Citation
The Barbados advocate

Material Information

Title:
The Barbados advocate
Uniform Title:
Barbados advocate (Bridgetown, Barbados : 1983)
Portion of title:
Sunday advocate
Place of Publication:
Bridgetown Barbados
Bridgetown, Barbados
Publisher:
Advocate Co.
Publication Date:
Frequency:
Daily
regular
Language:
English

Subjects

Subjects / Keywords:
Newspapers -- Bridgetown (Barbados) ( lcsh )
Genre:
newspaper ( sobekcm )
Spatial Coverage:
Barbados -- Bridgetown

Notes

Dates or Sequential Designation:
Apr. 22, 1983-
Numbering Peculiarities:
No issue published for May 3, 1983.
General Note:
On Sunday published as: Sunday advocate.
General Note:
Microfilm produced before 1988 may be substandard.
General Note:
Latest issue consulted: Feb. 28, 2005.

Record Information

Source Institution:
University of Florida
Holding Location:
University of Florida
Rights Management:
Copyright Advocate Co.. Permission granted to University of Florida to digitize and display this item for non-profit research and educational purposes. Any reuse of this item in excess of fair use or other copyright exemptions requires permission of the copyright holder.
Resource Identifier:
17931718 ( OCLC )
sn 88063345 ( LCCN )
Classification:
Newspaper ( lcc )

Related Items

Preceded by:
Advocate-news (Bridgetown, Barbados)

Downloads

This item has the following downloads:


Full Text
arbados







ESTABLISHED 1895

SATURDAY,



OCTOBER 27,



1951











PRICE; FIVE CENTS

TEN





TORIES SHO VE LABOUR INTO SECOND PLACE

THE “WARMONG
THE ‘PEACEMAKER’ IS OUT

AN ANNOUNCEMENT :

“Court Circular; Buckingham Palace, 26th October,
The Right Honourable C. R. Attlee had an audience
with the King this evening and tendered his resignation
as Prime Minister and First Lord of the Treasury which

1951:

His Majesty was graciously

subsequently received in audience the Right Hon. Winston
Spencer Churchill and requested him to form a new admin-

istration.

And so after six years, the Socialists went out of power.
In the previous Government, they held a 9 seat majority.
But now, latest reports say that the Conservatives have at

least a 25 seat majority.

After leaving Buckingham Pal-
ace Attlee stepped through the
door of the Prime Minister's resi-
dence smiling and drove awa,
past the silent crowd of about 10:
persons, Only four people includ-
ing a woman waving a Conserva-
tive campaign balloon were
outside the Palace to watch
Attlee arrive.

Attlee was accompanied only
by a bodyguard when his car
glided along the gravelled fore-
court through the arch way and
up to the King’s door just after
dark.

Churchill left the Conservative
headquarters at 5.12 p.m. GMT.

Winston QOburchill, a sprig of
white heather in his lapel for
good luck awaiting hourly the
late Friday summons wal
would send him to Bucki

Palace to receive from Ring
George the invita’ to form a
new Conservative vernment,

No one was calmer than the 76
year old warrior as the fateful
moment drew near. In his own
constituency of Woodford, out-
side London Friday afternoon,
Churchill thanked voters for
returning him to Parliament for
the seventh time.

He told the cheering | throng it
was a “glorious victory” and con-
tinued; “Now we have

other things to think eet a
ve problems may a
oar country. is a ere

fort to me in all-the uncertainties
that surround me.”

Final results will not be known
until sometime next week.

King George the Sixth who
entrusted Britain to Winston
Churchill in the hour of its
greatest wartime peril asked him
at Buckingham Palace Friday
night to lead it through peace-
time dangers unprecedented in
history.

The dramatic, meeting toa
place inthe bedroom of the
marble Palace in which the
is recovering from a serious aa
operation,

It. was more than eleven years
ago ag both men must have re-
membered, when Churchill ac-
cepted his wartime post.

The Man who promised Brit-
ons only blood, ‘toil, sweat and
tears in the dark days of 1940
when the; Nazis had
France, and Britain stood alone
told them in the election victory
Friday night: “There lie before
us hard times. I have seen worse
and had werse to face,

With seven of 625

uencies still to report siand-

ings were;—

Conservatives 318;

Labour 294:

Liberals 5:

Irish Nationalist 1.

Conservatives gained 24



TO-DAY’S WEATHER
CHART

Sunrise: 5.49 a.m.

Sunset : 5,50 p.m,

Moon : Last Quarter; Octo-
ber 22

Lighting : 6.00 p.m.

High Tide : 1.21 a.m; 141
p.m.

Low Tide : 7.42 a.m.; 8.08
p.m.

| home,

” IS IN:

LONDON, Oct. 26

pleased to accept. The King



seats
held.
Labour lost 22 and gained

a
Once a Conservative
Was assurea the ceremony
machinery which marks
change in British Government
were set in motion within a few
minutes, |
Churchill had been waiting for
that moment since 7 p.m. of July |
26, 1945 when an announcement
was made that British voters had!

and lost 1 previously

majority
and

thrown their war hero out of
office and chosen a _ Socialist
Prime Minister in his place,
Friday night’s assignment was}
the answer to Churchill’s final}
election campaign plea, “it is the!
last prize T have to win”, he said.

He meant the chance to seek a

lasting peace. “I pray indeed tnat
I may have this opportunity.”
Now it was his. He was ex-

pected to move fast to build up
Western defences, establish more

cordial relations with the United
States and even try to get his
old wartime colleague Premier
Josef Stalin to another confer-

ence table,

When he announces his Cab-
inet on Monday, it will include
such top Conservative party

Ms as the Marquess of Salis-
bury, Oliver Lyttleton, Harold
Mac Millan, Brendan Bracken,
Richard Austen Butler, Sir David
Maxwell Fyfe, Lord Woolton,
Anthony Eden and some of the
younger figures in the Party.

In the last days of his vigorous
election campaign, Churchill turn-
ed on his famous rhetoric to de-
nounce the labourite charge that
he was a trigger happy warmong-
er. He is suing one London news-
paper for libel. But Friday night
the warmonger label was gone and
it was Geod old Winnie to millions
here in the Empire and in other
g} parts of the world.

Next month he will celebrate his
77th birthday anniversary in Num-
ber 10 Downing Street the official
residence .of the Prime Minister.

This was the first time Churchill
ever became Prime Minister by
the peoples’ choice. The last time
he succeeded because of the ap-
peasement policy of his Conserva-

overrun | tive emgceuar Neville Chamber-

failed
ith the first flush of Conserva-
tive victory over, experts were
quick to point out it wont bring
many quick changes. Socialists
are here to stay, they said. Britain
is nearly bankrupt again and it
looks like a hard winter; Church-
ill already has promised hard
times for everyone . . . but he is
@ man of hope, not despair,
Crowds were outside Churchill’s
house on Friday night until police
-einforcements finally arrived to
clear them away. Churchill ap-
peared once but by 10 p.m. there
were still 400 in the crowd mostly
women calling and singing for him
to appear again. Police sent them

Attlee and his wife meanwhile
left Number Ten Downing Street

tor their last visit to Chequers’ the |

country home of British Prime
Ministers before the Churchills

take over, Only a few people were |

at Number Ten Downing Strect
when they left,

General, Lord Ismay who stood |
at Churchill's right hand through

L_ evanemmmnennnecnmmmmmmncmmmemen athe war is boosted in some quar-

a

COLONIAL SECRETARY

the;

<- tecitieeeenmagittiane

Mr. Anthony Eden (above),
Mr. Winston Churchill (cen-
ter). and Mr, A, T. Lennox-
Boyd (right) all victorious
Conservatives in the General
Elections in England, Mr.
Eden is tipped as Foreign
Secretary in the new Govern-
ment, Mr. Churehill is the new
Prime Minister and Mr. Len-
nox-Boyd may be the new
Secretary of State for the
Colonies.

ters as Minister of Defence with
the War Office going to Brigadier
Anthony Head 45, veteran mem-
ber of the war Cabinet Combined
Operations Office.

Ministry of Housing is expected
to go to Ernest Marples 48, or toy
Harold MacMillan 6

The Heaith Ministry may. f°
eithey-to 63-year-old Walter Elli- |
ott or Doctor Charles Hill f
Secretary General of British
eal Association,

Good posts will fall to Brendan
Bracken 51-year-old pul and
Wartime Minister of Information

who has been menti
ble Colonial Sec ‘eit.

Fuel and Power Min er Geoffrey
Lloyd 49. and land-owner investor
Ralph Asheton 50 are mentioned
as possible Ministers of a

WILL SUMMON.
EMPIRE TALKS

(From Our Own Correspondent)

LONDON, Oct, 26.
An empire economic conference
to include representatives from
the colonies will be called in
London probably within two
months. It is learnt tonight that
the conference is scheduled under
the “urgent plans” from the new
Tory government to help restore
the economic situation and raise













Britain’s prestige with foreign
countries.
First aim of the Tories hume

economic policy will be to cut
cost of living. Complete reorgan-
isation of the house building
programme will start immediately
to prepare the way for 300,000
houses, the yearly target Churchil)
has set.

Also Ariority will be given to
the Bill to repeal the nationali-
sation of the iron steel industry.

Socialists in the meantime are
planning to make things difficult
for the Government; some said
harassing tactics would be a
justifiable reprisal for the rough
time Conservatives gave them in
the last Parliament.

: °
Joe Louis Beaten
NEW YORK, Oct, 26.
JOE LOUIS, former world
heavyweight champion, was
to-night beaten by Rocky
Mareiano in the’ eighth

round of a tea-round bout.

Keferee Goldstein stopped
to prevent Louis

eing badly beaten.

|} the
from



SPEAKS



HON. R. N. TURNER, Colonial Secretary who was guest of honour at the Government Industrials

Schools’ Visitors Day at Dodds yesterday speaks to the itors and the
With Mr. Turner are His Lordship Bishop Mandeville, Mrs. Tur
intendent of the schools.
The boys are in the background

and girls of the sehool.

r and Major O. F. C. Walcott, Super-

*"' Nevada

|\Canada






























erage, Spee

By J. J. N

|
iEEHAN
LONDON, Oct. 26. |

General: Kigenhower’s Atlantic Pact commanders be-

lieve that the Nevada atomic

tests will be the blueprint of

the defence of Western Kurope against Russia, with rela-

tively small forces under

Western

Command. Reliably

military sources said that Nevada test results will be glean-
ed carefully by United States experts.

Royal Couple |
Ends Vacation |

VICTORIA, B.C., Oct, 26

It was back to the grind toaay|@

for Princess Elizabeth and Prince
Philip after a three-day rest which
the two of them spent at a lodge
106 miles north of here.

The Royal couple started their
journey eastward with a visit to

Nanaimo, From there they were
scheduled to embark on the
destroyer Crusader for a 38-mile

trip agross Georgia Strait to Van-
couver arriving there about noon,

Then it was on to New West-
minster and small centres up the
Fraser Valley and Canyon. They
are scheduled to reach Edmonton
on Saturday.

It was a relaxing day yesterday
including horseback riding, a drive
to Sproate Falls to take pictures
and a visit to a lumber camp in
the evening.

British election returns were re-
layed to them.—(C.P.



Russiam Relations
With US Less Tough

WASHINGTON, Oct. 26
Alan Kirk,, U.S. Ambassador to
Russia said at the White House on
Friday that relations between the
U.S. and the Soviet Union are not

“quite as tough as they were.”
Kirk who probably will not re-
turn to Moscow wilh leave for
Paris on Monday to serve as
adviser to the U.S. delegation at

the U.N. General Assembly.

—U.P

Canada Raises
$105,000 For J’ca





MONTREAL, oe 26
A total of $105,000 has en
raised for the Jamaica Hurric cane
Relief Fund it was announced to-
day by James Muir, Chairman of

the “Canadian Commi.tee for
campaign. The money will pu
chase supplies and material
for distribution
Jamaica.—(CP)

the

AMERICAN FOREIGN AID

WASHINGTON, Oct 26
The United States Government
aid to foreign countries during
the 11 years ended June 30, 1951

to $81,966,000,000 ac-
cording, to the Department of
Commerce. The total represent-
ed aggregate value of goods ser-
vices d fu furnishe n the
;

amounted

& mit oF re
Wit

nl uled

said that lessons will be
applied to the master plan for
holding the mass of manpower
jammed east of the Iron Curtain
from spilling to the Atlantic in a
sudden attack,

Despite Eisenhower's optimistic
predictions that Europe will be in
pretty good condition to take
of herself in two or three
years, his subordinates are faced
with the foremost day to day
question: Suppose the Russians
don’t wait that long?

Western planners believe that
the first United States atomic
manoeuvres, involving actual
troops, will explain how Western
armies, that for a long time will
be cxvarfed by the Russian armed
might, can get ready to deal a
lecisive defensive blow,

For are certain

They

care

they that al-
though the Russians have a stock
of atomic bombs for use against
sities, the Reds have not amassed
enough atomic wealth to expend it
against troops in the field at
present.

The tests, which may involve
‘fantastic’ weapons, referred to by
Truman, are designed to show how

radio-active blasts can be used to
help ground forces.







|
m



CONGRATULATIONS

A TELEGRAM was sent
‘esterday by the Electors’
ssociation of Barbados to
Mr. Lennox-Boyd, Conserv-
ative M.LP., congratulating
him and his Party on their
violory in the elections in
England, °

Allies Reject
Red Proposal

MUNSAN, Korea, Oct. 26

The Allies today quickly reject-
ed the Communist buffer zon
proposal that the United Nation:
give up such bitterly won Korean
areas as Heartbreak Ridge, Punch-
bowl and the Iron Triangle.

The Reds wanted U.N. forces to
withdraw as much as 15 miles
Their proposals countered yester-
day’s U.N. suggestion for a buffer
zone generally along the presen!
vattle lines,

Major General Henry I. Hodge:
told the Reds that their proposa’
bore no relationship to the mili
tary line of contact and did not
offer truce protections.

The Red oners and tie U.N. re-
jection care at the second meet
ing of the sub-committees tryin,
to agree on a cease fire line, Meet
ings are held at Pan Mun Jom
Under the Red proposal they woul:
keep Kaesong, former site of truc
talks, two miles south of the 38tl
parallel,

They would withdraw from the
part of the Ongjin Peninsula o:
the west coast area which the
Allies describe as militarily un



Eisenhower's forces are in need| !™portant.—-(C,P.)

f help. He is @xpeeted to have!
21 Divisfons by the end of mY
year in the face of between 30 and
40 crack Russian Divisions. Massed |
dear the [ron Curtain are 15 Rus-
sianised CzechoslovaNan Divis*
ions, 65 other satellite’ Divisions,

plus the potential striking power
of some 140 Divisions insido
Russia.

Informed sources said that al-

though Eisenhower probably would
nave to get permission before
launching any atomic retaliation
against any Russian attack, they
we certain that approval will be
given should Soviet aggression
lare up in Europe.

The sources said that Wnited
States officers, however, would ap-



ply what was iearned to the solu-
tion of Eisenhower's defensive
»roblems.—U.P,





ATOM TEST POSTPONED |

Unfavourable weather con!
caused the Atomic Energy!
on to its sched-;
atomic explosion to-day at
man's Flat testing ground.
—U,P.

ditions
C miss



cancel

a WAS VEGAS, Nevada, Oct. 26
|
i
'

in) F French

ments the net amount of US

foreign aid during 11 years of the
hot and cold war was $71,130,-
000,000. In this grand total $61,-
000,000,000 represented net grants}

and $10,010,000,000 were net!

credits

The Commerce Department said

It interesting to note that the
of the U.S

December

U.P.



Japs Approve

Peace Treaty

TOKAY, Oct. 26
The Japanese Peace "Treaty anc
the United States-Japan Securit;
Pact were overwhelmingly ap-
proved by the House of Represen-
tatives of the Japanese National
Diet.
Approval by this body is tanta-
mount to a final ratification.
—UP.



Australia Accepts
| ‘Broadly Speaking’

NEW DELHI, Oct. 26
Aus.ralian External Affairs
Minister, Chard Casey said here
on Friday “broadly speaking’
Australia accepted the invitatior
j to participate in the Wester’
| powers Middle Eas‘ defence
system. —U.P.

tattack involved the U.S. in war)

i
|
| were nearly the equivalent of aic
al
4



|pelicies of the fiscal year
jwhen the U.S. wads _ promoting
its own national security by as
sisting other nations to buiid up/
jtheir defensive strength.

| The U.S. foreign aid one
five year of World il
amoun $49 il



Oods sé € nd fund |

U.P

Allies Advance

“Go Home”’ Egypt
Tells Britons

CAIRO, Oct. 26

FOREIGN MINISTER Salah El Din Pasha urged all
Britons living in Egypt to “go home.” He told a news con-
ference that “the best way to avoid friction in the existing
circumstances would be for Britons living in Egypt to go
home.”

He said British newsmen and tourists however would
be welcome. The statement urging Britons to get out of
Egypt came in reply to a question from British newsmen
who asked whether the report was true that visas for

Britons living x in Egypt would not be extended.

El Din Pasha said “I think
jevery defence by the Egyptian
}Gevernment of Egyptian rights
should be taken into account.”
“Although the Egyptian govern-
!ment maintains security in so far
as foreign residents are concern-
ed—without. the exception of

800 Yards

8th ARMY HEADQUARTERS, | their nationality--it believes that
Korea, Oct. 26 the best way to avoid friction
Bayonet-wielding Allied troops| under existing — circumstances
carved out gains of up to 800] would be for Britons Usa: inn
yards against suddenly fierce| #8ypPt to ey or mated ee aiould
Communist resistance at the gates| Russia has indicated it woul:
ot bomb-blackened Kumsong. welcome a friendship and non-
United Nations infantrymen | 28etession pact with Egypt ac~
fought every inch of the way io|Cording to the Wafdist newspaper
: : > “\ | AL Misry.
= 0 ge ll the ewe The report came after a
r , Red “led sources said a draft trade
tens ten ee pee 29 miles| agreement between the two coun-
a . ee . ries will make Russia..and her
Communist resistance also stiff- catetiions Buy pis princienl cus-
ened in other parts of the Korean}tomers and “suppliers instead of
front as Communist troops sought! Britain,
to hold their positions as bargain Al Misry reporting the possi-
points in the Korean truce talks |bility of a non-aggression pact
United Nations tanks, trying ic|/between Egyptian and Russian
soften up Communist resistance | officials said it showed Moscow



rolled to the outskirts of Kumsong
or a hit and run raid, They with-

would favour any serioug move
on the part of Egypt to strength-

i drew after shelling Red foree:}en Russo-Egyptian relations.
there. The British Consulate herd
said there are approximately
It was one of the almost daily {30,000 British subjects in Egypt.
tank raids in «ne past week \o| Two thirds live in Alexandria

‘pierce through Ped positions, rim} 6,500 in Cairo and the rest are
ming the battered city. To the! mainly scattered in the Suez

south-west, Allied forees hacked!Canal zone.
out minor gains against heavy| The Egyptian Foreign Minister
frenade and machine-gun fire} said today there can be no ques-

from entrenched Communists on|tion of mediation in the Anglo-
the hill north-west of Yonchon. | Egyptian dispute before British
Allied artillery, aime d at the|*roops are evacuated from Egynt

hill positions, claimed 200 to 300: a Be od Sudan. but the: “yc hab
Communist casualties ih a thun-| £ Kayate sooping- ar be
fering bombardment of nearly Datence TE er PU nor
three hours on Thursday. North of es ree ran nde Re Cutt 4 he
the Hwachon Reservoir, United a ian P - '
Nations big guns caught another

trouv in the open and claimed 40 ‘OP. & UP.
dead fram the barrage.—U.P.





Aviatrix On Goodwill Tour

PARAMARIBO, Oct, 26
Brazilian aviatrix Ada Roga'a
arrived at the airfield at. Zandery
on Thursday in a one motor Cess- *
na aeroplane and left for Cayenne
'to-day continuing her goodwill
| tour of the Western Hemisphere,
—UP.

The “ADVOCATE”
pays for NEWS.

Dial 3113
Day or Night

Plane Crashes
At Airfield

LONDON, Oct, 26

A chartered airline passenger
liner crashed at Bovingdon air-
ield when its undercarriage col: |
apsed and burst into flames.
Ministry of Civil Aviation spokes-
nan said the crash “appears to;
»e a bad one.” {

The plane was flying to London;
rom Castel Benito, Tripolitania, |



when the accident occurred dur- |
ng a landing at the airport about)
of London.—wU,P. }

25 miles north





TRUMPETERS. They have such a

lovely flavour, so satisfying, so

| smooth, and FRESH."

TRUMPETER
CIGARETTES

@
OBTAINABLE EVERYWHERE

1
“Now | know why he always smokes





PAGE TWO



ne te ee

Carub Calling

Wins COMMANDER L. A.

a . es : If you want a really wonderful

bg Rpibecheld, prates Generel POCKET CARTOON R. W. H. ALLAN, Senior time you should be a strike itg| Starring Eleanor PARKER — Patricia NEAL .. Ruth ROMAN
pa foe te taaied tomorrow by by OSBERT LANCASTER Partner of C.B. Rice and Co., California. . wend —— oe

BWIA for Trinid#aen his way to apogee has jigrt returned from a business On September 5, 10,350 workers| TWO Spectacular Action Westerns —TODAY 9 30 a.m. & 1.90 p.m
Buenos Aires to attend a regional : . and pleasure trip to the U.K. He struck at the huge Douglas air-| BAD MAN or RED BUTTE & GUN TOWN
meeting of TCAO, covering the was among the passengers ar- craft factory in Long Beach,

South Amefican @nd South Atlan-
tie areas.

The meeting which is expected
to last from three to four weeks,
will discuss the present condition
of aeronautical communications,
meteorological services, etc., and
consider what improvements are
necessary.

While Commander Egglesfield






Back From U.K.

riving from Puerto Rico on Thurs-
day afternoon by B.W.LA,
companied by his son David. The

ac-

trip from Englend to Puerto Rico to live in the style to which they
ire accustomed, $

Some of the things .he motherly

was made via New York. During
his visit Mr. Allan took the oppor-
tunity to study modern ‘rend: in
the woollen trade.

Arrivin th lane was 2%d shoeshines for the men, and
reves he Se stine shane wae free babysitters for

Mr. Frank Morgan, proprietor of



MOTHER’S

1

er’,

me

unl

OCTOBER 27, 1951

ene

BARBADOS ADVOCATE SATURDAY,







| PEAZA Me era or

tna
TODAY 4.45 & #820 pm
WARNER BROS. Present

THREE SECRETS







Special Mon. 9. %
am
Secret Four a

Westward Bound”
—————_—_—__—

‘West Potmt Story
All Star Cast





UNION

NEW YORK.

and CONTINUING DAILY





Pheir union, United Auto Work-
has since seen to it that the
n and women have continued] / -

car’ (ASTIN
PLAZA visi su
Today & Temoerrow & & 45.4 pm.
Warners Giant Double ! |
“BREAKING POINT’
John GARFIELD — Pat NEAL &
“THIS SIDE OF THE LAW”
Jiveca LINDSFORS — Kent SMITH

Johnny Mack BROWN Kirby GRANT — Fuzzy KNIGHT

_ GAIETY
TODAY & TOMORROW @.30 pT







ion provides are free haircuts

“THE OUTLAW”
the women





MATINEE: TOMORROW 5 p.m |
|
!





o — Jack BUTTEL &
was in the U.K., he held prelimin- Club Morgan. (after all somebody has got to Today =m Tdnite To! ae dae “se
ary meetings with the Colonial : " look after Buster while poor | }j"Renaredes of, || Action - Packed |] SRABAZON, KING OF THE AIR”
Office and the Ministry of Civil Fair and Flying Dance mom's tramping up and down on & “ Okisheenn “Ranecer of net) Gemeniinem ahead a
Aviation in regard to various mat- E Fair a. the Ursuline Con- that little old picket line). Raiders” || Cherokee Strip” eee a ar
ters which will be raised at this vent this af.ernoon begins . And, of course, mom does not | ||Toa pm. Monte Hae & aia aan RA VENGEANCE
meeting in so far as they affect the at 3 o'clock and ends at 7 p.m. }ave much chance to cook meals, ||| ‘Haltway Howse” || Nataas tra “DESPERATE TRAIL”
British Caribbean territories. Throughout the evening the Pol- 5° the union feeds everyone—} |/ window’ 4 Alan Rocky Lane Johnny Mack BROWN

In connection with this meeting,
Major J. Nicole, Director of Civil
Aviation in British Guiana, visited
Barbados during the week for final



ice Band conducted by Capt. han-burgers, “hot dogs,” beef stew,
Raison will provide music. This — tomato sauce, and lots of
is always a ular feature of any Pancakes. : w
fair. eh * Keep them happy while they are| "i

“The first lesson is taken
from the eighth chapter of
the Bock of Exodus omitting








3 . ; . “S 2s ‘~, Wad Yrs.
discussions with the Director Gen- tur the moment all con- Proceeds from this annual event @ating? Why, yes—TV on giant wAS Lai f i x : :
eral in regard to British Guiana’s troversial references to the will go *o help give the pupils of Screens brings them the baseball SNAG the food for rowth
position. Egyptians.” St. Patrick’s Elementary School a &4™¢s from the East. Qe £




Back from U. K.
R. J. NICOL, Education Ad-
viser to the Comptroller for
Development and Welfare, re-
turned from England on Thursday
morning in the S.S. Gascogne after ,,
paying a short visit home. He was
accompanied by Mrs. Nicol.
in Six Months’ Leave
R. AND MRS. PERCY H.
BURTON of 7th Ave., Belle-
ville, left for Puerto Rico yester-
day by BWIA where they will
connect with PAA for the U.S.A.
to spend a holiday.

When they get tired of that,
there are all those lovely shiny

Two hours after the fair ends juke-boxes, “dealer-donated,” to
another bumper entertainment tWang out ‘the hill-billy favour-
will swing into action as the Bar- ‘tes:
bados Flying Club gets going with ,Said_a union
their “Flying High” dance at the “The donations
Psradise Beach Club. just fine.”

Besides the attractive door as
prize of a free trip ¢o Grenada for B. B. C. Radio
Programme

two, there are several other high-
SATURDAY, OCTOBER 27,






{ree daily meal and a free educa-
tion.

Visitors’ Day
Ove two hundred people at-
tended Visitors Day at
ds” yes erday and among the

\ 1koL is a concentrated food containing malt extract,

specially refined fats, egg, sugars (including glucose),

“ee

official hanvily:
are coming in

cd

and orange juice, with the addition of mineral salts
rany visitors were, the Lord

Bishop, the Lord Chief Justice and
Lady Collymore, Mr. and Mrs.
C. C. Skeete, Capt. J. G. Bryan,
Mr. C. M. Theobalds, Rev. Arm-
strong, Mr, and Mrs. L. T. Gay,
Mr. end Mrs, Risley Tucker, Mr.
end Mrs. E. J. Parry, Capt. J. R.

and vitamins, Children thrive on Virol because it



provides the food essentials for strength, vitality and

a sound constitution.




lights on the evening’s programme.
Two orchestras will provide non-
stop dancing, there will be a con-

tes. for the most beautiful legs, Ng







wwwowwwouvoeweweweuwwvwwewowwy



R ' ; Jordan, Miss Dora Ibberson, Mrs. Paar Pp oni gramme Parade. 11.30
avenue of Sse ons 1,4 UO, as ei "APME:Cuing and Steers at we fe Ase Aeaoae e x
months’ leave. During his absence, Field ane ohn nee F. E. many other side shows to make it “’T™5 »™ — Seen ed ae: x GS L Oo B E
Mr. George Grannum, Principal */¢'¢. Mr. and Mrs. S. H. Nurse, 4 real success, 4.00 p.m. The News, 4.10 p.m. The is -
Clerk: cwill act as Parechial Mr. and Mrs, A. W. Harper, Mr. z Datly Service, 4.15 p.m. Rugby League \% x
Taaneiedie H. S. Jemmott, Mr. D, D, Garner, Paid Short Visit Football, 4.25" p.m. Interlude, 4.30 p m TO-DAY & TO-MORROW, 5.00 & 8.00 P.M. x
M.C.P., Mr. and Mrs. Lisle Smith ; isi Tip Top Tunes, 5.00 p.m. Rugby Union $ %
Overheard ‘ : 5 . FTER paying a short visit to vootbati, 5.05 p.m. Interlude, 5.15 p.m. i ~ CARGO oo g
VERHEARD on Broad Street near panto i ea ane Trinidad, Mr. Charlie Taylor, Musie seme. Geaiia | Hote), sa p.m. } SEALED %
6 rE. A. am, e 5 ? ic ing, 6. m. a >
O yesterday was this conversa- p-(ch, Mr. D A. Wiles. te M. 7 er of Psi Hotel tg FO-. Derade, 7.00 pom. The (ne 18 pa Dana ANDREWS and = Carla BELENDA ¥
tion between a man and @ Puckerin and Mr. L.A. Chase, Rune? esterday. morning, by News "anaiasy 118 pan” Behind "The AND S
woman: . Mrs. Taylor and their little son 7-10-30 pam. — 48.43 m. 4 Leon ERROL in “HIGH AND DIZZY” -
Woman: “So the Conservatives Surgeon Sr -scialist Tony . : salad aoe TaraUE - %
a rns te Sane General Hospital % Radio Newareel 830 pm Nadie Theatre Monday and Tuesday, 4.30 and 7.45 p.m. :
arty.” . 4s . "N 40. m. . , 7
Mai: “That is England.” R, MALCOLM MURRAY i" ae ee 10.00 pan, The i043. p.m. Yours Folthe ROSEANNA MeCOY and SAVAGE SPLENDOUR
Woman: “And they they say PARKER has been appointed » ERUS; TOPS eh Sete ea nantes . 5S: s
goin’ come down hea and do the On agreement for a period of three Dorothy Gray Beauty con- shutuinice “Abeta ss, 16 SSSos : : ‘ CLS OSOO OOOO.
same thing.” years to the office of Surgeon sultant arrived from Jamaica on 10.05 p.m.—10.20 p.m.. News
For Yacht Races Specialist, General Hospital, fol- Thursday afternoon by B.W.LA. 1¢20 p.m.—10.35 pm...... To be

announced.
11.72Mes. 25.60M.

Attended Building Congress
. W. M. WOODHUUSE,
Building Development Ad-
‘ viser .o the Comptroller for De-
make-up hints, velopment and Welfare, returned
from Jamaica on Thursday eve-
ning b B.W.LA. He was ac-

For Cycle Races vonupuibaha by Mrs, Woodhouse.
R. KEN FARNUM, Barbados After attending the Internation-
ee i ing § ip i and West Indies ace cyclist, el Building Research Congress in
aie 5. WES ee "S Saat Ee wakes Shiva. left for Trinidad on ‘rhursday London during September, Mr.
Bryden and Sons Limited, return- sity, St. Louis and Barnes Hospital evening by BWIA to take part in Woodhouse, on his way back to
ed from ‘Trinidad on Thursday as Fellow in the Departments of the Trinidad and Tobago Cycle parbados, stopped off at Jamaica
evening by BWIA after paying a General Surgery and Urology. In Federation's meeting which opens a the request of the colony’s‘
short visit. 1937 he returned to Scotland and at the Queen’s Park Oval today. Governor in order to astist with
Back to Work acted as Surgical Specialist to the the rebuilding programme conse-

7 : lowing upon the resignation of Mr. on one of her routine visits. Here
MONG ‘the passengers leaving 4. G. Leacock. until November 2nd she is stay-
: yesterday by BWIA for Trin- “ir, Parker graduated at Edin- ing at the Windsor Hotel.
idad was Miss Ann Hoad, daughter purgh University in 1931 with the During her stay this trip she is
M.B., Ch.B. degrees, obtaining the not having any demonstrations
F.R.C.S. (Edin.) in 1933 and the put will be pleased to give anyone
F.A.C.S. in 1940, During his career who visits her
he served as a Demonstrator of ot.
Anatomy in the University of Ed- ~~
inburgh and as a Tutor in Clinical

Vaucluse, St. Thomas, and an em-
ployee of the Royal Bank of Can-
ada. She has gone for a few days
to witness some of the interco-
lonial yachting between Barbados

and Trinidad. Surgery with Sir Henry Wade.
Director Returns He was awarded a University



DOWNW

for the

DANCE!

Barbados Light Aeroplane Club



YARDLEY’S GIFT SETS

for Men and Women s
LEATHER GOODS — with Zipps

e
3 To See Them is to BUY Them!!
GET THE EARLY PICK!





TO-NIGHT







Highlands and Islands Service, Assistant Manager B.W.I.A. quent on the hurricane of
ETURNING to Antigua yes~ ;
R terday by BWIA to resume on ae ena kt Coleniat R. GLYNE MAHON, Assistant August 17. oe i Contest of S. th COLLINS DRUG STORES
his duties as Operations Officer, Hospital,’ Port-of-Spain, from Branch Manager of BWIA in CROSSWORD |) | : ou i) ia athe amie ha nal . '
BWIA, was Mr. Winston Warren 1938 to'1948 when he joined the Jamaica, returned to Jamaica yes- Beautiful Legs American SEB
who had spent a few weeks’ holi- staff of the Diagnostic Clinic and terday by BWIA after spending a — - T d
day here, He was accompanied by Hospital, Beckles Road, St. Mi- holiday here. He was accompan- oe oe te wo Bands Rhythm

his wife.





chael.

ied by his little daughter.



BY THE WAY - « by Beachcomber

‘THE suggestion that lower
houses should be built, “to

give more room to low-flying air-

craft,” comes late in the day.

We may soon have to wear
lower hats in the neighbourhood
of airports. Then hey and, away
for the time when little domestic
planes steal in at open windows
like cats, and tiny hoverplanes
come down chimneys and land
with a whisper on the hearth.

Remembered

winner of the contest after her
match against Steiger, the Alpine
Wonder, who pushed a pea over
the Silvretta pass into Austria in

1947.
ifteen All
HE sentence, “He looked down
his nose at her”, of which
novelists are so fond, has just
made me laugh again. It should
be followed by “She looked up
her nose at him.”

ERE is something odd about

people in the district heard the
roaring, or saw the animal’s face
at a window.

Outwitting the moon

‘“f7TOHE whole problem,” said the

sage, “is to get away from
the earth's sphere of attraction.”
It may be recalled that Strabismus
once tried to burst his way up-
wards at an unthinkable speed,
and landed in the sea off Wor-








PARADISE BEACH CLUB EMPIRE
wares Door Prize

T x
'CKETS | HOLIDAY IN GRENADA @) 00 bane ar tai «820

Supper Incl.
For Two

$ EACH

> 4> 4> 4> 4 4 > Ma ne de dtnlaans le



"we







Across
i. Stint upset by a cur. (8)
& Almost everybod
night prayers. (2)
10. The mares daub. (5)
12. Court partitions. (4)

’ D 7}
s, . thing. He next tried going very} !3. No out-patient ts one. (6) a aye
The Elephant who What's for dinner slowly, but the rocket started| 13: Make whoopee t (7)

AU LeU
sound of the gong-





To-night at 8 o’clock



without him (while he was hold-| 19. From Yaie or elephant? (4) ee BELVEDERE- 20” CENTURY-FOX'S
‘An angry chimpanzee in. the the story of a man who has ing up his het to test the wind:,, 2° Does shitbesdab toe uuber? (at visit EOE

circus threw its tricycle at her.
—News item.

been fined for keeping a full-
grown hungry lion in a Manhat-

and came down in a field a mile
from the starting-place. His pres-

22. idies on ice? (o>
23. Try a conveyor here. (4)
24. No sapling by the sound. (5)



ELLE




ile




HAT t wil ; tan boarding-house. It must have ent plan is to try guile; to outwit .
Cycler plea scg Smad been a very silly lion—and a very the force of gravity, as it were, _ Down ee ae a e Vv rs) er rs
for Road Decency. How much S!ly,man. The other lodgers could and then to steal up on the moon borg Page | WORLD!

in a most unexpected manner. dis-
carding the magnetic boots in fav-
our of a magnetic hat at some
given moment.

more civilised was the elephant
Rhoda. This soft-hearted monster
recognised a poverty-stricken
Mnilitary gentleman who had
given her a bun in Cawnpore
many years ago. The warrior was
sitting in the efght-penny seats.
Rhoda coiled her trunk round him

hardly believe their eyes, I .sup-
pose, when’ they passed the lion
on the stairs. And surely the house
must have got a bad name when

CBSPH— CISC RE

Landscape. (7) 4. Rustic. (5)
Turned when Edward goes (3)
Ragged enough to treat Ted, (8)
yas in final sungs. (4)

16 without Queen Victoria. (2)
Men stay to make it. (7)
Copper breaks the tall. (5)

Â¥ plus Queen Victoria, (5)

No south-east feature. (4)

Pussy s Egyptian weight? (3)




Rings
Cant,

MORGAN

The most Beautiful Night Club from Miami to Rio










Solution ot vesterday’s puzzle. -- Acro, sith a world-wide reputation for good food > » Se me ssi
and lifted him gently into the one 1 Sod 5 Down, Cardiganshire, 6, Certain ur sis jo... oe ay t Directed by Screen Play by RANALD MacDOUGALL
and ten-pénnies. Tears came into 18," Pre aie ‘insurgents a 'Scer“F5 F . DRU + MARLOWE» MOSTEL «anne Hakim =» HENRY KOSTER '"' eaz.ti erst
the eyes of both, — ae Goprright: “2. Retrestier % {tinerarg Music. Dancing
Aberbananer in a turmoil 4 Gale > Beet Aarons. 0. Cuan a ’ — PLUS —
Bodg ¥ 16, Geld: i7 . °
Rieter Aubin "with ee Entertainment CRISIS IN IRAN

his trainer, and at oncé went down
on all fours and posed for the pho-
tographers, with his nose behind
a pea. The nose looked very fit,
and he laughingly pinched his left
nostril to show how tough it was.
Meanwhile, Evans the Hearse,
after, shadow-pea-pushing in the
gymnasium, punched with his nose
a, pea suspended from the ceiling.
“His nostril-work was excellent,”
said his trainer, Morgan the Laun-
dry, “and he shaped up to the pea
like a winner.” Jivie Wosher-



| ee = ¥
Rupert and Rollo gaze around in
great anxiety. ‘* We're shut in!
However: are we going to get
away?" says the little bear, As
they crawl around to see if there
is any other door there is a noise



|
bocker, the American woman e at the top of their voices and bang BENTWOOD ane
champion, is prepared to meet the and ship trembles and starts ro the roof,
{ “BARBARY PIRATE”
with '

JUST RECEIVED
: LADIES’ AMERICAN SHOES

WHITE ELK
MULTICOLOUR





move. “‘] hope they won't go far,”
whispers Rollo. But it doesn’: stop,
and at length it begins to rock.
* Gracious, we're going to sea!
We must them know we're
here,"’ he cries. So they both shout



$6.61, $7.83
$6.96, $7.83

LADIES’ LILLEY & SKINNER SHOES

(ENGLISH MAKE)

=

ae



DESERT LIGHT

OLYMPIC

TO-DAY to MON. — 4.30 & 8.15

Columbia Big Double - - -

Johnny WIESSMULLER as
JUNGLE JiM in esi



throughout the night
Dial 4000 for reservations



ROYAL

TO-DAY & TOMORROW
5




Universal Presents - - -

“MARK OF THE GORILLA”




CHAIRS...

and other

IMPORTED
HARDWOOD
CHAIRS

Donald Woods — Trudy Marshall
Sword Slashing Adventure







ROXY



COMPLETE
FIXTURE

Of Australian — New Zeal-
and Cricket Tours
with a list of
The W.I. Team





At The



JEFF EVELYN





Men COURT ops reer seek Vika: 1) - oes ta Vy tba bes $7.00 Tea mada
TAN SUEDE SLING BACK ."....................-065. $6.76, $9.50 ONLY 6 ¢ Pein,
OE. SLING BACK) Aiea) aa bh cee oes $9.50 . =e
NAVY SU A COPY i
e e ie canial iisiiien te 2-REEL MUSICAL
) :
t R. EVANS & WHITFIELDS | ADVOCATE Try The Advoeate Stationery [- ¢.teiett, tetiinons, Ethel SMITH and
YOUR SHOE STORES { STATIONERY ' Ror Gene KRUPA and His Ore Henry KING Orchestra

Dial 41606



20: 70; 70:

&
4

Dial 4220

(





Sa





The Best BOOKS

saa










SATURDAY, OCTOBER 27, 1951 PAGE THREE

BARBADOS ADVOCATE



SR ce nec

Ask The Labour Party About Their Manifesto:



—Walcott Advises : MIGGEST RADAR IN EUROPE Brigadier Jackson — |





MR. E. K. WALCOTT told the electorate to whom he
spoke in Nelson Street on Friday night, to ask the Labour
Party about their Manifesto. “The more you are in favour

mi oe me a

allcedin t



of them the more you should urge them to tell you what
they intend doing for you,” he said.

Mr. Walcott was speaking at the meeting of the Ele:t- -

ors Association, held in support of Mr. Victor Chase’s
candidature for the City at the next General Election.

He told his listeners that he was
at present acting as the Leader of
the Parliamentary Party of the
Electors Association in the House
of Assembly. In truth and in fact,
he was the senior man in politics
in the island in the House. From
1924 when he returned to the
island after studying his profes-
sion, his father had suggested to
him that instead of going abroad
where he had the offer of a good
job, that he should live and stay
with the people where he had been
born. He agreed with him and
within a short period the people in
the parish of St. James asked him
to take up politics. He was first
elected to the House in 1925 and
had been in that Chamber ever
since except for the brief period
when as Attorney General, he had
been compelled to retire from
politics,

“I have come here tonight, said
Mr. Walcott, “to recommend to
you for the City constituency, not
only the inimitable Mr. E. D
Mottley who is already in the
House, but also to ask you to put
slong with him, his team mate,
Mr. Victor Chase,

Better Candidate

“I have not come here tonight
to say that any other candidate is
a bad or good one, but what I do
say instead is that our candidate
Mr. Chase is a better candidate
and when we offer him to you we
are asking that you elect him along
with Mr. Mottley and thereby
make a really good choice at the
polls,

“You will see for yourself that
if you put one man in the House
from one Party and the other from
another Party, you will have one
pulling one way and one the
other.”

Speaking on the matter of the
“vote”, Mr. Walcott said that it was
the first time in the island's history
that Adult Suffrage would be tried
out. That meant that every adult
could vote and not merely those
with qualifications such as was the
case at the last General Election.

“You can only vote for two can-
didates. The vote is absolutely
secret and therefore no victimisa-
tion can take place. Remember
that a people always got what they
deserved. When you choose your
candidates you are going to have
to wait for three years or possibly
five, as Mr. Adams has intimated,
before you can change them, and
you will get what you deserve.”

Manifesto
Mr. Walcott said that it was
usually the duty of the Party in
power to put out their manifesto
first, telling the people what
they intended doing for them,

“We cannet hear anything of

what the present Party in power

intend to do. Within a short
time the Electors Association
will be putting out theirs in
which we will tell you what we
propose doing for the people.”

“Tt does not seem,” said Mr.
Walcott, “that the other Party
have any idea of what they intend
to do. They did not put out a
manifesto last time either. To
only say something about the can-
didates of the opposing side is but
avoiding their responsibilities, be-
cause at the end of three or five
years they will be able to say: “We
promised you nothing so we have
done nothing.” The more you are
in favour of them the more you
should urge them to tell you what
thev intend doing for vou.”

There had been a lot of talk
about socialism by that Party at
the last election but nothing was
heard about it to-day. All one
heard about was “labour”, “Let
them come to you and talk about
socialism or let them say that they
have done with it. At the last
election we heard a lot about
what they, were going to national-
ize. We on the other hand had
spoken of public utility boards.
The result has been that before
the end of the House session, we
find them passing legislation for
utility boards. They gave up their
nationalisation and voted for an
item of our platform.”

Education

Mr. Walcott then spoke of the
failure of the Government to pro-
vide a sufficient number of teachérs
to carry out properly the educa-



tional programme of the elemen-
tary schools, They were also pro-
viding an excess of Barbados
scholarships, he said; but not the
secondary schools to accommodate
the large number of children who
were seeking entry to such schools.
“We pledge ourselves as an
association,” said Mr. Walcott,
“that if we get enough members
in the House of Assembly to see
to it as much as in our power hes
that there is neither an insuffi-
ciency of schoo] teachers or school
buildings.”

Of the proposed deep water
harbour for the island, Mr, Walcott
said that contrary to what had
been said by some people, he could
assure them that the harbour
would not put anybody out of
work. An excuse now was the
cost. “It might. cost £5,000,000
now, but if when it was first put
forward the Party in power had
edopted it, it would only have
cost in the vicinity of £3,000,000.”
What one had to remember,
was that the work would
have to be carried on for a
lengthy period and a very large
portion of the money would be
spent on labour. This would
mean that they would be in a pos-
ition to find employment for their
people without sending them to
the United States for a short pe-
riod of three or four months for
work. Ending, Mr. Walcott toid
his listeners that he hoped they
would see their way to support
the two candidates ‘the Electors
Association were offering, at the
General Election.

Less Abuse

Mr. Chase said that he was not
going to make use of the tactics
which had characterized some of
the political meetings he had been
attending. He was ho; that as
the campaign pr , abuse
would give place to constructive
criticism, and that constructive
criticism would eventually give
place to the candidates putting
before the electorate the things
for which they stood and what
they proposed to do if they got
the opportunity to help in fram-
Ing the laws of this country.

He had heard some of the
Speakers saying: “Chase may be
alright but he mixes parochial
politics with central government
politics.” I do not apologise for
that. I agreed with Mr. Adams
when he said that the Govern-
ment would do everything except
turn a woman into a man. There-
fore all I say to the constituents
of Bridgetown is based on the
knowledge that the Government
have only got to think that some-
thing is good for the people of
the island and it becomes a law
of the country.”

Tenantry Roads

“Now if this is the position,”
said Mr. Chase, “why cannot the
Government look after the tenan-
try roads in the City and the par-
ish generally—_roads which are in
a deplorable state of disrepair—
and put them in a suitable con-
dition tor the people who live in
these places?” Surely the Govern-
ment could get an Act passed em-

powering them to call on the
owners of private tenantries to
put the roads in order, failing

which they would do so and call
on the owner to pay the cost.
What he wanted to make clear
was that the Vestry had absolute-
ly no power to put private tenan-
try roads in order, but it was well,
within the reach of Government
to do so. That was not parochial
politics, It was his intention if
he was given the honour to repre-
sent the City, to make every
effort to get the Government to
take over the tenantry roads in the
City and St. Michael. He also
considered that Government
should be empowered to instal!
water not only in these tenantries
but others throughout the isiand,
and if he be elected he would do
hig best to help in bringing this

bout.
Cheaper Rice
Referring to the present high
cost of living, Mr. Chase said that
it would be stupid to blame the
Labour Government for it or any
other Government for that ma‘ter,

All

NATIONAL EMPLOYERS MUTUAL
GENERAL INSURANCE ASSN. LED.

Offer You Insurance Against

we ML TE e

THE NEW RADAR 8-A which



is being installed at Orly Airfield



will enable landings to be made irrespective of weather conditions

and in any visibility, It is twice

as powerlul as the previous one,

and is the biggest of its kind in Europe.—Express,



However, as regards to the im-
portant commodity “rice,” for
which Barbadians would have to
pay 11 cents per pint next year,
he thought the Government had
made a mistake in their dealing
about the price. They had the op-
portunity if they had the foresight
to close the price deal with British
Guiana at two dollars per bag
cheaper than they would be get-~
ting it Now they had no other al-
ternative than to accept a price
which was sure to create a
hardship for the majority of
people in the island. ““] am
advising you,” said Mr. Chase,
“that whoever you elect to
the House of Assembly, say to
them with one voice, ‘the price
of 11 cents per pint for rice is
too dear and the shock must be
borne by further subsidisation’”.

Mr. Chase spoke of what he
called the unsatisfactory system of
education in the island and
pointed out that an urgent neces-
sity was more schools and more
trained teachers.

Colour Question
On the matter of colour, there

had been a lot of talk, said Mr, b

Chase, but he would like to point
out that for the last 300 years
there had been no large Euro-
pean migration to ‘Barldos,
neither had ther@d be@h any
African migration. During the
years there had been inter-mar-
riages and they were now for
the most part Barbadians.
“Should any Barbadian tell you
that he is 100 per cent. Buro-
pean ask him when he came
from England or any other Eu-
ropean country. Likewise should
one say that he is 100 per cent.
African, ask him how long has
he come from Africa. Do not let
people throw a red _ herring
across the trail. Judge a man
by his principle and not his
colour. If a man asks you to
send him to the House and he
does not work in your interest
you have a perfect right to kick
him out.”

He was prepared if elected to
the House to put all his knowledge
and experience at their disposal
in an effort to improve their con-
dition. He would do evervenng
possible to raise their standard o!
living, especially those in tha
lower income brackets in the City:
He was committed to this and if
he did not carry out his promise
he would igive them his word that
he would never again ask them to

Risks.

When you Insure with N.E.M. You become a Member—

Your Problems, Difficulties & Claims are

treated in a spirit of Mutual Co-operation

Why Not Enjoy the Difference

Full Particulars at Your Disposal—

From—A. §. BRYDEN & Sons (8'dos) Ltd.



put him in a responsible position.

A
Mr, Fred Goddard told his tis-|

teners that there was only one
fundamental difference between
the Labour Party and the Electors
Association of which he was a
member, and that was “private
enterprise” as against “nationali-
sation” or “state ownership.”

In the state ownership system
as had been seen practiced in other
countries, ome just became a cog
in a wheel but in the private
business set-up every man could
use his ability and ingenuity to
climb the ladder from the bottom
to the top rung.

During the past three years, said
Mr. Goddard, the “Holidays with
Pay Bill” and other social legisla-
tion had been enacted. All such
legislation had the support of the
Electors Association. They were
the Opposition in the House of
Assembly but opposed no measure

brought down by the Government

once they considered it would
benefit the vast majority of the
people, One thing he would like
to draw to their attention was that
in this last session of the House
no legislation whatever had been
t down to create a single
new job for a Barbadian.

There were many boys and girls
leaving school who could not get a
job. Unemployment was their
greatest problem and any man who
could solve it, he would take his hat
off to him, In Trinidad and Jamaica
facilities had been granted for the
establishment of new industries so
that their people could get work.
Barbados, om the other hand, had
done nothing in this respect until
quite recently and for this he
blamed the Labour Government.
They would not bring in new in-
dustries and create new jobs for
the people. “We cannot maintain
even a reasonably good standard
of living for our teeming popula-
tion on sugar and sugar alone,”
said Mr. Goddard. “This year,” he
said, “we had a record crop of
187,000 tons but what will happen
if there is a decrease in produc-
tion. I see economic chaos if it
does, and if we have no money
coming in from outside we cannot
buy the goods we have to live on.”

After touching on some eo

is
hearers that Mr. Chase was a man
bility and

matters Mr. Goddard told

with experience and ai
he was sure that he would repre-
sent them well in the House. He
would ask them to support him
and Mr. Mottley at the polls on
Election Day.





ae ne




| Inspects Police

THE big attraction at District “A” Police Station yes-
terday evening was six-year-old Andrew Michelin of the

Good Shepherd School, son

missioner of Police. Andrew, dressed as a Police Constable
of the Mounted Branch, riding a pony, introduced the Musi-
cal Ride of the Mounted Police, staged in honour of Briga-

dier A. F. C. Jackson, O.B.E.,
Area

After the evening's performancemarched on to the square and gave

Brigadier Jackson told the Advo-
cate; “It was absolutely first class
and compares extremely favoura-
bly with shows I have seen in
other parts of the world.”

On arrival the Brigadier receiv-
ed the General Salute from ¢
@ of Honour of Police unde:

mand of Inspector Reid
Accompanied by the Commissioner
of Police, he inspected the Guard
which looked very attractive in
their white gloves. After the in-
spection he joined Mrs. Jackson
on thé platform from which they
watched the show.

The: show opened with a Phys!-
cal Training display by Cadets of
the Police Band, instructed by PC
Shannon who won the Baton of
Honour at the last passing out
parade of recruits.

This P.T. display was a new item
added to the local Police shows.
Fifteen cadets took part and the
exercises were done to the rhythm
of the Police Band which played
Tennessee Waltz, Good Night
lvene, My Heart Cries for You and
other ‘tunes,

Of this display the Brigadier told
the Advocate “It was well dane.

It was next announced that a
snartiy turned out youngster,
“our newest joined recruit,’
would introduce the Musical Ride
and Andrew Michelin, who be-
came a horseman six months ago
rode on to the square. As usua
the Musical Ride was very attrac
tive. The horses were more perfec
than previous occasions and 01
c e.ion both horsq@awen anc’
aaa renee loudly applauded.

Following this, 24 recruits of thi
Barbados Police Foree, who were

only, enlisted three weeks ag













2 g a.
Oe OTE Ae ae



rf

|

.

Ol JLY ONE SOAP GIVES YOUR SKIN
7
BF ‘our skin will be cooler, sweeter...
& desirably dainty from head-to-toe *
if you bathe with fragrant
Cashmere Bouquet Beauty Seep.

Fl

of Col. R. T. Michelin, Com-

Commander of the Caribbean

a display of the
learnt so far.
They marched very quick
time and shouted time of the
pause before making the move-
ment. It humoured the specta-
tors as the recruits, who posed an-
air of experience, shouted “1, 2

rill they had

_*

3, 4; 1, 2, 3, 4; 1, 2, 3, head; 1,
2, 3, foot.” |

A squad of Police gave a short
drill display. The outstanding

feature of this display was the
pertorming of the various move-|
ments while on the march, and)
still keeping in time.

The show ended with the
Beating of the Retreat by drum-|
mers of the Police Band. In con-|
trast with the closing in of the}
evening, the Police Band, under)
Capt, C. E, Raison, played The|
Day Thou Gavest and Abide With |
Me. A lighted cross in a nearby
tree top; a section of the Banc!

laying the soft nhythm of “Abide,

ith Me” from the background
and the emotion of the spectators, |
all added to the glory of the)
closing stages. |

Referring to the recruits, Brig-
adier Jackson said that it was
interesting to see what could be
done in three weeks for them.
‘Tam sure some of them must!
have been petrified with fright.”

He said: “I am very pleased)
with the Bandmaster for training |
the Band to play the march of
my Regiment (the Royal Hamp-|
shire Regiment). It was a big!
compliment to me.” He also con-|
gratulated Captain Raison on the)
turn out of Band.

After the show the Brigadier |
and Mrs. Jackson were enter-
tained at the home of the Com-
+ missioner of Police.







HIS EXCITING FRAGRANCE







TENDER LEAF Tef
| abuuays Tadlte- goede

—
y SJ







'
'
'









cause the trouble.





COUGHS

F you’re really out to conquer a cough—to get to the root
I of it and destroy the germ—then ask for Famel Syrup.
Why? Because Famel Syrup does so much more than



ordinary cough mixtures. It contains soluble lactocreosote
which is carried by the bloodstream to the throat and lungs
and breathing passages, where it destroys the germs which

Once the germs are destroyed then it’s goodbye to the cough
or cold. Meanwhile, the soothing balsams in Famel Syrup
| are easing the irritated membranes and the tonic minerals
are keeping up your strength and powers of resistance.
| Fame! Syrup is a recognised medical product used for coughs,
colds, influenza and bronchial troubles. It is widely recom-
| mended by Doctors. Hospitals and Sanatoria.

FAMEL SYRUP

Obtainable in two sizes—from all chemists @ sores

‘Trade enquiries ta:
Frank B. Armstrong Ltd.
BRIDGETOWN.







