Citation
The Barbados advocate

Material Information

Title:
The Barbados advocate
Uniform Title:
Barbados advocate (Bridgetown, Barbados : 1983)
Portion of title:
Sunday advocate
Place of Publication:
Bridgetown Barbados
Bridgetown, Barbados
Publisher:
Advocate Co.
Publication Date:
Frequency:
Daily
regular
Language:
English

Subjects

Subjects / Keywords:
Newspapers -- Bridgetown (Barbados) ( lcsh )
Genre:
newspaper ( sobekcm )
Spatial Coverage:
Barbados -- Bridgetown

Notes

Dates or Sequential Designation:
Apr. 22, 1983-
Numbering Peculiarities:
No issue published for May 3, 1983.
General Note:
On Sunday published as: Sunday advocate.
General Note:
Microfilm produced before 1988 may be substandard.
General Note:
Latest issue consulted: Feb. 28, 2005.

Record Information

Source Institution:
University of Florida
Holding Location:
University of Florida
Rights Management:
Copyright Advocate Co.. Permission granted to University of Florida to digitize and display this item for non-profit research and educational purposes. Any reuse of this item in excess of fair use or other copyright exemptions requires permission of the copyright holder.
Resource Identifier:
17931718 ( OCLC )
sn 88063345 ( LCCN )
Classification:
Newspaper ( lcc )

Related Items

Preceded by:
Advocate-news (Bridgetown, Barbados)

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ESTABLISHED



1895



Altered

Mutually

WASHINGTON, Oct. 10.
UNITED STATES Secretary of State Dean
Acheson through the press urged Egypt to
delay “unilateral action’’ on abrogating the Anglo-
Egyptian Treaty and await a “new proposal to be

offer
Acheson said the U.S.

’’ within the next few days.

Government was against

the course Egypt was adopting in deciding to abro-
gate the Anglo-Egyptian Treaty of 1986, and the
Anglo-Egyptian condominium agreements of 1899.
He said: “The U.S. Government believes proper
respect for international obligations requires that
they be altered by mutual agreement rather than
by unilateral action of one of the parties.’’



Trade Unions
Back Attlee

LONDON, Oct. 10.

Britain’s trade unions lined up
officially behind Prime Minister
Clement Attlee to present Win-
hurdle 000,000 Votes hgh.

h.

The National Union of Mine~
workers ued an election mani-
festo calling on 600,000 workers
to vote Labour in the October 25
general election and the warning
that Churchill’s Government
would return “capitalistic fea-
ae to the nationalized mining
nm ;

Other unions in the giant
8,000,000 strong Trades Union
Congress are falling into line
behind Labour. Trade unionists in
turn will be urged to tell wives
to vote labour,

All trade unionists will not
vote Labour despite the pleas of
their union leaders. But an over-
whelming percentage of them will
do so and this is almost one-fourth
of the ballots which will be cast.

Churchill showed his concern
about the trade union vote in a

hin his home district of

‘oodford last night. To offset

Labour “propaganda” he pledged
ae, oe safe:
ment ald - no ~
tion trade unions.
What Conservatives fear most
is the tempting possibility that
the trade unions will use their
position as a “political weapon”
if Conservatives win. wn

Accept 14 Points

BERLIN, Oet. 10

Communist run East Germany
accepted on Wednesday, the
western zone’s 14 point pro-
gramme for free elections as a
basis for negotiating German
unity but demanded a halt to
“dangerous” talks on West Ger-
man rearmament. The East Ger-
man Parliament again asked the
West German Parliament to meet
for talks aimed at unity, a peace
treaty and the evacuation of
occupation troops.—U.P.

Ships Hit New High

WASHINGTON, Oct. 11.
The National Federation of
American shipping reported on
Wednesday that the number of
ships in the United States Mer-
chant Marine “continued the up-
ward surge toward a record peace~

time high during September.”

—U.P.





HARRIMAN
DIRECT NEW PLAN

WASHINGTON, Oct. 10.
The Whijte House announced
on Wednesday that Averell Har-
riman, Special Assistant to Presi-
dent Truman, will be Director of
the new combined Military and

Eeenomic Foreign Aid _ Pro-
gramme. Harriman ig now in
Paris serving on a special com-
mittee of the North Atlantic
Treaty members studying the
possibility of increasing Western
Europe’s re - armament pro-
gramme.—vU.P.

TO-DAY’S WEATHER
CHART

5.48 a.m.
Sunset: 5:54 p.m.
Moon: First Quarter
Lighting: 6.00 pam,
High Tide: 12,40
p-m.
Low Tide:

Sunrise:

am., 1.33

1.11 a.m., 1.41 p.m

——-



The text of Acheson’s statement
read: “The American Embassy in
Cairo confirmed that the Egyp-
tian Prime Minister on October
8 introduced in the Egyptian
Chamber of Deputies draft legis-
lation which would abrogate the
Anglo-Egyptian treaty of 1936
and the Anglo-Egyptian condo-
minimum agreements of 1899
which provide for joint Anglo-
Egyptian administration of the
Sudan.

Parties directly involved are the
United Kingdom and Egypt and in
the case of the 1899 agreements the
Sudanese people as well.

However, these matters are also
of general concern to the free
world for they affect the security
and defence of the important
Middle East area. None of the
agreements in question provides
for abrogation. The United States

respect for international
tions requires they be altered by

mutual agreement rather than by jdaily
the unilateral action of one of the average in commercial competi-

parties.

Furthermore it should be noted
that producers wholly in accord
with such respect for internaticnal
commitments already have been
set in motion. During the past
months new proposals to be offered
to Egypt have been under con-
sideration and the Egyptian Gov-
ernment "has been informed that
the proposals were to be presented
fo it within the next few days.

It is the belief of the U.S. that
the solution of the Anglo-Egyptian
question can be found through
these proposals.

The U.S. considers that the new

‘| proposals, shortly to be presented

to the Egyptian Government should
serve as a sound basis for agree-
ment which will not only satisfy
the interests of all parties con-
cerned, but also contribute to the
defence of the free world in which
the Middle East plays such an im-
portant role”’.—U.P,



DENIES CHARGE

WASHINGTON, Oct. 10.
Secretary of State Dean Ache-
son on Wednesday denied the
eharges that he proposed cutting
off military aid to Nationalist

on February 5, 1949. “as a dra-
matic peace move’’.—U.P.

China at a White House "a dra]











W. German

Industry

Doing Well

By ROBERT HAGER

BONN, October, 10,
: Pushing hard for political and
Government believes that proper! military equality among the na-
obliga-} tions of the West, Western Ger-
is already ens
than

many
she can do better

tion.

Still operating under some
Allied industrial controls the
Ruhr and other manufacturing
centres are now grinding out

progucts at a rate of one-fourth
higher than 15 years ago just be-
rearmament drive

fore Hitler's
started,

Nor have Germats péen
tant to step on Allied
pouring a high percen

toes
e

in
of

their goods into expert channels,
They have jumped to the posi-
tion where they threaten “serious

consequences” to

Western nations according

recent report of the

competing
toa
Economic

Commission for Europe a United

Nations organization,

Bonn republic oapona now run

more than §300,0

000 monthly.

Big gains have been registered
in the categories of chemicals,

machinery, vehicles,

instruments, _ textiles
course steel.

But official

6

electrical
apparatus, optical and precision
and

production figures

are at variance with the lamenta-
tions. The Allied rule book has
long said that German produc-
tion is limited to 11,100,000 tons

annually, But

effectively destroyed last

that ceiling was
year

when it was agreed that an ex-

cess for



U.S. Infantrymen,

Tanks Rout Chinese

EIGHTH ARMY H.Q., Korea, Oct. 10.
Fifty U.S. tanks and nearly 3,000 infantrymen routed ter-
rorized Chinese troops in a daring stab eight miles into Com-

munist territory.

The powerful U.S. Second
Division Task force made a hit and
Tun “killer” raid in an attempt to
end the Coramunists’ month-long
stand on bloody “Heart-break
Ridge” on the East Central front,

of the ridge with guns blazing
thundered through the tiny
village of Mundung 23 miles north
of the 38 parallel and pushed on
two miles beyong the embattled
northernmost peak of ‘Heart-

Tanks rolled up the valley west





Vietminh For
Withdraw

SAIGON, Oct.
withdrawal
Vietminh forces was

The general
Communist

Western defence use
only eould be produced.—U.P.

reported from the mountains sur-
rounding the rice bow! of Nghia
Lo 90 miles northwest of Hanoi





U.S. Ask Egy

Agreement Can Be; —
|
|

P







of

BACK

THE Barbados cricket team traries from B.G. early yosterd

noon by B.G. Airways cha
Williams (Manager), Gerald
the first four members of the

Seawell at 1.15 p.m.

Mr. F. A. Clairmonte, Vice-President of the Barbados Cricket
Association, Mr. Teddy Hoad, Mr. T. N. Peirce and other
cricket enthusiasts including wives, parents and friends of
various members of the tearm were at Seawell to welcome

home the team,

From All Quarters 3
oe

after his international flight

in Mexico City.
service agents of

Four
the US.

immigration office.

patients,

was told.

Demonstrations — 9,000 demon-
strators continued an outbreak in
four truck
loads of police — about 150-—~ ar-
rived half an hour later and suc-
The
outbreak came as both Houge and
Senate Committees unanimously
approved the Government draft
Anglo-

Central Cairo until

ceeded in dispersing crowds.

jbills abrogating the

|Payptian treaty.

German-Argentine Trade —
\faltzan,
roreign

|Freiher Vollradt Von
|Chiet of the German
|Trade Department will fly

| Buenos Aires Thursday to join the
———- |German trade delegation negotiat-

ces

\ing German-Argentine trade,

Calls on Morrison — Argentine
Ambassador Carlos Hogan ¢alled
on Foreign Secretary Herbert Mor-

rison at his own request,

Vote of Confidence — Premier
Alcide De Gasperi faces a vote of
confidence tonight after making a
windup report on his recent trip

to the U.S. and Canada.

Gets Check Up — Hugh Daillic



The other members are seen alighting in the background,
Cricket Team
Return From B.G.

The Barbados Cricket team returned from B.G. yesterday
afternoon by B.G, Airways’ Special Flight which landed at

rr a ee cert ri ne

ue) US. Ceti a
Leader Captured
After Gaol-break

United States Communist leader
Guss Hall, 41, was escorted back
into the U.S. under heavy guard
to
escape gaol ended with his capture
secret
and
Mexican Governments accom-
panied the Secretary of the U.S.
Communist Party. They took Hall
f)and his luggage from an ancient

sedan and led him into the U.S.
He was not
hand-cuffed and he saic nothing

The Dentist Pays—Dentist Pierre
Toucas paid 55,000 frances to re-
move three teeth from one of his
He removed them with
his fist in an argument the court

oo

imminent today as

apparently selected the

Although no official reaction
was forthcoming over the liaison
meetixrg, Communist Radio at
Peiping said in an _ unofficial
broadeast early today that liai-
son officers had agreed that the
telks would resume in Pan Mut
Jom area. United Nations officials
are so confident that the talks
would again get underway that
they moved their equipment from
the old site at Kaesong and stored
it north of the Imjin River under
a stone bridge half a mile south-
east of Pan mun Jom near what
was believed to be the new con-
ference site. Already at Munian
camp were tents with floors anc
stoves waiting to be transported
to the new peace community,

—D.P.

Polish Refugees
May Be Spies

STOCKHOLM, Oct. 10.

Swedish authorities carefully
investigated the arrival of fou
Polish nationals who said they
seized a Polish trawler in armed
mutiny. They asked for politica)
asylum.

They arrived at the Baltic See
naval base of Karliskrona. As re-
ports from there indicated some
officials believe traffic from Po-
jund to Sweden may have been
organized by Russian Intelligence

it. Winston Greenidgé Foffie”
sud Skipper Charlie Taylor, were
to get off the plano.



tS psp aie eth ED








The team, many of whom were

was” the | their

t oF ail ches b:
amoun eal y the
The team also

ourneys varied widely.
—U.P,

U.S, Plans Migration
Conference

GENEVA, Oct. 10.

The United States is drawing
up plans for an_ international
conference to set up the first

Barbados team, i

suffered from inexperience but
the young members all agreed that
they had learnt » great deal from
the tour.

Those returning were, Charlie
Taylor, (Capt.) E. A. V. Williams
(Manager), Keith Wales, Norman
Marshall, Conrad Hynte, W.
Farmer, Gerald Wapd, Gordon
Proverbs, C. Bradshaw, Cammy mass migration programme ir
Smith, &, Branker, ‘|history, Refugee experts here
Greenidge, A and Erie) said the conference, which Francr
Atkinson, may also join in convening, ir







5 scheduled to take place someting
eg | before the middle of November
W.L Officials Wait pither in Washington or ir
q ° Europe.

On Food Ministr It would set up a new agency

y to handle the migration of ar

(Prom Our Own Correspondent) estimated 5,000,000 surplus Puro-

LONDON, Oct., 10. peans to homes overseas.

West Indian re esentatives to| Countries interested in immi-
the Commonwea ugar Talks | gration and emigration would be
have not yet been inforraga when |asked to set up an interim com-
their discussions yvith the Food | mittee which would go into action
Ministry and other Goyernmentjafter a certain number of coun-
Departments will commence. tries signed the agreement.—U.P

nu wey are not worried, ‘ :

su 1eir purpose to wait on *
until after the General Blection| Attlee Hits Out
when there may be a ehange of
‘government bringing with it more LONDON, Oct. 11.
favourable terms for Common-! prime Minister Attlee made «
wealth Producers. : rautious reference to Americar
‘allowing yesterday's meeting
between the W.LC, Officials and
Messrs Cuke, Eocles and Kirkwa@od

slap at the anti-American stanc

to ; é 8 P . ’
tuggper preliminary talks were hour Batty. dpesking et Cran
pnapbimmetammiepe tham in his eight-day electior
campaign tour, he said Britain’
a Sta recovery has been achieved bj)
Judgment nds the efforts of the British people
“And I am not in the leas)
Tee deemant eta tacor Te ashamed to say that we have hac
Togurt Daguino, World War I1’s|4™merican aid We have hac
Tokyo Rose, to’ prison on a ten-|4merican aid in peace as aa

year sentence for treason against
the United States was affirmed
by the three judges of the Ninth
Cireut Court on Wednesday,



‘Acheson Grieved











Peace Talks Will
Be Resumed Today

munist liaison officers met at Pan Mun Jom and

cations that the 48-day deadlock would soon be
broken were varied, but each heightened optimism
that the talks broken off by the Communists on
August 23 would get “back on the tracks’’ shortly,

well sun tanned looked somewhat Service.
ti a 3-hour trip. from| Qther wou sahsanen pews
ment} ae ah oF, eth asy recently we:
In a interview” Wish dish authorities discovered many
ipper Charlie Qaylor @ of their answers’ to standarc
r “KBoffie’ Williams questions were almost identica’
told the Adyocate that the chief | althou the circumstances 0’

aid on Wednesday in a backhand

of the left wing of his own La-



Advocate



;





denunciation

Feyptien treaty. Pa

the support of ali

TOKYO, Oct. 11. tical parties for Wahas Pasha’s
proposals.

RESUMPTION of the Korean peace talks was The Press also carried other

the of the Anglo-
rs reported

gyptian poli-

United Nations and Com.|Near Eastern items. for instenes
anti-British demonstrationss i
Iraq where “Englishmen do not
dare walk the streets without
police esco@"” and a report on
the forthcoming American, Brit-
ish and French talks in Turkey
on the co-ordination of the
Turkish army with the Atlantic
bloc.

The Sovigt press
commented on

new conference site. Indi

has not yet
Anglo-Egyptian



U.N. OIL DEBATE jieysionmen’ but fers. nol
2 : sition. Diplomatic circles here
LIKELY TO BE opined that the Soviet Govern-

ment will support the case in the
Security Council if Britain raises

POSTPONED the question.

is also generally believed

UNITED NATIONS that Britain will probably be

NEW YORK, Oct 10 {Compelled to accept the — new

The initial appearance of Mo-{ StUation as she did with the na-
hammed Mossadegh, Iran's 72 tionalization of Anglo-Lranian

—U-P.

F ull Partner

year old Premier before the U.N.
Security Council in the Anglo-
tranian oil dispute is scheduled
© be postponed for at least two





days owing to his precarious
health, : nies

Mossadegh, from the seclusion! WASHINGTON, Oct. 10.
ot his six-room suite at Now Highly placed Sources said on
York hospital, requested Council Wednesday that Egypt would be
President Jono Carlos Muniz of{@ full partner with the United
Brazil to postpone the session! States, Britain, Prance, Greece
wheduled for Thursday until] ict Turkey in deciding the
Saturday ov longer. NATO Middle East Command

Indications. were that the{ structure if Egypt agredd to take
meeting would not be held until] pert in the Middle Rast Defence
Monday iwrangements.-UP,

Deputy Premiei Hossein}

Patemi told newsmen that Mos-}
sadegh had not wanted to ask for .

Repay $500,000

postponement but had done so at

he advice of physicians “who UNITED NATIONS, Oct. 10
bought the Premier is very ex- Nationalist China observed its
‘yausted and some sort of post- “Double Ten” anniversary of the

yonement would be appreciated,” | founding of the Republic on

Mossadegh underwent a series|Wednesday by paying another
wf clinical tests yesterday which} $500,000 of its arrears in United
showed nothing organically | Nations assessments. A Chinese
vrong with him.—O.P, delegation spokesman said > “fe

\ payment brought to more than
yoare—tiP.
Womar
f . . hd

One of the small band of] °"( Mficial Welcome

women Liberals fighting their

irst election will be a_ travel
wency chief and export pro-
moter, Miss Marguerite Winsor,

She is contesting Yeovil; at the

WASHINGTON, Oct. 10.
Truman signed a joint resolu-
tion extending an “official wel-
come” from Congress to the For-

last election the Tory MP, Mr.|eign Metal Scientists attending
WV. MW. Kingsmill, had a major-}the six-day World Metaliurgical
ity of 1613 over his Socialist} Congress starting on Sunday nt
ypponent, Detroit.—-U.P



INDEX GOES UP
WASHINGTON, Oct. 11
Truman’s Council of Economic
Advisors said on Wednesday thai
the Federal Reserve Board's pri
@uction index rose from 216 in
August to 220 in sia dommes:

LONDON, Oct, 10
The military court at Lublin is
trying four Catholic priests and
seven other defendants as “lead-
ers of a gang of spies and diver-
sionists,” aecording to a_ Polish
lews agency.—U.P,





The “ADVOCATE”
pays for NEWS.
Dial 3113
Day*er Night

Reports On Tour |

WASHINGTON, Oct. 11.
Supreme Court Justice William
Douglas reported to Truman on
Wednesday on his tour of Iran
‘nd India this sur -P.

Te $2,000,000 the amount which the
Realistic Liberal : Goveryment paid, this
eres
Priests On Trial

|
1
|





OF
DISTINCTION !!

BOTTLED BY





are re ; UP. W.V.
break Ridge.” where French Union Forces | president of United. Dress left the WASHINGTON, Oct. 10 THE K.
Ch And Death counted 275 more Communist Sibley Memorig) Hospitg! today Secretary of State Dean Ache PAARL
aos An ea dead and took 350-more prisoners. ot. 5
The Task force returned safely ar following the check-up and x-rays. CHIEFS OF STAFF son has condemned the “dastard-
at dusk, leaving death and chaos These were in addition to 4,500|He entered the hospital October } ly assassination of Sir Henry ‘TABLE WINES ?
in its wake. It had struck just as | Prisoners see by para-Jafter beeoming ill during a trip) LEAVE FOR ATHENS pare wa —_ gta tie. Dives ae
elements of the Chinese Army |‘'0opers yesterday. here, te BONCr FOR: Meee “Me Slee Le K.W.V. SAUVIGNON BLANC—Serve Chilled
. PARIS, Oct. 10, partment disclosed on Wednes- eae ie » dy
= " : $00,000 Loan — la- J " pe 4 Wy. c D...(full-bodied) Burgundy
Corps 80,000 strong were replac-} French headquarters reported | na ank fi Baa Tho tne The Chiefs of Staff of the U.S.,Jday. In a letter sent on Tuesday RAE. AGS Pay GNON—Red Wine
ing battered North Korean troops no action in the northern Tonking. tional Bank for Reconstruction and @rance’ and favites left Orly|to the British Ambassador, Ache- K.W.Y. CABERNET SAUVI
on the west side of Mundung}province area except a skirmish |Development announced the loan] », fn gg Py | ce Se epee fees ure meere. The above-mentioned Wines, with the exception of
valle. about 32, miles nortaeapt of Hanoi [ot $1-J00000 for exploration and] Raia, at 1B. aboard a special son said he, Caso vine K.W.¥. Saucignon Blanc, should be derved at oom ‘Temper:
: eid , : Seiad ‘ a. ne for is and j@eriev ing aronra
In the air 32 US. Thunder jets during the night in which Reds|use of underground water re- then Ankara for talks with the|by Communist guerrillas, He ature. They are of the highest quality and their oe ns aon
damaged and probably destroyed? retired before an artillery barrage }$ources of Rio Elqui Valley in ‘ 's de loss “to and flavour make them indispensable companions at }
two of 25 Communist MIG-15 jet} leaving eight dead Chile aig Serene? *eneets. of “Cipence | end | called Sisimney sea UP. during whieh Meat is served.
Aghters: which jumped them over — micwiis Membiiek sas Iranian’ Ate Turkey on Western Defence|the peace loving world".—U.P.
MIG Alley” in northwest Koreg,| French headquarters | wld bassador NadirAragteh Wednesday} ? aye, rty included General @ Si SHERRIES
S. ses =a 7 atrols operating close to c Ti sitial oli ° ; 7 , ers Re $ r
| Onitea Benes poe Peat waeia inese border near Lai Chau told United Press he believes. ber Omar Bradley, Chairman of the De Gasperi Wins K.W.Y. SHERRY No. 1—A very ol extra-dry Sherry )
rail-cuttin Ciladon wala Sinanit made no contact with rebel !S°viet Government would continue} 1.§, General Staff; British Field K.W.V. Old Oloroso—Rich Golden Sweetish Sherry $
"5 miles southeast of the| forces. He said the operation at|t© Support the roe case in the! Marshal Sir William Slim, Chiefj ROME, Oct. 11. K.W.V. Old Brown—Rich in natural purity aroma ’
Manchuria attaas . Nghia Lo which turned into a (Security Council. General of the Imperial Staff; Premier Alcide de Gasperi wor K.W.V. Amontillado—Extra.Dry. y
Units of th, 38th iment on|rout for Ho Chi Minh’s Vietminh He said Soviet-Iranian relations} and General Charles Francois}two votes of confidence on Wed- a HH
“Kim ft Sung ridge” tertnen walk 42nd regiment had been brought|Wwere good and the tensions which] Lecheres, Chairman of the |nesday on his foreign policy and SAUTERNE Type i
; 7 t CES: si tleveloped at the end of th rar i 7 s ; his recent mission to Ottawa and . : . Ds)
Mi cas ity subaaens emenmimin 9 © Sowwer ss Srernbet: Te ueabpeareds | eee ae Lyashingion UP. nO K.W.V. Wemmershock—A sweetish White Table Wine to {)
eeeene aad were aoe to : be served aig ie — Ideal»)
raw from one pea ya for Wedding Celebrations. i
heavy counter attagi. 7 igiees s T C ; SWEET WINES ty
owever, other Second Division My | ' a : oe Sh (li
Infantrymen won two hills west Japs Anxious oO onclude rade A reements } K.W.V. Red Muscadel Jeripigo-—Delightfully rich in Mus- |
of Mundung valley against only | K.W.V ah flavour. . . 5 i
ale ance onesies oo al evi a LONDON, phe talks has not yet been appoint- Comeneqwanith countries as sufficient quantity. “V. on Tawny (Superior)—A very popular tawny ¥
he eo To ongkong will be the only col- | ed. means of conserving her dolle t is also considered likely that c > wi a ais 3 é ie > be ‘
armoured raid into the midst of|ony to have an official present at} The Anglo-Japanese trade talks |resources.- Japan intends a oe Japan may be able to supply some veh Wite Muscadel Jeripigo—Lovely: sweet—Popular {i
a ee eee a tiki ; | Bagotiations in Tokyo in December |follow the signing of ha, iown her imports from dollar|of the capital equipment needed} everywhere. )
ank af infantry force als@ifgr a trade agreement between | payments agreement wi Japan, |countries, and much of this trade/in the colonies to facilitate an| SUPER > hw wae Stas : t
| struck up the valley east of “Heart+| Japan and the United Kingdom| This paves the way for a much}will be switched to the sterling|expansion of production | SUPERIOR BRANDY—Minimum 3 years old-—Absolutely
| break ee and blasted oa and Colonies Its representative speed cache of goods between | area In return, Japan will buy larger | , PURE
| munist sunkers and fortified) jn Tokyo will be on hand to advise | Commonwealth countrie ind The new trade agreement is ex- | quantities of Colonial raw ate ? : Ke r . 1 s
ipositions before returning to its! the c eleg ie on matters |Japar jpected to provide for greater vol- | rial Rubber from Malaya, cottor ii} K.W.V. Key Brand Brandy—In quarts and pint
| lines i he ~ > jume of imports of Japanese manu lfrom East Africa, and il from | }) THE ABOVE AVAILABLE NEXT WEEK AT
| The main armoured raid jumped p Japan Anxious jfactured goods into the Colonies. | Brunei are likely to figure high or i
ioff under cover of ar early ’ Reports from Tokyo suggest that |These will include textile oe Looe ligt of — J apanese in port iH J. N. GODDARD &' SONS, LTD. 5
{morning fos e ULF lelegation wl }l | Japar anxiou » conclude ther consumer good t this|from/ the Commonwealth evlir ))
; UP 1 re je agreement : ply in) area —U.P. ! SSS





.

——

PAGE TWO



Canib Calling

ING. COMMANDER L. A.
‘ EGGLESFIELD, Director
General of Civil Aviation in the
Caribbean Area, returned from
England Gn Tuesday via Trinidad
by B.W.LA.

Wing Comdr. Egglesfield
Barbados on September 41h, to
attend a. conference with the
Ministry ®f Civil Aviation on the
operations of Turbo-jet aircraft.
He also had consultations with the
Colonial Office on CiVil ‘Aviation
matters ‘Concerning the | British
Caribbean Area.

left

Asst. Branch Manager

R. GLYNE MAHON, Assistant

Bratich Manager of B.W.I.A.
in Jamaica arrived from that
colony on Tuesday via Trinidad
by B.W.LA. He was accompanied
by his young daughter Melanie.
Here for about two weeks’ holiday
he is staying with relatives at
Lieth Guest House, Worthing.

New Year’s Day

Te Jewish Community of the
island celebrated New Year's
Day yesterday. Their stores were
closed and they celebrated just as

other people would on January 1.
Among the stores closed were
many in Swan Street. The.’

Coronation Store, H. Burak’s Store,
Berstein’s Sandal®

Jubilee Store,
Shoppe, B. Korr Dry Goods Store,
Altman Y Sons, S. J. Berstein &
Sons, the Bargain House, and
G. W. Hutchinson's branch store
fit Roebuck Street.

I'o Be Married on Saturday

R. GASTON DeGANNES,

Manager of Hub Taxi Co.,
Trinidad and son of Mrs. Eliza
DeGannes and the late Dr. F. De-
Gennes, flew in from Trinidad on
Tuesday night by B.W.I.A. accom-
panied by his sister Ena. “They
are guests at the Ocean View Hotel.

On Saturday afternoon at 5
o'clock Mr. DeGannes is to be
married at St. Patrick’s Church,
Jemmotts Lane to Miss Derrice
Steele also of Trinidad. One of
Miss Steele’s sisters is due to arrive
tomorrow from Trinidaq to be
Bridesmaid at the wedding. Miss
Steele is staying at Lieth Guest
House, Worthing.

ARES EAE,



“Now then,
have no three-way
this ‘margin’ seas,’




Back to Venezuela
WAR. AND MRS. CHARLIE
MILETS who spent a month's

holiday in Barbados have returned
to Venezuela where Mr. Milets
works for the Shell Company.
During their stay here they were
guests at Lieth Guest House,
Worthing.

Retired

R. AND MRS. FRED. EAST-
HAM arrived from Trinidad
yesterday afternoon by B.W.LA.
Mr. Eastham has recently retired
from National Mining which used
to operate in Trinidad. He plens
to spend part of his retirement in
Barbados,

Coincided

ISS Y VONNE CASTILHO,

sister of Mrs. Fab Hoyos, who

was in_B.G. for about three weeks

on holiday returned yesterday

afternoon by B.G. Airways. Her

visit coincided with the Barbados-
3.G. Cricket tour just ended.

To-night’s Talk

M* VAL McCOMIE will give a
talk on Martinique when the
Alliance Francaise meets tonight
at the British Council headquart-
ers, Wakefield.

The meeting begins
o’clock.

at 8.15



BY THE WAY e « e « By Beachcomber

(The only foremay Cutter in this
Street who ever made a pair of snake
skin breeches for a blaekguard)

FTHIS hand, accustomed for the

last month to the strangling
of chamois and the pulling’ of wild
boars’ noses, is called once more
to the more lady-like occupation
of pen-twirling.

At present, hand and pen are
at sixes and sevens, and I feel
Vike a man suddenly invited to
cut his finger-nails with a scythe,
button his waistcoat with a boat-
hook, mow a tield with a telescope,
or eat porridge with a corkscrew
(as happened at the Semaine Gas-
tronomique de Crewe). There-
fore, let us cut the cattle and
come to the horses, as the gourmet

said when he addressed himself 0 5

;

{high

a lump of dubious beef.

Another Gratifying
Reception

N Ribeauvillé, on a wooded
slope of the Vosges, I was the'
principal performer in a concer
of Schubert's songs.
no rehearsal, and knowing ne
German, I was compelled to in-
vent words as I went along. The
people of that part who had come
out in their thousands to greet
me, inquired whut patois this

Having had)

my old nurse in Xonrupt,” said I.
Compliments and wine followed.
I was told later that the people
of Obernai (where Ste, Odile was
born) were kept awake all night
by the cheering. Luckily IT am a
modest man.

Prodnose; Such extraordinary
and, to me, inexplicable popular-
ity must be ae inconvenient for
anybody on holiday.

Myself: Not if it is aceompan-
ied by enormous quantities of
wine.

Prodnose; Did you never shake
off the crowds?

Myself: _. No, Even on_ the
Schlucht Pass the bands and the
cheering multitudes hurried after

me, ;
A Triumphal Progress

N Remiremont, where the fifty

Canonesses who had rights of
and low justice over the
bans de St. Pierre defied Turenne
n 1638 or so, the Cheval de
Sronze still flourishes. In the
ireaded street I saw a num on a
notor-bicycle, The people of the
alley came out in their thousands
o offer me compliments and
}vine. “The compliments,” said I,
in a short speech, “though fully
deserved, 1 can do wethout. As
for the wine, that is another

might bo.) “It was taught me by | matter.” So I nuzzled down to it,





CROSSWORD



Across
4. Carries the bit at polo. (5-4)
8 Some cat! (6)
10 Toa snake suggests ambition, (3)
il. A black-crested monkey, (6
12 The ofticer commanding finally
left the image breaker, (4)
ik Arising’ our. of 2)
» Arising out of ten cans. (
17, Overjoyed. (6)
18 Panorama (4)
21 aoe kind of light-weight
‘a
22 This sort would be high!
finished. (9 mu
43 Beast ip a nuvel Kingdom. (3)
v4 He should be funny. (5)
Down
1. Sure, it’s no negative. (8)
2. Hanging water? (6)
3 Noel ubsec by the thousand. (5)
4 Do Wwtai so as to get polsonous
fung)
® Unciroied vexing. (3)
6 Had advertised asspciatiun with
ince. (7) %. Drop of water (4)
v Unite. (3)
14 Useful bioke in nay time. (4)
16 Divides the Isie of Man (5)
18 Earabe 14)
20 4 or 6 Down could make you
this. (3)
Soiutivn of vesterduy’s Oucele — Across
1 Stelioner, 6 Assorted 1}, Vest. iz
ame. i ~tntent 15, fdates, 17,
Stain 20 Tide “41 Pir, 4 Wuet. 24
inset. 25 Rvot, 46 Attic, 27, Lacy *
eke Powe: i atisiied; 2 Ass, 4,
Totieat “@ tr 5, Rup, 7, Sentinel:
& lovers" 9 Enmity: 10 ad. }
Nettle. 18 idee. 19 Nutty!

Varsia 16
PS ack

SN censors
BEEBE ERB RBHR ERR BRE RUR ESD

CHECK VOILE

A
T. R. EVANS & WHITFIELDS

3 DIAL 4220
ha

DRESS GABERDINE in all shades
WHITE SHARKSKIN
FLANNELLED SPU

pausing now and then to acknow-
ledge a piece of fulsome flattery
or to accept another bottle. Nor
was it any of your miserable vin
gris of Lorraine, but a stylish little
Alsatian wine from Riquewihr,
Futher up the wally, they cheer-
ed me so loudly thatI could
hardly hear myself drinking.

In Passing

NUMBER of well-meaning

but muddle-headed writers
have sent me their “Authors’
Peace Appeal,” with a request
for my signature. They will not
get it; but I have a favour to
ask. I would like the 12 signa-
tories to read through very -care-

‘|fully the document to which they

have put their names. I think
that the more intelligent among
them will then withdraw their
signatures.





The stranger bustles up to the

two pals and mops his brow,
“Whew, it's hot work hurrying
today,”’ he puffs, “I'm looking for
a sound fellow named Sailor Sam.
Do either of you know where he
lives and how to get there? |
want to find him quickly, It's
urgent." “Why, yes sir,” says

PLAIN SHANTUNGS—Grey, Blue, Fawn, Peach ................

NS

Fine shipment of Ladies Shoes

YOUR SHOE STORES



BARBADGS ADVOCATE

err

Sports Editor Returns
M* Oo. §S. COPFIN, Sports
Editor of the Barvados
Advocate who had been in B.G.
covering the Barbados-B.G. tou.
for his newspaper was among the
passengers arriving from B.C.
yesterday evenirg by 8.W.1.A.
Mercy Mission

.M.S. Apoue, one of the Royal

Navys fcst minelayezs, is
back in Ergland after her mercy
mission to Jamaica She was iusa-
ed off across the Atlantic with
relief stores soon after the hurri-
cane struck and errived back in
Po.tsmouth last Monday. The men
aboard Apo:lo, commanded by
Captain F. W. R. Larken, R.N,,
sailed the little minelayer with
its life-saving cargo with all the
vigour of a ciéw taking their ship
into action.

Hurricane Relief
Dogo efforts are being

made by West Indians in
England to raise money for the
Jamaica Hurricane Relief Fund
Tomorrow, the Cosmopolitan
Dance Club will stage a grand
dance at Holborn Hall. A Jamaican
band will be in attendance and
the entire proceeds will be devoted
to the Fund,












































was the last of the four wives «
more, dark-haired Elaine

as as aberration.

desk in Wall Street.

stockbrokers.

ind loving every minute of it.
by a mile.” she tells me. “Never

It is a tremendous boost to one’s
ego. ,

“When I go out with a man
friend now we don’t exchange the
usual chit-chat. Men always open
the conversation by asking what
do I think of such-and-such a
stock. And when I tell them théy
look at me with a new respect.”

From Jamaica

EW arrival in England trom

Jamaica is Mrs, S. W. P. Sut-
ton-Foster. She is there to see her
daughter Barbara, a cartographer
at the Central Office of Informa-
tion. Mrs, Sutton-Foster will re-
main in London until her husband,
Sir Sutfon-Foster, arrives from
Malaya. They leave later for the
Gold Coast where Sir Sutton-
Foster will take up appointment as
Lord President of the West
African Court of Appeal.

Some Cake

UESTS who attended the 60th
anniversary of the Chartered
Institute of Secretaries in London
last week rated the birthday cake
as the best they've seen for a long
time. No wonder. It was cooked by
an expért London chef and con-
tained ingredients that had come
from all parts of the Common-
wealth, including the West Indies.
Members of the West India Com-
mittee here contributed sugar, rum.

B.C. RADIO PROGRAMME

11.15 a.m. Programme Parade,
a.m. Jazz Music, 12 noon The
12.10 p.m. News Analysis
400—7.15 pm 6.23 M

1951

11.30
News,

, 31.92 M.

4 poem. The News, The
Daily Service, Jazz Music,
4.45 p.m. Sporting Record, 5 p.m
Composer of the Week, 5.15 p.m. BBC:
Northern Orchestra, 6 p.m, Pipes and
Drums, 6.15 p.m. Scottish Magazins
6.45 Programme

4.10 p.m
4.15 p.m

We See Britain, p.m. Coionial
Commentary, 7.45 Books to Read
7.45—10.45 p.m, 81 32 M. 48.43 M
ne

all-spice and caschew nuts, The} 8 p.m Pa deg poe ob saa
. P.â„¢, pecial Dispatch
flour was from Canada, butter 8.45 p.m. Composer of the Week; 9
from New Zealand, dried fruit] p.m. Ring up the Curtain; 10 p.m
from Australia and candied peel ae ao 10.10 om From the Editor-
1 als, p.m oray McLaren Talk-
from South Africa, Some cake! ing, 10.30 p.m. Barchester Towers
C.B.C. PROGRAMME

THURSDAY OCTOBER 11,
10,03—12.20 p.m.
10,20-—10.36 p.m,
Mes.

1951
dip eewas News,
it oe S This Week

2 oo M.

HREE weeks ago, on a moun-
tain track, I met a snail. He
was moving along with his house
on his back, and the scientist in
me _ whispered, “Research, re-
search.”
I tapped on his shell lightly,
like a nervous young postman
and he at once contracted his
short lower horns and his longer
upper ones, and began to go in-
doors. 1 withdrew. Out ihe came
and out came his horns, He moved
forward, at what seemed to me
an amazing speed for a snail, I
took out my watch, like any
trainer watching a racehorse, |
ut a bit of stick down, level with
is stern, and another bit an inch
further on, and I timed him. He
covered the inch in just over ¢°
minute. In a quarter of an hour
he was holf way to the far edge
of the track. Either snails are not
as slow as people think, or this
one was a speed-maniac. Veloci-
ter, velociter currite, noctis coch-
leae.



MAX BATTLE!
SANDY # WILLIE

Official Championship Fight Films!

_ Distributed by RKO Radio Pictures, Inc. :

the kind
of woman
that made
New Orleans
famous!

One Thing leads to

Another

_ get even, he should have

gone into a cow-shed and
trodden on a barber’s foot, Then
the barber would have gone to
the police station and trodden on
a cow's foot, By this time public
opinion, realising that something
odd was going on, would have
compelled the mayor to give a
civic banquet to the barber and
the policeman. The town hall
would have been decorated with
life-size models of cows, the rates
would have gone up, but the
enormous queype waiting to sec
the barber and the policeman
arrive for the banquet would
have been as happy as grigs.

She Forgot Auntie

Last night my wife picked ur
her father in one arm, me in the
other, and, with my son on her
back, carried us all upstairs

(Correspondence column)

When a policeman went into the
barber’s shop, a cow trod on hi:
foot. (News item.)



with LUCILE WATSON « JANIS CARTER:

THE SHORT
RETURN”
With Gary GRAY and |

The Wonder Dog “FLAME”

sce} | PEAT Aston
“He's an old

Rupert politely.

friend of mine. If you want to get PLAYING FRIDAY 12th
to him quickly you'd better let me 2.30, 4.45 & 8.30 p.m.

show you the way.” He is still & Continuing Daily 4.45 & 8.30 p.m. :
wondering about Rollo's mysterious pete

question so he tells the boy he
won't be long and asks him to wait.
Then he leads the gentleman
further up the hill,

Also :
“PALS





TS BACKACHE

JUST A SIGN

OF AGE?



$1.15

| Many people suffer an aching back
$1.36 | needlessly—believing you must expect
a few aches and eats When you're

| “getting on” in years
re aeeneerece $1.57—$1.59 But backache is often caused by the
faulty action of kidneys and lier,
Berta $2.16 | See how much better you feel after
| — or eee Kidney-Liver Pills,
n | and your kidneys and liver both filter
reneetneees $1.37—$1.43 | out impurities from your bloodstream.
That's because this time-proven Dr.
Chase remedy treats two conditions at
* | once—contains special remedial ingre-
jients for both the kidney and liver
disorders which often cause backache,
If you're feeling worn-out, tired,
headachy—with painful joints and
| aching back—look to your kidneys and

4606 } liver Try Dr. Chase's Kidney-Liver

Pills tonight. At all drug counters 14



Things have changed for her since then.

Now she awakes in her smajl flat on Man-
hattan’s fashionable East Side every morning
pefore seven. At 8.30, smartly turned out in
a tailored navy blue suit and crisp white
blouse, she pushes her way into the jam-
packed subway and travels Cowntown to her

Elaine Barrie is an actress no longer. To-
day she is the most attractive “customers’
man” in one of New York's larger firms of

She gives advice to investors, She sells
bonds and stocks on commission.
picking up the ropes of finance as she goes

“Finance has the theatre beaten ®

have I enjoyed anything so much hathet begin?

SADDLER~PEP



Won Barry-

Barrie
dreamed of getting up before ndpn. To have
done so would have been put down almost

The Last Mrs. Barrymore
Goes To Wall Street

By FREDERICK COOK
NEW YORK, Saturday.
In the old days in Hollywo

when she

never

She is

;

Passed Exam
How did Elaine’s career in the
Over lunch with
a broker friend one day she
brought the talk around to finance
“more or less out of politeness.’
She learned to her surprise that
there were women doing all right
as customers’ men” and that her
friend considered she too showed
“a feeling for it.”

Forthwith, somewhat flattered,
she skipped the fashion pages in
her paper, studied financial
selections instead.

“Then,” she said, I took « course
at the New York Institute of Fi-
nance, which trains persenne] for
member firms of the Stock Ex-
change. I took a very intensive
course, which included technical
accounting about which I knew
precisely nothing.

“Then I studied security
analysis. I passed the exam with

, a mark of 95 which is one of the

highest on record. A pass is 75.
That entitled me to become a cus-
tomer’s broker trainee.”

Can Tell A Dud

Already Elaine has formed some
strong opinions about stocks and
shares. For instance: “There is no
such thing as a phony stock, but
it does take a tremendous amount
of knowledge to pick out a good
one.

“War in Korea, floods in Kan-
Sas, everything has its effect on

SOOO SOSS BOCES OOS OOPS SOPOPPOOVPPOD

GLOBE

Last Shows TO-DAY 4.45 and 8.15 p.m.
CLARK GABLE in
ANY NUMBER CAN PLAY
AND
FRED ASTAIRE in
THREE LITTLE WORDS
Pit 16; House 30; Balcony 40; Box 54,

ALEC OE ACCEL OOOO ALA SY

SOCSSES





ELAINE BARRIE. From stoge to stocka

the market, and there is the per-
sonal element about the job which
appeals to me, too. I had a young
mother to see me the other day
who wanied something which
would show a profit in a few years’
time, so as to pay for the education
of her son.” ;

Miss Barrie’s only link with
her old life is her nearly-com-
pleted book on her husband to be
called The Great Lover, She met
Barrymore in 1935 when (as a
young girl) she had sent him a
fan letter while he was ill in
hospital, Later, with her mother,
she went to see him.

When he left hospital, he was
photographed often with an
attractive girl named in the cap-
tions as Elaine Jacobs. The same
girl turned up later among his
company on & radio programme,
listed now as Elaine Barrie. She
had taken the name “because it
sounded a bit like Barrymore.”

Man’s Language
A few months later they
married. Elaine made a name of
her own account in Hollywood
and on Broadway. Now, at 35,
she says “I’m through with the
theatre. There people live in a
sort of ivory tower, utterly out of
touch with what is going on out-
side. Finance is real. When I
go out with a man now, I can

really talk his language.”

WORLD COPYRIGHT

RESERVED
—L.ES.
PROPS SPSSOS



GLOBE




ae

M-G-M
presents a
ech
i
dynamite!



REMEMBER—There

when you

is

COTTON

ESTIONS ASKED"!

BARRY
SULLIVAN DAHL:
Sens SIDNEY SHELDON - “RASLeNLe

AN M-G-M PICTURE. a]
isis wba. . med

BARGAINS

in all Departments

AFTER STOCK-TAKING ~

Call and Inspect Them.

THE BARBADOS CO-OPERATIVE |
FACTORY LTD. }

OPENING TOMORROW 5 & 815 p.m.

FROM THE LITTLE BLACK BAGS, FROM THE D.A.’S j
FILES, FROM THE HALF-WORLD OF BIG









CITY CRIME... |
= COMES THIS |














a
3





tis

GEORGE JEAN

Murpay -Hacen

HAROLD FESS = 5" RICMOLAS MAYEACK



no Parking Problem

shop with us.



THURSDAY, OCTOBER 11, 1951





SAT: 2.30 & 1.30
TRAIL TO
ONV2ONGA

an

Opening Friday t2th

Sandy SADDLER &

Wille PEP Pight
A

“My Ferbidden
Past

PLAZA. 2310~

LAST 2 SHOWS TODAY
43% & 830 PM

PARAMOUNT’S MUSICAL & ACTION DOUBLE!
Color by

“THE FLEETS IN” & “EL PASO” Sisc-oic

Dorothy Lamour, William Holden John Payne Gail Russell, Dick Foran
â„¢ Eddie Bracken, Jimmy Dorcey & Ork Geo. (Gabby Haynes

SPECIAL TODAY 1.30 p.m

CODE of tHe LAWLESS & ARIZONA TRAIL

Kurby Grant, Fuzzy Knight Tex Ritter, Fuzzy Knight

B'TOWN |

DESPERSTE TRAIF,



























" , OISTIN ‘ A egy Y
PLAZA vii ss04 GAE®
7 THE GARDEN — ST. JAMES
Last 2 Shows Teday 5 & $0 p.m Today (only) 8.20 p m.
MYETORS | OF MARES oe ELIZABETH OF LADYMEADE
Maria Montez, Patric Knowles & Color by Technicolor
MAN MADE MONSTEK Asahteeaie
Lon Chaney, Dick Foran
aan. hier tae MLDNITE Sat. 13
a Fri. to Sun.
Fri. to Sun i ee 8.30 Peter Cookson
5 & 8.30 p.m. LAWLESS . p.m. SHADOWS of
Alan Ladd in Kirby want & Mat; Sun 5 p.m. SUSPICION &
BRANDED } VER the
Cour by | ARIZONA James Cagney in BORDER
Technicolor TRAIL CITY FOR Johnny Mack
, Mona Freeman Tex Ritter CONQUEST Brown
anne ainte— aeons







EMPIRE

LAST TWO SHOWS TO-DAY 4.30 & 8.30
Universal Action Double
ROD CAMERON — FUZZY KNIGHT
in

“THE OLD TEXAS TRAIL”

AND
“MADONNA OF THE SEVEN
MOONS ”

Starring STEWART GRANGER — PATRICIA ROCK



GRAND OPENING TOMORROW’ at 2.30 & 8.30

meena Fo
Nees)...

wa CECIL KELLAWAY «JESSE WHITE + A UNIVERSAL INTERNATIONAL em
ROX Y

LAST TWO SHOWS TO-DAY OPENING SATURDAY 4.45, & 8.15

zen we a



RE.





Universal DOUBLE —
“NAKED CITY”



Starring :
BARRY FITZGERALD ff
and © NOTETO
“SCARLET STREET” ‘ay \ j ace
Starring : ~~ ' j / veal the ending!

JOAN BENNETT —
DAN DURYEA

TOMORROW ONLY 4.30 & 8.15

Universal Double . ‘
Rod CAMERON —Fuzzy KNIGHT
in



f a
LY AR | , }
starring PAUL DOUGLAS



“THE OLD TEXAS TRAIL”

and
RICHARD BASEHART
“ODD MAN OUT”
with BARBARA BEL GEDDES -

DEBRA PAGET Seeirian

James MASON



ROYAL

LAST TWO SHOWS TO-DAY FRIDAY ONLY 4.30 & 8.15
4.30 & 8.15
Double .

ROD CAMERON in —
“THE MAGIC BOW”
“THE LADY OBJECTS”

and
‘o IBLE MAN”
“ARCTIC MANHUNT” . “THE INVIS ie
with
Starring

Mikel CONRAD Claude RAINES



OLYMPIC

TO-DAY ONLY 4.30 & 8.30 OPENING TOMORROW
|Republic Double . 4.30 & 8.15
Roy ROGERS -~ Dale EVANS | Fox Double .



in |
| «pPHE MAN WHO CHEATED
ere tee HIMSELF”
and
HIDE: and
age “yp CLIMB THE HIGHEST
‘ ”
Lloyd BRIDGES MOUNTAIN







To-night at 8 o’clock

week



and every night this
In honour of the visiting U.S. Navy

CLUB
ORGAN

the





be open with

CLUB MORGAN ORCHESTRA




will






Playing from 8 pm. to closing










Delicio.s Steak Dinners served throughout the night.



THURSDAY, OCTOBER 11, 1951



Peasants’ Deductions From Cane Pric

Discussed

By House

BEFORE THE BILL to impose a special levy on sugar and
molasses manufactured in the island in certain circum-

stances, was passed in the House of Assembly on Tuesday,

there was much discussion.

The discussion hinged upon the agreement between the
Sugar Producers’ Federation and the Barbados Workers’
Union, out of which the Bill arose. The suggestion was made
by some other members that peasants should be exempted
from having money deducted from their price for canes to
go to the Labour Welfare Fund.

Some of the speeches on the dis-
cussion appeared in yesterday's
issue. Following is the continua-
tion;

The junior member for St.
Andrew Mr. J. A Haynes said that
anyone who read the agreement
would see that it was obvious that
the money would come out of the
small and big growers in propor-
tion, In the end it all came down
to their taking away money from
the small growers.

After a long period of looking
for an increased price for canes,
the growers were being told that
something would be taken out.

He said he represented a large
number of cane growers about
2,000, most of them his friends,
with over 32,000 tons of canes and
he thought it would be hard for
them.

Road Conditions

The Labour Welfare Loan, he
said, should be extended to the
Highways and Transport workers
because they were indirectly con-
cerned with the sugar industry.
The roads were very necessary to
the industry. Were they to be
told they had to become Civil
Servants before they got a fund?

“Another thing I cannot under-
Stand,” he said, “is why should
they be asked to give the money
back. This is a gift to the workers
and yet it is taken back. I would
tell them never pay a cent back
.... absolutely wrong principle!”

Mr. W. A. Crawford said that
the introducer of the Bill had said
that the agreement out of which
the Bill was then before the House
was a phenomenal and stupendous
achievement. “But what I regard
as Stupendous and phenomenal is
the glib manner in which he said
they limit the profits of the sugar
producers in this colony and its
guillibility in really believing what
somebody has told him without
really reading «the agreement
himself.

It was inconceivable that the
Senior Member for St. Joseph
could have read the agreement
and the Bill before the House and
then get up and make the remarks
which he made.

“Listening to him, Sir,” he said,
“I was sometimes bewildered.
wondered what on earth had
happened. I could have under-
stood almost any other member of
that side of the House making the
mistake he made, but that he
should make the mistake he made

—

and almost m

ers. Theré was an agricul-
tural worker in Barbados who did
not own a pitce of larid but rented
piece from the plantation at which
he worked, Therefore they
should not fool themselves that
only the pé@asant proprietors
would be affected by it.

emorandum

He said that as to thé average
peasant proprietor oF producer of
canes amd his position in so far
as what shodld be paid for a ton
of canes, the memorandum was an
absolutely useless document. The
principle on which the whole
document was drawn up was so un-
just in so far as the Small pro-
ducers were concerned that one
wondered how the gréat socialist
Government of Barbados could
have oversighte@ it.

They were told on page two
of the memorandum that the
main factors to be taken into
account in the assessing of the
price to be paid for canes were,

1. The mechanical efficiency of

the factory; 2. The quality of

the’ ¢ané milled; and 3. The
manufacturing expanses per
ton of sugar.

“I know from my experience,”
Rie said, “that this year two sugar
factories within a mile of each
other were assessing canes from
the same district. Early when the
crop started in February, there
were some unusual rains, It was
claimed by many factory owners
that these unusual rains affected
the sucrose content of the cane
and the priee would be reduced.’
Th dhe case of these two fac-
‘tories, they were paying $11 and
when the rains ¢ame along they
went to. $10.

“The rains stopped and the

factory with the lower recovery

and the léss efficient put back
on the dollar. The other factory
did not. So it would be seen that
two factories milling canes grown
in the same area refused to pay
the same price.

Manutacturing Costs

Speaking on the manufacturing
expenses per ton of sugar, he
asked whether one intended to say
that the socialists subscribed to
the view that because a man may
have spent more on overhauling
he would pay less for canes. Was
that to be especially so, since the
factories were allowed money, not
out of their profits but out of funds

; specially allocated to them ou* of
today is stupendous: WPM Lathe rehabilitation fund?

Peas: Canes

There had been a lot of talk
about the peasants canes and the
arguments adduced by the intro-
ducers of the Bill” were to be
found in the part of the agree-
ment which dealt with paying
peasants the sume price as plan-
tation owners.

It was as well that they first ap-
preciated the fallacy underlying
this statement before going to,the
others.

Part of the agreement was, that:

Both parties are aware of the
following resolution which was
passed recently by a majority vote
at a special meeting of factory
owners or their duly constituted
representatives after protracted
negotiations:—

“That the same price calcu-
lated on-a crop average recovery
shall be paid for peasants’ and
estates’ canes (not being share-
holders or suppliers under
written contract) it being clear-
ly understood that neither shall
have priority of delivery.

“PROVIDED that where own-
ers of estates other than those
who are shareholders of the
factory or are supplying canes
under a written contract, supply
canes in excess of 500 tons to a
factory (the delivery of such
canes being if required spread
over the whole period of the
crop) the factory shall be at
liberty to pay such estate owners
an additional price ranging
from 5c. to 35c. per ton,

“PROVIDED also that where
a Co-operative Society of
péasants supplies canes in excess
of 500 tons to any factory (the
délivery of such canes being if
réquired spread over the whole
period of the crop) the Society
shall be paid the Same extra
ptice which is paid to outside
e8tates ranging from 5¢. to 35c.
per ton for similar quantities”.

Estate Canes

It meant in actual fact that they
wotild pay more for estate canes
because no estate sent in less than
500 tons of canes,

There was hardly any plantation
in Barbados which had not got
shares in the factory near it. Ob-
viously it guaranteed them a proper
supply of canes. They would be
entitled to a better price of canes
too. That naturally ruled out the
peasants as getting the same price.
With regard to complaints that
peasant proprietors are affected
unduly by the Bill, he wanted them
to keep before théir minds that
anything they did to reduce the
pri¢e of canes in Barbados affected
not only the small peasant pro~

prietors but the ag icultural work-

How Aladdin’s Lamp
®won the Princess





Once & poor young
found



1 mag Wheneve



n named Aladdin
he

“Anybody who said we are
limiting the profits of the sugar
factories is displaying woeful
ignorance with regards the man-
ner in Which the price of cane is
calculated.”

On the question of the sugar
price, he said that behind it was
that in 1947 when the British Gov-
ernment decided to give an in-
crease in the price of sugar they
gave it conditionally. There had
to be certain deductions for the
Labour Welfare, rehabilitation and
so on. They began sometime ago
to use their fund for housing tne
sugar workers. Naturally after
centuries of bad housing condi-
tions in the colony in a_ short
time they found themselves with
no funds in the Sugar Welfare
Fund. The Royal Commission in
1940 had recommended a recess
on every ton produced in the col-
ony ... two shillings per ton.

Deductions

He said that by deductions of
various amounts from what was
to have been given times before,
it would be seen that the money
to the workers was really theirs.

The Stabilization Fund was
still untouched, he said, and
amounted to over $4,000,000.

Since that fund was lying there

idle, they could borrow $1,000,-

000 and alloaate it to the Labour

Welfare Fund, especially as it

was being lent out to be repaid.

If there was_a small sum due

because of some defaulter, the

Government could easily make

up that. ~

The RéWabititation Fund had
been going on since four years and
there might be somé justification
in reducing the amount given to
that fund, ,

“My stiggestion thetefore is,” he
said, “to borrow from your Sta-
bdization Fund, reduce your Re-
habilitation Fund, rtow frém
Central Government (for aftér all
it will be repaid) but do not take
it in this method.”

His last point was that thé pré-
duction bonus being given to agri-
cultural workers was not a result
of any munificence on the part of
the producers,

With regards to the 19 per cent
production bonus, Mr, Crawford
traced the position of the Agricul-
tural workers wages since the
Sugar Industry distur pences in
1945 and Getponsiadies that if the
19 per cent production. bonus .was
paid this year, fhe agricultural
workers were still owed an addi-
tional increase of 74 per cent.

Mr. A. E. S, Lewis said that the
result of the agreement was that
the workers of the country would
get something. Only
before he heard that there were
labourers on the sugar plantation:
who would get more in bonus than

|

{






PRE-wAR



WORKER OFFICIAL | WORKER



employment .. .’

“* Food rations are higher
some foreign countries






VERY PRE-WAR



have improved . . .”

“And . at



they worked for in some crops.

He could not follow the argu-

ment about some cane growers
seing pénaliséd. There was not
anybody who could tell What was
the price to be paid for canes. If
members said that the peasants
would get less, they should be able
to say what it was intended should
be paid.
_ He said that what was worry-
ing the other side was that the
labourers were beihg made free
and would nof have to go to them
and borrow money.

Mr. F. L. Walcott said that the
Junior Member for St. Philip had
said all along that the wages of
the*sugat workers could not be
worse because he had nothing to
do with them. But no one ex-
pected that member to agree with
anything which came from that
Government,

Increase Offered

The Junior Member for St.
Philip brought figures to show
that somé money was left back for
the peopie, but he did not say
that in 1949 the Ministry of Food
did not offer any increase.

What had they to benefit from
making it hard for the poor peas-
ants anyway, he askéd ? Instead
of Honourable Members using
their energy in the Hoyse about
peasants, they should try to form
a co-operative organisation for
them,

The Junior Member for St.
George was part of a factory
which was in the inconvenient
position like any other factory or
manufacturing industry in the
world producing raw material in
large quantities which was forced
to pay more, Lower Estate with
Bulkeley just a step away were
forced to pay more for their canes,

Mr, Mapp talkéd against the

suggestion that the peasants were
going to suffer so much,
- pa D. D. Garner said he was
in hear greement with the
Labour Wels Fund which the
Government started and which
was providing many poor people
with shelter; so he could not see
that they should do away with
that scheme. It would be a fal-
lacy, too, to give the mone} tothe
people. It was a good thing to
keep the money floating and if
anything could be done to enlarge
the amount it should be done.

The time had come though,
when they should create a fund
for other workers besides those in
the sugar industry.

