Citation
The Barbados advocate

Material Information

Title:
The Barbados advocate
Uniform Title:
Barbados advocate (Bridgetown, Barbados : 1983)
Portion of title:
Sunday advocate
Place of Publication:
Bridgetown Barbados
Bridgetown, Barbados
Publisher:
Advocate Co.
Publication Date:
Frequency:
Daily
regular
Language:
English

Subjects

Subjects / Keywords:
Newspapers -- Bridgetown (Barbados) ( lcsh )
Genre:
newspaper ( sobekcm )
Spatial Coverage:
Barbados -- Bridgetown

Notes

Dates or Sequential Designation:
Apr. 22, 1983-
Numbering Peculiarities:
No issue published for May 3, 1983.
General Note:
On Sunday published as: Sunday advocate.
General Note:
Microfilm produced before 1988 may be substandard.
General Note:
Latest issue consulted: Feb. 28, 2005.

Record Information

Source Institution:
University of Florida
Holding Location:
University of Florida
Rights Management:
Copyright Advocate Co.. Permission granted to University of Florida to digitize and display this item for non-profit research and educational purposes. Any reuse of this item in excess of fair use or other copyright exemptions requires permission of the copyright holder.
Resource Identifier:
17931718 ( OCLC )
sn 88063345 ( LCCN )
Classification:
Newspaper ( lcc )

Related Items

Preceded by:
Advocate-news (Bridgetown, Barbados)

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BRITAIN, FRANCE | ats

WILL BACK TRUMAN
Over Control Of

Armaments

Britain and France will

LONDON, Nov. 5.
give full backing to President

Truman's proposals for the reduction and international

control of armaments, usua
to-day.

They believed the main purpose of Truman’s
als—to be made in the broadcast to the world on

lly reliable quarters said here

ropos-
ednes-

day — would be to test the sincerity of the Communist
peace campaign. The President's plan was expected to in-
clude firm measures for the international supervision of
all armaments, but especially atomic weapons.

The re-armament initiat
argued here, coming at the

ive from the West, it was
moment when the North At-

lantic Re-armament Programme was in full swing, would

serve a double purpose.
Firstly it woul

emphasise that the Atlantic Pact mili-

tary strategy was defensive; secondly, it would test the
reality of the Soviet appeals for peace.

Truman’s disarmament broad-
cast, it was understood here, was
subject to prolonged exchanges
between London, Paris and
Washington, even before the
British new Conservative Gov-
ernment came into power,

Thesis Expected

The project subsequently

ceived the backing of the





The ‘Acheson
Plan’ Is Secret

PARIS, Nov. 5.

re-.
_ Eden and re ill t
s new ra ‘e
British Prime, Minister ‘Winton | sain at 3.00 bim. to-day, ois

Churchill and Foreign Secretary
Anthony Eden, Eden and United
States Secretary of State Dean
Acheson are expected to develop
a thesis backed by Truman at
their opening speeches in the
General Assembly of the United
Nations in Paris later this week.
It was thought one basic
tactical consideration underlying
the West’s decision to launch a
“disarmament under international
supervision” campaign was their
recollection of past sessions of
the United Nations Assembly,
The recent sessions of the
Assembly have been used by the
Soviet delegation to launch calls
for atomic or general disarma-
ment. These appeals have all
failed because the Soviet Govern-

ment refused to allow interna-
tional inspection within its
borders. But the fact that the

initiative has come from Moscow
has allowed the Soviet Union to
appear as champion of ace,
his, prior to consultations be-
tween the “Big Three” Western
Governments, has resulted in
of the Western dis-
armament Plan.
—UP.



King’s Health
Improves

LONDON, Nov. 5.
A communique issued from
Buckingham Palace today said that

the King’s health has improved
over the last fortnight.
The Communique signed by

five doctors said that His Majesty
was up for the greater part of
the day and was able to attend
to certain affairs of State, but that
the need for care remained.
The last’ Communique
issued 16 days ago. —U,P.

was



Royal Couple To
Tour E. Seaboard

Provinces

HALIFAX, Nova Scotia, Nov. 5.

“The weather was the only thing
the maritime royal tour planners
had not completely arranged for
on Monday. Everything else was
shipshape howeyer as _ Princess
Elizabeth und the Duke of Edin-
burgh headed through Eastern
Quebec to start a seven-day tour
of the Eastern seaboard provinces.

The royal Tour will end near/

there on. Nov. 12th with a full
dress and completely rehearsed
sendoff. Before that, hewever,

United States Ernbassy. A
jid is being kept on the detai's of
the “Acheson Plan,” since few be-
side the three ministers—Acheson,
Eden, and Schuman—themselves
know the details, although sensa-
tionalised Parisian accounts

are

reported to have the “inside”
story. ’

All that can be said, is. that

Acheson intends to take the initi-

ative away trom the Russians and
lay the key question on the line:

Is the Soviet Union ready to
consider real peace or does it want
to continue the cold war?

He will seek to strengthen the
United Nations hand, so that the
eonfusion and hastily conceived
action which followed the start of
war in Korea, will not be neces-
sary in event of any new aggres-
sion,

The most likely course that he
will take in this field is to propose
machinery for bringing regional
defence forces such asthe NATO
into the framework of the United
Nations Collective Security.

—UP,



Truman Denounces |

“Obstruction” .

NEW YORK, Nov. 5.

Truman warned Monday that
“obstruction and confusion and
false propaganda” at home will!
hamper the rearmament _pro-
gramme in the coming “crucial!
year.

Truman said in a letter to the
Congress of Industrial Organiza-
tions Annual convention that some
Americans are working hard to!
put a brake on our domestic pro-
gress to cripple and cut down our
foreign aid, to weaken our support
for the United Nations, and some
of them would evem risk a world
war in their impatience to find)
short cuts. around the problems
that confront us.



—U.P.

llth Atomie

bly an air drop, was set off
grounds at Frenchman's Fla

From All Quarters:
Russian
MIAMI, Florida, Nov. 5
Gregorio Simonovich, Russian,
who for years was the kingpin of
an alien smuggling ring operat-
ing out of Cuba, was arrested by
U.S. immigration. officers after

his mysterious arrival at a little
ee airport 4 miles north of
mi.

,Simonovich was wanted on
smuggling charges since 1947 and
Was accused last year by the Sen-
ate Committee of ‘master-mind-
ing Communist activity” in the
western hemisphere.

The U.S. border pa‘rol re-
ceived an anonymous telephone
call early Sunday saying: “some-
one you want badly” arrives
Shortly at Prospect airport. Half
an hour later Simonovich was
found alone on the airfield.

Tucumari, New Mexico. — An
airliner attempting an emergency
ae near here in a snowstorm,
crashed with 37 aboard. Ten
were hospitalized, two in a ériti-
cal condition. The airliner chart-
ered by the Army, was carrying
army personnel returning from
Korea. The impact broke the
plane in two.

Oslo.—The Nobel Peace Prize
of 1951 was awarded to Leon Jou-
haux of France, the Norwegian
Nobel Institute announced to-day.
M, Jouhaux is a French Trade
Union leader.

Paris.—Brigadier General Car-
los P. Romulo, Foreign Seeretary
tt the Philippines, was called in

onday to try to mediate the four-
way fight among 20 Latin Ameri-
ean delegations over which of
the countries should hold the

residency of the sixth session of

e U.N. General Assembly
which opens here Tuesday. A
Latin American President of the
Assembly is generally agreed

upon,
. Washington.— Truman poonk
the rt from the Jewish i.
fare Board Monday on its 1952
programme for serving the relig-
ious and morale needs of, 200,000
Jews in the armed services. The
President of the Board told Tru-
man that the organization will
recruit 148 full-time and 211 part-
time Jewish chaplains for the
armed forces.





On The Spot

YESTERDAY afternoon
the Advocate’s Roving Re-
porter was driving along
Dayrell’s Road. He saw a
man waving a red flag furi-
ously ahead of him and he
stopped dead on reaching
the man with the flag.

But the flag-bearer, obvi-
ously annoyed, shouted,

“Man carry on driving,
yuh en see uh waving to
tell yuh uh gwine blow up a
hole in de road dere.”





Explosion In

U.S. Was Set Off To-day

LAS VEGAS, Nevada, Nov. 5.
The 11th atomic explosion in the United States, possi-

to-day at the

atomic proving
t.

The explosion sent a towering finger-like spiral of
-smoke high into the sky. The test came after the three-|

day lull, which followed the first atomic combat man-







they will visit in New Brunswick,
Nova Scotia, and Prince Edward
Island, where residents “have
patiently waited since October
8th, smugly telling | themselves
that Elizabeth and Philip had.not
seen anything yet.”



Indo-U.S, Relations
Are Good

NEW DELHI, Nov. 5.
Foreign Secretary K. P, S&
Menon declared Monday that
there’s no Indo-American problem
and the friendship between the
two countries would remain stable
perpetually, Menon spoke at an
official banquet in honour of three
new. Ambassadors Chester Bowles
U.S., Stanislaw Ostroborg, France

and Stephane Halot, Belgium.
Menon acknowledged American
sympathy with Indian indepen-
dence and. recalled. Roosevelt’s
memoirs wherein it is stated that
Churchill “roared like a wounded
lion” at Roosevelt’s mention of

Indian freedom. —U-P.



CRICKET:Latest 12.30

BRISBANE, Nov. 6.

Queensland were all out for
455 soon after lunch on the
third day’s play of their
four-day match here to-day

A. Carrigan, Queensland
skipper, was bowled by Gomez
after making 169.

Queensland thus have a first
innings lead of 257 over the
West Indic



Reds May Reject

Us + “2 ‘Spee
Cease-fire Offers
iene 7» SMe ea

, Communists id. to
ieee ee FR
Ls cern a
nounced at the truce abc:
tee’s talks at Panmunjom, simul-
taneously with the Allied counter-
attack on the west front, where
the United Nations forces had
been driven back by one of the
heaviest artillery barrages of the

Korean war.
The four points were:



(1) Any ceasefire zone will be
based on the battle line at the time
of the Armistice signing “with ap-
propriate adjustments”,

(2) The Zone is to be two and
a half miles wide.

(3) The Committee's three offi-
: should determine the actual



line contact at any specific future
date.

(4) The agreements are to be
mares to the Plenary Session

s with the recommendation
that the latter discuss other items
on the agenda, leaving completion
agreement on the demarcation
line until it can be settled defin-
itely.

United Nations Briefing Officer,
Brigadier William Nuckols, who
described the proposal as a “for-
ward step”, said that the Com-
jmunists had already labelled it
;“unfair, unjust and unreason-
table,” Near the end of to-day’s
session, they had indicated that

reject it, he added

-U.P

ula

oeuvres in history, on last Thursday.

; To-day’s was the Fifth. nuclear
detonation .of the present Las
Vegas series, and was dropped at
8.31 a.m.

Official observers included at

ast two dozen Generals, among
whom was Curtis Lemay, Chief of
Strategic Air Command.

Medium-Size Bomb

, The explosion was from an ap-

rently medium-sized bom b

iropped from a B-29. First there

was a brilliant flash, Thirty sec-
onds later a dirty gray coloured
atomic cloud .soared above the
horizon assumireg the customar:
mushroom, which has followed all
atomic explosions,

An indication of the size and po-
tency of this detonation was given
by the unusual warning from the
Atomic Energy Commission. Radio
stations in a wide area covering
Goldfield, Beatty, and Caliente.
Nevada, were asked to warn resi-
dents to open windows in their
homes and shops. Presumably,
this would be to lessen the effects
of the tremendous concussion ex-
pected.

Seven minutes after the detona-
tion, there was a perceptible rum-
ble in Las Vegas, along with a sud-
den blast of wind. The _ brilliant
flas) of light was as bright, at
least as the big one, last Thursday,
the first detonation. in. which
troops took part in atomic

man-
oeuvres. The cloud rose on its
stem and the mushroom above

quickly acquired formations that
looked like two ice caps
Then it settled, and with a few

Jaccidents caused



¢

COUNTRY BATSMAN Jim De Courcy run out after he had made 24 in the match against the West Indies

at Newcastle, New South Wales, on 27.10.51. The ‘keeper is Everton Weekes, who deputised for C

L. Walcott.





Two Key

: 8TH ARMY HQ,, Korea, Nov. 5.

An 8th Army communique said that Allied units had
withdrawn from two “key terrain features’’ west of Yon-
chon, following the Redsattack, but front dispatches said
had recaptured all of the lost

that United Nations uni

ground by 10.00 a.m .on’Sunday,
» Three new light Communist probing attacks south-
west of Yonchon were repulsed, An 8th Army communi-

que said that on the

ther up the coast.

SAYS GAIRY

iFrom Our Qwn spondent)
ST, GEORGP’S, Nov. 1,
Hon. E. M. Gairy told a
M.M.W.U. meeting at the Mar!
Square last Saturday night that

it. were better the jive other
members elected with him as
M.M.W.U. candidates left the

colony than choose not to support
him every time in the new Legis-~
lative Council.

Mr, Gairy was pep-taiking his
followers in his usual way before
leaving next day for Carciacon on
a short visit.

He assured them that his would
be an 8—6 majority in the Council
as Hons. T. A. Marryshow and
Cc. St. B. Sylvester would throw
jin their !ot with the M.M.W.U.
bloc. He would fix that with
the latter on his visit to Carria-
cou, He reproved policemen and
nurses who did not vote for him
or his candidates and said they
would have to watch ont. As
regards the former he would have
no sloppy salutes and that went
for the Superintendent of Polieg
as well. He would hold demen-
strations whenever he chose and
not at the deciding of the Super-
intendent of Police.

Referring to the coming Budget,
he said he understood revenue
would be short but he would see
to it that there was expenditure
on all the little people needed
and he
money was to come from.

Among other things in a speeca
of familiar outbursts lasting over
an hour he said he was sorry but

he was no. longer to. be styled
“Uncle” but given his proper
title — Hon. Mr. Gairy.



177 Dead

NEW YORK, Nov. 5.

The death toll caused by the
vast pre-winter cold wave mount-
ed on Monday as the frigid
weather blankeled the nation
from Maine to Oregon and south
to the Gulf of Mexico with no re-
lief in sight.

At, least 177 deaths have been
attributed to the weather. Traffic
138, 16 persons
died in fires caused by overheated
stoves, seven drowned, two frozen

to death and 14 died in mis-
cellaneous mishaps,
Crop damuge is extensive

particularly in the south where the
unseasonable cold spell hit cotton
and citrus crops,

The Chicago weather bureau
said it could foresee no end to the
frosty weather. _ Forecasters said
scattered locations might get some
relief from the cold but it would
be only temporary,—U.P,



astern front, United Nations forces
pushed their deepest spearhead in North Korea still far-

ease



would know where the |

| Military and Civil.

Positions

The Allies gained 2,000 to 3,000
yards northwest of Kaesong and
seized the hill south of Kosong, 46
miles north of the 38th Parallel.

United Nations troops on the
eentral front repulsed a light Com-
munist attack southeast of the
former Communist stronghold of
Muson.

The 8th Army announced to-
night that heavy fighting was go-
ing on on the western front. Unit-
ed Nations had launched a coun-
ter-attack today, after being
driven back by one of the heaviest

barrage he had ever seen. The
Communists followed the barrage
with a “human wave", advancing
over barbed wire to get to grips
with Allied soldiers, who met them
in hand to hand fighting.



Week Of
Speeches By
World Leaders

LONDON, Nov. 5.

Churchill will touch off a
week of important speeches
by most of the world’s lead-
ing statesmen; Firstly
Churchill will speak in the
Commons (o-morcow a ter
noon after the Lord Chancei-
lor has read for the ailing
King George Vi his speech
to both the Commons and the
Lords in the morning.

Secondly, Truman is sche-
duled to make an important
foreign policy address in
Washington Wednesday
night,

Thirdly tomorrow is the
anniversary of the Soviet
revolution and this year

Stalin may make a major
|] address in Bolshoi theatre.
') If not another highranking
|} Soviet official will put Rus-

sia’s “peace” views before
the world,
Fourthly by , Thursday

Foreign Ministers of some. 60
members of the United Na-
tions will be ready to open a
week of oratory on ths
plans for peace at the Assem-
bly in Paris,—U.P,

ATTLEE RECEIVES
ORDER OF MERIT

LONDON, Noy. 5.

The King has conferred the
Order of Merit on Mr. Clement
Attlee. Mr, Attlee was, called to
Buckingham Palace tonight, and
the King made the investiture.

The Order is designed as a
special distinction for eminent
men and women — without con-
| ferring a Knighthood upon them,
; The Order is limited in numbers
to 24, with the addition of
Foreign Honorary Members.

Membership is of two kinds,

























UNIT OF ANGLO-
IRANIAN OIL CO.
RE-STARTED

The newly opened unit will be
kept in operation for one month
Yo replace stocks used up since its
closing down and to keep the re-
finery in working order, The an-
nouncement added, “Should buy-
ers be found for our products we
may restart two more refinery
sections.”

rvers ans’ ae ee
was wi to coincide
Sis Vereen 7h Minister,
Mossadegh’s stay in ashington,
and his oil talks there, The Per-
sians hope, thus, to convince the
world that they are not dependent
on British oil technicians, they
said. —U.P.

_

Ike Keeps Out
Of Politics

; WASHINGTON, Novy. 5,

Eisenhower told, reporters at the
White House on Monday he has
given no one authority to under-,
take any political activity on his+
behalf. Eisenhower talked briefly
with reporters after a 65-minute
high level military conference
with Truman, Defence Department
| officials and part of the Cabinet.
The General left to the White
' House any discussion of the con-
ference itself. He spoke for him-
‘self when it came to politics,



The political discussion with re-
porters started when the Com-
mander of the Western European
Defence Forces said he planned to
Jremain at his hotel on Monday
night hoping to get to bed early,
but, he added, he also would be
happy to see any of his old friends
“if any of them came around.”

White House Press Secretary
Joseph Short told reporters he
could not say what was discussed
by the General and the President
‘at lunch, because only the two
were present.





—U.P.

Co-operation

(From Our Own Correspondent)
ST. GEORGES. —

Mr. A. Norris Hughes, Chair-
man of the St, George's District
Bourd, last Sunday broadcast an
appeal for co-operation of house-
holders with the Board’s scaven-
ger employees in “keeping St.
George’s clean." Previous to the
strike, he said, the capital com-
pared creditably with other West
Indian capitals for excellence of
appearance but there had been a
deteriofation since. He had had,
however, a meeting with all scav-
engers, heard what complaints
they had to make as regards
oe and had been assur-



ed of better work as the Board
was prepared to back them
by prosecuting any offenders.

up



232 Win Their Way To Safety
As Luxury Liner Sinks

HAMBURG, Germany, Nov. 5.

Survivors from
Argentine liner, Maipu, charged
that many crew members, includ-
ing officers, jumped into life-boats
before all of the passengers were
evacuated from the ill-fated ship,
which sank early yesterday after
a collision with a

minutes, the stem began to wither | f0g

| Perceptible Rumble



and break up The great white
jcloud took on a coral pi ast
; while at the base an angry look-
fi purple cl th
ldesert.—U.P

i



army transport in a North Sea
About 232 haggard men, women
ind childrer passe rs and|



nembers he brand new

, of 1

United States | sey

{temporarily te suburban Ueber-

the $4,000,000 | seeheim, a camp usually used for

emigrating and displaced persons.

They reached Hamburg by train
from Bremerhaven, where they
had been brought by the 8,500 ton
United States army transport
General M. L. Hersey. The Her-
had picked them up after
| colliding with ‘he Maipu yesterday
in a dense fog off the north-east

| coast of Germany
The Hersey, 2,500
troor of the Un 43rd. |



Infantry BD

crash. No lives were lost on
either ship.

Officers and crew members re-
fused any statement on the crash
and would not comment on the
passengers’ charges against them
“If anybody is going to do any
talking it will be the Captain,”
said an officer, who refused to
give his name.

The Captain of the Maipu ar-
rived by train late last night with
three other officer He went
mme tels to hi hotel ma
efuse t

TP

him is that he was primarily re
sponsible for Attlee’s first defeat



Under-Secty.

FOR COLONIAL , OFFICE

(From Our Own Correspondent)

LONDON, Nov. 5
Churchill has appointed as hi
Parliamentary Under Seeretary
for the Colonial Office a man wh«
in his younger days used to be
mistaken for Churchill's son Ran-
dolph. He is the Far! of Munster

Here is One story which illus-
strates the likeness between thes«
two men when t were young-
er. on sinesing enersbes of the
House of Lords was heard to ex-
clam “Tis young fellow is
Randolph Churchill. It is one
thing having him in and out of
the lobbies and dining rooms all
day but it is going a bit too far
when he strolls in and sits on the
Government behches. Just look
at him.” The noble lord indicated
his neighbour was a fair young
man called Lord Munster who
had just been made Paymaster
General,

Another point

connected wit

in the division of the lobbies of
the House of Lords in 1946

The Earl was Paymaster
eral, Chamberlain's
irom 1938 to January the
lowing year. He was then ap
po'nted Under Secretary for War
resigning from this post in Sep-

Gen-
Government
fol-

Another

appoiniment he held
under Churchill's coalition was
thet of Under Secretary of State
at the Home Office from 44 to
‘a5

The Earl of Munster who is 45
is married with no children



Woman Bull-fighter
Marries A Noble

LISBON, Noy. 5,
The 28 year old well known
woman bullfighter Conchita Citron
today put an end to her career by
marrying the 31 year ole Port-
uguese, Francisco Castelo Branco.
She had agreed at the request of
her flance to give up bull-fighting
when married, Her husband be-
longs to u noble fimily of Portu-
gol
Conchita, born in
many years in Portugal

Peru lived

She fought her bulls on horse-
oack. The wedding was carried
out with great pomp in Lisbon
'

today. Assembled were the guests
of many noble families of Portugal.

The ex-King Umberto of Italy
wes among the distinguished
quests. Conchita had to wait 20

minutes inside a motorcar before
entering the church, in order not
4o spoil her wedding dress in the
neavy rain. —U-P.

-

over

Production
Will Be More.

LESS FROM
COMMONWEALTH

From Cur Owr, Cor raride

LONDON, Ney, 5.
The world sugar production tor
1951—-1952 season is expected ix

be up by 500,000 tons despite
substantial falling off from Com-
nonwealth areas.

From Australia and South
Africa where disastrous weather
conditions have persisted, the
anticipated output is 4 by
200,000 tons and 107,000 tots

respectively on the figureseor the
previous 12 moriths. Bi on

On “the credit sidé Mauritius
promises to add 35,000 tons to
ast season’s total and accord-
ing to Czarnikows’ latest report
another 50,000 tons is expected
from the British Caribbean,

Nhe overall picture | however
shows a decline in Common-
wealth production of 200,000 tons

This reduction, taken in con-
junction with a small crop of
sugar beet expected in the U.K,,

is a serious loss to the Common-
wealth,
Contributing largely to the

increased world production. figure
—Wwhich promises to establish a
new record—is the anticipated
increase of 300,000 tong from
Cuba and 200,000 tons from the
Philippines

Czarnikows say it is difffeult, to
paint any very reliable statistical
picture into these figures. Many
areas of the world are still suf-



ternaber ‘39 to jcin the forces.Jfering from under consumption
From '39 to '41 he was A.D.C,,Jdue in part to a lack of internal
TEHERAN, Nov. 5. and Military. Assistant to Lord spending power, but mainly to
One unit of the Anglo-Iranian] Gort, P a shortage of the requisite over-
Oil Company's Refinery at Abadan seas curreney, -
has been re-started, an official an- A man of great energy and The take off must depend on
nouncement disclosed to-day. It/drive Earl Munster has been af how much foreign eurfency
quoted a letter from the provis-{ prominent figure for many years}these | consuming countries — in-
ional Oil Board, which took over){n the House of Lords where he} cluding the U.K. which depend
from the British when the world’s|has taken keen interest in such{O" imports can afford to spend
largest refinery was closed down] matters as housing and child wel- JO" SUset ; ;
in July, informing the Persian] faye . Jay an will no doubt provide an
Government that one unit had} pyom 1982 to '38 he wag Lord-| re nae cess +t world market
teen restarted, using Persian] in-Waiting to the King and from|*" oy i ae oe eres
technicians only, The output willl’4s to ‘44 he was Parliamentary bre umption was over [000,000
include low grade products like] Under Secretary of State for ate sis callin Nesiolaiets i
Kerosene and paraffin, India and Burma. Smétent tae Praline te Eee

production is modest indeed When
it is remembered that despite, the
overall addition of almost 4,000,-
000 tons last season only a very
moderate tonnage will be varried
into next year,



BRITISH BACK
U.S. PEACE PLAN

PARIS, Noy, 5,

Anthany,.Eden, Ewitish,.Â¥ortigue
Secretary, after a two and a quar-
ter hour meeting with United
States Secretary of State Dean
Acheson, said as he left the Ameri-
cal: Fmbassy: “We had the most
useful preliminary survey over the
whole agenda,”

Asked if the British were behind
the American Peace Plan, he said,





“Of course, we are in agreement
on it," Asked if he: thought. it

held out hope of suceess, he said
“Of course, We would not be do-
ing it if it did not”

~U.P.





The “ADVOCATE”
pays for NEWS.

Dial 3113
Day or Night





er awe








?



. thedral on Sunday November

* 7.15 p.m.,
17



BARBA



PAGE TWO

EMPERS of the Barbados

Office Association have
been invited to attend the Re-
membranee Service at the Ca-

ll
at 10.30 a.m. The Annual Gen-
eral Meeting of this Associa ion
takes place at the Drill Hall at
on Saturday November

Their annual dinner will be
held three” quarters of an hour
later also at the Drill Hall. Any
Officer at presen: visiting the
island is welcome to attend. +

Contact man is Mr. Dougie Al-
‘leyne at Brydens.

Seaworthy

P AT the Marine Hotel they
have been busy putting the
clock back, but this time it’s got
a new face, which is streamlined
and modern, The old bar which
Wally Hammond and many
another cricketer—local and old
country—propped up in the wee
exciting hours of Old Year's
Nights fifteen years and mora
ago has come back to the Marir2.

Only this ‘ime its made of ligat
curving mahogany and to remind
us that Marine has something to
do wih the sea there’s a large

porthole to keep us cool while 4

swilling John
punches,

They tell me first drinks will
be served there on November 10,
when vou can go and cee for
yourself what improvements nove
been going on in preparation for
a big tourist season.

Rifle Team Leaves
HE Barbados Rifle team for
the—Trinidad Annual Shoot
left Barbados on Sunday _ by
B.W.LA...The team is Lt. Col. J.

Collins’ and local

Connell, “tCapt.), Maj. J. Griffith,
Maj. O. F=C. Walcott, Capt. C.
Neblett, Mr. M. deVerteuil, Mr.
G. PilgrifY and Mr. T, "A. L.
Roberts, -<#t. Col, Connell was
accompanied by his wife.
Accompahying the team was

Mr. M. Pueker.
Yechting Team Returns
M*. PEVER INCE and Mr.
Gerald Nicholls two mem-
bers of the Barbados Yachting
team whith won the yachting
series against Trinidad returned
home OVer the weekend by ;
B.W.I1.A. The other members of

the team are due back today by
ship.

Cn. Honeymoon
R. AND MRS. A. CAMACHO
who were married in Trini-
dad on Saturday flew over from
Trinidad the following day by
B.W.LA, to spend their honey-
moon in Barbados, They are
guests 0 the Hotel Royal,

r The Races
M* Rn. HARDWIDGE was an
arrival from Trinidad by
B.W.J.A,, on Sunday. He has
come over to ride in the races.

BY THE

HE latest Beachcomber poll,

making use of the new statis-
tical law, has been able to predict,
with absolute certainty, not only
how everybody will vote, and how
they will vote under different con-
ditions, but also at what time they
will vote.

So mechanically perfect is this
new method of forecasting that I
have been asked not to publish the
figures. The apparent infallibility
of statistics might induce some of
the voters to change their minds
at the last moment, merely to de-
monstrate their independence, and
to satisfy themselves that the laws
of statistics have not yet abolished
free will.

Report from Aberbananer

A TRIAL push by Evans the
Hearse yesterday on Llangyr-
kyn Mountains once more show-
ed his uncanny skill at rounding
difficult corners on the mountain
paths, on one nostril, keeping the
pea close, and ushing rather than
propelling it. eg Bodger, who is
not so familiar with this course,
misséd the pea at Dwch Corner,
and his left nostril came in con-
tact with a bit of rock. The slight
nasal abrasion which resulted was
treated by Dr. Cosham of Fwt-
balpwll, -

Social Security

HE B.B.C. ban on the name of

Charles Kingsley for political
reasons shows how serious, this
matter is. It is said that a come-
dian who. introduced a_ grocer
named Palmerston was heavily
censored. and the name _ was
changed to Balmerston to avoid





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MR. AND MRS.
Married On Saturday

ISS DAISY GONSALVES

daughter of Mrs.@ Daisy
Gonsalves of “Osterley”, Max-
wells and Mr. Gabriel Gonsalves
of Miami was married on Sat-
urday afternoon at Christ Church
to Mr, James S.eed, son of Mr.
and Mrs, James Steed of Glas-
gow Scotland, and Senior En-
gineer of Esperansa Estate, Trin-
idad,

The ceremony which took
place shortly after 5.30 o’clock
was performed by Rev. Mande-
ville.

The Bride who was given in
marriage by her brother Michael,
wore a dress of white lace over
taffeta. Her headdress was of
white roses and her bouque: of
anthurium lilies.

The Bridesmaid, Miss Betty
Gonsalves, sister of the Bride
wore orchid lace and carried a
bouquet of anthurium lilies. There
were three Flower Girls, the
Misses Ginger, Joan and Dena
Bernstein. The Bestman was Mr.
Alexander Thompson who is also
from Scotland and works at the
same estate in Trinidad as the
*groom.

After the ceremony a recep-
tion was held at ‘Osterley’ Max-
wells and the honeymoon is
being spent at the Crane Hotel.

Mr. and Mrs. Steed leave to-
morrow for Trinidad,

Trinidad K.C.

R. H. U. B, WOODING, K.C.,
and his sister who arrived
from Trinidad on Saturday morn-
ing by B.W.1A._ returned the
following day to Trinidad.
Mr. Wooding is a Barrister at
Law Trinidad and a Director of
B.W.I. Airways.

WAY

“influencing the voter.” The word
“liberal” is barred as suggesting a
political party, and ballet must not
be mentioned, as it is too much
like ballot.

‘New light on Dickens‘
HE denigration of Dickens has
for some years been a favour-

ite sport. A few writers Wave
found him too vulgar for an age
of exquisite refinement, and too
sentimental about human beings
for a generation which reserves
ifs sentimentality for animals. It
has even been pointed out that his
private life was not above re-
proach—a state of affairs which is
acutely painful in this era_of rigid

Rupert ane the



Rupert looks gratefully at his pal.
VS topping, ot you nor to ask me

any questions’ he says Wi can
say now is that, Lion Reck must be
on this isiand.”” “ D'you think
there is any chance of us geting to
i before those men?" ** There

Eee



Phone 4764’



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e
in

36"

@

ee re ee ee ee ee ee te

In Very Attractive Shades

T.R. EVANS & WHITFIELDS

YOUR SHOE STORES



IN TOWN

ee i ee ee ee

JAMES STEED
Hot Or Cold

Dw from the first pre-
winter cold wave in the States

icy weather blanketed
Maine to Oregon,

was reported yesterday a
from

Here in Barbados a visitor was

complaining

Nuvember

having.
You can't please everybody.

Wedding

of the

unusual
heat we have been

N Thursday afternoon at 3.30

o'clock, Miss Joyce Ashby

grand- -daughter of Mrs. E. Ashby

of Reed Street was married at St.

Barnabas’ Church to Mr. Reuben
Adams, son of Mrs. E. Adams of

Gittens Road,
and the late Mr, Adams,

Government Hill,

JERRARD

ADVOCATE

TICKELL

| The man who is winning success with his book and

| film about a cow. Appointment with Venus—goes in

Manoir cowman made
funny thing,”’
ferent as cows

of this statement.

lation,

An Old Etonjan tie | listens
humbly to advice given “by «4
knotted handkerchiet, a diamond
clip sparkles more brightly at tne
report of mounting lactation
Weighty discussions are held on
such subjects as butter-fat con-
tent and the effect of a Mozar-
Symphony in B flat on the milk
yield of a pedigree Ayrshire.

Like Film Stars

The cattle themselves, as ii
aware that they are the raisons
@etre of all this excitement, agi-
tation, organisation and _ chat,
flutter their long eye-lashes like
film stars at a first night.

They came to Olympia from all
over Great Briain. Fairy Pr.ncess
8th an elegant Shorthorn bred by
Mr, J. H. Stephenson, travelled
more than 500 miles by rail from
the Royal Mental Hospital, Mont-
rose to chew the cud in Kensing-
‘on, Guernseys from Sussex,
Friesians from Shropshire, Ker-
rys from Somerset. Lincoln Reds
from Yorkshire, the breeds eat

The ceremony was performed] the grass of alien fields.
by Rev. K. A. B. Hinds. The I went first of all to see the
Bride who was given in marriage| Guernseys, the breed that pro-

by her cousin Mr. C. Drakes, wore
organza with
long elose fitting
Her

e@ dress of white
high neck line,
sleeves and a very full skirt.

headdress was a tulle veil, kept in
place by a tiara of roses and for-

get-me-nots and

she carried a

bouquet of Anthurium lilies and

Queen Anne’s Lace.

Miss Viclet
maid of honour wore mauve crepe

Farley who was

The Misses Lorna Grimes and
Doreen Farley were the Brides-
maids. The bestman was Mr.

Grafton Merritt and

the ushers

were Messrs Arthur and Kenneth

Ashby, brothers of the bride.

After the ceremony a reception

was held at
groom’s cousin “Homestead”,
mont Road.

being spent at
House, Bathsheba.

The honeymoon

By BEACHCOMBER

Christian morality.
just been reading a review of a
book which evidently explains all
this, Dickens suffered from manic-
depressive insanity, and was a
psychotic, Hence those regret-
table novels, which the unenlight-
ened continue to enjoy.

Putting Kreisler
at his ease

HE putilication of Kreisier's
Memoirs recalls to me the
story of the woman who, when
introduced to him, said: “Oh, Mr.
Kreisier, We've just bought your
new model. My husband won't

drive anything else!’

Lion Rock—23







|
=

Ke
Case

ay?




S27 Z





shall be a way af that ws what yo
want,’’ says Rollo. *’ Anyway.
certainly won't stay here anqg pr
pare a meal tor them.’ dorryi
to thei slespine place, he drags o

great lengths of rape of differes
thicknesses,

=

WITH
$3.08

$2.18

Dial 4220

the home of the
Bel-
is
“Fleet View” Guest

But I have

duced my own photogenic Venus.
My heart warmed ‘o these aristo-

cratic exiles separated forever
from their native Channel
{slands, for no beast that sails

out of Saint Peter Port may ever
return, It is thus that the
‘slanders, shrewd breeders, have
ixed a type that will always be
constant.

Beside them are their cousins
the Jerseys, finer and more deli-

cate, their amber milk rich in
butter.
In comparison, the South

Devons over the way are as enor-
mous and as shaggy as buffaloes.
The nimble Kerrys with their
sharp horns are as temperamen-
tal es the boys of Killarney,
they glance with rollicking eyes
at the little black Dexters who
look as if thev should be pulled
along on wheels.

ana

ee



ACTOS

+ ‘Where you ix the iobe up

(6
To pay back with great care

(9
The oeggar aiwavs nas one (3
This art w scrappy (5)
Capadie of vanishing in water. 4:
arly symptom of many ills. (5
They add up to a score. (4)
The plurnber’s mate does
snouid (5)

Where some jumpers make cur
tact. (
Better upset
) Begrud i
What the cheat may do (5)

Down
« Before the writer could lay dow
rules. )
¢ Found tn beagie Kennels.
‘ Hole in which to drop Lieut.- “to
be ’

without tea (6)
)

Slang for 19? (4)

Apes tonic. (ana ).

Can be reserved you'll find, (8)

(3)
(7

No. } of the gossip shop,
Ask tots where the rye runs,

Quite unfeeling. (4)

3

Reap.
13 Wager: 15.

Bar, 1 Average: 20. Lady: 1
ted(act), 22. Kettle: 25. {reat sOre
own: 1 ge 2, Axe: Ties
* Dirge 6 Venture: “B.

». Sultry Pla
i



NO CONS CONSTIPATION
FOR 25 YEARS ~

husband introduced rie te ta
maceied. ad. pone it in my cooking an as
fast. “The result: ry
we’re oa ha as}:
Soe caste

453 Gant fae ay Ave,



ma’ aot

Welt letters from

ALL-BRAN ‘users,

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to lack of Mew 5900, an

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mete ni

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——.

The naturat way to

KEEP SLIM
ano FIT

If you want to be





attractively
slim, with bright eyes, radiant
complexion, and real fitness,

Nature demands that you keep
your system cleansed of
impurities. Clinical tests by
doctors confirm that Bile Beans
do this, gently and effectively
Bile Beans are keeping millions
healthy and youthful in looks

and figure. Start taking them
tonight.

Nature's Gentile Aid

BILE BEANS |

Just a couple at Bedtime



‘
|
|
5) | ¢
‘
*)
4 e 14) %
r A i
(9 :
‘ (5
wo
g: 9
7
Does this worm aasist during fue
cuts? 14)
How needles warfare begins, (3)
Solution of voaiesde?'s purzle,— Across
Katvdid, 7 Service, 9. Realim); 11
nslaught: a8. People. 14. Elm, 16." Wit
t





the the Dairy Show in London for an
Appoin
With 324

QNE night last spring, in a candle-lit Sark stable, the

ent
enuses

a significant remark. /t

is a

he said,'‘but-human beings are almost as dif-

A visit to the Dairy Show at Olympia shows the truth
The exhibits—with the exception of a
few disconsolate cack pigeons—are exclusively feminine.
Their admirers vary in sex, custom and clothing. Standing
‘ankle deep in straw, the cows look with soft speculative
eyes at a complete cross-sec

tion of Britain’s human popu-

Glance at the sturdy Red Polls,
the piebald Ayrshires, the Welsh
Blacks—and ponder the fact that
the 324 cows at Olympia, big,
small and medium, have given au
average of 2,200 gallons a day—
over eight tons of milk—o be
marketed by the -Ministry of

ee Every cow in the show is
le-king her best—and no wonder.
ration for the Dairy Show

started a long time ago, A cow
is in her best show form immedi-
ately after calving, and the hour
of her mating is thus chosen to
a nicety. The period of gestation
is 41 weekes— and she must
conform to the rule and produce
her calf on or before October 3
of this year.

Allowance must be
the caprice of Nature, and manv
a potential champion has been
debarred from entering by 2 m‘4i-

made for

ter of minutes. Let us suppose,
however, thay Hyacinth, an
imaginary Guernsey, obligingly

produces her calf at 11.55 om
on October 3, zero hour
midnicht. Her breeder may
mib his hands, for he knows
the fates at least are on his

His Art

Heqnow summons art to assist
natp First the, horns; all the
rougfiness is taken off wi'h sand-
paper and glass and only when
the surface is silky smooth does
he apply the final polish with
best dairy butter. Hoofs are sim-
ilarly treated.

Any disfiguring hair is clipped
off and the hide is groomed ‘1d
regroomed until it glistens like
crepe de chine.

Now the important business of
the plume on Hyacinth’s tail. It
is washed again and again in
lather of soap flakes, dried out
with sewdust and tightlv nlait-

beinr
well
that
side.



IN the sewing room of her;
modest home in Minneapolis, Mrs. |
Gladys Olson, pretty blonde wife}
of a factory inspector, is raising a|
£26,775 chinchilla coat. She is
beginning to suspect that by the
time she has enough skins she will
have grown too fond of the chin-
chillas to deprive them of their
coats for her own use.

Mrs, Olsort is one of some 5,000
people in the United States who
have taken up fur-raising as a
sideline, for fun and profit.

In Mrs. Olson’s case, it all be-
gan four years ago as a hobby.

Her husbana Edward bought
his original pair of chinchillas
for £500, persuaded his wife w
give up her sewing room to make
room for them and, with rather
more difficulty, persuaded the
family dog Duchess that the chin~-
chillas were not some new form
of defenceless cat,

For a couple of days Mrs. Olson
stood in the doorway and watched
her husband feeq them. Now it
is Mr. Olson who stands in_ the
doorway when the chinchillas’
meals are served.

Fed With Milk

Some months after the Olsons
bought their first pair they became
the owners of four more—the first
litter. These had to be raised—by
Mrs. Olson—with an eye-dropper
filled «with milk. Now the popula-~
tion of the sewing room numbers
30— and additions are anticipated.

“] would never be able to par‘
with the original pair whatever |
could do about the rest,” says Mrs
Olson,

At 37 she does not own a fur
coat of any kind, much less a
£26,775 chinchilla.

When the Olsons have guest:
the 30 chinchillas are brought into
the lounge to play with them
The dog is banished to a corner 0!
the room, from which she glower:
reproachfully at the furry animals

gambolling over the furniture
They are a delicate pearl grey
colour.

tire for the night. In the morning.
the plaits are untied and combed
out into a mis y spreading plume
that is guaranteed to catch the
eye of any other than the most
cynical judge.

In an age when the dynas.ies
of kings have ceased to main-
tain the sense of human continu-
ity over the centuries, the gen-
ealogies of cows still keep man’s
imagination in touch with ‘he
fasting verities of the soil. From
the sophistieated farm of Olym-
pia to the wet and windy hill-
sides, the cow goes on doing her
kindly job for humenity.

(World Copyright Reserved)

Se ae ae ee ee

TUESDZY, NOVEMBER 6, 1951













~~
29S9 3O5
JANETTA DRESS SHOP
LOWER BROAD STREET
4
DRESSES | «eve: 10
Ready-made and made-to-Order.
Also—BR ASSIERES~ White and Pink.
SIZES 38 and 40—with Waistband and without
Waistband
From $3.00 to $5.44.
" SORSOSSS SRSSS SOOO OI SIS 5 TES



Opening Frida, il

coming
JOAN “RAW FORD

‘Goodbye a Fancy’
—_—_—_—

(Bank) 1.30—4.45
and 8.30 p.m
“Tarzan's Peril”

Ea. | |e AZA.S biaL ate

Last 2 SHOWS TO-DAY 4.45 and 8.30 ean
James Virginia Doris Gene
co an MAYO DAY MacHAR NELSON in

“ WEST POINT STORY”

Color Short:

ROYAL DUCK SHOOT
Monte HALE in— ae

Allan “Rocky” LANE in—
RANGER of CHEROKEE STRIP__& NAVAJO.TRAIL RAIDERS
PLAZA vii ts GAIETY

Last 2 Shows To-day 5 & 8.30 p.m. THE GARDEN — ST. JAMES
“TO-MORROW IS FOREVER” To-day .(only) 8.30 p.m.

Claudette Colbert, George Brent & “ALWAYS IN MY HEART”
“BERLIN EXPRESS” Gloria WARREN &
Merle O’BERON—Robert RYAN “FUAXY MARTIN"

Virginia MAYO
Wed. (only) 5 & 8.30 n
Walt Disney's oye
ree AND FANCY FREE”
‘olor by Technicolor
Dinah SHORE” Eagar BERGEN &
‘BAMBOO BLONDE”
Francis Langford and Ralph Edwards

peo ae

TO-DAY ONLY 4.30 and 7.45 p.m.
JOHN SUTTON — Serer MERRICK

“THE COUNTERFEITERS’
“ROGER TOUGHY GANGSTER”

VICTOR McLAGLON — PRESTON |__CVICTOR McLAGLON — PRESTON FOSTER

OPENING GLOBE Tomonnow |
WITH

THE SUPER STAR TALENT SHOW

LOUSING-
STORY OF A GUY
WITH EVERYTHING
10 LIVE FOR...
LOVE FOR...

FIGHT FOR!...







>

6.30 p.m
in



Wed. and Thurs.
ABBOTT and
“IT AINT HAY” &

“DANGEROUS GAME”
ee HAYWARD

















ed. Only then may Hyacinth re- —L.E.S

| OSES SS OOOOROPOPRDO POPOV OPPS PDIP EP OPPS COPOOSPSOOT *% JOAN
\o ms ;
'§ THE BRIDGETOWN "PLAYERS 3 DOUGLAS - * DARNELL eR
if DON DE FORE-suua SLAUSTEN soseFh yy
RS present Sereen Pay by ALLAN \
oN » q
‘

%,

ss

x x

‘ $ EMPIRE

% >

x s LAST 2 SHOWS TO-DAY 4.45 & 8.15

* 2 JOSEPH COTTEN — LORETTA YOUNG

% x

x ( | RCLE ¥ in *HALF ANGE

a x

% TO-MORROW ONLY 4.30 & 8.30 THURSDAY ONLY 4.30 & 8.30
x x Universal Double — Universal Double —

s a g

$ puri y < James MASON — Margaret Basil RATHBONE

x by SOMERSET MAUGHAN & LOCKWOOD in in

ss 31 6, i a -

x 7 %|“‘THE” WICKED LADY” BLACK CAT

* NOVEMBER 27,28 & 29

% % and and

‘ EMPIRE THEATRE (}"arenic man wuwre| “BLACK Narcissus”

3 with with
QPEL LEC E PORES SLE E 65006008

| THE MARINE

DINNER

$3.00 Per Person



OH,
SUCH

A
VARIETY!

SATURDAY NOVEMBER 10TH.

on the occasion
OF THE OPENING OF OUR NEW BAR

Dinner Served from 7 to 9.30 pm.
Dancing from 7 to Midnight

HOTEL LTD.

DANCE

Table Reservations
Tel. 3513







Table Glass





MIKEL CONRAD DEBORAH KERR

ROYAL

LAST 2 eee TO-DAY TO-MORROW ONLY 4
4.30 & 8.30 Universal Double oe

Republic Whole Serial—-

‘* DESTINATION
“HAUNTED HARBOUR” UNKNOWN ”
with and
KANE RICHMOND “STAIRWAY TO
MARSHALL J. REED HEAVEN ”’



OLYMPIC

TO-DAY & TO-MORROW 4.30 & 8.15
20th C-FOX DOUBLE —

DANA ANDREWS - GENE TI
STAN
AS

WW



“DO YOU. LOVE ME”

in TECHNICOLOR
Starring :
DICK HAYMES — MAUREEN O’HARA — HARRY JAMES

ROXY





| LAST 2 SHOWS 2 DAY 4.30 &| Wednesday & oe 4.30 &
8.1

| Universal Double —

Pyrex Ware | ||



BARBADOS
CO-OP COTTON
FACTORY LTD.










Mea et " A>

eee O'BRIEN Pd
Elia RAINES YA

eta BENDIX

Atala a3

JOEL McCREA — WANDA
HENDRIX
in

“SADDLE TRAMP”



Color by Technicolor fr a
and i A UNIVERSAL-INTERNATIONAL PICTURE |
“TAKE ONE FALSE |
STEP” |
Starring |BUD ABBOTT—LOU COSTELLO
LLIAM POWELI SHELL‘ ros
WINTERS “IN SOCIETY





TUESDAY, NOVEMBER 6, 1951



SESSIONS :





BARBADOS ADVOCATE



Bicycle Thief Jailed

For 18

Months

THE Hon. the Chief Justice Sir Allan Collymore at the
Court of Grand Sessions yesterday sentenced Fitz Cameron
Leacock to 18 months imprisonment when he was found
guilty by an Assize jury of the larceny of a Raleigh bicycle
valued at $60 the property of Arnold Pinder.

The offence was committed on
September 28. Miss M. EB
sourne appeared on behalf of the

Crown. This was the first case
tried yesterday as the Court of
Grand Sessions opened. The

Acting Attorney General Hon. F.
E. Field told the court that the
case was a short one and he
wanted to get through with it as
quickly ag_possible, >

Arnold Pinder of Bevkles Road
told the Court that on September
28 he wes working fi the shipping.
He ieft his bicy@le In QYiverpool
Lane, City, unlocked. & came
ashore about 10.10 p.m. the same
day and went to Liverpool Lane
to get his bicycle: The © bicyele
which is a Raleigh was not there.
He then reported the matter to
the Police.

He identified the bicycle by the
lamp and valued it, at $60.
Thirteen days after he reported
the bicycle lost, he went to St.
Joseph where he saw his bicycle.

On September 28 he did not give
anyone permission to use the
bicyele. He could not remember
the serial number of the bicycle.

Weston Jones of Cocoanut
Grove, St. Joseph said that he has
known the accused for some time.
On October 8, he was in Chim-
borazo Road, St. Joseph when the
accused asked him if he knew a
person who would like to buy a
bicycle. He told the accused no.
The accused had a bicycle with
him. The number was M-3386.

He reported to Sgt. Henderson
that the accused was trying to
sell a bicycle. Sgt. Henderson
arrested the accused,

Caspar Athaly, an agricultural
worker of St, Joseph told the
Court that the accused used to
work with him, He \Héard the
accused asking if anyoné wanted
to buy a bicyele. The accused was
then in a shop.

Station Sergeant . Henderson
attached to District: “F’’ Police.
Station said that on October 9 a

man by the name of Bradshaw
spoke to him. He got into the
motor van and went to Cocoanut
Grove Road. He later saw the
accused with a bicycle on Bissex
Hill Road and examined the
bicycle. The number was M-3386
and he recognised the bicycle as
one stolen, The accused was
taken to the Station and the
bievele was identified by Arnold
Pinder as his property. The
accused was_then charged.

Cecil Marshall a Writ Server
said that on October 9 he saw the
accused with a bicycle. He eX-
amined the bicycle and it answer-
ed to the description of one that
was reported stolen, The accused
made a statement at District “F”
Station which he signed.

At this Stage the case for the
prosecution was closed. The
accused then addressed the jury.



NO QUORUM AIT
VESTRY MEETING

The St. Michael Vestry Meeting,
which was to have taken place
yesterday, was not held. here
were not enough members pres-
ent to form «4 quorum, One person
was needed to form a quorum
but Mr. Trevor Bowring left after
waiting for 20 minutes. When
the other member did arrive
there was still no quorum.

One of the items on the Agenda
was a petition from residents of
Gittens Land, Government Hill,
asking for a. water Main across
that area.

Two reports would have been
received. One from the Street
Lighting Committee recommend-
ing the installation of additional
units in the City and suburban
areas and another from the
Barbados Gag Company stating
that they were doing their best
in the matter of the conversion
of street lamps equipped for
carrying Natural Gas, and regret-
ting any inconvenience caused.

Members present were: Dean
G. L. V. Hazelwood, Chairman,
Hon. V. C. Gale, Mr. T, Bowring,
Mr. E. D. Mottley, M.C.P., Mr.
J. K. C. Grannum, Mr. Victor
Chase, Mr. A. R. Toppin, Mr, McD.
Symmonds, Mr. H, A. Tudor.



“trouble,

2 Years For:

Larceny

FITZGERALD ROBINSON at
the Cort of Grand Sessions yes-
terday pleaded guilty to larceny

from the house of Litian Cossou. «

The Hon, the Chief Justice Sir
Allan Collymore sentenced him to
two years’ imprisonment wit
hard labour. The offence was com-
mitted sometime between June 4
and 6,

Lilian Cossou told the court that
she had employed Robinson as a
mason and while he was there ne

took away all of her valuable be- *

lengings from the house.

As regards his record Emerson
Howard told the court that the
accused was sentenced to [2
months for being in possession of
forged bank notes and six months
for larceny.

Bound Over

The Hon. The Chief Justice
bound over LEMUEL SKEETE a
19-year-old old labourer for 12
months in the sum of £25 after he
pleaded guilty of wounding Ty-
ronne St, Hill with a stone on his
head, Mr, E..W. Barrow who ap-
peared on belialf of Skeete told
the court that the accused and
another boy had a row and while
throwing a stone which was in-
tended for this boy unfortunately
this lad St. Hill was struck. There
was no eeeron of malice. The
Chief JuSstite told Skeete that in
a sense it Was dn accident. The
person who throws stones in law
is ble for the injury inflicted
on the other. Throwing stones is
unlawful but it was not his inten-
tion to send him to prison.

Postponed

Sentence was postponed on
GEORGE BOURNE who pleaded
guilty of wounding Whitneld Fli
With intént. Whitfield Eli told the
rourt that after he was wounded
by Bourne he was detained in the
General Hospital for, 20 days and
had an operation, Miss M, E.
Bourne Assistant Legal Draughts-
man, asked The Hon, the Chief
Justicé to take a serious view of
the matter.

The Chief Justice said that the
using of knives is a serious matter
and people are being killed by
knives. Anyhow he was postponing
sentence to get a report about him.
Bourne had nothing to say on his
plea.

GARVIN SMITH pleaded guilty
to thé larceny of articles valued
at $150.50 thé property of Clifford
Searles, Sentence was postponed
by the Hon. the Chief Justice. Mr,
Searles said that for sometime he
was missing things from his place
and the accused had access to his
place,

The Hon. the Chief Justice also
postponed sentence on Joseph
Whitright, a 22-year-old labourer
who pleaded guilty of the larceny
of articles valued at $330.52, the
property of Cyril Payne from the
dwelling house of David Payne
The offence was committed on
June 16,

Wounding

Seritence was also postponed on
IVAN ARCHER, a_ 20-year-old
mason who pleaded guilty of
wounding Doughlas Springer with
intent on September 15, Mr. L.
Williams who appearéd for Archer
said that he is a young man who
tried his best to keep out cf

The Acting Attorney General
told the court that this offence
took plate at midnight. For no
good reason this man stopped the
bread vendor and hit him with a
hammer. The accused said that
he borrowed the hammer from‘ a
woman to drive a cotter pin in a
bicycle.

Sentence was also postponed on

Winifred Morris who pleaded
guilty to inflicting grievous bodily
harm on Agnita., Springer on

August 19, Mr, G, Farmer counsel

for Morris told the court that in

an argument over some man be-

tween herself and the other wo-

man, a fight ensued in which the

aecused hit the woman with an
@ On page 7

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SECOND TIME



ma

With fur coat over chocolate
coloured suit and beige sweat-
er and make-up kit in trans-
parent bucket-type handbag,
filmstar Nancy Valentine ar-
rives in her London hotel from
America. She is on her way
to Calcutta for her second and
official marriage ceremony to
the Maharajah of Cooch Be-
har, The first ceremony—a
Brahmin one in 1949—was
kept secret pending Indian
governinent approval.

—EXPRESS.



SEA WELL

ARRIVALS BY W.ILA. ON
SATURDAY PRO ST. VINCENT
From ST. VINCENT—Patricia Casson.

From ANTIGUA—Alfred Mulcare.

From GREDANA — Anthony Hadid,
Monicar Hadid, Alive James, Jacqline
Jamts

From ST. KITTS Warren Tyson,
Wakefield Elliott
From ST. LUCIA—Theodora Alexander,

Calixite Alexander, Mary Phillips
DEPARTURES BY BWIA. ON
SATURDAY
For TRINIDAD—Alfred Mulcare, Edris
Chang Yit, Alicia Kong, Mavis Korig,
William Harris, Doris Barnwell, Leila
Sargeant, Warren Bennett, Maria Rojas,
Mercedes Rojas, iuis Fuentes, . Luisa
Madriz Maria Madriz, Marianelta Madriz,
Mireya Madriz, Elliott Reece, Stella

Reece
For GRENADA-—Edward. Hart, Norah
Hart, John Hart, Susasa Hart, Carmelo
Arino, Lucia Arino, Francisco Brandt,
Milagros Brandt, Edling Bjerkhamn,
Joan McKerness, Kathleen Rameay,
Thomas Vandijk, B. J A Vandijk,
Enka Vandijk, Margaret Finch, Paul
Vandijk
DEPARTURES BY BWIA. ON
SUNDAY
For TRINIDAD-—A Ryte, Thani,
Thani, G. Nicholls, P, Ince, 1. Harris,
S. King, R. Hardwidge, G. Adams, A
Frampton, ©. Thani, E. Mantilia, G
Mantifla, J. Perez, L. Thomas, S. Abreu,
Camacho, R. King, F. Hutson, J
hon, G, Pijpekamp, C, Pijpekamp,
J, Pijpekamp, W. Pijpekamp, Noreen

Vyfhuis, Barbara O'Neill, John O'Neill,
Arthur Marshall, Keith Fraser, Frank
Lobo, Phyllis Gonzales, Javee Young,
Morrell Bourne, Rosie Teikeira, Maria
D'Andrade, Col Joseph Connell, Ivy
Connell, , Maj Orville Waleott, Maj
John Griffith, Capt. Carl Neblett, Thornas
Roberts, Marcel Deverteuil, Geoffrey
Pilgrim, Milton Tucker, Alexander
Thompson, Charles Hayward, Hugh
Wooding, Daphne Wooding, Rita Lobo
For ST. LUCTA—Lionel King, Glad-
stone Haynes, Cynthia Evans, Clinton
Evans, Bertha Taylor, Hallam Massiah.
ARRIVALS BY E.W.LA.
From Trinidad
S. Boyce, C. Gill, B. Alleyne, M.

Alleyne, O. Cummins, M. Boyce, H, Gill,
M. Martinez, T. Camps Campins, J. Rap-
sey, D. Semple, E. Martin, V. Swafson,
C, Swanson, 8S. Swanson, I. Wilmer, J.
Widmer, G. Widmer, R. Valera, M. Val-
era, M,. Valera, R. Valera, G. Stevenson,
H,. Talbot, W. Wright,
From 8t, Vincent
Corbin Corbin, Rudolph Kirton.
From Grenada

Renwick, Eva Hagley,

From St. Kitts
Warren Tyson, Wakefield Elliott.
DEPARTURES BY B.W.LA.
For Puerto Rico

Anne

Sheila
Hagley.

Joan King, Catheline Bushell,
Skeete, Orrill Thompson.
For St. Vincent
Gertrude Lewis, Gladys
Samuel Cupid.
For Antigua
Walter Strisiver
For Martinique
Marie Cheneaux,
For Guadeloupe
William Lioyd-Jones,

Harold

Haynes,



RATES OF EXCHANGE

CANADA
65 2/10% pr. Cheques on
Bankers 63 2/10% pr.
Demand
Drafts 63.05% pr.
65 2/10% pr. Cable
63 7/10% pr Currency 61 7/10% pr
Coupons 61% pr,



Haliborange

The nicest way of taking
HALIBUT LIVER OIL

| Wade by ALLEN @ HANBURYS LTO., LONDOR

Sunrover Pays
First Visit

The S.S. Sunrover (4,373 tons
net,) paid her first visit to Bar-
bados from England yesterday
bringing general cargo from
Newport, Liverpool and Glasgow.

