the "We'll save branch offl C. Noott, T.D.. B.A. Mr. W. A. other. Those of you who at prosFarmer, M.A.. Mr. A. W. Roberts, ent have in mind not to vote, go Mr. L. A. Lynch, Dean Hazlewood, and give me a vote." Rev, B. Crosby. Rev. D. C. Mi R. C. Representa Ive, Capt. H. H. Williams, Girl Guide Representative, Mr. F. L. Cozier. Mr. J. E Brome, Mr. D. A. M. Haynes. Mr. E. S. Burrowes. Cap*. A. M. Jones, Mrs. F. J. Cole and Prof. Dash. Present were : The Chief Scout. Hi* Exrelloncy probation lhe Governor. Hon. Colonial Seen' • wounding On Probation Mr. H. A. Talma Police Magistrate of District "A" yesterday placed Oscar Carmichael of Codrington Hilt. St Michael 0.1 for 18 months f.>LeRoy Goring in hi" tary, Ihe Commissioner of Police chest with a knife on October 24. Mr. R. A. Tucker, mid Miss D. Ibberson (Vice Presidents). Mr. J. C. Hammond. Ma|or C Noott, bell. C. R. C. Springer. L. B Professor .' S. Dash. Mr. Louis Wi.'the. C. D. Spencer. E. L. BanLynch. th-> Very Rev. The Dean, nister, A. G Jordan. R*V Rev. B. Crosby. Mr. F. L. Mallalieu, J E Kirton, Cozier and the following comBlackmail. J L. Thorni inUsioners Col A H. C. Cam;*Corbin. R Brathwaite. A. Smith, he Driver Forfeits License For Year HENRY JOHN of Halls Rood, St. Michael yesterday pleaded guiltv before His Worship Mr. H. A. Talma. Police Magistrate of District "A" of driving trie motor car X—M on Baxter's Road. St. Michael under the Influence of drink. He was fined £5 to be paid In 28 dovs or three months' imprisonment with hard labour and was disqualified ror one jraar 1*001 holding .1 driver's licence. John wai also lined 40 for driving the same motor cor with inefiVlenl brakes and 20 for L C. driving the car without holding D ,m appropriate licence. All trie G offences wore committed on OctoDon't let MORNING MISERY •e all-d— Whan haadacha. Intigua and upMt uomiili tuin you( morning, you can -uvi ih* day" with Alka-SalUar. Take it on anting, again-i( luMdad -ltr in tha dy. Kaap %  "upply of quick .sctlnt Alka-Ssltsar f& handy mimmytl Alka Seltzer Fairy Founlains. Squibs, Silver Rains. Cannons. Black Jacks, Snowdrops and Fountains 4r. Pearly Showers, Fircbarrela, Crystal, Spray, Snowdrop Founlaln, Roman Candles, Cannon, Golden Rains. Golden Fountains. 6c. Snake in Ihe Grass— Ea 6c. Sparklers, — package 12c. Bombs—each 1c. Snake in lhe Eton Hat St. Silver Shooter. Snowdrop Fountain, Fire Barrels. Krakkra Boy, Pearly Shower. Chrysanthemum Fountains. I0. Mines, Rockets, Jack in the Boxes. 20*. CAVE SHEPHERD & CO. LTD. 10-13 BROAD STREET HORNIMAN'S TEA 1 1 .1 rod na| "m ri agings. g from her '•IT'S SUCH A RELIEF TO HAVE NO TROUBLE WITH TEETHING Jha J-insAi Selection; FOR SPORTS WEAR in FLORALS, PLAIDS', PAISLEYS FANCIES and PLAIN COLOURS. "^. r in a nf iv -X % %  n.l'rlHUT ISStM > M, T v, „„.. ivmi. h.l.T Ataiaa A I'o-dm. hi. h . ir. ll.ir'i r ngulsW ii'.ii, pii>ii.it pMiful aWap. •btolulrly SAl-Kl FOR DRESS WEAR From • -"il lo M ASHTON & PARSONS INFANTS' POWDERS a&kfor Cusson? TIIK FAMOUS -KI.ITK" A UKIC liini;,uf quaUliai 111 Plain Colours und Slri|K,l De.Mfjns From $.1.73 lo $.".25 "RKNOWN" TIIIUMSKI) in Tan, Bluo, Oray and White ;it $5.23 "MIUBLK TWO' will. Sparv Collar in Tan. Qrtrjr, Blur on.I White : (t.79 and IT.1S •mm SPECIAL* in While only with the Ultra Smart Whte Spread Collar at S5.S4 SKA ISLAND OOROM SHIRTS b "tl-ITE" and "RrNOWN" T)i,r Slim, arr im!>-irtil free of duly, and s.. r aD H a a lll lhr I1KST VALUI in BHIRTS I o ol III i d I H-.ll, Priors : $K.nil mid 5R.IK In Whilr. r raali Karl and n| UP tXURY TOILET SOAPS IMPtRULLEATHEI • LINDtN BLOSSOM • ILITE HVACIINTH "i U.MI IMMVS-..ni-->..... *-*-*-*-'-'-'-'.','.','-'„ ,;'//,',i-..'//,'-r.w/.v-'-y-'-'//.'.'.'' IWIill IMal-:S.S SHOP SJ VW t r%r\^^^a% r %„%^ > VS^A^^ r sysi" LOWER BROAD STRKKT :: %  FOR BEST RESULTS USF. TOYS IMM:SSI:S —Ready-n.jde and made-to-O-ttr —BRAKHIEREH—White an I I'ink. SIZES 3fl und 40— will. Waistband and with.mi waWbaod From 043 in |5.44. IMHIW oiims IN THE CHECKER BOARD BAGS =: 9 H. J. son Jones & Co., Ltd—OiUr.buion SAVB OX REDUCTIONS at your Jowellers Y. ISel.lMA A G.. I.TII. Ill ALLY %  HE I ISISI %  OWN! DECORATIONS LIGHTS TINSEL-A Beautiful Assortment XMAS CRACKERS at KNIGHTS DRUG STORES Hi, >.••• IWSII A I I II lit S„s,4:„ I \ ir.lKAII.II llll K SSHI MII.K IMI'I RIA1 VII NN \ \l ^ VI.I %  SPAOHCTn ,.lll, CHUM i" II. >l Mil -VI I I I I M -I'UM.I I'l IH>IM;S ORKill ALLV .29 20 .li I UHICAN [-OB / 89*. NORWEGIAN PI 8*-. 1'I.ANTEhS' <'tM-KTAIl. PEANUTS —per tin HikURRANT JAM 2-16 tins 65c. MAHMAl.ADK-2-m tin* 49c. M-STHAMAN STRAWBERRY 4 51c. I KLACKWELl-S 11KEAKFAST MOI.I. per tin 4C. IMPERIAL CORNED MVTTON 86c.



PAGE 1

wmi ^^mmmmm % %  %  -seaessi FACE TWO BARBADOS ADVOCATE Tl'KSDAt (>( l.illl.n :w. l:.i CaJtUb Calling L ADY GII.IlERT-t'ARTER of nia'i> Ciurt rolurnod to Barsaadf* -it Saturday morning %  hLa*> Nelsa* from the U.&.A ndhag iwr yet there. mid Cam, ih %  • •.•c her son Mi. Jo-m GUbert-ClTter, 5 r;:rlar rxp*>ii at Wetinsh< .nw She wa* very glad to be back m Harbadoc. Paid Visit to U.S.A. R ETURNING to Barbados over the %  ak-crid fron werr Mr. mid Mrs. Clifton Wnsh: of Pinr Hili who went up :u the USJi on a visit. Brothers A MUV1NU from Trteidad rtaJ\. b rifl by H W I.A. ,n n frwHays' vlstl was Mr. T. P m* lityden and Evrlvn. Kingston. Jamaica. A guest at the Marine Hold. Mr. Evelyn is due to l~nve Barbados lotnt l Mr. Evelvn is I l>ro'hri of Hefl Q V. r\<"|vn Carib Tour M R. HAROLD CHAMPION, ntaUvt of Pi Features Ltd.. of London. EnKland. left Barbados yesterday by B.W.I A Mr. Champion had here On ;i short visit in connection with the tourist industry. Me ha* p nc to 1 rtnUUd, conui of tlic Caribbean. U.S. Holiday M ISS JEAN WOOD of Ejectrie Sales find Service Ltd left over the week-end bv B.W.I.A. for Puerto Hi % %  From there she will fly P.A.A to the US where she Is eoin* on a visit. Barclays Accountant M M> MRS JAMES <•MAK.jl.Kit were among tin%  "ig for ~ 1,04)0 -IVrpinji his" Ifj-k Mtirrn-Diy I ail> Uiliu SACRAMENTO. Cal. October 29. One thousand "Peeping Tomsogled a modern-day Lady Godlva who asked them to write their C* ngresimen protesting against Ih. high Uxes in the United States. They were spectators at CM Horseman's Arena, when Mrs. Thelma Coburn, a tall b,lond housewife, donned extra irngiha of bland* hair and climbed 9 white horse named "Angel" to assart Lady Godlva's famous ride. According to legend, that original Lady Oodlva rods* through Coventry on a whito horse in 1041. The world's first "peeping torn" is supposed :J have been struck blind when he tried to peep. However, Mrs. Coburn did not demand she crowd to avert eyes. It did not matter anyway since under her golden tresses she wore a flesh coloured bathing suit. The Sheriff's deputies were present to make sure that there would be no deriding. Before mounting her white horse. Coburn said that she was sure Ihiit everyone who witnessed her rule would write to his Congress-' man She explained There'' nothing political about this. We just want to remind the Go> ment to be careful how it niil> < X jn4 I ( n Gloria WAHSntN in ALWAYS IN MY HEART & THIS SIDE OF THE LAW r HUSTON v.. ||M't"l. BaH SMITH Loveliness for yon the taxpayers" money. PLAZA BHMM To-day mail*' S and B M n m ClanWARREN In ALWATS IV st P.I ii a FLAXY MARTIN VSrsfMe MAVU GAIETY rill' GARDEN — ST. JAKES lul HhoTfltlttr • at gSBBBM RAPT a rail arvn. TIIMM A aistr Lewrcne* T1ERMY Wad >onl-> and %  i. ABBOTT A COSVrSB.1.11 in IT MS F MM A rKAIL TO VIMOIAMCS K rti, (;NA.ST FUIII KS.fJMT Wad Tkurs I U IM< %  r Tot KM si -ii Bddir CANTOR -Joan DAVIS & unoissum* OHOST t. I. it E TO-DAY 4 30 and 7.45 p.m. ln| b) nwi'X 1 S-'urdi> nlht •• hui %  i,„ % %  ,. s, OMM c !" *. &."£* SJHJSU? George' Back To Trinid.d B.B.C. RADIO PROGRAMME TUrsOAY. OCTORrH 30 ISS1 II l> > rn Proframire Parad*. II at m *ldn.y Toich. II Repoil Brllaln. IS pn T R II PrtnniMtKMh and Iho Duk> o( EdlnBaaflgj Chib on increasingly well cared for by that IV*/**• J" "' rt %  t<*-;rnnnw-*iu. RiK !" *?p-i,ix->y. .he we,. U ay T. %  ?n"*r,'£. h ",, ASL3r holding student*' Union. Latest of their to is p m Pound and AUOUI. it jo p m won the uivail lg a Halowe'en Dance which Takin* ihrcrnaui From all parts of the world visitors cams to London to attari'l tha InUmatlonaJ Danes PestiYsl at ths Albart Hall. It waa put on to Celebrate United Nations' Week. More than a third of the perform em ware members of the Society of International Folk Dancing. They bad made their costumes themielveTwo interested ipecta tors from the Caribbean were Miss Cecil Manrlce of Trinidad and Miis Lilian Samuel* of Jamaica. Todat Well Cared For T HE social activities of West r (on Indians In London are being c* tacting Mr. Jack Marson Marson & Sons. free trip to Grenada for two. They w ,„ ^ hcW fl (nc Hoglet n ^ hilm their prize by conCrescent. KnighUbrtdge on November 9. This dunce, likf nearly all W.I.S.U., activities is The Barbados Flying Club are open to non-members as well .is Indebted to British West Indian members. It should be great fun, Airways who have given them for all those attending will wenr ihe two tickets free of charge. costume. Thcic should be somvery original crciitn>nThe contest for the most beautiful legs, wns not as everyone Christmas Dinner Betty Grablc show. A NOTHEH West Indian organisation mak'ng plan* for the A MONG the passengers return, ins to Trinidad over the bv RW.I.A after a holiday in Barbados were Miw .loseohlnc* Gatrllffe. Miss Ann Bradley Mis* Mary Stanley. Mis* Rhona Barcant. Miss Mona Prada ami Mr P tcr Charlotl aTJ (>iar)ott Is with Barclays e*P**t* Han.; in rni;-'.f-S|iai(i MlW I'rail | "HI I DOAUat RaT '.lie BBOal liasni* is with Ihe Rovnl Bank of Canada l,ful men H e l' 9nd !,ome of ,nc Fn -,,, in Port-of-S P a.n: Miss Stankv Is "" * ll *"3 have fff'^"jJ'iVr P '"S one of Trinidad's leadins ballet %  ; lub members thsttho First Visit cent yesterday morning by B.C. Staff Christmas Fund has been Airways accompanied by their opened^ III L N ASCOUGH. Divltwi children. They have come up ^~*\ alonal Manager of Cable k to attend the wedding "f Mr. St. W I.) LAd. accompanHilt's lrother Iiotiis who is to be kfr. C. J, V, Lmwton, Am niarried to Muvt Sylvia IIONIII on tnglntwr of the same company Salurdny. ..steiilay evening by v -' %  Trinidad. They Inspection Tour Over to be away for one week. raoosAMM* TUESDAY. OtTUni.l S*. ISSl S III N V m N-ri > ion pin LvlU-r (ri.ni Canada n M>a ss es M CROSSWORD GLOBE t%'4rifl*'ri ill I .iiiiil > :..i.. r ,1 <*. IltYOUFBBL^ Opening Te-morrow '• SusMlsy Plus ALL STAR TALENT SHOW ORVIL GRANDERSON "Bless This House" CHESTER HOLDER OliMan Hivei" MALCOLM MURRAY lli'-ause" NKVI1.LK SYMMONDS I Apologise" BXALY iif You" utSM Ughts" :)MI*SON mg To Know" Trinidad Actor 1 HEARD this week from Frank S.ngutnenu. the Trmi.iadliorn actor. Frank Is in Bristol al the moment with the Old Vic Theatre Company. They are repiesenting the Steinbeck novel which became such a famous play Of Mire and Men." Fiank plays tl i part .. route to Jamaica. This was his X curate of Eaher (BURVS first visit to inspect local forces will be arilvtng shortly in KHIK. since he took up his new appointton to se ve the Church £ socndment. Jamaica. Leaving Today M R. AND MRS. CYRIL BARNARD who nuv. hnliday in Barbados. due to leave for St. Lucia Basket Ball Players M R. REGGIE DA SILVA, Managsi of Siegert Tigers, the Trinidad Basket Ball team which iiplayed a seriei of game* Ilarbadni left nawrday i H W,l A. for Trinidad. Ken .' aacs aoothet member of the learn k*ft on Sunday alone with Mr. PBlip HaMb who had lieen 'pending a shniholiday In Barbados. Besides being verv Int. r%  '-:el PI III YOl'R LAST CHANCE TO riNJOY A I \1 '.II TO-DAY 4.45 1.30 ROYAL LAST TWO SHOWS TO-DAY 4.M a 1.15 Iti'liUbUe Whole Scrinl . "FEDERAL OPERATOR 99" w;.',v SlbBM • %  •*< %  om> i:. t < it .• Suaan Ul n. ,7, UurL of tK oas BT^Sa^uTi til' %  aiaua i i - IIM womaD'a ftUnd elSSTaau/ OK! YDIA E. PIHKHAMS I POLICE BAND f CONCERT | at HASTING* ROCKS i Aid nf The Almalr Homo lueaday, November 13. 1S51 at S.M p.m. ADMISSION I/HORROCKSES FABRICS STRIPED COTTON CAMBRIC SI..11 COLOURED COTTON GINGHAM SI. IT WHITE & DYED COTTON LINENETTE SI.JO PRINTED COTTON CAMBRIC S1.3S PRINTED COTTON FURNISHING Sl. ALSO FLOWERED CREPE a.20 T. R. EVANS & WHITFIELDS VOUR SIIOK STORKS Dial 4SM :o^ :0: ;0: D ll 4120 COSTUME JEWELLERY suitable for Xmas Gifts and ensembles at your Jewellers Y. . LIMA A III.. LTD. Cbuwunmvq. ths vi&il o$ 7M&A £Laiw JUnksad DOROTHY GRAY (LONDON) Beauty Consultant who will be visiting Barbados from 26th October to 2nd November. Miss KINKEAD will be in attendance daily at our Cosmetic Department and will gladly give you the benefit of her expert know ledge on correct make.up and skin care. Jjui&t DOROTHY GRAY COLLINS LTD. BROAD STREET



PAGE 1

PAGE EIGHT BARBADOS ADVOCATE TUESDAY. OCTOBER M. 1*51 Atkinson Hits R. Lawless Makes A Total of 538 Runs 118 N.O. At Congo Road I B'doe Louis Tdad In Yachting Games Vomooj* In lit Place Ramadhin Was Too Hungry fnm I1IMV MAX.AN Two League Hals !" s EXCEED DEATHS Hit Centuries '* GEORGETOWN TOWNSVILLX. Sydney, Oct. JO. West Indiana enjoying Town*U'mdward against Spartan. R. A. "Tony" Lawless, .tl-yearold Cable and Wireless batsman who** position in the batting uidcT (or his team in usually number 3. scored 57 runs against Mental Hospi.al at Mental Hospital on Saturday. H e tha ftrst batsman to score 500 runs lor thai tenon In the Intermedia! • Division. Hm aggregate is now 538 runs. Lawless' 37 and a good knock by his brother C. B. •'JimmyUWINI who scored SS run*, enabled Cable and Wireless to Kore 1M runs In their Aral innings. "Tony", like hu brother •Jimmy" Is alto a useful bowler The Mental Hospital bowllnit was not devastating as It was > %  > some matches past and C, WU'.iami who si the principal batsman for the Mental Hospital was called on to rescue the lde when the Cable and Wireless bat'-men looked very com (on able. Williams bowled seven iioint three overs and took three wtl KSH tor 22. Medium pacer H took two wickets for 4'£ runwhile V. Carter, C Knight and l Hock who bowled 18 ovn %  conceded 45 runs each had one SfkftBH to their credit. A: the Garrison, Empire winning the lean also batted the whole day In their match against Pickwick. They scored 116 runs In their first Innings. C. Prescott no. out 29 an<| Skipper Amor/ 21. Opening pace bowler R. Clarke and Moore each captured tw wickets for 28 and 24 runs respectively. In tl-.,. Wins ward-Spartan fixture at Congo Road, Windward after batting the whole day lost live wickets In their first Inning', for 240 runs. The main feature of the match was a brilliant 118 not out by R. Atkinson who vesjl at number three In the balling order for Windward. A. I) Gittens look two of the wickets for 3D runs and Skinner. S. Parrls and E. MeComkc one each. Wanderers batting for the bettor part of Ihe day scored 132 runs In their first timingagmi Regiment at the Bay. Bookie* Road. For Wanderers A. G. Scale who opened the innings with A. laWls was undefeated with 47 Beat bowling performance was given by .1. Brathwalte who after bowling IS overs and four balls bagged three wickets. Two wicket., each went to A. Phillip*. V Wtt<. and J. Clarke. Regiment in their first innings have replied with 4fi run* wlthou. loas. The scores:— mrtaa noBWaCK % %  c..%  -.. UtPMB-IU Inning's, Bo..rnr *trr t> It Cl'"< II K. Awry r A*hby b Moot* SI Austin c Moore b !ihlr> M Jinn b Hoot* M.' Armaliw* lb* b Clark* K. OnniUt run out I. MarrU e <*rk Evalym k> Mooir C Barrow c IwhtoT b Fu*>m C Pmaotl nol oul N SM**U run oul C D aaooiwr run M Extra*: PORT.or-SPAlN," Oct. 2. The first day'* play in the Seventh Seriesof Intermediate j !" *^ r ^J^ wt i n, Kbioi uplin^rrivTs^unda.v^ght n\and" cricket matches* ended on Saturday. All the ground! had and Trinidad was to have taken seated in the park facing tray good wickets and honoura weie divided between batsman i>uce on Saturday but owing f. %  >**< played sort anocMm: mu. and bowler. Richard Atkinson scored 118 runs not out for 'ht wind It had to be abandoned. Joh T ummru up the J= Vamooae took one hour and 20 H ^ oIfl ^QmhM -.-king back in KO# UP minutes to complete oiw lap. vjn raiiaii -hair whenered softly T ,"~A.'"~Y "1 T"J 7" 1 — were no. out m iu numm--. >• %  DOW Ur Sunday morning this race was Ifc S^ a f"o me for a long time ". iekf '"**> l0Bl ,wo ,C ** U ,or were of persons who resided out "The bo-U parted 'pretty well g£^^a^B SiuXS S->and Reld cam. to<* * with a light south M WbtowSSnlX; swa\U r*>£ !" X% ^' 1 o '^ seventh wlck.f and Ing. On the first leg to the windrushed back t their bedrooms and "v" "• *J* run „i n *• minutes ward TK4fl was first, followed by nuf <*.! the glatnoureM shirts l>ou £*i tor row 70 also played ,. TK44. Vamoose. Ednl. TK45 sod ^'n In toil part of the country ", Jg 90 supporting innings for Cyclone. Colts. Vamooae however weit into Goddard wore a rich blue hlrt Batting (oi Bordeaux. G. Forde the lead and was first around the with a large picture of himself :op scored with M runs while windward mark, followed by dreaasjd as a matador stabbing a P. Union got 44 and K. Water TK45, TK49. Cyclone, TKt4 and *" awily EdxlL — %  -%  %  — % % %  Barrow ana rteid of Colts car„_. __ . ^_ From Our Own Common**' COLTS took three points from GEORGETOWN, Oct iktrdeaux when their two-day Georgetown's Health Department l.oague Cricket fixture at BornilB reported more births than -leaux ended on Saturday. deaths In the City during the Ctdric Chandler and Conrad September month. A total of 331 Peid. both of Colts, scored lie nol births were registered, but rf
Citation
The Barbados advocate

Material Information

Title:
The Barbados advocate
Uniform Title:
Barbados advocate (Bridgetown, Barbados : 1983)
Portion of title:
Sunday advocate
Place of Publication:
Bridgetown Barbados
Bridgetown, Barbados
Publisher:
Advocate Co.
Publication Date:
Frequency:
Daily
regular
Language:
English

Subjects

Subjects / Keywords:
Newspapers -- Bridgetown (Barbados) ( lcsh )
Genre:
newspaper ( sobekcm )
Spatial Coverage:
Barbados -- Bridgetown

Notes

Dates or Sequential Designation:
Apr. 22, 1983-
Numbering Peculiarities:
No issue published for May 3, 1983.
General Note:
On Sunday published as: Sunday advocate.
General Note:
Microfilm produced before 1988 may be substandard.
General Note:
Latest issue consulted: Feb. 28, 2005.

Record Information

Source Institution:
University of Florida
Holding Location:
University of Florida
Rights Management:
Copyright Advocate Co.. Permission granted to University of Florida to digitize and display this item for non-profit research and educational purposes. Any reuse of this item in excess of fair use or other copyright exemptions requires permission of the copyright holder.
Resource Identifier:
17931718 ( OCLC )
sn 88063345 ( LCCN )
Classification:
Newspaper ( lcc )

Related Items

Preceded by:
Advocate-news (Bridgetown, Barbados)

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This item has the following downloads:


Full Text
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Lebeshhy



ESTABLISHED 1895



Britain is beginning to go broke again, and that could be

7 nited States taxpayers. Their plight is
very simple. The British consume more than they produce.
They spend more than they earn as a nation.
The Prime Minister, Winston Churchill, is not expected to
make an outright public bid for more United States aid.
but he is likely to visit Washington before long to talk things
over. Churchill may go during the Christmas Parliamentary
recess. He might at that time suggest the redistribution of
mutual burdens; especially the Atlantic defence costs.

AL DEFENCE

A deal in that field would end with the United States pro-
viding considerably more in the mutual defence effort.
Alternatives to more United States aid to Britain—direct
or indirect—appear to be either reduced British rearma-
ment or reduced British living standards. Churchill is the
armaments man himself. He took the Defense Ministry in
addition to the Prime Minister’s office when he formed his
new Government over the week-end. am
Whatever Churchill may do about Britain’s financial crisis,
he wants closer military ties with the United States.
the breaking up of Anglo-American
combined Chiefs of Staff when the war ended.
He will urge now that the chiefs be combined again. The
Socialists left Churchill the expensive “cradle to grave’
welfare state, and he also has to be responsible for that.
Any British politician, who opposed it, would be out of
office tomorrow. The Socialists also left Churchill the sag-
ging national economy and the costly batch of “free” Gov-

bad news for the

Churchill op

ernment services.

