Citation
The Barbados advocate

Material Information

Title:
The Barbados advocate
Uniform Title:
Barbados advocate (Bridgetown, Barbados : 1983)
Portion of title:
Sunday advocate
Place of Publication:
Bridgetown Barbados
Bridgetown, Barbados
Publisher:
Advocate Co.
Publication Date:
Frequency:
Daily
regular
Language:
English

Subjects

Subjects / Keywords:
Newspapers -- Bridgetown (Barbados) ( lcsh )
Genre:
newspaper ( sobekcm )
Spatial Coverage:
Barbados -- Bridgetown

Notes

Dates or Sequential Designation:
Apr. 22, 1983-
Numbering Peculiarities:
No issue published for May 3, 1983.
General Note:
On Sunday published as: Sunday advocate.
General Note:
Microfilm produced before 1988 may be substandard.
General Note:
Latest issue consulted: Feb. 28, 2005.

Record Information

Source Institution:
University of Florida
Holding Location:
University of Florida
Rights Management:
Copyright Advocate Co.. Permission granted to University of Florida to digitize and display this item for non-profit research and educational purposes. Any reuse of this item in excess of fair use or other copyright exemptions requires permission of the copyright holder.
Resource Identifier:
17931718 ( OCLC )
sn 88063345 ( LCCN )
Classification:
Newspaper ( lcc )

Related Items

Preceded by:
Advocate-news (Bridgetown, Barbados)

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Havrbadvos



ESTABLISHED 1895



“Collaborators Will
Egypt’s Underground

Movement Warns

Seven Egyptian Policemen |

Evicted From Canal Zone

CAIRO, Nov. 1.
The Egyptian Padorerenns Movement announced that,

hereafter, ahy person helping to supply British troops, will
be lashed in the Publie Square and branded on the face with
fire. The w: came in a leaflet distributed by “Liber-

ation” battalions in the Suez Canal zone.



‘rom All Quarters:



Police Fire

On Rioters
IN CASABLANCA

CASABLANCA, Nov. 1.
The police opened fire on a

The let said that effective from today all “collaborators” |mob of Moroccans attempting to
who. sell or transport supplies to the British Garrison will |"8!t the voting for tne Consulta-

FRIDA







| Churchill [50-50 Chance
'Has A Plan | Fer Cease-Fire










LONDON, Nov, 1.

Prime Minister Winston
Churehill, presented to the Cab-
inet the broad outlines of his
plan to restore Britain to major
power status in the world. Top
priority will be given to. British
development of Atomic energy
and guided missiles. Churchill
long smarted from the fact that
both the United -States and
Russia have outraced Britain,
which contributed the major por-
tion of the basic facts on the
atomie bomb,

Churchill’s Cabinet met for the
second time this week at No. It
Downing Street. Around the tabk

=

By HARRY FER N
NEW YORK, Nov. 1,

The belief is growing
off the battlefield that th
there’s at least a 50-50 chae
et a cease-fire in Kores.â„¢
incident that nobody can fe
could change the while pie
overnight, but if is - pasonably

certain that neither side is

to try to create such an incident.
In other words, the mental
climate is ready for an armistice.
That attitude is reflected in Tokyo,
Washington and Peiping, State-
ments from all sources have taken
2 a more moderate and reason.
ible tone as though all persovis
were holding their breath for fear



be rounded uj
It said that

mark of treachery
The In

Batt

by the Underground and punished publicly.
branding by fire will serve as a “lifelong

Ministry said two days ago that the “Liberation
are determined to force the British ou

t of Egypt

and the Sudan. pond that they were able to obtain arms

on the black
“EYE
In another secret leaflet

un
“ey
paper

ma’ .

FOR EYE, TOOTH FOR TOOTH”
scattered through the Canal zone,
oe forces threatened to meet British troops on an
e As zi for tooth” basis, according to the news-

Meantime, the British seized policemen on the Cairo-
Ismailia road near Tel-el-Kebir, on the complaint that they

| Were preventing Egyptian workers from reaching British
camps. The British troops also ejected El Sami Abdu El
Shami, chief of the Seamen’s Union, trom the Canal Zone,
for allegedly inciting dock workers to boycott British ship-
ping, in line with passive resistance campaign.
According to Press reports, Russian diplomats are confer-
ring with all Arab states on the West's plan for the Middle
East Defence Pact against Communism. Al Misri reported
from Beirut, Lebanon, that diplomatic quarters expect
Moscow to say that particpiation in such a pact would re-
present a hostile act toward the Soviet Union.

‘ “DRASTIC ACTION”

The Egyptian Government today warned the British raili-



tary authorities that they would take “drastic action”. if

British troops do not end their ‘aggressive attitude”
towards Egyptian police in the Canal Zone.

Policemen at Fayid in the
the Governor of the Zone,

Canal Zone today protested to
Abdel Hady Ghaz Aly Bey, and

to the Minister of the Interior against the eviction of their

Chief Officer,

Captain Lufti E. Kholy by the British.

Workers at E] Abiad, the Royal Air Force camp walked

out today, in protest at the

o";7

Sir Harold Briggs
Has Greater Powers

IN THE EAST

SINGAPORE, Nov. 1.
Director Lieut, Gen-
eral Sir Harold Bs was given
almost dictatorial powers on
Thursday as the three-year-old
war against Communist terrorists
entered its third phase.

The official announcement said:
“Full executive authority in all
emergency matters falling within
the sphere of the Federal Govern-
ment has been delegated to the
Director of Operations, subject
only to the overriding authority
of the High Commissioner.

“From July 1948 to April 1951
the campaign against the jungle
terrorists has been directly un-
der the command of the Civil
Government Federation.

An anti-bandit drive gained
new momentum with the appoint-
ment of Briggs as Director of Op-
erations in April, 1950. Then it
was stated specifically that Briggs
was not Supreme Commander,
but his duty was to plan, co-
ordinate and generally direct all
anti-bandit operations. He is re-
sponsible only to the High Com-
missioner with the right to make
representations direct to him on
all matters concerning the con-
duct of the campaign.—vU.P.

TURKISH GENERAL
TRANSFERRED

NEW YORK, Nov. 1.
Tahsin Yazici, Commander of
the Turkish Forces in Korea, has
been recalled for an appointment
to another important post, ‘The
announcement said he will be
succeeded in Korea by General
Namik Argue who is to leave for

his new post on November 7.

—U-P.

Labour Has Majority
In Dominica. Elections
The DO! ICA, Nov. 1,





ford and Winston were

arrest.



;nists and accused the police of
| negligenee today by permitting

is results are five|demonstrate, protected by armed
for Lal of eight, Shilling-} Communists. He said that Russia |
ul | ‘was standing by “with open mouth |

They left for Ismailia.
—UP.

Dock Strike
_ Continues

NEW YORK, Nov. 1.
An attempt to mediate the 18-
day-old unauthorized dock-strike
failed, and authorities took steps
to force the rebel AFL longshore-
men back to work. A 12-hour
fe ce between Joseph P.
Ryan,’ President of the Interna-
tional Longshoremen's Association
(AFL), and John Sampson, the
leader of 20,000 insurgent steve-
dores, ended at 4.30 asm. with

neither willing to compromise

But an hour after the parley
with the State mediators ended,
the French Lines luxury liner

| Liberte docked and not one rebel

picket was in sight as “Joyal” |
union sievedores began unloading;
vperations. City policemen stood
guard in a downpour as the big
liner dropped anchor, and more
than 200 of Ryan’s followers start-
ed handling the cargo.U.P.

“Tudeh” Building
Up In Persia |

TEHERAN, Nov. 1. |
The Iranian Police Chief, Gen.
Manzur Mozayeni, asked the!
Shah for more power to fight the|
“critical” Communist threat in
Tran. He told the Shah ina lengthy |
conference that the outlawed|
Tudeh Party was expanding its |
strength, and showed the Shah
documents uncovered by the police
which .pointed to the Reds’ in+
creased activities.

Although the situation was con-
sidered “grave”,
reports that the police had un-
eovered a Red plot to seize power.
The Rightist Deputy, Jamail En
Ami, denounced the Government's
soft attitude towards the Commu-



Teheran University students to

Both Englishmen were defeated.jto devour this country.”—U.P.



U.K. Racing To Transfer |

Mozayeni @ un |

| accused of having failed to



tive Assembly here on Thursday,
killing one person and injuring
several others. The police de-
scribed the rioters as “Nationals”
who had orders not only to boy-
cott the elections but to prevent
others from voting.

They said they opened fire on
the crowd only after they had
attacked the police with rocks,
injuring four. They said two more
Moroccans were injured.

Stockholm: Many Poles ar-
‘riving in Sweden, claiming to be
fugitives from the Iron Curtain,
have been sent back recently.
Three Polish seamen . jumped
ship at Gothenburg, and* claimed
asylum, Suspected of being spies,
they were refused refugee pass-
ports and repatriated.

Copenhagen:—A Danish man-
ufacturer has invented a thinking
slot machine capable of changing
money and giving correct change.
The machine, which is being ex-
hibited at the Industrial Fair in
Odense, operates with any figure
divisible by five. It is now
patented all over the world.

Rome:—Africa (Calabria), the
poorest Italian village, has been
destroyed by recent floods. Africa
had no road, no electricity, no
doctor, no schools, Its 800 inhabi-
tants lived in hovels, with sheep
and goats. The village was sur-
rounded by precipices, so mothers
would tie rope round their chil-
dren’s feet, to prevent them gei-
ting too near the edge. It is be-

Capetown:—A local doctor left
instructions for the destruction
of his property after his death.
The executor of his will stood by
while a £500 motor car and cara-
van worth £300 were drenched in
petrol and burnt, Inside the flam-
ing car lay his clothes, correspond-
ence and diaries,

New York:—The average length
of life is steadily increasing among
Americans, It is now believed to be
almost 68 years—an increase of
more than 20 years since 1900. The
women do best. Their life ex-
pectancy at birth is 714 years, A
man’s works out at 65 years and
11 months,

Washington:—For 52 hours a
grocer from Georgia, lost in
fwamp while out fishing, fought,
while his own strength steadily
waned, to keep his 15-year-old
son from being engulfed in a
quicksand. Twice he had to shoot
huge water mocassins (a kind of
water snake) which threatened
them, They were finally rescued,
after being spotted by a plane.

REVOLT



SONATE RY AUESAL
Rae STAT) ¥





RUSSIA faced recently,
cording to U.S, State Depart-
ment radio, what was probably
her most serious uprising in
ten years—a peasant revolt in
the Central Asian Republic of
Kazakhstan. Collective farm
peasants are alleged to have
clashed in august with
Communist M.V.D. (Security)
troops. The troops were carry-
ing out forced requisition un-
der a new Stalinist farm pol-
icy. The Kazakh peasants are

satisfy the livestock breeding
and grain production goals set
Communist

by the regime,

| stated the Voice of America

in an overseas broadcast. De-
tails of the revolt were sup-
plied by a Turkmenian nation-
al, who was in Kazakhstan at
that time.





Power To Libyan Govt.

By -{AROLD GUARD
LONDON, Nov. 1.
Britain is racing against time

to -— ywer provi-
sional Bretainent % ee be-
fore Baypt 2 ts in the United
Nations month to prevent the
creation of a new Middle Fastern
state friendly to the Western
Powers.

Official sources said that Egypt's
unilateral abrogation of the 1936
Anglo-Egyptian Treaty had given
a new urgeney to the British plans
to transfer power to Libya, and

make a treaty with its ruler
which would give Britain mili+
tary safeguards in that area

Libya, comprising Cyrenaica,
Tripolitania and The Fezzan, was
placed under British and French
administration by Article 23 of
the Italian Peace Treaty, Britain
administered Cyrenaica ruled by

the Emir Cenisus, and France United States should have any
administered The Fezzan On objections to such a treaty because
November 21, 1949, the United all have identical strategic inter-
Nations recommended that the ests in Libya.
area should become an indepen- They said that it was antici-
dent sovereign state by January pated that the Libyan question |
1952 would be brought before the
Security System United Nations. The Libyan Com-
Officials said that Britain be- missioner, Adrian Pelt, said that
lieves that independence for Egypt would seek to wreck any
United Libya should now be com- moves for British Treaty with
pleted earlier thar planned tate U.P,

and a treaty signed with the Emir

Benisus in order that the area
may be included in the North
4frican security system to halt

the spread of Communism. They
said that neither Frarce nor the

Mr. J. H, Wilkinson, Presi-
dent of the Barbados Electors’
Association and leader of the

* Op ition in the House of As-
se , is seen here addressing
the large crowd which attend-
ed the Association's meeting at
Porters Yard, St. James, last
night. Mr. Wilkinson holds his
Party's manifesto as he tells
his listeners what they propose
to do for them should they get
a majority in the House.





The Victors Are.
‘Marching Again pas seat eee

By LYLE

with Churchill was Lord Cher-| 5¢ roeking the boat,

| well, whose title as Paymastei And this week-end United
; General in the Cabinet also cov-) press war correspondent, Arnold
,ers direct responsibility for] nibble, cabled from a village of
; atomic energy. Before the meet-| panmunjom: “Standing on the
ing, Churehill also named] mudbank before the truce teat
S, S. C. Mirchell the Controller] here, you can look to the east

of Guided Missiles and Electron-

i across golden-grain fleld and see
ci

wisps of smoke rising on the ridge-
line where Americans long to be
plastering the Communists posi-
tion, It cannot be more than three
miles away.”

“Yet sources on both sides here
seem to feel that we are closer
together than we have ever been
before. There is a feeling that a

8.

With his Government nearly
|complete, Churchill's next major
; task is working out with hie
;Cabinet a legislative programme

Winston Churchill summoned
; his top expert en atom bombs to
jlive in the house next door to

WILSON







ae No. 10 Downing Street, and fol-

The meeting was held im DO low t . int. | Compromise can be worked out.
support of the candidature x 6 N LONI N, Novy, 1. jwee aa 7 ee Nobody knows exactly how that
of Mr. Wilkinson and Mr.“]‘ Churchill and Eisenhower partners in victory over Hitler, |t\5 of Guided Missiles, Churehe| 20, be done but almost everybody
EB. K. Walcott for re-election are marching — again. This time, they are out to stop jill's decisive and unexpected | {¢e!s it can be done.”
1. eee at the fortuecuing. }) (he Russians. Prime Minister, Winston Churchill will jactions “underlined the siamif |, Nothing has happened to ehangs

. aha ‘ > : ‘ : ance a rehi * , o es «

General Election. swing Britain's prestige and power behind the United Britain's ao to oo Bs sides: For exaumple troops never

They have been the parish's Europe idea to back up General Eisenhower's defence plans. | with either the United States or|c&" be withdrawn to the 38th
representatives for some years. The British Socialists balked at that. The great man of |Russia in making atom. bombs.| Palle! as the Communists have

A report of the meeting will British polities started that ball rolling at Strasbourg,|The best information is thai} been demanding, ‘The simple
appear in a later issue. France, in 1950, with Juti d mh ‘) | Britain has not made a single} "eason for that is that terrain

; , a resolution adopted by the Council along’ the 38th Parallel is not a



of Europe in a session there.

Churchill called it the “House
of Europe” like his House of Com-
mons. Through it, Churchill sought
to co-ordinate the whole life and

Dean Acheson |








bomb yet, although she has the
scientific knowledge to make one,
UP.



1good defensive position, For the
; Communists, any truce formula
must allow them to save their face
They never want to be put in the
position of being forced to admit

Is Hopeful Of
World Peace

PARIS, Nov, 1.
Secretary of State, Dean Ache-|_





son, arrived for the sixth session Election here, rejected the coal Princess Elizabeth and Prince
of the General Assembly and “ bl 1 plan, because other par-|Philip played hosts to President
declared, “I believe, we Governments. were not}Truman at.a State dinner Thurs-
able im peace.t «Ac! ni ay night. after meeting and
headed the United States ga- British Conservative posi- [charming 1,514 selected guests
tion which arrived by train for tion is that a European organiza-|from Supreme Court Justices to

Le Havre for the assembly
session seheduled to open next

Tuesday, j

The United States Ambassador
to the United Nations, Warren
Austin, said that if the Korean
truce could be worked out at the
session, many problems threaten-

ing tae World sould be solved. He ment level. France, Italy. Bel-|Mount Vernon and the Tomb — of
said that Aches would deliver gium, the Netherlands, Luxem- | ‘he ‘Unknown Soldier in Arlington
a “very important speech” while WINSTON CHURCHILL bourg, and Western Germany, | National Cemetery.

at Paris, but did not say on what
subject.

—

Austin compared the present
session with the last Paris-United
Nations meeting in 1948 “under
the shadow of the Berlin block-
ade and the imminent danger of
conflict created by that blockade.
Here in Paris, we began a chain |
of events that led to the solution |
of that problem. I look forward
to a similar progress at this
Assembly. An agreement on a
truce in Korea would be a signifi-
cant step that could lead to the

peaceful solution of many issues.” abouts, He said the British would
contribute their share, There is
Acheson meets on Sunday with | some Conservative hedging on : .
the French Foreign Minister, | that now, “Empty thy full glass; fill thy empty glass—

Robert Schuman, and later with
Britain’s new Foreign Secretary,
Anthony Eden, to work out a
united Big Three front. American
delegation members said that the
three Foreign Ministers probably
would meet jointly for the first
time, on Monday.

Acheson spiked the reports of | GEN. EISENHOWER

the Big Three meeting being a}
possible prelude to a full Big Four |

























being. of Western Europe against
Communism,

The Socialists also rejected the
French Foreign Minister, Robert
Schuman’s Plan for a European
steel and coal community.
Churchill will change all of that.
The Socialist Government, which
lost last week’s British General

that they were defeated on the
battlefield. —U.P.

Royal ‘Couple
Play Hosts

To Truman




ARTIE’S HEADLINE

WASHINGTON, Nov. }.

tion relating to coal and steel can-

Boy Scouts at the swank British
not be wholly effective if the

Embassy reception The dinner,

greatest coal and steel producer in ,;¢iven in honour of the President
the Eastern Hemisphere is on the}and his family at the Canadian
outside, Embassy, rounded out a heetic day

The coal and steel organization{ cf activity whieh also saw. the
was designed to create a single | Royal couple lay wreaths at two

market, prevent restrictive prac-

of the U.S. most revered shrines
tices, and maintain a high employ-

~George Washington's Tomb at

already have
functioning,
Churchill’s Idea
Churchill's idea was that the
Council of Europe should be the
basic factor in European defence
and economic life. Before the
Council, and in Parliament, he
urged that German rearmament
was sufficient to enable Western
Germany to aid in its own defence.
The Socialists sharnly objected,
but finally agréed. lie keystone
of Churchill's policy toward Eu-
rope was defence. He wanted an
army of 70 Divisions or there- Wi

the organization Britain's future Queen and her
debonair Duke were on the go al-
nost every minute from 10 a.m.
m». They attended a private re-
seption for British Commonwealth
liplomats, lunched with President |
Truman and family at Blair
House, greeted several hundred
British subjects on the lawn of the
British Embassy and finally shook
hands with a long line of high offi-
cials and their wives who re-
ceived gold crested invitations to
the formal reception.
UP.



The “ADVOCATE”
pays for NEWS.
Dial 3113

Day or Night







Britain is already contributing
Divisions to Eisenhower's Atlantic
Pact Army, But it is unlikely that
the British will merge their groups
with French. Gerrnan, and other
soldiers to form European Army
Divisions. They could and proba-

! can't bear to see thy glass neither empty

nor full.” — RABELAIS.

bly will offer strong air support L N Jays when gentlernen of the type of Rabelais thought ‘
a> de all mere ot anne nothing of consuming two or more bottles of fine port
the French and Cermans together during their after-dinner relaxation period, their trend of f

in a friendly and mutual endeav- thought was effectively put into words by the extravagant

; 4 ‘
conference with Russia, saying ua | ; , a ; : ; ; Aaciticy “SaRaie
i E 1 ; § Carey's the 18th Century, whic ‘
Ms te 7d ie THUNDER Ji S, Frenchmen saw Churchill’s plan a song of Carey's in the f
ee ae ee ee : in the same light. The Frencl 8:
—UP. MIGS HA VE Government supported it so active-
? ly that it is known now of the “Bacchus must now his power resign—
* 7 iv Pleven Plan—after Rene Pleven ES
Truman Will Have A SCRAMBLE the French Premier. 1 am the only God of Wine!
. wie In Bonn, Germany, representa-
Talk With “Ike | |tives of the Continental Power: asi ine «

5TH AIR FORCE H.Q., Korea,
ov. 1,

_. WASHINGTON, Nov. |.
The White House announced;
that Gen. Dwight Eisenhower will!bled with 40 “reluctant”



Eight F.84 Thunder jets seram-
MIGs

fly from his French headquarters |over Sinanju in Northwest Korea

tomorrow night
on Western European military 10-minute battle.
problems. Gen, Eisenhower will
meet with the President and other
officials here on Monday and
Tuesday, and wili fly back to Paris
Tuesday night or Wednesday
morning.—U.P.

Princess Elizabeth

na

Communist intercepters

action.—U.P.



(From Our Own Correspondent)
GEORGETOWN, Nov. 1.

name.

Cee eeseee te reece



British Red Crosse Society of London.

The British Ked Cross Society also sent a message of good wishes
for its success, The home was made possible chiefly from a colony~-
wide collection taken to present the Princess with a wedding gift.
After the gift was purchased a balance of $8,992 was left and the
Princess gave permission to use this amount for some child welfare | COOKS,
object. Other money gifts were received, including $14,000 from the

for a two-duy;|today, with no damagé to either
confererice with President Truman!Communist or United States a contribution
flights were made by both the
Thunder jets and the swept-wings

MIGs during the skirmish, but the|be the prestige of Churchill him-
showed

no inclination to prolong the brief| against the Reds.

Cables B.G. Red Cross

eee ELIZABETH took time off on Wednesday to send from |ctate for Public Affairs said in a
Canada a congratulatory message to the British Guiana branch | speech
of the British Red Cross Society, expressing her delight at the | @0ut $2,000,000,000 annually on a
opening of the Children’s Convalescent Home which bears her

are at present discussing the 4°
Division Ground Army. With sup-
port and other troops a_divisior
would number about 30,000 men,
There is a shortage of man-
power and just about everythings
else in Britain. So the Britisr
is likely to be ¢
weapon of which Continenta!
| nations are very short—aeroplanes
rtant than that will

“Let Wine be earth and land and sea—
And let that Wine be all for me!”

To-day, the gentlemen of recent vintage retain the enthus-
iasm of Carey probably not his wish expressed in those last
few lines. They, however, are in full accord with the words

But more im of Rabelais : and find no deeper satisfaction than in doing it —

self, in support of a United Europe
—U.P.



THE K.W.V. WAY
The Only and

U.S. Denounces
r *
Russian Lies
WASHiNGION. Nov. 1.
The State Department Thurs-
day denounced Russia’s propa-
gand, machines for spreading
what it called hatred and “brazen

lies” about the U.S. Edward
Barrett, Assistant Secretary of

the Best.
The PILLARS

that Russia is spending



of

HEALTH INSIST

more massive propaganda machine
than Hitler or Mussolini had.”
—U.P.

2 JAMAICANS SEEK
WORK IN ENGLAND

KINGSTON, Nov, 1.

Another batch of 62 carpenters, |

mechanics and clerks}

started yesterdz by plane for
England via America to seek jot
C.P

on

K.W.V. ALWAYS















PRI ee 00

“Hearse claimed

PAGE TWO



Carib Calling

NE aspect of Revuedeville
1951, now playing at the
Empire Theatre which may have
passed unnoticed by many of the
people who saw the show is the
important role the men of the cast
played in making the show the
success it has been.

They were in more numbers
than last year and thig year they
were definitely more at home “on
stage.” Cedric Phillips was his
usual tireless self, pianist, dancer,
singer and in the B.G. sequence
with “Oscar” — a comedian.
Leonard Banfield too showed us
he can fall into any role and was
every bit aS graceful ag Doreen
Gibbs and Gloria Ramsay in the
Waltz number.

Another fine effort on the part
of the men was that of the Glee
Singers —- Horace Cumberbatch,
Hugh “Cortez” Jordan, Neville
Phillips and Keith Hall. Their
harmonising was very effective and
reflects great credit to Horac>
Cumberba'ich who arranged this
number,

Noel Clarke, Samuel Isaacs,
Clarrie Layne and Bernard Per-
kins, other members of the men’s
cast each did his bit to improve
production.

Joseph Tudor of cour’e is i.. ?
class by himself. As “Oscar” the
mason and guide he surpassed his
performance as the postman in
last year’s show. His entry on
stage—even before he said any-
thing always raised a “bubble” of
faughter from the audience.

He never felt for a liné.and in
fact gave the impression that he
had not memorised the script and
was making up his cracks as he
went along. He was also an able
manager and gave a great deal of
assistance ‘o Mrs, Stuart who of
courve was the producer,

The fincl performances take
place today, matinee at 5 p.m. and
tonight at 8.30.

Sister

ISS JEANNE SELLIER was

among the passengers leaving
for Puerto Rico yesterday morning
by B.W.LA. From there she will
fly P.A.A, to the U.S. where she
is a nurse at the Roosevelt
Hospital, New York.

She had been in Barbados on a
short visit, staying at the Hotel
Royal. Miss Sellier is a sister of
Fr. Joseph Sellier S.J., of St.
Patrick’s Church, Jemmotts Lane,

Today Fr. Sellier flies to B.Ge
by B.W.1A. on a visit. He is going
to the Catholic Hospital, George-
town for health reasons.

Barbados Wins

‘HE three tornadoes “Cyclone,”
Edril and Vamoose’ are due
to return to Barbados on Novem-
ber 6, by the Willemstad along
with their crews Peter Ince,
Gerald Nicholls, Ivan Perkins and
Teddy, Len and Jackie Hoad,
Barbados won the series against
Trinidad and they will be bring-

Come
ing home both the Bryden and jitterbugs, a good time is guaran- Nassau, Bahamas,

de Lima Cups.

‘PICK-UP GIRL’
“TO MARRY



Up Girk” fo marry aatey ndher' Satin
Freeman Turner, ls

An Honour
INE woctors sign the bulletin
about the King’s _ illness,

It is not the first time so many
have been called into conference
about the King’s health. Two and
a half years ago, nine signed the
Statement after an operation to
improve the blood supply to the
King’s right foot.

These doctors receive no pay-
ment from the King; members of
the medical household are un-
paid, The appointments are an
honour of great value to them,

The other five consultants
receive payment, But they send
no bills to the King.

Two of the doctors are radiolo.
gists: Dr. G, M. Cordiner and Dr.
Peter Kerley, Dr. Kerley, director
of the radiological department
at Westminster Hospital, was
called in by Dr, Cordiner, He was
present when the King visited
Dr. Cordiner’s consulting rooms
in Wimpole Street to be X-rayed
earlier this month.

Fireworks Dance

BS prec ne 3 holders are reminded
of the GUY FAWKES DANCE
which is being held at the Strath-
clyde Tennis Club on !Saturday
8rd November at 9.00 p.m. There
will be .side attractions and a
Fireworks Display at 10.00 p.m.
also a well stocked bar. Dancing
will be at the Club and also at
the residence of Mr. C. C. Park-
inson across the way. .
in your dungarees and

teed for all,



BY THE

O insufferaby accurate is the
Beachcomber poll proving,
The recent discovery of yet
another law of statistics, by
which it is possible to forecast a
vote by doubling the number of
letters in the voter’s name has
led to some confusion. Many
people included their initials in
the total, and thus spoiled the
whole thing. Tomorrow’s poll
will forecast, by the same infalli-
ble method, the results of the
election after this one.

A remarkable degree

of accuracy

ODAY the Beachcomber poll

shows..a_ definite forward
tre 1d in percentages. Out of 11,948
people questioned 368 gave the
same answers as on the previous
day, thus establishing a mea
constant of 26 in 811, taking into
account the fallover due to irdiyi-
dual variations. From the figures
it is possible*to conclude that votes
transferred m the Tories to the
Socialists Will reduce -he gross
total of Tory votes, and vite versa.
Taking 127 as the index figure,
we get a proportion of 16 to 29,
which, added together, gives us
45; the exact figure revealed by
the new Renton application of the
double.cube law!

Aftermath
UESTIONED about the pea.
pushing fiasco, Evans the

insufficient food
as a cause of his inability to
control the pea. The Mayor inter-
vened to Say: “You must have
eaten enough mud to last you a
lifetime.” Meanwhile it is clear
that nasal pea-pushing is a ‘ine-
weather sport. A well-known
physician said: “The human nose
is not made for shoving a small
object like a pea through a sea
of mud and slush.” Reg Bodger
said: “My pea got stuck in some
wet gravel on the track, and it
was more than my nostrils could
stand.” A Mrs. Gulpe commented:
“The grunts were dreadful, It was
like watching two clumsy animals
trying to thrust their noses through
an impenetrable wall of sodden
treacle.”



WAY...

The suet touch

HARLIE SUET’S style of
election oraitey” is proving
a great success. owing that
his audiences will cheer certain
phrases, he relies almost entirely
on those phrases, not bothering
to make a connected speech or to
fill in the bits between the bouts
of cheering. His speech yesterday

seemed to go like this:—
a: ee warmongers
(cheers). .. . Free Health -
vice (cheers). . . Fascists (cheers)

... Palmerston. . . gun-boat diplo-
macy (cheers). . Fair shares
(cheers) eae od hysteria
(cheers). . . Happier, more pros-

perous than ever before (cheers).
... Prestige abroad never higher
(cheers). . . Cool, level heads in
command (cheers).

Surprised

*y AM surprised and chagrined
that in the course of pouring
out their torrents of meaningless
drivel, the candidates are not being
subjected to the most tiresome
form of interruption. -
This consists in uttering, with
dismal monotony, and in a very
loud voice, one or two completely
irrelevant words. For instance, an

Hot Shirts, Hot Skirts
HAT with all those Hot
Skirts and Hot Shirts, tinted

by Kgjth Campbell’s Society
Quintet. The First Hot Shirt,
Hot Skirt Dance, to be stxged by
the Management of the Get-
together Club at the Goodwill
League on Saturday night,
November 3, surely promises te
be a success,

Judging takes place at mid-

night and the couple in the pret~- Theatre

tiest shirt and skirt will receive
attractive prizes.
B.G. Civil Servant
EAVING today by B.W.1LA. for
4 British Guiana is Miss Dosia
Chase, B.G. Civil servant who
has been holidaying in Barbados.
This is her first visit here and
she has had a wonderful holiday.
During her stay she has been
the guest of Miss Ercil Osbourne
cf Tudor Street.
Back To St. Vincent
M* ALBERT REECE, pro-
prietor of “Fountain House”.
Estate in St. Vincent, returned to
St. Vincent yesterday by B.G.
Airways.
Mr. Reece is a brother of Mr.
Sydney Reece of Navy G
«nd Mrs W. E. Dash of Enterprisa
Road, Christ Church.

Caribbean Revelry

meee tte A et cae Ne ee neem

BARBADOS ADVOCATE












B.B.C.’ Radio || ONLY A FEW DAYS OLD!

Programme j- DAILY TELEGRAPH

on sale at

ADVOCATE STATION










a.m. Listeners’ Choice,
News, 12.10 p.m News Analysis
1—7. 16 p.m 132M. #43 M







4 p.m. The News, 4.10 The Daily Ser-
vice; 4.15 p.m. Educating Arehie, 4.46
p.m. Music Magazine, 5 p.m. Composer
of the Week, 5.15 p.m. Listeners’ Choice,
6 p.m. Merchant Navy Programme, 6.15
»m. Carroll Levis and his
8.45 p.m. Programme Parade, 6.55 p.m.
Tod:.s Sport, 7 p.m. The News, 7.10
News Analysis.




JANETTA DRESS

LOWER BROAD STREET





7 15—10 50 p.m, 46.43 M. ¥,
7,15 West Indian Diary, 745 D

DRESSES of every kind

Ready-made and made-to-Order.
Also—BRASSIERES—White and Pink.

SIZES 38 and 40—-with Waistband and without
Waistband

From $3.00 to $5.44.
SRE GEO OOO FOE

PLAZA Wit",
TO-DAY "3,3. 3.2.»

Virginia



8.15 p.m,
Newsreel, 8.30 p.m. World Affairs.
p.m. Composer of the Week, 9 p.m.
Uogiish Magazine, 9.30 p.m. M
sritannica, 10 pum. The News, 10.10 p.m.
From the itorials, 10.15 p.m. The
Debate Continues, 10.30 p.m. From
Third Programme, 10.50 p.m. Interlude.
©.B.C. PROGRAMME
FRIDAY, NOVEMBER 2, 1951
10.05—-10.2% p.m. Ni
10 20—10.35 p.m.
1172 Mes, 2% 60

BETTING ON LOVE
NEW YORK BOOKIES are busy
laying the odds on romance. They
will bet ten to one — very few












Coming Friday %h }

“Tartzan’s Peril’ il

Lex Barker and
Cheta



Coming
JOAN CRAWFORD

in
“Goodbye My Fancy’
—_







& Continuing Dgily 4.45 & 8
Daris Got me



takers — that Frank Sinatra will CAGNEY MAYO DAY ce os Gene
marry Ava Gardner before New “WEST POINT STORY en
Year's Eve 1952. It’s 35—1 against Also_the Color Short! ROYAL | pU

that Billy Rose will remarry 2 CK sHooT





Pp m 2 New estern Features
‘HAUNTED TRAILS”
WHIP WILSON

GALETY

rm e : Ss ir a
“HIDDEN DANGER”
JOHNNY MACK BROWN

PLAZA oui si

within the same period.

It was 30—1 against a recon-
ciliation between Elizabeth Taylor
and Nicky Hilton—until they went
for some car drives togetner in

&

HOSE who saw Caribbean Connecticut. Promptly the odds|{} To-day To sun. 5 and 8.30 p.m TUE GARDEN — ST. JAMES

Revelry last year will no’ Shortened to 10—1. f “FIGHTING FATHER DUNNE” To-day To Sun. 8.30 p.m.
doubt be looking forward te Said a bookie: “These things are Pat O'BRIEN & Mat. Sun. 6 p.m :
another show this year but Carib ™ore popular than sport these “DEADLINE AT DAWN” John GAPPIELD Par EAL, &

was told that owing to certain
circumstances a show will not be
given until next year.

Miss Judy Graham and her
Bridgetown Yheatrical Grovp are
however planning to celebrate
‘tthe anniversary of this show with
an “Anniversary Hop” at the
Modern High School on Saturday
night, December 1, the procceds of
which will go to finance another
show next year.

This “Hop” promises to be lots
of fun with “hot” shirts, gay
frocks and jeans.

Film Show
7T°HROUGH the courtesy of the

British Council Representative
the following films will be shown
vat the monthly reunion of the
Combermere School Old Boys’
Association, tonight at 8 o'clock.

British News.

How Fibre is Spun.

Looking through glass.

Thames’ Tideway.

There will be the usual gamer
after the film show and all Old
Boys interested in Football are
asked to make a special effort to
attend.

Elegy
‘HE Curfew tol's the knell of
parting day, .
(And O, how welcome = soinc
departures are!)
When Attlee, piping down, gets
on his way,
And we again light Churchill's
big cigar.
Incidental Intelligence
S to this case. . . if ever there
was a clearer case of lottery
than this case, then this case is
that case.—Magistrate’s ruling in

—L.E.S.



By BEACHCOMBER

unflagging repetition of “What

about Mrs. Toplady?” will always
end by disturbing and annoying the
speaker. “Who is Mrs. Toplady?
he will whisper to his chairman. ,
The chairman will not be able to

return. 15 Ee: :
help him. v N.B.—Our Night Shows Over 10 0’
r again, a reiterated cry of J. Autogrann tan ight Shows Over 10 o’clock.
. D ostricis

MOVIETIME....

sardonically and tauntingly, and
goes on repeating the question
every time the speaker gets into
his stride.

Cause and effect

pre who complain that too
often in ballet, there appears

to be no adequate reason for the | 4

movements’ of the dancers will
probably change their opinion
when they have seen a ballet of
which I have been reading an
account. The central
“the stinging of a young man by
a bee.” If that’s not an adequate
reason for movement you_ may
call me Carter Patterson, [ hope

the bee used is a real one, and not |"

a cardboard one on a wire, IT
am at work myself on a more
subtle ballet, giving scope for
queerer movements. It is about
a man who sits on an ant-heap,



| Rupert and the



Before settling to sleep Rollo tells
Rupert what he has heard. * We're
in an awful yam," he sighs. “|
heard tha skipper say that they
wouldn't keep us after they had
reached a piace called the Lion
Rock and. . -"* But Rupert has

Lion Rock—19





roused himself with a jerk
Rock?" he
they are!
ts the admiral’s handyman.”
stares.
he demands,
covered something >

gasps. ‘' So that’s who
1 one which of them
Rollo
“What do you mean?”
“Have you dis-
Do tell me."



theme is]

HORROCKSES FABRICS

STRIPED COTTON CAMBRIC_.--—~—~—---------—$1.31

COLOURED COTTON GINGHAM__---~~---_~~-—$1.47

WHITE & DYED COTTON LINENETTE_____.._._S$1.50

PRINTED COTTON CAMBRIC_-~~.._.._._-_-__$L.54

PRINTED COTTON FURNISHING_--..___....—$L.98
ALSO

FLOWERED CREPE... sibelccihbtiapas deioas oh alee _._ $2.20

T.R. EVANS & WHITFIELDS

YOUR SHOE STORES
; Dial 4220

Dial 4606 20: 203 20:

“What happened to the fish?” wiil, ‘
often throw a_ speaker off his
balance. “What fish?” he will ask.
The interrupter then laughs

|

}

|

days, They aren’t ‘fixed’ like the
sports events.”

Susan HAYWOOD “THIS SIDE OF THE LAW”

Vevica LINDFORS--Kent SMITH
On neh aw



a sites a fo P.m Midnite Sat
“Shadow on “Gun Town" Midn. Ss.
SHOESHINE GIFTS Beacon Hill Kirby Grant & 2 ACTION ‘SPxtLALS!
IT is to be an escapist Christ- Roddy McDowall “Bad Man of “RANGER OF CHEROKEE STRIP”
mas for the tots. Out go the toy ; and ; Red Butte f Monte HALE &
soldieréy tanks, and atom weap- Night Has Byes Johnny Mack SAVAJO TRAIL RAIDERS"
’ ) 5 P James Mason Brown Allan “Rocky” LANE

ons, Instead, the toy trade is con-
centrating on such old favourites
as Red Indians, and bringing in
useful gadgéts, such as shoeshine
sets for boys and manicure outfits |
for girls.

CAREER GUIDE

THEY TRIED an experiment
at the high school in Shaker
Heights, a suburb of Cleveland,
Ohio.

The boys were given a course
on the real facts about the life
they would lead in the various
services when they were called
up. As a result 35 per cent. now
want to join the army, compared’
with 11 per cent. before the course
began, and while 45 per cent.
originally would have chosen the
navy, the post-course figure is
down to 21 per cent.







GLOBE



Across
ancient ity follows
the return bis, (8)

1, Ve on an

& Pai) behind in a vie parish, (7)
&. Pasten op. av 4 Seif. (4)
u tt med 613)
Lowest pot na (6)

mtiog. 1)
ae by accident or design
‘

Prepare the overhead. (4)

OW Mvlore start, (3)
Rea di! I
Cnamper 14)

20. Young Paeara op

ence » the Upper

Oreseot day

es 3 ee



for example (4)
Welcomes by a K.C 1B)
Once more a pare ul 3, (5)
Surprised te find Had healed by
one
By which Diva cut through

3
4
5
(5 4»

© (7)
Z Derange for a change, (7) y
3

6

8










Acted. (3) 10 Grated «7»
A mere prince in Arabia (5)
May be an tavoice. (4)

Baby measure (3)

Solution o1 veperany & Duzrie.— Across:
oF OM!

4

aetsynate ? ant S Home: 11,
be Hed. be ram: 16. Inane;
17 Got 1B. Alter, iY Can, 21. Stoop ?
2 Eh + 4 dne. 24 [onst. 25,
are eee A é areas &chinate. 5,
OUs Ltracte: -
m Niaering 10 fin bis

im» Opal, 13,
(8 Menace: 20, Army’ sn” rey

YOUR SILVER
NEEDS THE GENTLE



2.30m4.45 & 3.30 p.m.
|& Continuing. Daily 4.45 & 8.30 p.m.
| Also the Color Short :—
*ROVAL DUCK



SHOOT”,



FRIDAY, NOVEMBER 2, 1951





EMPIRE



REVUEDEVILLE 1951

TO-DAY 5 p.m. and 8,30 p.m.

NOW FOR THE FINEST SHOW OF
THE YEAR.

Box & Orchestra $1.50,
Balcony 72c.

House $1.00
Reserved.





Opening TO-MORROW, 3RD NOVEMBER, 4.45 and 8.30
and Continuing Daily

cK

LORETTA

YOUNG

JOSEPH



fe
BASIL RUYSDAEL Produced
cannery SALE "gt JULIAN BLAUSTEIN



ROYAL

TO-DAY Only 5 & 8.15 TOMORROW & SUNDAY
5 & 8.15



Jniversal presents . Republic Pictures presents . , .

“THE WICKED LADY” ‘* FIGHTING
Starring bs stg ARD ”

Margaret LOCKWOOD
—James MASON

ROXY

Opening TO-MORROW 4.30 and 8,15

“SADDLE
TRAMPS”~

Brian DONLEVY ‘
Forrest TUCKER



TO-DAY Only 4.30 & 8.15

Universal Double

“THE ASTONISHED

HEART”’ AND
AND
“ DESTINATION “ONE FALSE
UNKNOWN” STEP”







OLYMPIC

TO-DAY Only 4.30 and 8.15
EDWARD G. ROBINSON — JOAN BENNETT in

“SCARLET STREET”

AND

“THE MAGIC BOW”

with STEWART GRANGER



Opening TO-MORROW 4.30 and 8.15
M-G-M and 20th-C-Fox Double - - -

CHARLES BOYER — LINDA DARNELL

“THE 13th LETTER”

And The Big Technicolor Musical



“ROYAL WEDDING”

Starring: FRED ASTAIRE — JANE POWELL











BARBADOS

CO-OP COTTON
FACTORY LTD.







FRIDAY, NOVEMBER 2, 1951



Sugar Talks
In Britain

LGNDON, Oct. 25

(From Our Own Correspondent)

Talks between the Common-
wealth Sugar Producers and tie
British Government now appear
likely to start about the end of
next week or the of the
week after. The meetings of the
various sub-Committees, appoint-
ed by the Commonwealth Pro-
ducers, to solve the several “in-
ternal” matters are expected to
end about Thursday.

Representatives are seeking,
among other things, an increase
in price for the 1952 crop. This,
under the terms of the 1950 agree-
ment, is to be conceded, providing
the costs of production, based on
the 1950 figures, can be proved to
have risen. Commonwealth rep-
resentatives are confident that
they have figures to prove an in-
erease in the price'is necessary.

The West Indies delegates have
drawn up a document which they
are asking other Commonwealth
representatives to-approve as the
final draft of the agreement to be
presented to the British Govern-
ment. It is believed that this doc-
ument apart from a slight altera-
tion requested by Australia, has
been accepted, with very few
changes, by the other representa-
tives,

West Indies May Refuse

It is also understood that the
West Indies may not accept the
British Government’s offer to pur-
chase all the Commonwealth sugar
until the end of 1953. The reason
is that Canada is anxious to re-
sume purchasing direct from the
West Indies, and the tie-up with
Britain for another year would
cause a
particular direetion. This could
seriously prejudice the future of
the Canada-West Indies trade re-
lations, and possibly result in the
loss of a preference market in
Canada to the. British Caribbean
colonies,



Russia Warns
Arab States

CAIRO, Egypt, Oct. 31.
Russia has told the Arab Gov-
ernments she will consider it
unfriendly and even a hostile act
if they join the Western Powers

Middle East Defence Command,
diplomatic circles here revealed
today.

Russian legations in Arab capi-
tals are reported to be watching
with great interest the attitude of

Arab states, particularly Syria,
Lebanon and Iraq, towards the
Four Power proposals.—C.P.



B.G. Skittle Out
Combined Indians

(From Our Own Correspondent)
GEORGETOWN, Nov. 1,

Three wickets for 0 runs, a
brilliant fighting crisis-stand of
93 runs for the fourth wicket by
Sonny Moonsawmy 61, and See-
persaud 34, then another collapse
of seven wickets for 21 runs were
written at» Bourdavteday in ~ a
“cricket drama,”” when the Com-
bined Trinidad and Surinam East
Indians in a_ pitiable display
scraped together 114 runs against
the B.G. Colony side.

At close of play B.G. was al-
ready 51 runs to the good with six
wickets standing and with Leslie
Wight, 82 not out heading for his
third straight century in Inter.
colonial cricket. .

The Combined Indians innings
of 114 runs lasted 155 minutes and
the British Guiana made their
165 for four—Camacho being out
off the last ball of the day for 44—
in 135 minutes.

The match continues Friday.
COMBINED EAST TNDIANS Ist Innings
Asgarali c Jordan (Wkpr.) b Rodney 0
Wailoo e Jordan (Wkpr) b Camacho 0
Mohammed c Camacho b Rodney 0
Moonsawmy ¢ Camacho b Patoir 61
Seepersaud c Leslie Wight b Norman

Wignt
sau ec



ores ee hea
Pe Dyer b Norman Wight 7
Bahadur not out Ene ook «a.
Senkar b Patoir $ ‘ 1
Bacchus ¢ Jackman b Norman Wight 1
Jackbir b Norman Wight 0
Alli ec Dyer b Norman Wight



0
Total

Fall of Wickets: 1 for 0, 2 for 0,
3 for 0, 4 for 93, 5 for Wi, 6 for 106,
° for 1098, 8 for 112, 9 for Lid.

BOWLING ANALYSIS

M R Ww
Rodney 7 5 6 2
Camacho 8 3 20 1
EPG OAN ohne aedeas 2 0 9 0
Patoir seebsees 17 3 43 2
N. Wight . 122 4 23 5
Allen views 4 0 13 0
B.G. Ist Innings
L. Wight not out te 82
Gibbs c Asgarali b Jackbir . 0
Thomas b Alli ., : . 30
Jackman Ibw b Alli ... 9
Camacho stpd, Sankar b Alli 44
Total ( for 4 Wickets) .... 165
ROWLING ANALYSIS
oO M R Ww
Asgarali 7 1 ig oO
Jackbir 16 i 46 1
Alii . i8 0 78 %
Bahadur i o a2 0

—_-

further hold up in this !

/ operates.





OBO
WOULD MIS
FOR MICHAEL

oS DIN'





BARBADOS ADVOCATE





King’s Awards
(From Our Own Correspondent)

GEORGETOWN, Oct. 25.

Hon. Vincent Roth, J.P. receiv-
ed the O.B.E. insignia, Mr. H. N.
Critchlow, the O.B.E. also and
Mr. Sheik Shakoor the M.B.E., at
the opening of the Legislative
Council on Friday last week.

Making the presentations, the
Governor, Sir Charles Woolley
told Mr. Roth that “apart from
your seryices as a Member of the

slate Council and of several
publie es and Committees, you
have devoted yourself unsparingly
to cultural activities. You have
been the author or editor of severai
valuable books on British Guiana
and have taken the keenest inter-
est in the Amerindian community
and the development of the Interior
of which you have intimate know-
edge.

To Mr, Critchlow, the Governor
said. . . “You were the founder
of the first trade union in British
Guiana, the. British Guiana Labour
Union, and one of the founders of
the Caribbean Labour Conference.
You have contributed greatly io
the enactment of social welfare
legislation and improvement in
conditions of employment, You are
hele in high esteem by all sec-
tions of the community as a man
of charaeter, honesty of purpose
and balance, I warmly congratu-
late you on receiving this recog-
nition of your long and meritorious
services to promote the welfare
of the working classes in the
Colony.”

To Mr. Shakoor (General See-
retary of the Man Power Citizens’
Association), the Governor said
“The award has been conferred
on you in recognition of your
valuable services to the Trade
Union Movement in British Guiana
and to Labour welfare to which
you have ‘devoted yourself un-
sparingly for many years.”

Mr. Roth was sponsored by Hon.
C. V. Wight, C.B.E, and Hon. D. J,
Parkinson, O.B.E., Mr. Critehlow
by Sir Eustace Woolford; K.C.,
O.B.E., and Hon, G. A. C, Farnum,
Q,B.E., and Mr, Shakoor by Hon.
Dr. J. B. Singh, O.B.E., and Mr.
J. I. deAguiar, C.B.E.



6 Caribbean Oil
Companies To
Form Merger

To meet the administrative re-
quirements in the Caribbean area
resulting from rapidly .,growing
demand for petroleum products,
Standard Oil Comp: rier:
Jersey) today annourtesd
for reorganizing the ions of
six wholly owned into

one company with headquarters
at Havana.

The ie of the present Esso
Standard "Oil (Central America)
S.A. will be changed to Esso
Standard Qij) S,,and this com-
pany will acquire the business
and assets of these five affiliates:
Esso Standard Oil (Antilles) S.A.
Esso Standard Oil (Carribean)
S.A.; Esso Standard Oil Company
(Cuba); Esso Standard Oil Com-
pany'Puerto Rico), and Standard
Oil (Canal Zone) Company.

President of the new n,
will be Fred H. Billups, now
Western Hemisphére Marketing
Advisor for Jersey Standard.
Henry P. Blackeby, Assistant
Comptrolier of Jersey Standard,
will be Chairman of the Board.

“It is expected that this re-
organization will result in im-
proved operations and services
fin the Caribbean area,” Jersey
Standard said.

Besides its international office
at Havana, Esso Standard Oil
S.A. will continue principal
offices in Cuba, Panama, Dom-
inican Republic, Puerto Rico and
Trinidad and the present. offices
in other countries in which Esso
Operating responsibil-
ities will be largely decentralized
to these offices, the company
said.



Good food tastes all
the better with

Colman

Mustard

Agents: T. S. GARRAWAY & CO., Bridgetown







Get Health Centre

ANOTHER MONTH and a

half’s work will complete the

Health Centre at _ Speightstown—beside the Methodist

Mansé—Mr. Joseph Connell,

Architect, said yesterday.

The Health Centre is the renovated “Arlington” which was
one of the three-storeyed houses so typical of Speightstown.
Except for the outside appearance to a certain extent, the
entire building has been changed while more rooms have

been added to it.

Carpenters and masons are still
working on the Centre but most
of the work left to be done is
painting and washing. Steady
work has been going on at the
building for over five months now,

The date of the official openiag
of the Health Centre has not yet
been fixed.

Showers of rain swamped the
Coleridge School grounds, St.
Pe.er, yesterday, preventing the
first day's play of the scheduled
two-day fixture between the
Speightstown Boys’ Club and the
Schoolboys,

The wicket was at one time
covered in spots with water while
the outfield was heavy and ery
wet,

From early during the morning,
light showers set in and with an
occasional break, they continued
during the day. Shoppers and
clerks in Speightstown could be
seen hurrying back to their homes
through the rain

School childref were robbed of
their outdoor games. The rain
kept quite a number of them at
home,

“Radios”, an old cricket club of
Speightstown, which has not been
playing recently, is making its
reappearance on the cricket field
on Saturday when they will begin
a two-day fixture with the
Speightstown Boys’ Club at
Coleridge grounds.

Representing “Radios” will be
C. Holder (Capt,.), W. Gibbons, N.
Gibbons, H. Corbin, P. Alleyne,
L. Armstrong, V. Todd, C. Hope,
N. Brathwaite, C. Walker and S.
Mings.

The match will be continued on
the following Saturday.

Inmates of the $1. Peter’s Alms-
house clapped and danced to the
rhythm of the Police Band which
held an open air concert at the
Almshouse on Tuesday night,

Adding to the live! of the
atmosphere was the large crowd
which sang the familiar songs —
calypsoes and slow hits especially
—and the little children who
“mariecoaed” all around the band.

The Police Band played for
almost two hours. It was con-
ducted by Corporal Best who chose
a well varied programme. The
Band visits the Almshouse to play
for the inmates once every month.

The Third Barbados Sea Scouts
and the Revers attached to the
troop will stage a Camp Fire at
Mortimer Hall, the residence of

Dr. A. F. Matthews at 7.30 p.m, on Post

Monday night.

Under Scout Master Victor
Matthews, the scouts and rovers
have been putting in some hours
practising songs and yells for the
camp fire.

The Rovers will be making their

first public appearance at the
Camp Fire.
SCOUT BROADCASTS

Island Commissioner of Scouts,
Major J. E. Griffith, will give
the second seout broadeast over
Rediffusion at 845 p.m. tomor-
row.

Major Griffith will talk for 15
minutes on the Scout Movement,

FIRE AT BANK HALL

The Fire Brigade was sum-
moned to a fire at Bank Hall
last night at the home of Ivan
Sealy. The house was slightly
damaged. It is insured.

When the Brigade arrived the
fire had already been put out.

1,500 Bags Of Rice Here

The Schooner Lucitie M. Smith,
74 tong net, arrived here yester-
day with 1,500 bags of rice from
British Guiana along with sup-
plies of firewood and charcoal.
Lucile M. Smith is consigned to
Messrs. Robert Thom Ld.



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U.N., Reds Argue
Over Kaesong

PANMUNJOM, Korea, Nov. 1.

United Nations and Communist
negoviators agreed on where to
stop the fighting across half of
Korea, but’ still argued over the
possession of Kaesong and “Heart-
break Ridge” A United Nations
officer said to the Press that an
agreement was reached on about
59% of the proposed ceasefire line
— from Kimswa on the Central
Front to the East Coast except for
“Heartbreak Ridge.” Kaesong is
on the Western front.

Despite ipcreasing progress to-
ward an armistice agreement,
however, the United States Lieut.
Gen, L. G. Hill, saiq that the end
of the war was not yet in sight,
He said, “it is possible that war
will go on for some time after the
truce line is settled. Fighting will
go on until the entire Five Point
truce agenda is adopted.” The
joint sub-committee charged wit
findi a mutually satisfac
ceasefire line—the second item on
thie truce agenda—will meet again
at 9. p.m. today.—U.P.



Teeth Blown Out

At Combermere School yester-
day M. Rose of Form I C had
some of his teeth blown out with
a bomb. The incident occurred
at about 12.30 in the afternoon. .

Rose, before being taken to the
General Hospital where he was
treated and discharged, was given
First Aid treatment by Scoutmas-
ter, Mr, Brathwaite. On his re-
turn to the school his father arriv-
ed and took him home.

His action was against the in-
Siiections “of the Headmaster,

ajor Noott, who has forbidden
boys bringing fireworks to the
school premises,



MAIL NOTICES

MAIS for Dominica, Antigua, Mont-

serrat, Nevis and St. Kitts by the
M.V. Caribbee will be closed at the
General Post Office as under:—
Parcel Mail at 12 noon.

