Citation
The Barbados advocate

Material Information

Title:
The Barbados advocate
Uniform Title:
Barbados advocate (Bridgetown, Barbados : 1983)
Portion of title:
Sunday advocate
Place of Publication:
Bridgetown Barbados
Bridgetown, Barbados
Publisher:
Advocate Co.
Publication Date:
Frequency:
Daily
regular
Language:
English

Subjects

Subjects / Keywords:
Newspapers -- Bridgetown (Barbados) ( lcsh )
Genre:
newspaper ( sobekcm )
Spatial Coverage:
Barbados -- Bridgetown

Notes

Dates or Sequential Designation:
Apr. 22, 1983-
Numbering Peculiarities:
No issue published for May 3, 1983.
General Note:
On Sunday published as: Sunday advocate.
General Note:
Microfilm produced before 1988 may be substandard.
General Note:
Latest issue consulted: Feb. 28, 2005.

Record Information

Source Institution:
University of Florida
Holding Location:
University of Florida
Rights Management:
Copyright Advocate Co.. Permission granted to University of Florida to digitize and display this item for non-profit research and educational purposes. Any reuse of this item in excess of fair use or other copyright exemptions requires permission of the copyright holder.
Resource Identifier:
17931718 ( OCLC )
sn 88063345 ( LCCN )
Classification:
Newspaper ( lcc )

Related Items

Preceded by:
Advocate-news (Bridgetown, Barbados)

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.K. TROOPS SEIZE|

PRICE: FIVE CENTS



THURS@"'Y, NOVEMBER 1, 1951
RIFLE FI
m »* a























>]
a aly . :
~Gharchill Has 9
More Ministers

LONDON, Oct. 31.
Winston Churchill completed the formation ef his Consery-

a ad

ool



BRIDGE IN SUEZ



‘ : ative Government before meeting Britain’s new House of ;
’ . | Commons for its critical and historic séssion. The appoimt-*
syp lan c oOo e Ss ve ment of nine key Churchill aides was made from the Prime

Minister's official residence, as the Commons met in an or-
ganizational prelude to the formal opening next Thursday,
Churchill appointed his son-in-law, Duncan Sandys, to head
the vital Ministry of Supply, responsible for ra
| weapons for re-armament end Britain’s atomic ene ‘O-

gramme. ie ‘his ‘ “
wuse of Commons today tor the} Churchill Wall
Fight To The Last

House of Commons today for the
first time as Leader with a direct
mandate from the people. He was
elected to office last Tuesday, but
his Premiership in wartime came TO HOLD SURZ
by appointment when the fall of
By LYLE C. WILSON
LUN DOW, ce 31
Prime Minister Winston Cuut-
chill wilt fight to the last Brush
Toramy to nold the Suex Canal

!
| France in 1940 brought the resig
|nation of Neville Chamberlain.
one
‘{if fight he must. But Churegill

U.N. Forces
From Hills

EIGHTH ARMY, Headquarters,
Korea, October, 31,
Red troops drove United Nations
sonces off Pao: ia ea
umsong in a ati
and the Allies tried vainly ail
day to recapture them, The. Reds
attacked with machine guns and
other small arms under cover of
darkness after a mortar barrege.
United Nations units held firm
for 55 minutes, then fell back to
stronger positions. At dawn the

Also Taken Over

CAIRO, Egypt, Oct. 31.
A British Army spokesman said today British troops have
seized the road and rail bridge outside Port Said at the
Mediterranean end of the Suez Canal and are operating it
without interference or trouble.

@ was seized yesterday by the Cheshire Regiment

patrol after Egyptian authorities refused to keep it open
more than 50 minutes every day.
The spokesman said Britons also seized the Egyptian Gov-
ernment Girls’ School at Ismailia for use 2s a school for
British servicemen’s children.
The seizure followed the





F mathematically. His party
r rs holds an 18 seat majority in
poy 4 Commons, One more seat is to

tian closure of all British Sans , '
nited States Army Infantryman fires a 75 mm. recoilless rifle

Re ns

His mandate is a small
no
| filled. It is certain to be a Labor




Li the frout line in Korea &







: : hopes for a compromise sae 4
private schools in Ismailia. spokesman said there were | Allies counterattacked. The attack oa against an jseat, and will cut his majority sharing e " pampousitaie RHE %
no other incidents.in the Canal area from which Egypt continued: all day, bes Commmancist) See eee CO ae at. Canal operation,

mortar





STAND mii teers

and machine-gun fire
threw back every thrust.

Blunt Spearheads

The Reds are believed to be
trying to blunt the Allied spear-
heads reaching out towards Kum-
song, their former central front
bastion in No Man’s Land, 29
miles north of the 38th Parallel.
Both sides are fighting to keep
the other from occupying the
rugged island city, A United
Nations tank patrol stabbed into’
Kumsong itself on reconnaissance.
An infantry patrol earlier, had re-

seeks to oust British troops
Press reports said the Cham-*.
ber of Maritime Navigation at
Port Said had decided to boycott
all British shipping at the por
on the grounds that British ves-
sels are violating Egyptian laws.
In an attempt to stem resigna-
tions by Egyptian workers from |
prin 3 ‘ Se British

offic nelu a special appeal ;
in today’s Princess Elizabeth and the Duke
y’s pay packets. of Edinburgh arrived here at

“We know many of you have] 8.57 GMT for their first visit to
been ordered to leave after draw-|the United States as guests of

guarding the waterway.
PRINCESS
ARRIVES IN
WASHINGTON

WASHINGTON, Oct. 31.

The United States, Franee, the
Midd'e Eastern nations and merme-
bers of the British Commonwealth
wouki comprise the ;Canalguar-
dianship. That would give Egypt!
a shire in the Canal control, but
the Egyptians have rejected the
idea

Churchill is an Empire man;
he will pull the United States as
far as he can in support of an
empire around the world. He
may find some resistance to that
in the United States, which balks

3L Majority
But his working majority ’
most issues, counting the support
of six Liberals and the absence of
2 Irish Nationalists will be 31,
That is enough to do most of the
things that Churchill plans. As

* 0
members of the new House assem-

n’s |
Body Goes
; : |
ei j bled, Churchill! was well on hi:
To isbon way to establishing his new Gov-
lt L ;

ernment and meeting Britain's
toughest pending problems—Iran

VERSAILLES, Oct. 31.
The remains of former Queen














































TITO WILL
WITH U.S. AND WEST

BELGRADE, Oct. 31.
MARSHAL TITO told his first Press Conference in two
years that the militarily strong Yugoslavia is ready to
stand alongside the United States and the West, should
Russia attack. He said that with the United States arms



'





and Egypt.
All of the Cabinet members have






































. , . sen | been named. A r infantry divi- [2% imperialism in any ferm
fave’ been) teeter ag 70a] Premident snd Mrs. ‘Truman. {Posies Gane.cr three Communists] aid, Yugoslavia was realy and prepasted to natch ite AMM |tsmem. to. Drew or tomaecanplacmiwgn aispicned yesterday tc} ‘The whole oi. Sritie douetes
Commander tape teenie Sir} and rs roan Pane ante them. ‘ and Albania in building a strong military machine to {after religious services at the | life line, the Suez Canal, is threa'-| Empire”. This hardening will be
George Erskine said. “Before you] About 2,000 unomelal epiinann Allied officers estimated that} “defend the peace.” Cathedral here. Later the Queen's/ened by the Egyptians. Churchill's} felt quickly in the Suez. The
leave British employment it would}held back by a cordon of troops | United Nations troops killed 126 “® Tito said; “The Yugoslavia ae abe soda —— * Edobon) deure et rae ee behead Urea! aid. ipa a ac, lem confronting
be well to reflect that the British} with fixed bayonets cheered ag ee ag ye aoe sae aes 309 Army helped not only America but Ee erant ee en pene thee aioe ee wal = he ery ss lament ig there. The
have always dealt with you| the Royal couple and the ‘Trumans| °thers, in fighting below Kumsong also all countries in Europe which coe BT eee ee neat daar Mia tie oe eter Barb MR pabag omens mace
aria ‘Wash aeee sz "2 y od for Blair House where 2°? Tuesday, An Eighth Army i wished to develop equally.” As a She died at her chateau last vreeik | the Seen the time this Pay rightly rolled, the Inhapire’s life
; aa r cs communique reported only patrol Divas 2 fat the age of 86, | liament rises for its Christmas re-]line. Churchill! will net give it
—CP. & UP. {state dinner and reception are tivity f th i result America now has a friendly Ha’ * Th Iniversity|cess, the final arrangements wi!!|up. He will seek Empir id t
scheduled for Wednesday night. th ivity from the remainder of country on her side, on which she Bei dae, WO EG SESE LY ie an tie Gantocerice Peta. | seek Erapisenese “tO
e 135-mile Korean front, I students Federation scheduled a| have been made for the conferen hold it if necessary. “Afid Chur-
can count if aggression should i between Churchill ; Peamar: tok . emnaci
e The Royal couple attended their —U.P. break out, “This is an important |'™435 rally tonight where they will ween. turchill and Truma chill is expected to seek a firmer
on ews reception here less than two ifact which should not be forgot- demand ‘the Cuban Government| Which may bring up the question [alliance with the United States
_—s re ba arrival from R ten” . protest before U.N, for the| of a meeting with Stalin - be a anc throlghout. the
. 4 nada. e Prineess accom- ds Mak . “flagrant violation of human} Churchill was given a tremen- Oe BAST.
i ear Free ey oo ae © e one oer, oe oa ll rights and fundamental liberties|qous ovation in the House, even UF.
; ed ee om 2 Dian Fain ; é, “jon the part of military dictator-| {hough he almost sat in the wron % omni
House to the Statler, a hotel ew se- re Preteen ieee: ships” in Venezuela | neat
few i) He said tha 1 ; \ saat, # *
MENA, Oct. 31. teen tien ts Wake we “does actualy Dae tone West Virginia:—Twelve miners! Then the Conservatives imme- Russian ‘New Times’
cwed Tine’? ylign clawed and} Press Radio and Photographers Pr osal jever, he said that there appeared| Wee ‘Tapped and four others diately yot into a row with the $
chown = year = old. Maria| oresnimtins. op BE on ton rus toritataate danave, We sai escaped when an explosion ripped | defeated Socialist opponents over Attacks Kirk
Lauiz to death at.a circus last A! that war could best be prevented through a mine of the Truax-| the selection of a new Speaker,
night, upte the laugh- Princess Elizabeth wearing a MUNSAN, Korea, Oct. 31. ‘| by strength. Traer Coal Company along Cabin| W. §. Morrison was. elected MOSCOW, Oct. 31.
fur cape over a green bro-| Communist truce negotiators to- (2) Yugoslavia needs heavy | “Tek near here, Speaker 318 to 251 in the first vole} The Soviet publication New
show dro . out idee ak dress first from the|day proposed a new cease fire armament, including artillery, + — High ranking! of the new Commons. Times described U.S. Ambassa-
Several - who final; car. Povip wearing ble gold pume zone ivhich they said is]. us Rent sactk Fret Wwe toe aee Waweld Eomueh and IndonChinese digni- | T.U.C. Denial dew Alin: Gi Klek-ae <.nimaenie ae
ae ae Rastonial beast out of the car followed by ext| based line in eres “9 oposal O.B.E., Leader of the Opposi. | States. J ; tn ca 7 "Was > Meanwhile fhe powerrel 8,000,-fand slanderer who violated the
Maria approached ona lion, | President’s daughter. Paul Wooton| was submitted at the aheinoe tion in the House of Assembly, || (3) Tito condemned the Five Raymond, the 44-year-old French 000 strong Trades Union Congress | vlementary principles of diplo-
’

chained near the ring area where| Chairman of the Washington Cor-| session of the Truce Sub-Commit- was among the passengers who rejected charges that the unions | matie conduct”.



| Power Conference proposed by the
|



























, re Commissioner stabbed to death on} planned ides stri t
other, bls cats were being DFOd-'mhe' Princess. with a firm ‘and: "A United “Netions communigue|| ay moming by te BA Gel. | ling te United Nations. mee” [Monday by 8 political assassin |Gemomstrate. their opposition to |The publieation bitterly attack
‘ s wistiess 8. . eneral De Lattre De Tassigny,|¢@ ’ i ed Kirk for a speech he made i
s goes he pe aia aie shake and a brief speech of wel-|said that the Red proposal pro-|| fito. He was es by || (4) Yugoslavia wants closer and} the French High Coumplantonee tor Nae Setoreen cibeeiaiih said: New ‘Tire of October 16, Kink
and caught the child on the side|sremendaus ovation as sie entered| buffer zone “bate the tighie|| danchter Mist M. 7. Wilkin: | (engr’ Tiendly tes with the Vati-lindo-China and Cambodia's Kink tn Yoint consultation ata in ak {it the speech, urged. ight ih
of the face, The animal then : ea 2 Fc | “The c i ic in. | Noredom Sisanouk will be among |uther activities it will be our con- | dealing with Russia as negotia- |
of Sie Set The animal n the balleose. U altered Communist version of the son. The conference was strictly in-

those present at the ceremonies
tomorrow. De Raymonds body
will be sent back to France for

Leaving Barbados on July
4, Mr. Wilkinson went up to
Boston for medical treatment

line of ground battle contact.”
The United Nations already had
proposed that the ceasefire line

tions to better relations with that
country had failed.—wU.P.

stant aim and cluty to ensure the
steady progress and betterment
of the general conditions of Bri-

jformal, with newsmen shooting
questions and the Marshal answer-
ing. He emphasized that Yugo-

on the girl, and sank his teeth
into her neck and head. The beast

|
then seized the child by one Teg |





roughly follow the present battle- after which he visited Eng- slavi burial, | tain and of our people, We shall
and dragged her away from the lines and Allied ohaere had said land. He told the Advocate Sictishie cea hs ae oe Rome:—Top U.S. officials here; continue in that duty under the
arena area, A youngster screamed ; earlier that there was a near yesterday that he was feeling . is atican, He said,

are convinced that Italian military |
| forces will give a good account of |
themselves if the Soviet Union

Conservative Government.”

The Congress simultaneously
dispatched a letter to the former

The “ADVOCATE”
pays for NEWS.

for help, But she was not neoeE. |
Maria was travelling with the
circus in custody of her grand-|

“we in Yugoslavia have nothing
against the Vatican and do not in-
tend to make any demands upon

pretty good and was very glad

agreement i .
, agreement on the line of contact to the ‘baoke.

| However, the new Communist
'proposal would leave Kaesong as



mgther. Maria's cries finally at- the site of the Communist truce it.” " ee ore Pitictiaess | Labour Prime Minister Clement
tracted the attention of attendants. delegations base camp and the Religion and the Chureh are Washington:-—Averell Harriman, | Attlee, placing on record their Dial 3113

free in our country within the

historic gateway to Seoul in Red
framework of the country’s laws.

territory.


achievements of the Labour Gov-

The United Nations Truman's top Foreign policy ad- profound admiration









_-—_—__— wants to include Kaesong in the - But we cannot allow any inter- awe pee Se ee ae ee | ernment during their six and one- Day or Night
° ,200 square miles of largely un- Pl JBL IC ference from outside by anyone, Mohanttesa Mos¥adegh © at the half years of rule in the face of
Taxes Will Close contested West Korean territory, : . including the Vatican. “This is the | Tranian leaders’ 7 - at th?) unprecedented difficulties —U.P.
: | which it suggests the Reds give up T only poiht on which we do not w a ad wt ee ' | ag ec F ho|
Down Bookniakers in exchange for the 200 square] MJ : agree in our relations with the | COnes¢ay. apymaan told tho}

miles of East Korean territory eo.

press before the visit it was to b:!
won by the Eighth Army in battle

Vatican.”—U.P.
atican UP. solely a personal call.”



LAS VEGAS, Nevada, Oct. 31.



: re The United Nations argued that NEW YORK, Oct. 31. Karachi Pakistan:—The Pakistan |
This gambling resort ne ' lit needed Kaesong to cover the| Joe Louis issued a statement on “ke” Declines Government is considering send-|
ers’ plan to fold up their busi-) approaches to Seoul, A United] Wednesday asking the public to

nesses at midnight tonight, be-!

ing naval officers to the Turkish
cause-they will not’ be “economi-!

Nations communique said that a navy for submarine training Radic

have patience and bear with him
;|Communist proposal like that of

until he can make up his mind

cally sound” when the new Fed-
eral Government tax on race-
horse’ betting becomes effective.
State licensed bookies held a
meeting and decided unanimous-
ly that the 10 per cent. tax will
make iness unprofitable as
compared with the more lucrative
gambling games.

Operators said that turf fol-
lowers had little reason to come
here to bet when they can find
bookies in almost any city in the
country.—U.P,

Search Underway
For Engineer

NEW YORK, Oct. 31.

A nation-wide search is under-
way for the electrical engineer
who disappeared mysteriously on
October 12, while at work on a
secret Government project, Craig
T. Naudain (53), of New York
City, vanished in Salt Lake City
while returning from a trip to
Los Angeles. !

Electrical engineer for the con-
struction firm of Drake Merritt
which is engaged im a secret pro-
ject for the Army, Naudain had
been expected home by his wife
by October 17’, Alarmed at his
absence, she contacted the authori-
ties on October 19. A spokesman
for Drake Merritt said that it
was not known whether Naudain
eatried any classified meee:

—UP.

RUSSIA

LONDON, Oct. 31.

Informed sources said that the
official report on the fulfilment
of the United Socialist Soviet
Republics State Plan for the
third quarter of this year, indi-
cates that Russia is coneentra-
ting in making good the two
main deficiencies of her army—
transport and communications.

The. report, the full text of
which is now available in Lon-
don, showed that the following
Ministers had not fulfilled their
industrial production plans: Thé





_ the Speaker's seat.
a

—$———

» Speaker.





8. MORRISON was
Speaker of the House
Commons by a 67 vote ma-
jority in the first vote of the
new Commons. It is the first
time in over 50 years that
there has been a division over
Usually
one tiember acceptable to both
3 is proposed.
orrison was proposed by
Sir Hugh O'Neill, Ulster
Nationalist, and seconded by
a Conservative while two La-
bourites proposed Major James
Milmer, who has been Deputy
Speaker since March 1943,
After the discussion Prime
Minister Churchill and Mr.
Clement Attlee said that Party
leaders had been unable to
agree beforehand on a
Voting was 318 in
favour of Morrison, 251 in
favour of Major Milner.

MR. W. 8S. MORRISON, K.C.,
was born in 1893 in Scotland.
He served in the 1914-18 war,
and has represented Cirences-
ter and Tewkesbury since
1929. Before the war he held
several junior posts and in
1989 was ted Chancellor
of the Duchy of Lancaster. He
was the first Minister of Food
from 1939 to01940, and subse-
quently became Minister of
Town and Country Planning.
He took silk in 1934.



Ministry of Motor and Tractor
Industry, 97%. The Ministry of
Transport Machinery Industry,



97%. The Ministry of Com-
munications Equipment Indus-
try 99.6%. The Ministry of
Machine Tool Industry, 99%.
The Ministry of Heavy Engin-
eering, 99.

As the Soviet Press has lately
carried not more than the nor-
mal amount of criticism on the
work of industrial undertakings

controlled bs

thes Ministe

STRENG





the United Nations would provide
for a 2% mile wide buffer zone

ecross Korea.
—C.P. and U.P.



Little Progress Ait
Cease-fire Talks

WASHINGTON, Oct. 31.

Acting Secretary of State, James
Webb said despite apparent Com-
munist concessions many complex
problems remain to be worked
out before there can be cease-
fire in Korea. Webb warned at a
News Conference against toc
much optimism over the latest
‘Communist proposals of -a truce

line. He said the question
‘of a buffer zone was only
,;one of many that remained

‘to be solved and added there was
| little at hand to say about nego-
\tiations in Korea this time.

Acting Secretary of State James
Webb told the press he believed
isome progress had been made in
efforts here to settle the British-
| Fantan oil controversy.
| He told the Press Coriference
jthis Government received no
‘official request from Winston
|\Churchill or the Britiah Govern-
;ment for a visit by the Prime
Minister to the United States.
‘Asked if an informal approach
had been made to launch a Brit-
ish campaign, Churchill appar-
ently made it clear that he was
interested in coming to the United
States.

—UP.

the non-fulfilment of the Plan
by the five branches of the
Soviet industrial machine, is due
not to any fall in output, but to
the highly increased production
targets established for this year.

This is indirectly. confirmed by
the report itself, which said that

total volume of industrial out-
put in the USS.R, was 15%
higher in the third quarter of
1951 than in the corresponding
period of 1950. In spite of the
complete blackout, imposed by
ihe Soviet Government on al!



THENING ARMY

whether to retire or continue fight-
ing. He made the statement be-
eause of the many conflicting
reports that have been published
about his future plans since his
defeat Friday night by Rocky Mar-
ciano.

He said he wanted to thank
everyone for the goodwill they
have shown in the past and that
he will be grateful until the end
of his days for the benefits he had
derived from boxing.

He said many people have varied
opinions of what course he should
pursue now but he asked them to
have confidence in him while he
is making up his mind as to what
to do. He said he would announce
his future plans after his exhibi-
tion tour of Japan. He will fly to
Japan from New York on Novem-
ber 10.--U.P.



“Fleeting Moment’ Wins
Cambridgeshire

NEWMARKET, Eng., Oct. 31.

Fleeting Moment won the 106th
running of the Cambridgeshire
Stakes over 1% miles today.
Denizen was second and there
was a photo finish for third.
Forty-five horses ran. Fleeting
Moment owned by Mrs. M. John-
son started at 28 to 1. Denizen
was 20 to 1. Fastnet Rock started
favourite at 8 to 1. Jockey ‘Arthur
Breasley of Australia rode the
winner.—C.P.

economic information, it is
known that Russia is now more
than ever engaged in expanding
her industrial output

The importance of the five
Ministries output for the Soviet
re-armament effort is obvious.

West European and United
States experts on Soviet mili-
tary affairs, agree that the main
weakness of the Soviet Army
lies in its lack ient



of iffic
transport facilitie t

comm



U.P

Political Support

MILWAUKEE, Wis., Oct. 31,

A Milwaukee attorney said he
received a letter from one of
Gen. Dwight Eisenhower's aides
on Wednesday, saying that the
General declines to support any
political organisation backing him
for President.

The attorney, A. L. Tilton, said
“e wrote Eisenhower on October
13 asking his consent to run in
Wisconsin's presidential primary
next April as a delegate pledged
to support the General for nomi-
nation.

Tilton sald he received a reply
saying that Eisenhower repeatedly
has declined “all requests that he
authorize a political movement or
the establishment of an organiza-
tion in support of any politica!
movement in his behalf. There is
no question but that he will con-
tinue to adhere to this policy dur-
ing the future,” the letter said,

—U-P.



Jca Housing Fund
Gets £250,000 More

KINGSTON, Jca., Oct. 30,

Government is giving another
£250,000 to the emergency hous-
ing fund from which free issues
ot building materials up to a
maximum of £20 are being made
to persons whose homes were
damaged in the hurricane,

This brings the total
applied to the fund to £500,000.
At the same time Government is
tightening up on the issue of free
materials in the rural areas, and
suspended operation of the scheme
in some country districts.

A gift of $100,000 from tho
Trinidad Government has swelled
the Geovernor’s Relief Fund to
nearly £540,000.—C.P.

ELEVEN TRAPPED IN
COAL MINE EXPLOSION

KAYAFORD, W. Virginia, Oct. 31.
One miner was killed and 11
others trapped about one mile
underground when an explosion
ripped through United No. 1 mine
of th Traer Coal Co

° —U.P.





ie Truax

amount 5

Pakistan said Wednesday

Weshington:—A five-man U.S
Government mission left Wednes-
day for Malaya for first hand ob-
servation of the problems of the
tin industry there,

Barbados Win
Bryden Trophy

Vamoose Wins De Lima Cup
(From Our Own Correspondent)
PORT-OF-SPAIN, Oct. 31.
3 Barbados won the Bryden
Trophy with 54 points. The Trini-
dad team scored 39 points. The
fe hy was presented by His
ellency t Governor to
“Teddy” Hoad, The De Lima Cup
Was won by Vamoose with 201
points, second was Perkins, Edril
with 19% points and third H
Jason Jones’ Cyclone and Trini-
dad T.K. 45 with 14 points each.
The race was sailed under a very
light north wind. The teams and
boats were almost completely
becalmed and _ positions changed
constantly during the first lap. i
It was decided under the con-|
ditions, to race two laps so that
the boats could finish at a



a



Tou asked for Benson and Hedges cigarettes, Madam”



Occasions of unique and special

prope:

ae a6 first lap T.K, 29. PSI l fi ‘ tt
minutes seconds; T.K. 35, 5% iOV an t : garrettes
minutes, five seconds. T,.K, 49, 52 enjoy ment ca oF ce
minutes 11 seconds, T.K. 40, 54
renee S seconds, T.K. 45, 53
minutes séconds, T.K. 44, 54 y iS ty
minutes 51 seconds, made by BENSONadHIEDGES to
|_ Second lap T.K. 35, 27 minutes
6 seconds, T.K. 29, 30 minutes '
s peconaee 7 $. " minutes Al ‘. fi tion and to

seconds, T.K. 44, 32 minute os rare periec Il « :
25. seconds, T.K. 49, 34 minutes reect the P

37 seconds, 'T.K. 40, nil,

*.K, 34 won the race, T.K. 2°
second and T.K. 45 third. A
reception was held after the race

eterno

echo the whole contented mood

TODAY’S WEATHER G
CHART When
Sensi otra only the bett
Moon: New October
Lighting: 6.00 p.m.



well do

High Tide: 5.08 a.m; 4.48 p.m.
| Low Tide: 1043 am. 11.36
| p.m.







PAGE TWO

C C G
ADY RANCE, wife of the
Governor of Trinidad was an

in rarisit passenger by the Golfito
yesterday, She is on her way back
ree

ETURNING from the
yesterday morning by
Golfito was Mrs. E. J. Macintyre,
wite of the Manager of the Brit-
ish Union Oil Company. She left
here three months ago with her
younger daughter Joyce whom
she has put to school in Scotland.
Travelling out t o Barbados
with Mrs. Macintyre was another
daughter, Audrey, g former stu-
dent of Codrington High School
who was studying in Scotland at

after a visit to the

Finished School
ISS DEBRA MANNING,
daughter of Mr. and Mrs.
H. C. Manning of Newlands, Two
Mile Hili returned from England
yestesday by the Golfite. For the
pest three years, Debra has been
a.tending Cheltenham College,

Gloucester. = Glasgow Royal 1 .

Other passengers arriving b e has now got her .R.
the Golfito yesterday for Seehes (Member of the oe of Radi-
dos were Mr. J, H. Alexander, ographers and her C.T. (Certifi-

eate of Therapy.)

To See Her Friends

MONG the passengers arriv-

ing in the Golfito from Eng-
iand yesterday morning was Miss
H. Ridler, O.B.E. She has re-
turned here to see many of her
old friends and wiil be remainin,
1oy six months staying at Bus
Hill in the Garrison.

Miss Ridler will be remember-
ed as having acted as hostess at
Government House during the
time Mr. S. H. Perowne acted as
Governor.

1944 St. Lucia Scholar

Mrs. M. Biggar, Miss F. R. G.
Cameron, Mrs, H. F. Hadow, Mr.
J. Meakin, Mr. and Mrs. R. de C.
O’Neale and Mr. C, P. Wade.
Visiting Daughter
R. AND MRS. STEPHEN
PSAILA arrived from Eng-
land yesterday morning by the
to spend about one week
@n a visit to their son-in-law and
daughter Mr. and Mrs. Jack Mar-
son before flying io British
Guiana, where Mr. Psaila is Pro-
prietor of Psaila Bros., George-
town,



Mr. and Mrs. Psaila are on their
way home after just over five
months’ holiday in England and
the Continent and their visit took
them through Por ugal, Spain,
France, Rome, and Malta returning
to England via Switzerland and
Amsterdam.

Mr, Psaila is also Consular
Agent for France in B.G.

kiome Again
I8S MULLY BLADES

PROF. AND MRS, C. G. BEASLEY
and ea wes Songer a RR.VING yesterday morn-
and erie. 8. Beasley an e- f Engla
two children arrived from England Golan” intranait age hn, oe
yesterday by the Golfito. were Dr. and Mrs. C. O, R. King.
‘ A former student of St. Mary’s
After Eighteen Months }.coliege, St. Lucia. and island
5 . scholar of 1944, Dr. King went
FTER spending eighteenfup to Edinburgh University
months in England, Mrs.where he qualified and is now
C. G, Beasley, wife of Professor} returning home to take up an
Beasley, Economic Adviser to theMappointment with the Govern-
r ’ Comptroller for Development and{ment of St. Lucia.
â„¢ daugnter of Mr, and Mrs. welfare, returned to Barbados ,. . 7
Eaward slades of “Margate”, yesterday morning by the Elders Visited Festival Of Britain
Hastings who had been in England and Fyffes S.S, Golfito, She was G&t .
on @ long visit returned yesterday accompanied by her two daughters, R. J. W. McKINSTRY,
by .he Golfito. Jennifer and Valerie. Director of Messrs. Allenye,
Arthur and Co., Ltd. who was in

Intransit
i NTRANSIT passengers onthe Oscar Steals The Show [England for the ,»past three and
Goelfite bound for Trinidad are “a half months, returned. yester-
Mr. and Mis. Henry Seaford, Their A CROWD of well over eight{day morning by the Golfito’ ac-
final destination is British Guiana hundred people, which in-#companied his wife.
where Mr. Seaford is a Director of Cluded His Excellency the Gov- He said that the weather was
Booker Bros While in England @’mor and Lady Savage saw the good, they had a very pleasant
the attended th ddi eo ir @Pening performance of “Revue- time, and enjoyed iting the
daehte © wedding of their geville 1951” at the Empire The- Festival of Britain which they
ist ave. , atre last night. thought was very interesting.
Other intransi: passengers for “Hundreds of cars almost com-
British Guiana were Mr. and Mrs.

esis wit, tees, oe
pletely surrounded the Empire and Mrs, J. H. Glendinning, .
Edward de Freitas. They left Theatre block and patrons on ar-

McKinstry’s parents.
their son Paul at school at Stony- rival at the theatre, were greeted
hurst. Mr.-de Freitas is associated by attractive girls selling pro- Went To School
Snthate Sirm of Cameron and grammes. In England
erd isd a, Insid th eurtai:
epnerd of Bri.ish Guiana nee So cuetetn | Wate ie ETURNING from school in

shortly after 8.30 o'clock and the
Deputy. Comptroller Of Engiend on her way” home

show which lasted for two and a
Customs B.G. yesterday was Miss Elizabeth

half hours never lagged for a sec-
FTER $pending his long leave ond. The audience was always Scott-Johnston, daughter of Mr.
and Mrs. Edward Scott-Johnston

in England, _FR. . being entertained as the numbers
biieer. Deputy ne * rolled on 3 quick suceession one of Antigua, gy ve oe +
1 v ; after the other, passengers who arriv ere in-
Customs, British Guiana and Mrs. Joseph Tudor as Oscar gave an- transit from the U.K, in the Golfito
Mi'telhozer, arrived here yester- othor performance of “the master yesterday
day morning intransit in the showman.” The scene in Busby’s While in Barbados she will be
Golfito on their way back home. — Ajjey we.vey good and packed staying with Dr. ang re A. A,
' * with all the local “types” around Edwards of Christ ureh.
Egrier. Wolonial Secretary Bridgetown—the Mauby Vendor, =
eee ae " the Orange man, the Biscuit man
Secretary of Kenya, has been etc, Everyone was disappointed
appoin ed- British Resident in not to hear Nell Hall’s lovely
Zanzibar in succession to Sir voicé, but as Oscar said, she was
Vincent Gienday, who is shortly “t#arsed”. She is expected to be
retiring from the post, Mr. sen sing this afternoon and to-
Rankine wag appointed Colonial maht. i. ‘
Secretary in Barbados in 1945 and , Perhaps the cutest opie oa
went to Kenya in 1947, Hix father, the programme was nine-year-o

{ ‘ Juliet Gaskin, who sang “Cheek
veces mon sea ame to Cheek”. Her dancing was also

good and her facial expressions on
Attended Course In U.K.

stage were perfect, She has the
N BARBADOS for two months’ Makings of a versatile young
holiday is Mr. Pat Smith,

actress,

The scene in Trinidad’s Art
son-in-law of Mr, and Mrs. W. E. Gallery was cleverly executed and
Mandeville of St. James. He ar- the revolving “paintings” some-
rived here yesterday morning by thing new on the local stage.
‘the Golfito from England after The Jungle Fantasy was another



CROSSWORD



Actuss

attending a five week micro- highlight of the show, especially) } Often'rendered, but hot ns fat. (1)
biological course at Ravensbournt. ‘the music which kept up its relent-| ) Cheises at Stamford Bridge. (4)
Mr. Smith is a chemist at Mony- less exotic beat throug@out the|'! Single entry (4)
' 2 Bide softly on two tegs, (5)
musk Central in Jamaica. number, {i winny drania (a ;
. aD at ix silly (6)
U.K. Medico The show will be repeated this, : bna of the teat. (8)
N BARBADOS for a couple of afternoon and again tonight. a Chania Ui) eeteerine tee. (6)
onths’ holiday are Dr. and _ /f you were not ene the lucky" 4¥ Trotmnation’ te bus nothing tothe
= y a people Who saw last night's per-, 5

Mrs, S. C. Golds one from England,

post. (
formance don’t Bird tn the murder case, (3)

miss this other 22
They arrived yesterday morning | 23. Bog tt and leave. (3)
pportunity. 4 ¥, ;
Gy the Golfito and are staying with Joseph Tudor again stole the ae aa chee to eat or drink, (5)
Mr. and Mrs. D. V. S, Scott of show as he did last year, and all!

“Sherbourne,” Two Mile Hill, ‘in all, Mrs. Stuart and her Danc- Chandu Bticaueeey

j Ri ;
was attending school at Queen's R. BERNARD CONDUIT of | cure tea ene oF value. (4)

6
is Dr, Goldstone’s first ing School have something in 2 Prickly ius aS china tee, (8)
visit to the island, but not his “Revuedeville 1951” that will take) 3 40 (oAte ne note to en 498
wife’s, He spent a year oe some beating. $ Brawn (9) .
during the war with her two boys - ive ear to the abstainer for
who were at school at Harrison Back From England 8 Woon in ait ateel mixers, (8
College and her daughter whe Wicked fellow from
“ ” 1
College. Heathcroft,” Pine and | 18 card to men. (6)
Attorney of Messrs, Robert Thom | 20 Mary ts the making of it. (4)
People In England Cheerful ta, was among the pasnengers;?! Brody hens do eg )
R. BE, C. PARFITT, Assistant arriving from England yesterday] , Sqijton ot vestarday oH Bead tt.
Chief Engineer of the Water- morning by the Golfite, He was 9: 2. Grate, | 14. Yanks 15, Beli 16,
4 ; pire. 19, Salute, 23 joc; 24, Via;
works and Mrs, Parfitt, ere now accompanic! by Mrs, Conduit.| 26 Cougn: ‘27, Ermine: 9B at. Downt
back in Barbados afver spending They had b:. in England on three} 44, M3'**%, 2, Oppressor, 5. .

six months’ holiday in England nonths’ huuday,
They arrived yesterday morning
by the Golfito.

Mr. Parfitt told Carib that his
wife and he were both pleased to
meet their families in England. He
aid that in spite of everything,
everyone in England was still
cheerful. When they left, there
was the election excitement, but
they did not hear the results un.il

they were out to sea. His wife | anthia vielta
and he were very glad to be back ing‘his brother an old Lodge Boy
in Barbados as it was now getting jow reading Law at St. Cather-
cold in England. ‘ ine’s College, Cambridge.
Enjoyed Holiday
FTER a very good five mouths’
holiday in England, Mr.
Vernon Smith, Manager of the
Barbados Electric Supply Corpora- Retired director of Thompson
tion and Mrs. Smith, returned and Co, Ltd., Port-of-Spain,
yesterday by the Golfito, Trinidad, passed through Barbados
Mr. Smith said that they did a yesterday in the Golfite after
lot of motoring while in England spending his annual six months’
and practically wherever they leave in England and on the
wen’, the weather was good. Continent.

ui; 5, Moat: 6, Bodvy (7 j i
40, ‘free ent ‘ath : 95.





Lodge School Boy

NTRANSIT on the Golfito
yesterday from England on their
way back to Trinidad were Major
; Deacon, a retired Civil
Servant and Mrs, Deacon. Ac-
companying them from the U.K.
was their son Brian, a student of
the Lodge School who was in

Annual Leave
R. DUNCAN THOMPSON,



Before going ashore the skipper
frowns at the two pals, and tells
them 10 prepare a meal by the time
he returns. Then they watch while
the men stant off past the ree!

towards a landing beach. ‘* This
= tet he Nicholas Islind.” murmurs



HORROCKSES FABRICS

STRIPED COTTON CAMBRIC— a wo en yarn rte woclig
COLOURED COTTON GINGHAM__..~.___-____$L47
WHITE & DYED COTTON LINENETTE_____-__._$1.50
PRINTED COTTON CAMBRIC__-.._~-.W_____$L54
PRINTED COTTON FURNISHING_--.-___.___.$1.98



ALSO
PROWERED CREPE.UW ris eset ec Mintel tn $2.20
T.R. EVANS & WHITFIELDS
Dial 4606 won worry eee 30% Dial 4220





me.”
Took Daughter To School They are mistaken. It sounds |

the mar.







Rupert and the Lion Rock—22














7
it is just as a as waying | aes
“Between you @ ea pondering who will

If you have got into the bad|Per hee itwed to "os Sa
habit of using that phrase you | guinea tickets. A ion. _com-
have possibly been confused by | mittee is working closely with
a recollection of having been|two or three embassy officials
told not to say “Me and Charles | who are considered authorities on
are going” but “Charles and I} such matters.
are going’. © |

Consequently you are now so I foresee trouble—and a sharp
worried abouwg the word me that|fali in revenue—if the embassy
you are shy of using it when it anette its strict standard to the
ts linked with som ly else. |bail, Many who were welcomed

Few people would say “Give|to the embassy during Sir Duff
it to I,” but some tend te |Cooper’s ambassadorship are not
imagine it is correct to say “Give approved by the present ambas-
it to Charles and 1,” when, obvi- | Sador.
ously, they should say, “Give it to| Sir Oliver Harvey is a stickler
Charles and me.” for propriety, His disapproval

extends to certain fashionable

There are people, too, who/restaurants whose owners have
seem shy of the word him, They | dubious war records.
would not say “Send it to vl Quotes of the week:
but they are capable of saying, |
“Send it to he and his brother.” | Mistinguette: “Money can’t buy
—which is ridiculous. |happiness, but it helps to steady

All grammatical rules apart, |the.merves,
your ear is the best guide. If you Bertil of Sweden, now
are still in doubt about “I” and ae “y pope gee
me,” usé common sense. inee, ‘Wing Gunleve dest.

Words that end in “ing” can be _ One week I was promoted to
bit of a nuisance. admiral and a general.”

“Participles” they are called,
and they can lead you into
“howlers.” "

The “unattached participle
gets even the best writers into
trouble. :

“Being a fine day, I left my
umbrella at home’” means, gram-
matically, that I am a fine, day—
which is nonsense.

I should have said, ‘As it was
a fine day,” or “Seeing that it French public opinion pollsters
was a fine day.” have made the following discov-
Can you see what is wrong with | eries this week:
this? “Sitting in the back seat of} People ask to identify philoso-
the gallery, the actors seemed a|pher and author Jean Paul Sartre
leng way off.” mistook him for the name of a

nisers of the ball are now

GAA LK ATE

AE

GENE




:
4
*
s
%
#
#
4
2
Z





WARNER 4
BROS:

'O, ECA, NATO,
OEC and SHAPE—now outnumber
British and American reporters in
the city 12-1.

A__ high-grade translator | at
NATO earns almost as much as a
French general commanding a
division.

sf

=

PONT
STORY

DIRECTED BY

|



street, an MP, a_ painter, and a
It implies that the actors were |dress designer. F RIDAY
sitting in the gallery. NOV. 2
Here’s another example:— On marriage: Fifty-seven out of | 2.30-—4.45
“Having received a large con-| 100" French marriages: survive at! ©* iy

least 30 years; 37 out of 100 sur-] & 8.30 P.M.
vive 40 years; and 16 out of 100} & continuing
enjoyed golden wedding anniver-

signment of nylons, yoy will be
glad to know we are reducing the

origes” enjoy DAILY 4.45
ake ecei 2
one” who have received)" on” hygiene: Twenty-five per} & 8.30 p.m.

cent of French women wash their
hair less than once a month: 34
per cent have a permanent wave
at least once a year.

—L.E.S.

While the meaning of these two
examples is not cbscure, in other
cases an unattached participle
could lead to misunderstanding.

The word “while” in the last
sentence can be a trap, too.

It can mean either “although” or
“during the same time that. . .”
Confusion results when the sense
in which it is being’ used is not
made clear, It is wrong to use it
to mean “and,”

Example: “White scored two of
the five goals while Black scored
three.” Argue that out,

However. . . . But why should
I write “However’? It is such
an unnecessary word, though not
so in the sentence; “However hard
I try I cannot give up smoking.”

If at this juncture you remind
me that Mark Twain said: “Giving
up smoking is easy: I've done it
dozens of times” (or words to
that effect), I shall not regard the
‘interruption as irrelevant,

Be careful with that last word.
Don’t say “irrevelant.”’

PLAZA

BRIDGETOWN :

TAKE ADVANTAGE OF OUR
LATEST ADVANCE BOOK LIST

THE BOOKS listed below are those which British Publishers
hope to publish in December :
Prices shown are only approximate
ORDERS should be sent to the ADVOCATE STATIONERY.

~ POLITICS

AMERICA’S MASTER PLAN, John Fischer—Hamish
Hamilton

DATELINE MOSCOW, Don Dallas—Heinemann

DISTR: BUTION OF GERMAN ENEMY PROSPERITY,
H.M.S.O.

HONG KONG, Harold Ingrams—H.M.S.0.
LOCAL GOVERNMENT, H.M.S.O.—Choice of Careers

THE RADICAL TRADITION, S. Macoby—Nicholas
Kaye

STALIN’S SATELITES IN EUROPE, Y. Gluctstein—
Allen & Unwin.

HISTORY

HELLENISTiC CIVILISATION, W. W. Tarn—Arnold
THE PAST PRESENTED, Professor A. M. Low—Peter



—L.E.S.

B.B.C. Radio
Programme

THURSDAY, NOVEMBER 1,



1951

11,15 am, Programme Parade, 11.30
a.m Jazz Box, 12.00 (noon) The News,
12.10 p.m News Analysis.
4,.00—-7.15 pm, 31.82 M; 48.i3 M





4.00 p.m, The News, 4,10 pm. The
Daily Service, 4.15 p.m. Barchester
Towers, 445 p.m. Sporting Kecord,
5.00 jm. Composer of the Week, 6.00
p.m, Sandy Macpherson at the Theatre
Organ, 615 p.m. Scottish Magazine
6.45 |.m, Programme Parade, 6.55 p.m,
Toda ‘s Sport, 700 p.m. The News,
7.10 p.m, News Analysis,
We ‘ee Britain, 730 p m.
chest al Music.

7.15 p.m
Light Or-

1.4 0.90 pm 18.43 M, Davies

aie Renew Hien, a! ae ee RECALLED TO SERVICE, General Maxime Weygand
Og" ph." Sopot athe Weak | | enemann

pin, tee Meme, 38.08 pan. Fede bee SCRIPTA MINOA, Sir John Myres—Clarendon Press
Talk. 1. 1030 p.m. Barcheer ‘Towers |) A SHORT HISTORY OF SWITZERLAND, E. Bonjour,

H. S. Offler and G. R. Potter—Clarendon Press

CBC PROGRAMME

else Se ows THE STRUGGLE FOR TRANSCAUCASIA, Firuz
to te The, Wee Kazemadeh—George Ronald

TOPOGRAPHICAL BIBLSOGRAPHY OF ANCIENT
HIEROGLYPHIC TEXTS, RELIEFS, and PAINT-
INGS—Clarendon Press

UP AND OVER THE HILL, J. W. Barns-Graham—
George Ronald

YEOMAN’S ADVENTURE, J. Wentworth Day
—Harrap.
De «€6SEND IN YOUR ORDER TO-DAY

e
ADVOCATE STATIONERY.

Rupert. “lt say, what

a lot you
know about this queer business,"

exclaims Rollo, ‘* I just can't make
head or tail of it. Anyway, i:
means that you are leader now. fr
you have any plan just tell me wha
you want me to do.”

GLOBE

TO-DAY to SUNDAY
5 and 8 p.m. Daily





BARBADOS

CO-OP COTTON
FACTORY LTD.



7

SHORTS:
Night Shows Over 10 p.m.







ALAN HALE, ¥® ROY DEL RUTH,

















BARBADOS ADVOCATE THURSDAY, NOVEMBER 1, 1951
| |
. 7 @ . | _
Isit Me Oris it I? | Princess Margaret |MOVIETIME .... [== 7 a
LONDON. | rr i LIDDEN DANGER PL ATA DIAL 2310 “Tarzan's Peril”
Soke peiple. thion that “Be | ARBADOS f {|| LRxC ee et lien Barker
tween you and I” sounds more) tarts cram RE-RELEASE—
Sree | hem “eprnen, son Gen than ALWAYS IN MY HEART & THIS SIDE OF THE LAW
a a ses, sRRME ie BANOS Vieet” CinpeGKe en atm
U.K. dreadful. It is glaringly bad gram- La - Satan in hegnaednatee ‘Yankee Doodle Dandy! | MINNEVITCH & his Harmonica Rascals
And the eet: OF have oN | seni ereteh beatene ema 4 ABBOTT & COSTELLO in ee role Sek, BROWN in
to try saying “ een I and you” * _
and they will see their error, “Be- |=! Perey aid "edhe ___IT AIN'T HAY & DESPERTAE TRAIL
tween I and you” sounds wrong. Hertford Hospital in Paris.

: OISTIN
'
1? LAZA visi 1405
To-day jonly) 5 and 8.30 p.m
“DANGEROUS GAME”
RICHARD ARLEN
“DESPERATE TRAIL”
JOHNNY MACK BROWN
Sat p.m y and
Shadow on Continuing
Beacon Hil & 5 and 8.30 p.m
Night Has Eyes viewing Father

GAIETY
THE GARDEN — ST. JAME‘

Last Show Tonite 8.30

IF YOU KNEW SUSIE
Eddie CANTOR—Joan DAVIS &

GILDERSLEEVE'’S GHOST

a
Opening Tomorrow W.B. Double
“BREAKING POINT”

a.dnite bal. ofr unne ARFIELD—Pa'

Bad Man of Red | Pat O'Brian & Jeqn- @ ee
Butte & Deadline at “THIS SIDE OF THE LAW’
Gun Town Dawn Viveca LINDFORS—Kent SMITH

Fn at









EMPIRE



REVUEDEVILLE 1951

TO-NIGHT 8.30
TO-MORROW 5 p.m. and 8.30 p.m.

NOW FOR THE’ FINEST SHOW OF
THE YEAR.

BOOK

Box & Orchestra $1.50,
Balcony 72c.

_House $1.00
Reserved.



OPENING SATURDAY, 3rd NOVEMBER, 4.45 & 8.30

-_—

LORETTA

YOUNG

JOSEPH



20: CECIL KELLAWAY + BASIL RUYSDAEL °"**'s RICHARD SALE
Serden Play by ROBERT RISKIN + Based on Story by George

Prodverd JULIAN BLAUSTEIN

Carletan Brown





_ ROYAL
LAST TWO SHOWS TO-DAY TOMORROW Only 4.30 & 8.15
4.30 & 8.15

Universal presents

“THE WICKED LADY”
Starring
Joan BENNETT — James MASON

Republic Double .
Sunset CARSON in

‘““BANDIT OF THE



BADLAND ”
any OPENING SATURDAY, 3rd NOV.
“END OF THE =|‘ FIGHTING
er - COASTGUARD”

tarring
Nelson EDDY — Ilona MASSEY BRIAN DONLEVY



ROXY

LAST TWO SHOWS TO-DAY
4.30 & 8.15

Republic Whole Serial .

“FEDERAL OPERATOR

TOMORROW Only 4.30 & 8.15
Universal Double

“THE ASTONISHED

HEART”
â„¢ AND
with gt is
Martin LAMONT Helen TALBOT DESTINATION
Action from Start to Finish! UNKNOWN”





OLYMPIC

TO-DAY Only 4.30 & 8.15 | TOMORROW Only 4.30 & 8.15
Universal Double

Edward G. ROBINSON
Joan BENNETT
in

““SCARLET STREET”
AND

“THE MAGIC BOW”
Stewart GRANGER

Universal Double . .
Barry FITZGERALD in
‘““NAKED CITY”

AND

\“THE OVERLANDERS ”



Opening SATURDAY 4.30 and 8.15

M-G-M and 20th-C-Fox Double - - -

CHARLES BOYER — LINDA DARNELL

“THE 13th LETTER”

And The Big Technicolor Musical

“ROYAL WEDDING”

Starring: FRED ASTAIRE

|



— JANE POWELL













THURSDAY, NOVEMBER 1, 1951
Le



Four Seats Not Eno

Bea Talks
About Crops

In W. ra

October, 1951.
The extent to which the West
Indies present dependence on

Sugar might be reduced by pro-
ducing other crops, both for ex-
port and domestic consumption,

is discussed by Bernard
Braine in the current issue
of “New Commonwealth”. Mr.

Braine recently cut short a visit
to the West Indies to take part
in the Genera] Election here.

ug THe basie problem,” he suys
“is population”. In 30 years or
so, it may well have doubled it-
self. Unless, in the meantime, the
economy can be made less vulner-
able and the production of wealth
can be substantially increased,
the peoples of the West Indies
“face disaster.”

Mr. Braine says some second-
ary industries can and need to be
established in these territories.
The two most promising possibil-
ities seem to be rice and cocoa—
promising because all the indica-
tions are that world supply ‘of
these commodities is unlikel= to

meet demand for many years to
come.

“British Guian»y i the most
suitable area for rice development.
There seems to be no doubt that
the annual output of 50,000 tons
can be increased fivefold, ‘provided
capital, technical personnel and
equipment are made available
for the very extensive drainage
which would be necessary. Rice
cultivation can be extended else~
where, notably in. Trinidad and
Jamaica,” Mr. Braine declares.

After referring to the good re-
sults being achieved with cocoa,
he claims--preduction — of other
crops already established in the
West Indies, such as bananas,
citrus, coffee, cotton and coco-
nuts, can be extended on a very
big scale. Much ex
work is being done by various
Departments of Agriculture with
a view of introducing new ereps,
including jute, ramie;
hemp and sisal. It may be possi-
ble to grow oil-bearing crops such
as soya beans, sesame, sunflowers
and oil palms,

Mr, Braine recognizes the one
limiting factor to large-scale de-
velopment of. crops for gxport,
with the exception possibly of rice
and cocoa. It js the fear, which

springs from past experience
*hat markets will disappear. And ,¢
it is not anal beseless
fear,

“It is en ‘aging t6 tind the
Governments in the various West

Indie; Colonies alive to the need

for raising eee produc-.

tion, to encounter the “opcers
asm of their

and to observe aus

Sitio tt
ship between - 5a and
field. But if the agricultural po-

tentialities of the West Indies
are to be realized to the ful,
Britain heddself! must recognize
the special ature of the prob-
lem by continuing to provide that



market stability without which
great progress will be impossi-
ble,” he concludes.
—L.E.S,

MAILS for Dominica, Antigua, Mont-
serrat, Nevis and Sst Kitts by the
M.V. Caribbee will be closed at the
General Post Office as under:—

Parcel Mail at 12
Mail at 2 p.m., Ordinany
p.m. on the 2nd November

noon, Registered
Mai) at 2,30
1951

* MAILS for Maderia, United Kingdom,
Antwerp and Amsterdam by the M.S
Willemstad will be closed at the General
Post Office as under:—

Parcel Mail at 10 a.m., Registered
Mail at 2 p.m., Ordinary Mail at 2.30
p.m, on the 5th November 1951

MAILS for. St. Lucia, Martinique.
Guadeloupe, Antigua, United Kingdom
and France by the S.S. Gascogne will
be closed at the General Post Office as
under:—

Parcel Mail at 10 a.m., Registered
Mail at 2 p.m. Ordinary Mail at 2.30
p.m. on the 2nd November, 1951

THE PRINCESS WHO
WOULDN'T SMILE .. .,

In a far-off land lived a Princess who
never smiled. Clowns and jugglers came
from all over, but not one could bring

out even the tiniest smile.

over 100 delicious sandwiches.



3OVRIL

F. L. Walcott Says In
Federation Debate

The constitution which was proposed in the British Carib-
bean Standing Closer Association Committee Report as the
one to be used in the forming of a Federal Government of
the British West Indies, was criticised by Mr. F. L. Waicott
(L) of the Government and Mr. R. Mapp (L) at the House

of Assembly on Tuesday. The

House had begun debating the

report of a Seleet Committee which had been appointed to
prepare a draft reply o the Governor's message inviting the
prepare a draft reply to the Governor’s message inviting the
Caribbean Standing Closer Association Committee, and the
Unification of the Public Services in the British Caribbean

Area.

The Select
meeting on

Committee held a
October 8, when
Messrs. G. H. Adams, A. E. S.
Lewis, F. L. Walcott, F. Goddard
and The Speaker Hon. K. N. R.
Husbands were present.

They recommended the passing
of an Address to the Governor.
The Address reads:

The House of Assembly repeats

its acceptance of the principles of
establisning a Federal Govern-
ment of the British West Indies,
and accepts the proposals of the
British Caribbean Standing Closer
Association’ Committee’s Report
as a basis for discussion of the
form which the proposed Gov-
ernment's Constitution should
take. . :
2. The Hoke, however, does
not accept in their entirety the
detailed’?pr®posals of that Report,
and will in due course forward
to Your Excellency, its sugges-
tions for the amendment of some
of these proposals.

3. The House is convinced of
the advantages to be gained from
a Unification of the Public Ser-
vices in the British Caribbean
Area and therefore agree in gen-
eral with the “Holmes” Report on
this subject.

Only three members have
spoken so far on the Address and
it thas been adjourned until next
Monday when the House: meet
again.

Some Worry

Mr. F. L. Walcott said that it
was a very important matter and
it was a pity it had come before
the House so close to the time
when the House would die—next
Tuesday, The question of West
Indian Federation had been in the
air for many years. The then
Secretary of State for the Colonies,
Mr. Creech Jones, opened his con-
ference in Jamaica in 1947 and it
was almost four years that the
principle of federation had been
agreed upon by the various repre-
sentatives of the colonies and a
committee was set up to deal with
the question,

While some of the units in the
Caribbean agreed With the princi-
ples of Federation, Barbgdos had
up till then not debated it and
that failing to debate it was a
matter of some worry to the Colo-
nial Office.

The framers of the report had
made it cledr that they do not
» want to de ‘y. much from
the report and they would have tu
state in no, uncertain terms
whether they agreed with the re-
port or not.

When they saw the result of
adult suffrage in the West Indies
with regard to whom the people
had chosen to be their represen-
tatives, they had, to watch the
report very carefully when they
looked at the position of its
members.

eet for myself,” he said,
“at the set I will say that I
do not believe in double chambers.
With regard to legislation I am
not one with the idea that two
heads are better than one.

There are a number of people
in the community who have some-
thing to offer and will not seek
election. People who had some-
thing to offer and did not offer it
were just showing they were aloof
and one should not nominate
them because it was felt they had
something to offer.

He said that if it was felt that
they should decide on a legislator
by his educational qualifications,
there were sufficient professors at
the English Universities who could
devote three days a week to the
running of the English Govern-
ment.

One would have expected to
have a Prime Ministes, , whose

Close by lived a tailor and his son. One
_ the son had an idea. “I know what
i make the Princess smile,”” he said,





PUTS BEEF (NTO YOU

}
®
sandwich
A sandwich made with Bovril is a real meal
in miniature. Everyone enjoys the rich beefy ‘
flavour and goodness of Bovril. And they can
enjoy it often—one 4 oz. bottle of Bovril makes
}



status was somewhat similar te
those in the Dominions, but in-
stead of that they were presented
with what was no more than a
tlorified Crown Colony system in
which, if the House elected this
minister. he could not even form
a Cabinet himself. “You can
easily see that even in our little
experiment in Barbados even the
seaep work would be better than
this.”

No Reserve Power

Another matter that had to
strike West Indians was the re-
serve power of the Governor-
General. In Barbados the Gov-
ernor bad no reserve power. What
was the strength of a Government
when « Governor or Governor-
General had reserve powers,

“We should not go up to Eng-
land in January as Jamaica would
have us, until we have discussed
every aspect of this here,” he said.

After all these years of British
rule when they were dominated
by the British Imperial Govern-
ment, since they were being given
their freedom, no West Indian
should be ashamed to let the Brit-
ish Government know that at the
outset they should be given sub-
stantially to build up their super-
structure.

The question of Federation was
not a vote-catching one. It was
one which they had to be very
eareful about as it would affect
future West Indians.

Mr. Walcott drew attention to
Part 4, Chapter 11 where it is
mentioned that the House of
Assembly should consist of 50
elected members. It said that for
the purposes of the election of
members of the House of Assem-
bly seats should be _ allocated
among the Units as follows:—
Barbados 4, British Guiana 6,
British Honduras 2, Jamaiea 16,
Antigua 2, St. Kitts-Nevis 2,
Montserrat 1, Trinidad 9, Gren-
ada 2, St. Vincent 2, St. Lucia 2,
and Dominica 2.

He said that four seats to Bar-
bados was an insult to Barbados.
considering its economy and pop-
ulation as compared with the
others, ;

The recent action of Trinidad
and Grenada with regard to the
emigration laws was an indication
that on the eve of federation they
still found there was a bar against
Barbadians and other West In-
dians from entering those eolonies,

Free Travei

“Do not let us have co-opera-
tion for ¢ ation sake,
because Federation means some-
thing to us,” he said, “but if we
are to be united, let it mean that
a man can go from here to Trini-
dad just as he can go from St.
Michael to St. Lucy.”

Another matter for criticism
was the going outside the House
to look for a Speaker. That should
never be done. That would imply
that there might not be one capa-
ble among themselves to be
Speaker.