The agreement was good as they
should try, although it was almost
impossible to gét it done, to get
the money out of the big sugar
producérs,

He said, however, that it was a
sad state of affairs in that the
peasants were not organised and
he felt that there should be some
way of exempting thm frém the
scheme.

Money Repayment

Mr. Dowding said that the last
speaker had convinced him that
he should add his quota to the
debate. The hon. member had
Started off by complimenting the
Government and had then gone
on to give the most accurate rea-
sons why he should not agree to
the enactment of the legislation
before them.

He wanted to know if the hon.
member was really suggesting
that the peasants were going to
pay back the money they had
vorrowed. “The hon. member
knows that this money is gone and
gone forever,” said Mr. Dowding.

It was obviously the hon, mem-
ber’s argument, he said, that some
type of scale should be adopted so

in the lower brackets of income
vaid a smaller rate than one in
whe higher bracket, so one in the

the meg in the same way as a man



of aaa






> genili How he
ma hin
k



$ nid f and ha
ed him a package of Royal Pudding

ys

CORE

The Princess had refused many suitors

But
Ro

me Royal Pudding

when Aladdin offered her a dish of
yal Pudding, shecried, “It's delicious!



“Housing conditions



home
established complete unity
of thought and action.”

BARBADOS ADVOCATE



TODAY

|



OFFICIAL

than in

”
“ee

























we've 4



London Express Service

lower brackets of the production
of eanes should pay a smaller rate.
The Sugar Agreement had come
before him on the 27th of last
month and from that time he had
read and studied it. He had come
thens that afternoon and listened
to the speeches of other hon
members to see if hé could be
convinced that he might possibly
be wrong in his opinion about the
matter, “But regardless of what-
ever the results are here tonight,”
said Mr. Dowding, “I am taking
up the cudgels for those people
in this island whom the Labour
Union in their haste in fighting for
the labourers, have forgotten.”

Price Of Labour

Ot course he had to give the
Union their due. There was na
doubt about it that the hon.
senior member for St, Joseph
and his Union had done wonders
and a great good for the people
of this island. There was no
doubt too that as far as the sugar
industry in this island was con-
eerned, the fact that the Union
was now learning the facts of the
situation of sugar today and in
the past, was breaking down the
unholy untruth that had been
entertained of the planters in
this island for the last 300 years.
The Union was now learning
that labour could not be paid a
corresponding price to that paid
for the article by the United
Kingdom.

Referring again to the Agree-
ment, Mr. Dowding said that on
the 27th September when it came
before the Sugar Producers As-
sociation, there was not one
member who did not agree to the
first clauses which applied to
Bonus Production. There was a
vast majority at the beginning of
the meeting, however, who en-
tirely disagreed with the latter
part of the agreement which call-
ed for $1.80 in one case and $2
towards the Harbour Scheme, to
be taken from the cane grower
and at the same rate from top to
bottom

“The peasants in the island
handle, according to Mr. H
crow, séMe 7,700 acres in sugar
cane snd 5,600 acres in other
erops, and the estimated number
of people that this would affect
was about 125,000.”
Increased Cost

Mr, Dowding then referred to
the increased cost of uction
which the peasant had to face,
and now, he said, he had also to
bay the $1.80 into the Labour

Weliare Fund. In his (Mr.
Dowding's) opinion, a_ position
had been reached where the

small peasant-owner of land Up! sae.
Barbados Co-Ope
ty

ta 10 acres, the peasant who was
the backbone of the country, was
placed.in quite an unenviable po-
sition on account of the circum-
stances which now existed.

He pointéd out that the peas
ants’ crop produced this year was
288,806 tons of canes, and if, he
said, they divided that between
one extreme and the other this
would be about 36,100 tons of
sugar, According to the present
proposal of $1.80 to the Labour
Fund they would have to pay
some $64,980.

“1 do not feel that justice
has been done in the case of
the peasant,” said Mr. Dowding,
“and I have sat here until I
was convinced by the speech
of the hon, senior member for
St. Philip that justice has not
been done.”
Referring to the arguments

raised, Mr. Adams said that he
was going to be charitable and
forget that there was an election
around the corner. He thought
that some hon. members who had



'
Yes, everyone loves Roya: Puddings, |
Theyre so rich and smooth. So nutritious, |
too. 3 wonderful flavors: chocolate, va
nilla, and butterscotch. Try one today |
i



persuaded themselves that there
was sométhing wrong in princi-
ple as regards the matter under
diseussion, would not be so per-
suade@ if they happened to be in
the House next March or April.

Nine Months’ Work

What was before them was the
result of nine months of hard
bargaining with the necessity of
giving away something some-
times and not giving away on
some occasions. The Govern-
ment’s part in this was purely
because there was on the Statute
Book the (Rehabilitation, Price
Stabilisation and Labour Wel-
fare) Act, otherwise there would
have been no necessity to come to
the House at all. The Sugar Pro-
ducers Federation would have
kept to their agreement and the
Union to theirs. As soon as the
allocation by law to these three
funds were interfered with, the
Act had to be amended. What
the Government was doing then
was in order to carry out the
wishes of the Sugar Producers
Federation on the one hand and
the Workers Union on the other.
Of course ihasmuch as the Gov-
ernment happened to be a La-
bour Government, it was neces-
sary also to get the approval of
the Labour Party and the Party
had given its approval with some
eriticism here and there, but
again with the understanding
that it was the result of bargain-
ing.

He wanted to make his position
quite clear, the Union had_ bar-
gained with the Sugar Producers
Federation and the present bar-
gain was the best that could be
secured, “We are seeking legisla-
tion to carry out the terms of the
agreement, but our hands are not
tied in approaching the sugar
industry if it can be proved that
the present formula works an
injustice to the peasants.

Pre-Election Speeches

“T do not intend to accuse hon-
ourable members of making pre-
eléction speeches, but I am not
convinced that on the eve of the
election this broken-heartedness
for the peasants is genuine. Why
has it taken all this time?

stage. The reason

as we are today.”

Some employers, — said

nic ciety Dine thal to a

HALL’S

“The Union has been organised
for ten years, Why has it taken us
all this time to reach the present
is that we
were not as strong ten years ago

Mr.
Adams, were genuinely reformed,
some tried to meet one halfway
and used methods of conciliation,
“Human nature is human nature
all over the world. and after 300
years of undisputed sway doing
whatever they liked, it is not sur-
{prising that we had to take nine

months to
to an end.”

Referring to the speéch of the
honourable junior member for St.
Philip, Mr. Adams said that the
suggestion to make the Labour
Welfare Fund a gift and then to
borrow from the Stabilisation
Fund, had been exposed by more
than one speaker.

The honourable member knew
that he (Mr. Adams) had said on
more than one occasion that
profits would- be limited. The
whole basis of the figures started
with the acceptance by the indus-
try that it should not get more
than a pound per ton profit, for
the rest, a child would agree that
it was profit-sharing.

bring this agreement

Voluntary Agreement

He would repeat that he wel-
comed the spirit of those factory
owners who had entered the
agreement voluntarily, but the
spirit of the honourable junior
member for St. George and the
honourable member for St.
Andrew was not going to help
their own class,

To try to fool the peasants that
the Labour Party had done them
a great wrong was not fair, said
Mr. Adams, If this agreement did
not come about, he questioned,
what guarantee would they have
had this year — or what guaran-
tee did they have im the years
of their existence as a union, that
the peasants were ing what
the industry could afford to pay.

After further comment 7
Adams repeated that the two par-
ties concerned in the sugar agree-
ment having entailed a ahange,
jovernment was asking to allow
the parties to carry out the
agreement. This could not be done

unless the Act to whieh he had
already referred had been
changed,

The Bill finally was given its
second feading and when it went
into committee the Opposition led
by Mr. EB. K. Walcott ppopeed the
inclusion of clause 3 dealing with
the levy of $1.80. The inclusion,
however, was upheld by a 9 to

majority The Bill was then

passed without amendment.

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PAGE FOUR



——=—

Printead by the Advocate Co., L*4., Broad St, Bridgetown

Thursday, October 11, 1951

—_————

PRIVATE SCHOOLS

IT would be unwise to venture cr’ticism
of the introduction of age grouping into
the educational system of this island with-
out examining the factors which have con-
tributed to its disadvantages. Chief among
these are the uncontrolled private schools.

Under existing regulations it is within
the power of the Director of Education to
inspect schools which are registered. These
are given certificates of approval such as
are seen in the advertisement of those
schools which cater to secondary educa-
; tion in this island, But it is not with these

schools that there should be so much con-
cern. It is to the “home school” that seri-
ous attention should now be paid.

There are several of these schools scat-
tered in the many villages to accommodate
the few children of each district. A lady,

a usually past the prime of youth, starts
such a school and holds out to the parents
that there is an exclusive atmosphere in
which the children would not mix with
those of the “lesser breeds.” This is the
first attraction for those who believe that
society demands from them something
which it really does not and flatters their

} vanity of being exclusive.

The teacher is usually a person whose
association with teaching, the knowledge

: and skill it requires, and the special train-

ing demanded was that gained during a

few. years as a juvenile in school. . The
school itself has its only relation with in-
stitutions of its kind in the name given it.
The building is as suited to be a school as
for any other purpose and seldom pro-
vides the required number of cubic feet
per pupil or subscribes to the rules of the

. Health Authority for buildings where any

number of people are gathered.

In this atmosphere of make-believe the
child remains to have the first part of its
life blighted by incompetent, even if en-
thusiastic and well-meaning individuals.
There is no regular rule as to when the
child should, enter or leave this school.
The truth is that the school serves as a
substitute for a nursery until the parent
believes that-the-ehild is really old enough
to go to school. And in many of these
cases the child who has already lost a few
years is then sent to the elementary school
where a teacher is expected to work

fn. miracles. _

It is ‘here where. the child and its
parents come up against the evils of age
grouping, The child would have been
farther advanced in its studies if it had
been sent to,the elementary school at the
time wheal ‘haath the private school;
now it has td be*put along with children
‘of its own age and is usually at a disad-
vantage.

. There are, those who will attempt to»
justify the existence of the private school
despite the fact that it now works a hard-
ship on children of the poorer classes who
will never have the opportunity of getting
any other kind of education beyond that
of the elementary school. It is easy to
argue but not so easy to justify the claim
of women to a living at the expense of the
educational development of thousands of
children.

Nothing said against the private schocl
should be taken to mean that it should be
banished, but in view of its opportunity
for harm and on the converse, its potential
usefulness in the community, it should, be
made to conform to certain rules applied
to all educational institutions.

It should be made unlawful for anyone
r to open a private school in any district
without the approval of the Educational
Authority and there should be heavy pen-
alties attached to those who refuse to sub-
mit their school for inspection and
approval by the Inspectors provided by
the Government.

Until something is done to control the
growth and conduct of these private
schools there will always be this gap be-
tween the time the average child should
have gone to school where he would be
classified with others of his own aye and
the time when he is taken from the aimos-
phere of snobbery and grouped in a class
where he can assimilate little or nething.

7S Re ee



Our Keaders Say:

Why Not All

To the Editor, the Advocate, :
SIR,—I crave space in your columns to enquire

why all persons employed in the sugar industry
were not eligible for bonus, under the recent re-
production bonus scheme. I speak for the chemists
who have to work so hard, taking samples every
hour and on whose diligence the success or other-
wise of the industry depends.

Don’t you think, Sir, that we should also benefit
trom this bonus. The cost of living affects us very
much too, the more so, since we are employed for
a short time every year: 1 have also heard that

not even the crop séaSon overseers and cane-weigh-
ers have got one cent, Do you think that it is fair
to us? I say no.

Give us something. We worked hard for it. We



were one of the cogs in the machinery and therefore
shouldn’t be left out.
I thank you kindly for space.
HARD-UP



Here in full is the Manifesto of the Conservative and

BARBADOS

signed by Mr. Churchill.

| Unionist Party for the General Election of 1951, |
|

We are confronted with a critical
Election which may well be the
jturning point in the fortunes and
even the life of Britain. We canno:
! go on with this evenly balanced
iParty strife and hold our own in
ithe world, or even earn our living.
} The prime need is for a stabic
Government with several years
ibefore it, during which time
jnational interests must be faith-
j fully held far above Party feuds
jor tactics.

j We need a new Government not
biassed by privilege or interest or
cramped by doctrimal prejudices
or inflamed by the of
class warfare. Such a Government
only the Conservative and Unionist

|Party can today provide.

'

;

’

No Illusions

There must be no illusions about
‘our difficulties and dangers. It is
better to face them squarely as
'we did in 1940. The Conservative
'Party who since victory have had
ine responsibility for the events
‘which have led us to where we are
!now, offers no bribes to the elec-
jtors. We will do our best to
serve them and to make things
better all round, but we do not
blind ourselves to the difficulties
that have to be overcome, or the
time that will be required to bring
us back to our rightful position in
the world, and to revive the vigour
of our national life and impulse.

We all seek and y for peace
A mighty union nations tread
that path together, but we ail
know that peace can only come
through their united strength and
faithful brotherhood.

Then and Now

Contrast our position to-day
with what it was six years ago.
Then all our foes had yielded.
We all had a right to believe and
hope that the fear of war would

not afflict our generation nor our *
children. We were respected, hon- |

oured and admired throughout the
world. We were a united peopie
at home, and it was only by being
united that we had survived the

deadly perils through which we §
had come and had i Ee eee

of freedom flying through
fateful year when we were alone.
There, at any rate, isa great
foundation and inspiration, Every







war brings extraordinary difficul-
ties. With national unity we could
have overcome them. But what has
happened since those days?

The attempt to impose a doc-
trinaire Socialism upon an Island
which has grown great and famous
by free enterprise has inflicted
serious injury upon our strengtn
and prosperity. Nationalisation has
proved itself a failure which has
resulted in heavy losses to the tax-
ay or the consumer, or both.



It has not ,iven general satisfac-
tion to the wage-earners in the

industries, It has im-
paired the relations of the Trade
‘Unions with their members. in
more than one nationalised indus-
try the ers are ill-con-
tent with
private employers, with whom
they could negotiate on equal
terms through the Trade Unions
to the all-powerful and remote
officials in Whitehall.

Reckless Spending

Our finances have been brought
into grave disorder. No British
Government in peace-time has
ever had the power or spent the
money in the vast extent and
reckless manner of our present
rulers, Apart from the two thous-
and millions they have borrowed
cr obtained from the United
States and the Dominions, they
have spent more than 10 million

a day, or 22 thousand mil-
lions in their six years. No com-
munity living in a world of com-
peting nations can possibly afford
such frantic extravagances. De-
valuation was the offspring of wild,
profuse expenditure, and the evils
which we suffer to-day are the
inevitable progeny of that wanton
way of living.

A Conservative Government will
cut out all unnecessary Govern-
ment expenditure, simplify the
administrative machine, and prune
waste and extravagance in every
department.

More for Less

The greatest national misfor-
tune which we now endure is the
ever-falling value of our money,
or, to put it in other words, the
ever-increasing cost, measured in
work and skill, of everything we
buy. British taxation is higher than
in any country outside the Com-
munist world, It is higher by
eight hundred millions a year
than it was in the height of the
war. We have a population of
fifty millions depending on im-
ports of food and raw materials
which we have to win by our
exertions, ingenuity, and crafts-
manship. Since Devaluation it
takes nearly twelve hours of work
with hands or brains to buy across
the dollar exchange what we
could have got before for eight
hours, We have now to give from
one-quarter to one-third more of
our life's strength, skill and out-
put of every kind and quality to
'get the same intake as we did
|before Devaluation two years ago,
We pay more for what we buy
irom abroad; we get less for what
we sell. That is what Socialist
Devaluation has meant. This
costly expedient has not prevent-,
ed a new financial crisis.

Second to None
We are a hard-working people:

We are second to none in ability”

or enterprise so far as we are
allowed to use these gifts. We
now have the only Socialist Gov-
ernment in the Empire and Com-
monwealth. Of all the countries
in the world Britain is the one
least capable of bearing the Social-
ist system.

The nation now has the chance
of rebuilding its life at home and



of strengthening its’ position
abroad. We must free ourselves
from our impediments. Of all im-
|pediments the class war is the
| worst, At the time when a gruw~-
ing measure of national unity is
more than ever necessary the
Socialist Party hope to gain an-
ther lease of power by fomenting
cla hatred and appealing to
moods of greed ana @vy

one knows how the aftermath of ©



change from the i

Within the limits of a statement
of this kind, it is only possible to
deal with some of the main ques-
tions now before us. We wish to
be judged by deeds and their
results and not by words and their
applause. We seck to proclaim 2
theme, rather than write a pros-
pectus. Many years ago I used
the phrase, “Bring the rearguard
in.” This meant basic standards
of life and tabour, the duty of
the strong to help the weak, and
of the s to establish
tolerable conditions for the less
fortunate. That policy is adopted
by all parties today. But now we
have the new Socialist doctrine.
It.is no longer. “Bring the rear-
guard in,” but “Keep the vanguard
back.” There is no means by which
this Island can support its present
population except by allowing its
native genius to flourish and
fructify. We cannot possibly keep
ourselves alive without the indi-
vidual effort, invention, contriv-
ance, thrift and good housckeep-
ing of our people.

In 1945 I said:

“What we desire is freedom;
what we need is abundance.
Freedom and abundance — these

must be our aims. The production
of new wealth is far more bene-
ficial than class and party fights
about the liquidation of old wealth,
We must try to share blessings
and not miseries. The production
of new wealth must precede com-
mon wealth, otherwise there will
only be common poverty.”

It is because these simple truths
have been denied and our peopie
duped by idle hopes and false
doctrine that the value of our
money has fallen so grievously
and the confidence of the world
in Great Britain has been impair-
ed. Confidence and currency are

MR. WINSTQN CHURCHILL

interdependent, and restoring con-
fidence by sound finance is one of
the ways in which the value of
our money may be sustained and
the rising cost of living checked.

The Conservative aim is to in-
crease our national output.

Here is the surest way to keep
our people fully employed, to halt
the rising cost, of living, and to
preserve our social services. Hard
work, good management, thrift—
all must receive their due incen-
tive and reward.

Commonwealth First

In the wider world outside
this Island we put first the
safety progress and cohesien

of the British Empire and Com-
monwealth of Nations. We must
all stand together and help each
other with all our strength both
in Defence and Trade, To foster
commerce within the Empire we
shall maintain Imperial Prefer-
ence. In our home market the
Empire producer will have a place
second only to the home ucer,

Next, there is the unity of the
English-speaking peoples who to-
gether number hundreds of mil-
lions. They have only to act in
harmony to preserve their own
freedom and the general peace.

On these solid foundations we
should all continue to labour for
a United Europe, including in the
course of time those unhappy
countries still behind the Iron
Curtain.

These are the three pillars of
the United Nations Organisation
which, if Soviet Russia becomes
the fourth, would n to all the
toiling millions of the world an
era of moral and material advance
undreamed of hitherto among
men. There was atime in our
hour of victory when this object
seemed to be within our reach.
Even now, in spite of the clouds
and confusion into which we have
since fallen, ve must not abandon
the supreme hope and design.

To Prevent War
For all these purposes we sup-
port the Rearmament programme
on which the Socialist Government
have embarked. We believe, how-
ever, that far better value could
be got for the immense manpower

and sums of money which are in-
volved. Special sacrifices are re-
quired from us all for the sake of

our survival as free democratic
communities and the prevention of
war,

[Here follows the statement on
Excess Profits Tax printed on Page
One.}

We believe in the necessity for
reducing to the minimum possible
all restrictive practices on both
sides of industry, and we shall re-
ly on a greatly strengthened Mon-
opolies Commission to seek, and
enable Parliament to correct any
operations in restraint of trade,
including cf course in the nation-
alised industries,

I will row mention some other
practical steps we shall take

We shall stop all further na-
tionalisation

The Iron
repealed and the
allowed to
ments

and Steel Act will be
Steel industry
resume its. achieve-

of the war and post-war

comfort of the elderly is a sacrec

ADVOCATE

The Tory Policy Signed TiEY HELD UP ABU

;

;
;

years. To gupervise prices ne)
development we shall revive, if
necessary with et er the
former Iron and Board
the State, the man-|

, and

consumers.
gail and road
be reorganised into
regional groups of workable size.
Private road hauliers will be giv-
en the chance to return to busi- |
ness, and private lorries will no)
longer be crippled by the twenty-
five mile limit.
Coal will remain nationalised
There will be more decentral',>-
and stimulation of local
initiative and loyalties, but wage
negotiations will remain on a

agement,

alised will
purview of the Monopolies’ Com-

strict Parliamentary review of |
their activities.

Efficient—and Human

We seek to create an industrial
system that is not only efficient
but humam The Conservative
Workers’ Charter for Industry wil!
be brought into being as early a*

wherever practicable. The scheme
will be worked out with trad
unions, and employers, and the
laid before Parliament.

There you have a clear plan o
action in this field.

Housing is the first of the socic
services. It is also one of the kev
to increased productivity. Wor«
family life, health and educatio
ere all undermined by over-
crowded homes. Therefore a
Conservative and Unionist Gqv-
ernment will give housing
priority second only to national
defence. Our target remain:
300,006 houses a year. There
should be no reduction in th
number of houses and flats buil.
to let but more freedom must b
given to the private builder. In
property-owning democracy, th
more people who own their home
the better.

In Education and in Health
some of the most crying needs ar.
not being met. For the money now
being spent we will provide better
services and so fulfil the higt
hopes we all held when ve
planned the improvements dur'nt
the war.

eS

|
Drive for More Food |

The whole system of town plan-
ning and development charges
needs drastic overhaul.

We shall review the position oi
pensioners, including war pension-
ers, and see that the hardest needs
are met first. The care ano

trust. Some of them prefer. to 1p-
main at work and there must be
encouragen.ent for them to do 50

To obtain more food practic.
knowledge and business experi-
ence must be released to comb tne
world for greater supplies.

We shall maintain our system o1
guaranteed agricultural prices ana
markets and protect British horti-
culture from foreign dumpers. We
have untilled acres and much
marginal land. Farmers and mer-
chants should work together tc
improve distribution in the inter-
ests of the public.

Subject to the needs of Rearma-
ment, the utmost will be done to
provide better housing, water
supplies, drainage, electricity and
transport in rural areas.

The fishing industry will be
protected from unrestricted foreign
dumping. Every effort will be
made by international agreement
to prevent over-fishing,

Food subsidies cannot be radi-
cally changed in. present circum-
Blances, but later we
simplify the system and by in-
creases in family allowances, tax-
ation changes and other methods,
to ensure that public money is
spent on those who need help and
not, as at present, upon all classes
indiscriminately.

Apart from proposals to help
Britain to stand on her own feet
by increasing productivity, we
must guard the British way of
life, hallowed by centuries of
tradition. We have fought tyrants
at home and abroad to win and
preserve the institutions of con-
stitutional Monarchy and Parlia-
mentary government. From Britain
across the generations our message
has gone forth to all parts of the
globe. However well - meaning
many of the nt Socialist
leaders may be, there is no doubt
that in its complete development

a Socialist State, monopolisin,
proauction, distribution and ex-
change, would ‘fatal to ina-
vidual freedom.’ We look on the
Government as/the servant ana
not as the masters of the people.
Multiplying orders and _ rules
should be reduced, and the whole
system kept under more rigorous
Parliamentary scrutiny. We shall
call an all-Pa conference to
consider proposals for the reform
of the House of Lords.

We shall restore the University
constituencies, ‘which have been
disfranchised trary to the
agreement rea by all three
Parties during the war.

The United lom cannot be
kept in a Whitehall strait-jackei.
The Unionist policy for Scotland;
including the practical steps pro-
posed for effective Scottish control
of Scottish 4ffairs will be vigor-
ously pressed forward.

There will be ajCabinet Minister
charged with the care of Welsh
affairs. :

We shall seek to restore to Local
Government the, confidence and
responsibility it| has lost under
Socialism.

All these and other issues ot
the day can only (be stated briefi
in our Party Manifesto. A muc
fuller account will be given of
them in “Britain Stron and
Free” which will be published in
a few days.

I close with a simple declaration
our faith. The Conservative
and Unionist Party stands not for
any section of the people but for
all. In this spirit, we will do our
utmost to grapple with the in-
creasing difficulties into which our
country has been plunged, }
—L.E.8.!

—————————————



anes tea —aefpce att gg NS

rg ence

of

to| Wasn’t so thick here, and you could see half

SE

THURSDAY, OCTOBER 11, 1551



—and so we went out
bandit-chasing..
By Hernard Wicksteed

TROLAK, Malaya.

WE'VE been what the boys call “jungle
bashing” today. We went out after three
bandits who had held up a bus.

We didn’t find them, but reporter Wick-
steed, from Hampstead, finished the day
about 10]b. lighter than he started. Phew!
It was hot, hard work.

The bus was bumping along a rough) }

jungle track, taking a load of tin miners to
work, when three bandits stepped out on to
the road.

Bandits love stopping buses. They pass the}

hat round among the passengers in aid of|}

bandit funds, and then set the bus on fire.

On this occasion the Indian bus driver, as,
mission and there will also be|bus drivers the world over sometimes do,/§

ignored the signal to stop and put his foot
down instead.
There happened to be a Malay policeman

hanging on to the back of the bus and the

sudden acceleration threw him off into the
road, right among the bandits.

ALL FOURS

He ran so fast his shoes fell off, but he
managed to get away because the bandits
vere a bit surprised at the turn of events
themselves, and the shots they fired at the
fleeing policeman missed.

All this happened about 15 miles from the

of the Royal West Kents and Wicksteed
were standing by.

No. 1 Platoon, plus Wicksteed was ordered
out, and in a few minutes we were dashing

to the scene in trucks. When we got there,|}

naturally the bandits had vanished into the
thick jungle by the roadside.

We were lined up by Lieutenant Karl
Beale, aged 22, whose father grows Cox’s
Orange Pippins in Cranbrook, Kent. Ungat,
the platoon’s pet head-hunter from Borneo,
ran up and down the roadside like a terrier
after a rabbit.

Eventually he found what he was looking
for — a broken twig or some crushed grass
or something, and plunged into the jungle
with the rest of us after him.

It was so thick you could only see the man
ahead of you and the man behind.

At would not have been so bad if we had
been going on the level, but the tracker was
taking us up the side of a hill so steep we
had to go up on all fours.

OH, THE HEAT

Above I could see the boots and occasion-
ally the whole of Private John Morgan, a
National Service boy who used to work in a
gypsum mine at Netherfield, near Battle, in
Sussex.

Below me was Lance-Corporal Ricky Jack-
son. He is not unknown at the Hammersmith
Palais de Danse, but he has also been a Boy
Scout, a King’s Scout in the Isleworth (Mid-
dlesex) troop.

The heat was like the heat of a Turkish
bath, and we had to go on up this blinking,
jungle-covered hill for half an hour, without
a word and without a halt. .

When we got to the top of the hill, we
went down the other side to a swamp. It

a dozen chaps spread out in front and as
many more behind.

grin and the twinkling eyes of Private Don
Bags, the barrow boy from Camden Town,
and the broad back of Private Johnny Stav-
inski, ‘the acrobat temporarily absent on
National Service from the Tovarich Troupe.

I’m not sure the swamp wasn’t worse than
the hill. We were up to our knees in water
half the time. Then it was into the thick
undergrowth again, and up another murder-
ous hill. ,

At last the whisper to halt came back
from the front of the column. The tracker
had found something. It was an ambush
position in which six men had lain not more
than four hours before. |

SILLY PLACE

With the memory of the swamp and those
murderous hills between us and the road, I
thought what a cockeyed place it was for
the bandits to lay an ambush, It seemed
miles from anywhere.

Then I heard an odd noise and, looking)
round a bush, I saw a bus going past. We
had made a complete circle and come back
tothe road almost at the same spot from
which we had started. { Be

The*trucks picked us up, and we got back,
to camp just in time for the weekly film



show. The boys, who looked as if they had,

been for no more than an afternoon: stroll,’
paid 35 cents (or 9d.) for a seat, but the
Borneo headhunter boys got in for nothing.
They love films and their favourite star is,
Bing. |
BORING ?

The newsreel included shots of Ascot, and

the feature was a Western called “Prairie

Pirates.” It rained so hard outside you |

couldn’t hear a thing, and the screen was so
dim you couldn’t see much either.

“Sorry it has been such a boring day,” said
young Beale later, as we crept under our,
mosquito nets, with the rain still pelting
down.

“Not at all,” I said, as I sank on the bed.
“T found it rather unusual.”

' —L.ES.

camp at Trolak, where A for Able Company |}}

You could see the permanent, half-amused os ;





ONLY 4 DAYS OLD!

DAILY TELEGRAPH

on sale at



AND THE BEST
BUYS TOO!!

JAMS
CRYSTALS
PEAS

By Wm. P. HARTLEY Ltd.

NO ADDATIVES — Only FRUIT and SUGAR
@= Obtainable at all Grocers



THE

JAEGER

TRAVEL COATS

from Da Costa's



ORDER THESE

JUST ARRIVED

Apple Puree

Ground Ginger

Stem Ginger

Gelatine

Meltis Candies

Meltis Turkish Delight

WE DELIVER



Jaffa Dates

Pekin Figs

Marsh Mailows

SPECIALS

Dried Fruit Salad
-15e. per pkge.

Apple Puree Fresh Frozen Salmon {
—24e. per tin Red Salmon—in tins

Local Squash—24c. per tb Pilchards—in tins

Limes—1 cent each Sardines—in tins

a er ae ean nemaararterinas Lobster—in tins

SMOKERS’ Crab—in tins |

DELIGHT See

Embassy Cigarettes J & R BREAD with
—in tins of 25 for 53c.

Craven A ANCHOR BUTTER
—in tins of 50 —$1.04
Craven A Is_ Excellent

—in pkgs. of 20—Ale.

GODDARDS





THURSDAY, OCTOBER

2 Meu Get 4 Months
7aol Terms For
Snatching Wallets

EACH of two labourers—Carl
Lucas cf Reed Street, St. Michael
ind George Bur.owes of Delamere
Land, St Michael, was sentenced
yesterd to 4 mons’ imprison-
ment with hard labour by Mr.
. LL. Walwyn Acting Police,
Magistrate of District “A” for
larceny.

Eurrowes was found guilty of
stealing a_ wallet containing $20
from Leo Schedeker a sailor of the
U.S. Navy, while Lucas pleaded
guilty of siealing a wallet valued
$15 and containing $25 the
propeity of Bolbie Phillips a
sailor of the U.S. Navy.

Both sailors told the court that
on October 9, sometime during
the night both men came up
be ind them and snatched their
wallets from their trousers,

Scheeker said that his wallet
vas taken from him while he was
at the New Yok Club, Bay Street.
Phillips was about half way up
the staircase of the Zanzibar Club
going in when he was robbed.

Inspector F. Connell attached
te the Bridge Yost in addressing
t)e court on the charges said that
these robberies were getting very
prevalent especially when ships
of the United States Navy were
in port. Some people then took
the oppo;tunity to give the island
a bad name by robbing un-
suspecting tourists. .

S-ibect Wald:cn—keeper of the
eriminal records — told the court
that Burrowes had one previous



at

conviction for lareeny, when on
May 16, 1950, he was fined 10/-
by His Worship Mr, A, J, H.

Hanschell for stealing tamarinds
the property of the Barbados
General Hospital.

_ Lucas has two previous convic-
tions and on the last conviction—
June 29, 1943—he was sentenced
to 14 days’ imprisonment for
stealing 1/- from Edwin Clarke.

3efore sentencing the defend-
ants Mr. Walwyn said that this
crime of snatching wallets must
be stamped out, therefore he was
going to punish them so that this
pun.shment would act as a
deterrent for those who are likely
to commit a similar offence.



11, 1951

Legisla



Board Of Health
Approve Sale
Of Land

THE Board of Health at a
meeting yesterday approved the
division and sale of 1,880,537
feet in lots at Horse Planta-
tion, St. Joseph by Joes River

Estate Ltd.

Members of the Board also
assented to the dividing for sale
one lot containing 30,560 square
feet of land with a dwelling house
from the lands of Mrs. M.
Richardsen at Kent, Christ Church.

she having divided off and sold

another lot from the. same
property, .

Also approved was the division
and sale at »Albion. » e"

; Lodg
Bartaree; Hill, St, Michael by Mr.
S. P. Archer, qualified executor
to the estate of Winifred E'sie
Arc.er deceased,

Members present at the meeting
were Mr. F. Goddard, Hon'ble
V. C. Gale, Mr. J. M, Kidney, Mr.
4. E. S. Lewis, Dr, F, Grannum,
Dr. E B. Cavter, and Dr, J. @.
O'Mahony.



TWO mote casts of West
Indian currency notes arrived
at Seawell yesterday afternoon
on B.W.1.A's flight 305 from
Trinidad. Accompanying over
the cases wore two of Trini-
dad's Senior Currency Officers,
My, William Olacke and Mr.
W. Vincent Brown. They ex-
pect to return to Trinidad to-
morrow and will be ti
with them a quantity id
cancelled Trinidad and Tobago
notes.

—_— -—-—___ |

SHOPKEEPERS’ MEETING

In the report of the Shopkeepers’
Urion Meeting appearing recently in this
Peper mention was mace of a speech by
Mr. E. Atherley. The speaker was not
Mr. E. G. Atherley of Ather'ey Bros.
1 Speightstowns.



Preparations For Incom<
Survey Complete
The preparations for the first Survey of income and Ex-

penditure, which is being carried out in Barbados by the
Institute of Social and Economic Research of the University

College of the West Indies,

are now complete, Mr. Ken

Straw, a member of the Institute who is carrying out the
survey told the Advocate yesterday,
The interviewing of householders in the selected areas he

said will begin on Monday,

sample of households has
been taken according to rigid
scientific and statistical methods.
The process adopted of taking a
random sample means that in-
formation gathered from th@sam-
ple households can be used to

represent the. facets which would
have been obtained if all the
households in the particular
Parishes selected had been inter-
viewed,

Chance

It is purely a matter of chance
which particular households con-
stitute the sample. Those taking
the sample have no idea at all
before carrying out the statistical

calculations whieh households’
will be selected. The information
about any one household is of
interest only in so far as it forms
one of the 800 in the sample.

When the totals of all the house-
holds are added up the statistical
tabulation and analysis is carried
out. This provides broad averages
covering the whole 800 house-
holds, and it is these broad aver-
ages which are of particular
significance and interest.

“The survey will be carried out
in four areas of the island —
Bridgetown, St. Michael, St. Lucy
and St. George—St. John.”

“Out of the 120 school teachers
from all over Barbados who vol-
unteered to act as interviewers,
forty’ have been selected from



October 15th,

areas where the survey is to take
place. A questionnaire has been
prepared, -based on local condi-
tions and on experiefce gained
from similar surveys. in other
parts of the world.”

“The information asked for is M

required by the Institute in
Jamaica for Research purposes; it
is needed for educational pur-
poses in the University College
of the West Indies and in Barba-
dos. The broad averages which,
emerge may also be used to form
the basis of a new Cost of Living
Index in Barbados in accordance
with the Report of the Cost of
Living Index Committee.”

Public Support

“If the Survey is to be a suc-
cess, wide public support is
essential. The information sup-
plied by householders will be
treated as strictly confidential by
the University Research Institute.
The only figures which will be
published or used for Cost of
Living Index calculations will be
broad averages; Thus the position
of any individual householder
will not be. disclosed by the
figures.” ed,

“It is hoped that those house-
holders who constitute the sample
will willingly co-operate with
the teachers who have volunteered
to act as interviewers and who
have a difficult task to perform.”

BARBADOS ADVOCATE



Housing Encouraged

By Chamber

Of Commerce

MR. D. G. LEACOCK, President of the Chamber of Com-
merce, at yesterday's Council meeting, expressed the grati-
tude of the Chamber for the interest which the Colonial
Secretary had taken in getting the Legislature to provide
the necessary funds to be expended at the British Industries

Fair in 1952.

He said that the Chamber owed a considerable debt to the
Colonial Secretary who on his own initiative in the Execu-
tive Committee had got Government to put up this money.

The Chamber was discussing a
letter from the Colonial Secretary
which stated that in view of the
fact that sufficient funds had been
made available by the Legislature
for a ‘stand at the 1952 B.LF.,
whether the Chamber would un-
dertake to supe!y and forward the
ne essary exhibits for the booth.

After some discussion, the Clerk
was instructed

to reply saying
that the Chamber and/or interest-
ed parties would be pleased to
co-operate with Government by

supplying and forwarding exhioits
for the Barbados stand,
Advertisement

Mr. A. ceL. (an ss said that the
colonial Se-retary bad made the
point during his soeech in the
Legislative Council om Tuesday
that it would be useful to adver-
lise Barbados Fancy Molasses at
the British Industries Fair, but a
member closely connected with
the Canning Molasses trade, had,
al a recent meeting of the Cham-
ber. pointed out that on account
of restrictions, very little canned
molasses could be sold in the
United Kingdom. He (Mr. Inniss)
fclt that this poi should be
rr sl “> aticntion o: the
proper aucicriies.

on'ble K. R. Hunte said that
he had seen Mr. Healy, an official
of the Ministry of Food in the
U.K. while he was in Barbados,
Mr. Healy had said that restric-
tions were imposed on account of
the similarity between Fancy
Molasses and Treacle.

He had drawn to Mr, Healy's
attention that Barbados Fancy
Molasses was clearly branded on
each container. .

After further discussion, it was
decided that the local Canning
Company through the Barbados
Government, should make repre-
sentations to the British Ministry
of Food against restriction on the
importation of Barbados Fancy
Molasses into the U.K.

Hon. K. R. Hunte who is an
exporter of canned Fancy Mo-
lasses, promised to assist in the
drafting of this letter to be for-
warded to the British Ministry of
Food.

Tourism Observer

Another letter dealt with by the
Chamber was the reply from the
Colonial Secretary to a letter from
the Chamber of Commerce pro-
testing against the seection of Mr.
Cox, M.C.P., as the local
observer at the confgrence on
Tourism which took pl:‘}e recent-
ly in the Dominican Republic.

The Colonial Secretary in reply
said that the contents of their
letter would be brought to the
notice of the Governor-in-Execu-
tive Committee.

He added that the main purpose
of the Conference was to discuss
the establishment of the proposed
Caribbean Tourist Development
Association, and that the Barbados
Government must decide whether
or not the benefits which would
accrue to Barbados from member-
ship of this Association, in the
event of its being formed, justify
the by no means _ inconsiderable
annual contribution (believed to
be in the region of $13,000) which
it would be required to make,
bearing in mind the present an-
nual contribution $32,290 which is
made to the Barbados Publicity
Committee.

Since the decision whether or
not to request the Legislature. to.
provide funds for this purpose rest
with the Governor-in-Executive
Committee, ‘t was concluded that
the most appropriate observer that
could be sent on that occasion



tT

would be the House Member of
the Governor-in-Executive Com-
mittee in charge of Trade and
Commerce.

Housing

A letier from the Colonial
Secretary's Office to the Chamber
of Commerce yesterday informed
them that the British West Indies
Housing Conference which was

convened by the Comptroller for.

Development and Welfare in June
last, recommended that Govern-
ments should encourage private
enterprise building for’ the mid-
dle income groups.

The letter went on to state that
there was a report of the sub-
committee cppointed by the Con-
ference to report on Administra-
tion, Housing Finance, Rents,
Managements, ete.

That Sub-Committee suggested
that in connection with the pro-
vision of housing for the middle
income groups, the time had come
when private employers might
with advantage to all concerned,
give attention to the question of
assisting permanent members of
their staffs to acquire homes,

The exhortation to employers
to assist this class of worker was
made in the knowledge that it
was. very unlikely that Govern-
ments would be able to find the
necessary Money to build houses
for rental or sale to the middle
income groups.

Unattractive Investment
_. The report further stated that
it was well known that the high
cost of enterprise Was making
building construction by private
enterprise for the purpose of let-
ting, an unattractive field of
investment.

The Committee were unable
at the moment to suggest any
particular form of assistance,
but strongly recommended that
schemes of that nature be given
every possible encouragement by

Clerk to reply informing them

that the Chamber agreed that

middle class housing should be
encouraged. ‘

Arising out of the Minutes, the
President said that several mem-
bers of the Chamber had met. Mr.
Cc. J. Burgess, Executive Secretary
(Economies) of the Caribbean
Commission who visited here re-
cently to obtain information :for
the forthcoming Conference of
the Caribbean Commission,

He said that the members dis-
cussed with Mr. Burgess industrial
und labour problems and the latter
pointed out that he had got all the
necessary statisti¢s he had required
from the Government end omy
wished to obtain the general views
of the Chamber of Commerce.

Another matter arising out of
the minutes was an interview the
President had with the local
Manager of B.W.ILA., Mr. Percy
Taylor in connection with the in-
adequate service provided by hi¢
air line.

Mr. Taylor said that it was not a
matter for which he was respon-
sible. He therefore asked for ex-
tracts of the meeting at which the
matter had been discussed. These
had been supplied him and he had
in turn forwarded them to his
heedouarters in Trinidad for their
comments,

The Chamber decided to hola +
Muncheon instead of. Jre Annis!
Tiinher “provided there was cuf-
ficient resnonse fram mambhore



NATURAL GAS RELEASED TO PUBLIC

At mid-night last night Natural
Gas was turned into all the Gas

Company’s mains. Asking the
Manager of the Company, Mr.
Young, why mid-night was chosen
for turning on the gas, he told the

Advocate this was done in order
to give the old gas in the pipe
line an opportunity to be expelled
by morning.

In* reply to a query as to
whether it was safe to use the
new gas if the jets were not
changed, the Manager gave -the

was quite safe
gas on Cookers
had not been

assurance that /it
to use the new
where the

i 2 Burner

jets

The stove with

Sires i ae a as a es

WICKS No. 200 44c. No. 21 $1.00



| CAVE, SHEPHERD & 60. LTD.

OVENS
|
|

10, If,

It's delicious!

VALOR





changed provided a_ certain
amount of care was taken in reg-
ulating the flame down to a suit-
able size, as the increased pres-
sure and quality of gas would
naturally cause a longer flame at
the burners not adjusted to suit
the Natural Gas.

The Company is. changing and
regulating each and every burner
on all of their customers’ appli-
ances in order to give greater
efficiency and economy in its use,

New Thermal Rates
When asked what would be the
difference to customers with the
Natural Gas and the new Ther-



It's cooked

a reputation for good

cooking. We have the fallowing models:
TABLE MODEL
with stands $25.21 & $17.50

SHINS BM OR sic ining stannic papers ecrvn vedas aD

No, 300 80c.

12 & 13 Broad Street.





mal rate, the Manager — said:
“Theoretically our customers
should use half the quantity of
gas they have been previously
using, but the Company is hoping
that with this knowledge custom-
ers will take advantage of the
increased heating value and use
more gas which will also be to
their advantage as the Schedule
of Rates is so adapted to’ make
the gas cheaper the greater the
quantity used.” He also said that
the past system of charging meter
rental has been abolished with
this new Schedule of Rates.

He added: “By the amendment
to the Gas Company’s Act, the

on a





dividend of 74% is tied to the
average basic price of 40c. per
therm and before the Company
can: increase their dividend they
must first 1educe the price of gas
to the public, therefore, it is to
the advantage of the Company to
sell the Gas as cheafam as possi-
ble.

“During the past 4 years they
have been carrying on at a loss
and without paying any dividend
to Sharcholders — by this they
have earned the gratitude of their

* customers and deserve the co+
operation of the Publie in this
venture.”










THE NEWS



THE “Barbados Advocate” was promptly on board the U.S. warships

yesterday and here this newspaper

vendor is the centre of attraction,

as the eager sailors look for the news.

UNITED STATES NAVY
ENJOY SHORE LEAVE

CHARLIE CAMPBELL of Virginia, U.S.A., a member o
L.S.T. 525, one of the U.S.A. Naval vessels at present

port, likes photography. He

can appreciate scenery. ‘Tha

is why Charlie brought along his Speed Graphic came:
when he came ashore yesterday. He intends to take a:

many pictures of Barbados

as possible and, says Charlic

“Sometimes you are likely to get some of the best picturs

along the City streets.”

When the Advocate reporter
saw Charlie he was picking out
likely spots to take along Sw.un
Street and Busbey’s Alley. He has
alréady visited Puerto Rico and
St. Thomas, but this is his first
trip to Barbados.

He told the Advacate, “We are
going to write a book about the
ship and the various places we
visited. Some of my photos will
be published in this book”.

Accompanying Charlie were Joe
Medinas and Frank Wever. They
are not photographers, but they
liked watching Charlie taking
snaps.

Charlie was not the only photo-
grapher “in white”
City yesterday.
sailors took pictures, but their
cameras were smaller than
Charlie's. According to one of
Charlie’s friends, “This bud goes
in for photography in a big way”.

Radio Transmission

The U.S. Navy Special Police
had their Headquarters at the

Many _ other

Central Police Station, An office.

Was provided for the Officers in
charge while the radio transmit-
ting and receiving set was placed
in the yard, This set was in con-
tact with the U.S.S. Alshain, in
the harbour, and a jeep and truck
which patrolled the City

Four Officers, three Chief
Officers and 21 enlisted men were
attached to the Special Police
Up to 3 o'clock yesterday eve-
ning they received no reports of
thefts or bad behaviour, On the
frevious day the other S.P. shift
received two reports of thefts.

There was officially no. sight-
seeing for Special Police Staff
Today they will be free and it will
be their turn to look around the

island.
Also on the S.P. Staff are two
Hospital Orderlies, One goes

around in the truck with first aid
equipment. In case of an accident
the radio will contact the truck

PURINA

H. Jason Jones &

i


























AND SO
hy ANNE

of wisdom,

wealthy,

This is the
admits that v

Se ous, in the

get exhausted,

thing that strike
career is marriz
marriage to a
gratifying your
who always‘ ha:

You
sooner

may as
than la



around the A

FOR BEST
USE

IN THE CHECKER BOARD BAGS



*, and

Work is bad for
posture, and digestion. It is ruin-
long
personality. The
gent girl can abandon work, the
better for her it

There is a higher career, There
is one career in which 30%

ter,
this book carefully, and give heed |

we have it at

and he will be immediately take.
i» the scene, The other order!
iorréims at Headquarters.



Inquest Adjourned

FURTHER hearing
inquest touching the
Eugene Edwards was
yesterday by Mr. C,
Acting Coroner of
until November 2.

Edwards died suddenly at hi
home at Coilymore Rock in th
early hours of Tuesday morning
October 9. His body was removed
to the Public Mortuary where Di
. §&. Cato performed a_ pos
mortem Examination.

Clarrisa Edwards a 45-year-old
domestic and wife of the decease
told the court that her husband
went to bed on October 8 at 8.15
p.m. He awoke about 11.50 p.m.
the same night saying that he was
suffocating and she opened the
windows of the house, This did not
change his condition.
aa peak eye ae i rome a
é died shortly after
pes a a

To the jury Clarrisa Edwards
sald that her husband used to
drink heavily and they used to
quarrel over his drinking.

At the Mortuary she identifies
his body to Dr A. 8S, Cato,

At the next hearing Dr,

in th
death ot
adjourne
L. Walwy
District “A

A. S

“ato and the Government Analyst}

will give their evidence.

.

Car, Bus Collide
THE bus M-1301 of the Liberty
Motor "Bus Co, which was being
driven by Stanley Dash of Bibby’
Lane, St, Michael, and the ca
M-759, owned and driven by Mil
ton Kayley of Villa Road, Brit-
ton’s Hill, were both extensively
damaged yesterday evening, whe»
they came into a collision o
Britton’s Cross Road. The acci-

dent oceurred about 3.30 o'clock.

RESULTS

CHOWS

Co,, Ltd—Distributors

TO WED
HWALLIOL

Some girls struggle,
Some girls stagnate,
Others are smaft

And marry a Magnate.

Taking her cue from these words
Anne
every Good Gir
sobe:
bachelor for he;
lead him gently
the gift-lined po'h to the alter.
This book is diferent from every
other vocations
fuss
pork

Balliol tells
1 how to choose a
generou>
boss and how to
but firmly along

guide for girls.
manual which

is debasing,
a woman's figure,

run, to her
sooner an intelli-

will be.

never

never get wut of

bed one moment before you please,
and never lack money to buy any-
5 your fancy. The

ve. But it must be
an who enjoys
very whim, and





s the funds neces-
sary for this good purpose.

him
read

have
you

well
If

to its lessons, you surely will.

St. Joseph Column:

ture Thanked For B.LF. Stall.

Help For Middle Class



FILM SHOW

A large crowd attended a filn
show by the British Council uni
at the St. Joseph Girls’ School,
Horse Hill on Tuesday evening.
After the show the Rev. L. C.
Mallalieu, Rector of St. Joseph,

moved a vote of thanks. The show

Classes in joinery have been
tarted at the St. Joseph Boys’
School.

|

|

1

I

asted a little over an hour.

3,551 persons have registered
© go to the polls on general elec-
ion day to choose representatives
or St. Joseph.

People go to the St. Joseph
%ost Office daily for instructions

is to their polling stations

Ovening
Speed



Shorthand Results

OF THE students of the
ombermere Centre of the
Institute who sat the
Examinations of the
itman’s Shorthand Institute in

12

uly this year, the following have
M

heen

successful: Misses M -
Massiah 60 and 70 words. V. M.

Spencer, 60 and 70 words; M. K.

Darnett,

I
(

60 and 70 words; W
ilgrim, 60 and 70 words; E. D.
‘urwin, 60 and 70 words; S, J
ones, 50 and 70 words; J. Clarke
0 words; A. Smith, 60 words; and

J, Wiggins, 60 words.

;








4

at night



DRUG STORES

Made in England by THOMAS KERFOOT

oo

WHAT
A

GENUINE

GAR

}
i
'



AP
INHALANT

BREATHE... the antiseptic vapour from *
your handkerchief by day or from your pillow

. or use the
VAPEX INHALER
— handy for daytime
Easily recharged from
standard bottle.

Gn Sale at KNIGHT'S

PLL LCL LL LL OEE

BARGAIN!!!

DUNLOP



PAGE FIVE

fe.

Oy
OMbLlity

.
7
‘

RIGHT NUN,




By choosing

» *LIGHTNING*







you can

for the name
the shider oy

‘Lightning
are manti/@ tured

UNITED

T. GEDDES GRANT UTP .
e Agents.

0+

sure of getting
@ strong. smoot*
flexible and -

above ali
reliable si'te
fastener. Look

fasten

LIGHTNING FASTEN: 2°

A wairenbary ¢ »
Imperial Chemica Vagus
Lim, led)

a nme geen

Sandwiches are delicious



For health and flavour the 1 yeh
‘spread’ is Marmite, which gives
that ‘extra something’ to a wide
variety of Sandwiches. Marmite
contains Vitamin B which helps
youngsters to thrive and build up
resistance to disease. You'll like
the flavour in Stews, Sauces,
Gravies and all Savoury dishes too.

In jars: loz., 2 oz.,

4oz., Boz, I6oz.

The Food for
FAMILY. FITNESS

& co. LTD.

RUBBER

4 inch

DEN

| HOSE

ALOE

4

Bay Street —

S64
VO?

4,4,4,6454

FLEA PISS PEE SOD

44,4 +6 % 6.665%
ACO OC SSO OOOO 4.6606

at 17e. a foot

ECKSTEIN BROS.



Phone 4269

POPP FOE SS







MI

“AG LPPLPLLPPLPPBLABLLCPPPPBPP®DPDPLPRBOLDPDL LBL LPL

*
LOGOS.



PAGE SIX BARBADOS



BY CARL ANDERSON

~
BX } A
[WONDER WHAT BRIANS BEEN ¥ 70 ROU Aw 7
m \ d b , na f C|
y MS oF Sa ] s é ) > Scat» Sgt 4 evay

HENRY



- We' RE
aes RELBAS! NG YOu FoR
LACK OF EVIDENCE! BuT iF bd de oF

UP TO WHILE I WAS INTHE

————4{ THANKS, OFFICER!
Treks WON f
1

EGRE





[WE MASKED MAN? HE AND MY
HUSBAND WENT TO THE arse)

TW
tS RETURNING AND BRINGING . f
ee | WAREHOUSE . °

SOMEONE WITH HIM!

ID ENJOY A DIP.IN THE
BOUGHT MESELFE

“A BATHIN’ SUIT-1 WONDER

HOW VEL LOOK- Rate os



THEY COME / OW THAT THE
RIFLES ARE READY TO DARKEN THE
SEA WITH THE BLOOD OF THE fitpeaa
OFFENDERS / AVO,/ THIS

\ 4 IT LEAP TO /

OBEY / WE GHALL
GIVE THEM WARM

GREETING a

TABRIZ ISN1 GITTING
EXPOSED ON THAT ROCK FOR
A GUN TAN ' GOMESMING'S
FIGHY . LET'S POA SLOW
d CAGE 08 ¢






ROCK WOBBLES
PRECARIOUSLY /



THE PHANTC"4 BY LEE FALK & RAY MOORES

“3 THE MAIN JOBS DONE. (LL HANDLE
NOW THAT TWESPIRT WAG HAS 5 RETURNED Line! agg (MSURE THE WITCH DOCTOR,

TOMS REAL GHA
NNER OnVES, ANY-
* a
¢ 5

THE TGER BE HILEDS ely

TIME. WALKS










a a rr rr eects





|
A WORD OF ADVICE EEFORE) : a BE i
\ LEAVE. DON'T TRY IT DED BY
AGAIN. IT MIGHT NOT Your WIgbOM, }
WORK ASECOND 4 O GHOST WHO

S ~
LLL LAPPCELLELLELSLELAPLLLEEEESES SLD BEDEGPERSD VP ELLDVPLIVLAPADP APP AARP

THURSDAY, OCTOBER 11, 1951
———$—$—_$—$—$—$—$———— NT

is PURE,
SAFE MILK





\ Feet in Preference the World Over

pr. 1990 Hardin Co. Difernat'l Copr, Reserved











apumee good looks tell you they*re fust right.
You know, too, when you look at the price
tag, that you can’t get finer value. Illustrated
is a Tan Oxford shoe for Boys and Youths.
Tied to every pair is the John White Guaran-
tee Shield—the eign which means ‘ just right "J
Look for it in leading stores in Barbados.

JOHN WHITE»

means made just night



sO SS

IT PAYS ¥ YOu TO DEAL “HERE

SPECIAL offers to all Cash and Credit Customers for Thursday to Saturday only







USUALLY NOW USUALLY NOW {

26 20
31

Bottles Gordons Gin. 250.230

Tins Evaporated Milk 29 27 _~ Bottles O’Keefes Beer

24 22 28




Tins Grape Fruit Juice Tins Heinz Soup

Pkgs. Lux Flakes (Large) AW

D. V. SCOTT & Co. Ltd. Broad Street

50









{
2$9$55565559659 SSSSSOSSOS PISS SPF POOOOVOPO OPIS PPPPP POP PP POO SOES
%
&
%
:
o
a
»



‘caaeemeial



NEXT WEEK FLOUR
WILL BE BOUGHT
FOR NOVEMBER,
DECEMBER

PREECE SVE PED OOPS FRAG ESF

OCP LPPECCEL SCPE LSLOPLL PPLE EAP

-

— LCOS EEA CFSE

everaaeet

-



:
KNOWING YOU HAVE MANY x
TIMES BEEN DISAPPOINTED §
BY RECEIVING INFERIOR ‘
FLOURS, WHY NOT ASK YOUR
SUPPLIER TO GET THE BEST ‘
AT NO EXTRA COST! <

“LIBERTY BELL”

AND



Tia se) | | “CANADIAN QUEEN”

Lae :

1 ay 2 Lm h ZZ 4 . fe ;

S Ser we a : HIGHEST QUALITY BAKERS FLOUR

4 y UL 1} | mh nck fan ee a

' er di NE amen ROSE NER TL) ROBERT THOM. LTD.—Azents

FRG OOOO OOOO GOGO FOOOSSOSSOOSSSSOME POCO CSS
{ ‘



THURSDAY, OCTOBER 11, 1951

CLASSIFIED ADS.

TELEPHONE 2508.

FOR

Minimum



The charge for announcements of
Births, Marriages, Deaths, Acknowl-
edgements, and *n Memoriam notices is
61 50 on week-days and $1.80 on Sundays
for any mumber oa! words up to 50, and
3 cents per word on week-days and
4 cents per word cn Sundays for each
additienal word.

DIED |

ALLEYNE: On October 10, 1951, Aimey
Louise, wife of F. G. Alla me, Head-
master of St. Philip's Boys’ School.
Her funeral leaves her late residence
Chureh Village, St Philip, at 4.45
p.m. today for St. Philip’s Church

SALE

charge week 72 cents and
96 cents Su™duyps M worus — over 24
words 3 cents a word werk—4 cents a
word on Sundays







AUTOMOTIVE J

CAR—Morris Minor Convertible 1950.
One owner. Under 7,000 miles. Perfect
running order. Newly sprayed. First firm
offer (subject to approval on pur-
chaser’s inspection and trial) will secure.
Car now in St. Lucia but will be avail-











F. G. Alleyne (Widower), A
“ Maynes (Daughter), L. Mascoll
iNiece), C. Haynes (Son-in-law)
P. Haynes tGrandson)
11.10.51



FRANCO: Audrey Agnes. On Sunday
Cetober 7th 1951 at “Berford’, Max-
well Coast, Ch. Ch., daughter of
Mrs. Agnes Franco. Funeral took
place on Sunday afternoon at Christ
Church Parish Church

11.10.51





SEALY — On Wednesday 10th October,
1951, Edith Murphy Sealy, (late of
Pine Road, B'ville.) The funeral
leaves her daughter's residence, Mrs,
Arthur Chadderton’s, Glendover Court,
Maxwell Coast, Christ Church, at 4
o'clock this evening for the .Westbury
Cemetery. Friends are invited.

Meta Chadderton (daughter), Arthur
Chadderton (son-in-law), Gilbert
il (Nephew).

11.10.51.

PERSONAL

The public are hereby warned against
giving credit to my wife, LILIAN YEAR-
WOOD (nee Sylvester) as I do not hold
myself, responsible for her or anyone
else contfacting any debt or debts in
my name unless by a written order
signed by me, :

WILLIAM H. YEARWOOD,
Park Road, Bush Hall,
8. Michael.
10.10. 51—2n.







ANNOUNCEMENTS



To meet numerous requests of our
customers, we have opened a_ section
for custom made shirts, pyjamas, pants,
shorts, ladies slacks, boys clothing etc.
Having at our disposal the facilities of a
modern factory we are able to offer
prompt services at exceptionally reason-
able prices,

Reliance Shirt Factory, Shirt Depot.
Paimetto Street. Phone 4764.

10.10, 51—19n.

BROKEN DENTAL PLATES skilfully
repaired while yott wait. Square Deal
Denture Repair Service. Removed from
Magazine Lane to Upper Reed Street.

7.10.51—5n.