Registered
Mail at 2 p.m., Ordinany Mail at ‘2,39
p.m, on the r 1951.
MAILS for Maderia, United Kingdom,
Antwerp and Amsterdam by the M.S.
Willemstad will be closed at the General
e as —

Parcel Mail at 10 a.m., Registered
Mail at 2 p.m., Ordinary Mail at 2.96
?.m. on the Sth November 1961,

MAILS for St. Lucia, Martinique,
Guadeloupe, Antigua, United Kingdom
and France by the S.S. Gascogne will
be closed at the General Post Office as
under:— .
Parcel Mail at 16 a.m.. Registered
Mail at 2 p.m. Ordinary Mail at 2.30
p.m. On the 2nd November, 1951


















Warwick &

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}

Labourites Get Speightstown Will Soon

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Sch. Cyril EB. Smith, Sch. Mary E
Caroline, Sch. Mary M Lewis, Sch
United Pilgrim S., Sch. Sunshine R.,
Sch. Lydia Adina S., Sch. Molhy N
Jenkins Roberts, M.V
M.V. TB. Radar,
Seh. Marion
bt Keskadee, Yacht -
. M.V. Charles A. McLean, Sch
Franklyn D.R., Sch. Rosalime M
M.V. CARIBBER, 106 tans net, Capt
Parris from Dominica.
Sch. LUCSLLE M. SMITH, 74 tons net
Capt. Hassel, from British Guiana.
Sch. GARDENIA W.. 48 tons net, Capt
Wallace, from Trinidad via St. Vincent
8.8. STATESMAN, 4,429 tons net, Capt
hichardson, from London.

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Fer PUERTO RIOA—
Ina Wha Jeanne Sellier, Daisw
Waterman, a nger
ee A
In Touch With Barbados

on

Cable and Wireless «wW.5.) Lid. advise
that they can now communicate witt
the following ships through their Barba-
dos Coast Station:—-

S.S. Thorsisle, Regent Hawk, Mormac-
nwoon, Pacific Fortune, Matina, Del Sud,
Athene, Antartic, Tista, Runa, Gascogne,

Rio Aguapey, Wave Knight, Sarpedon,
Caraibe, Nueva Andalucia, Esso mgox*
nwalt, Louisiana, Brazil, Pye-
Golfiito, Beholar, B.p-

pl ing hen, A. W. Peake, Ss
a lifornia, Baechus, Aicoa

Pen t, Canadian Cruiser, Loidenho iti,
Eriwet Water, Alcoa Partner, Macoris,

Sund@le, Hermes and S.8. Rio Novo.



66 Ae?

Certificate “A

a e
Pass List

FOLLOWING is the list ef
names of those teachers who have
passed the Certificate A. examina-
tion: —

Baker, T. E,, St. Clement's B,;
Belgrave, R. E., Bay Street B.;
Best, C., St. Lawrence B.; Branch,
(Miss) M. A., Hindsbury G.;
Brathwaite, H. A., St. Luke's B
Cadogan, (Miss) L. E., St. Ber-
aerds Gy Paths oat. S 4

esley Hall, B. De lp RV +»
Saints’ B.; Giilkes: F., All
Saints’ B.; Gittens, (Miss) E, A.,
Beulah G.; Harewood, C, A,, St.
John Baptist B.; Keizer, (Miss) E.,
Christ Church G.; King, (Miss)
G. E, St. Matthias’ B.; Laurie,
(Miss) E. E., St. Luke’s G.; Law-
rence, D. K., Buxton B.; Leacock,
(Miss) C. C., St. Swithin’s G.; Lin-
ton, R., Providence B.; Massiah,
H. G., St. Giles’ B.; McAllister
(Miss) H. M,, Edghill Memorial
G.; Millington, J., St. Christopher's
B.: Pilgrim, (Miss) D,, Sharon M.;
Robinson, (Miss) I. V,, Buxton B.;
Springer, (Miss) E, V., St. Silas’
G,; Welch, V. C., Black Bess M.

Death of G.N. Ray

Mr. Guy Neeve Ray, a former
employee of the Western Tele-
graph Company in Barbados from
1931 to 1939, died suddenly in
Rio dé, Janeiro, on October 29.
Mr. Ray was e cricket enthusiast.







He played for Wanderers and also

: layed for Rovers at soccer.

GOLF BALLS

Blue Flash





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Keep 2 siyyly on hand - bake a2 momen’ nitice





e :
Lewis Attacks |
. ‘i Bah a

Electors’ Policy

A tremendous crowd attended
the Labour Party meeting held in
support of the candidature of Mr
A. E. S. Lewis for the City of
Bridgetown at Nelson Street .last
night. On the platform were Mr.}
F. L. Waleott, Mr. C. Tuder, Mr. L..
Williams and Mr, M. FE, Cox.

Mr. Lewis told his listeners that
if they thought that he did not de-
serve to be put in the House, then
they could act to suit. Mr. Lew a
strongly attacked thé policy of tire
Barbados Electors’ Association ard
called the manifesto a big farce.
He said that the damage that was
done by this Party is now being
repaired by the Labour Party
which is also trying to lift the yoke
that is around the neck of the Ja-
bourer to-day.

He said that the manifesto of
the Electors’ Association touched
upon a deep weter harbour. “The

@ity guns in this Party are now

aniegetepoontitnnta

feeling the squeeze from the light-
ermen,.” This harbour could have }
been built long ago but at that time

» it was not convenient for them. |

They say it would put the island |
in a good position but it would also
put many out of employment.

Mr. Lewis said that neverthe
less the English elections hav
got some of them thinking, bur
Barbados was not England.

Upright

Mr. F. L. Walcott said that it
was the duty of everyone to re-
turn Mr, Lewis to the House of
Assembly. He is an upright anc
fearless representative. In 1940
one of the biggest demonstrations
was one in the island for Mr.
Lewis. $s was for the treatment
he received from the hands of hi
employers after serving them fo:
some time,

Even before this demonstration,
Mr. Lewis had shown himself to be
upright. Some speakers on the

lectors’ Association platform have
said that the Labour Governmen:
of this island has not done enough

But this the masses could see

can’t ve the masses
“Adams will die, I will die, but
the Labour Movement will go on,
for it is the Movement of the

r, Walcott said that he did not
like to attack past friends but he
understood that Mr. T. Miller ha»
been saying things about the Union
but if he has something against one
member of the Party he should not
say things about that Party o/
which he was a member,

Plane Crashes Into
Mountain Side

RIVERSIDE, California, Oct, 31,
Six United States Air Foree
fliers were killed last night when



their twin engine C47
transport plane crashed into the
side of Box Springs Mountain,

five miles from their destination,
and exploded. The plane, based
at Truax Air Foree Base in Madi-
son, Wisconsin, crashed after the
pilot apparently lost direction iy
the heavy fog.—U.P.



Candidate Wounded

BUENOS AIRES, Nov. 1.

The Communist candidate toy
be = Presideney, Rodolfo Ghioldi,

reported wounded — tonight,
following a shooting affray be-
tween the Communists and Pero-
nistas in the Parana Province. |
The incident occurred during the’
Communists’ pre-electoral meet-
ing in which Ghioldi was speak-
ing. First reports stated that at
least one person was dead, and
there were several with firearms
wounds.

In an official communique the
Ministry stated that its decision
to invite newsmen is in accord-
ance with the wishes expressed
by Peron and the National Con-
gress. On October 11, Congress
voted a resolution “iat Latin-
American newsmen should be in-
vited to attend the election, To-
day's announcement extends cour-
tesy to other nationals and ex-
vlicitly states that Argentine em- |
bassies and legations will provide |
visiting correspondents with all!
necessary facilities. —U.P, |



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PAGE FOUR



Friday, November 2, 1951



Labour Welfare

THERE is an increasing fashion espe-
cially among candidates seeking election to
the House of Assembly to encourage people
who borrow money from the Labour
Welfare Fund, not to repay those loans.
The suggestion has already been publicly
condemned but in view of the fact that it
has been repeated, its implications should
be made plain.

The Labour Welfare Fund was created
at the instance of the British Government
who insisted that included in the guaran-
teed price for sugar there should be
ineluded asum which would be devoted
to'the welfare of the people employed in
the sugar industry. It was agreed that the
amount would be derived by means of a
cess to wnich a contribution would be
made on every ton of sugar produced.

That fund has had contributions during
the last four years and has now reached a
sum of approximately two million dollars.
Of this amount, the sum of $300,000 has
been allocated to playing fields and the
remainder except $100,000 left to reserve,
is to be utilised for housing. The quali-
fication for loans from this fund is that
the borrower must be a worker in the
sugar industry.

For the first twelve months of its opera-
tion the fund helped 1,200 people and if it
is accepted that there is an average of five
people to each household, then at least,
6,000 people have been given shelter by the
operation of this money. It is worth
knowing that the plantation labourers
have thought so well of this fund that
the first allocation of $400,000 was repaid
and is now in circulation a second time.
There are several thousand applications
more for loans under this fund and it is
to be hoped that the money due for the
1951 crop, amounting to over one million
‘dollars will soon be utilised as well,

| It has always been generally believed
that the average plantation labourer is
dull, stupid and unaware of his own inter-
ests. It will be seen from the way in which
they have made use of the fund that they
are not as unaware as many would believe.
They fully realise that i? they continue to
borrow from the Labour Welfare and
repay, it will always be at their disposal
for future use. That ‘is the case with the
£80,000 which formed the nucleus of the
Sugar Industry Agricultural Bank and that
is the standard of operation at which the
labourer has to aim,

' It is difficult to understand why anyone
should advocate that the labourer
should not repay after he has made a legi-
timate loan. Already in this Island there
is a dangerous angling for popularity by
flouting all authority. Serious minded
people in this island were alarmed some
years ago when the people of St. Thomas
were told ina public lecture that they
should not worry about obeying anybody
and should question all authority.

The plantation 6wner in this island has
set a good standard by making full use of
the Agricultural Bank and repaying his
loans. The money was granted in 1902
and if the loans had not been repaid the
Bank would not be in operation in 1951 to
help those who do not have the finance to
operate their estates.

' Labourers who use the Labour Welfare
Fund will understand that the money is not
theirs in the real sense of the term, and
even if it had been theirs and was taken
from them, it now provides a fine source
where they can have credit and to an ex-
tent which they would not get otherwise
and without the obligations usually at-
tached.

! The Labour Welfare Fund is a monu-
ment to social progress in this island and
those who invite the labourers to practise
dishonesty and to refuse to repay legiti-
mate loans are encouraging an attitude of
mind which might have most undesir-
able effects in future. The method of chang-
ing the procedure is to amend the act and
this. cannot be done from the soap box.
Only the House of Assembly, can do this.





Joe Cordle (name fictitious) sat
fin ‘hig customary place on a rocky
ledge overlooking the sea, his

yes glued to the water in con-
i rs mood. His net and
himself lead a kind of symbi-
otic existence, inseparable and,



hears dat guv’ment feedin’ dem
good fo’ nuttin Dodds boys like

Hut Gritain’s ‘Poor Leadership Is Straining The Bonds’

KARACHL.
PAKISTAN’S new Premier,
Khwaja Nazimuddin, today denied
reports that Pakistan is thinking
of withdrawing from the, Britieh

Commonwealth because of the
way the Kashmir ques.ion has
been handled by the United

Nations. But he admitted that the
‘British Government’s “lack of
leadership” in matters between
India and Pakistan is straining the
Commonwealth bonds.

Sitting in the centre of a horse-
shoe-shaped desk under a huge
portrait of the late Mohammed
Ali Jinnah, architect of the Mos-
lem Dominion.Nazimuddin said:

“T have enough troubles with-
out thinking of secession from the
Commonwealth. But people here
complain that the Commonwealth
seems to do little for Pakistan.”

Feeling in P»rkistan is ‘hat the
Commonwealth could have done
much more to prevent the Kerh-
mir question being weakly shelved
| by UNO.

Reports from Srinegar. Kash-
mir’s capital) say that five Moe-
lems who stood up in the mosanue
there on Friday and spoke pgains*
Hindu rule were heaten nn and
are still in hospital. That w
‘enough to set the Karachi hozoars
aflame with Holy War zeal,

‘No Arms Arrive’

Premier Nazimuddin a_ genial
tubby man educated at Duns.able
Grammar School and Cambridge
went on: “Britain has promised us
arms. They have not arrived. We

;}do not plan tq attack India or
anyone else. All we want is to be
able to defend ourselves;

“The British Government says
‘We help Pakistan just as much
as we help India,’ That is prob-
ably true, But the trouble is
that we did not start off equal.
“India did not hand over to us



Caravans In. The |
West Indies

LONDON.

If you can’t afford a house, why
not buy — or build — your own
caravan?

“Ideal for overseas conditions”
say the caravan manufacturers,
homes-on-wheels ever since the
homes-on-wheels ever since he
end of the war, when permanent
caravan-dwelling became a feat-
ure of British life.

“Why not caravans as homes
for hurricane victims in the West
Indies ?” asked one manufacturer
recently, Why not?

Freight and other taxes make
export on a large scale an im-
practicable venture. So manufac-
turers suggest that although they
can’t post you one of these
wonder models, on view at the
current motor show in London,
they could send the blueprints
overseas on payment of a small
sum, either to the optimistic home
carpenter who would like to
‘knock one up’ for himself, or to
any shrewd businessman who
would like to open his own caravan
manufac uring business in Domin-
ion or Colony.

Many more caravans are sold
in Britain as permanent homes
than as a mere holiday asset
Overlooking a yacht harbour at
Chiswick, on the Thames near
London, a whole township of
caravans has appeared like .a
cluster of mushrooms after the
rain,

Caravans are no longer the
draughty, cramped, rickety struc-
tures’ that one used to associate
with the gypsies and circuses.
Maybe the manufacturers tried
living in them to find out what it
was like. Ceriainly they have
evolved a home that has all the
essentials and comforts as well—
with the added advan‘age that
you can hitch it to your car and
find a new view when you fire
of the old one.

The 1951 caravan does not even
retain the silhouette of the tradi-
tional model, The most startling
of the models on show this year,
the “Statesman,” is a cross be-



a

got nuttin.

an’ting; we hey "pon sea rock ent
Ah_hears
vagabond dat does walk "bout an’

BARBADOS ADVOCATE





From JAMES LEASOR

all the armaments she should have
done on partition,”

Negotiations are still apparently
proceeding with India on this
matter of armg but hope over-
long deferred has sickened many
Pakistanis,

What is the chance of warmer
relaiions with India? azimud-
din is not very hopeful. “Settle
Kashmir first’, he said. “All we

ask is that a plebiscite should be
held in Kashmir.”



KASHMIR has been an Indian
and Pakistan quarrel since 1948,

Under the terms of the 1947
Pariition it was agreed that the

principalities of the old India
should join the appropriate State
—Hindu areas to India. Moslem
to Pakistan.

Kashmir, though predominantly
Mosiem was under a Hindu
maharajah, who announced that
his State would join India.

Moslem irregulars from the
turbulent North-West Frontier
poured into Kashmir to save their

By HAZEL MAY

tween an airport coach and a
Riviera cottage, with its enormous
double-decker height topped by
a sun-porch with stripea canopy,
canvas chairs and window-boxes
bursting wi.h geraniums,

It costs £1,070 in Britain, but
for this you get a large living
room with modern oak furniture,
heated by fuel stove which also
provides hot water for kitchen and
bathroom. Built-in cupboards
conserve every inch of space, and
a large folding table can seat five
for dinner or serve as a writing
desk. One side of the caravan
opens out in a double landscape
window.

A staircase leads upstairs to
the double-bedroom, and through
a centre door is a_ pink-and-
silver ba.hroom and_= another
double bedroom, suggested as the
nursery for the children.

A rather more expensive
double-decker-caravan selling for
£1,765 is built of anodised light
alloy instead of the more popu-
lar wood,

Even more formidable than
these giant erec ions on wheels
are the single-decker caravans

built to the maximum size—22

feet. “Half a block long” is how
one salesman describes them.
Once inside it is easy to forget
that you are in a caravan, Beau-
iiful furniture, carpet, tasteful

colours, flowers, pictures, even en
antique-convex mirror greet the
eye. And next door is a kitchen
that would delight the most house-

proud woman. Baking _ tables,
cupboards, a large yes oven, sink
and ample draining boards—

they’re all here.

These luxury models vary from
£700 té £800, but for the modest
pocket no such outlay is neces-
sary, Prices ranging from £275 to
£345 will buy a comfortable two-
berth with all mod. cons., and
for. just over £400 it is possible
to buy a roomy, wn-‘o-dete, well-
furnivhed four-berth, In most

dem idle



.
But Canada Says... |
OTTAWA — Canada is quite
satisfied” with the present state
of the British Commonwealth,
Mr. Lester Pearson, External
Affairs said today.

He added that Canada has no
faults to find with the present
organisation, but does not be-
lieve anything could be gained
by rebuilding the Common-
wealth into a “third world



Pakistan Will Not Thoughts For
Leave Cwealth

Politicians ©

IV.

ONE of the

THE STATE

reasons for the State’s neglect

of the family is the family’s ignorance of the
duties of the State. Too often the family re-
gards the State as an enemy. In fact it is the
function of the State to safeguard the inter-
ests of the family. There can be no conflict
between society and the individual, since the
interests of society and the interests of the
individual are not opposed but complemen-

Power” as suggested by somejtary. This does not mean that abuses do not

leaders.—Express News Service.
—L.E.S. |

Soldiers



Of Both
Sides Are
1Saall Im

| Kashmir

India sent in regular troops.|rights and duties and what

| the individual.
icisely beceuse individuals are ignorant of
jtheir rights and duties with relation to the

jexist in the relations between the State and

But these abuses arise pre-|

State and because the State quite frequently

tion

|negleets its diities towards the individual.
' Modern Statism, in fact, has sought to estab-
\l'sh (and in some cases has established to
\the detriment of society) a complete separa-
between the
| classes, between individuals and the State.
|. this way modern Statism has destroyed
{and is still destroying the interior current of
| social life and is creating a fertile ground for
\civic immorality which necessarily results

subject and governing

|from the apathy of citizens and their lack of
|interest in politics.

It is therefore the duty of all good citizens
brother Moslems from Hindu rule |‘? U%derstand quite clearly what are their

are the true

Pakistan sent forces, and there) functions of the State.

was fighting, until United Nations
mediators brought about a truce.

United Nations commissions have
supported the Pakistan demand for
a free plebiscite. Pandit Nehru
India’s Premier has refused to
withdraw his troops, and Pakistar
says that while they are there no
plebiscite could be free.

Troops of both sides are still in|
the country on either side of the!
truce line,

One definition of the

State is “human

society organised politically: that is civil
society considered as a unit of government,
with a code of law, and with manifold or-

\fanisations operating
|prosperity and the common wealth.”

to promote public

In addition to the family, man needs a

|Society to satisfy his needs and requirements.

‘3 | This society is the State, “the Civil associa-

eases the “de luxe” models have
only superficial advantages,

A great deal of imagination has
been expended on space saving
devices. Once inside, the viewer
leans against a deceptively
smooth wall at his peril. He is
liable to touch some _ hidden
spring, artfully camouflaged ar
grain in the wood, which will
release a double bed from that
misleading solid looking wall.
Folding _ partitions open out of
cupboards to divide the living
room into separate bedrooms,
and “convertible” is the operative
word,

Most ingenious space-saver in
the show was a remarkable semi-
rotating apartment housing a
toilet! This small circular room
can be swung into the main body
of the caravan when travelling,
and out when camping, with
great saving of space. The same
caravan, which must indeed have
been built by a genius in Sparing
That Inch, boasts a large bath
camouflaged as an oak chest of
drawers! It stands on end on cas-



prt of the caravan with the min-
imum of effort;

Smallest and cheipest Paeee|
on show.) was the £250 “Wan-
derer” designed: for the 8 h.p, car-
owner, a ‘simple fol
canvas flaps ’at' @ither. end anc|
fitted wih. a, doublebed. Thi: |
was also built of light metal, saic |
wooden caravans, although les
attrac.ive in appearance.

Most of this»dazzling array of
caravans at the motor show were
built by firms in Cheltenham. Why
has that respec‘able Englist
town got such a monopoly in the
trade? I asked. The answer is to
be found in thé aircraft industry
established there. Labour which
is accustomed to fine work ix
wood and steel is recruited into
making caravans, where all their
rkill is needed, First essen‘ia] ir
the caravan is

strength.

lightness and



ition willed by God as a necessary comple-

ment of the family.”
But the State, although its origin is willed

|by God, cannot consider itself as an arbi-
trary society, a free association like a cham-
|ber of commerce or a literary or scientific

society : “the State instead is a spontaneous
association integrated with and willed by
human nature, a necessary factor in its natu-

ral evolution
ment.”

and its progressive develop-

That is why the State cannot have a scope
which conflicts with the final aim of human

existence.

Leo XIII in Rerum Novarum (May 15, 1891)
pointed out the real functions of the State
when he defined true social prosperity as de-
riving “from holiness of customs, the right

constitution of the family, the guardianship
of justice and religion, an equal distribution
of duties, prosperity of arts and commerce,
from all that contributes to make life more
perfect and happy.”

But if the State exists, and has for its pur-

comprise the

pose the true welfare of the citizens who

State, it cannot perform its

functions without authority. That authority |

comes from God. To disobey the legitimate
tors, and canbe pushed to any | authority of the State is to oppose the divine
vill. But the State’s authority although sanc-
toned by God is not without limit. The power





of the State is not absolute and independent
ding van with lf every law or moral injunction. The author-

ity of the State has its limits fixed hy God
Himself. We must never forget and must
to have a longer life than the;always go on repeating that the “whole
veason for the existence of the power of the
State, at any time and whatever the circum-
‘tance, consists in its natural end, in its true
and proper function, which is the public pros~
perity and the common welfare.”

“If”, wrote Leo XIII in the Encyclical
Diuturnum, “anyone should have to choose
between disregarding the commands of God
or those of princes, he must obey Jesus Christ
who commanded ‘render to Caesar the things
that are Caesar’s and to God the things that
we God's’ and added “ if the will of princes
is repugnant to the will and law of God, they
themselves exceed the limit of their power
and prevent justice; nor can their authority
have any value in such case, since there can
be no authority where there is no justice.”

But wherever authority is, or has become
by passage of time legitimate, we must always

To-morrow:

a remember that thése who exercise legitimate |))}
power do so in the name of God, and that
disobedierice to legitimate rulers is not made!
to a man but is made to God Himself.

“THE CITIZEN AND THE
STATE”



Sea Roek Seer =By The Stroller” ~

she responded nobly. The sca was talk "bout ile in dis is! + mek
calm and his net which he had? me sick.
cleaned meticulously of moss and is ‘turn to gas wha come from

Ah hears dat

pomeneret

at, dis ile

at times, almost indistinguishable;
you see, he carries the net and
the net carries him in the per-
feetly honourable—if to the un-
accustomed, somewhat unfragrant
—business of catching ‘frays’
those miniature denizens of the
sea which frequent our coastal
waters. On this particular day,
Joe was gloomy. Yes sir, he was,
as he confided to g friend, ‘down
and out’. He put it this way:

“De moon bin look she sweetest
like pretty woman but underneat’
she was ugly fo’ true, she mek de
s@a so rough dat ah ent, ketch
even a scale fo’ de past
de result is dat all ah bin livin’
*pon is. brown jiskit an’ tea an‘
not too mich at dat, Now, ah

week;

dem is king sons. Whey dey
gettin’ all dis money from? Ah
knows ah ent got not even one
jack-ass fo’ dem tax. Qne time
back, some down along guv’nor
sen pelice fo’ reckon peepul don-
key an’ de peepul ups and chases
dey donkey in de bush so guvy’-
ment could'nt find dem fo’ tax.
Well, we ent got no bush hey,
but ah knows dis somting goin’
happin if dey sen pelice fo’ count
dese few frays ah ketchin’ outa
Gawd watah. Wha’ ah goin’ eat
fo’de Crismags ah dcen’t know;
mebbe ah will get de king food in
de po’house and get entrotain wid
ban’ musik besides. Ah hears dat
plenty food in town fo’ dem whey
got de money—all dem cane cutta
an’ factry worka whey get bonus

brag say dat de cane ripe an’ dey
taste some already; all ah got is
a patch uv spuds dat de worm
done edt out; de yam crop late
an de corn only now mekking
‘baby’ roun’ hey. Dem dat playin’
politic sayin’ dat every family
mus’ hav’ a chicken in de pot,
but all de chicken ‘bout hey dead

‘out an’ fowl egg is scarce as frays

an’ sea egg whey get ketch out
already.”

This gloomy oration to his
friend appears to have had a
soporific effort on poor Joe Cordle
and he lay down under a spread-
ing dunk tree and soon was fast
asleep. When he waked up the
scene had changed. It se«
moon had heard hi

ms the

wail

and j]

weed and spread out to dry called
to Joe for a cast.

ly haul in the catch; the second,
and third in like manner. Joe
now found himself behind a
huge pile of frays. Meantime,,
his friend hearing of the good’
news had returned to the scene.’
Joe, proud of his knowledge,,
prveeeds to expatiate:

“Looka wha happin, ah is got
eo much frays ah don’t know wha
fo’ do wid dem, Ah hears de
guv’ment say dey would like to

can dem fo’ gie touris fo’ eat,
wid fancy label ’pon de tin like
dem you. does buy from Mr.

Goddard

grocery, but de,

cook dem in

got

‘n? all dis

-

A first throw,
was so successful Joe could hard-'an’ mo’;

de hot air an’ same ‘ike talk dat
gone on in dts isiaud fo’ 100 ’ears
de ground suck um in
an’ now it comin’ out in gas—
well, to me lawd, wha is we po
peepul goin’ do? Anyhow, ah
hears dat one uv we big boys
pay a visit to British Honduras
an’ he come. back an’ say land
goin’ beggin’ up dey but it full
uv bush an’ Bajans could turn it
in land uv milk-an’ honey as de
good book say. Ah don’t mind
goin’ but ah hate to leave de
rock whey ah bred an’ born an’
me oder half, dis old net. Some
peepul say dey can’t get rice an’
Demerara full uv watah. Why
de guv’ment don’t gie dem rubber
boot- wid some uv de mon¢y dey

$$$

trowin’ ’way an’ let dem go down
dey an’ grow rice fo’ dehself an’
we up hey? Ah also hears dat
Pharoah in Egypt want fo’ add
a lot uv uncivilize’ Africans to
he kingdom. Why he don’t sen
fo" some uv we civilize’ Bajans?
Mo" besides, de bible say Egypt
is a land uv plenty an* manna
does fall from heaven when de
peepul hungry.

Ah tinks dat boy Adams should
go an’ talk wid dis rich Pharoah
and try an’ get a few uv we out
dey. Befo’ long wha goin’ hap-
pin hey is dis: all dem moto’
lorry and’ ting wha killin’ peepul
on de ‘road goin’ hav’ to go an’,
accordin’ to wha ah see in dem
American papah de boys~ bring |
back, we will hav’ de hellcoops
(a vision of helicopters) insted
uv bus, an’ kyar an’ lorry; dem}
kin haul cane too to de factry |
an’ fék molasses easy so dat no-|
bods kin get mash up by dem



foot

@ On Page 7

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FRIDAY, NOVEMBER 2, 1951

Leg. Co. Changes

House Give No ?©azonus

For Objections

THE Legislative Council at their meeting yesterday re-
ceived a message from the House of Assembly to the effect
that they did not agree with the amendments made by
that Honourable Council (o the Bill to make provision for
the protection of the wages of workers.

The short debate that followeu
Suggested that the offending
amendment was that in which
clause two of the bill had been
amended by the insertion of the

words “or work performed by
watchmen,”. so that the section
then read :—
2. In this Act—
“manual labour” includes
work ordinarily performed by
mechanics, artisans, handi-
craftsmen, seamen, boatmen,
transport workers, domestic

servants and all lapourers and

any other similar work associ-

ated therewith but does not in-
clude clerical work; or work
performed by watchmen.

“worker” means a person who

performs manuai labour.

Hon. G. B. Evelyn who led off
the debate, observed that The
Other Place, in their message re-
jecting the Honourable Council’s
amendments had not stated their
reasons for their objections to the
amendments and so that Council
was still in the dark as to why
their amendments had failed to
find fsvour with The Other
Place.

The bill had been referred to a
Select Committee of which he
was chairman and there were
members of that Committee who
knew more of the subject than he
did himself. After careful study
they hed suggested amendments
aimed at the clarification of cer-
tain sections which they consid-
ered ambiguous.

In the absence of any specific
objection to- any of the amend-
ments he could only move that
the Council send a message to the
Qther Place stating that they
were unable to waive _ their
amendments to ths bill-

No Reason

The Hon. tse Colonial Secre-
tary said that although there
were no reasons given by The
Other Place for their objection to
the amendments yet he had been
given to believe from the reports
of the debate in the Other Place
that the only real objection was
the insertion of the words “or
work performed by watchmen”.

There was nothing in the other
amendments, to his mind that
could suggest that there woul:
be any objection.

The other amendments were as
follows:— In section 8 there was
a typographical error in which
the word “for” was inserted for
“of” so that the section read: —

8. Except where otherwise
expressly permitted by the pro.
visions of this Act or of any other
Act no employer shall make any
deduction or make any agreement
or contract with a worktr for any
Geduction from the wages to be
paid by the employer to the
worker, or for any payment to the
employer by the worker, for or in
respect of any fine, or for bad or
negligent work or for injury to
the materials or other property
of the employer save when such
injury is occasioned by the wilful
misconduct or neglect of the
worker,

in section 15 where the bill was
made to read that the penalty for
contravention of the provisions
of the bill should be a fine of $48,
the Council had inserted “not ex-
ceeding” before $48 so that the
fine would not be an arbitrary
one,

This section then read: —

15. Any employer or his agent
who—

(a) enters into any agreement or
contract or gives any re-
muneration for employment
contrary to the provisions of
this Act or declared by the
provisions of this Act to be
illegal; or

(b) makes any deduction from
the wages of any worker or
receives any payment from
any worker contrary to the
provisions of this Act; or

(c) contravenes the provisions of

? section fourteen of this Act:
shall be liable, on conviction, to a
fine not exceeding forty-eight
dollars or for a second or subse.
quent offence to a fine of ninety-
six dollars,

Section 17 was similarly treated
and this read:—

17. (1) Every employer shall

keep a Register of wage payments
and workers accounts and every
worker shall be entitled, on de-
mand, to a copy of his account in
any pay-period.

(2) Every employer who con-





travenes the provisions of sub-
section (1) of this section shall be
guilty of an offence and shall be
liable on conviction to a fine of
forty-eight dollars.

An entirely new section 20 was
added and this read:—No prosecu-
tion for any offence under this Act
shall be institu.ed after the ex-
piration of one yerr from the date
of the commission of the offence.

Regretiable

Tie Hon'oze Dr. Massiah said
that it was regrettable ihat The
Other Place had made no definite
Statement with regard .o their
rejection of their amendments
o herwise they might have been
able to reach some compromise.

In his view it was very un-
fortunate. ‘The amendmen:s had
been originally put in for clarify-
ing the position and he did not
see how the Council could go back
on its decision,

He agreed with the view ex-
pressed that at first thought one
could reach the opinion that there
was no necessity for including the
words relating to the amendment
with regard to watchmen, and then
on second thought there was a
body of opinion that shared the
view that they should be inserted.

The very ambiguity surrounding
it sugges‘ed that there chould be
the amendment even if it was
superfluous but for the sake of
clarity,

The Hon'ble J. D. Chandler said
that he would not speak as the
President but give his own feelings
on the matter. He felt that it was
a difference of opinion hetween
the lawyers as to the in‘erpretation
of certain sections in the bill.

It was not agreed whethe-~ it
was necessarv to include watchmen
or whe'her thew were already in-
eluded in the interpretation of cer-
tain sections of the bill.

No Fight Needed

On the other hand he did not
think that this was such an issue
that there should be a fight he-
tween the two chambers, The

@ On Page 7

B’dos Has Ta Get
A New Harbour
-DR. CUMMINS

THE Barbados Labour Party
held a Political Meeting at Welch-
man Hall, St. Thomas, oh Wednes-
day night in support of Dr, Cum-
mins and Mr, R. G. Mapp, candi-
dates for the parish of St. Thomas.

“As long as the Labour Par y
exists it stands to represent all
classes in Barbados”, Dr. Cum-
mins told the electorate,

Mr. E. Holder, who ‘i¢, offering
himself as a catididute~ for St.
James, acted as Chairman.

Dr. Cummins said that he had
been coming to them since 1924
and it was from that time that they
were friends.

He said that the Union had been
in exi wefor ten years and
during that fime its efforts had
transformed the purpose of living
for workers, “It is quite evident
that the Barbados Workers’ Union
‘and the Barbados Labour Party
have transformed Barbados,” he
said,

A few months ago they had Mr.
Bradshaw of St. Kitts with them.
He told them that he had just re-
turned from Europe where he saw
more poverty than in Barbados.
Jn Spain little boys ran behind
him begging. He did not see tha.
in Barbados. He was glad to say
that in Barbados the people look-
ed happier.

Ten Years Ago

Dr. Cummins said that that was
not so ten years ago. A man
could not be happy when his
children were not well clothed
“These conditions now existing in
Europe did exist in Barbados ten
years ago,” he said.

He said that they stood for
material and economic progress.
From the fact that they got better
wages for the workers who have
been able to get better clothes

@ On Page 7





CABIN TRUN



BARBADOS ADVOCATE



IN THE LEGISLATIVE
COUNCIL YESTERDAY

The Legislative Couneii met at
2 p.m = yesterday and having sat
for nearly two hours, adjourned
until 2.30 p.m. next Tuesday.

The Hon The Colonial Secre-
tary lald the
ments

The Quarries (Miscellaneous
Forme) Regulations, 1051

Quarterly Return of Transac-
— in Rum te 20th September,
1951.

The Counell received a mes-
sage from the House of Assem-
bly stating that they were un-
able to agree with the amend-
ments which the Honourable
Council had made to the Bill
to make provision for the pretec-
tion of wages of workers

The Council passed a message
in reply stating that they had
waived their amendment to
clause @ of the Bill defining
“manual labour’ but insisted on
the other amendments they had
made to the bill,

fellowing docu-

The Council concurred
following resolutions: —
To place the sum of $18.450 at
the disposal of the Geverner-in-
Executive Committee to sup-
plement the Estimates 1951—S?;

in the

Part I—Capital, as shown in
Supplementary Estimates 151-32:
x

Te piace the sum of S120 at
‘the disposal of the Gevernor-in-
Executive Committee to sup-
plement the Estimates 1951—52,
Part ‘Current, as chown in
Supplementary Estimates 1951-52:

Te appreve the allocation of
the balance of the stabilisation
fund fixed on the 23th of Ocvo-
ber 1951, by the Gevernor-in-
Executive Committee
advice of the Faney
Contrel and M
under the previ
1e@ of «(the 6 bados . Fancy
Molasses Production and Expert
Act 1937;

To appreve the Order entiiled
“The Civil Establishment «Gen-
eral) (Amendment) No & Order
1951, made by the Governer-in-
Executive Comupiitter on the
Twenty-second day of October
TAM. under the provision: of See-
tion 3 of the Civil Establishment
Act, 19

The Councit passed a bill to
provide for the impertxtion into
this island, free of duty for o
peried of one year of goods made
from sea island cotton







C.O.L. Bonus
For Workers
Today

THE staff of the Sanitary Com-
missioners for St. Michael will get
some cost of living bonus to-day,
the Sanitary Commissioners de-
cided yests oc The tu.al avryount
of bonus tuey wili get wil ve iron
September 25 this year to March
next year. It will be paid at
Government rates Government
rates are 20% on the first $480
per annum of salary, 74% on the
second, and 5% on the third

or those who are paid weekly
the rates are:—for the first $10

of weekly wages 20%, for the
second $10, 744% and for the third
$10, 5%.

The Commissioners agreed to
pay the cost of living bonus on
the suggestion of the St. Michael
Vestry who decided a short while
ago that all parochial employees
would get a cost of living bonus.

The bonus paid to-day will come
from an unexpended balance of
$7,000 the Commissioners now
hold, Just over $11,000 is needed
for this department, however, and
the Vestry had agreed to seek the
Legislature’s approval to transfer
the required $4,000. Mr. E. D,
Mottley said yesterday that there
might be a possibility of getting
over the difficulty of getting the
$4,000 without going to the Legis-
lature.

In moving the adoption of the
Vestry’s suggestion for bonus, Mr.
Mottley said that the ways and
means for furnishing the money
had already been settled. It was
only for the Board to agree and
they would be able’ to pay the
rates as from to-day. The extra
cost of living bonus as from Sep-
tember 25 would also be paid
to-day,

“IT am sure,” he said, “that em-
ployees will appreciate this.”

Mr, Victor Chase said that he
took very great pleasure in sec-
onding Mr. Mottley’s motion as he
was well aware of the extreme
pressure that the increased cost of
living was making on salaries of
parochial employees. He was sure
if they received their money then
it would go a great way in helping
them to balance their budget.

“I feel sure,” he said, “that the
parochial employees would appre-
ciate receiving money as promptly
as We can pay it to them.”

ar ° *

DEALING with a letter from Mr,
Herbert H. Williams, Supervising
Returning Officer for St. Michael
in the forthcoming elections, the
Commissioners decided io grant
leave to members of their staff as
required by Mr. Williams for as-
sisting in the carrying out of the
elections.

The Board further authorised
the Chairman of the Finance Com-
mittee to grant such leave to other
members of the staff as may be
required for the conduct of the
elections.

* © a *

THE COMMISSIONERS were
informed by the Colonial Secretary
that the Legislature had provided
the necessary funds to enable a
refund to the Commissioners of
Health to the amount of $704.50
paid as Customs duty on equip-
ment imported for use in the scav-
enging of Bridgetown. i

* 4 at

THE BOARD were also inforin-
ed that the Governor-in-Executive
Committee agreed to accept the
responsibility of providing com-
munal baths at the Bay Estate.

a





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Schooner



In Wages Bill Rejected |



America Sticks A Goose
- Quill In The Caps Of
The Upper Crust

By EVELYN WEBBER
NEW YORK.

AN exotic new magazine which
sells for 15s. a cOpy has just
bubbled in o life over here. It is
designed, say the publishers, for
“those people who have never
relished the banal or the common-
piace.”

And Gentry, as it is called, con-
tains everything from a_ free
sample of marjoram herb pasted
on the cooking page to a complete
(and also free) architec.’s blue-
print on how to build a Finnish
steam bath in your cellar,

“We doubt whether many of our
readers will ever actually get
down to the job of building a
steam bath,” says Geniry frankly.
“But isn’t it a pleasant idea to toy
with?”

Launched

At Browne’s Beach

Fifty-one-year-old Ernest Lord, ex-harbour police, ship-
wright, wheelwright and engineer was a happy man yes-

terday when he launched his 64 feet

long schooner

Confident I. G., off Browne’s Beach. It took Ernest Lord

and two other shipwrights a
the schooner.

Lord is a man who has as his
not get through life.” That

year and three months to build

maxim: “With one job you can-
is why he has also done a bit

of speculating and a bit of fishing in his day. He worked six
years at the Westbury Garage and it is on this background
that he tells you, “In about a year and a half hence when 1

get sufficient money to buy
schooner myself.”

an engine, I will put it in the |

In 1923 he bought his first fshee—

ing boat and since then he built
hve others. “All the profits from
these and the savings trom work-
ing at my trades went to help
build this schooner,” he said.

When Lord stared building his
schooner, people used to laugh at
him. ‘He had started alone and
people used to say, he was a fool
to think. he would ever get ft
completed, but Lord was confident
in God. “In God’—:hat is what
the LG, of the Schooner’s name
stands for. ° .

He had $5,000 worth in materiat
and $7,000 in cash when he start-
ed_ building his boat,

From the time Lord was a boy
he knew he would some day in-
vest on a big scale and the fact

that he so much loved the sea de-

cided for him which way he would
invest. His grandfather was a
fisherman, and his fa her a ship-
wright. He has a son who is now
a seaman.

He was born at the Crane, St.
Philip. The sea off the Crane is
rough, but at the age of five Lord
had acquired the art of swimming.

Ambitions

Ne does not know anything about
naviga ion. He will have to em-
ploy a captain. But whenever his
schooner leaves these shores, he
will be aboard it and in charge.
He plans learning navigation so
that some day he will be able to
captain hig schooner.

All that is wanted for the
schooner now are the two masts
which he expects to reach here in
a month’s time and the sails, He
already has the canvas for the sails
and sail makers have just begun
to work on them,

“TI expect I will sail from Barba-
dos in about two monthg time,” he
said.

Yesterday before the schooner
was leunched, Rev. Crosby said
prayers and asked God to send
down his blessing on Lord's boat
He said, “Lord, I give it under
vour rare and protection and hope
it will be prosperous.”

The beam of the schooner is 19
feet and the dep‘h 9% feet.

GOLFITO CALLS

Thirty-six passengers arrived
here Wednesday by the Elders &
Fyffe’s liner Golfite which called
from Southampton, England.
The Golfito left port during the
tvening for Trinidad, Mr. C. E.
Clarke was the only passenger
who boarded the ship from Bar-
bados.

The Golfito



is consigned to

Messrs. Wilkinson & Haynes Co.,
Ltd.






a

—







: Hon. Francis Dias
Dies, Aged 76
In B.G.

(From Our Own Correspondent)

GEORGETOWN, B.G., Nov. 1,

Hon’ble Francis Dias, O.B.E,,
Solicitor and veteran politician
died here on Wednesday evening
at the age of 76, Dias was first
elected a member of the old
Court of Policy and later on the
Legislative Council, the served
more than 25 years and on retire-
ment received the royal privilege
to bear the honourable title for
life. He also served for years
On the Georgetown Town Coun-
cil and was Mayor several times,

Dias was also a , prominent
turfite of the old davs, owning
the famous horses Takealight
and Atom. He is mourned by a
widow, two sons—Vivian, Crown
Solicitor of B.G., Frank, also a
solicitor, two daughters Mrs,
Carlos Gomes, wife of the prom-
inent B.G. solicitor who is a
brother of the Trinidad Justice—
Gomes and Mrs. Eric Rodrigues,
wife of the Royal Bank of Trini-
dad branch employee.

Assize courts and Magistrates
Courts throughout the colony
adjourned two minutes as a mark
of respect. His body is lying in
state at the Sacred Heart Church
prior to his funeral at 4.30 p.m,
this afternoon, The flags of all
Government municipal buildings
are at half-mast,





PHOENIX SODA FOUNTAIN

PRL IEE

FALL LSS EFS PA SPC TSA &

} BUY THESE and
‘ SAVE







, , ‘ £ A ytptytet
, SOCOPOEE LO PLLPLLLEL LLLO

A COOLING DELIGHT
TO-DAY’S \)
SPECIAL a 3



On an essay on “The melodies
and rhythms in nature:” “Dont
we know,” say Gentry, “that
Peethoven composed a full sym-
phony around such motifs? And
won't it be impressive next time
you walk through the countryside
with a friend say, ‘That bird is
chirping in E flat major 4-5
vempo,'’

Gentry is published say its pub-
lishers, “for the 100,000 thinking
men in America.” (Total popula-
tion of America is 150,000,000.)

There is a piece (“not too many
words” the editors
ingly) on old cars,

but the

magazine simply pictures the cars. |



|

say encourag= |

|
| A little Marmite added to



PAGE FIVE







The food for Jamily
_ FITNESS






The Vitamins in the food you
eat are not always sufficient

Savouries, Soups, Stews and a

variety of Sandwiches, can
help to make up for the
deficiency. Marmite contains

Vitamin B, essential for build-
ing up resistance to disease

and is particularly good and

Not much thinking to do about | tasty for growing children
that. | Delicious on hot buttered

A new clothes fashion is given toast. —
and a sample of the fabric at ach- | =

ed to the page.
sense of touch.
involved here either.

The wildest addition is ‘o a poem
pheut wild geese some sample
soose quills. (This possibly. rt
the insistence of Mise Cora Corlvle
one/of the editors of the magazine
for men, who once wrote a best-
seller on how to get a husband.)

“The addi‘ion of stick-ons and
somples,’ say the publishers, “in
treduces a new and effective kind
cf ‘reading by touch’

“After the first few pages—
eremmedc with shirt and suit ad-
vertismeents to which cuttings of
the avertisers’ cloth have been
tty shed—you find yourself au-
tomatically running your hand
ov " the pictures in the mag-
azin® as coon as your eye falls on
them, end whether enything is
atteched to them or not.”

SOCIO LOOP OOPS SD

PAIN’S

CELEBRATED
FIREWORKS

The Largest Assortment in

Â¥
>
aS
>

ASS

town is at - - -

WEATHERHEAD'S

Crackers, Wheels, Flower
Pots, Dizzle Dazzle, Squibbs,
Rockets, Roman Candles,
Jack - in - the - Box, Deyil
Among the Tailors, Jet
Wheels, ete), ete,

4c., 8c., 12c., 16¢.,
24c., 36c., 60c., 72c.,
$1.08, $1.44, $1.80
$1.92, $2.64, $3.36
and $4.32.

SPARKLERS
MATCHES (Red & Green

Prives:

l4c, pk, of 12

—6c. Box
RED DEVILS .... 3c. each
BOMBS t .»+ 2c. each

Call in and make your Selec-

tion To-day.

BRUCE WEATHERHEAD

LT) = Head of Broad Street

POLE CLECSPS ESL PSPSPS SSSSOSSEPESSSSS. OSSSSGPPSOSOSSSOOSS GSS OPA SS

PLLC E LLL LLL LPL PLL LLLP

PLEA LLL LLL

oo



OCC SSSSSSS

~

5%

KNIGHTS

4,
CLS OS

os

-

oa.

Ce

Irresistible to the
But no thinking |

MARMITE

+
SS

‘HE VITAMIN B YEAST. EXTRACT

a -~- _ — si tlle Sen rere cece aipisic





oe ee ——— es ee

GOLF



GLOVES

Now obtainable at...

WM. FOGARTY (pos) LTD.



THE UNDERMENTIONED ITEMS ARE ONLY A
SMALL PROPORTION OF OUR WIDE RANGE OF

hHITCHEN REQUISITES

“HAND? PLATE
SCRAPERS
WIRE STRAINERS |
ASBESTOS STOVE
MATS
POTATO RICERS
WOTATO CHIPVPERS,
COOKS’ SIEVES
BUTTER CHURNS
DOMESTIC SCALES
MEAT MINCERS
BOILING STOVES
KITCHEN KNIVES

ICE. SHAVERS

BREAD KNIVES
METAL TOASTERS

| dAPANNED TRAYS

) “WIRD DISH COVERS

| BGG BEATERS

| PASTRY ROLLING

| PINS

KNIFE SHARPENERS
BEAN SLIGQERS
STEEL WOOL
KITCHEN SPOONS

EGG TIMERS MEASURING SPOONS
WOOD SPOONS (Sets)
(i STOVE MICA
BREAD TINS, DISH MOPS
—Enamd, ICING TUBES
BREAD TINS ICING SYRINGES
OVEN —Japanned | STEAM COOKERS

THERMOMETERS | PRESSURE COOKERS

We also carry a large assortment of
Domestic lines in - ~ -
EARTHENWARE, ALUMINIUM WARE,
TIN AND ENAMELLED WARE



7 WHILI RE AVAILABLE
AT REASONABLE PRICES.

THE GOODS

ie |
HARRISON'S sovesie anowane |



i
s |
- i
|
a
a
“3
% :
2
a







a

ia

in FOR BEST RESULTS *,

®o USE a,

"0060's PURINA CHOWS =

we IN THE CHECKER BOARD BAGS ‘,

a H. jason Jones & Co., Ltd—bDistributor, =
a

1 a

aaa =







OES



SPPPSCSS

s
ik ‘a
BS Originally This Week
8% EVAPORATED MILK per tin 29¢ 26¢ §
‘% CONDENSED MILK... ye Bae 31 3
§ IMPERIAL VIENNA SAUSAGES ,,, 38c. 34 $
° SPAGHET ES WITH CHEESE 1! ‘ y
$$ T AUCE ..... 20 16¢ x
% FIG SPONGE PUDDING 35¢. 30 x3
|} SULTANA SPONGE PUDDING 35c 30¢ x
§ Gainer cee
1% & pe = 35e 30¢
x MIXED FRUIT SPONGE PUDDING 35c 30¢ %
Sensi incswasirsesieearereidiacbto >
% DOMINICA NAVEL ORANGES : 6c.
% SLICED BACON—»per Ib. ; i $1.00 %
x SLICED DANISH HAM—per 1b Gs 1.76 &
* DANISH SALAMI SAUSAGFS—oper lb. 1.31 %
% CAMPBELL’S CONSOMME SO!P-—per Tin ; 390. %
% * BOULLION SOUP—per Tin ; 39 ¥
% SOUTH AFRICAN LOBSTER er Tin 69c. &
% NORWEGIAN PEELED SHRIMPS—per Tin . 86c. %
§ DUTCH STRAWBERRIES in LIGHT SYRUP—per Tin 69. R|
y APIE PEANUT BUTTER—per Jar 58c. }
g + ’ ”, %
¢ STANSFELD, SCOTT & CO. L®D. :
5, %
y ,

‘
EF SOOO OOOO OOF OLSON

HOW MANY SCREWS IN
A JA

?
WIN AN EKCO RADIO





GUESS COUPON WITH. EVERY
OVER $5.00‘ CASH BILL
FROM NOVEMBER IST



A. BARNES & CO,, LTD.

. EEE SE oo Ee eee
I
EN





a ee a eh en PE EA a,



PAGE SIX FRIDAY, NOVEMBER 2, 1951









3 3 5 outh and
|_ Bleeding Gums. Sore = pyerrhea,

| money Tenemia
age. Get 4mosan trom Ze the guar-
Amosan 53°)"
, you.
ter Prorshea—Trench

FEEL LIKE
THIS —
TAKE |

WINCARNIS

TONIC WINE

AND FEEL



MICKEY MOUSE



















+--+ SHALL HAVE T

YOu FOR TRYING TO HELP NOUR FRIES

Ke






eh
packet A}







LIKE THIS!

BE HEALTHY
& HAPPY.

OH, DAGWOOD DONT 2
GIVE ME AN ARGUMENT )
EVERY TIME TASK»:

ITS HUMANLY IMPOSSIBLE
TO LUFT BOTH FEET





CORN FLAKES
todayl

See Ihe =- =
ADVOCATE
for Best BOOKS









SSO

IT P

YS YOU TO DEAL HER

oC















USUALLY NOW USUALLY NOW ff
Pkgs. Jacob Cream Crackers 49 38 = =6Tins Grapefruit 55 44}

Pkgs. Polar Icing Sugar 37 34 ~~ Bottles Dows Stout 26 «21h

Tins Succotash 34 $0 Bottles Frontenac Beer 26 21



THE LOVELIEST
»LOT IN TOWN

XMAS







ROOM
‘TOMORROW MORNING - SO GET
ie FOR YOU - BUSY RIGHT AWAY AND STACK
WHILE T WAS OL 4 ALL THE FURNITURE IN THE
STOPPED OFF AT MIDDLE OF THE FLOOR-

I
THE PAINTING
CONTRACTOR'S -


















= a YOU KNOW Ti 4 “ a a athe oo
—“Tuat ey ——l A SKEPTIC! / itt bisa besarte k ; . : SSS SSS SSS
Vin & WONDERFUL, IAT GENTLEMAAN... 4 “= me h § —————————— SSS SSS












FORTUNE, MADAME |
ROMANY/ NOW READ | \
MR. KIRBY'S TEA /
Leaves / =

A VARIET*
OF FINE





a. Sore BLACKWELL'S

ELE ALT

Tins CROSSE & BLACKWELL'S
RED CURRANT JELLY

Small Tins SAXA SPICES 15c.
each

Small Tins SAXA GINGER, CIN-
NAMON, NUTMEG







~ for the XMAS

MIXED DRIED FRUIT in Cello-




















IF IM FOLLOWED YOU LL NEVER SEE vas — ‘ ! ne Packages BISTO for Gravies—It thickens,
ICANT SIGN THis ALI? X YOU'LL SIGN THEM AGAIN GOVERNOR? WHEN | ns CAKE g 1-foy'tins AUSTRALIAN ROAST Se te ee
eens ore " : ‘ asNO MOR | : BEEF a ie
IT TURNS THECOUNTRY)IF YOU WANT anal GET} | RETURN WITH THE NOTE *+NO MOR’ \6-Ib. hots of CARIB COFFEE 70é, Bots. CROSSE & BLACKWELL'S
OVER YOUR TO SEE YOUR : CURRANTS—RAISINS—MIXED PEEL— i-lb. bots TROPICAL PRIDE CALVES FEET JELLY
[SANGOF ere | FAMILY AGAIN. PRUNES—also 1-lb, bots. SOUTHWELL’S (Jamaica) MARMALADE 36c, 20 cz. Tins BEMA MOLASSES for {}}
CROOKS J's MINCEMEAT 66c. l-lb. bots JAMAICA GUAVA 26c i)
roe — SPREAD 6c. only Bots, PEANUT BUTTER 42c.
vy { : Rie, Danes cote SKIN Tins FRENCH MUSHROOMS $44e.
XMAS PLUM PUDDINGS Bots, Preserved STEM GINGER Bots, COLOURED COCKTAIL
; i by Noniis A gn ONIONS —- Yellow, Red and
1) MRS, PRES Ee ce oo Ai a ae ON'S ANE . y f Green at 60c. aie bok on white
lbs. net by Peek rrea Os, os



ALLEYNE ARTHUR &

“Your Grocers” = Migh St. Phone us=- We Deliver



—TS













Ceiechisinemenenceninsisbeln
Whe charge for announcements
Births, Marrisges, Deaths, Acknowl-
@dgements, and "n Memoriam notices is

$1 30 on week-days and $1.89 on Sundays
for any number o! words up to 50, and
3 cents per word on week-days and
@ cents per word en Sundays for each
additianal war?,



PoUMmLIC NOTICES

Ten cents per agate tine on week-days
[md 12 cents per agate line on Sundays,
im charge $1.50 on week-days
and $1. on Sundays





NOTICE

PARISH OF ST. GEORGE
Will those persons owing Taxes to the
Parish of St. George, piease pay same

without delay
D. H. A. JOHNSON,
Parochial Treasurer, St. George
1.11.51—3n

—_—



NOTICE
Parochial Treasur-r's Office of
George will be kept at the “Rosary”

The
St

day the ith November

Hours 10 a.m to 2 p.m

nesdays., Thursdays
D

1951
Tuesday, Wed-
"N. A. JOHNSON,
Parochial Treasurer
1.11.51

on

NOTICE

Notice is hereby given that neither
the Master nor the agents of the M.V
CHARLES A. MACLEAN now in port
will be responsible for any debt or debts
contracted by any member or members
of the crew of said vessel’ while in port







Capt. D. J. DOUCETTE,
(Master)
MANNING & Co., Ltd
(Agents) .
31.10. 51—3n
NOTICE
PARISH OF ST JAMES
The returning Officer for the Election
of Members to serve in the Genera:
Assembh/, for the Parish of St. James

has established his Office at Sandylane
Factory. Office hours between the hours
of 7 a.m. and 11 a.m. on Mondays, Tues-
days and Wednesdays
J. H. C. THORNE
2.11.51—3n



NOTICE
PARISH OF CHRIST CHURCH
SEALED TENDERS, (marked on the
envelope “Tender for Loan”), will be
received at my office up to 3.00 p.m
cn Monday 1.th November, 1951, for the
loan to the parish of $7,200.00 »
of interest not exceeding 4% as
ised by the “Christ Church Parish
(Cemetery) Loan Act 1951, such sum to
be repaid in ten annual instalments of
720.40 each together with interest the
first of such instalments becoming due
on October 25th 1955.
Certificates will be
$/20.00 each
WOOD GODDARD,
Clerk of the Vestry,
Christ Chureh
2.11.51—4n






issued in units of

NOTICE
PARISH OF ST. PETER
I hereby give notice that I have
established my office at “Pleasant Hall
Piantation, St. Peter. Office hours: Tues-
Gays, Wednesdays and Thursday, from





10 a.m, to 3 p.m.
C. A. THORNTON,
Returning Officer, _
Parish of St. Peter
2.11.51—3n.