Mr. R. G. Mapp (L) said that
he too felt that the report they
were considering was so impor-
tant that they eould not enter
lightly into any debate on it. Bar-
bados had always been in the
forefront of those colonies which
supported Federation. They shad
always felt that although given
the opportunity, they could lift
themselves up by their own boot-
straps, they could do even more
when joined together under a
Federal Government with the
other West Indian colonies.

There was no hope for small
units such as these in a world
in whieh events moved at a very
fast rate, units which were
shrinking more and more every
day and they would certainly



TH
ho
Kx

Osi Fi

ol

ted it, her face
broke out into a big ile In fact oe
gave him her hand and h





OVI T VI VT VT

WHITE HORSE
Scotch Whisky

In olden days, the crest emblazoned
on a Knight’s shield proclaimed his

noble ancestry.

To-day, there is another sign of
the white horse that pro-
claims a Scotch ; a whisky whose

worth :



+ AABABA © = ORO O&O he ete tote br te tate bbe te terlin ten fm ee to Go te ee > Lr er Ly Bate ee Se

BARBADOS











Just released from prison—after

life,
married her in a remote

band’s release.



have more power and influence the time of the Report

in a Federation than they could
have at present.

“But as soon. as We agree to
Federation, we begin to ask our-
selves what sort of Federation we
Should shave, and it is then that
we come up against ty of
constitution and legal and other
diffieulties;’ he said.

It was then that they would
meet with sharp divergences of
opinien and varied ds and
would encounter serious difflenl-
ties in agreeing to a formula
suitable to their wishes and to
what they thought best for the
peoples of the West Indies. It was
for that reason that he thought
members would weleome tha
opportunity, an opportunity which
they might not get im future, of
diseussing the report and seeing
in what way it fell short of the

sort of ting they wanted for then a, jn

West I

Loose Kind

“There is no doubt,” he said,
‘that stripped of all its panoply
of words, the Report falls short of
Ahe sort of document it should
have been, It had been agreed
the form of Federa-
tion they should have, should
follow the pattern of the
Australian Federation, It was a
loose kind of Federation. There
are important differences, how-
ever, between Austrajia and the
West Indies, which lead to some
giaringl weak proposals that we

cannot accept.

Australia was a Federation of
States which had reaghed a ievel
of constitutional advancement
Each state was equal to the other
in political status, That was not so,
however, in the West Indies. %
was conceded generally that Bar.
bados and Jamaica were constitu,
tionally ahead of the others.
British Guiana was about to have
its constitution changed, but ai
the time of the Report was a
Crown Coleny. Most of the smaller
islands in the Windwards and
Leewards had since had aduit
suffrage, but were in effect still
Crown Colonies, Trinidad was at



BRINGS A SMILE TO v *
EVERYONE'S FACE

Just serve delicious Royal to













Sole Distributors :

FRANK B. ARMSTRONG LTD



“ISLAND R@MEO” LEAVES PRISON

year service—Costa Kephaloyannis, the “island Romeo”
met by his wifé. They both say that all th
Costa almost caused a civil war in
carried off the beautiful Tassoula Potares

|

ADVOCATE



ugh For Barbados oS

i

he

and

monastery. of troops sent te

bring back Costa and@ his 19-year-old vhs cost Greek goverament

£50,000. He was jailed for raising an armed band to
Tassoula, daughter of a rich politician wasted patiently for



a Crows By
Colony and was in some ways stidi
one,

Those fundamental difference:
in the constitution of the severa

islands had led to many evils.
First there was the farce of nepre-
sentation at the conferenee

Jamaica had been represented by,
‘he clerk of the Houge of Represe.:
tatives. Trinidad and = Briti:,
Guiana were represented by men
who did not represent the will «
the people. It was not astonishai: «
that in those circumstances thoy
should have a mixture of the
worst features of Crown Colony
Government, Men who coud
echieve some power under a Grown
Colony Government would not |e
opposed to all its features,

‘They would also-find that where»
Australia the powers of
disallowance by the King were
yeneral and were hardly ever used
in the Report it was suggested
that they should be specific, The
King in Council for example
could make laws for seeuring aie
maintaining the financial stability
of the Federation, It was very
obvious that this power would be
retained by the British Govern.
ment so long as the Crown was
responsible for some of the con-
stituent units of the Federation.

Their being Crown Colonies, the
advisers to His Majesty’s Govern-
ment made sure that features of
the Crown Colony system should
be retained—thus the proposed re-
serve powers of the Governor
General, the power of the King in
Council and the weak nature of the
Federal structure,

“| think the delay which has
been met in dealing with the Re-
port has been useful. For one
thing, during that time several
colonies have had their constitu.
tions changed. The different levels
of constitutional advancement have
been evened up, especially her
tween the bigger colonies. If with
further delay we can witness
greater measure of self govern-
ment in colonies, the beeter
we would be.

He had heard warnings in the
British Parliament and had seen
them in the British Press that if
each colony concentrated on self
government before joining in the
Federation, it would mean much
delay in bringing it about, They
should not pay much attention to
that. That aspect of the Report of
which he' had spoken, to his mind
was the most serious part of 11



and they would. achieve a stronger
f Fecioratlgn if they came together
as unité that’ had reached the

same level of . political adyance-

“T cannot envisage,” be said.
“our sending even two representa-
tives to a Federation in which we
would have less wer to plan

effectively for the people of
Barbados than we have = at
present,”



OWING to the illness of
Mrs. C, A. Gonsalves, the les
sons on Spanish Conversation
which were to have at
Combermere School on Thurs-
day, November Ist have been
indefinitely postponed.

|



“SUNDIAL” BRINGS
SARDINES

The Saguenay its
Sundial arrived here yesterday
with 6884 bags of flour from
Port Alfred, Canada, along with
750 cartons of sardines and a
supply of batteries. |

Sundiat ing
her caro Feeiera evening ad,
cleare port for trinid She
fs consigned to Messrs, Planta-

tions Lid.

Gas Lamp =~

Shortly after 0.15 pam. yester-
day the Fire Brigade was called
out to Hincks Street, City, to put
ou to fame which started to burn
a gas lamp post.

The gas lamp which proved to
be defective exploded burning the
} top part of the post

Labour Defeat
Did Not

Surprise Reds

MOSCOW, Oct

Pravada, Ivevestia and other
Soviet papers on Saturday carried
a brief statement from the offici.!
news agency Tass on the result of
the British general election witn
the comment, “the defeat of the
Labour Party did not surprise us’,
It attributed Labour's defeat to
“che loss of influence due to the
wrong icies uf the Labour Party
in both internal and external
affair

Ss.

The Labourites did not keep
their promises to the electorate,
They promised peaceful and
friendly relations with other coun-
tries, but waged an anti-peace
policy, unqualifiedly supporting the
plans of American

voting Con-
apparentiy

it concluded “by
servative, the voters
entertain the hope for a change
in British policy. However, the
Conservatives’ advent to power
will hardly bring anything new
since the Labour Party practically
carried gut Conservative policies.”
—U.P.

Harbour Log

IN CARLISLE BAY



Sch. Cyril E, Seeith, Sch, Mary E
Caroline, Sch. Mary M ‘ewis, Sch
ted Pilgrim §., Seh. Sunshine BF . ;
hh. dvdie Ading S., Sch Molly N |
ones, MV. Jenkins Roberts, M.V
Joy, M.V Ve B Radar, Sch
Bi u Mh Sch. Marion Bei!
w Ba Sain Mac, “Yoei! |
OP ahh Marsaltese, M.V: |
Charles A. McLean, Sch grvenkiyn DR
ARRAY AL.

Capt

] SUNDIAL, 1,052 Motle net,
sh. from Cvidaa Trujillo

}
ns sg ye - tons net, Capt |
OLETTO, Mahe ioe” tone net, Capt |
Sapsworth, ys eee

7

> msi tan net

og eer FP nce 89 tons

for Trinidad, ww





a NDAkIEWoOD, 94 tons net, Capt
Pangusson, &. Lucid
Bape worth, ie Trinidad.

SEAWELL

ARRIVALS—By BWA. YESTERDAY
From TRINTDAD
K, Farnum, E4 Hoad, A. Me
J Allamby, § Sihman, S. W





Kenztle
els,
Revac, M. Rojas, M. Rojas, M Madriz
Sucre, L. Madtiz, M. Mudra, M
Madriz-Fuentes, L
lamby, 4. Jack, 1
DEPARTURES-By

BW.LA
YESTERDAY
For TRINIDAD
Sister Margaret Poole, Hermar
Ribeiro, Florence Ripeiro, Jack Piper

Fuentes, H
French; G

Al
Randall
L

Aleta Piper. Mary Leoneet
prrnge. Morgan Leonard,

» Grandseull Aurelia Cramer
ew, Cramer, Erie Robinson, Charles
Bell, John MacGowan,
John Seott, Stan Joties, Dr, Samuel
ree be den! Bisdex, Desmond Be!

Major — Hirat

Heaton, Herbert
Jane Beaubrun,

Sionee Heaton, Mrs
Â¥riend, Simone Palmer,

Rufus Sringer, Collis’ Barrow, Hugh
Blackman Alired Wilkingon, Lionel
Franklyn, Windal Harewood, Vernon
Cooper.



In Touch With Barbados
Coastal Station

Cable and Wireleas (W.1T.) Lid, advise
that they can now communicate with the
following ships through their Barbados
Coast Station:

8.8. Raban, Arakaka, Aleoa Pioneer,
Baso Pittsburgh, Pygmalion, Aleon Run
ner, Lady Nelson, Wave Baron, Atila,
Arthhan Queen, Five Forks, Steelore,
Abiqua, Pangitoto, Alcoa Pennant, Castor,
Tieworleas, Presidente Dawn, Trun, Sun-
dial, Morayvbank, Rosa, Seanw,
Alcoa Gavalier, Jean, Algona Pilgrim,
Pyamalion, Nueva Gloria, Bella, Rosawa,
Sea Magic, Athene, Prospector, Stater-
men, Northvalley, Dragon, Loide Haiti,
Colombie, Hydra and $.5, Mahetania

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PAGE THREE

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ADVOGATE
SS foseSa)

Printed by the Advocate Co., Ltd., Broad St, Bridgetewa

Thursday, November 1, 1951

——

District Market

' THE House of Assembly on Tuesday
passed a resolution for the sum of $18,650
to provide payment for a portion of land
at»Eagle Hall on which to establish a
district market. The land will now be
purchased at $1.32 per square foot instead

’ The story of delay behind the need for
the resolution is one which will give cause

~ for grave dissatisfaction on the part of tax-

payers for two very sound reasons. For
some time now it has been agreed that
there should be district markets scattered
about St. Michael instead of a large market

’ to which neither housewives nor hawkers

were inclined to go. The Sanitary Com-
missioners of St. Michael approached the
Government in the matter and certain
areas were selected as suitable. In these
areas it was agreed to purchase spots which
would accommodate the markets. One of
these was at Eagle Hall on the property of
Hon: Mrs. Hanschell. After some discus-
sion, it was agreed by Mrs. Hanschell to
sell the land at one dollar per square foot.
The Government disagreed on the ground
that the price was too high and there the
‘matter rested for some time.

, With public desire for these markets so
strong and the reason for the delay not
being made public, people began to ask
whether the Government was really ser-
ious about the establishment of district
markets. This delay was accentuated by
the sale of a portion of land at Waterhall
for the erection of a cinema.

The Government decided to acquire the
land under the provisions of the Land
Acquisition Act. This brought about
further delap. Meanwhile, another parcel
of land was sold at Waterhall for business
purposes and the price paid was $1.40 per
square foot. It was clear that while the
Government was trifling with the power
which they had the price of land like every
other commodity, was rising.

! “The matter had been filed in the Court
but had not yet come to trial and fortun-
ately another attempt was successful. Mrs.
Hanschell now agreed rot to ask the same
price as that of the land sold on the op-
posite side of the street and to accept $1.32
per square foot.

' The land will now be purchased at $1.32
-per square foot and if nothing untoward
happens again, it is likely that in the near
future, Eagle Hall will have its district
market, even although it could have been
acquired earlier and at less cost.

| The need for the market is obvious to
-anyone who passed that district where
hundreds of people gather to make pur-
chases from hawkers who come in from
the country by bus. It may be that the
establishment of this district market will
relieve some of the pressure in Baxters
Road and Busby Alley inasmuch as it
would not be necessary for people to travel
to the City to get the items which they
‘need.

|: This should give the necessary incentive
to the Government to speed up the work
on the market which is to be erected on or
near Fairchild Street which is even in a
worse condition than Eagle Hall.

It should be easy for the Legislative
Council to concur in this resolution so that
the erection of the market might be started
as soon as possible. And it is fortunate
that the matter has been settled amicably
as this will permit the settlement of de-
tails and the handing over to be done
quickly. The growing need for this mar-
ket to accommodate the public must be
the primary consideration in this matter.







, them.

BARBADOS



The Astonishing Story Of |
The-Los¢ Soviet War Brides

RUSSIA'S Secret Police are now
ready to close .heic thick dossiers
On the case of the Soviet War
Brides — one of the most shameful
episodes in the history of Anglo-
Soviet post-war relations.

That is the meaning behind the
week's bizarre happenings outside
the Bolshoi Theatre, Moscow,
when Mrs. Iraidg Ricketts, the
Soviet-Born wife of an official at
the Science Museum, London, was
kidnapped and later “released”.

Only one bride is now iree, and
she is virtually a prigoner in the
bri.ish Embassy where she lives
with her six-year-old son,

THERE were five of tne original
15 war brides sull at liberty in
Moscow when I arrived there in
October 1949 to take over the
editorship of the Foreign, Uflices
Russian magazine, British Ally.

I knew .nem all, shared their
fears and their hopes, and oc-
casionally acted as their escort.
Only witn someone enjoying diplo-
matic privileges could they move
outside the gates of their homes,

Now that chere is little, if any,
hope left for their reprieve it is
possible to tell the full story of
their grim ordeal at the hands of
the M.V.D.—ihe Secret Police—an
ordeal which they bore for six
years.

BECAUSE they married foreign-
ers and firmly refused to renounce
their husbands they were os-
tracised by their own families.

Some ‘were turned out of their
homes; some found sanctuary in an
ill-lit basemen; of the Press De-
partment of the British Embassy.
wo were permitted to stay on
with their ailing mothers.

No Russian would dare talk to
They were banned from
employment by any Soviet agency
and deprived of all civil rights
although they were regarded as
Soviet citizens by the law,

Always Trailed

A 24-hour guard on the gates of
the Press Department ensured that
they did not’ leave the premises
unnoticed, ,

When they went outside with a
member of the diplomatic staff
they were tailed by plain-cloths
men.

If they received callers the
visitors had to show their
identity documents to the
militiaman on duty.

Inside they were spied on by
the Russian staff. Two of them

By RICHARD JONES
Formcr Editor of British Ally,
the magazine the Foreign
Office published in Moscow.

were employed as telephonists.
Outen, after mysterious telephone
calls, IT would find them in vears.

They would never divulge ‘ihe
identity of the caller or the
messages.

OCCASIONALLY plain-clothes
detectives called on them. It was
after one of these visits tha. two
of the brides, Mrs. Lola Burke,
wife of an Ealing bank official, and
Mrs, Rosa Henderson, whose
husband is now in Canada,
tempted suicide,

Both took an overdose of as-
pirin and were found unconscious
by another wife. Doctors from the
American and British embassies
tevived them.

at-

arap Lyvadea

Time and agdin we wiV.. Lie
lensiied Wwelr eiurts WwW ureuK ule
Beis Morale, HvMeculiics . was a
seyuese lo MCCL SomMeOUe VU siuc,
«hey Gid NOL walk into the wap.

sur more than five yeers
euuS ved in fear, ney maa secu
vier WiV€g Vanish Overuignl, sume
wo Siberia.

1 WAS there when the first of
the five brides was kidnapped in
June last year. Mrs, Burke had
gone to spend the nignt at the
wome of Mrs. Bolton's mother,

wie

and taken to the Lubianka
Prison,

Attempts by embassy officials
and her mother to gee her failed.
Nobody could find out on what
charge she had been taken in.
Nobody has heard of her since.

Terrified

The four remaining brides were
terrified. They rarely moved out-
side their quarters for six months,

Then one night in March this
year Mrs, Henderson went outside.
Mrs, Bolton disappeared a few
days later, Neither has been heard
of since,

Embassy officials were snubbed
by the police authorities; told it
was not their business,

these three disappeared

Mrs, Hall and Mrs, Ricketts were

siven quarters in an annexe in the
British Embassy grounds.

Outside the embassy gates



uniformed guards reinformed by
pvlain-ciothes men also kept a con-
siant watch on their movements.

Last week Mrs. Ricke.ts made
the fatal matake of visiting the
theatre with a member of the em-
bassy who did not. enjoy diplo-
matic stavus, .

Betrayed

It was the moment for which the
M.V.D.’s agents had been waiting.

It was her brother who be-
trayed her. As she was leav-
ing a performance of the
bailet at the Bolshoi he point-
ed her out to a squad of pliin-
clothes men. They pushed her
into the taxi which her escort
had called and drove off.

Mrs. Ricketts’s brother did not
meet her there by chance, He
was there by arrangement with
the police—it was the jenalty he
had to pay for his tive years’
failure to make her agree ‘io
divorce her British husband.

ahreats ds

Nobody who has met Iraida
Ricketts, and I knew her well, can
doubt that it was under dire
threats that she denied she was
ever kidnapped.

Her frienas, and they were many
in the foreign ¢Ommunity on Mos-
cow, know thatthe sto.y she told
at an obviously anranged inter-
view .with..the Western cor-

doesn’t ring true.

UL une M,.V.D. have won half
their battle with her. She will no
longer have any contact with the
world outside her mother’s home.
Her brother, an ardent Com-
munist, is her guard.

She will nox be allowed any
foreign visitors. She is under
close house arrest, though that
is not the way the M.V.D.

it.












describe

She can easily be transferred, as
other Soviet brides have, to a con-
centration camp without anyone
being the wiser.

‘She’s Tough’

Last night I spoke on the tele-
phone to a friend in Moscow who
gave this reassuring message:
“Nobody will break Ira’s spirit.
She’s tough and will stand up, as
she has done all the time, to any
brow-beating.”

Then came this ominous re-
minder from behing the Iron
Curtain: “Don’t forget this is being
recorded”, and the subject changed
to the weather.—L.E.S.

Experiments in the wrong Direction

LONDON, Oct. 22.

The Colonial Development
Corporation is “an unimaginative
enlargement of old ideas” and is
based on a wrong approach to
the whole question of Colonial
Development. So writes Lord
Milverton, until recently a part-
time member of the Corporation
and a former Colonial Governor,
in the “New Commonwealth”
issue published to-day.

“Colonial Development must
ba closely the responsibility of
the local Government in each
instance,” he says. “In its true
form, it should be a conception
of aided Colonial Government,
learning and developing under
its own authority, not as at pres-
ent an Imperial Santa Claus
whose occasional incursions mere-
ly accentuate without solving
leeal needs. We live and learn
and enlightenment may well re-
veal that the Colonial Develop-
ment Corporation is conceived
and has been built up on the
wrong lines.”

Lord Milverton says it is at
least worthy of consideration
whether it should not be a very
small holding Corporation, allo-
cating and controlling financial
aid but not administering
schemes, having under it region-
al Corporations with an entirely
regional membership which
would work through local Gov-
ernments and would encourage
them to go into partnership with
private enterprise in as many of
their schemes as possible.

He adds: ‘The local Govern-
ment should almost always be
a partner in any development
scheme under Corporation auspi-
ces. Perhaps the chief advantage
of having the actual execution of
schemes doubly removed would
be to underline the responsi-
bility of the Corporation to Par-
liament through the Secretary of
State, for the allocation of funds,
and equally to remove the
temptation to tamper with the
details.”

“It seems to me that the les-
sons learnt by the Development
and Welfare Organization in the
West Indies on the one hand, and
by the Cameroons Development
Corporation, on the other hand,
might well be studied.”

Lord Milverton believes that
Colonial development, in fact,
really comes in the end to regu-
lating the whole life of the com-
munity concerned — social eco-
nomic and political. “If we are
true to our principles, this inevi-
tably means that the only
possible channels are the nascent
Colonial nationalities themselves.
In other words, our Colonial
Development Corporation and
suchlike bodies are really experi-
ments in the wrong direction.

OUR READERS SAY

“You cannot,” he claims, “do
all the things which seem to be
implicit in the conception of
Colonial development by = an
external authority. If the devel-
opment is to live and to become
part of the organic growth of the
people, it must be under their
authority and control.

“Dimly, this dilemma has been
foreseen when we talk of associa-
ting backward peoples with the
various schemes and getting them
to regard them as their own, But,
to be truly their own, the impetus,
the faith in them, the desire to
have them succeed must be drawn
from the beneficiaries, not the
benevolent patron,”

Earlier in his article Lord
Milverton said that during the
past 25 years there had been
a great deal of loose thinking and
looser talking on the subject of
Colonial Development and the
development of backward areas
generally,

"Many expensive lessons have
been bought but the fallacy that
money alone can work these
miracles still persists in far too
many minds. Development in
this connection really connotes
complete ‘mental and _ physical
revolution.

"Even We ourselves have only
just begun to face what the
problem means so that it is, per-
haps not surprising that the peo-
ple whom we propose to help



The Colonies in

LONDON.

The possibility of colonial rep-
resentation in Britain’s Parlia-
ment was commented upon by Mr.
Ivor Thomas, author and journal-
ist, in an address last week to the
Royal Empire Society. He re-
cently returned from a tour of
North Africa, where, he said, he
found the French system of gov-
ernment “well worth studying.”

Whereas, Britain had no repre -
sentatives of overseas territories
at Westminster, one French ter-

ritory, Algeria, he pointed out
sent 56 representatives to Paris.
He ihought it would be good

policy, for “some” of our colonies
to send members to the U.K. Par-

liament. The emphasis, however,
was on the word “some.” Coun-
tries with dominion status or

near self-governing status, were
obviously strong enough to “stand
on their own feet.” But others,
particularly small colonies, would

definitely benefit.
A second § difference he noted
between British and French

methods was that in the French
North African territories there
was equal representation of
French and local people in the





develop themselves to Our pat-
tern, are not only confused about
the scope of the envisaged
change in their lives but also
ere quite unaware of the price
of such progress and the funda-
mental upheaval involved,” Lord
Milverton said,

They wanted, naturally, the
glittering prizes of Western in-
dustry; they would like a higher
standard of living and the many
desirable things (that only money
can buy, but they have not trars-
lated those desires into terms of
effort or related them to the in-
escapable conditions of regular
responsible hard work and the
acquisition of all the skills which
go to make what is known as
Western civilization.

Lord Milverton asks ; “How
many of the Colonial communities
who clamour for self-government
and freedom from Imperial
shackles have any conception of
the choice at present involved ?

“It is not a choice,” he points
out, “between self-government or
foreign rule, with the benefits of
Western economy as a common
constant, but a choice between
self-government and their own
way of life, with its attendant
poverty and misery and oppres-
sion, or foreign guidance and the
benefits of association with West-
ern economy and a slow move?
ment towards autonomy.”

the Commons ?

general assemblies, This posed 4
question which would have to be
faced soon in British territories
There were, he said, two alter-
natives: firstly, a system of ‘one
man one vote;” secondly, a sys-
tem in which plural societies
would have each community
represented in proportion to the
part they played in relation to the
country as a whole,

Mr. Thomas spoke also oi
problems which French ana
British, territories have in com-~-
mon; the conserVative tendencies
of local people, particularly in
matters of religion, which put an
inevitable break on, development;
the rapid. ineres in, populations;
the keeping, of 5 ,and order.

In troubled, times like these the
nations of the western world must
co-operate and endeavour te
understand one another, if west-
ern civilization was to survive.

He also thought that another
aspect of the nch colonies
which jt would be beneficial to

study was their method of agri-
culture it provided a good
example of the co-operative

farming system working success-
fully.



‘where reconstruction was necessary or where
there was a housing shortage the President
of the Italian republic promulgated a law
dated 10th August, 1950. This law has many
provisions
Under the law guaranteed loans can be made

oank and who either singly or through co-

¢wo or more than five living rooms and must








ADVOCATE



II. Housing Co-operatives

TO encourage private building in areas

which deserve consideration.

-o individuals who have small savings in the

selves. These houses cannot have less than

yave in addition kitchen, bath and lavatory,
yantry and entrance hall. The law authorises

he issue of loans up to 75 per cent. of the ;
otal cost of the land and the building. These §

.oans are guaranteed by a first mortgage on
-epaid within a period of thirty five years and
oer cent. per annum. A condition for obtain-

vis immediate relatives must live in it for a
ninimum period of five years.

In addition to the special fund administered
n this way by the Treasury to encourage
srivate building, credit and building insti-
utes are also offered special privileges by the
jJovernment to encourage house building.
Among these privileges is exemption from
acome tax on the interest accruing from the
oans. There must be good faith on the part
of the borrowers. No payments can be made
o individuals or co-operatives until the in-
dividual or co-operative has paid 25 per cent.
of the total cost involved in purchasing the
yuilding area in construction of the building.

By an earlier decree dated 8th May, 1947
iegislation was provided in Italy to help the
,00rest classes by direct grants in aid. Grants
were paid either to individuals or to building
ocieties and varied with the size of houses
_o be constructed. Fifteen pounds were paid
o the builder of a one-roomed apartment,
with accessories and of minimum size of 360
square feet. Thirty pounds were paid to the
builder of a two-roomed apartment with ac-
sessories and of a minimum size of 450 square
‘eet. And so by an ascending scale of pay-
ment until a ‘maximum of £50 were paid
towards an apartment with five rooms and
accessories’ and a maximum area of 990
square feet.

By another law dated 2nd July, 1949 leg-
islation'was created to assist companies and
societies engaged in building “economic”
nouses for the people. Under this law the
State contracts to pay an agreed portion of
the cost of building over a period of thirty
five years! In the years 1949-50 and 1950-51
the State contribution was of an order of
£ 1,200,000 for each financial year. In the
financial year 1951-52 it was half this sum.
Popular or economic houses are defined
as follows: |
1. Each house must have not less than two
and not more than five living rooms be-
sides kitchen, bath, lavatory, store-room
and entrance.

2. Its own entrance from a common stair-

way.

Its own lavatory.

Its own water, i

. Must conform to sanitary and health

provisions.

The maximum area of the largest house
2annot exceed 990 square feet for a five-
roomed building.

Popular houses whether built by indus-
rialists, workmen or farmers can be rented
or bought by the occupiers.

Under this same law savings or lending
yanks are authorised to issue loans to co-
yperatives of journalists, magistrates and
other professional groups. The banks are
iuthorised to issue loans comprehensive of
‘he whole cost of building, less one half the
State’s contribution. Under this law the State
gives further encouragement to house build-
ars by exempting the owners for 25 years
from payment of house tax. Many other tax
2oncessions are provided. Due to this active
promotion of house-building, the State, in
italy is not only looking after the interests
of all its families, but is helping to create
employment for workers in the building in-
dustry.

To-morrow:

a ee

“THE STATE”



he land and buildings. The loans have to bel§
are subject to an interest not exceeding four}!

ng a loan is that the owner of the house or}





















To the Editor, The Advocate—
IR,—This is a brief comment
on the handling of “Requisition
Forms”—sent by the Education
Department to the elementar
Schools—through which, schoo!
buy requirements with small

grants
Has any ons ever known the
procedure? Firstly, a form is

sent to a school with let us say,
a total of ten dollars. Secondly,
a teacher has to go to a store
and ask for the prices of the
articles he wants so that he can
enumerate them with their prices
not to exceed the ten dollars.

Sometimes it takes an Archimi-
des to work them out. Thirdly,
‘tthe form has to be taken to the
headmaster who signs it; then he
fn turn has to hunt down the
Reverend who may be found at
the vicarage if he is not on holi-



day and he also signs it. After
this it has to be signed by the
District Inspector, and that is the
third stage.

Fourthly, a clerk copies that
list on two new forms and sends
them back to the headteacher; by
this time about two months would
fhhave elapsed and the fifth stage
comes up.

A teacher takes the two new
forms to the store again, so as
to bring out his parcel of require-

ments; and very often, when he
gets there, he discovers that the
store was not awaiting his forms
and sold all the articles he
wanted.

Oh! What a pernicious prece-
dent! What a poor regard of the

integrity and honesty of a poor
elementary teacher.

Justa while ago, if this teacher

were allowed the same ten dol-
lars on the pay sheet, you will
find the ins or dodging for
the bills. “Where is the bill for
that six cents in pins?” You
often heard. Then if he did not
find the bill six cents. was
subtracted from the next grant.

I have known of a teacher who
could not find the Reverend to
sign the form until he was nearly
weary searching for him. Then
after this he was told by a clerk
from the office that there was no
inspector appointed for his school

yet, so he could not have his
form signed and hence no re-
auirements.

As my word liveth if I were a

teacher, I would send every form
back to the Department just as it
came and do without the require-
ments.

A BIG MAN
30.10.51

Grow More Food

To The Editor, The Advocate—

SIR,—In view of the proposed
increase in the price of rice from
January next and the further
increase in the cost which is
bound to follow, it would be in
the, interest cf the entire island
if those persons who are in con-
trol of land would endeavour,
now that the rainy season has
come to plant food crops.

The extent to which gardening
has been done in this island with-
in the last few years shows that
there is room for it as a subsi-
diary. There has never been a
waste of vegetables; and in addi-
tien Barbados imports thousands
of dollars worth of garden veg-
etables from St. Lucia, St. Vin-
cent, Dominica and Canada.

In addition to reducing
cost of living it is possible f

the

or the

growers to improve the standard

of nutrition by their efforts to
ow vegetables and so vary the
iet of the family.

Here and there in every dis-
trict one sees small spots of land,
it is true, lying fallow. If as in
some cases it provided pasturage



of 7

SEE HOW
By JON HOPE

@ It’s a good thing authors don’t
put all their egos in one basket.

There’s a man in Manchester
who has destroyed a lot of com-
placency in booksy circles. He is
Charles Nowell, Librarian of Man-
chester public libaries. He order-
ed a census of the library public's
reading. Top of the poll comes
Dorothy L. Sayers (whose last
novel was published 14 years ago).
Census showed 685 copies of her
books in use, 109 on the shelves



THEY SLIDE

for small animals it would still
have been serving some useful
purpose but in the majority of
instances it is put to no use.

It is surprising what q small

well kept garden in the back
yard can do for the family table.
Yours

ECONOMY.

Second and third places fell to late
Sir Hugh Walpole (596 in use, 788
on the shelves); and Leslie (The
Saint) Charteris (582 in uge, 15
waiting for borrowers).

Runners-up; John Buchan,
Agatha Christie, Mazo de la Roche,
Howard Spring (426 out on loan,
23 on the shelves).

Fourteenth was Priestly; seven-
teenth, Daphne du Maurier.

Not placed were C. S. Fores‘er.
Graham Greene.

—L.E.S.















THURSDAY, NOVEMBER 1, 1951

NOW









IN STOCK ‘

PLANTATION & FACTORY
LABOUR SHEETS



Call







N

PNG SF ol

GOLDEN ARROW
FLOUR



NUTS PRUNES
BRANDY CURRANTS
CHERRIES SULTANAS
COOKING BUTTER
TABLE BUTTER
KIDNEY SUET



A FRESH SHIPMENT

“Bengalines ;
She Cast Includes:
Passion Blue
Dusky Rose
Old Gold
Feather Grey

A Da Costa

and Select Early from
ADVOCATE STATIONERY.








OF

JUST ARRIVED.

¢

Presentation

For the
WEEK-END
PARTY

MILK FED CHICKENS
MILK FED DUCKS
DRESSED RABBITS
FILLET STEAKS

OX TAILS

FRESH VEGETABLES
GOLD BRAID RUM



You Too, Ly FFE
will enjoy a bottle of Sy | | oN
MUSCATEL AYN ae Ki

Only $2.10 per bottle



PHONE GODDARD'S









ee

THURSDAY, NOVEMBER 1

Workers Should Repay

TO LABOUR WELFARE —

, 1951

FUND —says GODDARD

MR. FRED GODDARD told the electorate at St. Patrick,
Christ Church, on Monday night, that the Electors’ Associ-
ation feel that when a worker in the sugar industry borrows
money from the Labour Welfare Fund, he should only pay
back two-thirds of the lean as the money of the fund really

belongs to these workers.

Mr. Goddard who was speaking at a meeting of the Electors’
Association was referring to the part of his Party’s mani-
festo dealing with the Labour Welfare Fund.

The meeting was held in sup-
port of his candidature and that of
Mr, W. W. Reece for the parish of
Shrist Church at the forthcoming
General Election for the House of
Assembly. They are the present
members representing Christ
Church in the House.

Mr. Reece who spoke first, told
tis hearers that one of the first
things his Party had supported in
the present session of the House
cf Assembly was the extension of
the Barbados Scholarships from
«ne to five, one being for girls.
I{s and Mr. Goddard were among
those who had given this measure
suppgrt because they believed that
education Was a blessing which
every man was entitled to, no mat-
ter how humble his origin. An-
other thing they had supported
right up to the hilt. was the in-
crease of Old Age Pensions. As
they knew the amount per person
was now 7s. 6d. per week but be-
fore it was 5s. They had also
supported the reduction of the age
to 68 years, “and believe me,”
added Mr. Reece, “we are not go-
ing to be satisfied until it is redue-
ed to 65, because a man at the
age of 65 is generally worn out.-

“I will make every effort to
have this reduction brought about
if I am returned to the House.”

Tenantry Roads

Mr. Goddard and he had also
supported in 1948, the money
Resolution which appeared in the
estimates for $224,000 for the im-
provement of tenantry roads in
the island. Anyone who travelled
along these roads was aware of
the need for improvement. “I am
glad to say that the condition of
some of these roads has been im-
proved, but regret that there are
others still in a lamegtable state.”

Mr, Reece then went on to

refer to other progressive mea-
sures in the House which he and
Mr. Goddard had supported and
said that he was just doing that
“to give the lie to many false
rumours that they, and particu-
larly he, had done nothing for
the people of the island.” Such
a statement was utterly untrue,
he said. One of these measures
was the Teachers’ Pension Act.
Another was for the provision of
payment to “relief teachers.”
“And while on this”, said Mr.
Reece, “I think you will all
agree with me that it is almost
hopeless for the small number
of teachers in the schools to
cope -with the tremendous in-
crease of pupils.

“IT was speaking to a teacher a
short while ago and he told me
that it is impossible for him to
teach a class of 60, 70 or 80 boys.
I replied that it is not only im-
possible but the conditions under
which he is expected to teach are
even more impossible. ‘I cannot
understand how little children ever
learn anything nowadays’. —

“You must have read in the
Press a short while ago of the
severe criticism of our educational
system, on the grounds that the
pupils turned out from the ele-
mentary schools are not up to the
standard of former years, I do not
think this is any fault of the
teacher. I think it is due to two
or three things. Lack of trained
teachers, the very poor accommo-
dation and the conditions under
which pupils are being taught.
These conditions should be re-
moved.

Training College

“We know a teachers’ training
college has been established at
Erdiston but we also know that
it will take a large number of
years before the benefits of that
training college can reach our
children,”

In 1950, said Mr. Reece, Mr.
Goddard and he _ introduced in
the House, several Bills at the re-
quest of the Vestry of* Christ
Church. One of these Bills dealt
with the purchase of a_ refuse
collector, and the erection of
standposts in the parish. As a
result of that Bill no less than
ten standposts had been erected
in one year in the parish.

“Now can anybody say_ that
Fred Goddard and “Juby” Reece
have not been doing their best in
the interest of the parish in see-
ing that conditions are made bet-
ter for all?” questioned Mr.Reece.

He went on to speak of other
things Mr. Goddard and he had
done for the parish, and among
these mentioned Pao bag —
sui rted the esolution ‘or
$4'600 to build the Post Office;
the Resolution for the repairs to
the Foundation Boys’ School,
and that for the repairs to Provi-
dence School. “As long as I
live,” he said, “I shall always do
my utmost, inside and outside of
tne House, to forwad the interest
of the people of this island and
in particular of the parish of
Christ Church”. Mr. Reece then
asked the electorate to return
him to the House and promised
to continue to serve them to the
best of his ability.

More Standposts

Mr. Goddard told his listeners
that they had heard Mr. Reece



had spoken of what they had
done in the House. Ali that he
had said was true. Mr. Goddard
then spoke of the ten standposts
that had been erected in the par-
ish as a result of the Resolution
they had succeeded in getting
through the House and added.
“These are nothing to do with
three others which the Vestry of
which I am a member, has
erected.”

He could assure them that Mr.
Reece and he knew the needs of
the people.

In his position as a merchant in
Roebuck Street he came in con-
tact with all kinds of people
from all over the island and he
sought to know the condition of
these people.

“Iam really pleased that at
a time like this when I go
around canvassing from house
to house, I have the opportun-
ity to see the conditions under
which people live. Orfy yester-
day in this same district I went





into some houses, and it was
brought home to “more for-
cibly than ev

the people. A
talk about bac

amount given has not been

doubled, because I know the

money would be well spent.”

It was a shame, seid Mr. God-
dard, that in this age when
people were looking and thinking
of progress, some did not have
the means to buy the necessities
of life.

Social Legislation

“There is no social legislation
brought down to the House that
Mr: Reece and I will not vote for.

“I am going to do my best for
the people at all times and hav-
ing regard to the interest in the
people that has been shown by
Mr. Reece, the work he has done
during the session now coming to
an end, and his experience, I am
asking you to send him back with
me to the House. I can assure
you that we have every intention
of again doing good work in your
interest in the following session.”

Mr. Goddard referred to his
Party’s Manifesto and said that
if they could get half of the
things on it done during the next
five vears, good progress in the
country would have been made.

One of the important things
in it was in connection with the
Labour Welfare Fund, he said.
This fund. was raised through the
people who worked in the sugar
industry. The money was generally
lent to the workers to repair their
houses, but the Electors Associa-
tion felt that as the money be-..
longed to these people who put
it there, a borrower should only
pay back two-thirds of the money
he had borrowed and the remain-
ing third he should keep, We have
considered it, and we feel it is
economic, well-founded and can
be done, and I would like to see
it adopted by the Government in
power,”

The Unemployed

Mr. Goddard

went on to
say how very necessary it
was to find work for the
island’s unemployed, but that
the Government had done nothing
to find the means of employment.
They had not, until quite recently
sought to encourage new indus.
tries which would provide work,
nor had they tried to encourage
capital to do business in the island,
he said. “Unemployment is our
big problem,” he declared,

Concluding, he said: Vote for
both Mr, Reece and me on Election
Day, we stand for everything
constructive. Put us back together
and we will represent the people
as ever we have done in the past
and better.” /



Two Months For
Bodily Harm

JUSTICES. G.
H. A> Vaughan sitting in the
Court eal yesterday sen-
tenced Olyn Kirton of Sut-
tle Street, St. Michael, to two
months’ imprisonment with hard
labour for inflicting bodily harm
on Claude Beckles on June 9.

By doing this Their Honours

L. Taylor an?

‘confirmed the decision of Myr.
Cc. L. Walwyn, Police Magistrate
of District “A”. Kirton has

appealed to the Court of Error,

Mr. W. W. Reece K.C., Solicitor
General, associated with Mr.
B. Niles appeared on behalf of
the defendant while Sgt. King
prosecuted on behalf of the
Police.

Beckles told the court that on
June 6 some time in the afternoon
he was walking down Suttle
Street when he saw the defend-
ant. The defendant spoke to him
and there followed an argument
and the defendant threw some-
thing like ammonia in his face.
Some of this liquid got in his eye
which caused him to go the Gen-
eral Hospital for treatment.



HACK

HOME



MISS AUDREY MACINTYRE (left). who returned from
yesterday by the Golfito with her
Glindon Reed (centre) and Miss Pauline Manning shortly after land-
ing at the Baggage Warehouse. —See Carib Page 2.

Dowding Pledges
To Serve People

Neither of the “Labour canci-
datus fo: St. George could quote
from the minutes of the House of

Assembly meetings to show the
people that Mr. Dow?cing, Elec-
tors’ /.csoriati-n cancilet>, had

Spokti egainsi any measure that
would have benefited the people,
Mr, Dowding told © large crowd
of the electorate at Market Hill,
St. George, lasi night.

“I have served you well during
the last five veurs and wil! serve
you well agin,’ be said. “Any
ism which is not for the people
will have Dowdingism behind it
to erase it,”

“My bone against Socialists is
not their colour,” he said.

Another talked of a vision but
what the people wanted to hear
were the hard facts, employment,
wages, politics.

Mr. Dowding stressed that the
main difference between Labour
and Conservatives was the ques-
tion of state ownership as against
free enterprise.

Wherever they turned it was a
question of the masses. The real
diehard Tories were no more.
They had to realise that Capital
and Labour should go together,

On the question of the cost of
living, he said they sad to sell
sugar at a price the English gave
for it, On the other hand Barba-
dos had to pay whatever price the
English asked for machinery or
whatever it might be for factory
or for the people. The Labour
were not tackling that question
the right way. It was not forced
home that the people were suffer-
ing from unemployment,

“So long as I have voice I will
be strong in voicing your rights
as against the rights of the Eng-
lishmen, regardless of colour.”

He said that for the past five
years he had been representing
them and the defied any man to
say he ever did anything against
the community. He had been on
the Poor Law Board and knew
the people's needs. During the
five years he had been in politics
he had learnt much and was there
to help them.

Agricultural Wommunity

Mr. E. K. Walcott said that al-
though they did not seek to decry
their opponents they would show
them that they were incapable.

One of the four posts in the
Executive Committee was the Min-
ister of Agriculture. This com-
munity was naturally an agricul-
tural community. Everything that
they had was based on their sugar
and tihey had to have people in
the Executive Committee who
were conscious about agriculture,

“Today no member of the Exe-
cutive Committee is a planter or
has any intimate knowledge of
agriculture,” he said, “Therefore
our agricultural problems are not
well tackled,”

If the Electors’ Association were
put in power they could call upon

more than one member to be
Minister of Agriculture.
There was Mr. Ward or Mr.

Dowding who had the necessary
skill, ability and experience, They
Bhould consider all that and
should not be prejudiced by any
bogus idea of colour.

There were - Health problems,
and many other problems, but
none so importan: as the ‘agricul-
tural problem as far as Barbados
was concerned,

“We the Conservatives always
carry the brain and ability but
it has always been prejudice that
has worked against us,” he said.

“We have issued a manifesto,”
he said; “our political opponents
have not issued a manifesto. If
they have not issued a manifesto
and they fall down, they can say,
‘we made no promise,’”

When they got copies of the
Electors Association's manifesto
they would see that the main dif-
ference between Labour and them
were that Labour believed in na-
tionalisation whereas they be-
lieved in free enterprise... That
meant new industries, new indus-
tries meant more employment and
more employment meant more
wages.



‘‘Conkies’’ And “Blow Tots’? For Nov. 5

CONKIES the craze of the
average Barbadian on Guy Fawkes

In many of the City stores andRoman
Country

at some stores in the

candles, Jack-in-the-box,
Devil among the tailors, jet wheels,

Day, will probably enjoy the same districts, fireworks are on display sparkles and matches (green and

popularity this year.

ing up corn flour and have been
engaging banana and plantain

Little children and even men and
This can be judged by the num- women cannot resist stopping and
ber of people who have been stor- peering into the show windows

at the motley coloured fireworks
The stores have

leaves, which are two essentials good sales.

in the making of “coakies”. Day
after day, local flour mills have
been grinding bushels of corn.

fun on the day when Guy Fawkes

This year, new names have been
added to the list of fireworks while
most of the old ones have remained

Guy Fawkes Day is only five The cheapest of the fireworks--
days off. Everybody likes to have which the children will buy most

—are bombs and red devils

attempted to blow the English A Variety
Parliament “sky high” and so he Crackers, wheels, flower pot
prepares for it, dizzle dazzles, squibbs, rocket

been enjoying

red are in good supply in the
stores.
Some children, who cannot

withstand the temptation to “fire”
their fireworks, have already
started to have their fun, Others
have secufed cocoa tins and made

the familiar “blow tot” which
keeps as deafening a noise as a
bomb, With moist carbide inside
and a match flaming at a small
hole in the bottom of the covered
tins tots” provide lots of
fur the childrer
4

England
mother is seen chatting with Mra.

School For
Blind Opened

AT SANTA CRUZ

THE Barbados Association in
aid of the Blind and Deaf has
been informed that a schgol for
blind children has been opened
in Trinidad at Santa Cruz. The
Trinidad School is being run
under the auspices of the
Trinidad and Tobago Blind Wel-
fare Association, The Association
announces that it is in a position
to consider applications for the
admission of blind children from
other colonies when the term
opens after the Christmas Holi-
days.

Children who wisn to enter the
School should apart ‘from being
blind be otherwise physically nor-
mal and the proposal is that the
same general “education as is
available for sighted children
should be given together with
specialised training in Braille ahd
handicraf..

To be eligible for admission to
the School, a child should be be-
tween the ages of 6 and 18, (the
younger the better). It must be
medicaly fit and must be certified
by a medical officer as_ blind,
Children who suffer from physical
or mental disability in addition to
blindness cannot be considered
for admission.

Any parents or guardians who
are interested in sending a child
to the School should apply for
further particulars to the Social
Welfare Office, Garrison, St.
Michael.



Seismographic
Tests Continue
On East Coast

The vessel Sunshine R is still
working off the Ragged Point
coast, It is carrying out marine
seismographic tests for the Bar-
bados Gulf Oil Company. This
marine work is expected to con-
tinue throughout the year.

Dr. Auer told the Advocate
yesterday that the tests have
heen successful. They do _ not
prove whether there is oil or not
but they give some picture of
what the underground looks like
in order to choose likely drilling
sites.

He said that they had previous-
ly tried to carry out these tests
from. the and, but the island,
being so small, and owing to the
heavy charges that were needed,
they could not operate from the
land.

“We are going to concentrate
on the east coast for the next
month or two so as to try to
complete the work on that side
before the sea gets too rough.
When the sea is rough on that
side of the isiand, we will trans-
fer our work to the west coast,”
he said,

30’- For Wounding

POLICE Magistrate H. A, Talma
yesterday fined Joseph Morris
of Hothersal Turning, St. Michael,
30/- and 2/- costs to be paid in
14 days or one month’s imprison-
ment for wounding Caspar
Quintyne on October 13.

MISSIONARY GOES

TO OISTIN
MISSIONARY Sam Mathura
who arrived here three weeks ago
from Trinidad to give a series of
lectures locally is now carrying
his campaigning to Oistin, Christ
Church,







BARBADOS ADVOCATE



Two-Thirds Of Loan

enema pomnpaney

Revuedeville

_ Outstanding

By STAGE FAN

REVUEDEVILLE 1951, now
being staged under the dis-
tinguished patronege of Sir Wil-
liam and Lady Savage, at the
Empire Theatre by Mrs. Joyce
S uart and her dancing cla*s, can
be best summed up as “a show of
outstanding ability, technique ond
class.”

Associated with the c pacity
crowd which attended last night's
premiere was the high and sati--
factory standard of acting, The
troupe displayed their talent to ¢n
appreciative audience fully bent on
glossing over the amateurish mis-
takes— o my mind caused by stage
fright.

Not only was the cast wel!
selected, but there was grace and
poise in the movement of the
voung boys and girls. Fven the
little ‘ots performed reason biv
well, I share the view expressed
by the many who attended the
whow that it will be a bumper
success,

The stage decorations were of
tasty design. The cos umes good
and the scenes of a high standard.
The movement of limbs blended
with the rhythmic and exotic beat

of the “tom tom” drums in a
jungle dance,
Truly, this show provided the

audience with laughter, pleasure
and entertainment. It struck an
“all-time high” in Barbadian and
incidentally West Indian culture,
which has come to stay wi h us,

Ever too often have we rejected
these amateur shows. Ever too
often have we criticised the
sterling qualities end efforts made
by people in their attempt to hiring
about a definite conciousness of
our own culture,

And now to the show. It de-
picts the visit to the West Indies
of a group of American dancing
‘tudents during their summer
holidays. The s udents plan to
study West Indian culture, folk-
lore and creative dancing. Be-
cause of the expensive proposition
it is, they stage shows in each
island to defray costs of boarding,
lodging and travel.

The show opens with the
‘udents leaving their hometown
Chicago, by rail for Idaho. Much
of the acting in this opening scene
is America, Then, on arriving at
Seawell Airport, Barbados — the
first stop of the tour—the West
Indian life comes into the picture.
The story depicting West Indian
life, ig original. The local scenes,
native habits, music and costumes
provide fine entertainment.

The customs, culture and folk-
lore of each West Indian ‘island—
Trinidad, British Guiana and
Jamaica—are presen.eq with great
finesse and ease by the mixed
‘st. The work of Mrs, Stuart,
the producer, in getting the girls
and boys to grasp readily alien cul-
ture and folklore, stands out as
a testimonial of her versatili y end
stagecraft,

Stealing the show is the clown-
ing of Mr. Joseph Tudor, Junr.

beau iful singing of Miss Nell Hall 48

and the ballet dancing of the small

(Doreen Gibbs) and her subjects
in “Jungle Fantasy” were items
well received.

The laughter provided by Mr.
Tudor (Oscar) the
tumes, the acting, singing and
dancing of the troupe and the
music of the Barbados Police
Band under the baton of Capt
Cc. E. Raison, A.R.C.M., M.B.E
(by the kind permission of Colone)
R. Michelin) ring down the curtain
on a production which will remain
fresh in the minds of ell
who see it.

lovely cos-

those



B.C. Publications
On Show At
» “Wakefield”

AN exhibition of recent British
Council

Publications is now on
view at the British Council
“Wakefield”, Whitepark, and at

the Speightstown Branch Library

Among the publications shown
are the latest contribution to the
Series “The Arts in Britain” deal-
ing With Music, Drama and The
Novel from 1945—1950, and te
he series “The Year's Work’
which ¢over the achievements of
1950 in Music The Theatre, Liter-
uture and Films,

A selection of Supplements to
British Book News can also be
seen; these excellent little mono-
graphs, on famous British writers
afte published monthly and are
the work of well known critics:
‘he most recent are studies of
George Eliot, Osbert Sitwell and
Jane Austen,

girls, The male quartette and SPRPRGCOPODO PROVO GOOD
the performance of the :

9
Schoelboy’s
, 2
Inquiry
*
Adjourned
Further hearing in the inquiry
concerning the death of Edgehill
Drakes, a schoolboy of Welchman

Hall, St. Thomas, was yesterday
adjourned by Coroner C L

Wwaiwyn at the District “A”
Police Court until Tuesday, No-
vember 6.

Drakes died about 2 p.m. on

Sunday October 28 while on his
way w the General Hospital after
he was involved in an accident
with the motor car M-2749 owned
and driven by Clement Fields of
Richmond Gap, St. Michael, on
Welchmen Hall Road, St, Thomas.

Dr. A, S. Cato who performed
the post mortem examination on
October 29 about 1 p.m. said that
the body of the boy was identi-
fled to him by Gilbert Forde. The
apparent age of the boy was 14
and he ‘was dead for about 14
hours,

In his opinion death was due to
shock snd haemorrhage from the
injuries received,

Gilbert Forde said that he
went to the Public Mortuary and
identified the body of the de-
ceased to Dr, Cato at 12.30 p.m.
on October 29, The deceased was
his son,

Keeping Left

Michael Watson a 13-year-old
schoolboy of Welchman Hall, St.
Thomas, said that on October 28
about 1,30 p.m. he was riding a
bicycle along Welchman Hall
Road. He was going in the direc-
tion of the country on the left
side of the road. Drakes, the de-
ceased was also riding’ with him

and they were riding about three | ¢

feet from the*left gutter, Both of
them were riding at a moderate
rate of speed, While riding he
heard a car horn and pulled in
more to the left side of the road.
He hoard a car end then saw the

deceased “in the air’. After this
he did not stop for he was afraid.
When he heard the car horn

he looked up and saw the car
about 60 feet away coming to-
wards them, When the car passed
he heard the brakes of the motor
car applied,

The motor car was
at a fast rate of speed.

To the Jury: Watson said that
the deceased wes not riding with
his head down,

travelling



Fr. Lane Appointed
Curate Of Cathedral

AT a meeting of the Appoint-
ments Board yesterday, the Rev.
Harold Lane, Vicar of St. Mar-
tins, was unanimously appointed
to the curacy of St, Michael's
Cathedral,

Before going to St. Martins,
Father Lane worked at All Souls.
He will take up his new duties
as from December 1,

J’ca Relief Raffle

THE winner the electric
lamp which was raffled yester-
day in aid of the Mayorsof King-
ston (Jamaica) Hurricane Relief
Fund was holder of ticket No,



of

The raffle realized $55.72.

%
.

; PAIN’S |

BRUCE WEATHERHEAD

ss LT) = Head of Broad Street >>
‘,

x AAAAIA FCA LAAA DAIS AFA OS

COO cod

CELEBRATED
FIREWORKS

The Largest Assortment in

town is at - - -

WEATHERHEAD'S

Crackers, Wheels, Flower



Pots, Dizzle Dazzle, Squibbs, %
xockets, Roman Cyl. ¥
Jack - in - the - Box, Devil g
Among _ the Tailors, Jet %
Wheels, ete , ete, %
»

Prives: 4c., 8c.. 12¢., Ic, x
24c., 36c., 60c., 72".,

$1.08, $1.44, $1.80. %

$1.92, $2.64, $8.35 %

and $4.32. %

SPARKLERS—14c. pk. of 12 ¥

MATCHES (Red & Green %
—6c. Box &
RED DEVILS . 3c. each
BOMBS . ys 2c. each %
Call in and make your Sclec- %
tion To-day. 3

SOS





Ladies’ Handkerchiefs
in Gift Boxes

HONG

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EMBROIDERED HANKIES

{

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SHEPHERD
& Co. Ltd.

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PAGE FIVE









COOLING &
REFRESHING

24e. TIN





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a ee POS

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WHAT

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at 17e. a foot
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3 A Golden Opportunity .... 3
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‘ offered now at unbelievably low prices x
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: KNIGHTS DRUG STORES 3

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so ae Ma
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a IN THE CHECKER BOARD BAGS a.
we, He desom Jones & Co., Ltd—bisirbutor ea
wt “et aa ee =





?





© @
WIN AN EKCO RADIO

HOW MANY Sciuws
| A JAB
| OVER $5.00 ius BILL
ENE EET IE DE OLN ELE PRLS LEAR EEL EEE EEE





GUESS COUPON WITH EVERY
FROM NOVEMBER IST
A. BARNES & CO., LTD.





PAGE SIX BARBADOS





BY CARL ANDERSON

HENRE =:



“CKEY MOUSE

/ NONSENSE! ONE } J TUT TUT, BLACK BRIAN..
\ LITTLE OPERATION 11 SQuU ASKED
) \.nANO HELL NENER| |] FoR rr: _)
/ AVE TO OO ANY
\ THEMIS AGAIN!

NOW YOu SHALL HANE TO BE PUT
) | AWAY INTO A BOTTLE WITH ALL THE
GHOSTS!

I OON'T THINK
YOu SHOULD DO,
res TOMS
FRIEND MICKEY /

| | OTHER OSOBEDIENT

"C IT'S ALEXANDER : L
SOME OF HIS FRIENDS
PLAYING OUT THERE

"HE Great Scorr!
WHAT'S ALL THAT

BY FRANK STRIKER

NO. BUT WITH YOUR HELP, ONE MORE WS

GARG MAY BE TRAPPED. WILL YOU DOAS!

SAY, WITHOUT pela MY SOURCE

OF INFORMATION ? yr > f
A)

| YOURE WILLING TO PACE GREAT

DANGEI2 YOU MIGHT CATCH AN

IMPORTANT MEMBER OF TWE
GANG REDHANDED/

A i UNFORTUNATELY, THE JEWELRY YOU
& 3 RECOVERED WAS OF UTTLE VALUE,
€ TO TELL WHERE WE _Ae7 THAT THe rr VALUABLE OF THE THINGS
BATES WAS] | STOLEN BY THAT GANG- HAVE NOT

BEEN RECOVERED. emma}













| WELL... THAT MiGs TOOK
CARE OF ONE SHIELD,/ AND










NO “BLITS"- YOUR LOw-
BROW FRIENDS WILL
HAVE TO GET ALONG









I WANTED TOD
| TAKE YOU NIGHT-
CLUBBING TO
CELEBRATE /

, 'VE GOT A LITTLE SURPRISE
| FOR MAGGIE -I CAN'T WAIT
TO TH. HER -
5 eer

on






I THINK [T'S GREAT,.: AND
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o

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Seas ® Wy DON'T YOU BUY THE PLACE,.
GET COMPETENT PEOPLE TO RUN
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WHAT YOU WANTED
TO DO FOR MES





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15 A MAGNIFICENT LAVOUT,...



THE PHANTO*






SS: - THE JUNGLE Seas, OOP THE +FROM TRIBE TO TRIBE ACROSS THE | \+INTO THE DEEP WOODS TO THE
THE TOWNS OF BENGALI GOSSIP~~ | | WORD SPREADS QUICKLY ++~ JUNGLE FASTNESS=DEEPER-DEEAER.| | FABULOUS SKULL THRONE OF THe



0



ADVOCATE





PTHURSDAY, NOVEMBER 1, 1951











ADVERTISE
IN
THE
EVENING
ADVOCATE
e
Mounting Circulation
Every Week
e
HEIR good looks tell you they're just right. | for Manne. iat
T You know, too, when you look at the price _ 2237 or 2508
tag, that you can’t get finer value. Illustrated ®
is a Two-tone Brogue. ‘Tied to ev ir i K
the John White etn Sites dee | ADVOCATE

Advertising Department

LIGHTNING
op
exLUBAIty

which means ‘ just right’! Look for it in 4
leading stores in Barbados.













4 Geek She.

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means made just right



Sf SSSOSSSOSOOS

HAVE YOU PLACED
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By choosing
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HEAVY DUTY




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‘Shiments are once again coming forward and ‘Lightning’ fasteners

you are advised to book early.
NOTE SOME OF. THE MAIN. FEATURES
6 cyl. 42 B.H.P. PERKINS: Hetvy ‘Duty
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Hour-meter
be ante geome are obtainzble for ploughing
hilst for rea heavy; i “half-tracks”
sono , ly yY going alf-tracks
THE TROUBLE-FREE TRACTOR — BACK-
ED BY OUE SERVICE ORGANISATION

are manufactured by

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LIMITED

(A subsidiary company of
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Limited)

S

T. GEDDrS GRANT LTD,
Agents.



YOUR ENQUIRIES INVITED!