L° EDINBURGH SCOTLAND

VRRay &

MANNING & CO., LTD.

AGENTS



Teeth as white
as hers?










Let your mirror show you your true
smile — the smile that comes with
teeth that are, Pepsodent white!
Pepsodent, you see, contains Irium,
wonderful ingredient which dis-
solves the ugly stains that hide
whiteness, steal brightness from
your smile.

wet
—

ap}

TONIGHT Smile into your”

murror--take a good look at
your teeth,

uo ‘
tes 4

)
ape

NEXT —Clean your teeth with
Pepsodent. Do this, morning
and evening, for a week,




THE TOOTHPASTE




4
THEN—Smile
into your BOS?
mirror again FF
... you'll see
how a week
of Pepgodent
makes eteeth \ TTT
whiter, yoursmile \
simply dazzling!





WITH IRIUM*

* Iriwm is the registered trade mark of
Pepsodent Liad., for a special soluble in-
gredient that gives greater cleansing power.






KPO 19-202-80

PEPSODENT LTD., LONDON, ENGLAND

World's Finest Small - car
gives even grealer value:

Famous British -Buili

MORRIS MINOR
scores mew success |

Here is a four-door, four-scater
family saloon —a small car in a
very big way with accommoda
tion for four adults — nippy in
traffic, easy to park, and tireless
to drive.





way ahead and te
een through t
Pinger-light steor

STEERING The tue!

romediate sides can be
le windseree!

u



travel

All four doors are
wide, You can get in
and out in comfort.

VIVID, FLASHING PERFORMANCE Tne compart, mo 0
MORRIS MINOR develops 27 i antl pr 4 Ms dnape & ed f
a car of its size, Let us show you what a Ytw on smal! car |

FORT. ROYAL GARAGE LTD.?

Phone 2385 Sole Distributors Phone 4504



PAGE FOUR



“Saturday, October 27, 1951

CHANGE

THE Conservative victory in the United
Kingdom General Elections will encour-
age all those who cherish liberty. The
fundamental difference between British
conservatism and British socialism is that
the Conservative party thinks mainly in
terms of the country as a whole, while the
socialist party is preoccupied with the sec-
tional interests of a class. The United
Kingdom to-day has great need of a gov-
ernment which will consolidate social
unity and promote tolerance and co-oper-
ation between its people.

It is to be hoped that the new Conser-
vative Government will be able to achieve
this great task.

The way will not be easy.

Quite apart from the presence in the
House of Commons of a considerable La-
bour opposition, with the Bevanites in full
strength, the present economic condition
of the United Kingdom will demand all
the resources of any government to restore
it to health. Britain’s adverse trade bal-
ance in the current year is rated by ex-
perts in excess of £400 million. And it is
expected to be even higher in 1952,

It is not paradoxical to state that politi-
cally speaking the Labour Party is fortun-
até to have lost fhe elections at a time
when the cost of rearmament has consid-
erably increased the financial burden of a
country already suffering from the infla-
tionary effects of devaluation.

But if Britain’s internal troubles demand
statesmanship of a high order the loss of
prestige which she has-suffered as a result
of the Persian evacuation and the current
Egyptian dispute demand urgent action
to repair the damage.

One certain result of a Conservative
vietory will be the almost immediate re-
covery of British prestige in Europe, North
America and other non-socialist countries
of the world. This prestige, it is true, will
only be due to a temporary reaction and
if it is to be maintained, it will require
a foreign policy totally unlike that which
has recently led Britain from one overseas
crisis to another.

So far as the British Colonies in general,
and the West Indies in particular, are con-
cerned it would be unwarranted to expect
any change.. The British Conservatives
are, if anythfag, more afraid of treading

on colenialcérns than the British Social-
ists. TI been their boast in recent

- years that Colonial policy has beén kept
outside party polities and many Conserva-
tives secretly and openly admire the
Socialist record in the colonies. Even the
City of London, a traditional conservative
stronghold has the greatest respect for
socialist manipulation of colonial trade by
which the Mother Country has managed
to retain so many dollars for the sterling
area. There would be no justification for
colonial peoples of socialist persuasions to
expect any great change in the form cf
colonial policy because the new United
Kingdom Government is not socialist.
There would be even less justification for
colonial Conservatives to lift up their
hearts and hope for the dawn of a new
day: The present mixture now labelled
British Colonial policy does not depend
directly on what Britain says or does. It
depends on the political growth and politi-
cal sense of the colonial peoples them-
selves. Only indirectly is there likely to
be a change as colonial peoples themselves
come to realise the fact that in matters
affecting their welfare and their material
advancement and progress a Conser-
vative Secretary of State for the Colonies
will give them no less fair a hearing than
his socialist predecessor.

One great direct influence of the British
elections'which can have immediate effect
in Barbados is the good conduct, the order
and the democratic functioning of the
elections, This good conduct has been
praised by Labour and Conservative mem-
bers throughout the elections. It is a
model for our own voters and people to
follow in those elections which will take
place here in December and which will
mean as much for us in Barbados as the
results of the British elections mean for
Britain and the world.



Our Readers Say :

| Have You

Ever Been
Seared By

A Firefly?

———————————

PENANG. '
What are you going to do th



By BERNARD WICKSTEEPD

ir
Saturday night? I'll bet it’s noth-§the stolid outward calm of the
ing like the way I spent my last §trained soldier.

Saturday here.
No. 1 Platoon of “A” Compan:

No Twilight
At three points along the bank

of the Royal West Kents set angof a narrow, muddy river we took

ambush by a river crossing at@up our positions where
Trolak, and reporter Wicksteed® trees had made natural,

‘

qwPrecarious bridges.
1

went along to represent the Press.

Nobody got hurt, but it was an
interesting professional experi-
ence, for though the pen may be

mightier than the sword on most,

oecasions, it feels an inadequate

weapon of defence when you are.

lying om your tummy under a
bush in the jungle beside a ban-
dit track at midnight.

Trolak is pronounced Trola.
The k is silent, but at night-time
it’s the only thing about the place
that is. The jungle that seems so

limp and dead in the heat of the,

day comes to life with a million
noises at night.

At home you can usually reck-
on that any noise at night has a
natural and harmless explana-
tion, but in the Malayan j
there really are tigers, there really
are snakes with deadly bites, and
above all there really are men
prowling round with a desire to
kill you.

So in the course of lying for
six hours in the dark, reporter
Wicksteed experienced some of
those feeJings he has jeered at
in others—an admission no one
will be more delighted to read
of than his wife.

Ungat, our head - hunting
oe Sate sy aan

explanations every
those million jungle sounds, but
the National Service s, of
whom there were ten in 4 it
parts of our ambush, knew as

little of their cause ag I.
Yet they accepted them with



A Potential Colonia
Secretary

.

‘ LONDON.

Alan Lennox-Boyd, at the age
of 47, can be confidently picked as
Secretary of State for the Colo-
nies now that a Conservative
Government has been returned to
power,

His career reads like the pro-
gress of a_ gilded youth to the
courts of fame, At the age of 26,
not long out of Christchurch Col-
lege, Oxford, he entered Parlia-

ment, and at the age of 28 he was

issuing discreet denials to a report
that he was the Private Secretary
to an ex-Prime Minister—Mr.
Baldwin, At thirty-four years, a
job was found for him as Parlia-
mentary Secretary to the Ministry
of Labour, and the same year he
married the second daughter of
the Earl of Iveagh, Lady Patricia
Guiness. The war came and
found him a job in the Ministry
of Food, them a spell in the Navy
—in the little ships of the English
Channel—after which, back to
Whitehall as Parliamentary Secre-
tary in the Ministry of Aircraft
Productions, (under Sir Stafford
Cripps).

) But the future Colonial Secre-
“tary is far from being the dull

® dog with good fortune, in money

and conpexions, that this career
and those jobs would indicate.
Alan Lennox-Boyd was a scholar
and prizeman at Christchurch; he
is a great local figure in his own
homeland countryside of Bedford-
shire; he is a man who takes in-
finite pains to please his friends.
He won his present seat in Par-
liament in 1931 — unexpectedly
because he fought as a Conseryva-
tive for a traditionally Liberal
seat. Since then his peruse,
and his election majorities have
grown because he is always at the
service of his electors. is 6
7 ins. figure is as noted h

fallen
though

Our information was that the
ocal kanditry were using these
crossing points on their jour-
neys in and out of the jungle for
food supplies.

There is no twilight in the
tropics. We got into position at
6.15 in broad daylight. At 6.45
it was as black as midnight.

Under another bush, five
yards away in the darkness on
my left, was Ted Bailey, from
West Ham, who was a carpenter
in a furniture factory.

Beyond him was Don Bangs,
that cheerful Camden Town bar-
row boy.

As solid as a rock on my right
was Sargeant Frank Bucknell,
Military Medal, who has cam-
paigned in a dozen theatres of
war.

You are not allowed to talk
when you are on an ambush.
You are not allowed to cough or
clear your throat because no
sound travels better than that.
You are not allowed to move if
your joints creak, and, above all,
you are not a to smoke,

A few yards from the wet bush
that served as a Press box in
this ambush there was a puddle
and from the middle of it a bad-
mannered frog kept croaking
derisive remarks,

Then there was a beastly bird
in the tree above me that period-
ically called ‘‘Peep.” '

It didn’t even say “Peep,
peep,” which any normal bird

By D. T. ROBERTS

from village to village in his
corner of rural England as it is
as “tallest M.P.” at Westminster.

Alan Lennox-Boyd is the kind
of man about whom many stories
are told. On the one hand he
and his wife live in a fine Bel-

‘avia town house, and are famous

‘or their resplendent parties, At
one of these, guests at a ball found
300 walking sticks for tired danc-
ers to lean on. For their host has
the most remarkable collection of
walking sticks in London—includ-
ing jewelled possessions from
India, and ivory-carved work of
Tibet. Far from such dilettante
pleasures, Alan Lennox-Boyd is
the most practical of enterprising
men, For an example; before the
war he found that his Bedfordshire
market - gardening constituents
were selling their carrots to the
London's Covent Garden at £1 a
ton. In the end the housewife had
to pay at a price of £18 a ton
for the carrots when they reached
the shops. So the wealthy M.P.
for Mid-Bedfordshire set up his
own greengrocer’s shop in London
and sold at prices profitable to
the farmer and cheap for the
housewife — without the middle
man.

Alan Lennox-Boyd has had a
career not without troubles. He
has always had strong convictions
and sometimes suffered for them,
and for his youthful exuberance.
He was a declared admirer of
General Franco, (at a time before
Winston Churchill could find oc-
casion to praise Franco’s handling
of Hitler), and an advocate of

rewar British friendship with
Mussolini—to avoid war. Not long
after becoming a junior Minister
he told his constituents he thought

ft. Mr. Chamberlain should NOT
guarantee the frontiers of Czecho-





HALT for Bangs, Ungat, Wicksteed

would have done. It just said
the one word “peep” once about
every five minutes throughout
the entire duration of the am-
bush. I could have killed it.

Then there were the things
you SAW.

The fireflies were the most
perplexing. As soon as it was
dark they came out in dozens.
You could swear there was ¢
whole hkandits
‘torches
on the other side of the river.

Then you realised they were
not lights at a distance but fire-
flies only a few inches from your
nose.

The jungle is also full of
rotten wood that is luminous ir
the dark, and there were half <
dozen patches of this within sight
of the Press bush, winking like
the embers of’a ghostly fire.

No Coughs

Every now and again the dogs

in a (or village) near
by would bark madly, and you’d
think: “This is it, boys, the ban-
dits are coming.” You'd get all
keyed up till that horrible bird
called “Peep” again, and some-
how you felt that things were
normal.
You have no idea how harc
it is not to cough when it’s the
one thing in the world you are
not allowed to do, how impos-
sible it is not to move your
limbs when movement is a mili-
tary offence.

So it was g blessed relief when
Sargeant Bucknell said ‘Psst!’
and the ih was over.

Back in the camp there were

lights and tea, but if you
imagine the was about the
night’s operati you don’t know
your National Service man.
—L.E.S.

Slovakia. Feeling was then run-
ning high, in 1938. For this in-
discretion he was almost forced
to resign and perhaps this accounts
for why the two brilliant young
men of the Conservative Party in
the 1930’s—R. A. Butler and Len-
nox-Boyd—have had such unequal
fortunes. THe first is an acknow-
ledged leader and probably, the
future Chancellor; the latter will
now have his chance at the Colo-
nial Office, His political
have. been tempered with
years.

views
the

He has been talking, arguing
and hoping for a chance to assist

the development of the British |T

Empire into a practical, going
concern, ever since he left Oxford
University—where he was a Presi-
dent of the famous Union debating
society, As a member of the Em-
pire Industries Association, he
has been active in the cause of
Empire. But it is only since the
Labour- Government has been in
power that Alan Lennox-Boyd has
seen the prospect before him of
taking over the great office of
Colonial Secretary that Joseph
Chamberlain and _é Winston
Churchill, themselves, once fillee,
So he has been travelling widely
—through Africa and the West
Indies — from which he was re-
called to fight the General Elec-
tion of 1950.

As a Con:
Secretary, Lennox-Boyd is com-
mitted to the practical—to eco-
nomic development, rather than
the wordy arena of political
advancement. He has had a lead-
ing part drafting the Conservative
relative to the Colonial

pire — and his term of office
should be given an impressive
send-off with the Empire Economic
Conference early in 1952, promis-
ed by the Conservative Party.

B.H. Wants No Part In Federation

LONDON® Get. 18
Fears are being expressed in
London about possible fresh Guat-
emalan moves in support of its
claim to British Honduras, follow-
ing the news that the People's
United Party of Belize does not
want to sée British Honduras in-
cluded in the contemplated Feder-

ation of the British Caribbean.
The Hom, John Smith, leader of
the P.U.P., has asked the Central
American Foreign Ministers, meet-
ing in San Salvador to set up the
Organisation of Central American
States, to support his party's

claims against Federation,

The conference decided to ex-
press its sympathy with the aims
of the Belize party and passed a
resolution saying: “It is a just as-
piration of American republicans
to end the colonisation and occu-
pation of American territories by
éxtra-continental nations.”

There were unofficial reports
that the five Foreign Ministers
had discussed the possibility of
joint action to bring Guatemala’s
claim to British Honduras be-
fore the United Nations.
London observers believe that,

with this support, Guatemala will

soon be launching a fresh cam-
paign to uphold its claim to the
territory. But Britain has a cast-
jron case for retaining its sover-
eignty over the, Colony.

Not only has the Colony been
part of the Bri Empire for the
past 300 years, hut the Guatemalan
claim to the tefritory falls down|
on the grounds that there is no
ethnological at between
the peoples of the two territories.
Britain is not expected to depart;
from the firm stand it has always

taken in dealing with the Guate-
malan claim. U.P,



ative Colonial | FRIDAY—Saw Brigadier Jackson, the new

SATURDAY—Read Dr.



| NOBODY'S |

DIARY

SUNDAY—The quiet and rest of my weekly

meditation today was disturbed by a par-
son. Not that he made any great deal of
noise, but he wanted to know what were
my views on parsons taking part in poli-
tics. I told him that I wanted to have
one day free away from politics and all
that went with them. His reply was to say
that political meetings were being held on
Sunday nights,—a practice with which
he and many people seem to disagree.
But there it is, and I remember my old

people saying: “The better the day the | ¥

better the deed.”

* * *

party of with
coming down the track] MONDAY—Had a poser pushed at me to-day

while discussing traffic problems with a
friend. Here is. the question: “Can a ve-
hicle reverse up a one-way street” It is
facing the direction in which the regu-
lations say it can go, so what is to be
done? Exactly what did he mean I won-
dered, and he made it. quite clear by
breaking into unorthodox language: “Can

and still am. If he tries it out perhaps
Col. Michelin will answer his question.

* * *

CUESDAY—The more students who attend

the West Indies University Col‘ege, the
better it will be for that institution. And
all need not be West Indians either. This
thought was prompted by the recent
circular notice that English Universities
are making sure that there is sufficient
accommodation for their own students
before admitting ‘colonial ones. Let the
W.I. University set and maintain a high
standard and in the not too distant future
they too might have to serve notice that
West Indians come first in their catering
to educational needs.

* * *

WEDNESDAY—Thought the decision of the

House of Assembly yesterday quite a
strange proceeding. I am referring to the
appointment of a Puisne Judge for Bar-
bados and it was decided to leave the
question of salary to Governor-in-Execu-
tive Committee to fix. They must find the
Judge first and find out under what terms
he would take the job. It might be sound
reasoning from some angle, but it leaves
too wide a space for juggling in my
opinion.

* * *

HURSDAY—My Shopkeeper told us today
that he was having some difficulty in get-
ting his usual amount of rice. He was as
cross as I am, for like many Barbadians
I am very fond of rice. He said frankly
that he believed that the increased price
which comes into effect next January has
something to do with it, and that some-
body is already on the’ look out for a
little extra somewhere. Will somebody
please take care of my rice for me?

* * *

officer commanding the Caribbean area
on parade yesterday. He looked quite
smart in his fine uniform. Now that he is
here I wonder if we can hear some inside
news about the formation of the new
B.W.I. army. Barbados always seems to be
the last place to get certain information,
or the people who should circulate it have
three speeds to their machinery: Dead,
Slow and Stop.

* * *

Inge’s article in
yesterday’s paper with avidity. I mean

the one on “Parsons and Politics”, If you
haven't read it, do so. Many people do not
know that the Act making it possible to





a car back-back forward?” I was beaten



fine a clergyman £500 for every day he
sits or votes in the House of Commons is
still on the English Statute Book. But this
apart, the Doctor’s language, style and
views are well worth the reading.





Noisy Radios
To The Editor, The Advocate —

SIR,—You have sometimes made
room in “your interesting and
valuable Correspondence columns
for “letters complaining about
radios turfed on so loud as to be
very disturbing and annoying to
the neighbours, and appealing for
reasonable consideratior in con-
neetion therewith, I think there js
need for another such letter. It
appears that a good many people
have not considered the point, or
are too self-centred to be inter-
esied. and merciful.

Recently the outery has been
with regard to the nuisance of
late hours and uproarious noises
at Quéén’s Park, and surely resi-
dents in that neighbourhood can
obtain redress if they arise as a
body and claim it. But this matter
of the noisy radio belongs to a
much larger area.

In most districts there are busy,

or sick, or old people requiring
quiet conditions, to whom the
droning radio of some neighbour
—or perhaps more than one—is
really a serious trouble and nuis-
ance and they ought by all means
to be considered. I think in some
cases the complaint has come
from boys and girls preparing the
lessons for next day’s school who
have been badly hindered.

Now the remedy is very simple
and easy. It merely requires that
the loud speaker be not turned
on full blast, and that is no hard-
ship to the owner. Half full is in
almost all cases sufficient for an
ordinary home or listener, and if
everybody would just bear that in
mind, and turn on the receiver
accordingly, the trouble would be
done away right off.

Take another view of the mat-




or the music, and so turn on loud
to suit. That is not right. It means
annoying other neighbours for the
benefit of a few. No; it should be
arranged for those who want to
hear to come inside the house, The
radio service is not intended for a
district, but for the home of the
subscriber.

With thanks for space,
FAIR PLAY.
October 24, 1951.

Is Rice Rationed?

To the Editor, The Advocate—

SIR,—It is understood that the
price of rice is to be changed from
seven cents per pint to eleven
cents per pint from the beginning
of the coming year, but the
public were never notified that
from now on, till January 1952,

cent enough to inform the public
about it. For the past few weeks
poor people, especially in the
country districts, have had to be
running from shop to shop in an
effort to obtain a little rice and
are generally told by the shop-
keeper “there is no rice”. Some of
the more fortunate ones who are
accustomed getting a regular sup-,
ply of from six to eight pints now
get only two pints and if they fail
to get it on Saturday they will
get none at all.

The situation is getting worse
week after week. Some ‘shop-
keepers say that the merchants
refuse to give them rice, or at
least, a reasonable amount of it,
on the pretext rice is scarce.

Does the Government under-
stand the situation? Are the mer-
chants acting under the direction

on pos good-natured friendly rice will be rationed of the comptroller of supplies? If

ousewives think that some of they are not, then they are com-

their neighbours who have not got If this were to be, surely the mitting a very serious breach and

the service, like to hear the news Government should have been de- the Government should take im-
i t

mediate steps to set this matter

right, as no amount of platitudes

can assuage the anger of a hungry
Barbadian.

Your sincerely,

GUSTA.

Leave Private Schoo/s
Alone!

To the Editor, The Advocate—

SIR,—As an old pupil of two
different Private Schools, and also
one interested in Education, I
cannot allow the attack on “Pri-
vate Schools” to go unchallenged.

There are to-day numbers of
prominent citizens, who are relics
of some of the schools, and, to be
fair, Barbados should be proud of

such. 4

Right in our home there is a
girl, 14 years of age, who up to
last February, was a pupil of an
Elementary School and had to be
taken away and sent to a Privat
School the week after With the

fexcepticn of knowing a few Span-
ish sentences which were taught
orally, and being able to make a
garden bed very good, she was
almost void of elementary educa-
tion. Now, for these few months
she has shown much progress in
her studies. Leave Private Schools

_Alone, ;

Maybe I’m near-sighted so can
you tell me which is the more im-
portant: Our playing field in each
parish, or rather build more first
grade and Secondary Schools to
help those who are starving for a
decent education? Should parents
keep their children at horne, until!
those in authority wake up from
sleep and see to proper Educational
affairs? Leave Private Schools
alone, I say. To degrade these
schools, is like meddling with the
msg wheel of any travelling vehi-
cle,

ONE INTERESTED IN
EDUCATION

26.10.51

SATURDAY, OCTOBER 27, 1951

NOW IN STOCK

PLANTATION & FACTORY
LABOUR SHEETS

Call and Select Early from



ECONOMY

VALUE
as

A Result ! SATISFACTION

C. S. PITCHER & CO.






A FRESH SHIPMENT
OF

GOLDEN ARROW
FLOUR

JUST ARRIVED.
+
DA COSTA & CO. LTD. — Agents,



@ ww
~
e
8
©
be ae



IRV-O-LITE

Durable

GARDEN HOSE
at DA COSTA & CO,, LTD.

Plastic - Flexible -



BEST FOR YOUR PART)
UNIQUE IN

FLAVOUR





DELIGHTFUL HARVEY'S
SWEETS - HKRISTOL
Baby Foods (Strained) | SHERRIES
cee, |emes |
Sart Beet weal | ef
_ | GOLD BRAID |

FOR ENERGY _RUM |
J. & R. Bread | There is nothing better on
Anchor Butter | the Market.

PHONE GODDARDS BEFORE
A PARTY !!







SATURDAY, OCTOBER 27, 1951

Government Industrial Schools Have
—_ Notable Improvement,

At Schools—caou. ‘see.

FOR. THE SECOND TIME since the change over ‘at

the Government Industrial

were Hon. R. N,
was Guest of Honour at the

gathering. He said:

Until the happy idea was con-
ceived last year of opening the
Government Industrial Schools to
the general public on one Inspee-
tion Day a year the Government

BARBADOS ADVOCATE

Improvement
By generai reports there has
* “2g been a notable improvement in

Schools, it was Visitors’ D.
ng

yesterday. Among the large number of persons attendi
rner, M.L.C., Colonial Secretary, who

function and Mrs. Turner.

During the afternoon Mr. Turner spoke to the large

inkling of what went on behind
the gates of Dodds and Summer-
vale,

The function of an Annual
all







The fifteen-piece school band which entertained the visitors who ment” of Government. Probably
not more than a handful of persons

attended Visitors Day at “Dodds” ye:

sterday.

The boy at right is the conductor.

Tale of a Mule

A mule, kicking in desperation

~ for his life as he was about io
topple over into the Careenage on
‘Thursday, was fortunate to find
the ready hands of the crew of
the Government craft and other
people on the wharf. He and his

cart were barely saved in time.
It happened when the Govern-
ment Water Boat Ida was taking
coal by Messrs Central Foundry.
The coal was brought to her by
two mule drawn carts. And at
one time, the “fortunate” mule
became uncontrollable so that the
driver could not check him from
running back into the Careenage.
Just as the wheels rolled over
the edge of the wharf, the hands
came to the rescue. While one
group gripped the cart, the others
unharnessed the mule.
One of the crew fell into the
Ida’s bunker and came back up
covered in coal dust.



British Delegation
For St. Croix

On Sunday next the following
members of the British delega-
tion to the Thirteenth Meeting of
the Caribbean Commission which
opens in St. Croix on Monday 29th
October will be leaving Barba-
dos: —

Sir George Seel, K.C.M.G.—

British Co-Chairman;

Mr. G. H. Adams,—Commis-
sioner;

Mr. A. de K, Frampton, who
will be serving as a Commis-
sioner at this Meeting in place
of Mr. Kenneth Thompson.

Joining the delegation in St.
Croix will be Mr. S, T. Christian
of the Leeward Islands who, will
be serving as a Comm ner,
and Mr. M, A. Wenner who will
serve as an Adviser.

The delegation will be accom-
panied by Mr. B. E. Rolfe and
Mrs, Walcott of the Staff of the
Development and Welfare Organ-
isation,

C.J. Grants Petitions For
Letters Of Administration

The Honourable the Chief Judge
Sir Allan Collymore yesterday
granted the petition of Arthur
Drayton Herbert of Christ Church
for letters of Administration to the
estate (with the will annexed)
of his wife Hilda Herbert deceased.
Will proved 5th October, 1951.

Mr, D, E. G. Malone instructed
by Mr. R, C, Chapman, Solicitor,
of the firm of Carrington & Sealy
were for the petitioner

He also granted the Petition of
the Pubic Trustee of the Island
of Barbados for letters of Admiu-
istration to the “estate of Alfred
Tobias Phillips, late of Strath-
clyde, St. Michael, deceased,

Mr. W. W. Reece, K.C., Solicitor
General instructed by Mr, A, DeC.
Boyce, Solicitor of the firm of
Yearwood & Boyce, for the peti-
tioner,

Consideration of the Petition of
Caleb Neblett of Spooners Hill,
St. Michael the constituted attor-
ney of Gorden Pilgrim of New
York, U.S.A. for letters of admin-
istration to the estate of Cecelia
Pilgrim late of U.S.A, deceased
was postponed.

Mr, D. H. L. Ward instructed by
Mr, K. C. Browne of the firm of
Hutchinson & Banfield, Solicitors,
were for the petitioner,

Wills

The following wills were ad-
mitted to probate:

Elizabeth Charlotte Pile, St.
Peter.

Ellen Letitia Leach, St. Michael;

Winston Herbert Badley, St.
Michael.

Alietha Howell, St. James;

Georgiana Bourne, St. Michael;



Amanda Jestina Hoyte, St.
Michael.
George Albert Folkes, St.
Michael.

Charles Busby, St. Michael,



ope

ae)

co

‘nor Ta
ph

DYED ART SILK & COTTON
BROCADE

in Green, Brown, Rust, Rose

47” wide.. Per Yard



Pe



Industrial Schools were, so
speak, the “Forgotten Depart-

in the Island had more than en



Results Of
Educational Tests

The Director of Education re-
ports that the results of the tests
in Arithmetic and Reading given

to the 74
year have
and that
Arithmetic,
continued.
In Reading also, the Director
of Education reports, the results
show a marked rise in attainment
since the children of this age-
group were first tested in 19+.
The girls continue to obtain
better results than the boys in
both subjects. In all 9,694 children
have been tested .in Arithmetic
and 9,683 children in Reading

DECREE NISI

Eighty-three-year-old James B.
A. Cutting of Cave Road, How.
ells Cross Road, yesterday got
decree nisi pronouncéd by The
Hon. The Chief Judge, Sir Allan
Collymore when he sent in a
petition for the dissolution of
his marriage to Alice Cutting.
This is the third wife James
Cutting is divorcing.

The Hon. The Chief Judge pro-
nounced decree absolute in the
suit E. T. Arthur, petitioner and
H. C. Arthur respondent.

Mr. W. W. Reece, K.C., in-
structed by Mr. D. Lee Sarjeant,
solicitoy appeared for the peti-
tioner.

Age-group during this
now been analysed,
the -improvement in
noted last yer, has





to

Inspection Day has changed
that, and I feel very complimented
to be invited as the guest of hon-
our, at this, the second, function
af what { hope will become a long
and unbroken series, For I have
no doubt whatsoever that a func-
tion of this kind can do nothing
but good.

It does good to the boys and
girls at the schools for it opens
a window for them on to the out-
side world and shows them that
people outside are not indifferent
to them and their achievements;
it does good to the general pub-
lie for it must tend to stir their
social conscience and stimujate
vheir interest in an aspeet of edu-
cation which is of considerable
importance to the community,

It is, therefore, particularly un-
fortunate that this year’s function
should have clashed with another
one in Bridgetown; otherwise |
am sure that still more people
would have come down to St.
Philip this afternoon.



Bags, hats, hammocks, table cloths, t baskets, brushes, mats, shoes, etc.,
were on sels Cecing Visit urs Dey o5 “Dodds” yesterday.
This was (ae main sta.l which attracted much attention.



if

the tone of the Schools during
the last two or three years, and
Il propose to quote three extracts

‘from remarks by outside observers

in the official Report on the
Schools for 1950 which tend to
substantiate this view.

The Surgeon commented that
“the past year has been a healthy
one. Tne children have the ap-
»carvance of being well cared for.
shey are tidy in appearance at
all times, their deportment is ex-
emplary, and they are alert and
obedient, Tne improvement that
has taken place during the past
eighteen months in these aspects
vi the Schools has to be seen to
be appreciated, and is reflected in
we nappier attitude of the chil-
dien who are obviously enjoying

to the full, both in their work
and play, as children should.”
These remarks by the Surgeon

are reassuring,

The Education Department cor-
1oborated this favourable impres-
sion in ,the following extracts
from its report. As regards Dodds
it commented, “The disciyyline
compares very favourably with
that obtaining in the ordinary
Elementary Schools,

Their general appearance and
the excellent condition in which
the premises are kept all fur-
nish evidence ofa sense of per-
sonal well-being, of growing
confidence in themselves and of
a steady rise in the tone of the
School, The general impression
xained is that the teachers are
noing their best to cater to the
mental capacity and vocationsl
interests of the boys.

The boys seem happy in the
tone and atmosphere of the en-
lire school is good.” So much
tor Dodds. With re gird to Sum-
mervale the Education Depart-
ment report mentions, “The at-
tention given to cultural activi-

ties and the motherly care
shown by the Matfon are
pleasing.”

Staff's Credi,

For this marked and sustained
improvement great credit is ob-
viously due to the Staff. Pause
foc a moment to consider their
task. It is far trom easy, Tney
nave to look after the needs of
children of various, far too vari-
ous. ages. According to the figures
in the 1950 Report there were, on
the average, 19 boys of 14 and
under, 22 between 14 to 16 and
30 over 16. This wide disparity
in ages must present a formida-
ble problem in itself, and I hope
that one day the, creation of a
Borstal, which is at present await-
ing its turn among the many pro-
jects which the Government ad-
mits to be desirable but has not

The three boys in the foreground are being taught cabinet making, been able to afford, will mitigate

caning and carpentry.

-

The two instructors in the background look on.



Radar Towed

Into Careentage

this difficulty,

Apart from tbe diversity
ages is the diversity of
ground and mental capacity. As
the 1950 Report clearly shows
the School includes a few mental
detectives and, I quote’ the
Superintendent, “some pupils have
no tmoral sense unfortunately.”

of
back-

The 116-ton motor vessel T. B. troubles after she dropped anchor These misfits cannot easily be ab-

Radar safely reached Barbados
from St. Lucia yesterday morning,

but had to be towed into the
Careenage from Carlisle Bay
during the afternoon,

T. B. Radar developed engine

in Barbados. The Government
craft Ida towed her into the Ca-
reenage. T. B. Radar brought a
fair supply of fruit from St. Lu-
cia. She is consigned to the
Schooner Owners’ Association,



DIZZLE DAZZLES, SPARKLERS BEING
STORED AWAY FOR GUY FAWKES DA

ALREADY parents are buying for their children from
the wide variety of fireworks that which the fireworks
dealers have got down for them. There will be the usual
bombs and starlights, there will be crackers and sparklers,
there will be dizzle dazzle and radium dazzlers-—in short,
every kind of fireworks is available.



More Fine Stone
Shipped To B.G.

Barbados is shipping more fine
stone for use in the construction
of a road in Berbice, British Gui-
ana. Schooner Anita H. was at
her berth opposite the Customs
yesterday loading 140 tons of fine
stone with which she is expected
to sail for British Guiana around
the week-end.

Within the past three weeks,
three schooners left Barbados
with stone for Berbice. They
were the Emeline. Rosarene and
Claudia S. Over 400 tons of fine
stone will have been shipved
from Barbados to Berbice when
the Anita H. reacheg B.G.

- Anita H. is consifMed to the
Schooner Owners’ Association,

Golfito Due ‘Wednesday

The S.S._Golfito is expected to
arrive in Carlisle Bay on Wednes-
day October 31st at 8 o’clock and
will leave ten hours later for
Trinidad. On board are 33 pas.
sengers Yor Barbados.











A youngster from the elemen-
tary school told the Advocate yes-
terday, “My Daddy showed me the
long lists of fireworks that were in
the papers and I told him I wanted
bombs and crackers and serpents
and I know he will buy them, for
he always buys fireworks for
me on the fifth of November,” The
boy was as keen as boys are on
this oceasion.

A parent said that he has been
having quite a lot of trouble from
his son Tom. Last fireworks time,
Tom was too young to appreciate
fireworks. Now he is asking his
father such questions as, ‘“Dadds,
is a fireworks’ Flowerpot like the
flowerpot mama has?” or “Can you
suck the fireworks Chinese drops
like you suck acid drops?” So
Tom will be introduced to flower-
nots, Chinese drops and Jack-in-
the-box on November 5 for the
first time,

A few oft the usual fireworks
sellers are not selling fireworks
this year, but those who are sell-
ing have quite sufficient to supply
the children.

Guy Fawkes day is still nine
days off, but children have started
lo catch fire to their crackers and
throw their bombs.

Pretty Lights
Besides the glee caused by see-



=

rd

$s
]

ee

ss

= \
a
a —— at

se

eer]

8

he
t
ra





DYED COTTON SHEETING

47” wide,

in Blue Rust, Green,
Per Yard



DYED COTTON SHEETING
in Rose, Blse and Green
80” wide. Per Yard.... $3.72

S

in Rose, Blue and Green.

$2.45 70” wide.



Per Yard ....... $3.15





Spruce up your rooms
for Xmas

PRINTED COTTON CRETONNE
Excellent for all purposes in the home.
Per Yard

DYED COTTON FOLKWEAVE





ing pretty lights of the various
fireworks ar, hearing the minor
explosion of a bomb, some boys
set added amusement from throw-
ing bombs behind passersby's feet.
Yesterday a reporter heard a boy
not yet in his teens recount to an-
other hew he threw a bomb behind
an old man’s feet-last fifth of No-
vember and how the old man ha
to be given water afterwards t
revive him from the fright.

And as to the conkies that. ga/1y

with fireworks and the fifth of
Novembe,r, housewives are pre-
paring their materials for them.
Neither cocoanuts nor pumpkins
are plentiful so they are buying
them long before hand. There has
not been much corn either. This
is not worrying the small peasant
owner. He always has his supply.





Canteen. For
Greaves End Beach

PERMISSION has been
granted to Messrs. A. E.
Taylor Limited on certain
agreed conditions to erect a
small canteen on Greaves
End Beach where tea, non-
alcoholic drinks and cakes
may be sold. It is hoped

that this arrangement will
help to improve the ameni-
ties of this very popular
bathing beach.





$1.70

and Gold. 47” wide
$1.79

CAVE

HEPHERD
& Co,, Ltd.

10-13 Broad St.

sorbed wifhout
majority.

upsetting the

To cater for the needs of chil-
dren of such varying ages and
characters, many of whom have
come from unhappy or broken
homes, is no easy matter, and it
will be agreed, I think, that the
Superintendent, who hag’ thrown
himself into his job with the most
commendable zeal and determina-
tion, .he Chief Matron, the School-
master, and, indeed the whole of
the staff at both Dodd, and Sum-
mervale are to be congratulated
on the results which hey have
achieved and are achieving,

Handicrafts

I have been particularly inter-
ested in the display of handicrafts
which is on view to-day. I am
very strongly of the opinion that
the boy and girl who, in this
troubled second half of the Twen-

DEMONSTRATION

MODEL
OF THE NEW

MOR

DIESEL WHEEL TRACTOR

EXPECTED

15 — 20 — 25 — 35 hp. Models

Half Tracks a

Built by experienced German Diesel Engineers
@

J. G. KIRTON, Jnr.
“The Grange”, St. Philip |



We Have...

XMAS TREE
DECORATIONS

XMAS TREE
LIGHTS

TINSEL — A Beautiful |
Assortment

XMAS CRACKERS
At









KNIGHTS DRUG







tieth Century, knows how to us

his or her hands at come craft or
trade is, or maybe, at a distna
advan.age cOmpared with tnose
who cannot

It is particularly important in|
an. islan@ like Barbados. where!
there is not enough employment
to go round and not neany |
enough jobs for boys and girls
who have concentraied wholly on
literary subjects, that stress should
be placed on vocational training.

Tn this the Government Indus-
trial Schools are setting a notable |
Jcad. and I am quite sure that the
children who have learnt car-
pentry, basketry, masonry, tailor-
ing, shoemaking, or, so far as the
girls are concerned, needlecraft
and handicrafts during their stay
at the Schools will find these ac-
complishments of considerable |
benefit to them in after years,

1 paid a previous » visit to the
Schools ‘a few weeks ago. I had,
I must admit, half expected to
find a certain amount of listlesy-
ness or even sulkiness, and was
agreeably surprised to find the|
general air of robus! cheerfulness |
which prevailed.

I arrived at Summervale in
time to make my debut at cricket
in Barbados against a_ female)
Constantine wha, using the set-|
ting sun as a background and a
by no means straight arm style,
hurled down a succession of thun-
derbolts which I just managed to
ke»p out of my wicket,

I then went back to Dodds
where another game (of cricket
wes in progress, and the bruise on
my shin will bear witnevs to the}
fact that *here was no listlessness
in the bowling in that game.

Monthly Visits
| understand that monthly
visits to the School are made by
members of the Interim Advisory

Powd of the Schools. These
members, who are all busy men
an’ women, have a somewhat

thenk'ess task, but T would like to
tak> this opportunity of paying
public tribute to their strong
‘epse of social duty and to convey
to them the Government’s appre-,
ciation of the keen interest which
they take in the welfare of the
children at the Schools.

Tne more interest, indeed,
which inuuential members {of
we pupiic can be jccsueucu
to take in the Schools the bet-
t.r, For the time must come
wen tne buys auu guris Wis ve
turn to the outer . world and
must look tor employmeut

I am glad to note from the
records that in recent years
practically no one has b-en in
subsequent trouble with the
Police, ang it is only fair that,
when boys and girls leave the



Schools, they should be pro-
vided with the opportunity to
prove themselves useful citizens
of the Isiand, and the fact thar
they have been inmates of the
Schools should not be held
against them.

At present, unfortunately, there
is no proper After Care Organisa-
tion to deal properly with the
transition from school life into
normal life, and to provide suit-
able employment, and I earnestly
hope that such an organisation
will have been established be-
fore the next Inspection Day, At
present too much devolves on the
Superintendent and .\he Members
of the Advisory Board.

Now you, the general public,
have seen to-day what the boys
end girls at these Schools are
capable of doing, and you can ren-
der a valuable social service by
seeing that no barrier ig put in the
way of their fitting themselves
back into society when the time
comes. There is much talent
here; let it be used to the full.”

The Government Industrial
Schools are divided into two sec-
tions, boys at Dodds end girls at

@ On Page 8. |

—_—_—-—



No LEE SSIS SPSS SS SO FOSS 9 SOS OOOO SOOO SOOO FF FOF OFF



MAG

SHORTLY

iso available |



STORES

eit a 9 |
| Visitors Day No fleas,

LEASE

LOCPCLELLLLEAOEELALLOEPEEP EE EE OLEATE

EPA LLLP PAPE EE ELLE EE ELLE CE EOE F

We Oe

~~

5

*
%




no tapeworms.

Fawseey

The flea is an intermediate host of the tape-worm, and
to ensure freedom from this troublesome internal parasite,
your dog must be kept pest free.

Kill verminous parasites such as fleas, lice and ticks with
‘Lorexane’ Dusting Powder (containing gamma BHC).
‘Lorexane’ is a safe, pleasantly perfumed powder which will
quickly kill all common skin pests. The effect of a single
dusting lasts for some two weeks.

*Lorexane’

DUSTING POWDER
IN HANDY CONTAINERS

A product of Imperial Chemical (Pharmaceuticals)
Limited :—

A subsidiary company of Imperial Chemical Industries Ltd.-
A. S. Bryden & Sons (Barbados) Ltd., Agents.




FOR SPORTS WEAR

in FLORALS, PT.AIDS, PATSLEYS FANCIES
and PLAIN COLOURS,

FOR DRESS WEAR

THE FAMOUS “ELITE”
A wide range of qualities in Plain Colours
and Striped Designs

From $2.91 to $5.94

From $3.73 to $5.25
“RENOWN” TRIUNISED
in Tan, Blue, Grey and White at $5.25
“DOUBLE TWO” — with Spare Collar
in Tan, Grey, Blue and White at $6.79 and $7.15
“ELITE SPECIAL” in White only
with the Ultra Smart Wide Spread Collar at $5.94





SEA ISLAND COTTON SHIRTS

by “ELITE” and “RENOWN” 5
These Shirts are imported free of duty,
and so represent the BEST VALUE in
SHINTS. to be obtained locally,

Prices : $8.00 and $8.18
in White, Cream, Ecru and Blue







a S
HARRISON S-piai 2664 §
Cf LLCO CE AL OPPPECO PCPLOO oc.
a
Pe
o 2
a” FOR BEST RESULTS =
a” USE ae
an PURINA CHOWS .
oe IN THE CHECKER BOARD BAGS .
oa H. Jason Jones & Co., Ltd—pistibvor,
a oo a
a
a:
APOIO VIDIO O OOO IDIOT TIPO OSS OD < - *2
, GIVE YOUR
; AM MORE

LIFE
WITH

PRELL

EMERALD CLEAR
SHAMPOO

PRELL MAKES THE HAIR RADIANT
AND DANDRUFF-FREE



,
"~. DOO96500."’
OCC OSSSO9SSS9SOH SSS SSS999989959909838&.

OOO 9 599999559095

SSOOSSS SSO











sibiomseeiiteniiedi cietilatatl eens SATURDAY, OCTOBER 27, 1951

PAGE SIX fencer OOO IN aastscrttntncernn ne SATURDAY, OSSIN SSR
rOR

|

{









BY CARL ANDERSON



STOMACH® DISTRESS?

Lute ALb |

Alka-Seltzer hel;



|
|

Alka-Seltzer is so easy to take...

so pleasant-tasting. Just drop one
or two tablets into a glass of water,
wateh it fiaz, then drink it. Not a




|
at
|
i
|

laxative, not habit-forming, you can
take it any time. Let Alka-Seltzer
relieve your acid indigestion.

Have a supply handy. i

How. DO vou | BA [THE nerve oF 2”
“) HTHAT GUY--TRYING

a ent

HONESTLY, 2g


















" I DEMAND TO| | TO KEEP ME
MISTER, IT'S AT LEAST FROM BUYING )
THE MOST EXAMINE (T A WALNUT-
, SHREDDER



Raphaels: Almanac
Ephemeris...........-> 6/-
Almanac only .........2/9
Press Buttons put on to
Bags, Purses etc.—12c. each

e
JOHNSON’S STATIONERY
and
HARDWARE







r 4 it nN _
rapve veo Goat ORT CUT eee ning FORE CARE oe Sas ) SPECIAL offers to all Cash and Credit Customers for Thursday to Saturday only
OF JAIL. ae 0: aS. } ; SNEAD.) (FIND OUT WHO
78 Mg }
ge) RB =

De





USUALLY NOW USUALLY NOW
Pkgs. PEEK FREAN'S PLAIN
BISCUITS 4% 36 + WALLNUTS (per lb) 64 48 |
M\\\\qan Bottles O'KEEFE'S BEER 26 20 Pkgs. T. PAPER 32 26 |
rf Novis \ Tins APRICOT JUICE 40 36 Pkgs. RINSO (large) 58 50 |



JOHNNY HAZARD








D. V. SCOTT & Co. Ltd. Broad Street

ie
D. V. SCOTT & CO.. LTD.
NOTICE °
The Amendments made to the Shop Closing Act which affect the hours
during which deliveries can legally be made has caused us to review our
whole delivery schedule.
We beg to advise our Friends and Customers that as from Ist November the
following will be the position.
“COUNTRY DELIVERIES: In view of the impossibility of completing Coun-
try Deliveries within the hours permitted, we are compelled with the utmost
regret to discontinue all Country Deliveries,
LOCAL DELIVERIES: All Orders received by 11 a.m. will be delivered the
ah nica same day. ; ;
HELLO-GROGAN-GIT DUGAN- AT Ge Sere ik All Orders received after 11 a.m. will be delivered the following day.
COSTUMER ON'T GIT iM JA, hfe, Please note that any goods required for delivery on Thursday (Half Day)
a pia , must be placed the day before. Orders placed on Thursday will be de-
WIFE TO SBE ME INGOOD | |) Ii oR om i so) livered on Friday.
the, SONY wi oN Oe nua , SERVICE CHARGE: In view of the reduced Service which we are now com-
pelled to offer we will be discontinuing the service Charge recently
imposed.
BRANCHES: Any customer having an authorised charge Ac is at liberty to
charge goods at our Branches in Tweedside Road or in Speightstown.







THE LOVELIEST
LOT IN TOWN

JUSTIFICATION FOR YOUR KILLING “THE
GREAT YOU" BUTE yOu KILL “8,
(T WiLL BE JUST SENSELESS,
} QOLO-BLOCCEO MURDER! you'LL
BEA



DECORATIONS
ADVOCATE STATIONERY













9

-

SATURDAY, OCTOBER

CLASSIFIED ADS.

eo



7, 1951

TELEPHONE 2508.







The charge for announcements of
Births, Marriages, Deaths, Acknow!l-
edagements, and ‘n Memoriam notices is

$1 30 on week-day and $1.80 on Sundays
for any number 6! words up to 50,

3 cents per word on week-days and!
4 cents per word en Sundays for each
additienal werd,

—_—_—_—_

DIED

GARNES—Etheline as
Rosalind Holder), of
Harold and Colin’ Moore, mother-in-
law of Fev. Forde Moore. Funeral
will leave her daughter's residence,
Hunte ‘Street, St. Michael, at 4.30 p.m,
to-day for the Westbury Cemvtery

Eloise Moore (daughter)

(better known

THANKS

HOWELL: We the undersigned desire
to thank those who sent wreaths,
cards, or in any way expressed sym-
pathy with us in our recent bereave-
ment occasioned by the death of our
Mother Aleatha Howell

H. Howell, E. Howell, S. Roach, C.

Murray. 27.10.51—1n















FOR RENT
HOUSES

TO SUB-LET
ASHTON-ON-SEA, Maxwells, for
November Dial 8473 27,10. 51—4n

“GRACELYN”,. Upper Dayrells Road,
Phone 3317. 27.10.51—2n

LL

IN-AN-OUT, Gibbs Beach, St. Peter.
Fiom Ist Nov. Small modern bungalow
on the beach. Suitable for couple. Fully
furnished with frig. large garage and
servants’ room. Apply to Wesley Bayley,
High St. Phone 2818 23.10. 51—3n







RIPLEY-on-Sea, Maxwell Coast, full
furnished, two bedrooms, telephone and
refrigerator. For month of November
and from January on. Dial 2250

‘THE CAMP—On the Sea, St. Lawrence.
Fully furntshed Dial 8357.

14 7 S$1.—t fn.

WANTED

HELP

TEACHER—For “Naparima College”
Wanted at the beginning of the school
year, January 1952, University graduate
master qualified to teach French up to
and including Higher School Certificate
arode Monthly Salary—$200—10—250
with maximum of 275 for graduate with
High School Teacher's Dipioma. Starting
salary determined by teaching experience,
Apply with references, Principal, Napar-
ima College, San. Fernando, Trinidad

25.10.51—6n









MISCELLANEOUS

MACHINES—-Old Sewing Machines out
of order. Apply V. Vaughn Fairchild
St. or King's St.



27 .10,.51—2n

WANTED TO BUY
CABIN TRUNK ~—- In good condition,
Phone 2032. 25.10. 51—3n

WANTED TO RENT

Seaside House on the Crane Coast for
the month of November. Ring 4893, or
Ring 3113, Tan Gale. 21.10.51—t-f.n,

PERSONAL

The public are hereby warned against
sving credit to my wife, VERA
FLVIRA WHITE (nee VERA ELVIRA
BOVELI.) as I do not hold mvself re-
spowible for her or anyone else con-
trecting any debt or debts in my name
unless by a written order signed by me,

WHITE,













SIMEON N.
Hillaby,
St. Andrew.
27.10.51-—2n
NOTICE

This serves to notify the general pub-
lic that I do not hold myself responsible
for any debt or debts contracted by any-
one in my name without a written order
signed by me.

MARIA CARLOTA GONSALVBS,
“Brundish”
Blue Waters Terrace,
Phone 8589,
26.10. 51—3n

ANNOUNCEMENTS

To meet numerous requests of our
customers, we have opened a_ section
for custom made shirts, pyjamas, pants,
shorts, ladies slacks, boys clothing etc.
Having at our disposal the facilities of a
modern factory we are able to offer
prompt services at exceptionally reason-
able prices.







Reliance Shirt Factory, Shirt Depot.
Palmetto Street. Phone 4764.
10.10,51—19n.



PUBLIC SALES

Ten cents per agate line sm week-daut
and 12 cents per agate line on Sundays,
minimum, charge $1.50 on week-days
and $1,80 on Sundaua

REAL ESTATE

LAND—Ten Acres of Land situated
ehove Pegwell, Christ Church. Dial 5113
after 4 p.m, Douglas. 27.10. 51—3n

|



jHED — Going cheap one garage shed
24 ft x 10 ft. Comprised of 338 sq. ft.
Everite sheets, 95 feet 2” x 4” Fir,
72 feet spruce Sit and 10 ft. Wallaba posts
Also 18—5 ft. Wallaba posts suitable for
cow stalls

Vv. W. CLARKE,
Ivy Road.
27.10.51—2n

POPP FO OSPPOS








PARADISE BEACH CLUB

Notice To Members



In accordance with Rule
34 the Club will be closed to
members from 8 p.m. on
Saturday, 27th October,

19.10.51.--9n.

POSSESS LOOM





| FOR SALE

ins | og Minimum

charge week 72 cents and
cents Su"days % words — over % their taxes are asked to do so as proceed- Sch.

PUBLIC NoTICES Harbour Lo
“Senda IN CARLISLE BAY

Ten cents per agate tine on week-days
(md 12 cents per agate lina on

BARBADOS seems orrcnrttimeesattarte, HARADOS” ADVOCATS



0s

——e

GOVERNMENT NOTICES



metnirn harg : 2 ae a “a
Mihai: - Sch.. Zita Wonita, Sch. Henry 2s APPLICATIONS are invited for a post of Senior’ Assistant Master
| Wallace, Sch. W L. Eunicia. Sch. Lady| at the Boys’ Grammar School in St. Kitts, Celony of the Leeward
I Neeleen. Sch. Cyril ‘Sch 2
NOTICE [alate & Gosgiion, dem Stee agrees The post is pensionable. the appointment will be on proba-
Sch. Unit s 70 years, wi : fiediiiechs setictarihry medi~
All persons’ who have not yet paid} mek ot ao ; Sch. Providense | ton for two years, will be subject to the passing of a satisfactory medi

cee 3 cents a word week—4 cente a| '* for cone eeieete being taken

word on Sundays:
AUTOMOTIVE

CAR—One (1) Model A. Ford Car.
Engine in perfect running order. Appby
F. A. GULL Vaucluse Pita., St. Thomas.
, 26.10. 51—-3n

~CAR—1951 Citroen. Almost new —
3,000 miles Owner leaving the island.
Phone—2022. 14.10.51—t, f.n

CARS: Two Hilman Saloons 1961
models very little used and condition
like new A Hillman Saloon 1950 in
perfect condition. A Hillman Estate Car
(Station Wagon done only 8,000 odd miles
excellent condition, Austin A-70 Saloon
A-1 condi Austin A-40 Saloon under
10,000 miles, A-1 condition Morris Minor
Saloon perfect condition. Singer rot
model, repainted and in nice order.

& Co., Ltd. 25.10.51, Stal

Standard Vanguard,
Morris Oxford

BSA. 0 HP

Singer 9 h.p. Roadster.
$M1500 Singer Saloon
Hudson 1947 Model.
For siasateiers inquire REDMAN &
TAYLOR'S GARAGE LTD.

27.10.51—3n

SUE ns

” UORRY—One Federal lorry in working
order. Price $500.00. Apply Manager
Drax Hall. 27.10.51—Tn

——————
MOTOR TRUCK: Bedford Truck 1947
Model in good order. Can be seen at
Layne’s Garage, Tweedside Road.
24.10.51—2n
etapa
STATION WAGGON: Excellent buy
Austin Station Waggon (Panel) 3 months
use. Practically new. Easy payment, On
@isplay at Austin Agency (Eckstein Bros)
Adapted for 9 passengers.
27.10.51—2n

ELECTRICAL

REFRIGERATOR—One 5 Cubit ft
Westernhouse Refrigerator in good work-
ing ordur. Apply P. D. Maynard,
Porters Factory, St. James. Dial 2319.

27.10. 51—6n

FURNITURE

FURNITURE; One dining room Table
for 6 persons, one Side Board. Both
Mahogany, nearly new. Telephone 4718.

27,10,.51—-3n

FILING CABINETS: Safe Cabinets
with combination 3 ft. by 6 ft. $150.00
Not forgetting a good stock of New Fil-





















ing Cabinets, Desks, ete. At Ralph
Reards, Lower Bay Street.
25.10.51—3n
MECHANICAL

TYPEWRITERS: Royal as new 147
Carriage. $260.00. Also L. C. Smith in
good working order $60.00. At Ralph
Beards, Lower Bay Street.

25.10.51—3n

MISCELLANEOUS __

ARSENATE OF LEAD for dusting food
crops. Ring 4657 B'dos Co-op. Cotton
Factory Ltd. 26.10.51-—3n

BICYCLE ACCESSORIES Pedal
Rubbers at 36c. set, Handle Grips at 28.
and 32c. per pair, Brake Shoes and
Biocks at 28c. per pr. LAURIE DASH &
Co. Dial 5061 Tudor Street.

23.10.51—3n

COTTON SEERSUCKER—In ten beau-
tiful designs 36” wide usual price $1.12
reduced for one week only to $1.05 per
yard at KIRPALANI 52 Swan Street.

27.10.51—1n

CAL-C-TOS >. The Dietory Sippler..e t,
comans all tac pers ss Vu mins Wir
minerals in a pleasent, paiatable torm,
children will like it. $1.50 tin.

26, 10.51—3n
—_—

DIARIES: B'dos Fngagement Diaries,
Just in time for Xmas. The keal Gift for
friends overseas or office executice, 2/-
each KNIGHTS Ltd. 26.10.51—3n

FRY PANS— 8”, 9//, 10/7 and 12” steel
Fry Pans. Laurie Dash & Co.,Dial 5061,
Tudor Street, 23.10.51—3n.

