Citation
The Barbados advocate

Material Information

Title:
The Barbados advocate
Uniform Title:
Barbados advocate (Bridgetown, Barbados : 1983)
Portion of title:
Sunday advocate
Place of Publication:
Bridgetown Barbados
Bridgetown, Barbados
Publisher:
Advocate Co.
Publication Date:
Frequency:
Daily
regular
Language:
English

Subjects

Subjects / Keywords:
Newspapers -- Bridgetown (Barbados) ( lcsh )
Genre:
newspaper ( sobekcm )
Spatial Coverage:
Barbados -- Bridgetown

Notes

Dates or Sequential Designation:
Apr. 22, 1983-
Numbering Peculiarities:
No issue published for May 3, 1983.
General Note:
On Sunday published as: Sunday advocate.
General Note:
Microfilm produced before 1988 may be substandard.
General Note:
Latest issue consulted: Feb. 28, 2005.

Record Information

Source Institution:
University of Florida
Holding Location:
University of Florida
Rights Management:
Copyright Advocate Co.. Permission granted to University of Florida to digitize and display this item for non-profit research and educational purposes. Any reuse of this item in excess of fair use or other copyright exemptions requires permission of the copyright holder.
Resource Identifier:
17931718 ( OCLC )
sn 88063345 ( LCCN )
Classification:
Newspaper ( lcc )

Related Items

Preceded by:
Advocate-news (Bridgetown, Barbados)

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Full Text


fhavb

ESTABLISHED 1895

Cuba Fears Loss Of,
U.K. Sugar Market.

(From Our Own Correspondent)




TUESDAY, NOVEMBER 27,
GOMEZ CAUGHT

1951









Is Cuba going to lose her
question was being asked in

LONDON, Nov. 26,
sugar market in Britain? This
London to-night following the

receipt of a report from Havana which said “the Cuban
sugar industry is threatened with the loss of the British
market because of steps being taken by the Conservative
Government under Mr. Churchill.”





Food Ministry

This statement was made by
Mr, Diez Arguelles at Friday's
meeting of the Association of
Sugar Growers of Cuba. He asked



_READY BY 1954 —

Germany

By J. OLSEN

2

ROME, Nov. 26,

A joint meeting of the 12 Chiefs-of-Staff and 12 Defence
Ministers of the Nerth Atlantic Treaty Organization took

the following action to-day.

They accepted the “1954 Forces’ Plan with the recom-
mendation that it be reviewed after the Mutual Security
Administrator, W. Averell Harriman had given his final
economic report next month on national capabilities.

The 1954 target reportedly calls for 60 or 70 Divisiens
by then, in contrast to the 30 to 40 aimed for next year.



; WASHINGTON, Novy. 25. a ee a
ree To Sugar the matte GUGR TERS Cota tree Big Three Foreign Ministers ny more work on the Migdié ies
e tiotial Bei . Wi Pe \ Pag shaped to clear road blocks to a ete nce Commar d. There are 8

udy so as to political settlement with Ger ‘ : wy ; : S
FF z pees v po . r 10 different proposals before
Suggestions ak ny a ble loss of the many including provisions for the \.T.O., all of whieh will bé put



security of the Federal republic it

E Pact With



(From Our Own Correspondent) This report from Havana has their Paris mee.ings with Chan » eae eae ie cnatabane se
LONDON, Nov. 26. {not been in any way substantiated cellor Konrad Adenauer pprove The cided to report “no pro-
i The Food Ministry has agreea|i2 London, While it is known The West German leader he! sress at all” on the dispute bee
* in principle to Commonwealth |th#t the Conservative Government in Paris a series of meetings wilt ween the U.S. and Btitath over a
E recommendations on the method is anxious to build up trade with Anthony Eden, Robert Schumar ‘ tandard rifle. The Defence Min-
of price fixing and the conditions |‘¢ Empire, the fact remains that and Dean Acheson. a rea ty ters’ report to the Council will
of the long-term sugar agreement, | Britain’s is dependent upon im- Qualified U.S. officials said the ag ay that there is “no agreement”
This, it is understood, resulted porting considerable quantities of principal objective of the meet n the dispute between the U.S
from to-day’s meeting between |SUgar from outside the sterling ings Was to seek a solution of dis LONDON, Wov. 26 ) calibre and Britain's .280 cali-

the Commonwealth delegates and |®™e4. Last year imports from agreements which cropped = u The H an ad Pearunons appriy » yifl
the Food Ministry which was pre- Cuba totalled over 800,000 tons. during six weeks of negotiatio J 4 ine Japanese Peace Treaty oO They still disagreed over the
sided over by R. A. E. Feaveayear Cuban Report between Adenauer and Allie onday might after overwhelm | Atlantic naval commander —
of the Mifiistry. A Ministry of Food épokesman High Commissioners. tat ae be i: * Say Fab vether it should be an American
The decision was taken for the}said nothing was known of the] THE UMPIRE raised his finger in agreement when New South Wales bowler Keith Miller appealed for One of the mote serious dif! wie Pernice) 0g MB yaad Briton, But Defence Ministers
Food Ministty officials to divide|Cuban report, but he added “we] % catch by ‘Keeper Geoff Trueman from West Indies batsman Gomez during the West Indies v. New South jcullies has been the question « iotion to a it - te aro \ n (a mires, eae “ania ces a ea

into two toffimittees to discuss|in Britain do not Wales match at Sydney cricket ground on 17.11.51, Gomez made only three runs. security for Discus uP _ competition wy §«vapanes

with Commonwealth delegates the
details of price fixing in one, and

usually break
our contracts.”

Trade sources here cannot see





Photo by Consolidated Press.



Germany.
sions on that point have gone o

against the background of a Bi

>
|

idustry

The vote was 282 to 33 to ce

ouncil this afternoon that a Brit-

h naval officer should command

the esail- wan ae ame (how Geb Cok ; : 3 Three statement in Septemb eat the rebel motion after whic! a and Southern
ne long-|how the Cuban report can refer - eo 2 1950 that any attack on German, [ibe Commons read the Jap.nes TAS ee ed }
term agreement in the other. to the possibility of ending the MORE POLI TOAL would, be tohtaderea an attack o | Peace Treaty Bill a second time or
Mr. Cuke of Barbados is repre-|Anglo-Cuban “Black Pact”. This ‘ the Allies ind approved it by voize vot
senting the West Indies on both|was signed in August this year Adenauér if understood to hav saving the way for ratification o
these committees. and provided for Britain to im- THAN EQGONOMIC 7 7 wave





THEFT IN

; f sirance s the Treaty by the King
It is believed that the question|port one and a half million tons \ | pressed. for the assurance tha y , 9
of Canada and West Indies sugar|of Cuban sugar Up to the end of ‘ t ‘y ay piitde aap © ae oie tl ve See ke grag
is also under review. 1953. Nevertheless the Cuban re- IMPORTANCE Oct ation d prenatere: ieee ipa th ae oo ‘i li ; h 0 A NN] IGUA
Bi lenepenalicicine tions port is being stidted by Com- c pi n en Ss. more Man & ormality withot L f
monwealth intérests with atten- T aT , rn d &, The German Chancellor report [vote anu the second reading w*
17 Killed, 70 Huet [fers airs a See] Te Truman's Order f Smee oon Sera ae mee) TREASURY
7 when the Commonwealth sugar By ANTHONY ULSTEIN hy TOKYO, Nov. 26 | ecaeaent GEE ti to be the ke: pe mitecs ta’ ee ap a te : w
‘ . =) Lo itput wil rei V . me ‘ ’ sah Bac, & 8 vO P re ne Treaty of eace with Japa
In Train Collision ae vee ar“ TS, stg tetas “eaiaaes ean Allied infantry and argillery smashed a ferocious Chin- Coc Ueness in hp political contrac’ Land Aotekol thereto ” chedth ‘Gab “dade Choabeebibabss
2 € ‘ s I ‘ a 1 * * 7 a ae “ey > ‘ ” now eing worke ut, Ow
WOODSTOCK, Alabama wealth sugar delegation in Lon-|trade céncessions to Russia and} °S® C open unis attack in the “Little Gibraltar” sector of the Mitohl -dchtace Saahe bettrebi Fourteen Labour meibers rey ST. JOHNS.
' Nov. 26 don tonight said he could not see] Poland, and barifting the importa- front Monday night. Germany and the Allied power | ‘esenting — constituencies wher A theft was discovered in
A Southern railway omerat Rritein . tecminating the Present tion of ven 4 — our, has | Reds attacked about two hours before the Allied and | are understood not to be unde: {the textile and pottery industry he av ee een ae Bd
said that 17 persons were killed rae yt eer a. and a loraketailie leita milena yee Communist staff officers reached agreement at Panmunjom consideration. te aoe tabled a motion la sat 0 me ys ee e
in Sunday’s collision of twolpr p; aa SR ee Se ame on a truce line. —UP. hursday, for the rejection of the 7° ate i es
lusivy siteamliners, ‘the “OH of kité flying. ernment spokesman said _ that : : Treaty of Peace. t known and may never be
siorial Marge ennouhdlet edt 16 U.S. tradé with those two Iron Unde r a merciless rain of fire from infantry weapons 2 A special meeting of the Pow 4 Known because the clerk who has
bodies were nines svat thi S Curtain countries already was| and artillery Reds gave up just before night and withdrew Nutting Evades iliamentary Labour Party thi: }°en drawing money from, various
wreckage and that the 17th victim RU, SIA Is down to a. trickle. But added! to their lines. people's

was the engineer on one of

trains involved; his body was sti RESPONSIBLE





that the order will point up to
the entire world the split between
the U.S, and the Reds.

the Red positions Tuesday.



Allied artil’ery was stiil hurling shells into







formosa Issue |

morning ended in vain after J
minutés of ttying te fix 4 commot
Labout Stand on the bill





ecounts had a habit of
lrawing putting back

some

some and

I During theif 70-hour attempt to Attlee’s Labou Governmen It had been done over a period
buried under the debris. : ; se He said that it ends the anamoly {wrest “Little Gibtaltar’ from the LONDON, Nov. 26. |iiad accepted the wifi for Brit f years and was first diseovered
Upwards of 70 other persons FOR WORLD TENSION } of the Soviet Union and its satel-| Mayor Will U.N. the Communists threw 8,000], Under-Secretary for Foreign Af-| 4nd the tresty was signed b,}When a man who js in Curacao
were injured. The rescue crew : lites enjoying a “most favoured | d Ly t rounds of artillery into Allied } fairs, Anthony Nutting sidestepped | fgyiiee Poreign Minister Herber | wrote and questioned his account.
still had not searched two wrecked PARIS, Nov. 26, nation” treatment in trade with | * positions with an accutdcy not} the question Monday about trit- Morrison aoa ; fe was informed that he had
cars, Which were lying in a pre-| Doctor Philip Jessup of thé/the U.S, while at the same time Be Weighed shown in Korea before, This led jain's policy on the tu.ure of Pot-}" phe stite department Monday | iawn $600. from hig account this
carious position above a small|United States said Russia—not|they were trying to undermine | Allied officers. to. su t the aehe mosa. formally confirmed that, Japan ear, He said he had not done
gorge at the scene of the wreck.] America—is responsible for the} this nation ana its friends. | NEW YORK, Nov. 26: were being laid by Russians. .The} ‘The question was put by Left-|] win deposit the ratification oi]: and it was discovered that the
These cars, however, were not}current world tension. He said the The order which becomes effec- Minneapolis people will find British in pi far Peies the wing Labourite Tom Driberg anc} ihe péace treaty at a ceremony in} ™an's signature had been torged.
smashed and the likelihood of|U.S, will strive consistently for a|tive from Jan, 5th will leave out Friday just how much Reds e an officers, since Nutting gave a writteri answer. Washinton Wednesday after So far, at least a dozen other
finding additional victims there|disarmament agteement to relieve|only one trade agreement — a weight theit Mayor EG one © FON sh! 5 | He recalled that both the Cairo ané | noon. ‘ accounts have. been. tampered
was considered small. —U.P. |that vension treaty on customs matters with Mayor Eric Thoyer will te )) "Te Ov i rs otsdam Conferences agreed tha —U.P. with, A clerk Who Was at one
- Jessup replied in thé main Pol-| Hufgary — in existence, The| Sats in a pair of eighteenth ‘ions ween ey ‘ormosa shold be returned to time in the Treasury is under
COMPROMISE ON itical Committee to a statement|Hungarian Treaty cannot be|]| century jockey scales and it eather China after the war and Kore arrest. E
CLERKS ‘STRIKE Saturday by Soviet Foreign Min-| terminated until July 5, 1952. — oe hove Se San * ba Bitter pe across Koréa—tet- should be free and independent, Plane Crashes
REACHED ister Andrei Vyshinsky who called Exchange of Goods — ike tettuten ts > —— « - || perature repees were tek “The Fotmosan problem has now US. WILL START WITH
(From Our Own Corresnondent) Jemup, 9, “seeond rate” diplomat.| Hut economists believe in the} | wisn voters in high Harned OT ne Mipnt | becbme an international one ar ENGLAND, Nov, 26. AS. py PE abit

GRENADA, Nov. 26 |



He said in spite of Vyshinsky’s

rebuff of the





importance of the order from the

Wycombe, England, appraised






thampered both ground a air

concerns a number of nations othe



A bomber carrying a Royal Air



LOW SUGAR QUOTA



ae Ss mes io wieunot They nointe | operations and ground action today Bovwahit oc B otdd abeie
Negotiations between employ-jinent proposal oe oe or bak that the anckoeue tt Seat the Administration of their | ot limited 1. nea patrol con- pe? those which subseribed to thc ee ee ee a NEW YORK, Nov. 26.
ers and clerks delegations today no state arith re os yes onye between the U.S. and all Iton | Mayors since Queen Eliza- \tacts aceording to the latest re-|Faito and Potsdam declarations. infuritig 13 beihenteri eg lwo ane In connection with the opening
resulted in a wide measure of] occ Daa toy . Rey orcer 1 Curtain nations began drying up|| >¢th’s time. i ports. It is however only one of th a _ R his week of the 1952 sugar quota
agreement. and coverage of oe epee Pre an agree- in 1948 when U.S. exports were|| , “They were weighed on tak- The latest Chinese atterfipt to| factors contributing to the presen’ i ot fnotored plane stalled | yearings, the Washington Journ-
ground helpful in finalising dis- ec te placed under federal control. ing and leaving office and if gain territory on the ground be- | tension in the Far East and, in vies ail nad ne ae coe aa ote 4. | tt of Commerce predicted that the
cussion on points when they During the firs’ half of this year, they iost weight then they \ fore the truce line Is frozen for 30| of the Government the first anc |'@ pr glen S near a field, block- S. “will start with a low quota
meet again Thursday afternoo> Insurance Strike the U.S. exported only $43,000!| Were believed to have put 1! Gav. at Panmunjomy, caftie within| mot urgent step towards the les-|'"8 ‘TH! service » aid the market and will add
or Friday morning. aes worth of goods to Russia and forth gréat effort” explained ‘sight of the Panrtitnijom seatth-|sening of this tension is the Resciie workers said the plane] © its size if the condition and
eke “ate Bee me a CHICAGO, Nov. 26. |$821,000 worth to Poland, accord- Miss Field of the Sritish light givitig rige to the term “Atms}achievement of a settlement in|hat all its motors ripped in the] vices justify upward revision
The Clerks argued for a pay- The Nz ay oad ae 7 a yr Travel Association. isticé heights” Korea rdsh and the left wing was] ater in the year”.—U.P.
ment of a cost of living increase 1e National Executive Board of }ing to the Commerce Department, “But if they gained weight ee a 4 low cloud ov : ; nda aie hen alied A rien oaks
retroactive from October 1950] the A-F-L. Insurance agents Union Figures showed that in the same then they had loafed on the Although snow and lov clea When this has been achieved i irown across the railroac rie s.
and employers from Jtily in the|Monday authorized the _ strike perio imports from Russia} job”. so obscured a al resnny oe would be possible to proceed wit! —U-P. COPIES OF JAP
present year. Clerks “ finally|@8ainst the Prudential insurance iy = $5 ei tea and = from Eighteenth century scales te ahi BeOusiED far te the | He discussion of other problem TREATY REACH U.S.
agreed to Januafy and this goes ek. a a M By eartateae. ceeneety 48. Mae were sent by High Wycombe north along “M.L.G. Alley” © tne | including that of Formosa UP The “ADVOCATE” SAN FRANCISCO, Nov. 26.
before Thursday's meeting for spokesman sai e walkou- : serait? Aiedee se * 5 kaa and arrived in New York by fe er) ' 9 ian scares Je . 2
; Fatiation. ‘The bonus will affet| would involve 17000 "Prudential [UNMeH Minudom during the same) | lana an Monday. “mie Maye | 1AM YN sere .ig seis were| U.K. WANT TO DRIVE|| pays for NEWS — || cis oumese, Goynmen
all scales of pay. Employers] Agents in 35 States but added that _ ds tr “tha teeta? Hed or's wife and members of the damaked in a runhing fight be- P oa Tananéen eae tremke aid
, generally participate in locally|negotiations are continuing in|1™ports from the British totallec City Council in Minneapolis F-88 Sabre jets WEDGE BETWEEN ° ACS 8 OPA es Sen sone
' ; a N . $240,000,000 in value. An Official also will be weighed said Mis tween 17 US. e Dial 3113 ecurity treats arrived here
ees oe Cer eNO roe said, “with such a small turnover | held” aa kn S| | which tangled with the flight of 60 < Monday aboard a Pan-American
; schemes. The union is seeking a 20 per tin trate with the Soviet Bloc, the! | Pifeld’ Pecauge mo one is sup | | a Gs GOVT. AND ARMY D Night lipper from Tokyo.
SN See eee Seeced caudilistion of trade concessions | Sod ee arrose poe About the same time another SY OF Nigmss ‘

WRECKAGE OF

PLANE SIGHTED
CANAL ZONE, Nov, 26
An R.A.F. Reconnaissance
plane Monday reported sighting
a wreckage which may be the
missing Pakistan airforce trans-

port during search operations} SYDNEY, Australia, Nov. 26. Arab States The incustrial res a. The Ancona Observatory rv- og ee eee eee ee

between the Canal Zone and] The Sydney Ddily Telegraph ea is being ara . m Y ceemlt- ported that a mild earthquake wis United Natierie hélecetiohn chal.

Cyprus. reported Monday that 5,000 to t, fe . Adlittle, Inc., ee on pe » aitnilar recorded here yesterday at 1.45 lenged the statement by British
The Pakistan plane, believed|6,000 Australian troops in Korea, Hinder Mid-East \*"s, 5. “ho have done similar | The Observatory said that the nat p

to carry a crew of five and no

passengers disappeared Saturday

on a flight from Athens to Cyprus.
—U.P.

and commissions compared to the
company’s offer of 24% per cent.
—UP.



CHRESTMAS PARCELS
FOR AUSSIES IN KOREA

Japan and Malaya were due to

receive two parcels each from its

Christmas Korea Comfort Fund.
—UP.



Soviet Troops Mass
On Yugoslav Border

Yugoslavia accused the

satellites of massing troops and building fortifications on her |the defence and

borders as the possible prelu

PARIS, Nov. 26,
Soviet Union and her Balkan

de to an invasion, and warned





would have little economic effect.

,And i seemed plain that it would

not work economic hardship on
the average Russian or Pole,
—U-P.



Defence Plan

By JACK SCHEMEIL
PARIS, Nov. 25.
Turkish Foreign Minister Fouad

Koprtllu, advocates a polity of at a conference héld in the offices B, R, Sen, India’s Ambassador fortunately for hirn he will not find
“wait and see” in putting into of the U.S. Consul General here} jesignate to the U.S. ar rived 2 them, : ;

effect the projected Middle East between U.S, Officers and the Min- Washington and predicted closer The army of Egypt remained the
Defence Command and other | ister for Agriculture and, repre- | relations between the

events in that part of the world. |
Koprulu who is also head of the
Turkish delegation to the United
Natiofis Sixth General Assembly |
in Paris said in an interview that
security of the |
Middle East was a “vital question |



cal job.”—U.P.



INDUSTRIAL SURVEY
OF J’CA NEARS END

(From Our Own Correspondent)

KINGSTON, J’CA, Nov. 26,

work for the Puerto Rico Indus-
trial Development company. The
survey Was carried out by two
experts.

rhe question of the U.S. Gov-
ernment giving technical aid ana
assistance’ fot agticultural devel-
opment to Jamaica was discussed

setttatives of the Jarhaica Agricul+
tural Society.





flight of some 70 M.I.Gs was sight-
ed by F-86 escorting fighters near
the Yalu but Red jets refused com-
bat.—U.P.

MILD EARTHQUAKE

ANCONA, Italy, Nov. 26.



tremor was preceded by a faint

rumbling,
—U.P.

CLOSER RELATIONS

WASHINGTON, Nov. 26.



tries,

—U.P.



GOOD OLD CHARLIE

two coun-] faithful organ of its rulers, he said
Theré has been no intervention so

By K. C. THALER

PARIS, Novy. 26.

Egypt charged here Monday that |
Britain is trying to drive a wedge
between the Egyptian Government
and the army, but warned that
such attempts were doomed to fail
Mahmud Azim Bey, spokesman

Foreign Secretary Anthony Eden
at the N.A.T.O, Couneil’s Rome
meeting that the British had the
“sympathy of the Egyptian army”.

Azirh accused Eden of living in
the “old traditions of Great Bri-
tain” and said Britain was seeking
divisions within Egypt but “un-

far by the army in clashes in the
Canal zone
had not
serious

because Government
considered the situation

enough, he added.—U.P



T.U.C. Break

———
tian eetcenttomarea nena ATE,



The couriers will leave here
tonight for Washington.--U.P.

Gilbeys

INVALID. PORT

Famous

: : ’ P “i Si “that's he } i
that this Cominform era “threatens peace.” and OF | iternrscat’ (Proin Ofir Own Correspondent) full and there was no room Develo
The Yugoslav ae eae , nd : has felt it necessary to join} ST. JOHN’S for Charlie. ve ps a ove
Sane the United Nations Poli- U S, Nickel Plant To Frante, Britain and the United| ae vit ie - Off To Antigua (From Our Own Correspondent) /
I : Fe r = . States i the proposed Middle Yorlg hire, travelled to Lon- > Ss la. Yharlie .
tical Committee declared that Hh. the propos icc a Wh ee eo eto Three days ja.er Char JAMAICA, Nov, 26,

Hungary, Rumania and Bulgaria
have 810,000 men under arms,
more than three times what they
permitted under their peace treat-











Resume Operations

WASHINGTON, Nov, 26.

»|
East Command.” |
|

But Koprulu had no answer for
Arab oppositicn to the plan and |}

old and arrived in Barbados
on the 31st of May this year.
At the age of hihe montns

was again driven to Seawell
and finally flew off to Anti-
gua, On afrival at Coolidge
Field the porters refused to

An open break between leading
T.U.C. |
d to-day as Assistant Gen-
ral ecretary TT. Kelly broke

officers of Jamaica

levelo

the

the

; ai bas The Munitions Board announced] he cétild not say how it could be| he is exceedingly tall and A io btn anes Oe . a asd a
ies, and that 23 of their £9 gives that a Navy Airlift was established | implémented in the face of Arab eer . ig a Great Dane hanidlé him and his ma bis iway from the Organisation an
ions were deployed along the, oe ocen Norfolk and Cuba to opposition | lanky, He i = a acéompanied by the vet had began forming his owr independ- ”
f eT . | rut arbadians on edie ii 4 a i
bake me peony Oe noldters speed materials for the re-open-| Arab states have stated that he a i sedltainint ly to go to the baggage com World
cane aalee “instructed that their ; ing of an American owned nicke! one main objectiori . the plan teferria {6 fy tie Dofikey
“ ae . ~hai n-|is that it bypasses the existing 7 . a
Nether vee: ony Yigo= | On oF the Senate “Prepaibahens Arab segional Defence Pact and Dog. around the streets of St, if the T.U.C, Executive this after-
oe, U.P Sub-Committee made public the}the Arab League. But Koprulu | Quite recently Charlie John’s but no name has been noon €xpelled Kelly as Assistant ' , fs
Teeny letter in which the Board’s Chair-|said these Arab states were still made several attempts to suggestéd for him, He would Ww. MatPherson shut down region- | ‘ A
man, John Small, said that the] teo weak to insure the security of join his master in Antigua. iove to be friendly, but An- al offices in St. Catherine at Man- Hl Oa 2 he
airlift would cut shipping time}the Middié East region, ’ On the first occasion that he tiguanm shrink from him. chester where Kelly was in charge ‘ iA.
NO LOAN FOR for construction supplies for the} He added: “We still are not sure went to Seawell it was stated They hide ney wie or Selling Gene ral Bechetaty Florieel | INVALED at
;CUSS “ubs Z ive|of the re sition and there- that he had his papers to peep at him through jalousie e ; General secrete y a th Sa
ISRAEL DISCL SSED desi REP eee. oe *| ioe it Beran a wait ‘tit yar dave ‘Barbados, butt there a Glassbole whose leftwingers in the ails bey Pe Oa

PARIS, Nov. 26. 1
Israeli Foreign
Sharett denied Monday he

Small also said that navy heli-| attitude is made cleit before

Minister Moshe; copters had been made available | working out the details, of our
dis-|to conduct geological surveys of; Projéct regarding the aefence of

cussed the prospects of a loan to; mineral deposits in the area sur- the Middle Ba&t









was no import license to per-
mit him to land at Antigua,
and if he insisted in going
there he would face des.ruc-

Today Charlie’s master,
Mr. V. C. Horlock a Cable &
Wireless engineer sails on the
MV Caribbee to Montserrat,

|

\
partment and invi e him out,
Charlie has been strolling

nt Uffion in the bauxite industry,
extile industry and agricultural
workers. An emergency meeting

Union are believed to be in league
with Kelly.

P.N.P. Leader Norman Manley
held long conferences with Glass-

Israel with either U.S. Secretary| rounding the Nicaro Nickei Plant.! He said: a think E is_ best tion, but Charlie will enjoy a holi- a Ya eee” eee Ry tae

‘ “an Acheson or British| The plant, one of the largest injnow for all of us to be patient ‘harlie? ‘ oe anna al . a en ill, T.U.C. President anc

of State Dear et ey A eS Fd , he world es built 1942 4 in} and give plenty of time for Charlie import licens¢ day at St. Clair, the three Frank Hill, leading T.U.C. Execu-

roe petreey a vitt os . ie he Sa ile 's oe! bey. serious study and « 0 vas duly secured, and a few hundred acre estate owned tive who is acting to keep th
Sharett conferred vith boti ; a hem = — 1946 : Pi ae ad : ; jays later he motored to by Dr. A. Raeburn, There he Union together. The development
ministers here la _ . Fe ‘ ti car conditi e on mgr Sy Bos. ng "bi t Seawell. After the usual red will be abie to stroll in pad- follows months of dispute among
iy “of. Mideestern ‘dete < es to otuiuen, 16 000 neue th us foc is ing t tape and a long wait it wa docks among herds of docile T.U.C. Officers of the right and }
on o aste ofence sig 0 5 I 1u ussing tw« p. ings ? sua ~attle .U. : and
topped the list of topic of tons of nickel annually. ; portance on questior inounered that the plane wa Red Pole cattle léft as to who should lead the or- !
cdiscussion.—U.P. —U.P. | ganization !



urea) A eal

4
i





i





PAGE TWO



AJTING Commander
Egglesfield, Director General
of Civil Aviation in the Carib-
bean area is now back in Barbados
after attending the South Ameri-
can-Sduth Atlantic Regional Air
Navigation Conference which was
held in Buenos Aires and lasted
three Weeks.

The ‘Conference ended on Mon-
day, Neyember 19 and Command-
er Egglesfield arrived in Trinidad
on Thursday November 22 where

he remained until the 25th for
talks with Mr. Grimstead,
Director of the new British Car-

ibbean=Meteorological Service.

He Was met in Trinidad by his
wife who had been in Tobago for
a short holiday They’ both’ re-
turned here on Sunday by
B.W.1LA.

From Scotland
M's KATE RICHARDS and
Miss Mary Richards whose

home is in Scotland arrived from
Trinidad yesterday by B.W.I.A.
to spend about three weeks’ holi-
day in Barbados

They-are guests at
Club, St. James.

Short Holiday
JT EAVING for St. Lucia by
B-W.LA. over the week-end

was Mrs. Simmons Howell of
“Martindale”, Hastings. Mrs.
Howell will spend a short holiday

the Colony





with her husband Dr, Timothy
Howell of “Howelton”, The
Morne, ‘St. Lucia,

Koutine Visit
M® EK. T. MURRAY, Regional

rector cf Rediffusiou
(W.1.) «Lid... and Mr. Ronald
Goodsman, Chief Engineer of the
same coinpamy were among the
passengers arriving from Trini-
dad yestérday by B.W.1.A. Here
until Saturday on @ routine visit
they are guests at the Marine

Hotel.
Lodgs School Magazine
I T is expected that the latest

- editicn of the Lodge School
magazine is expected to go ~to
press within the next few days.
Keith Bowen is acting as agent
for the magazine both in Barba-
dos and the neighbouring
colonies. .

Old Lodge Boys who would like
to have a copy of this forthcom-
ing number ean contact Keith at
the Office of the Director of
Medical Services.

In view of the rising production
costs, the magazine committee is
trying to meet the cost of printing
hy increasing the circulation of
the magazine among Old Boys.

Keith ihas set about his task
enthusiastically and has already
contacted possible sub-agents like
Arthur Streetly and David Archer
in Trinidad and other Old Rovs in
British Guiana and elsewhere.

Annual Bazaar
HIS important occasion—de-
serving-of your utmost sup-
port. It's the: Annual Bazaar at
the Drill Helk on Saturday, De-
cember 1|.. In aid of the Old Ladies’
Home and under the distinguished
patronage of His Excellency the
Governor and Lady Savage, there
are many attractions and a great
many useful and desirable things
to buy, The well stocked counters
will feature Toys, Books, Novel-
ties, Gift Suggestions and Cooked
Foods among many other items.
There’s going to be a Marionette
Show. Lucky Dips and a well
stocked Bar. With the Police Band
in attendance, this is a date to re-
member—-Saturday, December 1,
at 3 o'clock,
Here For Races
R. AND MRS, GEOFFREY
LAUGHLIN of Trinidad who
came over to attend the Barbados
Turf Club's Autumn meeting were
among the passengers leaving for
Trinidad over the week-end by
B.W.LA,





Rupert and the



TS

=

Rupert
nil the
{ the istand

the issand, from which he can

jeads the way upwards

reach the topmost part

sve all of the coastline, Suddenly
ne points. “Look! Down by that
headlind, at's the other boat,” he

n great exciement. ‘* They're
already “Did you know

(aub C

NOEL COWARD leaving Bar.
bados in May after a four-day

visit. Tomorrow his new play
“Relative Values” opens in Lon-
don.

Concert Cabaret And
Coward

OEL COWARD'S first new

comedy since “Blithe Spirit”
opens in London tomorrow—and
the entire proceeds of the second
night of the run will be given to
the Jamaica Hurricane’ Relief
Fund.

Mr, Coward visited Barbados in
early May just after he had
finished writing this play, and
spent four days with Sir Edward

Cunard at “Glitter Bay”, St.
James, It was his first visit here.
The play is called “Relative

Values” and it is one of the events
of the theatrical season in Lon-
don, as any new Coward play
must be Although he is not ap-
pearing in it himself, he is
directing the production. Miss
Glacys Cooper, who will star in
the play, agreed with Mr.
Coward that proceeds of the
second night should be given to
the Hurricane Fund. Mr, Coward
has a home in Jamaica.

He is a member uw. the Fund
committee and this coming dona-
tien to the fund will provide one
of three social occasions in Lon-
don, all within a week that are
expected to add several thousand
pounds to the Fund.

The Orchid Room, one of Lon-
don's most exclusive night-clubs,
arranged a midnight cabaret te
raise money for the Fund. Al-
though the club ean accommodate
only 300 people, a minimum en-
trance fee of two guineas was
charged and a further large sum
was raised by an auction of gifts
presented to the Fund committee.

Taking part in the cabaret were

Orson Welles, the _ film-star;
Peter Ustinov, the British play-
right, aetor and producer; Moira
Lister, the South African film
star; and Genevieve Guitry,
former wife of Sacha Guitry, the
French actor. About a dozen

other stage and screen celebrities

also appeared,
Among them

Darnell, the

L

was Linda
Hollywood actress,





there would be another boat >"
exclaims Rollo. ** Who is it >
Where is it from?** But Rupert
doesn't wait to answer. "Quickly,
back to the Lion Rock,” he Rasps,
leading the way down the. hill
again. ‘* They're sure to go there,
ind we must not miss them!”





alling —



who was in Jamaica when the
hurricane struck the island. She
was on the north side of the

island and was not affected b
the hurricane. A _ special rum
cocktail was “launched at the
Orchid Room and has been nam-
ed after Miss Darnell

A supply of rum
make all the cocktails needed
during the cabaret was donated to
the Orchid Room by Myers, so
that the whole of the proceeds
from the sale of tne cocktails went
to the Fund. The Jamaican rum
industry also donated a keg of rum
to be auctioncd and there were
also gifts of Jamaican cigars

The third big event organised on
behalf of the Hurricane Fund is
the concert which takes place at
the Royal Festival Hall, London,
today The Queen has promised
to attend The concert will be
given by the Philharmonia Orches-
tra, conducted by Walter Susskind,
and the soloists will be Rudolf
somacho, the Jamaican tenor;
Anna Oticica, the Brazilian so-
prano; and Livia Rev, the French
pianist

Rudolf Comacho
group of three
songs. He gave a foretaste of the
concert in a broadcast, when he
sang one of these songs, a ballad
called “Jan”. Mr. Comacho
studied music in New York and
Toronto before joining the Cana-
dian Army and going to Britain.
It was in London that he was
heard by Benjamino Gigli,
great Italian concert artiste, who
arranged for him to study in Brit-
ain with a scholarship,

West Indian students in London
are playing their part in the ar-
rcangements for this concert. Eight
Jamaican girls, dressed in the col-
ourful costumes of the island, will
sell programmes to the concert-
goers,

Sterling Services

MONG the passengers arriv-

ing here on Saturday morning
by the French S.S. Colombie from
Cartagena were Dr. John Elmen-
dorf, O,B.E. and his wife. They
have come over to visit Mr. and
Mrs. Stanley Keith Jones of White
Hall, St. Michael and will be
spending two weeks staying at the
Colony Club, St. James.

Dr. Elmendorf has been for sev-
eral years head of the Rockefeller
Foundation in Colombia and has
performed sterling services both in

sufficient

is to sing a
Jamaican folk-

Panama and other Central and
South American countries.
During the war, he was a

Colonel in the U.S. Army, work-
ing in close co-operation with the
British for which he was awarded
the O.B.E.

To Settle

R. G. A. ALLEYNE, ;on of
Mrs, 1 Alleyne of Ebenezer,
St. Philip left for England over
the week-end by the Colombie.

He plans to settle in the U.K.

PAINS of PILES

It is no longer necessary to suffer
pains, itching and torment from Piles
since the discovery of Hytex (formerly
known as Chinaroid). Hytex starts to
work In 10 minutes and not only stops
the pain but also takes out the swell-
ing, stops Needing and combats nerve
irritation Serer curbing other trou-
bles caused by Piles such as Headache,
Nervousness, Backache, Constipation,
loss of energy, debility, and irritable
dispositinn, Get Hytex from your
druggis| gtoday under the positive

guarantee Hytex must stop your pile
pains and troubles or money back on
return of empty package.




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SIMPLY GREAT



1951 !









TUESDAY, NOVEMBER "1 to A ‘PERIODI ? Wy NCE
11.15 Programme Parade, 11.30; j mM VW
im, Musica Britannica, 12 (noon) The!
ws, 12.10 p.m. News Analysis ; Pe
46-75 pom 31.32M 48.48M ; Alemands hhe Coo.
‘p.m. The News, 410 pm. The Daily ¢
ervice, 4.15 p.m. John Bul, 4.45 pom |
print, 5 p.m. Composer of the We oS
15 pam. Foreign Correspondent, 6 n Hat
sa Ha eoreaen, Corvenpondent € pn. | active fragrances of
£45 p.m. Programme Parade, 6.55 p.1 Also nervous distress several days ‘betore’
To-day's Sport, 7 p.m. The News, 7.10
a ; : wu you suffer from monthly organs. Pinkham’s Com im 10)
p.t Ne “A 7.15 pm Cricket cramps, headache, backache —- or only relieves this mcnhbhy pain ol A T K | N S O N S$
dteport on 4tt jay's Playing West indies | do you, like so many women, start but aiso annoying pre-period ner- % DSF
Victoria and Rendezvous with Com- to suffer a few days just before vous, tense emotions of this na- 2 e

20 IWealth

745 p.m. Generally Speaking, 8
Think on these Things, 2.15 p.m
Newsreel, 8.30 p.m

4.45 pm



a Laugh, 10 p.m. The News, 10.10 p.m one Of woman's most important with added iron.
From the Editorials, 10.15 p.m. Round
and Abeuk 1098 pal, Seectiveace tae LYDIA E. PINKHAM’S Vegetable Compound
«f Skye
C.B.C, PROGRAMME
TUESDAY, NOVEMBER 27, 1%51 ———— =
10.05 p.m.—i0.20 p.m. News. | THURADAY SPECIAL ize p.m.
20 n.—10.55 pt Lett fror “H'DDEN DANGER”
Canada oe ee woe Johnny Mack Brown PLAZ B’TOWN
11.72 Mes 25.60M HAUNTED TRAILS" Whip WILSON Dial 2310
i
LAST 2 SHOWS TODAY —445 & 8.30 p.m
CROSSWORD | “ ha ig
- i THE THING FROM ANOTHER WORLD
Also Leon’ ERKOL’'S Latest “PUNCHY PANCHO”
, WED. & THURS. 4.29 & 8.30 p.m. By Popular Request !
OUR VERY OWN & MYSTERY in MEXICO
| Ann BLYTHE, Forley GRANGER William LUDIGAN Jacqueline WHITE
P OISTIN G My ~ ar The Garden t
RAZA oto OW or sanes



| Make a peer
mW)
th an N.C.O
(9)

S shave (t)

spirit
Ww




‘ it Of a feline oeust. 1d | ‘AU DE COLOGNE
» Little creclit before it’ makes x THE We BALET RUSSE E coLo
case (3) 6. The 17 does. (5) |

4 See arouna
and remove. (6)
for men to tin? (8)

4 Salve
11 Array
star.

i4 Both sides uf the scrap. (6)
is Tilled without having eaten
iy A mean Clue. (4)
20 Make aviaries supply
Solution of vesteraays puzzie
i Knowledge,



Nine; 15, Ram 14 Sniueers '
Leopard: is, Enact; 21 wer: 24 “ai {
6 eir, 27, ¥ ,
Down; 4
pown: by Somerset Maugham

Glare



Artists,
7.45—-16.90 p.m.

Composer of the Week, 9 p.m
feet the Cpmmonwealth, 9.30 p.m. Ray's



|
| Preston Foster—Ann Rutherford ; ribet
L. fo lisp among firearms 16) } “INSIDE JOB & Donald O'CONNER &
> End of a gale, (3) ! son code oh emda de FROZEN GHOST”
8 You meet none cuter iy) } KEEP ‘EM FLYING
4 ee Gr Bud ABBOT & Lou C<¢ : Lon CHANEY \S
2 sey col 4) e en oR
| Peete ones ere = FIGHT FRAGRANCES THAT >"

y crowd (3)

7 This guard ts in front, 3)

1 This path was screened. (5)

2 No topi, this broken sun-tile 147)
<3. Food from a tame animal, (4)
2+. The Winner's opponent (5) j

nothing leas than a nim

(“4

5
¢

GLOBE
To-day — 5 and 8.15 p.m. \
LAST SHOWS

your period from strange, nervous.
restless, weak, dragging feelings—
due to this functional cause?
Then start taking Lydia E
Pinkham's Vezetable Compound
to relieve such symptoms. Pink-
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S1.3°M 48.43M resistance against such female dis-

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p.m
Radio
Report from Britain,
NOTE: Or you may prefer

Lydia BE. Pinkhan’s TABLETS



















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TO-DAY (Only) 830 p.m
“IT’S A GREAT FEELING”
Dennis MORGAN and
“ESCAPE IN THE DESERT”

} TO-DAY (Only) 5 & 8.20 p.m.
} GOD'S COUNTRY & THE WOMAN
i George BRENT and

“CHAIN LIGHTNING"
Hurmphre






WED. & THURS. 8.30 p.m
“ET CAN'T GIVE YOU ANYTHING
BUT LOVE BABY”

WED. & THU



Across











back to private 6



MEET THE NEEDS OF ALL

te GOLD MEDAL EAU DE COLOGNE
te ENGLISH LAVENDER

sk ROYAL BRIAR EAU DE COLOGNE
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BY APPOINTMENT



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Acros ATKINSONS, 24 OLD BOND STREET, LONDON, ENGLAND

9 tlodine. Li. Ali

THE CIRCLE











A COMEDY IN 3 ACTS
November 27, 28.29
EMPIRE. THEATRE





OF SPECIAL
BASKET-BALL PLAYERS





Cclumbia Pictures presents—

























| EMPIRE

OPENING FRIDAY 30th 2.30 & 8.30

INTEREST TO ALL
















TUESDAY, NOVEMBER 27, 1951
fhe discriminating Lasle

x-AEC
112-302-53





‘THE. HARLEM GLOBE TROTTERS"



y r Ms r Starring :
GET YOUR TICKET TO-DAY ne
7 “7 7 a * THOMAS GOMEZ — DOROTHY DANDRIDGE and the
FOR THE SHOW TO-NIGHT ORIGINAL HARLEM GLOBE TROTTERS
= THE MIRACLE MEN OF SPORTS IN A FULL LENGTH
ireh FUN-FILLED HIT.
x ee ee eet ee eer Tee ee eee re rn R o Y A L
a} sf rma 7 ey _ -
8 JANETTA DRESS SHOP cenaebiaieis waiaie a te
ea er are ee nines LOWER BROAD STREET TOSDAY. Only 4:80 & 8:46 Tesbeaelind Hanwha
To-morrow Nite 8.15 p.m., .
STEEL BAND AND MARICO g “Youble Attraction— ‘6 END OF THE RIVER ”
ma “Sl + DRESSES—
Tripoli vs. Pearl Harbour & WITH
with the film %
“HOME STRETCH.” % of all types SABU and
Perfect for Xmas Gifts : AND “ ”
Get out your Hot Shirts Boxed Pure Irish Linen- Hand-Embroidered Sets DESTRY RIDES AGAIN
fancy skirts and Jeans for 6 Napkins — $8.39 Starring ‘

the

ANNIVERSARY HOP

of Caribbean Revelry

presented by

Miss Judy Graham's Bridge-
town Theatrical Group

MODERN HIGH SCHOOL

ON
SATURDAY, Ist December,

Mus'e

Highway One Porters x Rds

. 55366089 PIO FOO
SPEDE SOSPOSSE SESSSSSSS FOC OS PSE PELEES SEL ESLLES PEGE LOS PPPS eee

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| PCOS SOSS OOOO SSSOS

i

by Percy Green's Orchestra

SUBSCRIPTION — 2/-






‘THE WEB”

with Edmond O'BRIEN

13 Piece Luncheon Sets from $13.38 to $16.56
ON SALE from Wednesday, November 28th
REDUCED TO CLEAR
DRESSES from $6.00 up
LOCKNIT PANTIES — 90c.
LOCKNIT KNICKERS — $1.11
. LOCKNIT VESTS | — 81.14
BOYS’ BATHING TRUNKS — 75 Cents
TAFFETA BATHING SUITS from $5.08 to $7.73
PLES PSPSPS ELLOS.

SCVOSSSSVOCPOS SOOO








OLYMPIC





At The




TO-DAY Only 4.30 & 8.15

%
“ASTONISHED HEART”




Universal Double
1951










MR. PLANTER !!





Refreshments on Sale 1 AND
1) “est Aten commentars igh oe PROTECTING “RED CANYON”
{ the Spot.
| Don't Miss This.
Starring

Your PLANTS
IS ESSENTIAL !!

WE HAVE JUST RECEIVED

A shipment of - - -

PLANT PROTECTION PRODUCTS

for the Plantation or small garden
Everything for Insect Pests, Blight or Weeds.
Let us solve your problem

ALBOLINEUM NO. 1
AGROCIDE NO. 1

Howard DUFF — Ann BLYTH |



ROX Y

Paramount Presents .

in glorious Technicolor
Thomas Gomez

America’s Enemies !

« ¢
AGROCIDE NO 3
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With

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DUFF

LAST 2 SHOWS TO-DAY 4.45 & 8.15
A Blazing Box Office Thriller

TO-MORROW only 4.30 & 8.15

“THE OVERLANDERS ~

And BUD ABBOTT — LOU COSTELLO in

PRIVATES COME HOME*

SOO COSOS SISOS SES.

POSE SSGGS

James STUART
Brian DONLEVY

Tomorrow Only 4.30 & 8.15
Universal Double —

ANN TODD — CLAUDE RAINES
“AGAINST THE WIND”| ‘ONE WOMAN’S STORY’



“CALAMITY JANE &
SAM BASS”

Howard

Starring: John Payne, Rhoda Fleming, Dennis O’Keefe.

Strong as the Eagles, Fierce as the Hawks, They battled

“THE EAGLE anD THE HAWK”



_





TUESDAY, NOVEMBER



SUGAR NEWS

Philippines
Suspend All

Sugar Exports







MANILA, Philippines

The Philippi Government

as decided to suspend all future

hipments of sug -ountries

other than the tates, it

is announced in This

m has been because

the Philippines thas been unable

to fill its quota of sugar in the
U.S. market.

Some 50,000 tons had been

approved by the Government for

export to countrie other than
the United State but only
amounts actually old will now
be authorised for shipments.
Permits to sell the rest will be
eancelled. The amount actually
sold has not been disclosed,

zs on jee
Peru To Make
Bagasse Paper

LIMA, Peru.
print ‘and carton factory,
vely b », is to be
on 2a ge sugar
plantation on the northern coast
of Peru. Production will be 19
to 20 tons a day begin with,
but may be increased later.

The factory is at the Cayalti
Hacienda, in the Department of
ibayeque The hacienda is

A nev
ising exclusi

established




Si





red by Aspi and Anderson
Bros., who have imported machin-
ery for the factory from England.
This is the second bagasse news-
rint plant in Peru. The first
was set up by the Brace Co. and
produces newsprint said to be
nearly as good as the usual
imported newsprint.—B.U.P.



we: >
With Boy

Fourteen-year-old Fitz Whit-

taker of Bridge Field, St. Thomas,





a pupil of Sharon Boys’ School
was knocked down by ihe car
E—255 along Sharon Road yes<-

terday evening while on his way

from school. He was taken to
the General Hospital in an un-
conscious condition, treated and

injured to his

detained He was
head. The car is owned and was
being driven by Frank Kellman

of Queen Street, St. Peter.

Bicycle And
Bus Collide

THE front wheel of the bicycle
M-5403 was badly damaged when
it came collision with the
bus P-77 on Tweedside Road yes-
terday evening about 4 p.m. The

into

bicycle is owned and was being
ridden by Etheline Mascall of
Hothersal, St. John. The bus

which is of the General Motor Bus
Co., was being driven by Nathaniel
Alleyne of Well House.

Car Knocks Down
Labourer

SEVENTY -THREE-YEAR-OLD
Rebecca Sealy of Constant
Tenantry, St. George, was taken
to the General Hospital yesterday
evening and detained after she
was knocked down by the car
M-2872 on Constant Road about
5.15 o'clock. Sealy was on her
way home from work. The car
wes being driven by Joseph Singh
of Mahogany Lane, City.



ASARLRSEKaeS
&

a
a
Â¥
a
&R
@
a
a
a
w
"
a
oS
a
a
a
Po]
ot
LJ
&
a
a

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AY

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tw

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i die name speaks jor itself
OQ? lure
Blood Me

from blood impurities
impurities in the blood may canee rheumatic
boils, pimpies and common skin disorders.

Clarke’s Blood Mixture helps to purify
the blood, cleanses the system and assists

1951

27,

BURKE COVER DRIVES

JIM BURKE (at 7) cover drives a ball from West Indian spin bowler Valentine during the match at

Sydney cricket ground on 19.11.51

At W ‘estminster:

LONDON,

In the House of Commons on
November 21, Mr. Bernhard Braine
(Conservative, Billericay) asked
the Minister of Food how much
sugar was purchased by his De-
partment in 1950 and 1951 from

Commonwealth sources and non-
Commonwealth sources, respec-
tively.