LOST & FOUND

LOST
CAT—One (1) black and white half-
grown Persian Cat from the “Cot”,
Spooners Hill, St. Michael. Finder will
be suitably rewarded. 2.11.51—1n

‘RACE TICKET—Series 1.7000. Finder
will be rewarded on returning same to

















Arthur Gittens, Reed Strect, St. Michaet

2,11.51—1n.

SWEEPSTAKE TiCKET—Series K.K.

0552. Finder please return same to
Coleridge Leslie, Westbury Road

2.11.51—1n.

“Somewhere in Bridgetown Brown

Cise marked C. J Bayne containing
one pair of glasses Finder will be re-
warded on returning same to JOHNSON’S
STATIONERY. 2.11.51—3n





WHITE WOOL MAN'S CARDIGAN—-

Return E. A. Benjamin, Plantations
Building, or Phone 3123. Reward
' 1,11,51—2n



WANTED TO BUY

STAMPS STAMPS

All Kind of STAMPS
at the
CARIBBEAN STAMP
SOCIETY
No, 10, Swan Street.
| £.11.51—2n





NEW SHIPMENT—

GAS COOKERS

JUST ARRIVED !

ALL SOLD

(next to the Post Office) as from Tues- i
Office } tion

| Lta

RADIO—G_E.C



| Holder Bros.,

—

Call and see them at your Gas |

Showroom, Bay Street, and to

avoid disappointment BOOK your
order TODAY from a_ future
shipment.





—S————

siihoneteaiiieanmaiiaals
TO-DAY'S NEWS PLASH

STOP WATCHES
$12.00
“KIENZLE”
The Best made.



{



=

eee

at
JOHNSON’S STATIONERY

Hn



PRESS BUTTONS
Fitted to your Bag or Purse
WHILE YOU WAIT.
JOHNSON'S ARDWARE
FURNISH TO-DAY §
=
x
bo e %
. * th x
Christmas is on the 3
% Way. x
x ; ; 4
Splendid Cedar Wardrobe, be ¥
X with sparkie polish and tall yp
x bevelled Mirror Other Ward- 9 |
XS robes, Chests-of-Drawers, Gay
x Vanities and smaller Dressing
x Tables, $16 up Bedsteads in
x Wood or Iron, Springs, Folding
@ and other Cradies Nightchairs
$5 up %
.
Dining, Kitchen and Faney %
Tables in many shapes and sizes ¢
—China, Bedroom and Kitchen }
Cabinets. Larders, Waggons—Tub 2
and Rush Furniture %
Brilliant Mirrors in passopartout, %
12 x 9 and 14 x 10, $1.15 up— &
*% Birch framed Mirrors 24 x 12 t» %
* 48 x 16, $4 up—Big unframed X&
3 mirrors 28 x 18, $2.95, 48 x 16, %
@ 81.50 %
- o)
x %
% x
§L.S. WILSON 8
a . ~~ 4
3 %
* , %
& SPRY ST. %
4 >
& DIAL 4069 %
.
969055590695 0O% 600ccoews?



FRIDAY, NOVEMBER 2, 1951

CLASSIFIED ADS.

TELEPHONE 2508.





FOR SALE

Minimum charge week 72 cents
96 cents Sutdays % words —
words 3 cents a word week—4
word on Sundays;

and
a“
e



PUBLIC SALES

REAL ESTATE







FOR SALE ATL MOUNT WELTON
Complete plant of Sugar Machinery-
Inspection on application to the Manager
Sale starts at 8.30 a.m. on Monday, 5th
November at Mount Wilton. D. M
} Simpson & Co. 2.11.51—4n.

EVANTON

Situated at Top Rock, standing on half
AUTOMOTIVE an acre, having 4 bedrooms, Dining
Room, Sun Lounge, two fully tiled

CAR—1951 Morris Minor Saloon as| Toilets and Baths,

new. Only 2,500 miles,

in by owner-driver

Owner leaving Barbados. Phone #523
3.11. 51-—2n.





CAR—Dodge Car



driven, mileage 15,000 miles,
condition. Dial 4038. 31.10.51—5n,
CAR: 1951 Citroen. Almost new—

3,000 miles. Owner leaving the Island
Write Box H.H. c/o Advocate
14.10.51—t.f.n.











with Hot Water,

carefully run] Modern Kitchen. Outside 2 Car Garage,
Nearest $1,800. | Servants’ Room, Children's Play

The Gardens are well laid out, iesins
numerous Trees, with double entrance
‘The above Property can be purchased

1948 Model, owner | fully Furnished if so desired. With pos-
perfect | session Ist February 1952. For viewing

etc. Phone 8567 2.11.51—3n.



WORTHY DOWN
Situated at Top Rock, having 3 bed-
rooms with connecting Toilets and Baths

Large Balcony, having a view to the

—__-- — —_——-—--— ,; Sea. Lounge Dining Room, Modern

LORRY—One Federal lorry in working| Kitchen. Outside 2 Car Garage, 2

order, Price $500.00 Apply Manager Servants’ Qrts.. Toilet and Bath,
Drax Hall. 27.10.51—Tn | Laundry.

This Residence has Built-in-Cupboards

throughout. —s Gardens are weil laid

. z= out and fully enclosed. There is an

ELECTRivAL Electric Stove, -Frig., and Telephone

_ already installed. Ready for immediate

FRIGIDAIRE—5 c.b. Fit. A-1 condi-| possession. Further particulars -apply

Orange Hill, St. Peter Ralph Beard. Phone 5010

30.10.51—3n 2.1L. 51—3n

Sirsa See en

RADIO—G.E.C, 10-tube model. Just PROPERTY--Situated at Inch Marlow

overhauled
Phone 4629—4371

2.11.51—3n







condition. Phone 2285

$1.10) .51—3n

REFRIGERATOR: One (1) 5 Cubit ft
Westinghouse Refrigerator in good.
working order. Apply: P. D. Maynard,
Porters Factory, St. James. Dial 2319

7.10.51—6n

MECHANICAL

TYPEWRITER—One Underwood Porta-

ble Typewriter Excellent condition

Swan Street.
30.10.51—t.f.n









MISCELLANEUUS

BONE CHINA—"Royal Crown Derby”;
Crown Staffordshire “Shelley”. Louis L











Bayley of Bolton Lane. 30.10 .51—3n
BAVORIAN PORCELAIN — Louis L
30.10,51—8n.

Bayley of Bolton Lane.



BOARDS—Two large wooden advertis-
ing Sign Boards: Approximately 20 ft. x
12 ft. Purchaser must remove same

One Sign Board is located at “Welches"
—St. Michael—the other at Oistins, near
Plaza Theatre. CITY GARAGE TRADING
CO., LTD., Victoria St.

28.10,51—t.f.n.
—————
CHESS SETS—In plastic $3.25 each
Broadway Dress Shop. 2.11.51-—3n.

a ertnarenensaomeshaet eeeetenseaeeneiptalcoecreaanetieite
COSTUME JEWELLERY—New stocks |) 19.

of Czechoslovakian Costume Jewellery.
Wonderful value, Louis L. Bayley of

Bolton Lane. 30.10.51—3n.
DIABETIC CHOCOLATE — Made
especially for those who must eat a

restricted sweet diet. 4 oz Bars. Knight's
Ltd. 1.11.51—In





GAMES—Snakes and Ladders Tiddly-
Winks and Ludo at 2/- each, Broad-
we Dress. Shop. 2.11.51—3n.

LADIES COTTON VESTS—Superfine
soft as silk, light weight quality for
cool and comfort. English make, only
9 cents each. Kirpalani, 52 Swan
Street. 2.11.51—1n

MILL: Fan—Tower, Pump, and gal-
vanise tank, sold separately or together
Dial 4038 3,10. 51—5n









— Ss
GIG AND HARNESS—Good condition
Orange Hill, St. Peter 30.10.51—3n



NA S—Galvanized
quantity at 4c. per
Tyre Company, Trafalgar Street. Phone
2696 . 23.10,51—t.f.n.

nelle “a limited





ROLEX WATCHES—Louis L. Bayley
of Bolton.Lane. 30.10.51—3n.
RADOL LEG WASH POWDERS, for
reaucing inflammation caused by sprains











Bruises, 3/6 box. Knights Ltd.
1.11.51—2n.
SILVER WARE—About the largest
stock of sterling and plated wares in
Rarbados. Louis L. Bayley of Bolton
Lane. 20.10. 51—3n.
SADDLE — One Riding saddle in per-
fect condition Apply P. D. Maynard,
Porters Factory, St. James, Dial 2319.
27.10.51—6n
TANKS—Thirteen (13) Galv Steel
Tenks 8f{t. x 4ft. x 3ft. Apply: D. M
Simpson & Co. 2.11,51—4n

PLASTIC—Just opened 36” at 60c
per yard in all colours. Broadway
Dress Shop 2.11,.51—3n
The “MOULI” GRATER: This grater
is really great for grating Cheese Nut-
meg, Cocoanut, Hard-boiled Eggs, Bread
Crumbs etc.—It is Safe, Quick and Hy-
gienic. Only 93 cents each. Obtainable
only from HARRISON'S Hardware Store
Broad Street 2.11,.51—3n

WARM CLOTHING to fit bay of
14—15 years. Two Flannel Suits (Long
Trousers}, Shoes, Pyjamas, Raincoat
Write Box L.C. c/o Advocate.

2.11.51—1n.

LIQUOR LICENSE NOTICE

The application of Golbourne Sandi-
ford, shopkeeper of Hillaby, St. Andrew,
holder of Liquor License No. 857 of 1951,
granted to him in respect of board and
shingle shop attached to a house at
Hillaby, St. Andrew, for permission to
use the said Liquor License at said
premises a few yards away, Hillaby,
St. Andrew,

Dated this 23rd day of October, 1951.
To J. R. EDWARDS, Esq.,

Police Magistrate, Dist. “F.”

GOULBOURNE SANDIFORD,
Applicant.

N.B.—This application will be con-
sidered at a Licensing Court to be held
at Police Court, District “F" on Tuesday,
the 6th day of November 1951, at 11

o'clock, a.m
R. EDWARDS,
cop







iJ
Police Magistrate, Dist.



To Mothers
who cannot



10 Tube, in good |

|
\

— | Dining Table, Pedestal Sideboard, Chef-

|
ib. Enquire Auto |

Electric Sales and Service | Road, Christ Church, consisting of 1 acre

13. perches of land, a new timber
bungalow with all modern conveniences
including garage for large car, stock
Pens, fowl run, 3 minutes walk from the
Silver Sands Beach, Reasonably priced
Apply: Clarke on the premises
2.11.51—3n
——
THE UNDERSIGNED will offer for Sale
at Public competition at their office, No.
17 High Street, Bridgetown, on Friday
the 2nd day of November, 1951, at 2 p.m.
The Two-storied Dwellinghouse known
as “CONISTON” with the land whereon
the same stands and thereto belonging,
containing by admeasurement 6,422 sq.
feet or thereabouts, situate at 10th Ave-
nue Belleville, St. Michael,

Inspection by appointment with Mrs.
L. Toppin, 5th Avenue, Dial 2736.
For further particulars and conditions

of Sale, apply to:—
COTTLE, CATFORD & CO.
24.10.51—t.f.n,

“SORN"

The undersigned will offer for Sale at
Public Competition at their office, No
17, High Street Bridgetown, on Thurs-
day the 8th day of November, 1951 at 2
p.m,

The Cottage known as “SOPRN”, in
the Ist Avenue, Strathclyde, contain-
ing Drawing and Dining Rooms, 2 Bed-
rooms (formerly 3) with all modern
conveniences, and the [and on which
it stands, containing 5,510 square feet,
which is fully enclosed.

Inspection on application to R. A. Cor-
bin, General Traders Ltd.

For conditions of Sale, apply to—
COTTLE, CATFORD & Co.
51—8n 4





AUCTION

UNDER THE SILVER
HAMMER

ON TUESDAY, 6tn by order of Mrs.
A. C, Johnson we will sell the Furniture
at “Dunkirk”, St. Matthias Gap which





BARBADOS

| B’dos Has To Get

A New Harbour
-DR. CUMMINS

} From Page 5.
jand bot.ow muaey w repair their
;homes, all of tnese wings showed
;material progress,

Deep Water Harbour

Continuing on the, work of the
Union, he said that their job was
to get production bonus or back
pay for the workers. “Another
aspect of the Sugar Agreement is
the Harbour Fund. Barbados has
to get a new Harbour, Sugar i:
being shipped in bulk in other
places. Bags are expensive.”

He pointed out that purchasers
were looking to buy sugar from
the cheapest sources. If Barba-
| dos did not fall in line it would
;mean that the sugar would have
|to remain in the warehouse where
|it would be of no use to anyone.
| He said that when the back pay
|was distributed, he was told by a
jclerk in the City that his store
jhad sold out all the oil stoves ex-

cept one. He was very please to
|hear this.
He as them to have com-

plete confidence ip the Party. “If
we maké a miswke, come to us
and tell us. If there is anything
that has done you harm we did not
deliberately intend it to harm
you.”
The Future

Speaking of the future, he said
that he could only tell them that
the Party would ever work in their
interest, “You know these are
funny days, days in which you
cannot make any predictions.
Whatever we may do or whatever
we may say is in your interest.
We hope to start social services,
We are opening a Maternity Clinic
in Speightstown next year, and
we ask you to have complete
confidence in us and with God's
help, we cannot fail.”

Mr. Mapp said that the Labour
Party was a democratic one. They

alwavs thrashed out things on
Monday nights. He said that the
campaign was yet early and he

would have monv ore opportu-
nities to sxe9k to them.
“Political work is never finished,
because men’s minds are always
progrescinz,” he said.

Sea Rock Seer

@ From page 4
puncheon rollin’ ‘bout de roa&h
But, man wha ah sayin’? Ah ent
properly wake up outa dat dream.
Dis island is de wurl an’ kin hold
everybody so long as frays in da
sea. When de Lawd see we multi-





includes

fonier, Couch, Rockers, in Mahogany;
Oak Chairs (Leatherette Seats), China
Cabinets; Cedar Linen Press; Pictures,
Screens, Congoleum, Book-shelves: Re-
volving Office Chair, .
&ec., Verandah Chairs; Double Simmons
and’ Iron Bedsteads with Springs; good
Mahog. Mird. Press; Carpet, Larders,
Kitchen Tables, Shelvador (Refrigerator)
Cabinet; Coal and Oil Stoves; Kitchen
utensils, Elec. Iron: Cow Sheds with
Galvanized Roofs and other items

Sale 11.80 o'clock, Terms cash

BRANKER, TROTMAN & CO.

Auctioneers
2.11.51—%

PERSONAL

This serves to notify the general
public that I am no longer responsible
for any debt or debts contracted by my
wife MAUDRIE CLARADINE YEAR-
WOOD (nee Wiltshire) or anyone else
except by a written order signed by me

CLIFTON YEARWOOD,
My Lord's Hill,
St. Michael
1.11.51—2n,





The public are hereby warned against
giving credit to my wife SYLVIA
WATERMAN (nee HEADLEY) as I do
not hold myself responsible for her or
amyvone else contracting any debt or debts
in my name unless by a written order
signed by me.







URALE WATERMAN,
Pine Developing Area,



- St. Michael
1.11.51—2n
WANTED
i ae ee a



Barbados Company requires real first
class Secretary. Very high standard in
Shorthand and Typewriting is essential
together with sufficient experience and
ability to control an office and if neces-
sary interview clients, High Salany paid
to successful applicant. Apply with Testi-
meonials to Box C.C., c/o Advocate Co.

1,11.51—2n

EXPERIENCED NURSE—Apply: Mrs
friedman, Blue Waters 10, Rockley.
2.11,51—2n.





STENO-TYPIST: An experienced
Steno-Typist for our Office Apply in
person with written application to Sec-
retary Dowding Estates & Trading Co:,
Ltd., Bay Street 2.11. 51—in
—

TYPIST: Good Shorthand Typist. Office
near Broad Street, full-time. Salary
in accordance with capabilities. Reply to
W.R.G. c/o Advocate Advt. Office.

2.11,.51—2n





WASHERS, froners, Pressers. Barbados
Dye Works 2.11.51—1n





feed their babies

| i Don’t worry ! Cow’s milk can be prepared so that the youngest baby
can digest it without trouble. The addition of Robinson’s ‘ Patent’
{ Barley prevents the milk forming large clots in baby stomachs,

‘Patent’ Barley.



pOBINSONs

Lae

Bry tha!

q ees




j °



making it easy for the delicate digestive organs to do their work
thoroughly whilst getting them ready to digest heavier foods later
in life. That’s why wise nurses and mothers always use Robinson’s

OBINSON’S

‘PATENT’ BARLEY |

ply so fast he kin change we all
into penguin dat will eat frays
an’ guano will tek de place uv
sSugar—soon we goin’ live in de
tree top like birds any way.”

By this time, a squad of female,
fray vendors had descended on
Joe’s pile and it soon vanished;
money jingled in his pocket and
he had enough for meny square
meals. Joe Cordle was indeed his

happy and contented self again.
However, we must thank his
gloomy spell, followed by a pro-

phetic dream, for many pearls of
economic wisdom,

CHANGES IN BILL
REJECTED

From Page 5.
session was nearly closed and if
they could see their way to ge.
that important legislation on the
Statute Book they should try to do
so.
The Hon, the Colonial Secre-
tary moved that the Council pass
a message to the Other Place
s.ating that they had withdrawn
their amendment to section 2 of
the bill but insisted on the other
amendments made by them.

This was passed on a 5—4
division as follows:—

Ayes:— Hon'’bles .F. E. Field,
K. R. Hunte, Dr. A. S, Cato, Vv. C.
Gale and the Colonial Secretary—
(5).

Noes:—Hon'bles R. Challenor,
Dr. H. G. Massiah, G. B. Evelyn,
Mrs. M. Hanschell—(4).



















STOMACH
upsets

‘When the stomach is upset
as a result of hyperacidity, a
dose of De itt's Antacid
Powder will disperse the pain
and distress right away.
Flatulence, heartburn and in-
digestion are some of the
symptoms that this excess of
acid in the stomach can brin,
in its train. De Witt's Antaci
Powder soon neutralises the
acid and at the same time
other ingredients in the well-
balanced formula soothe and

otect the delicate stomach
ining. ‘Get a supply right
away.



ANTACID
POWDER

Neutralises Acid
Soothes Stomach

@ For use away from home
@ No water needed Carry a few







Relieves Pain





@ Prompt relief De WITT’S
> © Easily carried ANTACID
p @ Cell-sealed =TABLETS

l> Standard Size, 24 Tablets
Economy Size, 60 Tabiets



SHIRT

Palmetto Street

Obtainable at all Leading Stores













BUY A BETTER
FOR LESS MONEY
5

RELIANCE
SHIRT DEPOT



‘Pie Corner”
Inquiry
Adjourned

THE inquiry into the circum-
stances surrounding the death of
Arthur Greaves of Pie Corner,
St. Luey, who died on his way to
the General Hospital on October
20, continued before Coroner Mr.
C. L. Walwyn at the District ‘A’
Court yesterday. It was adjourned
until 2 o'clock today.

Forty-eight-year-old Adriana
Greaves, mother of Arthur|—
Greaves, said that she Last Sew] cesses
her son alive on Saturday night,
October 20, at about 7.00 p.m, |

On Wednesday, October 17, he
came homé complaining of terrible
pains in his stomach and head.
she soaked his head with Limacol.
He refused to eat anything.

The following morning, Thurs-
day, at about 6.00 a.m., he was
still complaining of the pains, but
he went to his work at Hope
Plan‘ ation, He again did not eat
anything. As usual she gave him

(ee ee

DUTCH. HOUSE
APPROVE SCHUMAN

IRON, STEEL PLAN

THE HAGUE, Oct. 31.

The Second Chamber of the
Dutch Parliament became the
first national legislative house in
Burope to approve the Schuman
Plan to pooling West Europe's
iron and steel,

The vote was 62 to six with
only the Communists voting
against, The First Chamber will
eensider the Schuman Plan later
this year, The Second Chamber
is the lower and most important
house of Parliament.—Us?P,









"LAA

eight cents to buy his breakfast, Enjoy the hospirality, com-
but he returned home with this. vagy nd atone serv-
At about 5.00 p.m,, she saw him â„¢

lying on the bed. He was in a ice which have made PAA

crouching position and complain-
ing of pains, She once more used
Limacol on his head and she
asked him if he had anything to
eat at his work. He replied that

“first choice” of veteran
travelers the world over.

he did not. NE vw Y ORK
: , = Anointed | Via San Juan or
Qn the Friday morning she

noticed a cord around his waist.
He was_ still complaining of
severe pains, She asked him what
was the meaning of the cord and
he told her that a woman had
anointed him with salt and
kerosene oil, He did not go to
work on that day.

She said that her son spent a
restless Friday night. On the
Saturday morning she awoke him
at abSut 7.00 a.m., and gave him
a dose of castor oil. He brought
back up some of this, along with
clot of blood. He was now very
weak, She gave him nothing to eat
Lut he constantly called for water.
He again vomited blood at about
2 p.m., on the Saturday and she

lines from Mam Reduced day,

round-trip Excursion Fares now
effect from Sen Juan.

All PAA flights to New York
now land at Idlewild Airport
instead of La Guardia Field.

MIAMI

Daily fighp—ocw-siny serving from
San Juan, Special 5-Day Round
Trip Excurston Fares now in effect.

ST. CROIX

ST. THOMAS

Frequent flights by swift Convair-
iy Clipper*. Convenient depar-
ture times.



decided to take him to the) You ean now “fly PAA” to
doctor. EUROPE, SOUTH AMERICA,
_ Ate about 7.00 p.m., on the} AFRICA, MEXICO, the FAR
Saturday she took him to Dr.| EAST—in fact, completely around
Clarke at St. Peter. the world,

She said Dr, Clarke examined
her son &nd ordered her to take
him to the General Hospital right-
away. left with Arthur for
the Hospital, but he died on the
way, At the time she was holding
him. in her arms. She went to the
Publi¢ Mortuary on the Sunday
and identified the body to the
doctor.

Violet Greaves, sister of Arthur
Greaves, corroborated the evidence
of her mother, Adriana,

For 22 years the leading
international airline—PAA
was first to link the Amer-
icas by air, first to fly to
all six continents.

For reservations, see your
Travel Agent or



DRIVING WITHOUT
APPROPRIATE LICENCE



A FINE of 30/- was imposed ’ A yy
e le Pectin of St. Thomas by ¢

r. E. A. McLeod who found him
Fae e ee mere = PAN AMERICAN
. along Roebuc reet, St,
Michel, on July 21 without an Homo Avinars
appropriate licence, .

fine is to be paid in 14 days DaCOSTA & CO., LTD.

Broad Street — Bridgetown
"Phone 2122. (After Business
Hours 2303)

or in default one month's impris-
onment,

RATES OF EXCHANGE

THURSDAY, NOVEMBER 1, 1961

CANADA
(ineluding Newfoundland)
64.8° pr, Cheques on
Bankers 52.8% pr.
Demand
Drafts 62.65% pr
4 Sight Drafts 62.5% pr.
8% pr Cable = nec bewoun thas
3% pr Currency 61.3% pr
Coupons @.6% pr.

NOTICE



Smedley’s Mixed Vegetable
in tins

Smedley’s Cream of Tomato
Soup in tins

Crosse & Blackwell
Salt in Bots.

Crosse & Blackwell Curry
Powder in Bots.

Crosse & Blackwell Marrow-
fat Peas in Tins

Nestle’s Milo Tonic Food in
tins

Nestle’s Nespray Powdered
Milk in tins

Koo Plum Jam
Large & small

T’dad Fine Quality Cocoa —-
L&S

Select Powdered Milk in tins

Bots. of Anchovy Paste

Tins of Three Bay Tomato

Table Any clothes left at the

following Sanitary Laun-
dry Depots before De-
1950, will

be sold, In future, any

cember 31st,
in tine— laundry or dry cleaning
not redeemed after three

months will be sold.

Juice
Tins of Farrow’s Fresh Gar- Country’ Road
den Peas i
Tins of Sasso Olive Oil Marhill Depot
&S

Tins of Liquid Stove Polish Aquatic Depot

Pkg. of Fab Soap Suds

INCE & Co. Ltd.

6. 7, 8 & 9 Roebuck St.

St. Lewrence 2 sot.

2.11.51.—6n.

The Designs and Shades of our recent shipment of

PLASTIC CLOTH

for Curtains are simply GORGEOUS.
Come, Have A Look For Yourself.

CENTRAL EMPORIUM

Cnr. BROAD & TUDOR STREETS.

THE

Phone 4764















PAGE SEVEN



SHIPPING NOTICES
Canadian National Steamships



















SOUTHBOUND
Salls Sails Salls Arrives Salls
Montreal Halifax Boston Barbados Barbados
19 Oct 22 Oct 1 Nov 1 Now
29 Oct 1 Nov 10 Nov 10 Nov
9 Nov 12 Now 14 Nov 23 Nov %% Nov
23 Nov . 25 Nev 5 De: 5 Dee
’ 3 Noy 9 Dee 10 Dee
Morrupounn
Arrives Arrives Arrives Arrives es
Barbades Boston Halifax Montreal :. ”
LADY NELSON" 6 Nov TM Nov 18 Nov
LADY RODNEY" 6 Dee 7 De * 18 Dee,
1952 1952
“LADY NELSON” 22 Dee 3 Jan 4 Jan
nied



GARDINER AUSTIN & CO., LTD.—Agents.



ROYAL NETHERLANDS

“
“
u
w

SAILING TO PARAMARIBO AND

@RITISH GUIANA Sailings to
M $. ABANEMNOR—Tk Woversber 1981. ENGLAND & FRANCE
SAILING TO TRINIDAD, PA. A « "
AND BRITISH GUIANA GASCOGNE November
» 8 COTTICA—22nd October 1951 3rd, 1951, via St. Lucia, Mar-
M.S. BONAIRE—i9th November 1951 tinique, Guadaloupe and
SAILING TO TRINIDAD ANP Antigua
CURACAO ,

s

{

“CAN CRUISER” .
“CAN CHALLENGER"
“LADY RODNEY" ‘
“CAN CONSTRUCTOR"
“LADY NELSON .

3
% Cargo and Passengers for Domin-
ca, Antigua, Montserrat, Nevis and
St. Kitts. Date of Sailing will be
*














SAILING FROM EUROPE
S. HYDRA—19th October, 1951.
S. AGAMEMNON..25th October 1951.
S BONAIRE-2nd November 1961.
S. HERSILLIA—Srd December 1951.
SATLING TO PLYMOUTH AND

AMSTERDAM

8. WILLEMSTAD——éth Nov. 1951.
S. ORANJESTAD—4th December 1951,

FRENCH LINE
Cie Gle Transatlantique

8. HYDRA—Sth November 1951,
P MUSSON, SON & CO., LTD
Agents

“COLOMBIE” 24th Novem-
ber, 1951, via Martinique and
Guadaloupe.



The M.V. MONEKA will accept

SOUTHBOUND
COLOMBIE 13th November,
1951, calling at Trinidad, La

Guaira, Curacao, Cartagena,
Jamaica,












Notified
The M.V. CARIBBEE will ac-
cept Cargo and Passengers, for
Dominica, Antigua, Mongserrat,
Nevis and St, Kitts, Sailing Sat-
urday, 3rd inst.
The M.V. DAERWOOD will
accept Cargo and Passengers for
St. Lucia, Grenada and Aruba,
and Passengers only for St. Vin-
cent. Date of Sailing to be Noti-
fled.
B.W.1, SCHOONER OWNERS’ '
ASSOCIATION (INC.)
Consignee, Telephone No

Accepting Passengers, Cargo
and Mail.

R. M. JONES & Co.
Ltd.—Agents.

4047 |




Brighten Up For Xmas

* We have a wide range of

PAINTS -ENAMELS -VARNISHES
“io T, HERBERT Ltd.

1860
10 @ 11 ROEBUCK STREET.





Incorporated
1926

BEARD & GREIG

ESTATE WROKERS '

Have moved to Prince William Henry Street
Proprietor! .MR. R. WILSON, 2

all enquiries should be addressed to him there. r

2,.11.51,—2n.














GOLF SHOES al
Brown & Brown & White
with spikes

SSS Oe







WM. FOGARTY @00s LTD?

—
-



— St

Passengers holding reservations on
or after 31st October 1951, are
kindly asked to contact our Office
regarding time and days of
departure of their flights due to
change of schedule.

BRITISH WEST INDIAN AIRWAYS
LTD.



Ps

Lower Broad St.

Phone 4585 â„¢.





HOUSE SPOTS -
RENDEZVOUS HILL



AVERAGE AREA 60 x 80

AND PRICED |
$1,000 to $1,700 |

A. BARNES & Co, Ltd.





thar

kode









PAGE EIGHT



Carlton Still Heads First THOUSANDS

Division

Marshall Has Fine

- Batting

Average

BY THE SPORTS EDITOR

CARLTON have maintained a elear lead in the 1951 Bar-
bados Cricket Association First Division Competition while when the Ameteur ralehtlitting
in the Intermediate Division a single point separates the held their
Regiment from Windward the leaders.

Leeward 34 points, Empire

and Police 32 points each, are

the leaders in the Seeond Division Competition.

The bowling and batting
averages for the First Division
to the end of the Seventh Series
show Wanderers’ all-rounder
Norman Marshall at the head of
the batting averages with the
fine average of 98 runs in five
innings.

T. Birkett who is second has

Denis Atkinson
bowling averages with 16 wickets
taken at a cost of 843 runs each
but J, Edghill, Carlton’s pace
bowler has 30 wickets, the highest
individual amount taken by a
bowler in this series and this has
gained him second place.

The following tables set out in

not reached half this average, his detail the situation up to
being 44.33 in eight innings, October 26,

BATTING

Batsmen I. NO. Total HS. Ay.
N. Marshall 5 1 392 137 98.00
T. Birkett 8 2 266 117 44.33
Cc. Alleyne 9 2 284 103* 40.57
A. Taylor 7 1 218 112 36.33
W. Greenidge 6 2 145 130 86.25
Cc. Hunte 7 1 202 64 33.66
A. Blenman 10 l 273 80 30.33
E. Edwards 9 0 267 77 29.66
A. Skinner 6 0 175 65 29.16
L. F. Harris 6 0 162 95 27.00
Cc. Smith 8 0 216 61 27,00
C. Atkins 8 2 160 40" 26.66
N. Lucas 9 1 209 56 26.12
W. Knowles 7 0 172 104 24.57
G. ood 5 1 97 54 24.25
O. Robinson il 2 217 46 24.11
N. Grant 10 0 238 87 23.86!
F. King ss 9 3 136 44° 22.66
C. Blackman (H.C.) 10 1 197 36* 21,88
B. Porter a ll 0 231 96 21.00
C. Me Kenzie 10 2 1638 32 20.37
K. Branker 8 1 142 71* 20.28
Cc. Greenidge os sk 6 1 100 62 20.00
N.B. * Denotes not out.
BOWLING ( ati
Bowler o M. R. w, AV.

D. Atkinson 19,5 8 195 (16 8.43
G. Edgehill 119.4 24 288 30 9.60
L. F. Harris 58.5 12 150 15 10.00
H. Barker 120.5 80 242 22 11.00
K. Warren 16 165 15 11.00
M, Simmons 117.1 33 268 24 11.16
C. Bradshaw 70.5 13 201 17 11.82
J. Farmer 43.1 0 202 17 11.88
J. Williams 92.1 14 202 17 11.88
K. Bowen 118.3 17 348 29 12.00
F. King 110.5 20 301 25 12.04
O. Fields 78 16 225 18 12.50
S. Headley 79.5 il 2 18 12.66
I. Burke 107 i4 B12 24 13.00

E. Branker
F. Phillivs
N. Marshall
+ King (Emp.)

°
heads thie

Basil Grant
Chosen As
Mr. B’dos

SHEILA HINDS IS
“MISS BRIDGETOWN

Basil Grant, who was earlier
this year chosen as Mr. Bridge-
tewn, was erowned Mr, Barbados

Association of Barbados

Island Championships and Body
Beauty Contests at Queen’s Park
last night. Lionel Maloney was
a close runper up for this hon-

ur.

The honour, Miss Bridgetown,
was won by 19-year-old Sheila
Hinds. The large crowd that
attended was treated te a grand
display of weightlifting, muscle
control by Gold Bede, contortion
by Audley Simpson, strong man
feats by Martin Bynoe and a
trapeze display by Gold Bede and
his son Rudy Linton.

Errol Douglas of the Middle-
heavy division, gave an exhibi-

tion. In the press his first
attempt was made with 215
pounds, This was an excellent

lift and he went on to press 225
and 235 in fine style.

His first snatch was at 205. He
did the second with 215 but failed
4 his third attempt when he tried

5.

Failed at 300

In the clean and jerk Douglas’
first attempt with 270 was done
in easy style. He next took 300
and if he had been successful with
this he would have been the third
person in Barbados to perform

0 this feat. Strong man Bison was

the first and St.Clair Warner the’
oa They are both now in the

In the Bantamweight division
H Stoddard (120 lbs.) of York,
met C. Barker (118%) of Aero.

‘The bar was unusual to Barker

and therefore he was not very
successful with the press.! Stod-
dard won, totalling 510 Ibs.
Barker totalled 490.

Seibert Rudder defeated H.
ee vite S oaias of

or. ub, wi! a weight of
1324, totalled 575 lbs. Thompson
scored 560. His bodyweight was
also 132}.

Clement Jackman defeated R.
Cox of Acro in the Lightweight
division. Jackman totalled 665 and
Cox 640,

In the Middleweight division
Sam Maloney defeated George

. Greenidge 1075 24 275 19 1447 Bynoe. ey scored 640 and
R. Austin 92 17 271 18 15.05 Bynoe 620,
B. Greene 113 29 279- 16 17.43 Edwin Rogers and C, Goodridge
V. Mc Comie 1113 16 343 18 19,05 Of Leeward, totalled the same
C. Mullins 1224 28 302 15 20,13 amount, 640, in the Light Heavy-
. Grant 90.3 2 362 17 21.29 Weight division but Rogers won
N L. G. Hoaa 96.3 5 370 16 28,12 OWing to his lighter bodyweight.
Won Lost i i
eine Played Won Lost 1stInn, 2ndInn Pts. Av. Prize Giving
1. Carlton pean ec od 0 1 25 69,44
At the conclusion of the show
2, Pickwick .. 5 2 0 2 1 19 OL5S is cuinse orape presented by Bir.
3. Empire 6 3 1 I 1 22 61.11 Freddie Miller, M.C.P.. President
4, Wanderers G2 4578 4 1 19 On). Clee uauan
5, Spartan Ss 0 3 15 50.00 ere
6. — College 6 2 2 1 1 16 44.44 He said that he was particular-
$i Comers” } ft 7h FRR Rey tae ie tas tts
: ( 00 ance. ri us a
1. yMPc 5 0 4. 0 gf B 9g. SOS to make the show @, success.
N.B. The Spartan-Y.M.P.C, is to be replayed; Pickwick-Com- pote ‘anked : >

bermere abandoned.

INTERMEDIATE ‘
Club Played W: Lost ts Im 2 na In
ye ‘on , 2nd Inn

1. Windward 3 6 3 1 +" 1 *e

2. Regiment ; 6 2 1 3 0 2

3. Empire be 6 1 2 3 1 16
4. & Wireless .. 6 ey 0 2 3 15

5. in Pe 6 1 0 0 5 11
6. Mental Hospital 6 1 3 1 1 10
7. Pickwick Si 6 0 1 1 4 7
8. Wanderers ey 6 0 2 1 3 6

* SECOND DIVISION
‘on’ = Lost

Club Played Won Lost IstInn. 2ndInn Pts,
1, Leeward 9 4 1 3 1 34
2. pe 8 4 0 2 2 32
3. Pol 8 4 0 2 2 32
4. Carlton 8 3 0 2 3 27
5. College 8 1 0 5 2 23
6. Lodge 8 3 3 1 1 22
7. Foundation 8 1 3 2 2 14
8. Central 9 1 5 2 1 13
9. Y.M.P.C. 8 0 2 3 3 12
10. Pickwick 8 0 2 2 4 10
11. Combermere 9 9 2 0 7 7
12. Wanderers 7 0 8 0 4 4



Sea-eggs Are In Short Supply

Housewives are complaining of
the shortage of sea eggs. Mr.
D. W. Wiles, Fisheries Officer.
told the Advocate yesterday that

is shortage is really due to the
early picking of the eggs which
Btarted in June.

ut there is no tremendous
shortage in Bridgetown. He said
that it takes about 14 sea-eggs to



WANT SOME
Y-LAUGHS!IT'D

TO IN

MY OL! PAL
PINKY +5.

fil a shell properly. Many divers
have stopped diving for the eggs
in order to have their boats
ready for the flying fish season,

In some cases’ hawkers never
have the chance to leave the
beaches with the sea eggs as they
are usually many people there
waiting to buy these sea eggs.

PNKY
WS MON,

Bert Banfield, Edwin Rogers,
Grannum, H. E. Bayley and Ben
Jones for their untiring assist-
anee. He said that his gratitude
was overwhelming because ii
was a difficult job to hold a crowd
so large in their seats until nearly
twe o’clock in the morning.



WHAT’S ON TODAY

Court of Original Jurisdiction
Court of Appeal and Lower
Courts—10 a.m.

Films for Public at the British
Council—5.00 p.m.

Mobile Cinema at Princess
Alice Playing Field — 7.30

p.m.

Police Band at Empire Theatre
5 and 8.30 p.m.

Labour Political Meeting at
Fitts Village, St. James (Mr.
Holder)—8 p.m.

Electors’ Association Meeting,
Bay Land, St. chael — 8

p.m.
Rediffusion ‘Friday Misccuicny’
at British Council—9 p.m.

CINEMAS;
EMPIRE: Revuedeville 1951 5 and
& 30 p.m

PLAZA: (Bridgetown): The West
Point Story 2.90, 445 and 8.30

Pm.

ROYAL: The Wicked Lady 4.30 &
815 p.m

ROXY: The Astonished Heart &
Destination Unknown 4.30 and
3.15 p.m

OLYMPIC: Searlet Street & The
Magic Bow 4 30 & 8.15 p.m






























BARBADOS ADVOCATE



WATCHED
HIM LOSE HIS SiGHT

Hy George Whiting

PORT offers rich endowments to its favourites.
Seme end their careers with a super-taxed
bank balanee, others with a sideboard full of silver.
Life stories im the ne vspapers, portraits in oils,
even a very occasional] knighthood, are other per-
quisites.

Boxer Mac Joachim, also at the end of his career,
has not been quite so fortunate. Ali he 7 to show
at the age of 24 is a pair of smoky specthcles.

That, for a good-looking, well-muscled yong
man, is no great reward. You might even call i
a tragedy.

This week, Mac has been lying in Westminster
Hospital, where they have performed the first of
two operations designed to mend a broken nose
that once, I imagine, was handsomely aquiline, The
second operation is planned for early in the new

year,
Celebrities

If the surgeons are satisfied, Mac Joachim will
be seen in the ring at Leyton Baths with Den
Ceckell. Roy Ankaran and other ring celebrities
showing off the paces that took them to the top.

Joachim himself will not be fighting. All you
will see of Mac is when he is led up the steps of the
ring, guided between the ropes, afd generally
accorded the assistance proffered to those who can-
not see.








JOACHIM — felt bis sight suddenly xo.

World a shadow

4 i : hat he was a
Por Mae Joachim, boxer, crick- CTicket; and t hocky
eter, footballer and hocky player, ©@Ptain before he reached his

is One of the unfortunates of
sport. He sees the world as a



gymnasium als,

champion Jac ardner.

At 1 he was works as a Stop boxin or you will
shadow through three darks’ spots ©iVilian clerk with US. ; totally blind, they ead e =

they laid him on his right side
for seven weeks, they taught him

later as a sergeant in the Cal- hospital, They
cuthy police. ae they —.
; i iser-weight vice-ca
pletely blind. on B
You soul oot 9 tiatie, 3 sup- Sar Workin Games boxing ‘Owed ;
, that J ’s tra $ e zs ren
onal ee a Beitaive’ ‘TV Turning professional in April, “But suddenly,” says Mac,
screens, with tens of thousands 1049, he was paid £16 for his first felt my right eye go bust.”
of viewers watching. fight and rose to the heights of Joachim left
That
seven months later, the dark- Later the pay packets reached for two suits he had ordered.
haired Mac smiles as he talks £65.
freely and in cultured accents





that float across the vision of
his left eye. His right eye is com-

to walk again.

has played on him. walks of the fight game, i
ban in Calcutta, Mackertich On the night of March 12, oo months;

Hovakimian (his real name) is 1951, they matched him wita eee: ae ‘ 4
the fifth child of an Armenian Reg Springs, and TV viewers Se eee F

shepherd who tured wrestler will tell you it was quite a battle ‘U% , . one to the tune
when he went to India from before Joachim won on _ points, Neary [“-

Persia. Dad, he will tel! you, But nobody, saye Mac

Mac Joachim jis grateful.

self made the grade at Calcutta’s "und that night at Leyton. “Perhaps one day I can get

famous college, La Martiniere. “Spring hit me with his left on

Denying stoutly the existencd top of my right eye.” says Mac. little business if my left eye gets

; “In the next round I could see "0 Worse,” he says.—L.E.S.
ge Orla nt uaa On eee three Springs through a kind of SUSPENSE

; shutter over my eye.
Fonder memory How do you know when you
For Mac it is a



|} Cohn that he ha



a (the baseball finals),
> Ht LDA | fi } y Be “What,”
X | i iH = y zy | “you are telling the court
\ S 0 Fi



hand.” Result : a



To be held at
Y. M. P. C.




on
SATURDAY NIGHT
Brd Nov., 1961, at 8 p.m.
Admission by Ticket—
$1.00 each
Music by .

Mr. Hoppie ‘J ordan’s Orch.
1.11.51.—3n.










DANCE

at
THE BARBADOS AQUATIC
CLUB

(Members Only)
on
SATURDAY, Nov. 3, 9 p.m.
Music by... . ;

Mr. C. CURWEN’S Orchestra
Members are cordially
invited.

Free Admission to Ballroom




‘Tell me

doctor ..
: Can an antiseptic help in healing ?”





‘ounds heal of their own accord when they are kept free
from the germs that cause septic infection. To keep
wounds in the healthy condition for healing, sufgeons

have for years relied upon ‘Dettol’. This ruthless des-
troyer of getms is non-poisonous, gentle and safe on



a ary
human tissues, While it disinfects the wound, ‘Dettol’ FOUR
leaves the living tissues undamaged to continue the WINDS
natural processes of safe and rapid repair.
St. Peter
DETTOL
THE MODERN ANTISEPTIC Closed
until
December

Ist.

YES! every suit








made by us is ERNIES

specially tailored Democratic Club

to “FIT TO oe ALave?
and ee thank e those

PERFECTION ” pg en ga

the world who sent me
cables, cards, flowers, and
otherwise enquired after my
health.

What’s the use of going over-
seas when you can get cured
right here.

Consequently
there will be a meeting on
there will, be a_ meeting
THIS AFTERNOON at
to discuss the probiems of
the First day’s racing of the
adem Turf Club Novem-
r meeting.

MENU:
Consome Froid
a la Francais
The vo. Turkey and

‘am
and Chicken Pelau

Have you visited Bathsheba?
| If not, Go to the Edgewater
Hotel where the Proprietor
is congenial and the wine list
| complete including

| The Best Scotch Wine and

Dutch Grogsch Beer

for after sea bath drinking.

While

* a 2
“tailors and tailors”

there are



we can boast

of being ....

THE TOP-SCORERS

IN TAILORING”
AFFEI & (0.
Ltd.

P.C.S.

Hertfordshjre
himself, Teader of the Evening Standard

went unschooled, but Mac him- knew the tragedy of the fourth Who saw the fight on TV sent 10s,

trate Morris
had a few too
many while “at the World Series”

said the meaiotrnte ;
you were in New York today?”

(Schenectady is 300 miles away.) | ({
“Oh, no, your honour, I was so] }))
excited watching it on TV I for-|
got “that I had a bottle in my

suspended

e

kept wicket and battedNo. 3 at he failed to recognise at > close
quarters one of the matiest of his
heavy-weight | }



































was last March. Now, @ffluence with £30 for his sixth. with his rent and owing money

‘ Since then sympathisers at Mile}:
Eyes, you must understand, are ri ay opt Mave, seeaeiet mouete
j not too ex iv, th er or him; the Boxin, oar

of the macabre joke that sport pensive in the low ality. titth & cana? £2 weekly
an Indian in
£10 note at his
olice have




ft

&
c L ) And in Schenectady, TV was
mueh donderare going blind? For Joachim mentioned in court when a dis-
memory that he could find touch that dread realisation came one _hevelled man, arrested for drunk-
In the Featherweight Division®S # "usby full-back; that he morning a few days later when|enness, told
























SOSS



It’s nearly Christmas!

Here

BARGAIN GIFTS

Ladies’

Ladies’ Khus Khus Hangers ea. $1.00

>...» FRIDAY, NOVEMBER 2, 1951

are some

Skirt Hangers

Ladies’ Plain Hangers

Hankerchief Boxes

Embroidered Note Pads $1.20



Cave Shepherd & Co., Ltd.

10, 11, 12 & 13 Broad Street

Telephone Pads $1.00



DUNLOP Sixty-five

GOLF BALLS

WM. FOGARTY 0s) LTD.

“HOPPER”

The BARBADOS FOUNDRY Le.

= +=

BICYCLE

White Park Road,

a *

+ An Economical Decoration for Walls and Ceilings

SISCOLIN DISTEMPER

Supplied in
WHI

Made ready for use by mixing 2% pints Water

Obtainable in 5-tb and 3%-tb packages at 21c. per tb.
FOR INTERIOR AND EXTERIOR WOODWORK

Use - - -

ED

Dries with a Hard Gloss equalling Enamel Finish.

Powd@et’ form in - - -

TE, , CREAM, GREEN, BLUE,

SUNSHINE and PEACH

with 5 lbs., Powder

HAND
WHITE ‘S’ PAINT:

Does not turn Yellow.

==

PHONE 4456.

_ IS THE MAN WHO HAS PROVED FROM.
EXPERIENCE THE FINE QUALITY AND
DURABILITY OF ENGLISH WOOLLEN

WILKINSON & HAYNES CO

TROPICALS AND WORSTEDS,

IS THE MAN WHOSE WARDROBE 1S
STOCKED WITH SUITS MADE FROM

THESE

IS THE MAN WHO HAS THESE SUITS

WISER

MATRIALS.

WISEST

TAILORED BY—

C.B. RICE & Co.

OF
BOLTON LANE

COS SSS OS SSCS SSS SOS SS SSS OOS OSSSD

ea. $1.00

|
|
































Full Text

PAGE 1

r.xr.r. TWO BARBADOS ADVOCATE FRIDAY, NOVEMBER I, 151 foAib CaUwq o NK aspect of RevuedevlUe Empire Thratrc which may have passed unnoticed by many of the people who taw tinshow is the important role the men of the cast played In making 'he show the success it hat boon. iwataw > lhan last year .,n,i r were definitely more at norm* "on stage." Cednc fhi1li;>s . usual tireless self, pianist, dancer, singer and in the B.G. sequence with "O.'-nr*' i cornelian. Leonard Ban field too showed us he can fall into any role and was every bit AS graceful a,Doreen Gibbs .nid Gloria Ramsay in the Waltz number. Another fine effor: on the p-iri of the men was that of the Glee Singers — Horace Cumberbatch. Hugh ( nrttv" Jordan. Neville Phillip* and Keith Hall harmonising wai verv effective and reflects great rrodil to H Cumberba eh who arranged this number. PICK UP CIRLTO MARRY B.B.G. Radio Programme ranMY. NOVEHamn i. MM It a m PnarMMM PuMi. u a* MM*, 11 INK Tfca, %  I T M MUM< Noe] Clarke. Sumuel Isaacs. Clarrle Layue and Bernard P*"kins. other members of the men's rnM Ssttfl did his bit to Improve product ion Joseph Tudor of eour e is ... r claaa by riimself. As < I mason and guide he surpassed hu> performance as the postman in 'how. Ills entry on Stage—even before he aid bn> thing alwu.Vg raised a "bubble" ol laughter from ihe ..udlenrc. >i. i Ml lot %  i.,i %  ipnaMl—l that he had not memorised the script and Hot Shirt*, Hot Skirts ." W 'HAT with all those Hot RJ Skirts and Hot Shirts, tinted by Kflth Campbrtl'i Sot let * Quintet. The First Hot Shut. I Hot Skirt Dance, t,, be sieged by W 11 tho Manafement of the Get* together Club at the Goodwill j ^ league on Saturday a I g h t. TM mo*mabmr 3. >mreiy promises t< J** ha* a auooasat. Judging takes place at mid" i . ——— -— niaii T M p.mr night and the couple In the pretThtatr* M—ww. • is m naaat tiest shirt and skirt will receive NW#I. B at p m W M M Affair* a a attractive prise* \ ? J*%%£ f m *•£• ^SsS. D.CJ. Civil Servant ,miimi*. II n-Nn.mini I !" V !" ' J" b > BW.I A. (or on-U.Cpniu.~i IP JP p m PYn O.M.I A FEW HAYS OLD! DAILY TELEGRAPH on tale at ADVOCATE SI AIIOMIIV EMPIRE Learnt*. I 1 %  *••*. lllpa Uaki u wiOvak*. 1. akrvhkil Navr rrnfttrnm—. • U Carroll l*v and hi. DUcmvrkM. 1 m Vr-rarn mr Parade. • H p %  *>. %  %  aporl. 1pm The Newt, Lit AaMSSfeJ -*• • a a. MUM. 1 British Guiana is MII> Docia Third Pregrsaanw. Chase. B.G. Civil servant who haa been holidaying in Barbados T.ua u hr first visit her* and she has had a wonderful holiday. During her stay ah* has been the guest of atlas Ercil Osbourne Tutor Street. Back To St. Vincent ALBERT REECE, InWiKj psoiisAgai rBlDAV. NOVBMBKH 1 IS-1 I* U—It Sv p m N*wi IP >•—10 St P I*. Canadian On-ilck K n M*> n m M lAMHA DRESS SHOP I'll"': Blllin SIKICT DRESSES of every kind Ready-made and madc-tu-Order. Also—BKASHIEKES—White and Pink. SIZES 38 and 40—with Waistband nnd without Waistband From S.1.M to 15.44. BETTING ON LOVE NEW YORK BOOKJEo. are busy laying the ouds on romance. They M R ALBERT REECE, pr **"'<* • bookieThese things re another show this year but Carib more popular than sport these was told that owing to certain days. They Brent 'nxed like Ihe circumstances a show will not be sports ev ents. Miss Jud v Graham and her SHOESHINE GIFTS Itrklgclown Theatrical Group are IT is to be an escapist Cniist.. ,, however planning to celebrate mas for the tots. Out go the toy {J. !" !" tho anniversary of thi f show with 'oldlcrs, tanks, and atom wcapnaw list Rings mness. an 'Anniversary Hop' 1 nt thr ons Instead, the toy trade Is conIt la not the first time so many Modern High School on Saturday centrating on such old favourites £,-££* K^XV.* .^SV^^h^irS' "^:H..D-n, bCT ,.,h, l ^<,.„. Bod L. manager and gave a great deal of TO-DAY WLL" ""S -"X.: ** < %  ..*"" ••Hivi roi.vr SIOII %  i.u JP^LI I 'IU T 'I.J'IU 7"M K ""'p' t i'ij''' K i r-"""'' HIDIXN DAS. IK a, „ A| -vTr.it' ''I'KAIXS"' ralri'-u I'lunkeit 1 Inn acU-ea* who became fat after bar aarfornmaaea la FlakI p Girl.Ea u snarry actor Jaass rrsaaaaa Tsratr, ?f Ia| t ,•-,,, StratH An Honour N INE %  ON tight. December 1, the proceeds of as Red Indians, and bringing in -vhlch will go to finance another useful gadgets, such as shoeshine ..__.„. nine signed UM fchow neKt v#ar WUI for ^^ and manicure outfits assistance n Mr? Stuart who of statement after an operation •' PEAA WMHM T-.U> To Sun Imdllpm -iifiiirrxi. raTHia in MM Pat O'BhlF-N \ •l>r*.DIJMI AT DAWN Suaan HAVWOOD ltodt w. i *...... and %  Nlfht ii.. ..Hal i.tlKTI TIIK GARDEN — 8T. I /1KI \MN,, l-OINT" .TAI. A II-HU O* IMI LAW LIWDTOSBS Kc^t SMITH >N IfEClAI II I MIHllhll -.('.IInl HALC A 1KAII. H vilit Its It.nkv %  LANE REVUEDEVILLE 1951 TO-DAY 5 p.m. and 8.30 p.m. 90<>A \OW l'Off THF FISF.ST SHOK OF Tl/F YEAR. Box A Orchestra $1.50, House $1.00 Balcony 72c. Reserved. Opening TO-MORROW. 3RD NOVEMBER. 4.45 am! 1.39 and <'unt,num.: Dally eour*e was the producer. Tlu? fin 1 performances place today, mitmee fit 6 prr tonight nt 8.30. Sitter improve the blood take Kirg's right foot, and These doctors race! This "Hop" promises to be tots for girls apply to the ,, fun W |-, h .. ho , htrlfi uy frocks snd Jeans. n? P**: Film Show CAREER GUIDE TllfcV TRIED an experiment the high school in Shaker __„, ___ ,._ ifi__ ,..—...,..' ". "aaaai araaa> .11 me nign nen. ,, r ,,hnrin on tha i., nuke phrases, not bothering onnected speech or to led to some confusion. Many prople included their initials in sr.tTr. %  *. L .i lll '.'-'rri^*".t:~ 1 ^..|. whol. %  i, ',", in in a|i<'iiv-(i niiihlng. Tomorrow'* poll will forecast, by the same infallible method, 'he results of the election after this one A niii'ii kuhliilfgrtH 1 of accuracy T 3DAY the Beachcomber poll shows a definite forward i in parcentagss. Out of n,43 seemed to go like this: — Tory warmongers (cheers). . Free Health Service (cheers). . Fascists (cheers! . Palmerslon. . gun-boat diplomat lcheers). . Fair shares (cheersl Tory hysteria (cheers). . Happier, more prosperous than ever before (cheeni. Prestige abroad never higher people questioned 368 gave the '< r h*ers). . Cool, level head; same answers as on the previous command (cheers). day, thus establishing a mea i constant of 20 in 811. taking im Surpritotl In unflagging repetition of "What about Mrs. Toplady?" will always end by disturbing and annoying lbs 2 tSg !" /-'-, •,7 n ,0 i 4 speaker. "Who is Mrs. Toplady' \l ££ m d he will whisper to his chairman. <"' %  " 4, The chairman will not be able to *' " %  ';' "•""' help him. •*— Or again, a reiterated cry "What happened to the flslT" w often throw a speaker off I balance. "What fish?'' he will ask. The interrupter then laughs sardonically and tauntingly, and goes on repeating the qucstwv every time the speaker gets Into his stride. I one or lwo completely queerer movements. It is about the new Ren ton application of the i rr0 [-vant words. For Instance, all a man who sits on an ant-heop. double.cube law' t/7T7Ml7l Q UESTIONED about the pea. pushing fiasco. Evans the B M claimed insufllcient fo^d as a cause of his Inability to control the pea. The Mayor Intervened to say: "You must have eaten enough mud to last you a lifetime." Meanwhile it U ele,i that nasal pea-pushing is a 3nepsethat %  port. A well-known physician said: "The human nose is not made for shoving a snu.ll object like a pea through a gag of mud and slush" Reg Bodge. said: "My pea tot stuck in some wet gravel on the track, and it was more than my nostrils could stand A Mrs. Gulpe commented; "The grunts were rirendlul. It Wats lik.watchiug two clumsy anl trying to thrust thebnoses throu.'.i an impenetrabli' wall of sodden Brtof* Milling to ..rrp Rolls __ Ruptn what he hii t.eird. W>'i d mMit *--i %  icrk I " Ro he gjip,. s.. rhai's who %  n i-rhil iam." ht sigh*. t they *t I I wondfT •hxh of ihm rd eh*i skippri MT tni ihfj tt ihr admiral** hindynun." Ktilo *ouU1n*i keep ui itiri ilttf htj if i,'i*.i %  puce ui r.t the I Rock *nd . Km Ruprrt h. 1**1. What Ho you mi ? "* he dtnundi. Hi** you dicovcrtd *>-<-r t t fX, [f!i Ss%>" HORROCKSES FABRICS STRIPED COTTON CAMBRIC •LSI COLOURED COTTON GINGHAM SI.4T WHITE & DYED COTTON LINENETTE SI.SO PRINTED COTTON CAMBRIC ^Sl.5^ PRINTED COTTON FURNISHING ILM ALSO FLOWERED CREPE S2.20 T. R. EVANS & WHITFIELDS YOUR SHOE STORES Dial 1GC6 :o: :o: :o: Dial UM era nuaaruai wnwa % -'IBICHAH) s*ii — T;IUIIA BUOTIH R O Y A L TO-DAY Only 5 A 1.15 'n.versal present.-! . •THE WICKED LADY" Starring vt.irgiret LOCKWOOD -James MASOW TOMORROW .'. SI'NDAY ft •% B.1S Republic Pictures presents FIGHTING COASTGUARD" Starring Brian DONLEVY Forrest TUCKER BOX Opening TO-MOBROW 4.30 and S.15 TO-DAY Only 4.3* A 8.15 Universal Double . "THE ASTONISHED HEART" AND "DESTINATION UNKNOWN SADDLE TRAMPS** -ONE FALSE STEP" OLYMPIC TO-DAY Only 4.30 and HI:, EDWARD G. ROBINSON — JOAN BENNETT in "SCARLET STREET" "THE MAGIC BOW" with STEWART GRANGER Optnlni TO-MORROW 4 M mil I -. ^1-C-M ind 'oih-( I M. Double CHARLES BOYER — LINDA DARNELL "THE 13th LETTER" And The Big Technicolor Musical "ROYAL WEDDING" Starring. FRED ASTAIPE — JANE POWELL V>* ..**** v^j.**



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Havrbadvos



ESTABLISHED 1895



“Collaborators Will
Egypt’s Underground

Movement Warns

Seven Egyptian Policemen |

Evicted From Canal Zone

CAIRO, Nov. 1.
The Egyptian Padorerenns Movement announced that,

hereafter, ahy person helping to supply British troops, will
be lashed in the Publie Square and branded on the face with
fire. The w: came in a leaflet distributed by “Liber-

ation” battalions in the Suez Canal zone.