INVALID WHEEL CHAIRS: Two In-
valid Wheel Chairs, one adjustable. Can
be seen any day at Fogarty’s Store.

26.10,51—3n

limited
quantity at 45c, per lb. Enquire Auto
Tire Company, Trafalgar Street. Phone
2696 . 23.10.51—t.f.n.
——

O.K. COFFEE—Fresh shipment of this
favoured brand has just been received in
1 lb and % Ib. packages, and is now
in the hands of your grocer

26.10.51—2n
SMALL SHIPMENT BUT LARGE
VARIETY

Children's Peter's Playballs. Various
colours and sizes to suit all ages. Ideal
as Xmas or Birthday presents. Select
yours early at Manning & Co. Ltd.,
Corner Store. K. J. HAMEL-SMITH —
DISTRIBUTORS. 24.10.51—2n

SILK. SPUN LINEN—Heavy Quality in
Fink, Grey, Beige, Gold and White 36”
wide at $1.64 per yard. Visit KIRPAL-
ANI 52 Swan Street. 27.10.51—In

SEA MOSS-—-in 100 Ibs bags. Those
interested can communicate with Ver-
onica Jn Baptiste, Choiseul, St. Lucia,
B.W.t. 27.10. 51—2n,

SADDLE — One Riding saddle in per-
feet condition. Apply P. D. Maynard,
Porters Faetory, St. James. Dial 2319,

27.10.51—6n































NAELS—Galvanized nails a











TOYS: Large selection of Toys in-
cluding Bicycles for 2 years old, Tri-
eyeles for 5 years old, and Bicycles for
8 years old. Not forgetting XMAS
Trees at $6.00. Call: Ralph Beard, Lower
Bay Street. 25.10.51—3n

PUBLIC OFFICIAL SALE

(The Provost Marshal's Act 1904,
(14—G) 830).

On Tuesday the 6th day of November
1951 at the hour of 2 o'clock in the after-
noon will be sold at my office to the
highest bidder for any sum not under
the appraissd valuc—

Ali that certain piece of Lavd contain-



ing by estimation 1 Acre, 1 rood, 25.
9/10 Perches or ther-abou.; situate
at Gall Hill in’ the Parish of Christ

Church butting and bounding on lands
formerly or late of T. Chase, and lands
now or late of F. Chase, on lands former-
iy of C. Gall but now or late of one Mrs
Ashby on a private roadway and on the
Public Road, together with the messuage
or Dwelling” eae Buildings, &c., ap-
raised as follows:—
PiThe entire pao appraised to TEN
THOUSAND TH HUNDRED AND
THIRTY-THREE ADOLLARS ($10,333.00)
Attached from Bismark D. Drayton for

‘| and towards satisfaction, &c.

BEACH LAND

ST. JAMES COAST

(Neer Four Winds)

TWO ACRES of most
attractive beach land
now available 20c. per
sq. foot — may be divid-

ed into half acre lots.

MARTIN GRIFFITH,

Four Winds.
27.10,51.—2n.



N.B.—26%
of purchase.

Derosit to be paid on day

T. T. HEADLEY,
Provost Marshal.
Provost Marshal's Office,
19th October, 1951.
N.B.—To be advertised on the follow-
ing dates:— 26%, 27th October, 3rd

nerere 26.10.51—3n

| WANTED TO BUY

STAMPS STAMPS

All Kind of STAMPS
at the
CARIBBEAN STAMP
SOCIETY
No, 10, Swan Street.
26.10.51—4n.














NEW SHIPMENT—

GAS COOKERS

JUST ARRIVED !

ALL SOLD

Call and see them at your Gas

Showroom, Bay Street, and to
avoid disappointment BOOK your
i from a future



TODAY



c
Ag.

E GRANNUM,
Parochial Treasure:

St Michael
27.10. 51—2n



NUTICE
PARISH OF ST. JOSEPH
Tenders will be received by the un-
dersigned up to 15th November 1951 for
the wurchase of two (2) buildings at the

Community Centre, Ba * known
as “The Rest House" and former
“Railway Station,” respectively, to be

removed as soon as vacated.
Inspection on application to Mr. Good-
ar 2 premises.
-B.—The Social Committee doe? not
bind itself to accept the highest or any

tender,
J. MERTON MeCARTY,
Secretary, Social Committee,
St. Josepn.
27. 1v.51—3n





NOTICE
Re Estate of
MILTON KING

deceased
NOTICE IS HEREBY GIVEN that al!
persons having any debt or claim
against the estate of MILTON KING
ee a died at Ss in the
Province @ Cape of Good Hope in
the Dominion of South

indebtedness without delay.
Dated this 5th of October 1951. }
CLARINE KING,
Qualified Administratrix. of the
Estate of Milton King deceased.
6.10. 51—4n. |

GON ERNMENT NOTICE |

POST OF FISHERY OFFICER, “
GRENADA.

Applications are invited for the
post of Fishery Officer, Depart-
ment of Agriculture, Grenada.

The post carries an initial sal-
ary of $1,512 per annum in the
scale $1,512.72 $1,728 plus] ¢
Cost of Living Allowance at the
rate of 20% of salary and Travell-
ing Allowance of $440 per annurn
provided a motor cycle is kept.

Applicants should have some
knowledge of, and, enthusiasm
for the sea, and a good approach
to fishermen. Previous business
or commercial experience would
be an added advantage.

The duties of the Officer would
include general welfare work
among fishermen; the collection
of statistics at the recognised
fishing centres and markets and
their compilation; the dissemina-
tion of information among fisher-
men; the execution of small ad
hoc investigations; upkeep and
operation of Government owned
boats and gear,

The appointment is for 4 years
in the fist instance and the post
48S non-pensionable. Applicants
should state age and_ educational
qualifications,

All applications should be ad-
dressed to the Director of Agri-
culture, nt. of Agricul-
ture, St. George's, Grenada, and
should reach him not latér than
15th November, 1951.

20.10.51—3n,
——____
DEPARTMENT OF EDUCATION

APPLICATIONS are invited sor
the post of HEADMIS'RESS of
St. Leonara’s Scnovi tor Girls,
Richmond Gap. ‘This scnool will
previde free education at the
secondary stage for 735 girls
between the ages of 11 and 14.
Preference will be given to appli-
cants who are Graduates of a
University wi.hin the British
Commonwealth and who have at
least 10 years’ teaching experi-
ence,

The salary will be on the scales
for a Grade IV Headmistress in
the Elementary Teaching Service
ie, for a graduate with Ist or 2nd
Class Honours, $2,138,40x9%.
20-3,110. 40x162- 3,758 40. For a
Graduate, who has not achieved
Ist or 2nd Class Honours the scale
is:— $1,911. 60x81-2,397. 60x97.
20-3,175 .20. An annual sum of
$216 is also payable to a Univer-
sity Graduate who holds a recog-
nised Teaching Certificate or
Diploma.

The post is pensionable in ac-
cordance with the provisions of
the Barbados Pensiong Act 1947
(1947-20).

Applications giving full particu-
lars of qualifications and experi-
ence should be sent ¢o the Direc-
tor of Education, The Garrison,
Barbados by 30th November, 1951.
23rd October, 1951.

REMEMBRANCE SUNDAY

His Majesty the King has ap-
proved of Remembrance Day be-
ing observed on Sunday, the
11:4 of November.

As in previous years the Church
authorities are being invited to
hold special services throughout
the Island at which the two min-
utes silence can be observed at
11 am.

The special service at St. Mi-
chael's Cathedral, which will be
attended by His Excellency the
Governor, will begin at 10.30
a.m., and will finish at approxi-
mately 11.10 am. At the end of
the service, if the weather per-





|



; Macoris,
Bernadotte, s.s. Cunene, s_s Mormacmar,
Rio de la Plata, s.s.

| Corsair, 8.5

Jones; MV
Moneka

c

L.

M Tannis,

SEAWELL

ARRIVALS

M.V. Duerwood. % tons net,

Mulzac, from St. Lucia.
DEPARTURES

Schooner Lindsyd II, 36 tons net. Capt.

Barnes, for fishing banks

S.S. Alcoa Pilgrim, 3,931

Capt.

BY BWHLA.

ON THURSDAY
From TRINIDAD:

W. Bennett, A. Bryden, C. Rivera, P
B. Atherly,
Themas, E. Young. R, Sharpe, W. Hul-

Powell,

land, R, Bumstead
From MARTINIQUE:

Paul Parfait.

J. Barcelo,

From PUERTO RICO;

Frenk Morgan, Elizabeth Ann reve. |
Levo, Doris Gertrude Levo, {
Herbert Allan, David Walter

John E
Walter
Allan.
ON
From TRINIDAD:

A. Taylor, S. Tarior, A. Taylor, E.

Deboussay, D. Bell.

IDAY



In Touch With Barbados
Coast Station

Cable end Wiretess
vise that they can now communicate
with the following ships through their

tw.l.) Ltd. ad

Barbados Coast Station:—

8.S. Alcoa Pilgrim,

Alcoa, Polaris, s.s.

8.8, Argentina, s.
Carnaro, s.s. Ca
na Aurora, ss
rmuda, s.$

Penama, ss

ss. Bera, s.s,|UP to-noon on 31st October, 1951, for the supply of Barbados “tar | '
Brattingsborg, s.s.|sand", a bituminous sand from the Scotland area consisting of silic
Michael, s.¢ Folke

8
stor,
Ar

Alcoa
Aleoa Pointer, 8.5.
Rodas, s.s

$.5, Laguna, s.s.
gual, 8.8. Queen o:
Cavalier, s.s

Sea Lender, s.s

Delaires; s.s. Bardal, s,s Dageid R.F\A

Dewdale, s.s
Marsano, s.s
Golfito, 5.8

Esso Belgium,
Beau,
ae Del Macifice.

5.58.

8.8. Rescue, s.s.



RATES OF EXCHANGE

OCTOBER 26, 1951



. Sch. Belqueen,

Lydia Adina S., Sch. Molly N.

M.V.

Capt

tons net,
Sreaasee, for St. Vincent.

c.

Alcoa

Ttalo

dal examination and will date from Ist January, 1952
2. The School is a Government institution arid the following
salary scales are applicable to male Secondary School Teachers in the
Leeward Islands.
Assistants with a degree
and Teachers’ diploma
Assistants with a degree only
efficiency bar ....... ,
A Temporary cost of living "allowance of £480 per annum is also
payable, A Salaries Commission is at present reviewing salaries in
the Leeward Islands.
3. Applicants should possess a degree of a University within
the British Commonwealth and the successful candidate will be re-
quired to teach Latin to the standard of the Higher School Certificate

$1,440-—$120-—-$1,680
$120 to $2,040

and skill at games should be stated in the application as the a
j will be required to take charge of school games and athletics.
4. Applications stating age. teaching experience, marital status |
etc. should be submitted to the Administrator St. Kitts, Nevis, Anguilla
not later than 30th November, 1951.
At least two testimonials and a photograph should also be sub-
mitted.

ppointee

27

10,51—-2n

INVITATION TO TENDER
Department of Highways and Transport

Sealed Tenders will be received at the Colonial Secretary’s



sand impregnated with a viscous bituminous oil referred to locally as

; 1951,

the Department of Highways and Transport.

the Colonial Secretary's office on payment of a deposit
($5.00), After a contract has been entered into, those persons who |
may Have submitted bona fide tenders will have their deposits refund-

when so called upon shall have the deposits made by them refunded,



Mary M. Lewis will be closed at the
General Post Office as under:—

Parcel

1951.
Mails

for

Mail and Registered Mail
8 am. on the 29th October 1951. Ordin-
ary Mait at 9 a.m, on the 29th October

Grenada
Cc. L. M. Tannis will be closed at the

by the

General Post Office as under:—

Parcel Mail

ber 1951.



and Registered Mail
9 am. on the 27th October 1951. Ordin-
ary Mail at 9.30 a.m. on the 27th Octo-







CHRISTIAN SCIENCE

First Church
Bridgetown,

Sundays 11 a.m.

Healing

SUNDAY, OCTOBER 21, 1951
Subject of Lesson-Sermon;
MENT

OF ATONE:
Golden Text:

Upper



and 7 p.m,
Wednesdays 8 p.m. A _ Service which
includes Testimonies of Christian Science

H Corinthians 5:17. h
mon be in Christ, he is a new creature:
old things are passed away; behold, ail

Christ,

Selentist,
Bay Street,

things are become new.

The following Citations are
the Lesson-Sermon; The Bi



shewed thee, O man, what is -good;.

Science and Health with key to
Mary Baker Eddy.
The scientific unity which exists between
God and man must be wro
and God's wil

Scriptures, by

life-practice,
universally done

Quick!—put a few as
o Vicks Va-tro-nol up
each nostril. Irritation is

thed, your nose“‘opens
up” and ze breathe

in! vere
epee. ped

freely oe fae
wast

Micah 6.8

Page 202.












at

M/V

at











eluded in



the

it. out in
must be

\

DEPARTMENT OF EDUCATION
BARBADOS EVENING INSTITUTE
Commercial Classes

(a) Applications will now be considered for entry to a beginners’
Shorthand-Typing course, to be held at Combermere School, |
commencing in January 1952.

(b) There is a limited number of vacancies for the Senior Short-
hand-Typing course. Applications will only be considered
from those who hold a Pitman's Theory Certificate or its
equivalent in Shorthand, and an L.C.C. Elementary Certifi-
cate or its equivalent in Typewriting.

Two lessons a week in Shorthand, two in Typewriting, and
: one in English, each of one hour's duration will be given
between the hours of 5 p.m. and 7 p.m. on Tuesdays, Wednes-
days and Thursdays. Students may take all three subjects,
but those who take Shorthand will be expected to take type-
writing and vice versa,

Applicants must be over 15 years ‘of age on Ist Januar. y, 1962.
As a guarantee that the minimum educational standard has
been reached, applicants for the beginners’ class who do not
hold a School Certificate or equivalent qualification must
supply a certificate from the Head of a School siating
that the school course up to the age of 14 -+ has been satis-
factorily completed. Preference for admission will in general |
be governed by the standard of attainment in English, to be |
determined by a test. |
A fee of $5.00 per item payable during the first week of the | ,
term covers all the subjects. 80% of the fees paid will be
refunded at the end of a session to all students who have,
in the opinion of the Principal, Dean and Lecturers, worked
eotisfactorily and attended regularly and punctually.

(g) Students will be required to supply their own stationery and

text books as required by the Lecturers.

(h) Applicants must obtain from the office of the Department of |
Education application forms, which must be filled in and tor- |
warded to the Dean of Commercial Studies, the Barbados |
Evening Institute at the office of the Department not later
than Saturday, 24th November.
the form whether they are applying for the beginners’ or the
Senior course,
vember will be considered.

Department of Education,

28rd October, 1951,

(dy
(e)

(f)

27.10.51. ~In



VACANT POST OF MATRON, MATERNITY HOS

BARBADOS, B.W.1.

Applications are invited for the post of Matron, Materni Hospital
Barbados, B.W.1. which will becomes vacant on Mareh 7th, 1952.
The post is on Agreement for three years in the first instance
and is renewable,
Applicants for the post should possess the following qualifications
‘ and experience;—
(a) State registration of nurses in the United Kingdom.
(b) Certificate of the Central Midwives [oard of England anc
Wales.
(c) Three to five years experience in practical midwifery, pre-
ferably in an acceptable institution,
(d) Some administrative experience required, not necessarily ir
a purely administrative post.
The salary attached to the post is at the rate of $2,160 per annurr
; with a deduction of 5% for rent of furnished quarters, an allowance

Prva,

\ Diuder Urinary System | towerds rations of 60 cents per day is payable, uniforms are supplicc
Busia yet is Senolutely harmless. to and electric light, telephone and water rites are frec.
: pumarid of nealth-destroying, poison Passages (not exceeding $1,440 W.1I.) are provided on appoint-
“ous acids witt» which your system has ment and on completion of Agreement in accordance with conditions
; oe case ond reinvigorates the kidneys, | Câ„¢mbodied in the Form of Agreement.
"protects from the ravages of see Government contributes to the Superannuation Scheme for Nurses
py gen Fell The Maternity Hospital is one of twenty beds with a materna
) Praized by Doctors, Chemists, and weltare clinic attached, It is primarily a teaching Hospital for student:
» One-time Sufferers Sua ‘> nd twenty are trained annually. It is served by a Visiting Obstetri-
Dyson 6 spprores 7 Deere Sorers toe | Clan, three groduate nurse-midwives and the usual subordinate staff

C, writes. “I on '

The Matron is responsible to the Director of Medical Services fo»

10 ‘years old. and have veered i | overall administration of the Hospital and the training of th«



thanks to Cystex I am much better
for years.” Mr. P. D.
wonders Cystex has worked with me seem ale

The

student midwives,
Applications should be addressed to the Colonial Secre tary, Bar-



1 dor theo
mite, ie “Excellency “ena perty U they were 1a box bados, B.W.I. so as to reach his office not later than De~: her at we
will walk to the War Memorial, Guoronteed to Put You Right =| eo
where His Excellency will lay a Money Bock
wreath. There will be no cere- , Get Oyster from your che
mony. today Give | Warthorgsh tat Applications for Admission to Universities and Colle zes in the
sallons are being ivited to make ga Fee ne enone
arrangements for ex- weevien gna meee oe oe be lies { Owing to the limited accommodation at Universities and College
> petite gnd 3 soees at on peetane ht no the eV }in the United Kingdom resulting from the large number of applica
pe ie a ra er packas ; tions for admission, the Director of Colonial Scholars is « ideavourin;
members of the public are invited KID fon EY!!
to attend their usual places of eee BLADDER to secure a quota for Colonial Students in each faci ulty in every Uni-
worship. 27. 10 5 : the SVARANTEED R Remedy RHEUMATIS versity and College throughout the British Isles. It must be realised
—l1n, '



BARBADOS AUTOMOBILE ASSOCIATION

=?

Members are reminded that when taking out new
car INSURANCE POLICIES or renewing them at
J. B. LESLIE & CO., 10% reduction on premiums

will be given if membership cards are produced.

STS





therefore, that only those who are strongly recommended and have
| first class qualifications for entry can be considered for sdission,
| 2. The British Council will be responsible for making arrange
ments for meeting students and for securing suitable accommodatior
| for them.
| 8. Students are advised that it is most undesirable for them t
} proceed to the United Kingdom unannounced and unsponsored in th«
\{hope of obtaining admission to Universities and Colleges, as ever
| tutorial colleges and polytechnics are overcrowded and it is ve ry diffi-
| cult to gain admission to them without due notice in the poner form
4. Forms of application for admission to Universities and~Col-
leges in the United Kingdom, to be completed ate
be obtained from the Secretary, Student Advisory Committee,
Office of the Director of Medical Services, Wharf, Brid
must be returned to him not later than Wednesday, 31st

in auhalusiic mas



1
{
{
(

“tar sand", for a period of five (5) months from the Ist arene |
2. Samples of “tar sand” of the quality required may be seen at|

|
3. Tenders are to be made on forms which can be obtained at |
of |

ed; but no person or\persons who may refuse to enter into a contract |

CANADA
_. Cneluding Newfoundland) and these shall be forfeited and paid into the Treasury.
| CHAN BF. Seeoeas 08 eankers ast: 4. The prices tendered must be based on the payment of wages
ta Sight Drafts 62.2% pr. |at current standard rates in the trade, and shall be the flat rate per
‘ ae Surreniy 61% pr. !cubic yard at which the tenderer would contract to supply “tar sand”
Coupons 60.3% pr. |on spot anywhere within the Parishes of St. Andrew and St, Joseph.
OCTO"FR 3, 1951 5. Tenders are to be addressed to the Colonial Secretary and
aan: CANADA marked “Tender for the supply of Tar Sand to the Department of |
V + pr. Cheques on
Bankers ‘62. 5/10" pr. | Highways and Transport.”
Oe 62.35% pr 6. The Contractor will be required to give security in a personal | |
Sight Drafts 622/10% pr.| bond with two (2) approved sureties in the sum of fifty (50) dollars
Se ee, eim pr, _ {for the due performance of his Contract. F
Coupons 60 340% pr j.ewee?. The Government does not bind itself to accept the lowest or
any tender, and only tenders submitt*1 on the prescribed form will |
MAIL NOTICES be considered. 21.10.51,—2n
Mails for Br. Guiana by the Sch.

Applicants must state on |

No applications received after the 24th No- |

| BARBADOS.

IN THE COURT OF CHANCERY

i pursuance of the Chancery

PAGE SEVEN.

a ee

Act 1906, I do hereby give notice to all persona-

wving or claiming any estate right or interest to any Hien or encumbrancés in or,

affecting the property hereinafter mentioned

the property

of the defendant) to bring:

efore me an account of their claims with their witnesses documents and voucherg

to be examined by me on any Tuesday or Friday between the hours of 12 neon and
t o'clock In the afternoon at the Registration Office, Public Buildings, Bridgetown,.
before the 2ist day of November, 1951, in order that such claims may De
reported’ on and ranked according to the nature and priority thereof Ln erg
otherwise such persons will be precluded from the benefits of any decree and

ceprived of all claims on or against the said property
HENRY WHITE

Plaintiff: Sere

Defendant: CLARENC
PROPERTY: ALL THAT certain piece cr
(formerly part of the land

be,

BELFIELD LAYNE
parcel of land situate at Bath Village

Maxwelis plantation) situate in the

parish of Christ Church cond island abovesaid containing by ad-
measurement twenty-six perches or thereabouts (inclusive of =e ‘
perches in roadway) abutting and bounding on lands formerly of :
Bertina Miller but now of F. Clarke, orm lands formerly of Maxwells

Plantation but now of A. B. Skin
of Joshua Bourne but now of Graeme Hall Co. and qn nthe ene
road or however else the se et

messuage or dwelling house calle.
and pulidings both freehold and chattel on the said land eer and
| built standing ard being with the appurtengnces.

| Bala

filed; August 1961

examination. A knowledge of Spanish would be regarded as an asset

SHIPPING



ner and S. Kingh on lands formerly

abut and bound

“Esme” and ot! the erections

H. WILLIAMS,
Registrar-in-Chancery.



NOTICES _



MONTREAL, AUSTHaL1A, NEW
ZEALAND LINE, LIMITED
(M.A.N Z. Line)

8.8. "POrt ADELAIDE” ts scheduled
to sail from Hobart September 25th,
Melbourne October 4th, Sydney October
| oth, Gladstone October 16th, Port Aima
| “ctober 20th, Brisbane October 27th,
rriving at Trinidad about November
ist and Barbados November th.
| In addition to general cargo this

$ Office | | veata has ample space for chilled and

rel frozen cargo,
" Cargo accepted on through Bills of

{t ding for transhipment at Trinidad to
7 Vitis Leeward and Windward

| Pyitish Guiana,

Islands.



Trinidad,
B.W.I.





.

a NEW

A STEAMER sails 12th October-
A STEAMER salle 2nd November--<







NEW ORL
A STEAMER 10th October—

A STBAMER

sails



.



ed

YORK SERVICE
errives B'dos
rrives B’'dos 13th November, 1951.

'S SERVICE

arrivea B'dos
sails 24th October—pirives B'dos
A STEAMER sails 7th November--urrives B'dos 22nd November, 1951,

A eo eee ten tt tt CT CE,

The M/V “C. L. M, “‘TANNIS”
will aceept Cargo and Passengers

ij

for Grenada, sailing Thursday, <>

25th inst ; =
The M/V “DAERWOOD" will accept Cargo and Passengers for

St. Lucia, Grenada and Aruba, .

and Passengers only for St. i com

Vincent, sailing Tuesday, ee

ins ‘ ta
The M/V “™ CA ae will” —_

aceept Cargo and Passengers” for”

Dominica. Antigua, Montserrat,

Nevis and St. Kitts, saling-

Friday, 2nd November 1951 =—"~

BWI. SCHOONER OWNERS
ASSOCIATION (INC. [°*"——

Consignee, Telephone No, 4047

}

tht mata

PLE PPPOE



Sieamship Co.

One.





2rd October, 1951,



1951,
1951.

25th October,
8th November,

CANADIAN SERVICE

JUTHROUND





Salle Sails Arrives
| Name-ot Shir Montreal Halifax Barbados |
“ALCOA POINTER" Sept. 28th Cet, Ist Oct. 12th
$ “ALCOA PILGRIM” Met. 1th Oct. 15th Oct. 2th
$s ‘ALCOA PEGASUS Oct. 26th Oct, 29th Novr, 8th
—_——
NORTHBOUND
§. “ALCOA PLANTER" Due Barbados October 15th, Sails
for St. Lawrence River Ports

ROBERT THOM LTD, — NEW YORK AND GULF »sERVICE.

\ APPLY:—DA COSTA & co.





xe

PLP PEE

with

A otatt pts SOOO
SOP SEES ELE EE ELL IIS FOO BSS

4, <
SOSPPSSS SSO COS POPP PO POSES

ASK TO





LTD —CANADIAN SERVOS. “7;







PCPA SCOPES GCOS SPE SSS PSY

COCO

THE LATEST

STOVES

FIBRE GLASS WICK
EXTRA HOT BLUE FLAME
NO PARTS TO BREAK OR SPOIL

ee oe



'gy HARRISON LINER

OUTWARD FROM THE UNITED KINGDOM









Vessel From Leaves Plans =
S.S. “STATESMAN” .. London 15th Oot, 30th eas
5.8. “STUDENT” _ ,.., au« Liverpool 27th Nov,
SS. “LINARIA’ . London 3ist i OV. r °
5.8. “ADVISER” _ Liverpool 10th Nov. , =
SS. TRA . Glastow & . - -
} Liverpool Sth Nov. 29th NoveSor-5
HOMEWARD FOR THE UNITED KINGDOM
Closes in’
Vessel For Barbados
| 3.8, “SCHOLAR”... ., Lf 1 27th Oct.
SS. “TRIBESMAN” . London “4th Novi ~~
For further Information apply to .. .
DA COSTA & sa oe eee
\ 99999999049
:
, ~
2 The T.S.S. GOLFITO will be arriving from South: J
| ampton on Wednesday, 31st October, at 8 a.m. and-~,
% will be sailing at 6 p.m. the same afternoon for
$ Trinidad,
‘ There is ample first clags Accommodation available
* for Trinidad, and also for Southampton on the
*%s- 9th November.
%
x Apply :
iis
) WILKINSON & HAYNES & Co., Ltd.
1%,
* Agents
‘,
2
% Phone 4230. :
‘,

cesses
Green ARROW

IN

SEE

GREEN ARROW
STOVES

AT

x

% The B’dos Co-operative Cotton Factory Ltd.—2039

>

$ Manning & Co. Ltd. Corner Store.—4283

5
Is Plantations Ltd.—4400

~
ie Ward & Spencer Lid.-—2223 S
$ x
inal ® Laurie Dash & Co. %
Ye PLL LLL LPS FS PO SS SPSS SPSS PSPS oP SPP PSPSPS SSS u



eT OOOO oe OE —V—_ ETC ll



PAGE EIGHT BARBADOS ADVOCATE

W.I. Struggle For Runs At Newcastle

eo

1951

SATURDAY, OCTOBER 27,





ern ee—wererinnneen ears

AND RAMADHIN 2—36

(From HAROLD oe.
SYDNEY, Oct. 27.

Govt. Industrial Schools

Lawns were. freshly cut,



CRYPTOQUOTE NO. 108

XZCB, DZZ, CLQ DCP LNGXOLH
OR PNI TNIQ WOAZ OL



From. F ag VZCMZ HNZS
Colle e 6-4. e m &. ee * Last Crypt: He who decides has- | r | 4 | R s
Si tr had been trimmed and the tily, will soon repent of his
ummervale, both formerly sugar grounds and narrow roadways decision ~-Publits Syres

A crowd of over seven hundred] P/@ntations, They are. situated. in hel O08 PS

snrough the school were all swept






























< ic| the heart of St, Philip, x i J. A. CORBIN & SONS
JOHN GODDARD and Roy Marshall to-day saved the Pong ana = a * r ean. Tear the buildings ||) ;
Teer oe PPers| = Wel Kapt La there was a faint smell of new | epee ee aera HYACINTH
West Indies from a minor disaster at Newcastle. The New score an upset victory over Harri- e pt wns yaint and the interior colour -
South Wales Country Eleven was dismissed for 139 soon = * the tune of —six oerhenday dhe iain a eseees of the . goals to four. In a thri match is len: well together especially » remind my friends h ‘ i
yeiantonag caigai the large crowd settled down to watch the with Harrison College starting hot — who — oi es the school room ofrich was of light yO Sa aro and bopa oe | |
7 favourites rs tur! inspec! i of gree! ith skirti rds of a |
am Mefoter very long. the crowd Site le see are halt anti 2n| Dodds must have been very im- arker shade TOS © ANNUAL DANCE
Australia Picks were six wickets for 61 and the opening two minutes of the| Pressed with what they saw, The given by
struggling desperately to match Same they had netted two goals, grounds and buildings were spot- At Dodds there are at present MR. CLYDE JONES i |
Test Team the countryside’s total. one by* Bannister and the other . aay, 36 boys. These boys attend school CLUB ROYAL, SILVER SANDS, Romaine
Local pace bowlers John Bull by Ince. | from 8 to 11 every morning in CHRIST CHURCH
(From HAROLD DALE) nee Se we eet ~ All honours went to Snappers WHAT'S ON TODAY teal Re cna Pag Wigan 4 MONDAY NIGHT 20TH OCTOBER Cr e e
atching. in this half and by the interval} Police Courts 10.09 a.m, shops where they are taught » Music supplied Bre. 2. Browne's | p
SYDNEY, Oct, 27 Schn Bull had taken six for 24 ‘hey had taken their score to six,/|. Meeting of the Housing trade. They have a choice of car- Orchestra :
The Australian selectors head- =gainst the MCC last season and ee George McLean scoring Board at the Couneil | pentry, shoe malhog, tailoring, ADMISSION — > 2/- In Green, Lime
ed by Sir Donald Bradman to- was again—in devastating form the Td goal Malcolm Browne} Chamber 10.00 a.m. masonry, handicraft, — cooking, Green, Rose
night omitted Sidney Barnes from brihatey the ball back sharply to the fourth and Bannister followed New Series of cricket games animal husbandry, horticulture, | Va Gold, Red, Ss, :
the Australian 12 chosen for the bowl Worrell after Rae had fall- up with the fifth and sixth just opens at the various )| jimers wark etc. There is POLE E AAI OTE, 30) axe
first Test in Brisbane Nov. 9. en to a brilllant slip cateh taken before half time. quande, 130 pm. also a schon. head gale THE REV. ALPHONSO { Blue, Black and
almost directly behind wicket- : ' s oys are taug! music, o X oe ee White.
They have preferred Queens- keeper Lambert. After the interval Snappers still) |. Empire ys. Lodge at Bank in the shops ends at three Geneste O.H.P.
land 22-year-old school teacher eekes was out to an astonish- pressed their rivals and College’s| Hall; Pickwick v. Y.M.P.C. || o'clock. Then there is a short spell will be consecrated 36 inches wide.
Ken Archer who scored 104 and ing one handed catch on the goalkeeper John Chabrol was at Old Collexe grounds; | of physical training before dinner SUFFRAGAN BISHOP :
88 in last week’s Sheffield Shield square leg boundary and Stoli- kept busy conceding several Combermere vs. College at four. After that the boys have in Per Yard ....... $2.08
game. agninet New South Weise meyer vleved ina - haut fam bs gl which looked like certain ey nga a ag ie recreation on the plajing field. ST. McGINLEY'S ORTHO- eg
in whic arnes scor only 3! ickles a fted sharply. oals, ‘ander i ‘race .
after suffering a foot injury. that stage the tourists were four : Carlton vs. Spartan at Superintendent of the school is DOX ‘nnn Bia R omaine |
for 37. With three and a half minutes Black Rock. Major O, F. C. Walcott, who has Base
SUN., 28th OCTOBER, 1951
Barnes had since reported fit. Then Walcott and Gomez fell to go in the second period Har-|}| Girl Guides Annual Meeting been in this position for the past regret at 3 p.m i
: to balls that moved in on them rison College found their form ab Pax Hill, 1.20 p.m. two years. Headmaster of the Sees Rina? | . Lavender, Saxe
The team selected in the pro- and Marshall’s last hope of a when after a good attacking mova- CINEMAS school is Mr, K. G. Simmons and oerenae me s R ne
bable batting order and with the partner was John Goddard. ment Billy Manning opened the GLOBE: Sealed Cargo 5.06 and there are three other teachers. At Confirmed members x omal Blue, Sky Blue,
probable twelfth man is: Morris; Marshall played studiously and scoring for his. team with a well 8.30 pom. wedi hi each workshop there is an Tnstruc~ Meas by eee ee Orchid, Green,
Archer; Hassett; Harvey; Miller; Goddard sturdily until the danger plaged. sigt which beat Snappers’ Miguel Auk ce bm 4 tor who teaches the boys the]g@ —"° °P"”* ceencent ||| Beige Lime Beige, Gold,
yraham; ; str es passed, : . . ‘ ; A363 66565 = ;
outstanding batsman and change held & calch. ten ards, Mica the UA ENE it “omar aatebe™ 1 er 2866 oe See Green, oe er and
bowler; Ian Johnson; Lindwall, wicket off ll th PLAZA (Oistins): Breaking Point ‘ ‘ ; r rey.
Fescathe.. Sina ssuae trea. borerian oe ave at would have Browne Out ! one ig it rire et eae = oe ‘ re ae, was held as sag The Ofticers ond Members of 45” wide. 7 :
and good batsman; Gil Langley, Prior Jones helped his captain : ARTY: Th von tha ne 0 os "that. the WOTAL Eede NO. Oe MM 45 inches wide
South Australia wicket - keeper to put the West Indies ahead. At this stage one of the Snap-|| OMVMriC. Mage et the Goria vad t ee occasion ra the Request the pleasure of your * Per Yd. $2.29
and moderate batsman; W. A. SCORES pers’ forwards Maleolm Browne and Barbary Pirate 430 ana | °° hn as been open to the company to their Per Yard ........ $2.61
Johnstone, fast medium bowler, New Seath Wales Conatex x1 was brought out of the water for ‘ a> = public.
Se ee en inc Wiles eit BE ne oe nv Lane pre oun Oa nae Ra Swat Ee ME AD & The arrangenwnts for the day's
2 9 nman alentine .. stiwee a

rounder,

Apart from the obvious batting
strength of this side another sig-

to equal Tallon at his best behind

the stumps and is not to be com- |

pared as a batsman,

nificant feature is the inclusion Lambert b Valentine ........ 1 SION — 2-
of opening bowler Bill Johnstone. Bull ¢€ Weekes b Valentine soewaad 0 Time however was against the as Soper a 10, 11, 12 & 13 BROAD STREET I
This confirms the current impres- Roxby b Ramadhin .... “+ 9 youngsters who ho’ Orches
ion that Miller will be asked to Pickles not out . 3 who however put on Refreshments on Sele
s10 a Extras 2 a terrific last minute burst and 27.10.51—2n
bowl only as a shock attack ~~ netted two more goals in the last
when his services seem most Total io : th 5 in the \
necessary. He has long objected —+ three quarters of a minute's play.
to his role as opening bowler BOWLING ANALYSIS Manning and Weatherhead again cree.
preferring to concentrate on his worrei : Sam ee - scoring. |
Sei eeatiee rs Ramadhin 187 : = : Referee Mr, Jack Knight. iH ] f) M if] | tS
f ** Valenti ; 1 a 5
‘ ene West Indies — Ist Innings The teams were: | a a aenth
Weakening Stellineyer ¢ Lamabert b Piokles... 18 inet eat i: Shabrot. 3. at the a
, nning, ‘apt. . Jordan, A,
‘ n ® Bull ! as 12 :
The wicket-keeper problem haS Weekes o Anderson b Bull |. @ Taylor, FP. Mannin . C. Evelyn Ursuline Convent

been solved by choosing Langley Walcott b Pickles ; 12 and M. Weatherhead.
to ee Sere a Marahell¢. Fidhies b. Bulk. 7 : 8: fe. Sater, G. Mc- ON
is a wea Goddard not out 29 ©6Lean, (Cap e, D, Ban- ‘ . caw 9: geen
traditional strength since Lang- Jones not out... is nister, F, Fobell oe! aia Lightning’ fasteners | SATURDAY “TH OCTOBER
‘ay would have to excel himself Extras ....../..ee 6 ™“f. Browne, are manufactured by | Sead: 3 Gt ek

Spin bowling is left to Doug
Ring and the flighted off spinners
of Ian Johnson.

Johnson’s appearance against
the West Indians will settle the
growing controversy as to whe-
ther his intelligent and con-
trolled flighting of the ball is the
way to beat the Islanders’ bats-
men or whether they will over-
come him by the footwork which
is a natural feature of their
aggressive batting.



B'dos Rifle Team

te “ne se ve the Cnr. BROAD & TUDOR STREETS. ‘
e ey rene ugby League side in After the = eagles
For Trinidad Australia this year. Paul Foster ¢ ppwentation, Mr SS

The team to represent Barba-
dos at the Intercolonial Rifle
Meeting to be held in Trinidad
from November 7 to 10 was se-
lected by the Barbados Rifle As-
sociation yesterday,

The team are: Lt, Col, J. Con-

* h , Carlton Brown
nel (Capt) Maine Oc: Wale eu patie gaat ahd Mem. Boker m4 "Bye im PRICE = af,ct Pret Seu & Cor"
cott, Mr. M. R. De Verteuil, we dard has taken up a diet to keep Git” who presented the Limacol Stoute’s Drug Store E. C. Gill

Jor By ative and’ Mr, Bis Welght down to the “best nro nueact ae Ms iE WS H. E. Pilgrim P. A. Clarke
Neblett, Roberts Ne MT playing weight” of 180 pounds. anufactuiog Drug Co. | GREENS [- and RU

Major A. S. Warren had been
selected vice captain to go, but is
unable to make the tour and Ma-
jor Walcott was chosen in_ his
place. .

The team will leave on Sun-
day 4 and retyirn on the follow-
ing Sunday.



YESTERDAY’S
WEATHER REPORT

From Codrington

Rainfall ; Nil

Total Rainfall for month to
Date : 2.60 ins,

Highest Temperature :



87.5° F. They are Lindwalh Bow in the printiee Snappers — Captain George Mr. G. H. Adams, M.C.P.
Lowest Temperature : peak of his form, Millér, and the 7 Sheaffers Ball Point Pens Presented Dr. H CP
73.0° F. left-hander, Johnstone, The tour- to the winning team of the Men's K.O. : , H. G. Cummins, M.C.P. -
Wind Velocity : 6 miles per | ists are little concerned, however, Store ita, Winnece Suupoiee Wane NO PARKING PROBLEMS Mr. R. G. Mapp, M.C.P.
hour Aving ie to the a omens Polo Club. | .
. ustralians that the West Indians Consolation Prise. 7 bottles of Li 1 . IC. » M.A.
Barometer (9 a.m.) : 29.907 Reprallina that the: Wont lenient, Pain Wak: ate we Mr. J. C. Tudor, M.A
(3 pum.) : 29,811 ee t th le us test competition, presented by Bookers Just pull up at t Mr. K. N. R. Husbands i
Friday. than play revealed on ceraon Drug Stores Ltd.—Harrison pe ie eso — M P i
. * ai tod ‘ollege. sy fees $
: ’ ' doo Mr. E. Holder \o4
° * t ’ YT. |
{ They'll Do It Every Time Swewcine Jimmy Hatlo ; our . and ,
y 4 B y ; James A. Tudor

BAr te surer









ARKET , WINESAP BLOWS
HIS TURRET WHEN WIFEY ASKS HIM TO

A SIXTEEN-FIFTY #! -WHAT
ARE YA DOIN’? BUYING STOCK
IN THE COMPANY €. A TROUPE
OF ACTORS COULDNT EAT UP
THAT MUCH FOOD LET |
=z ALONE US Twol!



Anderson b Worrell .....
Mannix run out ......
De Courcy b Ramadhin
MacDonald c Walcott b

4 a
10
Harvey c Weekes b Valentine .... 5

Valentine





Total (for 7 wickets) . . 147

Pickles took 3 wickets for 38 runs,
Bull took 4 for 49.



W.I. Not
Dowshearted
SYDNTY, Cot. 26.
Although the West indies “t-r-
ists had a close call i. the first
official tour match versus New
South Wales, here on Friday,
they were not down-hearted about
the first test prospects. The
team’s gay exuberance captured
the imagination of the Austra-
lian public in a manner similar

The Australians accustomed to
regardin;
rious businegs, are
out of listening to
dians sing calypso songs, in their
dressing rooms prior to taking
the fleld, carrying their favourite
brands of West Indies rum on the

cricket ag a deadly se-
etting a kick

He is not eating bread, butter,
potatoes, sweets and fried food.
Goddard lost nearly 14 ids
in the last three weeks. “If I am
able to keep weight off, I hope
to play vs India in England again,
before retiring in two years.”
Meanwhile, Goddard has a full-
time job getting his team into
shape for the first Test.

behalf of the N Chemic ;

weaknegies, ee ae hewiing Baltimore. Winners: starfish er cheat: | The Newest and one of the most Up-to-date DRY GOODS On
the han Carmic! *

Fast Australian wickets yet, were 7 Water Polo Limacol Cups. Presented | fA

revealed in Friday’s match. The

West Indians require much solid [*

practice to reach top form here,

The team will not get any op-
portunities before the first Test
on November 3. The Australian
test team, announced on Friday
night, includes three bowlers
much pacier than those the tour-
ists faced on Friday.

















he West In- to

oar sc wm 70 38 DeueAreseeN
SHELL OUT FOR THE WEEKLY GROCERIES~=| | IT'S BYE-BYE SIK MONTHS’ BUDGET ++

9 seized this opportunity and Morti-

mer Weatherhead soon scored
— brought a back into
play.

assembled in the ballroom



Strong, yet smooth and flexible,
After the match the ‘LIGHTNING’ is a fastener to be
beame. creer relied upon. Look for the name on the ©

ROXÂ¥: Wyoming Mail 4.45 ana
&.15 p.m.











ie presentation of trophies by} Sider pull.

e water polo tions’ 1.
dent Major A, i hee ae

Mr. Peter Patterson Vice-
President of the association
thanked the public for their sup-
port and congratplated the win-
Jn. teams. He then asked Maj.
Foster to present the cups and
p.izes. Before doing so Maj. Fos-
ter gave a short review of the
Season and also spoke of the re-
cent tour to Trinidad and gave a
warning to all the players to be
prepared pr even better Trinidad
teams next year. “We”, he said,
“must also improve.”

for presenting trophies; the
Aquatic Club for their co-opera-
tion. in al. the association
play their games at the cluv;
Mr, J. Chabrol for his interest in
the game and making it possible
for the association having sev-

handsome cups to present

Trophies presented were as fol-

Â¥. de Lima Challenge Cup. Presented
to the winners of the ladies competition,
by Messrs. Y. de Lima & Co., Ltd
Winners: Starfish—Captain Frieda Car:
michael.

Noxzema Challenge Cup. Presented to |

the winners of the ladies K.O. compet:

Their tion, by Messrs, Bookers Drug Store on |

to the winners of the ladies K.O. com-
petition, by Messrs. Stokes & Bynoe
td., on behalf of the Bookers Manu-
facturing Drug Co. Winners: Starfish
water polo club,
Water Polo Challenge Cup. Presented
to the winners of the Men's competition,
Mr. George Manning Wrinners:
Harrison College—Captain Billy Manning.
Water Polo Krock-Out Cup. Presented
to the winners of the Men’s K.Q. com-
petition, by the water polo association.












|

|
|
|

|









{. GEDDES GRANT LTD.,
Agents,

CORRUGATED BLACK SHEETS |

If you were too late to get some of the last lot, make sure |
* you are in time this trip.

THE CENTRAL EMPORIUM

OPENING MONDAY
October 29th




proceedings were made by Major
O. F. C. Walcott, Superintendent
of the schools and his staff.



LIGHTNING FASTENERS LTD.

(A subsidiary company of
Imperial Chemical Industries Ltd.)



(

|

in aid of |
ST. PATRICK'S DAILY MEALS
FUND & TH FREE ELEMEN-

TARY SCHOOL
Through. the Courtesy of the
Commissioner of Potice Col.
Michelin and the Band Master Capt
Raisen the Police Band will be in
attendance

f The Various - Fancy,
{hr id, Xmas 7; ete
Will 5a 3 eg ents ¢ t
2ony Rides and ious. Games,
Hoop-La etc. +Ice-Creams, Cakes,

at the
PRINCESS ALICE PLAYING
FIELD

OD
MONDAY NIGHT 28TH CCTOBER
1951

ANNUAL, DANCE |

Cave Shepherd & Co., ld.

















p.m











Drinks, Hot Dogs, Ham-
Tea Tables etc.

Sweets,

burgers,




/ ADMISSION — — 6d



4 Prizes for the luck No. Tickets—
Girl, Boy



Lady, and Gentleman

x ga f
" ay ——"
\ "
COME! SEE! and BUY! , i’ TSN









Obtainable at...

RETAIL Knight's Ltd.

Bruce Weatherhead
td.

POLITICAL

John Gill & Co.
Walkes’ Drug Store



THE RITZ STORE

M. B. HANNAH)

(Proprietor :

No. 60 Tudor Street

STORES in Bridgetown.

Stocked with EVERY ITEM that can be Found in the Best
Department Stores and just wateh out for our Prices,

They're really reasonable.

AND MOST IMPORTANT OF ALL

WITH THE

FERGUSON system

{

PLDI SPSS SEF SS



4 1 % The friend of both the small and Large Plantation Owners alike. Ps {
ATA This Tractor, the price of which is only a fraction of that of ~ ae ;
Raia, S a full “Track” Tracter— te
mS" , COURTESY
on : $3,165.00
| GARAGE |
is |
fa as] | 1% does an amazing job of Ploughing and is at home either in the 4 ‘i Ea Ae
ae AY\) % field or.on the road. | cuff a a” UD” a>
a4) \ Fee, oe oh ROBERT THOM || : ,
Te) j hese world-wide famous Tractors are :lso becoming increas~- vii ~
& ¥ ingly popular here and are doing fine work. LIMITED * SHOE STORE
| “ ‘
ah % We invite you to inspect this truly wonderful machine and jj Agents s No, 35 Broad Street
/ P. let us arrange for a demonstrat ou-—-ploughing Se - 2
a [RY tha, Manis Mmeeting, meme-cutat re vent i Dial 4616 Wateh For Opening Date
Ps ie os & | |
” 9SSS 9SSSSSSSSSSS OS 969595999999 9SOOOSCGI9S OF EOS SOSSE VS OC SSO COO FP FOOD se, ; — ain = —

IGOOSSS

MEETING

Nelson Pharmacy

L
Hinds’ Drug Store

and BOOKERS (B'DOS) DRUG STORES

Broad Street and Hastings (ALPHA PHARMACY)

AJ +
St. George Sole Agents

Supporting the candi- {
datures of: |

Messrs, F. E, MILLER &
E. W. BARROW



OPENIN G SOON

“er




SUNDAY NIGHT
Octaber 28th, 1951

at 8 o’clock



SPEAKERS :

27.10.51—In.




















PPLE ISOS OLELESIOOCFLLSEOLLISS





PGES SS SES



Full Text

PAGE 1

PACE SIX BARBADOS ADVOCATE SATURDAY, OCTOBER 2T, 1S1 FOR QUALITY & FLAVOUR STOMACH DISTRESS^ • %  y to Uk* %  JlMt diop — ... two tablet* iM %  |Un of wator. *w--i %  • tw itaan drink it Net %  liabit iotmin*. jwi can lab* ii v UIM Lew Alko-aWltMr lip TB^ STANDS SUPREME IT PAYS YOU TO DEAL HERE SPECIAL offers to all Cash and Credit Customers for Thursday to Saturday only USUALLY NOW USUALLY NOW Pkgs. PEEK FREANS PLAIN BISCUITS Ut Hi WALLNUTS (per lb.) Bottles OKEEFE'S BEER 26 20 Pkgs. T. PAPER Tins APRICOT JUICE 40 36 Pkgs. RINSO (large) 64 18 32 26 58 JO D. V. SCOTT & Co. Ltd. Broad Street D. V. SCOTT *V CO.. LTD. NOTICE The Amendments mad. lo the Shop Closing Act which affect the houn during which deliveries can legally be made has caused us to review our whole delivery schedule. We beg to advise our Friends and Customers that as irom 1st November the following will be the position. COUNTRY DELIVERIES: In view of the impossibility of completing Country Deliveries within the hours permitted, we are compelled with the utmost regret to discontinue all Country Deliveries. LOCAL DELIVERIES: All Orders received by 11 a.m. will be delivered the same day. All Orders received after 11 a.m. will be delivered the following day. Pleas* note that any goods required for delivery on Thursday (Half Day) must be placed the day before. Orders placed on Thursday will be delivered on Friday. SERVICE CHARGE: In view of the reduced Service which we are now compelled to offer we will be discontinuing the service Charge recently imposed. BRANCHES: Any customer having an authorised charge A c is at liberty to charge goods at our Branches in Tweedside Road or in Speightstown. .. THE LOVELIEST TOWJV TREE DECORATIONS AT ADVOCATE STATIONERY


arbados







ESTABLISHED 1895

SATURDAY,



OCTOBER 27,



1951











PRICE; FIVE CENTS

TEN





TORIES SHO VE LABOUR INTO SECOND PLACE

THE “WARMONG
THE ‘PEACEMAKER’ IS OUT

AN ANNOUNCEMENT :

“Court Circular; Buckingham Palace, 26th October,
The Right Honourable C. R. Attlee had an audience
with the King this evening and tendered his resignation
as Prime Minister and First Lord of the Treasury which

1951:

His Majesty was graciously

subsequently received in audience the Right Hon. Winston
Spencer Churchill and requested him to form a new admin-

istration.

And so after six years, the Socialists went out of power.
In the previous Government, they held a 9 seat majority.
But now, latest reports say that the Conservatives have at

least a 25 seat majority.

After leaving Buckingham Pal-
ace Attlee stepped through the
door of the Prime Minister's resi-
dence smiling and drove awa,
past the silent crowd of about 10:
persons, Only four people includ-
ing a woman waving a Conserva-
tive campaign balloon were
outside the Palace to watch
Attlee arrive.

Attlee was accompanied only
by a bodyguard when his car
glided along the gravelled fore-
court through the arch way and
up to the King’s door just after
dark.

Churchill left the Conservative
headquarters at 5.12 p.m. GMT.

Winston QOburchill, a sprig of
white heather in his lapel for
good luck awaiting hourly the
late Friday summons wal
would send him to Bucki

Palace to receive from Ring
George the invita’ to form a
new Conservative vernment,

No one was calmer than the 76
year old warrior as the fateful
moment drew near. In his own
constituency of Woodford, out-
side London Friday afternoon,
Churchill thanked voters for
returning him to Parliament for
the seventh time.

He told the cheering | throng it
was a “glorious victory” and con-
tinued; “Now we have

other things to think eet a
ve problems may a
oar country. is a ere

fort to me in all-the uncertainties
that surround me.”

Final results will not be known
until sometime next week.

King George the Sixth who
entrusted Britain to Winston
Churchill in the hour of its
greatest wartime peril asked him
at Buckingham Palace Friday
night to lead it through peace-
time dangers unprecedented in
history.

The dramatic, meeting toa
place inthe bedroom of the
marble Palace in which the
is recovering from a serious aa
operation,

It. was more than eleven years
ago ag both men must have re-
membered, when Churchill ac-
cepted his wartime post.

The Man who promised Brit-
ons only blood, ‘toil, sweat and
tears in the dark days of 1940
when the; Nazis had
France, and Britain stood alone
told them in the election victory
Friday night: “There lie before
us hard times. I have seen worse
and had werse to face,

With seven of 625

uencies still to report siand-

ings were;—

Conservatives 318;

Labour 294:

Liberals 5:

Irish Nationalist 1.

Conservatives gained 24



TO-DAY’S WEATHER
CHART

Sunrise: 5.49 a.m.

Sunset : 5,50 p.m,

Moon : Last Quarter; Octo-
ber 22

Lighting : 6.00 p.m.

High Tide : 1.21 a.m; 141
p.m.

Low Tide : 7.42 a.m.; 8.08
p.m.

| home,

” IS IN:

LONDON, Oct. 26

pleased to accept. The King



seats
held.
Labour lost 22 and gained

a
Once a Conservative
Was assurea the ceremony
machinery which marks
change in British Government
were set in motion within a few
minutes, |
Churchill had been waiting for
that moment since 7 p.m. of July |
26, 1945 when an announcement
was made that British voters had!

and lost 1 previously

majority
and

thrown their war hero out of
office and chosen a _ Socialist
Prime Minister in his place,
Friday night’s assignment was}
the answer to Churchill’s final}
election campaign plea, “it is the!
last prize T have to win”, he said.

He meant the chance to seek a

lasting peace. “I pray indeed tnat
I may have this opportunity.”
Now it was his. He was ex-

pected to move fast to build up
Western defences, establish more

cordial relations with the United
States and even try to get his
old wartime colleague Premier
Josef Stalin to another confer-

ence table,

When he announces his Cab-
inet on Monday, it will include
such top Conservative party

Ms as the Marquess of Salis-
bury, Oliver Lyttleton, Harold
Mac Millan, Brendan Bracken,
Richard Austen Butler, Sir David
Maxwell Fyfe, Lord Woolton,
Anthony Eden and some of the
younger figures in the Party.

In the last days of his vigorous
election campaign, Churchill turn-
ed on his famous rhetoric to de-
nounce the labourite charge that
he was a trigger happy warmong-
er. He is suing one London news-
paper for libel. But Friday night
the warmonger label was gone and
it was Geod old Winnie to millions
here in the Empire and in other
g} parts of the world.

Next month he will celebrate his
77th birthday anniversary in Num-
ber 10 Downing Street the official
residence .of the Prime Minister.

This was the first time Churchill
ever became Prime Minister by
the peoples’ choice. The last time
he succeeded because of the ap-
peasement policy of his Conserva-

overrun | tive emgceuar Neville Chamber-

failed
ith the first flush of Conserva-
tive victory over, experts were
quick to point out it wont bring
many quick changes. Socialists
are here to stay, they said. Britain
is nearly bankrupt again and it
looks like a hard winter; Church-
ill already has promised hard
times for everyone . . . but he is
@ man of hope, not despair,
Crowds were outside Churchill’s
house on Friday night until police
-einforcements finally arrived to
clear them away. Churchill ap-
peared once but by 10 p.m. there
were still 400 in the crowd mostly
women calling and singing for him
to appear again. Police sent them

Attlee and his wife meanwhile
left Number Ten Downing Street

tor their last visit to Chequers’ the |

country home of British Prime
Ministers before the Churchills

take over, Only a few people were |

at Number Ten Downing Strect
when they left,

General, Lord Ismay who stood |
at Churchill's right hand through

L_ evanemmmnennnecnmmmmmmncmmmemen athe war is boosted in some quar-

a

COLONIAL SECRETARY

the;

<- tecitieeeenmagittiane

Mr. Anthony Eden (above),
Mr. Winston Churchill (cen-
ter). and Mr, A, T. Lennox-
Boyd (right) all victorious
Conservatives in the General
Elections in England, Mr.
Eden is tipped as Foreign
Secretary in the new Govern-
ment, Mr. Churehill is the new
Prime Minister and Mr. Len-
nox-Boyd may be the new
Secretary of State for the
Colonies.

ters as Minister of Defence with
the War Office going to Brigadier
Anthony Head 45, veteran mem-
ber of the war Cabinet Combined
Operations Office.