The British will get quite a portion of United States money
as it is. Congress has just appropriated approximately
$5,840,000,000 for foreign, military, technical and economic

aid. That is for 12 months.

If the British get their usual share, it will run upward of
$2,000,000,000. Churchill can expect to be sniped by leftwing
Socialists for every sign of closer relations with the United
States. To them he replies that he never accepted a “position
of subservience” to the Americans.



Sec. of States |U.K. Cabinet
Messages (Seis to Work









7)» | \
Barbados

BRITAIN IS GOING
BROKE AGAIN _

Socialists
Sagging Economy

By LYLE C. WILSON



—

From All Quarters. 2

A SULTAN
BUYS SIX
JUKE BOXES

His Royal Highness Al Saud,
the Prince Sultan of Saudi Arabia
who is 24 years old, visited the
Rudolph Wurlitzer Co. plant dur-
ing a week-end tour of Buffalo
and the Niagara Falls area. He
showed little interest until he saw
a line of gay juke boxes being
readied for final assembly. After
a thorough inspection of them, he
ordered six to be shipped to the
royal palace. Al Saud specified
that the machines be equipped
with free play to forestall any
possibility of the royal household
running short of American nick-
els, dimes and quarters.-

Arrested: A 60-year-old Swiss
pastor accused of working for the
Russian Embassy in Berne has
been arrested on a charge of “kid-
napping” a Russian army deserter
in Switzerland. The pastor is
said to have offered financial help
to the deserter in his attempts to
emigrate to Canada.

Record: The African diamond
industry achieved a record pro-
duction of 97,960 carats in August
last, compared to 85,923 carats in
the previous month, The output
for the corresponding month last



Left

LONDON, Oct. 29.

i ¥
KUMSONG ARBA

‘ s 73,058 cts. valued at 8TH ARMY H.Q., eon
£138,810. * = . KOREA, Oct, 29
Deliberate: An unknown man}, Chinese Communists rushed

fresh divisions into the Kumsong
area on Monday as United Na-
tions troops won a series of sharp
engagements along the 70 mile
Korean front. A new Chinese
division was shifted from East-
ern Korea to bolster badl
mauled Red troops around Kum-

stole a merchant’s car in Mombasa
and drove six miles without lights
to a river ferry. After the ferry
had pulled away, the man de-
liberately pushed the car over the
ramp into 30ft of water and walked
away. During salvage operations
later, another car, stolen four
years previously, was discovered.

Caught: What may be the
world’s biggest turtle was this
week caught off the east coast of
Britain by a Danish fisherman.
The turtle is over 2% yards long
and its weight is estimated at
1,500 lbs. Its presence in the
North Sea is thought to be due to
climatic changes.

Pilgrim: A 34-year-old tramp,
(“King of Tramps’) arrived in

oth

e location of the front lines
in Kumsong is one of the points
at issue in the cease fire talks at
Panmunjom. United Nations
troops gained from half mile to
nearly a mile at the western and
eastern ends of the front on
Monday, and in the central sec-
tor beat off three Chinese
attempts to retake the strategic
hill mass southeast of rubbled
Kumsong, 29 miles north of the

—U-P.







En route from the chuck- — a _ .
Sagen a to the Calgary }
tampede, Princess Elizabeth | OF
—— — from = Halifax, ; P 0 WER B. G.
ruro and Picton Mail, historic |! :
stagecoach that carted her |) GOVT IS NOT
great-grandfather (later King || .
Edward VII) when he visited
Canada as Prince of Wales in
|} 1860. The Princess is helped
down from the coach by J. B. GEORGETOWN, B.G. Oct, 27
Cross, President of the western || The real power of the Govern-
,;ment has not been transferred
even in part, is the view of the
|Peoples Progressive Party on the
B.G. Constitution reform
mission's recommendations.
| It is the first of the now
known political parties existing
to state their views .as such. The
party concede that it ts true there
are three salutary recommenda-
tions—namely universal adult
| suffrage which is long overdue, a
|suggested reduction in the life of
P r Ce t j the Legislature to three years
e ; n oer “will encourage the elector-
7 Jate to appreciate its privileges and
pe ROME, Oct. 29. | duties” and to keep a democratic
The Food and Agriculture Or-|check on the irresponsibility of
f£inisation said that furious com- | elected representatives and
petition among the United States,|thirdly the proposal to practice
Rybsia and Communist China for ;racism be made an
ee rubber shot the price up| offence.
much as 150 per cent. Ina year-; “Unlike other politicians and

style rodeo, as a Canadian Sir
Walter Raleigh spreads his
Navajo rug in place of the
traditional red carpet.

(Fed, Newsphoto)

Rubber Prices
Jump 150

Com-

five-



electoral

Lisbon this week on his second} 38th Parallel. survey of world apenicans ‘ groups the Peoples

‘His Exeelléncy. the Governor Me N, Oct. 29. | pilgrimage to. Rome, He” eee , - complishments curing 125051, ve —Purty~e-believe any
has received the thltowlag tele-} All of thé abinet Minis-/ England in September with only} United ions planes again |@"d the possibilities for the future | indulgence in racism as a_politi-
grams from Mr. James Griffiths,|ters, that Churchill appointed on] ¢9° Last year he travelled 12,000{found North Korean roads |#f FAO, a United Nations organi-|{¢@l platform is an attempt to
the retired Sec of State |Saturday were at work this morn-| ies through Europe and became] clogged with Communist con-|S#tion, it said: “For commodities split the people and destroy the














for the Colonies, and from Mr.
Oliver Lyttelton the present Sec-
retary of State.

From Mr. Griffiths:

regret a's I am giving up the
Office of Secretary of State for
the Sones which I have been
privileged to hold for the past
20 months, During that time
through my work in the Col-
onial Office and my visit over-
seas,.I have come vividly to
appreciate the problems with
which people of the territories
associated with this office are
everywhere faced today. I
have also been deeply impressed
by the devotion and _
with which the members of a
branches of Same Services
are co-operating w ose
people in seeking for solution
to their problems. At no time
has their work been of greater
wople imimedigtely: attested but
mm affec yu
He British are:
Weeki a's whole 1 owe to $o0
w as a whole. I owe
and to all those serving in The
territories under your adminh-
istration most sincere gratitude
for the vita) part which you are
playing in this great partner-
ship and for all spl id help
Seenetary of State Your, con:
. ir con-
tributions continue to maintain
the highest tradition of the
great service of which you are
members, I send you my heart-
felt thanks and my best wishes
for the future.

JAMES GRIFFITHS.”

From the present Secretary of
State:

“As you have already been
informed H.M. the King eer
October 27th entrusted me wit!
charge of the Colonial Office.

I enter upon this great Office
with full realisation of the vital,
importance of its work to
ple of the territories assoc ated
with it and to the British Com-
monwealth and the democratic:
world. I know how numerous
and varied and complex are
questions to be answered in
those territories but I also know
with what energy of capacity
and high sense of purpose all
concerned with them are striv-
ing to find the answer, I am
glad and honoured to have the
































opportunity for playing my
part together with athe’ of
the territories for which I now

have responsibility and with
Colonial Services in common
efforts upon which you are all
engaged.

Commonwealth Sugar
Delegates Meet To-day

(From Our Own Correspondent!
LONDON, Oct. 29,

A full meeting of all Commen-
wealth sugar delegates has been
called for tomorrow, It will be
held at the West India Committee
Offices in Norfolk Street and will
be presided over by Mr. J. M.
Campbell. Chairman of the Com-}
mittee. It is expected that after
the meeting the Commonwealth
producers will approach the
Ministry of Food asking for their
discussions to commence on an\
official basis

ing, and the Foreign Secretary,
Anthony Eden, was busy receiv-
ing the customary courtesy calls
extended to the incoming Foreign
“It is with profound personal|Secretary by foreign Ambassadors
and Ministers.

nhents. doyen of the diplomatic Ocean—in a ship’s refrigerator. Of
corps, made the first call followed
sh
bass:
Churchill remained at his coun-
try home Chartwell today.
will move into No.
Street about midweek. The out-|the headquarters of
going Premier, Attlee, spent his; National gang of dope smugglers in
last week-end at the official Pre-| Milan.




Sunday.—w.P.

HON. LYTTELTON Franks May





voys, ferrying reinforcements and
supplies from Manchuria to the
Red front. They attacked at least
2,100 trucks last night and early
today, and destroyed at least
235 of them. *A string of 20 rail-|
way boxcars was also set afire.

51 MIG 15s Destroyed

Communist jets apparently
gave up at least temporarily
their attempts to break Allie |
air superiority over North Korea. |
No air battles have been reported |
up to midday. j
Reds lost 51 M.I.G. 15 jets de-/|
stroyed or damaged in dog fights

a convert to Catholicism after
seeing the Vatican Holy Year
ceremonies,

Passenger: A _ large albatross
has hitch-hiked to New Zealand

across 900 miles of the Pacific

Brazilian Ambassador

a rare species known as the
Wandering Albatross, it was killed
when it flew into the rigging of a
liner and is now in the National
He| Museum.
Dope:

by the United States Am-
or, Mr. Gifford.

Police this week raided

10 Downing “
an inter-

Cocaine worth £50,000
It is believed that the

mier’s country residence Che-' was seized. — in the previous eight days. An)
quers, and returned to Downing [gang is acting on behalf of the!Righth Army Gommunique said}
Street just before midnight on{New York underworld, buying!U.N. forces on the western‘

cocaine in Germany and shipping

front northwest of Yonchon made
it to the USA from Tialy.

the day’s biggest advance—800 to
2,000 yards.

The communique said that the
attacks were thrown back only
after heavy fighting. U.N. tanks
again raided Kumsong itself de-
spite the rain of mortar fire. Four
Allied tanks were damaged by
Communist artillery and mortar
fire in a similar hit and run raid
on Sunday, but returned safely
to Allied lines.—U.P.





Be Relieved

LONDON, Oct. 29.

Britain may shortly replace her
Ambassador in Washington, Sir
Oliver Franks, a good authority
said. This change in Britain's top
diplomatic post would be designed
to give the post to a representa-
tive who has Winston Churchill's
closest confidence,

A choice has not yet been made.
This is in line with expectations
of a general diplomatic reshuffle
by Churchill.

It was indicated that Churchill
felt the time was ripe for a major
move which would call for a new
personality in Washington, though
Franks is highly regarded by
Labour and Conservatives alike.

Franks may be called to Lon-
don for consultation shortly id
may return to Washington y
before being released.—U.P

Eden Recalls

Sir Francis

LONDON, Oct. 29.

The Foreign Secretary, Anthony
Eden, in one of his first official
icts, asked Sir Francis Shepherd,
the British Ambassador in Iran,
to return to London for immedi-
ate consultations on the Iranian-
British oil dispute.

A British Mission might soon be
sent to Washington by Eder to
,¢sume negotiations with Mossa-
College, Cambridge. Joined degh on the solution of the oil
army at outbreak of War, and dispute, once the American efforts
Grenadier Guards, Dec. 1914; to break the present deadlock
served continuously on active haye made some headway.—wU.P.

service, 1915-18; Adjutant 3rd
Eden Entertains

15 Oct. 1915-18; Bri-
gade Major 4th Guards Bri-

LONDON, Oct. 29
Foreign Secretary Anthony Eden

gade, Feb. 1918, 2nd Guards

Brigade Sept. 1918 (despatches y
entertained. at lunch the Peruvian
Foreign Minister Miguel Gallag-

thrice, D.8.0., M.C.); Manag-

ing Director of the British

Metal Corporation, Ltd.; Con-

troller of Non-ferronus Metals her. Herbert Morrison, the out-

1939-40: President of Board |, soing Foreign Secretary, was also
present. The luncheon was given
fat the Foreign Secretary's resi-
{dence in Carlton Gardens, West-





Strike Holds Up
‘Queen Elizabeth’

By WILLIAM LAFFLER
NEW YORK, Oct. 29.

Insurgent longshorempn held
the cargoes of two great liners
strike bound at Manhattan piers
on Monday, and defied the Union
President, Joseph Ryan, to make
good his threat to break the wild-
cat strike with “loyal” stevedores.

There was no sign of Ryan along
the waterfront, and no attempt
was made to break the mass pick-
et lines of the insurgents at the
Cunard Lines Pier 90 when the
Queen Elizabeth docked. Her mail
and 135 tons of cargo hed not
been unloaded. She arrived on
Sunday, Six blocks downstream,
the Italian liner Conte Bianca-
mano docked with 1,566 passen-
gers. Their luggage was carried
off by the Italian line employees

—U.P.

Liberals


















THE Right Honourable
Oliver Lyttelton, M.P., newly
appointed Secretary of State
for the Colonies, P.C, 1940;
D.S.O. 1916; M.C., late Grena-
dier Guards; M.P. (U) Alder-
shot Division of Hants since |,
1940; Chairman Associated
Electrical Industries Ltd.,
since 1945; B. 1893 0.8. of late
Rt. Hon. Alfred Lyttelton and
late Hon. Mrs. Alfred Lyttel-
ton, GB.E. M 1920 Lady
Moira Godolphin Osborne, 4th
D. of 10th Duke of Leeds; two
§ (and one killed in action)
One D. Educ: Eton; Trinity



maiority but Liberal leader
Cabinet bid from Prime Mi
oceania nent



The “ADVOCATE”
pays for NEWS.

of Trade, 1940-41; Minister of
State and member of War
Cabinet, 1941-42; Minister of
Production and Member of

minster yuests ine e i; "
War Cabinet 1942-45; Presi- | . we > . Gute of " included th Dial 3113
| Peruvian Ambassador Primo
evel = ene S See Rivera Schrieber, the Brazilian °
ane eo wannowen, ay |Ambassador and other members Day or Night
July 1945. f the Government and diploma- |

orps.—U.P.



| dented speed in late 1950 when the

















To Support Tories

Liberals conditionally prom 1
mons votes last night to bolster the narrew Conservative

like rubber where statistically the |¢o™munity for — selfish
supply situation is less tight, in-
ternational commodity speculation

pushed prices up at an unprece-

motives".

The Party declare other fea-
tures of the report however illus-
trate the Imperialist framework
within which the minds of com-
missioners consciously or uncon-
sciously operate.—C,P.

USA and Communist China began
buying large quantities.
“Compared with the first half
of 1950 during which some prices
had already responded to increas-
ing United States demand, many
commodity prices soared by ten
to 50 per cent and as much as 150
per cent, in the case of rubber.”
—U.P.

U.N. REJECT
RED OFFER.



More Manganese

In Barima Area

GEORGETOWN, Oct. 27.
Surveys carried out recentl
under the aegis of the Britis



ment indicate the possibility of

manganiferous deposits in

of force caused no surprise here

and the possibility of renewed

os : alg mob demonstrations in Egyptiar

} TRANSFERRED cities was not ruled out. A new
|



PRICE: FIVE CENTS








F BB:
In Mid-East

By DAVID G. BRIGGS

WASHINGTON, Oct. 29
Britain is expected jo take
drmer stand in the troubled
Middle East, as the result of the
Sonservative Party victory
Officials here would not specu-
ate on what specific measures
the new British Government
inder Prime Minister Winstor
Churchill, may adopt, but the)
aid that official concern amon;
Middle Eastern Governments i

ready evident

Disputes with Iran
nationaliziion of oil
and with Egypt over continued
British authority in Sudan and
he Suez Canal Zone, are the tw«
najor Middle Eastern trouble
pots confronting Churchill am

over the
properties

uis Foreign Seeretary, Anthon)
Eden, .
Officials here said that it wa

itill too early to have had any in
fication from the new Britis!
yovernment about the policies i
alans to follow in these tw«
rouble-spots. They said, how-
»ver, that in general terms, they
expect the British to reinforce:
their position there, and adopt :
sterner attitude against the de
mands of fanatic nationalism,

Britain Is Warned

An article in the

newspaper:
varning Britain

against the use

been

prevent
and in
eoncert
Chur-

has
Cairo to
demonstrations,
Iran, officials expressed
and disappointment
chill’s victory.
Press reports

state of emergency
clamped on
such

over

said that the
Egyptians were adopting a non-
co-operation policy of resistance
to the British, In the Canal Zone
Egyptian efforts to stop food sup-
plies and prevent the use o
Egyptian labour, were being in-
creasingly effective. The Egypt-
ians banned the transit through
the canal of all British warships
but this was largely a psychologi-

cal gesture.—U.P.





Krom Stockholm To
Calcutta By Bus

STOCKHOLM, Oct, 29.

Seven seholars left Stockholm
on Monday. night of a-year-lo
trip in a 20-year-old bus whi
they hope will take them to Cal-
cutta and back. Members of the
party are University
one photographer, one painter
and one doctor who plan to com-
tine business and pleasure during
the 31,000 mile trip.

scholars,

Head of the expedition is a
young teacher Ove Rogby who
planned the trip for two years.

He recruited other specialists who
will collect ethnographical and
anthropological data for various
Swedish institutions,

The expedition has been offici-
illy invited by the University of
Teheran and the route will take
the seven-man team to Turkey,
Afghanistan, Iran, Egypt and

Guiana Geological Survey Depart- | India.

The old bus was converted into

an extension of the known area of |#n all-purpose vehicle which can
the ;cven serve as an operating room

2 since e equi t includes r-
PAN MUM JOM, Korea, Get. 29. eae River area of the North ;since the equipment includes su

U.N. truce negotiators ‘rejected
the Communist offer to trade two
swampy peninsulas in Western
Korea for central and eastern
mountains captured by the United
Nations at high cost. The rejection
came during a “completely incon-
elusive” meeting of the sub-com-
mittee set up by United Nations
and Red armistice teams to find a
mutually agreeable cease-fire line
across Korea.

Brigadier General William Nuc-
kols, United Nations spokesman
said that the sub-Committee would
resume discussions at 9 p.m. to-
day.—U.P,

Atom Scientists
Make New Bomb

LAS VEGAS, Nevada, Oct. 29.

Results of the second atomic ex-
plosion in the current series of
tests on Nevada desert indicate
that atom scientists have developed
a compact at jal bomb that can
be used to support troops on the
battle field.

tinues so as to determine the pre-
cise extent of the manganiferous
zone. This was disclosed to-day
by Mr, Smith Bracewell, Geologi-
cal Survey Chief.

Meanwhile taking with them
some ten samples of deposits for
tests in chemical laboratories are
Walker and Oliver Seymour, geol-
ogists of the Hanna Company,
Cleveland, Ohio, United States
who left by air to-day for the coin-
pany.

Deposits were first discovered in
the North West in 1938 by thi
Geological Department and pros-
pections proved them fairly large
{but of a low grade and Bracewell
said further investigation would
have been necessary in order to
determine whether this low grade
material could be treated on the
spot and converted into market-
able ore which would be a profit-
able export under the existing
transportation difficulties.—-(CP)






















Foreign Exchange Rate

United States Atomic Energy System Approved
Commission set off the seventh y PP:
nuclear blast at Frenchman’s Flat WASHINGTON, Oct. 29.
proving ground Sunday apparent-| The International Monetary

ly by dropping a bomb from a B29
Super Fortress and the detonation
sent a purple cloud 30,000 feet in
the air. The detonation was not as
great as thoee held at Bjkini Attol
in the South Pacific._-t.P.

Promise

Fund approved the plan of the
Colombian Government to sim-
plify the foreign exchange ratc
system

The Fund announced it “docs
not object” to the progressive de-
valuation of Colombia's
buying rate of exchange which
has been proposed in Bogota

The arfhouncement said the de-
valuation plan was feasible now
but the Fuhd reserves thet privi-

should change.
—U-P.

if conditions

LONDON, Oct. 29.
1ised their six House of Com-

Clement Davies said “no” to a
sister Winston Churchill.

|

|
|

coffee

lege of suggesting modifications, |

i

West District and the survey con- gical instruments and a coflapsi-

ble operating table.
—U,P. ;




U.S. WILL ASK
FOR MORE AIR
BASES IN SPAIN

By EDWARD DEPUKY
WASHINGTON, Vet 28.
There is a belief here isay wie
United States Mili.ary Mf nm in
Spain will make firm reconimena-
ations for acquiring air and naval
bases for the United States Armect
Forces, when it returns to W.an-
ington about November Ist.
Preliminary impressigns from
the Mission headed by Major-Ge
eral J. W. Spry indicate that ibe



Mistion has already tound aw and
naval bases that would be Ssuliule
for the United States “Anne
Forees, and would contribuie to
he defence of Western Bia
against aggression

Officials, here, have understood

that the United States are also
seeking permission fer 4igitioe
States Airforce planes to fly 6. e
Spain, generally in the cou:
defence duties in Europe, and |
believed that *be Spanish author-
ities are studying all requests with
a large amount of comprehensia:

Officials pointed out tha he
United States Sixth Fleet, for
instance, would require stores of
fuel, oil, ammunition, food and
other supplies to last for several
months, so as to be independent of
replenishment by sea from the
United States at the outbreak of
any aggression.

Sources pointed to the recent re-
port from French Morocco, where
strategic air bases are being built
for the United States to show what
was likely to happen in Spain.

This report said that local work-
vs there are being employed by
housands, and are being paid hign
hourly wages for work on airfields,
and that construction undertakings



ire vast and milliong of dollars
have been spent in a shoxt time. It
said that suct flow of dollars to
Spain for air and naval bases, was
igeiy to exceed by a large amount
the military ind econsmic ald
which could be earmarked for
Spiin next year from the 3106 -
000,000 grant, and from 4 further

unspecified amount from the same
bill

It is understood that Spain might
send here next year an economic
mi*sion which would co-operate
with the Mutual Security Agency
'n regard to economic aid for
Spain. This would also prove a
valuable factor in bringing far
closer in 1952 the relations be-
tween the two countries.

While Congress had said that the
use of $100,000,000 for Spain in
the Mutual Security Bill was to be
used at the discretion of Truman,
there appeared to be little doubt
‘that the President would -dirert
the full Sars tS be uséd in view’
of the fact that members of both
Houses of Congress voted over-
whelmingly in favour of this
measure.—U.P.







Terrorists Kill 2

SAIGON, Indo-China, Oct. 29.

French authorities said maraud-
ing bands of grenade throwing
Vietminh rebels terrorized this
area in two more incidents over
the weekend. It said two natives
were’ killed and three French
civilians wounded last night wher
Communists threw three grenaties
and fired automatic rifles into
restaurant 15 miles northeast- of
here.

A woman was killed and* 12
persons including eight children
wounded when terrorists threw il
grenades into a crowded cafe the
night before on the outskirts of
this city. Terrorists kept un

ivolley of pistol fire as they fled.

—U.P.



Communists Call For
Overthrow of Shah

Thirty Communist leaders of
munist) Party were arrested
raid, after the appearance of
Mohammed Pahlevi.
chief Tudeh ringleaders, wer
The tracts blamed the Shah for
all of Iran’s troubles, and accused
him of trying to prevent oil
ationalisation, They called on the
people to overthrow the Shah
Tudeh radio reportedly broad-
cast from u secret radio last night,
calling on Iranians to unite unde?
he Communist banner,
The Organisation was banned on
‘ebruary 4, 1949, after assassin-



ition was attempted against the
Shah. Meanwhile, the Iranian
*ress and radio and Government

officials declared that the
9! Winston Churchill's Consery-
atives in the British election
would make no difference to the
nationalisation of Iranian oil

victory

“Tell Churchill to sheath his
word”, headlines of the Vice-
Premier, Hoi Fatemis newspaper

ecreamed, It added editorially

there is little difference betwee
the Conservative and Labour Gov
ernments.

At the close of the session ©

hecause of “the not unfavourable] tbe Majalis, the deputies generally
exchange prospects of Colombia’’ | ‘

ommented that the British elec
ions were the British people’s own
‘ffair, just as oil nationaliz
the own business of the
ians.—*).P







ROYAL COUPLE TRAVEL

The Communists,

TEHERAN, Oct. 29
Iran's outlawed Tudeh (Com-
1 late on Saturday in a police
pamphlets attacking the Shah
including three
e caught at a meeting.




POCKET CARTOON | ©
by OSBERT LANCASTER

|

wanteo

ar

“You realise our difficulty,

Lestrade? If fits ng has

switched from racehorzes to

parliamentary candidates,

how are we going te
prove it?”