TAKE NOTICE
JEPP

That RECKITT & COLMAN LIMITED,
a_ British Limited Liability Company,
Manufacturers, of Kingston Works, Dan-
som Lane, Hull, England, has applied
for the registration of a trade mark in|
Pa.. “A” of Register in respect of
pharmaceutical and medicinal prepara-
tions, and will be entitled to register
the same after one month from the 9th
day of October 1951 unless some person
shall in the meantime give notice in
cuplicate to me at my office of opposition
of such registration, The trade mark can
be seen on application at my office.

Dated this 26th day of September 1951.

H. WILLIAMS,
Registrar of Trade Marks.
9.10,51—3n





























ya
MUSCLE PAINS

May mean kidney trouble

A function of the kidneys is to
eliminate harmful impurities from
the system, If the kidneys grow
sluggish, these impurities accum-
ulate settle and often become
a cause of pain in joints and
muscles. The way to tackle the
trouble is to help the kidneys.

should be toned up with
De Witt’s ee ae medicine
made specially for this pu: .
De Witt’s Pills have a soothing,
cleansing and antiseptic action on
the kidneys thatâ„¢brings them
back to pepers ay gee
function properly. This well-
tried medians ia sold all over
the world and we have many
letters from sufferers telling
of relief gained, after years
of suffering, by i
Witt’s Pills. Try them
for your trouble, Go to
your chemist and
geta supply
tora;











SS







GUARANTEE

De Witt’s Pills are —
manufactured under strictly hygienic
conditions and the in ts con-

form to rigid standards of purity.

Va Tee ge

Ta GTO ae ites Troubles,
: ‘\





_—
,



SPECIAL NOTICE

TO ALL GAS CONSUMERS



Natural Gas was turned into the
Company's pipe lines on Wed-
nesdsjy 10th October at midnight.
You are warned not to use the
tings on which the jets HAVE

| NOT been changed AFTER the
+ turning on of the New Gas until
| the Company's Fitters have called
}



ORIENTAL
SOUVENIRS

Gifts, Curios, Jewels





THANTS
Pr. Wm. Bry, St. :: Dial 3466

Pe
TO-DAY'S NEWS ) FLASH

WINSTON CHURCHILL—
THE SECOND WORLD
WAR — Volunie IV
THE HINGE OF FATE

At Johnson’s Stationery









CARPENTER RULES
At
At Johnson’s Hardware














; Permanent.















i



able Barbados about October 9th. Cash
offers only. Reply Box No. B.B. C/o
| Advocate Co. 7.10.51—4n



CARS: 1950 Hillman Saloon in excel-
Jent condition only 10,000 miles. Austin
A-70 first class condition, 13,500 miles.
Standard Vanguard in good order 18,000
miles. 11.10.51—4n

CAR-—-One di) 1946 Plymouth Car .in
perfect condition. Tyres new. Apply:
Cosmopolitan Garage, Magazine Lane.
Phone 3915. 9.10.51—5n.

CAR—One (1) Ford ~ Prefect. For
further particulars Phone 4231. H, A.
Cuke, Jnr. Bovell & Skeete

10.10,.51—t.f.n.







ELECTRICAL

“CLIMAX” ELECTRIC WASHING
MACHINES.—A small shipment of these
just received from Canada and at our
price of $247.12 represents outstanding







FOR RENT
HOUSES

—_—_—_—_—
SANDY HOOK-—By the sea, furnished;
six months from October 15th Tel. 8131
9.10. 51—2n

PUBLIC SALES

Ten cents per agate line on week-day:
and 12 cents per agate line on Sundays,
charge $1.50 on week-day:
and $1.80 on Sundava.





REAL ESTATE

__
HOUSES—At Rockley, prices from
£3,500 to £8,000. Also houses at Navy
Gardens, Dayrells Road, Pine Hill and
City, Also House Spots at Maxwell.
Por particulars about building, selling
or buying Phone B. A. Brooks at 8335
Please leave Phone Number or Address
and I will contact you.

9.10.51—7n



|
nat nentacenitie nceeeadeitlar teen
Offers in writing are invited for the
purchase and removal of a dwelling
house known as “Wakefield” aback of
the Y.M.C.A. Headquarters, Pinfold
Street.
} Offers will be accepted up to and
including 15th inst. The purchaser will
be required to take down and remove
the Dweliing House from the premises
by noon 10th November 1951. Inspection
ania.
Signed BOARD OF DIRECTORS,
Y.M.C.A.,
Per HERBERT WILLIAMS,
General Secretary.
9.10. 51—én

—_—_—_—————
Offers will be received in writing up
to 4 p.m. on Wednesday, 17th Octr

value. Dial—3878 or 4710. DA COSTA &I 1951, by Courtesy Garage, White Park

Co,, Ltd. Electrical Department.
5.10.51—6n.



PADIOGRAM-—G.E.C. Radiogram Desk
console model $250.00. Timpson, Lodge
School. Ring 95-283 before 9 a.m.

11.10, 51—4n



MECHANICAL

SINGER SEWING MACHINE almost
new and Mahogany Furni'



10.10.51—2n



MISCELLANEOUS

COCOANUT PLANTS—Selected cocoa-
nut plants. Apply: Niagara Factory,
Spry Street. Dial 4322,

9.10.51—3n.

——— ———
GOOD CUT-OPEN MBLLO-KREEN—
5 lb. tins 3/- per doz. Also old card-
board boxes 1/6 per doz. Call at Roberts

Manufacturing Co., Bay Street
10.10. 51—8n,





WANTED







MISCELLANEOUS

—
CAR: Small Car, preferably from pri-

early October.
details and
No. A.A.

Cash, Please give full
lowest price. Reply: Box

c/o Advocate Co.

7.10.51—3n





SMALL HOUSE preferably unfurnished
wanted by English couple. No children
Good locality. Write Box
H. H. C/o Advocate Co, Ltd.

10.10, 51—2n.



PUBLIC NOTICES

Ten cents per agate line on week-days
and 12 cents per agate line on Sundays,
minimum charge $1.50 on week-day:
and $1.80 on Sundays.

NOTICE
This is to inform my patients and the
public that my Dental Office is now
jJocated at Marhill Street over the
Sanitary Laundry Depot.
S. HUNT, D.D.S.
9.10.51—4n.

NOTICE
IS HEREBY GIVEN that it is the in-
tertion of the Commissioners of High-
ways for the parish of SAINT JAMES
in this Island to cause to be introduced
into the Legislature of this Island a
Bill authorising them to increase the
salary payable to the Inspector of High-
ways for the said parish to a sum not
exceeding £500 per annum, and the
travelling allowance dayable to the said
Inspector of Highways to a sum not
exceeding £100. per annum, such in-
creases to take”vffect as from the Ist
day of April 1951.
Dated the 6th day of October 1951.
YEARWOOD & BOYCE,
Solicitors for the Commissioners of
Highways, Saint James.
9.10.51—3n.









NOTICE

The Estate of
MARGARET ANN JONES,
deceased,

NOTICE IS HEREBY GIVEN that all
persons having any debt or claim against
the Estate of Margaret Ann Jones who
died in this Island on the 29th day of
October, 1950 are hereby required to
send particulars of their claims duly at-
tested to the undersigned. in care of
Messrs. Cottle, Catford & Co., 17,
High Street, Bridgetown, Solicitors, on
or before the 30th day of November,
1951, after which date we shall proceed
to distribute the assets of the deceased
among the parties entitled thereto hav-
ing regard only to such claims as we
shall then have had notice of, and we
will not be liable for the assets or any
part thereof so distributey to any persbn
of whose debt or claim we shall not have
had notice.

And all persons indebted to the said
estate are requested to settle their in-
debtedness without delay.

Dated this 27th day of September, 1951.
VIOLET VERONA JONES,
PRINCESS LOUISE JONES.

Executors of the Will of
Margaret Ann Jones, decd.
O.A.F.



THE ASSOCIATED BOARD OF THE
ROYAL SCHOOL OF MUSIC

NOTICE

The Board begs to notify the teachers
that the Theory exam will take place
at the Ursuline Convent on Saturday,
November Urd 1971, at 9.45. All forms
and fees must be in by Cetober 20th. ,

A. TNN.3S,
Ayehford
11.10.53—1n

LOST & FOUND





LOST

RACE TICKET BOOKS in James
Street. Series W.8350-—59. Series W.8300
—69. Finder will be rewarded on
returning to Fitzgerald Alleyne, Martin-
dale’s Road 11,10. 51—1n.
a

WATCH-—-One Lady's Alton Watch
between the Bus Stand, Probyn Stre.t
and Broad Street. Finder rewarded on
returning; Abbeville Guest House.
11.10. 51—1n

Prospect,

|

|

A
Estate Agents,
THE FIRM W
"Phone 4640



”.

Real










ture, Phone] at 2 p.m.

vate owner. Must be available, delivery | Garage,

CAMBRAI

Large 2-storey stone house of good sound construction,
located on over a % acre of coast land with 160 ft. of sea
frontage. First class sandy beach. Large living rooms, 4 bed- |
rooms on the upper floor with similar accommodation below on
ground floor. In our opinion this property would be eminently
suitable for conversion into a Guest House. Low figure required.

JOHN M4. BLADON & Co.

Auctioneers & Building Surveyors
ITH THE



Road, for one (1) 197 Vauxhall 14
h.p. saloon damaged by Fire. Car can
be seen at Courtesy Garage

11.10. 51—6n



AUCTION

———

Bi; ORDER OF THE. INSURANCE COY

& will sell at CHELSEA GARAGE,

PINFOLD STREET ON FRIDAY 12th

one (1) Standard 12 h.p.
Sedan Car. Damaged. Terms Cash.
R. ARCHER McKENZIE,

Auctioneer,

EREneneyenreeneeeee

By public competition at the Office of

the undersigned on Friday 12th Octobor
1951, at 2 p.m,

70 Barbados Fire Insurance Co

Shares
G. L. W. ‘CLARKE & CO.,
James Street
10.10,51—3n,

UNDER THE IVORY HAMMER

By instructions received from the
Insurance Co, I will sell on Friday
October 12th at the Courtesy Garage,
Whitepark Road; (1)

Lad









& H.P. new brand tyres (damaged in
accident). Sale at 2 p.m. Terms cash
VINCENT GRIFFITH,
Auctioneer,
7.10.51—4n
On FRIDAY at 2.30 p.m. at Chelsea
Pinfold Street, One 14 h.pa

Sedan Car recently overhauled, in good
working condition. 1937 V-8 Ford Car
in good working order—would make
good pick-up.
R. ARCHER McKENZIE
Auctioneer,
7.10.51—5n

TAKE NOTICE



ELSIE

That THE BORDEN COMPANY, a cor-
poration organized and existing under the
laws of the State of New Jersey, United

States of America, whose trade or
business address is 350 Madison Avenue,
New York, New York, United States of
America, has applied for the registra-
tion of a trade mark in Part “A” of
Register in respect. of substances used
as foods and as ingredients in foods;
infants’ and invalids’ foods, and will be
entitled to register the same after one
month from the 9th day of October
1951 unless some person shall in the
meantime give notice in duplicate to me
at my office of opposition of such regis-
tration, The trade mark can be seen on
application at my office,
Dated this 26th day of September, 1951,
H, WILLIAMS,
Registrar of Trade Marks.
9.10.51—3n



TAKE NOTICE
DRYCO

That THE BORDEN COMPANY, a cor- ,

poration prganized and existing under the
jaws of the State of New Jersey, United
States of America, whose trade or
business address is 350 Madison Avenue,
New York, New York, United States of



BARBADOS ADVOCATE

TAKE NOTICE
CLOVER LEAF

That BRITISH COLUMBIA PACKERS
LIMITED, a corporation organized under
j the laws of the Dominion of Canada,
feckers, whose trade or business address
| ts Foot of Campbell Avenue, Vancouver,
| Canada, has applied for the registration
| of a trade mark in Part “A” of Register
; in_respect of fresh fish, frozen fish, sait
fish, smoked fish, canned fish and fish
pastes of all varieties, and will be entitled
ty register the same after one montn
from the 9th day of October 1951, unless
sme pérson shall in the meantime give
notice in duplicate to me at my office
ef opposition of such registration. The
trade mark can be seen on application
at_my office .
Dated this 26th day of September 1951
H. WILLEAMS,
Registrar of Trade Marks.





TAKE NOTICE
GRANDEE

That BRITISH COLUMBIA PACKERS
LIM » & corporation organized under
the laws of the Dominion of Canada.
Packers, whose trade or business address
is Foot of Campbell Avenue, Vancouver.
Canada, has applied for the registration
of a trade mark in Part “A” of Register
in respect of fresh fish, frozen fish, salt
fish. smoked fish, canned fish and fish
pastes of all varieties, and will be entitlec
to register the same after one mont!
from the 9th day of October 1951, unless
some person shall in the meantime giv
notice in duplicate to me at my offic:
of opposition of such registration. Th«
trade mark can be seen on application
at_my office

Dated this 26th day of September 1951

H. WILLDAMS,
Registrar of Trade Marks.

1946 Anglia Ford;,

9.10. 51—3n 9.10. 51—3n

GOVERNMENT NOTICES

EXPORTS AND IMPORTS (RESTRICTION) ACT, 1939

| THE Governor, in exercise of the powers conferred on him by
section 3 (2) of the Exports and Imports (Restriction) Act, 1939.
hereby makes the following Order: —

1. This Order may be cited as the Exports and Imports (General
Open Import Licence) Order, 1951.









2. Any person may import from any country —

(1) from and after the coming into operation of this Order
such type of goods as are set out in the First Schedule
hereto;

(2) From and after the first day of November one thousand
nine hundred and fifty-one such type of goods as are
set out in the Second Schedule hereto,

3.

: This Order shall have effect subject to, the following provis-
ons —
; (a) the order shall operate only in respect of the type of
goods set out in the First and Second Schedules hereto,
which are wholly produced in countries from which ex-
ports take place;
the certificate of origin of all imports of such goods shall
be produced by the importer or consignee;
the approval of the Financial Secretary must be obtained
prior to the importation of any of such goods where pay-
ment for such goods is to be made to a country other
then the country of origin of the goods.

Made by the Governor this 6th day of October, one thousand nine
hundred and fifty-one.
| By His Excellency’s Command,
(Sgd.) R. N. TURNER,

Colonial Secretary.

(b)

Ce)



FIRST SCHEDULE
Tin plate Ternplate or Black plate
Semi-manufactured Copper
Semi-manufactured Nickle
Semi-manufactured Zinc
Borax
Borie Acid
Newsprint
Jute goods
Smoked and Pickled Fish
Onions
Potatoes »
Finished Steel (excluding fabricated steel) as under:—
(a) Heavy Steel products including heavy rail Sleepers and
heavy and medium plate;
(b) Light rolled products including bars, rod hoops and strips;
(c) Steel sheets;
(d) Wire plain or barbed other than insulated wire;
(e) Wire rods;
(f) Tube and pipes including tube fittings;
(g) Tyres, wheels and axles;*
(h) Steel forgings;
(i) Nails, screws, nuts and bolts.
Kraft paper,

CeOyAQAvre,wne



SECOND SCHEDULE
Dried and Salted Fish ee
Animal feeding stuffs exeluding wheat and wheat flour.



Applications for Admission to Universities and Colleges in the
United Kingdom Session 1951—53.

Owing to the limited accommodation at Universities and Colleges
in the United Kingdom resulting from the large number of applica-
tions for admission, the Director of Colonial Scholars is endeavouring
to secure a quota for Colonial Students in each faculty in every Uni-
versity and College throughout the British Isles. It must be realised,
therefore, that only those who are strongly recommended and have
first class qualifications for entry can be considered for admission.

2. The British Council will be responsible for making arrange-
ments for meeting students and for securing suitable accommodation
for them.

3. Students are advised that it is most undesirable for them to
proceed to the United Kingdom unannounced and unsponsored in the
hope of obtaining admission to Universities and Colleges, as even
tutorial colleges and polytechnics are overcrowded and it is very diffi-
cult to gain admission to them without due notice in the proper form.

4. Forms of application for admission to Universities and Col-
leges in the United Kingdom, to be completed in quintuplicate, may
be obtained from the Secretary, Student Advisory Committee, c/o
Office of the Director of Medical Services, Wharf, Bridgetown, and
must be returned to him not later than Wednesday, 31st eae ee

10.10,51—3n



Customs Charges On Goods Imported Into United
Kingdom By Post

The following extract from a notice issued by the Customs and
Excise Department of the United Kingdom, is published for the infor-

America, has applied for the registra-| mation of persons who contemplate sending gifts through the post

tion of a trade mark in Part “A” of
Register in respect of substances used

to addressees in the United Kingdom, within the provisions of the

as foods and as ingredients in foods;|Exports and Imports (Restriction) Order 1949:—

infants’ and invalids’ foods, and will be
entitled to register the same after one
month from the 9th day of October
19851 unless some person shall in the
meantime give notice in duplicate to me

1. General. Most articles of personal and domestic use are

‘Viable on importation to Purchase Tax as well as to import duty.

Purchase Tax is chargeable on similar goods produced in the United

at my office of opposition of such regis- {Kingdom and in order not to discriminate against home production it

tration, The trade mark can be seen on
application at my office.

must equally apply to imported goods. For example, the home shop

Dated this 26th day of September, 1951, ed internally and it
= ’ ay a WILEaAM price of a handbag includes Purchase Tax charged 1 nally

Registrar of Trade Marks.
9.10. 51—3n

TAKE NOTICE
BORDEN'S

That THE BORDEN COMPANY, a cor-
poretion organized and existing under the
laws of the State of New Jersey, United
States of America, whose trade or
business address is 350 Madison Avenue,
New York, New York, United States of
America, has applied for the registra-
tion of a trade mark in Part “A” of
Register in respect of substances used
as foods and as ingredients in foods:
infants’ and invalids’ foods, and will be
entitled to register the same after one
month from the 9th day /f October
1951 unless some person siiall in the
meantime give notice in duplicate to m+
at my office of opposition of such regis-
tration.. The trade mark can be seen on
application at my office.

Dated this 26th day of September, 1951.

H, WILLIAMS,
Registra» of Trade Marks.
9.10,51-—3n








St. James

F.V.A.

REPUTATION
Plantations Building.






would be inequitable if a like imported article were not charged with
a corresponding amount of tax on importation.

2. Second-hand goods, The law does not exempt second-hand
jgoods from duty or tax, but, where these are chargeable by reference
to value, the fact that articles have been used is taken into account
in assessing the charges.

%. Gifts. The law which imposes Customs and Purchase Taa
on imported goods makes no exception in favour of gifts, Gifts pur-
chased in the United Kingdom are tax+paid and remission of taxa-
tion in favour only of those who receive gifts from abroad would
not be justified. British shop-keepers selling taxed goods would also
|be prejudiced if imported gifts were allowed to reach consumers tax
jfree. The volume of mails cleared daily through the Customs is
{moreover such that the selection of special casés for privileged treat-
[ment is not practicable. Lae

4. Rates, There are wide variations in the rates of duty and
Purchase Tax chargeable on different kinds of article. In the case
{of luxuries and semi-luxuries, in particular where both duty and tax



are chargeable, the total charge may be high in relation to the value!

declared by the sender. Articles commonly sent as presents such as
jewellery, scent, cosmetics, and fancy goods, are usually chargeable
{at high rates both of duty and tax and the total Customs charge
{may be expected to exceed the price paid abroad. In the case of
\tobacco and cigarettes the duty is nearly as much as the retail price
lin the United Kingdom, On the other hand the duty rates on food-
stuffs are usually low and the charge is generally ignored for gift
parcels containing foodstuffs only.

R. A, CLARKE,

Colonial Postmaster.
General Post Office,

9.10.51 11,10.51—1n



To ensure that your car is given the best lubrication—USE . . .

ERM LUBRICATING OILS

Obtainable from - - - -

G



} CENTRAL FOUNDRY LTD.—Trafalgar St.
(

REMEMBER
} DON’T ONLY OIL IT — GERM IT

aa

— SO

)







oo













PAGE SEVEN



'S.P.C.A. Inspectors Get SEAWELL

Last Of Four Lectures

UK To Review
G.AT.T.

Operation

“Restrictions On Imperial

”
Preferences
GENEVA,

The British Government will re-
view the whole operation of the
General Agreement on Tariffs anc
Trade within the next year or two,
in the light of experiences up to
date, because of the restrictions ic
imposes on Imperial Preference,
Sir Hartley Shaweross, Presiden -
of the Board of Trade, has an-
nounced in Geneva.

“So far, the United Kingdom
Government, like other govern -
ments, has not felt able to com -
mit itself finally to the Generel
Agreement,” he told a meeting cf
the contracting parties to G.A.T.).

“We shall need to consider ho.’
far its present provisions, wit
the undoubted restrictions whieo
they impose on us in such matters,
for example, as preferences be-
tween Commonwealth countries,
and with their unsatisfactory
bearing on the relations between
the contracting parties and the
International Monetary Fund, are
counter-balanced by tangible ad.
vantages in the promotion of
world trade. In this, the United

Kingdom must have its proper
share.”
The Agreement, which was

drawn up in 1947 to provide mul-
tilateral tariff negotiations and
fair trade rules, demands the
eventual end of all preferences.

.| It was at the G.A.T.T. conferences

in Torquay last winter that Bri-
tain began the negotiations with
Cuba which culminated in the
signing of the Anglo-Cuban trade
agreement, over the head of strony
protests from the British West In-
dies. Under the G.A,T.T, arrange-
ments, the tariff concessions which
Cuba granted to Britain in this
agreement automatically apply 1o
all nations which are parties
G.A.T.T,, thus throwing open the
Cuban market to fierce competi-
; tion from other exporting natious
besides Britain,

It_is. believed that a British re.
view of the agreement might in-
volve an effort to change its pro-
visions relating to Imperial Prefer-
ences and relations with the In-
ternational Monetary Fund, A re-
cent Fund report recommended
that Britain and other sterling
areas cease import restrictions im-
posed for reasons of balance of
payment.

While stressing the need for a
code of fair trade rules, Sir Hart.
ley told the Geneva meeting;
“Britain feels that at this time,
when there are already in exist-
ence a multiplicity internation-
al bodies, some of which are per-
haps less useful thin the expendi-
ture of experts’ time and taxpay-
ers’ money on them might have
entitled us to hope, new accretions
of international machinery ought
not to be established unless a cle or
case has been made out to show
that in practice they will achieve
useful results.”

The B.U.P. correspendent in
Geneva writes: Recent acts of the
U.S. Congress have put the Uni-
ted States, chief advocate of abol.
ishing preferences, in an embavr-
rassing position, as far as Sir
Hartley’s threat to eling to them
is concerned, Drastic U.S. restric-
tions on imports of dairy products
from Burope, for example, are be-
lieved to have encouraged the
U.K. Government in its latest posi-
tion,

The United States is not now ir
a good position to protest if Bri-
tain wants to maintain the Im-
perial Preference system, since
these recent actions by the U.S
Congress are violations of G.A.'T.T
There have been protests agains’
these U.S. measures at the Geneve
meeting and a ruling on them wil
be given by the contracting par
ties to G.A.T.T.—B.U.P.

Animal Week
Children’s Concert

AN excellent concert was stage.
at Queen’s Park House, on Friaa)
afternoon last by pupils of the foi-
Jowing elementary schools:—Car
rington's Girls’, St. Leonard's Boys
St. Giles’ Girls, Wesley Hall Boys ,
Wesley Hall Girls’ and Erdisto:
Model,

The programme consisted chiefl,
of Songs and Recitations and in
cluded a Play—‘The Buccaneer’
Boot” — which was splendidl,
enacted by pupils of the Erdisto
Model School. Among the per
formers in this play, Marjori
Clarke, who impersonated Jemim
the maid, and Edward Haynes
who played the part of Blacl
Marks, head of the pirates, de
serves special mention.

All of the items were well pre:
sented, and the children as well a’
the teachers who ftraineq them de
serve much credit, especially it
view of the fact that the concer
was got up within the short spac’
of three weeks. Outstanding re.
citers were A, Phillips of the S!
Leonard's Boys’ School who recite
“The Priest and the Mulberry
Tree” and T. Gill of St, Giles’
Girls’ School who recited “Man's
Best Friend.” The singing was of »
very high standard and it would
be invidious to single out any
school for special mention

At the conclusion of the pro-
gramme, Mr. A, G. Jordan mover
a vote of thanks to all who hac
helped in arty way to make the
concert a success. In doing so,
he expressed regret at the paucity
of the adult audience, and made
special mention of Mr. D. R
Arthurtnd C. Livingstone of the
Bay Street who-had undertaken
\the task of arranging the hall an°
directing the execution of the pro
gramme.
| Among those present were th
Rev. J. R. Nichols, formerly Chief
| Insvector Schools, and Mr
Nichols and se chool teacher
The Execut Comm
Barbados S.P.C.A
iby Mr. L. T.
Jordan.





of
veral

ttee of thr




was

and Mr, A.

represented

Gay G

ARRIVALS—By B.W LA
From TRINTIDAD—

E. DeGannes, G. DéeGannes, D. Steel,
T. Hawkins, N. Wilson, T. Brown, ©
Brown, J. Boyce, B. Clarke, W. Cave,
L.. Eggiesfield, S. Pole, G. Hoad, M
Mahon, G. Mahon we

DEPARTURES—By BW 1A yg

For St. LUCIA—

Mr. Rufus Springer, Mr
Mr Rudolph Gurnbs,
Evans.

For TRINTIDAD—

Miss Lian George, Mstr Pierre
Duranson, Miss Rene Duranson, Mrs. Ana
Duranson, Mr. Jean Duranson,.Mr. Don-
ald Knox, Mrs. Phyllis Knox, Mg...
Theocpre Gittens, Mr. Edward Waood-
t Mr. Percival Turner, Mr.
Steele, Mrs. Betty Smith, Mr,
Smith, Miss Betty Smith, Mr

The local S.P.C.A. Inspectors
received the final of four lectures,
given by Sgt. Major C. F. Tor-
rezao, Chief S.P.C.A. Inspector of
British Guiana, at the Y.M.C.A.
yesterday morning. The lecture
was “What Constitutes Cruelty
to Animals.” These instruction
classes were given to improve the
knowledge of local Inspectors.

The Sgt. Major said: “It may be
necessary to use a whip of some

isi
Harold Rose,
Nirs Cynthia

Billy
Lawrence

Wyatt,

Mr. Nahiman Pulver



kind to urge an a to go fast
but when an animal is already
going at a quick pace, to use a
thick heavy rope, more often than
not doubled, and to deliver sev-
eral blows therewith, is surely
causing unnecessary suffering to
the animal, especially if it is
drawing a heavily laden vehicle.

“Again, ._ for apparently no
reason, one sometimes sees some
cartman take a double rope which
torms his driving reins, and de-
liver several blows across the
face of his animal, or in attempt-
ing to make his-animal reverse a
heavily laden cart, do the same
thing with either a rope or a stick.
Such are examples of cruel beat-
ing, and instances such as these
are punishable by law.”

The Chief Inspector urged the
local Inspectors to keep a close
look out for symptoms of cruelty,
thus relieving the animal of un-
necessary suffering.

Later in the morning the Chief
Inspector gave a lecture at the
Police Training School on “Pre-
vention of Cruelty to Animals.”
He also told the recruits how
they could detect cruelty.

The recruits took a keen inter-



Harbour Log...

In Carlisle Bay

Yacht Marsaltese, Sch. Rosaline, Sei;
W. L. Eunicia, Sch, Lady Noeleen, Seh
Marion Belle Wolfe, Sch. Cyclorama Q.,
Sch. D’ Ortac, Sch. Marea Henrietta,
Sch. Anita H., Sch. Frances W. Smith,
Sch, Cyril E. Smith. M.V. Daerwood:

ARRIVALS '

Sch. ANITA H., 51 tons, Cap} Hagel,
from Demerara, Agents: Schooner OGwn-
ers’ Association

Seh. FRANCES W. SMITH, "74_tans,
Capt. Hassell, from Demerara, ts:
Schooner Owners’ Association -"

Sch. CYRIL E. SMITH, 56 tons, Cfipf.
Mitchell, from St. Vincent, Agents;
Schooner Owners' Association. —«

“ a: ig ar eee 1,944 tons,

Sapt. : enrikson, frem — Grenada,
Agents: Messrs. DaCosta & Co., Ltd

M.V. DAERWOOD, 4 tons, Capt.
Mulzac, from St. Lucia, Agents; Schooner
Owners’ Association ‘

DEPARTURES

Sch. AUGUSTUS B. COMPTON, 47
tons, Capt. Cozier, for Trinidad, Agents:
Schooner Owners’ Association

8.8 SCHOLAR, 4.454 tons; ‘Capt.
Wolstenholmes, for Trinidad, Agents:
Messrs DaCosta & Co. Ltd

M.V. C.L.M. TANNISS, 41 tons, Capt.

Davis, for Grenada, Agents: Sehooner -
est and asked many questions. A Owners’ Association.
vote of thanks was moved by 8.8. ALCOA PEGASUS, 3,901 tons,

Capt, Morgan, far Port Alfred, Agents:
Messrs. DaCosta & Co., Ltd.

MAILS for Martinique, Guadeloupe,
United Kingdom and France by the SS... |
COLOMBIE will be closed at the Gene. — «+
eral Post Office as under:— Sh

Parcel Mail at 12 noon on the t2th=—
October, Registered Mail at. 9 a.m...
Ordinary Mail at 10.15 a.m. on the :
13th October 1951. eee
ARRIVALS—by the 5.8. Fort Townshend
From TRINIDAD

Inspector Reid.

$7,483,400,000

WASHINGTON, Oct. 11.
President Truman on Wednes-
day signed into law the $7,483,-
400,000 arms economic foreign aid



programme intended to thwart ,,,Piteserald Blackman and Staeyy Wins-
“Communist dreams of world From GRENADA -

Helen Bacchus, Daphne Baeehus and
Hilda Frederick
From NEW YORK

conquest”,—U.P.

Fa Re Floretts Pounder, Iona Clarke, Sea
MAC TO SPEAK beny Yearwood, Gladys Alleyne, V
Robinson and Albertha Fletcher,

NEW YORK,
General Mae Arthur will make rye
the main address at the American

’ .
Legion's 33rd Annual Convention Boys Chub Opened

in Miami, Florida next Wedngs- 4 targe crowd saw Majée' Rowen
day,.—U.P, Stoute, Deputy Commissioner’ of ~'
Police formally open the thirteenth °
Boys’ Club in the Community



a



RATES OF EXCHANGE











Hall in St. Andrew 7
CANADA afternoon, Major Stoute
Be OCTOBER 10, 1951 the activities of the Boys? ~
a vio pr, ui on s .
its as vio; ye. {Steamed and sald that he ope
ng, OOS SORE. ee ee eee
eo ‘a ‘ * pr, r Major Stoute ha -
oe tae ‘Svea 60 3/io pe, the Club open, the bo -
. Coupons 89 6/10% pr, table tennis and domin Me
Rat des ves + their parents looked on. SS.
ea
ar nee
RTC
In the Court for Divorce and Matrimonial Causes” ~ —
BARBADOS,
GARNET GORDON IFILL—Petitioner
MATILDA IPHLL Respondent ree ee
JAMES’ GrtbE--Ue-reeyeridons
To; JAMES INNISS, the Co-respondent

TAKE NOTICE that this Honourable Court will be moved on Friday
jth day of December 1951 at 11 o'clock in the forenoon by. the Petitioner for.
a Decree for the dissolution of Marriage, and that you are. required to file
an Appearance in this Cause on ar before the 26rd day of November 1951 and
An Answer within fourteen days thereafter, otherwise the Court may proceed
to hear and determine the charges alleged in the Petition, your absence not
withstanding.

tite

Dated this 9th day of October 195)
D. LEE SARJRANT,
Solicitor for the Petitioner of No.12 James Street.
Bridgetown, Barbados,

10,10, 51-—3n
a —
CHANCERY SALE rm
a) ew
BARBADOS. =

The undermentioned properties will be set up for sale at the Registra’ o-
Office, Public Bulldings Bridgetown, between 12 noon and 2 p.m. for the” .
and on the date specified and if not then sold they will be set up on each suce
Friday at the same place and during the same hours until sold,
m application to me.

al



Plaintiff; JACK BOYCE GILL
Defendant: OSWALD GRAHAM DEANE
PROPERTY (1): ALA. THAT certain piece or parcel of land situate in the

parish of Saint Lucey in this Ialand containing by admeasurement One acr
roods twenty-seven perches or thereabouts abutting and bounding on two 6!
ather lands of the defendant on lands of Colleton Plantation and on the public
road or however else the same may abut and bound together with the messuase
or dwellinghouse called ‘DEANE HOLLOW" and all and singular other the buildings
om the said parcel of land erected and built.

IPSET PRICK : £2,500 0 0
Date of Sale; 12th October, 1951

two.
és ph

“ae

ed

PROPERTY (2): ALL THAT piece or parce! of land situate in the parish of Saint = s
suey in this Island containing by admecsurement Three acres three roods thirty:
nd four-fifths perches or thereabouts abutting and bounding on other lands of the ~> *
efendant being the parcel of land first herein described on lands of Colleton
‘lantation on lands of Checker Hall sold in lots on lands now or late of the estate
{ C @, Deane, deceased, and on the public road or however else the same may
but and bound lands hereditaments and premises,





UPSET PRICE: £800 0 0 —
date of Sale: 12th October, 1951,
H. WILLIAMS, .
Registrar-in-Ohancery.
28 9 51—4n
. ° ‘7
tn RE eee iperciatty :
MONTREAL, AUSTRALIA, NEW SCOCSGO VS OF9S9U8SS8G9SS"
ZEALAND LINE, LIMITED »
(M.A N Z. Line) The M.V. CARIBBEE,, , will

accept Cargo and Passengers 4or
Dominica, Antigua, Montserrat,
Nevis and St. Kitts. Sailing
Friday 19th inst.

The M.V. DAERWOOD will”
accept Cargo and Passengers for
St. Lucia, Grenada and Aruba,
Passengers only for St. Vincent-
Sailing Friday 12 inst,

The M.V. MONEKA will accept
Cargo and Passengers for Domin-

8.8. "PUxt ADELAIDE" is schedulec
o atl from Hobart September 25th,
lelbourne October 4th, Sydney October
Oth, Gladstone Getober Ifth, Port Atma
«tober 20th, Brisbane October 27th,
triving at Trinidad about November
lst and Barbados November 2ith,

In addition to general cargo this
asel has ample space for chilled and
ard frozen cargo,

Sat a

SOCIOL

Cargo accepted on through Bills of and St. Kitts. Sailing date to be
ading for transshipment at Trinidad to ica Antigua, Montserrat, Nevis
ritish Guiana, Leeward and Windward notified,

ands, BW SCHOONER OWNERS
For further particulars apply-— ASSOCIATION (INO)

URNESS, WITHY & CO. LTD., ana CONSIGNEE

POSS

DaCOSTA & CO, LTD., TEL. NO. 4047
Trinidad, Barbados,
BW... SOSSCSe



P.w.l

at a A See nero nectin



*
ve



Â¥ NEW YORK SERVICE

+S. “MARIO ('* sails Ist October arrives Barbados 13th Oct.,
\ STEAMER suils 12th October arrives Barbados 23rd October,

1961 ty
1951.





NEW ORLEANS SERVICE

“ALCOA PURITAN” sails 12th September — arrives Barbados 11th Oct., 195!

“FOLKE BERNADOTTE” salis 26th Sept arrives Ba jos 11th Oct., 1951
TEAMER sails 10th October — arrives Barbados 25th October, 1951

s
s
s'

2



;
3
\







CANADIAN SERVICE

OUTHBOUND

Sails Sails Arrives é

Name of Ship Montreal Halifak Barbados 4

Ss ALCOA POINTER Sept. 28th Cet. Ist Oct 12th z

S. "ALCOA PILGRIM" Oct. 12th Cet, 15th Oct, th “
PEGASUS Oct, 26th Oct. 29th Novr. 6th

1.5, ‘ALCOA
NL LS
SORTHBOUND
ALCOA Barbados October 15u Sa
for St Lawrence Rive Ports

ne eemammmnrueameeaneanmeeniemmanemmeemmmmmmmmastineal

PLANTER





ROBERT THOM LTD. — NEW YORK AND GULF SERVICE
APPLY:—DA COSTA & CO., LTD.—CANADIAN SERVICE

A





Pull partiomlarg=g, |



—
=
—


































































ml
; Y, OCTOBER 11, 1951
PAGE EIGHT BARBADOS ADVOCATE THURSDAY, ll,
ne nee
rali W l d W rick r
How Aust atta eicome ete tcketers BOVRIL .
“i + READY FOR THE FRAY is ill BARR AN a a aU RR ae ae mR ; s r
Will Give Game There 3 Golfer Bleeds | Taxpayers | gives you
‘ : o
To Death Complain meals the
P SEA Oct. 9.
New Zest Says Paper A rang et Ee dic| me nowt oe sean a o| goodness of
bled to death after he broke|Meeting yes a alt w a
SYDNEY. pan, wos using. peel lly{complaint from ta ers of :
: the club he was using, accidentally Pp xpay =
The West Indies Test team has arrived in Australia for what stabbed himself with it, and other eee, art. %. so gers t who real BEEF
Australian sportsmen persist in referring to as “the world olfers ioistook his agonised yaened a oe men s of Mayers
= ionship series.” Th sot their first oppor- screams fcr help as the cries of a/Land and the Back Ivy were
cricket championship series. * oy fe eir = 3 Rr Srannctt getting their water supply through
van a . : ‘ “ a ew- , i i .
t unity to show their form in — chy a mate Ww iitinn iabih: Sectiens peaeacitn seats site ay were aA. The Goad sible tide tae eee of Raven Te
castle, New South Wales, on October 2 was playing alone. When he came| Boar see fr y could c Se ae pi
A large crowd waited on the eight players down the gangplank to the ninth tee he swung with the See rich Gover weiee besos ,
deekside at Sydney as Mr. C. A. from the liner ‘Wanganella.” driver and it struck his golf cart. eppetising; its beefy goodness makes food
: Merry, the team manager, led John Goddard, the West Indies i. es ae nunt|| WHAT’S ON TODAY more nutritious. Bovril is the concentrated
5 : abe _. Captain, was among those who sroke, whippe ick a ca
| | arrived in the liner. With him Harrison in the groin. st ete en erntioten goodness of beef.
: i THE entire West Indies | were Valentine, Ferguson, Guil- ; : bi St. Thomas Vestry—1.30 p.m.
; | eam should be in Australia len, Atkinson, Trim, Christiani, Two other golfers said they House of Assembly-—3 p.m
to-day. This account is of the and Jones. twice heard screams but thought Tennis at Summerhayes—4.15
| arrival of John Goddard's Nine more players are still to Gay hp ane ae Dam.
party the first eight to reach | arrive in Australia, three by air rom a nearby peacock farm.—U.P. Mobile Cinema at Black Bess }
Australia, The second batch and six by sea, Sonny Ramadhin, School Pasture, St. Peter— TO ¥ouW ,
of six arrived on Tuesday — the star spin bowler, is on his 7.30 p.m. PuTs BEEF ‘NW
Worrell, Weekes, Walcott, way and also to come are the A bat from Bookers Sports De- Police Band at Queen’s Park
Fenathin. gem yg oe ~e “Three Terrible ie See name JOHN GODDARD “THE DON” partment to Ganesh Persaud for —7.45 p.m.
ars! who was delay y ‘ ate CINEMAS
tonsilitis. The final three, Guan to Waelioe Wontel oka Wat. Says that there are real “tear- Sir Donald Bradman once the aon ates and feding saad *LAZA (Bridgetown): The Fleets
Stollmeyer, Gomez and Rae | ¢oit : away” fast bowlers in the West leading cricket figure in the world, Weieler Gell for good in # Bl Paso 4:00 8.0
: were due in Australia by air A lone West Indian face was Indies to whom Worrell, Weekes is now Chairman of the Australian t© issu ta dis eee eatcts eprint rae Sin Texeé eau
4 yesterday. . and Walcott were accustomed, He Selection Bodrd of Selectors. They bowling in the “Wight Madouna of the Seven
among the crowd that weleomed was discussing Lirdwall’s speed. select the team by phone, A prize from Mr. Oscar Wight, Moons 4.30 & 4.30 p.m
Die aii i the ericketers. Pierre de Verteuil, “¢% © pth bdiedoeeen eet ee ——_——_.. M.B.E., to A. Holder for good GLOBE: Any Number Can Play &
) formerly of Tei ae feet ee e bowling throughout the tourna- Teres Little Words 4.45 &
f : row serving with the Royal Aus- ment. t :
Athletes Help ‘iri penne BLG, Governor Hails "curren. s|| ian ies:
deckside. Mr. Merry knows his e e C. Gomes and family to Leslie ; rwsu. |
2 , A * e 6 . *. *
; y lather well and remembers Pierre Wight for his score of 262 not )LYMPIC: Doctor And the Girl
Jamaica as a sehoolboy. “It was good - C e t y oa t for zs a ova | “Gaeta
see a West Indies face in the y k e Ss A packet of shirts from Mr. KORY: MORES Ore hk Geesiid
(From Our Own Correspondent) crowd,” he said, oung ric e r Jagdeo of Lusignan aS; wpe , Street 4 30 i. se
ee . . ‘ f ood batting in the secon
: LONDON. Leading Country WI M tK On Ti oe f
West Indian athletes who The West Indies players regard op A prize from Rayman’s Drug
turned out on a chilly evening in Australia as the world’s leading ee us oP ; Store te Norman Wight for good
London last week to take part in cricketing country. They have ‘ : bowling in both matches. TE ’
ihe athletic meeting organised ioe neard of the standard of Austra- iby 0. Ss. Coppin yr personal prize from Mr. R. YES RDAY Ss
the Jamaican Hurricane Relief jian cricket and are looking for- M. Wight to Leslie Wight for his WEATHER REPORT
Eg hl a! a Y iae on ward to meeting an ee GEORGETOWN. splendid batting throughout tha
~ was collected. ompa side. Spin bowl 4s one of the .,,. 7: : ‘ ent.
BS With some of the contributions tan Saiae ‘oie bc attack, © His Exeellency the Governor Sir Charles Woolley in a be p> of A. J. McIntyre From Codrington Remember, a comfortable
; which have come rolling in, the said Mr. Merry, but the players speech at the G.C.C., Ladies Pavilion at a Presentation wicket-keeping gloves from Mr. Rainfall: 17 in. fitting SUIT is our first con-
aries ene. pn Dg vegard Keith Miller, the Austra~ ceremony in honour of the visiting Barbados cricket team A, J. McIntyre to i goer Sor Total Rainfall for Month to sideration. There are in-
is a tribute to the fine spirit of eee as one of their chiet and the B.G. team said that the most pleasing feature of ve — oar vac inde Big ing d2? ta. creasing numbers who
vw lanes awa Se . es : x 3, - I . ighes : 85.0 °
The Fund itself is oxpected foe: One of the first things some ot the whole tournament was that there were so many young A bat from Bookers Sports|] Lowest Tempontan, soe cE resognise for tipiasives
a 6 Fon i dt e. is oper ed to top +16 West Indian players did when sters in both sides. ‘ : Dept. to Norman Marshall for Wind Velocity: 9 miles per the consistently superb cut,
hatha Wint, ‘one Olympic ‘hey arrived in Sydney was to _ He declared: “We have seen Mr. K. L. Wishart, secretary ofthe being the first Barbados batsman id itedimakk.....
cham om Sweden's ‘Gale Fi watch a club match in Sydney, more than two possible represen- Board. to score a century. Barometer (9 a.m.) 30,001
; Sedpiciieiee’ iat” bther ee where Miller and Sid Barnes tatives in the West Indies team Future W.I. Stars A bat from Wm, Fogarty to (3 p.m.) 29,997 1
: bers of Sweden's visiting athletes, ‘Vere playing. E of the future. West Indies cricket Leray Jackman for his promis- IDEAL TATLORING
started, but did not run when in 1 don’t know how fast Lindwall is on top of the world at the He picked three players as jng innings in the second match.
London this week they heard q 2nd Miller are today,” said God- moment and it is up to us to keep future W.I. representatives—Leslie A cup from Mr. R. G. aa 2 SSS We will welcome the op-
Joud report. dard, but we have some real tear- jt on top. We will never do it wn-~ Wight, who he said, “is definitely phrey to Leslie Wight for se oP Mastrcs ct « Beare
The occasion was one when ways in the West Indies. We jess we encourage those youngsters assured of his place—as he has brilliant batting throughout the H portunity of proving
they were now under starter’s did not bring them here because and make way for them. the right temperament,’ Glention tournament. His! BARBADOS LABOUR you in our...
orders; the report wag not that they eek ee ane aoe Encouragement Gibbs and the schoolboy Jack- tae a eee pera to Capt | PARTY ORING DEPARTMENT
of & pistol but the pop of acham- ment. But Worrell, Weekes 3% He said that he was very glad man. - : ordship istent batting. | ‘ TAILORING
pagne cork, The athletes were Walcott have played them all 1, "coe that on both teams, the The prize winners were :— Farmer ter rom Mr Alex Dray-| Will Hold A
the guests of the Lord Mayor of wight. Selectors had made room for the , A a of ie cheque i art when ht uk evine tr good bit- on the first floor of
Seth whit tee lke ree tee Taek Cte dats reas WA VION Giscn Cibie for spmelag 1G. ting and’ good Melding.
Monts on with the Gothenburg The arrival of the West Indies that with the encouragement of Glendon Gibbs for s 8 Carl A scarf from Mr. Alex Dray-| ' LTD
en's third annual fuss with Lon- team has been weleomed by sports A bat to Gibbs from Mr. Car : : 7. CAVE SHEP D&C i 4
dow men st the White City. Wint writers in all Australian news- pce an ar ee the ae West McCowan, agent for Wisden’s ton to pry coasn for bowl] | ’
won the 880 yards in the contest papers. The Sydney “Daily Tele- : Se eee eon bats ing and good captaincy. | 5 =
. Mr. W.S. Jones, President of the 1 i rize from Pestano’s Outfit! 10—13, BROAD STREET
fe Venda setteasce nae staph,” for example, eae oe B.G, Cricket Board of Control, wut Si Seon Pe ane’ \e Keith Walcott for the ; o
i ; r case Tecent visit of g French Rugby who spoke earlier, also touched on Wight. highest nuifiber of catches in the}
a ose pe another case ‘team which gave Australian rug- 4), promise shown by the young A packet of shirts to Gibbs hig ie
e with the Wint”. . i s - ; f Lusignan, tournament. :
‘ peg Lb teed on — sters. He said: “Among the new- ahs Py ag re Be er sais A bat from Gomes’ Outfit
Secreeket Ballty, for once we on ‘th a. k ww players comers, we find that we have got a” yy. Taylor from the Demerara Store to Gaskin for good all-
started bedly and had a neck- Welcome these bris' ket what-the the nucleus of a future W.1. team.” Tobacco Co., for scoring a cen- round performance. ; |
; and-neck race with Brian, Shen- Rea cricket bs er hen He singled out for special tury in the first match. A bat from eet Outfit,
’ ton also of Polytechnic Harriers, 4 m4 e praise ‘Cammy! Smith (Harrison “seu tain Ber- Store to Norman Wight for gooc yh
ef ve i ball—- ' p to the B.G. captain Ber ‘ore tin:
_ pomevel, Hames Home a ee ae for our foot! ive College schoolboy) and Holder keley Gaskin from Mr. s . bowling. > outat .
et in 9.9 secs, This was the 39 th edna) "Bender Sin” pub- (left-hand bowler) whom he saw Brown for services to Colony A_ bat from Gomes’ . f Ae
j time he had run the 100 yards in le Sydney y as a future W.I. batsman and cricket. Store to Norman Marshail fo
Jess than 10 secs. and was his last lished a long article by R. S. dividual score on WL hk
run this season, When I spoke to Whitington, a leading Australian bowler. He added that Leroy A bat from Mr. Carl McCowan the highest fe “egiia ; E -CL AR
: oe rome gina he telat ie ‘erica Witter, analysing the Jackman, of Queen’s College, to Leslie Wight—highest scorer a Perea o , eg ehahiier > ,
: that he and Brian Shenton are bowling of Ramadhin and Valen- Played a very fine innings and was on the vo ~~ from Mr. W. 8. of the Barbados team was also i ARK
i friendly rivals, During the past tine. He believes that Valentine’s unfortunate in getting run out, A ore sabe ea Marshall for presented with 12 bottles of
oe yar ane ae has style may not be ey i pee Sterling Batting Seis etivaene sed in the tour- Grant’s Scotch Whisky, from
n displaying in its Fleet Street for Australian pitches and says a en

Office a large-sized photograph of
MacDonald Bailey and his wife,
Doris, with their six children,
Many passers-by have stopped to
take a close up view of the fam-
ous athlete.

While on the athletic theme, I
fearn Herb McKenley, the Trini-
dad-born quarter miler, has
chosen October 1 for his first lim-

F. L. WALCOTT
bering up in preparation for the jfe compares Ramadhin’s grip Ment to last year and this year’s T. O. BRYAN
Helsinki Olympic. For two months of the ball with the technique of work put in by the England and M. E. COX

he will be hard at work on a Jack Iverson, the Australian spin Survey wicketkeeper A. J. McIn-

cross-country routine,
will get
work,

Then he
down to proper track



Regiment Win
Rifle Shoot

THE Governor, Lady Savage
and Major Vaughn, the Governor's
A.D.C, attended a shooting com-
peeton between the Barbados

egiment, Police, Harrison College
and Lodge School yesterday
evening at the Government Rift.
Range. Regiment, last year win
ners, again won the competition
this year,

The shoot was the Major Cave—
7 rounds at 200 yards. The fol-





















that the West Indies chances of
beating Australia
hang heavily on Ramadhin.

against slower-footed
batsmen.”

Like Iverson

English

1

bowler, and says: “On Australian tyre who has been engaged on -|
pitches Iverson had great difficulty coaching contract by the B.G.

his leg-break turn, Cricket Board,

|

|

|

in making
something he had achieved reg-

ularly On the more English-type manager of the Barbados team
pitches of New Zealand. Rama- expressed thanks
dhin eould have similar difficulty lic for the manner in which they
Therein lies the fell over one another to make the |
members of his team happy. He |
under thanked the Cricket Board for th |
trying Australian sung could also way
amazing them,

this summer.
main part of the gamble.
“Long bowling spells

sap even Ramadhin’s
stamina. If they do, he may lose

his pace off the pitch and with it ~~

odd method of choosing a team
is said to be financial economy.

much of his venom.”

There has been an outburst in
Australia too, over the methods
by which the Australian selec-
tors are expected to choose the
team to meet the West Indies, The










in the Tests captain commented on the fine
spirit of friendship that has always

“The West Indies gambled on marked
Ramadhin and Valentine in Eng- matches, He paid tribute to the
land in 1950 and won,” he writes. sterling batting of Glendon Gibbs
“That was on English wickets and land Leslie Wight. }

B.G. batting had definitely im-
proved and credited the improve-

present at the fifth Test match
last season in Melbourne against

England, but it is apparently o:
selectors are Sir Donald Bradman, ithe ay fee






Mr. Berkeley Gaskin, tne B.G. )nament. Universal Agencies

——

ase Scmsliteadpegumpiased

B.G.-Barbados cricket



He said that the standard of





Replying Mr. “Foffie” Williams
WHITE HORSE N
Scotch Whisky

The purpose of signs is to tell
wiseot wenda. This white horse
symbolises Scotch at its very finest;
whisky distilled, biended and
matured by Scotsmen in the tradi-
tional ways that they, and only
they, know sc well. :

to the B,G. pub-

in which they looked after i
and gave special praise io

aes



Not all the selectors were

form shown then that ‘they

































































On

Friday Night, 12th Octo-
ber, 1951, at 8.00 o'clock








Opening the full Cam-
paign for the General
Elections.




SHAMPOO

Speakers: G. H, ADAMS














Ask for a large tube of
PRELL first thing To-day

A. E. S. LEWIS
J. CAMERON TUDOR
E. W. BARROW.

Chairman: JAS. A. TUDOR.
12.10.51.—1n.





