try out new
methods of camouflage.

One marvels at the variety of
ways there are of spreading a
dozen hairs over an expanse in-
tended for several thousand, Some
legislators favour the sideways
spread, and others the fore and
aft.

Some boldly concentrate what
hair is left in a_ single defiant
streak, and others devote goodness
knows how much care to impart-
ing a curl in the strands that sur-
vive.

With a European Army of this
kind we shall be able to talk to

Russia from sirength (the most when he is weak and avoid fight-| manufacture the high-quality goods which

certain method of obtaining
peace), To judge from my own
discussions with the

not believe they will ever dare
to advance against us in Europe
once we have a force of the kind
now being created

We have not got it yet; let that

be clear. Britain hag four divis- tanks for the two roles and that| oils and petroleum. Each of these has its own

ions in Germany with the hope
of another division being available
l>ter. The United States is due to
have six divisions in Germany by
the end of 1951. France aims to

have 10 divisions ready by the period of two years before the ments,

end of 1951, The Benelux coun-
tries should provide another five
or six divisions.

This brings the total to about
26 divisions by the end of 1951.

The gap between this and the
40 or 50 divisions which we need
cannot possibly be filled without
a quota from Germany. The
ways in which the German share
of the European Army is to be
built up have not yet been set-
tled in detail. But the necessity
for it has been accepted.

What must we now do go as to
have the European Army ready
in two years’ time?

THE TANKS

First we mugt realise the great quite wrong, A long period passed| the Colonies.—B.U.P.

difference between armoured and

infantry divisions. The former
must be highly mobile. They
must be able to move rapidly

round the enemy forces and re-
main there for a considerable
time. The German Panzer forces
did this consistently in the early
stages of the war and gained
decisive success.

Our armoured divisions must
not be given heavy weapons such

os heavy tanks, which increase
their administrative tail and
therefore reduce their mobility.




“streae

e

IAS

. But whatever the system em-| only for Britain’s rearmament drive, but also

ployed, the watchdogs of the Press,
looking down like gargoyles from

the gallery, know them all, just as | export goods.

they know that Mr. Speaker's wig
has a patch like half a crown on
top, and that the roof of his ornate
chair is covered with lino,

The Press Gallery over-

hangs the Chamber like the| sugar, Sea Island cotton and British Guiana

dress circle in a theatre, so
a member who speaks from
not seen at all by the re-
porters immediately above
him. He has to be identi-
fied by sound. not sight.

me that for years he has
known Commander Williams,
the Tory member for Tor-
quay,*by his voice. but has
never learned what he looks
like.

Now. that the voice has
moved to the other side of
the House and become a face
he is blessed if he can pick
him out.

No Notes

TRICTLY speaking, it is still
forbidden to report the speech-
es made in Parliament, you know.
The ban on publication, dating
back to the struggles between King
and Commons, is still unrepealed.
The penalty is imprisonment
the Tower.
The first reporters had to re-
member not only faces and tops of



heads, they had to memorise the] [

speeches as well, for they weren't
allowed to make notes. Dr, John-
son used to employ “memory men”
to tell him what was said and then

write up his reports of Parliament} resources,

from that.

Publicity

Y the time Dickens became a
parliamentary reporter note-

taking was allowed, but in the] and it must find timber and other materials

Commons he had to write on his
knee, and in the Lords he had to

scribble standing up, huddled with ed. That is one reason why urgent attention
other reporters like sheep in al jc being given to the possibility of using Col-

pen.

Now politics and the Press are| 0nial hardwoods in British houses.

so interwoven that parliamentary
Government as we know it in this
country would not work without
publicity—and the accurate iden-
tification of speakers by their
heads.—L.E.S.



How Strong Is IKE’S ARMY?

Wy Lieut..General SIR GIFFARD MARTEL

The armoured division must use
its mobility to attack the enemy

ing streng:h,

On the other hand, the in-

Russians fantry division is a slower mov-] portant in the export drive to dollar coun-
towards the end of the war I de ing anq harder-hitting formation.) ¢ pj a5

It needs heavy tanks both for de-
fence and attack in position war-
fare.

It
must

is now accep.ed
have heavy and _ cruiser
a dual-purpose tank is nonsense.
It was never anything else.

The Germans worked hard to| Siraightened out by Colonial Office experts,
this}in consultation with the Colonial Govern-

develop the technique for
form of mobile warfare over a

war, and with fully equipped ar-
moured divisions. It is a deep
study and takes considerable

time. Thus they were ready when| Minor measures would produce quick results
t

he war broke out.
The European Army, however,
has not yet begun to study and

prepare the technique which we}next year.

need to-day for this form of war-
fare. I have been pyessing fér

several years that we should do} African groundnuts scheme, will be avoided.

so, but without success,

TACKLE IT!

It is argued that as we would
not have the troops available to
carry out this role for some time

we need not at present concern} predicted that the new Government envis-

ourselves with the technique
which would be needed. This is

before we accepted the necessity
to use this modern type of war.
Let us hope that we will not
repeat this long delay before we
develop the technique for these
operations,

Since the war there has been
a dearth of officers with real ex-
perience in armoured warfare in
the higher posts on the General
Staff and as commanders, This
should be rectified, for it has been
fhe cause of these delays.

(World Copyright Reserved)

—L.E.S.



IBY THE WAY...

PTAHE official reason given for an

engine’s failure to drag its
train up a hill the other day was
“lack of steam.”

Lack of steam! And there is
that man at Babington “with more
steam than I know what to do
with.” He cannot move for steam,
It emanates from him like egg-
shell from a_ grocer’s beard at
twilight. Doctors say he is suffer-
ing. from Schnockenspieler’s dis-
ease of the respiratory glands.
There he is, steaming like one ,of
the new bubble-sSausages stuck to
an Iceland geyser. The whole
house hisses like a net of hooded
scorpions when he scratches his

ear. Steam pours from every
window.
If the firemen weren’t all up

trees coaxing cats, there might be
a devilish deal of hosing ere
nightfall. Boys passing the cloud-
enveloped house make foghorn
| noises, and shout, “Ahoy, there!
jis this Cadiz harbour?” And yet
it is beyond the ingenuity of our

great railways to collect the
and ram it into these
engines,

Local Initiative
RECALL a,steam-famine on
the branch-line from Snatchine

St. Martin to Prinees Burlap (via
Buncombe, Snyothe, Chortlewych
end Bottle Bnd), The Mayor of
Kipperminister made an appeal,
and those living near the line
caught the steam from their tea-
kettles and pushed it through old
bits of piping which they con-
nected up with a large disused
cistern at Buncombe Station. Each
failing engine helps itself from the
cistern,. which is the least one
could expect.

Diary Of The Future

November 15, 1952: A bonus
Jump (4 inch by 1 inch) of Grade
VI coal is to be given, tax-free, to
any householder who returns his
vearly allowance of 1 cwt. of coal
to his coal merchant. The tonnage
thus saved will be exported to

tuff
féeble



By Beachcomber he wanted — British-bred pure Italians,

Java, and the money earned will
enable us to buy some Jepango,
the nourishing root which contains
as much vitamin F per square inch
as three pounds of rump steak.

‘Mid The Traffie’s Roar
SUET, ESQ., spent yesterday
driving round the streets to

observe certain aspects of the|“smoker” to control his bees. A puff of smoke

traffic problem, At the corner of
Mallock-road the following dia-
logue took place between Suet and
an official:—
“Why can’t they send them
round instead of straight on?”
“Round what, Mr. Suet?” ~*
“That's not the point.
come this way, too?”
“Yes, if they are going away
from the opposite direction.” —
“Then, if they went round, those

Do they

going in both directions would| with his queens.

avoid each other.”
“Both directions, Mr. Suet
“IT mean going backward and

forwards, referring to the’ traffic] w

as a whole, not to each vehicle.”
“Oh.”

one of the back benches is} |.

One reporter was telling] been started by the Colonial Office into the

in‘

that we

WEDNESDAY,

NOVEMBER 28, 1951



U.K. WANTS MORE | FOR FINEST

SUGAR, TIMBER, COTTON || CHRISTMAS CARDS

LONDON, eeeeneninane

First practical plan to enable the Colonial)

Empire to play its part in easing Britain’s

economic position has been placed before the

British Cabinet by Mr. Oliver Lyttelton, the
Colonial Secretary.

It envisages increased production of Col-




Call and Select Early from
STATIONERY.

ADVOCATE



COO



ca
onial commodities to add to Britain’s supply
of raw materials. Materials are needed not
for a renewed housing programme and for N oO T i CE

e

Three commodities that are wanted in
greater quantities from the West Indies— From Ist December, 1951 our HARDWARE and
LUMBER DEPARTMENTS will be closed for breakfast

from 11 a.m. to 12 noon except on Saturdays when we

timber—are specifically mentioned in Mr.
yttelton’s plan. Full details of the means to
inerease production, however, have not yet

will be open from 8 a.m. to 12 noon.
Leen worked out, but a full investigation has

Will all custom-

ers please note.

e
possibilities of improving Colonial output.

WILKINSON & HAYNES CO., LTD.,
It is expected that the scope of the sugar
talks now going on in London will be broad-
ened to cover Mr. Lyttelton’s proposals.
Increased sugar production in the West In-
dies, Fiji and Mauritius is largely a matter
of financial and political arrangement and
if Mr. Lyttelton wants to stimulate produc-
tion, he must offer the Colonial producers
the protection they demand of better prices
and guaranteed markets.

— Successors to —

C.S. PITCHER & CO. LTD.

4413, 4687, 4472
SS CCSOSO COC OS COO FOCCOO GOSS

| WHEELS anv CASTORS

Phones:













—

Plenty of timber is available in the Colo-




















’
ies, particularly in British Guiana, British CASTORS WITH SOCKETS
lfonduras and the African territories. Mr. Per Set of Four.
yttelton’s advisers are reviewing the labour a pete :. cn ae
id shippin bl th romium ate: f astic.... éo. .
Cr eee te nt ae Furniture Castors 156” Bakelite... $1.60
8 se valuable Ball Bearing 158” Bakelite... $2.10
Nickel Plated 156” Rubber.. $2.86
Britain’s post-war housing shortage has
been caused primarily by lack of raw mate- HEE
rials. The new Government has set itself a w LS Each
housing target of 300,000 new houses a year 7” x 14%” Cushion Tyred Swivel Castor.... $6.62
10” x 2” Roller Bearing Industrial Type
from somewhere if this target is to be reach- Rubber Tyred vo» $10.07
9” x 13%” Hospital Type vee $4.65
14” x 3” Heavy Duty Truck...............000 $10.11

DACOSTA & CO,, LTD.
Dial 4689

‘

Hardwood is more expensive and more
difficult to work than the softwoods to which
British builders are accustomed. The prob-
lcm would involve changes in working prac-
tices if the fullest possible use is to be made
of these potential Colonial supplies.





Most of the Colonial cotton which Britain

hopes to obtain will come from Uganda, but
there is an important contribution to be made

by Sea Island cotton, which is needed to

JACKETS
FABRICS...

Fine Tropical & Linen

STYLES.....

Single & Double Breasted

COLOURS...

Cream & White

And 3-Piece
Tuxedo Suits

With all Accessories

lave made Britain’s textile industry so im-

Other commodities wanted from the Col-
onies include copper, manganese, vegetable

production problems, which will have to be

Mr. Lyttelton believes that comparatively

in Colonial production and it is hoped that
practical results will become evident early
Large-scale projects requiring
heavy capital investments, such as the East

Mr. Lyttelton is an expert on securing sup-
plies of raw materials and when his appoint-
ment as Colonial Secretary was announced a
few weeks ago, political observers in London

aged a vast drive for more commodities from



HAPPY BEES DON'T STING

WHEN his doctor ordered an open-air life
36 years ago, Mr. Frederick Claridge, of Cop-
ford, near Colchester, bought two colonies
of bees. Within two years, after being stung
a great many times, he decided to rear
“docile but vigorous and hardy” queen bees.

It took him 15 years to produce the strain

GODDARD'S
FOR THESE





noted for their gentleness.









FISH
Now he has 75 colonies off the main Lon- Salmon..
don road. Every year hundreds of bees are Sole:
sent through the post in small narrow cages Haddock. s
t 1 y ~ Kippers.
0 oes - senna . CHEESE Pilchards.
y y ridge use a veil or Cit, Mea ‘Ciieees | Sardines,
from a cigarette is enough. tase as
sondde ducks, | SPECIALS
“Under certain conditions,” he said to-day, | Cheddar in Tins., Processed Peas,
“you can pick them up in handfuls without a Ca peo. per. Mn.
. . . . Fish P r
being stung. They are really too disciplined, MEATS | Gonnae. Snpysthe” oie ‘tin
and do not look after themselves enough.” cee he | Strawberry Jam
: ’ ‘ : . s 94c. r tin.
Mr. Claridge’s worrying time is when Smoked Hams. Fruit’ Salad—Dried
other swarms trespass and occasionally mate Smoked Bacon. i5e. per Pkg
\ That upsets the strain. “It Smoked: Salami.
is one of the banes of my life,” he said. 1 : Fresh
B hi r Veal Kidneys.
ut his queens cannot escape. Their ,
ings are clipped. Rabbits. Vegetables
—LES. |

—————————_—_—$—$$$—_——$—$$$$————— ————___________ —
WEDNESDAY,

NOVEMBER 28,

1951

For Murder Of
Lorry Driver

EWART OWEN THORNHILL, a bus driver of the Ivy
Land, was yesterday sentenced to be hanged by The Hon.

The Chief Judge, Sir Allan

Collymore, after a jury found

him guilty of murdering 39-year-old Leroy Worrell, a
lorry owner of Bank Hall, on August 6. The jury were
an hour and a half deliberating.

As

the foreman pronounced

the verdict—guilty,

Thornhill’s chest began to heave as he breathed heavily,
and his eyes were red. He was asked whether he had
anything to say, but he did not reply.

Thornhill was represented by
Mr. Lorenzo Williams who told
the jury that the case was one of
criminal negligence and not a‘case
of murder,

Mr. W. W. Reece, K.C., Solicitor
General, prosecuted for the crown.

Hundreds of people were outside
the Courtyard waiting to hear the
verdict and possibly see the police
van take Thorfhill back to prison.
The police, however, took the
Frisoner by way of Baxters Road.

About eight minutes after the
verdict was given, a conductor
who had left the court and
reached the junction of Pinfold
and Roebuck Streets, lay, rolled
in the read and wept, saying,

“Oh! oh! Owen is gone, is gone,

is gon:!”