Beer, whiskey, cotton thread,
bottles were among the cargo,
she discharged here yesterday.
Swmrover also brought. down 12
passengers —- four of whom got
off here—and 423 bags of English
mail, ‘

Built as a aeroplane carrier,
Sunrover was converted since th
last war into « passenger-freiehter
and she has been chartered by
Saguenay Terminals Ltd. to run
between England and the West
Indies.

Sunrover is expected to leave
Barbados tomorrow for Trinidad.

She is consigned to Messrs.
Plantation Ltd.



Schooners Bring
Rice, Charcoal

Two thousand bags of rice
were among the cargo arriving
here yesterday by schooners call-
ing from other islands. The
Francis W. Smith brought the
supply from British Guiana along
with 500 bags of heavy charcoal,
five tons of firewood and 30
bunches of plantains.

Other schooners calling were
the Marea Henrietta from St.
Lucia, the Everdene from British
Guiana. They brought between
them over 1,000 bags of charcoal,
150 tons of firewood, 78 posts and
18 crates of fruit,

The schooners are consigned to
the Schooner Owners’ Associa-
tion.

Men Raid: Factories
For Scrap Metal

BECAUSE of the good price now
being paid for scrap metals, many
men have started to raid factories,
Inspector Bourne of the C.LD. told
the Barbados Advocate, “My De-
partment has been very active in
trying to put an end to these
larcenies”, he said.

On Friday night a squad of
Police arrested Herman Alleyne,
a shopkeeper of Hindsbury Road,
Beresford Smith of Martindales
Road and Allan Clarke, a watah-
man of Graggs Hill. The Police
tntercepted a motor lorry in which
they were conveying a quantity



of copper which had been stolen
from Joes River Factory, St.
Joseph, the same _ night, The

felony was detected before the
manager of the ‘factory knew of
the incident.

Other investigations carried out
by the C.I,D. men led to the arrest
of Oswald Small, alias “Hungry”
of Venture, St John and Rudolph
Howell of Nurse Land, Carrington
Village, St. Michael. They have
been charged with breaking and
entering buildings at Cliff Planta-
tion, St. John and Malvern, St.
Joseph and stealing quantities ‘
different metals,

The metal stolen from Cliff was
attached to machinery which will
be used in the coming crop season.

HEAVY SHOWERS FALL
ISLAND-WIDE

Heavy showers of rain, accom-
panied by occasional flashes of
Jightning and rolls of thunder, fell
isiand wide on Sunday with the
exception of St. Philip’s parish
which enjoyed a dry day.

St. Lucy and St. Andrew record-
ed the heaviest falls. Returns from
Belleplaine Police Station recorded
10 parts of rain in St, Andrew
from 6 am, to 6 p.m. yesterday
and 1.36 inches of rain from 6
p.m, yesterday until 6 a.m. this
morning. Over the same periods,
Crab Hill Police Station, St Lucy,
recorded 13 parts and 1.10 inches.

Throughout the day, the sky
was overcast. Churth attendances
were poor. In some_ parishes,
streets were floodéd and water
surrounded people’s homes,

Most of the parishes had the
heaviest fall-during the night. St.
George, St. Thomas, St. James and
St. John received more rain dur-
ing the day than during the night,

The rainfall returns from the
various police stdtions are as
follows;—

Central Police Station 12 parts,
District “A” 43 parts, District “B”
80 parts, District “D” 21 parts, Dis-
trict “E” 65 parts, District “F’ 98
parts, Holetown 34 parts, Four
Roads 10 parts, Bélleplaine 1.36
inches, Crab Hill 1,23 inches.





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et RR E-Ten

ee

ELECTION



OFFICERS |

AND CLERKS APPOINTED

The following persons have
been appointed by the Governor-
in-Executive Committee to be Re-
turning Officers and Filection
Clerks for the election of mem-
bers to serve in the General As-
sembly for the session 1951-54
ingaccordance with the provisions

the Représentation of the Peo-

(Misc@llaneous Provisions)
Act, 1951:—

Constituency of Bridgetown:—
Returning Officer: Gilbert Darn-
ley Bynoe, Esq.; Election Clerk:
Errol Colin Redman, Esq

Constitaency of St. Michael:—

Returning Officer: Captain Her-
bert Hadley Williams, M B-E.;
Election Clerk: Henry Oswald

Ramsay, Esq.

Constituency of Christ Church:
—Returning Officer: Harry St.
George Ward, Esq.; Election
Clerk: Francis Edwin Wood God-
dard, Esq.

Constituency of St, George:—
Returning Officer: William Armel
Yearwood, Esq.; Election Clerk:



Election Clerk: Pearson Samuel
Walter Scott, Esq,
Constituéncy of St. jJoum—

Barton Gittens
Election Clerk

Returning Officer:
Cheesman, Esq.;

Harold Malcolm Hamilton West,
Esq. ala
Constituency of St. Joseph:—

Returning Officer: James Colin
King, Election Clerk: Lloyd Ed-
ward Cave, Esq.

Constituericy of St. James:—
Peturning Officer: John Henry
Clifford Thorne, Esq.; Election
Clerk: Percy Hamilton Tarilton,
ith. on

Constituency of St. Thomas:—
Returning Officer: D A M.
Haynes, Esq.; Election Clerk:

John Reynold Emtage, Esq.

Constituency of St, Andrew:—
Returning Officer: Frederick Ar-
thur Ingram, Esq.; Election Clerk
Clarence Alan Skinner, Esq.

Constituency of St. Peter:—
Returning Officer; Cyril Amos
Thornton, Esq.; Election Clerk:

Douglas Hugh Adrien Johnson, Ceorge Seymour Corbin, Esq,

Esq. Constituency of St. Lucy:—

Returning Officer: Beresford Ev-

Constituency of St. Philip:— erton Barnett, BEsq.; Blection

Returning Officer: Major Orville Clerk: Handel Cameron Bowen
Frank Cardvell Walcott, E. D.; Esq.

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PAGE FOUR

BARBADOS #68 ADVOCATE

Gee ee Senlyp- Se ae

Printed by the Advocate Co., Ltd., Broad Bt., Bridgetewa



Tuesday, November 6,

EISEN HOWER

WHAT is the significance of General
Eisenhewer's visit to the United States ?
The Supreme Commander has not been
sitting idle in his headquarters in Paris.
He has been travelling extensively
throughout Europe seeing for himself
what preparations are being made for the
integration of the European Army.

But the Schuman and Pleven plans
depend on the ratification of European
Parliaments. The victory of Winston
Churchill in the English Elections gives
greater hopes for a tederal Europe than
did the isolationist Labour policy of Mr.
Attlee’s administration. It is possible
therefore, that fears as to Eisenhower’s
remaining in Europe might prove ground-
less. Those fears have however been ex-
pressed and General Eisenhower's visit to
the United States and his conversation
with Mr. Truman are worth more than
passing attention by those interested in
world affairs.

General Eisenhower's departure from
Europe to-day would cause alarm and
despondency throughout the world. It
would not be easy to find a successor who
could be so acceptable by Europeans and
whose personal reputation would so rapid-
ly inspire world confidence in the holder
of the office of Supreme Commander. But
the job at SHAPE is not more than ten per
cent, military. The rest is political, and
General Eisenhower is a soldier.

In addition to fears which are being
expressed in Europe, General Eisenhower,
like the rest of the world, must wonder
with anxiety what America’s policy in
Europe would become should a Republican
Administration under Senator Taft be
returned in‘the Presidential elections of
1951. Rather than risk such an eventual-
ity the General might well consider that
he could ‘best serve the interests of Euro-
pean integration by returning to the
United States and running for President
with very good chances of winning.

This in the long run would seem to be
the most satisfactory course to follow.
Because, it ig unlikely that any American
administration will continue to look with
favour on the indefinite presence in Europe
of six American divisions. But these are
critical days in Europe with the Russians
going full steam ahead in their “peace and
unity” campaign in Germany.

If the European army, as planned by the
experts, and the European parliament to
give administrative support can be formed
before Eisenhower's possible departure
from Europe, then the position might be
less depressing. But can all this be done
before March which is the time that Gen-
eral Eisenhower must he in the United
States if he is going to run for President ?

The General's visit to the United States
may be a normal visit to report back to
President Truman, but it comes at a time
when speculaticn as to his own future in
Europe ts being made by well-informed
quarters.!..Me rest of the world will tol-
low wiin interest and anxiety any chacge
in the Genrral’s status during these critical
inonths.

From The “TIMES”
Oct. 29. 1951

THE appointment of Lord Ismay as Sec-
retary of State for Commonwealth Rela-
tions and of Mr. Oliver Lyttelton one of
the senior members of the Conservative
Party, as Colonial Secretary, is an indica-
tion of the importance which Mr, Church-
ill attaches to these posts... . . The Colon-
ies are in urgent need of ‘development.
The good intentions of the Labour Gov-
ernment in this matter were too often
baulked by their failure to ensure that
their plans were sound in conception and
in execution. Mr. Lyttelton’s practical ex-
perience should enable him to beware of
this mistake : he should also find it easier
than a Labour Minister would to encour-
age private investment in colonial develop-
ment: schemes.

—







An authoritative life of Admiral
Beatty has long been needed, Rear
Admiral Chalmers possesses high
qualification for the task of
writing it.

He has been given full access to
Beatty's. private papers. He was
navigating officer in Beatty’s flag-

Nelson.





He rose to the top with
extraordinary speed.

admit that hitherto insufficient at-
tention has been paid to his Scout
education,

As Island Scout Commissioner
I have already addressed myself

The Broadcast Address made by Major
J —. Griffith, island Commissioner on
Fridsy, 2nd November, 195)

THE Boy Scout Movement in

3arbados reaches its 40:h Mile-
stone as its birthdays are referred
to, early next year when it is
hoped appropriate celebration

vill take place.

Today, after 39% years one yet
hears the now time-honoured
Jament that all is not well with
Scouting. One deplores the small-
ness in numbers, the mediocrity in
standard. The question ig often
asked why canno. the Boy Scouts
do more for themselves, why can-

not they equal the sister Move-
ment in numbers, in smartness
and in ability to raise large sums
of money?

Few stop to zonsiaer whut ine
Boy Seev. Movement really is;
what are its Aims and Objects and
how it sets about to achieve these.

My purpose in *naking this
broadcast through the kind offices
of Reditfusion is to answer these
ques.ions, to justify our existence
and to try to show the Barbados
public wny Scouting should be
supported from all angles.

It is truly amazing how little
the average member of the public
knows about ihe Movement. \

to Scouters on the subject and to-
night and on a few subsequent
oceasions I propose enlightening
the public on many aspects of
Scouting»

At the outset I would emphasize
that as an Organisation the Boy
Scout Movement is not in competi-
tion with other organisations for
pride of place; it does not seek to
belittle or oppose any organisa-
tion having for its purpose the
uplifting of youth; it strives to
promote the healthiest relation-
ships with all youth bodies. Ap-
parently it suffers in comparison
with them all.

by slancuics vf compar.son with
popuiauon tne number On Wie rust
as disclosed py tne recent Census
4S lamentaply pelow what it snowia
oe, imperial mMeaaquarvers COli~
siders .hat tne proporuon vot
scouts to population snould be 100
to 5,uUU, 50 Lnat with our popula-
tion at approximately 210,vlWu our
Scouts suould be, especially after
39 years, no less than 4,200. What
a aitferent piace our island would
be if for the past 10 or 15 years
4,000 of its boys were boy Scouts
—boys living or at least striving
to live the Scour lite. And what is
the, Scout life? The answer is
the Christian life, the life Our
Lord and Saviour came 2,000
years ago to teach mankind to
practice. There will always be
some bad’ people in the world—
by bad I mean, dishonest, un-
reliable, immoral, selfish, wicked.
This has been the case since
Creation. Satan once occupied a
lace im heaven; amongst Our
rd’s chosen few was an arch-
traitor. These ugly spots, how-
ever, in the general scheme of
things must not lead us away
from the real purpose of life.

There are nue a few persons in
all walks of life who regard
Scouting as another of those more
or less worthy efforts of well
meaning persons to help the poor
and unfor.unate; others think it a
splendid means of putting an end
to petty larceny and general bad
behaviour in a_ certain class,
Scouting ig nothing of the sort.
Our Founder himself said “Scou:-
fing is not a charity organisation
run by people in society for the
benefit of the poor children.”
Scouting is a way of life. It is a
way made very attractive, almost
alluring, so that those who would
walk in it may be better en-
couraged to preserve and not yield
too easily to the many temptations





with which the average christian
‘minded person is beset,
You get a child to take a nasty

pill by coating it with sugar, not
so much to deceive it (though a
deception it may be) but really
because we know it is good for
the child. So, why not make it
palatable to secure the end — the
hetith of the child?

Tne Chief Executive Commis-
sioner at Imperiai Heaaquar.ers
ih closing his Annual Report for
iuSt year says “Many boys have
never been brought to realise the
tull meaning of Scouting. The
small boy wno joins a Cub Pack
or a Scout Troop comes to get
fun and advenure, and all too
otten many never get beyond this
stage”—how applicable to Barba-
dos — he goes on “It is our
responsibility as Scouters, through
our example, to bring all our
Scouts to the realisation that
Scouting is indeed an aaventure—
the greatest of adventures — the
adventure of living under the
guidance of God.” What an ad-
veniure for these days of unrest,
of suspicion, of mistrust, of in-
stability, of unselfishness and
greed.

I am to show you how Scouting
sets out bovs on this adventure.

Scouting aims at formation and
development for Character, I read
in the newspaper a few days ago
that the family is the very element
of the community. What makes
up a family? A number of ->-
dividuals; and if those individuals
are not units of character then as
an element of the community fhe
family is worthless.

Lord Baden-Powell in another
of his wise sayings ac.ises that
we should not let the technical
outweigh the normal. Our Methods,
of which I shall speak on another
occasion, are not the end but the
means. He says, “The end is
character, character with a pur-
pose, and that purpose, that the
next generation be sane in an in-
sane world, and develop the
higher realisation of SERVICE,
the active service of Love and
Duty to God and neighbour.”

Is such an. adventure to be
confined to any one class or race?
Scouting, its Aims, Objec.s and
Methods, has fired the imagination
of the whole world, 47 odd nations
have embraced Scouting. Every
individual without exception
should be and must be helped to
be a person of charac.er—a_per-
son with high moral principles, a
person that can be depended upon
to say the right thing and do the
right thing under all circum-
stances, a person in whom there
is no petiiness of feeling, nasty
prejudices, a person tolerant of
the feelings and opinions of others,
a person who loves his fellow man
because, like himself, he is made
in the likeness and image of God.

Such persons are to be found in
all strata of society. Why then
the insistence in Barbados on
Scouling for the poor. Scouting
is also for the rich.

It would appear that parents are
not as solicitous of their children’s
moral welfare as they are of their
material. Today the emphasis is
on Certificates not Character,

When | sat my Cambridge Senior
Exam. some years ago I ex-
perienced the disgust of seeing a
boy in front of me answering his
questions from books and leaves
he held on his knees; I saw another
boy pass entire sheets of work to
a friend a few seats behind. I
have been told that these practices
have not been abandoned. Should
it be any wonder if such boys in
later years become thieves, not
only thieves of property but of
their employers’ time,

Can we afford to sacrifice char-
acter for certificates?

What is Scouting? There are
many answers but when analysed



Sir Gorell Barnes

LONDON, Oct, 1951.

In charge of the African sec-
tion of the Colonial Office at the
end of the year, when Mr. A. B.
Cohen leaves to become Governor
of Uganda will be 42-year-old Mr.
W. L. Gorell Barnes, C.M.G., son
of the late Sir Frederick Gorell
Barnes and of Lady Barnes.

Though a comparative new-boy
in the Colonial Office—he was
first ap, potent to it in February,
1948— Gorell Barnes is a man
with extensive overseas experi-
ence, gained chiefly with the For-
eign Office. During World War
JI. and since then he has been
brought into close contact with
the central economic planning
machinery of H.M.G., and it is for
his work in the economic field
that he has been chiefly distin-

He was a



guished since entering the Colo-
nial Office.

He was in charge at the moment
of the Economic, Finance Statis-
tics and Supplies departments of
the Colonial Office.

His earliest visit to the Colo-
nies, following his appointment as
an Assistant Under-Secretary, was
in July, 1948. Christmas 1949,
to Nigeria and the Gold Coast —
found him in the West Indies,
where he spent two months tour-
ing. In the latter part of 1950,
he spent six to seven weeks in
Nigeria and the Gold Coast for a
East Africa. He was back in
short visit ‘earlier this year.

During each of these visits he
has discussed with people on the
spot questions arising in connec-



Poseur? Dare-devil? |
The Astonishing Beatty

“By ROBERT BLAKE.

He defends
ground that the errors which oc-

BARBADOS ADVOCATE

The Scout Movement | AFTER ALL

they mean the same thing. Scout- |
ing is a way of life.
Founder says “Is a school of citi~
zenship through woodcraft.”

Scouting can be divided into four
heads — CHARACTER, develop-

ment, resourcefulness, self-reli-
ance, ene pluck, and
persist ICRAFTS, ‘10 |
elemen re a belie and possivly i

of a future career; PUBLEC SER-
VICE, specialisation

and personal hygiene. And really
there is nothing new in all this.
Long ago Plato described it a:
education in virtue from youth
upwards, which makes a man pas-
sionately desire to be the perfect
citizen, and teaches him how
rightly to rule and how to obey.’

Scouting in itself is not a new
form of education but it helps
Education. In spite of all the
efforts of their teachers childre 1
have insufficient opportunity of
gaining character, health or enjoy-
ment of life in school; Scoutin
helps. In Scouting the boy is led
to acquire qualities of self-relianc :
and resource, health and energy,
technical skill and handicraft an
a sense of service to the com-~
munity. Seouting gives him
qualities which enable him t
start in life with a reasonabl
chance of sucess,

Scoutung is not a .eugion but it
helps the Church. Every Scout is
supposed to belong to some de-
nomination and to attend its
services. Teaching religion 1
poys is much a matter of individ
ual and personal contact, hence
the chief factor in influencing boys
is the personal example of the
Scouter. Scouting is based on th
Promise and the Law and the
Promise involves. Duty to Goa
Every Scouter should be an activ
member of a church.

Scouting is not a Business but
helps busimess. The objective 0
Scouting is good citizenship. Th
is achieved by methods whicl
while appealing to the boy uncon
sciously help him to acquire rig’
habits of conduct, the chief beins
willing and efficient. service for
other people. Having no barrier
of race , colour, creed or religion
Scouting has already shown tha‘
what is considered impossible is
not by any means so — th
establishment of a social. system
built on harmony and goodwil
between individual and individusl
race and race, nation and nation
Therefore the community shoulc
show its appreciation of this b
definite acts of financial sympathy

1 again quote the Founde
“There can be no more profitable
investment of money than to tak«
a share in carrying out the devel-
opment of a Movement whict
provides a balanced system 0’
education, physically, mentally
morally, and spiritually, to supple
ment in the matter of CHARAC
TER the ordinary book-learnin
of the schools.”

In another broadcast I hope tr
deal with Scout Methods and the
Scout Uniform, with some of u
a rather controversial subject.

I close this with a word on ou;
immediate need, Our need today
is for leaders, for persons who are
willing to find time to practise the
methods which Scouting uses t
achieve its objective — Scout-
masters for persons to find time
to assist these Scoutmasters by
relieving them of the business enc
of Scouting, financing the Troop—,
lay people to act as secretaries
treasurers, members of commit-
tees; for persons to find time, tc
assist these Scoutmasters by ‘th-
structing in special subjects—lIn-
structors and Examiners. You see
heaw everybody can help, not onl)
the Scoutmasters, but you, mem-
bers of the community. The boys
are there and they will come
they want to be manly and true a
heart; they want to be led arig):
Where are the leaders and the
helpers? I ask “Is the standarc
Teaured too high?"

tion with the different departments
for which he is responsible.

Educated at Marlborough Col-
lege and Pembroke College, Cam-,
bridge, Mr. Gorell Barnes joinec
the Foreign Office in 1932 and
served successfully at H.M. Em-
bassies in Bagdad and Lisbon. At
the outset of war he was seconded
to the Export Credits Guarantee
Department and then to the War
Cabinet Offices. From 1942 he was
Personal Assistant to the Lord
President of the Council (first Sir
John Anderson and then Mr.
Attlee.) In 1945 he was trans-
ferred to the Treasury (Defence
Materials Division) and in the fol-
lowing year he became the Prime
Minister’s Personal Assistant, an
appointment he held till he went
to the Colonial Office.

Beatty on the

Scouting, the |

in different |
forms of usefulness for others and |
HEALTH, physical development |

























ship at the Battle of Jutland, He
was Beatty’; personal friend,

Such a combination’ of docu-

mentary, private and professional
knowledge can scarcely fail te
produce. a valuable graphy.
Admiral Chalmers’s book* will be
widely read not only by student?
of naval history but by many
others to whom the name of Beatty
has become both a symbol and a
legend.

A Second Nelson ?

Was Beatty a second Nelson or
was he merely a brave but fool-
tardy commander who_ only
escaped disaster through luck and
the errors cf his enemies? Admiral
Chalmers naturally inclines to the
former view.





“It would be invidious to
stretch the comparison too far,”
he writes, “but it can be truly
said that Nelson and Beatty each
in his day symbolised to the
people of all nations the

fighting
spirit of the British '
Certainly Beatty

the qualities which disting he

Navy

had many of

captain at 29, an Admiral at 38.

Like Nelson he possessed un-
limited personal courage, like
Nelson he was a_ flamboyant
personality with more than a rouch
of the poseur (everyone remem-
bere the rakish angie of his hat).

Like Nelson, too, he _ fell
passionately in love with a married
woman; but it is not so clear that
he possessed the genius of a
Nelson. “He certainly did not
achieve the same success. The
most important battles in Beatty’s
career were those of the Dogger
Bank and Jutland, At both Beatty
commanded the battle cruisers
and his task was of paramount
importance; but the Dogger Bank
was disappointing and inconclusive
while Jutland must be regarded as
a clear defeat.

The Big Muddle

Both battles, especially Jutland,
have been the subject of protracted
and acrimonious dispute, and the
part played by Beatty is far more
controversial than would appear
from Admiral Chalmers’s account

curred were due to faulty signals
and lay outside Beatty’s control,
And that if Beatty’s intentions had
been carried out all would have
been well.

It is no doubt true that muddle
over communications had disas-
trous results at certain moments.

At the Dogger Bank, for exam-
ple, Beatty’s cruisers, owing to a
misunderstanding, left one of the
German ships completely un-
marked and free to fire without
disturbance. Even more serious,
an ambiguous signal from Beatty
caused his second-in-command,
Admiral Moore, to break off from
the pursuit at the very moment
when victory seemed certain.

But surely this was Beatty’s
iault, not Admiral Moore's; and
when we find exactly the same
errors occurring at Jutland 18
months later we begin to wonder
if bad luck alone can explain
Beatty’s misfortunes,
Same Again
again Beatty’s
@ On Page 7.



He clashed with Churchill.
He married a divorced heir-
ess. He set strategists argu-
ing for a generation. To-day
comes the story of Britain's
most controversial sailor: the
dark background behind the

Once
facade of success.

cruisers



TUESDAY, NOVEMBER 6, 1951














oo
\
NOW IN STOCK
PLANTATION & FACTORY

THAT



LABOUR SHEETS
‘You Who've )
Toiled Cad Years Call and Select Early from

Against The Taunts

v
» ADVOCATE STATIONERY.
By WILLIAM BARKLEY t







THIS new House is to an astonishing
extent the mixture as before. Many of the
new winners are former losers. The election

givs us singularly little new blood, e of

But, mercifully, at least when the pudding : Many Uses
was stirred the basin was left facing the :
opposite way.. From my Gallery seat front- : &



ing the Government I shall not see so many
faces from which I have the desire to avert
the eye:

The Socialists will be beneath me.

It will be a thrill to see Churchill enter
on the right of the Chair as Prime Minister.

These 18 months he has stood the taunts
of Shinwell and other Socialists that he
always acted as if he were Prime Minister.
It was not his fault.

He did not have any competition in appear-
ance.

Who'll talk beside him from the Front
Bench ? It is a vital question. So many
young and able thrusters sat behind him in
Opposition that they can hardly all be suited
to office.

But they all think themselves suitable:
Boyd-Carpenter, Peter Thorneycroft, David
Eccles, Antony Head, Walker-Smith, Nigel
Birch — a host of “youngsters” as politicians
age have toiled six years in the wilderness
and look now for their reward.



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ROOM FOR ALL
There would be ill-will if Churchill were

ne eI.

disposed to bring in outsiders in the interest Fe
of broadly basing his Government to their
exclusion.

They will not be disposed to accept sacri-
fice in the cause of face to such oldsters as
John Anderson or Archibald Sinclair, who
might reach office via the Lords.

But, as it happens, Churchill inherits, if he
zares to maintain, a Government machine ‘ e
which the Socialists greatly expanded, He
aas 60 or 70 places to allot. So maybe it ) ie
will be the case of “Will there be beds for DA COSTA & Co., Ltd. ments
all who come? Yea, beds for all.”

Churchill has not fully achieved the “firm
and stable” Imajority he requjested of the
people.

It is assumed he will at once set about
nereasing it by 12 with a Bill to restore the
University seats. He is entitled to say he has

On Sale at Your Druggist







avery moral right to do it. He gave notice. The Elegance
Moreover, as we saw last spring, the +
Socialist Government would not have lasted of apestry

a month on a vote if it had not first destroyed
these seats.

But be sure the Socialists will fight the
3ill night and day. It will be in Churchill
‘anguage the first “main crunch” of Opposi-
‘tion. Possibly embarrassment may arise
whether this is the best use to be made of the
time available.

UNSCRAMBLING

Next battle will be the unscrambling of
Messrs. Strauss and Hardie’s Nationalised
steel Corporation. The new chairman of the
Kitchen Committee should be able to show
a profit on 3 am. snacks and breakfasts.
some barristers will wish they had failed of
alection. No freedom for them to go on cir-
cuit.

One comfort is that the Liberal nuisance
is abated. Even the small Tory majority
offers no scope for the Clement Davies bal-
ancing act. Liberals must really now not
only be dead but know it, if a Scotsman is
permitted an Irishism, Note that the last
remnants of the Asquith-Lloyd George Lib-
eral feud which split the party have van-
ished from the mortal scene. Not all
Churchill’s horses could put Lady Vi back.

He was more fortunate when like the
Colossus he is he bestrode this gulf over-|
night from the Asquith Huddersfield plat-
form to the Newcastle LI.G. platform. But
when I see Gwilym called Liberal-Conserva-
tive and one thing or another I repeat that
his election address called him only “The|)
Official Conservative,” and Tory he is to me.

IF ONLY—’ |;

Lady Megan’s is among the familiar faccs})
10w involuntarily absent. She tock impish!
oleasure in teasing Churchill when he asked: i
her support. She voted Socialist to keep er
Socialists in power.

If only she had been done with it and|
worn the party label she would be in the,
new House. Anglesey would have seen her
again had she but angled less.

A strenuous time will be had by all at|
Westminster. It is unfortunate that the
House:is so nearly divided in half, because I |

Gorgeous

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do not believe that this represents the feel-|

ing of the nation.
I feel that the Bevan mentality is much

like the old I.L.P. and in a small permanent

minority of the people’s outlook.

Perhaps in Opposition the large numbers

bowl of
of moderate, middle-of-the-way men in thc ates OATFLAKES



which they tamely surrendered when in
power.
Somehow in the nation’s distress the un-
derlying unities will emerge which Mr. eal
ston Churchill is best of us all to detect and
to rally. {

—L.E.S

Socialist Party will exert the influence | 24 per lb.



GODDARD'S FOR BEST siviC E tT





TUESDAY, NOVEMBER

6, 1951



CONSIDER FEDERATION CAREFULLY

Adams

Warns

It is cur bounden duty to go carefully into the proposed

sections of this constitution
other constitutions and state
Federal Structure before we

and examine it in the light of
what we feel ought to be in the
go in, the Leader of the House,

Mr. G. H. Adams said yesterday when the House of Assem-
bly were discussing the proposed constitution of a Feder-

ated West Indies.

This constitution is proposed in
the British Caribbean Standing
Closer Association’s Report.

The House passed the follow-
ing Address to the Governor on
the Report: —

The House of Assembly repeats
its acceptance of the principles of
establishing a Federal Govern-
ment of the British West Indies,
and accepts the proposals of the
British Caribbean Standing Closer
Association Committee’s Report
as a basis for discussion of the
form which the. proposed Gov-

ernment’s Constitution should
take.
2. The House, however, does

not accept in their entirety the
detailed proposals of that Report,
and will in due course forward
to Your Excellency its suggestions
for the amendment of some of
these proposals.

3. The House is convinced of
the advantages to be gained from
a Unification of the Public Ser-
vices in the British Caribbean
Area and therefore agree in gen-
eral with the “Holmes” Report on
this subject.

Comparisons

Mr. R. G. Mapp who was
speaking on the last occasion when
the discussion was adjourned,
again made comparisons between
the Australian federation and that
proposed for the West Indies. He
repeated that the Australian fed-
cration was composed of a group
of States which had _ reached
constitutional advancement while
the islands of the West Indies had
enly reached various stages of
constitutional development. The
whole proposal was therefore
weak, to his mind, because of this
fact.

Another point he had referred
to, he reminded, was that whereas
in Australia the senate was
elected, in the proposals for the
West Indies the senate would be
nominated. It was a point on
which he was not strong.

He, however, expressed views
showing that he was in favour
of an elected senate as members
would then be representing the
wishes of the people.

Mr. Mapp advised that they
put forward their views clearly
and strongly about the sugges-
tions in the report. Let them say
whether or not they disapproved
of these suggestions.

‘ Capable West Indians

Speaking of the proposed Coun-
cil of State, He said: “I think
we will all admit that the West
Indies have people capable of
running our own Council of State
rather than the nominated and
official members as proposed.

Of the representatives of Bar-
bados for the General Assembly,
he said: “If in a General As-
sembly any federation our
representatives have less oppor-
tunity to plan effectively for the
people of Barbados than they do
now, I feel that rather than the
four members proposed we sheuld
agree to two.”

or

Closer Unien

Mr. Wilkinson (E) said that
the question of federation was a
very big and vital one. Some
months ago, he felt that the
principle of federation was good
for the West Indies. But on
second thought, he felt that
“closer union” should have come
first. ,

Barbadians, he said, could
boast of a very good constitution
and they leoked over their own
affairs yery much more than the
people of the other colonies of
the British West Indies, And so
they should see that they did not
give up some of the authority
they had.

Tt did seem strange to him that
they should pledge themselves to
any future policy on that very big
question. It was a question that
called for a great deal of consid-
eration and he was not proposing
to commit himself until he was
satisfied that they were in no
worse position than they were
in then.

Expenditure would be great
and they must bear in mind that





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they would have to bear their
percentage of the expenditure.
More Detail

He was not saying that they
were not ripe for federation as
laid down by Sir Hubert Rance
but closer union should be en-
couraged as a step towards fed-
eration and give them the time
to go into more detail and under-
stand better what they were go-
ing to do. There had been a
change in England as far as gov-
ernment was concerned. Again
they did not know what effect
that would have.

The House was dying the next
day and was letting the Govern-
ment know that although they
were in favour of federation,
they were not going to pledge
themselves to agree to the sug-
gestions made by Sir Hubert
Rance.

Mr. Lewis (L) said that he did
not intend adding to the debate,
but he had got up to raise a point
of view that he had not yet
heard. While they too desired
federation—because unity was
strength—they seemed not to see
with a clear cut view what kind
of federation they wanted.

Travel

He felt that before federation,
they should have a British West
{ndies Aeroplane service subsi-
dized by each Government so
that people of the colonies would
have the privilege of going
around and knowing each other.
School children would have the
opportunity to mix. There should
also be a_ British West Indies
Steamship service.

He felt that the fact that Bar-
bados had a_ better constitution
than the other islands—better
educational standard, a people
more politically awakened—was
going to make it hard for Barba-
dos to fit into the scheme.

Tihey were federating princi-
pally because they wanted to
become strong. And two colonies
in the proposed federal area were
unable to make up their minds.
One colony seemed to think that
it had a continental destiny and
the other was becoming aware of
what the belief of having a con-
tinenta) destiny meant,

In order to utilise the wide
open space of British Honduras,
they would either have had to
get an extremely big gift or
embark on a loan that would ruin
the entire scheme,

He did not feel that the people
of the colonies would be satisfied
to have a nominated chamber
deciding issues in which they
would be involved,

He felt that they should have
nothing to do with the report.

Mr. G. H. Adams said that it
was not possible for the debate
to take place earlier.

He did not think they could do
more than speak in general terms
as to what they felt about the re-
port in as much as there Was
bound to be a difference in the
new House—to a greater or less-
er degree.

“In as much as TI signed this
report,” he said, “I have to make
my position clear.”

The Standing Closer Associa-
tion Committee had __ several
meetings but the representatives
of Barbados, unfortunately were
not present throughout the whole
of these -neet’ igs. A_ sort of
rough and ready procedure was
laid down, the main thing being
that their proceedings were to be
private,

Secret

This was chiefly because a de-
cision arrived at one meeting
might have been modified at an-

other meeting and the public
might be given the impression
that members were shifting in

their views. To a great extent it
was felt too that it was not un-
reasonable to foilow the practice
of the founders of the American
Constitution. Most historians
have regretted that their know-
ledge of what took place at the
convention that produced the
American Constitution was con-
fined to the notes and diaries of
two or three of the representa-
tives in as much as their meetings
were in secret and their proceed-
ings burnt at the end of their
sessions.





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In The House
Yesterday

WHEN the House of Assembly
met yesterds), Mr. Adams laid
the

The
Forms)

following papers :—
Quarries
Regulations,

(Miscellaneous
1951. Quart-






ment of Money
September, 1951.

The House passed a Resolution

for 84,420 for cost of living allow-
ance to the Official Reporters, Ex.
eratia fratuity to the widew of
Mr. E. A. Maynard, etc.
— The House agreed to amend-
ments from the Other Place in
connection with certain Bills
among these were the amend-
ments to the Bill to make pro-
vision for the protection of wages
of workers, and the amendments
to the Bill to make prevision for
the execution of works necessary
lo prevent and contre! flooding
and inundations caused by ex-~-
cessive rains and by high tides
and by reasén of the low level
of various places, causing ineon-
venience to persons and injury to
health aud property.

The House adjourned
day at 2.20 p.m.



until to-



Hon. H, A Cuke and himself
had endeavoured to put. their
point of view as they saw it and
eventually the report ‘was pro-
duced.

“While I subscribed to the view
that our proceedings were: to be
secret and confidential, on the
other hand, when ‘the report
came to be signed, I made it quite
clear that there were points in it
with which I did not agree and
hat I was going to write a mi-
nority report.

“Had I proceeded in
that mincrity report, I
think thot this would
sean the Lich. o2 day.”

They of Barbados were second
to none in the West Indies in
believing in the principles of
Federation in the sense that fed-
erated units could speak more
effectively in political and econo-
mical matters than if they were
separate units.

Not Bound By It

When it came to the signing of
this report, there were some
things in it to which he did not
agree and he did not consider
that they should sign a comprom-
ise report and be bound by it. If
it were necessary to sign the re-
port before breaking up, he
meant to do so with the reserva-
tion that he would not be bound
by anything in that report with
which he disagreed and with
which he knew members of the
Barbados House would disagree.

“I nave even wondered,” he
said, ‘whether I made an error in
not writing a minority report,
But it was to avoid postponing
consideration of Federation that
I agreed.”

He said they all knew how dear
to them a constitution was which
really made a reality of self Gov-
ernment, They knew what it
meant to them who had known
what it was to have no restraining
influence like the reserve powers
of a Governor,

Wien they saw proposed, a
constitution which would put the
Federal Government in a position
of not being really masters of
their destiny they hesitated and
had ,to ask themselves whether
the advantages to be gained were
so considerable as to outweigh
the freedom which they had in
their constitution,

writing
do not
ever have

Agree With Principle

They might all agree to the
principle, but not to everything
in the Report. It was unreason-
able to assume that the West
Indians were the wisest people
that God ever made and that 16
cr 18 of them could get together
and draft a Resolution that would
reach with wholehearted agree-
ment. Never in the history of the
world had people come together
from separate states, even if they
were plenipotentiary, and draft
a Resolution that was accepted by
the several states.

Even at the risk of seeming to
be insular, he would say that
Trinidad did not act altogether in
the interest of Federation when
\hey took the stand they took in
trying to bulldoze every colony in
accepting what they wanted.

Trinidad Annoyed
He said he did not want to say
things which would cause friction
to other colonies who believed
that Barbados always thought
itself superior to the other islands



BARBADOS

in the West Indies. But was it
not peculiar that the. American
delegates got together, quarrelled.
made a compromise report and
then many states repudiated their
delegates when they went. back
bame, for agreeing with certain
things which they did noty feel
were advantageous to them, Yet
the colony of Trimidad . felt
annoyed that all the others, iad
not swallowed the Report.

“So I am saying very deliber-

ately that those colonies which
thought that Barbados was a
stumbling block were not doing
the cause of Federation any
good, he said.

For 300 years they had had
their representative system and
maybe it was because of their
British connections that they

were blinded to the exigences of
that system and did not see the
disadvantages of it.

It was better not to have a writ-
ten constitution to which you had
to stick to every comma, semi-
colon and full stop. The American
Supreme Court had gone so far

as to claim the right to say
whether an amendment of the
constitution was unconstitutional

itself. Therefore they were liable
to find themselves being confined
for a generation.

Some lawyers who practised
the Privy Courts made a lot
money over the interpretation
the Constitution, he said
_ No colony should pass that in
its er.tirety without careful consid-
eration, So far Barbados and
Jamaica were the only ones that
sent the matter to a Select Com-
mittee,

U.K. Government Anxious

“The British Government with-
out any intention of forcing it
down their throats, were a little
anxious a little while ago:to know
what our attitude would be,” he
said,

“They are anxious to see Fed-
eration, but they are anxious t
see that it should come from. us
and that they should not seem to
be pushing it in one direction or
another.”

He said that another thing that
made him sound his warning was
the fact that they had,a Con-
servative Government in Great
Britain,

in
of
of

it was perfectiy true that they
did not have the money to’ pro-
vide their own army or navy and
they could well say that defence
and foreign policy were imperial
matters,

Those who had said .that the
proposed Government was not
much more than a glorified Crown
Colony were not far wrong.

He said that the Imperial Gov-
ernment would have jurisdiction
to legislate all matters of financial
stability and that was a serious
matter. Matters of that sort would
make a Barbadian hesit:/.e before
he agreed with Federation. On
the other hand the British Gov-
ernment would have to make some
sort of financial advancement
whereby they could begin.

To some extent one would ex-
pect the British Government if
they were to lend money, to make
some stipulations,

Lest it be thought that he was
not in favour of Federation, he
would say that if they were going
to get an economic Federation, let
them get it by all means.

“Our Constitution would be
giving up a lot if we, for the first
time in our lives,” he said, “have
to be run by a Constitution that
puts a lot of power in the hands
of the Governor.”

Commerce Chamber Battle

After the Leeward and Wind-
ward islands’ election, the signs of
the time pointed to the danger of
their coming into a Federation and
having to fight the old anti-Cham-
ber of Commerce battle all over
again. As things were at the
present moment, if Trinided were
going to have the capital estab-
lished there, it looked as if they
would be run by associated Cham-
bers of Commerce in the West
Indies and he did not agree—no
matter how insular he might be

accused of being—and they as
Barbadians and West Indians
should avoid that, The whole

essence of progressive movement
throughout the British Empire
was to get away from that. In
Barbados they had got away from
that. Other colonies were show-
ing signs of getting away from it.

“After years of fighting and get-
ting away from this in Barbados,”
he said, “are we to begin all over
again on a bigger scale to fight
the Sugar Producers Association.”

He knew that people would say
it was a very narrow way of
looking at things. Some
feel that no matter what Govern-
ment was in power they showtd








NAMES

( Coonsiulel >

SHIRTS TIES PYJAMAS



!
that mean a lot in Shirts |
CONSULATE SHIRTS with Trubenised

Collars attached. White self colours,

Pin Stripes and end-and-end Poplin.
Prices : $8.40, $8.77, $8.54, $8.73 & $9.11

VAN HEUSEN SHIRTS, Turbenised collar
attached. White and Cream,

Prices : ....



... $8.11, $8.60 and $9.34

CONSULATE PYJAMAS in self colours

and Striped Poplins.

$10.99, $11.55, $12.74, $13.93, $15.31

CAVE SHEPHERD & CO. LTD.

10, 11, 12 & 13



Broad Street



'

Sizes 36 to 46 ins.
}
!

ADVOCATE



have Federation He could not
subseribe to that. That was say-
ing that so long as there was Fed-
eration, even if they had a Gov-
ernment of the extreme right, they
should accept the Government of
the extreme right.

Socialist Commonwealth

“I think. that we shoul: be con-
vinced,” he said, “thai th. only
hope 1a, tne building of a West
Indian Nation is to have a Social-
ist commonwealth, Our only nope
of salvation if we want to avoid

the current strife is to aim at
establishing a socialist Govern-
ment.”

aven if he might be accused of
icoking at one political faith rath-
ér than federation, he would say
that.

In 1944, he said, Russia was a
wonderful place. In the same year
che freedom of the individual was
preached on the house tops all
over the world. Today they were
being told that the salvation of
the world rested only in the big
business and the Conservative
Government

“It is our bounden duty to go
earefully into the proposed sec-
tions of this constitution and ex-
amine it in the light of other con-
stitutions, and to state what we
feel we ought to be in the Fed-
veral structure before we go in,”
he said.

He said that he had resisted so
far from replying to Mr. Hannays
of Trinidad. Mr, Hannays ought
to have been ashamed to have
said what he said,

Mr. Hannays had said that far
from the Labourite (Mr. Adams)
being opposed to it, he was the
first that had signed it.

He had signed it first because
he was leaving by an early plane.
It was very dishonest of Mr. Han-
navs to suggest that he (Mr.
Adams) had rushed to sign it
Mr, Hannays knew like the other
members of the committee that
he was going to adopt the attitude
he was adopting then.

The Address was then passed



Harbour Log

IN CARLISLE BAY

Sch. Cyril E. Smith, Seh. Mary E
earoline, Seh. Sunshine R., Sch. Lydia
Adina’ S., Seh, Mol), N. Jones, M.V
Jenkins Roberts, M.V. T. B. Radar
Seh Marion Belle Wolfe, Yoeht
Feskadee, Yacht Marsaltese, M.V
Charles A MadcLaan, Sch, Franklyn
D. R., Sch. Posaline M., Sch. Lucille

M. Smith, Sch. Gardenia W
ARRIVALS

Schooner Everdene, 68 tonsa net, Copt

Phillips, from British Gutana

5.8. Sunrover, 4,373 tons net, Capt
MeVicar, from Glasgow

M.V. Cc. Lb. M. Tannis, 41 tons net,

Capt Tihnis, from St. Vinecnt
Schooner Frances W. Smith,
net, Capt Hassell, from British Guiana
Schooner Marea Henrietta, 43 tons net,
Capt. Selby, from St. Lucia
DEPARTURES

Alcoa Pointer, 3,931
Olestad, for St. John

74 tons

8.s
Capt

tons net,

PASSENGERS ARRIVING FROM
GLASGOW YESTERDAY BY THE
8.8. SUNROVER WERE:

Band, Band, Band and Lawson

On Murder Charge

Carlton Brewster, a 23-year-old
labourer of Bank Hall, St, Michael
yesterday appeared before a Dis-
trict “A” Police Magistrate charged
with the murder of Norma Has-
well on September 7. ‘

He was remanded until Novem~
ber 12,

Died Suddenly





Donald Brathwaite of Chase
Land, Carrington’s Village, St
Michael, ‘died suddenly at hig

home about 2.30 p.m. yesterday.
His body was removed to the
Public Mortuary and a post mor
tem will be performed to-day.

CONDITION OF EVA
PERON KEPT SECRET

BUENOS AIRES, Nov. 5.
Official secrecy veiled the con-
cition Monday of Mrs. Juan Peron
wife of Argentinas’ President,
who entered hospital Saturday to
undergo an operation “within 24
hours.”

Huge crowds jammed __ th:
street outside the hospitsl in
suburban Avellanda for th

second day in a row but Jate i

would | the day no information had bee 1

made public. —U.P.

PURINA

H. Jason Jones &



‘ IN THE CHECKER BOARD BAGS





wee

Leg. Go. Withdraws
Amendment To |
Wages Bill

Mr. G. H, Adams told the House
of Assembly yesterday that the
Legislative Council had with-
drawn their amendment not to
include “watchmen” in the defini-|
tion of “manual labour”, in the

Bul to make provision for the
protection of wages of workers.
hey had insisted, however, she

aid, on the retention of the other |
amendments they had made t
the Bill, These amendments, Mr.
Adams pointed out, were trivial
and merely had to do with gram-
matical correctness.

The House had sent a messagi |
io the Other Place saying tha
they disagreed with the amend
ments, They objected to th:
omission of watchmen from thx
category of worker, as it is stated
in the Bill that worker means 3
person who performs “manual
labour.”

Mr. Adams told the House tha‘
the attitude of the Government
was that now the Other Place had
withdrawn the amendment with
respect to the status of watchman,
they were prepared to accept the
other amendments as they were
only minor amendments,

The House then agreed to these
amendments.





House Reporter’s
Widow May Get
$1,920

The widow of the late Mr, B, A
Maynard, Official Reporter of the
House of Assembly, may get an
ex-gratia gratuity of $1,920.

This provision was included iy
a Resolution for $4,420 which wa
pacsed by the House of Assembly
yeste-day.

in accordance with the terms o
the Addresses from the House oi
Assembly to His Excellency the
Governor passed on the 16th an
23rd of October, provision is in
cluded in the resolution for; —

The payment of cost of livin;
allowance to the Official Reporter
ef the Legislature at the same
rates and on the same terms men
tioned in Supplementary Esti
mates, 1951-52 No, 26.

The payment of an amount o)
$576 for indexing the volumes of
the Debates of the Legislature for

the years 1944—1951;
An amount of $1,550 for the
payment of substitutes for the

Official Reporter of the House of
Assembly while on leave and for
bringing his arrears of work up-
to-date,

The payment of an ex-gratia
gratuity of $1,920 to the widow
of the late Mr, E. A, Maynard,
Official Reporter of the House of
Assembly,

Before

the Resolution was

* passed, Mr. J, H,. Wilkinson paid

tribute to the late Mr, Maynard
for his work in the House of As-
sembly.

“For a long time,” said Mr,
Wilkinson, Mr, Maynard was, in
my opinion, the most efficient re-
porter we had in this House: 1
now take this opportunity to ex-
press my sympathy to his widow
and relatives.”



Cocktail Party In
Honour of ‘Barney’

Members of the Barbados Pres:
Club held a cocktail party yeste:
day at their Club coor in ho 10ur o
Mr. “Barney” Millar who is ex
pected to leave the colony or
November 8 for the U.S. where hr
will spend a holiday with his wite

Mr. Miller is Chief Sub-Edito
of the Barbados Advocate,

It is no longer necessary to suff:

pains, itohing and torment from Pil:

since the discovery of Hytex (former!
known as Chinaroid) ytew atarts

work in 10 minuter ana oot only of -
the pain but slso takes out the ewe,

ing, stops bleeding and combate nerv.
irritation thereby curbing jer trow
ples caused by Piles euch as Headach.

Nervousness, Backaohe, Conetipat)
lone of energy Srey and irrite:
deposition. Get Hytex trom ye
druggistG.oday under the cai:
guarantee Hytex must stop your ;
pains and troubles or money beob

‘sturo of empty packore

5,

FOR BEST RESULTS
USE

CHOWS

Co., Ltd—Distributors

a*u a a's 8





By “PRINCE
offered now at unbelievably low prices

We have
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very limited Stock remaining

KNIGHTS DRUG STORES








}



THE
SMALL PROPORTION OF OUR WIDE RANGE OF

hITCHEN REQUISITES

“HANDI” PLATE

WIRE STRAINERS
ASBESTOS STOVE

POTATO RICERS
POTATO CHIPPERS,
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MEAT MINCERS
BOILING STOVES
KITCHEN KNIVES
EGG TIMERS
WOOD SPOONS

ee S™®™EOQmmmanamnanno00SOOO
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PAGE FIVE .

ANIMATED OPINIONS



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HOW ABOUT enjoying life even if you have a stuffy head-cold? 4
For instant breathing comfort, wherever you go, just reach into
your pocket or handbag for your little Vicks Inhale,

IS TINY —but loaded full of volatile, nose-clearing medication, |
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yt WRENS NMALER(

HARRISON'S — BROAD STREET

UNDERMENTIONED ITEMS ARE ONLY A
































ICE SHAVERS
BREAD KNIVES
METAL TOASTERS
JAPANNED TRAYS
WIRE DISH COVERS
EGG BEATERS

PASTRY ROLLING
PINS

SCRAPERS

MATS

BUTTER CHURNS

BEAN SLICERS
STEEL WOOL
KITCHEN SPOONS

(Sets)
/TOVE MICA
BREAD TINS, DISH MOPS
ICING TUBES
ICING SYRINGES
STEAM COOKERS

—Enamd.
BREAD TINS
—Japanned
OVEN
THERMOMETERS

! We also carry a large assortment of
Domestic lines in - - -
BARTHENWARE, ALUMINIUM WARE,
TIN AND ENAMELLED WARE



BUY NOW WHILE THE GOODS ARE AVAILABLE
At’ REASONABLE PRICES,

HARRISON'S

SS oO







Specialists in



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Originally This Week
CONDENSED MILK 34 31
EVAPORATED MILK 29 26
IMPERIAL VIENNA SAUSAGES 38 M4
CRAWFORDS, MARIE SWEET Asst,
CREAM CRACKERS, TRI. FRUIT
PUFFS, CUSTARD CREAMS, }-lb.

Pkts. ‘ ‘ weer OF 40
The above Items for Cash & Carry Customers ONLY,
SEEDLESS RAISINS—ver 1}! Be din =
PRUNES—-per Ib d : pte,
MIXED PEEL—per Ib ; ; ‘ po
CHERRIES—per |b ‘ : re
CHIVERS MINCEMEAT—ver jar ‘ es
PERLSTEIN BEER—vper bottle wa) Me.
PERLSTEIN BEER—ver Carton , . $4.00

STANSFELD. SCOTT & CO. LTD.

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SPAKE AAD

MEASURING SPOONS

PRESSURE COOKERS



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PLO LLOEELLI

0%

654












-
LPP LLLP,

e
S
&

-



2 PAGE SIX ’ BARBADOS ADVOCATE TUESDAY, NOVEMBER 6, 1951

LE LESPORSPOPPPCIOR,
(3 Taste It! 2

You'll like ...
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HENRY , BY CARL ANDERSON |





















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CHEMICALS



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Smedley’s Cream of Tomato
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Crosse & Blackwell Curry
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Crosse & Blackwell Marrow-
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on Milo Tonic Food in















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You know, too, when you look at the price
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on sign which means ‘ just right’! Look for it in Koo Plum, Jam in tins—
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GOT IT BuT| | may 1 HAVE leading stores in Barbados. T’dad Fine Quality Cocoa —
ee (UL SEE IF| [Five ay LAA ¢ xe 4 a Bacal as
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nf an! fet) “a a iS ; Ie | fa ra Bots. of Anchovy Lig ,
4 Tins of Three Bay Tomato



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Tins of se’ § Fresh Gar-
den Pea

Tins of Sass0 Olive Oil —
L&

>
Tins of Liquia Stove Polish
Pkg. of Fab ERD Suds

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JOHN WHITE

| means made just right



aecmnmntonnensenees penecebeaenaeinen tenner OOPS POC COE SPIO PI POO

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YOU BOYS DRIFT INTO TOWN ONE OR TWO ATATIME, TAKE POSITIONS IT PAYS YOu TO DEAL HERE

NSNEAR li | : :
“Px STOPPED) YOU KNOW WAR TODO) agree | Did You Miss Your First Chance to Set Your Cake?
Here is Your Last Chance Now Before Xmas

SPECIAL offers to all Cash and Credit Customers for Monday to Wednesday only

“USUALLY NOW USUALLY NOW |
Mixed Nut (Per lb.) 64 AS Currants 46 36}

Pkgs. Sultanas 63 GO ~~ Prunes (Per lb.) 68 66

Pkgs. Mixed Fruit (lb) 69 64 Raisins (Per Ib.) 58 354
(Walnuts & Filberts)










ANC THEN VE RUN LIKE THE
LIPPLE GAZELLE... AFTER EIGHT
HOURS OF BRROILING SUN,
BESIDES NO FOOD OR VATER /
AY THINK AY TAKE LONG
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BARGAIN








nahin etneeeeqmeet a a



% DUNLOP
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4 inch

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at 17e. a foot








Ee YOU U6ED TO RUN ONE

3 WHAT'S OF THESE THINGS ~—-

WELL-I NEVER NOW RUN ALONG~ : IN YER KIN YOU GIVE ME SOME
LIKED HIM — ee. ¢ we To THE Ww ahr ql MIND # >
BUT SINCE | is J\ TH Jos!’
) }

POINTERS ® I'M NEW ON
HE‘S IN THE | UAE ” neler:
MLL GO-




MOTHER- A MR PAT
TUNIA CALLED
AND SAID HE WAS
DRILLING AT OAK
AND BUCKET












STRES TS -- HE
WANTS DADDY
TO COME AND
SER HIM -






NATURALLY | v

WANT JIGGS || {

TO SEE HIM - @ > “=
ipatenvaiaiel



BY cn MC. MANUS |



CC Stair in

N- Ay .




Here’s good news. You cap
enjoy the luxury of 14 glasses
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THE KIDNAPING OF THE
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x
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WE CANT FOLLOW HIM? | | WE WONT FOLLOW HIM.JUST WATCH

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at

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le is 2a a

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GAA 152 mele) eel ITs



| now MANY SCREWS IN
A. BARNES & CO, LT

— —_—_—ae a i a a a Ne a aaa ata | i i ie ar a a i a a i et ar



TUESDAY, NOVEMBER 6, 1951 BARBADOS ADVOCATE PAGE SEVEN ‘
CLASSIFIED ADS. "umr sau

OFFICIAL NOTICE 4







—

PERSONAL | Poseur?