COURTESY
GARAGE

ROBERT THOM LIMITED
—AGENTS—

Dial 4616



SS =
SPECIAL offers to all Cash and Credit Customers for Thursday to Saturday only



USUALLY NOW
Pkgs. Jacob Cream Crackers 49 33

USUALLY NOW

Tins Grapefruit AA

Pkgs. Polar Icing Sugar 37 44 ~=Bottles Dows Stout 21

Tins Succotash 34 +40 ~=Bottles Frontenac Beer 21

. V. SCOTT & Co. Ltd. Broad Street




LOT IN TOWN
| NMAS
TREE

| DECORATIONS



| ADVOCATE STATIONERY

ee a I ~ SS me
t SSS

===” TPE ——— SBF CG SEES — SSS.

SS
SSS

{

a i ttl eta i ta eli a tt



THURSDAY, NOVEMBER 1, 1951

CLASSIFIED ADS, rumic sats

TELEPHONE 2508. REAL ESTATE :

BARBADOS ADVOCATE

PUBLIC NOTICES | J’ca Grants Mining |
Ten cents per agate fine on week-day’ Licence To U.S.

| Gnd 12 cents per agate © *« on Sundays



PAGE SEVEN’

SHIPPING NOTICES





zinc, copper and silver for which
the capitalist will prospect in two
areas of the island.

These areas are considered ideal



——— ee





























































































































an THE UNDERSIGNED will offer for Sal Gnd #185 on Suntave oa ° ° a a ena nb 2 savied, = | “Oikvane tine, “Limite i SS
wi rv for Sale tali other ores, and it is reported tha ZEALAND LINE, D
The charge for announcements of . at Public competition at their office, N Ca iI ‘ ~ j
Burts Marriages, Deaths, aoes| FOR SALE 17 High | Street, Bridgetown, on Friday P st ae study — Tyree Eo See :
ements, and 'n Memoriam notices 1s the 2nd day of November, 1951, at 2 p.m. a ere may even go. ere. S.S. “POxtf ADELAIDE” is schedulec
$1 50 on week-days and $1.80 on Sundays Minimum charge week 72 cents and The Two-storied Dwellinghouse ieee | NOTICE Germ Car Ree’ Corvengantene . to sail ad fobert Sopeanioer 25th,
for ed number ce words ee to 50, and ba or ow EA words —~ over 24 ee “CONISTON” with the land whereon PARISH OF ST JOSEPH KINGSTON, J’ca., Oct. 23. Melbourne October 4th, Sydney October Ci Gle T tl ti
cents per word on week-days and cents a w week—4 cents aj the same Stands and thereto belonging, 10th, Gladstone October 16th, Port Alma qu
Se ee week vag De Deed eeek ce Pome contain Be edn eee: | p Wil those, persoliorting Tyres to. the Following upon the announce-||] yew sazeMENT— Jem, Giedetene Ocreber 16m, Fart Sime ie ransatiantique
edditiona! war? feet or thereabouts, situate at 10th Ave-| without delay vr ment that the Jamaica Government arriving at Trinidad about November
cocked aie nue Belleville. St. Michael. : A. T. cane renee a concession to a Ca-!||] GAS COOKERS #ist and Barbados November 2th. seeeseee
‘ nspection by appointment w rs. Parochial Treasarer, |Nadian firm for oil mining hts " In addition to general cargo this
LYTE — On 2ist October, 1951, Rosalie AUTOMOTIVE Myo further’ paruoutene Sly Meeaptian St. "Joneph. Jin Jamaica comes the announces — eee ee eee ie Ee oe
Lyte, late Retired ‘Héad-Teacher of | =e M Fge ol agpaea 8 | 28.10.51—An ment that the Government has) ALL SOLD een Oren! supe tite ot ENGLAND & FRANCE
ifton i is’ ichool. The ne 14—6 Vauxha’ Engine C LE. <
Suanevat> ‘leaves.’ Gar take. radidanon became, 6 rebeonahie oll’ tallaneh COTTLE, CASTOR: ad, granted a licence to a United’ }] can and see them at your Gas Lading for transhipment at Trinidad to “GASCOGNE” Nov a
“Palmolone”, Upper Wilson Hill, St.|E) A, Goddard, Swans or Dial 8615, a7 aaa NOTICE States capitalist for mining, (opera) Showroom, Bay Street, and to pe Guiana, Leeward and Windward 3rd, 1951, via St. Lucia,
SP SS cee Sis cranes [nC at.10-81—an “one PARISH OF ST. 30sErH [tions in the island, Se ee BOK are ||| for further particulars apply-— Unique, Guedaloupe Od
Parish Cemetery. Friends are in- CAR—Dodge Car 1948 Model, owner aoe verre will offer for Sale at Applications will be received by the The inerals £ hic! shipment. FURNESS, W Y & CO. LFD., anc Antigua,
vited. Griven, mileage 15,000 miles, perfect} tie jompetition at their office, No. | undersigned up to 15th November, 1951 minerals tor which the li- DaCOSTA & CO. LTD., * *
Senmelicie Lyte, Biss Groventicr Olive (condition. Dis) een. 310.518. | be, gh Street Bridgetown, on Thurs- | for the post of Assessor for the Parish of }cence has been granted are lead,‘ Trinidad, Barbados, COLOMBIE” 24th Novem-
Beckles (Sisters), Heen Davis (Niece). =a the 8th day of November, 1951 at 2 ag Foe a on oe . B.W.I. B.W.I ber, 1951, via Martinique and
11151.) CAR: 1951 Citroen. Almost new— “ . Sart ae te Sues ot US. 20 Dae LESSSOSOS SOPPEOSPOOSOS wuadg
3,000 miles. Owner leaving the Island whe | Cottage ne ona TWh ag morth, C.L. Bonus included. , Cuateeupe.
IN MEMORIAM Write Box H.H. c/o Adyocate a enue, Strathclyde, contain-| ‘The successful Candidate will be on one The M/V “C. L. M. “TANNIS” sboseses
14.10.51—t3.n ng Drawing and Dining Rooms, 2 Bed-| (1 year’s probation, and must assume will accept Cargo and Passengers SOUTH IND
= re eat atin pr as ee ee a peel vor a % the Ist Sanaey, ne for Grenada, sailing Thursday. ° BOU

? ¢ f CAR—1951 Morris Minor Saloon, only . ‘ anvassing might invalidate any 25th inst. ~ COLOMBIE 13th November, ((
ceuet dice meaner Me ne memory of |2.900 miles. $1800. Owner leaving the] Nitch ts’ fully eusioeed. | Candiaate So ial The M/V “DABRWOOD" will 1951, calling at ‘Trinidad, La

rs rene Cumber- |isiand. Ph 1 —2n. : : . eecep' and Passe’ ¥

batch, who fell asleep in Jesus om | onus Pnone S523. 111-5120} "Inspection on application to R. A. Cor- Clerk, St. Joseph Vestry. st Lestat arene oot lovee, Guaira, Curacao, Cartagena,

November Ist 1945 CAR—1947 Ford V-8 Special De Luxe! PD, Genera! Traders Ttd. 28,10 51—4n and” Passengers only for St Jamaica.

Day by day the voice saith, “come, | perfect condition. Formerly L.117. No COTTLE. CATFORD "a "0 vo oH Laem Vincent, sailing Tuesday, 30th
Enter thine enternal home” reasonable offer refused. Phone 91-69. ] 9) 19 51 &Co. NOTICE inst. ae
a = can pare, | 30.10.51—3n. én. ene oo las sie The M/V “CARWBEE” will
summons there ' otice is ered: ven at neither » rs i
cane Sis amen ax a en eee WULMAN STATION WAGGON esi! ,,Th€ undersigned will offer for sale at | the Master nor the agents of the M.V. ee ee ne icanlescat, Somenes Passengers, Cargo
We should cry, “spare this blow”! | mileage 5,000. New Price $2,700.00 will} }, uw) Campetition at their office, No. CHARLES A. MACLEAN now in port Nevis and St. Kitts, — sailing and Mail.
Yes with streaming tears should pray, | accept $2,350.00. For inspection apply | + ie » Bridgetown, on Friday. | will be responsible for any debt or debts Friday, 2nd November 1951. ;
Lord we love her let her stay | Ralph A.” Beard, Lower Bay Street. he 16th day of November, 1951, at 2/ contracted by any member or members We: OWNERS’ R. M. JONES & Co
Ever to be remembered by— 30.10.51—3n | PD of the crew of said vessel while in port. B. SCHOONER 3 "
Adilith Skeete (daughter, U.S.A.\,]- The messuage or dwelling-house known Capt, D DOUCETTE, ASSOCIATION (INC.) Ltd.—Agents
Arlington King (son), Dudley Browne LORRY—One Federal lorry in working . reas HALL, standing on 2 (Master) Consignee, Telephone No. 4017 -—Age -
bs er 111St—In. | order. Price $500.00. Apply Manager! \cced “Situste ‘near ‘Top’ jock, Chri ee tAdeuter
—_! > '
GOVERNMENT NOTICE eee. aeeeeren {cr rear an cemnnnee of the late Mrs. | 31 10,51—3n gents ‘ teee, ee
' PICK-UP: (1) Austin 40 Pick-Up 1960 : serena cre
Model Almost new. Dial 91-39. ieee tame iee nia tecieehate NOTICE
1.11.51—6n 3 Bedrooms, Tollet and bath, Kitchen, .
Postmaster—Welches Road Branch Pantry Garage and Servants Rooms. PARISH OF ST. GRORGE ‘
suas Inspection on Tuesdays and Thursdars Will those persons owing Taxes to the
Post Office ELECTRiCAL only, between the hours of 4 p.m. and cae ad George, please pay same -
i as ——_ 6 p.m. a)

Applications are invited for the| RADIO—G.E.C. 10 Tube, in good} For further particulars and conditions D. H. A. JOHNSON, OUTWARD FROM THE UNITED KINGDOM
vacant office of Postmaster,| condition, Phone 2285 {ot sale, apply to— ct ees Treasurer, St. George. :
Welches Road Branch Post Office, Re eT a ake ne he eihiads Due
+. & oe REFRIGERATOR: One (1) 5 Cubit ft. | on soit aiden NOTICE Vessel From Leaves Barbados

intment will be made sub-| Westinghouse Refrigerator in good. } ‘“BOSVIGO HOUSE”, Eagle Hall Road, a Z »
seat to. the selected candidate be-| Working order. Apply: P. D. Maynard, ;St. Michael, with 4 Acres or thereabouts | .,7"¢ Parochial Treasurers OMce | of SS. “STATESMAN” - London 15th Octt ist Nov.
is ¥ on'3 1 St. George will be kept ot the “Rosary a % by
. Porters Factory, St. James. Dial 2319 and; all enclosed S.S. “STUDENT Liverpool 28th Oct. 11th Nov
ii ed edicall. (next to the Post Office) as from Tues- o por , :
ng pass as medically fit for 27.10.51—6n | THE DWELLINGHOUSE contains, oe 8.5. “LINARIA” Lond 3st Oct Oth N
employment in the Publie Service Open Verandahs, Enclosed Gallery, Draw- | 4%” the 13th November 1951, = Office G4 ” {Seno Sek. & es
, 4 ,
A : ing and Dining Rooms, 3 Bedeooms, one | Hours 10 a.m to 2 p.m. Tuesday, Wed- S.S. “PLANTER ..« London 17th Nov. 30th Nov.
and will be on. two year’s proba~ MECHANICAL very large, Toilet and Bath, Large Kitchen | "@84@¥s, Thursdays S.S. “TRADER” . Glasgow &
tion. The minimum educational | —-———_—--_—_ Pantry, Storé-room ete. and Cellars D. H. A. JOHNSON, Liverpool 24th Nov. 9th Dec
standard which will be accepted | ,,MACHINE: | Singer Sewings mobile | The Government Water as well a9] 14) 51 9 Parochial Trapmirer Shree iosencny acirataniia ath aitaeseliitadalatoasivepeet siccsieono i =
is a pass in the Cambridge Local|5, x 3° complete with Snooker Balls, ebay Di igerd Tales Nae wiaataaer dl Eo HOMEWARD FOR THE UNITED KINGDOM
School Certificate or a_ similar | Cues etc. Phone 4682 aa. ain Garage for 2 Cars, and Servants’ rooms. Closes in
examination of equivalent stand- . _A portion of the land is planted in| LOST & FOUND Vessel For Barbados
li MACHINE: Singer Sewing Machine,| Cocoanut Trees, Guava trees. Mango
ard. Applicants should be between | practically new, with Electric Motor trees, Golden Apple trees, and Breadfruit S.S. “TRIBESMAN” Lond 3rd N
tthe ages of 21 and 30 years... .. tee Lee: 7 ous Electric Motor $200.00) trees and another portion of land planted ven geen Tk eee e HOt ISE SPO I Ss beeen + een pe - evs ndliinditinn’
The salary attached Ff the Post; oear aed ee & ae in Guinea, Elephant and Sour Grass. a 7

LOST

OFFERS iN WRITING will be received
by the undersigned up to Tuesday the
14th day of November, at 4 p.m. The
vendor does not bind herself to accept

is at the rate of $1,056 x 72—
$1,775 (E.B.) x 96—$2,160 per
annum and will be subject to de-







For further Information apply to . . .

WHITE WwooL MAN'S CARDIGAN—
Return E. A. Benjamin, Plantations







TYPEWRITER—One Underwood Porta-
ble Typewriter, Excellent condition.
Holder Bros., Swan Street.



duction under the Widows’ and
Orphans’ Pension Act, 1928
(1928-3) at the rate of 4% per
annum, Further particulars may
be obtained from the Colonial
Postmaster.

Applications should be made on
forms obtainable from the Colon-
ial Secretary's Office and mus!
be returned not later than the
15th of November, 1951.

28.10. 51—2n



30.10.51—t.f.n

MISCELLANEOUS

BED TICKING — in five beautiful
stripped designs 51”—52” wide, usualhy







$1.25 yard, reduced for one week only
to $1.19 yard. Kirpalani, 52 Swan
Street ‘ 1.11.51—1n





BOARDS—tTwo large wooden advertis-
ing’ Bign Boards: Approximately 20 ft. x
12 ft, Purehaser must remove same.

One Sign Board is located at ‘“Welches”
—-St. Michael—the other at Oistins, near
Plaza Theatre. CITY GARAGE TRADING

—

application

ph

of

1

the highest, or any offer

Inspecton any day except Sundays on
to Mrs. Hanschell, Tele-
hone No. 2260

For further particulars and conditions

sale, apely to~—

CATFORD & CO.
i1,.51—Tn



No. 17, High Street,
PERSONAL



Bridgetown
This serves to inform the public that

Building,







at
THE BARBADOS AQUATIC

SATURDAY, Nov. 3, 9 pm. };
Music by

Phone 3123. Reward
1.11, 51-—2n

DANCE

or





CLUB
(Members Only)
on

RENDEZVOUS HILL

AVERAGE AREA 60 x 80

AND PRICED
$1,000 to $1,700






The Desig and Shades of our recent shipment of

PLASTIC CLOTH

for Curtains are simply GORGEOUS.
Come, Have A Look For Yourself.

THE CENTRAL EMPORIUM

Onr, BROAD & TUDOR STREETS.









. 1 have not heard of the whereabouts .
NOTICE TO MARINERS = | ©2” PTD», Victoria St.) fof my husband RUPERT HAREWOOD ||] Mr. C. CURWEN’S Orchestra aed asnorabnbanbsitilbney 2
“,of Redland, St. George, for the past Members are cordially



UNIVERSITY COLLEGE OF
THE WEST INDIES.

“PEZLA" Wax | 20 wears and it is my intention to re-

tipped Cigarette Leaves at 6c. Pk. of 50 marry in the near future
See us for Wholesale Prices. MILLICENT HAREWOOD,

One Dan buoy with flag top ‘CIGARETTE LEAVES:

mark has been placed in position



invited.
Free Admission to Ballroom

A. BARNES & Co,, Ltd.





















kK. J. HAMBL-SMITH













ones feos a, north | Weatherhead 44, 31.10.91—-2n Clevers Hill, Extra-Mural Department

ongitu § Ss | —————— er: A COURSE OF FOUR

Explosives charges will be fired| DIABETIC CHOCOLATE — Made ay ee oe i nhehibaiin LECTURES e
in th icinity of this buoy dur- especial\y for those who must eat a 1 Digi RAPTOR Um MG Srith Peete Mote le Ly oar;

in e ie It) - Piet restricted sweet diet. 4 oz Bars. Knight's ae Pure ie ore nena aa ke aed - on -

ing daylight hours for_seismogra-| ita 1.11,61--tu | gentle thas 1 am, ne henger ronpeurene Lae: This OUT for Reference. Contes a are e NOT available DRAMATICS

phic observations. Shipping is sd for any debt or debts contracted by my







NA! ‘e MAUDRIF CLARADINE YEAR-

quantity at 45c. per

1S--Galvanizec nai a limited
b, ‘Beanice Auto

Tere Company, Trafalgar Street. Phone

warned to keep clear. This notice

WOOD itnee Wiltthire) or anyone else
eancels our notice of 19th Septem-

except by a written order signed by me.

Beginning Monday, Nov. 5th Office, Corner of Trafal-

at The POST OFFICE







- at - é
ber, 1951, 2698. ee eee CLIFTON YEARWOOD, | Tee Pee gar and Bridge Streets:
eee rownas ae, POST OFFICE NOTICE as
fe
ac re RRR EC ton Leh Satie inflatens tion cadeed by visas 1.11,51—2n . at 8.15 p.m Upstairs Dominica
—_——— ee 88 Pox, ini ws si—2n. The public are hereby warned against Nov. 5 British Drama

giving credit to my wife SYLVIA







AIR MAILS

Effective 1st November, 1951 AIR MAILS will be closed at the General Post Office as follows :—

R, LeFanu, B.A.

Nov, 12 Stage Production
C. A. Gross-Smith, M.A

Handicrafts
WATERMAN (nee HEADLEY) as I do

not hold myself responsible for her or
anyone else contracting any debt or debts
in my name unless by a written order

SHAMPOO; “Nucta” “SNueta” Oil Sha Shampoo.
Fresh stock at Bruce Weatherhead, Ltd.
31,10. 51—2n



REAL ESTATE


















































































































7s ; . | Signed bj ‘ Cancelling previous Schedules Nov. 19 Make Up
tect. Sndton. hie fe, Mee ares signed ONS URALE. WATERMAN, é * - ) F, A. Collymore
Porters Factory, St. James, Dial 2319. Pine DENCH ne greet Met see ve a - Nov. 26. Elocution DIAL 4748
JOH eae : Bees | Fldiaie wn DESTINATION TIME DAY DESTINATION TIME DAY Mrs. R. Bynoe, B.A.
URODONAL—For Arthritism, Rheuma-
tism, youre eee Peek Seep ee a delle » dade.
Fresh St a ruce Weatherhead, ‘ .
4 e ea M1, 10, She DANCE Africa .. se =| 2.00 p.m. Monday Haiti .. vi fas a.m, Monde
11.45 a.m, riday A5 a.m, ur:
To be held at
! W. ‘ .M. P.C. Antigua 2.00 p.m. | Wednesday Hawaii .. 2.00 p.m. | Monday
B L A D 0 ~. ANTED : scrd e 9.00 am. | Saturday 11.45 am, | Friday
nT os SATURDAY NIGHT
HE Aruba 2.00 p.m. | Monda Hong Kong 9.00 a.m, |Monda
& Co. iipite le cickinenist LP AN PE 8rd Nov., 1951, at 8 p.m. 11.45 a.m. | Thur: 11.45 am. | Thur
GARDENER — Strong willing young Admission by Ticket— 0
V.A. man 18 to 22 as handy man and second $1.00 each Australia 9.00 a.m. | Mond India... oe ..| 2.00 p.m. | Monday
A.F.S., F.V. kardener. Steady job. Sleep in or out. baits ay” (all air) 11.45 am. | Thursday 11.45 am. | Friday
poly: Box 1.8.8. c/o Advocate. Mr. Hoppie Jordan's, Orch. ee Ve di de Wedniiday Indonesia 2,00 p.m. | Monday :
Reece tren nastny reset aaneee n. ustralia " mm. 2 ve at mM, i
FOR SALE Ranetes Comagntfageirg, so fst (air to Panama only) |'9,00 a.m. | Saturday 11.45 am. | Friday Passengers holding reservations on
ey gh Mg al bt Sa ae Rial
Shorthand a Yrpewriting is CS8eNUAl | se OOOO GOSD maica . * m,
together with sufficient experience and Bahamas 2.00 p.m. | Monday a
shi nigra chen High Sala’pais| 'DO YOUR SHOPPING 1145 Am. | Priday 2.00 pm. | Wednesday or after 31st October»,951, are
“LEETON ON SEA", Near Oistins. to successful applicant. Apply with Testi- IN COMFORT AT J 9.00 a.m, | Monda
An attractive fully furnished, sea- : : , | Bermuda we .. | 2.00 p.m. | Monday apan f
cide "bungalow built right on 9 monials to Box C.C., c/o Advotate. Co. The Ml { i Gift Sh 2.30 p.m. | Friday 11.45 am. | Thur: kindly asked to contact.our Office
faculties. There is a ae ae MISCELLANEOUS C ay ar Op Aas 2.00 p.m Monday Malaya 2.00 p.m. }Monday di ‘ f
who! = > . . 0 .
org Cg Re Beant oe) pavnane see : oe et es regarding time and days o
ane? rer : eee ee where you will find an attractive 11.45 am. | Wednesday Re
with cocktail bar, kitchen, garake jj) Apply to the Manhattan Cutting ful and original % 9.00 a.m. da Martinique 45 a.m, ‘ :
were Spo nasa: an] SUES inciualng ners, “mer Pr: Guiana 8.00 am. | Friday, : 9.00 am. Saturday departure of their flights due to
BUILDING LAND St. James i ’ . “es Cards and Decorations. . ae dina . ee
Coast— A ally | AtTaT Ye WANTED TO RENT i ss 2,00 p.m. | Monda Mauritius ort a ; * nn
Sot ta “oper diapacre rooming rotng man (white) Re-Opening Friday tnd Nov Br. Honduras p onday 11.45 am. | Friday change of schedule. v= ne
i ram requires unfu! ‘001 ne meals. . _ nas >
“Available a aoreorer vated Apply: Advocate ‘Advertising Dept. E.M. po tents oes a Burma ie phi you Mexico 9.00 a.m. |Monday eee
half to over acres Se dae bale 30,10,51—3n. days Fridays & Saturdays me 11.45 a.m, Thursday , “era
on te eee ‘LIQUOR LICENSE NOTICE PSOOOOS SO SOSS Canada . 00 p.m, | Monday 2.00 Wednesd BRITISH WEST INDI AN AIRW AYS 3
.00 p.m, nesday
“STRATHMORE, Culloden Rd The application of Gardiner Rice of (via Trinidad) 5 a a . 9.00 am. |Saturday I \
A spacious 2-storey stone house Welchman Hal, St. Thomas, for per- ite " —— (Via nt gua) i
wala Arcata scam {fut cyt Sei erenantatacs| | TO-DAY'S NEWS FLASH ff /conaas .. eee Zealand 8.90 aim. | Monday LTD
alle: a » a sho . Anh,
er see room, 6 Decrees situated at Welchman ‘Hall, St. “Thomas. eect (via Bermuda) sa 7 ay **111.45 am, |Thursday .
kitchen, pantry oreroo * ated this 29th day of October, 1951 STOP WA
Weil ded at To J. R. EDWARDS, A Canal Zone 11.45 a.m. | Wednésday i
the’ greatly “reduced price now ‘Police Magisirate,. Dist” “D hia es ss Oe , 9.00 a.m. | woamine New Sostend sans e es wean Lower Broad St. _ Phone 4585
asked. ARDINER . KIE (air to Panama on y : mM,
E Applicant The Best made. ri 9.00 a.m Neer SS SS ~ .
“SILVERTON", Cheapside— N.B.—This application will be con- at Central America : ‘m. | Monda: 2.00 p.m. |Monday ~ ooeeede — oe nae
od 2-storey st house idered at a Licensing Court to be heid except Cana! Zone) 11.45 am. | Thursda Palestine PRSPOOOOH oer
Schenaes ts “appor. , Me piaid at Police ‘Court. District “> on Monday JOHNSON’S STATIONERY SarPOr con r | 11.45 am, Friday
planted with fruit trees the 1 lay oO ovember, » at il Ceylon .. ee L , p.m. | Monday 9
bed s, 2 galleries, lock, a.m. : ar .00 am. |Monday
Ses pameons jee: COT ee. oe BOARS, PRESS BUTTONS - 11.45 a.m. | Friday Philippines STs sae’ Veeaeadas E
trally located and suitable for Police Magistrate, Dist. “D” Fitted to your Bag or Purse |
conversion into flats or boarding 1.11,51—In WHILE YOU WAIT. China .. ee ‘ 1 oor p.m. | Monday oudhin’ tl 2.00 p.m. {Wednesday
ae WARE 11.45 a.m. | Friday uerto Rico ' one a net
“COOLMORE:” Pine Hill — JOHNSON'S HARD * | 9,00 am. !Saturdey t
a i
Modern Bungalow conetrvcte . BE WISE eee ADVERTISE Cuba .. oS «| 9.00 a.m. | Monda: “ 9.00 a.m, |Monda
heavy asbestos roof. There is # 11.45 a.m. | Thur - Croix, Vilas 11.45 am. | THur b e f Cc h t
large Tahaped living, Teomein Al ae be iy We beg to inform our Customers that our
hi try, ser- Curacao we . 00 Q.m. onda : 2.00 p.m, | Wednesday
Pere eichen, bathroom with { 11.45 am. Thursday St. Kitts *) 9.00 ont Saturday HARDWARE DEPARTMENT ill be closed for
tub ape iat ee Seer beating ak tose Sa j | N wi e close -
» arage a 2 - ok i _m. oo y ee
ints rooms, The grounds of Dominica ' . Reb use St. Lucia | 72 ee | Serardsy § .
about % an acre are heavily |], 8 4 9.00 a.m. | Monday | 9.00 a.m. a . : am
wooded with Mahogany and Flam- | | Dom. Republic ¥3 00 am. |] % >
boyant trees and the lawns and 11.45 a.m. | Thurs: ay 9.00 a.m. Monday - a.
stone flagged terrace are in a se- | | St. Thomas, Vi. 11.45 am. | Thursday
cluded walled garden. Attractive Dutch Guiana 9.00 a.m. | Monday |
location close to town. \ ute! u + 11.45 a.m. | Wednesday | 4 Snare: | phursday
“WINDY WILLOWS", St. James | St. Vincent 900 am. | Saturday =
on Delightful bungalow — open veran commanding ma: } ae “sy re ob a.m. id
of beck tare fae, aes | |Friday | south Amerie _..|,89 am. [Monday â„¢
rooms, verandahs, kitchen, pantry | Fiji hs = tured | (except Venezuela) : m,
is" rooms Storeroo | 49 a.m. r r
a hesenant Offers considered hursday Tortola 5 wa eee ;
: | § m, ‘ Antigua) . mat Z "
ee gp Ry gy op |Fr, Guiana oS Son | Monday sia ' Our Lumber Yard, Office and Sugar Store will .
AOE teas oacine eat: oh } pie Som, Pauley | Trinidad 9.00 a.m. | Monday . 3
s route da oonly 2 miles from } 1 8. a.m. uesday
owe. ead DIESEL W HEEL TRACTOR Gt. Britain i‘ ae or [mone 11.45 a.m. Wednesday be opened for business as usual
EXPECTED SHORTLY | o Friday ,
| 9.00 am. | Saturday : ing} .,
REAL ESTATE AGENTS | 15 — 20 — 25 — 35 h.p. Models | Grenada 9.00 8 ei | Monday } Kindly arrange your business accordingly. , .
. 2.00 p.m. | Friday sd ¥,
| Half Tracks also available USA 2.00 p.m. | Wednesday 8
AUCTIONEERS and ” 9.00 a.m. | Saturday Te 2.30 pam. | Friday e :
, | Guadeloupe 11.45 a.m. | Wednesday | : S:
SURVEYORS Built by experienced German Diesel Engineers | : Cmnenisie | 2.00 p.m, | enaeay g ;
+ ;, . ae 2.00 p.m. iday é x
sacaaipinelcgngaac | i, KER — PLANTATIONS LTD
| J. G. KIRTON, Jnr. , To ee : > “ * x
“ ” | Registered mail is closed an hour before ordinary mail.
a | The Grange”, 6. Philip \ |General Post Office r = ? rm R. A. CLARKE, v
= OL sanevenieals 30th October, 1951 Colonial Postmaster 0004 CCOOUCCGVGOC OOO SOOO OOOO OSS OCS SSS OOO GOSS SOSS
'
A





PAGE EIGHT

West Indies



BARBADOS ADVOCATE



Fail To Foree Win



Valentine Spins
| Out Batsmen

_ By HAROLD DALE

SYDNEY, Oct. 31.

; For the third time in successive innings Alfred Valentine
took five wickets when Goddard declared at his overnight
total at Townsville and sent Queensland Country to bat. On
the dusty wicket that had developed several worn spots
Valentine’s leg spinners were virtually unplayable and
Goddard used six other bowlers just to save the country side

| WEIGHTLIFTERS

AND

COACH



from complete extinction.

Only one batsman, Donald Watt,
former state re, showed any
confidence and his 51 was nicely
put together. He top-scored in the
second innings when the Country
XI batted out time. Wilfred Fer~
guson very nearly won the match
outright by taking two wickets
with the first two balls of the
Jast over but Lonsdale managed
to hold out to the end.

These “country games, of no
importance in themselves, shave
given tourists some good match
practice, but strangely enough
they are belyin,
reputation with loose work that
will no doubt tighten up when
serious cricket begins.

WEST INI IES—ist Innings 460 for 5 deel.
QUEENSLAND COUNTY—ist Innings

A. Millard ¢ Ferguson b Jones

S. Dowhes stpd. Guillen b Valentine

W. Brown b Valentine

D

Watt ¢ Guillen b Atkinson
Vallely c Guillen b Valentine 1
Raymer c Christiani b Goddard
Allen b Atkinsgn .
A. Thorpe ¢ Worrell b Ferguson 10
Johnson Stpd. Guillen b Valentine
Lonsdale c Rickards b Valentine 2

P
Â¥%.
5

| Bignell not out o
Total 128
BOWLING

Valentine 5 for 2%

| Atkinson . 2 for 35

; Goddard 1 for 12
Jones 1 for 8
Ferguson 1 for 21

QUEENSLAND COUNTY—tnd Innings
. Millard c&b Jones . 3
Downes b Valentine .,.. 19
Brown ¢ Christiani b Gomez. 17
Watt ¢ Guillen b Valentine . 2
Vallely lbw Ferguson ........ 6
Raymer c Guillen b Goddard “4
Allen mot oUt ...... 66.4550
Thorpe b Ferguson ;
Johnson ¢ Ferguson b Goddar
Lonsdale mot out
Extras. rr

PASUO EMD

Bones

Total (for ® wickets)

BOWLING

2 for 35

Valentine 3
2 for ®

Ferguson

“West Indies” Beat
“Australia”

Two teams call themselves
W.I. and Australia XI’s met in a
two-day cricket match which was
concluded on Sunday last and the
former scored a sensational win
over their opponents.

The W.I. (Supporters) batted
first and scored 115 in 73 minutes
batting and oo ae ,
porters) rep wi 186 scor
in 169 minutes on the first day.
On Sunday last the W.I. batted
again and scored 337 for five
declared in 126 minutes and
Australians with 218,
with one man absent in 122 min-
utes. Best performances were
turned in by J. Bailey 26 runs in
W.1. first innings, and K. Colly-
more, R. Sober and C. Sealey 60,
71 and 83 not out respectively in
the second innings. C. Sealey a
left arm spinner took 5 for 63 and
6 for 81 in the Australians two
innings. For the Australians,
L. Jones and R. Pinder scored 39
and 28 respectively in the first



innings and R. Pinder, V. ome
and. L. Janes scored 81, 39,

51 not out ly in the
second innings. R. Pinder took 5
for 49 and 4 for 103 in W.I. two
innings,



WHAT’S ON TODAY

Court of Original Jurisdiction
—10.00 a.m.

Police Courts—10.00 a.m.

Old Boys’ Cricket match at
Lodge School—l p.m.

Meeting of the Sanitary Com-
missioners—1,00 p.m.

Meeting of the Legislative
Council—2.00 p.m,

Mobile Cinema gives show at
Clifton Plantation Yard, St.
Thomas—7.30 p.m.

M of “Alliance Fran-

at British Council,
Wakefield—8.30 p.m.

Weightlifting Contest

Queen’s Park—8.30 p.m.
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pm



at

it ceitenesenicictiaieins







‘It Will Never

Happen Again.
—John Goddard

From FRANK MARGAN
TOWNSVILLE, Nov. 1,
West Indies tourists

ere,

Following adverse Press com-
ment after the Newcastle batting
Goddard
lectured the team and

collapse last week
strongly
he later publicly stated that the
West. Indies disappointing per
formance in the first officia] matc!
of the tour “will never happer
again’”’.

followed

closely the instructions of their

seeere Goddard in a run-getting
it

thelr fielding = versus Queensland Country

HAROLD WEBSTER

To Be

EDWIN ROGERS SAM MALONEY

Miss Bridgetown

2
- “Miss Bridgetown” will be
» chosen tonight when the Amateur
) Weightlifting Association of Bar- encouraged if the parents want

bados Island Championships and healthier and happier homes.”

By P. A. V. an attack of dysentery.

has lost.”



Chosen At A.W.A.B. Show

He has
again started his training and is
trying to make up for what he

THURSDAY, NOVEMBER 1, 1951



Gallops
PRETTY WAY WAS AGAIN
IMPRESSIVE

By HOOKIE

Diamea: a big good iooking colt
from St. Kitts but a bit unruly.
Did five in 1.14 including a few
dodges here and there. Should
be in F2 in my opinion.

3 ip matched strides
with First Admiral) ter two-year-
old stable companion. Four in
54% was the time returned. bur I

: did not see the gallop.

Viceroy: five furlongs on the in-

day night and early Wednesday side in 1.034. Always e3pable of Seprane and Gavotte worked to-

morning which made the going a drawing some left handed com- gether but did nothing to write

little easier. it was not pliments from certain parties. home about.

much and opinion about the out- However, there are a few who will Two-year-old Dunquerque look-

side track seerned to be a bit di- finish behind him such as Miss eg much better than three-year-
'
|

There was some rain on Tues-

ided. Consequently half the gal- Friendship etc. ie: hott thew
l . ‘a His Worship: five in 1.094. tind and aid tk 107. Both
and this made it difficult for Dim View: worked inside. One wej) held but the two-year-old
recording times. of those which always attracts me. the better of the two.

Another definite feature of the Watercress: did her first gallop
preparation gallops for this meet- of any account doing five in 1.07
ing is that they have been more fairly easy. Looks very capable of
restrained tham any I can filling Bow Bells’ place.
remember, except when we nave _ Diadem: this half-bred from St.
had impossible tracks in the past Kitts had her first gallop doing
and had to work on the beach. om © 57 and finishing a bit
Wi four meetings having spent.
om to ry this T imagine will Fire Lady: certainly looked full well up I am sure.
be the new order of things. Early Of fire over the first three of a five My Love Il and Rambler Rose
morning spectators will in future with Infusion. But the old mare worked together but I missed
be able to spare themselves the was going well at the finish and them. "
rigours of rising at five when they returned 1.084. _ I also missed Red Cheeks who
* they know that they will learn Pretty’ Way: probably did the is still confined to work on the |
little before the first day’s racing most impressive work for the inside.
opens morning doing a box to box in . Atomic IT and March Winds

Yesterday morning’s work was 1.244 just striding out at the did five in 1.09%. .
a good example of this and while finish. Was shaken up a bit inthe , The Eagle and Test Match did
about fifty of the seventy-two second furlong but came home = yo re
entered were seen at exercise very easy. sales m to vom in am
there were only one or two = Darham Jame: an igessaive tants aot Joan's Star: five
did anything to give an indicat newcomer, id four in 52 on the . . z
of ‘can om on Here are inside. une sorte bo euet ae ine.
some of those we saw: Mabouya and Cavalier: the firs:, tay being pushed in the last two

Demure dic a comfortable box a C class Maiden the secondatw0- while the former was always
to box beginning very slowly but year-old. Both went well with

lops were done on the inside track

had to be pushed
to keep up with Doldrum over a
box to box on the inside the last
five of which was in 1.07. It is
difficult to choose a_ definite
favourite for the first C class
winners race but Doldrum will be

; - easy.
increasing her speed a bit from what little difference there was in Lanter: five in 1.06$ on the
the five. Her time for once favour of the former. On the pit.

around was 1.25 1/5 and the five strength of this I like Cavalier High and Low: worked on the





The team’s score of five wickets Body Beauty Contests take place ho’s o Rogers told me that he i; nct jn 1.05. I like her very much for very much for the Trumpeter Cup. inside three-quarter pace only.
for 460 runs in an_ afternoon’s at Queen’s Park Steel Shed The following is a Who's Who ing to disappoint the crowd. both A and B sprints. He is definitely my favourite for Sunina: four in sd. on the in-
batting bore out the effect of tonight. ‘ ; of the Divisions:— He is guimg all out to beat Good- Belle Surprise: we did not get this race. side. a
Goddard’s lecture. In preparation for this show 123 Ibs. Cammie Barker of "ge. her time as she worked on the in-

T have never seen Goodridge in

Goddard is quite

the performance. the tear

narrowly missing an innings win, bell Club, Hastings amd the other this division.
The last man selected among the at

tourists, Jamaican batsman Ric

kards proved no “ugly duckling” ne f
with a sterling 192 including 27 @Mce at these eliminations, espe- yses a lot of speed in the quick

fours in 231 minutes,
One of the quietest members o

the team, Rickards still has a long and h is
fight to gain a Test place against Which is shown, tonight's show will
the number of outstanding proved promises to be a greater success Unique in this division.
him, than the .one earlier this year.

selected before
“opposite”

batsmen
Rickards’

after day.

wherever
becomes
of

Ferguson
immediately the
attraction, He amused fans,

officials and teammates during the whose totals were the same, had }ifter.
luncheon adjournment here wita to be re-weighed and one keen gnatch but needs a little more

an exhibition of watermelon eat

pleased with the Association held two elimina- Acro Barbell Club and H. Stod-
0

publicity 1 e 7
spinner Ferguson remains in pro« Which I noticed. The first is that he lifted like a real champion
minent newspaper columns day the veteran lifters, who are re- would and came first. His bedy-

visits he every division there is a slight 965. His snatches were perform-
centre difference

) tions, one at Palm Springs Bar- dard of York have qualified for
They both gave an
York Barbel! Club, Black exhibition of lifting at the elimi-
ok nations but did not extend them-
Stoddard, I understand,

tu beat Rogers.
young and have a
future in weightlifting.

Judging by the large attend- selves,
cially at York Club where over jift he should give Barker a
f five hundred watched the lifting tough fant. .
the tremendous interest 13214 Ibs. S. Rudder of York
meet H. Thompson of
Rudder
m . has improved greatly since the
There are two important points jast show. At the eliminations

entrant, Errol ‘“Bunts”

the Customs Department

fore but is

turning to the game, are lifting weight is 180 and he made a lifting power. He is going

up to standard, and secondly, in prave attempt to clean, and jerk

in the totals
lifters.

ing 250 pounds and in
snatches, he will display
squat style.

Heavyweight.
single entrant

of the ed with ease.
lifters Thompson is also a very good
He is very fast on the

, Various Several
There is’ also

- lifter ran around the Garrison practice with the jerk. The re-

training but someone toid me
that he has to do a lot of lifting
Both litters are
glittering

198% Ibs. This is a new divis-
ion recently formed by the Olym-
pic Committee. There is only one
Douglas
from Palm Springs, a clerk of
who
was also once a pupil of George
Solomon. Douglas has never en-
tered in official competitions be-
well known for his

attempt 300 pounds in the clean
and jerk. He is capable of press-
his
the

in this division,

Body Beauty Contests. For the

side track but she was going well
and without any fuss. I do not ] =
think she will | Be acclima-

tised properly at this meeting.

Lunways: another who worked :
inside for which we took no time. ans

French Flutter: improves with
every gallop. Yesterday she
worked inside over about five. I
think she be a bit soft.

Betsam: did a slowish box to
box outside the barrels coming
back in 1.35 3/5.

Drury Lane: this two-year-old
half-bred did five in 1.05 3/5 on
the inside at an easy pace. I
should think this was equal to
about 1.09 on the outside or pos-
sibly slower so there is no telling
what he will do when he really
gets going. I like him a lot. |

Dashing Princess: buxom filly
by Dastur, a sire who seems to
provide his progeny with plenty

American Dress
PLAIDS

36 inches wide
in fast colours
only

$1.02







to

a

two two-year-olds from St. Kitts

ing. Scorning the conventional Savannah to try to lessen his suits of this division should be another Bynoe and he may be len
spoon Ferguson lifted the half- bodyweight. interestin« lifting along with Douglas. Bynoe of bulk. Worked on the inside |‘! Flowered Opaque
melon across his broad beaming The Association has spared no 148 Ibs. In this division we pressed 280 pounds sometime uly. ool
face like a mouthorgan and pro. efforts in making their show a have the veteran lifter, Clement a8. Diarose and Champagne, the |

|

ceeded to make short work of the success,

fruit spraying the seeds in al
directions.

Ferguson’s failure to obtain a esting programme which consists gj) for
large bag of wickets on Wednesday of hand balancing, a trapeze dis- ability,
afternoon was put down to the play by 17-year-old Rudy Linton, ejjminations
absence of watermelon tea on the son of the veteran lifter.

adjournment menu,
The tourists are

becoming trol,
spoiled as the Queensland tour and a new feature, the Ju-Do good at al
proceeds. The State’s hospitality, knife display which should be press
renowned throughout ‘Australia is very interesting to watch.

Meetings were held jackman of Bede’s Gym, compet-
1 weekly and the Organising Com- jing eed ‘oe dee
mittee has planned a very inter-

against R. Cox of Acro, Mr.

Jackman, who is well known to

Barbados honour there are
such recognised entrants as Basil

RA YONS

worked together. They did five
in 1.06% outside the barrels and



his lifting and ing Grant, present holder of the title, the four in 54. Their first gallop
is in good form. t the Mr. Bridgetown, 1951, Lionel Ma- and a good one. Champagne ap- 36 inches wide
he showed that loney, Clement Jackman, I. peared to have the better of the
4 . he possesses terrific energy when Parris, Roy Goddard, George finish but Diarose slowed down a
Bede”, contortion, muscle con- he was called upon to jerk a Bynoe, G. Nicholls,,John Mar- bit. The latter however looks ] 12
acrobatic stunts, clowning heavy weight overhead. He is Shall, Sam_ Maloney, C. Good- {ike the one with the most room | e

three lifts, but the "idge and G. Layne.
appears to be his “pet lift.”

Cox was suffering from a leg

It is divided into two divisions,
5 feet 8 inches and over and




for improvement. A very well
grown filly I think she will be
promising when she learns the



cutdoing itself for the popular Serious Training injury. Unfortunately he was under 5 feet 8 inches. business properly.

eriecketers and even the tropic For the past six weeks the lift- struck on his leg with 260 pounds | There are also a number of en- “ ‘p.jgy; did five inside, No time CAVE SHEPHERD
weather is co-operating to make ers have been doing serious while training. He is however trants for the honour, Miss pon A good bet for the C or ’

the tourists feel at home. The training. Mr. Harold Webster, now training very hard and out Bridgetown, for the ladies. On p74,"

team’s biggest test so far, is official coach of the Association to surprise Jackman. He was ex- this occasion body will replace “ yyituyce: did a box to box in & C0 LTD
November 3, versus a_ strong from its inception, has done all in tremely good at the last show and beauty, 1,253 and the five in 1.06 outside hase .

Queensland State side at Brisbane. his power for its success.

West Indies bowlers meet their
first Australian tester young Ken terest
partners the great past 20 years and
lefthander Arthur Morris at Bris. referred to as “father of weight- Springs will meet George Bynoe

Archer who
bane in the first Test as the open-
ing pair November 9, Archer’s per-
formance opposed to the est
Indies attack will be watched with
great interest by West Indians
and Australians alike sinee the
form will give an indication of the
Test performance of all players.
The tourists are likely to score
heavily against the Queensland
attack since it is little stronger
than that faced in the Townsville
match. The State side’s batting
strength will be a different proposi-
tion however.



SPORTS CARS

Helen Jacobs, an old Wimble-
don friend, crops up again. She
told the National Safety Congress
in Chicago that “the lack of good
sportsmanship by American motor-
car drivers is incredible”” And
she had some acid remarks about
drivers Who “think it is clever to
be stupid, and who regard sports-
manship on the road as a virtue
to be practised only when they
spot a policeman in the rearview
mirror,”

YESTERDAY’S



FROM
Rainfall: .21 in.
Total Rainfall for Month to
date: 2.87 ins.
Highest Temperature: 85.5 °F
Lowest Tempesature: 75.0 °F
Wind Velocity: 8 miles per

(9 a.m.) 29.971
(3 p.m.) 29.866





Mr.
Webster has been taking an in-
in weightlifting

carried off many prizes.

165 Ibs. There has always been
for the tremendous interest in this divis-
is sometimes ion, Sam Maloney of Palm

Harold Webster, = Dr.

For’ the

lifting in Barbados,” He is re- of Bede’s Gym and they are both
sponsible for the progress of such veteran lifters. Maloney and
lifters as Edwin Rogers and Sam Bynoe have been taking part in
Maloney. competitions for over 15 years
During the weeks of training and both are over 30 years old.
the lifters were forced to keep It should be interesting to watch
away from any other type of these “old lads” battle it out
sport. The interest had increas- again.
ed and many spectators now visit Sam Maloney’s mind plays a
the various clubs to watch the large part in big competitions
“work outs”. Since the last when he is called upon to put a
Championships, many more clubs tremendous poundage overhead.
have become affiliated to the As- He has left off his work on the
sociation. Those lifters who are waterfront for several days to
unfortunate not to have a gym train. His presses have improved
and proper weights, practice in and in the snatch, his “pet lift”.
their backyards with a bar and He will have to watch his jerks.
a few pieces of scrap iron, He gets very excited after clean-
Many schoolboys have taken ing the weight and is apt to
up weightlifting since interest throw it forward.
has been revived. The Harrison Bynoe, who has not been seen
College Water Polo team, for in- in competition for a very long
stance, winners of this year’s time, has returned tossing the
League Trophy, has some keen “old iron” with more vigour than
weightlifters im its group. he did when he was 16-years-old.
Some critics still feel that His presses are not up to mark
weightlifting is 7. to make one but he makes up for them with
“muscle bound.” ibert Bannis- terrific form in the snatch and
ter, who has been playing Water clean and jerk. Both of these
Polo for over a long period, can lads, have excellent physiques
be matched against any of the and have entered for the Body
youngsters and his body was built Beauty Contest as well.

Weekes,
ef whom

and Victor Evelyn,
are well

ERNIES
Democratic Club

OH YES!

IM STILL ALIVE!
anid wish to thank all those
kind friends from all over
the world who sent me
cables, cards, flowers, and
otherwise enquired after my
health.

What’s the use of going over-
seas when you can get cured
right here.

Consequently
there will be a meeti on
FRIDAY AFTERNOON at
6 O'CLOCK SHARP
to discuss the problems of

up off the weights, under the Bynoe was the Junior “Mr. ,

skilful supervision of George Barbados” in 1947 when a show ere ane eee tae
Solomon who is at present out of was staged by the Amateur Ath- ber meeting

the island. Randolph Turpin, the letic Association. ;

British Middleweight Champion, 181 Ibs. The two entrants in MENU:

is an ardent weightlifter. Did he chis class are Edwin Rogers of Consome Froid
appear to be “muscle bound” in Palm Springs and Clifton Good- a la Francais

his first venture ridge of Leeward Barbell Club.
Ray Robinson? These lifters were not seep in
The youngsters who attend to- action at the eliminations so very
night's show will most likely re- little can be said about them.
new their efforts in weightliftins Rogers, at the last show, gave
and as a veteran lifter of the a magnificent display of lifting !
island, referring to parents, told which showed that he had a

against Suga The Usual Turkey and

Ham
and Chicken Pelau

Have you visited Bathsheba?
If not. Go to the Edgewater
Hotel where the Proprietor
is congenial and the wine list
| complete including

| The Best Scotch Wine and

Dutch Grocsch Beer

for after sea bath drinking.

me; “The youngsters should $< for improvement. Mr. Harold
Webster, his tells
“Rogers



me?
hard

trainer,

is training very

and making improvement. Alf
few weeks ago however, he took
ill, After recovering from influ- |
enza, the following week he had

SLLVEESESSSSSOSSS



|

|

MORE
FAMILIES

THESE
* . DAYS...

J&R BREAD

.
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SYNDICATE, tne, WORLD WGKTS REsmEWED.

To judge the bodies are Mr.
David
Payne, Dr. Cato, Mr, A. Austin,
Mr. E. Douglas and Mr, A. Hunte.
weightlifting the
judges and referees will be select-
ed ke the lifters themselves from
a batch comprising of Messrs.
Delbert Bannister, Ben Jones, S.
Holder, J. Linton, G. Gilkes, o
a

acquainted
with the rules of weightlifting.






the barrels.
The Thing: did five but only the
last three were taken in 37 secs.