‘rom All Quarters:



Police Fire

On Rioters
IN CASABLANCA

CASABLANCA, Nov. 1.
The police opened fire on a

The let said that effective from today all “collaborators” |mob of Moroccans attempting to
who. sell or transport supplies to the British Garrison will |"8!t the voting for tne Consulta-

FRIDA







| Churchill [50-50 Chance
'Has A Plan | Fer Cease-Fire










LONDON, Nov, 1.

Prime Minister Winston
Churehill, presented to the Cab-
inet the broad outlines of his
plan to restore Britain to major
power status in the world. Top
priority will be given to. British
development of Atomic energy
and guided missiles. Churchill
long smarted from the fact that
both the United -States and
Russia have outraced Britain,
which contributed the major por-
tion of the basic facts on the
atomie bomb,

Churchill’s Cabinet met for the
second time this week at No. It
Downing Street. Around the tabk

=

By HARRY FER N
NEW YORK, Nov. 1,

The belief is growing
off the battlefield that th
there’s at least a 50-50 chae
et a cease-fire in Kores.â„¢
incident that nobody can fe
could change the while pie
overnight, but if is - pasonably

certain that neither side is

to try to create such an incident.
In other words, the mental
climate is ready for an armistice.
That attitude is reflected in Tokyo,
Washington and Peiping, State-
ments from all sources have taken
2 a more moderate and reason.
ible tone as though all persovis
were holding their breath for fear



be rounded uj
It said that

mark of treachery
The In

Batt

by the Underground and punished publicly.
branding by fire will serve as a “lifelong

Ministry said two days ago that the “Liberation
are determined to force the British ou

t of Egypt

and the Sudan. pond that they were able to obtain arms

on the black
“EYE
In another secret leaflet

un
“ey
paper

ma’ .

FOR EYE, TOOTH FOR TOOTH”
scattered through the Canal zone,
oe forces threatened to meet British troops on an
e As zi for tooth” basis, according to the news-

Meantime, the British seized policemen on the Cairo-
Ismailia road near Tel-el-Kebir, on the complaint that they

| Were preventing Egyptian workers from reaching British
camps. The British troops also ejected El Sami Abdu El
Shami, chief of the Seamen’s Union, trom the Canal Zone,
for allegedly inciting dock workers to boycott British ship-
ping, in line with passive resistance campaign.
According to Press reports, Russian diplomats are confer-
ring with all Arab states on the West's plan for the Middle
East Defence Pact against Communism. Al Misri reported
from Beirut, Lebanon, that diplomatic quarters expect
Moscow to say that particpiation in such a pact would re-
present a hostile act toward the Soviet Union.

‘ “DRASTIC ACTION”

The Egyptian Government today warned the British raili-



tary authorities that they would take “drastic action”. if

British troops do not end their ‘aggressive attitude”
towards Egyptian police in the Canal Zone.

Policemen at Fayid in the
the Governor of the Zone,

Canal Zone today protested to
Abdel Hady Ghaz Aly Bey, and

to the Minister of the Interior against the eviction of their

Chief Officer,

Captain Lufti E. Kholy by the British.

Workers at E] Abiad, the Royal Air Force camp walked

out today, in protest at the

o";7

Sir Harold Briggs
Has Greater Powers

IN THE EAST

SINGAPORE, Nov. 1.
Director Lieut, Gen-
eral Sir Harold Bs was given
almost dictatorial powers on
Thursday as the three-year-old
war against Communist terrorists
entered its third phase.

The official announcement said:
“Full executive authority in all
emergency matters falling within
the sphere of the Federal Govern-
ment has been delegated to the
Director of Operations, subject
only to the overriding authority
of the High Commissioner.

“From July 1948 to April 1951
the campaign against the jungle
terrorists has been directly un-
der the command of the Civil
Government Federation.

An anti-bandit drive gained
new momentum with the appoint-
ment of Briggs as Director of Op-
erations in April, 1950. Then it
was stated specifically that Briggs
was not Supreme Commander,
but his duty was to plan, co-
ordinate and generally direct all
anti-bandit operations. He is re-
sponsible only to the High Com-
missioner with the right to make
representations direct to him on
all matters concerning the con-
duct of the campaign.—vU.P.

TURKISH GENERAL
TRANSFERRED

NEW YORK, Nov. 1.
Tahsin Yazici, Commander of
the Turkish Forces in Korea, has
been recalled for an appointment
to another important post, ‘The
announcement said he will be
succeeded in Korea by General
Namik Argue who is to leave for

his new post on November 7.

—U-P.

Labour Has Majority
In Dominica. Elections
The DO! ICA, Nov. 1,





ford and Winston were

arrest.



;nists and accused the police of
| negligenee today by permitting

is results are five|demonstrate, protected by armed
for Lal of eight, Shilling-} Communists. He said that Russia |
ul | ‘was standing by “with open mouth |

They left for Ismailia.
—UP.

Dock Strike
_ Continues

NEW YORK, Nov. 1.
An attempt to mediate the 18-
day-old unauthorized dock-strike
failed, and authorities took steps
to force the rebel AFL longshore-
men back to work. A 12-hour
fe ce between Joseph P.
Ryan,’ President of the Interna-
tional Longshoremen's Association
(AFL), and John Sampson, the
leader of 20,000 insurgent steve-
dores, ended at 4.30 asm. with

neither willing to compromise

But an hour after the parley
with the State mediators ended,
the French Lines luxury liner

| Liberte docked and not one rebel

picket was in sight as “Joyal” |
union sievedores began unloading;
vperations. City policemen stood
guard in a downpour as the big
liner dropped anchor, and more
than 200 of Ryan’s followers start-
ed handling the cargo.U.P.

“Tudeh” Building
Up In Persia |

TEHERAN, Nov. 1. |
The Iranian Police Chief, Gen.
Manzur Mozayeni, asked the!
Shah for more power to fight the|
“critical” Communist threat in
Tran. He told the Shah ina lengthy |
conference that the outlawed|
Tudeh Party was expanding its |
strength, and showed the Shah
documents uncovered by the police
which .pointed to the Reds’ in+
creased activities.

Although the situation was con-
sidered “grave”,
reports that the police had un-
eovered a Red plot to seize power.
The Rightist Deputy, Jamail En
Ami, denounced the Government's
soft attitude towards the Commu-



Teheran University students to

Both Englishmen were defeated.jto devour this country.”—U.P.



U.K. Racing To Transfer |

Mozayeni @ un |

| accused of having failed to



tive Assembly here on Thursday,
killing one person and injuring
several others. The police de-
scribed the rioters as “Nationals”
who had orders not only to boy-
cott the elections but to prevent
others from voting.

They said they opened fire on
the crowd only after they had
attacked the police with rocks,
injuring four. They said two more
Moroccans were injured.

Stockholm: Many Poles ar-
‘riving in Sweden, claiming to be
fugitives from the Iron Curtain,
have been sent back recently.
Three Polish seamen . jumped
ship at Gothenburg, and* claimed
asylum, Suspected of being spies,
they were refused refugee pass-
ports and repatriated.

Copenhagen:—A Danish man-
ufacturer has invented a thinking
slot machine capable of changing
money and giving correct change.
The machine, which is being ex-
hibited at the Industrial Fair in
Odense, operates with any figure
divisible by five. It is now
patented all over the world.

Rome:—Africa (Calabria), the
poorest Italian village, has been
destroyed by recent floods. Africa
had no road, no electricity, no
doctor, no schools, Its 800 inhabi-
tants lived in hovels, with sheep
and goats. The village was sur-
rounded by precipices, so mothers
would tie rope round their chil-
dren’s feet, to prevent them gei-
ting too near the edge. It is be-

Capetown:—A local doctor left
instructions for the destruction
of his property after his death.
The executor of his will stood by
while a £500 motor car and cara-
van worth £300 were drenched in
petrol and burnt, Inside the flam-
ing car lay his clothes, correspond-
ence and diaries,

New York:—The average length
of life is steadily increasing among
Americans, It is now believed to be
almost 68 years—an increase of
more than 20 years since 1900. The
women do best. Their life ex-
pectancy at birth is 714 years, A
man’s works out at 65 years and
11 months,

Washington:—For 52 hours a
grocer from Georgia, lost in
fwamp while out fishing, fought,
while his own strength steadily
waned, to keep his 15-year-old
son from being engulfed in a
quicksand. Twice he had to shoot
huge water mocassins (a kind of
water snake) which threatened
them, They were finally rescued,
after being spotted by a plane.

REVOLT



SONATE RY AUESAL
Rae STAT) ¥





RUSSIA faced recently,
cording to U.S, State Depart-
ment radio, what was probably
her most serious uprising in
ten years—a peasant revolt in
the Central Asian Republic of
Kazakhstan. Collective farm
peasants are alleged to have
clashed in august with
Communist M.V.D. (Security)
troops. The troops were carry-
ing out forced requisition un-
der a new Stalinist farm pol-
icy. The Kazakh peasants are

satisfy the livestock breeding
and grain production goals set
Communist

by the regime,

| stated the Voice of America

in an overseas broadcast. De-
tails of the revolt were sup-
plied by a Turkmenian nation-
al, who was in Kazakhstan at
that time.





Power To Libyan Govt.

By -{AROLD GUARD
LONDON, Nov. 1.
Britain is racing against time

to -— ywer provi-
sional Bretainent % ee be-
fore Baypt 2 ts in the United
Nations month to prevent the
creation of a new Middle Fastern
state friendly to the Western
Powers.

Official sources said that Egypt's
unilateral abrogation of the 1936
Anglo-Egyptian Treaty had given
a new urgeney to the British plans
to transfer power to Libya, and

make a treaty with its ruler
which would give Britain mili+
tary safeguards in that area

Libya, comprising Cyrenaica,
Tripolitania and The Fezzan, was
placed under British and French
administration by Article 23 of
the Italian Peace Treaty, Britain
administered Cyrenaica ruled by

the Emir Cenisus, and France United States should have any
administered The Fezzan On objections to such a treaty because
November 21, 1949, the United all have identical strategic inter-
Nations recommended that the ests in Libya.
area should become an indepen- They said that it was antici-
dent sovereign state by January pated that the Libyan question |
1952 would be brought before the
Security System United Nations. The Libyan Com-
Officials said that Britain be- missioner, Adrian Pelt, said that
lieves that independence for Egypt would seek to wreck any
United Libya should now be com- moves for British Treaty with
pleted earlier thar planned tate U.P,

and a treaty signed with the Emir

Benisus in order that the area
may be included in the North
4frican security system to halt

the spread of Communism. They
said that neither Frarce nor the

Mr. J. H, Wilkinson, Presi-
dent of the Barbados Electors’
Association and leader of the

* Op ition in the House of As-
se , is seen here addressing
the large crowd which attend-
ed the Association's meeting at
Porters Yard, St. James, last
night. Mr. Wilkinson holds his
Party's manifesto as he tells
his listeners what they propose
to do for them should they get
a majority in the House.





The Victors Are.
‘Marching Again pas seat eee

By LYLE

with Churchill was Lord Cher-| 5¢ roeking the boat,

| well, whose title as Paymastei And this week-end United
; General in the Cabinet also cov-) press war correspondent, Arnold
,ers direct responsibility for] nibble, cabled from a village of
; atomic energy. Before the meet-| panmunjom: “Standing on the
ing, Churehill also named] mudbank before the truce teat
S, S. C. Mirchell the Controller] here, you can look to the east

of Guided Missiles and Electron-

i across golden-grain fleld and see
ci

wisps of smoke rising on the ridge-
line where Americans long to be
plastering the Communists posi-
tion, It cannot be more than three
miles away.”

“Yet sources on both sides here
seem to feel that we are closer
together than we have ever been
before. There is a feeling that a

8.

With his Government nearly
|complete, Churchill's next major
; task is working out with hie
;Cabinet a legislative programme

Winston Churchill summoned
; his top expert en atom bombs to
jlive in the house next door to

WILSON







ae No. 10 Downing Street, and fol-

The meeting was held im DO low t . int. | Compromise can be worked out.
support of the candidature x 6 N LONI N, Novy, 1. jwee aa 7 ee Nobody knows exactly how that
of Mr. Wilkinson and Mr.“]‘ Churchill and Eisenhower partners in victory over Hitler, |t\5 of Guided Missiles, Churehe| 20, be done but almost everybody
EB. K. Walcott for re-election are marching — again. This time, they are out to stop jill's decisive and unexpected | {¢e!s it can be done.”
1. eee at the fortuecuing. }) (he Russians. Prime Minister, Winston Churchill will jactions “underlined the siamif |, Nothing has happened to ehangs

. aha ‘ > : ‘ : ance a rehi * , o es «

General Election. swing Britain's prestige and power behind the United Britain's ao to oo Bs sides: For exaumple troops never

They have been the parish's Europe idea to back up General Eisenhower's defence plans. | with either the United States or|c&" be withdrawn to the 38th
representatives for some years. The British Socialists balked at that. The great man of |Russia in making atom. bombs.| Palle! as the Communists have

A report of the meeting will British polities started that ball rolling at Strasbourg,|The best information is thai} been demanding, ‘The simple
appear in a later issue. France, in 1950, with Juti d mh ‘) | Britain has not made a single} "eason for that is that terrain

; , a resolution adopted by the Council along’ the 38th Parallel is not a



of Europe in a session there.

Churchill called it the “House
of Europe” like his House of Com-
mons. Through it, Churchill sought
to co-ordinate the whole life and

Dean Acheson |








bomb yet, although she has the
scientific knowledge to make one,
UP.



1good defensive position, For the
; Communists, any truce formula
must allow them to save their face
They never want to be put in the
position of being forced to admit

Is Hopeful Of
World Peace

PARIS, Nov, 1.
Secretary of State, Dean Ache-|_





son, arrived for the sixth session Election here, rejected the coal Princess Elizabeth and Prince
of the General Assembly and “ bl 1 plan, because other par-|Philip played hosts to President
declared, “I believe, we Governments. were not}Truman at.a State dinner Thurs-
able im peace.t «Ac! ni ay night. after meeting and
headed the United States ga- British Conservative posi- [charming 1,514 selected guests
tion which arrived by train for tion is that a European organiza-|from Supreme Court Justices to

Le Havre for the assembly
session seheduled to open next

Tuesday, j

The United States Ambassador
to the United Nations, Warren
Austin, said that if the Korean
truce could be worked out at the
session, many problems threaten-

ing tae World sould be solved. He ment level. France, Italy. Bel-|Mount Vernon and the Tomb — of
said that Aches would deliver gium, the Netherlands, Luxem- | ‘he ‘Unknown Soldier in Arlington
a “very important speech” while WINSTON CHURCHILL bourg, and Western Germany, | National Cemetery.

at Paris, but did not say on what
subject.

—

Austin compared the present
session with the last Paris-United
Nations meeting in 1948 “under
the shadow of the Berlin block-
ade and the imminent danger of
conflict created by that blockade.
Here in Paris, we began a chain |
of events that led to the solution |
of that problem. I look forward
to a similar progress at this
Assembly. An agreement on a
truce in Korea would be a signifi-
cant step that could lead to the

peaceful solution of many issues.” abouts, He said the British would
contribute their share, There is
Acheson meets on Sunday with | some Conservative hedging on : .
the French Foreign Minister, | that now, “Empty thy full glass; fill thy empty glass—

Robert Schuman, and later with
Britain’s new Foreign Secretary,
Anthony Eden, to work out a
united Big Three front. American
delegation members said that the
three Foreign Ministers probably
would meet jointly for the first
time, on Monday.

Acheson spiked the reports of | GEN. EISENHOWER

the Big Three meeting being a}
possible prelude to a full Big Four |

























being. of Western Europe against
Communism,

The Socialists also rejected the
French Foreign Minister, Robert
Schuman’s Plan for a European
steel and coal community.
Churchill will change all of that.
The Socialist Government, which
lost last week’s British General

that they were defeated on the
battlefield. —U.P.

Royal ‘Couple
Play Hosts

To Truman




ARTIE’S HEADLINE

WASHINGTON, Nov. }.

tion relating to coal and steel can-

Boy Scouts at the swank British
not be wholly effective if the

Embassy reception The dinner,

greatest coal and steel producer in ,;¢iven in honour of the President
the Eastern Hemisphere is on the}and his family at the Canadian
outside, Embassy, rounded out a heetic day

The coal and steel organization{ cf activity whieh also saw. the
was designed to create a single | Royal couple lay wreaths at two

market, prevent restrictive prac-

of the U.S. most revered shrines
tices, and maintain a high employ-

~George Washington's Tomb at

already have
functioning,
Churchill’s Idea
Churchill's idea was that the
Council of Europe should be the
basic factor in European defence
and economic life. Before the
Council, and in Parliament, he
urged that German rearmament
was sufficient to enable Western
Germany to aid in its own defence.
The Socialists sharnly objected,
but finally agréed. lie keystone
of Churchill's policy toward Eu-
rope was defence. He wanted an
army of 70 Divisions or there- Wi

the organization Britain's future Queen and her
debonair Duke were on the go al-
nost every minute from 10 a.m.
m». They attended a private re-
seption for British Commonwealth
liplomats, lunched with President |
Truman and family at Blair
House, greeted several hundred
British subjects on the lawn of the
British Embassy and finally shook
hands with a long line of high offi-
cials and their wives who re-
ceived gold crested invitations to
the formal reception.
UP.



The “ADVOCATE”
pays for NEWS.
Dial 3113

Day or Night







Britain is already contributing
Divisions to Eisenhower's Atlantic
Pact Army, But it is unlikely that
the British will merge their groups
with French. Gerrnan, and other
soldiers to form European Army
Divisions. They could and proba-

! can't bear to see thy glass neither empty

nor full.” — RABELAIS.

bly will offer strong air support L N Jays when gentlernen of the type of Rabelais thought ‘
a> de all mere ot anne nothing of consuming two or more bottles of fine port
the French and Cermans together during their after-dinner relaxation period, their trend of f

in a friendly and mutual endeav- thought was effectively put into words by the extravagant

; 4 ‘
conference with Russia, saying ua | ; , a ; : ; ; Aaciticy “SaRaie
i E 1 ; § Carey's the 18th Century, whic ‘
Ms te 7d ie THUNDER Ji S, Frenchmen saw Churchill’s plan a song of Carey's in the f
ee ae ee ee : in the same light. The Frencl 8:
—UP. MIGS HA VE Government supported it so active-
? ly that it is known now of the “Bacchus must now his power resign—
* 7 iv Pleven Plan—after Rene Pleven ES
Truman Will Have A SCRAMBLE the French Premier. 1 am the only God of Wine!
. wie In Bonn, Germany, representa-
Talk With “Ike | |tives of the Continental Power: asi ine «

5TH AIR FORCE H.Q., Korea,
ov. 1,

_. WASHINGTON, Nov. |.
The White House announced;
that Gen. Dwight Eisenhower will!bled with 40 “reluctant”



Eight F.84 Thunder jets seram-
MIGs

fly from his French headquarters |over Sinanju in Northwest Korea

tomorrow night
on Western European military 10-minute battle.
problems. Gen, Eisenhower will
meet with the President and other
officials here on Monday and
Tuesday, and wili fly back to Paris
Tuesday night or Wednesday
morning.—U.P.

Princess Elizabeth

na

Communist intercepters

action.—U.P.



(From Our Own Correspondent)
GEORGETOWN, Nov. 1.

name.

Cee eeseee te reece



British Red Crosse Society of London.

The British Ked Cross Society also sent a message of good wishes
for its success, The home was made possible chiefly from a colony~-
wide collection taken to present the Princess with a wedding gift.
After the gift was purchased a balance of $8,992 was left and the
Princess gave permission to use this amount for some child welfare | COOKS,
object. Other money gifts were received, including $14,000 from the

for a two-duy;|today, with no damagé to either
confererice with President Truman!Communist or United States a contribution
flights were made by both the
Thunder jets and the swept-wings

MIGs during the skirmish, but the|be the prestige of Churchill him-
showed

no inclination to prolong the brief| against the Reds.

Cables B.G. Red Cross

eee ELIZABETH took time off on Wednesday to send from |ctate for Public Affairs said in a
Canada a congratulatory message to the British Guiana branch | speech
of the British Red Cross Society, expressing her delight at the | @0ut $2,000,000,000 annually on a
opening of the Children’s Convalescent Home which bears her

are at present discussing the 4°
Division Ground Army. With sup-
port and other troops a_divisior
would number about 30,000 men,
There is a shortage of man-
power and just about everythings
else in Britain. So the Britisr
is likely to be ¢
weapon of which Continenta!
| nations are very short—aeroplanes
rtant than that will

“Let Wine be earth and land and sea—
And let that Wine be all for me!”

To-day, the gentlemen of recent vintage retain the enthus-
iasm of Carey probably not his wish expressed in those last
few lines. They, however, are in full accord with the words

But more im of Rabelais : and find no deeper satisfaction than in doing it —

self, in support of a United Europe
—U.P.



THE K.W.V. WAY
The Only and

U.S. Denounces
r *
Russian Lies
WASHiNGION. Nov. 1.
The State Department Thurs-
day denounced Russia’s propa-
gand, machines for spreading
what it called hatred and “brazen

lies” about the U.S. Edward
Barrett, Assistant Secretary of

the Best.
The PILLARS

that Russia is spending



of

HEALTH INSIST

more massive propaganda machine
than Hitler or Mussolini had.”
—U.P.

2 JAMAICANS SEEK
WORK IN ENGLAND

KINGSTON, Nov, 1.

Another batch of 62 carpenters, |

mechanics and clerks}

started yesterdz by plane for
England via America to seek jot
C.P

on

K.W.V. ALWAYS












PRI ee 00

“Hearse claimed

PAGE TWO



Carib Calling

NE aspect of Revuedeville
1951, now playing at the
Empire Theatre which may have
passed unnoticed by many of the
people who saw the show is the
important role the men of the cast
played in making the show the
success it has been.

They were in more numbers
than last year and thig year they
were definitely more at home “on
stage.” Cedric Phillips was his
usual tireless self, pianist, dancer,
singer and in the B.G. sequence
with “Oscar” — a comedian.
Leonard Banfield too showed us
he can fall into any role and was
every bit aS graceful ag Doreen
Gibbs and Gloria Ramsay in the
Waltz number.

Another fine effort on the part
of the men was that of the Glee
Singers —- Horace Cumberbatch,
Hugh “Cortez” Jordan, Neville
Phillips and Keith Hall. Their
harmonising was very effective and
reflects great credit to Horac>
Cumberba'ich who arranged this
number,

Noel Clarke, Samuel Isaacs,
Clarrie Layne and Bernard Per-
kins, other members of the men’s
cast each did his bit to improve
production.

Joseph Tudor of cour’e is i.. ?
class by himself. As “Oscar” the
mason and guide he surpassed his
performance as the postman in
last year’s show. His entry on
stage—even before he said any-
thing always raised a “bubble” of
faughter from the audience.

He never felt for a liné.and in
fact gave the impression that he
had not memorised the script and
was making up his cracks as he
went along. He was also an able
manager and gave a great deal of
assistance ‘o Mrs, Stuart who of
courve was the producer,

The fincl performances take
place today, matinee at 5 p.m. and
tonight at 8.30.

Sister

ISS JEANNE SELLIER was

among the passengers leaving
for Puerto Rico yesterday morning
by B.W.LA. From there she will
fly P.A.A, to the U.S. where she
is a nurse at the Roosevelt
Hospital, New York.

She had been in Barbados on a
short visit, staying at the Hotel
Royal. Miss Sellier is a sister of
Fr. Joseph Sellier S.J., of St.
Patrick’s Church, Jemmotts Lane,

Today Fr. Sellier flies to B.Ge
by B.W.1A. on a visit. He is going
to the Catholic Hospital, George-
town for health reasons.

Barbados Wins

‘HE three tornadoes “Cyclone,”
Edril and Vamoose’ are due
to return to Barbados on Novem-
ber 6, by the Willemstad along
with their crews Peter Ince,
Gerald Nicholls, Ivan Perkins and
Teddy, Len and Jackie Hoad,
Barbados won the series against
Trinidad and they will be bring-

Come
ing home both the Bryden and jitterbugs, a good time is guaran- Nassau, Bahamas,

de Lima Cups.

‘PICK-UP GIRL’
“TO MARRY



Up Girk” fo marry aatey ndher' Satin
Freeman Turner, ls

An Honour
INE woctors sign the bulletin
about the King’s _ illness,

It is not the first time so many
have been called into conference
about the King’s health. Two and
a half years ago, nine signed the
Statement after an operation to
improve the blood supply to the
King’s right foot.

These doctors receive no pay-
ment from the King; members of
the medical household are un-
paid, The appointments are an
honour of great value to them,

The other five consultants
receive payment, But they send
no bills to the King.

Two of the doctors are radiolo.
gists: Dr. G, M. Cordiner and Dr.
Peter Kerley, Dr. Kerley, director
of the radiological department
at Westminster Hospital, was
called in by Dr, Cordiner, He was
present when the King visited
Dr. Cordiner’s consulting rooms
in Wimpole Street to be X-rayed
earlier this month.

Fireworks Dance

BS prec ne 3 holders are reminded
of the GUY FAWKES DANCE
which is being held at the Strath-
clyde Tennis Club on !Saturday
8rd November at 9.00 p.m. There
will be .side attractions and a
Fireworks Display at 10.00 p.m.
also a well stocked bar. Dancing
will be at the Club and also at
the residence of Mr. C. C. Park-
inson across the way. .
in your dungarees and

teed for all,



BY THE

O insufferaby accurate is the
Beachcomber poll proving,
The recent discovery of yet
another law of statistics, by
which it is possible to forecast a
vote by doubling the number of
letters in the voter’s name has
led to some confusion. Many
people included their initials in
the total, and thus spoiled the
whole thing. Tomorrow’s poll
will forecast, by the same infalli-
ble method, the results of the
election after this one.

A remarkable degree

of accuracy

ODAY the Beachcomber poll

shows..a_ definite forward
tre 1d in percentages. Out of 11,948
people questioned 368 gave the
same answers as on the previous
day, thus establishing a mea
constant of 26 in 811, taking into
account the fallover due to irdiyi-
dual variations. From the figures
it is possible*to conclude that votes
transferred m the Tories to the
Socialists Will reduce -he gross
total of Tory votes, and vite versa.
Taking 127 as the index figure,
we get a proportion of 16 to 29,
which, added together, gives us
45; the exact figure revealed by
the new Renton application of the
double.cube law!

Aftermath
UESTIONED about the pea.
pushing fiasco, Evans the

insufficient food
as a cause of his inability to
control the pea. The Mayor inter-
vened to Say: “You must have
eaten enough mud to last you a
lifetime.” Meanwhile it is clear
that nasal pea-pushing is a ‘ine-
weather sport. A well-known
physician said: “The human nose
is not made for shoving a small
object like a pea through a sea
of mud and slush.” Reg Bodger
said: “My pea got stuck in some
wet gravel on the track, and it
was more than my nostrils could
stand.” A Mrs. Gulpe commented:
“The grunts were dreadful, It was
like watching two clumsy animals
trying to thrust their noses through
an impenetrable wall of sodden
treacle.”



WAY...

The suet touch

HARLIE SUET’S style of
election oraitey” is proving
a great success. owing that
his audiences will cheer certain
phrases, he relies almost entirely
on those phrases, not bothering
to make a connected speech or to
fill in the bits between the bouts
of cheering. His speech yesterday

seemed to go like this:—
a: ee warmongers
(cheers). .. . Free Health -
vice (cheers). . . Fascists (cheers)

... Palmerston. . . gun-boat diplo-
macy (cheers). . Fair shares
(cheers) eae od hysteria
(cheers). . . Happier, more pros-

perous than ever before (cheers).
... Prestige abroad never higher
(cheers). . . Cool, level heads in
command (cheers).

Surprised

*y AM surprised and chagrined
that in the course of pouring
out their torrents of meaningless
drivel, the candidates are not being
subjected to the most tiresome
form of interruption. -
This consists in uttering, with
dismal monotony, and in a very
loud voice, one or two completely
irrelevant words. For instance, an

Hot Shirts, Hot Skirts
HAT with all those Hot
Skirts and Hot Shirts, tinted

by Kgjth Campbell’s Society
Quintet. The First Hot Shirt,
Hot Skirt Dance, to be stxged by
the Management of the Get-
together Club at the Goodwill
League on Saturday night,
November 3, surely promises te
be a success,

Judging takes place at mid-

night and the couple in the pret~- Theatre

tiest shirt and skirt will receive
attractive prizes.
B.G. Civil Servant
EAVING today by B.W.1LA. for
4 British Guiana is Miss Dosia
Chase, B.G. Civil servant who
has been holidaying in Barbados.
This is her first visit here and
she has had a wonderful holiday.
During her stay she has been
the guest of Miss Ercil Osbourne
cf Tudor Street.
Back To St. Vincent
M* ALBERT REECE, pro-
prietor of “Fountain House”.
Estate in St. Vincent, returned to
St. Vincent yesterday by B.G.
Airways.
Mr. Reece is a brother of Mr.
Sydney Reece of Navy G
«nd Mrs W. E. Dash of Enterprisa
Road, Christ Church.

Caribbean Revelry

meee tte A et cae Ne ee neem

BARBADOS ADVOCATE












B.B.C.’ Radio || ONLY A FEW DAYS OLD!

Programme j- DAILY TELEGRAPH

on sale at

ADVOCATE STATION










a.m. Listeners’ Choice,
News, 12.10 p.m News Analysis
1—7. 16 p.m 132M. #43 M







4 p.m. The News, 4.10 The Daily Ser-
vice; 4.15 p.m. Educating Arehie, 4.46
p.m. Music Magazine, 5 p.m. Composer
of the Week, 5.15 p.m. Listeners’ Choice,
6 p.m. Merchant Navy Programme, 6.15
»m. Carroll Levis and his
8.45 p.m. Programme Parade, 6.55 p.m.
Tod:.s Sport, 7 p.m. The News, 7.10
News Analysis.




JANETTA DRESS

LOWER BROAD STREET





7 15—10 50 p.m, 46.43 M. ¥,
7,15 West Indian Diary, 745 D

DRESSES of every kind

Ready-made and made-to-Order.
Also—BRASSIERES—White and Pink.

SIZES 38 and 40—-with Waistband and without
Waistband

From $3.00 to $5.44.
SRE GEO OOO FOE

PLAZA Wit",
TO-DAY "3,3. 3.2.»

Virginia



8.15 p.m,
Newsreel, 8.30 p.m. World Affairs.
p.m. Composer of the Week, 9 p.m.
Uogiish Magazine, 9.30 p.m. M
sritannica, 10 pum. The News, 10.10 p.m.
From the itorials, 10.15 p.m. The
Debate Continues, 10.30 p.m. From
Third Programme, 10.50 p.m. Interlude.
©.B.C. PROGRAMME
FRIDAY, NOVEMBER 2, 1951
10.05—-10.2% p.m. Ni
10 20—10.35 p.m.
1172 Mes, 2% 60

BETTING ON LOVE
NEW YORK BOOKIES are busy
laying the odds on romance. They
will bet ten to one — very few












Coming Friday %h }

“Tartzan’s Peril’ il

Lex Barker and
Cheta



Coming
JOAN CRAWFORD

in
“Goodbye My Fancy’
—_







& Continuing Dgily 4.45 & 8
Daris Got me



takers — that Frank Sinatra will CAGNEY MAYO DAY ce os Gene
marry Ava Gardner before New “WEST POINT STORY en
Year's Eve 1952. It’s 35—1 against Also_the Color Short! ROYAL | pU

that Billy Rose will remarry 2 CK sHooT





Pp m 2 New estern Features
‘HAUNTED TRAILS”
WHIP WILSON

GALETY

rm e : Ss ir a
“HIDDEN DANGER”
JOHNNY MACK BROWN

PLAZA oui si

within the same period.

It was 30—1 against a recon-
ciliation between Elizabeth Taylor
and Nicky Hilton—until they went
for some car drives togetner in

&

HOSE who saw Caribbean Connecticut. Promptly the odds|{} To-day To sun. 5 and 8.30 p.m TUE GARDEN — ST. JAMES

Revelry last year will no’ Shortened to 10—1. f “FIGHTING FATHER DUNNE” To-day To Sun. 8.30 p.m.
doubt be looking forward te Said a bookie: “These things are Pat O'BRIEN & Mat. Sun. 6 p.m :
another show this year but Carib ™ore popular than sport these “DEADLINE AT DAWN” John GAPPIELD Par EAL, &

was told that owing to certain
circumstances a show will not be
given until next year.

Miss Judy Graham and her
Bridgetown Yheatrical Grovp are
however planning to celebrate
‘tthe anniversary of this show with
an “Anniversary Hop” at the
Modern High School on Saturday
night, December 1, the procceds of
which will go to finance another
show next year.

This “Hop” promises to be lots
of fun with “hot” shirts, gay
frocks and jeans.

Film Show
7T°HROUGH the courtesy of the

British Council Representative
the following films will be shown
vat the monthly reunion of the
Combermere School Old Boys’
Association, tonight at 8 o'clock.

British News.

How Fibre is Spun.

Looking through glass.

Thames’ Tideway.

There will be the usual gamer
after the film show and all Old
Boys interested in Football are
asked to make a special effort to
attend.

Elegy
‘HE Curfew tol's the knell of
parting day, .
(And O, how welcome = soinc
departures are!)
When Attlee, piping down, gets
on his way,
And we again light Churchill's
big cigar.
Incidental Intelligence
S to this case. . . if ever there
was a clearer case of lottery
than this case, then this case is
that case.—Magistrate’s ruling in

—L.E.S.



By BEACHCOMBER

unflagging repetition of “What

about Mrs. Toplady?” will always
end by disturbing and annoying the
speaker. “Who is Mrs. Toplady?
he will whisper to his chairman. ,
The chairman will not be able to

return. 15 Ee: :
help him. v N.B.—Our Night Shows Over 10 0’
r again, a reiterated cry of J. Autogrann tan ight Shows Over 10 o’clock.
. D ostricis

MOVIETIME....

sardonically and tauntingly, and
goes on repeating the question
every time the speaker gets into
his stride.

Cause and effect

pre who complain that too
often in ballet, there appears

to be no adequate reason for the | 4

movements’ of the dancers will
probably change their opinion
when they have seen a ballet of
which I have been reading an
account. The central
“the stinging of a young man by
a bee.” If that’s not an adequate
reason for movement you_ may
call me Carter Patterson, [ hope

the bee used is a real one, and not |"

a cardboard one on a wire, IT
am at work myself on a more
subtle ballet, giving scope for
queerer movements. It is about
a man who sits on an ant-heap,



| Rupert and the



Before settling to sleep Rollo tells
Rupert what he has heard. * We're
in an awful yam," he sighs. “|
heard tha skipper say that they
wouldn't keep us after they had
reached a piace called the Lion
Rock and. . -"* But Rupert has

Lion Rock—19





roused himself with a jerk
Rock?" he
they are!
ts the admiral’s handyman.”
stares.
he demands,
covered something >

gasps. ‘' So that’s who
1 one which of them
Rollo
“What do you mean?”
“Have you dis-
Do tell me."



theme is]

HORROCKSES FABRICS

STRIPED COTTON CAMBRIC_.--—~—~—---------—$1.31

COLOURED COTTON GINGHAM__---~~---_~~-—$1.47

WHITE & DYED COTTON LINENETTE_____.._._S$1.50

PRINTED COTTON CAMBRIC_-~~.._.._._-_-__$L.54

PRINTED COTTON FURNISHING_--..___....—$L.98
ALSO

FLOWERED CREPE... sibelccihbtiapas deioas oh alee _._ $2.20

T.R. EVANS & WHITFIELDS

YOUR SHOE STORES
; Dial 4220

Dial 4606 20: 203 20:

“What happened to the fish?” wiil, ‘
often throw a_ speaker off his
balance. “What fish?” he will ask.
The interrupter then laughs

|

}

|

days, They aren’t ‘fixed’ like the
sports events.”

Susan HAYWOOD “THIS SIDE OF THE LAW”

Vevica LINDFORS--Kent SMITH
On neh aw



a sites a fo P.m Midnite Sat
“Shadow on “Gun Town" Midn. Ss.
SHOESHINE GIFTS Beacon Hill Kirby Grant & 2 ACTION ‘SPxtLALS!
IT is to be an escapist Christ- Roddy McDowall “Bad Man of “RANGER OF CHEROKEE STRIP”
mas for the tots. Out go the toy ; and ; Red Butte f Monte HALE &
soldieréy tanks, and atom weap- Night Has Byes Johnny Mack SAVAJO TRAIL RAIDERS"
’ ) 5 P James Mason Brown Allan “Rocky” LANE

ons, Instead, the toy trade is con-
centrating on such old favourites
as Red Indians, and bringing in
useful gadgéts, such as shoeshine
sets for boys and manicure outfits |
for girls.

CAREER GUIDE

THEY TRIED an experiment
at the high school in Shaker
Heights, a suburb of Cleveland,
Ohio.

The boys were given a course
on the real facts about the life
they would lead in the various
services when they were called
up. As a result 35 per cent. now
want to join the army, compared’
with 11 per cent. before the course
began, and while 45 per cent.
originally would have chosen the
navy, the post-course figure is
down to 21 per cent.







GLOBE



Across
ancient ity follows
the return bis, (8)

1, Ve on an

& Pai) behind in a vie parish, (7)
&. Pasten op. av 4 Seif. (4)
u tt med 613)
Lowest pot na (6)

mtiog. 1)
ae by accident or design
‘

Prepare the overhead. (4)

OW Mvlore start, (3)
Rea di! I
Cnamper 14)

20. Young Paeara op

ence » the Upper

Oreseot day

es 3 ee



for example (4)
Welcomes by a K.C 1B)
Once more a pare ul 3, (5)
Surprised te find Had healed by
one
By which Diva cut through

3
4
5
(5 4»

© (7)
Z Derange for a change, (7) y
3

6

8










Acted. (3) 10 Grated «7»
A mere prince in Arabia (5)
May be an tavoice. (4)

Baby measure (3)

Solution o1 veperany & Duzrie.— Across:
oF OM!

4

aetsynate ? ant S Home: 11,
be Hed. be ram: 16. Inane;
17 Got 1B. Alter, iY Can, 21. Stoop ?
2 Eh + 4 dne. 24 [onst. 25,
are eee A é areas &chinate. 5,
OUs Ltracte: -
m Niaering 10 fin bis

im» Opal, 13,
(8 Menace: 20, Army’ sn” rey

YOUR SILVER
NEEDS THE GENTLE



2.30m4.45 & 3.30 p.m.
|& Continuing. Daily 4.45 & 8.30 p.m.
| Also the Color Short :—
*ROVAL DUCK



SHOOT”,



FRIDAY, NOVEMBER 2, 1951





EMPIRE



REVUEDEVILLE 1951

TO-DAY 5 p.m. and 8,30 p.m.

NOW FOR THE FINEST SHOW OF
THE YEAR.

Box & Orchestra $1.50,
Balcony 72c.

House $1.00
Reserved.





Opening TO-MORROW, 3RD NOVEMBER, 4.45 and 8.30
and Continuing Daily

cK

LORETTA

YOUNG

JOSEPH



fe
BASIL RUYSDAEL Produced
cannery SALE "gt JULIAN BLAUSTEIN



ROYAL

TO-DAY Only 5 & 8.15 TOMORROW & SUNDAY
5 & 8.15



Jniversal presents . Republic Pictures presents . , .

“THE WICKED LADY” ‘* FIGHTING
Starring bs stg ARD ”

Margaret LOCKWOOD
—James MASON

ROXY

Opening TO-MORROW 4.30 and 8,15

“SADDLE
TRAMPS”~

Brian DONLEVY ‘
Forrest TUCKER



TO-DAY Only 4.30 & 8.15

Universal Double

“THE ASTONISHED

HEART”’ AND
AND
“ DESTINATION “ONE FALSE
UNKNOWN” STEP”







OLYMPIC

TO-DAY Only 4.30 and 8.15
EDWARD G. ROBINSON — JOAN BENNETT in

“SCARLET STREET”

AND

“THE MAGIC BOW”

with STEWART GRANGER



Opening TO-MORROW 4.30 and 8.15
M-G-M and 20th-C-Fox Double - - -

CHARLES BOYER — LINDA DARNELL

“THE 13th LETTER”

And The Big Technicolor Musical



“ROYAL WEDDING”

Starring: FRED ASTAIRE — JANE POWELL











BARBADOS

CO-OP COTTON
FACTORY LTD.




FRIDAY, NOVEMBER 2, 1951



Sugar Talks
In Britain

LGNDON, Oct. 25

(From Our Own Correspondent)

Talks between the Common-
wealth Sugar Producers and tie
British Government now appear
likely to start about the end of
next week or the of the
week after. The meetings of the
various sub-Committees, appoint-
ed by the Commonwealth Pro-
ducers, to solve the several “in-
ternal” matters are expected to
end about Thursday.

Representatives are seeking,
among other things, an increase
in price for the 1952 crop. This,
under the terms of the 1950 agree-
ment, is to be conceded, providing
the costs of production, based on
the 1950 figures, can be proved to
have risen. Commonwealth rep-
resentatives are confident that
they have figures to prove an in-
erease in the price'is necessary.

The West Indies delegates have
drawn up a document which they
are asking other Commonwealth
representatives to-approve as the
final draft of the agreement to be
presented to the British Govern-
ment. It is believed that this doc-
ument apart from a slight altera-
tion requested by Australia, has
been accepted, with very few
changes, by the other representa-
tives,

West Indies May Refuse

It is also understood that the
West Indies may not accept the
British Government’s offer to pur-
chase all the Commonwealth sugar
until the end of 1953. The reason
is that Canada is anxious to re-
sume purchasing direct from the
West Indies, and the tie-up with
Britain for another year would
cause a
particular direetion. This could
seriously prejudice the future of
the Canada-West Indies trade re-
lations, and possibly result in the
loss of a preference market in
Canada to the. British Caribbean
colonies,



Russia Warns
Arab States

CAIRO, Egypt, Oct. 31.
Russia has told the Arab Gov-
ernments she will consider it
unfriendly and even a hostile act
if they join the Western Powers

Middle East Defence Command,
diplomatic circles here revealed
today.

Russian legations in Arab capi-
tals are reported to be watching
with great interest the attitude of

Arab states, particularly Syria,
Lebanon and Iraq, towards the
Four Power proposals.—C.P.



B.G. Skittle Out
Combined Indians

(From Our Own Correspondent)
GEORGETOWN, Nov. 1,

Three wickets for 0 runs, a
brilliant fighting crisis-stand of
93 runs for the fourth wicket by
Sonny Moonsawmy 61, and See-
persaud 34, then another collapse
of seven wickets for 21 runs were
written at» Bourdavteday in ~ a
“cricket drama,”” when the Com-
bined Trinidad and Surinam East
Indians in a_ pitiable display
scraped together 114 runs against
the B.G. Colony side.

At close of play B.G. was al-
ready 51 runs to the good with six
wickets standing and with Leslie
Wight, 82 not out heading for his
third straight century in Inter.
colonial cricket. .

The Combined Indians innings
of 114 runs lasted 155 minutes and
the British Guiana made their
165 for four—Camacho being out
off the last ball of the day for 44—
in 135 minutes.

The match continues Friday.
COMBINED EAST TNDIANS Ist Innings
Asgarali c Jordan (Wkpr.) b Rodney 0
Wailoo e Jordan (Wkpr) b Camacho 0
Mohammed c Camacho b Rodney 0
Moonsawmy ¢ Camacho b Patoir 61
Seepersaud c Leslie Wight b Norman

Wignt
sau ec



ores ee hea
Pe Dyer b Norman Wight 7
Bahadur not out Ene ook «a.
Senkar b Patoir $ ‘ 1
Bacchus ¢ Jackman b Norman Wight 1
Jackbir b Norman Wight 0
Alli ec Dyer b Norman Wight



0
Total

Fall of Wickets: 1 for 0, 2 for 0,
3 for 0, 4 for 93, 5 for Wi, 6 for 106,
° for 1098, 8 for 112, 9 for Lid.

BOWLING ANALYSIS

M R Ww
Rodney 7 5 6 2
Camacho 8 3 20 1
EPG OAN ohne aedeas 2 0 9 0
Patoir seebsees 17 3 43 2
N. Wight . 122 4 23 5
Allen views 4 0 13 0
B.G. Ist Innings
L. Wight not out te 82
Gibbs c Asgarali b Jackbir . 0
Thomas b Alli ., : . 30
Jackman Ibw b Alli ... 9
Camacho stpd, Sankar b Alli 44
Total ( for 4 Wickets) .... 165
ROWLING ANALYSIS
oO M R Ww
Asgarali 7 1 ig oO
Jackbir 16 i 46 1
Alii . i8 0 78 %
Bahadur i o a2 0

—_-

further hold up in this !

/ operates.





OBO
WOULD MIS
FOR MICHAEL

oS DIN'





BARBADOS ADVOCATE





King’s Awards
(From Our Own Correspondent)

GEORGETOWN, Oct. 25.

Hon. Vincent Roth, J.P. receiv-
ed the O.B.E. insignia, Mr. H. N.
Critchlow, the O.B.E. also and
Mr. Sheik Shakoor the M.B.E., at
the opening of the Legislative
Council on Friday last week.

Making the presentations, the
Governor, Sir Charles Woolley
told Mr. Roth that “apart from
your seryices as a Member of the

slate Council and of several
publie es and Committees, you
have devoted yourself unsparingly
to cultural activities. You have
been the author or editor of severai
valuable books on British Guiana
and have taken the keenest inter-
est in the Amerindian community
and the development of the Interior
of which you have intimate know-
edge.

To Mr, Critchlow, the Governor
said. . . “You were the founder
of the first trade union in British
Guiana, the. British Guiana Labour
Union, and one of the founders of
the Caribbean Labour Conference.
You have contributed greatly io
the enactment of social welfare
legislation and improvement in
conditions of employment, You are
hele in high esteem by all sec-
tions of the community as a man
of charaeter, honesty of purpose
and balance, I warmly congratu-
late you on receiving this recog-
nition of your long and meritorious
services to promote the welfare
of the working classes in the
Colony.”

To Mr. Shakoor (General See-
retary of the Man Power Citizens’
Association), the Governor said
“The award has been conferred
on you in recognition of your
valuable services to the Trade
Union Movement in British Guiana
and to Labour welfare to which
you have ‘devoted yourself un-
sparingly for many years.”

Mr. Roth was sponsored by Hon.
C. V. Wight, C.B.E, and Hon. D. J,
Parkinson, O.B.E., Mr. Critehlow
by Sir Eustace Woolford; K.C.,
O.B.E., and Hon, G. A. C, Farnum,
Q,B.E., and Mr, Shakoor by Hon.
Dr. J. B. Singh, O.B.E., and Mr.
J. I. deAguiar, C.B.E.



6 Caribbean Oil
Companies To
Form Merger

To meet the administrative re-
quirements in the Caribbean area
resulting from rapidly .,growing
demand for petroleum products,
Standard Oil Comp: rier:
Jersey) today annourtesd
for reorganizing the ions of
six wholly owned into

one company with headquarters
at Havana.

The ie of the present Esso
Standard "Oil (Central America)
S.A. will be changed to Esso
Standard Qij) S,,and this com-
pany will acquire the business
and assets of these five affiliates:
Esso Standard Oil (Antilles) S.A.
Esso Standard Oil (Carribean)
S.A.; Esso Standard Oil Company
(Cuba); Esso Standard Oil Com-
pany'Puerto Rico), and Standard
Oil (Canal Zone) Company.

President of the new n,
will be Fred H. Billups, now
Western Hemisphére Marketing
Advisor for Jersey Standard.
Henry P. Blackeby, Assistant
Comptrolier of Jersey Standard,
will be Chairman of the Board.

“It is expected that this re-
organization will result in im-
proved operations and services
fin the Caribbean area,” Jersey
Standard said.

Besides its international office
at Havana, Esso Standard Oil
S.A. will continue principal
offices in Cuba, Panama, Dom-
inican Republic, Puerto Rico and
Trinidad and the present. offices
in other countries in which Esso
Operating responsibil-
ities will be largely decentralized
to these offices, the company
said.



Good food tastes all
the better with

Colman

Mustard

Agents: T. S. GARRAWAY & CO., Bridgetown







Get Health Centre

ANOTHER MONTH and a

half’s work will complete the

Health Centre at _ Speightstown—beside the Methodist

Mansé—Mr. Joseph Connell,

Architect, said yesterday.

The Health Centre is the renovated “Arlington” which was
one of the three-storeyed houses so typical of Speightstown.
Except for the outside appearance to a certain extent, the
entire building has been changed while more rooms have

been added to it.

Carpenters and masons are still
working on the Centre but most
of the work left to be done is
painting and washing. Steady
work has been going on at the
building for over five months now,

The date of the official openiag
of the Health Centre has not yet
been fixed.