On the first day of hearing, the
Prosecution called 17 witnesses.
Yesterday Mr. Williams addressed
the jury for 35 minutes, Mr. Reece
for nearly an hour and then the
Chief Justice summed up.

Return Trip

The Prosecution’s case was that
a club of the Girls’ Industrial
Union had an excursion at St
Lucy on August 6. Thornhill was
driving one of the buses which
took the people and Worrell was
driving his’ lorry. When the
vehicles were returning, Worrell
and Thornhill were each speeding
ond trying to overtake each other.
Worrell passed out Thornhill on
the improper side at least cn one
occasion and another time when
one was attempting to pass the
other, the vehicles were brought to
a stand-still as they were raking
each other.

When they eventually reached
town, Worrell started a row with
Thornhill and at one time Thorn-
hill pulled out a penknife and at
ancther had two stones in his
hand, but he never used either.
One witness told the Court he
heard Thornhill tell Worrell, “You
are out for trouble and if you do
not leave me I will do something
to you this same night,”

He left after the row, drove to
the corner at Belmont and Martin-
cale’s roads, turned around the bus
and drove back down Constitution
where the row had been carried
on. The bus swerved when it got
near to the place where Worrell
was standing at the side of the
lorry. It struck the lorry and
Worrell was killed.

Addressing the jury, Mr. Wil-
liams told them that it was agreed
that when the vehicles were re-

turning, the drivers were all
speeding.
He said it was perhaps un-

fortunate that they had had the
type of witnesses they had had,
two civil servants and two teachers
besides others. Their stories were
all much the same.

Changed Gear

“When George Brewster told
you that Thornhill changed gear
just when the bus swerved and
went in the direction of Worrell
and the lorry,” he said, “he was
trying to get the idea im your
r.inds that there was some wicked
intention in the changing of the
gear, but there is nothing to invite
you to believe that there was such
an intention.

“Brewster himself is no driver
and would not know what a
driver would have to do at various
points. You all have seen the
seene and know that there is an
incline just there and it was quite
reasonable for the driver to change
gear.”

He said he was putting up a
defence of criminal negligence.
There was nothing to suggest the
wilful killing of Worrell. The
buses and lorries had gone on an
excursion, not to a Sunday School
party, and it was reasonable to
expect that would be high spirits.

When the people saw Thornhill
swerve when driving back from
Belmont Road they were just
surprised and scampered away.

Only one witness had said
that he heard Thornhill tell





ASSIZE DIARY

Wednesday

No. 23 Rex vs Wilbert
Blackman

No. 34 Rex vs James Wil-
liams
Thursday

No. 24 Rex vs Theophilus
Clarke

No. 33 Rex vs Simeon
Springer

No. 20 Rex vs_ Bertrem
Ward and George
Butts,

Friday
No. 4 Rex vs Elbert Brown
No. 18 Rex vs Oliver Mill-

ington and Bertram
Ward.

__

Worrell that he had been look-
ing for trouble and if he did not
leave him he would have got it
that same night and because of
that the jury would know what
strength to attach to it.

He reminded the jury that it
was for the Prosecution to
prove their case beyond a reas-
onable doubt. If they felt that
Worrell was killed accidentally
or had any doubts as to Thorn-
hill’s intentions, ~ they should
return a verdict of not guilty of
murd

Penknite Opened

Mr. Reece for the Prosecution
said that there was no doubt that
Worrell started the row. Thorn-
hill, he reminded them, had
opened his penknife at one stage
and at another taken two stones
from the bus, though, he did not
Use them.

George Brewster had told them
that he did not know whether
Thornhill had intended taking
those who were in the bus nea
home or in the bus stand..

“But the fact remains,” he said,
“that he had gone to Belmoni
Corner when the turned back.
You have seen the place and you
ean ask yourself if he could not
have turned by going into the
Queen's Park gate if he really
intended to go to the bus stand.”

It was for them to say whether.
in the light of the facts, Thornhill
did not deliberately change his
course and go and strike Worrell.
If they came to that decision,
then their verdict had to be one
of murder as it did not matter
what kind of weapon was used to
do a killing.

It had been suggested, he said,
that there might have been a de-
fect about the bus, and, realising
it, Thornhill had tried to put right
the defect and during that time

could not have been’ exercising
the proper care which was nor-
mally required. But, Mr. Far-

num, the bus inspector, had ex-
amined the bus and had _ told
them that he had found nothing
wrong with it. '
No Sympathy

1
Summing up, The Chief Judge
told the jury that when they came

to deliberate, they would put out }

cc That du rett
throu mut; here is It
teda The Prosecuti
atisfy you f the a. t
accused. If they satisfy
yond a sasonable dou
hall find him guilty
He told them that there coul
be one of three verdicts returned
guilty of murder, guilty of man- he
slaughter, or not guilty of any
offence. ing.
Murder, he said, was the un-
lawful killing of a person with

malice aforethought, expressed or
implied. Malice meant a wicked
intention, and it could either be

expressed or imolied

If

to kill
but had killed someone else,

tne

THORNHILL SENTENCED TO HANG —





Driving Win intent

Thornhill had driven the bus
some particular person
he

weuld be still guilty of murder
of course. assuming he had
driven a bus to kill anyone

A person was guilty of man-
slaughter by negligent drivin

the driving with a wanton disré







FISH are
along the

st

heard one

fish,







yesterday





| Dy.taniite: Fish

being dynamited

James coast. A
resident of ihat area tola the
“Advocate”

that
explosion at

7.45 o'clock yesterday morn-
Explosiens
during the day and there was
another at 1.30.

It was not known who was
doing the actual dynamiting
but a group of about a dozen
young boys were
aing into the surf after each
explosion to collect the stun-
ned

continued

seen run-





Christmas

Food Will

gard of human life and safety,
the wicked intention to kill bein xy
absent, Cost More
The main defence put to the
though it w J als ete to ares po erall picture of the stock
ry eee eee f Ch s food in. the — stores
them on every phase. } 134 .
He talked of the rivalry | Stet OSS UGE AO, MANY, BROWS
tween Thornhill and Wor fry “SOF "there will be an ample: aup-
driving fast when they we eee 1 SUES ah. Sones
turning from the excur 1; the e reulatia aes day. rey
he went on talk of discreperc : Wee eae higher prices
It had been pointed cut, he saia, “22 PY kel Jase ERT,” Be said.
that there shad been discreps) t ; {
but they were of such a eos. a ‘ i in =
nature that he thought them suct i. aati cel se
as could be expected. ; : ike saad
There had been a row bet 5 j } ey eet
Thornhill and Worrell whicl Fn: "
Worrell had started and Thorn Hams ,will be in excess of last
hill had to be restrained when he yes: ip! They will be sold
had a penknife. At another tinte a: py: ; ranging between 5/6
ae ae stones, but he never us 6/- per lb., which will. be
either. ore expensive than. last. year’s
The Prosecution had showed that The ahnie thing applies to dried
Thornhill had driven the bu : d canned fruit. There will be
far as Belmont corner anc nple supplies at higher © prices.
returned .and. could have: turned Unfortunately, -he said, the same

in the Queen’s Park gate if he had

thing cannot be

said about butter.







intended to go..te the bus -starid
Well, he. said,. that was a matte At present, the” island is in
entirely for them, short sipply of butter and. the
Theres was” no dispiiting tyat next shipment of butter from
Worrell met his death .by bein y Australias, that, “i expected to
struck with the ik Ch come d arly next month is
should, however, judge» Thovon- expected to be sold at $1.18 or
hill’s intention from the evidence, $1.15 per tin, A shipment of
He finally reminded them of New Zealand butter in slabs is
the. suggestion that there had .expected around the same time
been excursion feelings and ex- and it will be sold at cheaper
cursion driving. prices
The jury then deliberated for . ;
an hour and a half before they A shipment of cooking butter is
returned their verdict. “"fxpected. soon’ to arrive with a
upply .of table butter, the prices
2. ee of which have already been
” . advanced. The merchant® thought
Police Bureau the rise in the price of butter due
to the Australian Government
The Information Bureau at the having to levy a cess on those
Central Police Station has not *Sipment own to prolong
been receiving as many enquiries Sikes among the dock workers
during the last month as it did ‘here
when it was first opened, The merchant said thet there
The Bureau is opened between has been a definite increase in the
8.00 am. and 4.30 p.m, from Supplies of most of the Christmas
Monday to Friday and from 8.00 $00dS arriving at Barbados within
a.m. to 1.00 p.m. on Saturday the past three or four weeks, and
Most of the questions asked are hams will be coming in good
about the prices of controlled SUPplies around December 9,
articles, queries about traffic regu- : \
lations an& the addresses of “And don’t forget, ue said
officials and the whereabouts of “there will be lots of drink to ada
their offices, to’ the Gonviviality of Christmas.’
The clerk in charge of the And as to West Indian pro-
Information Bureau is Cpl. God- ducts, oranges, grapefruits, mane
dard. He is assisted by Police- derines and spices arrive in
woman Clarke f Barbados by the majority of the
: schooners that call here Within
the last two months, the schooner

Case Dismissed



traffic has increased, Trays in
Bridgetown are taking good shape
for the holidays







of their minds all considerations ;
of sympathy for the accused, for |

the position he was in or sym-

pathy for the deceased or his
family. They would put sym-
pathy out of their minds. along
with anything they might have

heard outside in the clamour and

excitement when people had been#g;

expressing opinions, whetiher {=
favourable to the one party or to
the other.

He said that if in the course of
his remarks to them he expressed
any opinion on the facts, they
would realise that they were their
own judges of the facts and it was
for them to discard any opinions
he expressed if they disagreed
with them, So far as the law was
concerned, they had to take the
law from him.

“Now, in this case,” he said, “it
has been pointed out by counsel
that it is the duty of the Prosecu-
tion to establish the guilt of the

A case brought by the Police The lumber yards are filled
charging Eric Burnett of Chelsea with scores of people making|
Road, St. Michael with larceny as purchase The buyers are for
a bailee of $5 belonging to Charles the most part of the working
Sandiford was yesterday dismiss- class, whose purchases are gen-
ed without prejudice by Mr. G: B. erally a few bundles of shingles,
Griffith, Acting Police Magistrate a few feet of ‘board and some
of District “A”. lathing for repairing their houses

nd putting n in shape, té use
their own words, before the big
ACCIDENT day arrives
i. i » Polis

“Saul” Hewitt of Black Rock. * Furniture Polish setting
3 ; iu 7 Several people jou are getting
St. Michael, was knocked down their supplies’of varnish, turpen-
iby the motor bus, M.335 (owned tell SUPE rp :

any) around Harrison's Corne: sure that when the big rush takes
about 1.05 p.m. yesterday, Thr place for these.things, theirs will
bus ..was driven’ by Gordon not be the uncomfortable experi-
Straughn of Beckles Road, St énee to be among the crowd, As
Michael. one trousewife told an Advocate
i A Policé lotry took Hewitt t reporter yesterday: “When later
the General Hospital some people ‘will be getting
piel Sala crushed to secure their require-
ment of these things, my furniture
FINED 40/- ill 5 have been cleaned

and tened up for the holi- 1}

Mr. G, B, Griffith, Acting Police da) i ; sar- ||

Magistrate of District “A” yester- Another evidence of the eh ie i
day fined Eustace Wilson of ness of Christmas and incidentally
Station Hill, St. Michael 40/- to. the Exhibition, is tte busy tailor
be paid in seven days or in default and dressmaker shops. ie for
one month's imprisonment for workers are already, os eel

using indecent language on Pro- imto the night in order to mM

by the National Motor Bus Gom-

byn Street on November

variou



the de

26.



“TT

tine, polish and_ the

hardware



tores,

like from the

making

RADIAC REX PIN STRIPED SHIRT with fused collar
87.74

CONSULATE SELF COLOUR SHIRTS with trubenised
collar attached. Coat style assorted sleeve lengths.

attached. Sizes 14} to 17 ins,

Sizes 14 to 17. Each .

88.54

ELITE SEA ISLAND COTTON SHIRTS, 100% truben-
ised collar aitached in shades of White, Blud, Grey,

$8.17

RADIAC MARCELLA WHITE DRESS SHIRTS, with

Wit

Cream. Each

two separate collars. Sizes 14 to
h Sofi Collar attached, 14 to 18.

tS.
Hach



$7.5

ach. Sab.cb4a>
1

SILK SCARVES in plain white and white with self
$1.85

BOYS’ STRIPED PYJAMA SUITS, attractive designs
$4.28

Stripes and coleurs, Prices fro

Sizes 26 to 34. Each

m



———





10, 11, 12 & 13 BROAD STREET

CAVE SHEPHERD & CO., LTD |



nds of thejr ‘customers.

ae Cet

BARBADOS ADVOCATE

Queen’s House

Gets Repaired \. ::%

And Painted

Fhe interior of Queen's
t - ss Park has been repaired
and painted. Many other repairs
are also being carried out at

Park and it should look quite
attractive for the Arnual Indus-
trial Exhibition.

The many promenades
the Bandstand area are being

House

around ple don’t want electricity ‘before |

—.

Political Meeting

From page 3

seawell, the Government
of land
1t un Mto. sever
#iving 28 people an acre each Bi

Reads in the parish wanted re-
pairing and a lot of money
lying down in the treasury

i not the Goverr

was
Why
ment come and}

the ‘ke over Colleton and develop a|

using scheme, putting up toilets
and baths’ They were talking of
giving the people electricity which
they would never get. ‘THe peo-|

CONG

they want houses. Many of them

resurfaced and guard walls built €Moy opening their front door and)

up at the sides of each. Guard

walls have also been built around feel quite happy with an oil lamp

the trees which have been trim-
med

The seats have been repainted
and more are now being built

Mr. G
told the Advocate that the walls
surrounding the Park will be
waied in the near future



*rincess Alice Grass
Being Cleared

THREE men with hoes were
clearing away some of the
grass from the Princess Alice
Playing Field yesterday This
work has been going on for many
wee Owing to the recent
heavy rains the grass has grown
considerably

The Caretaker at the Playin;

Field told the Advocate that
mower. He said that inasmuch as
the fteld is so large, the hand
mowers are unable to cope with
he growth of the grass.

|
Dances are kept in the pavilion |
tennis is!

regularly and lawn
pliyed on one court.