10—13 Broad Street






MEETINGS

THE BARBADOS
LABOUR PARTY
: AT:
NELSON STREET
TO.NIGHT
at 7.30 o’clock



|
























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Full Text

PAGE 1

THl'ftSDAY. NOVEMBER 1, 1*51 BARBADOS ADVOCATE Workers Should Repay Two-Thirds Of Loan r\i.i FIVE TO LABOUR WELFARE FVND-Says GODDARD MR. FRED GODDARD told the electorate at St. Pair.ck. <*l n.t Church, on Monday night, that the Electors' Associ ation feel that when a worker in the sugar industry borrows money from the Labour Welfare Fund, he should only payback two-thirds of the loan as the money of the fund n.iih belongs to these workers. Mr. Goddard who was speaking at a meeting of the ElcctuiV Association was referring to the pa-t of his Party*! festo dealing with the I abour Welfaic Fund llVlh HO HI rW The niMIng was held in supI <-rt of his candidature and that of Mr. W. W Reece for the parish of hrisi Church at the forthcoming General Election for the House of Aaaeriibly. They are the present i-iembcrs rcpresenUng Christ Church in the House. Mr. Recce who spoke Ant, told I Is hearers that one of the first things his Party had supported in the present session of the Rotata I f Assembly was the extension of the Barbados Scholarship-, from • ne to live, one being for girl* II iin Mr Goddard tract among had given this measure iuppgrt because tin belli vert thai education was a blessing w-ich every man was entitled to. no matter how humble his origin. Another thing they had supported light up to the hilt was the Increase of Old Age Pensions. As they knew the amount per person was now 7s. 6d. per week but before It was 5s They had also supported the reduction of the age to 68 years, "and believe me." added Mr Reeve, "we are not going to be satisfied until it is reduced to 65, because a man at the age of 65 is generally worn out "1 will make every effort to have this reduction brought about if I am returned to the Hcuse." Tenantry Reads Mr. Goddard and he had also supported in 1948. the money Resolution which appeared in the estimates for $224,000 for the linupivt'iniTit of tenantry roads in the i Ian I Anyone who ttvn llod %  long torn roadi v.:i* aware i" the need fur improvement. I am glad to ray that the condition of lOma of these reran has been improved, but ragra, that there are other*, still in a lamentable state." Mr. Heece then went on to refer to other progressive measure* in the House which he and Mr. Goddard had supported and said that he was Just doing that "to give the lie to many false rumours that they, and particularly he. had done nothing for the people of the island." Such u statement was utterly untrue. he said. One of these measures was the Teachers' Pension Act. Another was for the provision of payment to "relief teache.ru." "And while on this", said Mr Reece. "I think you will all agree with me that It Is almost hopeless for the small number of teachers in the schools to rope With the tremendous increase of pupiR "I was speaking to a teacher a short while ago and he told me that It Is impossible for him to teach a class of 60. 70 or 80 boys. I replied that It is not only impossible but the conditions under which he is expected to teach are even more impossible. 'I cannot understand how little children ever learn unything nowadays'. "YVi must have road in the Press a short while ago of the severe criticism of our educational system, on the grounds that the pupils turned out from the elementary schools are not up to the standard of former years. I do not think this Is any fault of the teacher. I think it is due to two or three things. Lack of trained teachers, the very poor accommodation and the conditions under which pupils are being taught. These conditions should be removed. Training College "We know a teachers' training college has been established at Erdiston but we also know that it will take a large number of years before the benefits of that training college can reach our children." In 1050, said Mr. Reece. Mr. Goddard and he introduced in the House, several Bills at the request of the Vestry of Christ Church. One of these Bills dealt with the purchase of a refuse collector, and the erection of Mandposts in the parish. As a result of that Bill no less than ten standposts had been erected in one year in the parish. "Now can anybody say that Fred Goddard and "Juby" Reece have not been doing their best In the interest of the parish in seeing that conditions are made better for alP" questioned Mr.Keece. He went on to speak of other things Mr. Goddard and he had done for the parish, and among these mentioned that they had supported the Resolution for M,f00 to build the Post Office; the Resolution for the repairs to the Foundation Boys' School. and that for the repairs to Providence School. "As long as I live.' he said, "1 shall always do my utmost, inside and outside of the House, to forwad the interest Of the people of this island and in particular of the parish of Christ Church". Mr. Reece Ihen a-ked the electorate to return him to the House and promised to continue to serve them to the he?t of his ability. More Standpoots Mr. Goddard told his listeners that they had heard Mr. Reeee had spoken of what 0w l.. i OOtM iii the House. All that he had said was true. Mr. Goddard then spoke of the ten standposts that had been erected in the parish as a result of the Resolution they had si ecceded in |Huni through the House and aeaaed "These arc nothing to do <>•>' threr others which the v. which I am a member. hn> erected." He K.uld j'ssure Ihem thai Mr. Ram and ha knew the needs of the people In his position as a merchant in Roebuck Street lie ..one in contact with all kinds of people from all over the island and he sought lo know the condition of these peoith "I am really pleaded th-it at a time like tinwhen I go arotUsd canvassing from house la house. I have the opportunitv i i tea iba rondltkau under which people li-. i day m ihis same district I went into some he brought hi cibly than evi the people A* ,nx-V •''' % %  talk about bacssMrJo^tht me that I am only^|oo*'Jbrry the amount given has not been doubled, because I know Ihe nioncv would he well spent." It was a shame, said Mr. Goddan), that in this age when people were looking and thinking of progress, some did not have •he means to buy the iwceasitie* of Ufa, Social I e;^l iin 'i "There is no social legislation hrought down to the House that Mr Heece and I will not vote for. 'I am going to do my best for the people at all times and having regard to the interest in the people that has been shown by Mr. Reece. the work he has done during the session now coming to an end. and his experience. I am asking you to send him bin wfth me to the House. 1 can assure you that we have every intention of again doing good work in your Interest in the following session." Mr. Goddard referred lo his Party's Manifesto and said thai If they could get half of the thines on it done during ihe DOXl five years, good progress in the country would have been made. One r the money he had borrowed ami the remaining third he should keep. We have considered it. and we feel it U a con o tn l c well-founded and can ba done, and I Wi.uld like UO H It adopted by the Government in power." The Unemployed Mr. Goddard went on to say how very necessary it was to find work for the island's unemployed, but that the Government had done nothing to find the means of employment They had not, until quite recently sought to encourage new Indus tries which would provide work. nor had they tried to enoourago capital to do business In the island, he said. "Unemployment Is our big problem." he declared. Concluding, he said: Vote for both Mr. Reece and me on KtacUon Day. we stand for everything constructive. Put us back tngethtv I.IKI we will represent the people as ever we hBve done in the pat and better." *M MISS AUDREY MACINTYBK .wt* who returned from Engluid yeoterdsy by tli? Uolflto with hoi metbtr Is seen chatting with Mrs. Ullnrinn Reel (centre) mid Miss f nulls* Manning shortly after laasV lag at thf Baggage Wsretiouaa Set Corfft fate -\ Two Afonths For Bodily Harm JUSTICES G. I. Taylor an' H. A. Vaughan sitting In th* Court oX alvfi-.i. lei In tenced TJWWIBolyn Kirton of Suttle Street. St. Mlcna*L to two months' imprisonment with hard labour for inflicting bodily harm on Claude Deckles on June 9. By doing'this Their Honours con firmed the decision of Mr. C. L. Walwyn. Police Magistrate of District "A". Kirton has appealed to the Court of Error Mr. W. W Reece K.C.. Solicitoi General, associated with Mi B. NHes appeared on behalf of the defendant while SgtKing prosecuted on behalf of the Police. Heckles told trie court that on June 6 some time in the afternoon he was walking down Suttle Street when he saw the defendant. The defendant spoke to him and there followed an argument and the defendant threw something like ammonia in his face. Some of this liquid got in his e>e which caused him to go the General Hospital for treatment. Doubling Pledge* To Serve People •OUT canc'i%  i ksOTM could quote from the munlcs of the House of A-Minhly meetings to show the ial Mr Dow 'ng. ElechtH cu %  ad spoKm .i atsitfa tii.,1 would have benetUcI ihe people. Mr, Dowding told i largo crowd "i tha lecto ate at Markoi Hill, St. George. !.-, night "I have MTVad yotl well during the last live .vui-i and %  you well ag< in," ho said. "Any htm which b i".t for UM paopu will have Dowdingism behind it a it." "My bone afiaJntl BoeJaJteta li not the n colour. he said. Another talked of a vision but what UV people wanted to hear %  hard facts, employment. Mr Dowding stressed that the mam did." ion Labour and Conservatives was the question of state owner-hip as against %  prise. M they turned it was a question of the masses. The real diehard Tories were no more. The) had to roalJao that tpttal und Ijiilmtir should go together. On the question of the cost of llvu ha) said they .'tad to soil Ihe English gave m II I Hi UW MMICI band Barbados had to paj whatever price the English asked for machinery or whatava. It might i>c for factory "i I %  %  E %  [•!•The UilMiur were not tackling tha*. QJIiaatJoa the right way. It was not forced home that the people were suffering from unemployment. "So long as I have voice I will be strung In VOsOlltg rOUl tight' os against the rights of the Englishmen, regardless of colour." He said that for the past five years he had Ivcn representing them and ho dctled any man to say he OVOf did anything against the community. He huit the l>in Law Hoard and knew Iha i<>pie*s needs. During the five years he had been in polities he had learnt much and was there |0 help tlnin. Agricultural i'<>mmnily Mr. E K Walcott said that although they did not seek to decry pOOOnta they would iriow them that they were incapable One of the four posts in the Executive Committee was the Minister of Agriculture. This commu'ui> v/as naturally an agricultural community. Everything that in addition I., blindness cannot be COMlOaro u for admission. Any parents or guardians who are Interested In sending a child to the School should applv for further particulars to tbe Social Welfare Office, Garrison, St. Michael. Seismographir Tests Continue On Eusl Goust Th. voaaal Sunshine R is still working off the Ragged Point coast. It is carrying out marine seismographic tests for the Barbados Gulf Oil Cumpam Thai mwino work is expected to continue throughout the yexr. Dr. Auer told the Advocate vesterdey that the tests have been successful. They do not piove whether there is oil or not but they give some picture of what the underground looks like in order to choose likely drilling sites. He said thnt they had previously tiled to carry out these tests from the land, but the island, being an small, and owing to tha heavy eh urges tha'. were needed, they roulri not operate from the land %  We m loing to concentrate on the cast coast for the next montn or two so as to try to i iinnUte the work on that side before the sea gets too rough. When the sea is rough on that side of the island, we will transfer our work to the west coast." he said. Revuedevilh' Outstanding lt> si \(.l 1 \\ REVUEDEULLK 1051. now being stigel under "he dated patron ge of Sir William and Lady Savage, at the Empue Theatre by Mrs Joyce S uart and her daw log be best aununad %  rtaoa," Associated with th. crowd which attended last night's WO! the high and sati notary ohMMeaTd Of acting. Th^ trcajpe dlaplayad I'^eir taleni *.i ii appreciative audience fully bent on %  my mind caused by stage fright Not only was the easmH aelected. but there was grace ad poise in the movement of the vnung boys and girls. little lagg performiM well | An t'n bv *he manv who itte*v**d ihe • %  bow that it will t>e a bumiwr %  ajaggan, The stage decorations wort of tatty design. The cos umes goi-d and the scenes of a high standard. The movement of limb, blende! with the rhythmic and exo'ie beat of the "torn torn" dun jungle dance. Truly, this show provided Iho II hence with laughter, pleasure nd eniertsinment It thnich an .'ll-time high" in Barbadian and incidentally West Indian culture, which hat come to -lay wl h us Ever too often have we rejected these amateur Ihowa, Ever tno often have we erfuV iterllng quallliet i n Tlie male quartette and thn performance of the Goddess (Do -n Gibbs) and her subjects in "Jungle Fantasy" aaaeg item* well received. The laughter provided by Mr Tudor (Oscar) the lovely costumes, the acting. -Ingtng and dancing of Ihe troupe and the music of the Barbados Polio Hand under the baton of Capl C. E. Raison. AH CM. M H F 'by the kind permission of Colmiel R Mirhelin) ring down tin curt ill on a production which will reman fresh In the minds of Ml thos' who see It. Schoolboy's Inquiry Adjourned Further hearing in 0 concerning the death of Cdgehlll Drakes, a schoolboy of Welchman Hall. St Thomas, was yesterday adjourned by Coroner C I taeiwyn at thi Dftsf \ .,i.t until Tu. I p.m. on Sunday October 20 while on his a I) hi ttu I i>ital alter he was involved m an accident with the moloi c-t M-S1. arid driven by Clement | Richmond Gap St Mn hael. OR Hal) Road, Si. Thomas. Dr. A S CatO who i the ooal mrl-M ev. inm.ition on October 20 about I p in. said that :i %  UKI. araa identiItc i io bin b) QUberl I • v ' %  > '* ai.i he wa* dead f.^i .ilxml It bovra. in hu opinion deal n rhaga from the %  QUheti rorde said that he went t.. Hie Public Mm tuns and id.-ntihed the body of the rie%  i ..: % %  ,,t 1L' 3d p.m. on October 29 The o^oooasald ahM his son. Keepinu l^-fl Manhaol Wat-son a 13-year-old %  chootboy of Welchman Hall, St. rioinas. said that on OctobeJ :'H about 1.311 p.m he was riding a %  long Wesehman Hall Itoad. He was going in the dlraetion of the country on tha left side of the road. Drakes, the deceased was also rtdlng' with him and tliey were tiding abOUl llllia feet from the'left guttn. Both of them were riding at a moderate While riding he heaid a ear horn and pulled in Iha Mi iido of thi '! i i WartM them. When the car patted he heard the bukes of the motor car applied. The motor car was travelling at a fast rate of speed. TO the Jury Watson said that '.[ %  : %  daooaoad wai not rtdlng with his head dov r. Fr Lane Appointed Cuiate Of Cathedral I Ihr A| |Hi|l 1ments Board /etterda] tha Km Harold Lane Vkai ol (ft Mi > tins, was unanlnv t. tha mirao] of Bl Mlchael'i CaahadraL liefiire going tu St. Martins. Father lane worked at All Souls. He will tak. up his new dulles %  from December I J'ca Relief Raff fa THI wu.ne, of the elcctri, lamp which wun iaflle-1 yaatar> iias m aid of Iha afayorsof KingMon (Jamaica i Hurricane Rellal boidet of ticket N... II The %  ffle realized gS5 .72 30'For Wounding POLICE Magistrate H. A. Talmo yesterday fined Joseph Morris or Hotbertal Turning. St Michael. 30 and 2 costs to be paid In 14 daga "i otM month's imptisonment for wounding Caspar Quintyne on October 13. MISSIONARY GOES TO OIST1N MISSIONARY Sam Mathuia who arrived here three weeks ago from Trinidad to give a series of lectures locally is now carrying his campaigning to Oistln Christ Church. B.C. Publicatioiw On Show At • "Wakefield" AN exhibition of recent British Council Publications Is now <-o view at the British Council Id Whitepark, and at the Spoigntslown Branch Library Among the publications shown a.e the latest contribution to the Series Trie Ail* in Britaindealing with Music, Drama and Thi Nova, from ItHV-1950, and it .e *ene-The Yea. W.,ik K n i IT I OVOI Ihe arlmvetnetits ••< |U5i in Music The Thea'n Liter. mure and Films. A selection of SupplementW British Book News can also bs ton Ihaaa excellent little monographs, on famous British writer, are published monthly and are tbe work of well known critics 'he most recent are studies of George Eliot, Osbert Sltwell and Jane Austen. I PAIN'S I CELEBRATED FIREWORKS The largest Assortment in town is at WEATHERHEAD'S %  .1 k#n ID m 'Flower Pots. Dizzie Daggla s 1 lack in iha Bog, Devil Among UH Tailors, Jet .v.. 11 i %  an Prives: 4c 8c. 12. II 24c. 3fl. 60. 7 fl08. fl.44. 91 vr 1.92, $264. $211 and HM SPARKLERS H, MATCHPS rRgdl Orati %  iii:n DCVII %  I |c. i Call in ami make pOUf S I %  lion Ton HJICI WKATHF.KH1AI) I LTD—Hwdol Bro.J5lrMl DlliiNk & ENJOY COOLING & REFRESHING 2 !•. II\ WHAT A BARGAIN III .M.OI* 4.IM l\l HI limit 2 inch GARDEN HOSE ul 17c. a fool ECKSTEIN BROS. Bay Street Phone 4269 f^%V**d\ \ .1 Im tlllll-ll It/I/III I I (1 III Ifl ...,. \ FRENCH PERFUMES | in •I'RINVt: MA TCHAltELU" ''. offered row of unbelievably low prices very limited Stock remaining \ KNIGHTS DRUG STOR' |u~:OwhftCer of people who havo ueen storing up com flour ,md have (>een engagliuj banana und pian'.iln leavat, which are two ew;ntijls in the making of "co.i':ies". Dy ..iier day local dour mills Iwve Mern grinding bushels of corn. Guy Fawkes Day It Onl) live days off. Everybody likes to have fun on the day when Guy rawkes attempted to blow the English Parliament "sky high'" and ;o he prepares for it. In many of the City stores andRoman candlet. Jack-in-the-box. at some stores in the Countrv Ievi| among the tailors, Jet wheels, districts, fireworks are on dlsplav sparkles and matches (green and Little children and even men t red are in good supply in the women cannot resist stopping and stores. into the show windows at^the motley coloured firework-, ^, me rn ,, dipn< w1lo canno The stores have been enjoying W1 l-'" 1 1 sjl1 t their fliewnrk*. have already Th^yerir. new n:,"ic,-ir fun. Others added to the list of fireworks whJ [|(15 !md nwd(l mosiof the old ones have remiiine.t h( f;iini | 1( r .. (l |,, w Ic-> whicn The cheapest of the fireworks k ,., . .. u u ^^ which the children will buy most hon rarbWe lfllld> —are bombs and red devils and n match namlri|r Ht a „,„,,, A Variet> heir in the bottom of the covered Crackers, wheels, flower pots, tins, -blow tots" pi .vide lots ef diztle dazzles, squlbbs. rocke:.'. fun for the children. Ladies' Handkerchiefs in Gift Boxes HONG SONG HANI) DRAWN t :MKKOIIII:KI:I> HANKIFS %  Mini, \ HAND IMhKOIItlRHi ^IN(.I i film i; COTTON HANKIES wiim I IMS' IIANKOCAVE SHEPHERD 6L CO., Ltd. 10—11 BromH SUeel mow %i \.\v st it* "s is O .1 JAtS O • ? • e WIN AN EKCQ RADIO GUESS COUPON WITH EVERY OVER $5,110 CASH BILL FROM NOVEMBER 1ST A. BARNES & CO.. LTD.


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PAGE POUR BARBADOS ADVOCATE TIIL-RMIAY NOVBSBBIS 1. itsi BARBADOS Am r Oft"TTE The Astonishing Story Of i ii4--|.osl So\ i4-h WurlKrith-s Thursday, November I. 1951 Irisii i, < Market THE House of Aaaembly on Tuesday passed a resolution for the sum of $18,650 to provide payment for a portion of lan3 at Ragle Hall on which to establish a district market. The land will now be purchased ut $1.32 per square foot instead of $1.00. The story of delay behind the need for the resolution is one which will give cause for grave dissatisfaction on the part of taxpayers for two very sound reasons. For some time now it has been agreed that th> i> should be district markets scattered about St. Michael instead of a large market to which neither housewives nor hawkers were inclined to go. The Sanitary Commissioners of St. Michael approached the Government in the matter and certain areas were selected as suitable. In these areas it was agreed to purchase spots which would accommodate the markets. One of these was at Eagle Hall on the property of Hon. Mrs. Hanschell. After some discussion, it was agreed by Mrs. Hanschell to sell the land at one dollar per square foot. The Government disagreed on the ground that the price was too high and there the matter rested for some time. With public desire for these markets so strong and the reason for the delay not being made public, people began to ask whether the Government was really serious about the establishment of district markets. This delay was accentuated by the sale of a portion of land at Waterhall for the erection of a cinema. The Government decided to acquire the land under the provisions of the Land Acquisition Act. This brought about further delap. Meanwhile, another parcel of land was sold at Waterhall for business purposes and the price paid was $1.40 per square foot, h was clear that while the Government was trifling with the power which they had the price of land like every other commodity, was rising. The matter had been filed in the Court but had not yet come to trial and fortunately another attempt was successful. Mrs. Hanschell now agreed rot to ask the same price as that of the land sold on the opposite side of the street and to accept $1.32 per square foot. The land will now be purchased at $1.32 per square foot and if nothing untoward happens again, it is likely that in the near future. Eagle Hall will have its district market, even although it could have been acquired earlier and at less cost. i The need for the market is obvious to anyone who passed thr.t district where hundreds of people gather to make purchases from hawkers who come in from the country by 'bus. It may be that the establishment of this district market will relieve some of the pressure in Baxters Road and Busby Alley Inasmuch as it would not be necessary for people to travel to the City to get the items which they need. This should give the necessary incentive to the Government to speed up the work on the market which is to be erected on or near Fairchild Street which is even in a worse condition than Eagle Hall. It should be easy for the Legislative Council to concur in this resolution so that the erection of the market might be started as soon as possible. And it is fortunate that the matter has been settled amicably as this will permit the settlement of details and the handing over to be done quickly. The growing need for this market to accommodate the public must be the primary consideration in this matter. B> Kit u vim JONI | i i Has* <>f British Ally. Ulr inacasine llw Mn-ricn Oflirr published In Moscow. uniformed guard* rein formed by UkM men altu Kept a cont.-int yUn on their %  Last week Mr*. Kickc.ls made the fatal nuj.uk. oi vuiting the ii:i a member u! the emiifter mysUriou* telephone b-ssy who did not enjoy dlplo•are now ready to clow hi on we car of the ft Bride* — one of the morplsorte* In the history of Ai Soviet post-war relations That IB the meaning behind the Oi ..rre happenings outs. > ma be Sta.UI. the Botshoi Theatre, Moc<*. 'i noy would never divulge .ho Metraveal when Mr*. Iraid a Hiekett*. the .dei.tity or the ., thTmomSTtor winch the Soviet-Born wife of an official at messages. M tf J" inttTd ii W the Science Museum. London, wa, OCCASIONALLY plain-clothes MV £ •A! m aelieTwsa. si. %  aflat one of these visiU tha. two of tha brides, Mrs. L" Aife of M Eating bank <" Mrs. Rosa Itsndsrson, whose husband is now >n Canada, at%  •>k .in ovwdjoaa of aspirin and were found unconscious by another wife. Doctors from the American and British embassies > -vived them. kidnapped and later 'released' Only one bride is now she is virtually a prisoner in the bri.ish Embassy where she live-. H im-year-old son. I HhHr. .. 15 war brides mil at U MOSCOW when I October I IMS to take i editorship oi tin t rtussian magazine, British AILj I knew .nem all. shared their fears and their hopes, and ocoastanaUy acted as tncir escort. Only wltn someone enjoying diplomatic privileges could they move outside the gates .it thrir bOflM Now that .here Is little, if anv. hope left f"i then rein %  possible to tell Hie full story of their grim orde;n ordeal which they bore for si* yean. bECAUSE they married forelgnii.p aMrassM Itafel HIIU aiaBUB %  %  iMlSUlUl U.C'U UlUllj lO ^.11aajafaaSa MBB ... .n. uU -i.i-. tnaj uid noi waia inio iaa ....^. uf sasra ttt%n ova jnari oaa HI n-.ii. iney iiao BMMU ! Ibe ballet at Use BoUhai he pointrd her mil t a squad af pliln%  Iwthea nifii They paanrd her Into the ml whleh her eseart had i .tiled aatg drave off. Mrs. RJckeitVs brother did net meet her there by chance. JU was there by artanscment with the police—it was the penally he had to pay for his five years' laftart t> make her agree *o ,, .. divorce her British husband .'.,. gas shrcau %  a Nobooy who hus met liaiaa uu *MM. RlcketU, and 1 knew her well, doubt that it was under dire threats that she denied she was ever kidnapped. Her fnenos, and they were many in the foreign cosomualt/ on Moscow, know that uo jto.y die WdSteru corthelr husbands they were osgone to spend the mgni at uie napofldsBU doesn't ring true, iraclsed by their own families. .iome of Mrs. boitons mother. Some were turned out of their She left the bouse home.-: some found sanctuary In an panlrd the follwwUu .11-111 basanstn. of the Press Da-a * bundled into a oar and Uke n to the l.ubiaufca Priaaa. Aitenipta by embassy officials partment of the liiil^h Kmbai Two were permitted to stay on with their ailing mothers. No KllSM.ll uUI il.ire talk to '"id her mother to *eo her lailcd. them. They were banned from employment by -my Soviet agency and deprived of all civil rights although they w" c regarded as Soviet citizens by the law. Always Trailed A 24-hour guard on the gales of the Press Department ensured that they did not lea unnoticed. When they went outside with a member of the diplomatic staff they were tailed by plain-cloth* men. If they received calleruie visitor* had to show their Identity documents to the inihti.iii.il on dasy. Inside they were spied on by the Russian staff. Two of them aie M.V.U. nave won hall their battle with her. She will no longer have any contact with the world outside her mother's home. Her brother, an ardent Communist, is her guard. She will no* be allowed any foreign visitors. She to nader clear house arrest, though thai la nM Uie way Uie M.V.D. describe It. She can easily be transferred, as .sobody could luul out on wha. ciiaigc she had boen taken in. Nobody has heard of her since. Terrified The four remaining brides were other Soviet bride,* have, to a conN Mined. They rarely moved outcentraUon camp without anyone ride their quarters for six months, being the wiser. Then one night in March this 'She'* Tough' the premises year Mrs. Henderson went outside. Last night I spoke on the teleMrs. Bolton disappeared a few phone to a friend in Moscow who days later. Neither has been heard gave this reassuring message: of since. "Nobody will break Ira's fpirit tmbassy officials were snubbed She's tough and will stand up. as by the police authorities; told It she has done all the time, to any was not their business. brow-beating." AFTER these three disappeared Then came this ominou Mr HaU and Mr*. RlcketU were minder from behind tne Iron riven quarters in an annexe In the Curtain: "Don't forget this is being Embassy grounds. recorded", and the subject changed Outside the embassy gates to the weather—I..E.S. Experiments in Hi ('wrong Direction LONDON. Oct. 22. The Colonial Development Corporation is "an unimaginative enlargement of old ideas" and Is bised on a wrong approach to the whole question of Colonial Development. S,, wrtle. Lord Milverton, until recently a parttime member of the Corporation and a former Colonial Governor, In the "New Common wealth" issue published to-day. "Colonial Development must bj closely tho responsibility of %  ho local Govomment | n each instance." he says. "In its true form, it should be a conception of aided Colonial Government, learning and developing; under Its own authority, not a fl ut present an Imperial Santa Claus whose occasional Incursions merely accentuate without solving lecal needs. We live and learn and enlightenment may well reveal that the Colonial Development Corporation Is conceived and ha R been built up on the wrong linesLord Milverton says 1' is at least worthy of CONa whether it should not be u very small holding Corporation, ..I!caUng and oontntUnsj aid but not administering schema", having under It regional Corporations with an entirely regional membership which would work through local Governments and would encourage them to to into partnership with private enterprise in as many of their schemes as possible. He adds; "The local Government should almost always be a partner In any dSWSjOpmanl scheme under Corporation auspices. Perhaps th P chief advnnlage < f having the actual execution of schemes doubly removed would be to underline the rssponsttulitv of the Corporation to Parliament through the Secretary of State, for the allocation of funds. and equally to remove the temptation b tamper with the details." "It seems to me that the lessons learnt by the Development and Welfare Organisation in the West Indira on the one hand, and b v the Cameroons Development Corporation, on the other hand, might well be studied." Lord Milverton believes that Colonial development. In fact, really' comes in the end to regulating the whole life of the community concerned — social economic and political. "If m are true to our principles, this inevitably means that the only possible channels are the nascent Colonial nationalities themselves. In other words, our Colonial Development Corporation and such-like bodies are really experiments In the wrong direction. "You cannot," ho claims, "do oil lbs things which seem to t-r Implicit in Ihe conception of Colonial development by an external authority. If trie develU> live and to become pan of tha organic Rrowih of the paojile. it must be under their .niUimiiN and control "Dimly, this dilemma has beet, foreseen when we talk of assoclaUni iM.kward peoples with the various schemes und getting them to regard Uiem as their own. But, to !• truly their own. the impetus. tho faith in them, the desire to havo them succeed must be drawn from the beneficiaries, not the benevolent patron." Earlier In his article Lord Milverton said that during the past 25 year^ there bad been a gmit deal of loose thinking and looser talking on the subject of Cnloiii.it Development and the development of backward areas generally. 'Man v expensive leuong have been bought but the fallacy that money alone can work these i II i>erslsts in far too many minds. Development i thl f connection really ronswan OQjnplata mental and physical revolution. "Even w,. ourselves have only lust begun to face what the problem means so thai It Is, perhaps not surprising that the peoplC whom wj propose to help develop themselves to ou r pattern, are not only confused about the scope of the envisaged chanse In their lives but ; are quite unaware of the price of such progress and the fundamental upheaval Involved." Lord Milverton said. The v wanted, naturally, the glittering prises of Western ii dustry; they would like a higher standard of living and the many desirabla things that only money can buy. but they have not transl.it.• tho-.*desires into Vint.-, of effort or related them to the inescapable conditions of regular responsible hird work and the acquisition of nil the skills which go to make what is known as Western civilisation. I^ir.j Milverton asks "How many of the colonial coaacnunltsfi who clamour for self-govrinnun and freedom from Imperial shackles have any conception of the choice at present involved • It not a choice." he points OUt, "bc'.wcen self-government or foreign rule, with the benefits oi Western economy as a COnunOCI constant, but a choice helwecr ininenl and their own way of life, with its attendan poverty and misery and oppresUon, %  r foreign guidance and th benchts of association with Westc in economy and a slow movement towards autonomy. 1 TLta l'olonie.% in *IW 4 oimnoiis V LONDON. The possibility of colonl >1 rprsss nU tion In Britain's Parliament was commented upon by Mr. Ivor Thomas, author and Journalist, in an address last week to •!<%  Royal Empire Society. He recently returned from a tour of North Africa, where, he snid. he found the French system of government "well worth studying." Whereas. Britain had no rep'c •.rnlon'". ut Westminster, one French territory. Algeria, he pointed out sent 58 representatives to Paris. He thought it would be good policy, for "some" of our colonies to send members I" tho C.K. Parliament. The empii.ii*. haaVOVCXi VrM on the u..id "some." Countries with dominion status OS" coveriung status. Itffn %  Oung enough to "stand on their own font BW other-, particularly small colonies, would liciimvly benefit. A second difference lie noted between BrtttSfl and French methods was th il in the Fren :h North African lenttorhl UM eras aqua! rewnsantatton of French and local people in the general assemblies. This posed question which would have to b-faced soon in British territories There were, he said, two alternatives: firstly, a system of "one man one vote;" secondly, a system in which plunl soctetie. would have each community represented in proportion to the part they played in relation to the country as a whole. Mr. Thomas spoke also problems which French ann British, territories have in com iron the conservative tendencies of local people, particularly 11 mattanj of religion, which put ai le break on development, Ihe rapid, increase in popula'ions. tinkeeping "C law and order. III troubled tunes like these the rations at the western world must co-opt rate and endeavour u uimerstnnd one another, if western civilisation was to survive. He also thought that another 'tspeet of the Trench colonies which n would be beneficial to stud} ems their method of agriculture it provided a good of the co-opera tl' farming system working successfully. Thoughts For Politicians III. Housing Co-operatives TO encourage private buildinp. in areas where reconstruction was necessary or where here was a housing shortage the President of the Italian republic promulgated a law dated 10th August, 1950. This lr.w has many ( iP>vi*Mins which deserve consideration. Jnder the law guaranteed loans can be made o individuals who have small savinys in the jjnk and who cither singly or through coipera'.ives, want to build houses for ihemttftVCS, These houses cannot have lev than .wo or more than five living rooms and musl lave in addition kitchen, bath and lavatory, jantry and entrance hall. The law authorises he issue of loans up to 75 per rent, of the otal cost of the land and the building. These ans are guaranteed by a first mortgage on he land and buildings. The loans have to be epaid withir. a period of thirty live years and ire sub(ect to an interest not exceeding four >er cent, per annum. A condition for ohtainng a loan is that the owner of the house or us immediate relatives must live in it for a ninimum period of five years. In addition to the special fund administered ; i this way by the Treasury to encourage >rivate building, credit and building in.stiutes are also offered special privileges by the lovernment to encourage house building. \mong these privileges is exemption from ..come tax on the interest accruing from the oans. There must be good faith on the part ;f the borrowers. No payments can be made u individuals or co-operatives until the in1 Jividual or co-operative has paid 20 per cent. f the total cost involved in purchasing the milding area in construction uf the building. By an earlier decree dated 8th May. 1947 .emulation was provided in Italy to help the poorest classes by direct grants in aid. Grants Ai-re paid either to individuals or to building rdctifg and varied with the size of houses ,o be constructed. Fifteen pounds were paid H the builder of a one-roomed apartment, with accessories and of minimum size of ;ir50 qu.iio tat. Thirty pounds were paid to the builder <>f a two-roomed apaitment with acMMOi lag tnd of a minimum size of 450 square bet And so by an ascending scale of payment until u maximum of £50 were paid towards an apartmen* with five rooms and lCLcssories and a maximum area of 990 tiuare feet. By another law dated 2nd July, 1949 legislation was created to assist companies and societies engaged in building "economic" iscs for the people. Under this law the] Slide contracts to pay an agreed portion of the cost of building over a period of thirty five years. In the years 1949-50 and 1950-51 tha State contribution was of an order of 11.200,000 for each financial year. In the' financial year 1951-52 it was half this .sum. Popular or economic houses are defined as follows: 1 Each house must have not less than two and not more than five living rooms besides kitchen, bath, lavatory, store-room and entrance. I. Its own entrance from a common stairway. I. Its own lavatory. 1. Its own water. >. Must conform to sanitary and health' provisions. The maximum area of the largest house ?annot exceed 990 square feet for n fiveroomed building. Popular houses whether built by indusiiahsls, workmen or farmers can be rented %  r bought by the occupiers. Under this same law savings or lending anks are authorised to issue loans to cooperatives of journalists, magistrates and .ther professional groups. The banks are luthorised to issue loans comprehensive of he whole cost of building, less one half the State's contribution. Under this law the State lives further encouragement to house build*rs by exempting the owners for 25 years from payment of house tax. Many other tax concessions are provided. Due to this active oromotion of house-building, the State, in .taly is not only looking after the interests %  t alt its families, but is helping to create employment for workers in the building industry. To-morrow: "THE STATE" WMJUHTAmmN A WACMWmW i litOI H SHEETS Call and Select Early in ADVOCATE VTATIOXEUV. A FRESH SHIPMENT OF GOLDEN ARROW FLOUR JUST ARRIVED. &f DA COSTA & CO. LTD. Agents. # # #£ £ ^# %  ?£ =S £ 9 2 2 2 Z 2 2 2 2 222 2 n heard. Then if he did not rind the bill six cents M Subtracted, from the next grant. I have kn<r regard of the inaagrtty and honesty of a poor elementary teacher. fVroir HonFood Po Th.Fdifnr. The Adeoeare SIR,—In view of the proposed Increase in the price of ric* from January next :md the further increase In the cost which is bound to follow, a would be in Iha tnter* l nhre island if those persons who are In control of land would endeavour, row that the rainy season has Cooks to plant food crops. The extent to which gardening hat been done in this island within the last few years shows that room for it as u subsidiary. There has never been a waste of vegetables; and In addition Barbados Imports thousands aoUari worth of garden vegetables from St. Lucia, ST Vinrent. Dominica and Canada. In nddition to reducing the cost of living It Is possible EQr the growers to Improve the standard for small animals it wouli still of nutrition by their efforts to have been serving some useful! grow vegetables and so vary the purpose but in the majority of diet of the family. instances It Is put to no use. It r: surprising what ;1 small I j Here and ther e in every dtswell kept garden in the backj] trict one sees small spots of land, yard can do for the family table it is true, lying fallow. If as tn Youri soine cases it provided pasturage ECONOMY si i HOW nii.1 si.mi £^Z>7&* MXf.Itt Hit MS EorYnur1.\EK By JON llorE # It's a good thing authors don't put all their rttos in QM basket There's a man in Manchester who has destroyed ;) int of complacency in booksy miles. He * Charles Nowell, Ubraj I Chester public lil.u n • He ordered a census of the l&Mary public's reading. Top of ih,pull comes. Dorothy L, Bajrsrs (whose last novel was published 14 years ago). Census showed 885 copies of n#r books In use, 100 on the shelves. Second and third places fell to late Sir Hugh Walpole (506 in ue. 7BB on the shelves); and Leslie (The Saini) Charteris (582 B wafting for borrowers). Runners-up: John Buchan, Agatha Christie, Mazo de la Roche. Howard Spring (426 out on loan, 23 on the shelves). Fourteenth |U Priestly; seventeenth. Daphne du Maurler. Not placed were C. S. Fores er. Clrdhani QgSJBM T ft NUTS PR1 CURRANTS CHERRIES SULTANAS COOKING HITTTER TABLE UUTTER KIDNEY sf'or tinWEEK-EAO WAMmt MII.K FED CHICKENS MILK FED DUCKS DRESSED RABBITS FII.I.ET STEAKS OX TAILS FRESH VEGETABLES (.OLD BRAID RUM V..I1 I will fnjxv MCSCATK.. Only S2.I0 per bi.tll. ,£ V '& .... i *-•> rmr PHONE GODDARD'S



PAGE 1

•MM BIMI TIIUR'sIHV. VOVTMBFR 1. It31 BARBADOS ADVOCATF PACF SI \TN CLASSIFIED ADS. TELfWCNC 250i TIM charga (•> Butna, Marriaar.. '".. Acknowl1*. •"* -n H..i a m m.ticda M -• %  %  • % %  ...i u M %  BaaaaM r.-iinbor •; word* up to JO. and %  or* vMrni ana per MUC n S-ai-oaya for e..cb Ljle. lair K-i.re-1 II..,,! T.'rr of %  fune-el loavo* lye. late re-.deii.-e -Palmo-one". UWfi Wilann Mill SI John, a: t SI Jhn'. Chucn and tboner to Ulr Pariah Cemetrry Friend' are mIN Mfc.MORIAM <'"'""" hi Loving mw< of our ilrj! moine, Mr. Irene Cumber Deirh. .h.. i.i: aU>*|> in Jeau< an November IN It*'. Day b day Iho voice MIIH • com*. IMnt onlernal h I Aakinc not if I on MM; %  HBSMM IMnt .-ao*. n .-!• M .enla Ck W • *oMe a -roed tooan-al ca-ti •eoT* oat Skatdopa. AL'TOMOTIVK CAW—DadjB Car IMS Model. •• u-age HUM mllaa. wilnt email AT Dial MM II 10 M—tn R: IMI Cltonon Armor) nowinllra Owmv leaving live Iiland %  H. v if H i Arii.. >to 14 to SI-IT n CAR !WI Uir.< Minor Saloon, ofth ?.SC* miM (IM O-nor MMH| IM l-l.itd Phone MB I II II i.i CARIMI Ford V-g Special Da UM perfect condition formerly L II" No ri Man ill la offer refused Ition* Bl-M IM III H SVIIS REAL ESTATE IM If" H Mllll IS Ton nau !•• a>a %  *. •• ueea-dni, • IWvllle. bv .in-'.nln* Toppln SUi A For rurthor partaei %  I Bale, (fbaj CWTU CATTORD CO M ttU-l In %  SOBST PiiblK CoaoprUt-nn M Uveat NOTHK rABMM of or josgra WIU I hoar aeranrn. nwtavf Tavr. I Joaoayh kind:, pay Knout delay A T ma, Paxxhul Treaaoier NOTICE rAsusa or ST J AMJkrationa w reeelved by IM tm %  h day Hi>**V— iv on Thura| f in* MM of Aanraaoi ,. NmrmDf: INI at J n Jeaepb The Cottage knoo-n . %  SO AM ", In th* la) Avenue MraHy.-. da euolalnm* Dra-ing and DHI.** RaaaH. t Bedroaano .inrrnorlv II *tu. nil modem miivanrnMH. and IKa land II i(m*> ronlalnani lilt aa.ytr (r*t • hich la full. anaMard IrMvavlWn on aaaUacaUrwi lo R A Cor ban. Oaataral Tradara Ltd For condition! of til*, apply to COTTU:. CATTORD A Co 11 l l -in T*ia I H I Had Ha aahad Wt anoubd to. -| Va* u.m •traaiulnd I^rd • lovo bar Ev*r lo b* rriTaMTUoarad Adllitn Skir .rfamhttt %  %  • %  > n I p i* nor May liUJJtlAM STATION W AOOON It mllaoa* VOW Naw Prleo rtlaa oo will MMM .•• Tor Inaportlon apply KalpK A Board. Lowor Bay SUaol 30 It) 11 in Ml h T*ia aalart I I I ROMUl M I' fl 4n IncJudod ndin.tr will bo on i n. and mual aoou lauMfl. ItU i MM invbdado i COYHNMLM' NOTICE Po-nLmdsbrr—Wrlchn Ro*4 Kr^nrh Poft Other AppltcatlofiB arc invited for the vacant office of Postmaster, Welches Road Branch Pout Office. St. Michael. Appointment will be made subject to the selected candidate being patMMd ag medically tit lot employment In the Public Service, and will bo. on two year'; rotation. The minimum educational •tandard which will be accepted IS a pass In the Cambridge Local School Certiflcatf Of %  similar examination of equivalent standard. Applicant* should be between the ages of 21 and SO years... The salary attached 'o the Post; is at the rate of $1,056 x 72— $1,775 #T.B.) x 96—$2,160 per annum nnd will b<> subject to deduction under the Widows' and Orphans' Pension Act. 1928 (1928-3) at 'he rate of 4^ t*T annum. Further particulars may be obtained from the Colonial Postmaster. Applications should be made on forms obtainable from th,. Colonial Secrct.irv's Office and muV be returned not later thnn the 15th of November. 1951. M). 1 M In lOilKY Otir rrdaral lorry In oorklnf rdn Price MM 80 Apply Manaavi ra> Hall 71 IB SI-tn NOTICK ..- ia haratiy |lvn thai nollhrr I Tno undarUBnod will oflar for (Olo al ln Maaior rxn i" apanM of tho M V iDrtilfii al IhMf oAVo. No (HARtEK A HIATULAN no* In port Hun S4rorl Fiitddrlown. on Prlday I ,, ( | „, laaaanHali fee ao dabt or dobu ISIh day of Novambor. 1MI. al 1 | contradod by any mombor or moanbrra of the crew of aald vraarl whilr In perl Capt. D J DOUCVTT1. MANNING A Co lid IABOI.UI 1 11 IP JI In .TLMTCTUCAL HAOHl <; i: c Sl Iti ItfS-KIGCRATOR Onr J C\.bH fl WoMlngbouio Kofrlor. %  comploto with SnoohaffpoUt. •• etc Phone MM 1 It >l In %  MdH* S*wl„ MacMnr ,ow. with ElccUlc Moloi !. %  .. Motor W* %  no at WARD a SPSNCCR %  n-PEW HITCH-U blr Typowrltor II. loct llroa Swai i Undorwood PorUEicallonl rondili^n SUaol 30 10 51-1 f n NOTICE TO MARINERS One Dan buoy with flag top mark has been placed in position lntnuie il degrees 12' north lor.iiituile 51 degrees 27' west. Explo-uves charges will be (lred in thfl vie um v or this buoy during daylight hours fur scismograpl %  %  ShlDptng is %  warneci to krei> rlear. TluDOtic* rsHiCwlt OUr notice of 19,li September. I!>51 1.11.51 ~ln. REAL ESTATE JOHN M. BLADON y co. A.r.s.. P.V.A. FOR SALE MISCELLANHH-'S m:n TICKING in n. iirippcd droitiM 11Mu II IS >ard. roducad for om •i l \>id Klipolam llOARIML TWO %  %  ..,,..!, : '. IMrchaarr muni .*-.• -Han Board la located al "Wrtchea" Si Mkrhaol-Uio olhor al OlMIni, noar I'i. 7.i Thaalra CITV GARAGE THAIHNti i O LTD Victoria Bl M 10 51 i r.i "PIZlX Wa('lUAHrrTK IXAVKK tifpad Cldarolto l^avaa at Of P Of H "< ui lor Wholoaala Prtcoa Bruce Waalhainoad IJd 31 10 SISn i DIARPnC -~~ a*a> a.--ansn IOO Moun RMM M m tktu Michel .11" A. er> largo Toilet and BaUi, Large Kitchen Panto. S.>r.-room elc and I The fjnvornmmt Wale. a> orll Windmill ond Wall, which lupplica alcr .'"f Karurni and lawn (laragr for > Cara. and SoevanU' looma A portion Of tho land M planted in < oooanut Tren. Guava iroo*. Manfo Ireoa. Uoldeti Appletiee.. and Breadfruit treoa and an olhor portion of land planted In Guinea. SUrphant and lour Graaa nrryjiR :N WPITINO III W roemvod b\ the underaunird up to Txiioday tho 14th day of Novrmbor. at 4 p in Tho vendor dor* not bind hrrarlf lo accept that highrol. or any offer Inajjeclon ark' day cmrpl tiundiv* on ipptk-aUon in Mi Haim-hril. Tele %  ph. • No an • (urthor parUcul beautiful "' "*'?_f£i 'i '' : III I CATTORD A CO PA MMM *r dT I.MIIII hill Ihoor H t—a owind Ta.c to tl I'jilah of Bl Ooorao. elraar pat .an VlllHlUl .i. D H A JOHNSXW. Treaauray. M Goorgi I II 51-Jr. NOTICE The Parochial Troaaurer' n Ooorgo Mill be kept oi t noat lo Iho Poal Office. .. lo the ISIh Novombar II I.UVI' A FOUND LOST wiirrr. WIKH. MAN s llrlnrn E A B> Building %  Phona Jill IM:HNOV\I a lS Mt, SI 10 ;eor and II Mil I H INT .|„. rifocoiATIt — Mado IV lor thoae oho inuil col a rd aweol diet 4 or Ban Knlfjil! 1 11 SI—In HAJU pfOOB C gVM* H i nl. Joaoph I II 51 S.I .. limit d quaiilll> al 45c par l. Cn^ulia Aulo Tf Company. Trafalgar Slrort. Phono MOO S3 10 51 I f n 11-Hi lib I*by my vrAR "LIETON ON SEA". Noar Ontmi %  MM bungalow bultl right on a Nad* beach With ellnt palhlfg facliltira, Tbere la a wide Irani verandah c.laodlng 1h* *hf>J frontage. S bodrooma. 'J wlln badnil. large I^ahaped loungo with cucaUil bar. kllchen. garage and •aerant'i quartera. HI li'DtNO LAND St Jamea Co#tAn un.L.iallv atlracll-e plot it land approi IW aerea udjoirdng %  TtlMtf. St Jamoi. Avallablo lo approved bu *or Other building aoctlona from J half to err 4 arm alao for Hie on Oilf coaa! -gTBATBHORg CulUlen lid A apacioua 3-.lor. Mono houot MM, Aecommooiallor. corn. prtaaa enck>tod g.Jle.i.v I recepbfatffMBM RADOL LEG WASH POWDSItH. lor irauniig int.inunatiun c-itaod by apralni Bmlar.. 3d boi KnlghU Lid I II SI—Sn Thl4 -rill lo notify public thai I am no long* fur any debl or d-bta ronlracin .... | ,| %  copl by a wnllon order aumed b> MM CI.IFTON YEARWOOD. My Lordi Hill. Rt Michael 1 11 51 3ri ri pRj -,.|,... %  Unrlli "i i M 31 10 5l-Jn SADDIJ: CM.' Ridlni; lect coodtllon Apply P Porter! Esctorr. t Jamoa idd!. In ne> D. Moynard, Dial Will 27 10 31 n lIloDoNAX lor Ailhrliiam. Rheiinia Gravel. Pain and Acidity ro!h Stock al Bi.". '• %  31 10 51 WAMIII HELP GAHOENCH Strong WUMfJ >• %  MR I* to II ai handy man and second Hardener Steady lob Sloop in or I Appl> Box L B B co AdvoraU M 10 51% %  r MM C.ii [ %  %  ItM ny roqi >ry high Handard •'horUiBhd nnd Typowrllind li eaten loffrlner wilh auflWlent capenerice I artlirv to control an office and if net wrf Interview client! lliah Solan, p |q MtOMddfvJ applicant Apply with T*otimoilal* lo Box C C c o Advocate Co II JI—Ai paj %  ill recommended M reduced prlco now planted with fruit treo. S largo reeopUon. 4 bedroom.. I aallerW.. % lichen. I bathrooma etc Cr-riirally located and aultabla for conversion inlo Rat* or boardii.g %  itlOURORB:'* Pino Mill — Modern Bungalow comlrn.IrO to IBM with ISMono wall! and hoavy %  llnolni roof There I* a U'flo I>-4haped living room. I double bodroor... Ml buUt-UI wardrobo*. kitchen, paniry. miVMH1 kitchon. bathroom wilh tub and ahowor. .olar brallr.g garage and 3 erThf trounda — -goded oitu Mahoaany boyant Irae. and tlie atono flagged lerr.ee ai eluded %  %  lied f,jrdcn I PM I cl... %  Jamei '-WINDY WILLOWS". St Deliahtful bungalow ***— " n I&MM Bfl •* MS MM RMMM i.f beach Larco loungo. 3 nedr,_.m.. verandah., kitchon. gantry and arrvant-' rooma Rtororooroa in liMiMSnt OBora eonaldccwl tang, riot" M ey'lapa**-ri .rra .-> r.dfeoatmangl-i -Me MMMtttM -r, MISCELLANEOUS yo public are giving crodil t ,. \ n Em ut .ol hold mywlf ..•.. %  one rlae coin.. In n.y MMM Ml >i""il ty nw hereby warned amliiat m. ife SYLVIA HBADUEVi ai I do reapunilblc for her or tlng any debt or debt. raa by a wrltlofi order DANCE o be held at Y. M. P. C DANCE at THF BARBAHOS AQl'ATIC CLUB tMrmbera Onl> I SATI KDAV, Nov. 3. 9 p.m. . Mr. C. CL":iWEN'S Oicheatr-i Members arc cordially u.vited. Free AfimlMiUn to Ballroom JVu (.ranis Mining IJeMSB To UaS, Capitalist KINGSTON. J'ca., Oct. 18. Following upon the announceniMit thai the Jamaica Government haa gi anted a concession to a Canadiar. Anil for oil mining rights .i iumr the dnnounceBMRII that the Ciovernment ban granted a licence to a Unitad Stated capltaliat for mining oper-iIKNUI In ihrlaland. The minerals to r which th* licence has been granted are Lead,' line, "ipper and silver for which Ihe capitalist will prospect In two the island. The*e areas are considered ideal lor the exploitation of copper and other ores, and it Is reported that preliminary study has that there may even be gold there NSW SaUPMUtl— I. tS IIMIKIIIS Jl'ST ABBITBM 1 ALL SOI II Call and oae thorn at your Oaa ordei TODAY lion. HORNIMAN'S TEA e w HOUSE SPOTS RENDEZVOUS HILL AVERAGE AREA 60 x 80 AND PRICED $1,000 to $1,700 A. BARNES & Co., Ltd I ui Thin IH I for H.lrr.nr... Vopif* ••• %  • %  .XOT i.niilnl./i' nl ThIHtST Ol I II i: POST OFFICE NOTICE A IR MAI LS MMM! M NoVfmkr. Utl AIR MAILS will br rlu.ril .1 ll.f Irfn.r.l l-.-l Offlrr u MUn :— ICwaini prr.loiu Srhrd.lf.1 DESTINATION SATURDAY NIGHT 3rd Nov., 1951, at 8 p.rr AdmlMlm b TICM— fl.M each Mmic by Mr. Hopple Jordan', Orch. 1.11.51.—Sn. "-%-;" WANTEH TO BCKT ,t:e yooiif, man r*uuiroa unfumlahod room no Apply Advocate Advertising Depl 1.1QLOR LICKNSK NOTICE The application of Gardli.rr Rke of Watchman Ban, fH Thomaa. tor p#ri-ynwn>n to toll Bplrtti. Mall Liquor* Ac ut a boarded and galvanliod ihop %  ii.led at Wolchman Hall. St Thomai Dn'cd thi. Mih day of October. IMI To J R EDWARDS, Caq Pa ,MaaMrati D P GAI;.IINL.( 11ICK. Applicai.t N B ~Thl! applM-atloo w, dmd ai .i lie. i.. ng i Mil %  I Police Court Dun in D on Uoudav 'ie I31h day of November. IMI. at II BE WlSt. . ADVERTISE IK) YOl'R SHOPPING IN COMFORT AT I InMiij fair Gilt Ship AQI'AIlt ( I l H where you will Rnd an al aaaorlmenl of aaalal and i CJIITS livcrudlnd Tayt. 0MM1 MM Deearallaai %  a-Og*aln| rrMay >4 200 p.m 11.45 a.m. 200 p.m. 9.00 n.m 2.00 p.r HAS a.n Australia (all air) Australia (air to Panama TO-D AVS NEWS FLASH STOP HAT< HIS 12.M K1ENZLE' The Real made. at JIHINtON S STATIONFRY PRESS BITTON8 Fitted to your Bag or Parse WHILE YOU WAIT JOHNSONS HARDWARE Br. Honduras Burma ., Canada via Trinidad) Canada Thurmlay Monday Thuraday i Monday Friday Monday Friday DFSTINATION M.il.. .. Martinique Maurittm Mexico Moafaa i al I Via AnllKiia. New Zealand (all air I | New Zealand (air to Panama I'l.il.ppinei Puerto Rico SI Crolx, V I St Km, S; I.ucla SI Thomaii. V.l. South America (riccepl Venezuela) Tortola (via Anliiuai 1.00 a n 11.45 a.r 2.00 p.m. 2.00 p.m. 9.00 a.m. 11.45 a.m 2.00 p.r 11.45 a.II 1143 an 0 00 a.r 2.00 p.n 1143 an 0 00 I 11.43 j .0O .r 11 43 a r 11.43 an • 00 an 1.00 I 11.43 2.00 pn t.00 an • 00 II 43 2 00 p.m 6 00 nm. I .00 I 11.43 I 000 I !00 0 00 air 1145 a. IT 0.00 am 1! 4'. .. n Monday Thuraday Monday Friday Monday Thuraday Monday Friday Monday Friday Monday Wr,(ll...... Monday %  day Wedne.day Saturday Monday Friday Monday ThurMi... W, .In. .... Saturday Monday Ivan % %  W.-.ll:. Sat.n.l.iMonday Friday Monday Thurday Wedneaday Salti'day Monday THiraday I Wedneaday | Saturday Monday Saturday I Monday I Thursday Thuraday Saturday Monday T'HII -.!.<• Wedneaday Saturday Monday Tueadav Vitaa l to Friday Saturday W :.-. .My Friday Monday Friday SHIPPING NOTICES ISAIAND USI LIMIflU (MANX LMal %  fl "POKr ADCl-AIDM" la arhed ilor M aali from Hobort %  eSdnBi l wf Mth. M.lboun.e Oetohor fth. Sydney Oclobo) Mth, tllad'lono October IMh. Port Ama (Ntoc-rr Mth, Bniban* October ITU. tfltrMf| al T-inldad about Mov.rr.l.er HM and Barhadoa Novonbor MUi i ban ample apaco tui chiliad IM Cargo aceopled on ihrotigSt Billo' li|M for Iranahlgwnont al Tnmdad t> Lnllah Ouiana. Laoward and Windward for further porUrtilara apply rt'BNMafl. WITWV a. CO ITU .nt DaOOMTA a CO LTD. Trinidad, Barhadoa B W I tf W I Ttw M V -C. L. M. ^AJnCM" > will acc-pl Cargo and Paaaei.ie.. •or Qranada, aallmg Thur-d.'. Mth InM Tho M.V -DAmWOOaD*will urcrapt Cargo and Paaaengen fof It LwcU, Qronada and Arubn. I I'bdaai T fMra only lof St cent, anlllng Tuoaday. Mth The M V CARBPIir*' -..epl Cargo and Paaoeniara B Dominica. Anlldua. Montaerra NeVH and Si KltU. Praday. 3nd November IMI • W 1 BCTBH1NIR OWSDW ASSOCIATION iIMC i n.igneo. Telaphono No Mtt FRENCH LINE (ir Glr Transallanliqup Salliibia la ENGLANII A FRANCE G sKQattfT Novetsjher 3rd. ItSl, via St. Lucia. Martuuiiue. Guadaloup*' and AnUgua, •COLOMBIE24th November. It51, via Martinique and 1 Guadaloupr SOI I III. Ol Ml COLOMBIE 13th November. 1051. calling at Trinidad. La Guaira. Curacao, Cartagena, Jamaica. Accepting Passengers. Cargo .it. i Hail M. JONES & Co. Ltd.—Ag-enca. HARRISON LINE OUTWARD FROM THE UNHID KINGDOM Vessel STATESMAN" "STl'DENT" LINARIA" PLANTER"TRADER" From .. Liverpool London . irfindon Glasxow a Livsn i".; Lrart'f 15th Oct: 2gth Oct 31st Oct iTili MM Due Burbd-dos 1st Nov. Illh Nov. Wtn Nnv 30th Nov. 24th Nov. 8th Dec. HOMEWARD FOR THE I'NITED KINGDOM CIOMM In Veagfl For BVVM4M SS "TRIBESMAN" r fiifl'-r Inr.iitu-linn ipiil, tn . DA COSTA A CO., LTD.-AgenU THE i KATHU. I MI'OKlll # Car BROAD A TI'DOR STREETS. CNIVERHITY COLLEGE OF THE WEST INDIES. I *tr Mural Department A COI'RBE OF mill I i i l I in %  DRAMATICS BeRiniiiiig Monday, Nov Mh at ITIE BRITISH COUNCIL, Waken rid al B.13 i'in Nov. S British Drama R. LcFanu, B.A. Nov. 12 Stage Production C. A. Gross-Smith. M A Nov. 19 Mike Up F. A. Collymore NOV. 20. Elocution Mm. R. Bynoe. II A VVVa'e444Sg4sa'. W-V.'.*-'.',*/,'^ 1 k. J. II \ MH-NMITH Ofllce, Corner ol TraUIcm and ll.iili:.. Streets rpwlair* Doininira ll.in.il. ...li. DIAL 4748 ****** r '**s.*,*.'*',*,*.*.*.;*.+,;*.r.*s*, !y NOTICE Passengers holding reservations on or after 31st October 1951, are kindly asked to contact our Office regarding time and days of departure of their flights due to change of schedule. BRITISH WEST INDIAN AIRWAYS LTD. — Phone 4585 Lower Broad Si. %  /AW*y//rC4WWiW/V^v,v/,-.v.v,v,'/ NOTICE Ri .. ttvad mini u {"•rneral Post Office 30th October. 1991 closed an botll before ordinary mail. R. A CLARKE, Colonial Postmaster, We beg to inform our Customers that our I HARDWARE DEPARTMENT will be closed for STOCKTAKING TO-DAY Our Lumber Yard. Office un.l Su-jar Store will be opened for business as IISIIHI. Kindly arrange your business iiccordiriKly. • PLa^WTitTIOXS LTD.


PHarbados

icniceanetaainaoe









1895

.K. TROOPS SEIZE|

PRICE: FIVE CENTS



THURS@"'Y, NOVEMBER 1, 1951
RIFLE FI
m »* a























>]
a aly . :
~Gharchill Has 9
More Ministers

LONDON, Oct. 31.
Winston Churchill completed the formation ef his Consery-

a ad

ool



BRIDGE IN SUEZ



‘ : ative Government before meeting Britain’s new House of ;
’ . | Commons for its critical and historic séssion. The appoimt-*
syp lan c oOo e Ss ve ment of nine key Churchill aides was made from the Prime

Minister's official residence, as the Commons met in an or-
ganizational prelude to the formal opening next Thursday,
Churchill appointed his son-in-law, Duncan Sandys, to head
the vital Ministry of Supply, responsible for ra
| weapons for re-armament end Britain’s atomic ene ‘O-

gramme. ie ‘his ‘ “
wuse of Commons today tor the} Churchill Wall
Fight To The Last

House of Commons today for the
first time as Leader with a direct
mandate from the people. He was
elected to office last Tuesday, but
his Premiership in wartime came TO HOLD SURZ
by appointment when the fall of
By LYLE C. WILSON
LUN DOW, ce 31
Prime Minister Winston Cuut-
chill wilt fight to the last Brush
Toramy to nold the Suex Canal

!
| France in 1940 brought the resig
|nation of Neville Chamberlain.
one
‘{if fight he must. But Churegill

U.N. Forces
From Hills

EIGHTH ARMY, Headquarters,
Korea, October, 31,
Red troops drove United Nations
sonces off Pao: ia ea
umsong in a ati
and the Allies tried vainly ail
day to recapture them, The. Reds
attacked with machine guns and
other small arms under cover of
darkness after a mortar barrege.
United Nations units held firm
for 55 minutes, then fell back to
stronger positions. At dawn the

Also Taken Over

CAIRO, Egypt, Oct. 31.
A British Army spokesman said today British troops have
seized the road and rail bridge outside Port Said at the
Mediterranean end of the Suez Canal and are operating it
without interference or trouble.

@ was seized yesterday by the Cheshire Regiment

patrol after Egyptian authorities refused to keep it open
more than 50 minutes every day.
The spokesman said Britons also seized the Egyptian Gov-
ernment Girls’ School at Ismailia for use 2s a school for
British servicemen’s children.
The seizure followed the





F mathematically. His party
r rs holds an 18 seat majority in
poy 4 Commons, One more seat is to

tian closure of all British Sans , '
nited States Army Infantryman fires a 75 mm. recoilless rifle

Re ns

His mandate is a small
no
| filled. It is certain to be a Labor




Li the frout line in Korea &







: : hopes for a compromise sae 4
private schools in Ismailia. spokesman said there were | Allies counterattacked. The attack oa against an jseat, and will cut his majority sharing e " pampousitaie RHE %
no other incidents.in the Canal area from which Egypt continued: all day, bes Commmancist) See eee CO ae at. Canal operation,

mortar





STAND mii teers

and machine-gun fire
threw back every thrust.

Blunt Spearheads

The Reds are believed to be
trying to blunt the Allied spear-
heads reaching out towards Kum-
song, their former central front
bastion in No Man’s Land, 29
miles north of the 38th Parallel.
Both sides are fighting to keep
the other from occupying the
rugged island city, A United
Nations tank patrol stabbed into’
Kumsong itself on reconnaissance.
An infantry patrol earlier, had re-

seeks to oust British troops
Press reports said the Cham-*.
ber of Maritime Navigation at
Port Said had decided to boycott
all British shipping at the por
on the grounds that British ves-
sels are violating Egyptian laws.
In an attempt to stem resigna-
tions by Egyptian workers from |
prin 3 ‘ Se British

offic nelu a special appeal ;
in today’s Princess Elizabeth and the Duke
y’s pay packets. of Edinburgh arrived here at

“We know many of you have] 8.57 GMT for their first visit to
been ordered to leave after draw-|the United States as guests of

guarding the waterway.
PRINCESS
ARRIVES IN
WASHINGTON

WASHINGTON, Oct. 31.

