Citation
The Barbados advocate

Material Information

Title:
The Barbados advocate
Uniform Title:
Barbados advocate (Bridgetown, Barbados : 1983)
Portion of title:
Sunday advocate
Place of Publication:
Bridgetown Barbados
Bridgetown, Barbados
Publisher:
Advocate Co.
Publication Date:
Frequency:
Daily
regular
Language:
English

Subjects

Subjects / Keywords:
Newspapers -- Bridgetown (Barbados) ( lcsh )
Genre:
newspaper ( sobekcm )
Spatial Coverage:
Barbados -- Bridgetown

Notes

Dates or Sequential Designation:
Apr. 22, 1983-
Numbering Peculiarities:
No issue published for May 3, 1983.
General Note:
On Sunday published as: Sunday advocate.
General Note:
Microfilm produced before 1988 may be substandard.
General Note:
Latest issue consulted: Feb. 28, 2005.

Record Information

Source Institution:
University of Florida
Holding Location:
University of Florida
Rights Management:
Copyright Advocate Co.. Permission granted to University of Florida to digitize and display this item for non-profit research and educational purposes. Any reuse of this item in excess of fair use or other copyright exemptions requires permission of the copyright holder.
Resource Identifier:
17931718 ( OCLC )
sn 88063345 ( LCCN )
Classification:
Newspaper ( lcc )

Related Items

Preceded by:
Advocate-news (Bridgetown, Barbados)

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This item has the following downloads:


Full Text
thar bados

ESTABLISHED 1895



U.K. Asks U.S. For
Aid To Re-arm

LONDON, Nov. 12.
BRITAIN, which had hoped to carry out her arms pro-
gramme without United States help, has appealed to the
United States for aid, in advance of Prime Minister Winston
Churchill’s January meeting with President Truman.
Churchill had been expected to put United States’ aid
at the*top of the agenda for his man to man*meeting with
Truman. It probably will still be at the top. The Con-
j servative Government found that it had inherited such a
b tremendous financial crisis, however, that it could not wait
until January to send out its distress signal.
—— New U.S. aid for Britain will

; Ibe discusséd in Churchill’s and
Ro al C ae ] - | Truman’s general review of how to
y oup e prosecute and end the “cold war.”
Churchill wants to have a chat

e “

Sail For H Pee Sl.
ome There is speculation here that he
: may see Stalin after he confers
NEWFOUNDLAND, Nov. 12 with Truman, Trumen is less in-
Princess Elizabeth and the Duke clined than Churchill to talk things
of Edinburgh sailed for home| °VT with the Russians. Many
aboard the Empress of Scotland Britons consider Truman a “pris-
on Monday after a triumphal sve. {oner” of his Opposition at home—
week tour of Cat ee = ot ., jhe cannot meet the Russians for
an Washin co Do ‘enn aan visit fear of being branded “appeaser.”
as gton, D.C, 1e Empress sy consider C »hill’s 3i-
stood off-shore and the royal _ They consider Churc hill’s posi
Ya!) tion more flexible. His Labour
couple boarded her from a tender. Opposition would welcome a talk

rhe cruiser Ontario and fhe des-

with Stalin although many re-
troyer Miemay escorted her for|sponsible officials pin no great
100 miles out to sea. hopes on the outcome of such a

conference.—U .P.

—U-P.





New Provisions For
Colonial Shares

LONDON.

The Crown Agents for the Col-
onies have given notice to inves-
tors that after January 1 next!
some 50 Colonial Government!
Inscribed stocks will be trans-}
ferable only by instrument =f
writing. This will mean no prac~

Robertson Will
Probably Head
Mid-east Command

PARIS, Noy.12
French sources said on Monday
night British General Sir Brian
Robertson “quite probably” will
head the West’s new Middle East



defence command, although no tical difference — from existing
i decisior. has been reached.| @trangaments, since the Emer-
Brian is at present the} 8ency Provisions in 1939 sus-



mre a

British military chief in Egypt.
The agreement on the four-power
command composed of the United
States, Britain, France and Turkey
Was announced on Saturday, but
Bince Turkey has not yet been
taken officially into the North At-
lantic Pact “family”, informed
quarters said no_ decision on
Robertson was possible yet.

The British embassy here. ha
no comment,

—U.P.



No West Indian
Regimert Yet

LONDON, Nov. 12.

No official action has yet been
taken by the Colonial Office with
regard to the reformation of the
West Indian Regiment. ‘This
statement was made by a spokes-
man this afternoon.

He was referring to a story in
this morning’s News Chronicle,
which stated that the regiment—
disbanded in 1927—may be re-
formed in Jamaica. The story
added that the Colonial Office was:
to consult the West Indian Gov-|
ernments as part of a general
policy of making use of colonial
manpower |

errr nnenegnneaPianaia oon ence aieeesitinaaian a eaaeaeeecieremicinnaniial a De lle ll
= ies





The proposal, which was men-
tioned on two or three occasions
during question time in the old |
Parliament, is being given careful |
consideration by the Colanial)
Office.

pended the pre-way procedure for
transferring title.

The change has already been
placed on a permanent basis for
British Government and Domin-

jon stocks. In the case of the
Colonies, the authority of the
Colonial Stock Act, 1948, and

amending legislation by each of
the Colonies coneerned has been
required. Thig has now been
obtained.

Stocks affected include four,
British Guiana stocks, redeemable
between 1959 and _ 1980; five|
Jamaican issues, redeemable be-
tween 1952 and 1973; three
Trinidad stocks, redeemable be-
tween 1958 and 1971; the Grenada
3% 1959/1964 issue; and the
St. Lucia 34% 1965/1970 issue.

—B.U.P.

FORMER PREMIER

ASKED TO FORM GOVT.

LONDON, Nov. 12. |
Syrian President Hachen ,Apassi|
asked former Premier Zakiel
Khatib, an independent, to form
a new Government to end the
Government crisis over the West-
ern proposal for a Middle East
Defence Command, reports reacih-!
ing here said Monday. |
Reports said Zakiel Khatib was
asked after the ‘Peoples’ Par'y|
leader,



Rashdi El Kudsi and both)
former Speakers of the House of,
Representatives, refused. H
—uP.|



U.N. Admit Violation
Of Neutral Zone |

COMMUNISTS CLAIM

PEKING RADIO quoting a Communist correspondent
claimed Monday ‘that the United Nations delegation at

Panmunjom admitted air vi

Sunday and promised to take disciplinary action. _
The London Daily Worker correspondent Winnington
said planes twice flew over the security area, once Sunday

and again Monday.
He said Sunday one of a group

of three fighters ‘‘flew right
across the thousand yard confer-
ence area end strafed nearby
hilis He said: “Americans ad-
mitted this Monday and promised
disciplinary action. Winnington
said a second plane crossed the
road to Kaesong and dropped
leaflets, some of which fell into
the conference area

Winnington said “Presumably

this is some af the American
pressure, anyway it shows what
they think of solemn agreements.

“This is the first neutrality
violation charge by the Com-
munists since October 12th when



a U.N. plame strafed the Panmun-
jom area killing one Korean boy
and wounding his brother.
United Press correspondent
Arnold Dibble at Mungan said the
alleged incident occurred several

days ago and that U.N. Liaison
officers promised, Reds to investi-
gate. He pointed out that the
eutrality agreement for Pun-
munjom does not prohibit flight
‘ Ith igt U.N pilot have
the
¥ ’
everal
} ha '
U.P



j TAIPEH,

-{ern Formosa }

TOKYO, Nov. 12.

olation of the neutral zone on

er

Hit East Formosa

Formosa, Nov. 12
Two earthquake shocks heavily
damaged the East Formosan port
of Siankang. Reports from East
Formosa said that eight shocks
the city of Hualien, badly
damaged last month by an earth-
quake and large scale relief was
;needed badly in Sainkang. East-
suffered a serie



oe

=

se

a

w

S

a

BlLive
we a

® boa

nf rthquake

|
\ t init P















TUESDAY, NOVEMBER 13, 1961



RED RULE BY’ MASS





CRITICAL

CATCH













To U.

Churchill |
Wins First |
Test Vote |

el

MURDER ©
~.. Greek Tells Horrors

PRICE: FIVE CENTS





N. Assembly

PARIS, Nov. .12.
AND GREEK speakers charged before United
Nations Assembly Monday that Communist rule by
murder is leading the world back to an age of barbarism.
The Chinese delegate Tingfu Tsiang and the Greek delegate
John Politis said Communists were perpetrating crimes
unmatched in the past. Tsiang said aceordirg to offieral
Chinese Communist reports that Reds in his country
“liquidated” 1,176,000 persons in the year ended: October
first 1950 and the total for the year ended last October first
Politis said Communist

CHINESE











LONDON, Nov. 12 “far exceeded this number.
Churehill’s Conservative Gov- abduction of Greck children during the civil war in Greece
ernment won the first test vote} was a “erime unmatched in the darkest periods of primitive
Monday night when the Commons ee 9
approved a plan to turn the British soci¢ es.
iren and steel industry back to I'siang said the world seemed to be drifting: back to
private enterprise. The Labourite an age of barbarism. He then gave an account of Red
peoval af tt ‘pian ‘wee 4 foatea? “rule by mass murder” citing how Comiaunists on the basis
on te ea ee ee, f their own figures “liquidated so-called counter-
320 to 281 ol 11 ow! _ ig ires hg é ‘ é
The vote got the denationaliza revolutionaries :
tion plan past the first hurdle. RED TERROR
Che bill setting forth the denation- He told how Communist terror forces invaded homes
alization scheme was expected to by night arresting all those who had at one time or another
be presented within three months 1ccepted public office from the chief af a street to the chief
The vote arke. > Ave acceptec pie O ‘e tro 1e Cc Tt ai a stree 2 ¢ PB
emererser rte ——- GODDARD makes his brilliant and critical catch from Archer off The vote marked only the first eae Aa ; ,
h : round of the Parliamentary battle of a section of a city, and all people who once had been in
| Valentine's fifth ball in Australia’s first innings. ; ; eee ee Bites .
over this issue. Bills covering the army whether as an officer or a private or even as a
s : i ray
A li Wi | Left to right are Gomez, Goddard, Weekes, Walcott and Archer. | denationalization are expected to transport worker, This rule by murder is. entirely
ustra ta ‘ins | Radiophoto. be introduced over the next twe Chi nal n r y
" . — months or more and their adop- Un neer A
First Test } tion is not expected for several Let us all remember teiror is preparation for war,
' | e months after that Politis said there is no need for me to recall abominable
an cease i ueZ a er 1 e Churchil’s new Government erime which stirred Nanking and ‘which the world calls
Australia won the first 8 face another test vote Tuesday on the opproprium of our societies.”
Test here against the West the Conservative proposal TH : ed an ne . 1 iv :
Indies by 3 wickets at 1.52 adjourn Parliament from Decem- is crime is unmatched in the darkest periods of
So: ar a otage ber 7 until January 29 which primitive societies
play | Labourites view as an excep Everybody knows the hideous act of abduction of tens
sak 226 | ‘ z : 8 ‘ . . "
ae ig Hel — oe te oy a rere: for of thousands of children with a view to perverting their
victory, Austra made the | iristmas holidays. g - ‘ ow ‘ . a A . "
suaiat Nelda apa etehaan. CAIRO, Nov. 12. Acvemataeat Gunined: ie :-de souls and tut ning the m into matricides heinous felony
Hole played a fighting m- || THE BRITISH AUTHORITIES reported Monday that] #tionalization plan Monday and, Still persists ... . These Greek thildren abducted four years
nings and was eventually || . water pipe which the town of Suez was sabo-| L#bourites immediately proposed ago from their parents and from the fatherland have since
undefeated with 44 to his || 2 Water pipe whic supplies the n e a an amendment disapproving the grown up under the guidance of their abductors. >. /Soon
credit The Second Test || taged Sunday night. A spokesman said such incidents were] pian which would have meant the it may be tog late to save what still can be saved frem these
opens at Sydney on Novem- || common even before the gurrent Anglo-Egyptian flareup.} tall of the Government and new children,’"—U P 2 rom : t
ber 30 and continues De- British officials said about 80 per cent of 3,500 Egyptians re eas es cia eels ; ‘a
cember i 3, 4 and 5, * * she . : aay a rive Liberals present voted with
The scores were: employed at British post exchanges had quit their jobs. | the Conservatives.-U.P. ‘ > ae @ ‘
W.I. Ist innings si6 in an attempt to stem this flow the recent issue of the Union I acifie | Suspended Officers
Australia ist innings .. 226 || Canal Zone News appealed to British families to provide Hirohi ? san
W.1, 2nd Innings 245 toys for children of Egyptians remaining on the job. Film trohito Meets Trains Collide { Still On The Job
Australia 2nd Innings shows also are being organized for Egyptians. , ons | oe
K. Archer b. Gomes .. | 4 OT te Red Hostility WASHINGTON, Nov. 12.
Morris ¢. Gomez, b. , Dockworkers who went on! | FOUR KILLED | It has been learned that two
Ramadhin .......... 48 |}strike earlier Monday in the vitel : KYOTA, Japan, Nov. 12 | = \‘suspended” Chinese Nationalist
Hassett l.b.w. Ramadhin 35 Mediterranean port of Alexandria} } (or ers € Four hundred Communist uni- EVANSTON). Wyoming aight pmcers. 0 ec home last
Harvey b. Ramadhin .. 42 returned to their jobs ‘after t ete sidan We versity students staged a demon- x e’Nov. ge: .! rt i " Pisce’ y
Miller b. Valentine..: 4 | {Egyptian Government told them stratio d the ¢ rr i Ha GB My far’ O19 fye.°
‘ » nm around the car of Em T Uni P . y li
Hole not out 44 their walkout hurt their own Cc % Hiroh wo Union Pacific streamliners 000 in offeial funds are -still on
Lindwall b. Ramadhin 29 |{Country more than Britain, eh irohito. Police clashed !heading east through a blinding the job in . Washington. The
i yeknain GR pee ie > Dockworkers said however . wit the ! students, who packed blizzard smashed up in a “major” officers “refused to obey orders"
i 0 on b. Ramadnain they would boycott any ship with IN TEL AVIV themselves around the Emperor's {collision five miles west of here and are continuing to buy equip-
Ring not out + i | cargo. bo or Britis : 2 ti car, It wag the Japanese ruler's ] Monday. State police said at least. ment for Nationalists,
Extras 15 go bound for British troops in TEL A VIV, Nov. 12 | first aca ie . I i y :
BAND aly 5 ies keane Ba the Suez Canal Zone. The short-] several oo A ’ v. rst personal contact with Com-|tour persOfis were killed, They They are apparentiy doing this
—— |llived strike began when dockers}| -°vera! thousand workers|munist hostility, and the first}used acetylene torches to cut with the blessing of Chiang Kai-
Total (for 7 wickets).. 236 Jircfused to load the British marched along Allenby Street on|demonstration against him in the} through the twisted coaches of Shek's Government which accused
\*e 5 ae freighter Exeter Gate with cot- eS a Mapam party -spon- many tours he has made of Japan|the two trains the City of San,them in the first place. Charges
ton bound for Bombay and quick- “food r emonstration damanding since the war, Francisco, ahd the City of Los} @gainst the men were made after
ly spread to all vessels in the]. a 1s a and prison for! The Communists chanted Com-| Angeles in their search for more | thé y had accused officials of their
U S Ne r TT harbour.” speculators. he demonstration | munist songs, and waved placards, {dead and injuesd Government of waste _and cor-
owe 2 oO oO —_UP followed a meeting called in Jaffa] we oppose the revival of the ruption U.P
it which the pro-Soviet Mapam]jmper : ” F A Union Pacific official
“mperor system. The demon-

appealed to workers to participate



scribed the accident as a “major”



Handle Land
Reform For U.N.

PARIS, Nov. 12

The American negro religious
and civic leader Dr. Channing
‘Tobias has been chosen to handle
the question of land reform at
the U.N. General Assembly to
counter Communist charges that
negro farmers in America are held| US. Army Secretary Frank Pace
down at share-cropper level. conferred Monday on how to

Tobias, alternate U.S. delegate|speed arms to the Western Buro-
to the Assembly, told the press! pean army.
conference that Britain, Thailand, France warned she faced seri-
and Brazil have joined with the|us economic crisis and would not
U.S. in a resolution asking the|be able to meet defence commit-
Assembly to approve the first]mentm without more American
global ;gogramme for land reform | aid.
in history. “We

The programme was introduced] schedule
by the U.S. at the last session of
the Economic and Social Coun-

Eisenhower, Pace
Discuss Arms For
W. European Army

PARIS,-Nov. 12
General Dwight Eisenhower and

reconsidering
make sure we

are
to

cil and approved by the Council total requirements” Pace said
with abstentiong of the Soviet later.

bloc. Tobias said the joint res- [fa ee ie
olution dogs not seek merely to wank alfred pag Eo “y cot
divide large estates but includes}yowers Chief of ’

: ; Staff, French
many steps to improve the status

of the farmer.—-U.P,

Red Truce Team

General Alphonso Huin,
Front Commander for
Atlantic Forces and Geners! Lau-



mander in Europe.





d f U.S He indicated he discussed
Tiol Off By ee changing the strategy of U.S.
military planners as a result oi
PANMUMJOM, Korea, Monday.|development of atomic weapons.
United States Major General —U-P.
Henry I. Hodes accused Com-
munist truce negotiators to their
faces of trying’ to avoid -a full] 5 St
armistice settlement. The chief 0 Dead In orims
U.N. representative on the armis- ’
s Pa fv. A yi opted c MILAN, Nov. 12
tice sub-committee is seeking to Another five deaths. were re-

fix a eoase-fire line and buffer

zone across Korea, Hodes told the |PoOrted in the raging storms which

have been lashing Northern Italy

Reds “you intend to establish . 4
presumptive demarcation line ]@nd Southern France in the past
and a demilitarized zone which|!six days.—U.P.

will relieve you of any necessity
to settle the remaining items on
the agenda with speed and equity.
You want to establish a spurious
line and zone which will provide

you with leisure and freedom to
continue delaying the confer-
ence,”’

—UP.



PARIS, Nov. 12.
Leaders of Arab countries met
here Monday night but failed to
reach a decision on their attitude
to the four power Mid-eastern de-

MacArthur Has No
Political Ambitions

INDIA. NAPOLIS, Nov. 12 fence pact
Douglas MacArthur turned dowr They decided to call a turther
an offer to run for President on|â„¢eeting at a date yet to be deter-

the Prohibition ticket, it was!Mined to continue their delibera-









announced on Monday. He told | Hons. Egyptian Foreign Minister

party officials that he had no|>#!@h El Din said at a press con-

political ambitions “of any sort | ference following the meeting that
MacArthur wa ay proached by| ill the Arab Governments were
a pede =F . ? 1 @ — -eme

Prohibition. party officials last in entire agreement.

month and his reply made public sh said: “All Arab Govern-
1 ins ’ . : “ . é é ab

a _ Monday on the ¢ ve of the) ments are entirely agreed and th«

Party's national nomination COMn-| decision to be taken will be taken

vention. I am not a ¢ indidate| with the. entire agreement of all

for the Office of President and! To-<¢ meet icerne

have nc



in a
delegates from
country,
tated for three hours at
meeting against Government even
though
federation,
participation by its members

tion
Parliament where a
delegation asked to be received by
the Presidium,
demonstration had been requested
but it
licence had been

the text
our | last
can*standing “of the difficulties faced
get as much as possible over here }by Government” askirfg food sup-
in terms of arms, considering our} plies to have top priority and if;
possible
'Farms
production while Government was |
requested to provide public anti-

rig Norstad U.S. Air Force Com-|



hunger march, About 500
all parts of the
Communists, agi-

a public

plus

the Histadrut, a
decided to

workers
condemn

Simultaneously, a
in

demonstra-
Jerusalem marched to
ten-member

Permission for the

clear whether

given.

was not

Meanwhile Histadrut
of a resolution
week showing full

released
adopted
under-

Nee eee NN ee

of

to

rations. |
increase |

increase
asked

an
were

black market committees wit!

Central |limited executive powers. “Scrip”
“North shops were condemned for selling

fond

unobtainable on the ration
The resolution condemned the
separatist action taken by Mapam

—U.P.



STALIN-CHURCHILL
MEETING POSSIBLE

LONDON, Novy. 12

Winston Churchill said on Mon-
day that the possibility of meet-
ing with Josef Stalin “should not
be excluded” if circumstances are
favourable, but there were at
present no plans for general
negotiations with Russia.—U.P.

which was handed to the Egyptian
Government, and with the four
power decision on the Middle East
defence plan which was sent late-
ly to Arab Governments. Leaders
of the Arab delegations will meet
again to resume discussions on the
subject ~

Syria's Faris El Khouri who pre-
sided over Monday’s meeting said
in an interview that the Arab
countries are fully agreed they will
pursue a joint policy on all matters
concerning the U.N

He said Egypt’s rejection of the
four power proposals to join the
projected Mid-Eastern defence



pact was the only possible course
left open to her and that all other
ntrie vere sreed on tk



stration
prepared
Kyota

welcome
the

occurred at a
for Hirohito at
University

campus.



Russia Prompted
Final Decision

ROME, Nov. 12

Italian Foreign Office sources
said On Monday the final decision
to hold a North Atlantic meeting
in Rome on November 24 was
prompted by Russia's rejection of
the West's peace proposals at the
U.N. session in Paris.

They said the Soviet Foreign
Minister Andrei Vyshinsky’s
scornful rejection of the western
disarmament plan convinced At-
lantic leaders that Western rear-
mament plans should be pushed
ahead as fast as possible.

Although the full agenda
the fortheoming talks was
worked out, high political
ters here confirmed that the bulk
of questions reflecting the Euro-
pean rearmament programme will
be discussed in Rome.—wU,P.

ISRAELI GOVERNMENT
DENIES REPORTS

TEL A VIV, Israel, Nov. 12

A Government spokesman on
Monday denied “certain irrespon-
sible reports appearing abroad’
Suggesting that the Government
already has decided to cancel the
concession granted to a British
company to exploit potash of the
Dead Sea.

He said that no decision was
taken and also denied any inter-
ruption in the road linking the
potash plant on the Dead Sea with
the rest of the country.—U.P.

for
not!
quar-





Arab Nations Undecided
Over Mid-Eastern Pact

During the discussions Iraq's
Jammali returned to the Palestine
problem when he condemned the
use of power politics and pressure
groups in the U.N

He said: “Once power politic
prevail here at the expense of hu-
man rights, the clear principles of
a charter of peace and justice are
jeopardized.”

Jammali charged the U.N. with
weakness in the face of Jewish ag-
gression and stubborne and dis-
regard of U.N resolution He
said: “The United Nations ha
failed so far to do justice to Arabs





ip, Palestine.” ‘It is high time that
the U.N, should rid itself of power
politics and pressure grour ne
hould take a m« ealist

of Arab right aT

U.P {

neading
LP. fos

the city of San Francisco follow-|

ing.

stopped by a block signal and the
City

deol

ollision. Two trains, each carry-
ing about 200 passengers were!
eastward with the city |
Angeles in the lead and}

The “ADVOCATE”
pays for NEWS,
Dial 3113
| Day or Night

Los
|

The City of Los Angeles wus |

of San Francisco
into its rear end.

ploughed





—UP.
PALL LPL EESOPES

PLO PLVSPPPE

COLLAPSE

EMPIRE RED WINE



Maintains
the same high
Standard

of Qualityas
shipped to the
West Indies
for the past

hitty years

OT ated a
ae

GARDINER AUSTING CL?

Agents a



LOSS

4,464,444 644,016 COCO

SPECS Ss





~

PAGE TWO



R. MELVILLE JOHNSTON,
T.C.A. Station Controller
in Bermuda is at present in Bar-

bados for. one week assisting
T.C.A.’s_ Resident M&nager Mr.
Hal Baxter. Mr. Johnston is a

guest at the Ocean View Hotel.
He will be returning to Bermuda
on Saturday.
To Join Husband
RS. FRANK THOMAS has ar-
rived from St. Vincent io

join her husband who is on three ,

months holiday in Barbados. He is

a Civil. Servant in St. Vincent,
and has been here for about
three weeks. They are staying

with the Branches in King Wil-
liam Street.

Mr. “Thomas is a_ Barbadian
while his wife hails from St.
Vincent,

Short Talks
R. NORMAN MacDONALD,
Sales Representative.
B.W.LA. in Jamaica, arrived here
on Friday. The jfollowjng da,
Capt. H. Whitehorn, Assistant
Island Commissioner, (Boy

Scouts) Jamaica flew in via Tri-
nidad. They had a one day dis-
cussion. with Scout leaders hero
with r@gard to the forthcoming
Caribbean Scout Jamboree being
held in Jamaica in March next
year.

They left on Sunday for Trini-
dad and will also visit British
Guiana checking on the strength
of each contingent from the vari-
ous colonies.

B.W.LA. are making it possible
that stouts from the other col-
onies fly to Jamaica at greatly
reduced rates and they also made
it possible for Capt. Whitehorn
to make this trip free of charge.

Mr. MacDonald is also keen
on water polo and during this short
stay in Barbados he spoke to the
Water Polo Association’s President
Major A. R, Foster, with regard

e Jamaican water polo team
touring Barbados sometime next
year.

Barbadian From Aruba
R. COLIN BATSON, a Bar-
badian on the teaching
staff of the Lago Oil and Trans-
port Company's school in Aruba
arrived from Aruba ovey the
week-end to spend a couple of
weeks’ holiday in Barbados, He is
staying at the Cosmopolitan Guest

House,

Mr. Batson

is an ex-army of-
ficer and old

Harrisonian.

With B,W.I1.A.

M* BERTIE ROGERS who is
with B.W.LA. in Trinidad
left last night by B.W.I.A. for
Piarco after spending a holiday
in Barbados, Mr. Rogers is a
Barbadian,

Week-end Visit

R. O. P. BENNETT, Official

Starter for the Barbados
Turf Club flew to Trinidad by
B.W.LA, over the week-end. He
is expected back here today.

Carib, Calling

PARTY DAYS ARE
HERE AGAIN



THE PARTY season is a hapny one,
but it can be a bit expensive, so any
idea that eases the strain in to-day’s
all too slender budgets is welcome.
The home perm will save many pre-
cious pennies and give a result that

everyone will admire. If you follow
the directions carefully you will find
it is not at all difficult. There is
one kit that contains Spin curlers,
and these make the job both easier
and faster.

—Toni News Bureau,

Dark Eyes

OTS of us have been turning
up for work with dark cir-
cles under our eyes. Listening to
the cricket broadcast from Aus-
tralia is the excuse, We can now
relax and catch up on sleep un-
til November 30, when the Sec-
ond Test begins,

t? °

If the dark circles continue
another excuse will have to be
made to pull the wool over the
boss’ eyes.

B.G, Marksman

M* J. ARChi£ SUTTON of
British Guiana is at present
in Barbados. He arrived from
Trinidad over the week-end by
B.W.LA. and leaves for B.G. on
Friday.

Mr. Sutton had been in Trini-
dad as a member of the B.G.
Rifle team which took part in the
Trinidad Rifle Association's an-
nual shoot, which ended on Sat-
urday with the competition for
the Anchor Cup. Teams from
Barbados, Trinidad, and British
Guiana took part in this shoot.

The Anchor Cup was won by
Trinidad with Barbados second
and British Guiana third.

Mr, Sutton is staying with Mr.
and Mrs, Dick Richardson at
Worthing.



BY THE WAY...

" ‘O the booths; to the booths!”

All over the vast metro-
polis men and women leaped
lightly from their beds this morn-
ing, with these ominous words on
Meir lips.

At each booth courteous officials
waited with friendly smiles. And
as though conscious of the occa-
sion, the old city by the Thames
seemed to shed its dingy garb and
to don the more fitting apparel of
a festive occasion. The sun flashed
out, as though to dart a message
of hope, and to bestow a benison
on this palpitating democracy
u-tiptoe with expectation, The
bark of a dog or the cry of a child
lent reality to the dream-like con-
centration of the hurrying millions
—millions with but one thought
in their heads, if that, Inexorable
us doom, the voting papers awaited
the impress of friendly pens, Lon-
don, Mother London, was on her
way to fulfil her multifold des-
tiny.

Wait for the finat sorecast

HOSE who have been sneer-
ing at the Beachcomber Poll

are likely to receive a shock on
Friday morning, when the final
forecast of the election figures as
they will stand at the moment will
be published. This feat will
be achieved by strictly a_ priori
methods. Later on, the Beach-
comber Poll will tell you the total
number of votes registered, the
proportion of male to female votes,
and the overall percentage reduced
‘© the simplest and most tedious

terms. What more can one ex-
pect? i
The Chepstow egg
EAR Sir,
“Puzzled” is talking non-

sense. A square egg can be laid
sideways just as easily as an or-
dinary one. Just because all the
sides are equal, that does not mean
that there are no sides. An ex-
periment with a cardboard model
will make this clear. And why
should, scientists think it odd that
the corners were smooth? Isn't
any egg smooth at the corners? But
can a square egg have any corners?
Yrs. truly,
H. E, MOTTLE,
Jivie Washerbocker
is coming

ORGAN the Laundry, Evans
the Hearse’s manager, hopes

to arrange a match for the Aber-
bananer Wizard against the
American champion Jivie Washer-
hocker, of Xenophon, Utah. A
contest was abandoned in 1949,



owing to a public uproar created
by the Women’s Anti-Nasal Pea-
Pushing League, led by Mrs. Al-
manza H, Strowberger jun, She
succeeded in persuading 61 women
to lie down on the pea-track on
Llangyrkyn mountain, as a protest.
Jivie Washerbocker is due here to
appear in cabaret next month,

Staggering Poll Drama
PREDICTION BOMBSHELL
STUNS EUROPE
Uncanny, Says Mayor
A’ 3.32 p.m, last Tuesday the

Beachcomber Poll forecast
that the election figures as this
edition went to press, would be
as follows: Socialists 175; Conser-
vatives 142.

The outcome of this daring en-
terprise is a triumph for the scien-
tifle methods of my poll,

On page 3 will be found but I
don't think so, a new method of
calculating the number of shop-
ping days since last Christmas, 23
ways of using up old bits of halibut
directions for making a model, in
feathers, of London Bridge, and
the further adventures of Ger-
maine Blancmange and the Terri-
ble Troglodyte of the Sierras.

Barbedwire for harps ?

N a musical criticism I came

across the phrase: “The or-
chestra took themselves too seri-
ously.” This seems to amount ta
an invitation to orchestras to be-
have like dance bands; to jump
about. make faces, and _ utter
American cries. 1 remember an
incident in the old Queen’s Hall,



Rupert and the



When all is

ready Rupert tes
Rollo's bundle firmly round his
waist and gets over the rail. Then,

gripping the rope, he hangs upside
down, and makes his way slowly
vai surely along it. “* This must be

Just Opened

DRESS GOODS |

CREPES

omy at EVANS & WHITFIELDS |

DIAL 4606

SPUNS
IN DESIGNS



SHEERS



Married In Scotland

ISS MARGARET JEAN ED-
+ WARDS, elder daughter of
Dr. and Mrs. A. C. Edwards of
“Claremont”, Rockley, was mar-
ried on Thursday, November 8th
at Inverness, Scotland, to Mr,
Malecim Sargeant, eldest son of
Mr. and Mrs, Wyndham Sargeant

cf “Vapscott’, Culinstock, Devon-
shire, England.
Tonight’s Concert
AONIGHT cet the Hastings
Rovks, tha Police Band is

giving a mid-veek concert, which
begins at 8 o’clock. Price of ad-
mission is one shilling which
g to help the Almair Home,

Permission for the Police Band
to play was kindly given by Col.
R. T. Michelin, Commissioner of
Police.

From Carib’s Mailbag

Marine Hotel,
Sunday, Nov.





11th.
Dear Carib,

Far be it from me to be criti-
eal of anything on your truly
beautiful island—this is my sec-
md visit to BARBADOS, and I
sincerely (hope it won't be my
last.

Along with the marvellous sea
bathing the superb climate and
the very friendly people here I
enjoy Carib Calling. After all
this eulogising (check spelling, I
forgot my dictionary) you will I

trust realize that the following
correction is not made in any
derogatory (sp?) sense, but

merely in the interest of journal-
ism in general—as an ex-jour-
nalist of sorts (me) to a practis-
ing columnist (you).

To get to the point, your brief
item in today’s column about
“Mrs. Joyce Waters of Montreal
arriving via T.C.A. and staying
at the Ocean View Hotel” has
only two correct facts therein.
The signature at the end of this
note will attest to the fact that
my surname is spelled with two
“t's”, this stationery will dispel
any rumours that I am staying
at the Ocean View and the fact
that I spent 4 days last week in
Montreal waiting for Flight 600
to Barbados does not make me a
Montrealer. I am a native of
Rothesay New Brunswick, Can-
ada and spend my winters (part
thereof) in Toronto where I am
studying for my L.L.B. (Law)
degree at University of Toronto.

I have nothing against Mon-
treal—I like it, especially since
last week I was lucky enough to
meet Charles Boyer as .well as
see him on the stage—also you
were correct in reporting my first
name and the fact that I am Priv-
ileged (?) to precede same with
a “Mrs.” Also, I did arrive via
1T.C.A. Saturday.

Yours sincerely,
Mrs. Joyce WATTERS



By Beachcomber

when, during the playing of a som-
bre symphony, a violinist leaned
across his neighbour and laughing-
ly twanged his G-string. ‘Keep
to your own violin,” shouted the
conductor. And at that very mo-
ment an instrumentalist of sorts
poked his hand through the harp-
wires and chucked the pretty
harpist under the chin. “One
needs barbed wire for a harp with
these fellows about,” commented
the lady at the harp.

See Report on egg-crates

T has been suggested that the
Colonial Office report on Brit-
ish Guiana shows the influence of
Sir Ernest Gowers’ criticisms of
official jargon. ‘More colourful
English” is anticipated. I hope
soon to see this sort of mixture: —
An egg-crate within the mean-
ing of what, for want of a better
word, we must agree to call the
Act, is deemed to be, for the rather
tiresome purpose of registration,
a crate for the reception of eggs.
And, as though that were not
enough, any crate which, through
no fault of its own, fails to fulfil
what one so fatuously calls the
standard measurements, is not for
a crate, actually. The standard
measurements, to which a laughing
allusion is made above, will be
found, by those who have enough
energy to waste in such an un-
profitable pursuit of worthless
knowledge, in the dreary Report
on egg-crates recently issued, to
the damnation and frustration of
all egg-fanciers.

g
=

Lion Rock

7



what Rollo meant when he
that 1 could reach the rocks by air.”

BARBADOS

American Column :

NEW YORK, Sunday.
For three long years the Statue
of Liberty presented a rather ironic
sight as far as pretty 36-year-old
Mrs. Ellen Knauff was concerned.
For she spent a good deal of her

time looking at it—from Ellis
Island, the place of detention for
those visitors whom America 1s

none too anxious to w elcome

For she spent a good deal «f
her time looking at it—from Ellis
Island, the place of detention for
those visitors whom America is
none too anxious to welcome.

Mrs. Knauff married a G.I, in
Frankfort, but when in August
1948 she crossed the Atlantic sh?
was promptly placed on Ellis
Island, accused of having spied
on behalf of the Czech mission in
Germany.



B.B.C, Prograiume

TUESDAY, NOVEMBER
11.15 am. Programme Parade, 11.30
a.m. Robert Stolz, 12 00 noon’ The News,
12.10 p.m. News Analysis
41.00—7.15 pm 31.32 m.,
400 pm The News, 4 10 p.m. Daily
Service, 4.15 p.m Cathedral Music, 4.45
Pm Semprini, 5.00 p m Composer of
the Week, 515 pm _ Listeners’ Digest,
5 45 p m. Rendezvous Players, 6 00 p.m
Singing and Playing for you, 6.15 pm

13,

1951



48.43 m







Welsh Magazine, 645 pm Programme
Parade, 655 pm _ Today's Sport, 7.00
p.m. The News, 7.10 pm News Analy-
sis, 715 pm Cricket Report on fourth
Day’s play in First Test and Rendez
vous with Commonwealth Artist 7.45
pm Generally Speaking

$1.32 m, 48.43 m

7.45—10.30 p.m,

800 pm _ Think On These Things,

8.15 p.m. Radio Newsreel, 830 pm
Report From Britain, 8 45 p.m_ Royal

Tour of Canada bv H.R Princess
Elizabeth and The Duke of Edinburgh,

9.00 p m. Meet The Commonwealth, % 30
p.m, Ray’s A Laugh, 10 00 pm. The
News, 1010 pm From The Fditorials,
10 15 pm Round and About, 10 30 p.m.
I Like My Job.
C.B.C. PROGRAMME

10.05 pm. — 10.20 p.m. News

10.20 pm. — 10 35 p m Letter from
Canada. 11.72 Mes., 25.60 M



CROSSWORD



1. To spread I cure talc. (9)

7. Sufficient to make Cain legal. (9)
9. Prightened by a dead nut. (7)
10. Minus two, (5)

13. “Bones of the ——.” (5)

16. Out of the throes. (3)

17. She's from the native quarter. (3)
18. They bring news from Simla. (5)
21. Some would make 20 Down a

this, (3)

22. A knock-out in his tunic.
23. To ye island seemingly. (4)
+. Alternative heart to P.T. (4)

Usual terthought, could be
astr! ae. Tey

(4)

Down
1. 1¢ arrived before the artist. (6)
2. One way to tice rind. (8)
%. Disarranged tie Larry made up
(B) 4, Spot, but only one, @)
5. Swims with its pet ioad. (7)
6. Little work upsets the eel when
you run away. (5)
8. Comedians stock-in-trade, (3)
11. The devii wisnout tea? (6)
12. For support prod it. (6)
14, Become iable to incorporate

briefly an ancient city. (5)
. Make aunt boast after five. (5)
. Nightlight. (4)
Some people 21 Across this. (3)

Solution ot Saturday s ouxzie.—Across:
1. Pfennix: {rrigated: 9 Icicle; 11
Lucky; 12. Cape (anagram: pacer: 35,
Event: 1/, Rill: 20 Opera. 21. Dig: 22
Tram; 25. Menace: 24 Pie: 25, Cat: 26,
Sedan. Down: 12. Pillorv: 2, ‘a
Erica: 4. Nickel: 5, Peen:
Accepted. 10 Lane: 14, Voice
16 amer: 18 idea. 19 Lint

oe
seo







Psychological Warmth

Cprr ice advice on how ‘0
make a little fuel go a long
that

make

way includes a suggestion
householders should
briquettes out of coal dust. But
far more important, says joily
Jack Hopkins, with a light laugh,
is the psychological approach.
Create 4 suggestion of warmth by
using stones painted a
red. “After staring at this form
or fuel for just under eight min-
utes you begin to purr with satis-
faction, says Dr. Stoppe of the
Board of Psychological Fuel.





' The pleasant Wolts
to quick relief fren
ACID INDIGES TiC!








Alka-Seltzer’s pleasant taste
and sparkling effervescence
assures gentle efliciency.
Drop one or two tablets into
a glass of water, watch it fize.
then drink it. Keep a
supply handy always! * >)





he shinks. ** It's working splendic
Thank goodness, those men ca
see us.” ft is tiring work, bur at
last he feels himsell held by the
boy, and he ts safely ashore again.





4294



oe a et ee





glowing

ADVOCATE

(By R. M. MacCOLL)

Since then she has been caught
up in red tape.

Repeatediy the immigration
people tried to have her deported.
Repeatedly last-minute legal ac-
we blocked these moves, The

max ‘ame when America’s
Aftorney-General Howard Mc-
@rath finally approved a recom-
mendation that the deportation
proceedings be abandoned,

And to-night Mrs. Knauff went
out of the Statue of Liberty, on
the ferry with all the other Sun-
day trippers, to have a close-up
look at her at last.

LESSON

JUDGE CLARENCE DENNING,
of Cincinnati, Ohio, is fed up with
careless and drunken motorists.
“We've got to make them change
their habits,” he says, And to lend
point to his view the judge, whiie
cealing in October alone with
2,929 motoring offences, sent 22
people to jail and imposed fines
totalling 56,676 dollars,

HUMILIATION
EIGHTY-YEAR-OLD W. O.
Weissich, of San Raphael, Cali-

fornia, values one of his cigars at
$5,000 dollars. He is suing a bus
company for that amount because
he says, when he got aboard one
of their vehicles the woman driver
seized his cheroot and mz
arainst the side of the st ng
wheel, explaining that it would
be returned at the journey’s end.
Weissich said he suffered





ering



rave








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BARBADOS
Co-op COTTON FACTORY *
Ltd.

AT EAST, A REAL LOOK AT LIBERTY

humiliation,

SHEEPSKIN PETE

THE ARMY had never had a
recruit quite like 26-year-old Pete}
Grainger, who haijs from the
remote hill country of Texas. He}
had never seen a car before he
emerged from his native eyrie the
other day for the first time, nor
heard about conscription. He was
barefoot, wore sheepskin trousers}
and a shawl j

He explained that he decided to)
join the army when his father
died, “I buried Paw right on tup
of the mountain and then started.’
A ride of four flights in a lift—his
first—made him feel “a little sick’.
Sut Pete’s education was not en-

tirely neglected. He read 200

books “that Paw and ole Doc

Carver gave me.” |
SQUATTER

THERE is a spreading epidemic
of neurotic young men who clam-
ber out on to the ledges of hign|
buildings, threaten to jump, and
then after several nerve-racking|
hours, allow themselves to
dissuaded by fast-talking police, |
priests, or girl-friends. |

But Milwaukee police wasted!
little sympathy on a 21-year-old
who tried it there. He had done it
twice before in other cities and
said he liked the publicity.

OUT OF BIZZ
A BARBER SHOP STRIKE is
going on in New York. And oitt-
side the big shop in Rockefeller |
Centre a waggish striker struck)
up a notice saying: “The whizz|
of the scizz is out of bizz.

be}



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en ne



, TO-DAY Last 2 Shows 4.30 & 8.15



Cutlery















TUESDAY, NOVEMBER 13, 1951
Opening Fri 2.30; 1.4 & 89 pm
BTIOWN Another CARIBBEAN PREMIERE !

PLAZA RGN | Seite, sect ieee

Last 2 Shows TODAY
445 & 830 p.m

|
TARZAN’S PERIL ~-

with Lex BARKER—Virginie HUSTON—George MACREADY and CHETA
ALSO: SPECIAL ADDED ATTRACTION!
“BASKETBALL CHAMPIONS OF 1951"
with the HARLEM GLOBETROTTERS
pecia SDA Dom! Watmntaues
“GUN TOWN” a “BAD MAN OF RED BUTTE”
Kirby GRANT Johnny Mack BROWN

P OISTIN . ,
PLAZA sate || ot MAE TY.
Last % Shows Today 5 & 8.30 p.m Last Shew Tonite 8 30 p.m
James CAGNEY in—

“TOMORROW I5 ee ee m
“KISS TO-MORROW GOODBYE” Claudette Colbert & George Bren
with Barbara PAYTON — Ward

“BERLIN EXPRESS”
BOND & Barton McLANE





Merle O’BERON—Robert RYAN



ed. (only) (aus) a. oe
y _ ‘ .m, $.30 p.m. only) 4. -m.
WED. ionly) 430 & 8.30 p.m Wait Disney's “ghabew ob

“ONE SUNDAY AFTERNOON" “Fun & Fancy Beacon Hill"

Color by Technicolor Free” Roddy McDowall|
Denis MORGAN & (Technicolor) & “Night Has
“WHITE HEAT” & “Bambeo Byes”
James CAGNEY Blonde” James Mason



GLOBE

TO-DAY, 5.00 & 8.15 P.M. — LAST SHOWS

“CALLING BULLDOG DRUMMOND”
TOMORROW, 4.30 P.M. ONLY

“13 RUE MADELEINE” and “IN OLD CHICAGO”
TOMORROW NITE ONLY, 8.00 P.M.

STEEL BAND and MARICO CONTEST

RHYTHM KINGS vs. THE DEFENDERS
PLUS
James CAGNEY in “13 RUE MADELEINE”





PP SOPPLSSS POSS SSS SSS POSS POSSSDS SS PSP PSPPSSSSOE,

Flashing Steel To-morrow Nite

GLOBE THEATRE Presents:—

TOMORROW NITE AT 8 O'CLOCK
STEEL BAND AND MARICO COMPETITIONS
THE RHYTHM KINGS (The Champs.)
vs
THE DEFENDERS (Challengers)
PLUS

The Film “13 RUE MADELINE”
(James CAGNEY)











Pit 18c; House 36c; Balcony 48c; Box 60c.
|
|
IS IT HUMAN OR INHUMAN? |
}
[THE | HING |
FROM ANOTHER WORLD |







EMPIRE

TO-DAY 4.45 & 8.30 and CONTINUING DAILY
20th C-FOX BIG TECHNICOLOR MUSICAL—

ON THE RIVIERA â„¢

Starring:

DANNY KAYE — GENE TIERNEY
MUSIC — DANCING — SINGING — COMEDY
DANNY IS FUNNIER THAN EVER
EXTRA
“ANTI CAT” — 1 Bell Short





ROYAL

Last 2 Shows Today 4.30 & 8.15 TOMORROW & THURSDAY

4.30 & 8.15
Republic Double—

Roy ROGERS — Dale EVANS
in
“UNDER NEVADA
SKIES ”

Republic Whole Serial - - -

‘*ZORRO’S BLACK
WHIP ”’

Starring and
es ”
Linda STERLING — George RED PONY
Starring

J. LEWIS Robert MITCHUM — Myrna LOY

OLYMPIC

TOMORROW & THURSDAY
4.30 & 8.15

Universal Double - - -
ABBOTT and COSTELLO



John GARFIELD in

“UNDER MY SKIN”

and “IN SOCIETY ”
“THRILL OF A -
ROMANCE ” “HUNGRY HILL”
Starring Starring
Esther WILLIAMS — Van Margaret LOCKWOOD
JOHNSON Dennis PRICE



ROXY

Last 2 Shows TO-DAY 4.30 & 815] TOMORROW & THURSDAY

4.30 & 8.15
Columbia Double - - -
: Columbia Double - - -
‘““‘WHEN THE REDSKINS Eddy ARNOLD
RODE ”’ in
Starring : HOEDOWN_
Jon HALL — Mary CASTLE and
and “FATHER IS A
“ REVENUE AGENT ” BACHELO ”
Starring Starring

William HOLDEN

Douglas KENNEDY Coleen GRAY





ADVERTISE ...

IN THE

ADVOCATE

PRES ta Ree eet:







TUESDAY, NOVEMBER 13, 1951 BARBADOS ADVOCATE [AGE THREE













Human Brain

Fighting The

Seawell

Will Aid With ,, Sleeping a ae DRINK & ENJOY

Income Tax

Sickness ’**









v € J Biel Walcott, Major Griffit
ebiett, T. Roberts, M. Tucker, O
5 K. Small, A. Small, M Martir
CALIFORNIA, Noy. 10, PITTSBURGH, Nov. 10 S Sorrae See Ee. Bates .
One of the most ingenuous of A 28-year-old research worker ST. LUCIA (on Saturdays
modern mechanism known as the 3t the University of Pittsburgh ak ay Dae Gongor 4, Hons |
human brain which can make up rallied slightly Saturday in the Potles Stante Know les Reginald |
income tax returns or even play battle against the deadly “sleeping Lots Curt topher Herbert, Simon |
chess will soon be released. sickness” the virus diseasc that re Ree Senay

The brain produced for the U.S.
Air Force appeared as a cross be-
tween an expensive television set
and a pinball machine. It is
about the size of’an office desk.
Engineer Richard Sprague, one of
the designers, described the ma-

has been menacing U.N. troops in
Korea.

Robert W. Vensel was stricken
several days ago while working
with viruses some of which were
shigped from Korea. He is seek-
ing a cure for the disease at the



From TRINIDAD (On Saturaay)

G Radix H Ghar R Cra c
Xing: H. Woeding: D. Ramehtran; 5
Remdeen; C. Batson; R. Rider, E. Acs
From ST. KITTS (On Saturday)

Sir George Seei( K.C M.G
From ANTIGUA (On Saturday)

Chandra Permanand, Hurley Whitehorn
fF (On Saturday)



chine known as Dere 1002, CRC Pittsburgh graduate school of pub na Protair, lL. Robins
1102 s8 4 general purpose com- lic health for the armed forces’
puter, and a suecessor to those now Epidemiological Board Ver DEPARTURES — BY BWHLA

it Harvard and the University ot
California.

It is also a portable “affair de-

reindell Arthur «Moore Veronic
Spite its size. Sprague said that side. eS YOlivtira, Michael Marti Teresa
larger brains are usually big They said his condition remains r eee Poked agg nea Benes |
enough to fill one room and some Serious although he rallied slight- * Cheer up, everybody! Mr. Butler’s just discovered another threepenny bit ” White-Horn: Hugh Wooding; Norman |
of them cost million®’'"He added ly. University officials said the ; London steal ti MeDonz Marguerite Moore
that a newly developed baby Nations top medical men were = at : ee a4 M og NOnGOn Sxnresa Service ee : Pinger 2 wh fe Chetan!
sized gadget was very capable. He called into the case after sur- ™ sie 7 i ae ‘Herbal. Marie Ribeiro, Geoltrey |
. ‘ . e so : > Te % 2} Fan r Nbe “
age I i an even think enough qeons eut a hole in Vensel’s oe Longshoremen J ca Imports First Industrial lalks eee ay mee - ‘enon etiggg
0 play chess with such regularity @nd pumped air into his lungs to - stead
that nobody can ever beat it.” It keep him alive.

Was taken to St. Joseph's hospital
where authorijies said he was un-
conscious and paralyzed on one

Ormargy

Threaten To Tie Up



Shipment Of

For Puerto Rico

VESTERDAY
ter TRINIDAD

Luther Skeete, Georgina Clarke, Peter








er VENEZUELA (On Saturday)











would cost about $80,000 and They said that Vensel was ap- rot 2 — et rag pe COOLING &
would be on the market n about parently infected accidentally by T , . ° = CHRISTIANSTED, St. Croi tt house Wate Mate Tost Janie
+ at : : . : me. ' ; t . é 5 » wot. Cro. Vatt, Robert Watt, Mary Foster; James
six months’ time.—(U.P.) viruses which attack the brain and New Y ork Port Copra Since 1945 Industrial development with- Kenne dy; Jessie | Kenied) Abraham | REFRESHIN( 3
spinal cord producing a form of n the Caribbes : > q Guidenberg
ak ieiemicag ve é ‘ mw v r New ; t an Will be the , Sv LUCIA
7 ‘ encephalitis or sleeping sicknes The seat a Nov. : (From Qur Qwn- Gorrespondent theme of a conference to be james Foster, Howard King; Eaith |
Meteorites May ' UP, the leaders of the insurgent KINGSTON, Nov. 6, held in Puerto Rico in Febru- Chastanet
m —— eee ces ee A shipment of 1,000 tons of ary next year. Plans for these ARRIVALS — BY BWHLA & c T XN
. + 7 - 7 2 his cargo-jammec - ‘ acid eas 4 Ma - s ¢ ri by the Caribbez : nee > i
t ris. Wes eS ; copra has arrived in Jamaica from talks approved by the Cari an. YESTERDAY e 4
Hit The Earth NEW AFRIGAN Over again, unless “the the Philippines consigned to the Commission at its Thirteenth From GRENADA
Ves wah a ceasefire”, which sent Jamaica Coc ee ard. Meeting, inc lude a detailed . Doreen Viechneg; Raymond Noel; Roy
ALBUQUERQUE, Nov. 10. : back sak aruda ss Jamaica Coconut Industry Board. ’ s John; A Church; John Renwick
A scientist reported Saturday Al OR oO ENED BOGE, 10, WOK yeMermEE, : agenda and suggestions for the paward Hare Denis Henry; Am
night that TE ac new Bviterine vate observed This is the first shipment of preparation of the necesSary Leng; John Lang; Michael Hanschell
_ 7 , en ig , I copra to be imported into Jamaica background jocumentatior for Harker Protain; Tyldesly Protain
of mysterious green fireballs seen Be SASL GUARD sings 1945 When stew shipmants delegates 7” 7 whee
in south western skies during the ENTEBBE, Uganda, Monday, tied up an estimated $1,000,000,- 2... =n af lo, “eal ds kh kan af , : . } DEPARTURES — BY BW 1A
Tat r ‘pea A new link the Britist were received from Trinidad. In the proposed agenda, the YESTERDAY
ast two weeks were meteorites N nk in Ae riuish 0900 worth of exports and imports, « ; oe . . , { ,v, VINCENT:
: : : Commonwealth strategic air chai 7 Such importations are made in subject of Industrial Development Fer 81 NOENT:
and some of them may hit the © a strategic air chali ended on Friday with a back to dar that coon oduct. fore hasbeen broken dow nder the Henry St. Hill: Agnes St. Hill; Hele
earth, was completed here Saturday work agreement, negotiated order that cocoanut product fac- foll SSR ESRB Cee ert St. Hill; Osear Kelle |
Farmers and ranchers in one When Acting Governor H.S, Potter state mediation service. Race ri mt Po . penpeser 5 Pees ee Structure of the â„¢ 7 FY Long; K. Simpson A. |
New Mexico locality where resi- Officially opened this East African ~ pir strike leader, John Samp- yen! FR hy et ig Hee Pl pale Caribbean territories Decouteay; R. Kdwards, H. Pome, 2. |
dents wete frightened and awed 2!'port, big enough to operate jet con charged that 117 men caused by hurricane damage 2. Prospects for further Industria! Davies, L. Govi Williams, R. Modi

by the. fireballs, said they felt
a “terrific” jolt shortly after they
had seen one of the objects

5 ae ‘ ‘loverdale West shore of Lake Victoria. To the | years—as young of Industrial Development
Some residents of Cloverdale th j r pha c % z for work. irees on the northside of the 5. Improvement in Labour Produc Mr. Perey Branker, Miss Gladys Wilson
New Mexico reported one of 2O0rth it is bordered by the Anglo- , tivity in Industry in Under. 71 J ih, OM Charle
t Egyptian Sudan over which Bgypt Weekend crews reported island, planted after the 1944 hur- \ » ' Jimm Creagh ' 1arles

the objects was spotted Thursday
morning. It may have fallen in
the desert section of the state of
Chihuahua, Mexico according to

De lanco: Le fee “Diseetan ot port with a 10,300 feet runway-— Shoremen’s Association that there cane and thus restore local copra pers include Professor Arthur Lh at eg Iversen, Peter
the Institute of Meteotitics of the: longest in the African Would be no discrimination production to adequate level: Lewis, St. Lucia-born Stanley ,,%?° i
1e Institute of Meteoritics of the continent, against strikers. —U.P. Jevons Professor af Economics

University of New. Mexico.

La Paz said information came
‘indirectly - through investigators
for an unidentified Government
Agency who visited the area
around Cloverdale to check re-
ports

La Paz said findings indicated

g wih wane 5 gi c fich Molly N. Jones, Sch Belqueen, 5
pied Pr as a she haee teen Hundreds of planes swarmed @ Pes: ae Vek At ” Ortac, & h B a ne “MM v iue Star.
umu such as mig have been the airport as he declared the air- eed LONDON, Nov. 9 . F teh. Ruth, Sch Gardenia W , Sch W. L
collsed. by mebcorites “oreshing na, mort o# he declared the sir- MAUD A church GONDON, Nov. 9. Fire Damtages Roof isiicia sen” Staee stensiens, "ser

into the earth.—U.P.,

“JOHN CANOE”

(From Our Own Correspondent)
KINGSTON, Nov. 6.
“John Canoe,” the old West
Indian pantomime which brought
the spirit of Carnival to Jamaican



Chri ee , ace’ would use Entebbe as its East & POWRRP Of 7 Beusch Seve el pa I The house is occupied by Mrs imapue Li ieee sae ieee a bago or common urinary troubles due to impurities

No peta nis Fen oye 0 Atslee stopping Wet, . LIBERAL PARTY urgent than now for the insistence Carter, When the fire broke out, cook, trom Trinidad in the blood.

cg oda hee ip year, =e j ° : — . -year-old daughter was DERARTURES . ‘li i an’s Backac
Seventy John Gane bends Have U.P. upon the sanctity of marriage and Per nine-year-olc augh c FERARTURES Why not get happy relief by taking Doan’s Backache

entered the Gleaner’s John Canoe
Christmas Competition and keen
rivalry in dress and in acting is
anticipated. Processions “will take
place in several sections of the
island.

IMPRISONMENT




.

air liners and jet bombers. The;
British protectorate of Uganda lies
astride the Equator on the north-

and, Britain are in dispute.
Entebbe the seat of the Uganda
Government, now boasts an air-

Potter told representatives of
the world’s leading airlines and
Government officials attending the
ceremony that extensions would
make Entebbe the first airport in
the world to be specifically re-
designed for operation. of jet
aircraft,

pioneer aviator and first to make
a flight around Africa 20 years ago
attended the ceremony.

Potter told the Assembly that
the airport’s construction had been
carried out after consultation with
Sir Frank Whittle inventor of the
jet aircraft engine and that the
British “comet jet airliner service



U.N. Reject Plan To
Admit Red China

PARIS, Nov. iv.

ment, when

work, today, after an
from Joseph P. Ryan, the Presi-
dent of the International

The 25-day-old

ordered off the Brooklyn
in violation. of the truce
they reported





;

3

|, £94










strike

assurance

Aaa Ty
POCKET CARTOON

by OSBERT LANCASTER



BA RL GELLES

115 A GUARANTEE



Other shipments are to follow
until such time—probably two to
three coconut

ricane, come to bearing to — suffi-
cient extent to offset the south-
side losses in the August hurri-

Pope’s Dictum
‘Inhuman, Callous’
SAYS ANGLICAN PAPER

paper on Friday termed “inhuman
callous, and cruel”, the recent pro-
nouncement by the Pope that a
baby should not be sacrificed to
save the life of its mother in a
difficult childbirth,

The newspaper, a weekly jour-
nal of opinion, is privately owned,
but reflects the

respect for the sexual function,

The newspaper said in_a front
page editorial, that the pity of it
is that the Pope has so far over-
stepped the limits of commonsense
that his statements are irrelevant
He had brought discredit upon the

Development
3. Financial Measures for
of Industrial Development
4. Fiscal Measures for the Fostering

Fostering

developed areas;
6 Machinery for the Fostering otf
Industrial Development

Authors of documentation pa-

at Manchester University; Dr
Adolfo Dorfman, Assistant Direc
tor, Division of Economic Stabil-
ity and Development, Economix
and Social Council, United Na-
tions; and technical officers of the
Commission’s Central Secretariat.