Peruvian Army

Chief Honoured

NEW YORK, Oct. 29



Liberals said their six members ] General Zenon Noriega, . bi
yould swell the Tories 18 seat f f 4 of Staff of the ea rr
W ] ‘ § & receiv te > Natior
majority on measures clearly con- 9 : in Reine ed ee ot ; ede ee ,
ceived in the interest of the coun- FORT WILLIAM, Ont. Oct. 29. ys ah “ahy visit ‘to the Unit
r >, ca 7 > . YE av © -|im ana day visi oO The t
try as a whole RINCESS ELIZABETH and the Duke of Réinburgh today —_ Shahes highest omnive of re
Davies however, after the second pleted their greatest day's journey, some 1,250 miles of their | instruction. He urrive

eek-end

conference with Chur-
nounced he felt unable to



he Conservative leader’: The major portion of
! f post 1 the Cabinet the
linister still was forming

=O. P President Truman.—-C.P

their Canadian visit

Canadian tour in giant hops by train from Edmonton to Saskatoon; jin a motor car fron
and from there by ‘plane to Lakehead. | 1

has ended. Ahead |

; +4 |
lies their revisit to the East and their Washington excursion to visit | ter





receiving the
military t



4

wi sei tin cia ce i st hat at a a ai tt ha Di a ei i Ri it i iil art ta it aaa en etnias in ly“ mnie onl mins ales ae seme ana eee





PAGE TWO
’ C: C y
ADY. GILBERT-CARTER of :

Maro Court, returned to
Barbados on Saturday morning in
the Lady Nelson from the U.S.A.
after spending twce years there,

She told Carib thet che went to
Baltimove to sec her son Mr. Jolin
Gilbert-Chtter, 9 radar expert at
Westinghouse She was very
glad to be back in Barbados.

Paid Visit to U.S.A.

ETURNING to Barbados over
the week-end from Boston
were Mr. and Mrs. Clifton Wright
of Pine Hill who went up io the
U.S.A. on a visit.

Brothers

RRIVING from Trinidad yes-
if terday morning by B.W.1.A.
on a few days’ visit was Mr. T. P.
Evelyn of Bryden and Evelyn,
Kingston, Jamaica. A guest at the
Marine Hotel, Mr. Evelyn is due
to leave Barbados tomorrow.

Mr. Evelyn is a brother of Hon.
B, Evelyn.

Carib Tour

R, HAROLD CHAMPION,
representative of Promotion

G.



1,000 “Peeping Toms”
Ogle Modern-Day
Lady Godiva,

SACRAMENTO, California,
October 29,
One thousand “Peeping Toms”
ogled a modern-day Lady Godiva
who asked them to write their
Congressmen protesting against
the high taxes in the United
States. They were spectators at
ie Horseman’s Arena, when Ms
Thelma Coburn, a tall blond
housewife, donned extra |
of blonde hair and clim
white horse named “Angel” to
enact Lady Godiva's famous ride.
According to

ever, Mrs.
demand the crowd to avert eyes.

that everyone who witnessed her
ride would write to his Congress-
man. She explained: ‘There's
nothing political about this. We
just want to remind the Govern-
ment to be careful how it s

the taxpayers’ money.”



It did not matter anyway since





BARBADOS ADVOCATE

nn a ee
|



1.2 p.m
& Costello
in-

IT AIN'T HAY &
DESPERATE TRAIL



BIOWN —__1.500 pn

PLAZA viv 2310

LAST 2 SHOWS TO-DAY
4.45 and 8.30 p.n

WARNER BROS. Present





Thurs
Abbott

p.n
DANGER
Mac Browr
& HAUNTED TRA
Whip Wilson

THREE SECRETS

Starring Eleanor PARKER ~- Patricia NEAL Ruth ROMAN

Wed. and Thurs. (only) 4x
Gloria WARREN in

ALWAYS IN MY HEART & THIS SIDE oF THE LAW

fay FRANCIS—Walter HUSTON Viveca LINDFORS Kent SMITH

1.30
HIDDEN
Johnny













and @.30 p.m

i
GAIETY |

THE GARDEN — ST. JAMES |



PLAZA ui 1

To-day ionly) 5 and 8.30 p.m
Glerla WARREN in
ALWAYS IN MY HEART &
FLAXY MARTIN
Virginia MAYO

Last Show Tonite 8.30

RACE STREET
George RAFT &

THE DEVIL

THUMBS A RIDE |} |

Lawrence TIERNEY |

- tonly) 5 and 8.30 p.m
ABBOTT & COSTELLO in
iT AINT HAY &
TRAIL TO VENGEANCE
Kirby GRANT—Fuzzy KNIGHT I

Wed. & Thurs. 8.30 p.m
Ir YOU KNEW SUSIE
Eddie CANTOR—Joan DAVIS &
GILDERSLEEVE'S GHOST







GLOBE

TO-DAY 4.30 and 7.45 p.m. (Last Shows)

“ROSEANNA McCOY~

and
“SAVAGE SPLENDOUR”

To-night’s Show will be finished at 10.20 p.m.

TUESDAY, OCTOBER 30, 1951

|

———_—

fark eS

-— Loveliness
for you

oS
Nes

/
(

Ve
XS

v3
O





Ge



—U,P.
loth Barbados A eedantay te B.B.C. RADIO GLOBE | oe Pe wot
B.W.1.A,. Mr. Champion had been oor | , ?
here on a short visit in connection PROGRAMME | The lovely film stars know how “You'll love the way Lux







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smoother — really lovelier.
A quick, easy care, but it
really works. 1 always
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with the tourist industry. to care for their skin—they use
Lux Toilet Soap. Pure white Lux
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natural beauty of your skin, too.

Opening - - -
TUESDAY, OCTOBER 30, 1961
11.15 a.m. Programme Parade; 11.30
am. Sidney Torch, 12 noon The News;
12.10 p.m. News Analysis
4.0—7 15 p.m. 31.82 M., 48.43 M.

He has gone to ‘Trinidad, con-
tinuing his tour of the Caribbean.

U.S. Holiday

To-morrow to Sunday

Plus














4p.m The News; 4.10 p.m. The Daily

From all parts of the world visitors came to London to attend the ervice, .4.15 p.m. English Cathedral 3 about RP ALL STAR TALENT Just wash in warm water with
ISS JEAN WOOD. of Electric International Dance Festival at the Albert Hall. It was put on to Susie: 4.45 p.m. Ian, Stewart: 5 p.m. . yaa SHOW its creamy lather then splash with
Sales and Service Ltd., left | Celebrate United Nations’ Week. More than a third of the perform- ppc Hymn Book; 6 p.m. Singing and s : ai € cold. Lux Toilet Soap leaves

over the week-end by B.W.I.A. for
Puerto Rico. From there she will
fly P.A.A. to the U.S. where she

ers were members of the Society of International Folk Dancing.
They had made their costumes themselves. Two interested specta-
tors from the Caribbean were Miss Cecil Maurice of Trinidad and

Playing for you; 6.15 p.m. Wel: Maga-
zine, 6.45 p.m. Programme Parade, 6.55
p.m. Today's Sport; 7 p.m. The News; {
7.10 p.m. 7.15 p.m

ORVIL GRANDERSON

“Bless This House” your complexion clear, your skin

smooth and fragrant.

° Ps
wonderl ri

News Analysis;

is going on a visit,
Barclays Accountant

R. AND MRS, JAMES
CHANDLER were among the
omesnaers leaving for Grenada
yesterday -morning by B.W.LA.
Mr. Chandler is Accountant, Bar-
clays Bagg, St. George’s, Grenada.

Back To Trinidad

a Mos the passengers return-
= ing to Trinidad over the
week-end by B.W.LA. after a
holiday in Barbados were Miss
Josephine” Gatcliffe, Miss Ann
Bradley, Miss Mary Stanley, Miss
Rhona Barcant, Miss Mona Prada
and Mr. Peter Charlott.

Mr. Qharlott is with Barclays
Bank in Port-of-Spain, Miss Prada
is with the Royal Bank of Canada
in Port-of-Spain; Miss Stanley is
one of Trinidad's leading ballet
dancers, while Miss Gatcliffe, Miss
Bradley and Miss Barcant play
water polo in the Trinidad Ladies
league. They have all represented
Trinidad against Barbados,

First Visit

R. H. L, N. ASCOUGH, Divi-

‘4 sional Manager of Cable &
Wireless (W.1.) Ltd. accompan-
jed by Mr. C. J, V, Lawson, Area
Engineer of the same company
left yesterday evening by
B.WAA. for Trinidad. They
expeet to be away for one week.

This is Mr. Ascough’s first visit
to Trinidad since he took up his
appointment as Divisional Mana-
ger in July.

Leaving Today

R. AND MRS. CYRIL BARN-
\ ARD who have been spend-
ing a short holiday in Barbados,
are due»=to leave for St. Lucia
today. ~"â„¢

Basket Ball Players

R. REGGIE DA SILVA, Man-

ager. of Siegert Tigers, the
Trinidad-Basket Ball team which
recently. played a series of games
against “Barbados left yesterday
by B.We:A. for Trinidad. Ken
isaacs abother member of the
team left on Sunday along with
Mr. Philip Habib who had been
fpending’a short holiday in Bar-
bados. ides being very inter-
ested in’ basket ball, Mr. Habib is
Sceretary. of the Trinidad Light
Aeroplane Ciub of Trinidad, He
7 2 member of B.W.1.A. in Trini-
aad,

Neil Hodgkinson another mem-
ber of the Siegert Tigers Basket
Rall teain is due to return to

Trinidad today.



SHIRT

RELIA

‘Palmetto Street







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FOR LESS MONEY
°

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Obtainable at all Leading Stores





Miss Lilian Samuels of Jamaica.

Flying Success

HE Flying Club’s Dance at
the Paradise Beach Club on
Saturday night was a huge suc-
cess and the lucky person holding
the ticket No. 1362 has won the
free trip to Grenada for two, They:
can claim their prize by con-
tacting Mr, Jack Marson of J. A.
Marson & Sons.

The Barbados Flying Club are
indebted to British West Indian
Airways who have given them
the two tickets free of charge.

The contest for the most beau-
tiful legs, was not as everyone
expected a Betty Grable show,
but a contest for the most ‘beau-
tiful’ men’s legs, and some of the
exhibits it was felt would have
had a better chance shad they
worn long pants!!

For Brother’s Wedding’

R. AND MRS. HARRY ST.

HILL flew in from St. Vin-
cent yesterday morning by B.G.
Airways accompanied by their
two children. They have come up
to attend the wedding of Mr. St.
Hill’s brother Louis -who is to be
married to Miss Sylvia Boxill on
Saturday.

Inspection Tour Over

RIG. A. F. C. JACKSON,
G.O.C, Caribbean Area ac-
companied by Mrs. Jackson and
Brig. Jackson's A.D.C., Lt. Stephen
Morton left on Sunday morning
for Puerto Rico by B.W.LA. en
route to Jamaica. This was his
first visit to inspect local forces
since he took up his new appoint-
ment,





Hearing voices a third man joins
them and the men all glare angrily.
** | found them stowed away below.
What shall we do with them?”
says the first man. ‘* Let's chuck

them overboard,"” growls another.
“Oh please, don’t hurt Rupert,”



NCE

Phone 4764





HORROCKSES FABRICS |

erireD COTTON CAMBRIC 2 2302s a



Rendezvous.

745-10. 30 pom 48.43 M.

Well Cared For 1.46 p.m. Generally Speaking: 8.15
HE social activities of West fiom Britain, 845 pm. TRH. Prin-
Indians in London are being — sid the Duke of Bei
increasingly well cared for by that DUrsh. 9 pm. Me a SAOCRER OW .
enterprising body, the West Indian News, 10.10 pm. From: the Bdltoriale:
Students’ ‘Union. Latest of their 10.15 p.m. Pound and About; 10.30 p.m.
ideas is a Halowe’en Dance which Taking the Census.
will be held at the Hostel in Hans 2 ee
Crescent, Knightsbridge on 10 05—10.20 p.m. .... .. News
November 9. This dance, like 10.20—10.95 p.m, Letter from Canada.
nearly all W.1S.U., activities is 11:72 Mes. 25.60 M.
open to non-members as well as
members, It should be great fun,
for all those attending will wear
costume. There should be some
very original creations,

Christrias Dinner
NOTHER West Indian organi-
sation making plans for the
Festive Season is the West India
Club, Secretary Mr. R. L. Payne
says that a dinner, limited for
space reasons to 45 members, will
be held on the club premises at
Whitehall Court on Desember 19
Mr, Payne also sends out a re-
minder to club members that the
Staff Christmas Fund has been
opened,
Trinidad Actor
HEARD this week from Frank
Singuineau, the Trinidad-
born actor, Frank is in Bristol at; 'z

PROGRAMME
TUESDAY, OCTOBER 3°, 1951.



CROSSWORD



Across

2 and 6 Down. {tem in a gangster’s
manicure case? (2%)

4. Pancy e sorts. (6)

10. In these you Introduce novelties.

iw)
Stop them if they strrttogo. (5)

: 13 See the post it’s tops! (4

the moment with the Old Vic! if Tei, ’mar do this, ca) |
Theatre Company. They are re-| 15. Metricai foot mat! me ea
presenting the “Steinbeck novel] |, Cee atone ae (4) |
which became such a famous play] 'y: Concealed taien’ > (6)

“Of Mice and Men.” Frank plays] 20.
the part of “Crooks.” He says that
the play has b»en warmly received, “t

Curate For Jamaica

What the homeless tong for. (9)
Down
Held to dance in, (9)

Pamous ornitiiological utterance.
(5, 4

4. Here you can see the bishop's





HE Reverend John Redmayne, throne, (9)
curate of Esher (Surrey) % Giwaye spotted rarely seen. (7)
will be artiving shortly in Kings-| 7° Broken oat jane. (7)
ton to serzve the Church in] 8 here it must not be told (4)
J ice 9 Pitmayv recognitios thar it as |
amaica. ee ee, (8 ii. 47)
. S is sometimes prtseq, (4
18. Girls of the ola Sriwete ? rt :
Solution ot , slo. —
* Rock—17 ¢ Gen Glide, Vesteraeye et sce at: |
ton 0C. — Leset. 15. Alp: 14, Teagel: 15 Reason:
18 Bast. 2) Lois (AegsEaas : sollj, 22.
Inns: 82 Ultra: 23 Down: 1.
et ret men Ae weyel: |B. 24. Gees:
; 6. ning: : 9,
Testato-; 18. : 15. +. 16, °
Testator: 18, eotin fb. Rail? fo Soda
fleip retieve distress of MONTHLY

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SOD DOOOID OI POTON

POLICE BAND
CONCERT

HASTINGS ROCKS
In Aid of The Almair Home
on
‘Tuesday, November 13, 1951
at 8.00 p.m.

ADMISSION =o:







cries Rollo, ‘It's my fault we're
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says the skipper, ‘* We'll keep
them as long as they're useful to
us. Alter that they shall pay the
penaliy for coming where they're
not wanted,"’ Then the pals are
hustled away and put to work.

1/-





COSTUME
JEWELLERY



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MALCOLM MURRAY
“Because”

NEVILLE SYMMONDS
“I Apologise”

KEITH SEALY
“Because of You”

NEVILLE GREEN
“Harbour Lights”

DORIAN THOMPSON
“Too Young To Know”

FRANK CORBIN __
“Count Every Star”

DENZIL DEANE we
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ROYAL

LAST TWO SHOWS TO-DAY
4.30 & 8.15

Republic Whole Serial . . .

“FEDERAL OPERATOR
99”

with
Martin LAMONT Helen TALBOT

WEDNESDAY & THURSDAY
4.30 & 8.15

Republic Double
Sunset CARSON in

‘BANDIT OF THE

BADLAND ”
AND
“END OF THE
RAINBOW ”
Starring

Nelson EDDY — Ilona MASSEY



ROXY

LAST TWO SHOWS TO-DAY
445 &

8.15



wiv HOWARD da SILVA
‘A Univeral-intemational Picture
EXTRA

2-REEL MUSICAL
Gene KRUPA and His Orc.



WEDNESDAY & THURSDAY
4.30 & 8.15

Republic Whole Serial
“FEDERAL OPERATOR
99 ”

with
Martin LAMONT Helen TALBOT
Action from Start to Finish!



OLYMPIC

TO-DAY & TOMORROW
4.30 & 8.15

Columbia Double .. .

CHARLES STARRETT—SMILEY

BURNETT in

TEXAS BYNAMO”

AND

“GIRL OF
WEAR”
— Starring —

Robert CUMMINGS
Joan CAULFIELD

THE





THURSDAY Only 4.30 & 8.15

Universal Double

Barry FITZGERALD in

“NAKED CITY”

AND

“THE OVERLANDERS ”

FRIDAY Only 4.30 & 8.15
“SCARLET STREET”’
AND
“THE MAGIC BOW”







TUESDAY, OCTOBER 30,





1951

We Claim We Are The
People Most Competent

Walcott Tells St. Joseph Electorate

MR. E. K. WALCOTT, Deputy Leader of the Electors’ Asso-

ciation, told

his listeners at Bathsheba, St.

Joseph, on

Friday night, that like New Zealand and Australia, England
had just changed their Labour Government for a Conserv-
ative Government, and advised that the electorate here do

the same thing on Election

Day.

He was speaking in support of his Party’s candidate Mr.
Coward for election to the House of Assembly as a repre-

sentative of St. Joseph.

Mr. Walcott said that as they
knew it was the first time in the
history of the island that they
would be having Adult Franchise.
When they voted this time it might
be the last time they would do so
for five years. In truth and in
fact the session of the House to-
day was only a_ three-year one,
but they had heard the other side,
or at any rate some of them, say-
ing that they were going to make
the session five years. “I hope
that is not true”, seid Mr. Wal-
cott. “because for many reasons
it would be utterly unfair. It is
true that the parliament of Great
Britain sits for five years, but then
they have had Adult Franchise
since 1918.

World History

“It is the history of the world
that the first time Adult Franchise
is given, you find people inclined
to give way to emotions rather
than to. their common sense and
their ability, That is a danger
which should be avoided, and you
should have the opportunity with-
in three years to see how it works
so that you will be able to rectify
any mistakes whieh you may make
at the ejections. Having gained
experience you, will be able to use
that knowledge better when the
next times comes.”

Mr. Walcott said that they
might not know but it was right
that they should know, that up
to four years ago, members of
the House of Assembly had no
authority to dictate the policy
of the island. I: was the Gov-
ernor-in-Executive Committee
who dictated the policy. Four
years ago had come what was
known as the “Bushe Experi-
ment” and that was an experi-

. ment to give the four members
of the House of Assembly who
sat on. the Executive Committee,
the right and the power to dic-
tate and to do what they
thought, in their opinion, was
for the good of the island.

“So far it-has only been our
political opponents who have had
the opportunity of doing or being
able to show the island what they
ean do. This has never fallen to
the lot of the Conservative Party.”

The Gther side liked to say that
the Conservative Party, no matter
where such a party was, was com-
posed of a lot of diehards, but if
his listeners had read the Advo-
cate a few days ago they would
probably have seen a paragraph
from the great Disraeli, afterwards
Lord Beaconsfield. He was one of
the greatest Conservatives but did
more for the people of Great Brit-
ain than any Labour Government
had ever done,

“We claim that if and when you
give us the chance to dictate the
policy of this island, that with our
brains, our. experience and our
knowledge, we shall be able to do
better than our present political
opponents.

Manifesto Issued

“We have issued a manifesto to
show you what we are prepared
to do if you will give us enough
members in the House to be able
to control the House.”

Mr. Walcott said to his listeners
that they had no doubt heard a
lot of talk about the Bprbados
Workers’ Union and the Labour
Party but he could assure them
that the two things were distinct-
ly different.

The trade union was created by
the Governor-in-Executive Com-
mittee in 1939 when he was Attor-
ney General. “We were the people

who created trade unions and said
that they must function in this
island as in other den cratic coun-
tries; that employees should be
able to treat with their employers
so as to be able to get fair terms.
This has nothing to do with poli-
tics.”

When they heard the other side
talking about the benefits the
people had got through the
trade union, they were not to con-
fuse the trade union with political
power or with politicians. “It does
not matter who is in power in the
House, trade unions will function

and will continue to function
effectively.’?

Mr. Walcott said that his
Party did not want to decry

their opponents, but what they

had to say was that their oppo-

nents may be good but they
were better. ‘‘We claim that we
are the people most competent,

Take out their undoubtedly

brilliant leader and tell me of

any of the rest that, can stand
up to us,” questioned Mr, Wal-
cott,

Change of Government

He told them ‘that New Zealand
after 15 years had changed their
Labour Government and put in a
Conservative Government and that
was almost the same case with
regard to Australia. That day
England had also put the Conser-
vative Government back in power,
and he counselled: “If you have
as much sense as the Englishmen
you will do the same thing here.”

He was glad to recommend Mr.
Coward to them as a_ candidate
who would look after their inter-
est and would ask that they give
him their support. “You will see
to it that when you go to the polis
you will put an “X” against Mr.
Coward's name. Do not make a
mistake for it may be five years
before you will be in a position to
remedy it.”

Mr. Coward said that he was
glad of the opportunity to speak
to them on the platform of the
Electors’ Association. He was
there to offer himself as a candi-
date for the House of Assembly
to represent them. He was not a
stranger to them and could assure
them that he had political experi-
ence, some judgment and a sound
knowledge of the constitutional
and social set-up of the island,
With these attributes he felt him-
self capable of representing them.

High C.O.L.

Day by day the high cost of liv-
ing was taking away everything
the worker possessed. There was
no likelihood of getting this situa-
tion remedied in the near future
without a radical change. He was
determified to do his bit in reliev-
ing the situation.

Mr. Coward referred to the East
Coast Road ana said that not only
would the doing of the road pro-
vide wovk for the people of the
parish, but it would be beneficial
to the ratepayers, With the road
done buildings would soon start to
go up along it, landowners would
be able to dispose of some house
spots and the parish would get
more revenue which would be
used to help the destitute people
in it,

He was presenting himself as a
servant of the people and not one
who would toe the Party line. He
knew the sufferings of the under-
privileged because he had sprung
from among them. He knew their
needs and therefore he was
appealing to them to vote in his
favour on Election Day.









i oI

For Walue Plus
Quality

insist on this







wine

He'f touies 3/3

_



PAULETTE copparp iw mapam /larbour Log Charge Dismissed





PAULETTE GODDARD, popular United States screen star anes not

seem in the least bit perturbed by

the number of male admirers that

surround her as she leaves her hotel in Madrid during a recent visit.

—Express.



THE CHILD IS
MORE
IMPORTANT
POPE PIUS SAYS

CASTEL GANDOLFO, Italy,
Oct. 29.

Pope Pius XII in a lengthy
speech to Catholics reiterated the
Church’s opposition in any form to
birth control, abortion and artiti-
cial insemination.

The Pontiff took particular pains
in his 8,000 word discourse to par-
ticipants of the Catholic Congress
of Obstetricians which just con-
cluded its work, to point out that
there are no exceptions to the
“divine mandate” that matri-
mony’s primary purpose is the be-
getting of children.

He said the child itself was more
important than the mother and
that if doctors had to make a de-
cision in the critical moment
which should survive, “the baby
has the right to live immediately”,

The Pope told doctors that they
must reply with a “calm, fearless
and irrevocable “no” when con-
fronted with unreasonable and im-
moral demands”, Regarding birth
control in any form, contraceptives,
abortion—even to save the moth-
er’s life—and artificial insemin-
ation. He said: “Every human being
even a baby in its mother’s womb
has the right to live immediately.
That right comes from God—not
from his parents nor from any
human society, or authority.”

There’s no man, no human
authority no science, no medical,
eugenic, social, economic or moral
reason which may give valid juri-
dical decision for the direct, delib-
erate disposition of an innocent
life.’—U.P.



‘The antiseptic for general use in the home should be highly
germicidal yet gentle on delicate tissues, non-poisonous and,
preferably, should not stain clothes or the skin,
fulfils every one of these conditions. Absolutely reliable,
‘ Dettol’ can be safely used on even very young children.

‘DETTOL

Jamaica Séeks
Development

Corporation
-IN US.

(From Our Own Correspondent)

KINGSTON,

The Jamaica Government is now
studying a proposal for the estab-
lishment of a Jamaica Develop-
ment Corporation in the United
States as a follow-up to the “Sell
Jamaica” mission which recently
toured that country in eonnection
with the island’s industrialisation
programme,

The proposal was conceived in
Washington and New York a few
days ago during consultations
between Jamaica’s Minister for
Social Welfare and overseas. poli-
teal trade representative, the
Hon, Donald Sangster, and the
President of the Import-Export
Bank, the vice-president of. the
International Bank for Reconstruc-
tion and Development, representa-
tives of the United States Point-
four administration and represen-
tatives of a well-known interna-
tional Trust firm,

A draft plan has been drawn
up in the United States and
submitted to the Government for
consideration, The Corporation
would follow the lines of the
successful experience of Chile
Puerto Rico and Liberia, among
ether countries with such Cor-
porations in the United States—
the objective being to secure the
flow of investment capital to
Jamaica for industrial and semi-
public development.

‘Tell me
doctor... |

What do
you mean by
a safe antiseptic?’