The United States, Franee, the
Midd'e Eastern nations and merme-
bers of the British Commonwealth
wouki comprise the ;Canalguar-
dianship. That would give Egypt!
a shire in the Canal control, but
the Egyptians have rejected the
idea

Churchill is an Empire man;
he will pull the United States as
far as he can in support of an
empire around the world. He
may find some resistance to that
in the United States, which balks

3L Majority
But his working majority ’
most issues, counting the support
of six Liberals and the absence of
2 Irish Nationalists will be 31,
That is enough to do most of the
things that Churchill plans. As

* 0
members of the new House assem-

n’s |
Body Goes
; : |
ei j bled, Churchill! was well on hi:
To isbon way to establishing his new Gov-
lt L ;

ernment and meeting Britain's
toughest pending problems—Iran

VERSAILLES, Oct. 31.
The remains of former Queen














































TITO WILL
WITH U.S. AND WEST

BELGRADE, Oct. 31.
MARSHAL TITO told his first Press Conference in two
years that the militarily strong Yugoslavia is ready to
stand alongside the United States and the West, should
Russia attack. He said that with the United States arms



'





and Egypt.
All of the Cabinet members have






































. , . sen | been named. A r infantry divi- [2% imperialism in any ferm
fave’ been) teeter ag 70a] Premident snd Mrs. ‘Truman. {Posies Gane.cr three Communists] aid, Yugoslavia was realy and prepasted to natch ite AMM |tsmem. to. Drew or tomaecanplacmiwgn aispicned yesterday tc} ‘The whole oi. Sritie douetes
Commander tape teenie Sir} and rs roan Pane ante them. ‘ and Albania in building a strong military machine to {after religious services at the | life line, the Suez Canal, is threa'-| Empire”. This hardening will be
George Erskine said. “Before you] About 2,000 unomelal epiinann Allied officers estimated that} “defend the peace.” Cathedral here. Later the Queen's/ened by the Egyptians. Churchill's} felt quickly in the Suez. The
leave British employment it would}held back by a cordon of troops | United Nations troops killed 126 “® Tito said; “The Yugoslavia ae abe soda —— * Edobon) deure et rae ee behead Urea! aid. ipa a ac, lem confronting
be well to reflect that the British} with fixed bayonets cheered ag ee ag ye aoe sae aes 309 Army helped not only America but Ee erant ee en pene thee aioe ee wal = he ery ss lament ig there. The
have always dealt with you| the Royal couple and the ‘Trumans| °thers, in fighting below Kumsong also all countries in Europe which coe BT eee ee neat daar Mia tie oe eter Barb MR pabag omens mace
aria ‘Wash aeee sz "2 y od for Blair House where 2°? Tuesday, An Eighth Army i wished to develop equally.” As a She died at her chateau last vreeik | the Seen the time this Pay rightly rolled, the Inhapire’s life
; aa r cs communique reported only patrol Divas 2 fat the age of 86, | liament rises for its Christmas re-]line. Churchill! will net give it
—CP. & UP. {state dinner and reception are tivity f th i result America now has a friendly Ha’ * Th Iniversity|cess, the final arrangements wi!!|up. He will seek Empir id t
scheduled for Wednesday night. th ivity from the remainder of country on her side, on which she Bei dae, WO EG SESE LY ie an tie Gantocerice Peta. | seek Erapisenese “tO
e 135-mile Korean front, I students Federation scheduled a| have been made for the conferen hold it if necessary. “Afid Chur-
can count if aggression should i between Churchill ; Peamar: tok . emnaci
e The Royal couple attended their —U.P. break out, “This is an important |'™435 rally tonight where they will ween. turchill and Truma chill is expected to seek a firmer
on ews reception here less than two ifact which should not be forgot- demand ‘the Cuban Government| Which may bring up the question [alliance with the United States
_—s re ba arrival from R ten” . protest before U.N, for the| of a meeting with Stalin - be a anc throlghout. the
. 4 nada. e Prineess accom- ds Mak . “flagrant violation of human} Churchill was given a tremen- Oe BAST.
i ear Free ey oo ae © e one oer, oe oa ll rights and fundamental liberties|qous ovation in the House, even UF.
; ed ee om 2 Dian Fain ; é, “jon the part of military dictator-| {hough he almost sat in the wron % omni
House to the Statler, a hotel ew se- re Preteen ieee: ships” in Venezuela | neat
few i) He said tha 1 ; \ saat, # *
MENA, Oct. 31. teen tien ts Wake we “does actualy Dae tone West Virginia:—Twelve miners! Then the Conservatives imme- Russian ‘New Times’
cwed Tine’? ylign clawed and} Press Radio and Photographers Pr osal jever, he said that there appeared| Wee ‘Tapped and four others diately yot into a row with the $
chown = year = old. Maria| oresnimtins. op BE on ton rus toritataate danave, We sai escaped when an explosion ripped | defeated Socialist opponents over Attacks Kirk
Lauiz to death at.a circus last A! that war could best be prevented through a mine of the Truax-| the selection of a new Speaker,
night, upte the laugh- Princess Elizabeth wearing a MUNSAN, Korea, Oct. 31. ‘| by strength. Traer Coal Company along Cabin| W. §. Morrison was. elected MOSCOW, Oct. 31.
fur cape over a green bro-| Communist truce negotiators to- (2) Yugoslavia needs heavy | “Tek near here, Speaker 318 to 251 in the first vole} The Soviet publication New
show dro . out idee ak dress first from the|day proposed a new cease fire armament, including artillery, + — High ranking! of the new Commons. Times described U.S. Ambassa-
Several - who final; car. Povip wearing ble gold pume zone ivhich they said is]. us Rent sactk Fret Wwe toe aee Waweld Eomueh and IndonChinese digni- | T.U.C. Denial dew Alin: Gi Klek-ae <.nimaenie ae
ae ae Rastonial beast out of the car followed by ext| based line in eres “9 oposal O.B.E., Leader of the Opposi. | States. J ; tn ca 7 "Was > Meanwhile fhe powerrel 8,000,-fand slanderer who violated the
Maria approached ona lion, | President’s daughter. Paul Wooton| was submitted at the aheinoe tion in the House of Assembly, || (3) Tito condemned the Five Raymond, the 44-year-old French 000 strong Trades Union Congress | vlementary principles of diplo-
’

chained near the ring area where| Chairman of the Washington Cor-| session of the Truce Sub-Commit- was among the passengers who rejected charges that the unions | matie conduct”.



| Power Conference proposed by the
|



























, re Commissioner stabbed to death on} planned ides stri t
other, bls cats were being DFOd-'mhe' Princess. with a firm ‘and: "A United “Netions communigue|| ay moming by te BA Gel. | ling te United Nations. mee” [Monday by 8 political assassin |Gemomstrate. their opposition to |The publieation bitterly attack
‘ s wistiess 8. . eneral De Lattre De Tassigny,|¢@ ’ i ed Kirk for a speech he made i
s goes he pe aia aie shake and a brief speech of wel-|said that the Red proposal pro-|| fito. He was es by || (4) Yugoslavia wants closer and} the French High Coumplantonee tor Nae Setoreen cibeeiaiih said: New ‘Tire of October 16, Kink
and caught the child on the side|sremendaus ovation as sie entered| buffer zone “bate the tighie|| danchter Mist M. 7. Wilkin: | (engr’ Tiendly tes with the Vati-lindo-China and Cambodia's Kink tn Yoint consultation ata in ak {it the speech, urged. ight ih
of the face, The animal then : ea 2 Fc | “The c i ic in. | Noredom Sisanouk will be among |uther activities it will be our con- | dealing with Russia as negotia- |
of Sie Set The animal n the balleose. U altered Communist version of the son. The conference was strictly in-

those present at the ceremonies
tomorrow. De Raymonds body
will be sent back to France for

Leaving Barbados on July
4, Mr. Wilkinson went up to
Boston for medical treatment

line of ground battle contact.”
The United Nations already had
proposed that the ceasefire line

tions to better relations with that
country had failed.—wU.P.

stant aim and cluty to ensure the
steady progress and betterment
of the general conditions of Bri-

jformal, with newsmen shooting
questions and the Marshal answer-
ing. He emphasized that Yugo-

on the girl, and sank his teeth
into her neck and head. The beast

|
then seized the child by one Teg |





roughly follow the present battle- after which he visited Eng- slavi burial, | tain and of our people, We shall
and dragged her away from the lines and Allied ohaere had said land. He told the Advocate Sictishie cea hs ae oe Rome:—Top U.S. officials here; continue in that duty under the
arena area, A youngster screamed ; earlier that there was a near yesterday that he was feeling . is atican, He said,

are convinced that Italian military |
| forces will give a good account of |
themselves if the Soviet Union

Conservative Government.”

The Congress simultaneously
dispatched a letter to the former

The “ADVOCATE”
pays for NEWS.

for help, But she was not neoeE. |
Maria was travelling with the
circus in custody of her grand-|

“we in Yugoslavia have nothing
against the Vatican and do not in-
tend to make any demands upon

pretty good and was very glad

agreement i .
, agreement on the line of contact to the ‘baoke.

| However, the new Communist
'proposal would leave Kaesong as



mgther. Maria's cries finally at- the site of the Communist truce it.” " ee ore Pitictiaess | Labour Prime Minister Clement
tracted the attention of attendants. delegations base camp and the Religion and the Chureh are Washington:-—Averell Harriman, | Attlee, placing on record their Dial 3113

free in our country within the

historic gateway to Seoul in Red
framework of the country’s laws.

territory.


achievements of the Labour Gov-

The United Nations Truman's top Foreign policy ad- profound admiration









_-—_—__— wants to include Kaesong in the - But we cannot allow any inter- awe pee Se ee ae ee | ernment during their six and one- Day or Night
° ,200 square miles of largely un- Pl JBL IC ference from outside by anyone, Mohanttesa Mos¥adegh © at the half years of rule in the face of
Taxes Will Close contested West Korean territory, : . including the Vatican. “This is the | Tranian leaders’ 7 - at th?) unprecedented difficulties —U.P.
: | which it suggests the Reds give up T only poiht on which we do not w a ad wt ee ' | ag ec F ho|
Down Bookniakers in exchange for the 200 square] MJ : agree in our relations with the | COnes¢ay. apymaan told tho}

miles of East Korean territory eo.

press before the visit it was to b:!
won by the Eighth Army in battle

Vatican.”—U.P.
atican UP. solely a personal call.”



LAS VEGAS, Nevada, Oct. 31.



: re The United Nations argued that NEW YORK, Oct. 31. Karachi Pakistan:—The Pakistan |
This gambling resort ne ' lit needed Kaesong to cover the| Joe Louis issued a statement on “ke” Declines Government is considering send-|
ers’ plan to fold up their busi-) approaches to Seoul, A United] Wednesday asking the public to

nesses at midnight tonight, be-!

ing naval officers to the Turkish
cause-they will not’ be “economi-!

Nations communique said that a navy for submarine training Radic

have patience and bear with him
;|Communist proposal like that of

until he can make up his mind

cally sound” when the new Fed-
eral Government tax on race-
horse’ betting becomes effective.
State licensed bookies held a
meeting and decided unanimous-
ly that the 10 per cent. tax will
make iness unprofitable as
compared with the more lucrative
gambling games.

Operators said that turf fol-
lowers had little reason to come
here to bet when they can find
bookies in almost any city in the
country.—U.P,

Search Underway
For Engineer

NEW YORK, Oct. 31.

A nation-wide search is under-
way for the electrical engineer
who disappeared mysteriously on
October 12, while at work on a
secret Government project, Craig
T. Naudain (53), of New York
City, vanished in Salt Lake City
while returning from a trip to
Los Angeles. !

Electrical engineer for the con-
struction firm of Drake Merritt
which is engaged im a secret pro-
ject for the Army, Naudain had
been expected home by his wife
by October 17’, Alarmed at his
absence, she contacted the authori-
ties on October 19. A spokesman
for Drake Merritt said that it
was not known whether Naudain
eatried any classified meee:

—UP.

RUSSIA

LONDON, Oct. 31.

Informed sources said that the
official report on the fulfilment
of the United Socialist Soviet
Republics State Plan for the
third quarter of this year, indi-
cates that Russia is coneentra-
ting in making good the two
main deficiencies of her army—
transport and communications.

The. report, the full text of
which is now available in Lon-
don, showed that the following
Ministers had not fulfilled their
industrial production plans: Thé





_ the Speaker's seat.
a

—$———

» Speaker.





8. MORRISON was
Speaker of the House
Commons by a 67 vote ma-
jority in the first vote of the
new Commons. It is the first
time in over 50 years that
there has been a division over
Usually
one tiember acceptable to both
3 is proposed.
orrison was proposed by
Sir Hugh O'Neill, Ulster
Nationalist, and seconded by
a Conservative while two La-
bourites proposed Major James
Milmer, who has been Deputy
Speaker since March 1943,
After the discussion Prime
Minister Churchill and Mr.
Clement Attlee said that Party
leaders had been unable to
agree beforehand on a
Voting was 318 in
favour of Morrison, 251 in
favour of Major Milner.

MR. W. 8S. MORRISON, K.C.,
was born in 1893 in Scotland.
He served in the 1914-18 war,
and has represented Cirences-
ter and Tewkesbury since
1929. Before the war he held
several junior posts and in
1989 was ted Chancellor
of the Duchy of Lancaster. He
was the first Minister of Food
from 1939 to01940, and subse-
quently became Minister of
Town and Country Planning.
He took silk in 1934.



Ministry of Motor and Tractor
Industry, 97%. The Ministry of
Transport Machinery Industry,



97%. The Ministry of Com-
munications Equipment Indus-
try 99.6%. The Ministry of
Machine Tool Industry, 99%.
The Ministry of Heavy Engin-
eering, 99.

As the Soviet Press has lately
carried not more than the nor-
mal amount of criticism on the
work of industrial undertakings

controlled bs

thes Ministe

STRENG





the United Nations would provide
for a 2% mile wide buffer zone

ecross Korea.
—C.P. and U.P.



Little Progress Ait
Cease-fire Talks

WASHINGTON, Oct. 31.

Acting Secretary of State, James
Webb said despite apparent Com-
munist concessions many complex
problems remain to be worked
out before there can be cease-
fire in Korea. Webb warned at a
News Conference against toc
much optimism over the latest
‘Communist proposals of -a truce

line. He said the question
‘of a buffer zone was only
,;one of many that remained

‘to be solved and added there was
| little at hand to say about nego-
\tiations in Korea this time.

Acting Secretary of State James
Webb told the press he believed
isome progress had been made in
efforts here to settle the British-
| Fantan oil controversy.
| He told the Press Coriference
jthis Government received no
‘official request from Winston
|\Churchill or the Britiah Govern-
;ment for a visit by the Prime
Minister to the United States.
‘Asked if an informal approach
had been made to launch a Brit-
ish campaign, Churchill appar-
ently made it clear that he was
interested in coming to the United
States.

—UP.

the non-fulfilment of the Plan
by the five branches of the
Soviet industrial machine, is due
not to any fall in output, but to
the highly increased production
targets established for this year.

This is indirectly. confirmed by
the report itself, which said that

total volume of industrial out-
put in the USS.R, was 15%
higher in the third quarter of
1951 than in the corresponding
period of 1950. In spite of the
complete blackout, imposed by
ihe Soviet Government on al!



THENING ARMY

whether to retire or continue fight-
ing. He made the statement be-
eause of the many conflicting
reports that have been published
about his future plans since his
defeat Friday night by Rocky Mar-
ciano.

He said he wanted to thank
everyone for the goodwill they
have shown in the past and that
he will be grateful until the end
of his days for the benefits he had
derived from boxing.

He said many people have varied
opinions of what course he should
pursue now but he asked them to
have confidence in him while he
is making up his mind as to what
to do. He said he would announce
his future plans after his exhibi-
tion tour of Japan. He will fly to
Japan from New York on Novem-
ber 10.--U.P.



“Fleeting Moment’ Wins
Cambridgeshire

NEWMARKET, Eng., Oct. 31.

Fleeting Moment won the 106th
running of the Cambridgeshire
Stakes over 1% miles today.
Denizen was second and there
was a photo finish for third.
Forty-five horses ran. Fleeting
Moment owned by Mrs. M. John-
son started at 28 to 1. Denizen
was 20 to 1. Fastnet Rock started
favourite at 8 to 1. Jockey ‘Arthur
Breasley of Australia rode the
winner.—C.P.

economic information, it is
known that Russia is now more
than ever engaged in expanding
her industrial output

The importance of the five
Ministries output for the Soviet
re-armament effort is obvious.

West European and United
States experts on Soviet mili-
tary affairs, agree that the main
weakness of the Soviet Army
lies in its lack ient



of iffic
transport facilitie t

comm



U.P

Political Support

MILWAUKEE, Wis., Oct. 31,

A Milwaukee attorney said he
received a letter from one of
Gen. Dwight Eisenhower's aides
on Wednesday, saying that the
General declines to support any
political organisation backing him
for President.

The attorney, A. L. Tilton, said
“e wrote Eisenhower on October
13 asking his consent to run in
Wisconsin's presidential primary
next April as a delegate pledged
to support the General for nomi-
nation.

Tilton sald he received a reply
saying that Eisenhower repeatedly
has declined “all requests that he
authorize a political movement or
the establishment of an organiza-
tion in support of any politica!
movement in his behalf. There is
no question but that he will con-
tinue to adhere to this policy dur-
ing the future,” the letter said,

—U-P.



Jca Housing Fund
Gets £250,000 More

KINGSTON, Jca., Oct. 30,

Government is giving another
£250,000 to the emergency hous-
ing fund from which free issues
ot building materials up to a
maximum of £20 are being made
to persons whose homes were
damaged in the hurricane,

This brings the total
applied to the fund to £500,000.
At the same time Government is
tightening up on the issue of free
materials in the rural areas, and
suspended operation of the scheme
in some country districts.

A gift of $100,000 from tho
Trinidad Government has swelled
the Geovernor’s Relief Fund to
nearly £540,000.—C.P.

ELEVEN TRAPPED IN
COAL MINE EXPLOSION

KAYAFORD, W. Virginia, Oct. 31.
One miner was killed and 11
others trapped about one mile
underground when an explosion
ripped through United No. 1 mine
of th Traer Coal Co

° —U.P.





ie Truax

amount 5

Pakistan said Wednesday

Weshington:—A five-man U.S
Government mission left Wednes-
day for Malaya for first hand ob-
servation of the problems of the
tin industry there,

Barbados Win
Bryden Trophy

Vamoose Wins De Lima Cup
(From Our Own Correspondent)
PORT-OF-SPAIN, Oct. 31.
3 Barbados won the Bryden
Trophy with 54 points. The Trini-
dad team scored 39 points. The
fe hy was presented by His
ellency t Governor to
“Teddy” Hoad, The De Lima Cup
Was won by Vamoose with 201
points, second was Perkins, Edril
with 19% points and third H
Jason Jones’ Cyclone and Trini-
dad T.K. 45 with 14 points each.
The race was sailed under a very
light north wind. The teams and
boats were almost completely
becalmed and _ positions changed
constantly during the first lap. i
It was decided under the con-|
ditions, to race two laps so that
the boats could finish at a



a



Tou asked for Benson and Hedges cigarettes, Madam”



Occasions of unique and special

prope:

ae a6 first lap T.K, 29. PSI l fi ‘ tt
minutes seconds; T.K. 35, 5% iOV an t : garrettes
minutes, five seconds. T,.K, 49, 52 enjoy ment ca oF ce
minutes 11 seconds, T.K. 40, 54
renee S seconds, T.K. 45, 53
minutes séconds, T.K. 44, 54 y iS ty
minutes 51 seconds, made by BENSONadHIEDGES to
|_ Second lap T.K. 35, 27 minutes
6 seconds, T.K. 29, 30 minutes '
s peconaee 7 $. " minutes Al ‘. fi tion and to

seconds, T.K. 44, 32 minute os rare periec Il « :
25. seconds, T.K. 49, 34 minutes reect the P

37 seconds, 'T.K. 40, nil,

*.K, 34 won the race, T.K. 2°
second and T.K. 45 third. A
reception was held after the race

eterno

echo the whole contented mood

TODAY’S WEATHER G
CHART When
Sensi otra only the bett
Moon: New October
Lighting: 6.00 p.m.



well do

High Tide: 5.08 a.m; 4.48 p.m.
| Low Tide: 1043 am. 11.36
| p.m.




PAGE TWO

C C G
ADY RANCE, wife of the
Governor of Trinidad was an

in rarisit passenger by the Golfito
yesterday, She is on her way back
ree

ETURNING from the
yesterday morning by
Golfito was Mrs. E. J. Macintyre,
wite of the Manager of the Brit-
ish Union Oil Company. She left
here three months ago with her
younger daughter Joyce whom
she has put to school in Scotland.
Travelling out t o Barbados
with Mrs. Macintyre was another
daughter, Audrey, g former stu-
dent of Codrington High School
who was studying in Scotland at

after a visit to the

Finished School
ISS DEBRA MANNING,
daughter of Mr. and Mrs.
H. C. Manning of Newlands, Two
Mile Hili returned from England
yestesday by the Golfite. For the
pest three years, Debra has been
a.tending Cheltenham College,

Gloucester. = Glasgow Royal 1 .

Other passengers arriving b e has now got her .R.
the Golfito yesterday for Seehes (Member of the oe of Radi-
dos were Mr. J, H. Alexander, ographers and her C.T. (Certifi-

eate of Therapy.)

To See Her Friends

MONG the passengers arriv-

ing in the Golfito from Eng-
iand yesterday morning was Miss
H. Ridler, O.B.E. She has re-
turned here to see many of her
old friends and wiil be remainin,
1oy six months staying at Bus
Hill in the Garrison.

Miss Ridler will be remember-
ed as having acted as hostess at
Government House during the
time Mr. S. H. Perowne acted as
Governor.

1944 St. Lucia Scholar

Mrs. M. Biggar, Miss F. R. G.
Cameron, Mrs, H. F. Hadow, Mr.
J. Meakin, Mr. and Mrs. R. de C.
O’Neale and Mr. C, P. Wade.
Visiting Daughter
R. AND MRS. STEPHEN
PSAILA arrived from Eng-
land yesterday morning by the
to spend about one week
@n a visit to their son-in-law and
daughter Mr. and Mrs. Jack Mar-
son before flying io British
Guiana, where Mr. Psaila is Pro-
prietor of Psaila Bros., George-
town,



Mr. and Mrs. Psaila are on their
way home after just over five
months’ holiday in England and
the Continent and their visit took
them through Por ugal, Spain,
France, Rome, and Malta returning
to England via Switzerland and
Amsterdam.

Mr, Psaila is also Consular
Agent for France in B.G.

kiome Again
I8S MULLY BLADES

PROF. AND MRS, C. G. BEASLEY
and ea wes Songer a RR.VING yesterday morn-
and erie. 8. Beasley an e- f Engla
two children arrived from England Golan” intranait age hn, oe
yesterday by the Golfito. were Dr. and Mrs. C. O, R. King.
‘ A former student of St. Mary’s
After Eighteen Months }.coliege, St. Lucia. and island
5 . scholar of 1944, Dr. King went
FTER spending eighteenfup to Edinburgh University
months in England, Mrs.where he qualified and is now
C. G, Beasley, wife of Professor} returning home to take up an
Beasley, Economic Adviser to theMappointment with the Govern-
r ’ Comptroller for Development and{ment of St. Lucia.
â„¢ daugnter of Mr, and Mrs. welfare, returned to Barbados ,. . 7
Eaward slades of “Margate”, yesterday morning by the Elders Visited Festival Of Britain
Hastings who had been in England and Fyffes S.S, Golfito, She was G&t .
on @ long visit returned yesterday accompanied by her two daughters, R. J. W. McKINSTRY,
by .he Golfito. Jennifer and Valerie. Director of Messrs. Allenye,
Arthur and Co., Ltd. who was in

Intransit
i NTRANSIT passengers onthe Oscar Steals The Show [England for the ,»past three and
Goelfite bound for Trinidad are “a half months, returned. yester-
Mr. and Mis. Henry Seaford, Their A CROWD of well over eight{day morning by the Golfito’ ac-
final destination is British Guiana hundred people, which in-#companied his wife.
where Mr. Seaford is a Director of Cluded His Excellency the Gov- He said that the weather was
Booker Bros While in England @’mor and Lady Savage saw the good, they had a very pleasant
the attended th ddi eo ir @Pening performance of “Revue- time, and enjoyed iting the
daehte © wedding of their geville 1951” at the Empire The- Festival of Britain which they
ist ave. , atre last night. thought was very interesting.
Other intransi: passengers for “Hundreds of cars almost com-
British Guiana were Mr. and Mrs.

esis wit, tees, oe
pletely surrounded the Empire and Mrs, J. H. Glendinning, .
Edward de Freitas. They left Theatre block and patrons on ar-

McKinstry’s parents.
their son Paul at school at Stony- rival at the theatre, were greeted
hurst. Mr.-de Freitas is associated by attractive girls selling pro- Went To School
Snthate Sirm of Cameron and grammes. In England
erd isd a, Insid th eurtai:
epnerd of Bri.ish Guiana nee So cuetetn | Wate ie ETURNING from school in

shortly after 8.30 o'clock and the
Deputy. Comptroller Of Engiend on her way” home

show which lasted for two and a
Customs B.G. yesterday was Miss Elizabeth

half hours never lagged for a sec-
FTER $pending his long leave ond. The audience was always Scott-Johnston, daughter of Mr.
and Mrs. Edward Scott-Johnston

in England, _FR. . being entertained as the numbers
biieer. Deputy ne * rolled on 3 quick suceession one of Antigua, gy ve oe +
1 v ; after the other, passengers who arriv ere in-
Customs, British Guiana and Mrs. Joseph Tudor as Oscar gave an- transit from the U.K, in the Golfito
Mi'telhozer, arrived here yester- othor performance of “the master yesterday
day morning intransit in the showman.” The scene in Busby’s While in Barbados she will be
Golfito on their way back home. — Ajjey we.vey good and packed staying with Dr. ang re A. A,
' * with all the local “types” around Edwards of Christ ureh.
Egrier. Wolonial Secretary Bridgetown—the Mauby Vendor, =
eee ae " the Orange man, the Biscuit man
Secretary of Kenya, has been etc, Everyone was disappointed
appoin ed- British Resident in not to hear Nell Hall’s lovely
Zanzibar in succession to Sir voicé, but as Oscar said, she was
Vincent Gienday, who is shortly “t#arsed”. She is expected to be
retiring from the post, Mr. sen sing this afternoon and to-
Rankine wag appointed Colonial maht. i. ‘
Secretary in Barbados in 1945 and , Perhaps the cutest opie oa
went to Kenya in 1947, Hix father, the programme was nine-year-o

{ ‘ Juliet Gaskin, who sang “Cheek
veces mon sea ame to Cheek”. Her dancing was also

good and her facial expressions on
Attended Course In U.K.

stage were perfect, She has the
N BARBADOS for two months’ Makings of a versatile young
holiday is Mr. Pat Smith,

actress,

The scene in Trinidad’s Art
son-in-law of Mr, and Mrs. W. E. Gallery was cleverly executed and
Mandeville of St. James. He ar- the revolving “paintings” some-
rived here yesterday morning by thing new on the local stage.
‘the Golfito from England after The Jungle Fantasy was another



CROSSWORD



Actuss

attending a five week micro- highlight of the show, especially) } Often'rendered, but hot ns fat. (1)
biological course at Ravensbournt. ‘the music which kept up its relent-| ) Cheises at Stamford Bridge. (4)
Mr. Smith is a chemist at Mony- less exotic beat throug@out the|'! Single entry (4)
' 2 Bide softly on two tegs, (5)
musk Central in Jamaica. number, {i winny drania (a ;
. aD at ix silly (6)
U.K. Medico The show will be repeated this, : bna of the teat. (8)
N BARBADOS for a couple of afternoon and again tonight. a Chania Ui) eeteerine tee. (6)
onths’ holiday are Dr. and _ /f you were not ene the lucky" 4¥ Trotmnation’ te bus nothing tothe
= y a people Who saw last night's per-, 5

Mrs, S. C. Golds one from England,

post. (
formance don’t Bird tn the murder case, (3)

miss this other 22
They arrived yesterday morning | 23. Bog tt and leave. (3)
pportunity. 4 ¥, ;
Gy the Golfito and are staying with Joseph Tudor again stole the ae aa chee to eat or drink, (5)
Mr. and Mrs. D. V. S, Scott of show as he did last year, and all!

“Sherbourne,” Two Mile Hill, ‘in all, Mrs. Stuart and her Danc- Chandu Bticaueeey

j Ri ;
was attending school at Queen's R. BERNARD CONDUIT of | cure tea ene oF value. (4)

6
is Dr, Goldstone’s first ing School have something in 2 Prickly ius aS china tee, (8)
visit to the island, but not his “Revuedeville 1951” that will take) 3 40 (oAte ne note to en 498
wife’s, He spent a year oe some beating. $ Brawn (9) .
during the war with her two boys - ive ear to the abstainer for
who were at school at Harrison Back From England 8 Woon in ait ateel mixers, (8
College and her daughter whe Wicked fellow from
“ ” 1
College. Heathcroft,” Pine and | 18 card to men. (6)
Attorney of Messrs, Robert Thom | 20 Mary ts the making of it. (4)
People In England Cheerful ta, was among the pasnengers;?! Brody hens do eg )
R. BE, C. PARFITT, Assistant arriving from England yesterday] , Sqijton ot vestarday oH Bead tt.
Chief Engineer of the Water- morning by the Golfite, He was 9: 2. Grate, | 14. Yanks 15, Beli 16,
4 ; pire. 19, Salute, 23 joc; 24, Via;
works and Mrs, Parfitt, ere now accompanic! by Mrs, Conduit.| 26 Cougn: ‘27, Ermine: 9B at. Downt
back in Barbados afver spending They had b:. in England on three} 44, M3'**%, 2, Oppressor, 5. .

six months’ holiday in England nonths’ huuday,
They arrived yesterday morning
by the Golfito.

Mr. Parfitt told Carib that his
wife and he were both pleased to
meet their families in England. He
aid that in spite of everything,
everyone in England was still
cheerful. When they left, there
was the election excitement, but
they did not hear the results un.il

they were out to sea. His wife | anthia vielta
and he were very glad to be back ing‘his brother an old Lodge Boy
in Barbados as it was now getting jow reading Law at St. Cather-
cold in England. ‘ ine’s College, Cambridge.
Enjoyed Holiday
FTER a very good five mouths’
holiday in England, Mr.
Vernon Smith, Manager of the
Barbados Electric Supply Corpora- Retired director of Thompson
tion and Mrs. Smith, returned and Co, Ltd., Port-of-Spain,
yesterday by the Golfito, Trinidad, passed through Barbados
Mr. Smith said that they did a yesterday in the Golfite after
lot of motoring while in England spending his annual six months’
and practically wherever they leave in England and on the
wen’, the weather was good. Continent.

ui; 5, Moat: 6, Bodvy (7 j i
40, ‘free ent ‘ath : 95.





Lodge School Boy

NTRANSIT on the Golfito
yesterday from England on their
way back to Trinidad were Major
; Deacon, a retired Civil
Servant and Mrs, Deacon. Ac-
companying them from the U.K.
was their son Brian, a student of
the Lodge School who was in

Annual Leave
R. DUNCAN THOMPSON,



Before going ashore the skipper
frowns at the two pals, and tells
them 10 prepare a meal by the time
he returns. Then they watch while
the men stant off past the ree!

towards a landing beach. ‘* This
= tet he Nicholas Islind.” murmurs



HORROCKSES FABRICS

STRIPED COTTON CAMBRIC— a wo en yarn rte woclig
COLOURED COTTON GINGHAM__..~.___-____$L47
WHITE & DYED COTTON LINENETTE_____-__._$1.50
PRINTED COTTON CAMBRIC__-.._~-.W_____$L54
PRINTED COTTON FURNISHING_--.-___.___.$1.98



ALSO
PROWERED CREPE.UW ris eset ec Mintel tn $2.20
T.R. EVANS & WHITFIELDS
Dial 4606 won worry eee 30% Dial 4220





me.”
Took Daughter To School They are mistaken. It sounds |

the mar.







Rupert and the Lion Rock—22














7
it is just as a as waying | aes
“Between you @ ea pondering who will

If you have got into the bad|Per hee itwed to "os Sa
habit of using that phrase you | guinea tickets. A ion. _com-
have possibly been confused by | mittee is working closely with
a recollection of having been|two or three embassy officials
told not to say “Me and Charles | who are considered authorities on
are going” but “Charles and I} such matters.
are going’. © |

Consequently you are now so I foresee trouble—and a sharp
worried abouwg the word me that|fali in revenue—if the embassy
you are shy of using it when it anette its strict standard to the
ts linked with som ly else. |bail, Many who were welcomed

Few people would say “Give|to the embassy during Sir Duff
it to I,” but some tend te |Cooper’s ambassadorship are not
imagine it is correct to say “Give approved by the present ambas-
it to Charles and 1,” when, obvi- | Sador.
ously, they should say, “Give it to| Sir Oliver Harvey is a stickler
Charles and me.” for propriety, His disapproval

extends to certain fashionable

There are people, too, who/restaurants whose owners have
seem shy of the word him, They | dubious war records.
would not say “Send it to vl Quotes of the week:
but they are capable of saying, |
“Send it to he and his brother.” | Mistinguette: “Money can’t buy
—which is ridiculous. |happiness, but it helps to steady

All grammatical rules apart, |the.merves,
your ear is the best guide. If you Bertil of Sweden, now
are still in doubt about “I” and ae “y pope gee
me,” usé common sense. inee, ‘Wing Gunleve dest.

Words that end in “ing” can be _ One week I was promoted to
bit of a nuisance. admiral and a general.”

“Participles” they are called,
and they can lead you into
“howlers.” "

The “unattached participle
gets even the best writers into
trouble. :

“Being a fine day, I left my
umbrella at home’” means, gram-
matically, that I am a fine, day—
which is nonsense.

I should have said, ‘As it was
a fine day,” or “Seeing that it French public opinion pollsters
was a fine day.” have made the following discov-
Can you see what is wrong with | eries this week:
this? “Sitting in the back seat of} People ask to identify philoso-
the gallery, the actors seemed a|pher and author Jean Paul Sartre
leng way off.” mistook him for the name of a

nisers of the ball are now

GAA LK ATE

AE

GENE




:
4
*
s
%
#
#
4
2
Z





WARNER 4
BROS:

'O, ECA, NATO,
OEC and SHAPE—now outnumber
British and American reporters in
the city 12-1.

A__ high-grade translator | at
NATO earns almost as much as a
French general commanding a
division.

sf

=

PONT
STORY

DIRECTED BY

|



street, an MP, a_ painter, and a
It implies that the actors were |dress designer. F RIDAY
sitting in the gallery. NOV. 2
Here’s another example:— On marriage: Fifty-seven out of | 2.30-—4.45
“Having received a large con-| 100" French marriages: survive at! ©* iy

least 30 years; 37 out of 100 sur-] & 8.30 P.M.
vive 40 years; and 16 out of 100} & continuing
enjoyed golden wedding anniver-

signment of nylons, yoy will be
glad to know we are reducing the

origes” enjoy DAILY 4.45
ake ecei 2
one” who have received)" on” hygiene: Twenty-five per} & 8.30 p.m.

cent of French women wash their
hair less than once a month: 34
per cent have a permanent wave
at least once a year.

—L.E.S.

While the meaning of these two
examples is not cbscure, in other
cases an unattached participle
could lead to misunderstanding.

The word “while” in the last
sentence can be a trap, too.

It can mean either “although” or
“during the same time that. . .”
Confusion results when the sense
in which it is being’ used is not
made clear, It is wrong to use it
to mean “and,”

Example: “White scored two of
the five goals while Black scored
three.” Argue that out,

However. . . . But why should
I write “However’? It is such
an unnecessary word, though not
so in the sentence; “However hard
I try I cannot give up smoking.”

If at this juncture you remind
me that Mark Twain said: “Giving
up smoking is easy: I've done it
dozens of times” (or words to
that effect), I shall not regard the
‘interruption as irrelevant,

Be careful with that last word.
Don’t say “irrevelant.”’

PLAZA

BRIDGETOWN :

TAKE ADVANTAGE OF OUR
LATEST ADVANCE BOOK LIST

THE BOOKS listed below are those which British Publishers
hope to publish in December :
Prices shown are only approximate
ORDERS should be sent to the ADVOCATE STATIONERY.

~ POLITICS

AMERICA’S MASTER PLAN, John Fischer—Hamish
Hamilton

DATELINE MOSCOW, Don Dallas—Heinemann

DISTR: BUTION OF GERMAN ENEMY PROSPERITY,
H.M.S.O.

HONG KONG, Harold Ingrams—H.M.S.0.
LOCAL GOVERNMENT, H.M.S.O.—Choice of Careers

THE RADICAL TRADITION, S. Macoby—Nicholas
Kaye

STALIN’S SATELITES IN EUROPE, Y. Gluctstein—
Allen & Unwin.

HISTORY

HELLENISTiC CIVILISATION, W. W. Tarn—Arnold
THE PAST PRESENTED, Professor A. M. Low—Peter



—L.E.S.

B.B.C. Radio
Programme

THURSDAY, NOVEMBER 1,



1951

11,15 am, Programme Parade, 11.30
a.m Jazz Box, 12.00 (noon) The News,
12.10 p.m News Analysis.
4,.00—-7.15 pm, 31.82 M; 48.i3 M





4.00 p.m, The News, 4,10 pm. The
Daily Service, 4.15 p.m. Barchester
Towers, 445 p.m. Sporting Kecord,
5.00 jm. Composer of the Week, 6.00
p.m, Sandy Macpherson at the Theatre
Organ, 615 p.m. Scottish Magazine
6.45 |.m, Programme Parade, 6.55 p.m,
Toda ‘s Sport, 700 p.m. The News,
7.10 p.m, News Analysis,
We ‘ee Britain, 730 p m.
chest al Music.

7.15 p.m
Light Or-

1.4 0.90 pm 18.43 M, Davies

aie Renew Hien, a! ae ee RECALLED TO SERVICE, General Maxime Weygand
Og" ph." Sopot athe Weak | | enemann

pin, tee Meme, 38.08 pan. Fede bee SCRIPTA MINOA, Sir John Myres—Clarendon Press
Talk. 1. 1030 p.m. Barcheer ‘Towers |) A SHORT HISTORY OF SWITZERLAND, E. Bonjour,

H. S. Offler and G. R. Potter—Clarendon Press

CBC PROGRAMME

else Se ows THE STRUGGLE FOR TRANSCAUCASIA, Firuz
to te The, Wee Kazemadeh—George Ronald

TOPOGRAPHICAL BIBLSOGRAPHY OF ANCIENT
HIEROGLYPHIC TEXTS, RELIEFS, and PAINT-
INGS—Clarendon Press

UP AND OVER THE HILL, J. W. Barns-Graham—
George Ronald

YEOMAN’S ADVENTURE, J. Wentworth Day
—Harrap.
De «€6SEND IN YOUR ORDER TO-DAY

e
ADVOCATE STATIONERY.

Rupert. “lt say, what

a lot you
know about this queer business,"

exclaims Rollo, ‘* I just can't make
head or tail of it. Anyway, i:
means that you are leader now. fr
you have any plan just tell me wha
you want me to do.”

GLOBE

TO-DAY to SUNDAY
5 and 8 p.m. Daily





BARBADOS

CO-OP COTTON
FACTORY LTD.



7

SHORTS:
Night Shows Over 10 p.m.







ALAN HALE, ¥® ROY DEL RUTH,

















BARBADOS ADVOCATE THURSDAY, NOVEMBER 1, 1951
| |
. 7 @ . | _
Isit Me Oris it I? | Princess Margaret |MOVIETIME .... [== 7 a
LONDON. | rr i LIDDEN DANGER PL ATA DIAL 2310 “Tarzan's Peril”
Soke peiple. thion that “Be | ARBADOS f {|| LRxC ee et lien Barker
tween you and I” sounds more) tarts cram RE-RELEASE—
Sree | hem “eprnen, son Gen than ALWAYS IN MY HEART & THIS SIDE OF THE LAW
a a ses, sRRME ie BANOS Vieet” CinpeGKe en atm
U.K. dreadful. It is glaringly bad gram- La - Satan in hegnaednatee ‘Yankee Doodle Dandy! | MINNEVITCH & his Harmonica Rascals
And the eet: OF have oN | seni ereteh beatene ema 4 ABBOTT & COSTELLO in ee role Sek, BROWN in
to try saying “ een I and you” * _
and they will see their error, “Be- |=! Perey aid "edhe ___IT AIN'T HAY & DESPERTAE TRAIL
tween I and you” sounds wrong. Hertford Hospital in Paris.

: OISTIN
'
1? LAZA visi 1405
To-day jonly) 5 and 8.30 p.m
“DANGEROUS GAME”
RICHARD ARLEN
“DESPERATE TRAIL”
JOHNNY MACK BROWN
Sat p.m y and
Shadow on Continuing
Beacon Hil & 5 and 8.30 p.m
Night Has Eyes viewing Father

GAIETY
THE GARDEN — ST. JAME‘

Last Show Tonite 8.30

IF YOU KNEW SUSIE
Eddie CANTOR—Joan DAVIS &

GILDERSLEEVE'’S GHOST

a
Opening Tomorrow W.B. Double
“BREAKING POINT”

a.dnite bal. ofr unne ARFIELD—Pa'

Bad Man of Red | Pat O'Brian & Jeqn- @ ee
Butte & Deadline at “THIS SIDE OF THE LAW’
Gun Town Dawn Viveca LINDFORS—Kent SMITH

Fn at









EMPIRE



REVUEDEVILLE 1951

TO-NIGHT 8.30
TO-MORROW 5 p.m. and 8.30 p.m.

NOW FOR THE’ FINEST SHOW OF
THE YEAR.

BOOK

Box & Orchestra $1.50,
Balcony 72c.

_House $1.00
Reserved.



OPENING SATURDAY, 3rd NOVEMBER, 4.45 & 8.30

-_—

LORETTA

YOUNG

JOSEPH



20: CECIL KELLAWAY + BASIL RUYSDAEL °"**'s RICHARD SALE
Serden Play by ROBERT RISKIN + Based on Story by George

Prodverd JULIAN BLAUSTEIN

Carletan Brown





_ ROYAL
LAST TWO SHOWS TO-DAY TOMORROW Only 4.30 & 8.15
4.30 & 8.15

Universal presents

“THE WICKED LADY”
Starring
Joan BENNETT — James MASON

Republic Double .
Sunset CARSON in

‘““BANDIT OF THE



BADLAND ”
any OPENING SATURDAY, 3rd NOV.
“END OF THE =|‘ FIGHTING
er - COASTGUARD”

tarring
Nelson EDDY — Ilona MASSEY BRIAN DONLEVY



ROXY

LAST TWO SHOWS TO-DAY
4.30 & 8.15

Republic Whole Serial .

“FEDERAL OPERATOR

TOMORROW Only 4.30 & 8.15
Universal Double

“THE ASTONISHED

HEART”
â„¢ AND
with gt is
Martin LAMONT Helen TALBOT DESTINATION
Action from Start to Finish! UNKNOWN”





OLYMPIC

TO-DAY Only 4.30 & 8.15 | TOMORROW Only 4.30 & 8.15
Universal Double

Edward G. ROBINSON
Joan BENNETT
in

““SCARLET STREET”
AND

“THE MAGIC BOW”
Stewart GRANGER

Universal Double . .
Barry FITZGERALD in
‘““NAKED CITY”

AND

\“THE OVERLANDERS ”



Opening SATURDAY 4.30 and 8.15

M-G-M and 20th-C-Fox Double - - -

CHARLES BOYER — LINDA DARNELL

“THE 13th LETTER”

And The Big Technicolor Musical

“ROYAL WEDDING”

Starring: FRED ASTAIRE

|



— JANE POWELL










THURSDAY, NOVEMBER 1, 1951
Le



Four Seats Not Eno

Bea Talks
About Crops

In W. ra

October, 1951.
The extent to which the West
Indies present dependence on

Sugar might be reduced by pro-
ducing other crops, both for ex-
port and domestic consumption,

is discussed by Bernard
Braine in the current issue
of “New Commonwealth”. Mr.

Braine recently cut short a visit
to the West Indies to take part
in the Genera] Election here.

ug THe basie problem,” he suys
“is population”. In 30 years or
so, it may well have doubled it-
self. Unless, in the meantime, the
economy can be made less vulner-
able and the production of wealth
can be substantially increased,
the peoples of the West Indies
“face disaster.”

Mr. Braine says some second-
ary industries can and need to be
established in these territories.
The two most promising possibil-
ities seem to be rice and cocoa—
promising because all the indica-
tions are that world supply ‘of
these commodities is unlikel= to

meet demand for many years to
come.

“British Guian»y i the most
suitable area for rice development.
There seems to be no doubt that
the annual output of 50,000 tons
can be increased fivefold, ‘provided
capital, technical personnel and
equipment are made available
for the very extensive drainage
which would be necessary. Rice
cultivation can be extended else~
where, notably in. Trinidad and
Jamaica,” Mr. Braine declares.

After referring to the good re-
sults being achieved with cocoa,
he claims--preduction — of other
crops already established in the
West Indies, such as bananas,
citrus, coffee, cotton and coco-
nuts, can be extended on a very
big scale. Much ex
work is being done by various
Departments of Agriculture with
a view of introducing new ereps,
including jute, ramie;
hemp and sisal. It may be possi-
ble to grow oil-bearing crops such
as soya beans, sesame, sunflowers
and oil palms,

Mr, Braine recognizes the one
limiting factor to large-scale de-
velopment of. crops for gxport,
with the exception possibly of rice
and cocoa. It js the fear, which

springs from past experience
*hat markets will disappear. And ,¢
it is not anal beseless
fear,

“It is en ‘aging t6 tind the
Governments in the various West

Indie; Colonies alive to the need

for raising eee produc-.

tion, to encounter the “opcers
asm of their

and to observe aus

Sitio tt
ship between - 5a and
field. But if the agricultural po-

tentialities of the West Indies
are to be realized to the ful,
Britain heddself! must recognize
the special ature of the prob-
lem by continuing to provide that



market stability without which
great progress will be impossi-
ble,” he concludes.
—L.E.S,

MAILS for Dominica, Antigua, Mont-
serrat, Nevis and Sst Kitts by the
M.V. Caribbee will be closed at the
General Post Office as under:—

Parcel Mail at 12
Mail at 2 p.m., Ordinany
p.m. on the 2nd November

noon, Registered
Mai) at 2,30
1951

* MAILS for Maderia, United Kingdom,
Antwerp and Amsterdam by the M.S
Willemstad will be closed at the General
Post Office as under:—

Parcel Mail at 10 a.m., Registered
Mail at 2 p.m., Ordinary Mail at 2.30
p.m, on the 5th November 1951

MAILS for. St. Lucia, Martinique.
Guadeloupe, Antigua, United Kingdom
and France by the S.S. Gascogne will
be closed at the General Post Office as
under:—

Parcel Mail at 10 a.m., Registered
Mail at 2 p.m. Ordinary Mail at 2.30
p.m. on the 2nd November, 1951

THE PRINCESS WHO
WOULDN'T SMILE .. .,

In a far-off land lived a Princess who
never smiled. Clowns and jugglers came
from all over, but not one could bring

out even the tiniest smile.

over 100 delicious sandwiches.



3OVRIL

F. L. Walcott Says In
Federation Debate

The constitution which was proposed in the British Carib-
bean Standing Closer Association Committee Report as the
one to be used in the forming of a Federal Government of
the British West Indies, was criticised by Mr. F. L. Waicott
(L) of the Government and Mr. R. Mapp (L) at the House

of Assembly on Tuesday. The

House had begun debating the

report of a Seleet Committee which had been appointed to
prepare a draft reply o the Governor's message inviting the
prepare a draft reply to the Governor’s message inviting the
Caribbean Standing Closer Association Committee, and the
Unification of the Public Services in the British Caribbean

Area.

The Select
meeting on

Committee held a
October 8, when
Messrs. G. H. Adams, A. E. S.
Lewis, F. L. Walcott, F. Goddard
and The Speaker Hon. K. N. R.
Husbands were present.

They recommended the passing
of an Address to the Governor.
The Address reads:

The House of Assembly repeats

its acceptance of the principles of
establisning a Federal Govern-
ment of the British West Indies,
and accepts the proposals of the
British Caribbean Standing Closer
Association’ Committee’s Report
as a basis for discussion of the
form which the proposed Gov-
ernment's Constitution should
take. . :
2. The Hoke, however, does
not accept in their entirety the
detailed’?pr®posals of that Report,
and will in due course forward
to Your Excellency, its sugges-
tions for the amendment of some
of these proposals.

3. The House is convinced of
the advantages to be gained from
a Unification of the Public Ser-
vices in the British Caribbean
Area and therefore agree in gen-
eral with the “Holmes” Report on
this subject.

Only three members have
spoken so far on the Address and
it thas been adjourned until next
Monday when the House: meet
again.

Some Worry

Mr. F. L. Walcott said that it
was a very important matter and
it was a pity it had come before
the House so close to the time
when the House would die—next
Tuesday, The question of West
Indian Federation had been in the
air for many years. The then
Secretary of State for the Colonies,
Mr. Creech Jones, opened his con-
ference in Jamaica in 1947 and it
was almost four years that the
principle of federation had been
agreed upon by the various repre-
sentatives of the colonies and a
committee was set up to deal with
the question,

While some of the units in the
Caribbean agreed With the princi-
ples of Federation, Barbgdos had
up till then not debated it and
that failing to debate it was a
matter of some worry to the Colo-
nial Office.

The framers of the report had
made it cledr that they do not
» want to de ‘y. much from
the report and they would have tu
state in no, uncertain terms
whether they agreed with the re-
port or not.

When they saw the result of
adult suffrage in the West Indies
with regard to whom the people
had chosen to be their represen-
tatives, they had, to watch the
report very carefully when they
looked at the position of its
members.

eet for myself,” he said,
“at the set I will say that I
do not believe in double chambers.
With regard to legislation I am
not one with the idea that two
heads are better than one.

There are a number of people
in the community who have some-
thing to offer and will not seek
election. People who had some-
thing to offer and did not offer it
were just showing they were aloof
and one should not nominate
them because it was felt they had
something to offer.

He said that if it was felt that
they should decide on a legislator
by his educational qualifications,
there were sufficient professors at
the English Universities who could
devote three days a week to the
running of the English Govern-
ment.

One would have expected to
have a Prime Ministes, , whose

Close by lived a tailor and his son. One
_ the son had an idea. “I know what
i make the Princess smile,”” he said,





PUTS BEEF (NTO YOU

}
®
sandwich
A sandwich made with Bovril is a real meal
in miniature. Everyone enjoys the rich beefy ‘
flavour and goodness of Bovril. And they can
enjoy it often—one 4 oz. bottle of Bovril makes
}



status was somewhat similar te
those in the Dominions, but in-
stead of that they were presented
with what was no more than a
tlorified Crown Colony system in
which, if the House elected this
minister. he could not even form
a Cabinet himself. “You can
easily see that even in our little
experiment in Barbados even the
seaep work would be better than
this.”

No Reserve Power

Another matter that had to
strike West Indians was the re-
serve power of the Governor-
General. In Barbados the Gov-
ernor bad no reserve power. What
was the strength of a Government
when « Governor or Governor-
General had reserve powers,

“We should not go up to Eng-
land in January as Jamaica would
have us, until we have discussed
every aspect of this here,” he said.

After all these years of British
rule when they were dominated
by the British Imperial Govern-
ment, since they were being given
their freedom, no West Indian
should be ashamed to let the Brit-
ish Government know that at the
outset they should be given sub-
stantially to build up their super-
structure.

The question of Federation was
not a vote-catching one. It was
one which they had to be very
eareful about as it would affect
future West Indians.

Mr. Walcott drew attention to
Part 4, Chapter 11 where it is
mentioned that the House of
Assembly should consist of 50
elected members. It said that for
the purposes of the election of
members of the House of Assem-
bly seats should be _ allocated
among the Units as follows:—
Barbados 4, British Guiana 6,
British Honduras 2, Jamaiea 16,
Antigua 2, St. Kitts-Nevis 2,
Montserrat 1, Trinidad 9, Gren-
ada 2, St. Vincent 2, St. Lucia 2,
and Dominica 2.

He said that four seats to Bar-
bados was an insult to Barbados.
considering its economy and pop-
ulation as compared with the
others, ;

The recent action of Trinidad
and Grenada with regard to the
emigration laws was an indication
that on the eve of federation they
still found there was a bar against
Barbadians and other West In-
dians from entering those eolonies,

Free Travei

“Do not let us have co-opera-
tion for ¢ ation sake,
because Federation means some-
thing to us,” he said, “but if we
are to be united, let it mean that
a man can go from here to Trini-
dad just as he can go from St.
Michael to St. Lucy.”

Another matter for criticism
was the going outside the House
to look for a Speaker. That should
never be done. That would imply
that there might not be one capa-
ble among themselves to be
Speaker.

Mr. R. G. Mapp (L) said that
he too felt that the report they
were considering was so impor-
tant that they eould not enter
lightly into any debate on it. Bar-
bados had always been in the
forefront of those colonies which
supported Federation. They shad
always felt that although given
the opportunity, they could lift
themselves up by their own boot-
straps, they could do even more
when joined together under a
Federal Government with the
other West Indian colonies.

There was no hope for small
units such as these in a world
in whieh events moved at a very
fast rate, units which were
shrinking more and more every
day and they would certainly



TH
ho
Kx

Osi Fi

ol

ted it, her face
broke out into a big ile In fact oe
gave him her hand and h





OVI T VI VT VT

WHITE HORSE
Scotch Whisky

In olden days, the crest emblazoned
on a Knight’s shield proclaimed his

noble ancestry.

To-day, there is another sign of
the white horse that pro-
claims a Scotch ; a whisky whose

worth :



+ AABABA © = ORO O&O he ete tote br te tate bbe te terlin ten fm ee to Go te ee > Lr er Ly Bate ee Se

BARBADOS











Just released from prison—after

life,
married her in a remote

band’s release.



have more power and influence the time of the Report

in a Federation than they could
have at present.

“But as soon. as We agree to
Federation, we begin to ask our-
selves what sort of Federation we
Should shave, and it is then that
we come up against ty of
constitution and legal and other
diffieulties;’ he said.

It was then that they would
meet with sharp divergences of
opinien and varied ds and
would encounter serious difflenl-
ties in agreeing to a formula
suitable to their wishes and to
what they thought best for the
peoples of the West Indies. It was
for that reason that he thought
members would weleome tha
opportunity, an opportunity which
they might not get im future, of
diseussing the report and seeing
in what way it fell short of the

sort of ting they wanted for then a, jn

West I

Loose Kind

“There is no doubt,” he said,
‘that stripped of all its panoply
of words, the Report falls short of
Ahe sort of document it should
have been, It had been agreed
the form of Federa-
tion they should have, should
follow the pattern of the
Australian Federation, It was a
loose kind of Federation. There
are important differences, how-
ever, between Austrajia and the
West Indies, which lead to some
giaringl weak proposals that we

cannot accept.

Australia was a Federation of
States which had reaghed a ievel
of constitutional advancement
Each state was equal to the other
in political status, That was not so,
however, in the West Indies. %
was conceded generally that Bar.
bados and Jamaica were constitu,
tionally ahead of the others.
British Guiana was about to have
its constitution changed, but ai
the time of the Report was a
Crown Coleny. Most of the smaller
islands in the Windwards and
Leewards had since had aduit
suffrage, but were in effect still
Crown Colonies, Trinidad was at



BRINGS A SMILE TO v *
EVERYONE'S FACE

Just serve delicious Royal to













Sole Distributors :

FRANK B. ARMSTRONG LTD



“ISLAND R@MEO” LEAVES PRISON

year service—Costa Kephaloyannis, the “island Romeo”
met by his wifé. They both say that all th
Costa almost caused a civil war in
carried off the beautiful Tassoula Potares

|

ADVOCATE



ugh For Barbados oS

i

he

and

monastery. of troops sent te

bring back Costa and@ his 19-year-old vhs cost Greek goverament

£50,000. He was jailed for raising an armed band to
Tassoula, daughter of a rich politician wasted patiently for



a Crows By
Colony and was in some ways stidi
one,

Those fundamental difference:
in the constitution of the severa

islands had led to many evils.
First there was the farce of nepre-
sentation at the conferenee

Jamaica had been represented by,
‘he clerk of the Houge of Represe.:
tatives. Trinidad and = Briti:,
Guiana were represented by men
who did not represent the will «
the people. It was not astonishai: «
that in those circumstances thoy
should have a mixture of the
worst features of Crown Colony
Government, Men who coud
echieve some power under a Grown
Colony Government would not |e
opposed to all its features,

‘They would also-find that where»
Australia the powers of
disallowance by the King were
yeneral and were hardly ever used
in the Report it was suggested
that they should be specific, The
King in Council for example
could make laws for seeuring aie
maintaining the financial stability
of the Federation, It was very
obvious that this power would be
retained by the British Govern.
ment so long as the Crown was
responsible for some of the con-
stituent units of the Federation.

Their being Crown Colonies, the
advisers to His Majesty’s Govern-
ment made sure that features of
the Crown Colony system should
be retained—thus the proposed re-
serve powers of the Governor
General, the power of the King in
Council and the weak nature of the
Federal structure,

“| think the delay which has
been met in dealing with the Re-
port has been useful. For one
thing, during that time several
colonies have had their constitu.
tions changed. The different levels
of constitutional advancement have
been evened up, especially her
tween the bigger colonies. If with
further delay we can witness
greater measure of self govern-
ment in colonies, the beeter
we would be.

He had heard warnings in the
British Parliament and had seen
them in the British Press that if
each colony concentrated on self
government before joining in the
Federation, it would mean much
delay in bringing it about, They
should not pay much attention to
that. That aspect of the Report of
which he' had spoken, to his mind
was the most serious part of 11



and they would. achieve a stronger
f Fecioratlgn if they came together
as unité that’ had reached the

same level of . political adyance-

“T cannot envisage,” be said.
“our sending even two representa-
tives to a Federation in which we
would have less wer to plan

effectively for the people of
Barbados than we have = at
present,”



OWING to the illness of
Mrs. C, A. Gonsalves, the les
sons on Spanish Conversation
which were to have at
Combermere School on Thurs-
day, November Ist have been
indefinitely postponed.

|



“SUNDIAL” BRINGS
SARDINES

The Saguenay its
Sundial arrived here yesterday
with 6884 bags of flour from
Port Alfred, Canada, along with
750 cartons of sardines and a
supply of batteries. |

Sundiat ing
her caro Feeiera evening ad,
cleare port for trinid She
fs consigned to Messrs, Planta-

tions Lid.

Gas Lamp =~

Shortly after 0.15 pam. yester-
day the Fire Brigade was called
out to Hincks Street, City, to put
ou to fame which started to burn
a gas lamp post.

The gas lamp which proved to
be defective exploded burning the
} top part of the post

Labour Defeat
Did Not

Surprise Reds

MOSCOW, Oct

Pravada, Ivevestia and other
Soviet papers on Saturday carried
a brief statement from the offici.!
news agency Tass on the result of
the British general election witn
the comment, “the defeat of the
Labour Party did not surprise us’,
It attributed Labour's defeat to
“che loss of influence due to the
wrong icies uf the Labour Party
in both internal and external
affair

Ss.

The Labourites did not keep
their promises to the electorate,
They promised peaceful and
friendly relations with other coun-
tries, but waged an anti-peace
policy, unqualifiedly supporting the
plans of American

voting Con-
apparentiy

it concluded “by
servative, the voters
entertain the hope for a change
in British policy. However, the
Conservatives’ advent to power
will hardly bring anything new
since the Labour Party practically
carried gut Conservative policies.”
—U.P.

Harbour Log

IN CARLISLE BAY



Sch. Cyril E, Seeith, Sch, Mary E
Caroline, Sch. Mary M ‘ewis, Sch
ted Pilgrim §., Seh. Sunshine BF . ;
hh. dvdie Ading S., Sch Molly N |
ones, MV. Jenkins Roberts, M.V
Joy, M.V Ve B Radar, Sch
Bi u Mh Sch. Marion Bei!
w Ba Sain Mac, “Yoei! |
OP ahh Marsaltese, M.V: |
Charles A. McLean, Sch grvenkiyn DR
ARRAY AL.

Capt

] SUNDIAL, 1,052 Motle net,
sh. from Cvidaa Trujillo

}
ns sg ye - tons net, Capt |
OLETTO, Mahe ioe” tone net, Capt |
Sapsworth, ys eee

7

> msi tan net

og eer FP nce 89 tons

for Trinidad, ww





a NDAkIEWoOD, 94 tons net, Capt
Pangusson, &. Lucid
Bape worth, ie Trinidad.

SEAWELL

ARRIVALS—By BWA. YESTERDAY
From TRINTDAD
K, Farnum, E4 Hoad, A. Me
J Allamby, § Sihman, S. W





Kenztle
els,
Revac, M. Rojas, M. Rojas, M Madriz
Sucre, L. Madtiz, M. Mudra, M
Madriz-Fuentes, L
lamby, 4. Jack, 1
DEPARTURES-By

BW.LA
YESTERDAY
For TRINIDAD
Sister Margaret Poole, Hermar
Ribeiro, Florence Ripeiro, Jack Piper

Fuentes, H
French; G

Al
Randall
L

Aleta Piper. Mary Leoneet
prrnge. Morgan Leonard,

» Grandseull Aurelia Cramer
ew, Cramer, Erie Robinson, Charles
Bell, John MacGowan,
John Seott, Stan Joties, Dr, Samuel
ree be den! Bisdex, Desmond Be!

Major — Hirat

Heaton, Herbert
Jane Beaubrun,

Sionee Heaton, Mrs
Â¥riend, Simone Palmer,

Rufus Sringer, Collis’ Barrow, Hugh
Blackman Alired Wilkingon, Lionel
Franklyn, Windal Harewood, Vernon
Cooper.