WANTED










































































































































































































































meena ~ | The public are hereby warned against ;—-————— i ,
TELEPHONE 2508. REAL ESTATE giving credit to my wite, MARWINA | BARBADOS IN THE ,
eine _ Re mementos RUDDER inee Eversiey) I do not hold » HELP Brom Page Four IN PURSUANCE of the Chancery Act, 1 t COURT OF ‘
BUNGALOW—One stone wall Bung: } myself responsible for her o * ave : d g - , 186, I do hereby give notice
; ne wa ungalow r or anyone else cave a verman snip unmarked, | Persons having or claiming any,estate, right or interest or any Ile i .
DIED FOR SALE eee Gaines room, three bed | contracting ony debt or debts in my Vnce’ again a signal is misread o1 in or affecting the property hereinafter mentioned (the . y . noe nee 5
PARE Lo as, akfast room, toilet and bath, | "#™e Unless by « written order signed A MANAGER. f . . = z, F arse OF | to bring before me an ace f _
ign death oa dandin ong a MANAGER. for Joes River Sugar | ao, seen. se ree > he an account of their claims with their witnesses,
CADOGAN—On November 3rd 1951, at] Minimum charge week 72 cent oe. ho 7 pene eae Bay | 2 JOHN RUDDER Estates Factory. Applications in writing | 41) n. As a result the power-| and vouchers to be examined by me on any Tuesday or Friday between
Aruba, D.W.I. Oscar Sydney Cadog- |} 96 cents Sutdays %4 words end — reet | , Wocehe ai addressed to the Attorney—Joes Hiver )*“ uth Battle Squadron arrived | hours of 12 noon and 3 o'clock in the afternoon at the tion Office,
sn. 45 years of age. Formerly of | words 3 cents @ word woech-— a can ” 6.21.51—En. | qvely Cot. Sugar Estates Lid. will be received on | half an hour late on the scene and | Buildings, gtty Sedo before the 22nd day of December 1981, In order that
ee Street, Speightstown, St. | wor? on Sundays; Germaine G. Cadogan (Wife) re ae -_ oe A eee or thereabouts | Buildings, Marhill Street, Bridgetown sulfered disastrous losses, Gecree and be deprived of all claims on or against the said property. a4
eet S._ Cadogan (Mother), THE DWELLINGHOUSE contains 3.11,81-—3n aaa" events suggest either that Plaintiff; PETER NIGEL HUAN JOHNSON oe
uel . : > 2 z .
rae fae Sees saree AUTOMOTIVE Sng Boning neoe's See oe.) PO MMLEC NOTICES [on ewes teak” Seti toe | tore’ closely into the emeketey ar | PRORRETY: ALL TILA certain les or patel of nd atuate tn Upper Cale
oaee. eae = Cadogan very large, Toilet and Bath Large | tunity for young unmarried "inan with us communication. A ern m4 > wand erenton ous’ on d be ip.maes tonve fo ae inten esting by © ~
(Brother), abs Cai “a Pantry, seek eae. G | eater! . . . > a mnatsve- admeasurement one roo ® the same more or less butting and . -
winheie ae C. ce F. Cadogan, a ak v-8 Eos, left hand drive,} The Government Water an a as | e4 caiery Seal Deck Breas FE po ll her ly that the Beat y “touch” was lands now or late of James H. Wiles. of Catherine Wiles, of Clement Lace ;
infie! dogan, (Sons), k m_ perfect working order. | Windmill and Well. wh No. RB ; atv ® mpos . ° of James Ford and of Miss Louisa Mallet, and on the Public Road or however
Washbrook L. Cadogan’ (Grand. |Pply to ©. RM. Austin, Jam-s Street. | for gardens and laws ich supplies water NOTICE B. C/a Advocate. Sr i pt ing a Strain which existing} else the same may butt and bound Together with the messuage or
sons 6.11.53 6.11,51—8n. | Garage for 2 Cars, and Servants’ r PARISH OF 8ST PHULIP m al Eo Sil oe ag pee not stand. | host gale “AYER and all and singular other the houses and ou!
!ARNUM_oy . and is planted in i hereby give notice that I have estab MALE SALES HELP WANTED aimers gives us eal
Rabeces, bina Aga tthe funcral | 4800 mee aha in extent conden. | Gece Gelace Aopuc oes aS EneseaMee | detatgl™ aes, eaconsro an, | Meow ledee of Sank desirable” Meat |@ salutary reminder of the dificult Fru ied Tan Soares isl :
ae! ee wah ; “ . , Golden ple trees, and Breadfruit | 44s Schools, s, St. Philip ubmit reforences. Experience | z ici ah See progam ates a.
Soto oC iichast te ib oreloon GARitn hee freee, trees and another portion of land planted ioe hours: Mondays to Fridays from) haberdashery essential Starting salary Sens water Which Beatty | Dated 19th October, 1951 B WRAJAMB,
Sree Rt. Miche, ot 4.18 Qelock ; ; f —In tn Guines, Elephant and Sour Grass. 10 a.m, to 4 pm from $60 up commensurate with previous | fought—the high seas, the roay of Registrar-in-Chanceny. 6 =
Souk Hoa he iiie Meodoee GUELET AM DE eeaeaes ein eee pero not nen a WRITING will be received | 0, F. C. WALCOTT, Major, experience plus commission, all saies | gunfire, the screaming wind, the eee
Prichin ate tnetten tery with new tyres. Automatic —_ . > e undersigned up to Tuesday the | Returning Officer, ond obter benefits, Reply in own hand- | murk visibilit h . } ‘
. Wears, safety | 13th day of November, at 4 p.m. Th Parish of writing to Box A.M_S cate C y y, the great column
Btnany Alleyne, Daisy Farnum, | clutch. Mileage 33,000 and in perfect | vendor does not bind herself’ to accept | 3.11.51—3n vo ee That a ES “one Sa: | of “water thrown up by enen ,
(Children). 6.11.51, | Condition. Courtesy Garage. Dial 4616.| the highest, or ” a —~2n. bitty
~ | th i any offer. ————— ee | <—— salvoes Naval batt
ate ’ 6.11.51—6n Inspecton any day r : . vs atom are 8
JAMES—On th y day except Sundays on STENO-TYPIST An experienced ; Ti
i681. Charlotte James late Govern: | CAR—One ) Vauzhall ae Doar, | spplcation to, Mrs. Hanschell, Teie. NOTICE Steno-Typiat for our Omice. “Apply im {ning decisions take ae ie ———_—— —
mont Stenotypist at Saint Lucia, The | 1938—29. Engine perfect, tyres good. "yer fetthar ae rticul | PARISH OF ST. JAMES person with written application to Sec-) UNS decisions taken on mislesu- ;
funcral leaves from the Funeral Parlour | Dial 442-84. Horace Hovte. a eae pred particulars and conditions| he returning, Officer for the Election comets ae Estates & Trading Co.,|!Ng or doubtful evidence. | MONTREAL, AUSTM@aLIA, NEW <
of Hinds & Co. Tweedaide Road, Saint | 6.11,51—2n. COTTLE, CATFORD & CO of Members to serve in the General | “\0.. Day Street Su1si-en} It is well to remember the Oe te we The M NEKA nahiek
Michael, z o is evenin: . | Assembly, for t s ; f aiaider >. thie ne oe a, ena a i . : (iM, . ine e M.V. *
for The R.@oCHareh, Behnotis Lanz !. CAR—One Standard “S" In exedlient No. 17, High Street | has established ms es MaAHEATRE MANAGER—A_ full tne — which lies behind the neat Cargo and. eve Ss
and thence to the Westbury Cemeteny. |ccndition. May be seen at Chelsea|111.51—71 Bridgetown. | Factory, between the hours of 7 a im nesuaveui ge THEATRE— ;@lagrams of the naval historian.; s.s. “PUwt ADELAIDE” is schedulec ca, Antigua, Montserrat, Nevis and |
I riende are ped : st Garage (1950) Ltd. Ri I deprcteepta ence indice casnain ens des va a.m. on Mondays, Tuesdays ano | ui the office of CARIBEEAM © 1s prRES Well to remember tha: at Jutland | to sail from tae ee ee Q St. Kitts, Date of Sailing will be
I a rs. Laymone ames en esncnesentsneeeneinniianesiee ‘gee! nesdays a a THEA " x roa Se ontiad Melbourne October 4th, Sydney er Notified.
(Castries, St. Lucia), Owen James, CAP—Rover 16 H.P. Perfect condition eee eens will offer for sale at J. H. C. THORNE rete The Banyans’ Bay Street, ts 250 ships were involved, 10th, Gladstone October 16th, Port Aima]\$ The M.V, CARIBBEE will
Leotta James, Edith Chasnette throughout 24,000 miles only. Not driven |17 High Street “al at their office, No ©.11.6a-u8n: | eee the hours of 9 a.m. and 12 noon, was never possible to see more | October 20th, Brisbane October 27th,]y§ cept Cargo and Panengere =
8.11.51, |over 9% M.P.H. Treated as only child | the 16th day of Movember, telir at's ° cessful applicant must take up hir duties | nan three Or four of the enemy's| srriving st ‘Trinidad about “aa % Nevis and St aha Montserrat
—-——--— an ener ust seen and driv - : J . . 7 utes | capité i if ; bados November Mth. Ni
JORDAN: On November 5, 1961, at her |clated. Apply: Courtesy Garece. Pinte P th , NO Py ganuary 4th.” All applications treated eee ships at any one time and|*i, “faaition to general cango, this % Urday, “Sed inst a oe
residence at Boscobel, St: Peter, pedigrée trial and full pacticulare: | as os sneraage or dwelling-house known woes aan TICE in striet_ confidence 4.11,51-—1n, Pad on the British line, vessel has ample space for chilled and S The M.V. DAERWOOD will
eresa Jords A % Pri ‘ 6 ‘i " Standing on 2 REB GIVEN, that I gb ee nt ~ ¥ oc ,
leaves ihe above Wesdaet Ta — ee 6-11.51—t.f.n. | Acres, 20 Perches of land, which is en- | have established my office at the Vest: REPRESENTATIVE-—Full time repre- | ogg: ful ae Cosientie $6 Bet 9b eue- ie uan Tekoonbel on through Bills of St. ant de none tae
p.m. today for the Boscobel Ceme-| MOTOR CYGLE—One () BSA’ 3s aoe situate meer Top Rock, Christ Clerk's Office, Parochial Buildings, Cum. | S@ntative ae tee a cinadian Life Tee = nara to Se Luding for transhipment at Trinidad to ane Pachenigeed ante ind Arabs,
teri’ Motor C ca +the residence of the late Mrs. | berland Street, Bridgetown, Hours 10] /PSurance Co., tn Barbados. Applica- ‘ al course of events, The a, Leeward and Windward cent, Sailing 5 he
Edwarlina Chandler, Thoris Jor- | Apply: a alte te eae T. A. Clarke a.m. to 12 noon daily (Sundays ex- | #0" in writing are invited which will]/art of describing battles, whether ieee, ? ied oe > bem
aan, Cattibis Jalan. Totccnes | Seaton . ‘ee ee The dwelling-house contains Open | cepted) be treated in strict confidence. Apply: | naval” ili i , For further particulars apply—
Jordan, Herlonial Genn : . Sia in | Verandah, Drawing and Dining Rooms, G. D. _BYNOE, “Insurance Underwriter”, c/o Barbados {;\4Va" Or military, in terms intel-| pigwess, WITHY @ CO. LTD, anc
iene’ Wash’ Yaberd tibese:-edow. FURNITUR 3 Bedrooms, Toilet and Bath, Kitchen, Returning Officer for the Advorate 3.11.51—™m. [ligible to the plain man is exceed- h eCOSTA & CO. LID. :
6.11.51 E Sraomee as feral | en City of Bridgetow: ;————— eg e ——+fingly difficult. Mr. Churchill is} Trinidad Barbados, :
o ‘ue: ys an ursdays 4.11.51—1 | » [ .
SMITE-Op November & Jel at bar TaABLE—One (1) Mahogany Dining | only, between the hours of 4 p.m. and | ———————-. ——___—__ ee UNIVERSITY COLLEGE oh of = ee modern writers} BW ite a ae
residence College Tenantry, St. John, wns reer jal 2708. F f HOSPITAL OF THE WEST WHO. CRE: Ge st.
side 1 ‘ ’ ny rther particulars and diti : i i
Blanch¢. Her funeral leaves the above 4.11.51—2n. | erie. conditions NOTICE INDIES, JAMAIC But too often in Admiral Chal- °
midence . apply to— n Ss, CA, B.W.1. = ral Chal
Pon eg i pl Sun pi LIVESTOCK COTTLE, CATFORD & Co 1 BARTON GITTENS CHEESMAN, | mers’s account of naval operations :
e peey Digar Lavyd: -Zawhis s! 1,11,51—8n paving been appointed Returning Officer | MEDICAL STAFF ema descends something of the :
a , . gston 5 Sn oe s 31 re > -, y 7 . = .
Claude Smith (sons) 6.11.51, HORSE: One half-bred black gelding EVANTON eee ished my “office "i Pa gy oy Foto ! tn tecanae et a eee ‘Dotvanser 1 ed and mist which surrounded 3
$e | OUt of “Joan of Are” by “Battle Front” St. John F s ‘ . ai em in actual Y
Poe o Sanne 5, ‘- o her Pa Manager ‘Rilesne Gols Pistatinn: Sree tte ee Bie B. G. CHEESMAN, tha nee ha aa bay ant tig Ray | through ceure’ tikes tae ns ; Onc.
esidence, Farm Tenantry, eter, . Peter. 3.11.51—3n | Room, Sun Lounge, tw ful i Returning Offic: Medical R ist th a ae ee eenenecemeeenenpell
Selena Whitney. Her funeral leaves T ‘s Set Se ully | tiled 8 Sure a oe" rs 2 clouds, the outline of events cen mee Ad eee *
the thee resldance of 4.30 p.m. to- MARE The half-bred mare Marinole, maeaen Shendan tue ks aoe earn —— bt aver) tip weratnicumin lr i ans: ak done be, but dimly seen, and the readin NEW YORK SERVICE
aglow vet ag thd cate mi out of O.T.C., and Marina and in foal for | Servants’ Room, Children’s Play Room lin the first instance, Salary will be in | becomes weary SS. “SEABREEZE” sails ard November—arrives Barbados 13th November, 1951.
Spas mts oe bad Front. This mare is also an excel-| The Gardens are well laid out, having NOTICE the seale of £700 to £1,000 per annum, The portions. f Admir: 7 A STEAMER sails 23rd November—arrives Barbados 4th December, 195).
sae e sean. ane ine Bowen, Jent plantation riding mare. Apply: | numerous Trees, with double entrance “= depending on experience and qualifica 9, s G dmiral Chal-) A STEAMER sails 4th December—errives Barbados 25th December, 1951
la jowen, uby Bowen, C. Payre, Barrow or phone 3344 The above Property can be purchased | PARISH OF CHRIST CHURCH tions, and is subject to a deduction of |™ePS’s book which will come new meena oem — -——- —_ 7
A is Venice Bowen (Granda Children). 3.11.51—3n | fully Furnished if so desired. With pos- 1 HEREBY GIVE NOTICE that I have| £100 per annum in respect of board, | tO most readers are tho se dealing NEW ORLEANS SERVICE
6.12.51 session Ist February 1952. Fot viewing 4» returning Officer for the election of | residence, ete. Further information may with Beatty’ “ . . ™ *s 2
_ ee ELECTRKivc etc. Phone 8657. 6.11.51—1n men.bers to serve in the General Assem-| be ontiined from the Hospital Manager Lor mee career as First Se ry STEAMER onlin sand Oatober—-arvives Bathados Ste. Movectiaee,, tar
IN MEMORIAM TAL bly for the Parish of Chrst Chuich, | and Secretary rd and those dealing with his;4 STEAMER sails 7th November—arrives Barbados 23rd November, 1951.
NORGROVEIn loving memory of Sarah | “RADIOS — One 10” tube “Phipipe’ | , MOUSE One chattel house standing ertablished ‘my "uffee at th. Parochial Applications with full details sna private life. [A STEAMER sails 2st Nobember—urrives Barbados 7th December, 1951.
Norgrove, who was called to t Radio in rfect conditi on / perches of laNi, situated at re », Ch ’ , hours ondoy | two recent testimonials should be sent i .
4th November, 1950. rest On | algo one “Phico 8 tate: Nadel ane | Comer of Dash Road, Bank Hall. Apply | '° TEE ar ee ar a ee to the Hospital Manager and Secretary, ae First Sea Lord from 1920 ‘o | CANADIAN SERVICE
aivubr 40: ans tember hos Gition’ a Tew. No. cea’ ca [to C. RM. Austin, James treet, Ais Signed) H Cy G. WARD, University Coliege of the West Indies, Beatty made it his duty to , SOUTHBOUND
Theo and Kenneth (sons, U.S.A.),| refused. Apply: The Standard Agency | °"¢ SPot land, Bank Hall 25 3/10 perches seth ra ei a Mona, Jamaica, B.WT., before 3ist} preserve what he could of tho! nga —_ en
Miriam (daughter-in-law, U.S.A.), Emily | (B’dos) Co. 14 Swan Street. Dial 3620 6.11, 61—5n ist Chureh Joowmber, 1991 Navy in the f, | Name of @hip Montreal Halifax Barbados
(aaughter--in-law), Claudine Prescott, SN: Wa at ene nme Se tt Re Shay ee f drastic eevhouy, fe F sin fOr ss. “ALCOA POINTER” 1+ Regt BE, Babs ae Oe ae
grand-daughter), Henderson (grandson) , | ———————eeenenes © (2) very comfortable houses built Ne aca le El re . y. e had a s * mM” Oct. 12th Oct, 18th Oct. th +
U.S.A.) 6.11.51— penn Na 61509. each. {They photh NOTICE | UNIVERsii¥ COLLEGE dificult struggle, and oppositic n 88 ‘ALCOA PEGASUS Oct, 26th Oct. 29th Novr. 8th
ater and ligh ne is at Black PARISH OF ST. ANDREW HOSPITAL OF THE WES came fro . avter
FOR RENT MECHANICAL Rock, and the other is at Codrington Hill, | 1 PEREBY GIVE NOTICE that I have INDIE adele ad wie = m an unexpected quarter.
inci stone jDunealtn at Spooner’s | established my office at Turner's Holi | r “M ICAL STAFF ‘ ‘1984 r. Baldwin came into office NORTHBOUND
_ on % acre of land. Price attractive. | Plortation Office hours Tuesday ah ’ in 24 he was pledged to licyi ss « ”
HOUSES AIR MIld.—One Climax 18ft. Air Mili| Apply to D'ARCY A, SCOTT, Magazine | Wednesday and Thursday from ape ‘ ; be of cuttin I ge a policy] §s.8. “ALCOA PLANTER Due Barbados October 15th, Sails.
with 8” pump both in good order, Phone | Lane 30.10.51—n |to0 2 > un Applications are invited for 12 posts § expenditure. for St. Lawrence River Ports. .
BOULOGNE toes ee a eanndal Gow 91-05. 3.11.51—2n. = b , AS SNaBARE 3 of House Officer in ihe new University This policy was strongly cup ROBERT THOM LTD. — NEW YORK AND GULF »s&RVICE. .
_ BOULOGNE s wr e y xs , OR SALE > a 2 Seen ee ollege Hospital, to take up duties with r whi Fe
Vacant on the first of December. Fully'| MiLLcivigalion Basioment” Fant | Comat AS See? ee + Returning Officer, | the Hospital on the Ist April, 1952 ee ted by Mr. Churchill We APPLY:—DA COSTA & CO., LTD—CANADIAN SERVICE
furnished. Dial 8607 6.11.51—2n. | Tower, Pump and galvanise tank, so.a | Inspection on application to the Manager ‘arish went ator House Surgeons: for general and ‘ive suffered a severe blow fron - - --——-——---—_ ET
Separately or together. Dial 4038. Sale starts at 8.30 a.m, on Monday, 5th | —— Ba dees Teer ree. surgical dutics + | bis. Government,” Beatty wroce
nCALAIS-—Dover Coast, newly built 31.10.51—5n | November at Mount Wilton. D. M NOTICE Bri ie eee eee to his wife. “Of course, it is pl
3ungalow on the sea Ee DEGTOOMS, (memes | Simpson & Co. ; . duties 4 ine 3 owe 8 *
Fully furnished. All, modern con-| REXEL STAPLING MACHINES—Just esieeenct cre date soba RMe eee: PARISH OF ST. LUCY PR elated ayaa Rg Winston at the Exchequer; he jias SAGUENAY TERMINALS 4
Vaniendee From Ist January 1952. [received Rexel Stapling Machines, side | PROPERTY: The dwelling house known Having been appointed Returning |. The appointments will be for one year, | Zone economy mad.” — : oS So “
Dial 2307 3.11,51—6n. | staplers, staples, transparent (Scotch) | a* LEE-SIDE, St Lawrence Gap, Ch, Ch, | Officer for the Parish of St. Lucy, 1] Pach House Officer will serve 4 months | So serious did the conflic ~— OP en ce cat a gan 4
47 51—tfn. vee ~ dispensers, foolscap carbons | standing on 2 roods, 36 perches of land, ee Rive notice that my office is |'" ae suaaleal, pene 35 me come. that ‘Beatty thr t = A CANADIAN SER "
tr sart oe . - automa’ dati taini . 4 established at the Sela s' $e! Gepartments respectivety Salary £36 é reatened » , 4
FORM II Marson & Son Lid., Fabs Seek y water, Resse tigen dian pions sesoMLAghy m Pr ees eee per annum less £100 in respect of board, | resign and State his reasons ra ine . E VICE : ae
@ eye 6.11.51—2n, | Kitchen, Toilet and Bath, 2 Servants . B. B. BARNETT. ~ |icsidence, etc. West Indian House | House of Lords. From Halifax, N.S., and Montreal, “e
The Land Acquisition Act, | rooms, Garage, clectric light and Gas €.11, 80-05. | OMoers who. BAYS) Sie Sule Saeed Ils wale tha vs 4 oo
RALEIGH CYCLE—One (1) prewar| Land sufficient to build 2 Bungalows $$$ fone year at. the University College : S was too much for Mr, Rild- Expected ;
gents model Raleigh Bicycle, in perfect | Highest offer not necessariky accepted. | NOTICE TO THE ELECTORS OF THE! !loepital will, Mf-appointed to the serviee|win and he negotiated a set lo Montreal Halifax gt. John p;
1949 working order, Apply: G. Lewis, Arthur |Inspection any day from 10 a.m PARISH OF ST. MICHAEL of their reepective. Governments at the ment in which the Teen § Y . a 1, ween me
Seat, St. Thomas. 6.11.51—In. | to 3. pm, Telephone 8123 for further| I the undersigned HERPERT HADL®y | cod of that period be granted one year's reasury bee) as. “pOLYRIVER" “
n. P P ie ; re | tO surrend Ss. “POLYRIVER W Oct, 5 Nov 21 November
- dark es WILLIAMS, Returnin seriority (and one inerement where surrender. It is one of Beatty’: “ py" — :
(Noti- required by Section 5) . : particu ars, 3.11.51,—7n. . ~ Officer for the | ‘ \ eatty’s pss. “SUNVALLEY “s 7 Nov. 12 Nov - 28 November >
TF* neq, istion, fo: public purposes, t{YPEWR TS —cne Koyal Portabie porie of St. Michael for the 1951 General salen (er Oe oe corinne most valuable achievements to | s.s. “SUNPRINCE! 53 21 Nov, 26 Nov = 12 December. =
. * ¥ + ” m1 s erve have 2: a y er “ “ ” \"
in ro Bee oie eer Snes aneurin ate renga da tite. Cartes The undersigned ‘will offer for Gale at Genral Ansmeakiy veo eine Parle oe reduced by one year F have preserved the core of hr | %* “A VESSEL oa M8 Dee) *) 21 Dec 8 Saneaee ee
ing oe cee aos eas most Stendard “Underwood” typewriter, very | Public Competition at their office, No, | St. M-chael do hereby notify the Electors Further information may be obtained | Navy sofe during there yoars of UNITED KINGDO ae
Christopher in the parish of Christ nox! Sea aA aan Re eee ney. cy ae te ec ce tater oe ees en is pes, arte Univinity College: --ieepieal, + Mona, stinginess and sloth, M SERVICE te
ply: The Standard day th h f my office at the residence of Mr. ? x < hee
Chureh in the island of Barbados deserib- | Co” 14 Swan Street, Dist $6, Po |p et NY OF November, 1951 at 2) Oe gid Ramsey, Richville, 6th Avenue, Jammica, B,W.1., to whom applicauons | ,, Admiral Chalmers gives a can- From Newport, Liverpool and Glasgow :
HolIAbE Wein hie Seta a " . 6.11.51—5n P ihe Cottage known as “SORN”, in | Belleville. ; ‘ xhould be sent before sist December,|did account of Beatty’s private —— riniaialennn mitten :
3 e: an - : : : rath ,
oured pink on a plan of survey slened by M hapten. sos, the ae Avenue, Strathclyde, contain- soe hours iwi, be from 8 a.m a Pa life. He prints a number o' yi Mees
Mr. C. K. Nichols, $ ing Drawing and Dining Rooms, 2 Bed- .30 a.m. daily, Sundays excep Reatty’s ‘ naw atte rriv i
Gaied ‘28th Say GUE ane mice ae — ISCELLANEVUS foothé. (formerly. 8) with ell ‘sodden HERBERT HADLEY WILLIAMS, ae er eran nL ea. ae oe o Ladv RBentt Newport Liverpool Glasgow Dates
office of the Colonial Engineer having, | meee | CONVENIENCES, and the land on which ' Returning Officer. MISCELLANEOUS ae ‘y form one of the mo i ; ‘i BARBADOS
been decided on‘ by the Governor with} AMERICAN CHRISTMAS CARDS—A | ‘¢, Stands, containing 5,510 square feet, 6.11.51—1n,. interes.ing parts of the bool 8 8. “SUNROVER : . 9 Oct 18 Oct, 5 November "
the approval of both Houses of the Leg- which is fully enclosed. outitnstlitenehnsienrenrinnierits +6. “SUNWHIT 9 Nov, id Nov 21 Nov 7 December




ure of

the island of Barbados by



love’; assortment of American Christmas

Cards



in boxes of 16 different Cards,





















Inspection on application to R. A. Cor-





























Harold









Great Wealth


















olution of the Houses of the Legisla-| rather cute ang ureommon. Cleari {| bin, General Traders Ltd COMPANIES ACT 1910 Proverbs & Co. Litd., High Street a js
ture, it is hereby declared in pursuance | $2.00 per box. You should call at our} FoF conditions of Sale, apply to— CENTRAL FOUNDRY LTD. 6.11 S—In. | og Beatty's wife was a doughter} UNITED KINGDOM AND CONTINENTAL SERVICE
OMe on 5 of the Land Acquisition Act, | office and see them immediately. The|s; 10506. OO SO NOTICE IS HEREBY GIVEN that the| ———-———— ———————— |Of Marshal Field, the American 4 ————-— ——___._ —___ ah ealahee ite rs
9, that the said lands have been ac-| Standard Agency (B'dos) Co. 14” Swan ae Transfer Books of the Company will be millionaire. She had been Expected Arrival
quired "for the following. purposes: Street. Dial 3630 gis bce TT Avoron daded tims the Ord. aay of Noverabart divorced from her husband and Antwerp Rotterdam London — Dates, Barbados
r ~ no aeeenetaet 1951, to the 30th d { November, 1951, ig :
thease ants ¥ vos Sontateing BOARDS—Two large wooden advertis- | — both Nast tiainiatons “ Sie, en well have damaged 8.8. SUNMONT” , «17 Oct, 20 Oct 1 Nov. . 4% November
land of Saint Christophers tae ako ee rae Approximately 20 ft. x| I am instructed by_the Executors of | By order of the Board of Directors 7 Sa ha uote for although his] 8-8. “SUNRAY” - 15 Nov. 18 Nov 22 Nov.. .§ December
. : le aser must remove same. the Estate of James E. Seale, deceased H. GARNET ST. HILL, did not appear in the ¢ tn ee mg ee a! “2
in the Parish of Christ Church and bound-| ©; fi wf . ee : , n case
ing on lands of M. Hazlewood on lands | St. Michael~the ‘other at Olstiee: near |. Ae. Se Orne gat the spot at O11 Sian dant tint of divorae could be Agents: PLANTAXIONS LIMITED — Phone 4703
of A. Clarke, on lands of Estwick Kirton, * , : , } angerous ir 5 i
on lands of the said St, Christopher's ae fam ie GARAGE TRADING | Thursday 8th day of November, 1951, | =~ ? tics tale Sh : those ORT SDE oo et Bee .
Girls’ School and on the public highway qihelgery. ViRiOER BF. Sale 4. oiploch 5. 43 NOTICE Milacaves ee) eee Se
and particularly shown and delineated 28,10.51—t.f.n. O'DONALD DANIEL. The Estate of score,
on the plan thereof dated the 15th day of ; nee rae . Telia > Beatty's marriage brou ,
May 1951 certified by C. K. Nichols, |zamb dyed beavee roo, “ott pastes G:11 .81—8n, Pep aera ein vce great wealth—a yacht eee yh hil Lat +
Sworn Surveyor. Ter Be: * show a . tf . a yp ) gh ren: e
Dated this twenty-ninth day of October ese Beauty Salon, McGregor Street NOTICE 1S HEREBY GIVEN that all loor, a place in Leicestershire pe TE
1981 at Government House in the Island ariel See. §.11-51—t.t.n. |UNDER THE IVORY HAMMER | persons having any debt or claim against and all the appurtenances of CLEAR :
of Barbadoy ALFRED SAVAGE SPRING CUSHIONS UNITS—Ready| By instructions received I will sell on|died in this Island on the 29th day of Edwardian luxury, Once when en ae Saeed 7
Govarnse racked Spring Cushions Units, just ready |Thursday, 8th November, at Messrs.| October, 1950 are hereby required to there was a prospect of Beatty ’ -
m | for padding and covering at a price|Fort Royal Garage, St, Michael's Row,|send particulars of their claims duly at-! being court martialled for darn- AseT, TRACE MARA
of $2.00 each. The Standard Agency | (1) 1947 Anglia Ford 8 H.P. (Damaged|tested to the undersigned. in care of aging his shi t ’
(B'dos) Co. 14 Swan Street. Dial 3620.|in accident), Terms Cash. Sale at 2| Messrs. Cottle, Catford & Co., No. 17, | 5 ship, his wife is repu-
r 6.11.51—5n, | P-m. High Street, Bridgetown, Solicitors, on ted to have said: “What! Court
VINCENT GRIFFITH, |or before the 30th day of November, martial my David? I'll buy them
TANKS—Thirteen (13) Galv. Steel Auctioneer. 1951, after which date we shall proceed See ge aa” a new ship!” . ee fs ¢ “ * 4,
‘ Tenks 8ft. x 4ft. x 3ft. Apply: 4.11.51—3n, | to distribute the assets of the deceased 7 7 Ml in oe ‘
Simpson & Co. Oey ata ~ among the parties entitled thereto vav-| Stop Pyorrhea and Py marriage at first brought x a nc cneceennneneiltiticicenn ative
. / é aan
can e ure ing fegard only to such claims as we T h Mouth eatty great happiness, too, but
shall then have had notice of, and we renc ou this did not last. Lady Beati as
LOST & FOUND . will not be Mable for the assets or any “ eet x y y
There are thousands of men and women essions part thereof so distributed to any person} in 24 Meurs was jealous of her husband’s
who suffer awful agony day and night of whose debt or claim we shall not have asses Wake w ae labise abscrption in his naval duties
i " had notice. ing gums, sore mouth, of ee °
because of pile trouble, who do not know LOST @ From Page 3. And all persons indebted to the said) teeth mean that you are a victim of Pyar As 7 went on they drifted
that every chemist stocksa special remedy | - Re cae estate are requested to settle their in- | FRee GF peenen MpErh. OF soaks had disence { Sone and she declined into a
that does most surely and quickly banish iron stake and fractured her col-|“@btedness without delay. ony | YOUR teeth and have to wear fei tty | State of acute melancholia,
* . DOG —, White Bull and ‘Terrier Dated this 27th day of September, 1951. | fore your tiine. Bince the preat Wore Beatty treated her with great
the misery of this wretched trouble. Answering 'to the name “Jean. Owner: |/aP_bone. 5 VOM ee, Sonn. | War these mouth diseases have spread | nationce and forbes oh 5
Make a confidant of your chemist. Asie | Aubrey Greaves. Can be found at the} The accused has a girl of ten PRINCESS LOUISE JONES throughout the world so that now sclen- e an forbearance. Few
7a ; : i FE o tists say that four ous of every five people | people realised hi
Public Market or Hall’s Road 3 di dent hi txecutors of the Will of 5a: if ealis ow deeply wor-
him about Man Zan Pile Remedy. He |, Hered cde cena Reward |/years who is dependent on her. Margaret Ann Jones, decd, re sufferers sooner or inter. Be warned In | nied 5 - a
will tell you this i ordinary ointm oe 1 -51—1n. | Springer told the court that Morris] o.a.F : *| time and stop these diseases before it in ie was by these private
mus 18 00 | ry ointment, always annoyed her saying that} -—-~ —-—— s 7 too late, because they often cause not only | matters during the years of his ‘
but a soothing, healing, g KEYS — One bunch keys between ys annoy y , eet the loss of teeth, but also chronic rheuma~ | oreotest fame.

balm that at once stops the intense irrit-
ation and clears away internal, external,
sore or bleeding piles.

The unique tube in which Man Zan is

; Baxters Road and Strathelyde

rewarded, Advertising Department, c/o

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eet
RACE TICKETS—Series P.



6.11,61—1n



No, 7155.

Series R. No. 5913. Series KK. No. 9161

Finder|she has one to represent her.

Alcohol
ALFRED HARDING pleaded
guilty of wounding Lionel Pinder

Re Estate of
MILTON KING
deceased
NOTICE IS HEREBY GIVEN that

scientist, fights thease

all] &nd quick way












tism and heart trouble,

New Discovery Saves Tcoth

Amozson, the discovery of an Am
It penetrates right ¢

an |



troubles in ©

tie |
bleed-





Behind The Facade
Few people suspected the dark
background behind the gleaming
facade of prosperity and success


















; t of the trouble, stops gums from
7 Series KK N ‘, {on September 18. Sentence was] persons having any debt or ciaim| [00 takes tha vind

sold makes this preparation so easy and ye Pe ae es Tei Cemented postponed by the Hon, the Chief| against the estate of MIUTON KING ing she very args day, quickly roe Se | mn a Beatty presented ty the

clean to use. The big size supply, with | Bayfieid, St. Philip. 6.11.51—1n. [Justice Sir Allan Collymore. Mv.| deceased, who died at Capetown in the| tightens the teeth. The following letter | nvious world,

special applicator, is usuall fficient eeeemsenetiantseiniemeninctanesinntpnees E : ‘| Province of the Cape of Good Hope from Mr. W. W. B. shows the results tint ; It is to Admirsl Chalmers's

PP ae ry sumcient 60 G. Farmer who appeared on be-|the Dominion of South Africa on the | Amoson users get cayeetee. eat os credit and to the credit t °
clear away the most difficult case. — half of Harding told the court that] 11th day of March 1951 intestate ore} Mouth and Pyotrhea for ten yours, jas | Onecare sare o
. FIN gums were sore and bleeding anc 3 | Beatty's family that no attempt
Remember the name of this special GER-TIP FLY CONTRO] |both men were under the influenve | requested to send particulars of their} [Ser “our teotm, while several othe: toc, | p00 y omy We Can Supply... .
remedy fot pile trouble— of alcohol and an argument fol-| 4ebts and claims duly attested to the] were getting looser all the iime, * tries | 45 been made in his biography kf Plates, Dish
v Pp $ ‘ 7 8 : undersigned in care of Messrs Haynes &| many Usings and then heara of tht mew | ‘o conceal or tg ignore these Soup, Dinner and Breakfast ates, es
= = lowed and Pinder was cut with aj Grifith, No, 12 High Street, Bridgetown | discovery Amosan, In 24 hours after wing | facts P ; ts, Ete., Ete
knife. The doctor said that the] So teltors, on or before the 15th day of Aipeces Ee Geet bee eer ered is - “Hi e and Lette { agp hate rca ;
wounding was trivial but the site| December 1951, after which dae I] (Yue Ulys ane im two weeks 1 found that Beatt His setters of David a You'll be proud to own these. See our display
was dangerous. The accused had| %8!!, proceed to distribute the assets! jay loose tort) sore much tighter aud that atty, by Rear-Admiral W.G. BUY NOW! : :
as i see ft simila - cativineiees of the deceased among the per | could eat the hurdest of tou.” *|Chalmers. Hodder and Stough- 5 d
a nu r 0) r ction titled th . d only ty . T T w
but they were long ago as 1932 oaah sae ae which f dhait then, have | Guorentecd HOR 25s, PL AN A IONS LTD. R
\ Mr. Farmer asked that his client had notice and I will not be Mable for yf time 0 fast 398 oo coF.en WORLD COPYRIGHT RESERVEN - —<—————————
_—— be placed on probation “| the assets or any part thereof so dis) j/3:h ilenting, ond tore mouth and sighton - —LES. rem eT
i : tributed to any person of whose ded' Or | your \eeth to your complete satisfaction or

Bertram Ward pleaded not} claim I shall not then have had notice
And all



money 1, PROPS DOP OCVO 1 LIPDOVIS PD SEPEPODOOS PEDO PPPS SOOOSS
Dou't ta
suffering
and heart trouble

ou return of empty packuge.
hance on Osi ont tec'h or

dangers frrin recurs tor
Get Amora tron



persons indebted to the said
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PAGE EIGHT



om

ROY MARSHALL
TAKES 4 FOR 21

From HAROLD DALE

The West Indies to-day learned a valuable lesson at
an appropriate time in the tour. They learned that their
own dashing attractive approach to cricket is unlikely to
be reciprocated in Australia.
Fielding this morning, they had —-
that lesson grimly impressed upon
them. Harvey and McKay of
Queensland — one of the weaker
states — sensed that they had the
chance to humble the tounsts, and
they took it.

For nearly three hours not a
worthwhile stroke was made, not

B.G. Defeat
Indians After

QUEENSLAND S

a Wisk.was taken, there was not
one joyous hit, but — and this is
the most important but to the
Australians — the West Indies
total was. passed without any loss.

The tourists knew long before
the stand was broken that they
were to be given no quarter. They
tughtened their fielding to a pitch
of brilliance, but with their weak-
ened attack, there seemed no help
for them, until Roy Marshall was
given the ball, and immediately
began to sweep the batsmen from
his path.

It_was_ lucky, indeed, that this

young. all rounder, fresh from

Lancashire League struck such a The game seesawed throughout
patch of sustained excellence.:the 150 minutes of play Sunday
Without him, — the scoreboard after Dyer was bowled shortly
showed 2 for 224 when he came @fter reaching the century in 117

Big Recovery

(From Our Own Correspondent)

GEORGETOWN, B.G., Nov. 5.

A brilliant crisis century by
“Babbs” Dyer 103 in a_ fighting
89 run stand with Brian Patoir
41, and a fighting unfinished last
wicket partnership by the match
winning pair Norman Wight 40

and Jack Allen 12 gave British
one wicket

Guiana a_ thrilling
vietory and saved tihe_ colony’s
reputation against the hard try-
ing Combined Trinidad and B.G.
Indians.

on — the day might have been dire ™inutes of scintillating cricket.

indeed for the West Indians.
Keeping a perfect length at
medium pace, he made the bail
move both ways and his flight con-
sistently invited the batsmen to
hesitate until it was too late. At
one period, he had three wickets
for four runs in seven overs three

maidens and that out of a total of oes and_in f

tion for he saw the 70 runs

act contributed 42
f them. Patoir who was de-
fending while Dyer attacking

At the end of the day, Goddard
and his men could breathe again.
Their position is none too good,
but there is plenty of hope. Nobody
with the, interests of the game at
heart, would want the islanders to
abate one jot of their. natural bril-
liance nor their gay zestful ap-

fall.

had collared

When he left the game swung
back in Trinidad’s favour as the
score read 229 for seven—70 runs
to go and only three wickets to
Norman Wight B.G, crisis
batsman lived up to his reputa-

stepped up the scoring but when
he and Wight looked like
the bowling Patoir
was trapped into hooking an Ali
longhop into Asgarali’s
hands,

they

waiting



, The score was 267 for 8 and
proach to the game, but—in Aus- British Guiana was again in
tralia, at least — it must be trouble. Came Vibart Rodney,
tempered with watchfulness and who indiscreetly moved out to
due caution, hit Jackbir and was stumped with

They realised today that an the score at 276. With 23 runs

Australian side given a fingerheld needed for victory

Jack, Allen

will turn it into a stranglehold, pluckily stood up with Norman

even though the spectators — as

Wight and scored

the winning

today — scream from sheer bore- Shot to give B.G. victory.

dom,

QUEENSLAND 18 INNINGS
Archer 1.b.w. Gomez ............+++-
Seeey ¢ Gomez b Ferguson ....

leKay 1.b.w. Marshall . 2

90
a 7
A. Carrigan not out ....





COMBINED INDIANS
BG

COMBINED INDIANS
B

ist Innings 114
Ist Innings 175

2nd Innings 359
2ND INNINGS

. L. Wight l.b.w. b Jackbir ; 19

= ee P ae “a Gibbs run out ‘ 9
Cc. McCool b Marshall ....... ‘ Jackman c & b Ali 18
w. Grout.b Marshall ver EE ET Te 5 Camacho ¢ Bahadur b Jackbiir 40
M. Raymer. not out " ch Jordan b Ali ’ oeAvee oe
* ” Byes 7 oe Dire Thomas ¢ Sankar (w.k.) b Jackbir 10

t
BOWLING ANALYSIS
oO, M.

* R,
45 1
70 0
128 1
58 1
21 a

Dyer b Bacchus ......

326 aaa ec Asgaralli b All

Rodney stpd. Sanker b Jackbir 2

w, Alien not out ¥ white
‘ Ex’

Wight not out



Real ca. ’ ‘ 9
Total (for 9 wkts.)

Fall of wickets: 1 for 17, 2 for 21,

3 for 58, 4 for 66, 5 for 86, 6 for 140, 7 for

229, 8 for 267, 9 276



ee

Me © H BOWLING ANALYSIS ar

, nt, re Asgaralli . ee oe a)

Set Up Records i" Sig
ay : $ 11%

. P eco Bahadur ’ 2 0 13 0

te Persaud 2 0 4 0

Against England Bacebus ; 00 ae ke

mos tulle

NEW DELHI, Nov. 5.

India made its highest score
ever aeeinn England in the first
Test cricket match here Monday.
In reply to the England first in-
nings total of 203, India scored 418
for six wickets by close of play
‘and with four wickets still to fall
led by 215 runs. rc

Vijay. Merchant and Vijay Ha-
zare, again dominated the game
scoring 154 and 164 runs respec-
tively. First Merchant and theri
Hazare set up a record for the
highest individual score by an In-
dian in a Test match,

The third wicket stand of 211
between the pair was a record for
any Indian wicket against any
country,

Monday is an off day. The match
continues Tuesday and Wednes-
day.—CP) ' Jaa

Xmas Broadcast
For Cricketers

} From FRANK MARGAN.

‘ SYDNEY Nov. 6.

When an Aussie fan asked
bowler Valentine the significance
of the gold bracelet he wears on
his right wrist, Alfred broke out
into one of his huge smiles and
drawled “nah ah just likes it.
Ah ‘bought it in England,”

A Christmas Party broadcast
is being arranged to enable the
visitors to speak to their home
folks.

Only 2,000 watched Monday’s
Brisbane innings. A section of the
crowd began barracking after



Do It Every

Â¥ A GUY WILL
WORK ALL HIS LIFE
GET A WONDERFUL



WHAT’S ON TODAY

Court of Grand Sessions 10.00
a.m.

Police Courts and Court of
Original Jurisdiction 10.00

a.m.
Meeting of the Legislative
Council 2. o.m

Meeting of the House of As-
sembly 3 p.m,

Extra-Mural Group meet at
wakefield, British Council
at 5 p.m.

CINEMAS:

WLOBE: Roger Toughy Gangster
a The Counterfeiters
4.30 & 7.90 p.m.

"LAZA (Bridgetown): West Point
Story 445 & 8.30 p.m

PLAZA = (Oistin): Temorrow Is
Forever 5 & 8.30 p.m

OLYMPIC: Where the Sidewalk
Ends & Do you love Me
4.3% & 830 p.m

EMPIRE: Half Angel 4.45 &

wpm
ROYAL: Haunted Harbour 4.30
& 8.15 p.m

ROXY: Saddle Tramp & Take
One False Step 4.30 &
8.15 pm,

every stroke when the bowling
was dead and the batting dull.

The visitors have to fight hard
on Tuesday to draw the Queens-
land match. When they begin bat-
ting the wicket will be slightly
tworn, also they will probably
find it difficult to handle the
Queensland bowlers.

Time

Registered U. 1 Pemet Olen

BARBADOS



ADVOCATE



CORE 326 FOR 7



J. DE COURCY bowled by Sonny Ramadhin for 64 in the Country Teams first innings against the West

Indies at Newcastle, New South Wales, on 26.10.51. C. L. Walcott is



F “orm
Lesson Fr
By DENNIS HART

LONDON, Oct 29.

It would have been a travesty, of
football justice if Fulham’s
last-ditch rally had been enough
to gain them even one point from
their London ‘derby’ with Arsenal
at Highbury on Saturday (Octo-
ber 27th). Throughout the first
seventy-five minutes
taught them a lesson in the finer
arts of football, It is only to be
hoped that Fulham took heed of
that lesson, for frankly, if they
don’t show a marked improve~
ment very soon they are going tc
be in serious trouble.

For Manager Bili DoGgin one
can feel nothing but sympathy.
Looking at his injured list you find
it includes the names o* Wally

Hinshelwood, Jimmy Bowie, Bed-;

ford Jezzard, Bob Thomas and

Jack MacDonald, This represents

a complete first
line.

With all these players out vf
action Fulhara’s remaining for-
wards have been shuffled and re-
shuffled more times than a pack
of cards. There was another whole-
sale change-round for ,the matca
at Highbury. But I am afraid that
it did not do the necessary trick.
As individuals they all played well
but as a line they lacked under-
standing,

Fulham’s need is for a ‘gen-
eral’; some-one to command the
pare to scheme and to make those

efence-splitting passes, At in-
side-right, Macaulay — captain in
honour of playing against his old
club — showéd he had some of
that ability but he is no young-
ster, and there were long intervals
when he faded right out of the
nicture, In this respect he differed
from his opposite number, wee
Jimmy Logie, who on this form
must surely cause the Scottish
selectors, to think hard before
ignoring his claim for the forth-
coming International against

ales,

Fulham were up against one of
the best organised defences in the
country. Trying to split it, is
normally like trying to run
through a wall, But the last fifteen
minutes proved that even Arsenal
can be caught unawares,

, With the Arsenal forwards run-
ning into top gear from the start,
the Fulham half-backs were im-
mediately forced on the defensive.
Gonsequently they were unable vo
devote much time to promoting
attacks. Len Quested, not looking
at all comfortable at right half,
did occasionally wander up-fieid
to take a shot at goal, but in doing
so left.a gap in the defence. This
paved the way for two early goals
from Arsenal inside left Doug.
Lishman,

A word of praise for Fulham’s
centre-half Pavitt. He kept a firm
grip on Arsenal’s burly young
centre forward Cliff Holton. In-
ternational centre-half Jim Tay-
lor, another of Fulham’s injured,
will not find it easy to get back
his place in the first team,

Both of Arsenal’s early goals
were laid on by their young out-
side right Arthur Milton, who dur-

- ing the summer ‘plays cricket for

Gloucestershire. Young Arthur, in
lis first full season in league foot-
ball, is surely one of the most
improved players in the game, If
this rate of improvement con-
tinues, then I’m_ certain he will
ene day wear England’s colours
My hope is that he is not rushed.

The remainder of the half was
occupied by an exhibition of
‘pretty-pretty’ football by the

By Jimmy Hatlo

etkeeper.



Learnt A
om Arsenal

\rsenal_ which took them no-
where-fast. Apart from Milton and
Logie the only other Arsenal
player not engaged in this, was
right halzi Alex Forbes. If the
Scottish selectors can afford to
overlook such a keen tackler and
excellent ball distributor, . then
indeed there must be a wealth of
talent over the border.

Immediately after half-time,
Arsenal went further ahead when
Holton took the easiest of chances
laid on by Milton. Logie split the
defence with a pass to Roper at
outside left His centre to Milton
was returned right to the feet of
Holton, standing
five yards out from the goal. That
was that.

fortable margin. But just after
this, Swindin was only able to
parry a shot from Macaulay which
went to the feet c¥ Stevens who
pushed it into the net.

So we came to the last hectic

five minutes. Then Stevens scored
the best goal of the match. Re-
ceiving a pass from Campbell, he
declined to make the expected re-
turn pass as Campbell raced into!
the middle. Instead he crashed
home the ball from twenty yards. |
In the last minute, Brennan scored
with a powerful shot from twenty
yards which entered the net off
the post,



Much as one yvaust admire Ful-
ham’s last ditch fight, I do not
think that Arsenal’s defence would
have been caught so easily had
they fot held such a lead.

ARSENAL — Swinain, Barnes,

When

tar





no. more than Smith; Forbes, Daniel,’ Mercer;| “es, Colombia, Central America,
Milton, Logie, Holton, Lishman,| Mexico... and to East Coast of
Roper. South America. In fact, you can
FULHAM — Flack, Freeman,’ now “fly PAA” to 88 countries
teen minutes later Bacuzzi; Quested, Pavitt, Lowe, and colonies.
Epaning scored a fourth, it seemed (FE); Newcombe, Macaulay,
that Arsenal would win by a com- Stevens, Brennan, Campbell.
eaten : For 22 years the leading
international airline—PAA
was first to link the Amer-
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CASABLANCA, Morocco,
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Two yachtsmen left here Sun-

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Canary {slands, the last call in a

4,000-mile bid to cross the Atlan- !}}

tic, They are. Patrick Ellan, 31; !
and Colin Mudie, 23, both of Lon- }
don. “We expect to reach Trini-
dad about January 10, provided, of
course, the wind is fair because we |
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arrived here Saturday. They left |
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Spain and Lisbon.
The purpose of
they say, is to prove the tiny
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worthiness.—(CP)
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Impurities in the eae ne cause ta ae
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boils, pimples and niet skin Sethe
Clarke’s Blood Mixture

TUESDAY, NOVEMBER 6, 1951









Remember, a comfortable
fitting SUIT is our first con-
sideration. There are in-
creasing numbers who

for themselves
the consistently superb cut,
fit and finish of the.....

IDEAL TAILORING
We will welcome the op-

portunity of proving this to
you in our...

TAILORING DEPARTMENT
on the first floor of

10—13, BROAD STREET

Motor

PLEO CEES POP EP PSSOS FOSS OOOPO VOSS PONS

OPENING

* On SATURDAY 10th NOVEMBER

1951

The New BATA Shoe Store

At No.

35 Broad’ Street.

We thank our customers for theim kind -pat-
conage in the past and now offer them improved

at our new modern
built for their benefit.

store which has been

We trust your kind support will continue in the

s
s future.
>

HOUSE OF SERVICE










Walls and Ceilings

SISCOLIN DISTEMPER

Supplied in Powder form in - - -
WHITE, BUFF, CREAM, GREEN, BLUE,
SUNSHINE and PEACH

Made ready for use by mixing 2% pints Water
with 5 lbs., Powder

Obtainable in 5-16 and 314-1b packages at 2lc. per th.
FOR INTERIOR AND EXTERIOR WOODWORK

Use -- -

RED HAND
WHITE ‘S’ PAINT

Dries with a Hard Gloss equalling Enamel Finish.
Does not turn Yellow.

PHONE 4456.

-_



WILKINSON & HAYNES

——~=—

CO., LTD.



CAVE SHEPHERD & (0., LTD.










$969 999 CSS SSCS SPOS PPOOO PPPOE SSS SPS OD














Full Text



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PAC.l MX BARBADOS ADVOCATE TUESDAY. SOVFMBF.R 6. IM1 OY CARL ANDERSON KEY MOUSE BY WALT Dlbi. ric in You'll lil.. .. STl'AKT & SAMPSON'S Social & Mounl Cay Rum II has iti famous and Distinctive Flavour BLONDIE *• -AvE I i BY CHIC YOUNG # W ft| made by rpHEIR guod looka tell you they're just right. Ton know, too, when you look at the price tag, that you can't get finer value. Illustrated U • Two-tone GimpM Bro*ur. Tied to every pair ithe John White Guarantee Shield—the aign which mean* just right 7 Look fur it in leading atores in Barbados. JOHN WHITE means made just right mm 4 SAMPSON (1938) LTD. Ur..il.,.i.i ii-t--. fur Best Rum mm SmedhV* Mixed Vegetable in Una Siuedlry's Cream of Tomato Sony in tins Crow & Black well Table Salt in Bota. Crosac Blaekwell Curry Powder In BoU. Cronac ft Blaekwell Marrowfat Peas in Tina Neatle'l Milo Tonic Food in tins Nestles Nospray Powdered MUk in Una Koo Plum Jam in tina— Large small T'dHd Fine Quallt? Cocoa L|S %  Powdered Milk in tin* Bots of Anchovy Pone Tina of Three Bay Tomato Juice Tins of Farrow* Fresh Garden Pea* Tina of Saasn Olive Oil — L It S. Tins ol Liquid Stove Polish Pka. of Fab Soap Sud" THE LONE RANGER BY FRANK STRIKER iSKCrf *" rfr-ummxits a&fc^ JOHNNY HAZARD ^rTmU.0FUa0NrUtfO,5MB<*OViH0-1 fvOJ &OV5 PPlFT INTO TOV*1 OB Ott TWO fcTATTMC. TAXI POSt | ...... -ou 4*l*'..Tri_u c->*, A %  i up iou>a N %  ii .. -. RIP KIRBY DY ALEX RAYMOND 39v s a. %  t-s c M*_-V ->.; >v e-~ i 0" B1. A*0 *88-> ~i -Ct',2* DWT P-CTOMA1VI3 %  ^1 -'' *;;EI ./I ~~c*a oc'iasf T-E i 0AM v aM...Tv.i \ CgvWCTr BAOM*.' -_5 CDM^aC*TwB .v SS"t>'. BABV... A WtVfl good newt. You can enjoy the luxury of 14 glas&c of really line wine from every bottle of VP. ASK AT YOVIt VSVAL STOMF. VP RICH RUBY VP BRITISH SHERRY VP SWEET WHITE VPGINGER WINE WHAT i; BARGAIN IIIMOI' .1\I I\I; RUBBER !, inch GARDEN HOSE at 17c. a foot ECKSTEIN BROS. Bay Street Phone 4269 %  '--.'-•-•.•-'.'.-.v,*-'*--','. PHANTr .' BY LEE FALK ft RAY MOORES .VWJTC IWECANTRXLOWHIM,' FIND COT S,MESAI[1|'DNEVEI1EE WHEBE All'5 ) Mi tAWUV A6*:N IF XN6. i —*—— l^WE W>l "V .-.' .'. !.' FCUCWHIM.JUS1 v.A" HIM TUB. ON THE MK^OCHONE^/" HUAfii.AHOKEEP VEBVQUlEr. ^ Mea a^lrt UfHVrtu. If TOO M1 UnlaH ind run-down bttauw you nead mor A,\D Viuunins. iak Scou'i bmulilon nghi away. Yoti'U toM fMl fall of Ufa tfain, \ mon thfl |ot a real* Ifa POWERFUL NOURISHMENT Not put ao ordinary took—ii'f rich ia Mniral AalD Vitusioi. Oood | luting, •conoailcal too. HOW MAXY SCREWS fiV O 4 JAR O • • WIN AN EKCO RADIO GUESS COUPON WITH EVERY OVER $5.00 CASH BILL FROM NOVEMBER 1ST A. BARNES & CO., LTD.