Ohristmas Vendors
Invade City

Vendors, carrying boxes con-
taining Christmas Greeting cards
and tags, have invaded the City.
These vendors sell mainly along
Broad Stréet and Swan Street,

Religious pictures
Moore Almanacs are
sold by some of

end
also being
these vendors

Both the almanacs and pictures
were on the road for many
months now,
4 ‘ ee
The cards are selling from six

cents to 12 cents and in some cases

Ola

Morris, Superintendent, that age grouping is all right but]

long had not got a better price for their |

eration and the B.W.U. The Labour |
he
is awaiting the arrival of a motor| the werkers 19 per cent but they |

|

|
|



higher One vendor told the
Advocate: “It is hard work walk-
ing around in the sun trying to
sell our cards and yet we make
only a very small profit, Many
people prefer to purchase their
eatds direct from the stores
otherwise we would make a good
profit.’ He however felt that it
is a good way to occupy the idle
~~





2



Ss

DIAMOND
RINGS

no finer gift from you to her
Prices Start at $18.00
wonderful quality & values
At Your JEWELLERS
Y. De LIMA

& CO... LTD.
20 Broad Street









A 4-Wheel Drive Tractor
A Delivery Wagon

letting the moonlight come in and

The system of age grouping wa



rotten. The children are coming}
cut of school not knowing any
thing. The teachers are saying}

they want more teachers and more}
schools. The Government is say-| ff}
ing that they can’t afford to spend |@!
more money on employing, teach-
ers. Mr. Wilkinson, the Leader
of his party, said that he felt that

19 per cent was not given the peo-|§}
ple by the Labour Party. It was/ |
an agreement and not law. If they |

canes, the labourers would never
have got the back ‘pay It
fortunate that the island had a

bumper crop

The agreemeni was reacned be- |

een the Sugar Producers’ Fed- |

t
Party were saying that they gave
were not telling them that they
ere taking away $3.80 from every
n of canes grown

ee

tc



PANTIES

From 7le. to $3.17

SLIPS

in Satin, Jersey, Crepe

Colours :
White.

HALE SLIPS

Pink, Peach,



WHEN A HEAD-COLD stuffs you

up, makes your nose sore and ir-



ritated and won't let you breathe |
— here's quick relief: 1} in Nylon ..... ..@ $7.67
)
1} Colours: Pink, Black and
i! White.
| PYJAMAS
Rey | In Jersey ......... @ $4.39
SO EASY! Just put a few drops Colours: Peach, Ivy & Sky
ae wera up each nos-
tril. Then feel these special
Sreps fe ert ae ae NIGHT
where the trouble is.., /
: ‘
In Jersey and Nylon
1 From $3.43 to $20.00
Colours: Pink, Blue and
White,

RIGHT AWAY, Vicks Va-tro-nol
Nose Drops give you wonderful
breathing comfort . . .
irritation is soothed,
stuffiness goes aveay,
and your nose‘ opens
up"’— and stays clear
for hours. Man, that's
relief! Try it!

VICKS <9
VA‘TRO-NOL

NOSE DROPS

DIAL 2352

SSS

tort J

aL Tey

A828 1 @



H. Jason Jones &

we es ee ee

5

A Mobile Power Plant

Engine
High efficienay four-cylinder
Capacity 1595 ce Develops
more than 50 B.H.P?. 25-27
m.p.8

|

ey
Flectrieal System
Twelve volt starting and light

|

Bodywork
High
aluminium

REDMAN & TAYLOR'S
GARAGE LTD.





tensile,
sheet







ae

Power Take-off
Gives a powerful
drive

haft or pulley
for generators, compres

sors, or agricultural equipment

|



PINK CLOVER COLOG

Chassis
Side and
box section
| tionally rigid
——$

cross mémbers of

Light but excep

GOLDEN CHANCE

HONEY SUCKLE ,,
GOLDEN CHANCE SOA

non-corrodible ”

metal work

|



Lay
oat tactoea ca |O = % j L V E R :
STAR?’’

| as a
FLOOR COVERING

Hl!
age grouping should be done away | |
with ia)

Mr. S, A. Walcott said that the | @)

m Art Silk and Nylon

Colours: Pink, Peach, Helio
Blue, White and Black,

Nylon From $2.43 to $9.87

HARRISON'S



PAGE FIVE





OLEUM.



and

ynd





ee ee

IT’S HERE AGAIN !!

PURINA MILK CHOW

iB

—_ |

"Janes ee

|
4

Co., Ltd.—Distributors
eee eee A





JUST IN TIME
FOI X4A$

Gifts Sets Harriet
Hubbard Ayer (Canada

NE & TALCUM POWDER

HONEYSUCKLE COLOGNE & TALCUM POWDER

PINK CLOVEN SOAP & TALCUM POWDER

” ”

P & TALCUM POWDER

Also CREAM SOAP (3 cakes to Box)








PAGE SIX

CLASSIFIED ADS.







PUBLIC SALES ° WANTED





























TRUEST 8008 REAL ESTATE Pr es | ANGLO—U.S. DISPUTE — the first big task for the US.| |] PROOF THAT BRUSHING TEETH RIGHT AFTER EATING
rere - —$—$_—__— : i Btn
icine ——————— ee ee ne An experienced cutter | ’. THALE new economic stabilizer Roger | CTI
T z neements of FOR SALE ALL THAT certain stone-wall dweling- | wanted, preferably with recommendation. By K. ¢. TF R 3 Lowell Putnam is to contract ne-| IS THE SAFE, EFFECTIVE WAY TO
he ¢harge for announcements _ of 8&2 house 30 ft by 22 ft comprising open | Broadway Dress Shop. 25.11.51—Sn. | i PARIS, Nov. 27. — gotiations opening today between | v
Marriages, __D = Lalicry, dtawing, dining and thre béd-| ——-—-—-————<————<—<————« | Official sources disclosed Tues- the steel industry and 1,000 000 | ;
e a aes rooms with kitchen and usual outoffices| COLONY CLUB, St. James. have a/day behind-scenes moves for a CIO k Putra |
$1 os and § AUTOMOTIVE ind small shop all standing on two roods| vacancy for an Assistant Manager or | conciliation in the West’ flic 1.0. steel workers. ‘utrpam j
‘or nDeE os words of land at Ellerton, Saint George abutting | Manageress; applications should be made) 1 mp “ S conflict succeeds to the post of stabilizing
ae per word on we a" =| - 7 on the public road. There is a guurd| in writing, in the first plase, giving unl | with Bypt over Mid-East defence wages, salaries and prices on De-
ae 2 Soe Se ee | Ate So . Oe or il to the front, and an enclosed yard. j particulars and experienge. plans on Egypt's dispute with Brit- cember 1 in piace of Eric A. John- ,
ee Butcher, McHnearney & Water service is connected. , 7.11.51—n. | ain over treaties and the Suez son who resigned last week to re
+ 2 ace cE mt For further particulars an SPC) ——$—_— | is —
For Bi Marriage (ot ee - apply on premises to RICHARD HENRY | “BISHOP'S HIGH S€ROOL, TOBAGO CRE turn to the Presidency of the Mo-
’ in Carib allind ts CAR—1961_ Morris Oxfo Mileage 25.11.51—2n | CO-EDUCATIONAL The chief initiative reportedly tion Picture Association —U.P o 2
sha for any number o 4 Condition as new. For inapectic PE ata leame from Pakistan’s Foreign : : :
and 6 cents per word for each] ..\; Raiph Beard, Lower Bay Street ee : _| Applications are invited for the posts > :
nl word. foemanh. aoc otreet: | “By instructions received from the Har-| | ATRiG tant femches empable of Minister Sir Zafrullah Khan who

en 8.30 and 4 p.m., 3213 for Death bour & Shipping Master

Netices only after 4 p.m

rr —one , Am . ott at the Baggage Ware-
AR—One (1) A-40 Car public Auction a

A-l condi-



c * sday the 2th day of Standard.
EE | tion New Battery and Tyres Price reac Thursd »’clock (a) Geography.
DIED $1,600. For information Dial 2143 November, pegirinlng oS aie ouins (b) Mathematics.
- 25.11.51.—3n.} VPS’ Yundred pounds of scrap metal, | Salary—$2,160—$2,800 (Degree Applicants) |
November, 1951, | > —————— 2, New | Brass and Copper, 53 used tyres, (1) $1,440—$1,680 Cipher Certificate |
gyereaee CAR—One Singer, 9 good tyres. New| crane and one Mill roller (app. 3 to 4 with Distinction).
funeral} Battery. Going cheap. Suitable for making



one speed hand
Several pieces

tons dismantled), (1)
operator vertical winch
of rubber mattings. Several empty 6 gal

Pick-up. Apply G. E. Martin, Brighton

r Singer Co

Maasiah Street
ck this evening

1951.
25.11.51—-34 Apply te ps































































Cer Friends are |] ——_—_—_— re aati t ace Mr. KENNETH REID, ‘week and later with Britain’s
CAR-—Drop-head Convertible Ford V-8] ONTlg, Si cons. of Nncering wire, (3) | Concordia, Tobago. | Minister of State for Foreign
Toppin (widow), Thomas,! in good condition. Going cheap. Apply: thr six volt Batteries, 65 sq ft. pan- %4.11.51—én | Affairs Mr. Selwyn Lloyd.
George and MacDonaia} Cole & Co., Limited. Phone 4516 elling. (24) row locks. (13) tife belt, ADAIrS, : y oyd.
28.11.51—1n , 23.11.51-—t.£.0.] 3) fre extinguishers, (2) life boat sea| SIGN PAINTER —Apply Colonial adver. —USF. T DMIRAL
——— _—_-— ————-———=—- | a.chors and three Oildrums, (2) rud- | tising Co., Shepherd Street, between HE A MI oe
= CHRYSLER (WINDSOR) 1947 Model! #ucbo™ ' “lam. Bring samples of work.
THANKS with New Tyres. Fluid drive with auto epeene: Wits PRES Oe ee itil e 27,11.51=2n JAP TREATY REVISION PASTURE,
k ES. Ww ky thank our frie nas natic Transmission Mileage 33,000 and cae B ook-case with glass front, (1) Pro- SUGGESTED IN U.K.
S—We sincerely K i . tion—Dial Courtesy Bung ) —. i ili
Satie wee. quae Menlo S eT Wee’ st oh aoe pelle, (1) life host sooupass abinnacte, MISCELLANEOUS LONDON, Nov. 27. Six Roads, St. Philip
aths Z a eat exch ere ae . —————$$—$—$___———————_ =r Y *
pathy by sending cards, wre aths, ————— nn | | veral oth ic 00 tee to mentien. British newspapers were divided
or ed the funeral of our beloved ELECTRICAL several other item: a ee Af BOTTIES—Clean ony SP ae at Tuesday over the C ps debate TO-NIGHT
a 5 vu R s : ‘'48e. per dozen—deliver Colonnade Stores, aS ommo
ister if ache |
The Gilkes family 28.11.51—1n ee a Govt, Auctioneer. | White Park Road. 11,11.51—t.f.n. | on the Japanese treaty and several Wedn y Nov. 28th IRON BEDSTEADS WITH SPRINGS
sn ta————__~Ee! REFRIGERATOR: One (Electrolux) 51— " t ednesda F
r " Of Burning Refrigerator in pertect | __eeemencees | WANTED to purchase an unused suggested that th he treaty should be and SPRING FILLED MATTRESSES
IN MEMORIAM ' : ’ ‘o\revised where it applies to Japan- at 7 p.m.
* order. Apply to T. Sydney Kinch, ‘TORNADO—International K.41. Beauti-| Electric Service. Apply B,D. C/o pps pe : f th recently received, do not wait until the last moment
‘1 ‘ die” osu; Seite Cmte New Building, R wd a7). | ful condition, excellent equipment, good | Advocate. 27.11.51—3n | ese overseas trade.—U.P. in support of the BUY NOW
. Fei 7 o por ‘ ° racing record. Cost $700.00 now $500.00. ee j
2 a See ee be No ‘offers. Hicks, ‘Telephone, $100, ON PAROLE ee ;
SS So yes eee FURNITURE vn ter | ANNOUNCEMENTS CENTRAL







Boy your poor mother is still leaning D



















iit TABLE—One modern mahogany Dining ‘ aot wena Sth vee a nicinimvsainaiitaasitieasieatinsnediiimmminmindet |

He has promised Table. AS new. Phone 3050. |) ae oe. ) Ltd. Further particu! $5 in goods and with your cash bill

A ev leave nor forsake m 27.11.51—2n | lars, apply Wm. Fogarty eitat. tia you get a guess-coupon: how many

t I Graonum (mother), Mrs. bs Spee . screws in a jar? You can win an

PW w (U.S.A.), Mrs. Peg MISCELLANEUVUUS EKCO radio, It certainly pays to shop

Wilson, Be ters 28.11, 51-—-In . at A. BARNES & Co., Ltd
———_ mn | ARERIGAN PLASTIC DOLLS—Fair AUCTION 23.11.51—t.f.n.
Dur ” SWAT? Size Only @4c. each. Modern Dress

GOVERNMENT NOTICE | s:200e 211.813
GU bh \ \ N ib Shoppe. a meth — ‘ESDAY 28th at 12 noom BAY)



FOK RENT

cET opposite Beckwith St. Mahogany
Tub Chairs, Arm Chairs, Mahogany Wash |
Stand Marble Top, Iron bedsteads, painted

AMERICAN BRASSLERES—Endorsed by
Good Housekeeping — Pink and white,







‘ A and B cups, sizes 32—38 $1.50 per pr
Appomtment of = Warden,| iicdern Dress ‘Shoppe Pall Si —3n Dressing tables, Mrdicine cabinet, Press, HOUSES
7 > Home General __.._. | Hat Rack with Mirror, Hocker, ware,| _ a
Nurses ’ ANE QUES Of every description | ives, spoons, wash stands, Ladies Desk| “ReResPORD—Maxwell Road, Christ
Hospital class, China, old Jewels, fine Silver 9 hg ar peel Cams R-) church. From Ist December Apply next
Watercolours. Early books, Maps, Auto- " iY eerer door to Lashley. 28.11, 5i—4n

j oe
TIONS are invited for 25,.11.51—3n

ionabie appointment ol
Nurses’ rlome, General

graphs ete., at Gorringes Antique Shop
sdjoining Royal Yacht Club..
3.10.51—t.f.n

PPLICA



“UNDER THE SILVER
HAMMER




BLANKETS: Good quality Assd. shades







BARBADOS ADVOCATE

teaching Subjects up te Higher Certificate | discreetly offered his good offices
;when the U.N. General Asse-ably
eonvened here earlier this month.

ported to have had a series of
|meetings wi

Closing Date: Saturday, 28nd December, /Nyries Said Pasha shortly before
| the latter's return to Baghdad last



WEDNESDAY, NOVEMBER 28, 1951








Science Reveals

'
|











PAKISTAN OFFERS ’s Bi ' Seen ae.
AKISTANOFFERS = Putnam's Big Task | |. NOW! Dental
WASHINGTON, Nov. 27. |



‘with

Colgate Dental Cream

Zafrullah Khan is reliably re-

Iraq’s Premier



MEETING







EMPORIUM

Corner Broad and Tudor Streets

W. A. CRAWFORD
and
J. C. MOTTLEY

as Representatives for
the parish in the General
Assembly.