The Minister of Food, Major

Lloyd George, replied: The quan-
tity of sugar purchased by my De-
partment was as follows:

1950 1951
tons tons
Commonwealth
sources 1,662,000, 1,490,000
Foreign 1,372,000 1,452,000

Mr. Gerald Nabarre (Conserva-
tive, Kidderminister): “Can my
right hon. and gallant Friend give
the House an assurance that he is
taking from British Guiana, Mau-
ritius and Jamaica every ton of
sugar that those Colonies can offer
to the Mother Country?





Mr. Lioyd George: There is an
agreement, my hon, Friend
knows, which is now being dis-
cussed by which we are taking as

as




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much as We possibly can, and the
total this year which shows that
the Commonwealth figure is down
is due to the disastrous trouble
in Australia when we lost much
sugar.

Lady Tweedsmuir
tive, Aberdeen): Can my _ right
hon. and gailant Friend say
whether Jamaica has delivered the
full amount of sugar expected?

Major Lioyd George: I cannot
answer that without notice, but I
think she has.

Lieut.-Colonel Lipton (Labour,
Lambeth): When are private buy-
ers to be sent out to find the sugar?

Hon. Members: Answer.

Major Gwilym Lloyd
The answer to that is, the sooner
the better.

Mr. Gordon Walker (Labour,
Smethwick): Do I understand the
right hon. and gallant Gentleman
to mean that he wants to bring to
as early an end as possible the
Commonwealth Sugar Agreement.

Major Lioyd George: I most
emphatically deny any such thing.

Hon. Members: What does it
mean?

(Conserva-

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ugar Supplies And Prices

Major Lloyd George: | rather
gathered that the hon, and gallant
Gentleman’s remark was that he
was looking for sources of sugar
other than what we have to-day,

Mr. Braine (Conservative, Bill-
ericay); asked the Minister of
Food the average price of sugar
purchased by his Departrrent in
1950 and 1951 from Common-
wealth sources, respectively.

Major Lloyd George: Whereas
Commonwealth sugar was bought
at one agreed price covering ship-
ments throughout the year, our
purchases of foreign sugars were
made under widely varying con-
ditions. It would therefore be
misleading to attempt to give
figures,

Mr. Braine: Is it not a fact that
on balance more was paid for for-
eign sugar than Commonwealth
sugar? In view of the dual need
to keep prices down at home and
encourage Empire production,
can my right hon. and gallan’
Friend say whether he will be pre-
pared to give a guarantee to colo-
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Coastal Station















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that they can now conwnunicate wit
| the following ships through their Ba
bados Coast Station

&.8. Havber, 8.8, Romano. America
Eagiexytam Lincoln Elisworth
Esso Birlington, s.5. Maimanger, 6
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tather than only 70 per cent.?
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and they are perfectly satisficc
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PAGE THREE



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BARBADOS Sp ADVOGAT

xa 559 Reseed

Ltd., Broad St.,

FOUR





Printed by the Advocate Co Bridgetown

—

Tuesday, November 27, 1951

LABOUR MARCHES






THE pamphlet “Labour Marches On”
released last week by the Barbadds Labour
Party is not a simple document, except in
one particular It is full of praise for the

Labour Party, whose motto might not un-
fairly be summed up as “government by
our government for our government.”

There is praise for no one else: neither in-
dividual nor organisation. There are plenty
of threats, and many paradoxes, In one par-
agraph we read that “for over three hun-
dred years, the people of this Island have
groaned and sweated in misery and sordid
conditions under the system of private en-
terprise as practised locally.” In another
we are told that “the silent revolution by
which one fifth of the arable land of Barba-
dos has passed into the hands of small-hold-
ers is of tremendous social importance.”

The pamphlet is not a constructive docu-
ment: it is full of journalistic elichés e.g.
“crying need”, “strangle-hold of vested
interests”, “will outlaw and liquidate all
organisations and associations which ham-
per trading, “will contifue to fight”, “the
van of constitutional progress”, and “West
Indian consciousness.”

But it cannot be dismissed out of hand
for these reasons. Wordiness and exagger-
ation are characteristics not only of the
West Indies but are found wherever poli-
ticians lose their grasp on realities and
essentials. But there is no doubt that what
gives the wordiness and emotional appeal
of “Labour Marches On” effective propa-
ganda value is the fact that without the
activities of the l.abour Party and the Bar-
bados Workers’ Union it is doubtful
whether as much would have been done
for the workers as has been done in recent
years. The rights of Labour must be cham-
pioned. But there is no justification; moral
or historical for the continued flaunting by
the Barbados Labour Party -of statements
which have no basis for foundation in fact.
When a dispassionate historian like W. L.
Burn writes in his history of The British
West Indies that after 1833 “the task of the
planters demanded a very careful combin-
ation of generosity and firmness” and that
“this combination’ was most successfully
achieved in Barbados and Antigua, and
“that so many planters tried to adapt them-
selves to the new conditions learhing new
methods of handling labour growing cane
and making sugar, and that so many
negroes acted prudently and sensibly in
spite of threats and allurements”, we recog-
nise the authentic note of Barbadian his-
tory. The Labour Party damages its own
eause by its continual harping and re-
iteration of the non-historical assertion that
private enterprise as practised locally is
responsible for over three hundred years
of “misery and sordid conditions,” The
truth is that without local private enter-
prise the conditions of the 200,000. people
who live in Barbados would be frightening
indeed, Barbados has so far escaped the
tragie fate of Nevis and Antigua, where
exodus of the so-called “exploiting class”
resulted in the economic running down of

islands whose names once ranked with
ours for efficiency.
The Labour Department's. report for

1950, giving, as it does, detailed inform-
ation of the Barbados Sugar Industry is
tribute enough to the most successful work-
ing of private enterprise that this island
has seen. The tribute paid by the Colonial
Secretary to the Hon. H. A. Cuke, C.B.E.,
and the employers of Barbados in the Leg-
islative Council recently, must remind the
authors of “Labour Marches On” how much
they owe to this successful example of
private enterprise and to the harmonious
relations which exist between workers and
employers.

But the authors of “Labour Marches On”
do believe in private enterprise, the pri-
vate enterprise of the Labour Party. There
is nowhere in the pamphlet a° suggestion
that Labour could not do better than those
who now manfully shoulder the burdens
and carry the risks involved in carrying on
business and industry in Barbados today.
Yet nowhere are we told how they are
going to do better.

There are plenty of promises, Excess
profits tax, entertainment tax: “equal op-
portunities for all”, “public ownership,”
“regional industries,” “all possible measures
to provide employment,” “security of em-
ployment”, “capital works”, “deep water
harbour”, “East Coast Road”, “increase in
money wages”, “grow more food”, “security
of land tenure’, “planned development of
tourism”, “eliminate school fees”, “press
forward with” housing”, “Housing Loan
Fund for» Civil Servants”, “new public
health bill’, "social insurance”, “increased
hospital accommodation”, bétter conditions
for Government servants” and all ending
with the slogan “Forward with Labour”:
these are indeed big promises.

One looks in vain in the pamphlet for
any recognition of the known fact that the
relative high standard of living which Bar-
bados enjoys is due mainly to the efficient
privately organised sugar industry: the
bulk buying long term agreement of sugar
between ithe United Kingdom and the West
Indies: and above all to the industry and
applicatioA of each Barbadian by whose
energies we have reached the imperfect but
reasonable standards of life which we have
attained.

Less promises and some constructive
proposals suggesting how to tackle the
maintenance of these standards in view of
continuous rising costs and other difficul-
ties would have given us firmer grounds
for believing in Labour’s ability to march
on. As it is, if some of the threats contained
in this pamphlet were brought in by any
political party with a majority in the Bar-
bados House of Assembly there is no doubt
that whatever the direction of Labour’s
movement capital would March OUT.

That is the frightening alternative which
the Barbadian fairer sex (the ladies, who
are the majority of voters) can prevent by

their votes on December 13. We
woo capital, not scare it away.

want to









; BARBADOS ADVOCATE

Making An Executive

From the Cafiada

Royal Bank
Newsletter

Not everyone is a natural-born
execucive, but many can become
good executives by training, by
observing the methods and abil-
ities needed, and by working to-
wards self-development.

Being an executive is not mere-
ly having a massive desk and a
name-plate on the door, It makes
many demands upon a man, de-
mands of temperament and drive
and health. An executive is al-
ways meeting challenges. He
must know his job, make sound
decisions and direct the work of
other people. He needs imagina-
tion and courage.

The market value of an execu-
tive is determined by his special
qualities. He is not paid for the
thing he does, but for the moral
content of his effort — his en-
thusiasm, his specialized abilities,
his knowledge, his experience and
his judgment.

Naturally enough, there are in-
telligence requirements, though
successful executives differ great-
ly in their ratings on tests. All of
them have a high degree of ability
to organize, and keen vision to
see the path ahead. They are
skilled in taking several seem-
ingly isolated events or facts and
detecting the relationships that
exist between them.

We might say that it is not
superior mental ability or age or
social background or family
affiliations that count in these
days. The executive has trans-
ferred himself to a new arena.
one in which his development of
good mental habits is the key to
success.

of

Choosing Executives

The problem in business ig to
get the right men and women,
keep them, and develop them in-
to good leaders. Facts are better
than opinions in this screening:
what has this man done? how has
he done it? what can he do to-day?

Length of service alone does
not qualify a man for executive
rank. It is, undoubtedly, an ad-
vantage, but during it the man
must have developed alertly. He
must have learned to perceive
meanings that do not appear on
the surface. He must be almost
psychic in hfs ability to steer safely
through dangerous economic
waters. He must be able to ge
on well with people above and be-
ldw him in the firm's roster of
workers, '

Above all, the executive must
be a leader of men, No business
and no department will run itself.
It needs a leader who keeps a
jump ahead of the procession.

A leader is not one who achieves
by his personal powers, but one
who inspires all those under his
command, Morale is the child of
good leadership. Men work best
for the executive who holds his
beliefs with confidence, who will
stand up on Wednesday for the
principle he believed in on Mon-
day. The executive needs inner
harmony, which shows itself in
judgments based upon _ sound
thinking and in his whole attitude
fowards his business and society.

Confidence And Control

The executive is a man who
must trust his own iudgment.
Suecess will never be attained by
a nerson who has to ask advice
before doing anything important,
or who leans on the boss. or who
aske how to execute an order
A man’s self-confidenre mesure
the hefeh* of his nossibilities. end
no mn nasses his own self-im-
posed limitations.

Synthetic self-confidence will
not do, The most painful tumble
a man can take is to fall over his
own bluff. The bluff may be
caused by his conceit, or by a fool-
ish and unproved belief in his
ability.

Next to confidence, built solidly
upon knowledge, comes self-con-
irol, There never has been, and
cannot be, a good life without
self-control, It enables a man to
adapt himself to the perpetual
shifting of conditions, to meet un-
expected challenges, and to deal
effectively with crises,

This is one of the most difficult
of all qualities to attain. Men in
more humble spheres may indulge
in violence, engage in quarrels,
express themselves in angry pas-

AMERICAN COLUM

sions, but these are unbecoming
in an executive; they undermine
nis au.hority and destroy the
effectiveness of all his other
virtues,

Discretion is imperative in an
executive. It is true that qa man
who never goes out on a limb may
preserve the safety of his position,
but he will never rise above ii.
That is not the kind of discretion
we mean, The executive should.
have a hundred eyes to scrutinize
a project before he calls upon his
people to carry it out.

Courage

The executive also needs cour-
age. Many a brilliant idea has
been lost because the man who
dreamed it lacked the spunk to
put it across.

The budding executive wiho
fings that he is too conservative
should practise taking chances in
a small way until he gets .he
feeling of self-confidence that
comes from exercising initiative.
The courage he is seeking is not
mere absence of fear. He who
realizes clearly all the risks in-
volved, and decides to go ahead
with his plan, is a courageous
man in the best sense of the word.

Bravado is to be equally cen-
sured with cowardice. The ill-
considered accep.ance of any and
every risk has no part in the es-
sence of true courage.

The executive must have the
power of decision. Life is con-
stantly confronting us with a
series of choices, We cannot deciding, because even to seem to

make no choice at all is in it-
self to choose not to decide,
It is not required that the

executive make decisiong in rapid-
fire succession, though this seems
to come naturally to some men.
More crucial is the ability to ar-
rive without dithering at a decis-
ion that is wise.

This is one of the traits watched
in a man when he is being con-
sidered for promotion; does he
come to his boss with decisions or
for decisions? The man who says
“Do you want to do so and so?”
is trying to use the head of the
man above him. Some weakness-
es can be covered up by superior
qualities in other spheres, but if
a person is not certain and de-
cisive he has only dim prospects
of becoming a good executive.

Administrative ability is taken
for granted as a necessary quality.
In a great many businesses it i;
more important than technical
knowledge. The good administra-
tor is able to develop an organiza-
tion and keep it working purpose-
fully and harmoniously.

The good execu‘ive leaves his
emotions at home, and only his
family knows of his tempera-
mental upsets. If is a sad day
for the rising executive when his
secretary warns his subordinates:
“Don't go near Mr. Blank to-day
—he is in one of his moods.”

Seasoned Youth

It may be that the need for so
many perfections has contributed
to the preference of men _ for
executive positions who have at-
tained a certain degree of co-or-
dination through years of experi-
ence, Age in i.self is neither
handicap nor benefit. Many men
who occupy high places in indus-
try are going strong at sixty-five,
while others have wrecked busi-
nesses at half that age,

It is only a feeling, not a fact,
when the mature man experiences
a twinge of envy in contact with
younger people, He hes not their
light-heartedness, their casual
manner, their air of living for to-
day. But on the other hand he
has poise knowledge of the world,
and understanding of people: as-
sets which, in the very nature of
things, younger men cannot yet
have acquired.

Whether a man ranks as youth-
fully immature or fixedly aged de
pends not at all upon his calendar
age but upon his mental age and
his flexibility of thinking. The
expression “seasoned youth” cov-
ers all cases: the young execu-
tive may take a seasoned atti ude
toward life and make good; the
older executive may take a men-
tally youthful attitude, with wide
horizons still beckoning, and keep
on making stood.

The Arms Flow=0r

NEW YORK.

An ugly row down in Washing-
ton—over whether America is or
is not way behind on her promises
of arms for Europe,

General Olmsted, director of the
Office of Military Assistance, holds
a Press conference and tells the re-
porters that all is well, and that
shipments are well up to schedule.

Senator Lyndon Johnson, of
Texas, chairman of the Senate
Preparedness Committee, pounces
on the general. He: says indig-
nantly that only a short time be-
fore this Press conference, Olm-
sted appeared before the commit-
tee and gave them a bleak story to
the effect that there is a near-
breakdown in the flow of Ameri-
can arms. }

The senator accuses the general
of telling the committee that his
information was correct—but then
s0 was the information be pro-
duced for the Press conference.
How come? asks the senator.

Well, explains the general, he
“used different schedules in each
instance.”

Washington is much bewildered
by the whole thing. For by this
time everyone knows that one of
the most urgent reasons which
brought Eisenhower home on that
flying trip was to discuss the arms
shortage,

Meanwhile Senator Johnson fires
off an angry letter to the War De-
partment.

Careless

WITH MEAT PRICES at their
highest ever and apparently soar-
ing further all the time, Ameri-
eans are shocked to learn that
70,000,000 Ib. of prime meat is lost
every year through sheer careless-
ness. Off-hand and too-hasty ar-

By R. M. MACCOLL

rangements for transporting live-
stock are mainly responsible. In
1948 alone, 38,500 hogs, 25.500
sheep, and 14,700 cattle were dead
when they arrived by lorry at the
stockyaids. Nearly all were con-
demned as total losses by Govern-
ment inspectors,

Parallel
SO ALARMED are the 13
Roman Catholic bishops of the

United States by the corruption in
present-day American public life
that they issue a statement draw-
ing an “alarming parallel” between
America and ancient Rome.
“Rome's fate will befall us”, warn
the churchmen. “If; we do not
awaken to the danger which
threatens from within our house-

hold.”
No Moncy

IN RESPONSE to the groans of
the citizenry that, what with prices
the way they are, nobody can poss-
ibly find the money for higher
taxes (which are planned by New
York for the New Year), the

Our Readers Say



Politics

To The Editor, The Advocate—

SIR,—I happened to be driving
through the country last night
when I came on a Political Meet-
ing sponsored by the local Labour
Party. The speaker who was a
member of the House of Assem-
bly during the last session, said
these words: —

“Tf by stealing a piece of
Nelson’s statue it would make
my wife happy, I would steal

it.”



The Firm’s Responsibility

The persona] qualities of a
man, however good they may be,
are not made use of except in the
proper environment. One of the
bitterest situations for a qualified
and eager executive is to be given
a title without authority. Rank
should not be looked upon as a
reward for past services; it is
given a man for the sole purpose
of enabling him to meet respon-
sibilities

Everyone in an _ organization
should know pfecisely what he
is responsible «for, what hi
authority is, and who does wha:
in directing effort. The execu-
live has the right to be consulted.

Many a firm would benefit by a
stocktaking in this area. Progress
in business, as in the making ot
the world, is the domination o1
chaos by mind and purpose. 1,
ean be achieved only when there
fs a basic philosophy and a good
plan.

Let us ask, have the objectives
and policies of the firm been de-
fined? This may sound academic
but unless there js a clear state-
ment available, how are execu-
tives to mesh their efforts? How
are fhey to obtain _teamwork on
their own or lower levels? How
are they to be sure that ineir
time and effort are being spent
productively? How are they to
avoid the all=-too-common frus-
tration that arises when projects
are squelched because the firm
doesn’t know whether it wants
them or not?

The Human Problem

It is good policy for an execu-
tive to refrain from doing any-
thing that can be done sufficient-
ly well by a subordinate. If he
hugs his job to his bosom down to
the last trivial detail, he is being
unfair to himself as well as to his
people. He deprives himself of the
opportunity to deal with more
vital problems, to consider and
plan expansion and improvement.
He is, truly, working himself
into an early grave,

Of course, one, must not go too
far. No good ecutive tries to
delegate everything, including his
own responsibility for seeing that
the job gets doné well.

Those who do so have probably
come into their offices. by inheri-
tance or accident, and not by
winning their spurs in the open
field.

Of all the problems faced by an
executive, the human prohlem far
exceeds the mechanical in diffi-
culty,

No predigested psychology will
give the executive what he needs
in human understanding. It is good
to study, but theory must be tried
out and applied so that the right
response becomes habitual.

It takes a big man of superior
quality to be capable of treating
little men so as to gain and retain
their respect and affection, He
is the sort of man who, instead
of climbing upon his fellow
workers whom he has _ pulled
down, sets himself to help every-
one around him in order that he
may go up with them. No man
has true power, poise, charm or
good personality unless he has a
genuine interest in people.

It is. necessary to get along
well with associates on the ex-
ecutive’s level. There is a temp-
tation for the young or new ex-
ceutive to lean over backward
rather than appear to be a “yes
man,”’ Instead of that, he should
accept gladly every gesture of
friendship and help, seek to un-
derstand his associates’ problems,
give the feeling that he is genu-
inely . interested in their work,
and accept in» good part even
irritating things if his good sense
tells him they are for his benefit.

Only if morale is high in a
firm will production be high, both
in quantity and quality.

Morale means more than an
occasional staff y. It ns
that every man is interested in
the success of) thé firm and works

for it. Field Marshal Sir William
Slim, Chief of Imperial Gen-
eral staff, is qu in the Cana-

dian Army Journal as stating this
in a striking way “An army must
have Generals to lead, but if te
only men in it, who have
the mark of greainess are the
Generals, it will win few victories.”



Do They?

municipal authorities smilingly
point to the recent betting figures
on the local race tracks.

On Friday—the last day of the
season—56,000 New Yorkers some-
how managed to bet 4,589,185 dol-
lars on 16 races.

TV-itis

THEY have praised or blamed
['V for pretty well everything by
now—but here’s a new one.

Dr, Charles King, scientific di-
rector of the Nutrition Foundation
of America, says that TV is re-
sponsible for the steadily expand-
ing waistline of the American
business man,

Less golf and more sitting
around with the glazing eyes glued
to that luminous little screen, diag-
noses the doc.

Quota

SENATOR ROBERT TAFT. of
Ohio, coins a shrewd phrase. The
man who may well be the Repub-
lican battler for the Presidency
next year makes a speech urging
a quick truce in Korea. For, says
he, “a stalemated peace is far bet-
ter than a stalemated war.”



Surely that was a plain message
to his listeners who were mostly
composed of field workers and
labourers, that if they wanted a
watch for their girl-friend they
should go into town and steal it.
Apart from the fact that he would
destroy the statue of a national

hero for a domestic ambition
he was. definitely upholding
crime,

Another speaker ridiculed the
wearing of brass badges by office
messengers,

Yours very truly Sir,
BARBADIAN.














TUESDAY, NOVEMBER 27,



WATER, WATER
EVERYWHERE

What commodity weuld you say is most
used as an industrial raw material? Per-
naps you think of coal, or oil, or perhaps of
timber, sulphur, or steel. But the answer
is: plain, ordinary water — and in quanti-
ties that may astonish many not familiar
with industrial technique.

For instance, it takes anything up to 5
tons of water — or 1,120 gallons — to pro-
duce 100 tons of coal. The water, of course,
‘'s essential for suppressing the dangerous
dust inseparable from mining operations.
And British coal output for 1950 averaged
‘ust over 4 million tons a week — which
means that some 44,800,000 gallons of water



were also used seven days in dust suppres- %

sion.

Take another source of power—electricity.
for every 100,000 k.w. of generating plant,
between 4 and 5 million gallons of water
oer hour is used for cocling the installation.
\ltogether, the British Electricity Authority
ises a total of between 600 and 750 million
gallons every sixty minutes in this fashion.
And, in addition, there is the use of water—
chiefly in Scotland for producing current
from hydro-electric plant.

Certainly the third great enterprise con-
ce-ned, among other things, with the pro-
vis'on of a source of power — the oil indus-
try
supplies of water. It uses, on an average,
something over 20 gallons of cooling-water
during the refining of every gallon of crude
o'! or partially processed products.

ust one refinery alone, now being built
nesr London, will use 34 million gallons of
water every hour — rather more than the
equivalent water consumption of the entire
city of Glasgow. Another large refinery—
this time in Louisiana, U.S.A.—absorbs suf-
ficient thermal heat units every day into its
cooling-water to warm the average home for
more than 200 years.

Since world crude oil output for the first
half of this year was just over 300 million
metric tons, the refineries processing that oil
must be pumping a total of approximately
100,000 gallons of water through their cool-
ing systems every second!

The brewing industry is yet a further
undertaking that uses water by the thous-
and million gallons a year. Just one leading
London brewery used between 150 and 200
miliion gallons for all purposes in 1950. And
there are a whole host of other important
enterprises — ranging from steel to paper-
meking — whose operations would not be
possible without an unlimited supply of
water on tap. Nor is industry the only large-
scale user: the London Zoological Gardens,
for instance, needs an average of 55 million
gallons every year. It is dreadful to imagine
the consequences if, for any reason, commer-
cial water supplies dried up !

CDC CLOSE £63,000 HQ

! LONDON,
Have CDC been left with another white

elephant? That is the question being asked
in the Central African township of Blantyre
following the closing down of the £63,000
CDC estate comprising four houses for
married couples, a communal messing hall
for bachelors and the finest office building
in Nyasaland.



The estate, opened three years ago, was
intended to be the administrative centre for
the tung oil, rice and tobacco growing pro-
jects which CDC had undertaken in Nyasa-
land.

But as a result of an economy drive from
London, it has been decided to shut — at
least temporarily — the Blantyre buildings.

The staff’ have been moved to Lusaka /and
today that £63,000 worth of concrete and
masonry is occupied only by an accountant
who is clearing up the Corporation’s affairs
in the area, and by a woman stenographer.

Reports from a correspondent in Blantyre
suggest that the Corporation is offering the
houses for sale, But, he says, scarcely any-
one is nibbling. Attempts to let them are
said to have met with no greater success.

The refrigerators which graced the houses
have been sold at knock-down prices to Blan-
tyre business firms.

And the man who administered the
scheme from the beginning, Mr. Sinclair
Hay ? CDC headquarters in London say that
he left the Corporation over a year ago. Mr.

Hay was a_ Glasgow solicitor who “had
no specialised knowledge of Africa. But he

was very good at administration and hous-
ing estates.”

CDC headquarters deny that they are
trying to get rid of the Blantyre property—
by this time referred to among local inhabi-
tants as the “white elephant.” They say
that a new Regional Controller for the Cen-
tral Africa area will be leaving from Eng-
land very shortly and that if he is unable io
find the necessary accommodation in Lusaka
he will quite likely re-open the Blantyre
buildings.

And what of the CDC schemes PEs
They are still in the pilot stage but local ex-
perts think that the rice and tobacco Projects |
will succeed. |





Ve

— could not operate without ample}!





COOOOOOOOPOOOO OVO

POPE SPSSSOOOO ES

1951

FOR FINEST
CHRISTMAS CARDS

Call and Select Early from

ADVOCATE

NOTICE

From Ist December, 1951 our HARDWARE and
LUMBER DEPARTMENTS will be closed for breakfast
from 11 a.m. to 12 noon except on Saturdays when we
will be open from 8 a.m. to 12 noon.

ers please note,

WILKINSON & HAYNES CO., LTD.,
— Successors to —

C.S. PITCHER & CO. LTD.

4413, 4687, 4472

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Phones:





STATIONERY.





LEO EEAP PPS SPSS:

Will all custom-

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WHEELS anv CASTORS

CASTORS WITH SOCKETS

Per Set of Four.









Chromium Plated 2” Plastic....... $1.46
Chromium Plated 3” Plastic.... $1.96
Furniture Castors 156” Bakelite.. $1.60
Ball Bearing 156” Bakelite........ $2.10
Nickel Plated 156” Rubber..... $2.86
WHEELS
Each
7” x 14%" Cushion Tyred Swivel Castor.... $6.62
10” x 2” Roller Bearing Industrial Type
Rubber Tyred oo.ccccccccccccccseeeee $10.07
9” x 134” Hospital Type = =$4.65
14” x 3” Heavy Duty Truck.........00..00000000 $10.11

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STYLES...

Single & Double Breasted

COLOURS...

Cream & White

And 3-Piece
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CHEESE
Red Cheese.
Dutch Head.
Denish Gouda.
heddar in Tins..

Can,



MEATS

Smoked Hams
Smoked Bacon.
Smoked Salami.
Veal Kidneys.
Rabbits.

GODDARD'S
FOR THESE

Sn







Salmon.,
Sole. }
Haddock. ‘
Kippers. i
Pilchards.
| Sardines.
| SPECIALS
Processed Peas,
30 oz. 30c. per tin.

Fish Paste—6 cents per tin.

Orange Jam—48c. per tin
Strawberry Jam
| 94c. per tin.

| Fruit Sa’ad—Dried
75e. per Pkg



Frosh
Vegetables





TUESDAY, NOVEMBER 27, 1951

Bus Driver Stands

BARBADOS ADVOCATE PAGE FIVE

BEEF’ WILL COST













Horisund Calls
On Maiden Trip

Death By ADVICE TO CERTAIN

STATESMEN—FROM







° a . e
TrialOn MurderCharge * ?!" 4% — Misadventure oe Ma A
Making her maide to ince
. | aie x : P she was built this year, the Ger-
: ~ SAYS VICTOR CHASP _A VERDICT of death by mis- | py ateving the ren P' | man steamship atecnsuna cailed s
Case For Prosecution Closes : adventure was returned by a " goer anual ik ee ox Ratain an itomdss tisshinis oO: 4
Do you know that the price of nine-man jury to Coroner G. B. , " wrencmen Se with toys and other Christmas
your salt fish in January next Will Criffith when the inc y he weak by weakening the goods w *h > load i - 1
} ; 2 3 a juiry into th str goods which she loaded at Ham
AFTER CALLING 17 witnesses at the Court of Grand >& COMERS. YOU something like. six circumstances surrounding the ¥ Ms era burg, Copenhagen and Antwerp |
Sessions yesterday to prove that Ewart Owen Thornhill, a - olen conte oe = = At death of Aubrey Jordan of Sands vias _— ie re Hornsupd is ister ship to }
. : a sort time the bee y Street 3 i .
bus driver of the Ivy Land, murdered 39-year-old Leroy buy at two sititines teen’ Te will ae Seiek ae Peter, was concluded |” coyraging class ha'red. Masato. Which also wade het
Worrell, a | > ow ‘ > : eta aa , ‘7 pe at District “A” Police Court yes- . " maiden trip to Barbados on Octo-
orrell, a lorry owner of Bank Hall, on August 6 this year. be costing you $1.45 or $1.20, and terday You cannot keep out of ber 18 with a similar cargo. Bot’s
the Prosecution closed their case before the Hon. The Chief ‘at the milk for which yOu are Aubrey Jordan was involved in trouble by spending more of these ships are planning tol
Judge, Sir Allan Collymore. a ak pe eee — pint an accident ,with the motor car than you can earn. make one call each every three
The trial of Thornhill wi : eee : Glia tecaenthoas a pois age “A IL—132 on Sands Street, St. Peter —Abrah.m Lincoln. | moaths to Barbados. They belong
Ldpeuse Willinias Defence Conse! arid Mr. W, W. Resce, Vitor. Guice t toe ings teed nS to the Hom Line.
W unsel and Mr. ‘ . Reece ons ase to the arge crow He was taken to the General A shipping clerk of Mess:
K.C., Solicitor General, for the Crown, will address the jury. oxioeetan’ = sonpe? him Ry Hospital the same day but cied at R. M. Jone; & Co, Ltd. said yes-
. . : : rv. | “ 5S ar ¥ ; = ; ; |
On the application of Mr. Williams, the jury will visit qh’B™man’s lane Sunday | night: the Hospital on November 13. Dee Fest For te.day that the Horn Lines hopes |
a as spez g about the cost ~ t <
the scene of the death before Defence Counsel and Crown cf ‘iving ‘This is the position +i Set. oo told the Court that on to or a continual link between |
Frosecutor address j ve are facing,” said ‘hace, November 9 about 1 p.m. he was ® ° fest Indies and Germany
The Prosecution's — ‘he Worrell on August 7. The body “and I counsel you. thet whoever St sane -t: Gpeientatowne rms, il LikelySoon sage te Wee teuc wine to pat :
a Club of the Girls’ Industrial was identified by his wife * you put into the House of Assem. Station when he heard an alarm: expect to build four mure ta put
Union had an excursion to St. There were — asia _ bly, to impress upon them in nq He ran into the road and about brains ; sy on the WL. run, The Company is)
ere numerous con . p 200 yards ; THE rains of the past few ; . ¢
Lucy on August €. Thornhill was tusions and lacerations over the “certain terms, the necessity of yards away opposite Mr. Jor- weeks and the heavy seas off the ney ere ee er tee
driving M-1422, one of the buses whole body. There was a frac- 9g something to cushion the den’s residence he saw a crowd. Qact coas 2 = pl gal ae ene penance eave ig
which took the excursionists to St. ture of the right frontal bone ex- °!¢ck in this ever-increasing rise On going to the crowd he found ° Onaat ae: ee island had fleet of six {
Duct. andsWarrell was dvivine one ‘ ! jah ROA OR. sl cost of living.” that there was a motor car L—139 owed down the progress of he The Horn line ran ships before |
: ‘ 8 posing the train. There was con- living ; 38 seis . ; neurite , p
of his lorries with some of the ex- tusion aud haemorrhage of the ,,M¥ Chace is a candidate of the »" the road. This car was about selsmograph “party considerably, World War Il. but it was broken \
cursionists. On the return journey, brain. There was contusion of the Electo s’ Associaton seeking elec- 100 feet from Mr, Jordan’s house. but such results as had been ob- up during that war. |
Worrell and Thornhill each drove left kidney. There was also a '° to ‘1e House of Assembly as There was a little sand on the tained, had been very good said Horusund is 4,032 tons gross and |
fast. and attempted io overtake compound fracture of the left hip 2 Tepresentative of the City of risht side of the road about three Dr, W. F, Auer, Manager of the bas passenger accommodation {
each other. and _ both legs were broken P Bridgetown. feet nine inches from the right Barbados Gulf Oil Company about 12. She brought with het |
When they eventually reached “From my examination and Expirnstion side of the gutter, t i S eneee esas ae ate MAKE |
the Girls’ Industrial Union, a dis- from a consideration of the cir- | Explaining the increases men- . one geologic staff of the Bav- German crew of 36 including
pute started between Worrell and cumstances, I am of the opinion tioned, he said that as regard Car Damaged bados Gulf Oil has been increased her skipper, Captain Koch }
Thornhill. Witnesses said that that death was duc to the multi. beef, importers could ‘only ge : by the arrival of Mr. Neil Mac- Barbados is Hornsund’s first call
Worrell cufféd Thornhill in his ple injuries described. These their supplies from the _ sterling The right bonnet of the car Kenzie who will take up the work frem Antwerp and she sailed out

eye and Thornhill pulled a pen-
knife from his pocket. opened it,
but did not use it, He then drove
to Belmont corner, turned around
the bus and drove back down Con-
stitution at a moderate rate.

Bus Swerves

George Brewster who was in the
bus at the time told the court: “He
changed gear when not far from
where Worrell was standing on the
right of his lorry and I saw the
bus swerve and head for the lorry.
I held up my hands and looked
away.”

Other people who were near the
lorry ran, but Worrell was killed.

Pieces of Worrell’s bones were
exhibited in the Court.

Inspector Terrence Franklyn
said that on August 6, he received
a report and went to Belmont Post
where he saw Thornhill under
arrest. He went to Constitution
Road and saw lorry A-128 drawn
up on the left side cf the road
opposite the upper Queen's College
gate.

The bus M-1422 was to the’ rear
of the lorry facing town and was
on the opposite side of the road.

A body which he recognised as
Leroy Worrell's was on the right
side of the lorry lying on the
ground. After taking some photo-
graphs of the scene he returned to
Belmont Police Station and
charged him with murder.

After Thornhill was cautioned
he said that he had not done it
purposely.

Thornhill was later taken to Dr.
Cato as he said he had been cuffed
in his eye by Worrell.

On the following day he took
measurements of the scene where
Worrell had been killed,

Widow's Evidence

Ena Worrell, widow of Leroy
Worrell, said her husband was a
chauffeur and mechanic and
owned two lorries. He used to
hire them out for excursions and
would drive A-128 himself. On
‘August 6 he left home about 8 a.m,
with A-128.

About 6.45 p.m, the same day
she received certain information
and went to Constitution Road
where she saw her husband lying
dead by the side of his lorry, Next
day she identified her husband's
body to Dr. Cato.

To Mr. Williams, she said that
her husband was not upset in any
way the morning he left for the
excursion, He had had nothing of
any moment to worry him before
that day.

O. A. Pilgrim, land surveyor,
produced a plan of the part of
Constitution Road where Worrell
was killed. The lorry A-128 was
standing in the road when he made
the plan. The distance of the lorry
from the Queen's Park Governor's
gate was 209 feet.

Uprights Broken Off

Aubrey Farnum, inspector of
Highways and Transport, went to
the scene of the accident where
he examined the bus M-1422. The
right front fender was damaged.
Three uprights on the right side
of the bus were broken off. The
right windscreen was also broken
and there were pieces of bone in
the frame.

The steering and
were in good order.

He also examined the lorry
which was on the other side of
the road. This was damaged on
its right side,

To Mr. Williams, he said he
tested the clutch of the bus and it
was in working condition.

Dr. A. S. Cato said that he per-

the brakes

tion on

were consistent with the deceased
having been struck and squeezed
by a heavy motor vehicle.”

Bus Turns
P.c. 125 Arthur Searles was
Station Orderly at Belmont Sta-

August 6. There
crowd near Queen's Park.
came from Queen's Park,
around at Belmont corner.

“Before he turned I stopped
him and asked him whether any-
thing had happened at the Park,
he replied that nothing had hap-

was a
A bus
turned

pened. He then went toward the
Park.” :
Later Set. Henry brought
Thornhill to the Station.
Sat. Jonathan Henry attached

to Belmont Police Station said
that on August 6, he went to Con-
stitution Road and saw the lorry
A-128 parked on its left side of
the road. A body which he recog-
nised as Leroy Worrell’s was
lying at the right side of the torry.

He gave further evidence as to
broken pieces of the damaged
bus that Thornhill had been driv-
ing. Thornhill was atanding a
short distance away from the bus
and he arrested him.

“T took him to Belmont Police
Station and about three quarters
of an hour after he told him that
he had been struck in his eye by
Worrell”, he said.

To Mr. Williams he said that
Thornhill appeared normal when
he saw him the evening after the
accident. He was walking with
his head down. He did not wish
*o stay near the scene.

George Brewster, a civil ser-
vant, was one of those who at-
tended the excursion of Club 19
of the Girls’ Industrial Union on
August 6. The excursion was to
River Bay.

He said he drove in the bus
M-1422 which was being driven
by Thornhill.

Fairly Fast Speed

On the way back to town the
bus was travelling at a fairly fast
rate and _ closel followed by
Leroy Worrell. The lorry made
about two attempts to pass the
bus and when it reached Sandy
Lane Woods, it succeeded in pass-
ing it.

After the bus followed the lorry
at a fast rate, and overtook it, it
passed several other buses.

“We then noticed that the lorry
was again behind us,” he said.
“The lorry soon after got-up to the
bus and tried to pass it on its right
side but the two vehicles raked
each other. They stopped and the
drivers and some of the passen-
gers got out and looked at the
vehicles but there was no dam-
ages.”

They proceeded again at a re-
duced rate, the bus in front. The
bus arrived about 10 to 15 min-
utes at the Girls’ Industrial Union
before the lorry did. The lorry
came up and parked behind the
bus which was parked on the left
side of the road in front of the
Girls’ Industrial Union.

“After the lorry was pirkec
Worrell came up to Thornhill and
accused him of having tried to
cross him. A dispute between then
followed. They attempted to fight,
but the crowd kept them apart
Worrell went up to Thornhill and
tried to take hold of him. Worreil
eventually cuffed Thornhill in his
eye.

“Thornhill had an opened pen
knife in his hand but nothing
happened, I afterwards saw him



were present!
from Australia
The beef for
paying 36

arga, and these
only obtainable
and New Zealand,
which they were now
and 48 cents per lb. would be
secured in the near future at
much thigher prices. Ninety-four
cents per lb. would be charged for
best quality beef, That being the
case, the price to the consumer
would be about $1.15 or $1.20 per
Ib. “Imagine what this will mean
to you who can hardly pay two
shillings per lb. now for the
item,” said Mr. Chase.

Salt fish had just been removed

from the controls and h* could
assur® t! : > Jariior ‘eo
price would be as he had said,
unless a_ reduction be brought

about by subsidisation.
Government should continue to
cubsidise balanced aninal feed,
he said, so that people would be
encouraged to rear pias, sheep
fowls and other poultry, to cope
in some way with the exhorbitant
prices that would be charged
for beef and the other essential
foodstuffs he had referred to,
There should be ‘some alternative



Fishing Industry

One very good alternative, he
thought, was the fishing industry,
and ihe believed that a proper
Fisheries Bill, unlike the one they
had at present, should be operated
to encourage this very worth-
while industry. It was an altern-
ative that was sure to bring about
some relief in the cost of living.

“Oilmeal and pollard can now
be imported, but the price of these
is almost prohibitive at the
moment. This is going to mean
an enormous increase to you for
your animal feed. What is going
to be the result? Your milk will
assuredly be increased in price
and 15 or 18 cents per pint, as I
have said, will most likely be the
cost.”

Mr. Chase touched on_ such
matters as education, house rent
restrictions and a few other items,
and finally told his listeners that
he had built his business with
their support and was prepared
to show them his gratitude by
rendering them faithful and hon-
est service in the House, He
would ask that they give him
the opportunity to do this by
electing sim on December 13.

More Exhibits In
Poultry Section
AT EXHIBITION

Three hundred and twenty-two
entries in the poultry section have
been made for the Annual Agri-
cultural Exhibition at Queen’s
Park, 32 more than last year, the
Advocate learnt yesterday. There
are 50 birds in the leghorn class,
the biggest entry in years, it was
said.

Entries in the pigeon class are
340 this year, 40 less than last
year’s figure. y

The entries for cows, horses,
pigs, goats, sheep and dogs are
now complete. The figures are 66
cows, 11 bulls, 9 horses, 17 pigs,
62 goats, 40 sheep and 35 gogs.

Over 20 booths have already
teen erectéd in Queen’s Park.

,lso erected are the small un-

svered booths along the wire

nelesure facing the roadway,—
for those sellers who would not
be deing so,large a trade as to
neces.itate the use of one of the























was dented and the right head
inmp damaged. A brake mark of
52 feet was on the road. This
mark was traced to the left rear
wheel of the car. He saw Mr. Jor-
tan lying in a bed in his house.
He did not test the brakes of
L—132. He enquired for the driver
1d found her in Mr, Jordan's
house, \
Police Constable Daniel
that he tested

said
the brakes of the
motor car L—132 and found them
to be in good order. Two tests
were carried out.

? Mrs, Beryl Birch said that she
lives at Paynes Bay, St. James
She has been driving for 19
months. She was driving the
motor car L-132 along Sands
Street, St. Peter, about 12.45 p.m.
Her sister was sitting beside her
and her husband was behind

There were two cars on Sands
Street and just as she was about
to pass the last car, a man sudden-
ly appeared from behind the last
ear, This man came from the sea-
side. Her car struck this man and
he fell on the road, She was driv-
ing on the left side of the road
After the car hit the man she got
unnerved. After the man was
struck she stopped the car.

Tke brakes of the car were in
good order. Before the man was
struck she had no time to apply
her brakes, The man came on the
car suddenly, One of the parked
cars was a Hillman. When the man
appeared he was facing the land-
side of the road,

To Mr. Malone, Mrs. Birch said
that she could not say which side
of the man was hit.

At this stage the Coroner re-
viewed the evidence of the wit-
nesses in the inquiry,





9
Boys’ Club Prepare
~~ oy eg?
For Exhibition
During the past weeks the hoys
of the Speightstown Boys’ Clu
have been making mats, baskets

brushes etc,, for their exhibition
which will take place at the Boys’

Club premises on December 3 at

4.30 p.m. The public will be able
to buy any of the boys’ work at
the Exhibition,



After your Shopping, drop

HAM, CHEESE,
HOT

TEA —





COCKADE BAR & LOUNGE

Over Stanfeld Scott & Co., Lid.,
Broad Street

EGG,
DOGS

COOL DRINKS & FRUIT JUICES

COFYVEE
The Place where only the Best is Served.

of studying the expased geology
of the island in preparation for
cubsurface geological work which
will come wi h the drilling of ihe
first deep test.

Mr. Eugene Dawson of Brown
Drilling Co, of Long Beach, Cali-
fornia, who was in Barbados for
the past week conferring with

him, returned home yesterday via § 1
cargo arriving from
Hornsund

San Juan by B.W.1.A,

While here they discussed the
pos*Tble contact for the drilling
of the Barbados Oil Company's
first deep test*which is tentative-
ly proposed for the early part of
1952 if a suitable location can
be found,

In the meantime, a search fot
the location is going on by means
of the seismic survey.

Where Is The

“Daerwood” ?

Where is the motor vessel Daer-
wood? This question could not be
answered yesterday by the vessel's
agents, The Schooner Pool, and
the local Harbour and Shipping
Department did not have any in-
foimation of its whereabouts.



However, a cablegram reaching
the Harbour and Shipping Master
on November 21 reported that an
intercept from Curacao’ Radio
said that the Daerwood was over-
due since she sailed from Grenada
for Aruba, A message was flashed
to all ships asking their skippers
to keep a sharp look out for the
two masted motor vessel,

Daerwood skippered by Cap-
tain Mulzaec and having on board
12 passengers — two children in-
cluded = left Barbados on No-
vember 15 for Aruba via Gren-
ada. She also took cargo for her
poris of call

Daerwood
crew of ten.

usually carries a
She has a net ton-
rage of 94, Her hull is painted
black and her bottom red, The
woodwork above her deck was
mostly painted white and cream,

in with the children for

a drink and a snack



SANDWICHES,

— COCOA

Co., Ltd.
hooped
cessories,
ironware, oi] and gas cookers, saw
blades, iron scissors, lamp burners,
enamelware,

Copenhagen, typewriters,
photo accessories from Antwerp

appropriate driving

PDO OOOO TOTO

last night for Trinidad,
F.om
9,500

Hamburg, she

bags of muriate of
Messrs. R. & G. Challenor
iron, shoes,

clocks, toys,

wire
ctor were

goods,
among
Hamburg.

a tr



also

batteries and cotton

No Driver's Liceace

Mr. G. B. Griffith, Acting Police
Mag.swate of
seeaay tined Oscar
Hill, St. Joseph,
14 days or one month's
ment
0-81 on
being tne holder of an
diiving licence

The offence
November 24

Joseph
was also fined
Pwo

employing Oscar

District “A,”

for driving the

Swan Street

was committed

Branch of
£3 in

Horse
14 days
months’
Hoyte to
O.81

motor car without

licence



Gold Chain Stolen

Daisy Bowen of Fairchild Street,
that

City, reported to the Police
between 3 a.m. and 8.30 a.m
November 22 her house wus
broken into and a= gold chi

valued at $60 stolen



Poole Pottery

A new shipment



Book Ends, Flying Ducks,
Blue Birds, Sea Gulls,
Vases, ete.

at your Jewellers

WY. De LIMA
& €O., LTD.

Broad Street

Weatherhead’s
Offer To-day

s ~ .
Chocolates in Presenta-

tion Boxes by all the

brought
potash

Beech staves and heavis,
electrical ac-
batteries

chairs
othe

brought dry
from
nails and



yes-
Hoyte of Horse
£3 to be paid in
imprison
motor Car
without
Appropriate

Hill,

imprisonmen for
drive

MORE AND MORE MEN
ARE CHANGING TO ...



4
#
®
« PURINA MILK CHOW
L
a

gp Hi. Jason Jones & Co., Ltd.
ieee
{a we ee ee a @ubuaoawta





YOUR BAKING
EASIER



‘K SHOES vary

“ecause they have become convinced

of K's Superiority.
e

“RE ARE THREE OF THE MANY VERY GOOD

REASONS FOR THAT SUPERIORITY:
e

(1) ‘K’ SHOES are made from the finest leathers
obtainable. Both soles and insoles are hand-
tested for flexibility and accurately graded
by skilled craftsmen. ;

(2) THE UPPERS of ‘K’ SHOES are selected,
hand-cut and matched by experienced crafts-
men with a care that no machine could
imitate .

(3) ‘K’ SHOWS are made over the famous ‘K’
PLUS FITTING LASTS with the heel-parts
one fitting narrower than the fore-parts. This

ensures a close fit at the heel and freedom
for the toes,
e

ae Why not come in and be fitted with a pair
of these world famous shoes? We are suve
you'll say like all the other ‘K’ wearers ;—

PLL NEVER WEAR ANOTHER SHOK BUT ‘K’

PRICES $17.00 to $21.63

FROM

HARRISON'S

DIAL 2664

Sole Distributors for ‘K’ SHOES in Barbados









SSS Se = =



Rep Ot & ern

Om mG) fo of
See ee ee ee

ano @
IT’S HERE AGAIN |!



Distributors

88 89 8 wt ©














—-—

ther booths.



_@ On Page 8 Popular Makers

FOR XMAS

“TOIRS CHOCOLATES IN PRE







NOTICE

COME

SCOOP OEE



SPNTATION BOXES, MOIR’S
e POT OF GOLD--Contain Aimons- | ONK
Tinos, Pineapple Cubes rn Pa
Nits King’s Choice Burnt >
A'mnonda, Mararschino Ch rries OO}
Nougatines Cashew Nuts, alt ¢ COME
these and sixteen other varietle y,
in “Moir's Pot of Gold” Pox

We regret to inform our customers

\ino Moire Luxury Package
welcome and happiness

For those who visit our ALL

PACKAGES
TRYS CHOCOLATES IN



MILLINERY DEPT’ labour and materials we have ce aie ae CALL IN TODAY AND SELECT {Vy

rehed Almonds

that due to the increased cost of

SORES SSIS

WE ARE WELL STOCKED with items for ladies
including HATS, TRIMMINGS FOR HATS.
RIBBONS of many Patterns. ARTIFICIAL .. .
FLOWERS for all purposes. VELVETS and a
wide variety of DRESSES.