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TUESDAY, NOTEMBU . 1MI BARBADOS ADVOCATE PAG rilRKF. •' -ln\... Bicycle Thief Jailed For 18 Months THE Hon. the Chief Justice Sir Allan Collymore ol the Court til Urand Sessions yesterday sentenced ritz Cameron Leao>ck to 18 months imprisonment when he was found guilty by an Assize jury -:( the larceny of a Raleigh bicyck viihiod at $00 the projHrty o' Arnold Plnder. The offence was committed on September M. UlH M. E *-+, T -M-* .lourne appeared on behalf of the */ \ aT* as POMlbte, %  ., .*., %  i.ii.idnl guiltv to larceny i PfndW of Pleelclcs Rood f r ,,i ,-i CoOOU. told tin -< nhee The lion, the Chlel Ju ; ^8 lie u. %  wnrktnsj hi the *lipi>in^ AH.in CoUymoni seaUenced nun to He left his hi, vcli \f Live,. imprisonment with H< cune hard labour. The offence wa comtlie same putted ; -omcilme between June %  i went to Liverpool Lane llu j g S,OM> ,,M, Sunrover Pays ELECTION OFFKJERS ^^ First Visit AND CLERKS APPOINTED \d her Brat VIM! I* BarTne following persons have Election Clertr Pearson Samuel badoa from England >esterda> been appointed b> the Govern! fl .Her Scott, Dq. bringing general cargo from it. > .mitee lo be Re. m Newport Liverpool and Glasgow turniiiK Omcer* nnd Weetion (owawna •* su. Berr whiakey, cotton thread. Ctf/tti lor the election of memReturning omcei ii bonln were among the cargo trs to larva in the General An pasacngers four of whom got f the Rjppreienutlrm of the P*ooff her.—and 3 bag* of KngUsh ptr | 11 %  whlcta I* a Raleigh M 11" linen reported the matter to I-Tapp -nd" the Poh,... He IdeoUOod the bicycle by af SI. Mkharl — RetiiiiiLiiK OftVri CS| beif Radley W Ulan M B C Clerk II Ramsay. ESq I niislltiirii, \ .if Thrill ( hurrh — Heturning Officer: Harry St. w.ir.i. Bag ranna Bdwut W.d Godgsq. CenaeHnencv af SI, m m. J Returning Officer; James Colin Kin^. Election Clerk: Lloyd Ed* .ir.f Cave. Esq raawthavnry of SI Ja-wa — r-turning Officer John Henry Thnrne. BsO>; Elevtlon i.-lit peiv, Hainilten Tarilton N I Casurtiaaeitey af >t Oswald Keturnuig Officer. t> hsynes. Eaq ; Elect v M Clerk i IMPERIAL I FATnrRW ask for LUXURY TOILET SOAP9 N flOSSOM • KIT in u IMH for accused and ow and while With fur coat orar cbocolata coloured suit and balga swaat er and inaka up kit In Iranparant buckat type handbag, filmstar Nancy Taltntlaa tr Hvas in her London hotel from America. She w on her way to Calcutta for her oacond and official marriage ceremony to the Maharajah of Coocb Ba nar. Tne Brst ceranwnya Brahmin one In into ww kept -ecrct pending Indian government approval. EXPRESS SEAWELL AMUvaxa ni n w i A ON •'""I'M rsoal r vrsTKNt rotn ST VINCENT-Pmtncia Caea Fivrx ANTIC.VA -Alfred UuKirr reon. URSUANA Anlhon, Hadl Madid. AIKo Jane*. Jacejll •.,. rram T KfTTS %  — LUCIA Tl — Trpen. anyone permission to use He could n't remember Wie serial number of the bicycle. Weston Jones of Cocoanut Groee. St Joseph *nld that he has Ti v -_ 0 rt „, i,l>cmiei &si&Ttf s;rcnmTssssttmiJ iSrss -er.he accused asked him if he knew njnne St Hill with J ne ' p l person who would like to buy a n * d -. Mr E i,/^ eare,t on behnlf of Skeeb The accuaad had a bicycle with f he court that the him. The number was M-SM6 mother boy had a i throwing a stone which was inI!.reported to Sgt. Henderson tended for this boy unfortunate)* that the accused was trying to this lad St. Hill was struck Thcrsell a bicycle. Sgt. Henderson wa j no oMgetton of malice. The %  iTtsited the iiccused. Chief JtAfee told Skoete that in Caspar Athaly. an agricnrlural a *,. ,t was In accident. Tne worker of St. Joseph told the person who throws stones in law Court that Wie accused used to ls Uable tor the injury inflicted work with him. He Heard the un tne ,,t n ,.. Throwing stones i^ accused asking If anyone wanted un i aw f U | but it was not his intciilo buy a I'H-ycle. The accused was ,| on ,„ vnd n j m („ p ,hon. then In a -hop. Positioned Station Sergeant Henderson !" 1PT^L attached lo District -F" Police v .S?^.^ Bf SS KP P ff ntZ W, ,BW Station said that on October 9 a £"JJ BCi ^SSz WMt..e UM name of Brndshaw >? ''>. £ wounding WJuti.eld r spoke to h.m He got into *e *th Intent ltir ,, lpApit rccoRtiised the bicvclc a man. asked The Hon. tne t-niei Mirey* aiadru. snioit tiOttt, The accused was Justice to take a serious view taken to the Station and the the matter. bicvele was identified bv Arnold The Chief Justice said th.it tM Finder as his property The using of knives is a serious mattei accused was then charged. and people are being killed by knives. Anyhow he was postponing Cecil Marshall a Writ Server sentence to get s report about him. I on October 9 he saw the Bourne had nothing to say on his accused with a bicycle. He examined the bicycle and it answer' CARVIN SMITH pleaded guilt) lo tN' larceny of articles valued „, MM. L Thotni H Abrru by the n.m. the Chief J us Saos : Mr. M>hn.'"(i 'pua-samp.' c. rijlZk-mi.. ?Z Searles said that for sometime he Uj&g k *26 TJU'^Tt' OSVf Th was missing things from hi, place **£ £* Vl^S^.VSSi .,i il the accused had access to bis usw, Phuu ouak. Ja.ec Young. place. Mou.l1 BMinte, Kir TVIIu-lia. Maria The Hon. the Chief Justice also E n ^ l £ n V? 01 i2H?* JSHSf"'J? sentence on Joseph iottn origii Whitrlght. a J2-year-old lubourer Kbrri i gtfl Reynold Emtage. E<) i aaaSssaBSSaSS af St. Andrem:— Kt turning Officer. Fmlerick A: thus ingi-in. Eaq., Elaetton Can ance Alan Skumer. Esq. rice Ceaaenaetacv ef St. George:— ( ..n.Ui.iri. of >U reite: (vlng Returning Offlcei Willi.un Arme) Rttumtng Officer; Cyril Amos F c*terday by schoMiers callYearwood. Eaq. EMctlon Clert Thorntoi Esq.; Election Clerk from other islands. Thi IVmglnv Hugh Adrten Johl %  Coctsn, Esq. frYsnrh W -Smith brought the Esq. CanmttUeetry af St. .*:— fli? Tn ? US Sr mS-% <•";•'' f <*v"'" Cl" H.ndrt C.n^ Other schooners calling were Ihc Mares Henrietta from Si. Lucia, the Everdene trom llritish* Guiana. They brought between them over 1.000 bags of charcoal. 150 tons of Are wood. 71 posts and 18 crates of fruit. The schooners are consigned lo inc Sch,cner Owners' aBBKanaV tion. Men Raid Factories For Sicrap Metal Whttfleld EU told the ""''' * BECAUSE or the good price nou being paid for scrap metals, many men have started to raid factories. Inspector Bourne of the i: I.n \ I tM Bau-baaaa Advaease. "My Department has been very active in trying to put an end Ifl tl I %  • larcenies", he said. On Friday night a ^quad of Police arrested Herman Alleyne. shopkeeper of Hlnd.* *"* CID men lfd Io ,h€ :,r st giiha Vandiju. M irfsrH nnch. pa,.i of Venture. St John and Rudolph Imm . . „„ Howell of Nur.e Land. Cairlngton arapA? Village, SI Michael. Thcv half rntNtnM> *. it>Tttuni. been charged with breaking and I.I i ii. i ed to the description of waa reported stolen. I that Thai, i l \ TJ^Jff^SS at 150.5O the property of Cbflord EJnVSITj rtatasnerrt at District F SvMlos Sentence was postpoiKvi A i Station wttfoh he signed. At this stage the case for prosecution was closed. The accused then addressed the Ju entering buildings at Cliff Plantation. St. John and Malvern. St Joseph and stealing quantities different metals. The metal stolen from Cliff was attached to machinery vrttetl arfll be used In the romlng crop season. NO QUORUMI AT VESTRY MEETING who pleaded guilty of the larceny L! 1 """ valued at $330.52, the ',t^li" B property of Cyril Payne from the flichoel Vestry Meeting, dW elling house of David Payne which was U> have tnke n place Thp „*,,.,„.,. wm committed on yesterday, wa not held. There j une i_ wore not enough members prosWounding Sentence fgj atao psWaWncd <-n M'"."^^.' ent to form a W !"!" ^ f*" 0 Sentence was also postponed on was needed t, form n quorum ,,..„ llir u. D „ ni,iy,i SZmmtf&Bm^SmVnt I !" .,nl?,m '""" %  Srptombor 15. Mr. I. ,i A i llatwurd. lliiah D-plmr W.-odi i i. Brrtlu. Taylor, HaUam StaMiab, Asan UJ nt is a i \ rr-n 1.IM..J Boyee. C cm. H. Alleyne, M. AlWjw. O Cuntmlm. M Roys*. H. Olll. (amiCaiiiplnn. J Rap%  Wllm tr. g Vaarra. w I .1. | '. Vli i tain ,... M Vlx.nl CarMn, Suiii.ipi. Ki Glttcns Land, Govenimcnt Hill. ^L,„ ro, a water main acnaa !" S* Actini AtI( Ml .., );( )( ., Two^uortwould have been tn,d ,h *\ c0ur1 ,nnl %  np ^ *. %  ->^ii n >i nn *e -nirfuinmil bread vendor iu hit him with ., Ine; th. .nsUU. on of *< !" "> h „ mmor ThP uccus d ..y n .„ U ? n^ an"Wr fSrT^K " borruwod .ho hammer from'a .-,,. lining thflr bmt %  "q^if!" tWr o lh* tonvmlon m *'S CO u" .'" T" Hm M .'"! .I, ,trcl lamp, ,ulpprd for WIn tml Morrll who pl e a.ll carrying Natural Gas, and regretj;""^ ting an v im-oiivenicnoe caused. Members present wc rc ; Mm-m! nothing tastes so good as a good cup of coffee! IIMR I.I ir 11 ars BV "Si l... PatrU ki.., Jtian K.na. C.lt.rl.. !" iualatll Frl. Oirlll TlH>mDann l. SI Vlneaal Oarlruda Uwb. Glady* Hci.iurl Cupid. M.I,.,. '.il'Sentence w Winifred M Inllicling grievous bodil. Iinin on Agnila Springer on Dean August 19. Mr. G. Farmer counsel I I. V. Hazolwood. Chairman, gr Morris told the court that in Hon. V. C. C.ale, Mr. T. Bowrlng, ".. argumen over some man be• ""* pr Mr. E. D. Mottley, M.C.P., Mr. tween herself awl the trthar woi K (' C.rannum. Mr. Victor 'an. a Aght ensued in which UM ciiase. Mr. A. R. Toppin. Mr.McD. accused hit the woman with :,.. ,;, : symmonds. Mr. 11. A. Tudor. •_T n p *"' Sun I.. MiHIalua* t'tvttcaux. l-r CliiJ.lo.a~' C4TSS Of KXCBAlKt t AN.1M SBffi ItraO. Cable IIEW* SHOWERS FALL ISLAND-VIDE Heavy snowers of ram. accom MJI il^ 1 l ) mc d by occasional flashes ol Kina Oiadlightning and rolls of thunder, fel. cn.too Isiand wide on Sunday with the exception of St. Philip's pansli which enjoyed a dry day. St. Lucy ami St. Andrew recorded the heaviest falls. Returns from Itelleplame Police Station recorded 10 parts of rain in St. Andrew rram 0 a.m. to 0 p.m. yesterda %  "" %  and 1.30 inches of rain from p in. yesterday until 6 a.in th morning. Over the same periods, gaafla v'rab Hill Police Station, St Lucy i. corded 13 parts and ll niche Throughout the day, the sky was oeereasrt. Church attendances were poor. In sOme pa 1 iraetg were flooded and vrator v-irroumle,! people'* homes. Most of the parishes had the heaviest fall during the night St. George. St. Thomas, St. James and St. John received more rain during the day than during the night. The rainfall returns from the various police stations are as follows:— Central Police Station 12 parts, District "A' 43 parts. District "B" B0 parts. District "D" 21 parts. District 'E' 05 parts, District %  18 parts, Holetown 34 parts. Tour Roads 10 parts. RSlleplaine 1.36 inches, Crab Hill 1,23 inches Especkillyil the "cup Soldi Chose Sonbom. For here's coffee as coffei should be —rich, hearty and totHtyi Just sniff that inviting aroma . tip that heavenly ootree ffovor. see if you don't agree Chose & Sanboi gives you all me flavor your cup held. So don't knt ask for coffee, ask forChote & Sonbom^ Has* %  a 111", pr 9^ anuptufe, -any tme>. my attain* /Ac coot, *tfttfietii!t> jya^fancei of ATKINSONS / mi HEALTH BENEFITS L> • CONTAINS VITAMIN A t D IN A DELICIOUS FORM • INCREASES RESISTANCE TO ILLNESS • ENSURES STRONG LIMBS AND SOUND TEETH IN CHILDREN SOU A' MISSRS. A. S. BRYOEN** SONS (BA*ADOSl. LTD., P.O. BOX 5), BRIDGETOWN, BARBADOS Haliborange The niemtt way of taking HALIBUT LIVER OIL iii II mil i IIIIIITI ITD lOtfooi > RlGrTT fttAOnAnt f* THAT Ml | I Mil Ml l>OF \l I. COLD MID* rm or rotoo* t'tZtnn LWTr*Of sso'i Mi** fu or eotozHt aorai asfst tonoN w tonoN eau or exoem Maucr 14 riowrst eau or COIOT^F tAurr sutu i*u oc coiocrf ATllNHNt. M 010 MM ITaffT. 10MM, IMLANO WITH ov.-r 100 Micld" d.iiK h ci.mt SKvlitiers. carrying djiarl than *I.IK*I pacMengers n IH.lNKl mil.* of "Mnple Leaf" mutes C"iil lo oMaSl in Caiunla. to the is Britain and rTswoa, D aT fliu da Mad tho Weat lu.li.-a. OARDIMll / | SUN IO. L"'D. Mrik*ar*M Strei-I, Irldirtot, a. FaWfM *'*' If you sre worried %  bout hi. health, give him a good I NcM-nScnS Pure tod Liver Oil. In rids natural lm. jnd vmniin. ill do muih n rnergy and hui/d up new lictlth and nrcngili. Does he get chest'colds ancT coughs? ••• % %  • %  ••• % % %  -a f 4P3UU1.S in fa*.. sagoMg r/fli;/fi-a.M*irf.,i,. isff-M,.-*.,. // ytm ld> riprtlrnia In the | tlon ol cars ol r •fllclen rnKMixiIivkiix/ %  ui .mobile CUIT i :i.~i!na advnti in'ludlns i.n.' n Dai ind> *wa?SoM\VartitB""aa i CM,IC tii] f8R LU66IBl i.li*ui. >.i ...' %  -, RooaS tor lisnraea tor tour inn ** < h ir-mk pa> Mil 'ho uparewBeel "•stole from a % %  twill STS WIIHII WHKLIASl tkll 10 F**K a TO IRIVC All iM.vr.irrs alt )'> down wit Mn up whrriui %  < %  roartetlanorafert %  a-t il-nrrifHl to if.-nnalofni.aJI/ ipSort r-jv to park in %  man spac* and atrer tUouiin iralfk. Lea* coaUy tomaJntalB. T.< onomical to operate with fuel .utuumptlon of W i WORLOS BloC(3l SlILt CAR HUf ;' ri 'A,IUZ'.< i ^rod tear oof %  i %  .hin.-a ol taany bit %  •;.niva cars. FORT ROYAL GARAGE LTD. Paon 2385 Sole Diilributori Phonf 4504



PAGE 1

PACK Hint RAIlBADOS ADVOCATE II I SI>AV, SOVI Ml'.l 11 I I'l.M BARB.^S^_Am''O0ATE nt>to4 r **• i Tm-Mby. November K. IfSl KISE.MIOWIK WHAT is the MfniftCM*" ol < :.-neraI SfMBfeSWcri VSatit to the United States? The 9 nmiandcr has not been fitting iiTig But can all this be done before March which is the time that General Eisenhower must he in the United States if he is going to run for President ? The General's visit to the United States may be a normal visit to report back to President Truman, but it comes at a time wh?n speculate? as to his own future in Europe \r> being made by welMnfolinari quari'is. f*a rest of the world will lollow syltn interest and anxiety any chai.ge in the Genral's status during these critical .nonths. The ttroul JLUv mi nl At TEX ALL *? *rr*r* A*" 1 : "! ""g*??-**" ? with which the average rhrutian they mean the same thing. Scoutd Ntyr. I5r^^ 'nunik-rl person U beset. inn I* a w.iy r.f lire SkOUtt liny Seoul Movement ui v "u ret n child to take a na*ty Founder My* "U a school of cltireeche* It, 40 h Milelull by coating H with Neap, nol unship through woodcraft %  tone a. ita birthdays are referred much though a Seeming ran be dlvidM inu> RW to. early next year n it may be) but really heads — CHARACTER, develop hoped appropriate celebration because we know it is food for "lent, will take place. the child. So. why not make i. • %  •. Today, after 3t>? years one yet palatable to secure the end — the pcrstftency hears the now time-honoured he'.ith of the cfcdrt* I Ml in| that all i* BO* well with self-reliobedlenefi pluck an rttRWCRAn elements of a hobby and poeai u i> ; of a future cirer, PUBUC SER| nuv VICE. specialisation in different' at Imperial He-oyu— .en forms of usefulness for others and in closing hu Annual Report loi HEAI-TH. physical development it Indeed an Mveniutv— „ lnmB c haracter. heVlth or enjo> %  oi Kedilfuauin u to atweer tnese the greatest of adventure. — the mfM ^ ||f( ^ hKhuol: ScwiXin to justify our existence adventure of living under the ^^ |n ^. oatmt h( ^y b, l ci and to try to show the ttaroado* guidance of cod. What an adlo acquire nuaUtlcs of seU-relunc nubile wny Scoutuig -Jwuld t-c ven.ure for these day* of unrest, an( r^ourc. health and ener*i> Lupyitic' oppose any orgnni^outwel gh the normal. Our Methods, member of a church. tion having for it* purpose the f nlcn j sh a ii ,peak on another uplifting Of youth; it drives to ^V^ .„ not tnc fnd but lh e S !" "*'"^ *<* %  **£.*?„ promote the healthiest relation„<, MyBi .-The ^ |8 helps bushiest The obJylve o Ship, with all youth bodies. ApSTcWr. character with a pur^"•^ %  ^ l tr 25 0dJ wJ "STfi l B*" ,n C m,,,,^,W P. -"I S Purpose th-t the J h .^ lin V to Thf£y Jneon next generation be mm,Jm._m m^ e s| /Rfp him to acquire aane world, and J'velop the habllfl ^ lf ^.ducl. the chief bemhigher realisation of SCTVic^ and emC|ent ^^ , ^ I cher rwle. Havuig no barrie m nn. enii.nr ,-rced or reliwu.i i.j itai iua "i compariaoi population Ha* nuniwi on u aicioi-.'U uy tnc rscent CMnea the active servit, %  llssiliaillj oeiow wn-i U wiouio Duty to God and imoxfasl aeaiiiiu.ii-rs conu such an adventure to be Scouting has already shown th; aiders -nat tnc proportion oi co nfined to any one class or race? what is considered impoasib is to population StkOUMI be luu Slimll „g )Ul Aims, Object and not by any loa.uuu. ao mat wiin our popui-^clhods. has hred the imagination r* ta b,Uhm n uon at approximately ^IU.WUO our of the whole wor id, 47 odd nations ^'J'^ 0 ",^)," !" 0 "^ ,* means so — th it o social systrn harmony and goodwil Every between Indivtdu-il and individu I race and race, nation and nati id Therefore the community shoult iception bcouts siiould be, especially after hilVC em braced Scouting. 3D years, no less than 4.Z0U. What inalvtdu ai without nni place our uuaod would ah ould be and must be helped to !" *'<£ av ^ atton of this .. oe ,l foi the pa.M i" or 15 years. bl . person of charac.cr—a per£ finlu act JTof financial sympathy 4.00U of its boys were boy Scouts son wlt h high moral principles, a l 0((iljn quoU the Found-—boys living or at least striving person that can be depended upon .r>here can be no more profitable to live lhe Scout liie. And wfiat is l0 Bay i hc right thing and do the lnvpstmen t of money than to tak. lhe> Scout life* The answer Is rlg ht thing under all circum„ s hare in carrying out lhe devel the Christian life, the life Our stances, a person In whom there opm cnt of u Movement srhld Lord and Saviour came 2,000 „ no pet.mess of feeling, nasty provides a balamed system o' years ago to teach mankind to prejudices, a person tolerant of education, physically, mentally practice There will alwuys be the feelings and opinions of others, morally, and spiritually, to supple some bad people in the world— „ person who loves his fellow man ment in the matter of CHARA* by bad 1 mean, dishonest, unbecause, like himself, he is made TER the ordinary book-leamin reliable, immoral, selfish, wicked. ln ln e likeness and image of God. <-f the schools." This has been the case since Such persons are to be found In In another broadcast I hope t Creation. Satan once occupied a ftU „ lraU 0 f society. Why then deal with Scout Methods and tm place in heaven; amongst Our ne lru|U rtencc in Barbados on Scout Uniform, with some or u Lord's chose., few was an archS cou ing for the poor. Scout.ng rather controversial subject. traitor. These ugly apota. howw aIjlo for ( h r rich. clQae ihin y^t,, „ wor d on ou. & mus^ KdlTawa 0 ; ? would appear that pare.,,, arc J^S^iSt SSTln^S from Ihe real purpose o, Uf, n-JJ ^^.o^r^r^ ^^0^X0^ Scouting as another of,hose ino.e when M t my Cambridge Senior !" J !" f 'h^^itm.,' 0, Uej w.M,h> .ii... bj of well Bxan mja year ..,„ i exn hevln them of tnebtSness en meaning persons to help the poor perienced the disgust of seeing )( St .juung financing the Troop— and unfor.unale; others think it a boy in front of me answering his la people to act as secretaries splendid means of putting an end questions from books and leaves treasurers, members of committo |>e,ty larceny and general bad he held on his knees: I saw onothcr ipes; for persons to find time t< behaviour in a certain class, boy pass entire sheets of work tT assist these Scoutmasters by InScouting i s nothing of the sort. a friend a few seats behind. I ..irutting in special subjects—JnOur Founder himself said "Scou.have been told that these practice* gtructors and Examiners. You set |ng Is not a charity organisation have not been abandoned. Should hew everybody can help, not onlj by i>cople in society for the u be any wonder If such boys In the Scoutmasters, but you. membenefll of the poor children." later years become thieves, not bcrs of the community. The boy Routing is a way of life. It la only thieves of property but of are there and they will come way rrfade very attractive, almost ,heir employers' time they want to be manly And true a diluting, so that those who would Can we afford to sacrifice charheart; they want to be led arig walk In i, mav be better enarter for certificates? Where are the leaders and the courage,! It. preserve nnd not yield Whit, is Scouting* There are helpers? I ask 'is the standart too easily ,o the many temptatloni many answers but when analysed required too high I io.ii The" "TIMKV Orf. 2. I?m THE ap|Miintmi'Tit of Lord Ismay as Secretary of State for Commonwealth Relations and of Mr. Oliver Lyttelton one ol the senior members of the Conservative Party, as Colonial Setrttary. is an indication of the importance which Mr. Churchill attaches to these posts The Colonies arc in urgent need of development. The good intentions of the Labour Government in this matter were too often baulkad by (Mr failure to ensure that thenplans wore sound in conception and in execution. Mr Lyltclton's practical experience should enable him to beware of this miitake he slmuld also lind it easier than a Labour Minister would to encourueprlvab IrrYititnunl In colonial developmentSClH'tlH'.s THAT 'Youngsters' Who't* Toiled Six Years Against The Taunt* By WILLIAM BARKLEY THIS new House is to an astonishing extent the mixture as before. Many of the new winners are former losers. The election givs us singularly little new blood. But. mercifully, at least when the pudding was stirred the basin was left facing the opposite way. From my Gallery seat fronting the Government I shall not see so many faces from which I have the desire to avert the eye. The? Socialists will be beneath me. It will be a thrill to see Churchill enter on the right of the Chair as Prime Minister These 18 months he has stood the taunts of Shinwell and other Socialists that he always acted as if he were Prime Minister It was not his fault. He did not have any competition in appearance. Who'll talk beside him from lhe Front Bench ? It is a vital question. So many young and able thruslers sat behind him in Opposition that they can hardly all be suited to office. But they all think themselves suitable Boyd-Carpenter. Peter Thorneycroft. David Eccles, Antony Head, Walker-Smith, Nigel Birch — a host of "youngsters" as politicians age have toiled six years in the wilderness ind look now for their reward. ROOM FOR ALL There would be ill-will if Churchill we r e disposed to bring in outsiders in the interest f broadly basing his Government to their exclusion. They will not be disposed to accept sacrilice in the cause of face to such oldsters as lohn Anderson or Archibald Sinclair, who might reach office via the Lords. But. as it happens, Churchill inherits, if he .'ares to maintain, a Government machine which the Socialists greatly expanded. He bag. 60 or 70 places to allot. So maybe it the Lord with extensive overseas experttng. In the latter part of 1950, I>ieslden, of the Council (first Sir enre gained chiefly with f'.r Forhe spent six to seven weeks In John Anderson and then Mr. elgn Office. During Worid War Nigeria and the Gold Coast for a Altlce ) In 1945 he was transII. and since then he has been East Africa He was back In ferred >o the Treasury (Defenc. brought into close con tart with short vltlt earlier this year. Materials Division) and in the IC4ntral economic planning lowing year he became the Prime •narhlncry of H.M.G.. and it Is for During each of these visits h? Minister's Personal Assistant, an in* work in the economic field has discussed with pejple on the appointment he held till he wen" 'hat he has !>een chiefly distinspot questions arising in connecto the Colonial Office. An uulhoiiUl.vc life of Admiral Beatty has long been needed. Rear Admiral Chalmers po-ucsse* high (tualiflcat ion for lhe task of writing it. He has been given full access to Beatty's private papers He was navigating officer in Bcaltvs flagship at the I lUanaa. He was Beatty'., personal friend. Such a inmbinalioii of documentary, private nnd professional knowledge cn *< trceK f.nl U> produce a valuable raogr,iphy Admnal Chalmers'.nook* will be widely read not only by students of n-ival history but by many ethers to whom Ihe nann of I has become both a symbol and a %  A Second Nelson ? Was Beatty a second Nelson or %  merely • %  brave but fooltardy commander who only k and mtral Chalmers oaturany inclines to the it would ba invidious to i: il*.comparison l"o fnr." ul ii can i %  symbolised to the people of all nations the flgnting ...vy Poseur V Dare -devil ? The Asloiiisliinit Beafty rSassWn. He rose to the Jop with extraordinary speed He was a i-.iptain at 29. an Admiral at 38 I,ike Nelson he possessed unlimited personal courage, like he was a II imboya.it personality with more than a touch n( HM poseur (everyone rememberthe rakish angie of his hat>. Like NeLon, too. he fell passionately in love with a married v.t rn HI. but il is not so clear that igBBSMfl the genius of* a He certainly did not .' the same success. The moat important battles in Beatty's weM those of the Dogger Bank and Jutland At both Beatty commanded the battle cruisers and Ins task was of paramount lance; but the Dogger Bank appointing and Incom while Jutland must be regarded as a clear defeat. The Big Muddle Both battles, especially Jutland. subject of protracted "Timonlous dispute, and the part played by Beatty is f.ir more would appear from Admtrnl Chalmers's account B ROBERT Bl.AKF II.rUshrd with t hurrhlll. He married a divorced heir rs He set atralegbda argnIni far a generation To-day rainra the story of Britain's moat ceaUovenial sailor: the dark backiruund behind the farsde of saeeess. He defends Beatty on the r.round that the error* which occurred were due to faulty signals Mid lay outside Beatty's control. ind that If Beatty's intentions had been carried out all would have been well. It is no doubt true Uiat muddle o\er communicationhad disastrous results at cert.un momm*At the Dogger Bank, for example, Beatty's cruisers, owing ,o a n-isunderstanding. left on* of the ilcrm .ri ships completely unmarked and frsw to Ore without disturbance Even more serious an ambiguous signal from Beatty caused his second-in-command. Admiral Moore, to break oft from the pursuit a, the very moment when victory seemed certain But surely this was Beatty's mult, not Admiral Moore's; and when we find exactly the same errors occurring at Jutland 18 moB*Jse later we begin to wonder If bad luck alone can explain Beatty's misfortunea. Same Again Once again BeaiiVs cruisers # On Page I. Next battle will be the unscrambling ol Messrs. Strauss and Hardie's Nationalised Steel Corporation. The new chairman of the ,: of '•:• Many Uses : 6 Sheffield Steel KITCHEN CUTLERY C. S. PITCHER & Co., LTD. y Ph. 4472 Enjoy a DOMINICA CIGAR On Sale al Your Druggist DA COSTA & Co., Ltd-Agents GODDARDS EARLY!! THIB WEEK Is Holiday Wack. Thursday and Pridsy hetn* Hollday*. we !>- you to phone EARLY for your favonrlte CARR'B SWEET BISCUITS ID Tins ual Pkga. Start i hiday with a bowl of OATFLAKES .24 per lb. For lour Sandwii hrs J. fe R. BREAD ANCHOR BUTTER OX TONOUEU CORNED BEEF LUNCHEON BEEF ROAST BEEF HAMS in TinPOTTED MEAT LIVER PASTE PATE DE FOIS GODDARDS FOR BEST SERVICE



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m BRITAIN, FRANCE WILL BACK TRUMAN Of Over Control Armaments LONDON. Nov. IttD will give full backing to President Truman's proposals for the reduction and international I of armaments, usually reliable quarters said here to-day. They believed the main purpose of Truman's proposals—to be made in the broadcast to the world on Wednesday — would be to test the sincerity of the Communist peace campaign The President's plan was expected to include tirm measures for the international supervision of all armaments, but especially atomic weapons. The re-armament initiative from the West, it was argued here, coming at the moment when the North Atlantic Re-armament Programme was in full swing, would serve a double purpose. Firstly it wouldemphasise that the Atlantic Pact military sirateuy was defensive; secondly, it would test the result) of the Soviet appeals for peace. Trumun's disarmament broad-< cast, it was understood here. subject to prolonged exchanges batmen London, Part* and Washington, even hafd British new Conservative Government came into power. Thesis Expected The project subsequently received the backing of the new British, Prime Minister Winston Churchill Hid Foreign Secretary Anthony Eden. Eden ai Stute* Secretary of State Dean Achc.'on are expected to develop ;i tin backed by Truman at their opening speeches in the General Assembly of the United Part* later this week. It was thought one basic tactic.11 consideration underlying the W> :'.decision to launch a "disarmament under international supervision'" campaign was their recollection of past sessions of the United Nations Assembly. The recent sessions of the have i>cen used by the Soviet delegation to launch calls for atomic nr general disarmament These ..[ii.c;il> have all railed because the S >viet Governawd to allow International inspection within Its borders. But she fact that the initiative his come from Motcow has allowed the Soviet Union to a puce a* champion of p*a This, prior to consultation twren the "Big Three" ICC. irior to consultation* beWestern Oovernments, has resulted in preparation of the Western disarmament I'll! -TJ.P. The 'Acheson Plan' Is Secret PARIS, Nov 9 Eden and Acheaon win metl again at J.00 pjn to-day, jt U.• %  United Stales Embassy. A tight Jjd is being kept o n the detai's of ihe "Acheson Plan." since few beside the three ministers Acheson. Eden, and Scnum.n—themselves know the details. although sensationalised Parisian accounts are reported to have the 'inside' %  lory. All that can be said |i (hat Acheson intend* to take the initiative away tram the Russians and lay the key question on the line; Is Ihe Soviet Union ready to consider real peace or does it want to continue the cold war? He will seek to strengthen thv United Nations hand, so that the confusion and hastily conceived action which followed the start of war in Korea, will not be necessary in event of any new aggresThe must likely course that be Ul take in this Held is lo propose machinery for bringing regional i All Quartrrt: Russian Smuggler Caught MIAMI. Florida, Nov. 3 < i i "go'lo Simonovlch. Russian, who for years was the kingpin of •n .then smuggling ring operating out of Cuba, was arrested by l.S immigration officers attar hbi mysterious amvil at a littli uMd airport 4 miles north o Simonovich wixs wanted 01 Mnwggling charges since 1847 and Mil unit year by the Senate Committee of "master-minding Communist activity" in the western hemisphere. The US border pa"rol reeled an anonymous teaajhooa call early Sunday saying "someone you want badly" arrives shoitly at Prospect airport Half an hour later Blmaoovld found alone on the airfield. I ui nm.iri. New Mexico. — An ir liner attempting an emergency landing near here in a sin crashed with 37 aboard Ten were hospitalized, two in a critical condition. The airliner chartered by the Army, was carrying army personnel returning from Korea. The impact broke the plane in two. Oslo.—The Nobel Peace Prize of 1951 was awarded to Leon Jouhaux of France, the Norwegian Nobel Institute announced to-doy. U. Jouhaux is a French Trade Union leader. Paris.—Brigadier General CarUK P. Romulu. Foreign Secretary ot the Philippines, was called in Monday to try to mediate the fourtight among 20 Latin Ameridctegations over which of the countries should hold the 'Sldency of the sixth session of U N. General Assembly which opens here Tuesday. A Latin American President of the Assembly is generally agreed ipon. arsssSa g£S3£WtfS Nation. Collective Security. King ;'s Health Improves LONDON. Nov B. A communique Issued from Buekingham Palace today said that the King'* health has improved last fortnight. The Communique signed by five doctors said that Hi.Majesty %  *' T part of U* md was able to attend to certain affairs of StJte. out that the need for core remained. The last Communique was Issued 16 aays ago. ill'.P. Royal Couple To Tour E. Seaboard Provinces HALIFAX. Nova Scotia, Nov. 5 "The weather was] ihe onto thing Ihe maritime royal tour planner* had not completely arranged for on Monday. Everything els was shipshape however as Princes* Elizabeth and the Duke of Edinburgh headed through Eastern Quebec b) i n-day tour of the Eastern seaboard provinces. The royal Tour will end near there on Nov. 12th with a full dress and completely rehearsed sendoff. Before that, however, Ihey will visit in New Brunswick, Nova Bcotla, and Prince Ed,waxd Island, where residents have patiently waited since Octebsr 8th. smugly telling themselves that Elizabeth nnn Phil; seen anything vet." — I'.f*. Truman Denounces "Obstruction" NEW YORK. Nov. 5. Truman warned Monday that "obstruction and confusion and false propaganda" at home will hamper the rearmament programme in the coming "crucial' VIM I Truman said in a letter to th" Congress of Industrial Organizations Annual convention that some Americans are working hard to put a brako on our domestic progress to cripple and cut down our foreign aid. lo weaken our suppo-t for the United Nations, and some "I them would even, risk a world war in their impatience to find short cuts around the problems that confront us. —I'.F. day on its 193? programme for serving the religious and morale needs of 200.000 Jews In the armed services. The President of the Board told Truman that the organization will recruit 148 full-time and 211 parttime Jewish chaplains for the armed forces. On The Spot YESTERDAY afternoon Ihe Advocate* Kovinc Reporter was driving along Dayrrlls Road. He saw a man waving a red flag furiously ahead of him and he stepped dead on reaching. Ihe man with Ihe flag. Bui the Hag-bearer, obviously annoyed. shouted. "Man carry on driving, yuh en aee uh waving to tell yuh uh gwlne blow up a hole In de road dere.' 11th Atomic Explosion In U.S. Was Set Off To-day LAS VEGAS, Nevada, Nov. 5. The 11th atomic explosion in the United States, possibly an air drop, was set off to-day at the atomic proving grounds at Frenchman s Flat. The oxplosion sent a towering linger-like spiral of -smoke high into the sky. The test came after the threeday lull, which followed the first atomic combat manoeuv res in history, on last Thursday. To-day's was the Fifth nuclear [detonation of the present I Vegas series, and was dropped Iado-U.S. Relations Are Good NEW DELHI, Nov. 5. Foieign Secretary K. P. S. Mcnon declared Monday that there's no Indo-American problem and the friendship between the • L.-. would remain stable perpetually. Menon spoke at an official banquet in honour of three new Ambassadors Chester Bowles U.S.. Stanislaw Ostroborg, France and Stephane Halot, Belgium. acknowledged American sympathy with Indian independence and recalled Roosevelt's memoirs wherein it is stated thut Churchill "roared like a wounded lion" al Rooucvclt's mention tt Indian freedom. —f.l*. CRICKETrLatest 12.30 BRISBANE Nov 6. Queensland were all out for 466 soon after lunch on the third day" v' BV ' their four day match hers to-day A. Carrtgsn. Queensland %  kipper, was bowled by Oomez after making 160. Queensland thus hsvV a first Inning, lead of 257 over the West Indies. Reds May Reject Cease-fire Offers TQKVO. Nov. 5. Communists are i-juiocted ti> iciest the new Four Point United Natiuns ceasefire proposal made today. The proposal was announced at the truce sub-committee's talks at Panmuniom, simultaneously with the Allied counterattack on the west front, where the United Notions forces had heen driven back by one of the heaviest artillery barrages of the Korean war The four points were: (1) Any ceasefire zone will be based on the battle line at the time of the Armistice signing "with appropriate adjustment*". (2) The Zone is to be two and a half miles wide. <3) The Committee's three officer* should determine the actual line contact at any specific future date (4) The agreements are to be reported u> the Plenary Session talks with the recommendation thai the latter discuss other items on the agenda, leaving completion agreement on the demarcation hue until it can be settled definitely. United Nations Briefing Officer i William Nuckols, who described the proposal as a "forward step", -aid-that the Com>iad already labelled it "unfair, unjust and unreason•nbla." Near the end of to-day' session, they had indicated that they would reject it. he added -f r 8 31 Oftlci.il I observers included am Curtis Lcmay, Chief of Strategic Air Command. Medium-Size Bomb The explosion was from an apirentiy medium-sized bomb •.pped from a H-2U First there as a brilliant flash. Thirty %  onds later a dirty gray coloured loud soared above the horiton assumlr-g the customary mushroom, which has foil..wed all atomic explosions. An indication of the size and potency of this detonation was given by the unusual warning from the Aloenh Energy Commission. Radio stations in a wide area covet Ooldfleld. Beatty. and Callento Nevada, were asked to warn residents to open windows in their homos and shops. Presumably, this would be to lessen the effects of the tremendous concussion expected Perceptible Rumble Seven minutes after Ihe detonation, there was a perceptible n ble In Ls Vegas, along with a sudden blast of wind. The brilliant light was as bright. leas: as the big one. last Thursday, the first detonation u. which troops took part in atomic manoeuvres. The cloud rose on its stem and the mushroom above quickly acquired formations that looked like two ice caps. Then it settled, and with a few minutes, the stem began to wither and break up The great whit cloud took on a coral pink east, while at the base an gag ing purple cloud sprt-a 1 desert —|* P. %  %  -t •ldartg*m#n COUNTRY BATSr.'AN Jim Da Oourcy run out after he had msd> 24 In the uuii against las West India* at Newcastle. New South Wales, on '!' 10 M. The 'keeper Is Everton Waekes. who deputised for C L. Walrott Allies Withdraw From Two Key Positions 8TH ARMY H<*. Korea, Nov B An 8th Army communique said that Allied unils hid withdrawn from two "key terrain features' west of Yonchon, following the Redg attack, but front dispatches said that United Nations units had recaptured all of the losl ground by 10.00 a.m .on'our.dav. Three new light Cotonainist probing attacks southwest nl Yoiiehun were icpu! %  I An 8ih Army communique said that on .the ekstern front. United Nations forces pushed their deepest spearhead in Norlh Korea still farther up the coast. The AJl!a gained 2.000 to 3,000 yards northwest ul Kaesong and i-i/cd the hill Miuth of Kosong. i tli ..I Ihe 3Hth Parallel "/Vo Mane? Sloppy SalMfes" SAYS GAIKY United Nations troops on ths ntral front repulsed a light Comunlst attack southeast of the former Communist stronghold of Muson. The Hili Arim announced tonight that heavv lighting was goIng on o'i UM we U m bent, United Nations had launchcu ttr-attack today, aftrr being driven back by one ol the heaviest J. meeting at .he Marl^J""""..^"K' "'J^ X£ ~ ^ t JSrS^.!!!f tl ..S Pere^ r .r^ ',ii I.ICC he nad era MM I hi Cornmuiusts followed the barrage with a "human wave", advancing over barbed wire to gel lo grips with Allied soldiers, who met them M hand t<> hand lighting. —v.r. thai Gain M.M.W.U. meeting at I Si|Uur* I. were better the ilvi fibers elected with bkn as M.M.W.U. candidates i.f' the colony than choose not to him every time In the new Leitisaattini Council. Galry was pep-inikin : his followers In his usual way before Jtavlng next day for Carriaeon on %  He assured them that his would I an 8—0 majority in the Council ; Hons T. A Man.v-h-.w and C. St. B. Sylvester would throw their h>\ ith the M.M.W U hi",He would fix that with the latter on his visii to t'liuaHe reproved policemen .md nurse* whu did not vote for him his candidates and said thev would have to watch out. As regards the former he would have iloppy salutes .mH I for the Sunerintendent of Pohog well. He would holii Ht'inonstrations whenever he those and not it the deciding of the Superintendent of Police. Referring to the coming Budget, he .aid lie understood HI Wall w would be short but he would see lo it that there WW expenditure on all the little i>e.ipic nasdad and he would know where the monty arai t eetng from. Among other things in a speec.i' of ramtliar 'Utburu lasiing over an hour he said he was sorry but i he was no longer to be styled! "Uncle" but given h, a Hon. Mr Galrv. I 177 Dead NEW YOKK. Nov S The death toll caused by the vast pre-wtplar cold s/aw Monday as the friglu weather blanke;ed the nation from Main* to Onajbti and south to the Gull <>r Ifexleo with no relief III sight. Al lea-t 177 dealh.s have been attributed to the weather. Traffic idents caused 138. 16 persons died in fires caused by overheated vea, seven drowned, lw ( fsjoggn death and 14 died in miscellaneous mishaps. Crop dam-ge -. extensive parUculgvJs 1 in the south where 0M unseasonable cold spell hit cotton and citrus crops, The Chicago weather bu Week Of Speeches By World Leaders LONDON. Nov. 6. Churchill will touch off a week of important prechr-i by moat of the worlds leadlog states m en; f* I r a 11 y < nut! hill will speak In tor (' %  immun. nf the Soviet revolution and this year Hlalln may make a major sddres* In BoUhui tbralre. If uol .mi.Um hlghranklng NovlK official will put Russia's "peace' views before thr world. I uurthly In Thursday f orrlgn Ministers r wme i." members of the raited Nation* will be ready to open a week or oratory on their iccn le-stavted. an official anDOtuicsangtUj di.Mloscd to-day. It nuoteii ,i letter fniMi tinproVla" nal OH Board, which \am OV* Orn the llnti.h when ihe world's Bnary was closvaj down i July, Informing the IVmian i %  thai one unit had fl i IMUng l'i-i--i..n t ahniclans onl* The output will include low Kiari.. products, llki k' n i ..nil ii.u.if'ln l> opgOgflJ unit will IHkept in operation u-\ one month 1 stocks used up cloning down and to keep the rei nerj in working ordstc TM an* nouncement added, "Should buyers be found for our products we may restart two more refli section* Observers considered that the reieaae was well timed to coincide with In* Persian Prim* Mlnialsr. Mossadeghs slay in Wnshliigh and his oil talk* there The Pt slans hope, thus, to convince the *ld that they are tint dependent British oil technicians, thev I — V f *tei* iteel Under-Secty. rrt/f coi.oMM. omen IX5NIXJN. N Churchill has appointed as hi Parliamentary Under Secretary for ihe Colonial Office %  in his younger days used to |. mistaken | on Randolph. He ithe Karl %  stiatea the likcncsbetwi t young:u.r i dg mi 0 rx %  -1^ r .is v ,.: rchUI It M one thing bavutl him in and out of H and dining rooms all di tn-i ._. ui and alts on the ...veiiuiu'iit heflehes J U | |oOft .1 linn The noble lord koda SbMl his neiKhlH.ur was a fair young i rd Minister who had just been made P OcpssMl point eonna i Is that he was prUtl i %  n lha division of th I %  oi Lord ii4. %  rai. Chan rom iU3 i .i. o\ hu >• then ap i" tiled Undei Set retnn r.. %  Wai re igning from ft tei ibrr "SJ to From 39 to '41 he was A.D.C.. .in llilitai I \ (Jorl. Ike keeps Out Of Politics WASHINGTON. Nov S Eisenhow.-r told reporters ot the While House Oil Monday he has given no one authority to undei take any political activity on hiheh.,:i Ki-enh.>wer talked briefly with reporters after a dn-niinutc high level military conference %  .'I run : u ,,,,',,.. ,. T officials and part of the Cabinet The General left to th< Whu. House any discussion of the con* '• M. ,itself. He spoke for himself when it came lo p The political discussion with reporters started when the Com%  f the Western European I" ( %  'n iKorres said he planned to remain at his hotel on Monday night hoping to get to bed early, but he added, he aim would 1* i py to see any of his old friends "if anv of them caunaround." White lion %  Pre-.. Sun I;.i %  Joseph Short toW reporters he could not say what was discussed by the General and the President at lunch, because only the two were present. man ol sal em Hun T.I h i l % %  %  i nt ligure for maju >. in u Ihe Koui i "i LonL arhei a %  > lakm keen Intel housing and i tire from 1092 lo -:i:; I nWaiting to the King and men '4i to '44 he Under Secretary ol Mia and Burma Aoiilhei appOil i %  %  under Churchlll'i i oalltton wai th t Ot I I %  lit lht> Home OflktM !' gU Tne Carl of H %  Pffl • man d %  • Ith no children W Members. relief from the cold but it would J Membership is of two kinds, ly temporary.—C.P. Military and Civil Co-operation A Norris Hughes, Chairrpan of the St. George's District lio.nl, last Sunday broadcast an ap;.4.il for co-operation of householders with the Board's scavenge! employees in keeping S; lean Previous to the strike, he said, the capital com*ith other We-t Indian capitals for excellence of %  npeejanes but there had been a ui' lie had had, .i meeting with all scavengers, heard what complaint! to make as regards hou %  holders nnd had been assurthe Board was prepared to back them bj pio*ecuting any offenders 232 Win Their Way To Safety As Luxury Liner Sinks HAMHUHC. Germany. Nov. 5 SurViTOTI from the 4.OJU. %  About 232 haggard men. women inn children — passengers and %  >ien, ot the brand new '.500 ton motnrship — arrived here early today, and ra | temporarily to niburban Ueberseeheim, a camp usually used for emitratlng and displaced perrons. Thev reached Hambtu. from Bremerhavrn. where they had I**" brought by the 8.S00 ton United States armv transport General M. L, Heraey. Thr Hersey hid picked them up after eluding with he Malpa yesterday in a dense fog off the %  coos', of Germany. The Mersey. brinmng 2.500 fnfantrv l was only slightly damaged in the crash. No lives were Part on cither ship. Officers and eftV K I fused any statement on th" craah and woul'l not comnirn*. on the oh irges against them "If anybody is going to do any bilking II will be the said an officer, who 11 give his name. The Captai.i Of the Msieu arrlved bv train late last night with three other officers. He went immediately to his hotel and i -vsmen —\p World Sugar Production WillBelfoiv LESS FROM COMMONWEALTH 1951—1632 season is .*>. %  '*> up by 500.11." .iiottantia' i i. piiweali* I onillUOM '•" iM'icipoted out| ^ss-i ' .' %  IO.00O tons .'tid in: pei>mlsos lo at ing to Cn i t report another 50.000 tons Is %  IOWS a *•< .dMi | i %  .ins redueUon, taken li hincUon syitta a %  mall %  Contributing largelj to the increased world production ligure —which in '.ililish a recom increase of SOg.oiio tang ftoo. Cuba and MM *wvi nlkows >ay ll paint any een reliable pkture lot %  %  du" In pan f %  i.. B cunt in' i depend | spend I i market %  ; rj .* ooo S in world %  1 00 i ti U t %  annage *ni %  %  BRITISH BACK U.S. PEACE LAN NSSUMOM .' % % % %  .'o:eisju%  quar' %  %  %  %  F W. had the 1 %  htlri i Of .ii It." %  % %  n it if ll did nnt.T i' The 'ADVOCATE" pays for NEWS. Dial 3113 Day or Night CLIPPER CIGARETTES









5 5 . * . A * | w
-
se
& 53»
ay.
\ ne . oa a
- Te oh
-E; FIVE die
ESTABLISHED 1895 PRICE ow

89.9%
*,





World Sugar e

- preparation

BRITAIN, FRANCE | ats

WILL BACK TRUMAN
Over Control Of

Armaments

Britain and France will

LONDON, Nov. 5.
give full backing to President

Truman's proposals for the reduction and international

control of armaments, usua
to-day.

They believed the main purpose of Truman’s
als—to be made in the broadcast to the world on

lly reliable quarters said here

ropos-
ednes-

day — would be to test the sincerity of the Communist
peace campaign. The President's plan was expected to in-
clude firm measures for the international supervision of
all armaments, but especially atomic weapons.

The re-armament initiat
argued here, coming at the

ive from the West, it was
moment when the North At-

lantic Re-armament Programme was in full swing, would

serve a double purpose.
Firstly it woul

emphasise that the Atlantic Pact mili-

tary strategy was defensive; secondly, it would test the
reality of the Soviet appeals for peace.

Truman’s disarmament broad-
cast, it was understood here, was
subject to prolonged exchanges
between London, Paris and
Washington, even before the
British new Conservative Gov-
ernment came into power,

Thesis Expected

The project subsequently

ceived the backing of the





The ‘Acheson
Plan’ Is Secret

PARIS, Nov. 5.

re-.
_ Eden and re ill t
s new ra ‘e
British Prime, Minister ‘Winton | sain at 3.00 bim. to-day, ois

Churchill and Foreign Secretary
Anthony Eden, Eden and United
States Secretary of State Dean
Acheson are expected to develop
a thesis backed by Truman at
their opening speeches in the
General Assembly of the United
Nations in Paris later this week.
It was thought one basic
tactical consideration underlying
the West’s decision to launch a
“disarmament under international
supervision” campaign was their
recollection of past sessions of
the United Nations Assembly,
The recent sessions of the
Assembly have been used by the
Soviet delegation to launch calls
for atomic or general disarma-
ment. These appeals have all
failed because the Soviet Govern-

ment refused to allow interna-
tional inspection within its
borders. But the fact that the

initiative has come from Moscow
has allowed the Soviet Union to
appear as champion of ace,
his, prior to consultations be-
tween the “Big Three” Western
Governments, has resulted in
of the Western dis-
armament Plan.
—UP.



King’s Health
Improves

LONDON, Nov. 5.
A communique issued from
Buckingham Palace today said that

the King’s health has improved
over the last fortnight.
The Communique signed by

five doctors said that His Majesty
was up for the greater part of
the day and was able to attend
to certain affairs of State, but that
the need for care remained.
The last’ Communique
issued 16 days ago. —U,P.

was



Royal Couple To
Tour E. Seaboard

Provinces

HALIFAX, Nova Scotia, Nov. 5.

“The weather was the only thing
the maritime royal tour planners
had not completely arranged for
on Monday. Everything else was
shipshape howeyer as _ Princess
Elizabeth und the Duke of Edin-
burgh headed through Eastern
Quebec to start a seven-day tour
of the Eastern seaboard provinces.

The royal Tour will end near/

there on. Nov. 12th with a full
dress and completely rehearsed
sendoff. Before that, hewever,

United States Ernbassy. A
jid is being kept on the detai's of
the “Acheson Plan,” since few be-
side the three ministers—Acheson,
Eden, and Schuman—themselves
know the details, although sensa-
tionalised Parisian accounts

are

reported to have the “inside”
story. ’

All that can be said, is. that

Acheson intends to take the initi-

ative away trom the Russians and
lay the key question on the line:

Is the Soviet Union ready to
consider real peace or does it want
to continue the cold war?

He will seek to strengthen the
United Nations hand, so that the
eonfusion and hastily conceived
action which followed the start of
war in Korea, will not be neces-
sary in event of any new aggres-
sion,

The most likely course that he
will take in this field is to propose
machinery for bringing regional
defence forces such asthe NATO
into the framework of the United
Nations Collective Security.

—UP,



Truman Denounces |

“Obstruction” .

NEW YORK, Nov. 5.

Truman warned Monday that
“obstruction and confusion and
false propaganda” at home will!
hamper the rearmament _pro-
gramme in the coming “crucial!
year.

Truman said in a letter to the
Congress of Industrial Organiza-
tions Annual convention that some
Americans are working hard to!
put a brake on our domestic pro-
gress to cripple and cut down our
foreign aid, to weaken our support
for the United Nations, and some
of them would evem risk a world
war in their impatience to find)
short cuts. around the problems
that confront us.



—U.P.

llth Atomie

bly an air drop, was set off
grounds at Frenchman's Fla

From All Quarters:
Russian
MIAMI, Florida, Nov. 5
Gregorio Simonovich, Russian,
who for years was the kingpin of
an alien smuggling ring operat-
ing out of Cuba, was arrested by
U.S. immigration. officers after

his mysterious arrival at a little
ee airport 4 miles north of
mi.

,Simonovich was wanted on
smuggling charges since 1947 and
Was accused last year by the Sen-
ate Committee of ‘master-mind-
ing Communist activity” in the
western hemisphere.

The U.S. border pa‘rol re-
ceived an anonymous telephone
call early Sunday saying: “some-
one you want badly” arrives
Shortly at Prospect airport. Half
an hour later Simonovich was
found alone on the airfield.

Tucumari, New Mexico. — An
airliner attempting an emergency
ae near here in a snowstorm,
crashed with 37 aboard. Ten
were hospitalized, two in a ériti-
cal condition. The airliner chart-
ered by the Army, was carrying
army personnel returning from
Korea. The impact broke the
plane in two.

Oslo.—The Nobel Peace Prize
of 1951 was awarded to Leon Jou-
haux of France, the Norwegian
Nobel Institute announced to-day.
M, Jouhaux is a French Trade
Union leader.

Paris.—Brigadier General Car-
los P. Romulo, Foreign Seeretary
tt the Philippines, was called in

onday to try to mediate the four-
way fight among 20 Latin Ameri-
ean delegations over which of
the countries should hold the

residency of the sixth session of

e U.N. General Assembly
which opens here Tuesday. A
Latin American President of the
Assembly is generally agreed

upon,
. Washington.— Truman poonk
the rt from the Jewish i.
fare Board Monday on its 1952
programme for serving the relig-
ious and morale needs of, 200,000
Jews in the armed services. The
President of the Board told Tru-
man that the organization will
recruit 148 full-time and 211 part-
time Jewish chaplains for the
armed forces.





On The Spot

YESTERDAY afternoon
the Advocate’s Roving Re-
porter was driving along
Dayrell’s Road. He saw a
man waving a red flag furi-
ously ahead of him and he
stopped dead on reaching
the man with the flag.

But the flag-bearer, obvi-
ously annoyed, shouted,

“Man carry on driving,
yuh en see uh waving to
tell yuh uh gwine blow up a
hole in de road dere.”





Explosion In

U.S. Was Set Off To-day

LAS VEGAS, Nevada, Nov. 5.
The 11th atomic explosion in the United States, possi-

to-day at the

atomic proving
t.

The explosion sent a towering finger-like spiral of
-smoke high into the sky. The test came after the three-|

day lull, which followed the first atomic combat man-







they will visit in New Brunswick,
Nova Scotia, and Prince Edward
Island, where residents “have
patiently waited since October
8th, smugly telling | themselves
that Elizabeth and Philip had.not
seen anything yet.”



Indo-U.S, Relations
Are Good

NEW DELHI, Nov. 5.
Foreign Secretary K. P, S&
Menon declared Monday that
there’s no Indo-American problem
and the friendship between the
two countries would remain stable
perpetually, Menon spoke at an
official banquet in honour of three
new. Ambassadors Chester Bowles
U.S., Stanislaw Ostroborg, France

and Stephane Halot, Belgium.
Menon acknowledged American
sympathy with Indian indepen-
dence and. recalled. Roosevelt’s
memoirs wherein it is stated that
Churchill “roared like a wounded
lion” at Roosevelt’s mention of

Indian freedom. —U-P.



CRICKET:Latest 12.30

BRISBANE, Nov. 6.

Queensland were all out for
455 soon after lunch on the
third day’s play of their
four-day match here to-day

A. Carrigan, Queensland
skipper, was bowled by Gomez
after making 169.

Queensland thus have a first
innings lead of 257 over the
West Indic



Reds May Reject

Us + “2 ‘Spee
Cease-fire Offers
iene 7» SMe ea

, Communists id. to
ieee ee FR
Ls cern a
nounced at the truce abc:
tee’s talks at Panmunjom, simul-
taneously with the Allied counter-
attack on the west front, where
the United Nations forces had
been driven back by one of the
heaviest artillery barrages of the

Korean war.
The four points were:



(1) Any ceasefire zone will be
based on the battle line at the time
of the Armistice signing “with ap-
propriate adjustments”,

(2) The Zone is to be two and
a half miles wide.

(3) The Committee's three offi-
: should determine the actual



line contact at any specific future
date.

(4) The agreements are to be
mares to the Plenary Session

s with the recommendation
that the latter discuss other items
on the agenda, leaving completion
agreement on the demarcation
line until it can be settled defin-
itely.

United Nations Briefing Officer,
Brigadier William Nuckols, who
described the proposal as a “for-
ward step”, said that the Com-
jmunists had already labelled it
;“unfair, unjust and unreason-
table,” Near the end of to-day’s
session, they had indicated that

reject it, he added

-U.P

ula

oeuvres in history, on last Thursday.

; To-day’s was the Fifth. nuclear
detonation .of the present Las
Vegas series, and was dropped at
8.31 a.m.

Official observers included at

ast two dozen Generals, among
whom was Curtis Lemay, Chief of
Strategic Air Command.

Medium-Size Bomb

, The explosion was from an ap-

rently medium-sized bom b

iropped from a B-29. First there

was a brilliant flash, Thirty sec-
onds later a dirty gray coloured
atomic cloud .soared above the
horizon assumireg the customar:
mushroom, which has followed all
atomic explosions,

An indication of the size and po-
tency of this detonation was given
by the unusual warning from the
Atomic Energy Commission. Radio
stations in a wide area covering
Goldfield, Beatty, and Caliente.
Nevada, were asked to warn resi-
dents to open windows in their
homes and shops. Presumably,
this would be to lessen the effects
of the tremendous concussion ex-
pected.

Seven minutes after the detona-
tion, there was a perceptible rum-
ble in Las Vegas, along with a sud-
den blast of wind. The _ brilliant
flas) of light was as bright, at
least as the big one, last Thursday,
the first detonation. in. which
troops took part in atomic

man-
oeuvres. The cloud rose on its
stem and the mushroom above

quickly acquired formations that
looked like two ice caps
Then it settled, and with a few

Jaccidents caused



¢

COUNTRY BATSMAN Jim De Courcy run out after he had made 24 in the match against the West Indies

at Newcastle, New South Wales, on 27.10.51. The ‘keeper is Everton Weekes, who deputised for C

L. Walcott.





Two Key

: 8TH ARMY HQ,, Korea, Nov. 5.

An 8th Army communique said that Allied units had
withdrawn from two “key terrain features’’ west of Yon-
chon, following the Redsattack, but front dispatches said
had recaptured all of the lost

that United Nations uni

ground by 10.00 a.m .on’Sunday,
» Three new light Communist probing attacks south-
west of Yonchon were repulsed, An 8th Army communi-

que said that on the

ther up the coast.

SAYS GAIRY

iFrom Our Qwn spondent)
ST, GEORGP’S, Nov. 1,
Hon. E. M. Gairy told a
M.M.W.U. meeting at the Mar!
Square last Saturday night that

it. were better the jive other
members elected with him as
M.M.W.U. candidates left the

colony than choose not to support
him every time in the new Legis-~
lative Council.

Mr, Gairy was pep-taiking his
followers in his usual way before
leaving next day for Carciacon on
a short visit.

He assured them that his would
be an 8—6 majority in the Council
as Hons. T. A. Marryshow and
Cc. St. B. Sylvester would throw
jin their !ot with the M.M.W.U.
bloc. He would fix that with
the latter on his visit to Carria-
cou, He reproved policemen and
nurses who did not vote for him
or his candidates and said they
would have to watch ont. As
regards the former he would have
no sloppy salutes and that went
for the Superintendent of Polieg
as well. He would hold demen-
strations whenever he chose and
not at the deciding of the Super-
intendent of Police.

Referring to the coming Budget,
he said he understood revenue
would be short but he would see
to it that there was expenditure
on all the little people needed
and he
money was to come from.

Among other things in a speeca
of familiar outbursts lasting over
an hour he said he was sorry but

he was no. longer to. be styled
“Uncle” but given his proper
title — Hon. Mr. Gairy.



177 Dead

NEW YORK, Nov. 5.

The death toll caused by the
vast pre-winter cold wave mount-
ed on Monday as the frigid
weather blankeled the nation
from Maine to Oregon and south
to the Gulf of Mexico with no re-
lief in sight.

At, least 177 deaths have been
attributed to the weather. Traffic
138, 16 persons
died in fires caused by overheated
stoves, seven drowned, two frozen

to death and 14 died in mis-
cellaneous mishaps,
Crop damuge is extensive

particularly in the south where the
unseasonable cold spell hit cotton
and citrus crops,

The Chicago weather bureau
said it could foresee no end to the
frosty weather. _ Forecasters said
scattered locations might get some
relief from the cold but it would
be only temporary,—U.P,



astern front, United Nations forces
pushed their deepest spearhead in North Korea still far-

ease



would know where the |

| Military and Civil.

Positions

The Allies gained 2,000 to 3,000
yards northwest of Kaesong and
seized the hill south of Kosong, 46
miles north of the 38th Parallel.

United Nations troops on the
eentral front repulsed a light Com-
munist attack southeast of the
former Communist stronghold of
Muson.

The 8th Army announced to-
night that heavy fighting was go-
ing on on the western front. Unit-
ed Nations had launched a coun-
ter-attack today, after being
driven back by one of the heaviest

barrage he had ever seen. The
Communists followed the barrage
with a “human wave", advancing
over barbed wire to get to grips
with Allied soldiers, who met them
in hand to hand fighting.



Week Of
Speeches By
World Leaders

LONDON, Nov. 5.

Churchill will touch off a
week of important speeches
by most of the world’s lead-
ing statesmen; Firstly
Churchill will speak in the
Commons (o-morcow a ter
noon after the Lord Chancei-
lor has read for the ailing
King George Vi his speech
to both the Commons and the
Lords in the morning.

Secondly, Truman is sche-
duled to make an important
foreign policy address in
Washington Wednesday
night,

Thirdly tomorrow is the
anniversary of the Soviet
revolution and this year

Stalin may make a major
|] address in Bolshoi theatre.
') If not another highranking
|} Soviet official will put Rus-

sia’s “peace” views before
the world,
Fourthly by , Thursday

Foreign Ministers of some. 60
members of the United Na-
tions will be ready to open a
week of oratory on ths
plans for peace at the Assem-
bly in Paris,—U.P,

ATTLEE RECEIVES
ORDER OF MERIT

LONDON, Noy. 5.

The King has conferred the
Order of Merit on Mr. Clement
Attlee. Mr, Attlee was, called to
Buckingham Palace tonight, and
the King made the investiture.

The Order is designed as a
special distinction for eminent
men and women — without con-
| ferring a Knighthood upon them,
; The Order is limited in numbers
to 24, with the addition of
Foreign Honorary Members.

Membership is of two kinds,

























UNIT OF ANGLO-
IRANIAN OIL CO.
RE-STARTED

The newly opened unit will be
kept in operation for one month
Yo replace stocks used up since its
closing down and to keep the re-
finery in working order, The an-
nouncement added, “Should buy-
ers be found for our products we
may restart two more refinery
sections.”

rvers ans’ ae ee
was wi to coincide
Sis Vereen 7h Minister,
Mossadegh’s stay in ashington,
and his oil talks there, The Per-
sians hope, thus, to convince the
world that they are not dependent
on British oil technicians, they
said. —U.P.

_

Ike Keeps Out
Of Politics

; WASHINGTON, Novy. 5,

Eisenhower told, reporters at the
White House on Monday he has
given no one authority to under-,
take any political activity on his+
behalf. Eisenhower talked briefly
with reporters after a 65-minute
high level military conference
with Truman, Defence Department
| officials and part of the Cabinet.
The General left to the White
' House any discussion of the con-
ference itself. He spoke for him-
‘self when it came to politics,



The political discussion with re-
porters started when the Com-
mander of the Western European
Defence Forces said he planned to
Jremain at his hotel on Monday
night hoping to get to bed early,
but, he added, he also would be
happy to see any of his old friends
“if any of them came around.”