* Dettol *

vo THE MODERN ANTISEPTIC

-













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'O GITHAGAS LAITR

oe

BARBADOS ADVOCATE



IN CARLISLE BAY

Sch. Henry D. Wallace, Sch. W. L
Eunicia, Sch Lady Noéleen, Sch. Cyril
E. Smith. Sch. Mary E. Caroline, Sch

Mary M Lewis, Sch United Pilgrim S.,
Sch, Providence Mark, Sch. Sunshine R.
Sch, Belqueen, Sch, Lydia Adina §

Sch, Molly N. Jones, M.V. Jenkins
Roberts
ARRIVALS
8.8. Alcoa Pointer, 3,931 tons net, Capt
Otestad, from St. Vincent
M‘V, Lady Joy, 46 tons net, Capt
Rarsons. from St. Lucia

° DEPARTURES
WONITA, 41 tons net, Capt.

Seh
ae, r Grenada

MONEKA, 100 tons net, Capt
Funder “tor Dominica.
Sch. ANTTA H., 51 tons net, Capt

Hazell, for British Guiana
8.8. POLYCREST, 720 tons net, Capt
Norsett, for British Guiana.



In Touch With Barbados
Coastal Station

Cable and Wireless (West Indies) Ltd.
advise that they can now communicate
with the following ships through their
Porbados Coast Station :—

S.S. Golfito, Mobrina, Atlantic Voyager,
Citta Di Viarreggio, British Restraint, S
Rosa, Romana, Treworlas, Rosario, Presi-
dente Dutra, Lady Nelson, Presidente
Monree, Alcoa Pioneer, Sheaf Mead, Alcoa
Pilgrim, Blue Master, Polycrest, Runa,
Gloxinia, Gascogne, North Valley, Maria
eaten Alcoa Polaris, Statesman and

Te De Re

Snare ON SUNDAY—By L.A.V
From MAIQUETIA—
Pete: Batten, Roberte Simeon, Dolorés
a Mariela Mellior, Rosa Isaguirre,
ieee) Peeuirre, Odoardo Morales, Tsabe!

ener ‘ON MO}
For MATURIN— ) DY
Basdeo Samaroo, Walter Spangler,
Estella Spangler, Judy Spangler
ARRIVALS By BWA

YESTERDAY
From, TRINIDAD—
DB, Levy, C. Knox, N Gransaull, §&
Levy, T. Evelyn, Cmdr, C. Hayward

A. Hoad, D. Ward, A. Kissel, M. Miz-
rahi, A. Wart
From TRINIDAD—
ON SATURDAY
N. Howard, A. eerees, G.
B®. Huggins, N. Hinkson,
Quested, J. Dinley
From TRENIDAD—
ON SUNDAY
D. Indar, C. Rogers, C. Farmer, FE
Farmer, G. Weatherstone, J. Williams,
R, Alexander, C. Demouy, M. Demouy,
C. Maples, E. Taylor,
From VENEZUELA—
ON SATURDAY

Hygains,
. Quested, M

Martina Jackson, T, Jackson, Sinclair
Splnce, Pedro Shick, Charles Bell
Frem PUBRTO kRICO—
ON SUNDAY
Leonard Morgan, Basil Reece, Ruth
Pilard, Lillian Waleott, Edward Holde;

' From GRENADA—

ON SATURDAY
Asibrey Greaves, Maple Medford, Fra \-
cis Bailey.
DEPARTURES—By BW LA

rae TERDAY
For GRENADA—

Roderick Hayd
Chandler, Esteesttinndie

er Napier, Jams
ler, Bettie Corbin,

Curtis Hpk, Francis Sandy.
For St CENT
Charies ins,- William a
Theodora Acosta
For VENEZURLA— }
Lenore Ritter, Gladys Ritter, Ernesto !
Pitter, George Wolf, Margaret Stude

meister, Elizabeth Studeimeister, Margar
ita Studemeister
For VENEZURLA—
ON SATURDAY
Manuel Barrios, Wilhelm Brod, Mari
Betgh, Maria Betgh, Arne Anderson
Milda Andeyson, Nobert Blayney, Nance
Blayney, Angela Rumbos, Euilia Pierce,
Olgh Rurmbos, Hilda Nuz, Jesus Nuz.
Nora Nuz, Aleide Del Conte, Mercede
Del Conte, Frank Geltz, Pauline Geltz,
Valerie Geltz, Daryl Geltz
For ANTIGUA—
ON SUNDAY
Bernard Baptiste. .



\RATES OF. EXCHANGE

MONDAY, OCTOBER 29, 1951
CANADA
Cheques on
» Bankers

Demand
Drafts 62.45%. pr
Sight Drafts 62 3/10% pr
Cable
Curreney
Coupons

64 6/10% pr.
62 6/10% pr

64 6/10" pr
63 1/10 pr 61 1/10% pr
ia 60 4/10 pr

JUSTICES G, L. Taylor and
H. A, Vaughan in the Assistant
Court of Appeal yesterday reversed
a decision of Mr. E, A, McLeoc
Police Magistrate of District “A”|
who placed Seymour Riley of}
Paradise Gap, Spooner’s Hill on)
a probation period of one moni)
in the sumy of £1 for using threats
to Lennie Blunt on May 13.

Their Honours agreed with ;
submission by Mr. E. K, Walcott
K.C., counsel for Riley that the
complaint was not properly made
out, amd dismissed the case
without prejudice,

Mr, E, W. Barrow appearéd or |
behalf of complainant Blunt. |

JENKINS ROBERTS |
CALLS FOR RUM

The motor vessel Jenkins Rob-|
erts called here over the week-enc
to load a quantity of rum for Nas-
sau, Bahamas. She is consignes |
‘o., Messrs A. S. Bryden & Sons, |
Ltd.

The Jenkins Roberts will be)
berthed in the Careenage when |
she is ebout to load the rum, but}
yesterday, she remained in Car- |
lisle Bay. She was awaiting a
part for her engine.

Harrison Liner Scholar arrived
at Barbados yesterday for a ship-
ment of sugar for U.K. On Sun-
day, the Alcoa 8. 8. Alcoa Pointer
called for molasses for Canada
Both ships are consigned t
Messrs Da Costa. & Co., Ltd.

Wanted For Murder

(From Our Own Correspondent)
GEORGETOWN, Oct. 25.

The Police have offered ‘y
reward of $200 for informatior
which would lead to the arrest 01
Ricky Rodrigues, a miner of the
Cuyuni River area, who is wanted
for the murder of Lamport Hora-
tion King at Cuyuni durin;
August last.

Rodrigues was arrested by a
posse of Police from the C.1.D
recently, but during the night
after a 40-mile trek through the
bush, he escaped from custody
although handcuffed. The Police
described Rodrigues as a danger-
ous man of mixed race-—-Amerin-
dian and Portuguese ancestry—
whose upper row of front teeth
are missing. He is about 42 years
of age and 5 ft, 6 ins. in heighi
and medium built. \

BOILS

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PAGE FOUR



Printeé by the Advocate Co., Led., rosé St, Bridsetows

Tuesday, October 30, 1951

INSURANCE

WHEN the House of Assembly meets
today, one of the measures for consideration
is the resumed debate on the bill to provide
for a system of compulsory insurance for
motor vehicles.

The debate was resumed in order that
members who had not yet given enough
thought to the matter should have oppor-
tunity to do so and make suggestions for the
proper working. There is little which could
be added as original in such a bill as similar
legislation operates in several countries and
in the neighbouring island of Trinidad,
where its merit has been proved.

One suggestion made at the time of the
adjourned discussion was that the Gov-
ernment should undertake the insurance of
these vehicles. There are several reasons
why such a suggestion should be rejected.

It has always been the contention of the
members of the House that the Government
should never enter competition with pri-
vate enterprise and ought never to incur
the risk of investing capital where it might
well be done by individuals and so provide
reyenue from taxation on the income so
earned.

It might be argued thatthe revenue
earned from compulsory insurance of motor
vehicles would find its way into the pockets
of overseas companies. But this is to admit
that local insurance companies would not
take up the business.

It must be remembered that the reason
advanced by the insurance companies for
the present high rates is that there are so
few vehicles insured and so small a
volume of business. By the same token it
is clear that if there is compulsory insur-
ance ‘there will be 6,000 vehicles to be
insured instead of 600 and the rates could be
lowered.

It would be the greatest condemnation of
Barbados businessmen, if after a Govern-
ment had enacted legislation providing for
the compulsory insurance of 6,000 motor
vehicles, they refused to take up the busi-
ness. It. is most unlikely that any such
condition will arise in view of the number

of ambitious and enterprising y@ung men”

willing to enter business.

But there is another view of the matter
which militates against the Government
instituting its own system of insurance. If
this were done it would set the dangerous
precedent by which the Government could
enact legislation to channel any particular
line of business into its own hands, Despite
the. fact that thé legislature is said to be
able to do anything, there are certain stan-
dards which must be observed and among
these is the right of the citizen to be protec-
ted rather than infringed by the Govern-
ment. In the first place the Government
would be entering competition with the
existing insurance companies after having
channelled one line of the business their
way. Im the second place there could be no
escape from the accusation of working a
hardship on those owners who had ex-
ercised care and had sought to protect them-
selves and other users of the road by taking
out insurance policies on their vehicles.

In the event vf compulsory insurance
being run by the Government those owners.
who had policies with other companies and
who. by careful driving had reduced their
annual premiums, would be compelled to
forego any benefit to be derived from the
long association with the company and to
support a new insurance scheme at higher
rates in order to build up an insurance
company. And it cannot be claimed that
the insurance run by the Government
would bring any greater advantage than
that run by a private company.

The only thing to be done is for the House
having satisfied itself of the merit of the
bill and with a view of protecting the pub-
lic, to pass the bill and leave it to private
companies to take up the business. It is now
clear that there will be so many vehicles
to be insured that there is little likelihood
of companies refusing or even being tardy.



Ee nantes nssenensitnnt tn

LONDON, Oct. 19
The ex-brigade major’s mous-
tavhe and the sleek hair heave
greyed since we first began to see
them on the newsreels, but there
ig no hint of the comfortable
pomposity which often pads out
statesmen after middle age. At
fifty-four Anthony Eden is much
as he was in 1938, when a poll
of New York beauty parlours
voted him the best looking man
of the year, with Gary Cooper
Fred Astaire, the Duke of Wind.
sor and Leopold Stokowski as
runners up. His tall, trim build
is that of a Guards subaltern

But it is not only the build that
strikes one! There is a boyish
alertness, restlessness even, in the
Way he moves. At Party con-
ferences, with the camera lights
on him, he smiles the. invaluable
Eden smile, which has done as
much for Party publicity § as
Churchill’s cigar or the late Earl
Baldwin's pipe. On these occa.
sions there is a kindly yet electric
glitter about his blue eyes. You get
the irrational feeling that Anthony
Eden's vitali.y will renew itself
for ever; that he will be talking
to our grendchildren about the
peauties of a property-owning
democracy and the sanctity of
interna‘ional. pacts as earnestly
and primly ag he talks about them
to us.

To overpaint Eden's elegance,
his good taste «nd cultivauuon is
easy enough. On the other hand
there is no poin: in running from these things. His study in
Mayfair has a woman's head by
Marie Laurencin over the ‘fire-
place, sibylline yet sweet as candy,
and a grave, strong landscape by
Derain on the opposite wall. stolid
party men whose notions of ar. are
confined to campaign posters 411
ovetween the two, and finyer their
sherry glasses without quite know-
ing what to make of either. Down
at Binderton, his country place
1ear Chichester, a hunk of mellow
'8th-century brick, there are more
paintings, mostly of our own time,
with the emphasis on France,
though English artists are by no
means barred. There is the same
Francophil bias among the books.
Many are first editions, with
eordial words from their authors
inseribed on the fly-leaves. Binder-
ton is a place where good wine,
good painting and good prose are
equally savoured; 18th-century
brick and 18ih-century tastes re-
inforce each other.

But life is larger than con-
noisseurship. On one side of
Binderton is a lawn with the shade
of trees and a sight of Goodwood
Downs over the wall. On hot days
Eden works here on his big
speeches in a deckchair, writing
pad on knee, Blue Books strewn
around him on the daisies, When
be comes io a knotty point of
phrasing or policy, he tugs at his
moustache or rung his fingers
through his hair. On the other
side of the house is a great garden
where smallholder Eden, with two
men and a boy, hoes, prunes and
digs for the love of it. Appleg,
dahlias and much else go regularly
down to Chichester market, nat
for profit but so that the holding
shall pay its way.

When stripped to the waist for
digging, Eden is surprisingly re-
vealed as a man of big mu/;cle.
Why is one surprised? Perhaps
because of a stupid preconcep ion
that elegance and muscle never
go together. As well as nervous
vitality there is a certain physical
toughness about Eden. Has he

By CHARLES REID
rarely @nd spi.e never ai all in
the heat of political baitle, because

he paints his foes in discrimimating
grays rather than in irredeemabie
black, there are those who cou-
sider hirn too gentlemanly by half,
His ministerial] record makes hay
of .hig reproach.

Consider the rugged assignments
that his leader gave him during
the war. It was Eden whom
Churchill sent to the Middle East
as his personal agent during the
black and harassed weeks which
preceded the Nazi assault on



ANTHONY EDEN

Greece. As a planner ot military
aid to Greece and an arcnitect oi
Greece resistance, Eden shared

with Waveil and Wilson a crucial

burden. In nis talks with .ne King
ot the Hellenes and in his code

BARBADOS ADVOCATE





Profile Of A Foreign Secretary

During the war Eden served
Churchill successively or in double
harness @s War Minister, Foreign
Secretary, political emissary to the
Middle East.and Leader of the
House of Commons. He gerved
his master “like a packhorse in the
great affairs ef State.” . But the
packhorse was alter ego as well.
The understanding between chief
and lievutenam®-—was almost tele-

pathic, = t alike with-
eut consultaief,” Churchill has
disclosed, A yery great number
of practical es as they arose
from day to day." To the King,

Churchill wrete on the eve of one
of his hazardous air trips to
Washington: “In case of my death
on this journey I am about
undertake, I avail myself of your
Majes y’s gracious permission to
advise you that you should trust
the formation of a new government
to Mr. Anthony Eden...... who i
in my mind the outstanding
Minister in the largest political
party in the House of Commons
....+-l am sume he will be founc
capable of conducting your
Majesty’s affairs with resolution,
experience and capacity.”

The toughness mm Eden, for the
toughness is qndoubtedly there
has been a gradual growth, a pro-
cess of geasoning behing the
political scenes. At the Foreign
Office during Be ‘thirties he was
clear-headed well ‘as idealistic
enough to see Hitler and Mussolin
as they really were, and plucky
enough to speak his mind about
them before the world. But he
could make no impression what-
ever on the well-meaning ap-
peasers with and for whom he had
to work. It was like butting cne’s
head against bales of cotton wool.

When Chamberlain wanted to
snub a mediation offer by Presi-
dent Roosevelt, or write a cordial
ietter to Mussolini, or pack Lord
Halifax off on a “sportsman’s

despatches to London, he threaded yisit’ to Karinhall and Berchtes-
hig way through political and gaden, he did so without saying
s‘rategic maze with sure touch and g word to his Foreign Secretary
firm purpose, Again, it was Eden who bit by bit found himself
who, during the war’s mos< relegated to the status of office boy
menacing winter, boarded 4 Since those days extracts have
destroyer and sailed through Arctic peen published from what is ad-
ice and gales to thaw out Stalin mittedly a one-sided account that

and Molotov, most frigid and
churlish of allies. He extracted
from them a treaty of alliance
which, although it has since been
crumpled and thrown away like
a tissue handkerchief, immensely
stiffened home morale at .he time.
For such achievements something
more than kid gloves and a smile
are needed.

Eden took everything politely, mile

in marver though truculent in
policy. I

“Anthouy Eden ade no com-
plaini,” notes Chamberlain afve
dealing him a pretty ba! rebufi.
“Anthony has been as nice as
possible about it”, he says after
dealing him an even worse one.

ERA,

Might it not have been a gooc
thing if Anthony had responded by
banging the table? The veteran
Lloyd George was confidentially

A third instance. One of the
things Over which English and
American statesmen used to wring

their hands around 1943 was ;

. Bie er ee ra informed of all the moves and all

oo aan a Se ccuaat the frustrations as they happened.
& c > “ » j g f

pride. ‘Time after time he refused ..” hen,” he asked a City platform,

to meet Churchill and Roosevelt at Fi 4 papas of ane
Casablanca, The great man cajoled a pl y e m ae oe
him by cable and in other ways, bell ae a at he rea 7
all to no purpose. At last Eden he Sh bs le does so he wi
was given the lion-tamer’s ;ob, %¢ the iggest man in Britain.
"| got Eden to put the utmost That was in the autumn of 1937.
pressure on General de Gaulle”, Five months later the “bullies”
Churchill has written since, “even eo ene ne
tothe into saying hak it he Cabinet owe Bde tof the Foe
eign ice. The desks were cleared
ple wane i by my = for appeasement’s last futile scrib-
else @ @ 1e i
Liberation Commi.-tee in London.” pom pee De amerete bineelt
What passed between Eden and de at the height of his prestige would
Gaulle in the sequel we do not nave been impotent: and in 1938
know. But certainly de Gaulle Eden had nothing of Palmerston’s
changed his mind. His appear- cool, hard mastery of political
a Sie tte a ~ rou. ee ae eek i os
ea n the air, turned an n through many toils, tests an
elbow bend in French liberation fires, out of office as well as in it
politics which, in North Africa He is-as ready for high tasks of

mental and moral toughness as expecially, had been divided and State, as groon.ed and sinewy, as

well? Because he betrays, anger

bedevilled,



2 finely trained boxer for the ring.



SUGAR BAGSa»:: «« syns

Reading recently of the diffi.
culty in obtaining jute bags for
the sugar crop, and the high cost
of the bags, makes me wonder if
these bags must nescessarily be
made of jute or if it might be
possible to find some suitable
alternative, perhaps at lower cost
were readily availayle, or

oth.

I understand that the 1951 crop
will require about two million
bags, at a cost of $1.10 or more
per bag, which scems like a lot
of money, over £450,000 in fac!
all of which leaves the island in
order to pay for the bags, and at
that we must apparently use
blandishments and cajolery to
persuade the government of India
‘to let us have them,

In view of the great need to
increase industry in Barbados,
it would be a step in the right
direction if we could import
material and make the bags here.
It would I believe come. under
the head of light industry that
would need only semi-skilled la.
bour and comparatively light and
inexpensive machinery, and rel.
atively little. power, therefore
eminently suitable in our present
stage of development. It could
give continuous employment in a
plant capable of producing about
8,000 bags per day for 250 working
days in the year.

The problem would be to find
a suitable material, and this
might involve some research. In
the past decade or so mony new

materials have heen developed
and put into commercial use for
a multiplicity of purposes. There
was much head-shaking over the
idea of using paper bags for ce.
ment when these first appeared,
but the practice seems to be
quite general now in Britain, the
United States and Canada, so
the bag made of several layers
of tough kraft paper has pre
sumably made good for this pur.
pose in spite of the rather exacting
requirements to be met,

It is possible that a similar bag
might be satisfactory for sugar.
er if not some modification of it,
perhaps a combination of textile
material with kraft paper. In
matters of this sort it is essential
to keep an open mind. It is
always possible to think of diffi.
culties and objections ta any
suggested solution, and in these
days technical problems are com-
plicated by currency restrictions.
However, few _ diffieulites are
really insuperable if the incentive
to overcome them is great enough,
and in this case the possible ad-
vantag?s seem well worth striving
for.

Ane item would be retention
in Barbados of perhaps one. mil-
lion dollars or more per year that
would be paid in wages for mak.
ing bags at present imported, thus
helping to redress the balance of
trade that now shows a very
large @xcess of imports over ex-
ports, averaging 60% or so over





When I hear people raising
ebjections to suggestions such as
this, I usually console myself by
remembering that when the idea
of building ships of steel was
first mooted, many men _ criec
out in alarm that it was com.
pletely crazy »‘etause they would
certainly sins | Some of these
self-styled exports were ancient
mariners who had spent their
lives navigating wooden vessels
about the oceans of the world,
without ever discovering what
really made them stay afloat.

Later still when a_ practical
marine steam turbine was first
offered to the Admiralty by the
inventor, the avy’s technical
experts turned it down flat, in
spite of the fact that it was the
answer to the great need for
more power from machinery that
weighed less and required les:
‘pace. The turbine was finally
forced on the Navy by what
may be described as an amazing
example of high-pressure sal¢s-
manship on the part of the in-
ventor. It is to be hoped that
ruch extreme measures would not
be necessary to interest the sugar
industry in an alternative to the
jute bag for sugar.

There is some talk of shipping
sugar in bulk so that no bags
would be n , but IT have no
idea whether this is a_ practical
possibility in ‘foreseeable fu.
ture. It would seem likely that
some part of the crop would
require to be shipped in bags in



eaten menor i rg aaa teatiiieaieneatacnes acetal

Thoughts For |

Politicians —
I— THE FAMILY

EVERYONE knows what you mean when
you advise someone not to put the cart before
the horse. Everyone has seen a horse pulling
a cart: but no one has seen a cart pulling a
horse. These are common place observa-
tions for ordinary people. But politicians do
not always behave like ordinary people. Too
often they attempt to put the cart before the
horse. And there is no progress, as a result.
They talk about the evils of society as if
society were something detached, abstract,
ypart from human life. Society is not a god
o be worshipped. It dees not exist by itself.
{t is not apart from human life. It is an}
entity composed of human beings, whose
anit is the family. Society is secondary to
che family. “The family does not exist for
society: it is society which exists for the
‘amily.” Without the family, the very ele-
nents of the community are missing.

What then are the duties of politicians?

Their first and principal duty is to make
aws and to promote legislation which will
yenefit the family. Without the family
ociety cannot properly exist. Because it is
he family which guarantees “the life, health,
strength and activity of the whole society.”
The “evils of society” of which the politicians
complain are not in fact evils of society:
they are signs of the absence of society as
such.

How far is the absence of family life the
reason for the evils which exist in our social
ife today? Would it be an exaggeration to
say that ourevils are due entirely to an
excess of human beings living outside the
‘amily ? Has there ever been a prosperous
or happy society in which the family was not
aonoured ? Even before the advent of
Christianity the ancient Romans achieved
greatness because of the respect and honour
paid to the head df the family. With Christ-
ianity the family gained its “heart and sun”
in the mother; but the father remained the
head of the family.

Wherever the mother has been at the
‘entre of family life and the father has been
concerned to promote the rights and privile-
ges of the family there has been true society.

Because society results from the family.
The primary duty then of ali politicians
whose task it is to minister to the needs of
society is to promote the interests 01 the
family. Where there is a family there will
be found a bulwark of true liberty. It is
only when the family has been despised as
the fundamental cell of society that the
tiberties and rights of the family have been
despised and there has infiltrated a false
worship of the State.

The society of men, whether in villages,
or towns is composed of families. It is the
collection of families which make cities; and
the state itself is composed of families. There
can be no progress, no society, no state if
there is no family. Because the family!
“derives from God its existence and its
dignity......” its rights and its privileges
are inalienable, intangible: it has the duty
ibove everything else, before God and
econdarily before society, to defend, to up-
hold and to promote these rights and these
wivileges effectively, not only for its own
dvantage, but for the glory of God and the
rood of all.”

If these are the rights and privileges of the
amily as ordained by God, how better can a
yolitician fulfil his responsibilities to those
amilies who have elected him to represent
their interests than by championing the cause
of families?

And since society is by definition composed
»€ families how then can a politician be said
9 serve the interests of society unless he
supports a policy which aids families and | S
hereby aids society ?

Any effort to cure “the evils” of society |
which ignores the primary social function ot |
the family is doomed tn the same fate as that



the cart before the horse. There is in both|!
instances a lot of apparent activity and much | '
noise: but when the performance is ended |}

we can all plainly see that there has been no |}
progress.







TUESDAY, OCTOBER 36, 1951



NOW IN

STOCK

PLANTATION & FACTORY
LABOUR SHEETS

Call and Select Early from
ADVOCATE STATIONERY.

ab¢

KITCHENWARE
AT
C. S. PITCHER & CO.



A FRESH SHIPMENT

OF

GOLDEN ARROW
FLOUR

JUST ARRIVED.

° ,
DA COSTA & CO. LTD. — Agents.

She Cast Includes:
Passion Blue





Keep a HAM |
on Hand for
the Race Week

Our Readers Say:

A Threat
To the Editor, the Advocate,

SIR,—Last month Mr. C, Kent
Wright, Town Clerk of | Stoke
Ne on, gave an address to the
Town and Country Planning Sum-
mér School at Oxford, According
toa brief report, among other
matters considered, he emphasized
the threat to the public as indi-
viduals from the constant pressure
by the central government to
encroagh on Local Authorities and
to centralize control, especially
financial control. So long, he
claimed, as control lay with local
people any one who was aggriev-
ed knew who to go to with his
complaint, and access was easy
but i power was in official hands
it would ke stherwise and very
difficult *i p
It vould be interesting to get
the full text of this address, Mr.
Wright is, it appeared, of great
experience in local government in
England, so now, when consider-
able changes in local government
here are proposed, it would be

specially instructive get the
Local Government, as distinct
from the Central Government,
point of view.