BONN, Nov. 27.
Major General Kurt Meyer serv-
ing 2 life term in connection with
the World War II slaying of Cana-
dian troops recently was granted
parole from a war crimes prison
on “urgent compassionate grounds”
according to British authorities.
U.P.



White shoes, to pass muster
in company, must be spot-
less, immaculate. Use











Propert’s White Renovato
or Propert’s Shuwhite. No
surer way of making sure


















i 1 ata salar) 2: sin
ee ’ me roe hd x oe rvs nd sizes $3.25 and /4.26 at THANIS, On Thursday 29th by order of Mrs. P. C
ammual increments , a ee conn x Brench we will sell her Furniture at
Wm. Hry .St. 27.11.51—t.f.n | Brenen = w
2 per annum, plus a temporary Zs i aid e “Good Hope”, Gibbs, St, Peter, : “ Nags
Cost of L : Allowance at Gov-] BARBADOS VIEW SCARVES 100 ; h includes
ramet es. In addition, quar-] 2ure suk with lovely views of Barbados Upright and Arm Chairs, Tables, Couch, w & e REGS
eroment rat a t » Que An ideal Gift to give or own. THANI'S | Sideboard all in Mahogany, Glass Ware,
ters in the. Home and board art} nia: 3466 27.11,.51—t.f.1 |] Dinner and Tea Services; Barrel Shade,
provided .* eee | Iron Sufe-on-Stand; Old China Plates;
n } . > 1e CHILDREN'S HANDBAGS—Useful for | Double Tron Bedsteads and Beds; Cedar
Applicants should not be ovei EN Sa BAGS Usitul tor) Devee, Cedar, Deak, Rockers, 'Mahog.
40 years of age, should be unmar-fon6 for your child and the other as a| Dressing Table and Chest of Drawers; wv
ried or..witiows without eneum: | gift for your friend. “Special jarge | Deal Tables, Kitehen Utensils, Books.
brances, should have attained i pcre aeinite vile Ce ey Two for pants and othes items, Sale 11.30 o'clock.
00. Mo PSs . ; SH.
satisfactory standard of education | * en Dress snopes 11.51—an. | BRANKER, TROTMAN & CO.







and have had experience of the
prepatation and service of meals

———$—$<$S—_—

EGYPTIAN LEATHER ARTICLES:

Just opened a large assortment of Gents

Auctioneers

25.11.51—2n











1 8 knowledge of domesti¢e du- fancy wallets and Ladies’ pure leather or a ay Et
ties on a large seale. purses: Ide for Gifts at THAN? BROS.] — — ~
The duties will include the] Dial 3466, 27,.11.51—t.in | p '
ain a » iscipli j hel —_—_—————————————— rf
maintenanee of discipline in the) Sey amaw Mats for powon||| OMEN TAL
{Uurses om * lovely designs $1.8 each THANI'S Pr ’
Applications should be forward-| Wm. Hry, St. Dial 3466 SOUVEN IRS |
‘ a iad . nt ge 26.11.51.—t.f.n
ed to the S« cretary, General 0 nu Sewn 4 CURIOS ANTIQUES, |
ital, not leter than 8rd December, “inpiaN SANDALS—Another shipment EWELS, CARVINGS |
i951, and should be on the form] just arrived. (Last one soid out immedi- EMBROIDERIES, Etc. |
of rable from the Secretary’s| #tely) come and secure yours a
Office, General Hospital THANFS. Dial 3466 27.11.51—t.f.1







J

!
|





































iii ctabene ° INE
28.11.51—2n. YTALIAN BORDERED SPUN—Anti- THANI Ss HARRISON L
Crease in thirty-four lovely designs Pr. Wm. Hry. St. :: Dial 3466
‘| Reduced from $1.86 to $1.73 yard up to cere ee
8 ® ext Saturday only. Better buy now at] )——————————— =
4 BY i Vv Kirpalani 52 Swan Street OUTWARD FROM THE UNITED KINGDOM
a k 28 11.51—In SOSCSPOSOSOOSSPOPP OPES,
re
® ° LADIES' HATS-—-New Ladies’ hats g % Due
ust opened. The latest creations Nylon] ®& NO IcE om is
a @$ ores ou traws and regular braids $5.41 — $8.50 T % Vessel Fr Leaves Barbado:
. ‘ Modern Dress Shoppe 28,11.51—3n » S.S. “LINARTIA” London 9th Nov. 3rd Dec
© 4 hemes eine eH “ a <“ . * ° “~
i 2 RUBBER TOYS—Largs Size Inflated}R po. constructi 7 % Theres a «: |S.S. “PLANTER” ‘ .. London 24th Nov. 7th Dec.
if} ours: Toys — Elephants, giraffes, rabbits, tigers ‘or construction of Roads ¥ SlISCO Paint for every S.S, TRADER” a we Liverpool. 27th Nov. 10th Dec.
’ ; and many others — Bde, nck. Monee and Yards; supply of Block % ose S.S. “ASTRONOMER Glasgow Ist Dec. 12th Dec.
sufferers from lone of vigour, nervous. | ?'°* Pe a stone, Rubble st Sand x ij + + |S.S. “DALESMAN” London 5th Dec. 19th Dec.
s, wealf’ body, Impure blood, falling H PIN wir , e stone, ,Sand, & ae ta
horny, and who are old and worn-out | SHOPPING BAGS & S& CASES-~ and Machine broken flint % SISSONS BROTHERS
see thetweaime will be delighted to learn | Cheapest prices at THANI'S Dial 2466. 0 % S COMPANY, LTD HOMEWARD FO =
now gland discovery by an American 27.11.51—t.f.n stone, Dial 2656 ) | meee LONG ON meet R THE UNITED KINGDOM
DHoetory — a2 woe v a bv T
Chis new discovery makes it possible to SHIRTS—For Sport, Holiday, work or] ¢ a ae ne Se eae . eniae Vessel For Closes ‘in
nd easily restore vigour to your | ocherwise. For the widest variety try] @ KEITH RAYSIDE, 9 | Co. Barbados Co-Operative Cotton Barbados
hea eur maint arcttobmcey and TRARY Aree ° teal Soe 27.11,51—t.f x Manager % Factory, N. B. Howell, G. W ee i = ———
like anew man in only 8 days, In fact, . “tin Lodge Stone Works. son & Co. Ltd., T. J. Sealy, Central] ™- .~
discovery which Is @ home medicine in reel = —— 12 X Foundry Ltd., Watkins & Co. Ltd., For further Information apply lo. . .
ant, easy-to-take tablet form, does SOAP—Famous Turtle Oil Soap, Supert 4606 6 CCCOSSSCE989960S00" and the B'des Hardware Co., Ltd.
with gland operations and begins to; 7uelity. Boxed for gift-giving at 40 and ce ao DA COSTA & co LTD A:
build pew Vigour and energy in 24 hours, | $3.00, exclusively at the Turtle Shop in —_ = ai
t it is absolutely harmless and natural in| the Marine Hotel 28.11.51—1n. |" * 5 gents

action

The suceess of this amazing discovery,
siied Vi- Tabs has been so great In Amer-
. that it is now being distributed by all
here under a guarantee of-com-
plete faction or money back. In other
vords, Vi- Tabs must make you feel full of
ir and energy and from 10 to 20 years
younger, or you merely return the empty
package and get your money back. A spe-
cial, Gouble-strength bottle of 48 Vi-Tabs



Phone 4267 for

UNITEX INSULATING WALLBOARD SHEETS
%” thick, 4’, x 8’, 9’, 10’, 12”

9 .

PERSONAL
“The public are hereby warned against
@iving credit to amy one in my name

without a written order signed by me
having left thé island on the Mth of

















November, 1951

ere costs little and the GOULBOURNE ASHLEY ALLEYNE, . 28

VieTabs ee Ebenezer, St. Philip WALLBOARD MOULDING (for covering joints)
4 27,11.51—2n

fiesteres Manhood and Vitality

The public are hereby warned against
civing credit to my wife, OLGA YEAR-
WOOD inee WYDICA) as I do not hold
myself responsible for her or anyone
else contracting amy debt or debts in my
name unless by a written order signed by
me.

STANDARD HARDBOARD SHEETS
4” thick, 4’ x 6’, 8’, 10’



TSR SS

SEA VIEW QUEST
HOUSE

HASTINGS BARBADOS

Under new management.

Daily and longterm rates
quoted on request

TEMPERED HARDBOARD SHEETS
4” thick, 4’ x 6’, 10’
NATHANIEL YEARWOOD,
King Street,
St, Michael.
27.11,51-—-2n

PLYWOOD SHEETS
%” thick, 4 x 8



I am not responsible for any debt or
debts contracted by anyone except by a
written order signed by me.

TURNALL ASBESTOS WOOD SHEETS



Permanent guests AUSTIN §S, HOLDER, 3/16” thick 4 x 8’
welcome, 27.11.51—2n
Dinner and Cocktail

ALL THESE BUILDING BOARDS ARE TREATED TO
RESIST THE ATTACK: OF WOOD ANTS AND OTHER
TERMITES.

parties arranged,

1, H, BUCKLAND,
Proprietor.

POLITICAL
MEETING

IN SUPPORT OF

MOTTLEY

FOR THE CITY



“Phone 4267.

WILKINSON & HAYNES C0.. LTD.





















CHRISTMAS IS NEAR AT HAND

See that you get your supply of :
Raisins, Currants, Prunes, Citron, Essence
Baking Powder, Icing Sugar,

Killed in 7 Minutes

Your skin has nearly 50 million tiny
seams and pores where germs hide
and cause terrible Itching, Cracking,
Eczema, Peeling, Burning, Acne,
Ringworm, Psoriasis, Blackheads,
Pimples, Foot Itch and other blem-
ishes. Ordinary treatments give only
temporary relief because they do not
kill the germ cause. e new discov-
ery, Nixoderm, kills the germs in 7

ne

We can supply you with —

5-lb. Tins Table Butter
Come Early and do not be disappointed.

°
JOHN D. TAYLOR & SONS LTD.

minutes and is guaranteed to give you





CAT—Female cat, fluffy tabby answer-
ing to the name of “Snookie”. Finder
cial 8295 Mrs. V. C. Gale

27.11.51—3n
——— Sas a













AT a soft, clear, attractive, smooth skin
. 15 one weak. 6 Money Dace on eager :
NELS + y ' Nixederm thon your chomist todayand Roebuck Street rer Dial 4335
I ee
NELSON STREET }) Nixoderm Feal cause
°o 8 n
For Skin Troubles trouble.
on
|__|] SANTA says—
WANTED TO BUY
f .
Thursday Night STAMPS STAMPS |! DELIGHT
,
All Kinds of STAMPS
Tay. oar at the THE
NOV. 29TH 8 O'CLOCK CARIBBEAN STAMP |
SOCIETY f !
‘ No. 10, Swan Street.
Syeakits:— 0. 10, Swan Street Ht CHITDREN
{
Messrs. VINCENT sear oT
orirrirn {i we offer — —
‘ Sait | JIG-SAW PUZZLES FOR
C. B. LAYNE, JUST THE THING CHILDREN AND GROWN-UPS
E. D. MOTTLEY ce See toe NURSERY RHYMES
“The Junior General" ‘ - ‘
SYDNEY | A compact little table Model Gas CUT-OUT re
WALCOTT it Cooker with 2 Boiling Burners and DOLLY BOOKS
| aa Anmiiated sen
Miss A. MANNING | yn bake a Chicken or a cake with H P HARRIS & co
and others Ak yea Go ean Plantations New Building — Lower Broad Street
Bay St. DIAL 4045





_—













GUIANA Sailings to
M8. STENTOR—€th December, 1951. ENGLAND & FRANCE
nl ah. s — January, 1952. ”

SAILING TO TRINIDAD, PARAMARIBO “GASCOGNE” — November
BL ace ca ore & B.C. 3rd, 1951, via St. Lucia, Mar-

8 C iCA—17th December, 1951. ini . n
SAILING TO TRINIDAD & CURACAO ante Guadeloupe . 606 e
M.S. HAARLEM—22nd December, 1951. gua.

that white shoes are white!

PROPERT’S

SHUWHITE & WHITE RENOVATOR

an



in Cartons with Sponge








SHIPPING NOTICES






























Canadian National Steamships

SOUTHBOUND



& Co. Ltd.




















Salls Sails Sails Arrives Sails OFFICE 4493 WORKSHOP 4203

“LADY RODNEY” wre ice Ma Nov ie Nov Bars Nov Seen

fe I as sg 0 ‘ov 0. ov v. - :

“CAN CONSTRUCTOR” 23 Novy 25 Nov 5 Dec 5 Dec PARTS DEPT. 4673

LAD NELSON - - do Nw 9 Dec 10 Dec

—_____—. ptenieiosel?” & thaneimiaaaas

NORTHBOUND S NIGHT 4125
soit nee ane Arrives wt Arrives
7 os n Halit .

“LADY RODNEY” 6 Dee 8 Dec 17, Dec ee ie mee

i 1952 1952

LADY NELSON” 22 Dec 24 Dec 3 Jan 4 Jan



GARDINER AUSTIN & CO., LTD.—Agents.

— =

ROYAL NETHERLANDS
STEAMSHIP CO.