ON SALE AT ALL LEADING STORES

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%
lowing were the best scores for Mr. E. A. Dwyer and Mr, Jack will have to make their decisions Sole Distributors: PWANK B. ARMSTRONG LTD,
classes “A” and “B” out of 2 Ryder, The Australian Board of ~ The West Imiixe i Hl play ee a SLICES OF
H.P.S. of 35. Cricket Control has asked them 15 ganas during. the “Anatsatiead APARA EASED ODOSPOROLOANPORELD DADS HLASLLDD :
f “A” CLASS eee the aa ean be ~ mae, including five Test matehes. | ~*———~-—— a ch ae?
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3rd Mr. G. E, Martin 34 To add to. their difficulties, the the second in Sydney from No- oe ; as %
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“B” CLASS shall represent Australia. They 22 to 27; the fourth in Melbourne %
Sgt. F. E. Edwards ........ 33 will stay in their separate States from December 31] to January *4 BAKED BY
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TIIIRSDAY. OCTOBER 11. lil BARBADOS ADVOCATE PACE THREE Peasants 9 Deductions From Cane Price Discussed By House BEFORE THE BILL to impose a special levy on sugar and molasses manufactured in the island in certain circumstances, was passed in the House of Assembly on Tuesday, there was much discussion. The discussion hinged upon the agreement, between the Sutti Producers' Federation and the Barbados Workers Union, out of which the Bill arose. The suggestion was made ; by some other members that peasants should be exempted from having money deducted from their price for canes to go to the Labour Welfare Fund. Some of the speeches on the diaers. There was hardly an age iculluiston appeared In yesterday's rural worker in Barbados who did issue. Following Is the continuanot own a piece of land but rented ,lo n: piece Ironi the plantation at which The junior member for St. he worked. TherelWe thev Andrew Mr. J. A HaVOe* said that should not foot themselves that anyone who read the agreement only the peasant proprietors would see that it was obvious that would be affected by it. the money would come out of tht small and big growers in proporMemorandum lion. In the end it all came down He said that M to the average to their taking away money from peasant proprietor or producer of the small growers. canes and his position in so far After u long period of looking *>* what shoald be paid for a tor. increased price for ran—, of canes, the memorandum was an the growers were being told that absolutely useless document. Tht something would be taken out. principle on which the whole He -aid he represented a large document was drawn up was so unnumber of eane growers about juUM tot be to pethonourable junior member fit happened to be at Philip, Mr. Adams said that the |H liuuse next March or April, -uggestion to make the Labour Welfare Fund a gift and then tr> Nine Months' Work I,now fi.im the Slahili-tir>n Fund, had been exposed by more What was before them was the than one speaker. re.ult of nine months of hard The honourable member knew Kan: lining with the necessity of that he '" ">>> voar or what guaran•vid linen in approval with some ,„, l|ld h „ h vc m ,„,, v „ r "'"' %  "" h ." .,." nd ?"" %  >" of Ihclr raiatence as a .in %  0*1 with the understanding |ht ,*„„,, „,rr getting what as the mult of bargain,,„. ,„„.„„, ,„„|,i .fjord to pay. After further tMimoM Mr a .inte-i to make hi* position Adam* repeat.-.! that the two parquite dam. the Union had bar,„., ,,.,„,. „, ho „,„,, ,,„,. Ith the Suitor Producers __, „ av |„g entailed a orange, and ii:. preaent brQowrnment anu asKinn to allow the bM Hull cjuld be „,,. ^o,^ ,„ c „ rr „„, Ih, aeeured. -We are BeeJtlng lealalai ,,,„ Mm nl Thi. rould not be done lion to rarry oul Ihe terms or the llnlcM tht Art to whleh he had ireem,-nt. but our hand are not aleeaati iefene*l hud been Had In upproaehlnc the ugr ^^an-pd indutry if it aan 1^. proved that Tllo pill finally waa Btvan Mi the present formula works an 1(v „ n( | re.i,.in and when 11 want Injustlre to the peaaant'. Int(l romn ,,ttee ahe Oppoaltion led n ..... i '. M' f K W.ihotl ..i|Ked Ihe Prp-Klerlnin Speeches in. lualon of .lauae 1 deollna arlth .. lha levy of $1.80. The lnelnsf,*i. avajr, produ-ce,,f ^'eolS.; and IU Z]? t J'V ""m*"",' "T'?"^ ^reT?"hc r ld fo Z (uUUbUlt, h, .any benevin, what „'*.*'," &>'£'. ** mernVr, saff tgS 'the'S Hut what 1 rerard t' rie . ,nr y •*'••* P->ying Sll and ,h fT worked for In some crops. lower brackets of the production when the rains came along they * rould not follow the arguol Canes should pay a smaller rate went to SI0. "nent about some cane growers The Sugar Agreement had come "The rains stopped and (he "*1* Penalised. There was not before him on the 27th ol last :inybody who could tell what was montli and from lhat time he had 'ones. |f read und studied it. He had coma >meb,yha, lotd him imW * gj*^SS OT. St J%&JZ ST^i^ffi^ ijSjK rtjaljy^ readin. Ihe ..reament ZXJ^Jg^^S, S^ 1 "' """ '*— !" SSXSW'A'TSJB It was ineoneelvable that the ' •** ame area refuaed to pav He aal.l lhat what was worrvbe wnrnn in his opinion about the Senior Member for St. Joseph tho ** me price. ing the other side waa that the matter. "But rekarilless of whatcould have read the agreement ama .|„ -, laliourers were brlnit ma.le free ever Ihe results are here tonight." and the Hill before the House and ""ntliacinnnK Coals and would no) hove lo go to them said Mr. Dowdlng. "1 am taking then get up and make the remark* SP""""* on the manufacturing and borrow inui,.->. up the rudtels for those iioople whleh he made expenses per Ion of sugar, he *"-• !" I.. Waleott said that Ihe In this island whom the Labour "Listening to him Sir" he said, ""'d whether one intended lo say Junior Member for St. Philip hsd linion In their haste in lighting for "I was sometimes bewildered 1 lhat ,ho *e |0UB Ls subscribed to "id all along that the wages ot the labourers, have forgotten." w.aidered what on earth had "* v " ,h "' because a man mav u-suaf workers could not be _,„... haooaned I !" ,,M ha !" ViJer!> s 1 1 morc on overhauling orae because he had nothing to Price Of Labour Happened. I.aud have underh • ,, 0 wllh hm Bu| onc Q h ha(| 0 iv „ hl .^. a. ^,hr y ? rr.JT„„ ,hi "-> > be eVpeciallv , >li £ "t d ,h """*" %  < '" "" h Union Ihir due. There was no ust ke he made buT that K '"ctorle. were allows money, not !!"""• l th •'"""• '"" that dmibl about it that the hon. should make the mistake he made out o( their profits but out of fund* "Anvhnrii. lastijx unlj "I do not Intend to accute hot ourabla members of making prealectlon .peeches, bat I m not %  j ffJKg, ; thid on the eve of the P' ,,Srrt v,l } election thin broken-heartedneai for the peasants k genuine Why has It taken all this ttfl "The Union has l>een organised for ten years. Why has it l.iken a %  me to reach the present stage. The reason Is lhat we were not cw strong ten yesr* ago i today." upheld by a • The Hill was then ut amendment. Some employers, said Mr. Adams, were genuinely reformed. some tried to meet one halfway and used methods of conciliation. -Human nature is human nature nil evei the world, and after 300 years of undisputed -wnv doing whatever they liked, it I* not surprising that we had to take nine rlne to worry, ovrwnrk. ovar indulgence-be smart, la ha AlkaSaltsar right away. Sparkllnf •Ifarvascanca malra* A Ika-Sati i*r plaaMnt-taiHng. halpi its pali.%  illlng arialgMic go • %  > work fast. KMp it handv Alkd Selt'/er W Oov l i easant3 l_an [• had been J ml-lor St. Joseph ,.-. end bis Union had dona wonders Increase Ottered (r)d a grooi go,^ f 0r the people The Junior Member for SI of |n ir ; island There was no H*^ ( W in .."l d .K W0 !."' P k M lp brn the House about xhe Union was now %  tinllll It was as well that they first apcrease in the price of sugar they Peasants, ihey ihould try to form that labour could not be paid %  precialed the fallacy underlying gave it conditionally. There had •' co-opetative orgunlsatlon for corresponding prire to that puid this statement before going to the u be certain deductions for the ln *i"for the article bv the United others. Labour Welfare, rehabllitalion and n ltiv Ju "" ,r Member for St. Kingdom. Part of the agreement was, that: soon. They began sometime ago r or a * BS •* %  f a fsctory Referring again to the AgreeBoth parties are aware of the to use their fund for housing the ^.^VarV' 1 ... lncon y menl rnent. Mr. Dowdlng said that on following resolution which was sugar workers. Naturally after SSSS^M uri.^ ^a.^L C l^ y i!L ,h S 27U September when It came passed recently by a majority vote centuries of bad housing condiJu?!!'^!, 1 ; **""* th .? u ar **<*""? A " at a special meeting of factory tions in the colony in a short Targe quantme/whichTa^ Boclatlon. there wasnot one owners*^ their duly constituted time.they found themselves with fi r pay"^" 'l^wt^fKt/'wim nST'cLust ^hTeh Jpph represc-ntaUves after protracted no funds ln_ the Sugar Welfare Bulkclcy Just a step away were ^. r C ja^^y a Tt !^g li !?„ legotiattons:— Pund. The Royal Commission in forced to pay more for their canes. „t m.Wiiv at ihe healmune of %  That the same price calcu1940 had recommended a recess Mr. Mapp talked against the \£? n^Uiig however whoenlatcd on a crop average recovery on everv ton produced In the colsuggestion that the peasants were t, rc |v disagreed with' the latter shall be paid for peasants' and ony . two shillings per ton. going to sutler so much, part of the uirevmenl which estates' canes (not being shareM L ".„ D .--'"J" V UI !it "it* 'or $1.80 in one case and 2 holders or auppliers under Deelucllons ikti ^ fCmon l Ul h towards the Harbour Scheme, to written contract) it being clearHe said that by deductions of Z !" : !" .T. 5a which the ^ uken j^p, xhe ciIW grower ly understood that neither shall various amounts from what was ""**""?? j ,, ^ rl a ""d which an , hc $limo ,. atp frnm pp lu have priority of delivery. to have been given time, before. "" •*" '" n m K any **% e p ^' ,, bottom •PROVIDED that where own|t would be seen that the money I !" :^ C i^?. J ne -! 0,i .^_ no! ..'f5 ers of estates other thi who are shareholders 000 and allooate it to the Labou Welfare Fund, especially as I 1 was being l< nt out to be repaid factory or are supplying under a written contra canes in excess of MM) factory (the delivery of such canes being If required spread over the whole period of the crop) the factory shall be at liberty to pay 'uch estate owners un additional price ranging from 5c. to 35c. per ton. "PROVIDED also that where g Co-operative Society of been going on Mine (our years and peasants supplies canes in excess there might t>c some Justification djf 500 tons to any factory uhe in reducing the amount given to deliverv of such canes being if that fund. required spread over the whole "My suggestion therefore Is. _pr period of the crop) the Society **"*• '' shall be paid the *ame extra H&"' 2SJHSJH ££ t SH? C>mnd';?,Vrnment-ffor.ft*-, eatatcs ranging rom Sc J 3J,„ „,„) be repaid) but <-n not taV per ton for similar quantities jp m Mt m ^ ttlllll % %  the nmount it should be done. The time had come though. If Ihcrc was a small sum due '" r oth *' r w *' k *? beii %  <•' exempting tr.m frn, Ih. .III. Fund, borrow hum -'feme ,tur SHIN 10 •* 7'ie quality Mvlnl Polish HALL'f DISTEMPER Is a recognised first grade WATER PAINT Ba-na twl-bouAd, •• all IMofior d#luncei which now exi-ted Monev Repayment He oolnted out thai the peas Mr. Dowdlng said thst the last !" s '"? P'it*i '•"' i >' !" "" *'•• % /f*t 06* aQ9 W *Q9*j M m* W f i i'l'>*044,*i9'i W *9*}9l speaker had convinced him lhat -.H8..WH tons of canes and H, he.a. Estate Canes m, last point was that the prohe should add his quota to the *•"'<*. rrowed. "The hon. member peaiants as getting the same P 1 1 !" workei-s were still owed an addlknows that this money is gone and With regard to complaints lhat tKH a | increase of 7| per cent. *one forever," said Mr. Dowdinji. peasant proprietors are a(Tec*e in the same way as a man forget that there waa an election jinything ... price of canes in Barbados affected before he heard lhat thci not only the small peasant prolabourers on the sugar plantation: prietora but lh. ,...-k-*ho would g>-. nun. .. • a i the lower brackets of Income around id a smaller rate than one in mat sor '.he higher br.ukft, so one In the the corner. He thought hon members who had How Aladdin's Lamp • won the Princes* t torvounfaunnanu nencer "c nibbed the l.nt|> %  jinl grui' %  c mih J ncautifol pnncess. \ jddln a>ked Ittr (ceH ho* St nam him. Here. MJI UBlon. % %  I anas Uaaa n offered her %  diOi <>i • i.nt Uwi:ried."l!'idalleJaai' %  me Royal Padding svary gay. V, I'en"^ - R"*T< P iwtdla g fh#-r S-..K* no. us..MB. HoaeirWkNO. lao. 3 — %  adtrlat aawri' eaeestsit. *•nilla, (vadtNllrxxuKh. Ir-Mlasif TRICYCLES FOR BOYS A t.llll S ^ These are so made that they can be j converted into BICYCLES. I I Your Children will be delighted with them. Secure your requirements now from PLANT/VriOXS LTD. an dit'sbrt ht an d clean A iprinklc oC Vim on a damp doth — a quick rub — and tbOM dirty, greasy tilings will sparkle like new again I Vim leaves surlaces shining and gleaming, so quickly and e;i-t)v | VIM cleans everything smoothly and speedily EQUIP YOUR TRACTOR D RAWN AgD ANIMAL -DRAWN VEHICLES fg^MD IMPLEMENTS with DUNLOP TYRES HUBS BRAKES • PERMIT GREATER LOADS REDUCE FUEL CONSUMPTION ELIMINATE DAMABE TO CROPS • PERMIT LOWER L0A0IN6 LINE • RUN SMOOTHLY AND SILENTLY



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PACE TWO BARBADdS ADVOCATE THURSDAY. OCTOBER II. 1951 Cahih Ccdtinq W ING F/JGI COMMANDER IA EGQ] I rector Aviation m the Caribbean med from MIBV via Triniilirt b> B-W I.A Wins C*Klr. fcgtfl^' Barbados on S< %  ttend | 1U1 ihr .,. opriHiion • t Turbp-je; He also bad consul tat tons with ihe DO Cmou*-u Ana .sat. Branch Manager I NI MAHON, I %  %  %  11 Branch Manager of Ivttl.A in Jamaica arrived from tri.it colony on Tuesday via Trinidad (.. %  W J A. He wa< BO by hU young daughter Melante. Here for about two weeks' holiday he is staying with relative* at J.lclh Gunt HUUM', Worthing. Nw Year* Day the Baruado. AsUorai* who hud ban la h<> covering Ihe B naajQl I lor hi* newspaper w;ts among ihe passcngeri arriving n yesterday evenlrz by || W I A Mercy Miaaion H M.s Apn a, nns <.r UM Royal Na<) I. t minelayc | glaaH .I'ler her nin> % % %  .imiiHiti She A-a* usnpjj .ill .HI.Uw Atlantic v-iih • soon -ifier the hurrlR :-, j:.d .Titved back li Po. ismcuth last Monday. The men M H GLYNF. MAHON. Assistant VIB*BBBBBBBBBBBBBB1 asP% i-**!"? 0 P 0, a 0 ? !" ^^*, M* it llfe-savlnsj cargo wtlh all the \lgour of a tew taking their 'hip t ion. Hurricane Relief C ONTINUED efforts nre being made by West Indians In Engl.i.d )Vf f< AND MKS FRED EASTton-rosier. She is there to see her Sl.oppe. H Korr Dry Goods Store. 1T ~ AM nvcd lr _ m Trinidad daughter Barbara. AHman Y Bow, s. J. Berne u, & £ %  **!? %  £_ afterno ??_ b j: Sons, the Bargain House, and b ports Editor Returns M n O. S. COPT'IN, SportEAtCM Back to Vcnexuela T^TK AND MRS. CHnRLIl MILETS* Among the stores closed were many In S*-n Street. The Coronation Store, H. Burak's Slore.i Store. Bersteln's Sandal 1 ,__ Trinidad daughter Barbara, a cartography H W.I.A. at the Central Office of InformaEastham has recently retired lion Mis. Sut ton-Foster will %  *. > tnm National Mining which used main In London until her husband, " b mh l r to operate in Trinidad. He ub-ns Sir Sutlon^ter. arrives from to spend part of Ml retirement in Majaya^ They leave later for the Uiirbario*. m Ruebuck Street. To Be Married on Saturday M fl. (i AS TON DeGANNF-S, M?nawr of Hub Taxi t u. Trinidad and son <>r Mrs. Eliza DeOan and Ihe late Dr. F DeGena Coincided ISS YVONNE CAST1LHO. sister of Mrs. Fab Hoyos, who flaw IB (man TrmioWun WM n ,? G ,or "bout three week! M Gold Coast where Sir SuttonFcster wfTI take up appointment Lord President of the West African Court of Appeal. Some Cake G UESTS who atlended the 60th anniversary of the Chartered Tuesday night by H.W.I.A. acconiholiday returned yesterday Institute of Secretariea In London ponied by hit sister En. Thay "ernoon by &G. Airways Her '•' *'*?* ( ra .. cd ,h, %  ''^hday cake are guests at the Ocean View Hotel, visit coincided with the Barbados'f^'J^ll**' v *,' mm fo ^J l J ,B d-C I ricket tour just ended. ,imc No wonder. It was cooked by U„ Saturday afternoon at 5 . __ f"> Pf n l *!*" i '* 1 C J IC / %  nd **" o'clock Mr. DeGannes b to be To-nifht'a Talk married at St. Patrick's Church. JemmotU Lone to Miss Deri ice \MH VAL McCOMIE will gi Steele also of Trinidad. One of AVI. Mi -s Steele's sister a is due t<; tomorrow from Trinidad to t>e at the British Council heodquarl(lour was from Can utter lid at the wedding. Mi*. er. Wakeneld. from New Zealand, dried fruit The meeting begins at 8.15 from Australia and candled peel from South Africa. Some cake: from all parts of the Commonwealth, Including the West Indr Members of the West India Committee here contributed suga: talk on Martinique when th mmvQ MTr to arrive Alliance Francabe meetn tonight aii-^tce and caschew nuts. The 1 to be at llie BntUh Council headquarlflour was from Canada, butter H Worth inB o'clock. BY THE WAY.... By Beachcomber my old nurn In Xonrupt." %  oid I T>HRE>! wok, ago. on u moun11' w u\1", I""' .r,"*. '""•"? %  '"I" t"'Ck. 1 „,.l u Mi„ll. Mr T.MS to* .„„„„,. ,„, .ho '-, W O^H ('X r rc' h st %nTwt SVnSl """" *" K "'" """" %  ifha eau MrHI -ken l..^-hr. nd the scientist ri '' "'• *ini '"" wrrc kept awake all night mi> whispered. -Reaearch. Of chaaxMls and t*IO pullinc Ol wild "V the cheering. Luckily I am u B earch." boai noaaa, Is called onca more modest man. i ODDr< i „. nl h _i t |iat, ( i v fed the I oecupadoo Prodn-e: Such extraordinary wd ^"CrvoTIs voung^ noaUnan of |.,-twirling. nnd. to me. inexplkable popularnm i h e at once* contracted Ms Ai praotnt, hand and pen are My must be very Inconvenient for nhort lower horns and his longer l w it L t. —"PP" • and began to go inNot If It U aeeompandoorB< i withdrew. Out he cun.e lormous quanUtles of j,„d out came his horns. He moved _._ forward, at what seemed to me : Did you never shake an amazing speed for a snuil. 1 w ds ? took out my watch, like onv No. Even on the trainer watching a racehorse. bit of stick down, level ].T. .in lid I I eel at sixes and sevens, and 1 feel nnvbody %  hi mail SUddanlar invited to Myelf: "ut his IliiKer-nails with a scythe, icd by button In walateoal witti a boatwine hook, mow a Held with a tgtagOOBO, Praslnai i'i i .i porrldg "nil ,i oornerw "ft the a M> .. II troiioihi*;.. %  %  i n m ). ThiTeSchlucht Pass the hands and th> b i m us cut the cattle and cheering mullilude^ hurried after come to the hor. :i lurmel mc. said wht ii he Kddraaaed hlmsell to A a lump ..f dubtmi Remlremoiit. where the fifty —.lones-vcs who had rights of Hfi I'lilmn ''iih and low justice over the a wooded T' 0 "' d f SL Plrrr ' defied Turcnnr 1 was thcri almost kg u abet ration Things have d < *nce then. NJoaj ^iie awakes in her small flat on Manhattan's fashionable East Side eveiy morning oefore seven. At 8.1*0. sm.irtU tunit"I out in a tailored navy blue suit and crisp white blouse, she pushes her way into the jampacked .subway and travels downtown to her Lsk in Wall Street. Elaine Barne is an actress noloper T"day she is the most attractive "cuati mi n man" in one of New York's larger firms ul •lock brokers. She gives advice to investors. She sells bonds and stocks on commission She is picking up the ropes of finance as she goes ind loving every minute oi it. "Finance has the theatre heaie.i % P HSV J hasaa by Mlkh. tell. m.. -Neve. *„_. d jTS!uJf^ ft la a tremendous loo*t to one's a ^^^ rriend one day she mother to MS me the other day brought the talk around to nnanc *ho wan-ed something whlcl ., rrMii L_IB I HAUD1JK PO ngM %  %  A/A B'TOWN %  ^ %  -'^"-^OlAi 2310 ra*uio i us* Baanta j ossriR--.il Tl rAJtAMOurers MUKIC-AI. THE FLEETS IN igrgg %  i- MSJI i "EL PASO Holdmt J*.ht. 1 CODE OF THE LAWLESS ft ARIZONA TRAIL RIIKT. ruii* Knistii I'I A/.A UISIIN IMal MI4 or NABU aooi M Pilric KIN mill MONslsa utv>. DtrK >anii> SAT. t.at a.sa. I *Wl.r -j Kirby u.aia ajjgasMi \ in MI T RltMr l.lllll III! QABDKM T JAMB> '.... ..,.: IIJ/\H(TII 11 LADISIDS Color l '•vhnioolar Anna pksgtt ni M -%  • M.DHmaai 11 ~>rlrr Coofesoai m p m • HAItOWS -i MX iliniiUN a ISSBS CMney Ir. nvm ih* Dffl ro* oiyi 1 l UiBn EMPIRE ILAINf BAIRIt f'" '•• •" ** tl;,the market. ;md there is the perI element about the job which "When I go out ncta ususl chit-chat. Men ataraj the conversation by nrking wha'. do I think of such-and-tueh stock And when I tell them thf •ook at me with :i new respect less out of politeness would show a profit in a few yea.._.ned to her surprl^ that time, so to pay for the education "P*"' there were women doing ^11 nghi r,f her *£• „ w ... a. customers' men" and that heM '" t a rnr s n,y l "\ k 2" gWkUrad she too ahowad her old life i< her "0'' l >;-eonv "a feeling for It" pleted _book_on her husband to be B.B.C. RADIO PROGRAMME -) 1.1 p m 4pm Th# N n nll fcrMw. ii IH PIP •ii—ilid! Composei al thf W Wan a asr a Oss is as U a Drumi. • IB p m •;. s*i.iti.h Maxar "nsday. Bport. 7pm Th N!.__ p.m Kewa An>l,.i, 7 15 p m BH nrilaln 7 p m CWSMM IMtitart, 7 U BroMa Io | .1 -!• IS %  m .11 if M M |i M lied Tlic Great Lover. She BMl Forthwith, somewhat flattered. Barrymore in 1935 when (as she skipped the fashion page? m young glrh she had sent him hi i |-.ii>r. sUi'lird im.iri'i. I Bin ktttM hlat he WM III %  elections Instead. hospital. I-iter, with her mother. %  n." she said, I took ;. < %  Bt to sat him. at the New York Institute of FiWhen he left hospital, he was nance, which trains personnel for photographed often with an "• member firms of the Stock E* aaSISsathsa sirl named In the capH. chnge. I took a very intensive tions as Klaine Jacobs. The same courje. which included tcchniml Kill turned up later among hi %  accounting about which I knew company on a radio programme, f* precisely nothing. listed now as Elaine Barric. Shi %  "Then I studied security had taken the name "because r, 1 analysis. I passed Die exam with sounded n bit like DwryiMT) u a mark of 95 which Is one of the hignest on record. A pass is 75. Thai entlUed me to become a rti-Thp All* %  n Radio 1>I ,...M. • a> %  W p II CompHHT of P n. Hins up Ui# Cui__., TTtr Newa. 10 10 p m Prom Ih* EkJUnrlab. io is pin Hani M.ir.i T.mU1S. lOSS p m B*r.(iralrr T.rn r a c i .i 1-.,.., THtmaoAY oc-ronrji u. iu\ Upm N.w. Anuthrr VrulifyiiiK I N Rlbaauvaalc, on riot i J A Triumpfutt Prugrf** j|N Ren %  it c ,,. his stern, and another bit an Inch further on, and I timed him. Mi covered the Inch In )ust over i minute. In quarter of an houi he was h .If way to the far edge of the track. Either snaHi an not is slow as people think, or thli one was speed-maniac. Velort('neral dr fer. MlOCtfrT currile. nocris cochOm Amtthrr out In trail me. !i.'|nii-',l might bo. nds to Hrect.delved, vhat patoi' taught CROSSWORD • l 1 | |5 r r %  %  %  r is icraai L Carrie* Uu OK at polo, in-li i I iii as if] 10 roaanaHPaumnatasjnDltton. (31 il A Dinea eroied mouse*, itii i ] is -mert rornmaiifiing Hnan* int Uic jnnar Dreskcr. 141 if Kut Oft I5I B *'i||"" " '" ini^ i4l lino M il|ht-weict!t TbU aort wouia ot Olgtui B-Mt in i nuv.i iingaum. is w anmim o lunar. Ifcl am Sur* it a no aa>il< iSl Haixing aster ? II Niwl UQac> by iInUv-uaaoa. ISl -o %  to I''. POlSOOOU* raaai ti %  i uias ISl i Hail iiiti*.Utl aaanviallon witn coo I7i 7. Orno tit waiar I*I a iiie io na lima. wo ouuio uii rou ,"•- i S-. % taaa D ••.uf I can do without. Ai A ne. that Is another So 1 uuzrlod ilowi T J K"*l tVgn, he should have gone Into a ctw-shed and trodden on u barber's foot. Then the barber would hfivc gon I for the matter pausing BOW lad tin n to acknow. the itollre xtntlin and traddan on leilge a piece of fuUonit flutter> a CJW'S foot. Dy this time publk or to accept another liotlle. N.opinion, realising that something was It any of your miserable pin odd was going on. wiuld have aria of Lorraine, but u stylish HtlL compelled the mayor to give a Alsatian wim from R!<|ur*wlhr civic banquet to the barber and Futher up the tf.illv. thev cheerthe policeman. The town hall ed me so loudly that 1 could would have been decorated with hardly hear myself drinking. llfe-sixc models of cows, the rate* would have gone up, but the #/i Putting enormous queue waiting to sr". H'le b.irtvs and iftf poUceman \ NUMBER of well-meaning arrive ftho banquet wool;, but muddle-headed writer, have been as happy as grig*. have aent me their "Authors' Peace Appeal." with %  request for my s'gnuturc. They will not get il. in.*. I have a favour to ask. I would like the 12 signatories to read through very carefully the document to which the. have put their names. I think *iiat the more intelligent among ithdraw Sftfl Forgot \unlif them will then signatures. Ltut night TIU wife picked uj her foxFurr in one arm, me t. I'M other, and. with my son Bat fttl bock, carried us all upstairs (Correspondence column i When a policeman u'enf into fi. their barber's *nop, a cow trod on hit /oof. (News Item.) Rupert and the Lion Rock—2 tomer's broker train Can Tell A Dud Already Elaine has formed some strong opinions about stocks and shares. For instance: "There is no such thing as a phony stock, but It does take a tremendous amount of knowledge to pick out a good W..k <,„,. "War in Korea, floods ir. Kansas, everything has its effect on Man's language A few months later the> married. Elaine made a name of her own account in Hollywood mtl on Broadway. Now, at 35, the says "I'm through with the Tho*c people live in %  sort of Ivory tower, utterly out of touch with what is going on outside Flnnnee is real. When 1 go on* with %  man now. I can really talk his language." WORM) ooratiQBT RESERVED ILPT-I. LAST TWO SHOWS TO-DAY 1.30 & 8.30 r-.lv.rMl AeUa* DovjMe ROD CAMERON — FUZZY KNIGHT in "THE OLD TEXAS TRAIL "MADONNA OF THE SEVEN MOONS Starring STEWART GRANGER — PATRICIA BOCK GRAND OPENING TOMORROW' at 2.3t ft 1.30 WCBWBTO ir-HERACKj^ DONALO O'CONNOR PIPIR LAURIE @ ^FRANCIS*^**GLOBE Last Show. TO-DAY 4.45 and 8.1.% p.m. CLARK CAVLE In ANY \l Mill It CAN MAY AND FRED ASTAIRK HI I II MI: LITTLE II onus Pit 16: House .111: Balcony Mi Box 54. G L O M OPENING TOMORROW 5 8c 8.15 p.m. FROM THE LITTLE BLACK BAGS, FROM THE D.A.'S FILES, FROM THE HALF WORLD OF BIG CITY CRIME... COMES THIS SENSATIONAL CECIl KflUWAT JESSE WHITE A UN.VERSAL IN IHMOTOHAL PICTURE BOX Y LAST TWO SHOWS TO-DAY 4.30 A 1.15 Unlverul DOUBLE — "NAKED CITY" Starring : BARRY FITZGERALD and "SCARLET STKEET" Slarrlng : JOAN BENNETT — DAN DURYEA lUMOKItOW ONLY 4J A l.U Universal Double . Rod CAMERON —Fuzzy KNIGHT in THE OLD TEXAS TRAIL" ond "ODD MAN OUT" with James MASON OPENING SATI'RDAY 4.4S 1 t.15 llorring PAUL DOUGLAS BICHAPD BASEHAI7 lAiaARA B[i GEDDES DEBRA PAGET 2o. IIOVAI. LAST TWO SHOWS TO-DAY 4.30 A 1.15 HOD CAMERON In — "THE LADY OBJECTS" rod "ARCTIC MANHINTStarring Mikel CONRAD FRIDAY ONLY 4.J4 A I 15 Bible . THE MAGIC BOW" and "THE INVISIBLE MAN" with Claude RAINES Th. mm, t">o p*U I "Whw. it's lut aotk harrimi todir>" h* pulls. '* I'm loohmi lor s sound |fto nsirwd Sutor Sam. Do i % %  • '• ol you know where h* l.*cs and how to gci lheri> ? I w.nt io find him quickly. If. urn*!*." "Wh. n sir." tin %  ;•"'. poliirly. Irwnd Oi min*. II vou I io htm quitkly you d btiist ki i.._ ahow you ihf wsy." H is Mill wondering about Rollo'i myiferioui quMrion *o he irlla the boy he oi'i be Ions ind aiki him to wail. Then he Tesdi iht genflenMn lurihei up ihe hill. %  HiiiK VOILE $1.15 %  PLAIN SH\\HM:;s-r.rcN. Blue, Kawn. Faach $1.36 %  f. MsatSfl t-AKKKIHNK in all laatasN $1.57—11.59 4JVIIITK SHARKSKIN $2 lf WUUamiMD SIM ss $1.37-41.43 Fine slupmeiil ni Ladies Shoe* T. K. EVAiXS n% UII 111 III IIS mm DIAJ_ 4220 YOUR SHOE STORES 4606 Also TIIK SHORT PALS l^ET^ llN %  • Wilh Gary GRAY and I'd.' Wonder Dog "FLAME" PLAZA-B TOWN PLAYING FRIDAY 15th %  4.43 at % %  p.m. j; Canllnuliu Dally .45 a I.St p.ai. IS BACKACHE JUST A SIGN OF AGE? Many nrnplr II(I.T net,0n^u I QUESTIONS ASKED^ SULLIVAN DAHL MURPHY HAGEN •--sMmiim •• M M c fiery aau WHO OLYMPIC TO-DAY ONLY 1 Hepubllr Double I Ray ROGF.RS -SUSANNA PASS OPENING TOMORROW 4.30 St 115 EVANS [Fox Double .THE MAN WHO CHEATED HIMSELF" HIDEOUT with Lloyd BRIDGES •|T CLIMB THF. HIGHEST MOUNTAIN" iu-.il by the Uully action i>I k k fjs ty i and livrr. aching back ieving you must expect lew aches and paina wlun )>r. ClsMta Kulm* I (vn I and^our kidneys and liver UIHIII.V> mil IIISIIIA Playing from 8 pjn Io doting Dedco. t Sltak Dinners Mrv*d iKroughoul nS* nighl.



PAGE 1

TIHRSDAY. OCTOBER II. 1*51 BARBADOS ADVOCATF PACE SF.VF.V CLASSIFIED ADS. TEUPHOHC 2500. Marruse.. Dni'>. Acknmi nU. and 'n Mesnorlam nH W i i > and II M on Sunday. lor an> numMr ** words up 10 H. and ) reals per %  on ers-d)i and" ( nti per word n Sundays lot each 1 on arceS-dai OIKIJ %  TNI; OB Utjlur imi SAU AITOMOTIVK %  M "I St Philips Bovi %  -eves her late mreh Village. HI Philip, at 4 S3 n today fur St Itimp-. Chur-h F O Allevne iWldowe... A lla.nes %  D-mglile?. L Masrnll >Nl*4 % % %  C Hayiie. >th>n-ln-Ui< I' IIM*. iQrandiop* IHM" Audrey Alnn On *-ind-> Or a n B s r 1th Itll .1 -•BerforsV', Mn• c.. Coast. Ch CH daughter ol Mrs Agni* Freram Funeral look place on Sunday afternoon at ChrW Chureh Parish Ctiurch II 10 SI SEAL* On Wednesday IMh Octobir. IMI. Edith Murphy Sealy. lat. of Pine Rood. 11'.illr I The funeral Mvn her daushler"i. msdrnre. Mr* Arthur Chaddertonl. Glmoover Court. Ma* well Coast, drill CS o'clock Ihss evenina tor tot West bury Cemetery. Friends artinvited Mela Chadderton idaugMr, ATIT Chadderton ison-ln-lawi. Gilbert Murphy < Nephew I -i. Minor Convertible IS* One owoar Under LOW nil*. Perfect running order N.wl. sprayed FlrM firm offer 'SubJ.il M approval nel purI bin ,ll Or available Bsrbsdos about October Plri Cuh "1r. ..,„. Hcpl, Do. No H B C.J Advocate Co 1 10 II In CABS IMO Hiltnon Saloon In e*CS*M only l..(*k* mile* Austin A-TO first case cond.tion IIM sails*. Stendaid Varuruard in good orJ.r IIIUI miles it io Ji_n C AH -One eV I perfect condition l BSjt...p.III..: (..,-. Phone JSli Plymouth Car jr. yre* new Apply: Mas an ne Lane KM || Pord Prefect >atttciiUn Phono 4131 H r Bovell A Skeete 10 10 SI -I I %  Afttri in %  I* aea furnished ISlh Tel 11)1 P 10 U n 1*1 Hl.lt SAMS Tea emit per ooofa >iao .n wook-do,' •ad It coal* par apaie Ira* us SaasVy*. %  %  •" easr#* IIS" on a-sea-dea. "a |i M „ %  < H ndJv( TAKE NOTICE CLOVER LEAF i Ttvsl W tjTfsn COLUMBIA PACKKM > %  i>rpe>^lH> ll Mp.mii! %  I Ibe U of the Dominion d Carvta*. latlfft hoar trad* or business aajdaaaj I k> Foot ef Cenvpha-tl A.m.*. VawoMeir I Canada, haa applied lor the rr ( tiati. Of a trade maik tn Pan "A" of in rerprrt of fresh Hah. fr-een I I Ph. into had Ash. canned lUh %  p-i*tea of all an.tlea. and Will bo -e. r REAL ESTATE HOUBXaV -At Ho, .ie. ****> to xpajp Atoo „, G~ldens. Da>ielU Koad. Pine Hill ftiid Cm Alao Houea Spota at Mi<..i; For particular, about b.n!dinf. trlafti o: bv.ln* plone M A Wn" P>aar !.. Phono Numb— and I will contact you • 1 HKLKCTKK AL IMIISOVll The public are he f.vin* credit lo mr WOOD 'nee R.Uevt mrwll retpontible for her or anyone rlae mntrartlna any debt or debt* In my name unlera by a aritten order aienrd bv rne WIIJIAM II VEARffOOD. Part Boad. Buvli Hall. M.I,.,.10 10 SI Jn ANXOr.M'EMEVr* requn ^f ruiomin. *e ha.e opened for cualoni made •hveti pyiamat. ponta. •hoiti. ladle* aiacKi IMI\. <'iotmna etc. Ifa.lnt at our dlapoaal the laollltloa of a modem factory we air nblr to offer prompt %  arvlfr* at axceplionally reaaondble price. Rrllarxe Shirt Factory. Shirt Depot Palmetto Street Phone tTM 10 10 SI Irn UHOKEN DENTAL PI-ATT.S rtllf.illy iilimi whit* Jotl wa 1>.-.I Iti | | i.l Matarm to IPI. r II.M Street 10 fl •a -CLIMAX" ELECTRIC WASHING MACHINES -A email *hlpmao, of theee )ual roceiied from Canada and at ou. prkw of tMT 11 repreae-iU outitandlni Dial Mlt or 4110 DA COSTA a| \*ai Oliere in arltlnf are muted for th.purcnaa* and removal t dellli<| h< " "nown aa "Wakaftrld" aback ol the Y M C A Headquarter.. Pinfold Mrpa) OITrr. a ill be accepted up U. anil includine lllh In.t The purchaaei ail! be required W like down and teino.. the Dwellin Houae frotn the premier b> noon Itlh November IPSI lnaprrti.ii | Sicned BOAHD or DIRECTORS Y M C A Per HERBERT WILLIAMS. Oeneral Secretary • 10 HI on Co., Ltd Electnci lyeparrmrnt r MH' u.it v >.: It C RadMtrrrar 11 Sl--*n MECHANICAL SHdCER SEW INO MACHINE %  %  arid M,irH>|l.i!.. P.imltuir •MI 10 10 S MISCELLANEOUS C1K-OANUT PLANTS Selected coctwi mil plants Apply Nlavara PactoiSpry Street Dial 4312. t 10 SI 3n GOOD CUT-OPEN MRS J.O-KKHJ. 3 lb Una aVper do* Alao old can board boxea 1 a p^,. ,]„, c a || ,, Robert, Manulacturtna Co. Bay Street 10 10 SI In WANTED MISCELLANEOUS TAKE NOTICE i :MITI.I> JEPP Thai RECKITT A COiJ Manufacture !" of Klneaton Worka. Dan%  om Ijine Hull. England hai applied lor the reciatialion of a trade mark in Pi.. "A" of Reil'ter in revpeel ol pharniacdutKal and medicinal preparu l-ona. and will lie entitled lo regUl.t I'e lama after O-M monlh ftom the tth day of October IBM unlcee ami pencil •nail in the mean lime live notice In I'uplicale to -no at my office of oppoalllon of .i-.li reirtratl..n The trailmark PR be en on application at my office. Doled Dili a*lh day of September IPSI II WUJ.IAMS. Hreutrer of Trade Mark. • 10 SI -li JOINT AND MUSCLE PAINS May mean kidney trouble A linntitm of the kidner* is to clinuruttc harmful impurities (torn the %  xttem. If the kidnvvi grow ilujgiih. Iheprimptirrticspccumaldtc and aettle and often become a can** of pain in joAola and niwclfai. The way to tackle the trouble is to help the kidneys. They should be toned np with De Witt's Pills the medicine made spectA!!* lor this purpose. Dr Wut'a Pill* have a toothing;. cleanainK and antiseptic action on the kidneys that btuigi them back to perfotm their natural funcboa properly. This well* tried medicine is sold all over tj the world and we have many I latten from sufferers trllir.o; ^ Of relief gamed, after years of saffehns, by taking De Witfs Pills. Try them for your trouble. Co to your chemiit and get a wpp ly Mar. CAR: i CM 1-1 Mini be available, deli... •art* October Caal, Pleane give full detail, and loweat price Reply Box No A A c.o Advocate Co 7 10 M -Si. SMALL HOC'SE preferably unlunil;he<1 wanted by Enallah couple No children Permanent flood locality Write Boa PUBLIC NOTICES Tea crmte pa* apaia ita. oa n-Ui and 11 ..on per apsta Una oa Saadav*. •aaaiinuai inurp* II X) on ween -on, oad |l SO oa SsrHfov* H.-.1 m will be received : p m. on Wadneadaj by Courts*./ tiaras*. I a rltlns if] Uth Ovtr White |>stk \U(TION f. UHDIJt OF Tlir INSURANCE COV i all I aell at CHU-SalA GARAGE. PINPlfljy STREET ON PR1DAV llin si a p m one Hi SUndard II h p Sedan Car Damaed Trrmi Caah R ARCHER UcKXNZlE. B> public competition at the undervienrd on Frlda 1031. at 1 p m ..' Uarbadoa PUe li.ur.n C-1AHKH Si CO. Jomea Stie IO 10 SI UNDER THE IVORY HAMMER B, inalrucnoru. received fro,n B.I n.uraie Co I will aell on Friday txtoorr Ilth at the CoiirtesOarsae, VlMlepark Road. .1IPW An.lu Ford. e H P new brund tyres idamaaed in nccldrnn Sa| e ,, j () „, Ternn cash VINCENT GRIFFITH Amtroneer. T 10 M 4n TAKE NOTICE GRANDEE Th. ; l HRtTISH COltTMBIA PACKERS LnilTIJ' a r irjI f t U si oraanuad urut.r w Isar. of the Dominion Mas ttade or btuui b Phot of t-.nipleii a Can.., r„ applied In, the tecMtraltuh si a trade mark In Part "A" of %  SeSSPaM 'I Ire.h Itab. froien SM>. MH bat •moksd SaH, canned Sah and fWh p.. ..I all vartetiea. and will be entitle. la ie*:atar the same after one sssnt' Iram the s*h day of Ortobe. let I IBBSSSI aome pSTSOn .hall In the naeantimr.. notice In duplicste li. me at m> otte ol oppostUsn of suet) rrantraUon Th, trarte mark can bo earn on applmt ai ..[ i i mm Dated this asth day of S.pt.mb. is'i H WILLIAMS It-lUtrar of Trade Mark. GOVERNMENT NOTICES EXPORTS AND IMPORTS (RESTRICTION) ACT. I3 THE Governor, in exercise of the powers conferred on him bv section S (2) of the Exports and Imports (Restriction) Art. 1939 hereby makes the following Order. — I. This Order may be cited ax the Exporti sttd Imports (Genersl Open Import Licence) Order. 1951. 2 An> person may import from nny country — {I) from and after the coming into operation or this Order such type of goods as are tet out In the First Schedule hereto; (2) From and after the first nay of November one thousand nine hundred and fifty-one such type of goods as are set out la the Second Schedule hereto. 3. This Order shall have effect subject to the following provisions — (a) the order shall operate only in respect of the type of Itobds set out in the Pint and Second Schedule* fu-ret. whuh are wholly produced in countries from which exports take place; (b) the certificate of origin of all imports of uch goods shall be produced by the importer DC consignee; (C) the approval of the Financial Secretary must be obtained prior to Ihe importation of any of such goods where payment for such goods is to be made to a country other then the country of origin of the goods. Made by the Governor this 61h day of October, one thousand nine hundred and flftv-one By Hi.* Kxccllcncy's Command, (Sgd.) R. N TURNER. Colonial Secretary. FIRST SCHEDULE Tin plate Template or Black plate .>nufaciured Copper S.P.C.A. Inspectors Get SEAWELL Last Of Four Lectures king condition IUI V-l For good working order would good pick-up B AHCKEH McKFNZIF. TAKE NOTICE NOTICE Ph la to inloi binirt my Dental Office u no' %  ted at M.irluU Street over Ml unary Laundry Depot a HUNT, n D s S 10 SI—I' OUR GUARANTEE De Win's Pills ... assail(acturcd under strictly hygienic condition* and the ingredients conform to rigid rtaadarda of puntr. DE WITTS PILLS 'o' Kidrwy .d BUdder frpublei NOTICE IS HEREBY GIVEN thai II ll the lotion of the Co mm lea lone ra of HighA. for in.' psriih ol RAINT JAMES in tfiia I.land to cause to be introduced into the Legislature ol th.. Island i Bill authorising them to kiLiry payable to Ihe I rupee t %  ( of HUfe wayi for the said parish to a urn not travelling olloxince layable lo Ihe said .inspector of Hlgnw i par annure, aueh InI ffSCf si from Ihe let ls> ol April ISSI Dated the Sth day of October ISSI YPARWOOD fa BOYCE. Solicitors lor Ihe Commissioners ol Highways. Saint Jamea 0 10 SI—In Semi-manufactured Nickle Semi-manufactured Zinc Borax Hi .tic Acid Newsprint Jute goods Smoked and Pickled Fish Onioiiv Potatoes • Finished Steel (excluding fabricated steel) as under: — la I Heavy Steel products including heavy rail Sleepers and heavy and medium plate; (b) Light rolled products Including bars, rod hoops and strips; (c) Steel sheets; (d) Wire plain or barbed other thun insulated um (e) Wire rods; If) Tube and pipes including lube fittings; (g) Tyres, wheels and axles;* ratlon organired and t.iatmg „m|rr the laWf of the Stel,. „l Ne. j. America, whose trade ui business addiea. la 350 Madison Avenue New York. New York. United Slates of America, has applied for the registration of a trade mark in Part "A" ol lu-glaler In respect of substances used M loodi and aa Ingredients i„ foods. mania' und invalids' foods, and will be entitled to register the same after one Ihe Sth day of October person shall ..ii., plla iy nftVr of opposili. on. The trade mark can be seen on application at my office Dated this asth day 'A September, IPSI H WILLIAMS. Registrar of Trade Mark! t 10 31— in TAKE NOTICE DRYC0 Thai THE BOBDCN COMPANY, a corporalliin prganircd and existing under the laws of the SUte of New Jersey. United BUle* of America, whose trade oi business address jjo Madison Avenue New York. New York. United Slates of America, has applied for the icglstaaApplicalions for Admission to Universities Mid Colliers in the United Kingdom Session 1951—53. Owing to the limited .tcniiiiiiiixiiition at Universities and Colleges in the United Kingdom resulting from the large number of applications for admission, the Director of Colonial Scholars ii endeavouring to securt u iiuotu for Colonial Students In each faculty In every University and College throughout tht IlriUsh Isles It must be realised, therefore, that only those who are strongly recommended and h.ivtfirst class qualifications for entry can be considered for admission. 2 The British Council will be responsible for nuking arrangements for meeting students and for securing suitable accommodation for them. 9. Student* are advised that it Ii most undesirable for them to proceed to the United Kingdom unannounced und unsponsored in the' hope of obtaining admission to Universities and Colleges, as even tutorial colleges and polytechnics are t.vtrcrowdcd and it Is very dimcult to gain admission to them without due notice In the proper form 4. Forms of application for admission to Universities and Colleges in the United Kingdom, to ba completed In quintuplicate, may] be obtained from the Secretary, Student Advisory Committee, c/o Office of the Director of Medical Services, Wharf, Bridgetown, and must be returned lo him not later than Wedru'sdov, 3li October. 1w51 10 10.51 3n Register las* espect I as ingredient! In foods. Infanta and invalid** foods, and will be • lllled to register the samo alter one • innth from the Mb dsy of October SSI unless some person shall in the eanilme give notice In duplicate lo me it my office of opposition of such reals ration. The trade mark can be seen on i-'pllcitkin at my office Dated Ihit Mth day of September. IPSI H WIIXJAMK. Hrgutrar ot Trade Marks TAKE NOTICE BORDEN'S Thai THE RORDtBN COMPANY. corporMion orguniied and ii.tlng under ih 1-w. of Ihe State ol Nrw Jersey. United Stale, of America, whose trade ot b usi ness sddresI* 350 Madison Avenue. N York. New York. United Slates of Amsrk-s. has applied for the registration of a liads mark In Part "A" of llilta" in rrspeel of substances used I s foods snd a* Ingredients In foods. it f..nlC snd invalids' foods, snd Will be ei titled to register the seme alter osvn-onth from the Sth day • %  < October ISSI unless some person -tu.il in Ih %  mcanlime give notice In duM*..'.la at my ofnee of opposition uf I.I" legla trstlon Tlie Usde mark ran be seen 011 explication at my office Dated this Mth Usy of Septen.ber. ISO) II WILLIAMS Itrgi.ir..* ol Tmde Msrk> P 10 SI in TO-DAYS NEWS FLASH WINSTON CHURCHILL— THE SECOND WORLD WAR — Volume IV THE HINGE OF FATE Al Johnson's Stationery CARPENTER RlXES At Al Johnson's Hardware t A MHH Al I'lfispi 1 t. Si. .I:iitis-s Large 2-storey stone house of good sound construction, %  ottrtad "ii o\*er a H acre of coast land with 160 ft. of sen frontage. First class sandy beach. Large living rooms. 4 bedrooms on the upper floor with umilar accommodation below on ground floor. In our opinion this property would be eminently suitable for conversion into a Guest House. Low figure required. • JOHN si. BL4DON V €*>. A.F.S., F.V.A. Real Esta'e Agents. Auctioneers a> Building Surveyors THE FIRM WITH THE REPUTATION 'I'hone • Plantations Building. Cuiloms CharKes On Goods Imported Into United Kinndoin By Posl The following extract from a nottcfft issued by the Customs and Excise Department of the United Kingdom, is published for the information of per'ns who contemplate sending gifts through the post to addressees in the United Kingdom, within the provisions of the, Exports and Imports (Restriction) Order 1S49 1. General. Most articles of personal and domestic use are | 'liable on importation to Purchase Tax as well as to import duty (purchase Tax Is chargeable on similar goods produced in the United I (Kingdom and in order not to discriminate against home production It j (must equally apply lo imported goods. For example, the home shop | [price of a handbag Includes Purchase Tax charged internally and It I would be inequitable if 0 like Imported article were not charged with la corresponding amount of tax on importation. 2 Second-hand poods. The law di-s not exempt second-hand goods from duty or tax. but, where thesa are chargeable by reference' lo value, the fact that articles have l>tn used is taken into account | In assessing Ihe charges. 3. Gifts. The law which imposes Customs and Purchase TUA on imported goods makes no exception In favour of gifts. Gifts purchased in the United Kingdom arc tax-paid and remission of taxation in favour only of those who receive gifts from abroad would not be justified. Dritlsh shop-kit'i'"' selling taxed goods would also ibe prejudiced if imported gifts were .illowed to reach consumers tax [free The volume of mails cleared daily through the Customs is [moreover such that the selection of -pedal case* for privileged trmtIment is not practicable. 4. Rat*-: There are wide variations in the rales of duty and I Purchase Tax chargeable on different kinds of article. In the case |of luxuries and stmi-luxurics, In particular where both duty and tax tare chargejbl. tbi total charge may be high in relation lo the value (declared by the sender Articles commonly sent as presents such as jewellery, scent, cosmetics, and fancy foods, ore usually chargeable at high rates both of dutv and tax and the total Customs charge may be expected to exceed the prlct paid abroad. In the case of I tobacco and cigarettes the duty is nearly as much as the retail price in the United Kingdom. On the oth'T hand Ihe duty rates on foodstuffs are usually low and the charge is generally ignored for gift parcels containing foodstuffs only, B. A. ri.AHKK Colonial Postmaster. General Post Office, 9.1031 11.1001 In To ensure that yoar ear Is given the best lubrication—USE UKHUI lABHHATI.Wi OILS Obtainable from CENTRAL FOUNDRY LTD.—Trafalgar St. REMEMBER DON'T ONLY OIL IT — GERM IT UK To Review G.A.T.T. Operation Restrictions On Imperial Preferences" GKNEVA. The British Government will review the whole operation of th General Agreement on Tariffs ant. Trade within the next year or two. in the lighl of experiences up hi date, because of the restrictions l> imposes on lmperi.il Preference. Sir Hartley Shaworoas, Prealdan of the BAX.UI al Tun-, has anlOssssWd 111 Geneva. "So far. the United K Ouieinmwit. Ufea other gofOti tint fatt BlsVi to commit itself bully tn tba Oanaral Agreement." he told a ni"tint %  the contracting parties to C. AT'. -We shall need to consider ho* far its present provtslona. wit 1 the undoubted restrictions whl< < they impose on us in such matter*, for example, .is preferences between Commonwealth c tmtrie ami with their unsflUsf nctoi > bearing on the relations between the contracting parties and the International Monetary Fund, artcount er-ba la need by lat.i vantages in the promotion nl world trade. In this, the IJtlHod Kingdnm must have II* proper share." The Agreement, which was drawn up in 1941 to pfovMo multilateral tariff negotiations and fnir trade rults, demaints tineventual end of all prefei.-iu." It was a! the C..AT.T. cimfercni•%  in Torquay last winter that Hn tnin began the m-nntiiitions with Cuba which culiriin.itetl In the signing of the Anglo-CulMit ii-in.iticinciit. over the head of srtTong protests from the British West Indies. Under the G A.T.T. arrangements, the tariff concessions uhn li Cuba grunted tn Britain In th' ..iiecmi-ii'. .iiitrimatii-.llv iipplv li ill nations which are i-.itli'. ATT. Ihus thrnwitiK offfM t m Cuban market to BOTOI EOnptll Uon ffiini other cxixntuiK IUIIIDUHrilain, It i* believed that % %  It-llisli i view of th-.' iigrtvmetit might 1.1vnlve an elTort to change its pro%  litlng to Imperial lreferences and ret it ions with Iha 111* ternatlonal Monetary Fund A r. %  cent Fund report tecuniirn'riil.i that Britain and other slcrlliiff areas tease import restrictions imposed for reasons uf balance nf payment. While stressing the m<<-.n rassing position, as far as Sir Hartley's threat to cling to them is concerned. Drastic us n .u lions on Imports of dairy product) from Rurope. for example, are helievt.i to have encouraged the U.K. (.oveinment in Us latest position. The United Slates is not ngs*> Ll a good position to protest If Itritnin wants to mainluin the Impen,il Preference system, sinci these recent actions by the US Congress are violations of CAT T There have been protests again* these US. measures at the Genev; meeting and a ruling on thorn wil be given by Ihe contracting par ties to G.A.TT— B.IJ.P. The local S.P.CA. Inspectors Seceivrd the Anal of four lectures. given by Sgt. Major C. F. Torrezao. Chief S.PC.A. Inspector of British Guiana, at th*. Y.MCA yeaterday rrsornlng. The lecture was "What Constitute'Cin.-I'to Animals." 'These instructm.d.isses were given lo improve the knnvvledge of local In specters The Sgt. Major said "It may be neceasary to use ,1 whip of some kind tn urge an animal to go fast 1 ui when an ..iiinial is already g.nng at a quick pace, to use a thick heavy rope, more often than not doubled, and to deliver several blows therewith, is surely causing iinnecessarv suffering |o the .iiumal. especially If U is drawing a heavily laden vehicle "Attain. for apparently nn reason, one sometimes sees some c,n tin.in take a double rope which toirna his driving leina, and deliver several blows across the ti.ee of his animal, or in attempting to make hia animal revei&e %  heavily laden cart, do tlio same thing wtlh either a roue o r a stick. Such are examples of cruel beating, and instances such as these .1111 punishable by law." .IIKCll Ihl local Inspectors to keep a close look oul fo r symptom* of cruelty. thiiH relieving the animal of unnecessary suffering l*stnr in the mornum the Chief lns|M*clor gave a lecture at the [• %  dice Training School on "Prevention of Cruelty to Animals.'' He also told the recruits ho*'he. COUkl iletc.l cruelty. The recruits look %  keen interest and asked many questions. A vote of thanks was moved bv lnsiaector Reld. omlttla-H, a 1 Press ikisii.M. F DeOannea f. lHfl Sle.1 T Haa.kins. N Wilaon. 1 ll..., n.. !" 1 1 Or eaBe|d. H Pohr. O Head. M in evait si %  .n B R 1 Per SI ii.i\ Mr Ruftsa Bpelbsae. k. 11,..,, Raae >.i isiMuviiMlai Lilian Oeorge. Mstr %  aasaj • %  Mi, Vr %  D—a ..art Kim.. Mrs PbylUs KSBW, I:.I-,I.I 1 ffe Mr -sarcivsl Tue Sltele. Mrs Bell* Sir. th. Mr Bill! Smith Miss Beil. Smith Mi 1-a/aar.ce WSSMS. Mr Nahaman e\, ess Harbour Log In Carlisle Bay Yaihl Marsalless. Sch Bss||n Skr W 1. EunlclB. Sch Lad, NoansSa. SB* Marion Belle Wolfe Sch Cyckarams O. Bch D* Oetac Sch Marr I S*h Anita H BVh Prances W Brnith. Sch cprll %  Smith. M V isass-aaioe ARRIVAL. Bch ANITA H SI lona i..pt Hajsn lion. Demerara. AgenU Sri era Association mum TI ...,, SMITH Sg'uin.. Cst *7,48.1,14MMKM WASHINGTON, Oil. II 1'iVM.tcnt Tium in on Wednesday signed into law the S7.483.400.000 arms economic foreign aid programme inteudrd In D.WI I'lninuuist dreams of world n,n.|iiest" D r I .,' 11 taps Bcfe CVB1L K M it. hell. ss-rkaeerar Owners' A saw is I ion s S PORT TtlWNfsHOMD. CatM J III Agent. Messrs DsCosta at CO.. Ltd M v HAJDXWOOD M tons, cspi Muliac (nan SI Lucia. af-||; gphnrsur Owners AasoclsUon %  tr.tiiiM • Srh AUOU8TUS B COMIToN I" lona. Cspi Coslet f,.r Trtnld.id. Agent. HrhiHmer Ownsra' AssoriaUon B a RCHOI.AR (4M tona Css.1 as f. Trmlds.1 Agent. Messrs DsCoata Co I Ad M V C I. M TANNIfl. 41 DBS* r.., (Grenada. Agsa.l. seltaoaarr nersAawwlallon H Al.COA PBUASVB. 3S91 So,,. Capl Mnnjan. foe ^irl Alfred. Asents Messrs DaCoala a Co, Lid MAIlst fr>r Martinique. llllSIBU. United Klnadom and Prancsa bv U H.S CntAOMj.ll .ill be ,l„| ., Vlm ti# ,. Oence a" under I'-irel Mail % %  %  ssa Hsglali ssf • Uvdlnsry Mall at 10 lllh oelsber ISSI tUIVH*-S. Ik. .1 risen THiNiKAi. n tiger, iii fUackrnaii SSMTSS ri.Mm ORCNAltA M.1.1. Itacrhus. Dapl HlkSa PYederM-k Prsea NRW %  t a B ftSE, MAC TO SPEAK NRW ViiKK QOsrOn] Miii Arthur will m.ikiilie main adtlress at the American laVd Annual Convention in Miami. FIIKHI.I next Wc.lneday U-P. iJM7K9 ftE mVCCUAmS A'nimol Week Children^ CoaMrt AN excellent concert wai stage, at Queen's Park House, on Pritia> afternoon last by pupils ol the foi lowing clcnientnry schools:—Car rlngtona Girls 1 St. Leonard'n Boy* St. Giles' Girls, Wesley ]|.ed the port nf Blaci I Marks, head of the pirates, dc I servei specl,>l mention. All of the items were well pre sented, and the children a' well a the teachers who Iraine<| them de serve much cTsrdit, especially n view of the fact that Ihe conccr was got up within the short spac of three weeks. Outstanding re clters were A. Phillip* of the S' l-eonaid's Boys' School wi rba I'll'-and rh.Uutotmrn Tie. %  ind T Gill Of St Gil" Olrla' School who recited Man'i nd The singing was of > very high standard and it would be Invidious lo single out oni xhiMil f..i %  ! %  ( i.il II ientIon At Ihe conclusion of the programme. Mr. A. G Jm a vote of thanks to all who hat helped in aity way lo make thi concert a success. In doing so, he expressed regret at the paucity of the .idult .ludienie. and mad special mention nf Mr I). R ArlhurTnd C. Livingstone of the Bay Street who had midert.ik'i the task of arranging tha directing the execu'ion of the pro gramme. Amone those present were til rtvv J R I art* r>wl rwolt, and Mr* N (Barbados S.P.CA. was represented' l.v Mr L T Oar* and Mr. A. 0 Jordan. Misht Dsaiu si S'10-i I .1.1. Cirrenry 0> VIS %  Coupons aa n in. Silver Boys* Chib 0|i r m-(l A large crowd saw Major R. A, Stouto. Deputy Commissioner of Police formally open tho thlrtcentn Boys' Club in the Community %  til in SI. Andrew yc^-rtOu .iflernoon. Major Stoute nitllwga the activities of tho Boys* Club fat the Inland and sold that he fioporl that the l>oys in that conrniimitT would appiedale the cluU--."." After Majoi stouta had dSCLir.";! the Club open, the bo j W _jgU m ^r table tennis ;:nd MATBIJIA IPR.I_aUap.age n | MSIl INM < %  r.p.nri*tll t Ih day of l>ec>rU>er ISSI at 11 o-clot* in the l\.r.s..i Ikerree for Ihe dlssulullDn u by ine PetiUoswr fax ..ii are rsquired tu file i of Novsrober lt*| snd Ihe Court may proceed Iflon. .aoiir abaencc nol Brill.. ,S,r in io Si an I> UX SAIUaJA.NT the PVtlllrnier ol Null James Street. ... Ii... li I llArlBAIUlS The unde QfRce. I-ubllr BuHdingi on Ihe oats specified Friday si the same plan .iiplicalton lo Its CHANCERY SALE -trauost I'BHITHTV III AM. THAT certain arlsh of Saint I.ury In this Island cmtai nods twenu seven pei.hes or th.rrslvi.ila thrr lands of (he defendant on lands of ir dorlllngho-ise railed IIEANB HOliljW n Hie said parrel nl land erected and bul %  •SET I'fiiCk flVS • • Dale of Sah lllh Oetubrr, ISSI ind If not Ihen sold they will be set up on artttl during Ihe same hours until sold Full pstlteolaig-y. land situate In the s/Hh Haa .iruuasr I,II -i u li i. bultlruj and bmindi [•ollelon Planlatlon ud iKiuml together and all and singuUi I'l'i.l 1I.TV I | n, ti.i. I.l. ri inur nrths in or thereabout %  *• linn on lands of Che. Ser Hall saM AV Dearie deceased and ind bound land, heredllai AT piece or parcel of Und situate in the pariah of Sslnl rut bv adm surement Three acre, three roods thirtyng and bounding on oiher lands sf I lerein desrrlbsd on lend, of Collets Ms on lands now o; late of Ihe ealsie __ the public road or however else Ihe same may . ind premliei — WILLIAMS, Hrsi-lrar n.-Ohsfi-eeSHIPPING NOTICE? MOSfTRPSt. ..%  !. ,J I. Nr*t SSAIANP UN*. I.IMITBD (M A Sf Z IU.I 9 R "Ii,nr ADELAIDC" Is srhedulst k sail from llobart September IMh. lelbourne October 4th. Sydney October MB, OUnitone Octisar ISth. I'nrt Ann. i lube r itnti. II r lab at i> October Pith, rrl.mg al Trioldsd soo.il November lal and Pavbados No.tmber lath. In addition to fsneial cargo this %  ael has smple spare lot chilled aivl S The M V CAluniH i | Bt Lucia. Grenada nd Aeub ..,,>., miii niiali Gultna. Le*ward and Windaari .and! Pnr further particulars apply— I'l.NFJifi. WITIIV a CO LTD. an DsCOBTA CO LTD. I I | Ulll.-ll..! II w i r w i Bailing Friday 11 m-t The M V MONI.KA will accept Cargo and Passengers lor Dsrrirv snd Bl Kilts Sailing , %  asth Vr.l.ea llsrkasas %  OBTshsssi so SOREST TBOH LTD. — WTW TOSS AND CULT .-.f.EVlCE Arn.T>-DA COSTA CO.. ITS-CANADIAN SE1VICB



PAGE 1

PACK SIX BARBADOS ADVOCATE Tlll'RNDAY, OCTOBER 11. Mil HENRY BY CARL ANDERSON MICKEY MOUSE BY WALT DISNEY %  ^ pfcfa fl pp veo raa : WAS .M-we -. %\ 3CAff£7... B^T ;\E 30T TJ 30 Tr-ZOu3* 1 TJ.S...TO C'_*e WNSELP WTt-l MICKEY... BLONDIE BY CHIC YOUNG rpHEIR good looks tell yon they're/usl righi. Yon know, too, when you look at the price tag, that you can't get finer value. Ilia*! rated U a Tan Oxford shoe for Boys and Youths. Tied to every pair is the John White Guarantee Shield—the rign which means 'just right 7 Look for it in leading stores in Barbados. JOHN WHITE means made just right '-.*^-*--^%%%'-v*-'-*^o****v*v>r.ov-v,v*'-*,'*'-%%^o^v.v^^^%--*,---.---,u %  CUM SAFE MILK KLIM $m% taft MILK HnP.tlMc.iiWoridOv HORNIMAN'S TEA IT PAYS YOU TO DEAL HERE SPECIAL offers to all Cash and Credi* Customers for Thursday to Saturday only USUALLY NOW USUALLY NOW Tins Evaporated Milk 29 27 Bottles O'Keefes Beer 26 20 Tins Grape Fruit Juice 24 22 Tins Heinz Soup 31 28 Pkgs. Lux Flakes (Large) 50 17 Bottles Gordons Gin 250 230 D. V. SCOTT & Co. Ltd. Broad Street .:vsrV/V*>ViVs/-/v>iv**Wi BAKERS! SHOPKEEPERS! NEXT WEEK FLOUR WILL BE BOUGHT j FOR NOVEMBER, j DECEMBER KNOWING YOU HAVE MANY TIMES BEEN DISAPPOINTED BY RECEIVING INFERIOR. FL OURS, WHY NOT ASK YOUR SUPPLIER TO GET THE BEST AT NO EXTRA COST "LIBERTY BELL" CANADIAN QUEEN" HIGHEST QUALITY BAKERS FLOUR ROBERT THOM. LTD.—Agtnl*


or

,

ESTABLISHED



1895



Altered

Mutually

WASHINGTON, Oct. 10.
UNITED STATES Secretary of State Dean
Acheson through the press urged Egypt to
delay “unilateral action’’ on abrogating the Anglo-
Egyptian Treaty and await a “new proposal to be

offer
Acheson said the U.S.