In Touch With Barbados
Coastal Station

Cable and Wireleas (W.1T.) Lid, advise
that they can now communicate with the
following ships through their Barbados
Coast Station:

8.8. Raban, Arakaka, Aleoa Pioneer,
Baso Pittsburgh, Pygmalion, Aleon Run
ner, Lady Nelson, Wave Baron, Atila,
Arthhan Queen, Five Forks, Steelore,
Abiqua, Pangitoto, Alcoa Pennant, Castor,
Tieworleas, Presidente Dawn, Trun, Sun-
dial, Morayvbank, Rosa, Seanw,
Alcoa Gavalier, Jean, Algona Pilgrim,
Pyamalion, Nueva Gloria, Bella, Rosawa,
Sea Magic, Athene, Prospector, Stater-
men, Northvalley, Dragon, Loide Haiti,
Colombie, Hydra and $.5, Mahetania

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PAGE THREE

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ADVOGATE
SS foseSa)

Printed by the Advocate Co., Ltd., Broad St, Bridgetewa

Thursday, November 1, 1951

——

District Market

' THE House of Assembly on Tuesday
passed a resolution for the sum of $18,650
to provide payment for a portion of land
at»Eagle Hall on which to establish a
district market. The land will now be
purchased at $1.32 per square foot instead

’ The story of delay behind the need for
the resolution is one which will give cause

~ for grave dissatisfaction on the part of tax-

payers for two very sound reasons. For
some time now it has been agreed that
there should be district markets scattered
about St. Michael instead of a large market

’ to which neither housewives nor hawkers

were inclined to go. The Sanitary Com-
missioners of St. Michael approached the
Government in the matter and certain
areas were selected as suitable. In these
areas it was agreed to purchase spots which
would accommodate the markets. One of
these was at Eagle Hall on the property of
Hon: Mrs. Hanschell. After some discus-
sion, it was agreed by Mrs. Hanschell to
sell the land at one dollar per square foot.
The Government disagreed on the ground
that the price was too high and there the
‘matter rested for some time.

, With public desire for these markets so
strong and the reason for the delay not
being made public, people began to ask
whether the Government was really ser-
ious about the establishment of district
markets. This delay was accentuated by
the sale of a portion of land at Waterhall
for the erection of a cinema.

The Government decided to acquire the
land under the provisions of the Land
Acquisition Act. This brought about
further delap. Meanwhile, another parcel
of land was sold at Waterhall for business
purposes and the price paid was $1.40 per
square foot. It was clear that while the
Government was trifling with the power
which they had the price of land like every
other commodity, was rising.

! “The matter had been filed in the Court
but had not yet come to trial and fortun-
ately another attempt was successful. Mrs.
Hanschell now agreed rot to ask the same
price as that of the land sold on the op-
posite side of the street and to accept $1.32
per square foot.

' The land will now be purchased at $1.32
-per square foot and if nothing untoward
happens again, it is likely that in the near
future, Eagle Hall will have its district
market, even although it could have been
acquired earlier and at less cost.

| The need for the market is obvious to
-anyone who passed that district where
hundreds of people gather to make pur-
chases from hawkers who come in from
the country by bus. It may be that the
establishment of this district market will
relieve some of the pressure in Baxters
Road and Busby Alley inasmuch as it
would not be necessary for people to travel
to the City to get the items which they
‘need.

|: This should give the necessary incentive
to the Government to speed up the work
on the market which is to be erected on or
near Fairchild Street which is even in a
worse condition than Eagle Hall.

It should be easy for the Legislative
Council to concur in this resolution so that
the erection of the market might be started
as soon as possible. And it is fortunate
that the matter has been settled amicably
as this will permit the settlement of de-
tails and the handing over to be done
quickly. The growing need for this mar-
ket to accommodate the public must be
the primary consideration in this matter.







, them.

BARBADOS



The Astonishing Story Of |
The-Los¢ Soviet War Brides

RUSSIA'S Secret Police are now
ready to close .heic thick dossiers
On the case of the Soviet War
Brides — one of the most shameful
episodes in the history of Anglo-
Soviet post-war relations.

That is the meaning behind the
week's bizarre happenings outside
the Bolshoi Theatre, Moscow,
when Mrs. Iraidg Ricketts, the
Soviet-Born wife of an official at
the Science Museum, London, was
kidnapped and later “released”.

Only one bride is now iree, and
she is virtually a prigoner in the
bri.ish Embassy where she lives
with her six-year-old son,

THERE were five of tne original
15 war brides sull at liberty in
Moscow when I arrived there in
October 1949 to take over the
editorship of the Foreign, Uflices
Russian magazine, British Ally.

I knew .nem all, shared their
fears and their hopes, and oc-
casionally acted as their escort.
Only witn someone enjoying diplo-
matic privileges could they move
outside the gates of their homes,

Now that chere is little, if any,
hope left for their reprieve it is
possible to tell the full story of
their grim ordeal at the hands of
the M.V.D.—ihe Secret Police—an
ordeal which they bore for six
years.

BECAUSE they married foreign-
ers and firmly refused to renounce
their husbands they were os-
tracised by their own families.

Some ‘were turned out of their
homes; some found sanctuary in an
ill-lit basemen; of the Press De-
partment of the British Embassy.
wo were permitted to stay on
with their ailing mothers.

No Russian would dare talk to
They were banned from
employment by any Soviet agency
and deprived of all civil rights
although they were regarded as
Soviet citizens by the law,

Always Trailed

A 24-hour guard on the gates of
the Press Department ensured that
they did not’ leave the premises
unnoticed, ,

When they went outside with a
member of the diplomatic staff
they were tailed by plain-cloths
men.

If they received callers the
visitors had to show their
identity documents to the
militiaman on duty.

Inside they were spied on by
the Russian staff. Two of them

By RICHARD JONES
Formcr Editor of British Ally,
the magazine the Foreign
Office published in Moscow.

were employed as telephonists.
Outen, after mysterious telephone
calls, IT would find them in vears.

They would never divulge ‘ihe
identity of the caller or the
messages.

OCCASIONALLY plain-clothes
detectives called on them. It was
after one of these visits tha. two
of the brides, Mrs. Lola Burke,
wife of an Ealing bank official, and
Mrs, Rosa Henderson, whose
husband is now in Canada,
tempted suicide,

Both took an overdose of as-
pirin and were found unconscious
by another wife. Doctors from the
American and British embassies
tevived them.

at-

arap Lyvadea

Time and agdin we wiV.. Lie
lensiied Wwelr eiurts WwW ureuK ule
Beis Morale, HvMeculiics . was a
seyuese lo MCCL SomMeOUe VU siuc,
«hey Gid NOL walk into the wap.

sur more than five yeers
euuS ved in fear, ney maa secu
vier WiV€g Vanish Overuignl, sume
wo Siberia.

1 WAS there when the first of
the five brides was kidnapped in
June last year. Mrs, Burke had
gone to spend the nignt at the
wome of Mrs. Bolton's mother,

wie

and taken to the Lubianka
Prison,

Attempts by embassy officials
and her mother to gee her failed.
Nobody could find out on what
charge she had been taken in.
Nobody has heard of her since.

Terrified

The four remaining brides were
terrified. They rarely moved out-
side their quarters for six months,

Then one night in March this
year Mrs, Henderson went outside.
Mrs, Bolton disappeared a few
days later, Neither has been heard
of since,

Embassy officials were snubbed
by the police authorities; told it
was not their business,

these three disappeared

Mrs, Hall and Mrs, Ricketts were

siven quarters in an annexe in the
British Embassy grounds.

Outside the embassy gates



uniformed guards reinformed by
pvlain-ciothes men also kept a con-
siant watch on their movements.

Last week Mrs. Ricke.ts made
the fatal matake of visiting the
theatre with a member of the em-
bassy who did not. enjoy diplo-
matic stavus, .

Betrayed

It was the moment for which the
M.V.D.’s agents had been waiting.

It was her brother who be-
trayed her. As she was leav-
ing a performance of the
bailet at the Bolshoi he point-
ed her out to a squad of pliin-
clothes men. They pushed her
into the taxi which her escort
had called and drove off.

Mrs. Ricketts’s brother did not
meet her there by chance, He
was there by arrangement with
the police—it was the jenalty he
had to pay for his tive years’
failure to make her agree ‘io
divorce her British husband.

ahreats ds

Nobody who has met Iraida
Ricketts, and I knew her well, can
doubt that it was under dire
threats that she denied she was
ever kidnapped.

Her frienas, and they were many
in the foreign ¢Ommunity on Mos-
cow, know thatthe sto.y she told
at an obviously anranged inter-
view .with..the Western cor-

doesn’t ring true.

UL une M,.V.D. have won half
their battle with her. She will no
longer have any contact with the
world outside her mother’s home.
Her brother, an ardent Com-
munist, is her guard.

She will nox be allowed any
foreign visitors. She is under
close house arrest, though that
is not the way the M.V.D.

it.












describe

She can easily be transferred, as
other Soviet brides have, to a con-
centration camp without anyone
being the wiser.

‘She’s Tough’

Last night I spoke on the tele-
phone to a friend in Moscow who
gave this reassuring message:
“Nobody will break Ira’s spirit.
She’s tough and will stand up, as
she has done all the time, to any
brow-beating.”

Then came this ominous re-
minder from behing the Iron
Curtain: “Don’t forget this is being
recorded”, and the subject changed
to the weather.—L.E.S.

Experiments in the wrong Direction

LONDON, Oct. 22.

The Colonial Development
Corporation is “an unimaginative
enlargement of old ideas” and is
based on a wrong approach to
the whole question of Colonial
Development. So writes Lord
Milverton, until recently a part-
time member of the Corporation
and a former Colonial Governor,
in the “New Commonwealth”
issue published to-day.

“Colonial Development must
ba closely the responsibility of
the local Government in each
instance,” he says. “In its true
form, it should be a conception
of aided Colonial Government,
learning and developing under
its own authority, not as at pres-
ent an Imperial Santa Claus
whose occasional incursions mere-
ly accentuate without solving
leeal needs. We live and learn
and enlightenment may well re-
veal that the Colonial Develop-
ment Corporation is conceived
and has been built up on the
wrong lines.”

Lord Milverton says it is at
least worthy of consideration
whether it should not be a very
small holding Corporation, allo-
cating and controlling financial
aid but not administering
schemes, having under it region-
al Corporations with an entirely
regional membership which
would work through local Gov-
ernments and would encourage
them to go into partnership with
private enterprise in as many of
their schemes as possible.

He adds: ‘The local Govern-
ment should almost always be
a partner in any development
scheme under Corporation auspi-
ces. Perhaps the chief advantage
of having the actual execution of
schemes doubly removed would
be to underline the responsi-
bility of the Corporation to Par-
liament through the Secretary of
State, for the allocation of funds,
and equally to remove the
temptation to tamper with the
details.”

“It seems to me that the les-
sons learnt by the Development
and Welfare Organization in the
West Indies on the one hand, and
by the Cameroons Development
Corporation, on the other hand,
might well be studied.”

Lord Milverton believes that
Colonial development, in fact,
really comes in the end to regu-
lating the whole life of the com-
munity concerned — social eco-
nomic and political. “If we are
true to our principles, this inevi-
tably means that the only
possible channels are the nascent
Colonial nationalities themselves.
In other words, our Colonial
Development Corporation and
suchlike bodies are really experi-
ments in the wrong direction.

OUR READERS SAY

“You cannot,” he claims, “do
all the things which seem to be
implicit in the conception of
Colonial development by = an
external authority. If the devel-
opment is to live and to become
part of the organic growth of the
people, it must be under their
authority and control.

“Dimly, this dilemma has been
foreseen when we talk of associa-
ting backward peoples with the
various schemes and getting them
to regard them as their own, But,
to be truly their own, the impetus,
the faith in them, the desire to
have them succeed must be drawn
from the beneficiaries, not the
benevolent patron,”

Earlier in his article Lord
Milverton said that during the
past 25 years there had been
a great deal of loose thinking and
looser talking on the subject of
Colonial Development and the
development of backward areas
generally,

"Many expensive lessons have
been bought but the fallacy that
money alone can work these
miracles still persists in far too
many minds. Development in
this connection really connotes
complete ‘mental and _ physical
revolution.

"Even We ourselves have only
just begun to face what the
problem means so that it is, per-
haps not surprising that the peo-
ple whom we propose to help



The Colonies in

LONDON.

The possibility of colonial rep-
resentation in Britain’s Parlia-
ment was commented upon by Mr.
Ivor Thomas, author and journal-
ist, in an address last week to the
Royal Empire Society. He re-
cently returned from a tour of
North Africa, where, he said, he
found the French system of gov-
ernment “well worth studying.”

Whereas, Britain had no repre -
sentatives of overseas territories
at Westminster, one French ter-

ritory, Algeria, he pointed out
sent 56 representatives to Paris.
He ihought it would be good

policy, for “some” of our colonies
to send members to the U.K. Par-

liament. The emphasis, however,
was on the word “some.” Coun-
tries with dominion status or

near self-governing status, were
obviously strong enough to “stand
on their own feet.” But others,
particularly small colonies, would

definitely benefit.
A second § difference he noted
between British and French

methods was that in the French
North African territories there
was equal representation of
French and local people in the





develop themselves to Our pat-
tern, are not only confused about
the scope of the envisaged
change in their lives but also
ere quite unaware of the price
of such progress and the funda-
mental upheaval involved,” Lord
Milverton said,

They wanted, naturally, the
glittering prizes of Western in-
dustry; they would like a higher
standard of living and the many
desirable things (that only money
can buy, but they have not trars-
lated those desires into terms of
effort or related them to the in-
escapable conditions of regular
responsible hard work and the
acquisition of all the skills which
go to make what is known as
Western civilization.

Lord Milverton asks ; “How
many of the Colonial communities
who clamour for self-government
and freedom from Imperial
shackles have any conception of
the choice at present involved ?

“It is not a choice,” he points
out, “between self-government or
foreign rule, with the benefits of
Western economy as a common
constant, but a choice between
self-government and their own
way of life, with its attendant
poverty and misery and oppres-
sion, or foreign guidance and the
benefits of association with West-
ern economy and a slow move?
ment towards autonomy.”

the Commons ?

general assemblies, This posed 4
question which would have to be
faced soon in British territories
There were, he said, two alter-
natives: firstly, a system of ‘one
man one vote;” secondly, a sys-
tem in which plural societies
would have each community
represented in proportion to the
part they played in relation to the
country as a whole,

Mr. Thomas spoke also oi
problems which French ana
British, territories have in com-~-
mon; the conserVative tendencies
of local people, particularly in
matters of religion, which put an
inevitable break on, development;
the rapid. ineres in, populations;
the keeping, of 5 ,and order.

In troubled, times like these the
nations of the western world must
co-operate and endeavour te
understand one another, if west-
ern civilization was to survive.

He also thought that another
aspect of the nch colonies
which jt would be beneficial to

study was their method of agri-
culture it provided a good
example of the co-operative

farming system working success-
fully.



‘where reconstruction was necessary or where
there was a housing shortage the President
of the Italian republic promulgated a law
dated 10th August, 1950. This law has many
provisions
Under the law guaranteed loans can be made

oank and who either singly or through co-

¢wo or more than five living rooms and must








ADVOCATE



II. Housing Co-operatives

TO encourage private building in areas

which deserve consideration.

-o individuals who have small savings in the

selves. These houses cannot have less than

yave in addition kitchen, bath and lavatory,
yantry and entrance hall. The law authorises

he issue of loans up to 75 per cent. of the ;
otal cost of the land and the building. These §

.oans are guaranteed by a first mortgage on
-epaid within a period of thirty five years and
oer cent. per annum. A condition for obtain-

vis immediate relatives must live in it for a
ninimum period of five years.

In addition to the special fund administered
n this way by the Treasury to encourage
srivate building, credit and building insti-
utes are also offered special privileges by the
jJovernment to encourage house building.
Among these privileges is exemption from
acome tax on the interest accruing from the
oans. There must be good faith on the part
of the borrowers. No payments can be made
o individuals or co-operatives until the in-
dividual or co-operative has paid 25 per cent.
of the total cost involved in purchasing the
yuilding area in construction of the building.

By an earlier decree dated 8th May, 1947
iegislation was provided in Italy to help the
,00rest classes by direct grants in aid. Grants
were paid either to individuals or to building
ocieties and varied with the size of houses
_o be constructed. Fifteen pounds were paid
o the builder of a one-roomed apartment,
with accessories and of minimum size of 360
square feet. Thirty pounds were paid to the
builder of a two-roomed apartment with ac-
sessories and of a minimum size of 450 square
‘eet. And so by an ascending scale of pay-
ment until a ‘maximum of £50 were paid
towards an apartment with five rooms and
accessories’ and a maximum area of 990
square feet.

By another law dated 2nd July, 1949 leg-
islation'was created to assist companies and
societies engaged in building “economic”
nouses for the people. Under this law the
State contracts to pay an agreed portion of
the cost of building over a period of thirty
five years! In the years 1949-50 and 1950-51
the State contribution was of an order of
£ 1,200,000 for each financial year. In the
financial year 1951-52 it was half this sum.
Popular or economic houses are defined
as follows: |
1. Each house must have not less than two
and not more than five living rooms be-
sides kitchen, bath, lavatory, store-room
and entrance.

2. Its own entrance from a common stair-

way.

Its own lavatory.

Its own water, i

. Must conform to sanitary and health

provisions.

The maximum area of the largest house
2annot exceed 990 square feet for a five-
roomed building.

Popular houses whether built by indus-
rialists, workmen or farmers can be rented
or bought by the occupiers.

Under this same law savings or lending
yanks are authorised to issue loans to co-
yperatives of journalists, magistrates and
other professional groups. The banks are
iuthorised to issue loans comprehensive of
‘he whole cost of building, less one half the
State’s contribution. Under this law the State
gives further encouragement to house build-
ars by exempting the owners for 25 years
from payment of house tax. Many other tax
2oncessions are provided. Due to this active
promotion of house-building, the State, in
italy is not only looking after the interests
of all its families, but is helping to create
employment for workers in the building in-
dustry.

To-morrow:

a ee

“THE STATE”



he land and buildings. The loans have to bel§
are subject to an interest not exceeding four}!

ng a loan is that the owner of the house or}





















To the Editor, The Advocate—
IR,—This is a brief comment
on the handling of “Requisition
Forms”—sent by the Education
Department to the elementar
Schools—through which, schoo!
buy requirements with small

grants
Has any ons ever known the
procedure? Firstly, a form is

sent to a school with let us say,
a total of ten dollars. Secondly,
a teacher has to go to a store
and ask for the prices of the
articles he wants so that he can
enumerate them with their prices
not to exceed the ten dollars.

Sometimes it takes an Archimi-
des to work them out. Thirdly,
‘tthe form has to be taken to the
headmaster who signs it; then he
fn turn has to hunt down the
Reverend who may be found at
the vicarage if he is not on holi-



day and he also signs it. After
this it has to be signed by the
District Inspector, and that is the
third stage.

Fourthly, a clerk copies that
list on two new forms and sends
them back to the headteacher; by
this time about two months would
fhhave elapsed and the fifth stage
comes up.

A teacher takes the two new
forms to the store again, so as
to bring out his parcel of require-

ments; and very often, when he
gets there, he discovers that the
store was not awaiting his forms
and sold all the articles he
wanted.

Oh! What a pernicious prece-
dent! What a poor regard of the

integrity and honesty of a poor
elementary teacher.

Justa while ago, if this teacher

were allowed the same ten dol-
lars on the pay sheet, you will
find the ins or dodging for
the bills. “Where is the bill for
that six cents in pins?” You
often heard. Then if he did not
find the bill six cents. was
subtracted from the next grant.

I have known of a teacher who
could not find the Reverend to
sign the form until he was nearly
weary searching for him. Then
after this he was told by a clerk
from the office that there was no
inspector appointed for his school

yet, so he could not have his
form signed and hence no re-
auirements.

As my word liveth if I were a

teacher, I would send every form
back to the Department just as it
came and do without the require-
ments.

A BIG MAN
30.10.51

Grow More Food

To The Editor, The Advocate—

SIR,—In view of the proposed
increase in the price of rice from
January next and the further
increase in the cost which is
bound to follow, it would be in
the, interest cf the entire island
if those persons who are in con-
trol of land would endeavour,
now that the rainy season has
come to plant food crops.

The extent to which gardening
has been done in this island with-
in the last few years shows that
there is room for it as a subsi-
diary. There has never been a
waste of vegetables; and in addi-
tien Barbados imports thousands
of dollars worth of garden veg-
etables from St. Lucia, St. Vin-
cent, Dominica and Canada.

In addition to reducing
cost of living it is possible f

the

or the

growers to improve the standard

of nutrition by their efforts to
ow vegetables and so vary the
iet of the family.

Here and there in every dis-
trict one sees small spots of land,
it is true, lying fallow. If as in
some cases it provided pasturage



of 7

SEE HOW
By JON HOPE

@ It’s a good thing authors don’t
put all their egos in one basket.

There’s a man in Manchester
who has destroyed a lot of com-
placency in booksy circles. He is
Charles Nowell, Librarian of Man-
chester public libaries. He order-
ed a census of the library public's
reading. Top of the poll comes
Dorothy L. Sayers (whose last
novel was published 14 years ago).
Census showed 685 copies of her
books in use, 109 on the shelves



THEY SLIDE

for small animals it would still
have been serving some useful
purpose but in the majority of
instances it is put to no use.

It is surprising what q small

well kept garden in the back
yard can do for the family table.
Yours

ECONOMY.

Second and third places fell to late
Sir Hugh Walpole (596 in use, 788
on the shelves); and Leslie (The
Saint) Charteris (582 in uge, 15
waiting for borrowers).

Runners-up; John Buchan,
Agatha Christie, Mazo de la Roche,
Howard Spring (426 out on loan,
23 on the shelves).

Fourteenth was Priestly; seven-
teenth, Daphne du Maurier.

Not placed were C. S. Fores‘er.
Graham Greene.

—L.E.S.















THURSDAY, NOVEMBER 1, 1951

NOW









IN STOCK ‘

PLANTATION & FACTORY
LABOUR SHEETS



Call







N

PNG SF ol

GOLDEN ARROW
FLOUR



NUTS PRUNES
BRANDY CURRANTS
CHERRIES SULTANAS
COOKING BUTTER
TABLE BUTTER
KIDNEY SUET



A FRESH SHIPMENT

“Bengalines ;
She Cast Includes:
Passion Blue
Dusky Rose
Old Gold
Feather Grey

A Da Costa

and Select Early from
ADVOCATE STATIONERY.








OF

JUST ARRIVED.

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For the
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PHONE GODDARD'S






ee

THURSDAY, NOVEMBER 1

Workers Should Repay

TO LABOUR WELFARE —

, 1951

FUND —says GODDARD

MR. FRED GODDARD told the electorate at St. Patrick,
Christ Church, on Monday night, that the Electors’ Associ-
ation feel that when a worker in the sugar industry borrows
money from the Labour Welfare Fund, he should only pay
back two-thirds of the lean as the money of the fund really

belongs to these workers.

Mr. Goddard who was speaking at a meeting of the Electors’
Association was referring to the part of his Party’s mani-
festo dealing with the Labour Welfare Fund.

The meeting was held in sup-
port of his candidature and that of
Mr, W. W. Reece for the parish of
Shrist Church at the forthcoming
General Election for the House of
Assembly. They are the present
members representing Christ
Church in the House.

Mr. Reece who spoke first, told
tis hearers that one of the first
things his Party had supported in
the present session of the House
cf Assembly was the extension of
the Barbados Scholarships from
«ne to five, one being for girls.
I{s and Mr. Goddard were among
those who had given this measure
suppgrt because they believed that
education Was a blessing which
every man was entitled to, no mat-
ter how humble his origin. An-
other thing they had supported
right up to the hilt. was the in-
crease of Old Age Pensions. As
they knew the amount per person
was now 7s. 6d. per week but be-
fore it was 5s. They had also
supported the reduction of the age
to 68 years, “and believe me,”
added Mr. Reece, “we are not go-
ing to be satisfied until it is redue-
ed to 65, because a man at the
age of 65 is generally worn out.-

“I will make every effort to
have this reduction brought about
if I am returned to the House.”

Tenantry Roads

Mr. Goddard and he had also
supported in 1948, the money
Resolution which appeared in the
estimates for $224,000 for the im-
provement of tenantry roads in
the island. Anyone who travelled
along these roads was aware of
the need for improvement. “I am
glad to say that the condition of
some of these roads has been im-
proved, but regret that there are
others still in a lamegtable state.”

Mr, Reece then went on to

refer to other progressive mea-
sures in the House which he and
Mr. Goddard had supported and
said that he was just doing that
“to give the lie to many false
rumours that they, and particu-
larly he, had done nothing for
the people of the island.” Such
a statement was utterly untrue,
he said. One of these measures
was the Teachers’ Pension Act.
Another was for the provision of
payment to “relief teachers.”
“And while on this”, said Mr.
Reece, “I think you will all
agree with me that it is almost
hopeless for the small number
of teachers in the schools to
cope -with the tremendous in-
crease of pupils.

“IT was speaking to a teacher a
short while ago and he told me
that it is impossible for him to
teach a class of 60, 70 or 80 boys.
I replied that it is not only im-
possible but the conditions under
which he is expected to teach are
even more impossible. ‘I cannot
understand how little children ever
learn anything nowadays’. —

“You must have read in the
Press a short while ago of the
severe criticism of our educational
system, on the grounds that the
pupils turned out from the ele-
mentary schools are not up to the
standard of former years, I do not
think this is any fault of the
teacher. I think it is due to two
or three things. Lack of trained
teachers, the very poor accommo-
dation and the conditions under
which pupils are being taught.
These conditions should be re-
moved.

Training College

“We know a teachers’ training
college has been established at
Erdiston but we also know that
it will take a large number of
years before the benefits of that
training college can reach our
children,”

In 1950, said Mr. Reece, Mr.
Goddard and he _ introduced in
the House, several Bills at the re-
quest of the Vestry of* Christ
Church. One of these Bills dealt
with the purchase of a_ refuse
collector, and the erection of
standposts in the parish. As a
result of that Bill no less than
ten standposts had been erected
in one year in the parish.

“Now can anybody say_ that
Fred Goddard and “Juby” Reece
have not been doing their best in
the interest of the parish in see-
ing that conditions are made bet-
ter for all?” questioned Mr.Reece.

He went on to speak of other
things Mr. Goddard and he had
done for the parish, and among
these mentioned Pao bag —
sui rted the esolution ‘or
$4'600 to build the Post Office;
the Resolution for the repairs to
the Foundation Boys’ School,
and that for the repairs to Provi-
dence School. “As long as I
live,” he said, “I shall always do
my utmost, inside and outside of
tne House, to forwad the interest
of the people of this island and
in particular of the parish of
Christ Church”. Mr. Reece then
asked the electorate to return
him to the House and promised
to continue to serve them to the
best of his ability.

More Standposts

Mr. Goddard told his listeners
that they had heard Mr. Reece



had spoken of what they had
done in the House. Ali that he
had said was true. Mr. Goddard
then spoke of the ten standposts
that had been erected in the par-
ish as a result of the Resolution
they had succeeded in getting
through the House and added.
“These are nothing to do with
three others which the Vestry of
which I am a member, has
erected.”

He could assure them that Mr.
Reece and he knew the needs of
the people.

In his position as a merchant in
Roebuck Street he came in con-
tact with all kinds of people
from all over the island and he
sought to know the condition of
these people.

“Iam really pleased that at
a time like this when I go
around canvassing from house
to house, I have the opportun-
ity to see the conditions under
which people live. Orfy yester-
day in this same district I went





into some houses, and it was
brought home to “more for-
cibly than ev

the people. A
talk about bac

amount given has not been

doubled, because I know the

money would be well spent.”

It was a shame, seid Mr. God-
dard, that in this age when
people were looking and thinking
of progress, some did not have
the means to buy the necessities
of life.

Social Legislation

“There is no social legislation
brought down to the House that
Mr: Reece and I will not vote for.

“I am going to do my best for
the people at all times and hav-
ing regard to the interest in the
people that has been shown by
Mr. Reece, the work he has done
during the session now coming to
an end, and his experience, I am
asking you to send him back with
me to the House. I can assure
you that we have every intention
of again doing good work in your
interest in the following session.”

Mr. Goddard referred to his
Party’s Manifesto and said that
if they could get half of the
things on it done during the next
five vears, good progress in the
country would have been made.

One of the important things
in it was in connection with the
Labour Welfare Fund, he said.
This fund. was raised through the
people who worked in the sugar
industry. The money was generally
lent to the workers to repair their
houses, but the Electors Associa-
tion felt that as the money be-..
longed to these people who put
it there, a borrower should only
pay back two-thirds of the money
he had borrowed and the remain-
ing third he should keep, We have
considered it, and we feel it is
economic, well-founded and can
be done, and I would like to see
it adopted by the Government in
power,”

The Unemployed

Mr. Goddard

went on to
say how very necessary it
was to find work for the
island’s unemployed, but that
the Government had done nothing
to find the means of employment.
They had not, until quite recently
sought to encourage new indus.
tries which would provide work,
nor had they tried to encourage
capital to do business in the island,
he said. “Unemployment is our
big problem,” he declared,

Concluding, he said: Vote for
both Mr, Reece and me on Election
Day, we stand for everything
constructive. Put us back together
and we will represent the people
as ever we have done in the past
and better.” /



Two Months For
Bodily Harm

JUSTICES. G.
H. A> Vaughan sitting in the
Court eal yesterday sen-
tenced Olyn Kirton of Sut-
tle Street, St. Michael, to two
months’ imprisonment with hard
labour for inflicting bodily harm
on Claude Beckles on June 9.

By doing this Their Honours

L. Taylor an?

‘confirmed the decision of Myr.
Cc. L. Walwyn, Police Magistrate
of District “A”. Kirton has

appealed to the Court of Error,

Mr. W. W. Reece K.C., Solicitor
General, associated with Mr.
B. Niles appeared on behalf of
the defendant while Sgt. King
prosecuted on behalf of the
Police.

Beckles told the court that on
June 6 some time in the afternoon
he was walking down Suttle
Street when he saw the defend-
ant. The defendant spoke to him
and there followed an argument
and the defendant threw some-
thing like ammonia in his face.
Some of this liquid got in his eye
which caused him to go the Gen-
eral Hospital for treatment.



HACK

HOME



MISS AUDREY MACINTYRE (left). who returned from
yesterday by the Golfito with her
Glindon Reed (centre) and Miss Pauline Manning shortly after land-
ing at the Baggage Warehouse. —See Carib Page 2.

Dowding Pledges
To Serve People

Neither of the “Labour canci-
datus fo: St. George could quote
from the minutes of the House of

Assembly meetings to show the
people that Mr. Dow?cing, Elec-
tors’ /.csoriati-n cancilet>, had

Spokti egainsi any measure that
would have benefited the people,
Mr, Dowding told © large crowd
of the electorate at Market Hill,
St. George, lasi night.

“I have served you well during
the last five veurs and wil! serve
you well agin,’ be said. “Any
ism which is not for the people
will have Dowdingism behind it
to erase it,”

“My bone against Socialists is
not their colour,” he said.

Another talked of a vision but
what the people wanted to hear
were the hard facts, employment,
wages, politics.

Mr. Dowding stressed that the
main difference between Labour
and Conservatives was the ques-
tion of state ownership as against
free enterprise.

Wherever they turned it was a
question of the masses. The real
diehard Tories were no more.
They had to realise that Capital
and Labour should go together,

On the question of the cost of
living, he said they sad to sell
sugar at a price the English gave
for it, On the other hand Barba-
dos had to pay whatever price the
English asked for machinery or
whatever it might be for factory
or for the people. The Labour
were not tackling that question
the right way. It was not forced
home that the people were suffer-
ing from unemployment,

“So long as I have voice I will
be strong in voicing your rights
as against the rights of the Eng-
lishmen, regardless of colour.”

He said that for the past five
years he had been representing
them and the defied any man to
say he ever did anything against
the community. He had been on
the Poor Law Board and knew
the people's needs. During the
five years he had been in politics
he had learnt much and was there
to help them.

Agricultural Wommunity

Mr. E. K. Walcott said that al-
though they did not seek to decry
their opponents they would show
them that they were incapable.

One of the four posts in the
Executive Committee was the Min-
ister of Agriculture. This com-
munity was naturally an agricul-
tural community. Everything that
they had was based on their sugar
and tihey had to have people in
the Executive Committee who
were conscious about agriculture,

“Today no member of the Exe-
cutive Committee is a planter or
has any intimate knowledge of
agriculture,” he said, “Therefore
our agricultural problems are not
well tackled,”

If the Electors’ Association were
put in power they could call upon

more than one member to be
Minister of Agriculture.
There was Mr. Ward or Mr.

Dowding who had the necessary
skill, ability and experience, They
Bhould consider all that and
should not be prejudiced by any
bogus idea of colour.

There were - Health problems,
and many other problems, but
none so importan: as the ‘agricul-
tural problem as far as Barbados
was concerned,

“We the Conservatives always
carry the brain and ability but
it has always been prejudice that
has worked against us,” he said.

“We have issued a manifesto,”
he said; “our political opponents
have not issued a manifesto. If
they have not issued a manifesto
and they fall down, they can say,
‘we made no promise,’”

When they got copies of the
Electors Association's manifesto
they would see that the main dif-
ference between Labour and them
were that Labour believed in na-
tionalisation whereas they be-
lieved in free enterprise... That
meant new industries, new indus-
tries meant more employment and
more employment meant more
wages.



‘‘Conkies’’ And “Blow Tots’? For Nov. 5

CONKIES the craze of the
average Barbadian on Guy Fawkes

In many of the City stores andRoman
Country

at some stores in the

candles, Jack-in-the-box,
Devil among the tailors, jet wheels,

Day, will probably enjoy the same districts, fireworks are on display sparkles and matches (green and

popularity this year.

ing up corn flour and have been
engaging banana and plantain

Little children and even men and
This can be judged by the num- women cannot resist stopping and
ber of people who have been stor- peering into the show windows

at the motley coloured fireworks
The stores have

leaves, which are two essentials good sales.

in the making of “coakies”. Day
after day, local flour mills have
been grinding bushels of corn.

fun on the day when Guy Fawkes

This year, new names have been
added to the list of fireworks while
most of the old ones have remained

Guy Fawkes Day is only five The cheapest of the fireworks--
days off. Everybody likes to have which the children will buy most

—are bombs and red devils

attempted to blow the English A Variety
Parliament “sky high” and so he Crackers, wheels, flower pot
prepares for it, dizzle dazzles, squibbs, rocket

been enjoying

red are in good supply in the
stores.
Some children, who cannot

withstand the temptation to “fire”
their fireworks, have already
started to have their fun, Others
have secufed cocoa tins and made

the familiar “blow tot” which
keeps as deafening a noise as a
bomb, With moist carbide inside
and a match flaming at a small
hole in the bottom of the covered
tins tots” provide lots of
fur the childrer
4

England
mother is seen chatting with Mra.

School For
Blind Opened

AT SANTA CRUZ

THE Barbados Association in
aid of the Blind and Deaf has
been informed that a schgol for
blind children has been opened
in Trinidad at Santa Cruz. The
Trinidad School is being run
under the auspices of the
Trinidad and Tobago Blind Wel-
fare Association, The Association
announces that it is in a position
to consider applications for the
admission of blind children from
other colonies when the term
opens after the Christmas Holi-
days.

Children who wisn to enter the
School should apart ‘from being
blind be otherwise physically nor-
mal and the proposal is that the
same general “education as is
available for sighted children
should be given together with
specialised training in Braille ahd
handicraf..

To be eligible for admission to
the School, a child should be be-
tween the ages of 6 and 18, (the
younger the better). It must be
medicaly fit and must be certified
by a medical officer as_ blind,
Children who suffer from physical
or mental disability in addition to
blindness cannot be considered
for admission.

Any parents or guardians who
are interested in sending a child
to the School should apply for
further particulars to the Social
Welfare Office, Garrison, St.
Michael.



Seismographic
Tests Continue
On East Coast

The vessel Sunshine R is still
working off the Ragged Point
coast, It is carrying out marine
seismographic tests for the Bar-
bados Gulf Oil Company. This
marine work is expected to con-
tinue throughout the year.

Dr. Auer told the Advocate
yesterday that the tests have
heen successful. They do _ not
prove whether there is oil or not
but they give some picture of
what the underground looks like
in order to choose likely drilling
sites.

He said that they had previous-
ly tried to carry out these tests
from. the and, but the island,
being so small, and owing to the
heavy charges that were needed,
they could not operate from the
land.

“We are going to concentrate
on the east coast for the next
month or two so as to try to
complete the work on that side
before the sea gets too rough.
When the sea is rough on that
side of the isiand, we will trans-
fer our work to the west coast,”
he said,

30’- For Wounding

POLICE Magistrate H. A, Talma
yesterday fined Joseph Morris
of Hothersal Turning, St. Michael,
30/- and 2/- costs to be paid in
14 days or one month’s imprison-
ment for wounding Caspar
Quintyne on October 13.

MISSIONARY GOES

TO OISTIN
MISSIONARY Sam Mathura
who arrived here three weeks ago
from Trinidad to give a series of
lectures locally is now carrying
his campaigning to Oistin, Christ
Church,







BARBADOS ADVOCATE



Two-Thirds Of Loan

enema pomnpaney

Revuedeville

_ Outstanding

By STAGE FAN

REVUEDEVILLE 1951, now
being staged under the dis-
tinguished patronege of Sir Wil-
liam and Lady Savage, at the
Empire Theatre by Mrs. Joyce
S uart and her dancing cla*s, can
be best summed up as “a show of
outstanding ability, technique ond
class.”

Associated with the c pacity
crowd which attended last night's
premiere was the high and sati--
factory standard of acting, The
troupe displayed their talent to ¢n
appreciative audience fully bent on
glossing over the amateurish mis-
takes— o my mind caused by stage
fright.

Not only was the cast wel!
selected, but there was grace and
poise in the movement of the
voung boys and girls. Fven the
little ‘ots performed reason biv
well, I share the view expressed
by the many who attended the
whow that it will be a bumper
success,

The stage decorations were of
tasty design. The cos umes good
and the scenes of a high standard.
The movement of limbs blended
with the rhythmic and exotic beat

of the “tom tom” drums in a
jungle dance,
Truly, this show provided the

audience with laughter, pleasure
and entertainment. It struck an
“all-time high” in Barbadian and
incidentally West Indian culture,
which has come to stay wi h us,

Ever too often have we rejected
these amateur shows. Ever too
often have we criticised the
sterling qualities end efforts made
by people in their attempt to hiring
about a definite conciousness of
our own culture,

And now to the show. It de-
picts the visit to the West Indies
of a group of American dancing
‘tudents during their summer
holidays. The s udents plan to
study West Indian culture, folk-
lore and creative dancing. Be-
cause of the expensive proposition
it is, they stage shows in each
island to defray costs of boarding,
lodging and travel.

The show opens with the
‘udents leaving their hometown
Chicago, by rail for Idaho. Much
of the acting in this opening scene
is America, Then, on arriving at
Seawell Airport, Barbados — the
first stop of the tour—the West
Indian life comes into the picture.
The story depicting West Indian
life, ig original. The local scenes,
native habits, music and costumes
provide fine entertainment.

The customs, culture and folk-
lore of each West Indian ‘island—
Trinidad, British Guiana and
Jamaica—are presen.eq with great
finesse and ease by the mixed
‘st. The work of Mrs, Stuart,
the producer, in getting the girls
and boys to grasp readily alien cul-
ture and folklore, stands out as
a testimonial of her versatili y end
stagecraft,

Stealing the show is the clown-
ing of Mr. Joseph Tudor, Junr.

beau iful singing of Miss Nell Hall 48

and the ballet dancing of the small

(Doreen Gibbs) and her subjects
in “Jungle Fantasy” were items
well received.

The laughter provided by Mr.
Tudor (Oscar) the
tumes, the acting, singing and
dancing of the troupe and the
music of the Barbados Police
Band under the baton of Capt
Cc. E. Raison, A.R.C.M., M.B.E
(by the kind permission of Colone)
R. Michelin) ring down the curtain
on a production which will remain
fresh in the minds of ell
who see it.

lovely cos-

those



B.C. Publications
On Show At
» “Wakefield”

AN exhibition of recent British
Council

Publications is now on
view at the British Council
“Wakefield”, Whitepark, and at

the Speightstown Branch Library

Among the publications shown
are the latest contribution to the
Series “The Arts in Britain” deal-
ing With Music, Drama and The
Novel from 1945—1950, and te
he series “The Year's Work’
which ¢over the achievements of
1950 in Music The Theatre, Liter-
uture and Films,

A selection of Supplements to
British Book News can also be
seen; these excellent little mono-
graphs, on famous British writers
afte published monthly and are
the work of well known critics:
‘he most recent are studies of
George Eliot, Osbert Sitwell and
Jane Austen,

girls, The male quartette and SPRPRGCOPODO PROVO GOOD
the performance of the :

9
Schoelboy’s
, 2
Inquiry
*
Adjourned
Further hearing in the inquiry
concerning the death of Edgehill
Drakes, a schoolboy of Welchman

Hall, St. Thomas, was yesterday
adjourned by Coroner C L

Wwaiwyn at the District “A”
Police Court until Tuesday, No-
vember 6.

Drakes died about 2 p.m. on

Sunday October 28 while on his
way w the General Hospital after
he was involved in an accident
with the motor car M-2749 owned
and driven by Clement Fields of
Richmond Gap, St. Michael, on
Welchmen Hall Road, St, Thomas.

Dr. A, S. Cato who performed
the post mortem examination on
October 29 about 1 p.m. said that
the body of the boy was identi-
fled to him by Gilbert Forde. The
apparent age of the boy was 14
and he ‘was dead for about 14
hours,

In his opinion death was due to
shock snd haemorrhage from the
injuries received,

Gilbert Forde said that he
went to the Public Mortuary and
identified the body of the de-
ceased to Dr, Cato at 12.30 p.m.
on October 29, The deceased was
his son,

Keeping Left

Michael Watson a 13-year-old
schoolboy of Welchman Hall, St.
Thomas, said that on October 28
about 1,30 p.m. he was riding a
bicycle along Welchman Hall
Road. He was going in the direc-
tion of the country on the left
side of the road. Drakes, the de-
ceased was also riding’ with him

and they were riding about three | ¢

feet from the*left gutter, Both of
them were riding at a moderate
rate of speed, While riding he
heard a car horn and pulled in
more to the left side of the road.
He hoard a car end then saw the

deceased “in the air’. After this
he did not stop for he was afraid.
When he heard the car horn

he looked up and saw the car
about 60 feet away coming to-
wards them, When the car passed
he heard the brakes of the motor
car applied,

The motor car was
at a fast rate of speed.

To the Jury: Watson said that
the deceased wes not riding with
his head down,

travelling



Fr. Lane Appointed
Curate Of Cathedral

AT a meeting of the Appoint-
ments Board yesterday, the Rev.
Harold Lane, Vicar of St. Mar-
tins, was unanimously appointed
to the curacy of St, Michael's
Cathedral,

Before going to St. Martins,
Father Lane worked at All Souls.
He will take up his new duties
as from December 1,

J’ca Relief Raffle

THE winner the electric
lamp which was raffled yester-
day in aid of the Mayorsof King-
ston (Jamaica) Hurricane Relief
Fund was holder of ticket No,



of

The raffle realized $55.72.

%
.

; PAIN’S |

BRUCE WEATHERHEAD

ss LT) = Head of Broad Street >>
‘,

x AAAAIA FCA LAAA DAIS AFA OS

COO cod

CELEBRATED
FIREWORKS

The Largest Assortment in

town is at - - -

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Jack - in - the - Box, Devil g
Among _ the Tailors, Jet %
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»

Prives: 4c., 8c.. 12¢., Ic, x
24c., 36c., 60c., 72".,

$1.08, $1.44, $1.80. %

$1.92, $2.64, $8.35 %

and $4.32. %

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BOMBS . ys 2c. each %
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HONG

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PAGE FIVE









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WIN AN EKCO RADIO

HOW MANY Sciuws
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ENE EET IE DE OLN ELE PRLS LEAR EEL EEE EEE





GUESS COUPON WITH EVERY
FROM NOVEMBER IST
A. BARNES & CO., LTD.


PAGE SIX BARBADOS





BY CARL ANDERSON

HENRE =:



“CKEY MOUSE

/ NONSENSE! ONE } J TUT TUT, BLACK BRIAN..
\ LITTLE OPERATION 11 SQuU ASKED
) \.nANO HELL NENER| |] FoR rr: _)
/ AVE TO OO ANY
\ THEMIS AGAIN!

NOW YOu SHALL HANE TO BE PUT
) | AWAY INTO A BOTTLE WITH ALL THE
GHOSTS!

I OON'T THINK
YOu SHOULD DO,
res TOMS
FRIEND MICKEY /

| | OTHER OSOBEDIENT

"C IT'S ALEXANDER : L
SOME OF HIS FRIENDS
PLAYING OUT THERE

"HE Great Scorr!
WHAT'S ALL THAT

BY FRANK STRIKER

NO. BUT WITH YOUR HELP, ONE MORE WS

GARG MAY BE TRAPPED. WILL YOU DOAS!

SAY, WITHOUT pela MY SOURCE

OF INFORMATION ? yr > f
A)

| YOURE WILLING TO PACE GREAT

DANGEI2 YOU MIGHT CATCH AN

IMPORTANT MEMBER OF TWE
GANG REDHANDED/

A i UNFORTUNATELY, THE JEWELRY YOU
& 3 RECOVERED WAS OF UTTLE VALUE,
€ TO TELL WHERE WE _Ae7 THAT THe rr VALUABLE OF THE THINGS
BATES WAS] | STOLEN BY THAT GANG- HAVE NOT

BEEN RECOVERED. emma}













| WELL... THAT MiGs TOOK
CARE OF ONE SHIELD,/ AND










NO “BLITS"- YOUR LOw-
BROW FRIENDS WILL
HAVE TO GET ALONG









I WANTED TOD
| TAKE YOU NIGHT-
CLUBBING TO
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, 'VE GOT A LITTLE SURPRISE
| FOR MAGGIE -I CAN'T WAIT
TO TH. HER -
5 eer

on






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PTHURSDAY, NOVEMBER 1, 1951











ADVERTISE
IN
THE
EVENING
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e
Mounting Circulation
Every Week
e
HEIR good looks tell you they're just right. | for Manne. iat
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the John White etn Sites dee | ADVOCATE

Advertising Department

LIGHTNING
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which means ‘ just right’! Look for it in 4
leading stores in Barbados.













4 Geek She.

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YOUR ENQUIRIES INVITED!

COURTESY
GARAGE

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—AGENTS—

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SS =
SPECIAL offers to all Cash and Credit Customers for Thursday to Saturday only



USUALLY NOW
Pkgs. Jacob Cream Crackers 49 33

USUALLY NOW

Tins Grapefruit AA

Pkgs. Polar Icing Sugar 37 44 ~=Bottles Dows Stout 21

Tins Succotash 34 +40 ~=Bottles Frontenac Beer 21

. V. SCOTT & Co. Ltd. Broad Street




LOT IN TOWN
| NMAS
TREE

| DECORATIONS



| ADVOCATE STATIONERY

ee a I ~ SS me
t SSS

===” TPE ——— SBF CG SEES — SSS.

SS
SSS

{

a i ttl eta i ta eli a tt
THURSDAY, NOVEMBER 1, 1951

CLASSIFIED ADS, rumic sats

TELEPHONE 2508. REAL ESTATE :

BARBADOS ADVOCATE

PUBLIC NOTICES | J’ca Grants Mining |
Ten cents per agate fine on week-day’ Licence To U.S.

| Gnd 12 cents per agate © *« on Sundays



PAGE SEVEN’

SHIPPING NOTICES





zinc, copper and silver for which
the capitalist will prospect in two
areas of the island.

These areas are considered ideal



——— ee





























































































































an THE UNDERSIGNED will offer for Sal Gnd #185 on Suntave oa ° ° a a ena nb 2 savied, = | “Oikvane tine, “Limite i SS
wi rv for Sale tali other ores, and it is reported tha ZEALAND LINE, D
The charge for announcements of . at Public competition at their office, N Ca iI ‘ ~ j
Burts Marriages, Deaths, aoes| FOR SALE 17 High | Street, Bridgetown, on Friday P st ae study — Tyree Eo See :
ements, and 'n Memoriam notices 1s the 2nd day of November, 1951, at 2 p.m. a ere may even go. ere. S.S. “POxtf ADELAIDE” is schedulec
$1 50 on week-days and $1.80 on Sundays Minimum charge week 72 cents and The Two-storied Dwellinghouse ieee | NOTICE Germ Car Ree’ Corvengantene . to sail ad fobert Sopeanioer 25th,
for ed number ce words ee to 50, and ba or ow EA words —~ over 24 ee “CONISTON” with the land whereon PARISH OF ST JOSEPH KINGSTON, J’ca., Oct. 23. Melbourne October 4th, Sydney October Ci Gle T tl ti
cents per word on week-days and cents a w week—4 cents aj the same Stands and thereto belonging, 10th, Gladstone October 16th, Port Alma qu
Se ee week vag De Deed eeek ce Pome contain Be edn eee: | p Wil those, persoliorting Tyres to. the Following upon the announce-||] yew sazeMENT— Jem, Giedetene Ocreber 16m, Fart Sime ie ransatiantique
edditiona! war? feet or thereabouts, situate at 10th Ave-| without delay vr ment that the Jamaica Government arriving at Trinidad about November
cocked aie nue Belleville. St. Michael. : A. T. cane renee a concession to a Ca-!||] GAS COOKERS #ist and Barbados November 2th. seeeseee
‘ nspection by appointment w rs. Parochial Treasarer, |Nadian firm for oil mining hts " In addition to general cargo this
LYTE — On 2ist October, 1951, Rosalie AUTOMOTIVE Myo further’ paruoutene Sly Meeaptian St. "Joneph. Jin Jamaica comes the announces — eee ee eee ie Ee oe
Lyte, late Retired ‘Héad-Teacher of | =e M Fge ol agpaea 8 | 28.10.51—An ment that the Government has) ALL SOLD een Oren! supe tite ot ENGLAND & FRANCE
ifton i is’ ichool. The ne 14—6 Vauxha’ Engine C LE. <
Suanevat> ‘leaves.’ Gar take. radidanon became, 6 rebeonahie oll’ tallaneh COTTLE, CASTOR: ad, granted a licence to a United’ }] can and see them at your Gas Lading for transhipment at Trinidad to “GASCOGNE” Nov a
“Palmolone”, Upper Wilson Hill, St.|E) A, Goddard, Swans or Dial 8615, a7 aaa NOTICE States capitalist for mining, (opera) Showroom, Bay Street, and to pe Guiana, Leeward and Windward 3rd, 1951, via St. Lucia,
SP SS cee Sis cranes [nC at.10-81—an “one PARISH OF ST. 30sErH [tions in the island, Se ee BOK are ||| for further particulars apply-— Unique, Guedaloupe Od
Parish Cemetery. Friends are in- CAR—Dodge Car 1948 Model, owner aoe verre will offer for Sale at Applications will be received by the The inerals £ hic! shipment. FURNESS, W Y & CO. LFD., anc Antigua,
vited. Griven, mileage 15,000 miles, perfect} tie jompetition at their office, No. | undersigned up to 15th November, 1951 minerals tor which the li- DaCOSTA & CO. LTD., * *
Senmelicie Lyte, Biss Groventicr Olive (condition. Dis) een. 310.518. | be, gh Street Bridgetown, on Thurs- | for the post of Assessor for the Parish of }cence has been granted are lead,‘ Trinidad, Barbados, COLOMBIE” 24th Novem-
Beckles (Sisters), Heen Davis (Niece). =a the 8th day of November, 1951 at 2 ag Foe a on oe . B.W.I. B.W.I ber, 1951, via Martinique and
11151.) CAR: 1951 Citroen. Almost new— “ . Sart ae te Sues ot US. 20 Dae LESSSOSOS SOPPEOSPOOSOS wuadg
3,000 miles. Owner leaving the Island whe | Cottage ne ona TWh ag morth, C.L. Bonus included. , Cuateeupe.
IN MEMORIAM Write Box H.H. c/o Adyocate a enue, Strathclyde, contain-| ‘The successful Candidate will be on one The M/V “C. L. M. “TANNIS” sboseses
14.10.51—t3.n ng Drawing and Dining Rooms, 2 Bed-| (1 year’s probation, and must assume will accept Cargo and Passengers SOUTH IND
= re eat atin pr as ee ee a peel vor a % the Ist Sanaey, ne for Grenada, sailing Thursday. ° BOU

? ¢ f CAR—1951 Morris Minor Saloon, only . ‘ anvassing might invalidate any 25th inst. ~ COLOMBIE 13th November, ((
ceuet dice meaner Me ne memory of |2.900 miles. $1800. Owner leaving the] Nitch ts’ fully eusioeed. | Candiaate So ial The M/V “DABRWOOD" will 1951, calling at ‘Trinidad, La

rs rene Cumber- |isiand. Ph 1 —2n. : : . eecep' and Passe’ ¥

batch, who fell asleep in Jesus om | onus Pnone S523. 111-5120} "Inspection on application to R. A. Cor- Clerk, St. Joseph Vestry. st Lestat arene oot lovee, Guaira, Curacao, Cartagena,

November Ist 1945 CAR—1947 Ford V-8 Special De Luxe! PD, Genera! Traders Ttd. 28,10 51—4n and” Passengers only for St Jamaica.

Day by day the voice saith, “come, | perfect condition. Formerly L.117. No COTTLE. CATFORD "a "0 vo oH Laem Vincent, sailing Tuesday, 30th
Enter thine enternal home” reasonable offer refused. Phone 91-69. ] 9) 19 51 &Co. NOTICE inst. ae
a = can pare, | 30.10.51—3n. én. ene oo las sie The M/V “CARWBEE” will
summons there ' otice is ered: ven at neither » rs i
cane Sis amen ax a en eee WULMAN STATION WAGGON esi! ,,Th€ undersigned will offer for sale at | the Master nor the agents of the M.V. ee ee ne icanlescat, Somenes Passengers, Cargo
We should cry, “spare this blow”! | mileage 5,000. New Price $2,700.00 will} }, uw) Campetition at their office, No. CHARLES A. MACLEAN now in port Nevis and St. Kitts, — sailing and Mail.
Yes with streaming tears should pray, | accept $2,350.00. For inspection apply | + ie » Bridgetown, on Friday. | will be responsible for any debt or debts Friday, 2nd November 1951. ;
Lord we love her let her stay | Ralph A.” Beard, Lower Bay Street. he 16th day of November, 1951, at 2/ contracted by any member or members We: OWNERS’ R. M. JONES & Co
Ever to be remembered by— 30.10.51—3n | PD of the crew of said vessel while in port. B. SCHOONER 3 "
Adilith Skeete (daughter, U.S.A.\,]- The messuage or dwelling-house known Capt, D DOUCETTE, ASSOCIATION (INC.) Ltd.—Agents
Arlington King (son), Dudley Browne LORRY—One Federal lorry in working . reas HALL, standing on 2 (Master) Consignee, Telephone No. 4017 -—Age -
bs er 111St—In. | order. Price $500.00. Apply Manager! \cced “Situste ‘near ‘Top’ jock, Chri ee tAdeuter
—_! > '
GOVERNMENT NOTICE eee. aeeeeren {cr rear an cemnnnee of the late Mrs. | 31 10,51—3n gents ‘ teee, ee
' PICK-UP: (1) Austin 40 Pick-Up 1960 : serena cre
Model Almost new. Dial 91-39. ieee tame iee nia tecieehate NOTICE
1.11.51—6n 3 Bedrooms, Tollet and bath, Kitchen, .
Postmaster—Welches Road Branch Pantry Garage and Servants Rooms. PARISH OF ST. GRORGE ‘
suas Inspection on Tuesdays and Thursdars Will those persons owing Taxes to the
Post Office ELECTRiCAL only, between the hours of 4 p.m. and cae ad George, please pay same -
i as ——_ 6 p.m. a)

Applications are invited for the| RADIO—G.E.C. 10 Tube, in good} For further particulars and conditions D. H. A. JOHNSON, OUTWARD FROM THE UNITED KINGDOM
vacant office of Postmaster,| condition, Phone 2285 {ot sale, apply to— ct ees Treasurer, St. George. :
Welches Road Branch Post Office, Re eT a ake ne he eihiads Due
+. & oe REFRIGERATOR: One (1) 5 Cubit ft. | on soit aiden NOTICE Vessel From Leaves Barbados

intment will be made sub-| Westinghouse Refrigerator in good. } ‘“BOSVIGO HOUSE”, Eagle Hall Road, a Z »
seat to. the selected candidate be-| Working order. Apply: P. D. Maynard, ;St. Michael, with 4 Acres or thereabouts | .,7"¢ Parochial Treasurers OMce | of SS. “STATESMAN” - London 15th Octt ist Nov.
is ¥ on'3 1 St. George will be kept ot the “Rosary a % by
. Porters Factory, St. James. Dial 2319 and; all enclosed S.S. “STUDENT Liverpool 28th Oct. 11th Nov
ii ed edicall. (next to the Post Office) as from Tues- o por , :
ng pass as medically fit for 27.10.51—6n | THE DWELLINGHOUSE contains, oe 8.5. “LINARIA” Lond 3st Oct Oth N
employment in the Publie Service Open Verandahs, Enclosed Gallery, Draw- | 4%” the 13th November 1951, = Office G4 ” {Seno Sek. & es
, 4 ,
A : ing and Dining Rooms, 3 Bedeooms, one | Hours 10 a.m to 2 p.m. Tuesday, Wed- S.S. “PLANTER ..« London 17th Nov. 30th Nov.
and will be on. two year’s proba~ MECHANICAL very large, Toilet and Bath, Large Kitchen | "@84@¥s, Thursdays S.S. “TRADER” . Glasgow &
tion. The minimum educational | —-———_—--_—_ Pantry, Storé-room ete. and Cellars D. H. A. JOHNSON, Liverpool 24th Nov. 9th Dec
standard which will be accepted | ,,MACHINE: | Singer Sewings mobile | The Government Water as well a9] 14) 51 9 Parochial Trapmirer Shree iosencny acirataniia ath aitaeseliitadalatoasivepeet siccsieono i =
is a pass in the Cambridge Local|5, x 3° complete with Snooker Balls, ebay Di igerd Tales Nae wiaataaer dl Eo HOMEWARD FOR THE UNITED KINGDOM
School Certificate or a_ similar | Cues etc. Phone 4682 aa. ain Garage for 2 Cars, and Servants’ rooms. Closes in
examination of equivalent stand- . _A portion of the land is planted in| LOST & FOUND Vessel For Barbados
li MACHINE: Singer Sewing Machine,| Cocoanut Trees, Guava trees. Mango
ard. Applicants should be between | practically new, with Electric Motor trees, Golden Apple trees, and Breadfruit S.S. “TRIBESMAN” Lond 3rd N
tthe ages of 21 and 30 years... .. tee Lee: 7 ous Electric Motor $200.00) trees and another portion of land planted ven geen Tk eee e HOt ISE SPO I Ss beeen + een pe - evs ndliinditinn’
The salary attached Ff the Post; oear aed ee & ae in Guinea, Elephant and Sour Grass. a 7

LOST

OFFERS iN WRITING will be received
by the undersigned up to Tuesday the
14th day of November, at 4 p.m. The
vendor does not bind herself to accept

is at the rate of $1,056 x 72—
$1,775 (E.B.) x 96—$2,160 per
annum and will be subject to de-







For further Information apply to . . .