Showers of rain swamped the
Coleridge School grounds, St.
Pe.er, yesterday, preventing the
first day's play of the scheduled
two-day fixture between the
Speightstown Boys’ Club and the
Schoolboys,

The wicket was at one time
covered in spots with water while
the outfield was heavy and ery
wet,

From early during the morning,
light showers set in and with an
occasional break, they continued
during the day. Shoppers and
clerks in Speightstown could be
seen hurrying back to their homes
through the rain

School childref were robbed of
their outdoor games. The rain
kept quite a number of them at
home,

“Radios”, an old cricket club of
Speightstown, which has not been
playing recently, is making its
reappearance on the cricket field
on Saturday when they will begin
a two-day fixture with the
Speightstown Boys’ Club at
Coleridge grounds.

Representing “Radios” will be
C. Holder (Capt,.), W. Gibbons, N.
Gibbons, H. Corbin, P. Alleyne,
L. Armstrong, V. Todd, C. Hope,
N. Brathwaite, C. Walker and S.
Mings.

The match will be continued on
the following Saturday.

Inmates of the $1. Peter’s Alms-
house clapped and danced to the
rhythm of the Police Band which
held an open air concert at the
Almshouse on Tuesday night,

Adding to the live! of the
atmosphere was the large crowd
which sang the familiar songs —
calypsoes and slow hits especially
—and the little children who
“mariecoaed” all around the band.

The Police Band played for
almost two hours. It was con-
ducted by Corporal Best who chose
a well varied programme. The
Band visits the Almshouse to play
for the inmates once every month.

The Third Barbados Sea Scouts
and the Revers attached to the
troop will stage a Camp Fire at
Mortimer Hall, the residence of

Dr. A. F. Matthews at 7.30 p.m, on Post

Monday night.

Under Scout Master Victor
Matthews, the scouts and rovers
have been putting in some hours
practising songs and yells for the
camp fire.

The Rovers will be making their

first public appearance at the
Camp Fire.
SCOUT BROADCASTS

Island Commissioner of Scouts,
Major J. E. Griffith, will give
the second seout broadeast over
Rediffusion at 845 p.m. tomor-
row.

Major Griffith will talk for 15
minutes on the Scout Movement,

FIRE AT BANK HALL

The Fire Brigade was sum-
moned to a fire at Bank Hall
last night at the home of Ivan
Sealy. The house was slightly
damaged. It is insured.

When the Brigade arrived the
fire had already been put out.

1,500 Bags Of Rice Here

The Schooner Lucitie M. Smith,
74 tong net, arrived here yester-
day with 1,500 bags of rice from
British Guiana along with sup-
plies of firewood and charcoal.
Lucile M. Smith is consigned to
Messrs. Robert Thom Ld.



FINGER-TIP FLY CONTROL

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—Agents.

FAAS ESESSSS]R














U.N., Reds Argue
Over Kaesong

PANMUNJOM, Korea, Nov. 1.

United Nations and Communist
negoviators agreed on where to
stop the fighting across half of
Korea, but’ still argued over the
possession of Kaesong and “Heart-
break Ridge” A United Nations
officer said to the Press that an
agreement was reached on about
59% of the proposed ceasefire line
— from Kimswa on the Central
Front to the East Coast except for
“Heartbreak Ridge.” Kaesong is
on the Western front.

Despite ipcreasing progress to-
ward an armistice agreement,
however, the United States Lieut.
Gen, L. G. Hill, saiq that the end
of the war was not yet in sight,
He said, “it is possible that war
will go on for some time after the
truce line is settled. Fighting will
go on until the entire Five Point
truce agenda is adopted.” The
joint sub-committee charged wit
findi a mutually satisfac
ceasefire line—the second item on
thie truce agenda—will meet again
at 9. p.m. today.—U.P.



Teeth Blown Out

At Combermere School yester-
day M. Rose of Form I C had
some of his teeth blown out with
a bomb. The incident occurred
at about 12.30 in the afternoon. .

Rose, before being taken to the
General Hospital where he was
treated and discharged, was given
First Aid treatment by Scoutmas-
ter, Mr, Brathwaite. On his re-
turn to the school his father arriv-
ed and took him home.

His action was against the in-
Siiections “of the Headmaster,

ajor Noott, who has forbidden
boys bringing fireworks to the
school premises,



MAIL NOTICES

MAIS for Dominica, Antigua, Mont-

serrat, Nevis and St. Kitts by the
M.V. Caribbee will be closed at the
General Post Office as under:—
Parcel Mail at 12 noon.

Registered
Mail at 2 p.m., Ordinany Mail at ‘2,39
p.m, on the r 1951.
MAILS for Maderia, United Kingdom,
Antwerp and Amsterdam by the M.S.
Willemstad will be closed at the General
e as —

Parcel Mail at 10 a.m., Registered
Mail at 2 p.m., Ordinary Mail at 2.96
?.m. on the Sth November 1961,

MAILS for St. Lucia, Martinique,
Guadeloupe, Antigua, United Kingdom
and France by the S.S. Gascogne will
be closed at the General Post Office as
under:— .
Parcel Mail at 16 a.m.. Registered
Mail at 2 p.m. Ordinary Mail at 2.30
p.m. On the 2nd November, 1951


















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Caroline, Sch. Mary M Lewis, Sch
United Pilgrim S., Sch. Sunshine R.,
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bt Keskadee, Yacht -
. M.V. Charles A. McLean, Sch
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Sch. LUCSLLE M. SMITH, 74 tons net
Capt. Hassel, from British Guiana.
Sch. GARDENIA W.. 48 tons net, Capt
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8.8. STATESMAN, 4,429 tons net, Capt
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Ina Wha Jeanne Sellier, Daisw
Waterman, a nger
ee A
In Touch With Barbados

on

Cable and Wireless «wW.5.) Lid. advise
that they can now communicate witt
the following ships through their Barba-
dos Coast Station:—-

S.S. Thorsisle, Regent Hawk, Mormac-
nwoon, Pacific Fortune, Matina, Del Sud,
Athene, Antartic, Tista, Runa, Gascogne,

Rio Aguapey, Wave Knight, Sarpedon,
Caraibe, Nueva Andalucia, Esso mgox*
nwalt, Louisiana, Brazil, Pye-
Golfiito, Beholar, B.p-

pl ing hen, A. W. Peake, Ss
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Pen t, Canadian Cruiser, Loidenho iti,
Eriwet Water, Alcoa Partner, Macoris,

Sund@le, Hermes and S.8. Rio Novo.



66 Ae?

Certificate “A

a e
Pass List

FOLLOWING is the list ef
names of those teachers who have
passed the Certificate A. examina-
tion: —

Baker, T. E,, St. Clement's B,;
Belgrave, R. E., Bay Street B.;
Best, C., St. Lawrence B.; Branch,
(Miss) M. A., Hindsbury G.;
Brathwaite, H. A., St. Luke's B
Cadogan, (Miss) L. E., St. Ber-
aerds Gy Paths oat. S 4

esley Hall, B. De lp RV +»
Saints’ B.; Giilkes: F., All
Saints’ B.; Gittens, (Miss) E, A.,
Beulah G.; Harewood, C, A,, St.
John Baptist B.; Keizer, (Miss) E.,
Christ Church G.; King, (Miss)
G. E, St. Matthias’ B.; Laurie,
(Miss) E. E., St. Luke’s G.; Law-
rence, D. K., Buxton B.; Leacock,
(Miss) C. C., St. Swithin’s G.; Lin-
ton, R., Providence B.; Massiah,
H. G., St. Giles’ B.; McAllister
(Miss) H. M,, Edghill Memorial
G.; Millington, J., St. Christopher's
B.: Pilgrim, (Miss) D,, Sharon M.;
Robinson, (Miss) I. V,, Buxton B.;
Springer, (Miss) E, V., St. Silas’
G,; Welch, V. C., Black Bess M.

Death of G.N. Ray

Mr. Guy Neeve Ray, a former
employee of the Western Tele-
graph Company in Barbados from
1931 to 1939, died suddenly in
Rio dé, Janeiro, on October 29.
Mr. Ray was e cricket enthusiast.







He played for Wanderers and also

: layed for Rovers at soccer.

GOLF BALLS

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e :
Lewis Attacks |
. ‘i Bah a

Electors’ Policy

A tremendous crowd attended
the Labour Party meeting held in
support of the candidature of Mr
A. E. S. Lewis for the City of
Bridgetown at Nelson Street .last
night. On the platform were Mr.}
F. L. Waleott, Mr. C. Tuder, Mr. L..
Williams and Mr, M. FE, Cox.

Mr. Lewis told his listeners that
if they thought that he did not de-
serve to be put in the House, then
they could act to suit. Mr. Lew a
strongly attacked thé policy of tire
Barbados Electors’ Association ard
called the manifesto a big farce.
He said that the damage that was
done by this Party is now being
repaired by the Labour Party
which is also trying to lift the yoke
that is around the neck of the Ja-
bourer to-day.

He said that the manifesto of
the Electors’ Association touched
upon a deep weter harbour. “The

@ity guns in this Party are now

aniegetepoontitnnta

feeling the squeeze from the light-
ermen,.” This harbour could have }
been built long ago but at that time

» it was not convenient for them. |

They say it would put the island |
in a good position but it would also
put many out of employment.

Mr. Lewis said that neverthe
less the English elections hav
got some of them thinking, bur
Barbados was not England.

Upright

Mr. F. L. Walcott said that it
was the duty of everyone to re-
turn Mr, Lewis to the House of
Assembly. He is an upright anc
fearless representative. In 1940
one of the biggest demonstrations
was one in the island for Mr.
Lewis. $s was for the treatment
he received from the hands of hi
employers after serving them fo:
some time,

Even before this demonstration,
Mr. Lewis had shown himself to be
upright. Some speakers on the

lectors’ Association platform have
said that the Labour Governmen:
of this island has not done enough

But this the masses could see

can’t ve the masses
“Adams will die, I will die, but
the Labour Movement will go on,
for it is the Movement of the

r, Walcott said that he did not
like to attack past friends but he
understood that Mr. T. Miller ha»
been saying things about the Union
but if he has something against one
member of the Party he should not
say things about that Party o/
which he was a member,

Plane Crashes Into
Mountain Side

RIVERSIDE, California, Oct, 31,
Six United States Air Foree
fliers were killed last night when



their twin engine C47
transport plane crashed into the
side of Box Springs Mountain,

five miles from their destination,
and exploded. The plane, based
at Truax Air Foree Base in Madi-
son, Wisconsin, crashed after the
pilot apparently lost direction iy
the heavy fog.—U.P.



Candidate Wounded

BUENOS AIRES, Nov. 1.

The Communist candidate toy
be = Presideney, Rodolfo Ghioldi,

reported wounded — tonight,
following a shooting affray be-
tween the Communists and Pero-
nistas in the Parana Province. |
The incident occurred during the’
Communists’ pre-electoral meet-
ing in which Ghioldi was speak-
ing. First reports stated that at
least one person was dead, and
there were several with firearms
wounds.

In an official communique the
Ministry stated that its decision
to invite newsmen is in accord-
ance with the wishes expressed
by Peron and the National Con-
gress. On October 11, Congress
voted a resolution “iat Latin-
American newsmen should be in-
vited to attend the election, To-
day's announcement extends cour-
tesy to other nationals and ex-
vlicitly states that Argentine em- |
bassies and legations will provide |
visiting correspondents with all!
necessary facilities. —U.P, |



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PAGE FOUR



Friday, November 2, 1951



Labour Welfare

THERE is an increasing fashion espe-
cially among candidates seeking election to
the House of Assembly to encourage people
who borrow money from the Labour
Welfare Fund, not to repay those loans.
The suggestion has already been publicly
condemned but in view of the fact that it
has been repeated, its implications should
be made plain.

The Labour Welfare Fund was created
at the instance of the British Government
who insisted that included in the guaran-
teed price for sugar there should be
ineluded asum which would be devoted
to'the welfare of the people employed in
the sugar industry. It was agreed that the
amount would be derived by means of a
cess to wnich a contribution would be
made on every ton of sugar produced.

That fund has had contributions during
the last four years and has now reached a
sum of approximately two million dollars.
Of this amount, the sum of $300,000 has
been allocated to playing fields and the
remainder except $100,000 left to reserve,
is to be utilised for housing. The quali-
fication for loans from this fund is that
the borrower must be a worker in the
sugar industry.

For the first twelve months of its opera-
tion the fund helped 1,200 people and if it
is accepted that there is an average of five
people to each household, then at least,
6,000 people have been given shelter by the
operation of this money. It is worth
knowing that the plantation labourers
have thought so well of this fund that
the first allocation of $400,000 was repaid
and is now in circulation a second time.
There are several thousand applications
more for loans under this fund and it is
to be hoped that the money due for the
1951 crop, amounting to over one million
‘dollars will soon be utilised as well,

| It has always been generally believed
that the average plantation labourer is
dull, stupid and unaware of his own inter-
ests. It will be seen from the way in which
they have made use of the fund that they
are not as unaware as many would believe.
They fully realise that i? they continue to
borrow from the Labour Welfare and
repay, it will always be at their disposal
for future use. That ‘is the case with the
£80,000 which formed the nucleus of the
Sugar Industry Agricultural Bank and that
is the standard of operation at which the
labourer has to aim,

' It is difficult to understand why anyone
should advocate that the labourer
should not repay after he has made a legi-
timate loan. Already in this Island there
is a dangerous angling for popularity by
flouting all authority. Serious minded
people in this island were alarmed some
years ago when the people of St. Thomas
were told ina public lecture that they
should not worry about obeying anybody
and should question all authority.

The plantation 6wner in this island has
set a good standard by making full use of
the Agricultural Bank and repaying his
loans. The money was granted in 1902
and if the loans had not been repaid the
Bank would not be in operation in 1951 to
help those who do not have the finance to
operate their estates.

' Labourers who use the Labour Welfare
Fund will understand that the money is not
theirs in the real sense of the term, and
even if it had been theirs and was taken
from them, it now provides a fine source
where they can have credit and to an ex-
tent which they would not get otherwise
and without the obligations usually at-
tached.

! The Labour Welfare Fund is a monu-
ment to social progress in this island and
those who invite the labourers to practise
dishonesty and to refuse to repay legiti-
mate loans are encouraging an attitude of
mind which might have most undesir-
able effects in future. The method of chang-
ing the procedure is to amend the act and
this. cannot be done from the soap box.
Only the House of Assembly, can do this.





Joe Cordle (name fictitious) sat
fin ‘hig customary place on a rocky
ledge overlooking the sea, his

yes glued to the water in con-
i rs mood. His net and
himself lead a kind of symbi-
otic existence, inseparable and,



hears dat guv’ment feedin’ dem
good fo’ nuttin Dodds boys like

Hut Gritain’s ‘Poor Leadership Is Straining The Bonds’

KARACHL.
PAKISTAN’S new Premier,
Khwaja Nazimuddin, today denied
reports that Pakistan is thinking
of withdrawing from the, Britieh

Commonwealth because of the
way the Kashmir ques.ion has
been handled by the United

Nations. But he admitted that the
‘British Government’s “lack of
leadership” in matters between
India and Pakistan is straining the
Commonwealth bonds.

Sitting in the centre of a horse-
shoe-shaped desk under a huge
portrait of the late Mohammed
Ali Jinnah, architect of the Mos-
lem Dominion.Nazimuddin said:

“T have enough troubles with-
out thinking of secession from the
Commonwealth. But people here
complain that the Commonwealth
seems to do little for Pakistan.”

Feeling in P»rkistan is ‘hat the
Commonwealth could have done
much more to prevent the Kerh-
mir question being weakly shelved
| by UNO.

Reports from Srinegar. Kash-
mir’s capital) say that five Moe-
lems who stood up in the mosanue
there on Friday and spoke pgains*
Hindu rule were heaten nn and
are still in hospital. That w
‘enough to set the Karachi hozoars
aflame with Holy War zeal,

‘No Arms Arrive’

Premier Nazimuddin a_ genial
tubby man educated at Duns.able
Grammar School and Cambridge
went on: “Britain has promised us
arms. They have not arrived. We

;}do not plan tq attack India or
anyone else. All we want is to be
able to defend ourselves;

“The British Government says
‘We help Pakistan just as much
as we help India,’ That is prob-
ably true, But the trouble is
that we did not start off equal.
“India did not hand over to us



Caravans In. The |
West Indies

LONDON.

If you can’t afford a house, why
not buy — or build — your own
caravan?

“Ideal for overseas conditions”
say the caravan manufacturers,
homes-on-wheels ever since the
homes-on-wheels ever since he
end of the war, when permanent
caravan-dwelling became a feat-
ure of British life.

“Why not caravans as homes
for hurricane victims in the West
Indies ?” asked one manufacturer
recently, Why not?

Freight and other taxes make
export on a large scale an im-
practicable venture. So manufac-
turers suggest that although they
can’t post you one of these
wonder models, on view at the
current motor show in London,
they could send the blueprints
overseas on payment of a small
sum, either to the optimistic home
carpenter who would like to
‘knock one up’ for himself, or to
any shrewd businessman who
would like to open his own caravan
manufac uring business in Domin-
ion or Colony.

Many more caravans are sold
in Britain as permanent homes
than as a mere holiday asset
Overlooking a yacht harbour at
Chiswick, on the Thames near
London, a whole township of
caravans has appeared like .a
cluster of mushrooms after the
rain,

Caravans are no longer the
draughty, cramped, rickety struc-
tures’ that one used to associate
with the gypsies and circuses.
Maybe the manufacturers tried
living in them to find out what it
was like. Ceriainly they have
evolved a home that has all the
essentials and comforts as well—
with the added advan‘age that
you can hitch it to your car and
find a new view when you fire
of the old one.

The 1951 caravan does not even
retain the silhouette of the tradi-
tional model, The most startling
of the models on show this year,
the “Statesman,” is a cross be-



a

got nuttin.

an’ting; we hey "pon sea rock ent
Ah_hears
vagabond dat does walk "bout an’

BARBADOS ADVOCATE





From JAMES LEASOR

all the armaments she should have
done on partition,”

Negotiations are still apparently
proceeding with India on this
matter of armg but hope over-
long deferred has sickened many
Pakistanis,

What is the chance of warmer
relaiions with India? azimud-
din is not very hopeful. “Settle
Kashmir first’, he said. “All we

ask is that a plebiscite should be
held in Kashmir.”



KASHMIR has been an Indian
and Pakistan quarrel since 1948,

Under the terms of the 1947
Pariition it was agreed that the

principalities of the old India
should join the appropriate State
—Hindu areas to India. Moslem
to Pakistan.

Kashmir, though predominantly
Mosiem was under a Hindu
maharajah, who announced that
his State would join India.

Moslem irregulars from the
turbulent North-West Frontier
poured into Kashmir to save their

By HAZEL MAY

tween an airport coach and a
Riviera cottage, with its enormous
double-decker height topped by
a sun-porch with stripea canopy,
canvas chairs and window-boxes
bursting wi.h geraniums,

It costs £1,070 in Britain, but
for this you get a large living
room with modern oak furniture,
heated by fuel stove which also
provides hot water for kitchen and
bathroom. Built-in cupboards
conserve every inch of space, and
a large folding table can seat five
for dinner or serve as a writing
desk. One side of the caravan
opens out in a double landscape
window.

A staircase leads upstairs to
the double-bedroom, and through
a centre door is a_ pink-and-
silver ba.hroom and_= another
double bedroom, suggested as the
nursery for the children.

A rather more expensive
double-decker-caravan selling for
£1,765 is built of anodised light
alloy instead of the more popu-
lar wood,

Even more formidable than
these giant erec ions on wheels
are the single-decker caravans

built to the maximum size—22

feet. “Half a block long” is how
one salesman describes them.
Once inside it is easy to forget
that you are in a caravan, Beau-
iiful furniture, carpet, tasteful

colours, flowers, pictures, even en
antique-convex mirror greet the
eye. And next door is a kitchen
that would delight the most house-

proud woman. Baking _ tables,
cupboards, a large yes oven, sink
and ample draining boards—

they’re all here.

These luxury models vary from
£700 té £800, but for the modest
pocket no such outlay is neces-
sary, Prices ranging from £275 to
£345 will buy a comfortable two-
berth with all mod. cons., and
for. just over £400 it is possible
to buy a roomy, wn-‘o-dete, well-
furnivhed four-berth, In most

dem idle



.
But Canada Says... |
OTTAWA — Canada is quite
satisfied” with the present state
of the British Commonwealth,
Mr. Lester Pearson, External
Affairs said today.

He added that Canada has no
faults to find with the present
organisation, but does not be-
lieve anything could be gained
by rebuilding the Common-
wealth into a “third world



Pakistan Will Not Thoughts For
Leave Cwealth

Politicians ©

IV.

ONE of the

THE STATE

reasons for the State’s neglect

of the family is the family’s ignorance of the
duties of the State. Too often the family re-
gards the State as an enemy. In fact it is the
function of the State to safeguard the inter-
ests of the family. There can be no conflict
between society and the individual, since the
interests of society and the interests of the
individual are not opposed but complemen-

Power” as suggested by somejtary. This does not mean that abuses do not

leaders.—Express News Service.
—L.E.S. |

Soldiers



Of Both
Sides Are
1Saall Im

| Kashmir

India sent in regular troops.|rights and duties and what

| the individual.
icisely beceuse individuals are ignorant of
jtheir rights and duties with relation to the

jexist in the relations between the State and

But these abuses arise pre-|

State and because the State quite frequently

tion

|negleets its diities towards the individual.
' Modern Statism, in fact, has sought to estab-
\l'sh (and in some cases has established to
\the detriment of society) a complete separa-
between the
| classes, between individuals and the State.
|. this way modern Statism has destroyed
{and is still destroying the interior current of
| social life and is creating a fertile ground for
\civic immorality which necessarily results

subject and governing

|from the apathy of citizens and their lack of
|interest in politics.

It is therefore the duty of all good citizens
brother Moslems from Hindu rule |‘? U%derstand quite clearly what are their

are the true

Pakistan sent forces, and there) functions of the State.

was fighting, until United Nations
mediators brought about a truce.

United Nations commissions have
supported the Pakistan demand for
a free plebiscite. Pandit Nehru
India’s Premier has refused to
withdraw his troops, and Pakistar
says that while they are there no
plebiscite could be free.

Troops of both sides are still in|
the country on either side of the!
truce line,

One definition of the

State is “human

society organised politically: that is civil
society considered as a unit of government,
with a code of law, and with manifold or-

\fanisations operating
|prosperity and the common wealth.”

to promote public

In addition to the family, man needs a

|Society to satisfy his needs and requirements.

‘3 | This society is the State, “the Civil associa-

eases the “de luxe” models have
only superficial advantages,

A great deal of imagination has
been expended on space saving
devices. Once inside, the viewer
leans against a deceptively
smooth wall at his peril. He is
liable to touch some _ hidden
spring, artfully camouflaged ar
grain in the wood, which will
release a double bed from that
misleading solid looking wall.
Folding _ partitions open out of
cupboards to divide the living
room into separate bedrooms,
and “convertible” is the operative
word,

Most ingenious space-saver in
the show was a remarkable semi-
rotating apartment housing a
toilet! This small circular room
can be swung into the main body
of the caravan when travelling,
and out when camping, with
great saving of space. The same
caravan, which must indeed have
been built by a genius in Sparing
That Inch, boasts a large bath
camouflaged as an oak chest of
drawers! It stands on end on cas-



prt of the caravan with the min-
imum of effort;

Smallest and cheipest Paeee|
on show.) was the £250 “Wan-
derer” designed: for the 8 h.p, car-
owner, a ‘simple fol
canvas flaps ’at' @ither. end anc|
fitted wih. a, doublebed. Thi: |
was also built of light metal, saic |
wooden caravans, although les
attrac.ive in appearance.

Most of this»dazzling array of
caravans at the motor show were
built by firms in Cheltenham. Why
has that respec‘able Englist
town got such a monopoly in the
trade? I asked. The answer is to
be found in thé aircraft industry
established there. Labour which
is accustomed to fine work ix
wood and steel is recruited into
making caravans, where all their
rkill is needed, First essen‘ia] ir
the caravan is

strength.

lightness and



ition willed by God as a necessary comple-

ment of the family.”
But the State, although its origin is willed

|by God, cannot consider itself as an arbi-
trary society, a free association like a cham-
|ber of commerce or a literary or scientific

society : “the State instead is a spontaneous
association integrated with and willed by
human nature, a necessary factor in its natu-

ral evolution
ment.”

and its progressive develop-

That is why the State cannot have a scope
which conflicts with the final aim of human

existence.

Leo XIII in Rerum Novarum (May 15, 1891)
pointed out the real functions of the State
when he defined true social prosperity as de-
riving “from holiness of customs, the right

constitution of the family, the guardianship
of justice and religion, an equal distribution
of duties, prosperity of arts and commerce,
from all that contributes to make life more
perfect and happy.”

But if the State exists, and has for its pur-

comprise the

pose the true welfare of the citizens who

State, it cannot perform its

functions without authority. That authority |

comes from God. To disobey the legitimate
tors, and canbe pushed to any | authority of the State is to oppose the divine
vill. But the State’s authority although sanc-
toned by God is not without limit. The power





of the State is not absolute and independent
ding van with lf every law or moral injunction. The author-

ity of the State has its limits fixed hy God
Himself. We must never forget and must
to have a longer life than the;always go on repeating that the “whole
veason for the existence of the power of the
State, at any time and whatever the circum-
‘tance, consists in its natural end, in its true
and proper function, which is the public pros~
perity and the common welfare.”

“If”, wrote Leo XIII in the Encyclical
Diuturnum, “anyone should have to choose
between disregarding the commands of God
or those of princes, he must obey Jesus Christ
who commanded ‘render to Caesar the things
that are Caesar’s and to God the things that
we God's’ and added “ if the will of princes
is repugnant to the will and law of God, they
themselves exceed the limit of their power
and prevent justice; nor can their authority
have any value in such case, since there can
be no authority where there is no justice.”

But wherever authority is, or has become
by passage of time legitimate, we must always

To-morrow:

a remember that thése who exercise legitimate |))}
power do so in the name of God, and that
disobedierice to legitimate rulers is not made!
to a man but is made to God Himself.

“THE CITIZEN AND THE
STATE”



Sea Roek Seer =By The Stroller” ~

she responded nobly. The sca was talk "bout ile in dis is! + mek
calm and his net which he had? me sick.
cleaned meticulously of moss and is ‘turn to gas wha come from

Ah hears dat

pomeneret

at, dis ile

at times, almost indistinguishable;
you see, he carries the net and
the net carries him in the per-
feetly honourable—if to the un-
accustomed, somewhat unfragrant
—business of catching ‘frays’
those miniature denizens of the
sea which frequent our coastal
waters. On this particular day,
Joe was gloomy. Yes sir, he was,
as he confided to g friend, ‘down
and out’. He put it this way:

“De moon bin look she sweetest
like pretty woman but underneat’
she was ugly fo’ true, she mek de
s@a so rough dat ah ent, ketch
even a scale fo’ de past
de result is dat all ah bin livin’
*pon is. brown jiskit an’ tea an‘
not too mich at dat, Now, ah

week;

dem is king sons. Whey dey
gettin’ all dis money from? Ah
knows ah ent got not even one
jack-ass fo’ dem tax. Qne time
back, some down along guv’nor
sen pelice fo’ reckon peepul don-
key an’ de peepul ups and chases
dey donkey in de bush so guvy’-
ment could'nt find dem fo’ tax.
Well, we ent got no bush hey,
but ah knows dis somting goin’
happin if dey sen pelice fo’ count
dese few frays ah ketchin’ outa
Gawd watah. Wha’ ah goin’ eat
fo’de Crismags ah dcen’t know;
mebbe ah will get de king food in
de po’house and get entrotain wid
ban’ musik besides. Ah hears dat
plenty food in town fo’ dem whey
got de money—all dem cane cutta
an’ factry worka whey get bonus

brag say dat de cane ripe an’ dey
taste some already; all ah got is
a patch uv spuds dat de worm
done edt out; de yam crop late
an de corn only now mekking
‘baby’ roun’ hey. Dem dat playin’
politic sayin’ dat every family
mus’ hav’ a chicken in de pot,
but all de chicken ‘bout hey dead

‘out an’ fowl egg is scarce as frays

an’ sea egg whey get ketch out
already.”

This gloomy oration to his
friend appears to have had a
soporific effort on poor Joe Cordle
and he lay down under a spread-
ing dunk tree and soon was fast
asleep. When he waked up the
scene had changed. It se«
moon had heard hi

ms the

wail

and j]

weed and spread out to dry called
to Joe for a cast.

ly haul in the catch; the second,
and third in like manner. Joe
now found himself behind a
huge pile of frays. Meantime,,
his friend hearing of the good’
news had returned to the scene.’
Joe, proud of his knowledge,,
prveeeds to expatiate:

“Looka wha happin, ah is got
eo much frays ah don’t know wha
fo’ do wid dem, Ah hears de
guv’ment say dey would like to

can dem fo’ gie touris fo’ eat,
wid fancy label ’pon de tin like
dem you. does buy from Mr.

Goddard

grocery, but de,

cook dem in

got

‘n? all dis

-

A first throw,
was so successful Joe could hard-'an’ mo’;

de hot air an’ same ‘ike talk dat
gone on in dts isiaud fo’ 100 ’ears
de ground suck um in
an’ now it comin’ out in gas—
well, to me lawd, wha is we po
peepul goin’ do? Anyhow, ah
hears dat one uv we big boys
pay a visit to British Honduras
an’ he come. back an’ say land
goin’ beggin’ up dey but it full
uv bush an’ Bajans could turn it
in land uv milk-an’ honey as de
good book say. Ah don’t mind
goin’ but ah hate to leave de
rock whey ah bred an’ born an’
me oder half, dis old net. Some
peepul say dey can’t get rice an’
Demerara full uv watah. Why
de guv’ment don’t gie dem rubber
boot- wid some uv de mon¢y dey

$$$

trowin’ ’way an’ let dem go down
dey an’ grow rice fo’ dehself an’
we up hey? Ah also hears dat
Pharoah in Egypt want fo’ add
a lot uv uncivilize’ Africans to
he kingdom. Why he don’t sen
fo" some uv we civilize’ Bajans?
Mo" besides, de bible say Egypt
is a land uv plenty an* manna
does fall from heaven when de
peepul hungry.

Ah tinks dat boy Adams should
go an’ talk wid dis rich Pharoah
and try an’ get a few uv we out
dey. Befo’ long wha goin’ hap-
pin hey is dis: all dem moto’
lorry and’ ting wha killin’ peepul
on de ‘road goin’ hav’ to go an’,
accordin’ to wha ah see in dem
American papah de boys~ bring |
back, we will hav’ de hellcoops
(a vision of helicopters) insted
uv bus, an’ kyar an’ lorry; dem}
kin haul cane too to de factry |
an’ fék molasses easy so dat no-|
bods kin get mash up by dem



foot

@ On Page 7

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FRIDAY, NOVEMBER 2, 1951

Leg. Co. Changes

House Give No ?©azonus

For Objections

THE Legislative Council at their meeting yesterday re-
ceived a message from the House of Assembly to the effect
that they did not agree with the amendments made by
that Honourable Council (o the Bill to make provision for
the protection of the wages of workers.

The short debate that followeu
Suggested that the offending
amendment was that in which
clause two of the bill had been
amended by the insertion of the

words “or work performed by
watchmen,”. so that the section
then read :—
2. In this Act—
“manual labour” includes
work ordinarily performed by
mechanics, artisans, handi-
craftsmen, seamen, boatmen,
transport workers, domestic

servants and all lapourers and

any other similar work associ-

ated therewith but does not in-
clude clerical work; or work
performed by watchmen.

“worker” means a person who

performs manuai labour.

Hon. G. B. Evelyn who led off
the debate, observed that The
Other Place, in their message re-
jecting the Honourable Council’s
amendments had not stated their
reasons for their objections to the
amendments and so that Council
was still in the dark as to why
their amendments had failed to
find fsvour with The Other
Place.

The bill had been referred to a
Select Committee of which he
was chairman and there were
members of that Committee who
knew more of the subject than he
did himself. After careful study
they hed suggested amendments
aimed at the clarification of cer-
tain sections which they consid-
ered ambiguous.

In the absence of any specific
objection to- any of the amend-
ments he could only move that
the Council send a message to the
Qther Place stating that they
were unable to waive _ their
amendments to ths bill-

No Reason

The Hon. tse Colonial Secre-
tary said that although there
were no reasons given by The
Other Place for their objection to
the amendments yet he had been
given to believe from the reports
of the debate in the Other Place
that the only real objection was
the insertion of the words “or
work performed by watchmen”.

There was nothing in the other
amendments, to his mind that
could suggest that there woul:
be any objection.

The other amendments were as
follows:— In section 8 there was
a typographical error in which
the word “for” was inserted for
“of” so that the section read: —

8. Except where otherwise
expressly permitted by the pro.
visions of this Act or of any other
Act no employer shall make any
deduction or make any agreement
or contract with a worktr for any
Geduction from the wages to be
paid by the employer to the
worker, or for any payment to the
employer by the worker, for or in
respect of any fine, or for bad or
negligent work or for injury to
the materials or other property
of the employer save when such
injury is occasioned by the wilful
misconduct or neglect of the
worker,

in section 15 where the bill was
made to read that the penalty for
contravention of the provisions
of the bill should be a fine of $48,
the Council had inserted “not ex-
ceeding” before $48 so that the
fine would not be an arbitrary
one,

This section then read: —

15. Any employer or his agent
who—

(a) enters into any agreement or
contract or gives any re-
muneration for employment
contrary to the provisions of
this Act or declared by the
provisions of this Act to be
illegal; or

(b) makes any deduction from
the wages of any worker or
receives any payment from
any worker contrary to the
provisions of this Act; or

(c) contravenes the provisions of

? section fourteen of this Act:
shall be liable, on conviction, to a
fine not exceeding forty-eight
dollars or for a second or subse.
quent offence to a fine of ninety-
six dollars,

Section 17 was similarly treated
and this read:—

17. (1) Every employer shall

keep a Register of wage payments
and workers accounts and every
worker shall be entitled, on de-
mand, to a copy of his account in
any pay-period.

(2) Every employer who con-





travenes the provisions of sub-
section (1) of this section shall be
guilty of an offence and shall be
liable on conviction to a fine of
forty-eight dollars.

An entirely new section 20 was
added and this read:—No prosecu-
tion for any offence under this Act
shall be institu.ed after the ex-
piration of one yerr from the date
of the commission of the offence.

Regretiable

Tie Hon'oze Dr. Massiah said
that it was regrettable ihat The
Other Place had made no definite
Statement with regard .o their
rejection of their amendments
o herwise they might have been
able to reach some compromise.

In his view it was very un-
fortunate. ‘The amendmen:s had
been originally put in for clarify-
ing the position and he did not
see how the Council could go back
on its decision,

He agreed with the view ex-
pressed that at first thought one
could reach the opinion that there
was no necessity for including the
words relating to the amendment
with regard to watchmen, and then
on second thought there was a
body of opinion that shared the
view that they should be inserted.

The very ambiguity surrounding
it sugges‘ed that there chould be
the amendment even if it was
superfluous but for the sake of
clarity,

The Hon'ble J. D. Chandler said
that he would not speak as the
President but give his own feelings
on the matter. He felt that it was
a difference of opinion hetween
the lawyers as to the in‘erpretation
of certain sections in the bill.

It was not agreed whethe-~ it
was necessarv to include watchmen
or whe'her thew were already in-
eluded in the interpretation of cer-
tain sections of the bill.

No Fight Needed

On the other hand he did not
think that this was such an issue
that there should be a fight he-
tween the two chambers, The

@ On Page 7

B’dos Has Ta Get
A New Harbour
-DR. CUMMINS

THE Barbados Labour Party
held a Political Meeting at Welch-
man Hall, St. Thomas, oh Wednes-
day night in support of Dr, Cum-
mins and Mr, R. G. Mapp, candi-
dates for the parish of St. Thomas.

“As long as the Labour Par y
exists it stands to represent all
classes in Barbados”, Dr. Cum-
mins told the electorate,

Mr. E. Holder, who ‘i¢, offering
himself as a catididute~ for St.
James, acted as Chairman.

Dr. Cummins said that he had
been coming to them since 1924
and it was from that time that they
were friends.

He said that the Union had been
in exi wefor ten years and
during that fime its efforts had
transformed the purpose of living
for workers, “It is quite evident
that the Barbados Workers’ Union
‘and the Barbados Labour Party
have transformed Barbados,” he
said,

A few months ago they had Mr.
Bradshaw of St. Kitts with them.
He told them that he had just re-
turned from Europe where he saw
more poverty than in Barbados.
Jn Spain little boys ran behind
him begging. He did not see tha.
in Barbados. He was glad to say
that in Barbados the people look-
ed happier.

Ten Years Ago

Dr. Cummins said that that was
not so ten years ago. A man
could not be happy when his
children were not well clothed
“These conditions now existing in
Europe did exist in Barbados ten
years ago,” he said.

He said that they stood for
material and economic progress.
From the fact that they got better
wages for the workers who have
been able to get better clothes

@ On Page 7





CABIN TRUN



BARBADOS ADVOCATE



IN THE LEGISLATIVE
COUNCIL YESTERDAY

The Legislative Couneii met at
2 p.m = yesterday and having sat
for nearly two hours, adjourned
until 2.30 p.m. next Tuesday.

The Hon The Colonial Secre-
tary lald the
ments

The Quarries (Miscellaneous
Forme) Regulations, 1051

Quarterly Return of Transac-
— in Rum te 20th September,
1951.

The Counell received a mes-
sage from the House of Assem-
bly stating that they were un-
able to agree with the amend-
ments which the Honourable
Council had made to the Bill
to make provision for the pretec-
tion of wages of workers

The Council passed a message
in reply stating that they had
waived their amendment to
clause @ of the Bill defining
“manual labour’ but insisted on
the other amendments they had
made to the bill,

fellowing docu-

The Council concurred
following resolutions: —
To place the sum of $18.450 at
the disposal of the Geverner-in-
Executive Committee to sup-
plement the Estimates 1951—S?;

in the

Part I—Capital, as shown in
Supplementary Estimates 151-32:
x

Te piace the sum of S120 at
‘the disposal of the Gevernor-in-
Executive Committee to sup-
plement the Estimates 1951—52,
Part ‘Current, as chown in
Supplementary Estimates 1951-52:

Te appreve the allocation of
the balance of the stabilisation
fund fixed on the 23th of Ocvo-
ber 1951, by the Gevernor-in-
Executive Committee
advice of the Faney
Contrel and M
under the previ
1e@ of «(the 6 bados . Fancy
Molasses Production and Expert
Act 1937;

To appreve the Order entiiled
“The Civil Establishment «Gen-
eral) (Amendment) No & Order
1951, made by the Governer-in-
Executive Comupiitter on the
Twenty-second day of October
TAM. under the provision: of See-
tion 3 of the Civil Establishment
Act, 19

The Councit passed a bill to
provide for the impertxtion into
this island, free of duty for o
peried of one year of goods made
from sea island cotton







C.O.L. Bonus
For Workers
Today

THE staff of the Sanitary Com-
missioners for St. Michael will get
some cost of living bonus to-day,
the Sanitary Commissioners de-
cided yests oc The tu.al avryount
of bonus tuey wili get wil ve iron
September 25 this year to March
next year. It will be paid at
Government rates Government
rates are 20% on the first $480
per annum of salary, 74% on the
second, and 5% on the third

or those who are paid weekly
the rates are:—for the first $10

of weekly wages 20%, for the
second $10, 744% and for the third
$10, 5%.

The Commissioners agreed to
pay the cost of living bonus on
the suggestion of the St. Michael
Vestry who decided a short while
ago that all parochial employees
would get a cost of living bonus.

The bonus paid to-day will come
from an unexpended balance of
$7,000 the Commissioners now
hold, Just over $11,000 is needed
for this department, however, and
the Vestry had agreed to seek the
Legislature’s approval to transfer
the required $4,000. Mr. E. D,
Mottley said yesterday that there
might be a possibility of getting
over the difficulty of getting the
$4,000 without going to the Legis-
lature.

In moving the adoption of the
Vestry’s suggestion for bonus, Mr.
Mottley said that the ways and
means for furnishing the money
had already been settled. It was
only for the Board to agree and
they would be able’ to pay the
rates as from to-day. The extra
cost of living bonus as from Sep-
tember 25 would also be paid
to-day,

“IT am sure,” he said, “that em-
ployees will appreciate this.”

Mr, Victor Chase said that he
took very great pleasure in sec-
onding Mr. Mottley’s motion as he
was well aware of the extreme
pressure that the increased cost of
living was making on salaries of
parochial employees. He was sure
if they received their money then
it would go a great way in helping
them to balance their budget.

“I feel sure,” he said, “that the
parochial employees would appre-
ciate receiving money as promptly
as We can pay it to them.”

ar ° *

DEALING with a letter from Mr,
Herbert H. Williams, Supervising
Returning Officer for St. Michael
in the forthcoming elections, the
Commissioners decided io grant
leave to members of their staff as
required by Mr. Williams for as-
sisting in the carrying out of the
elections.

The Board further authorised
the Chairman of the Finance Com-
mittee to grant such leave to other
members of the staff as may be
required for the conduct of the
elections.

* © a *

THE COMMISSIONERS were
informed by the Colonial Secretary
that the Legislature had provided
the necessary funds to enable a
refund to the Commissioners of
Health to the amount of $704.50
paid as Customs duty on equip-
ment imported for use in the scav-
enging of Bridgetown. i

* 4 at

THE BOARD were also inforin-
ed that the Governor-in-Executive
Committee agreed to accept the
responsibility of providing com-
munal baths at the Bay Estate.

a





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REVELATION =-SS==



Schooner



In Wages Bill Rejected |



America Sticks A Goose
- Quill In The Caps Of
The Upper Crust

By EVELYN WEBBER
NEW YORK.

AN exotic new magazine which
sells for 15s. a cOpy has just
bubbled in o life over here. It is
designed, say the publishers, for
“those people who have never
relished the banal or the common-
piace.”

And Gentry, as it is called, con-
tains everything from a_ free
sample of marjoram herb pasted
on the cooking page to a complete
(and also free) architec.’s blue-
print on how to build a Finnish
steam bath in your cellar,

“We doubt whether many of our
readers will ever actually get
down to the job of building a
steam bath,” says Geniry frankly.
“But isn’t it a pleasant idea to toy
with?”

Launched

At Browne’s Beach

Fifty-one-year-old Ernest Lord, ex-harbour police, ship-
wright, wheelwright and engineer was a happy man yes-

terday when he launched his 64 feet

long schooner

Confident I. G., off Browne’s Beach. It took Ernest Lord

and two other shipwrights a
the schooner.

Lord is a man who has as his
not get through life.” That

year and three months to build

maxim: “With one job you can-
is why he has also done a bit

of speculating and a bit of fishing in his day. He worked six
years at the Westbury Garage and it is on this background
that he tells you, “In about a year and a half hence when 1

get sufficient money to buy
schooner myself.”

an engine, I will put it in the |

In 1923 he bought his first fshee—

ing boat and since then he built
hve others. “All the profits from
these and the savings trom work-
ing at my trades went to help
build this schooner,” he said.

When Lord stared building his
schooner, people used to laugh at
him. ‘He had started alone and
people used to say, he was a fool
to think. he would ever get ft
completed, but Lord was confident
in God. “In God’—:hat is what
the LG, of the Schooner’s name
stands for. ° .

He had $5,000 worth in materiat
and $7,000 in cash when he start-
ed_ building his boat,

From the time Lord was a boy
he knew he would some day in-
vest on a big scale and the fact

that he so much loved the sea de-

cided for him which way he would
invest. His grandfather was a
fisherman, and his fa her a ship-
wright. He has a son who is now
a seaman.

He was born at the Crane, St.
Philip. The sea off the Crane is
rough, but at the age of five Lord
had acquired the art of swimming.

Ambitions

Ne does not know anything about
naviga ion. He will have to em-
ploy a captain. But whenever his
schooner leaves these shores, he
will be aboard it and in charge.
He plans learning navigation so
that some day he will be able to
captain hig schooner.

All that is wanted for the
schooner now are the two masts
which he expects to reach here in
a month’s time and the sails, He
already has the canvas for the sails
and sail makers have just begun
to work on them,

“TI expect I will sail from Barba-
dos in about two monthg time,” he
said.

Yesterday before the schooner
was leunched, Rev. Crosby said
prayers and asked God to send
down his blessing on Lord's boat
He said, “Lord, I give it under
vour rare and protection and hope
it will be prosperous.”

The beam of the schooner is 19
feet and the dep‘h 9% feet.

GOLFITO CALLS

Thirty-six passengers arrived
here Wednesday by the Elders &
Fyffe’s liner Golfite which called
from Southampton, England.
The Golfito left port during the
tvening for Trinidad, Mr. C. E.
Clarke was the only passenger
who boarded the ship from Bar-
bados.

The Golfito



is consigned to

Messrs. Wilkinson & Haynes Co.,
Ltd.






a

—







: Hon. Francis Dias
Dies, Aged 76
In B.G.

(From Our Own Correspondent)

GEORGETOWN, B.G., Nov. 1,

Hon’ble Francis Dias, O.B.E,,
Solicitor and veteran politician
died here on Wednesday evening
at the age of 76, Dias was first
elected a member of the old
Court of Policy and later on the
Legislative Council, the served
more than 25 years and on retire-
ment received the royal privilege
to bear the honourable title for
life. He also served for years
On the Georgetown Town Coun-
cil and was Mayor several times,

Dias was also a , prominent
turfite of the old davs, owning
the famous horses Takealight
and Atom. He is mourned by a
widow, two sons—Vivian, Crown
Solicitor of B.G., Frank, also a
solicitor, two daughters Mrs,
Carlos Gomes, wife of the prom-
inent B.G. solicitor who is a
brother of the Trinidad Justice—
Gomes and Mrs. Eric Rodrigues,
wife of the Royal Bank of Trini-
dad branch employee.

Assize courts and Magistrates
Courts throughout the colony
adjourned two minutes as a mark
of respect. His body is lying in
state at the Sacred Heart Church
prior to his funeral at 4.30 p.m,
this afternoon, The flags of all
Government municipal buildings
are at half-mast,





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A COOLING DELIGHT
TO-DAY’S \)
SPECIAL a 3



On an essay on “The melodies
and rhythms in nature:” “Dont
we know,” say Gentry, “that
Peethoven composed a full sym-
phony around such motifs? And
won't it be impressive next time
you walk through the countryside
with a friend say, ‘That bird is
chirping in E flat major 4-5
vempo,'’

Gentry is published say its pub-
lishers, “for the 100,000 thinking
men in America.” (Total popula-
tion of America is 150,000,000.)

There is a piece (“not too many
words” the editors
ingly) on old cars,

but the

magazine simply pictures the cars. |



|

say encourag= |

|
| A little Marmite added to



PAGE FIVE







The food for Jamily
_ FITNESS






The Vitamins in the food you
eat are not always sufficient

Savouries, Soups, Stews and a

variety of Sandwiches, can
help to make up for the
deficiency. Marmite contains

Vitamin B, essential for build-
ing up resistance to disease

and is particularly good and

Not much thinking to do about | tasty for growing children
that. | Delicious on hot buttered

A new clothes fashion is given toast. —
and a sample of the fabric at ach- | =

ed to the page.
sense of touch.
involved here either.

The wildest addition is ‘o a poem
pheut wild geese some sample
soose quills. (This possibly. rt
the insistence of Mise Cora Corlvle
one/of the editors of the magazine
for men, who once wrote a best-
seller on how to get a husband.)

“The addi‘ion of stick-ons and
somples,’ say the publishers, “in
treduces a new and effective kind
cf ‘reading by touch’

“After the first few pages—
eremmedc with shirt and suit ad-
vertismeents to which cuttings of
the avertisers’ cloth have been
tty shed—you find yourself au-
tomatically running your hand
ov " the pictures in the mag-
azin® as coon as your eye falls on
them, end whether enything is
atteched to them or not.”

SOCIO LOOP OOPS SD

PAIN’S

CELEBRATED
FIREWORKS

The Largest Assortment in

Â¥
>
aS
>

ASS

town is at - - -

WEATHERHEAD'S

Crackers, Wheels, Flower
Pots, Dizzle Dazzle, Squibbs,
Rockets, Roman Candles,
Jack - in - the - Box, Deyil
Among the Tailors, Jet
Wheels, ete), ete,

4c., 8c., 12c., 16¢.,
24c., 36c., 60c., 72c.,
$1.08, $1.44, $1.80
$1.92, $2.64, $3.36
and $4.32.

SPARKLERS
MATCHES (Red & Green

Prives:

l4c, pk, of 12

—6c. Box
RED DEVILS .... 3c. each
BOMBS t .»+ 2c. each

Call in and make your Selec-

tion To-day.

BRUCE WEATHERHEAD

LT) = Head of Broad Street

POLE CLECSPS ESL PSPSPS SSSSOSSEPESSSSS. OSSSSGPPSOSOSSSOOSS GSS OPA SS

PLLC E LLL LLL LPL PLL LLLP

PLEA LLL LLL

oo



OCC SSSSSSS

~

5%

KNIGHTS

4,
CLS OS

os

-

oa.

Ce

Irresistible to the
But no thinking |

MARMITE

+
SS

‘HE VITAMIN B YEAST. EXTRACT

a -~- _ — si tlle Sen rere cece aipisic





oe ee ——— es ee

GOLF



GLOVES

Now obtainable at...

WM. FOGARTY (pos) LTD.



THE UNDERMENTIONED ITEMS ARE ONLY A
SMALL PROPORTION OF OUR WIDE RANGE OF

hHITCHEN REQUISITES

“HAND? PLATE
SCRAPERS
WIRE STRAINERS |
ASBESTOS STOVE
MATS
POTATO RICERS
WOTATO CHIPVPERS,
COOKS’ SIEVES
BUTTER CHURNS
DOMESTIC SCALES
MEAT MINCERS
BOILING STOVES
KITCHEN KNIVES

ICE. SHAVERS

BREAD KNIVES
METAL TOASTERS

| dAPANNED TRAYS

) “WIRD DISH COVERS

| BGG BEATERS

| PASTRY ROLLING

| PINS

KNIFE SHARPENERS
BEAN SLIGQERS
STEEL WOOL
KITCHEN SPOONS

EGG TIMERS MEASURING SPOONS
WOOD SPOONS (Sets)
(i STOVE MICA
BREAD TINS, DISH MOPS
—Enamd, ICING TUBES
BREAD TINS ICING SYRINGES
OVEN —Japanned | STEAM COOKERS

THERMOMETERS | PRESSURE COOKERS

We also carry a large assortment of
Domestic lines in - ~ -
EARTHENWARE, ALUMINIUM WARE,
TIN AND ENAMELLED WARE



7 WHILI RE AVAILABLE
AT REASONABLE PRICES.

THE GOODS

ie |
HARRISON'S sovesie anowane |



i
s |
- i
|
a
a
“3
% :
2
a







a

ia

in FOR BEST RESULTS *,

®o USE a,

"0060's PURINA CHOWS =

we IN THE CHECKER BOARD BAGS ‘,

a H. jason Jones & Co., Ltd—bDistributor, =
a

1 a

aaa =







OES



SPPPSCSS

s
ik ‘a
BS Originally This Week
8% EVAPORATED MILK per tin 29¢ 26¢ §
‘% CONDENSED MILK... ye Bae 31 3
§ IMPERIAL VIENNA SAUSAGES ,,, 38c. 34 $
° SPAGHET ES WITH CHEESE 1! ‘ y
$$ T AUCE ..... 20 16¢ x
% FIG SPONGE PUDDING 35¢. 30 x3
|} SULTANA SPONGE PUDDING 35c 30¢ x
§ Gainer cee
1% & pe = 35e 30¢
x MIXED FRUIT SPONGE PUDDING 35c 30¢ %
Sensi incswasirsesieearereidiacbto >
% DOMINICA NAVEL ORANGES : 6c.
% SLICED BACON—»per Ib. ; i $1.00 %
x SLICED DANISH HAM—per 1b Gs 1.76 &
* DANISH SALAMI SAUSAGFS—oper lb. 1.31 %
% CAMPBELL’S CONSOMME SO!P-—per Tin ; 390. %
% * BOULLION SOUP—per Tin ; 39 ¥
% SOUTH AFRICAN LOBSTER er Tin 69c. &
% NORWEGIAN PEELED SHRIMPS—per Tin . 86c. %
§ DUTCH STRAWBERRIES in LIGHT SYRUP—per Tin 69. R|
y APIE PEANUT BUTTER—per Jar 58c. }
g + ’ ”, %
¢ STANSFELD, SCOTT & CO. L®D. :
5, %
y ,

‘
EF SOOO OOOO OOF OLSON

HOW MANY SCREWS IN
A JA

?
WIN AN EKCO RADIO





GUESS COUPON WITH. EVERY
OVER $5.00‘ CASH BILL
FROM NOVEMBER IST



A. BARNES & CO,, LTD.

. EEE SE oo Ee eee
I
EN


a ee a eh en PE EA a,



PAGE SIX FRIDAY, NOVEMBER 2, 1951









3 3 5 outh and
|_ Bleeding Gums. Sore = pyerrhea,

| money Tenemia
age. Get 4mosan trom Ze the guar-
Amosan 53°)"
, you.
ter Prorshea—Trench

FEEL LIKE
THIS —
TAKE |

WINCARNIS

TONIC WINE

AND FEEL



MICKEY MOUSE



















+--+ SHALL HAVE T

YOu FOR TRYING TO HELP NOUR FRIES

Ke






eh
packet A}







LIKE THIS!

BE HEALTHY
& HAPPY.