Fire broke out on a 12x8 board-
ed and shingled house at Gitten’s
Road, Government Hill around
8.30 p.m Saturday, damaging
part of the roof and singeing a
few boards on the inside,

Nearby residents with buckets
and pails of water put out the fire
in about 15 minutes.

entrapped but she was brought to
safety by Keith Clarke of Upper
Government Hill who broke open
the door and took her from her
bed







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Russia suffered a setback in Christian faith instead of honour 9, 1/3
U.N. General Assembly Satur- “Honestly, don’t you think In a talk to Italian obstetricians at « Having Ask your OAN 2/9
ROME, Nov. 10, day when its Steering Commit- Jit would be rather chic to} {tome on Ortoves Bh, the Lope sit Dealer for }
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sentenced to 6 years’ imprison- 5°viet demand that Commun- England ‘o return a but the direct killing of the baby ———
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anarchist, Gieuseippe De Luiese, ship. Russia sought to get on the ” mitted.— (CP) g .
65, who, last year had failed in Assembly's programme its de- | 1 3
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FRENCH OFFICER TO
AID J‘CA ECONOMIC
DEVELOPMENT PLAN

KINGSTON, Nov. 11,

De Luiese was arrested on the that Reds be puc in their place.
pte But the General or Steering





7 . 7 ~~
Equipment For S.A.
WASHINGTON, Nov. 10.
The U.S. State Department an-
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2; > > ’
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Spanish Embassy and allegedly Committee, approved by 11 to 2
found in the possession of two Thailand's resolucion which
bombs and a large quantity. of ruled out debate on Red China’s
explosives, which he carried in @4mission during the current As-

a suiccase.—U.P. sembly meeting. ,
a Only Russia and its satellite

DIES AFTER ACCIDENT . and Development, and John Ol- self defence, 2

Com~ jier, economist of the Staff Bank

Poland, voted to put the question
Sixty-year old Ida Genetha of mittee then”addéd to the Assem- are here on a ten-day’s stay at A Department spokesman said

in the programme, The ; 3 }
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November . 13, q 51

Tuesday,

MIDDLE EASI

THE to up a four power
Middle Eastern Command is significant of
the hardening of America’s policy in the
Middle East. Until the first four-power
proposal was delivered in Cairo on Octo-
ber 15th, the Middle Eastern policy of the
United States had been officially described
as “fluid”. Now it has set.

American participation with Britain,
France and Turkey in the defence of the
vital Middle East, shows not only an
awareness of the importance of this area,
but a realization that today’s difficulties
in the Middle East are not solely due to
“starchy” British diplomacy.

American spokesmen have recently
been underlining what the United States
really thinks. General Eisenhower was
continuing the line of thought of the late
Admiral Sherman when he said last month
that “so far as the sheer value of territory
is concerned there is no more strategically
important area than the Middle East.”

Admiral Carney, U.S. naval Commander
for the Mediterranean and Eastern Atlan-
tic, told journalists on October 24th, that
“the defence of the Middle East would be
utterly wrecked if. the Canal Zone base
were not in allied hands.” But American
awakening to her own Middle Eastern
interests and to the fact that a line must
be drawn in that area to acts which favour
only the expansion of Communism and the
Soviet Empire is not indicative of any
bellicose intention on the part of the Four
Powers. The proposals put forward on
October 15th in Cairo invited Egypt to
participate in the defence of the Middle
East: to join, as it were, a military club as
a full member: a club in which national
armies would act together in the interests
of all.

Egypt refused. to join and her current
dispute with Great Britain shows no signs
of any change of heart. Yet the terms
setting out the details of the new four-
power command in the Middle East leave
a way open for Egypt and other Middle
Eastern Countries to join in protecting
that vital area from aggression. In its
essentials the defence of the Middle East
is no longer a question as to whether
European powers should have a sphere of
influence in a strategic part of the world :
itis simply achoice between the protection
of the Middle East in any possible conflict
by the Westerti PoWers and the United
States or its loss to Soviet imperialism.

The ‘lead which the United States,
Francé and Great Britain have given the
world in calling for disarmament, the
ringing Churchillian rhetoric thrown into
the battle for peace are solemn assurances
of the peaceful intentions of the West.

At the same time Russia’s refusal to
consider these proposals and her contin-
ued wearisome accusations against the
United States:on whom she lays responsi-
bility for the very race to arms that Presi-
dent Truman is so anxious to halt, forces
the Western powers to complete their
plans for defénce of the Middle East.

The announcement that the plan will
not interfere with the sovereignty of indi-
vidual Middle Eastern’ states is a neces-
sary precaution to convince them that the
four powers have no intentions in the
Middle East other, than the pregervatinn
of-world peace.

Their experiences in the last war will
not easily remove the suspicions of the
Arab States: British imperialism is some-
thing’ which: they actually experienced
and have not liked: Russian imperialism
is ‘an unknown faetor, distant and not
feared with the intensity of fear known to
Europeans. But in addition there is the
immediate national reaction to interfer-
ence of any kind in their own affairs.

The recent announcement is a welcome
sign that the pead¢e of the, world is not
going to be recklessly jeopardised by the
loss of a vital area. But the Middle Eastern
_ Wiation 1 is none me 'the less serious for that.

decision set



post

BARBADOS ADVOCATE



Lord Cherwell—the “Prof.” to
his friends—is back in Downing-
street. With Churchill and Cher-
well as neighbours at No. 10 and
No. 11, Britain's future is going to
be anything but dull.

Lord Cherwell’s appointment as
Paymaster-General in the new
Cabinet means a return to the
responsibilities he carried in the
war-winning Government— “per-
sonal scientific adviser to the
Prime Minister.”

The professor, “my friend and
confidant of so many years,” as
Churchill has written of him, is
something of an enigma.

Before he became Lord Cher-
well in 1941 he was Professor
Lindemann, comparatively un-
known outside Oxford, where he
was Professor of Experimental
Philosophy and Director of the
Clarendon Laboratory.

Because so little was known
about him he was often described
as the “mystery man behind the
Cabinet.”

Actually no mystery existed. It
was entirely because of his mod-

esty that the nation did not know
jof his scientific genius until he
“Man Fri-

| emerged as Churchill's
day” in 1939.

Skilled talent-spotter Churchill
had discovered his remarkable
abilities 20 years before.

Lindemann had won the D.S.O.
as an R.F.C, pilot and was Director
of the Aeronautical Research
Laboratory at Farnborough.

Old Friends

In his memoirs Churchill
says: —
“Lindemann was already an
eld friend of mine. I had met
him first at the close of the
previous war, in which he dis-

tinguished himself by conduct-

ing in the air a number of
experiments, hitherto reserved
for daring pilots, to overcome

the then almost mortal dangers

of a spin.’”

It was these
Churchill jis first glimpse
Lindemann's breath-taking con-
fidence and courage.

In his investigations of
spinning nose-dive, the young
scientist, then 32, reached math-
ematical conclusions which were
ridiculed by experts.

But Lindemann was so sure of
his theory that he decided to put
it to the test in the air.

Before a crowd of onlookers
who regarded his experiment as
“suicide,” he deliberately plunged
his aircraft into a spinning dive
—and landed without a scratch.

tests that

the

Has Travelled
Then, and many times since,
the “Prof.” vindicated his con-
viction that “one who has got his
figures correct need not fear
having his accounts checked.”
Like Churchill, Lindemann

was at 30, a widely travelled man,
Born at Sidmouth, Devon, of
Alsatian descent, he spent most
of his youth on the Continent,
He was educated in Germany.

THE

gave
of

By Joseph Garrity

After taking his Ph.D. at Berlin
University in 1911, he went to
Paris to collaborate with other
physicists in the study of radio-
activity. Then to America as a
lecturer at Chicago University.

Between the war, as an Oxford
don, Lindemann made important
contributions to a _ variety of
scientific studies.

But neither those peaceful pur-
suits nor Oxford’s calm could
dispel his fear that another war
was coming.

He realised that “the air-plane
had changed the whole outlook in
war.” That was why he never
relaxed his scientific studies of
the problems of air defence.

Lindemann and Churchill were
both appalled at Britain’s unpre-
paredness in the air, and as a
protest against the Baldwin Gov-
ernment’s apathy the non-politi-
cal professor contested, unsuccess-
fully, an Oxford University
by-election.

Apprehension
Churchill reveals in his
memoirs how their mutual appre-
hension made him and Lindemann
firmer friends.
The pair travelled Europe
together investigating their prob-

lem.
In 1936,

when Churchill
announced that Germany __ was
rearming. Lindemann made a
special trip to Tangier, where his
friend was on holiday.

After these years of close col-
laboration it is hardly surprising
when Qhurchill tells us that “this

pleasant -and fertile association
continued throughout the war.”
Under Lindemann’s © brilliant
direction our scientific teams
produced:—
The answer to the magnetic
mine;
the anti-aircraft balloon
barrage;
the means of bending a

radio beam to deflect enemy

bombers;

“Window,” the pane de-
vice to confuse the enemy’s
anti-aircraft radar installa-
tions; and airborne — radar
which helped to defeat the
U boats.

As the new atom chief, Lord
Cherwell’s first move will cer-
tainly be to free scientists from the
Civil Service strait-jacket.

First Move

He expects to stimulate pro-
gress in research by encouraging
them with better pay and
conditions,

Now that “Master” and “Prof.”
ure together again Downing-
street's midnight oil will no
doubt burn as brightly, or
perhaps as long, as it did during
the war.

But there will be a warmer
social glow about it now.
Churchill will have more time to
enjoy his companionship.









The tall, bald,
looking scientist has been de-
scribed as “quiet to the point oi
melancholy.” But Churchili
knows better. In the “Prot.” he
has found a scintillating conver-
sationist,

Though a scientist by profes-
sion, Cherwell is an enginec:
philosopher, economist, and in-
ventor by inclination.

He once caused an envious sti:

in the Lords by carrying, durin;
a heat wave, a home-made port-
able electric fan operated by a
flash-lamp battery.
j Churchill, himself a champio
in the art of using words, is en
joyably stimulated by Cherwell’:
sarcastic invective.

Once, when Lord Cherwell wa
criticising some particular legis-
lation in the Lords, Lord Stre-
bolgi interrupted with “What i
your alternative?”

Amid laughter, the “Prof
retorted: “When I sit on tha
Bench (the Government side «
the House) I will tell you.”

Occasionally he astonishes the
Lords with feats of mental] ariti
metic involving millions. Are
he is equally at home in debate
lampooning psychiatrists, or com
plaining of the importation o
American artists “like the nigh
club singer who calls herself
Midriff and specialises in leerin
lyrics.”

distinguished-

Same Brand

Winston and the “Prof.” shar«
the same brand of dry humour

On a visit to the Monte Cark
Sporting Club the professor wa
asked if he played roulette
“Young man,” replied the dor
“IT lecture on the laws of prob

ability.”

othing delights Cherwell
more than a joke against him
self,

A Good Match

He was highly amused whe
Churchill once wisecracked abou
his diet. For this bachelor, non
smoker, teetotaler is also a vege
tarian

With fellow-vegetarian
Stafford Cripps, Lord Cherwe!
was late for one of Churchill’
after-dinner War Cabinets.

Si

On arrival, after holding uj
the meeting for several minutes
they heard Mr. Churchill say
with a wry smile: “Now that ou
two colleagues have digeste
‘their beetroot, I think we car
begin.”

A good match; these two re-

markable cronies.

No. 10 and No. 11 might, affairs
of State permitting, enjoy a few}
games of Monopoly and Lexicon

But whoever gives the order
in the daytime, there is no doub
who will be master at night. For
the “Prof.” is reputed to be such
a wizard at Lexicon that he car
even build a word put of
W, X, Y and Z.—L.E.S.



Kasy To Trip Up In The

}_.Pve been down at the’ Houses

jof Parliament this week finding
out what it’s like to be a new
I M.P., and what I say is: “Brother,
you can keep the job. AND the
£1,000 a year that goes witih it.”
Getting yourself elected is
nothing; it’s the things you've got
to learn when you're in. Why, it’s
worse than joining the Army.
Up to Parliament you drive
with your chest full of pride at
being top of the poll, and the first

thing that happens is a policeman

tomes up to you and says you
¢an't park your car in the Palace
Yard without a permit from the
Lord Great Chamberlain.
Somewhat deflated by this set-
back, the new M.P. tries to creep
in without being noticed, like a
new boy at school, but on all
sides officials stare
whisper to each other till

the Tower of London,

Actually he is being stared at
only because the officials want
to remember his face,

Once inside, the new member
hangs his hat and coat on a peg,
but even such a simple operation
as this is fraught with parlia-
mentary tradition,
attached to the peg is a loop of
red tape that seems to have no
possible purpose.

It is meant for

new boy with nothing more
lethal than an umbrella to know?

Swords (and spure) are barred
be

in Parliament, and have_ to
left in the cloakroom, A Scottish

member was called to order once
for appearing with a knife in his

stocking.
Your Hat
You used to have to know an
awful lot about when and where
to wear your hat in Parliament,
put you can now leave it on the
peg with your mind at peace,

at hint and
he's
sure he’s going to be thrown into

because

hanging your
sword on, but how is a harmless

House
By BERNARD WICKSTEED

because the only occasion it is
needed is in the rare event of a
member wanting to raise a point:
of order after a division has been
called.

Then there’s smoking. The new
member is dying for a puff to
soothe this nerves, but he’d be
well advised not to light up
before he sees someone else doing
it, because there are times and
places where this is a fearful
offence.

On the other hand, he can get
a drink whenever he likes,
because whatever hardships Par-
liament imposes on the populace,
it recognises no licensing hours
for itself.

Now where
going to sit?

He knows he can’t sit on the
front bench, but if he takes a
seat in one of the rows behind
he is liable to find it belongs, by
unwritten law, to some ageing
legislator who thas had it for gen-
erations,

If he sits on any of the benches
beyond the Bar, e.g., those at the
opposite end to the Speaker, he
can listen to what goes on, but
he won't be allowed to speak him-
self,

is the new boy

Your Speech

At last, having parked his car
correctly, refrained from smoking
in the corridors, hung up his
sword and removed his spurs, the
new boy catches the Speaker's
elusive eye and steps out into the
gangway to make the speech that
will move the world.

At once there are devastating
cries of “Order, order,” for step-
ping into the gangway ‘s speak
is a parliamentary sin. sin.



It is also a sin to put so much
as a toe over the red lines at the
edge of the Chamber's greer
carpet. These lines are two and
a half sword-lengths apart, and
are designed to keep you fron
striking your opponents, you cad

Back in your constituency you
rather fancied your free-and-
easy platform style. But it won’
do here my boy. All speeches are
made to the Speaker, so unles
you are referring to him person-
ally you must never say “you”
in a speech,

You must never mention by
name the House of Lords,
because in the Commons it doesn’t
exist, You refer to it as “the
other place.”

Above all, you must never men-
tion another member’s name, He
is always the honourable-mem-
ber - who - has - just - sat - down
or the honourable - and - gallant-
member-for-so-and-so.

Your Notes
You mustn’t read a newspaper
or book in the House. You

shouldn't even have notes of your
speech (though most members
do), because they might fall into
the hands of the King.

You see, the King was once
the bugbear of Parliament, and
he wasn’t supposed to know what
was said there,

If the new member finds é
getting dark in the House he
ask someone to

doesn’t just
switch on the lights. He calls out:
“Candles.”

Thet’s only the start of the new
boy’s education, If you want to
know the rest of his syllabus
you'll find it in a handy book of
1,057 pages called “Parliamentary
Practice,” by Sir Thomas
Erskine. The 15th edition weigh.
nearly 4lb.

—L.E.S.



CHURCHILL'S FRIEND _ {ThisDrugSpells SAFETY...
-PROE”

A Wizard Moves In At No. 10

By CHAPMAN PINCHER

A DRUG which enables surgeons to per-
form intricate operations more skilfully and
more swiftly than ever before is being tested
in British hospitals.

It almost eliminates
tissues are cut.
the drug provides three great advantages:—
reducing the
haemorrhage it makes operations safer.

Mt enables the surgeon to operate
more surely and more rapidly because the
issues are not obscured.

ONE: By

TWO:

THREE: By

stored rapidly

the Royal

tion. |

Doctors and

Today,

at all. *

SOUNDER SLEEP
A SLEEPING TABLET said to be so safe

that even

has been discovered by USS. scientists.

In a six-month test 134 sufferers from in-
somnia found that the drug usually put them
soundly to sleep in less than half an hour.

“The sleep was restful and the patients ex-

perienced no

York’s Metropolitan Hospital report today
An overdose of the tablets produces ex-
tremely deep sleep. But there is no danger.
Unlike barbiturates, the new drug, say the
ductors, does not lower the breathing rate.

DOCTOR VETTED
fe BRITAIN'S vets are hankering after a
title. Convinced that they will never
train the public to call them “veterinary sur-
geons,” they are now agitating to be called

“doctor.”

Down-to-earth vets are opposing the change
—for a surprising reason. They point out tha’
the word “vet”
in the language than “doctor.”

Their argument :
honourable act, but “to doctor” it has a dis
reputable ring.

TUESDAY, NOVEMBER 13, 1951





1

loss of blood when
Trials so far have shown that

risk of severe

reducing the shock of surgery

t helps patients to make a quicker recovery
after operations.

The drug—it is called hexamethonium bro-
mide—acts by causing a rapid fall in blood
pressure. By propping the patient in different
oositions the surgeon can make any part of
the body almost bloodless.

The patient’s blood pressure can be re-

to normal by an injection.

Pr. George Hale Enderby, anaesthetist of
National Orthopaedic Hospital,
was the first to try out the drug in an opera-

He has used it successfully on more than
250 patients ranging in age from 11 to 78.

surgeons from other hospitals

have met Dr. Enderby in London to compare
their experiences with the drug. Verdict: “It
is proving particularly valuable in plastic
surgery and in deafness operations.”

Dr. Enderby warned that only highly ex-
perienced anaesthetists can use the drug
safely, which is still experimental.

MACHINE TELLS
ee one elegant dog breed, the red Irish
setter, is-afflicted with a most distressing
hereditary eye complaint.

Some of the pups seem normal, but within
six months they cannot see in dim light;
aventually they become totally blind.

As there is no likelihood of a cure, scien-
tists have been trying to find a way of detect-
ng afflicted puppies so that they may be
humanely destroyed.
scientists of Newmarket’s finely
equipped Canine Research Station report
success. They have discovered that the dis-
ease can be detected by an electrical machine
| before a puppy is one month old.

The machine records the minute electric
currents generated by healthy eyes. The eyes
of a pup destined to go blind give no current

a huge overdose is harmless

”

hangover,” doctors of New



has a much higher standing

“To vet” anything is ar

YOUR MOVE

A TRANSATLANTIC chess match be

tween two giant robot “brains”

is being

planned by British and American scientists

Britain’s challenger will be
“brain”
When Dr.

3,500-valve
University.
tuned it up,

University Computer—should be able

MUC, the
housed at Mancheste:
Alan Turing has
MUC—short for Manchester
to

think several moves ahead.
First chess-board opponent lined up for
MUC is Prinny, a new “brain” being buil’

at Princeton University. ‘
* As recorded in this column last year, doctors are
using this machine to diagnose human eye defects



No Floods From Artificial Rain |Our Readers Say:

WASHINGTON, Nov. 10
Weather experts here agree
there is no need to fear that arti-
ficial rain-making will unleash
disastrous floods. At the same
time they cautioned, farmers not

successful

ydne. seeding. The two
to expect man-made rains. w ould 5 They Sie enticneentn conteat> ‘are s-
bees cents toe hae _, ed by the Commonwealth Scien- A cloud formation hanging|Such a Christi
parrent ea mee tifie and Industrial Research Or- over a mountain crest, When |
shown that cloud seeding oak ganization “may have laid the bombarded with ice pellets. it |
speed up rainfall, oe 2 shh? basis for future rain making pro- will often release snow and in-|long time I hav
Site ingiance would Aicefinet, & cesses.” crease the hydraulic power at

Results of

radical change in normal weath-
er conditions.





By HENRY PAYMONT

Australia has taken the lead in
rain making research after
experiments
physics recently completed near

the
periments were read to members

He
tralian
national data
US.

some

in cloud

Australian ex-

said judging by the Aus-
experiment other
and
research only
pheric conditions have shown to
lend themselves to effective cloud
conditions island of Barbados to express my

deep regret of the departure of

the base of the mountain.

inter-
the result of
two atmos-



{that this

SURGEON SPECIALIST

To the Editor, The Advocate,

SIR,—I wish to be among the
many thousands of people in this

gentleman, as Mr, A, G. Leacock
As a patient of his for quite a

him most courteous, kindhearted
| and understanding. We all know
worthy and_ brilliant

hard from early

morning until

ate hours of the night to save

his saintly
matter how tired

ian and noble

We also know

e always found working privately

we see his

We pray that



manner was always
hard and what we all know, a
most strenuous day’s work.

the lives of his fellowmen. Yet
face and pleasant

he was aiter a
there, no

that he could

have made a much better salary

, but here again

christian love by
working at the General Hospital.

God’s blessing
brain and his
his lot may be

thrown and when things perplex
him sometimes, he may still find

To you and your family we say
good luck, God bless

PATIENT.

BURIAL GROUNDS

of the U.S. meteorological Society The presence of a shower cloud! “surgeon” has done all in his may guide his

Thic evarwavion given in an in- at the Weather Bureau Wednes- which aoe gm | yr aie power to help the community hands wherever
terview. by F.F. Reichelderfer, day by E. G. Bower, Australian peeewite’ A et a | heedless of class, coleur, or
Chief of the U.S. Weather physicist currently engaged in acre “vd 7 E - + ae creed. He has worked, vory
Bureau and Ferguson Hall, the research work in California. henetaiee paaieae gtd bureau's top research physicist. Reichelderfer said. “We were ; a borderin, rainbelts can gicmi : ;

They noted that considerable Reichelderter Ve Att th dhe t ow auricle? neds dismissed allegations that artifi-
progress in the development of Very much impressed ae ‘ch Pi 3 most irc Pp cial rains could produce floods. goodbye,
attificia. rain-making was made Australian experiments. aAGarh ot pitation. ; a Some farmers in the U.S. have You.
during ‘ast year largely due to @ Aa 10 a Sa Peon hg Economic A lvantages blamed rain-making efforts for GRATEFUL
the exchange of information on Over norma ROE i St ae Reichelderfer said: “Important causing disastrous Kansas floods.
‘ ternational basis tered with perhaps the best ex- economic advantages, especially ae ee November, 12.
ah. , perimental controls designed so for agriculture can be gained Hall said : There have been

Amazing Results far in this form of research.” from cloud seeding in situations hundreds of reports of commer-

Both scientists have been ana- More Research where either of these conditions cial success in seeding clouds

lyzing the results of experiments Reichelderfer pointed out how- is present. But we do not want and producing heavy showers.



To The Editor Th

e Advocate,—

in the U.S. and for the past two ever that at least one more year to raise the hopes of farmers in Evidence indicates in most cases

vears have exchanged informa- of intensive research will have to areas with dry climates. Rain that ae showers thought to have SIR,—I read with considerable

tion with experts in Australia, be carried out “until scientifical- does not come from a clear sky resulted from seeding were interest the article in Friday’s

Canada, Israel) Braz Chile. ly conclusive evidence has been Cloud formations are a prerequi- actually the result of natural Adveecate telling of a meeting of

Mexico obtained “to determine its effect- site for manufactured rain. Re CURES: Much more research in the St. Lucy’s Vestry when con-
Scientist: pointe u t ivent Reichelderfer categorically cloud physics is necessary.—U.P. sideration was given to a letter



—L.E.S.
from the Colonial Secretar)
regarding the granting of free

access to non-Anglican minister.
to perform the committal service |
of the providing of “public burial!
grounds,”

Rey. Pestaina is quoted as
Stating that he is not in favour
of the privilege being granted.
I wonder how Rev. Pestaina
would feel if he were transferre
to some Moslem country where
thirty per cent. of the population
were members of the Anglican
communion and he was not al-
Jowed to commit the body oi
any of his parishioners for whor
he had ministered all durin?
their life, and instead, funeral
rites were conducted by a Mos-
lem according to the Moslem
faith. I feel sure his viewpoint
would change before he knew it.

Mr. Sobers

A is reported as
saying “that if mnon-Anglican
churches want burial ground:

they should provide their own.”
Are the taxes not paid by mem-
bers of the “Church of God”
“Moravians”, “Pilgrim Holiness”
and ‘‘Seventh Day Adventists”
as well as members of the An-
glican church? Why not treat all
alike? :



C. M. GREENIDGE |

9th November, 1951,



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TUESDAY, NOVEMBER 13,

1951



BARBADOS ADVOCATE







40-Year-Old Conductor Stands Trial
On Murder Charge

THE TRIAL of Alphonza Beckles, a 40-year-old con-
ductor of Society Hill, St. John, who is charged with the
murder of 48-year-old Winston Cumberbatch, a bus driver,
began at the Court of Grand Sessions yesterday before the

Hon. the Acting Puisne Judge Mr. G. L. Taylor.

Beckles

is alleged to have committed the murder on September 9

this year.

Eleven cf the 22 witnesses the Prosecution are ex-
pected to call to prove their case, gave evidence yesterday

Mara the application of Mr. J. S.
B. Dear, one of Beckles’s law-
yers, the jury were carried yes-
terday evening to the scene of the
alleged murder at Thickets, St.
Philip. The ‘bus in which Cum-
berbatch and Beckles were driv-
ing at the time of the jncident,
was also inspeeted by the jury.

Mr. W. W. Reece, K.C., Solici-
tor General, is prosecuting for the
Crown.

Mr. Dear is associated with Mr.

George Farmer as counsel for
Beckles.

Both Beckles and Cumber-
batch were employed by the
General Motor Bus Co. and

worked on the St. Philip route.

Before calling any witnesses,
Mr. Reece outlined the case to
the jury. He told them that evi-
dence would be given to show
that Beckles and Cumberbatch
had had several bickerings pre-
vious to Cumberbatch’s death. The
fatal incident took place when
Cumberbatch and Beckles were
taking the bus P.175 along Thick-
etts to District “C”. It is alleged
that Cumberbatch was driving
the bus when he was _ stabbed.
The ‘bus swerved on to the em-
bankment

First Witness

Mildred Denny, reputed wife
of Winston Cumberbatch said she
and Cumberbatch had nine chil-
dren. She said that Cumber-
batch left home on September 8
between 11 and 12 o'clock, for
work.

As he was working in the coun-
try he would not return home
every night.

On the following morning she
carried breakfast for him. Later
ihat day she saw him at the
Hospital. She identified the body
to Dr. Cato on the following day.
Set. Arthur Scott, attached to the
Bridge Police Station, said he at-
tended the post mortem examina-
tion of Winston Cumberbatch
which was’ performed b Dr.
Cato. A nurse at the ospital
handed him blood-stained cloth-
ing. Near the left pocket of the
shirt there was a hole. There was
a corresponding hole in the vest.

Under cross-examination he
told Mr. Dear that the jacket had
no hole.

Carmen Boyce, a Nurse of the
Barbados General Hospital, said
that on September 10 she hand-
ed some clothes which had been
taken off Winston Cumberbatch
on the previous day to Sgt. Scott.

Sergeant’s Evidence

Sgt. Thorington, in charge of
Four Roads, St. John, said that
on September 9, Beckles was
brought to the Police Station and
charged with inflicting grievous
bodily harm,

“On the following day he was
charged with murder,” he said.
“TI cautioned Beckles and asked
him whether he had any thing
to say. Beckles said he was in-
nocent of the charge.”

Dr. Anthony Gale said that on
September 9 he was on duty at
the Casualty of the General Hos-

pital. A man whose name was
given as Winston Cumberbatch
was brought in. He had a stab

wound in the left breast. It was
about half an inch wide, two
inches deep and directly over the
heart.

When he saw Cumberbatch he
was just coherent and_ while
speaking to him he lapsed into
incoherence,

The wound was inflicted down-
wards. A sharp pointed instru-
ment such as a penknife could
have caused the wound,

Cross-Examined

Under cross - examination he
said that a wound of that nature
might spurt blood but it was not
spurting any when he saw it.

Dr. A. 8S. Cato, Visiting Medi-
cal Officer at the General Hos-
pital, said that on September
10 about 1.30 p.m. he examined
the body of a man at the Hos-
pital. The body was identified
by Mildred Denny as that of
Winston Cumberbatch.

Post mortem appearances
were as follows:__There was a
stab wound on the left side of
the chest. There was a bruise
on the lower part of the back
on the right side. There was an
area of softening and swelling
in the middle of the right cer-
ebral hemispheres,

The stab wound of the chest

and the case is adjourned until today.

in the left
bruise in front of each knee and
small bruises on the back of the
left elbow. There were no special
features about the stomach,

From his examination and from
consideration or the circumstances
surrounding the death he would
say that death was due to the
defects of embarrassment of the
contraction of the heart and air
getting into the circulation. there-
by causing damage. These were
the results of the stab wound of
the heart. The wound was in-
flicted by a sharp pointed instru-
ment.

Stab Wound

If a person had fallen trom a
bus he could have got bruises, but
the stab wound would have been
caused by something else. “I au
not think it was self inflicted,” he
said. Tneoretically it was not
impossible, but it was very im-
probable. If it were self inflicted,
it would more 'ikely have gone
through the space between the
ribs than through the cardiac
part. A fair degree of force had
to be used.”

Cross examined he said the
wound was nearer to the middle
line of the chest than the nipple
of the breast. With such a wound
unconsciousness did not neces-
sarily come on immediately and

it was possible that he could have
done _ something after being
wounded.

If Cumberbatch had fallen on a
firmly fixed, sharp-pointed instru-
ment, the wound could have been
inflicted. If a man had tried to
wound himself without killing
himself the degree of force that
had been used would not have
been used. If Cumberbatch had
inflicted the wound himself he
would have needed more freedom
of movement than Cumberbatch
would have had if he were driv-
ine o bus when the wound was
inflicted.

Station ’Phoned

George L. farmer, J.P., a
planter of Windemere, St. John,
said he was at home in his sitting
room on Sepltemoer Y about 1U.5u
a.m. Beckles came and asked
permission to use the telephone,
He asked to be put on to District
“C.” He said a bus had been in-
volved in an accident on Thick-
etts Road.

Beckles then said he wanted to
telephone the owners of the bus.
He wanted to get either Mr. Dow-
ding or Mr. O'Neale. ‘He tele-
phoned and repeated the same
statement he had made in the
previous telephone message.

His wife casne into the room
and she asked how the accident
happened. Beckles said that he had
the driver were taking the bus to
District “C” and they had a con-
tention as to the road they should
take, One wanted to go along one
road and the other wanted to go
along another road. In the ex-
citement the bus jumped the bank.

“My wife asked what became
of the driver and Beckles said the
driver put his head in the canes.

“She asked why the driver
acted as he did in driving the bus
over the bank. Beckles replied

that Cumberbatch must have
wanted to murder him.”
Cross-examined by Mr. Dear,

he said the canes along Thickets
were ahout 10 to 12 feet tall. The
farthest distance between the
outer edge of two cane holes was
about 12 feet.

Evidence Corroborated

Blanene Farmer, wite of George
S. Farmer, corroborated her hus-
band’s evidence.

She added at Beckles asked
whether he cduld leave his bi-
cycle there. She told him he could.
Yhe bicycle had on it a hand bag.
The police came by night and
took away the bicycle. :

P.C. Wosley Sobers who _ is
attached to District “C” said that
on September 9 about 9.30 a.m.
he went to Thickett’s Road where
he saw the bus P—175 in the
trench. The left front wheel had
come off the bus. He saw Win-
ston Cumberbatch lying in the
rear seat of the bus. His clothing
was sgaked in blood.

Another bus, J—7 was at Dis-
trict “C” as it was inspection day,



P.C. WICKHAM SEES HOW

Mr.

HENRIQUES, Founder of Boys’ Clubs in England, re

cently sent a letter to the Commissioner of Police in which he said

that P.C. Wickham of the Local

months course in the running
During that time P.C. Wickham

Force had just completed his three

and management of Boys’ Clubs
travelled to various camps in the

United Kingdom and saw how they were operated.

P.C. Wickham is now going

to a Military School of Physical

Training at Aldershot to take a three months course in physical

training.





hing ‘there wa a Lermites, Poor Construction

Caused Much Damage

In Jamaica

Hurricane

TERMITES, lack of maintenance and poor construc-
tion practice caused much of the damage during the hurri-
cane of August 17--18 in Jamaica, Mr. W. M. Woodhouse,
Building Development Adviser to the Comptroller for

Development and Welfare told the Advocate.

Vicar General
Of Grenada

Dies

(From Our Own Correspondent)
GRENADA, Noy. 12

Forty-six year old Vicar General
and Provincial of Grenada and the
Grenadines Alexandcr L’Estrange
died last night at the Colony Hos-
pital a few hours after edmission
on the afternoon of the same day.
He complained of illness on No-
vember 2 though he has been up
at his room at the Vicarage daily
and was nc: causing ar a‘ixiety
to jelow pries.@ S., George's
Catholic Church was crowded with
the faithful and other sympathis-
ers this morning when the impres-
sive funeral rite took place, all
Dominican clergy to the island at-
tending the solemn requiem mass,
celebrant being Father FitzGerald,
assisted by Fathers Bevas and
Coyle.

Governor Arundell, Administra-
tor McMillan, Treasurer Adams
and members of the Legislature
were among the congregation,

Born in London in April 1905,
the deceased was ordained a priest
in 1929. Schooled at a Jesuit Col-
lege he later studied the priest-
hood at the English Dominican
Priory, Woodchester. Gloucester-
shire, Hawkesyard Priory, Staf-
fordshire, and Blackfriars Priory,
Oxford

After ordination he did two
years advanced studies at Louvain
University, Belgium. Following
years of parish work in Newcastle
he came to Grenada, November,
1932.

During 1935 to 1947 he was re-
called to England where he taught
Moral Theology at Blackfriars and
also lectured students at Oxford.

After he returned in 1947 he be-
came Vicar General—Provincial



1950.
EE
Cumberbatch’s packet was but-

toned or not when he saw him,

P.C, Stanley Mayers attached to
District “C” said he went to
Thicketts Road, St. Phillip, on
September 9 about 1.30 p.m He
gave evidence as to measurements
of the road and various points
about the scene, He said that the
bus was damaged.

Mrs. Farmer handed him a
small canvas bag and bicycle
about 9.15 p.m. The bag contained
bread, rum, a screw driver and
bicycle tools.

He said in answer to Mr, Dear
that he took statements from some
of the witnesses,

Arrested
Cpl, Vernon Hunte attached
District “C” said he went to the
scene at Thicketts on Sept. 9.

He saw Beckles among the crowd
which had gathered, He asked him
to come to District “C” and give
a statement. Beckles was carried
to the station, Later in the day
he was arrested and charged with
grievous bodily “harm. He took
from him a small pair of scis-
sors, a small penknife and a
corkscrew.

He took
O'Neal «
ington.

a statement from Mr,
nd handed it to Sgt. Thor-

" Sgi. Thorington recalled said to

Mr. Dear that he received all the
Statements and forwarded them
to the Superintendent in charge.

When Beckles had been first
charged he had been charged in
his (Thorington's) name.

He had been acting at District
“C” when the accident occurred.

He knew what was the nature
of some of the statements as he
was present when some of them
were being taken,

He was not present when Whit-

Mr. Woodhouse was in Jamaica
last month to advise the Govern-
ment on rehousing problems cre-
ated by the hurricane. He stopped
there on his way to Barbados fron
England after attending the 195!
Building Research Congress 1
London.

He said that when he flew out
to the U.K. a fortnight after the
hurricane, it was thought th
about 12,000 houses had been des-
troyed or damaged. It was clear,
however, that returns from several
districts were widely inaccurate

nd it now seemed that neariy
50,000 houses were affected.

Poorer Classes

“This figure includes only houses
of the poorer classes who were
not insured” he said, There were,
of course, many other losses: in-
surance assessors from the U.K.
were amazed how little hurricane

insurance had been taken out
among all sections of the com-
munity.

Emergency Committees were

soon in operation and fortunately,
stocks of building materials were
fairly good. Emergency “first-aid”
issues were made up to a valve
of £20 to help the indigent to re-
100f or patch their houses.

He said that communal] feeding
in public buildings was already
proving very expensive and pre-
venting the use of the buildings
for normal purposes, as well as
being very bad for morale

Mr. Woodhouse said that sub-
ject to parliamentary approval, the
British Government had agreed to
assist Jamaica to the maximuin
of £4,600,000 in a grant and loan;
the greater portion would be fe:
rehousing and the balance fo:
agriculture. A special new agency
was to be set up in Jamaica for
this purpose of rehousing and the
principle of aided “Self-help”
house building would almost cer-
tainly be included and every effort
would be made to build hurricane-
proof houses, These homes he
said, would not be free gifts, as a
portion of the cost would have to
be repaid by the occupiers,

Many roof sheets -had been
blown off and caused further dam-
age during the hurricane. This was
because they were inadequately
fixed; drive screws and washers
were essential, Small roofing units
such as cedar shingles which had
more fixing per square foot of
roof which were much more re-
sistant

Wood Ants

Althougn wina speeds of 110
miles per hour were recorded,
ordinary glazing resisted, provided
it was properly fixed. Stone and
concrete buildings naturally stood
up better than wood frame build-
ings, but the latter if braced es-
pecially between frame and base
and between roof and frame were
quite adequate. The collapse of
many wood-frame and concrete-
nog panel buildings—common in
Jainaica—could in 90% of the
cases be attributed to advanced
infestation of the timber by ants
and the use of very weak concrete
in the panels.

“The need for improved build-
ing practices and codes and for
their reinforcement is very appar-
ent, Steps are being taken to
improve the Building Bye-Laws in
this dire:tion. Consideration may
also be given to the burying of
some power lines. The dans
from overhead live electric cables
which had blown down, caused
long delays and much extra work
for the utility companies after the
hurricane, The companies worked



very well, however, in restorin
their services.

Mr, Woodhouse was struck by
two features of the hurricane. The

first was the lack of attention to the
official warnings, which were man»
and adequate. As result, f
precautions were not taken ut
the damage was worse than it need
have been. Seventeen inche
rain could do a lot in five hour
that was recorded in many place



il

‘Gascogne’ Ruth Brings

Off WI Run

“De Grasse” Coming

‘he fr
Gasvog..e

aca passenger-freighter
Wiliktat SAMCU Irom Bar-
November 3% .or Soutn-
ampton, will not be coming back
to Baroacos a Cie Gle. irans-
She has been
over to an Italian Steamship
any who will run her in the
Mediterranean

The S.S. Colombie now runs thc
West Indies—-U.K. route alone for
the French line.

Gascogne has been
Barbados for 24 years. She took
ever in 1949 from the chartered
passenger - freighter Katoomba
which was then returned to her
owners.

Taking over from the Gascogne
will be another French liner, the
SS. De Grasse (21,000 tons)
vhich is expected to make her
first call at Barbados on May 6.
Nye Grasse will be coming from
England via Vigo (Spain). Mar-
tiniaue and she will be sailing on
to Trinidad, La Guaira, Curacao,
Cartagena and Jamaica,

Laaos on

as

itlanuque liner

old

Com,

coming to

Returning to Barbados on May
19 from Jamaica via Curacao, La
Guaira, Martinique and Trinidad,
De Grasse will be taking her first

passengers for U.K. from Barba-
aos

De Grasse can accommodate
615 passengers in three classes,

and will be making a call to Bar-
bacos once every five weeks.
Gascogne’s passenger accommoda-
tion is 254 and she used to call at
Barbadas once every five weeks.
Messrs R. M. Jones & Co., Ltd.
ire the locai representatives of
ihe French line

Gascomne was formerly
George Washinteton. She
troop transport during
War Il.

the
was 1

World



Nomination
Stations

At nine o’clock on Thursday,
the 22nd of November, the Return-
ing Officers of the various constit-
uencies will receive the nomination
of candidates for election to the
General Assembly of the island.
The places at which nomination
will take place are as follows

City of Bridgetown—Queen’'s
Park Building.

St. Michael Drill
Ann's Fort, Garrison.

Christ Churech—Vestry
Christ Church.

St. George—St
joys’ School,

Hall, St.
Room,

George's Church

St. Philip—St. Philip’s Church
Boys’ School,
St. John-——St. John’s Church

Mixed School,

« St. James--St, James’ Combined
School

St. Thomas St.
Church Boys’ School,

Thomas’

St. Joseph—St, Joseph's Chureh
Bovs’ School.

St. Andrew—Belleplaine Com-
munity Hall,

St. Peter—St. Peter's Church
Girls’ Sehool.

St Tnev—St. Lucy's Church
Girls’ School.



Labourer Jailed

Sentence of 12 months’

im-
prisonment with hard labour wa
yesterday passed on Cameron
Greenidge a labourer of Bay

Land, St. Michael by Mr. G. B
Griffiih, Acting Police Magistrate
of District “A”. Greenidge stole
$16 and a bamboo basket the
property of Mildred McKenzie on
November 11.
Greenidge has two
convictions for larceny.

Resisted Police

Nessie Clarke a labourer of
Mar.indales Road, St. Michae.
was ordered to pay a fine of 10/-

previou



* by Mr. G. B. Griffith for resistin

Police Constable Carrington whil-
he was making an arrest,

In another charge he was fined
40/- in 14 days or one month fo:
using indecent language on Pal-
metto Square, Bo.h offences were
committed on November 10,

s ad
SPCA Fund Grows
The Barbados S.P.C.A. has re-
paid a loan of $100 and collecict

1,764.08 during the past year.
Posters and leaflets have bee:

Liqueur

With torn sails and drench

eabins, the 94-foo. schooner Ruth
sailed into Carligle Bay on Sun-
day after a three-day stormy
tmp from Martinique Ruth is

paying her first visit .o Barbados
Mainsail, stemstaysail and jib

were all badly torn ir the squaiiy

weather. Ruth will be fitted wi

new sails before she leaves Bar
b_ dos fer crew were kept bu
throughout the trip temporaril)

mending che sails.

A French schooner, Ruth wa
built at Bonaire, Dutch Wes
Indies, 21 years ago. But in he
tresh coat of white paint, sh
looks a new schooner. Her mat
said vhat she has been kept i:
constant repair.

Ruth is owned by a
businessman who lives
tinique. The = skipper
Emilien and the other
bers of the crew

The mate said
she has only
Barbados to

Frencl
in Mar
Captair
nine mem
French
yesterday (hi
made this call t
bring empty druy
"nd of liqueur from Mar
tinique. She trades between S
Mcrr in and Curacao with gener:
cargo,
The

are

cases

echooner

is 22 feet wic
and draws 11 feet of water wher
tight, 14 feet when loaded. Sh
is 66 tons net and 120 tons grog

She is consigned to the Schoon
Pool.

DON'T. STOP
BETWEEN STOPS

Colonel R. T. Michelin, Com
n.issioner of Police, told = th
é.avocate yesterday that he ha

recently noticed
the practice of

an increave 1
bus drivers sto}

ping heir buses between stop
“This prectice, while for th
convenience of a few passenger:
besides being against the law, i
a great inconvenience for th
travelling public Police patro
are paying special atten ion
this matter and those disregard

ing the law in this respect will b
reported.”

He said ihat it Is hoped tha
the persons travelling in the b
will net expect the driver to sto

anywhere than at organised b
sops. “Drivers are arked t
ignore the requests from con

ductors who want to stop for t
convenience of pa
said,

sengers,” }



‘Alcoa Roamer”
Arrives Here

The SS. Aleoa Roamer (4,82:
ons net) arrived here from New
Orleans yesterday with 4,397 sack»
of cornmeal, 1,000 bags of wheat
flour

and a quantity of salted
meat.

Also arriving was the molasse
tanker Athelbrook which has
called for a load of vaceum pat
molasses for Trinidad, The Athel
brook is expected to leave por
‘oday for Trinidad

Alcoa Roamer is consigned |
Messrs Robert Thom Ltd., and
Athelbrook to Messrs H. Jason

Tones & Co., Ltd.

Blackguard Fined

Mr. G. B. Griffith, Acting Pol
ice Magistra.e of District "A
yesterday ordered Lucille Ad’ m





of Lightsfoot Lane, St. Michael
to pay a fine of 15/- and 2/- cost
in 14 days or 14 days’ imprison
ment when she appeared befor

him charged with blackguardin
oo Lightsfoot Lane.

The offence was committed
October 7. Counsel for the

fendant was Mr. D. Melone,

oO

de





C.0.L. GOES UP 2
POINTS

Tne cost of living index fo
ctober has increasea by iwu y
cent.-over September. For ur
2i8t year it was 241 pei
while for the same month .fi.}
year it is 284 per cent. kor Mua
ae figure was 264 while in Ju:

was 272.

The increase of eight point
ween the figure for May and t
wx June does not represent a sud
den increase in the cost of lvit
It is caused by the substitutior
new weights in calculating U
index.



RECRUITS FOR DOMINICA

In the

PAGF. FIVE



treatment of sarcoptic mange in small animals «
Tetmosol ' is invariably effective.

At the most, two or

three applications are required and moreover during
treatment no special isolation is necessary.

Tetmosol '
»bnoxious smell.

is

non-greasy, non-staining and has now

‘TETMOSOL’

Tetraethylthiuram Monosulphide Solution (25%). : g
IMPERIAL CHEMICAL (PHARMACEUTICALS) LIMITED

A subsidiary company of Imperial Chemical Industries Limited

WILMSLOW
ole agents and Distributors :—

A. S. BRYDEN & SONS ‘BARBADOS’ LTD.

THE
SMALL PROPORTION OF OUR WIDE RANGE OF

hITCHEN REQUISITES

“HANDI” PLATE
SCRAPERS

WIRE STRAINERS
ASBESTOS STOVE
MATS
POTATO RICERS
POTATO CHIPPERS,
COOKS’ SIEVES
BUTTER CHURNS
DOMESTIC SCALES
MEAT MINCERS
BOILING STOVES
KITCHEN KNIVES
EGG TIMERS
i WOOD SPOONS
\\( STOVE MICA
) BREAD TINS,
| -—Enamd.
BREAD TINS
—Japanned
OVEN
THERMOMETERS

MANCHESTER



UNDERMENTIONED ITEMS ARE ONLY A

ICE SHAVERS
BREAD KNIVES

METAL TOASTERS
JAPANNED TRAYS
WIRE DISH COVERS
EGG BEATERS
PASTRY ROLLING
PINS

KNIFE SHARPENERS
BEAN SLICERS
STEEL WOOL
KITCHEN SPOONS

MEASURING SPOONS
(Sets)

—

DISH MOPS
ICING TUBES
ICING SYRINGES
STEAM COOKERS

PRESSURE COOKERS

———
===

\ We also carry a large assortment of
Domestic lines in - - -

CARTHENWARE,

ALUMINIUM WARE,

TIN AND ENAMELLED WARE

BUY NOW WHILE THE GOODS ARE AVAILABLE
Alt’ REASONABLE PRICES.





HARRISON'S

Specialists in
DOMESTIC HARDWARE











HEARTBREAKE.

NY L



ONS

. A now variety in the
‘ field Mason, C 2 i ee oe iar ae purchased and given to the Ed. =
reached the muscle of the right and Cumberbatch was taken to [Ljljan MeClean gave ee The second feature was the nuim- B » au




































ventricle of the heart, giving a the General Hospital in it. mene “Me wal aeesent wm ber of people w all classes who ge Be RR ain ee enc if iia shales
half inch wound in the-heart. Cross-examined he said that O'Neal and another witness goon spent the first 24 hours after the 9. to use of Diatrict Tree th, a Pilipn “watees
Ahonen: ets ? lot. ; , 7 Vex another witness gave hurricane sight-seeing amid the 1€ use of District Inspecto.s the Dominica Police rce, )
There was a large amount of clot- apart from taking Cumberbatch to their statements ‘ . Ma f . will be ails ; at a se # nt ‘ i
: = eka : ae nae Firth? stater By A ruins. These “joy riders” addea available early in 1992, November 16 at 10.00 a.m, app! shades imaginable.
ted blood under the ea oo pel a he tigati u More evidence will be giveg to- substantially to the difficultic ; They are gifts of the Barbados cans will be interviewed at thi
and in the front part o e chest par n e investigations, © day at 10 am. when The anad th - hapetty 7 aS Pounds - Ve cs 3 | be i lewed at t
a ee a ; “m. p e Forces, the Police and other Foundry Ltd., and will be in- District A Police Traini :
There was:some degree of collapse could not remember whether continues. citar aorta oth stalled in District Police Station~ School. Just the thing for that
euaeuneneses The name speaks for itself | QPP ALEVE OT LPP PPE KM: 3 Special Xmas Gift
g % <
[ppkes yinture “t * OUTSTANDING Sig emer ee | Vor soe
Blood ; % | 15 Denier
| :
eer tocetaipteeom FOOD VALUES ‘(|CAL-C-TOSE
a % = -_,
& from blood impurities g |
2 é e &
5 impurities in the blood may cause rheumatic x Originally iianae k z |
a ee ‘ r
shee ans peien, Oe es eee eee, % EVAPORATED MILK $ .29 $26 3 EVERY CuP ao = » 6 ‘
= boils, pimples and common skin disorders. ® CONDENSED MILK 34 ave ) 50 & S 5 1 5
5 Shee Meet sheers ee > IMPERIAL VIENNA SAUSAGES 38 u 8 eee Pevote
“ - . ake eeeee eee . “ ¥ 7 |
mw _the blood, cleanses the system and assists CRAWFORDS SWEET BISCUITS }16 pkts. 54 4“ & 1S ADDED -
® in restoring good health. —~ . . .
| manent a ROGEReeeeeRnes x SWEET ASST. CUSTARD CREAM, MARIE x ,
SSSSeReeeeeees eee TRI FRUIT PUFFS, CREAM CRACKERS * | YW 7 ¥
“. s ; The above Items for Cash and Carry Customers only. % STRENGTMU . | CAVE
— _ .
ee a ee MS vimer's PRUIT SALAD per Tn - 1228 Sis fe Succeed tetek
a B AYLMER’S GREEN PEAS—per Tin .... 39 x pron Abe yyy Sage Ae ys Breage Be tiptcer Behar SHEPHERD
w FOR BEST RESULTS = LIN CAN GREEN PEAS—per Tin . 38 yp significant amounts of six vitamins plus Calcium Phosphorus
2 : ‘ ‘
a" USE a % POmmAN MIXED HUTS. pe et 25} [and tron. 1 is excettent for children who dislike milk and Ltd
Na : ——per ct. . 05 highly recommended for the eged, convalescents, expectant eS
Z \ @ |% HEINZ CREAM OF CHICKEN SOUP—pe » > ew t
zB 2A] EN SOUP—per Tin a2 and nurs s. < :
a PURENA CHOWS = Sei Hine Cui octamer ge tnt | Sater Co,
¢ DANISH SALAMI SAUSAGE—per 1, a 1.31 bo
*. IN THE CHECKER BOARD BAGS 4, % NORWEGIAN PEELED SHRIMPS—per Tin 86 & on sale at all 101% Broad Street
ass % PERLSTEIN BEER—per Bottle ; is %
a, H. Jason Jones & Co., Ltd—pistributors «, % PERLSTEIN BEER—per Carton ..... 4.00 & KNIGHT'S DRUG STOR ES }
: ’ 7 1, = . fi Pay’
s., a |: STANSFELD, SCOTT & CO. LTD. ; ee Li . " oe
a oe s Me % GEL FPEC CC SOP SPPFPLOLO LI? 4 oF CALS Go oats <* =—_— =









PAGE SIX
















iE BARBADOS ADVOCATE TUESDAY, NOVEMBER 13, 1951

HENRY BY CARL ANDERSON |p Serene.” a
\ Your First Taste of $
| %
%
WHETHER YOU ARE :

will explain more elo-
quently than words can %
WHY s
%,
} >
is & y
LARGE H S&S }

|

1s .
Ist in Quality x
Ist in Popularity

STUART & SAMPSON
(1938) LTD.

leadquarters for Best Rum

SGOSS8S MALLS OECD
LA SAPPS POSS SFP SCS?

USER
OR A

9% ee ee SF
LOVCCDSSCOBBOISS



T'S BEEN THE DREAM OF]

x

MY LIFE | BUT... WE GOT

A SURPRISE FOR YOU TOO,
mele {

*
%
‘s

Deliciong
‘ SS

Smedley’s Mixed Vegetable %
in tins

Smedley's Cream of Tomato
Soup in tins

Crosse & Blackwell Table
Salt in Bots.

Crosse & Blackwell Curry x

.

Powder in Bots.
Crosse & Blackwell Marrow- ‘



SPSS



7

:
eer SSOP FOOOO TS

OVS OD

YOU DESIRE THE
BEST TEA — SO USE

RED ROSE TEA!

IT 1S GOOD TEA.



fat Peas in Tins
Nestle’s Milo Tonic Food in
tins
Nestle’s Nespray Powdered
Milk in tins
Koo Plum Jam in tins—
Large & small ¢
T’dad Fine Quality Cocoa — &
L&s x



Select Powdered Milk in tins $
Bots. of Anchovy Paste %
Tins of Three Bay Tomato %
Juice

Tins of Farrow’'s Fresh Gar-
den Peas o
ins of Sasso Olive Oil — $

L & §S.



Tins of Liquid Stove Polish %
Pkg. of Fab Soap Suds g



INCE & Co. Ltd. ‘

6, 7, 8 & 9 Roebuck St. §¢
2GS6966

ee es
3
a









Ck ere ~ | RICHER
BY FRANK STRIKER World's Finest Smail - car | SMOOTHER

GRAB HIM, SHERIFF/|'LL a ee ae Si won i coves THROUGH i ives even real ér value |
qos "nepaon vero | _ phe a Ses i j is qj a Cc R E A M i E R
~ , my i = ‘ 5
. ni | Famous British-Buill Saas ie

MORRIS MINOR |
SCOres NeW Success _ of

Fere is a four-door, four-seater F
family saloon—asmall car ina
very big way with accommoda-
tion for four adults-—nippy in
eee sasy to park, and tireless
to dvive,








ti 6ICK AND TIRED OF SEEING

YOU SLEEPING AROUND HERE.’

GET UP AND SHOW SOME

AMBITION / GO CALL ON MR.

SID ADELL-IT WiLL. DO YOU

GOOD TO SEE HOW A
SM MART MAH

OH -WELL-I'LL DO IT-
IT WON'T TIRE ME
TO WATCH HIM WORK/



" ane: DORE TRUCTION Boby &
featur
fi ally ndide Lo ecren et red

» CHASSIS









* AsY Lag ae ar

wide eohiee nation
out comfort,



THERE MUST BE SOME
& YAR... AND IF VE n HIDDEN FOOD DEPOT...LET'S
CAN FIN? FOOD AND " VPS ONLY THING KEEP SEARCHING /
VATER, VE an SET UP we P LEFT IN THE FLUID

ING / DEPARTMENT...GCHNAPPS










viviD, FLASHING PERFORWANCE Th












ZH.P.. and D nae imp
TABBY'S aoe FROM THE OFFICERS a \- Moar of ie sie. Let us ice 9 ou What a big car ehie'ssand
BOy FRIENDS / IBF ie fiat a . QUARTERS / AND THAT ’
Walid Lan) IGN/T EXACTLY...

C. L. Gibbs & Co. Ltd.,

P. O. Box 56
BRIDGETOWN . Dial 2402

it rau ) AM eel BS San Ve FORT ROYAL GARAGE LTD.
V7 Ww ; Phone 2385 Sole Distributors Phone 4504



MARRIAGE

A BOOK FOR THE MARRIED
AND ABOUT TO BE MARRIED
by Kenneth Walker F.R.CS,,

ADVOCATE STATIONERY



It PAYS YOU TO DEAL HERE

‘SPECIAL offers to all Cash and Credit Credit Cus Customers for ‘fot Monday to Wednesday only

=—_—





















USUALLY y
[THINK (CAN \YoU D0? ILL. SEND A HE DIDN'T STOPTO ANGWEREAM | = NOW USUALLY NOW §
OUR Th00Ps SeaMGReD THE WNOLEtoUNTRY \EIND THEM }-%_ ARMY WITH YOU arseeiine Alt THIS EVER HE ampagne Victor Cligout bots. 6, 35.20 : sli i
oie Sona EFT | THINICTHE IONAPPERS f 6 Bacon: sliced 1 lb. 1.20 1.00
to 90K. YOUR WIFEAND SON INTOTHE JUNGLE. ne y bs bi (c s) 72.00 35 8.00
? .
Corned Mutton (tins) 66 .60
Vermouth Nolly Pratt 3.00 2.64 %

Orange & Grape Fruit Juice .29 -235 Condensed Milk 34 32



PA leah RR aos

SSS SSS tes eee ee









oa



TUESDAY, NOVEMBER

13, 1951 s

BARBADOS ADVOCATE



CLASSIF

IED ADS.

TELEPHONE 2508.