Officialdom is apt to lean tc
centralization. It makes for con-
venience in departmental contro:
and keeps estimates down. But if
it results in transferring the incon-
venience and cost to the public,
instead of apparent economy, there
may be real loss.

To increase the size of adminis-
trative areas, in moving towards
centralization, may bring about the
loss of the most valuable voluntary
services, It is the busy people, serv-
ing the public at personal sacri-
fice, whose knowledge and expe-
rience are so valuable, If increases
in area so increases the work that
they can no longer give the time
cequired for this public service,
they will stand aside, and their
places will be taken by those with

less of value to offer, but more
leisure. The increase in area
would al increase the distance
many people would have to go

the past five years. @ On Page 7. To-morrow: HOUSES FOR THE FAMILY
elie a ab von bap len fs

there and back again, to pay their Barbadians have always been Although good work is ; a ; . 2

toxes, a burden that would press W-llng to take other people's performed by all those Snceonat What Tidlig iecicien easton

most heavily on the poorest, children into their homes and to

The proposal to separate the
populous area of Bridgetown and
its environs from the countryside
beyond will, no doubt, meet with
approval, Urban and rural con-
ditions are different and require
different regulations. For exam-
ple, to practise the big bassoon at
midnight in some remote cane
piece would be just a harmless
eccentricity, to do so in a popu-
lous area would be an intolerable
nuisance, Town and country make
a difficult team in double harness.

Yours faithfully,
Cc. BE. SHEPHERD.

Society for Protection and

Care of Children
To the Editor, the Advocate,
SIR,—I read with interest the
recent leading article in ‘the Sun-
day Advocate at the close of Ani-

mal Week telling of the excellent
work done by the S.P.C.A. in
Barbados. The animals have had
their week, and let us not forget

them. But is there not now a case
for formir
tection and care of

ociety for the pr



childrer

look after them when the need
erose. But there is in the Island
ho organised society whose concern
is the prevention of ill-treatment
ov neglect of children, compar-
able with the §.P.C.A. and the’
work it undertakes on behalf of
animals. A valuable part of its
work lies in education as to what
constitutes cruelty, and in this
way it contributes to raise the
Standard of animal care,

A similar agency is needed to
raise the standard of the care of
children, Il cannot be denied that
there are children in Barbados
who are in need of care or pro-
tection: some suffer from diseases
ef dirt and malnutrition and from
harmful indiscipline as a result
not only of poverty, but also of
ignorance, selfishness and neglect:
others are subjected to a harsh
type of discipline which is many

years out of date, but which may
be due to ignorance of child man-
agement more than to intentional

1elty All who do social work

such cases or even



with child welfare, including the
churches, clinics, schools and po-
lice, they have not the machir.ery
to receive complaints and carry
out investigations into cases of
cruelty or neglect, It is true that
the legislation in Barbados
against cruelty to children is
nearly half a century old; but it
could have been much more wide-
ly used had such machinery ex-
isted apart from the Police, whom
many simple people would hesi-
tate to call in.

In most European countries as
well ac in the American nations,
voluntary agencies for child pro-
tection have been in existence for



}
i
)
tish West Indies Jamaica ae

which befalls the village idiot when he puts

has its own excellent child pro-
tection Society.

In Barbados we need a Society | }
Wits: he status to receive, inves-| '
tigate and deal with complaints of | '
cruelty and neglect, and to carry
out educational work to raise the
standard of child care. Surely||
this can be made possible if the
spirit of friendship and sympathy
for children evidenced in the

other similar work is extended to,
bring into being such a voluntary |
body which could devote itself to;
the cause of any child who may
be in need of care or protection
SCUTUM.,



Crazy Ducks!

COLS SPRINGS, COLORADO

Oc

Hundreds of ducks blinded
fog killed themselves during the
night by flying into buildings
utility poles i



and landing on the

r
rain slicked street which they mis- |
took for water.

Residents walked around the

by streets picking up hapless fowl
he which furr
i free duc

h

ished
' lit

many

Cats



persons | }}
: {
ner found | }

unting eas

Children’s Goodwill League and

COOL DRINKS

Apricot Nectar
Tuborg Beer
Bass’s Ale
Worthington
Golden Tree Beer
Schweppes Tonic

CHEESES

Aus. Cheddar in tins

Can. Cheddar in 1-Ib biecks
Can. Cheddar Grated

Can. Red Cheese

Danish Gouda

Edam

DESSERTS

Fruit Salad
Prunes

Bird’s Jellies
Bird's Custard
Sherriffs Puddings
Nestle’s Creem
Grapes

Guavas

Apricots



GODDARDS

—







HAMS
J & KR WREAD

’ ANCHOR
WUTTER

CARR'S
HOESCUITS
AND

CREAM
CRACKERS

‘GOLD HKRAID }





RUM
| Ex Lady Nelson
Frozen SALMON
Fillet SOLE
DELIVER



No ————————





TUESDAY, OCTOBER 30, 1951

FREE ENTERPRISE
NEEDED-says Victor Chase



The Electors’ Association held
a political meeting last night in
Bay Street opposite the Espla-
nade in support of the candida-
ture of Mr. Victor Wallace Chase
for the City of Bridgetown in the
coming election for the House of
Assembly.

A large crowd which at times
was inclined to be unruly and
jeering, heard Mr. Victor Chase
speak in favour of free enterprise
and the cost of living,

Mr. Chase said that he wished
that the Government would en-
courage new industries to find
employment for the ever increas-
ing unemployed in the island. He
felt that it was a grave state of

, affairs and it was the duty of all

the members of the Government
of Barbados to focus their atten-
tion on this matter.

Every year the schools were
turning out. hundreds of boys
and girls educated and full of
hope. They went out in the ex-
pectation of finding jobs ‘which
would *help their parents and
maintain themselves. But this
was not the case.

“If I have the opportunity to
take this matter of iree enter-
prise to the House of Assembly I
will consider it very important,”
Mr. Chase said.

The Government has warned
the people to expect a serious
advance in the price of rice be-
ginning from January. Rice is a
necessary food.

An advance of four cents a
pint must seriously affect the
budget of the house’ keeper.
Every means must be exploded to
find a way out of this increase.

Mr. Chase said that he realised

that it will be too severe a strain
on the Treasury to increase the
subsidization to cover the whole
of this increase.

Whatever method was adopted,
he felt that a reduction could be

made and consideration should
be given to those in the lower
brackets .

Good Work

Mr. Fred Goddard said that he
knew Mr. Victor Chase for some-
time, and knew that he is a per-
6on that would try to see that
those who are not so fortunate
also get the necessities of life. He
said that Mr. Chase is a member
of the St. Michael’s Vestry and

has done good work in that
capacity.
The Barbados Workers’ Union

has done well for those employed,
but what has it done for the un-
employed in the island? Some of
the waterfront: workers are “sit-
ting pretty” with regards to wages
but there were too many unem-
ployed. Some people think the
merchants are trying to kill the
poor man, but the merchants are
co-operating with the Barbados
Workers’ Union. The Government
could have done more in creating
new ifidustries so that the unem-
ployed could get work, But in-
stead the employers were called
upon to take on extra staff so that
a few can get employment.

Mr. Goddard in ending remind-
ed his listeners that this is a criti-
cal moment in the history of Bar-
hados and they, the people, should
trike care to return men to the
House of. Assembly who would do
fomethine for the good of the
island and the people dwelling in
it,



“Real Scout
Spirit Lacking”
SAYS MAJOR GRIFFITH

“FOR too long there have been
empty and idle boas.s of achieve-
ments, complacency, persistence in
setting and maintaining low
standards and lack of real scouts
‘spirit?’ on the parc of Scouters.”
Tnis is why there has not been
satisfactory progress in scouting in
Barbados, the Island Scout Com-
missioner Major J. E, Griffith said
yesterday when presenting the
report ai the Annual General
Meeting of the Island Scout Coun-
ceil,

The Island Scout Commigsioner
1s working towards building up
interest in scouting in Barbados.

The Commissioner assisteq by
the Secretary Mr, L. A. Harrison
will lead the representa ives of
the local association which will
represent Barbados at the
Jemaican jamboree in March next
year.

The question of lowering the
quality of uniform was discussed
at length after the report was
presented. Most members who
spoke were of the opinion that the
uniform was ar of the scout, part
of his character and should not be
displaced by a more shabby dress.

The Island Scout Commissioner
felt that there was not as miuch
poverty among scouts or would-be
scouters which would prevent
them from finding ways and
means of getting uniforms.

The Compbermere Scout troop
staged a play after the business of
the meeting was finished. The
play was a Success and drew ap-

plause and laughter from the
audience.
The following members were

co-opted to the Council:—

Mr. E. C. M, Theobalds, B.A.,
Mr. J. C, Hammond, M.A. Major
C. Noott, T.D., B.A. Mr. W. A.
Farmer, M.A., Mr. A. W. Roberts,
Mr. L, A. Lynch, Dean Hazlewood,
Rev, B. Crosby, Rev. D. C. Moore,
R. C. Representa ive, Capt. H. H.
Williams, Girl Guide Represent-
ative, Mr. F. L. Cozier, Mr. J. E.
Brome, Mr. D. A. M. Haynes, Mr.
E, S. Burrowes, Capt. A. M. Jones,
Mrs. F. J. Cole and Prof. Dash.

Present were:

The Chief Scout, His Excellency
the Governor, Hon. Colonial Secre-
tary, the Commissioner of Police
Mr, R. A. Tucker, and Miss D.
Ibberson (Vice Presidents), Mr.
J, CG» Hammond, Major C. Noott,
Professor J. S. Dash, Mr. Louis
Lynch, the Very Rey. The Dean,
Rev. B. Crosby, Mr. F. L.
Cozier and the following com-
missioners ; Col. A. H. C. Camp-

MILLER FOUGHT
THE VESTRY

Mr. T. W. Miller, Independent
candidate for the City in the forth-
coming General Election, said at
a Political Meeting in support of
his candidature at Greenfield last
night : “Tonight I stand before you
as an Independent Labour candi-
date, a position I was forced into.”

He said that for the past five
years he stood alone in the Vestry
as a member of the Barbados
Labour Party. Nearly all the other
Vestrymen were members of the
Electors Association. “T have
fought them. I defy any member
of the Vestry or any human being
in Barbados to say that Tommy
Miller has not held his own in the
Vestry.”

He said that the morning of the
flood he was in duty bound to
visit the flecd areas. He saw
many depressed faces. There is a
tune which goes : “Strolling Down
the River”, but that morning they
were “floating down the river.’

He explained how he became
parted from the Barbados Labour
Party, through representing a
woman who had suffered in the
flood. He said that he was once a
Sanitary Inspector and after gain-
ing some knowledge of politics
from Mr. Hugh Springer, he re-
signed that post and came forward
for the Vestry. He eventually got
into the St. Michael's Vestry. He
was always nominated as a mem-
ber of the Barbados Labour Party.
He never was on the side of the
Conservatives. He could not boast
of ever giving their children Cod
Liver Oil because he was never a
Churchwarden. A Churchwarden
has more than a million dollars at
his disposal

h->. Miner said: “There are two
seats. You need two representa-
tives. If you are going to give one
vote to Mottley, give the other to
Tommy. If you are going to give
one to Lewis. give Tommy the
other. Those of you who at pres-
ent have in mind not to vote, go
and give me a vote.”

‘ fi ‘
On Probation
Mr. H. A. Talma_ Police
Magistrate of District “A” yester-
day placed Oscar Carmichael of
Codrington Hill, St. Michael on
probation for 18 months _ for
wounding LeRoy Goring in his
chest with a knife on October 24.



bell, C. R. C. Springer, L. B.
Waithe, C. D. Spencer, E. L, Ban-
nister, A. G. Jordan, Rev. L. C.
Mallalieu, J. E. Kirton, A. D.
Blackman, J. lL. Thomas, G.
Corbin, R. Brathwaite, A. Smith.



BARBADOS ADVOCATE



BRANCH POST OFFICE



THIS NEW BRANCH POST OFFICE has been built in Welches.
and will soon te opened to th> public.

Village, My Lord’s Hill, the Ivy and the Bridge Road.

Rice Shortage Will



Welches Post
Office Finished

THE building of a small branch
Post Office at Welches, St. Michacl
has been completed about a week
now and will shorily be opened.
The Colonial Post Master said that
it will relieve scme of the wo-k
which is carried 0) at the General
Post Office. “It has especially come
in handy at this time of the
year—the Chrisimas season—-
wea there is an unusual amount
of correspondence going on,” he
said

It ‘s a ‘ow wall building near the
Norttern e o! Welches Road on
pert of a triangular piece of land.

A gallery runs on three sides
cf the almost square branch Post
Office. It is in this gallery the
people will be queueing up for
their stamps or postal packages.
The walls of the whole building
are yellow and the windows and
doors painted green,

Subtracting the width of the
counter which is built inside along
two sides of the biggest room, the

com where the clerks will sit to

sell the stamps, it is not much
more than 17 feet long and about
12 feet wide.



At this building, some old age
pensions will also be distributed.
The scheme to pay some old age
pensions from this new office has
met with the approval of many
old women of the district.

An old woman said yesterday,
“One can never know unless he
is old himself, how fatiguing it is
to have to walk in some cases
more than a mile, to get one’s
old age pension, If an old woman
like me has a grandson, she will
sometimes think of stopping him
away from school a day or so to
send him for the pension, Some-
times we wonder, too, which is
more profitable, to stand the
weariness of going for the pension
ourselves or paying a_ sinall
amcunt to a youngster to get him

bring it for us, but we can ill
ufford to give away a_ small
amount,

Another resident of the district
said it was a good thing that the
branch Post Office has been put
there, Sometimes one is forced to
go into town only to buy stamps
and post a letter. Besides the time
spent dressing oneself with more)
care to go to town and the going
to town itself, there is also the
question of bus fare. “We'll save
scms bus fare now a branch office
has been put here.”





—_—— 1

Driver Forfeits

License For Year |

HENRY JOHN of Halls Road,
St. Michael yesterday pleaded |
guilty before His Worship Mr.
H. A. Talma, Police Magistrate |
of District “A” of driving the |
motor car X—909 on Baxter’s
Road, St. Michael under the influ-
ence of drink. wei

He was fined £5 to be paid in
28 days or three months’ impris-
onment with hard labour and was
disqualified for one year from
holding a driver’s licence,

John was also fined 40/- for
driving the same motor car with
inefficient brakes and 20/- for
driving the car without holding
an appropriate licence. All
offences were committed on Octo-
ber 27,







Fairy Fountains,

Ae.

Pearly Showers, Firebarrels, Crys-
tal, Spray, Snowdrop Fountain,
Roman Candles, Canon, Golden
Rains, Golden Fountains,

Ge.

Snake in the Grass—Ea
Sparklers, — package
Bombs—each

Snake in the Eton Hat





Squibs, ' Silver
Rains, Cannons, Black Jacks,
Snowdrops and Fountains.



Silver Shooter, Snowdrop Foun-
tain, Fire Barrels, Krakkra Boy,
Pearly ‘Shower, Chrysanthemum

Fountains.

10e:

Mines, Rockets, Jack in the Boxes.

2ZOec.



CAVE

pai 6e. &
vikeeae 12c.

veenee 2c. 10—13
pe mel 6c.



SHEPHERD
C0. LTD.

BROAD STREET

|



Soon Be

It was completed just over a week ago
It is fairly central to the thickly populated districts Carrington’'s



Relieved

At present there is a rice shortage in the island but this
will soon be relieved. “During the next two weeks 4,500
bags of rice are expected to arrive in the island from British
Guiana,” Mr. Victor Chase, Merchant of Tudor Street, told
the Advocate yesterday One thousand bags of that amount

arrived on Sunday.

Mr. Chase said that the reason
for the shortage of rice is because.
usually at this time of the year
the British Guiana crop is ex-

hausted. “That colony did not
have the amount of rice to com-
plete the contract for this year

with Barbados in old crop rice.”

He said that B.G. has written to
Barbados explaining that the new
crop which is now being reaped
will make available the balance
which is due to Barbados, from
the old contract, They intend to
ship it as soon as they can get
vessels,

Mr. Chase explained that B.G
has not in any way suggested can-
celling any part of the old contract
which is at present being retailed
at seven cents per pint and “it is
my personal opinion, which of
course may not be that of the Con-
troller of Supplies, that all of the
rice bought under the old contract
should be disposed of at the pres-

ent price before any of the more

expensive rice is released.”
Serious Attack

In the interest of the rice con-
suming public, he sincerely hoped
that this method would be adopt-
ed as, in his opinion, a jump of
four cents a pint in the cost of
rice would be one of the most
serious attacks that the rise in the
cost of living has yet made on the
housekeeper's budget,

“If it is the policy of the Con-

on all said Mr
Chase.

The Provision Merchants’ Asso-

rice purchases,”

ciation, in a letter to the Advo-
eate, stated that they understood
from authoritative sources that

the present supply will be greatly
improved shortly and they hoped
soon to be able to take care o!
their customers’ requirements

Housewives Start
Xmas Shopping

MANY people have already
started to purchase clothing for
the Christmas season. Around the
City some men are of the opinion
that there will be a high rise in
the cost of shoes and because of
this they are buying a pair or
two.

Housewives have already begun
to buy quantities of currants,
raisins and other fruit for their
Christmas cakes. Last week many
people — purchased from one
Broad Street store which sold at
reduced prices.

At present there is no rush for
toys. One housewife told the

Advocate; “It would be foolish to
buy toys in October or
children in
impossible
the

Novem-
Decem-
to hide
children of

ber to give
ber. It. is
anything from

trol Board to include any of the ,today.”

old contract rice in the new crop,
stock will be taken of all old rice
held by the merchants and the
Controller of Supplies will collect
the difference in price and apply
it to the subsidisation which is paid
MORNING

Dive ®

Ta Leek Me a










OTe ma



When headache, fatigue and upset
stomach ruin your morning, you can
“save the day” with Alka-Seltzer.
Take it on arising, again—if needed
~later in the day. Keep a supply of

quick .seting Alka-Seltzer
=) handy — always!

a
d Alka-Seltz




er



ba Wy

HORNIMAN’S





at

BIG REDUCTIONS

at your Jewellers

Y. De LIMA
& €O.. LTD.















(ea

Labourites Stage
Two Meeting

QD





THE Barbados Labour
neid two meecungs on Sunday n
a they continued their elect
campaign. One was at Greens, St
George in support of the candida-
ture of Mr, F. E. Miller and Mr,
£. W. BarrowaThe other was at

St. Simon’s, St. Andrew, in support
of their only candidate for that
patish, Mrs. E. Bourne }

On Wednesday night they plan
holding a meeting at St. Stephen's
Pas.ure, St, Michael in support of

Mr, M, E. Cox and T. O, Bryan
end another at We'chman Hall,
St. Thomas in support of Dr. H, G,

Cummins and Mr, R, G. Mapp. The
last meeting for the week will be
1eld at Fitz Village, St. James, in
support of Mr, E. Holder,

The Electors’ Association are
holding three more election cam-|
paign meetings this week. On
Wednesday night a meeting will
be at Market Hill in support of
Mr. H. A. Dowding

The other two meetings are: —
Porters Yard, St. James on Thurs-
cay night 'n support of Mr, E, K
Waleott end Mr J. H, Wilkinson;
ind Bay Land, St Michael, in sup-
port of Mr. A. R. Toppin and Mr,
Vincent Griffith.



lnner Basin Cleared
Of Lumber

THE inner basin of the Careen-
age was cleared of lumber over
the week-end for the first time
in six months.

During the
quite a number

manths,
have

six
ships

past
of

called at Barbados bringing cargo |*

ram enn a RN ER A



PAGE FIVE



Befreshiny
&

Invigorating

|
|
|
|

ee a ee

4 STR RRP, Lies ACL TRARRNN V EA

from Canadian ports, Pine, spruce ee OLOLOSS IEP IV OS UIE LV OD ONIN IO II IIIS
and fir arrived in large quanti-! \ %
es, * x
Whenever the waterfront was) :
being cleared of a shipment,) ‘
another shipment would arrive.) \s x
The ships discharged their car- a %
soes of lumber much more} ~ y
quickly than the waterfront | }s x
werkers got it off the wharf and| v %
the wharf became congested es x
aguin, es $
\]l was quiet in the inner basin! '* %
vesterday. The noise of lumber! , g
being thrown on the waterfront) + S
and on to the lorries and hand-' < %
carts, the voices of tally clerks | \\ %
and lumber workers when check- |.
ing every piece of lumber, anc |‘
the busy traffic on the wharf) .,
caused by the lorries and carts | \s
removing the lumber were al lo
missed, ‘
A shipping clerk said that he [xs
did not expect the waterfront tol S
remain clear of lumber for very |‘.

long; Barbados would soon be get-| .*



ting shipments from Canada, lee
ws

.

“SUNSHINE R”’ NS

| is

REFUELLING 1%

es

The 25-ton fishing schooner x
Sunshine R., which is carrying) gs
out Seimmic operations off the! $$
coast of Barbados with the In-|%
dependent Exploration Company, 4

returned to Carlisle Bay yester-
day to refuel,

Sunshine R. lay in the explo-
sive berth of the Bay yesterday
She still carried her danger sig-
pala red flag flying from her
riggings.

“IT’S SUCH A
RELIEF TO HAVE

NO TROUBLE ,.
WITH TEETHING...”

‘Lry giving your baby Ashton &
Varsons Infants’ Powders, which are
wonderfully soothing at teething
time. These Powders ensure regular
easy motions, promote restful sleep,
and are absolutely SAFE!

ASHTON & PARSONS
INFANTS’ °OWDERS










ask for »*



LUXURY TOILET
SOAPS .~

>
IMPERIAL LEATHER ¢ LINDEN BLOSSOM « BLUE HYACINTH
rr rn nnn rt



OG OF



SIZES 38 and 40—witl

e
*
x

ISN

XMAS TREE
XMAS TREE

5555555999 SO SSO SISO PPPGOFOF

8

3 TINSEL—A Beautiful Assortment
3 XMAS CRACKERS

is at

i$ KNIGHTS DRUG

PAG AG PGGSG

JANETTA DRESS SHOP

LOWER BROAD STREET

DRESSES |

Ready-made and made-to-Order.
Also—BRASSIERES—White ani Pink.

Waistband
From $3.99 to $5.44.

GIOCLL



sonttntn
PROS O





of every kind

n Waistband and without

Ot OL ggnoes tole tntnt in txtnte Wolet, ttt,’
© GOSS GIS GOOG O CDOT TFG FOE,

VES COSCO OSG OOO OOO FOOL
\CROOD99SG POSSE: MLPA AOE PPP APPOSTS

REALLY
tHE

FINEST

TOWN!

DECORATIONS
LIGHTS

LLLP LL

e +4 + 446,64, 68
66th IAEA ALLE ILL < ey

-

46,446 ,64

STORES

|
|

\Cuassons

LEELA, OCSO60G64%

eo +4 ¢,
PLE EEE EL OE POSSE?

LFEPA FILE

PRESSES ISOLA S

*

oO

FOR SPORTS WEAR

in FLORALS, PLAIDS, PAISLEYS FANCIES
and PLAIN COLOURS.

FOR DRESS WEAR

THE FAMOUS



From $2.91 to $5.94

“ELITE”

A wide range of qualities in Plain Colours
and Striped Designs

From $3.73 to $5.25

“RENOWN” TRIUNISED

in Tan,

Blue, Grey and White at $5.25

“DOUBLE TWO” — with Spare Collar
in Tan, Grey, Blue and White at $6.79 and $7.15





y

SAVE









By our CASH & CARRY System







ORIGIVALLY NOW
EVAPORATED MILK 29 26
CONDENSED MILK , 34 ol
IMPERIAL VIENNA SAUSAGES 3 4
SPAGHETTI with CHEESE in
* TOMATO SAUCE 20 16
TYNE SPONGE PUDDINGS 35 30
SOUTH AFRICAN LOBSTE/—per tin 69e
NORWEGIAN PEELED SHRIMPS—per tin 8tic.
PLANTERS’ COCKTAIL PEANUTS—per tin 96¢e.
ALL GOLD BLACK CURRANT JAM—2-1b tins 65c
ALL GOLD SWEET ORANGE MARMALADE—2-1b tins 49c.
AUSTRALIAN STRAWBERRY JAM—1‘2-I!b tin 4c
ROSES BARTLETT PEARS—Small tin Sle.
CROSSE & BLACKWELLS BREAKFAST ROLL—per tin 49¢
IMPERIAL CORNED MUTTON—per tin 66

STANSFELD, SCOTT & CO. LTD.