Ministry of Housing is expected
to go to Ernest Marples 48, or toy
Harold MacMillan 6

The Heaith Ministry may. f°
eithey-to 63-year-old Walter Elli- |
ott or Doctor Charles Hill f
Secretary General of British
eal Association,

Good posts will fall to Brendan
Bracken 51-year-old pul and
Wartime Minister of Information

who has been menti
ble Colonial Sec ‘eit.

Fuel and Power Min er Geoffrey
Lloyd 49. and land-owner investor
Ralph Asheton 50 are mentioned
as possible Ministers of a

WILL SUMMON.
EMPIRE TALKS

(From Our Own Correspondent)

LONDON, Oct, 26.
An empire economic conference
to include representatives from
the colonies will be called in
London probably within two
months. It is learnt tonight that
the conference is scheduled under
the “urgent plans” from the new
Tory government to help restore
the economic situation and raise













Britain’s prestige with foreign
countries.
First aim of the Tories hume

economic policy will be to cut
cost of living. Complete reorgan-
isation of the house building
programme will start immediately
to prepare the way for 300,000
houses, the yearly target Churchil)
has set.

Also Ariority will be given to
the Bill to repeal the nationali-
sation of the iron steel industry.

Socialists in the meantime are
planning to make things difficult
for the Government; some said
harassing tactics would be a
justifiable reprisal for the rough
time Conservatives gave them in
the last Parliament.

: °
Joe Louis Beaten
NEW YORK, Oct, 26.
JOE LOUIS, former world
heavyweight champion, was
to-night beaten by Rocky
Mareiano in the’ eighth

round of a tea-round bout.

Keferee Goldstein stopped
to prevent Louis

eing badly beaten.

|} the
from



SPEAKS



HON. R. N. TURNER, Colonial Secretary who was guest of honour at the Government Industrials

Schools’ Visitors Day at Dodds yesterday speaks to the itors and the
With Mr. Turner are His Lordship Bishop Mandeville, Mrs. Tur
intendent of the schools.
The boys are in the background

and girls of the sehool.

r and Major O. F. C. Walcott, Super-

*"' Nevada

|\Canada






























erage, Spee

By J. J. N

|
iEEHAN
LONDON, Oct. 26. |

General: Kigenhower’s Atlantic Pact commanders be-

lieve that the Nevada atomic

tests will be the blueprint of

the defence of Western Kurope against Russia, with rela-

tively small forces under

Western

Command. Reliably

military sources said that Nevada test results will be glean-
ed carefully by United States experts.

Royal Couple |
Ends Vacation |

VICTORIA, B.C., Oct, 26

It was back to the grind toaay|@

for Princess Elizabeth and Prince
Philip after a three-day rest which
the two of them spent at a lodge
106 miles north of here.

The Royal couple started their
journey eastward with a visit to

Nanaimo, From there they were
scheduled to embark on the
destroyer Crusader for a 38-mile

trip agross Georgia Strait to Van-
couver arriving there about noon,

Then it was on to New West-
minster and small centres up the
Fraser Valley and Canyon. They
are scheduled to reach Edmonton
on Saturday.

It was a relaxing day yesterday
including horseback riding, a drive
to Sproate Falls to take pictures
and a visit to a lumber camp in
the evening.

British election returns were re-
layed to them.—(C.P.



Russiam Relations
With US Less Tough

WASHINGTON, Oct. 26
Alan Kirk,, U.S. Ambassador to
Russia said at the White House on
Friday that relations between the
U.S. and the Soviet Union are not

“quite as tough as they were.”
Kirk who probably will not re-
turn to Moscow wilh leave for
Paris on Monday to serve as
adviser to the U.S. delegation at

the U.N. General Assembly.

—U.P

Canada Raises
$105,000 For J’ca





MONTREAL, oe 26
A total of $105,000 has en
raised for the Jamaica Hurric cane
Relief Fund it was announced to-
day by James Muir, Chairman of

the “Canadian Commi.tee for
campaign. The money will pu
chase supplies and material
for distribution
Jamaica.—(CP)

the

AMERICAN FOREIGN AID

WASHINGTON, Oct 26
The United States Government
aid to foreign countries during
the 11 years ended June 30, 1951

to $81,966,000,000 ac-
cording, to the Department of
Commerce. The total represent-
ed aggregate value of goods ser-
vices d fu furnishe n the
;

amounted

& mit oF re
Wit

nl uled

said that lessons will be
applied to the master plan for
holding the mass of manpower
jammed east of the Iron Curtain
from spilling to the Atlantic in a
sudden attack,

Despite Eisenhower's optimistic
predictions that Europe will be in
pretty good condition to take
of herself in two or three
years, his subordinates are faced
with the foremost day to day
question: Suppose the Russians
don’t wait that long?

Western planners believe that
the first United States atomic
manoeuvres, involving actual
troops, will explain how Western
armies, that for a long time will
be cxvarfed by the Russian armed
might, can get ready to deal a
lecisive defensive blow,

For are certain

They

care

they that al-
though the Russians have a stock
of atomic bombs for use against
sities, the Reds have not amassed
enough atomic wealth to expend it
against troops in the field at
present.

The tests, which may involve
‘fantastic’ weapons, referred to by
Truman, are designed to show how

radio-active blasts can be used to
help ground forces.







|
m



CONGRATULATIONS

A TELEGRAM was sent
‘esterday by the Electors’
ssociation of Barbados to
Mr. Lennox-Boyd, Conserv-
ative M.LP., congratulating
him and his Party on their
violory in the elections in
England, °

Allies Reject
Red Proposal

MUNSAN, Korea, Oct. 26

The Allies today quickly reject-
ed the Communist buffer zon
proposal that the United Nation:
give up such bitterly won Korean
areas as Heartbreak Ridge, Punch-
bowl and the Iron Triangle.

The Reds wanted U.N. forces to
withdraw as much as 15 miles
Their proposals countered yester-
day’s U.N. suggestion for a buffer
zone generally along the presen!
vattle lines,

Major General Henry I. Hodge:
told the Reds that their proposa’
bore no relationship to the mili
tary line of contact and did not
offer truce protections.

The Red oners and tie U.N. re-
jection care at the second meet
ing of the sub-committees tryin,
to agree on a cease fire line, Meet
ings are held at Pan Mun Jom
Under the Red proposal they woul:
keep Kaesong, former site of truc
talks, two miles south of the 38tl
parallel,

They would withdraw from the
part of the Ongjin Peninsula o:
the west coast area which the
Allies describe as militarily un



Eisenhower's forces are in need| !™portant.—-(C,P.)

f help. He is @xpeeted to have!
21 Divisfons by the end of mY
year in the face of between 30 and
40 crack Russian Divisions. Massed |
dear the [ron Curtain are 15 Rus-
sianised CzechoslovaNan Divis*
ions, 65 other satellite’ Divisions,

plus the potential striking power
of some 140 Divisions insido
Russia.

Informed sources said that al-

though Eisenhower probably would
nave to get permission before
launching any atomic retaliation
against any Russian attack, they
we certain that approval will be
given should Soviet aggression
lare up in Europe.

The sources said that Wnited
States officers, however, would ap-



ply what was iearned to the solu-
tion of Eisenhower's defensive
»roblems.—U.P,





ATOM TEST POSTPONED |

Unfavourable weather con!
caused the Atomic Energy!
on to its sched-;
atomic explosion to-day at
man's Flat testing ground.
—U,P.

ditions
C miss



cancel

a WAS VEGAS, Nevada, Oct. 26
|
i
'

in) F French

ments the net amount of US

foreign aid during 11 years of the
hot and cold war was $71,130,-
000,000. In this grand total $61,-
000,000,000 represented net grants}

and $10,010,000,000 were net!

credits

The Commerce Department said

It interesting to note that the
of the U.S

December

U.P.



Japs Approve

Peace Treaty

TOKAY, Oct. 26
The Japanese Peace "Treaty anc
the United States-Japan Securit;
Pact were overwhelmingly ap-
proved by the House of Represen-
tatives of the Japanese National
Diet.
Approval by this body is tanta-
mount to a final ratification.
—UP.



Australia Accepts
| ‘Broadly Speaking’

NEW DELHI, Oct. 26
Aus.ralian External Affairs
Minister, Chard Casey said here
on Friday “broadly speaking’
Australia accepted the invitatior
j to participate in the Wester’
| powers Middle Eas‘ defence
system. —U.P.

tattack involved the U.S. in war)

i
|
| were nearly the equivalent of aic
al
4



|pelicies of the fiscal year
jwhen the U.S. wads _ promoting
its own national security by as
sisting other nations to buiid up/
jtheir defensive strength.

| The U.S. foreign aid one
five year of World il
amoun $49 il



Oods sé € nd fund |

U.P

Allies Advance

“Go Home”’ Egypt
Tells Britons

CAIRO, Oct. 26

FOREIGN MINISTER Salah El Din Pasha urged all
Britons living in Egypt to “go home.” He told a news con-
ference that “the best way to avoid friction in the existing
circumstances would be for Britons living in Egypt to go
home.”

He said British newsmen and tourists however would
be welcome. The statement urging Britons to get out of
Egypt came in reply to a question from British newsmen
who asked whether the report was true that visas for

Britons living x in Egypt would not be extended.

El Din Pasha said “I think
jevery defence by the Egyptian
}Gevernment of Egyptian rights
should be taken into account.”
“Although the Egyptian govern-
!ment maintains security in so far
as foreign residents are concern-
ed—without. the exception of

800 Yards

8th ARMY HEADQUARTERS, | their nationality--it believes that
Korea, Oct. 26 the best way to avoid friction
Bayonet-wielding Allied troops| under existing — circumstances
carved out gains of up to 800] would be for Britons Usa: inn
yards against suddenly fierce| #8ypPt to ey or mated ee aiould
Communist resistance at the gates| Russia has indicated it woul:
ot bomb-blackened Kumsong. welcome a friendship and non-
United Nations infantrymen | 28etession pact with Egypt ac~
fought every inch of the way io|Cording to the Wafdist newspaper
: : > “\ | AL Misry.
= 0 ge ll the ewe The report came after a
r , Red “led sources said a draft trade
tens ten ee pee 29 miles| agreement between the two coun-
a . ee . ries will make Russia..and her
Communist resistance also stiff- catetiions Buy pis princienl cus-
ened in other parts of the Korean}tomers and “suppliers instead of
front as Communist troops sought! Britain,
to hold their positions as bargain Al Misry reporting the possi-
points in the Korean truce talks |bility of a non-aggression pact
United Nations tanks, trying ic|/between Egyptian and Russian
soften up Communist resistance | officials said it showed Moscow



rolled to the outskirts of Kumsong
or a hit and run raid, They with-

would favour any serioug move
on the part of Egypt to strength-

i drew after shelling Red foree:}en Russo-Egyptian relations.
there. The British Consulate herd
said there are approximately
It was one of the almost daily {30,000 British subjects in Egypt.
tank raids in «ne past week \o| Two thirds live in Alexandria

‘pierce through Ped positions, rim} 6,500 in Cairo and the rest are
ming the battered city. To the! mainly scattered in the Suez

south-west, Allied forees hacked!Canal zone.
out minor gains against heavy| The Egyptian Foreign Minister
frenade and machine-gun fire} said today there can be no ques-

from entrenched Communists on|tion of mediation in the Anglo-
the hill north-west of Yonchon. | Egyptian dispute before British
Allied artillery, aime d at the|*roops are evacuated from Egynt

hill positions, claimed 200 to 300: a Be od Sudan. but the: “yc hab
Communist casualties ih a thun-| £ Kayate sooping- ar be
fering bombardment of nearly Datence TE er PU nor
three hours on Thursday. North of es ree ran nde Re Cutt 4 he
the Hwachon Reservoir, United a ian P - '
Nations big guns caught another

trouv in the open and claimed 40 ‘OP. & UP.
dead fram the barrage.—U.P.





Aviatrix On Goodwill Tour

PARAMARIBO, Oct, 26
Brazilian aviatrix Ada Roga'a
arrived at the airfield at. Zandery
on Thursday in a one motor Cess- *
na aeroplane and left for Cayenne
'to-day continuing her goodwill
| tour of the Western Hemisphere,
—UP.

The “ADVOCATE”
pays for NEWS.

Dial 3113
Day or Night

Plane Crashes
At Airfield

LONDON, Oct, 26

A chartered airline passenger
liner crashed at Bovingdon air-
ield when its undercarriage col: |
apsed and burst into flames.
Ministry of Civil Aviation spokes-
nan said the crash “appears to;
»e a bad one.” {

The plane was flying to London;
rom Castel Benito, Tripolitania, |



when the accident occurred dur- |
ng a landing at the airport about)
of London.—wU,P. }

25 miles north





TRUMPETERS. They have such a

lovely flavour, so satisfying, so

| smooth, and FRESH."

TRUMPETER
CIGARETTES

@
OBTAINABLE EVERYWHERE

1
“Now | know why he always smokes


PAGE TWO



ne te ee

Carub Calling

Wins COMMANDER L. A.

a . es : If you want a really wonderful

bg Rpibecheld, prates Generel POCKET CARTOON R. W. H. ALLAN, Senior time you should be a strike itg| Starring Eleanor PARKER — Patricia NEAL .. Ruth ROMAN
pa foe te taaied tomorrow by by OSBERT LANCASTER Partner of C.B. Rice and Co., California. . wend —— oe

BWIA for Trinid#aen his way to apogee has jigrt returned from a business On September 5, 10,350 workers| TWO Spectacular Action Westerns —TODAY 9 30 a.m. & 1.90 p.m
Buenos Aires to attend a regional : . and pleasure trip to the U.K. He struck at the huge Douglas air-| BAD MAN or RED BUTTE & GUN TOWN
meeting of TCAO, covering the was among the passengers ar- craft factory in Long Beach,

South Amefican @nd South Atlan-
tie areas.

The meeting which is expected
to last from three to four weeks,
will discuss the present condition
of aeronautical communications,
meteorological services, etc., and
consider what improvements are
necessary.

While Commander Egglesfield






Back From U.K.

riving from Puerto Rico on Thurs-
day afternoon by B.W.LA,
companied by his son David. The

ac-

trip from Englend to Puerto Rico to live in the style to which they
ire accustomed, $

Some of the things .he motherly

was made via New York. During
his visit Mr. Allan took the oppor-
tunity to study modern ‘rend: in
the woollen trade.

Arrivin th lane was 2%d shoeshines for the men, and
reves he Se stine shane wae free babysitters for

Mr. Frank Morgan, proprietor of



MOTHER’S

1

er’,

me

unl

OCTOBER 27, 1951

ene

BARBADOS ADVOCATE SATURDAY,







| PEAZA Me era or

tna
TODAY 4.45 & #820 pm
WARNER BROS. Present

THREE SECRETS







Special Mon. 9. %
am
Secret Four a

Westward Bound”
—————_—_—__—

‘West Potmt Story
All Star Cast





UNION

NEW YORK.

and CONTINUING DAILY





Pheir union, United Auto Work-
has since seen to it that the
n and women have continued] / -

car’ (ASTIN
PLAZA visi su
Today & Temoerrow & & 45.4 pm.
Warners Giant Double ! |
“BREAKING POINT’
John GARFIELD — Pat NEAL &
“THIS SIDE OF THE LAW”
Jiveca LINDSFORS — Kent SMITH

Johnny Mack BROWN Kirby GRANT — Fuzzy KNIGHT

_ GAIETY
TODAY & TOMORROW @.30 pT







ion provides are free haircuts

“THE OUTLAW”
the women





MATINEE: TOMORROW 5 p.m |
|
!





o — Jack BUTTEL &
was in the U.K., he held prelimin- Club Morgan. (after all somebody has got to Today =m Tdnite To! ae dae “se
ary meetings with the Colonial : " look after Buster while poor | }j"Renaredes of, || Action - Packed |] SRABAZON, KING OF THE AIR”
Office and the Ministry of Civil Fair and Flying Dance mom's tramping up and down on & “ Okisheenn “Ranecer of net) Gemeniinem ahead a
Aviation in regard to various mat- E Fair a. the Ursuline Con- that little old picket line). Raiders” || Cherokee Strip” eee a ar
ters which will be raised at this vent this af.ernoon begins . And, of course, mom does not | ||Toa pm. Monte Hae & aia aan RA VENGEANCE
meeting in so far as they affect the at 3 o'clock and ends at 7 p.m. }ave much chance to cook meals, ||| ‘Haltway Howse” || Nataas tra “DESPERATE TRAIL”
British Caribbean territories. Throughout the evening the Pol- 5° the union feeds everyone—} |/ window’ 4 Alan Rocky Lane Johnny Mack BROWN

In connection with this meeting,
Major J. Nicole, Director of Civil
Aviation in British Guiana, visited
Barbados during the week for final



ice Band conducted by Capt. han-burgers, “hot dogs,” beef stew,
Raison will provide music. This — tomato sauce, and lots of
is always a ular feature of any Pancakes. : w
fair. eh * Keep them happy while they are| "i

“The first lesson is taken
from the eighth chapter of
the Bock of Exodus omitting








3 . ; . “S 2s ‘~, Wad Yrs.
discussions with the Director Gen- tur the moment all con- Proceeds from this annual event @ating? Why, yes—TV on giant wAS Lai f i x : :
eral in regard to British Guiana’s troversial references to the will go *o help give the pupils of Screens brings them the baseball SNAG the food for rowth
position. Egyptians.” St. Patrick’s Elementary School a &4™¢s from the East. Qe £




Back from U. K.
R. J. NICOL, Education Ad-
viser to the Comptroller for
Development and Welfare, re-
turned from England on Thursday
morning in the S.S. Gascogne after ,,
paying a short visit home. He was
accompanied by Mrs. Nicol.
in Six Months’ Leave
R. AND MRS. PERCY H.
BURTON of 7th Ave., Belle-
ville, left for Puerto Rico yester-
day by BWIA where they will
connect with PAA for the U.S.A.
to spend a holiday.

When they get tired of that,
there are all those lovely shiny

Two hours after the fair ends juke-boxes, “dealer-donated,” to
another bumper entertainment tWang out ‘the hill-billy favour-
will swing into action as the Bar- ‘tes:
bados Flying Club gets going with ,Said_a union
their “Flying High” dance at the “The donations
Psradise Beach Club. just fine.”

Besides the attractive door as
prize of a free trip ¢o Grenada for B. B. C. Radio
Programme

two, there are several other high-
SATURDAY, OCTOBER 27,






{ree daily meal and a free educa-
tion.

Visitors’ Day
Ove two hundred people at-
tended Visitors Day at
ds” yes erday and among the

\ 1koL is a concentrated food containing malt extract,

specially refined fats, egg, sugars (including glucose),

“ee

official hanvily:
are coming in

cd

and orange juice, with the addition of mineral salts
rany visitors were, the Lord

Bishop, the Lord Chief Justice and
Lady Collymore, Mr. and Mrs.
C. C. Skeete, Capt. J. G. Bryan,
Mr. C. M. Theobalds, Rev. Arm-
strong, Mr, and Mrs. L. T. Gay,
Mr. end Mrs, Risley Tucker, Mr.
end Mrs. E. J. Parry, Capt. J. R.

and vitamins, Children thrive on Virol because it



provides the food essentials for strength, vitality and

a sound constitution.




lights on the evening’s programme.
Two orchestras will provide non-
stop dancing, there will be a con-

tes. for the most beautiful legs, Ng







wwwowwwouvoeweweweuwwvwwewowwy



R ' ; Jordan, Miss Dora Ibberson, Mrs. Paar Pp oni gramme Parade. 11.30
avenue of Sse ons 1,4 UO, as ei "APME:Cuing and Steers at we fe Ase Aeaoae e x
months’ leave. During his absence, Field ane ohn nee F. E. many other side shows to make it “’T™5 »™ — Seen ed ae: x GS L Oo B E
Mr. George Grannum, Principal */¢'¢. Mr. and Mrs. S. H. Nurse, 4 real success, 4.00 p.m. The News, 4.10 p.m. The is -
Clerk: cwill act as Parechial Mr. and Mrs, A. W. Harper, Mr. z Datly Service, 4.15 p.m. Rugby League \% x
Taaneiedie H. S. Jemmott, Mr. D, D, Garner, Paid Short Visit Football, 4.25" p.m. Interlude, 4.30 p m TO-DAY & TO-MORROW, 5.00 & 8.00 P.M. x
M.C.P., Mr. and Mrs. Lisle Smith ; isi Tip Top Tunes, 5.00 p.m. Rugby Union $ %
Overheard ‘ : 5 . FTER paying a short visit to vootbati, 5.05 p.m. Interlude, 5.15 p.m. i ~ CARGO oo g
VERHEARD on Broad Street near panto i ea ane Trinidad, Mr. Charlie Taylor, Musie seme. Geaiia | Hote), sa p.m. } SEALED %
6 rE. A. am, e 5 ? ic ing, 6. m. a >
O yesterday was this conversa- p-(ch, Mr. D A. Wiles. te M. 7 er of Psi Hotel tg FO-. Derade, 7.00 pom. The (ne 18 pa Dana ANDREWS and = Carla BELENDA ¥
tion between a man and @ Puckerin and Mr. L.A. Chase, Rune? esterday. morning, by News "anaiasy 118 pan” Behind "The AND S
woman: . Mrs. Taylor and their little son 7-10-30 pam. — 48.43 m. 4 Leon ERROL in “HIGH AND DIZZY” -
Woman: “So the Conservatives Surgeon Sr -scialist Tony . : salad aoe TaraUE - %
a rns te Sane General Hospital % Radio Newareel 830 pm Nadie Theatre Monday and Tuesday, 4.30 and 7.45 p.m. :
arty.” . 4s . "N 40. m. . , 7
Mai: “That is England.” R, MALCOLM MURRAY i" ae ee 10.00 pan, The i043. p.m. Yours Folthe ROSEANNA MeCOY and SAVAGE SPLENDOUR
Woman: “And they they say PARKER has been appointed » ERUS; TOPS eh Sete ea nantes . 5S: s
goin’ come down hea and do the On agreement for a period of three Dorothy Gray Beauty con- shutuinice “Abeta ss, 16 SSSos : : ‘ CLS OSOO OOOO.
same thing.” years to the office of Surgeon sultant arrived from Jamaica on 10.05 p.m.—10.20 p.m.. News
For Yacht Races Specialist, General Hospital, fol- Thursday afternoon by B.W.LA. 1¢20 p.m.—10.35 pm...... To be

announced.
11.72Mes. 25.60M.

Attended Building Congress
. W. M. WOODHUUSE,
Building Development Ad-
‘ viser .o the Comptroller for De-
make-up hints, velopment and Welfare, returned
from Jamaica on Thursday eve-
ning b B.W.LA. He was ac-

For Cycle Races vonupuibaha by Mrs, Woodhouse.
R. KEN FARNUM, Barbados After attending the Internation-
ee i ing § ip i and West Indies ace cyclist, el Building Research Congress in
aie 5. WES ee "S Saat Ee wakes Shiva. left for Trinidad on ‘rhursday London during September, Mr.
Bryden and Sons Limited, return- sity, St. Louis and Barnes Hospital evening by BWIA to take part in Woodhouse, on his way back to
ed from ‘Trinidad on Thursday as Fellow in the Departments of the Trinidad and Tobago Cycle parbados, stopped off at Jamaica
evening by BWIA after paying a General Surgery and Urology. In Federation's meeting which opens a the request of the colony’s‘
short visit. 1937 he returned to Scotland and at the Queen’s Park Oval today. Governor in order to astist with
Back to Work acted as Surgical Specialist to the the rebuilding programme conse-

7 : lowing upon the resignation of Mr. on one of her routine visits. Here
MONG ‘the passengers leaving 4. G. Leacock. until November 2nd she is stay-
: yesterday by BWIA for Trin- “ir, Parker graduated at Edin- ing at the Windsor Hotel.
idad was Miss Ann Hoad, daughter purgh University in 1931 with the During her stay this trip she is
M.B., Ch.B. degrees, obtaining the not having any demonstrations
F.R.C.S. (Edin.) in 1933 and the put will be pleased to give anyone
F.A.C.S. in 1940, During his career who visits her
he served as a Demonstrator of ot.
Anatomy in the University of Ed- ~~
inburgh and as a Tutor in Clinical

Vaucluse, St. Thomas, and an em-
ployee of the Royal Bank of Can-
ada. She has gone for a few days
to witness some of the interco-
lonial yachting between Barbados

and Trinidad. Surgery with Sir Henry Wade.
Director Returns He was awarded a University



DOWNW

for the

DANCE!

Barbados Light Aeroplane Club



YARDLEY’S GIFT SETS

for Men and Women s
LEATHER GOODS — with Zipps

e
3 To See Them is to BUY Them!!
GET THE EARLY PICK!





TO-NIGHT







Highlands and Islands Service, Assistant Manager B.W.I.A. quent on the hurricane of
ETURNING to Antigua yes~ ;
R terday by BWIA to resume on ae ena kt Coleniat R. GLYNE MAHON, Assistant August 17. oe i Contest of S. th COLLINS DRUG STORES
his duties as Operations Officer, Hospital,’ Port-of-Spain, from Branch Manager of BWIA in CROSSWORD |) | : ou i) ia athe amie ha nal . '
BWIA, was Mr. Winston Warren 1938 to'1948 when he joined the Jamaica, returned to Jamaica yes- Beautiful Legs American SEB
who had spent a few weeks’ holi- staff of the Diagnostic Clinic and terday by BWIA after spending a — - T d
day here, He was accompanied by Hospital, Beckles Road, St. Mi- holiday here. He was accompan- oe oe te wo Bands Rhythm

his wife.





chael.

ied by his little daughter.



BY THE WAY - « by Beachcomber

‘THE suggestion that lower
houses should be built, “to

give more room to low-flying air-

craft,” comes late in the day.

We may soon have to wear
lower hats in the neighbourhood
of airports. Then hey and, away
for the time when little domestic
planes steal in at open windows
like cats, and tiny hoverplanes
come down chimneys and land
with a whisper on the hearth.

Remembered

winner of the contest after her
match against Steiger, the Alpine
Wonder, who pushed a pea over
the Silvretta pass into Austria in

1947.
ifteen All
HE sentence, “He looked down
his nose at her”, of which
novelists are so fond, has just
made me laugh again. It should
be followed by “She looked up
her nose at him.”

ERE is something odd about

people in the district heard the
roaring, or saw the animal’s face
at a window.

Outwitting the moon

‘“f7TOHE whole problem,” said the

sage, “is to get away from
the earth's sphere of attraction.”
It may be recalled that Strabismus
once tried to burst his way up-
wards at an unthinkable speed,
and landed in the sea off Wor-








PARADISE BEACH CLUB EMPIRE
wares Door Prize

T x
'CKETS | HOLIDAY IN GRENADA @) 00 bane ar tai «820

Supper Incl.
For Two

$ EACH

> 4> 4> 4> 4 4 > Ma ne de dtnlaans le



"we







Across
i. Stint upset by a cur. (8)
& Almost everybod
night prayers. (2)
10. The mares daub. (5)
12. Court partitions. (4)

’ D 7}
s, . thing. He next tried going very} !3. No out-patient ts one. (6) a aye
The Elephant who What's for dinner slowly, but the rocket started| 13: Make whoopee t (7)

AU LeU
sound of the gong-





To-night at 8 o’clock



without him (while he was hold-| 19. From Yaie or elephant? (4) ee BELVEDERE- 20” CENTURY-FOX'S
‘An angry chimpanzee in. the the story of a man who has ing up his het to test the wind:,, 2° Does shitbesdab toe uuber? (at visit EOE

circus threw its tricycle at her.
—News item.

been fined for keeping a full-
grown hungry lion in a Manhat-

and came down in a field a mile
from the starting-place. His pres-

22. idies on ice? (o>
23. Try a conveyor here. (4)
24. No sapling by the sound. (5)



ELLE




ile




HAT t wil ; tan boarding-house. It must have ent plan is to try guile; to outwit .
Cycler plea scg Smad been a very silly lion—and a very the force of gravity, as it were, _ Down ee ae a e Vv rs) er rs
for Road Decency. How much S!ly,man. The other lodgers could and then to steal up on the moon borg Page | WORLD!

in a most unexpected manner. dis-
carding the magnetic boots in fav-
our of a magnetic hat at some
given moment.

more civilised was the elephant
Rhoda. This soft-hearted monster
recognised a poverty-stricken
Mnilitary gentleman who had
given her a bun in Cawnpore
many years ago. The warrior was
sitting in the efght-penny seats.
Rhoda coiled her trunk round him

hardly believe their eyes, I .sup-
pose, when’ they passed the lion
on the stairs. And surely the house
must have got a bad name when

CBSPH— CISC RE

Landscape. (7) 4. Rustic. (5)
Turned when Edward goes (3)
Ragged enough to treat Ted, (8)
yas in final sungs. (4)

16 without Queen Victoria. (2)
Men stay to make it. (7)
Copper breaks the tall. (5)

Â¥ plus Queen Victoria, (5)

No south-east feature. (4)

Pussy s Egyptian weight? (3)




Rings
Cant,

MORGAN

The most Beautiful Night Club from Miami to Rio










Solution ot vesterday’s puzzle. -- Acro, sith a world-wide reputation for good food > » Se me ssi
and lifted him gently into the one 1 Sod 5 Down, Cardiganshire, 6, Certain ur sis jo... oe ay t Directed by Screen Play by RANALD MacDOUGALL
and ten-pénnies. Tears came into 18," Pre aie ‘insurgents a 'Scer“F5 F . DRU + MARLOWE» MOSTEL «anne Hakim =» HENRY KOSTER '"' eaz.ti erst
the eyes of both, — ae Goprright: “2. Retrestier % {tinerarg Music. Dancing
Aberbananer in a turmoil 4 Gale > Beet Aarons. 0. Cuan a ’ — PLUS —
Bodg ¥ 16, Geld: i7 . °
Rieter Aubin "with ee Entertainment CRISIS IN IRAN

his trainer, and at oncé went down
on all fours and posed for the pho-
tographers, with his nose behind
a pea. The nose looked very fit,
and he laughingly pinched his left
nostril to show how tough it was.
Meanwhile, Evans the Hearse,
after, shadow-pea-pushing in the
gymnasium, punched with his nose
a, pea suspended from the ceiling.
“His nostril-work was excellent,”
said his trainer, Morgan the Laun-
dry, “and he shaped up to the pea
like a winner.” Jivie Wosher-



| ee = ¥
Rupert and Rollo gaze around in
great anxiety. ‘* We're shut in!
However: are we going to get
away?" says the little bear, As
they crawl around to see if there
is any other door there is a noise



|
bocker, the American woman e at the top of their voices and bang BENTWOOD ane
champion, is prepared to meet the and ship trembles and starts ro the roof,
{ “BARBARY PIRATE”
with '

JUST RECEIVED
: LADIES’ AMERICAN SHOES

WHITE ELK
MULTICOLOUR





move. “‘] hope they won't go far,”
whispers Rollo. But it doesn’: stop,
and at length it begins to rock.
* Gracious, we're going to sea!
We must them know we're
here,"’ he cries. So they both shout



$6.61, $7.83
$6.96, $7.83

LADIES’ LILLEY & SKINNER SHOES

(ENGLISH MAKE)

=

ae



DESERT LIGHT

OLYMPIC

TO-DAY to MON. — 4.30 & 8.15

Columbia Big Double - - -

Johnny WIESSMULLER as
JUNGLE JiM in esi



throughout the night
Dial 4000 for reservations



ROYAL

TO-DAY & TOMORROW
5




Universal Presents - - -

“MARK OF THE GORILLA”




CHAIRS...

and other

IMPORTED
HARDWOOD
CHAIRS

Donald Woods — Trudy Marshall
Sword Slashing Adventure







ROXY



COMPLETE
FIXTURE

Of Australian — New Zeal-
and Cricket Tours
with a list of
The W.I. Team





At The



JEFF EVELYN





Men COURT ops reer seek Vika: 1) - oes ta Vy tba bes $7.00 Tea mada
TAN SUEDE SLING BACK ."....................-065. $6.76, $9.50 ONLY 6 ¢ Pein,
OE. SLING BACK) Aiea) aa bh cee oes $9.50 . =e
NAVY SU A COPY i
e e ie canial iisiiien te 2-REEL MUSICAL
) :
t R. EVANS & WHITFIELDS | ADVOCATE Try The Advoeate Stationery [- ¢.teiett, tetiinons, Ethel SMITH and
YOUR SHOE STORES { STATIONERY ' Ror Gene KRUPA and His Ore Henry KING Orchestra

Dial 41606



20: 70; 70:

&
4

Dial 4220

(





Sa





The Best BOOKS

saa







SATURDAY, OCTOBER 27, 1951 PAGE THREE

BARBADOS ADVOCATE



SR ce nec

Ask The Labour Party About Their Manifesto:



—Walcott Advises : MIGGEST RADAR IN EUROPE Brigadier Jackson — |





MR. E. K. WALCOTT told the electorate to whom he
spoke in Nelson Street on Friday night, to ask the Labour
Party about their Manifesto. “The more you are in favour

mi oe me a

allcedin t



of them the more you should urge them to tell you what
they intend doing for you,” he said.

Mr. Walcott was speaking at the meeting of the Ele:t- -

ors Association, held in support of Mr. Victor Chase’s
candidature for the City at the next General Election.

He told his listeners that he was
at present acting as the Leader of
the Parliamentary Party of the
Electors Association in the House
of Assembly. In truth and in fact,
he was the senior man in politics
in the island in the House. From
1924 when he returned to the
island after studying his profes-
sion, his father had suggested to
him that instead of going abroad
where he had the offer of a good
job, that he should live and stay
with the people where he had been
born. He agreed with him and
within a short period the people in
the parish of St. James asked him
to take up politics. He was first
elected to the House in 1925 and
had been in that Chamber ever
since except for the brief period
when as Attorney General, he had
been compelled to retire from
politics,

“I have come here tonight, said
Mr. Walcott, “to recommend to
you for the City constituency, not
only the inimitable Mr. E. D
Mottley who is already in the
House, but also to ask you to put
slong with him, his team mate,
Mr. Victor Chase,

Better Candidate

“I have not come here tonight
to say that any other candidate is
a bad or good one, but what I do
say instead is that our candidate
Mr. Chase is a better candidate
and when we offer him to you we
are asking that you elect him along
with Mr. Mottley and thereby
make a really good choice at the
polls,

“You will see for yourself that
if you put one man in the House
from one Party and the other from
another Party, you will have one
pulling one way and one the
other.”

Speaking on the matter of the
“vote”, Mr. Walcott said that it was
the first time in the island's history
that Adult Suffrage would be tried
out. That meant that every adult
could vote and not merely those
with qualifications such as was the
case at the last General Election.

“You can only vote for two can-
didates. The vote is absolutely
secret and therefore no victimisa-
tion can take place. Remember
that a people always got what they
deserved. When you choose your
candidates you are going to have
to wait for three years or possibly
five, as Mr. Adams has intimated,
before you can change them, and
you will get what you deserve.”

Manifesto
Mr. Walcott said that it was
usually the duty of the Party in
power to put out their manifesto
first, telling the people what
they intended doing for them,

“We cannet hear anything of

what the present Party in power

intend to do. Within a short
time the Electors Association
will be putting out theirs in
which we will tell you what we
propose doing for the people.”

“Tt does not seem,” said Mr.
Walcott, “that the other Party
have any idea of what they intend
to do. They did not put out a
manifesto last time either. To
only say something about the can-
didates of the opposing side is but
avoiding their responsibilities, be-
cause at the end of three or five
years they will be able to say: “We
promised you nothing so we have
done nothing.” The more you are
in favour of them the more you
should urge them to tell you what
thev intend doing for vou.”

There had been a lot of talk
about socialism by that Party at
the last election but nothing was
heard about it to-day. All one
heard about was “labour”, “Let
them come to you and talk about
socialism or let them say that they
have done with it. At the last
election we heard a lot about
what they, were going to national-
ize. We on the other hand had
spoken of public utility boards.
The result has been that before
the end of the House session, we
find them passing legislation for
utility boards. They gave up their
nationalisation and voted for an
item of our platform.”

Education

Mr. Walcott then spoke of the
failure of the Government to pro-
vide a sufficient number of teachérs
to carry out properly the educa-



tional programme of the elemen-
tary schools, They were also pro-
viding an excess of Barbados
scholarships, he said; but not the
secondary schools to accommodate
the large number of children who
were seeking entry to such schools.
“We pledge ourselves as an
association,” said Mr. Walcott,
“that if we get enough members
in the House of Assembly to see
to it as much as in our power hes
that there is neither an insuffi-
ciency of schoo] teachers or school
buildings.”

Of the proposed deep water
harbour for the island, Mr, Walcott
said that contrary to what had
been said by some people, he could
assure them that the harbour
would not put anybody out of
work. An excuse now was the
cost. “It might. cost £5,000,000
now, but if when it was first put
forward the Party in power had
edopted it, it would only have
cost in the vicinity of £3,000,000.”
What one had to remember,
was that the work would
have to be carried on for a
lengthy period and a very large
portion of the money would be
spent on labour. This would
mean that they would be in a pos-
ition to find employment for their
people without sending them to
the United States for a short pe-
riod of three or four months for
work. Ending, Mr. Walcott toid
his listeners that he hoped they
would see their way to support
the two candidates ‘the Electors
Association were offering, at the
General Election.

Less Abuse

Mr. Chase said that he was not
going to make use of the tactics
which had characterized some of
the political meetings he had been
attending. He was ho; that as
the campaign pr , abuse
would give place to constructive
criticism, and that constructive
criticism would eventually give
place to the candidates putting
before the electorate the things
for which they stood and what
they proposed to do if they got
the opportunity to help in fram-
Ing the laws of this country.

He had heard some of the
Speakers saying: “Chase may be
alright but he mixes parochial
politics with central government
politics.” I do not apologise for
that. I agreed with Mr. Adams
when he said that the Govern-
ment would do everything except
turn a woman into a man. There-
fore all I say to the constituents
of Bridgetown is based on the
knowledge that the Government
have only got to think that some-
thing is good for the people of
the island and it becomes a law
of the country.”

Tenantry Roads

“Now if this is the position,”
said Mr. Chase, “why cannot the
Government look after the tenan-
try roads in the City and the par-
ish generally—_roads which are in
a deplorable state of disrepair—
and put them in a suitable con-
dition tor the people who live in
these places?” Surely the Govern-
ment could get an Act passed em-

powering them to call on the
owners of private tenantries to
put the roads in order, failing

which they would do so and call
on the owner to pay the cost.
What he wanted to make clear
was that the Vestry had absolute-
ly no power to put private tenan-
try roads in order, but it was well,
within the reach of Government
to do so. That was not parochial
politics, It was his intention if
he was given the honour to repre-
sent the City, to make every
effort to get the Government to
take over the tenantry roads in the
City and St. Michael. He also
considered that Government
should be empowered to instal!
water not only in these tenantries
but others throughout the isiand,
and if he be elected he would do
hig best to help in bringing this

bout.
Cheaper Rice
Referring to the present high
cost of living, Mr. Chase said that
it would be stupid to blame the
Labour Government for it or any
other Government for that ma‘ter,

All

NATIONAL EMPLOYERS MUTUAL
GENERAL INSURANCE ASSN. LED.

Offer You Insurance Against

we ML TE e

THE NEW RADAR 8-A which



is being installed at Orly Airfield



will enable landings to be made irrespective of weather conditions

and in any visibility, It is twice

as powerlul as the previous one,

and is the biggest of its kind in Europe.—Express,



However, as regards to the im-
portant commodity “rice,” for
which Barbadians would have to
pay 11 cents per pint next year,
he thought the Government had
made a mistake in their dealing
about the price. They had the op-
portunity if they had the foresight
to close the price deal with British
Guiana at two dollars per bag
cheaper than they would be get-~
ting it Now they had no other al-
ternative than to accept a price
which was sure to create a
hardship for the majority of
people in the island. ““] am
advising you,” said Mr. Chase,
“that whoever you elect to
the House of Assembly, say to
them with one voice, ‘the price
of 11 cents per pint for rice is
too dear and the shock must be
borne by further subsidisation’”.

Mr. Chase spoke of what he
called the unsatisfactory system of
education in the island and
pointed out that an urgent neces-
sity was more schools and more
trained teachers.

Colour Question
On the matter of colour, there

had been a lot of talk, said Mr, b

Chase, but he would like to point
out that for the last 300 years
there had been no large Euro-
pean migration to ‘Barldos,
neither had ther@d be@h any
African migration. During the
years there had been inter-mar-
riages and they were now for
the most part Barbadians.
“Should any Barbadian tell you
that he is 100 per cent. Buro-
pean ask him when he came
from England or any other Eu-
ropean country. Likewise should
one say that he is 100 per cent.
African, ask him how long has
he come from Africa. Do not let
people throw a red _ herring
across the trail. Judge a man
by his principle and not his
colour. If a man asks you to
send him to the House and he
does not work in your interest
you have a perfect right to kick
him out.”

He was prepared if elected to
the House to put all his knowledge
and experience at their disposal
in an effort to improve their con-
dition. He would do evervenng
possible to raise their standard o!
living, especially those in tha
lower income brackets in the City:
He was committed to this and if
he did not carry out his promise
he would igive them his word that
he would never again ask them to

Risks.

When you Insure with N.E.M. You become a Member—

Your Problems, Difficulties & Claims are

treated in a spirit of Mutual Co-operation

Why Not Enjoy the Difference

Full Particulars at Your Disposal—

From—A. §. BRYDEN & Sons (8'dos) Ltd.



put him in a responsible position.

A
Mr, Fred Goddard told his tis-|

teners that there was only one
fundamental difference between
the Labour Party and the Electors
Association of which he was a
member, and that was “private
enterprise” as against “nationali-
sation” or “state ownership.”

In the state ownership system
as had been seen practiced in other
countries, ome just became a cog
in a wheel but in the private
business set-up every man could
use his ability and ingenuity to
climb the ladder from the bottom
to the top rung.

During the past three years, said
Mr. Goddard, the “Holidays with
Pay Bill” and other social legisla-
tion had been enacted. All such
legislation had the support of the
Electors Association. They were
the Opposition in the House of
Assembly but opposed no measure

brought down by the Government

once they considered it would
benefit the vast majority of the
people, One thing he would like
to draw to their attention was that
in this last session of the House
no legislation whatever had been
t down to create a single
new job for a Barbadian.

There were many boys and girls
leaving school who could not get a
job. Unemployment was their
greatest problem and any man who
could solve it, he would take his hat
off to him, In Trinidad and Jamaica
facilities had been granted for the
establishment of new industries so
that their people could get work.
Barbados, om the other hand, had
done nothing in this respect until
quite recently and for this he
blamed the Labour Government.
They would not bring in new in-
dustries and create new jobs for
the people. “We cannot maintain
even a reasonably good standard
of living for our teeming popula-
tion on sugar and sugar alone,”
said Mr. Goddard. “This year,” he
said, “we had a record crop of
187,000 tons but what will happen
if there is a decrease in produc-
tion. I see economic chaos if it
does, and if we have no money
coming in from outside we cannot
buy the goods we have to live on.”

After touching on some eo

is
hearers that Mr. Chase was a man
bility and

matters Mr. Goddard told

with experience and ai
he was sure that he would repre-
sent them well in the House. He
would ask them to support him
and Mr. Mottley at the polls on
Election Day.





ae ne




| Inspects Police

THE big attraction at District “A” Police Station yes-
terday evening was six-year-old Andrew Michelin of the

Good Shepherd School, son

missioner of Police. Andrew, dressed as a Police Constable
of the Mounted Branch, riding a pony, introduced the Musi-
cal Ride of the Mounted Police, staged in honour of Briga-

dier A. F. C. Jackson, O.B.E.,
Area

After the evening's performancemarched on to the square and gave

Brigadier Jackson told the Advo-
cate; “It was absolutely first class
and compares extremely favoura-
bly with shows I have seen in
other parts of the world.”

On arrival the Brigadier receiv-
ed the General Salute from ¢
@ of Honour of Police unde:

mand of Inspector Reid
Accompanied by the Commissioner
of Police, he inspected the Guard
which looked very attractive in
their white gloves. After the in-
spection he joined Mrs. Jackson
on thé platform from which they
watched the show.

The: show opened with a Phys!-
cal Training display by Cadets of
the Police Band, instructed by PC
Shannon who won the Baton of
Honour at the last passing out
parade of recruits.

This P.T. display was a new item
added to the local Police shows.
Fifteen cadets took part and the
exercises were done to the rhythm
of the Police Band which played
Tennessee Waltz, Good Night
lvene, My Heart Cries for You and
other ‘tunes,

Of this display the Brigadier told
the Advocate “It was well dane.

It was next announced that a
snartiy turned out youngster,
“our newest joined recruit,’
would introduce the Musical Ride
and Andrew Michelin, who be-
came a horseman six months ago
rode on to the square. As usua
the Musical Ride was very attrac
tive. The horses were more perfec
than previous occasions and 01
c e.ion both horsq@awen anc’
aaa renee loudly applauded.

Following this, 24 recruits of thi
Barbados Police Foree, who were

only, enlisted three weeks ag













2 g a.
Oe OTE Ae ae



rf

|

.

Ol JLY ONE SOAP GIVES YOUR SKIN
7
BF ‘our skin will be cooler, sweeter...
& desirably dainty from head-to-toe *
if you bathe with fragrant
Cashmere Bouquet Beauty Seep.

Fl

of Col. R. T. Michelin, Com-

Commander of the Caribbean

a display of the
learnt so far.
They marched very quick
time and shouted time of the
pause before making the move-
ment. It humoured the specta-
tors as the recruits, who posed an-
air of experience, shouted “1, 2

rill they had

_*

3, 4; 1, 2, 3, 4; 1, 2, 3, head; 1,
2, 3, foot.” |

A squad of Police gave a short
drill display. The outstanding

feature of this display was the
pertorming of the various move-|
ments while on the march, and)
still keeping in time.

The show ended with the
Beating of the Retreat by drum-|
mers of the Police Band. In con-|
trast with the closing in of the}
evening, the Police Band, under)
Capt, C. E, Raison, played The|
Day Thou Gavest and Abide With |
Me. A lighted cross in a nearby
tree top; a section of the Banc!

laying the soft nhythm of “Abide,

ith Me” from the background
and the emotion of the spectators, |
all added to the glory of the)
closing stages. |

Referring to the recruits, Brig-
adier Jackson said that it was
interesting to see what could be
done in three weeks for them.
‘Tam sure some of them must!
have been petrified with fright.”

He said: “I am very pleased)
with the Bandmaster for training |
the Band to play the march of
my Regiment (the Royal Hamp-|
shire Regiment). It was a big!
compliment to me.” He also con-|
gratulated Captain Raison on the)
turn out of Band.

After the show the Brigadier |
and Mrs. Jackson were enter-
tained at the home of the Com-
+ missioner of Police.







HIS EXCITING FRAGRANCE







TENDER LEAF Tef
| abuuays Tadlte- goede

—
y SJ







'
'
'









cause the trouble.





COUGHS

F you’re really out to conquer a cough—to get to the root
I of it and destroy the germ—then ask for Famel Syrup.
Why? Because Famel Syrup does so much more than



ordinary cough mixtures. It contains soluble lactocreosote
which is carried by the bloodstream to the throat and lungs
and breathing passages, where it destroys the germs which

Once the germs are destroyed then it’s goodbye to the cough
or cold. Meanwhile, the soothing balsams in Famel Syrup
| are easing the irritated membranes and the tonic minerals
are keeping up your strength and powers of resistance.
| Fame! Syrup is a recognised medical product used for coughs,
colds, influenza and bronchial troubles. It is widely recom-
| mended by Doctors. Hospitals and Sanatoria.

FAMEL SYRUP

Obtainable in two sizes—from all chemists @ sores

‘Trade enquiries ta:
Frank B. Armstrong Ltd.
BRIDGETOWN.







L° EDINBURGH SCOTLAND

VRRay &

MANNING & CO., LTD.

AGENTS



Teeth as white
as hers?










Let your mirror show you your true
smile — the smile that comes with
teeth that are, Pepsodent white!
Pepsodent, you see, contains Irium,
wonderful ingredient which dis-
solves the ugly stains that hide
whiteness, steal brightness from
your smile.

wet
—

ap}

TONIGHT Smile into your”

murror--take a good look at
your teeth,

uo ‘
tes 4

)
ape

NEXT —Clean your teeth with
Pepsodent. Do this, morning
and evening, for a week,




THE TOOTHPASTE




4
THEN—Smile
into your BOS?
mirror again FF
... you'll see
how a week
of Pepgodent
makes eteeth \ TTT
whiter, yoursmile \
simply dazzling!





WITH IRIUM*

* Iriwm is the registered trade mark of
Pepsodent Liad., for a special soluble in-
gredient that gives greater cleansing power.






KPO 19-202-80

PEPSODENT LTD., LONDON, ENGLAND

World's Finest Small - car
gives even grealer value:

Famous British -Buili

MORRIS MINOR
scores mew success |

Here is a four-door, four-scater
family saloon —a small car in a
very big way with accommoda
tion for four adults — nippy in
traffic, easy to park, and tireless
to drive.





way ahead and te
een through t
Pinger-light steor

STEERING The tue!

romediate sides can be
le windseree!

u



travel

All four doors are
wide, You can get in
and out in comfort.

VIVID, FLASHING PERFORMANCE Tne compart, mo 0
MORRIS MINOR develops 27 i antl pr 4 Ms dnape & ed f
a car of its size, Let us show you what a Ytw on smal! car |

FORT. ROYAL GARAGE LTD.?

Phone 2385 Sole Distributors Phone 4504
PAGE FOUR



“Saturday, October 27, 1951

CHANGE

THE Conservative victory in the United
Kingdom General Elections will encour-
age all those who cherish liberty. The
fundamental difference between British
conservatism and British socialism is that
the Conservative party thinks mainly in
terms of the country as a whole, while the
socialist party is preoccupied with the sec-
tional interests of a class. The United
Kingdom to-day has great need of a gov-
ernment which will consolidate social
unity and promote tolerance and co-oper-
ation between its people.

It is to be hoped that the new Conser-
vative Government will be able to achieve
this great task.

The way will not be easy.

Quite apart from the presence in the
House of Commons of a considerable La-
bour opposition, with the Bevanites in full
strength, the present economic condition
of the United Kingdom will demand all
the resources of any government to restore
it to health. Britain’s adverse trade bal-
ance in the current year is rated by ex-
perts in excess of £400 million. And it is
expected to be even higher in 1952,

It is not paradoxical to state that politi-
cally speaking the Labour Party is fortun-
até to have lost fhe elections at a time
when the cost of rearmament has consid-
erably increased the financial burden of a
country already suffering from the infla-
tionary effects of devaluation.

But if Britain’s internal troubles demand
statesmanship of a high order the loss of
prestige which she has-suffered as a result
of the Persian evacuation and the current
Egyptian dispute demand urgent action
to repair the damage.

One certain result of a Conservative
vietory will be the almost immediate re-
covery of British prestige in Europe, North
America and other non-socialist countries
of the world. This prestige, it is true, will
only be due to a temporary reaction and
if it is to be maintained, it will require
a foreign policy totally unlike that which
has recently led Britain from one overseas
crisis to another.

So far as the British Colonies in general,
and the West Indies in particular, are con-
cerned it would be unwarranted to expect
any change.. The British Conservatives
are, if anythfag, more afraid of treading

on colenialcérns than the British Social-
ists. TI been their boast in recent

- years that Colonial policy has beén kept
outside party polities and many Conserva-
tives secretly and openly admire the
Socialist record in the colonies. Even the
City of London, a traditional conservative
stronghold has the greatest respect for
socialist manipulation of colonial trade by
which the Mother Country has managed
to retain so many dollars for the sterling
area. There would be no justification for
colonial peoples of socialist persuasions to
expect any great change in the form cf
colonial policy because the new United
Kingdom Government is not socialist.
There would be even less justification for
colonial Conservatives to lift up their
hearts and hope for the dawn of a new
day: The present mixture now labelled
British Colonial policy does not depend
directly on what Britain says or does. It
depends on the political growth and politi-
cal sense of the colonial peoples them-
selves. Only indirectly is there likely to
be a change as colonial peoples themselves
come to realise the fact that in matters
affecting their welfare and their material
advancement and progress a Conser-
vative Secretary of State for the Colonies
will give them no less fair a hearing than
his socialist predecessor.

One great direct influence of the British
elections'which can have immediate effect
in Barbados is the good conduct, the order
and the democratic functioning of the
elections, This good conduct has been
praised by Labour and Conservative mem-
bers throughout the elections. It is a
model for our own voters and people to
follow in those elections which will take
place here in December and which will
mean as much for us in Barbados as the
results of the British elections mean for
Britain and the world.



Our Readers Say :

| Have You

Ever Been
Seared By

A Firefly?

———————————

PENANG. '
What are you going to do th



By BERNARD WICKSTEEPD

ir
Saturday night? I'll bet it’s noth-§the stolid outward calm of the
ing like the way I spent my last §trained soldier.

Saturday here.
No. 1 Platoon of “A” Compan:

No Twilight
At three points along the bank

of the Royal West Kents set angof a narrow, muddy river we took

ambush by a river crossing at@up our positions where
Trolak, and reporter Wicksteed® trees had made natural,

‘

qwPrecarious bridges.
1

went along to represent the Press.

Nobody got hurt, but it was an
interesting professional experi-
ence, for though the pen may be

mightier than the sword on most,

oecasions, it feels an inadequate

weapon of defence when you are.

lying om your tummy under a
bush in the jungle beside a ban-
dit track at midnight.

Trolak is pronounced Trola.
The k is silent, but at night-time
it’s the only thing about the place
that is. The jungle that seems so

limp and dead in the heat of the,

day comes to life with a million
noises at night.

At home you can usually reck-
on that any noise at night has a
natural and harmless explana-
tion, but in the Malayan j
there really are tigers, there really
are snakes with deadly bites, and
above all there really are men
prowling round with a desire to
kill you.

So in the course of lying for
six hours in the dark, reporter
Wicksteed experienced some of
those feeJings he has jeered at
in others—an admission no one
will be more delighted to read
of than his wife.

Ungat, our head - hunting
oe Sate sy aan

explanations every
those million jungle sounds, but
the National Service s, of
whom there were ten in 4 it
parts of our ambush, knew as

little of their cause ag I.
Yet they accepted them with



A Potential Colonia
Secretary

.

‘ LONDON.

Alan Lennox-Boyd, at the age
of 47, can be confidently picked as
Secretary of State for the Colo-
nies now that a Conservative
Government has been returned to
power,

His career reads like the pro-
gress of a_ gilded youth to the
courts of fame, At the age of 26,
not long out of Christchurch Col-
lege, Oxford, he entered Parlia-

ment, and at the age of 28 he was

issuing discreet denials to a report
that he was the Private Secretary
to an ex-Prime Minister—Mr.
Baldwin, At thirty-four years, a
job was found for him as Parlia-
mentary Secretary to the Ministry
of Labour, and the same year he
married the second daughter of
the Earl of Iveagh, Lady Patricia
Guiness. The war came and
found him a job in the Ministry
of Food, them a spell in the Navy
—in the little ships of the English
Channel—after which, back to
Whitehall as Parliamentary Secre-
tary in the Ministry of Aircraft
Productions, (under Sir Stafford
Cripps).