SAILING FROM EUROPE

8.8. COTTICA—30th November, 1951.
M.S. HAARLEM—Sth November, 1951.
M.S. POSEIDON—20th December, 1951.

SAILING TO PLYMOUTH and

AMSTERDAM

M.S. ORANJESTAD—4th December, 1951.
SAILING TO PARAMARIBO & BRITISH

: FOR SALE
| HAGGATTS

|
|
|
|





——————



SSS,

FRENCH LINE
Cie Gle Transatlantique




























S. P. MUSSON, SON & CO., LTD. “COLOMBIE” 24th Novem-

Offers will be considered for the purchase of the
ber, 1951, via Martinique and

above group, consisting of Haggatts Factory and the






ee Vera Guadaloupe. following estates ;—
ance eee will a 33532882
a c a s ngers
Dominica, Antigua, pronteetant, SOUTHBOUND Arable Total
Nevis and St. Kitts, Sailing 30th coe we Moxersher, Acres Acres
The 2 “ ie a 1951, calling at Trinidad, La H o ¢ ‘ 713
The M.V. “Monek il t , aggatts & Bruce Vale approx. 305 7
Cargo und. Passthgers for Guaira, Curacao, Cartagena, }}) Greeninnd & Overhill saevor 324 644
Hovis’ snd “ae mister sieee ot eee Bawden & River approx 266 521
Soha ie onload, sys | Friendship approx, ..........4: Pr ae 211
BSEO Bed, Pees | 3a. N Accepting Passengers, Cargo
Arabs. “Date of "dwarine to he and Mail. | Haggatts Factory has been extensively modernised
ao" e : . - a
B.W.I. SCHOONER OWNERS : ONES 3 and is equipped to produce fancy molasses as well as
. R. M. J & Co D.C. sugar. During the 1951 crop, the factory produced
4,352 tons of sugar. The bags required for the 1952 crop
5O90066SS6 have been secured.
|
|

The mechanical equipment of the group includes
| among other items the following International Har-
vester tractors :—

REAL ESTATE)

Property & Land
: FOR SALE

t



1—TD14 Crawler Tractor with bulldozer.

1—WD9, 1—Farmall H.

Also 1—Caterpillar D2 2—Subsoiler
ploughs,

1—disc plough, 1—brushbreaker plough.

8 Dodge Trucks, 1 Austin Truck, 11 cane carts for
Tractors.

Livestock includes 14 horses, 12 mules.





tractor,



|
| Further details and conditions of sale may be
obtained from, i £y. he oR eis
|! S. P. MUSSON, SON & CO., LTD.,

Broad Street,

JOHN MM. BLADON & Co.

AF.S., F.V.A.
Auctioneers & Building Surveyors
> Plantations Building.

Real Estate Agents,
‘Phone 4640



3ridgetown



=






WV
WH
~

SS
RMVMAAAUVW

WOW
RABypy
WN
CVOOOAV’IM*4s
RA OQMBWiOW

WEDNESDAY, NOVEMBER 28, 1954 BARBADOS ADVOCATE PAGE SEVEN
BY CARL ANDERSON , LE EY |
Ee —) (Rew ig youn moraER | | 2 a ee sii or Me | ; Poole Pottery
f | } Ce es = y — A inti sal << ubet et : f : “a a , y , e Aa A new shipment

> =a = Book Ends, Flying Ducks,
= Blue Birds, Sea Gulls,
— } | Vases, etc.
Ai

Every normal skin needs










at your Jewellers

Y. De LUMA









non-greasy cream wiil hold your powder matt for hours, and protect
your complexion from sun and wind.

way to conquer them, Rub

$<. TS MY TOCK-TOCK?] [ISN’ TLL SAY! IT CAN MOVE if
Kucitimie once iT TELLS TIME? US FORWARD OR | cc ©
OF YOUR DAFFY ——~ UNUSA ( BACKWARD HUNDREDS ' l HESE ( REA MS & CO., LTD.
INVENTIONS, UNCLE a pn . |
WOMBAT ? 5 —/ f WRIST WATCHE) / Broad Street
3 mit Ay } F P | o 294808888 ge oe ,
! 40% Oi oe CIAMAAIIA TT IIA ANAL As SESS RIO TOA DTPOPOCOPOT
it XK Lovely Society women all over the >
‘R j cas FOLLOW THE BEAUTY y
405 world follow this simple, inexpen- CARE OF SOCIETY'S = $ ARE
sive beauty care; one that is LOVELIEST WOMEN P 4 > $
EVERYWHERE 2 % YOU :
within the reach of everyone of = % %
you. CAMRAM ACA KACAKAOARAS $
se S , SCARED
This is what you do: every night, at bedtime, smooth Pond’s Cold x
Cream over face and throat with your finger-tips. ,Remove the cream, x BY
and with it every scrap of dirt and make-up. Then “rinse” with more x
Cold Cream, for extra-cleansing, extra-softening. Very soon, your . RHEUMATIC
skin will be clearer, smoother, lovelier. %
FOUNDATION AND PROTECTION PAINS?
By day, use a touch of Pond’s Vanishing Cream as a foundation. This Here's the sure and certain
x
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a

* SACROOL



















ath %
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% and it’s penetrating powers

9 that can be yours when you use @ will act quickly and effec-

an me Pinca S tively
Pond's Creams. You'll find the %
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On Sale at %
Cold Cream the best beauty counters. x ‘ ™ 3
§ KNIGHT'S DRUGSTORES :
: Noes
pustotoione aan tazstara cro nh oLeEMTBNE TORSO IT PAYS YOU TO DEAL HERE
ie LONE RANGER, BY FRANK STRIKER a






Saran ee SPECIAL offers to all Cash and Credit Customers for Monday to Wednesday only
ON,SILVER/ = fae eo paeiied lads

—o —__--— srt ————————————————————————————____—_—_—_———
ah SPECIAL OFFERS are now available at our Branches Tweedside.

wa Speightstown and Swan Street
| Usually Now









Usually Now

Jars Chivers Mince Meat .73_ .t4 Tins Xmas Puddings 191 1.70
Bots, Heinz Salad Cream .52 -48 Tins Simolina 69 G4

Bots. Sandemans Apitiv Sherry 3.50 %.00 Bots. Cocktail vee 140 128
14 oz.

D. V. SCOTT & Co. Ltd. Broad Street



BY FRANK ROBBI

: _—
SUPFERIN’ SUSIE! f
THE GUY IS STARK, agai ee
RAVING... MAR’ uy iz











el

TARTS A RUNNING

if NEIN/ MEIN NOU
CE HIM THAT THE

Cire LIES! DEATH...
ray” CEATH FOR ~
EVERYBODY!



RIDE A |
| “HOPPER” |
BICYCLE

















-YOUR WIFE LEFT A

FOR YOU TO BE HOME
AT SEVEN-SHE IS EXPECTING
THE GREAT PIANIST

| PROF, CHRIS SENDOE

AT THAT TIME-



NO- CUT A FEW MORE
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POUND IT WITH YOUR

r ; HAMMER -
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THE PROFESSO
FOR A SHOCK WH
HE TRIES TO PLAY

2 THAT PIANO- ——





















a?)
_$ BAT
i ae >. >’ G

> q ‘ Vad

Ci

| HE'LL PAY US $500 29 I!

The BARBADOS FOUNDRY Lid.
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ee
es 2

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POR SESE
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| _ WANT TO SAY THIS IN FRONT OF STEPPED I ANO FLOORED OUR CHAP/* % x14
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j / FOR DISCIPLINE...THE B AAN WHO TOOK YOUR PAWS OFF ME , *
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A WONDERFUL
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Pay a visit to... * |) THE CITY GARAGE TRADING |
'} GENERAL HARDWARE suppPLIES § CO. LTD. — Vietoria St. |
F 1
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? eee
=_ooS

PAGE EIGHT



WALCOTT POSE THRE

CATCH IN IT

John Goddard, captain of the
West Indies side in Australia, is
not afraid to express opinions
about “incidents” during play. No
other captain, English, Australian
er South African, has dared to
court trouble in this manner

His latest criticism has been of
an Australian umpire in disallow-
ing a catch made by Goddard, who
threw the bail up in exuberance
and then failed to retain it.

Only the umpire can decide
whether a catch has been com-
pleted before the ball goes up
Here at home I have often won-
dered, after seeing catch and
throw-up as a simultaneous act
what woukl happen if the ball
were droped on descent. Fieids-
men had better not take this risk

~—Sportsman’s Diary.
—L.ES.

MATCH ABANDONED

From HAROLD DALE.
SYDNEY, Nov. 27.
The match between Victoria and
the West Indies here was aljan-
doned after rain today, schedulec
to have been the last day of play.
The West Indies had made 230

runs in their first innings to
which Victoria had replied with
195.

On ‘the third day of play the

West Indies made a rain-interruss-
ed 181 for 2 wickets.

Griffith Discusses
Education

The present educational system
and the food problem were the
main items explained by Mr. Vin-
cent Griffith when the Barbados
flectors’ Association kept a politi-
eal meeting at Layne’s Road,
3rittons Hilt last night in support
of his candidature for the parish
of §t. Michael. A crowd of
approximately 1,000 attended the
meeting.

Mr. Griffith



said that he was
very proud to see that the day
had come when he could offer
himself to be of service to the
people, He was very proud to see
that in the island of Barbados he
had lived such a life that it was
impossible for any man to lift a
finger or say,a thing against his
character. “Any man who can do
that—that finger is a lying finger
and that tongue is a lying torgue.”
Mr: J. W. Hewitt, who is offer-
ing himself as a candidate for St.
Thomas, was the Chairman, Other
speakers were Mr. E, D. Mottley,
Mr. John Maynard and Miss Reid.
Mr. Seibert Leacock introduced
the Chairman, .

NEW U.S. ECONOMIC

ADVISER
KEY WEST FLA., Nov. 26
Truman Monday elected Roger
Putnam, member of an old new





NEW SOUTH WALES batsman Jack Morone

on the pads,
19.11.51.)





As I Saw It—By Peter Ditton
Chelsea The Unpredictables

Fine Victory Over Manchester United

LONDON, Nov.

The butt of music-hall comedians for more years than
they care to remember, Chelsea are again proving them-

selves the unpredictables of

English soccer. Graced dur-

ing their existence with numerous famous players includ-

) ing Tommy Lawton, Hughie Gallache rs
England family and onetime Walker, Chelsea have ne ar! rise t ae i a
Democratic candidate for Gov- 2 ¥ ave never risen to the heights.
ernor of Massachusetts, as new The Cup and the Lea rd

1 achus , nev } f League on Saturday (November 10th).
a ne neee Adminis- Championship have always es- They were. playing Manchester
ator.—U.P, caped them. Each year they United at Stamford Bridge and,
penne So much only to leave really, no one could have given

i ‘ at promise un-fulfilled, and them much chance of emerging
WHAT S ON TODAY their supporters bewitched, both- successful {from the encounter

Court of Grand Sessions
10.00 a.m.
Police Courts 10.00 a.m.

Film Show—British Council,

Wakefield, for Barbados
Technologists’ Association
only 1.30 p.m.

ered and bewildered.

Last year Chelsea experienced
their worst fright for some time.
Only a near- miracle, so it
seemed, could save them from
relegation to the Second Division.
And that near miracle occurred

Olympic Club rehearsal at On the last Saturday of the
British Council 4,30 p.m. season, ro»

Police Band plays at St. Mar- Sheffield Wednesday were al-
garet’s School Pasture, ready doomed and so, it ap-
St. Philip 4.30 p.m. peared, were Chelsea, But the

Mobile Cinema film show ‘Pensioners’—as Chelsea are af-
Gellacs wave St. fectionately known—beat Bolton

John, 7.30 p.m,

Labour Political meeting, St.
Elizabeth Village, St.
Joseph in support of Mr.
G. H, Adams and Mr, L.
Smith, 8.00 p.m.

Labour Party Political meet-
ing at Spooner’s Hill, St.
Michael in support of Mr.
M. E. Cox and Mr. T. O.
Bryan 8.00 p.m.

Sunrise: 5.59 a.m.
Sunset: 5.36 p.m.
Moon: New.
Lighting: 6.00 p.m.

High Tide; 2.58 am, 2,46
p.m.

Low Tide; 8.53 a.m., 9.45
p.m,

See a

YESTERDAY’S
WEATHER REPORT
(From Codrington)

by four goals to nil and Sheffield
drubbed Everton to the tune of
5—1. High-speed after-the-match
calculations In the Chelsea board-
room revealed the fact that rele-
gation had been saved by .03 of
a goal.

At the commencement of the
present season Chelsea were in
further trouble, International in-
side-forward Bentley joined the
I-want-a-transfer brigade, as did
centrehalf Harris. On top of that
players such as Billington and
Hughes quit the club for South-
ern League football and Inter-
national outside-right Parsons
showed no sign of recovery from
the knee injury which had put
him out of the game at the close
of the previous season.

It was not surprising therefore
oe re off under a
cloud. ey a surprisingly
fo0d away win at Blackpool in
their first game but then came
a run of five successive defeats—
three of them at home. With the
return of Bentley and Harris the

Rainfall: Nil. “rot” was temporarily halted.
Total Rainfall for month (o But until the game at Stoke a
date: 6.49 Ins. fortnight ago Chelsea had not

Highest Temperature; 84.5 °F
Lowest Temperature: 71.5 °F
Wind Velocity: 7 miles per

gathered a point in three matches,
Stokes, on the othe; hand were
on the crest of the wave. They

nati had ven a matches in succes-
Pa sion. ut what happened when
es sen nem: they met Chelsea. Yes, chat’s















1 BEING A MEALTIME PAPER
OKRA LOOKED FORWARD

UNE SOWING up
‘SO SHED HAVE :
SOMEONE TO

TALC, WITH:



Wet
A CHIP
THEY
BETWEEN ’EM Now:

WURRA , WURRA/-

af
‘te

a

ON ACCOUNT OF HER HUSBAND'S

right. Chelsea beat them.
The “Pensioners” did it again



PERUSER,
TO :

JUNIOR IS GROWING’UP-
OFF THE OLD POTATO...
SPLIT THE PAPER



Manchester were at full-strength
with a powerful forward line
reading from left to right. Row-
ley, Downie, Aston, Pearson and
Berry, sia

As though resigned to their
chances Chelsea commenced in
mediocre fashion. Inside 17 min-
utes Manchester were two up
and it might easily have been
four. There was little or no evi-
dence of what lay in store for the
48,000 fans who had braved the
cold wind and drizzle rain to see
the match.