OH, DAGWOOD DONT 2
GIVE ME AN ARGUMENT )
EVERY TIME TASK»:

ITS HUMANLY IMPOSSIBLE
TO LUFT BOTH FEET





CORN FLAKES
todayl

See Ihe =- =
ADVOCATE
for Best BOOKS









SSO

IT P

YS YOU TO DEAL HER

oC















USUALLY NOW USUALLY NOW ff
Pkgs. Jacob Cream Crackers 49 38 = =6Tins Grapefruit 55 44}

Pkgs. Polar Icing Sugar 37 34 ~~ Bottles Dows Stout 26 «21h

Tins Succotash 34 $0 Bottles Frontenac Beer 26 21



THE LOVELIEST
»LOT IN TOWN

XMAS







ROOM
‘TOMORROW MORNING - SO GET
ie FOR YOU - BUSY RIGHT AWAY AND STACK
WHILE T WAS OL 4 ALL THE FURNITURE IN THE
STOPPED OFF AT MIDDLE OF THE FLOOR-

I
THE PAINTING
CONTRACTOR'S -


















= a YOU KNOW Ti 4 “ a a athe oo
—“Tuat ey ——l A SKEPTIC! / itt bisa besarte k ; . : SSS SSS SSS
Vin & WONDERFUL, IAT GENTLEMAAN... 4 “= me h § —————————— SSS SSS












FORTUNE, MADAME |
ROMANY/ NOW READ | \
MR. KIRBY'S TEA /
Leaves / =

A VARIET*
OF FINE





a. Sore BLACKWELL'S

ELE ALT

Tins CROSSE & BLACKWELL'S
RED CURRANT JELLY

Small Tins SAXA SPICES 15c.
each

Small Tins SAXA GINGER, CIN-
NAMON, NUTMEG







~ for the XMAS

MIXED DRIED FRUIT in Cello-




















IF IM FOLLOWED YOU LL NEVER SEE vas — ‘ ! ne Packages BISTO for Gravies—It thickens,
ICANT SIGN THis ALI? X YOU'LL SIGN THEM AGAIN GOVERNOR? WHEN | ns CAKE g 1-foy'tins AUSTRALIAN ROAST Se te ee
eens ore " : ‘ asNO MOR | : BEEF a ie
IT TURNS THECOUNTRY)IF YOU WANT anal GET} | RETURN WITH THE NOTE *+NO MOR’ \6-Ib. hots of CARIB COFFEE 70é, Bots. CROSSE & BLACKWELL'S
OVER YOUR TO SEE YOUR : CURRANTS—RAISINS—MIXED PEEL— i-lb. bots TROPICAL PRIDE CALVES FEET JELLY
[SANGOF ere | FAMILY AGAIN. PRUNES—also 1-lb, bots. SOUTHWELL’S (Jamaica) MARMALADE 36c, 20 cz. Tins BEMA MOLASSES for {}}
CROOKS J's MINCEMEAT 66c. l-lb. bots JAMAICA GUAVA 26c i)
roe — SPREAD 6c. only Bots, PEANUT BUTTER 42c.
vy { : Rie, Danes cote SKIN Tins FRENCH MUSHROOMS $44e.
XMAS PLUM PUDDINGS Bots, Preserved STEM GINGER Bots, COLOURED COCKTAIL
; i by Noniis A gn ONIONS —- Yellow, Red and
1) MRS, PRES Ee ce oo Ai a ae ON'S ANE . y f Green at 60c. aie bok on white
lbs. net by Peek rrea Os, os



ALLEYNE ARTHUR &

“Your Grocers” = Migh St. Phone us=- We Deliver



—TS










Ceiechisinemenenceninsisbeln
Whe charge for announcements
Births, Marrisges, Deaths, Acknowl-
@dgements, and "n Memoriam notices is

$1 30 on week-days and $1.89 on Sundays
for any number o! words up to 50, and
3 cents per word on week-days and
@ cents per word en Sundays for each
additianal war?,



PoUMmLIC NOTICES

Ten cents per agate tine on week-days
[md 12 cents per agate line on Sundays,
im charge $1.50 on week-days
and $1. on Sundays





NOTICE

PARISH OF ST. GEORGE
Will those persons owing Taxes to the
Parish of St. George, piease pay same

without delay
D. H. A. JOHNSON,
Parochial Treasurer, St. George
1.11.51—3n

—_—



NOTICE
Parochial Treasur-r's Office of
George will be kept at the “Rosary”

The
St

day the ith November

Hours 10 a.m to 2 p.m

nesdays., Thursdays
D

1951
Tuesday, Wed-
"N. A. JOHNSON,
Parochial Treasurer
1.11.51

on

NOTICE

Notice is hereby given that neither
the Master nor the agents of the M.V
CHARLES A. MACLEAN now in port
will be responsible for any debt or debts
contracted by any member or members
of the crew of said vessel’ while in port







Capt. D. J. DOUCETTE,
(Master)
MANNING & Co., Ltd
(Agents) .
31.10. 51—3n
NOTICE
PARISH OF ST JAMES
The returning Officer for the Election
of Members to serve in the Genera:
Assembh/, for the Parish of St. James

has established his Office at Sandylane
Factory. Office hours between the hours
of 7 a.m. and 11 a.m. on Mondays, Tues-
days and Wednesdays
J. H. C. THORNE
2.11.51—3n



NOTICE
PARISH OF CHRIST CHURCH
SEALED TENDERS, (marked on the
envelope “Tender for Loan”), will be
received at my office up to 3.00 p.m
cn Monday 1.th November, 1951, for the
loan to the parish of $7,200.00 »
of interest not exceeding 4% as
ised by the “Christ Church Parish
(Cemetery) Loan Act 1951, such sum to
be repaid in ten annual instalments of
720.40 each together with interest the
first of such instalments becoming due
on October 25th 1955.
Certificates will be
$/20.00 each
WOOD GODDARD,
Clerk of the Vestry,
Christ Chureh
2.11.51—4n






issued in units of

NOTICE
PARISH OF ST. PETER
I hereby give notice that I have
established my office at “Pleasant Hall
Piantation, St. Peter. Office hours: Tues-
Gays, Wednesdays and Thursday, from





10 a.m, to 3 p.m.
C. A. THORNTON,
Returning Officer, _
Parish of St. Peter
2.11.51—3n.



LOST & FOUND

LOST
CAT—One (1) black and white half-
grown Persian Cat from the “Cot”,
Spooners Hill, St. Michael. Finder will
be suitably rewarded. 2.11.51—1n

‘RACE TICKET—Series 1.7000. Finder
will be rewarded on returning same to

















Arthur Gittens, Reed Strect, St. Michaet

2,11.51—1n.

SWEEPSTAKE TiCKET—Series K.K.

0552. Finder please return same to
Coleridge Leslie, Westbury Road

2.11.51—1n.

“Somewhere in Bridgetown Brown

Cise marked C. J Bayne containing
one pair of glasses Finder will be re-
warded on returning same to JOHNSON’S
STATIONERY. 2.11.51—3n





WHITE WOOL MAN'S CARDIGAN—-

Return E. A. Benjamin, Plantations
Building, or Phone 3123. Reward
' 1,11,51—2n



WANTED TO BUY

STAMPS STAMPS

All Kind of STAMPS
at the
CARIBBEAN STAMP
SOCIETY
No, 10, Swan Street.
| £.11.51—2n





NEW SHIPMENT—

GAS COOKERS

JUST ARRIVED !

ALL SOLD

(next to the Post Office) as from Tues- i
Office } tion

| Lta

RADIO—G_E.C



| Holder Bros.,

—

Call and see them at your Gas |

Showroom, Bay Street, and to

avoid disappointment BOOK your
order TODAY from a_ future
shipment.





—S————

siihoneteaiiieanmaiiaals
TO-DAY'S NEWS PLASH

STOP WATCHES
$12.00
“KIENZLE”
The Best made.



{



=

eee

at
JOHNSON’S STATIONERY

Hn



PRESS BUTTONS
Fitted to your Bag or Purse
WHILE YOU WAIT.
JOHNSON'S ARDWARE
FURNISH TO-DAY §
=
x
bo e %
. * th x
Christmas is on the 3
% Way. x
x ; ; 4
Splendid Cedar Wardrobe, be ¥
X with sparkie polish and tall yp
x bevelled Mirror Other Ward- 9 |
XS robes, Chests-of-Drawers, Gay
x Vanities and smaller Dressing
x Tables, $16 up Bedsteads in
x Wood or Iron, Springs, Folding
@ and other Cradies Nightchairs
$5 up %
.
Dining, Kitchen and Faney %
Tables in many shapes and sizes ¢
—China, Bedroom and Kitchen }
Cabinets. Larders, Waggons—Tub 2
and Rush Furniture %
Brilliant Mirrors in passopartout, %
12 x 9 and 14 x 10, $1.15 up— &
*% Birch framed Mirrors 24 x 12 t» %
* 48 x 16, $4 up—Big unframed X&
3 mirrors 28 x 18, $2.95, 48 x 16, %
@ 81.50 %
- o)
x %
% x
§L.S. WILSON 8
a . ~~ 4
3 %
* , %
& SPRY ST. %
4 >
& DIAL 4069 %
.
969055590695 0O% 600ccoews?



FRIDAY, NOVEMBER 2, 1951

CLASSIFIED ADS.

TELEPHONE 2508.





FOR SALE

Minimum charge week 72 cents
96 cents Sutdays % words —
words 3 cents a word week—4
word on Sundays;

and
a“
e



PUBLIC SALES

REAL ESTATE







FOR SALE ATL MOUNT WELTON
Complete plant of Sugar Machinery-
Inspection on application to the Manager
Sale starts at 8.30 a.m. on Monday, 5th
November at Mount Wilton. D. M
} Simpson & Co. 2.11.51—4n.

EVANTON

Situated at Top Rock, standing on half
AUTOMOTIVE an acre, having 4 bedrooms, Dining
Room, Sun Lounge, two fully tiled

CAR—1951 Morris Minor Saloon as| Toilets and Baths,

new. Only 2,500 miles,

in by owner-driver

Owner leaving Barbados. Phone #523
3.11. 51-—2n.





CAR—Dodge Car



driven, mileage 15,000 miles,
condition. Dial 4038. 31.10.51—5n,
CAR: 1951 Citroen. Almost new—

3,000 miles. Owner leaving the Island
Write Box H.H. c/o Advocate
14.10.51—t.f.n.











with Hot Water,

carefully run] Modern Kitchen. Outside 2 Car Garage,
Nearest $1,800. | Servants’ Room, Children's Play

The Gardens are well laid out, iesins
numerous Trees, with double entrance
‘The above Property can be purchased

1948 Model, owner | fully Furnished if so desired. With pos-
perfect | session Ist February 1952. For viewing

etc. Phone 8567 2.11.51—3n.



WORTHY DOWN
Situated at Top Rock, having 3 bed-
rooms with connecting Toilets and Baths

Large Balcony, having a view to the

—__-- — —_——-—--— ,; Sea. Lounge Dining Room, Modern

LORRY—One Federal lorry in working| Kitchen. Outside 2 Car Garage, 2

order, Price $500.00 Apply Manager Servants’ Qrts.. Toilet and Bath,
Drax Hall. 27.10.51—Tn | Laundry.

This Residence has Built-in-Cupboards

throughout. —s Gardens are weil laid

. z= out and fully enclosed. There is an

ELECTRivAL Electric Stove, -Frig., and Telephone

_ already installed. Ready for immediate

FRIGIDAIRE—5 c.b. Fit. A-1 condi-| possession. Further particulars -apply

Orange Hill, St. Peter Ralph Beard. Phone 5010

30.10.51—3n 2.1L. 51—3n

Sirsa See en

RADIO—G.E.C, 10-tube model. Just PROPERTY--Situated at Inch Marlow

overhauled
Phone 4629—4371

2.11.51—3n







condition. Phone 2285

$1.10) .51—3n

REFRIGERATOR: One (1) 5 Cubit ft
Westinghouse Refrigerator in good.
working order. Apply: P. D. Maynard,
Porters Factory, St. James. Dial 2319

7.10.51—6n

MECHANICAL

TYPEWRITER—One Underwood Porta-

ble Typewriter Excellent condition

Swan Street.
30.10.51—t.f.n









MISCELLANEUUS

BONE CHINA—"Royal Crown Derby”;
Crown Staffordshire “Shelley”. Louis L











Bayley of Bolton Lane. 30.10 .51—3n
BAVORIAN PORCELAIN — Louis L
30.10,51—8n.

Bayley of Bolton Lane.



BOARDS—Two large wooden advertis-
ing Sign Boards: Approximately 20 ft. x
12 ft. Purchaser must remove same

One Sign Board is located at “Welches"
—St. Michael—the other at Oistins, near
Plaza Theatre. CITY GARAGE TRADING
CO., LTD., Victoria St.

28.10,51—t.f.n.
—————
CHESS SETS—In plastic $3.25 each
Broadway Dress Shop. 2.11.51-—3n.

a ertnarenensaomeshaet eeeetenseaeeneiptalcoecreaanetieite
COSTUME JEWELLERY—New stocks |) 19.

of Czechoslovakian Costume Jewellery.
Wonderful value, Louis L. Bayley of

Bolton Lane. 30.10.51—3n.
DIABETIC CHOCOLATE — Made
especially for those who must eat a

restricted sweet diet. 4 oz Bars. Knight's
Ltd. 1.11.51—In





GAMES—Snakes and Ladders Tiddly-
Winks and Ludo at 2/- each, Broad-
we Dress. Shop. 2.11.51—3n.

LADIES COTTON VESTS—Superfine
soft as silk, light weight quality for
cool and comfort. English make, only
9 cents each. Kirpalani, 52 Swan
Street. 2.11.51—1n

MILL: Fan—Tower, Pump, and gal-
vanise tank, sold separately or together
Dial 4038 3,10. 51—5n









— Ss
GIG AND HARNESS—Good condition
Orange Hill, St. Peter 30.10.51—3n



NA S—Galvanized
quantity at 4c. per
Tyre Company, Trafalgar Street. Phone
2696 . 23.10,51—t.f.n.

nelle “a limited





ROLEX WATCHES—Louis L. Bayley
of Bolton.Lane. 30.10.51—3n.
RADOL LEG WASH POWDERS, for
reaucing inflammation caused by sprains











Bruises, 3/6 box. Knights Ltd.
1.11.51—2n.
SILVER WARE—About the largest
stock of sterling and plated wares in
Rarbados. Louis L. Bayley of Bolton
Lane. 20.10. 51—3n.
SADDLE — One Riding saddle in per-
fect condition Apply P. D. Maynard,
Porters Factory, St. James, Dial 2319.
27.10.51—6n
TANKS—Thirteen (13) Galv Steel
Tenks 8f{t. x 4ft. x 3ft. Apply: D. M
Simpson & Co. 2.11,51—4n

PLASTIC—Just opened 36” at 60c
per yard in all colours. Broadway
Dress Shop 2.11,.51—3n
The “MOULI” GRATER: This grater
is really great for grating Cheese Nut-
meg, Cocoanut, Hard-boiled Eggs, Bread
Crumbs etc.—It is Safe, Quick and Hy-
gienic. Only 93 cents each. Obtainable
only from HARRISON'S Hardware Store
Broad Street 2.11,.51—3n

WARM CLOTHING to fit bay of
14—15 years. Two Flannel Suits (Long
Trousers}, Shoes, Pyjamas, Raincoat
Write Box L.C. c/o Advocate.

2.11.51—1n.

LIQUOR LICENSE NOTICE

The application of Golbourne Sandi-
ford, shopkeeper of Hillaby, St. Andrew,
holder of Liquor License No. 857 of 1951,
granted to him in respect of board and
shingle shop attached to a house at
Hillaby, St. Andrew, for permission to
use the said Liquor License at said
premises a few yards away, Hillaby,
St. Andrew,

Dated this 23rd day of October, 1951.
To J. R. EDWARDS, Esq.,

Police Magistrate, Dist. “F.”

GOULBOURNE SANDIFORD,
Applicant.

N.B.—This application will be con-
sidered at a Licensing Court to be held
at Police Court, District “F" on Tuesday,
the 6th day of November 1951, at 11

o'clock, a.m
R. EDWARDS,
cop







iJ
Police Magistrate, Dist.



To Mothers
who cannot



10 Tube, in good |

|
\

— | Dining Table, Pedestal Sideboard, Chef-

|
ib. Enquire Auto |

Electric Sales and Service | Road, Christ Church, consisting of 1 acre

13. perches of land, a new timber
bungalow with all modern conveniences
including garage for large car, stock
Pens, fowl run, 3 minutes walk from the
Silver Sands Beach, Reasonably priced
Apply: Clarke on the premises
2.11.51—3n
——
THE UNDERSIGNED will offer for Sale
at Public competition at their office, No.
17 High Street, Bridgetown, on Friday
the 2nd day of November, 1951, at 2 p.m.
The Two-storied Dwellinghouse known
as “CONISTON” with the land whereon
the same stands and thereto belonging,
containing by admeasurement 6,422 sq.
feet or thereabouts, situate at 10th Ave-
nue Belleville, St. Michael,

Inspection by appointment with Mrs.
L. Toppin, 5th Avenue, Dial 2736.
For further particulars and conditions

of Sale, apply to:—
COTTLE, CATFORD & CO.
24.10.51—t.f.n,

“SORN"

The undersigned will offer for Sale at
Public Competition at their office, No
17, High Street Bridgetown, on Thurs-
day the 8th day of November, 1951 at 2
p.m,

The Cottage known as “SOPRN”, in
the Ist Avenue, Strathclyde, contain-
ing Drawing and Dining Rooms, 2 Bed-
rooms (formerly 3) with all modern
conveniences, and the [and on which
it stands, containing 5,510 square feet,
which is fully enclosed.

Inspection on application to R. A. Cor-
bin, General Traders Ltd.

For conditions of Sale, apply to—
COTTLE, CATFORD & Co.
51—8n 4





AUCTION

UNDER THE SILVER
HAMMER

ON TUESDAY, 6tn by order of Mrs.
A. C, Johnson we will sell the Furniture
at “Dunkirk”, St. Matthias Gap which





BARBADOS

| B’dos Has To Get

A New Harbour
-DR. CUMMINS

} From Page 5.
jand bot.ow muaey w repair their
;homes, all of tnese wings showed
;material progress,

Deep Water Harbour

Continuing on the, work of the
Union, he said that their job was
to get production bonus or back
pay for the workers. “Another
aspect of the Sugar Agreement is
the Harbour Fund. Barbados has
to get a new Harbour, Sugar i:
being shipped in bulk in other
places. Bags are expensive.”

He pointed out that purchasers
were looking to buy sugar from
the cheapest sources. If Barba-
| dos did not fall in line it would
;mean that the sugar would have
|to remain in the warehouse where
|it would be of no use to anyone.
| He said that when the back pay
|was distributed, he was told by a
jclerk in the City that his store
jhad sold out all the oil stoves ex-

cept one. He was very please to
|hear this.
He as them to have com-

plete confidence ip the Party. “If
we maké a miswke, come to us
and tell us. If there is anything
that has done you harm we did not
deliberately intend it to harm
you.”
The Future

Speaking of the future, he said
that he could only tell them that
the Party would ever work in their
interest, “You know these are
funny days, days in which you
cannot make any predictions.
Whatever we may do or whatever
we may say is in your interest.
We hope to start social services,
We are opening a Maternity Clinic
in Speightstown next year, and
we ask you to have complete
confidence in us and with God's
help, we cannot fail.”

Mr. Mapp said that the Labour
Party was a democratic one. They

alwavs thrashed out things on
Monday nights. He said that the
campaign was yet early and he

would have monv ore opportu-
nities to sxe9k to them.
“Political work is never finished,
because men’s minds are always
progrescinz,” he said.

Sea Rock Seer

@ From page 4
puncheon rollin’ ‘bout de roa&h
But, man wha ah sayin’? Ah ent
properly wake up outa dat dream.
Dis island is de wurl an’ kin hold
everybody so long as frays in da
sea. When de Lawd see we multi-





includes

fonier, Couch, Rockers, in Mahogany;
Oak Chairs (Leatherette Seats), China
Cabinets; Cedar Linen Press; Pictures,
Screens, Congoleum, Book-shelves: Re-
volving Office Chair, .
&ec., Verandah Chairs; Double Simmons
and’ Iron Bedsteads with Springs; good
Mahog. Mird. Press; Carpet, Larders,
Kitchen Tables, Shelvador (Refrigerator)
Cabinet; Coal and Oil Stoves; Kitchen
utensils, Elec. Iron: Cow Sheds with
Galvanized Roofs and other items

Sale 11.80 o'clock, Terms cash

BRANKER, TROTMAN & CO.

Auctioneers
2.11.51—%

PERSONAL

This serves to notify the general
public that I am no longer responsible
for any debt or debts contracted by my
wife MAUDRIE CLARADINE YEAR-
WOOD (nee Wiltshire) or anyone else
except by a written order signed by me

CLIFTON YEARWOOD,
My Lord's Hill,
St. Michael
1.11.51—2n,





The public are hereby warned against
giving credit to my wife SYLVIA
WATERMAN (nee HEADLEY) as I do
not hold myself responsible for her or
amyvone else contracting any debt or debts
in my name unless by a written order
signed by me.







URALE WATERMAN,
Pine Developing Area,



- St. Michael
1.11.51—2n
WANTED
i ae ee a



Barbados Company requires real first
class Secretary. Very high standard in
Shorthand and Typewriting is essential
together with sufficient experience and
ability to control an office and if neces-
sary interview clients, High Salany paid
to successful applicant. Apply with Testi-
meonials to Box C.C., c/o Advocate Co.

1,11.51—2n

EXPERIENCED NURSE—Apply: Mrs
friedman, Blue Waters 10, Rockley.
2.11,51—2n.





STENO-TYPIST: An experienced
Steno-Typist for our Office Apply in
person with written application to Sec-
retary Dowding Estates & Trading Co:,
Ltd., Bay Street 2.11. 51—in
—

TYPIST: Good Shorthand Typist. Office
near Broad Street, full-time. Salary
in accordance with capabilities. Reply to
W.R.G. c/o Advocate Advt. Office.

2.11,.51—2n





WASHERS, froners, Pressers. Barbados
Dye Works 2.11.51—1n





feed their babies

| i Don’t worry ! Cow’s milk can be prepared so that the youngest baby
can digest it without trouble. The addition of Robinson’s ‘ Patent’
{ Barley prevents the milk forming large clots in baby stomachs,

‘Patent’ Barley.



pOBINSONs

Lae

Bry tha!

q ees




j °



making it easy for the delicate digestive organs to do their work
thoroughly whilst getting them ready to digest heavier foods later
in life. That’s why wise nurses and mothers always use Robinson’s

OBINSON’S

‘PATENT’ BARLEY |

ply so fast he kin change we all
into penguin dat will eat frays
an’ guano will tek de place uv
sSugar—soon we goin’ live in de
tree top like birds any way.”

By this time, a squad of female,
fray vendors had descended on
Joe’s pile and it soon vanished;
money jingled in his pocket and
he had enough for meny square
meals. Joe Cordle was indeed his

happy and contented self again.
However, we must thank his
gloomy spell, followed by a pro-

phetic dream, for many pearls of
economic wisdom,

CHANGES IN BILL
REJECTED

From Page 5.
session was nearly closed and if
they could see their way to ge.
that important legislation on the
Statute Book they should try to do
so.
The Hon, the Colonial Secre-
tary moved that the Council pass
a message to the Other Place
s.ating that they had withdrawn
their amendment to section 2 of
the bill but insisted on the other
amendments made by them.

This was passed on a 5—4
division as follows:—

Ayes:— Hon'’bles .F. E. Field,
K. R. Hunte, Dr. A. S, Cato, Vv. C.
Gale and the Colonial Secretary—
(5).

Noes:—Hon'bles R. Challenor,
Dr. H. G. Massiah, G. B. Evelyn,
Mrs. M. Hanschell—(4).



















STOMACH
upsets

‘When the stomach is upset
as a result of hyperacidity, a
dose of De itt's Antacid
Powder will disperse the pain
and distress right away.
Flatulence, heartburn and in-
digestion are some of the
symptoms that this excess of
acid in the stomach can brin,
in its train. De Witt's Antaci
Powder soon neutralises the
acid and at the same time
other ingredients in the well-
balanced formula soothe and

otect the delicate stomach
ining. ‘Get a supply right
away.



ANTACID
POWDER

Neutralises Acid
Soothes Stomach

@ For use away from home
@ No water needed Carry a few







Relieves Pain





@ Prompt relief De WITT’S
> © Easily carried ANTACID
p @ Cell-sealed =TABLETS

l> Standard Size, 24 Tablets
Economy Size, 60 Tabiets



SHIRT

Palmetto Street

Obtainable at all Leading Stores













BUY A BETTER
FOR LESS MONEY
5

RELIANCE
SHIRT DEPOT



‘Pie Corner”
Inquiry
Adjourned

THE inquiry into the circum-
stances surrounding the death of
Arthur Greaves of Pie Corner,
St. Luey, who died on his way to
the General Hospital on October
20, continued before Coroner Mr.
C. L. Walwyn at the District ‘A’
Court yesterday. It was adjourned
until 2 o'clock today.

Forty-eight-year-old Adriana
Greaves, mother of Arthur|—
Greaves, said that she Last Sew] cesses
her son alive on Saturday night,
October 20, at about 7.00 p.m, |

On Wednesday, October 17, he
came homé complaining of terrible
pains in his stomach and head.
she soaked his head with Limacol.
He refused to eat anything.

The following morning, Thurs-
day, at about 6.00 a.m., he was
still complaining of the pains, but
he went to his work at Hope
Plan‘ ation, He again did not eat
anything. As usual she gave him

(ee ee

DUTCH. HOUSE
APPROVE SCHUMAN

IRON, STEEL PLAN

THE HAGUE, Oct. 31.

The Second Chamber of the
Dutch Parliament became the
first national legislative house in
Burope to approve the Schuman
Plan to pooling West Europe's
iron and steel,

The vote was 62 to six with
only the Communists voting
against, The First Chamber will
eensider the Schuman Plan later
this year, The Second Chamber
is the lower and most important
house of Parliament.—Us?P,









"LAA

eight cents to buy his breakfast, Enjoy the hospirality, com-
but he returned home with this. vagy nd atone serv-
At about 5.00 p.m,, she saw him â„¢

lying on the bed. He was in a ice which have made PAA

crouching position and complain-
ing of pains, She once more used
Limacol on his head and she
asked him if he had anything to
eat at his work. He replied that

“first choice” of veteran
travelers the world over.

he did not. NE vw Y ORK
: , = Anointed | Via San Juan or
Qn the Friday morning she

noticed a cord around his waist.
He was_ still complaining of
severe pains, She asked him what
was the meaning of the cord and
he told her that a woman had
anointed him with salt and
kerosene oil, He did not go to
work on that day.

She said that her son spent a
restless Friday night. On the
Saturday morning she awoke him
at abSut 7.00 a.m., and gave him
a dose of castor oil. He brought
back up some of this, along with
clot of blood. He was now very
weak, She gave him nothing to eat
Lut he constantly called for water.
He again vomited blood at about
2 p.m., on the Saturday and she

lines from Mam Reduced day,

round-trip Excursion Fares now
effect from Sen Juan.

All PAA flights to New York
now land at Idlewild Airport
instead of La Guardia Field.

MIAMI

Daily fighp—ocw-siny serving from
San Juan, Special 5-Day Round
Trip Excurston Fares now in effect.

ST. CROIX

ST. THOMAS

Frequent flights by swift Convair-
iy Clipper*. Convenient depar-
ture times.



decided to take him to the) You ean now “fly PAA” to
doctor. EUROPE, SOUTH AMERICA,
_ Ate about 7.00 p.m., on the} AFRICA, MEXICO, the FAR
Saturday she took him to Dr.| EAST—in fact, completely around
Clarke at St. Peter. the world,

She said Dr, Clarke examined
her son &nd ordered her to take
him to the General Hospital right-
away. left with Arthur for
the Hospital, but he died on the
way, At the time she was holding
him. in her arms. She went to the
Publi¢ Mortuary on the Sunday
and identified the body to the
doctor.

Violet Greaves, sister of Arthur
Greaves, corroborated the evidence
of her mother, Adriana,

For 22 years the leading
international airline—PAA
was first to link the Amer-
icas by air, first to fly to
all six continents.

For reservations, see your
Travel Agent or



DRIVING WITHOUT
APPROPRIATE LICENCE



A FINE of 30/- was imposed ’ A yy
e le Pectin of St. Thomas by ¢

r. E. A. McLeod who found him
Fae e ee mere = PAN AMERICAN
. along Roebuc reet, St,
Michel, on July 21 without an Homo Avinars
appropriate licence, .

fine is to be paid in 14 days DaCOSTA & CO., LTD.

Broad Street — Bridgetown
"Phone 2122. (After Business
Hours 2303)

or in default one month's impris-
onment,

RATES OF EXCHANGE

THURSDAY, NOVEMBER 1, 1961

CANADA
(ineluding Newfoundland)
64.8° pr, Cheques on
Bankers 52.8% pr.
Demand
Drafts 62.65% pr
4 Sight Drafts 62.5% pr.
8% pr Cable = nec bewoun thas
3% pr Currency 61.3% pr
Coupons @.6% pr.

NOTICE



Smedley’s Mixed Vegetable
in tins

Smedley’s Cream of Tomato
Soup in tins

Crosse & Blackwell
Salt in Bots.

Crosse & Blackwell Curry
Powder in Bots.

Crosse & Blackwell Marrow-
fat Peas in Tins

Nestle’s Milo Tonic Food in
tins

Nestle’s Nespray Powdered
Milk in tins

Koo Plum Jam
Large & small

T’dad Fine Quality Cocoa —-
L&S

Select Powdered Milk in tins

Bots. of Anchovy Paste

Tins of Three Bay Tomato

Table Any clothes left at the

following Sanitary Laun-
dry Depots before De-
1950, will

be sold, In future, any

cember 31st,
in tine— laundry or dry cleaning
not redeemed after three

months will be sold.

Juice
Tins of Farrow’s Fresh Gar- Country’ Road
den Peas i
Tins of Sasso Olive Oil Marhill Depot
&S

Tins of Liquid Stove Polish Aquatic Depot

Pkg. of Fab Soap Suds

INCE & Co. Ltd.

6. 7, 8 & 9 Roebuck St.

St. Lewrence 2 sot.

2.11.51.—6n.

The Designs and Shades of our recent shipment of

PLASTIC CLOTH

for Curtains are simply GORGEOUS.
Come, Have A Look For Yourself.

CENTRAL EMPORIUM

Cnr. BROAD & TUDOR STREETS.

THE

Phone 4764















PAGE SEVEN



SHIPPING NOTICES
Canadian National Steamships



















SOUTHBOUND
Salls Sails Salls Arrives Salls
Montreal Halifax Boston Barbados Barbados
19 Oct 22 Oct 1 Nov 1 Now
29 Oct 1 Nov 10 Nov 10 Nov
9 Nov 12 Now 14 Nov 23 Nov %% Nov
23 Nov . 25 Nev 5 De: 5 Dee
’ 3 Noy 9 Dee 10 Dee
Morrupounn
Arrives Arrives Arrives Arrives es
Barbades Boston Halifax Montreal :. ”
LADY NELSON" 6 Nov TM Nov 18 Nov
LADY RODNEY" 6 Dee 7 De * 18 Dee,
1952 1952
“LADY NELSON” 22 Dee 3 Jan 4 Jan
nied



GARDINER AUSTIN & CO., LTD.—Agents.



ROYAL NETHERLANDS

“
“
u
w

SAILING TO PARAMARIBO AND

@RITISH GUIANA Sailings to
M $. ABANEMNOR—Tk Woversber 1981. ENGLAND & FRANCE
SAILING TO TRINIDAD, PA. A « "
AND BRITISH GUIANA GASCOGNE November
» 8 COTTICA—22nd October 1951 3rd, 1951, via St. Lucia, Mar-
M.S. BONAIRE—i9th November 1951 tinique, Guadaloupe and
SAILING TO TRINIDAD ANP Antigua
CURACAO ,

s

{

“CAN CRUISER” .
“CAN CHALLENGER"
“LADY RODNEY" ‘
“CAN CONSTRUCTOR"
“LADY NELSON .

3
% Cargo and Passengers for Domin-
ca, Antigua, Montserrat, Nevis and
St. Kitts. Date of Sailing will be
*














SAILING FROM EUROPE
S. HYDRA—19th October, 1951.
S. AGAMEMNON..25th October 1951.
S BONAIRE-2nd November 1961.
S. HERSILLIA—Srd December 1951.
SATLING TO PLYMOUTH AND

AMSTERDAM

8. WILLEMSTAD——éth Nov. 1951.
S. ORANJESTAD—4th December 1951,

FRENCH LINE
Cie Gle Transatlantique

8. HYDRA—Sth November 1951,
P MUSSON, SON & CO., LTD
Agents

“COLOMBIE” 24th Novem-
ber, 1951, via Martinique and
Guadaloupe.



The M.V. MONEKA will accept

SOUTHBOUND
COLOMBIE 13th November,
1951, calling at Trinidad, La

Guaira, Curacao, Cartagena,
Jamaica,












Notified
The M.V. CARIBBEE will ac-
cept Cargo and Passengers, for
Dominica, Antigua, Mongserrat,
Nevis and St, Kitts, Sailing Sat-
urday, 3rd inst.
The M.V. DAERWOOD will
accept Cargo and Passengers for
St. Lucia, Grenada and Aruba,
and Passengers only for St. Vin-
cent. Date of Sailing to be Noti-
fled.
B.W.1, SCHOONER OWNERS’ '
ASSOCIATION (INC.)
Consignee, Telephone No

Accepting Passengers, Cargo
and Mail.

R. M. JONES & Co.
Ltd.—Agents.

4047 |




Brighten Up For Xmas

* We have a wide range of

PAINTS -ENAMELS -VARNISHES
“io T, HERBERT Ltd.

1860
10 @ 11 ROEBUCK STREET.





Incorporated
1926

BEARD & GREIG

ESTATE WROKERS '

Have moved to Prince William Henry Street
Proprietor! .MR. R. WILSON, 2

all enquiries should be addressed to him there. r

2,.11.51,—2n.














GOLF SHOES al
Brown & Brown & White
with spikes

SSS Oe







WM. FOGARTY @00s LTD?

—
-



— St

Passengers holding reservations on
or after 31st October 1951, are
kindly asked to contact our Office
regarding time and days of
departure of their flights due to
change of schedule.

BRITISH WEST INDIAN AIRWAYS
LTD.



Ps

Lower Broad St.

Phone 4585 â„¢.





HOUSE SPOTS -
RENDEZVOUS HILL



AVERAGE AREA 60 x 80

AND PRICED |
$1,000 to $1,700 |

A. BARNES & Co, Ltd.





thar

kode






PAGE EIGHT



Carlton Still Heads First THOUSANDS

Division

Marshall Has Fine

- Batting

Average

BY THE SPORTS EDITOR

CARLTON have maintained a elear lead in the 1951 Bar-
bados Cricket Association First Division Competition while when the Ameteur ralehtlitting
in the Intermediate Division a single point separates the held their
Regiment from Windward the leaders.

Leeward 34 points, Empire

and Police 32 points each, are

the leaders in the Seeond Division Competition.

The bowling and batting
averages for the First Division
to the end of the Seventh Series
show Wanderers’ all-rounder
Norman Marshall at the head of
the batting averages with the
fine average of 98 runs in five
innings.

T. Birkett who is second has

Denis Atkinson
bowling averages with 16 wickets
taken at a cost of 843 runs each
but J, Edghill, Carlton’s pace
bowler has 30 wickets, the highest
individual amount taken by a
bowler in this series and this has
gained him second place.

The following tables set out in

not reached half this average, his detail the situation up to
being 44.33 in eight innings, October 26,

BATTING

Batsmen I. NO. Total HS. Ay.
N. Marshall 5 1 392 137 98.00
T. Birkett 8 2 266 117 44.33
Cc. Alleyne 9 2 284 103* 40.57
A. Taylor 7 1 218 112 36.33
W. Greenidge 6 2 145 130 86.25
Cc. Hunte 7 1 202 64 33.66
A. Blenman 10 l 273 80 30.33
E. Edwards 9 0 267 77 29.66
A. Skinner 6 0 175 65 29.16
L. F. Harris 6 0 162 95 27.00
Cc. Smith 8 0 216 61 27,00
C. Atkins 8 2 160 40" 26.66
N. Lucas 9 1 209 56 26.12
W. Knowles 7 0 172 104 24.57
G. ood 5 1 97 54 24.25
O. Robinson il 2 217 46 24.11
N. Grant 10 0 238 87 23.86!
F. King ss 9 3 136 44° 22.66
C. Blackman (H.C.) 10 1 197 36* 21,88
B. Porter a ll 0 231 96 21.00
C. Me Kenzie 10 2 1638 32 20.37
K. Branker 8 1 142 71* 20.28
Cc. Greenidge os sk 6 1 100 62 20.00
N.B. * Denotes not out.
BOWLING ( ati
Bowler o M. R. w, AV.

D. Atkinson 19,5 8 195 (16 8.43
G. Edgehill 119.4 24 288 30 9.60
L. F. Harris 58.5 12 150 15 10.00
H. Barker 120.5 80 242 22 11.00
K. Warren 16 165 15 11.00
M, Simmons 117.1 33 268 24 11.16
C. Bradshaw 70.5 13 201 17 11.82
J. Farmer 43.1 0 202 17 11.88
J. Williams 92.1 14 202 17 11.88
K. Bowen 118.3 17 348 29 12.00
F. King 110.5 20 301 25 12.04
O. Fields 78 16 225 18 12.50
S. Headley 79.5 il 2 18 12.66
I. Burke 107 i4 B12 24 13.00

E. Branker
F. Phillivs
N. Marshall
+ King (Emp.)

°
heads thie

Basil Grant
Chosen As
Mr. B’dos

SHEILA HINDS IS
“MISS BRIDGETOWN

Basil Grant, who was earlier
this year chosen as Mr. Bridge-
tewn, was erowned Mr, Barbados

Association of Barbados

Island Championships and Body
Beauty Contests at Queen’s Park
last night. Lionel Maloney was
a close runper up for this hon-

ur.

The honour, Miss Bridgetown,
was won by 19-year-old Sheila
Hinds. The large crowd that
attended was treated te a grand
display of weightlifting, muscle
control by Gold Bede, contortion
by Audley Simpson, strong man
feats by Martin Bynoe and a
trapeze display by Gold Bede and
his son Rudy Linton.

Errol Douglas of the Middle-
heavy division, gave an exhibi-

tion. In the press his first
attempt was made with 215
pounds, This was an excellent

lift and he went on to press 225
and 235 in fine style.

His first snatch was at 205. He
did the second with 215 but failed
4 his third attempt when he tried

5.

Failed at 300

In the clean and jerk Douglas’
first attempt with 270 was done
in easy style. He next took 300
and if he had been successful with
this he would have been the third
person in Barbados to perform

0 this feat. Strong man Bison was

the first and St.Clair Warner the’
oa They are both now in the

In the Bantamweight division
H Stoddard (120 lbs.) of York,
met C. Barker (118%) of Aero.

‘The bar was unusual to Barker

and therefore he was not very
successful with the press.! Stod-
dard won, totalling 510 Ibs.
Barker totalled 490.

Seibert Rudder defeated H.
ee vite S oaias of

or. ub, wi! a weight of
1324, totalled 575 lbs. Thompson
scored 560. His bodyweight was
also 132}.

Clement Jackman defeated R.
Cox of Acro in the Lightweight
division. Jackman totalled 665 and
Cox 640,

In the Middleweight division
Sam Maloney defeated George

. Greenidge 1075 24 275 19 1447 Bynoe. ey scored 640 and
R. Austin 92 17 271 18 15.05 Bynoe 620,
B. Greene 113 29 279- 16 17.43 Edwin Rogers and C, Goodridge
V. Mc Comie 1113 16 343 18 19,05 Of Leeward, totalled the same
C. Mullins 1224 28 302 15 20,13 amount, 640, in the Light Heavy-
. Grant 90.3 2 362 17 21.29 Weight division but Rogers won
N L. G. Hoaa 96.3 5 370 16 28,12 OWing to his lighter bodyweight.
Won Lost i i
eine Played Won Lost 1stInn, 2ndInn Pts. Av. Prize Giving
1. Carlton pean ec od 0 1 25 69,44
At the conclusion of the show
2, Pickwick .. 5 2 0 2 1 19 OL5S is cuinse orape presented by Bir.
3. Empire 6 3 1 I 1 22 61.11 Freddie Miller, M.C.P.. President
4, Wanderers G2 4578 4 1 19 On). Clee uauan
5, Spartan Ss 0 3 15 50.00 ere
6. — College 6 2 2 1 1 16 44.44 He said that he was particular-
$i Comers” } ft 7h FRR Rey tae ie tas tts
: ( 00 ance. ri us a
1. yMPc 5 0 4. 0 gf B 9g. SOS to make the show @, success.
N.B. The Spartan-Y.M.P.C, is to be replayed; Pickwick-Com- pote ‘anked : >

bermere abandoned.

INTERMEDIATE ‘
Club Played W: Lost ts Im 2 na In
ye ‘on , 2nd Inn

1. Windward 3 6 3 1 +" 1 *e

2. Regiment ; 6 2 1 3 0 2

3. Empire be 6 1 2 3 1 16
4. & Wireless .. 6 ey 0 2 3 15

5. in Pe 6 1 0 0 5 11
6. Mental Hospital 6 1 3 1 1 10
7. Pickwick Si 6 0 1 1 4 7
8. Wanderers ey 6 0 2 1 3 6

* SECOND DIVISION
‘on’ = Lost

Club Played Won Lost IstInn. 2ndInn Pts,
1, Leeward 9 4 1 3 1 34
2. pe 8 4 0 2 2 32
3. Pol 8 4 0 2 2 32
4. Carlton 8 3 0 2 3 27
5. College 8 1 0 5 2 23
6. Lodge 8 3 3 1 1 22
7. Foundation 8 1 3 2 2 14
8. Central 9 1 5 2 1 13
9. Y.M.P.C. 8 0 2 3 3 12
10. Pickwick 8 0 2 2 4 10
11. Combermere 9 9 2 0 7 7
12. Wanderers 7 0 8 0 4 4



Sea-eggs Are In Short Supply

Housewives are complaining of
the shortage of sea eggs. Mr.
D. W. Wiles, Fisheries Officer.
told the Advocate yesterday that

is shortage is really due to the
early picking of the eggs which
Btarted in June.

ut there is no tremendous
shortage in Bridgetown. He said
that it takes about 14 sea-eggs to



WANT SOME
Y-LAUGHS!IT'D

TO IN

MY OL! PAL
PINKY +5.

fil a shell properly. Many divers
have stopped diving for the eggs
in order to have their boats
ready for the flying fish season,

In some cases’ hawkers never
have the chance to leave the
beaches with the sea eggs as they
are usually many people there
waiting to buy these sea eggs.

PNKY
WS MON,

Bert Banfield, Edwin Rogers,
Grannum, H. E. Bayley and Ben
Jones for their untiring assist-
anee. He said that his gratitude
was overwhelming because ii
was a difficult job to hold a crowd
so large in their seats until nearly
twe o’clock in the morning.



WHAT’S ON TODAY

Court of Original Jurisdiction
Court of Appeal and Lower
Courts—10 a.m.

Films for Public at the British
Council—5.00 p.m.

Mobile Cinema at Princess
Alice Playing Field — 7.30

p.m.

Police Band at Empire Theatre
5 and 8.30 p.m.

Labour Political Meeting at
Fitts Village, St. James (Mr.
Holder)—8 p.m.

Electors’ Association Meeting,
Bay Land, St. chael — 8

p.m.
Rediffusion ‘Friday Misccuicny’
at British Council—9 p.m.

CINEMAS;
EMPIRE: Revuedeville 1951 5 and
& 30 p.m

PLAZA: (Bridgetown): The West
Point Story 2.90, 445 and 8.30

Pm.

ROYAL: The Wicked Lady 4.30 &
815 p.m

ROXY: The Astonished Heart &
Destination Unknown 4.30 and
3.15 p.m

OLYMPIC: Searlet Street & The
Magic Bow 4 30 & 8.15 p.m






























BARBADOS ADVOCATE



WATCHED
HIM LOSE HIS SiGHT

Hy George Whiting

PORT offers rich endowments to its favourites.
Seme end their careers with a super-taxed
bank balanee, others with a sideboard full of silver.
Life stories im the ne vspapers, portraits in oils,
even a very occasional] knighthood, are other per-
quisites.

Boxer Mac Joachim, also at the end of his career,
has not been quite so fortunate. Ali he 7 to show
at the age of 24 is a pair of smoky specthcles.

That, for a good-looking, well-muscled yong
man, is no great reward. You might even call i
a tragedy.

This week, Mac has been lying in Westminster
Hospital, where they have performed the first of
two operations designed to mend a broken nose
that once, I imagine, was handsomely aquiline, The
second operation is planned for early in the new

year,
Celebrities

If the surgeons are satisfied, Mac Joachim will
be seen in the ring at Leyton Baths with Den
Ceckell. Roy Ankaran and other ring celebrities
showing off the paces that took them to the top.

Joachim himself will not be fighting. All you
will see of Mac is when he is led up the steps of the
ring, guided between the ropes, afd generally
accorded the assistance proffered to those who can-
not see.








JOACHIM — felt bis sight suddenly xo.

World a shadow

4 i : hat he was a
Por Mae Joachim, boxer, crick- CTicket; and t hocky
eter, footballer and hocky player, ©@Ptain before he reached his

is One of the unfortunates of
sport. He sees the world as a



gymnasium als,

champion Jac ardner.

At 1 he was works as a Stop boxin or you will
shadow through three darks’ spots ©iVilian clerk with US. ; totally blind, they ead e =

they laid him on his right side
for seven weeks, they taught him

later as a sergeant in the Cal- hospital, They
cuthy police. ae they —.
; i iser-weight vice-ca
pletely blind. on B
You soul oot 9 tiatie, 3 sup- Sar Workin Games boxing ‘Owed ;
, that J ’s tra $ e zs ren
onal ee a Beitaive’ ‘TV Turning professional in April, “But suddenly,” says Mac,
screens, with tens of thousands 1049, he was paid £16 for his first felt my right eye go bust.”
of viewers watching. fight and rose to the heights of Joachim left
That
seven months later, the dark- Later the pay packets reached for two suits he had ordered.
haired Mac smiles as he talks £65.
freely and in cultured accents





that float across the vision of
his left eye. His right eye is com-

to walk again.

has played on him. walks of the fight game, i
ban in Calcutta, Mackertich On the night of March 12, oo months;

Hovakimian (his real name) is 1951, they matched him wita eee: ae ‘ 4
the fifth child of an Armenian Reg Springs, and TV viewers Se eee F

shepherd who tured wrestler will tell you it was quite a battle ‘U% , . one to the tune
when he went to India from before Joachim won on _ points, Neary [“-

Persia. Dad, he will tel! you, But nobody, saye Mac

Mac Joachim jis grateful.

self made the grade at Calcutta’s "und that night at Leyton. “Perhaps one day I can get

famous college, La Martiniere. “Spring hit me with his left on

Denying stoutly the existencd top of my right eye.” says Mac. little business if my left eye gets

; “In the next round I could see "0 Worse,” he says.—L.E.S.
ge Orla nt uaa On eee three Springs through a kind of SUSPENSE

; shutter over my eye.
Fonder memory How do you know when you
For Mac it is a



|} Cohn that he ha



a (the baseball finals),
> Ht LDA | fi } y Be “What,”
X | i iH = y zy | “you are telling the court
\ S 0 Fi



hand.” Result : a



To be held at
Y. M. P. C.




on
SATURDAY NIGHT
Brd Nov., 1961, at 8 p.m.
Admission by Ticket—
$1.00 each
Music by .

Mr. Hoppie ‘J ordan’s Orch.
1.11.51.—3n.










DANCE

at
THE BARBADOS AQUATIC
CLUB

(Members Only)
on
SATURDAY, Nov. 3, 9 p.m.
Music by... . ;

Mr. C. CURWEN’S Orchestra
Members are cordially
invited.

Free Admission to Ballroom




‘Tell me

doctor ..
: Can an antiseptic help in healing ?”





‘ounds heal of their own accord when they are kept free
from the germs that cause septic infection. To keep
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have for years relied upon ‘Dettol’. This ruthless des-
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THE MODERN ANTISEPTIC Closed
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specially tailored Democratic Club

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PERFECTION ” pg en ga

the world who sent me
cables, cards, flowers, and
otherwise enquired after my
health.

What’s the use of going over-
seas when you can get cured
right here.

Consequently
there will be a meeting on
there will, be a_ meeting
THIS AFTERNOON at
to discuss the probiems of
the First day’s racing of the
adem Turf Club Novem-
r meeting.

MENU:
Consome Froid
a la Francais
The vo. Turkey and

‘am
and Chicken Pelau

Have you visited Bathsheba?
| If not, Go to the Edgewater
Hotel where the Proprietor
is congenial and the wine list
| complete including

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Dutch Grogsch Beer

for after sea bath drinking.

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Hertfordshjre
himself, Teader of the Evening Standard

went unschooled, but Mac him- knew the tragedy of the fourth Who saw the fight on TV sent 10s,

trate Morris
had a few too
many while “at the World Series”

said the meaiotrnte ;
you were in New York today?”