The charge for announcements of
Births, Marriages, Deaths, Acknowl-
@agementi, and “n Memoriam notices is
$1 50 on week-days and $1.89 on Sundays
for any mumber of words up to 50, and
% cents per word on week-days and
# cents per word on Sundays for each
edditional wore



DIED

JORDAN—On Monday, November
1951, Elmer Aubrey (Ellie)
leaves his late residence, Sand Street,
Speightstown at 4 o'clock this after-
noon for the Westbury Cemetery
Friends are asked to attend

Alma Jordan (wife), Elmer and
Keith Jordan {sons}, C. H. P.
Jordan, Lavington Jordan (Canada)
brothers 13.11.51

THANKS

WOCDING

12,
His funeral





We the undersigned desire
plc > this medium to thank all
ho kind friends who attended the
funeral and sent wreaths and Cables,
and in any other way expressed their
sympathy in our bereavement occa-
sioned by the passing of Mr. Henry
*reston Wooding











FOR SALE

Minimum charge week «> cente and

cents Sutdays 4 words — over &



AUTOMOTIVE

CAR: One 1947 Hudson only done
12,000 miles. Apply R. D. C. O’Neale,
Cliff Cottage, St. Jchn 11.11.51—3n







CAR—Austin A-40, Devon 4 Door
Saloon with sliding roof. Owner-driven,
nmuleage 31,000, recently fitted new EXIDE
battery and new tyres. Price $1,440
Telephone 2989. 11.11.51—3n

es
CAR—Ford Prefect 11,000 miles. Condi-
tior perfect, owner leaving. Apply H. P
Harris & Co., Phone 4045

13.11.51—tin

—_——
CAR—Chrysler (Windsor) 1947 Modei

with new tyres. Automatic gears, safety
clutch. Mileage 33,000 and in perfect
condition. Courtesy Garage. Dial 4616
6.11.51—én















Dr. & Mrs. Wooding, Mr, Luther Wood- CAR—One V-8 Ford, left hand drive,
ing \(Brother) 13.11.51—1n | ¢0 ay ott perfect working order
Apply to C. M. Austin, James Street
IN MEMOR1LAM ' 6.11.51—Sn.
os Cc ae Glo een ae ———
SMALL—In ever loving memory of our CAR—One Citroen Motor Car. Done
beloved one Gloria Small who fell {9,000 miles. A-1 Condition Phone 4618
asleep 13th November, 1949. G. E. Ward. Morris Service Station
We do not need a special day 9.11.51—5n
To bring jrou to our mind ee eae
The day we do not think of you CAR—191 Morris Oxford, only 4,000
Is very hard to find miles. Nearly new $2,400. Owner leaving
Winifred Small (mother), Anthony} the island, Phone 4718 13.11.51—4n
(son) Ira and Beulah isisters), Dora{@-—————
(grandmother), Allan (uncle), Peter] _C4&R—Rover 16 H.P. Perfect condition
inephew), Joan, Cecile and ' Thelma] throughout 24,000 miles only. Not driven
(uieces) Carl (brother-in-law) over 30 M.P.H. Treated as only child
13.11.51—1n | Must be seen and driven to be appre-
inne OE, Apply: Courssy, Garagé,.. Fae
WOOD-—in loving memory of my dear| Pedigree trial and full particulars.
nother Aletha Wood who fell asleep| Price $2,880. 6.11,51—t.f.n
on November 13th, 1948
May she rest in peace * ar
Lilian, Millicent and Dolridge (children), ELECTRicAL
Glen, Eddie and Willie (Grandchildren)
16.11.51—1n WASHING MACHINES and VACUUM
CLEANERS—Another shipment of the
“ World famous HOOVER Washing Ma-
GOVERNMENT NOTICES chines and Vacuum Cleaners has just
arrived. Call early at K. R. Hunte &
Co Ltd., and save disappointment
—--— Washing Machine $135.00, Vacuum
Cleaner $75.00. Dial 5027. K. R
DOMINICA POLICE FORCE HUNTE & CO. LTD. 8.11. 51—6n
g Ee 7 er S oe i > i‘
Seven (7) Recruits are required MISCELLANEUUS

for the Dominica Police Force,

Details of pay and allowances,
ete., can be obtained from the Po-
lice Training School, Office, Dis-
trict “A”.

Applicants will be seen in person
s 10 a.m. on Friday, 16th Novem-
per.

Certificates of Education to be
produced.

(Sgd.) R. T. MICHELIN,
Commissioner of Police.
Police Headquarters,
Bridgetown.



12th November, 1951.
: 13.11.51.—2n.
NOTICE

Application are invited for the
post of Joint Secretary to the fol-
lowing

Sugar Production & Export Con-
trol Board

Fancy Molasses Control & Mar-
keting Board

Sugar Industry Capital Rehab-
ilitation Reserve Board

Sugar Industry Price Stabiliza-
tion Reserve Board.

The salary of the post will de-
pend on qualifications, but will not
be less than £500 per annum nor
more than £700 per annum, The
post is non-pensionable and ter-
minable at one month’s notice on
either side.

Applications stating age, educa
tional qualifications and experi-
ence, together with COPIES of
testimonials should be addressed to
the Director of Agriculture,
Queen’s Park, and will be accepted
up to Saturday, the 24th day of

vernber, 1951.
A es 13.11.51—4n.
a
PORDSSVD PID D OOOO SOFIA
Ss,
Vacant

Situations

Nesires
White
to

HOLIDAY
companion
Age, twenty-five
after 11 a.m. Hotel
6.11.51—6n.

ON
lady

>

%

%,

% LADY

young

preferably

thirty. Call

Hastings Ltd
SSSSSSSSSSOSSSSS SF IV OEY

——————

JUST THE THING



For the small Flat
“The Junior General”

A compact little table Model Gas
Cooker with 2 Boiling Burners and
an inst ed oven

Can bake a Chicken or a cake with
ease

SEE
GAS
Bay St.

1T

SHOWROOM,

At your





——
Se

= 7





| ORIENTAL |
SOUVENIRS

ANTIQUES,
CARVINGS

CURIOS |
' JEWELS,
EMBROIDERIES, Ete.

| THANYS



Pr. Wm. Hry. St. :: Dial 3466 ||!







| POLITICAL

MEETING
TO-NIGHT

Sept. 13th Nov.
AT
BAXTER’S RD.

Corner Kensington New

Rd. at 7.30 o'clock

=

the
of

In Support of
Candidature

MAYNARD

for the City of

Bridgetown.

13.11.51.—in
uv

—



BOYS' ELASTIC-TOP SOCKS — Cotton
“Primula Rosa" an Italian product Popu-
lar shades and sizes at 83 cents pair
Visit KTIRPALANI, 52 Swan Street

t 13.11.51—1n

FRESH SEEDS—Carrot, Cabbrge, Beet
Zinnia, Snapdragon, Marigole tc., etc.
Bruce Weatherhead Ltd. ®.11,51—3n











ONE (1) York Big 12 Special Set. For
further particulars, Dial 2733. F. Roach.
13.11 51—In

USED BOTTLING EQUIPMENT, com-
prising, Liquid 4—wide Universal Bottle
Washer; Dixie Model “F’’ One-man
Hook-up Automatic Filler-Crowner 5 h.p
Instantaneous Cooler; One Lynn Filter;
Wilson & Cousins Carbonator, and Two
tanks. S. M.
San Fernando,
13.11, 51—6n

pn? He means cme ae

Enamel-lined
JALEEL -
Trinidad

Syrup
Phone 2331,



WANTED



HELP







for Hotel Berwick. Ex-
Salary and share in

A Managress
perience necessary

profits Good position for the right
person Apply at first in writing A. E.
TAYLOR L7D.. P.O. Box 255, Bridge-
tova

~ MANAGER for first class residential





club in West Indies, Excellent oppor-
tunity for young unmarried man with
catering experience. Position offers

salary and part profits of business. Box
No. R. B. C/o Advocate.
6.11.51—6n.

————

PANTRY MAID—A really good Pantry
Maid to assist butler in housework also.
Apply DaCosta, Dalkeith 13,11.51-—In

THEATRE MANAGER—A_ full time
Manager for the PLAZA THEATRE—
Barbarees. Apply by letter and in person
at the office of CARIBBEAN THEATRES
LTD., “The Banyans” Bay Street,
between the hours of 9 a.m. and 12 noon,
on or before November 20th, The suc-
cessful applicant must take up his duties
by January 4th. All applications treated
in strict confidence 4.11.51—1n.







SITUATIONS WANTED
Experienced Shorthand typist female,
12 years with leading firm of Solicitors
in England Good reference seeks
position preferably with legal firm
Apply Box B. B, C/o Advocate Ad-
vertising Dept. 13 11.51—3n





MISCELLANEOUS

—_

BOTTLES—Clean empty nip bottles at
48c. per dozen — deliver Colonade Stores,
White Park Road. 11.11.51. f.n.

FOK RENT





HOUSES



BEDFORD COTTAGE—Bedford Aven-
ue, Upper Bay Street. immediate posses-
sion. Dial 8685.

13.11, 51—3n





HOMESTEAD—Upper Belmont Road
Two bedrooms, dining room, sitting room,
gallery, all conveniences. Apply within.

13.11.51—2n
—_—_—

THE GLEN, St. Lawrence Gap—Fur-

nished apartment Call 8273



Mr. Peter Morgan,
St. Lawrence Hotel
13,11, 51—3n
- ouieenteshininsansmatctatemonypcmeitie
THE Building known as “Berwick

Hotel" containing 14 bedrooms, bar etc.
A. E. TAYLOR LTD.,
Coleridge St
Dial 4100,

GOVERNMENT



ATTENTION is

prices of “Milk-Evaporated” are as

ARTICLE
(not more



Milk-Evaporated $12.69 per

48 x 144 oz, tins or
48 x 16 oz, tins

$12.21 per

96 x 6 oz. tins
—————— LL

12th November, 1951.

.
MR. ALBERT A. |

Note New Address:—

BEARD & GREIG

Prince William Henry Street
(Over Lashley’s)
Phone 4683
Can we sell your house or
property?
We have a quantity of en-
quiries from England, U.S.A.

and Canada.

Consult R, Wilson on the
yuestion of buying or dispos-
ing of any type of house,
shop or factory



—————=—SS==>= eee

= mr aO=OFeOr SSS









drawn to the Control of Prices
(Amendment) Order, 1951, No. 33 which will be published in the
Official Gazette of Monday 12th November, 1951.

3. Under this Order the maximum wholesale and retail selling

WHOLESALE PRICE

————_—





PUBLIC SALES PUFLIC NOTICES









REAL ESTATE NUTICE
The Parochial Treasurer's Office, St.
The undersigned will offer for sale at | Michael, will be closed at 12 o'clock,

Noon on Thursday the 15th instant
C. GEBORGE GRANNUM,
Ag. Parochial Treasurer

Public Competition at their office No
High Street, Bridgetown,

on Tuesday the
16th day of November

17 |
|
1951 at 2 p.m. |



450 shares Barbados Co-op. Cotton St Michael
Factory Limited 13.11,.51—2n
250 shares Barbados Fire Insurance | ———————————————
Co i
= sores Barbados Ice Co., Limited | panne, ucy
ts | : 7 ~
ben aan Hemeaen Tenet | TT eae imarked on the
100 > envelope “Tender for Loan”) will be re-
etiee wit Rum = Refinery | ceived by me up to Tuesday November,
“a 20th 1951 for a loan to the parish of
180
For eee Betares Ee. $8,600.00 at a rate of interest not exceed-

COTTLE CATFORD & co. |in® 4%

11.11.51—2n

eT
BUNGALOW—One stone wall Bungalow
drawing and dining room, three bed-
rooms, breakfast room, toilet and bath,
standing on 20 perches“of land. Apply

as authorised br the “Saint
Luey’s (Barbados) Loan Act, 1949" such
sum to be repaid in five annual instal-
ments of $1,920.00 each together with
interest the first of such instalments
becoming due on %th November, 19652
Certificates will be issued in units of





to C. R. M. Austin, James Street a rn O. L, DEANE
aur cs —— Vestry Clerk,
HOUSE—One chattel house standing > Bd
= 22 7 ye = land, situated at | oe
orner of Dash Road, Bank Hall. Apply
to C. R. M. Austin, James Street. Also NOTICE

one spot land, Bank Hall 25 3/10 perches
6.11.51—5n
TT

“BOSVIGO HOUSE", Eagle Hall Road,
St. Michael, with 4 Acres or thereabouts
of land; all enclosed.

THE DWELLINGHOUSE contains,
Open Verandahs, Enclosed Gallery, Draw-
ing and Dining Rooms, 3 Bedrooms, one
very large, Toilet and Bath, Large Kitchen
Pantry, Store-room ete. and Cellars

The Government Water as well as
Windmill and Well, which supplies water
for gardens and lawn.

Garage for 2 Cars, and Servants’ rooms.

A portion of the land is planted in
Cocoanut Trees, Guava trees, Mango
trees, Golden Apple trees, and Breadfruit

PARISH OF 8T. LUCY
Applications for one or more vacant
Vestn; Exhibitions tenable at the Parry
Sehool will be received by me riot later
than Saturday 24th inst. Candidates
must be sons of Parishioners of St. Lucy
in straightened circumstances, and not
less than eight and not more than twelve
years of age. Forms of application must
be obtained from the Parochial Treasurer
on office days A Baptismal Certificate
must accompany each application
Gandidates must present themselves to
the Headmaster for examination on Mon-
day 12th inst., at 10 o'clock, a.m
. oO. L. DEANE,
Vestry Clerk,





trees and another portion of land planted St. Lucey.

in Guinea, Elephant and Sour Grass 8.11.51—3n
OFFERS §N WRITING will be received

by the undersigned up to Tuesday the IN THE MATTER OF THE

13th day of November, at 4 p.m. The COMPANIES’ ACT 1910

vendor does not bind herself to accept

the highest, or any offer. CENTRAL FOUNDRY LTD.

JSUGAR NEWS :



| Delegates Ready
For New Talks

IN LONDON

LONDON.

Delegates from the Common-
wealth sugar-producing counvries
are due to begin a fresh series of
discussions with the British Gov-
ernment on November 15 on the
quota allocated to each area undei
the Commonwealth Sugar Agree-
meni,

The delegates have been in

London for some weeks and have
been holding preliminary discus-
sions among themselves at the
offices of the West India Commi.-
tee. These discussions have been
secret, but it is understood that
the delegates have now decided
Japon the poinis they will raise in
-tormal discussions with the
, Colonial Office and the Ministr,
of Food,

Among the West Indian dele-
gates are the Hon. Albert Gomes,
of Trinidad, and the Hon. H. A.
Cuke, of Barbados, The Hon.
W. A. Bustamante, of Jamaica, is

! also reported to be on his way to

j London, but his mission is report-

ed to be connected with bananas.
Fresh Light

There are great hopes among
the delegates that Britain’s new

Inspecton any day except Sundays on| NOTICE IS HEREBY GIVEN that the Government will regard their
application to Mrs. Hanschell, Tele- | Transfer Books of the Company will be!}C ase in a fresh light. It is
phone No. 2260. closed from the 3rd day of November,'realised, however, that the new

For further particulars and conditions

1951, to the 30th day of November,
of sale, apply to—

both days inclusive.

1951,







COTTLE, CATFORD & CO. By order of the Board of Directors
No. 17, High Street, H. GARNET ST. HILL,
Bridgetown. Secretary
1,11.51—7n 6.11.51—3n. |
: * ©
The undersigned will offer for sale at P bl Off | S l
rane Competition at their office, No. U I€ icla a i
17 High Street, Bridgetown, on Friday,
the 16th day of N ber, 195 (The Provost Marshal's Act 1901
we y ovember 1, at 2 rr ) #90)

The messuage or dwelling-house known t
as HARMONY HALL, standing on 2
Acres, 20 Perches of land, which is en-
closed, situate near Top Rock, Christ
Church, the residence of the late Mrs.
I. A. Clarke,

The dwelling-house contains Open
Verandah, Drawing and Dining Rooms,
3 Bedrooms, Toilet and Bath, Kitchen,
Pantry Garage and Servants Rooms.

Inspection on Tuesdays and Thursdays
eet between the hours of 4 p.m. and

p.m.

For further particulars and conditions
sale, apply to—
Cc , CATFORD & Co

On Tuesday the 13th day of Novem-
ber 1951 at the hour of 2 o'clock ia
the afternoon will be sold at my office
to the highest bidder for any sum not
under the appraised value

All that certain piece of Land con-
teining 4,616 sq. ft. or thereabouts sit-!
uate in Mango Land in the Parish of
St. Peter, butting and bounding on lands
of Sydney Aboab, deceased, on lands
ef The Alexandra School, on lands of
Norman Husbands, on Jands of ome Mr
Harris and a lane commonly known as
Mungo Lane together with the Chattel
Dwelling House thereon and appurten-
ances appraised thereto as follows:-—

The whole property appraised to TWO
THOUSAND FOUR HUNDRED AND
FIFTY DOLLARS ($2,450.00) Attached
from Samuel Timothy for and towards
sstisfaction, &c

N.B.—-25% Deposit to be paid on day

of purchase
W. R. DOUGLAS,
Acting Provost Marshal,
Provost Marshal's Office,
29th October, 1951



of

1.11,51—8n

PERSONAL

The public are hereby warned against
giving credit to anyone in my name as
{ do not hold myself responsible for
anyone contracting any debt or debts in



















my name unless by a written order 31.10. 51—3n
signed by me marino
G. V. BATSON,
Prince of Wales Road, LIQUOR LICENSE NOTICE
Bank Hall, St. Michael
9.11.51—2n The application of Cyril Blackman,
Shopkevper of Ivy Land, St. Michael,
The public are hereby warned against | for permission to sell Spirits, Malt
giving credit to my wife RITA BLACK. | Liquors, &c., at a board and = shingle

shop with shedroof attached at Ivy Land,
St. Michael
Dated this 10th day

ETT (nee GILL) as I do not hold myself
responsible for her or anyone else con-

tracting any debt or debts in my name of November, 1951.

unless by a written order signed by me, |To: E. A. McLEOD, Esq fea
COLEMAN CHESTERFIELD BLACKETT, Police Magistrate, Dist. ‘A
Ros. Hill, * CYRIL BLACKMAN,
Ss. Peter Applicant,

N.B.—This application will be consid-
red at a Licensing Court to be held at
Police Court, Dist. “A” on Tuesday the
20th day of November, 1951, at

. k a.m, *
Se E. A. MecLÂ¥op,
Dist. “A”,

13.11, 51—2n



The public are hereby warned against
giving credit to my wife IVY BOVELL
(nee O’NEALE) as I do not hold myseif
responsible for her or anyone else con-
tracting any debt or debts in my nume
unless by e written order signed by me

CLAYTON BOVELL,
Checker Hail,
St. Lucy

Police Magistrate,







13.11.51—2n,





The public are hereby warned against
against giving credit to my wife ALBER-
THA MARSHALL inee BOVELL) as I do

13.11.51—In
not hold myself responsible for her or
anyone els

}
se contracting any debt or ,
debts in my name unless by a written |
order signed by me Lt
BELFIELD MARSHALL, \\

AT



|
|

}

Allen View,
St. Thomas.
13.11.51—2n.

——s

LOST & FOUND

LOST

SWEEPSTAKE TICKETS—Series G.
8434, to 8438 also 8447, 8448. Finder please





CHURCH VILLAGE,
ST, PHILIP









ON
WEDNESDAY NIGHT



return to H. O. Goodridge, Farm Rd., AT

St. Peter. 13.11, 51—1n ; k h
SWEEPSTAKE TICKET—Series P. 3264. 7.30 oO Cloe s arp
Finder please return same to Marcus

Shepherd, Vaucluse Tenantry, St Supporting the
Thomas. 13.11.51—1n



Candidature of

Mr. D.D. GARNER

Come and Hear the Facts

RACE TICKET—B.T.C. Race Ticket
Series P, No. 7201. Inscribed Lionel
Smith end C. Mayers, Finder rewarded
on returning same to Advocate Advertis-
13.11.51—1n.

TO-DAY'S NEWS FLASH

BROWN'S NAUTICAL ALMANAC
1952

Local views in colour on Christmas
Cards



CHAIRMAN:
Mr. JAMES A. TUDOR

SPEAKERS:
D. D. Garner
G. H. Adams, M.C.P. ,
F. L. Walcott, M.C.P.



Mr.
Mr.
Mr.

Sheath Knives

Press Buttons fitted to your Bag or
Purse while you wait

Mr. J. E. T. Brancker,
, M.C.P.
JOHNSON A SsAOnaNe Dr. H. G. ieoiemine,
HARDWARE

M.C.P.
Mr. E. W. Barrow

Mr. J. C. Tudor
13.11.51.—2n.





“NOTICE



(Defence)
We would appreciate the o

follows: —

RETAIL PRICE

than) (not more than)



case of

29c. per tin
of

case 14c. per tin






ene SHIRT
. ‘ SOPCSOSEPOOOCCTS,
FREE HOOK
Which Makes
GOD’S WAY OF 3
; SALVATION S|
.
>
% PLAIN” |
+. %,
; Please write for one to $I SHIRT D
Samuel Roberts, Gospel a
Book and Tract Service, ¥ |
% 30, Central Avenue, Ban- 3 | Palmetto Street I
® gor N. Ireland.” ¥| Obtainable at all L
Ceciosssese SOOO COCCOTD”

BUY A BETTER

FOR LESS MONEY
@ ‘
RELIANCE

Government has not yet had time
to get a proper grasp of the de-
tails involved and that for thi
reason the talks may be somewha
protracted. The fact that Mr
Alan Lennox-Boyd, the new
Minister of State for Colonia
Affairs, who will undoubtedly
play a leading role in the discus-
sions, is known to be sympathetic
towards the West Indies is also
regarded as a hopeful portent.

Several points in the draf
heads of agreement are not ac-
ceptable to the Commonwealt!
producers. They believe that the
proposed terms of the agreemen
do not sufficiently entrench the
policy of inter - Commonwealth
marketing under preferential con-
ditions or provide complete secur-
iy for expansion programmes

While the producers
that production costs must be
taken into account when prices
are negotiated, they believe there
should be no question of any
Commonwealth producer being
able to institute an inquiry into
the production costs of another
Commonwealth producer, as pro-
posed in the Agreement,

recognive

Limitation
There is also a suggestion in the
proposed Agreement that some

limitation should be placed upon
expor.s of sugar from the Colonies
and Dominions over an eight-year
period. The Commonweaith pro-
ducers cannot accept this unless
Similar undertakings are given by
all parties to the Internationat
Sugar Agreement.
Commonwealth producers re-
d the conclusion of the Com-
monwealth Sugar Agreement, on
reasonable terms, as being of the
utmost importance and they be-
lieve that there is an equal need

for a new International Sugar
Agreement designed to balance
the requirements of the world’s

growing population and the out-
put of the producing countries.
Canadian Agreement

Negotiations which started at
Torquay this year have resulted
in the conclusion in Ottawa of a
sugar agreement under’ which
Canada agrees to buy from the
Dominican Republic during each
of the years 1952 and 1953, 64,500
short tons of raw sugar, an an-
nouncement from Ottawa states.

This represents 43 per cen‘, of
the 150,000 short tons which is
the maximum total quantity of
non-preferential sugar in respect
of which the Canadian Govern-
ment is prepared to enter into
similar negotiations with tra-
ditional suppliers of mon-prefer-
ential sugar. It is understood that
arrangements will be made
whereby Canadian importers will
be permi ted to receive this wear
at the same prices as those laid
down for Commonwealth supplies.
Canada entered into a similar
agreement with Cuba for 75,000
short tons some months ago.

New Chemical

The first basic change in the
processing of raw sugar in 266
years has been developed, accord-
ing to the New York mag*7'»°
Chemical Engineering, The re lt
it claims, is a high-qualitv
duct with higher purity rt a lower
production cos’, according to a
New York report.

In the new process, » purifvin
| powder evled Elguanite replaces
\dime, which has been used
‘purifier since 1685. The new svbh-
1 stance separates dicaolved org2n'e
land mineral impurities in cane



ne

pportunity to quote you for

@ FLAT EVERITE SHEETS
@ TEMPERED HARDBOARD
@ OILED SOAKED HARDBOARD

THE CENTRAL EMPORIUM

Corner Broad & Tudor Streets.



EPOT

Phone 4764
eading Stores



juice and creates a fast filtering
precipitate. The processing of
juice, from mills to evaporators
can be done in 45 minutes, Ii
formerly took from two to five}
hours just to precipitate impur- |
ities.

Earth Metals

The dry white powder is mace
from specially processed alkaline
earth metals in the form of ca
bonates, hydroxides and oxide
Each chemical was picked to reac
with the 20-odd impurities of raw
cane juice. In spite of the fac!
that modern harvesting
increase impurities in the juice
Elguanite removes a high percent
age of the soluble impurities anc
has increased

yields from five
eight per cent
Full capacity operation pos-
sible in mills because of faster

clarification
reduced
normally

Shipping cos s
since the mills woul
ship an extra ton
more of sucrose to market
every ton of product.
costs are cut down and
is increased.

are

or
for

efficiency

A Howaiian mill was the first '0}

adopt the new system, the maga-
zine reports. and more mills wil)
be converted there to use it. Raw
sugar mills in Florida may als
adopt tHe process and a Califor-
rian company is using the Elguan-
ite process in the manufacture

sugars—B.U.P.



of soft

An Official

(From Our ¢



ss
Visit
n Correspondent)

St. GEORGES, Nov. 1
Honourable Mr. D. E
Chief Justice of the
Windward and Leeward Islands,
in the colony on an _ official
visit Work is going on apace
ou a new building at Mt, Whei-
dale which is to be the Chief
Justice's residence

Stop Pyorrliea
In 24 Hours

Bleeding Gums, Loose Teeth and Sore
Mouth mean that you have Pyorrh
Trench Mouth or a bad disease which
sooner or later will make your teeth fall
out and may cause Rheumatism and Heart
Trouble. Stop this disease now with the
new discovery Am . Stops iepelng
gums in 24 hours, ends sore mouth anc
tightens teeth. Iron clad guarantee
Amosan must make your mouth well and
save your teeth or money ok on return
of empty rackage. Get Amosan from your

The
Jackson,

48











s chemist today.
protects you

for Pyorrhea—Trench Mouth
OSes" SPREE LOOCCO SOOO.
. %
4
: §
% BARBADOS ARTS AND :
$
$
$ x
% CRAFTS SOCIETY
2 ¥
%
%
9 »
ee ¥
sg The Seventh Annual Meet- %
ang of the General Assembly s
@® of Members of the above ¥
% Society will be held at %
% Waketield, Whitepark (by x
s kind permission of the Brit- %
% ish Council Representative) %
st on Monday, Dec, 3rd at 8.15 %
%& p.m, to confirm the Annual
@ Report and to elect a Com- 2
g tee ¥
% mittee, s
$ A. MILLS, x
Acting Hon. Sec %&
s %
.








IMPORTANT
NOTICE

Any clothes left at the

following Sanitary Laun

if dry Depots before De
cember 31st, 1950, will
be sold. In future, any

laundry or di ieaning

not redeemeéd after three

month: will be sold.

Country Road
Marhill Depot
Aquatic Depot

St. Lawrence Depot.

2.11.





methods |

Labour |

October 20th, Brisbane October 27th, Sailing Thursday 15th inst. =
arriving at Trinidad about November ‘The M ry CARIBBEE” will
Ist and Barbados November 24th eee Cargo and Passengers for
In addition to general cargo this % Meee a Antigua, Montserrat, ~
| vessel has ample space for chilled and g Sriday one ane Kitts. Sailing
wird frozen cargo, . 4 “; a
Cargo accepted ‘on through Bills of | 9 The M/V “MONEKA® will
Lading for transhipment at Trinidad to A or i and Passengers for
Hritish Guiana, Leeward and Windward | Stats | aad Seen. Sears
slands a . ate oO
For further particulars apply x sailing to be notified
FURNESS, WITHY & CO, LTD., anc] & The M/V “C. L. M. TANNIS*
DaCOSTA & CO. LTD., x will accept Cargo and Passengers
Trinidad, Barbados, % for Grenada and Trinidad. Sail-
MONTREAL, AUSTHaLIA, NEW % ing Friday 16th inst
BW. B.W.t x BWI. SCHOONER OWNERS’
cypirenannee a eee et XN ASSOCIATION (Ine
4 1 Consignee Tele No. 4047
a. sacinthiatnionensator enminapnsiatit adh 6a, naenncingemienncneorieniomoce ria:









PAGE SEVEN
















For Value Plus
Quality
insist on this

labe!



$1.65

wine «2

|

| POINT













BRAND
teagan
ZEALAND LINE, LIMITED
(M.A N @, Line)
| $.8. “PGs ADELAIDE” is schedulec _ The M/V “DAERWOOD” will



eecept Cargo and Passengers for
St. Lucia, Grenada and Aruba.
Passengers only for St, Vincent.

to sail from Hobart September
Melbourne October 4th, Sydney

25th,
October
10th, Gladstone October léth, Port Alma





Gnc.

_——$
















NEW YORK SERVICE
8.8 SABREEZE” sails 3rd November-—arrives Barbados 13th November, 1951
A AMER sails 23rd = November--arrives Barbados 4th December, 1951.
A AMER sails IM4th December —errives Barbados 25th December, 1951
_ —= —-— ~ - — a be
NEW ORLEANS SERVICE
A STEAMER sails 24rd October —arrives Barbados 9th November, 1951,
A STEAMER sails 7th November arrives Barbados 23rd November, 1951.
A STEAMER. sails 2ist Nobember arrives Barbados 7th December, 1951.
ee een
CANADIAN SERVICE
SOUTHBOUND
Sails Sails Arrives
Name of Ship Montreal Halifax Barbados
s8. “ALCOA PEGASUS" Oct. . 26th Oct. 29th Nev. lith
88. “ALCOA PLANTER" Nov. 9th Nov. 12th Nov, 22nd
8. “ALCOA POINTER” Noy, 23rd Nov. 26th Dec. 6th
“A STEAMER" _ Dee. 14th Dec. 24th
A STEAMER" ~ Dec. 28th Jan. Tth
NORTHBOUND wy
83.8. “ALCOA PLANTER" Due Barbados October 15th. Saila |.

for St. Lawrence River Ports. ' :
ROBERT THOM LTD. — NEW YORK AND GULF SERVICE. _.

APPLY:—DA COSTA & CO.. LTD.—CANADIAN SERVICE —-



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From Halifax, N.S., and Montreal,
Expected Arrival
Montreal Halifax St John Dates, Bridgetown,
My aS Barbad

: ‘POLYRIVER WO Oct 5 Noy 21 No

8.8 “SUNVALLEY' 9 Nov 12 Noy — 28 Novenie:

8.8. “SUNPRINCE 21 Noy, 26 Nov 12 December

5.8 A VESSEL + 15 Dee, 17 Dee 2 January

UNITED KINGDOM SERVICE
From Newport, Liverpool and Glasgow









Expected
Artival
Newport Liverpool Glasgow Dates
a.s. “SUNWHIT" Nov 16 Noy 21 Nov 7 Deeibee
UNITED KINGDOM AND CONTIN





Expected Arrival
Antwerp Rotterdam London Dates, Barbades
8.8 Be
8.8

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Agents $ PLA T

17 Oct
15 Noy

20 Oct
18 Nov

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22 Nov,

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5 December

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PAGE EIGHT
Robinson
Vs Turpin

In June

NEW YORK.

George Gainford, manager of
the world middleweight cham-
pion, “Sugar” Ray Robinson, has
stated in New York that Rob-
inson will go to Europe ih late
March or early April and possi-
bly remain there until late sum-
mer, with a title fight in London
against Randolph Turpin. He
will probably defend his title
against Turpin in June, said Mr.
Gainford.

When he returned from Europe,
if he still has the title, he will
defend it in America against
any logical challenger who can
be found. But said Mr. Gainford,
jf there is no legitimate chal-
lenger of his weight, then Robin-



son will seek a bout with the
world light-heavyweight champ-
ion, Joe Maxim, either title or metropolis.
non-title.
—B.U.P.

Another Boxing
Champ From B.G.?

LONDON.
British boxing writers are
praising Al Brown, aq lightweight

Heading

ROVAL

IN THEIR SKY-BLUE convertible the Royal Couple drove through
by one and a half million enthusiastic Canadians, packed 8-deep in the

~ Cable and Wireless

For Win

THE SECOND day’s play in the seventh round of
Intermediate Cricket matches ended on Saturday.

Cable

eer eae a ~~ & Wireless are in a strong position to score an outright
Satga. eta adhe. fies “fight in victory over Mental Hospital at the Mental Hospital
Britain last March. grounds. iS y

In his latest bout, he defeated After batting the whole of the n eee 7 : 2
a Welsh boxer, Tommy Jones, ‘irst day and scoring 184 runs, SPARTAN vs. WINDWARD

Cable & Wireless dismissed Men-
tal Hospital in their first innings
for 72 runs on Saturday. Bowling
for Cable & Wireless C. B. Lawless

with a right cross which finished
the fight in one minute and 55
seconds of the second round.
One boxing expert who saw the

fight declared: ‘“‘He showed that neaee i ee for at —
§ i ; s re + and J. Roberts three wickets for
he is going to be a figure in the ts" ,ins. R. McKenzie took two

“Ttis Rls Tint ten poig~4
British Empire rankings. viskete das DA rune.



Another West Indian boxer With 112 runs ahead, Cable &
who is being watched by the Wireless lost six of their wickets
British experts is Eric Thompson, for 55 runs when play ended on

the second day.

Windward who were 240 runs
for the loss of five wickets at the
end of the first day’s play, carried
. their first innings score to 268
giuns for 8 wickets declared on
Saturday Spartan replied with
124 runs, N. Wood the opening
batsman hit 62 runs to topscore.

R. Farmer was the best bowler

a Jamaican who has fought before
in England. At present, he is a
sparring partner to Ray Wilding,
the British heavyweight hope.
B.U.P.



U.K. Soccer Results



LONDON, Nov. 12 or Windward and his final bowl-

Following are the results of Soccer Mn anal s was four overs, one
matches played in the United Kingdor * . "7 P -r avickets

én Saturday aaiden, 15 runs, four »wickets, H,

ENGLISH LEAGUE DIVISION 1 “armer after sending down ten

Arsenal 6, West Bromwich Albion 3.
Aston Villa 0; Charlton Athletic 2
Blackpool 6; Newcastle United 3,
Chelsea 4; Manchester United 2,
Derby County 5; Fulham 0.
Huedersfield Town 1; Tottenham Hot-
spur 1.
Liverpool 1; Bolton Wanderers 1.
Manchester City 2; Middlesbrough 1.

overs took three wickets and con-
ceded 23 runs, Windward in their
second innings have collected 13
runs without loss.

In the Regiment-Wanderers fix-
ture, Regiment have gained a first
innings lead over Wanderers who

Portsmouth 4; Stoke City 1. scored 132 runs in their first turn
Sunderland 0, Burnley 0. at the wicket. Regiment replied
Wolverhampton Wanderers 1, Preston with 169 runs, Skipper Ishmael,

North End 4.

ENGLISH LEAGUE DIVISION 2%
Barnsley 3; Leicester City 3.
Blackburn Rovers 0; Cardiff City 1.
Bury 8; Southampton 2,

Coventry City 1; Doncaster Rovers 2.
Hull City 0; Birmingham City 1
Luton Town 5; Sheffield Wednesday 3.
Notts County 1; Leeds United 2
Queen's Park Rangers 2; Rotherham

topseoring with 34 runs,

At the end of play Wanderers
had scored 73 runs and lost seven
wickets in their second innings.

Ai the Garrison, Pickwick bat-
ting the whole day knocked up
147 runs for the loss of six wic-

kets in their first innings in re-
Waoneia Unliea 1; Nottingham Forest PlY to 116 runs scored by Empire
4. on the first day of play.

Swansea Town 0; Everton 2. The Pickwick opening batsman

TeUtGhes Lakain hieknos ‘ E. Evelyn scored 52 runs.

Southern Bournesmouth and Boscomb Scores



















Athletic 1; Plymouth Argyle 2 REGIMENT vs. WANDERERS AT BAY
Brighton and Hove Albion 4; Watford ,« Wanderers First Innings — 182
1 3 Regiment First Innings
Bristol City 1; Leyton Orient 1 A. Ishmael ¢ wk. (Lewis) b Corbin 34
Gillingham 3; Aldershot 3 R. Parris run out 12
Ipswich Town ©; Walsall) 1. J. Bynoe Lb.w. b Packer 10
Milwall Bristol Rovers Tie "A, Phillips ¢ wk. (Lewis) b Corbin 11
Newport County 4, Exeter City 0 R. Bispham b Proverb: 25
Northampton Town 5, Crystal Palace 2. 7J. Brathwaite b Ramsay 25
Port Vale—Swindon Town 2 tie R. Price c Patterson b Field 25
Reading 4; Colchester United 2 Crawford b Ramsay 5
Southend United 2; Norwich City 1 4 © stpd, (wk. Lewis) b Field 3
Torquay United 3; Shrewsbury Town 2. V. 8 stpd. (wk, Lewis) b Field 0
J » not out 1
ENGLISH LEAGUE DIVISION Extras 18
Northern Bradford City 1; Working-
ton 0 Total 169
Chester 4: Carlisle United 2 BOWLING ANALYSIS
Crewe AJexandra 3; Bradford 4 oO M R w
Darlington 2; Wrexham 1. J. Corbin 12 1 36 2
Gateshead 1; Chesterfield 1 tie Cc. Packer 12 1 42 1
Hartlepool United 3; Barrow 1 G. Skeete 5 1 20 9
Lincoln City 2; Accrington Stanley 2 H. Ramsay C25 Rl °
Oldham.Athlei'e 1, Grimsby Town 1 P. Patterson RANG) ee C Gera. |
tle, M. Proverbs ST eg
Scunthorpe United 3; Rochdale 1 A. Field 2 0 ye
Southport 3; Halifax Town 2 Wanderers Second Innings
Transmere Rovers 1; Mansfield Town Seale run out 9
1 tie H yne b Clarke 6
Lincoli “City 2; Accriogton Stanley 2 4 e Crawford b Phillips 5
tio G Lb.w. b Phillips 4
Oldham Athletic 1, Grimsby Town P Fun out 16
tic I rbs c & b Watts 4
Scunthorpe United 3; Rochdale 1 1 b Clarke *
Southport 3; Halifax Town 2 . Ch not out 15
Transmere Rovers 1, Mansfield Town % Corbin not out *
1 tie Extras 6
York City 0; Stockport County 1 * a E
SCOTTISH LEAGUE DIVISION A Potah (tan '% wietaid *
Aberdeen 4, Partick Thistle 2 oy xhaea . "a18 mee
Hearts 4; Queen of the South 3 BOWLING ANALY 7 B
Morton 2; Hibernian 1 \. Phillips v - zB ¥
Motherwell 2, Dundee 1 - Glare -o 3 : a ?
Raith Rovers 1, Airdrieonians 1 tie. ; Bun 2 ae 3 ;
Rangers 5, St. Mirren 1 y w tts 5 i 17 1
Stirling Albion 2; Celtic 1 a hatte ee ae
Third Lanark 1, East Fife 3 1 Clarke 3. 0 3 0
SCOTTISH LEAGUE DIVISION B. EMPIRE vs. PICKWICK AT GARRISON
Albion Rovers 1; St. Johnstone 0 Empire First Infings — 116
Arbroath 2; Falkirk 4 f£, Evelyn ec Griffith b Prescod 52
ovely : cor 5:
Ayr United 2; Cowdenb th 1 BE. Lewis b Skeete 19
Clyde 4; Alloa Athietic *.° ri Moore not out 31
Dumbarton 8; Forfar Athletic 1 #. Evelyn c Austin b Griffith 10
Dundee United 1; Kilmarnock 0 M. Foster c Amory b Skeete 1
Dunfermline Athletic 3; Hamilton mR Clarke b Prescod 10
Academicals 0 H. Kidney ec Barrow b Amory 8
Stenhouse-Muir 3; Queen's Park 4 Extras 10
IRISH LEAGUE nM
Bangor 1; Derry City 1 tie. Total (for 6 wkts,) 147
Cliftonville 1; Glenavon 4
Coleraine 7; Crusaders 2 BOWLING ANALYSIS
Distill Linfield 2 tie. Oo M R Ww
Glentoran 8; Ards 1 Cc. Prescod 16 2 32 2
Portadown 5; Ballymena United 0 « Spooner 13 4 0
—C.P. ‘. Harris 9 1 0
Amory 10 1

ARMLOADS OF THE FIRM’

MAIL. ,AND
BIGDOME'S TOO BUSY. Th

NOTICE





WINDWARD—FPirst Innings 208
SPARTAN—Ist Innings
N. Wood b R. Farmer 62
H. Cadogan c Farmer b H. Farmer 0
A. Gittens b H. Farmer 0
‘. Wood b. H. Farmer 2
B, Morris run out “ 25
S. Parris ¢ Thornton b R. Farmer 1
W. Jemmott c H, Farmer b R
Farmer 4
KF. MeComie b Thornton 12
N. Medford b R. Farmer 0
Cc. Skinner not out 13
A. Matthews absent 9
Extras : 5
Total 124
BOWLING ANALYSIS
Qo M R Ww
H. Farmer 10 3 23 3
D. Wilkie 2 0 6 0
R. Atkinson 9 0 32 0
Cc. Thornton 5.5 0 16 1
R. Farmer 4 1 15 4
B. Farmer 7 1 26 0
E. Bvelyn 1 0 4 0
WINDWARD—2nd Innings
Cc. Thornton not out 9
E, Evelyn not out 2
Extras 2
Total (for no wkts. 13
-
CABLE & WIRELESS vs. MENTAL
HOSPITAL
CABLE & WIRELESS—Iist Innings 1st
MENTAL HOSPITAL—Ist Innings
Cc. Best b Lawless . 17
Quintyne b Lawless 6
Williams c & b Roberts 2
. Boyee b Roberts 2
‘. Springer 1b.w. b Roberts 1
R, Chase ¢ (sub) b Lawless 12
M. Crichlow c (sub) b Lawless 8
N. Burrowes b Lawless 10
R. Rock b McKenzie 5
V. Carter not out
Cc. Knight b McKenzie 4
Extras 5
Total . Pry 72
BOWLING ANALYSIS
oO M R w
R. A. Lawless 4 2 3 0
R. B. Me nzie ll 3 28 2
Cc. B. Lawless 12 0 23 5
J. Roberts 5 1 13 3
CABLE & WIRELESS—2nd Innings
R. McKenzie 1,b.w. b Williams 1
B. Matthews b Rock ae 7
R. Lawless b Knight 27
Cc. Seale b Williams 7
Cc, Lawless b Chase 0
S. Gilkes b Williams 6
J. Roberts not out 1
Extras 6

Total (for 6 wkts.) 55

In Touch With Barbados
Coastal Station

Cable and Wireless (West Indies) Lid

advise that they can now communicate

with the following ships through their
Barbados Coast Station



S.S. Alcoa Poamer; s.s. Sunwalt; 8.8
Canadian Challenger; s.s. Colombie; 5.4
Alcoa Pennant, s.s, Tista, s.s. Dolores;
#.s. Ampac California; s.s. Del Sud;
8.8. Riotunuyan, 68.8. Sangamon, § s
Seapearl; s.8. Mormacgulf; s.s. Chris-
tian Holm; s.s. S. s.8. Andrew
Marschalk, 8.8. Rita, ss. Trun:; 8.9





WHAT’S ON TODAY

Police Courts 10, a.m.

Court of Grand Sessions
10.00 a.m,

Barbados Labour Party
Meeting in support of Mr.
R. G. Mapp and Dr. Cum-
mins at Prout Village,
St. Thomas 8.00 p.m,

Barbados Labour Party
Meeting in support of Mr.

G. H, Adams and Mr.
L. E, Smith at Mayers
Corner, St. Joseph 8.00
Pp. m,

Electors Association Meet-
‘ing at Horse Hill, St.
Joseph, in support of Mr.
W. R. Coward 8.00 p.m.

Police Band Concert at Has-
tings Rocks in aid of the
Almair Home 8.00 p.m.

Mobile Cinema at Britton’s
Hill area, St. Michael
8.00 p.m.

AND™ WOT HOPPEN €

HERE'S WOT HOPPEN !!

THANX TO
C.S AND M.S.,
BELLINGHAM,



WELCON

BARBADOS ADVOCATE









e 4

75 miles of Montreal streets, where they were greeted

suburbs and massed in thousands in the heart of the
(Federal Newsphoto.)

Police Beat New S. Wales Wins
H. College Friendly Ganie

NEW SOUTH WALES defeated
Police defeated Harrison College Sweethome when these two teams
by an innings and 66 runs on Played a one-day friendly cricket
Saturday, the last day in the ninth “fixture at Sutherland, St. Lucy,
round of Second Division cricket yesterday,

matche Harrison College bat- Batting first, New South Wales
fing first on a perfect wicket scored 102 runs and they skittled
were bowled out for 27 runs and out Sweethome for 54 runs.

Police replied with 138 runs. W. Cadogan and D. Lewis, each

In their second turn at the scoring 26 runs, were best scorers
wicket Harrison College again of New South Wales. D. Hus-
fared badly and were all out for bands scored 23 out of Sweet-
45 runs. C. Springer who held a home’s total of 54 runs.
steady length throughout the in- Bowling honours of the day
nings took five wickets for 19' went to S. Lewis of New South
runs, Wales who took 7 wickets for 14

Carlton won their match against Tuns in 6 overs. The other three
Foundation by innings and 75 Sweethome wickets were taken by
runs. Foungation in tneir tirst S- Griffith for 14 runs in 7 overs.
innings knocked up 109 runs and Bowling for Sweethome, J. Year-
Carlton after shaky start scored wood and C. Grant took 5 wickets
234 runs for the loss of seven each for 22 and 20 runs respec-
wickets. tively.

Foundation

an

were dismissed for

p2 runs in their second innings.
R. Edghill took three wickets for,
20 runs. }

Empire and Central also scored
outright victories over Y.M.P.C.|

and Combermete respectively.
Empire in their match with
Y.M.P.C. scored 111 runs in their |

first innings after they @ismissed
Y.M.P.C,

for 48 runs. Failing to)
prevent the follow on, Y.M,P.C.
were skittled out for 51 runs in|

their second innings. Best bowling
performance for Empire was given
by C. Beckles who took four |
wickets for nine runs. Thus Em-
pire won by an innings and 12
runs, |

Compbermere in their first in-|
nings scored 115 runs and Central
hit 151 runs in their turn. With
a first innings lead of 36 runs,
Central skittled out Combermere |
in their second turn at the wicket
for 80 runs. R. Branker top-
scored for Combermere. He made |
a stubborn 25,

adi Bo teh Bin pn
_ Needing 45 runs for victory, ee
Central at the end of play had | &
scored 47 runs for two wickets 1x
sy
Â¥.M.P.C. vs, EMPIRE S
Y.M.P.C. First Innings 48 1
Empire First Innings 111 for 7 x
| declared %
(E. Gill 22, O. Burke 7 wickets for | %
43 runs). |
Y.M.P.C. Second Innings 51 (D.}
Edghill 20, W. Hoyos 13, C. Beckles 4|
wickets for 9 runs) j



COMBERMERE vs, CENTRAL
Combermere First Innings 115.
Central 151 (EB. Weekes 30, R

Branker 4 wickets for 27 runs)
Comberme Second Innings 80 (R.
Branker 25, V, King 3 wickets for 12

runs)
Central Second Innings

Harrison College Second Innings
'C. Springer 5 wickets for
Sealy 2 wickets for

CARLTON vs,

Foundation First

Cariton First
wickets

Foundation Second
Edgehill 3 wickets for

- 45
19 runs, D
10 runs).

FOUNDATION |
Innings — 109, \
Innings 234 for 7



$ at KNIGHT'S

|
|
|





Britons Have Done
A Magnificent Job
SAYS BUSTAMANTE |

From Our Own Correspondent

LONDON, Nov. 12
Bustamante arriving in London
this afternoon had this to say:

“The people of Britain have done
a magnificent job in providing gifts
and interest free loans for the re-
habilitation of Jamaica's hurricane
homeless. This time Britain has
treated us not as brothers or sis-
ters-in-law but as partners. And
we are grateful.”

Reasons which he is prepared to
disclose and some which he is not
yet prepared to talk about have
brought Bustamante to England.
They are the annual revision of

prices provided for in the long
term banana contract: the long
term Commonwealth sugar con-

tract—“I am not heading the sugar
delegation but you can say I am
tremendously interested in sugar”
—and finally the decision as to
how the gifts and interest free loan
shall best be used to put Jamaica
back on her feet.

Japanese Cotton
Wants $40m. Loar

WASHINGTON, Novy. 11.

The Export-Import Bank will
make its final decision on the ap-
plication for a loan to support
Japan’s cotton industry during
the next two weeks, an official of
the Bank said on Morfay. 2

He said a $40,000,000 loan is
being studied and an analysis of
the requirement of Japan’s indus-
try has delayed the final decision
with the Agency had expected to
announce last week.

The official pointed out there
is no reason to believe that be-
cause of this delay Japan will not
qualify for the loan,

He said that the Export-Import
Bank has extended several loans
to cotton industries of other na-
tions, The request was made som¢
time ago by Japan’s Premier
Slugeru Yoshda. He outlined to
the Bank Japan’s needs with re-
spect to marketing and other re-
quirements of cotton, —U.P.



J ee} 47 runs for | THE NEW ANTISEPTIC VAPOURISING OINTMENT x

2 wickets a ee c %
HARRISON COLLEGE vs. POLICE for use in cases of local congestion and %
Harcison Colleur First Innings 27 inflamation, head and chest colds, coughs, .
Police First In s.ngs 138

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TUESDAY, NOVEMBER 13,

PAINS of PILES

Stopped in 10 Minutes

itching and torment from Piles
Diice the discovery of Hytex (formerly
known as Chinaroid). Hytex starts to

1951



CRYPTOQUCTE Ne. 105
ECL, ECLWSBL [CCQMSR CQ
DCcOP G QSFU ECLWSBL
QPFQP QWGE

has

Last Crypt: A
and cannot stand; but

lie no legs
it has
wings, far and

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and can fly
—Warburton





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POLITICAL
MEETING

TO-NIGHT

At LOWER BLACK
ROCK

the
of

VINCENT GRIFFITH
of

In Support of
Candidature



eat an

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bout f
oat ShAW ill, Gah

the Parish
St. Michael.