) But the future Colonial Secre-
“tary is far from being the dull

® dog with good fortune, in money

and conpexions, that this career
and those jobs would indicate.
Alan Lennox-Boyd was a scholar
and prizeman at Christchurch; he
is a great local figure in his own
homeland countryside of Bedford-
shire; he is a man who takes in-
finite pains to please his friends.
He won his present seat in Par-
liament in 1931 — unexpectedly
because he fought as a Conseryva-
tive for a traditionally Liberal
seat. Since then his peruse,
and his election majorities have
grown because he is always at the
service of his electors. is 6
7 ins. figure is as noted h

fallen
though

Our information was that the
ocal kanditry were using these
crossing points on their jour-
neys in and out of the jungle for
food supplies.

There is no twilight in the
tropics. We got into position at
6.15 in broad daylight. At 6.45
it was as black as midnight.

Under another bush, five
yards away in the darkness on
my left, was Ted Bailey, from
West Ham, who was a carpenter
in a furniture factory.

Beyond him was Don Bangs,
that cheerful Camden Town bar-
row boy.

As solid as a rock on my right
was Sargeant Frank Bucknell,
Military Medal, who has cam-
paigned in a dozen theatres of
war.

You are not allowed to talk
when you are on an ambush.
You are not allowed to cough or
clear your throat because no
sound travels better than that.
You are not allowed to move if
your joints creak, and, above all,
you are not a to smoke,

A few yards from the wet bush
that served as a Press box in
this ambush there was a puddle
and from the middle of it a bad-
mannered frog kept croaking
derisive remarks,

Then there was a beastly bird
in the tree above me that period-
ically called ‘‘Peep.” '

It didn’t even say “Peep,
peep,” which any normal bird

By D. T. ROBERTS

from village to village in his
corner of rural England as it is
as “tallest M.P.” at Westminster.

Alan Lennox-Boyd is the kind
of man about whom many stories
are told. On the one hand he
and his wife live in a fine Bel-

‘avia town house, and are famous

‘or their resplendent parties, At
one of these, guests at a ball found
300 walking sticks for tired danc-
ers to lean on. For their host has
the most remarkable collection of
walking sticks in London—includ-
ing jewelled possessions from
India, and ivory-carved work of
Tibet. Far from such dilettante
pleasures, Alan Lennox-Boyd is
the most practical of enterprising
men, For an example; before the
war he found that his Bedfordshire
market - gardening constituents
were selling their carrots to the
London's Covent Garden at £1 a
ton. In the end the housewife had
to pay at a price of £18 a ton
for the carrots when they reached
the shops. So the wealthy M.P.
for Mid-Bedfordshire set up his
own greengrocer’s shop in London
and sold at prices profitable to
the farmer and cheap for the
housewife — without the middle
man.

Alan Lennox-Boyd has had a
career not without troubles. He
has always had strong convictions
and sometimes suffered for them,
and for his youthful exuberance.
He was a declared admirer of
General Franco, (at a time before
Winston Churchill could find oc-
casion to praise Franco’s handling
of Hitler), and an advocate of

rewar British friendship with
Mussolini—to avoid war. Not long
after becoming a junior Minister
he told his constituents he thought

ft. Mr. Chamberlain should NOT
guarantee the frontiers of Czecho-





HALT for Bangs, Ungat, Wicksteed

would have done. It just said
the one word “peep” once about
every five minutes throughout
the entire duration of the am-
bush. I could have killed it.

Then there were the things
you SAW.

The fireflies were the most
perplexing. As soon as it was
dark they came out in dozens.
You could swear there was ¢
whole hkandits
‘torches
on the other side of the river.

Then you realised they were
not lights at a distance but fire-
flies only a few inches from your
nose.

The jungle is also full of
rotten wood that is luminous ir
the dark, and there were half <
dozen patches of this within sight
of the Press bush, winking like
the embers of’a ghostly fire.

No Coughs

Every now and again the dogs

in a (or village) near
by would bark madly, and you’d
think: “This is it, boys, the ban-
dits are coming.” You'd get all
keyed up till that horrible bird
called “Peep” again, and some-
how you felt that things were
normal.
You have no idea how harc
it is not to cough when it’s the
one thing in the world you are
not allowed to do, how impos-
sible it is not to move your
limbs when movement is a mili-
tary offence.

So it was g blessed relief when
Sargeant Bucknell said ‘Psst!’
and the ih was over.

Back in the camp there were

lights and tea, but if you
imagine the was about the
night’s operati you don’t know
your National Service man.
—L.E.S.

Slovakia. Feeling was then run-
ning high, in 1938. For this in-
discretion he was almost forced
to resign and perhaps this accounts
for why the two brilliant young
men of the Conservative Party in
the 1930’s—R. A. Butler and Len-
nox-Boyd—have had such unequal
fortunes. THe first is an acknow-
ledged leader and probably, the
future Chancellor; the latter will
now have his chance at the Colo-
nial Office, His political
have. been tempered with
years.

views
the

He has been talking, arguing
and hoping for a chance to assist

the development of the British |T

Empire into a practical, going
concern, ever since he left Oxford
University—where he was a Presi-
dent of the famous Union debating
society, As a member of the Em-
pire Industries Association, he
has been active in the cause of
Empire. But it is only since the
Labour- Government has been in
power that Alan Lennox-Boyd has
seen the prospect before him of
taking over the great office of
Colonial Secretary that Joseph
Chamberlain and _é Winston
Churchill, themselves, once fillee,
So he has been travelling widely
—through Africa and the West
Indies — from which he was re-
called to fight the General Elec-
tion of 1950.

As a Con:
Secretary, Lennox-Boyd is com-
mitted to the practical—to eco-
nomic development, rather than
the wordy arena of political
advancement. He has had a lead-
ing part drafting the Conservative
relative to the Colonial

pire — and his term of office
should be given an impressive
send-off with the Empire Economic
Conference early in 1952, promis-
ed by the Conservative Party.

B.H. Wants No Part In Federation

LONDON® Get. 18
Fears are being expressed in
London about possible fresh Guat-
emalan moves in support of its
claim to British Honduras, follow-
ing the news that the People's
United Party of Belize does not
want to sée British Honduras in-
cluded in the contemplated Feder-

ation of the British Caribbean.
The Hom, John Smith, leader of
the P.U.P., has asked the Central
American Foreign Ministers, meet-
ing in San Salvador to set up the
Organisation of Central American
States, to support his party's

claims against Federation,

The conference decided to ex-
press its sympathy with the aims
of the Belize party and passed a
resolution saying: “It is a just as-
piration of American republicans
to end the colonisation and occu-
pation of American territories by
éxtra-continental nations.”

There were unofficial reports
that the five Foreign Ministers
had discussed the possibility of
joint action to bring Guatemala’s
claim to British Honduras be-
fore the United Nations.
London observers believe that,

with this support, Guatemala will

soon be launching a fresh cam-
paign to uphold its claim to the
territory. But Britain has a cast-
jron case for retaining its sover-
eignty over the, Colony.

Not only has the Colony been
part of the Bri Empire for the
past 300 years, hut the Guatemalan
claim to the tefritory falls down|
on the grounds that there is no
ethnological at between
the peoples of the two territories.
Britain is not expected to depart;
from the firm stand it has always

taken in dealing with the Guate-
malan claim. U.P,



ative Colonial | FRIDAY—Saw Brigadier Jackson, the new

SATURDAY—Read Dr.



| NOBODY'S |

DIARY

SUNDAY—The quiet and rest of my weekly

meditation today was disturbed by a par-
son. Not that he made any great deal of
noise, but he wanted to know what were
my views on parsons taking part in poli-
tics. I told him that I wanted to have
one day free away from politics and all
that went with them. His reply was to say
that political meetings were being held on
Sunday nights,—a practice with which
he and many people seem to disagree.
But there it is, and I remember my old

people saying: “The better the day the | ¥

better the deed.”

* * *

party of with
coming down the track] MONDAY—Had a poser pushed at me to-day

while discussing traffic problems with a
friend. Here is. the question: “Can a ve-
hicle reverse up a one-way street” It is
facing the direction in which the regu-
lations say it can go, so what is to be
done? Exactly what did he mean I won-
dered, and he made it. quite clear by
breaking into unorthodox language: “Can

and still am. If he tries it out perhaps
Col. Michelin will answer his question.

* * *

CUESDAY—The more students who attend

the West Indies University Col‘ege, the
better it will be for that institution. And
all need not be West Indians either. This
thought was prompted by the recent
circular notice that English Universities
are making sure that there is sufficient
accommodation for their own students
before admitting ‘colonial ones. Let the
W.I. University set and maintain a high
standard and in the not too distant future
they too might have to serve notice that
West Indians come first in their catering
to educational needs.

* * *

WEDNESDAY—Thought the decision of the

House of Assembly yesterday quite a
strange proceeding. I am referring to the
appointment of a Puisne Judge for Bar-
bados and it was decided to leave the
question of salary to Governor-in-Execu-
tive Committee to fix. They must find the
Judge first and find out under what terms
he would take the job. It might be sound
reasoning from some angle, but it leaves
too wide a space for juggling in my
opinion.

* * *

HURSDAY—My Shopkeeper told us today
that he was having some difficulty in get-
ting his usual amount of rice. He was as
cross as I am, for like many Barbadians
I am very fond of rice. He said frankly
that he believed that the increased price
which comes into effect next January has
something to do with it, and that some-
body is already on the’ look out for a
little extra somewhere. Will somebody
please take care of my rice for me?

* * *

officer commanding the Caribbean area
on parade yesterday. He looked quite
smart in his fine uniform. Now that he is
here I wonder if we can hear some inside
news about the formation of the new
B.W.I. army. Barbados always seems to be
the last place to get certain information,
or the people who should circulate it have
three speeds to their machinery: Dead,
Slow and Stop.

* * *

Inge’s article in
yesterday’s paper with avidity. I mean

the one on “Parsons and Politics”, If you
haven't read it, do so. Many people do not
know that the Act making it possible to





a car back-back forward?” I was beaten



fine a clergyman £500 for every day he
sits or votes in the House of Commons is
still on the English Statute Book. But this
apart, the Doctor’s language, style and
views are well worth the reading.





Noisy Radios
To The Editor, The Advocate —

SIR,—You have sometimes made
room in “your interesting and
valuable Correspondence columns
for “letters complaining about
radios turfed on so loud as to be
very disturbing and annoying to
the neighbours, and appealing for
reasonable consideratior in con-
neetion therewith, I think there js
need for another such letter. It
appears that a good many people
have not considered the point, or
are too self-centred to be inter-
esied. and merciful.

Recently the outery has been
with regard to the nuisance of
late hours and uproarious noises
at Quéén’s Park, and surely resi-
dents in that neighbourhood can
obtain redress if they arise as a
body and claim it. But this matter
of the noisy radio belongs to a
much larger area.

In most districts there are busy,

or sick, or old people requiring
quiet conditions, to whom the
droning radio of some neighbour
—or perhaps more than one—is
really a serious trouble and nuis-
ance and they ought by all means
to be considered. I think in some
cases the complaint has come
from boys and girls preparing the
lessons for next day’s school who
have been badly hindered.

Now the remedy is very simple
and easy. It merely requires that
the loud speaker be not turned
on full blast, and that is no hard-
ship to the owner. Half full is in
almost all cases sufficient for an
ordinary home or listener, and if
everybody would just bear that in
mind, and turn on the receiver
accordingly, the trouble would be
done away right off.

Take another view of the mat-




or the music, and so turn on loud
to suit. That is not right. It means
annoying other neighbours for the
benefit of a few. No; it should be
arranged for those who want to
hear to come inside the house, The
radio service is not intended for a
district, but for the home of the
subscriber.

With thanks for space,
FAIR PLAY.
October 24, 1951.

Is Rice Rationed?

To the Editor, The Advocate—

SIR,—It is understood that the
price of rice is to be changed from
seven cents per pint to eleven
cents per pint from the beginning
of the coming year, but the
public were never notified that
from now on, till January 1952,

cent enough to inform the public
about it. For the past few weeks
poor people, especially in the
country districts, have had to be
running from shop to shop in an
effort to obtain a little rice and
are generally told by the shop-
keeper “there is no rice”. Some of
the more fortunate ones who are
accustomed getting a regular sup-,
ply of from six to eight pints now
get only two pints and if they fail
to get it on Saturday they will
get none at all.

The situation is getting worse
week after week. Some ‘shop-
keepers say that the merchants
refuse to give them rice, or at
least, a reasonable amount of it,
on the pretext rice is scarce.

Does the Government under-
stand the situation? Are the mer-
chants acting under the direction

on pos good-natured friendly rice will be rationed of the comptroller of supplies? If

ousewives think that some of they are not, then they are com-

their neighbours who have not got If this were to be, surely the mitting a very serious breach and

the service, like to hear the news Government should have been de- the Government should take im-
i t

mediate steps to set this matter

right, as no amount of platitudes

can assuage the anger of a hungry
Barbadian.

Your sincerely,

GUSTA.

Leave Private Schoo/s
Alone!

To the Editor, The Advocate—

SIR,—As an old pupil of two
different Private Schools, and also
one interested in Education, I
cannot allow the attack on “Pri-
vate Schools” to go unchallenged.

There are to-day numbers of
prominent citizens, who are relics
of some of the schools, and, to be
fair, Barbados should be proud of

such. 4

Right in our home there is a
girl, 14 years of age, who up to
last February, was a pupil of an
Elementary School and had to be
taken away and sent to a Privat
School the week after With the

fexcepticn of knowing a few Span-
ish sentences which were taught
orally, and being able to make a
garden bed very good, she was
almost void of elementary educa-
tion. Now, for these few months
she has shown much progress in
her studies. Leave Private Schools

_Alone, ;

Maybe I’m near-sighted so can
you tell me which is the more im-
portant: Our playing field in each
parish, or rather build more first
grade and Secondary Schools to
help those who are starving for a
decent education? Should parents
keep their children at horne, until!
those in authority wake up from
sleep and see to proper Educational
affairs? Leave Private Schools
alone, I say. To degrade these
schools, is like meddling with the
msg wheel of any travelling vehi-
cle,

ONE INTERESTED IN
EDUCATION

26.10.51

SATURDAY, OCTOBER 27, 1951

NOW IN STOCK

PLANTATION & FACTORY
LABOUR SHEETS

Call and Select Early from



ECONOMY

VALUE
as

A Result ! SATISFACTION

C. S. PITCHER & CO.






A FRESH SHIPMENT
OF

GOLDEN ARROW
FLOUR

JUST ARRIVED.
+
DA COSTA & CO. LTD. — Agents,



@ ww
~
e
8
©
be ae



IRV-O-LITE

Durable

GARDEN HOSE
at DA COSTA & CO,, LTD.

Plastic - Flexible -



BEST FOR YOUR PART)
UNIQUE IN

FLAVOUR





DELIGHTFUL HARVEY'S
SWEETS - HKRISTOL
Baby Foods (Strained) | SHERRIES
cee, |emes |
Sart Beet weal | ef
_ | GOLD BRAID |

FOR ENERGY _RUM |
J. & R. Bread | There is nothing better on
Anchor Butter | the Market.

PHONE GODDARDS BEFORE
A PARTY !!




SATURDAY, OCTOBER 27, 1951

Government Industrial Schools Have
—_ Notable Improvement,

At Schools—caou. ‘see.

FOR. THE SECOND TIME since the change over ‘at

the Government Industrial

were Hon. R. N,
was Guest of Honour at the

gathering. He said:

Until the happy idea was con-
ceived last year of opening the
Government Industrial Schools to
the general public on one Inspee-
tion Day a year the Government

BARBADOS ADVOCATE

Improvement
By generai reports there has
* “2g been a notable improvement in

Schools, it was Visitors’ D.
ng

yesterday. Among the large number of persons attendi
rner, M.L.C., Colonial Secretary, who

function and Mrs. Turner.

During the afternoon Mr. Turner spoke to the large

inkling of what went on behind
the gates of Dodds and Summer-
vale,

The function of an Annual
all







The fifteen-piece school band which entertained the visitors who ment” of Government. Probably
not more than a handful of persons

attended Visitors Day at “Dodds” ye:

sterday.

The boy at right is the conductor.

Tale of a Mule

A mule, kicking in desperation

~ for his life as he was about io
topple over into the Careenage on
‘Thursday, was fortunate to find
the ready hands of the crew of
the Government craft and other
people on the wharf. He and his

cart were barely saved in time.
It happened when the Govern-
ment Water Boat Ida was taking
coal by Messrs Central Foundry.
The coal was brought to her by
two mule drawn carts. And at
one time, the “fortunate” mule
became uncontrollable so that the
driver could not check him from
running back into the Careenage.
Just as the wheels rolled over
the edge of the wharf, the hands
came to the rescue. While one
group gripped the cart, the others
unharnessed the mule.
One of the crew fell into the
Ida’s bunker and came back up
covered in coal dust.



British Delegation
For St. Croix

On Sunday next the following
members of the British delega-
tion to the Thirteenth Meeting of
the Caribbean Commission which
opens in St. Croix on Monday 29th
October will be leaving Barba-
dos: —

Sir George Seel, K.C.M.G.—

British Co-Chairman;

Mr. G. H. Adams,—Commis-
sioner;

Mr. A. de K, Frampton, who
will be serving as a Commis-
sioner at this Meeting in place
of Mr. Kenneth Thompson.

Joining the delegation in St.
Croix will be Mr. S, T. Christian
of the Leeward Islands who, will
be serving as a Comm ner,
and Mr. M, A. Wenner who will
serve as an Adviser.

The delegation will be accom-
panied by Mr. B. E. Rolfe and
Mrs, Walcott of the Staff of the
Development and Welfare Organ-
isation,

C.J. Grants Petitions For
Letters Of Administration

The Honourable the Chief Judge
Sir Allan Collymore yesterday
granted the petition of Arthur
Drayton Herbert of Christ Church
for letters of Administration to the
estate (with the will annexed)
of his wife Hilda Herbert deceased.
Will proved 5th October, 1951.

Mr, D, E. G. Malone instructed
by Mr. R, C, Chapman, Solicitor,
of the firm of Carrington & Sealy
were for the petitioner

He also granted the Petition of
the Pubic Trustee of the Island
of Barbados for letters of Admiu-
istration to the “estate of Alfred
Tobias Phillips, late of Strath-
clyde, St. Michael, deceased,

Mr. W. W. Reece, K.C., Solicitor
General instructed by Mr, A, DeC.
Boyce, Solicitor of the firm of
Yearwood & Boyce, for the peti-
tioner,

Consideration of the Petition of
Caleb Neblett of Spooners Hill,
St. Michael the constituted attor-
ney of Gorden Pilgrim of New
York, U.S.A. for letters of admin-
istration to the estate of Cecelia
Pilgrim late of U.S.A, deceased
was postponed.

Mr, D. H. L. Ward instructed by
Mr, K. C. Browne of the firm of
Hutchinson & Banfield, Solicitors,
were for the petitioner,

Wills

The following wills were ad-
mitted to probate:

Elizabeth Charlotte Pile, St.
Peter.

Ellen Letitia Leach, St. Michael;

Winston Herbert Badley, St.
Michael.

Alietha Howell, St. James;

Georgiana Bourne, St. Michael;



Amanda Jestina Hoyte, St.
Michael.
George Albert Folkes, St.
Michael.

Charles Busby, St. Michael,



ope

ae)

co

‘nor Ta
ph

DYED ART SILK & COTTON
BROCADE

in Green, Brown, Rust, Rose

47” wide.. Per Yard



Pe



Industrial Schools were, so
speak, the “Forgotten Depart-

in the Island had more than en



Results Of
Educational Tests

The Director of Education re-
ports that the results of the tests
in Arithmetic and Reading given

to the 74
year have
and that
Arithmetic,
continued.
In Reading also, the Director
of Education reports, the results
show a marked rise in attainment
since the children of this age-
group were first tested in 19+.
The girls continue to obtain
better results than the boys in
both subjects. In all 9,694 children
have been tested .in Arithmetic
and 9,683 children in Reading

DECREE NISI

Eighty-three-year-old James B.
A. Cutting of Cave Road, How.
ells Cross Road, yesterday got
decree nisi pronouncéd by The
Hon. The Chief Judge, Sir Allan
Collymore when he sent in a
petition for the dissolution of
his marriage to Alice Cutting.
This is the third wife James
Cutting is divorcing.

The Hon. The Chief Judge pro-
nounced decree absolute in the
suit E. T. Arthur, petitioner and
H. C. Arthur respondent.

Mr. W. W. Reece, K.C., in-
structed by Mr. D. Lee Sarjeant,
solicitoy appeared for the peti-
tioner.

Age-group during this
now been analysed,
the -improvement in
noted last yer, has





to

Inspection Day has changed
that, and I feel very complimented
to be invited as the guest of hon-
our, at this, the second, function
af what { hope will become a long
and unbroken series, For I have
no doubt whatsoever that a func-
tion of this kind can do nothing
but good.

It does good to the boys and
girls at the schools for it opens
a window for them on to the out-
side world and shows them that
people outside are not indifferent
to them and their achievements;
it does good to the general pub-
lie for it must tend to stir their
social conscience and stimujate
vheir interest in an aspeet of edu-
cation which is of considerable
importance to the community,

It is, therefore, particularly un-
fortunate that this year’s function
should have clashed with another
one in Bridgetown; otherwise |
am sure that still more people
would have come down to St.
Philip this afternoon.



Bags, hats, hammocks, table cloths, t baskets, brushes, mats, shoes, etc.,
were on sels Cecing Visit urs Dey o5 “Dodds” yesterday.
This was (ae main sta.l which attracted much attention.



if

the tone of the Schools during
the last two or three years, and
Il propose to quote three extracts

‘from remarks by outside observers

in the official Report on the
Schools for 1950 which tend to
substantiate this view.

The Surgeon commented that
“the past year has been a healthy
one. Tne children have the ap-
»carvance of being well cared for.
shey are tidy in appearance at
all times, their deportment is ex-
emplary, and they are alert and
obedient, Tne improvement that
has taken place during the past
eighteen months in these aspects
vi the Schools has to be seen to
be appreciated, and is reflected in
we nappier attitude of the chil-
dien who are obviously enjoying

to the full, both in their work
and play, as children should.”
These remarks by the Surgeon

are reassuring,

The Education Department cor-
1oborated this favourable impres-
sion in ,the following extracts
from its report. As regards Dodds
it commented, “The disciyyline
compares very favourably with
that obtaining in the ordinary
Elementary Schools,

Their general appearance and
the excellent condition in which
the premises are kept all fur-
nish evidence ofa sense of per-
sonal well-being, of growing
confidence in themselves and of
a steady rise in the tone of the
School, The general impression
xained is that the teachers are
noing their best to cater to the
mental capacity and vocationsl
interests of the boys.

The boys seem happy in the
tone and atmosphere of the en-
lire school is good.” So much
tor Dodds. With re gird to Sum-
mervale the Education Depart-
ment report mentions, “The at-
tention given to cultural activi-

ties and the motherly care
shown by the Matfon are
pleasing.”

Staff's Credi,

For this marked and sustained
improvement great credit is ob-
viously due to the Staff. Pause
foc a moment to consider their
task. It is far trom easy, Tney
nave to look after the needs of
children of various, far too vari-
ous. ages. According to the figures
in the 1950 Report there were, on
the average, 19 boys of 14 and
under, 22 between 14 to 16 and
30 over 16. This wide disparity
in ages must present a formida-
ble problem in itself, and I hope
that one day the, creation of a
Borstal, which is at present await-
ing its turn among the many pro-
jects which the Government ad-
mits to be desirable but has not

The three boys in the foreground are being taught cabinet making, been able to afford, will mitigate

caning and carpentry.

-

The two instructors in the background look on.



Radar Towed

Into Careentage

this difficulty,

Apart from tbe diversity
ages is the diversity of
ground and mental capacity. As
the 1950 Report clearly shows
the School includes a few mental
detectives and, I quote’ the
Superintendent, “some pupils have
no tmoral sense unfortunately.”

of
back-

The 116-ton motor vessel T. B. troubles after she dropped anchor These misfits cannot easily be ab-

Radar safely reached Barbados
from St. Lucia yesterday morning,

but had to be towed into the
Careenage from Carlisle Bay
during the afternoon,

T. B. Radar developed engine

in Barbados. The Government
craft Ida towed her into the Ca-
reenage. T. B. Radar brought a
fair supply of fruit from St. Lu-
cia. She is consigned to the
Schooner Owners’ Association,



DIZZLE DAZZLES, SPARKLERS BEING
STORED AWAY FOR GUY FAWKES DA

ALREADY parents are buying for their children from
the wide variety of fireworks that which the fireworks
dealers have got down for them. There will be the usual
bombs and starlights, there will be crackers and sparklers,
there will be dizzle dazzle and radium dazzlers-—in short,
every kind of fireworks is available.



More Fine Stone
Shipped To B.G.

Barbados is shipping more fine
stone for use in the construction
of a road in Berbice, British Gui-
ana. Schooner Anita H. was at
her berth opposite the Customs
yesterday loading 140 tons of fine
stone with which she is expected
to sail for British Guiana around
the week-end.

Within the past three weeks,
three schooners left Barbados
with stone for Berbice. They
were the Emeline. Rosarene and
Claudia S. Over 400 tons of fine
stone will have been shipved
from Barbados to Berbice when
the Anita H. reacheg B.G.

- Anita H. is consifMed to the
Schooner Owners’ Association,

Golfito Due ‘Wednesday

The S.S._Golfito is expected to
arrive in Carlisle Bay on Wednes-
day October 31st at 8 o’clock and
will leave ten hours later for
Trinidad. On board are 33 pas.
sengers Yor Barbados.











A youngster from the elemen-
tary school told the Advocate yes-
terday, “My Daddy showed me the
long lists of fireworks that were in
the papers and I told him I wanted
bombs and crackers and serpents
and I know he will buy them, for
he always buys fireworks for
me on the fifth of November,” The
boy was as keen as boys are on
this oceasion.

A parent said that he has been
having quite a lot of trouble from
his son Tom. Last fireworks time,
Tom was too young to appreciate
fireworks. Now he is asking his
father such questions as, ‘“Dadds,
is a fireworks’ Flowerpot like the
flowerpot mama has?” or “Can you
suck the fireworks Chinese drops
like you suck acid drops?” So
Tom will be introduced to flower-
nots, Chinese drops and Jack-in-
the-box on November 5 for the
first time,

A few oft the usual fireworks
sellers are not selling fireworks
this year, but those who are sell-
ing have quite sufficient to supply
the children.

Guy Fawkes day is still nine
days off, but children have started
lo catch fire to their crackers and
throw their bombs.

Pretty Lights
Besides the glee caused by see-



=

rd

$s
]

ee

ss

= \
a
a —— at

se

eer]

8

he
t
ra





DYED COTTON SHEETING

47” wide,

in Blue Rust, Green,
Per Yard



DYED COTTON SHEETING
in Rose, Blse and Green
80” wide. Per Yard.... $3.72

S

in Rose, Blue and Green.

$2.45 70” wide.



Per Yard ....... $3.15





Spruce up your rooms
for Xmas

PRINTED COTTON CRETONNE
Excellent for all purposes in the home.
Per Yard

DYED COTTON FOLKWEAVE





ing pretty lights of the various
fireworks ar, hearing the minor
explosion of a bomb, some boys
set added amusement from throw-
ing bombs behind passersby's feet.
Yesterday a reporter heard a boy
not yet in his teens recount to an-
other hew he threw a bomb behind
an old man’s feet-last fifth of No-
vember and how the old man ha
to be given water afterwards t
revive him from the fright.

And as to the conkies that. ga/1y

with fireworks and the fifth of
Novembe,r, housewives are pre-
paring their materials for them.
Neither cocoanuts nor pumpkins
are plentiful so they are buying
them long before hand. There has
not been much corn either. This
is not worrying the small peasant
owner. He always has his supply.





Canteen. For
Greaves End Beach

PERMISSION has been
granted to Messrs. A. E.
Taylor Limited on certain
agreed conditions to erect a
small canteen on Greaves
End Beach where tea, non-
alcoholic drinks and cakes
may be sold. It is hoped

that this arrangement will
help to improve the ameni-
ties of this very popular
bathing beach.





$1.70

and Gold. 47” wide
$1.79

CAVE

HEPHERD
& Co,, Ltd.

10-13 Broad St.

sorbed wifhout
majority.

upsetting the

To cater for the needs of chil-
dren of such varying ages and
characters, many of whom have
come from unhappy or broken
homes, is no easy matter, and it
will be agreed, I think, that the
Superintendent, who hag’ thrown
himself into his job with the most
commendable zeal and determina-
tion, .he Chief Matron, the School-
master, and, indeed the whole of
the staff at both Dodd, and Sum-
mervale are to be congratulated
on the results which hey have
achieved and are achieving,

Handicrafts

I have been particularly inter-
ested in the display of handicrafts
which is on view to-day. I am
very strongly of the opinion that
the boy and girl who, in this
troubled second half of the Twen-

DEMONSTRATION

MODEL
OF THE NEW

MOR

DIESEL WHEEL TRACTOR

EXPECTED

15 — 20 — 25 — 35 hp. Models

Half Tracks a

Built by experienced German Diesel Engineers
@

J. G. KIRTON, Jnr.
“The Grange”, St. Philip |



We Have...

XMAS TREE
DECORATIONS

XMAS TREE
LIGHTS

TINSEL — A Beautiful |
Assortment

XMAS CRACKERS
At









KNIGHTS DRUG







tieth Century, knows how to us

his or her hands at come craft or
trade is, or maybe, at a distna
advan.age cOmpared with tnose
who cannot

It is particularly important in|
an. islan@ like Barbados. where!
there is not enough employment
to go round and not neany |
enough jobs for boys and girls
who have concentraied wholly on
literary subjects, that stress should
be placed on vocational training.

Tn this the Government Indus-
trial Schools are setting a notable |
Jcad. and I am quite sure that the
children who have learnt car-
pentry, basketry, masonry, tailor-
ing, shoemaking, or, so far as the
girls are concerned, needlecraft
and handicrafts during their stay
at the Schools will find these ac-
complishments of considerable |
benefit to them in after years,

1 paid a previous » visit to the
Schools ‘a few weeks ago. I had,
I must admit, half expected to
find a certain amount of listlesy-
ness or even sulkiness, and was
agreeably surprised to find the|
general air of robus! cheerfulness |
which prevailed.

I arrived at Summervale in
time to make my debut at cricket
in Barbados against a_ female)
Constantine wha, using the set-|
ting sun as a background and a
by no means straight arm style,
hurled down a succession of thun-
derbolts which I just managed to
ke»p out of my wicket,

I then went back to Dodds
where another game (of cricket
wes in progress, and the bruise on
my shin will bear witnevs to the}
fact that *here was no listlessness
in the bowling in that game.

Monthly Visits
| understand that monthly
visits to the School are made by
members of the Interim Advisory

Powd of the Schools. These
members, who are all busy men
an’ women, have a somewhat

thenk'ess task, but T would like to
tak> this opportunity of paying
public tribute to their strong
‘epse of social duty and to convey
to them the Government’s appre-,
ciation of the keen interest which
they take in the welfare of the
children at the Schools.

Tne more interest, indeed,
which inuuential members {of
we pupiic can be jccsueucu
to take in the Schools the bet-
t.r, For the time must come
wen tne buys auu guris Wis ve
turn to the outer . world and
must look tor employmeut

I am glad to note from the
records that in recent years
practically no one has b-en in
subsequent trouble with the
Police, ang it is only fair that,
when boys and girls leave the



Schools, they should be pro-
vided with the opportunity to
prove themselves useful citizens
of the Isiand, and the fact thar
they have been inmates of the
Schools should not be held
against them.

At present, unfortunately, there
is no proper After Care Organisa-
tion to deal properly with the
transition from school life into
normal life, and to provide suit-
able employment, and I earnestly
hope that such an organisation
will have been established be-
fore the next Inspection Day, At
present too much devolves on the
Superintendent and .\he Members
of the Advisory Board.

Now you, the general public,
have seen to-day what the boys
end girls at these Schools are
capable of doing, and you can ren-
der a valuable social service by
seeing that no barrier ig put in the
way of their fitting themselves
back into society when the time
comes. There is much talent
here; let it be used to the full.”

The Government Industrial
Schools are divided into two sec-
tions, boys at Dodds end girls at

@ On Page 8. |

—_—_—-—



No LEE SSIS SPSS SS SO FOSS 9 SOS OOOO SOOO SOOO FF FOF OFF



MAG

SHORTLY

iso available |



STORES

eit a 9 |
| Visitors Day No fleas,

LEASE

LOCPCLELLLLEAOEELALLOEPEEP EE EE OLEATE

EPA LLLP PAPE EE ELLE EE ELLE CE EOE F

We Oe

~~

5

*
%




no tapeworms.

Fawseey

The flea is an intermediate host of the tape-worm, and
to ensure freedom from this troublesome internal parasite,
your dog must be kept pest free.

Kill verminous parasites such as fleas, lice and ticks with
‘Lorexane’ Dusting Powder (containing gamma BHC).
‘Lorexane’ is a safe, pleasantly perfumed powder which will
quickly kill all common skin pests. The effect of a single
dusting lasts for some two weeks.

*Lorexane’

DUSTING POWDER
IN HANDY CONTAINERS

A product of Imperial Chemical (Pharmaceuticals)
Limited :—

A subsidiary company of Imperial Chemical Industries Ltd.-
A. S. Bryden & Sons (Barbados) Ltd., Agents.




FOR SPORTS WEAR

in FLORALS, PT.AIDS, PATSLEYS FANCIES
and PLAIN COLOURS,

FOR DRESS WEAR

THE FAMOUS “ELITE”
A wide range of qualities in Plain Colours
and Striped Designs

From $2.91 to $5.94

From $3.73 to $5.25
“RENOWN” TRIUNISED
in Tan, Blue, Grey and White at $5.25
“DOUBLE TWO” — with Spare Collar
in Tan, Grey, Blue and White at $6.79 and $7.15
“ELITE SPECIAL” in White only
with the Ultra Smart Wide Spread Collar at $5.94





SEA ISLAND COTTON SHIRTS

by “ELITE” and “RENOWN” 5
These Shirts are imported free of duty,
and so represent the BEST VALUE in
SHINTS. to be obtained locally,

Prices : $8.00 and $8.18
in White, Cream, Ecru and Blue







a S
HARRISON S-piai 2664 §
Cf LLCO CE AL OPPPECO PCPLOO oc.
a
Pe
o 2
a” FOR BEST RESULTS =
a” USE ae
an PURINA CHOWS .
oe IN THE CHECKER BOARD BAGS .
oa H. Jason Jones & Co., Ltd—pistibvor,
a oo a
a
a:
APOIO VIDIO O OOO IDIOT TIPO OSS OD < - *2
, GIVE YOUR
; AM MORE

LIFE
WITH

PRELL

EMERALD CLEAR
SHAMPOO

PRELL MAKES THE HAIR RADIANT
AND DANDRUFF-FREE



,
"~. DOO96500."’
OCC OSSSO9SSS9SOH SSS SSS999989959909838&.

OOO 9 599999559095

SSOOSSS SSO








sibiomseeiiteniiedi cietilatatl eens SATURDAY, OCTOBER 27, 1951

PAGE SIX fencer OOO IN aastscrttntncernn ne SATURDAY, OSSIN SSR
rOR

|

{









BY CARL ANDERSON



STOMACH® DISTRESS?

Lute ALb |

Alka-Seltzer hel;



|
|

Alka-Seltzer is so easy to take...

so pleasant-tasting. Just drop one
or two tablets into a glass of water,
wateh it fiaz, then drink it. Not a




|
at
|
i
|

laxative, not habit-forming, you can
take it any time. Let Alka-Seltzer
relieve your acid indigestion.

Have a supply handy. i

How. DO vou | BA [THE nerve oF 2”
“) HTHAT GUY--TRYING

a ent

HONESTLY, 2g


















" I DEMAND TO| | TO KEEP ME
MISTER, IT'S AT LEAST FROM BUYING )
THE MOST EXAMINE (T A WALNUT-
, SHREDDER



Raphaels: Almanac
Ephemeris...........-> 6/-
Almanac only .........2/9
Press Buttons put on to
Bags, Purses etc.—12c. each

e
JOHNSON’S STATIONERY
and
HARDWARE







r 4 it nN _
rapve veo Goat ORT CUT eee ning FORE CARE oe Sas ) SPECIAL offers to all Cash and Credit Customers for Thursday to Saturday only
OF JAIL. ae 0: aS. } ; SNEAD.) (FIND OUT WHO
78 Mg }
ge) RB =

De





USUALLY NOW USUALLY NOW
Pkgs. PEEK FREAN'S PLAIN
BISCUITS 4% 36 + WALLNUTS (per lb) 64 48 |
M\\\\qan Bottles O'KEEFE'S BEER 26 20 Pkgs. T. PAPER 32 26 |
rf Novis \ Tins APRICOT JUICE 40 36 Pkgs. RINSO (large) 58 50 |



JOHNNY HAZARD








D. V. SCOTT & Co. Ltd. Broad Street

ie
D. V. SCOTT & CO.. LTD.
NOTICE °
The Amendments made to the Shop Closing Act which affect the hours
during which deliveries can legally be made has caused us to review our
whole delivery schedule.
We beg to advise our Friends and Customers that as from Ist November the
following will be the position.
“COUNTRY DELIVERIES: In view of the impossibility of completing Coun-
try Deliveries within the hours permitted, we are compelled with the utmost
regret to discontinue all Country Deliveries,
LOCAL DELIVERIES: All Orders received by 11 a.m. will be delivered the
ah nica same day. ; ;
HELLO-GROGAN-GIT DUGAN- AT Ge Sere ik All Orders received after 11 a.m. will be delivered the following day.
COSTUMER ON'T GIT iM JA, hfe, Please note that any goods required for delivery on Thursday (Half Day)
a pia , must be placed the day before. Orders placed on Thursday will be de-
WIFE TO SBE ME INGOOD | |) Ii oR om i so) livered on Friday.
the, SONY wi oN Oe nua , SERVICE CHARGE: In view of the reduced Service which we are now com-
pelled to offer we will be discontinuing the service Charge recently
imposed.
BRANCHES: Any customer having an authorised charge Ac is at liberty to
charge goods at our Branches in Tweedside Road or in Speightstown.







THE LOVELIEST
LOT IN TOWN

JUSTIFICATION FOR YOUR KILLING “THE
GREAT YOU" BUTE yOu KILL “8,
(T WiLL BE JUST SENSELESS,
} QOLO-BLOCCEO MURDER! you'LL
BEA



DECORATIONS
ADVOCATE STATIONERY










9

-

SATURDAY, OCTOBER

CLASSIFIED ADS.

eo



7, 1951

TELEPHONE 2508.







The charge for announcements of
Births, Marriages, Deaths, Acknow!l-
edagements, and ‘n Memoriam notices is

$1 30 on week-day and $1.80 on Sundays
for any number 6! words up to 50,

3 cents per word on week-days and!
4 cents per word en Sundays for each
additienal werd,

—_—_—_—_

DIED

GARNES—Etheline as
Rosalind Holder), of
Harold and Colin’ Moore, mother-in-
law of Fev. Forde Moore. Funeral
will leave her daughter's residence,
Hunte ‘Street, St. Michael, at 4.30 p.m,
to-day for the Westbury Cemvtery

Eloise Moore (daughter)

(better known

THANKS

HOWELL: We the undersigned desire
to thank those who sent wreaths,
cards, or in any way expressed sym-
pathy with us in our recent bereave-
ment occasioned by the death of our
Mother Aleatha Howell

H. Howell, E. Howell, S. Roach, C.

Murray. 27.10.51—1n















FOR RENT
HOUSES

TO SUB-LET
ASHTON-ON-SEA, Maxwells, for
November Dial 8473 27,10. 51—4n

“GRACELYN”,. Upper Dayrells Road,
Phone 3317. 27.10.51—2n

LL

IN-AN-OUT, Gibbs Beach, St. Peter.
Fiom Ist Nov. Small modern bungalow
on the beach. Suitable for couple. Fully
furnished with frig. large garage and
servants’ room. Apply to Wesley Bayley,
High St. Phone 2818 23.10. 51—3n







RIPLEY-on-Sea, Maxwell Coast, full
furnished, two bedrooms, telephone and
refrigerator. For month of November
and from January on. Dial 2250

‘THE CAMP—On the Sea, St. Lawrence.
Fully furntshed Dial 8357.

14 7 S$1.—t fn.

WANTED

HELP

TEACHER—For “Naparima College”
Wanted at the beginning of the school
year, January 1952, University graduate
master qualified to teach French up to
and including Higher School Certificate
arode Monthly Salary—$200—10—250
with maximum of 275 for graduate with
High School Teacher's Dipioma. Starting
salary determined by teaching experience,
Apply with references, Principal, Napar-
ima College, San. Fernando, Trinidad

25.10.51—6n









MISCELLANEOUS

MACHINES—-Old Sewing Machines out
of order. Apply V. Vaughn Fairchild
St. or King's St.



27 .10,.51—2n

WANTED TO BUY
CABIN TRUNK ~—- In good condition,
Phone 2032. 25.10. 51—3n

WANTED TO RENT

Seaside House on the Crane Coast for
the month of November. Ring 4893, or
Ring 3113, Tan Gale. 21.10.51—t-f.n,

PERSONAL

The public are hereby warned against
sving credit to my wife, VERA
FLVIRA WHITE (nee VERA ELVIRA
BOVELI.) as I do not hold mvself re-
spowible for her or anyone else con-
trecting any debt or debts in my name
unless by a written order signed by me,

WHITE,













SIMEON N.
Hillaby,
St. Andrew.
27.10.51-—2n
NOTICE

This serves to notify the general pub-
lic that I do not hold myself responsible
for any debt or debts contracted by any-
one in my name without a written order
signed by me.

MARIA CARLOTA GONSALVBS,
“Brundish”
Blue Waters Terrace,
Phone 8589,
26.10. 51—3n

ANNOUNCEMENTS

To meet numerous requests of our
customers, we have opened a_ section
for custom made shirts, pyjamas, pants,
shorts, ladies slacks, boys clothing etc.
Having at our disposal the facilities of a
modern factory we are able to offer
prompt services at exceptionally reason-
able prices.







Reliance Shirt Factory, Shirt Depot.
Palmetto Street. Phone 4764.
10.10,51—19n.



PUBLIC SALES

Ten cents per agate line sm week-daut
and 12 cents per agate line on Sundays,
minimum, charge $1.50 on week-days
and $1,80 on Sundaua

REAL ESTATE

LAND—Ten Acres of Land situated
ehove Pegwell, Christ Church. Dial 5113
after 4 p.m, Douglas. 27.10. 51—3n

|



jHED — Going cheap one garage shed
24 ft x 10 ft. Comprised of 338 sq. ft.
Everite sheets, 95 feet 2” x 4” Fir,
72 feet spruce Sit and 10 ft. Wallaba posts
Also 18—5 ft. Wallaba posts suitable for
cow stalls

Vv. W. CLARKE,
Ivy Road.
27.10.51—2n

POPP FO OSPPOS








PARADISE BEACH CLUB

Notice To Members



In accordance with Rule
34 the Club will be closed to
members from 8 p.m. on
Saturday, 27th October,

19.10.51.--9n.

POSSESS LOOM





| FOR SALE

ins | og Minimum

charge week 72 cents and
cents Su"days % words — over % their taxes are asked to do so as proceed- Sch.

PUBLIC NoTICES Harbour Lo
“Senda IN CARLISLE BAY

Ten cents per agate tine on week-days
(md 12 cents per agate lina on

BARBADOS seems orrcnrttimeesattarte, HARADOS” ADVOCATS



0s

——e

GOVERNMENT NOTICES



metnirn harg : 2 ae a “a
Mihai: - Sch.. Zita Wonita, Sch. Henry 2s APPLICATIONS are invited for a post of Senior’ Assistant Master
| Wallace, Sch. W L. Eunicia. Sch. Lady| at the Boys’ Grammar School in St. Kitts, Celony of the Leeward
I Neeleen. Sch. Cyril ‘Sch 2
NOTICE [alate & Gosgiion, dem Stee agrees The post is pensionable. the appointment will be on proba-
Sch. Unit s 70 years, wi : fiediiiechs setictarihry medi~
All persons’ who have not yet paid} mek ot ao ; Sch. Providense | ton for two years, will be subject to the passing of a satisfactory medi

cee 3 cents a word week—4 cente a| '* for cone eeieete being taken

word on Sundays:
AUTOMOTIVE

CAR—One (1) Model A. Ford Car.
Engine in perfect running order. Appby
F. A. GULL Vaucluse Pita., St. Thomas.
, 26.10. 51—-3n

~CAR—1951 Citroen. Almost new —
3,000 miles Owner leaving the island.
Phone—2022. 14.10.51—t, f.n

CARS: Two Hilman Saloons 1961
models very little used and condition
like new A Hillman Saloon 1950 in
perfect condition. A Hillman Estate Car
(Station Wagon done only 8,000 odd miles
excellent condition, Austin A-70 Saloon
A-1 condi Austin A-40 Saloon under
10,000 miles, A-1 condition Morris Minor
Saloon perfect condition. Singer rot
model, repainted and in nice order.

& Co., Ltd. 25.10.51, Stal

Standard Vanguard,
Morris Oxford

BSA. 0 HP

Singer 9 h.p. Roadster.
$M1500 Singer Saloon
Hudson 1947 Model.
For siasateiers inquire REDMAN &
TAYLOR'S GARAGE LTD.

27.10.51—3n

SUE ns

” UORRY—One Federal lorry in working
order. Price $500.00. Apply Manager
Drax Hall. 27.10.51—Tn

——————
MOTOR TRUCK: Bedford Truck 1947
Model in good order. Can be seen at
Layne’s Garage, Tweedside Road.
24.10.51—2n
etapa
STATION WAGGON: Excellent buy
Austin Station Waggon (Panel) 3 months
use. Practically new. Easy payment, On
@isplay at Austin Agency (Eckstein Bros)
Adapted for 9 passengers.
27.10.51—2n

ELECTRICAL

REFRIGERATOR—One 5 Cubit ft
Westernhouse Refrigerator in good work-
ing ordur. Apply P. D. Maynard,
Porters Factory, St. James. Dial 2319.

27.10. 51—6n

FURNITURE

FURNITURE; One dining room Table
for 6 persons, one Side Board. Both
Mahogany, nearly new. Telephone 4718.

27,10,.51—-3n

FILING CABINETS: Safe Cabinets
with combination 3 ft. by 6 ft. $150.00
Not forgetting a good stock of New Fil-





















ing Cabinets, Desks, ete. At Ralph
Reards, Lower Bay Street.
25.10.51—3n
MECHANICAL

TYPEWRITERS: Royal as new 147
Carriage. $260.00. Also L. C. Smith in
good working order $60.00. At Ralph
Beards, Lower Bay Street.

25.10.51—3n

MISCELLANEOUS __

ARSENATE OF LEAD for dusting food
crops. Ring 4657 B'dos Co-op. Cotton
Factory Ltd. 26.10.51-—3n

BICYCLE ACCESSORIES Pedal
Rubbers at 36c. set, Handle Grips at 28.
and 32c. per pair, Brake Shoes and
Biocks at 28c. per pr. LAURIE DASH &
Co. Dial 5061 Tudor Street.

23.10.51—3n

COTTON SEERSUCKER—In ten beau-
tiful designs 36” wide usual price $1.12
reduced for one week only to $1.05 per
yard at KIRPALANI 52 Swan Street.

27.10.51—1n

CAL-C-TOS >. The Dietory Sippler..e t,
comans all tac pers ss Vu mins Wir
minerals in a pleasent, paiatable torm,
children will like it. $1.50 tin.

26, 10.51—3n
—_—

DIARIES: B'dos Fngagement Diaries,
Just in time for Xmas. The keal Gift for
friends overseas or office executice, 2/-
each KNIGHTS Ltd. 26.10.51—3n

FRY PANS— 8”, 9//, 10/7 and 12” steel
Fry Pans. Laurie Dash & Co.,Dial 5061,
Tudor Street, 23.10.51—3n.

INVALID WHEEL CHAIRS: Two In-
valid Wheel Chairs, one adjustable. Can
be seen any day at Fogarty’s Store.

26.10,51—3n

limited
quantity at 45c, per lb. Enquire Auto
Tire Company, Trafalgar Street. Phone
2696 . 23.10.51—t.f.n.
——

O.K. COFFEE—Fresh shipment of this
favoured brand has just been received in
1 lb and % Ib. packages, and is now
in the hands of your grocer

26.10.51—2n
SMALL SHIPMENT BUT LARGE
VARIETY

Children's Peter's Playballs. Various
colours and sizes to suit all ages. Ideal
as Xmas or Birthday presents. Select
yours early at Manning & Co. Ltd.,
Corner Store. K. J. HAMEL-SMITH —
DISTRIBUTORS. 24.10.51—2n

SILK. SPUN LINEN—Heavy Quality in
Fink, Grey, Beige, Gold and White 36”
wide at $1.64 per yard. Visit KIRPAL-
ANI 52 Swan Street. 27.10.51—In

SEA MOSS-—-in 100 Ibs bags. Those
interested can communicate with Ver-
onica Jn Baptiste, Choiseul, St. Lucia,
B.W.t. 27.10. 51—2n,

SADDLE — One Riding saddle in per-
feet condition. Apply P. D. Maynard,
Porters Faetory, St. James. Dial 2319,

27.10.51—6n































NAELS—Galvanized nails a











TOYS: Large selection of Toys in-
cluding Bicycles for 2 years old, Tri-
eyeles for 5 years old, and Bicycles for
8 years old. Not forgetting XMAS
Trees at $6.00. Call: Ralph Beard, Lower
Bay Street. 25.10.51—3n

PUBLIC OFFICIAL SALE

(The Provost Marshal's Act 1904,
(14—G) 830).

On Tuesday the 6th day of November
1951 at the hour of 2 o'clock in the after-
noon will be sold at my office to the
highest bidder for any sum not under
the appraissd valuc—

Ali that certain piece of Lavd contain-



ing by estimation 1 Acre, 1 rood, 25.
9/10 Perches or ther-abou.; situate
at Gall Hill in’ the Parish of Christ

Church butting and bounding on lands
formerly or late of T. Chase, and lands
now or late of F. Chase, on lands former-
iy of C. Gall but now or late of one Mrs
Ashby on a private roadway and on the
Public Road, together with the messuage
or Dwelling” eae Buildings, &c., ap-
raised as follows:—
PiThe entire pao appraised to TEN
THOUSAND TH HUNDRED AND
THIRTY-THREE ADOLLARS ($10,333.00)
Attached from Bismark D. Drayton for

‘| and towards satisfaction, &c.

BEACH LAND

ST. JAMES COAST

(Neer Four Winds)

TWO ACRES of most
attractive beach land
now available 20c. per
sq. foot — may be divid-

ed into half acre lots.

MARTIN GRIFFITH,

Four Winds.
27.10,51.—2n.



N.B.—26%
of purchase.

Derosit to be paid on day

T. T. HEADLEY,
Provost Marshal.
Provost Marshal's Office,
19th October, 1951.
N.B.—To be advertised on the follow-
ing dates:— 26%, 27th October, 3rd

nerere 26.10.51—3n

| WANTED TO BUY

STAMPS STAMPS

All Kind of STAMPS
at the
CARIBBEAN STAMP
SOCIETY
No, 10, Swan Street.
26.10.51—4n.














NEW SHIPMENT—

GAS COOKERS

JUST ARRIVED !

ALL SOLD

Call and see them at your Gas

Showroom, Bay Street, and to
avoid disappointment BOOK your
i from a future



TODAY



c
Ag.

E GRANNUM,
Parochial Treasure:

St Michael
27.10. 51—2n



NUTICE
PARISH OF ST. JOSEPH
Tenders will be received by the un-
dersigned up to 15th November 1951 for
the wurchase of two (2) buildings at the

Community Centre, Ba * known
as “The Rest House" and former
“Railway Station,” respectively, to be

removed as soon as vacated.
Inspection on application to Mr. Good-
ar 2 premises.
-B.—The Social Committee doe? not
bind itself to accept the highest or any

tender,
J. MERTON MeCARTY,
Secretary, Social Committee,
St. Josepn.
27. 1v.51—3n





NOTICE
Re Estate of
MILTON KING

deceased
NOTICE IS HEREBY GIVEN that al!
persons having any debt or claim
against the estate of MILTON KING
ee a died at Ss in the
Province @ Cape of Good Hope in
the Dominion of South

indebtedness without delay.
Dated this 5th of October 1951. }
CLARINE KING,
Qualified Administratrix. of the
Estate of Milton King deceased.
6.10. 51—4n. |

GON ERNMENT NOTICE |

POST OF FISHERY OFFICER, “
GRENADA.

Applications are invited for the
post of Fishery Officer, Depart-
ment of Agriculture, Grenada.

The post carries an initial sal-
ary of $1,512 per annum in the
scale $1,512.72 $1,728 plus] ¢
Cost of Living Allowance at the
rate of 20% of salary and Travell-
ing Allowance of $440 per annurn
provided a motor cycle is kept.

Applicants should have some
knowledge of, and, enthusiasm
for the sea, and a good approach
to fishermen. Previous business
or commercial experience would
be an added advantage.

The duties of the Officer would
include general welfare work
among fishermen; the collection
of statistics at the recognised
fishing centres and markets and
their compilation; the dissemina-
tion of information among fisher-
men; the execution of small ad
hoc investigations; upkeep and
operation of Government owned
boats and gear,

The appointment is for 4 years
in the fist instance and the post
48S non-pensionable. Applicants
should state age and_ educational
qualifications,

All applications should be ad-
dressed to the Director of Agri-
culture, nt. of Agricul-
ture, St. George's, Grenada, and
should reach him not latér than
15th November, 1951.

20.10.51—3n,
——____
DEPARTMENT OF EDUCATION

APPLICATIONS are invited sor
the post of HEADMIS'RESS of
St. Leonara’s Scnovi tor Girls,
Richmond Gap. ‘This scnool will
previde free education at the
secondary stage for 735 girls
between the ages of 11 and 14.
Preference will be given to appli-
cants who are Graduates of a
University wi.hin the British
Commonwealth and who have at
least 10 years’ teaching experi-
ence,

The salary will be on the scales
for a Grade IV Headmistress in
the Elementary Teaching Service
ie, for a graduate with Ist or 2nd
Class Honours, $2,138,40x9%.
20-3,110. 40x162- 3,758 40. For a
Graduate, who has not achieved
Ist or 2nd Class Honours the scale
is:— $1,911. 60x81-2,397. 60x97.
20-3,175 .20. An annual sum of
$216 is also payable to a Univer-
sity Graduate who holds a recog-
nised Teaching Certificate or
Diploma.

The post is pensionable in ac-
cordance with the provisions of
the Barbados Pensiong Act 1947
(1947-20).

Applications giving full particu-
lars of qualifications and experi-
ence should be sent ¢o the Direc-
tor of Education, The Garrison,
Barbados by 30th November, 1951.
23rd October, 1951.

REMEMBRANCE SUNDAY

His Majesty the King has ap-
proved of Remembrance Day be-
ing observed on Sunday, the
11:4 of November.

As in previous years the Church
authorities are being invited to
hold special services throughout
the Island at which the two min-
utes silence can be observed at
11 am.

The special service at St. Mi-
chael's Cathedral, which will be
attended by His Excellency the
Governor, will begin at 10.30
a.m., and will finish at approxi-
mately 11.10 am. At the end of
the service, if the weather per-





|



; Macoris,
Bernadotte, s.s. Cunene, s_s Mormacmar,
Rio de la Plata, s.s.

| Corsair, 8.5

Jones; MV
Moneka

c

L.

M Tannis,

SEAWELL

ARRIVALS

M.V. Duerwood. % tons net,

Mulzac, from St. Lucia.
DEPARTURES

Schooner Lindsyd II, 36 tons net. Capt.