Inside a minute, following the
second Manchester goal, Chelsea
had reduced the arrears through }
new-boy D’arcy, signed from |
Charlton a couple of weeks pre- |
viously. That wag the first sign |
that the match still held some
hope for Chelsea and when ten
minutes before half-time Bentley
found the back of the net with

a truly great shot from 25 yards}

the issue was as open as it had
ever been,

But whereas Manchester had}
Seized the initiative and had not
been able to capitalise on it, now
it was Chelsea who found them-
selves getting on top. Nor did
they allow the opportunity to
slip from their grasp. Dickson
and Armstrong the two wing-|
halves obtained control of the
centre-field and as their opposite

nambers Cockburn and_= Gibson
were forced more and more)
on the defensive, so the tide of}

battle turned. |

Not even the cool head of}
Johnny Carey, the Manchester}
skipper and right-back could
halt the onsurge of the men in|
blue and for the first time in
many matches signs of panic be-
gan to show in the Manchester)
defence,



T

me F

y looks uncertain as a ball from Alfred Valentine raps him
But the umpire disallowed keeper Guillen’s appeal for L.B.W. (West Indies vy. N.S.W.

-Consolidated Press Photo.

the end, the turnabout was com-
plete. Chelsea, the unpredictables
had done it again.

The heroes of the afternoon?
All the Chelsea team, And on the
Manchester side I would count
butside-left Rowley who has now
collected 18 goals this season
and full-back Carey, still one of
the game’s great players.

CHELSEA: Robertson, Bath-
gate, Tickridge, Armstrong, Har-
vis, Dickson, Gary, D'arcy, Smith
(R), Bentley, Campbell.

MANCHESTER UNITED: Al-
len Carey, Redman, Gibson, Chil-

BARBADOS ADV< CL



ATE WEDNESDAY. NOVEMBER 28, 1951



IN 2ND TEST

Australian Prestige |
In For Buffeting |
|








F — the name FAMOUS for Pickles
for generations

Branston Pickle
Mixed Pickles
Gherkins
Picca

alilli

White Onions
Cocktail Onions
Chow Chow
Walnuts

World-famous ay food products

Local Agents:
T. Geddes Grant Ltd., Bridgetown

(From FRANK MARGAN)

SYDNEY, Nov. 28,
Following their great Test trial against Victoria in the
match ended on Tuesday, West Indies tourists seem quit |
capable of giving Australia’s cricket prestige the greatesi
buffeting it received in the last decade.



West Indians are in great heart}











for the Second Test commenc ino! Second Test, to all appearances i ri
on Friday a Sydney cricke.| Will be drawing a sellout crowc
ground Tf ose as the of 40,000, the. capacity of the | POLLO EAP SO OSS SPE EPPA SS LAPP PIPE AAS PP PPPFOAP TG es
Australians at the beginning! famous Sydney cricket ground. !Â¥
knew, their success depends on a x |
good start being given by the It was on this ground where |
opening bafsmen. the great Bradman scored his |
hundredth century versus Nor-j} 2
The dashing form shown by|man Yardley’s English tourists. |
the “old. firm” Rae and Stoli- —UP. |
meyer in the Victorian game |

shows the tourists are now capa-
ble of starting the side off well

The improved form of giant
wicket-keeper batsman Clyde
Walcott shows him to be a po-
tential threat in the Test.”Better
things are to be expected of
suave flashy Frank Worrell who
has been off the line in all his
appearances to date. Apparent,

he has not yet lost his Lancashire
League outlook where the aim is
to score off every ball if possibk
and make every shot a_ sixer.
Worrell came straight from the
Lancashire League to take up
the Australian tour.

Worrell is now learning that
the Australian attack in cricket
outlook is vastly different fron
the Lancashire League and he
is making appropriate changes
in his approach. So keen were |
the West Indians to gain all]
available bowling practice in the,
Victorian game that they batted
in semi-darkness on Monday. |
The game was abandoned on)
Tuesday due to a spell of notori-:
ous Melbourne weather. '

“Bradman of Barbados” Ever-
ton Weekes who stayed at Syd-/

ney in an attempt to recover)
from a thigh muscle injury had
his first practice on’ Tuesday |
since the accident a_ fortnight
ago. |

Captain Goddard said: “We are
anxious to see how Weekes
stands up to hard practice but it
is far too early to decide his fit-
mess for the Test.”

Weekes batted against God-
dard, Gomez and Atkinson who
also stayed at Sydney for a rest.





ton, Cockburn, Berry, Péarson, Interest in the West Indies
Aston, Downie. Rowley, tour continues to grow. For the





Sport Shirts |

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MERCHANT TAILORS
OF

BOLTON LANE







When Smith headed home a
Campbell corner-kiek after 25
minutes and then D’arcy dived
headlong to convert a swift cen-
tre from Gray five minutes from

By Jimmy Hatlo
CA





YES! every suit
made by er is
specially tailored
“FIT TO
PERFECTION ”

to



While there are
“tailors and tailors”
we can boast
of being veal
THE TOP-SCORERS
IN TAILORING”





P.C.8. MAFFEI & (0.
Lta.





Fit to Parfecti

















nema





SOP OCPESOPOO FSO

< < 64664
SLOSS SSPE EEL OPEL IAL II IIA

WRAPPING
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WE HAVE
2 TOYS (Plastic and Mechanical)
DOLLS (AII Sizes)
TEDDY BEARS
TRI-CYCLES
PICTURE BOOKS
GAMES AND
BALLOONS.



Sheet _ _4¢

at your Jewellers

Y De LIMA

At

‘COME 10 TOYLAND

3ring along your Kids and let them choose for

themselves From The Large Variety.

BARBADOS HARDWARE Co. Ltd. §

LLL LSS

S

(The House For Bargains) $
‘ %

, . ~ ~ > € $
& co... LTD. 16 Swan Street — — — Phone 2109, 4406 or 3534 >
*
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IIIVf>lHV NOVKMBF.B :. ISM BABBADOS AD\i I'M, I rilBEF. -J^^i y "^um^^ Labour Cause Needs Help "Age Grouping Rotten 9 -~Says WARtf ~~%  % .,. \ LI I i a>gftm |[ Eveivbody (hat sal in the failure but had to do it because that they offended Ihe labourer*. of Assembly when the people were promised thai But utill the Government MM Jlltt.000 were voted to send Barthey would be sent out whenever telling the peasants to pool then ...n emigrants to the U.S.A. emigration was possible. An m together. i I BOUBMI told UN kTl " w thal ,he scheme would be %  mold pfftfW 10 ( balky Mount St %  failure and knew that he was from Mexico and Jamaica because thai tb labour doing wrong, Mr. 1E. Ward said these place* were nearer to her It a political inert inn held by (h< the labour cheaper. assistance and it is for them the Electors* Association at PIP CornThe Government should have worker* || assistance cr on Monday night in the suptaken Mr. Crawford's advice and HI DecemV-i.'Matures of Mr. spent the money on building I and giving their MJpport to 3. A. Wateolt and himself. roads whtafc would Rive thi Mr. Ward said thai the Labour people employment for MM mm i T !" B ur e *•" i-^kitig at the Tarty was not giving the people Added • this. Barbados — unlike Labour F' ,,i meeting: all the amenities thai they were Jamatea — was not properlv which was held in support of her talking about. represented m America and was laturr for o seal in the None of the people knew : Ullage of. Hal part. ti would get DMt Mt that a permanent represent.mp| b ^ ^'P"? taUve off the parish at the forthyear, but they knew that "< %  %  "~ -a—" —.< •* !" — — owners, the Colonial Govern ga On raie 5 Riot Damage 1X>NI>UN In the Mou-.,* <.f QM HawMBjgan 21. Mr. Thomas. Rood %  i H the Colunu %  *hat was the v.iluc of iLim;.. I'l.'lll 'hits I" I I I Gaol flreol iaV of the Inter* i %  lowiaat yeab BO bn-ek Gangsters escaped %  i gang .tressed M armeit,wtth machine guns. •' Then going up and that the price Although tha loud BpeaUni mam was going up. Nobody was posal to send Barbadians to the us refused to work there coming to them and tailing them hinterland of British Honduras. i the Evans proout .illU various t\ Among those arha addressed the electorate were Mr. F. L. Walcott Mr. Jome* A. Tudor, and Mr O. H. Adams. and the British taxpayer, respeeMr. Oliver I.i Helta*, llw Colo%  D.nu.i ;. %  GrenaJa strike is now estimated at abo'.i uld not be safislncurrod — %  %  *** h Honduras — m .-^ .. —... — ... .^ U ... B M —.... rillliriMMu in (I 111(11 llVIHtUHi „ _I1_J renTauIeT to* taa^^hc hal **** ""'"** **' **'**" *'*** hl ? Uk U U "' ** bcc-uw ^ — The labour people in Eng tried a Labour CMVortunanl and Ihe result was that England was liankiupt. Tha Labour Govern ment in England had the people starving as the Labour Ootnn ment of Barbados will surely do. The West Indies were getting rf ,„„ hl ^, ^ f Uv b t ne Sif -T ,Z f n fif ^ U8ar ,Qday *new that th.v could do lot t" because the British Government curt „ ^ ^.^ v wanted the West Indies to pro,„.„ w „ uUi liu M , ltshl „ n t^ W -^ 1 *, ^ ; f0^ J ,h ^ L nV ,hi "' %  'hev got DOW he said. "Tout and God's rain _,__ n h.Istna ahititv SEA WE'LL paw ae s Pavnl \l\.ls |iv S W I \ o-. WIIMIU AII\ Art^lPt„Hm TSnrMn %  From THUCfDAD K T Mum], %  Goodtnuin. J. "eiwi. H Appi".hit<>. N '-a. M Dalnh. li -. Clnrhr. ( O Sort. It IV I. From WH Hi %  %  %  %  IT Phdptw n rt VDfCDrT tVlwln join Harold Ksm*u.. Wllbvrt Wlli. rran i-IW P>om I'l i .. I Dowen. 0—m A-.h worth. M-ii-i %  arta, MhiMi %  HirtHIlM* Ml RWI. ON M0HBA1 ii %  i %  [i. %  i •-. Shu.-m I'M TRINIDAD Aithi.r D lav*. Arthur .... !• %  •. B tti :• Urn -i >.ii wnrl J.'.0 M*mn Waakburo. %  r<>i ST %  t t SVir MAKTlNigt t Skxni..." -J nun a..4 C..i Lai 'fO-Jrwn li Urvnaii. L.i.ir.1 Mntnn riar gUftlll getting back pay: not Ward or in. Labour Party or anybody else. JO Ch-rTsms The Labour Party was diabotMtf %  hen they said that they got back pay for the workci "If you %  ~.vl will see that there is not much difference between ours and the Labour Party's," he s-id. Do think that Barbados with its %  ft] i rfttftl and ruJve*'to"curdown forested *f.000 An accU rale saniant kill snakes before thev could find te % 'mp*iMr since the \ living conditions claims ivlate to Urlhftl .OS* Coming to Ihe cost of l.vmg. he -lles^i to lUVft Ix-er. stolen No was not savinK that the Birbados l !" 1 \ lhr * T".?^" Cnvemment was responsible for *he culpnU or the LnlUxl Kingdom taxpayer. A claun by tinln> d flgrteollural association for compensation amniinliog to C4V436 Ift : uninsured or inuruur.iH IT currad iy prtvaM ownera is now being considered by the Oreoada Go\'enunent. The Grenada OftVTIunftnt will BJM meet the cost of pspalrinj| or %  fplftellMj Government prop-r^^ %  i p / > OtBASS) ( Ot /i/r.iV not \/>/; t\ CAOtO i w-N A I n apokmaa said M injuries when %  Uftftkftd by .i 1 Bftnapeh ift aha antial trao %  C i %  nlstaken for .. I —V.P. TORNADO .7^— -y\ •. you thing that Barbados with its „, ",, economy can do what the Labour iTi!"!: trolled in FTigland but as soon the Rnglish exporter was tending out InKi-ods. there was nw conti %  .! I! | .'• %  f It th.,t T dele K'tson shotH.i be sent up to the .'„, !" '.„w Secretary of Slate for the Cotonkos and make demands just as BMtflrn.ante did. Mr. Ward said that the Welfare an v m,t ne and promise to you? "Barhndos Is too small; it primarily produces children and tiv sugar and its economy fll these promucs.'' factory owner, was getting fl per lOD EpM for his sugar factory while the labourer was only gelhiiting ICV-. He never had to pay back CUD cent while the labourers had to pay bftCh tVftry oatrt that Spa*king on LUngration. Mr. they got from the Labour WelWard said that the Barbados Govfare Fund. His party felt that the eminent voted $102,000 the last labourers should be given up to session to send emigrants tn one third of what they borrow Everybody in the Mr. Smith recommended in the ; House of Assembly at the time House thai the Government should Joseph knew that he mi doing wrong bring in u*ftCtorl to ttftlp I send mem to America. Every unit. The Government could not bodj knev that u would be a do hag wen afraid BR1SI %  A freak tornado near Brisbane \. f( into the Vi and (fropped on) v.trdf a u %  '%  rftUafd lion,. pevM 'Ih .. M %  w hirUd a barn aod a noo-g.iiiini uusi Into kbo ..Mil pnekeu fenca poati %  LI rnlaaftrj bj 13 people. FERGUSON FABRICS : I n DwuntMfaad fast tatouu %  w§mmz&S£% In Touch With Barbados CoatUl Station C.lilr %  .i Wk ;... ,, hl|M %  Plaillpr. %  %  Suo.1 Waur. flt.ii*(i Rnal* I I I. Iwbrl. I I, Dttn.Ti.rk I A.. I.. f. i %  -.. %  T. Irr-iHi BMr. %  a, Aslo*. II ....... %  HOW. • • AU-oii i • Aagie %  Hump". Ateot, PI .. lUlyeon Ird RATES OF EXCHANGE I > 1111 NOVKMDER IT. ISSI .-• on Bankaia a ft to 1 Hull. SJ *r> pi BHJM Irr.ir. S3 3-l~ cabta iH I 10-. i>r. dirrwncv ail PERFUMERY! 5, April Violets, Bond Street. IIS I III KM Tweed Miracle, Rpart.e. Confetti IIOIIIIH. \M Chanlilly. Quoiquo Fleurs. Illlll. SIOIII S THE FINEST IN ALL POPULAR CONGOLEUM CONGOLEUM SQUARES AND KUGS aasaMavassssj GIVE YOUR FLOORS THIS XMAS PRESENT THE CORNER STORE ._ iRMOUTH A special gift! —This new PARKER /J/" *tr> 0 *5V < •••• • ....that't my blnintiW I am? In.fact, at th vary onrca a* yoot'eUil* milk supply. So. too, .ire Neitla'i. MJk. tinned by^Nntlc'i ii milk of •tnvjrying axcellence. selected, jnd fprfpiredl under the mott eaactinf conditioni of master* hyfiane.'suirinfcad by itringtnl.teiU to bg Q^,*J**AW ( purity. Nairfe's now offa yeu It's the only pen iiil/i ib AiRO-minic l\K iYSTEM NESPRAY A NEST "' S PRODUCT Here's one gift you knotc is wanted! Thi* netii Parker '51' with its remarkable Aero-metric Ink System-a wholly different, scientific method of drawing in, storing, safeguarding and releasing ink. Sec this wondernil new Parker -51* at your dealer's. A* a very ipccUl gift ... or foe yourself... it's the perfect choice. frarcr: Rnn 111 Gou ( %t MAMS I 1 -.TBAIOY CAP SIV.77 I > NIW (OTO-'llL fUUR NIW INR