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l'Ac.i i oil: BARBADOS ADVOCATE TUESDAY, VOMMRII! 13. I9SI B\RR\I)OS_ A0V r OOCTE i . f*. %  — i I III IUIIII I S IKIIMI THE %  • %  tOE" November II IS1 Ml HIM I I AST THK el up a foui Middle l .it.eant of the hardening of America's policy in the : a (our-powej proposal was delivered in Cairo 00 Octothe Middle Eastern policy .f the • id been officially described Now it lias set. Amerii with Britain, .1 iha dftfaDM of the vital MuUii. Baft, ifaowi not only an [•urtance of this area, %  %  Lo) i .)itiiciii',it's in the M US ""t solely due to "starchy" British diplomacy. Aiiici: nen have recently been underlining what the United States thinks General Eisenhower was continuing the line ol thought of the late Admiral Sherman I Lost month that "so far at the iheer value ol territorj is concerned there if no oaora strategically important an., than the Mi.ldli1 Admin tnmandrr fur the Mediti i I n Atlantic, told journalists on October 24lh. that •'the defence <>f tho Middle East would be utterly wrecked it the Canal Zone base i in allied handi." But American awakening to her own Middle Eastern interests and to the fact that a line must be drawn in that area to acts which favour only the expansion of Communism and the Snviet Empire is not indicative of any bellicose intention on the part of the Four Powers. The proposal! put forward on October lath in Cairo invited Egypt M perflcipate In the defence ol tho Middle East: to join, as it were, a military club as . club in which national armies wmild act together in the interests refused i<> Join and her I dispute with Greet Britain shows no dgns of any chassa ol heart Vet the terms Setting OUt the details of the new fourpo\vi : m the Middle East leave a way open for Enypt and other Middle Eastern Countries to Joan In preatetiiifl thai vital ;ne.i lion: Ogg T Oll l On. In its essentials the defence of the Middle East ts no lofigel a question as to whether European powers should have a sphere of influence in a strategic part of the world : it is limply choice between the protection of the M i in any possible conflict i ( % %  i. ,-, Powers and the Untied States or Us !"< to Soviet imperialism. The lead which the I Franre and Great Britain have tfiven the world in calling lor disarmament, the ringing Churchilliun rhetoric thrown into the battle t"i peace are solemn .i-^urances of the peaceful intentions of the West. At the same tune Russia's refusal to consider these proposals and her continued wearisome accusations against the United States on whom BOO lays responsibihtv f .r the very race to arms that President Truman is so anxious to halt, forces lh,> Western powers to complete their plans for defrnee ot the Middle East The announcement that the plan will not interfere with the sovereignty "f '"dividual Middle Eastern stales is a neceslary precaution U> convince then that the four powers have no intentions in the Middle East other than the preservation o( world peace. Their experiences in the last war will not easily remove the suspicions of the Arab States. British imperialism is somethin which they actually experienced and haw not liked: Russian imperialism is on unknown factor, distant and not Mfed with the intensity of fear known to Europeans. But in addition there is the immediate national reaction to interference of any kind in their own affairs. Che recent annoancehnent is a welpome D that the peace of the world is not goinn to be recklessly jeopardised by the loss of a vital area. But the Middle Eastern %  ftuatton is none the les serious for that. \ Ui/.inl >lo* s In Ai \K 10 IK Joseph (.iirrilt BerUti Mil lo meUnchul> I.ord CfierwoU t aw I i -ii back ID Downing 'Ailh Churchill and Chw•'igliiHiurs at No, 10 and So II. Britain'* future is going to iinythuiK 1ml dull rd Cl nsmem %  > ll in I he nov... return la the %  %  -I in the mr-wtnalai Government %  JK-Iadviser lo the %  Trie professor, "mv f: I ears," as Churchill has written of him. is 1 %  : will in 1941 IB, i otnpunilively uni.lMde Oxford own d*%  tall, i ..I Jig *< .. After taking his 1'h.IJ ..t Jlerlin r b l ** '.ui 11) in 1011. ie went to melancholy.' But Cnurcml. I collaborate with other knows better 1, %  I physicists in the study of radio"SI found a scintillating torn actlvtij linn lo America as a i ''' •it Chicago l.'iuveraity. Tliougii a scientist by profi-sl n the war, aa an Oxford %  Ion. Cher well is mi\ I ilemann made important philosopher, economist, end Bl'.i. a variety of ventor by inclination, '"dies He once caused an envious sti. liul neither Ihow peaceful puin. Ihe Lords by earning, aormi suit, nor Oxford's calm could a heat wave, a home-made portdispel his fear that another war able electric fan operated bv a was coming. flash-lamp battery used that "ihe air-plane Churchill, himself a chompio Professor "'"' S n S? >d ,he holc ou,look ,n in the art of using words, is en war. That was Why he never ,oyably stimulated b> „,„,,*,*,.,. -„,,. . £ lax< *L h ,' *"."" ii ,*H£'* * %  •* Invective. Professor ,.f Experimerrtal "".J* obl !" of j"' d t fence Once, wben Lore Cberwell tva __ parednesa in the air. and as a K he wi often deiribed' ;S2L I -I1 ,,il lh ,nr aldwln 2*T >' ernmeni s apathy the non-polltlcal professor contested, unsuccess__. Oxfo„l University Laboratory o little about riim Cabinet Actunll. >-t-Tl—• g^ij liition in the Lores, i. bolgi interrupted with Vrnat our a 1 u.'rnative Airud laughter, tht Pn>l When I sil on th* tient-h (the Government side \intwhi,.i,, ,he House) I will Mil Apprehension Occasionally he MtM ChurrhiU reveaU in his Lords with feaU of ment.H aril emoirs how their mutual appremetic invulvmg millions, Ai ode him and Undemann he Is equally at home in dabafc lampooning psychiatrutv • Europe ii:,inlng of the Imporl .in artist.s "lik. club ilnaar who call* herwlf MtdrUI .ind gpeetalleai In leenr because >>f hi* mod%  %  MottflC genii. m' l39. henslon BUUed bU en t epotter Chunhill firmer friends. \.iid his "ii HI.' The puir travelled %  .i before together investigating tfaStl peabLindemann had won the D.S.O. lem. r.C. pUot and wee Dtrectoi in ifl3e. when Churchill nf Uie Aeronautical Research unnniinced that Germany, was KVI'J^ I rough leanniiiK Undemann made a Old tliaOMb) i* !l1 *rlp to Tangier, where his Same >. n i M cKi.irhiH '""lend was on holiday. Winston and the 'Prof gfeai „,,„..irs Churchill AflM Vm& y ^ n of ( |nw w ,_ |hp u|n|i ^^ (pf humou( ..— *_ — laboratlnn it Is hardtx surprising On a visit to the Monte Carl hen Churchill tells u that "this Sporting Club iho professor wa Same Brand In "I.indeniii ,,1,1 rriend el %  had me* first at the close of th< previous war, in Ungulshed himself the air a number of R pleasant and fertile association usked „ L*i.^h K. 4t continued throughout the war." "Yoimg u t\!i,ix „as "*— bnman..., rsso; u i.•Hi,teams j Nothing In played repl ied be lawi nwletb ine doi of prob 1T1K III III..Ill .i I"!"!"-. - Of,l.llie.Hl — esparlnseate, hitherto reserved P^ooucea. f the b • In the Hi Before a crowd of onlookers %  I i .in.Til H "•ulctde,' 1 be deliberately plunged I.I .niii.ifl into a .vpinning (Ufl -ami landed without a Hcratch. Has Travelled md many times since, 1 i -f.' %  vindicated his conrlctloe shat "one who has got his figures correct need not fear Streets midnight having his accounts checked." doubt burn or l.ikChurehUL Undemann pwhaps as long, i as at 30. a widely travelled man. the war, d< light* Cherwc joke ni; • The anwwrr to Ihe maonetlc •nine: rhe entr aircraft balloon bevrsaSf ihe means of herulino a radio beam SO aWled enemy bombers; %  Window." tlufin/oil d>etmfu$g tas eassajr*e mifl-airrro/t radar irirlallunous, and airborne radar mhlch helped to defeat the If boats. As the new atom chief. Lord first mov e will cerlo free aclenuss from lbs civil Bervlee itralt-JacBsi First Move He expects to stimulate protheir beetroot. I think gross in research by encouraging t-egln" than with better pay and A good match, these conditions. markable eranii Now that "Master" and "Prof" No, 10 and No. U might, together again Downingot State permit:ing. enjoy brightly, or it did during in the dayti who will be more wan self. A Good Match He was highly amused whs Churchill once wiMCraCSSd iilx'ihl* diet, for Ihll bachelor, non %  raoksr, taatota|er i also a veie tartan With fcllnw-vcgelartan Si Stafford Cripps. Lord I was late for one of Churchill' uncr War Cabinet.Ot) arrival, after hnliliiii: II the meeting for several minuter they heurd Mr Churchill taj with a wry smilt Now that ..u olleasuai hn\r ilotn it Si.lmo'uth. Devon, of lt ther,will U> a warmer the 'Prof.' IN reputed to be suet AI ..ii.ir, ,ii ..:: %  p.. rnanl nm-.fOdai gloei 10001 It now. %  etsanl el Lexicon Ibal ba DS of his youth on the Continent. ChUfChlll will have more time lo even build a word out o I e/M 1 lu sled in Germany. enjoy incompanionship. W. X. Y and / — L.B.8. .Easy To Trip Up In T1W lliisr By BERNARD WICKSTEED I've been down at the Houses of Parliament this week lindmn out e/nai tt'i iik.tu be a pas MI', and what I say is "Hrnther. >vu can keep the job. AMD UH that goes with it." Celling yourself elected t* niitlimg. it'* the things you've got to learn when you're In. Why, it's worn than joining the Army. Up to Parliament vou drive th vow cheat full of pride at It is also a sin to put so much a to*over the red lines at the :lge of Ihe Chamber's greet irpct. These lines are two an half sword-lengths apart, am because the only occasion it is "" needed is in the rare event ol "' opponents. men,I--, muitlng to ,.,is, .. t ......t %  i '' k '" *>"* constituency yo. el order ifter a division has been f lher fancied your free-and ; ,IUH easy platform style But it won %  HMO there's smoking. The new *• *"' rr m >' *^A M speeches unle here mn >".i enssn IUII -.1 prrae %  m „„. h ^_ „ ,(,.„,, f !" "a nufl in madt to ,he SpeaKeri because then when fearful 1 the populace, licensing hours the new boy he can't sit on the the House of Loidf. because in ihe Commons It doosn'i exist. You refer to it as "the other place." Above all, you must never mention another member's name. Is alwavs Hie honourable-m bar who has just sat d or the honourable and gallantmemoer-for-so-and-so. Your Notei ne Pel e Yard without a permit from the i.nd Oreal Chamberlain. ',,'" hat deflated bv this set*% cm A. .. „ ._ _, M p ,, i to „., On the thcr hand. BO caojat n uitlvit Ming noticed, like .. %  • '"'"^ whcnevei he likes, tew DOB It l> bOOl, bW On all because whatever hardships ParIdem ofllcials stare at hlnl aid (uunenl impows each other till he's r f5f nl,Wl !" i;.>in| to be Oirown Into for Itself. the r 1 Ol London. Now **> !" Actually he || being stared .'.t soing to sit ilv because the ofileials want * f! now ; s ]„., QI, ,„,. fi Ill bench, Inn if he takes %  Once IruUe, the Dm mambei scat In nc t rt ^ c ./?**;^"'K You musln't read a newspa,,. Pf. "* "L?J*y.t P„ n * lt .-?* P n g^ or book in the House. but even sod, ., simple operation ui'wnUen la v to siome agelng 8nou dn t pven nayr thl fniuglll with parliilegislator who cuis had it for genspfrech (Ihou|(n mosl mpn mentaiN tradition. tH-causo mt4ons. v-^h— *> %  because they might fall |nt, ,tl.,ehcd I • " %  l'K 1%  loop of U he sits ,n any of thelmcMl (hc h ihe King, ed Upe that seems to have no beyond the tar. eg., Ihoeeat '^ Yllu see lh( Kin ttil pOuJblc purpose opposite end lo *^ Speaker, he b ugbl-ar of Parliament, and „ „ raeanl to, henglu your can Uetso to t what.gaaijei.^bui ne wa S uppnxi to See sword on. but how is a harmless he won t l>e alLnved to speak him^ ^^ ^rr new boy with n.nhmg more self. r lhp nfW member BBdH lethal than an umbrella lo know. Your Speech getting dark in the House he Bwores (end. •pure) are barred At last, having parked his car doesn't Just ask someone lo in Parliament, and have to be correctly, refrained from smoking sw Hch on the lights. He calls out left in the cloakroom. A ScuUish |rj iihe corridors, hung up his "Candles '" %  was called to order once BWOf d and removed his spurs, the Thrt's only the start of th. ne (or appea r ing Wnul •' tolle In hw rjew b0) catchee the Speakers bov's education. If you want to elusive eye and steps out Into Ihe hlll u lhp IeBt ot nls syUebul Yoiir IIlM gangway to make the '[KIVII that vn „ M )md it ,„ ., bead* book Ol -, ,.! in have In kn i an will move IBS eaano 1,057 pages called "Parliament..i | iwful lot al-^it when and where At once there are devastating practice." by Sir Thomas to wear vour hat in Parliament, cries of "Order, order, for stepErskine. Tie 15th edition wail w BMl SOW leave ll on th %  ping Into the lariMas Mik ,,„U 411,. With vour mind at peace. Is a parliamentary sin. —L.E.fl !>eg This Drug Spells SAFETY... By CM IN AN P1NCHKK A DRUG which enab'es surReons b furm intricate operations more skilfully and mure swiftly than ever before is being tested in Rutish hospitals. It almost eliminates !oss of blood when tissues are cut Trials so far have shown that the drug provides three great advanta^< ONE: By reducing the nsk of scverel haemorrhage it makes operations TWO: :t enables the surReon to operate more surely and more rapidly bc< issues are not obscured. THREE: By reducing the shock of surgery t helps patients to make a quicker recoveryl ifti i operations. The drug -it is called hexamclhonium bromide—acts by causing a rapid fall in blmxl Bj pi upping the patient in different doeUioOl the surgeon can make any part of alroott bhHKtleaa. The patient's blood pressure can be restored rapidly to normal by an injection. Pr. Gcorue Hale Underhy. anaesthetist of the Royal National Orthopaedic Hospital. was Ihe first to try out the drug in an operation He has used it successfully on more than 250 patients ranging in age from 11 to 78. Doctors and surgeons from other hospitals have met Dr. Enderby in London lo compare their experiences with the drug. Verdict: "It .s proving particularly valuable in plastic %  iurgery and in deafness operations." Dr Enderby warned that only highly experienced anaesthetists can use the drug safely, which is still experimental. M u HIM TELLS ^THAT elegant dog breed, the red Irish setter, is-afflicted with a mst distlOnVing hereditary eye complaint. Some of the pups seem normal, but within iix months they cannot see in dim light; .•ventually they become totally blind. As there is no likelihood of a cure, scienisis have been trying to find a way of detectng afflicted puppies so that they may be Humanely destroyed. Today, scientists of Newmarket's finely •quipped Canine Research Station report success. They have discovered that the disl M can be detected by an electrical machine I De ore a P u Ppy s one month old. i few The machine records the minute electric Ka n,!r hll^^^' l ii*^?.!; """rents generated by healthy eyes. The oyet of a pup destined to go blind give no current • at all. • SOUNDER SLEEP J^, A SLEEPING TABLET said to be so safe that even a huge overdose is harmles* has been discovered by U.S. scientist--. In a six-month test 134 sufferers from in somnia found (hat the drug usually put them soundly to leep in less than half an hour. "The sit *p was restful and the patients ex perienced no hangover." doctors of N< v. j York's Metropolitan Hospital report today An overdose of the tablets products <-\ trcmely deep sleep. But there is no riangei Unlike barbiturates, the new drug, s.iv U* doctors, does not lower the breathing rate DOCTOR VETTED ^.BRITAIN'S vets are hankering .itti title. Convinced that they will novel train the public to call them "veterinary surgeons," they are now agitating to be culled "doctor." Down-to-earth vets are opposing thechOJijfi — for a surprising reason They point out tha' the word "vet" has a much higher standnu in the language than "doctor." Their argument : "To vet" anything is ai honourable act. but "to doctor" it has a dis reputable ring. YOUR MOVE J^. A TRANSATLANTIC chess match be j tween two giant robot "brains" is bcim | planned by British and American scientists Britain's challenger will be MUC. tht • .'1.500-valve "brain" housed at Manchester University. When Dr. Alan Turing baa tuned it up. MUC—short for Manchester University Computer—should be able to think several moves ahead. First chess-board opponent lined up foi MUC is Prinny, a new "brain" being bull at Princeton University. %  A r*vord*d In IM column lail rtt'. doetot arc u>lns Ihli machine lo diatnoar human *vr esSHSi —L.K.S. FOR FINEST CHRISTMAS CARDS Call and Select Early from lUVOt All MATIO.MIIIV. 1 oin i: it's -vl FL l SI'H I 1 II U.I. %  rS VHI ,,U! .Vest" und vxlrvntvly fffwtivf vumliinvil Tin und Sprayvr. \ tui. SILENT KNIGHT KEROSENE REFRIGERATORS a O.VI.Y I.KFT I >S(H II Secure one for Chrislnuw • DA COSTA & Co., Ltd.-Agenls DIAL 3378 I I I ( DKPT. t"l cloulj ni TiiKni. F< Versatile VIYELLA and CLYDELLA •^ ' "'<• N %  i>ase of the mountain, iM-uth encaged in from the area needing r k in California. These t*,. coodlUoni mountainous regions and o.. ,: We erers %  real bordering raknbelts can ICO imprBssed with Ihe profit most from artificial precitperlmenta. As much pitation. as a i PI cent Iroprov ernep l Kconomir Advantagi-s "'ii norrnal rainfall was reglsRelchvlderfer said "Important U perhape the best exaeonorntc advantage*, especial!) ,; controls designed s<> (lP afnculture can be gained ..ni seeding in sltuaUQIU >|i;rr Research wbl • i nut howIs present. Rut we do not want mare year lo n.i> the hopes of farmers in 111) drj climates. Rain ed out until ecteauftcalloe not come from a clear sky i evidence hat been cloud formations an%  prerequimeaufactured ReicheldcrEer categorically Isj ba B reeeari" i SURGEON SPECIALIST To the Editor Tht Advocate, SIR 1 wish u> be amort* the many thousands of people in this island of Barbados to express my deep regret of the dfsparture of such a Christian and noble gentleman, M Mr. A ('.. Le.ioock As a patient of his for quite a lone, time I have always found him rnoet eourtooue. kindheertni end understanding We all know ; that this worthy and brilliant "surgeon" has done all ;n his power to help the community I heedless of class, colour, or creed. He has worked, very indicate dismissed allegation* thai artificial rains could produce floods. Some farmers in the US. have blamed rain-making effort H for causing disastrous Kansas floods. Hall said There have been <*f reports of commercial success in seeding clouds and producing heavy showers Evidence ;ndictes in most cases that the showers Ihoughl lo have resulted from seeding were actually the result of natural causes. Much n %  loud physics is n eoea ta i %  v.r. hard from early morning until late hnurs <.f ihe night to save Ihe lives of his fellowmen. Yet his saintly face and pleasant matter how tired he was alter n manner wa s always there, no hard and what we all know, a most strenuous day's work We also know that he could have made a much better salary working privately, but here again we see ha Christian love by ereildni .it the General Hospital. Wo pray thnt God's blessing mny mini,, his brain and his bands wherever hi* lot may be llu-own and when things irp'ex him sometimes, he may still find the Silver tuning. To you and your family we say goodbye, good luck. God blew you. GRATEFIL PATIENT. November. 12. BURIAL GROUNDS To The Fdilor The Adrocole,— SIR.—I read with considerable interest the article i n Friday's Advucate telling of a meeting of the St. Lucy's Vestry when conwas given to a letter from tho Colonial Secret n regarding the granting of free access to non-Anglican minister. I to perform th> committal servle.1 Of the providing of "public burial! grounds." Rev. Pestalna is quoted UI stating that he is not In favour of the privilege being granted. I I wonder how Rev. peetain* would feel if he were trai %  • to some Moslem country where thirty per cent, of the populate were members of the Anjli.-M communion ami he was not allowed to commit th body oi any of hU parishioners for whm he had ministered all gsOrind their life, and instoad. funeral rltea were conducted by a Hoelem according to the Moslem faith. I feel sure his viewpoint would change before he knew it Mr Sobers Is reporte.1 as saying "that If non-Anglicn churches want burial ground they should provide their own."' %ie Ine taxes not paid by memln hlvr I.ircrHtocka ai IMV. rrlir* —But tour Bull.r jnu MM T-> Just I ••/ Ifll CUBE SUGAR CASTOR SUGAR ICING SUGAR PREPARED MUSTARD mag CKAMETTEH CHI'RCHMANS CRAVBK DU UAl'RIER COUNTRY utr. VEEETABItES CARROTS. BI.ET ROOT. II I II I I XTI'll' BEEr SIET — J6r. r-r lb



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rxf.l -i\ i:\lin\IMiS ADVOCATE HI M> n \(i\ i Miit.R n. issi HI NR1 BY CARL ANDERSON MICKtY MOUSE CY WALT DISNEY w u E '. 9^-...vsa 30A S_WK 5C C3 vo^ TOO i Out =r %  . t*Ou9f % %  AN HONOWAItY —3£ *o .ii = AJO"-"" S005 I -". %  —""Or >,' -* %  it BLONDIE BY CHIC YOUNG THF LONE RANGER BY FRANK STRIKER BRINGING UP FATHER BY GEORGE MC. MANUS JOHNNY HAZARD _£ i BY FRANK ROBBINS RIP KIRBY BY ALEX RAYMOND lb PHANTOM BY LEE FALK ft RAY MOORES HE [WrsroPTOAWWER'AMI WHETHER YOU ARE A LARGE USER OR A REDROSE TEA cnsvs SMALL USER YOU DESIRE THE BEST TEA SO USE RED ROSE TEA IT IS GOOD TEA. *; Your First Ta*|i* "I 5 |s & s 8 will • ;^ :i than word W 11 V s & s 1st ill Quality Jj lit in Popularity \ SMART I SAMPSON I J (1938) LTD. .; Ili-4a|u.uarl*r> lor Best Rum 0 Ve&ueu* (Mm en ma of Tomato Crowe BlKckwell Table Salt in BoU. & BUekwvll Currv Powder 111 Bots. I ltl.11 ku.ll MarrowM 1'*.-in Tina Mtlo Tonic Food in tins Nestle* Nenpray Powdered Milk in tins Koo Plum Jam in UnaLarge St small T'tiad Fin.Quality Cocoa — L8 Select Powdered Milk in tins %  Anchovy Paste Tina o( Three BBJ Tomato %  Tim of Farrow's Fresh Garden Peas Tins of Sasso Olive Oil — L 8. Tins of Liquid Stove Polish Pkg. of Fab Soap Suds IINCE & Co. Ltd. 8, 7. 8 8 Boebnck St.



thar bados

ESTABLISHED 1895



U.K. Asks U.S. For
Aid To Re-arm

LONDON, Nov. 12.
BRITAIN, which had hoped to carry out her arms pro-
gramme without United States help, has appealed to the
United States for aid, in advance of Prime Minister Winston
Churchill’s January meeting with President Truman.
Churchill had been expected to put United States’ aid
at the*top of the agenda for his man to man*meeting with
Truman. It probably will still be at the top. The Con-
j servative Government found that it had inherited such a
b tremendous financial crisis, however, that it could not wait
until January to send out its distress signal.
—— New U.S. aid for Britain will

; Ibe discusséd in Churchill’s and
Ro al C ae ] - | Truman’s general review of how to
y oup e prosecute and end the “cold war.”
Churchill wants to have a chat

e “

Sail For H Pee Sl.
ome There is speculation here that he
: may see Stalin after he confers
NEWFOUNDLAND, Nov. 12 with Truman, Trumen is less in-
Princess Elizabeth and the Duke clined than Churchill to talk things
of Edinburgh sailed for home| °VT with the Russians. Many
aboard the Empress of Scotland Britons consider Truman a “pris-
on Monday after a triumphal sve. {oner” of his Opposition at home—
week tour of Cat ee = ot ., jhe cannot meet the Russians for
an Washin co Do ‘enn aan visit fear of being branded “appeaser.”
as gton, D.C, 1e Empress sy consider C »hill’s 3i-
stood off-shore and the royal _ They consider Churc hill’s posi
Ya!) tion more flexible. His Labour
couple boarded her from a tender. Opposition would welcome a talk

rhe cruiser Ontario and fhe des-

with Stalin although many re-
troyer Miemay escorted her for|sponsible officials pin no great
100 miles out to sea. hopes on the outcome of such a

conference.—U .P.

—U-P.





New Provisions For
Colonial Shares

LONDON.

The Crown Agents for the Col-
onies have given notice to inves-
tors that after January 1 next!
some 50 Colonial Government!
Inscribed stocks will be trans-}
ferable only by instrument =f
writing. This will mean no prac~

Robertson Will
Probably Head
Mid-east Command

PARIS, Noy.12
French sources said on Monday
night British General Sir Brian
Robertson “quite probably” will
head the West’s new Middle East



defence command, although no tical difference — from existing
i decisior. has been reached.| @trangaments, since the Emer-
Brian is at present the} 8ency Provisions in 1939 sus-



mre a

British military chief in Egypt.
The agreement on the four-power
command composed of the United
States, Britain, France and Turkey
Was announced on Saturday, but
Bince Turkey has not yet been
taken officially into the North At-
lantic Pact “family”, informed
quarters said no_ decision on
Robertson was possible yet.

The British embassy here. ha
no comment,

—U.P.



No West Indian
Regimert Yet

LONDON, Nov. 12.

No official action has yet been
taken by the Colonial Office with
regard to the reformation of the
West Indian Regiment. ‘This
statement was made by a spokes-
man this afternoon.

He was referring to a story in
this morning’s News Chronicle,
which stated that the regiment—
disbanded in 1927—may be re-
formed in Jamaica. The story
added that the Colonial Office was:
to consult the West Indian Gov-|
ernments as part of a general
policy of making use of colonial
manpower |

errr nnenegnneaPianaia oon ence aieeesitinaaian a eaaeaeeecieremicinnaniial a De lle ll
= ies





The proposal, which was men-
tioned on two or three occasions
during question time in the old |
Parliament, is being given careful |
consideration by the Colanial)
Office.

pended the pre-way procedure for
transferring title.

The change has already been
placed on a permanent basis for
British Government and Domin-

jon stocks. In the case of the
Colonies, the authority of the
Colonial Stock Act, 1948, and

amending legislation by each of
the Colonies coneerned has been
required. Thig has now been
obtained.

Stocks affected include four,
British Guiana stocks, redeemable
between 1959 and _ 1980; five|
Jamaican issues, redeemable be-
tween 1952 and 1973; three
Trinidad stocks, redeemable be-
tween 1958 and 1971; the Grenada
3% 1959/1964 issue; and the
St. Lucia 34% 1965/1970 issue.

—B.U.P.

FORMER PREMIER

ASKED TO FORM GOVT.

LONDON, Nov. 12. |
Syrian President Hachen ,Apassi|
asked former Premier Zakiel
Khatib, an independent, to form
a new Government to end the
Government crisis over the West-
ern proposal for a Middle East
Defence Command, reports reacih-!
ing here said Monday. |
Reports said Zakiel Khatib was
asked after the ‘Peoples’ Par'y|
leader,



Rashdi El Kudsi and both)
former Speakers of the House of,
Representatives, refused. H
—uP.|



U.N. Admit Violation
Of Neutral Zone |

COMMUNISTS CLAIM

PEKING RADIO quoting a Communist correspondent
claimed Monday ‘that the United Nations delegation at

Panmunjom admitted air vi

Sunday and promised to take disciplinary action. _
The London Daily Worker correspondent Winnington
said planes twice flew over the security area, once Sunday

and again Monday.
He said Sunday one of a group

of three fighters ‘‘flew right
across the thousand yard confer-
ence area end strafed nearby
hilis He said: “Americans ad-
mitted this Monday and promised
disciplinary action. Winnington
said a second plane crossed the
road to Kaesong and dropped
leaflets, some of which fell into
the conference area

Winnington said “Presumably

this is some af the American
pressure, anyway it shows what
they think of solemn agreements.

“This is the first neutrality
violation charge by the Com-
munists since October 12th when



a U.N. plame strafed the Panmun-
jom area killing one Korean boy
and wounding his brother.
United Press correspondent
Arnold Dibble at Mungan said the
alleged incident occurred several

days ago and that U.N. Liaison
officers promised, Reds to investi-
gate. He pointed out that the
eutrality agreement for Pun-
munjom does not prohibit flight
‘ Ith igt U.N pilot have
the
¥ ’
everal
} ha '
U.P



j TAIPEH,

-{ern Formosa }

TOKYO, Nov. 12.

olation of the neutral zone on

er

Hit East Formosa

Formosa, Nov. 12
Two earthquake shocks heavily
damaged the East Formosan port
of Siankang. Reports from East
Formosa said that eight shocks
the city of Hualien, badly
damaged last month by an earth-
quake and large scale relief was
;needed badly in Sainkang. East-
suffered a serie



oe

=

se

a

w

S

a

BlLive
we a

® boa

nf rthquake

|
\ t init P















TUESDAY, NOVEMBER 13, 1961



RED RULE BY’ MASS





CRITICAL

CATCH













To U.

Churchill |
Wins First |
Test Vote |

el

MURDER ©
~.. Greek Tells Horrors

PRICE: FIVE CENTS





N. Assembly

PARIS, Nov. .12.
AND GREEK speakers charged before United
Nations Assembly Monday that Communist rule by
murder is leading the world back to an age of barbarism.
The Chinese delegate Tingfu Tsiang and the Greek delegate
John Politis said Communists were perpetrating crimes
unmatched in the past. Tsiang said aceordirg to offieral
Chinese Communist reports that Reds in his country
“liquidated” 1,176,000 persons in the year ended: October
first 1950 and the total for the year ended last October first
Politis said Communist

CHINESE











LONDON, Nov. 12 “far exceeded this number.
Churehill’s Conservative Gov- abduction of Greck children during the civil war in Greece
ernment won the first test vote} was a “erime unmatched in the darkest periods of primitive
Monday night when the Commons ee 9
approved a plan to turn the British soci¢ es.
iren and steel industry back to I'siang said the world seemed to be drifting: back to
private enterprise. The Labourite an age of barbarism. He then gave an account of Red
peoval af tt ‘pian ‘wee 4 foatea? “rule by mass murder” citing how Comiaunists on the basis
on te ea ee ee, f their own figures “liquidated so-called counter-
320 to 281 ol 11 ow! _ ig ires hg é ‘ é
The vote got the denationaliza revolutionaries :
tion plan past the first hurdle. RED TERROR
Che bill setting forth the denation- He told how Communist terror forces invaded homes
alization scheme was expected to by night arresting all those who had at one time or another
be presented within three months 1ccepted public office from the chief af a street to the chief
The vote arke. > Ave acceptec pie O ‘e tro 1e Cc Tt ai a stree 2 ¢ PB
emererser rte ——- GODDARD makes his brilliant and critical catch from Archer off The vote marked only the first eae Aa ; ,
h : round of the Parliamentary battle of a section of a city, and all people who once had been in
| Valentine's fifth ball in Australia’s first innings. ; ; eee ee Bites .
over this issue. Bills covering the army whether as an officer or a private or even as a
s : i ray
A li Wi | Left to right are Gomez, Goddard, Weekes, Walcott and Archer. | denationalization are expected to transport worker, This rule by murder is. entirely
ustra ta ‘ins | Radiophoto. be introduced over the next twe Chi nal n r y
" . — months or more and their adop- Un neer A
First Test } tion is not expected for several Let us all remember teiror is preparation for war,
' | e months after that Politis said there is no need for me to recall abominable
an cease i ueZ a er 1 e Churchil’s new Government erime which stirred Nanking and ‘which the world calls
Australia won the first 8 face another test vote Tuesday on the opproprium of our societies.”
Test here against the West the Conservative proposal TH : ed an ne . 1 iv :
Indies by 3 wickets at 1.52 adjourn Parliament from Decem- is crime is unmatched in the darkest periods of
So: ar a otage ber 7 until January 29 which primitive societies
play | Labourites view as an excep Everybody knows the hideous act of abduction of tens
sak 226 | ‘ z : 8 ‘ . . "
ae ig Hel — oe te oy a rere: for of thousands of children with a view to perverting their
victory, Austra made the | iristmas holidays. g - ‘ ow ‘ . a A . "
suaiat Nelda apa etehaan. CAIRO, Nov. 12. Acvemataeat Gunined: ie :-de souls and tut ning the m into matricides heinous felony
Hole played a fighting m- || THE BRITISH AUTHORITIES reported Monday that] #tionalization plan Monday and, Still persists ... . These Greek thildren abducted four years
nings and was eventually || . water pipe which the town of Suez was sabo-| L#bourites immediately proposed ago from their parents and from the fatherland have since
undefeated with 44 to his || 2 Water pipe whic supplies the n e a an amendment disapproving the grown up under the guidance of their abductors. >. /Soon
credit The Second Test || taged Sunday night. A spokesman said such incidents were] pian which would have meant the it may be tog late to save what still can be saved frem these
opens at Sydney on Novem- || common even before the gurrent Anglo-Egyptian flareup.} tall of the Government and new children,’"—U P 2 rom : t
ber 30 and continues De- British officials said about 80 per cent of 3,500 Egyptians re eas es cia eels ; ‘a
cember i 3, 4 and 5, * * she . : aay a rive Liberals present voted with
The scores were: employed at British post exchanges had quit their jobs. | the Conservatives.-U.P. ‘ > ae @ ‘
W.I. Ist innings si6 in an attempt to stem this flow the recent issue of the Union I acifie | Suspended Officers
Australia ist innings .. 226 || Canal Zone News appealed to British families to provide Hirohi ? san
W.1, 2nd Innings 245 toys for children of Egyptians remaining on the job. Film trohito Meets Trains Collide { Still On The Job
Australia 2nd Innings shows also are being organized for Egyptians. , ons | oe
K. Archer b. Gomes .. | 4 OT te Red Hostility WASHINGTON, Nov. 12.
Morris ¢. Gomez, b. , Dockworkers who went on! | FOUR KILLED | It has been learned that two
Ramadhin .......... 48 |}strike earlier Monday in the vitel : KYOTA, Japan, Nov. 12 | = \‘suspended” Chinese Nationalist
Hassett l.b.w. Ramadhin 35 Mediterranean port of Alexandria} } (or ers € Four hundred Communist uni- EVANSTON). Wyoming aight pmcers. 0 ec home last
Harvey b. Ramadhin .. 42 returned to their jobs ‘after t ete sidan We versity students staged a demon- x e’Nov. ge: .! rt i " Pisce’ y
Miller b. Valentine..: 4 | {Egyptian Government told them stratio d the ¢ rr i Ha GB My far’ O19 fye.°
‘ » nm around the car of Em T Uni P . y li
Hole not out 44 their walkout hurt their own Cc % Hiroh wo Union Pacific streamliners 000 in offeial funds are -still on
Lindwall b. Ramadhin 29 |{Country more than Britain, eh irohito. Police clashed !heading east through a blinding the job in . Washington. The
i yeknain GR pee ie > Dockworkers said however . wit the ! students, who packed blizzard smashed up in a “major” officers “refused to obey orders"
i 0 on b. Ramadnain they would boycott any ship with IN TEL AVIV themselves around the Emperor's {collision five miles west of here and are continuing to buy equip-
Ring not out + i | cargo. bo or Britis : 2 ti car, It wag the Japanese ruler's ] Monday. State police said at least. ment for Nationalists,
Extras 15 go bound for British troops in TEL A VIV, Nov. 12 | first aca ie . I i y :
BAND aly 5 ies keane Ba the Suez Canal Zone. The short-] several oo A ’ v. rst personal contact with Com-|tour persOfis were killed, They They are apparentiy doing this
—— |llived strike began when dockers}| -°vera! thousand workers|munist hostility, and the first}used acetylene torches to cut with the blessing of Chiang Kai-
Total (for 7 wickets).. 236 Jircfused to load the British marched along Allenby Street on|demonstration against him in the} through the twisted coaches of Shek's Government which accused
\*e 5 ae freighter Exeter Gate with cot- eS a Mapam party -spon- many tours he has made of Japan|the two trains the City of San,them in the first place. Charges
ton bound for Bombay and quick- “food r emonstration damanding since the war, Francisco, ahd the City of Los} @gainst the men were made after
ly spread to all vessels in the]. a 1s a and prison for! The Communists chanted Com-| Angeles in their search for more | thé y had accused officials of their
U S Ne r TT harbour.” speculators. he demonstration | munist songs, and waved placards, {dead and injuesd Government of waste _and cor-
owe 2 oO oO —_UP followed a meeting called in Jaffa] we oppose the revival of the ruption U.P
it which the pro-Soviet Mapam]jmper : ” F A Union Pacific official
“mperor system. The demon-

appealed to workers to participate



scribed the accident as a “major”



Handle Land
Reform For U.N.

PARIS, Nov. 12

The American negro religious
and civic leader Dr. Channing
‘Tobias has been chosen to handle
the question of land reform at
the U.N. General Assembly to
counter Communist charges that
negro farmers in America are held| US. Army Secretary Frank Pace
down at share-cropper level. conferred Monday on how to

Tobias, alternate U.S. delegate|speed arms to the Western Buro-
to the Assembly, told the press! pean army.
conference that Britain, Thailand, France warned she faced seri-
and Brazil have joined with the|us economic crisis and would not
U.S. in a resolution asking the|be able to meet defence commit-
Assembly to approve the first]mentm without more American
global ;gogramme for land reform | aid.
in history. “We

The programme was introduced] schedule
by the U.S. at the last session of
the Economic and Social Coun-

Eisenhower, Pace
Discuss Arms For
W. European Army

PARIS,-Nov. 12
General Dwight Eisenhower and

reconsidering
make sure we

are
to

cil and approved by the Council total requirements” Pace said
with abstentiong of the Soviet later.

bloc. Tobias said the joint res- [fa ee ie
olution dogs not seek merely to wank alfred pag Eo “y cot
divide large estates but includes}yowers Chief of ’

: ; Staff, French
many steps to improve the status

of the farmer.—-U.P,

Red Truce Team

General Alphonso Huin,
Front Commander for
Atlantic Forces and Geners! Lau-



mander in Europe.





d f U.S He indicated he discussed
Tiol Off By ee changing the strategy of U.S.
military planners as a result oi
PANMUMJOM, Korea, Monday.|development of atomic weapons.
United States Major General —U-P.
Henry I. Hodes accused Com-
munist truce negotiators to their
faces of trying’ to avoid -a full] 5 St
armistice settlement. The chief 0 Dead In orims
U.N. representative on the armis- ’
s Pa fv. A yi opted c MILAN, Nov. 12
tice sub-committee is seeking to Another five deaths. were re-

fix a eoase-fire line and buffer

zone across Korea, Hodes told the |PoOrted in the raging storms which

have been lashing Northern Italy

Reds “you intend to establish . 4
presumptive demarcation line ]@nd Southern France in the past
and a demilitarized zone which|!six days.—U.P.

will relieve you of any necessity
to settle the remaining items on
the agenda with speed and equity.
You want to establish a spurious
line and zone which will provide

you with leisure and freedom to
continue delaying the confer-
ence,”’

—UP.



PARIS, Nov. 12.
Leaders of Arab countries met
here Monday night but failed to
reach a decision on their attitude
to the four power Mid-eastern de-

MacArthur Has No
Political Ambitions

INDIA. NAPOLIS, Nov. 12 fence pact
Douglas MacArthur turned dowr They decided to call a turther
an offer to run for President on|â„¢eeting at a date yet to be deter-

the Prohibition ticket, it was!Mined to continue their delibera-









announced on Monday. He told | Hons. Egyptian Foreign Minister

party officials that he had no|>#!@h El Din said at a press con-

political ambitions “of any sort | ference following the meeting that
MacArthur wa ay proached by| ill the Arab Governments were
a pede =F . ? 1 @ — -eme

Prohibition. party officials last in entire agreement.

month and his reply made public sh said: “All Arab Govern-
1 ins ’ . : “ . é é ab

a _ Monday on the ¢ ve of the) ments are entirely agreed and th«

Party's national nomination COMn-| decision to be taken will be taken

vention. I am not a ¢ indidate| with the. entire agreement of all

for the Office of President and! To-<¢ meet icerne

have nc



in a
delegates from
country,
tated for three hours at
meeting against Government even
though
federation,
participation by its members

tion
Parliament where a
delegation asked to be received by
the Presidium,
demonstration had been requested
but it
licence had been

the text
our | last
can*standing “of the difficulties faced
get as much as possible over here }by Government” askirfg food sup-
in terms of arms, considering our} plies to have top priority and if;
possible
'Farms
production while Government was |
requested to provide public anti-

rig Norstad U.S. Air Force Com-|



hunger march, About 500
all parts of the
Communists, agi-

a public

plus

the Histadrut, a
decided to

workers
condemn

Simultaneously, a
in

demonstra-
Jerusalem marched to
ten-member

Permission for the

clear whether

given.

was not

Meanwhile Histadrut
of a resolution
week showing full

released
adopted
under-

Nee eee NN ee

of

to

rations. |
increase |

increase
asked

an
were

black market committees wit!

Central |limited executive powers. “Scrip”
“North shops were condemned for selling

fond

unobtainable on the ration
The resolution condemned the
separatist action taken by Mapam

—U.P.



STALIN-CHURCHILL
MEETING POSSIBLE

LONDON, Novy. 12

Winston Churchill said on Mon-
day that the possibility of meet-
ing with Josef Stalin “should not
be excluded” if circumstances are
favourable, but there were at
present no plans for general
negotiations with Russia.—U.P.

which was handed to the Egyptian
Government, and with the four
power decision on the Middle East
defence plan which was sent late-
ly to Arab Governments. Leaders
of the Arab delegations will meet
again to resume discussions on the
subject ~

Syria's Faris El Khouri who pre-
sided over Monday’s meeting said
in an interview that the Arab
countries are fully agreed they will
pursue a joint policy on all matters
concerning the U.N

He said Egypt’s rejection of the
four power proposals to join the
projected Mid-Eastern defence



pact was the only possible course
left open to her and that all other
ntrie vere sreed on tk



stration
prepared
Kyota

welcome
the

occurred at a
for Hirohito at
University

campus.



Russia Prompted
Final Decision

ROME, Nov. 12

Italian Foreign Office sources
said On Monday the final decision
to hold a North Atlantic meeting
in Rome on November 24 was
prompted by Russia's rejection of
the West's peace proposals at the
U.N. session in Paris.

They said the Soviet Foreign
Minister Andrei Vyshinsky’s
scornful rejection of the western
disarmament plan convinced At-
lantic leaders that Western rear-
mament plans should be pushed
ahead as fast as possible.

Although the full agenda
the fortheoming talks was
worked out, high political
ters here confirmed that the bulk
of questions reflecting the Euro-
pean rearmament programme will
be discussed in Rome.—wU,P.

ISRAELI GOVERNMENT
DENIES REPORTS

TEL A VIV, Israel, Nov. 12

A Government spokesman on
Monday denied “certain irrespon-
sible reports appearing abroad’
Suggesting that the Government
already has decided to cancel the
concession granted to a British
company to exploit potash of the
Dead Sea.

He said that no decision was
taken and also denied any inter-
ruption in the road linking the
potash plant on the Dead Sea with
the rest of the country.—U.P.

for
not!
quar-





Arab Nations Undecided
Over Mid-Eastern Pact

During the discussions Iraq's
Jammali returned to the Palestine
problem when he condemned the
use of power politics and pressure
groups in the U.N

He said: “Once power politic
prevail here at the expense of hu-
man rights, the clear principles of
a charter of peace and justice are
jeopardized.”

Jammali charged the U.N. with
weakness in the face of Jewish ag-
gression and stubborne and dis-
regard of U.N resolution He
said: “The United Nations ha
failed so far to do justice to Arabs





ip, Palestine.” ‘It is high time that
the U.N, should rid itself of power
politics and pressure grour ne
hould take a m« ealist

of Arab right aT

U.P {

neading
LP. fos

the city of San Francisco follow-|

ing.

stopped by a block signal and the
City

deol

ollision. Two trains, each carry-
ing about 200 passengers were!
eastward with the city |
Angeles in the lead and}

The “ADVOCATE”
pays for NEWS,
Dial 3113
| Day or Night

Los
|

The City of Los Angeles wus |

of San Francisco
into its rear end.

ploughed





—UP.
PALL LPL EESOPES

PLO PLVSPPPE

COLLAPSE

EMPIRE RED WINE



Maintains
the same high
Standard

of Qualityas
shipped to the
West Indies
for the past

hitty years

OT ated a
ae

GARDINER AUSTING CL?

Agents a



LOSS

4,464,444 644,016 COCO

SPECS Ss


~

PAGE TWO



R. MELVILLE JOHNSTON,
T.C.A. Station Controller
in Bermuda is at present in Bar-

bados for. one week assisting
T.C.A.’s_ Resident M&nager Mr.
Hal Baxter. Mr. Johnston is a

guest at the Ocean View Hotel.
He will be returning to Bermuda
on Saturday.
To Join Husband
RS. FRANK THOMAS has ar-
rived from St. Vincent io

join her husband who is on three ,

months holiday in Barbados. He is

a Civil. Servant in St. Vincent,
and has been here for about
three weeks. They are staying

with the Branches in King Wil-
liam Street.

Mr. “Thomas is a_ Barbadian
while his wife hails from St.
Vincent,

Short Talks
R. NORMAN MacDONALD,
Sales Representative.
B.W.LA. in Jamaica, arrived here
on Friday. The jfollowjng da,
Capt. H. Whitehorn, Assistant
Island Commissioner, (Boy

Scouts) Jamaica flew in via Tri-
nidad. They had a one day dis-
cussion. with Scout leaders hero
with r@gard to the forthcoming
Caribbean Scout Jamboree being
held in Jamaica in March next
year.

They left on Sunday for Trini-
dad and will also visit British
Guiana checking on the strength
of each contingent from the vari-
ous colonies.

B.W.LA. are making it possible
that stouts from the other col-
onies fly to Jamaica at greatly
reduced rates and they also made
it possible for Capt. Whitehorn
to make this trip free of charge.

Mr. MacDonald is also keen
on water polo and during this short
stay in Barbados he spoke to the
Water Polo Association’s President
Major A. R, Foster, with regard

e Jamaican water polo team
touring Barbados sometime next
year.

Barbadian From Aruba
R. COLIN BATSON, a Bar-
badian on the teaching
staff of the Lago Oil and Trans-
port Company's school in Aruba
arrived from Aruba ovey the
week-end to spend a couple of
weeks’ holiday in Barbados, He is
staying at the Cosmopolitan Guest

House,

Mr. Batson

is an ex-army of-
ficer and old

Harrisonian.

With B,W.I1.A.

M* BERTIE ROGERS who is
with B.W.LA. in Trinidad
left last night by B.W.I.A. for
Piarco after spending a holiday
in Barbados, Mr. Rogers is a
Barbadian,

Week-end Visit

R. O. P. BENNETT, Official

Starter for the Barbados
Turf Club flew to Trinidad by
B.W.LA, over the week-end. He
is expected back here today.

Carib, Calling

PARTY DAYS ARE
HERE AGAIN



THE PARTY season is a hapny one,
but it can be a bit expensive, so any
idea that eases the strain in to-day’s
all too slender budgets is welcome.
The home perm will save many pre-
cious pennies and give a result that

everyone will admire. If you follow
the directions carefully you will find
it is not at all difficult. There is
one kit that contains Spin curlers,
and these make the job both easier
and faster.

—Toni News Bureau,

Dark Eyes

OTS of us have been turning
up for work with dark cir-
cles under our eyes. Listening to
the cricket broadcast from Aus-
tralia is the excuse, We can now
relax and catch up on sleep un-
til November 30, when the Sec-
ond Test begins,

t? °

If the dark circles continue
another excuse will have to be
made to pull the wool over the
boss’ eyes.

B.G, Marksman

M* J. ARChi£ SUTTON of
British Guiana is at present
in Barbados. He arrived from
Trinidad over the week-end by
B.W.LA. and leaves for B.G. on
Friday.

Mr. Sutton had been in Trini-
dad as a member of the B.G.
Rifle team which took part in the
Trinidad Rifle Association's an-
nual shoot, which ended on Sat-
urday with the competition for
the Anchor Cup. Teams from
Barbados, Trinidad, and British
Guiana took part in this shoot.

The Anchor Cup was won by
Trinidad with Barbados second
and British Guiana third.

Mr, Sutton is staying with Mr.
and Mrs, Dick Richardson at
Worthing.



BY THE WAY...

" ‘O the booths; to the booths!”

All over the vast metro-
polis men and women leaped
lightly from their beds this morn-
ing, with these ominous words on
Meir lips.

At each booth courteous officials
waited with friendly smiles. And
as though conscious of the occa-
sion, the old city by the Thames
seemed to shed its dingy garb and
to don the more fitting apparel of
a festive occasion. The sun flashed
out, as though to dart a message
of hope, and to bestow a benison
on this palpitating democracy
u-tiptoe with expectation, The
bark of a dog or the cry of a child
lent reality to the dream-like con-
centration of the hurrying millions
—millions with but one thought
in their heads, if that, Inexorable
us doom, the voting papers awaited
the impress of friendly pens, Lon-
don, Mother London, was on her
way to fulfil her multifold des-
tiny.

Wait for the finat sorecast

HOSE who have been sneer-
ing at the Beachcomber Poll

are likely to receive a shock on
Friday morning, when the final
forecast of the election figures as
they will stand at the moment will
be published. This feat will
be achieved by strictly a_ priori
methods. Later on, the Beach-
comber Poll will tell you the total
number of votes registered, the
proportion of male to female votes,
and the overall percentage reduced
‘© the simplest and most tedious

terms. What more can one ex-
pect? i
The Chepstow egg
EAR Sir,
“Puzzled” is talking non-

sense. A square egg can be laid
sideways just as easily as an or-
dinary one. Just because all the
sides are equal, that does not mean
that there are no sides. An ex-
periment with a cardboard model
will make this clear. And why
should, scientists think it odd that
the corners were smooth? Isn't
any egg smooth at the corners? But
can a square egg have any corners?
Yrs. truly,
H. E, MOTTLE,
Jivie Washerbocker
is coming

ORGAN the Laundry, Evans
the Hearse’s manager, hopes

to arrange a match for the Aber-
bananer Wizard against the
American champion Jivie Washer-
hocker, of Xenophon, Utah. A
contest was abandoned in 1949,



owing to a public uproar created
by the Women’s Anti-Nasal Pea-
Pushing League, led by Mrs. Al-
manza H, Strowberger jun, She
succeeded in persuading 61 women
to lie down on the pea-track on
Llangyrkyn mountain, as a protest.
Jivie Washerbocker is due here to
appear in cabaret next month,

Staggering Poll Drama
PREDICTION BOMBSHELL
STUNS EUROPE
Uncanny, Says Mayor
A’ 3.32 p.m, last Tuesday the

Beachcomber Poll forecast
that the election figures as this
edition went to press, would be
as follows: Socialists 175; Conser-
vatives 142.

The outcome of this daring en-
terprise is a triumph for the scien-
tifle methods of my poll,

On page 3 will be found but I
don't think so, a new method of
calculating the number of shop-
ping days since last Christmas, 23
ways of using up old bits of halibut
directions for making a model, in
feathers, of London Bridge, and
the further adventures of Ger-
maine Blancmange and the Terri-
ble Troglodyte of the Sierras.

Barbedwire for harps ?

N a musical criticism I came

across the phrase: “The or-
chestra took themselves too seri-
ously.” This seems to amount ta
an invitation to orchestras to be-
have like dance bands; to jump
about. make faces, and _ utter
American cries. 1 remember an
incident in the old Queen’s Hall,



Rupert and the



When all is

ready Rupert tes
Rollo's bundle firmly round his
waist and gets over the rail. Then,

gripping the rope, he hangs upside
down, and makes his way slowly
vai surely along it. “* This must be

Just Opened

DRESS GOODS |

CREPES

omy at EVANS & WHITFIELDS |

DIAL 4606

SPUNS
IN DESIGNS



SHEERS



Married In Scotland

ISS MARGARET JEAN ED-
+ WARDS, elder daughter of
Dr. and Mrs. A. C. Edwards of
“Claremont”, Rockley, was mar-
ried on Thursday, November 8th
at Inverness, Scotland, to Mr,
Malecim Sargeant, eldest son of
Mr. and Mrs, Wyndham Sargeant

cf “Vapscott’, Culinstock, Devon-
shire, England.
Tonight’s Concert
AONIGHT cet the Hastings
Rovks, tha Police Band is

giving a mid-veek concert, which
begins at 8 o’clock. Price of ad-
mission is one shilling which
g to help the Almair Home,

Permission for the Police Band
to play was kindly given by Col.
R. T. Michelin, Commissioner of
Police.

From Carib’s Mailbag

Marine Hotel,
Sunday, Nov.





11th.
Dear Carib,

Far be it from me to be criti-
eal of anything on your truly
beautiful island—this is my sec-
md visit to BARBADOS, and I
sincerely (hope it won't be my
last.

Along with the marvellous sea
bathing the superb climate and
the very friendly people here I
enjoy Carib Calling. After all
this eulogising (check spelling, I
forgot my dictionary) you will I

trust realize that the following
correction is not made in any
derogatory (sp?) sense, but

merely in the interest of journal-
ism in general—as an ex-jour-
nalist of sorts (me) to a practis-
ing columnist (you).

To get to the point, your brief
item in today’s column about
“Mrs. Joyce Waters of Montreal
arriving via T.C.A. and staying
at the Ocean View Hotel” has
only two correct facts therein.
The signature at the end of this
note will attest to the fact that
my surname is spelled with two
“t's”, this stationery will dispel
any rumours that I am staying
at the Ocean View and the fact
that I spent 4 days last week in
Montreal waiting for Flight 600
to Barbados does not make me a
Montrealer. I am a native of
Rothesay New Brunswick, Can-
ada and spend my winters (part
thereof) in Toronto where I am
studying for my L.L.B. (Law)
degree at University of Toronto.

I have nothing against Mon-
treal—I like it, especially since
last week I was lucky enough to
meet Charles Boyer as .well as
see him on the stage—also you
were correct in reporting my first
name and the fact that I am Priv-
ileged (?) to precede same with
a “Mrs.” Also, I did arrive via
1T.C.A. Saturday.

Yours sincerely,
Mrs. Joyce WATTERS



By Beachcomber

when, during the playing of a som-
bre symphony, a violinist leaned
across his neighbour and laughing-
ly twanged his G-string. ‘Keep
to your own violin,” shouted the
conductor. And at that very mo-
ment an instrumentalist of sorts
poked his hand through the harp-
wires and chucked the pretty
harpist under the chin. “One
needs barbed wire for a harp with
these fellows about,” commented
the lady at the harp.

See Report on egg-crates

T has been suggested that the
Colonial Office report on Brit-
ish Guiana shows the influence of
Sir Ernest Gowers’ criticisms of
official jargon. ‘More colourful
English” is anticipated. I hope
soon to see this sort of mixture: —
An egg-crate within the mean-
ing of what, for want of a better
word, we must agree to call the
Act, is deemed to be, for the rather
tiresome purpose of registration,
a crate for the reception of eggs.
And, as though that were not
enough, any crate which, through
no fault of its own, fails to fulfil
what one so fatuously calls the
standard measurements, is not for
a crate, actually. The standard
measurements, to which a laughing
allusion is made above, will be
found, by those who have enough
energy to waste in such an un-
profitable pursuit of worthless
knowledge, in the dreary Report
on egg-crates recently issued, to
the damnation and frustration of
all egg-fanciers.

g
=

Lion Rock

7



what Rollo meant when he
that 1 could reach the rocks by air.”

BARBADOS

American Column :

NEW YORK, Sunday.
For three long years the Statue
of Liberty presented a rather ironic
sight as far as pretty 36-year-old
Mrs. Ellen Knauff was concerned.
For she spent a good deal of her

time looking at it—from Ellis
Island, the place of detention for
those visitors whom America 1s

none too anxious to w elcome

For she spent a good deal «f
her time looking at it—from Ellis
Island, the place of detention for
those visitors whom America is
none too anxious to welcome.

Mrs. Knauff married a G.I, in
Frankfort, but when in August
1948 she crossed the Atlantic sh?
was promptly placed on Ellis
Island, accused of having spied
on behalf of the Czech mission in
Germany.



B.B.C, Prograiume

TUESDAY, NOVEMBER
11.15 am. Programme Parade, 11.30
a.m. Robert Stolz, 12 00 noon’ The News,
12.10 p.m. News Analysis
41.00—7.15 pm 31.32 m.,
400 pm The News, 4 10 p.m. Daily
Service, 4.15 p.m Cathedral Music, 4.45
Pm Semprini, 5.00 p m Composer of
the Week, 515 pm _ Listeners’ Digest,
5 45 p m. Rendezvous Players, 6 00 p.m
Singing and Playing for you, 6.15 pm

13,

1951



48.43 m







Welsh Magazine, 645 pm Programme
Parade, 655 pm _ Today's Sport, 7.00
p.m. The News, 7.10 pm News Analy-
sis, 715 pm Cricket Report on fourth
Day’s play in First Test and Rendez
vous with Commonwealth Artist 7.45
pm Generally Speaking

$1.32 m, 48.43 m

7.45—10.30 p.m,

800 pm _ Think On These Things,

8.15 p.m. Radio Newsreel, 830 pm
Report From Britain, 8 45 p.m_ Royal

Tour of Canada bv H.R Princess
Elizabeth and The Duke of Edinburgh,

9.00 p m. Meet The Commonwealth, % 30
p.m, Ray’s A Laugh, 10 00 pm. The
News, 1010 pm From The Fditorials,
10 15 pm Round and About, 10 30 p.m.
I Like My Job.
C.B.C. PROGRAMME

10.05 pm. — 10.20 p.m. News

10.20 pm. — 10 35 p m Letter from
Canada. 11.72 Mes., 25.60 M



CROSSWORD



1. To spread I cure talc. (9)

7. Sufficient to make Cain legal. (9)
9. Prightened by a dead nut. (7)
10. Minus two, (5)

13. “Bones of the ——.” (5)

16. Out of the throes. (3)

17. She's from the native quarter. (3)
18. They bring news from Simla. (5)
21. Some would make 20 Down a

this, (3)

22. A knock-out in his tunic.
23. To ye island seemingly. (4)
+. Alternative heart to P.T. (4)

Usual terthought, could be
astr! ae. Tey

(4)

Down
1. 1¢ arrived before the artist. (6)
2. One way to tice rind. (8)
%. Disarranged tie Larry made up
(B) 4, Spot, but only one, @)
5. Swims with its pet ioad. (7)
6. Little work upsets the eel when
you run away. (5)
8. Comedians stock-in-trade, (3)
11. The devii wisnout tea? (6)
12. For support prod it. (6)
14, Become iable to incorporate

briefly an ancient city. (5)
. Make aunt boast after five. (5)
. Nightlight. (4)
Some people 21 Across this. (3)

Solution ot Saturday s ouxzie.—Across:
1. Pfennix: {rrigated: 9 Icicle; 11
Lucky; 12. Cape (anagram: pacer: 35,
Event: 1/, Rill: 20 Opera. 21. Dig: 22
Tram; 25. Menace: 24 Pie: 25, Cat: 26,
Sedan. Down: 12. Pillorv: 2, ‘a
Erica: 4. Nickel: 5, Peen:
Accepted. 10 Lane: 14, Voice
16 amer: 18 idea. 19 Lint

oe
seo







Psychological Warmth

Cprr ice advice on how ‘0
make a little fuel go a long
that

make

way includes a suggestion
householders should
briquettes out of coal dust. But
far more important, says joily
Jack Hopkins, with a light laugh,
is the psychological approach.
Create 4 suggestion of warmth by
using stones painted a
red. “After staring at this form
or fuel for just under eight min-
utes you begin to purr with satis-
faction, says Dr. Stoppe of the
Board of Psychological Fuel.





' The pleasant Wolts
to quick relief fren
ACID INDIGES TiC!








Alka-Seltzer’s pleasant taste
and sparkling effervescence
assures gentle efliciency.
Drop one or two tablets into
a glass of water, watch it fize.
then drink it. Keep a
supply handy always! * >)





he shinks. ** It's working splendic
Thank goodness, those men ca
see us.” ft is tiring work, bur at
last he feels himsell held by the
boy, and he ts safely ashore again.





4294



oe a et ee





glowing

ADVOCATE

(By R. M. MacCOLL)

Since then she has been caught
up in red tape.

Repeatediy the immigration
people tried to have her deported.
Repeatedly last-minute legal ac-
we blocked these moves, The

max ‘ame when America’s
Aftorney-General Howard Mc-
@rath finally approved a recom-
mendation that the deportation
proceedings be abandoned,

And to-night Mrs. Knauff went
out of the Statue of Liberty, on
the ferry with all the other Sun-
day trippers, to have a close-up
look at her at last.

LESSON

JUDGE CLARENCE DENNING,
of Cincinnati, Ohio, is fed up with
careless and drunken motorists.
“We've got to make them change
their habits,” he says, And to lend
point to his view the judge, whiie
cealing in October alone with
2,929 motoring offences, sent 22
people to jail and imposed fines
totalling 56,676 dollars,

HUMILIATION
EIGHTY-YEAR-OLD W. O.
Weissich, of San Raphael, Cali-

fornia, values one of his cigars at
$5,000 dollars. He is suing a bus
company for that amount because
he says, when he got aboard one
of their vehicles the woman driver
seized his cheroot and mz
arainst the side of the st ng
wheel, explaining that it would
be returned at the journey’s end.
Weissich said he suffered





ering



rave








Your MONTHLY Period ?

Do female func ‘onal monthly
ailments make you feel so ner-
vous, strangely restless, so tense
and weak a few days just before
your period? Then start taking
Lydia E. Pinkhatm’s Vegetable
Compound to relieve such
toms! It has such a soothi
comforting antispasmodic elf!
on one of woman's most impor
tant orgat:s, working throu
the sympathetic nervous syste:

Pinkham’s Compound dc
more than relieve monthly pa
It also relieves pre-period ner-
vous irritability, tense em

of this nature. Regule

LYDIA E. PINKHAM’S

Choe












tons



fi [Seemed above ull
hers hy people of
discrimination —hhe cool,
atlattive fragrances of
ATKINSONS |
in Colognes |

>





%& GOLD MEDAL EAU DE COLOGNE
Â¥e ENGLISH LAVENDER

we ROYAL BRIAR EAU DE COLOGNE
swe ROYAL BRIAR LOTION

& LOTION EAU DE COLOGNE

%& MIRAGE

te 24 FLOWERS EAU DE COLOGNE
te BALLET RUSSE EAU DE COLOGNE

BY APPOINTMENT
PERFUMERS TO H.M. KING GEORGE VI
J. & E. ATKINSON LTD,

ATKINSONS, 24 OLD BOND STREET, LONDON, ENGLAND

—_—_ ____.





Good







SUHAL EUS BEFORE

HIGHT FRAGRANCES THAT
MEET THE NEEDS OF ALL



desirable .
To Own



BARBADOS
Co-op COTTON FACTORY *
Ltd.

AT EAST, A REAL LOOK AT LIBERTY

humiliation,

SHEEPSKIN PETE

THE ARMY had never had a
recruit quite like 26-year-old Pete}
Grainger, who haijs from the
remote hill country of Texas. He}
had never seen a car before he
emerged from his native eyrie the
other day for the first time, nor
heard about conscription. He was
barefoot, wore sheepskin trousers}
and a shawl j

He explained that he decided to)
join the army when his father
died, “I buried Paw right on tup
of the mountain and then started.’
A ride of four flights in a lift—his
first—made him feel “a little sick’.
Sut Pete’s education was not en-

tirely neglected. He read 200

books “that Paw and ole Doc

Carver gave me.” |
SQUATTER

THERE is a spreading epidemic
of neurotic young men who clam-
ber out on to the ledges of hign|
buildings, threaten to jump, and
then after several nerve-racking|
hours, allow themselves to
dissuaded by fast-talking police, |
priests, or girl-friends. |

But Milwaukee police wasted!
little sympathy on a 21-year-old
who tried it there. He had done it
twice before in other cities and
said he liked the publicity.

OUT OF BIZZ
A BARBER SHOP STRIKE is
going on in New York. And oitt-
side the big shop in Rockefeller |
Centre a waggish striker struck)
up a notice saying: “The whizz|
of the scizz is out of bizz.

be}



of this great medicine helps
build up resistance against such

female distress. Truly the wo-
man's friend! eo
NOTE: Or vou may prefer
» Lydia FE. Pinkham’s TABLETS
with added iron.

Vegetable Compound ~



en ne



, TO-DAY Last 2 Shows 4.30 & 8.15



Cutlery















TUESDAY, NOVEMBER 13, 1951
Opening Fri 2.30; 1.4 & 89 pm
BTIOWN Another CARIBBEAN PREMIERE !