Barnes, for fishing banks

S.S. Alcoa Pilgrim, 3,931

Capt.

BY BWHLA.

ON THURSDAY
From TRINIDAD:

W. Bennett, A. Bryden, C. Rivera, P
B. Atherly,
Themas, E. Young. R, Sharpe, W. Hul-

Powell,

land, R, Bumstead
From MARTINIQUE:

Paul Parfait.

J. Barcelo,

From PUERTO RICO;

Frenk Morgan, Elizabeth Ann reve. |
Levo, Doris Gertrude Levo, {
Herbert Allan, David Walter

John E
Walter
Allan.
ON
From TRINIDAD:

A. Taylor, S. Tarior, A. Taylor, E.

Deboussay, D. Bell.

IDAY



In Touch With Barbados
Coast Station

Cable end Wiretess
vise that they can now communicate
with the following ships through their

tw.l.) Ltd. ad

Barbados Coast Station:—

8.S. Alcoa Pilgrim,

Alcoa, Polaris, s.s.

8.8, Argentina, s.
Carnaro, s.s. Ca
na Aurora, ss
rmuda, s.$

Penama, ss

ss. Bera, s.s,|UP to-noon on 31st October, 1951, for the supply of Barbados “tar | '
Brattingsborg, s.s.|sand", a bituminous sand from the Scotland area consisting of silic
Michael, s.¢ Folke

8
stor,
Ar

Alcoa
Aleoa Pointer, 8.5.
Rodas, s.s

$.5, Laguna, s.s.
gual, 8.8. Queen o:
Cavalier, s.s

Sea Lender, s.s

Delaires; s.s. Bardal, s,s Dageid R.F\A

Dewdale, s.s
Marsano, s.s
Golfito, 5.8

Esso Belgium,
Beau,
ae Del Macifice.

5.58.

8.8. Rescue, s.s.



RATES OF EXCHANGE

OCTOBER 26, 1951



. Sch. Belqueen,

Lydia Adina S., Sch. Molly N.

M.V.

Capt

tons net,
Sreaasee, for St. Vincent.

c.

Alcoa

Ttalo

dal examination and will date from Ist January, 1952
2. The School is a Government institution arid the following
salary scales are applicable to male Secondary School Teachers in the
Leeward Islands.
Assistants with a degree
and Teachers’ diploma
Assistants with a degree only
efficiency bar ....... ,
A Temporary cost of living "allowance of £480 per annum is also
payable, A Salaries Commission is at present reviewing salaries in
the Leeward Islands.
3. Applicants should possess a degree of a University within
the British Commonwealth and the successful candidate will be re-
quired to teach Latin to the standard of the Higher School Certificate

$1,440-—$120-—-$1,680
$120 to $2,040

and skill at games should be stated in the application as the a
j will be required to take charge of school games and athletics.
4. Applications stating age. teaching experience, marital status |
etc. should be submitted to the Administrator St. Kitts, Nevis, Anguilla
not later than 30th November, 1951.
At least two testimonials and a photograph should also be sub-
mitted.

ppointee

27

10,51—-2n

INVITATION TO TENDER
Department of Highways and Transport

Sealed Tenders will be received at the Colonial Secretary’s



sand impregnated with a viscous bituminous oil referred to locally as

; 1951,

the Department of Highways and Transport.

the Colonial Secretary's office on payment of a deposit
($5.00), After a contract has been entered into, those persons who |
may Have submitted bona fide tenders will have their deposits refund-

when so called upon shall have the deposits made by them refunded,



Mary M. Lewis will be closed at the
General Post Office as under:—

Parcel

1951.
Mails

for

Mail and Registered Mail
8 am. on the 29th October 1951. Ordin-
ary Mait at 9 a.m, on the 29th October

Grenada
Cc. L. M. Tannis will be closed at the

by the

General Post Office as under:—

Parcel Mail

ber 1951.



and Registered Mail
9 am. on the 27th October 1951. Ordin-
ary Mail at 9.30 a.m. on the 27th Octo-







CHRISTIAN SCIENCE

First Church
Bridgetown,

Sundays 11 a.m.

Healing

SUNDAY, OCTOBER 21, 1951
Subject of Lesson-Sermon;
MENT

OF ATONE:
Golden Text:

Upper



and 7 p.m,
Wednesdays 8 p.m. A _ Service which
includes Testimonies of Christian Science

H Corinthians 5:17. h
mon be in Christ, he is a new creature:
old things are passed away; behold, ail

Christ,

Selentist,
Bay Street,

things are become new.

The following Citations are
the Lesson-Sermon; The Bi



shewed thee, O man, what is -good;.

Science and Health with key to
Mary Baker Eddy.
The scientific unity which exists between
God and man must be wro
and God's wil

Scriptures, by

life-practice,
universally done

Quick!—put a few as
o Vicks Va-tro-nol up
each nostril. Irritation is

thed, your nose“‘opens
up” and ze breathe

in! vere
epee. ped

freely oe fae
wast

Micah 6.8

Page 202.












at

M/V

at











eluded in



the

it. out in
must be

\

DEPARTMENT OF EDUCATION
BARBADOS EVENING INSTITUTE
Commercial Classes

(a) Applications will now be considered for entry to a beginners’
Shorthand-Typing course, to be held at Combermere School, |
commencing in January 1952.

(b) There is a limited number of vacancies for the Senior Short-
hand-Typing course. Applications will only be considered
from those who hold a Pitman's Theory Certificate or its
equivalent in Shorthand, and an L.C.C. Elementary Certifi-
cate or its equivalent in Typewriting.

Two lessons a week in Shorthand, two in Typewriting, and
: one in English, each of one hour's duration will be given
between the hours of 5 p.m. and 7 p.m. on Tuesdays, Wednes-
days and Thursdays. Students may take all three subjects,
but those who take Shorthand will be expected to take type-
writing and vice versa,

Applicants must be over 15 years ‘of age on Ist Januar. y, 1962.
As a guarantee that the minimum educational standard has
been reached, applicants for the beginners’ class who do not
hold a School Certificate or equivalent qualification must
supply a certificate from the Head of a School siating
that the school course up to the age of 14 -+ has been satis-
factorily completed. Preference for admission will in general |
be governed by the standard of attainment in English, to be |
determined by a test. |
A fee of $5.00 per item payable during the first week of the | ,
term covers all the subjects. 80% of the fees paid will be
refunded at the end of a session to all students who have,
in the opinion of the Principal, Dean and Lecturers, worked
eotisfactorily and attended regularly and punctually.

(g) Students will be required to supply their own stationery and

text books as required by the Lecturers.

(h) Applicants must obtain from the office of the Department of |
Education application forms, which must be filled in and tor- |
warded to the Dean of Commercial Studies, the Barbados |
Evening Institute at the office of the Department not later
than Saturday, 24th November.
the form whether they are applying for the beginners’ or the
Senior course,
vember will be considered.

Department of Education,

28rd October, 1951,

(dy
(e)

(f)

27.10.51. ~In



VACANT POST OF MATRON, MATERNITY HOS

BARBADOS, B.W.1.

Applications are invited for the post of Matron, Materni Hospital
Barbados, B.W.1. which will becomes vacant on Mareh 7th, 1952.
The post is on Agreement for three years in the first instance
and is renewable,
Applicants for the post should possess the following qualifications
‘ and experience;—
(a) State registration of nurses in the United Kingdom.
(b) Certificate of the Central Midwives [oard of England anc
Wales.
(c) Three to five years experience in practical midwifery, pre-
ferably in an acceptable institution,
(d) Some administrative experience required, not necessarily ir
a purely administrative post.
The salary attached to the post is at the rate of $2,160 per annurr
; with a deduction of 5% for rent of furnished quarters, an allowance

Prva,

\ Diuder Urinary System | towerds rations of 60 cents per day is payable, uniforms are supplicc
Busia yet is Senolutely harmless. to and electric light, telephone and water rites are frec.
: pumarid of nealth-destroying, poison Passages (not exceeding $1,440 W.1I.) are provided on appoint-
“ous acids witt» which your system has ment and on completion of Agreement in accordance with conditions
; oe case ond reinvigorates the kidneys, | Câ„¢mbodied in the Form of Agreement.
"protects from the ravages of see Government contributes to the Superannuation Scheme for Nurses
py gen Fell The Maternity Hospital is one of twenty beds with a materna
) Praized by Doctors, Chemists, and weltare clinic attached, It is primarily a teaching Hospital for student:
» One-time Sufferers Sua ‘> nd twenty are trained annually. It is served by a Visiting Obstetri-
Dyson 6 spprores 7 Deere Sorers toe | Clan, three groduate nurse-midwives and the usual subordinate staff

C, writes. “I on '

The Matron is responsible to the Director of Medical Services fo»

10 ‘years old. and have veered i | overall administration of the Hospital and the training of th«



thanks to Cystex I am much better
for years.” Mr. P. D.
wonders Cystex has worked with me seem ale

The

student midwives,
Applications should be addressed to the Colonial Secre tary, Bar-



1 dor theo
mite, ie “Excellency “ena perty U they were 1a box bados, B.W.I. so as to reach his office not later than De~: her at we
will walk to the War Memorial, Guoronteed to Put You Right =| eo
where His Excellency will lay a Money Bock
wreath. There will be no cere- , Get Oyster from your che
mony. today Give | Warthorgsh tat Applications for Admission to Universities and Colle zes in the
sallons are being ivited to make ga Fee ne enone
arrangements for ex- weevien gna meee oe oe be lies { Owing to the limited accommodation at Universities and College
> petite gnd 3 soees at on peetane ht no the eV }in the United Kingdom resulting from the large number of applica
pe ie a ra er packas ; tions for admission, the Director of Colonial Scholars is « ideavourin;
members of the public are invited KID fon EY!!
to attend their usual places of eee BLADDER to secure a quota for Colonial Students in each faci ulty in every Uni-
worship. 27. 10 5 : the SVARANTEED R Remedy RHEUMATIS versity and College throughout the British Isles. It must be realised
—l1n, '



BARBADOS AUTOMOBILE ASSOCIATION

=?

Members are reminded that when taking out new
car INSURANCE POLICIES or renewing them at
J. B. LESLIE & CO., 10% reduction on premiums

will be given if membership cards are produced.

STS





therefore, that only those who are strongly recommended and have
| first class qualifications for entry can be considered for sdission,
| 2. The British Council will be responsible for making arrange
ments for meeting students and for securing suitable accommodatior
| for them.
| 8. Students are advised that it is most undesirable for them t
} proceed to the United Kingdom unannounced and unsponsored in th«
\{hope of obtaining admission to Universities and Colleges, as ever
| tutorial colleges and polytechnics are overcrowded and it is ve ry diffi-
| cult to gain admission to them without due notice in the poner form
4. Forms of application for admission to Universities and~Col-
leges in the United Kingdom, to be completed ate
be obtained from the Secretary, Student Advisory Committee,
Office of the Director of Medical Services, Wharf, Brid
must be returned to him not later than Wednesday, 31st

in auhalusiic mas



1
{
{
(

“tar sand", for a period of five (5) months from the Ist arene |
2. Samples of “tar sand” of the quality required may be seen at|

|
3. Tenders are to be made on forms which can be obtained at |
of |

ed; but no person or\persons who may refuse to enter into a contract |

CANADA
_. Cneluding Newfoundland) and these shall be forfeited and paid into the Treasury.
| CHAN BF. Seeoeas 08 eankers ast: 4. The prices tendered must be based on the payment of wages
ta Sight Drafts 62.2% pr. |at current standard rates in the trade, and shall be the flat rate per
‘ ae Surreniy 61% pr. !cubic yard at which the tenderer would contract to supply “tar sand”
Coupons 60.3% pr. |on spot anywhere within the Parishes of St. Andrew and St, Joseph.
OCTO"FR 3, 1951 5. Tenders are to be addressed to the Colonial Secretary and
aan: CANADA marked “Tender for the supply of Tar Sand to the Department of |
V + pr. Cheques on
Bankers ‘62. 5/10" pr. | Highways and Transport.”
Oe 62.35% pr 6. The Contractor will be required to give security in a personal | |
Sight Drafts 622/10% pr.| bond with two (2) approved sureties in the sum of fifty (50) dollars
Se ee, eim pr, _ {for the due performance of his Contract. F
Coupons 60 340% pr j.ewee?. The Government does not bind itself to accept the lowest or
any tender, and only tenders submitt*1 on the prescribed form will |
MAIL NOTICES be considered. 21.10.51,—2n
Mails for Br. Guiana by the Sch.

Applicants must state on |

No applications received after the 24th No- |

| BARBADOS.

IN THE COURT OF CHANCERY

i pursuance of the Chancery

PAGE SEVEN.

a ee

Act 1906, I do hereby give notice to all persona-

wving or claiming any estate right or interest to any Hien or encumbrancés in or,

affecting the property hereinafter mentioned

the property

of the defendant) to bring:

efore me an account of their claims with their witnesses documents and voucherg

to be examined by me on any Tuesday or Friday between the hours of 12 neon and
t o'clock In the afternoon at the Registration Office, Public Buildings, Bridgetown,.
before the 2ist day of November, 1951, in order that such claims may De
reported’ on and ranked according to the nature and priority thereof Ln erg
otherwise such persons will be precluded from the benefits of any decree and

ceprived of all claims on or against the said property
HENRY WHITE

Plaintiff: Sere

Defendant: CLARENC
PROPERTY: ALL THAT certain piece cr
(formerly part of the land

be,

BELFIELD LAYNE
parcel of land situate at Bath Village

Maxwelis plantation) situate in the

parish of Christ Church cond island abovesaid containing by ad-
measurement twenty-six perches or thereabouts (inclusive of =e ‘
perches in roadway) abutting and bounding on lands formerly of :
Bertina Miller but now of F. Clarke, orm lands formerly of Maxwells

Plantation but now of A. B. Skin
of Joshua Bourne but now of Graeme Hall Co. and qn nthe ene
road or however else the se et

messuage or dwelling house calle.
and pulidings both freehold and chattel on the said land eer and
| built standing ard being with the appurtengnces.

| Bala

filed; August 1961

examination. A knowledge of Spanish would be regarded as an asset

SHIPPING



ner and S. Kingh on lands formerly

abut and bound

“Esme” and ot! the erections

H. WILLIAMS,
Registrar-in-Chancery.



NOTICES _



MONTREAL, AUSTHaL1A, NEW
ZEALAND LINE, LIMITED
(M.A.N Z. Line)

8.8. "POrt ADELAIDE” ts scheduled
to sail from Hobart September 25th,
Melbourne October 4th, Sydney October
| oth, Gladstone October 16th, Port Aima
| “ctober 20th, Brisbane October 27th,
rriving at Trinidad about November
ist and Barbados November th.
| In addition to general cargo this

$ Office | | veata has ample space for chilled and

rel frozen cargo,
" Cargo accepted on through Bills of

{t ding for transhipment at Trinidad to
7 Vitis Leeward and Windward

| Pyitish Guiana,

Islands.



Trinidad,
B.W.I.





.

a NEW

A STEAMER sails 12th October-
A STEAMER salle 2nd November--<







NEW ORL
A STEAMER 10th October—

A STBAMER

sails



.



ed

YORK SERVICE
errives B'dos
rrives B’'dos 13th November, 1951.

'S SERVICE

arrivea B'dos
sails 24th October—pirives B'dos
A STEAMER sails 7th November--urrives B'dos 22nd November, 1951,

A eo eee ten tt tt CT CE,

The M/V “C. L. M, “‘TANNIS”
will aceept Cargo and Passengers

ij

for Grenada, sailing Thursday, <>

25th inst ; =
The M/V “DAERWOOD" will accept Cargo and Passengers for

St. Lucia, Grenada and Aruba, .

and Passengers only for St. i com

Vincent, sailing Tuesday, ee

ins ‘ ta
The M/V “™ CA ae will” —_

aceept Cargo and Passengers” for”

Dominica. Antigua, Montserrat,

Nevis and St. Kitts, saling-

Friday, 2nd November 1951 =—"~

BWI. SCHOONER OWNERS
ASSOCIATION (INC. [°*"——

Consignee, Telephone No, 4047

}

tht mata

PLE PPPOE



Sieamship Co.

One.





2rd October, 1951,



1951,
1951.

25th October,
8th November,

CANADIAN SERVICE

JUTHROUND





Salle Sails Arrives
| Name-ot Shir Montreal Halifax Barbados |
“ALCOA POINTER" Sept. 28th Cet, Ist Oct. 12th
$ “ALCOA PILGRIM” Met. 1th Oct. 15th Oct. 2th
$s ‘ALCOA PEGASUS Oct. 26th Oct, 29th Novr, 8th
—_——
NORTHBOUND
§. “ALCOA PLANTER" Due Barbados October 15th, Sails
for St. Lawrence River Ports

ROBERT THOM LTD, — NEW YORK AND GULF »sERVICE.

\ APPLY:—DA COSTA & co.





xe

PLP PEE

with

A otatt pts SOOO
SOP SEES ELE EE ELL IIS FOO BSS

4, <
SOSPPSSS SSO COS POPP PO POSES

ASK TO





LTD —CANADIAN SERVOS. “7;







PCPA SCOPES GCOS SPE SSS PSY

COCO

THE LATEST

STOVES

FIBRE GLASS WICK
EXTRA HOT BLUE FLAME
NO PARTS TO BREAK OR SPOIL

ee oe



'gy HARRISON LINER

OUTWARD FROM THE UNITED KINGDOM









Vessel From Leaves Plans =
S.S. “STATESMAN” .. London 15th Oot, 30th eas
5.8. “STUDENT” _ ,.., au« Liverpool 27th Nov,
SS. “LINARIA’ . London 3ist i OV. r °
5.8. “ADVISER” _ Liverpool 10th Nov. , =
SS. TRA . Glastow & . - -
} Liverpool Sth Nov. 29th NoveSor-5
HOMEWARD FOR THE UNITED KINGDOM
Closes in’
Vessel For Barbados
| 3.8, “SCHOLAR”... ., Lf 1 27th Oct.
SS. “TRIBESMAN” . London “4th Novi ~~
For further Information apply to .. .
DA COSTA & sa oe eee
\ 99999999049
:
, ~
2 The T.S.S. GOLFITO will be arriving from South: J
| ampton on Wednesday, 31st October, at 8 a.m. and-~,
% will be sailing at 6 p.m. the same afternoon for
$ Trinidad,
‘ There is ample first clags Accommodation available
* for Trinidad, and also for Southampton on the
*%s- 9th November.
%
x Apply :
iis
) WILKINSON & HAYNES & Co., Ltd.
1%,
* Agents
‘,
2
% Phone 4230. :
‘,

cesses
Green ARROW

IN

SEE

GREEN ARROW
STOVES

AT

x

% The B’dos Co-operative Cotton Factory Ltd.—2039

>

$ Manning & Co. Ltd. Corner Store.—4283

5
Is Plantations Ltd.—4400

~
ie Ward & Spencer Lid.-—2223 S
$ x
inal ® Laurie Dash & Co. %
Ye PLL LLL LPS FS PO SS SPSS SPSS PSPS oP SPP PSPSPS SSS u
eT OOOO oe OE —V—_ ETC ll



PAGE EIGHT BARBADOS ADVOCATE

W.I. Struggle For Runs At Newcastle

eo

1951

SATURDAY, OCTOBER 27,





ern ee—wererinnneen ears

AND RAMADHIN 2—36

(From HAROLD oe.
SYDNEY, Oct. 27.

Govt. Industrial Schools

Lawns were. freshly cut,



CRYPTOQUOTE NO. 108

XZCB, DZZ, CLQ DCP LNGXOLH
OR PNI TNIQ WOAZ OL



From. F ag VZCMZ HNZS
Colle e 6-4. e m &. ee * Last Crypt: He who decides has- | r | 4 | R s
Si tr had been trimmed and the tily, will soon repent of his
ummervale, both formerly sugar grounds and narrow roadways decision ~-Publits Syres

A crowd of over seven hundred] P/@ntations, They are. situated. in hel O08 PS

snrough the school were all swept






























< ic| the heart of St, Philip, x i J. A. CORBIN & SONS
JOHN GODDARD and Roy Marshall to-day saved the Pong ana = a * r ean. Tear the buildings ||) ;
Teer oe PPers| = Wel Kapt La there was a faint smell of new | epee ee aera HYACINTH
West Indies from a minor disaster at Newcastle. The New score an upset victory over Harri- e pt wns yaint and the interior colour -
South Wales Country Eleven was dismissed for 139 soon = * the tune of —six oerhenday dhe iain a eseees of the . goals to four. In a thri match is len: well together especially » remind my friends h ‘ i
yeiantonag caigai the large crowd settled down to watch the with Harrison College starting hot — who — oi es the school room ofrich was of light yO Sa aro and bopa oe | |
7 favourites rs tur! inspec! i of gree! ith skirti rds of a |
am Mefoter very long. the crowd Site le see are halt anti 2n| Dodds must have been very im- arker shade TOS © ANNUAL DANCE
Australia Picks were six wickets for 61 and the opening two minutes of the| Pressed with what they saw, The given by
struggling desperately to match Same they had netted two goals, grounds and buildings were spot- At Dodds there are at present MR. CLYDE JONES i |
Test Team the countryside’s total. one by* Bannister and the other . aay, 36 boys. These boys attend school CLUB ROYAL, SILVER SANDS, Romaine
Local pace bowlers John Bull by Ince. | from 8 to 11 every morning in CHRIST CHURCH
(From HAROLD DALE) nee Se we eet ~ All honours went to Snappers WHAT'S ON TODAY teal Re cna Pag Wigan 4 MONDAY NIGHT 20TH OCTOBER Cr e e
atching. in this half and by the interval} Police Courts 10.09 a.m, shops where they are taught » Music supplied Bre. 2. Browne's | p
SYDNEY, Oct, 27 Schn Bull had taken six for 24 ‘hey had taken their score to six,/|. Meeting of the Housing trade. They have a choice of car- Orchestra :
The Australian selectors head- =gainst the MCC last season and ee George McLean scoring Board at the Couneil | pentry, shoe malhog, tailoring, ADMISSION — > 2/- In Green, Lime
ed by Sir Donald Bradman to- was again—in devastating form the Td goal Malcolm Browne} Chamber 10.00 a.m. masonry, handicraft, — cooking, Green, Rose
night omitted Sidney Barnes from brihatey the ball back sharply to the fourth and Bannister followed New Series of cricket games animal husbandry, horticulture, | Va Gold, Red, Ss, :
the Australian 12 chosen for the bowl Worrell after Rae had fall- up with the fifth and sixth just opens at the various )| jimers wark etc. There is POLE E AAI OTE, 30) axe
first Test in Brisbane Nov. 9. en to a brilllant slip cateh taken before half time. quande, 130 pm. also a schon. head gale THE REV. ALPHONSO { Blue, Black and
almost directly behind wicket- : ' s oys are taug! music, o X oe ee White.
They have preferred Queens- keeper Lambert. After the interval Snappers still) |. Empire ys. Lodge at Bank in the shops ends at three Geneste O.H.P.
land 22-year-old school teacher eekes was out to an astonish- pressed their rivals and College’s| Hall; Pickwick v. Y.M.P.C. || o'clock. Then there is a short spell will be consecrated 36 inches wide.
Ken Archer who scored 104 and ing one handed catch on the goalkeeper John Chabrol was at Old Collexe grounds; | of physical training before dinner SUFFRAGAN BISHOP :
88 in last week’s Sheffield Shield square leg boundary and Stoli- kept busy conceding several Combermere vs. College at four. After that the boys have in Per Yard ....... $2.08
game. agninet New South Weise meyer vleved ina - haut fam bs gl which looked like certain ey nga a ag ie recreation on the plajing field. ST. McGINLEY'S ORTHO- eg
in whic arnes scor only 3! ickles a fted sharply. oals, ‘ander i ‘race .
after suffering a foot injury. that stage the tourists were four : Carlton vs. Spartan at Superintendent of the school is DOX ‘nnn Bia R omaine |
for 37. With three and a half minutes Black Rock. Major O, F. C. Walcott, who has Base
SUN., 28th OCTOBER, 1951
Barnes had since reported fit. Then Walcott and Gomez fell to go in the second period Har-|}| Girl Guides Annual Meeting been in this position for the past regret at 3 p.m i
: to balls that moved in on them rison College found their form ab Pax Hill, 1.20 p.m. two years. Headmaster of the Sees Rina? | . Lavender, Saxe
The team selected in the pro- and Marshall’s last hope of a when after a good attacking mova- CINEMAS school is Mr, K. G. Simmons and oerenae me s R ne
bable batting order and with the partner was John Goddard. ment Billy Manning opened the GLOBE: Sealed Cargo 5.06 and there are three other teachers. At Confirmed members x omal Blue, Sky Blue,
probable twelfth man is: Morris; Marshall played studiously and scoring for his. team with a well 8.30 pom. wedi hi each workshop there is an Tnstruc~ Meas by eee ee Orchid, Green,
Archer; Hassett; Harvey; Miller; Goddard sturdily until the danger plaged. sigt which beat Snappers’ Miguel Auk ce bm 4 tor who teaches the boys the]g@ —"° °P"”* ceencent ||| Beige Lime Beige, Gold,
yraham; ; str es passed, : . . ‘ ; A363 66565 = ;
outstanding batsman and change held & calch. ten ards, Mica the UA ENE it “omar aatebe™ 1 er 2866 oe See Green, oe er and
bowler; Ian Johnson; Lindwall, wicket off ll th PLAZA (Oistins): Breaking Point ‘ ‘ ; r rey.
Fescathe.. Sina ssuae trea. borerian oe ave at would have Browne Out ! one ig it rire et eae = oe ‘ re ae, was held as sag The Ofticers ond Members of 45” wide. 7 :
and good batsman; Gil Langley, Prior Jones helped his captain : ARTY: Th von tha ne 0 os "that. the WOTAL Eede NO. Oe MM 45 inches wide
South Australia wicket - keeper to put the West Indies ahead. At this stage one of the Snap-|| OMVMriC. Mage et the Goria vad t ee occasion ra the Request the pleasure of your * Per Yd. $2.29
and moderate batsman; W. A. SCORES pers’ forwards Maleolm Browne and Barbary Pirate 430 ana | °° hn as been open to the company to their Per Yard ........ $2.61
Johnstone, fast medium bowler, New Seath Wales Conatex x1 was brought out of the water for ‘ a> = public.
Se ee en inc Wiles eit BE ne oe nv Lane pre oun Oa nae Ra Swat Ee ME AD & The arrangenwnts for the day's
2 9 nman alentine .. stiwee a

rounder,

Apart from the obvious batting
strength of this side another sig-

to equal Tallon at his best behind

the stumps and is not to be com- |

pared as a batsman,

nificant feature is the inclusion Lambert b Valentine ........ 1 SION — 2-
of opening bowler Bill Johnstone. Bull ¢€ Weekes b Valentine soewaad 0 Time however was against the as Soper a 10, 11, 12 & 13 BROAD STREET I
This confirms the current impres- Roxby b Ramadhin .... “+ 9 youngsters who ho’ Orches
ion that Miller will be asked to Pickles not out . 3 who however put on Refreshments on Sele
s10 a Extras 2 a terrific last minute burst and 27.10.51—2n
bowl only as a shock attack ~~ netted two more goals in the last
when his services seem most Total io : th 5 in the \
necessary. He has long objected —+ three quarters of a minute's play.
to his role as opening bowler BOWLING ANALYSIS Manning and Weatherhead again cree.
preferring to concentrate on his worrei : Sam ee - scoring. |
Sei eeatiee rs Ramadhin 187 : = : Referee Mr, Jack Knight. iH ] f) M if] | tS
f ** Valenti ; 1 a 5
‘ ene West Indies — Ist Innings The teams were: | a a aenth
Weakening Stellineyer ¢ Lamabert b Piokles... 18 inet eat i: Shabrot. 3. at the a
, nning, ‘apt. . Jordan, A,
‘ n ® Bull ! as 12 :
The wicket-keeper problem haS Weekes o Anderson b Bull |. @ Taylor, FP. Mannin . C. Evelyn Ursuline Convent

been solved by choosing Langley Walcott b Pickles ; 12 and M. Weatherhead.
to ee Sere a Marahell¢. Fidhies b. Bulk. 7 : 8: fe. Sater, G. Mc- ON
is a wea Goddard not out 29 ©6Lean, (Cap e, D, Ban- ‘ . caw 9: geen
traditional strength since Lang- Jones not out... is nister, F, Fobell oe! aia Lightning’ fasteners | SATURDAY “TH OCTOBER
‘ay would have to excel himself Extras ....../..ee 6 ™“f. Browne, are manufactured by | Sead: 3 Gt ek

Spin bowling is left to Doug
Ring and the flighted off spinners
of Ian Johnson.

Johnson’s appearance against
the West Indians will settle the
growing controversy as to whe-
ther his intelligent and con-
trolled flighting of the ball is the
way to beat the Islanders’ bats-
men or whether they will over-
come him by the footwork which
is a natural feature of their
aggressive batting.



B'dos Rifle Team

te “ne se ve the Cnr. BROAD & TUDOR STREETS. ‘
e ey rene ugby League side in After the = eagles
For Trinidad Australia this year. Paul Foster ¢ ppwentation, Mr SS

The team to represent Barba-
dos at the Intercolonial Rifle
Meeting to be held in Trinidad
from November 7 to 10 was se-
lected by the Barbados Rifle As-
sociation yesterday,

The team are: Lt, Col, J. Con-

* h , Carlton Brown
nel (Capt) Maine Oc: Wale eu patie gaat ahd Mem. Boker m4 "Bye im PRICE = af,ct Pret Seu & Cor"
cott, Mr. M. R. De Verteuil, we dard has taken up a diet to keep Git” who presented the Limacol Stoute’s Drug Store E. C. Gill

Jor By ative and’ Mr, Bis Welght down to the “best nro nueact ae Ms iE WS H. E. Pilgrim P. A. Clarke
Neblett, Roberts Ne MT playing weight” of 180 pounds. anufactuiog Drug Co. | GREENS [- and RU

Major A. S. Warren had been
selected vice captain to go, but is
unable to make the tour and Ma-
jor Walcott was chosen in_ his
place. .

The team will leave on Sun-
day 4 and retyirn on the follow-
ing Sunday.



YESTERDAY’S
WEATHER REPORT

From Codrington

Rainfall ; Nil

Total Rainfall for month to
Date : 2.60 ins,

Highest Temperature :



87.5° F. They are Lindwalh Bow in the printiee Snappers — Captain George Mr. G. H. Adams, M.C.P.
Lowest Temperature : peak of his form, Millér, and the 7 Sheaffers Ball Point Pens Presented Dr. H CP
73.0° F. left-hander, Johnstone, The tour- to the winning team of the Men's K.O. : , H. G. Cummins, M.C.P. -
Wind Velocity : 6 miles per | ists are little concerned, however, Store ita, Winnece Suupoiee Wane NO PARKING PROBLEMS Mr. R. G. Mapp, M.C.P.
hour Aving ie to the a omens Polo Club. | .
. ustralians that the West Indians Consolation Prise. 7 bottles of Li 1 . IC. » M.A.
Barometer (9 a.m.) : 29.907 Reprallina that the: Wont lenient, Pain Wak: ate we Mr. J. C. Tudor, M.A
(3 pum.) : 29,811 ee t th le us test competition, presented by Bookers Just pull up at t Mr. K. N. R. Husbands i
Friday. than play revealed on ceraon Drug Stores Ltd.—Harrison pe ie eso — M P i
. * ai tod ‘ollege. sy fees $
: ’ ' doo Mr. E. Holder \o4
° * t ’ YT. |
{ They'll Do It Every Time Swewcine Jimmy Hatlo ; our . and ,
y 4 B y ; James A. Tudor

BAr te surer









ARKET , WINESAP BLOWS
HIS TURRET WHEN WIFEY ASKS HIM TO

A SIXTEEN-FIFTY #! -WHAT
ARE YA DOIN’? BUYING STOCK
IN THE COMPANY €. A TROUPE
OF ACTORS COULDNT EAT UP
THAT MUCH FOOD LET |
=z ALONE US Twol!



Anderson b Worrell .....
Mannix run out ......
De Courcy b Ramadhin
MacDonald c Walcott b

4 a
10
Harvey c Weekes b Valentine .... 5

Valentine





Total (for 7 wickets) . . 147

Pickles took 3 wickets for 38 runs,
Bull took 4 for 49.



W.I. Not
Dowshearted
SYDNTY, Cot. 26.
Although the West indies “t-r-
ists had a close call i. the first
official tour match versus New
South Wales, here on Friday,
they were not down-hearted about
the first test prospects. The
team’s gay exuberance captured
the imagination of the Austra-
lian public in a manner similar

The Australians accustomed to
regardin;
rious businegs, are
out of listening to
dians sing calypso songs, in their
dressing rooms prior to taking
the fleld, carrying their favourite
brands of West Indies rum on the

cricket ag a deadly se-
etting a kick

He is not eating bread, butter,
potatoes, sweets and fried food.
Goddard lost nearly 14 ids
in the last three weeks. “If I am
able to keep weight off, I hope
to play vs India in England again,
before retiring in two years.”
Meanwhile, Goddard has a full-
time job getting his team into
shape for the first Test.

behalf of the N Chemic ;

weaknegies, ee ae hewiing Baltimore. Winners: starfish er cheat: | The Newest and one of the most Up-to-date DRY GOODS On
the han Carmic! *

Fast Australian wickets yet, were 7 Water Polo Limacol Cups. Presented | fA

revealed in Friday’s match. The

West Indians require much solid [*

practice to reach top form here,

The team will not get any op-
portunities before the first Test
on November 3. The Australian
test team, announced on Friday
night, includes three bowlers
much pacier than those the tour-
ists faced on Friday.

















he West In- to

oar sc wm 70 38 DeueAreseeN
SHELL OUT FOR THE WEEKLY GROCERIES~=| | IT'S BYE-BYE SIK MONTHS’ BUDGET ++

9 seized this opportunity and Morti-

mer Weatherhead soon scored
— brought a back into
play.

assembled in the ballroom



Strong, yet smooth and flexible,
After the match the ‘LIGHTNING’ is a fastener to be
beame. creer relied upon. Look for the name on the ©

ROXÂ¥: Wyoming Mail 4.45 ana
&.15 p.m.











ie presentation of trophies by} Sider pull.

e water polo tions’ 1.
dent Major A, i hee ae

Mr. Peter Patterson Vice-
President of the association
thanked the public for their sup-
port and congratplated the win-
Jn. teams. He then asked Maj.
Foster to present the cups and
p.izes. Before doing so Maj. Fos-
ter gave a short review of the
Season and also spoke of the re-
cent tour to Trinidad and gave a
warning to all the players to be
prepared pr even better Trinidad
teams next year. “We”, he said,
“must also improve.”

for presenting trophies; the
Aquatic Club for their co-opera-
tion. in al. the association
play their games at the cluv;
Mr, J. Chabrol for his interest in
the game and making it possible
for the association having sev-

handsome cups to present

Trophies presented were as fol-

Â¥. de Lima Challenge Cup. Presented
to the winners of the ladies competition,
by Messrs. Y. de Lima & Co., Ltd
Winners: Starfish—Captain Frieda Car:
michael.

Noxzema Challenge Cup. Presented to |

the winners of the ladies K.O. compet:

Their tion, by Messrs, Bookers Drug Store on |

to the winners of the ladies K.O. com-
petition, by Messrs. Stokes & Bynoe
td., on behalf of the Bookers Manu-
facturing Drug Co. Winners: Starfish
water polo club,
Water Polo Challenge Cup. Presented
to the winners of the Men's competition,
Mr. George Manning Wrinners:
Harrison College—Captain Billy Manning.
Water Polo Krock-Out Cup. Presented
to the winners of the Men’s K.Q. com-
petition, by the water polo association.












|

|
|
|

|









{. GEDDES GRANT LTD.,
Agents,

CORRUGATED BLACK SHEETS |

If you were too late to get some of the last lot, make sure |
* you are in time this trip.

THE CENTRAL EMPORIUM

OPENING MONDAY
October 29th




proceedings were made by Major
O. F. C. Walcott, Superintendent
of the schools and his staff.



LIGHTNING FASTENERS LTD.

(A subsidiary company of
Imperial Chemical Industries Ltd.)



(

|

in aid of |
ST. PATRICK'S DAILY MEALS
FUND & TH FREE ELEMEN-

TARY SCHOOL
Through. the Courtesy of the
Commissioner of Potice Col.
Michelin and the Band Master Capt
Raisen the Police Band will be in
attendance

f The Various - Fancy,
{hr id, Xmas 7; ete
Will 5a 3 eg ents ¢ t
2ony Rides and ious. Games,
Hoop-La etc. +Ice-Creams, Cakes,

at the
PRINCESS ALICE PLAYING
FIELD

OD
MONDAY NIGHT 28TH CCTOBER
1951

ANNUAL, DANCE |

Cave Shepherd & Co., ld.

















p.m











Drinks, Hot Dogs, Ham-
Tea Tables etc.

Sweets,

burgers,




/ ADMISSION — — 6d



4 Prizes for the luck No. Tickets—
Girl, Boy



Lady, and Gentleman

x ga f
" ay ——"
\ "
COME! SEE! and BUY! , i’ TSN









Obtainable at...

RETAIL Knight's Ltd.

Bruce Weatherhead
td.

POLITICAL

John Gill & Co.
Walkes’ Drug Store



THE RITZ STORE

M. B. HANNAH)

(Proprietor :

No. 60 Tudor Street

STORES in Bridgetown.

Stocked with EVERY ITEM that can be Found in the Best
Department Stores and just wateh out for our Prices,

They're really reasonable.

AND MOST IMPORTANT OF ALL

WITH THE

FERGUSON system

{

PLDI SPSS SEF SS



4 1 % The friend of both the small and Large Plantation Owners alike. Ps {
ATA This Tractor, the price of which is only a fraction of that of ~ ae ;
Raia, S a full “Track” Tracter— te
mS" , COURTESY
on : $3,165.00
| GARAGE |
is |
fa as] | 1% does an amazing job of Ploughing and is at home either in the 4 ‘i Ea Ae
ae AY\) % field or.on the road. | cuff a a” UD” a>
a4) \ Fee, oe oh ROBERT THOM || : ,
Te) j hese world-wide famous Tractors are :lso becoming increas~- vii ~
& ¥ ingly popular here and are doing fine work. LIMITED * SHOE STORE
| “ ‘
ah % We invite you to inspect this truly wonderful machine and jj Agents s No, 35 Broad Street
/ P. let us arrange for a demonstrat ou-—-ploughing Se - 2
a [RY tha, Manis Mmeeting, meme-cutat re vent i Dial 4616 Wateh For Opening Date
Ps ie os & | |
” 9SSS 9SSSSSSSSSSS OS 969595999999 9SOOOSCGI9S OF EOS SOSSE VS OC SSO COO FP FOOD se, ; — ain = —

IGOOSSS

MEETING

Nelson Pharmacy

L
Hinds’ Drug Store

and BOOKERS (B'DOS) DRUG STORES

Broad Street and Hastings (ALPHA PHARMACY)

AJ +
St. George Sole Agents

Supporting the candi- {
datures of: |

Messrs, F. E, MILLER &
E. W. BARROW



OPENIN G SOON

“er




SUNDAY NIGHT
Octaber 28th, 1951

at 8 o’clock



SPEAKERS :

27.10.51—In.




















PPLE ISOS OLELESIOOCFLLSEOLLISS





PGES SS SES




PAGE 1

SATVBDAV. OCTUflm tf, 1IS1 BASBADOS AOVOCATE TAOK nvc Government Industrial Schools Have Visitors 9 Day Notable Improvement. At Schools— CoL 'Sec. FOR THE SECOND TIME smcr the change over at ihr Government Industrial Schools, it WAS Visitor*' Day \esterday Among the large number of persons attending were Hon. R. N. Turner. M.L.C.. Colonial Secretary, who wis Guest o( Honour at the (unction and Mrs. Turner. During the afternoon Mr. Turner spoke to the large gathering. He said : The Afun place school band which eatrrtalnta the v(itor intended Visitor* Day at "Dodds" yesterday The boy at right is the conductor Until the happy Idea was conceived last year ol opening the Government Industrial Schoola ;o the Keneral public on one Inspection Day a year the Government Industrial Schools were, so to speak, the "Forgotten DepartI Government. Probably. not more than a handful ol persons in ihe M.niii had more than •*• Tale of a Mule A mule, kicking in desperation for his life as he was about .o topple over Into the Careenage on fnursday, was fortunate to find the ready hands of the crew of •he Government craft and other ix-ople on the wharf. He and his CCsTt were barely saved In time. it happened when the Government Water Boat Ida was taking coal by Messrs Central Foundry. The coal was* brought to her by two nuiia drawn carts. And ut one lime. Ihe 'fortunate'' mule became uncontrollable so that the driver could not cheek him from running back into the Careenage. Just a* the wheels rolled over the edge of Ihe wharf, the hands came to the rescue. While one group gripped the cart, the others unharnessed the mule. One of the crew fell into the Ida's bunker and came back uo covered fn coal dust. Inkling of what went on behin<< the gate* of Dodds i.nd Summer vale. The function or an Annu.l Inspection Day has changed all that, and I feel very complimented to be Invited as the guest ol banMil at this, the second, function of what 1 hope will become a lont and unbroken series. For I have no doubt whatsoever that a function of this kind can d<> not tun tut good. It does good to the boys an I gjril at the schools for it Opart! j Window fur liter.i mi U> Ihe "inside world and shows them U t people outside are nut mdiiTereir. to them and then gfSnJOVSjgsggaSjj it does good lo the general pa' He for It must tend to stir their social conscience and stimulate .heir Interest In an aspect of education which is of considerable importance t. tha eossctuinUj It is, therefore, particularly unfortunate that this yeai'* (miitim. should have cUshed with another cip In Bridgetown; otherwise I urn sure that still more people would have come down to Si Philip this afternoon. British Delegation For St. Croix On Sunday next the following members of the British delegation to the Thirteenth Meeting of the Caribbean Commission which opens in St. Croix on Monday 29: h October will be leaving Barballns Sir George Seel, K.C.M.G.— British Co-Chalrman; Mr. G. H. Adams,—Commissioner; Mr. A. de K Frampton, who will be serving as a Commissioner at this Meeting In place of Mr. Kenneth Thompson. Joining the delegation in St. Croix will be Mr. S. T. Christum of the Leeward Islands who will i <• p i ving as a Commissioner, and Mr. M. A. Wcimer who will serve as an Adviser. The delegation will be accompanied by Mr. B. E. RoUe and Mrs. Walcolt of the Staff of th Development and Welfare Organisation. Results of Educational Tests The Director of Education report* tha*. th %  fault! ut tha tests in Arithmetic and Heading given to the 1 | Age-group during this year have now been attuned. i.nd that the improvcmvnt In Arithmetic, noted last yetr, has continued. In Reading also, the Director of Education report*, the reaului show a marked rise in uttnninent since the children of this agegroup wer e "rat tested in IB-**". The girls continue to obtain better results than the boys In both subjects. I n all 9,694 children have been tested In Arithmetic and 9.(183 children in Reading Bags, hats, basBssock*. table cloths, baskets, brushes, ntsu, shoss. etc. i a • '* <*•• l:-j Vis.* .n> D"T ' "Dodda" yesterday. T tfg %  ;.. it taslr. UO 1 %  tttek attrscted much attention. CJ. Grants Petitions For Letters Of Administration The Honourable the Chief Judge S.r Allan Collymore yesterday (runted the petition of Arthur Drayton Herbert of Christ Church for letters of Administration to tho estate (with the will annexed) of his wife Hilda Herbert deceased. Will proved 5th October, 1951. Mr. D. E. G. Malone Instructed by Mr. H C. Chapman, Solicitor, of the firm of Carnngton 4 Scaly were f i the petitioner He also granted the Petition of the Pubic Trustee of the Island of Barbados for letters of Administration to the 'estate of Alfred Tobias Phillips, late of Strathtl-.de. St. Michael, deceased. Mr. W. W. Reece, K.C., Solicitor General instructed by Mr. A. DeC. Boyce. Solicitor of the firm of Vearwooi k Boyce, for the petitioner. Consideration of the Petition of Caleb Neblett of Spooncrs Hill. St. Michael the constituted attorney of Gorden Pilgrim of New York. U.S.A. for letters of administration to the estate of Cecelia Pilgrim late of U.S.A. deceased was postponed. Mr. D. H. L. Ward instructed by Mr. K. C. Browne of the firm -f Hutchlnson It Ban field. Solicitors, were for the petitioner. DECREE NISI Eighty-lhrec-year.old Jane* B. A. Cutting of Cave Romt. ROW. ells Cross Road, yesterday got decree, nisi pronounced fcy The Hon. The Chief Judge. Sir Allan Collymore when he sent in a petition for the dissolution of his marriage to Alice Cutting. This la the third wife James Cutting is divorcing. The Hon. The Chief Judge pronounced decree absolute in the tutt E. T. Arthur, petitioner and H. C. Arthur respondent Mr. W. W. Reece. K.C.. inftructed by Mr. D. Lee Sarjeant, solicitor appeared for the petitioner. being taught cabinet snakliif, The two instructors in the background look on. Tbe three boy* in the foregronnd Ung and carpentry. Radar Towed Into Careenage The 116-ton motor vessel T. B. troubles after she dropped anchor Radar safely reached Barbados in Barbados. The QOVI from St. Lucia yesterday morning, craft Ida towed her into the Cabut had to be towed into the teenage T. B. Radar brought a Careenage from Carlisle Bay fair supply of fruit from St I.uduring the afternoon. eta. She is consigned tn the T. B. Radar developed engine Schooner Owners' Association. DIZZLE DAZZLES, SPARKLERS BEING STORED AWAY FOR GUYFAWKES DAY More Fine Stone Shipped To B.G. Wills Th. following wills were admitted to probate: Khzabeih Cha:lotte Pile. St. Peter. Ellen Letitla Leach St Michael; Winston Herbert Badley, St. Michael. Alietha Howell. St. James; Geutgiana Bourne. St, Michael: Amanda Jestlnn Hoyte, St. Michael. George Albert FoUtes, St. Michael. Charles Busby. St. Michael. ALREADY parents are buying for their children from the wide variety of fireworks that which the fireworks dealers have got down for them. There will be the usual bombs and starlights, there will be crackers ond sparklers, there will be dizzle dazzle and radium dazzlers—in short, every kind of fireworks is available. — — %  — — A youngster from the elementary school told the Advocate yesterday, "My Daddy showed me the long lists of fireworks that were In the papers and I told him I wanted bombs and crackers and serpents and I know he will buy them, for Barbados La shipping more fine he always buys fireworks for %  tone for use In the construction me on the fifth of November." The of a rood in Berbice, British Gulboy was as keen as boys sre on ana. Schooner Anita H. was at thin occasion. her berth opposite ihe Customs A parent said that he has been yesterday loading 140 tons of Ane having mute a lot of trouble from •tone with which she is expected "'• *n Tom l*ast fireworks time. lo sail for British Guiana around '<•"> * " X^ Jo appreciate the week-end. fireworks. Now he is asking his Claudia S. Over 40C,o„. of fine g£ £?jXeo to flowed 8S i^r'to suras a&SsSSrVr**ing pretty lights of the various fireworks a*, hearing the minor explosion of a bomb, some boys eel addtd amunement from throwing bombs behind passersby's fogf, Yesterday a reporter heard a boy pot yet >n his teens recount to another he w he threw a bomb behind an old nan's feet .last fifth of November and how the old BUB lud to be given water afterwards to revive him from the fright. And at to the conkles that gu with fireworks and the fifth of November, housewives ar>preB tring 'heir materials for them. either cocoanuU nor pumpkins itre plentiful so they sre buying them long before hand. There has not been much corn either This Is not worrying the smsll peasant owner He always has his supply. Improvement By gci;. there has bet .i notable improvement in Ihe tone of the Schools during the Hist two or three years, and I propose to quote three extracts Irom remarks by outside observers %  tWial Re|-vi on the oi lMt which lend to %  uQauottati tiii i KM The Surgeon commented that 'he* past year has been a healthy %  children have the ap. well cared for. UdQ m appearance at all limes, then dopM intent is exemplaiy, and ihey are alert and ooeaieiii Tno improvement that has takei, place during the past eighteen months In these aspects i lite SCIKH-IK has to be seen lo nied. and is reflected in %  n ipptei etUtuos) of ihe chiidien Wno .ire obviously enjoying U the full, both in their work and play, as children should." These remarks by the Surgeon re rvassuring rbe Kducatlon Departn,< lOboiated this favourable impression in ,the following extract* from its report. As regards Dodds ti coounented, The dbcliajina compare* very favourably wiih that obtaining in the ordinary Etemeiil.ny S-ti.-.U. Their general appearance and the excellent condition in which the pr-rrl". rtre ke;<* M furf a sense of personal well-being, of growing H< e in themselves and of a steady rise in the tone ..f Ihe School. The general impression .uned Is that the tfBKhCfl Bl* •mini 'heir best u, calCt lo tha mental capacity and vocslioiv.l mie.ests of the boys. The boys seem happy in ihr tone and atmi tire school ts good." So much tor Dodds. With icgird to Summervale the Education Departmenl report tISMtlOnO, "The ailention given to cultural sctlvlties and the molherl. ,-.i. %  %  hnvvn by the Matron a r •> pleasingStaffs Credi. Foe this markeu and sutUiined improvemeni great credit Is obviously due to the Staff. Pause fu, moment to consider then :ii*k. Il is far liom easy. Tney nave tu look aflcr the needs ol children of various, far loo various, ages. According to Ihe figures in the 1HMI Itepoit there were, on the average, 19 boys of 14 and under. 22 between 14 to 16 and W over 1. This wide disparity in uges must present a formidable problem in itself, and I hop* that one day the creation of a Borstal, which is at present awaiting its turn among the many prorets which Ihe Giiveriimetit ...lit.its to be desirable bul has not Been able to afford, will mitigate this difficulty. Apart from the diversity of ages la the diversity of bat-kkiound snd mental capacity. \B lh bUc tribute to their strong •er-~ of social duty and *o convey to them thGovernment's appreciation of the keen interest which thev take In the welfare or Ihe children nt 'he Schools. Toe more inter eat, Indeed, widen InnurnUal me.nbers raf %  a taae in Ute henools Uie beit.r, "or Ihe time must come Klttli ii.iIn... .1.1,1 |III. Will 1. turn to the outer world and must lostk lor rmploymenl I am glad lo note rrom the records lhal In recent irara practically no one has b ea In •ubMiiuent Ireuble with Ihr r-liee. ang It as aaly fslr ihil. win.n boys .nil girls leave Ihe -" in...is UVy aheuld be provided with ihe opportunity lo prove Ihemselvea useful ritlsens of Ihr Island, and tho fact thai Ihey have bean inmate, of the Hrhooks should not br held aaalnal ihrm. Ai present, unfortunately. Ihere is no proper Alter Car,. Ornarication to deal properly with ihe transition from school lil> into normal life, and 1st provide sull%  bla empioynienl. and I earnestly hope Ilia, such an organisation will hav,. been establlvhe,tck into society when the time cornea. There Is much islent here; let It b c used to the full." The Government Industrial Schools are divided into two sections, boys at Dodds *nd flrls at #> On Pace I No'fleo*, no tapeworms. The llci is an intermediate host of the tape-worm, and to ensure freedom from ihe. troublcMtmc internal rtgrssite, your dog, must he kepi pest ftec Kill verminous parasites such as Heas. lice and ticks with 'Lorexsnc' Dusting Powder (containing gamma BIIC 'Lorcxane' a safe, plcavimly perfumed powder which will quickly kill all common skin pnti. The effect of a tingle dusting lasts for some TWO weeks. Lor ex ane' DUSTING POWDER IN HANDY CONTAINERS A product ol Imperial I lu-niual < Pharmaceuticals 1.muted :— A **H*my m W h*i-W t*nmoi aBSSSSSSSI I M A. 1 Bndcn & Sons ri^rhsdos) LU.. Agrm. ;;:*,'.'.•.•,'.:; -.*, -. Jhs Jinsidi Sslactlon ; FOR SPORTS WEAR in KI.OhAl.s. PI Ml).-. PAISI BYS PAJJCrSS and PLAIN COLOURS Prom KM to SUM FOR DRESS WEAR TIIK rSMOUB "KLITE" A wide rane uf qualities in and Striped DI-M. aj Plain Coloura From S3.T3 to tMi -KKNOWN" TKII'MSKII in Tan. Blue. Grey and White at S5.25 "DOUBLE TWO" with Spare Collar in T..11. Clrey. Blue and White at .7i and I7.1S "KI.ITE Sl'liC IAI." in White only with the Ultra Smart Wide Spread Collar at tS.M DEMONSTRATION MODEL OF THE NEW MORMAG DIESEL WHEEL TRACTOR I MM I I ii SHORTLY It — 211 — 25 — M lip Models Half Trucks ;iiv. available • Built by experienced German Diesel EnKimN J. G. KIKTON, Jnr. "Thr Grant' si. rhlllp SKA ISLAND COTTON SHIRTS hs %  •ELITr" snd "RENOWN" These Shirts air Imporled free of duty. gild o leprcsent the BEST VALD! m S!i:;.TS ;u bo obtalnssi i.. li> Prices I SH.IMI and SH.1K In While. Cream. Ecru and Blur IIAIllllSOXS-.ni-Mi. I .-' ',' rf V>'-'*WV-' 1 >V'V*V-'.*-'.*.'-*-*-**V-'. % %  %VVVVVr^rV^rVWr^ArV^Af^ A rV^ ^ ^ %  FOR BEST RESULTS % USE "a ll lll\A 41IOWS ^S IN THE C HECKER BOA RD BAGS %  H. Jaton Jonci & Co., Ltd —OrtrSMlOfi %  f.lt I tot II in i it MO n r LIFE — WITH PRELL EMERALD CLEAR SHAMPOO PRELL MAKES THE HAIR RADIANT AND DANDRUFF-FREE