$66 6666O666S6O6St ’
PPLE DSSS SSS EP OSOSOOIS LOCO

tt i at a a a a ea crt atic et tari acacia iain ee a i a i al

“ S46t
PEOTeS

ae

S
POLL E LLL LLL OE LSPS LEEESPSEES SESE EP CCL ETFE OSES

“ELITE SPECIAL” in White only
So with the Ultra Smart Wide Spread Collar at $5.94
‘
% SEA ISLAND COTTON SHIRTS
by “ELITE” and “RENOWN”
% These Shirts are imported free of duty,
st and so represent the BEST VALUE in
ws SHIRTS to be obtained locally
x Prices : $8.00 and $8.18
. in White. Cream, Eeru and Blue
‘ st "@' . ‘
' HARRISON’ S-piai 2664
: “~ 4 LOE VOLO LEILA LLLP LLNS ,
Sad
w ~_—
Gi a a eM Ma aS
is an
o, FOR BEST RESULTS 2
o USE a
1 ,
=, PURINA CHows
|
“a «IN THE CHECKER BOARD BAGS sy
n é S
a” H. Jason Jones & Co., Ltd—Distributors ae
a ‘
| & a
a
acerca 23 POST,

SOC PYPOPRCOOSOSS

COPOOPSE POPES SS

oO

af

GO

PRISED





PAGE SIX BARBADOS ADVOCATE TUESDAY, OCTOBER 30, 1951
Me =

BY CARL ANDERSON

(BRITAIN’S HEST ISISCUITS)

OBTAINABLE AT ALL LEADING STORES




















Leel Lep tbat secanibcenien 5 ~ DERIMENTAY [WHAT ARE YOU GONG sue ] [-. THAT WiLL PUT *
| TAKE HIMIN THERE) :: SRBORATOSY| | TO 00; Ole. DOOM ? pat OPERATION... yoy] [HIM IN MY POWER! ‘
| BLACK Bean! ane, ’ oe ie atte er — —<¢}

“= ) r

Worl pee Fe | Oe
Wes CHEESELETS
MARTINI CRACKERS
PLAY BOX
TWIGLETS Etc. Etc.



BLONDIE

DELICIOUS & APPETISING





ities ae siete heieeicainnsanioaide. he
ee
FROFPSSSSO SFOS SSS SS SSS PPO PT PP POSSE LALA SLOPES
.
#
°
°



MR. PLANTER

Have you yet given full thought to your
TRANSPORT REQUIREMENTS for the
COMING CROP ?

We recommend for your serious considera-
tion the famous - - -

MASSEY = HARRIS
42 B.H.P. Heavy Duty 6 cyl. Diesel Engine
WHEEL TRACTOR

with our 5 tons ALL-STEEL CANE CARTS fitted with
over-run Brakes and Pneumatic Tyres. :
These units have already been tried and proved to the YOUR ENQUIRIES INVITED!

y



satisfaction of their owners — be amongst these satisfied

owners, ‘ |
LET US ASSIST ae YOUR TRANSPORT |
EMS ‘

Other Massey-Harris Agricultural Equipment available %
tnplades - - - s
ASS MOWERS AND

$ BARES LOADERS

4
ROBERT THOM LIMITED »
PEN MANURE LOADERS AND SPREADERS —AGENTS—



DIP YOU SEE 'EM, NUDPING, YOHNNY / Ay ; ae DISTRIBUTORS Dial 4616
1 % THEY DIDN'T WAS YUST WIGHING VE % ay .
VELL, YOHNNY, AT LEAST ! — DARE OPEN FIRE IN WERE VAY UP NORTH ..

AY BAN STILL SITTING ATOP ite THIG MURK ! WHAT'S VHERE THE NIGHTS ARE r a “2 SRELOOE ECE EEE COCO, COCO OCCA EOE
SSS ee ee eS ipo peiipeentnreinet coneses ce
‘ : , TROUBLING YOU 7 SIX MONTHS LONG /

IT PAYS YOU TO DEAL

—_—









—












USUALLY NOW
Tins All Gold Raspberry
Jam (2 1b.) 68 60 Pkgs. Cutrite




YOUR WIFE -SIR-.
SHE WISHES TO
SPEAK TO YOL-





SS ———————

THE LOVELIEST
LOT IN TOWN

XMAS
TREE









MILSON WHEW! LIKE BEING INA LIONS
Â¥} | DEN? (GAMBLED WITHMY LIFE?
: sia remeor rer DO WHAT WE
WAN] 9 F

UNDERSTAND, GOVERNOR? IF YOU OKAY

THAT BILL. YOUR WIFE ANDCHILDLL BE

RETURNED IN TWENTY-FOUR HOURS?
Ve

2



































IR You'll like ...
%

3/8 STUART & SAMPSON’S
‘| % Special & Mount Gay $

°

R %
$18 Headquarters for Best Rum ¢
R | X y



a
SPECIAL offers to all Cash and Credit Customers for Monday to Wednesday only
nie eeninelieleinigia ee re One San



Pkgs. Kellogs Corn Flakes 39 %3 Tins Bluebell Cream 37 34
Tins Klim P. Milk (5 1b.) 5.98 5.50 Tins Velop Tomatoes 36 33









Enloy the hospitality, com-
fort and thoughtful serv-
ice which have made PAA
“first choice” of veteran
travelers the world over.

NEW YORK

Via San Juan or by connecting air-
nes from Miami. Reduced 15-day,
round-trip Excursion Fares now in
effect from Sen Juan.

All PAA flights to New York
now land at Idlewild Airport
instead of La Guardia Field.

MIAMI

Dail, ts—non-stop service fr
San "isan Special 18-Day Round
Trip Excursion Fares now in effect.
ST. CROIX
ST. THOMAS

Frequent flights by swift Convair-
type Clipper*. Convenient depar-
ture times.

You can now “‘fly PAA’ to
EUROPE, SOUTH AMERICA,
AFRICA, MEXICO, the FAR
EAST—in fact, completely around
the world.

For 22 years the leading
international airline—PAA
was first to link the Amer-
icas by air, first to fly to
all six continents.

For reservations, see your
Travel Agent or



MOST EXPERIENCED
AIRLINE

AMERICAN
Horto AIRWAYS

DaCOSTA & CO., LTD.
Broad Street — Bridgetown
‘Phone 2122. (After Business

Hours 2303)

} | 93939947599990999 100004

x Taste It!

Rum

It has its famous
and
Distinctive Flavour

STUART & SAMPSON
(1938) LTD.



USUALLY NOW

Paper 58 30





DECORATIONS

ADVOCATE STATIONERY







TUESDAY, OCTOBER 30.

1951

BARBADOS



CLASSIF

The charge for announcements of
Births, Marriages, Desths, Acknowl-
@agement:, and 'n Memoriam notices is
$1 50 on week-dajs and $1.80 on Sundays
for any number of words up to 50, cnd
3 cents per word on week-days and
4 cents per word on Sundays for each
additional ward.

DIED

KING—On 0th October
I’ >ynold at bis residence “Haroldville”
Perry's Gap, Roebuck Street His
funeral leaves his late residence at
4.30 this afternoon for the Westbury
Cemetery

Beutrice King and Family





1951, George

HELP

GARDENER — Strong willing young
man 18 to 22 as handy man and second





gardencr. Steady job. Sleep in or out
App'y: Box L.S.S8. c/o Advocate.
30 .10.51—3n

IED ADS,

TELEPHONE 2508.



}

FOR SALE

|
| Minimum charge wee 72 cents and

96 cents Su days % words — over 24
words 3 cents a word week-—4« cents a
wor’ on Sundays.



AUTOMOTIVE



CAR—Hillman Minx
Cition

Very good con-
Phone Hassell at 4003 or 4371.
28. 10.51—3n



CAR—195i Citroen.
3,000 miles Owner
Phone—2032

Almost
leaving tite
14.10 .51—t.f.n

new —



CAR—19i17 Ford V-8 Special De Luxe
| perfect. condition. Formerly L.117, No
reasonable offer refused. Phone 91-69

30.10.51—3n.



CAR—One 199 8 H.P. Aneta
C. Feild 4673



Ring
30.10.51—In.

CAR—Ford Prefect. Engine in good
running order, tyres new. Phone L. N
Chenery 8659 between 9 a.m.—1Il a.m
or 4 p.m.—5 p.m 30.10, 51—3n










NUFSE—Fxperienc







4 se to sleep
in Oniy those with od ref -rence
required Apply: Mrs. J. B. D. Rob-
inson in person “Glenaire”, Britton’s
Mill 30.15,51—2n

TEACHER—For aparima College”
Warted at the beginning of the school
year, January 1952, University graduate
master qualified to teach French up to
and including Higher School Certificate
grade. Monthly Salary—$200—10—250

with maximum of 275 for graduate with
High Schoo] Teacher's Dipioma
salary determined by teaching experience,
Apply with references, Principal, Napar-
ima College, San Fernando, Trinidad









25.10.51—6n }
MISCELLANEOUS
oe eeeprenentarnemnnentneaennsdlansnrintiemaniinntin.
ITEMS—China, Cuttlery, Silver ware,
flass ware and small furniture Dial |
8115
LOAN: £7,500 required Secured by

First Mortgage on valuable property
YEARWOOD & BOYCE
24.10.51—3n





WANTED TO RENT
ROOM~—Single young man
requires unfurnished room ne meals
Apply: Advocate Advertising Dept. E.M
30.10, 51—3n

PUBLIC NOTICES

Ten cents per agate tine on week-days
end 12 cents per agate tine on Sundays,
minimum charge $1.50 on week-days
on? $1.80 on Sundays

NOTICE
PARISH OF ST. JOSEPH

Will those persons owing Taxes to the
Parish of St. Joseph kindly pay same
without delay

(white)







A. T. KING,
Parochial Treasurer,
St. Joseph
28.10.51—4n

NOTICE
PARISH OF ST JOSEPH

Tenders will be received by the un-
dersigned up to 15th November 1951 for







Starting Ralph A

| Drax



Standard Vanguard,

Morris Oxford

B.39.A, 10 HP.

Singer 9 h.p. Roadster
One SM1500 Singer Saloon
One Hudson 1947 Model.

For particulars inquire REDMAN &

AYLOR’S GARAGE LTD



CARS—One
One
One
One

|

|
\r

27.10.51—3n





HILLMAN STATI
mileage 5,000.

ON WAGGON 1951
New Price $2,700.00 will

accept $2,350.00. For inspection apply
Beard, Lower Bay Street
30. 10.51—3n



LORRY—One Federal lorry in working
order. Price $500.00. Apply Manager
Hall 27.10.51—Tn





ELECTRICAL



FRIGIDAIPE—5 c.b. Fit
tion. Orange Hill, St. Peter
30.10.51—3n

A-1 condi-

Westinghouse Refrigerator in good

working order. Apply: P. D. Maynard,

Porters Factory, St. James. Dial 2319
27.10.51—6n



FURNITURE

FURNITURE: One dining room Table
for 6 persons, one Side Board Both
Mahogany, nearly new, Telephone 4718.

27.10.51—3n



FURNITURE—Mag Dining
$22.00 pr. Birch Dining Chairs $18.00 pr.

Not forgetting a good selection of Lard-

Chairs









ers, Deal Tables etc. At Ralph Beard’s
Lower Bay Street. 28.10.51—2n
STEEL FURNITURE: Steel Tables,
Painted Red and Green. Round $14.50,
Square $17.00 Ideal for Galleries. At

Ralph Beards, Lower Bay Street
28.10.51—2n

MECHANICAL



MACHINE; Candy Floss Machine very



the purchase of two (2) buildings at the| simple to work. Large Profits can be
Community Centre, Bathshelti, known | made at Exhibitions, Fairs, and private
as “The Rest House” id the former | Parties. Cost new $480.00 will accept
“Reilway Station,” respectively, to be | $200.00 At Ralph Beards, Lower Bay
removed as soon as vacated Street 28.10.51—2n

Inspection on application to Mr. Good-
man on premises

N.B.—The Social Committee
bind itself to aceept the

does not
highest or any





TYPEWRITER Underwood Office
Model, in good working order. Phone
P. De Vertiville 4317 during office hours.









tender 30.10,51—3n.
J. MERTON McCARTY, a
Secretary, Social Committee, TYPEWRITER—One Underwood Porta-
St. Joseph ble Typewriter Excellent condition
27.10.51—3n | Holder Bros van Street
20.22.51. f.n
NOTICE
PARISH OF ST. JOSEPH L. N EO Ss
Applications will be received by the | | MISCEL A E U

undersigned up to 15th November, 1951
for the post of Assessor for theParish of
St. Joseph.

The salary is at the rate of $46.25 per
month, C.L. Bonus invluded,

The successful Candidates will be on one







A SMALL YACHT and Dinghy $150
or near offer. May be seen at the Yacht
Club, and Sailed. Owner leaving the
Island, Phone 8523. 30,10, 51—2n





BONE CHINA—"Royal Crown Derby";







(1 year's probation, and must assum?) crown Staffordshire “Shelley”. Louis L

duties on the Ist January, 1952 eishanars¢ < : “40.10. 51—2
N.B. Canvassing might invalidate any Bayley OF Baron ANS: mt a eae
Cundidate BAVORIAN PORCELAIN Louls Ly
A, T. KING, Ba ‘ley of Bolton Lane 30.10. 51—3n,

Clerk, St. Joseph Vestry.

28.10. 51—4n





FOR RENT





ooo par Ee
HOUSES
tial ieeidddeaphneriestncatanmnaeetnk t
TO SUB-LET
ASHTON-ON-SEA, Maxwells, for
November Dial 8473. 27.10.51—4n



» Crane Coast







On





1 2 Apply to John Fruni-
val, Crane Villa 20.10.51-—3n
IN-an-OUT, Gibbs Beach, St Peter
From Ist Nov. Small modern bungalow

on the beach. Suitable for couple. Fully

furnished with frig. large garage and |
servants’ room. Apply to Wesley Bayley,
Kiigh St. Phone 3818 2310.5



3n



ILFRACOMBE-on Sta, Maxwell Coast,
cexeclient seabathing, modern conveni-
erx.ces, four bedrooms and verandah, over-
Icoking the sea. Fully furnished, Phone





BOARDS—Two large wooden advertis-
ing Sign Boards: Approximately 20 ft. x
12 ft. Purchaser must remove same.

One Sign Board is located at *‘Welches”
--St, Michael—the other at Oistins, near
Plaza Theatre. CITY GARAGE TRADING
co,, LTD., Victoria St
28.10 .51—t.f.n.

BATH CAPS—From 3/6 to 4/6. Special
offer on one style to clear Org. Price
3/6 now 1/6. Knights. 28.10.51—2n.

COSTUME JEWELLERY—New stocks
of Czechoslovakian Costume Jewellery
Woncerful value. Louis L. Bayley of
Bolton Lane 30 .10.51—3n









GIG AND HARNESS—Good condition
Orange Hill, St. Peter 30.10.51—3n
INVALID WHEEL CHAERS: Two In-
| velid Wheel Chairs, tne adjustable. Can
| be seen any day at Fogarty'’s Store.
| 26.10.51—3n







LADIES DRESSES: Just in time for
the Races. New Ladies Dresses (sizes
12 to 48) in Florals and Pastels. Select









2266. Anyone requiring house for Novem yours early at The MODERN DRESS
ter only Phone 4150 28.10.51—2n | SHOPPE. 28.10,51—2n
" RIPLEY-on-Sea, Maxwell Coast, fully | NAILS—Galvanized nails a_ limited

furnished, two bedrooms, telephone and
refrigerator, For month of November
and from January on, Dial 2250.











NEW SHIPMENT—

GAS COOKERS
JUST. ARRIVED !

ALL SOLD

Call and see them at your Gas







Showroom, Bay Street a SADDLE One ae eee pee
= ‘oO i. ay ‘eet, an nv ‘i : A 1 A . ‘aynard,
Syain: dippainen’ BOOK yas ee vectory at Sunes, Dial 2319.
order TODAY from a_ future x ze 27.10.51—6n
shipment. Es a
SILVER WARE—About the largest
ire cms crit of sterling and plated es
“i a Louis L, Bayley of olton
LOR FORODEOPOOOPODOOOOOF, | Lane. ca 30. 10.51—Gn.
. .,
x < ~ ; . ,
i. K “WESTWARD bo"—Land’s End, fou
3 FREE HOO 8 bedrooms, from 5th November, Phone
4 Which Makes @ | 2038 20. 10.51—3n
5 ’ %
% GOD'S WAY OF &
. a
% SALVATION }| ANNOUNCEMENTS
3 S
% 99 x BROKEN DENTAL PLATES skilfully
x PLAIN x repaired while you wait. Square Deal
% \ | Denture Repair Service. Upper Reed
% Please write for one to % Street 28,10.51—2n
+ Sa , a we
% uel’ Roberts, Gospel x To meet numerous requests of our
% Book and Tract Service, % | customers, we have a a section
: % = us de shirts, pyjamas, pants,
%, tra! venue. n * | for custom ma
x *, Corel & , ee & vhorte, ladies slacks, boys clothing etc.
x gor N. me <8 | Having at our disposal the facilities of a
% 54 4 * | modern factory we are able to offer
Res PPL LLC prompt services at exceptionally feason-
36004 3% SOCCOOOOSâ„¢, abie prices.
QPOOee> DOSED «| Rellance Shirt Factory, Shirt Depot.
* | palmetto Street, Phone 4764.
M % 10.10.51—19n.
S FURNISH TO-DAY $
>
x % %
% The Money Saving Way 3| LOST & FOUND
%, si
? —— sou
x NEW and renewed Wardrobes x | —_—_—__—
xX $14 up, Chests of Drawers, Bu- %
<% reaus, Bedsteads in Iron or wood, % LOST
<* $10 up, Cradles, Beds, Nightchairs >
@ Extension and fixed styles, in SWEEPSTAKE TICKETS: Series K.
S$ many shapes and sizes for Din- ‘sen6 and Series S, 6609. Finder please
Sing, Kitchen, Radio and Cocktails ‘return to Sinclair Brathwaite, Kirtons,
\. —Morris, Tub, Rush and other % | St. Philip. 30.10.51—1n |
‘. Drawing Room Furniture ¥
x ¥
X PIANO by Story and Clark. 9 =
S$ — BRat volume. Good Wood and RI WANTED TO BUY
. ;
<& Better Music %
$ %|| STAMPS — STAMPS |
$ {| :
x 3} | All Kind of STAMPS
% L.S. WIL gi | at the
° e\fe % |
x . > © %|| CARIBBEAN STAMP
S SPRY ST. 2 | | SOCIETY
z No. 10, Swan Street.
> s/ } . . .
* abode” S14 26.10.51—4r.
“ 444 ot 4 At 8 FF 464 4 ° ’

44,6604

ELGG SS SSS SF ES SFI OT OTT

per Ib. Enquire Auto
Trafalgar Street. Phone
23.10.51—t.f.n.

quantity at 4fc
Tyre Company,
2696



ROLEX WATCHES-—Louis L. Bayley
of Bo'ton Lane 30.10.51—2n



SOA?S—Buy now for Xmas, Bronnleys
English Soaps. Assorted Scents — Bath
Scap, Box of 3 cakes Orig. Price 10/-
now 17/6. Toilet Soap, Box of 6 cakes
Orig. Price 10/6 now 86/-. Brilliantine
large bottle Orig. Price 3/- now 2/-
Knight's 28.10.51—2n.

















































island. |)

| cal fitness and two years’ probation. Salary scale $1,200 x



| PUMLIC SALES SUGAR BAGS

@ From Page ¢
Local manufacture of



|





SHIPPING



MONTheat,

ADVOCATE

AUSTaaLIA, NEW





NOT!







CES



LSPS FS FOSS SSOOSIOS,



| any case. cae |
: ; ZEALAND LINE, LIMITED x 5
} REAL ESTATE bags of some suitable materia] (M.A NZ. Line) i. The M/V “Cc. L. M.*““TANNITS* >
pata LE aaa would be a decided advantage ie oh cept asia hela Ci ha i will ac argo and Passengers }
i mee > 4 ° a - sc! ; a n, sday,
| THE UNDERSIGNED will offer for Sale in the event of jute from India} ..°c, ‘trom Hobart September 25th, | 25th inst ee mee!
| at Public competition at their office, No. being cut off in time of war, and! Melbourne October 4th, Sydney October The M/V “DABRWOOD”’ will
aes Bee ne or Macro ates ae would be a step towards better|10th. Gladstone October 16th, Port Amal ® sccept Cargo and Passengers for
The Two-storied Dwellinghouse known integration of the sugar industry, .. eee eres St. Lucia, Grenada and Aruba,
“ * ich is rar , and Pa 1 fi st
as “CONISTON” with the land whereon which is always an advantage. | 15 ‘sna Barbados November Ath. x ond, Pemenasie ely oe
the same stands and thereto belonging, I do not know if any body or)” 4, addition te general cargo this R inst: "
o~ ES ee aoe organisation exists for the ats | veseo! has ample space for chilled and | & The M/V “CAREBBEE” will
nue Belleville, St. Michael pose of dealing with such problems) bare frozen cargo, aceept Cargo and Passengers for
In by 3 ; ar t Caggo accepted on through Bills of Dominica, Antigua, Montserrat,
spection by appointment with Mrs. of the industry, and trying 0); diay for. transhipment at Trinidad to Nevis and St. Kitts. sailing
i awe eR anne intl acne find the best solutions, but Very Guiana, Leeward and Windward Pe a anes ae
. 1 idea to} Ista
of Sale. apply to:— would over be 2 ra. d | for further particulars apply— | Bw fa Sa A aaa
COTTLE, CATFORD & CO. have something 0! kind. FURBESS, WITHY & CO. LTD.. anc ASSOCIATION (
%4.10.51—t.f.n. JT have seen a lot of such research | DaCOSTA & CO, LTD., Consignee, Telephone Nog 4047
earried on in Canada and the) = Tripidad, Barbados,
ONE SHOP, House and Shed, to be 1S by individual corporations wi B.W.l. 1 6S969669699696969999SSS9S98S8s,
removed. Apply: Joseph St. Hill, Tweed- ae ? oss Be ep-we bicesmeeenibnnictsinepnntensniieanpepeneninenstndndiapen Srapguatmeannennee henna
side Road, Carrington Village trade associations, and govern.

#.10.51—2n. ments, and sometimes by all three}
collaborating, and in many cases
with astonishingly beneficial re-
sults.

According to the trade statis-
tics given in the Advocate Year



Two (2) very comfortable houses built
of stone for £1,100 each. They both
have water and light. One is at Black
Rock, and the other is st Codrington Hill.

Anothcr stone bungalow at Spooner's
Bill on ‘y acre of land. Price attractive
Apply to D'ARCY A. SCOTT, Magazine
Lane 30. 10.51—3n

£2,309,000 more than we exported,
so that one wonders where the
balance came from, Presumably
some of it came from tourists,
settlers and interest on invest-
ments, but “the figures do seem
to point to the desirability of ex-
ploring all possibilities of closing
the gap, especially by means that
ereate year-round employment of
suitable type.

LOGO GSIIOO T9999

Members of Club 7
of the G.I.U.

Remind you of their
Annual Conkie Dance
ON
THURSDAY NITE



LAND FOR SALE

74,000 sq. ft. of seaside land at Road
View, St. Peter

4% Acres at Thorpes, St

3% Acres
terminus
% Acre at Prospect, $1,000.00.

7,320 sq. ft. at Navy Gardens

Several Spots at Maxwell Road

27 Acres above the Government Farm,
Ch. Ch

4 Acres at Black Rock

For further particulars see D'ARCY
A. SCOTT, Magazine Lane

James
at Cave Hill, near bus







|

30.10. 51—3n

PERSONAL









The public are hereby warned against
giving credit to my wife MATTLDA
EURROWES (nee Young) as I do not
hold myself responsible for her or any-
one else contracting any debt or debts
m my name unless by a written order

signed by me. ¢
Sehiinc ‘crtencietn: | lst NOVEMBER, 1951
Little Island, 30.10.51. X
St. Joseph.
30.10.51—2n | pooccodt





GOVERNMENT NOTICES







|
|

OFFICER, SEAWELL AIRPORT

Applications are invited for appointment as Control Officer
Seawell Airport.

Applicants should be not less than 21 years of age and should
have previcus experience of Flying Contrel, preferably with Air Crew
experience as Pilot or Navigator.
eral knowledge of Civil
Radio Aids to Navigation. .

The appointment is permanent and pensionable, subject to medi-
72—1,776
x 96—2,160 per annum. Point of entry will be determined on the
basis of experience and qualifications.

Applications stating age, education, qualifications and experience,
accompanied by testimonials should be sent to the Colonial Secre-
tary, Secretariat, Bridgetown, Barbados, on or before 30th November,
1951.

at



Additional] assets would be a gen-
Aviation Legislation and Practice, and of



REGULATIONS FOR BRITISH COUNCIL
SCHOLARSHIPS

1. The British Council offers scholarships to overseas students,
tenable at Universities and other educational institutions in the United
Kingdom.

2. The awards are mainly for men and women who have al-
ready successfully completed university degree courses or who have
equivalent professional qualifications. Applications will, however,
be considered from candidates requiring less academic courses involve
ing attachment to industrial firms, hospitals, and non-academic institu-
tions. It should be noted that facilities for postgraduate study in music
and art are very limited and are not comparable to those that exist
for candidates in other subjects. Preference is given to candidates
between 25 and 35 years of age. .