White House Press Secretary
Joseph Short told reporters he
could not say what was discussed
by the General and the President
‘at lunch, because only the two
were present.





—U.P.

Co-operation

(From Our Own Correspondent)
ST. GEORGES. —

Mr. A. Norris Hughes, Chair-
man of the St, George's District
Bourd, last Sunday broadcast an
appeal for co-operation of house-
holders with the Board’s scaven-
ger employees in “keeping St.
George’s clean." Previous to the
strike, he said, the capital com-
pared creditably with other West
Indian capitals for excellence of
appearance but there had been a
deteriofation since. He had had,
however, a meeting with all scav-
engers, heard what complaints
they had to make as regards
oe and had been assur-



ed of better work as the Board
was prepared to back them
by prosecuting any offenders.

up



232 Win Their Way To Safety
As Luxury Liner Sinks

HAMBURG, Germany, Nov. 5.

Survivors from
Argentine liner, Maipu, charged
that many crew members, includ-
ing officers, jumped into life-boats
before all of the passengers were
evacuated from the ill-fated ship,
which sank early yesterday after
a collision with a

minutes, the stem began to wither | f0g

| Perceptible Rumble



and break up The great white
jcloud took on a coral pi ast
; while at the base an angry look-
fi purple cl th
ldesert.—U.P

i



army transport in a North Sea
About 232 haggard men, women
ind childrer passe rs and|



nembers he brand new

, of 1

United States | sey

{temporarily te suburban Ueber-

the $4,000,000 | seeheim, a camp usually used for

emigrating and displaced persons.

They reached Hamburg by train
from Bremerhaven, where they
had been brought by the 8,500 ton
United States army transport
General M. L. Hersey. The Her-
had picked them up after
| colliding with ‘he Maipu yesterday
in a dense fog off the north-east

| coast of Germany
The Hersey, 2,500
troor of the Un 43rd. |



Infantry BD

crash. No lives were lost on
either ship.

Officers and crew members re-
fused any statement on the crash
and would not comment on the
passengers’ charges against them
“If anybody is going to do any
talking it will be the Captain,”
said an officer, who refused to
give his name.

The Captain of the Maipu ar-
rived by train late last night with
three other officer He went
mme tels to hi hotel ma
efuse t

TP

him is that he was primarily re
sponsible for Attlee’s first defeat



Under-Secty.

FOR COLONIAL , OFFICE

(From Our Own Correspondent)

LONDON, Nov. 5
Churchill has appointed as hi
Parliamentary Under Seeretary
for the Colonial Office a man wh«
in his younger days used to be
mistaken for Churchill's son Ran-
dolph. He is the Far! of Munster

Here is One story which illus-
strates the likeness between thes«
two men when t were young-
er. on sinesing enersbes of the
House of Lords was heard to ex-
clam “Tis young fellow is
Randolph Churchill. It is one
thing having him in and out of
the lobbies and dining rooms all
day but it is going a bit too far
when he strolls in and sits on the
Government behches. Just look
at him.” The noble lord indicated
his neighbour was a fair young
man called Lord Munster who
had just been made Paymaster
General,

Another point

connected wit

in the division of the lobbies of
the House of Lords in 1946

The Earl was Paymaster
eral, Chamberlain's
irom 1938 to January the
lowing year. He was then ap
po'nted Under Secretary for War
resigning from this post in Sep-

Gen-
Government
fol-

Another

appoiniment he held
under Churchill's coalition was
thet of Under Secretary of State
at the Home Office from 44 to
‘a5

The Earl of Munster who is 45
is married with no children



Woman Bull-fighter
Marries A Noble

LISBON, Noy. 5,
The 28 year old well known
woman bullfighter Conchita Citron
today put an end to her career by
marrying the 31 year ole Port-
uguese, Francisco Castelo Branco.
She had agreed at the request of
her flance to give up bull-fighting
when married, Her husband be-
longs to u noble fimily of Portu-
gol
Conchita, born in
many years in Portugal

Peru lived

She fought her bulls on horse-
oack. The wedding was carried
out with great pomp in Lisbon
'

today. Assembled were the guests
of many noble families of Portugal.

The ex-King Umberto of Italy
wes among the distinguished
quests. Conchita had to wait 20

minutes inside a motorcar before
entering the church, in order not
4o spoil her wedding dress in the
neavy rain. —U-P.

-

over

Production
Will Be More.

LESS FROM
COMMONWEALTH

From Cur Owr, Cor raride

LONDON, Ney, 5.
The world sugar production tor
1951—-1952 season is expected ix

be up by 500,000 tons despite
substantial falling off from Com-
nonwealth areas.

From Australia and South
Africa where disastrous weather
conditions have persisted, the
anticipated output is 4 by
200,000 tons and 107,000 tots

respectively on the figureseor the
previous 12 moriths. Bi on

On “the credit sidé Mauritius
promises to add 35,000 tons to
ast season’s total and accord-
ing to Czarnikows’ latest report
another 50,000 tons is expected
from the British Caribbean,

Nhe overall picture | however
shows a decline in Common-
wealth production of 200,000 tons

This reduction, taken in con-
junction with a small crop of
sugar beet expected in the U.K,,

is a serious loss to the Common-
wealth,
Contributing largely to the

increased world production. figure
—Wwhich promises to establish a
new record—is the anticipated
increase of 300,000 tong from
Cuba and 200,000 tons from the
Philippines

Czarnikows say it is difffeult, to
paint any very reliable statistical
picture into these figures. Many
areas of the world are still suf-



ternaber ‘39 to jcin the forces.Jfering from under consumption
From '39 to '41 he was A.D.C,,Jdue in part to a lack of internal
TEHERAN, Nov. 5. and Military. Assistant to Lord spending power, but mainly to
One unit of the Anglo-Iranian] Gort, P a shortage of the requisite over-
Oil Company's Refinery at Abadan seas curreney, -
has been re-started, an official an- A man of great energy and The take off must depend on
nouncement disclosed to-day. It/drive Earl Munster has been af how much foreign eurfency
quoted a letter from the provis-{ prominent figure for many years}these | consuming countries — in-
ional Oil Board, which took over){n the House of Lords where he} cluding the U.K. which depend
from the British when the world’s|has taken keen interest in such{O" imports can afford to spend
largest refinery was closed down] matters as housing and child wel- JO" SUset ; ;
in July, informing the Persian] faye . Jay an will no doubt provide an
Government that one unit had} pyom 1982 to '38 he wag Lord-| re nae cess +t world market
teen restarted, using Persian] in-Waiting to the King and from|*" oy i ae oe eres
technicians only, The output willl’4s to ‘44 he was Parliamentary bre umption was over [000,000
include low grade products like] Under Secretary of State for ate sis callin Nesiolaiets i
Kerosene and paraffin, India and Burma. Smétent tae Praline te Eee

production is modest indeed When
it is remembered that despite, the
overall addition of almost 4,000,-
000 tons last season only a very
moderate tonnage will be varried
into next year,



BRITISH BACK
U.S. PEACE PLAN

PARIS, Noy, 5,

Anthany,.Eden, Ewitish,.Â¥ortigue
Secretary, after a two and a quar-
ter hour meeting with United
States Secretary of State Dean
Acheson, said as he left the Ameri-
cal: Fmbassy: “We had the most
useful preliminary survey over the
whole agenda,”

Asked if the British were behind
the American Peace Plan, he said,





“Of course, we are in agreement
on it," Asked if he: thought. it

held out hope of suceess, he said
“Of course, We would not be do-
ing it if it did not”

~U.P.





The “ADVOCATE”
pays for NEWS.

Dial 3113
Day or Night





er awe





?



. thedral on Sunday November

* 7.15 p.m.,
17



BARBA



PAGE TWO

EMPERS of the Barbados

Office Association have
been invited to attend the Re-
membranee Service at the Ca-

ll
at 10.30 a.m. The Annual Gen-
eral Meeting of this Associa ion
takes place at the Drill Hall at
on Saturday November

Their annual dinner will be
held three” quarters of an hour
later also at the Drill Hall. Any
Officer at presen: visiting the
island is welcome to attend. +

Contact man is Mr. Dougie Al-
‘leyne at Brydens.

Seaworthy

P AT the Marine Hotel they
have been busy putting the
clock back, but this time it’s got
a new face, which is streamlined
and modern, The old bar which
Wally Hammond and many
another cricketer—local and old
country—propped up in the wee
exciting hours of Old Year's
Nights fifteen years and mora
ago has come back to the Marir2.

Only this ‘ime its made of ligat
curving mahogany and to remind
us that Marine has something to
do wih the sea there’s a large

porthole to keep us cool while 4

swilling John
punches,

They tell me first drinks will
be served there on November 10,
when vou can go and cee for
yourself what improvements nove
been going on in preparation for
a big tourist season.

Rifle Team Leaves
HE Barbados Rifle team for
the—Trinidad Annual Shoot
left Barbados on Sunday _ by
B.W.LA...The team is Lt. Col. J.

Collins’ and local

Connell, “tCapt.), Maj. J. Griffith,
Maj. O. F=C. Walcott, Capt. C.
Neblett, Mr. M. deVerteuil, Mr.
G. PilgrifY and Mr. T, "A. L.
Roberts, -<#t. Col, Connell was
accompanied by his wife.
Accompahying the team was

Mr. M. Pueker.
Yechting Team Returns
M*. PEVER INCE and Mr.
Gerald Nicholls two mem-
bers of the Barbados Yachting
team whith won the yachting
series against Trinidad returned
home OVer the weekend by ;
B.W.I1.A. The other members of

the team are due back today by
ship.

Cn. Honeymoon
R. AND MRS. A. CAMACHO
who were married in Trini-
dad on Saturday flew over from
Trinidad the following day by
B.W.LA, to spend their honey-
moon in Barbados, They are
guests 0 the Hotel Royal,

r The Races
M* Rn. HARDWIDGE was an
arrival from Trinidad by
B.W.J.A,, on Sunday. He has
come over to ride in the races.

BY THE

HE latest Beachcomber poll,

making use of the new statis-
tical law, has been able to predict,
with absolute certainty, not only
how everybody will vote, and how
they will vote under different con-
ditions, but also at what time they
will vote.

So mechanically perfect is this
new method of forecasting that I
have been asked not to publish the
figures. The apparent infallibility
of statistics might induce some of
the voters to change their minds
at the last moment, merely to de-
monstrate their independence, and
to satisfy themselves that the laws
of statistics have not yet abolished
free will.

Report from Aberbananer

A TRIAL push by Evans the
Hearse yesterday on Llangyr-
kyn Mountains once more show-
ed his uncanny skill at rounding
difficult corners on the mountain
paths, on one nostril, keeping the
pea close, and ushing rather than
propelling it. eg Bodger, who is
not so familiar with this course,
misséd the pea at Dwch Corner,
and his left nostril came in con-
tact with a bit of rock. The slight
nasal abrasion which resulted was
treated by Dr. Cosham of Fwt-
balpwll, -

Social Security

HE B.B.C. ban on the name of

Charles Kingsley for political
reasons shows how serious, this
matter is. It is said that a come-
dian who. introduced a_ grocer
named Palmerston was heavily
censored. and the name _ was
changed to Balmerston to avoid





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MR. AND MRS.
Married On Saturday

ISS DAISY GONSALVES

daughter of Mrs.@ Daisy
Gonsalves of “Osterley”, Max-
wells and Mr. Gabriel Gonsalves
of Miami was married on Sat-
urday afternoon at Christ Church
to Mr, James S.eed, son of Mr.
and Mrs, James Steed of Glas-
gow Scotland, and Senior En-
gineer of Esperansa Estate, Trin-
idad,

The ceremony which took
place shortly after 5.30 o’clock
was performed by Rev. Mande-
ville.

The Bride who was given in
marriage by her brother Michael,
wore a dress of white lace over
taffeta. Her headdress was of
white roses and her bouque: of
anthurium lilies.

The Bridesmaid, Miss Betty
Gonsalves, sister of the Bride
wore orchid lace and carried a
bouquet of anthurium lilies. There
were three Flower Girls, the
Misses Ginger, Joan and Dena
Bernstein. The Bestman was Mr.
Alexander Thompson who is also
from Scotland and works at the
same estate in Trinidad as the
*groom.

After the ceremony a recep-
tion was held at ‘Osterley’ Max-
wells and the honeymoon is
being spent at the Crane Hotel.

Mr. and Mrs. Steed leave to-
morrow for Trinidad,

Trinidad K.C.

R. H. U. B, WOODING, K.C.,
and his sister who arrived
from Trinidad on Saturday morn-
ing by B.W.1A._ returned the
following day to Trinidad.
Mr. Wooding is a Barrister at
Law Trinidad and a Director of
B.W.I. Airways.

WAY

“influencing the voter.” The word
“liberal” is barred as suggesting a
political party, and ballet must not
be mentioned, as it is too much
like ballot.

‘New light on Dickens‘
HE denigration of Dickens has
for some years been a favour-

ite sport. A few writers Wave
found him too vulgar for an age
of exquisite refinement, and too
sentimental about human beings
for a generation which reserves
ifs sentimentality for animals. It
has even been pointed out that his
private life was not above re-
proach—a state of affairs which is
acutely painful in this era_of rigid

Rupert ane the



Rupert looks gratefully at his pal.
VS topping, ot you nor to ask me

any questions’ he says Wi can
say now is that, Lion Reck must be
on this isiand.”” “ D'you think
there is any chance of us geting to
i before those men?" ** There

Eee



Phone 4764’



STORES

e
in

36"

@

ee re ee ee ee ee ee te

In Very Attractive Shades

T.R. EVANS & WHITFIELDS

YOUR SHOE STORES



IN TOWN

ee i ee ee ee

JAMES STEED
Hot Or Cold

Dw from the first pre-
winter cold wave in the States

icy weather blanketed
Maine to Oregon,

was reported yesterday a
from

Here in Barbados a visitor was

complaining

Nuvember

having.
You can't please everybody.

Wedding

of the

unusual
heat we have been

N Thursday afternoon at 3.30

o'clock, Miss Joyce Ashby

grand- -daughter of Mrs. E. Ashby

of Reed Street was married at St.

Barnabas’ Church to Mr. Reuben
Adams, son of Mrs. E. Adams of

Gittens Road,
and the late Mr, Adams,

Government Hill,

JERRARD

ADVOCATE

TICKELL

| The man who is winning success with his book and

| film about a cow. Appointment with Venus—goes in

Manoir cowman made
funny thing,”’
ferent as cows

of this statement.

lation,

An Old Etonjan tie | listens
humbly to advice given “by «4
knotted handkerchiet, a diamond
clip sparkles more brightly at tne
report of mounting lactation
Weighty discussions are held on
such subjects as butter-fat con-
tent and the effect of a Mozar-
Symphony in B flat on the milk
yield of a pedigree Ayrshire.

Like Film Stars

The cattle themselves, as ii
aware that they are the raisons
@etre of all this excitement, agi-
tation, organisation and _ chat,
flutter their long eye-lashes like
film stars at a first night.

They came to Olympia from all
over Great Briain. Fairy Pr.ncess
8th an elegant Shorthorn bred by
Mr, J. H. Stephenson, travelled
more than 500 miles by rail from
the Royal Mental Hospital, Mont-
rose to chew the cud in Kensing-
‘on, Guernseys from Sussex,
Friesians from Shropshire, Ker-
rys from Somerset. Lincoln Reds
from Yorkshire, the breeds eat

The ceremony was performed] the grass of alien fields.
by Rev. K. A. B. Hinds. The I went first of all to see the
Bride who was given in marriage| Guernseys, the breed that pro-

by her cousin Mr. C. Drakes, wore
organza with
long elose fitting
Her

e@ dress of white
high neck line,
sleeves and a very full skirt.

headdress was a tulle veil, kept in
place by a tiara of roses and for-

get-me-nots and

she carried a

bouquet of Anthurium lilies and

Queen Anne’s Lace.

Miss Viclet
maid of honour wore mauve crepe

Farley who was

The Misses Lorna Grimes and
Doreen Farley were the Brides-
maids. The bestman was Mr.

Grafton Merritt and

the ushers

were Messrs Arthur and Kenneth

Ashby, brothers of the bride.

After the ceremony a reception

was held at
groom’s cousin “Homestead”,
mont Road.

being spent at
House, Bathsheba.

The honeymoon

By BEACHCOMBER

Christian morality.
just been reading a review of a
book which evidently explains all
this, Dickens suffered from manic-
depressive insanity, and was a
psychotic, Hence those regret-
table novels, which the unenlight-
ened continue to enjoy.

Putting Kreisler
at his ease

HE putilication of Kreisier's
Memoirs recalls to me the
story of the woman who, when
introduced to him, said: “Oh, Mr.
Kreisier, We've just bought your
new model. My husband won't

drive anything else!’

Lion Rock—23







|
=

Ke
Case

ay?




S27 Z





shall be a way af that ws what yo
want,’’ says Rollo. *’ Anyway.
certainly won't stay here anqg pr
pare a meal tor them.’ dorryi
to thei slespine place, he drags o

great lengths of rape of differes
thicknesses,

=

WITH
$3.08

$2.18

Dial 4220

the home of the
Bel-
is
“Fleet View” Guest

But I have

duced my own photogenic Venus.
My heart warmed ‘o these aristo-

cratic exiles separated forever
from their native Channel
{slands, for no beast that sails

out of Saint Peter Port may ever
return, It is thus that the
‘slanders, shrewd breeders, have
ixed a type that will always be
constant.

Beside them are their cousins
the Jerseys, finer and more deli-

cate, their amber milk rich in
butter.
In comparison, the South

Devons over the way are as enor-
mous and as shaggy as buffaloes.
The nimble Kerrys with their
sharp horns are as temperamen-
tal es the boys of Killarney,
they glance with rollicking eyes
at the little black Dexters who
look as if thev should be pulled
along on wheels.

ana

ee



ACTOS

+ ‘Where you ix the iobe up

(6
To pay back with great care

(9
The oeggar aiwavs nas one (3
This art w scrappy (5)
Capadie of vanishing in water. 4:
arly symptom of many ills. (5
They add up to a score. (4)
The plurnber’s mate does
snouid (5)

Where some jumpers make cur
tact. (
Better upset
) Begrud i
What the cheat may do (5)

Down
« Before the writer could lay dow
rules. )
¢ Found tn beagie Kennels.
‘ Hole in which to drop Lieut.- “to
be ’

without tea (6)
)

Slang for 19? (4)

Apes tonic. (ana ).

Can be reserved you'll find, (8)

(3)
(7

No. } of the gossip shop,
Ask tots where the rye runs,

Quite unfeeling. (4)

3

Reap.
13 Wager: 15.

Bar, 1 Average: 20. Lady: 1
ted(act), 22. Kettle: 25. {reat sOre
own: 1 ge 2, Axe: Ties
* Dirge 6 Venture: “B.

». Sultry Pla
i



NO CONS CONSTIPATION
FOR 25 YEARS ~

husband introduced rie te ta
maceied. ad. pone it in my cooking an as
fast. “The result: ry
we’re oa ha as}:
Soe caste

453 Gant fae ay Ave,



ma’ aot

Welt letters from

ALL-BRAN ‘users,

If you suffer from constipation due

to lack of Mew 5900, an

ounce ake oO}
mete ni

il by ns 4
a oe reat Britsin, Ltd.,

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——.

The naturat way to

KEEP SLIM
ano FIT

If you want to be





attractively
slim, with bright eyes, radiant
complexion, and real fitness,

Nature demands that you keep
your system cleansed of
impurities. Clinical tests by
doctors confirm that Bile Beans
do this, gently and effectively
Bile Beans are keeping millions
healthy and youthful in looks

and figure. Start taking them
tonight.

Nature's Gentile Aid

BILE BEANS |

Just a couple at Bedtime



‘
|
|
5) | ¢
‘
*)
4 e 14) %
r A i
(9 :
‘ (5
wo
g: 9
7
Does this worm aasist during fue
cuts? 14)
How needles warfare begins, (3)
Solution of voaiesde?'s purzle,— Across
Katvdid, 7 Service, 9. Realim); 11
nslaught: a8. People. 14. Elm, 16." Wit
t





the the Dairy Show in London for an
Appoin
With 324

QNE night last spring, in a candle-lit Sark stable, the

ent
enuses

a significant remark. /t

is a

he said,'‘but-human beings are almost as dif-

A visit to the Dairy Show at Olympia shows the truth
The exhibits—with the exception of a
few disconsolate cack pigeons—are exclusively feminine.
Their admirers vary in sex, custom and clothing. Standing
‘ankle deep in straw, the cows look with soft speculative
eyes at a complete cross-sec

tion of Britain’s human popu-

Glance at the sturdy Red Polls,
the piebald Ayrshires, the Welsh
Blacks—and ponder the fact that
the 324 cows at Olympia, big,
small and medium, have given au
average of 2,200 gallons a day—
over eight tons of milk—o be
marketed by the -Ministry of

ee Every cow in the show is
le-king her best—and no wonder.
ration for the Dairy Show

started a long time ago, A cow
is in her best show form immedi-
ately after calving, and the hour
of her mating is thus chosen to
a nicety. The period of gestation
is 41 weekes— and she must
conform to the rule and produce
her calf on or before October 3
of this year.

Allowance must be
the caprice of Nature, and manv
a potential champion has been
debarred from entering by 2 m‘4i-

made for

ter of minutes. Let us suppose,
however, thay Hyacinth, an
imaginary Guernsey, obligingly

produces her calf at 11.55 om
on October 3, zero hour
midnicht. Her breeder may
mib his hands, for he knows
the fates at least are on his

His Art

Heqnow summons art to assist
natp First the, horns; all the
rougfiness is taken off wi'h sand-
paper and glass and only when
the surface is silky smooth does
he apply the final polish with
best dairy butter. Hoofs are sim-
ilarly treated.

Any disfiguring hair is clipped
off and the hide is groomed ‘1d
regroomed until it glistens like
crepe de chine.

Now the important business of
the plume on Hyacinth’s tail. It
is washed again and again in
lather of soap flakes, dried out
with sewdust and tightlv nlait-

beinr
well
that
side.



IN the sewing room of her;
modest home in Minneapolis, Mrs. |
Gladys Olson, pretty blonde wife}
of a factory inspector, is raising a|
£26,775 chinchilla coat. She is
beginning to suspect that by the
time she has enough skins she will
have grown too fond of the chin-
chillas to deprive them of their
coats for her own use.

Mrs, Olsort is one of some 5,000
people in the United States who
have taken up fur-raising as a
sideline, for fun and profit.

In Mrs. Olson’s case, it all be-
gan four years ago as a hobby.

Her husbana Edward bought
his original pair of chinchillas
for £500, persuaded his wife w
give up her sewing room to make
room for them and, with rather
more difficulty, persuaded the
family dog Duchess that the chin~-
chillas were not some new form
of defenceless cat,

For a couple of days Mrs. Olson
stood in the doorway and watched
her husband feeq them. Now it
is Mr. Olson who stands in_ the
doorway when the chinchillas’
meals are served.

Fed With Milk

Some months after the Olsons
bought their first pair they became
the owners of four more—the first
litter. These had to be raised—by
Mrs. Olson—with an eye-dropper
filled «with milk. Now the popula-~
tion of the sewing room numbers
30— and additions are anticipated.

“] would never be able to par‘
with the original pair whatever |
could do about the rest,” says Mrs
Olson,

At 37 she does not own a fur
coat of any kind, much less a
£26,775 chinchilla.

When the Olsons have guest:
the 30 chinchillas are brought into
the lounge to play with them
The dog is banished to a corner 0!
the room, from which she glower:
reproachfully at the furry animals

gambolling over the furniture
They are a delicate pearl grey
colour.

tire for the night. In the morning.
the plaits are untied and combed
out into a mis y spreading plume
that is guaranteed to catch the
eye of any other than the most
cynical judge.

In an age when the dynas.ies
of kings have ceased to main-
tain the sense of human continu-
ity over the centuries, the gen-
ealogies of cows still keep man’s
imagination in touch with ‘he
fasting verities of the soil. From
the sophistieated farm of Olym-
pia to the wet and windy hill-
sides, the cow goes on doing her
kindly job for humenity.

(World Copyright Reserved)

Se ae ae ee ee

TUESDZY, NOVEMBER 6, 1951













~~
29S9 3O5
JANETTA DRESS SHOP
LOWER BROAD STREET
4
DRESSES | «eve: 10
Ready-made and made-to-Order.
Also—BR ASSIERES~ White and Pink.
SIZES 38 and 40—with Waistband and without
Waistband
From $3.00 to $5.44.
" SORSOSSS SRSSS SOOO OI SIS 5 TES



Opening Frida, il

coming
JOAN “RAW FORD

‘Goodbye a Fancy’
—_—_—_—

(Bank) 1.30—4.45
and 8.30 p.m
“Tarzan's Peril”

Ea. | |e AZA.S biaL ate

Last 2 SHOWS TO-DAY 4.45 and 8.30 ean
James Virginia Doris Gene
co an MAYO DAY MacHAR NELSON in

“ WEST POINT STORY”

Color Short:

ROYAL DUCK SHOOT
Monte HALE in— ae

Allan “Rocky” LANE in—
RANGER of CHEROKEE STRIP__& NAVAJO.TRAIL RAIDERS
PLAZA vii ts GAIETY

Last 2 Shows To-day 5 & 8.30 p.m. THE GARDEN — ST. JAMES
“TO-MORROW IS FOREVER” To-day .(only) 8.30 p.m.

Claudette Colbert, George Brent & “ALWAYS IN MY HEART”
“BERLIN EXPRESS” Gloria WARREN &
Merle O’BERON—Robert RYAN “FUAXY MARTIN"

Virginia MAYO
Wed. (only) 5 & 8.30 n
Walt Disney's oye
ree AND FANCY FREE”
‘olor by Technicolor
Dinah SHORE” Eagar BERGEN &
‘BAMBOO BLONDE”
Francis Langford and Ralph Edwards

peo ae

TO-DAY ONLY 4.30 and 7.45 p.m.
JOHN SUTTON — Serer MERRICK

“THE COUNTERFEITERS’
“ROGER TOUGHY GANGSTER”

VICTOR McLAGLON — PRESTON |__CVICTOR McLAGLON — PRESTON FOSTER

OPENING GLOBE Tomonnow |
WITH

THE SUPER STAR TALENT SHOW

LOUSING-
STORY OF A GUY
WITH EVERYTHING
10 LIVE FOR...
LOVE FOR...

FIGHT FOR!...







>

6.30 p.m
in



Wed. and Thurs.
ABBOTT and
“IT AINT HAY” &

“DANGEROUS GAME”
ee HAYWARD

















ed. Only then may Hyacinth re- —L.E.S

| OSES SS OOOOROPOPRDO POPOV OPPS PDIP EP OPPS COPOOSPSOOT *% JOAN
\o ms ;
'§ THE BRIDGETOWN "PLAYERS 3 DOUGLAS - * DARNELL eR
if DON DE FORE-suua SLAUSTEN soseFh yy
RS present Sereen Pay by ALLAN \
oN » q
‘

%,

ss

x x

‘ $ EMPIRE

% >

x s LAST 2 SHOWS TO-DAY 4.45 & 8.15

* 2 JOSEPH COTTEN — LORETTA YOUNG

% x

x ( | RCLE ¥ in *HALF ANGE

a x

% TO-MORROW ONLY 4.30 & 8.30 THURSDAY ONLY 4.30 & 8.30
x x Universal Double — Universal Double —

s a g

$ puri y < James MASON — Margaret Basil RATHBONE

x by SOMERSET MAUGHAN & LOCKWOOD in in

ss 31 6, i a -

x 7 %|“‘THE” WICKED LADY” BLACK CAT

* NOVEMBER 27,28 & 29

% % and and

‘ EMPIRE THEATRE (}"arenic man wuwre| “BLACK Narcissus”

3 with with
QPEL LEC E PORES SLE E 65006008

| THE MARINE

DINNER

$3.00 Per Person



OH,
SUCH

A
VARIETY!

SATURDAY NOVEMBER 10TH.

on the occasion
OF THE OPENING OF OUR NEW BAR

Dinner Served from 7 to 9.30 pm.
Dancing from 7 to Midnight

HOTEL LTD.

DANCE

Table Reservations
Tel. 3513







Table Glass





MIKEL CONRAD DEBORAH KERR

ROYAL

LAST 2 eee TO-DAY TO-MORROW ONLY 4
4.30 & 8.30 Universal Double oe

Republic Whole Serial—-

‘* DESTINATION
“HAUNTED HARBOUR” UNKNOWN ”
with and
KANE RICHMOND “STAIRWAY TO
MARSHALL J. REED HEAVEN ”’



OLYMPIC

TO-DAY & TO-MORROW 4.30 & 8.15
20th C-FOX DOUBLE —

DANA ANDREWS - GENE TI
STAN
AS

WW



“DO YOU. LOVE ME”

in TECHNICOLOR
Starring :
DICK HAYMES — MAUREEN O’HARA — HARRY JAMES

ROXY





| LAST 2 SHOWS 2 DAY 4.30 &| Wednesday & oe 4.30 &
8.1

| Universal Double —

Pyrex Ware | ||



BARBADOS
CO-OP COTTON
FACTORY LTD.










Mea et " A>

eee O'BRIEN Pd
Elia RAINES YA

eta BENDIX

Atala a3

JOEL McCREA — WANDA
HENDRIX
in

“SADDLE TRAMP”



Color by Technicolor fr a
and i A UNIVERSAL-INTERNATIONAL PICTURE |
“TAKE ONE FALSE |
STEP” |
Starring |BUD ABBOTT—LOU COSTELLO
LLIAM POWELI SHELL‘ ros
WINTERS “IN SOCIETY


TUESDAY, NOVEMBER 6, 1951



SESSIONS :





BARBADOS ADVOCATE



Bicycle Thief Jailed

For 18

Months

THE Hon. the Chief Justice Sir Allan Collymore at the
Court of Grand Sessions yesterday sentenced Fitz Cameron
Leacock to 18 months imprisonment when he was found
guilty by an Assize jury of the larceny of a Raleigh bicycle
valued at $60 the property of Arnold Pinder.

The offence was committed on
September 28. Miss M. EB
sourne appeared on behalf of the

Crown. This was the first case
tried yesterday as the Court of
Grand Sessions opened. The

Acting Attorney General Hon. F.
E. Field told the court that the
case was a short one and he
wanted to get through with it as
quickly ag_possible, >

Arnold Pinder of Bevkles Road
told the Court that on September
28 he wes working fi the shipping.
He ieft his bicy@le In QYiverpool
Lane, City, unlocked. & came
ashore about 10.10 p.m. the same
day and went to Liverpool Lane
to get his bicycle: The © bicyele
which is a Raleigh was not there.
He then reported the matter to
the Police.

He identified the bicycle by the
lamp and valued it, at $60.
Thirteen days after he reported
the bicycle lost, he went to St.
Joseph where he saw his bicycle.

On September 28 he did not give
anyone permission to use the
bicyele. He could not remember
the serial number of the bicycle.

Weston Jones of Cocoanut
Grove, St. Joseph said that he has
known the accused for some time.
On October 8, he was in Chim-
borazo Road, St. Joseph when the
accused asked him if he knew a
person who would like to buy a
bicycle. He told the accused no.
The accused had a bicycle with
him. The number was M-3386.

He reported to Sgt. Henderson
that the accused was trying to
sell a bicycle. Sgt. Henderson
arrested the accused,

Caspar Athaly, an agricultural
worker of St, Joseph told the
Court that the accused used to
work with him, He \Héard the
accused asking if anyoné wanted
to buy a bicyele. The accused was
then in a shop.

Station Sergeant . Henderson
attached to District: “F’’ Police.
Station said that on October 9 a

man by the name of Bradshaw
spoke to him. He got into the
motor van and went to Cocoanut
Grove Road. He later saw the
accused with a bicycle on Bissex
Hill Road and examined the
bicycle. The number was M-3386
and he recognised the bicycle as
one stolen, The accused was
taken to the Station and the
bievele was identified by Arnold
Pinder as his property. The
accused was_then charged.

Cecil Marshall a Writ Server
said that on October 9 he saw the
accused with a bicycle. He eX-
amined the bicycle and it answer-
ed to the description of one that
was reported stolen, The accused
made a statement at District “F”
Station which he signed.

At this Stage the case for the
prosecution was closed. The
accused then addressed the jury.



NO QUORUM AIT
VESTRY MEETING

The St. Michael Vestry Meeting,
which was to have taken place
yesterday, was not held. here
were not enough members pres-
ent to form «4 quorum, One person
was needed to form a quorum
but Mr. Trevor Bowring left after
waiting for 20 minutes. When
the other member did arrive
there was still no quorum.

One of the items on the Agenda
was a petition from residents of
Gittens Land, Government Hill,
asking for a. water Main across
that area.

Two reports would have been
received. One from the Street
Lighting Committee recommend-
ing the installation of additional
units in the City and suburban
areas and another from the
Barbados Gag Company stating
that they were doing their best
in the matter of the conversion
of street lamps equipped for
carrying Natural Gas, and regret-
ting any inconvenience caused.

Members present were: Dean
G. L. V. Hazelwood, Chairman,
Hon. V. C. Gale, Mr. T, Bowring,
Mr. E. D. Mottley, M.C.P., Mr.
J. K. C. Grannum, Mr. Victor
Chase, Mr. A. R. Toppin, Mr, McD.
Symmonds, Mr. H, A. Tudor.



“trouble,

2 Years For:

Larceny

FITZGERALD ROBINSON at
the Cort of Grand Sessions yes-
terday pleaded guilty to larceny

from the house of Litian Cossou. «

The Hon, the Chief Justice Sir
Allan Collymore sentenced him to
two years’ imprisonment wit
hard labour. The offence was com-
mitted sometime between June 4
and 6,

Lilian Cossou told the court that
she had employed Robinson as a
mason and while he was there ne

took away all of her valuable be- *

lengings from the house.

As regards his record Emerson
Howard told the court that the
accused was sentenced to [2
months for being in possession of
forged bank notes and six months
for larceny.

Bound Over

The Hon. The Chief Justice
bound over LEMUEL SKEETE a
19-year-old old labourer for 12
months in the sum of £25 after he
pleaded guilty of wounding Ty-
ronne St, Hill with a stone on his
head, Mr, E..W. Barrow who ap-
peared on belialf of Skeete told
the court that the accused and
another boy had a row and while
throwing a stone which was in-
tended for this boy unfortunately
this lad St. Hill was struck. There
was no eeeron of malice. The
Chief JuSstite told Skeete that in
a sense it Was dn accident. The
person who throws stones in law
is ble for the injury inflicted
on the other. Throwing stones is
unlawful but it was not his inten-
tion to send him to prison.

Postponed

Sentence was postponed on
GEORGE BOURNE who pleaded
guilty of wounding Whitneld Fli
With intént. Whitfield Eli told the
rourt that after he was wounded
by Bourne he was detained in the
General Hospital for, 20 days and
had an operation, Miss M, E.
Bourne Assistant Legal Draughts-
man, asked The Hon, the Chief
Justicé to take a serious view of
the matter.

The Chief Justice said that the
using of knives is a serious matter
and people are being killed by
knives. Anyhow he was postponing
sentence to get a report about him.
Bourne had nothing to say on his
plea.

GARVIN SMITH pleaded guilty
to thé larceny of articles valued
at $150.50 thé property of Clifford
Searles, Sentence was postponed
by the Hon. the Chief Justice. Mr,
Searles said that for sometime he
was missing things from his place
and the accused had access to his
place,

The Hon. the Chief Justice also
postponed sentence on Joseph
Whitright, a 22-year-old labourer
who pleaded guilty of the larceny
of articles valued at $330.52, the
property of Cyril Payne from the
dwelling house of David Payne
The offence was committed on
June 16,

Wounding

Seritence was also postponed on
IVAN ARCHER, a_ 20-year-old
mason who pleaded guilty of
wounding Doughlas Springer with
intent on September 15, Mr. L.
Williams who appearéd for Archer
said that he is a young man who
tried his best to keep out cf

The Acting Attorney General
told the court that this offence
took plate at midnight. For no
good reason this man stopped the
bread vendor and hit him with a
hammer. The accused said that
he borrowed the hammer from‘ a
woman to drive a cotter pin in a
bicycle.

Sentence was also postponed on

Winifred Morris who pleaded
guilty to inflicting grievous bodily
harm on Agnita., Springer on

August 19, Mr, G, Farmer counsel

for Morris told the court that in

an argument over some man be-

tween herself and the other wo-

man, a fight ensued in which the

aecused hit the woman with an
@ On page 7

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SECOND TIME



ma

With fur coat over chocolate
coloured suit and beige sweat-
er and make-up kit in trans-
parent bucket-type handbag,
filmstar Nancy Valentine ar-
rives in her London hotel from
America. She is on her way
to Calcutta for her second and
official marriage ceremony to
the Maharajah of Cooch Be-
har, The first ceremony—a
Brahmin one in 1949—was
kept secret pending Indian
governinent approval.

—EXPRESS.



SEA WELL

ARRIVALS BY W.ILA. ON
SATURDAY PRO ST. VINCENT
From ST. VINCENT—Patricia Casson.

From ANTIGUA—Alfred Mulcare.

From GREDANA — Anthony Hadid,
Monicar Hadid, Alive James, Jacqline
Jamts

From ST. KITTS Warren Tyson,
Wakefield Elliott
From ST. LUCIA—Theodora Alexander,

Calixite Alexander, Mary Phillips
DEPARTURES BY BWIA. ON
SATURDAY
For TRINIDAD—Alfred Mulcare, Edris
Chang Yit, Alicia Kong, Mavis Korig,
William Harris, Doris Barnwell, Leila
Sargeant, Warren Bennett, Maria Rojas,
Mercedes Rojas, iuis Fuentes, . Luisa
Madriz Maria Madriz, Marianelta Madriz,
Mireya Madriz, Elliott Reece, Stella

Reece
For GRENADA-—Edward. Hart, Norah
Hart, John Hart, Susasa Hart, Carmelo
Arino, Lucia Arino, Francisco Brandt,
Milagros Brandt, Edling Bjerkhamn,
Joan McKerness, Kathleen Rameay,
Thomas Vandijk, B. J A Vandijk,
Enka Vandijk, Margaret Finch, Paul
Vandijk
DEPARTURES BY BWIA. ON
SUNDAY
For TRINIDAD-—A Ryte, Thani,
Thani, G. Nicholls, P, Ince, 1. Harris,
S. King, R. Hardwidge, G. Adams, A
Frampton, ©. Thani, E. Mantilia, G
Mantifla, J. Perez, L. Thomas, S. Abreu,
Camacho, R. King, F. Hutson, J
hon, G, Pijpekamp, C, Pijpekamp,
J, Pijpekamp, W. Pijpekamp, Noreen

Vyfhuis, Barbara O'Neill, John O'Neill,
Arthur Marshall, Keith Fraser, Frank
Lobo, Phyllis Gonzales, Javee Young,
Morrell Bourne, Rosie Teikeira, Maria
D'Andrade, Col Joseph Connell, Ivy
Connell, , Maj Orville Waleott, Maj
John Griffith, Capt. Carl Neblett, Thornas
Roberts, Marcel Deverteuil, Geoffrey
Pilgrim, Milton Tucker, Alexander
Thompson, Charles Hayward, Hugh
Wooding, Daphne Wooding, Rita Lobo
For ST. LUCTA—Lionel King, Glad-
stone Haynes, Cynthia Evans, Clinton
Evans, Bertha Taylor, Hallam Massiah.
ARRIVALS BY E.W.LA.
From Trinidad
S. Boyce, C. Gill, B. Alleyne, M.

Alleyne, O. Cummins, M. Boyce, H, Gill,
M. Martinez, T. Camps Campins, J. Rap-
sey, D. Semple, E. Martin, V. Swafson,
C, Swanson, 8S. Swanson, I. Wilmer, J.
Widmer, G. Widmer, R. Valera, M. Val-
era, M,. Valera, R. Valera, G. Stevenson,
H,. Talbot, W. Wright,
From 8t, Vincent
Corbin Corbin, Rudolph Kirton.
From Grenada

Renwick, Eva Hagley,

From St. Kitts
Warren Tyson, Wakefield Elliott.
DEPARTURES BY B.W.LA.
For Puerto Rico

Anne

Sheila
Hagley.

Joan King, Catheline Bushell,
Skeete, Orrill Thompson.
For St. Vincent
Gertrude Lewis, Gladys
Samuel Cupid.
For Antigua
Walter Strisiver
For Martinique
Marie Cheneaux,
For Guadeloupe
William Lioyd-Jones,

Harold

Haynes,



RATES OF EXCHANGE

CANADA
65 2/10% pr. Cheques on
Bankers 63 2/10% pr.
Demand
Drafts 63.05% pr.
65 2/10% pr. Cable
63 7/10% pr Currency 61 7/10% pr
Coupons 61% pr,



Haliborange

The nicest way of taking
HALIBUT LIVER OIL

| Wade by ALLEN @ HANBURYS LTO., LONDOR

Sunrover Pays
First Visit

The S.S. Sunrover (4,373 tons
net,) paid her first visit to Bar-
bados from England yesterday
bringing general cargo from
Newport, Liverpool and Glasgow.

Beer, whiskey, cotton thread,
bottles were among the cargo,
she discharged here yesterday.
Swmrover also brought. down 12
passengers —- four of whom got
off here—and 423 bags of English
mail, ‘

Built as a aeroplane carrier,
Sunrover was converted since th
last war into « passenger-freiehter
and she has been chartered by
Saguenay Terminals Ltd. to run
between England and the West
Indies.

Sunrover is expected to leave
Barbados tomorrow for Trinidad.

She is consigned to Messrs.
Plantation Ltd.



Schooners Bring
Rice, Charcoal

Two thousand bags of rice
were among the cargo arriving
here yesterday by schooners call-
ing from other islands. The
Francis W. Smith brought the
supply from British Guiana along
with 500 bags of heavy charcoal,
five tons of firewood and 30
bunches of plantains.

Other schooners calling were
the Marea Henrietta from St.
Lucia, the Everdene from British
Guiana. They brought between
them over 1,000 bags of charcoal,
150 tons of firewood, 78 posts and
18 crates of fruit,

The schooners are consigned to
the Schooner Owners’ Associa-
tion.

Men Raid: Factories
For Scrap Metal

BECAUSE of the good price now
being paid for scrap metals, many
men have started to raid factories,
Inspector Bourne of the C.LD. told
the Barbados Advocate, “My De-
partment has been very active in
trying to put an end to these
larcenies”, he said.

On Friday night a squad of
Police arrested Herman Alleyne,
a shopkeeper of Hindsbury Road,
Beresford Smith of Martindales
Road and Allan Clarke, a watah-
man of Graggs Hill. The Police
tntercepted a motor lorry in which
they were conveying a quantity



of copper which had been stolen
from Joes River Factory, St.
Joseph, the same _ night, The

felony was detected before the
manager of the ‘factory knew of
the incident.

Other investigations carried out
by the C.I,D. men led to the arrest
of Oswald Small, alias “Hungry”
of Venture, St John and Rudolph
Howell of Nurse Land, Carrington
Village, St. Michael. They have
been charged with breaking and
entering buildings at Cliff Planta-
tion, St. John and Malvern, St.
Joseph and stealing quantities ‘
different metals,

The metal stolen from Cliff was
attached to machinery which will
be used in the coming crop season.

HEAVY SHOWERS FALL
ISLAND-WIDE

Heavy showers of rain, accom-
panied by occasional flashes of
Jightning and rolls of thunder, fell
isiand wide on Sunday with the
exception of St. Philip’s parish
which enjoyed a dry day.

St. Lucy and St. Andrew record-
ed the heaviest falls. Returns from
Belleplaine Police Station recorded
10 parts of rain in St, Andrew
from 6 am, to 6 p.m. yesterday
and 1.36 inches of rain from 6
p.m, yesterday until 6 a.m. this
morning. Over the same periods,
Crab Hill Police Station, St Lucy,
recorded 13 parts and 1.10 inches.

Throughout the day, the sky
was overcast. Churth attendances
were poor. In some_ parishes,
streets were floodéd and water
surrounded people’s homes,

Most of the parishes had the
heaviest fall-during the night. St.
George, St. Thomas, St. James and
St. John received more rain dur-
ing the day than during the night,

The rainfall returns from the
various police stdtions are as
follows;—

Central Police Station 12 parts,
District “A” 43 parts, District “B”
80 parts, District “D” 21 parts, Dis-
trict “E” 65 parts, District “F’ 98
parts, Holetown 34 parts, Four
Roads 10 parts, Bélleplaine 1.36
inches, Crab Hill 1,23 inches.





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et RR E-Ten

ee

ELECTION



OFFICERS |

AND CLERKS APPOINTED

The following persons have
been appointed by the Governor-
in-Executive Committee to be Re-
turning Officers and Filection
Clerks for the election of mem-
bers to serve in the General As-
sembly for the session 1951-54
ingaccordance with the provisions

the Représentation of the Peo-

(Misc@llaneous Provisions)
Act, 1951:—

Constituency of Bridgetown:—
Returning Officer: Gilbert Darn-
ley Bynoe, Esq.; Election Clerk:
Errol Colin Redman, Esq

Constitaency of St. Michael:—

Returning Officer: Captain Her-
bert Hadley Williams, M B-E.;
Election Clerk: Henry Oswald

Ramsay, Esq.

Constituency of Christ Church:
—Returning Officer: Harry St.
George Ward, Esq.; Election
Clerk: Francis Edwin Wood God-
dard, Esq.

Constituency of St, George:—
Returning Officer: William Armel
Yearwood, Esq.; Election Clerk:



Election Clerk: Pearson Samuel
Walter Scott, Esq,
Constituéncy of St. jJoum—

Barton Gittens
Election Clerk

Returning Officer:
Cheesman, Esq.;

Harold Malcolm Hamilton West,
Esq. ala
Constituency of St. Joseph:—

Returning Officer: James Colin
King, Election Clerk: Lloyd Ed-
ward Cave, Esq.

Constituericy of St. James:—
Peturning Officer: John Henry
Clifford Thorne, Esq.; Election
Clerk: Percy Hamilton Tarilton,
ith. on

Constituency of St. Thomas:—
Returning Officer: D A M.
Haynes, Esq.; Election Clerk:

John Reynold Emtage, Esq.

Constituency of St, Andrew:—
Returning Officer: Frederick Ar-
thur Ingram, Esq.; Election Clerk
Clarence Alan Skinner, Esq.

Constituency of St. Peter:—
Returning Officer; Cyril Amos
Thornton, Esq.; Election Clerk:

Douglas Hugh Adrien Johnson, Ceorge Seymour Corbin, Esq,

Esq. Constituency of St. Lucy:—

Returning Officer: Beresford Ev-

Constituency of St. Philip:— erton Barnett, BEsq.; Blection

Returning Officer: Major Orville Clerk: Handel Cameron Bowen
Frank Cardvell Walcott, E. D.; Esq.

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PAGE FOUR

BARBADOS #68 ADVOCATE

Gee ee Senlyp- Se ae

Printed by the Advocate Co., Ltd., Broad Bt., Bridgetewa



Tuesday, November 6,

EISEN HOWER

WHAT is the significance of General
Eisenhewer's visit to the United States ?
The Supreme Commander has not been
sitting idle in his headquarters in Paris.
He has been travelling extensively
throughout Europe seeing for himself
what preparations are being made for the
integration of the European Army.

But the Schuman and Pleven plans
depend on the ratification of European
Parliaments. The victory of Winston
Churchill in the English Elections gives
greater hopes for a tederal Europe than
did the isolationist Labour policy of Mr.
Attlee’s administration. It is possible
therefore, that fears as to Eisenhower’s
remaining in Europe might prove ground-
less. Those fears have however been ex-
pressed and General Eisenhower's visit to
the United States and his conversation
with Mr. Truman are worth more than
passing attention by those interested in
world affairs.

General Eisenhower's departure from
Europe to-day would cause alarm and
despondency throughout the world. It
would not be easy to find a successor who
could be so acceptable by Europeans and
whose personal reputation would so rapid-
ly inspire world confidence in the holder
of the office of Supreme Commander. But
the job at SHAPE is not more than ten per
cent, military. The rest is political, and
General Eisenhower is a soldier.

In addition to fears which are being
expressed in Europe, General Eisenhower,
like the rest of the world, must wonder
with anxiety what America’s policy in
Europe would become should a Republican
Administration under Senator Taft be
returned in‘the Presidential elections of
1951. Rather than risk such an eventual-
ity the General might well consider that
he could ‘best serve the interests of Euro-
pean integration by returning to the
United States and running for President
with very good chances of winning.

This in the long run would seem to be
the most satisfactory course to follow.
Because, it ig unlikely that any American
administration will continue to look with
favour on the indefinite presence in Europe
of six American divisions. But these are
critical days in Europe with the Russians
going full steam ahead in their “peace and
unity” campaign in Germany.

If the European army, as planned by the
experts, and the European parliament to
give administrative support can be formed
before Eisenhower's possible departure
from Europe, then the position might be
less depressing. But can all this be done
before March which is the time that Gen-
eral Eisenhower must he in the United
States if he is going to run for President ?

The General's visit to the United States
may be a normal visit to report back to
President Truman, but it comes at a time
when speculaticn as to his own future in
Europe ts being made by well-informed
quarters.!..Me rest of the world will tol-
low wiin interest and anxiety any chacge
in the Genrral’s status during these critical
inonths.

From The “TIMES”
Oct. 29. 1951

THE appointment of Lord Ismay as Sec-
retary of State for Commonwealth Rela-
tions and of Mr. Oliver Lyttelton one of
the senior members of the Conservative
Party, as Colonial Secretary, is an indica-
tion of the importance which Mr, Church-
ill attaches to these posts... . . The Colon-
ies are in urgent need of ‘development.
The good intentions of the Labour Gov-
ernment in this matter were too often
baulked by their failure to ensure that
their plans were sound in conception and
in execution. Mr. Lyttelton’s practical ex-
perience should enable him to beware of
this mistake : he should also find it easier
than a Labour Minister would to encour-
age private investment in colonial develop-
ment: schemes.

—







An authoritative life of Admiral
Beatty has long been needed, Rear
Admiral Chalmers possesses high
qualification for the task of
writing it.

He has been given full access to
Beatty's. private papers. He was
navigating officer in Beatty’s flag-

Nelson.





He rose to the top with
extraordinary speed.

admit that hitherto insufficient at-
tention has been paid to his Scout
education,

As Island Scout Commissioner
I have already addressed myself

The Broadcast Address made by Major
J —. Griffith, island Commissioner on
Fridsy, 2nd November, 195)

THE Boy Scout Movement in

3arbados reaches its 40:h Mile-
stone as its birthdays are referred
to, early next year when it is
hoped appropriate celebration

vill take place.

Today, after 39% years one yet
hears the now time-honoured
Jament that all is not well with
Scouting. One deplores the small-
ness in numbers, the mediocrity in
standard. The question ig often
asked why canno. the Boy Scouts
do more for themselves, why can-

not they equal the sister Move-
ment in numbers, in smartness
and in ability to raise large sums
of money?

Few stop to zonsiaer whut ine
Boy Seev. Movement really is;
what are its Aims and Objects and
how it sets about to achieve these.

My purpose in *naking this
broadcast through the kind offices
of Reditfusion is to answer these
ques.ions, to justify our existence
and to try to show the Barbados
public wny Scouting should be
supported from all angles.

It is truly amazing how little
the average member of the public
knows about ihe Movement. \

to Scouters on the subject and to-
night and on a few subsequent
oceasions I propose enlightening
the public on many aspects of
Scouting»

At the outset I would emphasize
that as an Organisation the Boy
Scout Movement is not in competi-
tion with other organisations for
pride of place; it does not seek to
belittle or oppose any organisa-
tion having for its purpose the
uplifting of youth; it strives to
promote the healthiest relation-
ships with all youth bodies. Ap-
parently it suffers in comparison
with them all.

by slancuics vf compar.son with
popuiauon tne number On Wie rust
as disclosed py tne recent Census
4S lamentaply pelow what it snowia
oe, imperial mMeaaquarvers COli~
siders .hat tne proporuon vot
scouts to population snould be 100
to 5,uUU, 50 Lnat with our popula-
tion at approximately 210,vlWu our
Scouts suould be, especially after
39 years, no less than 4,200. What
a aitferent piace our island would
be if for the past 10 or 15 years
4,000 of its boys were boy Scouts
—boys living or at least striving
to live the Scour lite. And what is
the, Scout life? The answer is
the Christian life, the life Our
Lord and Saviour came 2,000
years ago to teach mankind to
practice. There will always be
some bad’ people in the world—
by bad I mean, dishonest, un-
reliable, immoral, selfish, wicked.
This has been the case since
Creation. Satan once occupied a
lace im heaven; amongst Our
rd’s chosen few was an arch-
traitor. These ugly spots, how-
ever, in the general scheme of
things must not lead us away
from the real purpose of life.

There are nue a few persons in
all walks of life who regard
Scouting as another of those more
or less worthy efforts of well
meaning persons to help the poor
and unfor.unate; others think it a
splendid means of putting an end
to petty larceny and general bad
behaviour in a_ certain class,
Scouting ig nothing of the sort.
Our Founder himself said “Scou:-
fing is not a charity organisation
run by people in society for the
benefit of the poor children.”
Scouting is a way of life. It is a
way made very attractive, almost
alluring, so that those who would
walk in it may be better en-
couraged to preserve and not yield
too easily to the many temptations





with which the average christian
‘minded person is beset,
You get a child to take a nasty

pill by coating it with sugar, not
so much to deceive it (though a
deception it may be) but really
because we know it is good for
the child. So, why not make it
palatable to secure the end — the
hetith of the child?

Tne Chief Executive Commis-
sioner at Imperiai Heaaquar.ers
ih closing his Annual Report for
iuSt year says “Many boys have
never been brought to realise the
tull meaning of Scouting. The
small boy wno joins a Cub Pack
or a Scout Troop comes to get
fun and advenure, and all too
otten many never get beyond this
stage”—how applicable to Barba-
dos — he goes on “It is our
responsibility as Scouters, through
our example, to bring all our
Scouts to the realisation that
Scouting is indeed an aaventure—
the greatest of adventures — the
adventure of living under the
guidance of God.” What an ad-
veniure for these days of unrest,
of suspicion, of mistrust, of in-
stability, of unselfishness and
greed.

I am to show you how Scouting
sets out bovs on this adventure.

Scouting aims at formation and
development for Character, I read
in the newspaper a few days ago
that the family is the very element
of the community. What makes
up a family? A number of ->-
dividuals; and if those individuals
are not units of character then as
an element of the community fhe
family is worthless.

Lord Baden-Powell in another
of his wise sayings ac.ises that
we should not let the technical
outweigh the normal. Our Methods,
of which I shall speak on another
occasion, are not the end but the
means. He says, “The end is
character, character with a pur-
pose, and that purpose, that the
next generation be sane in an in-
sane world, and develop the
higher realisation of SERVICE,
the active service of Love and
Duty to God and neighbour.”

Is such an. adventure to be
confined to any one class or race?
Scouting, its Aims, Objec.s and
Methods, has fired the imagination
of the whole world, 47 odd nations
have embraced Scouting. Every
individual without exception
should be and must be helped to
be a person of charac.er—a_per-
son with high moral principles, a
person that can be depended upon
to say the right thing and do the
right thing under all circum-
stances, a person in whom there
is no petiiness of feeling, nasty
prejudices, a person tolerant of
the feelings and opinions of others,
a person who loves his fellow man
because, like himself, he is made
in the likeness and image of God.

Such persons are to be found in
all strata of society. Why then
the insistence in Barbados on
Scouling for the poor. Scouting
is also for the rich.

It would appear that parents are
not as solicitous of their children’s
moral welfare as they are of their
material. Today the emphasis is
on Certificates not Character,

When | sat my Cambridge Senior
Exam. some years ago I ex-
perienced the disgust of seeing a
boy in front of me answering his
questions from books and leaves
he held on his knees; I saw another
boy pass entire sheets of work to
a friend a few seats behind. I
have been told that these practices
have not been abandoned. Should
it be any wonder if such boys in
later years become thieves, not
only thieves of property but of
their employers’ time,

Can we afford to sacrifice char-
acter for certificates?

What is Scouting? There are
many answers but when analysed



Sir Gorell Barnes

LONDON, Oct, 1951.

In charge of the African sec-
tion of the Colonial Office at the
end of the year, when Mr. A. B.
Cohen leaves to become Governor
of Uganda will be 42-year-old Mr.
W. L. Gorell Barnes, C.M.G., son
of the late Sir Frederick Gorell
Barnes and of Lady Barnes.

Though a comparative new-boy
in the Colonial Office—he was
first ap, potent to it in February,
1948— Gorell Barnes is a man
with extensive overseas experi-
ence, gained chiefly with the For-
eign Office. During World War
JI. and since then he has been
brought into close contact with
the central economic planning
machinery of H.M.G., and it is for
his work in the economic field
that he has been chiefly distin-

He was a



guished since entering the Colo-
nial Office.

He was in charge at the moment
of the Economic, Finance Statis-
tics and Supplies departments of
the Colonial Office.

His earliest visit to the Colo-
nies, following his appointment as
an Assistant Under-Secretary, was
in July, 1948. Christmas 1949,
to Nigeria and the Gold Coast —
found him in the West Indies,
where he spent two months tour-
ing. In the latter part of 1950,
he spent six to seven weeks in
Nigeria and the Gold Coast for a
East Africa. He was back in
short visit ‘earlier this year.

During each of these visits he
has discussed with people on the
spot questions arising in connec-



Poseur? Dare-devil? |
The Astonishing Beatty

“By ROBERT BLAKE.

He defends
ground that the errors which oc-

BARBADOS ADVOCATE

The Scout Movement | AFTER ALL

they mean the same thing. Scout- |
ing is a way of life.
Founder says “Is a school of citi~
zenship through woodcraft.”

Scouting can be divided into four
heads — CHARACTER, develop-

ment, resourcefulness, self-reli-
ance, ene pluck, and
persist ICRAFTS, ‘10 |
elemen re a belie and possivly i

of a future career; PUBLEC SER-
VICE, specialisation

and personal hygiene. And really
there is nothing new in all this.
Long ago Plato described it a:
education in virtue from youth
upwards, which makes a man pas-
sionately desire to be the perfect
citizen, and teaches him how
rightly to rule and how to obey.’