’’ within the next few days.

Government was against

the course Egypt was adopting in deciding to abro-
gate the Anglo-Egyptian Treaty of 1986, and the
Anglo-Egyptian condominium agreements of 1899.
He said: “The U.S. Government believes proper
respect for international obligations requires that
they be altered by mutual agreement rather than
by unilateral action of one of the parties.’’



Trade Unions
Back Attlee

LONDON, Oct. 10.

Britain’s trade unions lined up
officially behind Prime Minister
Clement Attlee to present Win-
hurdle 000,000 Votes hgh.

h.

The National Union of Mine~
workers ued an election mani-
festo calling on 600,000 workers
to vote Labour in the October 25
general election and the warning
that Churchill’s Government
would return “capitalistic fea-
ae to the nationalized mining
nm ;

Other unions in the giant
8,000,000 strong Trades Union
Congress are falling into line
behind Labour. Trade unionists in
turn will be urged to tell wives
to vote labour,

All trade unionists will not
vote Labour despite the pleas of
their union leaders. But an over-
whelming percentage of them will
do so and this is almost one-fourth
of the ballots which will be cast.

Churchill showed his concern
about the trade union vote in a

hin his home district of

‘oodford last night. To offset

Labour “propaganda” he pledged
ae, oe safe:
ment ald - no ~
tion trade unions.
What Conservatives fear most
is the tempting possibility that
the trade unions will use their
position as a “political weapon”
if Conservatives win. wn

Accept 14 Points

BERLIN, Oet. 10

Communist run East Germany
accepted on Wednesday, the
western zone’s 14 point pro-
gramme for free elections as a
basis for negotiating German
unity but demanded a halt to
“dangerous” talks on West Ger-
man rearmament. The East Ger-
man Parliament again asked the
West German Parliament to meet
for talks aimed at unity, a peace
treaty and the evacuation of
occupation troops.—U.P.

Ships Hit New High

WASHINGTON, Oct. 11.
The National Federation of
American shipping reported on
Wednesday that the number of
ships in the United States Mer-
chant Marine “continued the up-
ward surge toward a record peace~

time high during September.”

—U.P.





HARRIMAN
DIRECT NEW PLAN

WASHINGTON, Oct. 10.
The Whijte House announced
on Wednesday that Averell Har-
riman, Special Assistant to Presi-
dent Truman, will be Director of
the new combined Military and

Eeenomic Foreign Aid _ Pro-
gramme. Harriman ig now in
Paris serving on a special com-
mittee of the North Atlantic
Treaty members studying the
possibility of increasing Western
Europe’s re - armament pro-
gramme.—vU.P.

TO-DAY’S WEATHER
CHART

5.48 a.m.
Sunset: 5:54 p.m.
Moon: First Quarter
Lighting: 6.00 pam,
High Tide: 12,40
p-m.
Low Tide:

Sunrise:

am., 1.33

1.11 a.m., 1.41 p.m

——-



The text of Acheson’s statement
read: “The American Embassy in
Cairo confirmed that the Egyp-
tian Prime Minister on October
8 introduced in the Egyptian
Chamber of Deputies draft legis-
lation which would abrogate the
Anglo-Egyptian treaty of 1936
and the Anglo-Egyptian condo-
minimum agreements of 1899
which provide for joint Anglo-
Egyptian administration of the
Sudan.

Parties directly involved are the
United Kingdom and Egypt and in
the case of the 1899 agreements the
Sudanese people as well.

However, these matters are also
of general concern to the free
world for they affect the security
and defence of the important
Middle East area. None of the
agreements in question provides
for abrogation. The United States

respect for international
tions requires they be altered by

mutual agreement rather than by jdaily
the unilateral action of one of the average in commercial competi-

parties.

Furthermore it should be noted
that producers wholly in accord
with such respect for internaticnal
commitments already have been
set in motion. During the past
months new proposals to be offered
to Egypt have been under con-
sideration and the Egyptian Gov-
ernment "has been informed that
the proposals were to be presented
fo it within the next few days.

It is the belief of the U.S. that
the solution of the Anglo-Egyptian
question can be found through
these proposals.

The U.S. considers that the new

‘| proposals, shortly to be presented

to the Egyptian Government should
serve as a sound basis for agree-
ment which will not only satisfy
the interests of all parties con-
cerned, but also contribute to the
defence of the free world in which
the Middle East plays such an im-
portant role”’.—U.P,



DENIES CHARGE

WASHINGTON, Oct. 10.
Secretary of State Dean Ache-
son on Wednesday denied the
eharges that he proposed cutting
off military aid to Nationalist

on February 5, 1949. “as a dra-
matic peace move’’.—U.P.

China at a White House "a dra]











W. German

Industry

Doing Well

By ROBERT HAGER

BONN, October, 10,
: Pushing hard for political and
Government believes that proper! military equality among the na-
obliga-} tions of the West, Western Ger-
is already ens
than

many
she can do better

tion.

Still operating under some
Allied industrial controls the
Ruhr and other manufacturing
centres are now grinding out

progucts at a rate of one-fourth
higher than 15 years ago just be-
rearmament drive

fore Hitler's
started,

Nor have Germats péen
tant to step on Allied
pouring a high percen

toes
e

in
of

their goods into expert channels,
They have jumped to the posi-
tion where they threaten “serious

consequences” to

Western nations according

recent report of the

competing
toa
Economic

Commission for Europe a United

Nations organization,

Bonn republic oapona now run

more than §300,0

000 monthly.

Big gains have been registered
in the categories of chemicals,

machinery, vehicles,

instruments, _ textiles
course steel.

But official

6

electrical
apparatus, optical and precision
and

production figures

are at variance with the lamenta-
tions. The Allied rule book has
long said that German produc-
tion is limited to 11,100,000 tons

annually, But

effectively destroyed last

that ceiling was
year

when it was agreed that an ex-

cess for



U.S. Infantrymen,

Tanks Rout Chinese

EIGHTH ARMY H.Q., Korea, Oct. 10.
Fifty U.S. tanks and nearly 3,000 infantrymen routed ter-
rorized Chinese troops in a daring stab eight miles into Com-

munist territory.

The powerful U.S. Second
Division Task force made a hit and
Tun “killer” raid in an attempt to
end the Coramunists’ month-long
stand on bloody “Heart-break
Ridge” on the East Central front,

of the ridge with guns blazing
thundered through the tiny
village of Mundung 23 miles north
of the 38 parallel and pushed on
two miles beyong the embattled
northernmost peak of ‘Heart-

Tanks rolled up the valley west





Vietminh For
Withdraw

SAIGON, Oct.
withdrawal
Vietminh forces was

The general
Communist

Western defence use
only eould be produced.—U.P.

reported from the mountains sur-
rounding the rice bow! of Nghia
Lo 90 miles northwest of Hanoi





U.S. Ask Egy

Agreement Can Be; —
|
|

P







of

BACK

THE Barbados cricket team traries from B.G. early yosterd

noon by B.G. Airways cha
Williams (Manager), Gerald
the first four members of the

Seawell at 1.15 p.m.

Mr. F. A. Clairmonte, Vice-President of the Barbados Cricket
Association, Mr. Teddy Hoad, Mr. T. N. Peirce and other
cricket enthusiasts including wives, parents and friends of
various members of the tearm were at Seawell to welcome

home the team,

From All Quarters 3
oe

after his international flight

in Mexico City.
service agents of

Four
the US.

immigration office.

patients,

was told.

Demonstrations — 9,000 demon-
strators continued an outbreak in
four truck
loads of police — about 150-—~ ar-
rived half an hour later and suc-
The
outbreak came as both Houge and
Senate Committees unanimously
approved the Government draft
Anglo-

Central Cairo until

ceeded in dispersing crowds.

jbills abrogating the

|Payptian treaty.

German-Argentine Trade —
\faltzan,
roreign

|Freiher Vollradt Von
|Chiet of the German
|Trade Department will fly

| Buenos Aires Thursday to join the
———- |German trade delegation negotiat-

ces

\ing German-Argentine trade,

Calls on Morrison — Argentine
Ambassador Carlos Hogan ¢alled
on Foreign Secretary Herbert Mor-

rison at his own request,

Vote of Confidence — Premier
Alcide De Gasperi faces a vote of
confidence tonight after making a
windup report on his recent trip

to the U.S. and Canada.

Gets Check Up — Hugh Daillic



The other members are seen alighting in the background,
Cricket Team
Return From B.G.

The Barbados Cricket team returned from B.G. yesterday
afternoon by B.G, Airways’ Special Flight which landed at

rr a ee cert ri ne

ue) US. Ceti a
Leader Captured
After Gaol-break

United States Communist leader
Guss Hall, 41, was escorted back
into the U.S. under heavy guard
to
escape gaol ended with his capture
secret
and
Mexican Governments accom-
panied the Secretary of the U.S.
Communist Party. They took Hall
f)and his luggage from an ancient

sedan and led him into the U.S.
He was not
hand-cuffed and he saic nothing

The Dentist Pays—Dentist Pierre
Toucas paid 55,000 frances to re-
move three teeth from one of his
He removed them with
his fist in an argument the court

oo

imminent today as

apparently selected the

Although no official reaction
was forthcoming over the liaison
meetixrg, Communist Radio at
Peiping said in an _ unofficial
broadeast early today that liai-
son officers had agreed that the
telks would resume in Pan Mut
Jom area. United Nations officials
are so confident that the talks
would again get underway that
they moved their equipment from
the old site at Kaesong and stored
it north of the Imjin River under
a stone bridge half a mile south-
east of Pan mun Jom near what
was believed to be the new con-
ference site. Already at Munian
camp were tents with floors anc
stoves waiting to be transported
to the new peace community,

—D.P.

Polish Refugees
May Be Spies

STOCKHOLM, Oct. 10.

Swedish authorities carefully
investigated the arrival of fou
Polish nationals who said they
seized a Polish trawler in armed
mutiny. They asked for politica)
asylum.

They arrived at the Baltic See
naval base of Karliskrona. As re-
ports from there indicated some
officials believe traffic from Po-
jund to Sweden may have been
organized by Russian Intelligence

it. Winston Greenidgé Foffie”
sud Skipper Charlie Taylor, were
to get off the plano.



tS psp aie eth ED








The team, many of whom were

was” the | their

t oF ail ches b:
amoun eal y the
The team also

ourneys varied widely.
—U.P,

U.S, Plans Migration
Conference

GENEVA, Oct. 10.

The United States is drawing
up plans for an_ international
conference to set up the first

Barbados team, i

suffered from inexperience but
the young members all agreed that
they had learnt » great deal from
the tour.

Those returning were, Charlie
Taylor, (Capt.) E. A. V. Williams
(Manager), Keith Wales, Norman
Marshall, Conrad Hynte, W.
Farmer, Gerald Wapd, Gordon
Proverbs, C. Bradshaw, Cammy mass migration programme ir
Smith, &, Branker, ‘|history, Refugee experts here
Greenidge, A and Erie) said the conference, which Francr
Atkinson, may also join in convening, ir







5 scheduled to take place someting
eg | before the middle of November
W.L Officials Wait pither in Washington or ir
q ° Europe.

On Food Ministr It would set up a new agency

y to handle the migration of ar

(Prom Our Own Correspondent) estimated 5,000,000 surplus Puro-

LONDON, Oct., 10. peans to homes overseas.

West Indian re esentatives to| Countries interested in immi-
the Commonwea ugar Talks | gration and emigration would be
have not yet been inforraga when |asked to set up an interim com-
their discussions yvith the Food | mittee which would go into action
Ministry and other Goyernmentjafter a certain number of coun-
Departments will commence. tries signed the agreement.—U.P

nu wey are not worried, ‘ :

su 1eir purpose to wait on *
until after the General Blection| Attlee Hits Out
when there may be a ehange of
‘government bringing with it more LONDON, Oct. 11.
favourable terms for Common-! prime Minister Attlee made «
wealth Producers. : rautious reference to Americar
‘allowing yesterday's meeting
between the W.LC, Officials and
Messrs Cuke, Eocles and Kirkwa@od

slap at the anti-American stanc

to ; é 8 P . ’
tuggper preliminary talks were hour Batty. dpesking et Cran
pnapbimmetammiepe tham in his eight-day electior
campaign tour, he said Britain’
a Sta recovery has been achieved bj)
Judgment nds the efforts of the British people
“And I am not in the leas)
Tee deemant eta tacor Te ashamed to say that we have hac
Togurt Daguino, World War I1’s|4™merican aid We have hac
Tokyo Rose, to’ prison on a ten-|4merican aid in peace as aa

year sentence for treason against
the United States was affirmed
by the three judges of the Ninth
Cireut Court on Wednesday,



‘Acheson Grieved











Peace Talks Will
Be Resumed Today

munist liaison officers met at Pan Mun Jom and

cations that the 48-day deadlock would soon be
broken were varied, but each heightened optimism
that the talks broken off by the Communists on
August 23 would get “back on the tracks’’ shortly,

well sun tanned looked somewhat Service.
ti a 3-hour trip. from| Qther wou sahsanen pews
ment} ae ah oF, eth asy recently we:
In a interview” Wish dish authorities discovered many
ipper Charlie Qaylor @ of their answers’ to standarc
r “KBoffie’ Williams questions were almost identica’
told the Adyocate that the chief | althou the circumstances 0’

aid on Wednesday in a backhand

of the left wing of his own La-



Advocate



;





denunciation

Feyptien treaty. Pa

the support of ali

TOKYO, Oct. 11. tical parties for Wahas Pasha’s
proposals.

RESUMPTION of the Korean peace talks was The Press also carried other

the of the Anglo-
rs reported

gyptian poli-

United Nations and Com.|Near Eastern items. for instenes
anti-British demonstrationss i
Iraq where “Englishmen do not
dare walk the streets without
police esco@"” and a report on
the forthcoming American, Brit-
ish and French talks in Turkey
on the co-ordination of the
Turkish army with the Atlantic
bloc.

The Sovigt press
commented on

new conference site. Indi

has not yet
Anglo-Egyptian



U.N. OIL DEBATE jieysionmen’ but fers. nol
2 : sition. Diplomatic circles here
LIKELY TO BE opined that the Soviet Govern-

ment will support the case in the
Security Council if Britain raises

POSTPONED the question.

is also generally believed

UNITED NATIONS that Britain will probably be

NEW YORK, Oct 10 {Compelled to accept the — new

The initial appearance of Mo-{ StUation as she did with the na-
hammed Mossadegh, Iran's 72 tionalization of Anglo-Lranian

—U-P.

F ull Partner

year old Premier before the U.N.
Security Council in the Anglo-
tranian oil dispute is scheduled
© be postponed for at least two





days owing to his precarious
health, : nies

Mossadegh, from the seclusion! WASHINGTON, Oct. 10.
ot his six-room suite at Now Highly placed Sources said on
York hospital, requested Council Wednesday that Egypt would be
President Jono Carlos Muniz of{@ full partner with the United
Brazil to postpone the session! States, Britain, Prance, Greece
wheduled for Thursday until] ict Turkey in deciding the
Saturday ov longer. NATO Middle East Command

Indications. were that the{ structure if Egypt agredd to take
meeting would not be held until] pert in the Middle Rast Defence
Monday iwrangements.-UP,

Deputy Premiei Hossein}

Patemi told newsmen that Mos-}
sadegh had not wanted to ask for .

Repay $500,000

postponement but had done so at

he advice of physicians “who UNITED NATIONS, Oct. 10
bought the Premier is very ex- Nationalist China observed its
‘yausted and some sort of post- “Double Ten” anniversary of the

yonement would be appreciated,” | founding of the Republic on

Mossadegh underwent a series|Wednesday by paying another
wf clinical tests yesterday which} $500,000 of its arrears in United
showed nothing organically | Nations assessments. A Chinese
vrong with him.—O.P, delegation spokesman said > “fe

\ payment brought to more than
yoare—tiP.
Womar
f . . hd

One of the small band of] °"( Mficial Welcome

women Liberals fighting their

irst election will be a_ travel
wency chief and export pro-
moter, Miss Marguerite Winsor,

She is contesting Yeovil; at the

WASHINGTON, Oct. 10.
Truman signed a joint resolu-
tion extending an “official wel-
come” from Congress to the For-

last election the Tory MP, Mr.|eign Metal Scientists attending
WV. MW. Kingsmill, had a major-}the six-day World Metaliurgical
ity of 1613 over his Socialist} Congress starting on Sunday nt
ypponent, Detroit.—-U.P



INDEX GOES UP
WASHINGTON, Oct. 11
Truman’s Council of Economic
Advisors said on Wednesday thai
the Federal Reserve Board's pri
@uction index rose from 216 in
August to 220 in sia dommes:

LONDON, Oct, 10
The military court at Lublin is
trying four Catholic priests and
seven other defendants as “lead-
ers of a gang of spies and diver-
sionists,” aecording to a_ Polish
lews agency.—U.P,





The “ADVOCATE”
pays for NEWS.
Dial 3113
Day*er Night

Reports On Tour |

WASHINGTON, Oct. 11.
Supreme Court Justice William
Douglas reported to Truman on
Wednesday on his tour of Iran
‘nd India this sur -P.

Te $2,000,000 the amount which the
Realistic Liberal : Goveryment paid, this
eres
Priests On Trial

|
1
|





OF
DISTINCTION !!

BOTTLED BY





are re ; UP. W.V.
break Ridge.” where French Union Forces | president of United. Dress left the WASHINGTON, Oct. 10 THE K.
Ch And Death counted 275 more Communist Sibley Memorig) Hospitg! today Secretary of State Dean Ache PAARL
aos An ea dead and took 350-more prisoners. ot. 5
The Task force returned safely ar following the check-up and x-rays. CHIEFS OF STAFF son has condemned the “dastard-
at dusk, leaving death and chaos These were in addition to 4,500|He entered the hospital October } ly assassination of Sir Henry ‘TABLE WINES ?
in its wake. It had struck just as | Prisoners see by para-Jafter beeoming ill during a trip) LEAVE FOR ATHENS pare wa —_ gta tie. Dives ae
elements of the Chinese Army |‘'0opers yesterday. here, te BONCr FOR: Meee “Me Slee Le K.W.V. SAUVIGNON BLANC—Serve Chilled
. PARIS, Oct. 10, partment disclosed on Wednes- eae ie » dy
= " : $00,000 Loan — la- J " pe 4 Wy. c D...(full-bodied) Burgundy
Corps 80,000 strong were replac-} French headquarters reported | na ank fi Baa Tho tne The Chiefs of Staff of the U.S.,Jday. In a letter sent on Tuesday RAE. AGS Pay GNON—Red Wine
ing battered North Korean troops no action in the northern Tonking. tional Bank for Reconstruction and @rance’ and favites left Orly|to the British Ambassador, Ache- K.W.Y. CABERNET SAUVI
on the west side of Mundung}province area except a skirmish |Development announced the loan] », fn gg Py | ce Se epee fees ure meere. The above-mentioned Wines, with the exception of
valle. about 32, miles nortaeapt of Hanoi [ot $1-J00000 for exploration and] Raia, at 1B. aboard a special son said he, Caso vine K.W.¥. Saucignon Blanc, should be derved at oom ‘Temper:
: eid , : Seiad ‘ a. ne for is and j@eriev ing aronra
In the air 32 US. Thunder jets during the night in which Reds|use of underground water re- then Ankara for talks with the|by Communist guerrillas, He ature. They are of the highest quality and their oe ns aon
damaged and probably destroyed? retired before an artillery barrage }$ources of Rio Elqui Valley in ‘ 's de loss “to and flavour make them indispensable companions at }
two of 25 Communist MIG-15 jet} leaving eight dead Chile aig Serene? *eneets. of “Cipence | end | called Sisimney sea UP. during whieh Meat is served.
Aghters: which jumped them over — micwiis Membiiek sas Iranian’ Ate Turkey on Western Defence|the peace loving world".—U.P.
MIG Alley” in northwest Koreg,| French headquarters | wld bassador NadirAragteh Wednesday} ? aye, rty included General @ Si SHERRIES
S. ses =a 7 atrols operating close to c Ti sitial oli ° ; 7 , ers Re $ r
| Onitea Benes poe Peat waeia inese border near Lai Chau told United Press he believes. ber Omar Bradley, Chairman of the De Gasperi Wins K.W.Y. SHERRY No. 1—A very ol extra-dry Sherry )
rail-cuttin Ciladon wala Sinanit made no contact with rebel !S°viet Government would continue} 1.§, General Staff; British Field K.W.V. Old Oloroso—Rich Golden Sweetish Sherry $
"5 miles southeast of the| forces. He said the operation at|t© Support the roe case in the! Marshal Sir William Slim, Chiefj ROME, Oct. 11. K.W.V. Old Brown—Rich in natural purity aroma ’
Manchuria attaas . Nghia Lo which turned into a (Security Council. General of the Imperial Staff; Premier Alcide de Gasperi wor K.W.V. Amontillado—Extra.Dry. y
Units of th, 38th iment on|rout for Ho Chi Minh’s Vietminh He said Soviet-Iranian relations} and General Charles Francois}two votes of confidence on Wed- a HH
“Kim ft Sung ridge” tertnen walk 42nd regiment had been brought|Wwere good and the tensions which] Lecheres, Chairman of the |nesday on his foreign policy and SAUTERNE Type i
; 7 t CES: si tleveloped at the end of th rar i 7 s ; his recent mission to Ottawa and . : . Ds)
Mi cas ity subaaens emenmimin 9 © Sowwer ss Srernbet: Te ueabpeareds | eee ae Lyashingion UP. nO K.W.V. Wemmershock—A sweetish White Table Wine to {)
eeeene aad were aoe to : be served aig ie — Ideal»)
raw from one pea ya for Wedding Celebrations. i
heavy counter attagi. 7 igiees s T C ; SWEET WINES ty
owever, other Second Division My | ' a : oe Sh (li
Infantrymen won two hills west Japs Anxious oO onclude rade A reements } K.W.V. Red Muscadel Jeripigo-—Delightfully rich in Mus- |
of Mundung valley against only | K.W.V ah flavour. . . 5 i
ale ance onesies oo al evi a LONDON, phe talks has not yet been appoint- Comeneqwanith countries as sufficient quantity. “V. on Tawny (Superior)—A very popular tawny ¥
he eo To ongkong will be the only col- | ed. means of conserving her dolle t is also considered likely that c > wi a ais 3 é ie > be ‘
armoured raid into the midst of|ony to have an official present at} The Anglo-Japanese trade talks |resources.- Japan intends a oe Japan may be able to supply some veh Wite Muscadel Jeripigo—Lovely: sweet—Popular {i
a ee eee a tiki ; | Bagotiations in Tokyo in December |follow the signing of ha, iown her imports from dollar|of the capital equipment needed} everywhere. )
ank af infantry force als@ifgr a trade agreement between | payments agreement wi Japan, |countries, and much of this trade/in the colonies to facilitate an| SUPER > hw wae Stas : t
| struck up the valley east of “Heart+| Japan and the United Kingdom| This paves the way for a much}will be switched to the sterling|expansion of production | SUPERIOR BRANDY—Minimum 3 years old-—Absolutely
| break ee and blasted oa and Colonies Its representative speed cache of goods between | area In return, Japan will buy larger | , PURE
| munist sunkers and fortified) jn Tokyo will be on hand to advise | Commonwealth countrie ind The new trade agreement is ex- | quantities of Colonial raw ate ? : Ke r . 1 s
ipositions before returning to its! the c eleg ie on matters |Japar jpected to provide for greater vol- | rial Rubber from Malaya, cottor ii} K.W.V. Key Brand Brandy—In quarts and pint
| lines i he ~ > jume of imports of Japanese manu lfrom East Africa, and il from | }) THE ABOVE AVAILABLE NEXT WEEK AT
| The main armoured raid jumped p Japan Anxious jfactured goods into the Colonies. | Brunei are likely to figure high or i
ioff under cover of ar early ’ Reports from Tokyo suggest that |These will include textile oe Looe ligt of — J apanese in port iH J. N. GODDARD &' SONS, LTD. 5
{morning fos e ULF lelegation wl }l | Japar anxiou » conclude ther consumer good t this|from/ the Commonwealth evlir ))
; UP 1 re je agreement : ply in) area —U.P. ! SSS


.

——

PAGE TWO



Canib Calling

ING. COMMANDER L. A.
‘ EGGLESFIELD, Director
General of Civil Aviation in the
Caribbean Area, returned from
England Gn Tuesday via Trinidad
by B.W.LA.

Wing Comdr. Egglesfield
Barbados on September 41h, to
attend a. conference with the
Ministry ®f Civil Aviation on the
operations of Turbo-jet aircraft.
He also had consultations with the
Colonial Office on CiVil ‘Aviation
matters ‘Concerning the | British
Caribbean Area.

left

Asst. Branch Manager

R. GLYNE MAHON, Assistant

Bratich Manager of B.W.I.A.
in Jamaica arrived from that
colony on Tuesday via Trinidad
by B.W.LA. He was accompanied
by his young daughter Melanie.
Here for about two weeks’ holiday
he is staying with relatives at
Lieth Guest House, Worthing.

New Year’s Day

Te Jewish Community of the
island celebrated New Year's
Day yesterday. Their stores were
closed and they celebrated just as

other people would on January 1.
Among the stores closed were
many in Swan Street. The.’

Coronation Store, H. Burak’s Store,
Berstein’s Sandal®

Jubilee Store,
Shoppe, B. Korr Dry Goods Store,
Altman Y Sons, S. J. Berstein &
Sons, the Bargain House, and
G. W. Hutchinson's branch store
fit Roebuck Street.

I'o Be Married on Saturday

R. GASTON DeGANNES,

Manager of Hub Taxi Co.,
Trinidad and son of Mrs. Eliza
DeGannes and the late Dr. F. De-
Gennes, flew in from Trinidad on
Tuesday night by B.W.I.A. accom-
panied by his sister Ena. “They
are guests at the Ocean View Hotel.

On Saturday afternoon at 5
o'clock Mr. DeGannes is to be
married at St. Patrick’s Church,
Jemmotts Lane to Miss Derrice
Steele also of Trinidad. One of
Miss Steele’s sisters is due to arrive
tomorrow from Trinidaq to be
Bridesmaid at the wedding. Miss
Steele is staying at Lieth Guest
House, Worthing.

ARES EAE,



“Now then,
have no three-way
this ‘margin’ seas,’




Back to Venezuela
WAR. AND MRS. CHARLIE
MILETS who spent a month's

holiday in Barbados have returned
to Venezuela where Mr. Milets
works for the Shell Company.
During their stay here they were
guests at Lieth Guest House,
Worthing.

Retired

R. AND MRS. FRED. EAST-
HAM arrived from Trinidad
yesterday afternoon by B.W.LA.
Mr. Eastham has recently retired
from National Mining which used
to operate in Trinidad. He plens
to spend part of his retirement in
Barbados,

Coincided

ISS Y VONNE CASTILHO,

sister of Mrs. Fab Hoyos, who

was in_B.G. for about three weeks

on holiday returned yesterday

afternoon by B.G. Airways. Her

visit coincided with the Barbados-
3.G. Cricket tour just ended.

To-night’s Talk

M* VAL McCOMIE will give a
talk on Martinique when the
Alliance Francaise meets tonight
at the British Council headquart-
ers, Wakefield.

The meeting begins
o’clock.

at 8.15



BY THE WAY e « e « By Beachcomber

(The only foremay Cutter in this
Street who ever made a pair of snake
skin breeches for a blaekguard)

FTHIS hand, accustomed for the

last month to the strangling
of chamois and the pulling’ of wild
boars’ noses, is called once more
to the more lady-like occupation
of pen-twirling.

At present, hand and pen are
at sixes and sevens, and I feel
Vike a man suddenly invited to
cut his finger-nails with a scythe,
button his waistcoat with a boat-
hook, mow a tield with a telescope,
or eat porridge with a corkscrew
(as happened at the Semaine Gas-
tronomique de Crewe). There-
fore, let us cut the cattle and
come to the horses, as the gourmet

said when he addressed himself 0 5

;

{high

a lump of dubious beef.

Another Gratifying
Reception

N Ribeauvillé, on a wooded
slope of the Vosges, I was the'
principal performer in a concer
of Schubert's songs.
no rehearsal, and knowing ne
German, I was compelled to in-
vent words as I went along. The
people of that part who had come
out in their thousands to greet
me, inquired whut patois this

Having had)

my old nurse in Xonrupt,” said I.
Compliments and wine followed.
I was told later that the people
of Obernai (where Ste, Odile was
born) were kept awake all night
by the cheering. Luckily IT am a
modest man.

Prodnose; Such extraordinary
and, to me, inexplicable popular-
ity must be ae inconvenient for
anybody on holiday.

Myself: Not if it is aceompan-
ied by enormous quantities of
wine.

Prodnose; Did you never shake
off the crowds?

Myself: _. No, Even on_ the
Schlucht Pass the bands and the
cheering multitudes hurried after

me, ;
A Triumphal Progress

N Remiremont, where the fifty

Canonesses who had rights of
and low justice over the
bans de St. Pierre defied Turenne
n 1638 or so, the Cheval de
Sronze still flourishes. In the
ireaded street I saw a num on a
notor-bicycle, The people of the
alley came out in their thousands
o offer me compliments and
}vine. “The compliments,” said I,
in a short speech, “though fully
deserved, 1 can do wethout. As
for the wine, that is another

might bo.) “It was taught me by | matter.” So I nuzzled down to it,





CROSSWORD



Across
4. Carries the bit at polo. (5-4)
8 Some cat! (6)
10 Toa snake suggests ambition, (3)
il. A black-crested monkey, (6
12 The ofticer commanding finally
left the image breaker, (4)
ik Arising’ our. of 2)
» Arising out of ten cans. (
17, Overjoyed. (6)
18 Panorama (4)
21 aoe kind of light-weight
‘a
22 This sort would be high!
finished. (9 mu
43 Beast ip a nuvel Kingdom. (3)
v4 He should be funny. (5)
Down
1. Sure, it’s no negative. (8)
2. Hanging water? (6)
3 Noel ubsec by the thousand. (5)
4 Do Wwtai so as to get polsonous
fung)
® Unciroied vexing. (3)
6 Had advertised asspciatiun with
ince. (7) %. Drop of water (4)
v Unite. (3)
14 Useful bioke in nay time. (4)
16 Divides the Isie of Man (5)
18 Earabe 14)
20 4 or 6 Down could make you
this. (3)
Soiutivn of vesterduy’s Oucele — Across
1 Stelioner, 6 Assorted 1}, Vest. iz
ame. i ~tntent 15, fdates, 17,
Stain 20 Tide “41 Pir, 4 Wuet. 24
inset. 25 Rvot, 46 Attic, 27, Lacy *
eke Powe: i atisiied; 2 Ass, 4,
Totieat “@ tr 5, Rup, 7, Sentinel:
& lovers" 9 Enmity: 10 ad. }
Nettle. 18 idee. 19 Nutty!

Varsia 16
PS ack

SN censors
BEEBE ERB RBHR ERR BRE RUR ESD

CHECK VOILE

A
T. R. EVANS & WHITFIELDS

3 DIAL 4220
ha

DRESS GABERDINE in all shades
WHITE SHARKSKIN
FLANNELLED SPU

pausing now and then to acknow-
ledge a piece of fulsome flattery
or to accept another bottle. Nor
was it any of your miserable vin
gris of Lorraine, but a stylish little
Alsatian wine from Riquewihr,
Futher up the wally, they cheer-
ed me so loudly thatI could
hardly hear myself drinking.

In Passing

NUMBER of well-meaning

but muddle-headed writers
have sent me their “Authors’
Peace Appeal,” with a request
for my signature. They will not
get it; but I have a favour to
ask. I would like the 12 signa-
tories to read through very -care-

‘|fully the document to which they

have put their names. I think
that the more intelligent among
them will then withdraw their
signatures.





The stranger bustles up to the

two pals and mops his brow,
“Whew, it's hot work hurrying
today,”’ he puffs, “I'm looking for
a sound fellow named Sailor Sam.
Do either of you know where he
lives and how to get there? |
want to find him quickly, It's
urgent." “Why, yes sir,” says

PLAIN SHANTUNGS—Grey, Blue, Fawn, Peach ................

NS

Fine shipment of Ladies Shoes

YOUR SHOE STORES



BARBADGS ADVOCATE

err

Sports Editor Returns
M* Oo. §S. COPFIN, Sports
Editor of the Barvados
Advocate who had been in B.G.
covering the Barbados-B.G. tou.
for his newspaper was among the
passengers arriving from B.C.
yesterday evenirg by 8.W.1.A.
Mercy Mission

.M.S. Apoue, one of the Royal

Navys fcst minelayezs, is
back in Ergland after her mercy
mission to Jamaica She was iusa-
ed off across the Atlantic with
relief stores soon after the hurri-
cane struck and errived back in
Po.tsmouth last Monday. The men
aboard Apo:lo, commanded by
Captain F. W. R. Larken, R.N,,
sailed the little minelayer with
its life-saving cargo with all the
vigour of a ciéw taking their ship
into action.

Hurricane Relief
Dogo efforts are being

made by West Indians in
England to raise money for the
Jamaica Hurricane Relief Fund
Tomorrow, the Cosmopolitan
Dance Club will stage a grand
dance at Holborn Hall. A Jamaican
band will be in attendance and
the entire proceeds will be devoted
to the Fund,












































was the last of the four wives «
more, dark-haired Elaine

as as aberration.

desk in Wall Street.

stockbrokers.

ind loving every minute of it.
by a mile.” she tells me. “Never

It is a tremendous boost to one’s
ego. ,

“When I go out with a man
friend now we don’t exchange the
usual chit-chat. Men always open
the conversation by asking what
do I think of such-and-such a
stock. And when I tell them théy
look at me with a new respect.”

From Jamaica

EW arrival in England trom

Jamaica is Mrs, S. W. P. Sut-
ton-Foster. She is there to see her
daughter Barbara, a cartographer
at the Central Office of Informa-
tion. Mrs, Sutton-Foster will re-
main in London until her husband,
Sir Sutfon-Foster, arrives from
Malaya. They leave later for the
Gold Coast where Sir Sutton-
Foster will take up appointment as
Lord President of the West
African Court of Appeal.

Some Cake

UESTS who attended the 60th
anniversary of the Chartered
Institute of Secretaries in London
last week rated the birthday cake
as the best they've seen for a long
time. No wonder. It was cooked by
an expért London chef and con-
tained ingredients that had come
from all parts of the Common-
wealth, including the West Indies.
Members of the West India Com-
mittee here contributed sugar, rum.

B.C. RADIO PROGRAMME

11.15 a.m. Programme Parade,
a.m. Jazz Music, 12 noon The
12.10 p.m. News Analysis
400—7.15 pm 6.23 M

1951

11.30
News,

, 31.92 M.

4 poem. The News, The
Daily Service, Jazz Music,
4.45 p.m. Sporting Record, 5 p.m
Composer of the Week, 5.15 p.m. BBC:
Northern Orchestra, 6 p.m, Pipes and
Drums, 6.15 p.m. Scottish Magazins
6.45 Programme

4.10 p.m
4.15 p.m

We See Britain, p.m. Coionial
Commentary, 7.45 Books to Read
7.45—10.45 p.m, 81 32 M. 48.43 M
ne

all-spice and caschew nuts, The} 8 p.m Pa deg poe ob saa
. P.â„¢, pecial Dispatch
flour was from Canada, butter 8.45 p.m. Composer of the Week; 9
from New Zealand, dried fruit] p.m. Ring up the Curtain; 10 p.m
from Australia and candied peel ae ao 10.10 om From the Editor-
1 als, p.m oray McLaren Talk-
from South Africa, Some cake! ing, 10.30 p.m. Barchester Towers
C.B.C. PROGRAMME

THURSDAY OCTOBER 11,
10,03—12.20 p.m.
10,20-—10.36 p.m,
Mes.

1951
dip eewas News,
it oe S This Week

2 oo M.

HREE weeks ago, on a moun-
tain track, I met a snail. He
was moving along with his house
on his back, and the scientist in
me _ whispered, “Research, re-
search.”
I tapped on his shell lightly,
like a nervous young postman
and he at once contracted his
short lower horns and his longer
upper ones, and began to go in-
doors. 1 withdrew. Out ihe came
and out came his horns, He moved
forward, at what seemed to me
an amazing speed for a snail, I
took out my watch, like any
trainer watching a racehorse, |
ut a bit of stick down, level with
is stern, and another bit an inch
further on, and I timed him. He
covered the inch in just over ¢°
minute. In a quarter of an hour
he was holf way to the far edge
of the track. Either snails are not
as slow as people think, or this
one was a speed-maniac. Veloci-
ter, velociter currite, noctis coch-
leae.



MAX BATTLE!
SANDY # WILLIE

Official Championship Fight Films!

_ Distributed by RKO Radio Pictures, Inc. :

the kind
of woman
that made
New Orleans
famous!

One Thing leads to

Another

_ get even, he should have

gone into a cow-shed and
trodden on a barber’s foot, Then
the barber would have gone to
the police station and trodden on
a cow's foot, By this time public
opinion, realising that something
odd was going on, would have
compelled the mayor to give a
civic banquet to the barber and
the policeman. The town hall
would have been decorated with
life-size models of cows, the rates
would have gone up, but the
enormous queype waiting to sec
the barber and the policeman
arrive for the banquet would
have been as happy as grigs.

She Forgot Auntie

Last night my wife picked ur
her father in one arm, me in the
other, and, with my son on her
back, carried us all upstairs

(Correspondence column)

When a policeman went into the
barber’s shop, a cow trod on hi:
foot. (News item.)



with LUCILE WATSON « JANIS CARTER:

THE SHORT
RETURN”
With Gary GRAY and |

The Wonder Dog “FLAME”

sce} | PEAT Aston
“He's an old

Rupert politely.

friend of mine. If you want to get PLAYING FRIDAY 12th
to him quickly you'd better let me 2.30, 4.45 & 8.30 p.m.

show you the way.” He is still & Continuing Daily 4.45 & 8.30 p.m. :
wondering about Rollo's mysterious pete

question so he tells the boy he
won't be long and asks him to wait.
Then he leads the gentleman
further up the hill,

Also :
“PALS





TS BACKACHE

JUST A SIGN

OF AGE?



$1.15

| Many people suffer an aching back
$1.36 | needlessly—believing you must expect
a few aches and eats When you're

| “getting on” in years
re aeeneerece $1.57—$1.59 But backache is often caused by the
faulty action of kidneys and lier,
Berta $2.16 | See how much better you feel after
| — or eee Kidney-Liver Pills,
n | and your kidneys and liver both filter
reneetneees $1.37—$1.43 | out impurities from your bloodstream.
That's because this time-proven Dr.
Chase remedy treats two conditions at
* | once—contains special remedial ingre-
jients for both the kidney and liver
disorders which often cause backache,
If you're feeling worn-out, tired,
headachy—with painful joints and
| aching back—look to your kidneys and

4606 } liver Try Dr. Chase's Kidney-Liver

Pills tonight. At all drug counters 14



Things have changed for her since then.

Now she awakes in her smajl flat on Man-
hattan’s fashionable East Side every morning
pefore seven. At 8.30, smartly turned out in
a tailored navy blue suit and crisp white
blouse, she pushes her way into the jam-
packed subway and travels Cowntown to her

Elaine Barrie is an actress no longer. To-
day she is the most attractive “customers’
man” in one of New York's larger firms of

She gives advice to investors, She sells
bonds and stocks on commission.
picking up the ropes of finance as she goes

“Finance has the theatre beaten ®

have I enjoyed anything so much hathet begin?

SADDLER~PEP



Won Barry-

Barrie
dreamed of getting up before ndpn. To have
done so would have been put down almost

The Last Mrs. Barrymore
Goes To Wall Street

By FREDERICK COOK
NEW YORK, Saturday.
In the old days in Hollywo

when she

never

She is

;

Passed Exam
How did Elaine’s career in the
Over lunch with
a broker friend one day she
brought the talk around to finance
“more or less out of politeness.’
She learned to her surprise that
there were women doing all right
as customers’ men” and that her
friend considered she too showed
“a feeling for it.”

Forthwith, somewhat flattered,
she skipped the fashion pages in
her paper, studied financial
selections instead.

“Then,” she said, I took « course
at the New York Institute of Fi-
nance, which trains persenne] for
member firms of the Stock Ex-
change. I took a very intensive
course, which included technical
accounting about which I knew
precisely nothing.

“Then I studied security
analysis. I passed the exam with

, a mark of 95 which is one of the

highest on record. A pass is 75.
That entitled me to become a cus-
tomer’s broker trainee.”

Can Tell A Dud

Already Elaine has formed some
strong opinions about stocks and
shares. For instance: “There is no
such thing as a phony stock, but
it does take a tremendous amount
of knowledge to pick out a good
one.

“War in Korea, floods in Kan-
Sas, everything has its effect on

SOOO SOSS BOCES OOS OOPS SOPOPPOOVPPOD

GLOBE

Last Shows TO-DAY 4.45 and 8.15 p.m.
CLARK GABLE in
ANY NUMBER CAN PLAY
AND
FRED ASTAIRE in
THREE LITTLE WORDS
Pit 16; House 30; Balcony 40; Box 54,

ALEC OE ACCEL OOOO ALA SY

SOCSSES





ELAINE BARRIE. From stoge to stocka

the market, and there is the per-
sonal element about the job which
appeals to me, too. I had a young
mother to see me the other day
who wanied something which
would show a profit in a few years’
time, so as to pay for the education
of her son.” ;

Miss Barrie’s only link with
her old life is her nearly-com-
pleted book on her husband to be
called The Great Lover, She met
Barrymore in 1935 when (as a
young girl) she had sent him a
fan letter while he was ill in
hospital, Later, with her mother,
she went to see him.

When he left hospital, he was
photographed often with an
attractive girl named in the cap-
tions as Elaine Jacobs. The same
girl turned up later among his
company on & radio programme,
listed now as Elaine Barrie. She
had taken the name “because it
sounded a bit like Barrymore.”

Man’s Language
A few months later they
married. Elaine made a name of
her own account in Hollywood
and on Broadway. Now, at 35,
she says “I’m through with the
theatre. There people live in a
sort of ivory tower, utterly out of
touch with what is going on out-
side. Finance is real. When I
go out with a man now, I can

really talk his language.”

WORLD COPYRIGHT

RESERVED
—L.ES.
PROPS SPSSOS



GLOBE




ae

M-G-M
presents a
ech
i
dynamite!



REMEMBER—There

when you

is

COTTON

ESTIONS ASKED"!

BARRY
SULLIVAN DAHL:
Sens SIDNEY SHELDON - “RASLeNLe

AN M-G-M PICTURE. a]
isis wba. . med

BARGAINS

in all Departments

AFTER STOCK-TAKING ~

Call and Inspect Them.

THE BARBADOS CO-OPERATIVE |
FACTORY LTD. }

OPENING TOMORROW 5 & 815 p.m.

FROM THE LITTLE BLACK BAGS, FROM THE D.A.’S j
FILES, FROM THE HALF-WORLD OF BIG









CITY CRIME... |
= COMES THIS |














a
3





tis

GEORGE JEAN

Murpay -Hacen

HAROLD FESS = 5" RICMOLAS MAYEACK



no Parking Problem

shop with us.



THURSDAY, OCTOBER 11, 1951





SAT: 2.30 & 1.30
TRAIL TO
ONV2ONGA

an

Opening Friday t2th

Sandy SADDLER &

Wille PEP Pight
A

“My Ferbidden
Past

PLAZA. 2310~

LAST 2 SHOWS TODAY
43% & 830 PM

PARAMOUNT’S MUSICAL & ACTION DOUBLE!
Color by

“THE FLEETS IN” & “EL PASO” Sisc-oic

Dorothy Lamour, William Holden John Payne Gail Russell, Dick Foran
â„¢ Eddie Bracken, Jimmy Dorcey & Ork Geo. (Gabby Haynes

SPECIAL TODAY 1.30 p.m

CODE of tHe LAWLESS & ARIZONA TRAIL

Kurby Grant, Fuzzy Knight Tex Ritter, Fuzzy Knight

B'TOWN |

DESPERSTE TRAIF,



























" , OISTIN ‘ A egy Y
PLAZA vii ss04 GAE®
7 THE GARDEN — ST. JAMES
Last 2 Shows Teday 5 & $0 p.m Today (only) 8.20 p m.
MYETORS | OF MARES oe ELIZABETH OF LADYMEADE
Maria Montez, Patric Knowles & Color by Technicolor
MAN MADE MONSTEK Asahteeaie
Lon Chaney, Dick Foran
aan. hier tae MLDNITE Sat. 13
a Fri. to Sun.
Fri. to Sun i ee 8.30 Peter Cookson
5 & 8.30 p.m. LAWLESS . p.m. SHADOWS of
Alan Ladd in Kirby want & Mat; Sun 5 p.m. SUSPICION &
BRANDED } VER the
Cour by | ARIZONA James Cagney in BORDER
Technicolor TRAIL CITY FOR Johnny Mack
, Mona Freeman Tex Ritter CONQUEST Brown
anne ainte— aeons







EMPIRE

LAST TWO SHOWS TO-DAY 4.30 & 8.30
Universal Action Double
ROD CAMERON — FUZZY KNIGHT
in

“THE OLD TEXAS TRAIL”

AND
“MADONNA OF THE SEVEN
MOONS ”

Starring STEWART GRANGER — PATRICIA ROCK



GRAND OPENING TOMORROW’ at 2.30 & 8.30

meena Fo
Nees)...

wa CECIL KELLAWAY «JESSE WHITE + A UNIVERSAL INTERNATIONAL em
ROX Y

LAST TWO SHOWS TO-DAY OPENING SATURDAY 4.45, & 8.15

zen we a



RE.





Universal DOUBLE —
“NAKED CITY”



Starring :
BARRY FITZGERALD ff
and © NOTETO
“SCARLET STREET” ‘ay \ j ace
Starring : ~~ ' j / veal the ending!

JOAN BENNETT —
DAN DURYEA

TOMORROW ONLY 4.30 & 8.15

Universal Double . ‘
Rod CAMERON —Fuzzy KNIGHT
in



f a
LY AR | , }
starring PAUL DOUGLAS



“THE OLD TEXAS TRAIL”

and
RICHARD BASEHART
“ODD MAN OUT”
with BARBARA BEL GEDDES -

DEBRA PAGET Seeirian

James MASON



ROYAL

LAST TWO SHOWS TO-DAY FRIDAY ONLY 4.30 & 8.15
4.30 & 8.15
Double .

ROD CAMERON in —
“THE MAGIC BOW”
“THE LADY OBJECTS”

and
‘o IBLE MAN”
“ARCTIC MANHUNT” . “THE INVIS ie
with
Starring

Mikel CONRAD Claude RAINES



OLYMPIC

TO-DAY ONLY 4.30 & 8.30 OPENING TOMORROW
|Republic Double . 4.30 & 8.15
Roy ROGERS -~ Dale EVANS | Fox Double .



in |
| «pPHE MAN WHO CHEATED
ere tee HIMSELF”
and
HIDE: and
age “yp CLIMB THE HIGHEST
‘ ”
Lloyd BRIDGES MOUNTAIN







To-night at 8 o’clock

week



and every night this
In honour of the visiting U.S. Navy

CLUB
ORGAN

the





be open with

CLUB MORGAN ORCHESTRA




will






Playing from 8 pm. to closing










Delicio.s Steak Dinners served throughout the night.
THURSDAY, OCTOBER 11, 1951



Peasants’ Deductions From Cane Pric

Discussed

By House

BEFORE THE BILL to impose a special levy on sugar and
molasses manufactured in the island in certain circum-

stances, was passed in the House of Assembly on Tuesday,

there was much discussion.

The discussion hinged upon the agreement between the
Sugar Producers’ Federation and the Barbados Workers’
Union, out of which the Bill arose. The suggestion was made
by some other members that peasants should be exempted
from having money deducted from their price for canes to
go to the Labour Welfare Fund.

Some of the speeches on the dis-
cussion appeared in yesterday's
issue. Following is the continua-
tion;

The junior member for St.
Andrew Mr. J. A Haynes said that
anyone who read the agreement
would see that it was obvious that
the money would come out of the
small and big growers in propor-
tion, In the end it all came down
to their taking away money from
the small growers.

After a long period of looking
for an increased price for canes,
the growers were being told that
something would be taken out.

He said he represented a large
number of cane growers about
2,000, most of them his friends,
with over 32,000 tons of canes and
he thought it would be hard for
them.

Road Conditions

The Labour Welfare Loan, he
said, should be extended to the
Highways and Transport workers
because they were indirectly con-
cerned with the sugar industry.
The roads were very necessary to
the industry. Were they to be
told they had to become Civil
Servants before they got a fund?

“Another thing I cannot under-
Stand,” he said, “is why should
they be asked to give the money
back. This is a gift to the workers
and yet it is taken back. I would
tell them never pay a cent back
.... absolutely wrong principle!”

Mr. W. A. Crawford said that
the introducer of the Bill had said
that the agreement out of which
the Bill was then before the House
was a phenomenal and stupendous
achievement. “But what I regard
as Stupendous and phenomenal is
the glib manner in which he said
they limit the profits of the sugar
producers in this colony and its
guillibility in really believing what
somebody has told him without
really reading «the agreement
himself.

It was inconceivable that the
Senior Member for St. Joseph
could have read the agreement
and the Bill before the House and
then get up and make the remarks
which he made.

“Listening to him, Sir,” he said,
“I was sometimes bewildered.
wondered what on earth had
happened. I could have under-
stood almost any other member of
that side of the House making the
mistake he made, but that he
should make the mistake he made

—

and almost m

ers. Theré was an agricul-
tural worker in Barbados who did
not own a pitce of larid but rented
piece from the plantation at which
he worked, Therefore they
should not fool themselves that
only the pé@asant proprietors
would be affected by it.

emorandum

He said that as to thé average
peasant proprietor oF producer of
canes amd his position in so far
as what shodld be paid for a ton
of canes, the memorandum was an
absolutely useless document. The
principle on which the whole
document was drawn up was so un-
just in so far as the Small pro-
ducers were concerned that one
wondered how the gréat socialist
Government of Barbados could
have oversighte@ it.

They were told on page two
of the memorandum that the
main factors to be taken into
account in the assessing of the
price to be paid for canes were,

1. The mechanical efficiency of

the factory; 2. The quality of

the’ ¢ané milled; and 3. The
manufacturing expanses per
ton of sugar.

“I know from my experience,”
Rie said, “that this year two sugar
factories within a mile of each
other were assessing canes from
the same district. Early when the
crop started in February, there
were some unusual rains, It was
claimed by many factory owners
that these unusual rains affected
the sucrose content of the cane
and the priee would be reduced.’
Th dhe case of these two fac-
‘tories, they were paying $11 and
when the rains ¢ame along they
went to. $10.

“The rains stopped and the

factory with the lower recovery

and the léss efficient put back
on the dollar. The other factory
did not. So it would be seen that
two factories milling canes grown
in the same area refused to pay
the same price.

Manutacturing Costs

Speaking on the manufacturing
expenses per ton of sugar, he
asked whether one intended to say
that the socialists subscribed to
the view that because a man may
have spent more on overhauling
he would pay less for canes. Was
that to be especially so, since the
factories were allowed money, not
out of their profits but out of funds

; specially allocated to them ou* of
today is stupendous: WPM Lathe rehabilitation fund?

Peas: Canes

There had been a lot of talk
about the peasants canes and the
arguments adduced by the intro-
ducers of the Bill” were to be
found in the part of the agree-
ment which dealt with paying
peasants the sume price as plan-
tation owners.

It was as well that they first ap-
preciated the fallacy underlying
this statement before going to,the
others.

Part of the agreement was, that:

Both parties are aware of the
following resolution which was
passed recently by a majority vote
at a special meeting of factory
owners or their duly constituted
representatives after protracted
negotiations:—

“That the same price calcu-
lated on-a crop average recovery
shall be paid for peasants’ and
estates’ canes (not being share-
holders or suppliers under
written contract) it being clear-
ly understood that neither shall
have priority of delivery.

“PROVIDED that where own-
ers of estates other than those
who are shareholders of the
factory or are supplying canes
under a written contract, supply
canes in excess of 500 tons to a
factory (the delivery of such
canes being if required spread
over the whole period of the
crop) the factory shall be at
liberty to pay such estate owners
an additional price ranging
from 5c. to 35c. per ton,

“PROVIDED also that where
a Co-operative Society of
péasants supplies canes in excess
of 500 tons to any factory (the
délivery of such canes being if
réquired spread over the whole
period of the crop) the Society
shall be paid the Same extra
ptice which is paid to outside
e8tates ranging from 5¢. to 35c.
per ton for similar quantities”.

Estate Canes

It meant in actual fact that they
wotild pay more for estate canes
because no estate sent in less than
500 tons of canes,

There was hardly any plantation
in Barbados which had not got
shares in the factory near it. Ob-
viously it guaranteed them a proper
supply of canes. They would be
entitled to a better price of canes
too. That naturally ruled out the
peasants as getting the same price.
With regard to complaints that
peasant proprietors are affected
unduly by the Bill, he wanted them
to keep before théir minds that
anything they did to reduce the
pri¢e of canes in Barbados affected
not only the small peasant pro~

prietors but the ag icultural work-

How Aladdin’s Lamp
®won the Princess





Once & poor young
found



1 mag Wheneve



n named Aladdin
he

“Anybody who said we are
limiting the profits of the sugar
factories is displaying woeful
ignorance with regards the man-
ner in Which the price of cane is
calculated.”

On the question of the sugar
price, he said that behind it was
that in 1947 when the British Gov-
ernment decided to give an in-
crease in the price of sugar they
gave it conditionally. There had
to be certain deductions for the
Labour Welfare, rehabilitation and
so on. They began sometime ago
to use their fund for housing tne
sugar workers. Naturally after
centuries of bad housing condi-
tions in the colony in a_ short
time they found themselves with
no funds in the Sugar Welfare
Fund. The Royal Commission in
1940 had recommended a recess
on every ton produced in the col-
ony ... two shillings per ton.

Deductions

He said that by deductions of
various amounts from what was
to have been given times before,
it would be seen that the money
to the workers was really theirs.

The Stabilization Fund was
still untouched, he said, and
amounted to over $4,000,000.

Since that fund was lying there

idle, they could borrow $1,000,-

000 and alloaate it to the Labour

Welfare Fund, especially as it

was being lent out to be repaid.

If there was_a small sum due

because of some defaulter, the

Government could easily make

up that. ~

The RéWabititation Fund had
been going on since four years and
there might be somé justification
in reducing the amount given to
that fund, ,

“My stiggestion thetefore is,” he
said, “to borrow from your Sta-
bdization Fund, reduce your Re-
habilitation Fund, rtow frém
Central Government (for aftér all
it will be repaid) but do not take
it in this method.”

His last point was that thé pré-
duction bonus being given to agri-
cultural workers was not a result
of any munificence on the part of
the producers,

With regards to the 19 per cent
production bonus, Mr, Crawford
traced the position of the Agricul-
tural workers wages since the
Sugar Industry distur pences in
1945 and Getponsiadies that if the
19 per cent production. bonus .was
paid this year, fhe agricultural
workers were still owed an addi-
tional increase of 74 per cent.

Mr. A. E. S, Lewis said that the
result of the agreement was that
the workers of the country would
get something. Only
before he heard that there were
labourers on the sugar plantation:
who would get more in bonus than

|

{






PRE-wAR



WORKER OFFICIAL | WORKER



employment .. .’

“* Food rations are higher
some foreign countries






VERY PRE-WAR



have improved . . .”

“And . at



they worked for in some crops.

He could not follow the argu-

ment about some cane growers
seing pénaliséd. There was not
anybody who could tell What was
the price to be paid for canes. If
members said that the peasants
would get less, they should be able
to say what it was intended should
be paid.
_ He said that what was worry-
ing the other side was that the
labourers were beihg made free
and would nof have to go to them
and borrow money.

Mr. F. L. Walcott said that the
Junior Member for St. Philip had
said all along that the wages of
the*sugat workers could not be
worse because he had nothing to
do with them. But no one ex-
pected that member to agree with
anything which came from that
Government,

Increase Offered

The Junior Member for St.
Philip brought figures to show
that somé money was left back for
the peopie, but he did not say
that in 1949 the Ministry of Food
did not offer any increase.

What had they to benefit from
making it hard for the poor peas-
ants anyway, he askéd ? Instead
of Honourable Members using
their energy in the Hoyse about
peasants, they should try to form
a co-operative organisation for
them,

The Junior Member for St.
George was part of a factory
which was in the inconvenient
position like any other factory or
manufacturing industry in the
world producing raw material in
large quantities which was forced
to pay more, Lower Estate with
Bulkeley just a step away were
forced to pay more for their canes,

Mr, Mapp talkéd against the

suggestion that the peasants were
going to suffer so much,
- pa D. D. Garner said he was
in hear greement with the
Labour Wels Fund which the
Government started and which
was providing many poor people
with shelter; so he could not see
that they should do away with
that scheme. It would be a fal-
lacy, too, to give the mone} tothe
people. It was a good thing to
keep the money floating and if
anything could be done to enlarge
the amount it should be done.

The time had come though,
when they should create a fund
for other workers besides those in
the sugar industry.

The agreement was good as they
should try, although it was almost
impossible to gét it done, to get
the money out of the big sugar
producérs,

He said, however, that it was a
sad state of affairs in that the
peasants were not organised and
he felt that there should be some
way of exempting thm frém the
scheme.