(Schenectady is 300 miles away.) | ({
“Oh, no, your honour, I was so] }))
excited watching it on TV I for-|
got “that I had a bottle in my

suspended

e

kept wicket and battedNo. 3 at he failed to recognise at > close
quarters one of the matiest of his
heavy-weight | }



































was last March. Now, @ffluence with £30 for his sixth. with his rent and owing money

‘ Since then sympathisers at Mile}:
Eyes, you must understand, are ri ay opt Mave, seeaeiet mouete
j not too ex iv, th er or him; the Boxin, oar

of the macabre joke that sport pensive in the low ality. titth & cana? £2 weekly
an Indian in
£10 note at his
olice have




ft

&
c L ) And in Schenectady, TV was
mueh donderare going blind? For Joachim mentioned in court when a dis-
memory that he could find touch that dread realisation came one _hevelled man, arrested for drunk-
In the Featherweight Division®S # "usby full-back; that he morning a few days later when|enness, told
























SOSS



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Here

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PAGE 1

. Collaborators Will Be Branded 0 sA "'ace" Egypt 9 8 Underground Movement Warns Seven Egyptian Policemen Evicted From Canal Zone CAIRO. NOT I The Egyptian Underground Movement announced that, hereafter, any person helping to supply British troop*, will be lashed In the Public Square and branded on the face with Are. The warning came in a leaflet distributed hv "Liberation" battalions In the Suez Canal zone. The leaflet laid that effective from today all -collator.*'on* who Mil or transport supplies to the British Garrison will be rounded up by the Underground and punished publicly. It said that the branding by Are will serve as a "lifelong mark of treachery." The Interior Ministry said two days ngo that the "Liberation Battaliona" are determined to force the British out of Egypt and the Sudan. It said that they were able to obtain arms on tha black market. "EYE rOB BYE, TOOTH FOB TOOTH" In another secret leaflet scattered through the Canal rone, underground forces threatened to meet British troops on an "eye for eye tooth for tooth" basis, according to the news paper Al Misri. Meantime, the British seized policemen on the CairoIsmailia road near Tel-el-Keblr, on the complaint that they were preventing Egyptian workera from reaching I camps. The British troops also ejected El Sami Abilu El Shami, chief of the Seamen's Union, from the Canal Zone, for allegedly inciting dock workers to boycott British shipping, in line with passive resistance campaign. According to Press reports. Russian diplomats arconferring with all Arab states on the West s plan for the .Middle East Defence Pact against Communism. Al Miari reported from Beirut, Lebanon, that diplomatic quarters expect Moscow to say that particpiation In such a pact would represent a hostile act toward the Soviet Union. "DRASTIC ACTION" The Egyptian Government today wained the British military authorities that they would tak "drastic action", if British troops do not end their "aggressive atti towards Egyptian police in the Canal Zone. Policemen at Fayid in the Canal Zone today protested to the Governor of the Zone, Abdel Hady Ghaz Aly Bev. and S-fff vl!£' sler of ** n 'or against the eviction of their Chief Officer. Captain Lufti E. Kholy by the British Workers at El Ablad, the Royal Air Force camp walked out today, in protest at the arrest. They left for Ismailia. —U.P. Sir Harold Brigga Has Greater Powers IN THS EAST SINu.M'ORE, Nov. I. Director General Lieut General Sir Harold Brlggs * %  given ulmoM dictatorial powers on Thursday as the three-year-old war against Communist terrorists entered its third phase. The official announcement said: "Full executive authority in all emergency matters falling within the sphere of the Federal Government has been delegated to the Director of Operations, subject only to the overriding author!tj of the High Commissioner. "From July 1946 to April 1951 the campaign against the Jungle i terrorists has been directly un* der the command of the Civil Government Federation. An anti-bandit drive gained new momentum with the appointment of Briggs as Director of Operations in April. 1950. Then it was stated specifically that Brlggs was not Supreme Commander but his duty was to plan, coordinate and generally direct all anti-bandit operations. He is responsible only to the High Commissioner with the right lo make representations direct to him on all matters concerning the conduct of the campaign.— V.t. TURKISH GENERAL TRANSFERRED NEW YORK. Nov. I. Tahsln Yarici, Commander of the Turkish Forces In Korea, has been recalled for an appointment to another important pott Tha announcement aid he will lx' succeeded In Korea by General Namlk Argue who is to leave for hi* new post on November 7. —*J.P. Dock Strike Continues NEW YORK. Nov. 1 An attempt to mediate Ihe 18day-old unauthorized dork-strike failed, and authorities look steps to force the rebel AFL long-shoremen back to work. A 12-hour conference between Joseph P %  Ryan. President of the Intematiunal Longshoieriacn i Association (AFL), and John Sampson, th<_ leader of 20.000 insurgent staredores. ended at 4.30 am. with neither willing to compromise But an hour alter the parley with Ihe State mediators ended. tha French Lines luxury liner Libert* docked and noi i picket was in sight as "loyal" Union s'.e-veriorcs begun unloading operations City policemen stood guard in a downpour as the big liner dropped anchor, and more than 200 of Ryan's followers started handling the cargo.—t'-P. Labour Has Maiotity In Dominica Elections iPrOiYi Our Q*vn Cm r•-aftai.i > DOMINICA. Nov. 1. The elections results are five for Labour out f eight. Shillingford and Winston were successful Both Englishmen were defeated t'rnni Ml (Juiirlrr*: Police Fire On Rioters l\ t:\SABLANCA CASABLANCA, Nov. 1 The police opened fire on moo of Moroccans attempt mg to .ill Unvoting for tne Couaultaive Assembly here op Thursday killing one person and injuring everal others. Tne police decribed the rioters as "Nationals" vho had orders not only to boyutt the elections but to prevent others from voting. They said they opened lire on •the crowd only after they had %  Hacked the police with rocks, njurtng four. They said two more Moroccan* were injured. Stockholm: Many Poles arriving in Sweden, claiming to be fugitives from ihe Iron Curtain. have been sent back recently Three Polish seamen jumped sh|p at Gothenburg and claimed I.ispertcd of being spies. y were refused refugee passports and repatriated. Copenhagen: A Danish manufacturer has invented a thinking slot machine capable of chancing money and giving correct change. The machine, which Is being exhibited at the Industrial Fair In Odense. operates with any figure divisible by rive It Is nov patented all over the world. Rome:—Africa (Calabria), the poorest Italian village, has been destroyed by recent floods. Africa had no road, no electricity, no doctor, no schools. It* BOO inhabitant--, lived in hovels, with sheep id goat*. The village was surrounded by precipices, so mothers would tie rope round their children's feet, to prevent them getting too near the edge. It is beL'apelewn:—A local doctor left instrueiions for the destructii of his property after his death. The executor of his will stood by while a £500 motor ear and cai van worth £300 were drenched petrol and burnt. Inside the naming car lay his clothes, correspondence and diaries. New York:—The average lengih of life is steadily mcresslng among Americans. It is now believed lo be almost 08 years—an increase more than 20 years since 1900. The women do best. Their life expectancy at birth is 71| year*. A man's works out at 65 years and 11 months. Washington:—For 52 hours a grocer from Georgia, lost rwamp while out fishing, fought, while his own strength steadily waned, to keep his IS-year-old ion from being engulfed In quicksand. Twice he had to shoot hufj water mocassins 'a kind of water snake) which threatened them. They were Anally rescued, after being spotted by a plane III AMI I orcoscrian iiAiini Churchill Has A Plan U>NDON. Nov I Prime Minister Winston I presented to the Cabinet the broad outlines of hit | Ian KB reStofl Britain lo major power status in the world. Top pnorMa will lie given to British develeaasBCCst Of Atomic ertergy ami guided missiles. Churchill .u led from the fad that ; botll the United Stale* and i ,., Mitra < i iiiiw.ui .Mutinied the MI..JOI puiUon of the basic fact* on Ike atomic bomb Churchill's Cabinet met fur thi second time this work al No ll la-wiiing Ml**! Ai.>ur..l Hi. .a 1. I with Churchill was l-'iti Cher Mr J H Wilkinson. Prem dent of Uu Barbados Electors' A*oclatlon aad leader of tha Opposition 111 Uir Bt St Of Al sTiilrly, Is seen hare *ddrawing Iks large crowd whloa attended the Association's Meeting at Porters Yard. It Jaaws. last Bight. Mr. Wilkinson holds bis Party'* manifesto as hr tells his listeners what they prep rate to da for them should they get a saajorlty In the House. The meeting was held io sappoit of the candidature of Mr. WllkliiKon and Mr E K. Walostt for re election to tha House of Assembly for %  t. Janes at tha forthconuiut Oeneral Electitui They have been tha pariah's representative* for soa yearA report of tha saeetlng will appear in a later Issue. The Victors Are Marching Again By LYLF. WILSON LONDON, Nov. 1 title as I'avmale General In tha Cal ers direct responsibility foi Mtwa the meet I inn. ChuKhtll also named 8 S 1 Mircliell tha Controller pf Gutted sfasiDag *nd IkactranI With %  tt nl neml> complete. Churchill's next man* task la working out with hit Cabinet .1 legislative programme ito replace six years t I Winston Chun-hill suovnoned 1 1 top 'X|n un atom bombs te IVt m the house next door te Mo If Downing Street, and fol>wed khot up with the appointa.urch.U and Eu^nhower, partners .n victory over Hitler. | SJ'JJFSSJS. §££ "Tudeh" Building Up In Persia TEHERAN, Nov. 1. The Iranian Police Chief. Gen.' Maiuur MuzayenJ, aakad the" Shah for more power to light tm. ^ critical" Communist threat In Iran. He told the Shah in a lengthy conference that the outlawed] Tudeh Party was expanding its 1 strength, and showed the Shah documents uncovered by the police, which pointed to the F"ls IBe* created %  eUvltlea Although the < Mdered "gravo". Mo/ayrni ocnied reports that the police had uncovered a Hed plot a* seur ,>-.T TluRiuhtlst Deputy. Jamail En Ami, denounced the QownBttBV$ soft attitude towards the Communists and accused the poUog of negltgenee today bv Teheran University students to demonstrate, protected by armed Communists He said that Russia was standing by "with open mouth to devour this country. —U.P. RUHHIA faced lecenUy, ac cording to U. State Depart neat radio, what was probably bet roost serious uprising in ten years a peasant revolt In the Central Asian Republic of Kasakbstau Collective farm peasants are aUegsd to have clashed in said Aegwrt with Communist MT.D. (Security! troopsTha troops wars carrying oat forced requisition un dar s now Stalint-t farm policy. The Kazakh peasants are accused of having failed to satisfy the Uvaatock breeding and grain producUon goals set by the Communist reglaae. atated tha Voice of America In an overseas broadcast. Details of the revolt ware sup plied by a Turkmeiuan nation al. who waa In Kasakhstan at that lime Dedn Acheson Is Hopeful Of World Peace PARIS. Nov. I. Secretary of State, Dean Acheson, arrived for the sixth session of Use Oeneral Assembly and declared. "I believe we snail able to marntj-ln peace.' Aehesm headed the United States delegation which arrived by train Iron Lc Havre for the aaarmbl. session scheduled to open tie* Toaaajav. The United Stale Ambassador to the United Nation*. Wain: Austin, said that if the saereen truce could be worked out at Ihe session, many problems threaten ing the world could be solved Mi said that Acheson VNNUd daUvei a "very important %  patch*' whil. at Paris, but did not ~av M whai subject Austin compared the present session with the l.t I'.ri^-l nil* Nations meeting in 1948 "und-r Ihe shadow of the Herlm blockade and tha Imminent 1 conflict created by that blockade. Here in Parts, we began a chan of events that led to the eotUtkn of that problem. I look forward to a similar progress at this Assembly. An agreement on a truce in Korea would be a sign ill1 cant step that could lead to the peaceful solution of many issues" Acheson meets on Sunday with the French Foreign Minisli-i. Robert Schuman, and later with Britain's new Foreign Serretarj. Anthony lvden, to work out a united Big Three front. American delegation members said that the three Foreign Ministers pinbabl> would meet jointly for the first time, on Monday. Acheson spiked lh| laMtig "! the Big Three meeting being a possible prelude to a full I'.iu Foui conference with Russia, saying "1 do not know anything about plans for a Big Four conference —u.r. Truman WU1 Hav.Talk With "Ik." WASHINGTON. Nov. 1. The Whitll U.K. Racing To Transfer Power To Libyan Govt. STB AM; FORCE ll y. Karaa Nov. 1. Light r Hi Thunder jets scramthat Gen. Dwight attaenhosva. ui>bld with 40 'relucUnt MIGi 1 ttmurijti m Northwest Kontoday, with no damage ha aatbi Communist or United Stales jeta Mi a lu-minutc battle. Sevi fliglits were made by both the Thunder jets and the swept-wmg MIGs during the skirmish, but the Lad iiitrrcepters showed DO inclination to prolong the b action.—CaT. fly from his French headejuarte tomorrow night for a two-dav conference with President Truman or. Western aatrnaaaan mllllui> problems Gen. Riscnliowcr will meet with the Pmident and other ofncials here on Monday and Tuesday, and will fly back to Pari* Tuesday night or Wedncedu.. morning.—ani*> nrchitiK together a^aiii Tliia time, they are? out t<> stop the Russians Prime Minister, Winston Churchill will swing Britain's prestige and power behind the United HI. a to back up General Kisenlmwer'* defence plans. British Socialists balked at that. The great man of h poHtlca ntarted that ball rolling nt Strasbourg. r>ance. In 1950. with a resolution udopted by lhc CoUfkril of Europe in a session tin rnir.hill called it the "Housa of Europe" like his House of Commons. Through It, Churchill to co-ordinate the whole lifY and being of Western Europe against t /'_~ *^LB>B' 1 Communism W*.^laiBlaBBBaBB, Thc So,, "" ,,N • lao rejected Ihe ^* I BBBBBH Fr u "h Foreign Minister, Robert *---'-^s^**eBBaBaBaBaBasaBl Srhuman's Plan for a European itecl and coal eommunilv (hurchili win rh aaga ail of that The Socialist Goveniment. which lost last week's British Genci Vlii-Uon here, rejected the n aod atael plan, because other participating Cover n met it 11 wore not SoolahaU. The British Conservntlv.position la that a European organisation relating to coal and steel eonMi be wholly effective) if ihe greatest coal and steel producer In thf I I t. in Hemisphere is on the outside. The coal and steel organization waa designed to create .1 single market, prevent reslrirtive prscUces, anrf maintain a high employment level. France. Italy. ItHalum, the Netherlands Lusem% %  11 1: .,11 1 VY, already have the organiratlon functioning. Churchill's Idea Churchill's Idea was thai the Cou nci l of Europe should be the bade factor in European defence and economic life Before thf Council, and in Parliament, he %  irged that German rearmament was sufficient to enable Western Germany to aid In its own Jj f>n. | The Socialist* sharply objected. 1 ..it finally agreed. The keystone of Churchill's policy toward Eu* r >i>r was defence He wanted an "niv of 70 Divisions or thereal'Ait" He said the British would "ilrlhute their share. There Is ime Conservative hedging on Britain is already contributing Divisions to Eisenhower's Atlanth Pact Army. But it is unlikdv thai the British will merge ttk with French. German, and other soldiers to form European Army Divisions. They could and probably will offer strong air support In .1 European Army. Churchill .aw Ihe only means of bringlno the French and Germans together a friendly and mutual endeavour Frenchmen saw Churchill's plan the same light. The French nvernment supported ll so activeIhat it Is knimr. now as the leven Plan after Reft*. Pleven the French Premi-1 In Bonn, Germany, rcprcscntaUVaa "f the Continental Powerare at present discussing the 1' Division Ground Army. With support and other troopa a divisiot would numbr about 30.000 men. There is a shortage of manpower and lust, about everylhini els.in Britain. So the Britisr contribution Is likely to be 1 weapon of which Continents 1 nations are very stunt aeroplane* But more important than that wil' be the prestige of Churchill himself in support of %  United Europi against the Rods —v.r. II' 0> I IMVC and UMSDSM IK underlined the signitlChurchill places or Britain's, failure to keep pare Ithaj Ihe Unlleil Stales .a Kuasia In making atooi l ii* The beat information i< ih> Bnlain has not made a sin si. bomb jet. although -he riax the rUtOwfeagaja lo —H.F. Royal <<>!//>/< %  Pkty Hosts To Truman WA/miNGTON Nov 1 Prince-* „| p nnir PblDp played hosts to I -.1 a Stale dinner Thurx*a.v nisht after meetinr and charming I SI4 select*, ,-uesti rr-itn Hupn-me Court Jmiires (, %  h llrlti^li his f 1 madiaa 1 1 saw the "" UJJ moat revere I ahrines ing ton's Tomb at Metint vacnoa ind lbs Tomb of he Unkr. \rllngton National OHM lor) Britain's future Queen and her lelKinair Duke were on the go al. 10 a.m. 'ti Tin v attended ; %  ptivati ri %  epiion for nntlsh Commonwealth iiplomats, lunched with Prastfdaat Truman and family at Blalr House, greeted several hundred Irilish subiects on the lawn of the Irilish Embassy and finally shook anda with a long line of hfgh offlials and their wives who re-elved gold crested Invitations lo THUNDER JETS, MIGS HAVE A SCRAMBLE it. lAHOLIi GCARD LONDON. Nov 1. Britain Is racing against time to transfer power to the provitovenirrtent in Libya i*a* •ore Kgypt attempts in the United this month to prevent the (lealion of a new Middle F'iS.ern s'^le friendly U> Ihe Western Powers. Offlcial sources said that Egypt's unilateral abrogation of ihe |3o Anglo-Egyptian Treaty had given a new urgency to the British plans to transfer power lo Libya, and make a treaty with Its ruler which would give Britain military safeguards In that area Libya. comprising Cyrena Tripolitania and The Fczian. was placed under British an administration by Article 71 of U. e Italian Peace Treaty. Britain administerert CyTenalca ruled by the Emir Cenisus. and France administered Thi FMtsn On November 21, 1949. the United Nations recommended that the area should becorne ar dent sovereign state bv Janiian 1952 Security System Officials said that Britain believes that independence for United Libva should no" pleted earlier than was planned. nnd a treaty signed with the EmJr |. ID order that the area may be included in the North \frican security system to hal' 1 of Communism The> aald Ihal neither Frarc* nor tha United States should have any '•bjections to such a treaty because -ill have Identical strategic interests m Libya. la anticipated that the Libyan question would be brought before the United Nations. The Libyan Commissioner, Adrian Pelt, said that Egypt would seek to wreck any moves for a British Treaty with the new state.—TJ*. Princess Elizabeth Cables B.G. Red Cross 'Fresn Our Own < orreetmndent) GEORGETOWN. Nov. I. T>KI\(ssaea. M.I/ArUTIl took time off en Hednemdo to send fron Canada a eons ralu la leer isiosise te HnBritish Guiana Iwwneh of the Riitlah Red < '— S'-l-b. c*preulng hrr delight at the openins of the Children'* 1 oiivilpvnl Home which bears her The British Red C'reaa So.ll> ^l*o sen! a meaaage ef geed wishes for It* aacce**. The home made poaalble ehlefl> from a eelenywidr ealleeUen taken In preseni ike Prlnreea with a wedding si" After the ,1ft waa parrhaaed a balance of SS.S9S waa lefl and Ihe Prlnceaa gave permlss4ea te uee this amount for some child welfare object. Other money gift* were received Including 114,000 from Ihe British Red fro** Society of London. the formal 1 pwoti -W.F. 50-50 Chance For Cease-Fife H\ HARRY H IM.I NEW YORK Rev. 1 The belief la growing .*} in*' off the Iwltlelleld that tldlLtimr there's at least a 50-5] 1 ,. In Koi that n>bod\ 1 ai could chi .venilght. hut it certain that neither side is going tncUleal. P "liinale Is ready for an anntstlv.. That attilude is reflected In Tokyo Was h i n gton and Peiping. Staie%  nenls from all aources have tak<-n TO a more moderate and reaeouiblo '.one aa though all uerao'i.% 1 breath for fea< if nttking the boat. Ami BUS v • %  %  P.innmnlom '*SUt>tUn| OB the Ixdore the truce te.u %  %  •*-. \A-,t 1.111 tooh lo the oast arroas golden-grain Held and see wisps of smoKc rising on tha ridge. line when Ami-i 1 plastrring the Cornmunlats position It r.mnol Inmore ih.m thr*^ miles awaj." Y.i samS— on laith •: siem to fe.l HUM ti nrtbai than sra haea ever i>een lefme Thenis .1 fceln nanpramiaa can I Nobod can 1* dork bui over*body toats it can bo d Nothing haha| 1 the rock-tFor 1 can t-e wltlid.awn to the 38th ) Co muriMa have i.K.iiuim; The simple raaaan fts thai li thai terrain Along'the 3fllh Parallel I t<,l dsafaa Fur the riaislWlRaalS anv Iruoa loiTnMli must allow them to save their face ThOy never ahUII to I" 1 BUt In 'tie position i>f being for ted to admit that they wrie defeated on •.!• —P.P. ARTIE'S HEADLINE The "ADVOCATti" pay. for NEWS. Dial 3113 Day or Night U.S. Denounces Russian Lies The rt'ASM.r.UTUN. Nov. 1. Slate Department Thursd,,\ denounced Russia'spropaganda machine, for wnst it called hatred and lies" about th I'S VsrraM Assistant Secretary of State for Public ttUfaira said In a speech that Ruaala is upending about S2.000,000,OeO annually on a n.,i.vive propau-nda tnachiflf than Hitler or Mussolini had —tl.P. 62 MMA/LA\S 8MOL H fifth l\ ENGl t>/' KINGSTON. Nov 1 Anothfljibatch of 82 carpenters, cooks, mechanics an I started yesterday by plane for England via America to m —C.P. "Empty thy full glau; fill thy empty glaaI can't bear to see thy glau neither empty nor full" RABELAIS I N .'ays when gentlemen cf tha type cf R;.lwlals thought nothing of consuming two or more bottles of fine port •luring their aflor-ainner relaxation period, their trend eg thought was effectively put into words by the extravagant little drinking song of Carey's In the 18th Ccntuiy, which begins ; "Hacchua must now ins |>u)er resign— 1 am tne onlp God of Wlite?" "Let Wine be euNh and land and see— And let that Wine he all for me'" To-day, the gentlemen of recent vintage rgtajn thc enthusiasm of Carey probably not his wish expressed in those last few lines. They, however, are In full neenrd w.th tinwords of Rabelais : and find no deeper ratisfactlon than in doing It — THE K.W.V. WAY The Only and the Best. The PILLARS of HEALTH INSIST on K.W.V. ALWAYS



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PACK KIO.IIT BARBADOS .ADVOCATE FRIDAY, NOVEMBER 2. 1931 Carlton Still Heads First THOUSANDS WATCHED Basil Grant HIM LOSE HIS SIGHT Division Marshall Has Fine Batting Average BY THE SPOftTS EDITOR CARLTON' have maintained a clear lead in the 1951 Barbados Cricket Association First Division Competition while in the Intermediate Division a single point separates iho Regiment from Windward the leaden. I.oowaul M points, Empire and Police 32 points each, arc the leaders in the Second Division Competition. The bowline and batting Denis Atkinson beads the nveragf** for the Fust Division i*>w lin* average* wiili 10 wick.'* to the end of the Seventh Sen.** taken at a coat of t.41 runs each •hou Wanderers' all-rounder but J. Edghtll. Carlton'* pa c Norman Marshall nt the head of bowler ha 30 wicket*, the highest the batting averages with lbe Individual amouot Uktn by a Mae average of M runs In five bowler in this series and this h.is innings, gained him second place. T. Rlrkett who Is second hftl The following tables set out in not reached half this average, hll detail the situation up to 1-eing 44.33 in eight Innings, October 26. BaUmrn N. Marshall T. Dirkett ( AlleymA. Taylor w tiiecnidgc .. t Ihinle A. Ulenman -viirds A. Skinner L. F. Harris C. Smith C Atkins N. Lucas W. KnuwU-s G. Wood u Itobinson N. Orani F. King C Blackman die ) -.1 C. Mc Kenzie K. Brankvi C. Green idee N H Denotes not out. Sewler D. A'kinsun G. F.ilshill I. P. Harra H. Barker K V. M. Slmmon r C. Bradshow J. Fun J. WM.en.<: K. Bowen y Kir K\l IIM. 11 10 ToUl iira 206 284 218 145 HI 273 287 175 162 218 180 208 172 B7 217 238 136 187 231 i 100 U.S. 137 117 I0J112 HO 77 US 99 • 1 4056 104 M 0. Fields %  Haadler 1. Burke K ltr.mk.pr r. Phillim N. Marshall H. Kins (Emp.) W. Crccnidfo R. Aus'ln E. Greene V. Mr Comic C, M.lll.TI, N. Grant E. L. G. Hood I in" Carlton Pickwick Empire Wanderer Spartan CollCKc Police Comltcrmere Lod mitti INC. p 78.5 119.4 5.5 W 117.1 70.5 43.1 Ml IIM nu .T 102.2 118.5 IS7.I 125.5 107.5 02 Id ins 122.4 •inn 06.3 >l 111 24 II %  II. a it H 24 17 ."J 16 M it. 135 288 150 Ml 165 268 201 Sfl 202 14* 301 | III 261 111 326 301 275 271 27K 343 302 362 370 H. II w II 11 17 %  (Tared Wo* l~\ Won l.llm. 1.4 laa PU. laXIC M.PC ID Ifi 16 II I I Av. %  won 44 33 40.57 3633 30.J5 3366 .1013 .' M 20.16 27.00 27.00 26.6B 26.12 24.57 24.25 24.11 21.60 22.66 21.88 21.00 J0.37 20.28 20.1111 AT. 1.43 0.60 10.00 11.00 11.00 11.16 11.82 11.88 1188 12.00 12.04 12.50 I ill 13.00 13.03 13.52 14.17 14 33 1447 15.05 17.4J 11.05 20.13 21.29 23.12 Ac. 68 44 63.33 61.11 5277 .mm 4444 30.55 13 II. 00 N.B. The Spartan-Y.M.P.C. Is to be replaced; Plekwick-Combermere abandoned. IMIKMtDIATI Chat Windward Retlmcr.i Kmuiic Cable & Wir.lci Spartan Mi-kl.il Hospital Pickwick Wanderer. i i ... .1 Wan i ...i e I i Won Leal IMIaei. Indlaa SEI'IIND IIIVinitlN 11. H Clae Laeward Krnplre I'.,lkc Carlton College Lodle Foundation Ce.nlr.ll Y.M.P.C. Pickwick Comber menWanderer. rl.....I Won • Leal l.o.t I.I Inn. 2nd Inn Chosen As Mr. B'dos SHEILA nm IS %  HISS 11 if 11 u.i TO* >" B>sil Grant, who was earlier thie year chosen as Mr Bridgetnwn, wa* crowned Mr. Barbed'-'. when the Am. teur Welghtlifiing A--s-ciallon of Barbados bald thtir laland onal kntghihocxl. .ire other perquisites Boxer Mac Joacrtirc. also at The end of his career, ha* nut been quite so fortunate AH he has to show at the age of 24 is a pair of smoky specttocles. That, lor a good-lnoUna well-miiM-led yojng man, is no gre.i. retsard. You might even call it .< tragedy. This week, Mac has bean lying in Westminster Hospital, whore they have performed the first of two oparaUoM designed to nivoo .i hroken aoae that once, I imagine, was nandeoim-ly nqulline. The wend operation is pl.mneil foi ear!y in the new y#ar. Celebrllken If the surgeons are settaned. Mac Joachim will l-e seen in the ring at Leyton Baths with Don (eckell Roy Ankaran and other ring eelebritie* • howlng off the poeea that took them to the top Joachim himself will not be fgfhting All you will see of Mae is when he is led up the steps a. the ring, guided between the ropes, and generally accorded ihe assistance proffered to thoee who canWhi.inu World a thmdmw For Mac Joachim, boxer, CTK-.eler, footballer and hocky player, is one of the unfortunates >f .-port Ha sees the world as a shadow through three darks spots that float across the vision of his left aye. His iighl gang is completely blind. You could call It ironic. I cuppoet, that Joachim's tragedy was played out on Britain's TV scraene, wiih tens of thousand* of viewers watching. Thai was last March. Now, seven months later, the darkhaired Mac %  miles aa he talks freely and 111 cultured accents of the macabre joke lhal sport h.is played on him Born in Calcutta. MackerUch llovaklmian (his real name) i" UBS fifth child of an Armenian shepherd who turned wrestler when he went to India from I'ersta. Dad, he will tel! you. went unschooled, but Mac IkanV % %  eif m.xle the grade at Calcuttn'it famous college. La Martinlare. Denying stoutly the of %  brain, hedismisses biisali the ocquisltiiin Of Latin and Urdu. Fonder memory For Mac it is a muali lands* memory that he could find touch AS a rugby full-back: that be kept wickrl and baited. No. 2 at he failed to recognise at close cricket; and that he was a hocky quarters one of the matiest of his captain before be reached hu gymnasium pals, heavy-weight teens. champion Jack Gardner. At 17 ho was working a* u Stop boating, or you will civilian clerk with the U.S. army; totally blind, they told him at the later aa a sergeant In the Calhospital. They operated twice, cut!* police. In 1B48 they mad'hey laid him on his light side him cruiser-weight vice-captain tnr *even weeks, they taught him of India's Olympic Games boxing lo W -1K again, team at Wembley. Owe*, rent Turning professional In April. "But suddenly." says Mac. "J 1848, he was paid £18 for his first felt my right tye go ou#t." iighl and rose to the heights of Joachim left hospital, behind affluence with £30 for his sixth, with his rent and owing money Later the pay packets reached tor two suits he had ordered. 185. Since then sympathisers at Mile Eyas, you must understand, are Er "l Arena have collected nearly not too expensive in the lower £350 for him; the Boxing Board walks of the fight game. %  "w him a pension of £2 weekly On the night of March It, tor six months; an Indian in 1851. they matched him wlLi London left a £ 10 note at his Keg Springs, and TV viewers (edgings; the Bombay police have will tell you It was quite a battle ruM J benefit show to the tune f before Joachim won on potnU ncirl > 10 : • Hertfordshire But nobody, save Mac himself, reader of the Evening Standard toe* the tragedy of the fourth w * MW 'he fight on TV sent 10s round that night at Leyton. Mac Joeehlm Is grateful. "Spring hit me with his left on "Pwhaps one day I can get a lop of my right eye." says Mac. nle business if my left eye gets "in the next round I could see no worse, he says.—UE.8. three Springs through a kind of =iiepfc-N4M-~ 4 shutter over my eye. aUarr.Nsr. 8 Mow d-> you know when you And in Schenactady, TV %  axe going blind? For Joachin mentioned in court when 8 ea e gg* Are In Short Supply Housewives are complaining of the shortage of sea eggs. Mr. D. W. Wiles, Fisheries Officer, told the Advocate yoatarday that that shortage is really due to the early picking of the eggs which .darted .„ June. But there is no tremendous shortage In Bridgetown He said that it takes nbout 14 sea-eggs to njl a shell properly. Many divers pp8d diving for the oggs in order to have their boats ready for the flying fish season. In some cases hawkers never h.iv t tincham-i1-, Itrive lhc beaches with th sea eggs as they are usually man.people Iheri waiting to buy these sea eggs WHAT'S ON TODAY Court of Original JorisdicUon Court of Appeal and Lower Courts 10 a.m. Films for PibUo st the British Council A.00 p.m. Mobile Olooaaa at Princess Alice Playing Field — 7.30 MB, Police Band at Emyiro Theatre 5 sod 8.30 p.m. Labour Political Meeting at Fltta Village. BL Jamas (Mr Holder)—8 |im. Elactars' Aasootation Meeting. Bay Land, St Michael — t IWinmlon -Friday Mlr.^U.'ny' at British Council 9 p.m. ,.,. .,,„„ mentioned in court when a disIhai dread realisation came one bevelled man. arrested for dninkmommg a few days later when Ua, old nuurjstrale Morris , ,'Cohn that he had had a lew too many while "at the World Series' (the baseball finals). "What," said the magistrate "you are telling the court that you were in New York today?" Schenectady is 300 miles away.) "Oh r no, you, honour, I was so CM ited watching it on TV I forgot that I had a bottle in my hand." Result a suspended sentence. [Th ey'll D o h Every 'Tell me doctor . Cmn an antlieptk htlp in foaling t" 'omuls heal of their own accord when they arc kept free from the perms that cause tcptic infection. To keep wounds in the healthy condition for healing, aurgeona have for years relied upon 'Dcttol'. This ruthleaa det•royer of germs is non-poisonous, gentle and safe on human tissues. While it disinfects the wound, 'Dcttol' leaves the living tissues undamaged to continue the natural processes of safe and rapid repair. DETTOL THE MODERN ANTISEPTIC -a. I IT IS AN HONOR TO BE UCTE IDNtOMTAS WK T04£nM*TTER ESPECIALLY WWEN TM 3IVEN" THE OPCORTUN.Ty TO NTWXVCE THE CENTLEMAN ON" M/ raSHT— AinWOR, 8K5OAME HXTER Jit lo (psAfrditm! V £S / vry suit mad* by us is specially tailored lo "FIT TO PERFECTION nir 11 \KB4IMIS AQI'ATIC CLl'B (Mmam Onl?) SATURDAY. Nov. 3, 9 p.m. Mime by . Mr. C. CUHWCN'S Orthaalra M*mbern are cordially invited. Free Admlaaloa ii. Ballroom EvERysccvs AH MC THESE 0f/S~H3BOOy WANTS TO JUST SiT AKO USTErJ—AND WHO CAN 3LAME -EM? While mere are tailors and tailors'' wo can boast of being .... THE TOP-SCORERS IN TAILORING" P.f.S. MAFFEI&CO. Lia. i 01 II WIMIS SI PeieClosed until December 1st. It's nearly Christmas! //era are some BARGMN GIFTS Ladies' Skirt Hangers •• $1.00 Ladies' Plain Hangers ea 24c. Ladies' Khus Khus Hangers ea $1.00 Hankerchief Boxes ea $1.50 Embroidered Note Pads $1.20 Telephone Pads $1.00 Cave Shepherd & Co., Ltd. 10. 12 & 13 Broad Street DVNLOP Sixty-five GOLF BALLS gssBBsAeeassai Will. I4M.VIIIV


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IklliAV NOVEMBER 2. I51 BARBADOS ADVOCATE PAGI illkKK Sugar Talks In Britain LONDON. Oct. IS iieea u.r u-t.n r .a*aa>i. Tatta between tne LOmmniwealth Sugai Producers and Uie liritlsn Q ,. w apfM-.ii likely lo start about the end of i-exi week or in,. U<*mtui v of itu*eek aft* various aub-ComnUtlCv cd l>v HitCommonwealth lroducers, to solve the s. i lerna." matters are expected to end about Thursday. Representatives H r seeking, •iniong other things, an increase ;>r the 1952 crop. This, under the terms of the 19S0 agree* mcni. is to be conceded, providing the costs of production, based on %  mires, can be proved to ML Commonwealth reprmatattvai ., r .cvMdgflM tii.it I figures to prove an tattle price Is necessary. The West Indies delegates have drawn up a document which they ifl ottMT Commonwealth i cure-sen ta lives w> approve as the final draft of the agreement to be presented lo the nsrktttta mciil. It .-. hclieved dull utiifiii apjtt from u sllgj I IMttd by Australia, has been accepted, with changes. b\ the other representaW.sl Indie* May Refuse l! i asM understood that tho Weal Imiu may not accept tho %  vcniuit-nfs offer to purchase nil the Commonwealth sugar until the end of 1958. The reason Is that Canada is anxious to resume purchasingdirect from the* t th,||g Up with Britain tor n a ibm si rttW hold uu in thin •"MI. This could ei u lv pretiagiee the future nf %  tUtt in the %  marital in Canada f. the British Caribbean ealaoal %  THESAM80L? %  %  %  JOULP *i(-U|| <** O* *&£$ ••X maOQa>p ai-f* fi In : &,2A4j/ A^^Uji^srU Pi* PtO • %  -** 'a A\ .i-i.i Tmf •***! *.<. %  V0 sum a* %  aCfruuK' a*,^t>*wor ^^ Labourites Get King's Awards Speightstown Will Soon Harbour Log r t 5 IN CARLISLE BAY Get Health Centre #SK Srh alary f Russia Warns Arab States tMHO. Egypt. Oct. II, Ru I.I h.i told the Arab Govshe will consider it %  U they join the Western Powers Middle East Defence Command, diplomatic circles ban today. Russian legations in Arab i.ipireporcad to be watching with arent btaraal the attttuda of tag, | artlcularijr Syria, l-i-Kmon and Iraq, towards the Four Power proposals.—C.p. BUG. Skittle Out Combined Indians FYern Oir Owe Cat i*|HitHl*n( GEORGETOWN. Nov. 1. Three wickets for 0 runs, a Uillianl lighting crisis-stand of 93 runs for the fourth wicket by Sonny Moonsawmy 61, and Seepersaud 34, then another collapse of seven wickets for 21 runs were written at Uaurda taday in a •cricket druma," when the Combined Trinidad and Surinam East Indians in a pitiable display scraped together 114 runs against Iho n G. Colony side. Al stoat of piuy B.C. was already SI runs to the good with six wickets standing and with Leslie Wight, 82 not out heading for has third straight century in Inter. mlonial cricket. The Combined Indians Innings of 114 runs lasted 155 minutes and the British Guiana made their 165 for four—Camacho being out off tho last ball of the day for 44— -ii IM minutes. The match continues Friday. inVIUMh I T IMHtNl IM MM. Aasaiali c Jordan i*kri b Rudrwt • Whammed t Camaeha b HadfM>v v Mogtiiawmy c Cemecho b Paioli 61 Seeperssud c l.e*llr Wl|hl b Norman Wahl M Prraaiid c Dver b Nnnna.. Wight T I" Vrlar l. 1 ataman I. Norman Wiani I r r> rlorman Wlghl 11 Dyer a Norman Wlstii o GEORGETOWN. Oct. 25. Hon. Vincent Roth, J I ed the O.B.E. insignia, Mr. H. N. Cntchtaiw. the O.B.K. also and Mr Sheik Shakoor tne ,M HE the rspasklnsj of the 1. Council on Prklaj Usd Making the praaaouttoaa, the Governor. Sir Charles Wooll-y told Mr. Roth that "apart from u Member of the Legislative Council and i Bes .aid Committees, you have devoted yourself unsparingly to cultural activities. You have been the author or editor of several valuable books on British Guiana and have taken the keenest interest in the Amerindian community and the development of the llitartoi < %  ( v huh >uu have nun; ledge To Mr. t i drill..... the Oovom said. . -You were the nxinder of th*> first trade union in Briti.ih Guiana, tho-British Guiana 1-ahou, nd one nf the founders of tho Caribbean Labour Conferem< Y.iu have contributed greatly to the anartiuaiU of social welfare and mipi.ivcment in l oodtUofkl of employment. You are held In high esteem by all sections of the community as a man '•( ehaiacier, houcslaof purpose ..nd balance. I warmly congratulate you on receiving this recoiluUOQ of your long and meritorious servtees to isnanotti th> Of Unworking classes in the Colony." To Mr. Shakoor (General Secretary of the Man Power ( r../< i. Association), the Governor said The award has been conferred on you in recognition of your valuable services t. the Trade Union Movement in British Guiana and to laibour welfaie to which you have devoted yourself imi-paringly for many years." Mr. Roth was sponsored by Hun. C V. Wight. C.B.E. and Hon. D J. Parkinson. O.B.E. Mr. MttMow by Sir Eustace Woolford, K.C.. O.B.E and Hon. G A. C. Farnum, C*,U.E-. and Mr. Shakoor by Hon. Dr J B Singh, O.B.E. and Mr. J. I deAguiar. C.B.E. 6 ( laribh.'an Oil Companies To Form Merger To meet th* administrative requirements In (he Caribbean area resulting from rapidly yoiviiu; demand for petroleum prouueta. --""^ " b i *j5 i i3a I of MirkMa : I foi . ] Im . • lor N. I lor 101. a In 10t. %  for 111. S lor 114 nonisd ANAI, vats I..,.. 1 .... 7 a S 3 Dyw .... t a 1'aWHr IT 1 N Wlh IS 2 4 Allan 4 0 B.I l.l lanloa. 1 Wisfi oaMai gagai b All ill b J — Hl.lr I A III . r. .,. % %  .ID :.. ; -.., 1. A:.. Total < lo. 4 MVkn.i ItOWUNC A N 11 %  AMtaraH 1 Jacks*! J*y> today annouin..-., for reorganinng UV opexaUons of six wholly owned affiliate* into one company with headquarters at Havana. The asasne of the present Esso Standard "Oil'" (Central America) S.A. will be changed to Esso Standard Oat SaVf-nd thu company will acquire the husinea* and assets of these five aillliatesr Ess,, Standard O t l (Antilles) S.A. Esso Standard Oil (Cnrnbean) S.A.: Esso Standard Oil Company (Cuba); Esso Standard Oil Cotnpanyii ba I irgat) da'enli|Hiad B aaj, the company %  aid ANOTHER MONTH and a hall's work will complete the Health Centre at Spoightstownbeside the Methodist Manse -Mr. Joseph Connell. Architect, said yesterday. Thr Health Centre is the renovated "Arlington" which was on*> of the thue-storeyed houses so typical of Speichutoun Except for the outside appearance to a certain r\lrn1. the entire building has been changed while more rooms hav been added to it. Carpenters ana masons are still working on the Centre but must of the work left to be dene Is painting and washing. Steady work has been going on at the building fur over five months now. The dale of the official openlgtg of the Health Centre has not yet been fixed. HkoHera of rain swamped the Coleridge School grounds. St. 1 '• • -1 >.t'ida>. preventing the Hrst day's play of the scheduled two-day fixture between t h e Spatahtatown h"V Club and the Schoolboys. The wlrket was at one time covered In spots with water while fir ou'Held was heavy and ery wet. From early during the morning, light showers set in and with an octiisioiial break, ttas> BOOUniasd dnriiii; tde day. Shoppers and eleiks In Speight "'IIWM could tie seen hurrying back to their homes through the rain School children* were robbed of their outdoor game*. The rain kept quite a number or them at home. Radles". an old cricket club of Speights town, which has not been playing recently, is making Ms reappearance on the cricket field on Saturday when they wlU begin a two-day fixture with the Snelghtstown Boys' Club at Coleridge ground*. Representing Radios" will be C Holder (Capt). W. Gibbons, N Gibbons. K. Cnrbin. P. Alleyne. L. Armstrong. V Todd, C. Hope, N. Brathwaite. (.. Walker aad S. Mings. The match will be continued on the following Saturday. Inmates of the St. Peter's Almshouse clapped and danced to the rhythm of the Police Band which held sn open air concert a I the Almshouse on Tuesday night. Adding to the liveliness of the ..tmosphere was the large crowd which sang the familiar songs — calypsoes and slow hits especially —and the little children who "martecoaed" all around the band. The Police Band played for almost two hours. It was conducted by Corporal Best who chose a well variert programme. The Band visits the Almshouse to play for 'he inmates once every month The Third BsrWdos fte* Scout* and the Rovers attached lo th.troop will stage a Camp Fire a* Mortimer Hall, the residence of Dr. A F. Matthews at 7.30 pfli. on Monday night. Under Scout Master Victor Matthews, the scouts and rovers have been putting in some hour i practising songs and yells for the I .Y. Reds Arpiif %  Over Kaesong FANMUNJOM. Korea, Nov. 1. United NaUons and Communist negotiators agreed on where to slop the fighting across half of BpsVaa, out still argued Qtftl l'"' poasesiion of Kaesong and Heartbreak Ridge" A United Nations uAeer said le the Prc>* mat an agreement „ as reached on about M% of the proposed ceasefire line — from Kimswa on the Central Front to the East Coast except for 'Heartbreak Ridge." Kaesong at on the Western front. Despite locrea-ing progress toward an armistice agreement, however, the United states Ueut. Gen. IGHill, said that the and of the war was not yet in Ugh*. He said, "It Is possible that war will go on for om<* time after the truce line is settled. Fighting will go on until "The entire Five Point truce agenda Is adopted." Th< Joint sub-committee charged wi 1 rinding a mutually satlsfa cemeflrc line—the second item 01 tfle truce agenda—will meet agnin %  t 9 p.m today.—r.f. Wallar*. fi.ar. TnttMLaa I R S STATESMAN. .a lar.. n.t C'a k.aasrSMe, Ira. UMr. nnitikiI --D1AI. l.ama tona HH, Ca i i But ,r Trtntaad SEA WELL \m-ii \i -s. a W I Vr5tTKmtAV l....lUMIlll' C Ktn0 A C"H.>.".O Bann. P l*mm— Ur> %  N I A VCsTrBUAV l-r \Ml'i A— ri>>.)br*h MtsMI JI>*IIIH. Kr-tiVM II %  BB) • •> MOMtNH A— Oplirlin Rlsrln. I-, JAMAPTA AibwM An. Jatin Wll*.mi I •> PI mm m p.. Wliarbin, Jrsim* s..||i,t. % %  Wal**ia>i Ttwlma SprlnSVi In Touch With Barbadot Coajtal Station littmtlut .Mpa llm-.it> UUli Bart... t rrior*laa>. Mrfmi Hawk, aimiv... -m. PaClAr rOrltin*. Mallna Drl g*M | WBVS Ki.i<*>. Sarp-lo.. xtawa ABdaltwia, r.a*. a><-> kunwvss, I-'.IUIMUI. saaill. P'* r --*BBB. QMlto, BaOaur, S .p ( airpn.,, A W. P*akw. BBK C-lll.ir.nB. %  —aun. Al... :-anaSian 1'r.n-rr. latdarvh..!. ler, Aki>* I'urliirr. Bar.. M Irrmaa KIMI S S Rao rlovo Lewis Attacks Etectart* Policy \ tiem.-n.lou. | rOwd BSBSl QRII the Labour Parl> mealing held in support of the casntHsature of Mr A E S l*u for the Csty oi Hndgetown at Nslson Street 1 night Cm the platform were Mr F. U WaleolL Mr. C. Tudor, Mi 1 ; Williams .inrl Mr M F Cm Mr. Lew -criers th % %  • %  ', d they thought that he did net aV[ tarve to IT put in the House, then they could act lo suit. Mr. Leu Is strongly attacked Hie p. HaiUado* Klectors' Association ar 1 [ railed the manifesto a big farce He said that the damage that •*! done by thi* Party Is now beit-i repaired by the Laboaw IHrtv which is also trying 'o lift the yokthat is around the ne, k of the u bourer to-day. He said that the manifesto of oat BatsBga 1 Assoclition loucbed upon a deep w.-ter harlxiur. 'ThI mighty gun* in this Party are nnv. feeling the *queee from the llfh: ] crmen This harboui could hav been built lung ago but at tnat tinv %  It was not convenient for there They eay it would put the island in a good position but it would til put many out of employment. Mr. Le\ws -aid DUt neverthilass the English clot got BBflM .if Uses! ilnnking, In ltnrt>adns was imi Kngland I'lwlKht Wnlci'tt said that it was the duty of eveivune to i turn Mr. Ltwkl to the House m Asaemblv He Is an uptight and fearless representative In 194L' one of the biggest demoristi itu was staged in the island for Mi I civia. Thl* ..^ la the ti-e.itm.n he received from the hands nf hi employers after serving them fol Bstne time. Even Iteftire this ileiruni.ti -il*. %  Mr lx-wls had shown hlm>. it i.. %  ( %  plight lOBM UsoclaUon i L.ttorm hav. %  aid that the I.aln.i (eivc-ntnn ti of this Inland has nut dune ennui.h But this the masses could see They cant deceive the masses "Adams will die, I dl die. IM, the Labour Movement will gn no for it is the Movement of tin atr Walcott ssld that he did not like to attack pest friends but h. understood thai Mr. T Miller hitbeen saying things about the Union %  mt If be has something against on< member of the Partj fie should am ay things shout that Party oi which he was a inorid-i JXV \oVINGs YEASTVITE Sr Tha Only Pain Reliever containing Vitamin B, f*rs*t**+\ > iaa'i bars to toonM~ —* %  *'"• ; MAKES YOU i fr N(IDCMES, HEIVE PSIHS, > (ff WF|| J COLDS. CHL$. SHEUMtTIC PIIW > tLtL WtiL I LOOK YOUR BEST Mi Teeth Blown Out At Cnmbermere School yesterday M. Rose of Form I C had some of his teeth blown out with a bomb. The Incident occurred at about 12 30 in the afternoon Rose, before being taken to the General Hospital where he was treated and discharged, was given First Aid treatment by Scoutmaster, Mr. Brathwaite On his return to the school his father arrived and took him home. Hla action was against the instructions of the Meed an a tier. Major Noott. who has forbidden l>oys bringing fireworks to the school premises. MAIL NOTICES WAIIA lor Dominica. Armsua. Mont. —iral. Mavn and SI Km. bv t'r MV CarlBb-* Kill h* rawed .1 ('. (•metal Poet Orer .. under; — S-.li rtn The Rover* will be making their first public appearance at the SCOUT BROADCASTS Island Commissioner of Scouts, Major J. E. Griffith, will give the second scout broadcast over RedifTusion at 8.45 p.m. tomorMeil el It i, r> r( n. t---> 1 r> m OftUnaey Mall al IS) v • > IW ana Nevemfarr Ml MAI1.1 Mr Madetla. t'.OIeal Kl.^S-.,.. Aniwerp and An'Merdain by th. M s wnir-. 1 ,t..d -ill be cloaed al (he Benenil Pspt ossee%  • luiase:— Petrel Mall al ia %  Moil •! 1 u IN Ordim ) in on IM Mh Nevem HAUJ lor SI Lucia. Manir.i<|. GuadeluKpa. Anli|u. Uxilrd Kit^il-x ead Franc* to IM S S Oeai'eatne wtl be clear*, al the Qenrial PoM Office a BBBMt— . RrgiMerrd I Men al 3 St r 1BSI Mi, I al in a m Ral.WING Is the list at names "f those teachers who hav. passed the Certificate A. examination:— Baker T F.. St Clement's B ; Belcravc. H K.. Bay Street B j Bast, C St. Lawrence B ; Brand tssisf) M A. HlndBbury G Brathwaite. H. A St. Luke's B Cadogan, (Miss) 1F,, Si Bet uard's G; Clarke. (Mrs) J. A. Wesley Hall B %  rSaPeiM, V Alt Saint? B.: dikes. W t.. Alt Saints' B. Gittens. (Miss) E. A. Baulab O.: Harewood. C A. S' John Baptist II. Kci/cr. iMuw i. Ohrtt Church G ; King. (Ml>) G. F.. St. Matthias' H Laurie, t E St Luke's G.; Law. rence.. l K. Huston B.; LescocK. IMISK) C. C.St SwithinsG. Union It, Providence B., Massluh II. G, St. Gilc B., MiAlii-t.r. (Mii II M Kdghiil Memorial G-i Milling!""! J.. St. Christopher'' B.; Pilgrim. (Miss) O., Sharon M Robinson. fMhu) I. V., Buxton B Springer. (Miss) E. V. St. 3H*s' G Welch. V. C Black Hess M Death of G.N. Ray Mr. Guy Neeve Ray. a former employee of the Western Telegraph Company in Barbados from 1831 to 1930. died suddenly in Rio de Janeiro, on October 2 Mr Ra> was r cricket enthusiast. He played for Wanderers and also iilnvcd for Hovers at Mwcei. Plant* CrttPihts Into Mountain >'i ti.nii.pon plane enuhad into the id.nf Beat Bprltlfll Mountain. five miles from their destination •gMl exploded The plane, based at Tru.ix Air Force Bust* ni Madison. Wisconsin. arasBWd aftei tli. pilot Bpparentlv lo*i direni.u, h the heavy fog.—P.p. Your hnir witl be handsonw *iy far when you treat If to Vaseline' Hair Tonic. Just UN a few drops a day... then see the difference! Buy a bottle today 1 Vaselineffi Jo-. Br.fV.as> Mij I -. < —4 tM tfRU mtim tocMqtij Gan %  tie Pi.-sideney. Kodolt.. was reported wounded loniglit. following n shouting affray between the Communist* ami IVmnlstas in the Parana Province The Incident occurred durum the (.'omniuiusts' |.it-ele,ioral meeting ui which Glnoldi was speaking. First reports stiitesl that u\ least one person was .1. there were several with ilrearrn•> our ids In an official communiI vited to attend the election T"day'i announcement extends courtesy to other nationals uliriil, ..(.iK-fc Unit Aiicentinr miBBBSSPM and UBsntaani ail] pravkb visiting correspondents with .ill ar> facilities C P Zubei Cough Mixture t\ > balanced blend oi nine **>cred ingredient \, which hat already won a £re reputation overstat ai a family remed/ for coughi, tore throati and bronchial inflammation. Its 100thinj tyrup quickly taict congettion and ralievet discomfort. Keep a bottle ready in your home. Tftc c<*44$A remedy far a& £fof**u6f COUGH MIXTURE %  . _* U Major r mutes i rifllth will talk for IS the Scout Movement. FIRE AT BANK HALL The Fire Brigade was summoned to a fire nt Bank Hall last night at the home of Ivan Sealy. The house was slightly damuged. It i* Insured. When the Brigade arrived the fire had already b een put out. 1500 Bags Oj Met Here The Schooner laaellle M. Mairth. 74 tofiu net. arrived here yestiTda* with 1.500 rxigs of nee from %  iaiui [ilong with supplies of firewood and charcoal Lueuie M Haallh Is consigned t., Mewr:. Kobert Thorn Ud. ^**5***^S^BP^ FINGER-TIP FLY CONTIOl Good food tastes all the better with Colman's Mustard r -I and aaaaBmirioee aaapaca kaeltn AEaoaoiV rLrspgAY. j...i presj iu i.'.ila*. aeal 0M eaM-IBM aeea> awtoraalC t-Mff t&t&t SoptrrWr IT EM %  -• i fil BsseB %  a i M nolmanus, nananaammKti'a aeJ aW— reWlete. Ue II In homes arj e#Tv. IwM .tlorea, heaaliel trsrs. •>-.j^fi. ier> %  laanh 'Z\ rallae %  iee i iarS t>aVkSeW. ssssT'sA SL" "" —*" ***"' "'" re-ana. n.norr,ii a BriBlaSfSON I.TB Hi URN \-*-.. I riratn. IHOUHI. C.a Be Oblxaae ereesi— I |-;i'I)DEK GKANT LTD. 4frMi: T. f. OAIRAWAY a CO, BrMtario< — j^s*^.^eP*^a^l^ GOLF BALLS Warwick & Blue Flash WM. FOGARTY (BDOS) LTD. MSIDS NO PJIf BICSrTATIOH CAST TO USI • Wah ririKhmaim'i sforalnfal new Dry Yraet—yoti can baler cldKiour DUBM and rode any limai all. FVnechmsnn'i eteys fresh for srseks. If you bake at home— aerp a keg pupply en hand. Oet Fleierbmajir'r Dry Yraet today, fet Yew HeeMh'i Seke %  Flrisckmann'a dauolved in fruit lukr. milk or water. Like fed yeast. ii aespi torn up your %  v*tem. to i*ir ro Ufa 1. Spnnkle Mito luaewerm'wsirr. 1 Lrl i and 10 Minutei Stir Whee dnwi'veel, one prstBaa)* equeli eoe loil yaeat i-akr as any renpe fepasuptfyMAa/hf-tetetfa/Mwti/Mftx THE lAKGESI VSSlllirMIM TO DELIGHT THE cmumss FOR THE HOME A GIFT THE WHOLE FAMILY WILL WELCOME An ENGLISH ELECTRIC REFRIGERATOR CREAM or WHITE WITH 5 YP.AR GUARANTEE CAUL AT THE 1 1 HIXI It STOHK