CADBURY'S IN
T:ON BOXES

been compelled to raise our prices
from lst December, 1951. Viriety, Pink Rones, Sumner

PRESENTA
Box,
Girls

| PROM THE FINEST RANGE OF

XMAS PRESENTS

Hazel nuts ond
Picadilly
Pictorial

Breeze, Milk Tray, Roses, Sel. cted

CADBURYS
> cuits, Plain and

CHICOLATE
Milk Choc



We shall renew our efforts to
bring you the best of services and

trust that

ROWNTREE IN PRESENTA

TION BOXES-—Galleon, Flowers, & 4 % e si
Hicture Assortment, Girls, Round, Presentation Sets by Max Factor, Yardley’s, Eliz-
Black Magic in large boxe and



in tins

FOR CHILDREN of all ages we have some really
dainty items which will make them excellent gifts,
or dress them up for their special occasions in the
coming season.

abeth Arden, Cusson, Morny Bath & Tcilet Soaps,
Also a Delicious Assortment of
SWEET BISCUITS by P ek Frean
suntiey & Palmer, Crawfords
and CARRS in tin Boxes with
Pea uutiful Xmas desig:

$
Pea FRESH PASCALLS MARSH
% “ALLOWS in Packages and Tins

e Goodness knows the're good
*
%
% a

SANITARY LAUNDRY COMPANY . BRUCE WEATHERHEAD
|) MIMITED OF BARBADOS. HS as ane

ig Head of Brozd Street.

Morny Tale & Body Powder in Gardenia, Jasmin,

663°

656660 S8O

COCOOEES

your patronage will

>

sandalwood, French Fern ete.

continue.

oF

VANITY CASES & BEAUTY MIRRORS
COMB & BRUSH SETS



DRESSES, SUN SUITS, ROMPERS, ETC.

Cave Shepherd & Co., Ltd.

10, 11, 12 & 13, BROAD STREET

COS





also

GIFT BOXES OF CHOCOLATES



4,544

PLSD





KNIGHTS DRUG STORES



7%





§ 4660+ 5
errs PLEO OOP?

— SO —_———________!





7







PAGE SÂ¥X



CLASSIFIED ADS."

TELEPHONE 2508.



























































|

FOR SALE



















































































BLIC SALES

=~





REAL ESTATE

DEBENTURES—4%



























































BARBADOS ADVOCATE



r

*





The charge f annowncements of Debentures, Mar- |
ths riage Death Acknow!- | ine Hotel (1943) Ltd. Further particu- me
7 â„¢ Memoriam notices is Sa jlars, apply Wm. Fogarty (B'dos.) Ltd ca
0 leeias's ond )on Sundays AUTOMOTIVE 16.11.51—t.f.n
am bd , o p to 50, ard! os. _- |
ent 4 week-days and CAI Si 9 good tyre N ‘ j
cent - on Sundays for eveh) parte « cheap. Suitable for mak AUCTION me
bie wer | Pick-up Apply G. E. Martin, Brighton | A YZ
ay Singer 25,11,51 WEDNESDAY 28th at 12 noon BAY | ke “yp
a inal is STREET opposite Beckwith St. Mahogany \> cd
DIED | CAR—One 1937 Ford V8 in good cé Tub Chairs, Arm Chairs, Mahogany Wash | X
= j tio ply to General Engine Rebuild-} Stand Marble Top, Iron bedsteads, painted eee 4% J
. - ; ‘om Dial 4351 27.11,51—2n | Dressing tables, Medicine cabinet, Press, \ J
JOUNKE a November, 1951 Hat Rack with Mirror, Hocker, ware, sje
Alice Margue Her funeral will CAR—Ford Prefect 11,000 miles. Con-]| knives, spoons, wash stands, Ladies Desk e
, her Tate wnee at G15 430) tact Butcher, McKnearne/ & Cog Garage.| @nd_ other items TERMS CASH. R
m= St u's Chureh, Bay 2711.51 in | ARCHER Mc KENZIE, Auctioneer Vv
Gods are invited — 25.11.51—3n oN
Xeeorge: Bree and Daamend) CAme1 Citroen Car, under one year{ — - - | i>
ald, me 8, miles n perfect order
. id, done 9,000 miles. |
Nearest offer to $2,400.00 accepted. Dial
IN = MEMORIAM | 3904 Dr. C. G. Manning or 4618 G. B. | HAMMER
r = Ward 27.11.51-—4r | SALES IN DECEMBER
pensiegiivemeeniet TURSDAY 4TH: Sale at Bosvigo, Fag!
nore * ef our dear CAR -One (1) A-@@® Car. A-1 condi i Hall toad
t w wie Hope who] tien New Battery and Tyre Price TURSDAY 11TH: Sale of clothing fram
Mae m November 26th' $1,660 For wufermation Dial 2142 the Sanitary Laundr at The Mart, |
e 25.11.51 3n 17 High Street |
E ed since that sad WEDNESDAY 12TH: Estate ot Cc, B
- CAR--Drop-head Convertible Ford V-8 Rice Sale Tranquility Strath- |
cd was called away] im good condition, Gaing cheap. Apply elyde }
‘ woo! to rise. | | Cale & Co, Limited. Phone 4516 | BRANKER, TROTMAN & CO.
mp shall rend ne ar - Si 2 nu. 51 “4 Aeetuanani
he hrist fetters of the tomb CHRYSLER (WINDSOR) 1947 Moc ! 27.21. Sle dn
‘ ‘ \ ortal mane with New Tyres. Fluid drive with aute- | |
to t bered by Darnley Hope] matic Transmission Mileage 33,000 and +
Myrth and] jn perfect condition—Dial 4616 vi RENT
, Fite Lys j FOK |
v AI oe rT memory of my “MOTORCYE LE ae “i : Hi PB S.A |
5 ‘ ci Walcott who died} side valve. Apply: J. Mahon c/o S$ HOUSES |
err it 42 Sewing Machine Co. 25 -11.61-~2n
t pe ter ROOMS——Furnished or unfurnished for
27.11.5110 “ een t vulays Dial 4837
5 et ELECTRICAL particular Dial 485 ss tia
r REFRIGERATOR One (Electrolux) | ~ ’
WOTKICES Ou Burning Refrigerator ir perfect my
See ee. Se ANNOUNCEMENTS
i Sistine Plantations New Bullding, Phone 8270
Ng’ an 70 21 11.51—12n
vO TICE sinensis $5 in goods and with your cash bill
oe 3 a ting of the MISCELLANEVUUS ou get a guess-coupon; how many
rr : } "t os nosed m —- —-—__—__— : crews in a jar? You can win an
; ati Se ber at § p.m BLANKETS: Good quality Assd. shades KCO radio it certainly pays to $s
WLLIAMS and sizes $3.25 and /4.26 at Tr Aw) > 8 OT a re ss stuck 8.0
eral Secretary Wm. Hry .St 27.11.51—t.1.n s fl~
O85. Gisee8 Ii 0 ndehiiacemmnernsensromeemtcbone
~| BARBADOS VIEW SCARVES 100
pure silk with lovely views ef Barbados PERSONAL
EDUC ATIONAI An ideal Gift to give or own. THANT
i Zi 4 Dial 27.41,61—t.f.1
“FRMNOODO ET Ul ton aC Dhenlc |. Bee, Public hereby warn:d against | Here is coffee with the inviting aroma,
. ; . . ea . van giving credit to a one in my name a
MALVERN ACADEMY. | m2 House, st. sosepn."Anpiy: Mrs. | CY" ieitten order signed’ py me| he heavenly flavor that makes every sip
SDENUILLE, CHEAPSIDE ohn Les. ‘Telephone Goi. sien, | naving left the island on the Mth of a satisfying experieftce. With Chase &
; ae aa ead. the s s November, 1951 |
aa git dg yh pba aaecaege Eggers ne GOULBOURNE ASHLEY ALLEYNE, | Sanborn you get all the flavor your cup can
Jepartment of Rducation EGYPTIAN LEATHER eeninec Be Phi
1 entrance examination for the hue Just opened a large ¢ rtment of Gents 27.11.51—2n | hold. Ask for Chase & Sanborn today.
952 ¥ i be heid er chool og Friday} faney wallets and Ladies’ pure leather Soni | Ip
Jecember at 10 a.m. purses: Ideal for Gifts at THAN! BROS. wae as dla inst |
re ) irie exam p 8 Th ublic are hereby warned agains’
ae Gis Me and. Carsbritgel once 27.11.51—t.t.0 | aiging eredit to my wife, OLGA YPAR- |
land -_. 7 : aap . se WYDICA) as I do not hold
Bs on _ NANCY STRAW MATS: For bedroor nenat reaponsible for “hes of anyone
rtan aia ipa ovely designs $1.0) each THANT'S Pr ee entree ee, debt or debts in ms | 3 scsit soli laa linia aa cae al atlantis eee
Headmaster hp opie ely clamenmss name unless by @ written order signed by
: ea sss GOVERNMENT. NOTICE
: = aad in | i ANIEL YEARWOOD, | ‘
ps sine INDIAN SANDALS—Another shipment | sari hae xing Street, | TR
GOVERNMENT NOTICE sss parived re Spe aid out immedi- | St. Michael. | EXECUTIVE ENGINEER, HIGHWAYS & ANSPORT
f } ti ome ane secure yours at} AL S121
atta ane I THAN?S. Dial 3466. 27.11.51 —t.f.n ane | DEPARTMENT, BARBADOS.
K c a ot responsible for any debt or ‘ ;
Serer KODAK Precision enlarger 4.5 lens.| udbtg eonteacted by nnyone except by a Applications are invited by the Government of Barbados tor
$ WA. CENTRAL SUGAR CANE 1 AGRE a 0/a Singer aoa written order signed by m % he post of Executive Engineer, Highways & Transport Department.
BREEDING STATION = ipbneipnicannbiond eateaas: | AUHTIN 8. HOLPRS 2. The post is pensionable and carries salary scale of $3,456
DEPARTMENT OF SCIENCE |“ADIES BATH SUITS—Excellent quality | ie Riana |x 144 — $4,320 per annum. In addition a non-pensionable cost
AND «AGRICULTURE withemxlste in blue, green, red and gold) | of living allowance of $156 per annum is payable. Point of entry
A: f sizes 32 to 40 $3.51 each at KIRIPALANT | : “j ; i "
Agricultural Assistant, B.W.1. [52 swan Street 27.11.51 LOST & FOUND | into scale will be determined by experience and qualification. Holdei
Central Sugar Cane Breeding = retitareerapibllintiatiimionte aun | | will be required to keep a motor vehicle for the performance of his
Station SHOPPING BAGS & SUIT CASES—j —______. | juties and will be eligible for travelling allowance in accordance
Cheapest prices at THANT'S Dial 3466. | LOST | with local rates. He will be liable to Widows’ and Orphans’ con-
pplications are invited for the} dt cs: lade sinpbilinabiy stag asi | tributions at the rate of 5% of salary. No quarters are provided.
of Agricultural Assistant,] sHIRTS—For Sport, Holiday, work or) CAT—Female cat, flufty tabby answer-| Passage expenses of officer and family not exceeding $1,440 are pay-
WJ, Central Sugar Cane Breed-| otherwise, For the widest variety try| ing to the name of en eeae Finder able on first appointment. s ;
Station, Department of Agri-] THAN! PROS, Dial sas, 27.11.51—t.0.n ee eee te 97.11.51—3n os pe) ve - en a cea on SRerenee ae
culture reek Ne | to medical fitness. In other respects the appointment | 5
2. ‘Whe salary attached to the} TABLE—One modern mahogany Dining a /to the Colonial Regulations ard the local Civil Service Regulations
ost is in the scale $1,200 x $72—] Table. As new. Phone 3950, 0 WANTED | and Instruetions.
20 (E.B.) x $96—$2,592 per ee Braise | 4. Candidates should be between the ages of 30 and 40 years
unnum and the point of entry in —qyene—s ——— land sheuld possess one of the following qualifications —
» scale will depend on the qual- Election Notice HELP | Corporate Membership ci the Institution of Civil Engineers,
ideations and experience of the ° PF Set - : of a Degree or Diploma exempting from Seetions A and B
successful applicant. The post is CUTTER — An experienced cutter |

not pensionable but after a year’s
probationary service the officer
may join a Provident Fund,

3. The | successful applican:
will be required to provide him-
elf with a motor car, a loan to-
wards the purchase of which wil)
be made on terms and condition:
imilar to those which are appli-















FORM NO. 9
The Representation of the People (Mis-
cellancous Provisions) (Section 15)

Act, 1951
NOTICE OF GRANT OF A POLL
THE PARISH OF ST. THOMAS

NOTICE is hereby given to the electors
“0 the aforesaid parish of St. Thomas
that a Poil hag been granted for the
leetion now pending for the said parish
Â¥f St. Thomas and that such Poll will be













wanted, preferably with recommendation,
Broadway Dress Shop 25.11.51—3n

COOK—Head
for new Small
Tobago. Modern Kitchen, Write giv-
ing age, experience and_ references
ABRNOS VALE BEACH HOTEL, mrenen

First Class Hotel in

B.W.l 3n.

OLONY CLUB,
vaceaney for an Assis



a
or

James, have
Manager



























Cook or Chef required |

| of the Associate Membership Examination of the Institution
} of Civil Engineers with at least ten years practical experi-
ence on civil enginecring works, preferably in connection
with road making.

| 5. Helder will be required to take charge of all works on
maintenance and construction ef yoads and bridges, to make surveys,
take levels and prepare plans, designs and estimates and to set out
and supervise all work and be responsible for its proper and economi-
cal execution, to assist with the technical, administrative, financial
and disciplinary contro] of the depariment,

































































ble relli jeers Manageress; applice should be made " icati - 4 _ + +.
cable to travelling officers of the | ‘pened on the 13th day of December, 1951,| jn writing. in the first plage, giving full | ,, 6. ADRRIGAtIONS snonld be ubmitted to the Colonial Secretary,
Harbados Government Service [it the hour of seven in the forenoon] particulars and experience Public Buildings, Bridgetown, to reach him not later than noon on
\ mileage allowance will be paic | ind kept ogen until the hour of six in 27.11.81-tn. | Friday, 28th December, 1951.
; nek Clave . rates, he afternoon in the Polling Stations ————$$$—$—$——— 17.11.51—3n.
ote : Sere iearrid rase vo, | stablished in the yarious Polling] BISHOP'S HIGH SCHOOL, TOBAGO ive “ Baad si ens
1. Applications, stating ake | divisions comprised in the said parish CO-EDUCATIONAT
educational qualifications and eX-) of St. Thomas and set out in the list ¥ — 4
nerience, together with COPIES] #ttached hereto Applications are invited for the posts €
4 . Is should be address And that the candidates in the above| of TWO Assistant Teachers capable of J
of testimonials should be aaaress- | .vrish of St. Thomas are as follows: teaching Subjects up to Higher Certificate
| to the Director of Agriculture, Candidates Standard rs ee er
Jueen’s Park, and will be accept- CUMMINS, HUGH GORDON (a) Geography MONTREAL, AUSTRALIA, NEW ese 30%
{ up to 12 noon on Thursday 6ih HEWITT, JOHN WINSTONE ib) Mathematics. ZEALAND LINE, LIMITED .
: 7 i981, ie MAPP, RONALD GRENVILLE | Salary-$2,160-—$2,880 (Degree Applicants) (M.A NZ. Line) The M.V, “Caribbee” will accept ¢
‘ember vor, of whieh all persons are heveby requirea $1,440—-$1,680 (Higher Certificate iF si a% r Carge and Passengers for
25.11.51.—4n.] to take notice and govern themselves with Distinction) 8.8 PORT ADELAIDE {a a heds Dominica, Antigua, Montserrat,
sordingl Closing Date; Saturday, 28nd December, | ‘led to sail from Hobart September 25th Nevis and St. Kitts. Sailing 30th §
" TROT nat ine wountin & the | vot 1951 é a sgaheo *| Melbourne October 4th, Sydney October brintatits = he ‘
" f » counting of the votes} 19% aes 4 stant.
ok a given to the several ToanAldata will Apply to Oth, Gladstone October lth, Port The M.V. “Moneka" will aceept
L ommehce on the ith day of December Mr, KENNETH REID, Alma October 20th, “Brisbane October) & cargo and Pass:ngers —_ for
1951 at the hour of nine in the forenoon Concordia, Tobago, | 7b arriving at late ons Doininica, Antigua, Montserrat, %
at St, Thomas Church Bows’ Sehool in %4,11,51—n. Lee SRE GATHACES “Say Perera Nevis and St. Kitts. Date of
5 caernve ry ce x [the parish of St. Thomas. ~ - ——— | mn. dep: ire to be notified.
UNIVERSITY COLLEGE Ox Given under my. hand at St. Thomas SIGN PAINTER—Apply Colonial Adv im addition to general cargo this ves- The M.V. Daerwood will accept
tae WEST INDIES this 22nd day of November, 1951 tising Co,, Shepherd Street, between &—%| sel hag ample space for chilled and hard. Cargo and Passenge~ for St
, : ox ‘ONS. D. A. HAYNES, am Bring samples of work rozen ¢argo. Lucia, St. Vincent, Grenada and
BAKSADUS TLE a Returning Officer, 27.11,51-2n Cargo accepted on through Bills of Lad- Aruba. Date of departure to be
1952 Parish of St. Thomas. | - ee arnaeeemene | ng for trans-shipment at Trinidad to notified,
ihe Bxaminauen for two (2) List OF POLLING STATIONS TYPIST—Good copy typist and filing | British Guiana, Leeward and Windward B.W.I. SCHOONER? OWNERS
Bar io Government Exhibi- PARISH OF ST. THOMAS clerk with mepecianee of customs work | {slands -. peaes Ine.
Sat } pasa (To be attached to “Form 9%") wanted by International Trading Carpora- ' a ls le, 404
H Wnabs the University No. 1. Sharon Mixed School tion 3rd floor Barelays Bank Byilding, | Por further particulars apply a
Olle ol the West Indies wilt No, 2. Welehes Mixed School 97.11.461—-1n | FURNSSS, WITHY & Co., Ltd, y
hducted im Barbados by the} No &, St. ‘Thomas Boys’ Schoo! = = TRINIDAD SS SOOCCROVETRAEBEEEES*
le . Itation}] Ne % Club Casablanca, Porey Spring TWO GENERAL SERVANTS A} B.W.1. =
i ollege ao ee 8 No, §. Hillaby Mixed School Laundry Maid and a Cook General HecOwrA a Gh, Li
the director of Edueation, No. 6. Bright Star Friendly Society,] Apply. to Mrs, Lisle Bayley, Pavillon, 4DOS, zr
ud will consist ol. Weichman Hall 7 : Hasting 25.11.51--2n | DATE ST IT PA Ys TO ADVERTISE
+ * ; No. 7. Southborough Boys’ School
written examination. t ; rr ia a
No. 8 Mr, Milton Bynoc's Residence SCE
be held in the week be- Bridgefield MISCELLANEOUS fe
ginning Monday, Febru- No, 9. Vaucluse Factory. BOTTLES--Clean empty nip bottles at 0.
ary 25th, 1952. A i mee eae aoe , School.] 4ge, per dozen—deliver Colonnade Stores,
7 4 : I astie Plantation » Ps Oh
(ii) an oral examination t D. A. M. HAYNES, wanes Park Rong, — 13-11: 0)--t..n, | g.
be held in April, 1952 Returning Officer, WANTED to purchase an unused | ,
Candidates must bei— Parish of St. Thomas. | Riectric Service. Apply B.D. C a| pe
. os ne 11.5 \ nate 27.11.51—3n | B tee, epee
(a) under twenty (20) year: ag ALS ee % avPPAte { smi
of age on the 31st Janu- Peat ae eats i rakd 7 NEW YORK SERVICE
ry 1052: | A STEAMER Sails 23rd Novemb*r arrives Barbados 4th December, 1951
= " ane he ie las es oO ine ne | A SPEAMER Sails Mth Deceraberâ„¢ arriv Barbados 25th December, 1951
(b) Natives o s is 01 g Ss elibleeee eilln a ; realty onthe a iicihcediaibtiniesintest
(c) Children os a native, ot NEW ORLEANS SERVICE
i oe caer’ if oF n he , S 8 “OCEAN RANGER" Sailed 71!) Nov ember—arrives B'dos 24th Nov., 1951.
(d) Chitaren of persons Ww ’ A STEAMER Saila 2ist Novem! are domiciled and have from every bottle y | A STEAMER Sails Sth Deceraber-— arrives Barbados 19th December 1951.
evateanpgren ew ameet ovine TT
been resident in this
istand for a period of no | MEE, | CANADIAN SERVICE
less than ten (10) y2ars ¥ | SOUTHBOUND P : Sails Balls And
Candidates will be required i | Name of Sbte Montreal Halifax Barbados
produce with their applications | #8, “ALCOA PEGASUS” Oct. 2th Cet. 29th Nov. lith
Birth Certificates together wit 5.8. “ALCOA PLANTER” Nov. 9th Nov. 12th Nov. 22nd
ertified statements declaring tha | 2.8 APU A th Nov. 23rd Nov. seth Dec. x
h have been receiving thei | “A. STEAMER" : ey . = oe: 2th 9 7th
(ueation for the past three (3 ROBERT THOM LTD. New YORK AND GULF SERVICE.
cars in this colony and that their | APPLY: DA COSTA * co LTD—CANADIAN SERVICE
moral character and general con- lad si agen aeieetare
duct are satisfactory.
\pplications for admission as =
“Iiates for the" Exhibition’ TV ail Ore re)
inust be sent to the Director oi Pe Ne wee oe
E » « Education Office, The a on vr x
Gar? St. Michael, not later
in Qu Sjay, 22nd January, 1952 CANADIAN SERVICE
4 leg ’ > .
: eetees tee some » as From Halifax, N.S., and Montreal,
cond 2 s -
meot Exhibitions must also for- Expected Arrival
M
vd rect to ‘Se Registrar of I fontreal Halifax St John Dates, Bridgetown,
University Colle ze of the Wes s.s. “SUNVALLBY” 7 Nov. 12 Nev, sae 28 Foci
fndles, Jamaica, their applica- 5.8 UNPRINCE 21 Nov,’ 26 Nov _- 12 December
tions for Entrance to the Univer- sa sh VESSEL: Se = ry es 4 ae
» College, The closing date for cahicitee--~ ane oe PS ery









plications for Entrance is 31st
January. 1952

of Application for

to the University Col-

! rticulars of the neces-

lific ns for Matricula-

line of the courses

be obtained from

} * of the University

‘ J sa, or from the local

resentative Mr. H. A.

ghan c/o Y.M.C.A., Pinfold

S!-ex Bridgetov or from the
»» of Education.





of Education,
November, 1954.

27.11.51-——-3n



VP RICH RUBY
VP BRITISH SHERRY

a



You can
enjoy the luxury of 14 glasses
of really fine wine from every
bottle of VP.

ASK AT YOUR

Here’s good news.

USUAL STORE



VP SWEET WHITE
VP GINGER WINE





UNITED KINGDOM SERVICE
From Newport, Liverpool and Glasgow





Expected
Arrival
Newport Liverpool Glasgow Dates
BARBADOS
8.6. “SUNWHYT" 9 Nov 1§ Nov 23 Nov 9 December





UNITED KINGDOM AND CONTINENTAL SERVICE





Expected Arrival

Rotterdam London Dates, Barbados
f.s. “STARCR ST 24 Nov 28 r
STARR S aM Bev. 8 Nov 14 Deeemb +
LARRINAGA 12 D 16 Dec 6 January

20 Dec

ATIONS LIMITED — Phone 4763



Agents: PLA



























TUESDAY, NOVEMBER 27. 1951
Se ee cnet
eR _ ee NS
i . : ' Q
HEADACHE? || onmenTAL
“pean doe ode SOUVENIRS | POLITICAL |
with Double-Acting ALKA-SELTZER! |$ CURIOS ANTIQUES, 1)
You are doubly sure of relief when > JEWELS, CARVINGS |
ou take Alka-Seltzer for your EMBROIDERIES, Etc. |
adache, news Alka - Seltzer $333 i
tai ict ing, {1
sgumesescwcccen: | vmanrs — |i MEETING
excess gastric acidity, so often as- | Pr. Wm. Hry. St. :: Dial 3466 |
sociated with headaches. Have a | j
supply handy always. ————
(GOCP0SO9S 9599599 59SS905F TO-NIGHT R
a . .
Alka-Seltzer } FREE HOOK 2: :
$ Which Makes x At 8 OChk
eae = rae ad z
% GOD'S WAY OF 3 at the
. o
The Secretary and Members of S SALVATION % YANKEE STADIUM,
CLUB OG & x te ae
ta easure o ’ r on S
alee at ee PLAIN ; % ' , .



2 “ in s rt of the
1 1 Please write for one to in suppor
GRAND BARN DANCE Samuel Roberts, Gospel x candidature of
Which will be held at 7 by naan % » a ‘
: ' . INCEN IF FIT
G.1.U. CLUB gor N. Ireland.” S - . on
Ou BEDAY Might NOV.” 20, 1901 OLE to a seat in the House
Admission: Gents 2/6 Ladies 2/- SPSS SSS SSOP P 9 PFSSSSIOâ„¢, of Assembly for the
in T0-DAY'S NEWS FLASH > Parish of St. Michael
v

Speakers :
H. A. Dowding,
E. D. Mottley,

PATIENCE PLAYING CARDS

CANASTA complete with Cards
and Instructions

FURNISH

GIFT PLAYING CARDS with

Barbados Emblem on each :
FOR ENJOYMENT Card. New Novels by the hun- Vincent Griffith
dreds Window Glass and Cabinet
Makers Glass at—

Sydney Walcott
Miss L. Reid

All are invited !

THE MONEY-SAVING WAR

NEW and renewed MAHOGANY
and other Wardrobes, Chest-of-
drawers and Linen Presses—
Vanities, Dressing Tables, Stools,
Screen Frames—-Single and Double

JOHNSON’S STATIONERY
and HARDWARE









Bedsteads, Separate Side Rails, SSS SSS ES
Laths, Washstands.
wining, Kitehen and Fancy

IRON BEDSTEADS WITH SPRINGS

and SPRING FILLED MATTRESSES
recently received, do not wait until the last moment

BUY NOW
CENTRAL EMPORIUM

Corner Broad and Tudor Streets

Tables, Sideboards $17 up, China,
Kitehen and Bedroom Cabina\s
—Larders, Waggons, and many
other things.

L.S. WILSON

SPRY STREET. DIAL



4069









iS & : FOR SALE
b Samiy"ibeh gos Soa 7 |
i s@s HAGGATTS |
teas, | GROUP



STUART & SAMPSON
(1938) LTD.

Headquarters for Best Rum

Offers will be considered for the purchase of the
above group, consisting of Haggatts Factory and the
following estates :—



ie f
: % Arable Total
$. ¥ Acres Acres

We have just * Haggatts & Bruce Vale approx. 305 713

B : Greenland & Overhill approx. 324 644
Received Bawden & River approx. ....... 266 521
Friendship approx. ........... ; 115 211

e

Haggatts Factory has been extensively modernised
and is equipped to produce fancy molasses as well as
D.C. sugar. During the 1951 crop, the factory produced
4,352 tons of sugar. The bags required for the 1952 crop
have been secured.

Tins Plum Pudding
Assorted Biscuits
Cream Crackers

Pea Nuts

Pears, Peaches, Grapes
and Pineapples

”

Soups The mechanical equipment of the group includes }
» Sausages among other items the following International Har-
» Coffee vester tractors :—

Sheil Almonds (Retail)

SSSSSEESSSESESSEEEOO

SEECESOSSSSSS

Pkgs. Mixed Fruit

Raisins, Currants, Prunes & 1—TD14 Crawler Tractor with bulldozer.

Mixed Peel 1—WD9, 1—Farmall H.
Table Jellies, Jams, Table Also 1i—Caterpillar D2 tractor, 2—Subsoiler
Butter




ploughs,

1—dise plough, 1—brushbreaker plough.

8 Dodge Trucks, 1 Austin Truck, 11 cane carts for
Tractors.

Livestock includes 14 horses, 12 mules.



Luncheon Beef, Roast Beef
Tea (pkg. Lipton’s, Horni-
man’s, Typhoo, Red Rose)
Cocoa (Fry’s, Peter’s, Round
Trees) of sale

Further details and conditions

obtained from,

may be

INCE & Co. Ltd.

8 & 9, ROEBUCK ST.

S. P. MUSSON, SON & CO., LTD.,
Broad Street, Bridgetown.

|





SO
EF

BUY A BETTER

SHIRT
FOR LESS MONEY
©

RELIANCE
SHIRT DEPOT

Palmetto Street Phone 4764
Obtainable at all Leading Stores













OF 6668S *

The friend of both the small and Large Plantation Owners alike.
Whis Tractor, the price of which is only a fraction of that of
a full “Track” Tractor—

$3.165.00



COURTESY
GARAGE

ROBERT THOM
LIMITED

3 Agents
9556606666665695695555505 966 96S 55599 SS9SSSSIOSHOS SOHSSISSSSSGOHGOSE*

does an amazing job of Ploughing and is at home either in the
field or on the road.

These world-wide famous Tractors are elso becoming increas-
ingly popular here and are doing fine work.



We invite you to inspect tnis truly wor ful machine
let us arrange for a demonstration for you—ploughing, h

mg, Manure spreading, grass-cutting or what you will.



1%

l-

!
|
|

<
ot“

6606



SEVEN

————.



TUESDAY, NOVEMBER 27, 1951 BARBADOS ADVOCATE PAGI



MiICKcY MOUSE BY WALT DISNEY






To good looks tell you they're just right.
You know, too, when you look at the price
tag, that you can’t get finer value, Illustrated



|
THE GAMBOLS is a Two-tone Brogue. ‘Tied to every pair is
j™| the John White Guarantee Shield—the sign
THAT'S JUST THE FROCK , ’ — gum : . ne
WWE BEEN LOOKING FOR} ff a PARDON Me. BuT mm | YES CERTAINLY - ’ |
1 SAW IT FIRST iT SPECIALLY LL FETCH ONE - ; rm }
= ~ ‘ FROM THE STOCK e
b ar re ROOM,
\

which means ‘ just right’! Look for it in
leacling stores in Barbados.



means made
just right









~ me
ANO THIS MAN GAID THAT 11 JUST Fe
CAN'T LOSE THE Soc -SO BE



T SOUNDS LIK
THE DOOR
















| Iv PAYS YOU TO DEAL HER

SPECIAL offers to all Cash and Credit Customers for Monday to Wednesday only









SPECIAL OFFERS are now available at our Branches Tweedside,
Speightstown and Swan Street
Usually Now Usually Now

Jars Chivers Mince Meat .73 .64 Tins Xmas Puddings 1.91 170
Bots. Heinz Salad Cream 52 -#é Tins Simolina 69 .64

Bots. Sandemans Apitiv Sherry 3.50 3.00 Bots. Cocktail ane 140 128
4 oz.

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—
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PAGE EIGHT
INTERMEDIATE CRICKET :



Windward Defeat Spartan
To Win Intermediate Cup

WINDWARD defeated Spartan in their Intermediate

cricket match on Saturday by 96 runs.
them Cup winners in this division

This victory makes
Cable & Wireless, and

the Regiment also scored outright victories over Mental

Hospital and Wanderers.

Empire and Pickwick played to

a draw, Pickwick getting three points for a first innings lead.

Windward in their first innings
scored 268 runs for eight wickets
declared and rtan replied with
124 runs. Wh play started on
Saturday Windward declared in
their second innings with the score
at 13 for no wicket.

Spartan needing 158 runs
seore a win, were all out in their
secofid innings for 61 funs. W.
Jemmott top-scored for Spartan
with 18 while A. Matthews hit 12.
H. Farmer ami B. Thornton took
threé wickets @ath.

At Bay, Wariderers who had
scored 132 runs in their first inn-
ings were dismissed by the Regi-
ment in their second turn at the
wickét fot 106 runs. M. Clarke
and K. Corbin 18 runs each to
top score for Wanderers while A.
Phillips who bowled at a steady
length captured five of the Wan-
derets wickets for 30.

In, their first innings the Regi-
ment scored 169 runs, Needing 69
runs for victory the Regiment
scored 79 runs for the loss of one
wickét.

C. & W. Declare

Cable & Wireless who
the Whole of the first day in their
match against t Mental Hos-
pital and scored 1 ‘ runs declared
in thefr second innings on Satur-
day when the score had reached
55 ruris for the loss of six wickets,
In their first innings Mental Hos-
pital scored 72 runs and again in
the setond innings they were un-
able tO reach the 100 mark. They
scored 91 runs, A good bowling
spell by C, Lawless Was perhaps
responsible for the a He
took four wickéts for 30 after
bowling nine overs.

Thug Cable & Wireless defeated
Mental Hospital by 73 runs.

batted



The Empire-Pickwick match
ended ina draw but Pickwick
who dismissed Empire for 116
runs carried their score to 168
runs t6 gain a first innings lead
ever their opponents, Rain held
up play for a considérable time
and en stumps were drawn
Empiré had scoted 13 runs for iio
wicket in their second innings.

= board: —

iE vs. PICKWICK
‘wun Fist at aarrats
wf I
E, Evel¥n c Grit al 52
E. Lewis b Siaele,” 19
G. Moate b Prescod 42
E. Evel¥n c Austin b Griffith 10
M. Fostér c Amory b Skeete . 7
R. Clare b Prescod 10
a a. | © Barrow b Amory 8
» Peterkin ni
W. Edwards eetite & Brescod 5
O, Lashley |.b.w. b prponex ‘ 1
W. Yeafwood absent . 0
Extras ‘ 2
Total “168
BOWLING ANALYSIS wads
oO. R. w.
Cc. Prestod 20 w 4
C. Spooner 13.1 4 3 (1
1, Harris 9 1 25
E. Amory oe i
N. Sk ° 3 27
K. Griffith 8
EMPIRE— “and Trias
C. Bouthe not out 5
E. Barrow not out 4
Extras ... Ron 4
Total (for no wkts,) ‘ 34 13

CABLE & WIRELESS vs, MENTAL |
PITAL

HOS
CABLE f WIRELESS — ist Junings 184 *
MENTAL HOSPITAL—ist Loy Ings
CABLE & WIRELESS— 2nr Innings
(for 6 wkts, decid.)
MENTAL HOSPITAL—2nd Innings
Best b R. Lawless
Boyce ¢ C, Lawless b R. Lawless 4
Burrowes c McKenzie b R.
Lawless 0
M. Crichiow 1.b.w. b R. Lawless 1
G, Springer c Gilkes b Branker
Cc. Williams Lb.w. b C. Lawless 22
R. Chase c Gilbert b C. Lawless
E. Quintyne c C. Lawless b Branker 1
V. Carter stpd. (wkpr. Matthews) b
Cc. Lawless
R. Rock c Seale b C, Lawless
C, Knight not out

Cc,
v.
N.

7
ti]

Xtras : 1
Total ooo epee eb
BOWLING ADEE SS
oO, M. Ww
Oy Se lo BP *, a
R. MeKendie ........ 3 0 16 0
BE, Mranker .......... 11 2 38 2
C. Lawless fam, Ss Le Ol
“ WINDWARD vs. SPARTAN
WINDWARD— ist Innings
lor 8 wkts. decid.) 268
SPARTAN—Ist Innings im
WINDWARD—2nd Innings
Cc. Evelyn not out ; 2
H. Thornton not out : ‘ 9
tras ice

Total {for no wkts.) .

SPARTAN—2nd Innings

N. Wood ¢ (wkpr. T. Farmer) b

area Farmer .. 6
Wood stpd (wkor. T. Farmer) b



YESTERDAY’S
WEATHER REPORT

FROM CODRINGTON.
Rainfall; Nil
Total Rainfall for Month to
Date; 6.45 ins.
Highest Temperature: 8.35°F
Lowest Temperature: 72.5 °F

Wind Velocity: 8 miles per
hour
Barometer: (9 a.m.) 29.907

(3 p.m.) 29.827












Theyll Do It _Bvery

“GET MEA
BID-AND-ASK ON
ULTRA ASHCAN, PFD,
GRUNTO

may

g

N
to

55 Sponsible

mM. Farmer
H. Cadogan run out
A. Matthews Lb.w, b R. Farmér
A. Gittens Lb.w. b H. Farmer
B. Morris b R. Farmer.
W. Jefmmoti » Thornton
S. Marris Lb.w. b Atkinson
Â¥ MeComie not out
Skinner b Thornton
Medford b Thornton
Extras 2

;
2
4
8
1
4
0
0

Total
REGIMENT vs. WANDERERS
at Wanderers
WANDERERS—ist Innings
REGIMENT—Ist Innin,
WANDERERS—2nd Innings
A. Seale run out :
D. Alleyne b Clarke
A. Lewis c Crawfor
G. Skeete 1b.w. b
R. Packer run out
M. Proverbs ¢ & b Watts
M. Mayers b Clarke ,
M. Clarke c ¢wkpr.) b Phillips i
K. Corbin b Phillips
. Patterson not out 1
H, Remsay b Phillips
Extras



b Phillips
illips

Total . 106

BOWLING ANALYSIS
Pe ee

A. Phillips
K. Clarke
L. Bynoe 1 0
Cc, Watts 8 1
A. Brathwaite ‘ 0
«. Clarke 1
REGIMENT~ 2nd Innings
A. Ishmael not out 34
A. Btathwaite b Corbin 3
L By Dog not out 40
fa 2

Total
BOWLING ANALYSIS
Oo. M. R

(for 1 wkt.)

23 1
24 0
ot 0
12 0

K. Corbin 7 1
R. Packer 6 0
H, Ramsay 3 0
M. Proverbs 2 6

2ND DIV. CRICKET :

H.C. 73 For 7
Vs. Empire

The first day’s play in_ the
Eleventh Round of Second Divi-
sidn ¢ricket matches ended on
Saturday. At most grounds rain
stopped play, In the Empire—
College match, College batting
first seored 73 rung for seven
wickets when play ended. Rain
held up play for a considerable
time. C. Beckles took three

« Wickets for 15 runs for Empire

and L, Clarke two wickets for
three runs.

At Leeward, Carlton ir their
match against Leeward scored
108 runs in their first turn at the
wicket. C. White topscored in the
Carltch innings with 38 runs,
Best bowling performance was
given by S. Marshall who cap-
tured five of the Carlton wickets
for 9 runs, G. Gilkes took three
wigsels, for 46 runs.

the énd of play Leewatd
had replied with 42 runs for four
wickets. L, Jordan is not out 26.

Rain held We lay at Beckles
Rodd where Wanderers and Pick-
wick are playing. Wanderers who
batted first had scoted 48 runs
in theiy first innings when stumps
were drawn. Bowling for Pick-
wick D. King bagged four wickets
for 11 runs

Foundation scored 151 runs in
their first innings at Foundation
against Y.M.P.C. Mr, Jones 53
and C, Burke 45 not out were re-
for this score. The
wicket was taking turn. C. O'Neil
and C. Greenidge each took three
wickets,

Rain prevented Y.M.P.C. from

ing their first innings.
EMPIRE vs, COLLEGE AT COLLEGE

COLLEGE Ist Innings—73 for 7 wkts

C. Beckles 3 for 15, L. Clarke 2 for 3)
CARLTON vs. LEEWARD AT LEEWARD

CARLTON Ist Innings—108 (C. White
38, S. Marshall 5 for 9, G. Gilkes 3 for 46).

LEEWARD Ist Innings—42 for 4 wkts.

(L. Jordon not out 26).
WANDERERS vs, PICKWICK AT

Hn it ROAD
= abet for

Ist .Innings — 48 (D
H. Simthons 3 for 12).
FOUNDATON va.

Y.M.P.C. AT
FOUNDATION
FOUNDATION ist Inhings—151 for 7
wickets.
(Mr.
Cc. O'Neil 3 for 27,

WHAT’S ON TODAY

Court of Grand Sessions—
Thornhill murder _ trial
10.00 a.m,

Drama Group, Extra-Mural
Youth — British Council,

Jones 53, C, Burke not out 45,
C, Gréen'dge 3 for 51)

fica

Political Meeting — Labour,
Arch Hall, St. Thomas—
Dr. Cummins and Mr.

Politieal Meeting — Labour.
Chalky Mt., St. Andrew—
Mrs. E. E. Bourne.

Sunrise: 5.58 a.m. a.m.

Suhset: 5.36 p.m.

Moon; Last Quarter, No-
vember 21

Lighting: 6.00 p.m.

Full Tide: 2.09 a.m, 2.06
p.m.

Low Tide: 8.13 p.m., 9.00
p.m.

W- turned at



BUS DRIVER

@ from page 5

with two stones in his hards, but
he did not throw them.
“Thornhill then got into the bus
~I was in the bus—and drove
off in the direction of Belmont

Police Station. He tutned the bus
inte Martindale’s Road and was
about to go by the Union again.

A. policeman came out and en-
quired wnether there was any-
thing wrong and Thornhill re-
plicd that the bus was returning
from an excursion.

“When drawing near to the
Park gate by the Constitution
swamp,” he said, “Tnornhill

bus veered
As a result

changed gear and the
over to the right side.

of the change the engine was
raised upwards.
“A nuffiber of people were

standing by the right side of the
lorry and the bus was going in
their direction. The people scat-
tered in different directions. Soon
after I heard a crash. The bus
proceeded a short distance and
stopped.”

When he saw thé bus going to-
wards the people he threw his
hand in the air and exclaimed,
“What is this!” and took his eyes
from the scene.

Lady Fails Out

A young lady named Miss Wig-
gins had been in the bus and after
the crash she fell out. He assisted
her to her feet.

When he got out of the bus he
saw Leroy Worrell lying beside
the lorry apparently dead.

After the bis was patked
Thernhill got out and stood lean-
ing On the bus’ fender.

Hé said that after the bus had
Belmont and was re-
turning to the Girls’ Industrial
Union a car was parked on the
right side of the road facing the
Police Station.



STANDS TRIAL
ON MURDER CHARGE |

BARBADOS

ADVOCATE

The natural way to

KEEP SLIM
ano FIT

If you want to be attractively
slim, with bright eyes, radiant

The bus seemed to be going in a|
normal way. He did not, however, |
see much of it until it was near |

him. complexion, and real fitness,
Clifford Gittens, a Civil ser-| — eae Ant you keep
vant, another who went on the | y system cleansed of

impurities, Clinical tésts by
doctors confirm that Bile Bea:
do this, gently and effectively.
Bile Beans are keeping milliohs
healthy and youthful in looks

excursion in M—1422 next gave |
evidence, He corroborated Brew-
ster’s evidence ag to the attempts
to overtake each other that had

been going on between Wofrell and figure. Start taking them
and Thornhill and of the oom, tonight.

Winifred Wiggins, a schoo : i
teacher, who also went to ,the Natute’s Gentle Aid
excursion in the bus —142°

BILE BEANS |

was the twelfth witness togive
evidence. She, too corroborated
George Brewster’s evidence and
added that e@ saw when the
lorry hit orrell. She also
‘toppled out of the bus. but a
possible heavy fall was broken
by her brother's alertness in
assisting her.

Doris Bowen, Victor Bowen's
wife was the next witness called.
She gave corroborative evidence.

Three other witnesses were
offered for cross-examination.,

The first was Joseph Brewster.
He said in answer to Mr, Williams
that he had told Worrell to
behave himself after the bus and
thi lorry had rubbed each otner.
He told him sg because he had |
tried to pass out the bus on the
wrong sidé,

He said the row lasted for about |
15 minutes.

Percy Elcock told Mr. Williams |
that he had seen Thornhill lean- ;
ing on the Park rails after the|
row. Thornhill said if had not
been held he would not have been |
struck in his eye.

Worrell Be up to him and |
Thornhill s “you are out for
trouble and if you do not leave
me I will do something to you
this same night.”

Ruth King and Charles Wiggins
were called for possible cross-





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While at River Bay he saw Wor- cxamination, but Mr. Williams
rell and he seemed in a faitly good ‘said he did tot wish to cross-
mood. He had also seen Thornhill [examine them.
who seemed in the same pleasant















mood. He had not seen either ay po ag eg
Worrell or Thornhill drinking. WANTED TO BUY

On the two occasions that Worrell STAMPS STAMPS
tried to overtake the bus it was All Kinds of STAMPS

on the wrong side.

When the dispute between Wor-
rell and Thornhill occurred be-
fore Worréll was killé@, Thornhill
was standing beside the bus.

At the time of the dispute
Thornhill seemed angry.

To the Court, he said that when |
the bus pulled off and went to Bel-
mont Road and returned, he did
not know whether the driver in-,

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tended taking him near his home }
in Government Hill or whether pe |
was going to take him to the bus

stand.
Car Parked

Victor Bowen, a schoolteacher,
‘was the next witness. He and his
wife were among those who went
to the excursion. He said that
when he got to Constitution Road
he parked the car in which he had
been dfivitig on Constitution Road
20 to 30 yards in front of the bus
M—1422,

Worrell’s lorry was parked be-
hind the bus. When hé reached
Constitution Road Worrell and
Thornhill had a heated argument.

“Thornhill took a knife out of
his pocket and opened it,” he said.
“Worrell cuffed him in his eye
when he did this. I was at the
side of the road then.”

Thornhill got into the bus
shortly afterwards and drove it
towards Belmont. He went over
to the side of the road where
Worrell Was atid began to talk to
him. His wife called to him and
while going to her, he heard the
noise of a bus which he saw was
M—1422 returning. The bus
swerved in the direction of the
lorry. He made a jump toward
the right front fender of the lorry
an@ the bus went on, struck the
jorry and Worrell who was stand-
ing by the door, and went on.

When the bus got to the end of
the lorry’s platform, it went back
to its left side, continued for about
50 yards and then stopped.

The road was dry, he said. He
went and lifted Worrell’s hand
after the collision and it was 26
less.

To Mr .Williams he said “alee a
had spoken to Worrell at irae
times during the day, but had
never smelled drink on him

Drivers Admonished

When he came to the scene
when the dispute was going on he
told Worrell he should behave
better because Worrell was the
owner of a lorry and Thornhill
was only an employee. Worreil
answered that his lorry was his
basket and hoe and it would not

sound well for it to be going
around that he (Worrell. had
killed people while they were

being driven on his lorry.
Opened Knife

He also told Thornhill that he
was ashamed of him as he had
taken out a knife when there was
a fracas with a smaller man.

When the bus was returning
from Belmont Road, it was going
at about 20 to 25 miles an hour.



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Full Text


fhavb

ESTABLISHED 1895

Cuba Fears Loss Of,
U.K. Sugar Market.

(From Our Own Correspondent)




TUESDAY, NOVEMBER 27,
GOMEZ CAUGHT

1951









Is Cuba going to lose her
question was being asked in

LONDON, Nov. 26,
sugar market in Britain? This
London to-night following the

receipt of a report from Havana which said “the Cuban
sugar industry is threatened with the loss of the British
market because of steps being taken by the Conservative
Government under Mr. Churchill.”





Food Ministry

This statement was made by
Mr, Diez Arguelles at Friday's
meeting of the Association of
Sugar Growers of Cuba. He asked



_READY BY 1954 —

Germany

By J. OLSEN

2

ROME, Nov. 26,

A joint meeting of the 12 Chiefs-of-Staff and 12 Defence
Ministers of the Nerth Atlantic Treaty Organization took

the following action to-day.

They accepted the “1954 Forces’ Plan with the recom-
mendation that it be reviewed after the Mutual Security
Administrator, W. Averell Harriman had given his final
economic report next month on national capabilities.

The 1954 target reportedly calls for 60 or 70 Divisiens
by then, in contrast to the 30 to 40 aimed for next year.



; WASHINGTON, Novy. 25. a ee a
ree To Sugar the matte GUGR TERS Cota tree Big Three Foreign Ministers ny more work on the Migdié ies
e tiotial Bei . Wi Pe \ Pag shaped to clear road blocks to a ete nce Commar d. There are 8

udy so as to political settlement with Ger ‘ : wy ; : S
FF z pees v po . r 10 different proposals before
Suggestions ak ny a ble loss of the many including provisions for the \.T.O., all of whieh will bé put



security of the Federal republic it

E Pact With



(From Our Own Correspondent) This report from Havana has their Paris mee.ings with Chan » eae eae ie cnatabane se
LONDON, Nov. 26. {not been in any way substantiated cellor Konrad Adenauer pprove The cided to report “no pro-
i The Food Ministry has agreea|i2 London, While it is known The West German leader he! sress at all” on the dispute bee
* in principle to Commonwealth |th#t the Conservative Government in Paris a series of meetings wilt ween the U.S. and Btitath over a
E recommendations on the method is anxious to build up trade with Anthony Eden, Robert Schumar ‘ tandard rifle. The Defence Min-
of price fixing and the conditions |‘¢ Empire, the fact remains that and Dean Acheson. a rea ty ters’ report to the Council will
of the long-term sugar agreement, | Britain’s is dependent upon im- Qualified U.S. officials said the ag ay that there is “no agreement”
This, it is understood, resulted porting considerable quantities of principal objective of the meet n the dispute between the U.S
from to-day’s meeting between |SUgar from outside the sterling ings Was to seek a solution of dis LONDON, Wov. 26 ) calibre and Britain's .280 cali-

the Commonwealth delegates and |®™e4. Last year imports from agreements which cropped = u The H an ad Pearunons appriy » yifl
the Food Ministry which was pre- Cuba totalled over 800,000 tons. during six weeks of negotiatio J 4 ine Japanese Peace Treaty oO They still disagreed over the
sided over by R. A. E. Feaveayear Cuban Report between Adenauer and Allie onday might after overwhelm | Atlantic naval commander —
of the Mifiistry. A Ministry of Food épokesman High Commissioners. tat ae be i: * Say Fab vether it should be an American
The decision was taken for the}said nothing was known of the] THE UMPIRE raised his finger in agreement when New South Wales bowler Keith Miller appealed for One of the mote serious dif! wie Pernice) 0g MB yaad Briton, But Defence Ministers
Food Ministty officials to divide|Cuban report, but he added “we] % catch by ‘Keeper Geoff Trueman from West Indies batsman Gomez during the West Indies v. New South jcullies has been the question « iotion to a it - te aro \ n (a mires, eae “ania ces a ea

into two toffimittees to discuss|in Britain do not Wales match at Sydney cricket ground on 17.11.51, Gomez made only three runs. security for Discus uP _ competition wy §«vapanes

with Commonwealth delegates the
details of price fixing in one, and

usually break
our contracts.”