Money Repayment

Mr. Dowding said that the last
speaker had convinced him that
he should add his quota to the
debate. The hon. member had
Started off by complimenting the
Government and had then gone
on to give the most accurate rea-
sons why he should not agree to
the enactment of the legislation
before them.

He wanted to know if the hon.
member was really suggesting
that the peasants were going to
pay back the money they had
vorrowed. “The hon. member
knows that this money is gone and
gone forever,” said Mr. Dowding.

It was obviously the hon, mem-
ber’s argument, he said, that some
type of scale should be adopted so

in the lower brackets of income
vaid a smaller rate than one in
whe higher bracket, so one in the

the meg in the same way as a man



of aaa






> genili How he
ma hin
k



$ nid f and ha
ed him a package of Royal Pudding

ys

CORE

The Princess had refused many suitors

But
Ro

me Royal Pudding

when Aladdin offered her a dish of
yal Pudding, shecried, “It's delicious!



“Housing conditions



home
established complete unity
of thought and action.”

BARBADOS ADVOCATE



TODAY

|



OFFICIAL

than in

”
“ee

























we've 4



London Express Service

lower brackets of the production
of eanes should pay a smaller rate.
The Sugar Agreement had come
before him on the 27th of last
month and from that time he had
read and studied it. He had come
thens that afternoon and listened
to the speeches of other hon
members to see if hé could be
convinced that he might possibly
be wrong in his opinion about the
matter, “But regardless of what-
ever the results are here tonight,”
said Mr. Dowding, “I am taking
up the cudgels for those people
in this island whom the Labour
Union in their haste in fighting for
the labourers, have forgotten.”

Price Of Labour

Ot course he had to give the
Union their due. There was na
doubt about it that the hon.
senior member for St, Joseph
and his Union had done wonders
and a great good for the people
of this island. There was no
doubt too that as far as the sugar
industry in this island was con-
eerned, the fact that the Union
was now learning the facts of the
situation of sugar today and in
the past, was breaking down the
unholy untruth that had been
entertained of the planters in
this island for the last 300 years.
The Union was now learning
that labour could not be paid a
corresponding price to that paid
for the article by the United
Kingdom.

Referring again to the Agree-
ment, Mr. Dowding said that on
the 27th September when it came
before the Sugar Producers As-
sociation, there was not one
member who did not agree to the
first clauses which applied to
Bonus Production. There was a
vast majority at the beginning of
the meeting, however, who en-
tirely disagreed with the latter
part of the agreement which call-
ed for $1.80 in one case and $2
towards the Harbour Scheme, to
be taken from the cane grower
and at the same rate from top to
bottom

“The peasants in the island
handle, according to Mr. H
crow, séMe 7,700 acres in sugar
cane snd 5,600 acres in other
erops, and the estimated number
of people that this would affect
was about 125,000.”
Increased Cost

Mr, Dowding then referred to
the increased cost of uction
which the peasant had to face,
and now, he said, he had also to
bay the $1.80 into the Labour

Weliare Fund. In his (Mr.
Dowding's) opinion, a_ position
had been reached where the

small peasant-owner of land Up! sae.
Barbados Co-Ope
ty

ta 10 acres, the peasant who was
the backbone of the country, was
placed.in quite an unenviable po-
sition on account of the circum-
stances which now existed.

He pointéd out that the peas
ants’ crop produced this year was
288,806 tons of canes, and if, he
said, they divided that between
one extreme and the other this
would be about 36,100 tons of
sugar, According to the present
proposal of $1.80 to the Labour
Fund they would have to pay
some $64,980.

“1 do not feel that justice
has been done in the case of
the peasant,” said Mr. Dowding,
“and I have sat here until I
was convinced by the speech
of the hon, senior member for
St. Philip that justice has not
been done.”
Referring to the arguments

raised, Mr. Adams said that he
was going to be charitable and
forget that there was an election
around the corner. He thought
that some hon. members who had



'
Yes, everyone loves Roya: Puddings, |
Theyre so rich and smooth. So nutritious, |
too. 3 wonderful flavors: chocolate, va
nilla, and butterscotch. Try one today |
i



persuaded themselves that there
was sométhing wrong in princi-
ple as regards the matter under
diseussion, would not be so per-
suade@ if they happened to be in
the House next March or April.

Nine Months’ Work

What was before them was the
result of nine months of hard
bargaining with the necessity of
giving away something some-
times and not giving away on
some occasions. The Govern-
ment’s part in this was purely
because there was on the Statute
Book the (Rehabilitation, Price
Stabilisation and Labour Wel-
fare) Act, otherwise there would
have been no necessity to come to
the House at all. The Sugar Pro-
ducers Federation would have
kept to their agreement and the
Union to theirs. As soon as the
allocation by law to these three
funds were interfered with, the
Act had to be amended. What
the Government was doing then
was in order to carry out the
wishes of the Sugar Producers
Federation on the one hand and
the Workers Union on the other.
Of course ihasmuch as the Gov-
ernment happened to be a La-
bour Government, it was neces-
sary also to get the approval of
the Labour Party and the Party
had given its approval with some
eriticism here and there, but
again with the understanding
that it was the result of bargain-
ing.

He wanted to make his position
quite clear, the Union had_ bar-
gained with the Sugar Producers
Federation and the present bar-
gain was the best that could be
secured, “We are seeking legisla-
tion to carry out the terms of the
agreement, but our hands are not
tied in approaching the sugar
industry if it can be proved that
the present formula works an
injustice to the peasants.

Pre-Election Speeches

“T do not intend to accuse hon-
ourable members of making pre-
eléction speeches, but I am not
convinced that on the eve of the
election this broken-heartedness
for the peasants is genuine. Why
has it taken all this time?

stage. The reason

as we are today.”

Some employers, — said

nic ciety Dine thal to a

HALL’S

“The Union has been organised
for ten years, Why has it taken us
all this time to reach the present
is that we
were not as strong ten years ago

Mr.
Adams, were genuinely reformed,
some tried to meet one halfway
and used methods of conciliation,
“Human nature is human nature
all over the world. and after 300
years of undisputed sway doing
whatever they liked, it is not sur-
{prising that we had to take nine

months to
to an end.”

Referring to the speéch of the
honourable junior member for St.
Philip, Mr. Adams said that the
suggestion to make the Labour
Welfare Fund a gift and then to
borrow from the Stabilisation
Fund, had been exposed by more
than one speaker.

The honourable member knew
that he (Mr. Adams) had said on
more than one occasion that
profits would- be limited. The
whole basis of the figures started
with the acceptance by the indus-
try that it should not get more
than a pound per ton profit, for
the rest, a child would agree that
it was profit-sharing.

bring this agreement

Voluntary Agreement

He would repeat that he wel-
comed the spirit of those factory
owners who had entered the
agreement voluntarily, but the
spirit of the honourable junior
member for St. George and the
honourable member for St.
Andrew was not going to help
their own class,

To try to fool the peasants that
the Labour Party had done them
a great wrong was not fair, said
Mr. Adams, If this agreement did
not come about, he questioned,
what guarantee would they have
had this year — or what guaran-
tee did they have im the years
of their existence as a union, that
the peasants were ing what
the industry could afford to pay.

After further comment 7
Adams repeated that the two par-
ties concerned in the sugar agree-
ment having entailed a ahange,
jovernment was asking to allow
the parties to carry out the
agreement. This could not be done

unless the Act to whieh he had
already referred had been
changed,

The Bill finally was given its
second feading and when it went
into committee the Opposition led
by Mr. EB. K. Walcott ppopeed the
inclusion of clause 3 dealing with
the levy of $1.80. The inclusion,
however, was upheld by a 9 to

majority The Bill was then

passed without amendment.

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PAGE FOUR



——=—

Printead by the Advocate Co., L*4., Broad St, Bridgetown

Thursday, October 11, 1951

—_————

PRIVATE SCHOOLS

IT would be unwise to venture cr’ticism
of the introduction of age grouping into
the educational system of this island with-
out examining the factors which have con-
tributed to its disadvantages. Chief among
these are the uncontrolled private schools.

Under existing regulations it is within
the power of the Director of Education to
inspect schools which are registered. These
are given certificates of approval such as
are seen in the advertisement of those
schools which cater to secondary educa-
; tion in this island, But it is not with these

schools that there should be so much con-
cern. It is to the “home school” that seri-
ous attention should now be paid.

There are several of these schools scat-
tered in the many villages to accommodate
the few children of each district. A lady,

a usually past the prime of youth, starts
such a school and holds out to the parents
that there is an exclusive atmosphere in
which the children would not mix with
those of the “lesser breeds.” This is the
first attraction for those who believe that
society demands from them something
which it really does not and flatters their

} vanity of being exclusive.

The teacher is usually a person whose
association with teaching, the knowledge

: and skill it requires, and the special train-

ing demanded was that gained during a

few. years as a juvenile in school. . The
school itself has its only relation with in-
stitutions of its kind in the name given it.
The building is as suited to be a school as
for any other purpose and seldom pro-
vides the required number of cubic feet
per pupil or subscribes to the rules of the

. Health Authority for buildings where any

number of people are gathered.

In this atmosphere of make-believe the
child remains to have the first part of its
life blighted by incompetent, even if en-
thusiastic and well-meaning individuals.
There is no regular rule as to when the
child should, enter or leave this school.
The truth is that the school serves as a
substitute for a nursery until the parent
believes that-the-ehild is really old enough
to go to school. And in many of these
cases the child who has already lost a few
years is then sent to the elementary school
where a teacher is expected to work

fn. miracles. _

It is ‘here where. the child and its
parents come up against the evils of age
grouping, The child would have been
farther advanced in its studies if it had
been sent to,the elementary school at the
time wheal ‘haath the private school;
now it has td be*put along with children
‘of its own age and is usually at a disad-
vantage.

. There are, those who will attempt to»
justify the existence of the private school
despite the fact that it now works a hard-
ship on children of the poorer classes who
will never have the opportunity of getting
any other kind of education beyond that
of the elementary school. It is easy to
argue but not so easy to justify the claim
of women to a living at the expense of the
educational development of thousands of
children.

Nothing said against the private schocl
should be taken to mean that it should be
banished, but in view of its opportunity
for harm and on the converse, its potential
usefulness in the community, it should, be
made to conform to certain rules applied
to all educational institutions.

It should be made unlawful for anyone
r to open a private school in any district
without the approval of the Educational
Authority and there should be heavy pen-
alties attached to those who refuse to sub-
mit their school for inspection and
approval by the Inspectors provided by
the Government.

Until something is done to control the
growth and conduct of these private
schools there will always be this gap be-
tween the time the average child should
have gone to school where he would be
classified with others of his own aye and
the time when he is taken from the aimos-
phere of snobbery and grouped in a class
where he can assimilate little or nething.

7S Re ee



Our Keaders Say:

Why Not All

To the Editor, the Advocate, :
SIR,—I crave space in your columns to enquire

why all persons employed in the sugar industry
were not eligible for bonus, under the recent re-
production bonus scheme. I speak for the chemists
who have to work so hard, taking samples every
hour and on whose diligence the success or other-
wise of the industry depends.

Don’t you think, Sir, that we should also benefit
trom this bonus. The cost of living affects us very
much too, the more so, since we are employed for
a short time every year: 1 have also heard that

not even the crop séaSon overseers and cane-weigh-
ers have got one cent, Do you think that it is fair
to us? I say no.

Give us something. We worked hard for it. We



were one of the cogs in the machinery and therefore
shouldn’t be left out.
I thank you kindly for space.
HARD-UP



Here in full is the Manifesto of the Conservative and

BARBADOS

signed by Mr. Churchill.

| Unionist Party for the General Election of 1951, |
|

We are confronted with a critical
Election which may well be the
jturning point in the fortunes and
even the life of Britain. We canno:
! go on with this evenly balanced
iParty strife and hold our own in
ithe world, or even earn our living.
} The prime need is for a stabic
Government with several years
ibefore it, during which time
jnational interests must be faith-
j fully held far above Party feuds
jor tactics.

j We need a new Government not
biassed by privilege or interest or
cramped by doctrimal prejudices
or inflamed by the of
class warfare. Such a Government
only the Conservative and Unionist

|Party can today provide.

'

;

’

No Illusions

There must be no illusions about
‘our difficulties and dangers. It is
better to face them squarely as
'we did in 1940. The Conservative
'Party who since victory have had
ine responsibility for the events
‘which have led us to where we are
!now, offers no bribes to the elec-
jtors. We will do our best to
serve them and to make things
better all round, but we do not
blind ourselves to the difficulties
that have to be overcome, or the
time that will be required to bring
us back to our rightful position in
the world, and to revive the vigour
of our national life and impulse.

We all seek and y for peace
A mighty union nations tread
that path together, but we ail
know that peace can only come
through their united strength and
faithful brotherhood.

Then and Now

Contrast our position to-day
with what it was six years ago.
Then all our foes had yielded.
We all had a right to believe and
hope that the fear of war would

not afflict our generation nor our *
children. We were respected, hon- |

oured and admired throughout the
world. We were a united peopie
at home, and it was only by being
united that we had survived the

deadly perils through which we §
had come and had i Ee eee

of freedom flying through
fateful year when we were alone.
There, at any rate, isa great
foundation and inspiration, Every







war brings extraordinary difficul-
ties. With national unity we could
have overcome them. But what has
happened since those days?

The attempt to impose a doc-
trinaire Socialism upon an Island
which has grown great and famous
by free enterprise has inflicted
serious injury upon our strengtn
and prosperity. Nationalisation has
proved itself a failure which has
resulted in heavy losses to the tax-
ay or the consumer, or both.



It has not ,iven general satisfac-
tion to the wage-earners in the

industries, It has im-
paired the relations of the Trade
‘Unions with their members. in
more than one nationalised indus-
try the ers are ill-con-
tent with
private employers, with whom
they could negotiate on equal
terms through the Trade Unions
to the all-powerful and remote
officials in Whitehall.

Reckless Spending

Our finances have been brought
into grave disorder. No British
Government in peace-time has
ever had the power or spent the
money in the vast extent and
reckless manner of our present
rulers, Apart from the two thous-
and millions they have borrowed
cr obtained from the United
States and the Dominions, they
have spent more than 10 million

a day, or 22 thousand mil-
lions in their six years. No com-
munity living in a world of com-
peting nations can possibly afford
such frantic extravagances. De-
valuation was the offspring of wild,
profuse expenditure, and the evils
which we suffer to-day are the
inevitable progeny of that wanton
way of living.

A Conservative Government will
cut out all unnecessary Govern-
ment expenditure, simplify the
administrative machine, and prune
waste and extravagance in every
department.

More for Less

The greatest national misfor-
tune which we now endure is the
ever-falling value of our money,
or, to put it in other words, the
ever-increasing cost, measured in
work and skill, of everything we
buy. British taxation is higher than
in any country outside the Com-
munist world, It is higher by
eight hundred millions a year
than it was in the height of the
war. We have a population of
fifty millions depending on im-
ports of food and raw materials
which we have to win by our
exertions, ingenuity, and crafts-
manship. Since Devaluation it
takes nearly twelve hours of work
with hands or brains to buy across
the dollar exchange what we
could have got before for eight
hours, We have now to give from
one-quarter to one-third more of
our life's strength, skill and out-
put of every kind and quality to
'get the same intake as we did
|before Devaluation two years ago,
We pay more for what we buy
irom abroad; we get less for what
we sell. That is what Socialist
Devaluation has meant. This
costly expedient has not prevent-,
ed a new financial crisis.

Second to None
We are a hard-working people:

We are second to none in ability”

or enterprise so far as we are
allowed to use these gifts. We
now have the only Socialist Gov-
ernment in the Empire and Com-
monwealth. Of all the countries
in the world Britain is the one
least capable of bearing the Social-
ist system.

The nation now has the chance
of rebuilding its life at home and



of strengthening its’ position
abroad. We must free ourselves
from our impediments. Of all im-
|pediments the class war is the
| worst, At the time when a gruw~-
ing measure of national unity is
more than ever necessary the
Socialist Party hope to gain an-
ther lease of power by fomenting
cla hatred and appealing to
moods of greed ana @vy

one knows how the aftermath of ©



change from the i

Within the limits of a statement
of this kind, it is only possible to
deal with some of the main ques-
tions now before us. We wish to
be judged by deeds and their
results and not by words and their
applause. We seck to proclaim 2
theme, rather than write a pros-
pectus. Many years ago I used
the phrase, “Bring the rearguard
in.” This meant basic standards
of life and tabour, the duty of
the strong to help the weak, and
of the s to establish
tolerable conditions for the less
fortunate. That policy is adopted
by all parties today. But now we
have the new Socialist doctrine.
It.is no longer. “Bring the rear-
guard in,” but “Keep the vanguard
back.” There is no means by which
this Island can support its present
population except by allowing its
native genius to flourish and
fructify. We cannot possibly keep
ourselves alive without the indi-
vidual effort, invention, contriv-
ance, thrift and good housckeep-
ing of our people.

In 1945 I said:

“What we desire is freedom;
what we need is abundance.
Freedom and abundance — these

must be our aims. The production
of new wealth is far more bene-
ficial than class and party fights
about the liquidation of old wealth,
We must try to share blessings
and not miseries. The production
of new wealth must precede com-
mon wealth, otherwise there will
only be common poverty.”

It is because these simple truths
have been denied and our peopie
duped by idle hopes and false
doctrine that the value of our
money has fallen so grievously
and the confidence of the world
in Great Britain has been impair-
ed. Confidence and currency are

MR. WINSTQN CHURCHILL

interdependent, and restoring con-
fidence by sound finance is one of
the ways in which the value of
our money may be sustained and
the rising cost of living checked.

The Conservative aim is to in-
crease our national output.

Here is the surest way to keep
our people fully employed, to halt
the rising cost, of living, and to
preserve our social services. Hard
work, good management, thrift—
all must receive their due incen-
tive and reward.

Commonwealth First

In the wider world outside
this Island we put first the
safety progress and cohesien

of the British Empire and Com-
monwealth of Nations. We must
all stand together and help each
other with all our strength both
in Defence and Trade, To foster
commerce within the Empire we
shall maintain Imperial Prefer-
ence. In our home market the
Empire producer will have a place
second only to the home ucer,

Next, there is the unity of the
English-speaking peoples who to-
gether number hundreds of mil-
lions. They have only to act in
harmony to preserve their own
freedom and the general peace.

On these solid foundations we
should all continue to labour for
a United Europe, including in the
course of time those unhappy
countries still behind the Iron
Curtain.

These are the three pillars of
the United Nations Organisation
which, if Soviet Russia becomes
the fourth, would n to all the
toiling millions of the world an
era of moral and material advance
undreamed of hitherto among
men. There was atime in our
hour of victory when this object
seemed to be within our reach.
Even now, in spite of the clouds
and confusion into which we have
since fallen, ve must not abandon
the supreme hope and design.

To Prevent War
For all these purposes we sup-
port the Rearmament programme
on which the Socialist Government
have embarked. We believe, how-
ever, that far better value could
be got for the immense manpower

and sums of money which are in-
volved. Special sacrifices are re-
quired from us all for the sake of

our survival as free democratic
communities and the prevention of
war,

[Here follows the statement on
Excess Profits Tax printed on Page
One.}

We believe in the necessity for
reducing to the minimum possible
all restrictive practices on both
sides of industry, and we shall re-
ly on a greatly strengthened Mon-
opolies Commission to seek, and
enable Parliament to correct any
operations in restraint of trade,
including cf course in the nation-
alised industries,

I will row mention some other
practical steps we shall take

We shall stop all further na-
tionalisation

The Iron
repealed and the
allowed to
ments

and Steel Act will be
Steel industry
resume its. achieve-

of the war and post-war

comfort of the elderly is a sacrec

ADVOCATE

The Tory Policy Signed TiEY HELD UP ABU

;

;
;

years. To gupervise prices ne)
development we shall revive, if
necessary with et er the
former Iron and Board
the State, the man-|

, and

consumers.
gail and road
be reorganised into
regional groups of workable size.
Private road hauliers will be giv-
en the chance to return to busi- |
ness, and private lorries will no)
longer be crippled by the twenty-
five mile limit.
Coal will remain nationalised
There will be more decentral',>-
and stimulation of local
initiative and loyalties, but wage
negotiations will remain on a

agement,

alised will
purview of the Monopolies’ Com-

strict Parliamentary review of |
their activities.

Efficient—and Human

We seek to create an industrial
system that is not only efficient
but humam The Conservative
Workers’ Charter for Industry wil!
be brought into being as early a*

wherever practicable. The scheme
will be worked out with trad
unions, and employers, and the
laid before Parliament.

There you have a clear plan o
action in this field.

Housing is the first of the socic
services. It is also one of the kev
to increased productivity. Wor«
family life, health and educatio
ere all undermined by over-
crowded homes. Therefore a
Conservative and Unionist Gqv-
ernment will give housing
priority second only to national
defence. Our target remain:
300,006 houses a year. There
should be no reduction in th
number of houses and flats buil.
to let but more freedom must b
given to the private builder. In
property-owning democracy, th
more people who own their home
the better.

In Education and in Health
some of the most crying needs ar.
not being met. For the money now
being spent we will provide better
services and so fulfil the higt
hopes we all held when ve
planned the improvements dur'nt
the war.

eS

|
Drive for More Food |

The whole system of town plan-
ning and development charges
needs drastic overhaul.

We shall review the position oi
pensioners, including war pension-
ers, and see that the hardest needs
are met first. The care ano

trust. Some of them prefer. to 1p-
main at work and there must be
encouragen.ent for them to do 50

To obtain more food practic.
knowledge and business experi-
ence must be released to comb tne
world for greater supplies.

We shall maintain our system o1
guaranteed agricultural prices ana
markets and protect British horti-
culture from foreign dumpers. We
have untilled acres and much
marginal land. Farmers and mer-
chants should work together tc
improve distribution in the inter-
ests of the public.

Subject to the needs of Rearma-
ment, the utmost will be done to
provide better housing, water
supplies, drainage, electricity and
transport in rural areas.

The fishing industry will be
protected from unrestricted foreign
dumping. Every effort will be
made by international agreement
to prevent over-fishing,

Food subsidies cannot be radi-
cally changed in. present circum-
Blances, but later we
simplify the system and by in-
creases in family allowances, tax-
ation changes and other methods,
to ensure that public money is
spent on those who need help and
not, as at present, upon all classes
indiscriminately.

Apart from proposals to help
Britain to stand on her own feet
by increasing productivity, we
must guard the British way of
life, hallowed by centuries of
tradition. We have fought tyrants
at home and abroad to win and
preserve the institutions of con-
stitutional Monarchy and Parlia-
mentary government. From Britain
across the generations our message
has gone forth to all parts of the
globe. However well - meaning
many of the nt Socialist
leaders may be, there is no doubt
that in its complete development

a Socialist State, monopolisin,
proauction, distribution and ex-
change, would ‘fatal to ina-
vidual freedom.’ We look on the
Government as/the servant ana
not as the masters of the people.
Multiplying orders and _ rules
should be reduced, and the whole
system kept under more rigorous
Parliamentary scrutiny. We shall
call an all-Pa conference to
consider proposals for the reform
of the House of Lords.

We shall restore the University
constituencies, ‘which have been
disfranchised trary to the
agreement rea by all three
Parties during the war.

The United lom cannot be
kept in a Whitehall strait-jackei.
The Unionist policy for Scotland;
including the practical steps pro-
posed for effective Scottish control
of Scottish 4ffairs will be vigor-
ously pressed forward.

There will be ajCabinet Minister
charged with the care of Welsh
affairs. :

We shall seek to restore to Local
Government the, confidence and
responsibility it| has lost under
Socialism.

All these and other issues ot
the day can only (be stated briefi
in our Party Manifesto. A muc
fuller account will be given of
them in “Britain Stron and
Free” which will be published in
a few days.

I close with a simple declaration
our faith. The Conservative
and Unionist Party stands not for
any section of the people but for
all. In this spirit, we will do our
utmost to grapple with the in-
creasing difficulties into which our
country has been plunged, }
—L.E.8.!

—————————————



anes tea —aefpce att gg NS

rg ence

of

to| Wasn’t so thick here, and you could see half

SE

THURSDAY, OCTOBER 11, 1551



—and so we went out
bandit-chasing..
By Hernard Wicksteed

TROLAK, Malaya.

WE'VE been what the boys call “jungle
bashing” today. We went out after three
bandits who had held up a bus.

We didn’t find them, but reporter Wick-
steed, from Hampstead, finished the day
about 10]b. lighter than he started. Phew!
It was hot, hard work.

The bus was bumping along a rough) }

jungle track, taking a load of tin miners to
work, when three bandits stepped out on to
the road.

Bandits love stopping buses. They pass the}

hat round among the passengers in aid of|}

bandit funds, and then set the bus on fire.

On this occasion the Indian bus driver, as,
mission and there will also be|bus drivers the world over sometimes do,/§

ignored the signal to stop and put his foot
down instead.
There happened to be a Malay policeman

hanging on to the back of the bus and the

sudden acceleration threw him off into the
road, right among the bandits.

ALL FOURS

He ran so fast his shoes fell off, but he
managed to get away because the bandits
vere a bit surprised at the turn of events
themselves, and the shots they fired at the
fleeing policeman missed.

All this happened about 15 miles from the

of the Royal West Kents and Wicksteed
were standing by.

No. 1 Platoon, plus Wicksteed was ordered
out, and in a few minutes we were dashing

to the scene in trucks. When we got there,|}

naturally the bandits had vanished into the
thick jungle by the roadside.

We were lined up by Lieutenant Karl
Beale, aged 22, whose father grows Cox’s
Orange Pippins in Cranbrook, Kent. Ungat,
the platoon’s pet head-hunter from Borneo,
ran up and down the roadside like a terrier
after a rabbit.

Eventually he found what he was looking
for — a broken twig or some crushed grass
or something, and plunged into the jungle
with the rest of us after him.

It was so thick you could only see the man
ahead of you and the man behind.

At would not have been so bad if we had
been going on the level, but the tracker was
taking us up the side of a hill so steep we
had to go up on all fours.

OH, THE HEAT

Above I could see the boots and occasion-
ally the whole of Private John Morgan, a
National Service boy who used to work in a
gypsum mine at Netherfield, near Battle, in
Sussex.

Below me was Lance-Corporal Ricky Jack-
son. He is not unknown at the Hammersmith
Palais de Danse, but he has also been a Boy
Scout, a King’s Scout in the Isleworth (Mid-
dlesex) troop.

The heat was like the heat of a Turkish
bath, and we had to go on up this blinking,
jungle-covered hill for half an hour, without
a word and without a halt. .

When we got to the top of the hill, we
went down the other side to a swamp. It

a dozen chaps spread out in front and as
many more behind.

grin and the twinkling eyes of Private Don
Bags, the barrow boy from Camden Town,
and the broad back of Private Johnny Stav-
inski, ‘the acrobat temporarily absent on
National Service from the Tovarich Troupe.

I’m not sure the swamp wasn’t worse than
the hill. We were up to our knees in water
half the time. Then it was into the thick
undergrowth again, and up another murder-
ous hill. ,

At last the whisper to halt came back
from the front of the column. The tracker
had found something. It was an ambush
position in which six men had lain not more
than four hours before. |

SILLY PLACE

With the memory of the swamp and those
murderous hills between us and the road, I
thought what a cockeyed place it was for
the bandits to lay an ambush, It seemed
miles from anywhere.

Then I heard an odd noise and, looking)
round a bush, I saw a bus going past. We
had made a complete circle and come back
tothe road almost at the same spot from
which we had started. { Be

The*trucks picked us up, and we got back,
to camp just in time for the weekly film



show. The boys, who looked as if they had,

been for no more than an afternoon: stroll,’
paid 35 cents (or 9d.) for a seat, but the
Borneo headhunter boys got in for nothing.
They love films and their favourite star is,
Bing. |
BORING ?

The newsreel included shots of Ascot, and

the feature was a Western called “Prairie

Pirates.” It rained so hard outside you |

couldn’t hear a thing, and the screen was so
dim you couldn’t see much either.

“Sorry it has been such a boring day,” said
young Beale later, as we crept under our,
mosquito nets, with the rain still pelting
down.

“Not at all,” I said, as I sank on the bed.
“T found it rather unusual.”

' —L.ES.

camp at Trolak, where A for Able Company |}}

You could see the permanent, half-amused os ;





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SPECIALS

Dried Fruit Salad
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Apple Puree Fresh Frozen Salmon {
—24e. per tin Red Salmon—in tins

Local Squash—24c. per tb Pilchards—in tins

Limes—1 cent each Sardines—in tins

a er ae ean nemaararterinas Lobster—in tins

SMOKERS’ Crab—in tins |

DELIGHT See

Embassy Cigarettes J & R BREAD with
—in tins of 25 for 53c.

Craven A ANCHOR BUTTER
—in tins of 50 —$1.04
Craven A Is_ Excellent

—in pkgs. of 20—Ale.

GODDARDS


THURSDAY, OCTOBER

2 Meu Get 4 Months
7aol Terms For
Snatching Wallets

EACH of two labourers—Carl
Lucas cf Reed Street, St. Michael
ind George Bur.owes of Delamere
Land, St Michael, was sentenced
yesterd to 4 mons’ imprison-
ment with hard labour by Mr.
. LL. Walwyn Acting Police,
Magistrate of District “A” for
larceny.

Eurrowes was found guilty of
stealing a_ wallet containing $20
from Leo Schedeker a sailor of the
U.S. Navy, while Lucas pleaded
guilty of siealing a wallet valued
$15 and containing $25 the
propeity of Bolbie Phillips a
sailor of the U.S. Navy.

Both sailors told the court that
on October 9, sometime during
the night both men came up
be ind them and snatched their
wallets from their trousers,

Scheeker said that his wallet
vas taken from him while he was
at the New Yok Club, Bay Street.
Phillips was about half way up
the staircase of the Zanzibar Club
going in when he was robbed.

Inspector F. Connell attached
te the Bridge Yost in addressing
t)e court on the charges said that
these robberies were getting very
prevalent especially when ships
of the United States Navy were
in port. Some people then took
the oppo;tunity to give the island
a bad name by robbing un-
suspecting tourists. .

S-ibect Wald:cn—keeper of the
eriminal records — told the court
that Burrowes had one previous



at

conviction for lareeny, when on
May 16, 1950, he was fined 10/-
by His Worship Mr, A, J, H.

Hanschell for stealing tamarinds
the property of the Barbados
General Hospital.

_ Lucas has two previous convic-
tions and on the last conviction—
June 29, 1943—he was sentenced
to 14 days’ imprisonment for
stealing 1/- from Edwin Clarke.

3efore sentencing the defend-
ants Mr. Walwyn said that this
crime of snatching wallets must
be stamped out, therefore he was
going to punish them so that this
pun.shment would act as a
deterrent for those who are likely
to commit a similar offence.



11, 1951

Legisla



Board Of Health
Approve Sale
Of Land

THE Board of Health at a
meeting yesterday approved the
division and sale of 1,880,537
feet in lots at Horse Planta-
tion, St. Joseph by Joes River

Estate Ltd.

Members of the Board also
assented to the dividing for sale
one lot containing 30,560 square
feet of land with a dwelling house
from the lands of Mrs. M.
Richardsen at Kent, Christ Church.

she having divided off and sold

another lot from the. same
property, .

Also approved was the division
and sale at »Albion. » e"

; Lodg
Bartaree; Hill, St, Michael by Mr.
S. P. Archer, qualified executor
to the estate of Winifred E'sie
Arc.er deceased,

Members present at the meeting
were Mr. F. Goddard, Hon'ble
V. C. Gale, Mr. J. M, Kidney, Mr.
4. E. S. Lewis, Dr, F, Grannum,
Dr. E B. Cavter, and Dr, J. @.
O'Mahony.



TWO mote casts of West
Indian currency notes arrived
at Seawell yesterday afternoon
on B.W.1.A's flight 305 from
Trinidad. Accompanying over
the cases wore two of Trini-
dad's Senior Currency Officers,
My, William Olacke and Mr.
W. Vincent Brown. They ex-
pect to return to Trinidad to-
morrow and will be ti
with them a quantity id
cancelled Trinidad and Tobago
notes.

—_— -—-—___ |

SHOPKEEPERS’ MEETING

In the report of the Shopkeepers’
Urion Meeting appearing recently in this
Peper mention was mace of a speech by
Mr. E. Atherley. The speaker was not
Mr. E. G. Atherley of Ather'ey Bros.
1 Speightstowns.



Preparations For Incom<
Survey Complete
The preparations for the first Survey of income and Ex-

penditure, which is being carried out in Barbados by the
Institute of Social and Economic Research of the University

College of the West Indies,

are now complete, Mr. Ken

Straw, a member of the Institute who is carrying out the
survey told the Advocate yesterday,
The interviewing of householders in the selected areas he

said will begin on Monday,

sample of households has
been taken according to rigid
scientific and statistical methods.
The process adopted of taking a
random sample means that in-
formation gathered from th@sam-
ple households can be used to

represent the. facets which would
have been obtained if all the
households in the particular
Parishes selected had been inter-
viewed,

Chance

It is purely a matter of chance
which particular households con-
stitute the sample. Those taking
the sample have no idea at all
before carrying out the statistical

calculations whieh households’
will be selected. The information
about any one household is of
interest only in so far as it forms
one of the 800 in the sample.

When the totals of all the house-
holds are added up the statistical
tabulation and analysis is carried
out. This provides broad averages
covering the whole 800 house-
holds, and it is these broad aver-
ages which are of particular
significance and interest.

“The survey will be carried out
in four areas of the island —
Bridgetown, St. Michael, St. Lucy
and St. George—St. John.”

“Out of the 120 school teachers
from all over Barbados who vol-
unteered to act as interviewers,
forty’ have been selected from



October 15th,

areas where the survey is to take
place. A questionnaire has been
prepared, -based on local condi-
tions and on experiefce gained
from similar surveys. in other
parts of the world.”

“The information asked for is M

required by the Institute in
Jamaica for Research purposes; it
is needed for educational pur-
poses in the University College
of the West Indies and in Barba-
dos. The broad averages which,
emerge may also be used to form
the basis of a new Cost of Living
Index in Barbados in accordance
with the Report of the Cost of
Living Index Committee.”

Public Support

“If the Survey is to be a suc-
cess, wide public support is
essential. The information sup-
plied by householders will be
treated as strictly confidential by
the University Research Institute.
The only figures which will be
published or used for Cost of
Living Index calculations will be
broad averages; Thus the position
of any individual householder
will not be. disclosed by the
figures.” ed,

“It is hoped that those house-
holders who constitute the sample
will willingly co-operate with
the teachers who have volunteered
to act as interviewers and who
have a difficult task to perform.”

BARBADOS ADVOCATE



Housing Encouraged

By Chamber

Of Commerce

MR. D. G. LEACOCK, President of the Chamber of Com-
merce, at yesterday's Council meeting, expressed the grati-
tude of the Chamber for the interest which the Colonial
Secretary had taken in getting the Legislature to provide
the necessary funds to be expended at the British Industries

Fair in 1952.

He said that the Chamber owed a considerable debt to the
Colonial Secretary who on his own initiative in the Execu-
tive Committee had got Government to put up this money.

The Chamber was discussing a
letter from the Colonial Secretary
which stated that in view of the
fact that sufficient funds had been
made available by the Legislature
for a ‘stand at the 1952 B.LF.,
whether the Chamber would un-
dertake to supe!y and forward the
ne essary exhibits for the booth.

After some discussion, the Clerk
was instructed

to reply saying
that the Chamber and/or interest-
ed parties would be pleased to
co-operate with Government by

supplying and forwarding exhioits
for the Barbados stand,
Advertisement

Mr. A. ceL. (an ss said that the
colonial Se-retary bad made the
point during his soeech in the
Legislative Council om Tuesday
that it would be useful to adver-
lise Barbados Fancy Molasses at
the British Industries Fair, but a
member closely connected with
the Canning Molasses trade, had,
al a recent meeting of the Cham-
ber. pointed out that on account
of restrictions, very little canned
molasses could be sold in the
United Kingdom. He (Mr. Inniss)
fclt that this poi should be
rr sl “> aticntion o: the
proper aucicriies.

on'ble K. R. Hunte said that
he had seen Mr. Healy, an official
of the Ministry of Food in the
U.K. while he was in Barbados,
Mr. Healy had said that restric-
tions were imposed on account of
the similarity between Fancy
Molasses and Treacle.

He had drawn to Mr, Healy's
attention that Barbados Fancy
Molasses was clearly branded on
each container. .

After further discussion, it was
decided that the local Canning
Company through the Barbados
Government, should make repre-
sentations to the British Ministry
of Food against restriction on the
importation of Barbados Fancy
Molasses into the U.K.

Hon. K. R. Hunte who is an
exporter of canned Fancy Mo-
lasses, promised to assist in the
drafting of this letter to be for-
warded to the British Ministry of
Food.

Tourism Observer

Another letter dealt with by the
Chamber was the reply from the
Colonial Secretary to a letter from
the Chamber of Commerce pro-
testing against the seection of Mr.
Cox, M.C.P., as the local
observer at the confgrence on
Tourism which took pl:‘}e recent-
ly in the Dominican Republic.

The Colonial Secretary in reply
said that the contents of their
letter would be brought to the
notice of the Governor-in-Execu-
tive Committee.

He added that the main purpose
of the Conference was to discuss
the establishment of the proposed
Caribbean Tourist Development
Association, and that the Barbados
Government must decide whether
or not the benefits which would
accrue to Barbados from member-
ship of this Association, in the
event of its being formed, justify
the by no means _ inconsiderable
annual contribution (believed to
be in the region of $13,000) which
it would be required to make,
bearing in mind the present an-
nual contribution $32,290 which is
made to the Barbados Publicity
Committee.

Since the decision whether or
not to request the Legislature. to.
provide funds for this purpose rest
with the Governor-in-Executive
Committee, ‘t was concluded that
the most appropriate observer that
could be sent on that occasion



tT

would be the House Member of
the Governor-in-Executive Com-
mittee in charge of Trade and
Commerce.

Housing

A letier from the Colonial
Secretary's Office to the Chamber
of Commerce yesterday informed
them that the British West Indies
Housing Conference which was

convened by the Comptroller for.

Development and Welfare in June
last, recommended that Govern-
ments should encourage private
enterprise building for’ the mid-
dle income groups.

The letter went on to state that
there was a report of the sub-
committee cppointed by the Con-
ference to report on Administra-
tion, Housing Finance, Rents,
Managements, ete.

That Sub-Committee suggested
that in connection with the pro-
vision of housing for the middle
income groups, the time had come
when private employers might
with advantage to all concerned,
give attention to the question of
assisting permanent members of
their staffs to acquire homes,

The exhortation to employers
to assist this class of worker was
made in the knowledge that it
was. very unlikely that Govern-
ments would be able to find the
necessary Money to build houses
for rental or sale to the middle
income groups.

Unattractive Investment
_. The report further stated that
it was well known that the high
cost of enterprise Was making
building construction by private
enterprise for the purpose of let-
ting, an unattractive field of
investment.

The Committee were unable
at the moment to suggest any
particular form of assistance,
but strongly recommended that
schemes of that nature be given
every possible encouragement by

Clerk to reply informing them

that the Chamber agreed that

middle class housing should be
encouraged. ‘

Arising out of the Minutes, the
President said that several mem-
bers of the Chamber had met. Mr.
Cc. J. Burgess, Executive Secretary
(Economies) of the Caribbean
Commission who visited here re-
cently to obtain information :for
the forthcoming Conference of
the Caribbean Commission,

He said that the members dis-
cussed with Mr. Burgess industrial
und labour problems and the latter
pointed out that he had got all the
necessary statisti¢s he had required
from the Government end omy
wished to obtain the general views
of the Chamber of Commerce.

Another matter arising out of
the minutes was an interview the
President had with the local
Manager of B.W.ILA., Mr. Percy
Taylor in connection with the in-
adequate service provided by hi¢
air line.

Mr. Taylor said that it was not a
matter for which he was respon-
sible. He therefore asked for ex-
tracts of the meeting at which the
matter had been discussed. These
had been supplied him and he had
in turn forwarded them to his
heedouarters in Trinidad for their
comments,

The Chamber decided to hola +
Muncheon instead of. Jre Annis!
Tiinher “provided there was cuf-
ficient resnonse fram mambhore



NATURAL GAS RELEASED TO PUBLIC

At mid-night last night Natural
Gas was turned into all the Gas

Company’s mains. Asking the
Manager of the Company, Mr.
Young, why mid-night was chosen
for turning on the gas, he told the

Advocate this was done in order
to give the old gas in the pipe
line an opportunity to be expelled
by morning.

In* reply to a query as to
whether it was safe to use the
new gas if the jets were not
changed, the Manager gave -the

was quite safe
gas on Cookers
had not been

assurance that /it
to use the new
where the

i 2 Burner

jets

The stove with

Sires i ae a as a es

WICKS No. 200 44c. No. 21 $1.00



| CAVE, SHEPHERD & 60. LTD.

OVENS
|
|

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It's delicious!

VALOR





changed provided a_ certain
amount of care was taken in reg-
ulating the flame down to a suit-
able size, as the increased pres-
sure and quality of gas would
naturally cause a longer flame at
the burners not adjusted to suit
the Natural Gas.

The Company is. changing and
regulating each and every burner
on all of their customers’ appli-
ances in order to give greater
efficiency and economy in its use,

New Thermal Rates
When asked what would be the
difference to customers with the
Natural Gas and the new Ther-



It's cooked

a reputation for good

cooking. We have the fallowing models:
TABLE MODEL
with stands $25.21 & $17.50

SHINS BM OR sic ining stannic papers ecrvn vedas aD

No, 300 80c.

12 & 13 Broad Street.





mal rate, the Manager — said:
“Theoretically our customers
should use half the quantity of
gas they have been previously
using, but the Company is hoping
that with this knowledge custom-
ers will take advantage of the
increased heating value and use
more gas which will also be to
their advantage as the Schedule
of Rates is so adapted to’ make
the gas cheaper the greater the
quantity used.” He also said that
the past system of charging meter
rental has been abolished with
this new Schedule of Rates.

He added: “By the amendment
to the Gas Company’s Act, the

on a





dividend of 74% is tied to the
average basic price of 40c. per
therm and before the Company
can: increase their dividend they
must first 1educe the price of gas
to the public, therefore, it is to
the advantage of the Company to
sell the Gas as cheafam as possi-
ble.

“During the past 4 years they
have been carrying on at a loss
and without paying any dividend
to Sharcholders — by this they
have earned the gratitude of their

* customers and deserve the co+
operation of the Publie in this
venture.”










THE NEWS



THE “Barbados Advocate” was promptly on board the U.S. warships

yesterday and here this newspaper

vendor is the centre of attraction,

as the eager sailors look for the news.

UNITED STATES NAVY
ENJOY SHORE LEAVE

CHARLIE CAMPBELL of Virginia, U.S.A., a member o
L.S.T. 525, one of the U.S.A. Naval vessels at present

port, likes photography. He

can appreciate scenery. ‘Tha

is why Charlie brought along his Speed Graphic came:
when he came ashore yesterday. He intends to take a:

many pictures of Barbados

as possible and, says Charlic

“Sometimes you are likely to get some of the best picturs

along the City streets.”

When the Advocate reporter
saw Charlie he was picking out
likely spots to take along Sw.un
Street and Busbey’s Alley. He has
alréady visited Puerto Rico and
St. Thomas, but this is his first
trip to Barbados.

He told the Advacate, “We are
going to write a book about the
ship and the various places we
visited. Some of my photos will
be published in this book”.

Accompanying Charlie were Joe
Medinas and Frank Wever. They
are not photographers, but they
liked watching Charlie taking
snaps.

Charlie was not the only photo-
grapher “in white”
City yesterday.
sailors took pictures, but their
cameras were smaller than
Charlie's. According to one of
Charlie’s friends, “This bud goes
in for photography in a big way”.

Radio Transmission

The U.S. Navy Special Police
had their Headquarters at the

Many _ other

Central Police Station, An office.

Was provided for the Officers in
charge while the radio transmit-
ting and receiving set was placed
in the yard, This set was in con-
tact with the U.S.S. Alshain, in
the harbour, and a jeep and truck
which patrolled the City

Four Officers, three Chief
Officers and 21 enlisted men were
attached to the Special Police
Up to 3 o'clock yesterday eve-
ning they received no reports of
thefts or bad behaviour, On the
frevious day the other S.P. shift
received two reports of thefts.

There was officially no. sight-
seeing for Special Police Staff
Today they will be free and it will
be their turn to look around the

island.
Also on the S.P. Staff are two
Hospital Orderlies, One goes

around in the truck with first aid
equipment. In case of an accident
the radio will contact the truck

PURINA

H. Jason Jones &

i


























AND SO
hy ANNE

of wisdom,

wealthy,

This is the
admits that v

Se ous, in the

get exhausted,

thing that strike
career is marriz
marriage to a
gratifying your
who always‘ ha:

You
sooner

may as
than la



around the A

FOR BEST
USE

IN THE CHECKER BOARD BAGS



*, and

Work is bad for
posture, and digestion. It is ruin-
long
personality. The
gent girl can abandon work, the
better for her it

There is a higher career, There
is one career in which 30%

ter,
this book carefully, and give heed |

we have it at

and he will be immediately take.
i» the scene, The other order!
iorréims at Headquarters.



Inquest Adjourned

FURTHER hearing
inquest touching the
Eugene Edwards was
yesterday by Mr. C,
Acting Coroner of
until November 2.

Edwards died suddenly at hi
home at Coilymore Rock in th
early hours of Tuesday morning
October 9. His body was removed
to the Public Mortuary where Di
. §&. Cato performed a_ pos
mortem Examination.

Clarrisa Edwards a 45-year-old
domestic and wife of the decease
told the court that her husband
went to bed on October 8 at 8.15
p.m. He awoke about 11.50 p.m.
the same night saying that he was
suffocating and she opened the
windows of the house, This did not
change his condition.
aa peak eye ae i rome a
é died shortly after
pes a a

To the jury Clarrisa Edwards
sald that her husband used to
drink heavily and they used to
quarrel over his drinking.

At the Mortuary she identifies
his body to Dr A. 8S, Cato,

At the next hearing Dr,

in th
death ot
adjourne
L. Walwy
District “A

A. S

“ato and the Government Analyst}

will give their evidence.

.

Car, Bus Collide
THE bus M-1301 of the Liberty
Motor "Bus Co, which was being
driven by Stanley Dash of Bibby’
Lane, St, Michael, and the ca
M-759, owned and driven by Mil
ton Kayley of Villa Road, Brit-
ton’s Hill, were both extensively
damaged yesterday evening, whe»
they came into a collision o
Britton’s Cross Road. The acci-

dent oceurred about 3.30 o'clock.

RESULTS

CHOWS

Co,, Ltd—Distributors

TO WED
HWALLIOL

Some girls struggle,
Some girls stagnate,
Others are smaft

And marry a Magnate.

Taking her cue from these words
Anne
every Good Gir
sobe:
bachelor for he;
lead him gently
the gift-lined po'h to the alter.
This book is diferent from every
other vocations
fuss
pork

Balliol tells
1 how to choose a
generou>
boss and how to
but firmly along

guide for girls.
manual which

is debasing,
a woman's figure,

run, to her
sooner an intelli-

will be.

never

never get wut of

bed one moment before you please,
and never lack money to buy any-
5 your fancy. The

ve. But it must be
an who enjoys
very whim, and





s the funds neces-
sary for this good purpose.

him
read

have
you

well
If

to its lessons, you surely will.

St. Joseph Column:

ture Thanked For B.LF. Stall.

Help For Middle Class



FILM SHOW

A large crowd attended a filn
show by the British Council uni
at the St. Joseph Girls’ School,
Horse Hill on Tuesday evening.
After the show the Rev. L. C.
Mallalieu, Rector of St. Joseph,

moved a vote of thanks. The show

Classes in joinery have been
tarted at the St. Joseph Boys’
School.

|

|

1

I

asted a little over an hour.

3,551 persons have registered
© go to the polls on general elec-
ion day to choose representatives
or St. Joseph.

People go to the St. Joseph
%ost Office daily for instructions

is to their polling stations

Ovening
Speed



Shorthand Results

OF THE students of the
ombermere Centre of the
Institute who sat the
Examinations of the
itman’s Shorthand Institute in

12

uly this year, the following have
M

heen

successful: Misses M -
Massiah 60 and 70 words. V. M.

Spencer, 60 and 70 words; M. K.

Darnett,

I
(

60 and 70 words; W
ilgrim, 60 and 70 words; E. D.
‘urwin, 60 and 70 words; S, J
ones, 50 and 70 words; J. Clarke
0 words; A. Smith, 60 words; and

J, Wiggins, 60 words.

;








4

at night



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oo

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fasten

LIGHTNING FASTEN: 2°

A wairenbary ¢ »
Imperial Chemica Vagus
Lim, led)

a nme geen

Sandwiches are delicious



For health and flavour the 1 yeh
‘spread’ is Marmite, which gives
that ‘extra something’ to a wide
variety of Sandwiches. Marmite
contains Vitamin B which helps
youngsters to thrive and build up
resistance to disease. You'll like
the flavour in Stews, Sauces,
Gravies and all Savoury dishes too.

In jars: loz., 2 oz.,

4oz., Boz, I6oz.

The Food for
FAMILY. FITNESS

& co. LTD.

RUBBER

4 inch

DEN

| HOSE

ALOE

4

Bay Street —

S64
VO?

4,4,4,6454

FLEA PISS PEE SOD

44,4 +6 % 6.665%
ACO OC SSO OOOO 4.6606

at 17e. a foot

ECKSTEIN BROS.



Phone 4269

POPP FOE SS







MI

“AG LPPLPLLPPLPPBLABLLCPPPPBPP®DPDPLPRBOLDPDL LBL LPL

*
LOGOS.
PAGE SIX BARBADOS



BY CARL ANDERSON

~
BX } A
[WONDER WHAT BRIANS BEEN ¥ 70 ROU Aw 7
m \ d b , na f C|
y MS oF Sa ] s é ) > Scat» Sgt 4 evay

HENRY



- We' RE
aes RELBAS! NG YOu FoR
LACK OF EVIDENCE! BuT iF bd de oF

UP TO WHILE I WAS INTHE

————4{ THANKS, OFFICER!
Treks WON f
1

EGRE





[WE MASKED MAN? HE AND MY
HUSBAND WENT TO THE arse)

TW
tS RETURNING AND BRINGING . f
ee | WAREHOUSE . °

SOMEONE WITH HIM!

ID ENJOY A DIP.IN THE
BOUGHT MESELFE

“A BATHIN’ SUIT-1 WONDER

HOW VEL LOOK- Rate os



THEY COME / OW THAT THE
RIFLES ARE READY TO DARKEN THE
SEA WITH THE BLOOD OF THE fitpeaa
OFFENDERS / AVO,/ THIS

\ 4 IT LEAP TO /

OBEY / WE GHALL
GIVE THEM WARM

GREETING a

TABRIZ ISN1 GITTING
EXPOSED ON THAT ROCK FOR
A GUN TAN ' GOMESMING'S
FIGHY . LET'S POA SLOW
d CAGE 08 ¢






ROCK WOBBLES
PRECARIOUSLY /



THE PHANTC"4 BY LEE FALK & RAY MOORES

“3 THE MAIN JOBS DONE. (LL HANDLE
NOW THAT TWESPIRT WAG HAS 5 RETURNED Line! agg (MSURE THE WITCH DOCTOR,

TOMS REAL GHA
NNER OnVES, ANY-
* a
¢ 5

THE TGER BE HILEDS ely

TIME. WALKS










a a rr rr eects





|
A WORD OF ADVICE EEFORE) : a BE i
\ LEAVE. DON'T TRY IT DED BY
AGAIN. IT MIGHT NOT Your WIgbOM, }
WORK ASECOND 4 O GHOST WHO

S ~
LLL LAPPCELLELLELSLELAPLLLEEEESES SLD BEDEGPERSD VP ELLDVPLIVLAPADP APP AARP

THURSDAY, OCTOBER 11, 1951
———$—$—_$—$—$—$—$———— NT

is PURE,
SAFE MILK





\ Feet in Preference the World Over

pr. 1990 Hardin Co. Difernat'l Copr, Reserved











apumee good looks tell you they*re fust right.
You know, too, when you look at the price
tag, that you can’t get finer value. Illustrated
is a Tan Oxford shoe for Boys and Youths.
Tied to every pair is the John White Guaran-
tee Shield—the eign which means ‘ just right "J
Look for it in leading stores in Barbados.

JOHN WHITE»

means made just night



sO SS

IT PAYS ¥ YOu TO DEAL “HERE

SPECIAL offers to all Cash and Credit Customers for Thursday to Saturday only







USUALLY NOW USUALLY NOW {

26 20
31

Bottles Gordons Gin. 250.230

Tins Evaporated Milk 29 27 _~ Bottles O’Keefes Beer

24 22 28




Tins Grape Fruit Juice Tins Heinz Soup

Pkgs. Lux Flakes (Large) AW

D. V. SCOTT & Co. Ltd. Broad Street

50









{
2$9$55565559659 SSSSSOSSOS PISS SPF POOOOVOPO OPIS PPPPP POP PP POO SOES
%
&
%
:
o
a
»



‘caaeemeial



NEXT WEEK FLOUR
WILL BE BOUGHT
FOR NOVEMBER,
DECEMBER

PREECE SVE PED OOPS FRAG ESF

OCP LPPECCEL SCPE LSLOPLL PPLE EAP

-

— LCOS EEA CFSE

everaaeet

-



:
KNOWING YOU HAVE MANY x
TIMES BEEN DISAPPOINTED §
BY RECEIVING INFERIOR ‘
FLOURS, WHY NOT ASK YOUR
SUPPLIER TO GET THE BEST ‘
AT NO EXTRA COST! <

“LIBERTY BELL”

AND



Tia se) | | “CANADIAN QUEEN”

Lae :

1 ay 2 Lm h ZZ 4 . fe ;

S Ser we a : HIGHEST QUALITY BAKERS FLOUR

4 y UL 1} | mh nck fan ee a

' er di NE amen ROSE NER TL) ROBERT THOM. LTD.—Azents

FRG OOOO OOOO GOGO FOOOSSOSSOOSSSSOME POCO CSS
{ ‘
THURSDAY, OCTOBER 11, 1951

CLASSIFIED ADS.

TELEPHONE 2508.

FOR

Minimum



The charge for announcements of
Births, Marriages, Deaths, Acknowl-
edgements, and *n Memoriam notices is
61 50 on week-days and $1.80 on Sundays
for any mumber oa! words up to 50, and
3 cents per word on week-days and
4 cents per word cn Sundays for each
additienal word.

DIED |

ALLEYNE: On October 10, 1951, Aimey
Louise, wife of F. G. Alla me, Head-
master of St. Philip's Boys’ School.
Her funeral leaves her late residence
Chureh Village, St Philip, at 4.45
p.m. today for St. Philip’s Church

SALE

charge week 72 cents and
96 cents Su™duyps M worus — over 24
words 3 cents a word werk—4 cents a
word on Sundays







AUTOMOTIVE J

CAR—Morris Minor Convertible 1950.
One owner. Under 7,000 miles. Perfect
running order. Newly sprayed. First firm
offer (subject to approval on pur-
chaser’s inspection and trial) will secure.
Car now in St. Lucia but will be avail-











F. G. Alleyne (Widower), A
“ Maynes (Daughter), L. Mascoll
iNiece), C. Haynes (Son-in-law)
P. Haynes tGrandson)
11.10.51



FRANCO: Audrey Agnes. On Sunday
Cetober 7th 1951 at “Berford’, Max-
well Coast, Ch. Ch., daughter of
Mrs. Agnes Franco. Funeral took
place on Sunday afternoon at Christ
Church Parish Church

11.10.51





SEALY — On Wednesday 10th October,
1951, Edith Murphy Sealy, (late of
Pine Road, B'ville.) The funeral
leaves her daughter's residence, Mrs,
Arthur Chadderton’s, Glendover Court,
Maxwell Coast, Christ Church, at 4
o'clock this evening for the .Westbury
Cemetery. Friends are invited.

Meta Chadderton (daughter), Arthur
Chadderton (son-in-law), Gilbert
il (Nephew).

11.10.51.

PERSONAL

The public are hereby warned against
giving credit to my wife, LILIAN YEAR-
WOOD (nee Sylvester) as I do not hold
myself, responsible for her or anyone
else contfacting any debt or debts in
my name unless by a written order
signed by me, :

WILLIAM H. YEARWOOD,
Park Road, Bush Hall,
8. Michael.
10.10. 51—2n.







ANNOUNCEMENTS



To meet numerous requests of our
customers, we have opened a_ section
for custom made shirts, pyjamas, pants,
shorts, ladies slacks, boys clothing etc.
Having at our disposal the facilities of a
modern factory we are able to offer
prompt services at exceptionally reason-
able prices,

Reliance Shirt Factory, Shirt Depot.
Paimetto Street. Phone 4764.

10.10, 51—19n.

BROKEN DENTAL PLATES skilfully
repaired while yott wait. Square Deal
Denture Repair Service. Removed from
Magazine Lane to Upper Reed Street.

7.10.51—5n.

TAKE NOTICE
JEPP

That RECKITT & COLMAN LIMITED,
a_ British Limited Liability Company,
Manufacturers, of Kingston Works, Dan-
som Lane, Hull, England, has applied
for the registration of a trade mark in|
Pa.. “A” of Register in respect of
pharmaceutical and medicinal prepara-
tions, and will be entitled to register
the same after one month from the 9th
day of October 1951 unless some person
shall in the meantime give notice in
cuplicate to me at my office of opposition
of such registration, The trade mark can
be seen on application at my office.

Dated this 26th day of September 1951.

H. WILLIAMS,
Registrar of Trade Marks.
9.10,51—3n





























ya
MUSCLE PAINS

May mean kidney trouble

A function of the kidneys is to
eliminate harmful impurities from
the system, If the kidneys grow
sluggish, these impurities accum-
ulate settle and often become
a cause of pain in joints and
muscles. The way to tackle the
trouble is to help the kidneys.

should be toned up with
De Witt’s ee ae medicine
made specially for this pu: .
De Witt’s Pills have a soothing,
cleansing and antiseptic action on
the kidneys thatâ„¢brings them
back to pepers ay gee
function properly. This well-
tried medians ia sold all over
the world and we have many
letters from sufferers telling
of relief gained, after years
of suffering, by i
Witt’s Pills. Try them
for your trouble, Go to
your chemist and
geta supply
tora;











SS







GUARANTEE

De Witt’s Pills are —
manufactured under strictly hygienic
conditions and the in ts con-

form to rigid standards of purity.