3. The scholarships are normally for one academic year of 10
months or for two academic years, according to the duration of the
approved course of study. ‘

4. A full scholarship is intended to cover all expenses of main
tenance and study, and includes fares, fees, personal maintenance, a
grant for books and apparatus of £10 per annum and approved travel-
ling expenses in the United Kingdom, The maintenance allowance
varies between £25 and £35 monthly, according to the seniority of
the scholar and the place in which he is studying. Where scholars are
in a position to do so, they are expected to contribute to the cost.

5. Scholarships are awarded only on the recommendation of the
Council Representatives overseas.

6. Conditions of Tenure.

(a) A scholar must spend the whole of his scholarship period
in the United Kingdom and must undertake to return to
his own country at the end of this time. 4
A scholar may not take paid employment without ‘the
consent of the Council, which will be granted only in
exceptional cases.

A scholar must follow the course of study approved by
the Council and abide by the rules of the University or

(b)

(c)

|



other institution in which he is placed. |
Scholars may not bring their wives or families with
them to the United Kingdom.

7. Method of Application.

Further information and application forms may be obtained from }
the British Council, ‘Wakefield’, Whitepark Road. |

These application forms must be completed and returned with
supporting documents before the 10th November, 1951. '

Candidates recommended by the local selection committee wilt!
be required to supply five (5) sets of all documents and a medical
certificate of fitness.

A candidate who has previously applied for a scholarship must |
make his second application in full.

8. Method of Selection.

A local selection committee will consider applications from resi-

(d)

|
|
|
|



5
a.s

~



dents in Barbados, The final selection will be made by the British
Council in London from among those on the -hort list.

25.10.51.



Applications for Admission to Universities and Colleges in the
United Kingdom Session 1952-53

Owing to the limited accommodation at Universities and Colleges
in the United Kingdom resulting from the large number of applica- |

to secure a quota for Colonial Students in each faculty in every Uni-
versity and College throughout the British Isles. It must be realised, |
therefore, that only those who are strongly recommended and err |
first class qualifications for entry can be considered for admission.

2. The British Council will be responsible for making arrange- |
ments for meeting students and for securilg suitable accommodation
for them.

¢ 8. Students are advised that it is most undesirable for them to!
proceed to the United Kingdom unannounced and unsponsored in the |
hope of obtaining admission to Universities and Colleges, as even !
tutorial colleges and polytechnics are overcrowded and it is very cifl- !
cult to gain admission to them without due notice in the proper form. |
| 4. Forms of application for admission to Universities and Col- |
\leges in the United Kingdom, to be completed in quintuplicate, may
be obtained ffom the Secretary, Student Advisory Commitiee, ¢/9 |
Office of the Director of Medical Services, Wharf, Bridgetown, and |
| must be returned to him not later than Wednesday. 31st October, 1951. |







ATTACHE CASES

{
in a variety of sizes just received |
} BUY YOURS TO-DAY
‘cause they are goiny like... . i
“BUTTER AGAINST THE SUN”
|
‘

THE CENTRAL EMPORIUM

Cnr. BROAD & TUDOR STREETS.
AA IAA





3n |

{1
|



5.5
8.8

Book, in 1950 we imported some | __







for St. I











NEW YORK SERVICE
A STRAMER sails 12th October—rrrives B'dos 23rd October, 1951.
A STEAMER sails 2nd November-—~<:rives B’dos 13th November, 1951.
dine cae eae nncetnneltinclavartes sonningio! puickteatnt eet sheiatieennelpellocateenlibianaty
NEW ORLEANS SERVICE
A STEAMER sails 10th Octobep—a'rives B'dos 25th October, 1951
A STEAMER sails Mth October—arrives B’dos &th November, 1951.
A STEAMER sails 7th November— arrives B'dos 22nd November, 1951.
CANADIAN SERVICE
SOUTHBOUND
Bails Sails Arrives
Name of Ship Montreal Halifax Barbados
S.S. “ALCOA POINTER” Sept. 28th Oct. Ist Oct. 12th
$.S. "ALOOA PILGREM” . Oet.. 12th Oct. 1th Oct. 25th
8.84 ‘ALCOA PEGASUS . Oct, 26th Oct. Wh Novr. 8th
NORTHBOUND
} 8.8. “ALCOA PLANTER" Due Barbados October 15th. Sails

awrence River Ports.

ROBERT THOM LTD. — NEW YORK AND GULF sERVICE.

APPLY:—DA COSTA & ©O.. LTD.—CANADIAN SERVICE










Montreal Halifax Da
Barba
“SUNDIAL” 10 Oct 15 Oct a1 October
“POLYRIVER” 26 Oct Sl Oct Ww November
‘A VESSEL" 7 Nov 12 Nov 28 November
21 Nov 26 Nov 12 December

UNITED KINGDO

oe

|
APPOINTMENT OF AN AIR TRAFFIC CONTROL |s.*. "A VESSEL”
|

“SUNROVER”
“SUNWHIT
SS

M AND CONTINENTAL SERVICE





UNITED KINGDOM SERVICE

From Newport, Liverpool and Glasgow



Newport Liverpeel ¢
£ Oct
Nov

is

9 Nov 1 21



















accep
Expected
Arrival
jlasgow Dates
BARBADOS
Oct 31 Octe
Nov 7 December



Expected Arri



Antwerp Rotterdam ZDIMI6 Dates, Bar
SUNMONT” 17 Oct $ o 2 : g ov"
“SUNRAY" a 15 Nov. is soe aoe . Eanes
Agents: PLANTAYIONS LIMITED — Phone 4703

. Passengers holding reservations on
or after 31st October 1951, are
kindly asked to contact our Office

regarding

time and

days of

departure of their flights due to
change of schedule.

BRITISH WEST INDIAN AIRWAYS

LTD.
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TS

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on the following days:

Tuesday 30th October,
Wednesday 31st October,
Thursday 1st November,

Our Lumber Yard, Office and Sugar Store will
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PAGE.EIGHT

ee

BARBADOS



Atkinson Hits 118 N.O. At Congo Road |

R. Lawless Makes

A Total of

The first day’s play in the Seventh Series of Intermediate ,,
éricket matches ended on Saturday. All the grounds had gnq Trinidad was to have taken seated

good wickets and honours were divided between batsman place on Saturday but owing to hotel played soft soothing
and bowler. Richard Atkinson scored 118 runs not out for gm wind it had to be abandoned.

500 UP

Windward against Spartan.

R. A, “Tony” Lawless, 23-year-
old Cable and Wireless batsman
whose position in the batting
order for his team is usually
number 3, scored 57 runs against
Mental Hospi.al at Mental Hospital
on Saturday. He is the first bats-
man to score 500 runs for this
s@ason in the Intermediate
Division. His aggregate is now
538 runs. Lawless’ 57 and a good
knock by his brother C, B. “Jim-
my” Lawless who scored 53 runs,
enabled Cable and Wireless to
seore 184 runs in their first
innings. “Tony”, like his brother
“Jimmy” is also a useful bowler

The Mental Hospital bowling
was not devastating as it was in
some matches past and C, Williams
who is the principal batsman for
the Mefital Hospital was called on
to rescue the side when the Cable
and . Wireless. batsmen looked
very comfortable.

Williams bowled seven point
three overs and took three wicket
for 22. .Medium pacer R. Chase
took two. wickets for 32 runs
while Y, Carter, C. Knight and k.
Rock. who bowled 18 overs and
conceded 45 runs each had one
wicket to their credit.

At the Garrison, Empire winning
the toss also batted the whole
day in their match against Pick-
wick. They scored 116 runs in
their first innings, C. Prescott no-
out 29 and Skipper Amory 21.
Opening pace bowler R. Clarke
land Moore each captured tw
wickets for 28 and 24 rung respec-
tively.

In the Winagward-Spartan fix-
ture at Congo Road, Windward
afier batting the whole day lost
five wickets in their first innings
for 240 runs. The main feature
of the match was a brilliant 118
not out by R. Atkinson who went
at number three in the batting
order for Windward.

A. D. Gittens took two of the
wigkets for 39 runs and Skinner,
S. Parris and E. MeComie one
each.

Wanderers batting for the better

of the day scored 132 runs
fn their first inningg against the
Regiment at the y, Beckles
Road

‘For Wanderers A. G. Seale who
opened the innings with A. Lewis
was undefeated with 47. Best
bowling performance was given by
J. Brathwaite who after bowling
13 overs and four balls bagged
three wickets. Two wickets each
went to A, Phillips, V. Watts, and
J, Clarke,

Regiment in their first innings -

have replied with 46 runs without
floss.

The scores;—
PMPIRE v. PICKWICK at Garrison

SE Innings
2 Bourne ¢ ried 2 = Clarke
i, e 4p loore ..
B. Austin c joore b Lashley

Griffith run out .
I. Tris ¢ (wk, elyn)
E. wc Lashley b Peterk:
C, Preseott not out ..........
N,
c

ll

. Skeete run out .........
. Spooner run out .

Extras: 4 fake at
Total:

BOWLING AN. are

1
3
3
10
13
6
9
3

M R
R. Clarke .......... 18 4 2 2
T. Lashley .. . 16 5 31 1
Lewis. . 4 1 8 -
Moore... 9 1053 2 2
Peterkin be i paek 0 2 7 1
Cc & WIRELESS

Â¥

MENTAL HOSPITAL
CABLE & WIRELESS—lst Innings
Matthews c Boyce b Knight 10
McKenzie c Rock b Chase 19
Lawless 1.b.w. Williams ST
. Cozier c Williams b Chase...
C. Gilkes run out ....
Lawless b Williams ........
. Seale b Williams ..
L. Branker b Rock ..............
Frost c Rock b Carter
Clarke not out .
Roberts absent
Extras:

>vE

weg

MBOMAOMp aS
o

ey

E ccoltectis

Total: és ;
BOWLING ANALYSIS
Carter

Knight |
Crichlow
Rock

ozo
ono z
Bskasssa

Chase ..
Springer
Williams

SPARTAN v. WINDWARD at Congo Rd
WINDWARD—Ist Innings

FE. Evelyn b S. Parris : 12
N. Thornton ec Matthews b Skinner 10
R. Atkinson not out ....... 118
H. ©. Farmer c MeComie b Gittens 14
H. M. Farmer ¢ b McComie 9
K. rant ¢ (wk)

an b Gittens 61
xtras.t oa pepe sis 9:9 0 ots a tm 16
Total (for 5 wkts.) a)

538 Runs

~



B'dos Leads T’dad Ramadhin Was
In Yachting Games Too Hungry

Vamoose In Ist Place From HENRY MARGAN

(From Our Own. Correspondent) TOWNSVILLE, Sydney, Oct. 30,
PORT-.OF-SPAIN, Oct. 29, West Indians enjoying Towns-
The Second Intercolonial ville’s tropical climate, where
ornado race between Barbados upon arrival Sunday night a band,
in the park facing the

music.
F John Trim summed up _ the
amoose took one hour and 20 whole atmosphere sinking back ip
minutes to complete one lap. On 4 rattan chair, whispered softly:

Sunday morning this race was «pont talk to me for a long time 7

reld. 2 folks, I want to focus m

The boats started pretty well pack’ home”. When the fons saw
with a light south east wind blow- Tovwnsville’s swaying palms, they
ing. On the first leg to the wind- rushed back to their bedrooms and

ADVOCATE



Two League Bats 8!RTHS EXCEED DEATHS
Hit Centuries IN, GEORGETOWN

COLTS took three points from “""GEORGETOWN Oct. 25.
Bordeaux when their two-day Georgetown’s Health Department

League Cricket fixture at Bor- has reported more births than
deaux end . deaths in the City during the
Cedric and Conrad r month. A total of 331




Reid, both of scored 116 not pirths were registered, but .2f
oe ond gp out to bolster these 108 were born to parents
r team’

outside Georgetown leav-
to the City.
Deaths registered for the month
the were 178, but of this number, 82
runs were of persons who resided out-
Chandi a side the City.

ler and Reid came to- es also reveal that more

gether for the seventh wicket and eae died than females, and more

«wickets. Bordeaux, who batted

to 310 for sx residing
Wrst, made 185 in their first in- â„¢%

TUESDAY, OCTOBER 30, 1951



SSE SS



|



A lovely new Stock
attractive
Shoes for ladies in a

of these

2

put on 206 runs in 90 minutes.

females were born than males. Of



ward TK49 was first, followed by
TK44, Vamoose, Edril, TK45 and
Cyclone.

Vamoose however went into
the lead and was first around the
windward mark, followed by
TK45, TK49, Cyclone, TK44 and
finally Edril.

fhe boats held this position for
some time. In the second round
first around the windward buoy
was again Vamoose, Edril, owing
to some brilliant sailing by Ivan
Perkins, had now moved into
second place. Cyclone was third
and the three Trinidad boats in
the following positions, TK49,
TK44 and TK45, Vamoose did the

shirts
part of the country.

Goddard wore a rich blue shirt
with a large picture of himself
dressed as_a matador stabbing a
bull.

dug out the glamourest
seen in this

The team plays in Townsville
on Tuesday and Wednesday ver-
sus Queensland Country, return-
ing to Brisbane to meet Queens-
land November 3, prior to start-
ing the First Test on the ninth.

Manager Cyril Merry plans to
arrange a pre-match meal when-
ever Ramadhin plays next
because of the bowler’s underpar





CABLE & WIRELESS’ RB. A. “Tony”
Lawless is the first Intermediate

batsman to score 500 runs this sea-
son,

——
BOWLING ANALYSIS
Oo M

Cc. Skinner 8 1 27
N. Medford ) dite -
S. Parris 11 1 40 1
c ood ‘ <-> 10
A. D. Gittens 12 1 30
E. G, McComie 5 a
N. Wood 1 9
B. D. is 2; 2
REGIM vy WANDERERS at Bay
‘WANDERERS—1st Innings
A. Seale not out “6 47
A. Lewis b Philips ‘ 0
C. Packer c Crawford b Philips s
M. Clarke c¢ Price b Brathwaite. 1
M. Mayers b Watts :
G. Skeete c&b Watts 0
M, Proverbs run out 20
G. Alleyne ¢ (wk) b Brathwaite... 27
J. Corbin lbw. b Clarke 6
B. Patterson c Brandford b Brath-
waite tes sores 1
H. Ramsay |.b.w. b Brathwaite
Extras ; fA 4
Total: : 4 132
BOWLING ANALYSIS
Oo M R
A, Philips ll 4 19 2
J. Parris ' 3 1 2-
J latke 3 1 2
J 2.— Si -
Vv. Watts . 18 5 42 2
J. Clarke tine 9 3 17 2
J, Brathwaite . 134 3 41 3
MENT —1st Innings
A. Ishmael not out . Fe
L. Parris not out .... 12
Extras : ‘ 3
Total (for no wkts) 46

BOWLING ANALYSIS
Qo M
Corbin
Ke



Skeete



Four Teams

Gain Lead

Lodge is in a strong position to wicket
score an outright victory over F, Taylor ‘topscored with 68. Har-

7 S- rison College are now three runs
missed the Wanderers batsmen for the loss of one wicket in their

NZS secon
on Saturday the first day, of a am,
Vv

Wanderers at Lodge. Lodge di
for 68 runs in their first

new series in Second
cricket matches,

dae Gee Re ee eat 7 the schoolboys knocked up 115
iS rr i i S d
why the Wanderers batsmen did ee in ele See ne i
eG 3° re — ae Ss —7
w wickets for 22 runs. At the en kets.
of play Lodge had replied with sayan wickets
145 runs in their (Nst innings. gyt for 48 runs by Empire at}
EB, Pierce took seven wickets for Beckles Road. F, Thomas medium |








45 runs.

a good wicket
Police. Skipper Denny, R.

ts for eight runs.
ice in

WHAT’S ON TODAY

Oourt of Original Jurisdiction
and Lower Courts—10 a.m.
House of Assembly—3 p.m.
Mobile Cinema at Cottage
Plantation, 8t. George—7.45
p.m.
CINEMAS
EMPIRE: Mr. Belvedere Rings the
Bell 4.45 & 8.30 p m
GLOBE: Reseanna McOoy &
Savage Splendour 4.30 & 7.45

pm
PLAZA: Three Secrets 4.45 & 4

p.m
OLYMPIC: Texas Dynamo and
Girl of the Year 4.30 & 8 15

p.m.

ROYAL: Federal Operator 9) (4.40
& 8.15 p.m,

ROXY: Wyoming Mall 4.46 & #15
Pom.

p DUCA’
{ SWINOLE SHEET
TAKE A LICKIN’,

GETS
THE
pss 30 Ger)
NECK
. WHE LIKES
FEET BW te
MAKE A R
Soe SateonAN
iS :

GUY s+.

MOST
GIVE HiM A
HIS



w Another Win For Vamoose

ision already got a first innings’ lead

At Harrison College, Harrison
College batting first collapsed on topscored for
and were all out ]
for 27 in their first innings against mpire are now 111 runs—63

Sealy runs ahead—for the loss of seven
and C. Springer each took three wickets.

ir turn at the

race in one hour four minutes and
44 seconds; Edril one hour, seven
minutes, 8 seconds, Cyclone one
hour, seven minutes, 12 seconds.
TK49 one hour, eight minutes, 44
seconiis, TK44 one hour, nine
minutes, TK45 one hour, eight
minutes 23 seconds.

On Sunday the Third Inter-
colonial Tornado race was held in
a light south easterly wind. The

form before lunching on both
days against Newcastle last week-
end,

Wihen Ramadhin arrived at

what’s the matter?
Sonny porng both arms around
his middle said woefully
hungry.”



, hoats started the race beating to

windward, The Trinidad boats got
the jump and were off in the
following order, TK45, TK44 and
TK49. Fourth was Vamoose
followed by Edril and last,
Cyclone. .

Trinidad boat, TK49 unfortun-
ately broke its jib halliard and
fell well astern while repairs
were being carried out.

At the end of the first lap TK45
was in the lead, followed by
TK44, Vamoose, Cyclone, Edril
and TK49,

Vamoose however crept into the
lead and was first at the end of
the second lap. Second was TK45,
third Cyclone and the others in the
os order, TK44, Edril and

4

S0
Satistying
... this

Chase |

* Vamoose scored another victory,
completing the course in 57
mirfutes 13 seconds. Second was
Cyclone which did the race in 59
minutes, 27 ond; third was
Trinidad’s TKés, completing the
re Pe! Pri oe soere “

» nex t in one our, one|
minute it seconds, TK44 one
four minutes and 52}

of the boats at the

is as follows:
Vamoose 194 points, Edril 13
points, TK45 10 points, Cyclone
nine points, TK49 seven points,
TK44 three points. Barbados is so
far 414 points and Trinidad 20

points.

Yesterday’s race, the Fourth
Regatta, was postponed when the
time limit expired before the
second lap was completed.

Games will take place to-day.
RT

:

sanborn.

—.

knocked up 115 runs.

At Vaucluse, Central has

over Combermere. Batting first

Central at the end of play replied
with 129 runs for the toss of

Y.M.P.C. batsmen were skittled

pacer took six wickets for six
runs for Empire and G. Greenidge
YÂ¥.M.P.C. by scoring ;
runs.

The scores :—

EMPIRE vs ¥.M.P.C. at Beckles Road
Y.M.P. iG
Thoma.
6 wickets for 6 runs).

Empire First Innings—111 runs for
seven wickets, (G. Clarke 11, N. Holder
17,0. B 7 wickets for 43 runs).

COMBERMERE vs CENTRAL
At Central

Combermere First Innings—115 (O
Beckles 39, Mr. Hughes 22. H. Andrews
Sen for 53, L. King 4 wickets for

Me

Central First Innings—129 for 7 wick-
ots (R. Shepherd 26, 1. Beckles 3 wick
ets for 26 runs).

POLICE ys COLLEGE at Collese

Harrison College First Innings—27 (1
Deny 3 wickets for six runs, R. Seal:
3 wickets for nine runs, C. Springer !
wickets for 8 runs.)

Police First Innings—i138 runs (F
Taylor L Dodson 17, T. Medford 4
wickets for 8 runs.)

son College Second
runs for 1 wicket,
LODGE vs WANDERERS
Innings—68

Innings—

following such calamity ?

. Inniss 4 for 22). by covering you with...
Lodge First Innings—145 (Mr. Timsen
87. K. Johnson 33, BE. Pierce 7 for 45).



§ DACOSTA &

ENJOYING
THE
BEST

POOOOGOS

* THESE
8
S ra
§ DAYS...
A GIFT HORSE * 7 ’
THANX To PETE FOLEY, x ff & FR
SUNNYSIDE , LZ. N.% & :
$69$96690S60S69900000"

lunch on Saturday, Merry asked,
Whereupon

“T am

Here is coffee with the inviting aroma,
the heavenly flavor that makes every sip
a satisfying experience. With Chase &
Sanborn you get all the flavor your cup can
hold. Ask for Chase & Sanbori; today.

You have, doubtless, had the foresight to insure your
business premises and stocks against the risks of fire or other
calamity. But have you considered the loss of earning power

Allow us to protect the earning power of your business

A LOSS OF PROFITS INSURANCE POLICY

We shall be pleased to give you full particulars and advice.

96S

Douglas Barrow, 70 also played

a
Colts.

Batting for Bordeaux, G. Forde
top scored with 68 runs
F. Linton got 44 and K.
man 34,

Barrow and Reid of Colts car-
‘ried off the game’s bowling hon-

@ the deaths 114 were males, and
Supporting innings for j99 females while birth figures
show 46 were males and 52 females.