PLAZA RGN | Seite, sect ieee

Last 2 Shows TODAY
445 & 830 p.m

|
TARZAN’S PERIL ~-

with Lex BARKER—Virginie HUSTON—George MACREADY and CHETA
ALSO: SPECIAL ADDED ATTRACTION!
“BASKETBALL CHAMPIONS OF 1951"
with the HARLEM GLOBETROTTERS
pecia SDA Dom! Watmntaues
“GUN TOWN” a “BAD MAN OF RED BUTTE”
Kirby GRANT Johnny Mack BROWN

P OISTIN . ,
PLAZA sate || ot MAE TY.
Last % Shows Today 5 & 8.30 p.m Last Shew Tonite 8 30 p.m
James CAGNEY in—

“TOMORROW I5 ee ee m
“KISS TO-MORROW GOODBYE” Claudette Colbert & George Bren
with Barbara PAYTON — Ward

“BERLIN EXPRESS”
BOND & Barton McLANE





Merle O’BERON—Robert RYAN



ed. (only) (aus) a. oe
y _ ‘ .m, $.30 p.m. only) 4. -m.
WED. ionly) 430 & 8.30 p.m Wait Disney's “ghabew ob

“ONE SUNDAY AFTERNOON" “Fun & Fancy Beacon Hill"

Color by Technicolor Free” Roddy McDowall|
Denis MORGAN & (Technicolor) & “Night Has
“WHITE HEAT” & “Bambeo Byes”
James CAGNEY Blonde” James Mason



GLOBE

TO-DAY, 5.00 & 8.15 P.M. — LAST SHOWS

“CALLING BULLDOG DRUMMOND”
TOMORROW, 4.30 P.M. ONLY

“13 RUE MADELEINE” and “IN OLD CHICAGO”
TOMORROW NITE ONLY, 8.00 P.M.

STEEL BAND and MARICO CONTEST

RHYTHM KINGS vs. THE DEFENDERS
PLUS
James CAGNEY in “13 RUE MADELEINE”





PP SOPPLSSS POSS SSS SSS POSS POSSSDS SS PSP PSPPSSSSOE,

Flashing Steel To-morrow Nite

GLOBE THEATRE Presents:—

TOMORROW NITE AT 8 O'CLOCK
STEEL BAND AND MARICO COMPETITIONS
THE RHYTHM KINGS (The Champs.)
vs
THE DEFENDERS (Challengers)
PLUS

The Film “13 RUE MADELINE”
(James CAGNEY)











Pit 18c; House 36c; Balcony 48c; Box 60c.
|
|
IS IT HUMAN OR INHUMAN? |
}
[THE | HING |
FROM ANOTHER WORLD |







EMPIRE

TO-DAY 4.45 & 8.30 and CONTINUING DAILY
20th C-FOX BIG TECHNICOLOR MUSICAL—

ON THE RIVIERA â„¢

Starring:

DANNY KAYE — GENE TIERNEY
MUSIC — DANCING — SINGING — COMEDY
DANNY IS FUNNIER THAN EVER
EXTRA
“ANTI CAT” — 1 Bell Short





ROYAL

Last 2 Shows Today 4.30 & 8.15 TOMORROW & THURSDAY

4.30 & 8.15
Republic Double—

Roy ROGERS — Dale EVANS
in
“UNDER NEVADA
SKIES ”

Republic Whole Serial - - -

‘*ZORRO’S BLACK
WHIP ”’

Starring and
es ”
Linda STERLING — George RED PONY
Starring

J. LEWIS Robert MITCHUM — Myrna LOY

OLYMPIC

TOMORROW & THURSDAY
4.30 & 8.15

Universal Double - - -
ABBOTT and COSTELLO



John GARFIELD in

“UNDER MY SKIN”

and “IN SOCIETY ”
“THRILL OF A -
ROMANCE ” “HUNGRY HILL”
Starring Starring
Esther WILLIAMS — Van Margaret LOCKWOOD
JOHNSON Dennis PRICE



ROXY

Last 2 Shows TO-DAY 4.30 & 815] TOMORROW & THURSDAY

4.30 & 8.15
Columbia Double - - -
: Columbia Double - - -
‘““‘WHEN THE REDSKINS Eddy ARNOLD
RODE ”’ in
Starring : HOEDOWN_
Jon HALL — Mary CASTLE and
and “FATHER IS A
“ REVENUE AGENT ” BACHELO ”
Starring Starring

William HOLDEN

Douglas KENNEDY Coleen GRAY





ADVERTISE ...

IN THE

ADVOCATE

PRES ta Ree eet:




TUESDAY, NOVEMBER 13, 1951 BARBADOS ADVOCATE [AGE THREE













Human Brain

Fighting The

Seawell

Will Aid With ,, Sleeping a ae DRINK & ENJOY

Income Tax

Sickness ’**









v € J Biel Walcott, Major Griffit
ebiett, T. Roberts, M. Tucker, O
5 K. Small, A. Small, M Martir
CALIFORNIA, Noy. 10, PITTSBURGH, Nov. 10 S Sorrae See Ee. Bates .
One of the most ingenuous of A 28-year-old research worker ST. LUCIA (on Saturdays
modern mechanism known as the 3t the University of Pittsburgh ak ay Dae Gongor 4, Hons |
human brain which can make up rallied slightly Saturday in the Potles Stante Know les Reginald |
income tax returns or even play battle against the deadly “sleeping Lots Curt topher Herbert, Simon |
chess will soon be released. sickness” the virus diseasc that re Ree Senay

The brain produced for the U.S.
Air Force appeared as a cross be-
tween an expensive television set
and a pinball machine. It is
about the size of’an office desk.
Engineer Richard Sprague, one of
the designers, described the ma-

has been menacing U.N. troops in
Korea.

Robert W. Vensel was stricken
several days ago while working
with viruses some of which were
shigped from Korea. He is seek-
ing a cure for the disease at the



From TRINIDAD (On Saturaay)

G Radix H Ghar R Cra c
Xing: H. Woeding: D. Ramehtran; 5
Remdeen; C. Batson; R. Rider, E. Acs
From ST. KITTS (On Saturday)

Sir George Seei( K.C M.G
From ANTIGUA (On Saturday)

Chandra Permanand, Hurley Whitehorn
fF (On Saturday)



chine known as Dere 1002, CRC Pittsburgh graduate school of pub na Protair, lL. Robins
1102 s8 4 general purpose com- lic health for the armed forces’
puter, and a suecessor to those now Epidemiological Board Ver DEPARTURES — BY BWHLA

it Harvard and the University ot
California.

It is also a portable “affair de-

reindell Arthur «Moore Veronic
Spite its size. Sprague said that side. eS YOlivtira, Michael Marti Teresa
larger brains are usually big They said his condition remains r eee Poked agg nea Benes |
enough to fill one room and some Serious although he rallied slight- * Cheer up, everybody! Mr. Butler’s just discovered another threepenny bit ” White-Horn: Hugh Wooding; Norman |
of them cost million®’'"He added ly. University officials said the ; London steal ti MeDonz Marguerite Moore
that a newly developed baby Nations top medical men were = at : ee a4 M og NOnGOn Sxnresa Service ee : Pinger 2 wh fe Chetan!
sized gadget was very capable. He called into the case after sur- ™ sie 7 i ae ‘Herbal. Marie Ribeiro, Geoltrey |
. ‘ . e so : > Te % 2} Fan r Nbe “
age I i an even think enough qeons eut a hole in Vensel’s oe Longshoremen J ca Imports First Industrial lalks eee ay mee - ‘enon etiggg
0 play chess with such regularity @nd pumped air into his lungs to - stead
that nobody can ever beat it.” It keep him alive.

Was taken to St. Joseph's hospital
where authorijies said he was un-
conscious and paralyzed on one

Ormargy

Threaten To Tie Up



Shipment Of

For Puerto Rico

VESTERDAY
ter TRINIDAD

Luther Skeete, Georgina Clarke, Peter








er VENEZUELA (On Saturday)











would cost about $80,000 and They said that Vensel was ap- rot 2 — et rag pe COOLING &
would be on the market n about parently infected accidentally by T , . ° = CHRISTIANSTED, St. Croi tt house Wate Mate Tost Janie
+ at : : . : me. ' ; t . é 5 » wot. Cro. Vatt, Robert Watt, Mary Foster; James
six months’ time.—(U.P.) viruses which attack the brain and New Y ork Port Copra Since 1945 Industrial development with- Kenne dy; Jessie | Kenied) Abraham | REFRESHIN( 3
spinal cord producing a form of n the Caribbes : > q Guidenberg
ak ieiemicag ve é ‘ mw v r New ; t an Will be the , Sv LUCIA
7 ‘ encephalitis or sleeping sicknes The seat a Nov. : (From Qur Qwn- Gorrespondent theme of a conference to be james Foster, Howard King; Eaith |
Meteorites May ' UP, the leaders of the insurgent KINGSTON, Nov. 6, held in Puerto Rico in Febru- Chastanet
m —— eee ces ee A shipment of 1,000 tons of ary next year. Plans for these ARRIVALS — BY BWHLA & c T XN
. + 7 - 7 2 his cargo-jammec - ‘ acid eas 4 Ma - s ¢ ri by the Caribbez : nee > i
t ris. Wes eS ; copra has arrived in Jamaica from talks approved by the Cari an. YESTERDAY e 4
Hit The Earth NEW AFRIGAN Over again, unless “the the Philippines consigned to the Commission at its Thirteenth From GRENADA
Ves wah a ceasefire”, which sent Jamaica Coc ee ard. Meeting, inc lude a detailed . Doreen Viechneg; Raymond Noel; Roy
ALBUQUERQUE, Nov. 10. : back sak aruda ss Jamaica Coconut Industry Board. ’ s John; A Church; John Renwick
A scientist reported Saturday Al OR oO ENED BOGE, 10, WOK yeMermEE, : agenda and suggestions for the paward Hare Denis Henry; Am
night that TE ac new Bviterine vate observed This is the first shipment of preparation of the necesSary Leng; John Lang; Michael Hanschell
_ 7 , en ig , I copra to be imported into Jamaica background jocumentatior for Harker Protain; Tyldesly Protain
of mysterious green fireballs seen Be SASL GUARD sings 1945 When stew shipmants delegates 7” 7 whee
in south western skies during the ENTEBBE, Uganda, Monday, tied up an estimated $1,000,000,- 2... =n af lo, “eal ds kh kan af , : . } DEPARTURES — BY BW 1A
Tat r ‘pea A new link the Britist were received from Trinidad. In the proposed agenda, the YESTERDAY
ast two weeks were meteorites N nk in Ae riuish 0900 worth of exports and imports, « ; oe . . , { ,v, VINCENT:
: : : Commonwealth strategic air chai 7 Such importations are made in subject of Industrial Development Fer 81 NOENT:
and some of them may hit the © a strategic air chali ended on Friday with a back to dar that coon oduct. fore hasbeen broken dow nder the Henry St. Hill: Agnes St. Hill; Hele
earth, was completed here Saturday work agreement, negotiated order that cocoanut product fac- foll SSR ESRB Cee ert St. Hill; Osear Kelle |
Farmers and ranchers in one When Acting Governor H.S, Potter state mediation service. Race ri mt Po . penpeser 5 Pees ee Structure of the â„¢ 7 FY Long; K. Simpson A. |
New Mexico locality where resi- Officially opened this East African ~ pir strike leader, John Samp- yen! FR hy et ig Hee Pl pale Caribbean territories Decouteay; R. Kdwards, H. Pome, 2. |
dents wete frightened and awed 2!'port, big enough to operate jet con charged that 117 men caused by hurricane damage 2. Prospects for further Industria! Davies, L. Govi Williams, R. Modi

by the. fireballs, said they felt
a “terrific” jolt shortly after they
had seen one of the objects

5 ae ‘ ‘loverdale West shore of Lake Victoria. To the | years—as young of Industrial Development
Some residents of Cloverdale th j r pha c % z for work. irees on the northside of the 5. Improvement in Labour Produc Mr. Perey Branker, Miss Gladys Wilson
New Mexico reported one of 2O0rth it is bordered by the Anglo- , tivity in Industry in Under. 71 J ih, OM Charle
t Egyptian Sudan over which Bgypt Weekend crews reported island, planted after the 1944 hur- \ » ' Jimm Creagh ' 1arles

the objects was spotted Thursday
morning. It may have fallen in
the desert section of the state of
Chihuahua, Mexico according to

De lanco: Le fee “Diseetan ot port with a 10,300 feet runway-— Shoremen’s Association that there cane and thus restore local copra pers include Professor Arthur Lh at eg Iversen, Peter
the Institute of Meteotitics of the: longest in the African Would be no discrimination production to adequate level: Lewis, St. Lucia-born Stanley ,,%?° i
1e Institute of Meteoritics of the continent, against strikers. —U.P. Jevons Professor af Economics

University of New. Mexico.

La Paz said information came
‘indirectly - through investigators
for an unidentified Government
Agency who visited the area
around Cloverdale to check re-
ports

La Paz said findings indicated

g wih wane 5 gi c fich Molly N. Jones, Sch Belqueen, 5
pied Pr as a she haee teen Hundreds of planes swarmed @ Pes: ae Vek At ” Ortac, & h B a ne “MM v iue Star.
umu such as mig have been the airport as he declared the air- eed LONDON, Nov. 9 . F teh. Ruth, Sch Gardenia W , Sch W. L
collsed. by mebcorites “oreshing na, mort o# he declared the sir- MAUD A church GONDON, Nov. 9. Fire Damtages Roof isiicia sen” Staee stensiens, "ser

into the earth.—U.P.,

“JOHN CANOE”

(From Our Own Correspondent)
KINGSTON, Nov. 6.
“John Canoe,” the old West
Indian pantomime which brought
the spirit of Carnival to Jamaican



Chri ee , ace’ would use Entebbe as its East & POWRRP Of 7 Beusch Seve el pa I The house is occupied by Mrs imapue Li ieee sae ieee a bago or common urinary troubles due to impurities

No peta nis Fen oye 0 Atslee stopping Wet, . LIBERAL PARTY urgent than now for the insistence Carter, When the fire broke out, cook, trom Trinidad in the blood.

cg oda hee ip year, =e j ° : — . -year-old daughter was DERARTURES . ‘li i an’s Backac
Seventy John Gane bends Have U.P. upon the sanctity of marriage and Per nine-year-olc augh c FERARTURES Why not get happy relief by taking Doan’s Backache

entered the Gleaner’s John Canoe
Christmas Competition and keen
rivalry in dress and in acting is
anticipated. Processions “will take
place in several sections of the
island.

IMPRISONMENT




.

air liners and jet bombers. The;
British protectorate of Uganda lies
astride the Equator on the north-

and, Britain are in dispute.
Entebbe the seat of the Uganda
Government, now boasts an air-

Potter told representatives of
the world’s leading airlines and
Government officials attending the
ceremony that extensions would
make Entebbe the first airport in
the world to be specifically re-
designed for operation. of jet
aircraft,

pioneer aviator and first to make
a flight around Africa 20 years ago
attended the ceremony.

Potter told the Assembly that
the airport’s construction had been
carried out after consultation with
Sir Frank Whittle inventor of the
jet aircraft engine and that the
British “comet jet airliner service



U.N. Reject Plan To
Admit Red China

PARIS, Nov. iv.

ment, when

work, today, after an
from Joseph P. Ryan, the Presi-
dent of the International

The 25-day-old

ordered off the Brooklyn
in violation. of the truce
they reported





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SAYS ANGLICAN PAPER

paper on Friday termed “inhuman
callous, and cruel”, the recent pro-
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Development
3. Financial Measures for
of Industrial Development
4. Fiscal Measures for the Fostering

Fostering

developed areas;
6 Machinery for the Fostering otf
Industrial Development

Authors of documentation pa-

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ity and Development, Economix
and Social Council, United Na-
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Commission’s Central Secretariat.



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November . 13, q 51

Tuesday,

MIDDLE EASI

THE to up a four power
Middle Eastern Command is significant of
the hardening of America’s policy in the
Middle East. Until the first four-power
proposal was delivered in Cairo on Octo-
ber 15th, the Middle Eastern policy of the
United States had been officially described
as “fluid”. Now it has set.

American participation with Britain,
France and Turkey in the defence of the
vital Middle East, shows not only an
awareness of the importance of this area,
but a realization that today’s difficulties
in the Middle East are not solely due to
“starchy” British diplomacy.

American spokesmen have recently
been underlining what the United States
really thinks. General Eisenhower was
continuing the line of thought of the late
Admiral Sherman when he said last month
that “so far as the sheer value of territory
is concerned there is no more strategically
important area than the Middle East.”

Admiral Carney, U.S. naval Commander
for the Mediterranean and Eastern Atlan-
tic, told journalists on October 24th, that
“the defence of the Middle East would be
utterly wrecked if. the Canal Zone base
were not in allied hands.” But American
awakening to her own Middle Eastern
interests and to the fact that a line must
be drawn in that area to acts which favour
only the expansion of Communism and the
Soviet Empire is not indicative of any
bellicose intention on the part of the Four
Powers. The proposals put forward on
October 15th in Cairo invited Egypt to
participate in the defence of the Middle
East: to join, as it were, a military club as
a full member: a club in which national
armies would act together in the interests
of all.

Egypt refused. to join and her current
dispute with Great Britain shows no signs
of any change of heart. Yet the terms
setting out the details of the new four-
power command in the Middle East leave
a way open for Egypt and other Middle
Eastern Countries to join in protecting
that vital area from aggression. In its
essentials the defence of the Middle East
is no longer a question as to whether
European powers should have a sphere of
influence in a strategic part of the world :
itis simply achoice between the protection
of the Middle East in any possible conflict
by the Westerti PoWers and the United
States or its loss to Soviet imperialism.

The ‘lead which the United States,
Francé and Great Britain have given the
world in calling for disarmament, the
ringing Churchillian rhetoric thrown into
the battle for peace are solemn assurances
of the peaceful intentions of the West.

At the same time Russia’s refusal to
consider these proposals and her contin-
ued wearisome accusations against the
United States:on whom she lays responsi-
bility for the very race to arms that Presi-
dent Truman is so anxious to halt, forces
the Western powers to complete their
plans for defénce of the Middle East.

The announcement that the plan will
not interfere with the sovereignty of indi-
vidual Middle Eastern’ states is a neces-
sary precaution to convince them that the
four powers have no intentions in the
Middle East other, than the pregervatinn
of-world peace.

Their experiences in the last war will
not easily remove the suspicions of the
Arab States: British imperialism is some-
thing’ which: they actually experienced
and have not liked: Russian imperialism
is ‘an unknown faetor, distant and not
feared with the intensity of fear known to
Europeans. But in addition there is the
immediate national reaction to interfer-
ence of any kind in their own affairs.

The recent announcement is a welcome
sign that the pead¢e of the, world is not
going to be recklessly jeopardised by the
loss of a vital area. But the Middle Eastern
_ Wiation 1 is none me 'the less serious for that.

decision set



post

BARBADOS ADVOCATE



Lord Cherwell—the “Prof.” to
his friends—is back in Downing-
street. With Churchill and Cher-
well as neighbours at No. 10 and
No. 11, Britain's future is going to
be anything but dull.

Lord Cherwell’s appointment as
Paymaster-General in the new
Cabinet means a return to the
responsibilities he carried in the
war-winning Government— “per-
sonal scientific adviser to the
Prime Minister.”

The professor, “my friend and
confidant of so many years,” as
Churchill has written of him, is
something of an enigma.

Before he became Lord Cher-
well in 1941 he was Professor
Lindemann, comparatively un-
known outside Oxford, where he
was Professor of Experimental
Philosophy and Director of the
Clarendon Laboratory.

Because so little was known
about him he was often described
as the “mystery man behind the
Cabinet.”

Actually no mystery existed. It
was entirely because of his mod-

esty that the nation did not know
jof his scientific genius until he
“Man Fri-

| emerged as Churchill's
day” in 1939.

Skilled talent-spotter Churchill
had discovered his remarkable
abilities 20 years before.

Lindemann had won the D.S.O.
as an R.F.C, pilot and was Director
of the Aeronautical Research
Laboratory at Farnborough.

Old Friends

In his memoirs Churchill
says: —
“Lindemann was already an
eld friend of mine. I had met
him first at the close of the
previous war, in which he dis-

tinguished himself by conduct-

ing in the air a number of
experiments, hitherto reserved
for daring pilots, to overcome

the then almost mortal dangers

of a spin.’”

It was these
Churchill jis first glimpse
Lindemann's breath-taking con-
fidence and courage.

In his investigations of
spinning nose-dive, the young
scientist, then 32, reached math-
ematical conclusions which were
ridiculed by experts.

But Lindemann was so sure of
his theory that he decided to put
it to the test in the air.

Before a crowd of onlookers
who regarded his experiment as
“suicide,” he deliberately plunged
his aircraft into a spinning dive
—and landed without a scratch.

tests that

the

Has Travelled
Then, and many times since,
the “Prof.” vindicated his con-
viction that “one who has got his
figures correct need not fear
having his accounts checked.”
Like Churchill, Lindemann

was at 30, a widely travelled man,
Born at Sidmouth, Devon, of
Alsatian descent, he spent most
of his youth on the Continent,
He was educated in Germany.

THE

gave
of

By Joseph Garrity

After taking his Ph.D. at Berlin
University in 1911, he went to
Paris to collaborate with other
physicists in the study of radio-
activity. Then to America as a
lecturer at Chicago University.

Between the war, as an Oxford
don, Lindemann made important
contributions to a _ variety of
scientific studies.

But neither those peaceful pur-
suits nor Oxford’s calm could
dispel his fear that another war
was coming.

He realised that “the air-plane
had changed the whole outlook in
war.” That was why he never
relaxed his scientific studies of
the problems of air defence.

Lindemann and Churchill were
both appalled at Britain’s unpre-
paredness in the air, and as a
protest against the Baldwin Gov-
ernment’s apathy the non-politi-
cal professor contested, unsuccess-
fully, an Oxford University
by-election.

Apprehension
Churchill reveals in his
memoirs how their mutual appre-
hension made him and Lindemann
firmer friends.
The pair travelled Europe
together investigating their prob-

lem.
In 1936,

when Churchill
announced that Germany __ was
rearming. Lindemann made a
special trip to Tangier, where his
friend was on holiday.

After these years of close col-
laboration it is hardly surprising
when Qhurchill tells us that “this

pleasant -and fertile association
continued throughout the war.”
Under Lindemann’s © brilliant
direction our scientific teams
produced:—
The answer to the magnetic
mine;
the anti-aircraft balloon
barrage;
the means of bending a

radio beam to deflect enemy

bombers;

“Window,” the pane de-
vice to confuse the enemy’s
anti-aircraft radar installa-
tions; and airborne — radar
which helped to defeat the
U boats.

As the new atom chief, Lord
Cherwell’s first move will cer-
tainly be to free scientists from the
Civil Service strait-jacket.

First Move

He expects to stimulate pro-
gress in research by encouraging
them with better pay and
conditions,

Now that “Master” and “Prof.”
ure together again Downing-
street's midnight oil will no
doubt burn as brightly, or
perhaps as long, as it did during
the war.

But there will be a warmer
social glow about it now.
Churchill will have more time to
enjoy his companionship.









The tall, bald,
looking scientist has been de-
scribed as “quiet to the point oi
melancholy.” But Churchili
knows better. In the “Prot.” he
has found a scintillating conver-
sationist,

Though a scientist by profes-
sion, Cherwell is an enginec:
philosopher, economist, and in-
ventor by inclination.

He once caused an envious sti:

in the Lords by carrying, durin;
a heat wave, a home-made port-
able electric fan operated by a
flash-lamp battery.
j Churchill, himself a champio
in the art of using words, is en
joyably stimulated by Cherwell’:
sarcastic invective.

Once, when Lord Cherwell wa
criticising some particular legis-
lation in the Lords, Lord Stre-
bolgi interrupted with “What i
your alternative?”

Amid laughter, the “Prof
retorted: “When I sit on tha
Bench (the Government side «
the House) I will tell you.”

Occasionally he astonishes the
Lords with feats of mental] ariti
metic involving millions. Are
he is equally at home in debate
lampooning psychiatrists, or com
plaining of the importation o
American artists “like the nigh
club singer who calls herself
Midriff and specialises in leerin
lyrics.”

distinguished-

Same Brand

Winston and the “Prof.” shar«
the same brand of dry humour

On a visit to the Monte Cark
Sporting Club the professor wa
asked if he played roulette
“Young man,” replied the dor
“IT lecture on the laws of prob

ability.”

othing delights Cherwell
more than a joke against him
self,

A Good Match

He was highly amused whe
Churchill once wisecracked abou
his diet. For this bachelor, non
smoker, teetotaler is also a vege
tarian

With fellow-vegetarian
Stafford Cripps, Lord Cherwe!
was late for one of Churchill’
after-dinner War Cabinets.

Si

On arrival, after holding uj
the meeting for several minutes
they heard Mr. Churchill say
with a wry smile: “Now that ou
two colleagues have digeste
‘their beetroot, I think we car
begin.”

A good match; these two re-

markable cronies.

No. 10 and No. 11 might, affairs
of State permitting, enjoy a few}
games of Monopoly and Lexicon

But whoever gives the order
in the daytime, there is no doub
who will be master at night. For
the “Prof.” is reputed to be such
a wizard at Lexicon that he car
even build a word put of
W, X, Y and Z.—L.E.S.



Kasy To Trip Up In The

}_.Pve been down at the’ Houses

jof Parliament this week finding
out what it’s like to be a new
I M.P., and what I say is: “Brother,
you can keep the job. AND the
£1,000 a year that goes witih it.”
Getting yourself elected is
nothing; it’s the things you've got
to learn when you're in. Why, it’s
worse than joining the Army.
Up to Parliament you drive
with your chest full of pride at
being top of the poll, and the first

thing that happens is a policeman

tomes up to you and says you
¢an't park your car in the Palace
Yard without a permit from the
Lord Great Chamberlain.
Somewhat deflated by this set-
back, the new M.P. tries to creep
in without being noticed, like a
new boy at school, but on all
sides officials stare
whisper to each other till

the Tower of London,

Actually he is being stared at
only because the officials want
to remember his face,

Once inside, the new member
hangs his hat and coat on a peg,
but even such a simple operation
as this is fraught with parlia-
mentary tradition,
attached to the peg is a loop of
red tape that seems to have no
possible purpose.

It is meant for

new boy with nothing more
lethal than an umbrella to know?

Swords (and spure) are barred
be

in Parliament, and have_ to
left in the cloakroom, A Scottish

member was called to order once
for appearing with a knife in his

stocking.
Your Hat
You used to have to know an
awful lot about when and where
to wear your hat in Parliament,
put you can now leave it on the
peg with your mind at peace,

at hint and
he's
sure he’s going to be thrown into

because

hanging your
sword on, but how is a harmless

House
By BERNARD WICKSTEED

because the only occasion it is
needed is in the rare event of a
member wanting to raise a point:
of order after a division has been
called.

Then there’s smoking. The new
member is dying for a puff to
soothe this nerves, but he’d be
well advised not to light up
before he sees someone else doing
it, because there are times and
places where this is a fearful
offence.

On the other hand, he can get
a drink whenever he likes,
because whatever hardships Par-
liament imposes on the populace,
it recognises no licensing hours
for itself.

Now where
going to sit?

He knows he can’t sit on the
front bench, but if he takes a
seat in one of the rows behind
he is liable to find it belongs, by
unwritten law, to some ageing
legislator who thas had it for gen-
erations,

If he sits on any of the benches
beyond the Bar, e.g., those at the
opposite end to the Speaker, he
can listen to what goes on, but
he won't be allowed to speak him-
self,

is the new boy

Your Speech

At last, having parked his car
correctly, refrained from smoking
in the corridors, hung up his
sword and removed his spurs, the
new boy catches the Speaker's
elusive eye and steps out into the
gangway to make the speech that
will move the world.

At once there are devastating
cries of “Order, order,” for step-
ping into the gangway ‘s speak
is a parliamentary sin. sin.



It is also a sin to put so much
as a toe over the red lines at the
edge of the Chamber's greer
carpet. These lines are two and
a half sword-lengths apart, and
are designed to keep you fron
striking your opponents, you cad

Back in your constituency you
rather fancied your free-and-
easy platform style. But it won’
do here my boy. All speeches are
made to the Speaker, so unles
you are referring to him person-
ally you must never say “you”
in a speech,

You must never mention by
name the House of Lords,
because in the Commons it doesn’t
exist, You refer to it as “the
other place.”

Above all, you must never men-
tion another member’s name, He
is always the honourable-mem-
ber - who - has - just - sat - down
or the honourable - and - gallant-
member-for-so-and-so.

Your Notes
You mustn’t read a newspaper
or book in the House. You

shouldn't even have notes of your
speech (though most members
do), because they might fall into
the hands of the King.

You see, the King was once
the bugbear of Parliament, and
he wasn’t supposed to know what
was said there,

If the new member finds é
getting dark in the House he
ask someone to

doesn’t just
switch on the lights. He calls out:
“Candles.”

Thet’s only the start of the new
boy’s education, If you want to
know the rest of his syllabus
you'll find it in a handy book of
1,057 pages called “Parliamentary
Practice,” by Sir Thomas
Erskine. The 15th edition weigh.
nearly 4lb.

—L.E.S.



CHURCHILL'S FRIEND _ {ThisDrugSpells SAFETY...
-PROE”

A Wizard Moves In At No. 10

By CHAPMAN PINCHER

A DRUG which enables surgeons to per-
form intricate operations more skilfully and
more swiftly than ever before is being tested
in British hospitals.

It almost eliminates
tissues are cut.
the drug provides three great advantages:—
reducing the
haemorrhage it makes operations safer.

Mt enables the surgeon to operate
more surely and more rapidly because the
issues are not obscured.

ONE: By

TWO:

THREE: By

stored rapidly

the Royal

tion. |

Doctors and

Today,

at all. *

SOUNDER SLEEP
A SLEEPING TABLET said to be so safe

that even

has been discovered by USS. scientists.

In a six-month test 134 sufferers from in-
somnia found that the drug usually put them
soundly to sleep in less than half an hour.

“The sleep was restful and the patients ex-

perienced no

York’s Metropolitan Hospital report today
An overdose of the tablets produces ex-
tremely deep sleep. But there is no danger.
Unlike barbiturates, the new drug, say the
ductors, does not lower the breathing rate.

DOCTOR VETTED
fe BRITAIN'S vets are hankering after a
title. Convinced that they will never
train the public to call them “veterinary sur-
geons,” they are now agitating to be called

“doctor.”

Down-to-earth vets are opposing the change
—for a surprising reason. They point out tha’
the word “vet”
in the language than “doctor.”

Their argument :
honourable act, but “to doctor” it has a dis
reputable ring.

TUESDAY, NOVEMBER 13, 1951





1

loss of blood when
Trials so far have shown that

risk of severe

reducing the shock of surgery

t helps patients to make a quicker recovery
after operations.

The drug—it is called hexamethonium bro-
mide—acts by causing a rapid fall in blood
pressure. By propping the patient in different
oositions the surgeon can make any part of
the body almost bloodless.

The patient’s blood pressure can be re-

to normal by an injection.

Pr. George Hale Enderby, anaesthetist of
National Orthopaedic Hospital,
was the first to try out the drug in an opera-

He has used it successfully on more than
250 patients ranging in age from 11 to 78.

surgeons from other hospitals

have met Dr. Enderby in London to compare
their experiences with the drug. Verdict: “It
is proving particularly valuable in plastic
surgery and in deafness operations.”

Dr. Enderby warned that only highly ex-
perienced anaesthetists can use the drug
safely, which is still experimental.

MACHINE TELLS
ee one elegant dog breed, the red Irish
setter, is-afflicted with a most distressing
hereditary eye complaint.

Some of the pups seem normal, but within
six months they cannot see in dim light;
aventually they become totally blind.

As there is no likelihood of a cure, scien-
tists have been trying to find a way of detect-
ng afflicted puppies so that they may be
humanely destroyed.
scientists of Newmarket’s finely
equipped Canine Research Station report
success. They have discovered that the dis-
ease can be detected by an electrical machine
| before a puppy is one month old.

The machine records the minute electric
currents generated by healthy eyes. The eyes
of a pup destined to go blind give no current

a huge overdose is harmless

”

hangover,” doctors of New



has a much higher standing

“To vet” anything is ar

YOUR MOVE

A TRANSATLANTIC chess match be

tween two giant robot “brains”

is being

planned by British and American scientists

Britain’s challenger will be
“brain”
When Dr.

3,500-valve
University.
tuned it up,

University Computer—should be able

MUC, the
housed at Mancheste:
Alan Turing has
MUC—short for Manchester
to

think several moves ahead.
First chess-board opponent lined up for
MUC is Prinny, a new “brain” being buil’

at Princeton University. ‘
* As recorded in this column last year, doctors are
using this machine to diagnose human eye defects



No Floods From Artificial Rain |Our Readers Say:

WASHINGTON, Nov. 10
Weather experts here agree
there is no need to fear that arti-
ficial rain-making will unleash
disastrous floods. At the same
time they cautioned, farmers not

successful

ydne. seeding. The two
to expect man-made rains. w ould 5 They Sie enticneentn conteat> ‘are s-
bees cents toe hae _, ed by the Commonwealth Scien- A cloud formation hanging|Such a Christi
parrent ea mee tifie and Industrial Research Or- over a mountain crest, When |
shown that cloud seeding oak ganization “may have laid the bombarded with ice pellets. it |
speed up rainfall, oe 2 shh? basis for future rain making pro- will often release snow and in-|long time I hav
Site ingiance would Aicefinet, & cesses.” crease the hydraulic power at

Results of

radical change in normal weath-
er conditions.





By HENRY PAYMONT

Australia has taken the lead in
rain making research after
experiments
physics recently completed near

the
periments were read to members

He
tralian
national data
US.

some

in cloud

Australian ex-

said judging by the Aus-
experiment other
and
research only
pheric conditions have shown to
lend themselves to effective cloud
conditions island of Barbados to express my

deep regret of the departure of

the base of the mountain.

inter-
the result of
two atmos-



{that this

SURGEON SPECIALIST

To the Editor, The Advocate,

SIR,—I wish to be among the
many thousands of people in this

gentleman, as Mr, A, G. Leacock
As a patient of his for quite a

him most courteous, kindhearted
| and understanding. We all know
worthy and_ brilliant

hard from early

morning until

ate hours of the night to save

his saintly
matter how tired

ian and noble

We also know

e always found working privately

we see his

We pray that



manner was always
hard and what we all know, a
most strenuous day’s work.

the lives of his fellowmen. Yet
face and pleasant

he was aiter a
there, no

that he could

have made a much better salary

, but here again

christian love by
working at the General Hospital.

God’s blessing
brain and his
his lot may be

thrown and when things perplex
him sometimes, he may still find

To you and your family we say
good luck, God bless

PATIENT.

BURIAL GROUNDS

of the U.S. meteorological Society The presence of a shower cloud! “surgeon” has done all in his may guide his

Thic evarwavion given in an in- at the Weather Bureau Wednes- which aoe gm | yr aie power to help the community hands wherever
terview. by F.F. Reichelderfer, day by E. G. Bower, Australian peeewite’ A et a | heedless of class, coleur, or
Chief of the U.S. Weather physicist currently engaged in acre “vd 7 E - + ae creed. He has worked, vory
Bureau and Ferguson Hall, the research work in California. henetaiee paaieae gtd bureau's top research physicist. Reichelderfer said. “We were ; a borderin, rainbelts can gicmi : ;

They noted that considerable Reichelderter Ve Att th dhe t ow auricle? neds dismissed allegations that artifi-
progress in the development of Very much impressed ae ‘ch Pi 3 most irc Pp cial rains could produce floods. goodbye,
attificia. rain-making was made Australian experiments. aAGarh ot pitation. ; a Some farmers in the U.S. have You.
during ‘ast year largely due to @ Aa 10 a Sa Peon hg Economic A lvantages blamed rain-making efforts for GRATEFUL
the exchange of information on Over norma ROE i St ae Reichelderfer said: “Important causing disastrous Kansas floods.
‘ ternational basis tered with perhaps the best ex- economic advantages, especially ae ee November, 12.
ah. , perimental controls designed so for agriculture can be gained Hall said : There have been

Amazing Results far in this form of research.” from cloud seeding in situations hundreds of reports of commer-

Both scientists have been ana- More Research where either of these conditions cial success in seeding clouds

lyzing the results of experiments Reichelderfer pointed out how- is present. But we do not want and producing heavy showers.



To The Editor Th

e Advocate,—

in the U.S. and for the past two ever that at least one more year to raise the hopes of farmers in Evidence indicates in most cases

vears have exchanged informa- of intensive research will have to areas with dry climates. Rain that ae showers thought to have SIR,—I read with considerable

tion with experts in Australia, be carried out “until scientifical- does not come from a clear sky resulted from seeding were interest the article in Friday’s

Canada, Israel) Braz Chile. ly conclusive evidence has been Cloud formations are a prerequi- actually the result of natural Adveecate telling of a meeting of

Mexico obtained “to determine its effect- site for manufactured rain. Re CURES: Much more research in the St. Lucy’s Vestry when con-
Scientist: pointe u t ivent Reichelderfer categorically cloud physics is necessary.—U.P. sideration was given to a letter



—L.E.S.
from the Colonial Secretar)
regarding the granting of free

access to non-Anglican minister.
to perform the committal service |
of the providing of “public burial!
grounds,”

Rey. Pestaina is quoted as
Stating that he is not in favour
of the privilege being granted.
I wonder how Rev. Pestaina
would feel if he were transferre
to some Moslem country where
thirty per cent. of the population
were members of the Anglican
communion and he was not al-
Jowed to commit the body oi
any of his parishioners for whor
he had ministered all durin?
their life, and instead, funeral
rites were conducted by a Mos-
lem according to the Moslem
faith. I feel sure his viewpoint
would change before he knew it.

Mr. Sobers

A is reported as
saying “that if mnon-Anglican
churches want burial ground:

they should provide their own.”
Are the taxes not paid by mem-
bers of the “Church of God”
“Moravians”, “Pilgrim Holiness”
and ‘‘Seventh Day Adventists”
as well as members of the An-
glican church? Why not treat all
alike? :



C. M. GREENIDGE |

9th November, 1951,



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TUESDAY, NOVEMBER 13,

1951



BARBADOS ADVOCATE







40-Year-Old Conductor Stands Trial
On Murder Charge

THE TRIAL of Alphonza Beckles, a 40-year-old con-
ductor of Society Hill, St. John, who is charged with the
murder of 48-year-old Winston Cumberbatch, a bus driver,
began at the Court of Grand Sessions yesterday before the

Hon. the Acting Puisne Judge Mr. G. L. Taylor.

Beckles

is alleged to have committed the murder on September 9

this year.

Eleven cf the 22 witnesses the Prosecution are ex-
pected to call to prove their case, gave evidence yesterday

Mara the application of Mr. J. S.
B. Dear, one of Beckles’s law-
yers, the jury were carried yes-
terday evening to the scene of the
alleged murder at Thickets, St.
Philip. The ‘bus in which Cum-
berbatch and Beckles were driv-
ing at the time of the jncident,
was also inspeeted by the jury.

Mr. W. W. Reece, K.C., Solici-
tor General, is prosecuting for the
Crown.

Mr. Dear is associated with Mr.

George Farmer as counsel for
Beckles.

Both Beckles and Cumber-
batch were employed by the
General Motor Bus Co. and

worked on the St. Philip route.

Before calling any witnesses,
Mr. Reece outlined the case to
the jury. He told them that evi-
dence would be given to show
that Beckles and Cumberbatch
had had several bickerings pre-
vious to Cumberbatch’s death. The
fatal incident took place when
Cumberbatch and Beckles were
taking the bus P.175 along Thick-
etts to District “C”. It is alleged
that Cumberbatch was driving
the bus when he was _ stabbed.
The ‘bus swerved on to the em-
bankment

First Witness

Mildred Denny, reputed wife
of Winston Cumberbatch said she
and Cumberbatch had nine chil-
dren. She said that Cumber-
batch left home on September 8
between 11 and 12 o'clock, for
work.

As he was working in the coun-
try he would not return home
every night.

On the following morning she
carried breakfast for him. Later
ihat day she saw him at the
Hospital. She identified the body
to Dr. Cato on the following day.
Set. Arthur Scott, attached to the
Bridge Police Station, said he at-
tended the post mortem examina-
tion of Winston Cumberbatch
which was’ performed b Dr.
Cato. A nurse at the ospital
handed him blood-stained cloth-
ing. Near the left pocket of the
shirt there was a hole. There was
a corresponding hole in the vest.

Under cross-examination he
told Mr. Dear that the jacket had
no hole.

Carmen Boyce, a Nurse of the
Barbados General Hospital, said
that on September 10 she hand-
ed some clothes which had been
taken off Winston Cumberbatch
on the previous day to Sgt. Scott.

Sergeant’s Evidence

Sgt. Thorington, in charge of
Four Roads, St. John, said that
on September 9, Beckles was
brought to the Police Station and
charged with inflicting grievous
bodily harm,

“On the following day he was
charged with murder,” he said.
“TI cautioned Beckles and asked
him whether he had any thing
to say. Beckles said he was in-
nocent of the charge.”

Dr. Anthony Gale said that on
September 9 he was on duty at
the Casualty of the General Hos-

pital. A man whose name was
given as Winston Cumberbatch
was brought in. He had a stab

wound in the left breast. It was
about half an inch wide, two
inches deep and directly over the
heart.

When he saw Cumberbatch he
was just coherent and_ while
speaking to him he lapsed into
incoherence,

The wound was inflicted down-
wards. A sharp pointed instru-
ment such as a penknife could
have caused the wound,

Cross-Examined

Under cross - examination he
said that a wound of that nature
might spurt blood but it was not
spurting any when he saw it.

Dr. A. 8S. Cato, Visiting Medi-
cal Officer at the General Hos-
pital, said that on September
10 about 1.30 p.m. he examined
the body of a man at the Hos-
pital. The body was identified
by Mildred Denny as that of
Winston Cumberbatch.

Post mortem appearances
were as follows:__There was a
stab wound on the left side of
the chest. There was a bruise
on the lower part of the back
on the right side. There was an
area of softening and swelling
in the middle of the right cer-
ebral hemispheres,

The stab wound of the chest

and the case is adjourned until today.

in the left
bruise in front of each knee and
small bruises on the back of the
left elbow. There were no special
features about the stomach,

From his examination and from
consideration or the circumstances
surrounding the death he would
say that death was due to the
defects of embarrassment of the
contraction of the heart and air
getting into the circulation. there-
by causing damage. These were
the results of the stab wound of
the heart. The wound was in-
flicted by a sharp pointed instru-
ment.

Stab Wound

If a person had fallen trom a
bus he could have got bruises, but
the stab wound would have been
caused by something else. “I au
not think it was self inflicted,” he
said. Tneoretically it was not
impossible, but it was very im-
probable. If it were self inflicted,
it would more 'ikely have gone
through the space between the
ribs than through the cardiac
part. A fair degree of force had
to be used.”

Cross examined he said the
wound was nearer to the middle
line of the chest than the nipple
of the breast. With such a wound
unconsciousness did not neces-
sarily come on immediately and

it was possible that he could have
done _ something after being
wounded.

If Cumberbatch had fallen on a
firmly fixed, sharp-pointed instru-
ment, the wound could have been
inflicted. If a man had tried to
wound himself without killing
himself the degree of force that
had been used would not have
been used. If Cumberbatch had
inflicted the wound himself he
would have needed more freedom
of movement than Cumberbatch
would have had if he were driv-
ine o bus when the wound was
inflicted.

Station ’Phoned

George L. farmer, J.P., a
planter of Windemere, St. John,
said he was at home in his sitting
room on Sepltemoer Y about 1U.5u
a.m. Beckles came and asked
permission to use the telephone,
He asked to be put on to District
“C.” He said a bus had been in-
volved in an accident on Thick-
etts Road.

Beckles then said he wanted to
telephone the owners of the bus.
He wanted to get either Mr. Dow-
ding or Mr. O'Neale. ‘He tele-
phoned and repeated the same
statement he had made in the
previous telephone message.

His wife casne into the room
and she asked how the accident
happened. Beckles said that he had
the driver were taking the bus to
District “C” and they had a con-
tention as to the road they should
take, One wanted to go along one
road and the other wanted to go
along another road. In the ex-
citement the bus jumped the bank.

“My wife asked what became
of the driver and Beckles said the
driver put his head in the canes.

“She asked why the driver
acted as he did in driving the bus
over the bank. Beckles replied

that Cumberbatch must have
wanted to murder him.”
Cross-examined by Mr. Dear,

he said the canes along Thickets
were ahout 10 to 12 feet tall. The
farthest distance between the
outer edge of two cane holes was
about 12 feet.

Evidence Corroborated

Blanene Farmer, wite of George
S. Farmer, corroborated her hus-
band’s evidence.

She added at Beckles asked
whether he cduld leave his bi-
cycle there. She told him he could.
Yhe bicycle had on it a hand bag.
The police came by night and
took away the bicycle. :

P.C. Wosley Sobers who _ is
attached to District “C” said that
on September 9 about 9.30 a.m.
he went to Thickett’s Road where
he saw the bus P—175 in the
trench. The left front wheel had
come off the bus. He saw Win-
ston Cumberbatch lying in the
rear seat of the bus. His clothing
was sgaked in blood.

Another bus, J—7 was at Dis-
trict “C” as it was inspection day,



P.C. WICKHAM SEES HOW

Mr.

HENRIQUES, Founder of Boys’ Clubs in England, re

cently sent a letter to the Commissioner of Police in which he said

that P.C. Wickham of the Local

months course in the running
During that time P.C. Wickham

Force had just completed his three

and management of Boys’ Clubs
travelled to various camps in the

United Kingdom and saw how they were operated.

P.C. Wickham is now going

to a Military School of Physical

Training at Aldershot to take a three months course in physical

training.





hing ‘there wa a Lermites, Poor Construction

Caused Much Damage

In Jamaica

Hurricane

TERMITES, lack of maintenance and poor construc-
tion practice caused much of the damage during the hurri-
cane of August 17--18 in Jamaica, Mr. W. M. Woodhouse,
Building Development Adviser to the Comptroller for

Development and Welfare told the Advocate.

Vicar General
Of Grenada

Dies

(From Our Own Correspondent)
GRENADA, Noy. 12

Forty-six year old Vicar General
and Provincial of Grenada and the
Grenadines Alexandcr L’Estrange
died last night at the Colony Hos-
pital a few hours after edmission
on the afternoon of the same day.
He complained of illness on No-
vember 2 though he has been up
at his room at the Vicarage daily
and was nc: causing ar a‘ixiety
to jelow pries.@ S., George's
Catholic Church was crowded with
the faithful and other sympathis-
ers this morning when the impres-
sive funeral rite took place, all
Dominican clergy to the island at-
tending the solemn requiem mass,
celebrant being Father FitzGerald,
assisted by Fathers Bevas and
Coyle.

Governor Arundell, Administra-
tor McMillan, Treasurer Adams
and members of the Legislature
were among the congregation,

Born in London in April 1905,
the deceased was ordained a priest
in 1929. Schooled at a Jesuit Col-
lege he later studied the priest-
hood at the English Dominican
Priory, Woodchester. Gloucester-
shire, Hawkesyard Priory, Staf-
fordshire, and Blackfriars Priory,
Oxford

After ordination he did two
years advanced studies at Louvain
University, Belgium. Following
years of parish work in Newcastle
he came to Grenada, November,
1932.

During 1935 to 1947 he was re-
called to England where he taught
Moral Theology at Blackfriars and
also lectured students at Oxford.

After he returned in 1947 he be-
came Vicar General—Provincial



1950.
EE
Cumberbatch’s packet was but-

toned or not when he saw him,

P.C, Stanley Mayers attached to
District “C” said he went to
Thicketts Road, St. Phillip, on
September 9 about 1.30 p.m He
gave evidence as to measurements
of the road and various points
about the scene, He said that the
bus was damaged.

Mrs. Farmer handed him a
small canvas bag and bicycle
about 9.15 p.m. The bag contained
bread, rum, a screw driver and
bicycle tools.

He said in answer to Mr, Dear
that he took statements from some
of the witnesses,

Arrested
Cpl, Vernon Hunte attached
District “C” said he went to the
scene at Thicketts on Sept. 9.

He saw Beckles among the crowd
which had gathered, He asked him
to come to District “C” and give
a statement. Beckles was carried
to the station, Later in the day
he was arrested and charged with
grievous bodily “harm. He took
from him a small pair of scis-
sors, a small penknife and a
corkscrew.

He took
O'Neal «
ington.

a statement from Mr,
nd handed it to Sgt. Thor-

" Sgi. Thorington recalled said to

Mr. Dear that he received all the
Statements and forwarded them
to the Superintendent in charge.

When Beckles had been first
charged he had been charged in
his (Thorington's) name.

He had been acting at District
“C” when the accident occurred.

He knew what was the nature
of some of the statements as he
was present when some of them
were being taken,

He was not present when Whit-

Mr. Woodhouse was in Jamaica
last month to advise the Govern-
ment on rehousing problems cre-
ated by the hurricane. He stopped
there on his way to Barbados fron
England after attending the 195!
Building Research Congress 1
London.

He said that when he flew out
to the U.K. a fortnight after the
hurricane, it was thought th
about 12,000 houses had been des-
troyed or damaged. It was clear,
however, that returns from several
districts were widely inaccurate

nd it now seemed that neariy
50,000 houses were affected.

Poorer Classes

“This figure includes only houses
of the poorer classes who were
not insured” he said, There were,
of course, many other losses: in-
surance assessors from the U.K.
were amazed how little hurricane

insurance had been taken out
among all sections of the com-
munity.

Emergency Committees were

soon in operation and fortunately,
stocks of building materials were
fairly good. Emergency “first-aid”
issues were made up to a valve
of £20 to help the indigent to re-
100f or patch their houses.

He said that communal] feeding
in public buildings was already
proving very expensive and pre-
venting the use of the buildings
for normal purposes, as well as
being very bad for morale

Mr. Woodhouse said that sub-
ject to parliamentary approval, the
British Government had agreed to
assist Jamaica to the maximuin
of £4,600,000 in a grant and loan;
the greater portion would be fe:
rehousing and the balance fo:
agriculture. A special new agency
was to be set up in Jamaica for
this purpose of rehousing and the
principle of aided “Self-help”
house building would almost cer-
tainly be included and every effort
would be made to build hurricane-
proof houses, These homes he
said, would not be free gifts, as a
portion of the cost would have to
be repaid by the occupiers,

Many roof sheets -had been
blown off and caused further dam-
age during the hurricane. This was
because they were inadequately
fixed; drive screws and washers
were essential, Small roofing units
such as cedar shingles which had
more fixing per square foot of
roof which were much more re-
sistant

Wood Ants

Althougn wina speeds of 110
miles per hour were recorded,
ordinary glazing resisted, provided
it was properly fixed. Stone and
concrete buildings naturally stood
up better than wood frame build-
ings, but the latter if braced es-
pecially between frame and base
and between roof and frame were
quite adequate. The collapse of
many wood-frame and concrete-
nog panel buildings—common in
Jainaica—could in 90% of the
cases be attributed to advanced
infestation of the timber by ants
and the use of very weak concrete
in the panels.

“The need for improved build-
ing practices and codes and for
their reinforcement is very appar-
ent, Steps are being taken to
improve the Building Bye-Laws in
this dire:tion. Consideration may
also be given to the burying of
some power lines. The dans
from overhead live electric cables
which had blown down, caused
long delays and much extra work
for the utility companies after the
hurricane, The companies worked



very well, however, in restorin
their services.

Mr, Woodhouse was struck by
two features of the hurricane. The

first was the lack of attention to the
official warnings, which were man»
and adequate. As result, f
precautions were not taken ut
the damage was worse than it need
have been. Seventeen inche
rain could do a lot in five hour
that was recorded in many place



il

‘Gascogne’ Ruth Brings

Off WI Run

“De Grasse” Coming

‘he fr
Gasvog..e

aca passenger-freighter
Wiliktat SAMCU Irom Bar-
November 3% .or Soutn-
ampton, will not be coming back
to Baroacos a Cie Gle. irans-
She has been
over to an Italian Steamship
any who will run her in the
Mediterranean

The S.S. Colombie now runs thc
West Indies—-U.K. route alone for
the French line.

Gascogne has been
Barbados for 24 years. She took
ever in 1949 from the chartered
passenger - freighter Katoomba
which was then returned to her
owners.

Taking over from the Gascogne
will be another French liner, the
SS. De Grasse (21,000 tons)
vhich is expected to make her
first call at Barbados on May 6.
Nye Grasse will be coming from
England via Vigo (Spain). Mar-
tiniaue and she will be sailing on
to Trinidad, La Guaira, Curacao,
Cartagena and Jamaica,

Laaos on

as

itlanuque liner

old

Com,

coming to

Returning to Barbados on May
19 from Jamaica via Curacao, La
Guaira, Martinique and Trinidad,
De Grasse will be taking her first

passengers for U.K. from Barba-
aos

De Grasse can accommodate
615 passengers in three classes,

and will be making a call to Bar-
bacos once every five weeks.
Gascogne’s passenger accommoda-
tion is 254 and she used to call at
Barbadas once every five weeks.
Messrs R. M. Jones & Co., Ltd.
ire the locai representatives of
ihe French line

Gascomne was formerly
George Washinteton. She
troop transport during
War Il.

the
was 1

World



Nomination
Stations

At nine o’clock on Thursday,
the 22nd of November, the Return-
ing Officers of the various constit-
uencies will receive the nomination
of candidates for election to the
General Assembly of the island.
The places at which nomination
will take place are as follows

City of Bridgetown—Queen’'s
Park Building.

St. Michael Drill
Ann's Fort, Garrison.

Christ Churech—Vestry
Christ Church.

St. George—St
joys’ School,

Hall, St.
Room,

George's Church

St. Philip—St. Philip’s Church
Boys’ School,
St. John-——St. John’s Church

Mixed School,

« St. James--St, James’ Combined
School

St. Thomas St.
Church Boys’ School,

Thomas’

St. Joseph—St, Joseph's Chureh
Bovs’ School.

St. Andrew—Belleplaine Com-
munity Hall,

St. Peter—St. Peter's Church
Girls’ Sehool.

St Tnev—St. Lucy's Church
Girls’ School.



Labourer Jailed

Sentence of 12 months’

im-
prisonment with hard labour wa
yesterday passed on Cameron
Greenidge a labourer of Bay

Land, St. Michael by Mr. G. B
Griffiih, Acting Police Magistrate
of District “A”. Greenidge stole
$16 and a bamboo basket the
property of Mildred McKenzie on
November 11.
Greenidge has two
convictions for larceny.

Resisted Police

Nessie Clarke a labourer of
Mar.indales Road, St. Michae.
was ordered to pay a fine of 10/-

previou



* by Mr. G. B. Griffith for resistin

Police Constable Carrington whil-
he was making an arrest,

In another charge he was fined
40/- in 14 days or one month fo:
using indecent language on Pal-
metto Square, Bo.h offences were
committed on November 10,

s ad
SPCA Fund Grows
The Barbados S.P.C.A. has re-
paid a loan of $100 and collecict

1,764.08 during the past year.
Posters and leaflets have bee:

Liqueur

With torn sails and drench

eabins, the 94-foo. schooner Ruth
sailed into Carligle Bay on Sun-
day after a three-day stormy
tmp from Martinique Ruth is

paying her first visit .o Barbados
Mainsail, stemstaysail and jib

were all badly torn ir the squaiiy

weather. Ruth will be fitted wi

new sails before she leaves Bar
b_ dos fer crew were kept bu
throughout the trip temporaril)

mending che sails.

A French schooner, Ruth wa
built at Bonaire, Dutch Wes
Indies, 21 years ago. But in he
tresh coat of white paint, sh
looks a new schooner. Her mat
said vhat she has been kept i:
constant repair.

Ruth is owned by a
businessman who lives
tinique. The = skipper
Emilien and the other
bers of the crew

The mate said
she has only
Barbados to

Frencl
in Mar
Captair
nine mem
French
yesterday (hi
made this call t
bring empty druy
"nd of liqueur from Mar
tinique. She trades between S
Mcrr in and Curacao with gener:
cargo,
The

are

cases

echooner

is 22 feet wic
and draws 11 feet of water wher
tight, 14 feet when loaded. Sh
is 66 tons net and 120 tons grog

She is consigned to the Schoon
Pool.

DON'T. STOP
BETWEEN STOPS

Colonel R. T. Michelin, Com
n.issioner of Police, told = th
é.avocate yesterday that he ha

recently noticed
the practice of

an increave 1
bus drivers sto}

ping heir buses between stop
“This prectice, while for th
convenience of a few passenger:
besides being against the law, i
a great inconvenience for th
travelling public Police patro
are paying special atten ion
this matter and those disregard

ing the law in this respect will b
reported.”

He said ihat it Is hoped tha
the persons travelling in the b
will net expect the driver to sto

anywhere than at organised b
sops. “Drivers are arked t
ignore the requests from con

ductors who want to stop for t
convenience of pa
said,

sengers,” }



‘Alcoa Roamer”
Arrives Here

The SS. Aleoa Roamer (4,82:
ons net) arrived here from New
Orleans yesterday with 4,397 sack»
of cornmeal, 1,000 bags of wheat
flour

and a quantity of salted
meat.

Also arriving was the molasse
tanker Athelbrook which has
called for a load of vaceum pat
molasses for Trinidad, The Athel
brook is expected to leave por
‘oday for Trinidad

Alcoa Roamer is consigned |
Messrs Robert Thom Ltd., and
Athelbrook to Messrs H. Jason

Tones & Co., Ltd.

Blackguard Fined

Mr. G. B. Griffith, Acting Pol
ice Magistra.e of District "A
yesterday ordered Lucille Ad’ m





of Lightsfoot Lane, St. Michael
to pay a fine of 15/- and 2/- cost
in 14 days or 14 days’ imprison
ment when she appeared befor

him charged with blackguardin
oo Lightsfoot Lane.

The offence was committed
October 7. Counsel for the

fendant was Mr. D. Melone,

oO

de





C.0.L. GOES UP 2
POINTS

Tne cost of living index fo
ctober has increasea by iwu y
cent.-over September. For ur
2i8t year it was 241 pei
while for the same month .fi.}
year it is 284 per cent. kor Mua
ae figure was 264 while in Ju:

was 272.