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PACE SIX BARBADOS A1IVM ATI' V.IDM.MiW SOVEMBEI M. WM CLASSIFIED ADS. TUEWONE 2S0i%  MMMMtflXI pf ; Th* h"i tor II W on waak-<* %  ** 1 *" b *-" -t_.r.. B ''I %  %  %  %  ;i"> vu u and • can" par war* — —•atdiiioual aurd l. !" * FMwcMM M" 8 *D and p m I NaMra. o..l %  !•* 4 P -a %  OIK SAII; AUTOMOTIVE im 11 Thr fuiiar*l %  iS.nsar fl fowl i Btaitavjr oim ehHp. faiublick-up. Apply a C. Martin RJiiItr CO THANKS UmHh— Wr ..niaraiY ina* our In. nS card.. M oi atundad Ihr I v famll. r 1-1....1 IX Mt.MOKIAM %  I Prefect 11 apt MI Bv...ia. Hrlwin.r O*. U>ii' niiM-la all K*Hl He-Id. I*rl %  • % %  • %  I A an CM A.l eo Ilallnv and Tr" Pltcv information D.al Il3 i anod eaod •I* a. to l %  I" %  \ I tp*ti I R iWINDBOHIM1 Modal KI.KCTIt.i Al. I'l I.H SALES' WAMIU SEAL RTATK rU-I. THAT carta,. ... JO fl b iMMWWal II '. aSaaslrig. *ru.. a*4 lha1-H .. -in hilch*-. "id uaual uloaV- %  %  no... Saint 0*bnr, h*> public ro-d T*-ff M a %  %  '* wall IP taa Ironl. aid %  *"> 'NirNr>ktitN*ri**. ;,[. ,„ J. -,,.,. • KintAim HI-.K. Mil 11 %  PAKISTAN OFFERS TO MEDIATE W ANGLO—U.S. DISPUTE prataraMy wHn II M COCOMT nra m Jai tlvtr* I iu r MnajHaahj I *>U1 aril MM • %  a ato, • o* clock, a %  VmcJFtUVTOH On* 'UarlroMS' %  uKuni Balriearaior . Apr %  Kiiich. italtona %  iluLldiriir. Priori* •TO il |l r.l lln %  clap malal. d DT. IT ii.-mi.aa ftai-ial r..#y ft sal harn-li. •avare! Ilia IM. .1 Mod %  H, • %  < alx <—>k> <>l mriml %  irr. 01 three aia vutt Balkarlaa. U >q n pan. ral karka. u >Aw kaila, koal aa* A.J-1-ira and UllW OLklrun.. iMta-ir *rt ptnUaa and on. wiin runpi and lular. 1 r-lam Coalpulllss. ona """*•• wllk glaaa BMaJ pallcr. Ill lil boat pompaaa blnnacl I|I Hal pli-nar on* atral Sh.ll ai xm4l atbar imr.i U>o many to rnanuo I> AJICY A SCOTT. Uovi Auction*-. Ill II Sl-*t I* k C THAIAR PARIS. Nov 27 aources discloMd Turs.nd-pcerku move* for a Kjiu iliatltm ill the Wt*t's lonflul %  rttii EKypt ovat Mld-Eaal defence plpni gn Eg>pl'> ditiMil*' wiinBnlain over treaties and tlv. Suez Canal. The chief initiative reportedly ILK fium Pakistan'' .._ Mini-'ter Sir Zafrull&h Khan who OruacaM | discreetly offered his good offices when the UN. General Ar;bly convened here earlwr this month Zafrulliih Khan if rvliaUy re•enaa of ' %  •' %  • %  •TNOl Tl Ftrt-CATIOHAt. -iIOMU*J (a* v MaM Tai M '.ma S..',act Up *p jpjaajj Oil Ovocrapaiy. bi M-inamattca. Iilki I Mill H PM iDkpraa Apf l^antai •i ata-M.apo t MKo*T c*mncat ported to have had CI :•., n.ta Applv M %  at .rdj wio Dtatincuom mcetinaa with Irak's Premier ttnd D-caml*! KISMTH RF.ID. Cknc Brdia. Tobap M II 51 %  ION PAIMTKP Appo Comnaal *•%  taaj r.. Sn*pna*a m.nrt b^w^p -• im Ilrins aamplaa of work S'uries Said Pasha shortly before to Baghdad la&l wetK and later with Britain'! %  • ii IM nnaftVi Mr St-lwyn Lloyd. —C.P. Putnam's Big Task WASHINGTON. No*/ 27 The ftrst big task tar Ib U.S. new economic stabilizer Roger Lowell Putnam is to contract negotiation* npening today between the steel industry and 1.000.000 CXO. steel workers. Putrturi succeeds to the post of stabilizing wages, salaries and prices on December 1 in piace of %u son who resigned last week to return to the Presidency of the Motion Picture Aooation—I".P. POLITICAL MEETING MIStrXLAXEOUS utlui-al K %  I'ijUVUiNMkNi AOiiu: FL'KXITt'KK MISt 'Ki.l-AM-.OUS AMCHKAN Appuintnu-ni of Warden, Nan*M Home. General il.ismtal invsMd to nmeni .. . i %  .noeiiu of 4B tc I .. ton, qu-.i' I haul tied or. pstdows withoi brances. ahould bava %  i.laid of rducatloi i agaparianria -4 Un u service tif menu. owladga a* domestic du. i.. aril In . i Una in the hould be forward• 'ry. Oeneral Ifoa%  in Jrd Dacaambw on the form la from the Seereltt\' ral Hotpilal 2ft n SI In a..a Pi .pao 9 3* l I* par t :~lfni Draaa Snoppa. af II Si—j Baai Lid UllSl-tfr. AUCTION IIWW'tWIWilliMWIB I K1AJ -IIand with raw • j.rYou %  nag I pars :MI -II .1 I! % %  % %  .. mt -IHllI -(ipi...I. ar.kollk HI. Midacinv Ann ChBlr.. Mahoirany Wain •tend Marbla Top, Iron bad rt aada. paBMad Diaaalni Ublaa. M-dKina .abi>t. ITaaa. Hal Rack with MUror. HDC.I. traPk, kiilvaa, aaoana. waab ati>d.. ladlaa Daak and athar llama TIC HMS CASH II Al111 K Mc KK34ZUC. AiHtianaar. IS. II SI-3n I OK niKXT J\P ntSATl pWV7SfO> SUaTCaWnDi -W (IX LONDON. Nov. 27. Brtthjta newspaix-is *cu divided irairti atarea. Tur d^iy over the loamwii ch-bali : ii si tin. I,, the Japanese treaty and several i %  c>.. '.•.( that Mai braastj asswlal ba vised where it applies to Japan. ovai asai bTtjda —I v ON PAROLE BONN. Nov 27. Major General Kurt Meyer ser< ing i life term in connection wi the World War II slaying of Can. dian troops recently was grarte parole from a war crime.. pns< on "urgent compassionate grounds according To British aUltKnTttaM — V P. I • NOW! Dental Science Reveals PtOOf THAT MUSHING TIETH MOHT AFTW iATIMO IS THE SAFE, EFFECTIVE WAY TO HELP STOP TOOTH DECAY with Colgate Dental Cream 1 l—: I n. ,.P C n KAMOI Lfa ful *"' KubnalUon or aa Xmu Olfla rh.. >n* for y"" cblld and Ih* otnai ..a lor your rricnd Sprcioi i-' haa* p-rmlU tbi* low pner. I-.. PM Modam Draaa aheppa M 11 il aa, tCiYITlAN IXAT1IEK AHTU1.1.* i HB I VANfY arilAW MATK rnr bad.o." .i>vrr' draipn. fl as oacli THANI-S PI Ii i. si ii ii -tr UNDER THK SILVKR I1AMMKR Un Ttturadav XtOi as ordar ol all Ii, %  rli <••• ill wll bar rurnitur %  iWhasM Upil§hl and Ait S..i*board .ill in M.ihaeanv, Olaaa V Wr iM T*a Wifn. n-rral Sri.dc. gpfc aa abnal It poMibti MMtaF r..i >ra vipMir to your "lv. to bull.l rt'h, uura Mm*t. .. mr mini and memory and v i. <> inc. (data In tm --tlon. and b.alr.. t '1 %  i-r> in :i riouri. •imtosa sad aalursl In .f it., -mallpg dlar.yarv. m haa h.n ao B*ast In A mar' ln| illalilbutod by all r %  varaalc* our raonay park A V r-n,th bottl* ol Vi-TaB* ;n..i n.nji if ITALIAN BORDCHEI> :rraar in tniny-four lovaly daaujn li.l.Hr.1 from II SB In 1173 yard up 1 %  M II JI-1. ADIEKHATS—Nrw Laatlaa' h< Tha lalart cr-i.ii <<.ida tSl SSPll %  tn Hrr.. •Uiopp* 2fl II SI li :inirii i' %  i Eirpliajil., ll.iRa.. rPbB many olhrn Sat aach Modam I si. .|.|.. 1I1I.M—3r> IOPPINQ HA*;* A *t'tT CAagrV i — nt THAN1 tXal Mar, Tl 1111t 1 NIMH-n* l*or *v %  %  rilANI IIIUW Dial MSB Vi-Tabai ; i-orei and i IkUCfVprot*. Ml Vi'ald/ m VIEW GUEST iTASTlNC.S r.AHIlADOS Under new rrjuiagcment. ii.niv ind longtanii rates gunted on request i ianDl Ruests welcome. Dinner and Cocktail r < arranged. 1. H. Bl'CKLAND, Proprietor. POLITICAL MEETING IX SI FPORT or MOTTLEY Hilt III) tTTY AT NELSON mm on fliiirMla\ Niglil NOV. MTB .)( U.I K IN. I.NT GRIFFITH C. Ii. LATHI I D. MOT11 I \ nrmm WAI 0OT1 ^: '. M %  HMTA > ,. i >.l Sni |. ..... Hft.flv.nf .1 M (K. Tur.lv Sh.i PERSONAL Ollll VI Al sorvi:.vins II BIOS ANTIQUES. JKHfcLS. i'ARVIN. L :: Dial 3. Cantral foundry Ud Walklna A to Ltd. .114 tha B'd-a Hacdwara *... Lb* Tn* pitklar aia Maerk-y wanted adainat urn! .radii lo any oaa i" -MWR ocdar alinad In <•• mrtm %  **• as* raland on rba Mill ol • •OllJauUKNE ASMUrt Al.IXYNR. %  bart-l'i BI I'm nun In IPM WTOaCA ri~iuonalblF lor bar or ant itlracllns an' dab< a mMM by %  wrlltn ordar aigruM NATIIAK1KL VlT-AUWIKtD. %  SI M, rUM : rv.p.ni.iMt lor anv i artrd by anvoniai*i ,. % %  ,.i i. AUSTIN g HOLD LOST A Forxn LOST CAT Tanuilr ral. t I up to tn* nama ai -anookla %  • rindai ml art MrV C. Gala V 114) -aa Eczema Itch Killed In 7 Minutes in. .rlv chins. I'm.k lini %  Il g, i u.i. Blaakli* root Itch and mii-r li n ti-atm l-aama. Paallus kill tli* IMP aa-aag Tha n-w ill .rv. Nlaodarm, killtha lain. In I %  iitnutra and Is puanntaa-J tn (|va > i n soft, rl.-nr. n'lrni'tlva. amrxiih akin %  K, or mo,.,.v back Mratti <.f [mptv uaiKicr-. Uat suarani.-. 'I Niaodarm fn'iii J.-ui I %  PMBl l'-lov.f 1 Nixoderm -r-vvii FT Skis Trouslii ueaeU. WANTKD STAMPS 10 mv STAMPS t \MI'S All Klndo of at the fAltllinU.W STAMP NIX IETY No 10, Swan Street si n >. %  •hone 4207 for UNITEX INSULATING WALI.BdARD SHEETS 4" thick. 4'. x 8'. '. 10*. 12' WALLBOARD MOULDING (for covering joints) STANDARD HARDBOARD SHEETS I* thKk. 4' X 6'. 8'. IP* TEMPERED HARDBOARD SHEETS i" thick. 4' x 0'. 1C PLYWOOD SHEETS V." thick TURNALL ASBESTOS WOOD SHEETS 3/16" lluck 4' X 8* AI.I. TH1SI [WILDING HOARDS ARE TRE.\TKI) TO RESIST THE ATTACK OF WOOD ANTS AND 0THIH rxRiuraa Phone 4267. H ll.HI.SSO.S A HtVXES !.. I.TH. London London Liverpool. Glasgow* London Due Learei Barbadoa flth Nov. 3rd Dec Mali 7 th Dec. ?7th N;.v 10th Dec. i lifM (. .v I ivt IADY BODNEY" "LADY NELSON" Ar.l... SBIII Barbkdai Barbaric. f Dap • Dae Arrlrr* Boaian 17 Dae 1*M STRIKE A NEW NOTE! TUNE-UP at 7)U£mwuuu)'i SsAuics Station Shine o$: Jius $taA yftotuhinq tj&nuinsi Jond fiaJiii and Charles McEnearney & Co., Lid. OFFICE 4493 WORKSHOP PARTS DEPI 4673 NIGHT 4125 GARDINER AUSTIN A CO., LTD.— Agenu. CHRISTMAS IS NEAR AT HAND See that you get your supply of K. IIin-.. I'ltrruiilv I'l-uiH's. t ilron, l---.i-n.iBukinu rodr. ktssl SUKBT. TV Wi supply you with — 5-lb. Tins Wafa Butter Come Karly and ilo not be disappointed. IOIIX D. TAVI.OII Rm-biick Street -:& SO\S I.TII. Dial 4335 ROYAL NF.1MERLANDS STEAMSHIP CO. *AII. isu nits inori a cnlTK A— 3W.TIIIIAH M.S. OIAMI.MD Hh Uarvmaar. ISM -Miis.. m PASAHAKiao a iimu-ii I.I nv \ 'i -11 s i i.i: Bin par, );.> M.i> I'OirlDOV— TT.,1 J..i,iir IS51? MUIV. TO TIIMIIMI. I'ASAMAPII'.O JUST THE THING srs IT GA3 SIIUWBUOM garj at SANTA saysDELIGHT THE CHILDREN we offer JIC.-S.UV IT/./.l.ES Fon CHILDREN AND GROWN-UPS STOHY-I. NURSERY RHYMES CUT-OUT 1KLLY HOOKS H. P. HARRIS Tha M V I'anDPr.' will atrapl Cargo and Paaoanpara for 1 A'lllsuj. Monlaarr.I. Navia and Si. Knu Saillns 3Mh ssatan:. Tha MV Monaka" oil) accopt Carlo miri Paaampara for Don.ii'.i.i. Aniisua. Moitlavrrai. Navli .."O St •* i br noOltod V Daaraood *ill accapl n~i 'Hanipan for il a*! • %  i (iranada aod Oalw ol dapanort lo ba •UHOONITl OWNVrtW FRENCH LINE Ik Glr I raiiMtiInni ifjiir SaiUngs to ENGLAND FRANCE "CASCOGNE" November 3rd. 1951. via St. Lucia. Martlniou., Gu.ida.oupe and Antigua. "COLOMBIE" 24th November. 1951. via Martinique Guadeloupe. iivi SOUTHBOUND COLOMBIE I3th November 1951, calling at Trinidad. La Guolra. Curacao, Cartagena, .lair.iu.i Accepbng Passengers. Cargo and Mall. R. M. JONES & Co. Ltd.—Ate oU. & CO. Lamer Bread Sirert REAL ESTATE Property & Land FOR SALE JOHN M. KUDOS tV Ce>. AJT.8., F.V.A. Real EsUte AgenU. Auctioneers A Butldlnr Surveyors I'honr li. hi PlanUtlons Bulldinc FOR SALE a HAGCATTS GROUP Offers will be considered for tinpurchase of the I tlnfl ol BaggBtl '-.Ki.ii> and the following fgitttf. Haggatts & Bruce Vale approx. Greenland & Over hill approx. Bawden & River approx Friendship approx H.-iKgutts Factnry has been extensively modernisexi and is equipped to produce fancy inulaaaws as well as D.C sugar. During the 11*51 crop. Ihe factory produced 4.352 tons of sugar. The bags required for the 1952 crop have been secured. The mechanical equipment of the group includes among other items the following International Harvester tractors :— 1— TD14 Crawler Tractor with bulldozer. 1—WD9. 1— Farmall H. Also 1—Caterpillar D2 tractor, 2—Subsoiler ploughs. 1—disc plough, 1—brush breaker plough, 8 Dodge Truck.-:. I Austin Truck. 11 cane carts for Tractors. Livestock includes 14 horses. 12 mules. Anblr T.UI Arm Arm :n)5 713 324 644 286 521 115 211 Further details and obtained from, .ttnditions of sale may be • JB\JBU\. S. P. MUSSON. SON & CO.. LTD.. Broad Street. Brut