Scouting in itself is not a new
form of education but it helps
Education. In spite of all the
efforts of their teachers childre 1
have insufficient opportunity of
gaining character, health or enjoy-
ment of life in school; Scoutin
helps. In Scouting the boy is led
to acquire qualities of self-relianc :
and resource, health and energy,
technical skill and handicraft an
a sense of service to the com-~
munity. Seouting gives him
qualities which enable him t
start in life with a reasonabl
chance of sucess,

Scoutung is not a .eugion but it
helps the Church. Every Scout is
supposed to belong to some de-
nomination and to attend its
services. Teaching religion 1
poys is much a matter of individ
ual and personal contact, hence
the chief factor in influencing boys
is the personal example of the
Scouter. Scouting is based on th
Promise and the Law and the
Promise involves. Duty to Goa
Every Scouter should be an activ
member of a church.

Scouting is not a Business but
helps busimess. The objective 0
Scouting is good citizenship. Th
is achieved by methods whicl
while appealing to the boy uncon
sciously help him to acquire rig’
habits of conduct, the chief beins
willing and efficient. service for
other people. Having no barrier
of race , colour, creed or religion
Scouting has already shown tha‘
what is considered impossible is
not by any means so — th
establishment of a social. system
built on harmony and goodwil
between individual and individusl
race and race, nation and nation
Therefore the community shoulc
show its appreciation of this b
definite acts of financial sympathy

1 again quote the Founde
“There can be no more profitable
investment of money than to tak«
a share in carrying out the devel-
opment of a Movement whict
provides a balanced system 0’
education, physically, mentally
morally, and spiritually, to supple
ment in the matter of CHARAC
TER the ordinary book-learnin
of the schools.”

In another broadcast I hope tr
deal with Scout Methods and the
Scout Uniform, with some of u
a rather controversial subject.

I close this with a word on ou;
immediate need, Our need today
is for leaders, for persons who are
willing to find time to practise the
methods which Scouting uses t
achieve its objective — Scout-
masters for persons to find time
to assist these Scoutmasters by
relieving them of the business enc
of Scouting, financing the Troop—,
lay people to act as secretaries
treasurers, members of commit-
tees; for persons to find time, tc
assist these Scoutmasters by ‘th-
structing in special subjects—lIn-
structors and Examiners. You see
heaw everybody can help, not onl)
the Scoutmasters, but you, mem-
bers of the community. The boys
are there and they will come
they want to be manly and true a
heart; they want to be led arig):
Where are the leaders and the
helpers? I ask “Is the standarc
Teaured too high?"

tion with the different departments
for which he is responsible.

Educated at Marlborough Col-
lege and Pembroke College, Cam-,
bridge, Mr. Gorell Barnes joinec
the Foreign Office in 1932 and
served successfully at H.M. Em-
bassies in Bagdad and Lisbon. At
the outset of war he was seconded
to the Export Credits Guarantee
Department and then to the War
Cabinet Offices. From 1942 he was
Personal Assistant to the Lord
President of the Council (first Sir
John Anderson and then Mr.
Attlee.) In 1945 he was trans-
ferred to the Treasury (Defence
Materials Division) and in the fol-
lowing year he became the Prime
Minister’s Personal Assistant, an
appointment he held till he went
to the Colonial Office.

Beatty on the

Scouting, the |

in different |
forms of usefulness for others and |
HEALTH, physical development |

























ship at the Battle of Jutland, He
was Beatty’; personal friend,

Such a combination’ of docu-

mentary, private and professional
knowledge can scarcely fail te
produce. a valuable graphy.
Admiral Chalmers’s book* will be
widely read not only by student?
of naval history but by many
others to whom the name of Beatty
has become both a symbol and a
legend.

A Second Nelson ?

Was Beatty a second Nelson or
was he merely a brave but fool-
tardy commander who_ only
escaped disaster through luck and
the errors cf his enemies? Admiral
Chalmers naturally inclines to the
former view.





“It would be invidious to
stretch the comparison too far,”
he writes, “but it can be truly
said that Nelson and Beatty each
in his day symbolised to the
people of all nations the

fighting
spirit of the British '
Certainly Beatty

the qualities which disting he

Navy

had many of

captain at 29, an Admiral at 38.

Like Nelson he possessed un-
limited personal courage, like
Nelson he was a_ flamboyant
personality with more than a rouch
of the poseur (everyone remem-
bere the rakish angie of his hat).

Like Nelson, too, he _ fell
passionately in love with a married
woman; but it is not so clear that
he possessed the genius of a
Nelson. “He certainly did not
achieve the same success. The
most important battles in Beatty’s
career were those of the Dogger
Bank and Jutland, At both Beatty
commanded the battle cruisers
and his task was of paramount
importance; but the Dogger Bank
was disappointing and inconclusive
while Jutland must be regarded as
a clear defeat.

The Big Muddle

Both battles, especially Jutland,
have been the subject of protracted
and acrimonious dispute, and the
part played by Beatty is far more
controversial than would appear
from Admiral Chalmers’s account

curred were due to faulty signals
and lay outside Beatty’s control,
And that if Beatty’s intentions had
been carried out all would have
been well.

It is no doubt true that muddle
over communications had disas-
trous results at certain moments.

At the Dogger Bank, for exam-
ple, Beatty’s cruisers, owing to a
misunderstanding, left one of the
German ships completely un-
marked and free to fire without
disturbance. Even more serious,
an ambiguous signal from Beatty
caused his second-in-command,
Admiral Moore, to break off from
the pursuit at the very moment
when victory seemed certain.

But surely this was Beatty’s
iault, not Admiral Moore's; and
when we find exactly the same
errors occurring at Jutland 18
months later we begin to wonder
if bad luck alone can explain
Beatty’s misfortunes,
Same Again
again Beatty’s
@ On Page 7.



He clashed with Churchill.
He married a divorced heir-
ess. He set strategists argu-
ing for a generation. To-day
comes the story of Britain's
most controversial sailor: the
dark background behind the

Once
facade of success.

cruisers



TUESDAY, NOVEMBER 6, 1951














oo
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NOW IN STOCK
PLANTATION & FACTORY

THAT



LABOUR SHEETS
‘You Who've )
Toiled Cad Years Call and Select Early from

Against The Taunts

v
» ADVOCATE STATIONERY.
By WILLIAM BARKLEY t







THIS new House is to an astonishing
extent the mixture as before. Many of the
new winners are former losers. The election

givs us singularly little new blood, e of

But, mercifully, at least when the pudding : Many Uses
was stirred the basin was left facing the :
opposite way.. From my Gallery seat front- : &



ing the Government I shall not see so many
faces from which I have the desire to avert
the eye:

The Socialists will be beneath me.

It will be a thrill to see Churchill enter
on the right of the Chair as Prime Minister.

These 18 months he has stood the taunts
of Shinwell and other Socialists that he
always acted as if he were Prime Minister.
It was not his fault.

He did not have any competition in appear-
ance.

Who'll talk beside him from the Front
Bench ? It is a vital question. So many
young and able thrusters sat behind him in
Opposition that they can hardly all be suited
to office.

But they all think themselves suitable:
Boyd-Carpenter, Peter Thorneycroft, David
Eccles, Antony Head, Walker-Smith, Nigel
Birch — a host of “youngsters” as politicians
age have toiled six years in the wilderness
and look now for their reward.



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ROOM FOR ALL
There would be ill-will if Churchill were

ne eI.

disposed to bring in outsiders in the interest Fe
of broadly basing his Government to their
exclusion.

They will not be disposed to accept sacri-
fice in the cause of face to such oldsters as
John Anderson or Archibald Sinclair, who
might reach office via the Lords.

But, as it happens, Churchill inherits, if he
zares to maintain, a Government machine ‘ e
which the Socialists greatly expanded, He
aas 60 or 70 places to allot. So maybe it ) ie
will be the case of “Will there be beds for DA COSTA & Co., Ltd. ments
all who come? Yea, beds for all.”

Churchill has not fully achieved the “firm
and stable” Imajority he requjested of the
people.

It is assumed he will at once set about
nereasing it by 12 with a Bill to restore the
University seats. He is entitled to say he has

On Sale at Your Druggist







avery moral right to do it. He gave notice. The Elegance
Moreover, as we saw last spring, the +
Socialist Government would not have lasted of apestry

a month on a vote if it had not first destroyed
these seats.

But be sure the Socialists will fight the
3ill night and day. It will be in Churchill
‘anguage the first “main crunch” of Opposi-
‘tion. Possibly embarrassment may arise
whether this is the best use to be made of the
time available.

UNSCRAMBLING

Next battle will be the unscrambling of
Messrs. Strauss and Hardie’s Nationalised
steel Corporation. The new chairman of the
Kitchen Committee should be able to show
a profit on 3 am. snacks and breakfasts.
some barristers will wish they had failed of
alection. No freedom for them to go on cir-
cuit.

One comfort is that the Liberal nuisance
is abated. Even the small Tory majority
offers no scope for the Clement Davies bal-
ancing act. Liberals must really now not
only be dead but know it, if a Scotsman is
permitted an Irishism, Note that the last
remnants of the Asquith-Lloyd George Lib-
eral feud which split the party have van-
ished from the mortal scene. Not all
Churchill’s horses could put Lady Vi back.

He was more fortunate when like the
Colossus he is he bestrode this gulf over-|
night from the Asquith Huddersfield plat-
form to the Newcastle LI.G. platform. But
when I see Gwilym called Liberal-Conserva-
tive and one thing or another I repeat that
his election address called him only “The|)
Official Conservative,” and Tory he is to me.

IF ONLY—’ |;

Lady Megan’s is among the familiar faccs})
10w involuntarily absent. She tock impish!
oleasure in teasing Churchill when he asked: i
her support. She voted Socialist to keep er
Socialists in power.

If only she had been done with it and|
worn the party label she would be in the,
new House. Anglesey would have seen her
again had she but angled less.

A strenuous time will be had by all at|
Westminster. It is unfortunate that the
House:is so nearly divided in half, because I |

Gorgeous

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do not believe that this represents the feel-|

ing of the nation.
I feel that the Bevan mentality is much

like the old I.L.P. and in a small permanent

minority of the people’s outlook.

Perhaps in Opposition the large numbers

bowl of
of moderate, middle-of-the-way men in thc ates OATFLAKES



which they tamely surrendered when in
power.
Somehow in the nation’s distress the un-
derlying unities will emerge which Mr. eal
ston Churchill is best of us all to detect and
to rally. {

—L.E.S

Socialist Party will exert the influence | 24 per lb.



GODDARD'S FOR BEST siviC E tT


TUESDAY, NOVEMBER

6, 1951



CONSIDER FEDERATION CAREFULLY

Adams

Warns

It is cur bounden duty to go carefully into the proposed

sections of this constitution
other constitutions and state
Federal Structure before we

and examine it in the light of
what we feel ought to be in the
go in, the Leader of the House,

Mr. G. H. Adams said yesterday when the House of Assem-
bly were discussing the proposed constitution of a Feder-

ated West Indies.

This constitution is proposed in
the British Caribbean Standing
Closer Association’s Report.

The House passed the follow-
ing Address to the Governor on
the Report: —

The House of Assembly repeats
its acceptance of the principles of
establishing a Federal Govern-
ment of the British West Indies,
and accepts the proposals of the
British Caribbean Standing Closer
Association Committee’s Report
as a basis for discussion of the
form which the. proposed Gov-

ernment’s Constitution should
take.
2. The House, however, does

not accept in their entirety the
detailed proposals of that Report,
and will in due course forward
to Your Excellency its suggestions
for the amendment of some of
these proposals.

3. The House is convinced of
the advantages to be gained from
a Unification of the Public Ser-
vices in the British Caribbean
Area and therefore agree in gen-
eral with the “Holmes” Report on
this subject.

Comparisons

Mr. R. G. Mapp who was
speaking on the last occasion when
the discussion was adjourned,
again made comparisons between
the Australian federation and that
proposed for the West Indies. He
repeated that the Australian fed-
cration was composed of a group
of States which had _ reached
constitutional advancement while
the islands of the West Indies had
enly reached various stages of
constitutional development. The
whole proposal was therefore
weak, to his mind, because of this
fact.

Another point he had referred
to, he reminded, was that whereas
in Australia the senate was
elected, in the proposals for the
West Indies the senate would be
nominated. It was a point on
which he was not strong.

He, however, expressed views
showing that he was in favour
of an elected senate as members
would then be representing the
wishes of the people.

Mr. Mapp advised that they
put forward their views clearly
and strongly about the sugges-
tions in the report. Let them say
whether or not they disapproved
of these suggestions.

‘ Capable West Indians

Speaking of the proposed Coun-
cil of State, He said: “I think
we will all admit that the West
Indies have people capable of
running our own Council of State
rather than the nominated and
official members as proposed.

Of the representatives of Bar-
bados for the General Assembly,
he said: “If in a General As-
sembly any federation our
representatives have less oppor-
tunity to plan effectively for the
people of Barbados than they do
now, I feel that rather than the
four members proposed we sheuld
agree to two.”

or

Closer Unien

Mr. Wilkinson (E) said that
the question of federation was a
very big and vital one. Some
months ago, he felt that the
principle of federation was good
for the West Indies. But on
second thought, he felt that
“closer union” should have come
first. ,

Barbadians, he said, could
boast of a very good constitution
and they leoked over their own
affairs yery much more than the
people of the other colonies of
the British West Indies, And so
they should see that they did not
give up some of the authority
they had.

Tt did seem strange to him that
they should pledge themselves to
any future policy on that very big
question. It was a question that
called for a great deal of consid-
eration and he was not proposing
to commit himself until he was
satisfied that they were in no
worse position than they were
in then.

Expenditure would be great
and they must bear in mind that





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they would have to bear their
percentage of the expenditure.
More Detail

He was not saying that they
were not ripe for federation as
laid down by Sir Hubert Rance
but closer union should be en-
couraged as a step towards fed-
eration and give them the time
to go into more detail and under-
stand better what they were go-
ing to do. There had been a
change in England as far as gov-
ernment was concerned. Again
they did not know what effect
that would have.

The House was dying the next
day and was letting the Govern-
ment know that although they
were in favour of federation,
they were not going to pledge
themselves to agree to the sug-
gestions made by Sir Hubert
Rance.

Mr. Lewis (L) said that he did
not intend adding to the debate,
but he had got up to raise a point
of view that he had not yet
heard. While they too desired
federation—because unity was
strength—they seemed not to see
with a clear cut view what kind
of federation they wanted.

Travel

He felt that before federation,
they should have a British West
{ndies Aeroplane service subsi-
dized by each Government so
that people of the colonies would
have the privilege of going
around and knowing each other.
School children would have the
opportunity to mix. There should
also be a_ British West Indies
Steamship service.

He felt that the fact that Bar-
bados had a_ better constitution
than the other islands—better
educational standard, a people
more politically awakened—was
going to make it hard for Barba-
dos to fit into the scheme.

Tihey were federating princi-
pally because they wanted to
become strong. And two colonies
in the proposed federal area were
unable to make up their minds.
One colony seemed to think that
it had a continental destiny and
the other was becoming aware of
what the belief of having a con-
tinenta) destiny meant,

In order to utilise the wide
open space of British Honduras,
they would either have had to
get an extremely big gift or
embark on a loan that would ruin
the entire scheme,

He did not feel that the people
of the colonies would be satisfied
to have a nominated chamber
deciding issues in which they
would be involved,

He felt that they should have
nothing to do with the report.

Mr. G. H. Adams said that it
was not possible for the debate
to take place earlier.

He did not think they could do
more than speak in general terms
as to what they felt about the re-
port in as much as there Was
bound to be a difference in the
new House—to a greater or less-
er degree.

“In as much as TI signed this
report,” he said, “I have to make
my position clear.”

The Standing Closer Associa-
tion Committee had __ several
meetings but the representatives
of Barbados, unfortunately were
not present throughout the whole
of these -neet’ igs. A_ sort of
rough and ready procedure was
laid down, the main thing being
that their proceedings were to be
private,

Secret

This was chiefly because a de-
cision arrived at one meeting
might have been modified at an-

other meeting and the public
might be given the impression
that members were shifting in

their views. To a great extent it
was felt too that it was not un-
reasonable to foilow the practice
of the founders of the American
Constitution. Most historians
have regretted that their know-
ledge of what took place at the
convention that produced the
American Constitution was con-
fined to the notes and diaries of
two or three of the representa-
tives in as much as their meetings
were in secret and their proceed-
ings burnt at the end of their
sessions.





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In The House
Yesterday

WHEN the House of Assembly
met yesterds), Mr. Adams laid
the

The
Forms)

following papers :—
Quarries
Regulations,

(Miscellaneous
1951. Quart-






ment of Money
September, 1951.

The House passed a Resolution

for 84,420 for cost of living allow-
ance to the Official Reporters, Ex.
eratia fratuity to the widew of
Mr. E. A. Maynard, etc.
— The House agreed to amend-
ments from the Other Place in
connection with certain Bills
among these were the amend-
ments to the Bill to make pro-
vision for the protection of wages
of workers, and the amendments
to the Bill to make prevision for
the execution of works necessary
lo prevent and contre! flooding
and inundations caused by ex-~-
cessive rains and by high tides
and by reasén of the low level
of various places, causing ineon-
venience to persons and injury to
health aud property.

The House adjourned
day at 2.20 p.m.



until to-



Hon. H, A Cuke and himself
had endeavoured to put. their
point of view as they saw it and
eventually the report ‘was pro-
duced.

“While I subscribed to the view
that our proceedings were: to be
secret and confidential, on the
other hand, when ‘the report
came to be signed, I made it quite
clear that there were points in it
with which I did not agree and
hat I was going to write a mi-
nority report.

“Had I proceeded in
that mincrity report, I
think thot this would
sean the Lich. o2 day.”

They of Barbados were second
to none in the West Indies in
believing in the principles of
Federation in the sense that fed-
erated units could speak more
effectively in political and econo-
mical matters than if they were
separate units.

Not Bound By It

When it came to the signing of
this report, there were some
things in it to which he did not
agree and he did not consider
that they should sign a comprom-
ise report and be bound by it. If
it were necessary to sign the re-
port before breaking up, he
meant to do so with the reserva-
tion that he would not be bound
by anything in that report with
which he disagreed and with
which he knew members of the
Barbados House would disagree.

“I nave even wondered,” he
said, ‘whether I made an error in
not writing a minority report,
But it was to avoid postponing
consideration of Federation that
I agreed.”

He said they all knew how dear
to them a constitution was which
really made a reality of self Gov-
ernment, They knew what it
meant to them who had known
what it was to have no restraining
influence like the reserve powers
of a Governor,

Wien they saw proposed, a
constitution which would put the
Federal Government in a position
of not being really masters of
their destiny they hesitated and
had ,to ask themselves whether
the advantages to be gained were
so considerable as to outweigh
the freedom which they had in
their constitution,

writing
do not
ever have

Agree With Principle

They might all agree to the
principle, but not to everything
in the Report. It was unreason-
able to assume that the West
Indians were the wisest people
that God ever made and that 16
cr 18 of them could get together
and draft a Resolution that would
reach with wholehearted agree-
ment. Never in the history of the
world had people come together
from separate states, even if they
were plenipotentiary, and draft
a Resolution that was accepted by
the several states.

Even at the risk of seeming to
be insular, he would say that
Trinidad did not act altogether in
the interest of Federation when
\hey took the stand they took in
trying to bulldoze every colony in
accepting what they wanted.

Trinidad Annoyed
He said he did not want to say
things which would cause friction
to other colonies who believed
that Barbados always thought
itself superior to the other islands



BARBADOS

in the West Indies. But was it
not peculiar that the. American
delegates got together, quarrelled.
made a compromise report and
then many states repudiated their
delegates when they went. back
bame, for agreeing with certain
things which they did noty feel
were advantageous to them, Yet
the colony of Trimidad . felt
annoyed that all the others, iad
not swallowed the Report.

“So I am saying very deliber-

ately that those colonies which
thought that Barbados was a
stumbling block were not doing
the cause of Federation any
good, he said.

For 300 years they had had
their representative system and
maybe it was because of their
British connections that they

were blinded to the exigences of
that system and did not see the
disadvantages of it.

It was better not to have a writ-
ten constitution to which you had
to stick to every comma, semi-
colon and full stop. The American
Supreme Court had gone so far

as to claim the right to say
whether an amendment of the
constitution was unconstitutional

itself. Therefore they were liable
to find themselves being confined
for a generation.

Some lawyers who practised
the Privy Courts made a lot
money over the interpretation
the Constitution, he said
_ No colony should pass that in
its er.tirety without careful consid-
eration, So far Barbados and
Jamaica were the only ones that
sent the matter to a Select Com-
mittee,

U.K. Government Anxious

“The British Government with-
out any intention of forcing it
down their throats, were a little
anxious a little while ago:to know
what our attitude would be,” he
said,

“They are anxious to see Fed-
eration, but they are anxious t
see that it should come from. us
and that they should not seem to
be pushing it in one direction or
another.”

He said that another thing that
made him sound his warning was
the fact that they had,a Con-
servative Government in Great
Britain,

in
of
of

it was perfectiy true that they
did not have the money to’ pro-
vide their own army or navy and
they could well say that defence
and foreign policy were imperial
matters,

Those who had said .that the
proposed Government was not
much more than a glorified Crown
Colony were not far wrong.

He said that the Imperial Gov-
ernment would have jurisdiction
to legislate all matters of financial
stability and that was a serious
matter. Matters of that sort would
make a Barbadian hesit:/.e before
he agreed with Federation. On
the other hand the British Gov-
ernment would have to make some
sort of financial advancement
whereby they could begin.

To some extent one would ex-
pect the British Government if
they were to lend money, to make
some stipulations,

Lest it be thought that he was
not in favour of Federation, he
would say that if they were going
to get an economic Federation, let
them get it by all means.

“Our Constitution would be
giving up a lot if we, for the first
time in our lives,” he said, “have
to be run by a Constitution that
puts a lot of power in the hands
of the Governor.”

Commerce Chamber Battle

After the Leeward and Wind-
ward islands’ election, the signs of
the time pointed to the danger of
their coming into a Federation and
having to fight the old anti-Cham-
ber of Commerce battle all over
again. As things were at the
present moment, if Trinided were
going to have the capital estab-
lished there, it looked as if they
would be run by associated Cham-
bers of Commerce in the West
Indies and he did not agree—no
matter how insular he might be

accused of being—and they as
Barbadians and West Indians
should avoid that, The whole

essence of progressive movement
throughout the British Empire
was to get away from that. In
Barbados they had got away from
that. Other colonies were show-
ing signs of getting away from it.

“After years of fighting and get-
ting away from this in Barbados,”
he said, “are we to begin all over
again on a bigger scale to fight
the Sugar Producers Association.”

He knew that people would say
it was a very narrow way of
looking at things. Some
feel that no matter what Govern-
ment was in power they showtd








NAMES

( Coonsiulel >

SHIRTS TIES PYJAMAS



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that mean a lot in Shirts |
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Collars attached. White self colours,

Pin Stripes and end-and-end Poplin.
Prices : $8.40, $8.77, $8.54, $8.73 & $9.11

VAN HEUSEN SHIRTS, Turbenised collar
attached. White and Cream,

Prices : ....



... $8.11, $8.60 and $9.34

CONSULATE PYJAMAS in self colours

and Striped Poplins.

$10.99, $11.55, $12.74, $13.93, $15.31

CAVE SHEPHERD & CO. LTD.

10, 11, 12 & 13



Broad Street



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Sizes 36 to 46 ins.
}
!

ADVOCATE



have Federation He could not
subseribe to that. That was say-
ing that so long as there was Fed-
eration, even if they had a Gov-
ernment of the extreme right, they
should accept the Government of
the extreme right.

Socialist Commonwealth

“I think. that we shoul: be con-
vinced,” he said, “thai th. only
hope 1a, tne building of a West
Indian Nation is to have a Social-
ist commonwealth, Our only nope
of salvation if we want to avoid

the current strife is to aim at
establishing a socialist Govern-
ment.”

aven if he might be accused of
icoking at one political faith rath-
ér than federation, he would say
that.

In 1944, he said, Russia was a
wonderful place. In the same year
che freedom of the individual was
preached on the house tops all
over the world. Today they were
being told that the salvation of
the world rested only in the big
business and the Conservative
Government

“It is our bounden duty to go
earefully into the proposed sec-
tions of this constitution and ex-
amine it in the light of other con-
stitutions, and to state what we
feel we ought to be in the Fed-
veral structure before we go in,”
he said.

He said that he had resisted so
far from replying to Mr. Hannays
of Trinidad. Mr, Hannays ought
to have been ashamed to have
said what he said,

Mr. Hannays had said that far
from the Labourite (Mr. Adams)
being opposed to it, he was the
first that had signed it.

He had signed it first because
he was leaving by an early plane.
It was very dishonest of Mr. Han-
navs to suggest that he (Mr.
Adams) had rushed to sign it
Mr, Hannays knew like the other
members of the committee that
he was going to adopt the attitude
he was adopting then.

The Address was then passed



Harbour Log

IN CARLISLE BAY

Sch. Cyril E. Smith, Seh. Mary E
earoline, Seh. Sunshine R., Sch. Lydia
Adina’ S., Seh, Mol), N. Jones, M.V
Jenkins Roberts, M.V. T. B. Radar
Seh Marion Belle Wolfe, Yoeht
Feskadee, Yacht Marsaltese, M.V
Charles A MadcLaan, Sch, Franklyn
D. R., Sch. Posaline M., Sch. Lucille

M. Smith, Sch. Gardenia W
ARRIVALS

Schooner Everdene, 68 tonsa net, Copt

Phillips, from British Gutana

5.8. Sunrover, 4,373 tons net, Capt
MeVicar, from Glasgow

M.V. Cc. Lb. M. Tannis, 41 tons net,

Capt Tihnis, from St. Vinecnt
Schooner Frances W. Smith,
net, Capt Hassell, from British Guiana
Schooner Marea Henrietta, 43 tons net,
Capt. Selby, from St. Lucia
DEPARTURES

Alcoa Pointer, 3,931
Olestad, for St. John

74 tons

8.s
Capt

tons net,

PASSENGERS ARRIVING FROM
GLASGOW YESTERDAY BY THE
8.8. SUNROVER WERE:

Band, Band, Band and Lawson

On Murder Charge

Carlton Brewster, a 23-year-old
labourer of Bank Hall, St, Michael
yesterday appeared before a Dis-
trict “A” Police Magistrate charged
with the murder of Norma Has-
well on September 7. ‘

He was remanded until Novem~
ber 12,

Died Suddenly





Donald Brathwaite of Chase
Land, Carrington’s Village, St
Michael, ‘died suddenly at hig

home about 2.30 p.m. yesterday.
His body was removed to the
Public Mortuary and a post mor
tem will be performed to-day.

CONDITION OF EVA
PERON KEPT SECRET

BUENOS AIRES, Nov. 5.
Official secrecy veiled the con-
cition Monday of Mrs. Juan Peron
wife of Argentinas’ President,
who entered hospital Saturday to
undergo an operation “within 24
hours.”

Huge crowds jammed __ th:
street outside the hospitsl in
suburban Avellanda for th

second day in a row but Jate i

would | the day no information had bee 1

made public. —U.P.

PURINA

H. Jason Jones &



‘ IN THE CHECKER BOARD BAGS





wee

Leg. Go. Withdraws
Amendment To |
Wages Bill

Mr. G. H, Adams told the House
of Assembly yesterday that the
Legislative Council had with-
drawn their amendment not to
include “watchmen” in the defini-|
tion of “manual labour”, in the

Bul to make provision for the
protection of wages of workers.
hey had insisted, however, she

aid, on the retention of the other |
amendments they had made t
the Bill, These amendments, Mr.
Adams pointed out, were trivial
and merely had to do with gram-
matical correctness.

The House had sent a messagi |
io the Other Place saying tha
they disagreed with the amend
ments, They objected to th:
omission of watchmen from thx
category of worker, as it is stated
in the Bill that worker means 3
person who performs “manual
labour.”

Mr. Adams told the House tha‘
the attitude of the Government
was that now the Other Place had
withdrawn the amendment with
respect to the status of watchman,
they were prepared to accept the
other amendments as they were
only minor amendments,

The House then agreed to these
amendments.





House Reporter’s
Widow May Get
$1,920

The widow of the late Mr, B, A
Maynard, Official Reporter of the
House of Assembly, may get an
ex-gratia gratuity of $1,920.

This provision was included iy
a Resolution for $4,420 which wa
pacsed by the House of Assembly
yeste-day.

in accordance with the terms o
the Addresses from the House oi
Assembly to His Excellency the
Governor passed on the 16th an
23rd of October, provision is in
cluded in the resolution for; —

The payment of cost of livin;
allowance to the Official Reporter
ef the Legislature at the same
rates and on the same terms men
tioned in Supplementary Esti
mates, 1951-52 No, 26.

The payment of an amount o)
$576 for indexing the volumes of
the Debates of the Legislature for

the years 1944—1951;
An amount of $1,550 for the
payment of substitutes for the

Official Reporter of the House of
Assembly while on leave and for
bringing his arrears of work up-
to-date,

The payment of an ex-gratia
gratuity of $1,920 to the widow
of the late Mr, E. A, Maynard,
Official Reporter of the House of
Assembly,

Before

the Resolution was

* passed, Mr. J, H,. Wilkinson paid

tribute to the late Mr, Maynard
for his work in the House of As-
sembly.

“For a long time,” said Mr,
Wilkinson, Mr, Maynard was, in
my opinion, the most efficient re-
porter we had in this House: 1
now take this opportunity to ex-
press my sympathy to his widow
and relatives.”



Cocktail Party In
Honour of ‘Barney’

Members of the Barbados Pres:
Club held a cocktail party yeste:
day at their Club coor in ho 10ur o
Mr. “Barney” Millar who is ex
pected to leave the colony or
November 8 for the U.S. where hr
will spend a holiday with his wite

Mr. Miller is Chief Sub-Edito
of the Barbados Advocate,

It is no longer necessary to suff:

pains, itohing and torment from Pil:

since the discovery of Hytex (former!
known as Chinaroid) ytew atarts

work in 10 minuter ana oot only of -
the pain but slso takes out the ewe,

ing, stops bleeding and combate nerv.
irritation thereby curbing jer trow
ples caused by Piles euch as Headach.

Nervousness, Backaohe, Conetipat)
lone of energy Srey and irrite:
deposition. Get Hytex trom ye
druggistG.oday under the cai:
guarantee Hytex must stop your ;
pains and troubles or money beob

‘sturo of empty packore

5,

FOR BEST RESULTS
USE

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UNDERMENTIONED ITEMS ARE ONLY A
































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JAPANNED TRAYS
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BREAD TINS, DISH MOPS
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! We also carry a large assortment of
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BARTHENWARE, ALUMINIUM WARE,
TIN AND ENAMELLED WARE



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IMPERIAL VIENNA SAUSAGES 38 M4
CRAWFORDS, MARIE SWEET Asst,
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PUFFS, CUSTARD CREAMS, }-lb.

Pkts. ‘ ‘ weer OF 40
The above Items for Cash & Carry Customers ONLY,
SEEDLESS RAISINS—ver 1}! Be din =
PRUNES—-per Ib d : pte,
MIXED PEEL—per Ib ; ; ‘ po
CHERRIES—per |b ‘ : re
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e
S
&

-
2 PAGE SIX ’ BARBADOS ADVOCATE TUESDAY, NOVEMBER 6, 1951

LE LESPORSPOPPPCIOR,
(3 Taste It! 2

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You know, too, when you look at the price
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Mixed Nut (Per lb.) 64 AS Currants 46 36}

Pkgs. Sultanas 63 GO ~~ Prunes (Per lb.) 68 66

Pkgs. Mixed Fruit (lb) 69 64 Raisins (Per Ib.) 58 354
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ANC THEN VE RUN LIKE THE
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BUT SINCE | is J\ TH Jos!’
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POINTERS ® I'M NEW ON
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MOTHER- A MR PAT
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STRES TS -- HE
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NATURALLY | v

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— —_—_—ae a i a a a Ne a aaa ata | i i ie ar a a i a a i et ar
TUESDAY, NOVEMBER 6, 1951 BARBADOS ADVOCATE PAGE SEVEN ‘
CLASSIFIED ADS. "umr sau

OFFICIAL NOTICE 4







—

PERSONAL | Poseur?

WANTED










































































































































































































































meena ~ | The public are hereby warned against ;—-————— i ,
TELEPHONE 2508. REAL ESTATE giving credit to my wite, MARWINA | BARBADOS IN THE ,
eine _ Re mementos RUDDER inee Eversiey) I do not hold » HELP Brom Page Four IN PURSUANCE of the Chancery Act, 1 t COURT OF ‘
BUNGALOW—One stone wall Bung: } myself responsible for her o * ave : d g - , 186, I do hereby give notice
; ne wa ungalow r or anyone else cave a verman snip unmarked, | Persons having or claiming any,estate, right or interest or any Ile i .
DIED FOR SALE eee Gaines room, three bed | contracting ony debt or debts in my Vnce’ again a signal is misread o1 in or affecting the property hereinafter mentioned (the . y . noe nee 5
PARE Lo as, akfast room, toilet and bath, | "#™e Unless by « written order signed A MANAGER. f . . = z, F arse OF | to bring before me an ace f _
ign death oa dandin ong a MANAGER. for Joes River Sugar | ao, seen. se ree > he an account of their claims with their witnesses,
CADOGAN—On November 3rd 1951, at] Minimum charge week 72 cent oe. ho 7 pene eae Bay | 2 JOHN RUDDER Estates Factory. Applications in writing | 41) n. As a result the power-| and vouchers to be examined by me on any Tuesday or Friday between
Aruba, D.W.I. Oscar Sydney Cadog- |} 96 cents Sutdays %4 words end — reet | , Wocehe ai addressed to the Attorney—Joes Hiver )*“ uth Battle Squadron arrived | hours of 12 noon and 3 o'clock in the afternoon at the tion Office,
sn. 45 years of age. Formerly of | words 3 cents @ word woech-— a can ” 6.21.51—En. | qvely Cot. Sugar Estates Lid. will be received on | half an hour late on the scene and | Buildings, gtty Sedo before the 22nd day of December 1981, In order that
ee Street, Speightstown, St. | wor? on Sundays; Germaine G. Cadogan (Wife) re ae -_ oe A eee or thereabouts | Buildings, Marhill Street, Bridgetown sulfered disastrous losses, Gecree and be deprived of all claims on or against the said property. a4
eet S._ Cadogan (Mother), THE DWELLINGHOUSE contains 3.11,81-—3n aaa" events suggest either that Plaintiff; PETER NIGEL HUAN JOHNSON oe
uel . : > 2 z .
rae fae Sees saree AUTOMOTIVE Sng Boning neoe's See oe.) PO MMLEC NOTICES [on ewes teak” Seti toe | tore’ closely into the emeketey ar | PRORRETY: ALL TILA certain les or patel of nd atuate tn Upper Cale
oaee. eae = Cadogan very large, Toilet and Bath Large | tunity for young unmarried "inan with us communication. A ern m4 > wand erenton ous’ on d be ip.maes tonve fo ae inten esting by © ~
(Brother), abs Cai “a Pantry, seek eae. G | eater! . . . > a mnatsve- admeasurement one roo ® the same more or less butting and . -
winheie ae C. ce F. Cadogan, a ak v-8 Eos, left hand drive,} The Government Water an a as | e4 caiery Seal Deck Breas FE po ll her ly that the Beat y “touch” was lands now or late of James H. Wiles. of Catherine Wiles, of Clement Lace ;
infie! dogan, (Sons), k m_ perfect working order. | Windmill and Well. wh No. RB ; atv ® mpos . ° of James Ford and of Miss Louisa Mallet, and on the Public Road or however
Washbrook L. Cadogan’ (Grand. |Pply to ©. RM. Austin, Jam-s Street. | for gardens and laws ich supplies water NOTICE B. C/a Advocate. Sr i pt ing a Strain which existing} else the same may butt and bound Together with the messuage or
sons 6.11.53 6.11,51—8n. | Garage for 2 Cars, and Servants’ r PARISH OF 8ST PHULIP m al Eo Sil oe ag pee not stand. | host gale “AYER and all and singular other the houses and ou!
!ARNUM_oy . and is planted in i hereby give notice that I have estab MALE SALES HELP WANTED aimers gives us eal
Rabeces, bina Aga tthe funcral | 4800 mee aha in extent conden. | Gece Gelace Aopuc oes aS EneseaMee | detatgl™ aes, eaconsro an, | Meow ledee of Sank desirable” Meat |@ salutary reminder of the dificult Fru ied Tan Soares isl :
ae! ee wah ; “ . , Golden ple trees, and Breadfruit | 44s Schools, s, St. Philip ubmit reforences. Experience | z ici ah See progam ates a.
Soto oC iichast te ib oreloon GARitn hee freee, trees and another portion of land planted ioe hours: Mondays to Fridays from) haberdashery essential Starting salary Sens water Which Beatty | Dated 19th October, 1951 B WRAJAMB,
Sree Rt. Miche, ot 4.18 Qelock ; ; f —In tn Guines, Elephant and Sour Grass. 10 a.m, to 4 pm from $60 up commensurate with previous | fought—the high seas, the roay of Registrar-in-Chanceny. 6 =
Souk Hoa he iiie Meodoee GUELET AM DE eeaeaes ein eee pero not nen a WRITING will be received | 0, F. C. WALCOTT, Major, experience plus commission, all saies | gunfire, the screaming wind, the eee
Prichin ate tnetten tery with new tyres. Automatic —_ . > e undersigned up to Tuesday the | Returning Officer, ond obter benefits, Reply in own hand- | murk visibilit h . } ‘
. Wears, safety | 13th day of November, at 4 p.m. Th Parish of writing to Box A.M_S cate C y y, the great column
Btnany Alleyne, Daisy Farnum, | clutch. Mileage 33,000 and in perfect | vendor does not bind herself’ to accept | 3.11.51—3n vo ee That a ES “one Sa: | of “water thrown up by enen ,
(Children). 6.11.51, | Condition. Courtesy Garage. Dial 4616.| the highest, or ” a —~2n. bitty
~ | th i any offer. ————— ee | <—— salvoes Naval batt
ate ’ 6.11.51—6n Inspecton any day r : . vs atom are 8
JAMES—On th y day except Sundays on STENO-TYPIST An experienced ; Ti
i681. Charlotte James late Govern: | CAR—One ) Vauzhall ae Doar, | spplcation to, Mrs. Hanschell, Teie. NOTICE Steno-Typiat for our Omice. “Apply im {ning decisions take ae ie ———_—— —
mont Stenotypist at Saint Lucia, The | 1938—29. Engine perfect, tyres good. "yer fetthar ae rticul | PARISH OF ST. JAMES person with written application to Sec-) UNS decisions taken on mislesu- ;
funcral leaves from the Funeral Parlour | Dial 442-84. Horace Hovte. a eae pred particulars and conditions| he returning, Officer for the Election comets ae Estates & Trading Co.,|!Ng or doubtful evidence. | MONTREAL, AUSTM@aLIA, NEW <
of Hinds & Co. Tweedaide Road, Saint | 6.11,51—2n. COTTLE, CATFORD & CO of Members to serve in the General | “\0.. Day Street Su1si-en} It is well to remember the Oe te we The M NEKA nahiek
Michael, z o is evenin: . | Assembly, for t s ; f aiaider >. thie ne oe a, ena a i . : (iM, . ine e M.V. *
for The R.@oCHareh, Behnotis Lanz !. CAR—One Standard “S" In exedlient No. 17, High Street | has established ms es MaAHEATRE MANAGER—A_ full tne — which lies behind the neat Cargo and. eve Ss
and thence to the Westbury Cemeteny. |ccndition. May be seen at Chelsea|111.51—71 Bridgetown. | Factory, between the hours of 7 a im nesuaveui ge THEATRE— ;@lagrams of the naval historian.; s.s. “PUwt ADELAIDE” is schedulec ca, Antigua, Montserrat, Nevis and |
I riende are ped : st Garage (1950) Ltd. Ri I deprcteepta ence indice casnain ens des va a.m. on Mondays, Tuesdays ano | ui the office of CARIBEEAM © 1s prRES Well to remember tha: at Jutland | to sail from tae ee ee Q St. Kitts, Date of Sailing will be
I a rs. Laymone ames en esncnesentsneeeneinniianesiee ‘gee! nesdays a a THEA " x roa Se ontiad Melbourne October 4th, Sydney er Notified.
(Castries, St. Lucia), Owen James, CAP—Rover 16 H.P. Perfect condition eee eens will offer for sale at J. H. C. THORNE rete The Banyans’ Bay Street, ts 250 ships were involved, 10th, Gladstone October 16th, Port Aima]\$ The M.V, CARIBBEE will
Leotta James, Edith Chasnette throughout 24,000 miles only. Not driven |17 High Street “al at their office, No ©.11.6a-u8n: | eee the hours of 9 a.m. and 12 noon, was never possible to see more | October 20th, Brisbane October 27th,]y§ cept Cargo and Panengere =
8.11.51, |over 9% M.P.H. Treated as only child | the 16th day of Movember, telir at's ° cessful applicant must take up hir duties | nan three Or four of the enemy's| srriving st ‘Trinidad about “aa % Nevis and St aha Montserrat
—-——--— an ener ust seen and driv - : J . . 7 utes | capité i if ; bados November Mth. Ni
JORDAN: On November 5, 1961, at her |clated. Apply: Courtesy Garece. Pinte P th , NO Py ganuary 4th.” All applications treated eee ships at any one time and|*i, “faaition to general cango, this % Urday, “Sed inst a oe
residence at Boscobel, St: Peter, pedigrée trial and full pacticulare: | as os sneraage or dwelling-house known woes aan TICE in striet_ confidence 4.11,51-—1n, Pad on the British line, vessel has ample space for chilled and S The M.V. DAERWOOD will
eresa Jords A % Pri ‘ 6 ‘i " Standing on 2 REB GIVEN, that I gb ee nt ~ ¥ oc ,
leaves ihe above Wesdaet Ta — ee 6-11.51—t.f.n. | Acres, 20 Perches of land, which is en- | have established my office at the Vest: REPRESENTATIVE-—Full time repre- | ogg: ful ae Cosientie $6 Bet 9b eue- ie uan Tekoonbel on through Bills of St. ant de none tae
p.m. today for the Boscobel Ceme-| MOTOR CYGLE—One () BSA’ 3s aoe situate meer Top Rock, Christ Clerk's Office, Parochial Buildings, Cum. | S@ntative ae tee a cinadian Life Tee = nara to Se Luding for transhipment at Trinidad to ane Pachenigeed ante ind Arabs,
teri’ Motor C ca +the residence of the late Mrs. | berland Street, Bridgetown, Hours 10] /PSurance Co., tn Barbados. Applica- ‘ al course of events, The a, Leeward and Windward cent, Sailing 5 he
Edwarlina Chandler, Thoris Jor- | Apply: a alte te eae T. A. Clarke a.m. to 12 noon daily (Sundays ex- | #0" in writing are invited which will]/art of describing battles, whether ieee, ? ied oe > bem
aan, Cattibis Jalan. Totccnes | Seaton . ‘ee ee The dwelling-house contains Open | cepted) be treated in strict confidence. Apply: | naval” ili i , For further particulars apply—
Jordan, Herlonial Genn : . Sia in | Verandah, Drawing and Dining Rooms, G. D. _BYNOE, “Insurance Underwriter”, c/o Barbados {;\4Va" Or military, in terms intel-| pigwess, WITHY @ CO. LTD, anc
iene’ Wash’ Yaberd tibese:-edow. FURNITUR 3 Bedrooms, Toilet and Bath, Kitchen, Returning Officer for the Advorate 3.11.51—™m. [ligible to the plain man is exceed- h eCOSTA & CO. LID. :
6.11.51 E Sraomee as feral | en City of Bridgetow: ;————— eg e ——+fingly difficult. Mr. Churchill is} Trinidad Barbados, :
o ‘ue: ys an ursdays 4.11.51—1 | » [ .
SMITE-Op November & Jel at bar TaABLE—One (1) Mahogany Dining | only, between the hours of 4 p.m. and | ———————-. ——___—__ ee UNIVERSITY COLLEGE oh of = ee modern writers} BW ite a ae
residence College Tenantry, St. John, wns reer jal 2708. F f HOSPITAL OF THE WEST WHO. CRE: Ge st.
side 1 ‘ ’ ny rther particulars and diti : i i
Blanch¢. Her funeral leaves the above 4.11.51—2n. | erie. conditions NOTICE INDIES, JAMAIC But too often in Admiral Chal- °
midence . apply to— n Ss, CA, B.W.1. = ral Chal
Pon eg i pl Sun pi LIVESTOCK COTTLE, CATFORD & Co 1 BARTON GITTENS CHEESMAN, | mers’s account of naval operations :
e peey Digar Lavyd: -Zawhis s! 1,11,51—8n paving been appointed Returning Officer | MEDICAL STAFF ema descends something of the :
a , . gston 5 Sn oe s 31 re > -, y 7 . = .
Claude Smith (sons) 6.11.51, HORSE: One half-bred black gelding EVANTON eee ished my “office "i Pa gy oy Foto ! tn tecanae et a eee ‘Dotvanser 1 ed and mist which surrounded 3
$e | OUt of “Joan of Are” by “Battle Front” St. John F s ‘ . ai em in actual Y
Poe o Sanne 5, ‘- o her Pa Manager ‘Rilesne Gols Pistatinn: Sree tte ee Bie B. G. CHEESMAN, tha nee ha aa bay ant tig Ray | through ceure’ tikes tae ns ; Onc.
esidence, Farm Tenantry, eter, . Peter. 3.11.51—3n | Room, Sun Lounge, tw ful i Returning Offic: Medical R ist th a ae ee eenenecemeeenenpell
Selena Whitney. Her funeral leaves T ‘s Set Se ully | tiled 8 Sure a oe" rs 2 clouds, the outline of events cen mee Ad eee *
the thee resldance of 4.30 p.m. to- MARE The half-bred mare Marinole, maeaen Shendan tue ks aoe earn —— bt aver) tip weratnicumin lr i ans: ak done be, but dimly seen, and the readin NEW YORK SERVICE
aglow vet ag thd cate mi out of O.T.C., and Marina and in foal for | Servants’ Room, Children’s Play Room lin the first instance, Salary will be in | becomes weary SS. “SEABREEZE” sails ard November—arrives Barbados 13th November, 1951.
Spas mts oe bad Front. This mare is also an excel-| The Gardens are well laid out, having NOTICE the seale of £700 to £1,000 per annum, The portions. f Admir: 7 A STEAMER sails 23rd November—arrives Barbados 4th December, 195).
sae e sean. ane ine Bowen, Jent plantation riding mare. Apply: | numerous Trees, with double entrance “= depending on experience and qualifica 9, s G dmiral Chal-) A STEAMER sails 4th December—errives Barbados 25th December, 1951
la jowen, uby Bowen, C. Payre, Barrow or phone 3344 The above Property can be purchased | PARISH OF CHRIST CHURCH tions, and is subject to a deduction of |™ePS’s book which will come new meena oem — -——- —_ 7
A is Venice Bowen (Granda Children). 3.11.51—3n | fully Furnished if so desired. With pos- 1 HEREBY GIVE NOTICE that I have| £100 per annum in respect of board, | tO most readers are tho se dealing NEW ORLEANS SERVICE
6.12.51 session Ist February 1952. Fot viewing 4» returning Officer for the election of | residence, ete. Further information may with Beatty’ “ . . ™ *s 2
_ ee ELECTRKivc etc. Phone 8657. 6.11.51—1n men.bers to serve in the General Assem-| be ontiined from the Hospital Manager Lor mee career as First Se ry STEAMER onlin sand Oatober—-arvives Bathados Ste. Movectiaee,, tar
IN MEMORIAM TAL bly for the Parish of Chrst Chuich, | and Secretary rd and those dealing with his;4 STEAMER sails 7th November—arrives Barbados 23rd November, 1951.
NORGROVEIn loving memory of Sarah | “RADIOS — One 10” tube “Phipipe’ | , MOUSE One chattel house standing ertablished ‘my "uffee at th. Parochial Applications with full details sna private life. [A STEAMER sails 2st Nobember—urrives Barbados 7th December, 1951.
Norgrove, who was called to t Radio in rfect conditi on / perches of laNi, situated at re », Ch ’ , hours ondoy | two recent testimonials should be sent i .
4th November, 1950. rest On | algo one “Phico 8 tate: Nadel ane | Comer of Dash Road, Bank Hall. Apply | '° TEE ar ee ar a ee to the Hospital Manager and Secretary, ae First Sea Lord from 1920 ‘o | CANADIAN SERVICE
aivubr 40: ans tember hos Gition’ a Tew. No. cea’ ca [to C. RM. Austin, James treet, Ais Signed) H Cy G. WARD, University Coliege of the West Indies, Beatty made it his duty to , SOUTHBOUND
Theo and Kenneth (sons, U.S.A.),| refused. Apply: The Standard Agency | °"¢ SPot land, Bank Hall 25 3/10 perches seth ra ei a Mona, Jamaica, B.WT., before 3ist} preserve what he could of tho! nga —_ en
Miriam (daughter-in-law, U.S.A.), Emily | (B’dos) Co. 14 Swan Street. Dial 3620 6.11, 61—5n ist Chureh Joowmber, 1991 Navy in the f, | Name of @hip Montreal Halifax Barbados
(aaughter--in-law), Claudine Prescott, SN: Wa at ene nme Se tt Re Shay ee f drastic eevhouy, fe F sin fOr ss. “ALCOA POINTER” 1+ Regt BE, Babs ae Oe ae
grand-daughter), Henderson (grandson) , | ———————eeenenes © (2) very comfortable houses built Ne aca le El re . y. e had a s * mM” Oct. 12th Oct, 18th Oct. th +
U.S.A.) 6.11.51— penn Na 61509. each. {They photh NOTICE | UNIVERsii¥ COLLEGE dificult struggle, and oppositic n 88 ‘ALCOA PEGASUS Oct, 26th Oct. 29th Novr. 8th
ater and ligh ne is at Black PARISH OF ST. ANDREW HOSPITAL OF THE WES came fro . avter
FOR RENT MECHANICAL Rock, and the other is at Codrington Hill, | 1 PEREBY GIVE NOTICE that I have INDIE adele ad wie = m an unexpected quarter.
inci stone jDunealtn at Spooner’s | established my office at Turner's Holi | r “M ICAL STAFF ‘ ‘1984 r. Baldwin came into office NORTHBOUND
_ on % acre of land. Price attractive. | Plortation Office hours Tuesday ah ’ in 24 he was pledged to licyi ss « ”
HOUSES AIR MIld.—One Climax 18ft. Air Mili| Apply to D'ARCY A, SCOTT, Magazine | Wednesday and Thursday from ape ‘ ; be of cuttin I ge a policy] §s.8. “ALCOA PLANTER Due Barbados October 15th, Sails.
with 8” pump both in good order, Phone | Lane 30.10.51—n |to0 2 > un Applications are invited for 12 posts § expenditure. for St. Lawrence River Ports. .
BOULOGNE toes ee a eanndal Gow 91-05. 3.11.51—2n. = b , AS SNaBARE 3 of House Officer in ihe new University This policy was strongly cup ROBERT THOM LTD. — NEW YORK AND GULF »s&RVICE. .
_ BOULOGNE s wr e y xs , OR SALE > a 2 Seen ee ollege Hospital, to take up duties with r whi Fe
Vacant on the first of December. Fully'| MiLLcivigalion Basioment” Fant | Comat AS See? ee + Returning Officer, | the Hospital on the Ist April, 1952 ee ted by Mr. Churchill We APPLY:—DA COSTA & CO., LTD—CANADIAN SERVICE
furnished. Dial 8607 6.11.51—2n. | Tower, Pump and galvanise tank, so.a | Inspection on application to the Manager ‘arish went ator House Surgeons: for general and ‘ive suffered a severe blow fron - - --——-——---—_ ET
Separately or together. Dial 4038. Sale starts at 8.30 a.m, on Monday, 5th | —— Ba dees Teer ree. surgical dutics + | bis. Government,” Beatty wroce
nCALAIS-—Dover Coast, newly built 31.10.51—5n | November at Mount Wilton. D. M NOTICE Bri ie eee eee to his wife. “Of course, it is pl
3ungalow on the sea Ee DEGTOOMS, (memes | Simpson & Co. ; . duties 4 ine 3 owe 8 *
Fully furnished. All, modern con-| REXEL STAPLING MACHINES—Just esieeenct cre date soba RMe eee: PARISH OF ST. LUCY PR elated ayaa Rg Winston at the Exchequer; he jias SAGUENAY TERMINALS 4
Vaniendee From Ist January 1952. [received Rexel Stapling Machines, side | PROPERTY: The dwelling house known Having been appointed Returning |. The appointments will be for one year, | Zone economy mad.” — : oS So “
Dial 2307 3.11,51—6n. | staplers, staples, transparent (Scotch) | a* LEE-SIDE, St Lawrence Gap, Ch, Ch, | Officer for the Parish of St. Lucy, 1] Pach House Officer will serve 4 months | So serious did the conflic ~— OP en ce cat a gan 4
47 51—tfn. vee ~ dispensers, foolscap carbons | standing on 2 roods, 36 perches of land, ee Rive notice that my office is |'" ae suaaleal, pene 35 me come. that ‘Beatty thr t = A CANADIAN SER "
tr sart oe . - automa’ dati taini . 4 established at the Sela s' $e! Gepartments respectivety Salary £36 é reatened » , 4
FORM II Marson & Son Lid., Fabs Seek y water, Resse tigen dian pions sesoMLAghy m Pr ees eee per annum less £100 in respect of board, | resign and State his reasons ra ine . E VICE : ae
@ eye 6.11.51—2n, | Kitchen, Toilet and Bath, 2 Servants . B. B. BARNETT. ~ |icsidence, etc. West Indian House | House of Lords. From Halifax, N.S., and Montreal, “e
The Land Acquisition Act, | rooms, Garage, clectric light and Gas €.11, 80-05. | OMoers who. BAYS) Sie Sule Saeed Ils wale tha vs 4 oo
RALEIGH CYCLE—One (1) prewar| Land sufficient to build 2 Bungalows $$$ fone year at. the University College : S was too much for Mr, Rild- Expected ;
gents model Raleigh Bicycle, in perfect | Highest offer not necessariky accepted. | NOTICE TO THE ELECTORS OF THE! !loepital will, Mf-appointed to the serviee|win and he negotiated a set lo Montreal Halifax gt. John p;
1949 working order, Apply: G. Lewis, Arthur |Inspection any day from 10 a.m PARISH OF ST. MICHAEL of their reepective. Governments at the ment in which the Teen § Y . a 1, ween me
Seat, St. Thomas. 6.11.51—In. | to 3. pm, Telephone 8123 for further| I the undersigned HERPERT HADL®y | cod of that period be granted one year's reasury bee) as. “pOLYRIVER" “
n. P P ie ; re | tO surrend Ss. “POLYRIVER W Oct, 5 Nov 21 November
- dark es WILLIAMS, Returnin seriority (and one inerement where surrender. It is one of Beatty’: “ py" — :
(Noti- required by Section 5) . : particu ars, 3.11.51,—7n. . ~ Officer for the | ‘ \ eatty’s pss. “SUNVALLEY “s 7 Nov. 12 Nov - 28 November >
TF* neq, istion, fo: public purposes, t{YPEWR TS —cne Koyal Portabie porie of St. Michael for the 1951 General salen (er Oe oe corinne most valuable achievements to | s.s. “SUNPRINCE! 53 21 Nov, 26 Nov = 12 December. =
. * ¥ + ” m1 s erve have 2: a y er “ “ ” \"
in ro Bee oie eer Snes aneurin ate renga da tite. Cartes The undersigned ‘will offer for Gale at Genral Ansmeakiy veo eine Parle oe reduced by one year F have preserved the core of hr | %* “A VESSEL oa M8 Dee) *) 21 Dec 8 Saneaee ee
ing oe cee aos eas most Stendard “Underwood” typewriter, very | Public Competition at their office, No, | St. M-chael do hereby notify the Electors Further information may be obtained | Navy sofe during there yoars of UNITED KINGDO ae
Christopher in the parish of Christ nox! Sea aA aan Re eee ney. cy ae te ec ce tater oe ees en is pes, arte Univinity College: --ieepieal, + Mona, stinginess and sloth, M SERVICE te
ply: The Standard day th h f my office at the residence of Mr. ? x < hee
Chureh in the island of Barbados deserib- | Co” 14 Swan Street, Dist $6, Po |p et NY OF November, 1951 at 2) Oe gid Ramsey, Richville, 6th Avenue, Jammica, B,W.1., to whom applicauons | ,, Admiral Chalmers gives a can- From Newport, Liverpool and Glasgow :
HolIAbE Wein hie Seta a " . 6.11.51—5n P ihe Cottage known as “SORN”, in | Belleville. ; ‘ xhould be sent before sist December,|did account of Beatty’s private —— riniaialennn mitten :
3 e: an - : : : rath ,
oured pink on a plan of survey slened by M hapten. sos, the ae Avenue, Strathclyde, contain- soe hours iwi, be from 8 a.m a Pa life. He prints a number o' yi Mees
Mr. C. K. Nichols, $ ing Drawing and Dining Rooms, 2 Bed- .30 a.m. daily, Sundays excep Reatty’s ‘ naw atte rriv i
Gaied ‘28th Say GUE ane mice ae — ISCELLANEVUS foothé. (formerly. 8) with ell ‘sodden HERBERT HADLEY WILLIAMS, ae er eran nL ea. ae oe o Ladv RBentt Newport Liverpool Glasgow Dates
office of the Colonial Engineer having, | meee | CONVENIENCES, and the land on which ' Returning Officer. MISCELLANEOUS ae ‘y form one of the mo i ; ‘i BARBADOS
been decided on‘ by the Governor with} AMERICAN CHRISTMAS CARDS—A | ‘¢, Stands, containing 5,510 square feet, 6.11.51—1n,. interes.ing parts of the bool 8 8. “SUNROVER : . 9 Oct 18 Oct, 5 November "
the approval of both Houses of the Leg- which is fully enclosed. outitnstlitenehnsienrenrinnierits +6. “SUNWHIT 9 Nov, id Nov 21 Nov 7 December




ure of

the island of Barbados by



love’; assortment of American Christmas

Cards



in boxes of 16 different Cards,





















Inspection on application to R. A. Cor-





























Harold









Great Wealth


















olution of the Houses of the Legisla-| rather cute ang ureommon. Cleari {| bin, General Traders Ltd COMPANIES ACT 1910 Proverbs & Co. Litd., High Street a js
ture, it is hereby declared in pursuance | $2.00 per box. You should call at our} FoF conditions of Sale, apply to— CENTRAL FOUNDRY LTD. 6.11 S—In. | og Beatty's wife was a doughter} UNITED KINGDOM AND CONTINENTAL SERVICE
OMe on 5 of the Land Acquisition Act, | office and see them immediately. The|s; 10506. OO SO NOTICE IS HEREBY GIVEN that the| ———-———— ———————— |Of Marshal Field, the American 4 ————-— ——___._ —___ ah ealahee ite rs
9, that the said lands have been ac-| Standard Agency (B'dos) Co. 14” Swan ae Transfer Books of the Company will be millionaire. She had been Expected Arrival
quired "for the following. purposes: Street. Dial 3630 gis bce TT Avoron daded tims the Ord. aay of Noverabart divorced from her husband and Antwerp Rotterdam London — Dates, Barbados
r ~ no aeeenetaet 1951, to the 30th d { November, 1951, ig :
thease ants ¥ vos Sontateing BOARDS—Two large wooden advertis- | — both Nast tiainiatons “ Sie, en well have damaged 8.8. SUNMONT” , «17 Oct, 20 Oct 1 Nov. . 4% November
land of Saint Christophers tae ako ee rae Approximately 20 ft. x| I am instructed by_the Executors of | By order of the Board of Directors 7 Sa ha uote for although his] 8-8. “SUNRAY” - 15 Nov. 18 Nov 22 Nov.. .§ December
. : le aser must remove same. the Estate of James E. Seale, deceased H. GARNET ST. HILL, did not appear in the ¢ tn ee mg ee a! “2
in the Parish of Christ Church and bound-| ©; fi wf . ee : , n case
ing on lands of M. Hazlewood on lands | St. Michael~the ‘other at Olstiee: near |. Ae. Se Orne gat the spot at O11 Sian dant tint of divorae could be Agents: PLANTAXIONS LIMITED — Phone 4703
of A. Clarke, on lands of Estwick Kirton, * , : , } angerous ir 5 i
on lands of the said St, Christopher's ae fam ie GARAGE TRADING | Thursday 8th day of November, 1951, | =~ ? tics tale Sh : those ORT SDE oo et Bee .
Girls’ School and on the public highway qihelgery. ViRiOER BF. Sale 4. oiploch 5. 43 NOTICE Milacaves ee) eee Se
and particularly shown and delineated 28,10.51—t.f.n. O'DONALD DANIEL. The Estate of score,
on the plan thereof dated the 15th day of ; nee rae . Telia > Beatty's marriage brou ,
May 1951 certified by C. K. Nichols, |zamb dyed beavee roo, “ott pastes G:11 .81—8n, Pep aera ein vce great wealth—a yacht eee yh hil Lat +
Sworn Surveyor. Ter Be: * show a . tf . a yp ) gh ren: e
Dated this twenty-ninth day of October ese Beauty Salon, McGregor Street NOTICE 1S HEREBY GIVEN that all loor, a place in Leicestershire pe TE
1981 at Government House in the Island ariel See. §.11-51—t.t.n. |UNDER THE IVORY HAMMER | persons having any debt or claim against and all the appurtenances of CLEAR :
of Barbadoy ALFRED SAVAGE SPRING CUSHIONS UNITS—Ready| By instructions received I will sell on|died in this Island on the 29th day of Edwardian luxury, Once when en ae Saeed 7
Govarnse racked Spring Cushions Units, just ready |Thursday, 8th November, at Messrs.| October, 1950 are hereby required to there was a prospect of Beatty ’ -
m | for padding and covering at a price|Fort Royal Garage, St, Michael's Row,|send particulars of their claims duly at-! being court martialled for darn- AseT, TRACE MARA
of $2.00 each. The Standard Agency | (1) 1947 Anglia Ford 8 H.P. (Damaged|tested to the undersigned. in care of aging his shi t ’
(B'dos) Co. 14 Swan Street. Dial 3620.|in accident), Terms Cash. Sale at 2| Messrs. Cottle, Catford & Co., No. 17, | 5 ship, his wife is repu-
r 6.11.51—5n, | P-m. High Street, Bridgetown, Solicitors, on ted to have said: “What! Court
VINCENT GRIFFITH, |or before the 30th day of November, martial my David? I'll buy them
TANKS—Thirteen (13) Galv. Steel Auctioneer. 1951, after which date we shall proceed See ge aa” a new ship!” . ee fs ¢ “ * 4,
‘ Tenks 8ft. x 4ft. x 3ft. Apply: 4.11.51—3n, | to distribute the assets of the deceased 7 7 Ml in oe ‘
Simpson & Co. Oey ata ~ among the parties entitled thereto vav-| Stop Pyorrhea and Py marriage at first brought x a nc cneceennneneiltiticicenn ative
. / é aan
can e ure ing fegard only to such claims as we T h Mouth eatty great happiness, too, but
shall then have had notice of, and we renc ou this did not last. Lady Beati as
LOST & FOUND . will not be Mable for the assets or any “ eet x y y
There are thousands of men and women essions part thereof so distributed to any person} in 24 Meurs was jealous of her husband’s
who suffer awful agony day and night of whose debt or claim we shall not have asses Wake w ae labise abscrption in his naval duties
i " had notice. ing gums, sore mouth, of ee °
because of pile trouble, who do not know LOST @ From Page 3. And all persons indebted to the said) teeth mean that you are a victim of Pyar As 7 went on they drifted
that every chemist stocksa special remedy | - Re cae estate are requested to settle their in- | FRee GF peenen MpErh. OF soaks had disence { Sone and she declined into a
that does most surely and quickly banish iron stake and fractured her col-|“@btedness without delay. ony | YOUR teeth and have to wear fei tty | State of acute melancholia,
* . DOG —, White Bull and ‘Terrier Dated this 27th day of September, 1951. | fore your tiine. Bince the preat Wore Beatty treated her with great
the misery of this wretched trouble. Answering 'to the name “Jean. Owner: |/aP_bone. 5 VOM ee, Sonn. | War these mouth diseases have spread | nationce and forbes oh 5
Make a confidant of your chemist. Asie | Aubrey Greaves. Can be found at the} The accused has a girl of ten PRINCESS LOUISE JONES throughout the world so that now sclen- e an forbearance. Few
7a ; : i FE o tists say that four ous of every five people | people realised hi
Public Market or Hall’s Road 3 di dent hi txecutors of the Will of 5a: if ealis ow deeply wor-
him about Man Zan Pile Remedy. He |, Hered cde cena Reward |/years who is dependent on her. Margaret Ann Jones, decd, re sufferers sooner or inter. Be warned In | nied 5 - a
will tell you this i ordinary ointm oe 1 -51—1n. | Springer told the court that Morris] o.a.F : *| time and stop these diseases before it in ie was by these private
mus 18 00 | ry ointment, always annoyed her saying that} -—-~ —-—— s 7 too late, because they often cause not only | matters during the years of his ‘
but a soothing, healing, g KEYS — One bunch keys between ys annoy y , eet the loss of teeth, but also chronic rheuma~ | oreotest fame.

balm that at once stops the intense irrit-
ation and clears away internal, external,
sore or bleeding piles.