The increase of eight point
ween the figure for May and t
wx June does not represent a sud
den increase in the cost of lvit
It is caused by the substitutior
new weights in calculating U
index.



RECRUITS FOR DOMINICA

In the

PAGF. FIVE



treatment of sarcoptic mange in small animals «
Tetmosol ' is invariably effective.

At the most, two or

three applications are required and moreover during
treatment no special isolation is necessary.

Tetmosol '
»bnoxious smell.

is

non-greasy, non-staining and has now

‘TETMOSOL’

Tetraethylthiuram Monosulphide Solution (25%). : g
IMPERIAL CHEMICAL (PHARMACEUTICALS) LIMITED

A subsidiary company of Imperial Chemical Industries Limited

WILMSLOW
ole agents and Distributors :—

A. S. BRYDEN & SONS ‘BARBADOS’ LTD.

THE
SMALL PROPORTION OF OUR WIDE RANGE OF

hITCHEN REQUISITES

“HANDI” PLATE
SCRAPERS

WIRE STRAINERS
ASBESTOS STOVE
MATS
POTATO RICERS
POTATO CHIPPERS,
COOKS’ SIEVES
BUTTER CHURNS
DOMESTIC SCALES
MEAT MINCERS
BOILING STOVES
KITCHEN KNIVES
EGG TIMERS
i WOOD SPOONS
\\( STOVE MICA
) BREAD TINS,
| -—Enamd.
BREAD TINS
—Japanned
OVEN
THERMOMETERS

MANCHESTER



UNDERMENTIONED ITEMS ARE ONLY A

ICE SHAVERS
BREAD KNIVES

METAL TOASTERS
JAPANNED TRAYS
WIRE DISH COVERS
EGG BEATERS
PASTRY ROLLING
PINS

KNIFE SHARPENERS
BEAN SLICERS
STEEL WOOL
KITCHEN SPOONS

MEASURING SPOONS
(Sets)

—

DISH MOPS
ICING TUBES
ICING SYRINGES
STEAM COOKERS

PRESSURE COOKERS

———
===

\ We also carry a large assortment of
Domestic lines in - - -

CARTHENWARE,

ALUMINIUM WARE,

TIN AND ENAMELLED WARE

BUY NOW WHILE THE GOODS ARE AVAILABLE
Alt’ REASONABLE PRICES.





HARRISON'S

Specialists in
DOMESTIC HARDWARE











HEARTBREAKE.

NY L



ONS

. A now variety in the
‘ field Mason, C 2 i ee oe iar ae purchased and given to the Ed. =
reached the muscle of the right and Cumberbatch was taken to [Ljljan MeClean gave ee The second feature was the nuim- B » au




































ventricle of the heart, giving a the General Hospital in it. mene “Me wal aeesent wm ber of people w all classes who ge Be RR ain ee enc if iia shales
half inch wound in the-heart. Cross-examined he said that O'Neal and another witness goon spent the first 24 hours after the 9. to use of Diatrict Tree th, a Pilipn “watees
Ahonen: ets ? lot. ; , 7 Vex another witness gave hurricane sight-seeing amid the 1€ use of District Inspecto.s the Dominica Police rce, )
There was a large amount of clot- apart from taking Cumberbatch to their statements ‘ . Ma f . will be ails ; at a se # nt ‘ i
: = eka : ae nae Firth? stater By A ruins. These “joy riders” addea available early in 1992, November 16 at 10.00 a.m, app! shades imaginable.
ted blood under the ea oo pel a he tigati u More evidence will be giveg to- substantially to the difficultic ; They are gifts of the Barbados cans will be interviewed at thi
and in the front part o e chest par n e investigations, © day at 10 am. when The anad th - hapetty 7 aS Pounds - Ve cs 3 | be i lewed at t
a ee a ; “m. p e Forces, the Police and other Foundry Ltd., and will be in- District A Police Traini :
There was:some degree of collapse could not remember whether continues. citar aorta oth stalled in District Police Station~ School. Just the thing for that
euaeuneneses The name speaks for itself | QPP ALEVE OT LPP PPE KM: 3 Special Xmas Gift
g % <
[ppkes yinture “t * OUTSTANDING Sig emer ee | Vor soe
Blood ; % | 15 Denier
| :
eer tocetaipteeom FOOD VALUES ‘(|CAL-C-TOSE
a % = -_,
& from blood impurities g |
2 é e &
5 impurities in the blood may cause rheumatic x Originally iianae k z |
a ee ‘ r
shee ans peien, Oe es eee eee, % EVAPORATED MILK $ .29 $26 3 EVERY CuP ao = » 6 ‘
= boils, pimples and common skin disorders. ® CONDENSED MILK 34 ave ) 50 & S 5 1 5
5 Shee Meet sheers ee > IMPERIAL VIENNA SAUSAGES 38 u 8 eee Pevote
“ - . ake eeeee eee . “ ¥ 7 |
mw _the blood, cleanses the system and assists CRAWFORDS SWEET BISCUITS }16 pkts. 54 4“ & 1S ADDED -
® in restoring good health. —~ . . .
| manent a ROGEReeeeeRnes x SWEET ASST. CUSTARD CREAM, MARIE x ,
SSSSeReeeeeees eee TRI FRUIT PUFFS, CREAM CRACKERS * | YW 7 ¥
“. s ; The above Items for Cash and Carry Customers only. % STRENGTMU . | CAVE
— _ .
ee a ee MS vimer's PRUIT SALAD per Tn - 1228 Sis fe Succeed tetek
a B AYLMER’S GREEN PEAS—per Tin .... 39 x pron Abe yyy Sage Ae ys Breage Be tiptcer Behar SHEPHERD
w FOR BEST RESULTS = LIN CAN GREEN PEAS—per Tin . 38 yp significant amounts of six vitamins plus Calcium Phosphorus
2 : ‘ ‘
a" USE a % POmmAN MIXED HUTS. pe et 25} [and tron. 1 is excettent for children who dislike milk and Ltd
Na : ——per ct. . 05 highly recommended for the eged, convalescents, expectant eS
Z \ @ |% HEINZ CREAM OF CHICKEN SOUP—pe » > ew t
zB 2A] EN SOUP—per Tin a2 and nurs s. < :
a PURENA CHOWS = Sei Hine Cui octamer ge tnt | Sater Co,
¢ DANISH SALAMI SAUSAGE—per 1, a 1.31 bo
*. IN THE CHECKER BOARD BAGS 4, % NORWEGIAN PEELED SHRIMPS—per Tin 86 & on sale at all 101% Broad Street
ass % PERLSTEIN BEER—per Bottle ; is %
a, H. Jason Jones & Co., Ltd—pistributors «, % PERLSTEIN BEER—per Carton ..... 4.00 & KNIGHT'S DRUG STOR ES }
: ’ 7 1, = . fi Pay’
s., a |: STANSFELD, SCOTT & CO. LTD. ; ee Li . " oe
a oe s Me % GEL FPEC CC SOP SPPFPLOLO LI? 4 oF CALS Go oats <* =—_— =






PAGE SIX
















iE BARBADOS ADVOCATE TUESDAY, NOVEMBER 13, 1951

HENRY BY CARL ANDERSON |p Serene.” a
\ Your First Taste of $
| %
%
WHETHER YOU ARE :

will explain more elo-
quently than words can %
WHY s
%,
} >
is & y
LARGE H S&S }

|

1s .
Ist in Quality x
Ist in Popularity

STUART & SAMPSON
(1938) LTD.

leadquarters for Best Rum

SGOSS8S MALLS OECD
LA SAPPS POSS SFP SCS?

USER
OR A

9% ee ee SF
LOVCCDSSCOBBOISS



T'S BEEN THE DREAM OF]

x

MY LIFE | BUT... WE GOT

A SURPRISE FOR YOU TOO,
mele {

*
%
‘s

Deliciong
‘ SS

Smedley’s Mixed Vegetable %
in tins

Smedley's Cream of Tomato
Soup in tins

Crosse & Blackwell Table
Salt in Bots.

Crosse & Blackwell Curry x

.

Powder in Bots.
Crosse & Blackwell Marrow- ‘



SPSS



7

:
eer SSOP FOOOO TS

OVS OD

YOU DESIRE THE
BEST TEA — SO USE

RED ROSE TEA!

IT 1S GOOD TEA.



fat Peas in Tins
Nestle’s Milo Tonic Food in
tins
Nestle’s Nespray Powdered
Milk in tins
Koo Plum Jam in tins—
Large & small ¢
T’dad Fine Quality Cocoa — &
L&s x



Select Powdered Milk in tins $
Bots. of Anchovy Paste %
Tins of Three Bay Tomato %
Juice

Tins of Farrow’'s Fresh Gar-
den Peas o
ins of Sasso Olive Oil — $

L & §S.



Tins of Liquid Stove Polish %
Pkg. of Fab Soap Suds g



INCE & Co. Ltd. ‘

6, 7, 8 & 9 Roebuck St. §¢
2GS6966

ee es
3
a









Ck ere ~ | RICHER
BY FRANK STRIKER World's Finest Smail - car | SMOOTHER

GRAB HIM, SHERIFF/|'LL a ee ae Si won i coves THROUGH i ives even real ér value |
qos "nepaon vero | _ phe a Ses i j is qj a Cc R E A M i E R
~ , my i = ‘ 5
. ni | Famous British-Buill Saas ie

MORRIS MINOR |
SCOres NeW Success _ of

Fere is a four-door, four-seater F
family saloon—asmall car ina
very big way with accommoda-
tion for four adults-—nippy in
eee sasy to park, and tireless
to dvive,








ti 6ICK AND TIRED OF SEEING

YOU SLEEPING AROUND HERE.’

GET UP AND SHOW SOME

AMBITION / GO CALL ON MR.

SID ADELL-IT WiLL. DO YOU

GOOD TO SEE HOW A
SM MART MAH

OH -WELL-I'LL DO IT-
IT WON'T TIRE ME
TO WATCH HIM WORK/



" ane: DORE TRUCTION Boby &
featur
fi ally ndide Lo ecren et red

» CHASSIS









* AsY Lag ae ar

wide eohiee nation
out comfort,



THERE MUST BE SOME
& YAR... AND IF VE n HIDDEN FOOD DEPOT...LET'S
CAN FIN? FOOD AND " VPS ONLY THING KEEP SEARCHING /
VATER, VE an SET UP we P LEFT IN THE FLUID

ING / DEPARTMENT...GCHNAPPS










viviD, FLASHING PERFORWANCE Th












ZH.P.. and D nae imp
TABBY'S aoe FROM THE OFFICERS a \- Moar of ie sie. Let us ice 9 ou What a big car ehie'ssand
BOy FRIENDS / IBF ie fiat a . QUARTERS / AND THAT ’
Walid Lan) IGN/T EXACTLY...

C. L. Gibbs & Co. Ltd.,

P. O. Box 56
BRIDGETOWN . Dial 2402

it rau ) AM eel BS San Ve FORT ROYAL GARAGE LTD.
V7 Ww ; Phone 2385 Sole Distributors Phone 4504



MARRIAGE

A BOOK FOR THE MARRIED
AND ABOUT TO BE MARRIED
by Kenneth Walker F.R.CS,,

ADVOCATE STATIONERY



It PAYS YOU TO DEAL HERE

‘SPECIAL offers to all Cash and Credit Credit Cus Customers for ‘fot Monday to Wednesday only

=—_—





















USUALLY y
[THINK (CAN \YoU D0? ILL. SEND A HE DIDN'T STOPTO ANGWEREAM | = NOW USUALLY NOW §
OUR Th00Ps SeaMGReD THE WNOLEtoUNTRY \EIND THEM }-%_ ARMY WITH YOU arseeiine Alt THIS EVER HE ampagne Victor Cligout bots. 6, 35.20 : sli i
oie Sona EFT | THINICTHE IONAPPERS f 6 Bacon: sliced 1 lb. 1.20 1.00
to 90K. YOUR WIFEAND SON INTOTHE JUNGLE. ne y bs bi (c s) 72.00 35 8.00
? .
Corned Mutton (tins) 66 .60
Vermouth Nolly Pratt 3.00 2.64 %

Orange & Grape Fruit Juice .29 -235 Condensed Milk 34 32



PA leah RR aos

SSS SSS tes eee ee






oa



TUESDAY, NOVEMBER

13, 1951 s

BARBADOS ADVOCATE



CLASSIF

IED ADS.

TELEPHONE 2508.





The charge for announcements of
Births, Marriages, Deaths, Acknowl-
@agementi, and “n Memoriam notices is
$1 50 on week-days and $1.89 on Sundays
for any mumber of words up to 50, and
% cents per word on week-days and
# cents per word on Sundays for each
edditional wore



DIED

JORDAN—On Monday, November
1951, Elmer Aubrey (Ellie)
leaves his late residence, Sand Street,
Speightstown at 4 o'clock this after-
noon for the Westbury Cemetery
Friends are asked to attend

Alma Jordan (wife), Elmer and
Keith Jordan {sons}, C. H. P.
Jordan, Lavington Jordan (Canada)
brothers 13.11.51

THANKS

WOCDING

12,
His funeral





We the undersigned desire
plc > this medium to thank all
ho kind friends who attended the
funeral and sent wreaths and Cables,
and in any other way expressed their
sympathy in our bereavement occa-
sioned by the passing of Mr. Henry
*reston Wooding











FOR SALE

Minimum charge week «> cente and

cents Sutdays 4 words — over &



AUTOMOTIVE

CAR: One 1947 Hudson only done
12,000 miles. Apply R. D. C. O’Neale,
Cliff Cottage, St. Jchn 11.11.51—3n







CAR—Austin A-40, Devon 4 Door
Saloon with sliding roof. Owner-driven,
nmuleage 31,000, recently fitted new EXIDE
battery and new tyres. Price $1,440
Telephone 2989. 11.11.51—3n

es
CAR—Ford Prefect 11,000 miles. Condi-
tior perfect, owner leaving. Apply H. P
Harris & Co., Phone 4045

13.11.51—tin

—_——
CAR—Chrysler (Windsor) 1947 Modei

with new tyres. Automatic gears, safety
clutch. Mileage 33,000 and in perfect
condition. Courtesy Garage. Dial 4616
6.11.51—én















Dr. & Mrs. Wooding, Mr, Luther Wood- CAR—One V-8 Ford, left hand drive,
ing \(Brother) 13.11.51—1n | ¢0 ay ott perfect working order
Apply to C. M. Austin, James Street
IN MEMOR1LAM ' 6.11.51—Sn.
os Cc ae Glo een ae ———
SMALL—In ever loving memory of our CAR—One Citroen Motor Car. Done
beloved one Gloria Small who fell {9,000 miles. A-1 Condition Phone 4618
asleep 13th November, 1949. G. E. Ward. Morris Service Station
We do not need a special day 9.11.51—5n
To bring jrou to our mind ee eae
The day we do not think of you CAR—191 Morris Oxford, only 4,000
Is very hard to find miles. Nearly new $2,400. Owner leaving
Winifred Small (mother), Anthony} the island, Phone 4718 13.11.51—4n
(son) Ira and Beulah isisters), Dora{@-—————
(grandmother), Allan (uncle), Peter] _C4&R—Rover 16 H.P. Perfect condition
inephew), Joan, Cecile and ' Thelma] throughout 24,000 miles only. Not driven
(uieces) Carl (brother-in-law) over 30 M.P.H. Treated as only child
13.11.51—1n | Must be seen and driven to be appre-
inne OE, Apply: Courssy, Garagé,.. Fae
WOOD-—in loving memory of my dear| Pedigree trial and full particulars.
nother Aletha Wood who fell asleep| Price $2,880. 6.11,51—t.f.n
on November 13th, 1948
May she rest in peace * ar
Lilian, Millicent and Dolridge (children), ELECTRicAL
Glen, Eddie and Willie (Grandchildren)
16.11.51—1n WASHING MACHINES and VACUUM
CLEANERS—Another shipment of the
“ World famous HOOVER Washing Ma-
GOVERNMENT NOTICES chines and Vacuum Cleaners has just
arrived. Call early at K. R. Hunte &
Co Ltd., and save disappointment
—--— Washing Machine $135.00, Vacuum
Cleaner $75.00. Dial 5027. K. R
DOMINICA POLICE FORCE HUNTE & CO. LTD. 8.11. 51—6n
g Ee 7 er S oe i > i‘
Seven (7) Recruits are required MISCELLANEUUS

for the Dominica Police Force,

Details of pay and allowances,
ete., can be obtained from the Po-
lice Training School, Office, Dis-
trict “A”.

Applicants will be seen in person
s 10 a.m. on Friday, 16th Novem-
per.

Certificates of Education to be
produced.

(Sgd.) R. T. MICHELIN,
Commissioner of Police.
Police Headquarters,
Bridgetown.



12th November, 1951.
: 13.11.51.—2n.
NOTICE

Application are invited for the
post of Joint Secretary to the fol-
lowing

Sugar Production & Export Con-
trol Board

Fancy Molasses Control & Mar-
keting Board

Sugar Industry Capital Rehab-
ilitation Reserve Board

Sugar Industry Price Stabiliza-
tion Reserve Board.

The salary of the post will de-
pend on qualifications, but will not
be less than £500 per annum nor
more than £700 per annum, The
post is non-pensionable and ter-
minable at one month’s notice on
either side.

Applications stating age, educa
tional qualifications and experi-
ence, together with COPIES of
testimonials should be addressed to
the Director of Agriculture,
Queen’s Park, and will be accepted
up to Saturday, the 24th day of

vernber, 1951.
A es 13.11.51—4n.
a
PORDSSVD PID D OOOO SOFIA
Ss,
Vacant

Situations

Nesires
White
to

HOLIDAY
companion
Age, twenty-five
after 11 a.m. Hotel
6.11.51—6n.

ON
lady

>

%

%,

% LADY

young

preferably

thirty. Call

Hastings Ltd
SSSSSSSSSSOSSSSS SF IV OEY

——————

JUST THE THING



For the small Flat
“The Junior General”

A compact little table Model Gas
Cooker with 2 Boiling Burners and
an inst ed oven

Can bake a Chicken or a cake with
ease

SEE
GAS
Bay St.

1T

SHOWROOM,

At your





——
Se

= 7





| ORIENTAL |
SOUVENIRS

ANTIQUES,
CARVINGS

CURIOS |
' JEWELS,
EMBROIDERIES, Ete.

| THANYS



Pr. Wm. Hry. St. :: Dial 3466 ||!







| POLITICAL

MEETING
TO-NIGHT

Sept. 13th Nov.
AT
BAXTER’S RD.

Corner Kensington New

Rd. at 7.30 o'clock

=

the
of

In Support of
Candidature

MAYNARD

for the City of

Bridgetown.

13.11.51.—in
uv

—



BOYS' ELASTIC-TOP SOCKS — Cotton
“Primula Rosa" an Italian product Popu-
lar shades and sizes at 83 cents pair
Visit KTIRPALANI, 52 Swan Street

t 13.11.51—1n

FRESH SEEDS—Carrot, Cabbrge, Beet
Zinnia, Snapdragon, Marigole tc., etc.
Bruce Weatherhead Ltd. ®.11,51—3n











ONE (1) York Big 12 Special Set. For
further particulars, Dial 2733. F. Roach.
13.11 51—In

USED BOTTLING EQUIPMENT, com-
prising, Liquid 4—wide Universal Bottle
Washer; Dixie Model “F’’ One-man
Hook-up Automatic Filler-Crowner 5 h.p
Instantaneous Cooler; One Lynn Filter;
Wilson & Cousins Carbonator, and Two
tanks. S. M.
San Fernando,
13.11, 51—6n

pn? He means cme ae

Enamel-lined
JALEEL -
Trinidad

Syrup
Phone 2331,



WANTED



HELP







for Hotel Berwick. Ex-
Salary and share in

A Managress
perience necessary

profits Good position for the right
person Apply at first in writing A. E.
TAYLOR L7D.. P.O. Box 255, Bridge-
tova

~ MANAGER for first class residential





club in West Indies, Excellent oppor-
tunity for young unmarried man with
catering experience. Position offers

salary and part profits of business. Box
No. R. B. C/o Advocate.
6.11.51—6n.

————

PANTRY MAID—A really good Pantry
Maid to assist butler in housework also.
Apply DaCosta, Dalkeith 13,11.51-—In

THEATRE MANAGER—A_ full time
Manager for the PLAZA THEATRE—
Barbarees. Apply by letter and in person
at the office of CARIBBEAN THEATRES
LTD., “The Banyans” Bay Street,
between the hours of 9 a.m. and 12 noon,
on or before November 20th, The suc-
cessful applicant must take up his duties
by January 4th. All applications treated
in strict confidence 4.11.51—1n.







SITUATIONS WANTED
Experienced Shorthand typist female,
12 years with leading firm of Solicitors
in England Good reference seeks
position preferably with legal firm
Apply Box B. B, C/o Advocate Ad-
vertising Dept. 13 11.51—3n





MISCELLANEOUS

—_

BOTTLES—Clean empty nip bottles at
48c. per dozen — deliver Colonade Stores,
White Park Road. 11.11.51. f.n.

FOK RENT





HOUSES



BEDFORD COTTAGE—Bedford Aven-
ue, Upper Bay Street. immediate posses-
sion. Dial 8685.

13.11, 51—3n





HOMESTEAD—Upper Belmont Road
Two bedrooms, dining room, sitting room,
gallery, all conveniences. Apply within.

13.11.51—2n
—_—_—

THE GLEN, St. Lawrence Gap—Fur-

nished apartment Call 8273



Mr. Peter Morgan,
St. Lawrence Hotel
13,11, 51—3n
- ouieenteshininsansmatctatemonypcmeitie
THE Building known as “Berwick

Hotel" containing 14 bedrooms, bar etc.
A. E. TAYLOR LTD.,
Coleridge St
Dial 4100,

GOVERNMENT



ATTENTION is

prices of “Milk-Evaporated” are as

ARTICLE
(not more



Milk-Evaporated $12.69 per

48 x 144 oz, tins or
48 x 16 oz, tins

$12.21 per

96 x 6 oz. tins
—————— LL

12th November, 1951.

.
MR. ALBERT A. |

Note New Address:—

BEARD & GREIG

Prince William Henry Street
(Over Lashley’s)
Phone 4683
Can we sell your house or
property?
We have a quantity of en-
quiries from England, U.S.A.

and Canada.

Consult R, Wilson on the
yuestion of buying or dispos-
ing of any type of house,
shop or factory



—————=—SS==>= eee

= mr aO=OFeOr SSS









drawn to the Control of Prices
(Amendment) Order, 1951, No. 33 which will be published in the
Official Gazette of Monday 12th November, 1951.

3. Under this Order the maximum wholesale and retail selling

WHOLESALE PRICE

————_—





PUBLIC SALES PUFLIC NOTICES









REAL ESTATE NUTICE
The Parochial Treasurer's Office, St.
The undersigned will offer for sale at | Michael, will be closed at 12 o'clock,

Noon on Thursday the 15th instant
C. GEBORGE GRANNUM,
Ag. Parochial Treasurer

Public Competition at their office No
High Street, Bridgetown,

on Tuesday the
16th day of November

17 |
|
1951 at 2 p.m. |



450 shares Barbados Co-op. Cotton St Michael
Factory Limited 13.11,.51—2n
250 shares Barbados Fire Insurance | ———————————————
Co i
= sores Barbados Ice Co., Limited | panne, ucy
ts | : 7 ~
ben aan Hemeaen Tenet | TT eae imarked on the
100 > envelope “Tender for Loan”) will be re-
etiee wit Rum = Refinery | ceived by me up to Tuesday November,
“a 20th 1951 for a loan to the parish of
180
For eee Betares Ee. $8,600.00 at a rate of interest not exceed-

COTTLE CATFORD & co. |in® 4%

11.11.51—2n

eT
BUNGALOW—One stone wall Bungalow
drawing and dining room, three bed-
rooms, breakfast room, toilet and bath,
standing on 20 perches“of land. Apply

as authorised br the “Saint
Luey’s (Barbados) Loan Act, 1949" such
sum to be repaid in five annual instal-
ments of $1,920.00 each together with
interest the first of such instalments
becoming due on %th November, 19652
Certificates will be issued in units of





to C. R. M. Austin, James Street a rn O. L, DEANE
aur cs —— Vestry Clerk,
HOUSE—One chattel house standing > Bd
= 22 7 ye = land, situated at | oe
orner of Dash Road, Bank Hall. Apply
to C. R. M. Austin, James Street. Also NOTICE

one spot land, Bank Hall 25 3/10 perches
6.11.51—5n
TT

“BOSVIGO HOUSE", Eagle Hall Road,
St. Michael, with 4 Acres or thereabouts
of land; all enclosed.

THE DWELLINGHOUSE contains,
Open Verandahs, Enclosed Gallery, Draw-
ing and Dining Rooms, 3 Bedrooms, one
very large, Toilet and Bath, Large Kitchen
Pantry, Store-room ete. and Cellars

The Government Water as well as
Windmill and Well, which supplies water
for gardens and lawn.

Garage for 2 Cars, and Servants’ rooms.

A portion of the land is planted in
Cocoanut Trees, Guava trees, Mango
trees, Golden Apple trees, and Breadfruit

PARISH OF 8T. LUCY
Applications for one or more vacant
Vestn; Exhibitions tenable at the Parry
Sehool will be received by me riot later
than Saturday 24th inst. Candidates
must be sons of Parishioners of St. Lucy
in straightened circumstances, and not
less than eight and not more than twelve
years of age. Forms of application must
be obtained from the Parochial Treasurer
on office days A Baptismal Certificate
must accompany each application
Gandidates must present themselves to
the Headmaster for examination on Mon-
day 12th inst., at 10 o'clock, a.m
. oO. L. DEANE,
Vestry Clerk,





trees and another portion of land planted St. Lucey.

in Guinea, Elephant and Sour Grass 8.11.51—3n
OFFERS §N WRITING will be received

by the undersigned up to Tuesday the IN THE MATTER OF THE

13th day of November, at 4 p.m. The COMPANIES’ ACT 1910

vendor does not bind herself to accept

the highest, or any offer. CENTRAL FOUNDRY LTD.

JSUGAR NEWS :



| Delegates Ready
For New Talks

IN LONDON

LONDON.

Delegates from the Common-
wealth sugar-producing counvries
are due to begin a fresh series of
discussions with the British Gov-
ernment on November 15 on the
quota allocated to each area undei
the Commonwealth Sugar Agree-
meni,

The delegates have been in

London for some weeks and have
been holding preliminary discus-
sions among themselves at the
offices of the West India Commi.-
tee. These discussions have been
secret, but it is understood that
the delegates have now decided
Japon the poinis they will raise in
-tormal discussions with the
, Colonial Office and the Ministr,
of Food,

Among the West Indian dele-
gates are the Hon. Albert Gomes,
of Trinidad, and the Hon. H. A.
Cuke, of Barbados, The Hon.
W. A. Bustamante, of Jamaica, is

! also reported to be on his way to

j London, but his mission is report-

ed to be connected with bananas.
Fresh Light

There are great hopes among
the delegates that Britain’s new

Inspecton any day except Sundays on| NOTICE IS HEREBY GIVEN that the Government will regard their
application to Mrs. Hanschell, Tele- | Transfer Books of the Company will be!}C ase in a fresh light. It is
phone No. 2260. closed from the 3rd day of November,'realised, however, that the new

For further particulars and conditions

1951, to the 30th day of November,
of sale, apply to—

both days inclusive.

1951,







COTTLE, CATFORD & CO. By order of the Board of Directors
No. 17, High Street, H. GARNET ST. HILL,
Bridgetown. Secretary
1,11.51—7n 6.11.51—3n. |
: * ©
The undersigned will offer for sale at P bl Off | S l
rane Competition at their office, No. U I€ icla a i
17 High Street, Bridgetown, on Friday,
the 16th day of N ber, 195 (The Provost Marshal's Act 1901
we y ovember 1, at 2 rr ) #90)

The messuage or dwelling-house known t
as HARMONY HALL, standing on 2
Acres, 20 Perches of land, which is en-
closed, situate near Top Rock, Christ
Church, the residence of the late Mrs.
I. A. Clarke,

The dwelling-house contains Open
Verandah, Drawing and Dining Rooms,
3 Bedrooms, Toilet and Bath, Kitchen,
Pantry Garage and Servants Rooms.

Inspection on Tuesdays and Thursdays
eet between the hours of 4 p.m. and

p.m.

For further particulars and conditions
sale, apply to—
Cc , CATFORD & Co

On Tuesday the 13th day of Novem-
ber 1951 at the hour of 2 o'clock ia
the afternoon will be sold at my office
to the highest bidder for any sum not
under the appraised value

All that certain piece of Land con-
teining 4,616 sq. ft. or thereabouts sit-!
uate in Mango Land in the Parish of
St. Peter, butting and bounding on lands
of Sydney Aboab, deceased, on lands
ef The Alexandra School, on lands of
Norman Husbands, on Jands of ome Mr
Harris and a lane commonly known as
Mungo Lane together with the Chattel
Dwelling House thereon and appurten-
ances appraised thereto as follows:-—

The whole property appraised to TWO
THOUSAND FOUR HUNDRED AND
FIFTY DOLLARS ($2,450.00) Attached
from Samuel Timothy for and towards
sstisfaction, &c

N.B.—-25% Deposit to be paid on day

of purchase
W. R. DOUGLAS,
Acting Provost Marshal,
Provost Marshal's Office,
29th October, 1951



of

1.11,51—8n

PERSONAL

The public are hereby warned against
giving credit to anyone in my name as
{ do not hold myself responsible for
anyone contracting any debt or debts in



















my name unless by a written order 31.10. 51—3n
signed by me marino
G. V. BATSON,
Prince of Wales Road, LIQUOR LICENSE NOTICE
Bank Hall, St. Michael
9.11.51—2n The application of Cyril Blackman,
Shopkevper of Ivy Land, St. Michael,
The public are hereby warned against | for permission to sell Spirits, Malt
giving credit to my wife RITA BLACK. | Liquors, &c., at a board and = shingle

shop with shedroof attached at Ivy Land,
St. Michael
Dated this 10th day

ETT (nee GILL) as I do not hold myself
responsible for her or anyone else con-

tracting any debt or debts in my name of November, 1951.

unless by a written order signed by me, |To: E. A. McLEOD, Esq fea
COLEMAN CHESTERFIELD BLACKETT, Police Magistrate, Dist. ‘A
Ros. Hill, * CYRIL BLACKMAN,
Ss. Peter Applicant,

N.B.—This application will be consid-
red at a Licensing Court to be held at
Police Court, Dist. “A” on Tuesday the
20th day of November, 1951, at

. k a.m, *
Se E. A. MecLÂ¥op,
Dist. “A”,

13.11, 51—2n



The public are hereby warned against
giving credit to my wife IVY BOVELL
(nee O’NEALE) as I do not hold myseif
responsible for her or anyone else con-
tracting any debt or debts in my nume
unless by e written order signed by me

CLAYTON BOVELL,
Checker Hail,
St. Lucy

Police Magistrate,







13.11.51—2n,





The public are hereby warned against
against giving credit to my wife ALBER-
THA MARSHALL inee BOVELL) as I do

13.11.51—In
not hold myself responsible for her or
anyone els

}
se contracting any debt or ,
debts in my name unless by a written |
order signed by me Lt
BELFIELD MARSHALL, \\

AT



|
|

}

Allen View,
St. Thomas.
13.11.51—2n.

——s

LOST & FOUND

LOST

SWEEPSTAKE TICKETS—Series G.
8434, to 8438 also 8447, 8448. Finder please





CHURCH VILLAGE,
ST, PHILIP









ON
WEDNESDAY NIGHT



return to H. O. Goodridge, Farm Rd., AT

St. Peter. 13.11, 51—1n ; k h
SWEEPSTAKE TICKET—Series P. 3264. 7.30 oO Cloe s arp
Finder please return same to Marcus

Shepherd, Vaucluse Tenantry, St Supporting the
Thomas. 13.11.51—1n



Candidature of

Mr. D.D. GARNER

Come and Hear the Facts

RACE TICKET—B.T.C. Race Ticket
Series P, No. 7201. Inscribed Lionel
Smith end C. Mayers, Finder rewarded
on returning same to Advocate Advertis-
13.11.51—1n.

TO-DAY'S NEWS FLASH

BROWN'S NAUTICAL ALMANAC
1952

Local views in colour on Christmas
Cards



CHAIRMAN:
Mr. JAMES A. TUDOR

SPEAKERS:
D. D. Garner
G. H. Adams, M.C.P. ,
F. L. Walcott, M.C.P.



Mr.
Mr.
Mr.

Sheath Knives

Press Buttons fitted to your Bag or
Purse while you wait

Mr. J. E. T. Brancker,
, M.C.P.
JOHNSON A SsAOnaNe Dr. H. G. ieoiemine,
HARDWARE

M.C.P.
Mr. E. W. Barrow

Mr. J. C. Tudor
13.11.51.—2n.





“NOTICE



(Defence)
We would appreciate the o

follows: —

RETAIL PRICE

than) (not more than)



case of

29c. per tin
of

case 14c. per tin






ene SHIRT
. ‘ SOPCSOSEPOOOCCTS,
FREE HOOK
Which Makes
GOD’S WAY OF 3
; SALVATION S|
.
>
% PLAIN” |
+. %,
; Please write for one to $I SHIRT D
Samuel Roberts, Gospel a
Book and Tract Service, ¥ |
% 30, Central Avenue, Ban- 3 | Palmetto Street I
® gor N. Ireland.” ¥| Obtainable at all L
Ceciosssese SOOO COCCOTD”

BUY A BETTER

FOR LESS MONEY
@ ‘
RELIANCE

Government has not yet had time
to get a proper grasp of the de-
tails involved and that for thi
reason the talks may be somewha
protracted. The fact that Mr
Alan Lennox-Boyd, the new
Minister of State for Colonia
Affairs, who will undoubtedly
play a leading role in the discus-
sions, is known to be sympathetic
towards the West Indies is also
regarded as a hopeful portent.

Several points in the draf
heads of agreement are not ac-
ceptable to the Commonwealt!
producers. They believe that the
proposed terms of the agreemen
do not sufficiently entrench the
policy of inter - Commonwealth
marketing under preferential con-
ditions or provide complete secur-
iy for expansion programmes

While the producers
that production costs must be
taken into account when prices
are negotiated, they believe there
should be no question of any
Commonwealth producer being
able to institute an inquiry into
the production costs of another
Commonwealth producer, as pro-
posed in the Agreement,

recognive

Limitation
There is also a suggestion in the
proposed Agreement that some

limitation should be placed upon
expor.s of sugar from the Colonies
and Dominions over an eight-year
period. The Commonweaith pro-
ducers cannot accept this unless
Similar undertakings are given by
all parties to the Internationat
Sugar Agreement.
Commonwealth producers re-
d the conclusion of the Com-
monwealth Sugar Agreement, on
reasonable terms, as being of the
utmost importance and they be-
lieve that there is an equal need

for a new International Sugar
Agreement designed to balance
the requirements of the world’s

growing population and the out-
put of the producing countries.
Canadian Agreement

Negotiations which started at
Torquay this year have resulted
in the conclusion in Ottawa of a
sugar agreement under’ which
Canada agrees to buy from the
Dominican Republic during each
of the years 1952 and 1953, 64,500
short tons of raw sugar, an an-
nouncement from Ottawa states.

This represents 43 per cen‘, of
the 150,000 short tons which is
the maximum total quantity of
non-preferential sugar in respect
of which the Canadian Govern-
ment is prepared to enter into
similar negotiations with tra-
ditional suppliers of mon-prefer-
ential sugar. It is understood that
arrangements will be made
whereby Canadian importers will
be permi ted to receive this wear
at the same prices as those laid
down for Commonwealth supplies.
Canada entered into a similar
agreement with Cuba for 75,000
short tons some months ago.

New Chemical

The first basic change in the
processing of raw sugar in 266
years has been developed, accord-
ing to the New York mag*7'»°
Chemical Engineering, The re lt
it claims, is a high-qualitv
duct with higher purity rt a lower
production cos’, according to a
New York report.

In the new process, » purifvin
| powder evled Elguanite replaces
\dime, which has been used
‘purifier since 1685. The new svbh-
1 stance separates dicaolved org2n'e
land mineral impurities in cane



ne

pportunity to quote you for

@ FLAT EVERITE SHEETS
@ TEMPERED HARDBOARD
@ OILED SOAKED HARDBOARD

THE CENTRAL EMPORIUM

Corner Broad & Tudor Streets.



EPOT

Phone 4764
eading Stores



juice and creates a fast filtering
precipitate. The processing of
juice, from mills to evaporators
can be done in 45 minutes, Ii
formerly took from two to five}
hours just to precipitate impur- |
ities.

Earth Metals

The dry white powder is mace
from specially processed alkaline
earth metals in the form of ca
bonates, hydroxides and oxide
Each chemical was picked to reac
with the 20-odd impurities of raw
cane juice. In spite of the fac!
that modern harvesting
increase impurities in the juice
Elguanite removes a high percent
age of the soluble impurities anc
has increased

yields from five
eight per cent
Full capacity operation pos-
sible in mills because of faster

clarification
reduced
normally

Shipping cos s
since the mills woul
ship an extra ton
more of sucrose to market
every ton of product.
costs are cut down and
is increased.

are

or
for

efficiency

A Howaiian mill was the first '0}

adopt the new system, the maga-
zine reports. and more mills wil)
be converted there to use it. Raw
sugar mills in Florida may als
adopt tHe process and a Califor-
rian company is using the Elguan-
ite process in the manufacture

sugars—B.U.P.



of soft

An Official

(From Our ¢



ss
Visit
n Correspondent)

St. GEORGES, Nov. 1
Honourable Mr. D. E
Chief Justice of the
Windward and Leeward Islands,
in the colony on an _ official
visit Work is going on apace
ou a new building at Mt, Whei-
dale which is to be the Chief
Justice's residence

Stop Pyorrliea
In 24 Hours

Bleeding Gums, Loose Teeth and Sore
Mouth mean that you have Pyorrh
Trench Mouth or a bad disease which
sooner or later will make your teeth fall
out and may cause Rheumatism and Heart
Trouble. Stop this disease now with the
new discovery Am . Stops iepelng
gums in 24 hours, ends sore mouth anc
tightens teeth. Iron clad guarantee
Amosan must make your mouth well and
save your teeth or money ok on return
of empty rackage. Get Amosan from your

The
Jackson,

48











s chemist today.
protects you

for Pyorrhea—Trench Mouth
OSes" SPREE LOOCCO SOOO.
. %
4
: §
% BARBADOS ARTS AND :
$
$
$ x
% CRAFTS SOCIETY
2 ¥
%
%
9 »
ee ¥
sg The Seventh Annual Meet- %
ang of the General Assembly s
@® of Members of the above ¥
% Society will be held at %
% Waketield, Whitepark (by x
s kind permission of the Brit- %
% ish Council Representative) %
st on Monday, Dec, 3rd at 8.15 %
%& p.m, to confirm the Annual
@ Report and to elect a Com- 2
g tee ¥
% mittee, s
$ A. MILLS, x
Acting Hon. Sec %&
s %
.








IMPORTANT
NOTICE

Any clothes left at the

following Sanitary Laun

if dry Depots before De
cember 31st, 1950, will
be sold. In future, any

laundry or di ieaning

not redeemeéd after three

month: will be sold.

Country Road
Marhill Depot
Aquatic Depot

St. Lawrence Depot.

2.11.





methods |

Labour |

October 20th, Brisbane October 27th, Sailing Thursday 15th inst. =
arriving at Trinidad about November ‘The M ry CARIBBEE” will
Ist and Barbados November 24th eee Cargo and Passengers for
In addition to general cargo this % Meee a Antigua, Montserrat, ~
| vessel has ample space for chilled and g Sriday one ane Kitts. Sailing
wird frozen cargo, . 4 “; a
Cargo accepted ‘on through Bills of | 9 The M/V “MONEKA® will
Lading for transhipment at Trinidad to A or i and Passengers for
Hritish Guiana, Leeward and Windward | Stats | aad Seen. Sears
slands a . ate oO
For further particulars apply x sailing to be notified
FURNESS, WITHY & CO, LTD., anc] & The M/V “C. L. M. TANNIS*
DaCOSTA & CO. LTD., x will accept Cargo and Passengers
Trinidad, Barbados, % for Grenada and Trinidad. Sail-
MONTREAL, AUSTHaLIA, NEW % ing Friday 16th inst
BW. B.W.t x BWI. SCHOONER OWNERS’
cypirenannee a eee et XN ASSOCIATION (Ine
4 1 Consignee Tele No. 4047
a. sacinthiatnionensator enminapnsiatit adh 6a, naenncingemienncneorieniomoce ria:









PAGE SEVEN
















For Value Plus
Quality
insist on this

labe!



$1.65

wine «2

|

| POINT













BRAND
teagan
ZEALAND LINE, LIMITED
(M.A N @, Line)
| $.8. “PGs ADELAIDE” is schedulec _ The M/V “DAERWOOD” will



eecept Cargo and Passengers for
St. Lucia, Grenada and Aruba.
Passengers only for St, Vincent.

to sail from Hobart September
Melbourne October 4th, Sydney

25th,
October
10th, Gladstone October léth, Port Alma





Gnc.

_——$
















NEW YORK SERVICE
8.8 SABREEZE” sails 3rd November-—arrives Barbados 13th November, 1951
A AMER sails 23rd = November--arrives Barbados 4th December, 1951.
A AMER sails IM4th December —errives Barbados 25th December, 1951
_ —= —-— ~ - — a be
NEW ORLEANS SERVICE
A STEAMER sails 24rd October —arrives Barbados 9th November, 1951,
A STEAMER sails 7th November arrives Barbados 23rd November, 1951.
A STEAMER. sails 2ist Nobember arrives Barbados 7th December, 1951.
ee een
CANADIAN SERVICE
SOUTHBOUND
Sails Sails Arrives
Name of Ship Montreal Halifax Barbados
s8. “ALCOA PEGASUS" Oct. . 26th Oct. 29th Nev. lith
88. “ALCOA PLANTER" Nov. 9th Nov. 12th Nov, 22nd
8. “ALCOA POINTER” Noy, 23rd Nov. 26th Dec. 6th
“A STEAMER" _ Dee. 14th Dec. 24th
A STEAMER" ~ Dec. 28th Jan. Tth
NORTHBOUND wy
83.8. “ALCOA PLANTER" Due Barbados October 15th. Saila |.

for St. Lawrence River Ports. ' :
ROBERT THOM LTD. — NEW YORK AND GULF SERVICE. _.

APPLY:—DA COSTA & CO.. LTD.—CANADIAN SERVICE —-



cater aetna hintaan saci




GUENAY TERMINALS.

Po Se Loy eS —~

aa me ae

CANADIAN SERVICE











From Halifax, N.S., and Montreal,
Expected Arrival
Montreal Halifax St John Dates, Bridgetown,
My aS Barbad

: ‘POLYRIVER WO Oct 5 Noy 21 No

8.8 “SUNVALLEY' 9 Nov 12 Noy — 28 Novenie:

8.8. “SUNPRINCE 21 Noy, 26 Nov 12 December

5.8 A VESSEL + 15 Dee, 17 Dee 2 January

UNITED KINGDOM SERVICE
From Newport, Liverpool and Glasgow









Expected
Artival
Newport Liverpool Glasgow Dates
a.s. “SUNWHIT" Nov 16 Noy 21 Nov 7 Deeibee
UNITED KINGDOM AND CONTIN





Expected Arrival
Antwerp Rotterdam London Dates, Barbades
8.8 Be
8.8

SUNMONT"’
“SUNRAY"

Agents $ PLA T

17 Oct
15 Noy

20 Oct
18 Nov

1 Nov
22 Nov,

17 Noverfiber
5 December

IONS LIMITED — Phone 4703











PROSE GSS

JANETTA DRESS SHOP

LOWER BROAD STREET

C009 OOF ISOS SS ~
DRESSES
Bui vi Es of every kind

Ready-made and made-to-Order.
Also—BRASSIERES—White and Pink. :
SIZES 38 and 40—with Waistband and without
Waistband
From $3.00 to $5.44,
GOI GG OS COSCO GIGI TOON OOO NOC SRO NC I
!

FRINGE cea »

REGr TRADE HARA

OVEN GLASSWARE



thatdoee,





Ad


















We Can Supply...
Soup, Dinner and Breakfast Plates, Dishes
Sauce Boats, Ete., Ete.
= You'll be proud to own these.
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PLANTATIONS LTD.

See our display




PAGE EIGHT
Robinson
Vs Turpin

In June

NEW YORK.

George Gainford, manager of
the world middleweight cham-
pion, “Sugar” Ray Robinson, has
stated in New York that Rob-
inson will go to Europe ih late
March or early April and possi-
bly remain there until late sum-
mer, with a title fight in London
against Randolph Turpin. He
will probably defend his title
against Turpin in June, said Mr.
Gainford.

When he returned from Europe,
if he still has the title, he will
defend it in America against
any logical challenger who can
be found. But said Mr. Gainford,
jf there is no legitimate chal-
lenger of his weight, then Robin-



son will seek a bout with the
world light-heavyweight champ-
ion, Joe Maxim, either title or metropolis.
non-title.
—B.U.P.

Another Boxing
Champ From B.G.?

LONDON.
British boxing writers are
praising Al Brown, aq lightweight

Heading

ROVAL

IN THEIR SKY-BLUE convertible the Royal Couple drove through
by one and a half million enthusiastic Canadians, packed 8-deep in the

~ Cable and Wireless

For Win

THE SECOND day’s play in the seventh round of
Intermediate Cricket matches ended on Saturday.

Cable

eer eae a ~~ & Wireless are in a strong position to score an outright
Satga. eta adhe. fies “fight in victory over Mental Hospital at the Mental Hospital
Britain last March. grounds. iS y

In his latest bout, he defeated After batting the whole of the n eee 7 : 2
a Welsh boxer, Tommy Jones, ‘irst day and scoring 184 runs, SPARTAN vs. WINDWARD

Cable & Wireless dismissed Men-
tal Hospital in their first innings
for 72 runs on Saturday. Bowling
for Cable & Wireless C. B. Lawless

with a right cross which finished
the fight in one minute and 55
seconds of the second round.
One boxing expert who saw the

fight declared: ‘“‘He showed that neaee i ee for at —
§ i ; s re + and J. Roberts three wickets for
he is going to be a figure in the ts" ,ins. R. McKenzie took two

“Ttis Rls Tint ten poig~4
British Empire rankings. viskete das DA rune.



Another West Indian boxer With 112 runs ahead, Cable &
who is being watched by the Wireless lost six of their wickets
British experts is Eric Thompson, for 55 runs when play ended on

the second day.

Windward who were 240 runs
for the loss of five wickets at the
end of the first day’s play, carried
. their first innings score to 268
giuns for 8 wickets declared on
Saturday Spartan replied with
124 runs, N. Wood the opening
batsman hit 62 runs to topscore.

R. Farmer was the best bowler

a Jamaican who has fought before
in England. At present, he is a
sparring partner to Ray Wilding,
the British heavyweight hope.
B.U.P.



U.K. Soccer Results



LONDON, Nov. 12 or Windward and his final bowl-

Following are the results of Soccer Mn anal s was four overs, one
matches played in the United Kingdor * . "7 P -r avickets

én Saturday aaiden, 15 runs, four »wickets, H,

ENGLISH LEAGUE DIVISION 1 “armer after sending down ten

Arsenal 6, West Bromwich Albion 3.
Aston Villa 0; Charlton Athletic 2
Blackpool 6; Newcastle United 3,
Chelsea 4; Manchester United 2,
Derby County 5; Fulham 0.
Huedersfield Town 1; Tottenham Hot-
spur 1.
Liverpool 1; Bolton Wanderers 1.
Manchester City 2; Middlesbrough 1.

overs took three wickets and con-
ceded 23 runs, Windward in their
second innings have collected 13
runs without loss.

In the Regiment-Wanderers fix-
ture, Regiment have gained a first
innings lead over Wanderers who

Portsmouth 4; Stoke City 1. scored 132 runs in their first turn
Sunderland 0, Burnley 0. at the wicket. Regiment replied
Wolverhampton Wanderers 1, Preston with 169 runs, Skipper Ishmael,

North End 4.

ENGLISH LEAGUE DIVISION 2%
Barnsley 3; Leicester City 3.
Blackburn Rovers 0; Cardiff City 1.
Bury 8; Southampton 2,

Coventry City 1; Doncaster Rovers 2.
Hull City 0; Birmingham City 1
Luton Town 5; Sheffield Wednesday 3.
Notts County 1; Leeds United 2
Queen's Park Rangers 2; Rotherham

topseoring with 34 runs,

At the end of play Wanderers
had scored 73 runs and lost seven
wickets in their second innings.

Ai the Garrison, Pickwick bat-
ting the whole day knocked up
147 runs for the loss of six wic-

kets in their first innings in re-
Waoneia Unliea 1; Nottingham Forest PlY to 116 runs scored by Empire
4. on the first day of play.

Swansea Town 0; Everton 2. The Pickwick opening batsman

TeUtGhes Lakain hieknos ‘ E. Evelyn scored 52 runs.

Southern Bournesmouth and Boscomb Scores



















Athletic 1; Plymouth Argyle 2 REGIMENT vs. WANDERERS AT BAY
Brighton and Hove Albion 4; Watford ,« Wanderers First Innings — 182
1 3 Regiment First Innings
Bristol City 1; Leyton Orient 1 A. Ishmael ¢ wk. (Lewis) b Corbin 34
Gillingham 3; Aldershot 3 R. Parris run out 12
Ipswich Town ©; Walsall) 1. J. Bynoe Lb.w. b Packer 10
Milwall Bristol Rovers Tie "A, Phillips ¢ wk. (Lewis) b Corbin 11
Newport County 4, Exeter City 0 R. Bispham b Proverb: 25
Northampton Town 5, Crystal Palace 2. 7J. Brathwaite b Ramsay 25
Port Vale—Swindon Town 2 tie R. Price c Patterson b Field 25
Reading 4; Colchester United 2 Crawford b Ramsay 5
Southend United 2; Norwich City 1 4 © stpd, (wk. Lewis) b Field 3
Torquay United 3; Shrewsbury Town 2. V. 8 stpd. (wk, Lewis) b Field 0
J » not out 1
ENGLISH LEAGUE DIVISION Extras 18
Northern Bradford City 1; Working-
ton 0 Total 169
Chester 4: Carlisle United 2 BOWLING ANALYSIS
Crewe AJexandra 3; Bradford 4 oO M R w
Darlington 2; Wrexham 1. J. Corbin 12 1 36 2
Gateshead 1; Chesterfield 1 tie Cc. Packer 12 1 42 1
Hartlepool United 3; Barrow 1 G. Skeete 5 1 20 9
Lincoln City 2; Accrington Stanley 2 H. Ramsay C25 Rl °
Oldham.Athlei'e 1, Grimsby Town 1 P. Patterson RANG) ee C Gera. |
tle, M. Proverbs ST eg
Scunthorpe United 3; Rochdale 1 A. Field 2 0 ye
Southport 3; Halifax Town 2 Wanderers Second Innings
Transmere Rovers 1; Mansfield Town Seale run out 9
1 tie H yne b Clarke 6
Lincoli “City 2; Accriogton Stanley 2 4 e Crawford b Phillips 5
tio G Lb.w. b Phillips 4
Oldham Athletic 1, Grimsby Town P Fun out 16
tic I rbs c & b Watts 4
Scunthorpe United 3; Rochdale 1 1 b Clarke *
Southport 3; Halifax Town 2 . Ch not out 15
Transmere Rovers 1, Mansfield Town % Corbin not out *
1 tie Extras 6
York City 0; Stockport County 1 * a E
SCOTTISH LEAGUE DIVISION A Potah (tan '% wietaid *
Aberdeen 4, Partick Thistle 2 oy xhaea . "a18 mee
Hearts 4; Queen of the South 3 BOWLING ANALY 7 B
Morton 2; Hibernian 1 \. Phillips v - zB ¥
Motherwell 2, Dundee 1 - Glare -o 3 : a ?
Raith Rovers 1, Airdrieonians 1 tie. ; Bun 2 ae 3 ;
Rangers 5, St. Mirren 1 y w tts 5 i 17 1
Stirling Albion 2; Celtic 1 a hatte ee ae
Third Lanark 1, East Fife 3 1 Clarke 3. 0 3 0
SCOTTISH LEAGUE DIVISION B. EMPIRE vs. PICKWICK AT GARRISON
Albion Rovers 1; St. Johnstone 0 Empire First Infings — 116
Arbroath 2; Falkirk 4 f£, Evelyn ec Griffith b Prescod 52
ovely : cor 5:
Ayr United 2; Cowdenb th 1 BE. Lewis b Skeete 19
Clyde 4; Alloa Athietic *.° ri Moore not out 31
Dumbarton 8; Forfar Athletic 1 #. Evelyn c Austin b Griffith 10
Dundee United 1; Kilmarnock 0 M. Foster c Amory b Skeete 1
Dunfermline Athletic 3; Hamilton mR Clarke b Prescod 10
Academicals 0 H. Kidney ec Barrow b Amory 8
Stenhouse-Muir 3; Queen's Park 4 Extras 10
IRISH LEAGUE nM
Bangor 1; Derry City 1 tie. Total (for 6 wkts,) 147
Cliftonville 1; Glenavon 4
Coleraine 7; Crusaders 2 BOWLING ANALYSIS
Distill Linfield 2 tie. Oo M R Ww
Glentoran 8; Ards 1 Cc. Prescod 16 2 32 2
Portadown 5; Ballymena United 0 « Spooner 13 4 0
—C.P. ‘. Harris 9 1 0
Amory 10 1

ARMLOADS OF THE FIRM’

MAIL. ,AND
BIGDOME'S TOO BUSY. Th

NOTICE





WINDWARD—FPirst Innings 208
SPARTAN—Ist Innings
N. Wood b R. Farmer 62
H. Cadogan c Farmer b H. Farmer 0
A. Gittens b H. Farmer 0
‘. Wood b. H. Farmer 2
B, Morris run out “ 25
S. Parris ¢ Thornton b R. Farmer 1
W. Jemmott c H, Farmer b R
Farmer 4
KF. MeComie b Thornton 12
N. Medford b R. Farmer 0
Cc. Skinner not out 13
A. Matthews absent 9
Extras : 5
Total 124
BOWLING ANALYSIS
Qo M R Ww
H. Farmer 10 3 23 3
D. Wilkie 2 0 6 0
R. Atkinson 9 0 32 0
Cc. Thornton 5.5 0 16 1
R. Farmer 4 1 15 4
B. Farmer 7 1 26 0
E. Bvelyn 1 0 4 0
WINDWARD—2nd Innings
Cc. Thornton not out 9
E, Evelyn not out 2
Extras 2
Total (for no wkts. 13
-
CABLE & WIRELESS vs. MENTAL
HOSPITAL
CABLE & WIRELESS—Iist Innings 1st
MENTAL HOSPITAL—Ist Innings
Cc. Best b Lawless . 17
Quintyne b Lawless 6
Williams c & b Roberts 2
. Boyee b Roberts 2
‘. Springer 1b.w. b Roberts 1
R, Chase ¢ (sub) b Lawless 12
M. Crichlow c (sub) b Lawless 8
N. Burrowes b Lawless 10
R. Rock b McKenzie 5
V. Carter not out
Cc. Knight b McKenzie 4
Extras 5
Total . Pry 72
BOWLING ANALYSIS
oO M R w
R. A. Lawless 4 2 3 0
R. B. Me nzie ll 3 28 2
Cc. B. Lawless 12 0 23 5
J. Roberts 5 1 13 3
CABLE & WIRELESS—2nd Innings
R. McKenzie 1,b.w. b Williams 1
B. Matthews b Rock ae 7
R. Lawless b Knight 27
Cc. Seale b Williams 7
Cc, Lawless b Chase 0
S. Gilkes b Williams 6
J. Roberts not out 1
Extras 6

Total (for 6 wkts.) 55

In Touch With Barbados
Coastal Station

Cable and Wireless (West Indies) Lid

advise that they can now communicate

with the following ships through their
Barbados Coast Station



S.S. Alcoa Poamer; s.s. Sunwalt; 8.8
Canadian Challenger; s.s. Colombie; 5.4
Alcoa Pennant, s.s, Tista, s.s. Dolores;
#.s. Ampac California; s.s. Del Sud;
8.8. Riotunuyan, 68.8. Sangamon, § s
Seapearl; s.8. Mormacgulf; s.s. Chris-
tian Holm; s.s. S. s.8. Andrew
Marschalk, 8.8. Rita, ss. Trun:; 8.9





WHAT’S ON TODAY

Police Courts 10, a.m.

Court of Grand Sessions
10.00 a.m,

Barbados Labour Party
Meeting in support of Mr.
R. G. Mapp and Dr. Cum-
mins at Prout Village,
St. Thomas 8.00 p.m,

Barbados Labour Party
Meeting in support of Mr.

G. H, Adams and Mr.
L. E, Smith at Mayers
Corner, St. Joseph 8.00
Pp. m,

Electors Association Meet-
‘ing at Horse Hill, St.
Joseph, in support of Mr.
W. R. Coward 8.00 p.m.

Police Band Concert at Has-
tings Rocks in aid of the
Almair Home 8.00 p.m.

Mobile Cinema at Britton’s
Hill area, St. Michael
8.00 p.m.

AND™ WOT HOPPEN €

HERE'S WOT HOPPEN !!

THANX TO
C.S AND M.S.,
BELLINGHAM,



WELCON

BARBADOS ADVOCATE









e 4

75 miles of Montreal streets, where they were greeted

suburbs and massed in thousands in the heart of the
(Federal Newsphoto.)

Police Beat New S. Wales Wins
H. College Friendly Ganie

NEW SOUTH WALES defeated
Police defeated Harrison College Sweethome when these two teams
by an innings and 66 runs on Played a one-day friendly cricket
Saturday, the last day in the ninth “fixture at Sutherland, St. Lucy,
round of Second Division cricket yesterday,

matche Harrison College bat- Batting first, New South Wales
fing first on a perfect wicket scored 102 runs and they skittled
were bowled out for 27 runs and out Sweethome for 54 runs.