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PACK IIGHT HAKRADOS VDMKMI UIIIMMI1I NOMMIIER 2K. 1W1 WALCOTTPOSE THREAT IN 2ND TEST Australian Prestige In For Buffeting CATCH IN IT captain i n Australia, is John Goddard. Wesi Indies side ltd lo exprew jhout "incident*" dunnt yihi captain English •ourl t: i '-inner Hit latest criticism !>.• 411 4UatralUn umpire In i ing a catch made by Goddard. wh" ha ball up In exuberann and then failed to retain it Only the umpire MB whether a catch has bet B leted baton Uw ball %  H ;,: >M. ii. i i. iva • Hen won rjercd. after teeing c: | M a simult.ii' Bl %  |l % i btttcc not take this risk —Sporlniiof a than, I I R (From rKWK HAWAII) SYDNEY. V Following their creat Test trial agains* match ended on Tuesda> tmiris's seem quit.* capable of cjivini 1 Australia's cricket prestie.e the bulleting it received in the last decade. MATCH ABANDONED from HAROLD DALE SYDNEY Nov J"? The match bet wren Victoria and ihe West Indies here WM a ini d arter i im to to have been the last day of Th* W. gj %  made tM THUS 111 IM Inj to whhh Vletorll i' id reph. 1OT. On the third day •<' \ Wi Indlaa made ,1 raJn-lnterruiii'd 1BI for 2 wickets. Griffith IMMMMS Education Tha present educational s>stem Bttd tha rood problem %  innin Items explained by Mr VTnI | atMp taa BM RVctora' Asvwl.it Ion kept .1 polttlel meeting %  l-tyne's Ho,ld Bntttuu. Hill, last night in suppoii 4 his candidature IM tin ponaB of St. Michael. A crowd of approximately 1.000 attended the rnatUna Mr. Grimth said that he waa very proud to nee that the day hau oofM whan ba could onai himself to be of service tu tlW la He w very prud to aee iha. in the island of Barbados he had lived BUCh I Ufa that it waa — %  — impoeatble (or any man lo lilt a %£&.•*& 'SSXfmX A S M /'— By ftter Dillon ihn—ih.it linger is a lying ftngei and that tongue is a lying tongue -Ol 1 r lM "E* S n, ^ il r h S"l^nelsea 1 he ing himself as a candidate tor St. Thomas, was the Chairman Other S fakers wero*Tr E D Mottlt %  >. r. Joten Maynard and Ml BJ W Mr. Selbert Lcacock introduced the Chairman. *-' u '•" Mormiey look* uncertain a-. lull from Alfred Valentin* raps him on the padBut tlie ninune Ui-*llowd kcepsi OUIIU-HH appeal for L B.W. (Went Indie, v NSW 10 ai CffaaoMdaiad Pre* Pas** NEW U.S. ECONOMIC ADVISER KEY WEST FLA., Nov. 28 Truman Monday elected Roger Putnam, member of an uld new England family and onetime ltemuci.il ir candidate for Governor of MassachuseU*. as new Economic Stabilization Administrator.—U.P. WHAT'S ON TODAY Court of (.rand -.'.sum' HI mi a.n. Police Courts 10 00 l iim Show—British Council. W.ikri.ri,: for Barhadoi Tec h M., i.., bU Auociit kin i.niv i .in p.m. Oljmplc Club i i'h. ii-.11 at British Council CJM l> ni Police Band plays al Si. Marcaret*.. Si-hoot IMMurr. St. I'hlllp 4.30 i> ... Mobile I num. film "how OaaVsga savamuh. si John. 7.30 p.m. Ubuur rollllral ineeliug. St. KlUibeth Village. St Joseph In Miptwrt of Mr. 1>. II. Adam* and Mr. !*• Smith. B.00 iin Labour Early Political meetlug at SpoonerHill. St. Michael In support of Mr. M. ECox and Mr. T. O. Bryan S.tO pjn. %  MCflggJ 5.39 .in Sunset: 5.U p.m Moon: New. llnhtinic: fi.00 p.m. High Tide; Z.gg am 2.4* Lew Tide: 8.53 p.m. 9.41 UnprtMlu'lahles Finv 'Victory Over Manchester Lniteit %  M LONDON. Nov The butt of music-hall comedians for nan yw thai thov care to icmeniber. Chelsea are again proving thank* MIVM (lie iintiii-fiictiihlcs of English soccer. Graced during Iheir existence with numerous lunoui playtrTl Inchldinn Tommy Lawton, Hughio Gallacher arid Toramj Walker. Chelsea huve never risen to the heigh's. The Cup and the league on Saturday (November 10th) Championship have always esThey were playing Mam-hcster ipcl thru raich \r> they t'nited at Stamford Bridge and, promiso R4 ( much onl v to lOBVO icallv. nu one could h % % % %  that promise un-lultlUed. and them ima.li ehaUMO ot emergingtheir supporters Lewitcheil, IxithsucicuKlul (train UueiuxiunhT •red and bewildered. Manchester were at full-strength with ,i powerful forward Una Last year Chobw. experienced reading from left h. riant RawthgOr asanM fright for ramie lime lev. Duwnie. Aatoo, Pool only a nearmiracle, so i' iicrry %  ••mad, oould ova Ihem rrom As though raatgnat] to taatti rgauon to th* Second Dlvuuon ch conunencad in And that n ea r miracle uecurnd modloorp raahJoD, Inside 17 minon tho last n I '! uti Manonaatai waro two teaaon. . pod || mlghl taally have I Mu-llield WeiineMl.i> wore alfour. ThOPS wai llttlO 01 ready di>umi<| uiul .. .ip,|ene of what lay In atOnp lot thi were ciwlaea, Bui tno 48.OIMI hml who had bnmd Ih'Peiunoiiersas (lulsea mv of,„hl wind and driaglo uin tu IM recoonatet) known btml Ftolton the match. b v four KoaN in mi and SheOold uwido %  mlnut*, rolaowtauj the itiuidmi Bvarton to Ihg tum of aaoond Manohcatei s—]. iiigh-Bpcvd attcr-lhe-match had rodoood the arrean thnufjh eaJculauoni i n ihe Chelaaa boardnaw-boy ryarcy. signed from room reveahM the fact that raleCbariton i aoupai ( weeks pr**KMthai had or saved l. .03 i tdotl L) That wa* the first sign %  Kal. that the match still held some At the comim-Ti..-iuent of tho ho|>o for Chelsea and when tttl present seuaoj, Chelsea were i:i minutes before half-time Bantlai turthar broubM, Intarnauotial infound the back ol tha oal wtth float-forward Bantaty JoMd tho a truly great shot from 25 yards l-waiit-n-tranafdr brigade, us did the Issue was as open as il hau .entichair M.irns. On top of that ever DM such as nilhngton and But whereas Manehaatn had Hughe* gull th e club for SouthMaBOd the tnltiaUva and hid nrl em League football and Interi*,,-,, ;i i,|e i„ ..ipiiahse on It DOM rational oulsidc-i ight Parsoiw it was Chelsea who fousid |hamsnowed no sign "f rnpovo >. i.ttlng on top. Nor did knee Injury which had put they allow the OBSpOftunttj to close slip from their grasp. Dirk>on on Prldf i. know, as the Australians at the beginning knew, their success depends on a good start being given by ih. men. The dishing form 'hown b) l %  OU Itn." H.e UKl Stollmcyer tn tho Vlotarkui game ; •pie ide of well The Improved form of giant eper batsman Clyde \V..lroti shows him to be a p. | things are to b> > q • %  h, Frank Wnnell who has been off the line in all htt appearances to he has not yet lost his I League outlook where U in Tore .iff everv hall if peaaaD* and ntal %  I I sixer. Worrell came strnight from tiie Lancashire la-ague to the wuatiallm Mur. Worrell is now learning thn; the Australian attack in cricket outlook is vastly diiTeien: froci the Lancaatilra League and h<' is making appropriate diang. %  n hal approach. $0 k.Ihe Wesl IndUH available bowling prartar in In that they batted! in semi-darkness on Mondaj The K.iun waa ahandoned on luisday due lo a spell or notorious Melbourne weather. "Bradman of Barbados" EverIha turnabout was com(on Wceke* who stayed at SydUla unpradieiabhnoy in an %  ttampl i<> racon %  •"' ,l "" M '" i thigh muscle in;m The heroes of the afternoon' | is Oral practice on Tueada\ AH tno bolaaa tanm, And on the s„„ m B fortnlgh! i would i "I'lt ago. i r-lef| Unwley who has DOW 18 goals this season < We are till one oi ;.i.. % %  how Weekes the game's . standi up to hard practice but it CHELSEA: Itoberlson. Bath%  i ,,i. >., dOOtdO his fllfata, Tlcaa oaf Hai m Iha Test." Dlckson, Oai t r/an >. Snuth (Hi. RejiiiWeojtag hatted agiinst GodMANCIIESTER I NITKD: Aldard. Gomel and Atkinson WOO n Carey, Redman, Gibson, Chilalso stayed at Sydney for a rev. n. Cockburn, Berry. Pearson. Interest in the West Indu %  Aston, DowniO Rowlav, tour continues to grow For th* %  will be drawing a aellnf 40.000. the eanacU famous Sydney cruket ground LACKWELL -/*e tame FAMOUS 'forReich; for fenerohofts Wit OMSM Cacata I Oa*os C • W.II.UU local rtf*mi T. Csddst Grjm Lid trldfctown /,y.V///,'//V//.W/>'rVi',' It thi ground where Bradman scored h luindM-t' man Yarriley's I -If. XMAS WRAPPING PAPER Sheet. _._ .A* at your Jewellers Y lie 1.1.HI A A ML III*. COME 10 TOYLAND I WE HAVE . I; •I i TOYS (PlagttC mill Mr.lwiiii.ul) I DOLLS i Ml s./.-i .; TI'DDY BEASS •; : Tlll-CYlll^ > PICTOBI HOOKS ;: i. \MI s \si> ;: BALLOONS. BririK along your Kids and let Ihem choose for ^ :• themselves From Thi Laigi Variety. | A1 ^ I BARBADOS HARDWARE Co. Ltd. f (The House lor Burcains) < 5 16 Bwta Street — Phone 2109. 4406 or 3534 N I '^-.-.• %  • %  %  -.-.--• %  --•-•-%  •-•% %  •••-'• %  -•••-•-••••'••-'-'-•••-'••-'-'-•••-••••'''•*** < v YESTERDAY'S WEATHER REPORT (From Codrington) Kalnlall: Nil Total Rainfall for mouth la date: 6.40 las. lllgheol Temperature; 84.3 "F I"I-M Temperature: 71.5 *E Hind Velorlt): 7 villea per hour. Barometer: •<* a.m.) 2.897 (3 p.m.) ?9.801. him out of the game at th Of tho preuoua season. It was not surprising therefore '.hat Chelsea started off under a cloud. They had a surprUlngly good away win at Blackpool in their ilrst game but than canv a run of live IIHiggeJlll threo of them at horn. With thf • •'turn of Bent ley and Harris the : % %  '." was taaaPorarll) halted But until the g>me at Stoke a fortnight -no Chclscn had not |,|,ie fSthtnl a point in thrM mat nri AmistroiiK the tw. 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