Trade sources here cannot see





Photo by Consolidated Press.



Germany.
sions on that point have gone o

against the background of a Bi

>
|

idustry

The vote was 282 to 33 to ce

ouncil this afternoon that a Brit-

h naval officer should command

the esail- wan ae ame (how Geb Cok ; : 3 Three statement in Septemb eat the rebel motion after whic! a and Southern
ne long-|how the Cuban report can refer - eo 2 1950 that any attack on German, [ibe Commons read the Jap.nes TAS ee ed }
term agreement in the other. to the possibility of ending the MORE POLI TOAL would, be tohtaderea an attack o | Peace Treaty Bill a second time or
Mr. Cuke of Barbados is repre-|Anglo-Cuban “Black Pact”. This ‘ the Allies ind approved it by voize vot
senting the West Indies on both|was signed in August this year Adenauér if understood to hav saving the way for ratification o
these committees. and provided for Britain to im- THAN EQGONOMIC 7 7 wave





THEFT IN

; f sirance s the Treaty by the King
It is believed that the question|port one and a half million tons \ | pressed. for the assurance tha y , 9
of Canada and West Indies sugar|of Cuban sugar Up to the end of ‘ t ‘y ay piitde aap © ae oie tl ve See ke grag
is also under review. 1953. Nevertheless the Cuban re- IMPORTANCE Oct ation d prenatere: ieee ipa th ae oo ‘i li ; h 0 A NN] IGUA
Bi lenepenalicicine tions port is being stidted by Com- c pi n en Ss. more Man & ormality withot L f
monwealth intérests with atten- T aT , rn d &, The German Chancellor report [vote anu the second reading w*
17 Killed, 70 Huet [fers airs a See] Te Truman's Order f Smee oon Sera ae mee) TREASURY
7 when the Commonwealth sugar By ANTHONY ULSTEIN hy TOKYO, Nov. 26 | ecaeaent GEE ti to be the ke: pe mitecs ta’ ee ap a te : w
‘ . =) Lo itput wil rei V . me ‘ ’ sah Bac, & 8 vO P re ne Treaty of eace with Japa
In Train Collision ae vee ar“ TS, stg tetas “eaiaaes ean Allied infantry and argillery smashed a ferocious Chin- Coc Ueness in hp political contrac’ Land Aotekol thereto ” chedth ‘Gab “dade Choabeebibabss
2 € ‘ s I ‘ a 1 * * 7 a ae “ey > ‘ ” now eing worke ut, Ow
WOODSTOCK, Alabama wealth sugar delegation in Lon-|trade céncessions to Russia and} °S® C open unis attack in the “Little Gibraltar” sector of the Mitohl -dchtace Saahe bettrebi Fourteen Labour meibers rey ST. JOHNS.
' Nov. 26 don tonight said he could not see] Poland, and barifting the importa- front Monday night. Germany and the Allied power | ‘esenting — constituencies wher A theft was discovered in
A Southern railway omerat Rritein . tecminating the Present tion of ven 4 — our, has | Reds attacked about two hours before the Allied and | are understood not to be unde: {the textile and pottery industry he av ee een ae Bd
said that 17 persons were killed rae yt eer a. and a loraketailie leita milena yee Communist staff officers reached agreement at Panmunjom consideration. te aoe tabled a motion la sat 0 me ys ee e
in Sunday’s collision of twolpr p; aa SR ee Se ame on a truce line. —UP. hursday, for the rejection of the 7° ate i es
lusivy siteamliners, ‘the “OH of kité flying. ernment spokesman said _ that : : Treaty of Peace. t known and may never be
siorial Marge ennouhdlet edt 16 U.S. tradé with those two Iron Unde r a merciless rain of fire from infantry weapons 2 A special meeting of the Pow 4 Known because the clerk who has
bodies were nines svat thi S Curtain countries already was| and artillery Reds gave up just before night and withdrew Nutting Evades iliamentary Labour Party thi: }°en drawing money from, various
wreckage and that the 17th victim RU, SIA Is down to a. trickle. But added! to their lines. people's

was the engineer on one of

trains involved; his body was sti RESPONSIBLE





that the order will point up to
the entire world the split between
the U.S, and the Reds.

the Red positions Tuesday.



Allied artil’ery was stiil hurling shells into







formosa Issue |

morning ended in vain after J
minutés of ttying te fix 4 commot
Labout Stand on the bill





ecounts had a habit of
lrawing putting back

some

some and

I During theif 70-hour attempt to Attlee’s Labou Governmen It had been done over a period
buried under the debris. : ; se He said that it ends the anamoly {wrest “Little Gibtaltar’ from the LONDON, Nov. 26. |iiad accepted the wifi for Brit f years and was first diseovered
Upwards of 70 other persons FOR WORLD TENSION } of the Soviet Union and its satel-| Mayor Will U.N. the Communists threw 8,000], Under-Secretary for Foreign Af-| 4nd the tresty was signed b,}When a man who js in Curacao
were injured. The rescue crew : lites enjoying a “most favoured | d Ly t rounds of artillery into Allied } fairs, Anthony Nutting sidestepped | fgyiiee Poreign Minister Herber | wrote and questioned his account.
still had not searched two wrecked PARIS, Nov. 26, nation” treatment in trade with | * positions with an accutdcy not} the question Monday about trit- Morrison aoa ; fe was informed that he had
cars, Which were lying in a pre-| Doctor Philip Jessup of thé/the U.S, while at the same time Be Weighed shown in Korea before, This led jain's policy on the tu.ure of Pot-}" phe stite department Monday | iawn $600. from hig account this
carious position above a small|United States said Russia—not|they were trying to undermine | Allied officers. to. su t the aehe mosa. formally confirmed that, Japan ear, He said he had not done
gorge at the scene of the wreck.] America—is responsible for the} this nation ana its friends. | NEW YORK, Nov. 26: were being laid by Russians. .The} ‘The question was put by Left-|] win deposit the ratification oi]: and it was discovered that the
These cars, however, were not}current world tension. He said the The order which becomes effec- Minneapolis people will find British in pi far Peies the wing Labourite Tom Driberg anc} ihe péace treaty at a ceremony in} ™an's signature had been torged.
smashed and the likelihood of|U.S, will strive consistently for a|tive from Jan, 5th will leave out Friday just how much Reds e an officers, since Nutting gave a writteri answer. Washinton Wednesday after So far, at least a dozen other
finding additional victims there|disarmament agteement to relieve|only one trade agreement — a weight theit Mayor EG one © FON sh! 5 | He recalled that both the Cairo ané | noon. ‘ accounts have. been. tampered
was considered small. —U.P. |that vension treaty on customs matters with Mayor Eric Thoyer will te )) "Te Ov i rs otsdam Conferences agreed tha —U.P. with, A clerk Who Was at one
- Jessup replied in thé main Pol-| Hufgary — in existence, The| Sats in a pair of eighteenth ‘ions ween ey ‘ormosa shold be returned to time in the Treasury is under
COMPROMISE ON itical Committee to a statement|Hungarian Treaty cannot be|]| century jockey scales and it eather China after the war and Kore arrest. E
CLERKS ‘STRIKE Saturday by Soviet Foreign Min-| terminated until July 5, 1952. — oe hove Se San * ba Bitter pe across Koréa—tet- should be free and independent, Plane Crashes
REACHED ister Andrei Vyshinsky who called Exchange of Goods — ike tettuten ts > —— « - || perature repees were tek “The Fotmosan problem has now US. WILL START WITH
(From Our Own Corresnondent) Jemup, 9, “seeond rate” diplomat.| Hut economists believe in the} | wisn voters in high Harned OT ne Mipnt | becbme an international one ar ENGLAND, Nov, 26. AS. py PE abit

GRENADA, Nov. 26 |



He said in spite of Vyshinsky’s

rebuff of the





importance of the order from the

Wycombe, England, appraised






thampered both ground a air

concerns a number of nations othe



A bomber carrying a Royal Air



LOW SUGAR QUOTA



ae Ss mes io wieunot They nointe | operations and ground action today Bovwahit oc B otdd abeie
Negotiations between employ-jinent proposal oe oe or bak that the anckoeue tt Seat the Administration of their | ot limited 1. nea patrol con- pe? those which subseribed to thc ee ee ee a NEW YORK, Nov. 26.
ers and clerks delegations today no state arith re os yes onye between the U.S. and all Iton | Mayors since Queen Eliza- \tacts aceording to the latest re-|Faito and Potsdam declarations. infuritig 13 beihenteri eg lwo ane In connection with the opening
resulted in a wide measure of] occ Daa toy . Rey orcer 1 Curtain nations began drying up|| >¢th’s time. i ports. It is however only one of th a _ R his week of the 1952 sugar quota
agreement. and coverage of oe epee Pre an agree- in 1948 when U.S. exports were|| , “They were weighed on tak- The latest Chinese atterfipt to| factors contributing to the presen’ i ot fnotored plane stalled | yearings, the Washington Journ-
ground helpful in finalising dis- ec te placed under federal control. ing and leaving office and if gain territory on the ground be- | tension in the Far East and, in vies ail nad ne ae coe aa ote 4. | tt of Commerce predicted that the
cussion on points when they During the firs’ half of this year, they iost weight then they \ fore the truce line Is frozen for 30| of the Government the first anc |'@ pr glen S near a field, block- S. “will start with a low quota
meet again Thursday afternoo> Insurance Strike the U.S. exported only $43,000!| Were believed to have put 1! Gav. at Panmunjomy, caftie within| mot urgent step towards the les-|'"8 ‘TH! service » aid the market and will add
or Friday morning. aes worth of goods to Russia and forth gréat effort” explained ‘sight of the Panrtitnijom seatth-|sening of this tension is the Resciie workers said the plane] © its size if the condition and
eke “ate Bee me a CHICAGO, Nov. 26. |$821,000 worth to Poland, accord- Miss Field of the Sritish light givitig rige to the term “Atms}achievement of a settlement in|hat all its motors ripped in the] vices justify upward revision
The Clerks argued for a pay- The Nz ay oad ae 7 a yr Travel Association. isticé heights” Korea rdsh and the left wing was] ater in the year”.—U.P.
ment of a cost of living increase 1e National Executive Board of }ing to the Commerce Department, “But if they gained weight ee a 4 low cloud ov : ; nda aie hen alied A rien oaks
retroactive from October 1950] the A-F-L. Insurance agents Union Figures showed that in the same then they had loafed on the Although snow and lov clea When this has been achieved i irown across the railroac rie s.
and employers from Jtily in the|Monday authorized the _ strike perio imports from Russia} job”. so obscured a al resnny oe would be possible to proceed wit! —U-P. COPIES OF JAP
present year. Clerks “ finally|@8ainst the Prudential insurance iy = $5 ei tea and = from Eighteenth century scales te ahi BeOusiED far te the | He discussion of other problem TREATY REACH U.S.
agreed to Januafy and this goes ek. a a M By eartateae. ceeneety 48. Mae were sent by High Wycombe north along “M.L.G. Alley” © tne | including that of Formosa UP The “ADVOCATE” SAN FRANCISCO, Nov. 26.
before Thursday's meeting for spokesman sai e walkou- : serait? Aiedee se * 5 kaa and arrived in New York by fe er) ' 9 ian scares Je . 2
; Fatiation. ‘The bonus will affet| would involve 17000 "Prudential [UNMeH Minudom during the same) | lana an Monday. “mie Maye | 1AM YN sere .ig seis were| U.K. WANT TO DRIVE|| pays for NEWS — || cis oumese, Goynmen
all scales of pay. Employers] Agents in 35 States but added that _ ds tr “tha teeta? Hed or's wife and members of the damaked in a runhing fight be- P oa Tananéen eae tremke aid
, generally participate in locally|negotiations are continuing in|1™ports from the British totallec City Council in Minneapolis F-88 Sabre jets WEDGE BETWEEN ° ACS 8 OPA es Sen sone
' ; a N . $240,000,000 in value. An Official also will be weighed said Mis tween 17 US. e Dial 3113 ecurity treats arrived here
ees oe Cer eNO roe said, “with such a small turnover | held” aa kn S| | which tangled with the flight of 60 < Monday aboard a Pan-American
; schemes. The union is seeking a 20 per tin trate with the Soviet Bloc, the! | Pifeld’ Pecauge mo one is sup | | a Gs GOVT. AND ARMY D Night lipper from Tokyo.
SN See eee Seeced caudilistion of trade concessions | Sod ee arrose poe About the same time another SY OF Nigmss ‘

WRECKAGE OF

PLANE SIGHTED
CANAL ZONE, Nov, 26
An R.A.F. Reconnaissance
plane Monday reported sighting
a wreckage which may be the
missing Pakistan airforce trans-

port during search operations} SYDNEY, Australia, Nov. 26. Arab States The incustrial res a. The Ancona Observatory rv- og ee eee eee ee

between the Canal Zone and] The Sydney Ddily Telegraph ea is being ara . m Y ceemlt- ported that a mild earthquake wis United Natierie hélecetiohn chal.

Cyprus. reported Monday that 5,000 to t, fe . Adlittle, Inc., ee on pe » aitnilar recorded here yesterday at 1.45 lenged the statement by British
The Pakistan plane, believed|6,000 Australian troops in Korea, Hinder Mid-East \*"s, 5. “ho have done similar | The Observatory said that the nat p

to carry a crew of five and no

passengers disappeared Saturday

on a flight from Athens to Cyprus.
—U.P.

and commissions compared to the
company’s offer of 24% per cent.
—UP.



CHRESTMAS PARCELS
FOR AUSSIES IN KOREA

Japan and Malaya were due to

receive two parcels each from its

Christmas Korea Comfort Fund.
—UP.



Soviet Troops Mass
On Yugoslav Border

Yugoslavia accused the

satellites of massing troops and building fortifications on her |the defence and

borders as the possible prelu

PARIS, Nov. 26,
Soviet Union and her Balkan

de to an invasion, and warned





would have little economic effect.

,And i seemed plain that it would

not work economic hardship on
the average Russian or Pole,
—U-P.



Defence Plan

By JACK SCHEMEIL
PARIS, Nov. 25.
Turkish Foreign Minister Fouad

Koprtllu, advocates a polity of at a conference héld in the offices B, R, Sen, India’s Ambassador fortunately for hirn he will not find
“wait and see” in putting into of the U.S. Consul General here} jesignate to the U.S. ar rived 2 them, : ;

effect the projected Middle East between U.S, Officers and the Min- Washington and predicted closer The army of Egypt remained the
Defence Command and other | ister for Agriculture and, repre- | relations between the

events in that part of the world. |
Koprulu who is also head of the
Turkish delegation to the United
Natiofis Sixth General Assembly |
in Paris said in an interview that
security of the |
Middle East was a “vital question |



cal job.”—U.P.



INDUSTRIAL SURVEY
OF J’CA NEARS END

(From Our Own Correspondent)

KINGSTON, J’CA, Nov. 26,

work for the Puerto Rico Indus-
trial Development company. The
survey Was carried out by two
experts.

rhe question of the U.S. Gov-
ernment giving technical aid ana
assistance’ fot agticultural devel-
opment to Jamaica was discussed

setttatives of the Jarhaica Agricul+
tural Society.





flight of some 70 M.I.Gs was sight-
ed by F-86 escorting fighters near
the Yalu but Red jets refused com-
bat.—U.P.

MILD EARTHQUAKE

ANCONA, Italy, Nov. 26.



tremor was preceded by a faint

rumbling,
—U.P.

CLOSER RELATIONS

WASHINGTON, Nov. 26.



tries,

—U.P.



GOOD OLD CHARLIE

two coun-] faithful organ of its rulers, he said
Theré has been no intervention so

By K. C. THALER

PARIS, Novy. 26.

Egypt charged here Monday that |
Britain is trying to drive a wedge
between the Egyptian Government
and the army, but warned that
such attempts were doomed to fail
Mahmud Azim Bey, spokesman

Foreign Secretary Anthony Eden
at the N.A.T.O, Couneil’s Rome
meeting that the British had the
“sympathy of the Egyptian army”.

Azirh accused Eden of living in
the “old traditions of Great Bri-
tain” and said Britain was seeking
divisions within Egypt but “un-

far by the army in clashes in the
Canal zone
had not
serious

because Government
considered the situation

enough, he added.—U.P



T.U.C. Break

———
tian eetcenttomarea nena ATE,



The couriers will leave here
tonight for Washington.--U.P.

Gilbeys

INVALID. PORT

Famous

: : ’ P “i Si “that's he } i
that this Cominform era “threatens peace.” and OF | iternrscat’ (Proin Ofir Own Correspondent) full and there was no room Develo
The Yugoslav ae eae , nd : has felt it necessary to join} ST. JOHN’S for Charlie. ve ps a ove
Sane the United Nations Poli- U S, Nickel Plant To Frante, Britain and the United| ae vit ie - Off To Antigua (From Our Own Correspondent) /
I : Fe r = . States i the proposed Middle Yorlg hire, travelled to Lon- > Ss la. Yharlie .
tical Committee declared that Hh. the propos icc a Wh ee eo eto Three days ja.er Char JAMAICA, Nov, 26,

Hungary, Rumania and Bulgaria
have 810,000 men under arms,
more than three times what they
permitted under their peace treat-











Resume Operations

WASHINGTON, Nov, 26.

»|
East Command.” |
|

But Koprulu had no answer for
Arab oppositicn to the plan and |}

old and arrived in Barbados
on the 31st of May this year.
At the age of hihe montns

was again driven to Seawell
and finally flew off to Anti-
gua, On afrival at Coolidge
Field the porters refused to

An open break between leading
T.U.C. |
d to-day as Assistant Gen-
ral ecretary TT. Kelly broke

officers of Jamaica

levelo

the

the

; ai bas The Munitions Board announced] he cétild not say how it could be| he is exceedingly tall and A io btn anes Oe . a asd a
ies, and that 23 of their £9 gives that a Navy Airlift was established | implémented in the face of Arab eer . ig a Great Dane hanidlé him and his ma bis iway from the Organisation an
ions were deployed along the, oe ocen Norfolk and Cuba to opposition | lanky, He i = a acéompanied by the vet had began forming his owr independ- ”
f eT . | rut arbadians on edie ii 4 a i
bake me peony Oe noldters speed materials for the re-open-| Arab states have stated that he a i sedltainint ly to go to the baggage com World
cane aalee “instructed that their ; ing of an American owned nicke! one main objectiori . the plan teferria {6 fy tie Dofikey
“ ae . ~hai n-|is that it bypasses the existing 7 . a
Nether vee: ony Yigo= | On oF the Senate “Prepaibahens Arab segional Defence Pact and Dog. around the streets of St, if the T.U.C, Executive this after-
oe, U.P Sub-Committee made public the}the Arab League. But Koprulu | Quite recently Charlie John’s but no name has been noon €xpelled Kelly as Assistant ' , fs
Teeny letter in which the Board’s Chair-|said these Arab states were still made several attempts to suggestéd for him, He would Ww. MatPherson shut down region- | ‘ A
man, John Small, said that the] teo weak to insure the security of join his master in Antigua. iove to be friendly, but An- al offices in St. Catherine at Man- Hl Oa 2 he
airlift would cut shipping time}the Middié East region, ’ On the first occasion that he tiguanm shrink from him. chester where Kelly was in charge ‘ iA.
NO LOAN FOR for construction supplies for the} He added: “We still are not sure went to Seawell it was stated They hide ney wie or Selling Gene ral Bechetaty Florieel | INVALED at
;CUSS “ubs Z ive|of the re sition and there- that he had his papers to peep at him through jalousie e ; General secrete y a th Sa
ISRAEL DISCL SSED desi REP eee. oe *| ioe it Beran a wait ‘tit yar dave ‘Barbados, butt there a Glassbole whose leftwingers in the ails bey Pe Oa

PARIS, Nov. 26. 1
Israeli Foreign
Sharett denied Monday he

Small also said that navy heli-| attitude is made cleit before

Minister Moshe; copters had been made available | working out the details, of our
dis-|to conduct geological surveys of; Projéct regarding the aefence of

cussed the prospects of a loan to; mineral deposits in the area sur- the Middle Ba&t









was no import license to per-
mit him to land at Antigua,
and if he insisted in going
there he would face des.ruc-

Today Charlie’s master,
Mr. V. C. Horlock a Cable &
Wireless engineer sails on the
MV Caribbee to Montserrat,

|

\
partment and invi e him out,
Charlie has been strolling

nt Uffion in the bauxite industry,
extile industry and agricultural
workers. An emergency meeting

Union are believed to be in league
with Kelly.

P.N.P. Leader Norman Manley
held long conferences with Glass-

Israel with either U.S. Secretary| rounding the Nicaro Nickei Plant.! He said: a think E is_ best tion, but Charlie will enjoy a holi- a Ya eee” eee Ry tae

‘ “an Acheson or British| The plant, one of the largest injnow for all of us to be patient ‘harlie? ‘ oe anna al . a en ill, T.U.C. President anc

of State Dear et ey A eS Fd , he world es built 1942 4 in} and give plenty of time for Charlie import licens¢ day at St. Clair, the three Frank Hill, leading T.U.C. Execu-

roe petreey a vitt os . ie he Sa ile 's oe! bey. serious study and « 0 vas duly secured, and a few hundred acre estate owned tive who is acting to keep th
Sharett conferred vith boti ; a hem = — 1946 : Pi ae ad : ; jays later he motored to by Dr. A. Raeburn, There he Union together. The development
ministers here la _ . Fe ‘ ti car conditi e on mgr Sy Bos. ng "bi t Seawell. After the usual red will be abie to stroll in pad- follows months of dispute among
iy “of. Mideestern ‘dete < es to otuiuen, 16 000 neue th us foc is ing t tape and a long wait it wa docks among herds of docile T.U.C. Officers of the right and }
on o aste ofence sig 0 5 I 1u ussing tw« p. ings ? sua ~attle .U. : and
topped the list of topic of tons of nickel annually. ; portance on questior inounered that the plane wa Red Pole cattle léft as to who should lead the or- !
cdiscussion.—U.P. —U.P. | ganization !



urea) A eal

4
i





i


PAGE TWO



AJTING Commander
Egglesfield, Director General
of Civil Aviation in the Carib-
bean area is now back in Barbados
after attending the South Ameri-
can-Sduth Atlantic Regional Air
Navigation Conference which was
held in Buenos Aires and lasted
three Weeks.

The ‘Conference ended on Mon-
day, Neyember 19 and Command-
er Egglesfield arrived in Trinidad
on Thursday November 22 where

he remained until the 25th for
talks with Mr. Grimstead,
Director of the new British Car-

ibbean=Meteorological Service.

He Was met in Trinidad by his
wife who had been in Tobago for
a short holiday They’ both’ re-
turned here on Sunday by
B.W.1LA.

From Scotland
M's KATE RICHARDS and
Miss Mary Richards whose

home is in Scotland arrived from
Trinidad yesterday by B.W.I.A.
to spend about three weeks’ holi-
day in Barbados

They-are guests at
Club, St. James.

Short Holiday
JT EAVING for St. Lucia by
B-W.LA. over the week-end

was Mrs. Simmons Howell of
“Martindale”, Hastings. Mrs.
Howell will spend a short holiday

the Colony





with her husband Dr, Timothy
Howell of “Howelton”, The
Morne, ‘St. Lucia,

Koutine Visit
M® EK. T. MURRAY, Regional

rector cf Rediffusiou
(W.1.) «Lid... and Mr. Ronald
Goodsman, Chief Engineer of the
same coinpamy were among the
passengers arriving from Trini-
dad yestérday by B.W.1.A. Here
until Saturday on @ routine visit
they are guests at the Marine

Hotel.
Lodgs School Magazine
I T is expected that the latest

- editicn of the Lodge School
magazine is expected to go ~to
press within the next few days.
Keith Bowen is acting as agent
for the magazine both in Barba-
dos and the neighbouring
colonies. .

Old Lodge Boys who would like
to have a copy of this forthcom-
ing number ean contact Keith at
the Office of the Director of
Medical Services.

In view of the rising production
costs, the magazine committee is
trying to meet the cost of printing
hy increasing the circulation of
the magazine among Old Boys.

Keith ihas set about his task
enthusiastically and has already
contacted possible sub-agents like
Arthur Streetly and David Archer
in Trinidad and other Old Rovs in
British Guiana and elsewhere.

Annual Bazaar
HIS important occasion—de-
serving-of your utmost sup-
port. It's the: Annual Bazaar at
the Drill Helk on Saturday, De-
cember 1|.. In aid of the Old Ladies’
Home and under the distinguished
patronage of His Excellency the
Governor and Lady Savage, there
are many attractions and a great
many useful and desirable things
to buy, The well stocked counters
will feature Toys, Books, Novel-
ties, Gift Suggestions and Cooked
Foods among many other items.
There’s going to be a Marionette
Show. Lucky Dips and a well
stocked Bar. With the Police Band
in attendance, this is a date to re-
member—-Saturday, December 1,
at 3 o'clock,
Here For Races
R. AND MRS, GEOFFREY
LAUGHLIN of Trinidad who
came over to attend the Barbados
Turf Club's Autumn meeting were
among the passengers leaving for
Trinidad over the week-end by
B.W.LA,





Rupert and the



TS

=

Rupert
nil the
{ the istand

the issand, from which he can

jeads the way upwards

reach the topmost part

sve all of the coastline, Suddenly
ne points. “Look! Down by that
headlind, at's the other boat,” he

n great exciement. ‘* They're
already “Did you know

(aub C

NOEL COWARD leaving Bar.
bados in May after a four-day

visit. Tomorrow his new play
“Relative Values” opens in Lon-
don.

Concert Cabaret And
Coward

OEL COWARD'S first new

comedy since “Blithe Spirit”
opens in London tomorrow—and
the entire proceeds of the second
night of the run will be given to
the Jamaica Hurricane’ Relief
Fund.

Mr, Coward visited Barbados in
early May just after he had
finished writing this play, and
spent four days with Sir Edward

Cunard at “Glitter Bay”, St.
James, It was his first visit here.
The play is called “Relative

Values” and it is one of the events
of the theatrical season in Lon-
don, as any new Coward play
must be Although he is not ap-
pearing in it himself, he is
directing the production. Miss
Glacys Cooper, who will star in
the play, agreed with Mr.
Coward that proceeds of the
second night should be given to
the Hurricane Fund. Mr, Coward
has a home in Jamaica.

He is a member uw. the Fund
committee and this coming dona-
tien to the fund will provide one
of three social occasions in Lon-
don, all within a week that are
expected to add several thousand
pounds to the Fund.

The Orchid Room, one of Lon-
don's most exclusive night-clubs,
arranged a midnight cabaret te
raise money for the Fund. Al-
though the club ean accommodate
only 300 people, a minimum en-
trance fee of two guineas was
charged and a further large sum
was raised by an auction of gifts
presented to the Fund committee.

Taking part in the cabaret were

Orson Welles, the _ film-star;
Peter Ustinov, the British play-
right, aetor and producer; Moira
Lister, the South African film
star; and Genevieve Guitry,
former wife of Sacha Guitry, the
French actor. About a dozen

other stage and screen celebrities

also appeared,
Among them

Darnell, the

L

was Linda
Hollywood actress,





there would be another boat >"
exclaims Rollo. ** Who is it >
Where is it from?** But Rupert
doesn't wait to answer. "Quickly,
back to the Lion Rock,” he Rasps,
leading the way down the. hill
again. ‘* They're sure to go there,
ind we must not miss them!”





alling —



who was in Jamaica when the
hurricane struck the island. She
was on the north side of the

island and was not affected b
the hurricane. A _ special rum
cocktail was “launched at the
Orchid Room and has been nam-
ed after Miss Darnell

A supply of rum
make all the cocktails needed
during the cabaret was donated to
the Orchid Room by Myers, so
that the whole of the proceeds
from the sale of tne cocktails went
to the Fund. The Jamaican rum
industry also donated a keg of rum
to be auctioncd and there were
also gifts of Jamaican cigars

The third big event organised on
behalf of the Hurricane Fund is
the concert which takes place at
the Royal Festival Hall, London,
today The Queen has promised
to attend The concert will be
given by the Philharmonia Orches-
tra, conducted by Walter Susskind,
and the soloists will be Rudolf
somacho, the Jamaican tenor;
Anna Oticica, the Brazilian so-
prano; and Livia Rev, the French
pianist

Rudolf Comacho
group of three
songs. He gave a foretaste of the
concert in a broadcast, when he
sang one of these songs, a ballad
called “Jan”. Mr. Comacho
studied music in New York and
Toronto before joining the Cana-
dian Army and going to Britain.
It was in London that he was
heard by Benjamino Gigli,
great Italian concert artiste, who
arranged for him to study in Brit-
ain with a scholarship,

West Indian students in London
are playing their part in the ar-
rcangements for this concert. Eight
Jamaican girls, dressed in the col-
ourful costumes of the island, will
sell programmes to the concert-
goers,

Sterling Services

MONG the passengers arriv-

ing here on Saturday morning
by the French S.S. Colombie from
Cartagena were Dr. John Elmen-
dorf, O,B.E. and his wife. They
have come over to visit Mr. and
Mrs. Stanley Keith Jones of White
Hall, St. Michael and will be
spending two weeks staying at the
Colony Club, St. James.

Dr. Elmendorf has been for sev-
eral years head of the Rockefeller
Foundation in Colombia and has
performed sterling services both in

sufficient

is to sing a
Jamaican folk-

Panama and other Central and
South American countries.
During the war, he was a

Colonel in the U.S. Army, work-
ing in close co-operation with the
British for which he was awarded
the O.B.E.

To Settle

R. G. A. ALLEYNE, ;on of
Mrs, 1 Alleyne of Ebenezer,
St. Philip left for England over
the week-end by the Colombie.

He plans to settle in the U.K.

PAINS of PILES

It is no longer necessary to suffer
pains, itching and torment from Piles
since the discovery of Hytex (formerly
known as Chinaroid). Hytex starts to
work In 10 minutes and not only stops
the pain but also takes out the swell-
ing, stops Needing and combats nerve
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Nervousness, Backache, Constipation,
loss of energy, debility, and irritable
dispositinn, Get Hytex from your
druggis| gtoday under the positive

guarantee Hytex must stop your pile
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1951 !









TUESDAY, NOVEMBER "1 to A ‘PERIODI ? Wy NCE
11.15 Programme Parade, 11.30; j mM VW
im, Musica Britannica, 12 (noon) The!
ws, 12.10 p.m. News Analysis ; Pe
46-75 pom 31.32M 48.48M ; Alemands hhe Coo.
‘p.m. The News, 410 pm. The Daily ¢
ervice, 4.15 p.m. John Bul, 4.45 pom |
print, 5 p.m. Composer of the We oS
15 pam. Foreign Correspondent, 6 n Hat
sa Ha eoreaen, Corvenpondent € pn. | active fragrances of
£45 p.m. Programme Parade, 6.55 p.1 Also nervous distress several days ‘betore’
To-day's Sport, 7 p.m. The News, 7.10
a ; : wu you suffer from monthly organs. Pinkham’s Com im 10)
p.t Ne “A 7.15 pm Cricket cramps, headache, backache —- or only relieves this mcnhbhy pain ol A T K | N S O N S$
dteport on 4tt jay's Playing West indies | do you, like so many women, start but aiso annoying pre-period ner- % DSF
Victoria and Rendezvous with Com- to suffer a few days just before vous, tense emotions of this na- 2 e

20 IWealth

745 p.m. Generally Speaking, 8
Think on these Things, 2.15 p.m
Newsreel, 8.30 p.m

4.45 pm



a Laugh, 10 p.m. The News, 10.10 p.m one Of woman's most important with added iron.
From the Editorials, 10.15 p.m. Round
and Abeuk 1098 pal, Seectiveace tae LYDIA E. PINKHAM’S Vegetable Compound
«f Skye
C.B.C, PROGRAMME
TUESDAY, NOVEMBER 27, 1%51 ———— =
10.05 p.m.—i0.20 p.m. News. | THURADAY SPECIAL ize p.m.
20 n.—10.55 pt Lett fror “H'DDEN DANGER”
Canada oe ee woe Johnny Mack Brown PLAZ B’TOWN
11.72 Mes 25.60M HAUNTED TRAILS" Whip WILSON Dial 2310
i
LAST 2 SHOWS TODAY —445 & 8.30 p.m
CROSSWORD | “ ha ig
- i THE THING FROM ANOTHER WORLD
Also Leon’ ERKOL’'S Latest “PUNCHY PANCHO”
, WED. & THURS. 4.29 & 8.30 p.m. By Popular Request !
OUR VERY OWN & MYSTERY in MEXICO
| Ann BLYTHE, Forley GRANGER William LUDIGAN Jacqueline WHITE
P OISTIN G My ~ ar The Garden t
RAZA oto OW or sanes



| Make a peer
mW)
th an N.C.O
(9)

S shave (t)

spirit
Ww




‘ it Of a feline oeust. 1d | ‘AU DE COLOGNE
» Little creclit before it’ makes x THE We BALET RUSSE E coLo
case (3) 6. The 17 does. (5) |

4 See arouna
and remove. (6)
for men to tin? (8)

4 Salve
11 Array
star.

i4 Both sides uf the scrap. (6)
is Tilled without having eaten
iy A mean Clue. (4)
20 Make aviaries supply
Solution of vesteraays puzzie
i Knowledge,



Nine; 15, Ram 14 Sniueers '
Leopard: is, Enact; 21 wer: 24 “ai {
6 eir, 27, ¥ ,
Down; 4
pown: by Somerset Maugham

Glare



Artists,
7.45—-16.90 p.m.

Composer of the Week, 9 p.m
feet the Cpmmonwealth, 9.30 p.m. Ray's



|
| Preston Foster—Ann Rutherford ; ribet
L. fo lisp among firearms 16) } “INSIDE JOB & Donald O'CONNER &
> End of a gale, (3) ! son code oh emda de FROZEN GHOST”
8 You meet none cuter iy) } KEEP ‘EM FLYING
4 ee Gr Bud ABBOT & Lou C<¢ : Lon CHANEY \S
2 sey col 4) e en oR
| Peete ones ere = FIGHT FRAGRANCES THAT >"

y crowd (3)

7 This guard ts in front, 3)

1 This path was screened. (5)

2 No topi, this broken sun-tile 147)
<3. Food from a tame animal, (4)
2+. The Winner's opponent (5) j

nothing leas than a nim

(“4

5
¢

GLOBE
To-day — 5 and 8.15 p.m. \
LAST SHOWS

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*

| PCOS SOSS OOOO SSSOS

i

by Percy Green's Orchestra

SUBSCRIPTION — 2/-






‘THE WEB”

with Edmond O'BRIEN

13 Piece Luncheon Sets from $13.38 to $16.56
ON SALE from Wednesday, November 28th
REDUCED TO CLEAR
DRESSES from $6.00 up
LOCKNIT PANTIES — 90c.
LOCKNIT KNICKERS — $1.11
. LOCKNIT VESTS | — 81.14
BOYS’ BATHING TRUNKS — 75 Cents
TAFFETA BATHING SUITS from $5.08 to $7.73
PLES PSPSPS ELLOS.

SCVOSSSSVOCPOS SOOO








OLYMPIC





At The




TO-DAY Only 4.30 & 8.15

%
“ASTONISHED HEART”




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1951










MR. PLANTER !!





Refreshments on Sale 1 AND
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{ the Spot.
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Starring

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IS ESSENTIAL !!

WE HAVE JUST RECEIVED

A shipment of - - -

PLANT PROTECTION PRODUCTS

for the Plantation or small garden
Everything for Insect Pests, Blight or Weeds.
Let us solve your problem

ALBOLINEUM NO. 1
AGROCIDE NO. 1

Howard DUFF — Ann BLYTH |



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Thomas Gomez

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Brian DONLEVY

Tomorrow Only 4.30 & 8.15
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ANN TODD — CLAUDE RAINES
“AGAINST THE WIND”| ‘ONE WOMAN’S STORY’



“CALAMITY JANE &
SAM BASS”

Howard

Starring: John Payne, Rhoda Fleming, Dennis O’Keefe.

Strong as the Eagles, Fierce as the Hawks, They battled

“THE EAGLE anD THE HAWK”



_


TUESDAY, NOVEMBER



SUGAR NEWS

Philippines
Suspend All

Sugar Exports







MANILA, Philippines

The Philippi Government

as decided to suspend all future

hipments of sug -ountries

other than the tates, it

is announced in This

m has been because

the Philippines thas been unable

to fill its quota of sugar in the
U.S. market.

Some 50,000 tons had been

approved by the Government for

export to countrie other than
the United State but only
amounts actually old will now
be authorised for shipments.
Permits to sell the rest will be
eancelled. The amount actually
sold has not been disclosed,

zs on jee
Peru To Make
Bagasse Paper

LIMA, Peru.
print ‘and carton factory,
vely b », is to be
on 2a ge sugar
plantation on the northern coast
of Peru. Production will be 19
to 20 tons a day begin with,
but may be increased later.

The factory is at the Cayalti
Hacienda, in the Department of
ibayeque The hacienda is

A nev
ising exclusi

established




Si





red by Aspi and Anderson
Bros., who have imported machin-
ery for the factory from England.
This is the second bagasse news-
rint plant in Peru. The first
was set up by the Brace Co. and
produces newsprint said to be
nearly as good as the usual
imported newsprint.—B.U.P.



we: >
With Boy

Fourteen-year-old Fitz Whit-

taker of Bridge Field, St. Thomas,





a pupil of Sharon Boys’ School
was knocked down by ihe car
E—255 along Sharon Road yes<-

terday evening while on his way

from school. He was taken to
the General Hospital in an un-
conscious condition, treated and

injured to his

detained He was
head. The car is owned and was
being driven by Frank Kellman

of Queen Street, St. Peter.

Bicycle And
Bus Collide

THE front wheel of the bicycle
M-5403 was badly damaged when
it came collision with the
bus P-77 on Tweedside Road yes-
terday evening about 4 p.m. The

into

bicycle is owned and was being
ridden by Etheline Mascall of
Hothersal, St. John. The bus

which is of the General Motor Bus
Co., was being driven by Nathaniel
Alleyne of Well House.

Car Knocks Down
Labourer

SEVENTY -THREE-YEAR-OLD
Rebecca Sealy of Constant
Tenantry, St. George, was taken
to the General Hospital yesterday
evening and detained after she
was knocked down by the car
M-2872 on Constant Road about
5.15 o'clock. Sealy was on her
way home from work. The car
wes being driven by Joseph Singh
of Mahogany Lane, City.



ASARLRSEKaeS
&

a
a
Â¥
a
&R
@
a
a
a
w
"
a
oS
a
a
a
Po]
ot
LJ
&
a
a

go!

AY

4

Of /2
tw

Helps to cleanse the

aches. and pains, stiff and

in restoring good health.





i die name speaks jor itself
OQ? lure
Blood Me

from blood impurities
impurities in the blood may canee rheumatic
boils, pimpies and common skin disorders.

Clarke’s Blood Mixture helps to purify
the blood, cleanses the system and assists

1951

27,

BURKE COVER DRIVES

JIM BURKE (at 7) cover drives a ball from West Indian spin bowler Valentine during the match at

Sydney cricket ground on 19.11.51

At W ‘estminster:

LONDON,

In the House of Commons on
November 21, Mr. Bernhard Braine
(Conservative, Billericay) asked
the Minister of Food how much
sugar was purchased by his De-
partment in 1950 and 1951 from

Commonwealth sources and non-
Commonwealth sources, respec-
tively.

The Minister of Food, Major

Lloyd George, replied: The quan-
tity of sugar purchased by my De-
partment was as follows:

1950 1951
tons tons
Commonwealth
sources 1,662,000, 1,490,000
Foreign 1,372,000 1,452,000

Mr. Gerald Nabarre (Conserva-
tive, Kidderminister): “Can my
right hon. and gallant Friend give
the House an assurance that he is
taking from British Guiana, Mau-
ritius and Jamaica every ton of
sugar that those Colonies can offer
to the Mother Country?





Mr. Lioyd George: There is an
agreement, my hon, Friend
knows, which is now being dis-
cussed by which we are taking as

as




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much as We possibly can, and the
total this year which shows that
the Commonwealth figure is down
is due to the disastrous trouble
in Australia when we lost much
sugar.

Lady Tweedsmuir
tive, Aberdeen): Can my _ right
hon. and gailant Friend say
whether Jamaica has delivered the
full amount of sugar expected?

Major Lioyd George: I cannot
answer that without notice, but I
think she has.

Lieut.-Colonel Lipton (Labour,
Lambeth): When are private buy-
ers to be sent out to find the sugar?

Hon. Members: Answer.

Major Gwilym Lloyd
The answer to that is, the sooner
the better.

Mr. Gordon Walker (Labour,
Smethwick): Do I understand the
right hon. and gallant Gentleman
to mean that he wants to bring to
as early an end as possible the
Commonwealth Sugar Agreement.

Major Lioyd George: I most
emphatically deny any such thing.

Hon. Members: What does it
mean?

(Conserva-

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BARBADOS

Photo by Consolidated Press

ugar Supplies And Prices

Major Lloyd George: | rather
gathered that the hon, and gallant
Gentleman’s remark was that he
was looking for sources of sugar
other than what we have to-day,

Mr. Braine (Conservative, Bill-
ericay); asked the Minister of
Food the average price of sugar
purchased by his Departrrent in
1950 and 1951 from Common-
wealth sources, respectively.

Major Lloyd George: Whereas
Commonwealth sugar was bought
at one agreed price covering ship-
ments throughout the year, our
purchases of foreign sugars were
made under widely varying con-
ditions. It would therefore be
misleading to attempt to give
figures,

Mr. Braine: Is it not a fact that
on balance more was paid for for-
eign sugar than Commonwealth
sugar? In view of the dual need
to keep prices down at home and
encourage Empire production,
can my right hon. and gallan’
Friend say whether he will be pre-
pared to give a guarantee to colo-
nial producers that he will take







LGD. GE ie
SOAPS

BLUE HYACINTH





ln [lies



ADVOCATE

HARBOUR LOG

ARRIVALS
» Be Ww































et, « ¥ i
s Re
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net
$.S €
Koert
Se
Capt, Laurence, f
M T. Radar, 116 to wt, Cat
Mite t Tobago
DEPARTURES
e Hornsgund,; 23.257 tons net, Capt
Koc for Trimidad,
SEAWELL
ARRIVALS BY B.W.1.A.. ON
SATURDAY
From TREVIDAD L. Hinksor
Rooks. I. Gibbs, L Searles, G. K
Ke, M. Crick, J. Pilger O. Smit
und lL. Hoyte
- VENEZUELA 1 der
Me Qehea, N Oche
r Herrera, Wt A
Choe wi Manu | Ber
Pro ST. KITTS——M eien Pi
From MARTINIQUE Pe
nd Solange Petretluai
Fre GRENADA—Hugh Degale !
Eileen Degate
DEPARTURES BY BW.1.A. ON
SATURDA
For VENEZUELA~—Retsy Schierenbe
Clarita Sehierenber trice Necét
John Gaffhey, Eugene Gaffhey, Henrigq
Hellmund, Clorinda Hellmund, Carn
Arino, Lucia Orelia Small and Richard Smal
Por TRINIDAD- Robert Alefounde
Phy! Alefounder, Dora Ibberson, Tt
Schjotseth Lillia George Wilft
Weodhouse, Margucrite Maucaule Dd
Alfrec ‘eut, Dr. Joseph Pawa Elliot
Reece, Allan Hicks, Mona Hicks, Rey
Mare Frederick Simmo Warr
Bennet, Samuel! Phillip, Geoffrey Lave
im, Monica Laughlin, Lola Govia, Edws
Dubois, Matthew Nunes, Reyneid Gupy
Matcaim Detreitas, Le Defreit
Hichad@d Defreitas and Fonald Reekie
DEPARTURES BY BW ELA. ON
SUNDAY
For GRENADA—-Marge Lang \
Lang Edward Harding. M
Leadamith Dr Adolf
Reginald Bellot, Jack B
Baldin: and Mary Baldini
For ST LAUCTA—-Mon, Joseph De
Reginald t
Isadore
George
Randolph
Joseph Char
ARRIVALS BY BW.LA. ON
SUNDAY
Fro: TRINIDAD 1 Paviesfield
Alleyne. M. Alleyne, C. Stuart. P. Hugh
M. Jones, EB. Kelshall, H sfield
Dettin, 5. Mayers and S$. De es



In Touch With Barbados
Coastal Station















|

Cable and Wireless (W.1.) Utd., advi
that they can now conwnunicate wit
| the following ships through their Ba
bados Coast Station

&.8. Havber, 8.8, Romano. America
Eagiexytam Lincoln Elisworth
Esso Birlington, s.5. Maimanger, 6
Ca: mn Challenger, 5 Gerona, «5.*
Reat Halyeon HI Egkban}

1 Granada, s.s. Colombie, 6s
St Mormacwred, sis. Neaere
‘ t St. Louis, ss. Aleoa Cling
PPaul Dan, ss, David Allen, s.s, De
Mar, Rosa Brazil, s.s. Loid
Venerucla, 5.5, Esso Brazil, s.s, Uruguay
8.8, Lafayette, s.s, North Star, s.s. Tista
$.%.°Cavina, 8.8. Diiguesa, s.s. Mactr
§.8. Port Fairy, s.s. Lovdal, 8.8. Alcon
Run 8. Seabreeze, Prospector
sa. British Reliance, s,s Red Banh
$8 \riguani Reina Del Pacificc
$8. Orekal Dragan

100 per cent. of their producti
at remunerative prices after 195
tather than only 70 per cent.?
Major Lloyd George: 1 must 1
peat that the matter is now uncer
discussion with Commonweal!
and Colonial growers and that t

present price is one which has beou

agreed to by all Empire grows
and they are perfectly satisficc
with it.

—B.U.P
































$o convenient... you can slip it
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virely the size of your little finger!
Use itanytime ... anywhere



Handle
Cut
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{



ROCCE!
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WALLBOARD

From 16c. per sq. ft.

BARBADOS
CO-OP. COTTON FACTORY LTD.

}

|For Pyorrhea—Trench Mouth





















PAGE THREE



Ration

LONDON

Sugar
=



v rf greeme! A Cuba
when he will increass
ra

Major Lioyd George: | if i
I t !

t iol
t iat 1 ; cre
tion Im tr near tuture
—B.U.P

Sore Mouth

Bleeding Gums, Sore Mouth and Loose
Teeth mean that you have Pyorrhea,
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Amosan must make
and save your tee
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Amosan from your chemi
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PAGE

BARBADOS Sp ADVOGAT

xa 559 Reseed

Ltd., Broad St.,

FOUR





Printed by the Advocate Co Bridgetown

—

Tuesday, November 27, 1951

LABOUR MARCHES






THE pamphlet “Labour Marches On”
released last week by the Barbadds Labour
Party is not a simple document, except in
one particular It is full of praise for the

Labour Party, whose motto might not un-
fairly be summed up as “government by
our government for our government.”

There is praise for no one else: neither in-
dividual nor organisation. There are plenty
of threats, and many paradoxes, In one par-
agraph we read that “for over three hun-
dred years, the people of this Island have
groaned and sweated in misery and sordid
conditions under the system of private en-
terprise as practised locally.” In another
we are told that “the silent revolution by
which one fifth of the arable land of Barba-
dos has passed into the hands of small-hold-
ers is of tremendous social importance.”