Va Tee ge

Ta GTO ae ites Troubles,
: ‘\





_—
,



SPECIAL NOTICE

TO ALL GAS CONSUMERS



Natural Gas was turned into the
Company's pipe lines on Wed-
nesdsjy 10th October at midnight.
You are warned not to use the
tings on which the jets HAVE

| NOT been changed AFTER the
+ turning on of the New Gas until
| the Company's Fitters have called
}



ORIENTAL
SOUVENIRS

Gifts, Curios, Jewels





THANTS
Pr. Wm. Bry, St. :: Dial 3466

Pe
TO-DAY'S NEWS ) FLASH

WINSTON CHURCHILL—
THE SECOND WORLD
WAR — Volunie IV
THE HINGE OF FATE

At Johnson’s Stationery









CARPENTER RULES
At
At Johnson’s Hardware














; Permanent.















i



able Barbados about October 9th. Cash
offers only. Reply Box No. B.B. C/o
| Advocate Co. 7.10.51—4n



CARS: 1950 Hillman Saloon in excel-
Jent condition only 10,000 miles. Austin
A-70 first class condition, 13,500 miles.
Standard Vanguard in good order 18,000
miles. 11.10.51—4n

CAR-—-One di) 1946 Plymouth Car .in
perfect condition. Tyres new. Apply:
Cosmopolitan Garage, Magazine Lane.
Phone 3915. 9.10.51—5n.

CAR—One (1) Ford ~ Prefect. For
further particulars Phone 4231. H, A.
Cuke, Jnr. Bovell & Skeete

10.10,.51—t.f.n.







ELECTRICAL

“CLIMAX” ELECTRIC WASHING
MACHINES.—A small shipment of these
just received from Canada and at our
price of $247.12 represents outstanding







FOR RENT
HOUSES

—_—_—_—_—
SANDY HOOK-—By the sea, furnished;
six months from October 15th Tel. 8131
9.10. 51—2n

PUBLIC SALES

Ten cents per agate line on week-day:
and 12 cents per agate line on Sundays,
charge $1.50 on week-day:
and $1.80 on Sundava.





REAL ESTATE

__
HOUSES—At Rockley, prices from
£3,500 to £8,000. Also houses at Navy
Gardens, Dayrells Road, Pine Hill and
City, Also House Spots at Maxwell.
Por particulars about building, selling
or buying Phone B. A. Brooks at 8335
Please leave Phone Number or Address
and I will contact you.

9.10.51—7n



|
nat nentacenitie nceeeadeitlar teen
Offers in writing are invited for the
purchase and removal of a dwelling
house known as “Wakefield” aback of
the Y.M.C.A. Headquarters, Pinfold
Street.
} Offers will be accepted up to and
including 15th inst. The purchaser will
be required to take down and remove
the Dweliing House from the premises
by noon 10th November 1951. Inspection
ania.
Signed BOARD OF DIRECTORS,
Y.M.C.A.,
Per HERBERT WILLIAMS,
General Secretary.
9.10. 51—én

—_—_—_—————
Offers will be received in writing up
to 4 p.m. on Wednesday, 17th Octr

value. Dial—3878 or 4710. DA COSTA &I 1951, by Courtesy Garage, White Park

Co,, Ltd. Electrical Department.
5.10.51—6n.



PADIOGRAM-—G.E.C. Radiogram Desk
console model $250.00. Timpson, Lodge
School. Ring 95-283 before 9 a.m.

11.10, 51—4n



MECHANICAL

SINGER SEWING MACHINE almost
new and Mahogany Furni'



10.10.51—2n



MISCELLANEOUS

COCOANUT PLANTS—Selected cocoa-
nut plants. Apply: Niagara Factory,
Spry Street. Dial 4322,

9.10.51—3n.

——— ———
GOOD CUT-OPEN MBLLO-KREEN—
5 lb. tins 3/- per doz. Also old card-
board boxes 1/6 per doz. Call at Roberts

Manufacturing Co., Bay Street
10.10. 51—8n,





WANTED







MISCELLANEOUS

—
CAR: Small Car, preferably from pri-

early October.
details and
No. A.A.

Cash, Please give full
lowest price. Reply: Box

c/o Advocate Co.

7.10.51—3n





SMALL HOUSE preferably unfurnished
wanted by English couple. No children
Good locality. Write Box
H. H. C/o Advocate Co, Ltd.

10.10, 51—2n.



PUBLIC NOTICES

Ten cents per agate line on week-days
and 12 cents per agate line on Sundays,
minimum charge $1.50 on week-day:
and $1.80 on Sundays.

NOTICE
This is to inform my patients and the
public that my Dental Office is now
jJocated at Marhill Street over the
Sanitary Laundry Depot.
S. HUNT, D.D.S.
9.10.51—4n.

NOTICE
IS HEREBY GIVEN that it is the in-
tertion of the Commissioners of High-
ways for the parish of SAINT JAMES
in this Island to cause to be introduced
into the Legislature of this Island a
Bill authorising them to increase the
salary payable to the Inspector of High-
ways for the said parish to a sum not
exceeding £500 per annum, and the
travelling allowance dayable to the said
Inspector of Highways to a sum not
exceeding £100. per annum, such in-
creases to take”vffect as from the Ist
day of April 1951.
Dated the 6th day of October 1951.
YEARWOOD & BOYCE,
Solicitors for the Commissioners of
Highways, Saint James.
9.10.51—3n.









NOTICE

The Estate of
MARGARET ANN JONES,
deceased,

NOTICE IS HEREBY GIVEN that all
persons having any debt or claim against
the Estate of Margaret Ann Jones who
died in this Island on the 29th day of
October, 1950 are hereby required to
send particulars of their claims duly at-
tested to the undersigned. in care of
Messrs. Cottle, Catford & Co., 17,
High Street, Bridgetown, Solicitors, on
or before the 30th day of November,
1951, after which date we shall proceed
to distribute the assets of the deceased
among the parties entitled thereto hav-
ing regard only to such claims as we
shall then have had notice of, and we
will not be liable for the assets or any
part thereof so distributey to any persbn
of whose debt or claim we shall not have
had notice.

And all persons indebted to the said
estate are requested to settle their in-
debtedness without delay.

Dated this 27th day of September, 1951.
VIOLET VERONA JONES,
PRINCESS LOUISE JONES.

Executors of the Will of
Margaret Ann Jones, decd.
O.A.F.



THE ASSOCIATED BOARD OF THE
ROYAL SCHOOL OF MUSIC

NOTICE

The Board begs to notify the teachers
that the Theory exam will take place
at the Ursuline Convent on Saturday,
November Urd 1971, at 9.45. All forms
and fees must be in by Cetober 20th. ,

A. TNN.3S,
Ayehford
11.10.53—1n

LOST & FOUND





LOST

RACE TICKET BOOKS in James
Street. Series W.8350-—59. Series W.8300
—69. Finder will be rewarded on
returning to Fitzgerald Alleyne, Martin-
dale’s Road 11,10. 51—1n.
a

WATCH-—-One Lady's Alton Watch
between the Bus Stand, Probyn Stre.t
and Broad Street. Finder rewarded on
returning; Abbeville Guest House.
11.10. 51—1n

Prospect,

|

|

A
Estate Agents,
THE FIRM W
"Phone 4640



”.

Real










ture, Phone] at 2 p.m.

vate owner. Must be available, delivery | Garage,

CAMBRAI

Large 2-storey stone house of good sound construction,
located on over a % acre of coast land with 160 ft. of sea
frontage. First class sandy beach. Large living rooms, 4 bed- |
rooms on the upper floor with similar accommodation below on
ground floor. In our opinion this property would be eminently
suitable for conversion into a Guest House. Low figure required.

JOHN M4. BLADON & Co.

Auctioneers & Building Surveyors
ITH THE



Road, for one (1) 197 Vauxhall 14
h.p. saloon damaged by Fire. Car can
be seen at Courtesy Garage

11.10. 51—6n



AUCTION

———

Bi; ORDER OF THE. INSURANCE COY

& will sell at CHELSEA GARAGE,

PINFOLD STREET ON FRIDAY 12th

one (1) Standard 12 h.p.
Sedan Car. Damaged. Terms Cash.
R. ARCHER McKENZIE,

Auctioneer,

EREneneyenreeneeeee

By public competition at the Office of

the undersigned on Friday 12th Octobor
1951, at 2 p.m,

70 Barbados Fire Insurance Co

Shares
G. L. W. ‘CLARKE & CO.,
James Street
10.10,51—3n,

UNDER THE IVORY HAMMER

By instructions received from the
Insurance Co, I will sell on Friday
October 12th at the Courtesy Garage,
Whitepark Road; (1)

Lad









& H.P. new brand tyres (damaged in
accident). Sale at 2 p.m. Terms cash
VINCENT GRIFFITH,
Auctioneer,
7.10.51—4n
On FRIDAY at 2.30 p.m. at Chelsea
Pinfold Street, One 14 h.pa

Sedan Car recently overhauled, in good
working condition. 1937 V-8 Ford Car
in good working order—would make
good pick-up.
R. ARCHER McKENZIE
Auctioneer,
7.10.51—5n

TAKE NOTICE



ELSIE

That THE BORDEN COMPANY, a cor-
poration organized and existing under the
laws of the State of New Jersey, United

States of America, whose trade or
business address is 350 Madison Avenue,
New York, New York, United States of
America, has applied for the registra-
tion of a trade mark in Part “A” of
Register in respect. of substances used
as foods and as ingredients in foods;
infants’ and invalids’ foods, and will be
entitled to register the same after one
month from the 9th day of October
1951 unless some person shall in the
meantime give notice in duplicate to me
at my office of opposition of such regis-
tration, The trade mark can be seen on
application at my office,
Dated this 26th day of September, 1951,
H, WILLIAMS,
Registrar of Trade Marks.
9.10.51—3n



TAKE NOTICE
DRYCO

That THE BORDEN COMPANY, a cor- ,

poration prganized and existing under the
jaws of the State of New Jersey, United
States of America, whose trade or
business address is 350 Madison Avenue,
New York, New York, United States of



BARBADOS ADVOCATE

TAKE NOTICE
CLOVER LEAF

That BRITISH COLUMBIA PACKERS
LIMITED, a corporation organized under
j the laws of the Dominion of Canada,
feckers, whose trade or business address
| ts Foot of Campbell Avenue, Vancouver,
| Canada, has applied for the registration
| of a trade mark in Part “A” of Register
; in_respect of fresh fish, frozen fish, sait
fish, smoked fish, canned fish and fish
pastes of all varieties, and will be entitled
ty register the same after one montn
from the 9th day of October 1951, unless
sme pérson shall in the meantime give
notice in duplicate to me at my office
ef opposition of such registration. The
trade mark can be seen on application
at_my office .
Dated this 26th day of September 1951
H. WILLEAMS,
Registrar of Trade Marks.





TAKE NOTICE
GRANDEE

That BRITISH COLUMBIA PACKERS
LIM » & corporation organized under
the laws of the Dominion of Canada.
Packers, whose trade or business address
is Foot of Campbell Avenue, Vancouver.
Canada, has applied for the registration
of a trade mark in Part “A” of Register
in respect of fresh fish, frozen fish, salt
fish. smoked fish, canned fish and fish
pastes of all varieties, and will be entitlec
to register the same after one mont!
from the 9th day of October 1951, unless
some person shall in the meantime giv
notice in duplicate to me at my offic:
of opposition of such registration. Th«
trade mark can be seen on application
at_my office

Dated this 26th day of September 1951

H. WILLDAMS,
Registrar of Trade Marks.

1946 Anglia Ford;,

9.10. 51—3n 9.10. 51—3n

GOVERNMENT NOTICES

EXPORTS AND IMPORTS (RESTRICTION) ACT, 1939

| THE Governor, in exercise of the powers conferred on him by
section 3 (2) of the Exports and Imports (Restriction) Act, 1939.
hereby makes the following Order: —

1. This Order may be cited as the Exports and Imports (General
Open Import Licence) Order, 1951.









2. Any person may import from any country —

(1) from and after the coming into operation of this Order
such type of goods as are set out in the First Schedule
hereto;

(2) From and after the first day of November one thousand
nine hundred and fifty-one such type of goods as are
set out in the Second Schedule hereto,

3.

: This Order shall have effect subject to, the following provis-
ons —
; (a) the order shall operate only in respect of the type of
goods set out in the First and Second Schedules hereto,
which are wholly produced in countries from which ex-
ports take place;
the certificate of origin of all imports of such goods shall
be produced by the importer or consignee;
the approval of the Financial Secretary must be obtained
prior to the importation of any of such goods where pay-
ment for such goods is to be made to a country other
then the country of origin of the goods.

Made by the Governor this 6th day of October, one thousand nine
hundred and fifty-one.
| By His Excellency’s Command,
(Sgd.) R. N. TURNER,

Colonial Secretary.

(b)

Ce)



FIRST SCHEDULE
Tin plate Ternplate or Black plate
Semi-manufactured Copper
Semi-manufactured Nickle
Semi-manufactured Zinc
Borax
Borie Acid
Newsprint
Jute goods
Smoked and Pickled Fish
Onions
Potatoes »
Finished Steel (excluding fabricated steel) as under:—
(a) Heavy Steel products including heavy rail Sleepers and
heavy and medium plate;
(b) Light rolled products including bars, rod hoops and strips;
(c) Steel sheets;
(d) Wire plain or barbed other than insulated wire;
(e) Wire rods;
(f) Tube and pipes including tube fittings;
(g) Tyres, wheels and axles;*
(h) Steel forgings;
(i) Nails, screws, nuts and bolts.
Kraft paper,

CeOyAQAvre,wne



SECOND SCHEDULE
Dried and Salted Fish ee
Animal feeding stuffs exeluding wheat and wheat flour.



Applications for Admission to Universities and Colleges in the
United Kingdom Session 1951—53.

Owing to the limited accommodation at Universities and Colleges
in the United Kingdom resulting from the large number of applica-
tions for admission, the Director of Colonial Scholars is endeavouring
to secure a quota for Colonial Students in each faculty in every Uni-
versity and College throughout the British Isles. It must be realised,
therefore, that only those who are strongly recommended and have
first class qualifications for entry can be considered for admission.

2. The British Council will be responsible for making arrange-
ments for meeting students and for securing suitable accommodation
for them.

3. Students are advised that it is most undesirable for them to
proceed to the United Kingdom unannounced and unsponsored in the
hope of obtaining admission to Universities and Colleges, as even
tutorial colleges and polytechnics are overcrowded and it is very diffi-
cult to gain admission to them without due notice in the proper form.

4. Forms of application for admission to Universities and Col-
leges in the United Kingdom, to be completed in quintuplicate, may
be obtained from the Secretary, Student Advisory Committee, c/o
Office of the Director of Medical Services, Wharf, Bridgetown, and
must be returned to him not later than Wednesday, 31st eae ee

10.10,51—3n



Customs Charges On Goods Imported Into United
Kingdom By Post

The following extract from a notice issued by the Customs and
Excise Department of the United Kingdom, is published for the infor-

America, has applied for the registra-| mation of persons who contemplate sending gifts through the post

tion of a trade mark in Part “A” of
Register in respect of substances used

to addressees in the United Kingdom, within the provisions of the

as foods and as ingredients in foods;|Exports and Imports (Restriction) Order 1949:—

infants’ and invalids’ foods, and will be
entitled to register the same after one
month from the 9th day of October
19851 unless some person shall in the
meantime give notice in duplicate to me

1. General. Most articles of personal and domestic use are

‘Viable on importation to Purchase Tax as well as to import duty.

Purchase Tax is chargeable on similar goods produced in the United

at my office of opposition of such regis- {Kingdom and in order not to discriminate against home production it

tration, The trade mark can be seen on
application at my office.

must equally apply to imported goods. For example, the home shop

Dated this 26th day of September, 1951, ed internally and it
= ’ ay a WILEaAM price of a handbag includes Purchase Tax charged 1 nally

Registrar of Trade Marks.
9.10. 51—3n

TAKE NOTICE
BORDEN'S

That THE BORDEN COMPANY, a cor-
poretion organized and existing under the
laws of the State of New Jersey, United
States of America, whose trade or
business address is 350 Madison Avenue,
New York, New York, United States of
America, has applied for the registra-
tion of a trade mark in Part “A” of
Register in respect of substances used
as foods and as ingredients in foods:
infants’ and invalids’ foods, and will be
entitled to register the same after one
month from the 9th day /f October
1951 unless some person siiall in the
meantime give notice in duplicate to m+
at my office of opposition of such regis-
tration.. The trade mark can be seen on
application at my office.

Dated this 26th day of September, 1951.

H, WILLIAMS,
Registra» of Trade Marks.
9.10,51-—3n








St. James

F.V.A.

REPUTATION
Plantations Building.






would be inequitable if a like imported article were not charged with
a corresponding amount of tax on importation.

2. Second-hand goods, The law does not exempt second-hand
jgoods from duty or tax, but, where these are chargeable by reference
to value, the fact that articles have been used is taken into account
in assessing the charges.

%. Gifts. The law which imposes Customs and Purchase Taa
on imported goods makes no exception in favour of gifts, Gifts pur-
chased in the United Kingdom are tax+paid and remission of taxa-
tion in favour only of those who receive gifts from abroad would
not be justified. British shop-keepers selling taxed goods would also
|be prejudiced if imported gifts were allowed to reach consumers tax
jfree. The volume of mails cleared daily through the Customs is
{moreover such that the selection of special casés for privileged treat-
[ment is not practicable. Lae

4. Rates, There are wide variations in the rates of duty and
Purchase Tax chargeable on different kinds of article. In the case
{of luxuries and semi-luxuries, in particular where both duty and tax



are chargeable, the total charge may be high in relation to the value!

declared by the sender. Articles commonly sent as presents such as
jewellery, scent, cosmetics, and fancy goods, are usually chargeable
{at high rates both of duty and tax and the total Customs charge
{may be expected to exceed the price paid abroad. In the case of
\tobacco and cigarettes the duty is nearly as much as the retail price
lin the United Kingdom, On the other hand the duty rates on food-
stuffs are usually low and the charge is generally ignored for gift
parcels containing foodstuffs only.

R. A, CLARKE,

Colonial Postmaster.
General Post Office,

9.10.51 11,10.51—1n



To ensure that your car is given the best lubrication—USE . . .

ERM LUBRICATING OILS

Obtainable from - - - -

G



} CENTRAL FOUNDRY LTD.—Trafalgar St.
(

REMEMBER
} DON’T ONLY OIL IT — GERM IT

aa

— SO

)







oo













PAGE SEVEN



'S.P.C.A. Inspectors Get SEAWELL

Last Of Four Lectures

UK To Review
G.AT.T.

Operation

“Restrictions On Imperial

”
Preferences
GENEVA,

The British Government will re-
view the whole operation of the
General Agreement on Tariffs anc
Trade within the next year or two,
in the light of experiences up to
date, because of the restrictions ic
imposes on Imperial Preference,
Sir Hartley Shaweross, Presiden -
of the Board of Trade, has an-
nounced in Geneva.

“So far, the United Kingdom
Government, like other govern -
ments, has not felt able to com -
mit itself finally to the Generel
Agreement,” he told a meeting cf
the contracting parties to G.A.T.).

“We shall need to consider ho.’
far its present provisions, wit
the undoubted restrictions whieo
they impose on us in such matters,
for example, as preferences be-
tween Commonwealth countries,
and with their unsatisfactory
bearing on the relations between
the contracting parties and the
International Monetary Fund, are
counter-balanced by tangible ad.
vantages in the promotion of
world trade. In this, the United

Kingdom must have its proper
share.”
The Agreement, which was

drawn up in 1947 to provide mul-
tilateral tariff negotiations and
fair trade rules, demands the
eventual end of all preferences.

.| It was at the G.A.T.T. conferences

in Torquay last winter that Bri-
tain began the negotiations with
Cuba which culminated in the
signing of the Anglo-Cuban trade
agreement, over the head of strony
protests from the British West In-
dies. Under the G.A,T.T, arrange-
ments, the tariff concessions which
Cuba granted to Britain in this
agreement automatically apply 1o
all nations which are parties
G.A.T.T,, thus throwing open the
Cuban market to fierce competi-
; tion from other exporting natious
besides Britain,

It_is. believed that a British re.
view of the agreement might in-
volve an effort to change its pro-
visions relating to Imperial Prefer-
ences and relations with the In-
ternational Monetary Fund, A re-
cent Fund report recommended
that Britain and other sterling
areas cease import restrictions im-
posed for reasons of balance of
payment.

While stressing the need for a
code of fair trade rules, Sir Hart.
ley told the Geneva meeting;
“Britain feels that at this time,
when there are already in exist-
ence a multiplicity internation-
al bodies, some of which are per-
haps less useful thin the expendi-
ture of experts’ time and taxpay-
ers’ money on them might have
entitled us to hope, new accretions
of international machinery ought
not to be established unless a cle or
case has been made out to show
that in practice they will achieve
useful results.”

The B.U.P. correspendent in
Geneva writes: Recent acts of the
U.S. Congress have put the Uni-
ted States, chief advocate of abol.
ishing preferences, in an embavr-
rassing position, as far as Sir
Hartley’s threat to eling to them
is concerned, Drastic U.S. restric-
tions on imports of dairy products
from Burope, for example, are be-
lieved to have encouraged the
U.K. Government in its latest posi-
tion,

The United States is not now ir
a good position to protest if Bri-
tain wants to maintain the Im-
perial Preference system, since
these recent actions by the U.S
Congress are violations of G.A.'T.T
There have been protests agains’
these U.S. measures at the Geneve
meeting and a ruling on them wil
be given by the contracting par
ties to G.A.T.T.—B.U.P.

Animal Week
Children’s Concert

AN excellent concert was stage.
at Queen’s Park House, on Friaa)
afternoon last by pupils of the foi-
Jowing elementary schools:—Car
rington's Girls’, St. Leonard's Boys
St. Giles’ Girls, Wesley Hall Boys ,
Wesley Hall Girls’ and Erdisto:
Model,

The programme consisted chiefl,
of Songs and Recitations and in
cluded a Play—‘The Buccaneer’
Boot” — which was splendidl,
enacted by pupils of the Erdisto
Model School. Among the per
formers in this play, Marjori
Clarke, who impersonated Jemim
the maid, and Edward Haynes
who played the part of Blacl
Marks, head of the pirates, de
serves special mention.

All of the items were well pre:
sented, and the children as well a’
the teachers who ftraineq them de
serve much credit, especially it
view of the fact that the concer
was got up within the short spac’
of three weeks. Outstanding re.
citers were A, Phillips of the S!
Leonard's Boys’ School who recite
“The Priest and the Mulberry
Tree” and T. Gill of St, Giles’
Girls’ School who recited “Man's
Best Friend.” The singing was of »
very high standard and it would
be invidious to single out any
school for special mention

At the conclusion of the pro-
gramme, Mr. A, G. Jordan mover
a vote of thanks to all who hac
helped in arty way to make the
concert a success. In doing so,
he expressed regret at the paucity
of the adult audience, and made
special mention of Mr. D. R
Arthurtnd C. Livingstone of the
Bay Street who-had undertaken
\the task of arranging the hall an°
directing the execution of the pro
gramme.
| Among those present were th
Rev. J. R. Nichols, formerly Chief
| Insvector Schools, and Mr
Nichols and se chool teacher
The Execut Comm
Barbados S.P.C.A
iby Mr. L. T.
Jordan.





of
veral

ttee of thr




was

and Mr, A.

represented

Gay G

ARRIVALS—By B.W LA
From TRINTIDAD—

E. DeGannes, G. DéeGannes, D. Steel,
T. Hawkins, N. Wilson, T. Brown, ©
Brown, J. Boyce, B. Clarke, W. Cave,
L.. Eggiesfield, S. Pole, G. Hoad, M
Mahon, G. Mahon we

DEPARTURES—By BW 1A yg

For St. LUCIA—

Mr. Rufus Springer, Mr
Mr Rudolph Gurnbs,
Evans.

For TRINTIDAD—

Miss Lian George, Mstr Pierre
Duranson, Miss Rene Duranson, Mrs. Ana
Duranson, Mr. Jean Duranson,.Mr. Don-
ald Knox, Mrs. Phyllis Knox, Mg...
Theocpre Gittens, Mr. Edward Waood-
t Mr. Percival Turner, Mr.
Steele, Mrs. Betty Smith, Mr,
Smith, Miss Betty Smith, Mr

The local S.P.C.A. Inspectors
received the final of four lectures,
given by Sgt. Major C. F. Tor-
rezao, Chief S.P.C.A. Inspector of
British Guiana, at the Y.M.C.A.
yesterday morning. The lecture
was “What Constitutes Cruelty
to Animals.” These instruction
classes were given to improve the
knowledge of local Inspectors.

The Sgt. Major said: “It may be
necessary to use a whip of some

isi
Harold Rose,
Nirs Cynthia

Billy
Lawrence

Wyatt,

Mr. Nahiman Pulver



kind to urge an a to go fast
but when an animal is already
going at a quick pace, to use a
thick heavy rope, more often than
not doubled, and to deliver sev-
eral blows therewith, is surely
causing unnecessary suffering to
the animal, especially if it is
drawing a heavily laden vehicle.

“Again, ._ for apparently no
reason, one sometimes sees some
cartman take a double rope which
torms his driving reins, and de-
liver several blows across the
face of his animal, or in attempt-
ing to make his-animal reverse a
heavily laden cart, do the same
thing with either a rope or a stick.
Such are examples of cruel beat-
ing, and instances such as these
are punishable by law.”

The Chief Inspector urged the
local Inspectors to keep a close
look out for symptoms of cruelty,
thus relieving the animal of un-
necessary suffering.

Later in the morning the Chief
Inspector gave a lecture at the
Police Training School on “Pre-
vention of Cruelty to Animals.”
He also told the recruits how
they could detect cruelty.

The recruits took a keen inter-



Harbour Log...

In Carlisle Bay

Yacht Marsaltese, Sch. Rosaline, Sei;
W. L. Eunicia, Sch, Lady Noeleen, Seh
Marion Belle Wolfe, Sch. Cyclorama Q.,
Sch. D’ Ortac, Sch. Marea Henrietta,
Sch. Anita H., Sch. Frances W. Smith,
Sch, Cyril E. Smith. M.V. Daerwood:

ARRIVALS '

Sch. ANITA H., 51 tons, Cap} Hagel,
from Demerara, Agents: Schooner OGwn-
ers’ Association

Seh. FRANCES W. SMITH, "74_tans,
Capt. Hassell, from Demerara, ts:
Schooner Owners’ Association -"

Sch. CYRIL E. SMITH, 56 tons, Cfipf.
Mitchell, from St. Vincent, Agents;
Schooner Owners' Association. —«

“ a: ig ar eee 1,944 tons,

Sapt. : enrikson, frem — Grenada,
Agents: Messrs. DaCosta & Co., Ltd

M.V. DAERWOOD, 4 tons, Capt.
Mulzac, from St. Lucia, Agents; Schooner
Owners’ Association ‘

DEPARTURES

Sch. AUGUSTUS B. COMPTON, 47
tons, Capt. Cozier, for Trinidad, Agents:
Schooner Owners’ Association

8.8 SCHOLAR, 4.454 tons; ‘Capt.
Wolstenholmes, for Trinidad, Agents:
Messrs DaCosta & Co. Ltd

M.V. C.L.M. TANNISS, 41 tons, Capt.

Davis, for Grenada, Agents: Sehooner -
est and asked many questions. A Owners’ Association.
vote of thanks was moved by 8.8. ALCOA PEGASUS, 3,901 tons,

Capt, Morgan, far Port Alfred, Agents:
Messrs. DaCosta & Co., Ltd.

MAILS for Martinique, Guadeloupe,
United Kingdom and France by the SS... |
COLOMBIE will be closed at the Gene. — «+
eral Post Office as under:— Sh

Parcel Mail at 12 noon on the t2th=—
October, Registered Mail at. 9 a.m...
Ordinary Mail at 10.15 a.m. on the :
13th October 1951. eee
ARRIVALS—by the 5.8. Fort Townshend
From TRINIDAD

Inspector Reid.

$7,483,400,000

WASHINGTON, Oct. 11.
President Truman on Wednes-
day signed into law the $7,483,-
400,000 arms economic foreign aid



programme intended to thwart ,,,Piteserald Blackman and Staeyy Wins-
“Communist dreams of world From GRENADA -

Helen Bacchus, Daphne Baeehus and
Hilda Frederick
From NEW YORK

conquest”,—U.P.

Fa Re Floretts Pounder, Iona Clarke, Sea
MAC TO SPEAK beny Yearwood, Gladys Alleyne, V
Robinson and Albertha Fletcher,

NEW YORK,
General Mae Arthur will make rye
the main address at the American

’ .
Legion's 33rd Annual Convention Boys Chub Opened

in Miami, Florida next Wedngs- 4 targe crowd saw Majée' Rowen
day,.—U.P, Stoute, Deputy Commissioner’ of ~'
Police formally open the thirteenth °
Boys’ Club in the Community



a



RATES OF EXCHANGE











Hall in St. Andrew 7
CANADA afternoon, Major Stoute
Be OCTOBER 10, 1951 the activities of the Boys? ~
a vio pr, ui on s .
its as vio; ye. {Steamed and sald that he ope
ng, OOS SORE. ee ee eee
eo ‘a ‘ * pr, r Major Stoute ha -
oe tae ‘Svea 60 3/io pe, the Club open, the bo -
. Coupons 89 6/10% pr, table tennis and domin Me
Rat des ves + their parents looked on. SS.
ea
ar nee
RTC
In the Court for Divorce and Matrimonial Causes” ~ —
BARBADOS,
GARNET GORDON IFILL—Petitioner
MATILDA IPHLL Respondent ree ee
JAMES’ GrtbE--Ue-reeyeridons
To; JAMES INNISS, the Co-respondent

TAKE NOTICE that this Honourable Court will be moved on Friday
jth day of December 1951 at 11 o'clock in the forenoon by. the Petitioner for.
a Decree for the dissolution of Marriage, and that you are. required to file
an Appearance in this Cause on ar before the 26rd day of November 1951 and
An Answer within fourteen days thereafter, otherwise the Court may proceed
to hear and determine the charges alleged in the Petition, your absence not
withstanding.

tite

Dated this 9th day of October 195)
D. LEE SARJRANT,
Solicitor for the Petitioner of No.12 James Street.
Bridgetown, Barbados,

10,10, 51-—3n
a —
CHANCERY SALE rm
a) ew
BARBADOS. =

The undermentioned properties will be set up for sale at the Registra’ o-
Office, Public Bulldings Bridgetown, between 12 noon and 2 p.m. for the” .
and on the date specified and if not then sold they will be set up on each suce
Friday at the same place and during the same hours until sold,
m application to me.

al



Plaintiff; JACK BOYCE GILL
Defendant: OSWALD GRAHAM DEANE
PROPERTY (1): ALA. THAT certain piece or parcel of land situate in the

parish of Saint Lucey in this Ialand containing by admeasurement One acr
roods twenty-seven perches or thereabouts abutting and bounding on two 6!
ather lands of the defendant on lands of Colleton Plantation and on the public
road or however else the same may abut and bound together with the messuase
or dwellinghouse called ‘DEANE HOLLOW" and all and singular other the buildings
om the said parcel of land erected and built.

IPSET PRICK : £2,500 0 0
Date of Sale; 12th October, 1951

two.
és ph

“ae

ed

PROPERTY (2): ALL THAT piece or parce! of land situate in the parish of Saint = s
suey in this Island containing by admecsurement Three acres three roods thirty:
nd four-fifths perches or thereabouts abutting and bounding on other lands of the ~> *
efendant being the parcel of land first herein described on lands of Colleton
‘lantation on lands of Checker Hall sold in lots on lands now or late of the estate
{ C @, Deane, deceased, and on the public road or however else the same may
but and bound lands hereditaments and premises,





UPSET PRICE: £800 0 0 —
date of Sale: 12th October, 1951,
H. WILLIAMS, .
Registrar-in-Ohancery.
28 9 51—4n
. ° ‘7
tn RE eee iperciatty :
MONTREAL, AUSTRALIA, NEW SCOCSGO VS OF9S9U8SS8G9SS"
ZEALAND LINE, LIMITED »
(M.A N Z. Line) The M.V. CARIBBEE,, , will

accept Cargo and Passengers 4or
Dominica, Antigua, Montserrat,
Nevis and St. Kitts. Sailing
Friday 19th inst.

The M.V. DAERWOOD will”
accept Cargo and Passengers for
St. Lucia, Grenada and Aruba,
Passengers only for St. Vincent-
Sailing Friday 12 inst,

The M.V. MONEKA will accept
Cargo and Passengers for Domin-

8.8. "PUxt ADELAIDE" is schedulec
o atl from Hobart September 25th,
lelbourne October 4th, Sydney October
Oth, Gladstone Getober Ifth, Port Atma
«tober 20th, Brisbane October 27th,
triving at Trinidad about November
lst and Barbados November 2ith,

In addition to general cargo this
asel has ample space for chilled and
ard frozen cargo,

Sat a

SOCIOL

Cargo accepted on through Bills of and St. Kitts. Sailing date to be
ading for transshipment at Trinidad to ica Antigua, Montserrat, Nevis
ritish Guiana, Leeward and Windward notified,

ands, BW SCHOONER OWNERS
For further particulars apply-— ASSOCIATION (INO)

URNESS, WITHY & CO. LTD., ana CONSIGNEE

POSS

DaCOSTA & CO, LTD., TEL. NO. 4047
Trinidad, Barbados,
BW... SOSSCSe



P.w.l

at a A See nero nectin



*
ve



Â¥ NEW YORK SERVICE

+S. “MARIO ('* sails Ist October arrives Barbados 13th Oct.,
\ STEAMER suils 12th October arrives Barbados 23rd October,

1961 ty
1951.





NEW ORLEANS SERVICE

“ALCOA PURITAN” sails 12th September — arrives Barbados 11th Oct., 195!

“FOLKE BERNADOTTE” salis 26th Sept arrives Ba jos 11th Oct., 1951
TEAMER sails 10th October — arrives Barbados 25th October, 1951

s
s
s'

2



;
3
\







CANADIAN SERVICE

OUTHBOUND

Sails Sails Arrives é

Name of Ship Montreal Halifak Barbados 4

Ss ALCOA POINTER Sept. 28th Cet. Ist Oct 12th z

S. "ALCOA PILGRIM" Oct. 12th Cet, 15th Oct, th “
PEGASUS Oct, 26th Oct. 29th Novr. 6th

1.5, ‘ALCOA
NL LS
SORTHBOUND
ALCOA Barbados October 15u Sa
for St Lawrence Rive Ports

ne eemammmnrueameeaneanmeeniemmanemmeemmmmmmmmastineal

PLANTER





ROBERT THOM LTD. — NEW YORK AND GULF SERVICE
APPLY:—DA COSTA & CO., LTD.—CANADIAN SERVICE

A





Pull partiomlarg=g, |



—
=
—































































ml
; Y, OCTOBER 11, 1951
PAGE EIGHT BARBADOS ADVOCATE THURSDAY, ll,
ne nee
rali W l d W rick r
How Aust atta eicome ete tcketers BOVRIL .
“i + READY FOR THE FRAY is ill BARR AN a a aU RR ae ae mR ; s r
Will Give Game There 3 Golfer Bleeds | Taxpayers | gives you
‘ : o
To Death Complain meals the
P SEA Oct. 9.
New Zest Says Paper A rang et Ee dic| me nowt oe sean a o| goodness of
bled to death after he broke|Meeting yes a alt w a
SYDNEY. pan, wos using. peel lly{complaint from ta ers of :
: the club he was using, accidentally Pp xpay =
The West Indies Test team has arrived in Australia for what stabbed himself with it, and other eee, art. %. so gers t who real BEEF
Australian sportsmen persist in referring to as “the world olfers ioistook his agonised yaened a oe men s of Mayers
= ionship series.” Th sot their first oppor- screams fcr help as the cries of a/Land and the Back Ivy were
cricket championship series. * oy fe eir = 3 Rr Srannctt getting their water supply through
van a . : ‘ “ a ew- , i i .
t unity to show their form in — chy a mate Ww iitinn iabih: Sectiens peaeacitn seats site ay were aA. The Goad sible tide tae eee of Raven Te
castle, New South Wales, on October 2 was playing alone. When he came| Boar see fr y could c Se ae pi
A large crowd waited on the eight players down the gangplank to the ninth tee he swung with the See rich Gover weiee besos ,
deekside at Sydney as Mr. C. A. from the liner ‘Wanganella.” driver and it struck his golf cart. eppetising; its beefy goodness makes food
: Merry, the team manager, led John Goddard, the West Indies i. es ae nunt|| WHAT’S ON TODAY more nutritious. Bovril is the concentrated
5 : abe _. Captain, was among those who sroke, whippe ick a ca
| | arrived in the liner. With him Harrison in the groin. st ete en erntioten goodness of beef.
: i THE entire West Indies | were Valentine, Ferguson, Guil- ; : bi St. Thomas Vestry—1.30 p.m.
; | eam should be in Australia len, Atkinson, Trim, Christiani, Two other golfers said they House of Assembly-—3 p.m
to-day. This account is of the and Jones. twice heard screams but thought Tennis at Summerhayes—4.15
| arrival of John Goddard's Nine more players are still to Gay hp ane ae Dam.
party the first eight to reach | arrive in Australia, three by air rom a nearby peacock farm.—U.P. Mobile Cinema at Black Bess }
Australia, The second batch and six by sea, Sonny Ramadhin, School Pasture, St. Peter— TO ¥ouW ,
of six arrived on Tuesday — the star spin bowler, is on his 7.30 p.m. PuTs BEEF ‘NW
Worrell, Weekes, Walcott, way and also to come are the A bat from Bookers Sports De- Police Band at Queen’s Park
Fenathin. gem yg oe ~e “Three Terrible ie See name JOHN GODDARD “THE DON” partment to Ganesh Persaud for —7.45 p.m.
ars! who was delay y ‘ ate CINEMAS
tonsilitis. The final three, Guan to Waelioe Wontel oka Wat. Says that there are real “tear- Sir Donald Bradman once the aon ates and feding saad *LAZA (Bridgetown): The Fleets
Stollmeyer, Gomez and Rae | ¢oit : away” fast bowlers in the West leading cricket figure in the world, Weieler Gell for good in # Bl Paso 4:00 8.0
: were due in Australia by air A lone West Indian face was Indies to whom Worrell, Weekes is now Chairman of the Australian t© issu ta dis eee eatcts eprint rae Sin Texeé eau
4 yesterday. . and Walcott were accustomed, He Selection Bodrd of Selectors. They bowling in the “Wight Madouna of the Seven
among the crowd that weleomed was discussing Lirdwall’s speed. select the team by phone, A prize from Mr. Oscar Wight, Moons 4.30 & 4.30 p.m
Die aii i the ericketers. Pierre de Verteuil, “¢% © pth bdiedoeeen eet ee ——_——_.. M.B.E., to A. Holder for good GLOBE: Any Number Can Play &
) formerly of Tei ae feet ee e bowling throughout the tourna- Teres Little Words 4.45 &
f : row serving with the Royal Aus- ment. t :
Athletes Help ‘iri penne BLG, Governor Hails "curren. s|| ian ies:
deckside. Mr. Merry knows his e e C. Gomes and family to Leslie ; rwsu. |
2 , A * e 6 . *. *
; y lather well and remembers Pierre Wight for his score of 262 not )LYMPIC: Doctor And the Girl
Jamaica as a sehoolboy. “It was good - C e t y oa t for zs a ova | “Gaeta
see a West Indies face in the y k e Ss A packet of shirts from Mr. KORY: MORES Ore hk Geesiid
(From Our Own Correspondent) crowd,” he said, oung ric e r Jagdeo of Lusignan aS; wpe , Street 4 30 i. se
ee . . ‘ f ood batting in the secon
: LONDON. Leading Country WI M tK On Ti oe f
West Indian athletes who The West Indies players regard op A prize from Rayman’s Drug
turned out on a chilly evening in Australia as the world’s leading ee us oP ; Store te Norman Wight for good
London last week to take part in cricketing country. They have ‘ : bowling in both matches. TE ’
ihe athletic meeting organised ioe neard of the standard of Austra- iby 0. Ss. Coppin yr personal prize from Mr. R. YES RDAY Ss
the Jamaican Hurricane Relief jian cricket and are looking for- M. Wight to Leslie Wight for his WEATHER REPORT
Eg hl a! a Y iae on ward to meeting an ee GEORGETOWN. splendid batting throughout tha
~ was collected. ompa side. Spin bowl 4s one of the .,,. 7: : ‘ ent.
BS With some of the contributions tan Saiae ‘oie bc attack, © His Exeellency the Governor Sir Charles Woolley in a be p> of A. J. McIntyre From Codrington Remember, a comfortable
; which have come rolling in, the said Mr. Merry, but the players speech at the G.C.C., Ladies Pavilion at a Presentation wicket-keeping gloves from Mr. Rainfall: 17 in. fitting SUIT is our first con-
aries ene. pn Dg vegard Keith Miller, the Austra~ ceremony in honour of the visiting Barbados cricket team A, J. McIntyre to i goer Sor Total Rainfall for Month to sideration. There are in-
is a tribute to the fine spirit of eee as one of their chiet and the B.G. team said that the most pleasing feature of ve — oar vac inde Big ing d2? ta. creasing numbers who
vw lanes awa Se . es : x 3, - I . ighes : 85.0 °
The Fund itself is oxpected foe: One of the first things some ot the whole tournament was that there were so many young A bat from Bookers Sports|] Lowest Tempontan, soe cE resognise for tipiasives
a 6 Fon i dt e. is oper ed to top +16 West Indian players did when sters in both sides. ‘ : Dept. to Norman Marshall for Wind Velocity: 9 miles per the consistently superb cut,
hatha Wint, ‘one Olympic ‘hey arrived in Sydney was to _ He declared: “We have seen Mr. K. L. Wishart, secretary ofthe being the first Barbados batsman id itedimakk.....
cham om Sweden's ‘Gale Fi watch a club match in Sydney, more than two possible represen- Board. to score a century. Barometer (9 a.m.) 30,001
; Sedpiciieiee’ iat” bther ee where Miller and Sid Barnes tatives in the West Indies team Future W.I. Stars A bat from Wm, Fogarty to (3 p.m.) 29,997 1
: bers of Sweden's visiting athletes, ‘Vere playing. E of the future. West Indies cricket Leray Jackman for his promis- IDEAL TATLORING
started, but did not run when in 1 don’t know how fast Lindwall is on top of the world at the He picked three players as jng innings in the second match.
London this week they heard q 2nd Miller are today,” said God- moment and it is up to us to keep future W.I. representatives—Leslie A cup from Mr. R. G. aa 2 SSS We will welcome the op-
Joud report. dard, but we have some real tear- jt on top. We will never do it wn-~ Wight, who he said, “is definitely phrey to Leslie Wight for se oP Mastrcs ct « Beare
The occasion was one when ways in the West Indies. We jess we encourage those youngsters assured of his place—as he has brilliant batting throughout the H portunity of proving
they were now under starter’s did not bring them here because and make way for them. the right temperament,’ Glention tournament. His! BARBADOS LABOUR you in our...
orders; the report wag not that they eek ee ane aoe Encouragement Gibbs and the schoolboy Jack- tae a eee pera to Capt | PARTY ORING DEPARTMENT
of & pistol but the pop of acham- ment. But Worrell, Weekes 3% He said that he was very glad man. - : ordship istent batting. | ‘ TAILORING
pagne cork, The athletes were Walcott have played them all 1, "coe that on both teams, the The prize winners were :— Farmer ter rom Mr Alex Dray-| Will Hold A
the guests of the Lord Mayor of wight. Selectors had made room for the , A a of ie cheque i art when ht uk evine tr good bit- on the first floor of
Seth whit tee lke ree tee Taek Cte dats reas WA VION Giscn Cibie for spmelag 1G. ting and’ good Melding.
Monts on with the Gothenburg The arrival of the West Indies that with the encouragement of Glendon Gibbs for s 8 Carl A scarf from Mr. Alex Dray-| ' LTD
en's third annual fuss with Lon- team has been weleomed by sports A bat to Gibbs from Mr. Car : : 7. CAVE SHEP D&C i 4
dow men st the White City. Wint writers in all Australian news- pce an ar ee the ae West McCowan, agent for Wisden’s ton to pry coasn for bowl] | ’
won the 880 yards in the contest papers. The Sydney “Daily Tele- : Se eee eon bats ing and good captaincy. | 5 =
. Mr. W.S. Jones, President of the 1 i rize from Pestano’s Outfit! 10—13, BROAD STREET
fe Venda setteasce nae staph,” for example, eae oe B.G, Cricket Board of Control, wut Si Seon Pe ane’ \e Keith Walcott for the ; o
i ; r case Tecent visit of g French Rugby who spoke earlier, also touched on Wight. highest nuifiber of catches in the}
a ose pe another case ‘team which gave Australian rug- 4), promise shown by the young A packet of shirts to Gibbs hig ie
e with the Wint”. . i s - ; f Lusignan, tournament. :
‘ peg Lb teed on — sters. He said: “Among the new- ahs Py ag re Be er sais A bat from Gomes’ Outfit
Secreeket Ballty, for once we on ‘th a. k ww players comers, we find that we have got a” yy. Taylor from the Demerara Store to Gaskin for good all-
started bedly and had a neck- Welcome these bris' ket what-the the nucleus of a future W.1. team.” Tobacco Co., for scoring a cen- round performance. ; |
; and-neck race with Brian, Shen- Rea cricket bs er hen He singled out for special tury in the first match. A bat from eet Outfit,
’ ton also of Polytechnic Harriers, 4 m4 e praise ‘Cammy! Smith (Harrison “seu tain Ber- Store to Norman Wight for gooc yh
ef ve i ball—- ' p to the B.G. captain Ber ‘ore tin:
_ pomevel, Hames Home a ee ae for our foot! ive College schoolboy) and Holder keley Gaskin from Mr. s . bowling. > outat .
et in 9.9 secs, This was the 39 th edna) "Bender Sin” pub- (left-hand bowler) whom he saw Brown for services to Colony A_ bat from Gomes’ . f Ae
j time he had run the 100 yards in le Sydney y as a future W.I. batsman and cricket. Store to Norman Marshail fo
Jess than 10 secs. and was his last lished a long article by R. S. dividual score on WL hk
run this season, When I spoke to Whitington, a leading Australian bowler. He added that Leroy A bat from Mr. Carl McCowan the highest fe “egiia ; E -CL AR
: oe rome gina he telat ie ‘erica Witter, analysing the Jackman, of Queen’s College, to Leslie Wight—highest scorer a Perea o , eg ehahiier > ,
: that he and Brian Shenton are bowling of Ramadhin and Valen- Played a very fine innings and was on the vo ~~ from Mr. W. 8. of the Barbados team was also i ARK
i friendly rivals, During the past tine. He believes that Valentine’s unfortunate in getting run out, A ore sabe ea Marshall for presented with 12 bottles of
oe yar ane ae has style may not be ey i pee Sterling Batting Seis etivaene sed in the tour- Grant’s Scotch Whisky, from
n displaying in its Fleet Street for Australian pitches and says a en

Office a large-sized photograph of
MacDonald Bailey and his wife,
Doris, with their six children,
Many passers-by have stopped to
take a close up view of the fam-
ous athlete.

While on the athletic theme, I
fearn Herb McKenley, the Trini-
dad-born quarter miler, has
chosen October 1 for his first lim-

F. L. WALCOTT
bering up in preparation for the jfe compares Ramadhin’s grip Ment to last year and this year’s T. O. BRYAN
Helsinki Olympic. For two months of the ball with the technique of work put in by the England and M. E. COX

he will be hard at work on a Jack Iverson, the Australian spin Survey wicketkeeper A. J. McIn-

cross-country routine,
will get
work,

Then he
down to proper track



Regiment Win
Rifle Shoot

THE Governor, Lady Savage
and Major Vaughn, the Governor's
A.D.C, attended a shooting com-
peeton between the Barbados

egiment, Police, Harrison College
and Lodge School yesterday
evening at the Government Rift.
Range. Regiment, last year win
ners, again won the competition
this year,

The shoot was the Major Cave—
7 rounds at 200 yards. The fol-





















that the West Indies chances of
beating Australia
hang heavily on Ramadhin.

against slower-footed
batsmen.”

Like Iverson

English

1

bowler, and says: “On Australian tyre who has been engaged on -|
pitches Iverson had great difficulty coaching contract by the B.G.

his leg-break turn, Cricket Board,

|

|

|

in making
something he had achieved reg-

ularly On the more English-type manager of the Barbados team
pitches of New Zealand. Rama- expressed thanks
dhin eould have similar difficulty lic for the manner in which they
Therein lies the fell over one another to make the |
members of his team happy. He |
under thanked the Cricket Board for th |
trying Australian sung could also way
amazing them,

this summer.
main part of the gamble.
“Long bowling spells

sap even Ramadhin’s
stamina. If they do, he may lose

his pace off the pitch and with it ~~

odd method of choosing a team
is said to be financial economy.

much of his venom.”

There has been an outburst in
Australia too, over the methods
by which the Australian selec-
tors are expected to choose the
team to meet the West Indies, The










in the Tests captain commented on the fine
spirit of friendship that has always

“The West Indies gambled on marked
Ramadhin and Valentine in Eng- matches, He paid tribute to the
land in 1950 and won,” he writes. sterling batting of Glendon Gibbs
“That was on English wickets and land Leslie Wight. }

B.G. batting had definitely im-
proved and credited the improve-

present at the fifth Test match
last season in Melbourne against

England, but it is apparently o:
selectors are Sir Donald Bradman, ithe ay fee






Mr. Berkeley Gaskin, tne B.G. )nament. Universal Agencies

——

ase Scmsliteadpegumpiased

B.G.-Barbados cricket



He said that the standard of





Replying Mr. “Foffie” Williams
WHITE HORSE N
Scotch Whisky

The purpose of signs is to tell
wiseot wenda. This white horse
symbolises Scotch at its very finest;
whisky distilled, biended and
matured by Scotsmen in the tradi-
tional ways that they, and only
they, know sc well. :

to the B,G. pub-

in which they looked after i
and gave special praise io

aes



Not all the selectors were

form shown then that ‘they

































































On

Friday Night, 12th Octo-
ber, 1951, at 8.00 o'clock








Opening the full Cam-
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PAGE 1