PAGE 1

SATIRDAV. OCTOBER 27. 1M1 BARBADOS ADVOCATE PAGE THREE Ask The Labour Part) About Their Manifesto ^/8m island in \hv Hun* %  rrorn 1924 tnstn h, i > TUI m>l in U„M.lllli .if til MIIM Mon. his lather had suggested to him that instead of going abroad — Walcott Advises MB I K WALCOTT told, the electorate to whom he moke in Nelson Street on Friday m^ht. to ask thtLabour about their Manifesto "The nmrc you ;irc in fan .n you should urge them to tell you wl.at they intend dome; lor you." he said. Mr. Walcott was speaking at the meeting of the 1 ors Association, held in support of Mr. Victor < candidature for the City at the next General Election. He told hi* listeners that he was iional programme of the elemaaat Present acting as the Leader of tary schools. They were also prothe Parliamentary Party of the vlding an excess of Barbados Elector* Association in the House scholarships, he said; but not the of Assembly. In truth and in fact, secondary schools to accommodati%  senior muii lit politico the large number of children who were x eating Mb ^ to swob, schools. %  -cK. 1 .,* sn association,'' said Mr. Wulcott. ih;il if we gel enough members in the House of Assembly to sse where he had the offer of a good to It as much ss in our power lies lob. that he should live and stay that there is neither an insufftwith the people where ho had been ciency of school teachers or scho >l born. He agreed with him and buildings." within a short period the people In Of the proposed deep watei <>f St. Jame* asked him harbour for the Island, Mr. Walc.,n to takup politics. Re was first laid 'hat contrary to elected t.i HiROOM HI 1825 and been suld by some peopli1 had been In that Chamber ever sssure theiu that the lKirlur duct except for uubrief pariod s*ouId not put anybody nut of when as Attorney General. he hud WWlt. An escuse now the been compelled to retire from cort ,l might cost C5.0O0.0Ot) now. but If when it was first put 1 h.ivo come here tonight. said forward the Party in power h;.<1 Mr. Walcott, "to recommend to adopted it, it would only hav you for the City conslituencv. nof *< "' the vicinity of £3.000.000 only thi' Inimitable Mr. E. t> Who < on* h*d to remember. Mottles who is already in the w s th 1 lh wurk would House, hut also to nsk vow to nut have to be carried on for a long with him. his team mat', lengthy period and 11 very large Mr. Victor Chi |.ortlon of the money would IK* %  pent on labour. This woidd Better Caaialitlalc mean that thuy would be in a position to find employment for their I Dan* not come nentonight -xoplo without sending them to to say that any oUssT i undulate is the United State* for a short pca nail or good one, but what 1 do rlod of three or four months fcr ktsjd 1* that our candidate work. Ending. Mr. Walcott told Mr. Chase is a better candidate) his listeners thai he h.>ped the* and when we offer him to you we would see their way to support arc asking that you elect him along the two candidate* llie Elect... •Via Mi. Mull ley and thereby Association were offering, at th? make a really good choice at the General Election, polls. You will see for yourself that Less Abuse .f >ou put one man in the House M r. Chase said that h< was pot in.m one Parly and the other from aoing to make use of the tactics !-arty. you will have one wh ich had characterized some of pulling one way and one the thr political meeung* he had been 0,heT Heading. He was hoping that -s Speaking on the matter of tho the campaign progressed abuse vote Mr. Walcott said that it was would give pla-e to constructive the flrst time in the island's history crIUcism, and that constructive that Adult Sulfraite would be triad criticism would eventually give: out. That meant that every adult place to the candidates putting could vole and not merely those before the slectorale the things with qualification* such as was the for which they stood and mat case at the last General Election, they proposed to do if they got •You can only vote for two canthe opportunity to help in fram didates. The vote is absolutely i n the laws of this country. .-.ecret and therefore no viclimisaHe had heard some of the lion can take place. Remember Speaker* saying; Chase may be that a pimple always got what they a | rl ght but he mixes parochial dSSSrvasl. When vou choose your politics w i; n central government c ndldate? you arc going to have pohtlcs." I do not apologise for o wait for three years or Mgbbr „„,,. ^^ wUn Mr Adamt you wiU RC. what y,, eSS^ ^n^man VSSES? SSE Manifesto f ore *J1 I say lo the constituents Mr Waleolt said that It was of Bridgetown 1based on the **?** *^.f* r Jl %  £* *& .t* knowledge that the Government I have only got to think that sometiung Is ood for the people of %  he island *nd it lieromas a law of the coiinlrv" IIIIOIM; Brigadier Jackson Inspects Police THE big attraction at District "A"' Police Station yev tendav evening was six-year-old Andrew Michel in of the Good Shepherd School, son of Col. R T. Michciin. Commissioner of Police. Andrew, dntssed as a Police Constable of the Mounted Branch, riding a pony, introduced the Musi[ cat Ride of the Mounted Police, staged in honour of Brigadier A F C. Jackaon, O.B.E Commander of the Caribbean THE NEW RADAR l-A which 1* being Installed rl Orls AlrfMd will enable landtag* to be made IrreassreUve mt weather condition* and In any visibility. It la twice aa powerful as the prtrlotn asie, and I* the bluest of IU kind In Emrape— Lxpr.it. However. s regard* to the imput him in a responsible positionportant commodity "rice," for A Difference which Barbadians would have to Mr. Fred Goddard told his Us-' pay 11 cenls per plnl next year, teners that there was only otss he thought the Government had fundamental difference between made a mistake 111 their dealing the Labour Party and the fajeclor* about the price. They had the opAssociation of which he was a port unity iflhey had the foresight member, and thai was "nrlv.ite lo close the price deal with British enterproe" as against "naiionaliGulana at two dollars par bag sat ion" or "state ownership.' cheaper than they would be gelIn the state ownership system ting it Now they had no other alss had bsen seen practiced in otnei '.ernative than to accept a price countries, one Just became a cog which was sure to create a in a wheel but in the prfvata hardship for the majority of business set-up every man could people In the island. "1 am use his ability and ingenuity to advising you." said Mr. Ctiase. climb lbs ladder from the bottom that whoever you elect to to the top rung, the House of Assembly, say lo -. . ... %  hem wllh one voice, he price „ D """ "•• %  %  '• "V*" !" "••* rf II rniU ir nin. for rice I, Mr OoiMani. Ihc "Holiday! "I* l deT. l '„dTh. P iI'oc! 1 0r mu.T H & K l" d M • X '" %  **• %  borne by further subsldhation' Area Afiii the evening Itrlgsdui J.i.-Ksuii told the iidcowas abaulutely first claw and compares extremely favourably with shows 1 have seen In jthcr p.irts of the world On arrival the Brigadier received thi General Salute from r Guard of Honour of Police undei the aernmand of Inspector Retd AccMaitinied by the Commissioner of Paiii-e, he Inspected the Guar* which looked verv attractive U their unite cloven. After the Inspection he joined Mm Jackaon on the platfi>rm from which they watched the show. Tlie show opened with a Phy*.' ral Training display by CadeU of the Police Band, instructed by PC Shannon who won the Raton of Honour at the last passing out parade of recruits. This PT display was a new Hem added to the local Pohce shows Fifteen cadets took part aatd the exerctsei. were done to the rhythm or Uie Police Hand which played TennesM-e Walts. Good Night Irene, My Heart Cries for You and other tunes. Of thi. display the Brigadier told the Advocate "It AA well dune. It JV next announced that 1 m..lit'.turned out youngstei "our neweM Joined recruit,' would introduce the Musical Kid*' and Andrew Micliehn, who bs> came a horseman 111 monUis agi rode on to the square. As usun the Music*.L Hide was vary attrac Uve. Thi* horses were more perfc* u than on previous occasions ami o cumpli'.iuii both hortssiaan m> horset were loudly applauded. Foftowing this. 34 recruits <>( th Barstadoi Police Force, who wenonly ei,listed three weeks ag marched on to the souare and gave 01 the drill they h...i learnt so far The> marched 1st very quick time and shouted the time of th.' pause before making the movement It humoured she spectator* as the recruits, who posed an ;>f experience, shouted "1. S. 4; 1. t 1. 4, I, 2, 3, head. 1. 3 foot K squad ol Vuiu e gave a abort 1 drill displav The nuUtaiidiu,. feature ol thiN Ul-splsy nM Ilk pertuilllllig of the van.uumuv-; iuem> wtuW on the inarch, and -.till keeping m kSB %  The show ended with the Beating of the Retrvat by drummer* of the Police Band In can. trast with the closing In of Httl %  .'veiling, tlie Polsce Rand, und 11 Capl C a. Kaiaon. pjavi d Day Thou Caveat and Abide Wt'l. Me. A lighted cross in | in ,"|>. I section of the 1'. %  S laying the soft nh>thm of "AWdi 'ith Me" from the bnckgi-xoin n.l the i-mouon of the %  pSVtatoi .11 added to the idory of lhHosing stages Referring to the rvcrulU, Bru;idler Jackson said that it %  • interesting lo see what could Inlone in three wvek* for them.' 'I am sure some of Miem must have lieeei petril\e<1 with fright" He said "1 am very pleased with the Bandmaster for training the Hand to pla> the mer<*< M my heglment (the Hoyal ssMsPdure Regiment) It was a hi* -ompllinent to me He also ts*nKratulated Captain Raison on tinturn out of the Band After the *how \tu< lliig.ili and Mrs. Jackaon were cntct talned at the home of the C01.1lf P..h,r power to put out their manlfi Hrst, tellim the people what they intended doing for them. "We cannot hear anything of what the pr esent Tarty in power Intend to do. Within a short time the Electors Association will he pulling out their* In which we will tell you whst we propose doing for the peoph Tenantry Kuads "Now if thia is the position," %  aid Mr. Chase, "why cannot Ihe Government look after the tcnanit does not seem," said Mr. try roads in the City and the parWalcott, "thai the other Party iah generally—roads which are In have any idea of what they intend deplorable state of disrepair— 10 do. They did not put out a and put them in a suitable conto last tune either. To dition for the people who live in only say something about the canthese places'"' Surely the Governdidates of the opposing side is but ment could gel an Act passed cmnvolding their rosponsibilitir*. bepowering them to call on the cause it the end of three or five owners of private tenantries to years they srlll be able to say: "Wo put the roads m order, failing promised you^nothlng so we hive w hlch they would do so and call .lone nothing." The more you ore on the owner lo pay the cost, in favour of them the more you what he wanted to make clear should urge them to tell you what WiW lhu the V cslry had absoluteUiev intend dome for vou. Jy no power to put private tenanThere had been a fot of talk try ^4^ ln opdtr bu „ w „ W( ,„ about socialism bv 'hat Party at wUnm the naeh 0 Govcrnmf nl Li £f? " £ n0hn *" to do *>Thst was not parochial S'cometo^ou and Wk\liE ^ was given the honour to reprc%  ocialismorlet-themsaylhatthey *" l* 0 ^' '"^ 2* have .lone wllh it. At the last ff '' rl to "J* >• Government to election we hear.1 n lot aboul Jf.** •JS h ^, ,-n J.', n L ry [* d :n : he what they, were going to nationnlc,ty J nnd 1 s '\ 'c' 1 r' He also i?e. We on the other hand had ccwidered that Government spoken of public utility boards should be empowered to Instal' The result has been that before walcr not only In these tenantry the end of the House session, we but other* throughout the Island, find them passimlegislation for '"id if he be elected he would do I'tillty boards. Thcv gave up their hi* best to help In bringing thi* lis.ition and voted for an about item of our pluifo, n, Cheaper Rice Education Referring to the present high Mr. Walcott then spoke of the lost of llvmfl. Mr. Chase said that failure of the Government to proIt would be stupid to blame the vide a sufficient number of teachers labour Government for it or nnv to carry out properly the educnother Government for that ma'ter. slngK tlon had been enacted. All such legislation had the support of tho Mr. Chase spoke of what he Electors Association. They were called the uiwaUsfactory system of lh Opposition in tho House or education in the islatvj and Assembly but opposed no measure pointed out that an urgent necenbrought down by the Ouveriimeiil sity was more schools and more ncc l lh u ?' considered it would trained teachers. bCT "? 1 "*? v 1 "Uijority of thpeople. One thing he would like „ to draw to their attention was that Colour tgucslion ,„ 0,1, im session, of the House On the matter of colour. th.r. " ,C l 1 f lfc l n ha, V u n d had been %  lo. of t.dk. said Mr hrougnt down o create Chase, but he would like to point Mw ob for %  Barbadian. out that for the last 300 ysars There were many boys and girl* there had been no large fcuroleaving school who could not get a pcan migration M KarbSidoi. Jo b. Unempluyment was llieu neither had Uiord beeji any greatest problem jnd sny man who African migration. During the could solve it, he would take his hat years thenhad been inter-maroff lo him. In Trinidad and Jamaica riagea and they were now lor lacUitic* had been granted for the I h a, most part Barbadians, establishment of new Industries so "Should any Barbadian tell you that their people could get work, that he la 100 par cent. EuroBarbados, on the other hand, had pean ask him when he came done nothing in this respect until from England or any other Euquite recently und for this ha rope an country. Likewise should blamed the Labour Government, one say that he is 100 per cent. They would not bring in new inAfrican, ask him how long has dustries and create new Jobs for he come from Africa. Do not let the people. "We cannot maintain people throw a red herring even a reasonably good standard across the trail. Judge a man of living for our teeming populaby his principle and not his tlon on sugar and sugar alone," colour. If a man asks you to said Mr. Goddard. "This year." he send him lo the House and he said, "we had a record crop of does not work In your interest 187,000 tons but what will happen vou have ;, iierfect right to kick If there is a decrease in produchlm out" lion. I see economic chaos If It ,, .,,,_. does, snd if we have no money He was prepared f slartad to ctmtlnf tn from outside we cannot the House o put all his knowledge fc ^ ^ n lo |iv on • %  \ and experience ut their disposal ^ ^^ m an effort to improve their conAfter touching on some other dnlon. He would do everything mattci* Mr. Goddard told his possible to raise their standard of hearers that Mr Chase was a man living, especially those In the with experience and ability and lower income brackets In the City, he wss sure that he would repreHe was committed lo this and if sent them well In the House. He he did not carry out hi* promise would ask them to support him he would give Hum hi* word that and Mr Mottley at the polls on he would never again ask them lo Section Dsv Oil* OMf SOAP MVB XOm KM .HIS EXCITING FRAOMNCI I P r 7wrtklnwlllMe*lr,fWMtr... '*' .Uiirably dainty from ho4-l-M %  if you both, with t.ooranl Calhmtto Bouquo* Boouty Soap loinSEDSBSl NATIONAL EMPLOYERS MUTUAL GENERAL INSURANCE ASSN. LTD. Offer You Insurance Against All Risks. When you Insure with N.E.M. You become a Member — Your Problems. Difficulties & Claims are treated in a spirit of Mutual Co-operation Why Not Enjoy the Difference Full Particulars at Your Disposal— From -A. S. BRYDEN & Sons (Ms) Ltd AGENTS. hktf cohquers comm I P you're really out to conquer a cough—to get to the root of it and destroy the germ—then k for Famel Syrup. Why? Because Fame! I'Ap does so much more than ordinary cough mixturev Ii contains soluble lactocreosotc which is carried by the bloodsircam to the throat and lungs and breathing pntagei, where it destroys the germs which cause the trouble. Oace the germ, are destroyed then it's goodbye to the cough or cold. Meanwhile, the soothing balsam* in E'amcl Syrup ate casing the irritated membranes and the tonic minerals are keeping up your strength and powers of resistance. Famel Syrup is a recognised medical product used for cought, colds, inliuco/i and bronchia! troubles. It is widely rc.onimeoded by Doctors. Hospitals and Sanatoria. FAMEL SYRUP Armstrong Ltd. BRIDGETOWN. DRRAYS .. Ml LIT STOUT S Wir L' EDIfcbUUGH bCOTLANU JRAY*i*MANNING & CO., LTD. AGENTS u>oes your mirror show you... inn mi, fruooMT TUT ^'?;> •-,: 1 %  n.KiUfl* ..... sasssss) f-i •*. Teeth as white as hers? I .ct your mirror show you your true smile — the smile that comes wiili iceih thai arc I'cphodcnt white! .'cpuxIcM, you sec, contains Irium, wonderful ingredient which fjfc solves ihc ugly stains lhat hide ulnicncss, steal brightness from vnur smile. THE TOOTHPASTE World's Finest Smdli-c gives even greater value j Fameas British-Built Bss-Ui^fi MOBJUB MINOR stores new success vivia. fiasHisc unfonvuici icamf.UkVa ,. .. ItWcIlM .K-'iJX FORT ROYAL GARAGE LTD.: Phone 2383 Sole Diitributor, Phone 4504



PAGE 1

PACK 'MM) IIARBADOS ADVOCATE s\TI IDA] "I FOBBS 27. IS1 Cahib Ratling \k7WG '>MMANDER L. A. W Egflnrtcld, Director General of Civil Aviation in the Caribbean area, it due to leave tomorrow bv BWIA for Trinidad on hn way to But'iio' Aires lo attend a regional ii'AO. covering the m and SUth AtlunTtsS mrefliig which >s expected tn last from ihree to four mate, :*CUH 'he preaent condition of aeronautical communication-. I services, etc.. and consider what Irnpr'ivcrnent* are necessary. While Commandor Eggle*nel..\ Id Thmen and women have continued trip from Bug I -id to l>„. -t Rla la hv,. in the a lyle to which they was made via New York. During ire .iK-uslomed. Mr. Allan took the opportunity to study modern rendIn -* lM Uie things he motherly 'he m Allan trade. union provides are free haircuts Arriving by the same plane was an "oeshlnes for the men. and Mr Frank Morgan, proprietor of '"* babysitters for the Club Morgan. (after all somebody has _, 'ook after Buster while rair ant rlying Dance mom's tramping up and da •TVIIE F-ir a. the Ursuline Coni"M little old picket line). %  vent this af ernoon begins And. of coune. mom does not at 3 o'clock and ends at 7 pjn hBW mu ch chance to cook meals. Throughout the evening the pol* *** union feeds everyone— ire Bnd conducted by Capt. han.hurgers. "hot dogs,'* beef stew. Raison will provide music. This b*" 1 > tomato sauce, and lots of is always a popular feature of any Pwakw. fair. Keep them happy while they are Proceeds from this annual event • %  Wflg* Why. yes—TV on giant will go 'o help give the pupilof CIWf brings them the baseball St. Patrick's Elementary School a tmrr ** tr3t| — "I '-t.l V.' ta poor IAHSTH aaoa rtfwn THREE SECRETS Btam— P—n— fAWSUta t-.ir.cia foEAI. MuU. ROMAN i • &f "urn., aafBH *..... I BAD MAN OF RED BUTTE £ GUN TOWN Mart BROWM ANT Twy KNIGHT h PLAZA ,,',:;:, |Ta>? a inwfTin s a P • • .own Oianl n.iuhlr I -ami* KINO roiMT" Ha i-ARrir.io p a i NEAL a TBIS BMKI Of TBtE LAW *< % %  uKparow* Kiit SMITH > a Lhasa.* An ion Hrlfd UUubLr GAIETY TaU GARDEN — ST. JAME TODAY A TOMORROW %  p MATIN EX TOMORROW ft p iiu OtTLAW" '•at* RUaBBU. Jsrt BtTTTCL a .!. IS* -rl • %  • a* \a*/ov KiKo or ram t MIDNtTE TONfTB, •TaaiL TO VINOtANCa" .il ORANT I daily neal and a free educaVisitors' Day Two hours after (mother bumper ucv. lopment and Wellorr. re-vvRR two hu,idr*ri iUoni,. =• an o h ''' bumper entertainment from England on Thursday O tended V it^ r ^fy. M 1, w111 fw,n lnto •" "* "e BarS31wS=>:^r:^r^k~ Mtatnars.'S Mi' Nu-il On Six Monthi' Leave M il AND MKS. PERCY II. r IH'RTON or 7lh Avi Jfrlo Rico"ySicT,';. %  Mr U lt connect c U & A to *pcnd a h 'ida>. '.! "urion who is Parochial Treasurer of St Michael, is on six. l*ird Chier Justice and Dft-,-*. >K. ••.- Besides ihe attractive door prize of a free trip o Grenada for two. there are several other highlight, on the evening's programme. Two orchestras will provide nonl PnrrV "riU 'i~ti a,op danctn *. there will be a conMJ bJnT3t ai ?ti-JS 5!? *2-5t*s %  si tors Bi*hop. the Lniv Collymore. Mr. and M Skeete. Capt. J. G. Bryan. C. M Theobalds. Rev. Arm"tien thev get tired of 'hat. •here ar all thoselovely K^lny luke-boxes, "dealer-donated." ia twang out the hill-billy favouriteSaid a union official h.T-iilv "The donatttns are net fine." Ibbarson. Mrs. Vaughan. Miss Betty Aine. ft. During his absence. M1 %  %  B-rJett H.n P I te.Zi n-i-. !" i Feld. Mr. and Mrs S. H. Nurse. Mr. and Mr.. A W Harper. Mr M S JanmiOtt Mr I), n Garner. M.C P. Mr and Mrs. Lisle Smith. Mrs. M. Peebles, Mis Cameron. Mr. C. A. Newsim. Com. and Mrs. D vdi. Mr D. A. WHer Mr. M. A Puekerin and Mr I. A, Chase. Principal ~ ochlal I 1 floor show with dance mimhrrs. singing and comedians as well sti •nany other side hows to make it a real success. B.B.C. Radio Programme SATURDAY. OCTOBKR IT. 1M1 11 11 am Proiaminr P*r-i.i-. a m> Sport. IS SS noon the Nrxa, I p m Nwi Aiul>aw 4*a—i.is pan. — SI.SI m.. IS IllMr. George G jill .!Ct as Treasurer. Overheard 0 \ERHEAKU on Broad Street %  day was thij conversation between a man and a Tjf-T' Wom.n. "So tne Conservative* in England headed out the Labour Party." Man: "That is England." Woman: "And they they say gotn" come down hea and do the on agreement for a period of three • %  *. Dorothy Gray Beauty con•ame thing" years to the office of Surgeon nultant arrived from Jamaica For Vachl Races Spaciallst. General Hospital, folThursday iftarnoon by It Win A MONO the passenger, leav.ng 1"S^iScf '"nation of Mr on one of her routine visits. Here l\ asfesaseitati mm nwia f..r Tr.n A i-eacoc*. until November 2nd she s -t.ivMr P.r CT <,.du.tM .1 Edin,„, ., hc Wlnd „ r H „. el Surgeon Sr scialiat General Hoapilal ll* II MALCOLM MURRAY • < %  ) p.m Th Km I 10 D in T* . . .. *"y %  •'vie is pin II U( K :.n| M Paid Short Viiit !^"m i." • %  "• 6". •" <•" A FTER paylm a .or! v,,„ lo T:i\,S. X^ ..KA? **Trinidad. Mr. Charlie Taylor v %  %  ,rom ord Hol.i. %  0 p m. Monaacr of th. Hotel Royal, rp?"":, r ?? !" ""^if.'^. P ?!fT2* SSfi .terd, mornln, by KV^AIS^^"^^^^^. BWIA. He was accompanied ty "*• Mrs. Taylor and their little son *•%  " • % %  -- %  %  • Tonv 1*S ptn PAKKEfl has been appointed \f'SS ii Dorothy Gray Routine Visit ELAINE K1NKEAD. Sport Hrvm 111 p m Hadlo SrwiiNl SSS p m Radio Thralre. ISM p.m The New.. HMO p.m ftom Tlii. editorial... 1* IS pro Vour. rHhfullv I0.3O pm Sins It Again tut rions'ssi SAT1HI1AY OCTOHril TT. ISSI 10S* pm.-lOJS wm News I'SS pm-ISSS pm .To %  I IJMft TSS014idsd wa: i Hoad, daughter Attended Building Congress %  V|"R. W. M. WOODHuUSE, Mr. Parker grad Vsucluse.St Thom M and an emf R B ; .^ h ^^r ?8M and !ho l" 1 '. h "l n t a ^ demonstrations ITi Budding Development AdHo>ee 01 H*. Royal Bank of CanfjJgS ^'^ Ju !" -""^— H "" tt \** P L Mirt to f W %  "j !" ?" v.-er .o ihe Comptroller for Dohha. gone for a few day. Zf^ „ SmonstrstorT fi V 1U h mBk Up h,ntS ve.opmen, and Welfare, returned ,i H.. Xhe J nX ^lV > Anatomy in the University of EdPtr from Jamaica on Thursday cveJSVrtL 1 b*'***" Barbados lnburicn and „ a -^^ n CUnlcal • Q %  r.ng by BWIA. He was acSurgery w.th Sir Henry Wade. .„ P *', *~l* "'*"' rompanled by Mrs. Woodhouse He was awarded a University lM" KEN rAKNUM. Birbados After iittt-nding the IntemationUing Scholarship in 1B34 and XVl '•' Building Bewarch Conarcss in Director of Messrs A. S. proceeded to Washington Unlv-r,efl for Trinidad on Thursday London during September. Mr. nr.%den and Sons Limited, returnally. St. Louis and Barnes Hospital evening by BWIA to lake part In Woodhouse. on his way back to ed from Trinidad on Thursday ns Fellow in the Departments of lne Trinidad and Tobago Cycle Kurbados, s'opped off nt Jamaica ewuilng by BWIA after paying a General Surgery and Urology %  meeting which open* .-, the request of the colony's 18S7 he returned to Scotland and ' *he Queen's Park Oval lodav Qossnfwr in order to at acted as Surgical Specialist to the ._,.* D \ir i s ,h '* fl'iiilding programme cons*Highlands and Island* ServlorAssistant Manager tt.W.l.A. ,, UP nt on the hurricane of RS *<>rv*>.l in Trinidad nv Surgical _„ ,.. „..„ w. ur M a--.,, , August 17. SiK-.i,.li>t, Grade A. Colonu.1 \fR-C'"VNK MAHON. /( %  Hospital, Port-of-Si.iin. fn.m 1T Bmnch Manager of BWIA In BWIA. was Mr Winston Warren jg,iB •,, \gtB uVien he loined the Juniulea, returned lo Jim i who had spent a few weeks' halls t a ff of the Diagnostic Clinic and lerday by DWIA after speridin^ .. day here. He was accompanied by Hospital. Beekles Road. St. Miholiday here. He was accomp.uihis wife. chael. ied by his little daughter. Director Returns Vf R. A. S. I.HYDEN, Managing Tr.i Back to Work R ETURNING to Antigua yc by BWIA to resur his duties as Operations Oflicer. ]'i, BY THE WAY ...by Beachcomber HPJIE suggestion that lower houses should be built, "to give more room lo low-flying airCfftfl i-omes late in the day. We may soon have to wear Its in ilw neighbourhood of airports. Then hey and away fur the time when little domestic planes steal in at open windows like cats, and tiny hoverplanes come down chimneys and land with a whisper on the hearth. /InElrphnnl tc/io Rrmi-mbvrfti An angry chimpanzee In the flrct.s thrcu' Us tricycle at her —News item. T HAT beast will never win the Cyclists' Courtesy Diploma for Road Decencv. How much more civilised was the elephant Riiod.i This soft-hearted monster recognised a poverty-stricken military gentleman who had Kiven her a bun in Cawnpore iniiiy years ngo. The warrior was sitting In Ihe eight-penny seats. Rhoda coiled her trunk round him end lifted him gently into the one and ten-pennies. Tears came into the eyes of both XhiTluimiiu-r in a lurm.nl T HIS morning Reg Bodger arrived at Aberbananer with hi-* trainer, and at once went down on all fours and posed for the photographers, with his nose behind n pea The nose looked very (It. .ind he laughingly pinched his left nostril to show how tough It was. Meanwhile. Evans the Hearse, after shadow-pea-puihing in the rymnasium. punched with his nose a pea suspended from ifai "His nostril-work was excellent." Sli ii trainer. Morgan the Laundry, "and he shaped up to the pen like a winner JIVI. bocker. the American woman champion. Is prepared to meet the winner of the contest after her match against Stelger the Alpine Wonder, who pushed a pea over the Sllvretta pass Into Austria In 1947. /V//ee Alt T HE sentence, "He looked down his nose at her", of whlc'i novelists are so fond, has ]ut made me laugh again. It should be followed by "She looked ur> her nose at him What'* /or dinner T HERE is something odd about the story of a man who has been fined for keeping a fullgrown hungry lion in a Manhattan boarding-house. It must have been a very silly lion—and a very silly man. The other lodgers could hardly believe their eyes, I suppom when they passed the lion on the stairs. And surely the house must have got a bad name whet' people in the district heard the roaring, or saw the animal's face nt u window. tliiliriHin;: fsV sssasM T*HE antes* problem," said the sage, "is to get away from ihe earth's sphere of attraction It miv be recalled that Strabismus once tried to burst his way upwards at an unthinkable speed, and landed in the sea off Wor:tn:i(/ Ha next tried going very %  Umlv. but thr rocket startea without him (while he was holding up his h. : to last the wind and came down in a field a mile from the starting-place. His present plan Is to try guile; to outwil the force of gravity, as u \\er>.-. and then to steal up on the mooi, In a most unexpected manner discarding the magnetic bool* In f.ivOur of a magnetic hat at some given moment. Rupert and the Lion Rock — 15 CROSSWOHU %  1 -i 1 (, |7 .1 5 0 i IP 1 14 J L i r 1" 6 r n bl B ?4 > r r r f r r I > r ) r r r r > r r > P k TICKTFS a Supptr lne/ \$2 "CH Virol —the food for growth T gaag i a comrnlrated lo.nl containing mall extract, >pe.isllv renned fata, egg. ugar* (in. Iu.|nt gin |, an.l t>raiigT l"'er, with the addition of mineral -.ill. • ii.i iilaioiu* I liil.lrcn lliriMan TBRsI BSSSSS I H (•rutMifw Ike lJ crnliala fwr •treugth. MUIIU and a sound >onIitulion. GLOBE TO-DAV A TO-MOKROW. ^.OS A 8.00 H M. Stirttf 4 l HO o *• Dana ANDREWS and CarU BELINDA AND Leon ERROL in "HIGH AND DIZZY" Monday and Tuesday. 4.30 and 1.45 pm. ROSEA.WA McCO\ and SAVAGE SPi'.I'MtOl R W^/^W//,V J V,V.V,V///,^V////,^^^v.V J V,V,V,',^•^ DANCE! Barbados Light Aeroplane Club TO-NIGHT Contest o/ Beautiful legs Two Bands South American Rhythm PARADISE BEACH CLUB Door Prize HOLIDAY IN GRENADA For Two ncm > IIMI.1 -> %  GiFT SETS tor Men and Women LEATHER GOODS — with Zipps aW To See Them is lo BUY Them '. GET THE EARLY PICK [Bt*ra. itfi IS. Court uutitiana IS No .Miwii-iii U < 15 Hair iVHOoppai %  • IT Wlli 'Si ll WU. .o* il i' r i'vnr (wrt. (> 21 No •aplina Dr the oiund isi .,%  ihi tir mint iirinluce" him. (71 L.iiU'uiDf ill Runllc IS Turned nlirn BflwmrO sofa 14) to iresi rt. iB ruruiM in inai Kuiiam. II ft wltrvotn hfuefii VicturU IS) Mi atai la maHv it. Hi *M ttir Mil IB) • ~n VUt-WlB. IS) ""-o-atn-eact Iniui4i KarptUa ••urn (3) To-night at 8 o'clock visit CLUB MORGAN The most Beautiful Mont Club from Miami to Rio Ulth a lOOrld-Urtde rrpufation for o^od lood 3ftt8ic 9 Dancing En teria in men t throughout the night Dial 4000 for reservations <:•-> .".,:. W.rt (hut in '. Ho*vci

xml version 1.0 encoding UTF-8
REPORT xmlns http:www.fcla.edudlsmddaitss xmlns:xsi http:www.w3.org2001XMLSchema-instance xsi:schemaLocation http:www.fcla.edudlsmddaitssdaitssReport.xsd
INGEST IEID ENOHSE6JT_P26PL5 INGEST_TIME 2011-10-12T13:47:28Z PACKAGE UF00098964_02719
AGREEMENT_INFO ACCOUNT UF PROJECT UFDC
FILES



PAGE 1

s * Jtotor ESTABLISHED 1895 SATURDAY. UCTTBKR 21. 1951 CHURCHILL GOES BACK TO PUCE: FIVE CI TEN TORIES SHOVE LABOUR INTO SECOND PLACE Clement Attlee Resigns VICTORY THE -WARMONGER" IS IN: THE'PEACEMAKER' IS OUT LONDON, Oct. 26 AN ANNOUNCEMENT. "Court Circular; Buckingham Palace, 26th October, 1951 : The Right Honourable C. K Attlee haci an audieuawith the King this evening and tendered his resignation as Prime Minister and First Lord of the Treasury which His Majesty was graciously pleased to accept. TtH King subsequently received in audience the Right Hon. \\ taston Spencer Churchill and requested him to form a new administration. And so after six years, the Socialists want out o( power. In the previous Government, they held a y seat majority. But now, latest reports say that the Q have at least a 25 seat majority After leaving Buckingham PalaOS Attlee stepped through the door of fche Prim* Minister's residence smiling and drove sway past the silent crowd of about 100 parsons. Only four people including %  woman waving a Conservallve campaign balloon were outside the Palace to Mi Attlee arrive. Attlee was accompanied only l>.\ a bodyguard when his car glided along the gravelled forecourt through Use arch way and up to the King's door Just after i lurk Chutchill left the CunscrvaUve headquarters at 5.12 p.m. GMT. Winston Churchill, a sprig of white heather in his lapel for good luck awaiting hourly the late Friday summons which would send him to Buckingham i*a!.oe to receive from King Ge-iige the invitation Ui form a new Conservative Government. No one was calmer than Ibc 7g year old warrior as the fateful moment drew near In his own* constituency of Woodford, outside London Friday afternoon. Churchill thanked voters returning him to Parliameot for the seventh time. He told the cheering throng it was a "glorious victory and continued: "Now we have many on By colleagu. o another Now paafssi %  ster -dial relatli States and < old wartime Josef Stalin eoee table. When he announces his CaBInet on Monday. >t will include [such top Oeaeervatlve party ,md IT?*""" !" S'^Xf* of ,. Snll t: grave problem, may lie .heed of, Jury. -_ 0 ,v Lrl lo ' llu .' uld our country. It is a great com" %  ** %  "". Brendan iirneken. fort to me In all the uncertainties Hichard Austen Uutlci. Sir David scat* and lost 1 previoutl? held. l-ebeur leal Ti and aalned |j Once a CeeastfVSli** majority was assurei uh machinery which rnarst Ukf change in British Government were set In moU minutes. Churchill had been wailing tor that moment since 7 p.m. of July 26. 1*45 when an annuuncenivn'was mad 0 that B> I thrown their war hero out of office and chosen Prune Minister in his place, Friday night'N assignment wag :he answer to Church i. i election %  —"y^*gn pica Itsi pri?r r nave He meant the chance to seek a lasting pas portunity It was ha %  • inesss last ta uuiiu up defences, establish more rlth Ihe %  PresosH %  inlcrthat surround Final result, will not be known until sometime nest week. King George the Sixth who entrusted Britain to Winston Chun-hill in the hour of its greatest wartime peril asked him at Buckingham Palace Friday night to lead it through pencetime dangers unprecedented In history. The dramatic meeting tuvk place in the bedroom of the great marble Palace in which the King is recovering from a serious lung itperaWWA. It wai more than eleven years ;i go as both men must have remembered, when Churchill acleptad iiiwartime post. The Man who promised Brltona only blood, toil, sweat and tears in the dark day. of 1940 when the Nails had overrun France, and Britain stood alone told them in the election victory Friday night: There lie before us hard times. 1 have seen worse and had worse to face. With .even of Z5 c*w4ttueaeiea rtill u> revert mending* were:— Conservatives 311; Lebear SM: Liberals ft: Irish Nationalist 1. Coneervativea gained 24 TO-DAY'S WEATHER CHART Henrlee: ft 40 a.as. Sunset : !i.:-tJ p.m. Moon : Last Quarter; Oclebrr '12 Minting : 8.00 p.m High ride : 1.11 suns. 1-41 p.m. Low TMr l : l" a.m.: I.M Maxwell Fyfe. Lord Woolton. Anthony Eden UK younger figures In th ( P In the la t ,\.,\ | t %  ampaigo, Churchill turned on his famous rhetoric to denounce the labourite charge that he was a trigger happy warmonger. He Is suinir one London newspaper for libel. But Friday night the warmonger label was gone and it was <;od old Ulnnir to million. here In the Empire and in other parts of the world Heat naotUh he will i %  77lh fc.rUiday anniversary in Number 10 Downing Street the ofttu.il residence of the Prime Minister This was the first Urn. I over became Prime Mimsi. %  thu peoples' choice. The last lip r ha suc ce eded, because of tinpeasement policy of nil I live predecessor Neville ( lain rlled With (lie first Hush of ConservaUve victory over, experts wenquick lo point out il wont bung many quick change., socialist) are here lo stay, they said is nearly bankrupt again und it looks like %  hard winter. Church 111 already ha. promised hard limes for everyone but he '• man of hope, not despair Crowd, were outside Church I! house on Friday night until po Ice .enforcements finally arrived lo clear them away. Churchill a) pcared once Imt by 10 p.m. there were still 400 in the crowd mo 'I. women calling and singing for him to appear again Police i home. AtUee and his wife n left Number Ten Duwiung Strwl for their last visit to Chequers' the country home of British Prime Minister, before the Churchill* take over Onh %  few people were at Number Ten Downing Street when they left. General. Lord Ismay at Churchills right hand through the war is boosted in some quarMr. Anthony Eden labor.). Mr. Winston Churchill and land-owner investor Italph A'hetnn 50 arc mcntlomH QS possible Ministers of Supply. —UP. WILL SUMMON EMPLRE TALKS iFYnm Our Own Corrwponeml' LONDON, Oct. 2d. An empire economic COBfetmos tn Include representative, from llgg will be called in London probably within two month.. It is leirnt tonight thn: die centeanog is wrheduled under the "urgent plans" from the new Tory government to help restore the economic situation and raise ngfhun'l prestige with fnrelgt countries First aim of the Tones home economic policy will be to cut cost of living. Complete reorganisation of the house building programme will start immediately to prepare the way for 300,000 houses, the yearly target Churchill has set. Also iriorlty will be given to the Bill to repeal the nationalisation of the iron steel industry. Socialists in the meantime are planning lo make things dlfflcul' fir the Government; some said h sgssas in g tactics would be a justillable reprisal for the rough time Conservatives gave them In Paiiiament. Joe Louis Beaten M \\ YORK. Oct. :•;. JOE LOUS, former world neat > vM-icht rhamplon. was io ii.niu beaten by Rocky •1 .nun., in the eighth round of a le.iround bout. Keioree Goldstein miotpud the sWrhl le prevenl Louie from being bully beaten • OLOMAI Sl III I AIM SIMtHS Nevada Atom Tests The -Blueprint By J. J. X.KKIIAN LONUUN, Oct. M. General £iki.-til)"wUK. laid thl sala test results will be gleaned carefully by United States experts. gait] that lesson, will be Royal Couple Ends Vacation 'Go Home" Egypt Tells Britons CAB KOKEKi.N MJNISTKK Salah Kl Urn Fatal U Brtttaw Uvlnc In Igypt to "|o home." H< Itnaoi 'hm 'the IH-SI way to avoid Inclior in the i rlitm—Innn— mild be lor Britniu living In home." He sai.l liniisii nmnmen nd luunsu huwc^.> be wi'lconie. TluMawnwnt urginj I I "ui ol Oami ii ii'ply to a question from British m who asked whether Ihe report was true that vise* tor Briton, In HI,' in Kwvpt would not be extended. Kl Din I'asha UKI i IWnk Allies Advance 800 Yards Hlh AUMV HK.AUVUAHTtlLS. Korea, Oct. 'U Bayonst-wioldinK Allied troops luirved out gains of up to BUo yarus agam.t suddenly lierc" i ornmunist resialanee at tlw gabs it boml>bUckei>ed Kumsuiig. Uniled N.iti-.n. mfBntr>i fought ever) iwh of the wa; • sUblisn poaituHii on ttg .louth-eest os* the former Red ba.' in Cenli.il Korea, 29 mile. b*7l tin38th Parallel ("Mm,.mist resistance also slitT< i e avoid friction under eslsUng i-lrcui would be fr Biltona living in Egypt in no liii Hus.i.1 has mi' uelcome .i til. nil In, iiul nonnggresslon pad cording to the Wofdist rv Al Ni.r u The report came after informed source* said a draft trnde .igiivim-nt M, tween ihe lass oua> Hussui and her i ipal eu >lead if Al Sllgry ir|>ortiiig 'he poesibUtt] of ^ nnn-jinjritauon pad betwasp bvptian and would favour al on the pad of Egypt rtui-Kc i.ri it. M Vll. TOHIA. U.C.. oi It was back to th* K" fur I'rioieas KlUutxm ... 1'hilip .iflvr a tiuree-day • %  the two "f iham spent at a lodge I0S miles north The Royal couple started thau jnuriic. eastward witn a vtut lo immo. Prorri I scheduled to embark on the ( rswedrr for a 38-nnle trip eenns Georifia Sti.ui In Vao> .ouver arriving there about noon. Then il was on to N minster and gmaJI cesrti Prstser Valley and Canyon. T .y irr* scheduled to re.rh Kdi.ii.i %  m on Saturday. It wait a re la Mr including horseback riding, a di. ve to Sproate Falls to UuV and a visit to a lumlxr camp In the evening. Briti-h ewctlon returns wenrs> layed to Uirm.u f Russian Rolutions WUhVSLemTougk WASHINGTON, 'X-t 2d Al-n Knk. U.fa AiuUaMadui U Russia said d tSM Wi, |a Houw on Friday thai rslatl %  ii gra noi "quite as tough as the Kirk id i %  ill not return tu MOSCOW t. ill leave >r Paris on Monday to serve an adviser to the V :< djatsjgation al General AsaCmbly. —I'.P Canada Raises $105,000 For Jva io tiir master pi holdi HK the mass of manpow.i %  sal <>t the iron Curtail from spilling to the Atlantic HI a ittadV %  predictions that Europe will be in pretty good condition to tak< harasll m two or three AT%. his subordinates are faeca with the foremost day to day Suppose the Russian. H Uial looflt WesteiTi planner. beuSSg thai BeJ State, atomic %  %  .living actual l explain how Western 1 -d for a long time will led by the Russian armeo mlrjit. can get ready to deal a it-tensive blow. an ej i.it that althougn the Russian, have a stock iiombs fur use against IteSS 'he Itcd. have not amaueo nough atcaak arealth to XIII^I i •gainst troop, in the held at gSSt nl The easta, which msy involve G weapons, referred to bv Truman, are designed to show how radto-aCtiva blasu can be used to nelp ground forces. Elsenhower's forcos are in need >f help. I(e tj eupceted to have / % %  -, by the end of the /ear In ti soluEisenhowi. r's defensive CONGRATULATIONS A TBUCOIIAM waa sent ruterday b> Pie llni"^ seoclaUon ef sterbedw> U Mr. I. .mi.-. -liti.Mi. iiinxNi alive M.P.. eonxralHlatltv him and hh Partjr on Ibelr vloaM-y la thr election* In lllrl.lltl Allies Reject Red Proposal MUNSAN. Korea. Oct W The Allies toda • d the t'onununi.t buffer sSMS proposal that the Uniled Nation *ive up such bitterly won Koreui areas ss Heartbreak RUaK P uei I lx.wl and Uie Iron Triangle. The Reds wanted U.N. force, to withdraw as much a. IS milerheir proposal, countered yesterlay". U.N. suggestion for a bufler •one generally along the presen' attle line.. Major General Henry I Ilodge'old the Reds that their proposa' bore no relationship to the mill tary line of contact and did no' iffer truce protections. The Red oilers anu me IJ.N. re lection came at the esssg mg of the sub-commit lees irvn ta .ii;r... oa %  cassc Bra Um llsi ings are held .d Pan Mini Join under the Red proposal U keep Kaesong. former sit. .r uTUl talks, iwu miles south of Uie 3Btl paraUeb They would withdraw from thi part of the Ong]in Peninsula 0) the weat coast area which th. \iiie. describe as mill' important .< T i -JJ.P. Japs Approve Peace Treaty TOK'to, Oct 2 The Japanese Peace Treat* an the United State.-Japan Pact were overwhelituiiglf approved by the House of !o-pn sent.tive. of the Japanese Nation-1 Diet. Approval by this body is tant. %  mount to a final ratification. —I'.P. Uous move to strengthi iiions. The lit r..dd there are approsimat.l. (.i.uio Brit I* ul lank iai.u in ,ne i ul wee a o.Two thirds live in Alessndna %  --• %  ugh I'edooM.. ijgkj ,,. ,.. B od the irst are %  g the baaUered cilj re lha mainly mattered in the Snw. %  uth-wcui. Aiii.-a in,' %  laaalsgc] it miin" gasJ heavy grenade and nuKhaaa-SUrj fare from %  iitnn.li.il t'ommumaU on the hill north-w. Ailie.t artUU n aui i m in :imi Communist casual lie In i Ihunlenna lmntt> inlnirni of ne.rlv Hire* no. •ht H lintr-l N.iiio.r i % %  .• moiher lo -i, Mi. IIIHMI and claimed f>0 i r Plane Crashes At Airfield LONDON. Od. -ti A chartci.'i BlrUaS pasaei Canal gone. The Egyptian fill alga Minister Id today there can be no question of mediali.m In UK Egyptian dispute tielmv British troop, are %  vaeual BBd the Sudan but the poealbltl*r of KgyptV foiuoa We*tem Defence Oiganumtions nuiy bo subject Egypt's dernanda an fuinlled he said. —C.P. UP. A viatrix On Goodwill Tour 1'AHAMAKIBtI. Oct. 2fl Rratillan aviatrix Ada Roga'u arrived al the airfield al < on Thursday In a one moi n.. leroplane and left foi i to-day continuing her gnodwill rashed at Hovlngdon airtour of the WeMern H .i l.l when its undercarriage colI —I* P. apsed and burst Into flames. /* ministry of Civil Aviation sssaggftV nan said the crash "appears to The plane was flying to London rein Castel Henito, Tripolllaniu. *hen Uie accident oecurred durng a landing at the airport about :S miles north of London—l.r. ( Tbe "ADVOCATE" poyi for NEWS. Dial 3113 Day or Nlfft* MONTKEAL. Oct. A total of .103.000 has r..i .-. Itehel I It WS day by James Muir i • the ^Canadian Conuu U compalan. Tlic %  chstse supplier and material, in ulcd atomic explosion 10 Canada for distribution i i ) Prenrhman's Plat testing ground. Jamaica.—rKull\ >|riik in-/ NEW IlKI.Ml ii %  Australian External Affain Minister. Chard Caaey sjid here 'on Priduy "broadly speaking" Australia accepted the mvitatn[to participate in the Westerpowers Middle Eas*. defence aratem. —UP. HON. E. N. TtTEKEB. Colonial Secxatary who wa. gaset of hononr at th. Oor.rnm.nt Indnstn.l nehoela' Visitors Day at Dodds yesterday speaks to tbe visitor, and ta. boys and glrU of th. .caeel. With Mr. Turner ar. His Lordship BUthop Mssderllle. Hn Turner snd Msjor O. F. C Waloett. IntenSent ef the acaoea*. The boys are lo the bsckgroand lined In single file aronod th sqnan. AMERICAN FOREIGN AID WASHINGTON, Oct 26 The United State. Oov ;.!.! ta f'relgri countries dining the 11 vear. ended Juno SO, 1051 amounted to 8l.MS.Ofifl.OO0 aroordlng Commerce. The '01*1 represanl•d aggregate value of goods services and funds furnished on the basis. deduction of f 10M.OOO,000 for reverse aid or returned paymenta the net amount of U S foreign aid during II years of lho hot and cold war was $71.130. 000.000. In this grand total *fi! OOO.OOO.OOu represented net grants and S10.010.OOS.Otv were net nmerce Department said: *'-resting to note that the .id objectives of the US. Government prior to December. 1ftI. (when the Pearl Harbour attack involved thr US la wnri were nearly the equivalent of an: 'policies of the fiscal year 1MI i when the U.S. wSs promoting Ita own nationi.1 sistlng other nations to build u|i '; The US. foreign aid during she /!*• years of World War II to $48,200,000,000 In goods services end funds. -UP. "Now I know why he always smokes TRUMPETERS. They have such a lovely flavour, so satisfying, so smooth, and FRESH.' TRUMPETER CtGAMiETTES OATf. I IN. I ULE # %  -' EH I" II HEHE i