WHITE WwooL MAN'S CARDIGAN—
Return E. A. Benjamin, Plantations







TYPEWRITER—One Underwood Porta-
ble Typewriter, Excellent condition.
Holder Bros., Swan Street.



duction under the Widows’ and
Orphans’ Pension Act, 1928
(1928-3) at the rate of 4% per
annum, Further particulars may
be obtained from the Colonial
Postmaster.

Applications should be made on
forms obtainable from the Colon-
ial Secretary's Office and mus!
be returned not later than the
15th of November, 1951.

28.10. 51—2n



30.10.51—t.f.n

MISCELLANEOUS

BED TICKING — in five beautiful
stripped designs 51”—52” wide, usualhy







$1.25 yard, reduced for one week only
to $1.19 yard. Kirpalani, 52 Swan
Street ‘ 1.11.51—1n





BOARDS—tTwo large wooden advertis-
ing’ Bign Boards: Approximately 20 ft. x
12 ft, Purehaser must remove same.

One Sign Board is located at ‘“Welches”
—-St. Michael—the other at Oistins, near
Plaza Theatre. CITY GARAGE TRADING

—

application

ph

of

1

the highest, or any offer

Inspecton any day except Sundays on
to Mrs. Hanschell, Tele-
hone No. 2260

For further particulars and conditions

sale, apely to~—

CATFORD & CO.
i1,.51—Tn



No. 17, High Street,
PERSONAL



Bridgetown
This serves to inform the public that

Building,







at
THE BARBADOS AQUATIC

SATURDAY, Nov. 3, 9 pm. };
Music by

Phone 3123. Reward
1.11, 51-—2n

DANCE

or





CLUB
(Members Only)
on

RENDEZVOUS HILL

AVERAGE AREA 60 x 80

AND PRICED
$1,000 to $1,700






The Desig and Shades of our recent shipment of

PLASTIC CLOTH

for Curtains are simply GORGEOUS.
Come, Have A Look For Yourself.

THE CENTRAL EMPORIUM

Onr, BROAD & TUDOR STREETS.









. 1 have not heard of the whereabouts .
NOTICE TO MARINERS = | ©2” PTD», Victoria St.) fof my husband RUPERT HAREWOOD ||] Mr. C. CURWEN’S Orchestra aed asnorabnbanbsitilbney 2
“,of Redland, St. George, for the past Members are cordially



UNIVERSITY COLLEGE OF
THE WEST INDIES.

“PEZLA" Wax | 20 wears and it is my intention to re-

tipped Cigarette Leaves at 6c. Pk. of 50 marry in the near future
See us for Wholesale Prices. MILLICENT HAREWOOD,

One Dan buoy with flag top ‘CIGARETTE LEAVES:

mark has been placed in position



invited.
Free Admission to Ballroom

A. BARNES & Co,, Ltd.





















kK. J. HAMBL-SMITH













ones feos a, north | Weatherhead 44, 31.10.91—-2n Clevers Hill, Extra-Mural Department

ongitu § Ss | —————— er: A COURSE OF FOUR

Explosives charges will be fired| DIABETIC CHOCOLATE — Made ay ee oe i nhehibaiin LECTURES e
in th icinity of this buoy dur- especial\y for those who must eat a 1 Digi RAPTOR Um MG Srith Peete Mote le Ly oar;

in e ie It) - Piet restricted sweet diet. 4 oz Bars. Knight's ae Pure ie ore nena aa ke aed - on -

ing daylight hours for_seismogra-| ita 1.11,61--tu | gentle thas 1 am, ne henger ronpeurene Lae: This OUT for Reference. Contes a are e NOT available DRAMATICS

phic observations. Shipping is sd for any debt or debts contracted by my







NA! ‘e MAUDRIF CLARADINE YEAR-

quantity at 45c. per

1S--Galvanizec nai a limited
b, ‘Beanice Auto

Tere Company, Trafalgar Street. Phone

warned to keep clear. This notice

WOOD itnee Wiltthire) or anyone else
eancels our notice of 19th Septem-

except by a written order signed by me.

Beginning Monday, Nov. 5th Office, Corner of Trafal-

at The POST OFFICE







- at - é
ber, 1951, 2698. ee eee CLIFTON YEARWOOD, | Tee Pee gar and Bridge Streets:
eee rownas ae, POST OFFICE NOTICE as
fe
ac re RRR EC ton Leh Satie inflatens tion cadeed by visas 1.11,51—2n . at 8.15 p.m Upstairs Dominica
—_——— ee 88 Pox, ini ws si—2n. The public are hereby warned against Nov. 5 British Drama

giving credit to my wife SYLVIA







AIR MAILS

Effective 1st November, 1951 AIR MAILS will be closed at the General Post Office as follows :—

R, LeFanu, B.A.

Nov, 12 Stage Production
C. A. Gross-Smith, M.A

Handicrafts
WATERMAN (nee HEADLEY) as I do

not hold myself responsible for her or
anyone else contracting any debt or debts
in my name unless by a written order

SHAMPOO; “Nucta” “SNueta” Oil Sha Shampoo.
Fresh stock at Bruce Weatherhead, Ltd.
31,10. 51—2n



REAL ESTATE


















































































































7s ; . | Signed bj ‘ Cancelling previous Schedules Nov. 19 Make Up
tect. Sndton. hie fe, Mee ares signed ONS URALE. WATERMAN, é * - ) F, A. Collymore
Porters Factory, St. James, Dial 2319. Pine DENCH ne greet Met see ve a - Nov. 26. Elocution DIAL 4748
JOH eae : Bees | Fldiaie wn DESTINATION TIME DAY DESTINATION TIME DAY Mrs. R. Bynoe, B.A.
URODONAL—For Arthritism, Rheuma-
tism, youre eee Peek Seep ee a delle » dade.
Fresh St a ruce Weatherhead, ‘ .
4 e ea M1, 10, She DANCE Africa .. se =| 2.00 p.m. Monday Haiti .. vi fas a.m, Monde
11.45 a.m, riday A5 a.m, ur:
To be held at
! W. ‘ .M. P.C. Antigua 2.00 p.m. | Wednesday Hawaii .. 2.00 p.m. | Monday
B L A D 0 ~. ANTED : scrd e 9.00 am. | Saturday 11.45 am, | Friday
nT os SATURDAY NIGHT
HE Aruba 2.00 p.m. | Monda Hong Kong 9.00 a.m, |Monda
& Co. iipite le cickinenist LP AN PE 8rd Nov., 1951, at 8 p.m. 11.45 a.m. | Thur: 11.45 am. | Thur
GARDENER — Strong willing young Admission by Ticket— 0
V.A. man 18 to 22 as handy man and second $1.00 each Australia 9.00 a.m. | Mond India... oe ..| 2.00 p.m. | Monday
A.F.S., F.V. kardener. Steady job. Sleep in or out. baits ay” (all air) 11.45 am. | Thursday 11.45 am. | Friday
poly: Box 1.8.8. c/o Advocate. Mr. Hoppie Jordan's, Orch. ee Ve di de Wedniiday Indonesia 2,00 p.m. | Monday :
Reece tren nastny reset aaneee n. ustralia " mm. 2 ve at mM, i
FOR SALE Ranetes Comagntfageirg, so fst (air to Panama only) |'9,00 a.m. | Saturday 11.45 am. | Friday Passengers holding reservations on
ey gh Mg al bt Sa ae Rial
Shorthand a Yrpewriting is CS8eNUAl | se OOOO GOSD maica . * m,
together with sufficient experience and Bahamas 2.00 p.m. | Monday a
shi nigra chen High Sala’pais| 'DO YOUR SHOPPING 1145 Am. | Priday 2.00 pm. | Wednesday or after 31st October»,951, are
“LEETON ON SEA", Near Oistins. to successful applicant. Apply with Testi- IN COMFORT AT J 9.00 a.m, | Monda
An attractive fully furnished, sea- : : , | Bermuda we .. | 2.00 p.m. | Monday apan f
cide "bungalow built right on 9 monials to Box C.C., c/o Advotate. Co. The Ml { i Gift Sh 2.30 p.m. | Friday 11.45 am. | Thur: kindly asked to contact.our Office
faculties. There is a ae ae MISCELLANEOUS C ay ar Op Aas 2.00 p.m Monday Malaya 2.00 p.m. }Monday di ‘ f
who! = > . . 0 .
org Cg Re Beant oe) pavnane see : oe et es regarding time and days o
ane? rer : eee ee where you will find an attractive 11.45 am. | Wednesday Re
with cocktail bar, kitchen, garake jj) Apply to the Manhattan Cutting ful and original % 9.00 a.m. da Martinique 45 a.m, ‘ :
were Spo nasa: an] SUES inciualng ners, “mer Pr: Guiana 8.00 am. | Friday, : 9.00 am. Saturday departure of their flights due to
BUILDING LAND St. James i ’ . “es Cards and Decorations. . ae dina . ee
Coast— A ally | AtTaT Ye WANTED TO RENT i ss 2,00 p.m. | Monda Mauritius ort a ; * nn
Sot ta “oper diapacre rooming rotng man (white) Re-Opening Friday tnd Nov Br. Honduras p onday 11.45 am. | Friday change of schedule. v= ne
i ram requires unfu! ‘001 ne meals. . _ nas >
“Available a aoreorer vated Apply: Advocate ‘Advertising Dept. E.M. po tents oes a Burma ie phi you Mexico 9.00 a.m. |Monday eee
half to over acres Se dae bale 30,10,51—3n. days Fridays & Saturdays me 11.45 a.m, Thursday , “era
on te eee ‘LIQUOR LICENSE NOTICE PSOOOOS SO SOSS Canada . 00 p.m, | Monday 2.00 Wednesd BRITISH WEST INDI AN AIRW AYS 3
.00 p.m, nesday
“STRATHMORE, Culloden Rd The application of Gardiner Rice of (via Trinidad) 5 a a . 9.00 am. |Saturday I \
A spacious 2-storey stone house Welchman Hal, St. Thomas, for per- ite " —— (Via nt gua) i
wala Arcata scam {fut cyt Sei erenantatacs| | TO-DAY'S NEWS FLASH ff /conaas .. eee Zealand 8.90 aim. | Monday LTD
alle: a » a sho . Anh,
er see room, 6 Decrees situated at Welchman ‘Hall, St. “Thomas. eect (via Bermuda) sa 7 ay **111.45 am, |Thursday .
kitchen, pantry oreroo * ated this 29th day of October, 1951 STOP WA
Weil ded at To J. R. EDWARDS, A Canal Zone 11.45 a.m. | Wednésday i
the’ greatly “reduced price now ‘Police Magisirate,. Dist” “D hia es ss Oe , 9.00 a.m. | woamine New Sostend sans e es wean Lower Broad St. _ Phone 4585
asked. ARDINER . KIE (air to Panama on y : mM,
E Applicant The Best made. ri 9.00 a.m Neer SS SS ~ .
“SILVERTON", Cheapside— N.B.—This application will be con- at Central America : ‘m. | Monda: 2.00 p.m. |Monday ~ ooeeede — oe nae
od 2-storey st house idered at a Licensing Court to be heid except Cana! Zone) 11.45 am. | Thursda Palestine PRSPOOOOH oer
Schenaes ts “appor. , Me piaid at Police ‘Court. District “> on Monday JOHNSON’S STATIONERY SarPOr con r | 11.45 am, Friday
planted with fruit trees the 1 lay oO ovember, » at il Ceylon .. ee L , p.m. | Monday 9
bed s, 2 galleries, lock, a.m. : ar .00 am. |Monday
Ses pameons jee: COT ee. oe BOARS, PRESS BUTTONS - 11.45 a.m. | Friday Philippines STs sae’ Veeaeadas E
trally located and suitable for Police Magistrate, Dist. “D” Fitted to your Bag or Purse |
conversion into flats or boarding 1.11,51—In WHILE YOU WAIT. China .. ee ‘ 1 oor p.m. | Monday oudhin’ tl 2.00 p.m. {Wednesday
ae WARE 11.45 a.m. | Friday uerto Rico ' one a net
“COOLMORE:” Pine Hill — JOHNSON'S HARD * | 9,00 am. !Saturdey t
a i
Modern Bungalow conetrvcte . BE WISE eee ADVERTISE Cuba .. oS «| 9.00 a.m. | Monda: “ 9.00 a.m, |Monda
heavy asbestos roof. There is # 11.45 a.m. | Thur - Croix, Vilas 11.45 am. | THur b e f Cc h t
large Tahaped living, Teomein Al ae be iy We beg to inform our Customers that our
hi try, ser- Curacao we . 00 Q.m. onda : 2.00 p.m, | Wednesday
Pere eichen, bathroom with { 11.45 am. Thursday St. Kitts *) 9.00 ont Saturday HARDWARE DEPARTMENT ill be closed for
tub ape iat ee Seer beating ak tose Sa j | N wi e close -
» arage a 2 - ok i _m. oo y ee
ints rooms, The grounds of Dominica ' . Reb use St. Lucia | 72 ee | Serardsy § .
about % an acre are heavily |], 8 4 9.00 a.m. | Monday | 9.00 a.m. a . : am
wooded with Mahogany and Flam- | | Dom. Republic ¥3 00 am. |] % >
boyant trees and the lawns and 11.45 a.m. | Thurs: ay 9.00 a.m. Monday - a.
stone flagged terrace are in a se- | | St. Thomas, Vi. 11.45 am. | Thursday
cluded walled garden. Attractive Dutch Guiana 9.00 a.m. | Monday |
location close to town. \ ute! u + 11.45 a.m. | Wednesday | 4 Snare: | phursday
“WINDY WILLOWS", St. James | St. Vincent 900 am. | Saturday =
on Delightful bungalow — open veran commanding ma: } ae “sy re ob a.m. id
of beck tare fae, aes | |Friday | south Amerie _..|,89 am. [Monday â„¢
rooms, verandahs, kitchen, pantry | Fiji hs = tured | (except Venezuela) : m,
is" rooms Storeroo | 49 a.m. r r
a hesenant Offers considered hursday Tortola 5 wa eee ;
: | § m, ‘ Antigua) . mat Z "
ee gp Ry gy op |Fr, Guiana oS Son | Monday sia ' Our Lumber Yard, Office and Sugar Store will .
AOE teas oacine eat: oh } pie Som, Pauley | Trinidad 9.00 a.m. | Monday . 3
s route da oonly 2 miles from } 1 8. a.m. uesday
owe. ead DIESEL W HEEL TRACTOR Gt. Britain i‘ ae or [mone 11.45 a.m. Wednesday be opened for business as usual
EXPECTED SHORTLY | o Friday ,
| 9.00 am. | Saturday : ing} .,
REAL ESTATE AGENTS | 15 — 20 — 25 — 35 h.p. Models | Grenada 9.00 8 ei | Monday } Kindly arrange your business accordingly. , .
. 2.00 p.m. | Friday sd ¥,
| Half Tracks also available USA 2.00 p.m. | Wednesday 8
AUCTIONEERS and ” 9.00 a.m. | Saturday Te 2.30 pam. | Friday e :
, | Guadeloupe 11.45 a.m. | Wednesday | : S:
SURVEYORS Built by experienced German Diesel Engineers | : Cmnenisie | 2.00 p.m, | enaeay g ;
+ ;, . ae 2.00 p.m. iday é x
sacaaipinelcgngaac | i, KER — PLANTATIONS LTD
| J. G. KIRTON, Jnr. , To ee : > “ * x
“ ” | Registered mail is closed an hour before ordinary mail.
a | The Grange”, 6. Philip \ |General Post Office r = ? rm R. A. CLARKE, v
= OL sanevenieals 30th October, 1951 Colonial Postmaster 0004 CCOOUCCGVGOC OOO SOOO OOOO OSS OCS SSS OOO GOSS SOSS
'
A


PAGE EIGHT

West Indies



BARBADOS ADVOCATE



Fail To Foree Win



Valentine Spins
| Out Batsmen

_ By HAROLD DALE

SYDNEY, Oct. 31.

; For the third time in successive innings Alfred Valentine
took five wickets when Goddard declared at his overnight
total at Townsville and sent Queensland Country to bat. On
the dusty wicket that had developed several worn spots
Valentine’s leg spinners were virtually unplayable and
Goddard used six other bowlers just to save the country side

| WEIGHTLIFTERS

AND

COACH



from complete extinction.

Only one batsman, Donald Watt,
former state re, showed any
confidence and his 51 was nicely
put together. He top-scored in the
second innings when the Country
XI batted out time. Wilfred Fer~
guson very nearly won the match
outright by taking two wickets
with the first two balls of the
Jast over but Lonsdale managed
to hold out to the end.

These “country games, of no
importance in themselves, shave
given tourists some good match
practice, but strangely enough
they are belyin,
reputation with loose work that
will no doubt tighten up when
serious cricket begins.

WEST INI IES—ist Innings 460 for 5 deel.
QUEENSLAND COUNTY—ist Innings

A. Millard ¢ Ferguson b Jones

S. Dowhes stpd. Guillen b Valentine

W. Brown b Valentine

D

Watt ¢ Guillen b Atkinson
Vallely c Guillen b Valentine 1
Raymer c Christiani b Goddard
Allen b Atkinsgn .
A. Thorpe ¢ Worrell b Ferguson 10
Johnson Stpd. Guillen b Valentine
Lonsdale c Rickards b Valentine 2

P
Â¥%.
5

| Bignell not out o
Total 128
BOWLING

Valentine 5 for 2%

| Atkinson . 2 for 35

; Goddard 1 for 12
Jones 1 for 8
Ferguson 1 for 21

QUEENSLAND COUNTY—tnd Innings
. Millard c&b Jones . 3
Downes b Valentine .,.. 19
Brown ¢ Christiani b Gomez. 17
Watt ¢ Guillen b Valentine . 2
Vallely lbw Ferguson ........ 6
Raymer c Guillen b Goddard “4
Allen mot oUt ...... 66.4550
Thorpe b Ferguson ;
Johnson ¢ Ferguson b Goddar
Lonsdale mot out
Extras. rr

PASUO EMD

Bones

Total (for ® wickets)

BOWLING

2 for 35

Valentine 3
2 for ®

Ferguson

“West Indies” Beat
“Australia”

Two teams call themselves
W.I. and Australia XI’s met in a
two-day cricket match which was
concluded on Sunday last and the
former scored a sensational win
over their opponents.

The W.I. (Supporters) batted
first and scored 115 in 73 minutes
batting and oo ae ,
porters) rep wi 186 scor
in 169 minutes on the first day.
On Sunday last the W.I. batted
again and scored 337 for five
declared in 126 minutes and
Australians with 218,
with one man absent in 122 min-
utes. Best performances were
turned in by J. Bailey 26 runs in
W.1. first innings, and K. Colly-
more, R. Sober and C. Sealey 60,
71 and 83 not out respectively in
the second innings. C. Sealey a
left arm spinner took 5 for 63 and
6 for 81 in the Australians two
innings. For the Australians,
L. Jones and R. Pinder scored 39
and 28 respectively in the first



innings and R. Pinder, V. ome
and. L. Janes scored 81, 39,

51 not out ly in the
second innings. R. Pinder took 5
for 49 and 4 for 103 in W.I. two
innings,



WHAT’S ON TODAY

Court of Original Jurisdiction
—10.00 a.m.

Police Courts—10.00 a.m.

Old Boys’ Cricket match at
Lodge School—l p.m.

Meeting of the Sanitary Com-
missioners—1,00 p.m.

Meeting of the Legislative
Council—2.00 p.m,

Mobile Cinema gives show at
Clifton Plantation Yard, St.
Thomas—7.30 p.m.

M of “Alliance Fran-

at British Council,
Wakefield—8.30 p.m.

Weightlifting Contest

Queen’s Park—8.30 p.m.
CINEMAS:
GLOBE:

As Young As You Feei
S&S & p.m
; ROYAL: Bandit of the Bad Land
: @ End of t Rainbow
4.30 & 8.15 pum.
Federal Operator 9, 4.40
& 8.15 p.m.
OLYMPIC; Naked City & The
Overlanders, 4.30 & 8.15

Pm.
PLAZA (Bridgetown): Always in

My Heart & This Side of

the Law, 4.30 & 8.30 p.m
PLAZA (Qistin): Dangerous Game

& Desperate Trail 6 & ¥.40

pm



at

it ceitenesenicictiaieins







‘It Will Never

Happen Again.
—John Goddard

From FRANK MARGAN
TOWNSVILLE, Nov. 1,
West Indies tourists

ere,

Following adverse Press com-
ment after the Newcastle batting
Goddard
lectured the team and

collapse last week
strongly
he later publicly stated that the
West. Indies disappointing per
formance in the first officia] matc!
of the tour “will never happer
again’”’.

followed

closely the instructions of their

seeere Goddard in a run-getting
it

thelr fielding = versus Queensland Country

HAROLD WEBSTER

To Be

EDWIN ROGERS SAM MALONEY

Miss Bridgetown

2
- “Miss Bridgetown” will be
» chosen tonight when the Amateur
) Weightlifting Association of Bar- encouraged if the parents want

bados Island Championships and healthier and happier homes.”

By P. A. V. an attack of dysentery.

has lost.”



Chosen At A.W.A.B. Show

He has
again started his training and is
trying to make up for what he

THURSDAY, NOVEMBER 1, 1951



Gallops
PRETTY WAY WAS AGAIN
IMPRESSIVE

By HOOKIE

Diamea: a big good iooking colt
from St. Kitts but a bit unruly.
Did five in 1.14 including a few
dodges here and there. Should
be in F2 in my opinion.

3 ip matched strides
with First Admiral) ter two-year-
old stable companion. Four in
54% was the time returned. bur I

: did not see the gallop.

Viceroy: five furlongs on the in-

day night and early Wednesday side in 1.034. Always e3pable of Seprane and Gavotte worked to-

morning which made the going a drawing some left handed com- gether but did nothing to write

little easier. it was not pliments from certain parties. home about.

much and opinion about the out- However, there are a few who will Two-year-old Dunquerque look-

side track seerned to be a bit di- finish behind him such as Miss eg much better than three-year-
'
|

There was some rain on Tues-

ided. Consequently half the gal- Friendship etc. ie: hott thew
l . ‘a His Worship: five in 1.094. tind and aid tk 107. Both
and this made it difficult for Dim View: worked inside. One wej) held but the two-year-old
recording times. of those which always attracts me. the better of the two.

Another definite feature of the Watercress: did her first gallop
preparation gallops for this meet- of any account doing five in 1.07
ing is that they have been more fairly easy. Looks very capable of
restrained tham any I can filling Bow Bells’ place.
remember, except when we nave _ Diadem: this half-bred from St.
had impossible tracks in the past Kitts had her first gallop doing
and had to work on the beach. om © 57 and finishing a bit
Wi four meetings having spent.
om to ry this T imagine will Fire Lady: certainly looked full well up I am sure.
be the new order of things. Early Of fire over the first three of a five My Love Il and Rambler Rose
morning spectators will in future with Infusion. But the old mare worked together but I missed
be able to spare themselves the was going well at the finish and them. "
rigours of rising at five when they returned 1.084. _ I also missed Red Cheeks who
* they know that they will learn Pretty’ Way: probably did the is still confined to work on the |
little before the first day’s racing most impressive work for the inside.
opens morning doing a box to box in . Atomic IT and March Winds

Yesterday morning’s work was 1.244 just striding out at the did five in 1.09%. .
a good example of this and while finish. Was shaken up a bit inthe , The Eagle and Test Match did
about fifty of the seventy-two second furlong but came home = yo re
entered were seen at exercise very easy. sales m to vom in am
there were only one or two = Darham Jame: an igessaive tants aot Joan's Star: five
did anything to give an indicat newcomer, id four in 52 on the . . z
of ‘can om on Here are inside. une sorte bo euet ae ine.
some of those we saw: Mabouya and Cavalier: the firs:, tay being pushed in the last two

Demure dic a comfortable box a C class Maiden the secondatw0- while the former was always
to box beginning very slowly but year-old. Both went well with

lops were done on the inside track

had to be pushed
to keep up with Doldrum over a
box to box on the inside the last
five of which was in 1.07. It is
difficult to choose a_ definite
favourite for the first C class
winners race but Doldrum will be

; - easy.
increasing her speed a bit from what little difference there was in Lanter: five in 1.06$ on the
the five. Her time for once favour of the former. On the pit.

around was 1.25 1/5 and the five strength of this I like Cavalier High and Low: worked on the





The team’s score of five wickets Body Beauty Contests take place ho’s o Rogers told me that he i; nct jn 1.05. I like her very much for very much for the Trumpeter Cup. inside three-quarter pace only.
for 460 runs in an_ afternoon’s at Queen’s Park Steel Shed The following is a Who's Who ing to disappoint the crowd. both A and B sprints. He is definitely my favourite for Sunina: four in sd. on the in-
batting bore out the effect of tonight. ‘ ; of the Divisions:— He is guimg all out to beat Good- Belle Surprise: we did not get this race. side. a
Goddard’s lecture. In preparation for this show 123 Ibs. Cammie Barker of "ge. her time as she worked on the in-

T have never seen Goodridge in

Goddard is quite

the performance. the tear

narrowly missing an innings win, bell Club, Hastings amd the other this division.
The last man selected among the at

tourists, Jamaican batsman Ric

kards proved no “ugly duckling” ne f
with a sterling 192 including 27 @Mce at these eliminations, espe- yses a lot of speed in the quick

fours in 231 minutes,
One of the quietest members o

the team, Rickards still has a long and h is
fight to gain a Test place against Which is shown, tonight's show will
the number of outstanding proved promises to be a greater success Unique in this division.
him, than the .one earlier this year.

selected before
“opposite”

batsmen
Rickards’

after day.

wherever
becomes
of

Ferguson
immediately the
attraction, He amused fans,

officials and teammates during the whose totals were the same, had }ifter.
luncheon adjournment here wita to be re-weighed and one keen gnatch but needs a little more

an exhibition of watermelon eat

pleased with the Association held two elimina- Acro Barbell Club and H. Stod-
0

publicity 1 e 7
spinner Ferguson remains in pro« Which I noticed. The first is that he lifted like a real champion
minent newspaper columns day the veteran lifters, who are re- would and came first. His bedy-

visits he every division there is a slight 965. His snatches were perform-
centre difference

) tions, one at Palm Springs Bar- dard of York have qualified for
They both gave an
York Barbel! Club, Black exhibition of lifting at the elimi-
ok nations but did not extend them-
Stoddard, I understand,

tu beat Rogers.
young and have a
future in weightlifting.

Judging by the large attend- selves,
cially at York Club where over jift he should give Barker a
f five hundred watched the lifting tough fant. .
the tremendous interest 13214 Ibs. S. Rudder of York
meet H. Thompson of
Rudder
m . has improved greatly since the
There are two important points jast show. At the eliminations

entrant, Errol ‘“Bunts”

the Customs Department

fore but is

turning to the game, are lifting weight is 180 and he made a lifting power. He is going

up to standard, and secondly, in prave attempt to clean, and jerk

in the totals
lifters.

ing 250 pounds and in
snatches, he will display
squat style.

Heavyweight.
single entrant

of the ed with ease.
lifters Thompson is also a very good
He is very fast on the

, Various Several
There is’ also

- lifter ran around the Garrison practice with the jerk. The re-

training but someone toid me
that he has to do a lot of lifting
Both litters are
glittering

198% Ibs. This is a new divis-
ion recently formed by the Olym-
pic Committee. There is only one
Douglas
from Palm Springs, a clerk of
who
was also once a pupil of George
Solomon. Douglas has never en-
tered in official competitions be-
well known for his

attempt 300 pounds in the clean
and jerk. He is capable of press-
his
the

in this division,

Body Beauty Contests. For the

side track but she was going well
and without any fuss. I do not ] =
think she will | Be acclima-

tised properly at this meeting.

Lunways: another who worked :
inside for which we took no time. ans

French Flutter: improves with
every gallop. Yesterday she
worked inside over about five. I
think she be a bit soft.

Betsam: did a slowish box to
box outside the barrels coming
back in 1.35 3/5.

Drury Lane: this two-year-old
half-bred did five in 1.05 3/5 on
the inside at an easy pace. I
should think this was equal to
about 1.09 on the outside or pos-
sibly slower so there is no telling
what he will do when he really
gets going. I like him a lot. |

Dashing Princess: buxom filly
by Dastur, a sire who seems to
provide his progeny with plenty

American Dress
PLAIDS

36 inches wide
in fast colours
only

$1.02







to

a

two two-year-olds from St. Kitts

ing. Scorning the conventional Savannah to try to lessen his suits of this division should be another Bynoe and he may be len
spoon Ferguson lifted the half- bodyweight. interestin« lifting along with Douglas. Bynoe of bulk. Worked on the inside |‘! Flowered Opaque
melon across his broad beaming The Association has spared no 148 Ibs. In this division we pressed 280 pounds sometime uly. ool
face like a mouthorgan and pro. efforts in making their show a have the veteran lifter, Clement a8. Diarose and Champagne, the |

|

ceeded to make short work of the success,

fruit spraying the seeds in al
directions.

Ferguson’s failure to obtain a esting programme which consists gj) for
large bag of wickets on Wednesday of hand balancing, a trapeze dis- ability,
afternoon was put down to the play by 17-year-old Rudy Linton, ejjminations
absence of watermelon tea on the son of the veteran lifter.

adjournment menu,
The tourists are

becoming trol,
spoiled as the Queensland tour and a new feature, the Ju-Do good at al
proceeds. The State’s hospitality, knife display which should be press
renowned throughout ‘Australia is very interesting to watch.

Meetings were held jackman of Bede’s Gym, compet-
1 weekly and the Organising Com- jing eed ‘oe dee
mittee has planned a very inter-

against R. Cox of Acro, Mr.

Jackman, who is well known to

Barbados honour there are
such recognised entrants as Basil

RA YONS

worked together. They did five
in 1.06% outside the barrels and



his lifting and ing Grant, present holder of the title, the four in 54. Their first gallop
is in good form. t the Mr. Bridgetown, 1951, Lionel Ma- and a good one. Champagne ap- 36 inches wide
he showed that loney, Clement Jackman, I. peared to have the better of the
4 . he possesses terrific energy when Parris, Roy Goddard, George finish but Diarose slowed down a
Bede”, contortion, muscle con- he was called upon to jerk a Bynoe, G. Nicholls,,John Mar- bit. The latter however looks ] 12
acrobatic stunts, clowning heavy weight overhead. He is Shall, Sam_ Maloney, C. Good- {ike the one with the most room | e

three lifts, but the "idge and G. Layne.
appears to be his “pet lift.”

Cox was suffering from a leg

It is divided into two divisions,
5 feet 8 inches and over and




for improvement. A very well
grown filly I think she will be
promising when she learns the



cutdoing itself for the popular Serious Training injury. Unfortunately he was under 5 feet 8 inches. business properly.

eriecketers and even the tropic For the past six weeks the lift- struck on his leg with 260 pounds | There are also a number of en- “ ‘p.jgy; did five inside, No time CAVE SHEPHERD
weather is co-operating to make ers have been doing serious while training. He is however trants for the honour, Miss pon A good bet for the C or ’

the tourists feel at home. The training. Mr. Harold Webster, now training very hard and out Bridgetown, for the ladies. On p74,"

team’s biggest test so far, is official coach of the Association to surprise Jackman. He was ex- this occasion body will replace “ yyituyce: did a box to box in & C0 LTD
November 3, versus a_ strong from its inception, has done all in tremely good at the last show and beauty, 1,253 and the five in 1.06 outside hase .

Queensland State side at Brisbane. his power for its success.

West Indies bowlers meet their
first Australian tester young Ken terest
partners the great past 20 years and
lefthander Arthur Morris at Bris. referred to as “father of weight- Springs will meet George Bynoe

Archer who
bane in the first Test as the open-
ing pair November 9, Archer’s per-
formance opposed to the est
Indies attack will be watched with
great interest by West Indians
and Australians alike sinee the
form will give an indication of the
Test performance of all players.
The tourists are likely to score
heavily against the Queensland
attack since it is little stronger
than that faced in the Townsville
match. The State side’s batting
strength will be a different proposi-
tion however.



SPORTS CARS

Helen Jacobs, an old Wimble-
don friend, crops up again. She
told the National Safety Congress
in Chicago that “the lack of good
sportsmanship by American motor-
car drivers is incredible”” And
she had some acid remarks about
drivers Who “think it is clever to
be stupid, and who regard sports-
manship on the road as a virtue
to be practised only when they
spot a policeman in the rearview
mirror,”

YESTERDAY’S



FROM
Rainfall: .21 in.
Total Rainfall for Month to
date: 2.87 ins.
Highest Temperature: 85.5 °F
Lowest Tempesature: 75.0 °F
Wind Velocity: 8 miles per

(9 a.m.) 29.971
(3 p.m.) 29.866





Mr.
Webster has been taking an in-
in weightlifting

carried off many prizes.

165 Ibs. There has always been
for the tremendous interest in this divis-
is sometimes ion, Sam Maloney of Palm

Harold Webster, = Dr.

For’ the

lifting in Barbados,” He is re- of Bede’s Gym and they are both
sponsible for the progress of such veteran lifters. Maloney and
lifters as Edwin Rogers and Sam Bynoe have been taking part in
Maloney. competitions for over 15 years
During the weeks of training and both are over 30 years old.
the lifters were forced to keep It should be interesting to watch
away from any other type of these “old lads” battle it out
sport. The interest had increas- again.
ed and many spectators now visit Sam Maloney’s mind plays a
the various clubs to watch the large part in big competitions
“work outs”. Since the last when he is called upon to put a
Championships, many more clubs tremendous poundage overhead.
have become affiliated to the As- He has left off his work on the
sociation. Those lifters who are waterfront for several days to
unfortunate not to have a gym train. His presses have improved
and proper weights, practice in and in the snatch, his “pet lift”.
their backyards with a bar and He will have to watch his jerks.
a few pieces of scrap iron, He gets very excited after clean-
Many schoolboys have taken ing the weight and is apt to
up weightlifting since interest throw it forward.
has been revived. The Harrison Bynoe, who has not been seen
College Water Polo team, for in- in competition for a very long
stance, winners of this year’s time, has returned tossing the
League Trophy, has some keen “old iron” with more vigour than
weightlifters im its group. he did when he was 16-years-old.
Some critics still feel that His presses are not up to mark
weightlifting is 7. to make one but he makes up for them with
“muscle bound.” ibert Bannis- terrific form in the snatch and
ter, who has been playing Water clean and jerk. Both of these
Polo for over a long period, can lads, have excellent physiques
be matched against any of the and have entered for the Body
youngsters and his body was built Beauty Contest as well.

Weekes,
ef whom

and Victor Evelyn,
are well

ERNIES
Democratic Club

OH YES!

IM STILL ALIVE!
anid wish to thank all those
kind friends from all over
the world who sent me
cables, cards, flowers, and
otherwise enquired after my
health.

What’s the use of going over-
seas when you can get cured
right here.

Consequently
there will be a meeti on
FRIDAY AFTERNOON at
6 O'CLOCK SHARP
to discuss the problems of

up off the weights, under the Bynoe was the Junior “Mr. ,

skilful supervision of George Barbados” in 1947 when a show ere ane eee tae
Solomon who is at present out of was staged by the Amateur Ath- ber meeting

the island. Randolph Turpin, the letic Association. ;

British Middleweight Champion, 181 Ibs. The two entrants in MENU:

is an ardent weightlifter. Did he chis class are Edwin Rogers of Consome Froid
appear to be “muscle bound” in Palm Springs and Clifton Good- a la Francais

his first venture ridge of Leeward Barbell Club.
Ray Robinson? These lifters were not seep in
The youngsters who attend to- action at the eliminations so very
night's show will most likely re- little can be said about them.
new their efforts in weightliftins Rogers, at the last show, gave
and as a veteran lifter of the a magnificent display of lifting !
island, referring to parents, told which showed that he had a

against Suga The Usual Turkey and

Ham
and Chicken Pelau

Have you visited Bathsheba?
If not. Go to the Edgewater
Hotel where the Proprietor
is congenial and the wine list
| complete including

| The Best Scotch Wine and

Dutch Grocsch Beer

for after sea bath drinking.

me; “The youngsters should $< for improvement. Mr. Harold
Webster, his tells
“Rogers



me?
hard

trainer,

is training very

and making improvement. Alf
few weeks ago however, he took
ill, After recovering from influ- |
enza, the following week he had

SLLVEESESSSSSOSSS



|

|

MORE
FAMILIES

THESE
* . DAYS...

J&R BREAD

.
. toe
2999995699599 59988

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SYNDICATE, tne, WORLD WGKTS REsmEWED.

To judge the bodies are Mr.
David
Payne, Dr. Cato, Mr, A. Austin,
Mr. E. Douglas and Mr, A. Hunte.
weightlifting the
judges and referees will be select-
ed ke the lifters themselves from
a batch comprising of Messrs.
Delbert Bannister, Ben Jones, S.
Holder, J. Linton, G. Gilkes, o
a

acquainted
with the rules of weightlifting.






the barrels.
The Thing: did five but only the
last three were taken in 37 secs.

10—13 Broad Street






MEETINGS

THE BARBADOS
LABOUR PARTY
: AT:
NELSON STREET
TO.NIGHT
at 7.30 o’clock



|
























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PAGE 1

IMrgto. ESTABLISHED 18* PRICE: FWE CENTS U.K. TROOPS SEIZE BRIDGE IN SUEZ Egyptian School Also Taken Over CAIRO, Kffypt. Oct. 31. A British Army sponeiman said today British troops have seized the road and rail bridge outside Pori Said at the Mediterranean end of the Suez Canal and are operating it without interference or trouble. Ttie Bridge was seized yesterday by the Cheshire Regiment patrol after Egyptian authorities refused to keep • more than 50 minutes every day. The spokesman said Britons also seized the Egyptian Government Girls' School at Ismailia for use u B M-hool for British servicemen's children. The seizure followed the Egyptian closure of all British private schools in Ismailia. The spokesman said there were no other incidents in the Canal area from which Egypt seeks to oust British troops guarding the waterway.Press reports said the Cham*%  %  %  PRINCESS ARRIVES IN WASHINGTON ber Port Said had decided to boycott all British shipping at the port on the grounds that British vessels are violating Egyptian laws In an attempt to stem resignations by Egyptian workers from British employment. British officials Included a special appeal in today's pay packets "We know many ol you bavfl been ordered to leave after drawing your pay. and sots* of you have been threatened in various ways," the message from British Commander Lieut. -General Sir George Emkine said. "Before you leave British employment it would be well to reflect that the British have always dealt fairly with you .ind will continue to do so —C.t\ A C.P. Lion Chews Little Girl MEN A. Arkansas, Oct 11. A halt-grown lion clawed and • hewed nine rear old Maria i-miz to death it a circus last night, while the delighted laughter of other children watching the *liow drowned out her screams Several persons who finally at tempted to subdue the beast were injured, none seriously. Maria approached the lion, chained near the ring area where other big cats were being prodded into the lion tamer's area. The lion lashed out with one paw und caught the child on the side of the face. The animal then broke the chain leash, pounced on the girl, and sank his teeth into her neck and head. The beast then seized the child by one leg :ind dragged her away from the :.rena area. A youngster screamed for help. But she was not noticed. Maria was travelling; with the circus in custody of her rrandrnother. Marias cries flnallv attracted the attention of attendants. —U.P. WASHINGTON. Oct Princess Elizabeth and the Duke of Edinburgh SErtvad hsra at 8.57 GMT for their rhsi vtsH 10 the United Slates as guesU President and Mrs. Truman. The couple received I wi fatherly greeting from Truman and a 21-gun roiirfssji nlutt About 2,000 unofficial greeters held back by a cordon of troops with fixed bsyoneti eh sa n d as the Royal couple and Ihc Trumans started f<>r Blair House hn,i state dinner and i.veptir. are scheduled for Wednesday mifht. The Royjl couple .I'.t.ndod ibeir ftrst rorepUon here less t*um two hours after tlieii arrival from Canada. The Prince** accompanied by her husband MIK! Margaret Truman motored from Blair House to the Statler, a hotel a few blocks away, to attend the recepUon given by Washington Press Radio jnd Photographer urUHni'al.'Ki Princess Ehraoeth wearing a gray fur cape over a green brocade dress stepped it rat from the car. Philip wearing his gold braided nary uniform uu mxi Out of the car followed Reds Drive U.N. Forces From Hills nOKTU ARMY, Headquarters, Korea, October, 31. Red troops drove United NaUons forces off the hills southeast ul Ku m so n g in a pie-dawn attack. and the AUles tried vainly all day to recapture them. The Rads attacked with machine guns and other small arms under cover f darkness after a mortar barrage. United Nations units held DTDI for 35 minutes, then fell back to ktrongor positions. At dawn rled signs of three Communists tanks in the city, but United Nat Inns (.inks found no trace of them. Allied officers estimaled that United Nations troops killed 1 Communists and wounded 309 others, in lighting below Kumsong on Tuesday. An Eighth Army communique reported only patrol activity from the remainder if Ihc I3fi-mile Korean front. — U.P. Reds Make New Cease-fire Proposal MUNSAN. Korea. Oct. 31. Communist truce negotiators today proposed a new cease fire buffer zone which they said n based on their idea of the current battle line In Korea. The proposal Presidents daughter. Paul Wuotonj was submitted at the afternoon Chairman of the Washington Corsession of the Truce Sub-Commltrcspondent* Corrmltteo greeted) lees at Pan Mun Jon. the Princess with a llrm handA United Nations communique shake and g hud speech of wd-Uald thai the Red proposal procome. TJie Princess received a. vided for a ceasefire line and ious ovation .is she entered j buffer zone "based on the slightly mi 11 i mi Churchill Has 9 More Ministers %  icd the ruitn.ilion of Government befure meeting, Biil Commons t<>: its critical .ind historic m i >£ointment ot nine key Churchill aides was made fmm the Prime Minister's official residence, as the Commons mot ir Kanizational prelude to the formal opening .next Trr. Churchill appointed his son-in-luw. Dm head the vital Ministry of Supply, responsible for |>!"Hucirasssasssaafl weapons for re-armament and Bri'ainV atomic enerff^^roiramme. —— — %  %  %  ,..-. ,, Churchill Will Ugh I lo Thv Last in inn ii M // I la the front Una In Koraa %  V •assay troop coiK-entraUeii -C> the ballroom Taxes Will Close Down Bookmakers LAS VEGAS, Nevada. Oct. 31. This gambling resort's bookmakers plan to fold up their businesses at midnight tonight, because they will not be "economically sound" when the new Fedoral Government tax on racehorse betting becomes effective. State licensed bookies held a meeting snd decided unanimously that the 10 per cent, lax will make business unprontsble as compared with the mort lucrative gambling games. Operators said that turf followers had little reason to come here to bet when they can find bookies in almost any city in the country.—U.P. Search Underway For Engineer NEW YORK, Oct. 31. A nstion-widc search is underway for the electrical enarnsei who disappeared mysteriously on October 12, while at work on a secret Government project. Craig T. Naudaln (S3), of New York City, vanished in Salt Lake City while returning from a trip to Los Angeles Electrical engineer for the c struct ion firm of Drake Merrltt which U engaged In s secret project for the Army. Naudain had been expected home by his wife by October 17. Alarmed at his absence, she contacted the authorities on October 19. A spokesman for Drake Merrltt said that it was not known whether Naudain carried nny classified material MR W. S. MORRISON was elected Speaker of the House Of Common* by a 67 vote au jortty m the Srst rots of IB* new Common-. It Is the first tuna in over 60 years that there has been a dlvlHlon over the Speaker* seat. Usually one member Acceptable to both parties is proposed. Morrison was proponed by Sir Hsgb O'Neill. Ulster Natlonali-t. and *econded by a Conservative while two Labourite* proposed Major Jams" Mllaer. who ban been Deputy Speaker since March 1943. After the dlwuwdon Prune Minuter OfauichUl and Mr. Clement Attlea *ald that Party leaders had bean nnable to agree beforehand on a Speaker Voting was' lilK in favour of Morrison, 261 in favour of Major Milner. MB. W. S MORRISON. KC. was bom la l".i in Scotland He served in the 1914-18 war, and has represented Clrencestsr and Tewkesbury since 1989. Before the war he held several Junior postA and in 1989 wss appointed Ohajiceller of the Du^h*" of Lancaster. He waa the first Minister of Food frost 1939 M19W. and subeequently became Minister of Town and Country Planning He took silk in 1934. I tared Communist version of the bra* of ground battle contact." The United Nations already had proposed that the ceasefire line roughly follow the present battleUna, and Allied officers had said earlier that there was a near agreement on the line of contact However, the new Communist proposal would leave Kaesong as the site of the Communist truce delegations base camp and the historic Kiitewn/ to Seoul in Red territory. The United Notions wants to include Kaesong in the 200 %  OUSTS miles of largely uncontested West Korean territory, which it suggests the Reds give up in exchange for the 200 square miles of East Korean territory won by the Eighth Army in battle The United Nations argued thai it needed Kaesong to cover the approaches to Seoul. A United Nations communique said that a Communist proposal like that of the United Nations would provide for a 2'<* mile wide buffer zone across Korea —43.1*. and U.PLittle Progress A* Cease-fire Talks WASHINGTON, Oct. 31. Acting Secretary of State, James Webb said despite apparent Com,i.cessions many complex problems remain to be worked out bef'-re there can be ceasefire in Korea. Webb warned at ;i New Conference against toe much optimism over the latest Communist proposals of a truce line. He said the question of a buffer zone was only one of many that remained to be solved and added the little at hand to say about ncgoussjftou m K-.rea this time. Acting Secretary of State James Webb told the press he believed :'uino progress had been nude In iefforts here to settle the llntlsh. Iranian oil controversy. He told the Press Conference > this Government received no .official request from Winston Churchill or the British Government for a visit by the Pri.ne Mini He r to the United Staff. A.'ked if an informal approach had been made to launch a British campaign. Churchill apparently made it clear that he was interested in coming to the United St.,--. —U.P. I TITO WILL STAND WITH U.S. AND WEST BELGRADE, Oct. 31. MARSHAL TITn told his first Press Conference in two years that Ihc militarily urong Yugoslav's, is ready to stand alongside the United States and the West, should Russia attack. He said, that with the United States arms aid, Yugoslavia was ready and prepared to match its Russian satellite neighbours <>f Hungary, Rumania. Bulgaria and Albania In buiklinj .i strong military machine to "defend the pssVCe ————_— v ,|d -The Yugoslavia | Ai in> Helped not only America but also nil countries in Europe which wished to develop equally." As a result America now has a (riendlv Sn her side, on which she (tiin DOUM if aggression should n "Thht ts an important f.ict which should no*, he forgot1 tenNo Immediate Danger Othei highlights of Tll..'s new* deluded; (• > lie said that the danger raft .M-itiillv exist". Ho •VST, he said that there appeal to be no immediate danger. He s thai war could best be preventte by strength. I (2) Yugoslavia needs heavy ; armament including artllUM, Slides (3) Tlfn condemned the Five Power Conference proposed by the Soviet Union as "aimed at destroying the United Nations. <4) Yugoslavia wants closer and more friendly ties with the Vatican. The eonference was slnelh m formal, with newsmen shooting 'Hirsiioniand the Marshal aratwerH emphasized that Tugo%  Jsvta would welcome normal relations with the Vatican. He sakl. Yugoslavia have nothing Ex-Queen 'a Body Goes To Lisbon urrhlll appeared before the House of Commons today for (he iM time as I-eader with a dlreel i .indate from the people Hi* ssss i)--cted to office last Tuesday, but his Premiership m wartime came 1 ly nppolntment when the fjill of natson si Neville Chambi His in mdate is a smaM urn anathema?'. itl> H holds an 18 seat nalon' Common* One more seat in hi | filled. It b certain lo i seat, and will cut his m 17 31 Majnrilv Hut in.-. sKsnosg sfiajorit) most issues, counting :', %  of i. UbsraLi and Iho aiwcnre .r 2 Iri.ih Nidioiialiitrtl That Is enough L) da most of turnings that Churchill plans. As 0( the new IImine asscrrbl.M, fhunlill) was well ,41 hi way to establishing his new Government and meeting Britain's toughest pending problems—Iran ind Mm* All of the Cshiliiil members have been'been named. A ne*infanii, dli tempotary jsion waa dispnlehad yssttsi VERSAILLES, Oct 3t The reinain* of former Qum Ameilie of I'aftugal taken to Ureux for inleinient in a BSOrslon liy vault 'ihe Mhfdk Fi l. tvhenj I -ifter religious servkss at llul''c line, the Suei Canal h Cathedral here. l^:er the Quei-n'*' 'ned by Ihe Egyptiaivs Churchill 1 remains will be taken lo Lsston 'le^ire for anoUietalk wi n for permanent burial din in a xuprcme effcirt l.i i>ir graves of her husband nnd SOI Usi sold w.n %  tsMSfl ni the time this Pai • at the age of 86. liamenl rises for it* Chit;.tnini reHavana;— The Unlvtl ''" '"' r^ludenU Federation scheduUd - P *rS I sssa Ithtsls fOI i % %  "iifeirn. mass rally tonighi where lhe% %  Churchill and demand "the Cuban Government *hich may bring up the question of a m.-elnig with Stalin Chun-hill wai pvon .> tre dOOl "v:ilii:i in ttv H though hi i ltH. J. H. WILKINSON O.B.E X>eader ef tha Opponi Mon In the House of Assembly, was %  main tae psasangers who returned from England yesttr day morning by the ss. del flto. He waa accompanied lv Mr~. W ilk i n .on and UMir daughter Miss M J WiK:. seaLeaving Barbados on July 4. Mr. Wllklmon went up to Boston for aiedlcal treatment after which he visited EimIsnd Ha told the Advocate yesterday that be waa feeling pretty good and wan very glad to be back. LOUIS ASKS PUBLIC TO BE PATIENT NEW YORK. Oct. 31. Joe Louis issued a statement %  Wednesday asking tbe public have patience and hem until he can make up his mind tiether to retire or continue fighting. He made a. cause of the many I reports that have been publish' 1 about his future plans since h defcal Friday night hy K Ciano. He said he wanted to lhai.it everyone for t.;e goodwill ti have gOOVn in Die DBai and tint he will be grstsfu of his days for the DSTM derivcii from h-ixinit He said man> people I...opinions of what course r pursue now but he ask' I h*ve <*onfldenee in him whtls '• Is making up his mind as to what to do. He said he would announce his future plans after his exhibition tour of Japan. He w III fly lo Japan from New York on Novem* bci 10 l\P Monday Oeneral De Lallrc De Tasign> the French High CommiShioncr (oi indo-ciima and Cainboasa*! King Norodom SUnnuuk will uc unionithose present at the (-cremonie> tomorrow. De Raymonds body will be sent back lo Franc l< burial. Kernr— Top U.S. oftlctals heiInre convinced that llallan military efore U.N. for th llagrant violation of human rights and funds-menial lilt.-rlr 100 Ihe part of mililai | hip-" in Venezuela. West VsrgtsUS:—Twelve munThen Usf CtaasSrVStlVI ssn trappe.l and four other-.di .lely got into %  row with the raraiH-d when an explosion n,.pi defeated S-i il.si opponsi Ihrough a mine of the Truaxihe seletdou ..f .. i,.-w Speaker. Traer Coal Company along Cabin; W. S Morrison wa* ssscvtd Creek near here. Speaker 318 to ^51 in the Hrsi vole CasnbudU: II i g b rankin. oi tha new ( ommons. and Indo-Chinese iligm T U C Denial HSLSK ^ v,n ",' "'"'r' 1 Meanwhile the powerful g,0SO,g1" ir "1 *K ]^J r .i P KL "r(W *'rnr. e Trades ITnion Cssms Raymond, the 44-vea. -oM h „. n cl ..„-,.,„, ( nnrjp ., ,,„„ hr l)n(on Commissioner subbed to death on!planned wfde*prer,<( sink, s u, by S poliUcal assail.. Hrmon.tr.i'.fhe.r ..ppositio,, tl) tend lo make i RoUaJsg] and Ihe Church are II country within thf framework of the country's laws. But we cannot allow any interference from outside bv anyone rluding the Vattcsn. "This is the lv point on which we do not ree in our relation, with (he Vatlran."—U.P. "Ftttting Moment Wins Cambridgeshire NEWMARKET. Eng>. On. 31. Fleeting Moment won the lvdth running of i,V i Stakes over lVs milDenizen was second and there was a photo finish fur third. Forty-five horses i in Fleeting Moment owned b) kCn M. Johnson started at 11 to I llenl*en was 20 to I Fastnel Ran k t.n'.e.i favourite at g to I Jockey Artliur Breasley of Australia rede the winner,—C.P. Polilifal .Support MILWAUKEE, Wu... Oct. 31 A Milwaukee attorney said he received lelter from one of at n. Dwighi Eisenhower's aides 'day. laying Hiat the General declines to support sny poillical organisation hacking him for President. The sM ornsy, A. L. Tilton. said! Bavanhowsi on OctoiMT 13 *king hat eonscnt lo run Inl is prea4dsnUsl primary nex" April as a delegate pledged H (he General for nomlMtioa %  Id he received a lepiy ..'.Mini that Kis.nliowcr reiN-ute.il> has declined "all nsqussis that he %  |-illtieal moveinenl or Mi %  l..l.|i hrnt-nl of ai %  tion in support of anv polllictil Thovemenl in his behalf There Ir no question but that he will continue to adhere lo this oolicy durrutwe," the leller said. — V.T. JVa Housing Fund Gets £2.10,000 More Washington:--Aven-lI ll-rriinn. Tniman's top Foreign poliev adviser and m\hin.iin of Mutual Security called on Premier •adegh at Ih Iranian leaders' hutel suite Wednesday Harrlman told th press before the visit it wuto t •olely a personal call." Karachi FshUrUui:--The Pakistan (lovernment Is considering sending naval officers to the Turkisl navy for submarine training Kadi Paksstaa sold Wednesday W-ah ins ton;—A flvc-mnn H.S Government misvion lef' WSdASl day for Malaya for first hand observation of the problem* rf th< tin Industry there, CtlUfCftUTl regii %  "In joint eonsuH itlon snd in all •ill IKour constant aim %  fiaure the steady PrOgTO as and heltirment of Ihe geni'i ii i uc %  .! %  of Bl turn and sf our pi b Wt hall continue In that duly in Conservative Government < ..ngrea* simultsnaously :., nwiasi l ..I.III.I Prims Minister Clement Attlev. placing on record MB profound admlrstlon of the u hJSTI-menls of Ihe Labour Gov%  Miinenl during their six and onehalf vsan if rulg La baa fcos ol enprecedetiU-,1 difliculties.—U.F. By Mil Uii,.i\ U/NUOW. M PTIBM Ma chill will ngnt to Tommy in il llghi he mux Hut i hopes for a toiitpnniLiv S* a #SjBSSS sh.ujing ut rssspotssibttny liRr' i sBs* Tie bmted Si.iM -. mi Middle Eastern nations and sasssw uei* if ihe Untish C'ominoi wouln comprise ihe CanaP^uardiaiuhip. Tn-t ... i %  Ihe Egyptian* havi Ida ., Chunhiil is .m ERipin ho will pull the United States as Tar as he can in i empire around the world He may find some n in the l'n It imperil.Um In sn) form The *ii iii sUffen uiv!< Em| in %  .. will bo felt quickl) In lii' Sue/ The most urge. ,.,. U in c<.: ihe new Parliament i* there Trti ditch between sandj %  line Churchill I Hi -.ill *eek KtniMiw aid lr Ua Churchill M. exptvted lo >*ek a llrmer alliance with Ih. In lhat area and 4 'i. — it.p Raac4ss'New Times' VtUrka Kirk HOBO -w Oet II The Sovt.-I pUbUeatKsn Nrx* Time* described I* S Ai %  -tor Alan C. Kirk and %  land.'rer who viol lementaiy prSstrpiSS i In i The publication bMtSrfcj *• Kuk for a .spi-ch rn New York on October is Kirk in Ihe speech urged might in Icaling v it 'ions to betti %  win that i r*. The "ADVOCATE" puyi for NEWS. Dial 3113 Day or Night RUSSIA STRENGTHENING ARMY LONDON. Oct. 81. Informed sources said that the official report on the fuifllmen'. of the United Socialist Soviet Republics State Plan for the third quarter of this year. Indicates that Russia U concentrating in making good the two main deficiencies of her army— transport snd eommunicatlon^ The report, the full text r.f which is now available In London, showed that the following Minister* had not fulfilled trtftr industrial production plant: The Ministry of Motor and Tractor Industry. 97*;. The Ministry ol Transport Machinerj Industry, Mini of Communications Equipment Industrv W.8':. The Ministry of Machine Tool Industry. 99*. The MlniMrv of Heavv Engineering. <;. As the Soviet Press hss lately carried not more Shan Ihe normal amount of work of InduBUial undertakings controlled by t!ice Minister*, Observers here concluded that the non-fulfilment of the Plan by the five branches of the Melst, industrial machine, hi due not to any fall In output, but to the highly increa*ed production targets established for this veer. This is indirectly eenftrmed by the report ftolf. whieh said that lotal volume of industrial oulput in the irjs2.lt. was iv. higher in the third quarter of 1951 than in the correnpondinR period of IHO. In spite of the blackout, imposed bv the S.viet Oovemment a economic inform. ITKHI. it i known that nsssals ii than ever engaged In earponding her industrial output The importance of Ministries output f >r thi re-armsment cftori is obvious. West European :md United States experts on SoviM military affairs, agree that weakness ol the Bov ilex in it? lack of sufficient transport facilities and poc communications. -v.r. KINGSTON. Jcu.. Oct. 30 kfflenl is giving unothei fcZM.000 lo the emergency hou^ii. u fund from which free issues oi iiuiUinig raatertals up to a rnaxlmuna <*f CtO are being m>ide to persons whose homes were i in th# hurricane. %  %  %  thi ; sal amount applied 10 Ihe fund to £500.000. into lime Government is %  clilening up on the issue Of fre %  Titrrials in the rural areas, and < '>i>cniiion of the scheme in some country districts A glfl of 1100.000 from the Trmiriad (iovernment hss swelled the Governor's Relief fund nearly £540.000.—C.P. ELEviJTTkAPPED //V COAl MINE EXPLOSION KAYAfORP. W Virginia. Oct. 31. One miner was killed and 11 others trapped about one mile underground when sn explosion rough Mnlted N-. 1 mine of the Truax Traer Coal Co —IT. Barbados Win Bryden Trophy Vamoose Wins De Lima Cup i Prom Our Own Comnpandcnt I'OHT-OF-SI'MV Od .11 Mriasdog won t. uBryden Trophy with 54 points The Trinidad team scored 39 points The uophy WM presented bv ||>>. Excellency the Governor In %  Teddy" Hond. Thi **B won hy Varnoos*with 20V. points, seeond was Perkins Kdnl with 19^, poinu and third II Jason Jones' Cyclone and Trim dad T.K. 45 with 14 points each The race was sailed under a verv li.rit north wind. The teams snd boats were almost completed beraimed and positions change" constantly during Ihe first lap. It was decided under the M diiions. to race two ! %  !> tn that the boats could finish at a propei time The first lap T.K. 29 ,'| minutes 19 seconds; T.K. 35. Si minutes, live seconds. T.K. 49 52 minute* 11 seconds, T.K. 40, 55 minutes 4 setondit, T.K. 45 ;>: minutes J4 seconds, T.K. 44. 51 minutegl seconds. Second tap T.K. SS, 27 minute, 56 seconds. T.K. 29. 30 mtnulc? 33 seconds, T.K*. 30 minute* 43 setonds. T.K 44, 32 minute Sts, T.K. 49. S4 minulcs 17 seconds, T.K. 40. nil f.K. 34 won Ihc rare, T.K. ?' second snd T.K. 4ft ihiid •n was held after the i TODAY'S WEATHER CHART Bunnae: 5.60 a.m. S^uaseS: B.49 pa. Moon New October UghUng. H00 .sn. High Tide: f.Og a.BU 4.4S p.SB. LOW Tide: 10.43 a.m. 1136 p.m. gtl MAM/Bmm W IU*r> ^#— Occasions oi unique and sp enjoyment call for cigarettes made by BmsaXvjHk'DLL reflect the rare perfection and to echo the whole contented mood ftwta* J