U.S. Ask Egypt To Defer Action Agreement Can Be Altered Mutually WASHINGTON, Oct. 10. UNITED STATES Secretary of State Dean Acheson through the press urged Egypt to delay "unilateral action" on abrogating the Anglo Egyptian Treaty and await a "new proposal to be offered" within the next few days. Acheson said the U.S. Government was against the course Egypt was adopting in deciding to abro gate the Anglo Egyptian Treaty of 1936, and the Anglo Egyptian condominium agreements of 1899. He said: "The U.S. Government believes proper respect for international obligations requires that they be altered by mutual agreement rather than by unilateral action of one of the parties." Trade Unions Back Attlee LONDON. Oct. 10. firitain's trade unions lined up officially behind Prime Minister Clement Attlee to present Winston Churrhill with an election hurdle .000,00 votes high. The National Union of Mineworker* issued nn election mnnlfesto calling on 600.000 workers to vote Labour in the October 25 general election and the warning that Churchill's Government would return "capitalistic PMtunte" to the nationalized mining industry. Other unions in hhe giant 8.000.000 strong Trades Union Congress are falling Into line behind Labour. Trade unionists in turn will be urged to tell wives to vote labour. All trade unionists will not vote Labour despite the pleas of their union leaders. But an overwhelming percentage of them will do so ;ind this Is almost UM %  ftfirtll of the ballot* which will ba cast. Churchill showed his concern about the trade union vote in .1 speech In his home district of Woodford last night. To offset Labour "propaganda" he pledged that the Conservative Government would Introduce no legislation hurting trade unions. What Conservatives fear most Is the tempting possibility that the trade unions will use their position at u "political weapon" if Conservatives win. —I'. P. Accept 14 Points BERLIN. Oct. 10 Communist run East Germany accepted on Wednesday, Ihe western zone's 14 point proKramme for free elections as a biMal for negotiating German unity but demanded . hall tu "dungerous" talks on West G man rearmament. The East German Parliament again asked the West German Parliament to meel for talks aimed at unity, a peace treaty and the evacuation of occupation troops.—IT.P. Ships Hit New High WASHINGTON. Oct .11 The National Federation of American shipping reported Wednesday that the number ships in Ihe United BtaO Ml chant Marine continued the ward surge toward a re< time hi!h during September." —UP HARRIMAN WILL DIRECT NEW PLAN The text of ftrbab road "The Ann Cairo conlhmi.i thai tian Prime gftl 8 introduced In tha Egypt I Chamber of DtJM iatlon which would win Anglo-Egyttwn Imh %  >! 1934 and the Anglo* Egyptian condoiniiiiMuiiii agreements of i3i which provide lor joint AngloEgyptian bdminJatratiop Suden. Parties directly involved are the United Kingdom and Egypt and in the case of the IBM BgPsefl Sudanese people as well. However. ihe>e mallei of general concern to the nee world for the\ ..('eel Uh and ilefriii r t -. ".11 Middle East afN, None .,f trie agreements in question provides for abrogation. The United States Government believe* that proper respect for International obligations requires they be altered by mutual agrnemenl rather than by the unii.iteul action of one ,,f (hi parties. Furthermore It should ba DOtad that producers wholly in accord vtfh such reaped fos intarnaU nal oninntnienU already ( .. -he eaai do better than average in commercial competition. Still operating under Allied industrial controls Ilia Ruhr and other manufacturing centres are now grinding out producta at a rate of one-fourth higher than IS years ago Just before Hittei's rearmament driff started. Nor have Otrmini oeen reluctant to step on Allied toes in pouring a high percentage ol their goods into sapart channela. They have jumped to the posi-i tion where they threaten "serious! noes" to competing Western nations according to a, recent report of the EconomlclGu Commission for Europe a United Nations organization. THE Barhado 1 staidM iron BO asrly yssteiday after noon by HO Airwayihitar flight WIII.IOII Oreenidgs. 'Toffle" WllhaniH < Manager l. Oaisl* Wood ud Hkippnr Charlie Taylor, wera the nit torn momtici of the tesai -.0 get oft tha 'plage The othsr memberan *eeu sUsr.ting In the background. Cricket Team Return From B.G. The Barbados Cricket tram returned from B.C. yesterday afternoon by BC1 Airways' Special Plight which landed at Seawell at LIB p.m. Mr. F. A. Claii moult-, Vice-Pre*'dent of the Barbados Cricket ASMK ialmn. Mr Teddy Hoad. Mr. T. N Peirce and other nickel enthusiasts including wives, parents and friend* of various members of the team weir ,1! Senwell \,, welcome home the teum. The taMin. many of whom wen Bonn republic exports now run more than $300.rmo.0oo monthly. Hig gains have been registered in the categories of chemicals. maahlDery, vehicle, electrical apaaratua, optical and precision! Communist Party They took Mall instrument... textile, and f "?_ %  "M**!* ***_** J*££ cotdraa steel. front .1// Quarter* t I'.S. Corrinuinisf Leader Captured After Gaolbreak United Stales Communist leader IISJ Hall. 41, was escorted back into the U3. under heavy guard after hi* international flight to escape gaol ended with hu capture in Memo City. f\ service agent* of the U.S. and M eglc a it Ottfl led the Secret ;n y ..1 1 But official production figures %  I twianaa with the lamentations The Allied rule book has long suul that German production 1, limited to 11,100.000 lOM annually, But that i-ciiing was effectively destroyed last year when It was agreed that an excess for Western defence use only could be producen.— V.t. sedan and led him immigration olTIre. hand-cuffed and he into Ihe Mr U.S. Infantrymen, Tanks Rout Chinese EIGHTH ARMY H.Q.. Korcn, Oct. 10. F '" y J J ^ l '"' kS a d eaC) \ 3 ' 00 '"'""'"V !" routed ter... ronzed Chinese troops in a daring stab e'ght miles into Com-,Tr.^ Department will n> Peace Talks Will Be Resumed Today TOKYO, Oct. 11. RESUMPTION of the Korean peace talk., was imminent today an United Nation* and Com munist liaison officers met at Pan Mini Jom anc apparently selected the new conference site. Indi cations that tha 48 day deadlock would soon be broken were varied, but each heightened optimism that the talks broken off by the Communists on August 23 would get "back on the tracks" shortly. Although no official reaction V.N. OIL DEBATE LIKELY TO HE POSTPONED Kudu i.mnsl Mull lortt meeli ig. Ptipina said in an broadcast early today son officer, had agraa talks would resume m JM araa Uniuti K-IH mtSdent thai the talks \ ould again gel undrw.t\ thai they moved thru aqwiPHMUl from ml stored tin hnjin FUvei undcj %  tiim' batofs h-iif .i n • i.t HI pan MUD Jam naar a*na' i itiii.tti fu ba tha inw um nuanea site Already at MiuiUr • ..nip aMi UwM with Hi u,t % %  id.naa peace mm,iu ~vi'. I'OIIHII KrffOil May Be 9/tm SIIM KHOI.M Swedish atillifi ct 111 irvelilllj u| fouj id iba) irmod u iilin> They uskad l<" pulilnat MS yturn ii,. i arrived . •iinciai hallava baBc front Po i-Mid to Sweden niay have beei traani/ed by Hits-i-n Initlllgaaai tanned looked somewhat Sn v aj -ll-r the 3-hmir trip rrom J QUun I'ulish lefuguei. huvi Field. iadart aaylun receotij and SweIn a short Interview wilhlilmh auihortUee dliaaaiirad rataar] skipper t'hsrlle .Taylor and f ot their answer* to sfanrian Manager •roffle'' Williams they <|iiestions were almost identlca told the Advocate that the thiet (although the circumstance* o factor against lhani was th-,their Journeys varied widely A ',S„, siiffered fiom inexpenenca i.ut -. ---. .. the young members U agreed thai U.. FlaDS MlfiTHilOll they had leura' .1 i^reat dual from D Coitfereiiee 1 tfrritory. The powerful U.S. Second r.tsk force made it hit ant lun "kiliei" i.nd in ,ni attempt t end the Cui.ununists' month-Ion,'. stand on bloody Heart-hrcan Ridgo'' .n tba Baal Caotral front. Tanks rolled up the valle.v wet of the Hdce wllh gin thundered tlinnigh the liny village of Muiidune 23 miles north of the 38 parallel and 1 pm TIHICS bajaffal lha paah %  Haart1 Chaos And I>*'iilli The Task force returned safely at dusk, leaving death and chaos in its wake It had struck just as elements of the Chfnew Aimv Corps 30.000 strong were replat1. Korean troops on the west Mde of Mundung In the air 31 US. Thunder JeU damaged und probably destroyed two of 25 Communist MIC.-l.' jet flghteiwi.ii ii hi i-'d them ovei MIC; Alley" in northwA No US lussc* were report• %  ! The WASHINGTON, Oct. 10. The whi.T House announoad OP Wednesday that Averell Her,. ^ix-cinl Ass.stant to PresiUn ted SUtcs planes oent Truman, will be Director of rail-cutting misston nea the nev. combined Military and Eeotiomi. roratgn Aid Projnramir.r Harriman u now tn Paris serving on u special comil)Kfte* o* the North Atlantic Traaty member-studying the poaaibllity of increasing Western IIarmament proavajgnnv I'.t. TO-DAY'S WEATHER CHART Bonnse: S.4B am %  MaMi ItM P n\ MeanFirst Qnsrter ulffbtlBf: 6.00 p.m. High Tlsto 12.40 am. l.M 9m. Low Tide: 111 a.sS-, 1 41 pan. Sinanju of the 75 miles southeast 1.: ian bordei 1 the 38th rn: "Kim II Sunn ridge*' farther west also ran into stubborn Comm-tnisl resistance asad weni< • AIMUII.I*from one peak by heavy counter Howeve*\ otha %  of Mundung valley ne moderate opposition. Reds presum|ably were disorganized by an I armoured raid into lh | ; their positions. A tank and infantry force alsa %  trunk u-> the vaiii %  \ i.-lmiiih I'orrrs \\ itliclraw SAICON. fM 10 The general withdrawal uf Communi.-t Vietmlnh ( reported from II,loiindliiK lha rice IHIWI of Nghll Lo 90 milo northwest <<1 Hanoi % %  1 i-i. ratal ounted 275 more Communist dead and took 350 more These were In addition l,> 4.500 prisoner* rounded-up bj pUBIroopers yesterday. French hesdouartei* reported I'lit'u'in Tonkinit psovinsa arag aaaapt a ildjajnwi about 32 miles nortncasl %  >< rtanol during the night m which Reds ig U) f move three teeUt from ont <>t hi* patients. He removed them with his list In an argument the court was told. Demonstrations — ••• demonsaratori continued an outbreak in Central Cairo unlil four truck loads of police — about 150 arrived half an hour later and sueeeeded in dispersing crowds. Ttu nutbrcak came as both Hmi.iand Senate Committees unsnimousli approved the Government draft ,111 Ms abrogating the Anglo• Egyptian treaty. O arm a n-Argentine Trad, Freiher Vollradt Von tfejtxan, Chief < %  ( the German foreign ~sT Buenos Airc Thursday to J01 trada delegation nagWiat* Ulg Gennaii-Argentinc trade. fall* an Merriseai — Aigemm" Ambassadoi CMIIOS Hogmi caliad on Foreiaii SecreUn Havbert Mm rlson ii bis own request, Vete er feafldenee — Premier 1 raaaa 1 vein ul %  'oinglit .ifler grafting %  wmdup report on hi* racenl trio lo tin us ana Canada. i;n flwak l'a Hugh DatUh rhad from left ihi Slbley M'niorisi llvitli the Food Minia.tr> and olhtr Government Oepartments will commence. But they are not worried ll suits then purpose to wail on intil after the General Klsction whan Ihera rpsy i a change of (' %  verninent b|1ngln| with it more ravoufabje term-. Tor CommonwejUn Producers Following yesterday's meeting banya an the W1C omclais apd MesarCuke. locMs and Klrkwonl furthei 1'ieliiiiinify talks were hi Id to %  rawln, atlona GENEVA Tha CniUil S: itl 1 plans fin MII 11 nfaranca tu sit uj ass migration programme u history llefugee uaparts hen aald the colllerrnie. wnkh Kriiii' may also join In convening, 1 II In dulcd lo take place BonMtlRsI bafOrv the mlOeUa "f Novembei lither In Washington or Ir Etlinpe It would set up a new agmc> to handle Ihe migialion of at estimated 5,000,000 surplus Euroj^-ans to homes overseas Countries Interested In |m ftratlon and emigration trOUld ba ,1-kei* to set up an interim m it tee which would a<> into nctior afler a crtain number or coun* trios signed lha naieemenl I.F Jiulpi ii'iil SI amis KAN FRAMCIsK'O, Oct II Tha judgn'cnt which sent Ivi Togurl I>aguinu, World War ll'i Tokyo Rose, to prison on a ten %  ".it sentanep ("i tnioon .i;.t.ul t'r United bUites war by the three JudgM of the Nintl ClrattH ti'Uf' on Wednesday. If CHIEFS OF STAFF LEAVE FOR ATHENS PAHIK. Oil. 10 Thu Chief, of bun of Hit u s tod H.ii-in ian 6ri Field al I p m aboard u special niibt.iry plane for Alhens then Ankara for talks with thai military leader* of Gi Turkey on w. U rn planj The parly includad Omar Bradley. Chairman 1 0.8. General fitafl. Brltiah MaiNhal Sir William Slim. Chie Cenerd of the Imperial Starr and General Charles Prancobi Lecheres, Chairmaoi of tli French Joint Chiefs of Staff. —ll.P. and Dafn)> %  tr Attlee Hits Out LONDON. Oct II Prime Minuter Allln. made l auttous rap ntn< < %  \ %  r.. id on Wednesday in a backhand ilap at the anti-American itMM of Ihe left wing of his own Lajr Party Speaki-ik m in his eight-day alactkM npaign lour, he nald Britain' uvery ha been vehlevad b] the efforlv <>i lha BrllMt pangsVi Id I am not In tba tc.iM iishamed 10 MJ Uwl • l>.\ the forthcommg Arpencan. British and French Idlks in Turkey gfl the co-onllnallon of m Turkish armwith the Atlanta blue. The Sovis' pram has not vel I %  n^ hut there is not %  ition D11.l1.111.1t1. m.-les here opined lhat the manl will nippoii nSa > %  Security Council if Ttrltain raiie* %  tion It Is also generally believed thai Britain will probably t* ompeUad la aaaa p i the now 'ii.ti iliiatiou % %  ( Anglu ii i __ -v.r. Full Partner W \SMlNi. ti N Od Hujhl) 1 would bv %  H .1. 1 Greece ind 1 lirki 1 n di 1 iding the .NATO MnlMl. %  ,M -i in :i I !Vfen?e IP 1 nut wanted k 1 nt hut had done ao il ha advlea of phi M Ian %  "who llOUghl till I'lemiei 1 vei i ..f 1 -• -.-1 would t>e ipprsel rted Moasarlagh underwani ,, nriai %  t clinical u I %  • ti rdaj wbtah howiil notkiniii orgiinit'yll' vrong with him—C.P. U'-aWsiitLibi-ral Woiiiair tint .1 the -m-ll I1..11.I g| women Liberals Agliiing their list election will bo 11 travel iflannj ahlaf and onpon pmmotar, III ,' %  Winsor, She la oantesttng Veovil; al the last election the TOM Ml' Mr. A' R Kingsmlll. had a majority of 1013 ovei hal ipi'imetit. Prifslrf On Trial l/)NIK)N. (lit li Tba mtUum court .i lAibim ti ying four Catholic priests und 1 iran i'ihi-i dadatnlnnl >TS of a gang of ptes and diver, l'.li-l: lews agency |LP. ffepoy S/iOO.000 I'NITED NATIONS. Oil. 10 DouMa Tan innivirranrv of 'be ol lha Rapui jnothei IMO.OOO "i its .11 in United enta. A Chinese .1 legntloi an pakmenl hroughS •) more than v.t 1011.000 the srnauni which the i r • %Ml iciil Welc ome %  /AaWlNOTOM Ocl II %  man 1 .1 weli.me fr< •gn Metal ittend'^ the six-day Wo.1.1 Mel % %  ingress start In K on Sunday *' patmtl 1 f Tr I\M:\ GOBS IP WASHINGTON. Oct. II 'roman'p Council of 1 Adviaorg Mid on v. %  %  August to 320 1 r Report* On Tour | WASHINGTON. Oat II. Bupranu Court Jusuoa William Douglas rabortad '" rninaan on Wedneaday on his tour of Irani Ind The "ADVOCATE" pay. for NEWS. Dial 3113 Day-nr Night Vt I11MHI < Fl'irv ill WASHINGTON. CXI 10 Baoratarji of suite Dean Acheon has condemned tba "dbs'-m • assassination of Sir Hanr.v iurney. British Hiith Commhv konei rot M-I..S.! Hie Btata Da-I artment dbulose.i on Wclne*-I ay In a letter sent on Tuesday | 11 the IIIIIINII Ambioiadoi. A on said he "was shoike-i rnved'' to lauin o( the slaying) Communist guerrilla* tilled Gurney* dearth, .1 UsM wvtng wand" -Hi K.W.V. WINES OF DISTINCTION !! BOTTLED BY THE K.W.V. PAARL l>e (.;i -|nri Will* WHhln on hi., foreign policy nt niluion to Otlaw.. Ilon.-f.r. IXI.VDON. Hongkonj will Or thr onlv colony to havt an ofllcla! present at for a trade ajjreemenl between Klnadom break Hi. eaenUtlve Japs Anxious To Conclude Trade Agreements munist fnrtlfled posltaotw before returning to i' 'iied raid jumped off und'. ei ve Chilled k.H \ t Al'i: ll>b% KKIl ifull-bodlrdi Hanu KtVV CABICKNeT SACVIGNON—bed lnr Ihr %  m.iil nl Wines lth Ihe rsi rpllon Ol h \\ \ Banilanan Wang, should be served at Kmi TenilH*rature. They are of Ihe highest iiwillly and their pleatins aromi and flavour make thru. Iud.iwnable rompanional Meal* durum .limit Mc.it Is I ved h \\ V slUHKV No. 1—A very old rxlrj dn Sherr> K.W.Vdid Gloreso—bleh Golden Sweetish sherr\ K.W.V. Old BroHti—Rich In nalaral puriiv .inimri K.W.V. Am'iniiiiidi. Sbbpry, sMIIKM Tspr KM V Wrmmershock—A HMlMA W* WJl %  '" be served ^lirhth chilled Idrsl for Weddlnc Celebratlen-. SUHI WINKK.W.V. Ked MIL. i.l.i Jeriplio 1eH|hUully rich in Mural laveea KM V Psarl Tiwny 1-ip-r|or(—A very popular tawny Um. KM \ iMiii,Mnaanaart Jeriplio—lively sweet—I-eput*r r\ervwhere. -I I'l RIOR BR\N| I -Mimimini i-i bt 1 jrars ohl \>alutely %  V \r< Kr.nd Brandy—In eaarta and pbNa. fill illOVI. W Ml Mill M\i IVKH \i J V t.iiMI>\KH & SONS. LTD.


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HI! RSI) W OITOIHR ||, 1SI BARBAIK>S ADVOCATE tAC.F F1VK 2 HeuGefl 1 Months >] i f D* la me re Laud. St Mtchae:. was sentence.! priooaii .MI with hard labour by Mr. l I, Walw.vu Ailing Police. Magistrate or District "A" for WM found guilty of < Legislature Thanked For B.LF. Help For Middle Ciass Housing Encouraged Hy Chamber Of Commerce Stall Hoard Of Health kppraw ttde Of Und Till! NGWM THE Hoard of Health at • Inj y*icdv appioved Uw S20 mvision and uk of land t MO 537 from Leo Schcoeker a Bailor of the. feet In lota at Hora* Hill Plant* H pleaded l.on. St. Joseph by Joes Rivei %  wallet valued Estate Ltd. l '* .: $25 the Members of the Board also Phillips a assented '<> UH dividing for *mw SO ior of the US Navy. DM i, l t ,n'ai. m< 3C,580 square Both sailors Cold the court that leel of land with a dwelling house %  er 9, sometime during Iron the lands of Mrs M right bo:h m n came up hichard*p at Kent. Christ Church nd snatched their she having divided oh* and sold from the \ 0 k Chlb, Bay Slra. an., sale ,| -Albio. I| W made available h> inUSMUIVS k -"'""""' %  bout half way up Bariareei If ill St. MlchaH bv Mr "" J %  '"< at ihe 195J n.r F Hominii ihp Zanzih.; Club S. P Arcliei quaHAed exemtot ,u:h "' Chamber would un. ,„,._ w< en hp waa robbed. lo '* %  : E air dertak to supf!. and forward the oj/ !" ,' f... II. I i O.MII. le Ind ttp ualkts from their trousers. ..nother Sche eber ?uid that his wallet piopetty. MR. D Ci LEACOCK. President of the Chamber of Commerce, at yesterday's Council meeting, expressed the gratitude of the Chamber for that interest which the Colonial Secretary had taken in Rettirg liw legislature to provide the necessary funds to be expended at the British Industries Fair in 1952. He said that the Chamber owed a considerable debt to the I Secretary who on his own initiative in the Execummittee had got Government to put up this money. i..Ti?^ ."*"!?"„*'." d l""> a would be the House Member of """* -'lies 2^1 hj Colonial Secretary Has Cover... Com. men slated that in new „f ih. niltlee in r>; %  g5t -l the meeting Ihein thai tl md.es Iheae rnhhorle* w.r.^tim„ **£ Mr. f Qodd...d lion bit ...,, tht uh.mh, 3 nH,J,l,.,.?i£! Housing Conference which was V C. Gale. Mr. J L M. Kidney, Mr. %  tri especially when'shlpe ** %  -' aW Mr J ,. M ^"^ Mr to" ,^"^1 Jj ""i ^"'"" llr \ ' of the United States Navy were ft ,55 Dr F Gr,nnum co-opernte v. nrt Welfare in June port Some people then took itl aju. I .->lll|yr^')'ir iilt-il (CMJK (-,•>. ., -,__. i-land u Ka 0n > name by robbing unI 'ists. S llec.t Wuld. on—keeper of the toM the court had one previous -. when on May 16, lyou. he „, lined 10/Worship Mr. A. J. H. :ng ta.narinda the property of the Barbadoa f I I] Hospital. Lucas has two previous convic' tions and oi the last convictionJune 21, 11)43—he was sentenced :< %  14 days imprUonmeni for t'-.lini; I/fiom Edun Clarke. E B Ca ter. TWO moio ew of W*t Indian carreacy not-', arrivad %  t Sfawall yr>terd*y aftern'-on •m BWIA'i flight JOr. from Tilnldad Accompany)ii| our vm two of TrtuiUad Btmor Curreucy Ofltccrs, Mr. Wdhaia (Mark-* and Mr W. Vuicaai Brawn. Thay *• pect to return tj Trinidad to morrow and will be tabag with them a quantity ofTld cuicalkd Trinidad and Tobago not"*. P. >iipply t (iE | the t Advert Krrient xh Lilts last, recommended thai Goveniments ibouU encourago private 1 enterprise building for tfM middle income group*. -„;'" „? ' ,; '' ,he The letu-, went on to *tate that ^'^' fl J *• there wa, a report of the sub'he committee r.ppxMnted bs the Con!" J %  ) ferenw M irport on Administrawould Bue-ful to advertlon, Itouelnfl rinanee. RMM %  I Managemenu etc ;r, i -'' Industrie. %  ., That Sub-Committee suggested -ylUl Uiat in .oiiiieclinn with the pro< li .'I. vi Ion of housing fur the middle i a recern ineeiini! 01 ih'Pharoincome groups, the time had come btr polnieil >,u that un aecounl when prlvntr employer, might r.f reslnctioas v,,y Utlleaooed u,th advantage to dll .oncerned. i %  no l?^ t. c 2 uld .. "^i 1 ." thc * v %  "ention tt> the question of ; United Kingdom He (Mr. Innits) assisting permanent members of '.at thu po *h."i)t; be thetr staffs to acquire homes. the The exhortation to employers V J„.i/,h i M/I.HI.I FILM snow %  %  tl the Bl Joeei Horao Hill .„ i After the show the H. \ I. ( Bl Joseph, moved a vole of thanks The nhow lasted a little over an hour 3.551 persons have registered the polla on gam rlon day to eboo for St. Joseph. igo to the Bl lor tnatruotl ) %  %  UkMr peAfakg i taU Beal Claawei" in jomerv have been %  arted at the si Jootpri Boya' School. OttttWIIty J I,. thai iht ' worker was ants Mr. Wi.lw.wi said that this ^HnPKPFPFJS' MPF'ilNr u £ w ,,'."*' "' d J h ," 1 malit in th knowledge that It Of natchint wallet* must ^"UKKt-tKhK-i MttHNO he had MH Mr. Healv, an ornelal was very unlikely that C.overnbe stamped out. Ihurelore he was ln „,, ,_„,, _, „,, M,-^^,.. IIK wh M u f ry "' Tj^S 5 I moms wBuW ^ %  b,e lo flnd ,he going to punish them so that this T %  iTT?!. ^f.mT i^iTT'Vf S*"J5SfA ^S". ftJ^aftL 1 necessary m.iney to build hous. meat would act as a 'or those wh THE "Barbados Advocate" was promptly yat ji-day and hare this newspaper vondor athe eager nailorlook for tas new* UNITED STATES NAVY ENJOY SHORE LEAVE CHARLIE CAMPBEU. of Virginia. USA., a BMB l.ST 525, one of the USA. Naval vessels at ]>t. -n port, likes photography. He run appreciate seenei > 1 IB why Charlie brought along his Speed (graphic i when he came ashore yesterday. He intends lo U %  many pictures of Barbados as possible and. says ChBrlU "Sumetimes you are likely ti get some of the rn'sl ptotur* along the City streets Shorthdiul ResulU Of i HI II tads*! iif the ventAf InsUltrta who sat the ..f the Mman's Shorthand Institute la uly this year, the following have UlllMful: Misses M. M. Massiah 00 and 70 words. V. M. Si>eneer. BO and 70 words; M K. .mett, BO and 70 words; W 1'ilgrim. SO and 70 words; E. D. Curwln. B0 and 70 wffl ones. BO and 70 words. J CUu % %  <• I worda; A Smith. 60 words; and J Wiggins, B0 words. lo commit ;i similar offence. %  hkelv Hi U.K. whit v-Mr. Healy had ... art*) Thr .iw.k.t^V. I"" 1 wet. impc-ed that rcstrirfor account of inco Preparations For Incom: Survey Complete the similarity in-tween Molasses and Treacle He hsri dmwn to Mr Hea ^Mention that Molai ssj Fanev When Ihe Advocate reporter IW Charlie he was picking out sale !" . she middle llkol >' '-* 013 'ke along Sw .n Krouns. s;i..-t ,ind Husbey's Alley lie l-i ghlly tak.' ihp siene The t.tliei m.li. in ii Mt .ni niarters Sandwiches are delicious UnattrartivF Inve^iim'nt each container. ..In-idy visited Puerto Rico The report further stated that ^' Thomas but this many nronmn on i„„|j _„ ,.,-,.., ,..„.,..„ v. Inquest Adjourned* building After further discussion. It was e FURTHKII n. conalruction hy private going lo write a book about the inquest touching tindeath < enteiprl.se for the purpose of let'hip and the various places we Eugene Edwards was adiourni i ,-*......i„„ lm g. n unattractive Held of visited Some of my photo* will ye.terdav by Mr. C. U Walwy •^efisSSH investment lie published in this book' Acting Coroner of District A The ( uinmitte* were unable Accompanying Cl'urlie weir Jt-e eiitll November A at Ihe ntemenl to swfiest any Medinas and rrank Wever They Edwards died %  uddonly at hi partlculir form of asakstanee. itie not photographers, but they home at Coilynnne ROM In 111 bat strongly rccommendrd that liked watching Charlie taking -.uly IsOUn of Tuesday momln schemes of that nature be given snaps October tt Ills Iwdy was rtmovi every ftoealble encouracpmenl by Charlie was not the only photoBo the Public Mortuary where I>. i.-.w-rnin.-iu grapher "In white" ;.ro\ind the A S. Calo performed a pos Company through the Barbados CJovernment. should make repre_, sentstlons to the British Ministry I inpreparations for the first Survey of Income and Exof Food against restriction on the penditure. which is being carried out in Barbados bv the importation of Barbados Fancy U -..I Social and Economic Research of the University Hon^K ft R Hunt?" who Is an I til. W84 Indies, are now complete. Mr. Ken exporter Of canned Fancv MoGovernment. grapher "In white" :.round the A. S. Cal Straw, a member of the Institute who is carrying out the lasses, promised to assist in the The Council instructed the Cy yesterday Many other ,nor * ,m Examination nirvtl liild thfl Advocate vesterdav drafting or this letter in be lorClerk to reply informing them *'Hon. took pictures, but Iheir Clar.lsa Eawards f I „ n if iA .u i u warded lo Ihe British Ministry „f thai the Chamber srreed thst '•""' 1 u \ "" %  " Infotmauon for WBi piw)( |ed for the Offlcers In mirf-nfght. have been obtained If all the Jamaica for Research purposesit Tourism which took pile recentthe forthcoming Conference of rhnrge while the radio transmitTo the Jury Clarrjsa Edwanl•households in the particular )* needed for educational piirJ m Ihe Dominican Republic. Ihe Caribbean Commission. ting and receiving set was placed -aid that her husband used to satOO had been interposes in the University College The Colonial Secretary in reply He -aid that Ihe members rils|„ ihe yttr d. This set was in conolink heavily and they used I %  viewed. nf lhr Wpst indi^, and in Barba"Id 'hat the contents of their eussed with Mr. Burgess industrial tact with the U.SS Akhaln, In quarrel over hla drinking. Chance dos. The broad averages which letter would be brought to the ..nd labour problems and the latter the harbour, and a Jeep and truck At the Mortuarv she identill emerge may also be used to form notice of the Governor-in-Execupointed out that he had Rot all ihe which patrolled the City ton or chance the basis of a new Cost of Living I've Committee. necessary statistics he had requl'**l which paruculai households conindex in Barbados In accordance He added that the main purpose fm,,, thp Government .itltute the sample. Those taking with ItH Kepon of the Cost of of (he Conference wo* to discuss the sample have no idea at all Uving Index Committee." the establishment of the proposed %  frying out the statistical Caribbean Tourist Development calculations whioh households' Public Support Association, and that the Barbado: •Heeled. The information rr Government must decide whether about in) one Ixm-ehold Is of "If the Survey Is to be a sueor not the benefits which would t only in so far as it forms cess, wide public support is accrue to Barbados from memberManager nf H.W.I.A.. one of the BOO in the sample. essenUal. The information supship of this Association, In the Taylor In connection with the In.1 of all ihe houseplied by householders will be event of its being formed, justify adeouate service provided by hi* are added up the statistical treated as strictly confidential by the by no means inconsiderable air line. nd analysis, is carried ihe University Research Institute, annual contribution (believed to Mr Taylor said that it was no< a l Tl DPMd averages The only figures which will be be In the region of $13,000) which milter for which he was respon'•'%  whole 800 housepublished or used for Cost of It would he required to make, ij^le He therefore asked for rhold..nd it is these broad averLiving Index calculations will be bearing in mind the present an, Tac t K „f ihe meetinv at which th" ages which are of particular broad averages. Thus ihe position nusl contribution B32.280 which is _„,,-. ha ,, h—ndi !" ,!" TTW> Significance ind interest ol any individual householder made to the Barbados Publicity J"*J Z"; "' *J"i"^„, 'T, ......l ottt WU not be disclosed by the Committee f n ..^ r. rS^ Th!l ^ hu In fou .: the island — flgures." S| nc thc derision whether or '" ,' ; ~. .*. a. t Bridgetown, St. Michael. St. lAicy -|| ,s hoped that those housenot to request thc Legislature to h<"< tied to the Gas was turned into all the Gas amotml of care was taken in regTheoreticnlly our customers average basic price of 40c. per y's mains. Asking the ufaiinu ihe flame down lo a railshould use half the quantity of therm and before the Company of the Company. Mr. able sire, as the increased presRHS thrv have been previously can Increase their dividend Wiey *h) mld-nlght wag chosen sure and quality of gas would using, but the Company Is hoping must first led.ne the pn.. trie pas. he lold Onoaturally cause a longer flame at trial with this knowledge customto the pubUc, therefore, it is to Advct.u kino In order the burners not adjusted to suit ers will take advantage of the the advantage of Ihe Company In he old gas in thc pipe Ihe Natural Gas. Increased heating value and use sell the Gas as chear**ss poaaiLo lie oxpelled The Company b changing and more gas which will also be to ble. regulnttnK each and every burner their advantage as the Schedule on all of their customers 1 appllof Rales Is so adapted to make "During the past 4 yean they i to ances In order to give greater the gas cheaper the greater the hove been carrying on at J loss the efficiency and economy in Its use. quantity used." He also said that and without paying any dividend r£ %  tl* past system of .Urging meter I.. Sh.>r..Vld-r by IW tfW iht New Thermal Rales rental has been abolished with have earned the graUtude of then .if. W>ien a%kcd what would IM> the ihis new Schedule nf Rate* oupori rnlng. i query ws i hanged, ihe Mini;.. He added: "By Hie ameridn Ihe Gas Company's Act. Ih. : .nil |e % %  w opei alion .f tl | 1'iiMi lt. Iii Ihli It's delicious! It's cooked on VALOR ..lit a have reputation for good ihe following models The stove v cooking. We TABLE MODEL 2 Burner with stands $25.21 & $17.50 Single Burner 9.43 OVENS Single 510.54 WICKS No. 200 44c. No. 300 80c. No. 21 $1.00 CAVE, SHEPHERD & CO., LTD. 10. II. 12 fit 13 Broad Street. Four Officers. three Chief Officers and 21 enlisted men WON jtt.tche.1 to the Special Police Up to 3 o'clock yesterday evening they received no reports of theft* ody to Dr A S CatO At the next hc.it In* |> A alo and Ihe Government Analys will give their OvsdOnOO Car, 15ns Collide THE bus M-IMI "' Unl Uborl 1 i> Co. which was Ixin i driven by St.nley Dash of Bibb} I.me St Mi, hael .unl I M-759. nwne.1 and driven bv Mil Ion Ijnyley of Villa Ho.id. HIM Staff are two lon' Hill mn both < %  goes damaged fO aWdO) tVwJtlng, whe For health and fleor ih* ptrtmct 'iprrid' i Marmite. which gives thu inn someii-mi' to i >vide *a'ki< ol Sandwiches Hsrm.ie BSWSSSI v tassss a which help* yojipom co ihn< "•! build up rtnounte ;o di.-ue. Tou'M like the 'lAXir in Slews. Sauces. Griviti nd ill Sjoury dishtl (oo. In jars: lor.. 2 ox.. 4 ex., • 'i I* ei. The Food for FAMILY FITNESS nd In the truck with first aid they came Into ., cdllsioi equipment In case of an accident Prllton's Cross Road. The Ihe radio will contact the truck .lent occurred about 3 SO n'rlo (S3 fL/fttAat CM (53 'VV%AAAAA.rV%rVVVVVVVvVv a FOR BEST RESULTS USE PURINA CHOWS IN THE CHECKER BOARD BAGS n H. Jason Jones & Co., Ltd—Diiinbuion n %  fcwwwwww %  \xn SO TO H'KII Some glrl struggle. Some i.lrU dagnatc. Others aie smart And marry a Magnate. Taking her cue Trom these words of wisdom, Anne Ilalliol tells every Good Ol-I how to choose %  wealthy, sobe-. and generou* bachelor for be. boss and how lo lead him gentlj ait firmly ulong Ihr gift-lined pe'h to the alter. This bo.k is dlCerent from OVOty other Vocational guide f-i glri^ This Is the B. BaBBU .1 adndU lh.it Work It bad Bn D woman's figure. posture, and digestion. It i ruinous, in the 1 >.ig run. to her personality The nOOnW an intelh:ent girl can gfc, the U'tler for her u A ill le. There is a higher career. ThOTO get exhausted, never gel >ut of bed one monien before you please, und never lack money to buy anything that stnk'your fan. • The career Is muriii ge. But it must be marriage lo %  man who %  gratifyfo| youi I try whim, ami who always has the funds sary for this good purpose. You mny as well have him sooner than later. If you reed this book carefully, and give head to its lessons, you surely will. nf have if ill THC ADVOCATE SI A I HIM in VAPEX INHALANT t i I %  BE AT HE . the antiseptic vapour from your hendkercrue. by day or from your pillow at night or use the VAPEX INHALER — handy 'or daytime Easily recharged from standard bottle On Sulc at KNHillTS DRC


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PACK KIG1IT BARBADOS ATVOCATE THl KSDAY, OCTOBER 11. 1SJ1 in in. ion mi i it \, How Australia Welcomed W.L Cricketers Will Give Game There New Zest Says Paper SYDNEY. I '••,! Indies Test ic.im hf nrivcil in Australia for what Australian sportsmen persist in referring to as "the world championship agri tf their first opoortimitv to show their form in Australia in a match at NVw\ow South Wales, on October 2fi A 1MB crowd wtulad on BM OafM plurr. down th* gangplank at Sydney as Mr. C A ft m the liner WinjnticlU." Merry, the team manager, led .lot.,. Goddard. the W—t indie* i %  — m .... — .... '.itani. was among those who ( arrived m the liner. With him Valentine. Ferguson. GuilTHE entire Weat Iaglas Team should be in Australia to-day. This account ia of thi arrival of John Ooddatdparty tii* first sight to roach Australia. The second batch of Ma arrived on Tuesday Worrell. Weeks,. Walcett, Ramadhin. iMn*. and Roy Manhall who was delayed by ion>..mv The Baal three, %  tollmeyei, Oomos and Rao *'r duo in Austraha by air ys-terdnyAthletesHeJp Jamaioa LOKDOH. "Weat Indian athletes wia. 'urneti out on a chilly evening m .1 cek to ta| %  ihe athletic meeting 'irgantsed lor :isi l(n. Atkinson. Trim, Christian!. Bra] swMti Nina mom player* are Mill to • Austr-lu. three by ah* nd six by sea. Sunny Ramadhin. tr.o star spin bowlar, is on hU %  vj> ..nd alao to come are the Three Terrible W'a"—the ngaM Australian sports writers have givan to Week**. Worrell and Walcoit. A lone West Indian face was onions the, crowd that welcomed •tere. Pierre de Verteuil. lorwMtiy ..f CouVO, Trinidad, ami | N illi ilii I loyal AusUwUari Air Force, stood on the ii< ckslde. Mr. Merry knows his tn'her wail and remember* Pierre I a schoolboy. "It was good to M a West Indies face in the i owd." he said .Leading Country an regard Australia * the world's leading : ticketing country. They have oard of the standard of Auslr-iGolfer Bleeds I.. Deulh SKATTLE. Oct. 9. A young golfer. Edward Harrison, bled to death after he broke Ihe club >.< stabbed h.mself with it. and other BBafaM itistook his agonised .•creams fci help as the crie* of a peacock Pwik-e and Harrison apparently v aa playing alone When he came th tee he swung with the Id it struck hi* golf carl Tne metal shaft of the driver I r.ike. whipped back and caught in the groin. other golfers said they heard screams but thought were the enee of p i nearby peacock farm.—I'.F JOHN (iimiiAHh salts Itiat there arc I aicty fast boiHen in l-idlfi lu U'iO"i Worrell, 'THl! WIN" ?2Eli ''^"^ guaeo lor ..card of the standard of Austr..I. are gratifiedthat a sum of WBrd m „. lm „ un Austrahati was collected aome 0 filing in, the amcaaajl mag .ip,,car -.mall but i !" \ -omem.ndituu P tou,okoep futureU „,„,.„.,>,„ top, We will never do it unWight, wno he said, "Is dti I NHIIII...II.III Gibbs and the choolboy JackFulure W.I. Starv The occasion IhM were BOW under %  port wax not that of a pistol but tinpup of a chamwhen w y 1-ngne rork ri.i jilileles were Walcott lln-v Lick leiinlh ;... %  tentpcTi. nent Hut Worrell. wm for the hw,t i l-etaa youngster*. He expressed the view •ptn, Tho Sydney "Dally Tele' ' w ^ "t^"?** . r..fflll,H ih,"' w s %  •'"'*. President of the ren. V*. of Kren£"Sut 'JP, 2fJ ,? !" "' '"'"""" team which nave Australian rig" K h " ,okr '"'•" %  i 1 "' "" ger players some Orat-class ganu-i "!' Pejnnse shown l.y Ihe youngMacDonahl Relies, for once a"" said: "Australian sporwnen """ %  e '*>? "Among the ncwb 'I. .md had a neckwelcome Ihew hrlsk nrw players feiaeis. ws rind thai w* lujvg a-.' nd-nack race iu Srtan BhastThaj van da lor csMiat what th*menucleus of a future Wl team Ihe Ixrd Mav... ... lilt M.niM.ai lluuse In i with the tiothniburg with I^.n'" the White City. Wini ata n„. win yards in Ihe MKiiaat l in tho day Sports writers m*." for i-si ana nctorj %  • n.-i Batothe of "Oone with the Winl" from Bookers Sport „, I ih'pt. to Norman Marshall lor L Wishart, aecretan oTtlv ^^ thr fir; ( Barbados batsman to score a century. A bat from Wm. Fogarty Ui Lerov Jarkman for his promising Innings in the second in.itih A cup from Mr. R. C. Humphray b Leelie Wight fea brilliant twitting throughout the tournament Petr of beer mugs from His Lordship Justice Ward to Capt. Farmer for conjisteni batting. A scarf from Mr. Alex DroyTaxpayers Complain i HI Board eg fltaltti ai meeting yesterday dealt with com pi Hint from taxpayers Glttens Land. St. Michael who J.umed that the tenants ( ,f Mavers Hack Ivy were getting their water supply through %  not. The Board decided that they could do nothing about it. WHAT'S ON TODAY Court of Original Jurisdiction and Lower Court* in am. %  t. Thomai Veiry—1 p.m. Honae of Assemblyf p.m Tei.ni-. st Smrmsrhay p.m. Moblla Cinema at Black Bean School Patlurc. St. Peter TJO p.m. Police Band at Quaen's Park 746 p.m. I l-l'll B0YRIL gives your meals the goodness of real BEEF Ctood cooks know the value of Bovril Its Mar make* ihe simple*! meal tasty and ng | us beefy goodness make* food norc r.'jtniioui. Bovril is the comctntraitJ t beet. ner.i were :^ if a cheque for $171 ,„ -'..• inieleus of a hit Ion also erf Polytechnic Hanlen. French Rugbv l^aagu,. Intoma• Mngled out for l ftiihcd home Unit tional* did for our football—give ^'"• !" c 'Cammy' Smith (Harrison in 9.9 MVSThil WM [ne JJJJJ it „ew zoat." < .!l.v< HWOtbOyJ ,rnl Roldg) UwM he had i un ihe 100 yurds in The Sydney "Sunday Hun" pub(Wt-hand bowler) whom he saw Brown fo leaa tnan 10 sees, and was hia last lished a long article by R. S. " future W.I. batsman ^nd erickft run this atMaon. When I spoke to Whltington. a leading Australian r>owler. He added th;it L | him after the race, he told me cricket writer, analysing the Jackman. f Queen's College. Ihal hi ., u HMUH siienton are uowlink; of Hamadhin and Valenolayed a very line inning" and *... ii lendly iivaii.. During the past tine lie believe* that Valentine's unfortunate in getting run out. 2r,a*£E ** Cfcr * l >* "* atyle may not be entirely suitable .. _. Iieeii displaying in iu Fleet Street for Auslr-liau pilches and ggj Slrrling B-illing Urgt-sized photograph of Ihal the West Indies chances of Mi Heraelev (iaakin. tne B.G. i his wife, beating! Australia in the Test captain commented on the fine Ltons. with their six children, hang heavily on Ramadhin. spirit of friendship thai h %  i-sscrs-by have slopped to The Wesl Indies gambled on marked B.G.-Barbados .ink, lane ii close up view of the famRam.-idhin and Valentine in F-ngmahrhee. He paid tribute |Q th. ""IIM"'. t. ,9M anrcr-fontcd English He Mid that ihe standard Oi .i;l-u.rn quarter miler. has liatamen." B.G. batting had definite! choaeii (x-iuiier I for his find llmLike lverMm proved and credited the I up in preparation for the H e .-o.npares Ramadhin'. grin ment to last year and th, ,,.,, n*hs of the ball with the tochnJquo of Work pui in by the Bngliod B Hi a j nC |( iverson, the Australian spin Surrey wick (•.keeper A. J. Meln Then he bowler, and says: "On Australian tyre who has been engaged on ^ iwn to proper track pitches Iverson had great difficulty coaching eontr.ni i in making hi.' leg-break turn. Cricket Board. something he had achieved regReplying Mr. "Fofnc" Wilhuci. ularly on the mor e English-type man age of the Barbados team pitches of New Zealand. Ram*expressed thanks to (he B.G uul ilhin could hav P similar difficulty lie for the manner in which they this summer. Therein lie s th* fell ever one .mother to make lh> .in P-it of Ihe gamble. . ,,,| a .., ,,n ieam hapi spells under thanked the Cricket Boird for tii > y In which they looked after linn,, aggj gaaasj iVtvlu i praise I i from the people of the Colony to ton to A. M. Taylor for good bilGlendon Gibbs for scoring 216. tin* and good fielding. A bat to Gibbs from Mr. Carl A scarf from Mr. Alex DrayMcCowan, agent for Wisden's ton lo lleikeley Gaskin for bowl-j bats. ing and good captaincy. A bat to Gibbs from Mr. R. M A prize from Pestano's Outfit Wight. Stole tO Keith Walrol! for the A packet of shirts to Gibbs highest number of catches in the from Mr. Jagdeo of Lusignan. tournament. A bat to the Ilarl-ailos captain A bat from Gomes' Outfit A. M. Taylor from the Dcmeraru Store to Gaskin for good Tobacco Co., for scoring a eenround performance. •in> in the Hi t match. A oil from Oomea' OutJII A cup to Ihe B.G. captain BerStore lo Norman Wiifht for g< keley Gaskin from Mr. C. R bowling services lo Colony A bat from Gomes* Outfit Sl.e lo Norman M Helsinki Olympic. For tw h0 will IKhard at work outtne. work Regiment Win Rifle Shoot •tango THl Governor. Lady and M Ljoi Vaughn, the Govt rnoi i A.DC. altendrd a shooting eom%  D the ~ Regiment Police Hani and Lodge School yswterdo evening at the Government Rifl Range. Regiment, las' ners. again won the eompetltlot Long bowling trying Australian suna could also even Ramadhm's amazing Barbados stamina. If they do, he may lose i"a* r h,r p cc ofl the P' ich ana wlth much of his venom.* There has been an outburst ... Australia too. over the method.by which the Australian selectors are exiKvted to choose the Ihe shout was the Maioi Cave team t„ mevt the West Indie*. The rounds al 200 yards. The folselectors are Sir Donald Bradman ..h^t., ,ow,„, ,„ P :, r ,„ ,,, K A )wv ,. r %  . gj. JJJS. %  odd method of choosing a team Is said to be financial economy. Not all the selectors were Proeeng ot the fifth Teat matcllast season in Melbourne against England, but it is apparentl; clauses H-PJ of 35. i LASS 1st Major J. E Griffith 'I V Waleoll Srd M. D 4lh Mb,i o F. c v. %  (LASS Sgt. F. E. Edwards Mr. R. S. Bancroft Li E. R. Goddard Mr. P. D. E Chase "B" out of 33 b E A. Dwyer _.. Ryder, The Australian Board of i.iu?? !" ,toJL. ^ L "'." 1 "" 1 "' '" % %  <> % %  %  >••• 8; il: "SSr r S252S C •.•i^*S ,, • Jf*? **" • A.l..|a,l, I, m l*coa,b.. -^:*ZF !" ^<^. *lll stay about the II..I:.u, t.-.t !" .r!!""' r'?' r "."\ S I" e ,ram D !" "r >l to Jtiniuiry'%  U conlrroal, b>• telephone „,„| ,|„. „,,„ ,„ s of the Ausuar, 25 until u —IIP. tea ti.iThey'll Do It Every Time B y Jimmy Hatlo /BUT A ItSAP, tXAKX COMT WANT TO LM! IN THe COUNTRyI LIKE THe SMOHS -ND THH SHOPS[ BESICCS, ALL OUH ypRE'OS /tSE WERESj-WEy eajGttT HIS CWSaUl HOJSE W "me COUHTRY—BUT ecop CVMNES^P VERy RARELY SEES IT-HXirO-KHfUH-USUOH1*1 AT TH4T ftS^-NtSH QN\ER-IT TXM UJNCaTR WAH I Fa&aKD-COWT WiNK I CAN AlAsCE ir >^s 0*5—THl^< Z 3ETTER STHAV AT A HOTELOKAV.HON-J: BAKERIES W.'SSS.'.'Sr'SSSSSS.'*,'. -.ft*,•*&C>aV<.*V<^4'%4<.*'^'.'.' *' BEDFORD lll-l. I VER Y VA1VS OTigli looUiruj units keep your delivery costs at the Lowe | U'vel:— Low imlia' cosl MI keep r U K 110 c, ft. 10/12 cwls De\ I lately available. ronipleleU painted N 1. but at advanced URS NOW! DEPENDABLE DURABLE ECONOMICAL S WILKINSON & HAYNES CO.. LTD. %  %  \ OI IITHMV <.AII\'.I ROBI Itr TlltlM I.IMITKIl : /.%a< ** a *H l %  Hoad. nun WWMtWWA.'



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PACt FUIR BARBADOS ADVOCATE TIURMIW i>< row i: The Tory Policy Signed THEY HELD IP A — and so we went out bandit-chasing. sr._— Thurda>. October 11. 1*31 PRIVATE SC IIOOLS IT would be unwise td venture *.r "icism of the introduction of Sgje gruupmg into the educational system of this island without examining the factors which have contributed to its disadvantages. Chief among •hese are the uncontrolled private schools. Under existing regulations it is within the power of the Director of Education to inspect schools which axe registered. These are given certificates of approval such as are seen in the advertisement of those schools which cater to secondary education in this island. But it is not with these schools that there should be so much concern. It is to the "home school" that serious attention should now be paid. There are several of these schools scattered in the many villages to accommodate the few children of each district. A lady. usually past the prime of youth, starts such a school and holds out to the parents that there is an exclusive atmosphere in which the children would not mix with those of the "lesser breeds This is the Hist attraction for those who believe that society demands from them something which it really does not and flatters their vanity of being eXCiU The teacher is usually a person whose association with teaching, the knowledge and skill it requires, and the special training demanded was that gained during a faau years as a juvenile in school. The school itself has Its only relation with institutions of its kind in the name given it. The building is as suited to be a school as for any other purpose and seldom provides the required number of cubic feet per pupil or subscribes to the rules of the Health Authority for buildings where any number of people are gathered. In this atmosphere of make-believe the child remains to have the first part of its life blighted by incompetent, even if enthusiastic and well-meaning individuals. There is no regular rule as to when the child shouli eater or leave this school. The truth is that the school serves as %  substitute for a nursery until the parent believes thai the-ohild is really old enough to go to school. And in many of these cases the child who has already lost a few years is then sent to the elementary school where a teacher is expected to work miracles. It is here where the child and its parents come up against the evils of age grouping. The child would have been farther advanced in its studies if it had been sent to .the elementary school at the time when il entered the private school; now it has t3 be T put along with children of its own age and is usually at a disadvantage. There are. those who will attempt to justify the existence of the private school despite the fact that it now works a hardlup on children of the poorer classes who will never have the opportunity of getting any other kind of education beyond that of the elementary school. It is easy to argue but not so easy to justify the claim of women to a living at the expense of the educational development of thousands of children. Nothing said against the private schocl should be taken to mean that it should be banished, but in view of its opportunity for harm and on the converse, its potential usefulness In the community. It should b made to conform to certain rules applied to all educational institutions. Il should be made unlawful for anyone to open a private school in any district without the approval of the Educational Authority and there should be heavy penalties attached to those who i ifuse to submit their school for inspection and approval by the Inspectors provided by the Goverrujassn Until something is done to control the growth and conduit of these private schools there will always be this gap between the time the average child should have gone to school where he would be classified with others of Ins own aee and the time when he is taken from the almosphere of snobbery and grouped in a c'ass where he can assimilate little or BCtHtAg, Our ItYuisYr*. Say: tthv W AH Tu Ihe r.dUur, the Advocat*. Slh\—I crave apace In our coluir why all persona employe.) in the | were not ajja^blt for bonus, under l production bonus scheme. 1 %  p eak '" who have to work so hard, tukint! i Here in full is the Manifesto of the Conservative and Unionist Party for the General Election of 1951, signed by Mr. Churchill. IK IkVrmtrd W.rksM. .1 We are confronted with a cnt< -f a ?** '' %  %  necessary^ wtu. ^ mi J^* r ^^ \ bashing" today. We went out after three 4KV1.Y I HAYS Ol.ll! DAILY TELEGRAPH on sale at ADVOCATE SI A I IOM H even the life of Britain. Wt — w o : .:* now before us. K n with this evenly balanced be hatsaud by deeds and rty strife and bold our own In results and not by words and 'the world, or even earn our living. *pplaue. We seek to. proclaim a j The prune need is for a stable theme, rather than writ* a prosGovei njneni with several (before it. during which We wun u. fdrnser Iran af.d Steel Board I their leyra—ntsng the Slate the man-' bandits who had held up a bus. r "gS *i^Pfi ** ,d conaum *", We didn't find them, but reporter Wick riiSliinSisaa mil rail and roid ; traasvfasjtsBss be reorganised into steed, from Hampstead. finished the day *** pSvas?f£KL!i^^i b t !" _' about I01b "Rhter than he started. Phew 1 The bus was bumping along a rough jungle track, taking a load of tin miners to for the bras c ** i w u f*" 1 *'" nationalMed work, when three bandits stepped out on to !" < %  MMSSM There will be more decentral. rr ^ T,2 £ST2 "on and stimula.ion <4 lo? il the road year* pec-.us. Mai tune -he phrase. -'Brine the rearguard Pnvrte read hauliers will be giv~i national interest, assist be faith£• This meant baa* standard. • ^ *•*?* W return u bus.It was hot. hard work fully held far above Party feuds of ble and labour, the duty of *•• %  ; Jg2* 1"?!* -— or tactic the strong to help the weak, and iP**! be crippled b> the twentyWe need a new Goveraraant not of the successful to lilalilssti * Mil— %  by privilege or interest or tolerable conditions crarrped by doctrinal prejuic fortunate That policy ^ ta ^S^X?;^^SS^£^ U 1 C n J^ iS.i2? l SSlS22;! Lr ^"^.""'M :i B^t love .topping buses. They pa the ooU lb. Cce—vaiir. and UnioaM n , few. Unr, u* .— r22!?2L. " hat round among the passenger, in aid of Party can today provide, guard in." but Krtp Ih. vanfuara "• %  beck Tfcare no mean, t* -hich N IHi n ll M mi. island can aupoort m praaena ^JJL^ €te 'TJ 0 LJ 0 KrcorU I n thu oecMion the Indian bus driver, as !*.„ be no UUoo. about ^f "J^^Ao^'aS ""**Mai merTSu alao babu. drivers the world over sometime, do. 'our difficult.*, and dancers It la .-^j,.. We MMlet paa-i 1 %  • kr*T> Irl f 1 p rtiainanlarT ravipw ot ignored the s jy na l to s t op an d put his foot |brtt to fate them V£*>" ouraMvi. all.. ..£,! la. .r.d.'" !e did in ItM. The CoaaervaUve ^ ^cuon, contrre.Party wbo unt. virtorj hay. had '~~nV>T\jM^uui,>ss 'tSl, in rouad IH — deTott freedom and •"?;.theee i. OT^, toto ,„„ „ Mr „ iSZ ,Li^!^^Jl!tailuia mu 1 *• !" ""*" The P^duetion pca,ble. and aautnd to ariciilnir.S^-STS^t o^raooirorttJ "' ** %  "* '*' mc M*" hevee practicable The bcrr... ,„ ,1 ^i.Tuul^aSlonlf about the Iiquidalinn of old weahh. unmm M nployer.. and Ul* S < %  %  ' " '" ^"Ji—SS >^ hefor, Paruament ^alloaall I t.ill u^uS^ •*"> "" """" T * production ,,„„ TOU „, ve clrar ^^ „ M^SmZ* mStofrZL* "< %  %  *"" n ""*' pre !" d c !" ".', aeiion In thi. held k %  ^Sa I^SKM Mil. .11 n' M ""n !" P .ervkea. It I. alao one of the ke; £\. "SS SSi^n^o;Tcon'o I. beeayU~ k UuU ,„ .ncreajed p,^uctl.l.,._ Wcf All mduetnes remaining nation-1 bandit funds, and then set the bus on tire. -I n a d will cnie within th"* SSitn* id^erTTl''**'-' *:riet Pirilarnentary r meir artivitie* down instead. There happened to be a Malay policeman! hanging on to the back of the bus and the sudden acceleration threw him off into the road, right among the bandits. us to enquire iisur industry pj HI t-tit i''drnplra cveiy ALL FOURS tma i If, "aT -^"r^iTrJi.^"-.^i.h"7^ri have been denied and our people u mi \ y |.f e health and educaUo ? ,W ^-K.1^5 ft * J "^ oupe(1 Dy .die hope, and fala. Prp a n undermmed by overfaithfu] ( brotherloL doctrine that the value of our crowded homes Therefore a Then and >o money has fallen so grievoualy Conservative and Unionist GqvContrast our position to-day ^^ y^ con8der.ee of the world emment will give housing with what it was sta yean ago,„ Gre ,t Briuin has been impairpriority aecond only to nation-! Then all our foes had yielded. — Conftdence and currency are defence. Our target remai'i 300.00G houses 3 year Thei. should be no reduction in lh number of house* and flats buil to let but more freedim must t given to the private builder. lr property-owning democracy, th more people who own their home the better. We all had a right to hope that the fear of war would not afflict our generation nor our children We were respected, honoured a.nd admired throughout toe world We were a united peopie at home, and It was only by being j united that we had survived the I deadly perils through which we had come and had kept the flag ot fieedom flying through the fateful year when we were alosse There, at any rate, is a great foundation and InapiraUon. Everyone knows how the aftermath r spent th He ran so fast his shoes fell off, but he managed to get away because the bandits. were a bit surprised at the turn of events themselves, and the shots they fired at the fleeing policeman missed. All this happened about 15 miles from the camp at Trolak, where A for Able Company of the Royal West Kents and Wicksteed were standing by. No. 1 Platoon, plus Wicksteed was ordered out, and in a few minutes we were dashing to the scene in trucks. When we got there, naturally the bandits had vanished into the thick jungle by the roadside. We were lined up by Lieutenant Karl Beale. aged 22, whose father grows Cox's v>*vw,-------.^*.*,'.---,-------,--v--'-'^ I V A t of the most crying needs eing met. For the money now it spent we trill provide better ices and so fulfll the hlgl %  asg all held when .vr ned the improvements dm .-n Drive far More Food money In the vast extent and klcss manner of our prei MR. WIN'sTfJN CIH'RCIIILL have untllled acre* and much marginal landFarmers and nri inUTdrpendent. and restoring conchanU ihou|d wurk hpr 1( ndence by sound finance is one of c dlstrlbuUon ln the lnl „. Ihe ways in which the value of CTU of he bHc our money may be ""r.ed and ^ Rpiirmi Brit*n "* m,n co *' ?' '"'a"* ch f kcd ment. the utmost -rill be d< The Conservative aim u to In'ase our national output. I i surest way t iployed. to halt the platoons pet head-hunter from Borneo, ran up and down the roadside like a terrier after a rabbit. Eventually he found what he was looking 1 for — a broken twig or some crushed grass 1 or something, and plunged into the jungle The whole system of town planwith h rest of US after him. ig and development char- It was so thick ou could only see the man! T. an^'r. !" ""^ potion .„, h d ' V"" ""< the man behind. •oners, including war pensionIt would not have been so bad if we had "m.~£ h !" V r cri" !" i b en oin on the level, but the tracker was, mfort of the elderly is a sacret taking us up the side of a hill so steep we 1 -at Some of them prefer ..to %  | had to go up on all fours, tin at work and there must oe %  ** r ir' hflV '' ,,1 > '. •"''" menUry government. From Britain iv.i-fiilliiiK vulue of our money. h rm n >' '? Ifprv* jnr own across the generations our inasssge „r to pu. 8 it in other wor3i? the '^"V*^ X T'SaK'we ha *"* forth ' '" ^^ *• ,ver-ins:re.ing cort, measured in ^^T^nJ^nlSSS tS lobe However well meaning work and skill, of everything we ^^j'^^^tJiS^I .'^ "^V of the present Socialist buy. British taaaUon ny country outsiile 1st world. It IN higher by curtataT Socialui*. State, monopolism,. The "'-'< • " %  *%  •••<•"*. eight hundred millions a year These are the three pillars of production, distribution and cxthan it was in the height of the lh( ir m) ,, ( NsJofU Oi-gnnisiition change, would %  ? fatal to IIKHwor. We have ,• ix.pui.iUon of w |, lc h. if Soviet Russia Ixx-omes viduai freedom. Wc look on Ui„ r.rty milltoiir, di-pendintc un ininu•ifH-n t.. all tltr (ii.vfrnment as the servant ami pests of teed and raw matertabi tolling mtlllon. of the world an not as the masters of the people. which we have to win by our ,., ., ,x awral 'xertlons. Ingenuity, und craftsundn ship. Since Devaluation it men Above I could see the boots and occasionally the whole of Private John Morgan, a National Service boy who used to work in a gypsum mine at NetherHeld, near Battle, in Sussex. Below me was Lance-Corporal Ricky Jackson. He is not unknown at the Hammersmith Palais de Danse, but he has also been a BoyScout, a King's Scout in the Isleworth (Middlesex) troop. The heat was like the heat of a Turkish bath, and we had to go on up this blinking, jungle-covered hill for half an hour, without a word and without a halt. When we got to the top of the hill, we went down the other side to a swamp. It wasn't so thick here, and you could see half a dozen chaps spread out in front and as many more behind. You could see the permanent, half-amused grin and the twinkling eyes of Private Don Bags, the barrow boy from Camden Town, and the broad back of Private Johnny Stavinski, the acrobat temporarily absent on National Service from the Tovarich Troupe. I'm not sure the swaup wasn't worse than the hill. We were up to our knees in water Then it was into the thick undergrowth again, and up another murderous hill. At last the whisper to halt came back from the front of the column. The tracker had found something. It was an ambush position in which six men had lain not more than four hours before. THE JAEGEK TRAVEL COATS from DaCosta's SILLY PLACE With the memory of the swamp and those Multiplying order, and' rule.'murderous hills between us and the road, I material .di "T^rZ'r ^te^^l^^iS^ht'wtat .Voc'key'ed pf.ee it -£~to of work hour of victors when this object i .filamentary seruiiny. We shaU|the bandits to lay an ambush. It seemed call an all-Party conference left out. I thank vnu kindly for space. HAAD-ur brains to buy across seemed to be the dollar exchange what we Even 11..V rilie clouds Consider proposVa. foT'thY'refon could have got before for eight and cnnflnlon into which we have o( .j,,, 11,,^.,,.,,* i^s-d, s^rca&rtgs sr.Ss.r&'syrJLIS£&&2!?& ties during the war The United Kisjgdom cannot be ...-fore IX'V.IIII.IUOQ two yean ago. port the Rearmament programme Wo pay more for what we buv n which the Soe.aJist Goveinnicnl /rean'auro.d. .".! leA fiwhS ".vr eml....k„, Wa believe, how*£< '"*'•* S^SSS aeil. Th.t I. wh.t sa.-i.ii. ' m !" _P plM y PsSsjr.isr oeotlaad. ,-.,.„ ha. n„.„,i -n... be 1 ....uipuwer ineludlns Ihe practical atepa pror e.^ni.-n h.; „,t „..-„' -"'" a" m%  "" '"• %  ">'f S.-olllJn-onlrol .,' unai •-, crl. I? ' %  %  %  "'• s f'"-" -.'.'." %  > are ra"' SeollUh .Itaii -JI be vtior%SlM .he U ke of -ly Preed torw.rd. '",',",^r. , i.*"Ur .urv.v.l a. free democr..!, There will be sfcablnel Minuter n ,'^'7'S!".,J 0 ,iiL "iT SJ. I """•""• > * "alentent on We .hall seek to raitor. to Loci !" Earn. Prom. T... primed on P.e Government th* confidence and rcponatblhty Itl ha. lo.t under II I %  ..1 Ihe nSMSsMgr f"C Socl.luun. redurlnu lo the minimum poulblc on both Second to None We are a ha IV. lluonly Soclulul Gov5„ rnmenl In the Empire .nd Commonwealth. Of all Ihe countries M Z1Z^ now ha. the chane. £? g ^S ^' ^^"S AT? %  1.!.., nhfc at home -nd ,S£ w'S^^^ i£ %£.. '" Dr, n S,ron "^ .-thciung Its position operations in restraint of trade, ty T? wh,c n abroad. We must free ourselves in eludin of course in the nation* ^ ****:. , n impediments. Of all Imallied industries. 1 close with a simple declaration IS the class war Is '/ie 1 will now mention some other , ur ri,,h The Conservative worst. At Ihe time when a growpr rtical steps we hhall take nii Unionist Party stands not for Ing measure -if national unity la We ahull stop aU furlhei naon >• section of the people but for than ever necessary Ihe tlonallsation In tnta .iplrit. we will do our Socialist Party hope lo gain anThe Iron and Steel Act will be utmost to grapple with the in. fomi-nlitig ran AS Steel industry creasing dlnlculliei Into which our class haired and api%  Its achievecountry has been plunged, noodi Of greed a no #0v3 menti of shn war and post-war miles from anywhere. Then I heard an odd noise and, looking round a bush, I saw a bus going past. We had made a complete circle and come back to the road almost at the same spot from which we had started. The trucks picked us up, and we got back to camp Just in time for the weekly filir show. The boys, who looked as if they had been for no more than an afternoon stroll, paid 35 cents (or 9d.> for a seat, but the Borneo headhunter boys got In for nothing They love 61ms and their favourite star is Bing. BORING ? The newsreel included shots of Ascot, and the feature was a Western called "Prairie Pirates." It rained so hard outside you couldn't hear a thing, and the screen was so iu"be puW&ed"'in'd' m vou couldn't see much either. "Sorry it has been such a boring day," said young Beale later, as we crept under our mosquito nets, with the rain still peltine. down. "Not at all," I said, as I sank on the bed. "I found it rather unusual." I —L.E.S. ORDER THESE JUST ARRIVED Apple Puree Ground Ginger f*l*m Ginger Gelatine Melt*. Candle* Meltls Turkish l-elfcht Jsffa lute* Pekla Figs Mann Mslssn-s SPECIALS Dried Fruit ftalad "-'it per pkgr. Apple Puree 24c. per tin I*eal Squash—2tr. per lb Umes— 1 cent eseh SMOKERS' DELIGHT Km bass j Cigarette* —In Una of 25 fee Sir. Craven A —In tin* of 50 — 51.04 Craven A —In pkgs. of 1% — 11. WE OBLtVER SEA FQQVS Fresh Frosen Salmon Red Salmon In tin. Pilchard*— in Has Ssrdlnc-lti BBSS Lobster—In tins (i.h in tins Lobster Paste .1 & K BREAD with ANCHOR BUTTER Is Excellent G O D D AIID S