The pamphlet is not a constructive docu-
ment: it is full of journalistic elichés e.g.
“crying need”, “strangle-hold of vested
interests”, “will outlaw and liquidate all
organisations and associations which ham-
per trading, “will contifue to fight”, “the
van of constitutional progress”, and “West
Indian consciousness.”

But it cannot be dismissed out of hand
for these reasons. Wordiness and exagger-
ation are characteristics not only of the
West Indies but are found wherever poli-
ticians lose their grasp on realities and
essentials. But there is no doubt that what
gives the wordiness and emotional appeal
of “Labour Marches On” effective propa-
ganda value is the fact that without the
activities of the l.abour Party and the Bar-
bados Workers’ Union it is doubtful
whether as much would have been done
for the workers as has been done in recent
years. The rights of Labour must be cham-
pioned. But there is no justification; moral
or historical for the continued flaunting by
the Barbados Labour Party -of statements
which have no basis for foundation in fact.
When a dispassionate historian like W. L.
Burn writes in his history of The British
West Indies that after 1833 “the task of the
planters demanded a very careful combin-
ation of generosity and firmness” and that
“this combination’ was most successfully
achieved in Barbados and Antigua, and
“that so many planters tried to adapt them-
selves to the new conditions learhing new
methods of handling labour growing cane
and making sugar, and that so many
negroes acted prudently and sensibly in
spite of threats and allurements”, we recog-
nise the authentic note of Barbadian his-
tory. The Labour Party damages its own
eause by its continual harping and re-
iteration of the non-historical assertion that
private enterprise as practised locally is
responsible for over three hundred years
of “misery and sordid conditions,” The
truth is that without local private enter-
prise the conditions of the 200,000. people
who live in Barbados would be frightening
indeed, Barbados has so far escaped the
tragie fate of Nevis and Antigua, where
exodus of the so-called “exploiting class”
resulted in the economic running down of

islands whose names once ranked with
ours for efficiency.
The Labour Department's. report for

1950, giving, as it does, detailed inform-
ation of the Barbados Sugar Industry is
tribute enough to the most successful work-
ing of private enterprise that this island
has seen. The tribute paid by the Colonial
Secretary to the Hon. H. A. Cuke, C.B.E.,
and the employers of Barbados in the Leg-
islative Council recently, must remind the
authors of “Labour Marches On” how much
they owe to this successful example of
private enterprise and to the harmonious
relations which exist between workers and
employers.

But the authors of “Labour Marches On”
do believe in private enterprise, the pri-
vate enterprise of the Labour Party. There
is nowhere in the pamphlet a° suggestion
that Labour could not do better than those
who now manfully shoulder the burdens
and carry the risks involved in carrying on
business and industry in Barbados today.
Yet nowhere are we told how they are
going to do better.

There are plenty of promises, Excess
profits tax, entertainment tax: “equal op-
portunities for all”, “public ownership,”
“regional industries,” “all possible measures
to provide employment,” “security of em-
ployment”, “capital works”, “deep water
harbour”, “East Coast Road”, “increase in
money wages”, “grow more food”, “security
of land tenure’, “planned development of
tourism”, “eliminate school fees”, “press
forward with” housing”, “Housing Loan
Fund for» Civil Servants”, “new public
health bill’, "social insurance”, “increased
hospital accommodation”, bétter conditions
for Government servants” and all ending
with the slogan “Forward with Labour”:
these are indeed big promises.

One looks in vain in the pamphlet for
any recognition of the known fact that the
relative high standard of living which Bar-
bados enjoys is due mainly to the efficient
privately organised sugar industry: the
bulk buying long term agreement of sugar
between ithe United Kingdom and the West
Indies: and above all to the industry and
applicatioA of each Barbadian by whose
energies we have reached the imperfect but
reasonable standards of life which we have
attained.

Less promises and some constructive
proposals suggesting how to tackle the
maintenance of these standards in view of
continuous rising costs and other difficul-
ties would have given us firmer grounds
for believing in Labour’s ability to march
on. As it is, if some of the threats contained
in this pamphlet were brought in by any
political party with a majority in the Bar-
bados House of Assembly there is no doubt
that whatever the direction of Labour’s
movement capital would March OUT.

That is the frightening alternative which
the Barbadian fairer sex (the ladies, who
are the majority of voters) can prevent by

their votes on December 13. We
woo capital, not scare it away.

want to









; BARBADOS ADVOCATE

Making An Executive

From the Cafiada

Royal Bank
Newsletter

Not everyone is a natural-born
execucive, but many can become
good executives by training, by
observing the methods and abil-
ities needed, and by working to-
wards self-development.

Being an executive is not mere-
ly having a massive desk and a
name-plate on the door, It makes
many demands upon a man, de-
mands of temperament and drive
and health. An executive is al-
ways meeting challenges. He
must know his job, make sound
decisions and direct the work of
other people. He needs imagina-
tion and courage.

The market value of an execu-
tive is determined by his special
qualities. He is not paid for the
thing he does, but for the moral
content of his effort — his en-
thusiasm, his specialized abilities,
his knowledge, his experience and
his judgment.

Naturally enough, there are in-
telligence requirements, though
successful executives differ great-
ly in their ratings on tests. All of
them have a high degree of ability
to organize, and keen vision to
see the path ahead. They are
skilled in taking several seem-
ingly isolated events or facts and
detecting the relationships that
exist between them.

We might say that it is not
superior mental ability or age or
social background or family
affiliations that count in these
days. The executive has trans-
ferred himself to a new arena.
one in which his development of
good mental habits is the key to
success.

of

Choosing Executives

The problem in business ig to
get the right men and women,
keep them, and develop them in-
to good leaders. Facts are better
than opinions in this screening:
what has this man done? how has
he done it? what can he do to-day?

Length of service alone does
not qualify a man for executive
rank. It is, undoubtedly, an ad-
vantage, but during it the man
must have developed alertly. He
must have learned to perceive
meanings that do not appear on
the surface. He must be almost
psychic in hfs ability to steer safely
through dangerous economic
waters. He must be able to ge
on well with people above and be-
ldw him in the firm's roster of
workers, '

Above all, the executive must
be a leader of men, No business
and no department will run itself.
It needs a leader who keeps a
jump ahead of the procession.

A leader is not one who achieves
by his personal powers, but one
who inspires all those under his
command, Morale is the child of
good leadership. Men work best
for the executive who holds his
beliefs with confidence, who will
stand up on Wednesday for the
principle he believed in on Mon-
day. The executive needs inner
harmony, which shows itself in
judgments based upon _ sound
thinking and in his whole attitude
fowards his business and society.

Confidence And Control

The executive is a man who
must trust his own iudgment.
Suecess will never be attained by
a nerson who has to ask advice
before doing anything important,
or who leans on the boss. or who
aske how to execute an order
A man’s self-confidenre mesure
the hefeh* of his nossibilities. end
no mn nasses his own self-im-
posed limitations.

Synthetic self-confidence will
not do, The most painful tumble
a man can take is to fall over his
own bluff. The bluff may be
caused by his conceit, or by a fool-
ish and unproved belief in his
ability.

Next to confidence, built solidly
upon knowledge, comes self-con-
irol, There never has been, and
cannot be, a good life without
self-control, It enables a man to
adapt himself to the perpetual
shifting of conditions, to meet un-
expected challenges, and to deal
effectively with crises,

This is one of the most difficult
of all qualities to attain. Men in
more humble spheres may indulge
in violence, engage in quarrels,
express themselves in angry pas-

AMERICAN COLUM

sions, but these are unbecoming
in an executive; they undermine
nis au.hority and destroy the
effectiveness of all his other
virtues,

Discretion is imperative in an
executive. It is true that qa man
who never goes out on a limb may
preserve the safety of his position,
but he will never rise above ii.
That is not the kind of discretion
we mean, The executive should.
have a hundred eyes to scrutinize
a project before he calls upon his
people to carry it out.

Courage

The executive also needs cour-
age. Many a brilliant idea has
been lost because the man who
dreamed it lacked the spunk to
put it across.

The budding executive wiho
fings that he is too conservative
should practise taking chances in
a small way until he gets .he
feeling of self-confidence that
comes from exercising initiative.
The courage he is seeking is not
mere absence of fear. He who
realizes clearly all the risks in-
volved, and decides to go ahead
with his plan, is a courageous
man in the best sense of the word.

Bravado is to be equally cen-
sured with cowardice. The ill-
considered accep.ance of any and
every risk has no part in the es-
sence of true courage.

The executive must have the
power of decision. Life is con-
stantly confronting us with a
series of choices, We cannot deciding, because even to seem to

make no choice at all is in it-
self to choose not to decide,
It is not required that the

executive make decisiong in rapid-
fire succession, though this seems
to come naturally to some men.
More crucial is the ability to ar-
rive without dithering at a decis-
ion that is wise.

This is one of the traits watched
in a man when he is being con-
sidered for promotion; does he
come to his boss with decisions or
for decisions? The man who says
“Do you want to do so and so?”
is trying to use the head of the
man above him. Some weakness-
es can be covered up by superior
qualities in other spheres, but if
a person is not certain and de-
cisive he has only dim prospects
of becoming a good executive.

Administrative ability is taken
for granted as a necessary quality.
In a great many businesses it i;
more important than technical
knowledge. The good administra-
tor is able to develop an organiza-
tion and keep it working purpose-
fully and harmoniously.

The good execu‘ive leaves his
emotions at home, and only his
family knows of his tempera-
mental upsets. If is a sad day
for the rising executive when his
secretary warns his subordinates:
“Don't go near Mr. Blank to-day
—he is in one of his moods.”

Seasoned Youth

It may be that the need for so
many perfections has contributed
to the preference of men _ for
executive positions who have at-
tained a certain degree of co-or-
dination through years of experi-
ence, Age in i.self is neither
handicap nor benefit. Many men
who occupy high places in indus-
try are going strong at sixty-five,
while others have wrecked busi-
nesses at half that age,

It is only a feeling, not a fact,
when the mature man experiences
a twinge of envy in contact with
younger people, He hes not their
light-heartedness, their casual
manner, their air of living for to-
day. But on the other hand he
has poise knowledge of the world,
and understanding of people: as-
sets which, in the very nature of
things, younger men cannot yet
have acquired.

Whether a man ranks as youth-
fully immature or fixedly aged de
pends not at all upon his calendar
age but upon his mental age and
his flexibility of thinking. The
expression “seasoned youth” cov-
ers all cases: the young execu-
tive may take a seasoned atti ude
toward life and make good; the
older executive may take a men-
tally youthful attitude, with wide
horizons still beckoning, and keep
on making stood.

The Arms Flow=0r

NEW YORK.

An ugly row down in Washing-
ton—over whether America is or
is not way behind on her promises
of arms for Europe,

General Olmsted, director of the
Office of Military Assistance, holds
a Press conference and tells the re-
porters that all is well, and that
shipments are well up to schedule.

Senator Lyndon Johnson, of
Texas, chairman of the Senate
Preparedness Committee, pounces
on the general. He: says indig-
nantly that only a short time be-
fore this Press conference, Olm-
sted appeared before the commit-
tee and gave them a bleak story to
the effect that there is a near-
breakdown in the flow of Ameri-
can arms. }

The senator accuses the general
of telling the committee that his
information was correct—but then
s0 was the information be pro-
duced for the Press conference.
How come? asks the senator.

Well, explains the general, he
“used different schedules in each
instance.”

Washington is much bewildered
by the whole thing. For by this
time everyone knows that one of
the most urgent reasons which
brought Eisenhower home on that
flying trip was to discuss the arms
shortage,

Meanwhile Senator Johnson fires
off an angry letter to the War De-
partment.

Careless

WITH MEAT PRICES at their
highest ever and apparently soar-
ing further all the time, Ameri-
eans are shocked to learn that
70,000,000 Ib. of prime meat is lost
every year through sheer careless-
ness. Off-hand and too-hasty ar-

By R. M. MACCOLL

rangements for transporting live-
stock are mainly responsible. In
1948 alone, 38,500 hogs, 25.500
sheep, and 14,700 cattle were dead
when they arrived by lorry at the
stockyaids. Nearly all were con-
demned as total losses by Govern-
ment inspectors,

Parallel
SO ALARMED are the 13
Roman Catholic bishops of the

United States by the corruption in
present-day American public life
that they issue a statement draw-
ing an “alarming parallel” between
America and ancient Rome.
“Rome's fate will befall us”, warn
the churchmen. “If; we do not
awaken to the danger which
threatens from within our house-

hold.”
No Moncy

IN RESPONSE to the groans of
the citizenry that, what with prices
the way they are, nobody can poss-
ibly find the money for higher
taxes (which are planned by New
York for the New Year), the

Our Readers Say



Politics

To The Editor, The Advocate—

SIR,—I happened to be driving
through the country last night
when I came on a Political Meet-
ing sponsored by the local Labour
Party. The speaker who was a
member of the House of Assem-
bly during the last session, said
these words: —

“Tf by stealing a piece of
Nelson’s statue it would make
my wife happy, I would steal

it.”



The Firm’s Responsibility

The persona] qualities of a
man, however good they may be,
are not made use of except in the
proper environment. One of the
bitterest situations for a qualified
and eager executive is to be given
a title without authority. Rank
should not be looked upon as a
reward for past services; it is
given a man for the sole purpose
of enabling him to meet respon-
sibilities

Everyone in an _ organization
should know pfecisely what he
is responsible «for, what hi
authority is, and who does wha:
in directing effort. The execu-
live has the right to be consulted.

Many a firm would benefit by a
stocktaking in this area. Progress
in business, as in the making ot
the world, is the domination o1
chaos by mind and purpose. 1,
ean be achieved only when there
fs a basic philosophy and a good
plan.

Let us ask, have the objectives
and policies of the firm been de-
fined? This may sound academic
but unless there js a clear state-
ment available, how are execu-
tives to mesh their efforts? How
are fhey to obtain _teamwork on
their own or lower levels? How
are they to be sure that ineir
time and effort are being spent
productively? How are they to
avoid the all=-too-common frus-
tration that arises when projects
are squelched because the firm
doesn’t know whether it wants
them or not?

The Human Problem

It is good policy for an execu-
tive to refrain from doing any-
thing that can be done sufficient-
ly well by a subordinate. If he
hugs his job to his bosom down to
the last trivial detail, he is being
unfair to himself as well as to his
people. He deprives himself of the
opportunity to deal with more
vital problems, to consider and
plan expansion and improvement.
He is, truly, working himself
into an early grave,

Of course, one, must not go too
far. No good ecutive tries to
delegate everything, including his
own responsibility for seeing that
the job gets doné well.

Those who do so have probably
come into their offices. by inheri-
tance or accident, and not by
winning their spurs in the open
field.

Of all the problems faced by an
executive, the human prohlem far
exceeds the mechanical in diffi-
culty,

No predigested psychology will
give the executive what he needs
in human understanding. It is good
to study, but theory must be tried
out and applied so that the right
response becomes habitual.

It takes a big man of superior
quality to be capable of treating
little men so as to gain and retain
their respect and affection, He
is the sort of man who, instead
of climbing upon his fellow
workers whom he has _ pulled
down, sets himself to help every-
one around him in order that he
may go up with them. No man
has true power, poise, charm or
good personality unless he has a
genuine interest in people.

It is. necessary to get along
well with associates on the ex-
ecutive’s level. There is a temp-
tation for the young or new ex-
ceutive to lean over backward
rather than appear to be a “yes
man,”’ Instead of that, he should
accept gladly every gesture of
friendship and help, seek to un-
derstand his associates’ problems,
give the feeling that he is genu-
inely . interested in their work,
and accept in» good part even
irritating things if his good sense
tells him they are for his benefit.

Only if morale is high in a
firm will production be high, both
in quantity and quality.

Morale means more than an
occasional staff y. It ns
that every man is interested in
the success of) thé firm and works

for it. Field Marshal Sir William
Slim, Chief of Imperial Gen-
eral staff, is qu in the Cana-

dian Army Journal as stating this
in a striking way “An army must
have Generals to lead, but if te
only men in it, who have
the mark of greainess are the
Generals, it will win few victories.”



Do They?

municipal authorities smilingly
point to the recent betting figures
on the local race tracks.

On Friday—the last day of the
season—56,000 New Yorkers some-
how managed to bet 4,589,185 dol-
lars on 16 races.

TV-itis

THEY have praised or blamed
['V for pretty well everything by
now—but here’s a new one.

Dr, Charles King, scientific di-
rector of the Nutrition Foundation
of America, says that TV is re-
sponsible for the steadily expand-
ing waistline of the American
business man,

Less golf and more sitting
around with the glazing eyes glued
to that luminous little screen, diag-
noses the doc.

Quota

SENATOR ROBERT TAFT. of
Ohio, coins a shrewd phrase. The
man who may well be the Repub-
lican battler for the Presidency
next year makes a speech urging
a quick truce in Korea. For, says
he, “a stalemated peace is far bet-
ter than a stalemated war.”



Surely that was a plain message
to his listeners who were mostly
composed of field workers and
labourers, that if they wanted a
watch for their girl-friend they
should go into town and steal it.
Apart from the fact that he would
destroy the statue of a national

hero for a domestic ambition
he was. definitely upholding
crime,

Another speaker ridiculed the
wearing of brass badges by office
messengers,

Yours very truly Sir,
BARBADIAN.














TUESDAY, NOVEMBER 27,



WATER, WATER
EVERYWHERE

What commodity weuld you say is most
used as an industrial raw material? Per-
naps you think of coal, or oil, or perhaps of
timber, sulphur, or steel. But the answer
is: plain, ordinary water — and in quanti-
ties that may astonish many not familiar
with industrial technique.

For instance, it takes anything up to 5
tons of water — or 1,120 gallons — to pro-
duce 100 tons of coal. The water, of course,
‘'s essential for suppressing the dangerous
dust inseparable from mining operations.
And British coal output for 1950 averaged
‘ust over 4 million tons a week — which
means that some 44,800,000 gallons of water



were also used seven days in dust suppres- %

sion.

Take another source of power—electricity.
for every 100,000 k.w. of generating plant,
between 4 and 5 million gallons of water
oer hour is used for cocling the installation.
\ltogether, the British Electricity Authority
ises a total of between 600 and 750 million
gallons every sixty minutes in this fashion.
And, in addition, there is the use of water—
chiefly in Scotland for producing current
from hydro-electric plant.

Certainly the third great enterprise con-
ce-ned, among other things, with the pro-
vis'on of a source of power — the oil indus-
try
supplies of water. It uses, on an average,
something over 20 gallons of cooling-water
during the refining of every gallon of crude
o'! or partially processed products.

ust one refinery alone, now being built
nesr London, will use 34 million gallons of
water every hour — rather more than the
equivalent water consumption of the entire
city of Glasgow. Another large refinery—
this time in Louisiana, U.S.A.—absorbs suf-
ficient thermal heat units every day into its
cooling-water to warm the average home for
more than 200 years.

Since world crude oil output for the first
half of this year was just over 300 million
metric tons, the refineries processing that oil
must be pumping a total of approximately
100,000 gallons of water through their cool-
ing systems every second!

The brewing industry is yet a further
undertaking that uses water by the thous-
and million gallons a year. Just one leading
London brewery used between 150 and 200
miliion gallons for all purposes in 1950. And
there are a whole host of other important
enterprises — ranging from steel to paper-
meking — whose operations would not be
possible without an unlimited supply of
water on tap. Nor is industry the only large-
scale user: the London Zoological Gardens,
for instance, needs an average of 55 million
gallons every year. It is dreadful to imagine
the consequences if, for any reason, commer-
cial water supplies dried up !

CDC CLOSE £63,000 HQ

! LONDON,
Have CDC been left with another white

elephant? That is the question being asked
in the Central African township of Blantyre
following the closing down of the £63,000
CDC estate comprising four houses for
married couples, a communal messing hall
for bachelors and the finest office building
in Nyasaland.



The estate, opened three years ago, was
intended to be the administrative centre for
the tung oil, rice and tobacco growing pro-
jects which CDC had undertaken in Nyasa-
land.

But as a result of an economy drive from
London, it has been decided to shut — at
least temporarily — the Blantyre buildings.

The staff’ have been moved to Lusaka /and
today that £63,000 worth of concrete and
masonry is occupied only by an accountant
who is clearing up the Corporation’s affairs
in the area, and by a woman stenographer.

Reports from a correspondent in Blantyre
suggest that the Corporation is offering the
houses for sale, But, he says, scarcely any-
one is nibbling. Attempts to let them are
said to have met with no greater success.

The refrigerators which graced the houses
have been sold at knock-down prices to Blan-
tyre business firms.

And the man who administered the
scheme from the beginning, Mr. Sinclair
Hay ? CDC headquarters in London say that
he left the Corporation over a year ago. Mr.

Hay was a_ Glasgow solicitor who “had
no specialised knowledge of Africa. But he

was very good at administration and hous-
ing estates.”

CDC headquarters deny that they are
trying to get rid of the Blantyre property—
by this time referred to among local inhabi-
tants as the “white elephant.” They say
that a new Regional Controller for the Cen-
tral Africa area will be leaving from Eng-
land very shortly and that if he is unable io
find the necessary accommodation in Lusaka
he will quite likely re-open the Blantyre
buildings.

And what of the CDC schemes PEs
They are still in the pilot stage but local ex-
perts think that the rice and tobacco Projects |
will succeed. |





Ve

— could not operate without ample}!





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1951

FOR FINEST
CHRISTMAS CARDS

Call and Select Early from

ADVOCATE

NOTICE

From Ist December, 1951 our HARDWARE and
LUMBER DEPARTMENTS will be closed for breakfast
from 11 a.m. to 12 noon except on Saturdays when we
will be open from 8 a.m. to 12 noon.

ers please note,

WILKINSON & HAYNES CO., LTD.,
— Successors to —

C.S. PITCHER & CO. LTD.

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Chromium Plated 3” Plastic.... $1.96
Furniture Castors 156” Bakelite.. $1.60
Ball Bearing 156” Bakelite........ $2.10
Nickel Plated 156” Rubber..... $2.86
WHEELS
Each
7” x 14%" Cushion Tyred Swivel Castor.... $6.62
10” x 2” Roller Bearing Industrial Type
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Haddock. ‘
Kippers. i
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Fish Paste—6 cents per tin.

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Frosh
Vegetables


TUESDAY, NOVEMBER 27, 1951

Bus Driver Stands

BARBADOS ADVOCATE PAGE FIVE

BEEF’ WILL COST













Horisund Calls
On Maiden Trip

Death By ADVICE TO CERTAIN

STATESMEN—FROM







° a . e
TrialOn MurderCharge * ?!" 4% — Misadventure oe Ma A
Making her maide to ince
. | aie x : P she was built this year, the Ger-
: ~ SAYS VICTOR CHASP _A VERDICT of death by mis- | py ateving the ren P' | man steamship atecnsuna cailed s
Case For Prosecution Closes : adventure was returned by a " goer anual ik ee ox Ratain an itomdss tisshinis oO: 4
Do you know that the price of nine-man jury to Coroner G. B. , " wrencmen Se with toys and other Christmas
your salt fish in January next Will Criffith when the inc y he weak by weakening the goods w *h > load i - 1
} ; 2 3 a juiry into th str goods which she loaded at Ham
AFTER CALLING 17 witnesses at the Court of Grand >& COMERS. YOU something like. six circumstances surrounding the ¥ Ms era burg, Copenhagen and Antwerp |
Sessions yesterday to prove that Ewart Owen Thornhill, a - olen conte oe = = At death of Aubrey Jordan of Sands vias _— ie re Hornsupd is ister ship to }
. : a sort time the bee y Street 3 i .
bus driver of the Ivy Land, murdered 39-year-old Leroy buy at two sititines teen’ Te will ae Seiek ae Peter, was concluded |” coyraging class ha'red. Masato. Which also wade het
Worrell, a | > ow ‘ > : eta aa , ‘7 pe at District “A” Police Court yes- . " maiden trip to Barbados on Octo-
orrell, a lorry owner of Bank Hall, on August 6 this year. be costing you $1.45 or $1.20, and terday You cannot keep out of ber 18 with a similar cargo. Bot’s
the Prosecution closed their case before the Hon. The Chief ‘at the milk for which yOu are Aubrey Jordan was involved in trouble by spending more of these ships are planning tol
Judge, Sir Allan Collymore. a ak pe eee — pint an accident ,with the motor car than you can earn. make one call each every three
The trial of Thornhill wi : eee : Glia tecaenthoas a pois age “A IL—132 on Sands Street, St. Peter —Abrah.m Lincoln. | moaths to Barbados. They belong
Ldpeuse Willinias Defence Conse! arid Mr. W, W. Resce, Vitor. Guice t toe ings teed nS to the Hom Line.
W unsel and Mr. ‘ . Reece ons ase to the arge crow He was taken to the General A shipping clerk of Mess:
K.C., Solicitor General, for the Crown, will address the jury. oxioeetan’ = sonpe? him Ry Hospital the same day but cied at R. M. Jone; & Co, Ltd. said yes-
. . : : rv. | “ 5S ar ¥ ; = ; ; |
On the application of Mr. Williams, the jury will visit qh’B™man’s lane Sunday | night: the Hospital on November 13. Dee Fest For te.day that the Horn Lines hopes |
a as spez g about the cost ~ t <
the scene of the death before Defence Counsel and Crown cf ‘iving ‘This is the position +i Set. oo told the Court that on to or a continual link between |
Frosecutor address j ve are facing,” said ‘hace, November 9 about 1 p.m. he was ® ° fest Indies and Germany
The Prosecution's — ‘he Worrell on August 7. The body “and I counsel you. thet whoever St sane -t: Gpeientatowne rms, il LikelySoon sage te Wee teuc wine to pat :
a Club of the Girls’ Industrial was identified by his wife * you put into the House of Assem. Station when he heard an alarm: expect to build four mure ta put
Union had an excursion to St. There were — asia _ bly, to impress upon them in nq He ran into the road and about brains ; sy on the WL. run, The Company is)
ere numerous con . p 200 yards ; THE rains of the past few ; . ¢
Lucy on August €. Thornhill was tusions and lacerations over the “certain terms, the necessity of yards away opposite Mr. Jor- weeks and the heavy seas off the ney ere ee er tee
driving M-1422, one of the buses whole body. There was a frac- 9g something to cushion the den’s residence he saw a crowd. Qact coas 2 = pl gal ae ene penance eave ig
which took the excursionists to St. ture of the right frontal bone ex- °!¢ck in this ever-increasing rise On going to the crowd he found ° Onaat ae: ee island had fleet of six {
Duct. andsWarrell was dvivine one ‘ ! jah ROA OR. sl cost of living.” that there was a motor car L—139 owed down the progress of he The Horn line ran ships before |
: ‘ 8 posing the train. There was con- living ; 38 seis . ; neurite , p
of his lorries with some of the ex- tusion aud haemorrhage of the ,,M¥ Chace is a candidate of the »" the road. This car was about selsmograph “party considerably, World War Il. but it was broken \
cursionists. On the return journey, brain. There was contusion of the Electo s’ Associaton seeking elec- 100 feet from Mr, Jordan’s house. but such results as had been ob- up during that war. |
Worrell and Thornhill each drove left kidney. There was also a '° to ‘1e House of Assembly as There was a little sand on the tained, had been very good said Horusund is 4,032 tons gross and |
fast. and attempted io overtake compound fracture of the left hip 2 Tepresentative of the City of risht side of the road about three Dr, W. F, Auer, Manager of the bas passenger accommodation {
each other. and _ both legs were broken P Bridgetown. feet nine inches from the right Barbados Gulf Oil Company about 12. She brought with het |
When they eventually reached “From my examination and Expirnstion side of the gutter, t i S eneee esas ae ate MAKE |
the Girls’ Industrial Union, a dis- from a consideration of the cir- | Explaining the increases men- . one geologic staff of the Bav- German crew of 36 including
pute started between Worrell and cumstances, I am of the opinion tioned, he said that as regard Car Damaged bados Gulf Oil has been increased her skipper, Captain Koch }
Thornhill. Witnesses said that that death was duc to the multi. beef, importers could ‘only ge : by the arrival of Mr. Neil Mac- Barbados is Hornsund’s first call
Worrell cufféd Thornhill in his ple injuries described. These their supplies from the _ sterling The right bonnet of the car Kenzie who will take up the work frem Antwerp and she sailed out

eye and Thornhill pulled a pen-
knife from his pocket. opened it,
but did not use it, He then drove
to Belmont corner, turned around
the bus and drove back down Con-
stitution at a moderate rate.

Bus Swerves

George Brewster who was in the
bus at the time told the court: “He
changed gear when not far from
where Worrell was standing on the
right of his lorry and I saw the
bus swerve and head for the lorry.
I held up my hands and looked
away.”

Other people who were near the
lorry ran, but Worrell was killed.

Pieces of Worrell’s bones were
exhibited in the Court.

Inspector Terrence Franklyn
said that on August 6, he received
a report and went to Belmont Post
where he saw Thornhill under
arrest. He went to Constitution
Road and saw lorry A-128 drawn
up on the left side cf the road
opposite the upper Queen's College
gate.

The bus M-1422 was to the’ rear
of the lorry facing town and was
on the opposite side of the road.

A body which he recognised as
Leroy Worrell's was on the right
side of the lorry lying on the
ground. After taking some photo-
graphs of the scene he returned to
Belmont Police Station and
charged him with murder.

After Thornhill was cautioned
he said that he had not done it
purposely.

Thornhill was later taken to Dr.
Cato as he said he had been cuffed
in his eye by Worrell.

On the following day he took
measurements of the scene where
Worrell had been killed,

Widow's Evidence

Ena Worrell, widow of Leroy
Worrell, said her husband was a
chauffeur and mechanic and
owned two lorries. He used to
hire them out for excursions and
would drive A-128 himself. On
‘August 6 he left home about 8 a.m,
with A-128.

About 6.45 p.m, the same day
she received certain information
and went to Constitution Road
where she saw her husband lying
dead by the side of his lorry, Next
day she identified her husband's
body to Dr. Cato.

To Mr. Williams, she said that
her husband was not upset in any
way the morning he left for the
excursion, He had had nothing of
any moment to worry him before
that day.

O. A. Pilgrim, land surveyor,
produced a plan of the part of
Constitution Road where Worrell
was killed. The lorry A-128 was
standing in the road when he made
the plan. The distance of the lorry
from the Queen's Park Governor's
gate was 209 feet.

Uprights Broken Off

Aubrey Farnum, inspector of
Highways and Transport, went to
the scene of the accident where
he examined the bus M-1422. The
right front fender was damaged.
Three uprights on the right side
of the bus were broken off. The
right windscreen was also broken
and there were pieces of bone in
the frame.

The steering and
were in good order.

He also examined the lorry
which was on the other side of
the road. This was damaged on
its right side,

To Mr. Williams, he said he
tested the clutch of the bus and it
was in working condition.

Dr. A. S. Cato said that he per-

the brakes

tion on

were consistent with the deceased
having been struck and squeezed
by a heavy motor vehicle.”

Bus Turns
P.c. 125 Arthur Searles was
Station Orderly at Belmont Sta-

August 6. There
crowd near Queen's Park.
came from Queen's Park,
around at Belmont corner.

“Before he turned I stopped
him and asked him whether any-
thing had happened at the Park,
he replied that nothing had hap-

was a
A bus
turned

pened. He then went toward the
Park.” :
Later Set. Henry brought
Thornhill to the Station.
Sat. Jonathan Henry attached

to Belmont Police Station said
that on August 6, he went to Con-
stitution Road and saw the lorry
A-128 parked on its left side of
the road. A body which he recog-
nised as Leroy Worrell’s was
lying at the right side of the torry.

He gave further evidence as to
broken pieces of the damaged
bus that Thornhill had been driv-
ing. Thornhill was atanding a
short distance away from the bus
and he arrested him.

“T took him to Belmont Police
Station and about three quarters
of an hour after he told him that
he had been struck in his eye by
Worrell”, he said.

To Mr. Williams he said that
Thornhill appeared normal when
he saw him the evening after the
accident. He was walking with
his head down. He did not wish
*o stay near the scene.

George Brewster, a civil ser-
vant, was one of those who at-
tended the excursion of Club 19
of the Girls’ Industrial Union on
August 6. The excursion was to
River Bay.

He said he drove in the bus
M-1422 which was being driven
by Thornhill.

Fairly Fast Speed

On the way back to town the
bus was travelling at a fairly fast
rate and _ closel followed by
Leroy Worrell. The lorry made
about two attempts to pass the
bus and when it reached Sandy
Lane Woods, it succeeded in pass-
ing it.

After the bus followed the lorry
at a fast rate, and overtook it, it
passed several other buses.

“We then noticed that the lorry
was again behind us,” he said.
“The lorry soon after got-up to the
bus and tried to pass it on its right
side but the two vehicles raked
each other. They stopped and the
drivers and some of the passen-
gers got out and looked at the
vehicles but there was no dam-
ages.”

They proceeded again at a re-
duced rate, the bus in front. The
bus arrived about 10 to 15 min-
utes at the Girls’ Industrial Union
before the lorry did. The lorry
came up and parked behind the
bus which was parked on the left
side of the road in front of the
Girls’ Industrial Union.

“After the lorry was pirkec
Worrell came up to Thornhill and
accused him of having tried to
cross him. A dispute between then
followed. They attempted to fight,
but the crowd kept them apart
Worrell went up to Thornhill and
tried to take hold of him. Worreil
eventually cuffed Thornhill in his
eye.

“Thornhill had an opened pen
knife in his hand but nothing
happened, I afterwards saw him



were present!
from Australia
The beef for
paying 36

arga, and these
only obtainable
and New Zealand,
which they were now
and 48 cents per lb. would be
secured in the near future at
much thigher prices. Ninety-four
cents per lb. would be charged for
best quality beef, That being the
case, the price to the consumer
would be about $1.15 or $1.20 per
Ib. “Imagine what this will mean
to you who can hardly pay two
shillings per lb. now for the
item,” said Mr. Chase.

Salt fish had just been removed

from the controls and h* could
assur® t! : > Jariior ‘eo
price would be as he had said,
unless a_ reduction be brought

about by subsidisation.
Government should continue to
cubsidise balanced aninal feed,
he said, so that people would be
encouraged to rear pias, sheep
fowls and other poultry, to cope
in some way with the exhorbitant
prices that would be charged
for beef and the other essential
foodstuffs he had referred to,
There should be ‘some alternative



Fishing Industry

One very good alternative, he
thought, was the fishing industry,
and ihe believed that a proper
Fisheries Bill, unlike the one they
had at present, should be operated
to encourage this very worth-
while industry. It was an altern-
ative that was sure to bring about
some relief in the cost of living.

“Oilmeal and pollard can now
be imported, but the price of these
is almost prohibitive at the
moment. This is going to mean
an enormous increase to you for
your animal feed. What is going
to be the result? Your milk will
assuredly be increased in price
and 15 or 18 cents per pint, as I
have said, will most likely be the
cost.”

Mr. Chase touched on_ such
matters as education, house rent
restrictions and a few other items,
and finally told his listeners that
he had built his business with
their support and was prepared
to show them his gratitude by
rendering them faithful and hon-
est service in the House, He
would ask that they give him
the opportunity to do this by
electing sim on December 13.

More Exhibits In
Poultry Section
AT EXHIBITION

Three hundred and twenty-two
entries in the poultry section have
been made for the Annual Agri-
cultural Exhibition at Queen’s
Park, 32 more than last year, the
Advocate learnt yesterday. There
are 50 birds in the leghorn class,
the biggest entry in years, it was
said.

Entries in the pigeon class are
340 this year, 40 less than last
year’s figure. y

The entries for cows, horses,
pigs, goats, sheep and dogs are
now complete. The figures are 66
cows, 11 bulls, 9 horses, 17 pigs,
62 goats, 40 sheep and 35 gogs.

Over 20 booths have already
teen erectéd in Queen’s Park.

,lso erected are the small un-

svered booths along the wire

nelesure facing the roadway,—
for those sellers who would not
be deing so,large a trade as to
neces.itate the use of one of the























was dented and the right head
inmp damaged. A brake mark of
52 feet was on the road. This
mark was traced to the left rear
wheel of the car. He saw Mr. Jor-
tan lying in a bed in his house.
He did not test the brakes of
L—132. He enquired for the driver
1d found her in Mr, Jordan's
house, \
Police Constable Daniel
that he tested

said
the brakes of the
motor car L—132 and found them
to be in good order. Two tests
were carried out.

? Mrs, Beryl Birch said that she
lives at Paynes Bay, St. James
She has been driving for 19
months. She was driving the
motor car L-132 along Sands
Street, St. Peter, about 12.45 p.m.
Her sister was sitting beside her
and her husband was behind

There were two cars on Sands
Street and just as she was about
to pass the last car, a man sudden-
ly appeared from behind the last
ear, This man came from the sea-
side. Her car struck this man and
he fell on the road, She was driv-
ing on the left side of the road
After the car hit the man she got
unnerved. After the man was
struck she stopped the car.

Tke brakes of the car were in
good order. Before the man was
struck she had no time to apply
her brakes, The man came on the
car suddenly, One of the parked
cars was a Hillman. When the man
appeared he was facing the land-
side of the road,

To Mr. Malone, Mrs. Birch said
that she could not say which side
of the man was hit.

At this stage the Coroner re-
viewed the evidence of the wit-
nesses in the inquiry,





9
Boys’ Club Prepare
~~ oy eg?
For Exhibition
During the past weeks the hoys
of the Speightstown Boys’ Clu
have been making mats, baskets

brushes etc,, for their exhibition
which will take place at the Boys’

Club premises on December 3 at

4.30 p.m. The public will be able
to buy any of the boys’ work at
the Exhibition,



After your Shopping, drop

HAM, CHEESE,
HOT

TEA —





COCKADE BAR & LOUNGE

Over Stanfeld Scott & Co., Lid.,
Broad Street

EGG,
DOGS

COOL DRINKS & FRUIT JUICES

COFYVEE
The Place where only the Best is Served.

of studying the expased geology
of the island in preparation for
cubsurface geological work which
will come wi h the drilling of ihe
first deep test.

Mr. Eugene Dawson of Brown
Drilling Co, of Long Beach, Cali-
fornia, who was in Barbados for
the past week conferring with

him, returned home yesterday via § 1
cargo arriving from
Hornsund

San Juan by B.W.1.A,

While here they discussed the
pos*Tble contact for the drilling
of the Barbados Oil Company's
first deep test*which is tentative-
ly proposed for the early part of
1952 if a suitable location can
be found,

In the meantime, a search fot
the location is going on by means
of the seismic survey.

Where Is The

“Daerwood” ?

Where is the motor vessel Daer-
wood? This question could not be
answered yesterday by the vessel's
agents, The Schooner Pool, and
the local Harbour and Shipping
Department did not have any in-
foimation of its whereabouts.



However, a cablegram reaching
the Harbour and Shipping Master
on November 21 reported that an
intercept from Curacao’ Radio
said that the Daerwood was over-
due since she sailed from Grenada
for Aruba, A message was flashed
to all ships asking their skippers
to keep a sharp look out for the
two masted motor vessel,

Daerwood skippered by Cap-
tain Mulzaec and having on board
12 passengers — two children in-
cluded = left Barbados on No-
vember 15 for Aruba via Gren-
ada. She also took cargo for her
poris of call

Daerwood
crew of ten.

usually carries a
She has a net ton-
rage of 94, Her hull is painted
black and her bottom red, The
woodwork above her deck was
mostly painted white and cream,

in with the children for

a drink and a snack



SANDWICHES,

— COCOA

Co., Ltd.
hooped
cessories,
ironware, oi] and gas cookers, saw
blades, iron scissors, lamp burners,
enamelware,

Copenhagen, typewriters,
photo accessories from Antwerp

appropriate driving

PDO OOOO TOTO

last night for Trinidad,
F.om
9,500

Hamburg, she

bags of muriate of
Messrs. R. & G. Challenor
iron, shoes,

clocks, toys,

wire
ctor were

goods,
among
Hamburg.

a tr



also

batteries and cotton

No Driver's Liceace

Mr. G. B. Griffith, Acting Police
Mag.swate of
seeaay tined Oscar
Hill, St. Joseph,
14 days or one month's
ment
0-81 on
being tne holder of an
diiving licence

The offence
November 24

Joseph
was also fined
Pwo

employing Oscar

District “A,”

for driving the

Swan Street

was committed

Branch of
£3 in

Horse
14 days
months’
Hoyte to
O.81

motor car without

licence



Gold Chain Stolen

Daisy Bowen of Fairchild Street,
that

City, reported to the Police
between 3 a.m. and 8.30 a.m
November 22 her house wus
broken into and a= gold chi

valued at $60 stolen



Poole Pottery

A new shipment



Book Ends, Flying Ducks,
Blue Birds, Sea Gulls,
Vases, ete.

at your Jewellers

WY. De LIMA
& €O., LTD.

Broad Street

Weatherhead’s
Offer To-day

s ~ .
Chocolates in Presenta-

tion Boxes by all the

brought
potash

Beech staves and heavis,
electrical ac-
batteries

chairs
othe

brought dry
from
nails and



yes-
Hoyte of Horse
£3 to be paid in
imprison
motor Car
without
Appropriate

Hill,

imprisonmen for
drive

MORE AND MORE MEN
ARE CHANGING TO ...



4
#
®
« PURINA MILK CHOW
L
a

gp Hi. Jason Jones & Co., Ltd.
ieee
{a we ee ee a @ubuaoawta





YOUR BAKING
EASIER



‘K SHOES vary

“ecause they have become convinced

of K's Superiority.
e

“RE ARE THREE OF THE MANY VERY GOOD

REASONS FOR THAT SUPERIORITY:
e

(1) ‘K’ SHOES are made from the finest leathers
obtainable. Both soles and insoles are hand-
tested for flexibility and accurately graded
by skilled craftsmen. ;

(2) THE UPPERS of ‘K’ SHOES are selected,
hand-cut and matched by experienced crafts-
men with a care that no machine could
imitate .

(3) ‘K’ SHOWS are made over the famous ‘K’
PLUS FITTING LASTS with the heel-parts
one fitting narrower than the fore-parts. This

ensures a close fit at the heel and freedom
for the toes,
e

ae Why not come in and be fitted with a pair
of these world famous shoes? We are suve
you'll say like all the other ‘K’ wearers ;—

PLL NEVER WEAR ANOTHER SHOK BUT ‘K’

PRICES $17.00 to $21.63

FROM

HARRISON'S

DIAL 2664

Sole Distributors for ‘K’ SHOES in Barbados









SSS Se = =



Rep Ot & ern

Om mG) fo of
See ee ee ee

ano @
IT’S HERE AGAIN |!



Distributors

88 89 8 wt ©














—-—

ther booths.



_@ On Page 8 Popular Makers

FOR XMAS

“TOIRS CHOCOLATES IN PRE







NOTICE

COME

SCOOP OEE



SPNTATION BOXES, MOIR’S
e POT OF GOLD--Contain Aimons- | ONK
Tinos, Pineapple Cubes rn Pa
Nits King’s Choice Burnt >
A'mnonda, Mararschino Ch rries OO}
Nougatines Cashew Nuts, alt ¢ COME
these and sixteen other varietle y,
in “Moir's Pot of Gold” Pox

We regret to inform our customers

\ino Moire Luxury Package
welcome and happiness

For those who visit our ALL

PACKAGES
TRYS CHOCOLATES IN



MILLINERY DEPT’ labour and materials we have ce aie ae CALL IN TODAY AND SELECT {Vy

rehed Almonds

that due to the increased cost of

SORES SSIS

WE ARE WELL STOCKED with items for ladies
including HATS, TRIMMINGS FOR HATS.
RIBBONS of many Patterns. ARTIFICIAL .. .
FLOWERS for all purposes. VELVETS and a
wide variety of DRESSES.

CADBURY'S IN
T:ON BOXES

been compelled to raise our prices
from lst December, 1951. Viriety, Pink Rones, Sumner

PRESENTA
Box,
Girls

| PROM THE FINEST RANGE OF

XMAS PRESENTS

Hazel nuts ond
Picadilly
Pictorial

Breeze, Milk Tray, Roses, Sel. cted

CADBURYS
> cuits, Plain and

CHICOLATE
Milk Choc



We shall renew our efforts to
bring you the best of services and

trust that

ROWNTREE IN PRESENTA

TION BOXES-—Galleon, Flowers, & 4 % e si
Hicture Assortment, Girls, Round, Presentation Sets by Max Factor, Yardley’s, Eliz-
Black Magic in large boxe and



in tins

FOR CHILDREN of all ages we have some really
dainty items which will make them excellent gifts,
or dress them up for their special occasions in the
coming season.

abeth Arden, Cusson, Morny Bath & Tcilet Soaps,
Also a Delicious Assortment of
SWEET BISCUITS by P ek Frean
suntiey & Palmer, Crawfords
and CARRS in tin Boxes with
Pea uutiful Xmas desig:

$
Pea FRESH PASCALLS MARSH
% “ALLOWS in Packages and Tins

e Goodness knows the're good
*
%
% a

SANITARY LAUNDRY COMPANY . BRUCE WEATHERHEAD
|) MIMITED OF BARBADOS. HS as ane

ig Head of Brozd Street.

Morny Tale & Body Powder in Gardenia, Jasmin,

663°

656660 S8O

COCOOEES

your patronage will

>

sandalwood, French Fern ete.

continue.

oF

VANITY CASES & BEAUTY MIRRORS
COMB & BRUSH SETS



DRESSES, SUN SUITS, ROMPERS, ETC.

Cave Shepherd & Co., Ltd.

10, 11, 12 & 13, BROAD STREET

COS





also

GIFT BOXES OF CHOCOLATES



4,544

PLSD





KNIGHTS DRUG STORES



7%





§ 4660+ 5
errs PLEO OOP?

— SO —_———________!





7




PAGE SÂ¥X



CLASSIFIED ADS."