‘

rd by taking 3 for 62 and 3 for

TO-DAY'S NEWS

Jeth







Tepes Teeth n that you have
neh Mouth or perhane wome bad & teeth

it
tovall out an may, also cause Rheumatism
and Heart Trou





— te. Amosan
TO TOR first da: nds sore ut hy
rr = es and q aly’ tlantens “he. teeth. Iron clad
2. guarantee, otan must make ro
outh well and save your teeth of

turn of empty -
from your chemist

today. ie guar-
antee protects

ney
age. Get Amosan




PRESS BUTTONS
Fitted te your Bag or Purse
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Full Text

PAGE 1

J Tl l.xnw. OCTOBER 3, 1K1 BARBADOS ADVOCATE Af.l II1KI I. We Claim We Are The People Most Competent Walcott Tells St. Joseph Electorate -MH E K WALCOTT. Deputy Leader of ihc Elect.ciation. toU his listeners at Bathsheba, Si Joseph. 01 Friday night, that like New Zealand and Australia, Englam' had just chanced their Labour Government for a Conaerv Government, and auvised that the electorate here d < the same thing; on Election Day. He was speaking in support of his Party's candidate Mi Coward for election to the House of Assembly us a reprc sentativo of St. Joseph MSUKn UOUHAHU IX HIUKID Harbour Log Charge Dismissed Mr. Wjlcolt said that .i>. thev knew It wa the tint time in the history of the island that they would lie having Adult Franohise. When they voted this time it might be the last time they would dn so for five years. In truth and ID fact ihi s e ssion of the House today was only a throe-year one. i.ut ihcy hjd heard the other side. or at any rate some of them, saying that they were going to make the session rive years. -1 hop*that Is no! true", st'.d Mi Walcott, "because for many reasons it would bo utterly mil true that th* parliament of Qreat Britain all rra, hut then they have had Adult rr..i U hi-since 1918. World History "It is the history of the world Bral time Adull F Vtfrfi'Wft II given, you find peopl. %  in rather than lo their common sense and their abtitb Thai Is %  danger should have the opportunity within three .. %  u works ou r#ill be able u, notify us inKlake* whit-h you may mnke %  1 til.' _'. ; experience you aril] ioMo lo uaa tbtw Itrtowlfnlfjp better when the next timi-s cot %  Mr. Walcott said 1h;il they might not know hut It was right thai they should know, that up %  me House of Assembly had no %  UthOrttl Ifl m.l.itc Hi. polity of the island. 1. was the Oovl rm.i -iii-r.xioimviCommittee who rltcitr/ed UM policy. Pour .vears B. what was known .. tha "iiii'iic Bxp> 1Imenl" and (hat was an experi. ment lo give the (our member* of the H. \ ttnbty who sal on the Executive Committee, the right and the power to die" tate ;ind U. do wh.tt they thought. In their opinion. area for the good of the island. "So far il ha* only been our political opponents who have had tht opportunity of doing or being able to show the i-lami wn.it the) C-JII djO. TrilJ has never f.illen to the I"1 of the Coi %  P 11. The ulltci side liKi.i b rv;,tivParty, no matter v hare sui I it I v different. The trade union was created by the (;ovemoi-in-FxccuUve Committee in 1939 when he was Attorney General. "We were the people who created trade unions and sat | that lhe> must function in thi. island as in other democratic counnould t >• %  %  .i with then i so as to be able to get fair (ami This baa nothing in do with politics" When the) heard the other side talking about the benefits thpeople had got through th. trade union, they were not to confuse the trade union with politic, i power or with politician*. "U doe not matter who is In power In the g|e untani oriU function and will continue lo function : Mr Waleott said that his Party did not want lo decry I heir opponents, but what they had lo say was that thi nents may be good but they were better. "We claim that we are ihe people most competent, Take out then undoubted!) brilliant leader and tell me of ..in ol the res) thai 11 up to us," questioned Mi Wttlcotl. t h.iM : % %  of Government He told them that New Zealand • ears hud changed then Labour Government and put in .i Conservative Government and that Ml almost the same case with regard to Australia. That da.\ England had also put tlv Conservative Government back In power, >.unsellrd "If you have ens.' us the Engli-iin;.n you will do Ihe same thing here." He was glad lo recommend Mr Coward tO them as a eandKi.ili who would look after their Interest and would ask that they give hirn their support "You .ll Me to il that when you go to the poll you will put an "X" against Mi Cowards name. Do not make .. nut>takc for It may b t In-fore you will be in %  p remedy it Mi Coward -aid tn.it he wa clad of the opportunity lo speak to them on the platform of Ihe Association. it* WOO there to offer himself as a candidate (or die House of Assembly ent them. He was not a • them and could assuie them thai he had political experience, sonu ltd a sound knowledge of the constitutional Lai set-up or the island. With these attributes he fell himself capable of representing them. High COX. Day by day Ihe high cost of living was taking away everything the worker possessed. There was no likelihood of gelling this situation remedied in the near future without a radical change. He was determined to do his bit In relieving! the situation. Mr. Coward referred lo the East Coast Road ana said that not only would the doing of the road provide wovk for Ihc people of the parish, but il would be beneficial to the ratepayers. With the road 'lone building! would soon start to go up along it, landowners would he able lo dispose of some hou-.* spots and the parish would gel more revenue which would be used lo help Ihe destitute people in it. He was presenting himself as a servant of the people and not one who would toe ihe Paris line. He knew the sufferings of the underprivileged because he had sprung from among them He knew their needs ana therefore he was appealing to them to vote in his favour on Section Day. IN CARLISLE BAY ark H-n.. o Walla.*. Sen W XuiMTM s... i*y No**** VI. E Saw'h. Set. Uii: I **>•, Srh it** Urn. S.-. Iklturtn l.'.lu roinW. 3J nt-rf*. nm Si VIBH M V !-..< .-*l AHITA H 'I *U. (or in PCM vr^gsT. i JUSTICES G U Taylor and H A. Yataghan in Ihe Assistant | Courl of Appoal yesterday reveraeu eJ. • decision of Mr. E. A. McLeo. Srr. Police Magistrate of District "A** 1 %  I** -u*nn. *ho placed Seymour Riley o' Paradise Gap, Spoooer's HiU o: a probation period of one mono i in Hi* sunc of f| for using threat: lo Lennle Blunt on May IS. ., ThenHonour%  • greed with submission by Mi E. K. Walcott mm M r, K.C. counsel for Riley that th complaint was n<* properly mad' .nt, and dlimiioed the cast A ithout prejudice. Mr E. W. Barrow appeared or rehalf of complainant Blunt iTA. i in* im. cae* tea Una mi. Cat* as*, c*w In Touch With B.rbado. CoM.I Station Cabl* and Wlrrln. IWM Wiiiirlit nevUW II..1 ih*> can ntva rs-vmunic.i" ua IK roii.>(ain ahlpa ihrvuHi ihm f.Ttatl.. Voa.l Stalin 0 0 n.ilfliu. Mobrln. AlUnUoVnurr tltla PI Via.PraMio IVH .KMr.ittt 1 BOM. Sn-.iu TiramH. hwU. Ft.ll*dC Nalaon. hHiSinu Uonnw Ak-oa pwmvrr *"il Mf>a. Air...i I tiSTI" Hi,,* M.i.tn IS.I*cmal. Buna. '•••eocna. Nonn Vallrv. Maria SEA WELL 4UII41* ON SUNDAV-Bf UA V ..-, nmiMU PMv. BatUn. AiiKiir Sinwon. nnlut' Oial. MITMD M-lllor How la-.,i'"-• raaiuirre. IMIUMD Msiwkx. ii MwHM brrARTi an ON MONDAY I-I M^TIRINBSMro llMnHtn, Walter panl. i r.ieku spsigtla.. J.MI, spa^iM **IVAI, n a w i vrerntnAV Irani rRlMUAII— MM %  Fsrd R ..,' PA0LETTE OODDARD. popular United BUte* sciaen star does aot (teem in the le*t bit perturbed by the number of male mdrolren that surround Itcr AS she leaves her hotel in Madrid during A recant visit. -Express. N W.nl IKI.MOA0— TIRtlAV loward. A. HcnA': O HuibK"' loiw. N Hlnkssn. T Qri>id. Si THE CHILD IS Jamaica Seeks MORE IMPORTANT POPE PIUS SAYS t'ASTEI, GANUOLFO. 1UI>. Oct. 2> PopPius XII in a length* .sl>t*.ch Xt CiitlK.Ui ifitt-ralwl tn. Chuix-h's oppoaltMn in any form tn birth .-..iitr.il. itburtlon and arllllllMt Development Corporation IN as. i mm Our Own CerT^pomc.il i KINGSTON. The Jamaica Government is no-. I 1 I ,, | I l| | 11 | | • %  • V JUi—li i. >i""i nil II 111 IS ill. .1 The Pontlfl took particular pains r. ,u l dy,n %  P !" Poi '" ">e eatabi hicamui U t,.^ ntra n ..r.i n iH. r Ibmenl of a Jamaica DevelnuK Hai iimii I"* ISUMIIAD— 0t4 M>NDAV D indar. c no**,. r iParmer, r r.rm.r. O WeallwrMoiir .1 WHII.,,. Il Alriaiidrr. C Drntsn.. M Hrmui.. 1 M.pln F. Taylor I'M. VINS/IIIAON HATURJtAV Hatiiiui JarfeMn. T Jarkoxt. tlmi ,,t I i .tin nii-h ll.uli, B>lt I'ara n Mil" HI! O ON BUNDAV Ij-roi.t **nr*tn. n—>l IUw.,>. m.Ht ruard. IJIIint, Walroli, l rar %  .iv, ,N, fhail-. huajim William Sin l.it Aaeefa JENKINS ROBERTS CALLS FOR RUM The motor vessel Jenkins Robfrta tiled here over lh.> to l"d a quantity of rum for Na'.iii. Bahama*. She Is consign'''' to Messrs A. S. Bryden at Sons Ltd. The Jemhbu Kebeefa will \tterthed i n tha Careenage when one is eboui to load the rum. but M^torday. *h* remained tn Carlisle Bay. She was awaiting her migine Harrison Unof s-h4ar ;.rrive.i .it Ibirbadia yestolny for a shipment of sugar for U.K day, the Alcoa R. 8. Aleaa rolnW rafted for molassea for Conadi I Hull, shins are ooroigne-1 It Messrs Do Costa A Co.. Ltd. Wanted For Murder i I'M w 11 Our Own Ciiiiv"uiit' GEoiuirrowTf, Oct. 25 riif I'oiuc 1 lewsrd of |200 for i< uhlch would lend lo Ihe arrest ra rUdg pUarMguog, .1 irenei of Uu i iiyiiiii Klver urea, who Is wanli'" to, ilaa iiiiiiiiii nt I..MUI-.It KM I iu>n King at Ciiyunl durln. August last. ltodrlgues em ai'ii'Ntrtt In I'fli.c fnm tlw C.I I> lecenlli'. •'"' during the nleli lifter a 40-mll trek through tin : iii'li. bo oscaped frum euafod) although handiuffeil. The POllei deec n oad Kodrlguek as a dangriAinerln i uii and l'tHtin. |H-r row of frt-nl teelh ] are missing. Me in about 42 jrean i f age and 5 ft. 0 ins In heigh' %  .hum built. Ufa BOILS PIMPLES in his 8.000 word discourse to partoeT_ rt\ RV*II.I In connectM>ii Industrialuatiun mini itimiuiK ivkH* •-, ,, th.Cuth.,1,,' 1'un.r.-* Si?' ,TM£S in u^ho "sS ";<••"• ari '" "" with Ihe Island' "divine mandate that main.jrogrnmm,, beW Ittonja prinnny purpose is the besiiia. getting of children. The proposal was conceived In f"'* I 'he child itself was more Washington and New York a few Nom important than the mother and days ago during consultations ivi CfrnW, that if doctors had lo make a debetween Jamaica'* Minister for ^ clsion in the criticj) moineni Social Welfare and overseas pollwhich should survive. "Ihe baby I ' trade representative. the has the righl to live immediately". Hon. Donalri Singstei. *nd the The Pope lold doctors that they I>eidcnt ol the Imporl-Bxport must reply with a "calm, fearless Bank, ihc vlcc-piesidenl of tarn and irrevocable "no" when conInternational Bank for Rcconstrurm fronted with unreasonable and un' %  and Development, represont..morul demands". Kegarding birth "ve* of the United Stale* PointM V>*%. control In any form, contraceptives, ,ou r administration and represcni.tives o( a well-known Interiuiiional Trust Arm. nid ,.'f ; Flir..rH't-i Sin ilr'i. Ul.T i-l'l I KAON SATVrlpAY iRrl V..nw ., r M.irl R*>Ujt>. A-nc AndCTt-Ht. NolM-rl lllaj Aae*ia unit i-i. r.\. H.KIIWHlMU N... Nu.. Atoitff i Oanti lank (.--.Ii't Itarvl Ofllf • -. \MII.I \ OH SUNDAY 111i i..1.1 ll'pllnlr I Hlllrr. CrfMfNnt M-l..-.l MlKlr M.I*.i. Gt* rid ol un-agbdblrmiahts fast I CJ'f flftarrly irnslmcnt *>"l |, nit|.tir llf I Bass'* %  ml. Mtin Andi-r^, r.. NdtII. Pl t .„ ^eaatt Of EXOUNGE R.i.. abortion—even lo save Ihe mothOr*l Ufa %  and artificial Insemination. He said: "Every human being even a baby In its mother's womb has the right to live immediately. That nth! comes from God—not from his parents nor (rom any human society, or authority." There's no man. no human authority no science, no medical A draft plan has been drawn Up In the United States and submitted lo ihe Government for mnslderalion. The Corporation would ft.How the lines of Ihe I ucceaiful experience ol Chile Puerto Rico and Liberia, among ther countries wit) a la %  k*ra SI Id*. | rvmaiHl OralU S • %  %  >• Sia-hl Dr(l W ] lO | Caate i"upt. no ! %  | OlRiai — large eise.Oluaraae aui. h.liii DR. CHASE'S AnlUeptic OINTMENT CurbYourPilej 11 la no loitgor BiB H owy lo auT.r palna, Uc-htng saO lonnafil (rom Hi-. %  I %  d'.a ti.arr of M.l.a (f.i, . • !" *n oa CI.li.aroU). Hy\* S*B*W l" ••HI BB IS mln.lM MA M MIS' Stop. 'ha pair but MM MU.M MI UM -.I palm, netting sag lormanl'rru%  • • • i> %  %  .*.-! .-f n, %  ). H, lag inar. Stoipo b)o*AlB| and aomteui %  Irritalton Iharabr OfaTblBf alkor t._ ""•" %  "' iclllaBBMaisBlMaAoha >a. rlailUlf, Ccnatlpa.tl.i< a %  eaarav; dablfltt" ans'lrrliabi. Alaa>aii^tn. Oat MH. froan > %  n...ni..a...,i., undar Uio'^oaiiKr tiranWa Myta. niuat aloo rour ai:. C n. and Ooublas ar moaay M** M urs of ampt. p*. w.*. ouK.nic. social, economic or moral ^rations in the Uniled StateL reason which may give valid junthe objective being to HOC ma the dlcal decision for Ihe direct, delihflow of investment capital to erete disposition of an innocent Jamaica for Industrial and semilifc I'.P. i uhlic development FINGER-TIP FLY CONTROL i Tell me doctor .. W'hat do you mean In u -:i)r ant.Meplir ? 'I I,....it.., ,.!.. I... ,i.-i..-..il IL. in ilir lo.mr .limil.l lie liigbl> Crruii.iil.il \. ( gi'iillc on drlu air li—ur.. iiun-poKouoiiuml. pntaVaMy, •IH.HUI not Main , (-/*rrdi of a lattcm Uamiari fcn t l di li ifray ; Uu imaUT. GEDDES GRANT LTD.— Agenl. AGAINST COSJGHSoxd COLDS; V %  laabrOBCI "iih ihU KiroiUic, | %  ionic. Mini* ailmtnif isa ... ii | o taitb refrJ %  OBBT I cr kns in un Vsaaadaoj jf Maniina now wiiL auwdUaliag Scmi'i Imultioi mors Ihon jutt a lank— It's POWERFUL NOURSHMENT | M. laraMoo li s e-'d aiine of gtatual AMD Vn/mim VaJuablt Cor all %  he fimily— in 'iii > KO or dry %  very PlcUra Oslb s fkaryr il your *!M**ia!UC from Ukt aUH Mp ^ HfiGHLAND ^i QUEEN SCOTCH WHISKY W. J. MONftOI t CO. IIP., WracCTOVVN. IUBAO01 % %  _.....a --a •a~Z!K3XnSfi^ttt1*2S*\ IT1SOFTFNSURPR1S1NC how quidtly backache, mff. aching aauiclcs or lolota. lumbago, ibeurnauc paini And (oaunon urinary troubles doe P-i impurities In the blood can h*: irvenome. Sooog. acuve kidneys saiegu.iJ your health by straining impuriik* And harrnful wsitci out of the lysaero. Wb:a kidory scoon ii insdeausie a.,d fiil M !:ttrr the blood properly, Ask yawr Dealer far nslo and dlscaaitort sre th frequent results. Dean'^ 0*Uu*.Jae Kidney I'uli bring hAppy relief by helping IO ileansc the rudney niters and so Miiaajlsdag tfceir sctlan You can rely aaon this weal known aaasstk sod u r sasrf aniiacptK. Many Ihouaands of Knueful men and women have %  esufied to the goud health ihey have regsiaed by taking Dosn'i Puh. il' 2 9 BeciureMKi^P.aa.llir I/ChjJ^ i llf p* m mk3^ /MX** llrlfii In rlraiifir ihr nyntrtri front blmul im/mr itn Isne-arlttea. la the blood nsay ca.> rheum -lie aelass asM> % %  in*, alllf and paiti.< %  Mall*. i>imi>ir> and torurnoa akin Jn.ird. t>. Caattan Btood MUlur* halps to purif> (he Moad. elranae* law ly.i.ni and %  **••( %  la rotor la | Road kwalih. RICHER SIM0NDS MILK STOUT C. L. Gibbs


PAGE 1

1 TUESDAY. OCTOan 311. Hi FREE ENTERPRISE NEEDED-Saya Victor ChamThe Electors' Association held ihnt it will bo loo severe a strain a political meeting last night in m the rraaoury to increase the nay Street opposite the Esplasubs.dir..lioii to cov1 tinwtVMa nadc in support of the Candida<,f this increase ture of Mr Victor Wallace Chase Whatever method was adopted. for the City of Bridgetown in the t* M l that a reduction could be coming election for the House of madr aiM consideration should Aemol>. b^ giv9n IO hos< In hp lllA ,. r A large crowd which at times i rackets was inclined to be jnnily and gg__j %  L jeering, heird Mr. Victor Chase uooat Work Bpeak in favour of free enterprise Mr. Fred Goddard said that ho %  Bd the cost of living. knew Mr. Victor Chase for sometime, and knew that he is a perMr Chase aid that he wished win that would try to see th.it that the Government would enthose who are not so fortunate courage new industries to ftnd al*o net the necessities of lie H .mp'oyment for the ever increasgold that Mi Ctt&M p, | meinbei ing unemployed m the island. He of the St. HseJ?l1 V b felt_lh.it it WM a grave state of has done good work in that ^rtairs and it was the duly of all capacity ll } e mc L m ^ ers of th G overnm *'i The Barbados Workers Union Of Barbados to focus their attenhkl done well for those employed, tlon on ims matter. tut whjt to lt d(1I1 for g un Every year the schools were cmpl „ vcd ln Ihc litaad Some n( turning out hundr.-ds of boys lhtf w „„ rfr „ :i w „ rk ,... DARH\IM>S \l>\o. Ml I'M.I MM IMIAMII I'OS I Oil 14 I .ind girls educated and full of hope. They went out in the exting pretty" with i uld help their parents and maintain themselves. But this was not the i afafd. "* % ,%"£: syr^uTs; menhants are trying tb kill the 1 poor man. bu; the merchants arc co-CDCratinn with the Barbados "If I have the opportunity t< Worker*' Union. The Government lake this matter of free entercould have done more in creating prise to the House of Assembly I r w Industries so that the unemvill consider it very important." Flared could set work But inV.r. Chase said. Mead the employers were called The Government has warned "Pn lo take on extra staff so thai the people to expect a serious l*W can get employment. advance in the price of rice beMr. Goddanl in ending remindTHE building of .1 small branch ginning from January. Rice U %  ed his litlrners that this is a crltiPost Office at Welches, St. Michail necessary food. tal moment in DM historv of Barhas been complc'.ed alout a wee* An advance of four cents a hados and they, the people, should ** and will ghoi pint must seriously affect the t >ke care to return men to the The <_\ Ion] -,iid thit budget of the house keeper. HOMO* of A**emHv who would do '* w "> relieve s. me of the wu fc Every means must be exploded to r<>rm>h public. It u fairly central to the thickly populated districts Village. My Lords Hill. It* Ivv and the Bride* Road peat .-*" Labour.Irs Stage Two Meetings 1 %  :i the* untinued th> I and Mi. E. W. Bariow.s,Thr oil.. st HmoB s\: %  %  in iuppo:-i oj ihcii on for that I llourne On Wednesday night they plan holding a m*> %  Itefthen Pas.ure, St. Mi -hurl in support of Mr. M. r Cox ."in .it Wi' .-hman Ha'L I Pi 11. C. I last mecii aak will i>e ( -'i i ,tt Fit/ Vi::.,. M I II l.u-. 1 %  lattoa art h old ln i three mo %  ..-' %  :. 1.' II iweek On lav night a meeting will ic .it M-ik-t Hill In 1 H A DOWdtBtf Mioth*. tvro iiui'imga are: — I ortors Vard. St Jain.-, on Thurs%  hi BUppon of Mr. E. K • id Mi J. H Wilkinson, 1 nd Bav Land. St Michael in sutM %  A 1: r. p la MMI Mr Vincent Grifflth. Welches Post Office finished Rice Shortage Will Soon Be Relieved latter Busin Geared Of l.iiinlii'iI'M H :uner basin of tht etairid 'f lumber ovtr tha wiTk-.ml to* Iba llrsl lime in six monQsi Duriruj iht pawl .v month*, quite :i mimher of -<>H" h.iv. lied at 11 "Real Scout Spirit Lacking" SAYS MAJOR CM WITH FOB too long there have been empty and Idle boas.s of achievements, complacency, persistence in getting and maintaining I o w standards and lack of real scouts spirit' on the par. of Scoulers." Tins Is why there ha s not been satisfactory progress in icouttn* in Barbados, the Island Scout C I:.IV 11.inMILLER FOUGHT THE VESTRY handy at this time of tin Christmas season Wi * 1 tMrc is an unusual amoun correspondence going on." he Mr. Chase said that'th* ... for the shortage of rlc* is because lt s a ow wall building near Uw usually at this lime of the year 0 WtictWt IKuid on the British Guiana crop U pin of a triangular piece of land, hausted. "That colony did not A gallery runs on three sid .have the amount o( nee to com. T ur u;n_ I-J!" -^.^. '' 'he atmost square branch Post plele the contract for this year Ml ,' ,|IU '' %  | "'' o:!k.. n %  la tbH gallery the *uh llai l,.,do.. ,„ old crop fki cano.ual,. n \M %  1:, in the forth|p Wll| b( cu) .f up IttC He said that HC. ha. mttUo It) Sir! ^ ld "I thelr """lit or postal packages. Barbados explaining that Ihc nev. ;, PoirUcal Meeting In support of Th( wfl |, 5 „, tn whole building crop which is now helm: %  at Orcenfield last anP yellow and the windows and 111 m a*ie available the l>alance night : "Tonight I stand before you doois painted green. which I* due to Barbados, from as an Independent Labour candiSubtracting ihe width of the lh e old contract They intend to date. 1 position I was forced into." ,ountcr which Is built lnsld* along %  ni P ,l • "H*" as 'hey can gel He said that for ihe past five two sides of the biggest room, the v, '*? e1 "Mr. Chase explained that B.G has not in any way suggested canny part of the old 11 At present there is a rice shortage in Ihe islam) hut ihis will soon be relieved. "Durini; the next two WOtkl 4,f00 ice are expected to UrTve In the island from British ^.^^^^^cSSu. Guiana." Mr. Victor Chase, Merchant of Tudoff 8tnA, told the Advocate yesterday One thousand ba^s of that amount urind on Sunday. „ , ,,.,., M Chag* The ProvWoo M< renai I i-liitioti, in a lotto* lo Iho Advo erne, gtatfld lint ihc tram authorUativa m ura 1 thai the present supply will be great I v tni|.ii>v-d shortly and tin 1 %  ba %  tali lo lain requirements ticfrsh in if A in viif it ni tiny -'---'. W**#">'**.* .:•,•,•,:• *,*,-.*,'>*, wv.'* 1 he stood alone in the Vestry 0O m where the cleiks will sit to her of the Barbados sell the stamps, it is not much HouMwivifl Start \1111iK Shopping MANY psjopta !,.. tad Id purehast' %  ll e.i'l. Inthing for watarfrool a being cleared of another ihlpmont would bargod their car| lumlier mi-* the : .t It off the I MMMM .til was quiet in tha I 1 noise being thrown on Ihe .,,, ( _, t<> the hurie-. and hand% c#r u lhe >." %  '.. i>f t ilh eV wort •• •* ., . .... ,,f lumber, the busy tWBC on Hi Ad ciul' were a shlppiDg estTk aald that h< .t-eid'iiii :. (DAJL&A more waterfront t lumbei /oterfi 1 ihlpmei .hi KB) t 1 bo get* n.i.i.i --,-, Labour Puny. Nearly all Ihe other inort> than 17 "feet long and about f *!!'"*.-"' Muior J. E. Grifflth said vestrymen were members of the 12 feet wide ^^ whlcn is at Present being retailed ihe Christmas season. Around the did Ml MP' tho yesterday when presenting the Elector* Association "I hove %  • "even cents per pint and "it is City some men are of the inion romaln clear of It report athe Annual General f*> be durtxibutod -ni^c inav not be that of the COD[hi COOt of -hoe* and because of t cil. ,,, Baibiidos • %  sav that Tommy The scheme to pay some old age ""U" * SuppUoa, that all of th. I 1 btiytng I The Island Scout CommUsioncr Ml | lcr £, K no hrli | h ,, !" .,, Jg p. nslom from Uto new oAoa S ""• ->"Kl't ""der the old eonti m I ts working towards building up "estVy.'' met with the approval of many should be disposed of at the prosII %  b e...i> N >,, interest in scouting in Barbados. V "' X old women of th£ dUtrict. rnl EJ2 h !" n \ n1 h .f ""'"• Ul ^ "'••;""•* %  "' :"';'"„ The Commissioner assisted by He sold that the morning of tho An old woman said yesterday. %  ****'"* • >\ !" ca ? '' >\\ !" *i -' 'bo rue con%  >' %  %  ,„„ Sl .. ,„„ ^-rations n thi the local association which will miny depressed faces. There is .1 to have to walk in >.ome cases suming public, he sincerely hoped "',''' c ^ist of Barbado, with the In represent Barbados at tho tune which goes "Strolling Down n.orelhan a mile, to get 000*1 lhR t* *nls method would be adopt,, .......'.,., (t ; a -. i. , n-k foi dcpondonl Fxplnratlon Company J.mncan jamboree in March next >e Hiver", but that morning the. old aft pension. If an old woman f •**" %  op n lon ',? J ""l? "1 tovs line houM-wifo told th. % %  turned to Carlisle Bfly yester. were "floating down the river.' like me has a grandson, she will !" !" A \^"]Ll" J^.^l.Jtl A*ntm£ It would I*, tool,!, 10 f lo r*fU*t "SUNSHINE R" REFUELLING The question or lowerinu the He explained how ho became tometlll quality or uniform was dltcussed E artod from ,h e Barbados Labour away t at length after lhe report was ParI > r through representing a send him for the pension presented. Most memberId be of the most October Of Novem•M1 led d. 1 the explo %  i canted bar dnnwr i-i* poe were or tno opinion Ihal ini> J 00 ^; "', !" d '!'"' hc "J" " c ^ a .imrorm wu par. of .he .. par. & tt £Zl a g !" XJ" a ""V,^" of his chsraclcr and honld nobo '" ""' displaced by a more shabby dress. "Sift *7S£S ^flritftftdPiS S