Police replied with 138 runs. W. Cadogan and D. Lewis, each

In their second turn at the scoring 26 runs, were best scorers
wicket Harrison College again of New South Wales. D. Hus-
fared badly and were all out for bands scored 23 out of Sweet-
45 runs. C. Springer who held a home’s total of 54 runs.
steady length throughout the in- Bowling honours of the day
nings took five wickets for 19' went to S. Lewis of New South
runs, Wales who took 7 wickets for 14

Carlton won their match against Tuns in 6 overs. The other three
Foundation by innings and 75 Sweethome wickets were taken by
runs. Foungation in tneir tirst S- Griffith for 14 runs in 7 overs.
innings knocked up 109 runs and Bowling for Sweethome, J. Year-
Carlton after shaky start scored wood and C. Grant took 5 wickets
234 runs for the loss of seven each for 22 and 20 runs respec-
wickets. tively.

Foundation

an

were dismissed for

p2 runs in their second innings.
R. Edghill took three wickets for,
20 runs. }

Empire and Central also scored
outright victories over Y.M.P.C.|

and Combermete respectively.
Empire in their match with
Y.M.P.C. scored 111 runs in their |

first innings after they @ismissed
Y.M.P.C,

for 48 runs. Failing to)
prevent the follow on, Y.M,P.C.
were skittled out for 51 runs in|

their second innings. Best bowling
performance for Empire was given
by C. Beckles who took four |
wickets for nine runs. Thus Em-
pire won by an innings and 12
runs, |

Compbermere in their first in-|
nings scored 115 runs and Central
hit 151 runs in their turn. With
a first innings lead of 36 runs,
Central skittled out Combermere |
in their second turn at the wicket
for 80 runs. R. Branker top-
scored for Combermere. He made |
a stubborn 25,

adi Bo teh Bin pn
_ Needing 45 runs for victory, ee
Central at the end of play had | &
scored 47 runs for two wickets 1x
sy
Â¥.M.P.C. vs, EMPIRE S
Y.M.P.C. First Innings 48 1
Empire First Innings 111 for 7 x
| declared %
(E. Gill 22, O. Burke 7 wickets for | %
43 runs). |
Y.M.P.C. Second Innings 51 (D.}
Edghill 20, W. Hoyos 13, C. Beckles 4|
wickets for 9 runs) j



COMBERMERE vs, CENTRAL
Combermere First Innings 115.
Central 151 (EB. Weekes 30, R

Branker 4 wickets for 27 runs)
Comberme Second Innings 80 (R.
Branker 25, V, King 3 wickets for 12

runs)
Central Second Innings

Harrison College Second Innings
'C. Springer 5 wickets for
Sealy 2 wickets for

CARLTON vs,

Foundation First

Cariton First
wickets

Foundation Second
Edgehill 3 wickets for

- 45
19 runs, D
10 runs).

FOUNDATION |
Innings — 109, \
Innings 234 for 7



$ at KNIGHT'S

|
|
|





Britons Have Done
A Magnificent Job
SAYS BUSTAMANTE |

From Our Own Correspondent

LONDON, Nov. 12
Bustamante arriving in London
this afternoon had this to say:

“The people of Britain have done
a magnificent job in providing gifts
and interest free loans for the re-
habilitation of Jamaica's hurricane
homeless. This time Britain has
treated us not as brothers or sis-
ters-in-law but as partners. And
we are grateful.”

Reasons which he is prepared to
disclose and some which he is not
yet prepared to talk about have
brought Bustamante to England.
They are the annual revision of

prices provided for in the long
term banana contract: the long
term Commonwealth sugar con-

tract—“I am not heading the sugar
delegation but you can say I am
tremendously interested in sugar”
—and finally the decision as to
how the gifts and interest free loan
shall best be used to put Jamaica
back on her feet.

Japanese Cotton
Wants $40m. Loar

WASHINGTON, Novy. 11.

The Export-Import Bank will
make its final decision on the ap-
plication for a loan to support
Japan’s cotton industry during
the next two weeks, an official of
the Bank said on Morfay. 2

He said a $40,000,000 loan is
being studied and an analysis of
the requirement of Japan’s indus-
try has delayed the final decision
with the Agency had expected to
announce last week.

The official pointed out there
is no reason to believe that be-
cause of this delay Japan will not
qualify for the loan,

He said that the Export-Import
Bank has extended several loans
to cotton industries of other na-
tions, The request was made som¢
time ago by Japan’s Premier
Slugeru Yoshda. He outlined to
the Bank Japan’s needs with re-
spect to marketing and other re-
quirements of cotton, —U.P.



J ee} 47 runs for | THE NEW ANTISEPTIC VAPOURISING OINTMENT x

2 wickets a ee c %
HARRISON COLLEGE vs. POLICE for use in cases of local congestion and %
Harcison Colleur First Innings 27 inflamation, head and chest colds, coughs, .
Police First In s.ngs 138

hoarseness and threat irritations. Excellent
for Nasal Catarrh,
A 2-0Z. POT FOR 56 CENTS

DRUG STORES

¢ ¥,
arian | $566$5559655655550995 9996599 ODDS G9 PPS SOG F ODS PISS!



TUESDAY, NOVEMBER 13,

PAINS of PILES

Stopped in 10 Minutes

itching and torment from Piles
Diice the discovery of Hytex (formerly
known as Chinaroid). Hytex starts to

1951



CRYPTOQUCTE Ne. 105
ECL, ECLWSBL [CCQMSR CQ
DCcOP G QSFU ECLWSBL
QPFQP QWGE

has

Last Crypt: A
and cannot stand; but

lie no legs
it has
wings, far and

wide

and can fly
—Warburton





J. A CORBIN & SONS
work In 10 minutes and mot only stops
the pain but also takes out the swell-
ing, stops bleeding and combats nerve
irritation curbing other trou-
bles caused by Piles such hee.
Nervousness, Backache, °
of energy,

POLITICAL
MEETING

TO-NIGHT

At LOWER BLACK
ROCK

the
of

VINCENT GRIFFITH
of

In Support of
Candidature



eat an

aang hale
bout f
oat ShAW ill, Gah

the Parish
St. Michael.

r water. If not satisfied

Kell

plenty

after daya, separ ity box
to | ee eat Bitein. Ltd,,
Manchester, England. .
Get DOUBLE YOUR MONEY BACK!

for

SPEAKERS:
PO PDDSSOOCSS OS OPP SS SOPE




MRS LEVITTS BEAUTY SALON Messrs E. D. Mottley,
Special Prioes for the months of

4 Nov. & Dec. ONLY Vincent Griffith

x Any client bringing another

x client we will do the two Perman- Sydney Walcott

% ents for $10.00 each. Torie Waves

>» will be done at $5.00 each. Qtl ewi

x Manicures for brittle nails $1.20 fobn WwW. ”

& each

“4 Please make your appointments And others.
early

s 13.11.51—3n 13.11,51—1n.

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With the cooler nights nearby





this will make excellent covering
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—--

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x This Tractor, the price of which is only a fraction of that of 4)

$ a full “Track” Tractor—

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PAGE 1

r.i.i TWO BARBADOS ADVOCATE TUESDAY. NOVEMBER 13, IMl Ca*& tftztling \miriiun I -.11111111 M R. MELVILLE JOHNSTON. T.C.A Station Controller in Bermuda la .<* bado* (or one week assisting T.C.A.'* Resident Manager Mr Hal Baxter. Mr. Johnston Is a guesl at the Ocean Vtl He will be relurnini to Ber.nuda Oil Saturday. To Join Husband gHS. FRANK THOMAS ha* arPARTY DAYS ARE HERE AGAIN M ,: V1l tl, It V11 join hei hut>anl who 1 rnonttll holiday 111 Barbados He i .1 Civil SerX-ant in St. Vlncen.. and has been here for abou' Uaree ft efc I iej :>re ataylng, with the Branches in King Wil.... -. Meal MI Th-ma* is a Barbadian win(e hi* wife halls from St Short Talk. M R NORMAN Mac DON ALU Sales Repreacntativ. : W I A in Jamaica, arrived here on Frfcia_v. The .followlug da Capl. H. Whitehorn. Assista: Island Commissioner. < B\ Scoutsi Jamaica flew in via Tr.ntdad. They had a one n,,\ dl cusslon with Scout leaders here with regard to the forthcoming idea that ei Married In Scotland M ISS MARGARET Jr WARDS, elder daughtn of Dr. and Mrs. A. C. E.' it Ruckley. was married on Thursday. November 8'h MM, Scotland, to Mr. Malcolm Sergeant, eldest son ol Mi and MiWyndham Sar&eant r MJIJIHI. Tonight's Concert -1 r. Hasting* I It<* KS. ihj pnli.r Band is M i-i t. which pi lea 4 adhilllng which the Almair Home. I • 101. for the Police Rand to play w.ikuiiilv given by CoL R T. Michelin. Commissioner ol P From Carib's Mai I bug AT LAST, A REAL LOOK AT LIBERTY (B> IE. H. NMCOLL) i:h Tor three long year* the Btl SHLLKPSKIN PKTK 1 I. 1 ty presented a rather ironic Smce then *•*< %  has been eaugi-i THE ARMY had never "had a sight ..s fa. ^ pretty M-Jw^d Ui •',. llke 26-year-old Pee IIHL Ellen Knauff was < !" !" <>. Repeatedly the immigration Grainger, who haUs from the 1 . spent a good deal ofhr people tried to have her deports .-ountrv of Texas. Hlime looking at It—I 1. lust-mlnutc leual achadi never seen a'ear before he Island, the place of detention .r ai^,, bilked these raovea. Tl native eyrie the those visitors whom ame v. hen America*! .the* day I<-i theBrat Hi none too anxious to welcome \ Howard Mrheard a'-out omsv: 1 anl a i;4 <* proved a recce heepakln ti-ouse-s her time looking at It—front tl that the deportntioi aru | ;i Island, the place of detention fo pc^cedlngs be abandoned. that he decided '.o thoae vultors whom America 1 „ d to-night Mrs Knauff went oin the army when his fath r none too anxious to welcome. ou t of the SatiM ol Liberty, 1 „„,. 1 burted Paw right on ...,. Mrs Knauff marrie d a O 1 wllh a ii Ihc oth( r S un.,f hP moiintutn and then f:'I \. .*...'." *} lgu <>*r tnppera. t have a claee-. % i„ U i flights In a hft—liis 1948 she crossed tlieA. made h.m ft was promptly placed, on ( Island, accused of having 1.5 s^ON LITIV iictLiled He read 200 en behalf of the Czech mission JUDGE CLARENCE I-FNNIN "v.w and ole Doc Germany. >'n me." Marine Hotel, Sunday, Ifov. nth. 1 won 1* %  hrn> one. tar be it from me to be eritlbit expensive. o any cal <-f BBytMBg OH > HII truly the .train In to day'* beautiful island—tins is my secfabean Scout Jamboree being all too -dender budget* is welcome, md M H tc BMIHADOS, and I held In Jamaica in March next The hom* prrm will *ave many pre sincerely hope it won't be my THE PART* B.B.C. Fro^raiiime TUESDAY. NOVKMntB 11 is a n. Pi >. a n, Beaerl Mest H 1110 pm Nt An aaU, Ohio, u fed up wit • la and drunkfi got to make them change MjJ ATTKR I I THERE 15 ., presiding epidci, point to his view the judRe. wl inen who cla-.< In Oetobei'lone 1 ,,<<[& %  ,,f bj notorlni offence sent 23 .,, Pn to jump, a-i *iias poplc U. Jail and impoced fine-, then after seve al nervp-n.eki-. !" *rw.. totaiiins 5.676 dollars. ,1,.to h •n II I clans psnulfs and glva a result that lust. Sunday for Trimeverrons will sdmirc If you follow also visit British the dlrnctRns carefully you will dad Alori I ngth It is not at all diffl.nlt There Is Lalhiri| thl ..HIme kit that contains Spin curler", ihe vi and these make the job both aBeJtl ilh the marvellous sei i* superb climate and rieniii> [iple hare 1 Cailb Colling. Aftei .ill %  ar. They left did and will also Guiana checking on Ol 1 .1 h ontingent f i. .. BW.I.A ;ire making It poiti'( ch.irge. OTS of us have been turning ineirly in the interest of journalMr HecO .il*-i keen !_, U p (Off woik with dark orUrn in general—as an n on water polo and during -'us short r ios under our eves. Listening lo nalist of sorts (me) to a praWna%  Uy HI Bjarbadoa he ipoke lo 'he the cricket broadcast from Aus'" hH*a DHUI^AHI *—%1— I— *k_ %  %  H i .a % %  !.. To get to the point, >-our bncf today's column about Water P 'lo A-;*o-iation's MilA. R. ..-ti-i watt irurlns Dai olumnist (> 1 eaeoea. wcan ith regard relax and catch up on sleep un%  OKMIliin-xt ond T.-.I bo.lns .rrlvlnic vl. T.C.A. and Maylnj H lhc dark clrdcj conUnu P" 11 lh "" ""' U Thc "aTiaturo at the end of thi. R. COLIN BA7SON. a Bar> ,,...,. wm anc „ ,„ th( ,„,., ln ,„ badlnn on the teaching my aurr.ame la apellecl wllh t staff of Ihe Ij.o Oil and TramR f Markaman "t"s". thin aUllonery will dipl porl Company's achool In Aruba • %  " ""' %  '"•" arv Iurnour ,„ at | „ m naylni arrived from Aruba ovec the -,. A |( C i lt£ SUTTON trf at the Ocean View and the fad week-end to upend a couple of M „,„,. ,. „„ ,. „, __-., that I apent 4 dav. la.t week in &£X*£L2 fo B B r"dt GU ,r a ,.'Av'ed Pn ^n Montreal w.ltin. ,or Fll.h, .00 House. fli Mr Bat son Ig I fOf and (.1.! Kai nian. i Ihe P i M .T"me, the %  week^end'T/v to Barbados loei not make^me a B.W.I.A and l.-..ve fn, RC on Montrenlar. 1 %  I name Of ,f reUaw Rolhe'.iv New RiunswiiK. ( BB%  Ftid:i> With B.W.I.A. ada and -|"'"'l '"> Mi. Button "had been in TrimIheTeofl in TofOBjtO where I n dad as a member of the B.C. Undying for my I..L.B. (l M nHfriF utK'cnc _h u ^ ltto ,onm which took i>art in the degrea %  < 'niversily of Toronto -IS^w?i^S^2lL!! Trinidad Rifle iKaaoc4a&oo*i anl have tiotklnf against Monwith BW.I.A. in Trinidad nu;i| >h „„, whW| ^^ ^ s, t ireal—l hke .1. .-special;. V" '•"' m hl b >, BWt ?„} OT liTdevy with the competition for last ww4* I mi lueky enough t Plareo after spandliig a holiday lht Anchor Cup. Teams from meet Charles Boyer as wwll %  in Baibado* Mr. Rogers is a Barbados. Trinidad, and British see him on the stage—also yot liiiib-Kiian Guiana took part in this shoot, won correct In rep.i ting my first Week-end Vilit '."' %  Anchor Cup was won by name and (he fart that I am PrivM R. O. P, BENNETT Official Trinidad with Barbados second iloged (.'I to precede same wit* staiter ft., tl... i....--.1..%  ""' Britlali Oulana third a -Mr*." Also. I did arri Turf Club fleu H.W.I.A. over the i* expected back he Barbados Trinidad by Mr Sl „ tl „, | rtak-end. lie iir „, Ml Ihi k r today. Worthing. •1.i> mi; with Mi Richardson i T.C.A. Saturday Voi BY THE WAY ... % /i>c.w.,w M p m The Nr>. 4 10 Ian I., in t n, r.ihr A L-ueh. 10 oa p m The -i..ii,fi i > '.i -'.-'.alkini: potll ', priests, in ^iil-fncnds. .v.i-lch. of San R.,,,lu„l. ,„ g values ne % %  hai c ra ... .. baton in other eltle* and „ubllc.v" company for that amount because when he got aboard one OUT Ol'" BIZ7. the woman drivor A BARBER SHOP STRIKE LI seized his cheroot ind Ing on in Now York. And o.uide the big shop in Rockefeller ivheel. cxpbining that it WOUl wafjlan -inker stru. K lareturned at tl i I notice saying: "The trhln Welwich said he suffered JTave of thc scizz is out of blzz. -,. • i in i Hmin. I.lkr Mv Job. and A I* Thrd'ii car pBo..a\>*Mi i m ia pm. im I o S.I v III t'ller l..mi II n Mr. 15.00 M To spread I cure talc. (Hi Sufficient to make Cain legal. :() rrigmeued bi a dead nut. (7) 1 Minus two. CO) %  Bones or Uia ——." (B> Out of the tbroas. (II anew from tn* native quarter. (II They bring news from Simla(at Home would make 20 Down • •.Ills (31 "' %  pO the booths; to the booth>'" .I All over (he vast metro* E JIIS men and women leaped ghily from (heir beds this morning with ihese ominous words on n all lii I At each booth courteous officials %  .v.titeit with friendly smiles. And us though c\ HOMBSHEU. STUNS EUROPE Uncanny. Says .Mayor A T 3 32 pm. last Tuesday the Beachcomber Poll forecast that the election figures as this edition went to press, would be as follows; Socialists 175; Conservatives 142. The outcome of this daring enterprise is a triumph tor the scientific methods of my poll. On page 3 will be found but I don't think so. a nw method of calculating the number of shopping days since last Christmas. 23 ways of using up old bits of halibut directions for making a model, in leathers, of London Bridge, and Ihe further adventures of Gormaino Blancmange nd the Terrible Troglodyte of Ihe Sierras liar bint wirv far har/m f I N a musical criticism I came across thc phrase: "The orchestra took themselves too seriously." This seems to amount ta an invitation to orchestras to behave like dance bands; to Jump about, make faces, and utter American cries. I remember an incident in the old Queen's Hall. whan, during the pbi.wim of .. somi re %  ymphony, uarraaged lie Larry mad* up III . Spot. Ml only one. (Si Swims wlin IU pet load. Ill l.l'.tie *yra UpeeU tbe eel when pou "in away <:•>) Vpttfa.iii•n-c. in trudiill PXir tuajmr. prod .•-. ifli B i.ix U< DCitrporaubrielly an ancient city. Mase aunt Doaei alter live, (b) NiahtiiintHi Home oeople 31 Arruae %  .in. IM iti .... a te eai v iri.tafl H Irlel-. 11 E int If. HIII *o Ojrie SJ m: (a U'liaee: 'i* I'm JS. fi: 14, ardan Oe-e 1 Pillof. i Priud: KT>ea • tlcael !> Prrn. ft Idle ^ Laas l* voe IS Ttln £8mtl$M& BEFORE 4eV I Your MONTHLY Period? Do female funt onaj montnly ailmeuta make you feel so nervous, strangely reatleea, so tense und weak a few du\ )ut befure wour period? Then start taking Lydla E. Plnkhama Vegetabt* Oom|>iund U r-'It) || has aurh a aoot %  OBBlV rtliiB antlipaann^! on one of woman fanf orynt... working %  tbasympiatlietlc Mrvooa %  yatein. Pink ham* COt more then fwlitrVi It also relieve, ptw-patlod nervolt* Irritability, i % %  Rat ol nf thin pret tnt-dlrlne helps build up n itatanc* ni[rui.t "uch i;alreiui. Ttuly the leoaja> Mill II r ..(. "l laraas I 1-u.ii.i.'. I. HIII^ IH .' % %  LYDIA E. PINHHAM'S Vejeiabie Compound r f'pAfcmudi aSoVeaft dtiefinunationi-Mf/mC, > %  / %  '/?//•//#& j/btpttneei of ATKINSONS (yofomie6 M**yrhohiftiml Warmth O VFICIAL .. Alka Seltzer iii When ||| H i-e.idy Kupeti ir> 1 bundle fumly round his .. *nd pau ovef the rail. Ifteo. i*.pping the rape, he hng, upvdr ^ '. .1 mikn hii *Jy ibtoiy oaa %  '. Thu rnuii be *V'^^^^eVVVV*eV>V^eVV#V'-V>***VU-^^^ i liishtnif Stffl £ n-ni4>ritui Xiti GLOBE THEATRE Presents:TOMORROW SITE AT 8 O'CLOCK STKKL BAND AND M Mill n COMPETITIONS THE RHYTHM KINGS (The Champs.) vs THE DEFENDERS (Challmffnl PLUS Th. Film "13 RUE MADELINE" (Jamos CAGNEY) Pit ISc; HOUH. Ilfir: Balcony 48r; Box 60c. IS IT HUMAN OR INHUMAN' THE THING FROM ANOTHER WORLD EMPIRE TO-DAY Hi .v ISO and CONTINUING DAILT 20th C-FOX BIG TECHNICOLOR MUSICAL— ••JV THE mill III Starring: DANNY KAYE — C.T.NT. T1ERNEY MUSIC — DANCING — SINGING — COMEDY DANNY IS FUNNIER THAN EVER EXTRA *'ANTI CAT" — 1 Bell Short ROYAL Laat 2 Show* Today 4.30 A S.1S Republic Whole Serial "ZORRO'S BLACK WHIP" Starring Linda STERLING — George J. LEWIS TOMORROW m THt'RSDAV 4.30 A S.I5 Republic Double— Roy ROGERS — Dale EVANS in • UNDER NEVADA SKIES and %  RED PONY Starring Robert MITCHUM — Myrna LOY l ICHT I RAGRANCESTHAT Ml I I i ill HEEDS OF ALL can MloK. €MJ 0£ COtOCNI . *> aorau M.A* ("U DC COLOGNt MO Ml MM lOnON loriON wu cotocNt •AMIMACf •Jr 14 nowtn IAU W CtKOCNt %  # a*i.£T Moist t*u at cotocm %  lKo* mm tin **t u.' IT I. tinr, MorH. h.jr %  laM he tee:. h^"i haU boy, *n.l he :. ufely ignore eglM, Just Opened DRESS GOODS CREPES SPUNS SHEERS I.V III SH.\N ONLY AT EVANS & WHITFIELDS DIAL 4606 4294 iimatoas. :• OLD MUD STRUT, IOHDOH. INCUHD OLYMPIC TO-DAI' Laat 2 Show. 4.30 A 1.13 John GARPIELD in TOMORROW .THURSDAY 4.30 1.15 Universal Louble UNDER MY SKIN ABBOTT and COSTELLO and IN SOCIETY "THRILL OF A and ROMANCE " HUNCRY HILL Starring Starring Esther WILLIAMS — Van JOHNSON Margaret LOCKWOOD Dennis PRICE ftigkva,, Ont .'Porl,,, > 3)J. desirable To Own Good Cutlery BARBADOS Co-op COTTON FACTORY ] Ltd. HOW Laat 2 Showa TO-DAY 4.30 ".15 Columbia Double "WHEN THE REDSKINS RODE Starring Jon HALL — Mary CASTLE and REVENUE AGENT" Starring Douglas KENNEDY TOMORROW A TIURSOW 4 30 S.13 Columbia Double Eddy ARNOLD "HOEDOWN"' and FATHER IS A BACHELOR Starring William HOLDEN Coleen GRAY i M I i itrisi:. I\ THE ADVOCATE I


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TOBSDAl MiVIMBFR U. ISil BABBADQS \I.V(K \fl FACE nvs 40Year-Old On Murder Charge THE TRIAL Of Alphonza Beckles. a 40-year-oM CO** of Soctet" Hill. St. John, who is charged with the murder of 48-yw-old Winston Cumberbatch. a bus driver, began at the Court of Grand Sessions yesterday before the He Acting Puisne Judge Mr. G. L Taylor. Beckles i ^ed to have committed the murder on September 9 this year, kleven of the 22 witnesses the Prosecution are exI to call t< prove their casp. gave evidence yesterday ind the case is adjourned until todav On the application of Mr. J. S. B. Hear, one < %  Beeklea'a lawConductor Stands Trial •Gaseogne' Ruth Brings Off WI Run Li 1"""' P.C. W1CKHAH SEES //OH Mr HEHaUQUES Founder at loy' Club, in EngUud tt .'ritUy wit a letter to lb Comnuwuoaer of Police m win that PC Wickham of the Local Tore* had jut fosspletsd hta Urw mouth* court* in the running and management of Boys' Olabs During that timo PC Wickhan. travelled to variou. mi Uiutt-4 Kingdom and w how taojr war* opciat.-.l PC. Wickbam u now golni to a Military School of I Training at Aldarabot to take a throe month* court* in physical training. "De Grttsse G yen, th atrlad ratMi lu bruise in from of each knee i .Termites, Poor Construction Caused Much Damage In Jamaica Hurricane GoMS. v UM #4-fu.> oming %  1 rat visit ,i LU as n ^ I Suanwilp i Lull, Bartedm •in.1 j i f. en.all badly torn ir Uv Km.. %  %  crew weir k. terdsy evening; to the scene of the ^*'l bruises on the bock of the ulleged -nurder at Thickets, St T lfl e,b w. There were no special Philip. The 'bus In which Cumfeatures about the stomach. her batch and Beckles were dnvFrom his examination and from nig at the time of the incident, consideration ol ue circumstances u-< ili InspaetO d by the Jury. surroundingthe death he would Mi W W Rceea, K.C.. Solidsay that death was due to the tot QwMraL is prosecutm-: for the defect* of embarrassment of the Crown. contraction of the heart and air Mr. Dear bj awnutpu with Mr. getting into the circulation. thereGeorge Farmer as counsel for by causing damage. These were Beckles. the results of the stab wound of Ik/U Heckles ;nd Cumberihe heart. The wound was lnbatch were employed by the flicted by sharp pointed instmC.eneral Motor Bus Co. and m n worked on the St Philip route. Before calling anv witnesses. Stab Wound Mr Btaea outlined the case to II. t..Id them that evi" %  person had fallen irom a dence would Iw given to show *>us tie m-ild have gut bruises, bui that Beckles and Cumberbatch the stab wound srould have been had bad tVM bkaWina preeaused i > something: etsa. i „,. ekwi to CurnbertMteh'g death. The not thinl it aras self utflieted," hi* -prom ow own i %  n ** a fatal incident took place when %  aid. TnworetlcaUy It was not GRENADA N< Cumber luiU*. and Beckles were impossible, but It was very imr taking the bus P l?5 along Thickprobable if it were self inflicted, and Provincial oi Qrenada and the c". it is alleged ,t would more 'ikeiv nave gono Otesiadlnei Alexander l. Estrange 1 irnberbntch was driving through the spaoa between the <,lcy the inn ^ \ icar General )h „ r „ ,;., i„ K ....„ .„ liatlM.lo-i fi' i "Ul-iinl n Vigo (Spam) i If ( r..,i.i.ln > "*"' l_EI .1 i II. 1(1.1 Dies the cardiac Dltai ,vv ,u u,s n t *' 1 fidmission —i the afternoon of the same day. wound was nearer to the middle ._ Mildred Danny, raputad wife hne of the chest than the nipple te 0 s %  >f Winston Cumberbatch said she of the breast. With such g wound Catholic Church was crowded with nberbatcn had nine chiliintonsciousness did not necesthe faithful and other gympOthU— said that Cumbersi.niv come on immediately and Prs ,| us morning when the unnreai r home on Septembei II and 12 o'clock, for .v uyikmg in the counrould not return home :ght. f tllouing morning khe Ml .'. M fm turn. Ijter he -iw him at the 9he nieiitiiled the body : ilowlng day. thur Scott, attached to the '^.^ POUoa Station, said he at%  Ibal that he could have •.onielhing after mdon. Me Bald lhat when he flcv K hurricane, it was thought th about 11000 houst .... %  Ui-illlil ...:, %  > %  %  I-' u now get ined II 50,000 houses wen|A Poorer Classes "This figure includes only .houaes l.i; %  • %  A !io %  c % %  etv of course, many other I" i ic's surance assessors from thf U.K. %  i %  %  mated how little hurric an e dad been taken out imonf ;.il < ctlons "f lh i on unity Kmeigcntv Conunitl.', \M in operation and fortunately. i ling .he sails. .n aphOO n O T Kuth rg bvIM ->i Bonaire, Dutch Was iu,ii.>ji yens agn But In bo .. %  it. ih ^.JES?.** ££02* -Id >h-t ^ie has conatanl n Rath i owned bj rrat %  tmlUan and Iha othet nine mem Tinii,-. %  rdaj hi : %  made t Barbados | drun tween k M r in and CurBCM I cargo. The rib b light, ii na %  %  The BJ ) alaoaaaa West tndaai U K rout 1 inch line. Oaaaogmg %  Mumi Taking OVei h*Om the (iiwutM %  % % %  oeh lie f.raM> il'l" I bid l" make her l ••Qraaaa .n bo coming from sailing Curaea Cartagena and Jamalei though hi has been up of thi i>m at the Vi-arage dally t Insured" he funeral rile took ntai %  Dominican clargy lo Iha bnand attending the solemn requiem mass. If Cumberbatch had fallen on a celebrant being FBthei FlUOerald, gtocaj erf u lh Leaulature He said thut communal f.edu,^ had bean used would not h.v.. w c amon lh e co i n8r i a "Vi1o^ '" p,lbUr bu dl "* *• "i"*"^ Born in lndon In April IWID. pry\iiuj TJ %  xpanBlva and pcRelurnmg to Barbados on May %  ie and Trinidad, ir Ornaas will i %  uktag bat %  Poo) llr lilOv .. (at.' i three i laaaaa, and "ill bl milking .. .j|| in lt..i badOl OnOO every ti.. (•aacngiic passenger accommodation is 25* and she used lo eall Bt Barbados once even Qva aaaaki k Co., Ltd .:> %  %  .' \ i ic Prancfa lino Ooaaaana i (ormarl Oaar ga Hishimton si. troop Innanorl during World "< the treatment of sarcopnc manje in small inimalt Tetmotol it invirubly effective At the mote, two or Vee application* tr* required and moreover during, •MaMM no special itolmon it neceiiiry. Tetmotol it non-jreaty. non-st*lnin| and hat no 'bnoaiout tmell. TETNIOSOL' Tetraethylthiuram Monoiulphide Solution (2S%) MPfRIALCHFMICAL (PHARMACEUTICALS LIMITED A luBlxfid'r (0">pOftr of ''"pcncl C*t"(at l'>Ajil"ei limited ... i Mil ,iy. MANCMIfTia I B ""J Diitnbutofi — A. S tHYDCN 4 SONS BARBADOS' LTD. DON T UOP BETWEEN 9D0P8 HARRISON'S BROAD STREET w II used. If Ci sild not havi nberbalch had Nominal ion Stations fl'rtM the wnund himself t';,' dao and % %  Mr. eased was ordained a priest venting the use 1929. Schooled at a Jesuit Colifir no inml uun tcndel the post mortem oxamlna•"" %  %  * ... !" .i. ......,.. !" n.. k h( i. llrr sluf iicd the priestl-imu tion of Winston Cumberbatch ' movement than Cumberbatch hood (t )n( ^^^ Dominican X '" K which was performed bv Dr. would have hrtn i' he were dnv|. TI( IV v.\lt'hr-sler <;iCato. A nur-e at the Hospital ' "* when the wound was iiini blood -stained clothinflicted. I left pocket of the shirt there was a hole. There was Station Phoned a corresponding hole In the vest. „ Undei .ioss-examination he I'^rg* *' %  ">•"' told Mr. liear that the jacket had Pinter of WinUemere DO hole. %  %  Boyea, I Nurse of the room --Genera] Hospital, said a.m. llvtrklea came and askqd %  . that on Oaptamber 10 ana handpermission to use the MlephOM Od wme eloUMM which had leen He asked to be put On >< %  Uattriel V.'";;; Ti,:.V 1 iV;..V' '.i HI., kfrlnrs and taken off Winston Cum!.h.t.h '(. He said a bus had been inM'"-' 1 !" 9 .it the %  eloeh riiui sda> bad ( %  Wuodhouse said that subject to parliamentary approval, tlv iiake-v.n,i priory, st.,fBriuah Ooverni m t had agreed l fordshlre, and Blickfrtars Priory, ^i* Jamaica to the maximum Oxford of H.BOH.OOtl in ., k-rant and loan: After ordination he dM two n,,. greater portion would i>e f. i jr. g yceare advanced itudaw at UMvmiri rehouatni and the balance f St. John, University Belglunn rollowing Bgriculture. A ipeeia] new agem-v said ba was at home in his sitting ream 11 parish arorif In Naweaaw m ,,, |„. ol up m Jam., f 9 aoout iu.ovw came to Grenada. November, .1 purposes, as uell BJ ,. 22nd of Nov.nd.i. the Raturn During 193S to 1947 he was reday to Sgt. SciAl. an accident on Tnickalso lectured students 19 SO lived ett., K. ...i Beckles then said he wanted to telephone the owners of the bus. lie wanted to get either Mr Dowding or Mr. O-Neale. H.telerilIllbclbl itchj phoned and repented the '" .statement he had made I praviouj baiaahona message f,BMM into the room Oxford After he returned in 1M7 he became Vlcai this purpose of rehousing and of aided S.-li-n.-l|. • . i lalnly I e Included and every efft 11 v.ould he made to huild hurricaneif houses. These hornes hi: GefieVS-Woilnrtal "-' d wou,,i not "* rr ^ -" p rtion "i tha c< I era a me but~,-t t toned oi not when he wiw him. p.c. Btanlay llayers attaohtd t District '<*" said he went b Thlcketu \<->->-i. st Phillip, oi uskiti und ne a kod how thr •"•"•P 1 s*-uteml-er 9 about 1 30 p Bl H -aid that he had be retmitl by the occupiers. l.cets had been blown orr.mii eoused further damage during the hurricane Thii ara b fc a u sa Lhej "rera IriadNaquatel}) (ixed .line sen iling units adar iMnglos which had more nxl roof whuh were much more ieI WIHHI Ants of IHI d Idcd i I the i ill reoatva tinBOavJnaiion %  .TI to tha Qinasal Aaaanbti ol Iha Island. i %  ..i Much no "ll take place are as (Oilowi I'( iinctown—Queen's U lUtnjL h ....I Drill Hall. St. i n ( ;.IIII-I.|. Chureb Vastrj Boon hnst Church. Si < U *fi st Oaoraje'i Church Si eoL Bl Philip .St llnlip's Church b boot si John st John's Churoh School m Same st. i ,ne < ombinad ^*Z Bl T i si Thomas' Chun h Boys 1 Benool St .Ins.-ph St Joseph's Church t I \r dn %  Bellapl i i %  %  Hall etei Bl Patai Churcfi Brhool, '-. %  • ; %  i ..I,.n.-i it. T ifichel told lb .• .H Bit t he hs %  tinpracUca of ping hell while ioi tti convenience of %  %  paaaangari %  a great IneOOVi tr a vailing publb %  %  ,.i itten ion %  % %  nd 1 ing the law In this respCCt will b M.said I %  .i the b will not expect the drivi anywhere than at orgai a Red i' Ignore the raojueal h doctors who want to -t"i> (W |1 %  said "AictMi Rttamer" Arrive* Here THK I-NDKUMKNTIONKD ITEMS ARE ONLY A SMALL PROPORTION OF OUR WIDE RANGE OF KITCHEN HEDUISITES Serjeant's Evidence Sgt. Thorington, In charge of II. John, said that SeptemMB S. Il-eklea was broughl to the Police Station and charged with inflicting grievous bodily harm. "On the rollowing day he was charged with murder." he said. *ioned Beckles and asked him whether he had any thing happened. Beckles said that he had .,. ,. V|(U ., to say. Beckles said he was in* Kpn ,., hand. ,l him B Althougu ,r wd ilty of the General Hoiroad and the other wanted to go gmaii eunvilt bag a nd bicvele miles l>'-r houi wan piUl. A man whose name was along another road. In the exaboul 9 IS um Thc (>H ; t ontainl oidluary glazin-: resisted, pro 1 given BS Winston Cumberbatch citenwn: the bus jumped the bank. b| ,. U( ium 9 Kr w driver a-id it was properly fixed Btoru was broufM In. He had a stab "My wife asked what became ultvl .| P loo i 8 taereta buildlnBS Batumi ) wound in the left breast. It was of the driver and Beckles said the ^ c M J ( J ln art>wer t (l Mr De ir up letter than wood frame buiMabout half an inch wide, two driver put his head In the canes. na hp (|ok talrmi ... with hard latjour :<-ep and directly over thc "She asked whv the dnvei |i( .. pecially between frai %  passed on CSamera heart. acted as he did in driving the bus %  i of Ba) When he saw Cumberbatch he OVPr X hc hank Beckles replied Arrested quite adequate The collapse of Land, Bt Muha.-I by Mr (; it list coherent and while trifflt Cumberbatch must have many wood-frame arm COE> eta OrlnVh, Acting Police Magistral) lo him he lapsed into WBn(w i t o murder him" Cpl Vernon Hunt,attawhad"Hi nog panel bulldlngi -common In oi District "A". 0 Ineoherenc. Cross-examined by Mr Dear. District C" said he went to th? Jamaica could in 90'I nf t uglfi and a bamboo bnikd tin n he said the canes along Thickets scene a) Thtekatti on Sept. ease* ta> attributed to advanced propert) or Mildred Mi. %  ere ahou' 1" to 12 reel bill, The He s.iv BecfcUM among the rrowd inf^tation of the timber by ants bfovem Tlw ss Alcoa BaaaashS* 4H2. i Ne ui a.ttw: •sab. %  •loin mill nutv or %  meai thii \ihrii,r.ik which ha caUcd ("i .. load of i H i %  \Ot 1 i real i iped : i %  ajtaa Bsnasas r. ban Thom Ltd MhelttriHib US MI H JaSOl %  Ltd I JIIMHII-.T Jatlled i wards. A sharp pointed instrument such as a penknife could have caused the wound. Cniss-Kxamined farthest distnnee between the which had gathered. He asked him ami the use of very weak outer edge of two cane holes was lo >nw to District "C" and give jn the panels. aWit l> feel • statement Beckles was carried "Thf need for impnrtfi to the station. Later in the day Ing practices and code* and for Evidence Corroboraled be was arrested and charged with their reinforcement is vc > gppargrlevous bodily 'harm. He look ent. Steps are being taken to from him a small pair of setsimprove the Building five-1 .a II penknife and OreamMga hj ons for lareens prevlou icTie Kan vile of Ge Under cross examination he said that a wouna of that nature might spurt bloou but it was nut spurting anv when he saw it. S. Farmer, corroborated her hussors. a Dr. A. S. Cato, Visiting Medlband's evidence. corkscrew, cal Onicer at the General HoaShe added Lhat Beckles asked He took a statement from Mr. plUl. BBll lhat on September whether he cftild leave his bi i 10 about LM pm. he examined cycle there. She told him he could. the hodv of a man at the HoaThe bicycle had on it a hand bag. pital. The bod* waa Identified The polite CaVM h >' night and -< Mildred le.iny as lhat of look away the bicycle. P.C Woslev Sobers who 1 attached to District "C" said Out hp went to Thicken s Road where Kl , T h...,..-. !" .-.. Resisted Police I'.i.n i,'.:ii;ii ii Pined Mr C II QrlfflUl, At tini: l'..l -.,...( I. ...l.n'.l Lui Ulc A.i n i UXhtlfOol L Ml i.iie ol IB/, jn.t .ii 14 da>< or 1 I h -i. raarMd with bl v I ... l.i|hlliHr I. ,i T .. ..IT. %  the ' i 4fJ/in 14 days or one month %  • USlng indecent I inguag.rm tto BQIUUO. bo.h offssv i committed On November 10. field Mason. Can Milan McClean gave then present that O'Neal and a not he, their statement!.. More evidence will he give! t day at 10 a m. when the rn continues. i houi< lajht-sBSlna S1C,V Fund Geawa rh. Eaarskwioa I I'.c A. haa re,n i.t %\ou B nd past year. %  ave beei : Dejbtartmenl Two additional lethal chambci C.O.L. GOES UP 2 POINTS %  lieu ,i. i sasea rvei B ptemi si i...,. ,i was Ml pt mon h %  .. n IM pn .ie Bgura %  I Ii was 212. %  %  %  H is cau <. %  odtnt. %  uBotvm rai in>\tiv< \ rot. HI: POKE Sevan •V/iV/ l oi. I'h.s,"Joy riders" added substantially to the dlficultlc i ih.roroaa, tl %  i ;e!ief workers. mid the '"\' 11 '"' "' *• Donilnk I'll be available early Iii lfto2 lovembei id ii I0JM) They an Bavba* Foundry UdU, and will b.in District A" Polls W n DistMi t Poliei si ,1K HEARTBREAKER NYLONS OUTSTANDING FOOD VALUES Original!' .... S 29 ,. %  VVIrVUVEVww\rVVw\rV L /wVw^ %  FOR BEST RESULTS „ %  USE -' PURINA CHOWS %  IN THE C HECKER BOA RD BAGS !" d H. Jaioo Jonea & Co., Ltd—Distributor. %  %  WaVVVVVVWVVVVWVwVW %  5 ITVAPORATED MILK ( ONDENSED vn.K IMPERIAL VIENNA SAU8AGKfl 38 ( RAWKOMDS SWTF.T BISCUITS irh pkt*. .54 SWWET ASST CUSTARD CREAM, MAltlK TRI FRUIT PtTFS. CREAM CRACKERS The B lMive Hem* fur 0BBB a"d (arr> f uaUimrr* AVI.MEH'S ntUTT BALAD -per T'n AYI-MER'S GREEN PEAS—per Tii LIN CAN GREEN PEAS per Tn TURBAN DATES—per Pkt. TURHAN MIXED NUTS—per Pkt this W gab s :i, MEINZ CREAM OF CHICKEN 5 MEINZ CREAM Of MUSHROOM M UP DANISH SALAMI SAUSAGE—[' >; NORWEGIAN PEELED SHRIMP? N PERLSTEIN BEER per Bottle ; 1'I:HI.STF:IN BEER pas Carton : : 9TANSFELB. SCOTi A #. LTD. MUX* CAL-C-TOSE i I i t£* 1Vi> IS MHH 1> SiHEXHIH < AI.-C-TOSF. the B-lkloui. t Kuppk-ments the inUbr ef Ihe .in J .noun's of six \il. %  ml Ir.iri It i. ,\.<:inil lur hlghl* rr,.,iTiiiniid.il for Ihe .ml nurtlng mothers •a and Mall tl gular dirt v. it plus Calrlu hlldrrn u ho dlillk trea. rearalaaeasEta im red drink itrtUasaaUi im .M.. milk .irnl ,-,ii.< i.ni Ph on ia.e at all KNIGHTS BICUG STORES 1* s




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Tl I M.\\ MlVrMBrH 1:1. llil BAKBAIMJS ADVOCATE 1 Hill I Human Brain Fighting The/ Will VidWilh ..Sleeping Income Tax Sickness"10. %  I human brmm arhich can m ik u,. even play chess will -.,-,1, be n-leased. The brain prndurfd for the U.S. y imj *s a cross be%  i and a plnball machine It In %  bout the sue Ol Engineer HKIUIJ Spiagui-. QM O( the designer*. (hwnlx'J Hiima%  JI02 a* „ %  •-tool>i Mirn %  %  da. %  rtsrbta -iiT;nr de%  Mid ih it larger brains are usually big vnough to fill one room inj -nme Of them --ost mill.ni* R thai a oewlj ipabar, He %  -"I 'l ran even think rwo og h %  %  tin e — d'.r.t Meteorites May Hit The Earth ALBUQUKSQUi; Nov. 10. Saturday night th.ii atroi rlOW grwn fireballs seen b ritfc l during the last IWO i i meteorites and some of them may hit the e_rth. Far roe is and Kim-hers in one i dhij where reciPB frightened and awed by the fireballs, said they felt .. ten-iiA Jolt shortb aftai thsg had seen one nf tinobject* %  .. %  ..,, New Mi-.,, o reported ana "t the objects was spotted Thursday morning. It may have fallen in the deecrl section "f the slate of Chihuahua, Mi alee .ncording to till La Par. Director of the Institute of '.: %  %  :. %  A> %  %  %  : ' through iriveetigaton* unidentified Government lot iirea n round ("loverdale to check re. %  La Par said tlndlngs Indicated thai than was) I "tremendous tumult'' such as might have been 'v meteorites crashing into the earth —I' I* %  JOHN CANOE" KINGSTON. Nov. 8. r.noe." the old Weal Indian pantomime which brought the spirit of Carnival to J:uiwican HI olden days is being revived thin yaax %  John Canoe bands have Gleeiest*! John Canoe Chrfatm is Cornpatlttoa and keen i It ali i .HI,tini in actmK •" anticipated PmeesaioaVi NSn laki %  %  I sntions of the Wand. IMPRISONMENT HOME, Nov. 10. The Roma Coun of A sentenced to 6 years' Inujrisonroant, on Friday, the Italian anarchist. Oatjamppe Ds> Luieee, t!5. who. last year had failed in Dint on the life of the Spanish ajnbaaaadoi In Hi.nn-. De Luicse was arroatod on tha night of January 21 near the i v ..n b) viruses which attack the spinal cord producing ;i form of liljj or sleeping —II' Seaweii ssais si — or a %s i *. HI' in .. >,.m l'MH oi %  A %  %  Wattona I Hfi^iiM1 Ii.tI Pli.I U %  %  %  %  B il J.** W. Holi.rt .! ,IJ Hnbvit. aiii'.ti M* ( -„ ISas* I l ip lalMU to On •.l.i... RM H nh.i Nk & EN. ii, I I Kl|-T MlXKtO. Oniir SW.. K C 14 O urnoi in*.I-.4..J i ii URSNAD/ On .lnra. at* \n ISO'I Ct Saan u|>. nrr\hi>d\ Mr. Ruder'* ftwt ^aWSMnga] an^Hhrr thuvf*oui> hit..," Ion bores* Hervira M ctwel Mllll Wiilinl MML Ii Mum. i %  > IIIMIMIl II. **,,*.* Mi NEW AFRICAN AIRPORT OPENED By ii \i MI ii i M i> ENTEBBE. Uganda. Monday. A new link in lha British Commonwealth strategic air chain was compU-L'.i ban whan Acting* Qovarnor H. s. Potter \l airport, big enough to operate lot air liners and jet bombers. Tbej British protectorate of Uganda lies aatrtda the Equator on the northwest shore of Lake Victoria. To tlie noith it is bordered by the AngloEgyptian Sudan over which Eny,>t and Britain are in dispute. Entebbe the s*at of the Uganda Government, row boasts an airport with a 10300 feet runwayInnaajM in the African continent Potte. told representatives of the world's loadlnc airlines and Government officials attending the ceremony thai extensions would make aVttebbe the Oral alfporl the ..orid to be speciflcaliy redesigned for operation of lit Hundreds of planes swarmed the airport as he declared the airport open. Sir Alan Cobham pioneer aviator and (Irst to make a flight around Africa 20 years ago ;i, 11First Shipment Of Copra Since 1946 IFTIHII (liii II KINOSfON N A shipment ol i 000 ions of copra has arrived m Jams the Philippines eoi Jamaica Coconut Indus! i This is the Hi*: shipment ol • oora to IH since 1W5 when .. few shipments rnatdad. Such nnportatiui: order that cocoa mil product failories can keep in pmductiei during the shortage of lei caused by hurricane daman* -lnpmenl* ^re to follow until such limeprobably two |p three years—as youin: trees no the norUnodf ol the lantod after lha 1944 buxrieane, come to bearing to ufTiOlenl extent to ofTMt thi side losses in the August huniCSUM and 'bus restore local eopn production to nde-iud'c k MRS AFTSH 4CODSNT Sixty-year old Ida Qenetha of died at the Qeneral Hospitnl on Saturday evening. .1 few %  WBJ admitted. Qenetha was involved in an Idea In the Probyn Street Bus Stand at about 2.40 p.m. the same dav. t U.N. Reject Plan To Admit lied China I'Arti^., Nov. .u. Russia luBaiooj i laUMca in i . •it-iicrai Aaaamiuj a.i-uiu.iy when its bieerniit Commit' tec defeated by n votes to 2, uie Soviet demand that Communisi China be admitted t" membership. Kussia sought to get on the Assembly's programme its de111 iwi tlia. Clunese Hllatnallsla be thrown out of the U.N. and thai Beds be pni tn their place. but the QeneraJ 01 Bteerlni Committee, approveil by II to i Thailand's reaouUon which ruled out debate on Red China's admission during the current A-sembly meeting. Only Kussia and ilPoland. voted to put the qu esti on m the programme. The Committee then "added to the A,' l sembly agenda without both ih*Amerkan BrlUsh and French disarmament proposal as well as 1 Russia's peace proposal includiag a Kori world dlsarriMment opntorence, —U.P. POCKET CARTOON by OSBFRT LANCASTER 1'' ;5 an H aa ss alt, iton'l sou think it would I'.Milker chic lu be (he only cuiittiiurncy in England <> rrtuin a Lihnul I Pope's Dietuui •liilimiiaii. ( aflttu -" M Y3 i>f;/7f;i\ eu>nt LONDON, Nov 9 A Church of England new* paper on Friday termed 'Inhuman callous, and cruel", the ft %  nt bj the Pope that a baby should not be narrillced to says the life 01 ii. mother In ,1 .: %  chtidbfrth, The newspaper, a weekly journal of opinion, 1 prlvatt but reflects the views of the Church. Never was the need more urnent than now U>< tlH insistence ui .TI tha -.tiiiii 1 t for the sexu.il fun lion The newspaper said in -i from pug* editorial, that ihc pity oi it iv thai the Pope has so rot oversupped Ihc limits of i-ominonsense that his statements air Irrelevant He had brought discredit upon the Christian faith Instead ol honuui in .1 taii. tn it..11.in Qbetatrh lans at Roma on Oetobej tt, the l'"pv said that in childbirth to mother's life is .1 verj noble aim Lot the direct killing : as a means to that and la nut permitted.—tri deve l opsneni a rthtna c^ribfaaan i be tho theuse of a conference to be held in Puerto Hico 111 February next year. Plans for the* • i.i:kj .ippn>ved by the Caribbean Commission at its Thirteenth Inc 1 u d i' •• del a I ted and suggestions for th." % %  I 0| the necessary backgnmnd docuroantation lo dMssmta In the proposed agcirlt, the 1 industrial Development haa been broken down under the following heads: 1 Thr ijiiauttmi ateuetus < '*' %  1 I'mpfiK fw funnel DsveasaaasaS, ...1 HMIUIM lor P.i.llns ol 111 D 4 racul SlMiiim lur Hi* IMItnu. "I linlii-li 1 tl DM*lof>ni^nl .I...I..,-. nan ! %  "><• n*trng oi luduilrlal I>TVT1II|>III*I Authors Ol ilmutTientatioi, p*.(•era Include Professor Arlhui l^e^eis. Si Luote-born Manlry Jevnns l>rofeaanr of Beonomk 1 Ivendt] i> AdOtto IV'ifnmn. Asuistont Dire. tor, Dit lOfi >>( BciMuvii'i BtabU itv and Devi'lopmOlil, BaQOBtornl ., 1 s 1 ial Council, United Nations; and technical officers of the n • entral Secretariat. IV. %  %  IV. .km %  \ 1 \l /1 11 >.., •• %  .(da-' 1 1 1 LUCM Mewte RW AMRI% U> SI II M I raeraaaai ,... i.HI Mill III %  M: I I Ml.-!* VKBftHUAt 1.. -1 viN.ssr Hill. H.I COOLING & REFRESHING 2 4c. TaW I \s 11 BSwaH 11 1 ' DsvUi 1 Oavts C wiuiiu. n M.-L*'I>". M Mantilla) I* r ftina Aifi ..I".II .. 1... n 1 ini an <> ... umorsi :>..^ Id II 'an V-lil ..r mir ... M4KTINII4I HOKIBIMI Jonrt. JiHiii li.fi.ii I'.IM il| Hurbour I oIN CARLISLE BAY ntt:\ai OFFICER TO Ult JCA ECONOMIC IH MI.OFMEM NAA KINGSTON. Nov. II. Pattl r 1 Technical 1.1 in.Inteinational Hank for R and Devel.ipmcnt. and John Oilier, economist ol the stair Bonk an here on a ten-day's stay at 1. rvernmenl for exp!"%  inns as to whether the Bank can provide ,inv .r.-.'-iiii.. 111 respect of the %  f< the ei ooornit do* %  uf Jamaica —CP. I Equipment For S.A. WASH1N<;T0N. NOV. 10. The us. State Dtpartaw ai anrsounoas] Baturday thai the us has agreed to sell military equipment i" lha Union of South Africa provided it is used solely for M'lf defence. % A Dipartincnt spokesman said will depend on what ',% released by the Defence Denarti.'i.; gajd requested O) BaUtk Africa. Sales will be on i cash baam Th.deal ras negotiated under the Mutual Dofen ance Act of 1B49.—tl'.P.l WITH over 100 flighb' daily in giant Skylinera. cajTying more thiui HOO.tHK) paswngvm u year, aen'od by 5.000 inplo>c.'s K 'A. Canada's Airline, haa eatebuahed a proud record of comfortable, reliable, scheduled flying. Day after day, TCA"t 47 Skylinera give the finest nervier on 18.0011 mdea of "Maple Leaf" routes const tn coast in Canada, to the I .S Britain and Frame, Bermuda and thu Wtwt liulivu. NOT A SPOT ON MY I in Damagea Ktuil Fur nna., ,„n ,.,. :.',i: i cd and shingled house a> Olttl fl Hoad, Qovernmenl Hill around 8.30 p 01 Saturday, dinn.igini: S rt of the roof and Miigcim: .1 K boaid, on the inside. Nearby residents with bucketi I water pul out the (ire in about 15 mlnUtl The douse is occupied by Mrs i uti A'hcn the flrv broke out. her nlua yenr old daughlei wad entrapped but she was tirnughl to safe!) b) KHh Clarke of Uppfi r.ov-rnmtnt ftill who brok* onm .ind tiNik hor from her bed -1 I....I.. 1 a BstMst, i 1 M fl • S.I. nsMl .in 1 MeII. N Jiinrt. S.I. llrhiurt'ii Bel .1. %  M V I1I.T Hi 1 11 'Tl -. I I....I. . v, arh ^^ n>H. arn Him llesranui, ill... M-< • HIUVMJ* .V 1* km %  bsas H jaseaa f De 1 a aiudmi. 4.4U Ii%  %  11..|— %  .... I. •!. %  %  i' 1 ..i> D-ortae. ss iwn .'.1 1 .1.1 1. ,. 4 in bHM mil l*nlrren. fnmi %  1 M V Alhrlbnius. ISO luot Ml. ( ...1 • >H lium TiltiKUd lit'JaMITI III s vmn-itf Tlmoiliy K '' "•'' pass %  >'' %  ^KSTn'itivri,., S % ...,,iu<. IW MM .iirJciung, painting, odd |obi round tlw bou \ relief by taking Doun'i b^Ln he riiwsjPMs. ThtybaspmaMsWiamrid tl • it escvwuiic KIJ and mhci impunin 1 etbi wise miglil collect In ihc lyiiem und cauic duixcti 11 ALP A CBNTUR Y 4 BaBSSSI M reAfliW atlmrnii dm I •iaWy attim u iht proud t*u*d 0/ I\*m't Ihll'. tiruu/ul mum ami rnimtm of all agfi uu ami wommtnd /An rffiiirnt Jiurttu jnJ urvury %  sds^aaa M •*> fritndi and ntithbomn. V>sm dsaan am nVI -dWm '/ 3 %  CaPa#%l^l ^ll I^BacsjicheKidneyPills^siiP 5/Pa(r fer Muthw to wjm you AJ.1a P.r—. lafaai.' rimdm -.—.lf..U, stwlaag at tNltunii lm.-. I hy M~i* Mou, eoot UM blood and an >bMlulrly %  •! %  ley ih. !" D*H nme asby u bifoi iktw-s" ssstnlag. McniboUmm Balm i.pbab>'s Skin in tpoilcti conoitHm. It is to simple lo U*e After baH^. dlNTLY RliH 'Menthol-H'jni* into ihe skin and around tee legs Thai geotscU and comfoci* the ikin .ind presents soreness and ihsling. Barnes love Ihc soothing, cooling elicit of •Menlhoratum'. Ous-k get a >*i 01 tm to-day ASHTON & PARSONS IFeTANTS POWDERS a iWmnothing adds to a perfec meal like a good cu of coffee! MENTHOLATUM ASK fOR REAL MEN-THO-LAY-TUM (1ARD1N1J! SliailM d DO. I" D. M.;i.>c..i street IrMfrUua. Tlu.-M 411 N,tt. Only By r, MIA,/