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PAGE FOUR BARBADOS ADVOCATE I KII> \^ VOWMIIER 2. 1931 BARBADOS A17\'(MTF, L-*. •* .. i Frid>>. Novrmbrr 2. 1*51 Labour Welfare THKRfi is an increasing fashion especially among candidates seeking election to the House of Assembly to encourage people who borrow money from the I-abour Welfare Fund, not to repay those loans. The suggestion has already been publicly condemned but in view of the fact that it has been repeated, its implications should be made plain. The Labour Welfare Fund was created at the instance of the British Government who insisted that included in the guaranteed price for sugar there should be included a sum which would be devoted I" the welfare of the people employed in the sugar industry. It was agreed that the amount would be derived by means of a cess to which a contribution would be made on every ton of sugar produced. That fund has had contributions during the last four years and has now reached .1 sum of approximately two million dollars. Of this amount, the sum of $300,000 has been allocated to playing fields and the remainder except $100,000 left to reserve, is to be utilised for housing. The qualification for loans from this fund is that the borrower must be a worker in the sugar industry. For the first twelve months of its operation the fund helped 1,200 people and if it is accepted that there is an average of five people to each household, then at least, 6,000 people have been given shelter by the operation of this money. It is worth knowing that the plantation labourers have thought so well of this fund that the first allocation of $400,000 was repaid and is now in circulation a second time. There are several thousand applications more for loans under this fund and it is to be hoped that the money due for the 1951 crop, amounting to over one million dollars will soon be utilised as well. It has always been generally believed that the average plant ition labourer is dull, stupid and unaware of his own interest*. It will be seen from the way in which they have made use of the fund that they are not as unaware as many would believe. They fully realise that i." they continue to borrow from the Labour Welfare and repay, it will always be at their disposal for future use. That is the case with the £80,000 which formed the nucleus of the Sugar Industry Agricultural Bank and that is the standard of operation at which the labourer has to aim. It is difficult to understand why anyone should advocate that the labourer should not repay after he has made a legitimate loan. Already in this Island there is a dangerous angling for popularity by flouting all authority. Serious minded people in this island were alarmed some years ago when the people of St. Thomas were told in a public lecture that they should not worry about obeying anybody and should question all authority. The plantation owner in this island has set a good standard by making full use of the Agricultural Bank and repaying his loans. The money was granted in 1902 and If the loans had not been repaid the Bank would not be in operation in 1951 to help those who do not have the finance to operate their estates. Labourers who use the Labour Welfare Fund will understand that the money is not theirs ii tnc real sense of the term, and even if it had been theirs and was taken from them, it now provides a fine source where they can have credit and to an extent which they would not get otherwise and without the obligations usually attached 1 The Labour Welfare Fund is a monument to social progress in this island and those who invite the labourers to practise dishonesty and to refuse to repay legitimate loans are encouraging an attitude of mind which might have most undesirable effects in future. The method of changing the procedure is to amend the art and this cannot be done from the soap box. Only the House of Assembly, can do this. Pakistan Will Not Thoughts For Leave Cwealth Politicians Hill III il.iin s -Poor I r.nlrisnin Is Nil •MIIII U '|'| M IfooiU KARACHI 1'AKISTAN'S ntV Premier. Khwaja Nailmud.iin. too..reports that Pakistan it thinkin.; of withdrawing from lh> Commnnur.il Ui way the K %  BSftif QU ion h..s been handled by the United Nation.' Hut he .idmitted that the British GovarssMurs "lack of leadership" m imttt India and Pakistan is straining the Commonwealth bonds. Sitting in the etatra of a horse* shoe-shaped desk under a huge portrait of the late Mohammed All Jlnnah. srebHtd of the Moslem Dominion N-i/uninl'tin said "I have anough trouUsa without thinking of secession from IhO Commonwealth. But peonlr hen complain that the Commonwealth seems to do llttlr for Pakistan." Feelin* In P kMftn h Commonwealth could have done much more to orevent the K h mir finest Ion being weak] by UNO. Reports from Srii'Lir Rashnir'< ei Itstl l*m who atoo't up In 'hmmoii" there on Fridav ind took Hindu iv* ire illll In hosni'-il. enough to • t''" Ranch) iflame v Ith llnlv WOT ml 'No Arms Arrive' Premier Naiimuddln a genial tubby man educated at Durv-ab'lc Grammar School and Cambridge went on: "Britain has promised u>> arms. They have not arrived w. do not plan to, attack Indu 01 anyone else All we wTTAWA — Canada is quite -.it.si'• %  fnded on space saving device OMt Inside, the viewer leans against a deceptively smooth wall at his peril. Hi h liable to touch some hidden spring, artfully camouflaged a' grain In the wood, which will release a double bed from that misleading solid looking wall. Folding partitions open out of cupboirds to divide the living room Into separate brdrnom* and "convertible'' is the opera'ive word. Most ingenious space-saver in the show was a remarkable semirotating apartment housing a toilet! Tluji small circular room can be *wung Into the main body of the caravan when travelling, and out when camping, with great saving of space. The same caravan, which must indeed have been built by a genius in Sparing Thi Inch, boasts a large bath camouflaged a* an oak chest ol drawers! It stands on end on enstors, and can be pushed to any p r'. of th<* caravan with the minimum of effort, Smallest end rneipest caravan on show was |he £?5U "W.mlien 1 be found in the aircraft indu-tr< established there. Labour which is accustomed lo fine work i\ wood and steel Is recruited inti> making i_-.mv.ins. where all thru 'kill Is needed, First essen In] |r the caravan Is lightness ntx 1 strength. Joe Cordle (name fictitious) sat in his customary place on a rocky lad** overlooking the ses. his joyes glued to the water in cnHemplative mood. His net and himself lead a kind of vmbiotlc existence, inseparable and, ol times, almost indistinguishable; you see. he carries the net and the net carries him in the perfectly honourable—If to the unaccustomed, somewhat unfra^rant —businesof catching 'frays' those miniature denizens ol the ea which frequent our coastal waters. On this particular day, .Top was gloomy. Yes sir, he was, as he confided U> n friend, 'down und out". He put it this way: "De moon bin look site sweetest like pretty woman but undcrneat' %  he was ugly to' true, she mek de see so rough dat ah i even a scale fo' de past week: de result lg dat all ah bin livin' "pon is brown ijiaklt an' tea on' pot too icich Jit dat. Now. ah Sea IV. THE STATE ONI SI the reasons for the Si of the laim.y is the family's IfnaTuUM duties of the State Too often the family regards the Stale as an enemy. In fact it is the function of the State to safeguard the interests of the family. There can be no conflict between society and the individual, since the interests of society and the interests of the individual are not opposed but complementary. This does not mean thai abuses do not exist in the relations between the State and the individual. But thes,abuses arise pr> ciscly becpusc Indivtcfualg are[gnoraj their rights and duties with relation to the State and bcc-iuse the Stale quite frequently rtegktcti its duties towards the individual Uodern Stattsm. in fact, has sought to estabah (j.nd in some cases has established lo the detriment of society) a complete scparat.on between the subjTt and governins] •iasses, between individuate and the State. :i 'his way modern Statism has destroyed tnd is still deslmymi; th.> interior current of MCtal life and is creating a fertile ground for oivic immorality which necessarily results from the apathy of citizens and their lack of interest in politics. It is therefore the duty of all good citizens 11 understand quite clearly what are their r.ghts and duties and what are the true functions of the State. One definition of the Stale is "human society organised politically: that is civil society considered as a unil of government. with a code of law. and with manifold organisations operating to promote public prosperity and the common wealth." In addition to the family, man needs a society to satisfy his needs and requirements. This society is the State, "the Civil association willed by God as a necessary complement of the family." But the State, although its origin is willed by God, cannot consider itself as an arbitrary society, a free association like a chamber of commerce or a literary or scientillc I society: "the State instead is a spontaneous ition integrated with and willed by! ; human nature, a necessary factor in its natu-i lal evolution and its progressive develop| ment." That is why the State cannot have a scope | which conflicts with the final uim of human existence. LeoXlIIinRerum Novarum (May 15,1891) pointed out the real functions of the State | when he defined true social prosperity as denvfnfl "from holiness of cusjoms, the right constitution of the family, the guardianship of justice and religion, an equal distribution I of duties, prosperity of arts and commerce, i from all that contributes to maKO life mere i perfect and happy." But if the State exists, and has for its purp>se the true welfare of the ctizens who comprise the State, it cannot perform its j functions without authority. That authority I tomes from God. To disobey the legitimate j authority of the State is to oppose the divine v. 'ill. But the State's authority although sanct.oned by God is not without limit. The power i f the State is not absolute and independent I I i every law or moral injunction. The authority of the State has its limits fixed by (nil | Himself. We must never forget and must ulways go on repeating that the "whole cason for the existence of the power ol the i'ate, at any time and whatever the oIlYUmtance. consists in its natural end. in its true jnd proper function, which is the public progpstity and the common welfare." "If", wrote Leo XIII in the Enc\clicai Diuturnum. "anyone should have to choose between disregarding the commands of God those of princes, he must obey Jesus Christ Who commanded 'render to Caesar the things (hat are Caesar's and to God the thing? thct i" GbdY and added if the will of prinogf It repugnant to the will and law of God, they themselves exceed the limit of their power and prevent justice; nor can their authority have any value in such case, since there can he no authority where there is no justice." But wherever authority is, or has become by passage of time legitimate, we must always remember that th6se. who exercise legitimate power do to in the name of God. and that disobedience to legitimate rulers is not made to a man but is made to God Himself. To-morrow: "THE CITIZEN AND THE STATE" Seer -By The Stroller hears dat guv'ment fcedtn' dera good fo' nuttiu Dodds boys like dam Is king sons. Whey dey gettln* all dis money fromAh knows ah ent got not even pM )uck-ass fo* dem tax. One tints back. som 0 down along Ruv'nor sen petlce fo* reckon peepul donkey an' de pecuul ups and chases dey donkey in de bush so guv'ment could'nt Und dem fo' u.x. Will, we ent got no b but ah knows dls stunting goln' happin if dey sen pe'ice fo" count -ceeds to expatiate: Ixuka whs happin. ah is got • much frays nh don't luaDW sJuS f< • do wid dem. Ah hears de guv'metit say dey would 'Ike to ci>n dem fo' git touris fo* cat. wld fancy label 'pon de tin like %  y does buy from Mr, Goddard grocery, but day sot no lie lo cook dem In; an' ill dis talk 'bout it* In dis is' I n,ek me sick. Ah hears dat "5 dis lie l>i turn lo gas wlia CJrm* from de hot air an' same like lalk dat gone on in s Isia.Kt fo' 100 'ears r.n' mo'; de gKJQBd ruck um in an' now It comln 1 out In gaswell, to me law,d. wha is we po Iteepul goln' do' Anyhow, ah hoars dat one uv we hlc boys pay a visit to British Honduras an' he come back an' say land goln' beggta' up dp v but it full uv bush an' Bajsns could turn it In land uv milk-an' honev as de good book tay. Ah don't mind goln' but ah hate In lcivc do rock whev ah bred an' born an* me oder half, dis old net. Some peepul say dey can't fist Demerara full uv watah. Why de guv'ment don't gie dem rubber bootwIJ tome uv de mom y dey trowln' way an' let dem go down day an' grow rice fo' dehself an we up hey? Ah also hears dat Pharoah in Egypt want fo" add j a lot uv uncivilue* Africans to 1 ho kingdom. Why he don't sen fo' some uv we civilize' BajansT tea. de bible say Egypt is a land uv plenty an' manna doe* fall from heaven when de P'-epul hungry. Ah links dat boy Adams should 1 go an' talk wld dis rich Pharoah and try an' get u few uv w* out ASS 1 BSBV long wha goln' happin hey is dls: all dem motu' lorry and' ting wha klllln' peepul *>n de road goln' hav' to go an', accordin* to wha ah see In dem American papah de boys bring back, we will hnv' de hatkoOpi Of helicopters) insted uv bus. an' kyar an* lorry, dem km haul cane too to <(p f.irtry an' fek molasses easy so dat nokin get mash up by dem On Page 7. Enjoy a DOMINICA CIGAR On Sale at Your Druggist DA COSTA & Co., Ltd.-Agents &lv-&da+ tSUHEMEXTS For lour CAKB NITS PRUNES BRANDY CURRANTS C1IKRHIES SULTANAS COOKING BUTTER TABLI BUTTER KIDNEY SUET for //- S>AHT\ Mll.K FED CHICKENS MILK FED DUCKS DRESSED RABBITS FILLET STEAKS OX TAILS FRESH VEGETABLES GOLD BRAID RUM gfl SMOKED KIPPERS SMOKED HAI)pOCK u ill Onl Too. >y a bottle of CATEL per hot lie PHONE GODDARD'S



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PAC.F SIX BARBADOS ADVOCATE: KiliW M'M MBER I Hail HENRY BY CARL ANDERSON MICKEY MOUSE BY WALT DISNEY *3u P0 -•>> TO -*1-P •-J-'* PftlNDf : * 8L0NDIE BY CHIC YOUNG ... CMCWOOO DON MM *NMAM£NT ;. vauTo THE LONE RANGER BY FRANK STRIKER JW fifiNT FOR W.BMK.EB KASON. BCCAUSE 1DU M*D 1NFCWMAT.ON 1 BeOOT TrtE W.LO HORSE GANG-, f JOHNNY HAZARD BY FRANK ROBBJNS KtfP DOWN, TNT.. ANP WATCH T*iV-.TUV WONT *l*WU*'TU*VCA*A(roirt I TO WATT' !M6CNGTOTrV CMU-.T H.TTOL BRINGING UP FATHER BY GEORGE MC. MANUS WHI'-E MAQoYS OUT tU-GIVE TW6 I CWLC A (?AL GOCO CLEANNQ I KNOW MOW TO (SET N M*Q flOOO GRACES. / WHEW.f THAT VMAft A TCUSH JOB'eUT MAOGiE Wtl M TtCKTJC &LLX WUCN SHE GGi WMAT I _, CNO, 1 J>G\C GOOO NC.VG *>* >OU • W"iLB I WAG QUT I 6TOPPGO C*F AT TMS FAINTING (" COMTBACTDA ^ **TC cxa5 TO PaaNT TMaS HXM TCaacaNOV K*Ca*NINO SO GET BUSY RIGHT Away ANO STACK AUTHfi PURMTUHC IN TVaE WOOLSTHE aooa-1—' • KIRBY BY, ALEX RAYMf iCu UOA I %  AfXlPTlC. 1 ^ *5*T .-4A'C3HeLI. >6.TJilW,. *oTef. waaawt r—,,_—-1 : tc-: *- aa**Mr'*xeAO \ \ cup... '/ 10*3* S -6A THE PHAI\" -v wMi; i DBrvwo inoof Y we THATTUEviEUNHACMKl. / I vViNIA NOTE FMKI /OCUU.6ET MVeVltE.'! MM KXLOWEC AXJLLNtW.0SEE THEM A6W.GOVEBNOB.' WEN I RETuSNVnTH THE NOTE I %  ^1 THAT'S Iff BY LEE FALK ft RAY MOORES IF YOUFEEL LIKE THISTAKE WINCARNIS TONIC WINE ""** AND FEEL LIKE THIS! BE HEALTHY & HAPPY. r" Gums Bleed 1 Amonn -,:r •"'•r„ „.„l-Te..cft M..< •IIMnMMOm Th br..kf %  .h.l build.I S.V. 'm nd Swap 'am... 40 Cardl in Hi. Strica. CORNFLAKES CM nkv ADVOCATE for •*. IIIHH.S IT PAYS YOU TO DEAL HERE SPECIAL offers to all Cash and Credit Customers for Thursday to Saturday only USUALLY NOW Pkgs. Jacob Cream Crackers 49 M Tins Grapefruit Pkgs. Polar Icing Sugar 37 :i I Bottles Dows Stout Tins Succotash 34 M Bottles Frontenac Beer D. V. SCOTT & Co. Ltd. Broad Street USUALLY NOW 55 II 26 21 5 r 26 21 THE LOVELIEST EOT EX TOW r X XMA S TREE DECORATIONS AT ADVOCATE STATIONERY OF FI\F Order your Ingredients tor the XMAS CURRANTS-RAISINS ttTXI D PttL PRUNES—also 1-lb bou SOUTH'* M.l MINCEMEAT Gil, __.^ XM/S PLUM PUDDINGS Mils PEEK'S XMAS ll.I'M puDnmo 2 ll*. nri by Pck Frvaji ft Co.. I.ul MI.1KD DHIED rm-iT In Cpllo1-TtTTI'. N POAST BEE*' V--lb. bot -FEE 70-. 1-tl). bot~ TROPICAL I'HIhK ,)E 36.. l-lb b.'. SI'RK I BM r* UL ONIONS Zl_ B.K. CROSSEft BLACKWEI.I.S CBJSV 8ALT .i. I IIOSSF ft BlvU'KWM IS IIKIII LIIHANT JELLY Sni^ll Tin. SAXA SPICES lie. •Mb. Small Tin, SAXA GINCEl: I INNAMON NUTMEG P.ISTO for Gravt**—It thickens. hrowna aind wutnm tn on* oper1 1 RIJU-KWEU-'S CALVES rEET JEL1 V BEMA MOI-\SSES for Bota. PEANUT BUTTEB 42c. Ml II MUSHROOMS Mc. KTAI1. v.-llo. Red aand 11 60c. per bot. also white ALLEYNE ARTHUR & CO., LTD. -Ymmr Grmvrs" Hi H h SI. 1'htnf us— II' Itt-lirt-r I





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FRIDAY. NOVEMBER 2, 151 BARBADOS ADVOCATE PAOK nvi Leg. Co. Changes In Wages Bill Rejected House Give No R'easons For Objections THE Legislative Council at their meeting yesterday received a message from the House of Assembly to the effect that they did not agree with the amendments made by that Honourable Council o the Bill to make provision for the protect-on of the wa^es of workers. The short debate that follower Iravene* the provisions of subsuggested that the offending section (1 > of inU section ahull be amendment wa> that in which guiky of an offence .ind shall be clause two of the bill had been liable on conviction to a An* of amended by the insertion of the fort v-eight dollars. -ork performed by A n entirely new section was words vatchmen." so tha't the section then tend :— 2. In thia Act— "manual labour" includes work ordinarily performed by mechanics, artisans. handicraftsmen, seamen, boatmen, transport workers. domestic %  rv:mu and all larxmrcrs and .my "ther similar work associated therewith but dt elude clerical work; performed by watchmen. added and this read-—No proscc tiou for any offence under this Aci shall be institu ed aft* piratlon of one yer from of the commission uf the offence. Kei: reliable TV Ih.n Dr. MaMjh I not mother Race bad made ork tutemeni with regard <> Ibeii rejection of their ,i mend menu workerme.s a person who 0 herwivl> h ,. v mifh| navc ^ *ho led off bl W J cb %  omlul1 """ 1 %  "' the debate, observed that The i" *.* vi *2" H w "\ v "> n "* fortunate The amendmen s had nlydld not i for their objections to the ** no thp Council could RU back amendments and so that Council "" its decision. was still in the dark as to why He agreed with the view exthelr amendments had failed to pressed that at Hr*t thought one find f-.vour with The Oth-r could reach the opinion thai iherv Place. wat no necessity for Including; the The bill had been referred to a words relating to the amendment Select Committee of which he wl'h regard to watchmen, and then was chairman and there were on second thought there was a membe-s of that Committee who bodv of opinion that shared th km— performs manual laboi Hon. O. B. Evelyn wh he debate, observed | Other Place, in their message YeIonun w !" amendmen s Jecting the Honourable Councils originally, put in for clai amendments had not stated their ln lnc P'on and he did IN THE LEGISLATIVE COUNCIL YESTERDAY < %  >• UfHIaUo %  p -• ralteaas (•t n-.-l, %  >„ h.ar* a4>>*<'4 ...ill t.M m „,,, ~ >• I.M th. l.ll. 1MI Ih' <...„.( ••• %  • Ih. Mi • l*l.a thai %  kit I* 4|.r, i l.l.r,l Ih* ">... I.IO..I. i r i'< •* "i">i .ii.-njii, mm far !" % %  pi*l** \-i |M T. .•*••• %  • 11.11 l.i •*! % ... %  .. >• Bill OIHM 1*11. m*4* fc. II-I .I-W .%  %  IBSI. %  •>.•-• IB. 1MB S % %  < %  • 1 IIMHl la Ih* *rl ,•*•> O.K. li1 -• %  .II BBSS -i six-* M •.....*' 1.1 lb* ili.lllr. Is |U> America Sticks A Goose Quill In The Caps Of The Upper Crust By IVH.VN ;\ i uni i. On gs) cssav on The melodies \i R rORK ..ml rhythms in n AN am M nets magazine wiiirh we know." say Gentry, "that -II> i< i .i oflgjj bat .-omposed a full symOubbled in o Me over here It is phony around such motifs" And designed, say the publishers, for wont it be impressive next time "those people who h*ve nevei you walk through t tgJ or the commonwith a friend say. -That turd is P*ce." .Imping in E flat major 4-5 And Gentry us it called, cm' "'wLy |g published sa v Rg publams everything from a free ishp „ .. for xhf MOOO mple of marjoram herb pasted mc „ .„ Anipn ,. n (Tol Ion i '" adltoi .i\ i %  slmpl] .klnx t d The food for family FITNESS ample on the 0 cooking |>IIK< (.tnd also free) architt punt on how to build %  l*Umiah %  *th In your celUu "We noubt whether many of QUI n a| ressjkn will mm aetu much th down t i the job of buildinx a that. .. %  th," says Grary frankly, l.yt isn't it a pleasant idea to toy i-ui iai nuS?" C.O.L. Bonus For Workers Today iTk??. S "bject than he view that they should be inserted. Si T7 After careful study The very ambiauily surrounding they Had sugnested amendments t ll||r| M th lf 1hrr( aimed at the clarification of tain sections which they considered ambiguous. In the absence of any specific objgc'iou to any of the amendments he could only meve thnl the Council tend a messagi Other Place t.it ng thct W*n unable in waive arr.'ndmentto th t II THE staff of the Sanit.n ) Conmissionera for St. Michael aril] K" some cost of living bonus to-da>. the San'tarv Commit .< >ners c*i mli. i 'mm .1.. ^ (;ovorntn.'nt rates 'ii.vernmeut The Honble J. Tt. Chansller s.nd rates pre 201 on the Hr*t S4S0 thnl he would not speak n the |>er iinnum of salary. <','". on the amendment ven but for thi' ir Ine Pre'ldcnt but give his own fr*lins aNondL and thev on ,nP matter. He fe't th.'t H n I %  UMaa who are paid u,, :< Hlfference of onknion helween the rates are:—for_the (list ffo Schooner Launched At Browne's Beach Fifty-one-year-old Ernest Lord, ex-liarl-our poltM, lWp wright. wheelwright and engineer was a happv man na> terday when he launched his 64 feet long schooner Confident I. G., off Browne's Beach It look Ernest I.011I and tw other shipwrights a year and three months to hui!t! the schooner. Lord is a man who has as his maxim: "With om |ofa yXHi oui nol Bf weekly wages 201, for the second 10. ;u-, and for the third lit |f The Commissioners agreed to pay the cost of living bonus ... „ the suggestion of the St Michael -*Mlon of cerVes r> w|H> dpc)ded >horl whl|t ago that all parochial employees would get a cost of living bonus. The bonus paid to-day will come On the oiher hand he did not from an unexpended balance of think that this was such an issue flff 0 lhf Commissione that there should be a flgh: heft new doth* l and a sample of the fabric at avh% % %  ( to (ha i>-Ke. i sense of touch I Involved hmn cither. The wildest addition l( •' •>•. wild gei som* unptf ilN (This wwslblv | t a %  M Cora fNrlvie rttfot 'lie adltori of th.i 'omen, who once wrote a hes*%  etl-r on how to net I husband.) The sddl km of stink-am and %  •rnnles.' -ay the publish* !" "in""duees a new and effccti\r kind r r 'r-adlng hy touch' "Altar the first few pages-. 'r*•-im"d with anlrl and iutl fed r^rihtnoanti ki nWeh euttlnfi *>• | | l.'l: '. M rl rou and \mirself au>on t'eallj %  %  Mies m th" nute%  > m .i m id whether | nvlhlng is to them i>. not The ViUmini in the food yo< •at art not tlmiji m(f,n*i't A I ii lie Mil mite idded (. Sivouriet. Sou pi. Slaws snd vsrietr of S*ndhelp to make up lor ih> u*nsnc Mirm vtumm a. aanwual k &id mg up renttinte to d and pi'ticularlp good snO IMtf lor growing ihildrm Delicious oe hot buttered (out. MAR MITE rl l VITAMIN schooner myself." In 1923 he bought his first ttsbj years at the Westbury Gara;*e and it is on this background that he tells you. "In about %  year and a half hence when 1 tfet sufllcient money to buy an engine. I will put u m im1 PAIN'S I GOLF GLOVES Now obtainable at . %VM. I M. Alt I i IBDOS) I life. Dies, Aged In B.G. tween the two rhamlieig> On Page 7 Tl i mIns Has To Get A New Harbour -DR. CUMMINS THE Barbados labour Party held a Political Meeting at Wcichgreenient ma '' il "' s,i Thoma-. on WedneshmSmli i Nov. 1. i Mi 1' would tie able' to pay or contract with %  worker for any dav "' nl ln support of Dr. CumralC( M f roin to-day. The extra deduction fiom the wages to be mln, and Mr R G M^PPc*ndlcost ol living Iwnus as from Seppaid by the employer to th er 25 would also l>e paid worker, or for any payment to the "A" I* 1 "* us the Uibour Par y lo-day employer by the worker, for or in exists It stands to represent all respect of any line, or for bad or classes m 11-rbadi*,", 1): negligent work or for injury to mins told the electorate, the materials or other property Mr. E. Holder, who li offering of the employer save when su:h himself a>. a c.inrd slar.ed building his •chooner, people used to laugh at hold. Just over $11 000 Is needed him. He had started alone and for this department, however, and people used to say, he was a fool the Vestry had agreed to seek the io think he would ever aet it r^XiTO" iSr'T'S nC^kTafi SK K n over the dintcuU. ,.f (MUU B • IJ J* h '",, „,„, t J4.0O0 wilho.il nolni to the l*l"' !" a 5 •" " or,h I" inlrll Inture and I7.WM) in canh when ho martin pnovum the adoption of tho ''d hutldlng his bo*l. Vealry'B suggestion for bonus. Mr From the time I^jrd was a boy Mottley said that the way. and ****** he would some day inptni SooiVOsl'u^'l^^riwS. means for furnishing the money vest on a big scale and the fact i u bear the hoimm..),!.' Yi cWe\7ir M h. !" UC t\i'h Ved '"^ ie T,i,C H Lu -" !" l '" v r he m !" ii m Whlch 1 *>-" would o* the Cleorgeliwn Town CounIhe invest. His grandfatfier was a efl and was Mayor several tl "• (Isherman. u nd his fa he r %  shlpwright. He has a son who in now a seaman. He was bom at the Crane, St. Philip. The sea off the (,.„.! %  i rough, but at the age of five Lord had acquired the art of swimming Amriltlon* He does not know anythir" about mem (GEORGETOWN. IHi llofi'ble Francis Dlus. solicitor and veteran politlL.... died here on Wednesday ajvonlni at the age of 78. Oias was first elix-ted a member of the old Court of Policy and Inter on the I-nifclative Council, tu> served than 25 years and on retireonly for the Board to agree and they "I urn su 1 he said, Cumplover* will sppreelate Ihta." Mr Victor Chan said that he took VOTJ p*at pleasure In seconding Mr. Mottley s motion as he was well aware of the extreme pressure that the increased cost of them since 1024 Qvlnf was making on salaries of parochial employees He was sure olvad ih'ir money then it would go a great way ln helping them to balance their budget "I fed nurc" he said, parochial amplOrjess) would appreciate receiving money as promptly as we can pay It to them." pias was also a pcoaainanl turilte of the old dajs. owning the famous horses Takeallght and Atom. He i n*fld %  %  widow, two sons—Vivian, Crown Solicitor of B.C.. Prank, also a aaUettor, iwo daughters Mrs. Carlos Gomes, wife of the piombXG solicitc naviga ion. H* will have to embrother of the Trinidad Justice— ploy a captain But whenever his Gimes and Mrs Eric Kodngues wife of I.V Royal Bank of rumdad branch employee HEALING I schooner leaves these shores, he will be aboard it and in charge. He plans learning navigation so thai some day he will be able to that the rnptain hl s schooner. All that is wanted for the schooner now are (he two masts which he expects to reach here In n r ~ior a month's time and the sails. He already has the canvas for the sails and sr.II makers have Just begun to work on them. "I expect I will >ail from Barbados In about two month, time," he latter from Mr. who— have transformed Barbados," he Herbert H. Williams, Supervising (a) enten Into any agreement or said. Returning Officer for St. Michael contract or gives any re. In the forthcoming elections, the muneratior. for employment A few months ago they ha' Mr. commissioners decided io grant contrary to the provisions of Bradshaw of St. Kills with them, leave to memliers of their staff as Ihls Act or declared bv the He told them that he had Just rerequired by Mr. Williams for asprovisions of this Act to be turned from Europe .vhere he s iw gistlng in the carrying out of the Illegal; or more poverty than In Barbados, elections. (b, makes any deduction from In Spain little boys ran behind the wages of any worker or him begging. He did not see lha. receives any payment from ui Barbados. He w" g)*d any worker contrary to the that in Barbados the people lookprovisions or this Act; or ed happier. (c) contravenes the provisions of section fourteen of this Act: Ten Years Ago _„-. rnuui , n .r R r w.it h. it-1 i_ i HioiiMinn *n a THI'. ( OMMlhSIONr.rth were „ h i"^ to ^q^as,*<-*-K l^&EZZl&'SXXZ Thl SLFrro CALLS Ycsterd:iv before the -chooner vas lunched. Rev. Croshv saiH Rw Board further authorised prayers and asked God to send the Chairman of the Finance ComHown his blessing on lord's boat mittee to grant such leave to other He said, "Lord, I Rive it under members of the staff as may be vruare and protection and hope % %  ill be prosperous." required for bag conduct of the it i elections. The beam of the schooner feet and the dep'h H feet. Health to the amount of $704 50 fy" 1 paid as Customs duty on equipr £ om cnging of Bridgetown. anaon dollars children were not well clothed Section 17 am similarly treated "These conditions now existing in and this read:— Europe did exist in Barbados ten 17. (I) Every employer shall years ago," he said, keep a Register of wage payments He .'Jid that thOjr stood for i.nri workers accounts and every material and economic progress, worker shall lie entitled, on deFrom the fact that they got better mand. Io a copy of his account in wages for ^he workers who have Committee agreed i-ny pay-period. been able to get better clothes responsibility of provtdl (2) Every employer who con# 0 Pate 1 OoIfHo which called llhampton. England menl imported for use in the senvThe Golflto left port during th for Trinidad Mr C. K. Clarke was the only pasrs-nger THE BOARD were also informwho boarded the ship from B d that the Govertior-in-Executive badoe. >pt the The Gvlflto is consigned j comMessrs Wilkinson Haynes C unal baths at the Bay Estate. Ltd. CABIN TRUNKS A lovely new stock has just arrived. Reinforced in the centres 33 and 36 long 52142, $23.61, $37.17 REVELATION SUIT CASES $14.42 & $9.79 CAVE SHEPHERDS, CO., LTD. 10, 11, 12 & 13 Broad Street Assize courts and Magistrates Courts throughout the colony adjourned two minutes as a mark "' raapoel His body is lying in state at the Sacred Heart Church his funeral at 4.30 p.m this afternoon. The flags of all Government municipal IMUI'IIIIVare at half-mast. (UrllllAM) %  %  . %  IIAMIISO.YS BROAD STREET Crackers, Wheels, Flower I'ois i//ie Daxalg Iqulbl %  1 Jack in the Box, Devil Among tin Tailors, Jot Wheel Privet: 4c, gr :•) :K, MI. SIM, SI 44. SI.B2. $24. and |4JI \t Hi. St an SPARKLEItS 11. pk Ol LI II \K i IKS (Rod | Oresfl BED KEVll-S 3. each BOMBS 2v each CaH In and rnoki i :: BRUIT. W\ \llll lilll ill j LTll-HMd. A COOLING DELIGHT TO-DAY'S SPECIAL COCOANUT CRBAMS IHI UNDSRMSNTIONBD ITK.MS ARE (s %  rovp M ITS POTATO MCI H JPOTATO < HIPPER!! ( OOKS' sims Birrrn CHURNS UOMBSSK s< Hi g MEAT KflNCBSI BOILsMO STOVES KITCHEN KNIV'I 8 YV.V. TIMI.KS WOOD SPOONS STOVE MICA BBKAD TINS — 'KlIlilMll lillKAli TINS — Jiipnnnril 0VI N THBSMOMETEBS II I SHAVERS \l> KM\ I s METAL TOASTERS I \I'.\SM II II! \\ s WlHi: DISH COVERS RSfl IIK.ITI IIS PASTRY Kdl I IM; TINS KNIl I --II Mll'i \i R8 Bl IN SI.II;, us STIII. WOOL KITCHEN BPOOm MEASURING SPOONS iS.l.i DISH MOPS li IM. TUBES li IM; SVIUM.I s BTI \M COOKXR8 I l.i ', B| • 0OKEBS We also carry • lnrur a^snrlmnil of li Hiwsfic HUM in • EARTHENWABE, ALUMINIUM WARE. UN AM) L.NA'II LLED WARE AT .. in SON \III.I-: %  RICES. !!AI{RIS0NS ''aliftl in HARDWARE %  FOR BEST RESULTS USE PIHIV \ ciimvs IN THE C HECKER 0OA RU BAGS H. jason Jones & Co., Ltd —Disinbuio.. %  : 5 WW. A\WoWnV An ." THESE SAVE OrloSj 14 38.-. 3(. EVAPOBATEl) MILK CONDKNSED MI1JC IMPERIAL VIENNA SAURACI SPAGHETTI WITH CHEESE TOM SAUCE FIG SI-ONOE PUDUINt; SULTANA SPONGE PUDI S5c GINGER ,. . J5e. CTRRANT 35c MIXED PHttiT 8PONOE PUDI NO 35c || 30. 30c. 3". DOMINICA NAVEL OHXNGrS SLICED BACON i..-r It. SLICED DANISH HAM per Ih DANISH SALAMI S lb. CAMPBELL'S CONSOMME BO"P per Tn: ttoi'l.l N ; SOUTH AFRie NORWF.GIAN PI DUTCH STRAWI VIMT -per Tin APIE PE*NCT BUTTF1' pi fm SI 00 1 7 i n: So. Ofl 5e STAXSFELtM. SVOTT A CO. LTO. HOWMAJVY SCilEWS fiV O 1 JAB O WIN AN EKCO RADIO CUESS -COUPON WITH EVERY OVER $5.00 CASH BILL FROM NOVEMBER 1ST A. BARNES & CO.. LTD.



PAGE 1

FRIDAY. NOVFMRIR 2. 1931 BARBADOS ADVOCATF PAC.F SFVEN TtLIPMONC HOI CLASSI ED ADS.I P1BII< AIJ H ^ n a ^ M 'PieCorner' Inquiry Adjourned REAL ESTATE Barth*. Mi V >. Death*. Arki>o*>l%  JWiiiiiU and *n M.U* DMMM 11 •I on •.>•>• %  e*4 |l 1 OS, IKMTI lor Mr rumWr •' won't up I* M. and t ftnU per %  oerg oa mt-bri one} • ears I a per W("d Cn tumfax far —eg IM IM 14 NUIKIN NOTICE f * -H IH %  .! i.l OMI.I NOTIt 1. Office r.. The Paroel>.jl Tra-jeur 91 Cnric will be h. yl | u. \ %  II '1 Kl I .T. T.tr*0\ iif-MUt. I' D II A JuHNSON NOTICE Ihr klaater nor tha agent* %  MACUAN Till b* m*M>Mble far *n det.t at d.-til. oy mT ntoarjoee OT MMUMffV 1-HiCrTTE. 31 10 || m i o SASJjj %  HMaiarn (Mrf mil T| CM M (Ml Sh"*Wg* 14 leoxL* — • wo'df ) earn* • IM won* a* **.•*,.. AUTOMOTIVE Morn. Minor Saloon m %  •uml si.sss I Ba r fS** Pnniif UH ("II IMn CM UMft IM ...mil .or. Dial MM. itna Matti own. niUea. a>e.fr.-l -i H %  h CAR IHI otroe* Almo*t ne*.l.SS* n.ilea OWIMT leavinc Ih* ..land Wriie Bos H.H ( o Advocate %  4 M M —I I n Mrr* m working Appl> Manx* II 10 91—Ti %  UBcnuuu. A-i .-Mli > IS M Jn liAlHi. (i r C IS-Lib* modal overhauled Barelnc Sale, and Sank* I i.l liH.. airs. Ti :• 11 5| Tub*, in goM II Itj Sl-Jn ia-RATOK One |i Wmini'Miiiw Refrigerator worklna order Appi> r t I'niieri Factory. St. Jama*. NOTICE l-AStOH OF ST JAMES The returning Officer roc lbs tl ssUo n .l Sleii.tirr* to serve in in* Uni.i AaaMivbl.'. tor Ihc "oruvh ol St Jam** ha* eelablUhed hla OfAc* al Sandvlanr %  MMn -XT** toir. b*t| i SF.AIXD TFNnERa, IIBI V... loan of .11 K< II %  kill m '* u. thoi%  I.I by ll, loan Art ISSI. | I repaid in ten sjtfi W **eh tg> thcr —itli %  ...tng du* i October Jfttb ISM Ce.tUVr.I.. tli BS .. '. d in mill* ol • n i .i WOOD UODDABT), Clerk ot the Veatry. %  r ii m 4a NOTICE l-AKIMI III ST "III I tierrbi live i-nllif thai I hate e*labll*hed m> IHTW al "Pleaaanl Hall Plantation. SI Peter Offkv W*4n*ida>* and Thursday. Ironi IH C A H ION. Returning omcer. ( %  ...-.. %  i • % %  i.-i-. II al -*n I.OIST k iOI.MI LOST CAT-Oiw 111 bliu-d % %  -own Prr-lni CM p.nerm Hill. M MM h. oultably rewards*!. NAi.r. TUKI r .. Mill b. rewardrd on retuimnR m AMhur Uillr.u. Reed Bin I II ai In sWF.F.I'StTAKIt TiCKCT-Sen— KK 0551 PltMl ITS *ine tB Colerldte ledir Wn.tt...r v Road 3 II SI—In. r m rfei I rl.1*t>T*.!'. etoOSni Havne I < Tinder will be rei II SI—Jn iviim: HiilUlins. HAH i M HOAM lleniamin. Plantallum nil. 31H I. 1 II SI In TO Bl'Y STAMPS WANTEIl STAMPS All Kind of SIAMPf at the CAKIBBEAN STAMP HOCIETV No. 10. Swan Street MECHANICAL TYPEWHITFR %  TW •• rsM Holder Bio. Sw MISCELLANEOUS PtUNE CHINA Hnvnl ..d.hue -Shi Bayley of Bollon Lane *n Derb< I4HMI L 10 SI—Jn llOAHDfl Two lare wooden adveriuins Sinn Board! Approximately ft %  II fl Purchairr mu.l remove eame. One Sisn Board I. located at "Welchri St Michael -Uie other at fnepa.-Uon on application to the Manajp Sale murt. at I JB a m on ktonla>. ftl November at Mount Willon D ft Simpaon Si Co. 1 II Bl-*i t "l"\ •i K... i, %  1.U1 bedr. m half Dtadssj — — — • — % %  % %  • % %  iwu iviiy tilej Tolleta and Hath.. ith Hot Water Modem Kitchen Outaide I Car Osrss*. %  arvanbj' Rooin, Children %  Ptav KOOK TSw) Oarden> are well lam ouL bawlns T>ir ilHive PNBSfl .hed if M •••dm IM IfOn.,, •tc Phone tStT I,.-.r, -..,-..i KOSTIIt IliiHN Situated al Tap Rock having 1 be<1l.-.f ll'i .Mi.-n 11 I.,. %  '.. % %  .1 SMBS LarsaUlcofwhaving a vie. to the Bra Lounge D.n.ng Boom. Modern Kilohen OnUlde 1 Ca. Uar.fle. 1 Ralph Board Phone Wlo II. SI liicludmg s—rag pent. fol run. SiKer Saudi He> Apply: Claike < at Ineh Mae law eh. conalaling of I a.re land, a new limber I -.. lot large car. alack h RoaoonabU SstSl l tlie prrrnlra I II SI 3.i THE l-NTfOtSIUNEfj will offer for Sale %  t Public conapetlllon at their offlo. No IJ IIIBh Street. BrMgetown. Ot. Fn-lay the Sad da, of Novembrr ISSI, al ) p ra. The Twoiloried bwrllirghouae SJ1BOJW a. COMSTON" with the land whereon ihe ii"i' lUndi and thereto belonging, contain.ug by admeasurement I.W aq fe*l or Iherrabnutt. ulu-ile al IOth Avenue B-lleMlle. St Michael lt^,(t.n by appointment lth Mr* L L Toppin. Sth Avenue. Dial FT* For further particular* and condition* of Hale. SJSS1 M COTTIJ:. CATTORI1 J> CO M 10 SIt I n. -tiKN The underiigned 111 offer for Sale at Public Competition % %  their gssss. US IT. Hifh Mien IliiUi't.iwi TMfSday the atn day of Not ember. ISSI al 3 The Cottage k..." lb* st... %  ffJOffW cl-dr. g Drawing and Dti -..,,. .f.niiieiU 3i witn invenHnre*. and the lai -t.„l. containing J.SI0 hlrh la fully encloaed b RMI US) %  ". BM ti: ". General Trader* Ltd For condition* of Sale, apply to— i-trrnx. CATFORD & Co. Jl 10 Si-Si, -| all model on AUCTION LADIES COTTON •oft a* Mlh. light welghl eool and roanfort. EngUah make, a m cenU each Klrpalani. H fth Stran I il Si Pan—Towe re l -a Urn atiBBtfl at i ..|uit AitT r* Companj. Trafa.gar Street Phone a to si—if UNDER Mil SILVER HAMMER ON TUESDAY. Bli iv .„g r ,.f Mr* A C, Johnaon we will *ell the Furniture at -Dunklr*". St M-tthla. Oap which inclodaa Dining Table. Pedoalal liOcpoard. Chef VESTS—Auperfli-.i' I fouler. Couch. Rorarra, In Mahogany, OB* Chair* .Leatherette Se.u>. China CablneU. Cedar Uncn ITea*. Picturn Screen*. Congoleum, Bonk-ahelve* Revoivinn OfSc, t-han. BTBBS Jardlnterea. *JC Verandah Chair*. Double Htmmona and Iron Beditead* altl. Spring*, good Mahog Mird Pre**. Carpel. 1-rdrf-. Kilrhcn Table*. snclv,i..t .HefilBeratoi %  Cabinet; Cool and Oil Stove*; Kitchen Elec Iron: Cow Shed, with ...l 1 Mhei BRANKl.tt TROTMAN Auctioneers BADOL IJ-^i WASH POWDERS. %  enuring InfUmmatlnn raiiaed by sprain* Brunei. II box Knight. LidI II SI-In WARE About the rrllnit .mil plated LmiU I. Du vie • II MIA >: % %  Mock or i Larbnrt.H Lane SADDIJ; One Riding .add!In perfect condition Apply P D Maynard, PutMr* Factory. St Jama*. Dial it n II r.i fs TANKS Thirteen T'nki in 4ft S.mpann A Co %  Galv Ste* Appl> D M S II Sl-4n opened SBat per *rd In all coloura Broadway Pn BJ %  ssp > II II %  The %  MOULT OftATER: Thl. grater 1* realif greal lor grating Cheeaa I .-ml. Il.rtl l->ilrO Ea-it* B Crumb* etc -II I* Safe, Quick end gienlc Onlv SI cent* each Obtainable ml. Irom IIARFJSON'S Hardware Store. Broad Street I II SI 3n 4.'AS I tlOKIHS ALL MLB i i.Ill .'.! i|>] I'IIII rder TODAY D WARM CLOTHtnO to SI boj/ *—IS year* Two Flant-1 SulU Lon Crou*er*i. Shoe*. Pylama*. Halaeoal rtle Box LC • o Advocate I II II—In TO-DAVS NEWSJIASH STOP \lt III %  12.01 'KIKN/.M. The Best made. at JOHNSONS STATIONERY PRESS BI'TTONS Fitted to soar Bsg or Purse •Mill l YOV WAIT. JOHNSON S HARinVAKK ,-.',-e*e'e'-*e-^'e'e-*-e*Ve'*->'*'e'*V^. LIQUOR LICENSE NOTICE The application of Oo I bourne Sandi* lord, 'hopkecper of Hillal.v St. Andrew. holder of Liquor Llcenee No i; of IHI. Erantrd to him in reaper! nf board %  lii'*-1e *hop attached lo a houae al ItillabA. St Andrew, lor pennUMon lo u*r the *ald Liquor Ueeiiae at aatd pretnb** a few yard* away, lllllaby. fbl Andrew Dated IhU JSril d-> of October, ISSI To J R EDWARDS. Eaq Police MagMtiBte. DIM ~r GOUUtOCRNE SANDIFORD. Appllaant N B Thi* application will be> eonrldered al a Licensing Court lo bo held Police Court, Dulrlct "P" on Tuesday. 0th du. of November ISSI. al II IM IISOVAI ..nil. ih M i by I LUDHR cuvf WOOD iRgg Wlll'hliei OT anyone ela except b> rl s w od by >n* CLIFTON YEAKWiail) SffTI Hill. SI Michael I II SI aVi *e public are hereby wa'iiei giving credit lo m. wile WATERMAN nee HFADI-EYnot hold mytelf mpoiulble fo IIIAT.F WATRRMAN Pin* DeveMiplns Area. Si Michael w\Mi;i HELP Baibado* Company requires real Br* rlii** S-rrrtarv Very l.l.l. .tandard lr Shorthand and Typewriting I. eeaenlla togrther with Biifhcient operlenre ane ability to control an oflVe and if MOSS*ary Interview ctienU High Salnn %  pan ipplicanl Apply with Teati i. C C c -o Advocate Co I II St In Mi § I FURNISH TO-DAY •; Chrittip at %  • on thr Way. BS JP Ilia - -heato|.Drav.tr.. Co and amaller DreMing %  dataeda In I CradLea t m KtU-hen an many ahape* ana *i*aa Cab*e*tl UfSxSfS, STl %  T..i. and Kutb > Rrlll aal Mirror. In pa • II x • and 14 10. I: '•"• *• lI II • l S up-Big aalraa.ee -*lrr... Si a IB. 11 . 41 x IS 'I so Ltd Bay r our Office At men appl F.*Ulrl A, Tradli TYPIST O—1 Shorthand TyptM C near Broad Street, full-time Salary Ii aceordaiHe -llh >.| W lnlili.. 11. i.n W R> Q to Advocate Advt Omc I 11.11—J .4 Acir Harlfoifr •Dk. CUMMIHS d> I rum rage i. ,>jir .liclr aja ahowM %  L>-*p \\.,i.-, Harbour Continuing on the work of ihe Union, he sard that their job was to get production 1KIU or buck pjy tor the workers. "Aiiouiei aspect of the Sugar Agreement Is •he Harbour Fund. Barbados hi to get a new Harbour. Sugar l being %  rupped in bulk In oii'm placvs. Bags are expei He pointed oul thai purchagers were looking io buy sugar from the cheapest source* if Barbados did not fall in line It would mean tha: the sugar would have to remain in the warehouse where it would be of no use to anyone Hi Mid thai when the back pay was distributed, he was told by s clerk HI the City that his store hod sold out all the oil -loves except one He ws* very plea**.lo baar ttkH He asked them to have compseta KaDatoace u> thi p wc nmk* a mi., akr. come to u* and tell us. If there is aDythln| that has done you harm we <|ui nut deliberately LnfjajaJ n to karu VI 111 The Fillurc Bfl of the future, be said thai he could only tell them thai the Party would eveiwork m Ihtli interest. "Tu know these arc funny days, days In which von rnnnot T1 ,..ke gnj pn WaVasvrVa* gag m.y .|<> ..t WBtteVW %  My siiv i* in your mleresl We hope to start social services. We are opening a Ifatatatty Clinic In Speigiiistown nest year, and we ask you to have ,1. | confidence In us and with God's help. W e cannot f.iil." Mr. Mapp said lhat the Labour Party wns a democratic one. They nlwavs thrashed out thingon Monduv nights. He said that the %  moatR' oulil I fl •Utte-i I %  .. %  hi ,! %  | poiitu.i Tgorh Ban because men' minds >aid. %  .in i ha r nnished. 'p always S^'a Rock ^er • Flam page 4 pUDjCBafOn rollln' bout de roast But. man whs nh sayin'? Ah cnt properly wake up outa dat dream. Dig tsUnd is da wurl an' km hold evorybody so long as frays in da sea. When ne Lawd see we multiply so fast he kin chan-. %  Into penguin dni will eat frays an' guano will tek de place uv sugar—soon we goln' hw h* d tree top like birds any way." By this lime, a squad of female, fr.iv vendors had descended on uid it Boon vanished, money jingled In his pocket and he had enough fm in ny square meals. Joe Cordle was indeed hit happy and contented self again. However, we must thank his gloomy spell, followed I i I.I tic draan f"t mai 11 I economic wBttoni THK inquiry into Ihe clrci i rounding ihe death uf Arthjr Greaves of Pie Corn-i who died on his way i. %  %  20 Kiitinued before Coroner M" C 1. W.IIWMI ..I ihe Hutri.t 'A' Court ycst.d.ix !i g/M HjiHirnrd until 2 oVI.ick today. Foi ty.elghl-yrar-.ld Adriana Gieavea, muther nf Arthur Greaves, said that she last saw her son alive on Saturday nigtil, Octo) er 20. at about 7.00 p.m. On Wednesday. October 17. he lame horn* coniplamlng of tenible pains in hi* stomach and head she soaked his head with Umacol He lefusssd %  > eal anything;. rh. following moining, Thura'i-out 6 00 a.m., he was still oiiii|Uaiiiiii K „f ihe pains, but he ,. n i |fj hb woik at Hope a. He aajaln did not esi As usual hr gave him eight cents to buy his breakfast, but Inreturned home with this. At about 5.00 p.m.. she saw him lying on the bed. He was in a (touching position and complaining of pains. She once more used Umacol on his head and she BsBaad him if he had anything to eat at his work. He uplicd that he did not. Man Anointed On the Friday morning she %  cord around his waist He was sun complaining ol severe pains, she asked him what %  pag in.meaning of the cord and he told hoi that a woman hud UMatBtad him with salt and kerosene oil. He did not go to work on that day. She said that her son spent i icstless Friday night On lb. BMtVdft* morning she awoke him .it about 7.00 a.m.. and gave him %  i dose of castor oil. He brought back up some of this, along with %  i clot of blood. He was now very weak She gave him nothing to eat i ut he constantly called for water. He again vomited bL.od at %  bout A p.m„ on the Sauuday decided t Like him dort r. Ai t about 7.00 p.m.. on the Saturday she took him to Dr. Clarka at St Peter. She saJzl Dr. Clarke examined and ordered her to Use him to tha General Hospital rlglil%  iw.iy She l.-ft with Arthur fot the Hospital, but he riled on the way, At the time she was holding him In her arms. She went to tb* t'ifbllr Mortuary on the Sundav und identified the body to the doctor. Vloh-t Greaves, sister of Arthitr Greaves. corroborated the evidence of himother, Adriana, DUTCH HOUSE APPROVE SCHUMAN IRON, STEEL PLAN lllh rJAOVa*, Oct. 31. i of the ..me the urst n'ltlonal l*jgisUliva house in fcurupe to ar-provg the Scliuman t"-teel. Tho vote was 62 to six with tml> ihc Coiumunists voting Liu Fii*i Chamber will catsaider the Schuman Pi %  |g ihc lower and must important house of nil li.'.mci.i t'-PPLY nd she io the DRIVING WITHOUT APPROPRIATE LICENCE A FINE of 30-was imposed on U>!e Corbln of St. Thomas by Mr. E A. MCIANXI who found him guilt* o driving the motor eat T--ftl* along Roebuck S: Mlthi I. on July 21 wlthoiu m, 14 licence. kl i<. I>c paid in 14 days default one n..itli | |m|UaS> CHANGES IN BILL REJECTED g) From 1'age 5 session was nearly closed and %  they could see their wBj 10 M that important legislation on the BtatUta K<>ok they should try to do so. The Hon. the Colonial Secretary moved that the Council pas* message to the Other Place ating thai they had withdrawn • inlimiii to section 2 of the hill but Insisted on the other nendmenlH made l>y them This was passed on a 5—4 division as follows:— Ayes:—Hon'b.cs F. E. Field. K. R. Hunte. Dr. A. S. Cato, V. C Gale and the Colonial Betl (5). Naeai-llon'bles R. CTuillenoi i)r n (; Massiah. %¡ ii Evelyn Mrs. M". Ilanschell—<4). RATES OF EXCHANGE Pr ;rtsDAY. Novr.uiir-K NADA ilneiudlng Newfoundland! Cheou-p. on Banker. U %  ', pr IV ma nd Draft* S3 SB'-, pr RlSltt D..IU n J-. pr 'able Hi r. Sinedl-yi in tin %  Soup M %  Vegetable WAfflOBg k*s 'WVWWWl ra^*r-r-a STOMACH upsets When the itoniach is upset as a trsiilt of hyperacidity, a dose of De Wilt'* Antacid Powder will diipeitc thr wain and distress right sway Flatulence, h-artbutn and indigestion are ome of the 1 symptom* that this race** of i acid in the %  tomach can bring in its train De Witt* Antacid Powder soon neutralises Ihe i and and al the ame Unie b other ingredients in the wellbalanced formula soothe and protect the debeste stotnach lining Cet a supply right ANTACID POWDER dossiCri Salt earn of Tomato in tins Ulackwell n BoU Table -. Etl.ill Ci Powder In BoU. Crosse & Bloekwell Marrowfat Peas In Tins Nestle's Milo Tonic Food In Uni • % %  Nespray Powdered Milk in tins K -. Plum Jam In tins— Toad FieQuality I i L 4 s Selaat Powdereil Milk in tins Itfiti. of Anchovy Paste i Ting of Three Bay Tomato Juice Tins of Farrow's Fresh Garfagfl Paag Tins of Sasso Olive OU L ft S. > Tins ot Liquid Stove Polish I I'kg of Fab Soap Suds PAA ln|ev the hosp.tality comfort and thoughtful service which have made FAA "first chelce" of veteran travelers tho world over. NEW YORK VIM San Juan or In ...line, lnig airlines frost Miami. Reduced lS-dsy. %  '"nd any. I'. ni.ion Fares now la "ffeet from San Juan. All PAA /liuhfi lo AeuYork nou< land df fdleicild Airp..ri instead of La Guordta Field. MIAMI Daily lights-non ilnn srv1c tram San lusn. Spe^Ul 15-Day Round I %  -1 I • %  •*•> %  r.i 11 i now In effect ST. CHOIX ST. THOMAS 1 rniueiil Mighl ivpe caipi-cr-. Hire llmea t iwlft ConrssrnveiileTil deparYou ran now "lly PAA" Is KIIHOPK, SOUTH AMERICA, AFRICA. MEXICO, the FAR FAST-la fart, completely srotind the world For 23 years the leading international airline—PAA was first to link the Americas by air, first to fly to all %  %  continents. For rrirmiftonf, **e your Tim W Agent or SHIPPING NOTICES Canadian \alional SteamshipH SOtlTSDWITHD -CAN < KUkSXMCAN %  llAlOJINGrR' 'WHY HODMBTV CAN CUNSTRIIITOR%  I.ADV SriSON *' 'i >.n. Arrl>r< ••Me* Rarkaa.. 1 N*v S Nov SD,. 10 No* St No* S Dee IS Dee %  a -M """ Arrlrei £ZZ IADY NKLatrm >• %  • i-d* IMPORTANT NOTICE L. S. WILSON SPIIY ST. DIAL I0C9 To Mothers who cannot feed their babies Don', worry %  Cow'imilk can be prepared > lh>l the youngeil bby can digl it without trouble. The addition of Robinson\ 'Patent' Barley prevent, the milk farming large cloli in baby ttomachs, making il caay for the delicate digestive organ, to do their work thoroughly whilst getting them ready to digest heavier foods later in life.That's why wie nurses and mother! always uic Robinion'. 'Patent' Barley. m ROBINSON'S • Paris*' BARLEY i Any clotheleft at Ihe followini' Sanitary I-mull ry Depots before December 31ft, !9W, will be sold. In future, any laundry or dry clean.np, not redeemed after three nun ih i will be sold. < '•iimlry KoatJ M.HII.II I). p..| Aquatic Depot St, I ; wrenri GARDINER AUSTIN & CO., LTD.-A f ertU. ROYAL NETHERLANDS STEAMSHIP CO. • tlttNll FROM I HtlIRA ISlh < AOAMSMNON niiNtnu. .1 I in i. -il I i\ SN •IfllM, TO PI.1 i-ll> I v. II I I '1I >i> (<>I III I I HIIMIII Ml INIi Ii The M V SIONCKA -III acepl Cargo and Paaarngei* faa i %  a. Antigua. Monl.erral. Nevl. and St Kilt* Date of Sailing mil be Notified The M V CABuBSaTJI *vill accept CaiBo ana Haaaeneera. PM mntnlca. Antigua, SS-raJaarrat. Neil and St Kitu Balling Saturda> Ird nut fas M V DAERWOOO will and Paaaengee* .U for Rt Vln He -I Sailing to be NirUSTHOONKB OWNUtS' ASSOCIATIOR l INC Teieplu.no No eSII FRENCH LINE (ir tile Transatlanliqur Sailings to ENGLAND A FRANCE %  i;.\s. SOOmr November 3rd. 1951. via St Lucia. Mariini.nie. Guadaloupe and Antigua ccaxnaa Mtn -Novesnber, IM1, vi.. M ; ir!inique and GuadagsNlin "I I III'... I Ml COLOMHIE ISth November. IBS], calling at Trinidad. La Guaira. Curacao. Cartagena. % %  Accepting I'ussengers, Cargo and Mall. Brighten Up For Xmas We have a wide range of PAINTS-ENAMELS VARNISHES T. HERBERT Ltd. I .UMI.Iiril HM Ineorporated IK* ii initial t K sTK.irr PAN AMERICAN HfUtl/f UXHAiS l.ifnSTA A 00a l.TI. Rroarl Street — Brlrlgeton 'Phone Hit. .After Ha*lne Hours 2103) BEARD & GREIG INI All: MHOKI IIS lluvo movrd lo Prince Willinm Henry Slrrel Proprietor: Mil R. WILSON, all enqtiiriess nhould he nHHres^ed lo him Ihcre. — Jl GOLF SHOES Brown & Hrown & %  While with spikes W1H. FtM. All I V ( B Dost LTD. NOTICE OlhSl SlOnUKfl %  •'iB.BI f BM • for me *Bf'roeirtomB ) No oitlr ptrdrl furry i few 1 • •ror-MrHiel Da WITT'S etsts-ONvM ANTACID • • (.. M aieg TABLETS • SfBiasrg lag ?• TesVeti %  fconon-F St* 60 1b>'L and Shidei PLASTIC for Curtains are our recent shipm CLOTH ply OOROEOUS. Passengers holding reservations on or after 31st October 1951, are kindly asked to contact our Office regarding time and days of departure of their flights due to change of schedule. BRITISH WEST INDIAN AIRWAYS LTD. Lower Broad St. — Phone 4585 "i Come. .las'. A Look tor Ynurtrlf. IHI CI. XIII 11. IMI'OKII M il Cur BROAD a i 1 I.in: HTRrtlTH I BUY A BETTER SHIRT FOR LESS MONEY &f RELIANCE SHIRT DEPOT PJmeito Street Phone 4764 Obtainable at all Leading Stores -V.'.','.'.'.V1^.V.'.'.'.'.'.'.^^*''-'. HOUSE SPOTS RENDEZVOUS HILL AVERAGE AREA 60 x 80 AND PRICED $1,000 to $1,700 A. BARNES & Co.. Ltd.