The unique tube in which Man Zan is

; Baxters Road and Strathelyde

rewarded, Advertising Department, c/o

Advocate.

eet
RACE TICKETS—Series P.



6.11,61—1n



No, 7155.

Series R. No. 5913. Series KK. No. 9161

Finder|she has one to represent her.

Alcohol
ALFRED HARDING pleaded
guilty of wounding Lionel Pinder

Re Estate of
MILTON KING
deceased
NOTICE IS HEREBY GIVEN that

scientist, fights thease

all] &nd quick way












tism and heart trouble,

New Discovery Saves Tcoth

Amozson, the discovery of an Am
It penetrates right ¢

an |



troubles in ©

tie |
bleed-





Behind The Facade
Few people suspected the dark
background behind the gleaming
facade of prosperity and success


















; t of the trouble, stops gums from
7 Series KK N ‘, {on September 18. Sentence was] persons having any debt or ciaim| [00 takes tha vind

sold makes this preparation so easy and ye Pe ae es Tei Cemented postponed by the Hon, the Chief| against the estate of MIUTON KING ing she very args day, quickly roe Se | mn a Beatty presented ty the

clean to use. The big size supply, with | Bayfieid, St. Philip. 6.11.51—1n. [Justice Sir Allan Collymore. Mv.| deceased, who died at Capetown in the| tightens the teeth. The following letter | nvious world,

special applicator, is usuall fficient eeeemsenetiantseiniemeninctanesinntpnees E : ‘| Province of the Cape of Good Hope from Mr. W. W. B. shows the results tint ; It is to Admirsl Chalmers's

PP ae ry sumcient 60 G. Farmer who appeared on be-|the Dominion of South Africa on the | Amoson users get cayeetee. eat os credit and to the credit t °
clear away the most difficult case. — half of Harding told the court that] 11th day of March 1951 intestate ore} Mouth and Pyotrhea for ten yours, jas | Onecare sare o
. FIN gums were sore and bleeding anc 3 | Beatty's family that no attempt
Remember the name of this special GER-TIP FLY CONTRO] |both men were under the influenve | requested to send particulars of their} [Ser “our teotm, while several othe: toc, | p00 y omy We Can Supply... .
remedy fot pile trouble— of alcohol and an argument fol-| 4ebts and claims duly attested to the] were getting looser all the iime, * tries | 45 been made in his biography kf Plates, Dish
v Pp $ ‘ 7 8 : undersigned in care of Messrs Haynes &| many Usings and then heara of tht mew | ‘o conceal or tg ignore these Soup, Dinner and Breakfast ates, es
= = lowed and Pinder was cut with aj Grifith, No, 12 High Street, Bridgetown | discovery Amosan, In 24 hours after wing | facts P ; ts, Ete., Ete
knife. The doctor said that the] So teltors, on or before the 15th day of Aipeces Ee Geet bee eer ered is - “Hi e and Lette { agp hate rca ;
wounding was trivial but the site| December 1951, after which dae I] (Yue Ulys ane im two weeks 1 found that Beatt His setters of David a You'll be proud to own these. See our display
was dangerous. The accused had| %8!!, proceed to distribute the assets! jay loose tort) sore much tighter aud that atty, by Rear-Admiral W.G. BUY NOW! : :
as i see ft simila - cativineiees of the deceased among the per | could eat the hurdest of tou.” *|Chalmers. Hodder and Stough- 5 d
a nu r 0) r ction titled th . d only ty . T T w
but they were long ago as 1932 oaah sae ae which f dhait then, have | Guorentecd HOR 25s, PL AN A IONS LTD. R
\ Mr. Farmer asked that his client had notice and I will not be Mable for yf time 0 fast 398 oo coF.en WORLD COPYRIGHT RESERVEN - —<—————————
_—— be placed on probation “| the assets or any part thereof so dis) j/3:h ilenting, ond tore mouth and sighton - —LES. rem eT
i : tributed to any person of whose ded' Or | your \eeth to your complete satisfaction or

Bertram Ward pleaded not} claim I shall not then have had notice
And all



money 1, PROPS DOP OCVO 1 LIPDOVIS PD SEPEPODOOS PEDO PPPS SOOOSS
Dou't ta
suffering
and heart trouble

ou return of empty packuge.
hance on Osi ont tec'h or

dangers frrin recurs tor
Get Amora tron



persons indebted to the said
estate are requested to settle their sald
indebtedness without delay

guilty to four charges of house

breaking and larceny with alter-

NOTICE

the






































































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| Here, at your 4 tp. ot fodeens |pleaded not guilty to a charce of : AEROSOL FLYSPRAY. J press t r ye ua Administratrix. of the avantee
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Bi



PAGE EIGHT



om

ROY MARSHALL
TAKES 4 FOR 21

From HAROLD DALE

The West Indies to-day learned a valuable lesson at
an appropriate time in the tour. They learned that their
own dashing attractive approach to cricket is unlikely to
be reciprocated in Australia.
Fielding this morning, they had —-
that lesson grimly impressed upon
them. Harvey and McKay of
Queensland — one of the weaker
states — sensed that they had the
chance to humble the tounsts, and
they took it.

For nearly three hours not a
worthwhile stroke was made, not

B.G. Defeat
Indians After

QUEENSLAND S

a Wisk.was taken, there was not
one joyous hit, but — and this is
the most important but to the
Australians — the West Indies
total was. passed without any loss.

The tourists knew long before
the stand was broken that they
were to be given no quarter. They
tughtened their fielding to a pitch
of brilliance, but with their weak-
ened attack, there seemed no help
for them, until Roy Marshall was
given the ball, and immediately
began to sweep the batsmen from
his path.

It_was_ lucky, indeed, that this

young. all rounder, fresh from

Lancashire League struck such a The game seesawed throughout
patch of sustained excellence.:the 150 minutes of play Sunday
Without him, — the scoreboard after Dyer was bowled shortly
showed 2 for 224 when he came @fter reaching the century in 117

Big Recovery

(From Our Own Correspondent)

GEORGETOWN, B.G., Nov. 5.

A brilliant crisis century by
“Babbs” Dyer 103 in a_ fighting
89 run stand with Brian Patoir
41, and a fighting unfinished last
wicket partnership by the match
winning pair Norman Wight 40

and Jack Allen 12 gave British
one wicket

Guiana a_ thrilling
vietory and saved tihe_ colony’s
reputation against the hard try-
ing Combined Trinidad and B.G.
Indians.

on — the day might have been dire ™inutes of scintillating cricket.

indeed for the West Indians.
Keeping a perfect length at
medium pace, he made the bail
move both ways and his flight con-
sistently invited the batsmen to
hesitate until it was too late. At
one period, he had three wickets
for four runs in seven overs three

maidens and that out of a total of oes and_in f

tion for he saw the 70 runs

act contributed 42
f them. Patoir who was de-
fending while Dyer attacking

At the end of the day, Goddard
and his men could breathe again.
Their position is none too good,
but there is plenty of hope. Nobody
with the, interests of the game at
heart, would want the islanders to
abate one jot of their. natural bril-
liance nor their gay zestful ap-

fall.

had collared

When he left the game swung
back in Trinidad’s favour as the
score read 229 for seven—70 runs
to go and only three wickets to
Norman Wight B.G, crisis
batsman lived up to his reputa-

stepped up the scoring but when
he and Wight looked like
the bowling Patoir
was trapped into hooking an Ali
longhop into Asgarali’s
hands,

they

waiting



, The score was 267 for 8 and
proach to the game, but—in Aus- British Guiana was again in
tralia, at least — it must be trouble. Came Vibart Rodney,
tempered with watchfulness and who indiscreetly moved out to
due caution, hit Jackbir and was stumped with

They realised today that an the score at 276. With 23 runs

Australian side given a fingerheld needed for victory

Jack, Allen

will turn it into a stranglehold, pluckily stood up with Norman

even though the spectators — as

Wight and scored

the winning

today — scream from sheer bore- Shot to give B.G. victory.

dom,

QUEENSLAND 18 INNINGS
Archer 1.b.w. Gomez ............+++-
Seeey ¢ Gomez b Ferguson ....

leKay 1.b.w. Marshall . 2

90
a 7
A. Carrigan not out ....





COMBINED INDIANS
BG

COMBINED INDIANS
B

ist Innings 114
Ist Innings 175

2nd Innings 359
2ND INNINGS

. L. Wight l.b.w. b Jackbir ; 19

= ee P ae “a Gibbs run out ‘ 9
Cc. McCool b Marshall ....... ‘ Jackman c & b Ali 18
w. Grout.b Marshall ver EE ET Te 5 Camacho ¢ Bahadur b Jackbiir 40
M. Raymer. not out " ch Jordan b Ali ’ oeAvee oe
* ” Byes 7 oe Dire Thomas ¢ Sankar (w.k.) b Jackbir 10

t
BOWLING ANALYSIS
oO, M.

* R,
45 1
70 0
128 1
58 1
21 a

Dyer b Bacchus ......

326 aaa ec Asgaralli b All

Rodney stpd. Sanker b Jackbir 2

w, Alien not out ¥ white
‘ Ex’

Wight not out



Real ca. ’ ‘ 9
Total (for 9 wkts.)

Fall of wickets: 1 for 17, 2 for 21,

3 for 58, 4 for 66, 5 for 86, 6 for 140, 7 for

229, 8 for 267, 9 276



ee

Me © H BOWLING ANALYSIS ar

, nt, re Asgaralli . ee oe a)

Set Up Records i" Sig
ay : $ 11%

. P eco Bahadur ’ 2 0 13 0

te Persaud 2 0 4 0

Against England Bacebus ; 00 ae ke

mos tulle

NEW DELHI, Nov. 5.

India made its highest score
ever aeeinn England in the first
Test cricket match here Monday.
In reply to the England first in-
nings total of 203, India scored 418
for six wickets by close of play
‘and with four wickets still to fall
led by 215 runs. rc

Vijay. Merchant and Vijay Ha-
zare, again dominated the game
scoring 154 and 164 runs respec-
tively. First Merchant and theri
Hazare set up a record for the
highest individual score by an In-
dian in a Test match,

The third wicket stand of 211
between the pair was a record for
any Indian wicket against any
country,

Monday is an off day. The match
continues Tuesday and Wednes-
day.—CP) ' Jaa

Xmas Broadcast
For Cricketers

} From FRANK MARGAN.

‘ SYDNEY Nov. 6.

When an Aussie fan asked
bowler Valentine the significance
of the gold bracelet he wears on
his right wrist, Alfred broke out
into one of his huge smiles and
drawled “nah ah just likes it.
Ah ‘bought it in England,”

A Christmas Party broadcast
is being arranged to enable the
visitors to speak to their home
folks.

Only 2,000 watched Monday’s
Brisbane innings. A section of the
crowd began barracking after



Do It Every

Â¥ A GUY WILL
WORK ALL HIS LIFE
GET A WONDERFUL



WHAT’S ON TODAY

Court of Grand Sessions 10.00
a.m.

Police Courts and Court of
Original Jurisdiction 10.00

a.m.
Meeting of the Legislative
Council 2. o.m

Meeting of the House of As-
sembly 3 p.m,

Extra-Mural Group meet at
wakefield, British Council
at 5 p.m.

CINEMAS:

WLOBE: Roger Toughy Gangster
a The Counterfeiters
4.30 & 7.90 p.m.

"LAZA (Bridgetown): West Point
Story 445 & 8.30 p.m

PLAZA = (Oistin): Temorrow Is
Forever 5 & 8.30 p.m

OLYMPIC: Where the Sidewalk
Ends & Do you love Me
4.3% & 830 p.m

EMPIRE: Half Angel 4.45 &

wpm
ROYAL: Haunted Harbour 4.30
& 8.15 p.m

ROXY: Saddle Tramp & Take
One False Step 4.30 &
8.15 pm,

every stroke when the bowling
was dead and the batting dull.

The visitors have to fight hard
on Tuesday to draw the Queens-
land match. When they begin bat-
ting the wicket will be slightly
tworn, also they will probably
find it difficult to handle the
Queensland bowlers.

Time

Registered U. 1 Pemet Olen

BARBADOS



ADVOCATE



CORE 326 FOR 7



J. DE COURCY bowled by Sonny Ramadhin for 64 in the Country Teams first innings against the West

Indies at Newcastle, New South Wales, on 26.10.51. C. L. Walcott is



F “orm
Lesson Fr
By DENNIS HART

LONDON, Oct 29.

It would have been a travesty, of
football justice if Fulham’s
last-ditch rally had been enough
to gain them even one point from
their London ‘derby’ with Arsenal
at Highbury on Saturday (Octo-
ber 27th). Throughout the first
seventy-five minutes
taught them a lesson in the finer
arts of football, It is only to be
hoped that Fulham took heed of
that lesson, for frankly, if they
don’t show a marked improve~
ment very soon they are going tc
be in serious trouble.

For Manager Bili DoGgin one
can feel nothing but sympathy.
Looking at his injured list you find
it includes the names o* Wally

Hinshelwood, Jimmy Bowie, Bed-;

ford Jezzard, Bob Thomas and

Jack MacDonald, This represents

a complete first
line.

With all these players out vf
action Fulhara’s remaining for-
wards have been shuffled and re-
shuffled more times than a pack
of cards. There was another whole-
sale change-round for ,the matca
at Highbury. But I am afraid that
it did not do the necessary trick.
As individuals they all played well
but as a line they lacked under-
standing,

Fulham’s need is for a ‘gen-
eral’; some-one to command the
pare to scheme and to make those

efence-splitting passes, At in-
side-right, Macaulay — captain in
honour of playing against his old
club — showéd he had some of
that ability but he is no young-
ster, and there were long intervals
when he faded right out of the
nicture, In this respect he differed
from his opposite number, wee
Jimmy Logie, who on this form
must surely cause the Scottish
selectors, to think hard before
ignoring his claim for the forth-
coming International against

ales,

Fulham were up against one of
the best organised defences in the
country. Trying to split it, is
normally like trying to run
through a wall, But the last fifteen
minutes proved that even Arsenal
can be caught unawares,

, With the Arsenal forwards run-
ning into top gear from the start,
the Fulham half-backs were im-
mediately forced on the defensive.
Gonsequently they were unable vo
devote much time to promoting
attacks. Len Quested, not looking
at all comfortable at right half,
did occasionally wander up-fieid
to take a shot at goal, but in doing
so left.a gap in the defence. This
paved the way for two early goals
from Arsenal inside left Doug.
Lishman,

A word of praise for Fulham’s
centre-half Pavitt. He kept a firm
grip on Arsenal’s burly young
centre forward Cliff Holton. In-
ternational centre-half Jim Tay-
lor, another of Fulham’s injured,
will not find it easy to get back
his place in the first team,

Both of Arsenal’s early goals
were laid on by their young out-
side right Arthur Milton, who dur-

- ing the summer ‘plays cricket for

Gloucestershire. Young Arthur, in
lis first full season in league foot-
ball, is surely one of the most
improved players in the game, If
this rate of improvement con-
tinues, then I’m_ certain he will
ene day wear England’s colours
My hope is that he is not rushed.

The remainder of the half was
occupied by an exhibition of
‘pretty-pretty’ football by the

By Jimmy Hatlo

etkeeper.



Learnt A
om Arsenal

\rsenal_ which took them no-
where-fast. Apart from Milton and
Logie the only other Arsenal
player not engaged in this, was
right halzi Alex Forbes. If the
Scottish selectors can afford to
overlook such a keen tackler and
excellent ball distributor, . then
indeed there must be a wealth of
talent over the border.

Immediately after half-time,
Arsenal went further ahead when
Holton took the easiest of chances
laid on by Milton. Logie split the
defence with a pass to Roper at
outside left His centre to Milton
was returned right to the feet of
Holton, standing
five yards out from the goal. That
was that.

fortable margin. But just after
this, Swindin was only able to
parry a shot from Macaulay which
went to the feet c¥ Stevens who
pushed it into the net.

So we came to the last hectic

five minutes. Then Stevens scored
the best goal of the match. Re-
ceiving a pass from Campbell, he
declined to make the expected re-
turn pass as Campbell raced into!
the middle. Instead he crashed
home the ball from twenty yards. |
In the last minute, Brennan scored
with a powerful shot from twenty
yards which entered the net off
the post,



Much as one yvaust admire Ful-
ham’s last ditch fight, I do not
think that Arsenal’s defence would
have been caught so easily had
they fot held such a lead.

ARSENAL — Swinain, Barnes,

When

tar





no. more than Smith; Forbes, Daniel,’ Mercer;| “es, Colombia, Central America,
Milton, Logie, Holton, Lishman,| Mexico... and to East Coast of
Roper. South America. In fact, you can
FULHAM — Flack, Freeman,’ now “fly PAA” to 88 countries
teen minutes later Bacuzzi; Quested, Pavitt, Lowe, and colonies.
Epaning scored a fourth, it seemed (FE); Newcombe, Macaulay,
that Arsenal would win by a com- Stevens, Brennan, Campbell.
eaten : For 22 years the leading
international airline—PAA
was first to link the Amer-
NEW icas by air, first to fly to
all six continents, and first



at the
ADVOCATE

STATIONERY

34. Broad Street





THE THING

|









BEST
THE

THESE
DAYS ...





J&R BREA

CLEC



PA AMERICAN



Two Proving Yacht ||

By 4,000-Mile Trip

CASABLANCA, Morocco,
Nov. 5.

Two yachtsmen left here Sun-

day in an 18-foot sailboat for the

Canary {slands, the last call in a

4,000-mile bid to cross the Atlan- !}}

tic, They are. Patrick Ellan, 31; !
and Colin Mudie, 23, both of Lon- }
don. “We expect to reach Trini-
dad about January 10, provided, of
course, the wind is fair because we |
have no engine,” said Ellan. They
arrived here Saturday. They left |
Falmouth and stopped at Corunna. !
Spain and Lisbon.
The purpose of
they say, is to prove the tiny
yacht’s construction and \
worthiness.—(CP)
|
|

me venture,



Enjoy the hospitality, com-
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“first choice” of veteran
travelers the world over.

NEW YORK

Non-stop service by the luxurious
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tmstead of Lo ‘‘uardia Field.

Regular service by giant double-
decked “Strato” Clippers*—world’s
fastest airliners—to Paris, Rome...
stopovers in England, Ixqland.

%

Venezuela

Swift, daily service to all main

cities, Regular flights to West In-

to fly around the world.

For reservations, see your
Travel Agent or




MWorto Arenars





Da Costa & Co., Ltd. or
Broad Street — Bridgetown S
Phone 2122 (After business howrs 2303) *
Tah e 1h Delle AA its x
Xx
=

LADIES! Just Unpacked!

SPUN
SILKS!

in Plain Shades, Small and
Large Floral,
Designs.
these. Call at —

THANI-sros.

s
%
3
&

‘*

4

POSSESSES AOS

-

POSS

& Bordered
You would love

-

OF

+
x

s
%
es

€
$
g
:

Pr. Wm. Henry Street
DIAL 3466



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D ih
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EEO COC. COBO ODODE SOA EAA OO Oe Y



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service

>



PSPOTSES|

aches and



The name speaks for itsetf

Clark aed

Helps to cleanse the system
from blood impurities

Impurities in the eae ne cause ta ae
pains, painful

boils, pimples and niet skin Sethe
Clarke’s Blood Mixture

TUESDAY, NOVEMBER 6, 1951









Remember, a comfortable
fitting SUIT is our first con-
sideration. There are in-
creasing numbers who

for themselves
the consistently superb cut,
fit and finish of the.....

IDEAL TAILORING
We will welcome the op-

portunity of proving this to
you in our...

TAILORING DEPARTMENT
on the first floor of

10—13, BROAD STREET

Motor

PLEO CEES POP EP PSSOS FOSS OOOPO VOSS PONS

OPENING

* On SATURDAY 10th NOVEMBER

1951

The New BATA Shoe Store

At No.

35 Broad’ Street.

We thank our customers for theim kind -pat-
conage in the past and now offer them improved

at our new modern
built for their benefit.

store which has been

We trust your kind support will continue in the

s
s future.
>

HOUSE OF SERVICE










Walls and Ceilings

SISCOLIN DISTEMPER

Supplied in Powder form in - - -
WHITE, BUFF, CREAM, GREEN, BLUE,
SUNSHINE and PEACH

Made ready for use by mixing 2% pints Water
with 5 lbs., Powder

Obtainable in 5-16 and 314-1b packages at 2lc. per th.
FOR INTERIOR AND EXTERIOR WOODWORK

Use -- -

RED HAND
WHITE ‘S’ PAINT

Dries with a Hard Gloss equalling Enamel Finish.
Does not turn Yellow.

PHONE 4456.

-_



WILKINSON & HAYNES

——~=—

CO., LTD.



CAVE SHEPHERD & (0., LTD.