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PAGI %  %  <. i i i BARBADOS ADVOCATE TUESDAY, NOVEMBER U. 1951 Robinson Ys Turpin In June ran ".t>~ world m*t l" Europe IB aSSS March or early April and poasibly remain thr-rr until Lite um'. a mi* ARM ivi London ae-almtt Randolph Tuipui. He will probably defend hi-, ntle against Turpin In Juno, said Mr. OaJnford. m Europe. If he still has the Utlo, ha a*lH defend it iv Am.-i it .. % % %  : i:. 1 -' ny logical challenger who can Bui -iiH Mr. (, .mlm Jf there is no leubimate challenger of his weight, then Robinson wiB seek a boot with tl• world lighl-heavyweiK'r. lot), J'*Maxim, cither non-title. HOVU \\l I MM.I Hritont* Haw Dane A Magnificent Job MVfl BVS1 MMWrY LONDON U> arriving, in London on had this to say: IN THEIR 8KY BLUE convertible the Royal Couple drove thru.,*!, by one and a half million enthuitic Canadian., packed a deep in toe metropollv mtreal atreou where they were greeted ii-ned in %aorienes in the heart of the (Federal IvvMnftOtB I Cable and Wireless Heading For Win \nother Ilo\ii!r, Champ From B.C.? LONDON Brttlan i>xu.|f writers an praising Al Brown. ,, light Weight fiom British (iuiann, fir wlvmi %  tranr In the ri Mihad hia first tight in last March. In his latent bout, he defeated a Welsh l>oxer. ToCBBBJ J"i %  with ii right croes whi. I %  Men01 >., one mlnut oi the second round. ' *"" %  ?. BOWUn| ixlnfl expert who m tlie ; ?*?•* V, 1 1 '' 5*if*£! nghl rteclaied "Me hOWCd thai ta ' ;\ "" „ Another West Indian boxer w '> '* u " •head. Cable a R IP** !" ? J" J n £ r wh.. b being watcivta by the Wirele, sets K "ft*?"? i."^ British experts i* Eric Thompson, /or 5b i ended on a Jamaican who has fought berore 'he second day. in England. At prwant, he 1, sparring partner to Rag WOdi the Brnaab bMvywntfW bopa. THE SECOND ilay'i, play in the seventh round of Intermediate Crtckai ntntanM ended on Saturday. Cable 6 Wifvlaai ara In ;i strong position '.< %  utriffht .-.,] Mnspi',,1 aj the Mental HoaptUll firoundi. %  •' • s sast r .1 scoring 184 Men,UM.-M:U SPARTAN % %  N WuOd H K rrn-r II. CMUWK t Finr ii A, nutn.. '.II l.i C Wood b H. lunmi Wlndvi T..IAI n.rr. Wllkle A Ik In.* Tli-i'I M.I l-H I I M.I I HIV ISIIIS I Awn-: B. Weal Bmraekh AJbtan :i Arton VlUa 0. Char I ton Athletic 2 Blackpool ; Ffewcaatle United I, Chrlavn 4; Mancheairr United 3. arty s; Putnam o H W aei a Beld Town Tottenham Hotapur I. Liverpool I Bolloti Wanderer* I. alancheairr CHV J. Midd Lr-brminh 1-..til< t Stok^ CV> 1 StiiKiiTland 0. Burnley V. Wuiv>rlM>miv>n Wandeen I, Preelon End I M.I l-H LKAI1HK IMVI-lns aar n lle i l.i.r.tr r Clly 3 %  I S.,uttMinplnii 3. CM I. I tout a>Ur Hover* |. mill City 0 nimilnii>..)• tllN I Lutin. Town Sheffield Wedn>*da> 3. Leedi United 1 Queen 1*..IK K„in |, II.Ah.Hi^i UnltM Shetneld l-niird I Vulli.^h-n FOreal t %  watiiea Town 0; Kverlon I Wnthnii> Unlle.1 I. nrenlfotd I) ISOIUei IJ:AIII I IHHi.liis : Beutaem n i irneampuU ani n Hew b AtniiMi.' I Plymouu) Ar/l 3 muhLm end Have Albion a. Watlm llriatol Clly 1: t*>ton OrMnt I IlillliUh.tm 1. Aldrnhnt 3 tpa*irh Tn 0. Walaall 1 Mi,. .11 llnM.,1 BjDO) Nrwpntt County 4. Kaeti Niiilhalnlilun Tim n '. ( t i I \-.l---Mi-indoti Ton 2 tlr Biealna 4. rou-i.e-i.-. United / loutheMl fnit-d i. Net Tnrniiav Unilrd 1. *nr->-i who w. ns 140 rani (lor the I iss of rive wickets at the end of the fiml day's pi.. oora to L'hi for 8 wickets declared on I %  IparUui rwpliad with N Wood tha opening \[ .2 runs lo topacote. I IT was the best bOwlai Inal bowi%  %  lalden. 15 runs, four
ki-ls in their first inning* In reply to lit runi %  i t day of play. aftern |W )ob in proVtdUag gift* and inter* t DM toana par itia rain of Jamalra hurricane norm less. This time Britain has treated us lint as ters-in-law but as partner*. And we are grateful." Reasons which he Is prepared to disclose and some which he is not i talk about have brought Bustamante to England. They are ihe annual n prices pr< .the long term banann contract: the long %  trad—'"1 am not heading delegation but you can say 1 am tremendously interested in sugar" -and finally the decision as to how the gills and interest free loan shall best be used to put Jamaica rack mi her f\ ants 3441.il. Loan WASHINGTON. Ni>\ II. The Bxport-Import Bank will NEW SOUTH VTAUDI defeated .,..,„,. ,on the apI ,.„i ona-da, Iriandl, crkkel Japan's cotlo. to natura at SutberUnd, si. Lucy, tha nW;W mtcd out there a toi band, scored 23 out of Sw^t,/J ^m J S that bc%  M 2 ""Hit-, total o, 54 "J2 SVS&Sutin will not BowUni honours of the day ..uaiify for the loan 001 live wick' IS wm t u> S. Lewis "I Ntw BUah ,(,. Lll that the ExportImport f^" 1 Wales who took 7 wickets lor 14 BanK has ,. x teiuled M Carlton won '.. staaal runs ln 6 overs. The o.her three t o cotton industries of other naiwaathonM w-cawta wan taken by iiona, The request wag made some %  uiia. rounoal I <".ninth for 14 runs in 7 overs, time ago by Japan's Premier Innlngaj knotked up 109 runs aim bowling for Sweet home. J. l earSlugeru Yoshda. He outlined lo CarHOD al lart >coreu w -00 1 a "d C. Grant took 5 wlrkets the Hank Japan's needs H4 ni even %  **•> ,,r 22 a "d 2U runs respoc-pec: to markeunn and PAINS ol PILES ittpfi ia 10 Miaul" aaJae. KrlUe< and iinat*nt fr-m PlUa •!.(• Ikdlr..*f o* Mye. (toenaerlr kn...n • Mr..(..,•! I Hytea atari, to work te IS mlnetaa anal not only ato*t* Mia fctil alee takee e-t UM await r*-b rurtane eUtee MM rua*d by PU— eue an Haad-b. NtnwMiin. Backnn.*. ruBadn.il..tnee W eaertT aakltlty. end imtnnl. atepeeltlnn Oat Mytea frem year aruswleigr-odny --4W ts* •—'"•• %  onrnnle* Hptea aneM etna swar pSM •nlna and iroebl*. or money return of empty pack***. Police Beat H. College rfaw S. Wales Wins Friendly GameNO CONSTIPATrOft FOR 25 YEARS **My husband introduced ALL-BKAN %  hortly alter 1 married. I use it in my coolung as well as for breakfast. The result: we're regular as clockwork!" Mrs. Antonina Graziano, 453 Garfield Ave.. Jeraey City, N. J. Out aS many utsofirilerf lottrrs from ALL-BRAN tilers. If you suffer froni cwnsUpalion due to lack of dietary bulk, eat an ounce (about J-4 cup) of criepy Kellogg'* ALL-BRAN daily, dnnk plenty of erster. If no* satisfied after 10 day s return empty bos to Kelloan Co. of Gte.l RiUla. LW., M* ac hlw, sssajtsat. W-'l POUBLS TOL'g HONtT MCll ////////.V/A/W/AW %  OWLma ANALYSIS %  I Alt WIBSLkHS .. HKMTA1 HOSPITAL i Mill a WlkKLSH~l>l laelaft I MENTAL HOaPITAL -l-i Inmnaa r Beat b Lnwteae I C. Quint yiw b Lawkku B..ba(tl C'ABLS A William. •nrti b l-l. 1'iitiiliiB 1i.qbi b Lswleaa i |jle-. Huvk l> Ui-K.n/ir Caitai nt out Knkrhl b Mt'Krnl.r ToUl IIOWLINrt ANALYSIS McKrnilp 13 K Kyelyn -coreil U rUOB. > Scores I" i.l'll M I. IMS I. \\ r.\\ i t U.-r>.r. Iir.i I...H... %  \ ,. n „J;; %  .""•. ," v 'A PtUUhN i J riarkr -\,l V. Watt, atpd %  ii... %  %  Urnj Roberta TABU: A. WIHCi.gftS and Innineu • II. m i. Wiiiiama M(lhi-. b H—k tewkHa b Kniehi b Wllllauta I Oilkr. b William. Robert. nn| EJiUe^ lissed for 1>runs in their 1000001 iniiinn i took three wickets for Hn.p.uaad Cantral -u.o a*.-oitM outright victorias over Y.M.P.C. a n d Combermcte respectively. i thatr maiata with %  ..II ii ill rims m (haSD Iii?l inniiiK-s after Uiey dismisseu Y.M 1M tor 4H runs. Failing lo p-awanl I on. Y.M.P.C. tUad out fur 51 runs in their secmiti Innlnai Boat bowline %  A as givei. by C. Beckles who took four ", wickets for nine runs. Thus Em3 pire won by an innings and 12 runs. 'J COIIH. rrnili' in tdeu ni>l 111l| Dlngl scored IIS nil i : rut their turn. Win. .1 lii^t lnnin B lead %  I U II.I In their second lum .it the wicke*. .. 1I for 80 run... R. Braak) %  W D stubborn 2^. • Needing 4.'> run a Central at the end of plfl) had %  scored 47 run i fbr two i\a..r. .. Rsanema VHPC I i. || %  niptre Firil ILIUM,. Ill (t %  Oiii ta. II ii,..... m. ;p.iliements of cotton. rtth reother re—i-jr. HORNIMAN*S %  is b rieM Sfc.' Sc'iiilhorpo Umtrd i. Rochddlr Souinputt 3. ILillfaa Town 3 Lincoln tit) > Amwsioti Stanli Oldham Athlrtu t. OMa aVuntherne United 3. Kochdale I S--.U*rt 3. Hnllfa. Town 3 11 lanaMTi aevei %  I (.,!.. II I M C fasaeff it i S O. Rkrale S I SO t S 31 %  tMin 4 0 IV M ProverlM 4 D |S A. Field J ti 4 n ••>• %  •(• >!'>• Iniani. A 8e.W I. Ill b t'larkr I A Lewi. %  rr.wd.id n Phillip. Ikeetel.be i. riuin,.. I Proverba c a. b Wti. I> Clalkr I Clarke not out itaSa not out r.lraa In Touch With Barbatios Coastal Station Cable and WlreUen iWeat fcadMmi Ud IIIVIB tnat lh*y ran nov. ronu wltlt Uie inllowlna ahlpa Uiraiiak lhn Harbadoa Coail Su,| |iHI I Me Po-mer. %  a Bui Canadian Chailenser. a a. Colombir %  Alcoa Pennant. • Ti.la. a %  Dol.i.. 1 Ampac Calllortila. %  %  Del 8t>d. i RMrtuimyan, %  %  Sensamon. %  Seapexrl. %  • Menu -.ceull. I i tin. %  tort. . Ar %  % %  %  Una TVun. st. In ,t I-.. i %  ...i i nivi Aberdeen 4. Partuk ThUUe 1 ili.nui 4: Queen of the Seuid 1 Morion 3: HlbtniUn 1 KodaWWen I. Dundee 1 Hall'i %  'over. I, Airdmuiuiii' 1 wbta > %  %  r Hal si,i .in. All... Mir a. i Wait. I l*At.l K invi.ios n Albion Hovrr. I, St J u hnatoni> 0 Artaroalh 3; Ftilkhk ( Ayr United I; Cowdnnb m I Clyde 4; Alloa nlnien. *. Dun.bartiin J: Fnrfar Alhletlc I Dundee Unlitd Dunlarmliiii Acadeniicnl* 0 %  IRISH l.At.l r Mai.i" l| DMTJ Cil 1 HiCllftonvllle I r.lenavon 4 <:r. Cummins at iv ...it village. St. Thomas R.OO p.m. Ilarbadoa Labour l"art> Mectin*In support of Mr. G. H. Adams and Mr. I I Smith al Majen Corner. SI. Joaeph ft H P. m. Klretors Aoaociation Mert* Ing at Hone Hill, StJoseph, in support of Mr. U R. 4'owATd H.D0 II %  I'ollce Band Concrrt at IUs tins* Koefca in aid of Ihr Almalr Home X.00 p.m. Mi iniiCinema at swotssss's Hill arra. St. Michael H.00 p.m. %  I 1IMI1I KMl.l i mere t'rntril 1 I Comber.'.-. M iR Blanker 34. V. Knie 3 SRSWJ Central Seeond .7 rsafl f< %  II tltkliON 1 in 11 FOLK I Harrlaon Coll.a. 1.InnUHn 7' M..ri..,.i (Vile,,. s*,..,.| |„nii.rf. tf %  C Bpnneer I wn krK !.,< MJ HI ninai CABXTOM i. POt sn*riON Foundation Flnit Innnuu Talltun V .1 1.. ., k bet %  at V/OU CAH TYPE, FOU? AMD TOTE A&AUJADS OF THE RRrVfS MAII~,ANP asccevte's TOO BUSY TO Nonce • They'll Do It Every Time By Jimmy Hatlo FERGUSON TRACTORS WITH THE FERGUSON SYSTEM n fi b fad ill id Lurge Plantation Owners alika. lor. the price of which la only a fraction of that of 1 full rr..ck" Tractor— STOP THAT ..HI, 'Qanda VAPOUR RUB in NM UOaskWUC > *t'Ol 'KISIM; OIMMI.NT for use In SSMB ol local conseallon and inllamatlon. head and chest cold-, eoushs. Iioarsene-s and threat IrrlUlioii-. F.xcellenl for Nasal Catarrh, A 2-OZ l*OT FOR M GDITI ai K:\M-IIT* HHI . HwmmSB SET tXIT A PER50NAL LBTTER od owwuy TIMEANOWOT HOPPEM ?„ HEREB MOT MOPPBN !! / GUESS I'LL LEAVE EAW.V roaiY.Miss QKXX.V —I'LL TAKE THE MAIL-UMMP*'. R4TKER USWT TOtv. SN^IT? S3JO.t.O licld %  maalng job ..f Ploughing and i> ->t horn* e'ahpi in Ihe on Uic road. n famouj Traelon ure ..l>o botomn.,: lngly p-M : ng flnp work. 1 Hi Inily wo'* :. rrul nwictiini. and "Minslrotion for you—pluu^hing, liaulii -1 ,.,,-. gran cuttlna or whl Ki arlll COURTESY GARAGE ROBERT THOM Agcnti FLANNELETTE With the cooler rtrghli nearby Ihit will make excellent covering iheeti. 30" wide in Peach, Muo, Green & Grey A QJ P., .,d rftOF IMITATION LINEN In plain sUadat of White, Navy. Roto, Green, Blue 36' w.de. Excallenl (or all wear. per yard. $1.09 CAVE, SHEPHERD & 10.. ITD. 10-13 Broad Street -''-*. ','/.'.'/,VAV,V/M'.W.W MORE FAMILIES ARE ENJOYING BEST THE THESE DAYS... i AW.V.W.V/ AT YOUR SERVICE THE NEW SHOE STORE No. 35, Broad Street PAY US A VISIT. Hi: on l i: NEW STOCKS OF Building Materials — INCLUDINO — WAXWELD REINFORCING METAL FABRIC • In x in and 3 la x 18 In numh EXPANDED METAL SHEETS 'i In. and 1 In Iron mesh, 1 In Oslv mesh GALVANISED NAILS & STAPLES all sizes UNITEX INSULATING WALLBOARD • in thick, 4 It v K u 'i TI itn It ft Ions ASBESTOS WOOD SHEETS /II In thlek, ft | ft .FA a WILKINSON 8c HAYNES CO, LTD. *-*X.*,-*<.*.''e*-*****-*^'-V^ ..*,ctt.*,*,' ,+,',;*



PAGE 1

infill voYiMitr.R 13. i5i BARBADOS ADVOCATE FACE SEWN CLASSIFIED ADS. TFAEPHONt 2301. I MoB .ret di)< %  cMb pel "vocal toil MEB M|**sv"%  — %  DIED *OBa>AB On Monday Ms* IMI, Elmer Aubrey (BUMMM funeral i..le rr*idence. Sand Street. •fcnlj.hUto-.il at 4 o'.lor* thia afUTnoon for the Weeafeurv CMMUTI Friend* are rfm In attend Alma Jordan Cana the undernsncd deurc thana all thoae kiii "ended Iht i % % % %  MM ,n>d (.Jbici. ii if d t hall >auu >.oned by the paaalM D "iline; %  of Mr Henry Lutarr Wood. IN MLMOKIAM ID vli>K mnnotv o( a-leeo 13lh NowmWr. IMS We do not Td a tperial day ,r mind The dm *e do mil ihinh of you '...id lo f.nd Anthony r* i. Dora MM CAK IK mile, Nei i 1 ) %  .i %  CAKHover 10 H P Perfect condition iftmShnui M.OM mile* only Not driven re* K HPII Treated a* only chlM Muat be aean .ml driven to be approid Apply Courtcay Oarage Fo pedifTcr Ulal and lull particular* MM turn .. ii M i t %  %  Ik II M -li GOVEttME.Nl NOTICES DOMINK *. POLICE (OKIE ire required for the Donlnlci PollctJ I to Details of pay and allowances, cti can m the Police Traminc S-.hool. Office. DlsMel A Applicant! will t* seen in person at 10 a in on Friday. 16th November. i itc* of Education to be produced .i R T MICHEL.IN. Cumin Iwiiiiici i I Police Headquarters. Bridntown, 12th November. 1951. lj.11.51 —2n. NOTICE Application are Invited for the post of Joint Secretary to the following Production & Export Control Board Fane* Molasses Control i. Mar%  || ,| RehabB IndUBtl '• I'm-' Stabilization Re* rw Hoard. 'ill.lalan ol the povt will da,<• -TIM mi quauAeaUoDi. but will not Ulan £500 per annum nor innutn. The post is non-pensionable and terminable :.l i lie month's notice on %  :.\. Applications statins age. eduea•lonal qualification! and owneme LoMthai "Hit COPIES of testimonials should l>c addressed lo %  he Director of Agriculture. Queen's Park and will l the 24th day or er. 1951. 13 il 51—4n tOTNTE A CO 1 W,V,'//.V/.V'W//.W'''', ;: Situalitms I „n Varant w-o-d* 3 real* a word en) I C**kte Al'TOMOllVK B D C OJ in II I SI Apply H W I) II Sl-eta i nn i clutch Milearc "• and condition Courtesy Garage CAB Ow VI Ford, lelt hand dtive 0 M P ;t> perfect working ordet %  pplytoC B U Au.tln. Jam.. Street • II SI—Sn CAR—On* Citroen M Ol n.ilrn Al CondIV r Ward Hon.. S. I' i471l II II 11 ELECTRi*_AL MACHINES and VACl'l'M Another ahipmenl ol Iht .... HOOVER Wnahlni MiVacuum Cleaner* KM )uat ill early at K H. Hunte a and aave diaappoinlmenl ilachme 11)3 00. Vacuum DUI 07T K K MlSCht.LANKUUS IM m H S1IKS BEAI. KSTATE Th*. undeeugiied i C---p Cottae 3M iMm BarSwdea Tire Inauaanre Co •" -. -re. Barbado. Ice Co United JI •. Pretereore Barbadoa Talepkone Co I. ISO aharaa W I Rum Ratnetv i tssaM ISO Sharea Bdoa DwUlicnea l-td Far condition, of mir a pp. i i corn.r CATPORO a CO 11.11 •: .' %  IM ISI H MIIKKS f SUGAK VtTS: Delegates Ready For New Talks IN LONDON NOTICE Tk-> PHM-III TlaMuno OPVe. M..r,aei ".111 be .'loeed a) Moon or Tnnraday the ISti C aSSMKlE wKANNVM. A| "airoehial Treaeurc Si Mich. I) II SI Sn BliNOAIOW-On, done wall BumaWw drawing and dining room, th.e • hedrooma. breakfan room, tolavt and bath. %  landing on IS perrhee-of land Apply Id C H M Auatin. Jair.e* Blreet • II Sl-Sn NOTICE I M I II > I I ( Sk.MJTD rtWDBJW imarked M U envelea.Trndrr lm 1 <-. .ill ba IW cetved by -no up to Tue-i. SDlh IMI for a loan to the pariah . at**0 gb .i a rate ol mtareal not • .cred ing *•* aa aulhorlard b. U>C "StaitH Ljty .Barbadoa. loan Act IMS ...i I aunt lo be repaid In Ave annul m.tal menu of SI.BSt SO each together ill Ceilinrale* i tl'i No rnioer. IPAI HOUSE One Chatlrl houae Handing on n T 10 perrlkpa of land. •lUiated at Comer of Da*-i Kood Bank Hall Apply to C H. M Austin. Jam*. S|re*4 Alao one -pol land. Bank Hall n S 10 pcrchea II ^1 Si NOTICK -BOSVICO HOUSE. Eagle Hall Bond, St Michael. -Ilh 4 Ann or thereabout. of land, all encloaed THE DWEIIJN CHOUSE contain., open Veiandahi. Encloaed Gallery. Dra %  • inn and Dining Raotm. 1 Brd'oomi. one •er> lane. Toilet and Both large Kitchen Pantry. Store-room etc and Cellar. The Oo.raiunenl Water aa aell aa Windmill and Well, whvh aupplleatei Oarage for t Cai. BJkl Senanta' rooma Cocoanul Tree.. Uuava tree*. Mango Ireea. Golden Apple Ireea. and Breadfruit treea and another portion of land planted in Guinea. Elephant and Spur Qrata OFrZHS IN WRITING mil be received b> Ihe undcnlgned .ip to TUOOday Ida 13th dav of November. .14pm The lendor doe. not fend heraelf lo accept Uvj higheat. or any offer In.ueclun an,, dav except Sunday, on application to Mr* Hanachell. Telephene No 1H0 tor further particular* and condition* of aale. apply to— COTTli CATFOBD S. CO No U. High Street, Undgcion 1 il Si— Tn The undenlgnad will offer lor aala at Public Competition at their office. No IT High Stiect. Bridgetown, on Friday, the IBth day of November. IMI. at 1 p m The meaauage or dwellin|-hi l -ii Ol "T II i Application* for otva or more vacant Ve.ln bhibtuont tenable at the Parry School wilt bo received l nw not later than Saturday Mth tnat Candidate* %  mat b, aona ol P.n.h m %  tiaightaoed ii-u iha, eight and not more vear* ol age Forma ol application .. be obtained frmn (he *>aruchk*l Treavurei on orTre dayi A BapUmmal Ce.',nc.n n.ml acconipan> i*ih application U*i-d"Jale> -1 i>re.rnl lln-nwelve. Il Hie H.ni.tei lm ev.-unati.ni on Mii. Oil lllh in-t at 10 O'clOCk, a m O. L DKANE. Ve.tr> Claeh. • II SI 4 LA>NI>ON. juice and ttoni the COD wealth sugar-produvkug i-oun.i due to begin ;t rVaall %  The illt i-an be ti%  f..Nt %  proceasiiit; <•< iutes. I discussions with the Hnti h t. % %  took ft B) ernment on Novemoei 15 on ttW quota allocated to each an the Commonwealth Su| men i. The delegates hav %  : v,,|i,,\Mikhours Just to i" I nih Mcl-U The dry vvh,:i bean .'. • %  • %  ed alkallri %  arO been holding prelimin.ii v rJtaCU SCkd "vit "..niK thcinsvhi h (J wsnseaJ %  Offices of tfaa W.-t li..i,.i COsMkl ilh the > I .1juice In -pile Of the f.i .it It is undet pi meiho • the delegates ha\' .unities m lhipon ihc poln.i. they QatCteSalOtal i? i^ wti Coiomal Office atli than twel-e of Food. If.-' AmonK the We-l Indi.m dels gateare the Hon. Albert limmof i'rinidad, and the IJon II A Cuke, of I he ll.m W. A. Bustamante. ol Jamaica. IS •also reported to be on his way n< IN THE MATTER OF THE COMPANIES ACT ltlt CENTRAL I HI MM: LTI. SOTlcr IB HP1UTBY OIVEN that I cloaed from the 3rd dav of November.' re.11 iscd however, both I'SU) BOTTLJNG EU1I>MENT. comii.ii.a I i<| II, it 4 klr Univerul Bottle )uir Model F*' One-man Cajgan IHie l.inn Fill'? nni Caibonator. and Two Syrup tank. s M. done S33I. Ban Fernando. 13 II M on Enamel Ii Ala-r.l n ...i WAMIH HELP Managma fur Hotel Berwick E.perlence neceiaarv Salary and vhate In profit. Good position fnr the right Drraon Apply al llrti In writing A E -WlOB I n P O Bn IM. Itrldg-MANAGEK foi flrM cla** realdenllal club In Wrtt Indie* Bxcellent opporTinea! unmarrlad man with catering eapeilence PoMUon oBefS aakarv and pan proSu of builneaa. Bo* No B B Co Advocate. PANTRY MA1D-A i laid to BMI.I butler II i||. ^ If.I -' :>.:.. %  %  iBBaf tin Verandah. Drawing S BiSraei n a, Toilet Pantry Oarage and For further particular* and condiuona PERSONAL Taelf ii-*i.....ii.l.V UATSON. I I ( .. : %  . giving erwdil to m* IrlH H1TA Itl.A. K KIT %  '• %  t'.:i I I i.. .,•!.. . raaponilble fur her or anyone elae BBJX 1..., li..g ,."> debt or debt' In my name i,i i lea* bv a written order tlfned b> me i • i n :. in \t KFTI i;..Hill S. Patei 1 SI In The public are bercbv warned agai givr,, .,in ,„ „ bl ...i,. IVY 11" AT. >nee O'NalAIJt, a* I do no! hold mvi re-pomibie lor her or anyone el*e ci UacUng any debt or debt* In m> aai urleat by i written order *igned by n (UYTOS BOVEI.1-. TIO^THF. MA l)-rb.,., .< the Apu .*.,-riit/.A Tlir.ATHrJD hi iniei .md In peraon (-AHHIIIEAN TlltATBES II.. v Street. IIOI.IMAY raartr JUST THE THING laaier ..**..! Model C.- in ? Bnllln^ iturnera and iiimvru SOI rVEfYlBS (IKIIIS ANTIQUES. JIWILI, CARVINGS EMBROIDERIES, Mr. IIIAiM'S rr. Wm. Ilrr. W. :: DUI ItU POLITICAL MEETING TO-NIGHT Sept. 13th Nov. AT B WTERS KD. Corner Kensington New Rd. at 7.30 o'clock In Support of the Candidature of MR. ALBERT A. MAYNARD for the City of Bridgetown-The MfrWOOfl the houi* in MI ililQii Ni.ieinber SUth The *u ^c'fiil applicant ir.uat take up hi* dull b) .1 .,i,.i.irv 4th All application* treati lit alrtcl confldei.ee 4 11 SI I 1 MTI AJIONft WANTFII Kaperle.ice.1 Shorthand t>pl-t lemal tn leading Arm of SolKiloi n England Oood reference — aeel preferably with legal firm ply Bo* B B C% % % % %  D-P i Advocate Ad13 II Sl-3n MISCELLANEOUS BOTTUES Cle. While Park Boad I on HBNT HOUSES i COTTAGE Bedford Avi HOMESTEAD—Upper Belmonl Road rn bedroom* dining room. *lttlng room fillen. all conveiihmcM Apply within 11 II SI a> niE GLEN. St Lawren..U-P I > .hed apartment Call ST1S Peter Morsar.. r Hotel 13 It Sl-1 THE Biiildi ig known a* "Berwick ng 14 bedroom*, bar *. F. TAV1/>H ITT) Coleridge Dial 4100 • pubiii nrr herebi %  rornod %  ii.l giving credit lo mv wile AIJlERl MAKHHAI.I. mre IIOVUX. a* I d %  leaponaible for her o MM ..;. Mnlnraas sn* debt o debt. In b ) II -rlttei order iigned b> BM IV. .Mill. VtAKSM Ml. AUen View St Thotru. 13 11.51 In i 30th %  i N. Secrelary I'uhlir iilfiriiil Sak Tueaday the I3h l-i of Novt 1M1 at the hour of I o'clock Bltemoan will b Bold at my ol ne Mgre.1 bidder for any Bum All I *o. %  ... .1 I la Man* Peler. butting and b Svdncy Aboah d Tlii 1 Alexandra School, i Norman MuaaHUMU. or. land* lane commnnlv InwWfl M Slat go lane together w ith %  Dwelling Houae liter eon Mai ice* appralaed thereto a* follm* The -hole proper.appiaUed to TWO THOUSAND FOUR Hl'NDHElt ANU FIFTY IKKJ-Mt* .fcl.eoO IW. Attached o-n %  aaajaaal Tlnvothv for and tuaida %  laStarttOn, . A.t.ng ,*( Maivh.l Offl. Oclober. 11*11 Eiguanite i parei r %  hag in.!.' ed ) laldt frotn five eifhl per cent. ] %  is pe %  able in mill.'. COS s are I nongalli tain ton iimri' Of MCTO e tn DUU k l.iiiilon. but his nil "v l"ii of pp HI to be t-ennccied wiih banana eoatj an em do*i Ere-.h Liyht -eased There are great hopes aUnoOl s •vallaa at the delegates that llailain'i na* %  "' i>' In* !*• svstem. the mag"Covernnient will rtTffUd then ' more mills will freh light. It i I %  ''"' I" ""' ,; v that the I-. %  Governnirnt ha.v nut of Director, [lo get a proper grasp of the d*' BOIllpaUlll II USbll the Fluu tails Involved and thai fa %  [reas.n the talks may be • %  : % %  .protraeted. The lm t Ui.it Mr 'Alan lx/iinox-Buyd. the new Minister of Si.it. i ,.i Colonil Affairs, who will undoubtedly play a leadniK roia In tni siuns, u known to be syrnpathetii towards the West Indu regarded as a hopeful portMll Several points In the draf I igreernent an ceptablr tO the COaWatOnwealtl producers They iielievc lh.it tin propoH-d terms Of the ngreemen do not Miflii-ientlv ei.trench tin itoltcy nt Intel ('iiinminiiu.il' marketing undei preferential eon provide rn>n*pleti tpanaion prtafnui While the pn-hiiei iei.> K n: %  lhat prod ictlon %  taken int.. .n.uunl Ifietn pi i< • are negOtlatad, they believe IrMTt should itv no question .if an) R DOUGLAS. CUmm..nwe..lth pltKhlCCI able to institute an irupiirs mt' the production costs ol .itmthi SHIPPING NOTICES land I 10 31 3n LlQl'OR LICENSE NOTICE i-ip ith ahedn SI Mkc land. St Micl Mil Spirit*. Mall t.vanl and .hmgle .ttached at Ivy l-and. Dated Ihi. loth day .f November. ISM Tn F A MrlXOO. Eaq police MagUtrale. Dl.t A i %  Mil. Ill ACKMAN. Applicant N B -Thl application will be ronitd **r*d at a Ltcenilng Court to be held a 1 l> i .. .i CAM A .'n Tuewrtav Id 30th day "I Nnvember. 1B31. al 1 % %  •' M.llfll An Official Visit St l,: I Phi Honourabla Mr. D. K Chief Jusiaoa or th windward ind laeaward Iilaodi p in the oolonj on %  mn..; \.-it work li fL**n| oi. a new building at Ml W ( dale wlinh iU> '-' 'he "hief Slop Pyorrhea In 24 Hours C.AIANII I INK IIMIIIU ( %  aai ii-" a s "POni Aim vi H M..: fi.n llobait Septeniliei 2Mi. M, 11...nine Ihtober 4th. Sy,|. .( I( The M V -MONFJCA" -ill accept Cargo and Paaaengen for Dnentnlea. Amlgiia. Mnt.taerrat. Nevi. and SI KltU I).,ie „l aalling lo be notified The M/V "C L M TANNIS • will accept Cargo and J>a**ene*r* md Trinidad &>i|. ing Friday tilth In.t a M i -. IIII.IM ii "vu. v-^.ii t t mis i., i ^„r.le Ng 4-CI ^Atceo, **""£* C* M \OltK SERVICE I Teeth I i baSes 13th November. IMt id... tin Drcemb-r, IB01 aaHOjlaaal IMh ly-c.mber. IMI teelh fall I I i ovi A ioi\n LOST TICKETS Sene* G 0447. Seta Finder pleaae nuodndge. Farm IM 13 II 'in. SWrrt-STAKE TICKET Serte* P The I il l> RACE TICKET B.TC. Race Serlea P. No 1)01 Inacrlbcd Smith rnd C Mayer* Finder rewarded on returning *ame to Advocate Advertl*in6 D*pt 13 11 St -in V0>VVVaA--e4i*Ve*i<-tj 1 TO-DAY'S NEWS ELASH Local view. In colour on O Card* Khealh Knlvaa Pica* Bultoni lilted lo you r,il|-.-..NSTATION!: "V //////AV/A COVERNiMENT NOTICE CHAIRMAN Mr. JAME8 A. Tt'IM>K SPEAKERS | Mr. D. D. Garner Mr. G. II. Adaim. M.C.P. Mr. F. U Walcoit. M.C.P. Mr. J. E. T. Brancker. M.C.P. Dr. H. O. Cummins. M.C.P. Mr. E. W. Barrow Mr. J. C. Tudor i;..mn ,-TI wealth producer, posed in the Ann Limitation M II ,. .suggestion in the l>ropM'd Agreeineiu ti should be pl.i.iii upon expiii J ol sugar from it* and Dominions over .HI fiElU-ye..i period. The Commonwealth pro* lllK'l .illllUt tOCapl thl* le****W*1 iniui.it in.in 11 .iK ii it: ..:. given bj Jl parties to Uic In'. SUfBU AKleelltelit Cognmoiiweulm ptoduecra reghrd the coneluaiim of itie CORI< %  aOfiweallh Sugar Agreement. Qfl eeasonuble terms, as l'in of tin utmost Importance .m,i I e that ihere is an atv for a new internatioinl Sm: ll Agreement dealgnad i" bale nn i the requirement* ol the world' growing population an.l the out* put oi tinproducing countries Canadian Agreement Negotiations wudl %  terted %  Tonjuay thlfi yeur DstVI %  In the contlusion in OUawi ugar agreement under Tanada agrees to buy fro Dommiran Republic dm ing of the years 1952 and 1953, 84.500 short tons of raw sugar, an announcement from inti.v.i 't. This represents 43 get %  • %  the 150.WJO thort tons whn h UM) maximum total quantity i non-preferential augor in rvipecl Of which the Canadian OOV mem is prepared to enter similar negotiations with traditional suppliers or m ential sugar It If un** arrannemenUi will be i whereby Canadian importer !," %  pai ted \ H at the same prices Ml down for Commonwealth supi; Cnnada entere.i TI short tons some months ago. New Chemicnl The first basic fjuitgl processing of raw sugar In Mfl I years has been developed, according to the New York nUU hemltml Enilneerlns 1 u i l.ims. i' s high-'i'i' duct with higher purftv i nrr-liiction OB', ,n% %  Lnea IB* Th. j stance seuaritte* dParvt*/* and mm' I %  In rnne riiiubl' Btaaj Ihl* di.eaae now ailli lh* %  um* la H*a*WrSV 4>s*Va aof* lad in • lh *vel :.,! BARBADOS ARTS AND CRAFTS SOCIETY • ii.\ Hi H STFAMgl : I IMI -nt IHHIM VII \M\ OIU.EASS SERVICE i asrvi •a Barbadoa Slh Navember. I0SI. e* Barbadoa Brd November. IML ,-. n.iiiado. 7lh December. IMI CANADIAN BERVKk For Pyarrhra —Tnnca Mol II sntD Annual Met I 1 %  i A liiiii. ^ ol Mamiieis of the above *' I %  .11 be held .it rVhltepark (b) i mi pel mil Ion ol tinBi ll nMpre* i.. Ird at B.iri IhS Aiuim, el< %  I M . l\ IMI i iTaWuna A STFAMFH Na* lllli NnV Hud Dec Sth Dec Mth vH Al<< A I-I ANTE It Ihie Barbado* Oclober lllh. I..i s i„ %  rei.ee Blver Port* i".in i: I TllllM LTD — NEW YORK AND OUIaf* HI APri.V:-n% CORTA a> CO. ITTI—CANADIAN SI SACUENAY TERMINALS Hepi.it ..i mitto A MILLS. Acting Hoe -.-. •.:•.:*.•.;;;<,*.• ATTENTION is drawn to the Control of Prices (Defence) I (Amendment) Order. 1951, No. 33 which will be published in the loftlcial Gazette of Monday 12th November, 1951. 3. Under this Order the maximum wholesale and retail selling I prices of "Milk-Evaporated" are as follows:— ( ARTICLE Milk-Evjporatfd WHOLESALE PRICE (not more than) $12 69 per case 48 x 14} 02. tins 48 x 10 oz. tins $12.21 per cose 96 x 6 or. tins RETAIL PRICE (not more than) We would appreciate the opportunit> to (|iiti • FLAT EVERITE SHEETS • TEMPERED H VROBOAKI) • OILED SOAKED HARDBOARD CENTRAL EMPOBMVM IMPORTANT NOTICE 12th November, 1951 13.11 51. —In. Note NeuAddr BEARD & Prince VVilluim i Over L i Cl E GREIG Ham i •*• %  4683 our house oi quantity nf cni from England. U.S.A. .nt.i ivi. i Wilson on the juestion of buying or dispost*pe of house. >hop or factory ; iKM: BOOK Which Makes GOD'S WAY OF Any clothes It'll %  following Si.mLuy IUUii thy Depot! before 1>< 31st, 19^0, will be sold. In ftilun inl %  %  % %  %  • will It*' sold. Country Kond Marhill Depot Aqualir Depot St. Luwrenct DCIMII. CANADIAN SERVICE Erom H;ilil;i\. N.S., mid Montreal. Sl.nireal Hallfaa %  "HIINVAIJJIV" %  %  pined Arrlial H*le< lt,i.i,-ii._„ liar bade* 11 November SI Novambei II I mbe, 1 Januar* UNITED KINI1IMIM SIKVICK KriMii %  -. 1.1. .. U w ea u l mid fUaajea UNITED KINGDOM AND CONTINKNTAL SKRV1CE %  %  ..I..r^ I...4.I. I ... i.l *rrl Aucnls %  1M.ANTA I IONS LIMITED — Phon* 47*3 i'.:'.i',i5.-,w.Kin'.:v.:'.l'r,v/// ;'.^ts?^:sss a ^ttMw ^.'.wwww ^l IWITTA Dill SS SHOP LOWER HROAD STREET IMU SSI S of every kind %  dy-made and AUo-BHASSIERES—White .md Pink. BIZU H and in wrttb Waistb.u.. \v... t| Emm $:(. to $3.44. adc-to-Order. H*. i^*^ '-?•.-. iiSW544i3SS'V BUY SALVATION PLAIN" 1 e Please write foe one m ^ S Samuel Roberta, Oospel *> I Book and Trael Service. *T j 9 3. Central Avenue, Ban. Jj gor N. Ireland." ; V//MV/WW/.W.V-V//. A BETTER SHIRT FOR LESS MONEY RELIANCE SHIRT DEPOT Palmetto Street Obtainable at all Phone 4764 Lending Stores CLEAR m&wm OVEN GLASSWARE < n afappi Soup. Dinner and Brc.ikf.ud Plate*. Dishca Siu.c 11..H. Etc. Elc. jej" toull he pmud l nwn Ihcr. Sre our display Bl'Y N0V PLANTATIOIV§ LTD.



PAGE 1

Atowra ESTABLISHED 1895 TUESDAY. NOVEMBER 13. \9S1 Jt*rp PRICE m'r RED RULE BY MASS MURDER Greek Tells Horrors To U.N. Assembly U.K. Asks U.S. For Aid To Re-arm LONDON. Nov. 12. BRITAIN, which bad hupi-d toeairy out he* arms prothout United Stales help, has appealed to the BsfcnuiM i'I Prime Minister Wm-.top i 0Mctln| with President Truman ill h.-iH been expected to put United States' aid I : the agenda for his man to RlOl Bn (ing with liuman. ll probably will still be at the top. The Contjre Governinenl found that it had inherited such a adoufl financial crisis, however, that H could not wait until Januarv to send out its disn New V S aid for Britain will i Churchill's ..mi Truman's tct neral review ol how lo J l d the "cold war." hurchill wants to have a chat *iih Slahn. Th. re is speculation here that he may are Stalin after he confer* with Truman, Tru R dined than Chun hill lo lalk things over with the Russians Many Truman .i "at* IJIKI" of Ml Opposition at homehe cannot miel the Russians for fear of being branded "appeaser." They consider Churchill's portion mote flexible His Labour Opposition would Sf Sl eOQBO .• l.dk with Stalin although many responsible officials pin no greet hopes on the outcome of such a nee IP Royal Couple Sail For Home Kliubeth and of Edinburgh RaUad dn bome %  board the F.mpre** of ^ oil.nl on Monday aftei week tour of Canada and u visit to Washington. DC. The F.mrn*i stood off-ahore and ihe royal couple boaookd her fron Thicrulaer Ontario and the de%  *trw> escorted her 1 100 mils, out %  —II-P. Robertson Will Probably Head Mid-east Command PARIS, No* II Prend | ..„ Monday night British Gemral Sir Urmn Robertson "quite probob'v" will head the WmCt BOW Middle East defence command, although no Sir Brian || at present the British mHltar) chief in Egypt The aitiicnii nl .,(1 tinfour—POWflf cornpoMd. 4>l the United Itain, Fiance and Turkey Minced On Saturday, but Mi.iv Turkey lias not vet been i-iliy into the North Al: %  formed quarters said no decision on RobejUon was pots-Hfls nit Th ririUah •mbaaay hare IUH> no eommenT. — if.P. No \\ rst I mil.in I.VuiiiH-i-i Yrt LONDON. Nov. 12. ill action has ye", been taken by tha Colonial office with i tlu) H'fi.riiiution of the Wi %  Indian Itegimen' ThiI '.rnoon. this morning's News Chronicle, %  disbanded in '' %  %  funned In Jamaica. The story nddd that the Colonial Offlc e was 111 Ihe West hi i %  lUUn I'.i: ... par) "f .* general • making use ct colonial manpower Tile proposal, which wa.. menlioned On 'wo or thrv u time m the "'"I Parliament, is being given careful lion by tha Colonial Offlce. PfeW Provisions For Golonial Shares LONDON Tha Crown Agents for the Colnotiee lo Inveelors that after January 1 next t-om< 50 Colonial Government Inscribed slocks will l-e transferable only by instrument in writing. This will moan Do practical difference from existing arrangement*, since the Emergency 1'iuviaions in 193U suspended the pre-war procedure for transferring title. The (hang* has already been placed on a permanent basis for British Government and Dominion stocks. In the case of the the authority of the Colonial Stock Act. 1848, and amending legislation b v each of the Colonies cot learned hn.o been rwqojrad. Thi# has now h*an bCah -.1 Stocks affected include four hdana stocks, redeemable between 1959 and 1980. five Jamaican issue*, icdceuiahlc betwecn 1952 und 1973: three Trinidad stocks, redeemable between 1958 and 1971: the Grenada 3% 1959/1964 Issue: nnd the St. Lucia 3' r : 1965 1970 issue. -B.tr. Australia Wins first Test Bill SHANK. \tn li Australia won |he lirst Test herr agaLnst the West Indies by 3 wicket* at 1 52 iin ui the fourth day pUy Set i3b run. lo make lor vlclory, Auslralu made tin runs logins seven ttirkrlv II.ilc played a (uniting inmne* and %vaa eventually undefeated with 11 lu hb> credit Thr Second Test opriin al Sydney on November SO and continue* Ite .ember 1. 3, 4 and 5 The wore* were: W I 1st Inning* 216 Australia l*t Inning* • :>, W I :n.i Inning* : i Australia 2nd Inning* K Archer b. Gomes 4 Morris e Oomes. b. Rjmadhln 4B II .wit l.h.w. Kamadhln 35 M.H \ n h i;.Ii4iii 42 Miller h ValfuHne . 4 Hole not out 44 II h. Kamadhln t$ h. i: in. ,. i.iin u I < M.I L Joh Mill!: Ilol Mr.is Total (for 7 wtrkrts) u OODDARD ssskM bis brilliant and cnUcsl c.t h fi.-m Archti off V.l.uti.,. fifth ball In Australia'* first IHIUHKLft to nght ar Ottnes. Oeddnrd. Weak**. Wakott and Archfi Radloftholo. Pipe Suez Water Sabotaged CA1KO, Nov. U THE BKIT1SH AUTHOK1T1ES reported Monday thai a water pipe which supplies the town of Suaz was sabotaged Sunday night. A spokesman said such incidents were common even before the Current An^lo-EKyptian flareup British officials said about b0 P-'r •W1 "' ;,JWW Egyptians employed at British post exchanges had quit ilu.ii jobt.. In an attempt lo stem this How the recent issue of the Canal Zone New* appealed lo British families to provide toys for children of Egyptians remaining on the Job. Film shows also are being organized for Egyptians Churchill Wins First Test Vote IMMHiN N,.. I.' (luinhill's Conservativ. Qot nini-nt won the llrM te-l vnt.unday mtiht when th.c< mmoni proved a plan lo turn tha BnUah I 't,.'i hndiatti v rhi i. .!>.. 1.1iseapn arinsj dh in I royal >f tha p| 1 i • -'H: I. gut Hit iirn.itiunah/.i t* BIM past tb. bm hurdta •lling forth tin it %  I%  %  -> %  %  w.i I-.MH. led t be %  eassBbSa.t atiUuii IhlSN mi nlhg The vsShi marked only tinHis: I -^IKI ..f II, Fpiliameiit.il \ battle i/vei lhi<. HWf Hilltlenalionaluatu.il tra ,-N bt iiitin.iin'1'tl over the newt twr nuMllhs or mme and then |afj turn in imt i M'<* b i (W MvaraJ rmnths .liter that. ChWOklM*! new i •• %  vernment I : last voti I'uvMday on lilt Oanaei v it .\i i % %  np'.s.il ii adjourn Parllarneni from Deoanv %  til January 29 which view a.in i-M an III n-IK lon H iulj.nn nin.-m fm > > h..Inlays. . . %  .. . T iitiniialUatlnii |il.m Mmni.,, „n,i I 11" nil It t". llliniri 1.1-I .-.. %  ( i in amendnuiu dsBappi Wll plan wimh would nava maant tin* full of the (iiivernnn'i.t glnclliwia ii paaiadi Plva Ufai voted with the Conservatives I r. FORMER PREMIER ASKED TO FORMGOVT. LONDON, N"\ LS. Syrian fta al dant H.U hen ^pasti asked former Premier Ziiklel Khatlb. au independent, to lornl new (Juveinrncnt lo end the (Ji>\eroment eriais over the West.i| fur a Middle E.is' Dafance Command, ie|x>rts reaen-j %  ..iu Monday. If. ;...;! %  lid Z.iklll Kb..tlb V. •• asked after the "People-' Pary. hwdar, Rathdl El Kttdal and both 1 former SjH-nkeTS of the House of. UvfSL rl u tad —r.p. 1 U.N. Admit Violation Of Neutral Zone COMMUNISTS CLAIM TOKYO, Nov. 12. PEKING R VDIO quoting a Communist correspondent claimed MondaiV that the United Nations delegation at unjoin admitted aft violation of MM neutral zone on Sunday und promised to take disciplinary ... The London Daily wotlpsr corcaipondenl WinnmKton .i :hi %  MTU i it\ ;.!(•:.. Mine Sunday '.' indav grouv right %  %  nf Ihree llgt. %  fed nearby "i nans udWiiinulgtoii I piana dropped %  Men r* 11 toto %  Winmngton s.nd "Presumably %  %  mieementx. neutrality %  he Com. i .T U.N. plane tr,ded the PanmunklllinK one Korean I: .ntling hn> lit' Fi .. i-.irresnondent Arnold Dil-ble ;.t Mun.an said the ineldaM eecarrad th.t u.h :ite, ff polntad '"-' %  %  %  munjoin does DO* > %  S. pilots have oflklali %  %  %  hting has ban —IP CHINA Fcochow jrJ\ FORMOSA!. ^-Mll(S=^ M Seriea oi "Quukf-s Hit East l-oriiiosia TAIPEM i rn Mo a Two earthquake shock damaged the Cast Formosan port of Siunkang. Reports %  Id in.it tb till the clt) Of Hualien, bad); li.imaged last month by an earth quake and large scale relief wns needed badly in Salnkang. Easti .i lias suffered a series month.—f P. U.S. Negro To Handle Land Mann For im PARIS. Nov. 12 The American negn> religious and civic leader Dr. Channmg Tobias has been chosen lo handle the question of land reform al •ho UN. General Assembly to i mi. i Communist charges that negro farmers in America are held down at nhare-cruppei level Tobias, alternate US. delegate in tluAssembly, told the press eonfaronco that Britain. Thailand and Brazil have joined with the VS. In .i resolution asking the t.. .ippiove the first global rs'ograinnie for land reform in history. The prekworker< wl itrike earbai Mond Mediterianean port of Al* re t u rn ed to their jobs art. Egyptian Cnvernmeni lold then their walkout hurt rt • country more than Britain. Dockworker* said however they would boycott any ship with cargo bound for Bntuh | the BUM Canal Zone rth liv.-d strike begBJl -hen dockers refused to load the British freighter Exeter Gale with cotton bountl for Bombay and .nil peralata These (freekVhildren abdNrcted lour years igo from theli pan I the ivmeriand have ainoi up untjei H" I u i ilieii abductors. . .Soon ii may !>< %  (no late to save whal >till can be saved irmn these children — HP. Union Pacific Trains Collide Si-iM-niirii OfBcovt Still On Thr Job Red Truce IVam T-old Off By U.S. pwMUMjoM. Karaa, Hoadar. United Statei Major (ienvr.il Henry I llndea .-teeuscd Comite negotiator* lo Kiel: laces of trying to gVOid a lull amueUce settlemenl. The ehlel i N re p r es i nlaUt Ike armistice kub-e'nnmitlcc hi %  OliglllM Ufix a eoM--tire hue and buffer %  ll.-les t'.M the gj %  tw intend to esunutUve detnarcation line I.I( tone which ill ielu'Ve M'u nf :iiiv neeeaslty to settle the rent lining Items on the isjenda ith *\w i will provide Maure ;md freedom lo continue delaying the conference." —U.P. Eisenhower. Pace Discuss Arms For W. European Army PARIS, Nov lGeneral Dwiglit Eisenhower and UA Army Secretary rrank Pace conferred Monday on hnv Id *I*Pd arms lo the Western Bur..pean army. France warned she fncM eertnus ceonomic crisis and would no! be able to meet defence commit* menta without more American aid. "We are reconsidering our %  f h edule to make .sure are con get a s much as possible over bOSS in terms of arms, conslderlna our total re*iulrementa" Pace said later. llu said be also talkco wi!l (,.T..-: .i Aifwi Gi % %  Dtbat Use ihower' I < % %  • %  "I St^ff, Prem-h H Front ('ommander for North Atlantic Forces and General Louns Norstad U.S. Air F"r. | I 001' in Europe. He iitdieated tw (hanging the strategy of U<8< military planners as a result ot deeelopwenl of atocntc v.^apiMik. -IP. MurArthur Has \o Political Ambitions MDU NAPOLsl Noer. 12 Douglas Mat-Arthur tu tar k ml the l*mhlbition iicket. it was announced on M01 1 il. 1 party officleli that he bad no political ambitions "of %  M. 11 Arthur was approached by party officials last mohth end on Monday on the tve of the Party's nation.il noa .option convention. for the have no political ambitions of anv If Workers Stage Hunger March IV TEL AVIV TEL A VIV, Nov. 12 Several thousand workers marched ilona Alleaby Street on Monday in a Mapam partyspi 1.liwed deinousti aUOB demandBng rood for workers and pi im (Of The ilemonslration rollowed .1 aieatUtg called In Jaffu ebicB the im.-Sovlet Mapam pp eal ed t. ^lus Communists, agltalad KM mrea hours al a public %  neeling agalnsl (iovenimcnl even ibougb the Hist.idrin. ., w/orken federation, decided to condemn participation by its members Simultaneously. .1 uenion.tr..ti'iu in Jerusalem marched Parliament where %  ten-member delaeaUan ikcd to be received by the Presidium. Permission for the itlaa bed I sen n-qui-sled but it wai. not clear whether bed been abran Meanwhile Histadrut released the teal of a resolution iidupteil last week showing full understanding "of the difficulti> hioM by Government" asking food sup."> Dt.-ad In Stornin MILAN. Nov. 1? Another fee death-, were reported in the raging storms which 'iave been lashing Northein It iv ml Southern France In tinpast ix day-.—IIlilie to '1 uosslble an increase of rations. Farms were asked to increase pioduction wnile Government wa* requested to provide public anliirkt-i eommitte*-s v-it 1 luiilte-l executive BOWetl S. M| ihops were condemned fM illn., f—d iiiii.blsliiahl. on 11 1 list The resolution condemned the I'tlnn taken by M->pan< KYOTA, Japan, Nov Four himdifd 1 ummum 1 n.dcnls laged .U'lnoiislrallon around Hie car of Em peror Ilirohllo. Police clashed with Ihe students, who packed ;iroun,i ihe gteperor 1 ) Ber, It we f Ihe JapaiH Hist iwi-oiial contact with Comnut hostility, and the Arsl demonstration axainNt him la ttM many tours he has made .ince the war. TinCommunists chantr.l Com* minis! songs, and wivd placards. are oppose the revival ..1 t: Bmperer system" The dea-on' tiCM Hiurrod Bl .1 prepared for Mirohtio al Ihe KyoLi Unlversilv campus. 101 K h 1111 it WASMINUTON. Nov. 12. It has lieen learned that two isuenile-l" Chliu 1 N iliooaU I I ..11 offlcri .nd4u.1l tini-ie last KVAMSTUN. W.-*. ftuaSM \o M-rsWnin "n rt^TST' > Nov. J „f f.iUin* to account for SlMPO.Two Lfnlon ParlAr dlrenmlin-frs 000 In nfflelnl funds are still On hsSTtlm east Ihtough .1 l.limling the job bl Washington Th bliuard smashed up in a mainr" e-lflcer"refused to obey orders" illlsion live miles west of here und are tonlinuing to huy equipMi.ini.iv st la poilco 1 i .. eatl men! for Nations %  Wad They They are apparent u doing this ad I ItSiene lorehes to cut wh she blessing of Chiang KaU thniugh it.1 %  Shck's Goveinment which accuseii the two trams Ihe City of S ,' !l " '' Charges Russia Prompted Final Decision HOME. Nov 12 Italian Foreign Olllie sources lid on Monday Ihe final decision to hold .1 North AtUntii rsMU0| Home on Ni.vrnih.-i 24 eras prompted by Hussla s reje.tion of Ihe West's peace proposals al the 1 N session in 1'un-. They said Ute Suviei iVn-inii Milliner Andrei Vyshuuk-y's ful ie)L-ction of ihe western %  .11 .,..".cni plan convin.cd Aib I I b I (..III I %  ; 1* t .1 Id. I.llil 1 .1 STALIN-CHURCHILL MEETING POSSIBLE l-ONIX)N Nov 12 e/asstow CSuirehni said on Monday tii;it the possdblllty ol meetIng with Jnaef Stalm "should no! 11 .iliideci" if lislon. Two trains, each curryjj iraj about 200 psseanat KM. ling eastward with ihe city) 1 M A NV in the lead and he clly ot San Francis... toUoW11,' The City of 1* Angeles was. ..topped by a block signal and thi %  if s V 1 1 tea iiloughedj %  lo M reai and I —UJ. •aainal the men were re loeused onl'-iul^ .f then Qovernmenl ol nnon v P The -ADVOCATE" pays for NEWS. Dial 3113 Day or Night >'*^-/V>*'-VV'*V'. GilbeyS EMPIRE RED WINE ISRAELI GOVfcRNMKNl DENIES REPORTS \ viv. Israei, Nov 12 A Qoverttment -iiokesmsn or artalo irreeponSppeai mg abroad iver nm enl I %  eoneaSBUMI granted to a llntih %  ->mpany to exploil ( ...t i-.l. ..' t!.. i He said thai niy interruption ii. id. road linking the fash plant on Ihe Demi Ss negotiations with Russia—U.P. Ihe resl of Ihe country.— V.f. Arab Nations Undecidefi Over Mid-Eastern Pact which was handed to the Egyptian Dunn.' llu1 Oovernmant, und with th' four Jemmali returned to the PBleatBM Middle Fast j-mblem when he eoedonkned lb* %  plan which was sen! lateW ol power polilics end pressure |) lo Arab Govt-riuncnt. Leaden gSoupt In Uu U N 'ub delegations will meet He said "Once pom 1. aau dic PARIS. Nov 12. I ol Arab countries in %  im Mondaj ni^ht but failed reach II -.< a Hr atti'm If power Mid-eastern 't fenre paef Thej decided U. call a lurth.r :i*m to resume dlscusons on the irevail ben e of humecting nt a date yet tn he deter*ut>)rct *• men tights, the clear tnnciplcs uf mined h Mall deliberaa charter of peace and Juntlce are lions. Egvptian Foreign Mini ti Syria's Fans Bl Khourt who Piejeopardized." Sulsh F.I Din '.lid et a press eonsided over Monday's meeting said Jamnmli • ferenee following the meeting thut in an interview that the At gal lewlsh Sguiitnes are fully agreed they will gression and Stubbomei in entire agreement. uursu* a Joint poitey on all matters regard ol UN resolutions. .mg the 11 N said "The United Nati< Salah said "All Arab Govern" rejection of the failed so Tar to nO justice to Arab* nents are entire!v agreed end the four power proposals to ioln Ihe ir* Palestine "It is high time th. •MII be taken projected Mld-Easti-rn defence the U.N should rid Itself of power with the entire agreement of all. oact was tl;. only possible course politics end pressure groups a To-day's meeting was concerned left open to her and that all other should take a more with the four oower proposal on countries were agreed nn this of Arab rights and aentlfnentl —I P Maintains thesamehigft Standard ofQualityas shipped to the West Indies for the past fiftyyears VAHDIMKACSmttCW! \yrnt* ——A'.V/.WAV.'VAV