PAGE 1

sATI'Kim l1l>llt.lt 27. 1951 HtRRAIMIX ADVOCATE PACE si VI s CLASSIFIED ADS prBL,r OT Harbour Log GOVERNMENT NOTICES TILEMOIIE Km '•" •-"• %  %  %  •• "~ — — I — IN CAPI ll C HIV IN THE COURT OF CHANCERY TfUEfHONE 2308 <•* 11 mu gee ogasa h* M %  <""•• .-ke'ge e*d IIH SO IlM r-t %  MK BALK %  I SO ga • .•h-da.a .nd |i so 1 nnli per -eord on eei frrti **r avord en Sunda ddittt>-t avaed. nSuufi'll •** %  Mm eherga ID M. an4 ss reaate %  * %  ** 14 t daaa ar teorde I rest nihi) Roaal.nd Holder*. grandmaUwr el ilaroxt rind Cilln Moot*. moth, i-inlew of p*v Psrd* Moon Funeral %  Hrt d.,lit,i residence. Il.mte *rM. St Hirhwl. at 4 SO p m """ %  *o* the *• ELolee Moor* .daughter. THANKS HowMI We ihe undmiinM rieelr* to thank those •!. ml %  TMIAI. < %  •• %  .. r.rd aim. path, wltn ui I" nur retrr.t bereavement ocraaionrd hy the death of our Mr-ther Ai-oth.t IMMII H Howell. I lkn.rH S Roach, C. Murray pi 10 i—m IOR HKIVT HOUSES TO lllllt ABHTtfcNClN.SEA U.awrll.. tal Naveibei Dial MIS IT I* 11—4*1 %  plone nil. n ,„ M J_ AUTOMOTIVE "HWl Citroen Aimoat „e 3.CS0 miles Ownat ln\irj the i.ian* PhoneMil U ! Sl-t ( n CARS To H.lman lalooM .... model! very mile uwd and condition Ilka n A lti!:n-.. in Saloon 1M0 in perfect r<.iniiti..-i A riillmeii talste Car ir tatton Wagon dona only S.OSO odd anile* c.cellenl condition. Austin A-TO Saloon A-I rundilliHi Austin A-40 Saloon under %  im mile, A-l condition Murrl. M itoon parted condition Singer % % %  ill rnodet. repainted and in nk order COLE Co Ltd JJ io si *l CARS—One *t-r.d,.rd Vanguard, On* Morrl. Oxford On* S S A II HP Oil* Singer t h p Hoadatrr On* WIIMO kh|.i Saloon On* Hudson IS47 Modal For particular, inquire REDMAN J TAYIOII'S GARAOC LTD 17 13 SI—h Loaan i order FTH Hall I lull i In working Apply Manager n la siin ti iwar. torn in N'I Suitable fo cot. pie rully %  rniahtri with ffi larce ^ irvant. room Apply to Wealey Hayl.y. IW> Phone M1B D 10 SI -3.1 l:ll It > ..-. (..n,i.Ned i -| ,.' and from lu\ He*. M.. I I...|r.. rr mnin II Coa.1. full' lelephone nod HPVMI H* n Itta §m. Si Urrnrf Dial fd3T | 7 || _i f „. HELP M Cnlleda" r I ha nchool ><-r. Januar/ lM IM.varwq Br-dBaU inil-r qualined lo laaeh Fienrh up lo end inrludlnf Higher Mrnool Carllltcala m %  llh iraximu.it of 171 lor graduate with High School Teacher. D;pioma SUrtlng naluo determined b> lea me SIMEON N WlirTK. Hi'L.t.-. 27 10 SI On NOTTClt rif, | tOld myaelf n iponalhi f..r ,.nv debt cr dn i one In my name wllho.it a rttten orde •Igned by me MARIA CARI.OTA GQNS.AI.VaYt AlIOi;MC^lrIEWiTS To meet nurreroua requeata of eur *i iluimiai we h.ie opened a aertlon for tiirtoaji made ahtrls. p>)amaa. panta. • horla. ladle* alack*, boya rlothlng e!f I'viiij a) our diapoaal the faeilltlea of a modem farlorv we are able lo offt: e>>te pri-e* MOTOR TTUTK IWdford Trueh IT41 Model in good order Can be -een at l-yne'* Oarage. Tweedatde Huud M 10 SI -In STATION WAGGON Excellent buy A.-lm Wtmttm Wagg.-i %  Paneli 1 nionlha llga. Practlcall. n.w Eaav payment On dlaplay at Auatin Agency "Eckalein Uroai Auapird for paaaenger* f. 10 51 3n BLECTBKAL HEPTHOERATOR—One S Cubn n n'.iternhoume llefngrrator in good workApply P I> Uu it.nl F>.rterFactor). Si Jamea Dial SSIt ST 10 Sl-n FURMTUKE ITIINITI'IIE fine dining room Table for 4 peraona. one Side Board Both Mahogany, near I / new Telephone 4114 TT 10 SI l>t Safe Cahlnel. by g ft SIM> tg ttork of New Fll etc At Ralph i Street S3 10 Si-Jn MECHANICAL T^PEwnrpERB good working order Bee rda. Lower Bay ft* 00 Al Ralph Street 28 10 JI -J-i MISCELLANEOUS ARSBNATE OP LEAD far durtlng food cropa Ring 44UT R'doa Co-op Cotton UICVI-IJ: ACCESSORIES — Padi Rubben at SOT art. Handle Grlpa at SSr and Uc per pair. Brake Shoea an Blorka at BV per pr IAURIE DASH Co Dial SOB! Tudor Street S3 10 Sl J pOTTON sll ILSI i KK.H I i |„ llfi.1 de.lgna Jgwide uaual price (1 II reduced for >* week only to SI 0 pel Mea I IMIII II WALES H Ufj I v\n in Tee ceM> per apala I and 12 ceali per oaiale Maataagaa], (horpe ..'.... i |1 SO or. Stiaduu* i i.-.-V % %  ,.. • n 'mtd-,1 ireek^ttv! i4.i: san-'N UHBSl Ha k. Grey. Beige. Gold | ie al kl 64 per yard I SI Swan Street. iv Quality in ul White *i" Iglt KIHJ'Al. ST 10 SI—In REAL ESTATE AND Ten A. .JkggJWgU. Chrlil Chu I l t> in Douglaa Land aikiated :l\ Dial 111] n in M :i ID c< .i ,. .. .-.. %  i .. .% II < 10 ft C.tmpriaert ol Ul aq ft I ...He aheel.. I* le-l 1%  4Fll. T| 'eet ipeure HI art 10 ft WalUba poati ,'iio II S ft Wallaha poali aullable Lit V W. CLARKE. Ivy Road 2T 10 SI—Sn SEA MOea an ulcreaUd c mlra Jn Rapliate. Cholaiu '17.10 *I-Sn SADDIK One Riding uirldle In %  i Applv P D Ma.nard. Porten raetorv. St Jamea Dial 231 21 10 SI TOYS: Large telectlen of To'i eluding Bicycle* for I yeara old. Tn,T\W for S yeara old. and Bicycle* B veers old Not faraattMtg XMAS T.eea at 00 Call: Ralph Beard, Lower %  Bj SI,.. 10 SI e*e"e*e^^-*e^'^e**J vj PAHADISE BEACH CLUB S | Natfcr To Mfabtrs | S y In accordanc* with Rule 0 34 IQJ Club will be closed to V nwmb*rs Irom 8 p.m. on 5 Saturday. 27th October. 19.10.51 -9n. UwAW/rV/A'.V/ W/.V3 BEACH LAND ST. JAMES COAST tNe.-r id TWO ACRES of most attractive beach land now available Me. per M(. fool — may be divided into half acre lots. MARTIN GRIFFITH. Four Winds. 27 10.51 — 2n. PtBLIC OFFICIAL SALE si NOTICE rttoai are being taken Ag Parch.*! Treeaurer. Bt Michael IN CARLISLE BAY Elta Wonila *• Bch CS-ril HathaKet). %  „. i-.-I 1-, -., NOriCE PABISM O* Mt JO-tM i" 1 *" ""Hi be r u e a ta aj by Ih* designed up lo ISth Noverttber IMl Ihe iftrehaae of Iwo Hi building, i Centre. *a "The Beet Keu Rajhjroj Stationremoval aa aoan aa vacated "•% % %  e Uoet — appUcalion lo Mr Ooad N B The Social ComrtUtt** daee no) bind .taelf to accept the hlgneai or an> lander J MERTUN M.i-AUT*'. Secretary. Bortal Coninniire. St Joeivn NOTICE Re tnai e of MILTON KING u>, ,..,^ NOTICE IS HEREBY GIVEN Ih-t f**ota having any debt or ruti agatnat the eatule of MILTON Kl*. dacaaeed. who died al Capri...,, in II Province of the Cape of Good Hop* In* n aaa auu at ef South Africa an tl I IB. day of March IS31 intesUte u rga m ag m to aend parti.-ulara ol Uieir d**rta and oiauna duly alteated to (Jag laraderalgried in care of Meaaara Haynaa A _,i, GrlBtth. No. IS High Street. Brtdgetoon) |u,.,_, I Pilgrim s, I SEAWELL ARetlVAlA Ouerwood M Ion. net. from Bt Lucia %  Schooner UnaUed II. M Berne*, (or Aching bank. S S Alcoa Pllgrtm SMI Capt Haagenarn. Si ARRIVAL* — ON Praaa TRIM it AD ' Rennell A B.' Powell. B Atherlv Tl E Ytoiii taML R Bumatewd ire* HMI1IMUII i Morgan. I I.-to Bhttjaj* Eliubelh Ann DarU Ge-lrude AIU... Daval A Taybar. E In Touch With Barbados Coast Station APPLICATIONS ,irc invited fot ., post n at the BrjYB' Grammar School In Si Kitts, C Ialan.iv The ptat is pension.t^ | III b* .tMi oal examination and will date from 1st January, 1952 3The School is a Government institution and thg I salary scnlcs are applicable to male Secondary School Teachers in the Lax-ward Islands. AJMtsUnts with a degree and T-jBchenf diploma Assistants with a degree 11.44. |l> Sl.8 efnclency bar $120 to BJ A Tfinporarr cool of living II :HO par BBSTIlfTi payable. A Salaries Commission is at present reviewing islaj the Ieward Islands 3 Applicants should possess a degree of a Uiiiv.-tsiu i:hm the British Commonwealth and the successful candidate will IH? reH I "'* %  > quir.sl to tea. h laitln to the standaid of the Hi. liflcate examination. A knowledge of Spanish would !>e regarded as an asset •JM -kill M game shntild be stated in the itppll.-.iti.in Will be requlretl to take charge of school gagtaSS and sgaaittlci 4, AppUcaUons stating age teaching sstpSTsi et. should be submitted to the AdminiMr,,;,,, sK: ".. Anguill. not later than 30th November, 1951. At least two testimonials and a photograph should also he submitted. %  ft. rm-uanc, of .aving *f %  "*"|.i-Pe't I ..e .i r ,.„ ., tch peeeora will be precluded i atgag idtgaj*. BrM f r-aaeetlrele CIOPTOS HENRY WHITE rt.l.-daM CLAM ROPERTY All. THAT certain p... I atnasaa at Bath V ilaaj* .ie in In* t—.i*' ueirhea U n % % %  t* rasaMrti of %  .( U-.-ell. %  .-IM but ROW %  • A B U>l -1 and S Kinoh ".. UaNde Sarmerly %  Bourne b..t Mm e4 OraeaM Haul C* and qn Ul* public road of however car Ihe •-nie abul and bound leg*lier *llh tKe meaauag* or dwelling he.iaa gaU*. Earnr ... Ull ''r"^: and building* bo". treehoM and .naltel on Ihe aald land erected and SHIPPING NOTICES HONTka IKIIilll SIM LINK. IJwirtK N / li-' ISSI. i.ill ptl 'e.-tl %  Ul>. Bag i dap date • nil.ul. ** % %  > Ih* person %  an tilled thereto, having regard only I • %  uch claim* of which 1 anaII then have had notice and 1 will not be liable for th* easete or any part thereof ao distributed ta any paraen of whose deot a* claim I ahau net khan have had notice And all peraona indebted to the aald Cabkand W ireteae I ltd ad vlae that they e-n n.... a following ahlpa through thelt a Cnaat St-ti.... II Alcoa Pllgrtm. a a Bars, a a Alcoa Polarla. a a Hmltingsborg. a t Mrrorla. a a Michael. ga liernadtttte. %  a Cll W aagl, a SI...ma. .I„I a a Argentina, a i Kto de U I-lata. a a a'rgual. > > r*t>aea 'l r 11n> t i t orei.lr a Dalajfaja i Sea Uoder a a Dagi HI R • v ii.. ... KING. ga.iine.1 AdminiatraUlx of the Sdat* Of Milton King deceased g in -iI .1 KATES Of EXCIIAWE MUMtiM Ml I lie rOST OF I l-lll Hi GRENADA Applications are invited for the post of Fishery Officer, Department of Agriculture, Grenada. The post carries an initial salary of $1,512 per annum In the scale $1,512.72 — 11,728 plus Coat of Living Allowance at the ate of 20% of salary and Traveling Allowance of $440 per annum provided u motor cycle is kept Applicant* should have some knowledge of. and. enthusiasm lor the sea. and a good approach fishermen. Previous business commercial experience would be an added advantage. The duties of the Officer would include general welfare work among fishermen; the collection of statistics at the recognised fishing centres and markets and their compilation; the dissemination of information among fishermen; the execution of small ad .toe investigations, upkeep and operation of Government owned Doats and gear. The apiyJ.tment is for 4 years instance and the pott non-pensionable. Applicants should state age and educational qualifications. All applications should be addressed to the Director of AgnlUlture, Department of Agriculture, St. George's, Grenada, and should reach him not later than ISth November, 1951. 20. 10.51—3n. DEPARTMENT OF EDUCATION APPLICATIONS are inviterj tor (he post of HbADMISihb&S of St. l^eonara'g BctHKN leg (..trU, Hichmutid Gap. 1ms scnool will provide free education at the secondary stage for 735 girls between the ages of II and 14. Preference will be given lo applicants who are Gradual.ol -' University wi.hin the British Commonwealth and who have at least 10 years' teaching experience. The salary will be on the scales for a Grade IV Headmistress in the Elementary Teaching Service i.e. for a graduate with 1st or 2nd Class Honours, $2,138.40x9'; 20-3,110. 40x162-3,758 AO, Km | Graduate, who has not achieved 1st or 2nd CltM Honours the scale Is:— $1,911. 80x81-2.397. 60x97 2O-3.I73 .20. An annual sum of $216 is also payable to a University Graduate who holds a recognised Teaching Certificate or Diploma. The post is pensionable in accordance with the provisions of the Barbados Pension*Act 1947 (1947-20). Applications giving full particulars of qualifications and experience should be sent 'o the Director of Education, The Garrison, Barbados by 30th November, 1951. 23rd October, 1931. OCTOBER sn. > *s \n\ ilraHadla* Neofsaatdl |ir I Deques on llark.i Demand Drafta Right Draft. pr Cable pr Currency dCTO-F't ! l". CANADA Baiikri. 1 :t.i,.r Drfl Srht Draft. CIS pr 11 B Bt Ol't pr INVITATION TO TENDER I -.ji.iriiiiriii of IlichwgyH and Transport Sealed Tenders will be received at th. Ct up to noon on 31rt October. 1951. for the supply ol ltiirbadoa "tar nand". a bituminous sand from the So.il..n,l .i> 1 ocuri Ul •and impregnated with a viscous bllumlnou* 0 1 period of live (a) monthfi I \1DEaa ached .lev 1 rlbowra* O.M-r ih Sydney October ih. (lladalooe October ISth. Pott A-.iau toher SSth. Ill I'bane October T7th Trinidad about and Barbados Noi %  Ba |M cargo 1 chilled 1 i' lupBajl "tnr sand" I on spot anywhere within the Parishes of St AIKIM-A PJM) SI 3. Tenders are to he addressed to the Colonial marked "Tender for the supply of Tar Sand to the DajetattahtTtt of Highways and Transport 6. The Contnntor will lie required to give security In s personal bond with two (2) approved surrtir* in the sum of lift> (M) uVollarf for ihe due performance of his CcsttTBCl • ; I II Cuvernment does not bind itself to accept the b any tender, and only tenders submllt I on the pfggcrtbsd form Brill be considered. 21 in 51 —2n. -epted on thr.-.tah BOB a tranaltlpmant at Trinidad \i a Wlradaaar laUadg. Par further parWculara appl rVBNERS, WPrrlV CO I Til say DaCORTA A CO. LTD. Tnnldad. aT W BsfM H w i r w i will are*pi Cargo and pagle W jj i -..tiling Ttwirsa ISth ins" The M.V DAEKWOOli %  riu -t>d Psaaengera Grenada and Am and Paaaeegera only for Vincent aaiUng Tueedsy. 3 T-M V Cargo J UBBB] I —.-ttascrat. K.'ta aatalnd ay. 2nd NovenalK-r | S.110HNW OSflRBRB' %  Mtgnee. Telephone No 404T -I ^Mc sRuaVU Iting BIHI i"-i .te *f T C ow or late ol P Chaae. i I of C Coll but ding on lamia aae. and lend. .r-l I..-| e of one M.a private roade/a: i-ublMRoad, togurther with th or Dwelling House. Bulldtngi pralasd a a follows:— jh~ .it re property appraiaed lo TEN THOUSAND THREE HUNDRED AND 111DeTY-THREE DOLLARS i|10.233 m< Attached from Blarrnrk D. Drayton for and toward* aatbafacUon. arc Dej.oalt to be paid on day *8%$ Qukkfput a few dioroi VKks \a u. i'il up rath ""-.nil Irritation i* •oothed, your no*e"oit" up" and you breathe frrcly again! Va-tro-nol ofurti liclps prcuftU bad tl cokli arhi H" -"' v.cKsVA-TPO-rltil NOSf DROPS r iiLUJUv ru.ost Marahala Ofnce. ISth Octobae. ItSI . n Tu be -dveetiaed • Dccmbvr TO BI'Y STAMPS WANTED STAMPS All King of STAMPS Bt the CARIBBEAN STAMP SOCIETY No. 10. Swaa Street. 26 10 51—4 ICI.MI MIIK\N( | SUNDAY His Majesty the King hag approved of Reine-nbrunce Day ben I fjbaer\.(l mi Sunday. the II.i o| November. As in previous years the Church BUusOrlUao are being Invii.-tl DO bold special services throughout the Island at which the two minutes silence can be observed at 11 a.m. The special service at St. Michael's Cathedral, which will be attended by His Excellency the Governor, will begin at 10.30 a.m.. and will finish at approximately 11.10 a.m. At the end of the service. If the weather permits. His Excellency and pa if. will wal< to it %  whenHis Exielieiu v will lay a wreath. There will be no ceremony %  -Servkv Men's Organiinvited to make arrangement* for ex service ^nen to parade and to attend at To.30 a.m.. at the CaUhedral. Othe members of the public arc Invited to attend 'heir usual place* o' worship. 27 10 51—Ir. End Rheumatism While You Sleep eagtr aharp aiakOiaa il (elit.a are asolfn. ll aaaoa year Meed M —leaned khrssinlatiPr kidorr-ai.iion Other apajkbau el Kidney inaeraera ara Seeks***. Ashto, I—.. sad ll-w...l*-ta. He.".-, l.-kage. Se., e* Maaawa, Oun-n. Nae.. .aa* f.-a. Ss-tsa. It.kt-a -aiaaaai Leei ef aaeer asd AppeH'e ssa f r*. •SThCJoaiaaa^Zr Cekhk M S&Ssr| -auira. .am help wwh W'a-er yea a>eat easstke. u—asd .Wan ra.. v.. ....dr.... aed Madder sod raaaeee MMa ana ruse.a Irsf**t ayaieaa asf.l j. galahly and asrelt *ae,1BSH r- bgeaafal ee gaagarei n eruaa raeea ...a is 1 *aya le end reerlraa.a Maria kllllae Ih* geroi whin, aie atlacling roar Badeawa. Bhaddar and Urutary Syateai in tss noura. yet la ahaalalely harauew le I Oeta rid ef laealth-deatraylog. desdlr i alias aad sclda •IthehRh yse ayaieaa haa heI Mreagtheaa and relayltoeaiea the kktnaya. peotecia Ire. the ra.age.i_a* %  DEPARTMENT OK EDUCATION BARBADOS EVENING INSTITI'TK reial ("laiiei (a) Applications will now be consldereti fm into l %  Shorthand-Typing cours. to ( %  held at (.mil (.,. % %  %  commencing In January 1952 (b) There is a limited number of vacancies for th* laaj hand-Typing course. Applications will r.i from those who hold a Pitman's Throry CtrrtlDJgfcta Of Kl e>|Ulvalent In Shorthand, and an IC C % %  eate or its equivalent in Typewriting. ii i Two lessons a week in Shorthand, two in Typewriting and one In English, each of one hour's duration vrUI between the hours of 5 p m. ami 7 ,. m on T it days and Thursdays. Students may take all ihree sub)*cU. j but those who take Shnrirmnd will lie expe. tSXt I writing and vU,< VSOg, (d) Applicants must be over 15 years of age on laf M (e) As a guarantee thai the minimum educational stand.inl has been reached, applicants fer thr beginners" clas* who do not hold a School Certificate or equivalent qiuUflcatl supply a certificate frcm the Head of %  Behoi that the school course up to tinage of H has be*n sstii-, l.n-torily completed. Preferrnce for admission ill I %  be governed by the standard of attainment %  -, | determined by a test. (f) A fee of $5.00 per item payable dunni; Hie Hi-i sraMh ..f UM term covers all the subjects. 80*( of the f.epaM ..ill gMj refunded at the end of a session to all students who have. In the opinion of Ihe Principal, Dean and Lecturers, worked --•tiefactorlly and attended regularly and punetlMll} (g) Students will hf ippl' UMRI own t rmnrry ani fext Ivook* as rt-qulred by the lecturers. (h) Applicants must obtain from the ..flirt of th. Kducation application forms, which must be filled in and forwarded to the Dean of Commercial Studies, the Ilarbados Evening Institute at the oflt..of tinDapMlinBnl not laler than Saturday. 24th November. ApnU the form whether they are applying for the hBglntll Senior course. No aptlleattons receive.! after the IMth November will be considered. Departmer.* of Education, 2Jrd October 1951 27 10 5| In "'HHROISIt CORERT THOM LTD. — NEW YORK AND GULF b-KRVICB. \ ll l \ 1" A i n ST A A CO. I TD —CANADIAN Sfck VH'K ^HARRISON LINE OI'THABIt FR.IM THE UNITtlt KINGDOM VM| :.s. '.STATaSMAN" • S. "STUDKNT" IS "I.INARIASA 'ADVISIR" ntADia .... London ... Ltvarpoal La w jaa l.mroool ... Gillie k I.IV..HMK.I l.-.:.'i 15th Ort. ai Oci lllth Nov l&th Nov. DM — Barbado, ffitiS: ^Oth Nov. 24th Nov. 29 th Nov. HOMEWARD EOR THE I'NITED KINGDOM Cfoaes In Vessel fur Batbadot l.a SCHOLAR" ss "TRIHESMAN" Liverpool lamdiin J7th Oct. 4th Nov. 'V,V/,'/,V lid..i III in. III jpgly to . DA COSTA & CO., LTD.—Agent. V//MW/. FYFFES LINE V.YTANT POST OF MATI''IX, STATta BARBAIM>H, H V. I irn w. %  latea Ihe eatira %  i Slaer niani..!. i \ Pragaeo ST Dexhsta, Cha—ai.. aW ^*^4^-H~ Wrier**. f* iH'i old asd Aaa re*r" HJ '•• kerlsckea asg aorat eesii-a.ii •*"<"• makl aad Ikaata la Cysaaa I ax -• t Uaa I ... aees /•* paa lir r l> Mf.li Cyasea Aai oerkea ail. — are" •aeat 1-aoMihW It ikey %  ** 11 a hoi %  ssld ildl ft* weelA daaaMf. OMgaageasI *• h>t YM Rkyhl Applications are invited for the |>o%l of Matron Mat* fll Kari-ados, H.W.I, which will bSOO I I March 7th The post is on Aitn.ntl I I I thl | III iid is renewable. Appiic. nu lor ihe post .should poSBBBJ the following qualll -id experience:fa) State registration of nurses in the United Km (bj Certificate of the Central Mn Wales. (c) Three to five years experient. pi ferably In an acceptable institution. (d) Some administrative experience ipqoir %  •' .,..; naraasaglta ll J* a purely administrative post The salary attached to the pent bt at the rate or %2 ,IM "ith a deduction of 3% for rent of furnl ^* low. rds rations of 60 cents per day t* payabl iiiiilr.ni, .1 %  l a c t fk light, telephone and U rfll re IH J* Passages (not exceeding *1.44n \. I --_r.tvj ment and on completion of Agreement ... 1 .II the Torm of Agreement. Covi inmriii •nntrlbutes to the Superannuation Hnhsmi n The Maternity Hospital ione of twenty bed* | %  link attached. It is primarily a teaching Hospital f %  I :rained annually. It Is served by ;i Vlsiti. Q Obsteti I I Ian, three gr duste nurse-mid wives and the usual subordinate itafT The Matron Is responsible to the Director of Hedleal v rvices fothe overall udm In la i ration of the Hospital nn,] the tunning of thi %  Indent mulwive* Applications should lie sndrreksed lo thg Cotonutl s. | W.I. so as to reach his office not liter than I>ThfJ TSS < (>;.XIT( will bv airivinK from SoutV amptiin on Wcdnosday, 31st Octobrr, nt B a.m. and will be sailing at 6 p.m. the same ifttrn*O0n for Tiiiiid.iil. There? is ample first clRgj Act lunmodalion available for Trinidad, and al for Southampton on the 9th November. Apply WILKINSON & IIAYNES & Co., Ltd. Agents Phone 4230. v.-.',-.*.-.-,*,',',',*V/rW/. GREEN ARROW THE LATEST IN STOVES iada* Olrt It a le-f it ie>. 1*4 tyalaa ll rtia.ani"* Iotaaa V • yeai rarl |enei. alrenget. an aad'io er t .eielH.fi i nil aa I iM o' T*"' aasaey a^•* "'*** "•"' /gar l*ySt6X, KBDli Boaedr RMIUMATlis/ M.W .HirUlMI. AS IllllklllS irsT AiaivgD %  AU SOLD Call and tee Ihetn al your Gaa Bhooroom. Bay Street, and to avoid dlaappoliiiment BOOK yo.r order TODAY from a future Members are reminded that when taking out new car INSURANCE POLICIES or renewing them at J. B. LESLIE & CO., 10% reduction on premiums will be given if membership cards are produced. Applications for Admission t Universities and Collt gasj in Ihi Inited Kingdom Session IMS-U 0*in to the limited aceomm. .Iitioti ;t r In the United Kingdom remilin.. inn. the Director of Colonial S to secure a quota for Colonial Students in aa* h taeutt, I verslty and College throughout | therefore, thst only those who are slrongly recomm. I first class qualifications for entry can be cons,. ,„iJ on 2 The Uritlsh Council will be responsible for mak.ng arrang-menta for meeting students and for securing suitable for them. S. Students are advised that it is most undesirable for them U proceed to the United Kingdom unannounced and uiuponsored In thr hope of obtaining admission io Universities and Colleges, as even tutorial colleges and polytechnics arc overcrowded and it is very ddTi^ult to gain admission to them without due notice in the proper four, 4. Forms of application for admission to UBITSJI Icgeg in the United Kingdom, to be completed in quint tie obtained from the Secretary. Student Adrlsory OOSBB Office of the Director of Medical Set must bt returned to him not later than Wednesday 31t Oetobwr, 1951 with r-lBRE GLASS WICK EXTRA HOT BLUE FLAME NO PARTS TO BREAK OR SPOIL ASK TO SEE GREEN ARROW STOVES AT Thp It t.. Co-operalivr C.l.on Factory I.ld.—20M MiMiiinu & Co. Lid. ( ..rn.r Slore.—4283 Haalallaaa Ltd.—liuo Ward & Spencer Lid.—2223 l..u.i„ 11.1,1, A. ( I V. v, v-v,-.', v:



PAGE 1

PAGE MC'.IIT UABBAUOS ADVOCATE SWIKDAY. OITOBK.K 27. 1U1 W.I. Struggle For Runs At Newcastle VALENTINE TAKES 5-40 Snappers Beat \ND RAMADHIN 2-36 c J ege M DALE) SYDNEY, Oct. 27. (VMM II MIDI.I) A crowd of over tvveii hundred JOHN GODDAM) and Key Marshall uta, saved the ?--{ ,~ £ *££ lies from a minor disaster at Newcastle. The New scurv an upsnt victory over HaruSoulh Wales Country Eleven was dismissed for 139 soon son Collageto the tune of six after lunch and the large crowd settled down to watch the *>j ^S,'£j 1 J^',^, "-"I,^', ' UrUU **"Bdorevery Ion, the crowd fc~2*^. .-J-W !" L',7"* d r '" their feet—West Indies " heat In the flrsl half and Govt. Industrial Schools Australia Picks Test Team six wicket* for 81 and ,ne opaoing two minute* of th* mutch * me ^W "ad nelted two goals. urn' by' Bannister and the Otnai (From HAROLD PALE) SYDNEY. Oct. 27 t niggling desperately he countryaide's total. Local pace bowler* John Bull y n< niCi Tom Pick It's wrought the h vof aided by phenomenal All honours went to Snappers jt china "' ""'h 1 11 and ''v tn< Interval 'chn Bull had taken M* lor 24 'hey had taken their score U) six. The Australian selectors head;*iinst the MCC last season and Skipper George McLean scoring ed by Sir Donald Bradman towas again— in devastating form the third goal Malcolm Browne night omitted Sidney 1 Barnes from bringing the ball back sharply to the fourth and Bannister followed ihe Australian 12 chosen for lh bowl Wi # From Page 5. Sun. our vale, both formerly sugar pianWIO—S, Th.-y J ,„ i the heart of St. r*.ilip. Well K-pt Lawns Betwt-n noon anr 1 s.x o clock yesterday the large number of visitors who thronged the grounds and inspected the buildings of Dodds must have been very impressed with what they saw. Thgrounds and buildings were spotless. Lawns ware freshly cut, tree* had been trimmed and the ground* and narrow roadways •hruugii th> >nd clean. Inside the buildings mere * %  a faint smell of new • nut and tin* interior colour vnemij of the varioua rooms /tended well together espeeialli %  no school room which waa of light {Teen with skirling boards of n -larker shade. ii-.it in nrisbaiK irrrll after Rae had fallup with the fifth and sixth Just en to a brilliant slip catch taken Iwforc half time. almost directly behind wicket. .. _. They have preferred QueensKeeper Lambert. After the interval Snappurs sUll l.md 22-year-old school teach-r Weekes was out to an astonishpressed their rivals and Colleges Kan Archer who scored 104 and ing one handed catch on the goalkeeper John Chabrol was H8 in last week. Sheffield Shield square leg boundary and StollKept busy conceding several game against New South Wales meyer played under a ball from corners which looked like certain in which Barnes scored only 35 Pickles that lifted sharply At goals. after suffering a fool Injury. that rtaae the tourists ware four for 37. With three and a half minutes' Barnes had since reported in. Then Walcott and Gomez fell to go in the second period Hur-J to balls thai moved In on them rtson College found their form The team selected m the pro( n d Marshall's last hope of a when after J good attacking movj-! battle baiting order and with the partner was John Goddard. ment BIDy Manning opened the 1 probable twelfth man is. Morns; Marshall played studiously and souring for hi* team with a well Arohcr; Hassett; Harvey; Miller; Goddard sturdily until the danger placed shot which beat SnaDDe-y Graham; Hole, South Australia wai nearly passed. Then Pieklcs custodian Taylor I u*standlni; batsman and change nc |d a CM | Cn en yards from the bowler; Ian Jahnson: Lindwall. w j C Kel off a ball that would have Dcuglas King leg break bow er gonc f or ,& and good batsman; Gil Langley, prior Jones helped his captain to put Ihe West Indies ahead. Browne Out South Australia wicket keepe. and moderate batsman; W. A Johnstone. fast medium bowler, and no batsman; twelfth man. Jim Burke, New South Wale* all rounder. -I OKI •.• %  Ik '•!*. Catinlri XI 111 lunl".. Walcott b Worr.ll b Vatonllnc b Worrell Apart from the obvious batting t* £" b ISf!**?!"? „ i, %  „ %  t.M.irrh n* th,.. eirln nn>.th**iir MseDonaJd c Walcott b Valentine nirength of this side anoiner sig„ -(vrv tt(th ,, b vkniin niflcant feature is the inclusion i^ruberi b Valentine of opening bowler Bill Johnstone. uuii c Wr.nr. b valentine This confirms Ihe current imprc*"o"^ b lUmatiriin %  ton that Miller will be asked to PlW1.1I1 ANALYSIS Weakening At this stage one of the Snappers' forwards Malcolm Browne' waa brought out of the water for! T a major foul. Harrison College n with an extra man in the water o seized this opportunity and afortl' mer Weatherhead soon scored la This brought Browne back Into plsy. fl • Time however was against the youngsters who however put on 9 a terrific last minute burst and — netted two more goals In the last three quarters of a minute's play. Manning and Weatherhead agam w scoring. Referee Mr. Jack Knight. The teams were: i Harrison College. J. Chabrol il. ,'? Manning. (Capt.), G. Jordan. A. o Taylor, p. Manning. C. Kvel i* and M. Weatherhead Snappers: A. Taylor. G. Mcw Lean, (Capt,). K. Ince, D. BaiiU nlster. F. Hazell, J. Barnes and _2 C Browne. — After the match the huge crowd MM, assembled In the ballroom for ib proatnUUon of Jrophies by the water polo association*' President Major A. H. Foster. Mr. PetaiPatteraon VlcePresldent of the association thanked the public for their support -nd congratulated the wln%  :i' teams. He then asked Maj Fo-ter to present the cups and iaa*. Before doing so Maj. FMtor gave a short review of the season and also spoke of the ._ itiey were not down-hearted about cent tour to Trinidad and gave a the llrst test prospects. The warning to all the pluyera to be teams gay exuberance captured prepared \>r even better Trinidad the imagination of the Austrateams next voar. "We", he said, lian public in a manner similar "must also Improve." to that experienced with the French Rugby League side In After the presentation Mr; Australia ihh year. p u i Fo ste r thnnked Maj. Foster The Australians accustomed to f qr urcscnttn* the tranhlo*' the The team to WJB.; .^.rdlna c,„k > .**, ^Vu" a u £V, th^eto^^ dos at the InU-rcolorual It tie rious buBniw, arc getting a kick ,£,.. ,. u i low i nl ,.„ ,,,,„,. ,,.,,,, Meetlrt to bo held In Trinidad „,, „ r Ihnenlng to the West In,„" ^J ffS. J? !" .."ST clu? from Nmember 7 to 10 wa diun, ling calypso songs. In their SrTcCl mUoTl l! into., tni lor the association having revThe team are: LI. Col. J. ConWHAT'S ON TODAY 1 -JIH i CeurU 1M.J i a.m. Hretisuj %l the Heuainz Board at the loaned Chamber 10 M am. New Series of crkset games opens at the various aroundI.JO p.m. Eaipire vs. Lodge at Bank Hall: Pickwick v. V.M.P.C as Old Colirr. i gronnds. i Krutn-rnwrivs. College at Combermere, PeUee vs. Wanderen at Park 1.1 I i'aribm vs. Smrtaa St Black Rork. Girl Gnldes Ai.nual Meeting at Pas HUI. ' %  p m. ( IM M \s (.LOW:: r>f*|( U|< '. -I ...a t.a p M rtAT* IW„1.-R, tr.r %  —f-i. in i %  m p m .Mill,. Mr u-iv.a... rn.niHiB-ll I I. .01 B M m • 1 \/\ (ii.m. Br*ahln r.l-l am* TfcU Slit *t ihr I-.* s tu .l.-l.t.l.Ik 1 W,.! li.Sk. — 1.1 Il-I liar r DoOoun-* b I'ickW. stolloi4->r r Lsmlwrt b PIchlM The Wick< t-M.-ei..'i i>r<'bleiri ha" Wr*k*>. t.Andwmon b Bull been solved by choosing Langley w>k?b P**!.* to succeed veteran Tallon. Thl* JfSPh \S aSl fcU ii 1 weakening of Australia's orwVrti "•" out traditional strength *lnce Langjon*t noi oui '•v would have to excel himself Eauai to et,ual Tallon at his besl: beWnd Tot-| wick#1< the stumps and is not to be comnared as a batsman, Pickim look 1 irk*t. tor : Bull look 4 to. S. Spin bowling is left to Doug Ring and the (lighted off spinners of Ian Jehneo n Johnson's appearance against the West Indians will settle the growing conti"Vrsy aa to whether hi* intelligent and conirolled flighting of the ball is the way to bent the Islanders' batsmen or whether they will over*w h come him by the footwork which of""" 1 la a natural feature of their Soi aggressive batting. W.I. Not Downhearted Althi SYDNIT. C 1. 26 jgh the W\t icdle-. i a clo-jc call t • the tlrst tour match versus New Wales, here on Friday B'dos Rifle Team For Trinidad liUITV: fl.. O-ll.%  H n. 1 .Mil. Matk r lh r.-.lll. SB BS a as m XOTAL HMI *m kasas 1 a a %  IS 1 SOW Wr.mlni Mall u a 1 %  P .1. At Dodds fsHsTO are at present V boys. These boys attend %  -choo! J from 8 to 11 every morning in .our classes. After the midday meal they then go to the workshops where they are taught a irjde. They have a choice of carpentry, shoe making, tailoring, masonry. handicraft, cooking, animal husbandry, horticulture, joiners work etc. There is also a school band igbtft boys are taught music. Work in the shops ends at three o'clock. Then there is a short spell of physical training before dinner at four. After that the boys have recreation on the plajing field. Superintendent of "he school 1.Major O. F. CWalcott. who has been in this position for the past •us. Headmaster of school is Mr. K. G. Simmons and there are three other teachers. A* each workshop there Is an Instructor who teaches the boys Uv various trades. Visitors' Day was held for the first time last year and yeslerd.. was the second occasion that th school his been open to th public. The arrangenfnts for the day proceedings were made by Major O. F. C. Walcott. Superintendent of the schools and his staff. ilYIToylon NO MB xz-ca. D*Z FN1Q WOAZ Ol UM CtTpt' "r W> dW.drt "*1,... DANCE AN.MAl DANCE MOMH MiiHT frrsi ot Mii-n •uprtaiad in .; Otct1 MMI-.-IOV IVIflRUI I I \lltb INUtS BLUSNOM BUI H. v< I s -HI THE KEV. ALI'linNSO. fJenesM ('111'. will be conn SUFFRAGAN BLSlfUl' ST. Mr(,IM tV S ORT1IUim\ tAIHLDKAL on SIN.. -jBth OCTOBER. 1951 at 3 p.m. Admission ::: 1 I'oi.ili'nienr>ra of the lot y Hun Y am Urn rinncn. Starflih^C.pu FrlMU 1 ... YESTERDAY'S WEATHER REPORT From Codrlngton RalnUII : NU Total Rainfall for manth te Dale : %  >>'• bu. Highest Temperature : %  7.5* F. Lowest Temperature < 0* F. Wind Velocity : 0 mile*, per hour Barometer (t) a.m.) : 2t.9P? <3 p.m.) : "i.-l l 9 Itf>r.,lr-a '.i 1 K.O. %  imii-'i 1 Drus loir .CBPlnlr. SUrSifc before retiring In two years." Meanwhile, Goddard has a fullNJ"^ fhrtisat. 4 time job getting his team Into thr %  inmn 2 ihr i.d shape for ihe first Test Their uon. by Mum Booh, weaknesses against pace bowling Jtm,'' ^l'**!!!' !" .! 1 plus the inability to handle the n!^^.^.'^Cr fast Australian wickets yet, were 1 wu r*u> i.imci c iip> i'if .-.. revealed in Friday's match. The *• "• "inrrwa ot UM i.di K O con,. West Indians require much solid J^^ ^Yf^.h."^^ SS£ practice to reach top form here. i-etiirlng Dru Cn Wi.lT?," u"a.i, The team will not get any op*Mr polo dun. portunities before the first Tent wa—r f*H> C a}>Mt._CatPrasBntBd on November 3. The Australian test team, announced on Friday nighl, includes three bowlers much pacier than those the tourists faced on Friday. They are Lindwall, now in the peak of his form, Miller, nnd the left-hander, Johnstone. The tourist-, are little concerned, however. S'ving rise to the opinion among ustrallans that the West Indians play a much more serious test cricket lhan play revealed on Friday. . J*"^; 1 lh winner, of th. ay Mr <;.-..„. M„ H.rrl .. oil*I (aplu... Walcr I-.U K..ilnvl ., I',. lo Ihr Hlnnrri of Ihe M-n K U pelltlon, by the water polo •Ha Winners: %  ••r^'n CBBtBUl Helna ; Shi.fl.i. Ball Faliil r.n. |', t> ihe winnlns INIK of the Men'i i-mpeUtioii. by Bonhen, iP'rlio. K O. rtiui w .-. CesesaMton I*rl*e T 1...1 ii. la* lo-iiiir learn o( ih i-otnpeliuoii. prwaeiited iB'nOat Drug Store* ClBRffB They 'll Do It Every Time ftiT THE SJPEK MARKET .WWBMP SLOWS WtS TURRET VMbi WiFE/ AS MM TO THE DCUCATCSaCrs FOR A HALF POUNP OF B4LON£y,^lsJ0 rrs eye-3ve six MOUTHS' BUDGET •• %  eBy Jimmy Hatlo OPENING MONDAY October 29th THE RITZ STORE (Pr.rl.U>r: M. II. HANNAHl No. 60 Tudor Sfreal Thr Nrwfst 4 onf ot th moss! U-to-Jt MY l.tMlUS 1-1IKI In llriJtrl,,.. n storkrd with KVERY ITEM IhU rsn be Fvund In the BM lli-u^rtniriu SUrcs .nil Jwt wl#h mil lor our Prkes. Thr>'rr rrslly resjtonsblr. AND MOST IMPORTANT Or ALL NO PARKING PROBLEMS Just pull up at %  our door. ANNUM. DANCE ;pAV MOHT -TITI1 (,1'TOBEK 1301 \l)MI--IO\ Or-' n*rrrl.....'.is ..n Sole 31 10 51 -In FAIR at the Ursultne Convent OH VTI mi iv nn unom I r..m I p ,„ I. ; i, m il V MEALS IfUNp It TH' r-Kr.yF7I.ffMBNTARY WI ot Ihe 45" wide. Per Yd. S2.29 Romaine Crepe In Green. Lime Green. Rose, Gold, Red. Saxe Blue, Black and White 'M inches wide. Per Yard S2.0X Romaine Lavender, Suxe Blue. Sky Blue. Orchid, Green, Beige, Gold, Lifrht Grey, and Ikirk Grey. 45 inches wide Per Yard $ 2.€1 Cave Shepherd & Co., Ltd. 10. 11. 12 & 13 BROAD STREET ; .. %  .( Pollre . VI'IKIIII and th* Band Manor Capi Ralkun >Me 1't.lu-e KaiHl will be In I Djdaataaj rt%  %  ;..( 'I' ... r;.rr*a. I fl frfirn,, C.Hea. Sweeta, Drink'. IItu Doga. Hamimrgei i Tafl aa AUMUMOS — — 04 COMK : Sfch : auJ Bl V POLITICAL MEETING — at — <.ltl I \s St. 4s,-oi-t$>Supporting the candidatures of: Messrs. K. K. MILLER Si E. W. BARROW On SUNDAY NIGHT Ottabat 2oih. is.il at 8 o'clixk SPEAKERS: Mr (;. II \ilimi.. M I .1' Dr. II. howk farhkit out falgbllshta. With PViko jour hair looks s-ofter. jlonficr,' %  UklcTbcia. BLACK-WHITE PL J KO RETAIL 2/K nil h t'B Lid. IlriinWi-athrrlirad Ltd. Hind*' Drue Klore II. P. H.rrK Drui: Store StoUU'a IH Hi; StOrt* H. E. Pllsrim HAIR DRESSING John Gill A Co. H'alkrs' Drue StonNrlB-tin riiirrii.ii v ( .rllim Itr.n. nr Joiira A Co. E. C. GUI P. A. Clarkr and BOOKERS (BOOS) DRl'G STORKS Broad Street and HaslincB (ALPHA PHARMACY) Sole .Wills %  BT>W-*'>--,'#'--*-->---.-.-.0',-.'*'','-'',*,-,'--FERGUSON TRACTORS WITH THE FERGUSON SYSTEM The fru'iid of both the small nnd Large Plantation Owner* alike. Tin* TTaclor. the price of which Is only j fraction of that ol a full "Track" Tractor— •..-I.IK.VOO al home elthei In the doea an amazing job of Ploughing and I Jlold m-on tbe road. These world-wide famous Tractors are 'lso bocomiiiR increaringly popular here and are doing fine work. % %  you to inspect 'his truly wonderful machine and lot ua arrange fur a demonstration for yo u P inc. nianuia^neadiiig, grass-rutt i COURTESY GARAGE ROBERT THOM LIMITED Agent, Dial 4616 OPENING SOON 11 %  • %  Hi' '1' I %  '^1 1 THE NEW SHOI: SIOIII: No. 35 Broad Street Wulrh For Opening Ualv Jj



PAGE 1

PAGfc FOLK BARBADOS ADVOCATI. S.TI'KIIAI OCTOBER 27, IS.'. I BARBADOS &| ADVOCATE g lhlll .. M IMW C. I a.—4 ii. MMm Saturday OrtoWr {7. 1*51 4IIW4.I THK ( victory in the United Kin^d.iu tiCAgffal Kliviion* will encourage all those wiii> i-hensh liberty. The fundamental ditfeieme between British CoaMrvatu>m and British socialism is that the Conservauve party thinks mainly in terms of the country as a whole, while the socialist party is preocc-ipied with the sectional intenau of a claai. The United Kingdom to-day has great need of a government which will consolidate social unity and promote tolerance and co-operation between its people. It is lo be hoped that the new Conservative Government will be able to achieve this great task. The way will not be eaay. Quite apart from the presence in the House of Commons of a considerable Labour opposition, with the Bevanites in full strength, the present economic condition of the United Kingdom will demand all the resources of any government to restore it to health. Britain's adverse trade balance in the current year is rated by experts in excess of £400 million. And It is expected to be even higher in 1952. It is not paradoxical to slate that politically speaking the Labour Party is fortunate to have lost (he elections at a time when the cost of rearmament has considerably increased the financial burden of a country already suffering from the inflationary effects of devaluation. But if Britain's internal troubles demand statesmanship of a high order the loss of prestige which she has suffered as a result of the Persian evacuation and the current Egyptian dispute demand urgent action to repair the damage. One certain result of a Conservative victory will be the almost immediate recovery of British prestige in Europe, North America and other non-socialist countries of the world. This prestige, it is true, will only be due to a temporary reaction and if it is to be maintained, it will require a foreign policy totally unlike that which has recently led Britain from one overseas crisis to another. So far as the British Colonies in general, and the West Indies in particular, are concerned it would be unwarranted to expect any change. The British Conservatives are, if anything, more afraid of treading on cokinial'cortis than the British Socialists. It has been their boast in recent years that Colonial policy has been kept outside party politics and many Conservatives gecreUy and openly admire the Socialist record in the colonies. Even the City of London, a traditional conservative stronghold has the greatest respect for socialist manipulation of colonial trade by which the Mother Country has managed to retain so many dollars for the sterling area. There would be no justification for colonial peoples of socialist persuasions to expect any great change in the form cf colonial policy because the new United Kingdom Government is not socialist. There would be even less justification for colonial Conservatives to lift up their hearts and hope for the dawn of a new day. The present mixture now labelled British Colonial policy does not depend directly on what Britain says or does. It depends on the political growth and political sense of the colonial peoples themselves. Only indirectly is there likely to be a change as colonial peoples themselves come to realise the fact that in matters affecting their welfare and their material advancement and progress a Conservative Secretary of State for the Colonies will give them no less fair a hearing than his socialist predecessor. One great direct influence of the British elections which can have immediate effect in Barbados is the good conduct, the order and the democratic functioning of the elections. This good conduct has been praised by Labour and Conservative mem, bers throughout the elections. It is a model for our own voters and people to follow in those elections which will take place here in December and which will mean as much for us in Barbados as the results of the British elections mean for Britain and the world. Have You Ever Been Seared II y A Firefly? HALT for B*N|., Ungmt, Wukutrd Rr BERNARD WICKKTKtin the stolid outward mini of the trained soldier. No Twilight At three potnti along the bank of a narrow, muddy river we took T positions where fallen gh PENANG What are you going to do thi Saturday night? I'll bet It's nothing lik the way I spent my last Saturday her*. No. I Platoon of "A" Compan. of the Royal West Kenta set ambush by a river crusting a Trolak. and reporter Wicksteed' trees had made natural. rh< went along to represent the Press, a precarious bridge*. Nobody got hurt, but It was an g Our Information was that the interesting profession*! < xpt'i i^local banditry were usinc theae rnce. for though the pen may be crossing points on their jourmighticr than the sword on most, wy* in and out of the jungle for occasions, it feels an Inadequate food supplies. weapon of defence when you are There is no twilight i n the lying n your tummy under a tropics. We got into position at .iu*h in the jungle beside a ban6.15 in broad daylight. At 0.4ft dlt track at midnight. it was as black as midnight. Trolak is pronounced TroU. Under another bush, five The k U silent, but at night-time yards away In the darkness on it a the onlv thing about the pUce my left, was Ted Bailey, from that i*. The jungle that teems so West Ham. who was a carpenter limp and dead in the heat of the day come* to life with a million noises st night. At home you can usually reckon that any noise at night has a natural and harmless explanation, but In the Malayan jungle Military there really are tigers, there really palgned furniture factory Beyond him was Don Bangs. that cheerful Camdcn Town barrow boy. As solid as a rock on my right as Sargeant Frank BucknelL Medal, who has camn a doien theatres of are snakes with deadly bites, and war. above all thjre really are men You are not allowed to talk prowling round with a desire to when you are on an ambush. kill you. You are not allowed to cough or So In the course of lying for clear your throat because no six hours In the dark, reporter sound travels better than that. Wicksteod experienced some of You are not allowed to move if those fcel.ngs he has leered at your joints creak, and. above all. In others—an admission no one you are not allowed to smoke, will be more delighted to read A few yards from the wet bush ol than his wife. that served as a Press box In Ungat, our head hunting this ambush there was a puddle Borneo tracker, probably knew and from the middle of it a badthe explanations of every one of mannered frog kept croaking those million jungle sounds, but derisive remarks. the National Service boys, of Then there was a beastly bird whom there were ten In different in th* tree above me that periodparU of our ambuah, knew as Ically called "Peep.'' little of their cause as I. It didnt even say "Peep. Yet they accepted them with peep," which any normal bird rtimid have done. It just said the one word "peep" once about < very five minutes throughout the entire duration of the ambush, I could have killed It. Then there were the thing* you SAW. The flrefliev were the most perplexing. As soon as It wa? riark they came out in doxens You could swear there was t whole party of bandits wifh torches coming down the track on the other 'de of the river Then you realised they were not lights at a distance but fireflies only a few inches from your nose. The jungle U also full ol rotten wood that Is luminous lr the dark, and there were half i down patches of this within sight <>r the Press bush, winking lik< the embers of a ghostly fire. No Coughs Every now and again the (login a kampong (or village) near b v would bark madly, and ya think: "This i* it, boys, the bandits are coming" You'd get all keyed up till that horrible birti called "Peep" again, and somehow you felt that thing* wen normal. You have no idea how hart It Is not to cough when It's thi one thing in the world you are not allowed to do. how Impossible it Is not to move your limbs when movement Is a military offence. So it was a blessed relirt when Sargeant Bucknell said "Psst and the ambush was over. Back in the camp there were lights and hot tea, but 11 you imagine the tgjk was about the night's operatidns you don't know your National Service man. —L.e.s. A Potential Colonial Secretary LONDON. Alan I-ennox-Boyd, at the age of 47, can be confidently picked as Secretary of Stale for the Colonies now that a Conservative Government has been returned to power. His career reads like the progress of a glided youth to the courts of fame. At the age of 26, not long out of Chrlstchurch College, Oxford, he entrred Parliament, and at the age of 28 he was tawing discreet denials to a report that he was the Private Secretary to an eg-Prlme Minister—Mr. Baldwin. At thirty-four years, a job was found for him as Parliamentary Secretary to the Ministry of Labour, and the same year he married the second daughter of the Earl of Iveogh. Lady Patricia Guiness. The war came and found him %  job In the Ministry of Tood, thena spell In the Navy —in the little ships of the English Channelafter which, back to Whitehall as Parliamentary Secretary In the Ministry of Aircraft Productions, (under Sir Stafford Cripps) ij But the future Colonial Secre_tary Is far from being the dull dog with good fortune, In money and connexions, that this career and those jobs would Indicate. Alan Lennox-Boyd was a scholar and prizeman at Chrlstchurch; he is a great local figure in his own homeland countryside of Bedfordshire; he is a man who lakes infinite pains to please his friends He won his present seat In Parliament In 1931 — unexpectedly because he fought as a Conservative for a traditionally Liberal seat. Since then his popularity and his election majorities have grown because he Is always at 'the service of his electors His ft. 7 Ins. figure Is as poted hurrying By D. T. ROBERTS from village to village in his corner of rural England as it la as "tallest M.P." at Westminster Alan Lennox-Boyd is the kind of man about whom many stories are told. On the one hand he and his wife live in a fine Belgravia town house, and are famous for their resplendent parlies. At one of these, guests at a ball found 30" walking slicks for tired dancers to lean on. For their host has the most remarkable collection of walking sticks In London Including jewelled possessions from India, and Ivory-carved work of Tibet. Far from such dilettante pleasures, Alan Lennox-Boyd is the most practical of enterprising men. For an example; before the war he found thai his Bedfordshire market gardening constituents were selling their carrots to the London's Covent Garden at Cl a ton. In the end the housewife had to pay at a price of £ IS a ton for the carrots when they reached the shops. So the wealthy M.P. for Mid-Bedfordshire set up his own greengrocer's shop in London and sold at prices profitable to the fanner and cheap for the housewife — without the middle Alan Lennox-Boyd has had a career not without troubles. He has always had strong convictions and sometimes suffered for them, and for his youthful exuberance. Ha was a declared admirer of General Franco, (at a time before Winston Churchill could find occasion to praise Franco's handling of Hitler I, and an advocate of S rewar British friendship with lussollni -to avoid war. Not long after becoming • junior Minuter be told his constituents he thought Mr. Chamberlain should NUT guarantee the frontiers of Czechoslovakia. Feeling was then running high, in 1038. For this Indiscretion he was almost forced to resign and perhaps this accounts for why the two brilliant young men of the Conservative Partv in the IMO's—H. A. Butler and Lennox-Boyd—have had such unequal fortunes. The first is an acknowledged leader and probably the future Chancellor; the latter will now have his chance at the Colonial Office. His political views have been tempered with the years. He has been talking, arguing and hoping for a chance to assist the development of the British Empire into a practical, going concern, ever since he left Oxford University where he was a President of the famous Union debating society As a member of the Empire Industries Association, he has been active In the cause of Empire. But it Is only since the LabourGovernment has been in power thai Alan Lennox-Boyd has seen the prospect before him of taking over the great office of 1 Colonial Secretary that Joseph Chamberlain and Winston Churchill, themselves, once filler,. So he has been travelling widely —through Afrlcs and the West Indies — from which he was recalled to fight the General Election of 1950. As a Conservative Colonial Secretary. Lennox-Boyd Is committed to the practical—to economic development, rather than the wordy arena of political advancement. He has had a leading part drafting the Conservative E'licy relative to the Colonial nplre — and his term of office should be given an Impressive send-off with the Empire Economic Conference early In 1952. promised by the ConservaUve Party. 11.11. Wants No Part In Federation LONDON*^*. 18 Fears are being expressed in London about possible fresh Guatemalan moves in support of its claim to British Honduras, following the news lhat the People's United Party of Belize does not want to se* British Honduras Included in the contemplated Federat on of the British Caribbean. The Hon. John Smith, leader of the P.U.P-. has asked the Central American Foreign Ministers, meeting in San Salvador to set up the Organisation ol Central American States, to support his party's claims against Federation. The conference decided to express its sympathy with the aims of the Bellas part, and passed a resolution saying 'Una just aspiration of American republicans to end the colonisation and occupation of American territories by extra-continental nations." There were unofficial report** that the live Foreign Minister* had discussed the possibility of Joint srUon to brine Guatemala claim to Brllish Hondaras before the United Nsllens. h.'v.% %  ..,: with this support, Guatemala will soon be launching a fresh campaign to uphold its claim lo thi territory. But Britain haa a cast' iron case for retaining Its sovereignty over the Colony. Not only has the Colony been part of the British Empire for the past 3oo years, but the Guatemalan claim to the territory falls down! on the grounds that there la not ethnological link at all between! the peoples o( the two territories | Britain Is not expected to depart | from the firm stand it has always taken in dealing with the Guatemalan claim.—aS-U-P. NOBODY'S DIARY SUNDAY—The quiet and rest of my weekly meditation today was disturbed by a parson. Not that he made any great deal ol noise, but he wanted to know what were my views on parsons taking part in politics. I told him that I wanted to bfjVfl one day free away from politics and all that went with them. His reply was to say that political meetings were being held on Sunday nights,—a practice with which he and many people seem to disagree. But there it is, and I remember my old people saving: "The better the day the belter the deed." MONDAY—Had a poser pushed at me to-day while discussing traffic problems with a friend. Here is the question: "Can a vehicle reverse up a one-way street" It is facing the direction in which the regulations say it can go, so what is to be done? Exactly what did he mean I wondered, and he made it quite clear by breaking into unorthodox language: "Can a car back-back foiward?" 1 was beaten and still am. If he tries it out perhaps Col. Michelin will answer his question. I'KSDAY—The more students who attend the West Indies University Colege, the better it will be for that institution. And all need not be West Indians either. This thought was prompted by the recent circular notice that English Universities are making sure that there is sufficient accommodation for their own students before admitting colonial ones Let the W.I. University set and maintain a high standard and in the not too distant future they too might have to serve notice that West Indians come first in their catering to educational needs. • • WEDNESDAY—Thought the decision of the House of Assembly yesterday quite a strange proceeding. I am referring to the appointment of a. Puisne Judge for Barbados and it was decided to leave the question of salary lo Governor-in-Executive Committee to fix. They must find the Judge first and find out under what terms he would take the job. It might be sound reasoning from some angle, but it leaves too wide a space for juggling in my opinion. • • • l'HUHSDAY—My Shopkeeper told us today that he was having some difficulty in getting his usual amount of rice. He was as cross as 1 am. for like many Barbadians 1 am very fond of rice. He said frankly that he believed that the increased price which comes into effect next January has something to do with it, and that somebody is already on the look out for a little extra somewhere. Will somebody please take care of my rice for me? • • • miDAr—Saw Brigadier Jackson, the new officer commanding the Caribbean area on parade yesterday. He looked quite smart in his fine uniform Now that he is here I wonder if we can hear some inside news about the formation of the new B.W.I, army. Barbados always seems to be the last place to gel certain information, or the people who should circulate it have three speeds to their machinery: Dead, Slow and Stop. • • • SATURDAY—Read Dr. Inge's article In yesterday's paper with avidity. I mean the one on "Parsons and Politics". If you haven't read it, do so. Many people do not know that the Act making it possible to fine a clergyman £500 for every day he sits or votes in the House of Commons is i still on the English Statute Book. But this apart, the Doctor's language, style and views are well worth the reading. STOCK #•# i w 11 lit \ A i ii nm\ I l HOI It SHEETS Call and Select Early from AIIVIH All SEAIIOM IIV 'phone PUchaAA t$72 They did ECONOMY and Lived Happily VALUE as A Result I SATISFACTION C. S. PITCHER & CO. '::: %  '-'X.'.'.V,0'^>>>'-< •,;:;-,-.::;:::::v.:::;::::-.: : % ecu4 A FRESH SHIPMENT OF GOLDEN ARROW FLOUR JUST ARRIVED. &f DA COSTA & CO. LTD. — Ajjeats. 50/t f % / • and *j) # • • • IRV-O-LITE Plastic Flexible Durable GARDEN HOSE at DA COSTA & CO., LTD. Our Readers Say t Way Radiiw To The Editor, TheAdvocate — SIR You have sometimes mad.> room in your interesting and valuable Correspondence columns for letters complaining about radios turned on so loud as to be very disturbing and annoying to the neighbours, and appealing for reasonable consideration in connection therewith. I think there is need for another such loiter II %  flfMggaj that a good many people have not considered the point, or are too self-centred to IKInter. %  nd merciful. Recently the outcry has been with regard to the nuisance ol late hours and uproarious noises at Quean's Park, and surely real' dents In that neighbourhood can obtain redress if they arise as a body and claim It But thi*. matter of the noisy radio belongs to a much larger :irea. In most districts then or sick, or old people requiring quiet conditions, to whom the droning radio of some neighbour —or perhaps more than one— U really a serious trouble and nuisance and they ought by all means to be considered 1 think in sonvf cases the complaint has come from boys and girls preparing th* lessons for next day's school who have been badly hindered. Now the remedy Is very simple and easy. It merely requires that ihe loud speaker be not turned <>n full blast, and that is no hardship lo the owner. Half full u In almost all cases sufficient for an ordinary home or listener, and If everybody would Just bear that In mind, and turn on the receiver accordingly, the trouble would be done away right oft*. Take another view of the mat• %  good-natured friendly housewives th.nk that some of their neighbours who have not got the service, hke to hear the new* or the music, and so turn on loud to suitThat Is not right. It means annoying other neighbour* for the benefit of a few. No; It should IN arranged for those who want to hear to come inside the house. The radio service Is not inlended for i district, but for the home of thi subscriber. With thanks for spare, FAIR PLAY. October 24, 1951 It Rice Rationed? To the Editor, The Adoocole— SIR,—It is understood that the price of rice la to be changed from seven cents per pint to eleven cents per pint from the beginning of the coming yekr, luii .tie public were never notified th.it from now on, till January 193?. rice will be rationed. If this were to be. surely thant should have been decent enough to inform tl public about it. For the past few weeks p.xir people, especially in the country districts, have had to be running from shop to shop in an effort to obtain a little rice and am generally told by the shopkeeper "there Is no rice". Some of the more fortunate ones who are •irrustomcd getting a regulir supply of from six to eight pints now tet only two pints and If they fall to get It on Saturday they will get none at all. The situation Is getting worse week after week. Some shopkeepers say that the merchant? refuse to give them rice, or at least, a reasonable amount of it, on the pretext rice Is scarce Does the Government understand the situation? Are the merchants acting under the direction of the comptroller of supplies? If they are not, then they are committing a very serious breach and %  Timent should take Immediate steps to set this matter jaxceptlen of knowing a few Spanright, as no amount of platitudes ish sentences which were taught can assuage the anger *>f a hungry orally, and being able to make Your sincerely. OUST A. tnm Private .SrAoo/* Alonvf To the Editor. The Advocate— SIR.—As an old pupil of two different Private Schoi garden bed very good, she almost void of elementary education. Now. for those few months ahe has shown much progress in her studies. Leave Private Schools Alone. Maybe I'm near-sighted so can you tell me which is the more Important: Our playing held in each parish, or rather build more flrsl din *•••"*•*. "* HHUKI IIUMU III.HI1 ZHTZm^ hel > >" wlM> an "•rvmi for"^ the nttack on Pl-Idwn educallon? .„„„,,„ pa „ nU keep their children at home, untit thou In authority wake up frcm DRY SACK SHERRY BUST FIMt YOUR PART) VNIQVE VI FLAVOUR cannot alt \ ate Schools" to go unchallenged There j