TELEPHONE 2508.



























































|

FOR SALE



















































































BLIC SALES

=~





REAL ESTATE

DEBENTURES—4%



























































BARBADOS ADVOCATE



r

*





The charge f annowncements of Debentures, Mar- |
ths riage Death Acknow!- | ine Hotel (1943) Ltd. Further particu- me
7 â„¢ Memoriam notices is Sa jlars, apply Wm. Fogarty (B'dos.) Ltd ca
0 leeias's ond )on Sundays AUTOMOTIVE 16.11.51—t.f.n
am bd , o p to 50, ard! os. _- |
ent 4 week-days and CAI Si 9 good tyre N ‘ j
cent - on Sundays for eveh) parte « cheap. Suitable for mak AUCTION me
bie wer | Pick-up Apply G. E. Martin, Brighton | A YZ
ay Singer 25,11,51 WEDNESDAY 28th at 12 noon BAY | ke “yp
a inal is STREET opposite Beckwith St. Mahogany \> cd
DIED | CAR—One 1937 Ford V8 in good cé Tub Chairs, Arm Chairs, Mahogany Wash | X
= j tio ply to General Engine Rebuild-} Stand Marble Top, Iron bedsteads, painted eee 4% J
. - ; ‘om Dial 4351 27.11,51—2n | Dressing tables, Medicine cabinet, Press, \ J
JOUNKE a November, 1951 Hat Rack with Mirror, Hocker, ware, sje
Alice Margue Her funeral will CAR—Ford Prefect 11,000 miles. Con-]| knives, spoons, wash stands, Ladies Desk e
, her Tate wnee at G15 430) tact Butcher, McKnearne/ & Cog Garage.| @nd_ other items TERMS CASH. R
m= St u's Chureh, Bay 2711.51 in | ARCHER Mc KENZIE, Auctioneer Vv
Gods are invited — 25.11.51—3n oN
Xeeorge: Bree and Daamend) CAme1 Citroen Car, under one year{ — - - | i>
ald, me 8, miles n perfect order
. id, done 9,000 miles. |
Nearest offer to $2,400.00 accepted. Dial
IN = MEMORIAM | 3904 Dr. C. G. Manning or 4618 G. B. | HAMMER
r = Ward 27.11.51-—4r | SALES IN DECEMBER
pensiegiivemeeniet TURSDAY 4TH: Sale at Bosvigo, Fag!
nore * ef our dear CAR -One (1) A-@@® Car. A-1 condi i Hall toad
t w wie Hope who] tien New Battery and Tyre Price TURSDAY 11TH: Sale of clothing fram
Mae m November 26th' $1,660 For wufermation Dial 2142 the Sanitary Laundr at The Mart, |
e 25.11.51 3n 17 High Street |
E ed since that sad WEDNESDAY 12TH: Estate ot Cc, B
- CAR--Drop-head Convertible Ford V-8 Rice Sale Tranquility Strath- |
cd was called away] im good condition, Gaing cheap. Apply elyde }
‘ woo! to rise. | | Cale & Co, Limited. Phone 4516 | BRANKER, TROTMAN & CO.
mp shall rend ne ar - Si 2 nu. 51 “4 Aeetuanani
he hrist fetters of the tomb CHRYSLER (WINDSOR) 1947 Moc ! 27.21. Sle dn
‘ ‘ \ ortal mane with New Tyres. Fluid drive with aute- | |
to t bered by Darnley Hope] matic Transmission Mileage 33,000 and +
Myrth and] jn perfect condition—Dial 4616 vi RENT
, Fite Lys j FOK |
v AI oe rT memory of my “MOTORCYE LE ae “i : Hi PB S.A |
5 ‘ ci Walcott who died} side valve. Apply: J. Mahon c/o S$ HOUSES |
err it 42 Sewing Machine Co. 25 -11.61-~2n
t pe ter ROOMS——Furnished or unfurnished for
27.11.5110 “ een t vulays Dial 4837
5 et ELECTRICAL particular Dial 485 ss tia
r REFRIGERATOR One (Electrolux) | ~ ’
WOTKICES Ou Burning Refrigerator ir perfect my
See ee. Se ANNOUNCEMENTS
i Sistine Plantations New Bullding, Phone 8270
Ng’ an 70 21 11.51—12n
vO TICE sinensis $5 in goods and with your cash bill
oe 3 a ting of the MISCELLANEVUUS ou get a guess-coupon; how many
rr : } "t os nosed m —- —-—__—__— : crews in a jar? You can win an
; ati Se ber at § p.m BLANKETS: Good quality Assd. shades KCO radio it certainly pays to $s
WLLIAMS and sizes $3.25 and /4.26 at Tr Aw) > 8 OT a re ss stuck 8.0
eral Secretary Wm. Hry .St 27.11.51—t.1.n s fl~
O85. Gisee8 Ii 0 ndehiiacemmnernsensromeemtcbone
~| BARBADOS VIEW SCARVES 100
pure silk with lovely views ef Barbados PERSONAL
EDUC ATIONAI An ideal Gift to give or own. THANT
i Zi 4 Dial 27.41,61—t.f.1
“FRMNOODO ET Ul ton aC Dhenlc |. Bee, Public hereby warn:d against | Here is coffee with the inviting aroma,
. ; . . ea . van giving credit to a one in my name a
MALVERN ACADEMY. | m2 House, st. sosepn."Anpiy: Mrs. | CY" ieitten order signed’ py me| he heavenly flavor that makes every sip
SDENUILLE, CHEAPSIDE ohn Les. ‘Telephone Goi. sien, | naving left the island on the Mth of a satisfying experieftce. With Chase &
; ae aa ead. the s s November, 1951 |
aa git dg yh pba aaecaege Eggers ne GOULBOURNE ASHLEY ALLEYNE, | Sanborn you get all the flavor your cup can
Jepartment of Rducation EGYPTIAN LEATHER eeninec Be Phi
1 entrance examination for the hue Just opened a large ¢ rtment of Gents 27.11.51—2n | hold. Ask for Chase & Sanborn today.
952 ¥ i be heid er chool og Friday} faney wallets and Ladies’ pure leather Soni | Ip
Jecember at 10 a.m. purses: Ideal for Gifts at THAN! BROS. wae as dla inst |
re ) irie exam p 8 Th ublic are hereby warned agains’
ae Gis Me and. Carsbritgel once 27.11.51—t.t.0 | aiging eredit to my wife, OLGA YPAR- |
land -_. 7 : aap . se WYDICA) as I do not hold
Bs on _ NANCY STRAW MATS: For bedroor nenat reaponsible for “hes of anyone
rtan aia ipa ovely designs $1.0) each THANT'S Pr ee entree ee, debt or debts in ms | 3 scsit soli laa linia aa cae al atlantis eee
Headmaster hp opie ely clamenmss name unless by @ written order signed by
: ea sss GOVERNMENT. NOTICE
: = aad in | i ANIEL YEARWOOD, | ‘
ps sine INDIAN SANDALS—Another shipment | sari hae xing Street, | TR
GOVERNMENT NOTICE sss parived re Spe aid out immedi- | St. Michael. | EXECUTIVE ENGINEER, HIGHWAYS & ANSPORT
f } ti ome ane secure yours at} AL S121
atta ane I THAN?S. Dial 3466. 27.11.51 —t.f.n ane | DEPARTMENT, BARBADOS.
K c a ot responsible for any debt or ‘ ;
Serer KODAK Precision enlarger 4.5 lens.| udbtg eonteacted by nnyone except by a Applications are invited by the Government of Barbados tor
$ WA. CENTRAL SUGAR CANE 1 AGRE a 0/a Singer aoa written order signed by m % he post of Executive Engineer, Highways & Transport Department.
BREEDING STATION = ipbneipnicannbiond eateaas: | AUHTIN 8. HOLPRS 2. The post is pensionable and carries salary scale of $3,456
DEPARTMENT OF SCIENCE |“ADIES BATH SUITS—Excellent quality | ie Riana |x 144 — $4,320 per annum. In addition a non-pensionable cost
AND «AGRICULTURE withemxlste in blue, green, red and gold) | of living allowance of $156 per annum is payable. Point of entry
A: f sizes 32 to 40 $3.51 each at KIRIPALANT | : “j ; i "
Agricultural Assistant, B.W.1. [52 swan Street 27.11.51 LOST & FOUND | into scale will be determined by experience and qualification. Holdei
Central Sugar Cane Breeding = retitareerapibllintiatiimionte aun | | will be required to keep a motor vehicle for the performance of his
Station SHOPPING BAGS & SUIT CASES—j —______. | juties and will be eligible for travelling allowance in accordance
Cheapest prices at THANT'S Dial 3466. | LOST | with local rates. He will be liable to Widows’ and Orphans’ con-
pplications are invited for the} dt cs: lade sinpbilinabiy stag asi | tributions at the rate of 5% of salary. No quarters are provided.
of Agricultural Assistant,] sHIRTS—For Sport, Holiday, work or) CAT—Female cat, flufty tabby answer-| Passage expenses of officer and family not exceeding $1,440 are pay-
WJ, Central Sugar Cane Breed-| otherwise, For the widest variety try| ing to the name of en eeae Finder able on first appointment. s ;
Station, Department of Agri-] THAN! PROS, Dial sas, 27.11.51—t.0.n ee eee te 97.11.51—3n os pe) ve - en a cea on SRerenee ae
culture reek Ne | to medical fitness. In other respects the appointment | 5
2. ‘Whe salary attached to the} TABLE—One modern mahogany Dining a /to the Colonial Regulations ard the local Civil Service Regulations
ost is in the scale $1,200 x $72—] Table. As new. Phone 3950, 0 WANTED | and Instruetions.
20 (E.B.) x $96—$2,592 per ee Braise | 4. Candidates should be between the ages of 30 and 40 years
unnum and the point of entry in —qyene—s ——— land sheuld possess one of the following qualifications —
» scale will depend on the qual- Election Notice HELP | Corporate Membership ci the Institution of Civil Engineers,
ideations and experience of the ° PF Set - : of a Degree or Diploma exempting from Seetions A and B
successful applicant. The post is CUTTER — An experienced cutter |

not pensionable but after a year’s
probationary service the officer
may join a Provident Fund,

3. The | successful applican:
will be required to provide him-
elf with a motor car, a loan to-
wards the purchase of which wil)
be made on terms and condition:
imilar to those which are appli-















FORM NO. 9
The Representation of the People (Mis-
cellancous Provisions) (Section 15)

Act, 1951
NOTICE OF GRANT OF A POLL
THE PARISH OF ST. THOMAS

NOTICE is hereby given to the electors
“0 the aforesaid parish of St. Thomas
that a Poil hag been granted for the
leetion now pending for the said parish
Â¥f St. Thomas and that such Poll will be













wanted, preferably with recommendation,
Broadway Dress Shop 25.11.51—3n

COOK—Head
for new Small
Tobago. Modern Kitchen, Write giv-
ing age, experience and_ references
ABRNOS VALE BEACH HOTEL, mrenen

First Class Hotel in

B.W.l 3n.

OLONY CLUB,
vaceaney for an Assis



a
or

James, have
Manager



























Cook or Chef required |

| of the Associate Membership Examination of the Institution
} of Civil Engineers with at least ten years practical experi-
ence on civil enginecring works, preferably in connection
with road making.

| 5. Helder will be required to take charge of all works on
maintenance and construction ef yoads and bridges, to make surveys,
take levels and prepare plans, designs and estimates and to set out
and supervise all work and be responsible for its proper and economi-
cal execution, to assist with the technical, administrative, financial
and disciplinary contro] of the depariment,

































































ble relli jeers Manageress; applice should be made " icati - 4 _ + +.
cable to travelling officers of the | ‘pened on the 13th day of December, 1951,| jn writing. in the first plage, giving full | ,, 6. ADRRIGAtIONS snonld be ubmitted to the Colonial Secretary,
Harbados Government Service [it the hour of seven in the forenoon] particulars and experience Public Buildings, Bridgetown, to reach him not later than noon on
\ mileage allowance will be paic | ind kept ogen until the hour of six in 27.11.81-tn. | Friday, 28th December, 1951.
; nek Clave . rates, he afternoon in the Polling Stations ————$$$—$—$——— 17.11.51—3n.
ote : Sere iearrid rase vo, | stablished in the yarious Polling] BISHOP'S HIGH SCHOOL, TOBAGO ive “ Baad si ens
1. Applications, stating ake | divisions comprised in the said parish CO-EDUCATIONAT
educational qualifications and eX-) of St. Thomas and set out in the list ¥ — 4
nerience, together with COPIES] #ttached hereto Applications are invited for the posts €
4 . Is should be address And that the candidates in the above| of TWO Assistant Teachers capable of J
of testimonials should be aaaress- | .vrish of St. Thomas are as follows: teaching Subjects up to Higher Certificate
| to the Director of Agriculture, Candidates Standard rs ee er
Jueen’s Park, and will be accept- CUMMINS, HUGH GORDON (a) Geography MONTREAL, AUSTRALIA, NEW ese 30%
{ up to 12 noon on Thursday 6ih HEWITT, JOHN WINSTONE ib) Mathematics. ZEALAND LINE, LIMITED .
: 7 i981, ie MAPP, RONALD GRENVILLE | Salary-$2,160-—$2,880 (Degree Applicants) (M.A NZ. Line) The M.V, “Caribbee” will accept ¢
‘ember vor, of whieh all persons are heveby requirea $1,440—-$1,680 (Higher Certificate iF si a% r Carge and Passengers for
25.11.51.—4n.] to take notice and govern themselves with Distinction) 8.8 PORT ADELAIDE {a a heds Dominica, Antigua, Montserrat,
sordingl Closing Date; Saturday, 28nd December, | ‘led to sail from Hobart September 25th Nevis and St. Kitts. Sailing 30th §
" TROT nat ine wountin & the | vot 1951 é a sgaheo *| Melbourne October 4th, Sydney October brintatits = he ‘
" f » counting of the votes} 19% aes 4 stant.
ok a given to the several ToanAldata will Apply to Oth, Gladstone October lth, Port The M.V. “Moneka" will aceept
L ommehce on the ith day of December Mr, KENNETH REID, Alma October 20th, “Brisbane October) & cargo and Pass:ngers —_ for
1951 at the hour of nine in the forenoon Concordia, Tobago, | 7b arriving at late ons Doininica, Antigua, Montserrat, %
at St, Thomas Church Bows’ Sehool in %4,11,51—n. Lee SRE GATHACES “Say Perera Nevis and St. Kitts. Date of
5 caernve ry ce x [the parish of St. Thomas. ~ - ——— | mn. dep: ire to be notified.
UNIVERSITY COLLEGE Ox Given under my. hand at St. Thomas SIGN PAINTER—Apply Colonial Adv im addition to general cargo this ves- The M.V. Daerwood will accept
tae WEST INDIES this 22nd day of November, 1951 tising Co,, Shepherd Street, between &—%| sel hag ample space for chilled and hard. Cargo and Passenge~ for St
, : ox ‘ONS. D. A. HAYNES, am Bring samples of work rozen ¢argo. Lucia, St. Vincent, Grenada and
BAKSADUS TLE a Returning Officer, 27.11,51-2n Cargo accepted on through Bills of Lad- Aruba. Date of departure to be
1952 Parish of St. Thomas. | - ee arnaeeemene | ng for trans-shipment at Trinidad to notified,
ihe Bxaminauen for two (2) List OF POLLING STATIONS TYPIST—Good copy typist and filing | British Guiana, Leeward and Windward B.W.I. SCHOONER? OWNERS
Bar io Government Exhibi- PARISH OF ST. THOMAS clerk with mepecianee of customs work | {slands -. peaes Ine.
Sat } pasa (To be attached to “Form 9%") wanted by International Trading Carpora- ' a ls le, 404
H Wnabs the University No. 1. Sharon Mixed School tion 3rd floor Barelays Bank Byilding, | Por further particulars apply a
Olle ol the West Indies wilt No, 2. Welehes Mixed School 97.11.461—-1n | FURNSSS, WITHY & Co., Ltd, y
hducted im Barbados by the} No &, St. ‘Thomas Boys’ Schoo! = = TRINIDAD SS SOOCCROVETRAEBEEEES*
le . Itation}] Ne % Club Casablanca, Porey Spring TWO GENERAL SERVANTS A} B.W.1. =
i ollege ao ee 8 No, §. Hillaby Mixed School Laundry Maid and a Cook General HecOwrA a Gh, Li
the director of Edueation, No. 6. Bright Star Friendly Society,] Apply. to Mrs, Lisle Bayley, Pavillon, 4DOS, zr
ud will consist ol. Weichman Hall 7 : Hasting 25.11.51--2n | DATE ST IT PA Ys TO ADVERTISE
+ * ; No. 7. Southborough Boys’ School
written examination. t ; rr ia a
No. 8 Mr, Milton Bynoc's Residence SCE
be held in the week be- Bridgefield MISCELLANEOUS fe
ginning Monday, Febru- No, 9. Vaucluse Factory. BOTTLES--Clean empty nip bottles at 0.
ary 25th, 1952. A i mee eae aoe , School.] 4ge, per dozen—deliver Colonnade Stores,
7 4 : I astie Plantation » Ps Oh
(ii) an oral examination t D. A. M. HAYNES, wanes Park Rong, — 13-11: 0)--t..n, | g.
be held in April, 1952 Returning Officer, WANTED to purchase an unused | ,
Candidates must bei— Parish of St. Thomas. | Riectric Service. Apply B.D. C a| pe
. os ne 11.5 \ nate 27.11.51—3n | B tee, epee
(a) under twenty (20) year: ag ALS ee % avPPAte { smi
of age on the 31st Janu- Peat ae eats i rakd 7 NEW YORK SERVICE
ry 1052: | A STEAMER Sails 23rd Novemb*r arrives Barbados 4th December, 1951
= " ane he ie las es oO ine ne | A SPEAMER Sails Mth Deceraberâ„¢ arriv Barbados 25th December, 1951
(b) Natives o s is 01 g Ss elibleeee eilln a ; realty onthe a iicihcediaibtiniesintest
(c) Children os a native, ot NEW ORLEANS SERVICE
i oe caer’ if oF n he , S 8 “OCEAN RANGER" Sailed 71!) Nov ember—arrives B'dos 24th Nov., 1951.
(d) Chitaren of persons Ww ’ A STEAMER Saila 2ist Novem! are domiciled and have from every bottle y | A STEAMER Sails Sth Deceraber-— arrives Barbados 19th December 1951.
evateanpgren ew ameet ovine TT
been resident in this
istand for a period of no | MEE, | CANADIAN SERVICE
less than ten (10) y2ars ¥ | SOUTHBOUND P : Sails Balls And
Candidates will be required i | Name of Sbte Montreal Halifax Barbados
produce with their applications | #8, “ALCOA PEGASUS” Oct. 2th Cet. 29th Nov. lith
Birth Certificates together wit 5.8. “ALCOA PLANTER” Nov. 9th Nov. 12th Nov. 22nd
ertified statements declaring tha | 2.8 APU A th Nov. 23rd Nov. seth Dec. x
h have been receiving thei | “A. STEAMER" : ey . = oe: 2th 9 7th
(ueation for the past three (3 ROBERT THOM LTD. New YORK AND GULF SERVICE.
cars in this colony and that their | APPLY: DA COSTA * co LTD—CANADIAN SERVICE
moral character and general con- lad si agen aeieetare
duct are satisfactory.
\pplications for admission as =
“Iiates for the" Exhibition’ TV ail Ore re)
inust be sent to the Director oi Pe Ne wee oe
E » « Education Office, The a on vr x
Gar? St. Michael, not later
in Qu Sjay, 22nd January, 1952 CANADIAN SERVICE
4 leg ’ > .
: eetees tee some » as From Halifax, N.S., and Montreal,
cond 2 s -
meot Exhibitions must also for- Expected Arrival
M
vd rect to ‘Se Registrar of I fontreal Halifax St John Dates, Bridgetown,
University Colle ze of the Wes s.s. “SUNVALLBY” 7 Nov. 12 Nev, sae 28 Foci
fndles, Jamaica, their applica- 5.8 UNPRINCE 21 Nov,’ 26 Nov _- 12 December
tions for Entrance to the Univer- sa sh VESSEL: Se = ry es 4 ae
» College, The closing date for cahicitee--~ ane oe PS ery









plications for Entrance is 31st
January. 1952

of Application for

to the University Col-

! rticulars of the neces-

lific ns for Matricula-

line of the courses

be obtained from

} * of the University

‘ J sa, or from the local

resentative Mr. H. A.

ghan c/o Y.M.C.A., Pinfold

S!-ex Bridgetov or from the
»» of Education.





of Education,
November, 1954.

27.11.51-——-3n



VP RICH RUBY
VP BRITISH SHERRY

a



You can
enjoy the luxury of 14 glasses
of really fine wine from every
bottle of VP.

ASK AT YOUR

Here’s good news.

USUAL STORE



VP SWEET WHITE
VP GINGER WINE





UNITED KINGDOM SERVICE
From Newport, Liverpool and Glasgow





Expected
Arrival
Newport Liverpool Glasgow Dates
BARBADOS
8.6. “SUNWHYT" 9 Nov 1§ Nov 23 Nov 9 December





UNITED KINGDOM AND CONTINENTAL SERVICE





Expected Arrival

Rotterdam London Dates, Barbados
f.s. “STARCR ST 24 Nov 28 r
STARR S aM Bev. 8 Nov 14 Deeemb +
LARRINAGA 12 D 16 Dec 6 January

20 Dec

ATIONS LIMITED — Phone 4763



Agents: PLA



























TUESDAY, NOVEMBER 27. 1951
Se ee cnet
eR _ ee NS
i . : ' Q
HEADACHE? || onmenTAL
“pean doe ode SOUVENIRS | POLITICAL |
with Double-Acting ALKA-SELTZER! |$ CURIOS ANTIQUES, 1)
You are doubly sure of relief when > JEWELS, CARVINGS |
ou take Alka-Seltzer for your EMBROIDERIES, Etc. |
adache, news Alka - Seltzer $333 i
tai ict ing, {1
sgumesescwcccen: | vmanrs — |i MEETING
excess gastric acidity, so often as- | Pr. Wm. Hry. St. :: Dial 3466 |
sociated with headaches. Have a | j
supply handy always. ————
(GOCP0SO9S 9599599 59SS905F TO-NIGHT R
a . .
Alka-Seltzer } FREE HOOK 2: :
$ Which Makes x At 8 OChk
eae = rae ad z
% GOD'S WAY OF 3 at the
. o
The Secretary and Members of S SALVATION % YANKEE STADIUM,
CLUB OG & x te ae
ta easure o ’ r on S
alee at ee PLAIN ; % ' , .



2 “ in s rt of the
1 1 Please write for one to in suppor
GRAND BARN DANCE Samuel Roberts, Gospel x candidature of
Which will be held at 7 by naan % » a ‘
: ' . INCEN IF FIT
G.1.U. CLUB gor N. Ireland.” S - . on
Ou BEDAY Might NOV.” 20, 1901 OLE to a seat in the House
Admission: Gents 2/6 Ladies 2/- SPSS SSS SSOP P 9 PFSSSSIOâ„¢, of Assembly for the
in T0-DAY'S NEWS FLASH > Parish of St. Michael
v

Speakers :
H. A. Dowding,
E. D. Mottley,

PATIENCE PLAYING CARDS

CANASTA complete with Cards
and Instructions

FURNISH

GIFT PLAYING CARDS with

Barbados Emblem on each :
FOR ENJOYMENT Card. New Novels by the hun- Vincent Griffith
dreds Window Glass and Cabinet
Makers Glass at—

Sydney Walcott
Miss L. Reid

All are invited !

THE MONEY-SAVING WAR

NEW and renewed MAHOGANY
and other Wardrobes, Chest-of-
drawers and Linen Presses—
Vanities, Dressing Tables, Stools,
Screen Frames—-Single and Double

JOHNSON’S STATIONERY
and HARDWARE









Bedsteads, Separate Side Rails, SSS SSS ES
Laths, Washstands.
wining, Kitehen and Fancy

IRON BEDSTEADS WITH SPRINGS

and SPRING FILLED MATTRESSES
recently received, do not wait until the last moment

BUY NOW
CENTRAL EMPORIUM

Corner Broad and Tudor Streets

Tables, Sideboards $17 up, China,
Kitehen and Bedroom Cabina\s
—Larders, Waggons, and many
other things.

L.S. WILSON

SPRY STREET. DIAL



4069









iS & : FOR SALE
b Samiy"ibeh gos Soa 7 |
i s@s HAGGATTS |
teas, | GROUP



STUART & SAMPSON
(1938) LTD.

Headquarters for Best Rum

Offers will be considered for the purchase of the
above group, consisting of Haggatts Factory and the
following estates :—



ie f
: % Arable Total
$. ¥ Acres Acres

We have just * Haggatts & Bruce Vale approx. 305 713

B : Greenland & Overhill approx. 324 644
Received Bawden & River approx. ....... 266 521
Friendship approx. ........... ; 115 211

e

Haggatts Factory has been extensively modernised
and is equipped to produce fancy molasses as well as
D.C. sugar. During the 1951 crop, the factory produced
4,352 tons of sugar. The bags required for the 1952 crop
have been secured.

Tins Plum Pudding
Assorted Biscuits
Cream Crackers

Pea Nuts

Pears, Peaches, Grapes
and Pineapples

”

Soups The mechanical equipment of the group includes }
» Sausages among other items the following International Har-
» Coffee vester tractors :—

Sheil Almonds (Retail)

SSSSSEESSSESESSEEEOO

SEECESOSSSSSS

Pkgs. Mixed Fruit

Raisins, Currants, Prunes & 1—TD14 Crawler Tractor with bulldozer.

Mixed Peel 1—WD9, 1—Farmall H.
Table Jellies, Jams, Table Also 1i—Caterpillar D2 tractor, 2—Subsoiler
Butter




ploughs,

1—dise plough, 1—brushbreaker plough.

8 Dodge Trucks, 1 Austin Truck, 11 cane carts for
Tractors.

Livestock includes 14 horses, 12 mules.



Luncheon Beef, Roast Beef
Tea (pkg. Lipton’s, Horni-
man’s, Typhoo, Red Rose)
Cocoa (Fry’s, Peter’s, Round
Trees) of sale

Further details and conditions

obtained from,

may be

INCE & Co. Ltd.

8 & 9, ROEBUCK ST.

S. P. MUSSON, SON & CO., LTD.,
Broad Street, Bridgetown.

|





SO
EF

BUY A BETTER

SHIRT
FOR LESS MONEY
©

RELIANCE
SHIRT DEPOT

Palmetto Street Phone 4764
Obtainable at all Leading Stores













OF 6668S *

The friend of both the small and Large Plantation Owners alike.
Whis Tractor, the price of which is only a fraction of that of
a full “Track” Tractor—

$3.165.00



COURTESY
GARAGE

ROBERT THOM
LIMITED

3 Agents
9556606666665695695555505 966 96S 55599 SS9SSSSIOSHOS SOHSSISSSSSGOHGOSE*

does an amazing job of Ploughing and is at home either in the
field or on the road.

These world-wide famous Tractors are elso becoming increas-
ingly popular here and are doing fine work.



We invite you to inspect tnis truly wor ful machine
let us arrange for a demonstration for you—ploughing, h

mg, Manure spreading, grass-cutting or what you will.



1%

l-

!
|
|

<
ot“

6606
SEVEN

————.



TUESDAY, NOVEMBER 27, 1951 BARBADOS ADVOCATE PAGI



MiICKcY MOUSE BY WALT DISNEY






To good looks tell you they're just right.
You know, too, when you look at the price
tag, that you can’t get finer value, Illustrated



|
THE GAMBOLS is a Two-tone Brogue. ‘Tied to every pair is
j™| the John White Guarantee Shield—the sign
THAT'S JUST THE FROCK , ’ — gum : . ne
WWE BEEN LOOKING FOR} ff a PARDON Me. BuT mm | YES CERTAINLY - ’ |
1 SAW IT FIRST iT SPECIALLY LL FETCH ONE - ; rm }
= ~ ‘ FROM THE STOCK e
b ar re ROOM,
\

which means ‘ just right’! Look for it in
leacling stores in Barbados.



means made
just right









~ me
ANO THIS MAN GAID THAT 11 JUST Fe
CAN'T LOSE THE Soc -SO BE



T SOUNDS LIK
THE DOOR
















| Iv PAYS YOU TO DEAL HER

SPECIAL offers to all Cash and Credit Customers for Monday to Wednesday only









SPECIAL OFFERS are now available at our Branches Tweedside,
Speightstown and Swan Street
Usually Now Usually Now

Jars Chivers Mince Meat .73 .64 Tins Xmas Puddings 1.91 170
Bots. Heinz Salad Cream 52 -#é Tins Simolina 69 .64

Bots. Sandemans Apitiv Sherry 3.50 3.00 Bots. Cocktail ane 140 128
4 oz.

9. Ltd: Broad Street











DUCK FORCOVYER BOYS / I'LL Fix
A HOT WELCOME FOR THE LAW-
MEN/ |'LLLIGHT THE FUSE TO
TIS POWDER! yam

» HEY, Bors / THERES THE J
SHERIFF - THE MASKED MAN--AND A vg

ey]
y









eee

U L YSS K Ss — JAMES JOYCE

Mailed as a Masterpiece by writers
all over the world



SUFFERIN’ SUSIE! f Y 4
YOU HEAR THAT... DOESN'T fag v : ALSO :

THE HAPPY HYPOCRITE
By MAX BEVRBOUM.



MURDEREK'S MAZE
By ROBERT GLOVER.

TUK BLESSING
By NANCY MITFORD.

on sale at-~- ADVOCATE STATIONERY

SssaaeaeSsSSSSS9S939S99ao SSS LL











wo THINKS THE WAR IS
STILL ON! WITH TABRIZ ¥g

+. WE CAN STOP THIS WITHOUT
BLOOPSHED/ T.NT., ENGAGE HIM



IN PALAVER,.. BRING HIM UP TO

: Exel ee Re
SF: a British MORES MINOR | sMooTHER
u beats its own value-record | CREAMIER

| Four doors. and other [~~ Qasstaaussas
| features make it best
| small car of to-day

Made by an Organization with
| wide experience in the produc-
tion of cars of modest size. High
efficiency engine develops 27 horse-

alr | power. Incorporates the latest
BY ALEX RAYMON:.

AMAZING! POOR JERK
WAS PROBABLY TRAPPED HERE











- automobile engineering advance:
| me Ml dam --

BACK THERE, WE CAN'T
including torsion-bar indepen

HOOT... GOT AN IDEA...
dent front-wheel suspension 7 GUBIC FEET FOR LUGGAGE

a AW * —— i b
4 fy ; f
y ey A ~\\
ca A
METAS Te , ,
WHEN HIG BUDDIES PULLED OUT eS
AND BLEW THE BUNKER... DUG le
HIS WAY OUT RECENTLY, AND... 7” ° sig ¢
FL 3 og ;
+ Mono-eonstruction and
\ / 92 BETER YOU DISCOVERED BUOU
} \ LA : Gi" Wy?
5 3 Aes 4
aa 4,
MARK
i
4

MAY WE TALK TO THE FIRST | OF cOURSE... ) LET HIM TALK TO TWE =] | hydraulic brake Room for ju
L J BENSON TAKING PICTURES _ E, LADY NORLEY ? TLL KOVE THE \ MIND, I'D LIKE | WHOLE CREW IF HE | poco ° . with trunie pa

MATE, LADY NORLEY -_ spare wheel
STEWARD J ly LWISHES, MR. SPOFFORD,, be e | is readily accescible from a separ-
BUT BRING HIM BACK! = ~ ate compartment
r ll = a ef ]I. ey
; NN | [ a) |
a a Y be
Hoa | ae tid cM
OR AD <> (ae
eer A, 7
} 4 \ v4 ‘

SAM OF THE YOUNG I WANT TO GET THE
+ poles 4
} Saypitey) ,’ bes 9 It i Sn ge 4
ng i hte GS or ” : Ques &G A

fage for four. Byen
clead





7 AT YOUR PARTY
{ Shy YOU PUT HER



' F / _ 1 DID NOT PERSONALLY
\ YOUR YACHT... SAP HER WITH A SANDBAG,
Te iBy...T ORDERED my




\ FIRST MATE TO GIVE HER

THE HEAVE -HO!

PERSON... 4 oy LOWDOWN ON “MURDER,
i
oe

INCORPORATED"/
-- Pe
p ; J ia)
ALL SEATS WITHIN WHEELBASE EASY TO PARK & TO ORIVE






All passengers sit low down within fasy to park in small und
} tLe wheelbase. You ride incomfort steer t yugh trate. | stly
} 2 on the longest journey. Seats Pi

are designed to give anatomically

WOMAN AND) MUSTA STOPPED'EM- TEL , WHO WALKGAL |
q ; - : .

2

| rrect support "4 jles per gallo -
re ¢ . eta
THE PHANTOM | je = |
ONLY ONE WAY THEY ON] [Wi VOFTHESKULLY | N\ Mgr
COULD GET OUT! | ON THEIR~ JAWS! SCoY! iT. SIGN OF THE NA.

THE BOYS OUTSIDE ; PHANTOM~GHOST} | |

|

|

ee, «MILK STOUT @)
WORLD'S BIGGEST SMALL GAR BUY Sisto wide-ansio vision, nwo y |

‘ sLeering, lZ-Vv t lighting
synchromesh 4-speed gear box—all the important advances of mauy

i are co kG, ie: & Co. tre,
FORT ROYAL GARAGE LTD. | P. O. Box 56

Phone 2385 Sole Distributors Phone 4504 ' BRIDGETOWN . Dial 2402







ci RAS Se
~
—
oe


PAGE EIGHT
INTERMEDIATE CRICKET :



Windward Defeat Spartan
To Win Intermediate Cup

WINDWARD defeated Spartan in their Intermediate

cricket match on Saturday by 96 runs.
them Cup winners in this division

This victory makes
Cable & Wireless, and

the Regiment also scored outright victories over Mental

Hospital and Wanderers.

Empire and Pickwick played to

a draw, Pickwick getting three points for a first innings lead.

Windward in their first innings
scored 268 runs for eight wickets
declared and rtan replied with
124 runs. Wh play started on
Saturday Windward declared in
their second innings with the score
at 13 for no wicket.

Spartan needing 158 runs
seore a win, were all out in their
secofid innings for 61 funs. W.
Jemmott top-scored for Spartan
with 18 while A. Matthews hit 12.
H. Farmer ami B. Thornton took
threé wickets @ath.

At Bay, Wariderers who had
scored 132 runs in their first inn-
ings were dismissed by the Regi-
ment in their second turn at the
wickét fot 106 runs. M. Clarke
and K. Corbin 18 runs each to
top score for Wanderers while A.
Phillips who bowled at a steady
length captured five of the Wan-
derets wickets for 30.

In, their first innings the Regi-
ment scored 169 runs, Needing 69
runs for victory the Regiment
scored 79 runs for the loss of one
wickét.

C. & W. Declare

Cable & Wireless who
the Whole of the first day in their
match against t Mental Hos-
pital and scored 1 ‘ runs declared
in thefr second innings on Satur-
day when the score had reached
55 ruris for the loss of six wickets,
In their first innings Mental Hos-
pital scored 72 runs and again in
the setond innings they were un-
able tO reach the 100 mark. They
scored 91 runs, A good bowling
spell by C, Lawless Was perhaps
responsible for the a He
took four wickéts for 30 after
bowling nine overs.

Thug Cable & Wireless defeated
Mental Hospital by 73 runs.

batted



The Empire-Pickwick match
ended ina draw but Pickwick
who dismissed Empire for 116
runs carried their score to 168
runs t6 gain a first innings lead
ever their opponents, Rain held
up play for a considérable time
and en stumps were drawn
Empiré had scoted 13 runs for iio
wicket in their second innings.

= board: —

iE vs. PICKWICK
‘wun Fist at aarrats
wf I
E, Evel¥n c Grit al 52
E. Lewis b Siaele,” 19
G. Moate b Prescod 42
E. Evel¥n c Austin b Griffith 10
M. Fostér c Amory b Skeete . 7
R. Clare b Prescod 10
a a. | © Barrow b Amory 8
» Peterkin ni
W. Edwards eetite & Brescod 5
O, Lashley |.b.w. b prponex ‘ 1
W. Yeafwood absent . 0
Extras ‘ 2
Total “168
BOWLING ANALYSIS wads
oO. R. w.
Cc. Prestod 20 w 4
C. Spooner 13.1 4 3 (1
1, Harris 9 1 25
E. Amory oe i
N. Sk ° 3 27
K. Griffith 8
EMPIRE— “and Trias
C. Bouthe not out 5
E. Barrow not out 4
Extras ... Ron 4
Total (for no wkts,) ‘ 34 13

CABLE & WIRELESS vs, MENTAL |
PITAL

HOS
CABLE f WIRELESS — ist Junings 184 *
MENTAL HOSPITAL—ist Loy Ings
CABLE & WIRELESS— 2nr Innings
(for 6 wkts, decid.)
MENTAL HOSPITAL—2nd Innings
Best b R. Lawless
Boyce ¢ C, Lawless b R. Lawless 4
Burrowes c McKenzie b R.
Lawless 0
M. Crichiow 1.b.w. b R. Lawless 1
G, Springer c Gilkes b Branker
Cc. Williams Lb.w. b C. Lawless 22
R. Chase c Gilbert b C. Lawless
E. Quintyne c C. Lawless b Branker 1
V. Carter stpd. (wkpr. Matthews) b
Cc. Lawless
R. Rock c Seale b C, Lawless
C, Knight not out

Cc,
v.
N.

7
ti]

Xtras : 1
Total ooo epee eb
BOWLING ADEE SS
oO, M. Ww
Oy Se lo BP *, a
R. MeKendie ........ 3 0 16 0
BE, Mranker .......... 11 2 38 2
C. Lawless fam, Ss Le Ol
“ WINDWARD vs. SPARTAN
WINDWARD— ist Innings
lor 8 wkts. decid.) 268
SPARTAN—Ist Innings im
WINDWARD—2nd Innings
Cc. Evelyn not out ; 2
H. Thornton not out : ‘ 9
tras ice

Total {for no wkts.) .

SPARTAN—2nd Innings

N. Wood ¢ (wkpr. T. Farmer) b

area Farmer .. 6
Wood stpd (wkor. T. Farmer) b



YESTERDAY’S
WEATHER REPORT

FROM CODRINGTON.
Rainfall; Nil
Total Rainfall for Month to
Date; 6.45 ins.
Highest Temperature: 8.35°F
Lowest Temperature: 72.5 °F

Wind Velocity: 8 miles per
hour
Barometer: (9 a.m.) 29.907

(3 p.m.) 29.827












Theyll Do It _Bvery

“GET MEA
BID-AND-ASK ON
ULTRA ASHCAN, PFD,
GRUNTO

may

g

N
to

55 Sponsible

mM. Farmer
H. Cadogan run out
A. Matthews Lb.w, b R. Farmér
A. Gittens Lb.w. b H. Farmer
B. Morris b R. Farmer.
W. Jefmmoti » Thornton
S. Marris Lb.w. b Atkinson
Â¥ MeComie not out
Skinner b Thornton
Medford b Thornton
Extras 2

;
2
4
8
1
4
0
0

Total
REGIMENT vs. WANDERERS
at Wanderers
WANDERERS—ist Innings
REGIMENT—Ist Innin,
WANDERERS—2nd Innings
A. Seale run out :
D. Alleyne b Clarke
A. Lewis c Crawfor
G. Skeete 1b.w. b
R. Packer run out
M. Proverbs ¢ & b Watts
M. Mayers b Clarke ,
M. Clarke c ¢wkpr.) b Phillips i
K. Corbin b Phillips
. Patterson not out 1
H, Remsay b Phillips
Extras



b Phillips
illips

Total . 106

BOWLING ANALYSIS
Pe ee

A. Phillips
K. Clarke
L. Bynoe 1 0
Cc, Watts 8 1
A. Brathwaite ‘ 0
«. Clarke 1
REGIMENT~ 2nd Innings
A. Ishmael not out 34
A. Btathwaite b Corbin 3
L By Dog not out 40
fa 2

Total
BOWLING ANALYSIS
Oo. M. R

(for 1 wkt.)

23 1
24 0
ot 0
12 0

K. Corbin 7 1
R. Packer 6 0
H, Ramsay 3 0
M. Proverbs 2 6

2ND DIV. CRICKET :

H.C. 73 For 7
Vs. Empire

The first day’s play in_ the
Eleventh Round of Second Divi-
sidn ¢ricket matches ended on
Saturday. At most grounds rain
stopped play, In the Empire—
College match, College batting
first seored 73 rung for seven
wickets when play ended. Rain
held up play for a considerable
time. C. Beckles took three

« Wickets for 15 runs for Empire

and L, Clarke two wickets for
three runs.

At Leeward, Carlton ir their
match against Leeward scored
108 runs in their first turn at the
wicket. C. White topscored in the
Carltch innings with 38 runs,
Best bowling performance was
given by S. Marshall who cap-
tured five of the Carlton wickets
for 9 runs, G. Gilkes took three
wigsels, for 46 runs.

the énd of play Leewatd
had replied with 42 runs for four
wickets. L, Jordan is not out 26.

Rain held We lay at Beckles
Rodd where Wanderers and Pick-
wick are playing. Wanderers who
batted first had scoted 48 runs
in theiy first innings when stumps
were drawn. Bowling for Pick-
wick D. King bagged four wickets
for 11 runs

Foundation scored 151 runs in
their first innings at Foundation
against Y.M.P.C. Mr, Jones 53
and C, Burke 45 not out were re-
for this score. The
wicket was taking turn. C. O'Neil
and C. Greenidge each took three
wickets,

Rain prevented Y.M.P.C. from

ing their first innings.
EMPIRE vs, COLLEGE AT COLLEGE

COLLEGE Ist Innings—73 for 7 wkts

C. Beckles 3 for 15, L. Clarke 2 for 3)
CARLTON vs. LEEWARD AT LEEWARD

CARLTON Ist Innings—108 (C. White
38, S. Marshall 5 for 9, G. Gilkes 3 for 46).

LEEWARD Ist Innings—42 for 4 wkts.

(L. Jordon not out 26).
WANDERERS vs, PICKWICK AT

Hn it ROAD
= abet for

Ist .Innings — 48 (D
H. Simthons 3 for 12).
FOUNDATON va.

Y.M.P.C. AT
FOUNDATION
FOUNDATION ist Inhings—151 for 7
wickets.
(Mr.
Cc. O'Neil 3 for 27,

WHAT’S ON TODAY

Court of Grand Sessions—
Thornhill murder _ trial
10.00 a.m,

Drama Group, Extra-Mural
Youth — British Council,

Jones 53, C, Burke not out 45,
C, Gréen'dge 3 for 51)

fica

Political Meeting — Labour,
Arch Hall, St. Thomas—
Dr. Cummins and Mr.

Politieal Meeting — Labour.
Chalky Mt., St. Andrew—
Mrs. E. E. Bourne.

Sunrise: 5.58 a.m. a.m.

Suhset: 5.36 p.m.

Moon; Last Quarter, No-
vember 21

Lighting: 6.00 p.m.

Full Tide: 2.09 a.m, 2.06
p.m.

Low Tide: 8.13 p.m., 9.00
p.m.

W- turned at



BUS DRIVER

@ from page 5

with two stones in his hards, but
he did not throw them.
“Thornhill then got into the bus
~I was in the bus—and drove
off in the direction of Belmont

Police Station. He tutned the bus
inte Martindale’s Road and was
about to go by the Union again.

A. policeman came out and en-
quired wnether there was any-
thing wrong and Thornhill re-
plicd that the bus was returning
from an excursion.

“When drawing near to the
Park gate by the Constitution
swamp,” he said, “Tnornhill

bus veered
As a result

changed gear and the
over to the right side.

of the change the engine was
raised upwards.
“A nuffiber of people were

standing by the right side of the
lorry and the bus was going in
their direction. The people scat-
tered in different directions. Soon
after I heard a crash. The bus
proceeded a short distance and
stopped.”

When he saw thé bus going to-
wards the people he threw his
hand in the air and exclaimed,
“What is this!” and took his eyes
from the scene.

Lady Fails Out

A young lady named Miss Wig-
gins had been in the bus and after
the crash she fell out. He assisted
her to her feet.

When he got out of the bus he
saw Leroy Worrell lying beside
the lorry apparently dead.

After the bis was patked
Thernhill got out and stood lean-
ing On the bus’ fender.

Hé said that after the bus had
Belmont and was re-
turning to the Girls’ Industrial
Union a car was parked on the
right side of the road facing the
Police Station.



STANDS TRIAL
ON MURDER CHARGE |

BARBADOS

ADVOCATE

The natural way to

KEEP SLIM
ano FIT

If you want to be attractively
slim, with bright eyes, radiant

The bus seemed to be going in a|
normal way. He did not, however, |
see much of it until it was near |

him. complexion, and real fitness,
Clifford Gittens, a Civil ser-| — eae Ant you keep
vant, another who went on the | y system cleansed of

impurities, Clinical tésts by
doctors confirm that Bile Bea:
do this, gently and effectively.
Bile Beans are keeping milliohs
healthy and youthful in looks

excursion in M—1422 next gave |
evidence, He corroborated Brew-
ster’s evidence ag to the attempts
to overtake each other that had

been going on between Wofrell and figure. Start taking them
and Thornhill and of the oom, tonight.

Winifred Wiggins, a schoo : i
teacher, who also went to ,the Natute’s Gentle Aid
excursion in the bus —142°

BILE BEANS |

was the twelfth witness togive
evidence. She, too corroborated
George Brewster’s evidence and
added that e@ saw when the
lorry hit orrell. She also
‘toppled out of the bus. but a
possible heavy fall was broken
by her brother's alertness in
assisting her.

Doris Bowen, Victor Bowen's
wife was the next witness called.
She gave corroborative evidence.

Three other witnesses were
offered for cross-examination.,

The first was Joseph Brewster.
He said in answer to Mr, Williams
that he had told Worrell to
behave himself after the bus and
thi lorry had rubbed each otner.
He told him sg because he had |
tried to pass out the bus on the
wrong sidé,

He said the row lasted for about |
15 minutes.

Percy Elcock told Mr. Williams |
that he had seen Thornhill lean- ;
ing on the Park rails after the|
row. Thornhill said if had not
been held he would not have been |
struck in his eye.

Worrell Be up to him and |
Thornhill s “you are out for
trouble and if you do not leave
me I will do something to you
this same night.”

Ruth King and Charles Wiggins
were called for possible cross-





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Competition Prizes will be

aid or and from MONDAY
Déth instant.

"Rites and Serial Prizes

on and from MONDAY
3rd December next.

Payment will be from
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daily.

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soosecesonboneccesoeesssee

While at River Bay he saw Wor- cxamination, but Mr. Williams
rell and he seemed in a faitly good ‘said he did tot wish to cross-
mood. He had also seen Thornhill [examine them.
who seemed in the same pleasant















mood. He had not seen either ay po ag eg
Worrell or Thornhill drinking. WANTED TO BUY

On the two occasions that Worrell STAMPS STAMPS
tried to overtake the bus it was All Kinds of STAMPS

on the wrong side.

When the dispute between Wor-
rell and Thornhill occurred be-
fore Worréll was killé@, Thornhill
was standing beside the bus.

At the time of the dispute
Thornhill seemed angry.

To the Court, he said that when |
the bus pulled off and went to Bel-
mont Road and returned, he did
not know whether the driver in-,

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tended taking him near his home }
in Government Hill or whether pe |
was going to take him to the bus

stand.
Car Parked

Victor Bowen, a schoolteacher,
‘was the next witness. He and his
wife were among those who went
to the excursion. He said that
when he got to Constitution Road
he parked the car in which he had
been dfivitig on Constitution Road
20 to 30 yards in front of the bus
M—1422,

Worrell’s lorry was parked be-
hind the bus. When hé reached
Constitution Road Worrell and
Thornhill had a heated argument.

“Thornhill took a knife out of
his pocket and opened it,” he said.
“Worrell cuffed him in his eye
when he did this. I was at the
side of the road then.”

Thornhill got into the bus
shortly afterwards and drove it
towards Belmont. He went over
to the side of the road where
Worrell Was atid began to talk to
him. His wife called to him and
while going to her, he heard the
noise of a bus which he saw was
M—1422 returning. The bus
swerved in the direction of the
lorry. He made a jump toward
the right front fender of the lorry
an@ the bus went on, struck the
jorry and Worrell who was stand-
ing by the door, and went on.

When the bus got to the end of
the lorry’s platform, it went back
to its left side, continued for about
50 yards and then stopped.

The road was dry, he said. He
went and lifted Worrell’s hand
after the collision and it was 26
less.

To Mr .Williams he said “alee a
had spoken to Worrell at irae
times during the day, but had
never smelled drink on him

Drivers Admonished

When he came to the scene
when the dispute was going on he
told Worrell he should behave
better because Worrell was the
owner of a lorry and Thornhill
was only an employee. Worreil
answered that his lorry was his
basket and hoe and it would not

sound well for it to be going
around that he (Worrell. had
killed people while they were

being driven on his lorry.
Opened Knife

He also told Thornhill that he
was ashamed of him as he had
taken out a knife when there was
a fracas with a smaller man.

When the bus was returning
from Belmont Road, it was going
at about 20 to 25 miles an hour.