$969 999 CSS SSCS SPOS PPOOO PPPOE SSS SPS OD














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PAGE 1

II I sli \\ \o\ | \IRIR ,;. 19J! i! VIM: \IMIS \U\ HI VII CLASSIFIED ADS. P,BLM SALES l\t.l 5F.VEN TELEPHONE 2500 I'll I. An.be. DW I Ow.r 9rdn*y Cadog • ear. of age FBrMr',' ol fMsighSatowri. St Church Street. Itiwln. CJ Cadogan WifeEJIa*b*th S Cadogan iM..ih**>. Eoefln* Cadogan Alhalin* Jordan. J**ahr Jordan. Raw Cadogan %  WMI, Edwin H Cedoghn I"1. Cadagon Daughter 1. Wende'l P Cadogan. %  "'* M C Cadogan. >hi< Waahbmob t. CuBigi n • Grand%  *•" B II l %  %  Stahawd rtockwllfi Mwhael. ill I "g for Saint Ambrar Church %  SMthwei Cwiruis BMOga-al M. I* > %  % %  me h dd< — uo-d, i mU a MM wor-> mi SaaaWaa AUTOMOTIVE r V-a rort laf1 hmn4 dnw l" perf.cl %  -• %  ini order R M Austin. JMIftrM OARAOE Dial %  lei IBST Sk lenwola*. don* nd COURTEY CAR—Chr> .irr WiiHta..! CARon* ill Vauahaii ls-s DX SJS -7B ssrurin* p*rf*ri. i.re. good IL**% %  Horace II 4 II SI In CAR On* Standard • •ndlllon May bt Gar .a* .]*M> Ug 1 it CAP—Rover l II P Perfect rondiiim. throughout M.DM mil*, only Not dn-.ru OV-T JO M P H Tr*at*d aa only child Mu.t be arm and driven to b* appra%  lat.d Apply Court*** Garage For [•etigrr* tr i-l and full particular* PrtC* S2.BSB I II II < I n Horoa evcu OB* Motor Cvcl* m p*rl*ct Apply O Lnu, AD T'luiu. REAL ESTATE PI H\-,\ Al rnrd aatatr.t MAatVIN.V WAVI'I.II •v On* .(on* wall fSungal o* hr-a.iB.i toon,. t*>i*t aad SeUl. i> M A M ,. ..,,. %  II al-n Th* pubav ar* h*r.t Civknc cradli w %  *.> JOfOi RCDDER, Wovrl Cot. • II M* %  THE DWn.UNGIIOUSC contain %  cloaad Oalarry. l*a tag Dimn* Rooma ) rtrdraoma. on* W. Tol*t and Bath. Lar** KRcWn Ml and Cellar. "•" m ii MI i H is Pan Ir' IH* Ooiniin Windmill and W.ll. h K h runt.)I*.'•„,., |pf ad*na and Un Garaa lor 1 Car., and S*r*ant>' roarna A pa man o In* land i. Coroanui TV**. G.t-.a inraa. Mann trrra. Gold*n Applr tr**>. and aWsaalrull lrt*a i>d anoth** porlian <•( La, ,,|. i ,, %  "SHS?"* B 'P "' %  "• fcur OiHt OPPTJf* IN WK1TIM; WU to* ,-,„M ,i.*"? r,d -" l d '"l^"P l Tt-*da> ihr iJth da> n( NDvrmb*-. al 4 n m T*>* %  w*o ton not bind hcr.clf to acMpt l* blitMat. or any off*. lnp*cion ar.' da) *ir*pt Sunday! n •pptlcauon lo Mr. Hanarh*ll. T,U NOTICE ii'i'H in at 1.in 11 : hrrrtu nv nat *• U llaMd in CMM* al The *;.->. ( l...ulal a.li..i, lh-i.1. Offl*. hour. Monday. lo p rM |.,. ttm 10 a m to 4 (. %  0 i r WAI*?t*TT. Ma>or. Parun ol M PtiUip HELP A MANAGER lor Java Rivr H>.g. %  Mai** Partly ApplHallona in .rjlln. •ddr*i*| 10 in. All*v J**a Rlirri Si^.i Eatat*. l.ld .ill I W r*clv*d o. •" lta*B-a> lib rlov*ntb*c 1 onV*. naib^to. inc. Martini t >*i lindam n SUM h r Kr" rmo m W**t ladw* I ratsrln* *>p*r IOMCV 4 II SI m Phcn* No pi ., 1 fuiih*r partlrulara 1 1 ipadjii I*, appl, CirrnJi CATPrtRD A CO No I?. Hiari Strn-t -Mllli .... ptaaaa>at s. IMI at h*r rr.idrnrr Cotl*s* Tenantry. II John. Blancrid H*r funeral l*av*a th* abov* rvaldanr* at 4 IV p m lo-4v 1'L.rch Parry. Bdcar. IJoyd. Uvlnfilnn*. Claud* Smith taonai S 11 RKCTKIT: On Nov.nl*, J. |M] „, h „ Ftoldtntc. Fami TCI.TIII.. *l Pflrr. Sakma Whin."ll*r lunrral l*av** thi BIHIVK modrnr* al 4 Ml u ni loSI I. SI 1 |M c. %  ., rl*r> 1.iM(IU*r. 1.UCII1* Bow r 11. Clnudln* B*rn. S1*1U Rimn. Ruby Bowrn. Vmir* Bn*n iQrana rwidrnii IN MEMOIUAM KOMMVI M| uirnwry of Sarah Norprov*. 1.1.0 WU called U> r*it nit 4th Novrmbft, 1064 1 red by Then and Kenneth laon., U S A 1 in-la*, u S A 1. Emily luaushtar-ln-V.*' 1 FOII III \ I HOUSES POLXOG.NE st La* t'acant ..n HM BnS ..I Ihr.i fomlahed Dial aDT CALAIS Dover Coa*|. tliinealow on Ihr a*a Th Fullv fumnh*d All mod* The Land Atquisition Art. erl bv Section Si to %  public mirpoar. ir b of Und conuin1 -**n pen-lie. more the DUtriet of Saint h pariah of Chrkat %  I MM M BAJMl SPataV iieUule t.er*lo ann m orr parlicularly .hown and delineate.! and lmirrd pink on a plan of %  urvev Manad by Ml C K Nk hoi.. Sworn Sur\-**or. and IS MarISM and filed In the ..IHr* ol the Colonial Eneinrer having i-.'.d on'bv th* Governor Kith In* approval of botn llouar. ( the La*. UM H .nd of Ilarhado. by rruilullon of th* Houara of Ihr lahllaUtur*. It i. h*reb declared in purauanr* nl S*ri lnn j 0 | ij,,, i^ n( j Actpil.lllon Art. %  %  %  id land. %  •: .., iie ( nil in in 1.1. AI.I niAT P., ..I of land cantalnlna (hie rood and -even perche. adlolnna land. oJ saint CrlrlM.^|^h*r %  Girl.' School n inr Pan.n „f Chrl.l Church and boundIna on land, of M llaikpwood on land. of A Clara*, on li.nd. of Bat-ick Klrlon cm landi ol tc.e Mid SI ChrlatophrCi GUI*' School and on the public hi|hway ,-nd particular! ahon and delineated 1-1 ih.pl.1,1 thereof d.Hed Ihr 13th day of Mat ISSI r*nifl*d by c K Mchol.. Ihned 11,1. twmiy-nlnlh 4a\ of October 1081 al Oovamm*nt Houw in thr I.land of Haibadoa AlJ^TKl) SAVAGE. PILES oan be Cured There arc thousands ol men and women who suffer awful agonv dap and night became of pile trouble, who do not know thai every chemist stocks a special remedy %  bat does most surely and quickly banish, the misery of this wre'.ched trouble. Make s confidant of your chemist. Ask him about Man Zan Pile Remedy. He will tell you this is 00 ordinary ointment, but a soothing, healing, strengthening balm tnat st once stops the intense irritation and clears away internal, external, sore or bleeding piles. Tse unique tube in which Mao Zan is sold makes this preparation so easy and dean to use. The big size supply, with Special applicator, is usually sufficient to clear sway the moat difficult case. Remember the name of this special remedy for pile trouble /yianZan PILE REMEDY FUBNITUKK LIVESTOCK ORSE On* half-brad black aeldin. ","' ,* '.'?* n of Arc by "* %  "*• Front" Apply Manas** Alleyn* dalt plantation, 81 J>" 3 11 Si -In MARC-The half-brad mar* Marlnol. out of O T.C and Marina and ID foal f llattlr Front Thl. mare i. ate* an ec* l*nt plantation riding mai* Apt>t J C Payr*. Rarrov. or phonr 3344 3 II SI sn EUtcnacAL tub* %  Phillip-on. luvrly Cabinet lube model. < MECHANICAL Mll.l. -Irrigation Equipment Pan ISWsr, Pump and galvaniae Una. ao.i rpanturly or together Dial 40afl RIXEL STAJTJNG MACIIINKR-Jii.t • rivrd Rw Stapling; Marhme*. aid* %  Uplera. .taplei. Iran-parent 1 Scotch' ipe and dtaprnaeri foobeap carbon, utomatkdating machlnaa J A laraon at Son Ltd Jam*. Street RAI.FIOK CYCL*:--On* Hi prawa inta model Raleigh Rlcyrlr. In p*r>ec 'irking order Apply. Ci UWi. Artlm MBL St 'homaa. II >l—In Yfin IX ,„r loyal P., ,. rsin etc abo one IB Inch Carriage "darn -Undarwood" typewriter, very buaed No raaaonablr offer nluiM Apply The Standard Agrnry B'doal Co |4 •h.aii Street Dial SSaV II MISCELIaANEOUS .VI.IM. AN OIIUSTMAS CARDtv-A tove-i aaaorunant or American Chnatma. rtf. In boxaa of 14 different Card., rule anvuiromnnn Clearing al per boa You .tumid call at our ofBee and ar, them Immediately. Th* %  immOAoeirv Bd. !" Co 14 Bv., Di Mi II SI—an HOARDS-Two larga wooden advartli' %  S Slg„ Board. Approximately 30 ft %  fl Purchaarr mu.l remove aamr One Sum Board 1. located al "W*leh*a" -Si M-rhael-th* other at Oi.iin., near I'laia TheatrCITY GAIMOC TRADING CO LTD Victoria St III 10 SI —t t a. COAT—On* ladv. fur cost muton mb dytd beavrr. gioo OS on (how -1 Beaut, Salon. McOnrgor Sl(**l vm 1 si SCI'.M. ( I SIMONS I'NIT* Head, aed Spring Cuihion. Until jn't r*ady 'o* padding and covering al a price H n 00 each Th* Standard Ajjeiie* B-ao Co 14 Swan wreei Dial Man 4 II Si la TANKS-Thlrl**n %  1.1' Galv Slrel 1 3fl Apply; O M IOST A FOI fVD LOST DOG -.Whit* Bull and Teener Au.wcrlng lo ihr name -Jean Owner Aubrey Grcav*. Can be found at trw Public Market or Hall'. Road R*war rS*red 4 || |_i„ KEYS On* bunch aWi brtwrci Waiter. Road and Slrathclydr Finder cwarded Ar lb* Rl*ct ha. *.tabll*h*d hi. Office al Sand, Lane Paciory, actwaapn in* hour, of 1 a 1,1 anal 11 a m on Monde>., Tueadays an.. "^rvl, J M C THORNE > 11 SI O,: NOTICE ,IV(.\ Cl*rk-. Office. Panxhial Bonding.. C btrUnd Sti**t. RrHagrtoai. H .. U| am to 11 noon dally Simla., mcrpledi O D RYNOE Rrtiinnrg tXR..rlrtdgilm. 4 II SI In HBLP •T S' BrOkS (r . %  rev raumtial Biartina uli %  1 Pl"> n Ta-asssln 11. all a. Hep:. 111 awn han 0 II Ml wnmo rHu A •* %  ,,.„i Strno-Tvplat hn wr Offlc* Ap,i, Is %  anttrn applbatMn lo Secirlarv Dnwdlnj EaUle. t. Trading Co lid Bay Street j n SI fl THEATRE MANAGER A fuU 1 i.a Manager far in* P1AEA 1 lUfh.iee. Apply by letter and in uvr-ort -' the office of CARIBMAN I i II' The IffM-aH Iwtaren the hour, of S a m and II noon. %  Notnnlier ami, teuftil applicant ICikat lak* up hi. diiltr. l>> January 4th All application. United 4 II M In R| ptUtSI STAT11I In.1 1,,,-e ,.|.r %  %  uranc* Co In Barbatsua ApulM-a ,.n in .nlir. ( are invitee) which il trratrd In strict conSdanre Apply L'naViwriter I SI BVANTON it Top Rock, -landing on half an arr*. having 4 bedroom.. DlnbtS hoosn. Sun lounge, two fully tile,) Toilet. J",d Bath. will, ll..| W.,trr. Modem Kitchen OuUblr 2 Room. Children. Ilav Roam, w*ll Ubt otiL harms wiih di.niTw above Prupedi can b* purrhated fully Furniihed If ao de.lred WRtl poatraalon 1M February IMl ( tc I'hon* SSM a || si S.t J .ted i That l.ar.l-n. ar* < NOTICE 1 BAHTON OPTTI having bean -ppolnlrd Relnri,i„a itfKc.i for th* Parch ..f SI John have aaUb| ll.h*cl m> office al lein,.,, Arbar Factor.. I 81 John n o CMl 1 S'JA-4. Returning Offl-ei 3 II SI ;tn rNIVHtSlTY COIaLCGgt HDSI-ITM or TIIF WEST IM>It;S, JAM Alt A. B.W.I. MS lilt \l -t II 1 Applbatlona ar* Invttrd lor Ihr rStapt ig varanclaa al the new Unlvw*ll "'.inerrce ti |UJ l.t April. IBM: Vrdlcl Rrgl KOUSE One chattel houw on IS 7 10 per.hr. of |aM, ...i-, ,• f-ornrr of Da.h H....U i.,„, 11. on* apot land. Bank Hull 1. :i 1 I SI So Two
  • . Rich villa. 411, AvcmW. BHkvilie OnV* hour* will be from Sam to SB a m dally. Sunday, e.repiad HERBERT iiAlil r Y WtiiJAMS. R-Humtng ill.rr 4 11 si in ALCTION sin Inatmclrd b> the Executor, of tli* Eatate of Jam*. E Seale. dr.ea.ct sell S chattel houses on the .put at Sv* New Orlrona. St Michael on Th..rwl*y Sit da, of Novemtjrt IBM Sal* I o'clock. O'DONAl-D DANIEL. Auctioneer UNDER THE IVORY HAMMER Thursday. Bth Nuv* Fort Ruyal Garage. I III IB4T Anslta Ford in airident' Trim. Ca.1 ed I w.ll Mil 1 ,ber. al Mewi Mi.hael* Ro H P. 'Damaged Sab i VINCENT GRIFFITH, NOTICE '' • RRia? < IIIR4 %  GIVE NOTrCT. Ihal 1 'the rlr.li.. %  I I %  ,r at Cr, %  : %  NOTK E •.H tit -I IM'tlH %  Hi v n.i 1 hav. %  OrSce hour. Tuead. md Tti rag u offk-er. Part.h of • %  S II SI < 1 3 The appoint mania w.ll tie fur one vt.t 1 ssSSS-kM Salary will be in 1 £T00 |o CI.SBS pet annum, depending an VKpwlenr* and qualifk-a tlona. and Is aubyect to a deduclien of CIBS par annum in r*-v*ct of board, %  evidence. *w Purlbar uvfarmalku, may : %  'I . %  and aVerriary Application, with full dalail. tva IT.. r.1 is... I Cclnfsii of th* Weal Indlea VJona, ja.iHa. 11 w i before list %  t*NIYCfs->.i COUalOfl iiosrn AI. OK THI: ni:sr lMHl>. JAMAICA, n\\ 1 Ml llll t -." II I-*.HI<.M I Ihr ui derug ll.l.lA"s !•%  > n pi KM 1.. >l Aw M,. I "l It ar MII 11 vi 1 II Mil • iriurql Orneei for Stie .< I for the mil 1. I 11. 1 IN Till; MATTKK Ol I ill tOMPAMliS At'T ]!I10 I'KNTKAI. FOI NI1KV LTD NOTH'E IS IIEIuTIIV l.lVIN that tlw Tramfrr H--I. < Of UN closed from Ihe Jr.l da of November. IMI. to th* SOth d f Novrmhe. IBS). both da>. ,. order of th* Board of Director! II GAIIKTiT ST Hill.. %  at :. i.-.-. NOTICE Tk* StUtr -f MAIIUAKET ANN JONES. •HHHf, NOTICE IS IIEHF.HV GIVEN u,a iraun. liavina any drbt or claim aa, the E.Utr of Marcarrt Ann J died In thl. I.land on Ihe 3Blh da *r. IBM ate H StlBBJ I pailiculai. Of Iheli cutlma rl^h I to th* unite 1.ill mil 111 tai Hraen Collie. Cathud A I High Street lln.lK.tnwi or Ixtorr th* 30th day of Novrr, 1BSI. ,||er which date wr .hall pre to di-tiiiiuir the asarta of the dec. panic* rntitbd Uw**4o invited foi >, the now I i.it.il. to Like up di th* Hospital on the I.I April. I %  Th* eppointm.-1 1. -.11 be foi I .. 1, HOUM OfffSw will M-rv, in tin %  flfftcan who sarvs thnr full pWtud of on* year -1 Uss t aiv*, .I,, pital -111 >r .ii>i'iutrd 10 lha earvtc* %  nd of thai perl.. I h* gyaiiled oil* year • nl whrre ...lacy of the post t liHrasnanUli. and l.anuivbm may be uSAaliwd %  ,ital Mimager and Sacieiary. ,,,*.-. (Vlkw* HoaaMtal. Mooa, -.i ' *• I l-*llcal MIS( I LLANEOCS I See II.roll.1 Utah street I II SI Ir. Gums Bleed, Teelh Loose! PISSES-TIP FLY tONTIOI Her*, at your ftn,*r-tlp. b a Quac kW e....r war Of killing th*m-COOPSft S ...Jbw _.._ AEROSOL PLT8PRAV Just prats thi BUOSS -"1 thBJBW4BM H" BBSS •', I. '.iriial 1. death to all flying lr.ret. in the ,00m COOPERS AEROSOL TLV%  IT.AV do*, not taint foodrtnff. I. -ion. l-lmrrnii, mkn-Inflammable and a 1 mod oMourbsm Ua It tn homes and office, mod itoras. hoapllal ward, atrrraft. farto bi.ldir*.—wher>-ver thae* ar* Slaa Ik* !••(. Ml* 1 ...... 1.....1 Fie. %  !'.. r.i..i1iBMetleMsl ifNl •-•• Ihlnl. -f S lallas .Ua4.r4 kaarkdawa %  j-.* lha —.11 aba aaaab skoal BBffh ihin .r a aa.11. COAIPBS. Minorn'ii a BtiStfapsON LTD, BSSRHAMBTSO, BBBTS. BNOI.AND. STAMP CATAJ %  %  IVI.IM"' I UaTSt %  fl •> v. AT, Batl f Juat arrived for JORS.S4IS ~ si MliiM II %  I IBIirt Ml .'eVAWe'eV/'/V.'.'.V///, T. GEDDES GRANT LTD. Agenti WANTRD 10 mv STAMPS STAMPS All Kind of STAMP?" at the ('ARIBRFAN STAMP SOCIETY Ns. It, Ssran Street. sessions # From Page 3 iron .stoke und frsciuifd her collar bone. The accused has a ffirl of ten years who is dependent on hei SprmutT told the court that Morrl always annoyed her saying thnt she has one to represent her Alcohol ALFI(Ll) HAHUING pleudM ftullty of wounding Lionel Pino-.iDi s>|)tfniber 18. Sentence w postponed by the Hon. the Chi-'f Justu-tSir Allan Collymore. M.'. G. Farmer who appeared on behalf of Harding told the court th..l lioth men were under the Inrluen %  nf aloohol and an argument followed and Hinder was cut r.h .. knife The da e.tale lie r.qu.-trd to Mttb> lh*lt I d*btrdiieu without detav Dated tht. Uth da, .,( Bspi VF.IIONA JONKi PRINCESS I OUtSE JONES Ruacutor. of Use Will 1 f Margaret Ann J O A P NOTICE if*** ..1 NOTICE IS HEREIIY (;IVKS Ihal all parson, having any debt or ctaaSI again.! ih* eatat* of MILTON hi Nil decroaed. who dbd at Cap*4owft m I'.. Province of tha Cap* ol Uood Hope M tli* riomlnlon *f South Afrkw o'i t-.e 11th day of March IB'I Inle.ia-. raqueetod to a*nd particular, of tristr drbt. and claim, duly attrslad b Uie underMgord in care of Mawar. May, S Griffith. No. IS Hl*l threat lirid M %  a So icllor*. on or before the 1Mb da. ol D*crmh* 1BSI aflrr al.ich daI ."all pro. red lo dbtllbule O* th* daceaaed nr.ong the i^r. n etitilled therrto. having regard only I 1 lii'li clalma of which I alhBll I had nolle* and I will not SS tha asaat. or any part theraof so dltrlbtitad |o any parson ol *> • %  claim I shall not then h„e had 1 IRS Aral all person, indented to the SSM ratal* an* rwque-trd to aeti:e their aid Indented"**. Without delay Dated thl. Slh d.v of October I I. CLABINE n.lABlTM K1N<. Q-J lifted AdmlnlitratriK. of th* Eetaur of Milton King dacea.ed Stop ^yorrhoa and Trench Mouth in 24 .!e-jrs 1—ilaa. HnM aoi* mouth. lov Uath swan thai ion ira (Ml rhrsor Trrnch Mowtli. or sonrUa'1'l--' %  • hal WPI •vrnlnall* rsaar I" "** %  BBS* Uath and h. •U hrfora ywir %  ... War tlieae mIh <> IhrMghoal il-%  orbl nets say that f.r aa ... MSrrert -ooa-r or >ai -r lie v.rro-1 IB linss and .lop thedisaaua fcalero II la |* |SU. becauar tliey often raua. 1-.1 BIIII tha |aaa of lacth, bat also cbronb rieuitaM.m and vsrt troutif. New Dis Snvts tcortANMHSM. tha di-o.ery of SB %  (..Mill. r^ht. Ihr* bBMSSfl ing th* vrir not Sat, qunki/ t.iei '.'• ( D rr*aaa *ul *f roar ss-mla, arm aaan luhiem Ih. lerlh Ths lalbairji MM*I fron. Mr W W H *sa%  %  '• %  *-t -IsaSVi 4 %  .. all lbs %  %  .r %  %  Hh dbatipratcd in %  Of IBWS." Uiio.vnrc?ri %  %  %  •atafscllon ii Airfv-.:.'tr... rP PyorrhoM—Trcn-h Poseur? R*B Page FsMsr %  %  %  n a sisnai i< %  At a resuh Irk b-uuHrsuftoa n-if an hour late on the aie Jin.US lhat hall-h.ur ust-ity urterd disastrous los-eg. iTii-we evenu suu.ii either Uiat uio have looked 1-1 more clfxely into thr ei: .11* coiiunmiK-jtuiiL. or %  i iy thai mc Beat %  loo.-n t...s .mpoaing %  strain wt*>C4 iMVU ttvhmque could not sunn But Admiral Chalmers gives uj_ a salutary reminder 01 tha dlBrull uiim-r which Bealty tha high seas, the roa gunfire, the screamin|[ wind, ihe murky vulbllity, the great column of water thrown up 1 | salvoe-. Naval battles arc %  matter of chaos., ooscunlv U| nlng decisions uken an "n-i. ing or doubtful vrMl I H is well to remember the naJR) which lie* behind Ih. a* • disgrsnu of the naval historian well lo it-member tha' at Jutland Ithuugh ,250 ships wenI was never possible to see mors. ssun tine.or four of the enemy's lOpttaj -hip, nl *ny .me linn I,I place on the British lm. Admiral Chalmers u not so successful when he comes to explain ertual eosjrsa of ovont. rha art of describiiiK batlle*. WhlUiai nsvaror military, in terms inlelllglble to the pl-in man mgly difflculi. Mr. Chuntnli bj if the few modern writers who can do it. But too often in Admiral rjhalmers's account of naval 0E*H m v there descends something of lha fog and mist which MITOtindl I Man in o.-uiaiity. gj isiouin a ihrougl' ,'ieavy seas againai gr. v clouds, the outline of avacrl i be. but dii.ily Keen, and Ihe read, r becomes weary. Hi. ,,..,tion* of Admiral fhslmorrs book which will .. '" ' K'.nlei „re Ihope de.iln l-ord and those dealing with h private life AB Firs! SCM taOrd from 1920 n IBBTI tt.-.itiv in.,,i. ,i rsaa rhtt, i grrvo what he could of'll.Navy in the fnre ,f denianj fm rlruslie ivononi> He li.nl ., 11 fnco11 struggle, and ,..,,... cana iron an inafrUMM t, i WI.I-II Mi Bnldwii nn Lota i Wca In 1924 he was pledgetl lo a uo!uy < M -riHiture. Tills policy WBB stronKly ui poptnd by Mi. ChunhlU w.tavo Miffered a severe hi OiS Government." lie," '" Ui wif.v o 1 '"'' Jhajf '"'in one ,.f th^ rri'* (ireal Weallh Ik-alty's wife was a tausntai of Mamh;.l Full ,,,, millionaiM' si,.i,,,i be*?,, ahroroad from her hinband and this might well hav r damaged B"atty „ career, for although his name did not appear in the v^rv "" l a hint of divorce emiM l.<* flaniter-m, in those .1.. %  %  r, %  rose on thnt Beally'g marriage brought him %  :''-" • %  .' %  "Hi •' vat hi „ K i. nlM miKir. a place In Lele*>stershlre ihe appurtonances of Edwardian luxury. OnCMj when UMN %  ^.l^ a prospect of Beatty irtaulad '"i rhui aging his n a new siiip" Tha marri.'Mvf al llrst brought Beultv great happiness, too, hut this did not last Latdv %  *•) was Jaaloui of hor httanHtrl'g on in his naval dnin A* time went on thev dnftrd apart and she de. iin.il Ini., rtata ol acute melancholia. I%  %  treated her with gre.t paUanoa and foHHuraiu.ft % %  PaOMO r.-alised how deenly Wl .rwas by the-. niiitlors during the years of "it greatest fame. i:. III-I.I The Facade r'.-w pODpla Miikpecterl the dark kgrouiiil behind the. gleanuntt i piuspority and success %  %  I. ieh Iteutly presented %  mrid II i to Agtftur I Chalmeni'i %  family that no .ittenml made in his bloirrapriv ., %  facts. ffipe and / Beoffly. DK rtear-zldmlrol W& Chaltnrr*. IhxUIrr Q ,„i Ion 25. WOftlh COPYRIGHT RESERVr" — L.F..K OFFICIAL NOTICE ^le^UANCE of lb* Chaw.-, AC. IB*,", ^hS^U' SSVZ lo bring beioer m* an acrouni of Ihrir cla.aa. wssb on, %  lanaaBBS. I in njiafs and voucher, fas b. .uai-M b. nat on an. Ttraadta. ar Pnd-r aMSarrarTta*.oura o* II naan and 1 oclocS m the -Iter.aSon al tha aansSMlWtlon OfRc*. PubOB Butldln-P. Bodgetawn brio., ah* iSod day *f D-ewnbe. ISB1. In order that MB* and rataaad aecoedbig to thr nauir* and pr|orttr IlLSSaaj h peraani will be precluded f,< >m the oeneftt. of gggf 1 -II ctalm. 0.1 „r anssnal ihr aahfl proparty .HNS-iSf Defandant DORCAS WU I IA may be reported On re* and be daawlvcd %  PSSt f V ALI THAT certain pkor parcel eg bind MtuaSo In Upper C*SI|aia|B Rack In Ih* pariah ol Salrt Mnhaal and ldand ti ftartiadin contab n g ky %  SS T. aaaujrs rr .ar,t on* rood b* lbs sans* nor. or la*, butting and bmindmg • %  laaaks no* or lat* of Jam*. II Wl*. af C,th*nr.e Wile., of vlement Lucss, of Jamea Ford and of Mia. la>ulu Malbrt. snd an th* Pubsb Road or howevgr tlae lb* -am* may bun and bound Togrlh*r with the mewtng. or DwsSUnffhoiaw calbd AViDON and all and .H...U. ofbr* use rvaie*. and outkaajgaj both freehold and chattel on tha Mid '.,,..1 eeartad and built .land.t aaat %  I t ...ti, Hi. BBwajayag H WTUJAhtS. Rvgi.ti sr-ln-Chawcga-/. S> IB Jl~4n. i n.i i JIH lb-ton*.. HI %  SHIPPING NOTICES %  "Ml. .' %  tis.iil RIW BSA1AND 1.INB UStlTSU lM A M S IJael g S Tuaf ADC1AIUE is wh-Kh.UK aall from Hobarl S*pt*mba* aSBS. Melbaurna Oclobar *0. Bydnry Octaoar IBth OladMone October IBlh pott Ama ;b-b*r SMIi, Brliban* tbtoswr Pllh. ,„II, ,i T-midad about November •t and Ralbado* November Mlh lo addition lo a* net a I ael baa ample space aM i.med -nl Cargo arcvplad on tli la.dn.g Iw Uanshlpmotit i .iolana. lawward Itianda For furth*T parBMulars n-RNawa. wrmv ci DwCOsrTA a. i %  gh im. oi i. ...i i t ii . ..i-.i apply LTD. ant O I.TO. H.-I..V. p I TfBi M V MONEKA will a*c*M Cargo and Paaeeng.r. for rhynana. Anogo. Mrmiaerrat. Navu and Rt Rills Dal. of Sailing will ba \. i'.i| The M V (AJUaUKIBC Will accept Cargo and Paaa-ngrr.. tar IWInlea Antigua. MontaarrrNevU and St KHU ^/Wcoa, **"*£**, NF.W YORK %  -. A 111. It .'I trrCAMEBt saib HFKVICK rvsa Barbado* IMh N.i\ember i.e. fUrbado. Blta December. IBBI IBBI NKW Oltl.FANS SFRVICE •n-KAMF-R ik STEAM EH sail. MT-AMFJt -II. 'vmibr. IBBI it.,n,,-... Mi %  Rarbodo. Ut.l Nov*mba* Baibadoa Tth D*c*mb*r, sill IHHOI >.n sfsav* -' Skis MATOA cHNTrii 11 JCO A I Al.iiA I'SIIASUS CANADIAN MRVKB. Sail* M-alreal S*pt Mlh or MIR IHHOI NO g.I MCOA PLANTER" Du* Barbados October IMh Sails RlinrRT TMIIM LTD. — St.W YORK AND OXJUT .-.CRVICI. Mil.\ IIA COSTA g> CO. ITD—CANADIAN -KRVICR SA0UENAY TERMINALS Sto&tCfJ CANADIAN SKKVICK From Halifax. N.K., and Montrml. %  %  •••led Aarlial 'ii \II1VIJI kl/NV Mill slM-ltlM |. I S..vnnb*i Ns*nHaaSfl I :... M ur. UNITKD KINC.UOM SKUV1CF. Newporf. Liverpool and GlrsSfjrow N'.ap.H llrera..| Ola.gaw f*pe*led Arrival MSB I.HIM %  So\-ein|>r 1M-. 1 e. ii be I IMTKII KIM .IH IM AND CONTINKNTA1. SKKVICE M.ll.rgam l*ad.i .. 11 Oat. is c S Deremoer A(.m. : I'l.ANTAIIONS LIMITED — Phoa. 4703 CLEAR OVEN GLASSWARE 1 Ctin Supp'y Snap, Dinner and BreahfA^t Plates. Dishes risaee BoaU. K>r.. Etc. IJBT" Vou'll be proud lo own these. See our display Bl'V NOW PLANTATIONS LTD. V!e.vv..vvv e.-..>v>w.-.-.'.v-.v".^^^ *; Whlrh M.k.s <; GODS WAY ^ SALVATION PLAIN" i* Pleaae write far one to K Samuel Koherts, Oosprl ,* Book and Trael %  .. r\n % %  X W. Central Avenue, |UnJ gar N. Ireland tlllll MM soi viviiis C U.IOI ANTIQIEM. JEWESS. CARVINGS. IMBaonxBIBS r:i-. raaovrs Pr. Wm. avy. %t:: Dl.l 346. Ill VERY POPULAR re Ihew Oa. Caobri. that are coming down ar asrl of oven HouaaBp i-W lio.ner i, ( .... and n.d. \tl llll ItlHIHIll VI 1 IOB OSI • a.l .nd s* th*m for >*urwll ill ar* d*li,*r*d THE I '.iis ansimply GOfsOl Oana, Have A l.onk For Voa CENTRAL i Mt'OHit M < nr BROAII A I I IK)K s|TU I I FERGUSON TRACTORS WITH THE FERGUSON SYSTEM Tha fi lino Of I on the small r.nd Large Plantation Owners alike This Tractor. The price of which is only a fraction of that of a full -Track" Tractor— S3.is3.ee does an amazing Job of Ploughingand is at horn--iih.-i in lb OB the rood. These world-vide famous Tractors are "1*0 becoming Incrcag. 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    FAGF IK.in BARBADOS ADVOCATE TUESDAY, NOVEMBER . 1K1 QUEENSLAND SCORE 326 FOR 7 B.G. Defeat Indians After Big Recovery ROY MARSHALL TAKES 4 FOR 21 From HAROLD i \ll The West Indies to-day learned a valuable lesson at an appropriate time in the tour. They learned that the! own dashing attractive approach to cricket is unlikely to be reciprocated in Australia. FirMins till, morning, they had — ... %  %  %  % %  % %  — that W*on grimly impressed upon l.iem Harvey and McKay of Queensland — one of the weaker %  nsed th-it they had the %  nance to humble the touruts. and they took It. For neatly three hours not :i worthwhile stroke was made, not ..*. taken, thero was not one Joyous hit. but — and this L the niwt important but to the .r. !" .o.-o.nCofmpondm(i Australians the West Indies GEORGETOWN, B.G, Nov. 5. total was passed without an* loss. A brilliant crisis century by The tourists knew Ictur before "Babes" Dyer 103 in a titihlln* the stand, was broken that Uiey H u run *tand with Brian Pstoir were to be iiyen no guarur They 4 i ( and u n,htinf unfinished last tiuhlcnrd their fielding to a pitch wlck ,., partnership by the match of brilliance, bul with their weakwinning pair Norman Wight *0 ened attack, there seotned no help ^ nti J^J, Allen 12 gave British lor theni. until Roy Marshall w..s Guiana %  thrilling one wicket given the ball, and Immediately begin to sweep the batsmen from his path, lucky, indeed, that ihil young all rounder, fresh from Lancashire League struck such a jutrh of sustained excellence. Without him. — the scoreboor'l showed 2 for 224 when he came %  Kiy miKht have been d|re jmlnil for the West Indians. Keeping a perfect length at in tljutn pace, he made the ball move both ways and his flight con•ii.tcnily invited the batsmen to hesitate until it was too 1st* A; one period, he had three wickets for four runs in seven overs three maidens and that out of a total of MS, J. DC OOORCV bowled by Benny Raroadnln for 64 In the Countiy Tea**., arst lonuigs India* at KwcaU. Now South Walea, on 26 10 fti C 1, W'lcott U wlek at keeper. icainit tie Went Fulham Learnt A Lesson From Arsenal By DENNIS HART LONDON, Oet 28. Log ie tne II would have been a travesty of player not football justice if Fulbam's ii K ht bal fortable margin. But just after t::,!. Swindin was only able to parry a shot from Macaulav bat h the toot <-\ Bb pushed it into the net. So we cam* to the last hectic Vrseqal which look them nonV e minutes. Then Stevens scored here-fast. Apart from Milton and |he bvl goal v the match. R e Arsenal e ^ ving a ,>„ from Campbell, 'Ictory and saved trie colony's reputation against the hi.rd trying Combined Trinidad and B.G Indians. The game seesawed throughout the 150 minutes of play Sunday was bowled shortly in*; UM century in 117 f scintillating cricket When he left the game swung hack in Trinidad's favour as the SOOT* read 229 for seven—70 runs to go and only three wickets to -_.. — fall. Norman Wight B.G. crisis last-ditch rally had been enough Scottish select batsman lived up to hi* reputato gain them even one point from overlook such ii. .i for he saw the 70 runs their London derby' with Arsenal excellent ball distributor, then V n YhViast minute Biennan scored -ored and in fact contributed 42 at Highbury on Saturday anjued thill the %  iffliL'll declined to make the expected return pass as Campbell raced Into ddle. Instead he I I ih the ball from twenty yard*. rliurihiitfir Thru %  n. i .. it._. J' HT Enjoy ih. hospitality, comfort and thoughtful service which have mod* PAA "first choice" of veteran travelers tht) world over. NEW YORK Non-stop service by the luniriou* TO Praaidente" or via Sao Juan by pepelar, nwoey-ssviag "Q Turista." All PAA flights to New York now land nf Idleuild Afeporl instead of Lo 'uardia Field. EUROPE lUgular ftmfea l v giant double(t-cked "Stiito" Cuppm--world'. fartwt alrlinrr.IB l'.rii. Rome... •topovwi In England. Ii*Um1. Saturday tOctuof them. Patotr who was debtr 27th). Throughout the nrat talent over the bornV At ila. ,-i.t ,J ih.. H., r.-l.t-.r,! Ending while Dyer attacking seventy-live minute. Aratnal i nd hl'nwn rnuld breathe aum •""-!•- %  "P " rin but when taught thorn a leaaon In tbe Bnet Immediately alter hall-tune. Their po.il"..; 7^ no !" loo £3' '"' '" l ,* |hl looked like they am "( football It Is only lo he Ar^nal went further ahead when Much at one owl admire Fulbut IherTu plenty of hope Nobo.lv' l,; ' "SSS ."!' L" W J',"' Su l f op *' < """ *>""! •"* VfS,"' H "" n %  O"* "" s '"' ' chance, ham', last ditch right, 1 do not with the in&reit. of the BSSTM \<"IV*4 Into hooking an AM thai le5n. for frallkly. .1 they 1„,| „, by Milton I.oic .plil Ibe ihink that AlwuH'. defence would fieort would wanl Iho toUndm lo i' n ?" p """ A ""'"" walling com ahow a marked iroprovodefence with a paw l„ Roper at hale b.^n caught so eailly had abate enc Jot „t their natural br.ll """"' ,nl "3 ""'" lh ,'?' " !" * !" "M* ll HI. centre to Milton tSy ti.,1 held such a lead, liana nor Ihelr (ay ie.Hu! apTh „., „... M 7 or g „ n<1 ^ ln '* ^ ou • '">" Mp returned right to the feet of ARSENAL — Swlnaln. Barne.. proach ,„ the game, bu.-m AuTBrmlh^Mla^ wL again t Y. Manager Bill oouf.„ on. ftX-da oul from"?he".ri TC S CSS*H^t'ln"' ,ZZZ5 traUa. at lean 11 mu.t be „„uble Came Vlhan Rodney, can fal nothing bul .ympathy. '".<>%% oul '""" ,h ou Thj "^"L " 1 *' Holton """man., lempered with watehfulneu and who indiscreetly m .ved out to Looking at hi. Injured list you find """ '*"' ffl, HAM n.ck IWrnan !" 7-mZlXt. L L .'.'.'"; i 1 "?"^"??^ "ST* £?"*: ^?:|liahinan ....red a fourtli. ,t ,.,., n.-.l I El; New combe. Maculny., I lhat Arsonal would win by a comBlevona. Brennan. Campbell. Thcv reallned today thai an the score at 27C. With 23 Australian side given a llnferhcld need. .1 for victory Jack Allen | ur ,t Jezzard, Bob Thou Venezuela Swift, daily service to all msia < itie. fUcuisr flights to West ludlM, Cotonbia. Central America. Meiioo ... and to East Coast of sod Rememboi, a comlortable lit ting SUIT is our first consideration. There are increasing numbers who recognise foe themselves the consistently superb cut. tit and finish of the) IDEAL TAILORING We will welcome the opportunity of proving this to you in our . TAILORING DEPARTMENT on the first floor of CAVE SHEPHERD & CO., LTD. 10—13. BROAD STREET 'i""".r"i Itamtt (fr********* f IlelpM to rleanmm the tryttem from lihuiil impurities I input-iilr* In the blood may cause rheumatic aches and palm. atUT and p-intul >oIaU>. bolls, pimples and common ekln disorders. Clarke's Blood Mis-rare hales te purifj the blood, rleeesw the system sad asalats In restoring aood health. will turn It Into a rtranflchold, iihukil. HUHKI up with Nor even though the -pectators — as Wight and scored the winni today — scream rrnm sheer tiorcshot to give B.G. victory, dom. and I iCnU QtKSS'Mi.ftin isr INNING* Areher I b Ownrr Mr.-. c Oomee b rvrgusen ... MrKi. I b Usrahall A. Csrrlaait not D i.l K. TOKV.V h MuihaU L s>>4"> <..-nn..id C Mil-..' It hU>ih.ll W Or.uU. Ur*ell at. Reymar not t Be 1*1 Inning II.MIIISIII IMMW-id lt.nl-, B G 2ND LNNtNt.K I. WieM lb> b J.itkinr O.I4>. nin out Jarknan r k b All Camarho c BetUMtur b Jerkbllr Jt ,.f lorOoH-ri Trim >..->!' .1 Mar.hu 11 i c Bank*r II ii.'hui Plnjr t Aagomlll b All N Wliht not "lit HotMev ill-1 S.n.*r l> Jurkblr AHMt HOI .Hit D*ln . TOUI <(. 9 wkla r>n ot wisesei b Jackbtr 10 Morchant, Hazare Set Up Records Against Knjzlantl NEW DELHI. Nov. 5. India made its highest score ever ugainst England in the fln-i Test cricket match here Monday. In reply to the England llrst innings total of 203, India scored 4.8 for si* wlcktts by close of play and with four wickets still to fall led by 215 run:, Vijay Merchant n U.isare, again donur^jtrrt the game scoring 154 ami 1M run up.ttvcly. rirst Merchant and then Mliarc set up a record for the highcM individual coc b) an lndian in a Test match. The third wicket stand v' 211 between the pair was a record lor ;uiy Indian wicket against any country. Monday Is a: olT day. The match continues Tucsdsy and Wednesday.— i a. %  oen niq MCAavvea Ul • 10* \nias Broadcast For Cricketers WHAT'S ON TODAY Court of Grand Sessions 10.00 %  hSBa Police Courts and Court of Original Jurisdiction 10.00 MB. Meeting of the Lrglslatlvr ( iKinril 2 "in Mrellng of the llouae of Assembly 3 p.m. i Mr. Hum Creup nffl a' wskefleld. British ("ini.il st 5 p.m. MacDonald. This renre a complete first teSLtQ line. With all these players o action Fulhar.iB remaining *;irds have been shuffled and ruthuflled more times than a pack of cards. There was another wholeAiile i li;mgc-round for the matcn al Highbury. But I am afraid that it did not do the necesaary trick. As individu.il-, they ..11 played well tut as a line thoy lacked under* standing, *? Fulham's need is for u 'gen„ oral'; somo-one to command Si u line, to scheme and to miikc ihusi defence-splitting passes. At In% %  ude-right. Macaulay — captain in ,,„ -i Honour of playing against his old dub — showed he had some uf that ability but he is no younjts|er, and there were long intervals when he faded right out of the ulcture. In this respect he differed turn, his opposite number. wetJimmy LoKic. who nn this form roust surely cause tne Bedel selectors, to think hard before ignoring his claim for the forthning International against BSSAg .llini Kafir lauihi tlV.rll Wkrrlb* '".• a n* • % %  ' %  ' I MPISU It.II \-l-l %  a • %  t'ltt \J. ll.Kr.lrd II..I a I IS > m IMIXT Ma^atr li.- llnr I ..I.Ml.B IU is mi.i'r In.in FRANK MARGAN. SYDNEY Nov. 6. When an Aussie fan asked howler Valentine the significance of the gold bracelet he wears on his right wrist. Alfred broke out into one of his huge smiles and every stroke whei drawled "nan ah Just likes it. was dead and the baiting dul Ah bought it In England." lorninc Wale*. Fulham were up against one tbe best organised defences in country. Trying to split it. normally like trying to i tbiough a wall. But the last fifteen Minutes proved that even Arsenal %  i-aught unawares. With the Arsenal forwards running into top gear from the start. Ihe Fulham hiilf-backs were 1mnu-li.ady forced on the defensi Onuequenlly thoy were unable to devote much time to promoting attacks. Len Quested, not lookin 1 : at oil comfortable at right half, did occasionally wander up-field to take a shot nt goat, but in doin^ so left a gap In the defence. Thus paved the way for two early goals li'nn Arseniil Inside left Doug. Lishman. A word of praise for Fulha centie-half 1'aviit. He kept ; %  llrm grip mi Arsenal's buil> vouog aantre forward Cliff Holton. Inleinational centre-half Jim Taylor, another of Fulbam's Injured, will not find it easy to get back hi*, place In the first team. Both of Arsenal's early gc were laid on by their young outside right Arthur Milton, who du in", the summer plays cricket for Gloucestershire. Young Arthur. In the bowling fc Ilrst fuU B^gjon n loague football. Is surely one of the noet proved puryen In the NEW Christmas at the ADVOCATE STATIONERY 34 Broad Street THE Til INC. For 32 years Hie leading international airline—PAA was first to link the Americas by air, first to fly to all six continents, and first te fry around the world. For rn.n .ifinn... see your Tntrl Agent or PA /v AMERICAN Da Ca.lo S Co IM SrtMaal llraal — SiiJailowa "fcn. 1133 (Altar bv.nata •--.'• EMS] HORN I MAN'S LAIIIES: Just t'nparked! SPUN SILKS! In Plain Shadea. Small and Large Floral. A Bordrred Iteaigns You would love THANI -BROS. Pr. Wm. Henry Street DIAL 3466 ,v^.^///^/*v,v^>r^Av>'*w>v/>v,',vA',vA',..r. Cbrlflma. Party broadra.l Tha visitor, have to Hahl luix! lh ,„ rate of improvement 1. being arranged to enable the on Tuesday lo draw tbe Queensttnuea, then I'm certain ha will lo .peak to their home land match. When they begin bat, no day ucar England's clourfolk., t^ the wicket will oe slightly My hope 1. that he U not rnshid Only 2.000 watched Monday's worn, also ibey will probably Tho remainder ot the hall u Brisbane Inning. A section of the Dnd it difficult to handle the occupied by an exhibition ol crowd began barracking after (Queensland bowlers 'pretty-pretty* football by the They 11 Do It Every Time •—..•—.•. ILL SQMCOrJE PLEASE EXrVAIN-? wuy A 6uy WILL VOSK ALL WIS LIFE TO SET A WOMPERRJL HOME — MORE FAMILIES ARE ENJOYING BEST THE THESE DAYS... %  ^.:v.:v.v.\ .i£; J A It BREAD I OPENING j On SATURDAY 10th NOVEMBER 1931 | The ISfew BAT A Shoe Store At No. 35 Broad Slreet. X We thank our customers for thoim kind % p*t8 ronaRe in the past and now offer them improved g si'ivice a. nur new modern store which has been J built for iheir benefit. 1 J Wc trust your kind support will continue in the •§ future. HOUSE OF SERVICE .*,'--,-,*.•.-.',•,-,', s. •,'.;•*',;'.','.'.'.'. 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    II I SDAV NOVEMBER I.. IHI RAIillAliu-. \I)\.K \ II !'\(.l FIVE CONSIDER FEDERATION CARE FULLY \ Adams Warns ur btiunden duty to |gu carefully into the proposed M uf this constitution and examine it in the li^ht of L-onstitutions and state what we lcel ought to be in the Federal Structure before we go in. the Leader of the House. I H Adams said yesterday when the Ho:ise of AssemHiwriflg the proposed constitution of a Federated West >ndies. proposed la aMQ. *ould have lo bear their the British Caribbean Standing percentage of ihe expenditure. Cloaer Aasocu'; Mure l>elail The House paaaed fcV followHe WM not „ >tn g thai thev mil Address lo the Governor on . cr n0< r |p<. for iteration ., ort: — The House of Assembly repeats oul ,-iaapr un lon should be eniu acceptance ol the principle. oC couraged as a step toward, fedcslabllshing a Federal Govern.. ru lon ,„ d ji V e them the nn> men! of Ihe British West Indies, :o -_ | nlo morf „„.„ ,„„ „„„,,.. i!S?.. ^^"S^i^ PS? 00 !? 1 o, ,hc J "'" a he"" "hat they were goi .rlbbean Standing Clowr ng ,„ rttt rric „ had ,„„, Association Committee Report change in England as far a. fov... %  bead fat di-.-io. i., ..f uie .,„„.,„, IV ,,, ,,„„,.,,.,,i iSSn proposed Gov, hcv ,,,,, nol know whl ,.„„, ernmenl s Constllinion should lnfcl wou ld have. "* %  _. „ The House wait dying the net I The House, however, docs ,,„ „„,, „ M ,,.„, u „. 52 .Ei""* 1 ', ??.'oiJlf •' ,, n, kn w *• .''"" % %  'Hi' iidialled proposals of that Report „„, n Iasour „, federation • ml will in due cm !" forward ,„ w re „„, ,,„ „, lod lo Your Excellency Its suBtealions u, cmK .| v „ <„ „,„,. ,„ for the amendment of some ft Hubert than n .,.. %  la n_,, In The Haunt' Yesterday V H V If* H.U.. .1 .„..li IK. l-ll.-.r, ..•,.,< — i.i" Ml...lU>. Sea. .11.". I.i W.ai: • fIT P-lntri of TliaXrlliBi i-> or*., A. ...... Ur ... %  i %  ••.•• Or*... i* —t> '•H">' ll Tfce H.... ...... %  Me..1.1... %  1 |M —1 .1 lltl.a .11.Ur •V MilUII •)< — Tl m.a.1. the....e |kf aa.a 1. Ik* Hill la nsate a,,.. far Ihe ar.leiilaa .1 % % %  n 1MM .<-• a*rn4*>rau ri.ii i. .... ,,.,!,..„ Ia •he *t • rail-.1 ..... e... u .. seal ..,a ...Irrl .1 %  %  —lain... .....a h. ,,. • air.. >-a t.< huM ltd.. a.al k •1 • %  % ..,1th H-a.r .al.arnra %  ae> %  T a an sJ adta C n,^„'oe C XT?rom J^tfJgjg £ a UnUlcation of the Public SerD ui „, „"J ,.J uu a?J£ anoint po "". "V""",. ""' "* ""' vices in the Brll'nl Caribbean „, Jw .hiT £? ..T*Li""!" "."l.-lK Ik. raport w U proUnification i'i I hiHril':."-i I therefore agree eral with the "Holme*" Report thi Ctrlbbeain of view that he hn.i no. rM ,,,,,*i Senheard Wh|!( . (. vlf*d au ubject. Cnmparisfins on invause" unit sirenRth—thry lortneil nut i.i Aitli i di't! eul > iivv v*i*\ kind .f r. dcr-ition they wttnted. Mr %  pMkb i; M ipp in the last oc who Travel thai U-f.n d have a m rvit?e Mih-iI'rnnietil po "WhileI subhcribed to the tltw %  f thai our proreedin(s wen secret .nil intiii.tei.tial. on ihe nd, when Uv %  %  'in iv vrara i a with whtch I ." %  •f StatM whiih had reached "'" Thcv ' Barbados were second %  ttlUonal advancement while "|>|K>Huiiit\ to mix. There should to none in the West Indies in the islands of tl Wat Indies had "If" ** %  a British West Indies believing in the prin.lples of 1 ii""S.'. P .S.*?"^' k Federation m the sense that fedrn.:tttulionil development. The ',,' ^", ,hat l h V c >" Barerate.l units OOUld pek rnore pnptmA was then-fore b l a ,lo **?? •._^ W K "T" 1 '!" 1 0 effectively m pohtieal ami -xonoseparate units. Not Kountl By It 11ados had UU miTKl. bec.u~. of this coucati'cn.l a„da^'""a^2p" """ mi,1 "*'' h '" man poUtteaUi awakefw Another point he had referred going to make it hard for Barbato. he I minded, was that IvtlCMM dos to fit into the scheme In Aust.-alia the senate was Tihey were federating princiWhen it came lo the signing of i In the propcsals for the pally because they wanted to this report, there were some rflM the senate would be become strong. And Iwo colonies things in it lo which he did not nominated. It was a point on n '["' proposed federal area were agree and he did not consider which he was not strong. '" mUka up their minds, thai they should sign a compromf! %  •. however, expressed views Ul Md to think thai ise report and be bound by it 11 showing that he was in favour J* hnd n rc rt''"'nlal destiny and it were necessary lo sign the r*> ., elected senate as member! ,r "g" J"" becoming aware of port before breaking up. he s.,,.,,,1 then be reDrcs<-ntmg the hal ,hr ^H*" 1 '' f na vin %  tonmeant to do so with the reservaw shei of the MODle n en,: ,,, yU '' : "' %  ,,,, """ ,haI h * ^^ Mr Mann ariv^ .hat thev In " lv ' U,I M *• ^ "'vth.nR ,n lhal report with rJfoeS?tf2S ^SmSo^S ff" 51 Hondu.as. which he disagreed and w.th S str^ntflv Shout fh,. ^Ies. $2* w u1,1 l '' 1 1 h v hi "' '" •*** h k "w """"bers of the Z-in litthcTSv E!u an w "'r 1 '. 1 8 ,ft "' Ba.bados House would disagree. tions in tlie report, uci tnem say embark on a loan that won d ruin "l ,, ; .ve even wonderwl he ffiSSti s if M(i lM ^^ mMen ot iwoiltoaf Rnhnrios h t .n Ihey do er degree. Utter rJwtltl) lhN .'.d-d atvl DOW, 1 r.el th it -alher than the l n as much as I signed Uttfl -hw heihe, four members proposed w should report," he said, "I have to make Ihe advantages to be gained Wrt agree to two." my position cle.ir" so considerable M to outweigh Tin Standing Closer Associathe freedom whlnh they had In Closer Union tion Committe,' had several their constitution. meetings bui th* representatives Mr. Wilkinson (E) said that of Barbados, unfortunately' war* Ayree H itn Principle lirt qiM tloi Ol .t'deralion was a not present Ihroughout the whole Th... might all agree to the and vital one. Some of these .neef igs A sort of princlpla, but not to everything months ago, he felt that tho rough and reanv procedure was ' the Report. It was unreaaonprinclpla of federation was good |aJd doun. the main thing being able lo assume that the Wesl West Indies. But on hat iheir proceedings were to be Indians were the wisest people second thought. he felt that private. that God ever made and that 16 "closer union" should have come Sccrel tr ,B r Usip 'iuld get logeaher first. —.. ,., .„ . and draft .. Rasolutlan th.it would Barbadians, he said. could Th <* ^f 5 ,,^"* beti I. w,ih whoMMrtM agreeh-ast ..f a very good cmstltutlon """"J h "^^"L^ rn ,tln mnt Neve, In t'e history of the and they looked over their own m '* h nnv ( ***" !" '^ •* •"" world had people come togethei very much more, than the *£, ma *" n „">< 1 ^ P**^ from separate states even ,f they imUpotanUary, and draft in the VVfrt Indies. But taj .1 have Federation He c^uld not !^LK CU L tn "l h ,h *' *"• % %  %  deleotes got together, .juam-lled ma thkt so long as there was Fedmade %  ..„„, even ,, m tuir then many states repudiateo Hw delegates when Ihey t agreeing with ear tain iha oxirtme rlghl ihin,'hi. h Ustf) (ltd rtoi l-l &OC.I MM < oniminv.eallh %  %  !"!. i fall %  thai all the othara >iaJ "I ihink mat we ilaou. %  04 awal lagtort ..o.ed,he said. "So I am saying V* LM bu.htiiiK atl] ihht ilrioae colon leu which li.dtan NaUon is to hjve that Barbados was a is... Oui unl) nope stumii!ing bloek .., ro| Ihe cause of I good, he said. i lishmg a aaclal 1> %  100 ) ..i -ii. had h.i merit.-' m be Bcettaarl ->f II was because of the '.,ith ralhIhat u-> i than 11 were blinded to the exigences of that that system and did not see th-> in ivw M was a .ir.Hiv.mi,,-. | r II rful plw In the u was better not to have a writ, n ten romtllullon lo which you had ,,. house lops all u> stick to assarj eon ., Uu „, irlk T ,„. lv u g??.?? 1 Jt"" **!• T" Atiwrican ort,, ,„,,, h .„ !ho Vi P S JlaTm ihe U 'r,JhT''tr ,, %  "•* r -'" 1 "'"> "' ,np b, Whether so Ji^Jl* ^ t > "S.ness an,1 the fonsorvativ* w n**.ntr an amendment of the <--, v r „„.,.„i conaUlullOD wat uatconstitullonal ''..\ rrnn "' nl ^. It is our bounden dutjr lo go to Bnd MaanaiHii Mru conflned '""'"' ""** %  *" Uossi ol tin. c-onatltutkr. Some lawyers who praetiafj lii Ml %  ; "' ""• Ih, f •*•* %  "'HM ('..v. Court, rn£ %  M %  '" ,ul ••" &f rnonaj ovti Ih. interpralatior. of fepl wp OII nt IO ** tn thr Fort tMtion. he said r "' *'ruclura befoTf. we go m." No colony should pass triaat> without rareful consn %  *>• I IM thai M had raana>J M> eratmn Si. *M BarhailM and '• r r '"" replying It. Mr KaflgsU Jamaica %  otsM thai Trinidad Mr. Hannays ought sent the m,nter to %  tsMact Com' have been ash a met! I '"Ittee < a |(| uh.ii hiU.K. (iiivernnirnt \ii\ioiis Mr. Hannays had said lhat far I*** I r. i OovtnkRMlM With''"'" ,hr Labourite (Mr. Adams) OUt %  &) intention .if forcmy it *UUJ opi>oae.l to It, he was the down their Ibroais were a little nr "' ,n;1 ha <* laTe.i it anxious a little while j K '> 10 know He had signed it first because what our attitude would be,'' he he was leaving by an corlv piano. said II was very dishooevi ,f \i, Hm Th>* are anxious to see Fednavs to sugMt that he (Mr. eralion, hut they .ue anaJQMjl t Adams) had rushed tn sign it see that It should come from us Mr Itmnays knew like and that ihey should not seem to members of the commute,(hal IKpushing It in one direction or he was goliw to .idoot th, jttfeaLrtna t o ^*a^r^ the tact that Ihey had, a Con. • %  t Itlve r,n\ emir n iii Great Britain. It wa perfectly true that the* did not have the money to provide Iheir own army or navy ami they could .veil -.i> th.it tlefem. iini foreign policy were imneii.,: matters. Those who had said that th^ proposed Government fnal not im .„ rnuen more Ihon a glorified Cn ., Colony wfre not fur VVTOni 'ha>ir. A M stability and that was a sen. %  am matter Matters of that sort would „"„" *' %  ""'' %  makl .. ll..rliaABTUBI Ti> MIITI. extent one would ax* Altos iwmei. i.sai peel Ihe British Government if '""' "" %  *•'". %  %  J """ they were lo lend money lo makf some stipulations. Lest II be lh.-uj.ht lhal he was nol in favour of Federation, ha would say lhat If they were going to get an acOOODtk Ke.leralion, let Ihem ftt it by all m-ans "Our Cnnstllutlon would be givini! up a lot if -ve. for the flrsl Carlton Brewster. a ^yoar-Old lime In our lives." he aald, "have labourer of Hank Hall. St Mi. haol to be run hv i CoosUUiUoa thai ycotordaj ippearod bofora %  Diaputs a lot of powei in Ihe hamit Iricl "A Police Magistral, charged of the Governor" with Ihe murder of Norma llas%  M-II ..n Sepldiilier O nimeree Chamhcr Battle th.v i.nian.led until NovemAft.i the Loeward and Windher 12 lands' election, the signs of the time pointed lo the danger of ..• rJJ_f mg into a Federation and UUHl OlltfCff'llfV having to tight the old anil-Cham" ber of Commerce battle all irver I>onuld Bralhw;ille M I I again As things were at the Land, Carrington's Vili present moment, if Trinid,.! were Michael ied luddenly at hn going lo have ihe capital eslabhom lltoul 2 3o p m [JlbOd there it looked aa If Uwy Hls body wai remove.1 to th. would be run by associated Chamt...ii„ i.*-..r „ .„.. „ ... .. %  i i of cootmarco in the West \A'%. C. V. ithriruvt* ViiK-mlm. ul To I asgM Hill H Ad.tms t.-ui the Hoaaa trf Assembly yeslerda> IhtM th*' %  %  duwii then :unendinent not to .'. auhtnen' in the definition of "manual labour", in the foi tht ( .id's of workers • iiMd^i. iiowevor, iie tho Trfeiiti.ui of ihe olhei %  I!N they han ihe Hill Thee ..mendments. Mr •Mad out. m trivial and me;ely had to do with grammoth ii eonoi ttspi i sent a measagt rlni iha pOOd with the amend monta Thoj objactod to th oassssnVM >f watchmen from th. 4 ksorltar, a* it la statee in Ihe Bill that toorfcar means ; person who performs "manual labour Mr Adam> told the hssUM UM the altitude of the Gwernmeni no iha OUaar Place hn wtuidrawr Iha BmatsdrMcH with respect to the status of watchman. Iha* ^^ tra prapjai i %  %  '.lutieiit* aIhaj a*an only minor amendments The House then agreed to these imrndnn Harbour Log IN CARLISLE BAY I roMr W Srli Sim.hi".. an..' a an, M.-I' -.ik.fi, Robvrti, M V Mar %  r"i"ors AMKI\ISI. inn oi OIIIIH m-iinni in i -i s ion i HI ur %  I -II %  Oj MurclVr ChaVge lions.' Reporter*! \\ idtru Mix) Gd 11,920 ."tie WrtdOW ol the late Hi I A OOcftaJ ue|i..itcr r thHouse of Assembly, may get an i-uraiia gratuity of S1.M0 This provision W08 Included ll Hesolution for J4.420 which ra .. ad b> the llouaeof Asaembl y -tr day. %  dance with the terms < %  %  ..in the House ol to His Excellency tin Govornor poaaod on UM ititb an 23rd of October, provision is In t hided In the resolution for: — Tho ia>nnnt of MM of llvln %  to iha l MaV la] Itoparti i f the legislature at the Samtales and on the same lerms men tinned in Supplementary Esli males. IBM -52 No. 28 The |.ayinenl of .in BJBOUBl 0 S'ITU for indexing the vohfl tho Debate oi the Loa>latura i i 1944—11*51; An amount of $1,530 for the poyrnonl <.t Mib-.tit.itcfor Iha Official Repoiter of the House .-' I while on loava and I M hiiiging his arrears of work upThe payment of mi ex-glatta (, atinty of $1.1*211 to the widow of the late Mr. E. A. Maynard. Offlclal Reporter of the House of Assembly. Bafora the iU-solullon was paaaad. Mr. J. 11. Wilkinson paid tnl vite t.i the late Mr. Maynard for his work in Ihe House of As-emhly UM a lOfll tune." said M Wilkinson. Mr. Maynard was. i my Opinion, the most cm. not %  < l>nrter we had In this House low lake (hjl opimt tutnty to 01 %  rympathi to his wido nd rtlol ANIMATED OPINIONS Public Mortuary and I p*>* mor P 1 %  iolution lhat was accepted by and people of the other colonies of "•" be 8'vcn Ihe impress! the British West Indies. And so "•* men>bers were shifting in „ Rl thoy should see that they did not their views. To a great extent it .,.„. „„„, „,„,„ give up aoma Ol the authority was felt loo tha il was not unF |rf ^^^ lo ihey had. reasonable to followIhe practice u IIW il.,r. he would say that It did seem -diange to him that or the rounders or the Ameriran xrlnldi.d did not act altogether in they should pledge ihemselves lo Conslitution Most historians h( miere.t of Federation when ire policy Ml that very big hove regretted lhat their know, n ,, v lntok no ,,.„„, hcv tooh n question. It was a question lhat 'Kressive movement Ihroughout the British Empire was lo get away from that. In Barbados ihey had go! away Iron, lhal Other colonies were showlea. nil be performed to-dav Corktail l\irtv lit Honour of 'Itarni'v' M.IIIH-I of the Barbados Preprint, held a coektall party vestei .i Club .OOITI In ft U Mr. 'Barney" Mill.u who is '. DOStOd t" leave tlie colony M November 8 for Ihe U S. where h< will spend a holiday with his wife Mr Miller Is Chief Suh-Fdilo -.' the Barbados Advocate. CONDITION OF EVA PERON KEPT SECRET BUENOS AIRES N >v . I Vtllad Ihr COT rlitlnn Monday or Mra. Juan Pftro •.I AiiH-nlina.* Prwidcnt. ;.... ol <• iing "iwiV IronTll ""' '"' A.g.-.illnagPro-idcnt. "' %  A.'!!" :',' r "n!.hi".?i ..odV.-' %  %  %  "<-"-> * tl. %  m*. Stops t i. -.in., %  (,,] mMu n. IrrlUtloo ll.arabr aurblng athw ir-u. -laxsua.fi Li lllMtuiluHMili' %  -. uani.Il|."airha,'.'f, !• %  i..^. t-. undM ika .. %  %  ! luaiifit.* M.laa mual 1oa y„. i DSIr. %  n4 ir.-.Maa *r mooal Mat -aiurs or • % % %  .-, aaeknva. QV^nHeusen NAMES that mean a lot in Shirts CONSULATE SHIRTS with Tmbanlaad Colleva ottochad. Whila aalf colour*. Pin Stripaa and end and and Poplin. Price. : S8.40. $8.'7. $8.54. M.73 & 89.11 VAN HEUSEN SHTRTS, Turbanlaad collar attachad. Whila and Cream. Price, i S8.ll. $8.60 and *9.3 OLD ENGLAND STRIPED PYJAMAS Si... : 38 — 46 Suil S8.65.S7.30 BOYS' (1 LENGTH SOCKS Sir*. : 8'.> lo 10 in.. For Harriaon Colleae and Foundation Boys School. Pear SI.80 PURE IRISH LINEN HEMSTITCHED HANDKERCHIEFS with popular Initial. Each $1.10 HAT BANDS for Queen's College Girls Each SI.28 CONSULATE PYIAMAS in sell colours and Striped Poplins. Sizes 36 to 46 ins. M0.99. $11.55. S12.74. $13.93. $15.31 CAVE SHEPHERD & CO. LTD. 10, 11, 12 & 13 Broad Street rT> •- yu l.eo Kinc %  .ur C W HI | ION IT BaTBtB tin >wi i n.sT TaiKATr Toffee MADE IN U.K. The Perfection of Confection wAirces-f.LW' rorrrc no. PALMworn LONUON. W.3 ^JUrVCaiy Breathing Comfort in Ycur Pocket! ClEARS STUfFY Nose... now Aftour anJofVoj hie ran it you hm a MHITV k-ad-caldlj lor inMani bmtnaigcomloit, aiwnvaf >ou %  , jmt rvaih into' your pockrl or hanJUiil.w .ir little Vkks liilulrr. If'$ TINY -hm lcn.lr.1 lull o( vohiilr, noaa ctaartng mnlicailon, M i .ii \ i.. liiltalcr nit-it inio i-*,ii maT) H.-ii.i ii turn mhali %  %  rpl) !( %  % %  j-.iv-^ui.k aia i ...MH.'ssisd. JV /t-'VUBRrS ENHALIR HARRISON'S BROAD STREET nil NTIOMZO ITKM.S A HE ONLY A SMALL PROPORTION OF OUB WIDE RANGE OF KITCHEIa I1E0LISITES -. VWVWgFkVWVW\fl l VWWWVWVW"Z %  FOR BEST RESULTS % % %  USF % %  ". Il HI.\A (HOWS >. S IN THE C HECKER BOARD BAGS "aj %  H. Jason Jonea & to.. Ltd—BaOMM %  VvvyyvSfVv^kvvyvvvvvr.rV^i.2 "HAMH" PLATE BCIIPBBB WIKE STI:.\IM:IIS xsiiKsros STOVI: .MATS POTATO ucsaa POTATO II1PP|:I1S COOKS' SIEVES IIUTTEK Ill ItNS DOMESTIC SCAI.IS MEAT MIS. I IIS mm.iMi STOVES KIT. HEN KNIVES K.l. TI.MEKS WOOD SPOONS MINI \lll \ IIKEA1) TINS 1 i mill URIAH TINS —.In OVEN THERMOMETERS HE SIIAVEKS BREAD KNIVES METAL TOASTERS JAPANNED TRAYS 111(1 DISH COVERS EOa BEATERS PASTRY ROLLING PINS KNIFE SHARPENERS BEAN SI.HERS STEEL WOOL KITCHEN SPOONS Ml ASl'KI.M; SPOONS (Sef.) DISH MOPS ICINf. TIBES II I'.li SYRINGES M : \M C.HIKERS PRI ISUn COOKERS w, .1,, rerry n lurnMantmeal of lliitni slii lint's in XKI'III Ni' \ICI \l.l MIMI M WARE. iis i Mi is VMI I II Ii IRE BL'\ NOW WHILI rill GOODS MU. AVAILABLE AT KI \sos Mil I. PRICES. IIARRISOiVS Specialists in DOMESTIC HARDWARE We have FRENCH PERFUMES By -PRINCE MATCHABELU" o//erec/ now af unbelievably low prices very limited Stock remaining KNIGHTF DRUG STORES .',;;;; .;'.;•.'. %  .;'. at lover mft**4 \ (rrlElnall 34 ATED MUX 3t %  IDS, MAIllF r i;rr i -lb, %  • The shave ll> m rr Caali V < arT %  UN! PRUNES %  CHRRRII I'KIU-SI I Carton I hK Hrrk soc. 57c. 4aV. 8c. \



    PAGE 1

    1MGE TWO BARBAIjfrS ADVOCATE TlksKJJ NOVKMBF.K I 1931 £ahib falling M i: MI KFlS been invilert of lhBarbados AiuhKiation have to attend U thedral on Sundnj Novemta. at 10 J(' .I.IIl. TIM till an) MettlBf of Um AMOC.K i i lake* place at the Drill Hall at 7.15 p.m. on Saturday Novemi*ei IT. Their annual dinner will be held tliree qu hour i o n UM Drill Hall Anj OAear il pi the -land iMni Contact man is Mr DougicAl%  U-yiiiat Biydcn.. Seaworthy U P AT ihe Marine Hotel they have been busy putting the clock back, hut thi* time It's go". a new face, which in streamlined in.' modern, The old bar which Hammmul and many jiiolhlocal and old country—propped up in the wee ""'.nig hours of Old Year"* Night* fifteen years and mra ago ha* come back to the Y Only this 'Imc its nrde of llgnt curving mahogany and to remind ui that Marine has something to do wi h the sea there's a Urge porthole to keep us cool white swilling John Collins' ami local punrhe II IIIIAIIIt TIIKKLI. The man who is winning success with his book ana film about a cow. Appointment with the the Dairy Show in London for an A COAT MR AND MRS .JAM UK BTEED Married Gn Saturday M ISS DAISY OONSALVBB daughter of Mr.f Daisy Oonaalvcs „i n.u-u.v. M. X arajk and Mr. (iuhne) Gorualvea icy weather blank.!*,! They tail nv first drinks will of Miami was married on SatMaine to Oregon. -ed lhara on November 10. urday afternoon at Christ Churcrl llerr in Barbados a visitor vou ran gn and -ee for to Mr. James S eed, son of Mr omplaining of the unusual James Steed of Glash\, v er;ber heat we have been Hot Or Cold D EATH from the first prewinler cold wave tn the Slater was reported yesterday n't please everybody Weddinf fa when vour*elf what improvements i v and M ber>n roin on in nreparMInn for Kw Scotland, and Senior Enhaving. a big tourist senvm. mincer of Esperansa Estate. TrinYou Rifle Team Leaves The ceremony which took T HE Barbados Rifle team for place 'hortly after 5.30 o'clock r n rM Ll? nW 1 A nU, J Sh f viUe Petf rmed by ReV Mandc f\N Thursday afternoon at 3 30 left Barbados on Sunday by vine. %  %  n '„ ln w .,„ *„,,_, ...w„ B W.I.A. -The team is U Col J. The Bride who was given in mnd^uhi e ?oY Mr? F Uhft TX.i'l). Mai, J Griffith, m irriagc by her brother Michael. *f *V?' c" h 'f.'' "" ,„,"3 h c? P £ Walcott. Capt. C. wore a drew of white lace over £*£$J5 'S*", !" "M,KCI.S M. M deverttuil. Mr. t.fJcta. Her headdrc,, was of HSE" !" 0 fX.t AdSS*. nnd her bouque. of Gltleiu Roil() Government Hill nd the late Mr. Ad; The Bridesmaid. Miss Betty lionsalves. sifter of the Bride orchid lace and carried T. A. L. white roses anthurium lilies. G Pilgrttp and Mr M. Col. Connell Bcc-.mi'nuri by ins wife. jflBylllfl 'he team was I oeker. V thiin* Team Returns M R. PRfER IHCI and Mr. (Icraki NichiflN two meiiibers of the Barbados Yacht. !" '"; r "*;-' On SMB the yachting Al "' aerie against Trinidad returned home over the weekend b< llWIA I'ho OUMM members of e due back today by IN thr itwtag nwrj modest home In Mlnnea|iolai. Mrs-' Venus—gees ifl Gladys Olson, pretty blonde wife | of a factory inspector, h raising a £26,775 chinchilla coat. She is beginning to suspect that by the time sh has enough skins she will ~ t>*ve grown too fond of the chinchillas to deprive them af their coats for her own use. Mrs. Olsoit is on < some 500 i the United States who |p %  up fur-rslslng as a iMrlim for fun and profit. In Mrs. Olson's case, it all began four years ago a* a hobby. Her husbuMi Edward bought i pata of chinchillas e Datry Show at Olyropia shows the truth for £50 ?' J^'TlelX iT'iLkl 1 The exrtibits-withV exception of a ^^ST^^ rrtS few disconsolate cock pigeons—are exclusively feminine. more difficulty, persuaded the Iheir admirers vary in sex. custom and clothing. Standing family dog Duchess that the chinankle deep in straw, the cows look with soft speculative ehOlas were not some new fom. eyes at a complete cruss-ection of Britain's human popu' defenceless cat. r Tor a couple of days Mrs. Olson stood in the doorway and watched Olance at the sturdy Red Polls, her husband feed tneni Now .r he piebald Ayrshire*, the Welsh Is Mr. Olson who stands in th< Blacks—and ponder the fact that doorway when the chinchillas he 124 cows at Olympla, big. meals are served, •mall and medium, bavt average of 3,200 gallons a day— Jvcr eight tons of milk o l>. Sonw mnnX h* after tho Olson' narketed by the Ministry of IKlU( llI ihc-iHrst p-iir they bee am"oog Kv.rv ..in the show I' lM owners of four more—the firs' c^kaig hvr best—-and nu Pmnor.'ition for the Da Appoin hi in 11 With 324 Venuses QNK night last spring, in a candle-lit Sark stall*toManoir cowman made a significant remark. I fgiMsiej tkimg," he aaid,'*air)l eNa*M brim ferent A viait to th. of this statement Fed With Milk vender. llU|ir These had to be raised—by Shov* Mr Olson—with an eye-dropper filled with milk. i the popula darted a long time aaja, A is In her best show form immedi, lon 0 j i ne sewing room number ately after calving, and the hour j t0 ana additions are anticipateo of her mating is thu| wvU ui never be able to par i nicety The period of gcstntion w| h (h(; original pair whatever I is 41 wcekes. and she mui: ^y do about the rest," says Mrs •inform to the rule and nroduc Q) SO n. her en If on or before October 3 %  In;: Cn Honeymoon M R. AND MRS A CAMAfHO who were married In Trinidad on Saturday flew over froir Trinidad the following dav by B.W.IA. to sprnd their honevmoon in Barbados. They guests at the Hotel Royal, For The Races M R. R. HARDWIDGE was arrival from Trinidad 1' W I A., on Sunday. He mine over to ride in the ra< bouquet of anthurium lilies. There P*'~ were three Flower Girls, the Misses Ginger. Joan and Den.i Bernstein. The Best man was Mr Thompson who is also from Scotland and works at the same e'tate In Trinidad as the 'groom. After ilu% %  niiiony a recepy,„. ri ,\ lion was held :il 'O^lerlcy 1 Maxwells and the honeymoon is being *|ent at the Crane Hotel Mr. and Mrs. Steed leave tomorrow foi Trinidad The ceremony was performed Rev K A B. Hinds. The *ho was given In marriage cousin Mr. C. Drakes, wore dress of white organza with high neck hoc long close fitting sleeves and a very full skirt Her headdress was a tulle veil, kept in %  tiara of roses and forgot-nic-nots and tihe carried a bouquet of Anthurium lilies and Lace. Miss Viclet Farley who was maid of honour wore mauve crepe The Misses Lon Dorecn Farley were Hie Bridesmaids. The boatman was Mr. Grafton Mcrrilt and the ushers were Messrs Arthur and Kenneth Ashby. brothers of the bride from Trinidad on Saturday mornAfter the ceremonv a reception log bv B.W.I.A. returned the was held at the home of the following dav to Trinidad. groom's cousin "Homestead'', Bel"y Mr. Wooding is a Barrister at mont Road The honcvmooii "** Law Trinidad and a Director of being spent ut Fleet View' G;iest %  •* B.W.I. Airways. House. Bathsheba. lation. An Old Etonian n humbly to advice givi knotted handkm toll clip sparkles more brigii eport of mounting Weighty discussions are held on such subjects as butter-fat conlent and the effect of a Moiar Symphony in B flat on the milk yield of a pedigree Av Like Film Stars The cattle themselves, as n aware that they are the rataseu aVetre of jli tin on llamanl. gi taUon, organisation and chat, flutter their long eye-lashes like film stars at a first night. They came to Olympia from all over Great Bri.ain. Fairy Pr.ncev 8th an elegant Shormoi i Mr. J. H. Stephenson, travelled more than MX) miles by rail ft air the Boyal Mental Hospital. Montrose to chew the cud in Kenamgdebarred from entering b on. Guernseys from Sussex, -er of minutes. Let Frisians from Shro ( | .wever. 1ha| llv.i. > to Somerset. UneOtD Rodl tmngfnary Cucmw. obliginid: irom Yorkshire, the a*a4l eat nrodnr-s her calf at Hi the grass of alien fields. ., Oetobse 3. 7ro hour b"i" I went flrst of alt to sec Mr m |dn|h1 Hr breeder n Guernseys, the breed that pro„ib h'r hands, for he know duced mv own photogenic Von SuS^SZTX^^tKlSS "•Art if ut of Saint FW*t Port ma; .vi-r "•'"• !" "" %  ''""'• •" ";* '"at l %  uaranMM lo catch the return h II thuth it (he cofvrmeai la taken off art h *ndeye of any other than the rruxt '.lander,, ahrewd breeder., hnve PJP" nd ' """ ""'.•',. <.,„,„, udf e. Led a tpe that will al.il l">• '"'''".'• 5 J lk "S3? %  onilant h l'l ,l >' """ """' l >n sh "" BMldt them are their roualn. ^ **T** t "'" " ""thc Jerwy.. liner and more dell" l,rl v lr " d 9ANKTTA DRESS SHOP LOWE* BROAD MRI.ll mu SMS of every kind Ready-made and made-tu-Order. Alas— BKASSIEREf*White and Pink. SIZES 31! and 40—with Waistband and without Waattband Freaa S3.ee to $3.44. ; S gS ^S S &," vear. Allowance mut be m-"l I • the caprice of Na'ure. and run potential ctumpion has bee Trinidad K.C. M R. H. O. B. WOODING. K.C. and his sl"er who arrived BY THE WAY Bv UACHCOMMOt 'T'HE latest Beachcomber poll. "niflueiKlng the voter." The word Christian n X making use of Ihe new stalls"liberal" Is barred as suggesting a lust been r %  i ,if law, has been able lo predict, political party, and ballet must not book whii h arlUi ibaniiita certainty, not only be mentioned, as It is too much this. Dickens how everybody will vote, and hou like ballot. UM) AIM vole under different con., „. dltions. but also at what time thev •ISew light on Dickenml %  T i. i H , npHE denigration of Dickens has oo mechanically perfect Is this %  #,, -,,,,,„ v era ht*an a nraMir. S!L'SSr!^ ,or rv Mm l ,t irV "• -^ A K^3ir? v fiw .urei T-KM^U? fflS m 6 f Und hlm l Vul flr for " * ii M B ,i ^ P P, J in '* nib,lllx Of cx.iuiMtc rrlmcment, and too i ,11 .w Indu " m f o ( sentimental about human beings T^HE publication of KM M t<. change their minds (or a generation which reserves Memoirs recalls to me the Trr..H*y iy lo d **; '<* sentimentality for animals. It story of the woman who. when has even been pointed out that his introduced to him. said' "Oh Mr private life was not above reKreisler. we've Just bought you proach—a state of affairs which is new model. My husband won't acutely painful in this era.of rigid drive anything else!' ralil.v Bui I have ding review of n viiicntly explains all %  uttered from manicinsanity, and was a psychotic. Hence those regrettable novels, which the unenlightened continue to cnjnv Pulling hrrinlvr ui hi* <*<' at the last I l their independence, and to satisfy themselves that the la' of statistics have not yet oiKtlisheil free will. ft* lt from Mxrhonunor A TRIAL push by Evans the Hearse yesterday on Uangyrkyn Mountains once more showed his uncanny skill at rounding difficult corners on the mountain paths, on one nostril, keeping UM %  md pushing rather than propelling it. Reg Bodger, who is not so familiar vsith this course, DUeaad '^t pee .it Dweb Ootnoi and his left nostril came in contact with a bit of rock. The sllghi nasal abrasion which resulted ;i. treated by. Dr. Cosham of Fwtbalpwll. Social Security *"pilE B.0.C ban on the name of %  I Charles Kingsley for political reasons shows how serious, this matter Is. Il Is said that a comedian who introduced a grocer named Palmcrston was heavily censored and the name was changed to Hal merit on to avoid Rupert and the Lion Rock—23 At 37 she does not own a fur coat of any kind, much less a £28,775 chinchilla. When the Olsons have guest; ihe 30 chinchillas are brought intc %  mwt the lounge to play wi'h them ^ippese. rh( dou | f banished to a corner o* the room, from which she glower. reproachfully at the furry anlmaU rnmbolling over the furniture They are a delicate pe-irl gre> ,I..II'PLAZA BTOW* DIAL 23 10 JOAN CRAWFORD OMdbr* M< laser Lail 1 SHOWS TO-DAY 4 5 ^na ) an ~ ••H'EST I'OI.M sioin ta cair B. aov .i. au> aaoot n 'lllAU I U r. . 1 XIVUA H11WUIJ1 Allan "Bocky" LANE RAeSSER Of CHEROKEE STRIP ft NAVAJO man a.inra. I'lA/t SZTA, l-M 2 SAo a To-d.V I SB p n> %  ro MOUIOH is rouvii' ClaudaHlc Colbcrl. 0rs Brnt a nsai.iN ixraiss Mwta O-BBRON -Robwt RYAN Wi s a s so pji, I niaUlapyl IN AND VANC-T rui Cotoi by rachnicoior %  sm.nr. nii.i Bon\ ; BAMBOO in MM. I %  Laingford and Rdlpn Bdwardi t. All-TV THE GARDEN — ST. J \MF> RAYS IM MT HSAB-T Uloro WAHHEN -riaAxr MASTLN VirdnU MAYO Wd ad Thurs • 3D p n AlllliiT-E and COATaClJX) -IT AINT Ml" B OANOIROl'S %  "ii Suun HAYWARO GLOBE TO-DAY ONLY 4 SO and 7.4a p.m. JOHN SUTTON — DORIS MERHICK "THE COUNTERFEITERS" AND "ROGER TOUGHY GANGSTER" VKTOK M.LAGI.ON 1'HESTON FOSTKIt cate. iheir amber milk lick butter In comparison. the South Devons over the way are as cnormou, and as shaggy a hufTiil-""The nimble 10/rrys with th-'lr Oiarp horns '"I ^. the bov 'hey glsnce with rollicking rvr: it tlM little black Oionk ns If "hev should 1* pulhI .long on wheels. In an age when the dynai-ies of kings have ceased to maintain the sense of human contlnuAny disfiguring hair is dipped ity over the centuries, the genoff and the hide is groomed %•* ealogies of cows st.ll keen mans regro-niie.1 until it glis'ens like imagination in touch with ie crepe do chine. I Un verities of the soil. From Now the important business of the sophisticated farm oivmthe plume on Hyacinth's tali. It pla to the wet and windv hinashed again ami again in 1 *ides. the cow goes on doing her J —. — J .:-u.i.. .1.... (World Copyright Reserved. CROSSWORD r %  Y %  "1 !" ' 1 with %  -wdust' and -iaihtlv nl.ned. Onlv then may Hyacinth I THE BRIDQETOWN PLAYERS | present ;• Win B M i 1 f>itsr •** i • •crappt Sft** ••niiona Itsfii •vmpiom ii m rn-v tin up %  .'. .i *,~ rn piin.iiiiT nu [>. %  • tola •oin CUU t t • ) Hoe nrrtllaa wi I nimDrn TII. a I •I'.OlIlll an* rui-s. (Ml Pouna in DM(H aafiincu. i a • Hoi* ir. wttteh so drop Unit -i % ll aytli dunnt tu'. ' K.'t %  BUY A BETTER SHIRT FOR LESS MONEY &f RELIANCE SHIRT DEPOT Palmetto Street Phone 4764' Obtainable at ail Leading Stores SPECMAT TH! O.M.V SIOIIIS |.Y row > WITH COLOURED GEORGETTE 36" • J3.M in Double and Single Cords All The Popular Shades CREPE ROMAINE 36" e V-Mi' In Very Attractive Shades T. R. EVANS & WHITFIELDS YOUR SHOE STOKrs •J!;:! MM Dial 4220 NO CONSTIPATION FOR 25 YEARS "My huaband latroducrd BM I I AXL-BBAN ahorty *u, ,„ %  ff"*-] • I' "y cookiiaj aa wall aa for braak. faat. Th. raauh: wa'ra rafular aa %  lix-kwofli!" Mi. Anconina Graaiapo, 45J (iartiold An, Jaraay Oily. N. J. One of many unsolicited lattrra /ran AM..BRAN lijfrl. If you auffar from conatipai 10 lack of dietary bulk. Malta (about V, cup) of mai.v I KaUcanra_ALL-BBAN daily, drink '" ty &,' nX !" not aaliaHed ft^r 10 daya^jjlu-n ojnplv box 10 K.llo,, Co 9 Gitll Btilala" Lid.. ManckaMar. Eajl.nd. Grt DOUBLB TOU>~ MONIT p.ial by SOMERStT MAUGHAN NOVEMBER 27, 28 & 29 EMPIRE THEATRE OIWXIX1, GLOBE TOMORROW WITH THE SUPER STAR TALENT SHOW £*B*M4 srMrMnr win imriwM ro IIH Mt... 10H FM... mm mt... %  ,win •^ DOUGLAS EMPIRE LAST 2 SHOWS TO-DAY 4.45 A 8.15 JOSEPH COTTEN — UORETTA YOUNG in MALF ANGEL" TO-MOKROW ONLY 4.3t A I 3 TIU RSDAV ONLY 4.30 & B.30 Universal Double — ////.' .v.-// /. .•,','*',•,;',•.;•,',','.••''''• The natural way to KEEP SLIM AND FIT If irou want to b atuaaivcl* %  Um, wiih bft(hi cyn, mUtni comploion. n j ml ftmca-. NIIUK demand, thai you ,, your ITMCID domed or in %  punnet. (Jinical tei by oocton confirm thai Bile Bean* Rrnily and effectively Bile Beini are keeping millionv healthy anj youthful in (oolu and fijurc. Sun taking ihem tonight. Nature "i CsntCc Aid BILE BEANS THE MARINE HOTEL LTD. SATURDAY NOVEMBER 10TH. DINNER DANCE on the occasion OF THE OPENING OF OUR NEW BAR Dinner Served from Dancing from 7 7 lo 9.30 p.m. to Midnight $3.00 Per Person Table Reservations Tel. 3513 James MASON — Margaret LOCKWOOD In 'THE WICKED LADY' "ARCTIC MAN HUNT' with MIKEL CONRAD Basil RATHBONE in "BLACK CAT" and "BLACK NARCISSUS' with DEBORAH KERB ROYAL LAST % SHOWS TO-DAY 4.30 *8.3* Republic Whole Serial— "HAUNTED HARBOUR" with KANE RICHMOND KAY ALRICH MARSHALL J. REED l T ,r MORROW ONL -30 A 8 IB Universal Double DESTINATION UNKNOWN and STAIRWAY TO HEAVEN OLYMPIC )AY A TO-MOBKOW 4.30 A LE — BflSA HDBEWS GENE TIEfHEY. TO-I1AY Mi TO-MORROW 4.30 & B.15 .10th C-FOX DOUBLE — OH, SUCH A VARIETY! BARBADOS CO-OP COTTON FACTORY LTD. it DO YOU LOVE ME" In TECHNICOLOR Starring : DICK HAYMES — MAUREEN O'HARA — HARKV JAMES II O V V LAST 1 SHOH S TO-DAY 4.M Wedncadar Tharada) 4.S0 £ I 815 JOEL MfCREA — WANDA IIF.NDRIX "SADDLE TRAMP' Color by Technicolor and "TAKE ONE FALSE | STEPWILLIAM POWELL — SHELLY WINTERS a uawaiai inilsaT;'jaAi rKTuai and BUD ABBOTT—LOU COSTEI I o IN SOCIETY