PAGE 1

fAOE TWO BARBADOS ADVOCATE TIIIRSDAY. NOVEMBER I, MM Cajub QaUinq Is it Me Or is it I?! p r | im!SS Margaret IMOVIETIME Starts A Scramble "•""'*" | Any HA Nit: -,rc of the *-* Governor or Trinidad was an In ranrit passenger by the GalftU yesterday. She is on her way bark to Trinidad aftei a vWI io Ihe D K Finished School M M I'KBHA HANNINI.. daughter <>( Mr. and Mrs. H. C. Manning of New land* rsra Mile Hill returned fron yestesday by UM tielhu. past three years. Debra has been tending Cheltenham College. Gloucester. Other passengers arriving bj the (ielnta yesterday (or Barbados were Mr. J. H. Alexander. Ml*. M. higgar. Mis, F R. G. Cameron. Mrs. H. F Hadow. Mr. J. Meakin. Mr. and Mrs. R, de O O'Ncale and Mr C P. Wade. Visiting Daughter M R. AND MRS STEPHEN PSAILA arrived front England yesterday morning by the Ciolll* to spend about one week on a visit to their son-in-law and Mr and Mrs. Jack Marion before flying o British Guiana, where Mr. Psaila u Proprietor of Psaila Bros., Georgetown. Mr. and Mrs Psaila arc on theli home after just over nvr LONDON Some feoplr thtnk that "Between you and 1" sounds more genteel than "Belwec.i yaw and Took Daughter T< II ETURNING fr School the U.K. Tney are mistaken dreadful It is glaringly It sounds PARIS. id grarr. A/tor Vancouver, Ottawa and See&m&jz Tt p n,:,. --.* f£HHJSS nee month* ago with her iween I and you* 1 sssssvis wrens Hli ,*h Hertford Hxpital In pans younger daughter Joyce whom it ljust u wrong as saying o^nisers of the ball are now ^v^iR" *?? S^if*!^ Between you and I pondering who will and who will Travelling out t o Barbadoi if you have got Into the bad not be allowed to buv the 10wtth Mrs. Macintyre was mother habit of using that phrase you .uj nca UckeU. A selection rumdaughtei. Audrey. m former stu„vo possibly been confused by mtttce H working closely with dent of Codrlngton High School n-collection of having been two or three embassy officials who WM iludying In Scotland at told not to say "Me and Charles'who are considered authorities on the Glasgow Royal Infirmary. are going" but •Charle* and I ,uch matters. She has now got her MSR Bir going" (Member of th. Society of KadiConsequently you are now so 1 I foresee trouble' a nd a sharp cgraphers and her C.T. (CertifiWOIT ied abo%' the word ntc thai fall fn revenue—u* the embassy you are shy of using it when it applies lu strict standard to the (s linked with somebody else. I>a!l. Many who wore welcomed Pew people would say "Give Io the embassy during Sn Duff I to 1." but fume tend tt Cooper's ambassadorship are not cate of Therapy.) Io Sec Her Friends A MONG the passengers arriving In the Gellte from England yeaterday morning was Miss ajnbgjg Ridler, O.B.E. She has returned here to see many of her oi fi icndi and will be remaining io. six months slaying a* Bush Hill in the Garrison Ml than "Yankee Doodle Dandy"! mukm JAMES ViSGWIA OOatg GOODON OIBl Mil. ALWAYS IN MY HEART & THIS SIDE OF THE LAW %  m MA„hr..N HJ.1 irtAN.lS Vl.aca IJNDfi*.*>.. SMITH I XTON Bonn Rotor" Dot OLA 8 INNHTTi H Ma HtnnoiiKi H>'C-li PROF. AND MRS C Cl BEABLET i and laelr two daughtars Jennifer month, holiday in England and Md Vm]-rlt Mr „.„„ Md „,, the Continent and their visit took |w ch „ dren tnivea from En g| n d through Por ugal. Spain. ytmn i. y by the Oolflto A RK. ing correct to say "Give ( approved by the pr i to Charles and I." when, obvilador. usly. they should say. "Give it to i Sir Oliver Harvey l. | ath kl.I rharles and me/* for P">P"y. His disapproval! extends to certain fashionable There are people, too. who restaurants whose owners have leem shy of the word Mas. They dubious wur records. Rldler will be rememberwoikl nol say 'Send II to he.' Quotes of the week: laving aeted as hostess at but they are capable of saying.. Hous*. during the "Send it K. he and Ins biother MUlmguetie: "Money can t buy Mr. S II. Perowne acted as —which is ridiculous. (happiness, but It helps to steady All grammatical rules apart. |*ne our ear is the best guide If you re still in doubt about T* and me." use common sense. Governor. 1944 St. Lucia Scholar RH.VING them France. Rome, ami Malta returning to England Vl: Swi'xerl ml an Amsterdam. Mr. Psaila ialso Consuln Agent for France in It r, Words thit end in "ing" can he a After Eighteen Months A FTEK spendii g h t ee n months In England, Mrs C. 0 MIMSICV. wife of Professor B terday •nunifrom England In the F Oeiflte intransit for St. Lucia ... were Dr and Mrs. C. O. R. King. b,t f %  .''f.' 1 ^ A former student of St. Mary* p rttri Coliegr. St. Lucia, and island scholar of 1B44. Dr. King went up to Edinburgh University where he qualified and Is now returning home to take up an Adviser to the appointment with the, Government of St. Lucia. Bertil of Sweden, poDssMttJag now Paris: "My heavily on me since my ther. King Guslav's deaBh. promoted to Participles" they sM called. and they can lead you into •howlers The 'unattached participle" gets even the best writers into trouble. „, "Being a fine day. I left my'the city 12-1. umbrella t home'" means, grammatically, that I nm a fine, day— • i sited Ftntival Of BriUin h,ch ""•"* %  •Farii i u/ u r viuTRv "hould have said. As It was week t 1 an admiral and a general." home Again M : \, L ; U h ; S Comptroller fo r Development and 11 '"" Welfare, rclurned to Barbados of 'Msrgate vriIrrilliy morn n g by the Elden Hasting, who had been in England > nd Fvff( s u ^^ Shr ^ K vi-.il reiurned yesterday accompanied by her two daughters by he GeMio. lennifcr and Valerie. Intranut [ PRANSn Oscar Steals The Show A CeUla bound for Trinidad arc ,-orwi*n %  n i**. Mr. mid MiHenry Seaford,Their A CRO D of **" over *' h i u hiitish (iuuna !" hu .? tlr *? P^P"' wmon in %  tiara Mr Seaford is n llireemr nt eluded His Excellency the Gov—-iirt.n.h^ir opening performance of "Revue"me. and enjoyed visiting the Here's another examplereoaing ot men dfvl| e I9S ,.. al the rmpirr The restival of Britain which they -Having received a 1 irge conatre last night. Ihought was very interesting. signment of nylons, you will be Hundreds of cars almost comRetumuig with them, were Mr. f Ud to know we are reducing, the *^T* !" jjV !" Bureaucracy marches on. The public relations staffs of the international organisations based on Paris UNESCO. ECA. NATO. OEC and SHAPE—now outnumbei British and American reporters in W. McKINSTRY. irector of Messrs Allenye. WM flne d— .Arthur and Co., Ltd. who svas In Can you ^ wha lB wr0 ng with England for the past three and thU ? '-silting in lhe back *at of a half months, returned yester, h( nHrr v, the actors seemed u day morning by the tjelfsto acj (n( WB „ on - Lompanled uy his wife. He said that the weather was It implies that Use actor* were surrounded the Empire and Mrs. J. H. Glendlnning. Mrs. prices." It in't y the nylons. they attfsjaed the daughter Ev Other iatransl pa *engerj for GUSan.i were Mr and Mrs. pieteh Edw.ird (I,FrtlUS. They left Theatre block and patrons on"artheir son Paul at school ;it Stonyrival at the theatre, were greeted hurst. Mr. n ihi'i Intranalt In the way back Imme. The i showm Alley was very good and packed staying Firmer Pnlnn;*! . All I V THE GAKDEN — ST. JAMf UM Stew Tonllv I Si u rot' KNSW sista Eddlf CANTOS Jn DAVIS (.U.IWHIIIVI • OMOST QUiiim Tontufiow W B Doubl* SSIAKISI, rOUST" John aAJtrnttj>~j*t NBAL a •rats smr or rat LAW VIV UNUFORS-K*nt SMITH i: >i PIRE AlA* FRIDAY NOV. 2 2.30-4.45 & 8.30 PM l rontlnulni DAILY 4.45 & 8.30 I'M PLAZA BRIDGETOWN REVUEDEVILLE 1951 TO-NIGHT 8.30 TO-MORROW 5 p.m. and 8.30 p.m. WOO* nOW FOR THE nnttff SHOW OF THE YEAR. Box & Orchestra $1.50, House $1.00 Balcony 72c. Reserved. on MM, HATURDAV, 3rd NOVEMBER. 4.45 Si .J .ith Dr. and Mm. A. A. of Christ Church. wcnl to Kenya in 1947. Hi fathe Sir Richard Hankinc. was Resident in Znnzlbar from 1930 to 1937. Attended Course In U.K. I N BARBADOS for two months' holiday i Mr. Pat Smith, •on-in-luw of Mr. and Mrs. W. E Mnnrifville or St. James. He nrt h e revolving "paintings" somerivod hers yesterday mom ing by thing new on the local stage. the Ostflto from England after The Jungle Fantasy was another intending a five week microhighlight of the show, especially biological course at Ravenshournt. the music which kept up its relentMr. Smith is a chemist at Monyless exotic bent throui*oul the musk On'r;d in Jamaica. number. U.K. Medico The rhow will be repeated this X N BARl.AIXJS for fl couple of afternoon and again tonight .v i i. HJ rt,.,H If YOU were not among the lucky They arrived yeslerdjiy morning ( |. imtv by the r.olflto and are slaying with 'J^,. ph f ud or again stole the' Mr. and Mrs D V. 5, Scott of „ how „ 9 hp dld lBat yrur and all -Shcrboiirn.;Two Mile Hill. ni a n. Mrs. Stuart and her DanrThis is Dr. Golds-one* first ,„, School have something in visit to the island, but not his -ncvuedeville 1951" that will take wife's. He spent a year here some beating. during the war with her two boys B Back From England i IIOSSUOIIII 1 L ' r • r I" r %  T" 1 • % %  %  •-• I'tuOuf* Mum • Dttmin l_ UIWII isnderrU. uul nol a* lal i O h SISSS t Miamionl Brtdgf siim:r vntry 4i BiUa n.rtli o iw.. >tB IBI ..tin.' dnuim ii Mn thai f sill pui nothlnc In lb* pott. (Si Bird in tiif murdrt n.- it and imvs. iS)(-.iil lo Kiimml () 6 Orlni cai.l to mrn. 161 Mnry la the maKIng of It. (41 II (II





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PACT '-TV BVRBAOOS \nVOTVTF nil RSPA1 NOVI Hlir.R I. IHI HFK8Y CARL ANDERSON •:CKEY MOUSE WALT DISNEY %  l VAN XX •Off f J 'UT.RI.ACK g* AN... V TMAT -.1 .-. *.> -A — -.AVE TO 6* PuT -,-J fOT r_e v% *" A— *-£ OTH8 0*DSEt>esT C-6Twr *— BLONDIE M c* HiS rpio-os f\AVli CUT THESE THEV O.T HAI* T 0 1 PLAV SO HCUSH AND FlCHTANP 9UAi' BY CHIC YOUNG ;> Boys7T77 y^!T 'A STOPACTINS ) / ^Bk&Nr LUCF BOMB' _•>. / THE LONE RANGER BY FRANK STRIKER ifPiMMTiu III JMUM %  COVWKPW CFUTTlfWl.lt. ] T-E MOST v'iUJAei£CFTW -I'lC^ I 3TCX£N BV TT UO K*I NOT O BUT WITH vo.fi -^.CI* XX& 0= T *^y BETBAfTCP. WJ^OuCCAJi 6Y reTHOl/T Qji'VIOUNC' MY10UKE J Of llXettTlCei"r JOHNNY HAZARD BY FRANK ROBBINS ifat (MUM KftAK. jQkMNV. T.M.T. AMP IUM I 06I*t 'AWtrZ ItYkW ON TOOT, UtNi IHT *U fHAT MK4 TOOK CAM OT ONt UCU7 AHO IMfUJlWQUI OF MUfl. IMI M*T 1 TIM BRINGING UP FATHER BY GEORGE MC. MANUS MOf-fcUT %  &--.QJCAN CAr*riLrTNO *BinW iOJ*? : Ow B H PW WMNP6 v. 1. WiTWOUT KXlTOMUMT•O* NOT ANOTHER >:Q?0 OpT 3= >LAJ.' AH/ RIP KIRBY DY ALEX RAYMOND ALA5r (w-r c' y PM-AP* x.a MT Mr i> --:<. co*.: M...S** *'* A YOJ T>,N<* R.ACB t e -. ofa-' •-. —-— -T^WCKCWS e-ot \ I ii_Hs PKAJ U4WI i£ PHANTC*/ BY LEE FALK ft RAY MOORES 7**lQW$0fBENHU6Q£$iP*~ GOVEBNOft? FAMitV?/npPC ABOUT i THEJUN61E WOODS:" ioct; rHOM JBIBEir-.TBIBEKBOSSmi £0^"W.-SW" •Wf/APKfr. %  im> rue oecp WOODS TO THE •H8U0UISH Ki tKQt/ECfit fUANTOM.' "THEIR good looki Ul ran they're>u< rig*<. You know, too, when you look at the price, tag, that you can't get finer value. Ulu'trated U a Two-tone Brogue. Tied to every pair is the John White Guarantee Shield—the oign which U1C.111%  f u i right 7 Look for it in loading ttoren io Barhadoa. made by JOHN WHITE means made just right US ANVTIMt. MTWHtiT" ABvnmse 1\ THE VIVIIW • Mounting Circulation Ivery Uepk • tor Hat*-M Dial •22.17 or J-.OIl ADVOCATE Advertising Department Ob amunty '>^.'-',V''S. r ,'*'.' f r '.','.','S.VS^'.'''.'S.'S,'.'.'.'.'S.'.'.'.'.'.%'.'.'. '.%''.'.','.:•.:::'.:'''.-, HAVE YOU PLACED l H ODDER I nil MASSI.Y HAHHI.S DEAVY MOT DIESEL THACTOHV SLuncRti lie um. again Wing forward and >uu m • advised to tok vm\y. NOTr SOME 0/ Tin: MAIN FEATUREf. 6 ryl 42 B.II.F. PERlfnVS Mr vv Duiv Difscl Engine Koplacaable cylinder tlnern Preas button Staiter 6 forwiird Rears Well iMller Power Tnke-off Lights Hour-meter Steel wheels nrc obtaln^.bl? for ploughing wr.ilst for really neavy goma '-half-trjrk!!" are ivaflaUe V KSl 0 SBK9B HUCTOR — BACKED BY OV* siKViir ORGANISATION YOUR ENQUIRIES INVITED' COURTESY GARAGE KOBIIKT I HUM LIMITED —AGENTS— '.'..V,*,*,',*.',*. 'SS,'**,**.**.**;;;'.;;*.::;;:'.',;', By chowins LIUUTSINC • flj I ..Mlilns* iMUlMi dm msnutaetiaml l>v ttCHIMIM USKUEHS LIMITED T aroiiri GRANT I.TO Agrnl. IT PAYS YOU TO DEAL HERE SPECIAL offers to all Cash and Credit Customers for Thursday to Saturday only USUALLY NOW Pkgs. Jacob Cream Crackers 49 :t Tins Grapefruit Pksrs. Polar Icing Sugar 37 M Tins Succotash 34 :iw Bottles Dows Stout Bottles Frontenac Beer USUALLY NOW 55 14 26 21 rr 26 21 V. SCOTT & Co. Ltd. Broad Street TDE LOVELIEST LOT LX TOWX %  XMAS TREE DECORATIONS AT ADVOCATE STATIONERY



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PAGF. I IGH1 BARBADOS ADVOCATE THURSDAY, NOVEMBER I. 1*51 West Indies Fail To Force Win Valentine Spins U I M.II I I II II IIS 1M Mt.HII Out Batsmen By HABOLD DAI I SYDNEY. Oct 31. For the third time in successive innings Alfred Valentine took five wickets when Goddard declared at his overnight total at Townsville and sent Queensland Country to bat. On In* dusty wicket that had developed several worn spots Valentine's lea; spinners were virtually unplayable and Goddard used six other bowlers just to ave the count ry .side from complete extinction. &f It WUlNevc* Happen Again —John Goddard From FRANK MAJtGAN TOWNSVIt-LE. Nov 1. West Indies loun) followed is of ihe.r run-got Uiu Country Only one batsman, Donald Witit, former mate player showed an> confidence and tils 51 wu ntertv put together. He rop-*cored in the •tcond innings when Ukf OouatfJ XI batted out time. Wilfred Ferguson very nearly won the match outright by taking two wi.tc.i-!,, with the first two balls of the last over but Loosdale managed to hold out to the and. Theae country games, of no fntportnnc* In Ihemsel-es, .have closely the instruct!. given tourists some good match captain. Goddard practice, but strangely enough r j 0 ( versus Queensland they are belying their fielding ^L imputation with loose work ihat will no doubt tighten up *rhan serious rrirket begins. SSBBBBBS PRETTY WAY WAS AGAD IMPRESSIVE Hr. ffOOkll a biff good looking colt from St. Kltts but a Wt unruly. live in 1.14 incljdmg a few rtnitsjii her* and there. Should be in 7 In my opinion. Mass FTlisgaai, matched strides with First AdsBaml Vr two-yearold ttabkt companion Four in 54| was the time returned but I did not see the gallop. f worked together but did nothing to write name about. Two-year-old Daaa.tterq.oe lookKDWIN ROGERS SAM M AMIS'*'V HABOLD WEWTIk Mllkarfl c rs... •• % %  MV-l.l I-*.,,! i aatt, fen Piillowlng adverse Press comment after ttiv Newcastle batting collapae last week Ooddard strongly lectured the team nnd he Later pubUcb statad thnt tho West Indies disnpfMiintinK pei "Miss Bridgetown" will be Miss Bridgetown To Be Chosen At A.W.A.B. Show By P. A. V. There was some rain on TuesVleeray: five furlongs on the Inday night and early Wadnasday aide In 1.03!. Always cipablof morning which rnsde the going a drawing some left handed comlittle easier. But it was not piimenla from certain parties, much and opinion about the outHowever, thee are a few who will side track teemed to be a bit diflnish behind h.m such aa Miaa M much better than three-vearvided. Consaqucntly half the galfriendship ate. Q^ Sunbeam whom she left belops ware done on the inside track Hts Warsltta: five in 1 0|. hiDand ^ flve m 0 -, p^,, and this made h difficult for Dim View; worked inaidt. One ^ u „.!,, ^ ,„, | WO -yrar-old recording tlmaa. of those which always attracts me. ^ better of the Iwo. Another definite feature of the Watercress: did her first gallop riawarthas had to be pushed preparation gallops for this meet? any account doaig five in 1.07 to ^^ wl(h Doldrum over a ing is that they have been more fairly easy. Looks very cap.We of ^ M Mx „, 1hf lrandfl thf ,„, restrained than any I can nil £** !" ,***? ,f*f**\ _, flve of which wu in 1.07. Il is remember, except when we nave f" : tnls ^" b ^ ron V SU difficult to choose a definite had impossible tracks in the past Jim had her ftrst gallop doing favourite (or |hp flrftt c tutM and had to work on the beach_ Jour in 5. and finishing a bit winn4 r* but Doldrum will be With four day meetings having spent ... well uo 1 am sure come to stay this I imagine will FW LMj: certainly looked full **" up mm fur be the new order of things. Early of Are over the first three of a five My Love II and Rambler Roae morning spectators will in future with Infusion. But the old mare worked together but I missed be able to spare themselves the was going well at the finish and them. rigours of rising al five when they returned l.Osj. I also missed Red Cheeks who they know that they will learn rwity'Way: probably did the is still confined to work on the little before the first day's raring moat impressive work for ihe inside. open*. morning doing a box to box in AlasssC n and March Wind* Yeslerday morning's work was 1.241 Just striding out at the did five in 1.0| a good example of this and while finish. Was shaken up a bit in the %  %  "•£• •>"<* Test Match did about fifty of the seventy-two second furlong but enme home r ***, • n _** entered were seen al exercise very easy. ihere were only one or two who Darhasa Jam: an impressive did anything to give an indication newcomer Did four 'n 52 on the of their true worth. Here aia inside. some of those wc saw: Mabouya and Cavalier: the firs Demare di'" a comfortable box a C class Maiden the second Hi-La: a box lo box in 136. ii b-:iag pushed in the last two twow hiic the former was always live in 1.001 on '"0 Allan %  lla b Valmunr I MMnl b Goddam n I AU,,.-,,, a p C Worrell b FSTfUtun I John**. H CulMs* b Vl*ntin* is l. nM a S st o Rtck-rda b VaWtlllrr 1 Htlnatl *ol Mil a ToUl US BOWLING ValM>lli'.i. S for A ik %  -,-.-. i f ol OeSSaM I 'or II Isaai i lot %  v,.,.-... i Bst fi ..I I I NI'M Uimi-f.1 Innlnf A Millatd -*b JOKM l. Valvntliw |1 .'jUsly Urw Ffifui.V Ran r (luili'ii b< T All*n n-A mil A Tan* b r*niMun Joknuon < %  Paraun b dodders ToUl ifor wlckvlat The laat man selected among the at York Barbel! Club. Black exhibition of lifting it Ike el .Jiiin.iK iin fMlfsnaj) RlcItoik nations but did not extend thanikards proved no 'ugly duckling" Judging by the large attendrf ] ve ,. stoddard. I undarsland. with .. sterling 192 including 27 anco at these eliminations, espemes a lot of speed In the quick fours in 231 minutes. " %  "> t Vork Club where over nfo ind hc 5 hould give Barker .i One of the quietest member* of five huiidrcd watehod the lifting louf h flghl the team, Hickarda still has a long and the tremendous interest igt> lbs. S. Rudder of York fight I., itnln a Test phice against which is shown, tonight's show wil | m eet H. Thompson ol the number of outstanding proved promises to be a greater success Unique in this division. Rudder t"* Customs Department who batsmen selected before him. than tho one earlier this year. has improved greatly since the was also once a pupil of George Rklurds* "oppoaiUs" publicity There are two important points inat sh ow At the elimination* Solomon. Douglas has never enspinner Terguson remains in prowhich 1 noticed. The flnrt is thai he lifted like a real champion tered in official competitions beminent newspaper columns day "** v tan lifters, who are reWO uld and c:.me first. Hi* bedvfore but is well known for his ofter day turning to the game, are lifting weight Is 130 and he made a lifting power. Hc is going lo up to standard, and secondly. In brave attempt to clean and jerk attempt 300 pounds in the clean wherever Ferguson visits he every division there is a slight 26*. His snatches were performand jerk He "West Indies" Beat "Australia" becomes immediately the centre difference in the totals of the ^ ilion. He amused fan', various lifters. Several lifters Thompson is also officials and teammates during the whose totals were Ihe same, had |(fi e r. He is very luncheon adjournment here wit.i to be re-weighed und one keen m utth but need? • an exhibition of wiitermekm sat. lifter ran around ih ing. Scorning the conventlon.il Savannah to try to ing 250 pounds i very good snatches, he will fast on tho squat style. little more Heavyweight. French Flutter : improves with every gallop. Yesterday she worked inside over about live. I ihmk she win be a bit soft. Betaam: did a slowlsh box lo box outside the barrelr coming back in 1.35 3/3. Drvry Lane : this two-year-old half-bred did five in 1.08 J/5 on the inside at an easy pace. I should think this wss equal la eapable "of pressabout 1.09 on the outside or posand displayTwo teams calling UsgmsagW W.I and Australia XI's met In %  two-day cricket match which was concluded on Sunday last and Ihe former scored a sensation,d nil over Ihelr opponents. The W.I. (Supporters) batiwi adaourr first and scored 1 it In 73 minute* The Ferguson lifted the halfbodvweight. melon across his broad beaming The Association has spared no face like a mouthorgan and pro. efforts m making their sh (Ceded to make short work of the success. fruit spraying the seeds li his sibly slower so there is no telling Ihe what he will do when he really gets going. I like him a lot. There is also a Dashing Prusoeea: buxom filly Garrison p rarl j ce W nh the Jerk. The resingle entrant in this division, by Dastur. a sire who seems lo lessen his ^1* 0 j tnU dm-ion ;hould be another Bynoe and he may be P{oy id his^progcny with plenty interest'"lifting along 1U laa. In this division ws pressed 280 have the veteran lifter. Clement **<> %  io success. Meetings were held j BC kmsn of Bodes Oym compel%  *> Bcaolr Contests. For the two two-year-olds f; II weekly and the OrgaMlinff Coin(nj .^jinBt R. Cox of Zero. Mr Barbados honour there arc worked together. They vith Doubles. Bynoe o* bulk. Worked pounds sometime only. Dlarose and the inside an attack of dysentery. He taM to box beginning very slowly but ..ear-old. Both went well with easy* (onnaaot In the first official matc!> chosen tonight when the Amateur again started his training and .9 Increasing her speed a bit from what little difference there was in f of the lour "will never happen Weightlifting Association of Barencouraged if the parents want trying to make up for what he the five Her time for once favour of the former. On the bit *ti-m". bados Island Champion.-hips anct he.ilthiei and happier homes. has lost.' around was 1.25 1/5 and the five strength of this I 'ike Cavalier High and Low I worked on fha The team's score of five wickets Body Beauty Contests take place Who's Who Rogers told me thai he i; ntl m 1.06. I like her very much for very much for the Trumpeter Cup inside three-quarter oneonly fcr 400 runs in an afternoon's al Queen's Park Steel Shed The following is a Who's Who ">* "• disappoint the crowd, both A and B sprints. He is definitely mv favourite for Satoku: four In Sion the lav B# is lining sll out lo beat GoodBaUa ftsraesse: we did not get this race. side. "Ife. her time as she worked on the in„^^_ l have never seen Go^ludgc in (l de track but she was going well i:nng but someone told me tn d without any fuss. I do not il.at tie has to do a lot of lifting think she will be acclimaU beat Rogers. Both li-ten are tiBed properly at this meeting. vming and have a glittering Luwers: another who worked PJUSM in weighthftiag. Il-id tor whlch w look , Um€ ltf*i !*. Th Is a new division recently formed by tie Olympic Committee. There is only one entrant. Errol "Bunts" Dougt... from Palm Springs, a clerk hatting bore out the effect Goddard's lecture. Goddard is quite pleased the performance, of Ukl narrowly missing an innings Queen's Park Steel Shed f tonight. o| lhtf Dlv In preparation for this show m ib,, Cammle Barker ..f wltn Ihe Association held two elimmaAero Barbell Club and H. Stodns. one at Palm Springs Bar^rj o( Vork hav . qua Hmed for %  b-1 .V %  " ,in * an ** ?* ^' h< 1 this division. They bulk, gave an American Dress PL A IDS 36 Champagne, the St. Knit; did five directions. mlltce has planned a very inferJnckman, who"is well known~'i<> *"*•> recognised entrants as Basil In 1.06*? outside the barrels and Ferguson's failure to obtain ;i esting programme which consists aU j ot h is lifting and posing Grant, present holder of the title, the four in 54. Their first gallop large l>ag of wickets on Wednesdny of hand balancing, a trapeze dlsability, is in good form At the Mr Bridgetown. 1931. Lionel Maand a good one. Champagne apafternoon was put down lo the play by 17-ytar-old Rudy Lin ton. eliminations he showed that loney, Clement Jackman, 1. peered to have the better of thi BjSjsswa .f watermelon tea on lh~ son of the veteran lifter, "Gold h e possesses terrific energy when Harris. Roy Goddard. George flnish but Dlarose flowed down J Bynoe, G. Nicholls. John Marbit. The latter however look shall. Bed* becoming trol. 'Gold contortion muacle conhe waf Mned upori !o -j CT fc acrobatic stunU. flown'"* heavy weight overhead. H* ., %  .. For the L. Jones and R. Plndc and 28 icspccUvrly IT N innings and IL Plndcr. V. and L. Janes scored 81. 39. and 51 not out respectively second Innings R. Finder for 49 and 4 for 103 In W.I. two innings. lies of ell acquainted ciginiifting. WHATS ON TODAY Osnrt of Original JuriadioUen 10 i-i a.m. Fobcs Courts—10.00 a.m. Old Boys' Crlckst ssstck at Lodge Hcliool 1 p m M'ftms of tks BanlUry Com niUHUonsrsl.oo p.m. Masting of the Legislative Council 2.00 p.m. Mobile Cinema gives show al Clifton Plantation Yard. St Thomas -7 JO p.m. Mating of "Alliance Ftancsiss" at BrtUsh Council. W.-lknfli-ki : y I,, W*ighUifUng Osatsst at Quean's Park 8.30 p.m. C1NSMAS nmiil A> Taani A% !• %  I... laisa aOlAL, BuSM al tka Had L.-4 S Kmd f lb* H.l*hn. I. ie S S l:. v m mow fiSaral Ofvralar SB, i n.*/ v ri.\t\ lUWal !! %  .! %  ••. a l>:p.lllr Ifall I batting and the Australians (SupspoHed as the Queensland tOUT and a new feature, the Jn-li.. tot) t B a) J hnw HtXf but th-l C *rs) replied with 180 scorad uroce-ds. The State's hospitality knife display which should be preM appear, to be his "pc-. lift." 109 minutes on the first day. renowned throughout Australia 1* very interesting to watch. Cttx wn „ gu ff crllU | from a l,g On Sunday last the W.I. batted outdoing Itself for the populi: Serious Training; injury. Unfortunately he was again and scored 3S7 for five rrickelci-s and even the tropic For the post six weeks Ihe liftstruck on his leg with 280 pounds declared In 126 minutes and weather is co-operating to make ars have been doing serious while training. He is however Australians replied with 218. the tourists feel at home. The training. Mr. Harold Webster, now training very hard and out with one man absent In 122 mlntown's biggest test so far. is official coach of Ihe Assoclalu .l.-ekman. He was exutas. Best performances were November 3. versus a strong from its inception, has done all In trendy good at the last show and turned In by J. Bailey 2fi runs in Queensland State side al Brisbane, his power for Its success. Mr. cnrrled off manv prize*. WX first innings, and K. Collyufisi Indus Iwiwlers meet theh Webster has been taking an in1W Ihe. There has alwavs been more. R. Sober and C. Sealey tffl. *.„! Australian tester young Ken terest in weighllilting for the tremendous interest in this riivisPayne, Dr Cato, Mr. A. Austin 71 and 83 not nut r.s[ieciivel> in Arch.-, who partners the great past 20 years and is sometimes ion. Sam Maloney of Palm Mr. E. Douglas and Mr. A. Huntc. the second Innings C.Seoley a h-ftharid.v Arthur Morris at Bris. referred to as "father of weightSprings will meet George Bynoe Fo ,nc weighUifting the left arm ypinner took 5 for 83 and ^^ |n th(1 ,| rst To)ll as nc oucn lifting in Barbados." He is reof Bedes Gym and they arc both Judges and referees will be sclect6 for 81 in the Australians two )|lg p,,,. N ov *mber 9. Archer's persponsible for the progress of such veteran lifters. Maloney and ed 1^* the lifters themselves from innings. For_ the_ Australians IorTnimc opposed to the West lifters as Edwin Rogers and Sam Bynoe have been taking port in a batch comprising of Messrs c, t Indies attack will lie watched with Maloney. competitions for over 15 years Delbert Bannister. Ben Jonas. S. v . sTeul interest by West Indians During the weeks of training and both are over 30 vears old. Holder. J Lmton. G. Gilkes. H. uSd '"^ Auatraliaa-i alika sinae the the lifters were forced to keep h should be interesting to watch Weekcs. and Victor Evelyn, all ti*a f,,rim wU k*v* an Indication of the away from any other typo of these "old lads" battle it out af whom fc %  Tast i>es-forrnaace of all players, sport. The Interest had increasagain. % %  '" the The tourists are likely to score ed and many spectalurs now stall Sam Maloney's mind plays a hssivUy against the Quci'nslanfl the various clubs lo watch the large part in big compeUtions attack since It is little stronger "work outs". Since the |al when he is called upon to put a than thut faced In the Townsville Championships, many more clubs tremendous poundage overhead. match. The State side's batting have become affiliated to the AsHe has left off his work on the strength will be a different proposi-aociation. Those lifters who are waterfront for several days to lli.n however. unfortunate not to have a gym train. His presses have Improved — %  % % %  aad proper weights, practice in and in the snatch, his "pat lift". their backyards with a bar and He will have to watch his jerks. SPORTS CARS a few pieces of scrap iron. He gets very excited after cleanHelen Jacobs, n old WimbleMany schoolboys have taken mg the weight and Is apt to Ion lucnd. crops up again. She up weighUifting since interest throw it forward. told the National Safety Congress has been revived. The Harrison Bynoe, who has not been seen in Chicago that "the lack of good College Water Polo learn, for Inin competition for a very long sportsmanship lv American mnlo'-stance, winners of this year's lime, has returned tossing Ihe u drivers Lmi redlblc." Ann League Trophy, hiis some keen "old iron" wilh more vigour than .-he had gome acid remarks about wsighllifters in its group. ha did when he was 16-years-old. Orlvarg who "think it is clever to Some critics still feel that His presses are not up to mark be stupid, and who regard sportsweighUifting Is apt to make DIM hut he makes up for them wilh mansliip ori the road as a virtuo "muscle bound." Delbart Banmsterrific form in the snatch and lo be practised only when they t r who hn s been ploying Waici %  law and jerk, Bolh of these soot a uuUcenuin lu Ihe rearview Pl or "*** a long period, cun lads, have excellent physiques be matched against any of thr and have entered for the Body youngsters and his body was built Beauty Contest as well up off Ihe weights, under the Itynoc was the Junior "Me skilful supervision of George Solomon who is al present nut 01 the island. Randolph Turpin, the British Middleweight Champh-r is an ordenl welghllifler. Di| he appear to be "muscle bound" in his lust venture, against Sugn Ray ttobinson'.' The youngsters who attend 1 night's show will most likelv renew their effort* in weighilifn ..<' % %  • • %  \rtcran lifter ol Ihe island, referring lo parent-. I"' me; "The youngsters should Nicholls. John Marbit. The latter howev. Sam Maloney, C. Goodi,^ tne one w'th the most room "*"*• "' d i -i y nt : _. ,or improvement. A very well It is divided into two divisions grown „,,, j „,,„,, ^ # w ,„ ^ '•. inches and over and piomUlni wncn 5h e immrna lhp under S feet I mches. business properly. There are a so a number ol enT did 0ve l|lllde N j trants tor the honour. Miss Bridget the C or tor Ihe l.die. On '*? A • od "" "'"'"" bugh nrpjtaiHxi in the Trade ... renutaiion built on the of hatrJlrng Tsw l of Cigircncs. Ggsnr sad manuficturcd tobsoio. The Pott of London Authority smith nsai m bond an mrage of £(00,300.000 groat VKIUC of tobacco. I hi* tMi.it>. w-iih tonrrti %  BBBBBaaSM terrn* b %  ipccaUiMd ftulf. can only be gisen b^ the Pon .f I. jndnn. I you seen our — CRIHALL STEEL FRENCH DOORS opening outward, with top light. 3' 9" wide x V 9" high (RiTTALL STEEL SLIDING FOLDING DOORS The whole door slides and folds to one side. 6' 2" wide x 7' 2" high SWEDISH FLUSH DOORS S' wide x T i.mli 2' 8wide X 7' hifh The Door with a Perfect f. Can br Polished. VarnUhed or Palntad. 4267 WILKINSON & HAYNES CO., LTD. V,'AV/,',',V,V,v//.V,vl'-WWWl



PAGE 1

Till RSDAY NOVRMBF.R 1. 1S51 BARBADOS ADVOCATF. FAC.I THRI.E Four Seats Not Enough For Barbados — %  F. L. Walcott Says In Braine Talks ^ .. rs u About Oops federation Debate In W. Indies IM.l.VII IIO.MMl" UAVU l'MISO.\ %  The constitution which w is proposed in the British Caribbean Standing Closer Association Committee Repot I one to be used in the forming of I • •ivcrnment ol \uv I*it L —I: Wot I'.dnv piioltiriMfl by Mr. K I. Walcott (L) oi Uw Government m d Mr. K. Mapp U,> at the HUMof Assembly on Tuesday. The House had b**tfun debating the report of a Select Committee which had been appointed t> prepare a draft reply o the Governor's message invitjng the prepare a draft reply to tb* (!"\ enmrV message inviting the Caribbean Standing Closer Association Committee, and the Unification of thr Public Services in the British Caribbean Area. The Select Ocbibcr, IBM nan* t., which the w^t Indies present dependence on sugar might be reduced, by producing other crops, both for export and domestic consumption is discussed by Mr. Bernard Hrafne i n the current issue %  if %  *-* %  Ci immonwealth". Mr Ktame recently cut short a visit to the West Indies to tike part in the General Election litre. The Select Committee held a *tatus was somewhat similar "The basir problem." he s^ys meeting on Oclobei 8. when those in the Dominion*, but in' population". In SO years or Messrs. G. H. Adams. A. E S. stead of that they were presented so. it may well have, doubled itLewis. F. 1. WasCOtt, F. Godda.d *'ith what was no more than a self. Unless. i n the meantime, the •""* The Speaker Hon. K. N. R (lorUiad Crown Colon > systesn m economy ean be mide lc* vulne-Husbands ware present. which. i( the House elected this able and the production D f wealth Thp > recommended ihe passing minister he could not even farm can be substantially Increased, * "" Address to the Governor CaUnet himself Y.,.. gag the peoples of the WeM Indies The Address reads: %  • ** 'hat even In our little fare disaster" Th.House of Assembly repeat* experunenl in Barbados even the lU acceptance of the principles of Buabe work would be better than Mr. Braine says some secondest.iblisning a Federal Govern[nis dustnes can and need to be mcnl "* the British West Usfl ** Keaierve rfW established In these territories, end accepts the proposals of the The two most promising nossibllBritish Caribbean Standing Close: V"" !" r "} a,,rr ,n l h d ta itje* seem to be rice and cocoa— Association Committee'. Kcnornrlke West Indians was the repromlsing because all the uidiea9* %  '*"" f r *"*"" ••' %  % %  j *• flwernorirtrl sunnUnf form which the proposed GovC.cneral In Barbados the Gov.*.' J> BmmanCa PwidtiHiA. duaiu ernor had no iaterve power What tions are that these commodi: meet den come. nd for many years to take. .hould 2. The tttf.*. ihe strength of n Government wever, does. wh*n a Governor or Governor. nol acctpl In. their entirety the <-"ml bti immm power.. 'British Guiana .^ th" most deunled-Tpipc.l^ at that Heuon. "-e should not go up to Engrfuiublr area for ric devetaomnM. %  nd ,|]l "• * eourse forward ^"> a ' Juary as Jamaica would There mm. to be ,,o doubtUuil "• ""— %  • ? •*' Z ..al output o( 50.000 Wn. JJ " }• amendment of son,,ever, a.p^-l e^h.jl^. hrgM capital, technical personnel and equipment ;irc* mad !" available for the vrr v extensive drainage which would bo necessary. Rico cultivation can be extends elsert wkere. notably la Ti :; Jamaica." Mr. Braine declares. The Hous4> % nvinced or '1*' wban they w jained from W lh *' British lni|tenai GovernIhe advantage' to be --.. %  Unification of the Public Sei -nem. since they wen? being given v...... m the BrltUh Caribbean ">•'" freedom, no West Indian and therefore agree in general with the 'Holmes" Itcpnrt on this subject. Only should be ashamed to let the TWtish Government know that at tke outset they -hould be given subI,ahour Defeat Did Not Surprise tied* MOSCOW, ou Pravada. Iseveatla and •*<, i Soviet papers Saturday tari.u a brief statement from ihe om>. -I news ajriKy Taas on ihe result ol the BriUssi general election nn ine iomment. the deisttt of t'-eLabour Paxtl' did nol surynse us '. It atlribulsK. Laboui < deieat to he loss of uiduencc due to tl arwiig poiuMr of the labour Party ui both internal and external Thr laabowits* -ltd hat Iwtv Ihalr piusnisrs to the elertorat' They promised peaceful a u irteiully relations With other COUPtilas. but waawd in anti-pei uolicy. unquaufiadly supplWUna i aagissoive ulait* i oKHiup o iia i t. Il cou* .i 4|ajg CCsQ %  frVSttve, the voters ai>paiviitl> eulortaUi (lie lu>pe for a rhan^r ui iiriti*,! polu> Howevei Conservatkvas' asjveiu will luu-Uay bfiag anythinn new suuv the .Labour Part. Darned oui Cup-eevatlvs poUcbM t r three i far or as" meml*rs have ^^nUally to build up their superthe Address arned until next :he House meet After referring to the good re•"•" %  > sulu being uchleved with eocoo, '}. t,a f b ha duiinsnrt>duc1ion of other ""''day crops ;ili..-h .established In the a Wei i Indies, such as bananas. citrus. cofTec. cotton an-t cocoMv P ,„,_„„ .^,, ta ^, Much Mpenmantal „ WM „ pHy „ ta „ OOB|| (jo(.,. mentioned that Souse Worry structure The question of Federation *- not .i vote-cdUhing one. H wi. ivhich they luW to lar very careful ai-out aj it would affect tut.iiv Went Indians. WalcoU drew attention to -here it II work i, being done by varloua t'hc^Hous/'so "rtoT' t^hV^iime' AssembTy" should consist of 50 Departmenta of Agrlcultui,.with 'v^-n tto J^aiM-T^uld d'e^ next ''lertcd members. It said that for a view of introducing new creps J^g-gaThe question of West Ihe purposes of the election ef Mite. ramie, kenaf. Indi-n r**lerml> o( Fc^leraUoii. ariM.t Tsssonli. daughter af a rich politician waited ystlfatlp' for bat au aaad's release. -*:,rp-.-,. fear. have more power and influence the lime of Ihe leport a Crwi in a PoderaUon tlum thvy could Colony and was In some ways sttJ. have at present. one, "But as soon as we agree to i' n, we begin t<> .isV; ourThose fuMdonental ddferei .•*selves what sort of rYdemliim we in Ihe oasss*stwUs ol ihe aevert, should have, and it is then lha. lalandi had led to man. evib Antigua t, St Kitu-Nevis 1 *• _}'""' "P agaloal tyoss eg >iii t w . WM tw fjwsw U i**^ Montserrat I. Trinidad 9. Gren22^5", l,d ^ %  *""" seMhUii-. at the ada I, St. Vincent z. St Lurla 7. rtiflVultie*. he said. Jam.,I bad l--n anfl ftwIajniT L *3ts.lff U "il. a ** J wou !i '* %  •** of the House of ftcprv M. ....< 'Ii.it foui eats t l( Barm" 1 w1 "' "*"•> "ivvig.ii.rH u,^,, Tnmd.nl and Bun liadus was an Iteuli to Barbados *damon and variedI sQlndi. aiul psjlan. were lepieseiittm by m H.,,-1,1 t lb aeouon.) und pop*'? ld """"lOl'' M ', r *" us ', ." u t,,, "'** u ' %  > % %  "> %  will Harbour Log IN CAKUSLE BAY l M. U IS..IS-., M I. r Sva 4uaM>,.r Msr V. •UsfesiM*. Vactil M-ioilUw M CbstU* S HiOdi gsfei K>.n0„ I. aMVAi. SB Mt'MIMAJ, 1.UM l.nu i*4 C. ta fss*. IM OHHUS Trmili.t ay. wissajaMK M *, %  a notrrro. SM o>n. i, c. .H-itr-n.ll, f.,*. aaeaari at. • S AUUA elONBsai IA UH, .il K—iiu-fw ,-.ii|.it.. S-* USJNMV R "AJMCt I MSL CssS VaHSM. fr TrtoUUa. M VlfMlaMU M V UAIIIUOII), B |ans nrl, c* l'"l—• (•" SI I tor THMa the need t x.\\\ found then wo* .i bar agains' lug agricultural producTh e framers of the report had Barbadian* ami other West lntion. u. encoiastar the e*iUmsiina ,le ii rlcar that the> do not di..n^ rrom entering those colonies ..sin ..f thruugrioyltui-al officers, WMlt lo ap. v ute very much from _. __ and to observe the close relationn, 0 report and they would have to ?rp Travel ship uetwswii laboratory and state in no uncertain terms "Do not let us have eo-operafleld. But if the agricultural p*'whether they agreed with the relion for co-operation sake. tenli.ihties of the West Indies port or not. because Federation means someBre to be reuliaed U> the fuH, When they mar*/ the result of thing to us." he said, "but If we Britain heghalf must recognize sdult suffrage In the West Indies are to be united, let it mean thai the special nature of the probwith regard to whom the people a man can go from here to TrimI em by continuing to provide that had chosen to be tbeir repreeendad just as he ean go from St. market stability without which tative.-. they had to watch the Michael to St. Lucy," %  ingress will be imposslreport very carefully when they Another matter for criticism Be," he concludes. looked at the position of lU was the goinn outside the House —I .E.S. members. io look tor I Speaker. That should %  Speaking lor myself." he said, never be done. Thul would imply •„, the outset I will sav (hat I that there might not be one capado not believe in double chambers ble among themselves to (%  MAIL NOTICES With regard to legislation I am Speaker. not one with the idea that two Mr, . G. Map* (I,I said thai heads ate better ihan one. h c mo felt that the report the* TbeM are e^numlw of people wrre considering was so Impor.i. rp divvraenr 'aried minds up""" lu emounlr ..anpared with the *• < %  i ' r tt l Jj %  formuln suitable U> than wishes and to ,,,,! MttMl of Tiinidad whu Ui9 > '^"K^ ** !" *"' 3$ with regard to the pesmles of lh* West Indies. It w_* Nl>*-. K.Mll. I iv. A, e HI' indication l "' Lu *' 1 i -'* tu *' that he thought memliers would welcooie that bich K portunlty. an opportunity i py minht not get m futo: itscusidug tltw nix.11 and t fel of what MM-1 of tiling Wee) West Indies. %  %  in •he |M".pUIl Was not astutuxktii that in UMkM IUI IUO lunoss th kbould have a nilstuie of II i worst fcaluios of Crown Colon 1 '.nveniment. Men who SOU achieve sumo power under a Crov i Colony Government would nut I i p|ai~e lo all Us frulures. SEA WELL MUIIV Al 1 II, II , | A MB RINtDAD K r. mum. I il : A Mc J Allsaa-y S awn-...!, g w< Rst. M k..j.M IW;M ' %  I M.-iiw U V.m HSdta t"iif. i. rtwnu* II AI Urnln i > %  • %  i '.... i i llEHAHI'l lir. It, OWIAL vr.rrrju>AY T.H TltlNIIIAD HI.IH M-IS-O-I fix.1*ll.imi.1 llll-in. ri'.trn,.Nl|>Mri> Jitt* PIpS* %  I'.p" Mer* I.....in SB**.*' U>.Ml l^Xs.l.) ' II lil-1N I O. %  ..!.,. I dm I ... %  %  -. Kind "There U no doubt," he said, thai stripped of all its panoply of words, the Report tells abort of ihe sort of document it should have len. It had been W*ed that the form qf Federation they should have, should follow BM pattern of the Australian Federation It was | loose kind of Fsderatioii. There ore important dinVrmiriis, however, betwarn Austrujiu and the West IndifS, Wbiob laad lo some Hul l..wi. Mali II"" I M....1 of tJie ilev would also Had Uiatwbei— %\XJ^i*0LJt^J^^ rtnletJ lor U> „,, ,„ AUBH,,!^ tn( ^ W ers uf " %  ar i UCIA diN.iiowaiue by the King wee jSSTmSHTJSl l M "V 7"Z' tofs-ral and were hardly ever ua. A JX £^'* TBE' -WsTTh* ui the Report ll un> suggest, d niwaman AI(IM Wiikina.ii. i thut they should be s|>ecll.c. Too %  ^•t*i>n. wmdsi ii.i.--H.i rente* King in Council fpr examnlc C H Bould make laws fur securing and maWMalatttd toe financial stability ol ihe Federation, It was very ohvioss that thin power would t> retained by th Ihitish Govern mvut so lung u* the Crown w.n responsible for sonv of the eon%  tUueot units i.f tin' Fedoratlon, Tlteir being Crown Colonle*. te ivifcers to Hif Majesty's GovernIn Touch With Barbados Coastal Station ..id Wirrlrw .....I Kills taaaiioi %  ... T'lMl. 1 .i..i H>bnn. ArsMsk.. Al.... %  • %  <.,, %  u. si, ayaanlinn rlsringlwessk pin'rfisg thai we mem made sure that "features of ^^^fff^V?**? %  *.-* %  ' cannot haptps. the Crown Colony system should *" in^the community who have •ia nl ij^ i^ "could not entei Australia was | hs-ieratioi, ..l irvJ powTn "of Ite^Owernor SMH. M/i iirKMu-r-i thing to offrr and will not seek lightly into any debate on it. Barstate* which bad ieaehed ., ( . 11 <;,.„. ,al, the powci of the King m r Ss^^J t ?^ w ^!^JS e iii aa r t y d -^ waya £S m h l^ o r !" ^< !" i >v, •£*< < %  fff3£v&X!S7ihl thing to offer and did iiot offerlt forefront of llsoaeeolorues whirh a^h „ al WM #( lial ,„ tht othl „. F ,.neral structure MAIIS ro, M^m-. umird Kingdom, were just showing they were aloof supported Federation. They had m poUtlci.1 status That was not BO nruc.ure. Aii*ftp aad Am..d."i at thr M s and one should not nominate always fell that although given however in the Wed Indict U "I think ihe delay which ha. opportunity, they could lift wm €QO i mliMi generally th u i Bab.. n met in dealing with the He^^LLr^ mnl. ,u,doe and Jnw- •'<• (WDSttta. l--n has been useful. To,0 they could do even more UonmUy ahead of (ne ^^ thing, during that time several BiiUsh Guiana was about to have colonies have bad their oonstilu. nstitutn.il changed, but %  Uea changed The dMTereet levels IIS lor rvml,.,.-, NfvU Mid S Crlbbrr -III I 1-n.t Oetce .. ;.i 2 p Ri Oldli an the kid i the c*r..i them because it was felt s they had the something to offer them-* Psnti atoll at 10 s n . RHi.i^ea He said that if n was felt that straps stall nips. Ordinsrj. Mail ai I an thev should decide on a loglajatnr when joined together under e m on th* su. Novvmiier urn by his educational qualifications. Federal Government with thi „..„ tnr _, ,,„_ there were sufficient profcwiors at other West Indian colonies. -^ff^n; -~4PT ^^fe-Jir^F^ the English Universities who could Therg wag DP hone for wnall .,r.d rrnc b T ur s s ciawognwin devote three days a week to the units such as these in a world ^' own L ? !" *.:_ ..!, it* rio* M ta* o*i*fai P0.1 OfBc* rusujing of the English Governin whleh events moved at a very ment fast rate, uni One would have expected to shrinking more have a Prime alinpilf,! whose dav and they .Mail 1 MU i" lo a m HoOMerMl ; t in Ordinary UaU nncss who netcr anBad I lon.aml |Li|!Skrscjmc from all oter. hm run DIMcould Dims oul oen i"c laaci.i 1... ion "n "1 know whsi >milc." hc aria. So he hrosstflt Ui .I dnh of Roysl Puddint And wiian ike Utttsd a. hsr f bioke oul into a bi/ tank In fail die **• him as* hand aad her kinadoso BRINGS A SMILE TO EVERYONE'S FACE Jssl ssrw StbciMai UOTSI PiiiSIss' I" toss UBttit) sad frtrada sag assa ssss* Bfei ssdha sstsdarMoa. Vavl wdb. IM (M Hiqal Pislas>g urr so oasaJv .1. r .., W\ BOVRIL makes a tasty sandwich A sand".v!t ir.^.U sridl BOVTD IS a toal meal ihe rith beefy And ihcv can : often—one 4 oz. bottle oi Bovril make-. over 100 dehviout sandwiches. BOVRIL PUTS 8EEF INTO YOU WHITE HORSE Scotch Whisky la i>Uen davs. the creac cmhlaionad on a Kfiighl's sfaidd ir.HiaimeJ his nublc n i r\ lo-dav, there is anorher sign of worth : ilie white horse that proslaim* a Scotch; a whiskv whose excellence has been tamoHiCoc over 200 years. gssesfai IHIML H ajqejTBOVO f W ititui been evstitod up. especially tween the bigger colonies. If wito further delay we can witness gieaiei measuiv of *elf govern* snout in these colonies, the bastei w* would be." He had heard warnings lo the Hi itifcli Parliament and had seen them iu the Briush Prses that each colony concentratad on self .'. Iiefoie Joining in the Federation, it would mean much delay in bringing it about. The should not pay much attention t that That aspect of the Report o Whleh he had spokan. to his mi"d WHS the most serloud part of n and ihry would achieve a ttronge ( %  'etinration if they came together pi nuts that' bod reached lh. same level of puliticd advanc%  I cinnol •iivisav." be -our sending even two representatives to a Federation m which a paid have less power to pi:"' fTectlvaly for the people of Barbados than we rtgvg 11 n-iiil SM Masu. ,IKII. N'Mllivi shasaess H .HI, A lam Ills. lit.. i* UWlM. Utlla. Hi*-"" 4. rna. Piinnarlor. si .u-t a IL id HsUl, *..i %  h Mawt.i.... -t g af-ry t 0 London BY BO AC. CONSTELLATION IN CONJUNCTION WITH B W I A. Fly to Britain in style : Fly by fot. comfortoblc Conitcllofion — >. i B.0.A.C.'s ccnlral Atlontic rout* via Kingston. Nassau and Lisbon. The quickest way from Trinidad to London : IIii I.KIttm I..IHI.I. I1W.I. t C.9II0 IJlMJI I.4J4.M \1. i-i.'.llns. .. i thrn'hnlr World NHV miih Rook through British West In un Airways. No charge tor IVK e. information and reservtionson -iri'dlnul liqhts to all *.i continents. FLY BO At %  y -<• WJ BRUiSH OVERSEAS siRWAfS rORPORATION BRITISH WFST iNPlAN AieWAVS LIMITED. i. i II wm IIHOAU st riiOM: uu OWINO to the lllnss. of Mrs. C A Ooosslvs*, the lss•oii* on tpsDlflb Conversation which wsr* to have begun st Coaibennare flrhool en Thursday. sfovambar 1st hat* been indefinitely pootpoiied. •SUNDIAL" BRINGS i SARDINES Tho flasjuenay Terminal.' Stinaltsl orrived here yesterday I wiih 0.8S4 bags of Hour from' Port Alfred, Canada, alongwith j T5o cartons of sardines and %  upply Mi..gne\l to Messrs. MantaI OPaj Ui Gufi I IMI| Exploflf'H I Kfler 9.16 pni yesterflre aVigade was called •uf b) Hiarks Street. City, ta put uu to flats*e which stsrled to burn a gas lamp past. The ga* lamp which proved to be defective exploded L too jiart of the ppst. RINS0 for all your wash I %  i e i