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PAGE 1

Tl %  ; RD.U MI\I UBI i; :; B \lilt\lMls \\t\ 0 l'\.l -IMS MICK.Y MOUSE 'IMII-;IR good Iook Irll you ih^yV/uil right. You know, tun. *hrn raslookal the |nr* tag, ikat >ou rau't p[i-l Im.r \aim-. Illu-tr.it. Ia THn-tooe Hrnpur. Tied lu e\rry pair tinJohn Wliitr Guarantee Shield the vhit-li mno< ju*l tight'! Look lor it k*,it*in^: -tun> in Hiirbadu*. made by JOHN WHITE %  F"p means made just right IT PAYS YOU TO DEAL HERE SPECIAL offers to all Cash and Credit Customers for Monday to Wednesday only SWA IAI. OFFERS ore now ntuilublr ill our Wrnnrlirx TnertKidr. N| N^liiNiott it .i-nl Mmiii Sn-i-i-i Uiunllv Now dually Now Jars Chivers Mince Meat .73 .I Bots. Heinz Salad Cream 52 IK Tins Xmas Puddings 1.91 1.70 Tins Simolina .69 M I Bots. Sandemans Apitiv Sherry 3.50 S.M Bots. Cocktail Cherries 1.40 LM (14 Oz) D. V. SCOTT & Co. Ltd. Broad Street ULYSSES — .|\*n:s jovi i: II nil fl its MltBHlvrpivri' h/f irritvrs llll •#• lilt' ll-IH-ltl I ALSO : TUI: ii t ## > in inn in n: By 1/1 \ 11/i Hilt HIM. MI iiin-:in:it • H ./. /#•.' lly 11(1111 in I.I.IIMK. Till: III.I.SSI.W lly \ I W. ) 'II 11 OKI) „ M j / ADVOCATE STATIONERY .RICHER British MO&ftlS MINOR | s beats its own value-record RIP KIRBV SIMONDS ILK STOUT FORT ROYAL GARAGE LTD. Phone 2385 Salt Diitributori Phone 4504 C. L. Gibbs & Co. Ltd., P. O. Box 56 BRIDGETOWN Dial 2402



PAGE 1

11 F M> \v. \o\ I MBI R 17, Hit BARBADOS AD\ OC.ATl: 11 III. I M.AH STEWS Philippines Suspend \ll Sugar Exports %  % %  < %  -. r ThiK'I> bra use Of the %  ..' Ill IV %  %  I I.Mttti. /Vr 7V> Make Bogftu$B /VI/M/' I I M \ %  !• %  lie De 1 ) with bul DM The factory U at thj I Hacla. Lambayequc. The hacienda i* owned n acbin%  I %  %  Thi %  '< %  and producene-turim said to !*• %  .-!• —B.r.r. Cur Collides Will. Bm Rti *hit%  terdaj eho Re 1 I %  tad d ..1 ow Md "wi was %  ilicycie And Jilts t olliile HI IIHI M%lll IllllalS IIARHOIR LOU nqgar Ration PMMNM > SEA WELL I i.w. i SM %  % %  -ATIUII %  -• Kin* %  %  MraJm *r ai a w i \ ON %  an KIIU 1 8*~ %  %  %  1 i _r r Sore Mouth Loose Bloody Teeth %  %  ...... %  Amosan rr Pr*rrk*—Trend. M-lFINGERTIP FLY CONTRC rii % %  MI M i s o -.1 Mill I. <.*> %  %  ang. A I-.,., Mt..ro Narainf [> %  v i i %  i \ H > %  i %  II I * n v\ i iv -i RB41 USE GLOY In Touch With Barbados Coattal Station it' I alia tantO %  "%  i M mil mil a JIM BURKE (at 7) cover drlvi ball from Wast India Sydnry cricket ground on If 11 51 II ./. 1/ \\.stmin*tvr: spin howlrr Valentindm in* thr nu'i Phote PD CowoNdaied prcei III! | M-.MO.'t into coUlalon P i i ; p ni. Tin Sugar Supplies And Prices LONDON. much us we possibly can. an-) IM Major l.loyd QMTgtl In the Kousa f Conn %  %  plherad tha*. the i November tl, Mr Horn:, no. Bralne the Commonwealth flgura d rwn <;. %  %  %  thai he i ia ih.dJaaatrou tvouMa m (ooatlni far aounat ol SUK.II .% h.'n i i.-..ti" >; %  •-. Btm aainaBr. %  %  %  %  • I l.s >it A : i rood how much III Auatralla when < %  loai i in arhai we hern %  >uar. Mr. Ilr.im anl in I9.SU and 19M from Lady lumUmulr < B•; %  \.,.i i, n) Can m> m'l .wealth sourer-. rosier),,„,. ;Hlt | aailiuH Mend I v pun ' %  %  i. MBttnd: The qu tni Mused by my Dctauns driven by Nathai followa: All.yivc o| Wall 1951J 1051 1 % % % %  Ions tOBM *ar KiiiM'ks I >>w II I^OOO i 491,000 I .illXilil i r Mr. Orald Nabarra ..>i fforq Damn whether Jamaica I lull amount ot sugar expacted? *• ,,.,, Comnicnwciilth BUgBI was bousat Uant-OaaaaMl i.ipmn (Labour, at ana agaad prica covailng ahipLambaUi); Whmara priviinbu>-K..ts ihrouahout tn> I" an to ba iaaU out to flod the IUI Ho" MemhersAnsvrr unaai wnl. l. varytl Matar Owfllyaa Uoyd O i ain dJttOPa. It WOUld therefnr.. %  KlddennloiaMr) '"Can my the batiai SC\ i:.\l V IIIKFK VlAi: .< Mt f.nrrton alfcrr (LabOUJ l-anc* that h a Smethwkk): Do i imoanrtand we iint.sh Guiana, Hauiht hon. to tha G< tal yaatanlaji i %  ,. e Coloni*i can offti down by I he Cftr i„ the Mother Country" Commonwaflllh 8ug Ibjai i-iowi Oaargai I mm 5.15 o'clock. Mr. Llovd (ieore: Thero U an .mph Uical way home from work. Thi my bun. Friend Hn. Swfh km WB, which 11 now beina ditmean, cussed b\ which we ore taWng '. dttaao ii, Ht ls ; loading la %  ttarnBM I Mr. Ilralnr: Is il not .. fad that <>n iiii.innmore waa paid ih. HI Caman MOW of the d to kat p prtei produettoi ..ni hi pt ~,i pun : %  i ante* 'o colonial BfloffUOBn th-l hr will take i wfmmMajvi XCh****&****** "f iimipa f. fcavuM liVai ayatevn from blood impurUiea Lm|iiirnlcin the hinail xiffiw rh.uinjflc nchoand pain*, ! and painful lolnta, Ifllaa iin.! ce-inmon klT dixirdcr.. Bloo4 Mbtoare h-ip io purify iht blaad. aaaajaaai ihc ayticm and •*iu in rrtaforlof t;ood health. % %  % % %  %  Un %  %  i' i .II.. % %  PKMtMrtlX -I'll.'". I, BaUM tvi Pii.il>,. 1 loo pat oant ol their dive i j-ith.-i th u cent? M>.HII.HH Oaarge; I peat thai the math r i • i %  ream i i ! %  .' tn by all Brnptn %  with %  ii.i'.r 111 HIS. I > i'im >•• % %  % %  i Hi in teee at an st,rDIAMOND RINGS tin hue: v'il' nTOftl JfOU to llCI Prices Start at S18.0C wonderful quatiiy t* vluoi Ai Vow JI-.WI I I i RS V. lie I l>l A A IO.. I I ll 20 Broad Strati MEN and WOMEN 40, 50 AND here's how you can be strong and active >£f K roo fI ran down, ara not 7, ai full of lif % %  you ihoukl ba, A* and



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TUfcSOiV NOVEMBER 17. )•) BARBADOS ADVOCATE PAGE nvr. Bus Driver Stands Trial On Murder Charge Case Far Prosecution Climes AFTER CALLING 17 witness*-* Sessi%  | lo prove that Ewal Chi bus drivci ni the ivy Land, muni... Worrell, a (orry owner of Bank 11 the Prosecution closed then CM) IM Chief Judge. Sir Allan Collymore. The trial of Thnrnhill will continue t Lorenzo Williams Defence Counsel and Mr. W. W. Recce K.C Solicitor General, for ihe Crown, will addiaaa the jury On the application of Mr. Williams, the jury will visit the acana of the death before Defence Counatl atid I i roaacutoi i Idrcaa the fury. The Prosecution's case is that Worrell on Auguii T. The hxl. a Club uf Ihe Dills' Industrial was identified OJ Ml ifr Union had an excursion to St There were numerous conLucy on Auiust ( Thomhill wan tunions and lacerations over the drivini M-H22. one of the buses whole body. There was a fracwhicn took the excursionists to St. turc of the right (rental bone exLucy, and Worrell was driving one p.mt the brain of ftis lorries with some of the ex„... njrsioniMs. On tin -it-turn Journey. brain There was contuM^n .( the Worrell and Thornhill each drew |,.(( bdfti fast and attempted ;o overtake compound the krfl MB each other. and both leuewe broken. When they event.u.llv res th ed "From my examination and the Girls' Industrial Union. .1 ... ..', 1 uw .npuV started l-etw.-.ii Woncl] and eumstanee-i. 1 um of Us) Thurniiill. Witnesses said that thai death was due to the multiWorrell cufTtfl Thornhill in all pie toJUl I %  I These eye and Thornliill pulled a pen,.. arlUl the deceased knife from hi pocket opened ft. having been struck and but did not use it. He then drove by a heaw motor vehicle BEE/ WILL COST r>A PER LB. Mil \icrnn CaTHaW that the price of youl '-ill fish in January next v-.il. he casting >..„ s.mtethuui like six %  ie pet lb: lk4l Death By Misadventure in %  t in I the U i M to Belmont corner, turned around the bus and drove back down ConBtttution at a moderate rate. Bus Swerve* Bus Turns P.C. 125 Arthui Sag] Station Orderly at Belmon* SinCeor.c Brewer who wo. In OH ''"" T.^J,: 2*1' but at the time told the court n. changed gear when not far fronwhere W right of his lorrv and I saw the bus swerve ami heail lor the lorry I held up mv hand away." Vl Park. A bus tame h i" Queen* Park, tinned around at Belmont eorner he turned I stopped him and a and looked """E had happerh he replied that nothing had hapHe then went toward the Other people who were near the pened. lorry ran. but Worrell was killed. Park." Pieces of Worrell's bones were Later Sgt. Henry brought exhibited in the Court. Thornhill to the Station. Inspector Terrence Franklyn Sxt. Jonathan Henry attached Said that on August 8. he received "> Betmont Police Station said a report and went to Belmont Post that on August 6. h wen' where he saw Thornhill under stJtuUOfl Road and M* the lonrj am si. He went to Constitution A-I2B pgrkad OB Road and MW lorrv A-1U8 diawn the roa.l. A bodv which he reeo K Up on the left side of the road nlsed as LarOy Worrell's ami opposite the upper Qm en's Collage lying .'. the right side -i a gate. He gave furtb. The bus M-H22 was to the rear broken pieces of the damaged of the lorry facing town and was bus that Thornhill had b on the opposite side of the road mg. Thornhill was Vandlng a A bodv which he recognised as short distance away from the bus Leroy Worrell's A as on the right and he arrested him. side of the lorry lying on the -I took him to Belmont PoUcO ground. After taking some photostation and about three quarters E aphs of the scene he returned to 0 f an hour after he told him that Imont Police Station and he h0( | been struck in hiaya I %  charged him with murder. Worrell', he said. After Thornhill was cautioned T 0 Mr. William* he said that he said that he had not done it Thornhill appeared normal whan purposely nt Uto him the evening after the Thornhill was later taken to Dr. B( ,. H | ( .. • H, vaj w % %  Iking with Cato as he said he had been ruffed ms ntf;il| d „ wn Me did ft in his eye by Worrell On the following day In took measurements of tha %  eene whan Worrell had been killed Widow's Evidence Ena Woirell. idnw of 1-erny Worrell, said her husband w.i o stav neai the sn-ne George ll.ewst.i. I Cl ona of Ihoaa who at;<>nded the excursion of Club 19 ..[ tha tin i [nduitrl il Union on August 6. The excursion was to River Bay. He said he drove in the bus chauffeur and mechanic and M 142 2 which was being driven owned two lorries. He used to bv xho^hm. hire them out for excursions and would drive A-128 himself. On August 6 he left home about 8 a in. with A-128. Fairly Fast Speed On the way back to town the About 6.45 p-m the same day "• * travelling at a fal I. She received certain Information rate and e osely foilowed b> and want to Constitution Road Lwoy Won ell Tha lefty made where she saw hei husband lying fboul two attempts lo j dead iv the side of hi* i.a is jfexl but and wber, 11 reached Band) day she IdanUflad hei riusband'i I -me Woods, u succeeded in passbod v to Dr. Cato. ig 11. To Mr. Williams, she md that After the bus followed tha lorrj her husband Wai not upatl In any at a fast rale, and overtook it, M way the morning he left for the p. '! %  <' lu-'excursion. He had had nothing of "We then noticed thai the lorry any moment to worry him before was again behind us." hilaid that day. "The lorry soon after got up to the O A Pilgrim, land survevor. bus and tried to pegs it on its right produced I plan of the part of side but the two vehicle-; raked Constitution Road where Worrell each other They stopped and the was killed The lorry A-128 was drivers and some of ihe passenstanding in Ihe road when he made gers got out and looked at the the plan. The distance of the lorry vehicles but than was no damfrom the Queen's Park Governor's ages i: .,i, a*) 209 [al They proceeded again at I rerpnuhts Broken Off duced rate, the bus m front. The ..V.w F„,n„m %  nM .t nr nf t>US arrived about 10 tO 15 millAubrey Farnuni. inspecU.r o 0irta nd L iri .,, spoil, went lo , „,. ,,,., .,„ l,,,..,. IllghW l and Transport. l-efore the lorry did. The lorry OlruV lndusti "After the lorry w. I Thornhill and of tlte bus were broken off. The !" right windscreen was also broken and there were pieces of bone in worr*" Ih* frame ( i used mm nf having in. H lO The steenng and the brakes n.-s b.m A d.spule between them wen. in good order followed. They attempted to tight. W< Se '"l^examined the lorry but the crowd kept then,i apart which was on the o-her side of Worrell want UDlDj"^g^ the road. This was damaged on tried to take hold of hlrn Worn ;l its right side. eventual!} eutTad rhornjiu To Mr. Williams, he said he eye tested the clutch of the bus and >t •'Thornhill had an opened pen was in working condition. knife in his hand but nothing Dr. A. S. Cato said that he perhappened. I afterwards saw Mm formed the ptmi mortem on Leiov &f '>n I'aje 8 ; lb. will | you il la or ll.^U. and thai the ir.ilk fir whk paying 11 and 12 cents per pint .ou 15 ^r 18 cents? This qurstikin was put by Mr. kaaa to the large crowd of people who listened to him t l^Tie Sunday night peaking about the Ml f iving This is the position Ml I'll. %  • %  "and I counsel you that whoever you put into the I Ion-r uf Asse nnpreni upon ti*m m ni. ihe necessity of %  hick in this cver-Uicr?astng rise I Mr. Chfl 1 1 t%mg ebvIJtl to dative of ihe Ctt> of %  l\|ll I llil.M %  In-el. hnpoi %  :.ien ruppltefi o 1 the %  only obtainable from Au.-:r.iiii The beef f.ir Mm paying 36 .md 4B eanta per lb the naw future .it much eitgher prleaa Ninet.-Inin cents per lb would l>c t Thai batDg the %  would be about rrice would ba aa be ha unless a reduction be brouflhl i .t ion meal should continue tc. %  -iibsidinr balanced 0 Ui.it people would he ' I f..wiand other poultry, to cope ihe exhirbhont MrauM leh.listed for beef and the other essential roodltuffl he had referred to. "ild be some alternative Fishing Industry One very good alternative, ho tbtught. ...is the fishing industry, Moved that .. pfopag Hill, unlike the one they had ut present, should be Operated DBaaj this very worihwhllc Indu "ii attain ative that was sure to bring about n f in the Mat Of living. pollard i"ii now be Imported, bul me punof thena prohtofUve al ane nioiiient Tin-Il I'.ouu: I I itu-an an enormous increase to you for youi animal f-\i. Wh.it iaoln| %  .. n ui:' Your 'iik iii assuri'dl. in pure and 15 or 18 cents per pint, as I hav said, will m.it likely be the costMr Chase touched on such matters as education, h., restrictions and a few ofhai Item i (old his Uateneri thai he had built his mil l their support am %  pare to show them his gratitude by rendering them Faithful and hon* i in the House. He would .isk thai they give ll "'this by ,i,r MI Decerobei II. More Kxliihits la Poultry MClfdd \T A. \ ////// THt\ Three hundred and twenty-two < ntnes m the poultry section have been atada few Ihe Annual Agrt. ultural Exhibition at Queen's lark, 32 more than last year, tha \dvbcate laamt yesterday. There Ihe ktfhorn class. trj In veus. it was mM n the phjeon class are 140 this year. 40 less than las gure. The entries lor rows, horsea, pig*, foot?, sheep and dOJJi are run ire •>' cows. II bulls, 9 horses, 17 pigs. .j .. ,•. ,o :. % %  ,, ,.l : .(.. jogs Ovtl 21) lxths hav. .:..i.-. I'ai i. .i.i cted arc the small un-jvered booths along the wire i lacing the roadway,— who would not ba d ng w.laraa a trade as to e of one of the Iher booths. f death b\ BUS%  .mo the ies kurroundUU the death of Autne. terday %  a.i accident .:! 'hv motor e-r I -132 on Sands Street I tr 6. He was taken to the Hospital the same day but c ied at the Hospital on Noveml S,[t Rice U Id Ihe COUrt th it on Nitvrmber 9 about 1 p.m he KJ>. on duty at otWtahaHowB PattM station when he heard an altrrd He ran into the road and about 200 yards away opposite l Mence he saw a crowd. On going lo the crowd m found tl it there was a agotor car L—13" was about 'loin Mr. Jordan M a little sand OB the ut three feet nine laefM %  eatter. Car Damaged The iiKht bOtllSH Of ti. ..ii nd the right head : mp damaxed. A brake mark 11 '2 feet was on the road. This traced lo the A heel ,-f the car He saw Mr loiin a bed in hi hi m He did not test tha 1 the driver rt found her in Mr .Ionian'. | Police CoMtablc Dai I i I in! he tesied the braki '.' and found them 10 b*in ^IHKI order 1 were rsurkid out '•I H llirch said that she Byag %  : Paynes Bay, s fanmi UM has been driving for 19 months. She was driving the motor car 1.-132 along Sands Street, Si. Peter about l| 18 pJB i was sitting beelde hei and her husband There Wire two i-jrs on Sands Street and nist n' she a I %  : %  red fi-"r. behind the last ear, Tin man came from the -e.iside. Her car struck this man and he lell on the road. She was drivInn on the left side of the road After the car hit the man she got unnerved. AfNr the man was struck she stopped the car The brakes of the ear were in good order llefore I In %  ,m > struck she had no time to apply her b-akes The man came on the 1KI \ N •Illl-MIN R(IM tSOflllR lou unsii help (he 1H-I1 hi demtroylnf the nil Voo cannol trenslher the mmmk b urhenln| Ihe sirons\au i-aniMil further Ihe l>rotherhMMl af nuu* b* enreaaegdagi ru* ha'red. VL esitnot keep .> %  l ol UuuMe lit •prmllm marv Ikai. s fin esrr. —Abrah m Uncoln Deep Test For Oil Likely Soon THE ram* of ihe psst few wet ks and the heavy seas off the east coast of Ih* kal .>wn the piogr* s ,i hi seismograph party con bul men reeulti ,i> had been obtained, had bean very good Mid I>r. Vf K. Auer. Mananei of Bie bull Oil Company. I 'logic staff of the II-1. It Oil has been by ihe arrival of Mr. Neil ftuokei who will like nil lha srork of studying Ihe exposed geolog> land '" preparation tor .ubsurface aeological work wtm-h will come wi h the drilling of the first dee ( i test Mr. Eugene Dawson of Brown Drill inn Co. of Long Beach. Call* fOlins who was in Bai I I the cist week conferring with bun returned home by li W 1 A While here the> dhs II onta l loi H"' drilling of the Barbados OH Compan) first deep le af w nkh i> tentative' lv proposed for the early part of 1952 if a suitable location can be found. In the meantime, a I tha location is going on of the seismic survey. Boys Ctu b Prepare Ear Exhibition During the past weeks tinbO) sM-lHhtstown Boj %  i In. have been rnaJdni mats, baaketi bruahaa etc„ foi their i Whktl will take place at the Boy*' club piemlaes on Pecan 130 p.m. The public will bo abM t.. buy arty of Ihe bog t won 11 lha Exhibition. Where Is The "Daerwiioi I" ? •/here U the motor vessel laerweedr This quaatlon could not be Matwered yaamrdjjj bj the vesselagent The School %  I' : ll.nboiu and Bhlppfllt Depaitnient did not have anv inOf its whcreobouW ||,, ...... ,d>lci;ram i.-.nhinv the Harbour and Shipping M.isiei on November 21 reported that ii'i Intel |i tram Curacwi Itadin 'be ll*erwod w.n ovei ahi llad i O renada lor Arilba, A message was flashej a, ^n ihips aaklng thaii iklppen to ke-1 .. Sharp li-'k out for the lad motor vessel. Daerwaod sMpperad by Captcin Mulrac and having on boarl 12 passengers two children include*! — left Barbados on Nov.-niber la (0| Aiuba via Grenada She ulso took carfO foi nm of call lijrrwood usually carries a crew of ten She ha.< net ton %  '-4 lie huii li i aJntad i i hi-i bottom red Tin bora her deck was IIW 111v painted whitand ilarti su ml CtB tls On Maiden Trip Hah %  .. i .< < %  cadM %  i %  burg. C\psnhasen an.l Antwerp llmu(i now have two ship* and txped to imiiii Voui ansm la i 1 '' I n the W 1 run The Co .'inning It difllrult to et slee., but %  :". ; of >i\ The Horn line ran ships bafQee World War II. but It Wl op during that war. lliiri.sunit has paesenger accomnio,-. about 12. She brought with hei -even foi i Qerman era* of 3ii including %  ridppei Captain R Barbooos h mtnmut fn in Antwerp an I ia-i nlaht V om Hamburg, she brOUgM 9,500 bags of muriate for Messrs. It i> Q ChaUenoi a Co., Ltd. Beech staves and heads. %  %  %  %  blades. Iron iclaaoi s, lamp burnera, I %  "IM i .iinong oihi cargo arrlvlnj bom Hamburg Hti>.uHi also brouehi drj %  eii barb tton from Copen h aajs n t\ i-^w rtten miwerp No Driver's Uc6oc Mi | | Orunth, A. %  \ .... i ned Oacai Hoyte oi Horas Mdi. st Joaaph, i impi i I.Imelit for driving Ihe | o-ai on without IM mg tn.. hi i proprlati ui .vma % %  The offence was rOnv November 24 Joseph i.i Hon HDJ .v.i. also linr.l I i • rnenl S Including HATS. TRIMMINGS FOB HATS. RIBBONS ol many Pattern* ARTIFICIAl . FLOWERS lor al! purpoM*. VELVETS and a wide variety ol DRESSES. FOR CHILDREN ol all ag we ha om really dainty item* which will male* thm excellent qlil*. or dress them up lor their special occasions in the %  cominq season. >'. DRESSES. SUN SUITS. ROMPERS. ETC. COCKADE BAR & LOUNGE Over Stiinfeid Scott St Co., I.id. liruad Slreel After your Shopping, drop In with the children fa a drink and a snack 3 HAM. CHEESE. EGO, SANDWICHES. HOT DCX'.S COOL DRINKS fc 1'HUIT JUICES TEA COrYEK COCOA TinPlfjM where i.nlv IrM Be*t in Served. Poolc Pottery [i.nk End*. Flylns I -. I %  .. 11." Srii CaUll*. VUM. rtr. V. Be LIMA A (O.. I I II A RlPPINGILLE'S OVEN MAKES YOUR BAKING EASIER MORE AND MORE MEN ARE CHANGING TO . K SHOES DAILY because they have become convinced oi K's Superiority. m: AKI: THRU of Tin MANY VI;RY <;OOD RBASONfl ltK THAT SirKKIORITY: < I) 'K' 8HOB8 ai 6 made from UM HI I M nbtaiiKiole. Both lolaj tnd llUOMg .iin.uidU d I'tii HtxlbiUtj .11 i Rccura t)y graded by skilled erafttlMn. (I Till: UPPRM Ol K SlltllS i. elected, hand-mi ;uni matched i'. axpai leocad erafi men with .1 r.ne thai no Riachliu could Imitata t;{) ii' SHOTS tra made ovar the famnus 'K' PLUS KITTING LASTS with the heel-parts one flttinj; narrower than the furc-parts. This I loaa lit al tha hatl and frrednm [ill tilt' till Why no. nime in and he lilleil willi n pajp ol lliese world fiunoii<, ihajaajf U> are Mire \ou'll say like all Ihe other K' weiirei-. — III. NEVEft Wl AR ANOTHER SHOE BUT K PRICES FROM $1700 to $2163 \f*:::v.::::-.:::::;::::::Cave Shepherd & Co., Ltd. 10. II. 12 & 13. BROAD STREET NOTICE Wo regret lo inform our customers that due to the increased cost of labour and materials we have been compelled to raise our prices from 1st December. 1951. We shall renew our efforts to bring you the best of services and trust that your patronage will continue. • SANITARY LAUNDRY COMPANY LIMITED OF BARBADOS. Wealherhpail's OriVr To-iln* r HARRISONS DIAL 2664 Si.lp Ilislriliulnrv fur K' SIKIKS in llnrlmili. n a H ra r: e u e %  :••. %  H -~ r %  • J %  D It H H II U SI * iI I If I IT'S HERE AGAIN II PURINA MILK CHOW i ChocoUln in Preen!.^ B tf. Jason Jones 6 Co.. Ltd. Diitribulora a u %  on Boxe, l,y ,11 | W.VBVBV.VBWJWW J Popular Makers '; ion KMAfl HrVTATION Hi.XI rot %¡ i i Ni H KlH f..tir* I I th M..i> %  %  %  10 A l, M. I .* %  ,.I.Itll r K Wl li. O %  TATKN IKIKI.s %  \Miri!v an i .-. (II.Il Ifa.w. S \ I' I I' . II MM MIU I'". ROM i -•. %  ..! u..\\ %  .rim r. en) %  \: %  %  lara* brnfand i AAUJ I BRtlT. WEATHERHtAD ITD. S llrad of Bro.d strrrl. ^ (VII IS llllltl iMI illlll \jf' IHOM I HI IIMM II1M.I 61 XAAAS PRESENTS I'M .1 ni.iiiim Sets by Mux K.irtur. Yurdley's. Eliriihelh Aidrn. ( usson. Mnrny Itnlh & T.ilel Soap. Morny Talc Bod> Powder in (inrdenia. J.ismln, -. id ilwood. Krenrh Fern etc. VANITY CASEfl & BatAI l\ MiaalORa COMB A BRUSH SETS a Wo T.IKT BOXKS Off CHOCOLATES KNIGHTS DRUG STORES BJBeajsJ



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PAGE SIX ll\KliIM>AHVOOATE I I I -l> \\ \n\ I Mill R -' CLASSIFIED ADS. 1 rv m **" TCLCPMONE 2 SOS. 10.. siMdafi ,p lo W. a> DUD • %  > a-> Kill SALE AUTOMOTIVE 1 .i*T C<> H II.M A. IN Ml \MIKIAM i (AH-I i Old JK.I.. %  UBU Mill* KH.I..I v fl H I. M"|Q Uannli i ill I REAL ESTATE %  .ii. >i>pit *! %  ro.NI -|.\, Mfe %  IBSEl < |l l i **.kTA* Chain. Am, Ouln i Drruirx table*. M>dirlf HM lUrk h Miiii %  %  . •* tmy I. I CAM lif-H bead i-* %  I,lll O-ll. ,i* Ca i —iiu i II TKKMk i km %  %  LNDEK THE SILVEB HAMMER .1. • IN !•*• IMBIK %  BRAS-KIM 1ROTMAN CO. BntMaMH |(. I1M7 Mndel %  4 i mi • n ii u i*< I ', H I' Hs \ I Hill IIIM IIOl'SKS PI mii wnca EDUCATIONAL MALVr.RN ACADEMY ,„..... .1.1. Ill I ..,.!.*•> %  UOVEILNMIAT NOTICE BLVCTSICAL %  F.Wtn. : Phone I or NN 11 u 11 3 l.ANEOUS rnsiif ip all* -Hti lowly v virinvmn r %  -. SI Joarpli Al •hn U->. Trlvpaone %  %  •; ) n CtiVITIAN IIAOIIK AH I'M oupntd a 1'rat auiini>-i.-•Hetand 1ldri I.., Ullt* -il THAN .wan rim ney PANC'Y STRAW MATH I %  -kin till ruch THAN! .-MM M ii.it. —t.r.i I Ihel .hll-.^l i ttJ.il on* aol.l i •r and Ktun your, a Dial w IT It SI -il I i. .T.. \i. sir.AK CAN! BIICMlINi; MATION HEP .i I VI M OP s< IENCE ASH A • -.H I'LTL'RE Agrttult •*, B.w.i (>nlr..l StM "HitBrcedlnn Si. Han v I for the %  \i , i %  'ii.ii imriit "l AgnlU| attached I" UM lie $1,200 x *72• p urn of tntrj In i :, %  pi-mi on UM qual..;!.. UDM %  %  I %  i i %  %  I Mil alter a ngri iry service the omcei i .! iv.vuiint Fund. I %  %  i .,.'.11 in quired Ui provKM him' ell with .i motor in. u loan to* purehaas nf which will I %  ..] %  :IMI condition :l. H .'hull ;irc applii lllnf officers of th ei nmtnt Servli .i i into B*U1 bi po I. Appl I BUMS M n together with COPIES hould ip %  ddressAgriculture, . : 12 i .. M on Til I I 1951. -.':. 1 | Sinmr BlWhM \NXOIMIKMKSiT* lllisl\ Al 11M..11 a %  '<> b <• %  %  HN1 APIIU:V AliXYNr. %  n.ii.ti-•> JPP hrr-by wacnrri acalnvl U.A V \. *OOI) MI WYDO I %  %  %  rlaa contri"' naM link-., kv a %  rrlllM oralat umiM l>v MAT: I WtfOO, K n| Strwl, si MlrhiH 17 11.11-In I am r*t tlxMa ntriict-- •J8 willtrti "T*M Shop n.. NOTICE IONS. %  ; the I I il krl.t oup.. E '.liiiUnU In UVUKW i-nni' i m Tnwii^. w.Kin^ for Urn %  %  %  I, %  ui d*j H Den v< i i .. %  iimm, HUOH ooi lir.WlTT. .lullN W1NBTONK MAIIBDNALfl cwrjVii.l u( vtltirli all pqnaMii aiq (vatsbv r*Mllr dMpjb tOon t .MIIIH i -.i I iion 04 •,,( ., %  Bxbll I. %  !, %  Univeraiij .. i | [iidli will i %  nlifgi m couiullaUop %  %  i 'H: — wriiu i egamingtloD It the week beMonday, rVbru%  1932 i ivuiwnallon In April, 1952 %  twenty i an i\ji Nativei ui ihu i ..| ., IMtlVg 01 i.ind; or %  1 Inn in lb" %  111 I*L> required lOfBtBM Il taring iha .. i <••}. recall Ing ti ii I i. . %  ji.il lhat Iheii | and general nI irlory. \M llcaUeCN for admWWan S> Mdatee for iiu> t:\lilhlliini' i| If si i to tinliirr.iin al . i:duijtiu Oflirr Tht .. --I. Mirhsel. no! Ulri H .*li • i iv. gtJbl January. 19.%? i I late for idmMin <• %  n irb a dlea dovrrn. Mist il.so lor'{rci*trar ol I alia • *f ihe Wa i laaaalea, ih'lr ippiir.i %  in <• %i llir I'ri'wrre Thr rliMnr diii"" Inr M I iiirain ii 31st 1932 of Appl] inanity Cot%  .. illlno of tlic ruuraes talntd from Unlvcrsltr from thr loral Mi H. A. V M C.A.. Pinfold o, 4 "*•• Bridgetown, r from the %  I ..I •'.. % %  don. r, 195V TH 31—3n ,i" ..i . |. i rhorau. i.i' IIUPI ii.v liaaal ui HI Timn, %  I) A HUMUrUiri. C.n.l. %  II ill nil l i\(. BTAfTONa i misii . at. ii M : i IIIIK .! %  .1 C.-.k ... rof na Hn-ill Pint T.l.aap M'dnn Kmhi ARNflrt V.V R BI A II W I %  N %  EXECUTIVE ENOINKER. HIGHWAYS TRANSPORT i 'i %  \i; i ii %  i BARBADOS. Applications art invited I.N the Government of Barbados (or. he poll of Executive Engineer. Highway* & Traruport Uepai unanl.i 2. The po-t u peniionable and carries salary scale ol $8.4;>tl cl44 — $4,320 par annum. In addition a non-pciunouaW? c^^t it living gllowanca of $136 pc" annum U payable. Pob.i >f gate. %  mil Le tleterminad fcy experience and quahftcation. HWdei will be required lo keep J motor velurlo for tliw pt-ilormauce of hia %  I..I will if iligitjle foi trav'-lling allowance in uecoidanca *ith local rate*. He will be liable to V. uiwwk" and Orphana' eonr.butium al the rate of 51. of salary. No quarters aro provided. Passage expenses of officer and Iamll> not exceeding gi,440 are payilrat appointment. 8. Appointment "ill be on probation lor two yean and aubieci .i rnedKgJ ntOM In olper icjpecU the uppointmcnl will be subject it Hie C.lonijl lieiiulaliiins ai.d the liprol Civil Service HeguUtiolLs. .ml Imtrui tioi.N 4 C*iK!iau making 5. Holder *.ll be rtquirad 'o take charge of all works on Mi ui t. n Hue -ml coogtrucUOB i i I BMa ami bridgea. to make surveys. Acii uuTaL. T.'ii—" iagj levels and prapai %  plan deafgo and galiingtei and to set out and supervise all WDl k rutl Utoi its proper and eeonomi.il exacutiOD, to ggslBl adttl Ibt technical, administrative, Qnancial ind dlM Li li nii-nt . Applii-otioin -bould be subaiittad to the Colonial Secretary. Public DuUBlngii Bridgetown i.* reaeh him not later than noon on 3i it il—tn Friday. 28th December, 1931. 17.11.31—3n. will explain more elo; qucntlv than words can WHY U AMIM HELP iPf.ead CI.IW .. %  inni*n|jil<.n Sfi II 51-4 MUM %  m lui.c %  ..,!.) b* .. -a. .. KlvlM lull aiaaor* HU.N BOBOOL, roaAiit* i nrcATlONAI. %  Ihr pott" r nfO AaWUDI Ti ichini; g4iblei* up to Hbjhrr CPrtllU-al* S'aiularUi| Data s.1,.,,1 l>.. i.i i W ill Hi .i.. ( TobiMl" 34 II.M il "1 ln..|l> HI .iid imn I. 'ik win. I ..-(...ii.l I i.nliva lmm. lion apd ii-" B-r,i.v. b.k Bauniin SHIPFIW*:. NOTICES MI.I' %¡ ENgRAI M.i.1 ar-l A|>|.Iv iq Mi. I.1U, am V A NTS A Cooh i.-i. i -i Bavl.v. Pav.lHMi. %  Al S S "POHT iipg |q aail fr...-i lluimil s. i I. '.tplbuume Off < h, Bd %  %  *^ %  %  > % %  • , ii,l.<< mi,. I'-rl i*. amt!. nrutaAiw urioiipr BUt qrriviiiu M Trinidad I • %  'w.ml anil Wiiidw.til •i ana. Pr Puilhar i.rtlt-iiUr* *|jpir — | UlWstas IVITIh C LIB TIMDAD f I Dfl ..---,',','-*.-*'*'.'>•*-*•*'*•-**'-*i Ainiaioi. N v' and si. Kiin ii..i.,i.I II. M V \l.. rk (".*.. IH.ll I'.Anllana. 1 will nrr*|.t Ar At.Ur Tola I Mi Arrra 305 713 324 644 266 m 115 211 IIA4.GAI IS GROUP Offers will be considered for the purchase < % ( the above group, consisting of HRgfattg Factory ;"'• the tollowlnjj estate!!;— Hag^atts & Bruce Vale approx. Greenland & Overhill approx. Bawden & River approx Friendship approx HAggatta Factory has been extensively model nisei and is equipped lo produce lancy molasses as well as It C. sui^ai. During the 1951 crop, the factory produced •U5;! long of BUgaT. The bans required for the 1952 crop have been BCCUrtd. The mechanical equipment of the group includes amonn other ittms the following International Harvester tractors:— 1—TD14 Crawler Tractor with bulldozer. 1-WIW. I Farmall H. Also 1—Caterpillar D2 tractor. 2—Subsoilcr ploughs. I djgc plough, l -bruabbreaker plough. K Dudp;t' Trucks. 1 Austin Truck. 11 cane carts for Tractors. Livestock includes 14 horses. 12 mules. Further details and conditions of sale may be obtained from, S. P. MUSSON. SON Si CO.. LTD.. Brood Street. Bridgetown %  i I.I %  14 glasses of Fine Wine from every bottle! NFW Vi 'UK SERVICE A •JTKAMII! '.. : i .mm R.rth.d.1* *0< tWepmbrr. 1SSI A BffgjAAII ii.,' t> imi*i aartoWni *"i n*eqmb#r. Il M HI \N* SERVICE %  -(' % %  'i B*Q PMB Nov IMI ii .i... h %  ; i. Ih ..iii'aa li^it..ai i-ii, On ii.i.p, l- assaei law VASA1H \M snvica .o.Tuno.No wu • AfMraa Na •* Sbtq Mantt.l H>U'a Karl .rl.i • %  -ALCOA PMASl" OP SWI Oet tsta Nov llth • "AU'OA PLANTFK?v. *h No. init t "AlATOA POINTPFNov Snl Nw SSIh %  A HTPAMBH" — Dqe IMS "A STBAMrit" — Dec ISIh Dee J4ii Jan ttli RORFKT ilinM LTD. — NUT YORK AND GULF HCRTICB. APPLY-HA COSTA A CO LTD—CANADIAN SRRVftCB SA6UENAT TlRMINALS Scu&vtoaJ BETTER RT LESS MONEY LIANGE SHIRT DEPOT Phone 4764 Leading Stores CANADIAN SERVICE I linn Iliilif:.v. N.S., .IIMI Monlrnil. (gf;Cp£) POINT BSAND wines II. ui.. *l Jahl •aLNfTUNCr i .r.-i.-j Anlral Dalaa. inn ,< i ,. H..I..1.,. M PTOVPOAM 11 Deeember IT Dee. Januarr -i iaa u J. r Heie's H-HKI news. Vou osj ggjoj the hwary o( u glasses of icallv nM wine from B*pjr> boitlj ot \ P. Am AT roum USUAL sro*k UNITED KIM.DOM SEKVICE From Newport. Liverpool and Olasgow UNITBD KINGDOM AND CONTINENTAL SERVICE %  alltiJaia l>m VP RICH RUBY VP BRITISH SHERRY VP SWEET WHITE VPGINGER WINE ST MI. i n %  LAftRDfAG* %  HBee. *4 m It Drepmb i AgemPL \NT \ TlONS LIMITED — 4TtS FERGUSON TRACTORS WITH THE FERGUSON SYSTEM The friend of both tha small end Large Plantation Owners alike. .This Tractor, the price of which i. only : %  fraction of that ol a full "Trick" Tractor— S3.1B.1.0O 040V///.V/.V/-'//.W.'.'.V///y///A'/. //,vx/AVpVpV//>9W**r0aB*i' does an ama?ing job of Ploughing and la at home rltlx'i in the field OB on the road. %  jgaaa Terlgl wfcfci hiaouB Traeton gfg %  bavaaaggii laaaBaaingly popular here and are do|ll| BlW BTOTk. We invite you to inspect UiU trub' let OB aiianga foa .1 'lemomuratioii for you—ploughuig. liauiing. manure spreading, grnxs-eutting or what you will. COURTESY GARAGE ROBERT THOM LIMITED Agents NMMnaw



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f X(.l TWO IIAIIIIADos ADVOCATE TIESDAY. VOVF-MBKR 2:. 1KI Ccuub Calling B.B.C. Radio Program Hie W L. A. Eaglesfltld. Director General of Ciwfi Aviation in the Carlbirea is now back in Barbados after attending the South AmenMltA AUatitu Hcgi,.; %  TW Conference ended on Mon%  -.'--: || %  %  | immandl in Trinidad her 22 where he remained until the 25th for talks with Mr. Grlmsteed. 'he new British CarKlral Service He *..s .:..i \\ Trinidad b> his wife who had been in Tobago for las They both' return* Sunday b. II WIA. From Scotland M VTK HKIIARHS und Mary Richards whose %  fr iitn Trim-.. It.W I A. iul three week*' holi1 .rhados •1 W. tne Fund i nmittec ind tin...min,: dona-ticn to the fund will provide one. of three social occasions In London, all within a week Mint are i expected to add -everal thousand 10 the Fund The Orchid Room, one of London's most exclusive night-clubs. inranM a midnight cabaret tc rinse money for the Fund. Alj thmigh the club can accommodate only 300 people. H minimum en. trance fee of two mi in on, was I ind %  rurtbei large sum %  ;.•. r.u.p<| by an auction of gifts presented to ttie Tund committee. Taking part in the cabaret were Welle*. the fllm-slnr; Peter Ustinov, the British Duly. | rlalll aetar nnd producer; Moira < IJster. the South African film star; and Oaoevltvc Quttry, former wife of Sarha Gullry. the French actor. About a dozen other vloge :ind tcreen celebrities also appeared. Among them was Lindii Dnrnell. the Hollywood actress. who was In Jjaaageca when the was on the north tide of the Island and was not affected b; the hurricane. A special rum cocktail was "launched" at the Orchid Room and h*s >~ i ed after MlB Darnell. -Iof rum sufl .. durm,' thi %  that the whole of the proceeds %  v <>r trie cocktails went to the Fund The Jamaican rum to be auctioned and ti i %  ganlsed on 'he Hurricane Fund H •ft winch take : ; rai Qmw hi la %  Wend. The concert will be Ihe P lb and the soloists will be Rudolf 'omarho, the Jamaican tenor; Anna OUclea, the Brazilian sol>f-n p m o rvreay BM • Th nk on 'hnt Thlus. ( IS p m H*rt %  at p ... Tip,,,. II i" ("unpnwi nt ||. Wl • |> i i :lrl IK CpriimoiiKftalth. Itapm Ka> .. Iitti. 10 ( %  in Th N.. iu Id n m —I Ihe rditorinli 10 IB p m Slaune About. 1030 pm The M 0 m raooaAMMi rUKBDAV NOVEMBCn Ti : 04 pm lost p m Letter I Tt Mo UWM JS&*tPLYe*£AT JL I * %  %  'PERIODIC uffai %  distress s*ral days '!•'•< %  i... you rrumpa. haularbr b.-*.i •to Si*. Uk* so many WOCTIHI, etart to aun*r s f a*r* Ju"i B*far< your prnod fr-im tiranaa. orntrus "UW **•*. armsglB* M-Un*a\lto UllB luiic'l inl eallM* Than aiart i>lin( tli fc Plnkhm- Vr-:rtablr Compuui-1 to r-li*vo urh %  vmptoriii piniitwnra Coiiip.,,11,^ h*. .rh a f iioe •ntl^.sB.odkB.tii.11 orMM nnkham'fl OoDapoung pot ..... iliu uioiithli pain bui im uinoylns prr-pcrlod u-rvou. UMM •motioBa of thla alur. fe>ular th* pain t.i.i also takoo out Iho % %  -!!. In. atopo I l"lim n^ %  "> >,.!..,, mbata nr> ulhai lion a Hradarho. bl*aisa*d by P1I* N>r*ouanraa. lu> % % %  r.r h -. ..I -r,, il.-l.llll> and lifll .1 I. eiapoalll',d yo U hnow boit ihr, would be eaclMM Hollo. "Who W-her* H ., Iron.?" dorin'i win IO aniwr bh to the Lon Rock. n. ldlB| tht , t .Wn Iha h'| aaato. "They-,, iU „ lo w ,h„,. nd w* m U ir not mm them I" •Who ii ,i> Hitt. ; %  %  rer. "0MICI.I>. *k." h *.j,p*. PEARL NECKLACES 60c. al your Jewellers Y. De LIMA A tO.. I TO. to il*p '" -.l!* l|l I eoaa calt .Mth *ii nCirrned n-tIM i Fi-"i iiooi a inme aniinai. iti dt. Th* mnnar >.<•• nee/i i Mas* a pen Bom -idpa .. rilled wllhuut imvini aui A mrati Ciuo. Ml alas* aviarira *up|>il rtDoaiadi*. %  lodini mi MyTHMSt £BaUlilS • %  •-SAllY FORKS! i MACDQHALO CAREY '*-* %  > To-morrow Ni?e 8 15 pm. ;S Mill. HAND AND MAKK O .' (tINTEST ;v Tripoli vs 1'rarl Harbour 0 with the him "HOMi STRETCH Hot SI fancy skirls and Jeans for ANNIVERSARY HOP of Caribbean Heveiiy reaentad i. Mi Juil' I Hi. ..tri.,.1 Croup At The M 1>ERN H1C!H SCHOOL ON SATURDAY. 1st December, 1951 M b > Paeef flraan'i Orthealra S 11SCHIPT10N — I/. I'erlccl for XniaQWai r.'.s ,i I'urc Irish LlnrnHand-kmbrntderrd Sets 6 Napkins — 8.39 13 Piece l.u.i.h.i.ii Sels from $13.38 In SIC.5.6 ON KALI! from Wednesday. November 28th REDUCED TO CLEAR DRESSES from Sb'.OO up LOCKNI1 PANTIES — 90c. L — Also ether LADIES \K( til \ SHOES (frl.LANESE I NDERWEAK i;i Medium Si Larie Sties NYLON KTfM'KINGN. HATS BAOK MfiHT GOWNS \ HOUSE COATS IIIIOADU'AY IIIIINN SlltM' I inishiiitf Touvhvs for thv Kxhibition LADIES' DRESS SHOES Large Display LADIES' HANDBAGS iViatMaS SlylvH # v. /..s... To T. R. EVANS Dial 4220 & eVIIITI III IIS Dial 4606 f^f .MH. I'l.WTEHU PROTECTING P Your PLANTS IS ESSENTIAL!! WE HAVE JUST RECEIVED •\ shipment of PLANT PROTECTION PRODUCTS 'or the Plantation or small garden Everythingfor Insect Peata, Blight or Weeds. Let us solve jour problem. ALUOLINEUM NO. 1 AGROCIDE NO 1 AGROCIDE NO 3 GAMMAUN ARSIVETTE VF.I D >NE FERNOXONF DDT WETABLE MFTA1.DEHYDE (for Slugs) PLANTATIONS LTD. OLYMPIC TO-MORROW ....!. 4 30 A >.IS •• THE 9VEmM.ANmEm& •• And BUD ABBOTT — LOU COSTELLO in •BUCK PHIWXTES ###; #### %  .— QET L-O-W OIL CONSUMPTION—L-O-N-Q MILEAQE WITH TO-DAY Oalr 4.3* A 1.15 Universal Double "AGAINST THE WIND 1 AND "RED CANYON" Starring Ikword DUFF — Ann BLYTH Tomorrow (in!. 4.3* A 8.15 Universal Double — ANN TODD — CLAUDE RAINES •ONE WOMAN'S STORY' AND CALAMITY JANE & SAM BASS" With Yvonne DECARLO — Howard DUFT BONY LAST SHOWS TO-DAY 4.4S tt 8 15 A Blazing Box Office Thriller 'aramount Present! . -THE EAGLE AND TIIL HAWK la glorious Technicolor Starring: John Payne, Rhoda Fleming. Dennis O'Keefe. Thomas Gomez Strong as the Eagles. Fierce as Ihe Hawks, They battled America's Ene: EXTRA MID-NATE SERENADE €SSOl EXTRA MOTOR OIL W//AV/MV///^/rW-V*/rV/*W^ WA'AW/W/V.



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PAGI 1 CM I. tUBBAUOS ADVOCATE TUESDAY NOW.MHt.K 27. I5I B.\RBAW)SSalA0Vt)GrrE IV. 1 1* f--— -1 Tu.sd.n V, • ithir I.AIIOI II RLUCm %  %  %  I for the Ijabtttr might not unfairly be .summed up as "government by OUT u'vernment." i :her inlion. There are plenty ,i., % %  .. In une par! that "ini ovar three huntnd have • : t > md sordid conditions under the system n private en.mothcr we are lold thai "tha Ml.-nt ravolu which one ft ft I land of Barbadoa hai passed inl > the hands ol small-hold1 importance." i nol a coil u nalistic cliches e.g. i • (Ad •<( vested "will outlaw and liquidate all ns which hamling, "will ce light", "the van of i %  Bui n i ad out "f hand %  ation an • und wherever poUrealities and Hut there is no dmiht that what motional appeal ol "Labour Marches On* 1 effective propaganda value is the fact that without the activities of the 1 .hour Party and the Bari dodbtful whether as much would have been done done in recent years. The ru;'' must be chamfio justification) moral or historical fur the continued flaunting by i Partv of statements which have no basis tor foundation In fact* lionate historian Hire w. L. Burn unto in his historv of I %  / %  1 tl l&13*"the task of the planters demanded a van careful combination of generosM and that "this combination wni meet successfully achieved in Barbados and Antigua, and "thai s adapt themselves tn the new conditions learning new ndling labour grow and mi i. tnd thai acted prudently and sensibly in Ihirements", we recognise the authentic imie of iiarbadian his* torj The LabourI'.. > %  %  its own causa by Its continual harping and reitenttion of the non-histoi leal aaaertlon that ctised locally is over three hundred years of "misery and sordid conditions." The truth is that without local private enter* prise the conditions of the 21)0,000 people who live in Barbados would *>' tightening indeed. Barbados has HO far escaped the tragfc J Antigua, a/here exodu "exploiting class" dted In the economic running down of Island whose names once ranked with : efficiency Th Laboui Department'., retpoii tor I960, :i does, detailed information ol th Industry is bibt %  hi workM that this island Bid i v the Col mm I Secretary to the Hon H A Cuke, C.BJL, and the em| %  *, bados in the Legislative Council recently, must remind the authi u MarcheaOn**hownuaoh they owe to thl i ixample of private enterprise and to the harmonious r.-iations which -xw between workeri and employers. But the authors of "Labour Marches On" do balasve In private enterprise, the private enterprise Ol the Labour Party. Tne: B IS nowhere in the pamphlet B BUggSflttOI) that labour could not do better than those who now m .i fully shoulder the burdens and carry the i [ski, involved in carrying on business and Industry in Barbados today. Yet nowhere aie we told how they are going to do I There are plenty of promises. Excess profits tax, entertainment tax: "equal Opporl ill". "publafl ownciship," i '!> M all possible measures to provide employment." "security of employment", "capital woiks". 'deep water harbour". "Kast Coast Rea d ", "increase in mone scurlty of land tenure", "plani i ment of tourism". "cliBUnate school fe. 'press forward with 1 using", "Housing Loan *'" il "i public health bill", "social Insurance)", "incn hospit.d accornm -dati m", better conditions i i <; vernment servants" and all ending : the slogan 'Forward with Labi One looks in vain in the pamphlet for ktion Of the known fact thai the relai wl Ich Bari %  %  %  ie mainly to the efficient pnv. sod sugar industry: the bulk buj II..: I msnt of sugar betwi an the Unit I Kin [dom and the West Indies: and above all t<> the industry and application* of each Barbadian by whose enecgii i reached the Imperfect but reasonable standards of life which we have attained. Less promi' me constructive proposals how to tackle the maintenance of these standards in view of ither difficult US firmer ('.rounds : Sbility to march :. if some uf the threat, contained in this pamphlet were brouj ; %  In the Bar%  a is no doubt that lion ol Labour's That is the frightening alternative whieh 1 SB, Who Wt want to woo capital, not scare it away uking An Executive rwn tr.. "X^JXZt ' 0*m ,re unbecoming: Hot everyone is %  natural-bo. lecuUve; they m rxrtu.ivf, but many can become %  a live* by training, by jnd ablltt.es. aeeded, and by workm* toward* self-development. Beinn ..II txecirl ly having %  massive however good they may be. %  •** of all ay ..iner tn no ma( i # „„. of excei)l „, the virtue*. proper environment. One of the Duro "* %  m an bitterett sUuaUona lor a qualified executive it is true that a man and eafer executive „ to be jiven who ne\'er goes out on a limb may a (Me without tuttkority. Rank ,rewrve the safety of hi* poaition. h ould nol be looked upon aa but he toevs i reward tor paat services. dujcretion ^v,,, a „,„ (#r tne ^^ purpo,, ire should 0 f eo.blln* him to meet responcrutlnlre .ibmtles Cesjreeai in %  iaes II never not the kind of mean. The SSSCUU .ridred.eyee to a project before he calls upon his F.veryone in an enSjaSBattOB should know precisely what he is responsible for. what hi authority Is. and who docs wha. in directing effort. The execuIve has the right to be consulted. Many a Arm would benefit by a ipunk io stocktaking In this area. Progress in business, as in the making ol the world. K the domination o; ,* executive wi.o chaos by mind and purpose. I. tlna> that he is too conservative can be achieved only when then "Naturally enough there ne inshould P ritUw *' n chances m I. a basic philosophy and a good J^LS. e=-dV ff er'^ 1*£^jZLJSJr ^Z "& u. ask. have the ^cctlve ^ he oath ahead Thev are MliMn cl ** rl y a11 ,lM1 r " k '"m '' nl • v " l > . how are execuw IM P iiIinJ. L volved. and decide^ to go ahead lives to mesh their efforts* How n with his plan, ia courageous are they to obtain, .teamwork or man „, the best sense of the word, their own or lower levels' How Bravado Is to be equally cenare they to be sine thai nen MiM,i with cowardice. The IIItime and effort are OOIIIK spent lidcred accep.ancc of any and productively* How are they to every risk has no part In the eavoid the all-ioo-common IrusHOCS o| true courage. tration that arises when proicctJ The executive must have the are squelched because Ihe POWST i>f decision. Life i> condoesn't know whether it COntroDUaf u with a them or not? choices We cannot (Kold _. „ drciding. because even to seem to ltl Human Problem ..; 0 s?2.U!! *. ,n %  1 „ t :r„'Xr ( f '' or 1 n cu II U not rwuired thai In.*l v .„. ' lh If?J? Jl "7L'""" f* T prob..., 10 r „„,v, T Kc r „,o„. %  ,*.. g' n Jfby C, n %£&£? V't Wt Ih, rih> m ,„ nd w,„ncn. *~* thl. >.-m. h>1 „ hl ,*, ,„ „„ bo%t ^ ^ h < ktop thtm. and develop them In£,J'' !" "f; '"' '"' m \ '"*'" the lut trlvl.l del.ll. he I. !* %  „ Io a ood le.der. F.eU re hotter More eruclal 1. the ability to nrun ,. |r „, lhan opinion, m this „„.,„„ .ive without dllherlnu .1 a de,ls„„„„„ Hc deprlvi 1 hlmjt | u( I(u %  hat ha. this man done' how ha". ,nn ,n '" %  wii *opportunity to deal arith more bU job. make sound P*"'" 1 ' r rr J' " deetalon. and direct the work of other people. He needs iinaKio.-ition and courage. The market valOS ol SB essettfhe executive Many a brilliant idi qualities. He is not paid Io. UM £ %  Jf br f"4? e ,h f m n thing he dosa, but fo. the moral <* !" "ned 't lacked the ll it acrow. The budding (..km innly isolated events or facts and the relallnnships that %  t ween Ihem. We mieht 'i, | % %  %  %  %  ia| bsMkgrouad M I roiinl in the.se days. T.i' las transferred himself to a new tne in which his development of .rood mental habits is the kev N) ( III.11.1 ll; : MlllIlM he dOM W what ran he do to-day? (Length of pgrVMN alone does not qualify a man for SsSVUth rank. It Is, undnuliir.iK vantage, but during it the man mus; have developed alertly Hv must have learned to perceive meanings that do not SD| nurface. He mu't be almost This Is one of the traits watched v '** 1 problems, to consider and .i when he is being conP l0n expansion an,| improvement Mdered for promotion; does he " %  %  *• *fu'y. working himself to his boss with dee) Ions 01 ln *? ,n e r,v srave. for decisions? The man who says *>f course, one, must not go too Ho you want to do so and so— '" !" o ood •xecutlve tries to IS trying to use the head of the delegate everything. Including his man above him. Some weakness* n rponsiWslty for seeing that i ,.n be covered up by Mipvrtur th J ob K*' t dogie well, psychic In his ahititv in steer siifcU „,!,,,.. ni an going strong at sixty-live. whlU' others have winked businesses at half that age. It is only a feeling, not a fact, when th< .i twinge of envy in contact with ingtr people, lie has not their 1! llRht-heartedness. their casual manner, their air of living for today. But on the other hand h> own bluff. The bluff may be has poise knowledge of the world caused by bit cooottt. or u> J fi>ol:iiiii undtrslandinii of DSOpk iSfa and unproved baUtt m his nets which, in the very nature of ability. things, younger men Next to ...uher 'I Is necessary to get along Many men ' %  *"lh associates on Uw ecutive's level. There is a temptation for the young or new ex• cutive lo lean over backward nuher than appear to be a "ye* man.' 1 Instead of that, he should tl ni, nee""'' S'a Th€> Arms* I lou-Or Do They? NEW YORK Bv R. M. M4CCOM. municipal aulhoritle. smihnKlv .An (IKI> raw down in Wa.hmKpoint lo Ihp recent bettlnf Acu ton -over worth,., America l< or rangement. tor Iran.porllnn liveon the local race track.. '• ""V w a/"jnind on her promlM. .tma are mainly re.porlble. In On Friday-thl lait day ot the AT?? ,„, 'Ii' 1 ",' !< 'ne. 38.500 Wl, 25 500 .eaKin—5.OO0 Sew Yorker! ng. t.c ,-al Olmsied. dlroctor al tho jheei.. and 14.700 cattle were dead how manageil to bet 4.589,185 dolr.. i ,r it IIIKBI. A..ijt — Lit .. -~ .inee holds when thev arrived bv lorry at th, nferenceaiidtaUsthi i N earh all wen Oovtrnshipments are well up to schedule mvil \ i„ s .. | Sena'or Lyndon Johnson of Parallel Texas, chairman o( the Senate so ALARMED are the 13 Preparedness Committee. iMiunces Rwnan Catholic bishops of the on the patstral H| nyi indlgUnited States by the corruption In nantly thai only .1 h-.i t um, l>epresent-day AmerlcaB pubUC life fan thli Press conference, Olmthat they issue a statement drawKad Sppaared bsfora the Commit,n nn "alarming parallel" lietween businessman. on 16 races. TV-itis THEY have praised or blamed TV for pretty well everything by now but here's a new one. Ir. Charles King, scientific dlrectoi uf the Nutrition Found of America, says that TV ii .. sponsible for th steadily expanditistline of the American il gave them :i bleak b the effect that there Is a nearisreakdown in the flow of American -tini^ ind more sitUi I .:l.i/lna eyes glued I Uttlt screen, dlag%  \lHI ., .1 ..', %  .1 I I C II t l:.>tl %  I ,;,,;( %  'Home'fate will U-fall us", warn around with th the churchmen "If we do not to that lumlnou awaken to the danger which noses the doc. threatens from within our houseQuota h0,f1 wr u SKNATOH HORERT TAFT i\o SInni >' Ohio, coins a shrewd phrase. The IN RESPONSE lo the groans .f man who may well be the Hepub%  '' .th.it with price* llcan battler foi The senator i IDS the iiiformaUon 1 1 nnsral >mmittee that hli irrect—but then duced for the Press 1 Mow come'' asks the SSslslw Well, explainthe BBI "used different schedule* in each %  Btaaaa Washington is much bewildered by the whole thing, For bv this unw averyona knows that one of urgent reasons which liroiutht Busnihowet home on that flylas trip wai t scua the Presidency Ihe w.iv tlu> ire noliody can possnext year makes u speech urging ii>lv find IBS m 13 tor tiigher a quick truce in Korea. For. savs inch are pUnrjad by New he. "a stalemated peace II far betYork for the New Year>. the ter than a stalemated war." On. II. arli 1 s Suv The brewing industry is yet a further unjertaking that uses water by the thousand million gallons a year. Just one leading London brewery used between 150 and 200 iion gallons for all purposes in 1950. And than are a whole host of other important %  n'.^rprises — ranging from steel to papernuking — whose operations would not be pcssible without an unlimited supply of wLter on tap. Nor is industry the only large;c.i!e user : the London Zoological Gardens. or instance, needs an average of 55 million ;al'ons every year. It is dreadful to imagine h consequences if, for any reason, commer'ii.I water supplies dried up WHEELS AND CASTORS AM OIIS Vt II 11 MM hi IS Per Set ot Four. Chromium Platrd 2" Plastic $1.46 Chromium Plated X' Plastic... Furniture Castor* 1*." Bakelite Ball Bearini: |H" Bakelite Nickel Plated I'." Rubber in;i-;i.s S1.96 si.(in S2.10 S2.8f l.i.li S6.S2 J" x l',V Cushion Tyred Swivel Castor 10" x 2" Roller Bearini; Industrial Type Rubber Tyred SI0.07 •' x IV Hospital Type M.65 14" x 3" Heavy Duly Truck $10.11 DA COSTA & CO., LTD Dial 4689 ^v.-.v.v.y.'.'.v.v.v.v.v.v.'.v.'.vA'.'/A'.v/.'.; Surely that was a plain message ;',,/.!.. to hi. listener, who were mrwtly compoKd ot Held worker, and __ _. „ .. „. .. labouren, that it they wanted T,. The Fdifor. The Adroeale— „„ |ch (or Mle|r B irl.fri,,l they sill I happened to lie driving hou ld Bo into torn and .leal II. .,.,;",'*... SK'SiSS'S'.l'E! "<" ,h "~""J „"", 1* Apart from Ihe lad that he would when I tame on a Political Meet,!,.„,,..„ t t. nut NiimiM.red by thl local LabOM f },.;., fl .. iiff mi angry letter lo the War De partment. Careless stfcasal Parts The spaakm who ba -.-,_ .._ menil-'l of the House of Assem.. r t m WITH MEAT PRICES It their b i y during the httt session, said crim *' statue of a i domestic definitely upholding nd apparently inn further all the tin • learn that 70.000.000 II) of prime n I every year through -hecr carelessness. Off-hand and too-hasty ar,'ords: — Another speaker ridiculed the ,„, . „ weanna of Dfaai badges bv office If hv stealing %  pi eee of nie'-engerItM ii would make m. uife happy. I woulu -.te..i Yours verv truly Sir. It" BARBADIAN CDC CLOSE £63,000 H LONDON. Have CDC been left with another white elephant? That is the question bein asked m the Central African township of Blantyre following the closing down of the £63,000 CDC t'stale comprising four houses for married couples, a communal messing hall for bachelors and the finest office building in Nyasaland. Th. estate, opened three years ago. was Intended to be the administrative centre for ihe tung oil, rice and tobacco growing projects which CDC had undertaken in Nyasaland. But as a result of an economy drive from London, it has been decided to shut — at lei st temporarily — the Blantyre buildings. The staff have been moved to Lusaka and today that £63,000 worth of concrete and i i iM>nry is occupied only by an accountant Who is clearing up the Corporation's affairs in ihe area, and by a woman stenographer. Heports from a correspondent in Blantyre suggest that the Corporation is offering the '• %  .' uses for sale. But. he says, scarcely anyone is nibbling. Attempts to let them are said to have met with no greater success. The refrigerators which graced the houses have been sold at knock-down prices to Blantyre business Ilrms. And the man who administered the scheme from the beginning, Mr. Sinclair Hay ? CDC headquarters in London say that he left tho Corporation over a year ago. Mr. H.iv was a Glasgow -uilicitor who "had no specialised knowledge of Africa. But he was very good at administration and housing estates." CDC headquarters deny that they are trying to get rid of the Blantyre property— by this time referred to among local inhabi-) tants as the "white elephant." They say] that a new Regional Controller for the Central Africa area will be leaving from England very shortly and that if he is unable lo find the necessary accommodation in Lusaka he v.-ll quite likely re open the Blantyre buildings. And what of the CDC schemes themselves? They are still in the pilot stage but local ex-i ports think that the rice and tobacco projects will succeed. i DINNER JACKETS FABRICS.... Fine Tropical & Linen STYLES Single & Double Breasted COLOURS... Cream & While And 3-Piece Tuxedo Suits With all Accessories W/////W///.VWAy/w WAV//// '.V-VAVAV. pAme G0DDARDS FOR THESE 11IEESK an Red CheeM Dulrh Head %  • %  • %  ilrl.tr in Tins -moki-d Harm smoked Baron smoked Salami VStl Kidneys lUbblts §'9Sii Haddock lM|.|.r %  Pilchard. i' diM. SI'Kt f.l#..V rnn.-s.. ( | pra. 30 ot 30c per tin rUh Pane—6 rer.U per Un. Orange .?.,, %  i*, rrr tin Bluaseiij jam S4e per tin FruH saUd—Dried 7V per Pkr, .Va"*jtaa% B ft/fltifilf*.



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PAGE EIGHT BARBADOS ADVOCATE (I ESDAY, NOVEMBER 27. 1*51 .<(".. lb. b l F.I..1*. t.illno lbb II I MOTTO b R. Fanner Jeftiniot; .1 TKorataai HarrM IB. b AUilmoi "'* b Thornlaa. MmruH b Thurnt^t laaJ-f imUHtEDtATe OtKKBT Windward Defeat Spar Ian To Win Intermediate Cup WINDWARD defeated Spartan in their Intermediate feet) <>n Saturday by 96 runs Tins, victory make* %  in this division Cubic A the Regiment also scou-d outrigrrl victories ovet Hospital and Wanderers. Empire ant! Pickwick played to w, Pickwick Betting three points lor a first innings lead. Win PhillipR Pr krr i M Prirvrrtn rib Witt. M. Mayan b Clark* 14 CUm .whpr h Phillip. i I il, l-hiilii.. T. I'BIUIHHI nol out I. ptnlhp. M VsM IIIWIINC ANALYSIS ttarln>n..REGIMENT!> %  I %  %  niaiiiv.'. w '.', ANAL' iMr 1 p.tk.1 H.C. 73 For 7 Vs. Empire Th. dm day', play .n th run. ftorlM their nor. u, 188 S£"52 •" %  %  ."'Jj"""' 1 ',' "' v.-r thei, opponents. Rain held up play for a considerable time n atumps wen Empirr had scored 13 runs for no 'vicket m their second innings. Scoreboard.— rMPlft .. rllkwtiH ai fl.rrlwn IMI-IRF l.r.l lm.li... ||, I'l. KWICK 1-1 Innln. T. Bvalitt Grimth b Prr-.-.rt u C. I*w1i 0 Hkflr %¡ Q Moat* b FT % %  Mod E %  vl*i c AiMUn b (InmiP %  M Kr-Ur c Amorv b .% ., T R ria.fr b Pietcd )* II Kaoak ( IUIL.W b Anmrj a T Prii-rkn nol out %  -M, i> r„...-, a I-.niib. b Spann-r W. YMUfMed abwni n E*tia. 1, Total .... M BOWLING ANALYSIS C PrtO. I,-I ij. | 1 Karri. | K. AmorIS ] SI K OilRllh ft l EMPIRE Ind Innin C K.AiriMnot out .. E llarroa nol out %  BRH TftUI u4i I MM "l*MI" >l MIS, M II"III M A >'llll I I -< II *l I. A %laii i i -.1. I.I I Ml rfTAL IKISPITAI lit* U R i nrankr. i C l — l. ,M CfKhlM II!. b %  FT t Uilkr> C. William, lb* H Clut<# Ollbrn B. Vumu-rtr r C Uwlr Ii Hrauk. r V CarMr lpd. iukpr. Mallhwle C KiiMhl !" %  DUl ROWLING ANALYSIS grou stopped ploy, fn the Empire College iwrtch. College batting first scored 73 run*, for rvven Nskn play ended. Kaln held up play lor D considerable time C. Heckles took threiwickets lor 15 runs for Empire :tnd IClarke two wickets for thr**. runs. At I--eward. Curl ton it their match ngiilnst Leeward sirred 106 run m their first turn it the wu-ket c. White lopscored in the Carlt*4i iiuiitiBN WIUI 3H runs. rtesl bowling pt-rforinanc.was grven b S. Marshall who caplured live of the Carltun wickets for 9 runs. Q. Uilkes to lot 4t> runs. At the end of play l-ecward hud replied with 42 runs for four wickets. L. Jordan Is n"t 9BH t 2*1. ft.iin held up play at Deckle* Road wher P Wanaerers and Plcl.wick are playing. W.nuieT. i who butted ftntt had scored 48 runs m thei r first inning* when stump* were drawn. Bowling for Pickwick O. Kiiin bagged four wicket, for 11 i Foundation scored 151 runs In their first tottJDJI at Foundation ISI" against Y.M.P.C Mr. Jones 53 Jt and C. Burk*. 45 not out were reu sponxlble for this score. The wicket was taking turn. C O'Nol and C. GVtRatddflt each t'k three wickets. Rain prevented Y.M.P.C. from nig their first inning*. PIH .. coiisiir \\ coi.isin*: (i.i n:i: i-t bt, n< ?i tor 7 kt-. dpetiii mpiR i MII TON i.i Imtaaga i c Whilst. S Manttall 3 tor H G Gllk*. S (nr *• tEEWARn l.t Infill.*.--*) lot 4 -HI'. l .11 r,lim nc11 mil SSi M WIIIRI Hv ,. l-li KHII ID I. ''.. K: ,. ) lii.i...-SSt KIT" FOAI' WANIItBrnR I.) In-.lr.eKf.ig 4 f II. II IRnSftMa 1 I 1-OIMIArON ... V.M.P.C. AT S-Ot NUATION rtJUNDATtON 1*1 tnfttnm m '"' II I H I l\ WINPWAR NIVIIWASD I.I l-Mlx. .1-. S -.1. .l-.li • MtHS-M IriBlBI. WINliWARO-SriW lnnin. ifcv.l)" ""' "ul H Thamton not nut ToUl IBM na MtaRj SPARTAN-Jnd Innlns* V W.-K1 c i-kpr T Firm." I. II I-in*i C Wood upd iwkpr T. Pamwrt YESTERDAY'S WEATHER REPORT FKUM CODRINOTON. Rainfall: Ml Total K-.ini.il for Month to Date: 6.45 Ins. Hi.in -t Temperature: 8.S5 F Lowest Temperature: 72.5 F Wind Velocity: 8 mlle< per hear Barometer: <9 a.m.) %  • '•"* shortly afterwardRod dtOVg towaids Belmont. He went over to the side of the road where Worrell was and began to talk io him. His wife called to him and while going to her, he heard the I bus which he :-i U M —1422 returning. The bus <.werved in the direction of the lorrj Me made a pimp toward the right front fender of the lorry and the bui went on, struik tm lnrr> and Worrell who was standing by the door, and went on. When the bus got to the end of the lorry's platform, it wont back Bo Us left side, continued tOI about 50 yards and then stopped. The road was dry. he said. He went and lifted Worrell's hand after the collision and it *nu Iftte• • 4 To Mr Williams he said that he hid spoken to Worrell at various times during the day. but haci MVtf snulled dunk on him. I>ri\en. Admonished Wlun he came I" tl.< when the dispute was going on he told Worrell he should behav* belter because Worrell was the t.wner of a lorry and Thornhill waa only u tmptoyee. Worrell d that ins lorry was hibasket and hue ami it would nol %  ound well for it to be going %  round Uiat he (Worrell had killed people while they were %  i iwn on his lorry. Opened Knife He glfo told Thornhill that hi was ashamed of him as he h.nl titan out .i kntfg wotn Ihtn ww a fracas with n smaller man. VI %  i 'I. but i ntwnlng frotn llelmonl Road, it was gotnt; | afa ait in to 2^ mihemed to be R'UMB normal w see much wag near him. Cittens. a Civil If**%  at on liu .eXl RJVe Tiborated Brewster's evidence u to the to overtake each other th t hu-l Dang on between tsttsYfJI and Thornhill and of the co.iislon. Winifred Wiggins, a school ixcuf-ion i„ the bus M—142" was the twelfth witness to giv~ Georgf llre*rster's evidence and added that she aaw when Ihe orrj i Worn-il She ataa toppled out of the bUR_ but I possible heavy fall was' broken bj hi brother's alertnes* n assisting her Doris Bowen. Victor Bowen'-. wife was the next witness calleo She gave corroborative oridanc e Three other witnesses were nffi-red for erosi-exnminatlcn. Th 0 first was Joseph Brttwstei I ai wr to Mr. Wllliiini-. that iu. had told Worrell to behave himself after the bus and had rutkifcsd each otner. He told hifn So because he had tiled Id pass out the bu OO the wrong side. • lh,. row lasted for about 15 minutes. I'eny Klcoek told Mr. Wilhairs that he had seen Thornhlll tear itiK i it the Park rails after the row. Thornhill aajd hi been held he would not have been .-truck in his eye. Worrell came up to him and Thornhlll said, "you are out for trouble and if you do r % % %  me I will do something to '<" that same night." Ruth King and Chains, Wigfir* .led for possible croasixjnilnation. but Mr. Williams said he did not wish to crossle their KEEP SLIM | Kuiiniios TIKI CLUB AND FIT If voa <*ani to be anracnvel? •lun, wfth brighi eyn. rsdisnt oimpkiMn, and real ainriv. Nature demanus that you keep yr-ar nrsieoi cle.n.cd ,t ues. (Jimcsl iet by I • infirm thai Bile rViry gently and rffeviifcl/ Hile Beam ate keeping mill*, Ikcdltby and youthful m !...*and figure Starr taking them tonight Naturt't Gentle Aid BILE BEANS Juu a couple o*dt(me § ACTIVE KIDNEYS KEEP YOU WELL #ssutV (VIM mm r aaad ass> tT IS OFTEN SURPRISING bow qukaJy haAacfae. lumbago, rbeumatit pauii, MUT, •.hmg^inii aad the common urinary disorders due ihagglth kidney acuoo can be overcome. Strong, actn-e Udneyi %  afegaard your health by nraining esccss urk god and harmful wum out of lbs ayttem. When kidney action is Inadequate and fails to filter das blood properly, pam and di sc omfon frequenUy result Doans Backache Kadaey PiDa bring happy relief by h l r*"f as clean-r and itimulate the kidary flhen. (iraieful people e*crywbeta tell bo* good Dosn's I'llli arc £r,:DOAN'S | TO BUY STAMPS WANTED STANt?S All KIIMI. ..I .STAMrs it ihe CARIBBEAN STAMP SOCIETT N iff. Swan *ir**\. aati JUST THE THING A compart little labl Modal O.i <*(Hil Mr. Carl Curwen'v Orchestra II.mi in9 p.m. They'll Do It Bven lime -AST as A &D-AND-ASK ON ULTRA ASHCAN, PFD, AND QUOTH SRUNTO PIS IRON, WILL VOU, LIKEAG00DFaU3W? CAN ^00 FIND OUT ViWTCONl'EX MONOCLE IS SELLIN6 AT IN L0NP0N? >A OAN'T TfLL-'We GUVS 1 WITH HO SEAT IN THEIR PANTS MAYBE VJOOT IT OUT T0TN6 A WT WALLET j SO WE GOTTA BE NICE TO EVERYBODY v"' THIS IS WTTeON %  iTTINfi m THE PARKI THINK HE STEALS r,.-. CoaTiCKER TAPE AirSELLsrrce. h-l&fm CONFETTI^/, .41$? B y jimmy Hatlo YeAH--HE ALWAYS WEARS A BOaTONNlEBE.BUT I'LL BET HE PON'T KNOW WHERE HIS NPXT SOUP STAIN IS COWING Fcm yuKyliKyu< w CASING THE BOARDROOM HA8ITUE WHO Srrs IT OUTSTOCK AHEAD HEALTH BENEFITS Vj • CONTAINS VITAMIN A & D IN A DELICIOUS FORM • INCREASES RESISTANCE TO ILLNESS • ENSURES STRONG LIMBS AND SOUND TEETH IN CHILDREN Haliborange Tn nieai way of taking HALIBUT LIVER OIL %  ••• >i um t uiium no., ionooa ? Pavmrnt nf I'ri/cs ; : i BABY'S TEETHING need give you no anxieties ££< Bd. O.nsolalion. Cash Competition Prize* will be paid on ami from MONDAY !•* IssrUnt Horses and Sen.il Pnre* on and from MONDAY Irg Derrmber ae*t. Payment will be from 12.M noon la 3.M in dallj. O. A LEWIS, BasrMai i %  ased b* no reatlesa nights, aw taora. Do baby disorders, it' C i kava Aabton A Parsons rants' PUWJIII handy. Mothers all over the world ha%e found them soothing and cooling when baby la fretful through teething, ami. beat of all. thry are ALIS"! I II I Y -AFE. •**S*' r *.* e '** r r ; e r *s r t *s,;'**.*s,*s r XMAS WRAPPING PAPER Sheet At at your Jewellars Y II. I l>lA A. O.. I.TI. ASHTON & PARSONS INfANTS' POWDERS mm EPHEDROL quickly rcli,< es COLDS and CATARRH It clear-* tlie n.t-..il p.isMfkMtO ri-movr MuffisMM and the uttMnasjbil con* dUonaol head colaaaad catarrh. 'I hi pmant n.i-^.il applii uifii hurtle Ii infinitely heiter than >PTJV nr dropperi ind .. r rn.-J COftVt niontly in h.imll'.K.: r pOCktM x^ilh^^ul lear of leakage. Xladr h CLAY 6> ABRAHAM I IP., Liverpool, England i 1MJJ On Sale at — KNIGHTS DRUG STORES Tou pay no more for the GREATER EXPERIENCE "JZtA — that's one raaton why thlt airline has been "first choice" of international travelers for nearly a quarter of a century. NEW YORK Non-'top lerilp "El Pirsldentr" I popular.monrv-.n \narvaM hf iksnl t3buMe%  t.. I, d Strato" < %  % %  lirllnen tlupvrn In Etifll Un.i. v\.\ i ji*. ft) i. imii Venezuela PreooetR Sights u all i i by swift Convalr-typa CKppei You mi now "Hv PAA" laaMMl anyivhsn III I.'i. i. S3 catmint's .ind colonlf* .n rrrfr


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Food Ministry Agree To Sugar Suggestions Cuba Fears Loss Of U.K. Sugar Market (FlttM Our Own < .m -p. mil in i LONDON. N Is Cuba Mwrii; tu lose her sugar market in Bi II question w.. ndnn tn-nipht following the uceipt of a report from Havana which s.aid "the Cuban sugar industry is threatened with the loss of the British market because of steps being taken bv the Conservative Gov ernment under Mr Churchill." This statement was made by (Mr. Dies; Arguelle* at Friday': inieetlntc of the Association a iSiigin (1 tower* of Cuba. He askc* thal the Association should turn "ver to the Cuban N.iiiinnal Bank for studv 90 as 10 prevent the pcirsii.u. loss of the Itriiish murket. This report from Havana hi* not been in any way substantiated in London. While tt is known thnt the Conservative Oovemmc'i Is anxious to build up trade with tinEmpire, ihe fort remains that Britain's is dependent upon importing considerable quantities of sugar from outside the sterling en 1-ist vein impint-. fro 1 AM hsfcalta 1 i .. MMOQ I a Cuban Report A Mirmdy of pood spokesman id nothing was known of "hi Cuban report, but he added "we Britain do not usually bTWk OUr contracts." Trade sources here cannot sec how the Cuban report can refer to the poMiblUtg of ending the Anglo-CUMII "Black Pact". Thin •d in August this year and provided for Britain to Import one and a half million tOM of Cuban sugar pp to t. %  11153. Nevertheless the Cuban r* port is being studied by Comnonwealth Inters tfon ;.s .. iminter lo t h %  future hen the Commonwealth sugar Itsul will be Increased. A member of the Commonwealth sugar delegation in l-on1 tonight nid no could not tain terminating the present 1 described the report of kite Hying." Mnn / An. 11T Ir.-t oar o*> Pi n aSjaMaaQ LONDON, Nov. 26. The Food Ministry has agreed in principle to Common we.ilth recommendations on the method of price fixing and the conditions or the long-term sugar agreement. This, it is und< from to-day's mcetinji between the Commonwealth delegates and Ihe Food Ministry which Was presided over by It A E. Feaveavenr of the Ministry. The deehtfon was taken for the Food Ministry officials to divide Into two committees to discuss with Commonwealth delegates the details of price fixing in one. and ihe exact wording Ot the longterm agreement In the other. Mr Cuke of Barbados is representing the West Indies on both these committees. It is believed that the question of Canada and West Indies sugar is also under review. 17 Killed, 70 Hurt In Train Collision WOODSTOCK. Alabama. A Southern railway offlml said that 17 persons were kill In Sunday's collision of l\ luxury streamliners. The DP. 1sional Manager announced that 16 bodies were removed from the wreckage and thai the 17th irlctl was the engineer on I 1 trains involved; his body was still buried under the dsjsrfa. Upwards of TO Oth> i> 1 were injured. The rescue cr still had not searched two wrecked COM, which were lying carious position above .1 oaall gorge at the scene of the These cars, however, smashed and the likelihood :>f finding additional victims then was consJ %  1 —i\p. COMPROMISE ON CLERKS STRIKE REACHED GRENADA, Nov. 26 Negotiations between employers and clerks delegations today resulted in a wide measure of agreement and coverage of ground helpful m finalising discussion on points whoa thev meet again Thursdiiy afternocr or Friday morning. The Clerks argued fur a payment of a cost of living Increase retroactive from October 1950 and employers from July 111 the present year. Clerks finally agreed to January und this goes before Thursday's meeting for ratification. The bonus will alTect RUSSIA IS RESPONSIBLE RMT WOULD laasVfilOrf PAAll Pi Hip f t o i u fj of the 1 tilted Stats* said Russia—not America—is responsible foi the I in iii.' world tension, lie si id the U S v. HI strive consistent^ f %  disarmament .-•greement to relieve th.it %  MCftSkW) /•seufj laOtJod m the main Political Committee to ,1 sl.itciucnT Saturday by Soviet Foreign Minister Andre] Vvshmsky who called Jes*ap .1 Mconii i.r," diplomat Ho said in spiv erf v rebuff of the Western disarrr rnent propos.1. sponsors will leave sione unturned in order press forward toward an .igrecit.-I r all scales of pay. Employers generally part 71 pate m locally organised or other insurance schemes. WRECKAGE OF PLANE SIGHTED CANAL ZONE. Nov. 2 An R A.F Reconnaissance plane Monday reported sighting a wreckage which may be the missing Pakistan airforee tra port during search operations between the Canal Zone and I'ypi -uThe Pakistan plane. I clwv.-d to carry a crew of five and no passengers disappeared Saturday on a flight from Athens to Cyprus. —l\P. WESTERN ARMIES READY BY 1954 THE UMPIRE rauad his anger la agreement when a catch by 'Keeper Oeoft Trurmiin from B Wales match at Sydney cricket ground on IT it M New South Wale* bowler Keith Miller appealed foi ii.iUm.iii Oomes during the Wet Indie* v. New South ueniei made only three runs Phofo by Con solid a I ed Pre** in-111 an<< Strike 1 MM AGO. Nov 26 %  the A.F.L. Insurance agent* Union Monday aathun/cu the strike against tinPrudential rntvranca Company December 1. spokesman aaid the walkou would involve 17.000 Prudential Apents m SI States but adned that negotiations are continuing m New York The union is seeking a 20 per cent over all increase In salaries %  Hd < on,missions compared to the ofTi r of 2'i per cent. —I*. P. CfflUmtAB PAMCBL8 FOM 408808 KOMEA SYDNEY. Australia, Nov. 26. The Bydfsey Dolly Telegraph reported Monday that 5.000 to 6.000 Australian troops in Korea. Japan and Malaya were due to two parcels each from its Christmas Korea Comfort Fund. —I.P. MORE POIJTIOAL TIIW EGONOViH! IMlMHlTAtNCE To Truman s Crder By ANTHO.W ( LSTI IN WASHINGTON. Nov. 26. Truman'order, wiping out all trade eotiee-..wons to ItuSUa and Poland, and banning the Importation of seven of their 1 more polilic.il than economic importante, United States Government spokesman said that US. tr.tde with those two Iron Curtain etaantrlos already was down to a trickle. Rut added that the order will point up lo world the ipMI between the U.S ai lie tald that it and of the Soviet Union and Iti satel litcs enjoying a "most favOUffld nation' llOSliiiiinl in trade or1s from the British totalled $240,000,000 in value. An official 1 tarnovoi in trail.' with UM Soviet BkK, UM cancellation of trade concession^ would have little toonorok affect. ant I'd plain that it would not work economic hardship On the overage ROSSla ">!> —t'.P. Allies Smash Red Attack — TOKYO. Nov. 26. Alliad inlaiitry and artlUcry smashed a ferocious Chin. • rnch 111 the "l,iitl> Gibraltar" sector of the front Sfohday night. ked about iWn hours liefore the Allied and lunist slaff ofllcers rssached agreement at Panmunjtn 1 on • %  iiuo ''nd( r a merciless rain of" finfrom infantry weapons and artillery Rods gave up Jutl before night nnd withdrew Soviet Troops Mass On Yugoslav Border PARIS. Nov 26, Yugoslavia accused the Soviet Union and her Balkan satellites of massing troops and building fnrtifications on her borders as the possible prelude to an invasion, and warned thai this Coininform pressure "threatens peace." The Yugoslav Minister of 81 Arab Statva Hinder Mid-Eaxt uefbri&e Plan fly JACK -1 111 i. 11 PARIS. Nov. 2S. Turkish I Koprulu. pptlcj of It and see' in pull line*. Allied arti) the Rr-d positions Tuesday. Mayor Will He Weighed NEW YORK, No*. 98. Mliuisapolipeople will find oat Priday Just haw much weight ihatr afayor csrrUp Miyor Eric Thoyer will '. wslgksd In a p*ir of siihtMnth century Jockey seals* and It would he battst for him to l> found wantiD|. Por the w*l(hInx reremony in s means by which voters in hlah Wyronihe. Eafland. appraised the AdoUnistfatlon of their Mayors nines Queen Elisabeth'* time "They were weighed on tak ing and leaving office and if ri-r lout weliht then they were believed tn have put forth great eflort" explained Hiv Fl field of the Briti-h Travel Association. But il they gullied weight then they had loafed on the Job". Eighteenth century scale* were tent by High Wycombc and arrived in New York by plane on Monday The May. • %  i Wife and inenibei. of the City Council in Mlnneapollal*o will be weighed ald Mms Pifield" because ao one 1* aup pi.ed to set fat on the point cal job.'-U.P. INDUSTRIAL SURVEY OF J'CA NEARS END tffMSl %  OHM ( %  rf*M"eBl< KINOSTON, J'CA. Nov M %  : completed 1 Adllttle, Inc., Industrial consult0JDM sJmil.ii in I rto Rico Indus%  ; % %  1 ni "mpiiny. The 1 by two Ihe qw ng techi aid no for iioidtk>n< with an at-eursjey not I 'IOXMI 111 Koreai before This led Allied Ofneers to suspect the gun.* 1 rre helnsj laid bv ffuasl ll tnlish In piirtleuliir s/cie sufe llic if'-d^. have Hiissinn omeers, dnc* 1 tic of their r,wi. Polltl\-bom <-ft\ Wtfbnrd mmi.ei ping glv( n in RuMfari. C'olrf Weather Bitter miii aeroM Knrei (*fn lierature dropped to 10 iihovr >ero in some areas during the nltfh' hamprrfd both ground and air operation* .md Rround aeUoTl tod.iv was limited to small patrol contacts according 10 the latest reports. The latest Chinese attempt to nln tarrltop "" ">* ground before ihe truce line kt froaari m 3" ifftt within ilth' of the Panmunjci' ght giving rise to ihe term "Armignis". AlttioiiHh snow and low clouds 0 ohsrurcd the trOntliW thfli i.ictical air support was impossible. f.r to the; north aloog M f0 All", eoiith f me Yalu 1 Two Re Atxmt the same time another ome "n M.i.fJn 1 ..I by K-80 escorling lighters ne.ir tin Yalu Inn Red :•'* rt fused comhid —l-.P. Big 3 Prepare For Par! With Germaiiv Sty J. OLAEN WASHINCTON. Nov. 25. Hi* Three Prarwkfst Mlnantti %  faapad to clear road ll^tM %  k^ to •• political 1th c„i %  I'I ai Itj of Ihe Federal n % %  ,. %  11..! Konrad Adenau.r Tin Weal German leader htl in p,iri.1 aarlei of n %  at %  Aiithnm Wen, Roberi and Dean Acheson QaaWUd I'S. officials nid lh< principal otajeetrtfe of the rnaei tb seek n solution of d(* 1 %  betwagn Adenauei snd Alii High Cornmhrtioneri One of the more %  WtMM rflftl cultiea htm bestji to* oiueaMpn %  wcurlty ( %  >! Qerman) Discu %  1 us on th.it i-'lnf have gone o against the background ,,f %  it. Three atatement In IftSO that any attack w-mid be considered an alt* k %  the Altlev 1 to hav. pressed for trie UWII'IIT lbs this .ntitude remains a fundamen tal point of Alli.sf police jft. 1 k-cupatloi The (Jerman Chancelloi reporl sdl] Irishes that the idea be rjlvei specific expression in u MI agrtjerni nl whh h ii t !>< %  (ht kr documeni in the political contmr now l>.ing wrrke.1 out Mutual defeme pactl h.lwcr, Cerman.v and the Allied power an undeiv(ivi not 1 aonslo^esruon —t'.P. Nutting Evados '"I'lllOMI IHHIIIU>NDON. N Undei Beentarj toi Forelgin A( tnony Nutting rdrtsRsjtasefl as qaaataM Motulgi iboal Hrit sins policy on the lu.un of F*n Tha (lueitlon was put 1 wing Labourite Tom Dnix'tj 01 Nutting gave 11 written answer Lad that both th< 1 1 Potsdam Conferences as Ponnoaa should be rvtnrnfd h China after Ihe war and Korc should he free ami independent "The Formosan problem han now bci'nn, .in ijit.iri.ilh.ti.il one an numbsi ol na| 1 which subarrfl rairo and Potudiim d.-< 1..1 It is hOWevar only >ai of th factors r.iiitiibutirig to tl %  %  tension in UM Fai I .i and, ui 1 let of tin' (Government the first fin... %  ( rdta i,.nenlriK Of Ihfal tension I* UK 'tit of a aettlemenl u Korea Whi-n Ullfl h,is |>een achieved would be poctible lo pro. 1 %  %  M '.! othisr pYobh m including that of Formonn f.p I ft. Hi l Milovan Bjas. in a 38000-word speech lo the l.'nilert Nations Polltlcal Committee declared that Hungary. Rumania and Bu lgari a have BI0.0OO men under arm*. more than three times what they permitted under Micir peace treaties, and thnt 23 of iheti ions were deplortd ;d'.ng the Yugoslav border. He said that Comlnform -oldlrrs were being instructed that their Number on" "enemv -IP U.S. Nickel Plant T Resume Operations WO /"i^ 1 OK iskAr.i, onci ssnt Nov. 26. WASHINGTON. Nov. 26. The Munitions Board % %  that a N:iw airlift was established between Norfolk and Cuhn to •peed materials for the re-openn American owned nkkcl plant Chuirman IgrAdon Jefw•nn of the Senate Preparedness Sub*C<.mmitUM" mi.de public the lettei in which the Boara*i Chairman. John Small, said thai the .ltd cut shipping tune %  supplies for the %  Snail also "aid thnt w een made avail ibli Sharett dCl geological survey* of cussed Lhe pronpIsrael arltl %  r .1 v | r*.undliif Ire NIoano Nickel Plant. ol state Dean Ache 1 01 Brltlst rhe plant, one of the 1 11 Foreign Secretary Anthony Eden jthe world was built in 1M2 an-l i-.n hotn| 1943. but hiis l>een idle since lv4S.|?ei %  veek In sepIt Is now being restored on .inllo arsge Uttervh 'operating condition, and is detion of Mldeasterti defence signed to produce 16.000 ibcrl toDped Uta of tons of nickel annually. > r —I'.r. effect the proiected M U.S. Ofleefs and the MmDefence Comm 11 r for Agrn nil rej afthe Jarna.c.i AgrlculKoprulu who Is also head %  til %  Turkish jalsgatlon to U Niiiion* Sixth Oenaral Assembly .id in an htttsji • dcfi1 1 Middle Bast 1 foi ii^." Ht laid reasop the Torhlsti 'iovcrnment has felt it n aca esarj France. Britain and th* United States in the ; East Command." MILD EARTHQUAKE ANCONA. It.ily, Nov. 26. The Ancona Observatory 1 %  • B ,,,.i.t •stflhqualu w here yesterday at I.[i tn The Observstory said that in Urwhtor m preceded by n fain rufnbUng -i.r. CLOSER RELATIONS WASHINGTON. Nov. 20. Ii it Sen. India'* Ambassadte In the U.S. si rived n between ut* I -v.r. Hut Koprulu had no answer for Arab opipi.in and h the Aroi. Koprulu sf.id lhes' Arab state-. %  tro weak t intnrc the security of %  !(. %  aMad We still nre not sure of the Arao I %  attitude the Mldo:. 1 %  ii.ild "I thuifc %  •11 w for nil of 1, %  ill points Ol pressing 1 thus focussing t.> n .... I P GOOD OLD CHARLIE ii.tti o.i gate (•"!.• %  ''" ST JOHIfS CHARLIE was ba Yuri, hire, travelled to Indon when he was a month %  %  %  1 1 i>. ,rbado (ii the glftt of May this year. .ige of nine n he is • 'I in lanky. II %  final Dane %  a at irfouenth referred I Iha I %  % %  pts to join hi.* master in Antigun On 1h' I itiat I"* that ht ipstl to 1 Id |K-rmit him to land at A latad in %  fatal ha would fft'e %  ,n jble ti> -.troll in paddocks among herd" of docile Red Pole cattle ink ended minute* Ihe i>ill Mil tlOl ghd 't former F< A .11. The Sr 1. 1 Will aepd r .ifter I f A'., Plant' (,'rasht'H %  %  .\ bombl 1 uiing a Ito.vul An %  .f Wight u.i/ii.l killu inhirlng 13 paaisi ; 1 1 n larwlni ind railroad '1 nd, blocktin ir.'iii'. 1 rorki had all its motOI 1 Ippad III H" Ing was %  id iiHk -HP. U.K. WANT TO DR/Vf WfDGf BETWEEN GOVr. AND ARMY Bv K. C. THALER PARIS. Nov. 20 Egypt chiirged here MondOJ that j Mlilaln Is Irving tn flrtv*. a wi"l( Imwsjaii the Egyptian Oovt 1 ud ihe arm* but warned lb-1' uch atteu 1' riedto fail Mahtnud Af.im Bef, w\ for Egypt's Foreign Mini %  Din I'nsha and UM Egyptian United N.itions delegation 1 luillenged the statement by ItnlKh Foreign Si.retai.v Antlionv Eden at the NATO c ouncll Ronv meeting that the British had tb 'sympathy of the Egypt Azirn acrused Ihe "Old Uadltloi u seeking divisions within Bgypt but "m.fortUfUtely foi bun Fa .MM not find %  I) nl K10 l! MIIIIIIKII IIH faithful .1 ; %  < %  %  : I %  -., %  far by the army in clash* Canal sons becatisa Oovarntnenl %  1 :-'• : 1 1 UU situation nough. M addct — I T T.U.C. Break The "ADVOCATE' pays for NEWS Dial 3113 Day or Ntghl. 10 (tiftt I A fotni meetii MlnlftsTri 'i '' %  <• N rth .,. %  aixgiUan took the following action 1 1 rcea" Plan wrth the reeommentlntion that It Admmistra'ci. W i er. his final fliC icpcit next month on national cap;ii Tie |9M 1.iM.'.n i^portrdl) ntrssrl to UW M lo 4" aimed fnr next ySSJj %  I Commons Approvr Jap Treat} %  i %  .iitct ovei a hi fcal %  i >tion 10 %  patn %  %  %  i .it tt;, nil %  Peace rre I %  laving Ihe waj foi raUl %  Tlie Hi i UM BUI i• %  ('' tr.i lo ba littl %  nine thai rormaUty WIUHW %  tit.m 'he mam teal Tie inn provide for the he Treats ol Pi Fourteen !jil i. 1 %  ihe textile %  if t.iiiod ,i motion i.i rttursdaj foi thi Treat) " I aaelal i V till -IT until %  no pre— tress at all i pule be19 and BrHafn over II %  %  %  v*sj rta %  %  \ ... ,ii Std to the ouncll this afternoon ti I %  mmand —f.r. THEFT IIS WTIGUA TliEXSURY .... ..-.. .....,.,,4..ll sr .IOHNS Department ol the rraaaun ihi, areek. The taken is %  elm *ho hai an various %  %  | %  d i-uttiiiH bac.( ; .i period 1 'I WHS ilrst discovered Curaeacj .. %  le was informed lhnt hjl had Imwn Sfl'i'i from rug %  coount thi* i ar lie aid ha hud not Ion* n .md It was disc>vered that the %  nan's slgniilure had been forged. Bo far, si lasuri %  dcaiea other %  cuunl lu.v ta I* vii lainpered .vlth. A HI at one •inn in 'f,i rVsssrun >s under %  I U.8. Will 8TAMT WtTH /.on 8UGA* QVOTA NF.W YORK, Nov. 26. %  %  inarassi of the \9S1 lug HMrlngs. Journ. ri imilii ted that the %  %  %  yeai —t'.P. COPIES OF JAP TREATY REACH U.S. S\N FRANCISCO Xov. 26. Two J ipane i I iovanunaDi %  ; japani • paac Usssty and %  • %  i hara l,in-Amertcan %  i atyo. The courlOfl "ll leavs here -f.P. be IfypUan mm?" :i Iden of iivTTTpii, i.,. %  i-.i DvvelojM GilbeyS INVALID PORT JAMAICA. Nov. 26. An open break between Icidin .filler-, of th. Jamaica T.u (; it re l oPtd to-dav as Assistant Oenrtellj broki iwny from the Orranisalnni pnr began forminl hM own indapeniti Industi . rirulturril \n ami rgen >f the T.U.c. executive II lied Kelly aa Asstatartl W. MaePhrrsou shut deal nl offices in st Cathanna % %  MandMotel where Kelb was and studi• on of •*J lelllng Oenerol Bs %  lasshole whose leftwingi %  .' %  K< %  P N I M mlc held IOIIK oonferancsa with O l ass %  '• K' U M Phi rson, Mayor Ken Hill. Tl'.C. President and; Frank Hill, leading T.U •ive who ts acting t< ; Union tog ather T follows months of dispute among i ifAetn of the nghi ano j left as ti) who should lead the orFamous all over the World Ai/rn/s